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The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
Friday

April 14

193560.

ee



—_——

OuUNLsSEe

Jury In



ddress
Hospital

BeachMurderCase
Judge Sums Up To-day

Shes

with the murder of Anthony
Counsel for the Defence

CHIEF JUSTICE will sum up to the Jury in the
case today in which McDonald Holder has been charged |

George.
and the Prosecution addressed

the Jury yesterday after witnesses Dr. Copland and ‘Dr.

Kirton who had been called
evidence.



Know Everything
About Nothing
BRIGHTON.

Dr. G. B. Jeffery, director
of London University’s In-







. British education techniques
and pleaded for a “slow
down in specialization at our
universities.”
He told the Congress of the
National Union of Students:
“One can see no end to

.

stitute of Education, blasted | |

by the Court,

had given their

; In this case’ which began on
Tuesday, the Crown is alleging
that Holder cau sed George’s death
by striking hint on the head with
a piece of pine wood, once vortion
' Of the keel of a fishing boat, ana
| that by that blow he inflicted a
;Severe brain injury described by
the doctors as a “contre-coup”
injury.
| November 24, 1949
At the end of Mr. Whyatt’s
jaddress yesterday afternoon the
Chief Justice adjourned further
hearing until 10 a.m. today

When the case resumed yester-
day Dr. Copland again entered the
Witness stand.



the process of knowing more
and more about less and less,
until in the end it is know-
ing everything about noth-
ing”. {

Jeffery said in some re—
spects the universities were
behind the schools.

“Any decent .schoolmaster
gives some meaning to char-
acter building in thinking
about his work, but how |
many professors feel that
character building is an im-
portant part of their job?

Wallace Sharps, 25-year-
old president of the Associ-
ation of London Students,






















agreeing with Dr. Jeffery,
said:
“Degree-bearing ignora-

muses are in no short supply
in this country.”’—I.N}S.



Mr, Whyatt asked : There is no
doubt you diagnosed Anthony
George as being a drunkard,

Dr. Copland: What I said before

I observed I considered Dr. Kir-
ton’s diagnosis as correct and that

a bed outside the Casualty,
frequently used for drunks.

one

understanding Dr. Kirton and you
did diagnosed him as a drunk,
treated him accordingly, and con-
sequently did not make that de-
tailed meticulous examination
which Dr. Leacock told us about.

Dr. Copland: If I diagnosed him
as a drunkard there would be no
need to make a detailed examina-
tion.



40 Atom
Bombs
A Month

April 13.

Dr. W. Leon Godshall of Leigh
niversivy believes Russia has
nm making 40 atom bombs a
onth at three plants in Siberia,
entral Mongolia and Turkestan.
Dr. Godshall gave no source for
is belief when he addressed the
ochester Association of Credit
en last night.

Dr. Godshall, head of the De-
rmment of International Rela-
ions at Leigh, said: “I know this
id a lot of other people know it.
r Government has been mis-
ading us by withholding this
ormation from the American
ple.”—Reuter.


























Bevin In Hospital

LONDAN, April 13.
The British Foreign Secretary,
t. Ernest Bevin, underwent an
peration for haemorrhoids in a
ndon hospital today.
A Foreign Office announcement
id that the operavion was “suc-

: Bevin is expected to remain
1 the hospital for about a fort-
ght.—Reuter.

Indies Squadron.

Consideration of the



2 Injured As Train
Runs Off Rails

NEW DELHI, April 13.
Twelve passengers were injured
hen the Delhi Express ran off
e rails last night about nine
les from Fyzabad, United Pro-
ices, ris received by the
lway Ministry here said.

The train resumed its journey
ter a delay of about seven hours,

© cause of the accident was
far unknown,

This was the second train acei-
ent in the United Provinces oft

Same day — the firsi and far
ore serious was that to an @x-
ress early yestetday, in which,
ecording to latest figures avalt-

jured —Reuter,

es

Stewardess Fails



Decision to close the Naval Dockyard in Bermuda
unlikely to affect the efficiency of the America and West

This is the view of Naval observers here after
Admiralty
simultaneously in London a

ble, ae esas
People died ms bea The biggest problem now facing tish, Dutch and other foreign in-| daughter of the Spanish Chief of

Mr. Whyatt: I think a
later you began to wonder wheth-
er your diagnosis of this man
being a drunkard was correct.

Dr. Copland: I did query at one
time about 11 o'clock, but in the
absence of any history of being
struck on the head, and in view
of the history that he was often
in hospital—I myself had seen him
‘in hospital—it seemed quite reas-

onable, He was in aleoholic
coma.

Mr. Whyatt: You did receive.a
message from one of the nurses

Saying that he was foaming at the
mouth.

Dr. Copland: That did not sur-
prise me, that was around 8
o'clock.

Mr. Whyatt: You would not

normally expect that.

Dr. Copland: In view of his res-
piration and the fact that he had
been vomiting, he could have
foamed at the mouth, His deep
respiration would make him foam.

Mr. Whyatt: It might have indi-
cated some other complicated
factor.

Dr. Copland : It might have, yes.

Mr. Whyatt: I think it was a
little later in the evening that a
nurse said to you, “this man was
beaten up.”

Dr. Copland: That was between
10.30 and 11 when I came out of
tne theatre the second time.

Mr. Whyatt: That again might
have been some ground for caus-
ing you to reconsider your original

@ on page 3



BERMUDA DOCK YARD
SHUTS NEXT MARCH

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, April 138.

is

close
announcement issued

nd Bermuda this morning.
The fact that America and the
West Indies Squadron will in
future be maintained by the Home
Fleet ships, does not foreshadow
any reduction in Britain’s sea
power. In effect the only change

A eA

Date of the offence was!

the Magistrate was that from what |

and that she was to place him on!

Mr. Whyatt: According to your |

little | well

:

|



|
|

|



(Spartan) look on anxiously,



Secret Arms
Reach France

CHERBOURG, April

j
|
|

; The

‘ United States freighte:
the man was in a deep state of | “American Importer” docked here
intoxication. ; this: morning with the first secret

I told the nurse that the man] shipment of arms to Francé under
could not remain where he was! the Atlantic Pact

The “American Importer”, |
which docked at the Normandy |
| Quay, was unofficially estimated |
yesterday to be bringing in about |
600 tons of artillery and auto-|
matie weapons. }

Republican Security Guards and |
police were standing by to protect |
} several hundred Cherbourg dock- |
| ers when they began unloading the
|ship this morning. |

The unloading
bright sunshine. |

Mere than 600 of the guards, as |
as police and soldiers, had
been assigned to the port. }

French Minister of National De-
fence Rene Pleven to-day watched
the unloading of the first shipment
of Atlantic Pact arms at this sea]
port and said : |

“The example set by Cherbourg
is the best answer to the insolent
challenge of a certain propaganda”

A Communist demonstration in
protest against the arrival of these
United States military supplies
fizzled out. |

\
went on under |
|



Pleven new in a special mili- |
tary plane to watch the unload- }
ing operation and gave the local |
Dockers Union a cheque for
50,000 franes “as a token of keen
appreciation”.

Later the Minister said: “This |}
first shipment is sqall but very |
soon we Shall see four ships un-
loading. arms at the same time.
This proves once agkin that the |
French people want to be free.”

“If anyone wants to take a bite
at Cherbourg, he will break his
teeth,” Pleven said.

“In less than eight days, all the |
artillery will be delivered.” ;
During the unloading, Emiliene |



Galicier Communist deputy from|
northern France distributed heat,
lets urging the dockers to stop

Several dockers tore up me
leaflets without reading them





—Reuter.
|



“Settle Macassar |
Affair” Says

Soekarno

DJARKASA, April 18. |
President Soekarno of the Unived |
| States of Indonesia told his armed |
! fordes in a broadcast tonight to |
“settle the Macassar affair’. |

His orgler came after Capt
Abdul Azis rejecved the Indone-
sian Government's final ultimatum
to come to the Federal capital t«

j account for his seizure of the East

Indonesian capital of Macassar.
The 26-year-old rebel leader

| had occupied the port on April

| to oppose the plan to incorporate

East Indonesia into the Federal

(State.

President Soekarno said in his
broadcast thay as Supreme Com-
mander of the Armed Forces he
declared Capt. Azis an “insurgent

1

is that the Home Fleet will be against the authority of the Gov-

reinforced by the America and
West Indies Squadron.

Bermuda will still be
a base and the C-in_C

used
will con-

tinue to have his residence ah

One big effect of the decision
to close the dockyard may how-
ever be a reduction in the length
of time the ships spend in the
Caribbean area.

It is foreseen that, instead olf

completing an eighteen month or

as|

ernment of the Republic of the

| United States of Indonesix’
The: President's declaration

into motion operations planned

i a e
ing in South Celebes |the Hotel Matignon, the Prim
eee —(Reuter.) | Minister’s official residence.

| —-Reuter.





Japan Will Cut Tax

two year commission without a
break as at present, ships in i ae
future will come to the UK for TOK , Apr

overhaul after nine or ten months
afd then return to complete their
commission

| do with several

dos labourers presently employed

in the dockyard.



The Japanese Finance Minister |

.| Hayato Ikeds, voday notified the
International Taxation Commit-
tee, representing American,

| by half the proposed 55 per cent
tax on foreign incomes in Japan






UK workmen there are expected | Ikeds stated that the reducite I
F; | shor t > brought back to this would operate until December 31,
rom Plane shortly to be , sad weet 1951.
; country and re-emp 0; ud . Phassaiter, te Jepuneee Gov:
T LONDON, April 13. | Bermudans ye Pg a + te , obs| ernment would extend special ta»
tee etitish European Airways| the tourist trade but. few .J006| reductions for senior
from Vik Sue | Cramsie, feil} ideals executives of foreig
truck ne aur ANet which wa ut ry ee tributing to the “en rage
skins ol , shtning soon after + ‘2 ” foreign nve nJ
onight, opt Northolt aitport| * ery , ; The International Taxatic
njured she was seriously Latest reports fro Bi 7 1é nittee meeting vere
' state that the dockyard will clos@) nounced t! t “agreed in princi
~-(Reuter.) by March next year. (By Cable)..’ ple” with the proposals —Reuter



| _ “SHELL” HARRIS, Spartan’s ‘keeper’ goes
| White, Everton’s lett winger. Conliffe (Everton)

1C

fare driven by
| murderous

Andi |

| (8)

On Foreign Incomes

Bri- |

down
is tackling. Steede,

on one knee



U.





4



2 to stop a hard grounder from

(Everton) Gibbons and Haynes



S. TIGHTER THAN

EVER BEFORE

Says Truman

PRESIDENT TRUMAN

today that the internationa
proved since 1946,

WASHINGTON, April 13
said at his Press C
1 situation has

ntei
gradually

nce
im-

At his weekly Press Conference the President reviewed
the five years since he succeeded President Roosevelt. in

April 1945,
Mr. Truman said that in t
1946 was the worst he coul

he International field the year
d ever remember—worse than

anything exeept a shooting war.

Nine-Point
Anti-Stalin
Plan Outlined

NEW HAVEN, Connecticut,
April 13.
A nine-point Ameriean foreign
policy programme “to wrest the
offensive from Stalin” was out-
lined here today by Mr. William
3ullitt, a former United States
Ambassador in Moscow
“There can be no peace on
earth,” he declared, “as long as
the Russian people and the peo-
ples of the Soviet satellite states
men who prefer a
doctrine to the plain
existence of charity,”
He added: “We are not techni-
cally at war. but we shall have to
live and work as if we were, in
order to stop Stalin”. This was Mr,

Bullitt’s programme, outlined to

an audience of students at Yale

University

(1) To build up United States
military strength faster than
Stalin

(2) To achieve the federation of

Western Europe and give it
adequate arms.
To stand up with force to the
threat of the Communists in
Eastern Germany, “who have
announced that they will
mareh 500,000 youths from
East Berlin into West Berlin.
To increase United States aid
to resistance, forces in. all
Soviet satellite countries.
To help the Albanian exiles
to “rescue Albania from the
Communists and thus give
new spirit to all the enslaved
peoples behind the [ron Cur-
tain.”
To give adequate and effec-
tive economic aid to Persia
To prevent the Communist
conquest of Formosa.
To help the Viennese and the
| French to throw the Com-
| munist out of Indo-China,
| (9) To insist that the United Na-
tions, “now paralysed by
Soviet veto and _ boycott”,
should function as if there
| were no Soviet boycott.
( —(Reuter,)
|
|

BIDAULT RECEIVES
AMBASSADOR

| PARIS, April 13

|

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

(1)



| M. Georges Bidault, Prime Min-
set | ister of France, voday received M.
new Ambassa-
during last week to force a land-|dér of the Argentine in Paris, at

Hector Madermo,

LISBON, April 13
Carmen Franco, 23 - year - olc

| . is what to| terests in Japan, thai the Japanese | State, and her husband, the Mar-
——e.. sea il verre Barba, | Government was prepared to cut | quis de Villaverde, arrived of their







“BEST THING
Franco’s Son-In-Law Calls Marriage

But shortly thereafter America

) had instituted the programme. of |

| aid to Greece and Turkey and in
| June 1947 the Marshall Plan for

European Economic Recovery.

Since then there had been a
gradual improvement and_ the
worldwide international situation

was better than in 1946.

{In the domestic field; the Presi-
dent painted a glowing picture of
present-day prosperity in the
United States.



He said that more people were
at work in the United States than |
in any country in the world. There |
was the most prosperous business
activity in America’s history and}
America was in a tighter financial |
condition than ever before j

He said that the first tive years |
of his office had beer rather diffi- |
cult but the coultry was still on|
its feet. There was nothing seri- |
cusly the matter with the country |

as a whole. The country was ir
fine shape, |
The first post-war years had

been easier on the United States
than the aftermath of any prev'-
ous war. |
Referring to his political oppon-
ents the President said that he
knew some suggested that this |
would have been so even if there;
had been a moron as President
But, as President, he proposed \&
take credit for the situation
| —Reuter.



Insulted Bird:
Demoted

ST. JOHNS

It is understood that an agree-
) ment is being reached between the
firm of Geo, W, Bennett Brysor
& Co. Ltd. and the Antigua Trades
& Labour Union over the recent
waterfront strike which lasted
four days last week. Discipline has
been exercised upon William
Knight a foreman of the sugar
room who it is claimed abused
| the Union’s President, Hon. V
C. Bird. Knight has been demoted
to an ordinary labourer.



Taxis which lined the whar!
area last Tuesday lost their anti-
cipated trade from the “Fort

Amherst” and trade which is gen-
erally accelerated in the shops wa:
also lost. Few ships stop a
Antigua and = such incidences
cause a loss to an island which i:
now in search of every avenur
to earn dollars.

Although the strike was consid,
ered over MV “Caribbee” called ai
Antigua on Saturday morning and
left without discharging the
greater part of her cargo.

IN LIFE”

|

Madrid on Monday.
{ Asked by journalists What he
thought of love and marriage, the
Marquis said: “It's a marvellous

| short










Aduocate
GREAT BRITAIN MUST LET US LIVE

Is A



IF THEY

W.I. Should |
Unite With
Canada

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, April 13.

The imposition of a Federal
structure to the Colonies, already
heavily burdened with the ex-
pense of administrations they have
to support, might well prove too
much, This point is made this
morning by a special correspon-
dent of The Times, writing from
the West Indies on the “Closer
Caribbean Union.”

He says the figure of £180,000,
which has been estimated as added
expenditure consequent upon Fed-
eration, has been greeted with
scepticism in view of past ex-
perience of bureaucracy.

“For the British Colonies, an
alternative solution with certain
definite attractions would be union
With Canada, but all things con-
sidered, the founding of a new
Dominion would be more in keep-



ing with the glowing national
aspirations of the Caribbean
peoples.”’ It is pointed out that
if a Dominion is to be evolved,
the first need will be suitable
leadership. The writer says that
West Indies as they will show
this summer are capable of unit-
ing to form a first class cricket
team. On the same lines, they

Should be capable of producing a
frst class Commonwealth

At the same time on the law ot
averages, small communities of
100,000 to 500,000, are not likely
by themselves to produce enough

talent “effectively to guide the
destinies of a sovereign state
This need for wider opportuni-

ties and experience applies to ail
professions,
It is essential also that the/

Dominion should be large enough,
to make its voice héard at Inter- |}

national and Commonwealth |
gatherings, and should not re-
semble the few pocket states

presently surviving Ta Europe |
—(By Cable).

Van Zeeland
Sees Leopold

GENEVA, April 13.
M. Paul Van Zeeland, Belgian
Premier Designate, arrived here
by ‘air today on the urgent sum-
mons of King Leopold |
.M. Van Zeeland told waiting
correspondents: “I can make abso-
lutely no statement except that |
have been urgently called here to}
an audience with his Majesty. |
“It is not through discretion that
I ean say nothing. | do not know}
anything.”
M. Van Zeeland’s special Bel-|
gian Air Force Dakota brought
also King Leopold’s two principal
secretaries, Professoi Jacque
Pirenne and Willy Weemaes

The three men drove straight
from the airport to one of Geneva’s
Jeading hotels where they had a
talk in the public lounge

M. Van Zeeland, who gave the
impression that he did not know
the exact purpose of his mission
to the King, said he had no fixed
departure time.





Van Zeeland had planned t
present a new Cabinet to Prince
Charles, the Belgian Regent, at

noon on Tuesday but the meeting
was unexpectedly postponed

After seeing the Regent late on
Tuesday night M. Van Zeeland
said he had presented a proposition
to Prince Charles. M. Van Zeeland
stated that Prince Charles had
decided upon a series of consulta-
tions in connection with the propo-
sition

According to circles close to the
Caretaker Cabinet, the Premier:
Designate's ‘proposition’ amount-
ed to a list of Ministers with whom
he proposed to form a new admin
istration

—(Reuter,)

May Reconsider
Attitude On

Seretse’s Return

LONDON, April 13.

The Commonwealth Relations |
Office here to-night hinted that}
its attitude towards the return of |
Seretse Khama, exiled Bamang- |
wato chief to the Tribal reserve |
in Béchuanaland, might be re- |
considered as a result of disturb- |
}

‘



ances there last week.

Eleven Africans arrested after
riots at Serowe, the tribal capital
on Tuesday, were today remand*
ed in custody when they appearea
before the Assistant District Com-
missioner, charged with disturb-
ing the peace,

Giving its reasons for not al-
Jowing Seretse to enter the tribal
reserve so far, the Commonwealth
Relations Office stated that his
lawyer had failed to give assur-
ances concerning Seretse’s be-
haviour there.

The statement added that Rut!

thing. I believe marriage is the] Khama, former London typist,
honeymoon in Lisbon today by air} best thing in life.” could visit her husband at any
from Madrid Carmen added: “I am _ very] time.

The Marquis told a reporter at} happy. Love is something that Patrick, Gordon Walker, Com-
‘ne airport that they would stay|cannov be expressed in words. It} mohweaith Relations Minister,
about one week at Estoril, a sea-jis something to be lived.” told Parliament last month ‘that
ide resort near Lisbon. Then they Seretse’s return to the Protectorate

anted fly to Rome to see the| The honeymoon couple were| was “on condition of his own}

|met.at the. airport by Brigadier-} good conduct, and also that the
iid they would ilso | General Nieholas Franco, Spanish} order and good government of the

lgrimage shring| Ambassador to Portugal and the] tribe are not disturbed
i tima | bride’s unclé. ‘Seretse is now at Loba, out-
ry ul her Madrid phvysi- Reporters, photographers ind} side the Bamangwato territory,
cian husband were married in |naewe cameramen attended but no] awaiting permission to visit!
tenaissar plendour ae ee The couple had nov been‘ Ruth, who expects a baky in July
| father’s Bl Pardo Paiace near\expected toduy.—Reuter. — (Reuter.)

FLYING SAUCERS



Hy wie
FIVE CENTS

fh

Year 55.



WANT LOYALTY

GOMES CALLS FOR
EARLY START

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 13.
HON'BLE ALBERT GOMES, one of Trinidad’s
two political delegates to the Sugar Conference
in the United Kingdom, thinks it important that
the delegation should reach England as soon as
possible.

Its main task he said must be to
tell the English public what poli-
tical repercussions are likely to
result in the West Indies from the
policy of “smug obtuseness which
|the British Government seem de-
termined to follow”,

Gomes thinks the recent state-
ment by the Food Minister that
the Government will not budge
from the 640,000 ton offer to the
by a! West Indies is a direct challenge
ito the unity which the B,W.I.
sugar producing territories achiev-
ed at Grenada.

IN THE BIBLE

PARIS

Now the flying saucers have
been spotted in the Bible.

They were seen there
Paris newspaper.

Albert Mousset, writer for the
usually conservative daily
“L’Epoque,” told his readers |
that the saucers very well might) -





be the “signs in the sky” men- |
tioned in the Bible. ¥
He was referring to Luke, |
Chapter 21, Verse 11 which!
reads : }

“There will be great earth- |
quakes, there will be terrible
phenomena and great signs in
the sky.”



Nothing new at all in the!
saucers, explained Mousset. Just!
look at history. }

In 1580 inhabitants of the
European Empire of Charles V
clearly observed an army of
knights and armed peasants

marching right across the heav-
ens as plain as the nose of your
face.

And just two years after that
all Germany kept spotting bands
of dragons swooping through
the skies with faces like pigs.

Even the sensible Swiss re-
ported seeing allegorical scenes
enacted in the clouds—-and this
in broad daylight,

HON,

ALBERT GOMES

One of the best celestial spec- |
tacles took place in the skies of
Silesia in 1545 when the popu- |
lace was thrown into an uproar |
by the sight of a pitched battle
between two armies. One was

Failure to stand up to it would
an admission by the W.I, that
the territories are disunited, timid
and irresolute, The important
eleven-man delegation must reach
commanded by a lion; the other| Emgland as soon as possible seeing
by an eagle. | that the main task must be to tell

A forerunner of sky-writing | the English public what political
evolved in 1549, went on|repercussions in the West Indies
“L’Epoque’s” Mousset, when the | are likely to result from the policy

e

Ss

portrait of the Duke of Saxony} Of Smug obtuseness the British
emerged from the clouas. Government seem determined to
follow.

Although the flying saucers
have not yet made a debut in
the Paris area, there seems to

There is an interestIng paradox
in the policy of the Labour Gov-
ernment towards the colonies. On

have been an abundance of | the political front they are most
heavenly apparitions over the} jiberal with new constitutions, on
French capital in ancient times, | ¢)6 economic side obviously very

In 1578 Parisians are Supposed | reluctant to make concessions te
to have witnessed “fires in the make it possible for these new

air creating great light and
smoke.” And in 1582 there was

constitutions to succeed



a similar display of “great We say of such people in the
splendor,” according to ancient) West indies that they are two-
manuscripts cited by! faced. We are given all assistance
“L’ Epoque.” possible to produce a report re-
Mousset drew this conclusion;| commending a Federal Govern-
“The fact that the ‘signs’| ment for the West Indies which
were particularly numerous in| wil! involve an increase in the
the 16th Century, a period of | cost of Government
incéssant troubles, confirms the At the same time we are being
need of a state of receptivity, of jtold we must produce less. The
a psychosis, which renders the) Labour Government seem deter-
mind more receptive to discover) mined to make it dificult for us to
them or to imagine them maintain sane political impulses
“And, as in the 16th Century, | in the West Indies
do we not live now in a turbu-| Thi one issue on which the

lent period of history.”—LN.S. @ On Page 7

K.W.Y.

— Aromatic





Wines —

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nothing has to be added.

SWEET VERMOUTH
DRY VERMOUTH

Both Wines have excel-
lent qualities, as bev-
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made from pure White
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of extracts of health-
giving herbs.

Liqueurs

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this inimitable old Cafe
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K.W.V. BRANDY

With high ester content,
this brandy is unsurpass-

ed for use in Hospitals
and Nursing Homes.





1
‘J
;







Friday

April 14

i850.

—

Counsels Address
Jury In Hospital
| BeachMurderCase
Judge Sums Up To-day

TH CHIEF JUSTICE will sum up to the Jury in the
case today in which McDonald Holder has been charged
with the murder of Anthony George.

Counsel for the Defence and the Prosecution addressed
the Jury yesterday after witnesses Dr. Copland and ‘Dr.
Kirton who had been called by the Court, had given their
evidence.

Know Everything
About Nothing

BRIGHTON.

Dr. G. B. Jeffery, director
of London University’s In- |
stitute of Education, blasted | |
British education techniques
and pleaded for a “slow
down in specialization at our
universities.”

He told the Congress of the
National Union of Students:
“One can see no end to
the process of knowing more
and more about less and less,
until in the end it is know-
ing everything about noth-
ing”. {
Jeffery said in some re-



* In this case’ which began on
Tuesday, the Crown is alleging
that Holder cau sed George’s death
by striking hint on the head with
a piece of pine wood, once vortion
of the keel of a fishing boat, ana
| that by that blow he inflicted
| Severe brain injury described by
the doctors as a
injury. Date of the offence was
November 24, 1949

At the end of Mr, Whyatt’s
address yesterday
Chief Justice adjourned further
hearing until 10 a.m. today.

When the case resumed yester-
day Dr. Copland again entered the
Witness stand.

Mr. Whyait asked : There is no
doubt you diagnosed Anthony
| George as being a drunkard.

Dr. Copland: What I said before
the Magistrate was that from what
I observed I considered Dr. Kir-



i i | eT . CHERBOURG, April 1:
behind ‘the on were | | ton's diagnosis as correct and that | The United. States ‘freighter 7)
. ve the man was in a deep state of | «s ties ster” Honea-hiswen
“Any decent schoolmaster || SMe gre epee Tce Soak ha Says Truman
gives some meaning a char- I told the nurse that the man| shipment of arms to Francé unde tat aril
acter building k tn inking }could not remain where he was! the Atlantic Pact WASHINGTON, April 13
, | DpDpa SAT oy her ' : . . ,
about a 5 feel that ; and that she was to place him on| The “American Importer”, | PRESIDENT TRUMAN said at his Press Conference
sian Drereaagye. 72%. toe a bed outside the Casualty, one! which docked at the Normandy| tndaw the he , ional ui ae pki:
character building is an im- r ana Sr | at I andy today that the international situation has gradually im-
portant part vf their job? frequently used for drunks. Quay, was unofficially estimated | :

Wallace Sharps, 25-year-
old president of the Associ-
ation of London Students,

| understanding Dr. Kirton and you
did diagnosed him as a drunk,
treated him accordingly, and con-



aj

“contre-coup” !

afternoon the |





|} Mr. Whyatt: According to your |



Dipicnenttchtelins |

|

|

| “SHELL” HARRIS, Spartan’s
| White, Everton’s lett winger.

| (Spartan) look on anxiously.

“al rms \.,
Reach France

‘keeper’ goes
Conliffe

down on one knee
(Everton) is tackling. Steede,





|

| Secret

| proved since 1946,

yesterday to be bringing in about i"
“7 At his weekly Press Confe

600 tons of artillery and auto-|
matic weapons, |

Republican Security Guards and
police were standing by to protect |

April 1945,







the five years since he succeeded President Roosevelt. in



to stop a hard grounder from
(Everton) Gibbons and Haynes



S. TIGHTER THAN
EVER BEFORE

rence the President reviewed

agreeing wiih Dr. Jeffery, sequently did not make that de-
said: tailed meticulous examination
“Degree-bearing ignora- which Dr. Leacock told us about.

muses are in no short supply
in this country.”—I.N}S.



as a drunkard there would be no
need to make a detailed examina-
tion.



Mr. Whyatt: I think a

Dr. Copland: If I diagnosed him |

little |

ers when they began unloading the

ship this morning.
The unloading

bright sunshine.
Mere than 600 of the guards, as

went on

} several hundred Cherbourg dock- |

under |

|

|

Mr. Truman said that in the International field the year
1946 was the worst he could ever remember—worse than
anything except a shooting war.

{national and Commonwealth |
gatherings, and should not re-
semble the few pocket states



But shortly thereafter America

40 Atom
Bombs
A Month

April 13.
Dr. W. Leon Godshall of Leigh

later you began to wonder wheth-
er your diagnosis of this
being a drunkard was correct.

Dr. Copland: I did query at one
time about 11 o’clock, but in the
absence of any history of being
struck on the head, and in view
of the history that he was often
in hospital—I myself had seen him
‘in hospital—it seemed quite reas-

man |

Nine-Point:
Anti-Stalin
Plan Outlined

NEW HAVEN, Connecticut,

April 13.
A nine-point American foreign
policy programme “to wrest the
offensive from Stalin” was out-
lined here today by Mr. William

well as police and soldiers, had|
been assigned to the port :

French Minister of National De- |
fence Rene Pleven to-day watched
the unloading of the first shipment
of Atlantic Pact arms at this sea
port and said : |

“The example set by Cherbourg
is the best answer to the insolent
challenge of a certain propaganda”

A Communist demonstration in |
protest against the arrival of these
United States military supplies
fizzled out |

|



{



hiversivy believes Russia has|onable. He was in aleoholic

been making 40 atom bombs aj} coma.

onth at three plants in Siberia, Mr. Whyatt: You did receive a
entral Mongolia and Turkestan. | message from one of the nurses
Dr, Godshall gave no source for | saying that he was foaming at the
his belief when he addressed the , mouth.

Rochester Association of Credit Dr. Copland: That did not sur-
en last night. prise me, that was around 8
Dr. Godshall, head of the De-| o'clock.

partment of International Rela- Mr. Whyatt: You would not

ions at Leigh, said: “I know this

normally expect that.
da lot of other people know it.

Dr. Copland: In view of his res-

Uur Government has been mis-| piration and the fact that he had
leading us by withholding this} been vomiting, he could have
Information from the American| foamed at the mouth. His deep

people.”-—Reuter.

Bevin In Hospital

LONDAN, April 13.
The British Foreign Secretary,
Mr. Ernest Bevin, underwent an
Dperation for haemorrhoids in a

respiration would make him foam.

Mr. Whyatt : It might have indi-
cated some other complicated
factor.

Dr. Copland : It might have, yes.

Mr. Whyatt: I think it was a
little later in the evening that a
nurse said to you, “this man was
beaten up.”







|C. Bullitt, a former United States
Pleven new in a special mili- | ee - er
rv Nere ‘e > fa
tary plane to watch the unload- | , as a de at ot PapcP on
ing operation and gave the local ae 3, ne Ceciaredy “as long as
Dockers Union a cheque for|the Russian people and the peo-
50,000 franes “as a token of keen | Ples of the Soviet satellite states
nmeraciaaedets- 5. ; }are driven by men who prefer a
APP : | murderous doctrine the



, _ | to plain
Later the Minister said: “This | existence of charity.” :
first shipment is sqall but very | ie alidéa: aye hit deehiis
soon we shall see four ships un-j| , at, Urns eed cee
loading. arms at the same time. we oe Cee en sare >
This proves once again that the 5 , at ’

order to stop Stalin’, This was Mr.

French people want to be free.” Bullitt’s

, rogramme,
‘If anyone wants to take a bite Dre

outlined to



. z.}an audience of students at Yale

at eoeae ae will break his University,
man ] eae tet days, all the| ‘!) To. build up United States

tillery will be délivered.” | military strength faster than
artillery v . Stali

During the unloading, Emiliene| | ; ae eee ee aa
Galicier Communist deputy from{ ‘“ Western sud war mee itt
northern France distributed leaf- . pe ¢

adequate arms.







had instituted the programme. of |
| aid to Greece and Turkey and in
June 1947 the Marshall Plan fox
European Economic Recovery.
Since then there had been a
gradual improvement and_ the
worldwide international situation |





i cers had been a moron as President

_ 1 ; ‘ging > *kers to sto ae -

ondon hospital today. _Dr. Copland: That was between a Fe Th osnagy cl hee Pne| (3) To stand up with force to the | But, as President, he proposed t

@ A Foreign Office announcement} 10.30 and 11 when I came out of nai dae sactibucna? tenalioar Oia threat of the Communists in|take credit for the situation

Maid that the operavion was “suc-| the theatre the second time. ealiets Wi . yo etibkt | Eastern Germany, ‘who have | —Reuter.

Wresstul” F Mr. Whyatt: That again might bea announced that they will

A F’. } .

} Mf. Bevin is expected to remain} have been some or for alent = | march Scone sy eT

m the hospital for about a fort-| ing you to reconsider your origina “é r . | East Berlin into West Berlin : z
igh’ '—Reuter. @ on page 3 | Seitle Macassar | (4) To increase United States aid Insulted Bird:
* 99 | to resistance, forces in all
Affair Says | » c Save COU Demoted
- r | me oO help the ¢ ania ; S
| | to “rescue Albania from the oe -
BERMUDA DOCK YARD Soekarno | Communist and thus give] |S. JOHNS.
- | . 1 48 , spir o all the enslaved is understooc at an agree-
7 ! DJARKASSA, April 13. | new spirit to a ’ oe : Maitiad beraiben the
SHI J ] Ss NEX? MARCH President Soekarno of the United | egg behind the Iron Cur- j tal a Fae wi Semeatd eon
3 s a s ¢ »d | ain ? ; Br}
| States of engonesia tela se oe »|(6) To give adequate and effec- | & Co, Ltd. and the Antigua Trades
| st tonight to} ; 1 | E ’ ‘
fordes in a_ broadcas g | ‘hile Shane tf ax’ TH reoeast
“ acassar ¢ ee ive economic a ¢ Sla. ae 7
(From O8F Own Cormpapendest) sebum the acarsas. siteir. 7 ‘r Vv t tne, a iteteons pr i eilell lewted
LONDON, April 13, Fue Caer pare aa ane -~ ie ernie t of Formas four days last week. Discipline has
° : is r “Ve » Indone- st ¢ . ° :

; Decision to close the Naval Dockyard in Bermuda is Abdu} axis, er ees (8) To help the Viennese and the} been exercised upon William
unlikely te affect the efficiency of the America and West ated m4 to the Federal capital te | French to throw the Com- | Knight a foreman of the sugar
Indies < . F Oe tee os > » East | munist out of Indo-China. room who it is claimed abused
ndies Squadron j account for his seizure of the East | 1 . ; rho | { :
This j a ‘ Pas 1 sian capital of Macassar. | (9) To insist that the United Na-|the Union’s President, Hon

Is is the view of Naval observers here after _ close Indetiteien SE | Te tage | pacelneed by |C. Bird. Knight has been demoted
enderation of te Admiralty Sangquncement issued: had oogeyiad the port on April § Soviet veto and boycott >| to an ordinary labourer.
simultaneously in London and Bermuda this morning. | 4, oppose the plan to incorporate | should RUREtion as . . there eee eM an a

an peatland The fact that America and the | East Indonesia into the Federal | were no Soviet be om i Tusiday lost thelr anti-
2 ° - West Indies Squadron will inistate, = ‘ cated. eds tees the “Port
2 Injured As Train future be maintained by the Home| president Soekarno said in_ his | ‘Auiidiet* andi, whigh:le gan-
Fleet ships, does not foreshadow broadcast thav as Supreme Com- BIDAULT RECEIVES erally nécelérated in the shops wa:
" any reduction in Britain’s seaj mander of the Armed Forces he | ‘B 'SSADOR alee dechterGem ships stop 8
Runs Off Rails power. In effect the only change] declared Capt. Azis an “insurgent | AMBA Adtaae Lah nich” incidences
ee ee ee Ma a ageine; the suthorty = ry) eee PARIS, April 13 cause a loss to an island which i:
‘ ; , . A rica A - . a » Al E / ’
NEW DELHI, April 13. | reinforced by the _America nd ernment. of _ eee! ne | i: “Clune detail, Mtones Siena ennate-tersmmanedi- sae coneete- emimee
twelve passengers were injured | West Indies Squadron. - | Unived States 0 aa nealn. etl idte of Honda Wee aeeeed UL tae ee ee,
hen the Delhi Express ran off Bermuda will still ae. il c 4 The nes tic ‘s planned| Hector Madermo, new Ambassa- Although the strike was consid,
the rails last night about nine} base and the C-in-C wil = ong into motion cette ~~ is aoa | ae of the Argentine in Paris, at] ered over MV “Caribbee” called a1
F les from Fyzabad, United Pro-| tinue to have his residence there.| during last wee . Smagen ee oF the Hotel Matignon, the Prime| Antigua on Saturday morning anc
inces rece One big effect of the decision! jnp in South Celebes. ; ’ , ;
Railway it ves by the aa th iockvard may how- —" —(Reuter.) | Minister’s official residence. left without discharging the
The train nant aa e, Seer te : uaen in the length | —Reuter. greater part of her cargo.
after a delay Oh aueul teva Nour, of time the ships spend in cot Will C i T: a
ad come of the accident was ee area, boas eee » Japan i u ax | es 99
a beepers : “BEST THING IN LIFE
i completing an cighteen month or} comes |
stele “a the second train acci- two yéar commission without aj On Foreign In | ;

i the United Provinces ofi| preak as at present, ships in TOKYO. April 13 7 5 . ;

same day — the first and fF future will come to the UK for] ip. soanet Reo Avil 18. | “Mranco’s Son-In-Law Calls Marriage
more serious was that to a @x- after nine or ten months} ,, °° ake alee, ified ‘
press ; overhaul ; .| Hayato Ikeds, voday notified th :
Sed early yesterday, in which,} and then return to complete theit International Taxation Commit- LISBON, April 13 Madrid on Monday. —
able re eae figures avall-| commission tee, representing American, Bri- Carmen Franco, 23 - year - old Asked by journalists what he
jut People died and 157 were | i ish and other foreign in-| daughter of the Spanish Chief of |thought of love and marriage, the
i } . : » facing} tish, Dutch and other foreign | daught > panis t | \
jured. —Reuter, | The biggest grokeoe pow So to| terests in Japan, tha’ the Japanese | State, and her husband, the Mar-| Marquis said: “It’s a marvellous
i | Bermudan ee dred Barba-| Government was prepared to cut ! quis de Villaverde, arrived on their|thing. 1 believe murriage is the
| de with sqverl aa employed | by half the proposed 55 per cent. | honeymoon in Lisbon today by air] best thing in life.”
Steward Ki ii. ag soneunes ee tax on foreign incomes in Japan | from Madrid Carmen added: “I am very
ess atts j in the domyara. » expected} » [keds stated that the reducion| The Marquis told a reporter at} happy. Love is something that

F, Pi, ; UK wor — pee rid ag this} Would operate until December 31,| ‘he airport that they would stay] cannovr be expressed in words. It

rom ane REY Oe ee etiatad wane. 1:10bk bout one week at Estoril, a sea-/is something to be lived.”

} country and re-employved here.) Thereafter, the apanese Gx ide resort near Lisbon. Then they |
LONDON, April 13 | Bermudans rt oh ee ernment uld exter le fly to Rome to see the| The honeymoon couple were
The British European Airways} e tourist : BT ste reductions for ser met.at the. aiyport by Brigadier-
frovttdess, Sue Cramsie, fei S a Bh god oi id thes ld alsé}| General Nieholas Franco, Spanish
S Vikcin airliner which It et l's pilgrir ‘ ing}; Ambassador: to Portugal and the
me Tuck b ughtning soon fter| aoc . 7 dur I Fatima | bride’s uncié.

taking of from Northolt aitport! retu to thei rme ier Madrid physi- Reporters, photographers and
i; OMdght She was seriously Latest reports fro Bert i vere married in|news cameramen attended but ac
‘Njured *” I state that the dockyard will close Renai ( plendour her} crowds. The couple had nov beeu

~-(Reuter.) by March next year. (By Cable) —Reuter | father’s El Pardo Palace near | expected toduy.—Reuter.



















was better than in 1946.

In the domestic field; the Presi-
dent painted a glowing picture of
present-day prosperity in the
United States.

He said that more people were}
at work in the United States than |
in any country in the world. There |
was the most prosperous business
activity in America’s history and |
America was in a tighter financia) |
condition than ever before

He said that the first live years |
of his office had been rather diffi- }
cult but the coutry was still on|
its feet. There was nothing eit
ously the matter with the country

as a whole. The country was ir
fine shape.
The first post-war years had

been easier on the United States}
than the aftermath of any prev'-|
ous war. |

Referring to his political oppon-
ents the President said that he
knew some suggested that this
would have been so even if there













| short





Unite With
Canada

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, April 13.

The imposition of a Federal
Structure to the Colonies, already
heavily burdened with the ex-
pense of administrations they have
to support, might well prove too
much. This point is made this
morning by a special correspon -
dent of The Times, writing from
the West Indiés on the “Closer
Caribbean Union.”

He says the figure of £180,000,
which has been estimated as added
expenditure consequent upon Fed-
eration, has been greeted with
scepticism in view of past ex-
perience of bureaucracy.

“For the British Colonies, an
alternative solution with certain
definite attractions would be union
with Canada, but all things con-
sidered, the founding of a new
Dominion would be more in keep-

ing with the glowing national
aspirations of the Caribbean
peoples.” It is pointed out that
if a Dominion is to be evolved,
the first need will be suitable
leadership. The writer says that
West Indies as they will show

this summer are capable of unit-
ing to form a first class cricket
team. On the same lines, they
should be capable of producing a
hrst class Commonwealth

At the same time on the law ot
averages, small communities ot
100,000 to 500,000, are not likely
by themselves to produce enough
talent “effectively to guide the
destinies of a sovereign state

This need for wider opportuni- |
ties and experience applies to ail}
professions, |

It is essential also that the}
Dominion should be large enough!
to make its voice heard at Inte,- |

presently surviving Tn Europe. |
— (By Cable).

Van Zeeland



Sees Leopold’

»
GENEVA, April 13.
M. Paul Van Zeeland, Belgian
Premier Designate, arrived here |
by ‘air today on the urgent sum-
mons of King Leopold |
M. Van Zeeland told waiting
correspondents: “I can make abso-
lutely no statement except that |
have been urgently called here to|
an audience with his Majesty. |
“It is not through discretion that
I can say nothing. I do not know |
anything.”
M. Van Zeeland’s special Bel-
gian Air Force Dakota brought
also King Leopold’s two principal
secretaries, Professor
Pirenne and Willy

The three men drove straigh‘
from the airport to one of Geneva's
Jeading hotels where they had a
talk in the public lounge

M. Van Zeeland, who gave the
impression that he did not know
the exact purpose of his mission
to the King, said he had no fixed
departure time.



Jacque
Weemaes

Van Zeeland had planned t
present a new Cabinet to Prince
Charles, the Belgian Regent, at

noon on Tuesday but the meeting
was unexpectedly postponed

After seeing the Regent late on
Tuesday night M. Van Zeeland
said he had presented a proposition
to Prince Charles. M. Van Zeeland
stated that Prince Charles had
decided upon a series of consulta-
tions in connection with the propo-
sition

According to circles close to the
Caretaker Cabinet, the Premier:
Designate’s “proposition” amount-

ed to a list of Ministers with whom
he proposed to form a new admin
istration

—(Reuter,)

May Reconsider

Attitude On

Seretse’s Return
LONDON, April 13.



W.I. Should |

Aduncate

Z

Priee;

CENTS



GREAT BRITAIN MUST LET US LIVE

IF THEY WANT LOYALTY

GOMES CALLS FOR

EARLY

PORT-

START

OF-SPAIN, April 13.

HON'BLE ALBERT GOMES, one of Trinidad’s

two political delegates to the Sugar Conference
in the United Kingdom, thinks it important that
the delegation should reach England as soon as

possible.

FLYING SAUCERS
IN THE BIBLE

PARIS

Now the flying saucers have
been spotted in the Bible.

They were seen there by a
Paris newspaper. |

Albert Mousset, writer for the
usually conservative daily
“L’Epoque,” told his readers |
that the saucers very well might |
be the “signs in the sky” men-
tioned in the Bible.

He was referring to Luke,
Chapter 21, Verse 11 which!
reads :

{
“There will be great earth- |

quakes, there will be terrible
phenomena and great signs in
the sky.”

Nothing new at all in the
saucers, explained Mousset, Just!
look at history.

In 1530 inhabitants of the
European Empire of Charles V
clearly observed an army of
knights and armed peasants
marching right across the heav-
ens as plain as the nose of your
face.

And just two years after that
all Germany kept Spotting bands
of dragons swooping through
the skies with faces like pigs.

Even the sensible Swiss re-
ported seeing allegorical scenes
enacted in the clouds—-and this
in broad daylight,

One of the best celestial spec-
tacles took place in the skies of
Silesia in 1545 when the popu- |
lace was thrown into an uproar
by the sight of a pitched battle
between two armies. One was
commanded by a lion; the other
by an eagle.

A forerunner of sky-writing |
evolved in 1549, went on
“L’Epoque’s” Mousset, when the
portrait of the Duke of Saxony
emerged from the clouds.

Although the flying saucers
have not yet made a debut in
the Paris area, there seems to
have been an abundance of
heavenly apparitions over the
French capital in ancient times, |

In 1578 Parisians are supposed
to have witnessed “fires in the

air creating great light and
smoke.” And in 1582 there was
a similar display of “creat

splendor,” according to ancient
manuscripts cited by!
“L’ Epoque,”
Mousset drew this conclusion: |
“The fact that the ‘signs” |
were particularly numerous in |

Its main task he said must be to
tell the English public what poli-
tical repercussions are likely to
result in the West Indies from the
policy of “smug obtuseness which
the British Government seem de-
termined to follow”,

Gomes thinks the recent state-
ment by the Food Minister that
the Government will not budge
from the 640,000 ton offer to the
West Indies is a direct challenge
to the unity which the B.W.I.
sugar producing territories achiev-
ed at Grenada.

Tee



HON. ALBERT GOMES
Failure to stand up to it would
be an admission by the W.I. that

the territories are disunited, timid
and rresolute, The important
eleven-man delegation must reach
England as soon as possible seeing
that the main task must be to tell
the English public what political
repercussions in the West Indies
are likely to result from the policy

of smug obtuseness the Btitish
Government seem determined to
follow.

There is an interestIng paradox
in the policy of the Labour Gov-



the 16th Century, a period of)
incessant troubles, confirms the |
need of a state of receptivity, ot |
a psychosis, which renders the |
mind more receptive to discover
them or to imagine them

“And, as in the 16th Century.
do we not live now in a turbu- |
lent period of history.”—LN.S,







ernment towards the colonies. On
the political front they are most
liberal with new constitutions, on
the economic side obviously very
reluctant to make concessions to
make possible for these new
constitutions to succeed

We say such people in the
West Indie that they are two-
faced. We are given all assistance
possible to produce a report re-
commending a Federal Govern-
ment for the West Indies which
will involve an increase in the
cost of Government

At the same time we are being



told we must produce less
Labour Government seem deter-
mined to make it difficult for us to
maintain sane political impulses
in the West Indie

This is one issue on

@ On Page 7

The

vhich the



K. W. V.

— Aromatic

PAARLITA COCKTAIL

SWEET VERMOUTH
DRY VERMOUTH

Wines —

An excellent slightly
sweetish appetiser, con-
taining no synthetic sub-
stances, Very handy
for Cocktail Parties as
nothing has to be added.

Both Wines have excel-
lent qualities, as bev-
erages and for use with
Gin for appetisers or
Cocktails, They are
made from pure White
Wines with the addition

of extracts o e -
The Commonwealth Relations | oe. Re











Office here to-night hinted that

Seretse Khama, exiled Bamang-
wato.chief to the Tribal reserve
in Béchuanaland, might be re-
considered as a result of disturb-
ances there last week.

Eleven Africans arrested after
riots at Serowe, the tribal capital
on Tuesday, were today remand+
ed in custody when they appeared
before the Assistant District Com-
missioner, charged with disturb-
ing the peace.

Giving its reasons for fot al-
Jowing Seretse to enter the tribal
reserve so far, the Commonwealth

Relations Office stated that his
lawyer had failed to give assur-

ances concerning Seretse’s
haviour there.
The statement added that [.ut!

be-

Khama, former London typist,
could visit her husband at any
time.

Patrick, Gordon Walker, Com-|
mohwealth Relations Minister,
told Parliament last month ‘that
Seretse’s return to the Protectorate
was on condition of his own]
good conduct, and also that the
order and good government of the
tribe are not disturbed

‘Seretse is now at Loba, out-
side the Bamangwato territory,
awaiting permission to visit

* Ruth, who expects a baky in July
~~ ( Reuter.)

its attitude towards the return of |

}
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K.W.V. TABLE WINES,

giving herbs.

| | Liqueurs

Delightfully flavoured,
this inimitable old Cafe
Liqueur has already won
for itself world fame.

SHERRIES, SWEET

WINES, SPARKLING WINES (Red and White)

K.W.V. BRANDY

With bigh ester conten
this brandy is unsurpass

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and Nursing Homes.

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sage CNS ci 5 ee es ol = rete ES) as ae on ce oe SS aes! aw YD [a eee ———_ ae ass ae
Ee eS ee
FRIDAY, APRIL 14, j9«
] . 14, 19
PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE deca RIL 14, 1959
EERE ME TPIT |
‘ } —— | yo09 POSS SSSS SS SOS O SONGS
: : a No Papers || poy | KN ii
r | i . ‘ 1S a
| R. AND MRS. ROY WHaon : p ROWAL Worthings x JUST RECE s i
of Trinidad are now in Bar- ° VED R
* ' bados for a couple of weeks’ holi- Hy Themas Hardie To-day 5 é& 8.30 and Continuing % ;
day. They arrived last week by i M-G-M's Musical Romance % %
7 IS Excellency the Governor the S.S. “Stuyvesant” and are _LE HAVRE. : ey Gate. HAL % %
will be attending the meeting staying at tire Windsor Hotel. auntie bape yen oo = Judy GARLA! yeni . i e %
tt the Y.M.C.A. on Monday at Mr. Wilson told Carib that his re > he or i ery Ot th | in 1% g
+15 pm.,-when Mr. P. M ee mt gp or ag roma amen ee ees eae ack and fo’ 3
Sherlock; Vice-Principal of the and, first went out to Trinida today. : A i yee
- | niversity College of the West about the year 1840 and since then,| She has spent 23 of her 39 years |i] +"TNEIE PIRATE Ig Pkgs. Goddards’. Plate
“ndies will speak on the subject his family had been connected} prison, but without committing
f The Ui - Woot ith th 1 a single criminal offence. Her mis-
. e University College. H2 with that colony. 4 Color by Technicolor Powder
vill be The Wilson’s h , take was that she was born of
supported by Dr. J..H. he ilson’s have two sons, : em a} :
- ; Pp 4 r} in th parents of mixed nationality. This with
1 » Professor of History and one a phe Pt pat €ltime she has been, jailed for a ee walk 1 2 Lux Flakes
j a seer rT ae Trinidad Reginant por later with month, and for the usual offence, er ee OLD FAVOURITE MEDICINE ;
r he Windward Islands Battalion] "0 Papers.” A treasure chest of Magic RELIEVES CONSTIPATION Rinso
; Still A Mystery t ~ c . De ar age el a ve on}! “Her mother was White Russian ai ae aid 7
7 _ y aoe SOk is oes . Lucia) ond her father a Prussian scine- | To feel bright, clear eyed Ae sviean Dowell. oe
: Q} VERYONE yesterday was talk- | Their younger son, a graduate Of} rat a combination which she and "figestion. regularity. Dr, Morse. Tins Silvo
, ing about the supposed Flying | McGill University has been with] 121); “criminal”. As a result her } indian toot, Pills SUPP. dable 50-year-old :
a, which have been seen for | the International Film Board Of] ,apers have never been “in order.” EMPIRE V remedy, with se earitiay, uelbs. Beep » Windolene
he heer _— over Barba- re A. bs igenet oo s — She has been tortured by Germans { the system right and regula. See how mue
“ant Fr. peter . were” very 5 p) PORTS, ee and Russians, and arrested by better you : +3
‘ceptical about the whole thing, | a long vacation in Trinidad and] French and Americans as well, she To-day 2.30 & 8.30 | » Shinio
“thers showed great concern and | is ours eee says. \ DR. l Chemico
- mterest about the two objects. in his sphere of work, namely, Nina’s father was shot by the aa i ”
Some think that they are two Visual Education and Educational] Russians, and her mother died and Continuing i! i
_lamets, others will not give their | and Documentary Films ete. while she was still a baby. At 16 || JNDIAN i|% » 1-0-1 Cleanser
“pinion. Anyway whatever they | Mr. Wilson is a Director of] she was condemned to life impris- I} i?
_'re many Barbadians are losing Wilson and Johnstone, Ltd.,] onment for being the daughter of lt t $ » Harpic
yuite a bit of sleep, waking up in | Merchants and Agents of Trinidad.| a White Russian. “ aided siemtiiadelins A .
sia 1 d aft | V6
he middle of the night trying to | . She was released after 12 years H F it TRUSTED REMEDY | Ced oli
fiise @ua two mystery objects for f Toronto Tourists in a Russian jail, following the a UK i aoa Aa Bots. O’Cedar Polish
’ hemselves, Russo-German alliance of 1939. bee) We red 5O Years UR
“ yim visitors from Toron-| She made her way to Berlin. _ eae on ee { %
Welcome ; to lett the island recently She was again sentenced to life 7 Ne 8 ne
ARIB welcomes the arrival of | Mr. and Mr. J. L. Kestle atter | imprisonment, ‘this time for help- a Io nn nn et FY

if



}

H.N.M.S. Karel Doorman the
Jutch aircraft carrier which is
jue to arrive here today from
Duracao.

This is the second Dutch War-
thip to visit Barbados in ‘under
ive months. H.N.M.S. Van Speijk
vas here in late November 1949.

It was the H.N.M.S. Karel Door-

ind men of the Karel Doorman :
lappy stay_here.







the Trinidad Guardian and was in

Barbados for the

Test Matches covering the

B.G

Barbados



whenever he goes outside to catch
a bus, there is a car or cars parked
right underneath one or both of
these bus stops.

MRS.

ANTHONY EDE®

BY THE WAY



4 ira * me statement that him the devil of a dance. They widely distributed the stock-piles
» radio technicians are ad+ organised their own football teams, could not be manipulated is mere-
| vanced enough to send a wireless became open-air girls, and talked ly a repetition of Sir Henry
Ta to Mars and back” (my s0 shrilly that the poor Owph had Golden's discredited theory of ex-
A eee Ba to plug his ears with bits of cork, port price manipulation. And, in
} nber standing in somé They went mad on ‘“Westernisa- any case, it could only apply t
? averns near Syracuse and being tion,” plagued their lord to wear a degree of stabilisation which is
; 'tdvanced enough to get the echo a celluloid shirt front and a stiff impossible without inventing a
i ny rout retumed some. But collar, threw sherry and gin about new price mechanism. A _ buffer
ae ny caption. "3h the 1801 Festival 90 harem, and read “Wai and pool, to be practicable, must be
a oe ee aoa eact at him every time he poked completely divorced from con-
: : Ss, sag s his head round the door siderations of production, and how
lo Mars from the top of the Shot Vear Thing that possible under a system
ower must be answered. If you «, oe emi ” ; of forced supply answering re-
sk, “Is that Mars?” the voice of ata ckul is) Sane Peloaaihie ethinted den ey I ‘dua tin ore
eT etwanead tachnician under the elected 4 their Ce nstituc ncetes. nn os ad bt ar eave tin free
ht oor must reply, “Of course. What TER (ew s item ) to find its own level

jid you think it was?” (Oo! Ma A ang agg Acacias tart ery ol Rissole Mio!

Hea "hey can talk English!’’) gle, the Communist Party om eee wee
m4) Little Women once more has a workable major A’ last there is something
: i - ep a ity over all other parties which “replaces bacon or
HE United Nations, having meat, and can be used to fill

' investigated a report that the >
'Ton of Bikom has 110 wives, “de- OTHING

than the

more lau





i ided that any action to be taken i present talk in the each rissole does not contain
i hould be felt to the wives’. In City of the _establishme of more nourishment than frozen
the case of the Owph of Goboria, buffer pool of tin. The gument Turkish swordfish you may call
| ‘who had 317 wives the ladies led that if stocks of tin were more me Mrs. Araminta McGaffney.

.

“KHAKI DRILL—

EVANS ano WHITFIELDS

HAVE IT — AT THE



MR. WILLIAM VAN YPEREN is seen here sitting in the grounds
of Bay Mansion yesterday, painting in water-colour a scene of the





Do You WantA Buffer Pool?

ghable




three weeks at the Marine Hotel,
during which time they dd quite
a bit of fishing and played golf,
returned home by T.C.A.

Mr. Hamilton H. Gardiner who
is President of the Masco Electric
Co., in Toronto and his daughjer
Mrs. Audrey Pape and grandson
David who were also staying at the

- nan, which took Prince Bernhard Marine returned to Canada by
_ 4 the-Netherlands on his visit T.C.A., recently.
; 0 the Dutch West Indies and

south America a few months ago, tat

ind she is now returning to Hol-
‘and.
} :

It is hoped that during her CF 5

, short visit all Barbadians will d« CROSS WORE
, sheir utmost to give the officers



i Ls garden Ss ' i:aia
: Ask Mr. Jiggs! Arriving On Sunday Dutch Artist H
ARIB Mas met a gentleman UE TO ARRIVE on Sunday by e ~ “ hea
ae who says he has seen a Flying B.W.LA is Miss Bertha HERE was a small crowd
, Saucer. “Yesterday,” he said, ‘! Lamas, of the Dorothy Gray Park gathered along the wharf
mnoyed my wife and she threw 4a...) Sal n. She will be ac- esterday, and Carib joined in to
1 saucer at me!” ibis eryy M s Blaine Kin. S¢¢ What was going on. They
Another bright fellow suggested SO'PaNI®” woes ane oi were looking at an artist, Mr.
. | try and interview Mr. Jiggs, of kead of the Dorothy Gray Loncon witiam Van Yperen, a Dutchman
- “Bringing Up Father” fame salon ,. Who was painting in water colour
‘"Maggie has thrown enough 2" Monday, Miss Lamas, assist- 4 scene of one section of the
saucers at him; he should kno\ ed by Mis: Kinkead will be giving Careenage.
‘what they look like !” Fae ge carga re. at W te Mr. Van Yperen with his wife,
i otel where they will be ‘ying arrived here on Saturday from| ros
> Returns After Daughter’s until April 21st Surinam where they now live, and} g ana 1 coin Tahicieds perform
Wedding’ Leaving Tomorrow are touring pare’ Trinidad, ances which skaters. so term
aia atacarashatal tS. ANTHONY EDEN who i 3ermuda and Haiti, before return- rs ts
M*. aN ; ORTILLO, re- M* : ns a ee ake, Sed third ing to Dutch Guiana. 7 tat Wn’ it should be. 4) “—e
| turned to Venezuela yester paying aEDSG , wih 0. His last case was the one most

They expect to be in Barbados

liay via Trinidz 7 > Wir , visit is due to leave here tomorrow read. (5)
hie was in —_ ny B _ 1.A y T.C.A.. on her return journey for one month and are staying at] \1. You can see pots this shape. (4)
x . arbados for his 4. 5 nd via Canada one of the flats at Bay Mansion, | .2. This rot is feathered. (3) :
j laughter Ramona’s wedding, who *” ~"' . ete Carib visited his flat later 3. The part that may snare you. (4)
jwas married to Mr. A. Corrigar been here since Marct ‘ wn eR S flat later 1M} 4 Limp of farm servant. (3)
ey Wednesday aft See spent her time enjoy- the day and saw some of his) .7. Just one of these little corners
P saay atternoon at St : * oe W . are caves : . (4)
Patrick’s Church, Jemotts | nt climate on the St orks which are very good indeed 8. This clue seems to be a neces
Mie Gorriss ’ . mre , guest at Mr. and He has many oil paintings as well, sity. (4) 20. Spry! (5)
Cable and Wi a eye oe Mrs Ronald Tree at their home and is also very good at portraits n. Fae ar | No a * Sube tb
~able and ireless here Heron’ Beach’ which he does in oil. He says he} het examen or T ieave iisie.
On Honeymoon Mr and Mrs Tree are at hopes to give an exhibition 25. Care for. (4)
re their honeymoon at present in New York, and it is not Barbados of his work,
i Leeton-on-Sea, the Strean yet known if Mrs. Eden will visit
are Mr. and Mrs. Harcourt Thorne, them there before she returns
;| Who were married in Trinidad 01 England
aster Sunday.
Mr. Thorne is Sports Editor of BUFO

oo games exhibited her work at the Salor them. (5)
or his paper, His bride is tne d’Automn and had a private ex- 12 ee fle is omly seen sideways.
. 1 se Jowle : , . (
Se he ie roe ' wie hibition at the Gallery Royale. ry Melt, 90 that oa, inesttere. (9
aug x of Mrs. Justina Bowl ‘oe (6, Rendezvous. ( v. over,
land the late James Bowle: Assistant Manager 22. Taken from frat) ladies (3)
i 8 ° . R. AND MRS. EDDIE O’CON Solution of yesterday's puszle,—Across:
' Staying With His Aunt M NOR who arrived recently 1, Forscoth gabe, Slice: ie" wi
R. AND MRS. CHARLIE TAY from Trinidad are spending threc | \ Drain 19. Abed; 41. Off; 22. Narrow!
> . 3. : . nterdict wo: . Facts,
’ LOR left for Trinidad by weeks at Coral Sands, Worthing | } Reed: 3 spliced: 4, Orone: 5° Tarry:
| B.W.1LA. on Wednesday afternoon Mr. O’Connor is Assistant Man 5 ner ar tk Want 17’ Door
for a short visit They will be ager of Barclays Bank in Port (8, Aft; 20, Bes” r P , ,
staying with Charlie’ unt, Mr of-Spain. They were accompaniec
Mc Cutcheon, who will be return by their Tony and _ niece
| ing with them to spend a holiday Peggy Piaqcenprinanieneanismtnncin eiltnnitiitnatiaaasile
_| in Barbados. With Creole Petroleum BEAUTY DEMONSTR ATION
ie Bus Stops . M® and Mrs. Charles F. Linds ) L f t
HERE are two Bus Stops a ley and their two childrei A
between the Pavilion and the Adora Ann and Dana arrived o A Beauty Demonstration will
, Pavilion Court, Hastings. A resi- Monday afternoon by B.W.1A be staged by Miss Bertha Lamag
» dent in that area tells me that from La Guaira to spend one of the Dorothy Gray Park Avenue

Salon at the Windsor Hotel on
Monday, lith April, at 5 p.m.,
followed by personal consultationg
to those interested.

week at the Paradise Beach Club
Mr

and

Lindsley is from Los Angeles
works in
Petroleum.

Venezuela with

N Creole 14.4.50,—3n



By BEACHCOMBER

in (
which in-| Slept in skins. (5)
cludes scenes in Holland during Down
the war, Dutch street scenes, and] * Fae acre oe person you cannot
there are also some paintings done} 9, Put an end to Cleopatra. (3)
in Trinidad and Dutch Guiana, as . it's a scent. (5)
well as some local scenes 5. oppeere be a temporary sub
S| val scenes. 5 6.

His wife who is also from Hol-] 6. Relating to a change of musica!
shih te ae as 6 as 6 back nstrument, (8)
are a 5 ee a h As studiec 7, See 3 A b
in Italy ane aris. In Paris she} 9. You expect to get @ enore from

sausage rolls.” It is a new rissole

made of sunflower kernels, and if From 7



KHAKI DRILL





a

RIGHT PRICE






t
BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
|

ing Allied prisoners escape from a
German concentration camp. But
she too escaped, and reached
France to join the Resistance. And
fall in love.

After the Liberation she asked
American authorities—who had
arrested her—for the “papers”
necessary to get married. After, a
long delay she was advised to ask
the Russians. But the latter only
shipped her off to Eastern Ger-
many.

Last year she slipped into the
American Zone of Western Ger-
many, and eventually hitched a
ride to Alsace in the hope of find-
ing her long-lost fiance. But she
could find no traces of him. She
then came to Paris, and hopped a
train to Le Havre to board “any
ship sailing away from Europe.”

When caught by French police,
who like everyone else demanded
‘papers”, she only said:

“fT envy animals, birds—even
beasts of prey.”

And when her month in the Le
Havre jail is completed, she may
still have “no papers.”—I.N.S.

ee





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Robert TAYLOR, Audrey TOTTER

“HIGH WALL oe Produced by Frank & Maurice KING
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FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1950
—————es

Counsels Address Jury
In Murder Case

@ From Page |
jagnosis’

“Or. Copland: Yes. .

Wr. Whyatt: As a matter of fact
in the light of what you know and
what you have heard since, do you
believe it was a much more seri-
ous matter than just drunkenness?

Dr. Copland: Yes.

‘ Mr. Whyatt: You would not

differ from Dr. Cato’s opinion and
that of Dr. Leacock, that the man

was suffering from what is known
a contre-coup injury?

Dr. Copland: He had a contre-

injury.

re. Whyatt: When you gave
evidence before the magistrate you
were asked by my Learned Friend
for the defence, a number of ques-
tions which might be called ques-
tions put to an expert witness, not
of what you saw. One was, if a
man got a blow would haematoma
take long to appear. You had said
you did not know how long’ it
would take.

Dr. Copland: Yes.

Mr. Whyatt: You were also
asked if a man fell off a bed and
struck his head on the floor would
that produce haemorrhage, and
you said you could not say.

Dr. Copland: Alcoholic intoxi-
cation would produce cerebral
haemorrhage. :

Mr. Whyatt: Finally you sum-
marised these hypothetical opin-
ions by saying that in the matters
referred to you were not prepared
to express an opinion.

Dr. Copland; All these questions
depended on» several factors.
Whether a man would haemorr-
hage or not depended on several
factors.

Mr. Whyatt : You would not to-
day wish to express an opinion
that is in contradiction to the evi-
dence given by Dr. Cato and Dr.
Leacock.

Dr. Copland: I would not ex-
press an opinion in contradiction
to what I have heard.

Mr. Dear: The last

time you

Was filled with aa
i cid

alcoholic odour
uagnose him. All per-
are sent through the
Casualty into the General Hospi-
tal go on a provisional diagnosis.

To the Court: Any patient ad-
mitted through the Casualty to the
hospital by a doctor enters the
1ospital on a provisional diagnosis.
' GO not consider that a diagnosis
has beer’ made when a person has
been left under observation.

Mr. Whyatt;

not

sons who



Would you agree}
with me that the first Step in aj
diagnasis is to obtain, if possible, |
the history of the patient? i

Dr. Kirton; If possible. i

Mr. Whyatt; And indeed it is |
important to pay the closest atten-|
tion to the history of a patient}
when making a diagnosis? |

Dr. Kirton: Yes.

Mr. Whyatt: In some cases his-
tory is more important than any-
thing else.

Dr. Kirton: Yes. }
Mr. Whyatt; For instance, in
cases of a head injury it would

be particularly important.
Dr. Kirton; Yes
Mr. Whyatt: Because, of course,
these cases could easily be mis-
taken for cases of irunkenness.
Dr. Kirton: Definitely.
Mr Whyatt: Sometimes

a doctor
seeks to obtain the history from
the patient himself it on other

occasions if the patient is uncon-

scious or does tot =ce-operate
you have to tr; obtai mj}
a third party |
Dr. Kirton: That is right |
Mr. Whyatt At: f loctor
gets a wrong history, he may very
easily be misled and make

wrong diagnosis.
Dr. Kirton: Very likely, I agree.
Mr. Whyatt: In thi:
obtained some history from oe
Carter.
Dr. Kirton:
Mr. Whyaitt;



‘Ase vou

Yes, |
She told you that}

saw the man was either when he the patient was an alcoholic, andy

was dead or dying.

what you asked*her was whether








Argentine
Ambassador



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Ta



SLIGHTLY MIXED BATHING

Worla Copyright.

By arrangement wilh Daily Herald
3,90







W e Shall Paden

Stronger

0,000 HAITIANS
WILL GET PENICILLIN

en a era

Rebel Leader Sends
_A “Peace” Message

DJAKARTA, April 13.

Unless Capt. Andi Abdu Azis,
rebel leader of Macassar, is on his
| way to the Indonesian capital,
; Diakarta, by noon today, President
| Soekarne will announce “forceful
measures” to be taken against him
/and his troops, a Defence Ministry

|spokesman announced here.

It was. reported earlier today
from Macassar that Capt. Azis has
sent a special emissary with a
“peace” message to the Federal
Government in Djakarta, Lut he
was said to have refused \) go to
the capital himself, ignoring an
ultimatum to.leave Macass:’,



Capt. Azis, 26-year-old “vritish
trained paratrooper, took over
military control of Macassa:, capi-
tal of Easy Indonesia, on April 5
after weeks of tension folowing
the Federal Government’s plan to

incorporate East Indones. inte
Jogjakarta State.
Last Friday Capt. Azis was

given 47 hours in which vo come
to Djakarta and account for the
revolt,—Reuter.



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Dr. Copland: That was the last the patient was drunk or dying.



time, soon after 1 a.m. Dr. Kirton; Yes.

Mr. Dear: On the occasions Mr. Whyatt; She replied that he
you saw him, did you see any is always being brought in drunk,
marks of bruises or blood or and you proceeded on the assump-|
swellings? {ion that he was a drunkard and

Dr. Copland: No. not dying.

Mr. Dear: The first time you pr, Kirton: That does not sum |

saw him he was lying on the floor yy the
aoe mele: Yes Mr. Whyatt: Do you accept the |
Mr. Dean "You said then you 2ccount of Nurse Carter as being
ordered him to be put in the outer Completely accurate?
room in the Inquiry Office Dr. Kirton: It did not
Dr: Copland: Yes. off my guard
Mr Dear: You said that you Mr. Whyatt; Did you have any
went back to your quarters, there reason to doubt it?
you received a message and re- Dr. Kirton: No.
turned to the Casualty. Did you Mr. Whyatt: And why do you
see the man lying on the floor in not accept it as being accurate?

posftion ontirely

put me

the outer room? : Dr. Kirton: Because one does
Dr. Copland: No, He was lying not easily accept a statement of
on the outer bed on which I that sort.

ordered him to be placed.

Mr. Dear: My Learned Friend
has asked you if you agree with
the opinions of Dr. Leacock an:

Mr. Whyatt: I am asking you
about the history she gave you
the history of drunkenness. What
T am putting to you is, that you

a. a of sega sea m had no reason to doubt the histor:
pis oe vl iwon. to vou by Nurse Carter,

Dr. Copland: Which opts'o« Ne tinea. ee -

e inions of the p $0) aN
a We‘ aadings? a ae Mr. Whyatt: Since you had no
M Dear? | would like to know ‘son to coubt, it would have,
whetller hay are in PP rites heen reasonable for vou to |
agreement with everything tne) ceed upon the assumption that me
said or whether you have any patient was a drunkard? '
qualifications to make Dr. Kirton: I know nothing at
, : é t » se yn hear

Dr. Copland: There is one qual- ®!! about the case, I only reard
ification I think I might make. one side, I wanted more informa-
You asked whether it was possi- tion. : : oth
ble to distinguish .if the man had Mr. Whyatt: Was it not reas-
had several haemorrhages at Onable to place reliance on the
i imes. Usually if there Nurse? ;
i + ” different Dr. Kirton: I am responsible
haemorrhages the post mortem en Miaeett due tn not place
would show a laminated appear- Dr. Kirton: T did
a Mr. Whyatt: Having placed

To the Court: That would be,
you would see shades possibly as
a result of changes taking place.

some reliance upon the history of
drunkenness, then the next’ step

tulke it in diagnosing, to see
Mr. Dear: Witn all due respect \i inher the symptoms of the
you may have misunderstood the )tiant qt in with the history. Is
quesiion which I had put to Dr. thay joni?
Cato and Mr. Leacock. I will read Dr. Kirton: Yes.
that question. “If a man after re- Mr. Whyatt: For example, if

eeiving an injury by a blow to the you have a history of drunken-

head had a mishap such as I had ness, one thing you would look
supposed — by that I mean an- 4)¢ for would be the smell of
other blow, thereby increasing the jo hol,

severity of the - haemorrhage, Dr. Kirton: Yes.

would ‘he post mortem examina- Mr. Whyatt: You found that
tion indicate the increased jhe patient’s general appearance
haemorrhage?” was like that of a chronic

Dr. Copland: That would de- alcoholic.

pend on vhe time the second mis- Dr, Kirton: Yes,

hap happened. It would depend Mr, Whyatt: In view of tha
on how many hours after the first history of drunkenness, on, whieh

you placed some reliance and ii
view the fact that the symp-
toms fitted in with that history,
would it not have been reasonable
for you.or any doctor to diagnose
the man’s condition to see if i

@ mishap had taken place.
Dr. Kirton: At tie time of thd
me oceurrence jin question 1 was an
out-patient docvor at the General
Hospital. I was on duty in the
B Casualty Department of the Hos-

of



pital on November 24 when a man was due te alcoholic int< xication?
Was brought in on a stretcher and = Dr. -‘Kirton: I A Pe le
pul! on the farthest bed from me | Mr. Whyatt: A provisional

on my right. 1 was sitting at (ne diagnosis which in fact you made.

desk, that is in the inner room. a: Te Bvine eae
Shortly after Nurse Carter went “rr. Whyati: Having made §
provisional diagnosis there was

over and examined the man. She

went vo the other end.of the room. ™° need to make that meticulous

. detailed examination of the
then went over to the patient yatient which was described by

and hed a look at him. On my Dr, Leacock
way back to my desk I asked ie 4

i : . no
Nurse Carter a question to which neat a epee ep '
she replied. Isat at my desk for "“Mir ‘ Woyatt: Would jit be
a livile while and heard the man recurale to say that you did not

out in a normal voice for @ -x;mine him fully or carefully’
nurse. He then stretched violently Dr. Kirtom: I would prefer .o
A nurse from the other end of tic ay fully. I made a _ carefu
Toom started to goto him. | ~xamination but it did not go as
wpped her and went myself. far as it might have gone.

en I first saw him he was Mr. Whyatt: If you had got a
lying on his back on yhe left side torch and looked into the man’s

his face with his face pointing ear, you might have seen traces
to the wall, When I saw him a of ‘biood which you would not
Second time he had turned his face otherwise have seen.
Upwards. I then examined him, There might have
He had a good pulse between 70 plood in his left ear.
8 : a his skin felt warm, re- “pp, Kirton: It was very difficult
nba ons were quite normal. His ¢- see invo the man’s left ear from
and toe seemed to be raised where I stood. I am absolutely
radial Lacy naar that his certain that there was no blood
e] artery was somewhat thick- anywhere else; in his right ear,
? 1ose or nostril. There could have
heen dry blood deep in his left
ear as you suggest. I was not
eally looking for that sor’ of
ching, There was no reason why
€ should look for this thing in a
‘drunk’ with a history.

Mr. Whyatt: If you had been

Looking down at what I think given a history to the effect thay

@ 5 the blow and then looking up the patient had been struck by a
below, I saw no of pitce of wood on the side of his

been dry

T examin!d both sides of his

looking down on him. Look-

ng over his chest I noticed a faint

Smudge which looked like blood

This was in a position about oppo-

Site his sixth left rib, a few inches
from vhe sternum.






: sign : tae ke
bleeding fr : ‘ hed | Substance. He spoke of locating :
rom his @ar, nose or ead, you would have approached : ae es
mouth. he case quite diiferently nee over the parietal
P. then returned to my desk and Dr. Kirton: Of course. I would Mr Whyatt: You are not
shortly afterwards the nurses ‘ have wasted time. I would | es eee ae ws peted
ae changed. T stood with the | iitfed the patient to the Ge: haa oe ea a : "ti eer
r nu seorge wi yrought invo ri su
for nurse locking at the patient aign abc ’ ¢| ality, he wa not suffering from
fa ee time before I left. My tr. Wiryatt: In view of the post ntrarenie Dates fang iro
utc, usbection was at seven min- rte examination findings,| CO2'e-coup inju
sae past four and T left the Ca J u agree that the man’s] _ ae nee fe hponemined aie
“ity at twenty-five minutes past in ontre-coup Injury? poe. me a Saree
I rT called back to see tv Dr. Kirton: | have listen care- aid not outer, ron; a contre-coup
and left the hospital final! norte findings |#4jury when he cime
I Mr. Whyatt: Weuld ve
he t p 4y Opinion
ie gh de @ On Page



In Britain

LONDON, April 13.

Senor Chalos A. Hogan, new
Argentine Ambassador to Britain,
arrived in London’s docks today
in the Argentine liner Presidente
Peron. He was accompanied by
his wife and children.

In a statement Senor
said “under the Government of
General Peron, Argentina has
entered upon a new era—an era
in which we strive in defence of
our sovereignty and economic in-
dependence,”

Senor Hogan said all that Argen-
tina asked was that “she should
clasp hands with Britain ever
more lightly as the years go on.”

Absent from the company of

Hogan

Embassy officials who went aboard
the Presidente Peron to greet
Senor Hogan were the three

labour attaches who recently pro-
tested to the Vickers Armstrong
Company. that workers from the
firm’s shipyard had not been
invited to a luncheon for the
launching of the Argentine liner
17 De Octubre.

Senor Hogan with a smile told a
reporter, “I speak a little Engl’sh
very fluently. Senora Hogan speaks
no English at all’. The new Am-
bassador said that he felt honoured
and happier than he could express
at being privileged to serve Argen-
tina as her Ambassador “‘in historic
Britain. England hag been our
friend from the day of our inde-
pendence and this spirit of good
fellowship has grown in strength.

“My duty and pleasure: will be
to do everything in my vower to
foster this friendship. This is a
sacred trust.” —Reuter.

Lord Lyle
Champions
Empire Sugar

LONDON.

Encouragement from the Brit-
ish Government for Empire sugar
producers was advocated by Lord
Lyle at the forty-seventh annual
ordinary general meeting of Tate
and Lyle Ltd. in London on
Tuesday.

“I would like
pound of sugar consumed here
come from home or Empire
sources” he said. “Your company
has already played its part in
the West Indies and there are
others like us who are willing t
take a hand. All they need is
sign of encouragement from th«
Government”.

Lord Lyle said that even
though it were decided to spend
more dollars on sugar, this should
be only a short term policy.
Sugar could be produced within
the Empire as cheaply as any-
where in the world and there was
a potential market in this coun-
try for another million tons
year from Empire sources. Theré



to see every

was, in addition, a far greater
world demand,
“When agreements are drawn

up, let them be on a broad and
generous basis” he continued “and
most important of all, let there
be an end to talk about the
nationalisation of sugar.” °



of the most important features was
not mentioned as regards a contre-
coup injury. That is a severe and
extensive contusion of (ne brain
substance. I only heard about
haemorrhage.

Mr. Whyatt: You do not differ
about the opinion expressed by
Dr. Cato, that the blogy on the ief
side of the head did severe dam-
age to the brain on the right side
of the head. You could not dispute
tha?

Dr. Kirton: My position is this,
Dr. Cato spoke of the haemor-
rhage. He did not speak of this
contusion which I consider to be
essential. He did not speak of thi
extensive convusion of the brain



In V.D. Fight

IN THE FIRST ATTEMPT in world history

NEW YORK, April

to era

venereal disease from an entire nation. penicillin injecti

will be given to the entire

population of the Republic

Haiti, the New York Times reported today.

U.S. Asked To
Help Starving

Chinese

HONG KONG, April 13.

Delegates to Chiang Kai Shek’s
“National Assembly” have wired
the United States Congress urging
“immediate action to arouse
America to avert one of the great-
est famines ever to face the Chin-
ese nation”, according to the (Na-
tionalist) Central News Agency,
The telegram spoke of the ‘“mil-
lions of people on the verge of
starvation” on the Co unist
held Chinese mainland. is it
said resulted from Soviet policy
which was “to extinguish half
China’s population of 450,000,000
in a move to conquer, firstly the
countries of South East Asia, and
then eventually &o0 overrun the
whole world.’’—(Reuter.)

Ten Million
Flee Famine

HONGKONG, April 13.

Official Communist dispatches
from Peking to-day admitted there
were 10,000,000 famine refugees
in the Central and South China
administrative region alone.

The region comprises the pro-
vinees of Honan, Kiangsi, Hupeh,
Hunan, Kwangtung and Kwangsi,
but excludes the East China area
where conditions in the provinces
of Anhwei, Kiangsu, and Shang-
tung are understood to be infin-
itely worse. The dispatches said
the figure of 10,000,000 had been
given.by General Lin Piao, Chair-
man of the Central and South
China Regional Military and Po-
litical Committee.

According to the dispatches, Lin
Piao told the State Couneil that
of 10,000,000 refugees, four and a
half million were in a_ serious
plight.

He urged a reduction in land
rentaly end further food loans.

~—Reuter.

SEES WASHINGTON'S
TOMB

WASHINGTON, April 13.

President Gabriel] Gonzalez Vi-
dela of Chile was visiving Presi-
dent George Washkington’s tomb at
Mount Vernon and the tomb of
“The Unknown Soldier” here to-
duy.

He was dining with Secretary of
State Dean Acheson and Mrs.
Acheson tonight a: the end of the
second day of his official visit,

Senor Videla dined last night
with President Truman who pre-
sented him with a 600 grams gold
medallion to commemorate the
occasion.

The Chilean President then de-
clared vhat the policy of his Gov-
ernment was friendly co-opera-
tion with the United States.

President Truman, in reply,
said: “The solidarity of the West-
ern Empire is absolutely essential
to whe peace of the world.”—
Reuter.

TEN DAYS TOO LATE

SAN FRANCISCO, ril 13.
The “Flying Bixbys”, the young
Californian couple, who left here
on April 1 in an attempt to beat
the round the world speed re-
cord, lande@® back here to-day—
10 days too late. Their hopes
were dashed when their convert-
ed Mosquito bomber developed
engine troubles, which held them
up four days in Calcutta. Later,
they were further delayed by en-
gine trouble in Tokyo.
— (Reuter, )

PILOTS KILLED IN
JET PLANE CRASH

LONDON, April 13.

Britain’s latest jet
meteor and a vampire,
red to-day. Their pilots wer:











Tw '

of

planes, a



The operation, involving 3,500,-
000 people will take two vears. In
the process, the indigenous disease
of yaws, afflicting 85 percent of
the population, is also expected to
be eradicated.

The story
told by Dr.
ereal disease
Pan-American
of the World Health
ation, the paper reported

The programme will be con-
ducted under the auspices of the
World Health Organisation of the

of the project
James Thome, ven
consultant of the
Sanitary

was

Bure
Bureat

Or

anis-

United Nations, the Government
of Haiti and the United Nations
International Children’s Emerg-
ency Fund.

The project will begin by the

end of this month.,
— 6Reuter,)



Insecticide
Kills Men

VICTORIA, Canada—
A potent mass-killing chemical

being used in the war against
insects is so dangerous that
handlers must wear anti-gas
equipment similar to that wor
by servicemen during the wa
Perfeeted by the Germans

during the war, it is known a
parathion, an organic phosphate
It was tested and used for ‘
first time in Canada by Okanagan
fruit-growers last year, Prot
J. Spencer, biologist, Unive

G.
sity of British Columbia, dis
closed.

Parathion was one of the mili-

tary secrets Germany turned ove!

to United States authorities at
the end of the war. They did not
use the chemical weapon against

the Allies because they wi
aware that Britain had devel
oped a lethal gas just as effect vi

The new insecticide is described
by biologists as one of the most
effective toxic poisons ever used
against insects threaten'ng the
world’s food supply

Gas masks, rubber coats,
gloves and protective
the feet and legs must he
by growers when using it
their crops Decontamination
precautions must taken after
growers have used it

Failure to follow pre-
cautionary measures prove
fatal to users. Already three men
have died agonizing deaths |
the United States due to li-
gence in handling the chemical
Several others have narrowly
escaped death.

While not condemning

+} fo}
chorning tol

rm

on

be

these

may

neg

the

of parathion, Prof, Spencer fc!
more caution should be taken
using toxic poisons of this pe
He felt the indiscriminate use «
dangerous chemicals on plant
might‘ create some very serious

prceblems in the future,

“We are sitting on:a keg of
gun powder until ‘we knoW mors

about these chemicals and theft
long-range effects on _ plants,”
said the biologist.

He said that he had received

reports that parathion was des-
troying bird life.

“The public is not aware of
the dreadful chemicals which are
being brought into use against

insects,” he added. “Parathion is
ene. Others will follow. No one
knows what long-term effect

they will have on plants and indi-
rectly on man who eats the
plants.”—(C.P.)



Plan To Link
Policies In
Europe And Asi:

LONDON, Apri 3

A plan to co-ordinate the Fi
eign Policies of the Western P
ers into one “grand de
linking their policies in Europ
and Asia is emerging from pre-
parations being made here for
next month’s talks betwec he
“Big Three’ Foreign Minister
and the Atlantic T I
ferences will vel
possible ~ Reuter

|
Says U.S. Defence Secretary |

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Virginia, |
April 13 |

he United States Secretary ot |
Jefence, Mr. Louis Johnson to-day |
edged that the United States
would stand by its overseas allies

ind “yive them economic and
itary aid to the fullest extent |
sible” to build up a more

effective mutual defence,
Mr. Johnson, who recently re-
ined from the third meeting of
he North Atlantic Powers Defence





‘ommittee at the Hague, was
peaking on American defence
policy the University of Vir-
Inia here |
He also said that the United |
State \ determined to be|

ong” because peace can only be |
hieved through strength. Mr.
Johnson added “We shall win the
truggle to rally humanity for |
reedom, not by matching of man|
or man, gun for gun, tank for |
lank, or plane for plane: not by
jaying our,opponents game and

wrecking our economy through
spending ourselves into a depres-
sion: and not by military experi-
ments in the region of society”.
“We shall win by proving our- |
elve Stronger in ingenuity, in
irit and in muscle, than any who|
nay contemplate to challenge us.” |

We shall make every dollar |
bring a maximum in protection”.
—Reuter. |



Argentina
Will Reply |

BUENOS AIRES, April i3.
Buenos morning |
newspapers attach considerable
iportance to Anglo-Argen
1 meat price discussions which
scheduled for 11 o'clock this
corning (Argentine time).
lke British delegation is to be
headed by Commercial Minister
EK. J. Joint, while chief Argentine
negotiators will be acting as Sub-| |
Secretary of Economy and General
{
{

Tout
Viost

Aires

the

ere

Manager.
|

It expected that Argentina
will reply to the British’ proposal
for maintenance of the present

price of £97.536 per long ton and
reduction to 90 during the second
year of the agreement with oa
counter proposal for increase to
£140,379 to compensate for deval-

iation of sterling and the fact that] "
the sterling price of liquid fuels} |
now costing Argentina 40 per |
nt more than before devalua-] |
If the British agree to the meat
price adjustment, Argentines wil!] |
promise to use additional sterling 1
earnings by buying more “non-| 7
entials” from gritain and] i
eeording financial remittances .
to Britain



To Mothers
who cannot

feed their babies






Don’tworry ! Cow's milk can be prepared so that the youngest baby
can digest it without trouble. The addition of Robinson’s ‘Patent?
Barley prevents the milk forming large clots in baby stomachs,

making it easy for the delicate digestive organs to do their.work

thoroughly whilst getting them ready to digest heavier foods later

in life, That’s why wise nurses and mothers always use Robirison’s
‘Patent’ Barley.

——.



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COMPLETE RANGE OF SPARE PARTS IN STOCK!

| THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY « 1a.

15 Killed In
Stampede

NEW DELHI, April 13.

Fifteen people were reported
killed and 15 seriously injured in
a stampede today when huge
crowds of Hindu pilgrims were
making their way today vo the
sacred River Ganges for a purify-
ing bath at Hardwar, 120 miles
northeast of Delhi.

Nearly 1,000,000 pilgrims took a
dip in the river today on the
occasion of Humbh Mela — the
Holy Bathing Fair held at Hard-
war once in 12 years.

Pilgrims from all over India
have been pouring into Hardwar
for vhe past few days by train
bus, bullock cart and foot for the
Fair,— Reuter,



Rout of the Rattlers

OKEENE; Fried rattler was the
main item on the menu at a dinner
in Okeene which opened the In-
ternational Association of Rattle-
snake Hunters’ Convention. The
meeting boasted the world’s odd-
est “flodr show”’—men milking
snakes, Indians dancing round
wriggling snakes, and girls danc-
ing with snakes round their necks
and waists. The entertainment wae
the preliminary to a snake hunt—

the diners went into the hills to
catch an estimated 1,000 snakes to

all to zoos, to food canneries, and

atories. For each snake
3s. 6d. and some hunters
1) a night



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|... PAGE FOUR



ADVOGATE





=



r BS Pinned
“Published by Tho Advooste Co. Lt6., M4, Broad St, Bridgetow?
Friday, April 14 5
y, April 14, 1950 PARIS.

: = Protestants behind the “Iron

( urtain” are going to church this
oe Pedestrians Easter season largely unmolested, 5,
at ih = but that does not mean that free-
pet IT WOULD be interesting to know what dom of religion exists for them in

; will be the cost to the taxpayer of the new
' pedestrian crossing being constructed on
the sea side of Victoria Bridge.

The information will be useful for two
reasons.

First, should it be used by pedestrians
the Government will have found the type
that is suitable for this island.
ih Secondly, should it not be used by pedes-
' + -trians, the taxpayer will have a vested in-
- terest in complaining that his money is
‘being wasted and will support this news-
‘paper in its drive to educate pedestrians in
the proper use of the road.

At present nowhere in Barbados is there
better adequate accommodation for pedes-
trians than the two sidewalks on either
side of the Chamberlain Bridge.

Yet every motorist will tell you of daily

experiences in which pedestrians slow up
" . traffic over this main exit and entrance of
-. the City.
' he misuse of the Chamberlain Bridge
gives the answer to those public spirited
citizens who protest that pedestrians have
nowhere to walk and therefore say that
they must walk in the street.

The motorist sees the misuse of the street
wherever he drives throughout the island
of Barbados. It is a regular experience of
the motorist to see deep in the heart of the
country where delightful glades of mahog-
any invite the country residents to rest
beneath-their branches to see, twenty yards
away, clusters of adults playing games of
draughts or gossipping in the highway.
Every motorist in Barbados has at one time
or other been given gratuitous insults or
advice. by pedestrians whose business in
the road is never made plain.

Writers to this newspaper have been com-
plaining recently about the numbers of
accidents in the road. The accent has almost
invariably been on careless driving. This
newspaper does not countenance careless
driving. It has more than once brought to
the attention of the authorities the frequent
excesses in speed to be noticed almost daily
in Bay Street and other busy thoroughfares.
But there is no remedy to accidents and
deaths on the road unless pedestrians are
trained to walk the roads in their own inter-
ests.

Visitors to Barbados who are accustomed
to traffic lights and notices saying “cross
now” are amazed at seeing the reckless way
in which people here invite the risk of death
by waltzing across roads, getting out of
cars in the middle of the road, wave to
their friends from bicycles and in a hundred
and one ways leave themselves in the hands
of fate, whenever they walk the roads of
Barbados.

There is much that needs to be done by
Government. Compulsory legislation is
long overdue to ensure that shops in the
main streets of the City are equipped with





meocted en.

res

short of an all out drive by the community
as a whole will have any but the slightest
| effect in improving the chaotic condition
in which people, bicycles and animal drawn
or human-propelled vehicles meander

through the ancient City of Bridgetown.



ie No War

THE rather frightening prophesies of the
* 4) gentleman who foresees the disappearance
\\ of the Mediterranean, che end of the Nile
and the outbreak of war in 1950 are made
4) less dreadful by a story which is going the
rounds. When Mr. Strachey was Minis-
+ ter of Food say the raconteurs with their
+. 4 tongues in their cheek : “We got no food.
| Now that he is Minister of War—why we'll

9

get no war.” Comforting ”





































1



The Curtain

communized Eastern Europe any
more than for Catholics and Jews.

However, of the three great
faiths, protestantism has suffered
least under communism, competent
observers of religious affairs agree
The reasons for this are several:

1, In all the “Iron Curtain”
countries protestants are in the
minority, In Albania, protestants
comprise such a small number in
that predominantly Moslem land
that they are not even mentioned
in the latest available statistics. In
Bulgaria, about 15,000 are listed
in a country of 7,048,000.

Consequently the communists
did not have to contend with large
and powerful church oppositicas as
in the case of the Catholics ;who
comprise almost 50 per cent. of the
populace of Czechoslovakia and
Poland,

2. Besides being in the minor-
ity, the protestants are divided into
many small groups — Lutherans,
Baptists, Adventists, Methodists
and so on. There is in most cases
no central authority to contest with
the state for loyalty as in the case
of the Catholics’ Vatican. And
there is no international symbol
such as the State of Israe} in the

ease of the Jews to infect the pro-

testants with the “disease” of
“cosmopolitanism.”

3. Unlike the Catholic Church
the protestants have no large land
holdings in any of the East Eu-
ropean countries to stand in the
way of communist land reforms
and redistribution. Their schools
were fewer and their press far less
political and of narrower distribu-
tion than that of the Catholics.

However, where protestant
church leaders have presented op-
position to the regime—or even
voiced criticism—they have been
stamped down with the same ruth-

lessness and decisiveness as the

NEW BOOKS

Here I



THE KON-TIKI EXPEDITION. By
Thor Heyerdahl. Allen and Unwin.
12s. 6d. 2385 pages. ,

HERE is one of the great true
stories of the sea. It is a tale
of real life adventure which will
outlive the fiction of Conrad —
contains as much of the magic
atmosphere of maritame quest
and peril as Moby Dick itself

It tells how six young men,
five Norwegians and one Swede,
crossed the Pacific Ocean in a
craft more primitive by far than
that used by their ancestors, the
Vikings of a thousand years
earlier, in crossing the Atlantic.

It tells how one young scien-
tist’s theory was, if not proved,
at any rate supported, by the
voyage. For the purpose, or at
least the excuse of this Kon-Tiki
expedition was the belief, formed
by Norwegian anthropologist
Thor Heyerdahl when he was in
Polynesia before the war, that
the South Pacific Islands had
been peopled by a white race
coming from South America long
before the arrival of the present
brown-skinned population

proper sidewalks. The promise of making Keay « sees became gy og
. . . 4 a make boats, ld no 10 ow

street crossings in Broad Street compulsory use metals. How then could they
is arteni rovide € I rese re made the trip from the
is heartening, prov ided shat om — nt are om oo een —
arrangement of crossings 1s improved on by drifting on the westward-
and altered where necessary. But nothing flowing Humboldt Current in
: rafts of balsa wood lashed

‘together by balsa ropes
When the experts said that this
Heyerdahl was

was impossible,
Very well,

stung into retorting:
I shall do it.

He found another five young
men of restless disposition and
a Scandinavian love of the sea
who were ready to accompany
him.

They set off from South
America amidst universal predic-
tions of early disaster. Their
clumsy raft, the Kon-tiki, would
not answer the steering oar or
get much assistance from the
sail The logs, working against
one another in the sea, would
soon wear the ropes through
They would drown quickly or
starve slowly.

In fact, they made a voyage,
crowded with gay adventure and
an adequate spice of danger,
from South America to a coral
atoll near Tahiti, taking exactly
101 days to cover 4,300 miles of
empty ocean.

—— ee
ae



BARBADOS

By Irving HK. Levine
other faiths. Here are some exam-

es:

In Yugoslavia, when eight pro-
testant pastors mixed politics with
religion in their sermons, they
were dealt with in typical com-
munist style.

One of the pastors told his con-
gregation that America had the
atom bomb for use against such
as Tito, so there was no danger of
the Tito regime lasting long. The
eight pastors were sentenced to
prison in Zagres. That was in
1947 and other protestant pastors
apparently took the hint and for
the most part have steered clear
of politics.

Protestant leaders in Paris and
elsewhere in Europe admit that
complete, co-ordinated figures of
arrests in Yugoslavia, and else-
where behind the “Iron Curtain”
are difficult to obtain, but it is
reported that several other pro-
testant clergymen also have been
imprisoned in Yugoslavia.

In Hungary, three higin-r< nking
Evangelical Church officials vere
jailed in 1948 on the grounds of
“currency abuses” (a favourite
charge against church officials by
the communists who are careful
to frame charges in such a way
that they do not smack directly
of religious persecution). The most
prominent among them was Luth-
eran Bishop Lajos Ordass. Pro-
testants abroad have tried repeat-
edly to effect his release but with-
out success.

In Czechoslovakia, two Ameri-
can Mormon Missionaries, Stanley
E. Abbott, 23, of Lehigh, Utah,
and C. Aldon Johnson, 22, of
Idaho Falls, Idaho were arrested
in February on charges of attempt-
ing to enter a restricted area. They
were expelled along with the
rest of the Mormon Mission. The
Government said they were “en-
dangering the safety of the state”.
All other western missionaries
have been advised of their impend-
ing expulsion.



s A Magnificent Sea
Adventure Story

Ky George Malcolm Thomson

Empty of ships, that is to say.
But filled, overcrowded in truth,
with fish. Pilot fish scouted ahead
of the raft. Schools of dolphins
followed it.

The Kon-tiki’s timbers were
the home of countless crabs,
neluding one large crab that

became a domestic pet. At night
the sea was ablaze with brilliantly
illuminated fish coming up from
the lower depths.

There were giants rays, bigger
than the whole raft. There were
shoals of whales hurtling at top
speed towards the raft and swirl-
ing away when within a foot or
two.



THOR HEYERDAHL

There were sharks,
aboard by the tail.

And there was, hugest fish in
al the sea, the whale shark, 50ft.
long, which lay in a kind of good-
natured stupor alongside the raft
until somebody petulantly drove
a harpoon into it.

After sailing with the greatest
of ease across the ocean the raft
piled up on a coral reef and went
to pieces. It was a pity, but by
that time it did not matter. The
six young adventurers, magnifi-
cently bearded, gave themselves
up to the feasts and dances of
their Polynesian hosts.

It is a glorious book, for it
conveys not simply the bald facts
that make up a fine achievement,
but also the exhilaration, the
dare-devil spirit, the intrepidity,

pulled

the cool curiosity, which chal-
lenges such adventures, and
carries them triumphantly
through.

et



Franciscans of the St.
Cloister at Broumou were ousted
by the simple government expedi-
ent of refusing to extend their
visitors permits.

cently decided to abolish
“harmful character of the Y.M.C.A.
in accordance with the ideology
of the peoples of Poland.” Trusted
government agents took over ad-
ministration of the organisation.

Church was the victim of perhaps
the most dramatic example of
protestant repression of the post-
war era behind the “Iron Curtain”
when the top 15 leaders were put
on trial in Sofia a year ago. The
four top pastors received life im-
prisonment on charges of treason,

espionage, and blackmarketing.
Ten others received stiff lesser
sentences.

widely refused passports in “Iron
Curtain” countries to go to Rome
for the
protestant churchmen in all the
communized
passports to attend World Protes-
tant
late as April, 1949; a group of
Czechoslovakian
attend a Zurich session of The
World Council of Churches) .

Clergy, the ‘Communist govern-
ments have demanded Oaths of
Loyalty from the Protestant

Clergy. Not confronted with the
problem of loyalty to a central
authority such as the Vatican, the
Protestants have complied in most Company.
cases, ,

ADVOCATE

Czechoslovakia, four
Enceslas.

Also in

In Poland the Government re-
the

In Bulgaria, the Protestant

Leaders of the World Council of

Churches which was founded in} native
1948 and embraces 156 protestant "
denominations admit that they are managed the poolroom of the small rural com
afraid to send so much as a post-
card to churchmen in countries
like Romania for fear of jeopardiz-
ing the safety of their associates
there. e

Like Catnolic leaders who were

Holy Year observances,

lands are refused

Conferences (although as

protestants did

As in the case of the Catholic

—(I.N.S.)

THOR HEYERDAHL has since
childhood been interested in nat-
ural sciences. At seven he started
a one-room zoological museum,
when the Nazis invaded Norway
and joined the Free Norwegian
Airforce. After special training’
He interrupted his scientific work
with the British Forces in the U.K.
he served in a Parachute Com-
munication Unit in Arctic Nor-

way.

MAUPASSANT. By Francis Steeg-
muller. Collins, 12s, 6.° 384
pages.

“HE sought only high-class
liaisons and always respected
his mother’s house.” This com-
placent tribute to her son Guy,
by Laure de Maupassant, was on
evidence presented by his indus-
trious but sprightly biographer,

Steegmuller, not justified for
long.
When the’ family fortune

foundered after the war of 18706
Maupassant went to live in Paris
(where he stayed until the build-
ing of the Eiffel Tower drove
him, disgusted, to the Riviera)
in a house where charming
voices invited the visitors in:
“Apart from Maupassant, the
place was inhabited exclusively
by prostitutes.”

In such company Maupassant
caught syphilis (which killed him
at 42) and wrote his famous story
of a fat prostitute, Boule de Suif,

Flaubert, Maupassant’s master
in literature, recognised its merit:
“Your prostitute is charming. If
you could reduce her stomach a
little, you would give me pleas-
ure.”

Maupassant’s excessive love for
his hysterical mother is held by
Steegmuller responsible for his
inability to have any but coarse,
uncomplicated love affairs.

He had three close women
friends in Bohemian soctety:
Blanche Roosevelt, married to an
Italian marquis, who kept on the
far side of the Alps; Hermine
Lecomte de Nouy, whose husband
lived in Rumania, as lover of
the queen; Countess Helene
Potocka, whose husband lived in
Poland.

He loved none of them. His
mother returned his adoration.

When he died, she (a free-
thinker) said in her grief. “If
God exists, I will see him and
we will have it out.”

(World Copyright Reserved. )

—L.E.S.


















ALAA L LD,

MRE As

FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1959
Le



D
aot mt?

V, SCOTT

For Bonus

By Pat O'Shea

DETROIT.

H’S SIXTH-GRADE teacher probably
would not have thought of Dallas B. Winslow
if she had been asked which pupil would be-
come a multi-millionaire.

There is no way of telling for certain but
the record shows this is the grade when
Winslow, son of a poolroom owner, left school

He not only becarne a manufacturer whose
fortune is near two million dollars, but he
gave all of his employees automobiles some
weeks ago as a bonus.

And the cars were just another in the long
line of unusual or spectacular bonuses the
56-year-old tycoon has showered on his work-| |
ers of, as he calls them, his “associates.” ;

‘

Winslow was born in Holly, Michigan, of ||
Michigan people. Although his father

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munity. both parents, their son and daughter ALUMINUM SHEETS

lived on a small farm nearby.
6, 8, 10ft

No Scholar ,
His mother and sister are still alive but the AT ‘

elder Winslow died last year at the age of 86.
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD., Successors to

Winslow can recall few highlights from his .
C. S. PITCHER & CO, LTD. |

pre-working days—before he was 12, that is.
He did not participate in sports, had no hob-
bies, and was not a scholar.

When he discussed his limited schoolbag, he
said with a characteristic half smile and em- ‘PHONES : 4413, 4472, 4687
phatic wave of the hand:

“You can say I definitely wasn’t spectacular
—but I was good at mathematics.”

Possibly his liking for numbers started him
on the excutive career that originated with |
purchase of a gas station at 17 years of age—
two years before his marriage— and resulted
in his present post as head of the Mass Food























HEINZ 57
SAUCE
bot .49

The firm, of Springfield, Ohio, has four sub-
sidiary companies, one in Toronto, Canada, |
with products ranging from mowers to auto-
parts.

Winslow said his real business is buying
companies that show a deficit or whose owners
want to retire. He has owned Mass Food Com-
pany for nearly 20 years and through it pur-
chased a score of other firms

He and his executive staff, whose main
offices are in Detroit near his home, would
put the firms in the black and resell them
when a profitable offer was presented.

Never Jokes

Winslow is a stocky man with a full head
of gray-black hair. He is of less than medium
height and his manner is cordial and relaxed.
He smiles often. but never jokes. Yo

When queried about his benevolent attitude |);
toward his “associates” he rattled change in
his pocket—his one noticeable habit—and let
the conservation take a religious turn. He said:

“I do it because of the Lord and Mrs.
Winslow.”

He explained that his wife agrees with him
that an employer should share profits with his
workers.

His reference to “The Lord” was due to
Christian teachings as he understands them
through the Baptist Chureh — which he
attends regularly — and his sternly religious
. mother.

Winslow has given his employees cash bon-
uses many times. Each business quarter he
gives them either cash or a present. Some-
times—as several months ago—the present is
| a car, or eye glasses or dentures to the work-
ers who need them.

The workers in his subsidiary companies,
which he visits regulary, feel they can come
to him with their personal problems — but
none of them call him by his first name.

He never has had labour-relations problems.
One of his present plants has a union, in
Springfield, Ohio.

Winslow sees the union officials so seldom
he cannot remember which one of them want-
ed to run his picture under the headline: “One
Fair Employer.”

Less Labour Troubles

One of Winslow’s employees, Kenneth
Blakely, a shipping clerk at the Springfield
plant says that “if other employers had
shown the same attitude as Mr. Winslow,
there would be less labour trouble through-
out the country.”

Another, Mrs. Marie Massie, a steno-
grapher at the Springfield plant, says her
employer’s policies, “make us work harder
knowing Mr. Winslow thinks of us and
appreciates our efforts.”

Although workers who have been with
his firms for at least six months get yearly
paid vacations—Winslow said he never has
had a vacation in his life—I N.S.

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. Yesterday the “Advocate” car-
||ijried twenty two of the articles
‘on the “Universal Declaration of
‘Human Rights”. Today it carries
jjthe final eight,
| Articles 23 (1) Everyone has
the t to work, to free choice
of employment, to just and fav-
i ourable conditions of work and to
rf gprotection against unemployment.
Aha (2) Everyone, without any
_ discrimination, has the right to
jequal pay for equal work.









ta
Ss

Ma (3) Everyone who works has
» jthe right to just and favourable
ti ation insuring for himself
‘and his family an existence worthy
‘(cf human dignity, and supple-
; , if necessary, by other
‘ of social protection.

“ty (4) Everyone has the right
ito form and to join trade unions
‘for the protection of his interests

24. Everyone has the right to
rest and leisure, including reason-
able limitation of working hours
and periodic holidays with pay



25. (1) Everyone has the right
‘to a standard of living adequate
ffor the health and well-being of
thimself and of his family, includ
) ling focd, clothing, housing an
medical care and necessary
services, and the right to securit
in the event of unempl ent
sickn« disabilit

Rights

old age or other lack of livelihood
in creumstance beyond his con-
trol.

(2) Motherhood and child-
hood are entitled to special care
and assistance All_ children,
whether born in or out of wed-
lock, shall enjoy the same social
protection.

26. (1) Everyone has the right
to education, Education shall be
free, at least in the elementary and
fundamental stages. Elementary
education shall be compulsory
Technical and professional educa-
tion shall be made generally avail-
able and higher education shall be
equally accessible to all on the
basis of merit.

(2) Education shall be direct-
ed to the full development of the

human personality and to the
strengthening of respect for
human rights and fundamental
freedoms. It shall promote under-
standing, tolerance and friendship
among all nations, racial or reli





gious groups, and shal
of the Ur

the maintenance of peace

activities
for

(3) Parents have : gt
» choose the kind of educati
that hall be giver t
hildren
1) Everyone



tural life of the community, to
the arts and to share in

enjoy 7
scientific advancement and it¢
benefits.

(2) Everyone has the right to
the protection of the moral and
material interests resulting from
any scientific, literary or artistic
production of which he is the
author.

28. Everyone is entitled to a
social and international order in
which the rights and freedoms
set forth in this Declaration can
be fully realised.

29. (1) Everyone has duties to
the community in which alone
the free and full development of
his personality is possible.

_ (2) In the exercise of his
rights and freedoms, everyone
shall be subject only to such limi-
tations as are determined by law
solely for the rights and freedoms
of others and of meeting the just
requirements of morality, public
order and the general welfare in
a democratic society

(3)

These rights and freedoms



may in no case be exercised con-
trary to U purposes and princi-
ples of the United Nations
50. Nothing in this Declaration
y iterpreted as implying for



grout person any

» engage in ity



OUR READERS SAY:

Training Athletes
To the Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—The recent sporis meeting
held at Kensington Oval under
the auspices of the Amateur
Athletic Association of Barbados
has shown that the island is in
dire need of talent as far as
athletics are concerned.

It is good to see that at least
one athlete can set up two new
records in one day. But this
athlete is not a schoolboy. He is
one who as far as I know, never
figured in any events until now,
and what is more he is not a boy.
He is a man. I would like to know
what is wrong with the schoolboys
of this generation. They can run
very well against inferior schools
in the inter-school sports and put
up very good time, but when they
are pitted against some runners
of stamina they are just mediocre
If a rank outsider who has had



very little or no training could
come and set up two records in
one day, a the schoolboys

whom the island must look as the
future athletes cannot put up a
decent showing, then it is time
that we did something along the
lines of athletics for our boys and

girls

is a small bullet. She can carry
off all the prizes in any local meet,
but when she is sent away she
can only come back with second
and third places. I am not detrac-
ting from the lady's prowess as a
runner, but the performance shows
a lack of coaching. Then again,
our football at the schools is not
what it used to be, Why is there
this dearth of sports in the island?
It is because there are not men
and women sufficiently trained
along these lines to impart their
knowledge to those who need it
most. There is, as far as I know,
one gentleman in the island wno
has had any training along these
lines and that is Mr. Bruce St. John
at Combermere School, but ne
cannot be expected to serve the
entire island. We need more of
this type. The same as we need
art in the various schools we need
athletics too, for there is no
better nation-builder than a good
athlete.

Why could we not secure some
more scholarships for physical



accompanied by the customary bona fides, will be ignored.
Many such reach the Editor's desk each week, and readers
are again reminded of the necessity for the writer's name to

be known to the Editor, not for publication, but as an assw -

ance of good faith.

LETTERS which are signed with a nom-—de—plvme, but un-

culture, It would do the island a
lot of good. I think too that it be
worth scouting the idea of Inter-
colonial School Athletics, Inter-
colonial School Football and
Intercolenial School Cricket, the
three being independent of each
other. The masters of the various
schools may then take a keener
interest in athletics other than
just officiating at the school and
local sports meetings.
AN OLD BOY.











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Mix — Orange,
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Flavours

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bs Editor, The Advocate,

: See eee






A table is being laid above,
For a very large party,
By a very careless Waiter.
First, he begins by dropping the
“Saucers,”




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FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1950

eS

Counsels Address
Jury In Murder Case

@ From Page 3 :

pr. Kirton: In my opinion, it
be quite impossipie for a
who had received severe

within half an hour, re-
ied o> mere he was and shout
out for a “nurse”, Another rea-
son is that at that period he woul.
peeh deeply unconscious,
quite a different puise trom
he had, a pulse of cerebral
- that is concussion.
. whyatt: In case of contre-
coup injury, is there not what is
well known medically as a recog-
nised phenomenum, a »lucid
Dr. Kirton: In cases of contre-
coup injury, I have never heard
a lucid interval. A lucid
interval is a most dangerous
i of certain haemorrhage,
parficular] haemorrhages of the
artery; because an_ individual
may think he is alright and might
go home and suddenly collapse.
Mr. Whyatt; A lucid interval as
Dr. Cato and Dr. Leacock also
.is certainly to be found in a
injury.
Oe aictee: That is a profound
difference of opinion,
Mr. hate Before the Police
Magistrate, you had given as your
5 that the man had fallen
off the casualty bed on to the
floor and that such a fall off the
two-foot bed could have produced
a massive haemorrhage. In the
light of all you have heard, do you
still adhere to the opinion you had
expressed in the police courts?

Dr. Kirton: I do. ;

Mr. Whyatt: Are you not in-
clined to modify them somewhat,
after hearing the evidence of Dr.
Cato and Dr. Leacock?

Dr. Kirton: I am not so inclined.

Mfr. Whyatt: If the patient had)
fi off the bed and sustained
eontre-coup injury and thereby

unconscious without a lucid

interval for sometime, would it or

ould it not be possible for him

to be sitting up—sitting on the
‘floor?

Dr. Kirton: I have not thought
of the sitting up on the floor. I
do not know whether he sat up
pn the floor before he fell, or after.
t is all hypothetical.

Estey

a

EB

Mr. Whyatt: I do not understand
that answer. You have given the
vidence that if he fell off the bed
md sustained contre-coup injury,
ind having sustained it, would not
have a lucid interval. I am ask-
you how can you reconcile that
ith the fact that he was sitting
n the floor ?
Dr, Kirton: I cannot reconcile it.
Mr. Whyatt: Would you be pre-
ared to modify your opinion at
?
Dr. Kirton: No.
To Mr. Dear: I still agree with
ie evidence I gave before the
gistrate that a man, who is a
hronic alcoholic, would haemor-
¢ more freely than one who
not, When I examined the man
the afternoon, at the Casualty,
did not see any sign of the haem-
which has been described

in practise since
916.
This brought the evidence to a
WW@lose and Mr, Dear addressed the
He said that for two and a half
» they had listened witn
tience to a cavalcade of witness-
who had come to give them an
tt of what had taken place
the Hospital beach aback of
Street on the afternoon of
vemoer 24 last year.
The aspects which confronted
mm in the case were two. The
feature would be the events
t took place on the Hospital
ich and then the second would
mainly the medical witnésses
hd the members of the Hospital
aif would have told them what
d happened at the Hospital.
was important that they
d get reasonably clear in
minds the distinction that he
d draw or attempt to draw
n what had taken place
h the beach and what had taken
ce at the Hospital.
case was a charge of
. The accused was charged
having struck Anthony
f a severe blow on the head
ith a piece of wood and which
ulted in his death in the Gen-
Hospital about 1 a.m. on
Ovember 25,
Mr. Dear then told them how
Onus rested on the prosecution
Prove their case. e defence
d to prove nothing and if they
a any reasonable doubt in tneir
is as to the truth of the facts
th the prosecution had set out
rove, the aceused must always
the benefit of the doubt. If
y had any’ reasonable doubt
the man. was guilty, then he
$ entitled to be acquitted.
Severe Blow
The evidence was that Holder,
accused, with a few other
Mn, including Anthony George,
deceased, entered the yard
h as Mustor’s yard, and there
T suddenly attacked Anthony
gave him a severe blow
d he died as a result of that.
The Learned Judge, would
them on the law relating
Murder, though in the case of
Submission, he would make
e to certain points of law.
Mr. Dear described murder as
two kinds: one where a man
Fy oerately and with intent to
4, killed another person, and
er where a man with intent
Srevious bodily harm,
52 OF where attempting a
ony, he killed in the execution
that felony.
Said: “If, on the other hand,
Offence which he sets out to
mmit is not a felony, but mere-
& misdemeanour, he will not
Suilty of murder, but of man-
lughter.”’

Be There was

CCO

nee

&@ matter which

ht be relevant to the case, |

d that was that if am

an acting
& provocation

should kill

who did provoke him, then
4 ;
“r those circumstances, the
ge _—— be reduced from
r to manslaughter
In the case, there was no evi-
MmCe to any motive

as to why
have

killed

m §68eused- should

Anthony George. The prosecu-
tion had placed no reliance on
Cobham who was supposed to
give sume possipie reasun as to
how this thihg had taken place,
Other witnesses could give no
reason, though they were all on
the beach within the same vicinity.
!‘hey heard an argument waicn
they did not appear to describe,
and then, out of the blue, tne
accused had struck George with
ine biuageon (lney Nau seen) ou
the head and that after he haa
fallen he had again struck him.

“I am submitting that there is
not the shadow of any inference
that you could draw as to the
motive why Holder should go out
of the way to take up a weapon
with intent to kill the man.”

It was usual and it was only
possible to try to prove intent by
circumstantial evidence — circum-
Stances surrounding the attack.
He was submitting that the case
was sadly deficient of any of these
surrounding circumstances, sadly
deficient of any reason for this
crime. It seemed to him one of
those unfortunate tragedies, which
sometimes occurred, and as a re-
sult of which a man would be
charged with murder.

Bodily Harm

It was probabte the prosecution
might ask them to infer that
because that piece of wood was
used, there was intent to do!
grevious bodily harm.

“IT am submitting that is not
the inference which you can draw.
You cannot draw that inference
unless his actions were such that
no doubt could be left that
grevious bodily harm was what
he intended.”

When Anthony Gearge was sent
jn the Casualty ward, he had!
been sent there by Dr. Kirton and
Nurse Carter. They had had the
benefit of the evidence of Dr.;
Kirton, and. he had said thac
when he saw the man, there had
been no signs of blood on him.

The argument of the evidence
of those witnesses on the beact
was that they had seen this blood
clearly, Were they going to be
asked to infer that the blood had
disappeared between. the time
that he had been left at =
Hospital and the time that Dr
Kirton had seen him? Were they
going to be asked ito infer every-
thing against the prisoner? {t

i

could not be. F

They would remember that
Collymore, the head porter, had
said that he had seen no marks
of blood on the man and no
bruises. Why should he fail .to
see what the other witnesses o1
the beach said they had seen

The evidence before the court
was that from the moment ‘he
entered the court to the moment
of his death, he had no mark
externally either on -his head or
on his body. From that evidence, |
and relying on the evidence of |
Stoute, Maughn and Newton, they,
were being asked to say that the;
man had died as a result of a
severe blow on his head which
had caused him to bleed from his
nose, mouth and ear.

The Court adjourned for lunch.

Material Facts

On resumption Mr. Dear con-
tinued his address to the jury. He
reminded them that when the’
Court had adjourned he had been |
carrying them through the facts
of the case and making his sub-
missions on what he asked them
to regard as the material facts in
the whole case,

He was going to submit what in-
ferences he wanted them to draw
from those facts and then deal
with the opinions expressed by the
medical witnesses linking the
death of Anthony George to what
had been alleged to be the cause
of death.

After referring to that portion
of the Attorney General’s outline
dealing with evidence that the
man had been found sitting on the
floor of the Casualty after he had
been put to bed, Mr. Dear asked
the jury to infer that the man
came to be on the floor, not be-
cause he preferred the flcor to the
bed, but because he had fallen
from out of the bed.

It had been argued that if the
man had fallen from the bed onto
the floor in the inner pavt of the
Casualty, that Nurse Hewstt would
have heard him fall. He was sub-
mitting that her evidence that she
did not hear a fall was negative
evidence. There was a possibil-
ity, that attending to other patients
as she was, she did not hear the
fall in her preoccupation,

Direct Cause

On the other hand, according to
the evidence of Hewitt, Lacey and
Mullins, all three of them had in
their minds the possibility that he
might fall off the bed. ;

Mr. Dear said there were two
inferences that could be drawn.
The first was that the man had
fallen from the bed to the floor;
the second was that he had got
off the bed, stood up and then
fallen. There was no suggestion
that he was sitting on the floor on
that occasion.

“You must remember that the
Prosecution has got to prove that
the direct cause of this man’s
death was the blow that he re-
ceived on the beach.” Mr. Dear
said, as he began to deal with the
medical opinions that had been
expressed during the case. “You

t take the view that if he {rtraightforward
had not got the blow on the beach | had not been upset.

he would not have been in hospi-
tal and could not, therefore, have
fallen off the bed.

“The Prosecution has got to
forge a solid chain linking his
death with what they allege was
the cause of that death, and if in
your opinion that chain has not
been forged beyond reasonable
doubt it is your duty to acquit
him.” :

Dealing first with Dr. Cato’s
evidence, Mr. Dear told the jury
that the fact that Anthony George
had died from cerebral haem-

orrhage was not disputed by the|that the prisoner had not struck

Defence. Two things, however,
were being disputed. The first
was how did he get the cerebral
haemorrhage, and the second was
if the haemorrhage had been ag-
gravated by a subsequent mishap,
buch as falling off the bed, thus
turning what had been hopes of
recovery into a fatal injury

| They should accept the opinion
land evidence of the doctors very
| guardedly, Mr. Dear saix!. Could
|they really swear that when the
man came into the hospital he was





a dying man, and that he had no}

chances of recovering?

“When two men, irrespective of
their qualifications, set themselves
up to say the course that a man’s
life will take, and ask you to con-
vict a man of murder on that

opinion, I am submitting that you |!

should not act upon that opinion
unsupported by something far
more substantial,

“How often have doctors not
given up a man for dead, and
then see him rise as it were from
the grave again? How can they
say dogmatically that the man
was tound to die, espec’ally
when they have admitted that the
falls from the bed—assuming that
he fell as I am asking you to
assume — could have aggravated
his Injuries?”

How could the doctors predict
the course of a man’s life.

The Chief Justice: 1 do not

want to interrupt you, but they |)

are not precicting the course of
a man’s life. They are sa¥ing
that a man may recover from a
contre-coup injury and that a sub-
sequent mishap can aggravate it
But they are also saying that in

this particular case taking into ac- i

count all that they had heard, lead
them to the conclusion that as-

suming he had had such a subse- ||

quent mishap, his chances of life
were gone before he had such a
mishap.

Mr. Leacock’s evidence, said Mr.
Dear, was made up of opinions,
expectations and assumptions. He
qualified Dr. Cato’s opinion on one
point, and said that if George had
fallen onto the floor he could have
struck his head in the spot indi-
cated, but not with much violence.
But would it take much violence
to aggravate the haemorrhage
caused by an original blow?

No Trust

Mr. Leacock had said that he
did not put any trust in the
description of the swelling on the
side of the face, Mr. Dear said.
The only one who found a sweill-
ing was Dr. Cato. Mr. Leacock
said that the bleeding may have
stopped by the time that George
reached the hospital, but he did
not give any explanation of how
the blood that was supposed to be
trickling out of the ear had dis-
appeared. 7”

They would remember too, that
Dr. Cato and Dr. Leacock had
said that a post mortem examina-
tion would not reveal injuries that
had occurred subsequent to the
original head injury.

Dr. Kirton on the other hand
had expressed the opinion that he
did not think it impossible that
the man could have received the
injury that he had received, by
falling off the bed, onto the con-
crete floor.

In the face of conflicting medical
opinions they were being asked
to say that the chain linking his
death with the blow he received
on the beach had been satisfac-
torily forged.

Dr. Kirton had had a long
experience, having qualified in
1915. Mr. Leacock had an array of
qualifications, That those qualifi-
cations had been obtained in nine
years spoke highly of his bril-
liance. But in weighting the
scales between brilliance and
experience, on which side would
they go down?

“Or if you are incapable of
coming down on either side,” Mr.
Dear asked, “can you pass judg-
ment on two doctors, one un-
doubtedly brilliant and the other
a man with 34 years’ experience as;
a general practitioner and more!

particularly as diagnosing the
many ailments that come before
him?

Brilliant

; “Mr, Leacock may be brilliant
in surgery. But will you without
hesitation accept his opinion on a
matter of diagnosis that when
Anthony George entered the
hospital he was as good as dead?

“Dr. Cato is also a surgeon. Will
you accept his opinion that the
only cause of this man’s death
was the blow, assuming that you
accept the inference of the fall
or falls?

Mr. Dear then cited Wills on
Circumstantial Evidence, pages
321 and 322, and on the strength
of the citation submitted to the
jury that if there were reasonable
explanations as to how Anthony
George could have met his death
other than the fact that the blow
alone caused it, they should ex-
amine those possibilities rigorous-
ly, and only if they were con-
vinced with moral certainty that
it was the blow which had directly
caused it, could they convict him.

He submitted finally that the
prisoner should be acquitted,
since the evidence left them sus-
pended between the conflicting
opinions of doctors.

Mr. Whyatt in his address said
that he would underline the sali-
ent points se that they would pro-
vide the jury with sign posts to
indicate where the truth lay. He
said that throughout the cross ex-
amination of the medical wit-
nesses there had been the danger
that questions and answers on
hypothetical circumstances led to
the error that it might be forgot-
ten that they were only dealing
with suppositions.

He would get away from those
hypotheses and suppositions and
deal with the evidence of the
three eyewitnesses, and take into
account the weapon that had been
used, He was submitting that the
three eye witnesses, Stoute,
Maughn and Newton had given
evidence that

His learned friend had argued
that the Prosecution had not
proved motive. He would reply
first by saying that it was not es-
sential to prove motive, and that
even if it were essential, there
had been evidence of the argu-
ment or quarrel between the pris-
oner and Anthony George before
the incident had occurred.

Savagery

If they wanted evidence of the
savagery of the attack, Mr. Whyatt
said, they had only to remember



one blow, but that he had had to
be restrained by bystanders from
striking what would have been a
fourth blow, and that, after An-

thony George had fallen to the}
ground

The only possible criticism}
| that could be made of the evi-|

dence of the eye witnesses was that
they said something in the Court
below about what the police said|
when they came on the scene

oo had given that evidence

@ On Page 7

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

|

|

th
if

SS

%

EelIn A
Beer Bottle

The common freshwater eel is
usually found in rivers, streams,
lakes and other inland bodies of
freshwater but yesterday the “Ad-
vocate” found one comfortably re-

laxing in a beer bottle filled wiih !

fresh water.

Rhoda Callender, a labourer
employed by the Sanitation De-
partment was cleaning the drain
that passes through the Consti-
tution Swamp area and scooped
out a ten inch eel which she had
placed in a beer bottle filled with
peter When the “Advocate” heard
ems |.

The freshwater eel belongs to
a group of soft-rayed fishes dis-
tinguished by the presence of an
opening to the air bladder and
the absence of the pelvic fins.

The pecularities of the eel are
the rudimentary scales buried in
the skin, the well developed pev
toral fins and the rounded tail
fin continuous with the dorsal
and ventral fins.

90 Year Building

Goes

On Lower Broad Street at the
corner of Cowell Street and op-
posite the new Plantations Ltd.
building is a stone one storey
structure covered with shingle and
galvanized roofing,

This building is part of the
block bought by Messrs Gardiner
Austin and Co., Ltd. from Messrs
Jones and Swan in 1942. It is
now being demolished and a new
‘two storeyed building will be
erected with allowances made for
future extention of two additional
floors.

Operations for the new building
are likely to start in about eight
weeks’ time and when completed.
it will house the traffic depart.
met of T.C.A. and Canadian
National Steamships on the ground
floor, while on the second fidor
will be the offices of Messrs
Gardiner Austin and Co., Ltd.

Built some 80 to 90 years ago,
the block comprising of a two
Storeyed as well as a one storey
building, was formerly occupied
by Messrs W. P. Leacock and Co,
Ltd., one of the principal sugar
exporters and estate agents in
the colony at that time.

The two storeyed section of
the building embraced the offices
of this firm and the lower ad-
joining building was utilized for
the stabling of imported animais,

ut towards the close of the

nineteenth century, was convert-
ed into ~ moiasses stanchion under
the direction of Mr, Nat Green,
wellknown contractor of those
days.
_ This entire structure passed
into the possession of Messrs
Jones and Swan some 40 years
go, and was used for the storage
of molasses and sugar. During
the entire period, it was in the
possession up # the time when
it was sold to Messrs Gardiner
Austin and Co., Ltd. and in fact,
has been utilised by this firm
for a similar purpose up to its
present demolition,

Mr. Anthony Lewis, A.R.LB.A.
has been entrusted with the plans
for the new building, i





Vestry Discuss
Improving
Ch. Ch. Cemetery

_The Christ Church Vestry de-
cided yesterday to consider sug-
gestions of Rev. W. E, Dash, Chap-
lain of the Christ Church Ceme-
tery, which aim at better regula-
tions for the working of the ceme-
tery.

Rev. Dash pointed out to the
Vestry ways how the cemetery
could be modernised. He spoke of
the laying out’of paths and pre-
paring means whereby the. graves
could be charted. He said that as
things were, there was little
method in arrangements for
graves which were sold and free
graves. He made the suggestion
that there should be two definite
sections.

Mr. S. A. McKenzie moved a
vote of thanks to Rev. Dash. He
said that they appreciated the
Suggestions made and said that the
matter would be gone into care-
fully and to the satisfaction not
only of Mr. Dash, but the taxpay-
ers,

The Vestry then considered the
Trade Returns for 1950—51 and
revised the trade lists,

Sugar For London

STEAMSHIP “Indore,” 4,177
tons net, called here yesterday en
route to U.K., to take a cargo of
4,200 tons of sugar for London.



This makes the third sugar ship
to call here for the week and a
\total of about 9,200 tons of sugar
loaded here for U.K., over the same
period.

Next port of call for the

complete loading. The vessel will
leave eithpr on Monday or
Tuesday. It is consigned to Messrs

Da Costa Ltd

& 4









Indore”
lis Antigua where it is expected ‘+o

Fish!
Fish!

HE LARGEST amount of fish
to be recorded at the Public

| Market since the fishing season

began was between April 1 and
April 12.

On Wednesday alone, 7,825 Ibs.
of flying fish, the best catch of the
year, were brought in.

For the last 12 days a total o:

» 45,147 lbs. of fish passed through

the Market and much more was
sole outside in the couniry ais-
tricts. Of this amount 28,954 lbs
were flying fish and 6,226 lbs. ot
of shark. The best catch of shark

- was on April 1 when 2.251 Ibs.

were recorded.
; Other catches consisted of 8,083
Ibs. of dolphin, 324 Ibs. of king

}| fish, 664 lbs. of bill fish, 280; Ibs.

of albacore, 568 Ibs. of cavallies,
and 48 Ibs. of bonita.
Owing to the surplus amount of

S flying fish, hawkers has been re-
_| leasing them in some instances at

three and four cents each, but

-\;this generally happens after 6

o’clock in the evening. Many of
the fish are placed on ice until
the following day and in the early
morning hawkers are shouting
“Fish! Fish!”

The other people who benefit
from the large catches of fish are
those with one-door shops who
buy them and sell them fried.
; These vendors buy the fish at four
jeents each (wholeshle) and



:* cents, more than 50% profit.

During tne shortage of flying
fish these vendors even do a better
trade. Most of the fishermen re-
/serve their catches for them While
housewives just have to standby
and grudgingly watch them take
away a basket or two filled with
fish. In case of a shortage the
price of a fried flying fish goes up
by one penny. These vendors do
a good trade at night.

The Government Experimental
boat “Investigator” played its part
in bringing some of the fish to the
Market.

Mr. D. W. .Wiles, Fisheries
Officer, told the Advocate yester-
day that research work is. still
continuing especially with regards
to plankten indication as to where
| flying fish are likely to be found.

He said that some definite an-
nouncement will be made in the
|near future about the scheme.
The ring net, specially imported
{to catch bonita, has arrived in the
island and this net has been
geared recently. Other arrange-
ments are going ahead for prepar-
ing the Investigator as soon
bonita are seen.



as

HE EXECUTIVE Commitiee of

the League of Empire, under
the Presidency of Sir Allan Colly-
more, Kt. held their Annual
Meeting at Combermere School on
Saturday last.

Their Second Annual Exhibi-
tion of work produced by. the
Elementary and Secondary Schools
of Barbados is to be held during
Empire Week, May 24 and Satur-
day 27, inclusive, at Combermere
School Hall.

It is understood that competing
Schools have been working at
their Posters and Projects since
July 1949. The Managing Com-
mittee had felt so encouraged by
the response of the public and
schools to the Exhibition of 1949
that they had authorised the cir-
cularisation of details for the 1950
Competition in July last year.
This would afford all Headmasters,
who wished to compete, to make
full and ample arrangements for
the best possible effort to be pro-
duced by their schools for 1950.

The opening Ceremony will take
place on Wednesday, May 24, at
10.00 are

ISHERMEN of the fishing boat
“Sydney” landed six sharks,
each of about five feet long on|
Oistin’s beach yesterday. The
boat had been out all Wednesday
night and came in with their
catch yesterday evening. Many
flying fish were included in the
catch,

E REGULAR broadcast

feature of the British Council
ver the local service tonight be-
ginning at 9.15 o’clock is devoted
to the verse of Hugh Popham. The
poems to be read are taken from
“Against the Lightning” and “The
Journey and the Dream’ two
volumes of verse published in
England at the end of the war.

Other poems are taken from
“To the Unborn” a collection of
poems in manuscript.

Those taking part in the pro-
gramme are Jean Lawson—who
will play two musical interludes:
Christine Gracie, Hugh Popham
and Carl Dons who will read the
poems,

ANY SCHOOLBOYS spent

their recreational period at
the Reef grounds yesterdd@y play-
ing games which included foot-
ball and cricket.

Although the cricket pitch was
not prepared for the game the boys
still enjoyed themselves.

Meanwhile the tennis lawn is
being constantly watered to en-
courage the growth of grass. Only
a few sheep were seen quietly
grazing. rm

What’« On Today

Court of Grand Sessions at
10.00 a.m.

Meeting, Bosrd of Manage
ment, B.C.A. at Kensing-
ton at 4.15 p.m.

Football, Queen’s Park at

5 00 p.m.
Basket Ball, Y.MLC.A. at
7. 30 p.m.

| Mobile Cinema, Friendship
| Plantation Yard, St. Mich-
|



ael at 7.30 p.m.

Certificates will be pre-
sented to the nurses of
the Children’s Goodwill

League, Constitution, at
7.30 tonight. After the
presentation a movie will
be shown and the St,

Paul’s Choir will sing.

|
THE SUN

= of bidding without know-

ee of taking the boat over from

in
| turn sell one fried fish for 12

**Potick’’
Fetches $550



EN French “Yaw
Potick,” a vessel which wher
made new could have brougni

between $25,000 and $30,000, was
sold at:quction yesterday to the
highest bidder for $550.

Now owner is Mr. James Murray
of Halls, St. Michael who alon;
with the other bidders, took the

ing the condition of
merged ship.

All tp be seen of the ‘Potick’ fo
the past three to four months werc
its own masts, which were pro-
truding above water in the inner
basin of the Careenage, and a life
boat which was afloat in the area.

The hull and masts along with
three deck houses, a water tank,
a life boat, two water barrel stands
a table and three sections of hatch
covers were covered by the $500.

The first bid was $100 and after
some delay and prompting by the
Government auctioneer Mr. Darcy
Scott,
climax.

Mr. Murray, in signing the con-

the sub-

the figure reached the

Government for the sum men-
tioned, was also made to agree
that he would have the ship re-

| Basin from the bed of the inner

basin of the Careenage before the
end of May this year. In any
case, the responsibility of remov-
ing the vessel is all his.

This, however, did not seem to
worry him as he was not hesitant
in signing.

Quite a few of the bidders
seemed worried over the condi-
tion of the auxiliary engine. some
thought that the water would
have no effect.

Canary
Is Clean

THE large heap of stones and
cement squares, which _ partly
block the entrance to Whites Alley
from Swan Street, is still there aad
causing annoyance to cyclists and



pedestrians who go in and out ot
the alley.

Apart from this the alley is very
clean and appears to have had
recent attention.

Synagogue Lane situated
between Messrs. Ince & Co's
Bakery and the Barbados Turt
Club, is badly in need of a wash-
ing. Between 10 and 11.00 am.,
yesterday bits of paper could be
seen blowing around the alley. It
also has a strong smell of urine. |
A few coconut shells were also |
seen at the entrance from James
Street.

Da Costa’s Alley, situated neai
the Wharf, is also badly in need ot



a washing. The entrance from the
Wharf is in need of repairs.
Canary Street, although situated
in the vicinity of the Wharf, is one
of the cleanest alleys in the City
Only the gutters are in need of a

tity of moss can be seen,

Along Milk Market, opposi‘e
the Plantations Ltd., new building.
there is a cover to a manhole
which is practically falling in
Should a pedestrian step on this
cover he would be asking for a |
broken foot or fractured spine

_—_—_——_——.



Hams Arrive |

Some 618 cases of Swift hams|
were discharged here yesterday |

by the s,s. P. & T. Pathfincer|
which arrived during the morning |
with cargo from Buenos Aires, |

Vienna sausages, pigsnouts, |

heads and skins, veal loaf, pickled |
pork and leather comprised the
other cargo brought for Barbados
by the Pathfinder

The cargo was quickly dis-
charged and the vessel sailed!
during the evening for San Fran-
cisco. Messrs DaCosta & Co.,
Ltd. are the local agents.

More Rice

The third shipment within the |
past seven days of 1,500 bags of
rice arrived from British



|
Guiana
on Wednesday evening by the 74
ton schooner Mary M. Lewis.

Schooners Marion Belle Wolfe
and Philip H. Davidson, the two
other arrivals with rice during
this period, have already begun to
discharge their supplies.

The Mary M. Lewis was yester-
day in the Carecenage awaiting
its chance to get a berth in either
of the congested outer and inner
basins,

This schooner has also brought
to the island 600 bags of charcoal
and 30 tons of firewood. The
Schooner Owners’ Association are
agents.

25 YEARS AGO
Barbados Advocate, April 14, 1925

Mystery, gripping, enthralling
mystery, is the underlying feature
of “The Acquittal”, the remark-
able piturization of Rita Weiman’s
stage play opened at the Empire
Theatre last night. Through the
sensational episodes that followed
exch other, one is kept wondering
Who's Guilty? The sinister finger
of suspicion points first at one
character, then another.

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PAGE FIVE



4 fy Ah ff WV if, My,



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—

ee



GE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE
PAGE S



—

HENRY



ON



/
S WHAT IF MAMA 1
( AND PAPA WOULD )
LIE AROUND THE <
a7 HOUSE LIKE THIS
1SS.'45 TO BO OuR

1 READING ?





Ow HY CAN'T YOu
KIE. YOU'LL & Sm SIT IN A CHAIR ”
OUR | sa 7) AND BE COMFORTABLE
F | ;
_A Pak

at



ALL
% WHEN YOU READ

Pel nN frm




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Ss
COMFORTABLE,
ISN'T IT?

T READING | |.J



4 re is



ow
>
Lt
4
om
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>)

‘Mou, Weight and Haight
peru Children

——
LISTEN, WHISPER
| KNOW YOUR
& FATHER IS AT |

LET ME GO
f THERE.
r ———

FORGET THE WRETCHED
MONEY! YOUZE ONLY
A &/O! YOU NEEO
\. LOOKING AFTER,



iF 1 DION'T WINCE AT MYSELF
EVERY TIME | SHAVE-—I'D Say





Y NO MORE THAN
A FPATHERLY

FEELING, EH?

.
Ny





)




















“
t
‘|
a? iP.
| Y; me fire oY
f av oa
: oa | ly: rie PROFILE *
ee er rrr
ca THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER
BLO wus us bo} |r wa EAL RST I THOUGHT HE WAS ANY(
ear ae | DAD, ' | OUTLAW, BUT I WAS WRONG. ¢
| N’GET IT Z } | HE OFFERED ME A CHANCE I,
AN oe (O GET YOU, RHINO p—AI Gc
| W | Se tN
|
|
\! |
t
Children grow husky
a
Sais and tall : : ; bigger
BY GEORGE MC.MANUS SBSt,
ls stronger—better
f Ce ae | ? equipped for school
‘ Lsavilesyauierd Gnuee (1 worse VC pyiwqes and play, and for the
; ) ||| RAY ViuMAb CALLS || TS WORRY ABOUT [/2> Td :
AS “up | 4 future, with a hearty
\ UPN J ON | “Your ofmice™ || Taunus Quaker Oats breakfast
i i EVERY MORNING!
i \ No other whole grain
‘ tee: cereal is more delicious
i = 2 and satisfying, no other
| — gives greater nourish:
uaker Oats Ome”?
) Tequaer oo ment at less cost.
de! ae GREAT HEALTH FOOD. e » Quaker Oats is rich in the
he i A elements needed by everyone for quick energy, strength and health;

It supplies essential minerals, proteins; carbohydrates, and essen-
tial Vitamin B1 that serns food into energy. Quaker Oats is a health.
ful, delicious BREAKFAST FOOD for everybody.

Ask for Quaker Oats today at your favorite store . .
Oats “Health Breakfasts” every day!

RIP KIRBY



- Serve Quaker







K! QUAKER OATS GIVES YOU...
MORE ENERGY it's rich in carbohydrates

MORE STRENGTH plenty of proteins
MORE STAMINA . . . thanks to generous Thiamin (Vitamin B,)
MORE ENJOYMENT delicious flavor everybody likes




CRP eowreremececece














LEE

P. | How To Prepare a Delicious — —
Boil 2 cups of water. Add salt. 0
boiling; add 1 cup of — —
Cook it, stirring; for 2

That's all.



BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

ISENDA MESSAGE ToTHE Y IT cHaL! | 4cONG0, wave HORSE READY Foe «
jLLONGO TO HAVE A HORSE / BE DONE, | | PHAWTong On OLD TRAIL.
READY ON THE OLD TRAIL. | GREAT < Ost} | SSC ana,

CON MY WAY

‘

GREETINGS O GHOST
) | WHO WALWS! OUR HUMBLE




ra |
~~





LLAGT 1S HOMDOES
AAT IS YOUR DESIRE?
—s










LINGLEUM
Sizes: 9 ft. by 744 ft,



TARPETS
and 104% ft. by 9 ft.

Also

. LINGLEUM IN ROLLS éft

All very reasonable

wide



\ in Price.
5
s ' )
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1] 3 186 1926
j ? 10 & 11 Roebuck Street
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ASK FOR THE BEST

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tender skin healthy and (5 a

free from blemishes, ex- \
| quisitely softand velvery,

| delightful





7 2 4 >

>

a
Lika

& £°3 Fe

t May mean kidney troubly

A function of the kidneys is ty
eliminate harmful impurities frog
stem. If the kidneys

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ulate and settle and often become
1 cause of pain in joints ang
muscles. The way to tackle the
trouble is to help the Ij
“1 They should be toned up
De Witt’s Pills—the meg
























made specially for this
De Witt’s Pills have a ing
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the kidueys that brings them |
to perform their
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tried medicine is sold all over
the world and we have
letters from sufferers ¢,
of relici gained, after
of suffering, b i
Witt’s Pilis Try De
for your trouble, Goty
your chemist

back






OUR
GUARANTEE
| De Witt’s Pills «
| manufactured under strictly hy gis
} conditions and the ingredients
‘form to rigid standards of ppp

| OST

for Peart UT ETT. Can

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gem as ltl On

a

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about Locking prtter!

FIND OUT THE SECRETS FROM >=

gH A yy ggg gsr



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i

MISS BERTHA LAMAS



| NEW YORK SALON

NEXT WEEK

AT
COLLINS LTD.
BROAD STREET.

WILLIAM FOGARTY LOD,
Inc. B. G.

)





v

ty



IN OUR ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT

We can quote you





on
H A.C, MOTORS (Hoover) ;
1/6, 2, %4, 1/3 HLP. 50 Cycle 110 Volts i
Nr aaa es
=m



| Values & Qualities at the
BROADWAY



PLAST s lk ‘ » & $4.03 (2 varee® if
ie
euiee : from $3.96 to #9 1a
ik

PLASTIC CHILDREN’S BA White, Black and Red 2 |
HILDRI ARE HOF Ww I n to 7% ie
1 Gon
CHILDRED KLI S S60, 4% i

URGADWAY DRESS SHOP.





FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1950







CLASSIFIED ADS.

















P —_———— ee ee
gaTES FOR RENT
————————
aD a
Week Sun HOUSES
$1.00 1 20| aes
OUNCEMENTS ‘ ; TO SUBLET
ae per word on teens th ees Jawrence Gap
) yoR SALE articetenonth of May only, For further
a os | r tcutars apply to EB. C. Boyce Dun-
FOR RENT » 02 3 soos St. Lawrence Gay. | Phone 8240.
a -4.50—t.f.n.
WANTED # eT
LAT--At B
word a@y Mansion, fully fur-
ost. me De ta 48 6 | nished all modern conveniences” tons
e Ist May. Dial 4103. 12.4.50—3n
Minimum } i
PUBLIC SALES ‘alin HOUSE TO LET—From 15th May to
L 08 : os 30th. Large fully furnished house
4 ND REA - ames coast, cool position, Excellent
UCTION . bathing. $75 monthly. Ring Dons 3249.
per agate 13.4,.50—Tn.
” ctierze 1.20 br OFFICE—One Office over Sanitary
Minimum 4 . Laundry Depot., Marhitl Street. Apply
Fersonal Sanitary Laundry Co. Tel 3592
rics 08 10 31.3.50—t f.n
PUBLIC ores
: Per agate 1.20 1,50 BUNGALOW, also Plat, focing sea mai
Minimum harge road. Hastings, furnished from May 1st
ENING ADVOCATE (Monéay) All comforts, English baths with heate;
per inch ...-+rserereeeerseees see showers, telephones, verandahs. Tele ;}
phone 9 31.3.50—t.¢
FOR RENT. F we
MPs rom Ist April Upstairs
BIRTH ae No a Street. Suitable
fency or si r type of business
to Frank and Margaret in oad Contact immediately on’ Premises No 6
_ i child: a boy; Gran«iso! | Street. 31.3.50—t.f.n
John and Lady Sainte in. ‘

.
FOR SALE





OMOTIVE
'
14/6 SALOON — 1947!
MH 00 — Courtesy Garage.
) yada 14.4. 50—3n. |
Dial 4616. |
LIA — In Al condition. |
FORD ANG! Courtesy Garage. |
* _— opeemtenmei fy x

ne Morris 8 H.P. Sedan in Al,

nical condition. L. Ae “et

al Garage Ltd. .4.50.—7n.
wt.

VAN—1948 (June) Fordson os Ri

i fe under 9,000,

“eA sama. condition for viewing

a : Ralph A Beard’s Auction rooms,

iwood Alley, 8 a.m, to 12 noon daily,

_ 12,4.50—3n. |

Ford V-8. 1939 model. Just}

overhauled ane De eae
arage,

a 12.4.50—6n.

|

‘CAR ler Car 1940 Sedan. Per-

aiden. Dial 3915. Cosmopolitan

rage, Magazine Lane. 12.4.50—3n.

AR—(1) Prefect Ford Car 1948 Model
Se citent condition. Apply United
or Company. 85 Roebuck Street,
2741. 13.4.50—4n.

AND CHARGER & BATTERIES —32
y Wind charger & ae we
ic h lantation, St.

. Apply Bushy Par’ ane.

R AMME—With Garrard Auto-
iP coeres. In_ perfect workiny |
der. E. G. Gibbs, ‘‘Clairemonte’’,

orthing, Ch. Ch
Fee SOP) WORT oo s0~an

SCELLANEOUS

. V STOVE PARTS — Flame
oem Wick, Wick-Carriers, Flam
Galleries, Seteralere e oan
Auto Tyre Co., Trafalga
2806. 5.4.50—t.f.n. |

ngs
y
s,

Dial 2696.

. ALVANISE SHEETS
Bice Git, sft sins Bf
} p mild ste2) plates !/! 8

f and 3/8 in various sixes Beauire
i falgar Stree
te Tyre Company, Tra lea ees

'n

and 9ft lengths



ALVANISED PIPF. ae 1
o-inch galvanised pipe. 26c $

. BARNES & CO.. LTD
ss” 25.3.50—t f




to

MASKS — Rubber diving
; easier the sea bed for rare
lis, Coral, etc. $2.40, Cave Shepherr

Beach Club.
Bs ome aoe Bone 13.4. 50—2n

IALOUSIE FLAPS, — Jealousie W.in-
s and Doors. To be seen at ‘‘Ken-

? lyde
Strathely 14.4, 50-—2n

EMS—‘First & Last” by Hunter J

mesis. $1.50 and $1.00. Advocate
ionery Store. pes
ONN YEAST—Riich concentrated vite.
ee ee
res. 14.4. 50—-2n

s DIES BROWN TWEED SUIT -
Bitium size, also one travelling Ruc

12.4.50—2r

HIRCHILL, — Maxwell Corat.

s, fully furnished, Avnilable fo
iate possession. Applhy Raleh A
d, Hardwood Alley. Phone 4482 ©
12,4, 50—2n

jroo

TRIG NoTIC#S



25 easily earned by obtaining order’
for private Christmas Cards from

r friends. No previous experienc:
, Write today for beautiful free
Book to Britain’s largest ano
Publishers; highest commission

ous money making opportunity

; Williams & Co., Dept. 10 Victori*

THE BARBADOS

vil Service Association

be holding a Hance at the Com-
m School Hall on Saturda#y, 22nd
1950, in honour of the visiting
lates of the Federation of Givil Ser-
jations. Music will be supplied
. Arnold Meanwell's Orchestra.
ing 9 p.m. Dress Formal.
ission $1.00.

NOTICE

PARISH OF ST, PEXER
anted by the Poor Law Guardians
ithe Almshouse a fully qualified Nurse
mle of taking charge of Midwifery

ry $55.00 per montn,
Ppicants must present themselves
Certificate and credentials to
|P.M.O. at his residence “Roseville,”
er on or before April 17th up to

Signed,
G. 8, CORBIN,
Clerk, Poor Law Guardians,
St. Peter.
12.4.50—4n,

NOTICE

WNDERS for removing and replacing
of St. Philip's Parish Church,
be received by me up to 30th April,

W. U. GOODING,

Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip's
7.4,50.—6n.

NOTICE

B.A SPEARWATER Master of the
Have beg to notify that no

be given to any membe

crew of the said M/V La Have

by my written permission during
at the Port of Bridgetown,
“os. Dated this 11th day of April

E. A. SPEARWATER
Master.
12.4.50—3n





ADVERTISE

| in the

ie





KEW GENU

sane inttiacr pniniemrininsianes



ADVOCATE Tee



“SEA QUEEN"—Hastings. F=-m Ist.

May. Apply Mrs. Marion G'l>s. Dial
4568. 14.4.50—4n .



WANTED TO RENT

HEATHFIELD—On the Crane Ccnst
for the months of Mav, June, & July





Apply Mrs. A, * t, Cordoba,
Christ Church. Phone 8385.

14.4. 50—3n .

BUNGALOW—Maxwell’s Coast, con-

taining 4 bedrooms, fully furnished, For
the months of May, October and Novem-
ber. Apply J. H. Wilkinson. Phone 2404.

14.4.50—3n.
—_.

Tact rar~wn
——__—_—~<_[=[====[[=**_*""""_"___=]_:-----.

LOST

KEYS—Bunch of Keys. Post Office
‘ GLU. vicinity. Please return to:—
Post Office or/Tel: 3961.







SS eeSotSe



14.4.50—2n

LOST — A beautiful girl's life. I'm
going to find out how and whg". Alan
'ADD “CHICAGO DEADLINE” PT AZA













Theatre. 14.4.50—3n.
PUBLIC SALES
AUCTION

BY instructions of the Insurance Com-
pany, I will sell on FRIDAY lth at 2

D.m. at Me Enearney’s Garege, 1 Ford
Platform Lo DAMAGED. Terms
Cash. R. HER Mc KENZIE.

12.4.50—3n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON 18th by order of Mrs. GEORGE
CHASE we will sell her Furniture at
o " Navy Gardens.

which includes

Morris Suite, Settee & 2 Arm Chairs
with Cushions, Upright Chairs, Nice
Sideboard, Large Fook shelf, ornament
Tables, Curved Pedestal all in Mahog-
any, Oak Extension Dining Table &
Tea Trolley, Inlaid Mird. Cabinet, Fold-
ing Card Table, Cordea Arm Chairs,
Congoleum, Glass Ware, Service,
White Dinner Set, Invelid Chairs, Elec-
tric Hot Plate & Iron, Blue Bedroom
Suite, Iron Bedstead, Press, &c. Mahog
Dressing Tables, Writing ‘& Bed side
Tables, MT Washstand, Low Divan,
Peds, Kitchen Cabinet, Larder and other
items.

Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms Cash.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO..

Auctioneer.
14.4.50—2n

entrees}
REAL ESTATE

“SUNSET VIEW’—Rockley. (Adijoin
ing BLUE WATERS), on the land sid
‘ the road facing the Bay with 13,49
square feet of land including the ‘an
‘cross the road running to the water’
dge. The house contains verandah
‘rawing and dining rooms, three bed
coms with running water, and a!! ott
fices including kitehen with cupboard:
Water, Electricity, Gas and Rad
installed. Garage and Servants rooms
in yard

Inspection any day—Phone 8365. Mr.
Bellamy,

The above will be set up to public
competition at the office of the under
signed on Friday, the 2Ist of April, 1950.
at 2 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY,

Lucas Street
31.3,.50—13n.

“STAUNTON”: and land thereto con-
taining approximately 15,678 square feet,
6th Avenue, Belleville.

The dwelling house which is a sub-
stantially erected stonewall building in
perfect condition comprises:—

DOWNSTAIRS. Spacious cool veran-
dahs on two sides, large drawing and
dining rooms, Buttery, larder room,
pantry, kitchen and servants’ room.

UPSTAIRS, 5 bedrooms, toilet
bath room.

There is a small lawn to the east of
the house, as well as spacious back yard
with lime and fruit trees planted.

YARD. Large garage and washroom.

Electric light, water and gas are in-
stalled thnoughout. Inspection by ap-
pointment with Mrs. Waite, thg owner.
Telephone 2553. é

By public auction on Friday the %Jst
April 1950 at 2 p.m. at the office of the
undersigned from whom further parti-
culars and conditions of sale may be ob-

tained.
R. S. NICHOLLS S ei
152 Roebuc eet.
mre Phone 3925,
13.4,50—8n-e.d



and



Dr Emtage having decided to leave
Melbourne House, Belmont Road, at the
20th April, the property, which stands on
2% acres land and is in excellent condi-
tion, is offered for sale.

Interested parties please diai 2489—
Brittons Nursing Home, 9.4.50—6n.



The undersigned will offer for sale by
public competition at their office, James
Street, Seer, B Friday the ldth
day of April, , p.m.
my The dwellinghouse called “RAD-
COURT” standing on 8,436 square feet
of land at Navy Gardens, Christ Church.
Inspection on application to the under-

a Tine Gwallinetho use, eee ee.
DOWN” on

of land at Fontabelle, St. Michael, In-
spection on application to the tenant
between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

For further particulars, apply to :—
7 HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD,



Solicitors.
7.4,50.—5n.
AT the office of the undersigned on
Friday the 2ist instant at 2 p.m, at

Public competition:—
61 shares in the WEST INDIA BISCUIT
LIMITED



Stop Pyorrhiea
in 24 Hours

Bleeding Gums, Loose Teeth and Sore
Mouth mean that you have rere eee
Trench Mouth or a bad disease wee
sooner or later will make your teeth fa!
out and may cause Rheumatism and Heart

. Stop this Aiserzse now with the
new discovery Amosan. Stops pisodiag
gums in 24 ends sore mouth an
tightens teeth. [ron clad gonsestes
Amosan must make your mouth well an
save your teeth or money back on ee
of empty rackage. Get Amosan from you!

‘ - chemist today.

The guarantee
Pyerrhea—Treach Mouth

protects you.

INE DRY



; Apply in first instance by letter to:E.F.W.

Vacancy For Examination Secretary,

CROWN





Britain Must Let
Us Live

@ From Page 1

colonies must definitely make a
stand.

If the British want our loyalty |
they must make it possible for
us to live and not that they live
at our expense.

@ From Page 5.

sometime after the occurrence.
After the actual attack had been
;made and Anthony George had
been knocked down, there had
been confusion on the beach, and
it was not surprising to find some
people givmg different evidence
as to what they heard.

The material part of their evi-
dence was what they told of the
actual occurrence before the
confusion arose.

The second criticism of their
evidence was that they had de-
posed to the prisoner having

If they persist in the present
attitude on the Sugar question
they will become the chief insti-
gators of political unrest in the
West Indies and will destroy for-
ever all prospects of stable politi-
cal progress in these territories
which can only be made possible
by co-operation between the Brit-
ish Government and ourselves,




































eh struck three blows, while there
= BY Cable) was no evidence of bruises in the
: side or on the feet.
Wriavrep

—— ————, First Blow
HELP It would be remembered, Mr.
SERVANTS — Immediately an ex-| Whyatt told the jury that the
t ith rederenees nd general maid. Apply | first blow had made the man
St Micha Fare, ere tul| stagger and totter, and that al-

though the second blow might
have been aimed with force, the
deceased might not have got the
full force of it. They would re-
member too that those two last
blows had not fallen on the bare
skin of the deceased, but his clothes
had interposed.

The criticisms that had been
made did not entitle them to say
that those witnesses were un-
reliable.

Those three eye witnesses had
spoken about bleeding, and in that
part of their story they had been
corroborated by three other in-
dependent witnesses.

As far as Cobham was con-
cerned, he thought it would be

y
BUTLER—For small Hotel. Experienced
—quick—capable head butler. Must be
Pleasantly spoken, willing, and capable
of supervising work of under butlers

c/o The Advocate. 12.4.50—6n,



ieee hit etianpeeapeiemciens

TAILORS—Journeyman Tailors, apply
to J. W. Hewitt Tailaring Emporium.
Coleridge St. opposite Fire Brigade
Station. 13.4.50—4n.

An Assistant Master for the Christ
Church Boys’ Foundation School, trom
the Ist May 1950, to teach Spanish and
General Form Subjects,

Salary on approved Seale according to
qualification and experience.

Applications should be sent with ful)
details of qualification and experience,
to the Headmaster not later than 22nd

April, agreed that Cobham had told a
w an ar ane. eek watered down story. He had even

Ch. Ch. Boys’ Foundation School reminded them in the course of
9.4.50—7n.| his evidence that he was speaking

ieeentertteslinatinrst ahaa TT 4 :
KEEPER—Experienced linen — keeper the truth. They would remem

ber, said Mr. Whyatt, that in his
outline he had said that the Pros-
ecution was not relying on Cob-
ham, and he was still suggesting
to them that Cobham’s evidence
was not reliable.

Mr, Whyatt then told the jury
that if they reached the conclusion
that the prisoner’s mind had been
so obscured by drink that he was
incapable of forming a , specific
intention to do grievous bodily
harm to the deceased, they would
be entitled to say that he was
guilty not of murder, but of man-
slaughter. But they would have
to be satisfied that his mind had
been so obscured.

“The scene shifts,” said Mr.
Whyatt. “The deceased is taken
to the hospital as a senseless
drunk, says the Defence, and suf-
fering from a severe brain injury,
says vne Prosecution. Which is it?

“The Prosecution is saying that
he was suffering from severe brain
injury consequent on being hit by
a piece of wood. My submission
is that he had been knocked out
by that blow and was a proper
subject to be taken vo the hos-
pital.”

Mr. Whyatt continuing remind-
ed the jury that Dr. Kirton had

storekeeper or reception desires in
Barbados, where could use pia
Pained at Claridges Hotel, London, Scot-

and Paris Can excellent
references. Free now, can give personal
interview. Phone 3303.

14.4.50—3n.

FLOOR LADY—To take full charge of
and supervise our trimming department
An experienced person is perferred and
applicants must have a thorugh know-
ledge of millinery work, needlework,
and styles and designs for trimming
Leies Hats, A very attractive salary is
offered for a person with proper quali-
fications. Apply at once in writing:—
MODERNE HAT, P.O. Box 21, Bridge-

town, Barbados. Please quote references.
14.3,.50—3n

MISCELLANEOUS

cc cSaREiiatemD

WAGON WHEELS—with axle, with or
without tyres. Apply Manager, Black-
man's Plantation, St. Joseph,

12.4.50—6n.

STAMPS — Used Postage Stamps
wanted, will pay cash or send merc han-
dize in exchange. R. M. Chaplin, Box
389, Des Moines, Iowa. U.S.A.

14,4, 50—3n.

POTTLES—Pint Bottles 8 cents per
Dozen. D. V. Scott & Co. Ltd, Spring
Ham, White Park.

14.4. 50—3n



(1OUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of D. V. Scott & Co said that he had diagnosed him as
Itd. of Broad Street, City, for permis-
sion to sell Spirits, Malt 4Liquors, &e. | =







at a wall building at White Park, St

Michael
moved this 19th de of April 1950, WAL

Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’

H. HERBERT,
Applicant

N.B.—This application will be consi-

Cered at_a Licensing Court to be held at





‘The public are hereby warned against
wiving credit to any person or persons
Whomsoever in my name as I do not

Police Court, District ‘A’, on Monday] hoki myself responsible for anyone con-
‘he 24th day of April 1950 at 11 o'clock,| tnacting any debt or debts in my name
a-m, unless by a written rder signed by me
B. A. MeLEopD. Mr. CAMERON CODRINGTON
Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’ King William St.
14.4.50—In 14.4.50—2n

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Education Department,



British Guiana

Applications are invited for the vacant post of Examinations
Secretary, Education Department, British Guiana. The Examinations
Secretary will be required to take charge, under the Director of Edu-
cation, of arrangements for all Local and External Examinations held
by the British Guiana Education Department. Applicants should be
University Graduates, preferably with experience of the organisation
and supervision of examinations.

2. The post is on the Pensionable Establishment of the Colony
and the salary is on the scale $3,000 per annum rising to $3,600 per
annum by annual increments of $120 per annum. The candidate
selected will be appointed on one year’s probation.

3. Applications, stating age and full particulars of qualifications
and experience, accompanied by not less than two testimonials, should
be addressed to the Director of Education, Education Department,
Georgetown, British Guiana, to reach him not later than the Ist of
May, 1950.

14.4.'50,—2n,



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
REGISTRATION OF RELIEF TEACHERS.

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for regis-
istration as Relief Teachers,. Preference will be given to persons hold-
ing the School Certificate or some equivalent qualification:

Applications, to be submitted on Form E/7 M (Men) or Form E/7
W (Women) obtainable from the Department of Education, should
reach the Director of Education not later than Saturday, the 22nd of
April, 1950,

REGISTERED RELIEF TEACHERS, WHO WISH TO HAVE
THEIR NAMES RETAINED ON THE REVISED LIST, MUST IN-
FORM THE DEPARTMENT BY LETTER NOT LATER THAN SAT-
URDAY, THE 22ND OF APRIL, 1950.

14.4,.’50.—2n.

PROPERITY—FOR SALE







Bedrogms each with running water, Kitchenette, Lavatory and Bath tiled,
Toof cOvered with everite dry and properly made. It is well furnished with
Properly made Mahogany Furniture and stands on ‘4 of an acre of land.

At Christ Church opposite the sea Price reasonable.

Apply to D'ARCY A. SCOTT.

Built of Coral Stone and has Verandah, Drawing and Dining Room, (3)
| Magazine Lane









—_——



GINGER ALE —







—_—_..



BARBADOS, ADVOCATE

Counsels Address Jury
In Murder Case

a drunk. He had said he had vhus
diagnosed him “provisionally”:
But that provision seemed to be
continuing up to the present time.
The Prosecution was not saying
that anyone was blameworthy for
that diagnosis, It was excusable
when one took into account the
history of the patient and the fact
that he smelled strongly of alco-
hol. Doctors were only human
after all, and were liable to err.

Where medical opinion in the
case was concerned, it was the
opinion of Dr. Cavo, Mr. Leacock
and Dr. Copland that when An-
thony George was admitted into
the Casualty he had no chance of
recovery. It was a fact, in spite
of what his learned friend had
submivted, that there were cases
which doctors could say positively
were fatal.

Where the possibility of falling
cut of bed was concerned, he
would say that they were not there
to speculave but to decide the case
on the evidence. The evidence wag
that the nurse heard the noise of
a movement on the bed. There was
no evidence that he had fallen
out of bed, and they would re-
member that on the second odca-
sion the deceased had been found
on the floor vomiting.

If he had fallen out of bed and
received the injuries from which
he was suffering, he would not
have been found sitting, He would
have been found unconscious,

“You will remember,” said Mr.
Whyatt, “that I puv that to Dr.
Kirton, and he admitted that he
had not though‘ of vhat before.”

Chronic Alcoholic

In considering the case they
must not be prejudiced by any-
thing that they nad heard about
Anvoony George, It had been said
that he was a chronic alcoholic,
but even if the man was bad, he
had no one there to speak for him.

“If he had bad points,” Mr,
Whyatt said, “he might have had
good ones also. He cannot speak
tor himself, and he will never be
able to do so. You musv bear in
mind that the law of this island
—the English Common Law, holdg
sacred a human life, whether it
is the life of a drunkard or not.
Therefore you must consider tyis
case as one in which a human life
has been vaken,

“If you are satisfied beyond
reasonable doubt that the blow
which caused Anthony George’
death was inflicted by the prisoner
and that when he inflicted ihe
blow he intended to cause him
grievous bodily harm, you will
find the prisoner guilty of murder,
If you are satisfied that he had
not vhe ,intention of causing
grievous bodily harm but that he
inflicted the blow, you will be en-
titled to return a verdict of guiliy
of manslaughter.

“It will be your duty to return
one or the ovher of those verdicts
which the evidence establishes be-
yond reasonable doubt.”

At this stage further
was adjourned until today,

hearing



A. M. WEBB












Stocks — Bonds — Shares
30th Local and Foreign
Bought and Sold

155 Roebuck St., Bridgetown
Dial 3188. -:- Hours : 9-3





~ REAL ESTATE
DIXON

AND

BLADON

(JOHN M. BLADON)
A.F.S., F.V.AD)

FOR SALE

RESIDENCE



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modern two storey home well
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PINE HILL,—Two recently built
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& two storey house) Both well





constructed and attractive resi-
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This very attractively situated
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WHITE SANDS—St. Lawrence
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HOUSE,—St. James (On Coast).

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,
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ARRIVALS— FROM ST. LUCIA:
FROM TRINIDAD: yah Chables Chandler, Kenneth Grannum,
Paul Farmay, Hobert Spooner, Joan K. Michael Grannum, Ciccley Grannum,
’ ida Wharton, David Grannum.
Curley, Sheila Spoaner, Hilda arton aa: See :
Frank — Aitk Edmund Gwyn, Owen Seth White.
w. Clarke Decale, DEPARTURES—By B.W.I.A.L.
FROM ANTIGUA: FOR ANTIGUA:
Conrad Shoul. Capt. Eric Burton.

IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd. Prinsbernhard, Artillero, Esso Den Haag,



advise that can TOW cCammunicate Hurworth, Tactician, M.S Sarpedonip -
with the fol ships throtigh their hit, Balantia, Uruguay/WMCM, Custo-
Sg. Su i, atte abess dian, Rufina, Kelmscott, Union Carrier,
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Repton, Brazil, Auris, Misr/SUBO, nine
vilde, Loide Peru, Vigor, Washingto:,

» Pleads Guilty of Anti-State Activities

PRAGUE, April 13.

Miss Dagmar Kacerovska, 23-
year-old Czechoslovakian em-
ployee of the United States In-
formation Service (USIS) here,
pleaded “partly guilty” when she
appeared before the State Court
here today on charges of hostile
activities against the state.

Lubomir Elsner, 28, another
Czechoslovak employee of USIS,
who is being tried with her on

Pennant, Esso Apalachachee, M.V. South-
ern, States, Mormachwan.



the same charges, pleaded ‘not
guilty”.

The indictment against the two
accused included spreading hostile
propaganda against Czechoslo-
vakia, espionage activity and sup-
plying state secrets to the head of
the Press Department of the
United States Embassy. The in-
dictment named both defendants
as “enemies of the Republic”.

—(Reuter.)

SHIPPING NOTICES
Canadian National Steamships



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Sails Sails Sails Arriv Sri's
SOUTHBOUND Montreal Halitax Bovion Barbados Barbados |
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LADY RODNEY 12h May 15th May 17th May 26th 2 27th May)
LADY NELSON 3ilst May 3rd June Sth v 14th Jun: 15th Jun
LADY RODNEY 30th May 3rd July 6th July Mth Jul 15th July |
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
NORTHBOUND Barbados Barbados Boston St. John Halifax Montreal
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RODNEY 8th June 10th June 19th June — 2st Jun, 24th Jun
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N.B,—Subject to change without notice. All vessels fitted with cold storage chain
bers, Passenger Fares and freight rates on application to :—
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St. Kitts-Nevis sailing 21st April, Mails for United Kingdony

The M.V. “Daerwood" will ac- by the S.S. Indore wiil pe
cept Cargo and Passengers ‘o elesed at the General Post
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Se en TE wae be VARCEL MAIL at 4 py.

the 14th April 1950. ...
REGISTE MAIL at
yam, on the 15th April 1950.

Or
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ASSOCIATION (INC.)





Consignees, ORDINARY MAI, at 10
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Sailing to Sailing to

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“MISR” - April 5th, 1950
.GASCOGNE”.. April 19th, 1950 April 26th, 1950
“MISR” .. May 9th, 1950 May 13th, ‘1950
“GASCOGNE”.. May 24th, 1950 May 31st, 1950
“GASCOGNE”.. June 28th, 1950 July 5th, 195u

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PAGE SEVEN









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” PAGE FIGHT BARBADOS. ADVOCATE Sea en aC
. !
; T. Montserrat Wins |
fi i ot c ‘
Everton Holds | Mrs. Savage To | Mont |
P t Prizes | By 17 Runs
{ resen rizes | .
pie : ST. KITTS, Apt |
S artan To Draw On Tuesday cr gop
r. | and Montse ded vion
GAME ENDS 1-1 At Savannah Club | and Mo 17 Mon
} THE ina Club Tourna- | serrat in con
| SPART# YD EVERTON battied to a one-all draw ment bt t ae the close for lune eke
ina ¢ eY f tbe which v pnlaved at Kensiiett 1¢ : 5 inst. When} up 57 runs for ce el
in a good geme ot a . which wa played ¢ Ke sili sto: | ae ig the Mixed Doubles| inch they wes 84
‘yesterday afternoon belore a big ctowd spec’ ators will oe played. Miss D. Wood and} Bramble topscori: (
ag - —_——— *' Ormond Reece, the Everton Dr. C. G. Manning vs. Mrs. R. S Jeffrey 12, and Cls 4
’ goalkeeper, was the most out- Bancrott and P. Mc¢ terson 3owling for Antigua
t Wi re Wi “p. Sepe, Hg yer for the afternoon, After the above Mrs | four for 25 and Barnes
‘ or di, eeke 8 and savcd many a goal for red | | Savage has kindly sented t©| 9) Antigua in their seconc
tear 3oth goals were scored Cups to the winners| 2... ‘gt .
’ : 7 een Both goa pre ips tO tne winn were all out just befor
‘is ‘or juring the closing stages of the] jof u i events. 7 ee o. All tin
; irst | . of play for 111 Willia :
/ gune with Everton drawing ig PSDAY'S BESULES 91. Thidou 17, Smith e lf
by ‘ steede » s > Mer Doubles Final > MeG atte oh, Li dat, +t .
BTGERER 8 UTOUOR |e ives ocd: bemea son and GH Manniné beat BP. Taylor! and Kirnon 18, Cabey took four
I t limaxed i #00) orwarte and Dr Mann 6—4, 1—5, S—6 ickets x 26r s.for Montse
yeverment from close range. a YESTERDAY'S RESULTS a i Tm a8 run pt 2} CP
. i Says Crawford wy hite For Spartan, Desmond Johnson} _ Mixed ee ae Pay aie ee Peer en ,
te cred the equaliser shortly after-| ao Ah. Lendeen and G. i. Mannins
j LONDON, pts so wards when he beat Reece with «} ” 7 IXTURE
ant vy . t ale Ing \ £ yl MONDAY $i
good shot also from close up afte: ; St a
, | fer ingies Final: Dr. C. G
is ~ rece. ving from Walcott On the} hyd iy i oe , oO signe, as
4 b- right wing |
“4 “ Pine ame was, however, not!
I as, t : y ¢ Mr. | D: Gs , Conserv ra- |
i \ ferd, the Spartan fullback while} isk a question in the House con-
tourea Wit, We. Wie learing from a dangerous move- | cerning th ent proposals for a
ya) A Luaes tearn of 1939 | ricnt from the Everton front line, | 4 Meets Today aribb ‘. federation, nc
2 i ie We indics = players cilided with Conl'ffe, the Everton | ‘ stranger to the West Indies. He |
weatnet permitting, will have net} centre forward, fell and hutt his| The Board of Ma . vas a member of the Parliamen-
pravuce at dwrds tomorrow, | jaft shoulder and had to be lifted the 3arbado: Cricket As tary delegation ‘that went out to
aN and ae AGay. ey. off the field, This occurred about) ao , yd at - - oie at 4.15| the Wes lies in 1944. Mr. Gam- |
1 morrow § visit will be in the after- | +45 minutes before the interval | * hs emoria ee ““\ mans had 14 ye in the Colonial
* noon, but on Saturday they prac- as take m Pe hak ee h he retired
‘i ’ was taken an, rt acai abl ervice, from which he retired in
Ii use in the morning. as they will} Spartan who defended the goal The anand will Stet a 1934. At the last Election he was |
F* be watching the English Fi | fom the sereen end, were first on| approaching rovernment or strongly tipped for Coloni ial Secre-
J) pivision soccer match between| the cflensive and from a cornet loan a ggested at the last gen-| ~ i nservatives had won
; Chelsea and Wolverhampton Wan-! | kick taken by Evelyn on the right eral Vice as - m ~ Rigs
a Oe 7m a later ‘ wing, Reece in goal pushed out EXPRESS pont aon 1€ . “ the Board for la
: mes = 86vonnson = 6and Af utter Ishmael got possession and | Ta aaa
-/ Valentine, the Jamaica playe took a shot from the right wing WousppMeations, one trorm tn Remanded
; were expected to arr.ve but Tt Was all. there |< Central Cricket Club ind ey : #1
15 England today and M: Kidnes y Eaaty Riek | cther the Barbado tegi Afian Fields of | _ Bi V
i and Goddard arranged to meet) Ti I + y ‘i ‘ 5 fte | ene ant C.¢ for inclusion th anded to District “C” ye Er tte
on ; he Everton forwards after] . she ‘amnetiti ot tune i. Worst Mr A. J. t
1 {them at Paddington Station o : . 7 Second Division Competition yy His Worship Mr.
{ their arrival in London receiving from a lusty kick by Miss Gertrude Moran lalso on the Agenda | Hanschell until today for having
t é é 4 > aa aol a . > . }
( The rest of the team spent full back Robinson, carried the B # - Board will then consider] in his possession on April 12, one
i jay being fitted out for kit ana] > ll within their opponents the 1ual Report and Aecounts| forged $5 00 bank note knowins
i skit “yg Mg ca A yment are Ht without result | to Z tan ited to the G mneral| t to be gea
> yver equ ie€ ; ‘ esente ¢ |
‘ . redictions : es Weat Indie Sp: artar again attacked and re | Meeting next month He was arrested in the juri }
‘| would win their first cricket Test] fron See OY en on le po “ the head of correspond-| diction of Police Magistrate 01 |
fin England, but that England eer, We, meee wast ah 1 6 6 e | er ce le dealing with amend-|} District “A
would win the 1950 seri Nee R ae Bertie A vr wee } mer rules, tournament date
t : = oe a" te cece aver rihantly | ] y ip f SCUSSIOI .
made today by Crawtor Whit * ; ; i ill con up for discussion
‘ the Neu Chronicle’ icket eG EB " on Kata’ eat had bu ee The latter covers the next Inter-! SALESMAN FINED £3 }
onlif their centre orwar 1 | . ‘ f
{ writer. ,kicked out in a good effort , LONDON, Osa) SEL : Willisa Cromey salesman ol}
Discussing the ; At this stage, some fine football “Gorgeous Gussie’ .-Moran got an official sanction to don Reed Stree as oun guilty at}
ae at | { ¢ ‘ ‘ + W — btain t 8/4 ror a Bruce
pects he said if the is} wa itnessed by both teams and her celebrated lace panties again a Vimbledon this year | Four-Day Visit ‘1 fom! k bat ae nil 12
> | . ' of at ; ‘ alse pretenct on April 12]
at all reasonable this he — : u i ee Se ee but she was bluntly warned against the black shorts , esterday
4 most interesting season in po ib of con bina jon, took 1e bal - a tht a TODAY the Jutch warship | . ane Hane ll before
*') war cricket | down the field, but just failed t me pasted Egypt. is tien if : as Lees ‘Karel Doorman” will come to} oie, je j = a ae
, “The d mic fast-! ! et past the Everton defence t ol. A. D, maacauiady,» Con On anyone caring 'Wo")Barbados on a four-day visit een Tay tiniest, eterna ot
' hard-hittin; tour promis« Everton now made another rai 1} ‘ ean ot Ww ; Mort will wear| It comes when the American t e mont Y default undergo
thrills and excitement”, said th ind Medford the Spartan full} chhihiay Club, told International no ee eres oran ve * Sc ind salvage vessel “Opportune : na acilarninitst |
olin. °Elnoy ix feet four inches| back jumped and cleared with hi News Service that the frilly thing c Wit edon time has othe S| hich hab Wight these ainad Aan } |
Ben yates Jamaican, to} head, but collided with Conltffe in| the California tegnis star, sported) besides Harris on edge, primarily | oi) leaving for San Juat sic ma}
tho prilli t ri for Br od ind had to leave the,9t Wimbledon last year were} bec ¢ me hints thrown out | 2! to | ; ir |
ose brillia 1 J ‘ : . Puer I |
ce ; | perfectly ice dre | by Col re Tinling 7 7
man’s crow as th 0 batsmet wat ’ < ! : : ‘ | The “Karel Doorm is sch
t in the world. Everton Weekes an Cr i 10W brought fron And he added, it Mi : Mo | Tinlin t igned ¢ lace Staal’ ty y Hee Bue ear?
Frankie Worrell, the team is pack ef full back and Everton | Selected for the US Wightinan) 4 6 WORE 1a8t year. | n the mornit ; }
, ed x th personalitie advantage in theiy | team to compete in the Wimbledon nt with All-England |‘ *" Ee be
en —Reuter f tacked their opponent hampionships June, 26 to July 3 er what was to he |
l vithout result. On one) there will be no objection to hes} considered “fit and proper” tennis ' , i {
t _ ( or Steede missed a good them again—no objection| dress led to his resignation from B B (. rogrammes } |
| aan pport from within the are r, the club after 20 years official | oar
saat Tr é nothe ‘ox se : 0 la hor { ‘call boy } RIDAY, APRIL 1, 1950
First Team lo vother ( ent in ¢ e bh ck hort | ‘call bo ram 1%, APRA 14, Ce
good try it Harris was well in wore at Cairo in 4 | { | Think on These Thing | |
| ' ition nd saved kK ytiar International Tourn Ane now APL cesigning A) 3 t .; a -d Programme
' Play Against \ A Spartar ne made ; ood art they’ ; z Rt ; ale | yutfit for G le, one whien | 5 . he paceiay ‘ , "6 n |
ttempt to open the sco n anc ri sin | he said will be “probably more | p Pa 15 I
LONDOD 1, April | 3 fre a raid by their front Ions One of vBrtteinis ‘most witels distracting than the one yard of been ca et! on Ne Pe N7E CE
; The West Indies crict Robins« the Everton full back, | respected sports writ eteran | !#ce that caused last year’s fuss |v ws Anal R i coun 1 @
*) their tour of Englanc SLO! kicked away from Evelyn as he | Bruce Harris of the London Mucaul pug OUne! club | Para re hee a 1 Held ¢ A
1,’ on Friday, April 28 i one vas about to take a. shot { Evening Standard i of the now | Officials would prefer not having {p: sleep of Uordertilly of feo Tae
i day match against the Club Crile f is fror th J sSaeare SENS Bad chtage (20 rul hat Gussi “Or tl Sir 4 The pn aa: , oe
— “ay a abe ew a om » por aa b wt ( ule on wat Gu ( VOX ik g he Ne
»* ket Conferenct G, R. Pullinges } t me ri 4 | internationally-k._ 1 oe ” | she appeal it Wimbledon. | News From Britain, 2.15 p.m Sport Re- | |
{ ‘ ms ld E fast mediu "he interval was then taken | short $ ee Pets $90 p.m. David .WiNCOCks, » 2..1.17).,|. xagendnesneheineneearntinntiitimiiiientnsisnmess |
| the _ ar-old Essex fa ‘onfer. | With the seore love all We ought to make sure that | Macaulay pointed out that it wouid | Business is Business, 4 p.m The News
bowler, neluded the Conft . ae 7 ’ 2 j . ‘ The Da Service. 4.15. p m
1 oan te tg ; hich announced A Low On |she doesn’t try it-——or rather them - es the star herself and the ce ape ihe 4 oa, Carroll Calls BACK PAINS GOT
; day . toll On resumption, Everton were | on at Wimbledon S. = Preset team anne _ 101 the Tune. 5.15 p.m, Programine Parade |
reo the first to attack and Steede or “Her ‘frillies’ of 1949 were her| S&® that a. is dAressead)sa9 pm From the ve 2 COSA. | |
A. C. L, Bennett (Capt.), M. A.| the right wing sent in a low one | own ¢ ern, but black shorts in Ae he an i! he the 7 pn, The News. 7.10 p.m W RSE EACH DAY |
j Salmon, G. H. We H. J. J. Me from inside the area which Harris | 1950 uld be very uch th ae’ pe ny eo peg ey Pu we ig |
> < ner lyre 4 Ved | 4 e isu illy ) | ig D: Auaic. a .
y colr ro Cooper, P. G. Wrefo! v eR hee: tee ee oe Witt ictee- ff os +t ior 3.19 pm, BBC Symphony | Barber Found Relief by the |
le K. (¢ falve ) ntor Spartan, in spite of their handi “ CLOWN CS. Lt a player ar[ec aay a | The News 10 p.m ’ , .
wc se NL Gavin a7 ay ide many an attempt te lI hivh. “Johdvan: Wal Jaynes.| with a colored costume t | Orchestra. pat Britain, 9.18. pan. The Use of Dodd’s Kidney Pills |
Smith, I oe i t \ ed P mS ‘ ke it from
f linger I A. Murra core Reece between the up~ | Chase | ulgtrag ap OF Dey. SppoMah i 10 ai The 920 “ot Acting jt am a barber and have to stand long |
twelft n ght eemed to be here there Everton:—O. Reece, Hall, Robin } It's a ter of playu fal ' , 30 p.m. Music Magazine _ 10.45 pr hours,” writes Komal Hanooman, 37 Lord St.,
| is the t € e Clul ind ¢ rywhere and allowed]son, ¢ Reece, Culpepper, May 1.N World Affairs. 11 p.m, The News | San Fernando, Trini- + )
kei i ocia thing to pass ard. Steede, Blades, Conliffe, Cox A 7S55SSSS9": | dad, “I developed a |
of « I { whict Eve ) were still looking fo W h SPSSSSSOSSISSSIVSGSSEIESOPIOP PPP FSIS I IIS GS Q backache and it got
confine the t oal a bore down on their | } % worse each day. I was
‘ nds. Lt ! mat clul oppdhents t Nile Se | ¥, | worried because none
ri k-end en, “ ppon n time an igain but ¥ WE CAN SUPPLY THE FOLLOWING x of the medicines | used
busi ‘ failed to score During one of} 1 K ¥, ;
iM tew sl up the| these attacks, Blades kicked aver | Barbados Friendly Football 8 + | scemed to help, | tld
i members! Reuter the bar and later Cox tried a good % a trend of my distress
t } am ce rad te : 7 oe Association x % | and he recommended |
‘ Ba ince iilatailleatila oe | nhs Oss bat : ie | Dodd's Kidney Pills,
| y ine fO-DAY'S FIXTURES 12 $| Thad only to use one
| & Ee Everton ke pt.on pressing and eh ach eaten title “a % PORTLAND CEMENT in 941b bags & drums % bottle of Dodd’s Kid- i
; l S Jockey Anery | ‘vere soon rewat fed when fron : raya lid iid on $ | ney Pills andthe pain © K. Hanooman
a — g. 5 ov | centre by Blades on the left st. Ma Old B ‘ ats WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT was almost gone. | finished taking three
i . } Wing, Steede cut in from the right urd Referee i arKe | more bottles of Dodd’ Pills and | felt |
: » ie ~ 1 Harkliffe at the Ba , ; ; ea stain s Pills ai elt like
About Press Report), ing and beat Harris with a] xetoe: Mr. Brancl RED & KHAKI COLORCRETE CEMENT anew man.” 1» » 1313 |
} powerful shot from close range Pee ee oe 2G |
NEY, At} From the touch off, the Spartan a FERROCRETE RAPID-HARDENING CEMENT ¥
; he « Kk 1 { t VERS | front li nade a raid and Evelyn %
I . Y Y ‘ we n , ‘pDm@MTro
k Tohni I : the right wihg sent in a danger- Th ‘ Weather ~ ALUMINIUM CORRUGATED SHEETS DANCE
a th } in ? ro | rounder which Reece sayed ( € % rt ia : Bee tdi : ee L
a | abou Pre re} t BS) pant on caualisins tan agalt - 4 EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS
b he v I i fab) f TODAY % sha” al ge
’ ne $ j attacked and rom a centre by oO ’ ' . at . mnths THR / .
{ Sse por gay | Keith Walcott on the Stn Rises: 5.51 a.m % \SBESTOS WOOD SHEETS tor Ceilings | Aat ATIC CLUB
ea ‘ turn. | Desmond Johnson beat Reece wi Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m $ pote: SRS ae ‘ ao Sh
\ ic ‘ led retu tie a Bin Aiea Moon (New) April 17 g ASBESTOS SOIL PIPES, eisia ( tren anc ats
; or oO Dp . .. l ymoers Only
g to Au i \ eee : ‘ | faghting: 6.30 p.m ) oA 4 ePAN CHES isting Membe :
Page inclined to make another \ band ‘Gitter ‘the Bpattan Balt ra’ || High Water: 2.28 aun, 2.34 % EGNGR & BRANCHES SATURDAY, April 15th,
7 The ty levelopec ver) ! ' tlhe Spartan hall back p.m ‘ 9 p.m
’ 2 ‘ " so * °
{\ a stomy published in the Sydne leared tense mome few | {8TERDAY ¥ FLOOR TILES in’ several colours Music by PERCY GREEN &
ie" Tele pl ot of ra , rom the ‘ N ner | ESTERD % ; i his ORCHESTRA
: } ocke rode} w the ball in the middle than it ‘ ee 4 . j
of : wots whol ‘| tha Beer ‘~ | Rainfall (Codrington) 03 ° | Admission to Ballroom 2/-
y i Lonede who] was back in the Spartan goal ares | ais. s 1 i 9 . | 12.4.50,—4n
b red } i ucce n At | ut thefr defence eld ft wn She ssterdav . ‘ o :
| lia, . | warded off another attach {ely a pe Month Seen % Phone 4267, 4456
" Six of Australia eadine jock- | CPpenent ront | _ , ; | semperature (Max) 85.5° F. V 666564 4 6456666665955O08 SEEOSOHSOSOHOS }
144 « today deni the hey} The game ended shortly after-|{ Temperatute (Min) 71.5? F. SSS: SSS
id pulle ’ their mounts in vhe race rd th the score love all |} Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E by
7) and Mr. J, Donohoe, Chairman of| The referee \ Mr. Stantot N (3 p.m.) E by N. e /
; Fda ti ¢ tated the | Gitter vhile the linesme were Wind Velocity 15 miles per
7-7 the Randwick 5S ater j
x 7 VV . ws Vi} } r e e
* 4). Stewards were isged with the} Mr. D. W y My. F. A our. |
“y, way the race had been run, Both| Willian Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.005
; 2 ees gy nc ye BU ly , The tear ere foll | (3 pom.) 29.974
Sydney’s afterna pa} ; \ }
if voved front page space to a rebut Snartan:—H Gibbons. Me
poh +.’ -f the allegadon Reuter j I {
‘ 4 ane - » 1
; ‘ e . i
an | they li Wo It Every Time on ve 08 By Jimmy Hatlo |
ad lila a a ee Oe ; YES! ever
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Full Text

PAGE 1

PACE r.ir.iiT FIARBADOS \DVOrATP ntin.w. AI'KII. 11 Everion Holds Spartan To Draw GAME ENDS /-/ %  %  %  %  %  : %  %  A iti on the 1 Spartan fullhc \ front lino, h Co Mi %  : lllllt Ills iwlore the inti Spartan who defended the Rial nan em % % %  Ri %  i.iami fru": %  by Evelyn on the rigSti %  ; ...•-. t %  I DO l from ihp ii-' Lust) Kick arton tOrwa from niata kick By : UK : i ult •* kid ind r, on Ihi K< th w.tloti aan1 in art i • % %  CmllnV forward %  .-, %  %  %  -umc Ane football %  i %  botl TI a good %  %  I :ield. but jie.t %  atft ino lord the Sp&it-iii Ml %  %  • and i u d hnd to Idavi %  > %  %  i I %  %  in a %  vi ll In PI.IV Vlt'lillJ \\ I rial \'jaiiiM .1. %  %  1 %  %  taiki with the • \ l.ou On, R orrelL M eekes Rttoah lor i.nidmati s Lrown buyi K^rawfora "tide ... .. %  %  %  %  %  1 I &*turday %  prac%  %  • Hii.< %  %  %  them in London The resi of the taon day l" %  1 would %  1 UK' %  %  %  111 the Prank i ,Brk %  —Iteulrr \(rs. Savagp To Present Prizes On Tuesday At Savannah Club %  \ M s KBONI HDA1 ai .ll.TI II V Mx-4 l-.i-l. MaiiJI'.p Moaftserral W ins Bj 17 Rons The Inti %  Ijnch the JcfTrej %  four (or 3 II, Antijiua la thati of play f nickels for 26 runs f>' mt and It'-' •MM>V I l\ll II .Mi-s Gertrude Mornn No Black Shorts For "Gussie" LONDON, I sanction to don 1 1 bluntly wai %  %  t the blncl vpt. Col A ~ *." 'i' ai uiu twoCriehet Beard Meets Today The Board ol %  %  p in will eomidei ant for te last gen. %  Central %  B |l i %  rrespond• .: %  %  : %  : %  I No Stranger %  oak a qu Houaa con%  %  G Colonial :etired In loo he was %  Firsi Team To mgainal W X iigaton %  : %  I'ullmgri I %  On aVarton wen ; A c i wing I I K 1 • m i %  K cuter. I A Jockej kngr) About Pre* Report %  Th. %  %  and Mr .1 ;rtCri %  %  l'i %  %  I %  ' liltli'll %  i Harrli with -i %  %  %  ii i, by MWr %  %  Mi D. W I %  land l.nw.1 Tennis Club, told Inl i i %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  % % %  I ll %  I I .(her them on at v. Her 'Ii %  %  %  While Barbados Friendly Football Association %  .ill wear rj %  the club %  KM vuml i i aroaaipay more %  I'S fuss I she hpfx %  lie up to :i I %  %  ll — I.S Remanded A. J. H 1 until today for havlnK nl 12. om ink note knowlni' four-Day Visit Kurel 11 Barbados o %  %  i %  %  B.B.(. Programmes I BID \ \rMI. u. ISM i %  %  a in J in 1 %  I Ctooic* SALESMAN FINED £3 d guilty "%  %  UGH LOZENGES i \u %  BiMiiMM P" Tba MM %  .T I |, n, f I %  ihi Th.jiu 7 u |o pn T...• ACUM r MM | .. i II \t > mil %  The Wewther TIIIIVV l 4 111 HI -ii !> 10 p.Ill .1 s. i Xi : / ifhliBf: CM p.m Hull Hi I II I III .1 II III I. II I.II \ I KAIIIIIII ila^riiuConl .1)1 IN. in M.iHill III .. I i IIIIHI llllll iluV I i'inpri iliirii Mini 71 I 1 I H'lBfl Dlti' linn (I i III ii" \ ; n in I b| N l.iutl \ i I.i. ill II mil.. |i r I hej II Do It Even • ime P^" r -\ % %  -.:% %  ~ S-U\ £7 AND 60T ~s M:^ ._ PUKEP OUT AND DECIDED IT U AS OUT i'. Cl '. STT-ET.K'S TO TuNE THE MOTOR"HUM? LOOK B*L|! IT'S u* I mwkA S'ATTt: s \ WE CAN SUPPLY THE FOLLOWING BUILDING MATERIALS PORTLAND i i MUST in M Hi hagi 4 iruan WHIT) SNOW Bl II ( I MI N I RED k KMXKI COLOaCBETI CEMENT I I KKIK HI I I l: VI in IIMilll M CEMENT i MINIUM COMUGATBD SHI I H • X I an ( OBB1 GATED 8HE1 i^ ISBBStOa WOOD SIIKKTS IOI •. (i ISBRStOS SOU. l-ll'i.s HINDS ft l-.C INI Mill .OOR Til.is III Munil 1..I..111. WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO., LTD. I; Phum i-'i.; MM y d jto (P&itsxti" 1 BACK PAINS GOT WORSE EACH DAY Barber Found Relief by the I u of Dodd's Kidney Pith "I urn a luihri and ha*a lo iland Iwif haw*. aiMM Kuiiul Hanuoman. J7 Lard Si., SM 1-HnaD.la. Trine %  lad. "I ik-h-a bvkMlN> and il ( a| %  enaaadiahff. I-a. wnfiiril h*sr\t\r IICHH* vltlk-nMHii.'mraluard %  MVkrd lo h*l. lloM alriaodof tnv ilialirn nd hr fci M inJld Oadd's Kldnr, Pill,. lb.aofJitoui.ooA b-lU •! DaJd'i Kid-*"U nay Prik and ((pain K H.n**m*n •u .W.W tMW. I finlahtd lalunr ll -Mt botlU. *l Uodd P.U. and I ItH new man." nia IIVNCE a Tin: BuiHAims \o\ Ml. CLUB %  mly) BATI Kl> V^ \111.i I..U1. '• 1 in %  \llllllHill 1.1 H.UIl.HIIH Bites & Stings —take the danger out of them Don't scratch mosquito biles, goat bites, wasp < bee -tings The risk of blood poisoniiig is too great. Instead, i Germoleae at once! Germolene sinks into the skin, relieves thrd. and itching. Always keep a tin of Germoler.e Ointment banW) ?WSW ttttffi COLD DANISH BUFFET SUPPER SERVED EVERY SUNDAY NIGHT 1'riiin 1 I" i" n'eta* X Xttti '"" J-." -^ Ladies' Bathing Suits by ^1 / -o _ 12.00 CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., LTD '•. 11. U A II BROAD STRF.EI While lh.r Ji "U1I011 and lailori we cin boasl ol bing !Ht 10P-5CORWS IN TAILORING I't v MAMU l .,Ui A 11 ^1 in 1 \, n LINENS!! in all Lovely Shades HIM Iill II SCHOOL (Mil HI!! \ I MIOKMS i" Boyal, \ i> 1 Brown I'mk 1 T-ti |>i Ku> HUM Man ,11 i.^uij IIIAM IH8, Pr „, On ,\ s„. lMS1 HAVE REAL ENJOYMENT BY OBTAINING A SUET THAT IS ALWAYS A PLEASURE TO WEAR FROM C. B. RICE & Co. OF BOLTON LANE L


Friday

April 14

193560.

ee



—_——

OuUNLsSEe

Jury In



ddress
Hospital

BeachMurderCase
Judge Sums Up To-day

Shes

with the murder of Anthony
Counsel for the Defence

CHIEF JUSTICE will sum up to the Jury in the
case today in which McDonald Holder has been charged |

George.
and the Prosecution addressed

the Jury yesterday after witnesses Dr. Copland and ‘Dr.

Kirton who had been called
evidence.



Know Everything
About Nothing
BRIGHTON.

Dr. G. B. Jeffery, director
of London University’s In-







. British education techniques
and pleaded for a “slow
down in specialization at our
universities.”
He told the Congress of the
National Union of Students:
“One can see no end to

.

stitute of Education, blasted | |

by the Court,

had given their

; In this case’ which began on
Tuesday, the Crown is alleging
that Holder cau sed George’s death
by striking hint on the head with
a piece of pine wood, once vortion
' Of the keel of a fishing boat, ana
| that by that blow he inflicted a
;Severe brain injury described by
the doctors as a “contre-coup”
injury.
| November 24, 1949
At the end of Mr. Whyatt’s
jaddress yesterday afternoon the
Chief Justice adjourned further
hearing until 10 a.m. today

When the case resumed yester-
day Dr. Copland again entered the
Witness stand.



the process of knowing more
and more about less and less,
until in the end it is know-
ing everything about noth-
ing”. {

Jeffery said in some re—
spects the universities were
behind the schools.

“Any decent .schoolmaster
gives some meaning to char-
acter building in thinking
about his work, but how |
many professors feel that
character building is an im-
portant part of their job?

Wallace Sharps, 25-year-
old president of the Associ-
ation of London Students,






















agreeing with Dr. Jeffery,
said:
“Degree-bearing ignora-

muses are in no short supply
in this country.”’—I.N}S.



Mr, Whyatt asked : There is no
doubt you diagnosed Anthony
George as being a drunkard,

Dr. Copland: What I said before

I observed I considered Dr. Kir-
ton’s diagnosis as correct and that

a bed outside the Casualty,
frequently used for drunks.

one

understanding Dr. Kirton and you
did diagnosed him as a drunk,
treated him accordingly, and con-
sequently did not make that de-
tailed meticulous examination
which Dr. Leacock told us about.

Dr. Copland: If I diagnosed him
as a drunkard there would be no
need to make a detailed examina-
tion.



40 Atom
Bombs
A Month

April 13.

Dr. W. Leon Godshall of Leigh
niversivy believes Russia has
nm making 40 atom bombs a
onth at three plants in Siberia,
entral Mongolia and Turkestan.
Dr. Godshall gave no source for
is belief when he addressed the
ochester Association of Credit
en last night.

Dr. Godshall, head of the De-
rmment of International Rela-
ions at Leigh, said: “I know this
id a lot of other people know it.
r Government has been mis-
ading us by withholding this
ormation from the American
ple.”—Reuter.


























Bevin In Hospital

LONDAN, April 13.
The British Foreign Secretary,
t. Ernest Bevin, underwent an
peration for haemorrhoids in a
ndon hospital today.
A Foreign Office announcement
id that the operavion was “suc-

: Bevin is expected to remain
1 the hospital for about a fort-
ght.—Reuter.

Indies Squadron.

Consideration of the



2 Injured As Train
Runs Off Rails

NEW DELHI, April 13.
Twelve passengers were injured
hen the Delhi Express ran off
e rails last night about nine
les from Fyzabad, United Pro-
ices, ris received by the
lway Ministry here said.

The train resumed its journey
ter a delay of about seven hours,

© cause of the accident was
far unknown,

This was the second train acei-
ent in the United Provinces oft

Same day — the firsi and far
ore serious was that to an @x-
ress early yestetday, in which,
ecording to latest figures avalt-

jured —Reuter,

es

Stewardess Fails



Decision to close the Naval Dockyard in Bermuda
unlikely to affect the efficiency of the America and West

This is the view of Naval observers here after
Admiralty
simultaneously in London a

ble, ae esas
People died ms bea The biggest problem now facing tish, Dutch and other foreign in-| daughter of the Spanish Chief of

Mr. Whyatt: I think a
later you began to wonder wheth-
er your diagnosis of this man
being a drunkard was correct.

Dr. Copland: I did query at one
time about 11 o'clock, but in the
absence of any history of being
struck on the head, and in view
of the history that he was often
in hospital—I myself had seen him
‘in hospital—it seemed quite reas-

onable, He was in aleoholic
coma.

Mr. Whyatt: You did receive.a
message from one of the nurses

Saying that he was foaming at the
mouth.

Dr. Copland: That did not sur-
prise me, that was around 8
o'clock.

Mr. Whyatt: You would not

normally expect that.

Dr. Copland: In view of his res-
piration and the fact that he had
been vomiting, he could have
foamed at the mouth, His deep
respiration would make him foam.

Mr. Whyatt: It might have indi-
cated some other complicated
factor.

Dr. Copland : It might have, yes.

Mr. Whyatt: I think it was a
little later in the evening that a
nurse said to you, “this man was
beaten up.”

Dr. Copland: That was between
10.30 and 11 when I came out of
tne theatre the second time.

Mr. Whyatt: That again might
have been some ground for caus-
ing you to reconsider your original

@ on page 3



BERMUDA DOCK YARD
SHUTS NEXT MARCH

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, April 138.

is

close
announcement issued

nd Bermuda this morning.
The fact that America and the
West Indies Squadron will in
future be maintained by the Home
Fleet ships, does not foreshadow
any reduction in Britain’s sea
power. In effect the only change

A eA

Date of the offence was!

the Magistrate was that from what |

and that she was to place him on!

Mr. Whyatt: According to your |

little | well

:

|



|
|

|



(Spartan) look on anxiously,



Secret Arms
Reach France

CHERBOURG, April

j
|
|

; The

‘ United States freighte:
the man was in a deep state of | “American Importer” docked here
intoxication. ; this: morning with the first secret

I told the nurse that the man] shipment of arms to Francé under
could not remain where he was! the Atlantic Pact

The “American Importer”, |
which docked at the Normandy |
| Quay, was unofficially estimated |
yesterday to be bringing in about |
600 tons of artillery and auto-|
matie weapons. }

Republican Security Guards and |
police were standing by to protect |
} several hundred Cherbourg dock- |
| ers when they began unloading the
|ship this morning. |

The unloading
bright sunshine. |

Mere than 600 of the guards, as |
as police and soldiers, had
been assigned to the port. }

French Minister of National De-
fence Rene Pleven to-day watched
the unloading of the first shipment
of Atlantic Pact arms at this sea]
port and said : |

“The example set by Cherbourg
is the best answer to the insolent
challenge of a certain propaganda”

A Communist demonstration in
protest against the arrival of these
United States military supplies
fizzled out. |

\
went on under |
|



Pleven new in a special mili- |
tary plane to watch the unload- }
ing operation and gave the local |
Dockers Union a cheque for
50,000 franes “as a token of keen
appreciation”.

Later the Minister said: “This |}
first shipment is sqall but very |
soon we Shall see four ships un-
loading. arms at the same time.
This proves once agkin that the |
French people want to be free.”

“If anyone wants to take a bite
at Cherbourg, he will break his
teeth,” Pleven said.

“In less than eight days, all the |
artillery will be delivered.” ;
During the unloading, Emiliene |



Galicier Communist deputy from|
northern France distributed heat,
lets urging the dockers to stop

Several dockers tore up me
leaflets without reading them





—Reuter.
|



“Settle Macassar |
Affair” Says

Soekarno

DJARKASA, April 18. |
President Soekarno of the Unived |
| States of Indonesia told his armed |
! fordes in a broadcast tonight to |
“settle the Macassar affair’. |

His orgler came after Capt
Abdul Azis rejecved the Indone-
sian Government's final ultimatum
to come to the Federal capital t«

j account for his seizure of the East

Indonesian capital of Macassar.
The 26-year-old rebel leader

| had occupied the port on April

| to oppose the plan to incorporate

East Indonesia into the Federal

(State.

President Soekarno said in his
broadcast thay as Supreme Com-
mander of the Armed Forces he
declared Capt. Azis an “insurgent

1

is that the Home Fleet will be against the authority of the Gov-

reinforced by the America and
West Indies Squadron.

Bermuda will still be
a base and the C-in_C

used
will con-

tinue to have his residence ah

One big effect of the decision
to close the dockyard may how-
ever be a reduction in the length
of time the ships spend in the
Caribbean area.

It is foreseen that, instead olf

completing an eighteen month or

as|

ernment of the Republic of the

| United States of Indonesix’
The: President's declaration

into motion operations planned

i a e
ing in South Celebes |the Hotel Matignon, the Prim
eee —(Reuter.) | Minister’s official residence.

| —-Reuter.





Japan Will Cut Tax

two year commission without a
break as at present, ships in i ae
future will come to the UK for TOK , Apr

overhaul after nine or ten months
afd then return to complete their
commission

| do with several

dos labourers presently employed

in the dockyard.



The Japanese Finance Minister |

.| Hayato Ikeds, voday notified the
International Taxation Commit-
tee, representing American,

| by half the proposed 55 per cent
tax on foreign incomes in Japan






UK workmen there are expected | Ikeds stated that the reducite I
F; | shor t > brought back to this would operate until December 31,
rom Plane shortly to be , sad weet 1951.
; country and re-emp 0; ud . Phassaiter, te Jepuneee Gov:
T LONDON, April 13. | Bermudans ye Pg a + te , obs| ernment would extend special ta»
tee etitish European Airways| the tourist trade but. few .J006| reductions for senior
from Vik Sue | Cramsie, feil} ideals executives of foreig
truck ne aur ANet which wa ut ry ee tributing to the “en rage
skins ol , shtning soon after + ‘2 ” foreign nve nJ
onight, opt Northolt aitport| * ery , ; The International Taxatic
njured she was seriously Latest reports fro Bi 7 1é nittee meeting vere
' state that the dockyard will clos@) nounced t! t “agreed in princi
~-(Reuter.) by March next year. (By Cable)..’ ple” with the proposals —Reuter



| _ “SHELL” HARRIS, Spartan’s ‘keeper’ goes
| White, Everton’s lett winger. Conliffe (Everton)

1C

fare driven by
| murderous

Andi |

| (8)

On Foreign Incomes

Bri- |

down
is tackling. Steede,

on one knee



U.





4



2 to stop a hard grounder from

(Everton) Gibbons and Haynes



S. TIGHTER THAN

EVER BEFORE

Says Truman

PRESIDENT TRUMAN

today that the internationa
proved since 1946,

WASHINGTON, April 13
said at his Press C
1 situation has

ntei
gradually

nce
im-

At his weekly Press Conference the President reviewed
the five years since he succeeded President Roosevelt. in

April 1945,
Mr. Truman said that in t
1946 was the worst he coul

he International field the year
d ever remember—worse than

anything exeept a shooting war.

Nine-Point
Anti-Stalin
Plan Outlined

NEW HAVEN, Connecticut,
April 13.
A nine-point Ameriean foreign
policy programme “to wrest the
offensive from Stalin” was out-
lined here today by Mr. William
3ullitt, a former United States
Ambassador in Moscow
“There can be no peace on
earth,” he declared, “as long as
the Russian people and the peo-
ples of the Soviet satellite states
men who prefer a
doctrine to the plain
existence of charity,”
He added: “We are not techni-
cally at war. but we shall have to
live and work as if we were, in
order to stop Stalin”. This was Mr,

Bullitt’s programme, outlined to

an audience of students at Yale

University

(1) To build up United States
military strength faster than
Stalin

(2) To achieve the federation of

Western Europe and give it
adequate arms.
To stand up with force to the
threat of the Communists in
Eastern Germany, “who have
announced that they will
mareh 500,000 youths from
East Berlin into West Berlin.
To increase United States aid
to resistance, forces in. all
Soviet satellite countries.
To help the Albanian exiles
to “rescue Albania from the
Communists and thus give
new spirit to all the enslaved
peoples behind the [ron Cur-
tain.”
To give adequate and effec-
tive economic aid to Persia
To prevent the Communist
conquest of Formosa.
To help the Viennese and the
| French to throw the Com-
| munist out of Indo-China,
| (9) To insist that the United Na-
tions, “now paralysed by
Soviet veto and _ boycott”,
should function as if there
| were no Soviet boycott.
( —(Reuter,)
|
|

BIDAULT RECEIVES
AMBASSADOR

| PARIS, April 13

|

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

(1)



| M. Georges Bidault, Prime Min-
set | ister of France, voday received M.
new Ambassa-
during last week to force a land-|dér of the Argentine in Paris, at

Hector Madermo,

LISBON, April 13
Carmen Franco, 23 - year - olc

| . is what to| terests in Japan, thai the Japanese | State, and her husband, the Mar-
——e.. sea il verre Barba, | Government was prepared to cut | quis de Villaverde, arrived of their







“BEST THING
Franco’s Son-In-Law Calls Marriage

But shortly thereafter America

) had instituted the programme. of |

| aid to Greece and Turkey and in
| June 1947 the Marshall Plan for

European Economic Recovery.

Since then there had been a
gradual improvement and_ the
worldwide international situation

was better than in 1946.

{In the domestic field; the Presi-
dent painted a glowing picture of
present-day prosperity in the
United States.



He said that more people were
at work in the United States than |
in any country in the world. There |
was the most prosperous business
activity in America’s history and}
America was in a tighter financial |
condition than ever before j

He said that the first tive years |
of his office had beer rather diffi- |
cult but the coultry was still on|
its feet. There was nothing seri- |
cusly the matter with the country |

as a whole. The country was ir
fine shape, |
The first post-war years had

been easier on the United States
than the aftermath of any prev'-
ous war. |
Referring to his political oppon-
ents the President said that he
knew some suggested that this |
would have been so even if there;
had been a moron as President
But, as President, he proposed \&
take credit for the situation
| —Reuter.



Insulted Bird:
Demoted

ST. JOHNS

It is understood that an agree-
) ment is being reached between the
firm of Geo, W, Bennett Brysor
& Co. Ltd. and the Antigua Trades
& Labour Union over the recent
waterfront strike which lasted
four days last week. Discipline has
been exercised upon William
Knight a foreman of the sugar
room who it is claimed abused
| the Union’s President, Hon. V
C. Bird. Knight has been demoted
to an ordinary labourer.



Taxis which lined the whar!
area last Tuesday lost their anti-
cipated trade from the “Fort

Amherst” and trade which is gen-
erally accelerated in the shops wa:
also lost. Few ships stop a
Antigua and = such incidences
cause a loss to an island which i:
now in search of every avenur
to earn dollars.

Although the strike was consid,
ered over MV “Caribbee” called ai
Antigua on Saturday morning and
left without discharging the
greater part of her cargo.

IN LIFE”

|

Madrid on Monday.
{ Asked by journalists What he
thought of love and marriage, the
Marquis said: “It's a marvellous

| short










Aduocate
GREAT BRITAIN MUST LET US LIVE

Is A



IF THEY

W.I. Should |
Unite With
Canada

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, April 13.

The imposition of a Federal
structure to the Colonies, already
heavily burdened with the ex-
pense of administrations they have
to support, might well prove too
much, This point is made this
morning by a special correspon-
dent of The Times, writing from
the West Indies on the “Closer
Caribbean Union.”

He says the figure of £180,000,
which has been estimated as added
expenditure consequent upon Fed-
eration, has been greeted with
scepticism in view of past ex-
perience of bureaucracy.

“For the British Colonies, an
alternative solution with certain
definite attractions would be union
With Canada, but all things con-
sidered, the founding of a new
Dominion would be more in keep-



ing with the glowing national
aspirations of the Caribbean
peoples.”’ It is pointed out that
if a Dominion is to be evolved,
the first need will be suitable
leadership. The writer says that
West Indies as they will show
this summer are capable of unit-
ing to form a first class cricket
team. On the same lines, they

Should be capable of producing a
frst class Commonwealth

At the same time on the law ot
averages, small communities of
100,000 to 500,000, are not likely
by themselves to produce enough

talent “effectively to guide the
destinies of a sovereign state
This need for wider opportuni-

ties and experience applies to ail
professions,
It is essential also that the/

Dominion should be large enough,
to make its voice héard at Inter- |}

national and Commonwealth |
gatherings, and should not re-
semble the few pocket states

presently surviving Ta Europe |
—(By Cable).

Van Zeeland
Sees Leopold

GENEVA, April 13.
M. Paul Van Zeeland, Belgian
Premier Designate, arrived here
by ‘air today on the urgent sum-
mons of King Leopold |
.M. Van Zeeland told waiting
correspondents: “I can make abso-
lutely no statement except that |
have been urgently called here to}
an audience with his Majesty. |
“It is not through discretion that
I ean say nothing. | do not know}
anything.”
M. Van Zeeland’s special Bel-|
gian Air Force Dakota brought
also King Leopold’s two principal
secretaries, Professoi Jacque
Pirenne and Willy Weemaes

The three men drove straight
from the airport to one of Geneva’s
Jeading hotels where they had a
talk in the public lounge

M. Van Zeeland, who gave the
impression that he did not know
the exact purpose of his mission
to the King, said he had no fixed
departure time.





Van Zeeland had planned t
present a new Cabinet to Prince
Charles, the Belgian Regent, at

noon on Tuesday but the meeting
was unexpectedly postponed

After seeing the Regent late on
Tuesday night M. Van Zeeland
said he had presented a proposition
to Prince Charles. M. Van Zeeland
stated that Prince Charles had
decided upon a series of consulta-
tions in connection with the propo-
sition

According to circles close to the
Caretaker Cabinet, the Premier:
Designate's ‘proposition’ amount-
ed to a list of Ministers with whom
he proposed to form a new admin
istration

—(Reuter,)

May Reconsider
Attitude On

Seretse’s Return

LONDON, April 13.

The Commonwealth Relations |
Office here to-night hinted that}
its attitude towards the return of |
Seretse Khama, exiled Bamang- |
wato chief to the Tribal reserve |
in Béchuanaland, might be re- |
considered as a result of disturb- |
}

‘



ances there last week.

Eleven Africans arrested after
riots at Serowe, the tribal capital
on Tuesday, were today remand*
ed in custody when they appearea
before the Assistant District Com-
missioner, charged with disturb-
ing the peace,

Giving its reasons for not al-
Jowing Seretse to enter the tribal
reserve so far, the Commonwealth
Relations Office stated that his
lawyer had failed to give assur-
ances concerning Seretse’s be-
haviour there.

The statement added that Rut!

thing. I believe marriage is the] Khama, former London typist,
honeymoon in Lisbon today by air} best thing in life.” could visit her husband at any
from Madrid Carmen added: “I am _ very] time.

The Marquis told a reporter at} happy. Love is something that Patrick, Gordon Walker, Com-
‘ne airport that they would stay|cannov be expressed in words. It} mohweaith Relations Minister,
about one week at Estoril, a sea-jis something to be lived.” told Parliament last month ‘that
ide resort near Lisbon. Then they Seretse’s return to the Protectorate

anted fly to Rome to see the| The honeymoon couple were| was “on condition of his own}

|met.at the. airport by Brigadier-} good conduct, and also that the
iid they would ilso | General Nieholas Franco, Spanish} order and good government of the

lgrimage shring| Ambassador to Portugal and the] tribe are not disturbed
i tima | bride’s unclé. ‘Seretse is now at Loba, out-
ry ul her Madrid phvysi- Reporters, photographers ind} side the Bamangwato territory,
cian husband were married in |naewe cameramen attended but no] awaiting permission to visit!
tenaissar plendour ae ee The couple had nov been‘ Ruth, who expects a baky in July
| father’s Bl Pardo Paiace near\expected toduy.—Reuter. — (Reuter.)

FLYING SAUCERS



Hy wie
FIVE CENTS

fh

Year 55.



WANT LOYALTY

GOMES CALLS FOR
EARLY START

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 13.
HON'BLE ALBERT GOMES, one of Trinidad’s
two political delegates to the Sugar Conference
in the United Kingdom, thinks it important that
the delegation should reach England as soon as
possible.

Its main task he said must be to
tell the English public what poli-
tical repercussions are likely to
result in the West Indies from the
policy of “smug obtuseness which
|the British Government seem de-
termined to follow”,

Gomes thinks the recent state-
ment by the Food Minister that
the Government will not budge
from the 640,000 ton offer to the
by a! West Indies is a direct challenge
ito the unity which the B,W.I.
sugar producing territories achiev-
ed at Grenada.

IN THE BIBLE

PARIS

Now the flying saucers have
been spotted in the Bible.

They were seen there
Paris newspaper.

Albert Mousset, writer for the
usually conservative daily
“L’Epoque,” told his readers |
that the saucers very well might) -





be the “signs in the sky” men- |
tioned in the Bible. ¥
He was referring to Luke, |
Chapter 21, Verse 11 which!
reads : }

“There will be great earth- |
quakes, there will be terrible
phenomena and great signs in
the sky.”



Nothing new at all in the!
saucers, explained Mousset. Just!
look at history. }

In 1580 inhabitants of the
European Empire of Charles V
clearly observed an army of
knights and armed peasants

marching right across the heav-
ens as plain as the nose of your
face.

And just two years after that
all Germany kept spotting bands
of dragons swooping through
the skies with faces like pigs.

Even the sensible Swiss re-
ported seeing allegorical scenes
enacted in the clouds—-and this
in broad daylight,

HON,

ALBERT GOMES

One of the best celestial spec- |
tacles took place in the skies of
Silesia in 1545 when the popu- |
lace was thrown into an uproar |
by the sight of a pitched battle
between two armies. One was

Failure to stand up to it would
an admission by the W.I, that
the territories are disunited, timid
and irresolute, The important
eleven-man delegation must reach
commanded by a lion; the other| Emgland as soon as possible seeing
by an eagle. | that the main task must be to tell

A forerunner of sky-writing | the English public what political
evolved in 1549, went on|repercussions in the West Indies
“L’Epoque’s” Mousset, when the | are likely to result from the policy

e

Ss

portrait of the Duke of Saxony} Of Smug obtuseness the British
emerged from the clouas. Government seem determined to
follow.

Although the flying saucers
have not yet made a debut in
the Paris area, there seems to

There is an interestIng paradox
in the policy of the Labour Gov-
ernment towards the colonies. On

have been an abundance of | the political front they are most
heavenly apparitions over the} jiberal with new constitutions, on
French capital in ancient times, | ¢)6 economic side obviously very

In 1578 Parisians are Supposed | reluctant to make concessions te
to have witnessed “fires in the make it possible for these new

air creating great light and
smoke.” And in 1582 there was

constitutions to succeed



a similar display of “great We say of such people in the
splendor,” according to ancient) West indies that they are two-
manuscripts cited by! faced. We are given all assistance
“L’ Epoque.” possible to produce a report re-
Mousset drew this conclusion;| commending a Federal Govern-
“The fact that the ‘signs’| ment for the West Indies which
were particularly numerous in| wil! involve an increase in the
the 16th Century, a period of | cost of Government
incéssant troubles, confirms the At the same time we are being
need of a state of receptivity, of jtold we must produce less. The
a psychosis, which renders the) Labour Government seem deter-
mind more receptive to discover) mined to make it dificult for us to
them or to imagine them maintain sane political impulses
“And, as in the 16th Century, | in the West Indies
do we not live now in a turbu-| Thi one issue on which the

lent period of history.”—LN.S. @ On Page 7

K.W.Y.

— Aromatic





Wines —

PAARLITA COCKTAIL An excellent slightly

sweetish appetiser, con-
taining no synthetic sub-
stences, Very handy
for Cocktail Parties as
nothing has to be added.

SWEET VERMOUTH
DRY VERMOUTH

Both Wines have excel-
lent qualities, as bev-
erages and for use with
Gin for appetisers or
Cocktails, They are
made from pure White
Wines with the addition
of extracts of health-
giving herbs.

Liqueurs

K.W.V. VAN DER HUM Delightfully flavoured,

this inimitable old Cafe
Liqueur has already won
for itself world fame.

K.W.V. TABLE WINES, SHERRIES, SWEET
WINES, SPARKLING WINES (Red and White)

K.W.V. BRANDY

With high ester content,
this brandy is unsurpass-

ed for use in Hospitals
and Nursing Homes.





1
‘J
;




Friday

April 14

i850.

—

Counsels Address
Jury In Hospital
| BeachMurderCase
Judge Sums Up To-day

TH CHIEF JUSTICE will sum up to the Jury in the
case today in which McDonald Holder has been charged
with the murder of Anthony George.

Counsel for the Defence and the Prosecution addressed
the Jury yesterday after witnesses Dr. Copland and ‘Dr.
Kirton who had been called by the Court, had given their
evidence.

Know Everything
About Nothing

BRIGHTON.

Dr. G. B. Jeffery, director
of London University’s In- |
stitute of Education, blasted | |
British education techniques
and pleaded for a “slow
down in specialization at our
universities.”

He told the Congress of the
National Union of Students:
“One can see no end to
the process of knowing more
and more about less and less,
until in the end it is know-
ing everything about noth-
ing”. {
Jeffery said in some re-



* In this case’ which began on
Tuesday, the Crown is alleging
that Holder cau sed George’s death
by striking hint on the head with
a piece of pine wood, once vortion
of the keel of a fishing boat, ana
| that by that blow he inflicted
| Severe brain injury described by
the doctors as a
injury. Date of the offence was
November 24, 1949

At the end of Mr, Whyatt’s
address yesterday
Chief Justice adjourned further
hearing until 10 a.m. today.

When the case resumed yester-
day Dr. Copland again entered the
Witness stand.

Mr. Whyait asked : There is no
doubt you diagnosed Anthony
| George as being a drunkard.

Dr. Copland: What I said before
the Magistrate was that from what
I observed I considered Dr. Kir-



i i | eT . CHERBOURG, April 1:
behind ‘the on were | | ton's diagnosis as correct and that | The United. States ‘freighter 7)
. ve the man was in a deep state of | «s ties ster” Honea-hiswen
“Any decent schoolmaster || SMe gre epee Tce Soak ha Says Truman
gives some meaning a char- I told the nurse that the man| shipment of arms to Francé unde tat aril
acter building k tn inking }could not remain where he was! the Atlantic Pact WASHINGTON, April 13
, | DpDpa SAT oy her ' : . . ,
about a 5 feel that ; and that she was to place him on| The “American Importer”, | PRESIDENT TRUMAN said at his Press Conference
sian Drereaagye. 72%. toe a bed outside the Casualty, one! which docked at the Normandy| tndaw the he , ional ui ae pki:
character building is an im- r ana Sr | at I andy today that the international situation has gradually im-
portant part vf their job? frequently used for drunks. Quay, was unofficially estimated | :

Wallace Sharps, 25-year-
old president of the Associ-
ation of London Students,

| understanding Dr. Kirton and you
did diagnosed him as a drunk,
treated him accordingly, and con-



aj

“contre-coup” !

afternoon the |





|} Mr. Whyatt: According to your |



Dipicnenttchtelins |

|

|

| “SHELL” HARRIS, Spartan’s
| White, Everton’s lett winger.

| (Spartan) look on anxiously.

“al rms \.,
Reach France

‘keeper’ goes
Conliffe

down on one knee
(Everton) is tackling. Steede,





|

| Secret

| proved since 1946,

yesterday to be bringing in about i"
“7 At his weekly Press Confe

600 tons of artillery and auto-|
matic weapons, |

Republican Security Guards and
police were standing by to protect |

April 1945,







the five years since he succeeded President Roosevelt. in



to stop a hard grounder from
(Everton) Gibbons and Haynes



S. TIGHTER THAN
EVER BEFORE

rence the President reviewed

agreeing wiih Dr. Jeffery, sequently did not make that de-
said: tailed meticulous examination
“Degree-bearing ignora- which Dr. Leacock told us about.

muses are in no short supply
in this country.”—I.N}S.



as a drunkard there would be no
need to make a detailed examina-
tion.



Mr. Whyatt: I think a

Dr. Copland: If I diagnosed him |

little |

ers when they began unloading the

ship this morning.
The unloading

bright sunshine.
Mere than 600 of the guards, as

went on

} several hundred Cherbourg dock- |

under |

|

|

Mr. Truman said that in the International field the year
1946 was the worst he could ever remember—worse than
anything except a shooting war.

{national and Commonwealth |
gatherings, and should not re-
semble the few pocket states



But shortly thereafter America

40 Atom
Bombs
A Month

April 13.
Dr. W. Leon Godshall of Leigh

later you began to wonder wheth-
er your diagnosis of this
being a drunkard was correct.

Dr. Copland: I did query at one
time about 11 o’clock, but in the
absence of any history of being
struck on the head, and in view
of the history that he was often
in hospital—I myself had seen him
‘in hospital—it seemed quite reas-

man |

Nine-Point:
Anti-Stalin
Plan Outlined

NEW HAVEN, Connecticut,

April 13.
A nine-point American foreign
policy programme “to wrest the
offensive from Stalin” was out-
lined here today by Mr. William

well as police and soldiers, had|
been assigned to the port :

French Minister of National De- |
fence Rene Pleven to-day watched
the unloading of the first shipment
of Atlantic Pact arms at this sea
port and said : |

“The example set by Cherbourg
is the best answer to the insolent
challenge of a certain propaganda”

A Communist demonstration in |
protest against the arrival of these
United States military supplies
fizzled out |

|



{



hiversivy believes Russia has|onable. He was in aleoholic

been making 40 atom bombs aj} coma.

onth at three plants in Siberia, Mr. Whyatt: You did receive a
entral Mongolia and Turkestan. | message from one of the nurses
Dr, Godshall gave no source for | saying that he was foaming at the
his belief when he addressed the , mouth.

Rochester Association of Credit Dr. Copland: That did not sur-
en last night. prise me, that was around 8
Dr. Godshall, head of the De-| o'clock.

partment of International Rela- Mr. Whyatt: You would not

ions at Leigh, said: “I know this

normally expect that.
da lot of other people know it.

Dr. Copland: In view of his res-

Uur Government has been mis-| piration and the fact that he had
leading us by withholding this} been vomiting, he could have
Information from the American| foamed at the mouth. His deep

people.”-—Reuter.

Bevin In Hospital

LONDAN, April 13.
The British Foreign Secretary,
Mr. Ernest Bevin, underwent an
Dperation for haemorrhoids in a

respiration would make him foam.

Mr. Whyatt : It might have indi-
cated some other complicated
factor.

Dr. Copland : It might have, yes.

Mr. Whyatt: I think it was a
little later in the evening that a
nurse said to you, “this man was
beaten up.”







|C. Bullitt, a former United States
Pleven new in a special mili- | ee - er
rv Nere ‘e > fa
tary plane to watch the unload- | , as a de at ot PapcP on
ing operation and gave the local ae 3, ne Ceciaredy “as long as
Dockers Union a cheque for|the Russian people and the peo-
50,000 franes “as a token of keen | Ples of the Soviet satellite states
nmeraciaaedets- 5. ; }are driven by men who prefer a
APP : | murderous doctrine the



, _ | to plain
Later the Minister said: “This | existence of charity.” :
first shipment is sqall but very | ie alidéa: aye hit deehiis
soon we shall see four ships un-j| , at, Urns eed cee
loading. arms at the same time. we oe Cee en sare >
This proves once again that the 5 , at ’

order to stop Stalin’, This was Mr.

French people want to be free.” Bullitt’s

, rogramme,
‘If anyone wants to take a bite Dre

outlined to



. z.}an audience of students at Yale

at eoeae ae will break his University,
man ] eae tet days, all the| ‘!) To. build up United States

tillery will be délivered.” | military strength faster than
artillery v . Stali

During the unloading, Emiliene| | ; ae eee ee aa
Galicier Communist deputy from{ ‘“ Western sud war mee itt
northern France distributed leaf- . pe ¢

adequate arms.







had instituted the programme. of |
| aid to Greece and Turkey and in
June 1947 the Marshall Plan fox
European Economic Recovery.
Since then there had been a
gradual improvement and_ the
worldwide international situation |





i cers had been a moron as President

_ 1 ; ‘ging > *kers to sto ae -

ondon hospital today. _Dr. Copland: That was between a Fe Th osnagy cl hee Pne| (3) To stand up with force to the | But, as President, he proposed t

@ A Foreign Office announcement} 10.30 and 11 when I came out of nai dae sactibucna? tenalioar Oia threat of the Communists in|take credit for the situation

Maid that the operavion was “suc-| the theatre the second time. ealiets Wi . yo etibkt | Eastern Germany, ‘who have | —Reuter.

Wresstul” F Mr. Whyatt: That again might bea announced that they will

A F’. } .

} Mf. Bevin is expected to remain} have been some or for alent = | march Scone sy eT

m the hospital for about a fort-| ing you to reconsider your origina “é r . | East Berlin into West Berlin : z
igh’ '—Reuter. @ on page 3 | Seitle Macassar | (4) To increase United States aid Insulted Bird:
* 99 | to resistance, forces in all
Affair Says | » c Save COU Demoted
- r | me oO help the ¢ ania ; S
| | to “rescue Albania from the oe -
BERMUDA DOCK YARD Soekarno | Communist and thus give] |S. JOHNS.
- | . 1 48 , spir o all the enslaved is understooc at an agree-
7 ! DJARKASSA, April 13. | new spirit to a ’ oe : Maitiad beraiben the
SHI J ] Ss NEX? MARCH President Soekarno of the United | egg behind the Iron Cur- j tal a Fae wi Semeatd eon
3 s a s ¢ »d | ain ? ; Br}
| States of engonesia tela se oe »|(6) To give adequate and effec- | & Co, Ltd. and the Antigua Trades
| st tonight to} ; 1 | E ’ ‘
fordes in a_ broadcas g | ‘hile Shane tf ax’ TH reoeast
“ acassar ¢ ee ive economic a ¢ Sla. ae 7
(From O8F Own Cormpapendest) sebum the acarsas. siteir. 7 ‘r Vv t tne, a iteteons pr i eilell lewted
LONDON, April 13, Fue Caer pare aa ane -~ ie ernie t of Formas four days last week. Discipline has
° : is r “Ve » Indone- st ¢ . ° :

; Decision to close the Naval Dockyard in Bermuda is Abdu} axis, er ees (8) To help the Viennese and the} been exercised upon William
unlikely te affect the efficiency of the America and West ated m4 to the Federal capital te | French to throw the Com- | Knight a foreman of the sugar
Indies < . F Oe tee os > » East | munist out of Indo-China. room who it is claimed abused
ndies Squadron j account for his seizure of the East | 1 . ; rho | { :
This j a ‘ Pas 1 sian capital of Macassar. | (9) To insist that the United Na-|the Union’s President, Hon

Is is the view of Naval observers here after _ close Indetiteien SE | Te tage | pacelneed by |C. Bird. Knight has been demoted
enderation of te Admiralty Sangquncement issued: had oogeyiad the port on April § Soviet veto and boycott >| to an ordinary labourer.
simultaneously in London and Bermuda this morning. | 4, oppose the plan to incorporate | should RUREtion as . . there eee eM an a

an peatland The fact that America and the | East Indonesia into the Federal | were no Soviet be om i Tusiday lost thelr anti-
2 ° - West Indies Squadron will inistate, = ‘ cated. eds tees the “Port
2 Injured As Train future be maintained by the Home| president Soekarno said in_ his | ‘Auiidiet* andi, whigh:le gan-
Fleet ships, does not foreshadow broadcast thav as Supreme Com- BIDAULT RECEIVES erally nécelérated in the shops wa:
" any reduction in Britain’s seaj mander of the Armed Forces he | ‘B 'SSADOR alee dechterGem ships stop 8
Runs Off Rails power. In effect the only change] declared Capt. Azis an “insurgent | AMBA Adtaae Lah nich” incidences
ee ee ee Ma a ageine; the suthorty = ry) eee PARIS, April 13 cause a loss to an island which i:
‘ ; , . A rica A - . a » Al E / ’
NEW DELHI, April 13. | reinforced by the _America nd ernment. of _ eee! ne | i: “Clune detail, Mtones Siena ennate-tersmmanedi- sae coneete- emimee
twelve passengers were injured | West Indies Squadron. - | Unived States 0 aa nealn. etl idte of Honda Wee aeeeed UL tae ee ee,
hen the Delhi Express ran off Bermuda will still ae. il c 4 The nes tic ‘s planned| Hector Madermo, new Ambassa- Although the strike was consid,
the rails last night about nine} base and the C-in-C wil = ong into motion cette ~~ is aoa | ae of the Argentine in Paris, at] ered over MV “Caribbee” called a1
F les from Fyzabad, United Pro-| tinue to have his residence there.| during last wee . Smagen ee oF the Hotel Matignon, the Prime| Antigua on Saturday morning anc
inces rece One big effect of the decision! jnp in South Celebes. ; ’ , ;
Railway it ves by the aa th iockvard may how- —" —(Reuter.) | Minister’s official residence. left without discharging the
The train nant aa e, Seer te : uaen in the length | —Reuter. greater part of her cargo.
after a delay Oh aueul teva Nour, of time the ships spend in cot Will C i T: a
ad come of the accident was ee area, boas eee » Japan i u ax | es 99
a beepers : “BEST THING IN LIFE
i completing an cighteen month or} comes |
stele “a the second train acci- two yéar commission without aj On Foreign In | ;

i the United Provinces ofi| preak as at present, ships in TOKYO. April 13 7 5 . ;

same day — the first and fF future will come to the UK for] ip. soanet Reo Avil 18. | “Mranco’s Son-In-Law Calls Marriage
more serious was that to a @x- after nine or ten months} ,, °° ake alee, ified ‘
press ; overhaul ; .| Hayato Ikeds, voday notified th :
Sed early yesterday, in which,} and then return to complete theit International Taxation Commit- LISBON, April 13 Madrid on Monday. —
able re eae figures avall-| commission tee, representing American, Bri- Carmen Franco, 23 - year - old Asked by journalists what he
jut People died and 157 were | i ish and other foreign in-| daughter of the Spanish Chief of |thought of love and marriage, the
i } . : » facing} tish, Dutch and other foreign | daught > panis t | \
jured. —Reuter, | The biggest grokeoe pow So to| terests in Japan, tha’ the Japanese | State, and her husband, the Mar-| Marquis said: “It’s a marvellous
i | Bermudan ee dred Barba-| Government was prepared to cut ! quis de Villaverde, arrived on their|thing. 1 believe murriage is the
| de with sqverl aa employed | by half the proposed 55 per cent. | honeymoon in Lisbon today by air] best thing in life.”
Steward Ki ii. ag soneunes ee tax on foreign incomes in Japan | from Madrid Carmen added: “I am very
ess atts j in the domyara. » expected} » [keds stated that the reducion| The Marquis told a reporter at} happy. Love is something that

F, Pi, ; UK wor — pee rid ag this} Would operate until December 31,| ‘he airport that they would stay] cannovr be expressed in words. It

rom ane REY Oe ee etiatad wane. 1:10bk bout one week at Estoril, a sea-/is something to be lived.”

} country and re-employved here.) Thereafter, the apanese Gx ide resort near Lisbon. Then they |
LONDON, April 13 | Bermudans rt oh ee ernment uld exter le fly to Rome to see the| The honeymoon couple were
The British European Airways} e tourist : BT ste reductions for ser met.at the. aiyport by Brigadier-
frovttdess, Sue Cramsie, fei S a Bh god oi id thes ld alsé}| General Nieholas Franco, Spanish
S Vikcin airliner which It et l's pilgrir ‘ ing}; Ambassador: to Portugal and the
me Tuck b ughtning soon fter| aoc . 7 dur I Fatima | bride’s uncié.

taking of from Northolt aitport! retu to thei rme ier Madrid physi- Reporters, photographers and
i; OMdght She was seriously Latest reports fro Bert i vere married in|news cameramen attended but ac
‘Njured *” I state that the dockyard will close Renai ( plendour her} crowds. The couple had nov beeu

~-(Reuter.) by March next year. (By Cable) —Reuter | father’s El Pardo Palace near | expected toduy.—Reuter.



















was better than in 1946.

In the domestic field; the Presi-
dent painted a glowing picture of
present-day prosperity in the
United States.

He said that more people were}
at work in the United States than |
in any country in the world. There |
was the most prosperous business
activity in America’s history and |
America was in a tighter financia) |
condition than ever before

He said that the first live years |
of his office had been rather diffi- }
cult but the coutry was still on|
its feet. There was nothing eit
ously the matter with the country

as a whole. The country was ir
fine shape.
The first post-war years had

been easier on the United States}
than the aftermath of any prev'-|
ous war. |

Referring to his political oppon-
ents the President said that he
knew some suggested that this
would have been so even if there













| short





Unite With
Canada

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, April 13.

The imposition of a Federal
Structure to the Colonies, already
heavily burdened with the ex-
pense of administrations they have
to support, might well prove too
much. This point is made this
morning by a special correspon -
dent of The Times, writing from
the West Indiés on the “Closer
Caribbean Union.”

He says the figure of £180,000,
which has been estimated as added
expenditure consequent upon Fed-
eration, has been greeted with
scepticism in view of past ex-
perience of bureaucracy.

“For the British Colonies, an
alternative solution with certain
definite attractions would be union
with Canada, but all things con-
sidered, the founding of a new
Dominion would be more in keep-

ing with the glowing national
aspirations of the Caribbean
peoples.” It is pointed out that
if a Dominion is to be evolved,
the first need will be suitable
leadership. The writer says that
West Indies as they will show

this summer are capable of unit-
ing to form a first class cricket
team. On the same lines, they
should be capable of producing a
hrst class Commonwealth

At the same time on the law ot
averages, small communities ot
100,000 to 500,000, are not likely
by themselves to produce enough
talent “effectively to guide the
destinies of a sovereign state

This need for wider opportuni- |
ties and experience applies to ail}
professions, |

It is essential also that the}
Dominion should be large enough!
to make its voice heard at Inte,- |

presently surviving Tn Europe. |
— (By Cable).

Van Zeeland



Sees Leopold’

»
GENEVA, April 13.
M. Paul Van Zeeland, Belgian
Premier Designate, arrived here |
by ‘air today on the urgent sum-
mons of King Leopold |
M. Van Zeeland told waiting
correspondents: “I can make abso-
lutely no statement except that |
have been urgently called here to|
an audience with his Majesty. |
“It is not through discretion that
I can say nothing. I do not know |
anything.”
M. Van Zeeland’s special Bel-
gian Air Force Dakota brought
also King Leopold’s two principal
secretaries, Professor
Pirenne and Willy

The three men drove straigh‘
from the airport to one of Geneva's
Jeading hotels where they had a
talk in the public lounge

M. Van Zeeland, who gave the
impression that he did not know
the exact purpose of his mission
to the King, said he had no fixed
departure time.



Jacque
Weemaes

Van Zeeland had planned t
present a new Cabinet to Prince
Charles, the Belgian Regent, at

noon on Tuesday but the meeting
was unexpectedly postponed

After seeing the Regent late on
Tuesday night M. Van Zeeland
said he had presented a proposition
to Prince Charles. M. Van Zeeland
stated that Prince Charles had
decided upon a series of consulta-
tions in connection with the propo-
sition

According to circles close to the
Caretaker Cabinet, the Premier:
Designate’s “proposition” amount-

ed to a list of Ministers with whom
he proposed to form a new admin
istration

—(Reuter,)

May Reconsider

Attitude On

Seretse’s Return
LONDON, April 13.



W.I. Should |

Aduncate

Z

Priee;

CENTS



GREAT BRITAIN MUST LET US LIVE

IF THEY WANT LOYALTY

GOMES CALLS FOR

EARLY

PORT-

START

OF-SPAIN, April 13.

HON'BLE ALBERT GOMES, one of Trinidad’s

two political delegates to the Sugar Conference
in the United Kingdom, thinks it important that
the delegation should reach England as soon as

possible.

FLYING SAUCERS
IN THE BIBLE

PARIS

Now the flying saucers have
been spotted in the Bible.

They were seen there by a
Paris newspaper. |

Albert Mousset, writer for the
usually conservative daily
“L’Epoque,” told his readers |
that the saucers very well might |
be the “signs in the sky” men-
tioned in the Bible.

He was referring to Luke,
Chapter 21, Verse 11 which!
reads :

{
“There will be great earth- |

quakes, there will be terrible
phenomena and great signs in
the sky.”

Nothing new at all in the
saucers, explained Mousset, Just!
look at history.

In 1530 inhabitants of the
European Empire of Charles V
clearly observed an army of
knights and armed peasants
marching right across the heav-
ens as plain as the nose of your
face.

And just two years after that
all Germany kept Spotting bands
of dragons swooping through
the skies with faces like pigs.

Even the sensible Swiss re-
ported seeing allegorical scenes
enacted in the clouds—-and this
in broad daylight,

One of the best celestial spec-
tacles took place in the skies of
Silesia in 1545 when the popu- |
lace was thrown into an uproar
by the sight of a pitched battle
between two armies. One was
commanded by a lion; the other
by an eagle.

A forerunner of sky-writing |
evolved in 1549, went on
“L’Epoque’s” Mousset, when the
portrait of the Duke of Saxony
emerged from the clouds.

Although the flying saucers
have not yet made a debut in
the Paris area, there seems to
have been an abundance of
heavenly apparitions over the
French capital in ancient times, |

In 1578 Parisians are supposed
to have witnessed “fires in the

air creating great light and
smoke.” And in 1582 there was
a similar display of “creat

splendor,” according to ancient
manuscripts cited by!
“L’ Epoque,”
Mousset drew this conclusion: |
“The fact that the ‘signs” |
were particularly numerous in |

Its main task he said must be to
tell the English public what poli-
tical repercussions are likely to
result in the West Indies from the
policy of “smug obtuseness which
the British Government seem de-
termined to follow”,

Gomes thinks the recent state-
ment by the Food Minister that
the Government will not budge
from the 640,000 ton offer to the
West Indies is a direct challenge
to the unity which the B.W.I.
sugar producing territories achiev-
ed at Grenada.

Tee



HON. ALBERT GOMES
Failure to stand up to it would
be an admission by the W.I. that

the territories are disunited, timid
and rresolute, The important
eleven-man delegation must reach
England as soon as possible seeing
that the main task must be to tell
the English public what political
repercussions in the West Indies
are likely to result from the policy

of smug obtuseness the Btitish
Government seem determined to
follow.

There is an interestIng paradox
in the policy of the Labour Gov-



the 16th Century, a period of)
incessant troubles, confirms the |
need of a state of receptivity, ot |
a psychosis, which renders the |
mind more receptive to discover
them or to imagine them

“And, as in the 16th Century.
do we not live now in a turbu- |
lent period of history.”—LN.S,







ernment towards the colonies. On
the political front they are most
liberal with new constitutions, on
the economic side obviously very
reluctant to make concessions to
make possible for these new
constitutions to succeed

We say such people in the
West Indie that they are two-
faced. We are given all assistance
possible to produce a report re-
commending a Federal Govern-
ment for the West Indies which
will involve an increase in the
cost of Government

At the same time we are being



told we must produce less
Labour Government seem deter-
mined to make it difficult for us to
maintain sane political impulses
in the West Indie

This is one issue on

@ On Page 7

The

vhich the



K. W. V.

— Aromatic

PAARLITA COCKTAIL

SWEET VERMOUTH
DRY VERMOUTH

Wines —

An excellent slightly
sweetish appetiser, con-
taining no synthetic sub-
stances, Very handy
for Cocktail Parties as
nothing has to be added.

Both Wines have excel-
lent qualities, as bev-
erages and for use with
Gin for appetisers or
Cocktails, They are
made from pure White
Wines with the addition

of extracts o e -
The Commonwealth Relations | oe. Re











Office here to-night hinted that

Seretse Khama, exiled Bamang-
wato.chief to the Tribal reserve
in Béchuanaland, might be re-
considered as a result of disturb-
ances there last week.

Eleven Africans arrested after
riots at Serowe, the tribal capital
on Tuesday, were today remand+
ed in custody when they appeared
before the Assistant District Com-
missioner, charged with disturb-
ing the peace.

Giving its reasons for fot al-
Jowing Seretse to enter the tribal
reserve so far, the Commonwealth

Relations Office stated that his
lawyer had failed to give assur-

ances concerning Seretse’s
haviour there.
The statement added that [.ut!

be-

Khama, former London typist,
could visit her husband at any
time.

Patrick, Gordon Walker, Com-|
mohwealth Relations Minister,
told Parliament last month ‘that
Seretse’s return to the Protectorate
was on condition of his own]
good conduct, and also that the
order and good government of the
tribe are not disturbed

‘Seretse is now at Loba, out-
side the Bamangwato territory,
awaiting permission to visit

* Ruth, who expects a baky in July
~~ ( Reuter.)

its attitude towards the return of |

}
|

|
|

i

K.W.V. VAN DER HUM

K.W.V. TABLE WINES,

giving herbs.

| | Liqueurs

Delightfully flavoured,
this inimitable old Cafe
Liqueur has already won
for itself world fame.

SHERRIES, SWEET

WINES, SPARKLING WINES (Red and White)

K.W.V. BRANDY

With bigh ester conten
this brandy is unsurpass

ed for use in Hospitals

and Nursing Homes.

|
|

t,





































































sage CNS ci 5 ee es ol = rete ES) as ae on ce oe SS aes! aw YD [a eee ———_ ae ass ae
Ee eS ee
FRIDAY, APRIL 14, j9«
] . 14, 19
PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE deca RIL 14, 1959
EERE ME TPIT |
‘ } —— | yo09 POSS SSSS SS SOS O SONGS
: : a No Papers || poy | KN ii
r | i . ‘ 1S a
| R. AND MRS. ROY WHaon : p ROWAL Worthings x JUST RECE s i
of Trinidad are now in Bar- ° VED R
* ' bados for a couple of weeks’ holi- Hy Themas Hardie To-day 5 é& 8.30 and Continuing % ;
day. They arrived last week by i M-G-M's Musical Romance % %
7 IS Excellency the Governor the S.S. “Stuyvesant” and are _LE HAVRE. : ey Gate. HAL % %
will be attending the meeting staying at tire Windsor Hotel. auntie bape yen oo = Judy GARLA! yeni . i e %
tt the Y.M.C.A. on Monday at Mr. Wilson told Carib that his re > he or i ery Ot th | in 1% g
+15 pm.,-when Mr. P. M ee mt gp or ag roma amen ee ees eae ack and fo’ 3
Sherlock; Vice-Principal of the and, first went out to Trinida today. : A i yee
- | niversity College of the West about the year 1840 and since then,| She has spent 23 of her 39 years |i] +"TNEIE PIRATE Ig Pkgs. Goddards’. Plate
“ndies will speak on the subject his family had been connected} prison, but without committing
f The Ui - Woot ith th 1 a single criminal offence. Her mis-
. e University College. H2 with that colony. 4 Color by Technicolor Powder
vill be The Wilson’s h , take was that she was born of
supported by Dr. J..H. he ilson’s have two sons, : em a} :
- ; Pp 4 r} in th parents of mixed nationality. This with
1 » Professor of History and one a phe Pt pat €ltime she has been, jailed for a ee walk 1 2 Lux Flakes
j a seer rT ae Trinidad Reginant por later with month, and for the usual offence, er ee OLD FAVOURITE MEDICINE ;
r he Windward Islands Battalion] "0 Papers.” A treasure chest of Magic RELIEVES CONSTIPATION Rinso
; Still A Mystery t ~ c . De ar age el a ve on}! “Her mother was White Russian ai ae aid 7
7 _ y aoe SOk is oes . Lucia) ond her father a Prussian scine- | To feel bright, clear eyed Ae sviean Dowell. oe
: Q} VERYONE yesterday was talk- | Their younger son, a graduate Of} rat a combination which she and "figestion. regularity. Dr, Morse. Tins Silvo
, ing about the supposed Flying | McGill University has been with] 121); “criminal”. As a result her } indian toot, Pills SUPP. dable 50-year-old :
a, which have been seen for | the International Film Board Of] ,apers have never been “in order.” EMPIRE V remedy, with se earitiay, uelbs. Beep » Windolene
he heer _— over Barba- re A. bs igenet oo s — She has been tortured by Germans { the system right and regula. See how mue
“ant Fr. peter . were” very 5 p) PORTS, ee and Russians, and arrested by better you : +3
‘ceptical about the whole thing, | a long vacation in Trinidad and] French and Americans as well, she To-day 2.30 & 8.30 | » Shinio
“thers showed great concern and | is ours eee says. \ DR. l Chemico
- mterest about the two objects. in his sphere of work, namely, Nina’s father was shot by the aa i ”
Some think that they are two Visual Education and Educational] Russians, and her mother died and Continuing i! i
_lamets, others will not give their | and Documentary Films ete. while she was still a baby. At 16 || JNDIAN i|% » 1-0-1 Cleanser
“pinion. Anyway whatever they | Mr. Wilson is a Director of] she was condemned to life impris- I} i?
_'re many Barbadians are losing Wilson and Johnstone, Ltd.,] onment for being the daughter of lt t $ » Harpic
yuite a bit of sleep, waking up in | Merchants and Agents of Trinidad.| a White Russian. “ aided siemtiiadelins A .
sia 1 d aft | V6
he middle of the night trying to | . She was released after 12 years H F it TRUSTED REMEDY | Ced oli
fiise @ua two mystery objects for f Toronto Tourists in a Russian jail, following the a UK i aoa Aa Bots. O’Cedar Polish
’ hemselves, Russo-German alliance of 1939. bee) We red 5O Years UR
“ yim visitors from Toron-| She made her way to Berlin. _ eae on ee { %
Welcome ; to lett the island recently She was again sentenced to life 7 Ne 8 ne
ARIB welcomes the arrival of | Mr. and Mr. J. L. Kestle atter | imprisonment, ‘this time for help- a Io nn nn et FY

if



}

H.N.M.S. Karel Doorman the
Jutch aircraft carrier which is
jue to arrive here today from
Duracao.

This is the second Dutch War-
thip to visit Barbados in ‘under
ive months. H.N.M.S. Van Speijk
vas here in late November 1949.

It was the H.N.M.S. Karel Door-

ind men of the Karel Doorman :
lappy stay_here.







the Trinidad Guardian and was in

Barbados for the

Test Matches covering the

B.G

Barbados



whenever he goes outside to catch
a bus, there is a car or cars parked
right underneath one or both of
these bus stops.

MRS.

ANTHONY EDE®

BY THE WAY



4 ira * me statement that him the devil of a dance. They widely distributed the stock-piles
» radio technicians are ad+ organised their own football teams, could not be manipulated is mere-
| vanced enough to send a wireless became open-air girls, and talked ly a repetition of Sir Henry
Ta to Mars and back” (my s0 shrilly that the poor Owph had Golden's discredited theory of ex-
A eee Ba to plug his ears with bits of cork, port price manipulation. And, in
} nber standing in somé They went mad on ‘“Westernisa- any case, it could only apply t
? averns near Syracuse and being tion,” plagued their lord to wear a degree of stabilisation which is
; 'tdvanced enough to get the echo a celluloid shirt front and a stiff impossible without inventing a
i ny rout retumed some. But collar, threw sherry and gin about new price mechanism. A _ buffer
ae ny caption. "3h the 1801 Festival 90 harem, and read “Wai and pool, to be practicable, must be
a oe ee aoa eact at him every time he poked completely divorced from con-
: : Ss, sag s his head round the door siderations of production, and how
lo Mars from the top of the Shot Vear Thing that possible under a system
ower must be answered. If you «, oe emi ” ; of forced supply answering re-
sk, “Is that Mars?” the voice of ata ckul is) Sane Peloaaihie ethinted den ey I ‘dua tin ore
eT etwanead tachnician under the elected 4 their Ce nstituc ncetes. nn os ad bt ar eave tin free
ht oor must reply, “Of course. What TER (ew s item ) to find its own level

jid you think it was?” (Oo! Ma A ang agg Acacias tart ery ol Rissole Mio!

Hea "hey can talk English!’’) gle, the Communist Party om eee wee
m4) Little Women once more has a workable major A’ last there is something
: i - ep a ity over all other parties which “replaces bacon or
HE United Nations, having meat, and can be used to fill

' investigated a report that the >
'Ton of Bikom has 110 wives, “de- OTHING

than the

more lau





i ided that any action to be taken i present talk in the each rissole does not contain
i hould be felt to the wives’. In City of the _establishme of more nourishment than frozen
the case of the Owph of Goboria, buffer pool of tin. The gument Turkish swordfish you may call
| ‘who had 317 wives the ladies led that if stocks of tin were more me Mrs. Araminta McGaffney.

.

“KHAKI DRILL—

EVANS ano WHITFIELDS

HAVE IT — AT THE



MR. WILLIAM VAN YPEREN is seen here sitting in the grounds
of Bay Mansion yesterday, painting in water-colour a scene of the





Do You WantA Buffer Pool?

ghable




three weeks at the Marine Hotel,
during which time they dd quite
a bit of fishing and played golf,
returned home by T.C.A.

Mr. Hamilton H. Gardiner who
is President of the Masco Electric
Co., in Toronto and his daughjer
Mrs. Audrey Pape and grandson
David who were also staying at the

- nan, which took Prince Bernhard Marine returned to Canada by
_ 4 the-Netherlands on his visit T.C.A., recently.
; 0 the Dutch West Indies and

south America a few months ago, tat

ind she is now returning to Hol-
‘and.
} :

It is hoped that during her CF 5

, short visit all Barbadians will d« CROSS WORE
, sheir utmost to give the officers



i Ls garden Ss ' i:aia
: Ask Mr. Jiggs! Arriving On Sunday Dutch Artist H
ARIB Mas met a gentleman UE TO ARRIVE on Sunday by e ~ “ hea
ae who says he has seen a Flying B.W.LA is Miss Bertha HERE was a small crowd
, Saucer. “Yesterday,” he said, ‘! Lamas, of the Dorothy Gray Park gathered along the wharf
mnoyed my wife and she threw 4a...) Sal n. She will be ac- esterday, and Carib joined in to
1 saucer at me!” ibis eryy M s Blaine Kin. S¢¢ What was going on. They
Another bright fellow suggested SO'PaNI®” woes ane oi were looking at an artist, Mr.
. | try and interview Mr. Jiggs, of kead of the Dorothy Gray Loncon witiam Van Yperen, a Dutchman
- “Bringing Up Father” fame salon ,. Who was painting in water colour
‘"Maggie has thrown enough 2" Monday, Miss Lamas, assist- 4 scene of one section of the
saucers at him; he should kno\ ed by Mis: Kinkead will be giving Careenage.
‘what they look like !” Fae ge carga re. at W te Mr. Van Yperen with his wife,
i otel where they will be ‘ying arrived here on Saturday from| ros
> Returns After Daughter’s until April 21st Surinam where they now live, and} g ana 1 coin Tahicieds perform
Wedding’ Leaving Tomorrow are touring pare’ Trinidad, ances which skaters. so term
aia atacarashatal tS. ANTHONY EDEN who i 3ermuda and Haiti, before return- rs ts
M*. aN ; ORTILLO, re- M* : ns a ee ake, Sed third ing to Dutch Guiana. 7 tat Wn’ it should be. 4) “—e
| turned to Venezuela yester paying aEDSG , wih 0. His last case was the one most

They expect to be in Barbados

liay via Trinidz 7 > Wir , visit is due to leave here tomorrow read. (5)
hie was in —_ ny B _ 1.A y T.C.A.. on her return journey for one month and are staying at] \1. You can see pots this shape. (4)
x . arbados for his 4. 5 nd via Canada one of the flats at Bay Mansion, | .2. This rot is feathered. (3) :
j laughter Ramona’s wedding, who *” ~"' . ete Carib visited his flat later 3. The part that may snare you. (4)
jwas married to Mr. A. Corrigar been here since Marct ‘ wn eR S flat later 1M} 4 Limp of farm servant. (3)
ey Wednesday aft See spent her time enjoy- the day and saw some of his) .7. Just one of these little corners
P saay atternoon at St : * oe W . are caves : . (4)
Patrick’s Church, Jemotts | nt climate on the St orks which are very good indeed 8. This clue seems to be a neces
Mie Gorriss ’ . mre , guest at Mr. and He has many oil paintings as well, sity. (4) 20. Spry! (5)
Cable and Wi a eye oe Mrs Ronald Tree at their home and is also very good at portraits n. Fae ar | No a * Sube tb
~able and ireless here Heron’ Beach’ which he does in oil. He says he} het examen or T ieave iisie.
On Honeymoon Mr and Mrs Tree are at hopes to give an exhibition 25. Care for. (4)
re their honeymoon at present in New York, and it is not Barbados of his work,
i Leeton-on-Sea, the Strean yet known if Mrs. Eden will visit
are Mr. and Mrs. Harcourt Thorne, them there before she returns
;| Who were married in Trinidad 01 England
aster Sunday.
Mr. Thorne is Sports Editor of BUFO

oo games exhibited her work at the Salor them. (5)
or his paper, His bride is tne d’Automn and had a private ex- 12 ee fle is omly seen sideways.
. 1 se Jowle : , . (
Se he ie roe ' wie hibition at the Gallery Royale. ry Melt, 90 that oa, inesttere. (9
aug x of Mrs. Justina Bowl ‘oe (6, Rendezvous. ( v. over,
land the late James Bowle: Assistant Manager 22. Taken from frat) ladies (3)
i 8 ° . R. AND MRS. EDDIE O’CON Solution of yesterday's puszle,—Across:
' Staying With His Aunt M NOR who arrived recently 1, Forscoth gabe, Slice: ie" wi
R. AND MRS. CHARLIE TAY from Trinidad are spending threc | \ Drain 19. Abed; 41. Off; 22. Narrow!
> . 3. : . nterdict wo: . Facts,
’ LOR left for Trinidad by weeks at Coral Sands, Worthing | } Reed: 3 spliced: 4, Orone: 5° Tarry:
| B.W.1LA. on Wednesday afternoon Mr. O’Connor is Assistant Man 5 ner ar tk Want 17’ Door
for a short visit They will be ager of Barclays Bank in Port (8, Aft; 20, Bes” r P , ,
staying with Charlie’ unt, Mr of-Spain. They were accompaniec
Mc Cutcheon, who will be return by their Tony and _ niece
| ing with them to spend a holiday Peggy Piaqcenprinanieneanismtnncin eiltnnitiitnatiaaasile
_| in Barbados. With Creole Petroleum BEAUTY DEMONSTR ATION
ie Bus Stops . M® and Mrs. Charles F. Linds ) L f t
HERE are two Bus Stops a ley and their two childrei A
between the Pavilion and the Adora Ann and Dana arrived o A Beauty Demonstration will
, Pavilion Court, Hastings. A resi- Monday afternoon by B.W.1A be staged by Miss Bertha Lamag
» dent in that area tells me that from La Guaira to spend one of the Dorothy Gray Park Avenue

Salon at the Windsor Hotel on
Monday, lith April, at 5 p.m.,
followed by personal consultationg
to those interested.

week at the Paradise Beach Club
Mr

and

Lindsley is from Los Angeles
works in
Petroleum.

Venezuela with

N Creole 14.4.50,—3n



By BEACHCOMBER

in (
which in-| Slept in skins. (5)
cludes scenes in Holland during Down
the war, Dutch street scenes, and] * Fae acre oe person you cannot
there are also some paintings done} 9, Put an end to Cleopatra. (3)
in Trinidad and Dutch Guiana, as . it's a scent. (5)
well as some local scenes 5. oppeere be a temporary sub
S| val scenes. 5 6.

His wife who is also from Hol-] 6. Relating to a change of musica!
shih te ae as 6 as 6 back nstrument, (8)
are a 5 ee a h As studiec 7, See 3 A b
in Italy ane aris. In Paris she} 9. You expect to get @ enore from

sausage rolls.” It is a new rissole

made of sunflower kernels, and if From 7



KHAKI DRILL





a

RIGHT PRICE






t
BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
|

ing Allied prisoners escape from a
German concentration camp. But
she too escaped, and reached
France to join the Resistance. And
fall in love.

After the Liberation she asked
American authorities—who had
arrested her—for the “papers”
necessary to get married. After, a
long delay she was advised to ask
the Russians. But the latter only
shipped her off to Eastern Ger-
many.

Last year she slipped into the
American Zone of Western Ger-
many, and eventually hitched a
ride to Alsace in the hope of find-
ing her long-lost fiance. But she
could find no traces of him. She
then came to Paris, and hopped a
train to Le Havre to board “any
ship sailing away from Europe.”

When caught by French police,
who like everyone else demanded
‘papers”, she only said:

“fT envy animals, birds—even
beasts of prey.”

And when her month in the Le
Havre jail is completed, she may
still have “no papers.”—I.N.S.

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FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1950
—————es

Counsels Address Jury
In Murder Case

@ From Page |
jagnosis’

“Or. Copland: Yes. .

Wr. Whyatt: As a matter of fact
in the light of what you know and
what you have heard since, do you
believe it was a much more seri-
ous matter than just drunkenness?

Dr. Copland: Yes.

‘ Mr. Whyatt: You would not

differ from Dr. Cato’s opinion and
that of Dr. Leacock, that the man

was suffering from what is known
a contre-coup injury?

Dr. Copland: He had a contre-

injury.

re. Whyatt: When you gave
evidence before the magistrate you
were asked by my Learned Friend
for the defence, a number of ques-
tions which might be called ques-
tions put to an expert witness, not
of what you saw. One was, if a
man got a blow would haematoma
take long to appear. You had said
you did not know how long’ it
would take.

Dr. Copland: Yes.

Mr. Whyatt: You were also
asked if a man fell off a bed and
struck his head on the floor would
that produce haemorrhage, and
you said you could not say.

Dr. Copland: Alcoholic intoxi-
cation would produce cerebral
haemorrhage. :

Mr. Whyatt: Finally you sum-
marised these hypothetical opin-
ions by saying that in the matters
referred to you were not prepared
to express an opinion.

Dr. Copland; All these questions
depended on» several factors.
Whether a man would haemorr-
hage or not depended on several
factors.

Mr. Whyatt : You would not to-
day wish to express an opinion
that is in contradiction to the evi-
dence given by Dr. Cato and Dr.
Leacock.

Dr. Copland: I would not ex-
press an opinion in contradiction
to what I have heard.

Mr. Dear: The last

time you

Was filled with aa
i cid

alcoholic odour
uagnose him. All per-
are sent through the
Casualty into the General Hospi-
tal go on a provisional diagnosis.

To the Court: Any patient ad-
mitted through the Casualty to the
hospital by a doctor enters the
1ospital on a provisional diagnosis.
' GO not consider that a diagnosis
has beer’ made when a person has
been left under observation.

Mr. Whyatt;

not

sons who



Would you agree}
with me that the first Step in aj
diagnasis is to obtain, if possible, |
the history of the patient? i

Dr. Kirton; If possible. i

Mr. Whyatt; And indeed it is |
important to pay the closest atten-|
tion to the history of a patient}
when making a diagnosis? |

Dr. Kirton: Yes.

Mr. Whyatt: In some cases his-
tory is more important than any-
thing else.

Dr. Kirton: Yes. }
Mr. Whyatt; For instance, in
cases of a head injury it would

be particularly important.
Dr. Kirton; Yes
Mr. Whyatt: Because, of course,
these cases could easily be mis-
taken for cases of irunkenness.
Dr. Kirton: Definitely.
Mr Whyatt: Sometimes

a doctor
seeks to obtain the history from
the patient himself it on other

occasions if the patient is uncon-

scious or does tot =ce-operate
you have to tr; obtai mj}
a third party |
Dr. Kirton: That is right |
Mr. Whyatt At: f loctor
gets a wrong history, he may very
easily be misled and make

wrong diagnosis.
Dr. Kirton: Very likely, I agree.
Mr. Whyatt: In thi:
obtained some history from oe
Carter.
Dr. Kirton:
Mr. Whyaitt;



‘Ase vou

Yes, |
She told you that}

saw the man was either when he the patient was an alcoholic, andy

was dead or dying.

what you asked*her was whether








Argentine
Ambassador



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Ta



SLIGHTLY MIXED BATHING

Worla Copyright.

By arrangement wilh Daily Herald
3,90







W e Shall Paden

Stronger

0,000 HAITIANS
WILL GET PENICILLIN

en a era

Rebel Leader Sends
_A “Peace” Message

DJAKARTA, April 13.

Unless Capt. Andi Abdu Azis,
rebel leader of Macassar, is on his
| way to the Indonesian capital,
; Diakarta, by noon today, President
| Soekarne will announce “forceful
measures” to be taken against him
/and his troops, a Defence Ministry

|spokesman announced here.

It was. reported earlier today
from Macassar that Capt. Azis has
sent a special emissary with a
“peace” message to the Federal
Government in Djakarta, Lut he
was said to have refused \) go to
the capital himself, ignoring an
ultimatum to.leave Macass:’,



Capt. Azis, 26-year-old “vritish
trained paratrooper, took over
military control of Macassa:, capi-
tal of Easy Indonesia, on April 5
after weeks of tension folowing
the Federal Government’s plan to

incorporate East Indones. inte
Jogjakarta State.
Last Friday Capt. Azis was

given 47 hours in which vo come
to Djakarta and account for the
revolt,—Reuter.



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Dr. Copland: That was the last the patient was drunk or dying.



time, soon after 1 a.m. Dr. Kirton; Yes.

Mr. Dear: On the occasions Mr. Whyatt; She replied that he
you saw him, did you see any is always being brought in drunk,
marks of bruises or blood or and you proceeded on the assump-|
swellings? {ion that he was a drunkard and

Dr. Copland: No. not dying.

Mr. Dear: The first time you pr, Kirton: That does not sum |

saw him he was lying on the floor yy the
aoe mele: Yes Mr. Whyatt: Do you accept the |
Mr. Dean "You said then you 2ccount of Nurse Carter as being
ordered him to be put in the outer Completely accurate?
room in the Inquiry Office Dr. Kirton: It did not
Dr: Copland: Yes. off my guard
Mr Dear: You said that you Mr. Whyatt; Did you have any
went back to your quarters, there reason to doubt it?
you received a message and re- Dr. Kirton: No.
turned to the Casualty. Did you Mr. Whyatt: And why do you
see the man lying on the floor in not accept it as being accurate?

posftion ontirely

put me

the outer room? : Dr. Kirton: Because one does
Dr. Copland: No, He was lying not easily accept a statement of
on the outer bed on which I that sort.

ordered him to be placed.

Mr. Dear: My Learned Friend
has asked you if you agree with
the opinions of Dr. Leacock an:

Mr. Whyatt: I am asking you
about the history she gave you
the history of drunkenness. What
T am putting to you is, that you

a. a of sega sea m had no reason to doubt the histor:
pis oe vl iwon. to vou by Nurse Carter,

Dr. Copland: Which opts'o« Ne tinea. ee -

e inions of the p $0) aN
a We‘ aadings? a ae Mr. Whyatt: Since you had no
M Dear? | would like to know ‘son to coubt, it would have,
whetller hay are in PP rites heen reasonable for vou to |
agreement with everything tne) ceed upon the assumption that me
said or whether you have any patient was a drunkard? '
qualifications to make Dr. Kirton: I know nothing at
, : é t » se yn hear

Dr. Copland: There is one qual- ®!! about the case, I only reard
ification I think I might make. one side, I wanted more informa-
You asked whether it was possi- tion. : : oth
ble to distinguish .if the man had Mr. Whyatt: Was it not reas-
had several haemorrhages at Onable to place reliance on the
i imes. Usually if there Nurse? ;
i + ” different Dr. Kirton: I am responsible
haemorrhages the post mortem en Miaeett due tn not place
would show a laminated appear- Dr. Kirton: T did
a Mr. Whyatt: Having placed

To the Court: That would be,
you would see shades possibly as
a result of changes taking place.

some reliance upon the history of
drunkenness, then the next’ step

tulke it in diagnosing, to see
Mr. Dear: Witn all due respect \i inher the symptoms of the
you may have misunderstood the )tiant qt in with the history. Is
quesiion which I had put to Dr. thay joni?
Cato and Mr. Leacock. I will read Dr. Kirton: Yes.
that question. “If a man after re- Mr. Whyatt: For example, if

eeiving an injury by a blow to the you have a history of drunken-

head had a mishap such as I had ness, one thing you would look
supposed — by that I mean an- 4)¢ for would be the smell of
other blow, thereby increasing the jo hol,

severity of the - haemorrhage, Dr. Kirton: Yes.

would ‘he post mortem examina- Mr. Whyatt: You found that
tion indicate the increased jhe patient’s general appearance
haemorrhage?” was like that of a chronic

Dr. Copland: That would de- alcoholic.

pend on vhe time the second mis- Dr, Kirton: Yes,

hap happened. It would depend Mr, Whyatt: In view of tha
on how many hours after the first history of drunkenness, on, whieh

you placed some reliance and ii
view the fact that the symp-
toms fitted in with that history,
would it not have been reasonable
for you.or any doctor to diagnose
the man’s condition to see if i

@ mishap had taken place.
Dr. Kirton: At tie time of thd
me oceurrence jin question 1 was an
out-patient docvor at the General
Hospital. I was on duty in the
B Casualty Department of the Hos-

of



pital on November 24 when a man was due te alcoholic int< xication?
Was brought in on a stretcher and = Dr. -‘Kirton: I A Pe le
pul! on the farthest bed from me | Mr. Whyatt: A provisional

on my right. 1 was sitting at (ne diagnosis which in fact you made.

desk, that is in the inner room. a: Te Bvine eae
Shortly after Nurse Carter went “rr. Whyati: Having made §
provisional diagnosis there was

over and examined the man. She

went vo the other end.of the room. ™° need to make that meticulous

. detailed examination of the
then went over to the patient yatient which was described by

and hed a look at him. On my Dr, Leacock
way back to my desk I asked ie 4

i : . no
Nurse Carter a question to which neat a epee ep '
she replied. Isat at my desk for "“Mir ‘ Woyatt: Would jit be
a livile while and heard the man recurale to say that you did not

out in a normal voice for @ -x;mine him fully or carefully’
nurse. He then stretched violently Dr. Kirtom: I would prefer .o
A nurse from the other end of tic ay fully. I made a _ carefu
Toom started to goto him. | ~xamination but it did not go as
wpped her and went myself. far as it might have gone.

en I first saw him he was Mr. Whyatt: If you had got a
lying on his back on yhe left side torch and looked into the man’s

his face with his face pointing ear, you might have seen traces
to the wall, When I saw him a of ‘biood which you would not
Second time he had turned his face otherwise have seen.
Upwards. I then examined him, There might have
He had a good pulse between 70 plood in his left ear.
8 : a his skin felt warm, re- “pp, Kirton: It was very difficult
nba ons were quite normal. His ¢- see invo the man’s left ear from
and toe seemed to be raised where I stood. I am absolutely
radial Lacy naar that his certain that there was no blood
e] artery was somewhat thick- anywhere else; in his right ear,
? 1ose or nostril. There could have
heen dry blood deep in his left
ear as you suggest. I was not
eally looking for that sor’ of
ching, There was no reason why
€ should look for this thing in a
‘drunk’ with a history.

Mr. Whyatt: If you had been

Looking down at what I think given a history to the effect thay

@ 5 the blow and then looking up the patient had been struck by a
below, I saw no of pitce of wood on the side of his

been dry

T examin!d both sides of his

looking down on him. Look-

ng over his chest I noticed a faint

Smudge which looked like blood

This was in a position about oppo-

Site his sixth left rib, a few inches
from vhe sternum.






: sign : tae ke
bleeding fr : ‘ hed | Substance. He spoke of locating :
rom his @ar, nose or ead, you would have approached : ae es
mouth. he case quite diiferently nee over the parietal
P. then returned to my desk and Dr. Kirton: Of course. I would Mr Whyatt: You are not
shortly afterwards the nurses ‘ have wasted time. I would | es eee ae ws peted
ae changed. T stood with the | iitfed the patient to the Ge: haa oe ea a : "ti eer
r nu seorge wi yrought invo ri su
for nurse locking at the patient aign abc ’ ¢| ality, he wa not suffering from
fa ee time before I left. My tr. Wiryatt: In view of the post ntrarenie Dates fang iro
utc, usbection was at seven min- rte examination findings,| CO2'e-coup inju
sae past four and T left the Ca J u agree that the man’s] _ ae nee fe hponemined aie
“ity at twenty-five minutes past in ontre-coup Injury? poe. me a Saree
I rT called back to see tv Dr. Kirton: | have listen care- aid not outer, ron; a contre-coup
and left the hospital final! norte findings |#4jury when he cime
I Mr. Whyatt: Weuld ve
he t p 4y Opinion
ie gh de @ On Page



In Britain

LONDON, April 13.

Senor Chalos A. Hogan, new
Argentine Ambassador to Britain,
arrived in London’s docks today
in the Argentine liner Presidente
Peron. He was accompanied by
his wife and children.

In a statement Senor
said “under the Government of
General Peron, Argentina has
entered upon a new era—an era
in which we strive in defence of
our sovereignty and economic in-
dependence,”

Senor Hogan said all that Argen-
tina asked was that “she should
clasp hands with Britain ever
more lightly as the years go on.”

Absent from the company of

Hogan

Embassy officials who went aboard
the Presidente Peron to greet
Senor Hogan were the three

labour attaches who recently pro-
tested to the Vickers Armstrong
Company. that workers from the
firm’s shipyard had not been
invited to a luncheon for the
launching of the Argentine liner
17 De Octubre.

Senor Hogan with a smile told a
reporter, “I speak a little Engl’sh
very fluently. Senora Hogan speaks
no English at all’. The new Am-
bassador said that he felt honoured
and happier than he could express
at being privileged to serve Argen-
tina as her Ambassador “‘in historic
Britain. England hag been our
friend from the day of our inde-
pendence and this spirit of good
fellowship has grown in strength.

“My duty and pleasure: will be
to do everything in my vower to
foster this friendship. This is a
sacred trust.” —Reuter.

Lord Lyle
Champions
Empire Sugar

LONDON.

Encouragement from the Brit-
ish Government for Empire sugar
producers was advocated by Lord
Lyle at the forty-seventh annual
ordinary general meeting of Tate
and Lyle Ltd. in London on
Tuesday.

“I would like
pound of sugar consumed here
come from home or Empire
sources” he said. “Your company
has already played its part in
the West Indies and there are
others like us who are willing t
take a hand. All they need is
sign of encouragement from th«
Government”.

Lord Lyle said that even
though it were decided to spend
more dollars on sugar, this should
be only a short term policy.
Sugar could be produced within
the Empire as cheaply as any-
where in the world and there was
a potential market in this coun-
try for another million tons
year from Empire sources. Theré



to see every

was, in addition, a far greater
world demand,
“When agreements are drawn

up, let them be on a broad and
generous basis” he continued “and
most important of all, let there
be an end to talk about the
nationalisation of sugar.” °



of the most important features was
not mentioned as regards a contre-
coup injury. That is a severe and
extensive contusion of (ne brain
substance. I only heard about
haemorrhage.

Mr. Whyatt: You do not differ
about the opinion expressed by
Dr. Cato, that the blogy on the ief
side of the head did severe dam-
age to the brain on the right side
of the head. You could not dispute
tha?

Dr. Kirton: My position is this,
Dr. Cato spoke of the haemor-
rhage. He did not speak of this
contusion which I consider to be
essential. He did not speak of thi
extensive convusion of the brain



In V.D. Fight

IN THE FIRST ATTEMPT in world history

NEW YORK, April

to era

venereal disease from an entire nation. penicillin injecti

will be given to the entire

population of the Republic

Haiti, the New York Times reported today.

U.S. Asked To
Help Starving

Chinese

HONG KONG, April 13.

Delegates to Chiang Kai Shek’s
“National Assembly” have wired
the United States Congress urging
“immediate action to arouse
America to avert one of the great-
est famines ever to face the Chin-
ese nation”, according to the (Na-
tionalist) Central News Agency,
The telegram spoke of the ‘“mil-
lions of people on the verge of
starvation” on the Co unist
held Chinese mainland. is it
said resulted from Soviet policy
which was “to extinguish half
China’s population of 450,000,000
in a move to conquer, firstly the
countries of South East Asia, and
then eventually &o0 overrun the
whole world.’’—(Reuter.)

Ten Million
Flee Famine

HONGKONG, April 13.

Official Communist dispatches
from Peking to-day admitted there
were 10,000,000 famine refugees
in the Central and South China
administrative region alone.

The region comprises the pro-
vinees of Honan, Kiangsi, Hupeh,
Hunan, Kwangtung and Kwangsi,
but excludes the East China area
where conditions in the provinces
of Anhwei, Kiangsu, and Shang-
tung are understood to be infin-
itely worse. The dispatches said
the figure of 10,000,000 had been
given.by General Lin Piao, Chair-
man of the Central and South
China Regional Military and Po-
litical Committee.

According to the dispatches, Lin
Piao told the State Couneil that
of 10,000,000 refugees, four and a
half million were in a_ serious
plight.

He urged a reduction in land
rentaly end further food loans.

~—Reuter.

SEES WASHINGTON'S
TOMB

WASHINGTON, April 13.

President Gabriel] Gonzalez Vi-
dela of Chile was visiving Presi-
dent George Washkington’s tomb at
Mount Vernon and the tomb of
“The Unknown Soldier” here to-
duy.

He was dining with Secretary of
State Dean Acheson and Mrs.
Acheson tonight a: the end of the
second day of his official visit,

Senor Videla dined last night
with President Truman who pre-
sented him with a 600 grams gold
medallion to commemorate the
occasion.

The Chilean President then de-
clared vhat the policy of his Gov-
ernment was friendly co-opera-
tion with the United States.

President Truman, in reply,
said: “The solidarity of the West-
ern Empire is absolutely essential
to whe peace of the world.”—
Reuter.

TEN DAYS TOO LATE

SAN FRANCISCO, ril 13.
The “Flying Bixbys”, the young
Californian couple, who left here
on April 1 in an attempt to beat
the round the world speed re-
cord, lande@® back here to-day—
10 days too late. Their hopes
were dashed when their convert-
ed Mosquito bomber developed
engine troubles, which held them
up four days in Calcutta. Later,
they were further delayed by en-
gine trouble in Tokyo.
— (Reuter, )

PILOTS KILLED IN
JET PLANE CRASH

LONDON, April 13.

Britain’s latest jet
meteor and a vampire,
red to-day. Their pilots wer:











Tw '

of

planes, a



The operation, involving 3,500,-
000 people will take two vears. In
the process, the indigenous disease
of yaws, afflicting 85 percent of
the population, is also expected to
be eradicated.

The story
told by Dr.
ereal disease
Pan-American
of the World Health
ation, the paper reported

The programme will be con-
ducted under the auspices of the
World Health Organisation of the

of the project
James Thome, ven
consultant of the
Sanitary

was

Bure
Bureat

Or

anis-

United Nations, the Government
of Haiti and the United Nations
International Children’s Emerg-
ency Fund.

The project will begin by the

end of this month.,
— 6Reuter,)



Insecticide
Kills Men

VICTORIA, Canada—
A potent mass-killing chemical

being used in the war against
insects is so dangerous that
handlers must wear anti-gas
equipment similar to that wor
by servicemen during the wa
Perfeeted by the Germans

during the war, it is known a
parathion, an organic phosphate
It was tested and used for ‘
first time in Canada by Okanagan
fruit-growers last year, Prot
J. Spencer, biologist, Unive

G.
sity of British Columbia, dis
closed.

Parathion was one of the mili-

tary secrets Germany turned ove!

to United States authorities at
the end of the war. They did not
use the chemical weapon against

the Allies because they wi
aware that Britain had devel
oped a lethal gas just as effect vi

The new insecticide is described
by biologists as one of the most
effective toxic poisons ever used
against insects threaten'ng the
world’s food supply

Gas masks, rubber coats,
gloves and protective
the feet and legs must he
by growers when using it
their crops Decontamination
precautions must taken after
growers have used it

Failure to follow pre-
cautionary measures prove
fatal to users. Already three men
have died agonizing deaths |
the United States due to li-
gence in handling the chemical
Several others have narrowly
escaped death.

While not condemning

+} fo}
chorning tol

rm

on

be

these

may

neg

the

of parathion, Prof, Spencer fc!
more caution should be taken
using toxic poisons of this pe
He felt the indiscriminate use «
dangerous chemicals on plant
might‘ create some very serious

prceblems in the future,

“We are sitting on:a keg of
gun powder until ‘we knoW mors

about these chemicals and theft
long-range effects on _ plants,”
said the biologist.

He said that he had received

reports that parathion was des-
troying bird life.

“The public is not aware of
the dreadful chemicals which are
being brought into use against

insects,” he added. “Parathion is
ene. Others will follow. No one
knows what long-term effect

they will have on plants and indi-
rectly on man who eats the
plants.”—(C.P.)



Plan To Link
Policies In
Europe And Asi:

LONDON, Apri 3

A plan to co-ordinate the Fi
eign Policies of the Western P
ers into one “grand de
linking their policies in Europ
and Asia is emerging from pre-
parations being made here for
next month’s talks betwec he
“Big Three’ Foreign Minister
and the Atlantic T I
ferences will vel
possible ~ Reuter

|
Says U.S. Defence Secretary |

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Virginia, |
April 13 |

he United States Secretary ot |
Jefence, Mr. Louis Johnson to-day |
edged that the United States
would stand by its overseas allies

ind “yive them economic and
itary aid to the fullest extent |
sible” to build up a more

effective mutual defence,
Mr. Johnson, who recently re-
ined from the third meeting of
he North Atlantic Powers Defence





‘ommittee at the Hague, was
peaking on American defence
policy the University of Vir-
Inia here |
He also said that the United |
State \ determined to be|

ong” because peace can only be |
hieved through strength. Mr.
Johnson added “We shall win the
truggle to rally humanity for |
reedom, not by matching of man|
or man, gun for gun, tank for |
lank, or plane for plane: not by
jaying our,opponents game and

wrecking our economy through
spending ourselves into a depres-
sion: and not by military experi-
ments in the region of society”.
“We shall win by proving our- |
elve Stronger in ingenuity, in
irit and in muscle, than any who|
nay contemplate to challenge us.” |

We shall make every dollar |
bring a maximum in protection”.
—Reuter. |



Argentina
Will Reply |

BUENOS AIRES, April i3.
Buenos morning |
newspapers attach considerable
iportance to Anglo-Argen
1 meat price discussions which
scheduled for 11 o'clock this
corning (Argentine time).
lke British delegation is to be
headed by Commercial Minister
EK. J. Joint, while chief Argentine
negotiators will be acting as Sub-| |
Secretary of Economy and General
{
{

Tout
Viost

Aires

the

ere

Manager.
|

It expected that Argentina
will reply to the British’ proposal
for maintenance of the present

price of £97.536 per long ton and
reduction to 90 during the second
year of the agreement with oa
counter proposal for increase to
£140,379 to compensate for deval-

iation of sterling and the fact that] "
the sterling price of liquid fuels} |
now costing Argentina 40 per |
nt more than before devalua-] |
If the British agree to the meat
price adjustment, Argentines wil!] |
promise to use additional sterling 1
earnings by buying more “non-| 7
entials” from gritain and] i
eeording financial remittances .
to Britain



To Mothers
who cannot

feed their babies






Don’tworry ! Cow's milk can be prepared so that the youngest baby
can digest it without trouble. The addition of Robinson’s ‘Patent?
Barley prevents the milk forming large clots in baby stomachs,

making it easy for the delicate digestive organs to do their.work

thoroughly whilst getting them ready to digest heavier foods later

in life, That’s why wise nurses and mothers always use Robirison’s
‘Patent’ Barley.

——.



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| THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY « 1a.

15 Killed In
Stampede

NEW DELHI, April 13.

Fifteen people were reported
killed and 15 seriously injured in
a stampede today when huge
crowds of Hindu pilgrims were
making their way today vo the
sacred River Ganges for a purify-
ing bath at Hardwar, 120 miles
northeast of Delhi.

Nearly 1,000,000 pilgrims took a
dip in the river today on the
occasion of Humbh Mela — the
Holy Bathing Fair held at Hard-
war once in 12 years.

Pilgrims from all over India
have been pouring into Hardwar
for vhe past few days by train
bus, bullock cart and foot for the
Fair,— Reuter,



Rout of the Rattlers

OKEENE; Fried rattler was the
main item on the menu at a dinner
in Okeene which opened the In-
ternational Association of Rattle-
snake Hunters’ Convention. The
meeting boasted the world’s odd-
est “flodr show”’—men milking
snakes, Indians dancing round
wriggling snakes, and girls danc-
ing with snakes round their necks
and waists. The entertainment wae
the preliminary to a snake hunt—

the diners went into the hills to
catch an estimated 1,000 snakes to

all to zoos, to food canneries, and

atories. For each snake
3s. 6d. and some hunters
1) a night



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|... PAGE FOUR



ADVOGATE





=



r BS Pinned
“Published by Tho Advooste Co. Lt6., M4, Broad St, Bridgetow?
Friday, April 14 5
y, April 14, 1950 PARIS.

: = Protestants behind the “Iron

( urtain” are going to church this
oe Pedestrians Easter season largely unmolested, 5,
at ih = but that does not mean that free-
pet IT WOULD be interesting to know what dom of religion exists for them in

; will be the cost to the taxpayer of the new
' pedestrian crossing being constructed on
the sea side of Victoria Bridge.

The information will be useful for two
reasons.

First, should it be used by pedestrians
the Government will have found the type
that is suitable for this island.
ih Secondly, should it not be used by pedes-
' + -trians, the taxpayer will have a vested in-
- terest in complaining that his money is
‘being wasted and will support this news-
‘paper in its drive to educate pedestrians in
the proper use of the road.

At present nowhere in Barbados is there
better adequate accommodation for pedes-
trians than the two sidewalks on either
side of the Chamberlain Bridge.

Yet every motorist will tell you of daily

experiences in which pedestrians slow up
" . traffic over this main exit and entrance of
-. the City.
' he misuse of the Chamberlain Bridge
gives the answer to those public spirited
citizens who protest that pedestrians have
nowhere to walk and therefore say that
they must walk in the street.

The motorist sees the misuse of the street
wherever he drives throughout the island
of Barbados. It is a regular experience of
the motorist to see deep in the heart of the
country where delightful glades of mahog-
any invite the country residents to rest
beneath-their branches to see, twenty yards
away, clusters of adults playing games of
draughts or gossipping in the highway.
Every motorist in Barbados has at one time
or other been given gratuitous insults or
advice. by pedestrians whose business in
the road is never made plain.

Writers to this newspaper have been com-
plaining recently about the numbers of
accidents in the road. The accent has almost
invariably been on careless driving. This
newspaper does not countenance careless
driving. It has more than once brought to
the attention of the authorities the frequent
excesses in speed to be noticed almost daily
in Bay Street and other busy thoroughfares.
But there is no remedy to accidents and
deaths on the road unless pedestrians are
trained to walk the roads in their own inter-
ests.

Visitors to Barbados who are accustomed
to traffic lights and notices saying “cross
now” are amazed at seeing the reckless way
in which people here invite the risk of death
by waltzing across roads, getting out of
cars in the middle of the road, wave to
their friends from bicycles and in a hundred
and one ways leave themselves in the hands
of fate, whenever they walk the roads of
Barbados.

There is much that needs to be done by
Government. Compulsory legislation is
long overdue to ensure that shops in the
main streets of the City are equipped with





meocted en.

res

short of an all out drive by the community
as a whole will have any but the slightest
| effect in improving the chaotic condition
in which people, bicycles and animal drawn
or human-propelled vehicles meander

through the ancient City of Bridgetown.



ie No War

THE rather frightening prophesies of the
* 4) gentleman who foresees the disappearance
\\ of the Mediterranean, che end of the Nile
and the outbreak of war in 1950 are made
4) less dreadful by a story which is going the
rounds. When Mr. Strachey was Minis-
+ ter of Food say the raconteurs with their
+. 4 tongues in their cheek : “We got no food.
| Now that he is Minister of War—why we'll

9

get no war.” Comforting ”





































1



The Curtain

communized Eastern Europe any
more than for Catholics and Jews.

However, of the three great
faiths, protestantism has suffered
least under communism, competent
observers of religious affairs agree
The reasons for this are several:

1, In all the “Iron Curtain”
countries protestants are in the
minority, In Albania, protestants
comprise such a small number in
that predominantly Moslem land
that they are not even mentioned
in the latest available statistics. In
Bulgaria, about 15,000 are listed
in a country of 7,048,000.

Consequently the communists
did not have to contend with large
and powerful church oppositicas as
in the case of the Catholics ;who
comprise almost 50 per cent. of the
populace of Czechoslovakia and
Poland,

2. Besides being in the minor-
ity, the protestants are divided into
many small groups — Lutherans,
Baptists, Adventists, Methodists
and so on. There is in most cases
no central authority to contest with
the state for loyalty as in the case
of the Catholics’ Vatican. And
there is no international symbol
such as the State of Israe} in the

ease of the Jews to infect the pro-

testants with the “disease” of
“cosmopolitanism.”

3. Unlike the Catholic Church
the protestants have no large land
holdings in any of the East Eu-
ropean countries to stand in the
way of communist land reforms
and redistribution. Their schools
were fewer and their press far less
political and of narrower distribu-
tion than that of the Catholics.

However, where protestant
church leaders have presented op-
position to the regime—or even
voiced criticism—they have been
stamped down with the same ruth-

lessness and decisiveness as the

NEW BOOKS

Here I



THE KON-TIKI EXPEDITION. By
Thor Heyerdahl. Allen and Unwin.
12s. 6d. 2385 pages. ,

HERE is one of the great true
stories of the sea. It is a tale
of real life adventure which will
outlive the fiction of Conrad —
contains as much of the magic
atmosphere of maritame quest
and peril as Moby Dick itself

It tells how six young men,
five Norwegians and one Swede,
crossed the Pacific Ocean in a
craft more primitive by far than
that used by their ancestors, the
Vikings of a thousand years
earlier, in crossing the Atlantic.

It tells how one young scien-
tist’s theory was, if not proved,
at any rate supported, by the
voyage. For the purpose, or at
least the excuse of this Kon-Tiki
expedition was the belief, formed
by Norwegian anthropologist
Thor Heyerdahl when he was in
Polynesia before the war, that
the South Pacific Islands had
been peopled by a white race
coming from South America long
before the arrival of the present
brown-skinned population

proper sidewalks. The promise of making Keay « sees became gy og
. . . 4 a make boats, ld no 10 ow

street crossings in Broad Street compulsory use metals. How then could they
is arteni rovide € I rese re made the trip from the
is heartening, prov ided shat om — nt are om oo een —
arrangement of crossings 1s improved on by drifting on the westward-
and altered where necessary. But nothing flowing Humboldt Current in
: rafts of balsa wood lashed

‘together by balsa ropes
When the experts said that this
Heyerdahl was

was impossible,
Very well,

stung into retorting:
I shall do it.

He found another five young
men of restless disposition and
a Scandinavian love of the sea
who were ready to accompany
him.

They set off from South
America amidst universal predic-
tions of early disaster. Their
clumsy raft, the Kon-tiki, would
not answer the steering oar or
get much assistance from the
sail The logs, working against
one another in the sea, would
soon wear the ropes through
They would drown quickly or
starve slowly.

In fact, they made a voyage,
crowded with gay adventure and
an adequate spice of danger,
from South America to a coral
atoll near Tahiti, taking exactly
101 days to cover 4,300 miles of
empty ocean.

—— ee
ae



BARBADOS

By Irving HK. Levine
other faiths. Here are some exam-

es:

In Yugoslavia, when eight pro-
testant pastors mixed politics with
religion in their sermons, they
were dealt with in typical com-
munist style.

One of the pastors told his con-
gregation that America had the
atom bomb for use against such
as Tito, so there was no danger of
the Tito regime lasting long. The
eight pastors were sentenced to
prison in Zagres. That was in
1947 and other protestant pastors
apparently took the hint and for
the most part have steered clear
of politics.

Protestant leaders in Paris and
elsewhere in Europe admit that
complete, co-ordinated figures of
arrests in Yugoslavia, and else-
where behind the “Iron Curtain”
are difficult to obtain, but it is
reported that several other pro-
testant clergymen also have been
imprisoned in Yugoslavia.

In Hungary, three higin-r< nking
Evangelical Church officials vere
jailed in 1948 on the grounds of
“currency abuses” (a favourite
charge against church officials by
the communists who are careful
to frame charges in such a way
that they do not smack directly
of religious persecution). The most
prominent among them was Luth-
eran Bishop Lajos Ordass. Pro-
testants abroad have tried repeat-
edly to effect his release but with-
out success.

In Czechoslovakia, two Ameri-
can Mormon Missionaries, Stanley
E. Abbott, 23, of Lehigh, Utah,
and C. Aldon Johnson, 22, of
Idaho Falls, Idaho were arrested
in February on charges of attempt-
ing to enter a restricted area. They
were expelled along with the
rest of the Mormon Mission. The
Government said they were “en-
dangering the safety of the state”.
All other western missionaries
have been advised of their impend-
ing expulsion.



s A Magnificent Sea
Adventure Story

Ky George Malcolm Thomson

Empty of ships, that is to say.
But filled, overcrowded in truth,
with fish. Pilot fish scouted ahead
of the raft. Schools of dolphins
followed it.

The Kon-tiki’s timbers were
the home of countless crabs,
neluding one large crab that

became a domestic pet. At night
the sea was ablaze with brilliantly
illuminated fish coming up from
the lower depths.

There were giants rays, bigger
than the whole raft. There were
shoals of whales hurtling at top
speed towards the raft and swirl-
ing away when within a foot or
two.



THOR HEYERDAHL

There were sharks,
aboard by the tail.

And there was, hugest fish in
al the sea, the whale shark, 50ft.
long, which lay in a kind of good-
natured stupor alongside the raft
until somebody petulantly drove
a harpoon into it.

After sailing with the greatest
of ease across the ocean the raft
piled up on a coral reef and went
to pieces. It was a pity, but by
that time it did not matter. The
six young adventurers, magnifi-
cently bearded, gave themselves
up to the feasts and dances of
their Polynesian hosts.

It is a glorious book, for it
conveys not simply the bald facts
that make up a fine achievement,
but also the exhilaration, the
dare-devil spirit, the intrepidity,

pulled

the cool curiosity, which chal-
lenges such adventures, and
carries them triumphantly
through.

et



Franciscans of the St.
Cloister at Broumou were ousted
by the simple government expedi-
ent of refusing to extend their
visitors permits.

cently decided to abolish
“harmful character of the Y.M.C.A.
in accordance with the ideology
of the peoples of Poland.” Trusted
government agents took over ad-
ministration of the organisation.

Church was the victim of perhaps
the most dramatic example of
protestant repression of the post-
war era behind the “Iron Curtain”
when the top 15 leaders were put
on trial in Sofia a year ago. The
four top pastors received life im-
prisonment on charges of treason,

espionage, and blackmarketing.
Ten others received stiff lesser
sentences.

widely refused passports in “Iron
Curtain” countries to go to Rome
for the
protestant churchmen in all the
communized
passports to attend World Protes-
tant
late as April, 1949; a group of
Czechoslovakian
attend a Zurich session of The
World Council of Churches) .

Clergy, the ‘Communist govern-
ments have demanded Oaths of
Loyalty from the Protestant

Clergy. Not confronted with the
problem of loyalty to a central
authority such as the Vatican, the
Protestants have complied in most Company.
cases, ,

ADVOCATE

Czechoslovakia, four
Enceslas.

Also in

In Poland the Government re-
the

In Bulgaria, the Protestant

Leaders of the World Council of

Churches which was founded in} native
1948 and embraces 156 protestant "
denominations admit that they are managed the poolroom of the small rural com
afraid to send so much as a post-
card to churchmen in countries
like Romania for fear of jeopardiz-
ing the safety of their associates
there. e

Like Catnolic leaders who were

Holy Year observances,

lands are refused

Conferences (although as

protestants did

As in the case of the Catholic

—(I.N.S.)

THOR HEYERDAHL has since
childhood been interested in nat-
ural sciences. At seven he started
a one-room zoological museum,
when the Nazis invaded Norway
and joined the Free Norwegian
Airforce. After special training’
He interrupted his scientific work
with the British Forces in the U.K.
he served in a Parachute Com-
munication Unit in Arctic Nor-

way.

MAUPASSANT. By Francis Steeg-
muller. Collins, 12s, 6.° 384
pages.

“HE sought only high-class
liaisons and always respected
his mother’s house.” This com-
placent tribute to her son Guy,
by Laure de Maupassant, was on
evidence presented by his indus-
trious but sprightly biographer,

Steegmuller, not justified for
long.
When the’ family fortune

foundered after the war of 18706
Maupassant went to live in Paris
(where he stayed until the build-
ing of the Eiffel Tower drove
him, disgusted, to the Riviera)
in a house where charming
voices invited the visitors in:
“Apart from Maupassant, the
place was inhabited exclusively
by prostitutes.”

In such company Maupassant
caught syphilis (which killed him
at 42) and wrote his famous story
of a fat prostitute, Boule de Suif,

Flaubert, Maupassant’s master
in literature, recognised its merit:
“Your prostitute is charming. If
you could reduce her stomach a
little, you would give me pleas-
ure.”

Maupassant’s excessive love for
his hysterical mother is held by
Steegmuller responsible for his
inability to have any but coarse,
uncomplicated love affairs.

He had three close women
friends in Bohemian soctety:
Blanche Roosevelt, married to an
Italian marquis, who kept on the
far side of the Alps; Hermine
Lecomte de Nouy, whose husband
lived in Rumania, as lover of
the queen; Countess Helene
Potocka, whose husband lived in
Poland.

He loved none of them. His
mother returned his adoration.

When he died, she (a free-
thinker) said in her grief. “If
God exists, I will see him and
we will have it out.”

(World Copyright Reserved. )

—L.E.S.


















ALAA L LD,

MRE As

FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1959
Le



D
aot mt?

V, SCOTT

For Bonus

By Pat O'Shea

DETROIT.

H’S SIXTH-GRADE teacher probably
would not have thought of Dallas B. Winslow
if she had been asked which pupil would be-
come a multi-millionaire.

There is no way of telling for certain but
the record shows this is the grade when
Winslow, son of a poolroom owner, left school

He not only becarne a manufacturer whose
fortune is near two million dollars, but he
gave all of his employees automobiles some
weeks ago as a bonus.

And the cars were just another in the long
line of unusual or spectacular bonuses the
56-year-old tycoon has showered on his work-| |
ers of, as he calls them, his “associates.” ;

‘

Winslow was born in Holly, Michigan, of ||
Michigan people. Although his father

CAKE MIX ASST, FLAVOUKS

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munity. both parents, their son and daughter ALUMINUM SHEETS

lived on a small farm nearby.
6, 8, 10ft

No Scholar ,
His mother and sister are still alive but the AT ‘

elder Winslow died last year at the age of 86.
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD., Successors to

Winslow can recall few highlights from his .
C. S. PITCHER & CO, LTD. |

pre-working days—before he was 12, that is.
He did not participate in sports, had no hob-
bies, and was not a scholar.

When he discussed his limited schoolbag, he
said with a characteristic half smile and em- ‘PHONES : 4413, 4472, 4687
phatic wave of the hand:

“You can say I definitely wasn’t spectacular
—but I was good at mathematics.”

Possibly his liking for numbers started him
on the excutive career that originated with |
purchase of a gas station at 17 years of age—
two years before his marriage— and resulted
in his present post as head of the Mass Food























HEINZ 57
SAUCE
bot .49

The firm, of Springfield, Ohio, has four sub-
sidiary companies, one in Toronto, Canada, |
with products ranging from mowers to auto-
parts.

Winslow said his real business is buying
companies that show a deficit or whose owners
want to retire. He has owned Mass Food Com-
pany for nearly 20 years and through it pur-
chased a score of other firms

He and his executive staff, whose main
offices are in Detroit near his home, would
put the firms in the black and resell them
when a profitable offer was presented.

Never Jokes

Winslow is a stocky man with a full head
of gray-black hair. He is of less than medium
height and his manner is cordial and relaxed.
He smiles often. but never jokes. Yo

When queried about his benevolent attitude |);
toward his “associates” he rattled change in
his pocket—his one noticeable habit—and let
the conservation take a religious turn. He said:

“I do it because of the Lord and Mrs.
Winslow.”

He explained that his wife agrees with him
that an employer should share profits with his
workers.

His reference to “The Lord” was due to
Christian teachings as he understands them
through the Baptist Chureh — which he
attends regularly — and his sternly religious
. mother.

Winslow has given his employees cash bon-
uses many times. Each business quarter he
gives them either cash or a present. Some-
times—as several months ago—the present is
| a car, or eye glasses or dentures to the work-
ers who need them.

The workers in his subsidiary companies,
which he visits regulary, feel they can come
to him with their personal problems — but
none of them call him by his first name.

He never has had labour-relations problems.
One of his present plants has a union, in
Springfield, Ohio.

Winslow sees the union officials so seldom
he cannot remember which one of them want-
ed to run his picture under the headline: “One
Fair Employer.”

Less Labour Troubles

One of Winslow’s employees, Kenneth
Blakely, a shipping clerk at the Springfield
plant says that “if other employers had
shown the same attitude as Mr. Winslow,
there would be less labour trouble through-
out the country.”

Another, Mrs. Marie Massie, a steno-
grapher at the Springfield plant, says her
employer’s policies, “make us work harder
knowing Mr. Winslow thinks of us and
appreciates our efforts.”

Although workers who have been with
his firms for at least six months get yearly
paid vacations—Winslow said he never has
had a vacation in his life—I N.S.

BSSe OSE SSE" 2ZESSR F&F BBY BRBVYRERS aiiinadiateaeeacdae te



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AND “AJAX”

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Dry Goods Department

. Yesterday the “Advocate” car-
||ijried twenty two of the articles
‘on the “Universal Declaration of
‘Human Rights”. Today it carries
jjthe final eight,
| Articles 23 (1) Everyone has
the t to work, to free choice
of employment, to just and fav-
i ourable conditions of work and to
rf gprotection against unemployment.
Aha (2) Everyone, without any
_ discrimination, has the right to
jequal pay for equal work.









ta
Ss

Ma (3) Everyone who works has
» jthe right to just and favourable
ti ation insuring for himself
‘and his family an existence worthy
‘(cf human dignity, and supple-
; , if necessary, by other
‘ of social protection.

“ty (4) Everyone has the right
ito form and to join trade unions
‘for the protection of his interests

24. Everyone has the right to
rest and leisure, including reason-
able limitation of working hours
and periodic holidays with pay



25. (1) Everyone has the right
‘to a standard of living adequate
ffor the health and well-being of
thimself and of his family, includ
) ling focd, clothing, housing an
medical care and necessary
services, and the right to securit
in the event of unempl ent
sickn« disabilit

Rights

old age or other lack of livelihood
in creumstance beyond his con-
trol.

(2) Motherhood and child-
hood are entitled to special care
and assistance All_ children,
whether born in or out of wed-
lock, shall enjoy the same social
protection.

26. (1) Everyone has the right
to education, Education shall be
free, at least in the elementary and
fundamental stages. Elementary
education shall be compulsory
Technical and professional educa-
tion shall be made generally avail-
able and higher education shall be
equally accessible to all on the
basis of merit.

(2) Education shall be direct-
ed to the full development of the

human personality and to the
strengthening of respect for
human rights and fundamental
freedoms. It shall promote under-
standing, tolerance and friendship
among all nations, racial or reli





gious groups, and shal
of the Ur

the maintenance of peace

activities
for

(3) Parents have : gt
» choose the kind of educati
that hall be giver t
hildren
1) Everyone



tural life of the community, to
the arts and to share in

enjoy 7
scientific advancement and it¢
benefits.

(2) Everyone has the right to
the protection of the moral and
material interests resulting from
any scientific, literary or artistic
production of which he is the
author.

28. Everyone is entitled to a
social and international order in
which the rights and freedoms
set forth in this Declaration can
be fully realised.

29. (1) Everyone has duties to
the community in which alone
the free and full development of
his personality is possible.

_ (2) In the exercise of his
rights and freedoms, everyone
shall be subject only to such limi-
tations as are determined by law
solely for the rights and freedoms
of others and of meeting the just
requirements of morality, public
order and the general welfare in
a democratic society

(3)

These rights and freedoms



may in no case be exercised con-
trary to U purposes and princi-
ples of the United Nations
50. Nothing in this Declaration
y iterpreted as implying for



grout person any

» engage in ity



OUR READERS SAY:

Training Athletes
To the Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—The recent sporis meeting
held at Kensington Oval under
the auspices of the Amateur
Athletic Association of Barbados
has shown that the island is in
dire need of talent as far as
athletics are concerned.

It is good to see that at least
one athlete can set up two new
records in one day. But this
athlete is not a schoolboy. He is
one who as far as I know, never
figured in any events until now,
and what is more he is not a boy.
He is a man. I would like to know
what is wrong with the schoolboys
of this generation. They can run
very well against inferior schools
in the inter-school sports and put
up very good time, but when they
are pitted against some runners
of stamina they are just mediocre
If a rank outsider who has had



very little or no training could
come and set up two records in
one day, a the schoolboys

whom the island must look as the
future athletes cannot put up a
decent showing, then it is time
that we did something along the
lines of athletics for our boys and

girls

is a small bullet. She can carry
off all the prizes in any local meet,
but when she is sent away she
can only come back with second
and third places. I am not detrac-
ting from the lady's prowess as a
runner, but the performance shows
a lack of coaching. Then again,
our football at the schools is not
what it used to be, Why is there
this dearth of sports in the island?
It is because there are not men
and women sufficiently trained
along these lines to impart their
knowledge to those who need it
most. There is, as far as I know,
one gentleman in the island wno
has had any training along these
lines and that is Mr. Bruce St. John
at Combermere School, but ne
cannot be expected to serve the
entire island. We need more of
this type. The same as we need
art in the various schools we need
athletics too, for there is no
better nation-builder than a good
athlete.

Why could we not secure some
more scholarships for physical



accompanied by the customary bona fides, will be ignored.
Many such reach the Editor's desk each week, and readers
are again reminded of the necessity for the writer's name to

be known to the Editor, not for publication, but as an assw -

ance of good faith.

LETTERS which are signed with a nom-—de—plvme, but un-

culture, It would do the island a
lot of good. I think too that it be
worth scouting the idea of Inter-
colonial School Athletics, Inter-
colonial School Football and
Intercolenial School Cricket, the
three being independent of each
other. The masters of the various
schools may then take a keener
interest in athletics other than
just officiating at the school and
local sports meetings.
AN OLD BOY.











20 oz. tins Plums .24

16 oz. tins Carrots
& Peas.

Downy Fake Cake
Mix — Orange,
Vanilla,
Flavours

Seiad Boe ae

21

‘irst the Saucers Cnetiate

bs Editor, The Advocate,

: See eee






A table is being laid above,
For a very large party,
By a very careless Waiter.
First, he begins by dropping the
“Saucers,”




J&R ENRICHED
BREAD
IS THE LOAF

STONES
DRINKING

Jas Good!

AND 1E°S



Next, we shall be getting the ;
“cups,” 00D FOR 104 WS {
And finally, he will quite likely G fF ¥ STRA )
spill!
The whole “Jug” of “Atomic .
OLENIC.

: _ SUNCREST PINEAPPLE,
NUGRAPE, ORANGE, SORREL

(

Order now from

GODDARDS a
ween
—_—

\

1 it
1X


FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1950

eS

Counsels Address
Jury In Murder Case

@ From Page 3 :

pr. Kirton: In my opinion, it
be quite impossipie for a
who had received severe

within half an hour, re-
ied o> mere he was and shout
out for a “nurse”, Another rea-
son is that at that period he woul.
peeh deeply unconscious,
quite a different puise trom
he had, a pulse of cerebral
- that is concussion.
. whyatt: In case of contre-
coup injury, is there not what is
well known medically as a recog-
nised phenomenum, a »lucid
Dr. Kirton: In cases of contre-
coup injury, I have never heard
a lucid interval. A lucid
interval is a most dangerous
i of certain haemorrhage,
parficular] haemorrhages of the
artery; because an_ individual
may think he is alright and might
go home and suddenly collapse.
Mr. Whyatt; A lucid interval as
Dr. Cato and Dr. Leacock also
.is certainly to be found in a
injury.
Oe aictee: That is a profound
difference of opinion,
Mr. hate Before the Police
Magistrate, you had given as your
5 that the man had fallen
off the casualty bed on to the
floor and that such a fall off the
two-foot bed could have produced
a massive haemorrhage. In the
light of all you have heard, do you
still adhere to the opinion you had
expressed in the police courts?

Dr. Kirton: I do. ;

Mr. Whyatt: Are you not in-
clined to modify them somewhat,
after hearing the evidence of Dr.
Cato and Dr. Leacock?

Dr. Kirton: I am not so inclined.

Mfr. Whyatt: If the patient had)
fi off the bed and sustained
eontre-coup injury and thereby

unconscious without a lucid

interval for sometime, would it or

ould it not be possible for him

to be sitting up—sitting on the
‘floor?

Dr. Kirton: I have not thought
of the sitting up on the floor. I
do not know whether he sat up
pn the floor before he fell, or after.
t is all hypothetical.

Estey

a

EB

Mr. Whyatt: I do not understand
that answer. You have given the
vidence that if he fell off the bed
md sustained contre-coup injury,
ind having sustained it, would not
have a lucid interval. I am ask-
you how can you reconcile that
ith the fact that he was sitting
n the floor ?
Dr, Kirton: I cannot reconcile it.
Mr. Whyatt: Would you be pre-
ared to modify your opinion at
?
Dr. Kirton: No.
To Mr. Dear: I still agree with
ie evidence I gave before the
gistrate that a man, who is a
hronic alcoholic, would haemor-
¢ more freely than one who
not, When I examined the man
the afternoon, at the Casualty,
did not see any sign of the haem-
which has been described

in practise since
916.
This brought the evidence to a
WW@lose and Mr, Dear addressed the
He said that for two and a half
» they had listened witn
tience to a cavalcade of witness-
who had come to give them an
tt of what had taken place
the Hospital beach aback of
Street on the afternoon of
vemoer 24 last year.
The aspects which confronted
mm in the case were two. The
feature would be the events
t took place on the Hospital
ich and then the second would
mainly the medical witnésses
hd the members of the Hospital
aif would have told them what
d happened at the Hospital.
was important that they
d get reasonably clear in
minds the distinction that he
d draw or attempt to draw
n what had taken place
h the beach and what had taken
ce at the Hospital.
case was a charge of
. The accused was charged
having struck Anthony
f a severe blow on the head
ith a piece of wood and which
ulted in his death in the Gen-
Hospital about 1 a.m. on
Ovember 25,
Mr. Dear then told them how
Onus rested on the prosecution
Prove their case. e defence
d to prove nothing and if they
a any reasonable doubt in tneir
is as to the truth of the facts
th the prosecution had set out
rove, the aceused must always
the benefit of the doubt. If
y had any’ reasonable doubt
the man. was guilty, then he
$ entitled to be acquitted.
Severe Blow
The evidence was that Holder,
accused, with a few other
Mn, including Anthony George,
deceased, entered the yard
h as Mustor’s yard, and there
T suddenly attacked Anthony
gave him a severe blow
d he died as a result of that.
The Learned Judge, would
them on the law relating
Murder, though in the case of
Submission, he would make
e to certain points of law.
Mr. Dear described murder as
two kinds: one where a man
Fy oerately and with intent to
4, killed another person, and
er where a man with intent
Srevious bodily harm,
52 OF where attempting a
ony, he killed in the execution
that felony.
Said: “If, on the other hand,
Offence which he sets out to
mmit is not a felony, but mere-
& misdemeanour, he will not
Suilty of murder, but of man-
lughter.”’

Be There was

CCO

nee

&@ matter which

ht be relevant to the case, |

d that was that if am

an acting
& provocation

should kill

who did provoke him, then
4 ;
“r those circumstances, the
ge _—— be reduced from
r to manslaughter
In the case, there was no evi-
MmCe to any motive

as to why
have

killed

m §68eused- should

Anthony George. The prosecu-
tion had placed no reliance on
Cobham who was supposed to
give sume possipie reasun as to
how this thihg had taken place,
Other witnesses could give no
reason, though they were all on
the beach within the same vicinity.
!‘hey heard an argument waicn
they did not appear to describe,
and then, out of the blue, tne
accused had struck George with
ine biuageon (lney Nau seen) ou
the head and that after he haa
fallen he had again struck him.

“I am submitting that there is
not the shadow of any inference
that you could draw as to the
motive why Holder should go out
of the way to take up a weapon
with intent to kill the man.”

It was usual and it was only
possible to try to prove intent by
circumstantial evidence — circum-
Stances surrounding the attack.
He was submitting that the case
was sadly deficient of any of these
surrounding circumstances, sadly
deficient of any reason for this
crime. It seemed to him one of
those unfortunate tragedies, which
sometimes occurred, and as a re-
sult of which a man would be
charged with murder.

Bodily Harm

It was probabte the prosecution
might ask them to infer that
because that piece of wood was
used, there was intent to do!
grevious bodily harm.

“IT am submitting that is not
the inference which you can draw.
You cannot draw that inference
unless his actions were such that
no doubt could be left that
grevious bodily harm was what
he intended.”

When Anthony Gearge was sent
jn the Casualty ward, he had!
been sent there by Dr. Kirton and
Nurse Carter. They had had the
benefit of the evidence of Dr.;
Kirton, and. he had said thac
when he saw the man, there had
been no signs of blood on him.

The argument of the evidence
of those witnesses on the beact
was that they had seen this blood
clearly, Were they going to be
asked to infer that the blood had
disappeared between. the time
that he had been left at =
Hospital and the time that Dr
Kirton had seen him? Were they
going to be asked ito infer every-
thing against the prisoner? {t

i

could not be. F

They would remember that
Collymore, the head porter, had
said that he had seen no marks
of blood on the man and no
bruises. Why should he fail .to
see what the other witnesses o1
the beach said they had seen

The evidence before the court
was that from the moment ‘he
entered the court to the moment
of his death, he had no mark
externally either on -his head or
on his body. From that evidence, |
and relying on the evidence of |
Stoute, Maughn and Newton, they,
were being asked to say that the;
man had died as a result of a
severe blow on his head which
had caused him to bleed from his
nose, mouth and ear.

The Court adjourned for lunch.

Material Facts

On resumption Mr. Dear con-
tinued his address to the jury. He
reminded them that when the’
Court had adjourned he had been |
carrying them through the facts
of the case and making his sub-
missions on what he asked them
to regard as the material facts in
the whole case,

He was going to submit what in-
ferences he wanted them to draw
from those facts and then deal
with the opinions expressed by the
medical witnesses linking the
death of Anthony George to what
had been alleged to be the cause
of death.

After referring to that portion
of the Attorney General’s outline
dealing with evidence that the
man had been found sitting on the
floor of the Casualty after he had
been put to bed, Mr. Dear asked
the jury to infer that the man
came to be on the floor, not be-
cause he preferred the flcor to the
bed, but because he had fallen
from out of the bed.

It had been argued that if the
man had fallen from the bed onto
the floor in the inner pavt of the
Casualty, that Nurse Hewstt would
have heard him fall. He was sub-
mitting that her evidence that she
did not hear a fall was negative
evidence. There was a possibil-
ity, that attending to other patients
as she was, she did not hear the
fall in her preoccupation,

Direct Cause

On the other hand, according to
the evidence of Hewitt, Lacey and
Mullins, all three of them had in
their minds the possibility that he
might fall off the bed. ;

Mr. Dear said there were two
inferences that could be drawn.
The first was that the man had
fallen from the bed to the floor;
the second was that he had got
off the bed, stood up and then
fallen. There was no suggestion
that he was sitting on the floor on
that occasion.

“You must remember that the
Prosecution has got to prove that
the direct cause of this man’s
death was the blow that he re-
ceived on the beach.” Mr. Dear
said, as he began to deal with the
medical opinions that had been
expressed during the case. “You

t take the view that if he {rtraightforward
had not got the blow on the beach | had not been upset.

he would not have been in hospi-
tal and could not, therefore, have
fallen off the bed.

“The Prosecution has got to
forge a solid chain linking his
death with what they allege was
the cause of that death, and if in
your opinion that chain has not
been forged beyond reasonable
doubt it is your duty to acquit
him.” :

Dealing first with Dr. Cato’s
evidence, Mr. Dear told the jury
that the fact that Anthony George
had died from cerebral haem-

orrhage was not disputed by the|that the prisoner had not struck

Defence. Two things, however,
were being disputed. The first
was how did he get the cerebral
haemorrhage, and the second was
if the haemorrhage had been ag-
gravated by a subsequent mishap,
buch as falling off the bed, thus
turning what had been hopes of
recovery into a fatal injury

| They should accept the opinion
land evidence of the doctors very
| guardedly, Mr. Dear saix!. Could
|they really swear that when the
man came into the hospital he was





a dying man, and that he had no}

chances of recovering?

“When two men, irrespective of
their qualifications, set themselves
up to say the course that a man’s
life will take, and ask you to con-
vict a man of murder on that

opinion, I am submitting that you |!

should not act upon that opinion
unsupported by something far
more substantial,

“How often have doctors not
given up a man for dead, and
then see him rise as it were from
the grave again? How can they
say dogmatically that the man
was tound to die, espec’ally
when they have admitted that the
falls from the bed—assuming that
he fell as I am asking you to
assume — could have aggravated
his Injuries?”

How could the doctors predict
the course of a man’s life.

The Chief Justice: 1 do not

want to interrupt you, but they |)

are not precicting the course of
a man’s life. They are sa¥ing
that a man may recover from a
contre-coup injury and that a sub-
sequent mishap can aggravate it
But they are also saying that in

this particular case taking into ac- i

count all that they had heard, lead
them to the conclusion that as-

suming he had had such a subse- ||

quent mishap, his chances of life
were gone before he had such a
mishap.

Mr. Leacock’s evidence, said Mr.
Dear, was made up of opinions,
expectations and assumptions. He
qualified Dr. Cato’s opinion on one
point, and said that if George had
fallen onto the floor he could have
struck his head in the spot indi-
cated, but not with much violence.
But would it take much violence
to aggravate the haemorrhage
caused by an original blow?

No Trust

Mr. Leacock had said that he
did not put any trust in the
description of the swelling on the
side of the face, Mr. Dear said.
The only one who found a sweill-
ing was Dr. Cato. Mr. Leacock
said that the bleeding may have
stopped by the time that George
reached the hospital, but he did
not give any explanation of how
the blood that was supposed to be
trickling out of the ear had dis-
appeared. 7”

They would remember too, that
Dr. Cato and Dr. Leacock had
said that a post mortem examina-
tion would not reveal injuries that
had occurred subsequent to the
original head injury.

Dr. Kirton on the other hand
had expressed the opinion that he
did not think it impossible that
the man could have received the
injury that he had received, by
falling off the bed, onto the con-
crete floor.

In the face of conflicting medical
opinions they were being asked
to say that the chain linking his
death with the blow he received
on the beach had been satisfac-
torily forged.

Dr. Kirton had had a long
experience, having qualified in
1915. Mr. Leacock had an array of
qualifications, That those qualifi-
cations had been obtained in nine
years spoke highly of his bril-
liance. But in weighting the
scales between brilliance and
experience, on which side would
they go down?

“Or if you are incapable of
coming down on either side,” Mr.
Dear asked, “can you pass judg-
ment on two doctors, one un-
doubtedly brilliant and the other
a man with 34 years’ experience as;
a general practitioner and more!

particularly as diagnosing the
many ailments that come before
him?

Brilliant

; “Mr, Leacock may be brilliant
in surgery. But will you without
hesitation accept his opinion on a
matter of diagnosis that when
Anthony George entered the
hospital he was as good as dead?

“Dr. Cato is also a surgeon. Will
you accept his opinion that the
only cause of this man’s death
was the blow, assuming that you
accept the inference of the fall
or falls?

Mr. Dear then cited Wills on
Circumstantial Evidence, pages
321 and 322, and on the strength
of the citation submitted to the
jury that if there were reasonable
explanations as to how Anthony
George could have met his death
other than the fact that the blow
alone caused it, they should ex-
amine those possibilities rigorous-
ly, and only if they were con-
vinced with moral certainty that
it was the blow which had directly
caused it, could they convict him.

He submitted finally that the
prisoner should be acquitted,
since the evidence left them sus-
pended between the conflicting
opinions of doctors.

Mr. Whyatt in his address said
that he would underline the sali-
ent points se that they would pro-
vide the jury with sign posts to
indicate where the truth lay. He
said that throughout the cross ex-
amination of the medical wit-
nesses there had been the danger
that questions and answers on
hypothetical circumstances led to
the error that it might be forgot-
ten that they were only dealing
with suppositions.

He would get away from those
hypotheses and suppositions and
deal with the evidence of the
three eyewitnesses, and take into
account the weapon that had been
used, He was submitting that the
three eye witnesses, Stoute,
Maughn and Newton had given
evidence that

His learned friend had argued
that the Prosecution had not
proved motive. He would reply
first by saying that it was not es-
sential to prove motive, and that
even if it were essential, there
had been evidence of the argu-
ment or quarrel between the pris-
oner and Anthony George before
the incident had occurred.

Savagery

If they wanted evidence of the
savagery of the attack, Mr. Whyatt
said, they had only to remember



one blow, but that he had had to
be restrained by bystanders from
striking what would have been a
fourth blow, and that, after An-

thony George had fallen to the}
ground

The only possible criticism}
| that could be made of the evi-|

dence of the eye witnesses was that
they said something in the Court
below about what the police said|
when they came on the scene

oo had given that evidence

@ On Page 7

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

|

|

th
if

SS

%

EelIn A
Beer Bottle

The common freshwater eel is
usually found in rivers, streams,
lakes and other inland bodies of
freshwater but yesterday the “Ad-
vocate” found one comfortably re-

laxing in a beer bottle filled wiih !

fresh water.

Rhoda Callender, a labourer
employed by the Sanitation De-
partment was cleaning the drain
that passes through the Consti-
tution Swamp area and scooped
out a ten inch eel which she had
placed in a beer bottle filled with
peter When the “Advocate” heard
ems |.

The freshwater eel belongs to
a group of soft-rayed fishes dis-
tinguished by the presence of an
opening to the air bladder and
the absence of the pelvic fins.

The pecularities of the eel are
the rudimentary scales buried in
the skin, the well developed pev
toral fins and the rounded tail
fin continuous with the dorsal
and ventral fins.

90 Year Building

Goes

On Lower Broad Street at the
corner of Cowell Street and op-
posite the new Plantations Ltd.
building is a stone one storey
structure covered with shingle and
galvanized roofing,

This building is part of the
block bought by Messrs Gardiner
Austin and Co., Ltd. from Messrs
Jones and Swan in 1942. It is
now being demolished and a new
‘two storeyed building will be
erected with allowances made for
future extention of two additional
floors.

Operations for the new building
are likely to start in about eight
weeks’ time and when completed.
it will house the traffic depart.
met of T.C.A. and Canadian
National Steamships on the ground
floor, while on the second fidor
will be the offices of Messrs
Gardiner Austin and Co., Ltd.

Built some 80 to 90 years ago,
the block comprising of a two
Storeyed as well as a one storey
building, was formerly occupied
by Messrs W. P. Leacock and Co,
Ltd., one of the principal sugar
exporters and estate agents in
the colony at that time.

The two storeyed section of
the building embraced the offices
of this firm and the lower ad-
joining building was utilized for
the stabling of imported animais,

ut towards the close of the

nineteenth century, was convert-
ed into ~ moiasses stanchion under
the direction of Mr, Nat Green,
wellknown contractor of those
days.
_ This entire structure passed
into the possession of Messrs
Jones and Swan some 40 years
go, and was used for the storage
of molasses and sugar. During
the entire period, it was in the
possession up # the time when
it was sold to Messrs Gardiner
Austin and Co., Ltd. and in fact,
has been utilised by this firm
for a similar purpose up to its
present demolition,

Mr. Anthony Lewis, A.R.LB.A.
has been entrusted with the plans
for the new building, i





Vestry Discuss
Improving
Ch. Ch. Cemetery

_The Christ Church Vestry de-
cided yesterday to consider sug-
gestions of Rev. W. E, Dash, Chap-
lain of the Christ Church Ceme-
tery, which aim at better regula-
tions for the working of the ceme-
tery.

Rev. Dash pointed out to the
Vestry ways how the cemetery
could be modernised. He spoke of
the laying out’of paths and pre-
paring means whereby the. graves
could be charted. He said that as
things were, there was little
method in arrangements for
graves which were sold and free
graves. He made the suggestion
that there should be two definite
sections.

Mr. S. A. McKenzie moved a
vote of thanks to Rev. Dash. He
said that they appreciated the
Suggestions made and said that the
matter would be gone into care-
fully and to the satisfaction not
only of Mr. Dash, but the taxpay-
ers,

The Vestry then considered the
Trade Returns for 1950—51 and
revised the trade lists,

Sugar For London

STEAMSHIP “Indore,” 4,177
tons net, called here yesterday en
route to U.K., to take a cargo of
4,200 tons of sugar for London.



This makes the third sugar ship
to call here for the week and a
\total of about 9,200 tons of sugar
loaded here for U.K., over the same
period.

Next port of call for the

complete loading. The vessel will
leave eithpr on Monday or
Tuesday. It is consigned to Messrs

Da Costa Ltd

& 4









Indore”
lis Antigua where it is expected ‘+o

Fish!
Fish!

HE LARGEST amount of fish
to be recorded at the Public

| Market since the fishing season

began was between April 1 and
April 12.

On Wednesday alone, 7,825 Ibs.
of flying fish, the best catch of the
year, were brought in.

For the last 12 days a total o:

» 45,147 lbs. of fish passed through

the Market and much more was
sole outside in the couniry ais-
tricts. Of this amount 28,954 lbs
were flying fish and 6,226 lbs. ot
of shark. The best catch of shark

- was on April 1 when 2.251 Ibs.

were recorded.
; Other catches consisted of 8,083
Ibs. of dolphin, 324 Ibs. of king

}| fish, 664 lbs. of bill fish, 280; Ibs.

of albacore, 568 Ibs. of cavallies,
and 48 Ibs. of bonita.
Owing to the surplus amount of

S flying fish, hawkers has been re-
_| leasing them in some instances at

three and four cents each, but

-\;this generally happens after 6

o’clock in the evening. Many of
the fish are placed on ice until
the following day and in the early
morning hawkers are shouting
“Fish! Fish!”

The other people who benefit
from the large catches of fish are
those with one-door shops who
buy them and sell them fried.
; These vendors buy the fish at four
jeents each (wholeshle) and



:* cents, more than 50% profit.

During tne shortage of flying
fish these vendors even do a better
trade. Most of the fishermen re-
/serve their catches for them While
housewives just have to standby
and grudgingly watch them take
away a basket or two filled with
fish. In case of a shortage the
price of a fried flying fish goes up
by one penny. These vendors do
a good trade at night.

The Government Experimental
boat “Investigator” played its part
in bringing some of the fish to the
Market.

Mr. D. W. .Wiles, Fisheries
Officer, told the Advocate yester-
day that research work is. still
continuing especially with regards
to plankten indication as to where
| flying fish are likely to be found.

He said that some definite an-
nouncement will be made in the
|near future about the scheme.
The ring net, specially imported
{to catch bonita, has arrived in the
island and this net has been
geared recently. Other arrange-
ments are going ahead for prepar-
ing the Investigator as soon
bonita are seen.



as

HE EXECUTIVE Commitiee of

the League of Empire, under
the Presidency of Sir Allan Colly-
more, Kt. held their Annual
Meeting at Combermere School on
Saturday last.

Their Second Annual Exhibi-
tion of work produced by. the
Elementary and Secondary Schools
of Barbados is to be held during
Empire Week, May 24 and Satur-
day 27, inclusive, at Combermere
School Hall.

It is understood that competing
Schools have been working at
their Posters and Projects since
July 1949. The Managing Com-
mittee had felt so encouraged by
the response of the public and
schools to the Exhibition of 1949
that they had authorised the cir-
cularisation of details for the 1950
Competition in July last year.
This would afford all Headmasters,
who wished to compete, to make
full and ample arrangements for
the best possible effort to be pro-
duced by their schools for 1950.

The opening Ceremony will take
place on Wednesday, May 24, at
10.00 are

ISHERMEN of the fishing boat
“Sydney” landed six sharks,
each of about five feet long on|
Oistin’s beach yesterday. The
boat had been out all Wednesday
night and came in with their
catch yesterday evening. Many
flying fish were included in the
catch,

E REGULAR broadcast

feature of the British Council
ver the local service tonight be-
ginning at 9.15 o’clock is devoted
to the verse of Hugh Popham. The
poems to be read are taken from
“Against the Lightning” and “The
Journey and the Dream’ two
volumes of verse published in
England at the end of the war.

Other poems are taken from
“To the Unborn” a collection of
poems in manuscript.

Those taking part in the pro-
gramme are Jean Lawson—who
will play two musical interludes:
Christine Gracie, Hugh Popham
and Carl Dons who will read the
poems,

ANY SCHOOLBOYS spent

their recreational period at
the Reef grounds yesterdd@y play-
ing games which included foot-
ball and cricket.

Although the cricket pitch was
not prepared for the game the boys
still enjoyed themselves.

Meanwhile the tennis lawn is
being constantly watered to en-
courage the growth of grass. Only
a few sheep were seen quietly
grazing. rm

What’« On Today

Court of Grand Sessions at
10.00 a.m.

Meeting, Bosrd of Manage
ment, B.C.A. at Kensing-
ton at 4.15 p.m.

Football, Queen’s Park at

5 00 p.m.
Basket Ball, Y.MLC.A. at
7. 30 p.m.

| Mobile Cinema, Friendship
| Plantation Yard, St. Mich-
|



ael at 7.30 p.m.

Certificates will be pre-
sented to the nurses of
the Children’s Goodwill

League, Constitution, at
7.30 tonight. After the
presentation a movie will
be shown and the St,

Paul’s Choir will sing.

|
THE SUN

= of bidding without know-

ee of taking the boat over from

in
| turn sell one fried fish for 12

**Potick’’
Fetches $550



EN French “Yaw
Potick,” a vessel which wher
made new could have brougni

between $25,000 and $30,000, was
sold at:quction yesterday to the
highest bidder for $550.

Now owner is Mr. James Murray
of Halls, St. Michael who alon;
with the other bidders, took the

ing the condition of
merged ship.

All tp be seen of the ‘Potick’ fo
the past three to four months werc
its own masts, which were pro-
truding above water in the inner
basin of the Careenage, and a life
boat which was afloat in the area.

The hull and masts along with
three deck houses, a water tank,
a life boat, two water barrel stands
a table and three sections of hatch
covers were covered by the $500.

The first bid was $100 and after
some delay and prompting by the
Government auctioneer Mr. Darcy
Scott,
climax.

Mr. Murray, in signing the con-

the sub-

the figure reached the

Government for the sum men-
tioned, was also made to agree
that he would have the ship re-

| Basin from the bed of the inner

basin of the Careenage before the
end of May this year. In any
case, the responsibility of remov-
ing the vessel is all his.

This, however, did not seem to
worry him as he was not hesitant
in signing.

Quite a few of the bidders
seemed worried over the condi-
tion of the auxiliary engine. some
thought that the water would
have no effect.

Canary
Is Clean

THE large heap of stones and
cement squares, which _ partly
block the entrance to Whites Alley
from Swan Street, is still there aad
causing annoyance to cyclists and



pedestrians who go in and out ot
the alley.

Apart from this the alley is very
clean and appears to have had
recent attention.

Synagogue Lane situated
between Messrs. Ince & Co's
Bakery and the Barbados Turt
Club, is badly in need of a wash-
ing. Between 10 and 11.00 am.,
yesterday bits of paper could be
seen blowing around the alley. It
also has a strong smell of urine. |
A few coconut shells were also |
seen at the entrance from James
Street.

Da Costa’s Alley, situated neai
the Wharf, is also badly in need ot



a washing. The entrance from the
Wharf is in need of repairs.
Canary Street, although situated
in the vicinity of the Wharf, is one
of the cleanest alleys in the City
Only the gutters are in need of a

tity of moss can be seen,

Along Milk Market, opposi‘e
the Plantations Ltd., new building.
there is a cover to a manhole
which is practically falling in
Should a pedestrian step on this
cover he would be asking for a |
broken foot or fractured spine

_—_—_——_——.



Hams Arrive |

Some 618 cases of Swift hams|
were discharged here yesterday |

by the s,s. P. & T. Pathfincer|
which arrived during the morning |
with cargo from Buenos Aires, |

Vienna sausages, pigsnouts, |

heads and skins, veal loaf, pickled |
pork and leather comprised the
other cargo brought for Barbados
by the Pathfinder

The cargo was quickly dis-
charged and the vessel sailed!
during the evening for San Fran-
cisco. Messrs DaCosta & Co.,
Ltd. are the local agents.

More Rice

The third shipment within the |
past seven days of 1,500 bags of
rice arrived from British



|
Guiana
on Wednesday evening by the 74
ton schooner Mary M. Lewis.

Schooners Marion Belle Wolfe
and Philip H. Davidson, the two
other arrivals with rice during
this period, have already begun to
discharge their supplies.

The Mary M. Lewis was yester-
day in the Carecenage awaiting
its chance to get a berth in either
of the congested outer and inner
basins,

This schooner has also brought
to the island 600 bags of charcoal
and 30 tons of firewood. The
Schooner Owners’ Association are
agents.

25 YEARS AGO
Barbados Advocate, April 14, 1925

Mystery, gripping, enthralling
mystery, is the underlying feature
of “The Acquittal”, the remark-
able piturization of Rita Weiman’s
stage play opened at the Empire
Theatre last night. Through the
sensational episodes that followed
exch other, one is kept wondering
Who's Guilty? The sinister finger
of suspicion points first at one
character, then another.

36” wide Per yd



washing. Here and there a za



—

|

Tartan Checks

Admirable for Skirts and Gents’ Bath Robes

tt tt me

RAYON TAFFETA

Jn Black, White, Pink, Peach, Green, Rose, Blue

36” wide Per yd.

PYJAMA SUITING
31” wide Per yd 78¢. & SDC.

REAL MADRAS HEADKERCHIEFS
ee A a se $1.47



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, ITD.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

PAGE FIVE



4 fy Ah ff WV if, My,



7
47

fof

beeen

HAT hopeless feeling that you're too weak,

‘not up to it’ any longer simply means that
you've been taking too much out of yourself,
Your body is short of two essential strengthening
foods—phosphorus and protein.

Tissues strengthened

To put you right, you need a course of
‘Sanatggen’ Nerve Tonic Food. ‘Sanatogen’
combines these two great body-building foods—
phosphorus and protein—in their organic form.
so that they are quickly absorbed into your
system. Day by day glorious new health, youth
and vitality flow through your whole body —
your strength and self-confidence come back !
Start on a course of ‘Sanatogen’ today,

On sale at good chemists and druggists

TOGE



N



@ NERVE TONIC

SSA

FOOD
: » restores health, youth and vitality
\ The ward ‘Sanatogen’ is a registered trade mark of Gov Ltd., Loughborough, England
er ee YS

eee ee a ee ee oa ose aoe

Fresh for your
Pets! !

PURINA DOG CHOW
PURINA RABBIT CHOW

h. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.
Distributors.



ay

Re ;








SS











HARRISON'S soa sr

GOODS RECENTLY RECEIVED
INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING ITEMS

| CHRO. PLATED BIB AND STOP COCKS

8 2

NECKED BOLTS 3 ins. to 6 ins.

C. P. AND BRONZE FINISH.

BRASS RACKING COCKS

8

CASEMENT STAYS — Black 18 ins.
ALUMINUM CURTAIN RAILS

COMPLETE WITH FITTINGS.

| PERFORATED ZINC SHEETS

AND .——

“MAGNA” CAST IRON BATHS

Porcelain Enamelled and complete
with C.P. Hand C. Taps, Overflow and
Waste Fittings

$104.38 EACH.

|
|
| HP. BALL VALVES
|

HARRISON'S



Hardware Dept.
Tel. 2364.







SPECIFY

"EVERITE”

ASBESTOS-CEMENT
CORRUGATED SHEETS

AND

“TURNALL”

ASBESTOS


























Roe









j / Cant an,











"
i
'
i

Br A

£5



—

ee
GE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE
PAGE S



—

HENRY



ON



/
S WHAT IF MAMA 1
( AND PAPA WOULD )
LIE AROUND THE <
a7 HOUSE LIKE THIS
1SS.'45 TO BO OuR

1 READING ?





Ow HY CAN'T YOu
KIE. YOU'LL & Sm SIT IN A CHAIR ”
OUR | sa 7) AND BE COMFORTABLE
F | ;
_A Pak

at



ALL
% WHEN YOU READ

Pel nN frm




l-

Ss
COMFORTABLE,
ISN'T IT?

T READING | |.J



4 re is



ow
>
Lt
4
om
~~
a.
*









>)

‘Mou, Weight and Haight
peru Children

——
LISTEN, WHISPER
| KNOW YOUR
& FATHER IS AT |

LET ME GO
f THERE.
r ———

FORGET THE WRETCHED
MONEY! YOUZE ONLY
A &/O! YOU NEEO
\. LOOKING AFTER,



iF 1 DION'T WINCE AT MYSELF
EVERY TIME | SHAVE-—I'D Say





Y NO MORE THAN
A FPATHERLY

FEELING, EH?

.
Ny





)




















“
t
‘|
a? iP.
| Y; me fire oY
f av oa
: oa | ly: rie PROFILE *
ee er rrr
ca THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER
BLO wus us bo} |r wa EAL RST I THOUGHT HE WAS ANY(
ear ae | DAD, ' | OUTLAW, BUT I WAS WRONG. ¢
| N’GET IT Z } | HE OFFERED ME A CHANCE I,
AN oe (O GET YOU, RHINO p—AI Gc
| W | Se tN
|
|
\! |
t
Children grow husky
a
Sais and tall : : ; bigger
BY GEORGE MC.MANUS SBSt,
ls stronger—better
f Ce ae | ? equipped for school
‘ Lsavilesyauierd Gnuee (1 worse VC pyiwqes and play, and for the
; ) ||| RAY ViuMAb CALLS || TS WORRY ABOUT [/2> Td :
AS “up | 4 future, with a hearty
\ UPN J ON | “Your ofmice™ || Taunus Quaker Oats breakfast
i i EVERY MORNING!
i \ No other whole grain
‘ tee: cereal is more delicious
i = 2 and satisfying, no other
| — gives greater nourish:
uaker Oats Ome”?
) Tequaer oo ment at less cost.
de! ae GREAT HEALTH FOOD. e » Quaker Oats is rich in the
he i A elements needed by everyone for quick energy, strength and health;

It supplies essential minerals, proteins; carbohydrates, and essen-
tial Vitamin B1 that serns food into energy. Quaker Oats is a health.
ful, delicious BREAKFAST FOOD for everybody.

Ask for Quaker Oats today at your favorite store . .
Oats “Health Breakfasts” every day!

RIP KIRBY



- Serve Quaker







K! QUAKER OATS GIVES YOU...
MORE ENERGY it's rich in carbohydrates

MORE STRENGTH plenty of proteins
MORE STAMINA . . . thanks to generous Thiamin (Vitamin B,)
MORE ENJOYMENT delicious flavor everybody likes




CRP eowreremececece














LEE

P. | How To Prepare a Delicious — —
Boil 2 cups of water. Add salt. 0
boiling; add 1 cup of — —
Cook it, stirring; for 2

That's all.



BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

ISENDA MESSAGE ToTHE Y IT cHaL! | 4cONG0, wave HORSE READY Foe «
jLLONGO TO HAVE A HORSE / BE DONE, | | PHAWTong On OLD TRAIL.
READY ON THE OLD TRAIL. | GREAT < Ost} | SSC ana,

CON MY WAY

‘

GREETINGS O GHOST
) | WHO WALWS! OUR HUMBLE




ra |
~~





LLAGT 1S HOMDOES
AAT IS YOUR DESIRE?
—s










LINGLEUM
Sizes: 9 ft. by 744 ft,



TARPETS
and 104% ft. by 9 ft.

Also

. LINGLEUM IN ROLLS éft

All very reasonable

wide



\ in Price.
5
s ' )
, F ssaumes TL HERBERT Ltd, mecca
1] 3 186 1926
j ? 10 & 11 Roebuck Street
3946099990900690590S90e00e%











ASK FOR THE BEST

McEWANS.







ASE LLZZOSSOCESO.







® Baby revelsin the e
cream-like latherog £7 B
Curicura Soar = It combing

Fae
jemcllient aua medicing \ ey |
| properties which keep h's ~ * F

tender skin healthy and (5 a

free from blemishes, ex- \
| quisitely softand velvery,

| delightful





7 2 4 >

>

a
Lika

& £°3 Fe

t May mean kidney troubly

A function of the kidneys is ty
eliminate harmful impurities frog
stem. If the kidneys

sl sh, these impurities
ulate and settle and often become
1 cause of pain in joints ang
muscles. The way to tackle the
trouble is to help the Ij
“1 They should be toned up
De Witt’s Pills—the meg
























made specially for this
De Witt’s Pills have a ing
| cleansing and antiseptic aetigg
the kidueys that brings them |
to perform their
on properly. This a
tried medicine is sold all over
the world and we have
letters from sufferers ¢,
of relici gained, after
of suffering, b i
Witt’s Pilis Try De
for your trouble, Goty
your chemist

back






OUR
GUARANTEE
| De Witt’s Pills «
| manufactured under strictly hy gis
} conditions and the ingredients
‘form to rigid standards of ppp

| OST

for Peart UT ETT. Can

\ a
B ©



Kw
| LIN

nS

L Ce vie

gem as ltl On

a

Vonit justi dream
about Locking prtter!

FIND OUT THE SECRETS FROM >=

gH A yy ggg gsr



i
i

MISS BERTHA LAMAS



| NEW YORK SALON

NEXT WEEK

AT
COLLINS LTD.
BROAD STREET.

WILLIAM FOGARTY LOD,
Inc. B. G.

)





v

ty



IN OUR ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT

We can quote you





on
H A.C, MOTORS (Hoover) ;
1/6, 2, %4, 1/3 HLP. 50 Cycle 110 Volts i
Nr aaa es
=m



| Values & Qualities at the
BROADWAY



PLAST s lk ‘ » & $4.03 (2 varee® if
ie
euiee : from $3.96 to #9 1a
ik

PLASTIC CHILDREN’S BA White, Black and Red 2 |
HILDRI ARE HOF Ww I n to 7% ie
1 Gon
CHILDRED KLI S S60, 4% i

URGADWAY DRESS SHOP.


FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1950







CLASSIFIED ADS.

















P —_———— ee ee
gaTES FOR RENT
————————
aD a
Week Sun HOUSES
$1.00 1 20| aes
OUNCEMENTS ‘ ; TO SUBLET
ae per word on teens th ees Jawrence Gap
) yoR SALE articetenonth of May only, For further
a os | r tcutars apply to EB. C. Boyce Dun-
FOR RENT » 02 3 soos St. Lawrence Gay. | Phone 8240.
a -4.50—t.f.n.
WANTED # eT
LAT--At B
word a@y Mansion, fully fur-
ost. me De ta 48 6 | nished all modern conveniences” tons
e Ist May. Dial 4103. 12.4.50—3n
Minimum } i
PUBLIC SALES ‘alin HOUSE TO LET—From 15th May to
L 08 : os 30th. Large fully furnished house
4 ND REA - ames coast, cool position, Excellent
UCTION . bathing. $75 monthly. Ring Dons 3249.
per agate 13.4,.50—Tn.
” ctierze 1.20 br OFFICE—One Office over Sanitary
Minimum 4 . Laundry Depot., Marhitl Street. Apply
Fersonal Sanitary Laundry Co. Tel 3592
rics 08 10 31.3.50—t f.n
PUBLIC ores
: Per agate 1.20 1,50 BUNGALOW, also Plat, focing sea mai
Minimum harge road. Hastings, furnished from May 1st
ENING ADVOCATE (Monéay) All comforts, English baths with heate;
per inch ...-+rserereeeerseees see showers, telephones, verandahs. Tele ;}
phone 9 31.3.50—t.¢
FOR RENT. F we
MPs rom Ist April Upstairs
BIRTH ae No a Street. Suitable
fency or si r type of business
to Frank and Margaret in oad Contact immediately on’ Premises No 6
_ i child: a boy; Gran«iso! | Street. 31.3.50—t.f.n
John and Lady Sainte in. ‘

.
FOR SALE





OMOTIVE
'
14/6 SALOON — 1947!
MH 00 — Courtesy Garage.
) yada 14.4. 50—3n. |
Dial 4616. |
LIA — In Al condition. |
FORD ANG! Courtesy Garage. |
* _— opeemtenmei fy x

ne Morris 8 H.P. Sedan in Al,

nical condition. L. Ae “et

al Garage Ltd. .4.50.—7n.
wt.

VAN—1948 (June) Fordson os Ri

i fe under 9,000,

“eA sama. condition for viewing

a : Ralph A Beard’s Auction rooms,

iwood Alley, 8 a.m, to 12 noon daily,

_ 12,4.50—3n. |

Ford V-8. 1939 model. Just}

overhauled ane De eae
arage,

a 12.4.50—6n.

|

‘CAR ler Car 1940 Sedan. Per-

aiden. Dial 3915. Cosmopolitan

rage, Magazine Lane. 12.4.50—3n.

AR—(1) Prefect Ford Car 1948 Model
Se citent condition. Apply United
or Company. 85 Roebuck Street,
2741. 13.4.50—4n.

AND CHARGER & BATTERIES —32
y Wind charger & ae we
ic h lantation, St.

. Apply Bushy Par’ ane.

R AMME—With Garrard Auto-
iP coeres. In_ perfect workiny |
der. E. G. Gibbs, ‘‘Clairemonte’’,

orthing, Ch. Ch
Fee SOP) WORT oo s0~an

SCELLANEOUS

. V STOVE PARTS — Flame
oem Wick, Wick-Carriers, Flam
Galleries, Seteralere e oan
Auto Tyre Co., Trafalga
2806. 5.4.50—t.f.n. |

ngs
y
s,

Dial 2696.

. ALVANISE SHEETS
Bice Git, sft sins Bf
} p mild ste2) plates !/! 8

f and 3/8 in various sixes Beauire
i falgar Stree
te Tyre Company, Tra lea ees

'n

and 9ft lengths



ALVANISED PIPF. ae 1
o-inch galvanised pipe. 26c $

. BARNES & CO.. LTD
ss” 25.3.50—t f




to

MASKS — Rubber diving
; easier the sea bed for rare
lis, Coral, etc. $2.40, Cave Shepherr

Beach Club.
Bs ome aoe Bone 13.4. 50—2n

IALOUSIE FLAPS, — Jealousie W.in-
s and Doors. To be seen at ‘‘Ken-

? lyde
Strathely 14.4, 50-—2n

EMS—‘First & Last” by Hunter J

mesis. $1.50 and $1.00. Advocate
ionery Store. pes
ONN YEAST—Riich concentrated vite.
ee ee
res. 14.4. 50—-2n

s DIES BROWN TWEED SUIT -
Bitium size, also one travelling Ruc

12.4.50—2r

HIRCHILL, — Maxwell Corat.

s, fully furnished, Avnilable fo
iate possession. Applhy Raleh A
d, Hardwood Alley. Phone 4482 ©
12,4, 50—2n

jroo

TRIG NoTIC#S



25 easily earned by obtaining order’
for private Christmas Cards from

r friends. No previous experienc:
, Write today for beautiful free
Book to Britain’s largest ano
Publishers; highest commission

ous money making opportunity

; Williams & Co., Dept. 10 Victori*

THE BARBADOS

vil Service Association

be holding a Hance at the Com-
m School Hall on Saturda#y, 22nd
1950, in honour of the visiting
lates of the Federation of Givil Ser-
jations. Music will be supplied
. Arnold Meanwell's Orchestra.
ing 9 p.m. Dress Formal.
ission $1.00.

NOTICE

PARISH OF ST, PEXER
anted by the Poor Law Guardians
ithe Almshouse a fully qualified Nurse
mle of taking charge of Midwifery

ry $55.00 per montn,
Ppicants must present themselves
Certificate and credentials to
|P.M.O. at his residence “Roseville,”
er on or before April 17th up to

Signed,
G. 8, CORBIN,
Clerk, Poor Law Guardians,
St. Peter.
12.4.50—4n,

NOTICE

WNDERS for removing and replacing
of St. Philip's Parish Church,
be received by me up to 30th April,

W. U. GOODING,

Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip's
7.4,50.—6n.

NOTICE

B.A SPEARWATER Master of the
Have beg to notify that no

be given to any membe

crew of the said M/V La Have

by my written permission during
at the Port of Bridgetown,
“os. Dated this 11th day of April

E. A. SPEARWATER
Master.
12.4.50—3n





ADVERTISE

| in the

ie





KEW GENU

sane inttiacr pniniemrininsianes



ADVOCATE Tee



“SEA QUEEN"—Hastings. F=-m Ist.

May. Apply Mrs. Marion G'l>s. Dial
4568. 14.4.50—4n .



WANTED TO RENT

HEATHFIELD—On the Crane Ccnst
for the months of Mav, June, & July





Apply Mrs. A, * t, Cordoba,
Christ Church. Phone 8385.

14.4. 50—3n .

BUNGALOW—Maxwell’s Coast, con-

taining 4 bedrooms, fully furnished, For
the months of May, October and Novem-
ber. Apply J. H. Wilkinson. Phone 2404.

14.4.50—3n.
—_.

Tact rar~wn
——__—_—~<_[=[====[[=**_*""""_"___=]_:-----.

LOST

KEYS—Bunch of Keys. Post Office
‘ GLU. vicinity. Please return to:—
Post Office or/Tel: 3961.







SS eeSotSe



14.4.50—2n

LOST — A beautiful girl's life. I'm
going to find out how and whg". Alan
'ADD “CHICAGO DEADLINE” PT AZA













Theatre. 14.4.50—3n.
PUBLIC SALES
AUCTION

BY instructions of the Insurance Com-
pany, I will sell on FRIDAY lth at 2

D.m. at Me Enearney’s Garege, 1 Ford
Platform Lo DAMAGED. Terms
Cash. R. HER Mc KENZIE.

12.4.50—3n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON 18th by order of Mrs. GEORGE
CHASE we will sell her Furniture at
o " Navy Gardens.

which includes

Morris Suite, Settee & 2 Arm Chairs
with Cushions, Upright Chairs, Nice
Sideboard, Large Fook shelf, ornament
Tables, Curved Pedestal all in Mahog-
any, Oak Extension Dining Table &
Tea Trolley, Inlaid Mird. Cabinet, Fold-
ing Card Table, Cordea Arm Chairs,
Congoleum, Glass Ware, Service,
White Dinner Set, Invelid Chairs, Elec-
tric Hot Plate & Iron, Blue Bedroom
Suite, Iron Bedstead, Press, &c. Mahog
Dressing Tables, Writing ‘& Bed side
Tables, MT Washstand, Low Divan,
Peds, Kitchen Cabinet, Larder and other
items.

Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms Cash.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO..

Auctioneer.
14.4.50—2n

entrees}
REAL ESTATE

“SUNSET VIEW’—Rockley. (Adijoin
ing BLUE WATERS), on the land sid
‘ the road facing the Bay with 13,49
square feet of land including the ‘an
‘cross the road running to the water’
dge. The house contains verandah
‘rawing and dining rooms, three bed
coms with running water, and a!! ott
fices including kitehen with cupboard:
Water, Electricity, Gas and Rad
installed. Garage and Servants rooms
in yard

Inspection any day—Phone 8365. Mr.
Bellamy,

The above will be set up to public
competition at the office of the under
signed on Friday, the 2Ist of April, 1950.
at 2 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY,

Lucas Street
31.3,.50—13n.

“STAUNTON”: and land thereto con-
taining approximately 15,678 square feet,
6th Avenue, Belleville.

The dwelling house which is a sub-
stantially erected stonewall building in
perfect condition comprises:—

DOWNSTAIRS. Spacious cool veran-
dahs on two sides, large drawing and
dining rooms, Buttery, larder room,
pantry, kitchen and servants’ room.

UPSTAIRS, 5 bedrooms, toilet
bath room.

There is a small lawn to the east of
the house, as well as spacious back yard
with lime and fruit trees planted.

YARD. Large garage and washroom.

Electric light, water and gas are in-
stalled thnoughout. Inspection by ap-
pointment with Mrs. Waite, thg owner.
Telephone 2553. é

By public auction on Friday the %Jst
April 1950 at 2 p.m. at the office of the
undersigned from whom further parti-
culars and conditions of sale may be ob-

tained.
R. S. NICHOLLS S ei
152 Roebuc eet.
mre Phone 3925,
13.4,50—8n-e.d



and



Dr Emtage having decided to leave
Melbourne House, Belmont Road, at the
20th April, the property, which stands on
2% acres land and is in excellent condi-
tion, is offered for sale.

Interested parties please diai 2489—
Brittons Nursing Home, 9.4.50—6n.



The undersigned will offer for sale by
public competition at their office, James
Street, Seer, B Friday the ldth
day of April, , p.m.
my The dwellinghouse called “RAD-
COURT” standing on 8,436 square feet
of land at Navy Gardens, Christ Church.
Inspection on application to the under-

a Tine Gwallinetho use, eee ee.
DOWN” on

of land at Fontabelle, St. Michael, In-
spection on application to the tenant
between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

For further particulars, apply to :—
7 HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD,



Solicitors.
7.4,50.—5n.
AT the office of the undersigned on
Friday the 2ist instant at 2 p.m, at

Public competition:—
61 shares in the WEST INDIA BISCUIT
LIMITED



Stop Pyorrhiea
in 24 Hours

Bleeding Gums, Loose Teeth and Sore
Mouth mean that you have rere eee
Trench Mouth or a bad disease wee
sooner or later will make your teeth fa!
out and may cause Rheumatism and Heart

. Stop this Aiserzse now with the
new discovery Amosan. Stops pisodiag
gums in 24 ends sore mouth an
tightens teeth. [ron clad gonsestes
Amosan must make your mouth well an
save your teeth or money back on ee
of empty rackage. Get Amosan from you!

‘ - chemist today.

The guarantee
Pyerrhea—Treach Mouth

protects you.

INE DRY



; Apply in first instance by letter to:E.F.W.

Vacancy For Examination Secretary,

CROWN





Britain Must Let
Us Live

@ From Page 1

colonies must definitely make a
stand.

If the British want our loyalty |
they must make it possible for
us to live and not that they live
at our expense.

@ From Page 5.

sometime after the occurrence.
After the actual attack had been
;made and Anthony George had
been knocked down, there had
been confusion on the beach, and
it was not surprising to find some
people givmg different evidence
as to what they heard.

The material part of their evi-
dence was what they told of the
actual occurrence before the
confusion arose.

The second criticism of their
evidence was that they had de-
posed to the prisoner having

If they persist in the present
attitude on the Sugar question
they will become the chief insti-
gators of political unrest in the
West Indies and will destroy for-
ever all prospects of stable politi-
cal progress in these territories
which can only be made possible
by co-operation between the Brit-
ish Government and ourselves,




































eh struck three blows, while there
= BY Cable) was no evidence of bruises in the
: side or on the feet.
Wriavrep

—— ————, First Blow
HELP It would be remembered, Mr.
SERVANTS — Immediately an ex-| Whyatt told the jury that the
t ith rederenees nd general maid. Apply | first blow had made the man
St Micha Fare, ere tul| stagger and totter, and that al-

though the second blow might
have been aimed with force, the
deceased might not have got the
full force of it. They would re-
member too that those two last
blows had not fallen on the bare
skin of the deceased, but his clothes
had interposed.

The criticisms that had been
made did not entitle them to say
that those witnesses were un-
reliable.

Those three eye witnesses had
spoken about bleeding, and in that
part of their story they had been
corroborated by three other in-
dependent witnesses.

As far as Cobham was con-
cerned, he thought it would be

y
BUTLER—For small Hotel. Experienced
—quick—capable head butler. Must be
Pleasantly spoken, willing, and capable
of supervising work of under butlers

c/o The Advocate. 12.4.50—6n,



ieee hit etianpeeapeiemciens

TAILORS—Journeyman Tailors, apply
to J. W. Hewitt Tailaring Emporium.
Coleridge St. opposite Fire Brigade
Station. 13.4.50—4n.

An Assistant Master for the Christ
Church Boys’ Foundation School, trom
the Ist May 1950, to teach Spanish and
General Form Subjects,

Salary on approved Seale according to
qualification and experience.

Applications should be sent with ful)
details of qualification and experience,
to the Headmaster not later than 22nd

April, agreed that Cobham had told a
w an ar ane. eek watered down story. He had even

Ch. Ch. Boys’ Foundation School reminded them in the course of
9.4.50—7n.| his evidence that he was speaking

ieeentertteslinatinrst ahaa TT 4 :
KEEPER—Experienced linen — keeper the truth. They would remem

ber, said Mr. Whyatt, that in his
outline he had said that the Pros-
ecution was not relying on Cob-
ham, and he was still suggesting
to them that Cobham’s evidence
was not reliable.

Mr, Whyatt then told the jury
that if they reached the conclusion
that the prisoner’s mind had been
so obscured by drink that he was
incapable of forming a , specific
intention to do grievous bodily
harm to the deceased, they would
be entitled to say that he was
guilty not of murder, but of man-
slaughter. But they would have
to be satisfied that his mind had
been so obscured.

“The scene shifts,” said Mr.
Whyatt. “The deceased is taken
to the hospital as a senseless
drunk, says the Defence, and suf-
fering from a severe brain injury,
says vne Prosecution. Which is it?

“The Prosecution is saying that
he was suffering from severe brain
injury consequent on being hit by
a piece of wood. My submission
is that he had been knocked out
by that blow and was a proper
subject to be taken vo the hos-
pital.”

Mr. Whyatt continuing remind-
ed the jury that Dr. Kirton had

storekeeper or reception desires in
Barbados, where could use pia
Pained at Claridges Hotel, London, Scot-

and Paris Can excellent
references. Free now, can give personal
interview. Phone 3303.

14.4.50—3n.

FLOOR LADY—To take full charge of
and supervise our trimming department
An experienced person is perferred and
applicants must have a thorugh know-
ledge of millinery work, needlework,
and styles and designs for trimming
Leies Hats, A very attractive salary is
offered for a person with proper quali-
fications. Apply at once in writing:—
MODERNE HAT, P.O. Box 21, Bridge-

town, Barbados. Please quote references.
14.3,.50—3n

MISCELLANEOUS

cc cSaREiiatemD

WAGON WHEELS—with axle, with or
without tyres. Apply Manager, Black-
man's Plantation, St. Joseph,

12.4.50—6n.

STAMPS — Used Postage Stamps
wanted, will pay cash or send merc han-
dize in exchange. R. M. Chaplin, Box
389, Des Moines, Iowa. U.S.A.

14,4, 50—3n.

POTTLES—Pint Bottles 8 cents per
Dozen. D. V. Scott & Co. Ltd, Spring
Ham, White Park.

14.4. 50—3n



(1OUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of D. V. Scott & Co said that he had diagnosed him as
Itd. of Broad Street, City, for permis-
sion to sell Spirits, Malt 4Liquors, &e. | =







at a wall building at White Park, St

Michael
moved this 19th de of April 1950, WAL

Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’

H. HERBERT,
Applicant

N.B.—This application will be consi-

Cered at_a Licensing Court to be held at





‘The public are hereby warned against
wiving credit to any person or persons
Whomsoever in my name as I do not

Police Court, District ‘A’, on Monday] hoki myself responsible for anyone con-
‘he 24th day of April 1950 at 11 o'clock,| tnacting any debt or debts in my name
a-m, unless by a written rder signed by me
B. A. MeLEopD. Mr. CAMERON CODRINGTON
Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’ King William St.
14.4.50—In 14.4.50—2n

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Education Department,



British Guiana

Applications are invited for the vacant post of Examinations
Secretary, Education Department, British Guiana. The Examinations
Secretary will be required to take charge, under the Director of Edu-
cation, of arrangements for all Local and External Examinations held
by the British Guiana Education Department. Applicants should be
University Graduates, preferably with experience of the organisation
and supervision of examinations.

2. The post is on the Pensionable Establishment of the Colony
and the salary is on the scale $3,000 per annum rising to $3,600 per
annum by annual increments of $120 per annum. The candidate
selected will be appointed on one year’s probation.

3. Applications, stating age and full particulars of qualifications
and experience, accompanied by not less than two testimonials, should
be addressed to the Director of Education, Education Department,
Georgetown, British Guiana, to reach him not later than the Ist of
May, 1950.

14.4.'50,—2n,



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
REGISTRATION OF RELIEF TEACHERS.

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for regis-
istration as Relief Teachers,. Preference will be given to persons hold-
ing the School Certificate or some equivalent qualification:

Applications, to be submitted on Form E/7 M (Men) or Form E/7
W (Women) obtainable from the Department of Education, should
reach the Director of Education not later than Saturday, the 22nd of
April, 1950,

REGISTERED RELIEF TEACHERS, WHO WISH TO HAVE
THEIR NAMES RETAINED ON THE REVISED LIST, MUST IN-
FORM THE DEPARTMENT BY LETTER NOT LATER THAN SAT-
URDAY, THE 22ND OF APRIL, 1950.

14.4,.’50.—2n.

PROPERITY—FOR SALE







Bedrogms each with running water, Kitchenette, Lavatory and Bath tiled,
Toof cOvered with everite dry and properly made. It is well furnished with
Properly made Mahogany Furniture and stands on ‘4 of an acre of land.

At Christ Church opposite the sea Price reasonable.

Apply to D'ARCY A. SCOTT.

Built of Coral Stone and has Verandah, Drawing and Dining Room, (3)
| Magazine Lane









—_——



GINGER ALE —







—_—_..



BARBADOS, ADVOCATE

Counsels Address Jury
In Murder Case

a drunk. He had said he had vhus
diagnosed him “provisionally”:
But that provision seemed to be
continuing up to the present time.
The Prosecution was not saying
that anyone was blameworthy for
that diagnosis, It was excusable
when one took into account the
history of the patient and the fact
that he smelled strongly of alco-
hol. Doctors were only human
after all, and were liable to err.

Where medical opinion in the
case was concerned, it was the
opinion of Dr. Cavo, Mr. Leacock
and Dr. Copland that when An-
thony George was admitted into
the Casualty he had no chance of
recovery. It was a fact, in spite
of what his learned friend had
submivted, that there were cases
which doctors could say positively
were fatal.

Where the possibility of falling
cut of bed was concerned, he
would say that they were not there
to speculave but to decide the case
on the evidence. The evidence wag
that the nurse heard the noise of
a movement on the bed. There was
no evidence that he had fallen
out of bed, and they would re-
member that on the second odca-
sion the deceased had been found
on the floor vomiting.

If he had fallen out of bed and
received the injuries from which
he was suffering, he would not
have been found sitting, He would
have been found unconscious,

“You will remember,” said Mr.
Whyatt, “that I puv that to Dr.
Kirton, and he admitted that he
had not though‘ of vhat before.”

Chronic Alcoholic

In considering the case they
must not be prejudiced by any-
thing that they nad heard about
Anvoony George, It had been said
that he was a chronic alcoholic,
but even if the man was bad, he
had no one there to speak for him.

“If he had bad points,” Mr,
Whyatt said, “he might have had
good ones also. He cannot speak
tor himself, and he will never be
able to do so. You musv bear in
mind that the law of this island
—the English Common Law, holdg
sacred a human life, whether it
is the life of a drunkard or not.
Therefore you must consider tyis
case as one in which a human life
has been vaken,

“If you are satisfied beyond
reasonable doubt that the blow
which caused Anthony George’
death was inflicted by the prisoner
and that when he inflicted ihe
blow he intended to cause him
grievous bodily harm, you will
find the prisoner guilty of murder,
If you are satisfied that he had
not vhe ,intention of causing
grievous bodily harm but that he
inflicted the blow, you will be en-
titled to return a verdict of guiliy
of manslaughter.

“It will be your duty to return
one or the ovher of those verdicts
which the evidence establishes be-
yond reasonable doubt.”

At this stage further
was adjourned until today,

hearing



A. M. WEBB












Stocks — Bonds — Shares
30th Local and Foreign
Bought and Sold

155 Roebuck St., Bridgetown
Dial 3188. -:- Hours : 9-3





~ REAL ESTATE
DIXON

AND

BLADON

(JOHN M. BLADON)
A.F.S., F.V.AD)

FOR SALE

RESIDENCE



1l Graeme Hall
Road. Attractively designed
modern two storey home well
set back in approx: 1/3 rd. acre
ground with wide frontage. Coral
stone walls with asbestos roof,
shed panelled doors, all built-
in cupboards. There is a large
lounge and dining room with gal-
lery, 3 bedrooms, kitchen, 2 ser-
vants’ rooms, room for 2 cars,
provision for solar heater. This
property may be purchased fully
furnished if required at a very
reasonable figure.

PINE HILL,—Two recently built
coral stone properties (bungalow
& two storey house) Both well





constructed and attractive resi-
dences with 3 bedrooms, Avail-
able in the medium price range.

St. JAMES—A variety of ex-
cellent building lands are obtain-
able in this area varying con-
siderably in price per sq. ft.
location and area.

WINDY RIDGE, — St. James.
This very attractively situated
modern stone bungalow 3
large bedrooms (all with basins),
verandah, 2 lounges,
room, 2 toilets. There are 2 acres,
one under cane ond the remain-
der is very well laid out with
lawns, fruit trees, flowering
shrubs ete. The view can never
be spoiled and prevailing breezes
are unobstructed. 5 miles town

RENTALS

WHITE SANDS—St. Lawrence
(On Coast),

HOUSE,—St. James (On Coast).

eee FLAT,—St, James (On

HOUSE—Near Yacht Club,
THORNVILLE, — St. James
(next to Parish Church) (On

,
FLATS, — St. Lawrence (On
Coast),
FLATS, — Inch Marlow (Ov
rae BOWER,— The Garrison,
HOUSE, — Hill,
HOUSE,—Governmment Hill,
HOUSE, Blue Waters Rockiey
COLD SPRING COTTAGE, —
St. James (On Coast),
































REAL ESTATE AGENTS,




Auctioneers & Surveyors
| PLANTATIONS BUILDING



Phone 4640












GOES BETTER With








Im Carlisle Hay

IN PORT: Sch. Alexandrina R, Sch. say, from Trinidad; Agents :
Marea Henri: Seh. Everdene, C M V. & Co., Ltd.
Ipana, Sch, Blue Nose Mac, Sch. Manuata, §8."P a T Pathfinder, 4,671 cons net,
Sch. Zita Wonita, Sch. Emanuel C Gor- Capt. Floren, from Sanots, Brazil;
don, Sch Burma D, Sch Wonderful Agents: Da Costa & Co., Ltd. ‘ :
Counsellor, Sch. Frances W. Smith, Sch. Schooner Mary M. Lewis, 69 tons net,
W.L_Eunicia, Sch. Lucille M Smith, Capt. Marshall, from British Guiana;
Sch Princess Louise, Sch Philip H Agents: Schooner Owners’ Association.
Davidson, Sch Mandalay II, M.V. ee

Da Costa

Schooner Frances W. Smith, 74 tons
net, Capt. Hassel, for British Guiana;
Agents : Schooner Owners’ Association.

S.S. P. & T. Pathfinder, 4,671 tons net,
Capt. Floren, for San Francisco; Agents:
Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

M.V. Blue Star, Yacht Beegie, Sch. Molly

. Jones.
a Indore, 4,177 tons net, Capt. Ram-



ARRIVALS— FROM ST. LUCIA:
FROM TRINIDAD: yah Chables Chandler, Kenneth Grannum,
Paul Farmay, Hobert Spooner, Joan K. Michael Grannum, Ciccley Grannum,
’ ida Wharton, David Grannum.
Curley, Sheila Spoaner, Hilda arton aa: See :
Frank — Aitk Edmund Gwyn, Owen Seth White.
w. Clarke Decale, DEPARTURES—By B.W.I.A.L.
FROM ANTIGUA: FOR ANTIGUA:
Conrad Shoul. Capt. Eric Burton.

IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd. Prinsbernhard, Artillero, Esso Den Haag,



advise that can TOW cCammunicate Hurworth, Tactician, M.S Sarpedonip -
with the fol ships throtigh their hit, Balantia, Uruguay/WMCM, Custo-
Sg. Su i, atte abess dian, Rufina, Kelmscott, Union Carrier,
Haarlem, . y is, Fetierico Q Fassio, Mormackite, Tin-
Tachira, Amypac Washington, Liparus, aefjell, S. Gaspar, Lady Rodney, Alcoa

Repton, Brazil, Auris, Misr/SUBO, nine
vilde, Loide Peru, Vigor, Washingto:,

» Pleads Guilty of Anti-State Activities

PRAGUE, April 13.

Miss Dagmar Kacerovska, 23-
year-old Czechoslovakian em-
ployee of the United States In-
formation Service (USIS) here,
pleaded “partly guilty” when she
appeared before the State Court
here today on charges of hostile
activities against the state.

Lubomir Elsner, 28, another
Czechoslovak employee of USIS,
who is being tried with her on

Pennant, Esso Apalachachee, M.V. South-
ern, States, Mormachwan.



the same charges, pleaded ‘not
guilty”.

The indictment against the two
accused included spreading hostile
propaganda against Czechoslo-
vakia, espionage activity and sup-
plying state secrets to the head of
the Press Department of the
United States Embassy. The in-
dictment named both defendants
as “enemies of the Republic”.

—(Reuter.)

SHIPPING NOTICES
Canadian National Steamships



|
|
|
|













Sails Sails Sails Arriv Sri's
SOUTHBOUND Montreal Halitax Bovion Barbados Barbados |
LADY NELSON —_— 12th Apr. 13th Apr 23rd Apr 4th An- |
LADY RODNEY 12h May 15th May 17th May 26th 2 27th May)
LADY NELSON 3ilst May 3rd June Sth v 14th Jun: 15th Jun
LADY RODNEY 30th May 3rd July 6th July Mth Jul 15th July |
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
NORTHBOUND Barbados Barbados Boston St. John Halifax Montreal
iY RODNEY 17th Apr 19th Apr. 28th Apr. —— th Apr. rd Ma
Y NELSON 6th May 8th May 17th —— 18th Mar. 230a 5}
RODNEY 8th June 10th June 19th June — 2st Jun, 24th Jun
LADY NELSON 27th June 29th June 8th July -—— 10th July 13th Jul |
LADY RODNEY 27th Ju Mth July 7th Aug —— th Aug. 12th Aug
N.B,—Subject to change without notice. All vessels fitted with cold storage chain
bers, Passenger Fares and freight rates on application to :—
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD. — Agents. |
! CE
The M.V. “Caribbee” will ac ; MAIL NOTI
cept Cargo and Possengers fo;
Dominica, Antigua, Monsterrat, =



St. Kitts-Nevis sailing 21st April, Mails for United Kingdony

The M.V. “Daerwood" will ac- by the S.S. Indore wiil pe
cept Cargo and Passengers ‘o elesed at the General Post
St. Lucia, St. Vincent. Grenoda Office as under:—

Se en TE wae be VARCEL MAIL at 4 py.

the 14th April 1950. ...
REGISTE MAIL at
yam, on the 15th April 1950.

Or
B.W.I, SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC.)





Consignees, ORDINARY MAI, at 10
TEL. i950,
== ———SS=—=S ———







CHE. GLE., TRANSATLANT IQUE
FRENCH LINE

Sailing to Sailing to

Trinidad Plymouth
“MISR” - April 5th, 1950
.GASCOGNE”.. April 19th, 1950 April 26th, 1950
“MISR” .. May 9th, 1950 May 13th, ‘1950
“GASCOGNE”.. May 24th, 1950 May 31st, 1950
“GASCOGNE”.. June 28th, 1950 July 5th, 195u

For further particulars apply to:—

R. M. JONES & CO,, LTD.-Agents.
-
REMEMBER !

IT’S GERM FOR BALANCED
OILINESS

{
ee



CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

Service Station, Trafalgar St.





| BARBADOS BLECTRIC SUPPLY
COBPORATION LTD.



————SSoo



f= ewer ane har meneneceme |e DoS e E EE SEENS RETNE ASYM HS



ES CL | ts ty et ta

RUM OR WHISKY.



PAGE SEVEN









COMING SOON

Handy litthe

Portable Ovens
Just the thing ‘to use on one
of your Hotplate Boiling Rings.

| LOOK OUT &

or .
Your Gas Company's Advert.

=

Furnishing
IS easy

The MoneySaving Way

DRAWING ROOM PLEASURES
Morris and Tub Suites or se~
berate pieces, Radio & Cocktail
Tables, Tea Trolleys, Berbice and
other all-at-ease Chairs, Pouffes

BEDROOM DINING ROOM
PLEASURES Mahogany gnd
other Bedsteads, Spring and other
Bed Lovely Vanaties and Stools,
Dinir and Luncheon Tables
Chins Cabinets, Sideboards



&




FOR OFFICE,
KITCHEN—Des
can take it Kitchen ¢ inets,
Larders, Big mange of Waggons.
Bookeases, Rush Furniture

Trafalgar Street, Dial 4069

——/

ORIENTAL
GooDs!!

~URIOS, JEWELLERY
BRASSWARE, TEAKWOOD
SANDAL, IVORY, ETC.

KASHMERE

THANI BROS.
Pr. Wm. Hy. Street

Dial 3466

GALLE
and C








via L
PAN AMERICAN |
CLIPPER* [

Pi

Via Antigua
Tourist Service between



San Juan and New York
One Way $239.36
Round Trip 456.72

B.W.1. Currency
Via sed

Tourist Service between
Port of Spain and New York Ԥ
One Way $285.43
Round Trip .. 539.12

B.W.L. Currency

*
MIAMI

Via Antigua
One Way Round Trip
$220.40 $396.72
B.W.L Currency

EUROPE

luxurious Double-Decked
Clipper Service between
New York and transatlantic
points. Overnight accom-
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on through flights to Europe
at no additional cost.

FLY PAA... The best way
in the world to travel
anywhere in the world.
For further information and
reservations consult your
travel agent or

ae AMERICAN
Worto AKuAYS ©

*T.M. Reg., PAA, lac
PASSENGERS + MAIL + CLIPPER CARU.

PIA

Da Costa & Co., Ltd. -- Broad St
Phone 2122 (After bus. hours 23091



ate







¢

















































































































































































” PAGE FIGHT BARBADOS. ADVOCATE Sea en aC
. !
; T. Montserrat Wins |
fi i ot c ‘
Everton Holds | Mrs. Savage To | Mont |
P t Prizes | By 17 Runs
{ resen rizes | .
pie : ST. KITTS, Apt |
S artan To Draw On Tuesday cr gop
r. | and Montse ded vion
GAME ENDS 1-1 At Savannah Club | and Mo 17 Mon
} THE ina Club Tourna- | serrat in con
| SPART# YD EVERTON battied to a one-all draw ment bt t ae the close for lune eke
ina ¢ eY f tbe which v pnlaved at Kensiiett 1¢ : 5 inst. When} up 57 runs for ce el
in a good geme ot a . which wa played ¢ Ke sili sto: | ae ig the Mixed Doubles| inch they wes 84
‘yesterday afternoon belore a big ctowd spec’ ators will oe played. Miss D. Wood and} Bramble topscori: (
ag - —_——— *' Ormond Reece, the Everton Dr. C. G. Manning vs. Mrs. R. S Jeffrey 12, and Cls 4
’ goalkeeper, was the most out- Bancrott and P. Mc¢ terson 3owling for Antigua
t Wi re Wi “p. Sepe, Hg yer for the afternoon, After the above Mrs | four for 25 and Barnes
‘ or di, eeke 8 and savcd many a goal for red | | Savage has kindly sented t©| 9) Antigua in their seconc
tear 3oth goals were scored Cups to the winners| 2... ‘gt .
’ : 7 een Both goa pre ips tO tne winn were all out just befor
‘is ‘or juring the closing stages of the] jof u i events. 7 ee o. All tin
; irst | . of play for 111 Willia :
/ gune with Everton drawing ig PSDAY'S BESULES 91. Thidou 17, Smith e lf
by ‘ steede » s > Mer Doubles Final > MeG atte oh, Li dat, +t .
BTGERER 8 UTOUOR |e ives ocd: bemea son and GH Manniné beat BP. Taylor! and Kirnon 18, Cabey took four
I t limaxed i #00) orwarte and Dr Mann 6—4, 1—5, S—6 ickets x 26r s.for Montse
yeverment from close range. a YESTERDAY'S RESULTS a i Tm a8 run pt 2} CP
. i Says Crawford wy hite For Spartan, Desmond Johnson} _ Mixed ee ae Pay aie ee Peer en ,
te cred the equaliser shortly after-| ao Ah. Lendeen and G. i. Mannins
j LONDON, pts so wards when he beat Reece with «} ” 7 IXTURE
ant vy . t ale Ing \ £ yl MONDAY $i
good shot also from close up afte: ; St a
, | fer ingies Final: Dr. C. G
is ~ rece. ving from Walcott On the} hyd iy i oe , oO signe, as
4 b- right wing |
“4 “ Pine ame was, however, not!
I as, t : y ¢ Mr. | D: Gs , Conserv ra- |
i \ ferd, the Spartan fullback while} isk a question in the House con-
tourea Wit, We. Wie learing from a dangerous move- | cerning th ent proposals for a
ya) A Luaes tearn of 1939 | ricnt from the Everton front line, | 4 Meets Today aribb ‘. federation, nc
2 i ie We indics = players cilided with Conl'ffe, the Everton | ‘ stranger to the West Indies. He |
weatnet permitting, will have net} centre forward, fell and hutt his| The Board of Ma . vas a member of the Parliamen-
pravuce at dwrds tomorrow, | jaft shoulder and had to be lifted the 3arbado: Cricket As tary delegation ‘that went out to
aN and ae AGay. ey. off the field, This occurred about) ao , yd at - - oie at 4.15| the Wes lies in 1944. Mr. Gam- |
1 morrow § visit will be in the after- | +45 minutes before the interval | * hs emoria ee ““\ mans had 14 ye in the Colonial
* noon, but on Saturday they prac- as take m Pe hak ee h he retired
‘i ’ was taken an, rt acai abl ervice, from which he retired in
Ii use in the morning. as they will} Spartan who defended the goal The anand will Stet a 1934. At the last Election he was |
F* be watching the English Fi | fom the sereen end, were first on| approaching rovernment or strongly tipped for Coloni ial Secre-
J) pivision soccer match between| the cflensive and from a cornet loan a ggested at the last gen-| ~ i nservatives had won
; Chelsea and Wolverhampton Wan-! | kick taken by Evelyn on the right eral Vice as - m ~ Rigs
a Oe 7m a later ‘ wing, Reece in goal pushed out EXPRESS pont aon 1€ . “ the Board for la
: mes = 86vonnson = 6and Af utter Ishmael got possession and | Ta aaa
-/ Valentine, the Jamaica playe took a shot from the right wing WousppMeations, one trorm tn Remanded
; were expected to arr.ve but Tt Was all. there |< Central Cricket Club ind ey : #1
15 England today and M: Kidnes y Eaaty Riek | cther the Barbado tegi Afian Fields of | _ Bi V
i and Goddard arranged to meet) Ti I + y ‘i ‘ 5 fte | ene ant C.¢ for inclusion th anded to District “C” ye Er tte
on ; he Everton forwards after] . she ‘amnetiti ot tune i. Worst Mr A. J. t
1 {them at Paddington Station o : . 7 Second Division Competition yy His Worship Mr.
{ their arrival in London receiving from a lusty kick by Miss Gertrude Moran lalso on the Agenda | Hanschell until today for having
t é é 4 > aa aol a . > . }
( The rest of the team spent full back Robinson, carried the B # - Board will then consider] in his possession on April 12, one
i jay being fitted out for kit ana] > ll within their opponents the 1ual Report and Aecounts| forged $5 00 bank note knowins
i skit “yg Mg ca A yment are Ht without result | to Z tan ited to the G mneral| t to be gea
> yver equ ie€ ; ‘ esente ¢ |
‘ . redictions : es Weat Indie Sp: artar again attacked and re | Meeting next month He was arrested in the juri }
‘| would win their first cricket Test] fron See OY en on le po “ the head of correspond-| diction of Police Magistrate 01 |
fin England, but that England eer, We, meee wast ah 1 6 6 e | er ce le dealing with amend-|} District “A
would win the 1950 seri Nee R ae Bertie A vr wee } mer rules, tournament date
t : = oe a" te cece aver rihantly | ] y ip f SCUSSIOI .
made today by Crawtor Whit * ; ; i ill con up for discussion
‘ the Neu Chronicle’ icket eG EB " on Kata’ eat had bu ee The latter covers the next Inter-! SALESMAN FINED £3 }
onlif their centre orwar 1 | . ‘ f
{ writer. ,kicked out in a good effort , LONDON, Osa) SEL : Willisa Cromey salesman ol}
Discussing the ; At this stage, some fine football “Gorgeous Gussie’ .-Moran got an official sanction to don Reed Stree as oun guilty at}
ae at | { ¢ ‘ ‘ + W — btain t 8/4 ror a Bruce
pects he said if the is} wa itnessed by both teams and her celebrated lace panties again a Vimbledon this year | Four-Day Visit ‘1 fom! k bat ae nil 12
> | . ' of at ; ‘ alse pretenct on April 12]
at all reasonable this he — : u i ee Se ee but she was bluntly warned against the black shorts , esterday
4 most interesting season in po ib of con bina jon, took 1e bal - a tht a TODAY the Jutch warship | . ane Hane ll before
*') war cricket | down the field, but just failed t me pasted Egypt. is tien if : as Lees ‘Karel Doorman” will come to} oie, je j = a ae
, “The d mic fast-! ! et past the Everton defence t ol. A. D, maacauiady,» Con On anyone caring 'Wo")Barbados on a four-day visit een Tay tiniest, eterna ot
' hard-hittin; tour promis« Everton now made another rai 1} ‘ ean ot Ww ; Mort will wear| It comes when the American t e mont Y default undergo
thrills and excitement”, said th ind Medford the Spartan full} chhihiay Club, told International no ee eres oran ve * Sc ind salvage vessel “Opportune : na acilarninitst |
olin. °Elnoy ix feet four inches| back jumped and cleared with hi News Service that the frilly thing c Wit edon time has othe S| hich hab Wight these ainad Aan } |
Ben yates Jamaican, to} head, but collided with Conltffe in| the California tegnis star, sported) besides Harris on edge, primarily | oi) leaving for San Juat sic ma}
tho prilli t ri for Br od ind had to leave the,9t Wimbledon last year were} bec ¢ me hints thrown out | 2! to | ; ir |
ose brillia 1 J ‘ : . Puer I |
ce ; | perfectly ice dre | by Col re Tinling 7 7
man’s crow as th 0 batsmet wat ’ < ! : : ‘ | The “Karel Doorm is sch
t in the world. Everton Weekes an Cr i 10W brought fron And he added, it Mi : Mo | Tinlin t igned ¢ lace Staal’ ty y Hee Bue ear?
Frankie Worrell, the team is pack ef full back and Everton | Selected for the US Wightinan) 4 6 WORE 1a8t year. | n the mornit ; }
, ed x th personalitie advantage in theiy | team to compete in the Wimbledon nt with All-England |‘ *" Ee be
en —Reuter f tacked their opponent hampionships June, 26 to July 3 er what was to he |
l vithout result. On one) there will be no objection to hes} considered “fit and proper” tennis ' , i {
t _ ( or Steede missed a good them again—no objection| dress led to his resignation from B B (. rogrammes } |
| aan pport from within the are r, the club after 20 years official | oar
saat Tr é nothe ‘ox se : 0 la hor { ‘call boy } RIDAY, APRIL 1, 1950
First Team lo vother ( ent in ¢ e bh ck hort | ‘call bo ram 1%, APRA 14, Ce
good try it Harris was well in wore at Cairo in 4 | { | Think on These Thing | |
| ' ition nd saved kK ytiar International Tourn Ane now APL cesigning A) 3 t .; a -d Programme
' Play Against \ A Spartar ne made ; ood art they’ ; z Rt ; ale | yutfit for G le, one whien | 5 . he paceiay ‘ , "6 n |
ttempt to open the sco n anc ri sin | he said will be “probably more | p Pa 15 I
LONDOD 1, April | 3 fre a raid by their front Ions One of vBrtteinis ‘most witels distracting than the one yard of been ca et! on Ne Pe N7E CE
; The West Indies crict Robins« the Everton full back, | respected sports writ eteran | !#ce that caused last year’s fuss |v ws Anal R i coun 1 @
*) their tour of Englanc SLO! kicked away from Evelyn as he | Bruce Harris of the London Mucaul pug OUne! club | Para re hee a 1 Held ¢ A
1,’ on Friday, April 28 i one vas about to take a. shot { Evening Standard i of the now | Officials would prefer not having {p: sleep of Uordertilly of feo Tae
i day match against the Club Crile f is fror th J sSaeare SENS Bad chtage (20 rul hat Gussi “Or tl Sir 4 The pn aa: , oe
— “ay a abe ew a om » por aa b wt ( ule on wat Gu ( VOX ik g he Ne
»* ket Conferenct G, R. Pullinges } t me ri 4 | internationally-k._ 1 oe ” | she appeal it Wimbledon. | News From Britain, 2.15 p.m Sport Re- | |
{ ‘ ms ld E fast mediu "he interval was then taken | short $ ee Pets $90 p.m. David .WiNCOCks, » 2..1.17).,|. xagendnesneheineneearntinntiitimiiiientnsisnmess |
| the _ ar-old Essex fa ‘onfer. | With the seore love all We ought to make sure that | Macaulay pointed out that it wouid | Business is Business, 4 p.m The News
bowler, neluded the Conft . ae 7 ’ 2 j . ‘ The Da Service. 4.15. p m
1 oan te tg ; hich announced A Low On |she doesn’t try it-——or rather them - es the star herself and the ce ape ihe 4 oa, Carroll Calls BACK PAINS GOT
; day . toll On resumption, Everton were | on at Wimbledon S. = Preset team anne _ 101 the Tune. 5.15 p.m, Programine Parade |
reo the first to attack and Steede or “Her ‘frillies’ of 1949 were her| S&® that a. is dAressead)sa9 pm From the ve 2 COSA. | |
A. C. L, Bennett (Capt.), M. A.| the right wing sent in a low one | own ¢ ern, but black shorts in Ae he an i! he the 7 pn, The News. 7.10 p.m W RSE EACH DAY |
j Salmon, G. H. We H. J. J. Me from inside the area which Harris | 1950 uld be very uch th ae’ pe ny eo peg ey Pu we ig |
> < ner lyre 4 Ved | 4 e isu illy ) | ig D: Auaic. a .
y colr ro Cooper, P. G. Wrefo! v eR hee: tee ee oe Witt ictee- ff os +t ior 3.19 pm, BBC Symphony | Barber Found Relief by the |
le K. (¢ falve ) ntor Spartan, in spite of their handi “ CLOWN CS. Lt a player ar[ec aay a | The News 10 p.m ’ , .
wc se NL Gavin a7 ay ide many an attempt te lI hivh. “Johdvan: Wal Jaynes.| with a colored costume t | Orchestra. pat Britain, 9.18. pan. The Use of Dodd’s Kidney Pills |
Smith, I oe i t \ ed P mS ‘ ke it from
f linger I A. Murra core Reece between the up~ | Chase | ulgtrag ap OF Dey. SppoMah i 10 ai The 920 “ot Acting jt am a barber and have to stand long |
twelft n ght eemed to be here there Everton:—O. Reece, Hall, Robin } It's a ter of playu fal ' , 30 p.m. Music Magazine _ 10.45 pr hours,” writes Komal Hanooman, 37 Lord St.,
| is the t € e Clul ind ¢ rywhere and allowed]son, ¢ Reece, Culpepper, May 1.N World Affairs. 11 p.m, The News | San Fernando, Trini- + )
kei i ocia thing to pass ard. Steede, Blades, Conliffe, Cox A 7S55SSSS9": | dad, “I developed a |
of « I { whict Eve ) were still looking fo W h SPSSSSSOSSISSSIVSGSSEIESOPIOP PPP FSIS I IIS GS Q backache and it got
confine the t oal a bore down on their | } % worse each day. I was
‘ nds. Lt ! mat clul oppdhents t Nile Se | ¥, | worried because none
ri k-end en, “ ppon n time an igain but ¥ WE CAN SUPPLY THE FOLLOWING x of the medicines | used
busi ‘ failed to score During one of} 1 K ¥, ;
iM tew sl up the| these attacks, Blades kicked aver | Barbados Friendly Football 8 + | scemed to help, | tld
i members! Reuter the bar and later Cox tried a good % a trend of my distress
t } am ce rad te : 7 oe Association x % | and he recommended |
‘ Ba ince iilatailleatila oe | nhs Oss bat : ie | Dodd's Kidney Pills,
| y ine fO-DAY'S FIXTURES 12 $| Thad only to use one
| & Ee Everton ke pt.on pressing and eh ach eaten title “a % PORTLAND CEMENT in 941b bags & drums % bottle of Dodd’s Kid- i
; l S Jockey Anery | ‘vere soon rewat fed when fron : raya lid iid on $ | ney Pills andthe pain © K. Hanooman
a — g. 5 ov | centre by Blades on the left st. Ma Old B ‘ ats WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT was almost gone. | finished taking three
i . } Wing, Steede cut in from the right urd Referee i arKe | more bottles of Dodd’ Pills and | felt |
: » ie ~ 1 Harkliffe at the Ba , ; ; ea stain s Pills ai elt like
About Press Report), ing and beat Harris with a] xetoe: Mr. Brancl RED & KHAKI COLORCRETE CEMENT anew man.” 1» » 1313 |
} powerful shot from close range Pee ee oe 2G |
NEY, At} From the touch off, the Spartan a FERROCRETE RAPID-HARDENING CEMENT ¥
; he « Kk 1 { t VERS | front li nade a raid and Evelyn %
I . Y Y ‘ we n , ‘pDm@MTro
k Tohni I : the right wihg sent in a danger- Th ‘ Weather ~ ALUMINIUM CORRUGATED SHEETS DANCE
a th } in ? ro | rounder which Reece sayed ( € % rt ia : Bee tdi : ee L
a | abou Pre re} t BS) pant on caualisins tan agalt - 4 EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS
b he v I i fab) f TODAY % sha” al ge
’ ne $ j attacked and rom a centre by oO ’ ' . at . mnths THR / .
{ Sse por gay | Keith Walcott on the Stn Rises: 5.51 a.m % \SBESTOS WOOD SHEETS tor Ceilings | Aat ATIC CLUB
ea ‘ turn. | Desmond Johnson beat Reece wi Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m $ pote: SRS ae ‘ ao Sh
\ ic ‘ led retu tie a Bin Aiea Moon (New) April 17 g ASBESTOS SOIL PIPES, eisia ( tren anc ats
; or oO Dp . .. l ymoers Only
g to Au i \ eee : ‘ | faghting: 6.30 p.m ) oA 4 ePAN CHES isting Membe :
Page inclined to make another \ band ‘Gitter ‘the Bpattan Balt ra’ || High Water: 2.28 aun, 2.34 % EGNGR & BRANCHES SATURDAY, April 15th,
7 The ty levelopec ver) ! ' tlhe Spartan hall back p.m ‘ 9 p.m
’ 2 ‘ " so * °
{\ a stomy published in the Sydne leared tense mome few | {8TERDAY ¥ FLOOR TILES in’ several colours Music by PERCY GREEN &
ie" Tele pl ot of ra , rom the ‘ N ner | ESTERD % ; i his ORCHESTRA
: } ocke rode} w the ball in the middle than it ‘ ee 4 . j
of : wots whol ‘| tha Beer ‘~ | Rainfall (Codrington) 03 ° | Admission to Ballroom 2/-
y i Lonede who] was back in the Spartan goal ares | ais. s 1 i 9 . | 12.4.50,—4n
b red } i ucce n At | ut thefr defence eld ft wn She ssterdav . ‘ o :
| lia, . | warded off another attach {ely a pe Month Seen % Phone 4267, 4456
" Six of Australia eadine jock- | CPpenent ront | _ , ; | semperature (Max) 85.5° F. V 666564 4 6456666665955O08 SEEOSOHSOSOHOS }
144 « today deni the hey} The game ended shortly after-|{ Temperatute (Min) 71.5? F. SSS: SSS
id pulle ’ their mounts in vhe race rd th the score love all |} Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E by
7) and Mr. J, Donohoe, Chairman of| The referee \ Mr. Stantot N (3 p.m.) E by N. e /
; Fda ti ¢ tated the | Gitter vhile the linesme were Wind Velocity 15 miles per
7-7 the Randwick 5S ater j
x 7 VV . ws Vi} } r e e
* 4). Stewards were isged with the} Mr. D. W y My. F. A our. |
“y, way the race had been run, Both| Willian Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.005
; 2 ees gy nc ye BU ly , The tear ere foll | (3 pom.) 29.974
Sydney’s afterna pa} ; \ }
if voved front page space to a rebut Snartan:—H Gibbons. Me
poh +.’ -f the allegadon Reuter j I {
‘ 4 ane - » 1
; ‘ e . i
an | they li Wo It Every Time on ve 08 By Jimmy Hatlo |
ad lila a a ee Oe ; YES! ever
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PAGE 1

'. F r i d u v April 14 1939. Barbaras fluutrate I'rivr; ?t\m r Biers Year .?.. GREAT BRITAIN MUST LET US LIVE Counsels Address Jury In Hospital Beach Murder Case Judge Sums Lp To-dav 'pill' ( llll.I JUSTICE will sum up to Ihr Jun in the • 1.1., ii.ilnv in which McDaaaM HoUu hai becarhirsed with tin' murder uf Anthony George. Counsel fur the Defence und the I'roserliluin iiilitres-eil the Jury yesterday niter witnesses Pr. I'upbml mil |) r Kirl.ii> who h:iH been called by lite Court, had given lli.ir evidence. n %  hleh began op Tuesday, the Crown mat Holder cau>pU <;. • e of pine woou i of the keel ... '"at by that blow he influ brain injury l the docton. H a "rontre-coup" jniurj Data oi h November 24. 194b At the end uf Mr. Wh. address yesterday afternoon the I -curt I itlDUa a l-hiel Justice adjournd luillai! u hearing until ,n a,„ I | ,E;„ E ,'^" !" 'l."Jr Conl "" ,El ''"" 1 '•<*" %  <•• S.eede. uiltlini£ is an important part nf their job? Wallace Sharps. 25-yearold president of the Association of London Students. agreeing with Dr. %  id: "Degree-bearing Ignora* muses are in no short suppl> in this country."—I.NVi. 40 Atom Bombs A Month April 13, Dr. W. Leon Gudshall of LeigTJ belltvM Russia has. wen making 4i> atom bombs a aonlh at three plants in Siberia. %  Mral Mongolia and Turkestan. Dr. Godshall gave no source for lilt belief when he %  ddri tochesiei Associstton len Lai Dr. Godshall. head of the D*> irnnent <>t International [teutons at L I know this nd a lot of othei people km hir Qovernmcni hai been mia' %  ding us b) within. laforniatiuii from the American iple" -Rruler. Bevin In Hospital LONDON, April 13 %  IV British Poteign Secre-ary. (r JB undarwent an peration for hHemorrhoids in a ndon hospital today. A Pi i. ign Office announcement id that the operation v, esfui". pected to remain the hospital for about a fort*nt— Keuter day Dr. Copland again entered the witness stand. Mr. Whyalt a.ked doubt you diagnosed Anlhonv George as being %  drunkard Dr. Copland: W\ the Mngislrate was that from what I observed I considered Dr. Kn%  intoxication. I told the Dune that the man could not romain where ha WU .ind that the .'.as 10 place him on %  lied OUtSide the CM rrequentl> u ted fa dj %  Mr. Whyatt ; \. ., understanding Dr. Klrton and you did diagnosed him as a drunk. %  %  equenUj did not make that detailed maUeuli which Dr. Lcacock told Dr. Copland: 1! I dlagl dd be no need to make a detailed tion. Mr. Whyalt: I think a little latei you began ; woimer your diagnosis of this man .mkard was correct. Dr. Copland: I did qutime about 11 o'clock, but m the absence o) of being struck on the head, and In view Of the history that he was often in hospital—I myself had seen him onable. He was in alcoholic coma. Mr. Whyalt: You did receive a message Irom one Ol the nurses saying that he was foen mouth. Dr. ( oplandId not sur%  o'clock. Mr Whyalt: Yon : that. Dr. Copland: I piration and the fact that he had been vomiting, he could have the mouth i respiration would make him foam. Mr. Whyatl : It might I cutcd some othei .-.implicated factor. Hr. t upland : It ought i Mr. Whyatl: I Dunk it was a little later in :iuevening thai a nurse said to you, "this beaten up." Dr. Copland: Thai was Iwtween 10.30 and 11 what the theatre the wcond tune Mr. Whyalt: That again might have been some ground for causing YOU to reconsidei you *> on page I iSportan) look Secret Arms U.S. TIGHTER THAN Reach France EyER BEF()RE Says Truman CHEB freighter %  Ing with the siiipment %  The A i. i Importer", which docked at the IN %  Republic.!%  i iuardl an I Mice weir %  i morning. The unload ing ivenl is bright SUl More thai well .is police % %  %  -igned to thr i %  lonaj Dethe unloading of thi of Atlantl i this sea I III. -\.unplr Ml IM ( herbeurR Is the best answer lo the Insolent challenge of a certain propaganda" A Conn nitration In C iotest agaii % %  of these II ttee military supplies out. %  tary plane to watch the unloading operation and gave the local i %  deque for 50,000 [>..! ken of keen %  Later Ihe Mm. til si shipment is sgyail %  loading arms n Lh> BUM tinu as Bttea gfjain thai the French people want t. II aayeH wauls to lake a bltr at ii" in:, he Brill break his leelh.' Pleven said. In leas than eight daj urtilleiy will i>e dull i During the unloading. Ennlienc Gahciei Cpnunun mied leaflets urging the dockers to stop. i up the them. — Ileuter. thai the international sil %  H, At hia r.L.\ Pre** Coitflrence the President, reviewed %  i i bno ucceeded Pn April thai in the U -he could ever remembei koe wai %  nituted the progratni I aid ti . %  i | gradual iraproweenani worlc. . than in '946 %  dent painted a glowing picture • pieseni-uay proaperil} in the BERMUDA DOCKYARD SHUTS NEXT MARCH (From Our Ouu CMTBipomUnt) LONDON. April 1.1 Disinii to cloM Ihc Naval Dockvard In Bel unlikely to affect the efficiency of the Ann: Indies Squadron. the view of Naval obeerven he i afti tonsjderalion ol the Admiralty •jinoum amultaneouslv in London and Bermuda this : 'Sottlv Vlueussur Affair" Says Social iii a 12 Injured As Train Runs Off Kails NEW DELHI, April 13 iwtlv,. piajaniail were injured ln •,!,.. ix-lh, Expics. ran olt w roils lasi night about nlna %  • PyubM, Unltw Pro !" . reborn received b] •!,. Tailwav Nfi,„„ v hm ^ M ,„'" c "am resumed Iti journey "' n delay of about .even hours i no cauie ot the accident w itt unknown T|"i was the second In *"t '" the United Provinces on "taama day the rirs,and tar %  we serious was thai b %  e arly >e.t CT day, in hi,h. Mins lo latest Rguri IS 7 "ilured — straler s l'ti(inlfss Falls From Plane The 'act that Amerii .'. %  the Home I %  am reduction m Britain's sea power In is thai %  '! %  %  will ut reinforced by the Aim West Indies Squadron. Bermuda will %  %  l tinue lo hi %  to close the ever >*> of lime Ihe ll Is foreseei ighteen month or %  bieak future verl and Sen retui • %  '' %  The hirne-.! problem n..v ImHBV] Ittiiiiiidan do Hilh sev dol-ihourn ill thr duefc DJAKK*r^\ ^pril 18. President SoeJtarno 11 States of iiidonefci. foMN In -> broadcast tonight to the Maeafcsaiallair'. i came .iftei Abdul All %  to tome to the t account fi>t 1 the Bast The 2-year-olrt repel leade. had oCCUpfc to oppose the plan to incorporate ilo the Federal President Sockarno said In hi.broadcast thai as Supi %  mander of the M declared Cap: A.-. %  %  I %  %  into motmn on> during list week to lorot ing in South Ci — ilt-uter. Nine-Point Anti-Stalin Plan Outlined mecticut. April 13 kmar&NB foralsjn siahn" was outb9 Mr William C Eullilt. a tenner Uiuted States .m tx 1 no peace on Iniitf iis Ian %  %  %  plain %  %  .,1 have to %  nil was Mr. HuUiiCf pri nl Yalo %  tn ngu %  | ami its in Vho have I .'lOO.OOll yotlths from \ '. %  -\ Berlin ( %  ii To increase Umteu 31 in ..ii %  . >i To help the Albai %  Commu %  i I : Pormoao. ii the Viennese and Ihe . . %  %  %  %  should fumti ycofl —(Bosnar.l IF THEY WANT LOYALTY W.I. Should Unite With Canada Frca no r Own Correspond ml I-ONDON. April 13 I c imposition of ii Federal mles itreadj heavily burdened with the cx' i'lninistrntiuii' rt might well much. This pouu is made thi.s bj a special correspon%  iting from the West Indies Ofl Ihl Canbhoan Umun." I I the tigure ei C 180.11011. which has been estimated as added expenditure consequent upon Federation, has been greeted with in view uf ee ol bureaucrnev FIT the Hntish Colonies, in i solution with certam would be unmn •da, but ail Ukl ol a rif. Dominion would be more m keeping with the i>f the 1 Inion is to be evolved I %  says that West Indie* U tlu-v will show e capable ol untt%  i should bg %  he laa small ..immunities I 100.000 to 500,000. are not likei* i.n state %  ties and experience ippu Ions, i also that ihe Dominion should to make It ,.t Inte.%  uathcrings, and soinble thi presentlv surviving fn B — (By Cable) %  at work in the Ut In any country in the world Then ' %  ; %  %  %  •fere .t his office had I %  cult but the counti) v... %  ci.sK the iii.itter with tht counlrj i .. %  The first post-war peon easier on the United Slate* than the attorn il Ous war. I to his ix'iit> ents the P uw that hi cut i*. yjssss v .i that ;•" .•i. it in. re had been a moron .n< ; ... %  —Reuter. fi/DAUir RECEIVES AMBASSADOR PARIS. April 13 M. Qeorges l.tdault. Prima Mm: Ambassn|r of the Argentine in Part :. tr Hotel Matignon. Uk i fTlcial residence. —Rruler Insulted liird: Demoted ST JOHNS It is usMierstaod thai %  1 I Co, Ltd ..nd the Antigua Tiades & Labour Union watertronl four days last week Di* ticlsed upon William Knight .. foreman of the suaai ri>i ( m who It itha IJnion's President, Hon V C. Bird KniRht hs tr> an ordinary lalmurer Taxis area last Tue*u.. cipaied trade from the Pot Amherst" ;ind trade which is sjan• rally Bcceldrated m tn. also lout Few ships stop a' Antlfsji snd such inddencei cause a hiss to an island which e now in search of aval to earn dollars. Although the strike tn Antigua on Saturday nv left without discharging th. I her cargo. Van Zeeland Sees Leopold QENSVA. April II M. Paul Van Zealand, Belgian ; vsym.it.-. at i by air today on the ui p nuns -f King 1 i M. Van Zeeland loi lents: -I can make obsourgently calk* %  01 through discretion that .thing I do not know l| M Van Zeelai gian \n Pares i i also King LaoBoU Profeoaoi Jacque R he from the ;n %  short lalk in the publl) loungl D gave the hat hi nt know %  .-. %  the Ming, said ! %  had %  %  .... %  nl late "ii %  .' %  %  i preaentad a proposition %  : Prince Charles had : ronaulta' iiiiection with I I l ith whom %  — (Krulrr. Ja|>un >i\ ill (ul lav On Foreign Incomefl TOKYO. \; %  Hayato Ikeds. ,oia International Tai "BEST THING IN LIFE" Franco's Son-In-Law Calls Marriage N, Apr f^ardess %  ora a Vik %  Cram<-.%  Japan, tha, the Japnnesi Mar%  %  tj| Inmdrr.l fUi UJ Bffl -. Bill __ an j tax on foreign incomes in Japan i %  • •Self • %  Thi Ul TSBB IM —iktmrri bj March next year B* Cable), piewith the proposals — Reuier t Penu. i .td in Pardo Palace near Asked by lournallsts What h'bought of love and marriage, the thmr I believe marriage Is the Carmen adOe.. %  %  .omelhing t. father's El %  %  bride's .ned but .i>. %  expected tod-. Ma) Reconsider Atli.lH.C On SiTclsiV Uiturii Dril \i Reiauoni ight hinled thai tttoama, exiled Hamang%  inaland. tr-ighl Ekvii, %  %  i Assistant DtaU inifsioner, chargad witk ing tin its reasons fai %  Relate i hi* lawyer had failed to ances concerning B sie l •dded that l.utl could vis i %  % %  told Parlii Sereue's 11 awsiting pevadssioii %  %  —i Heater i GOMES CALLS FOR EARLY START PORT OF 6PAIN. April 13. I-JON'BLE ALBERT OOMES, one of Trinidad's two political delegates to the Sugar Conference in the United Kingdom, thinks it important that the delegation should reach England as soon as possible. • Its i :iist be to tell the English public what police likely to result In the West Indies from the | obtuseness which the Bi itkdi i d MI determined to follow". tlnn-cs thinks the recent statement by the Food Minister that ihe Government will not budge from the 1140.000 ton nffet to the eet %  hnllenge to th.unit) uluch the B.W.I ihkn FLYING SAUCERS IN THE BIBLE I'AKIS Nw the II'IMK saucers have lieen v|itled in the Hlblr thr> saggg "ren Ihrrr B] A Paris newspaper. ....! t, I, rrl Mou,M 1 '"er lor the; „,, mtories n-u.it> retssarvatiTe dn,i, I I poque. told his readers thai the sa t so er i rarj irll mlht he the Minn hi Ihe akt* menISMed in the Hilile. lie was referring lo l.uke. Chapter H, Versr II >t Charles v elaarli saaarvsJ in ami kalghla 4iid armed pissants naarehbu rlghl aersas the haav •iii wini face. lad lust tSm .car. illr, ihai Blltlerseany kept SSSSJBIBBU bands l ilr.iK.Hu swooplni throuxh "!• %  >kie. with faeaa Iski pegs i ret. the saaalMo iwlai re Parted saekBg aUegerleal setsMs sssaeled la Uu olouds snd Ihls in brand aaa'lIgM ui ihe i'e*i sJeatsal ss>a< tiik psaee In thr ikssa >>i in i.i. "inn ih. i.o.Mi Ihnmn lulu ., uprojr slfht ..I i atlas One Ha* AII tint Our taelao SUesIt laee s b) ih. betwe %  iiimn inilcii I.. ., Ii.in. ihe nihrr I" >n ,4i..uiiiiis „\ r r the %  pllal in aneieiil times. In 1511 ParKlans are -upK-.rd lo have ulltiewd "fires In Ike air creating (real Ihthi mil '... %  •ki \n.l in I -,B> ii,.,. ,.,. simllai dkpia> p] rent splaadai ssssrasai lo saelenl atanasarlpts cited uy I I i"M,ue." Mouaatl dr. iius rimlaslsg II" tjcl that the 'signs'* were parikularly num>i..u. La Ihg IMh ( eiilur*. | p, IIIKI nl at "'I irouht. need tif BUUH) I lent \l III m (,nMt*. ind up l. %  ... %  '.llich .fi.se in the %  illtllllls 'I" ... -eptlvitv. ol told v The |.s>< IH.MS ,. htdi renders thr I'.' ""'' %  "• %  P'-lve lo discover !".'" ", r '" %  %  •*" %  ""•"' \mt .. in the tsih i enfaarj ii we not live now in a lurbu nod M hlalory. — l.N . ^ rtg i K. W. V. Aromatic Wines — I %  > 1*1 II \ i ... Kl ill "III \ I I'.MOI III Ml Wmini ill \.l %  rll.,,1 I IK h I I > "%  l.sll .|.p. (,, | '-"""'i: Iliril, Mil. <'•'•. BI I...I..I. rw i... Mall I'.IIM MlMag 1.4. lu IMaJdrl bt rllU.lh ||„,. h... I'll, ini.ilili.s ".iw ..ml tot tut "III. faal im .ggMaMn "< 1 MkUlh „, nMaS ....... nun \\I„I, mm uiiii iiir uMHtaa t otrula .ii aaaMk. lirrb. Liqueurs KW V. VAN UFK Ht'M iieimiiuuiit llsrsami thai inuniuiil,. uld (afe Liqueur ksfl I-ul| B"BSI for itself world fun.nVVM i UUJ VMM s >HIKI:II> IVraUtl WIMI SPAautUMQ mm Red isulWhrsel K w x nit VNOI With hiili e%n-i ..iiiriii Hits brand] It nsurpass• d far use in llospluN %  id Nor,,,., n





PAGE 1

' ffJD.W APRIL 14, 195B 3AKBAOOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE Counsels Address Jury In Murder Case ^ From Fag S pr. Kla: In my opinion, n -ould be quite impossioie lor a -an who had received severe ajntre-coup injury to turn his mj U p within naif an hour, recojouse where he was and shout Tfor a "nurse". Another rcai u that at Uiat period ne woui~ have beeh deeply unconscious, with quite a dinorent pulM iron -Hal he had. a pulse of cerebral %  frock, that Is concusion Mr. vvhystt: In case of contrcS injury, Is there not whal is known medically as a recogphenomenum. a lucid tatorvar Dr. Klrton: In cases of contrecoup' injury. I h "ve nevct hedr(l v a lucid interval. A lueia Interval is a most dangerous future of certain haemorrhage. garflcularly haemorrhages of the JJery; because an Individual Buy think he is alright and might go home and suddenly collapse Bar Wajatt: A lucid interval as Dr. Cato and Dr. Leacock also %  aid is certainly to be found in a contre-coup injury. Dr. KirtM: That is a profound ffftrence of opinion. Mr. rVtiyatl: Before the Police Ifjgwtrate, you had given as your O, that the man had fallen off the casualty bed on to the and that such a full ufT the jwo-foot bed could have produced i massive haemorrhage. In the light of all you have heard, do you %  tilt adhere to the opinion you had ^pressed in the police courts? Dr. Klrton: I do. Mr. Whyatt: Are you not in-! dined to modify them somewhat, after hearing the evidence of Dr Cato and Dr. Leacock"" Dr. Kirton: 1 am not so inclined Mr. Whyatt: If the patient had fallen off the bed and sustained cootre-coup injury and thereby was unconscious without a lucid Interval for sometime, would it or would it not be possible for him to be silting up — sitting on the IMI Dr. Klrton: 1 have not thought the sitting up on the Boor. 1 gjdo not know whether he sat up the floor before he fell, or after. t is all hypothetical Mr. Whyatt: I do not understand Boat answer You have given the idtnce thai if ha fell on* the bed ^od sustained contre-coup injury, id having sustained it. would not ive a lucid interval. I am askf you how can you reconcile that ilh the fact that he was silting I the floor ? Dr. Klrton: I cannot reconcile it. Mr. Whyatt: Would you be pre% %  Wred to modify your opinion at til Dr. Kirton: No. T Mr. Dear: 1 still agree with le evidence I gave before the [agiltrate that a man, who is a ironic alcoholic, would haemorlago more freely than one who not. When 1 examined the man tp afternoon at the Casualty, did not sec uiiy sign of the haemtoma, which has been described iv Dr. Cato. I have been in practise since 111 This brought the evfdonca to a low and Mr. Deai addressed the iry. He said that for two and a hall they had listened witn to a cavalcade of witnesswho ha i cine to give them an [ %  munt of what had taken place i the Hospital beach aback of lay Street on the afternoon of tevemoer 24 last year. The aspects which confronted km in the case were two. The t feature would be the events sat took place on the Hospital inch and than the second would %  mainly the medical witnesses' nd the members of the Hospital iff would have told them whal ad happened at the Hospital. It was important that they ould set reasonably clear in "ir minds the distinction that he Xlld draw or attempt to draw ;ween what had taken place i the beach and what had taken ace at the Hospital. The case was i charge of nrder The accused was charged Mh having struck Anthony rge a sever.blow un the heaci n a piece of wood and which •Wtcd In his death in the Genii Hospital about 1 a.m on >vmbcr 25. Mr. Dear then tuij thoni now e onus rested on the prosecution prove their case. The defence %  1 to prove nothing and U thaj %  IB] reasonable doubt in :neir %  da as to the truth of the facts Wft the prosecution had set cut prove, the accused must always the benefit of the doubt. If Or had any reasonable doubt "it the man was guilty, then he t entitled to be acquitted. Sever* Blow The evidence was that Holder, a accused, with a few other , induaing Anthony George. a debased, entered the >am ^_|*n a* Mustor's yard, and there "der suddenly attacked Anthony ^•V* 1 !*, gavt him a severe blow Jjhe died as a result of that. %  learned Judge, would them on the In relating murder, though In the case of ^nibmisiion. he would make ""> to certain points of law. %  • Dear described murder as net. kinds: one where a man fhtrately and with intent to •jhUled another person, and &Cr where %  man with intent *> grevlous bodily hai "•. or where attempting %  -* J* ho killed in lh,. execution that felony. Hesaid if. on the other hand, ooence which he sets out t % %  is not a leloi.y. but mere • misdemeanour, he will not %  K tv Qf m r >r. bul Ughter Ther. .. • be relevant to .1 * w U thai %  ProvocaUo; !"_* ho d ld provoae hi hotc es the might be red,. > montlaut,. In the case, there was no ev'%  "T motive as to whv ^ %  • %  e*' should have killed Anthony George. The prosecution had placed no reliance on Cobham who was supposed to I possiuie ren as (0 how tins thing had tahen place Otner witnesses could give no reason, though they were all on the beach wiinin the same vicinity i/ney heard an argument wiucn they did not appear to describe, and then, out of the blue, tut .accused had struck George with UM oiu.isevMi tiuey nu„ §sj| the head and that after he haa fallen he had again struck him "I am submitting that then. „ not the snadow of. any inierence that you could draw as to the motive why Holder should go out of the way to take up a weapon with intent to kill the man." It was usual and it was only possible to try to prove intent b> circumstantial evidence — circumstances surrounding the attack. He was submitting that the case was sadly deficient of any of these surrounding circumstances, sadly deficient of any reason for this crime. It seemed to him one of those unfortunate tragedies, which sometimes occurred, and as a result of which a man would be charged with murder. Bodily Harm It WM probable the prosecution might ask them to infer that because lh:u piece of wood was, used. rher-> was intent to do grovioui bodily harm. "I am submitting that is not tho inference which you can draw. You cannot draw that inference* unless ills action! were sucti that no doubt could be left that gi-evtous bodily harm was what he intended." When Anthony George was sent in the Casualty ward, he had been sent there by Dr. Kirton and Nurse Carter. They had hud ilubeiwitt <>t the evUan Kirton, and he had said thai ajun lie saw the man. there had been no signs of blood on him.' Th*argument of the evidence of those witnesses on the bead. was that they had seen this blood clearly Were they going to lie atked to infer that the blood had disappeared between the time that he hud been left at tho Hospital and the time that Dr Kirton had seen him? Were they total to ba asked to inler everythtaf afaburi DM prisoner' It could not be. They would remember that Collymore. the head porter, had said that he had seen no marks "' blood on the man and no bruises. Why should be fail >to see what the other witnesses oi •the beach said they hud seen The evidence before the court was that from the moment .he entered the court to (he moment* of his death, he hau no mark ..illy .Miner on-his head or on his body. Tram that evidence, and relying on the evidence 01 BtDUtO, Maughn and Newton, they! were being asked to say that the; man had died as n result of a severe blow on his head which had caused him to bleed from his Dose, T'iouih and oar. The Court adjourned for lunch. Material Facts On resumption Mr. Dear continued his address to the Jury. He reminded them thai when tinCourt had adjourned he had been I carrying them through lhe facts of the case and making his submissions on what he asked them to regard as the material facts in the whole case. He was going to submit what inferences he wanted them to draw from those facts and then deal with the opinions expressed by the medical witnesses linking the death of Anthony George to what had been alleged to be the cause of death. After referring to that portion of the Atlorney General's outline dealing with evidence that the man had been found sitting on the lloor of the Casualty artel he bad been put to bed. Mr. Dear asked the jury to infer that IDO mar came to be on the floor, not because he preferred the floor to the bed, but because he had fallen from out of the bed. It had been argued that il tho man had fallen from tho bed onto the floor in the inner pa-t of the Casualty, that Nurse Hew.M would have heard him fall. He was submitting that her evidence that she did not hear a fall was BCfottvo evidence. There was a possibility, that attending to other patients M she was, she did no: ccupatton. Direct Cause On the other hand, according to the evidence of Hewitt, Lacey and ,:i three of them had in thou* minds the possibility that he might fall off the bed. Mr Dear said there were two inferences that could be drawn The first was that the man had fallen from the bed to the floor: Bd was that he had got off the bed. stood up and then fallen There was no suggestion that he was sitting on the floor on thai oi i etion "You must remember that the Prosecution has got to prove that the direct cause of this man's death was the blow that he received on the beach." Mr. Dear said, as he began to deal with the medical opinions that had been expressed during the case. "You cannot tain the view that if he had not got the blow on the beach he would not have been in hospital and could not. therefore, have fallen off the bed. losecution has got to forge a solid chain linking his death with what they allege was the cause of that death, and If In i..on that chain has not been forged beyond reasonable doubt it is your duty to acquit him." Dealing first with Dr Calos evidence. Mr. Dear told the jury that the fact that Anthony George had died from cerebral haemOOO not disputed by the however. were being disputed. The first did he get the cerebral haemorrhage, and the second was morrhage had been ag%  rxd. thus turning what had been hopes of I into a fatal ll hould accept ': : the doctors very 1 guardedly. Mr Dear said Could I they really swear that man came into the hospital he was a dying man. and that he had no chances "When %  their qualifications, set U up to say the course that a man's 1 on that opinion. I am submitting should not act upon thi unsupported by something Cai lanttal, "How often have do given up a man for I then see him rise as it were from the grave agjataf HOT cai • say dogmatically that the man was Lound to die. eapoe'aU] when tbey have admitted that the (alls from the bed aw u a he fell ai I am asking you tr> assume could have aggravated his injuries?" How could the doctors pr-xi the course of a man's life. Th*Chief Justice: I do not want to interrupt you. but th' are not predicting the course a man's life. They are sa.tmg that a man may recover 'iom %  contre-coup injury and U sequent mishap can aggravate it But ihey are also saying that in this particular case taking into account all that they had heard, lead them to lhe conclusion that assuming he had had such a subsequent mishap, his chances of life were gone before he had such a mishap. Mr. Leacock's evidence, said Mr Dear, was made up of opinions, expectations and assumptions. He qualified Dr. Cato's opinion on one point, and said that if George had fallen onto the floor he could have struck his head in the spot indicated, but not with much violence But would it take much violence to aggravate the haemorrhage caused by an original blow? No Trust Mr. Leacock had said that iie did not put any trust in the description of the swelling; on the side of the face. Mr. Dear said The only one who founti ing was Dr. Cato. Mr. Leacock said that the bleeding may have stopped by the time that George reached the hospital, hut lie (Mi not give any explanation of how the blood that was supposed to be trickling out of the ear had dis%  ppaared. They would remember too. that Dr. Cato and Dr. Leacock had said thai a post mortem examination would not reveal injuries that had occurred subsequent to the original head injury Dr. Kirton on the other hand had expressed the opinion that he did not think it impossible thin the man could have received the Injury that he had received tailing off the bed. onto the concrete floor. In lhe (ace of conflicting medical opinions they were being asked to say that the chain linking m death with the blow h. OB the l>euch had been satisfactorily forged. Dr. Kirton had had a long experience, having qualified i:i 1915 Mr Leacock had an array of qualifications. That those qualifications haa been obtained in nine years spoke highly of his brilliance. But in weighting the scales between brilliance ana experience, on which side would they go down? "Or if you are incapable of coming down on either side." Mr Dear asked, "can you pass judgment on two doctors, one undoubtedly brilliant and the other a man with 34 years' experience as practitioner and more particularly as diagnosing the many ailments that come before him? Brilliant "Mr. Leacock may be brilliant In surgery. But wilt you without hiMt.itiuii accept his opinion on a matter of diagnosis that when Anthony George entered the hospital he was as good as dead? -Dr. Cato Is also a surgeon. Will rou teeant his opinion that the only cause of this man's death was the blow, assuming that vou accept the inference of the fall Of fail;-' Mr Dear then cited Wills on Circumstantial Evidence, pages 321 and 322. and on the strength of the citation submitted to the jury that if there were reasonable explanations as to how Anthony George could have met his death other than the fact that the blow alone caused It. they should examine those possibilities rigorously, and only if they were convinced wnh moral certainty that it was the blow which had directly caused it. could they convict him. He submitted finally that the prisoner should be acquitted, since the evidence left them suspended between the eonflletlnj opinions of doctors. Mr. Whyatt m his address said that he would underlirn ent points to '.hat they would provide the jury with sign posts to indicate where the truth lay He said that throughout the cross examination of the medical witnesses there had been the danger that questions and answers on hypothetical circumstances lod to the error that it might be forgotten that they were onl\ dealing with suppositions. He would get away from those hypotheses and suppositions and deal with lhe evidence of the three eyewitnesses, and take into account the weapon that had been used. He was submitting that the three eye witnesses. Stoutc, Maugiin and MewtOU had given [I i.uiihtforv .no had nut been upset. His learned friend had argued that the r*rosecutinn had not proved m -uld replyfirst by saying that it was not essential to prove motive, and that *ven if It vire* essential, there had been evidence of the argument or quarrel between the prisoner and Anthony George before he incident had occurred. Fish Fish Eel In A Beer Bottle The common freshwater eel usually found in rivers, streams. 'f'Hl i \K< IST amount of ilsh •* %  to be recorded at the Public Market since the fishing season began was between April l ana April 12. mesday alone, 7,825 lbs. of (lying ilsh, the best catch of the year, were brought in. For the last 12 days a total o. 45.147 lbs. of Ilsh passed through the Market and much more was sole' outside in the COUB tncts Of this amount 28.HM lbs were flying Ilsh and 6.226 lbs. ol of >hark. The best cat,: was on April 1 when |jft] |bi were recorded. Other catches consisted of 8.U8J lbs. of dolphin, 324 lbs. of kinjt iish. 664 lbs. of bill sal of albacore, 560 lbs. of cavallies, nnd 48 lbs. of bonita Owing to the surplus amount of flying flsh. hawkers has been releasing them in some instances at three and four cents each, but this generally happens after 6 o'clock in the evening. Many ol the fish are placed on ice until the following day and in the early morning hawker;ire shouting "FlaW y. The other people who benefit fiom the large catches of fish are those with one-door shops who (buy them and sell them fried, vendors buy the Ilsh at fouri cents each (wholesale) lakes and other inland bodies ofl ,l,rn el1 onp rriw1 nsh for 12 and 14 cents, more than 50% profit. During tnc shorta*. Ilsh theie vendors even do a better trade. Most ol the llshermcn reSava*;er\ If they wanted evidei. savagery of the attack. Mr Whyatt had only to i •hat ih prisoner had not struck one blow, but that he had had to be restrained by bystanders from striking what would bavt fourth blow, and that, thony George had fall' ground. Tho only possible thai could be made o; dencc of the eye witnesees was that they said someth i below about what the police said when thev came on the scene They had given th*-. *> Oa Page 1 freshwater but yesterday the "Adind ( [,, storeyed as well H %  building, was formerly ocuupied by Messrs W. P. Leacock and Co. Ltd., one of the principal sugar exporters and estate agents in tnc colony at that time. ,. T" e two % %  oreyed *uon of 'he building embraced the office • oi this linn and the lower adjoining building was utilized foi the stabling of imported animais, hurt towards the close of tho Miieteeiun century, was converted into molaaaea stanchion under the direction of Mr. Nat Green, wellknown contractor of those days. This emire structure passed in. the possession of Messrs Jones and Swan some 40 year* go. and was used for the storage oi molasses and sugar During the entire period, it was in then possession up +> the time when M was sold to Messrs Gardiner Austin .ind Co.. Ltd. and in lac: has been utilised by this f-rm for a sarnilai purpose up to it present demolitionMr. Anthony Lewis. A.R.I.B A has been entrusted with the plan for the new building Vestry Discuss Improving ChCh. Cemetery The Christ Church Vestrv decided yesterday to eouat gestlons of Rev W E. Dash. Chapain of the Christ Church OI.Rmy, B/rdeh rdm at bctt. Uons Tor the working of the cemetery. Rev. Dash pointed out to the Vestry ways how the cemetery could IKmodernised. He spoke of the laying out of paths and preparing means whereby the graves could be charted He said lhal as things were. t(te re wa< little method in airansjauiauU for graves which were sold and free Vtvej He made the suggestion th.': Un ie should IKtwodcfinite %  Mr s ', vote of thanks to Itev. Dash. He said that the> ajatanU I made and said that the ild be gone U fully ami Faction not only of Mr Dash, but the taxpayers. The Vestry then considered the Trade Returnvfor iitSO—51 and revised the trade lists. Sugar For London STEAMSHIP 'Inch,,. route to i 4,200 torntotal of about 9.200 loaned lu : >i the same period. Next port of call it IS expected * loading. The vessel will i m Monday or Tuesday. It is consigned to Messrs. Da Cosu 4 Co housewives just have to standb.. and grudgingly watch them take away a basket or two filled with fish. In case of a shortage lb price of a fried flying ilsh goes U| by one penny. These a good trade at night The Government Experimental boat 1 livestlj;ator" plan • in bringim; some of the Market Mr. D. w. .Wiles Fisheries Officer, told the Astvaeaei day that research worl continuing especially with regards to plankton indication ai to whore to ba found He said that some detlnilr announcement will be made m th.near future about tin The ring net. specially imported to catch bonita. has arrived in the island and this net has been geared recently. Other ajrniOfenead (or properIn.; thi InvniUgater as soon bonita are soon. *TUE EXECUTIVE c/nmmmec ol %  the League of Empire, under the Presidency of Sir Allan C0II7more. Kt.. held their Annual Mooting at Combermere School on %  last. ThOU Second Annual Exhibition oi work produced i>> th* Elementary and Seconda: of Barbados is to be held during Empire Week, May 24 and Saturday 27. Inelualvo, at O Mall. It i> understood that competing Schools have been working at their Posters and PTOJV July 1949. The Managing Committee had felt so encouraged by the response of the public ond schools to the Exhibition of 1049 that they had authorised the cirularisatlon of details for the 1950 Competition in July last year This would afford all Headmasters. who wished to compete, to make full and ample arrangements for the best possible effort to be produced by their schools for 1950. The opening Ceremony will take plOCO Oil Wedi.''Sday, V 10.00 a.rF ISHKRMKN of the tishing boat ay" landed six sharks, each of about five feet long on Oistins beach yesterday. The boat had been out all Wednesday night and came in with their catch yesterday evening. Many flying flsh were included in the catch REGULAR broadcast feature of the British Council OVOr the local service tonight beginning at 9.15 o'clock is devoted to the verse of Hugh Popham. The poems to be read are taken from "Against the Lightning" and The Journey and the Dream'' two volumes of verse pub) England at the end o| thi Other poems are taken from "To the Unborn" a G0tt< poems in manuscript. Those taking part io gramme are Jean Lau will play two musical interludes: Oracle. Hugh Popham and Carl Dons who will read the poems. ANY SCHOOLBOYS spent their recreational period at the Heef giounds yeslerdejy playing game* which included football and cricket. Although the cricket pitch was not prepared for the game the boys still enjoyed themselves. Meanwhile the tennis lawn being constantly watered to < courage the growth of grass. Only a few sheep weie seen quietly grazing. -C; JVT What's On Today CfMirt of (.mid ul KM m MrcUni. Board of Manag* mrnl lit % al Kr>rwlni ton al 4.1S pm. Football. mirm' Park 4l i 00 p.m. u>1 Ball V M.C.A. at 1 30 o.m MoHkj llarnu. Kri. inl.h.i r-lanlallon Yard, si Mi. li aal al 7.30 on. < militate will br prr%  "Tntrd u Ulr aurora of la. CMMtra'a (.ooduill LeafMc, Coaatftwiloa. a I 1.30 taaKat. Alter Ulr praar.taUaa a ivir .ill bo ahawK and UK SI Paal'a Choir Mill sine "Potick" Fetches $550 THI SI lMticri." ,h who: I and $30,000. WOO ction yesterday to tho highest bidder for $550. nor is Mr. James Murray of Halls. St. Michael who alon, with the other bidders, took thi chance of bidding without knowing lhe condition ol merged shipAll tp be seen of the 'Potick' (0 the past three to four months we \ its own masts, which truding above water In the innci basin of the Careenage, and a life boat which was afloat in the area. The hull and masts along with three deck houses. %  water tank. a life boat, two water barrel stands a table and three covers were covered by th" $500 The tlrst bid was S10* some delay and pi Government auctioneer Mi Dan Scott, the figure reached ttv climax. Mr. Mull og tho contract of taking the boat Government for the sum mentioned, was also made to agree ould have the ship ro;n the bed of the inner boofal Ol the Careenage before the Ma) this -c.ii case, the respomululitfig the vessel Ll .ill This, however did not seem to as he w.is I nig. QuIM .i few of UM seemed wot I io condition ol the ;iu\ili;u ) n. thought that the water would afreet 7/ To put 'Sanatofcn •tSAXATOIeElY •pilAT liopelew f.-dm( Ida: vou're 1*0 .., •noi up io il' any longer timpty means ttiat you've been ukint. IOO much 001 eg Your body %  %  honof i-. cv.cnii.,1 an food*—phosphorus and BreOgOh Tissues strengthen** thi, you need i count of %  Tome l-ootl. 'Sjnatrtgcn' he* !*.• erci! bodvhuildina foodtpbosphorm nd pratSO, in i to Dial ihey are BateM) it system. I>ay bv das jlonous ne* hcalih. roudl -nd vitality flow itiroufh your whole I—.!, %  your strength -nd -elt ,ontidv-n,x come back Saul OB a course ol Sanaiogen' lodsy. Om —U *X goad fawaaaafel am. •Iiufgiia MRU JWOC l OOD rc\lori-s health, \ouih and titalilv Oa/nary fs Clean THI :.nge heap oi %  block the i : troei causing em and out ..l the alleo %  iccent attention %  %  I "^h 10 and 11 %  eon Mowing ..MM. mi i %  trong smr: 1 %  seen at Uw tn Jamaa rig. i I Canary St.is-i in the vie, %  tho Ctt) Only the : %  washing. Here .. %  ten. AioiiK Milk Market, opposi • lions Ltd new building manhole which is practiclly Should i pine. Hums Arrive i *.in caeeo of Swifl which %  with cargo fiom Bueno Viet.i heads and plcfa pickled I %  other cargo I rouglit : %  : • %  %  Ltd are tho lot .il ag*. More Rice The U >s of i.soo bai Britlafa Quhuu I n Wedn< Ifjri M Li arai M.uiin rtrllc Wulic and WlUlp ll UavicUen other .ii m alt N itfa 11 this perif-i %  Man M Lowh do] in thi its chain-' <.f the congji %  ad (MM bags 11 Od Thi. %  agents. 25 YEARS AGO Barhadcm Advocate, April 14. 1&25 gripping, enthralling ng feature of 'The Acqultfa I ablo plturluuon ol Rita Wciman's %  togaj play opened al tl Theatre last night Tin sensational episodes that followeti *, ch "ther. one %  kept ter finger i km points Aral eV. Fresh for your Pets ! UNA DIM; CHOW PURINA RABBIT (HOW Jason Jones & Co., Lid. DIstrihuEors. HARRISONS BROAD ST GOODS RECENTLY RECEIVED INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING ITEMS CHR0. PLATED BIB AND STOP COCKS NECKED BOLTS 3 in., to 6 C. P. AND BRONZE FINISH. BRASS RACKING COCKS H. P. BALL CASEMENT ALUMINUM VALVES STAYS Black 18 in.. CURTAIN RAILS COMPLETE WITH PERFORATED FITTINGS. ZINC SHEETS MAGNA Cm IRON BATHS Porcelain Bnamolled unli C P, H ind ( i ip rVaoto Phth SI04.38 EACH. ind eoniplete Orverflon oriel HARRISONS Hardware 2344 SPECIFY a EVEHITE" ASBESTOS-CEMENT CORRUGATED SHEETS AND TUHMLL ASBESTOS WOOD. Tartan Checks Vuimi.'.lr l,.r skirls ..nd t.cnU ttilli | 36' w.de Per yd .._72C, RAYON TAFFETA In Bla--li. H'hllrrink. I'r.i. Ii Qnafl |aaa, Hlui36" w,d Per yd. !).")(. PYJAMA SUITING „ 3V w,de Pe, yd _..7(SC. & S")C. REAL MADRAS HEADKERCHIEFS 36" square each $1,1/ CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10. II. 121 U HIIOAD STRHT



PAGE 1

PAGE FOUE BARBADOS ADVOCATE BARBADOS fift WtfXffTE I FrMa>. April 14. 1930 I'edewlriaiiK IT WOULD be interesting to know whl will be the cost to the taxpayer of the new pedestrian crossing being constructed on the a side of Victoria Bridge. The information will be useful for two reasons. First, should it be used by pedestrians the Government will have found the type that is suitable for this island. Secondly, should it not be used by pedestrians, the taxpayer will have a vested interest in complaining that his money is being wasted and will support this newspaper in its drive to educate pedestrians in the proper use of the road. At present nowhere in Barbados is there better adequate accommodation for pedestrians than the two sidewalks on either side of the Chamberlain Bridge. Yet every motorist will tell you of daily experiences in which pedestrians slow up traffic over this main exit and entrance of the City. The misuse of the Chamberlain Bridge gives the answer to those public spirited citizens who protest that pedestrians have nowhere to walk and therefore say that they must walk in the street. The motorist sees the misuse of the street wherever he drives throughout the island of Barbados. It is a regular experience it the motorist to see deep in the heart of the country where delightful cjlades of mahogany invite the country I beneath their branches to Me, twenty yards away, clusters of adults playil draughts or gossipping in the highway. Every motorist in Barbados has at one time or other been given gratuitous insur advice by pedestrian, whose t.usu.e the road is never made plain. Writers to this I,I complaining recently about the numbers of accidents in the road. The accent has almost invariably been on careless driving. Tins newspaper does not countenance careless driving. It has more than once brought to the attention of the lUthorttiai lb* frequent excesses in speed to be noticed almost daily Street and other busy thorough! But there is no remedy to accidents and deaths on the road unless pedestrians are trained to walk the roads in their own interests Visitors to Barbados who art accustomed to traffic lights and notices tying n w" are amazed at awing 'lie taclrlaM any in which people he by watoatng acrosroad cars in the middle of the road, wave to %  nends f rom b %  IsUltdred ana oni' wuvs leave tbaoaalvei In lb* handi of fat. they walk the roads f Barbados. There is much 11 Government Compulsory V long overdue to ensure thai I main streets of thi proper sidewalks The piomi.se oi n street crossings in Brow) i „,,aiigemciit of eiossit, and altered when ,il " '"""'• short of an all out d, Iv. by thi as a whole will have any but the si effect In Improv '"' '""""" in which people bicycles and animal drawn or human-propelled vehicl. through the ancient OK of Bl'lililcl DWD Protestants The Curtain lly Irvine! II. laHllaUl PARIS if, |... ;..,. SI 111 IMF AUo In Czechoslovakia, tour Preteet.nt, behind the "Iron !" ~ %  "III*! BS. B.I ..." ,, TUKiKm 0 , he s Bl ce.tM Curtain" ire going to church this .. .„,.„, ,,.„ a —, om e examCloister at Broumou were ouitel Easter season largely unmolested. *' r ilh! "" rc omc """" by the simple government expedient that don not mean that free. p !" Yugoslavia, when eight prot * ££* • xtml <"' dom ot religion exiiu for them In ,„,' „ Bm „,i,-d ,i i, f wHh visitors oermlU. communlred Eastern Europe any Sw !" m uUu^^ermon. they '" Po,,T i "* Government JO^JS^SSJTJS 3irrr are; HS^SSJ^T oilers of religion, .flair, agree fT^Vm b fir Z 'againstsuch vemment .gent, look over adThe reeson, for .hi, are several .^"EVeS ^ noTnge, of ministration of the organisation 1 In all the Iron Curtain" the Tito regime lading long The In Bulgaria. the ftolMtant ..mrC nmteitanuTare In the <'• P" n "* sentenced to tnurch „ as the vicUm of perhaps r Aftanu. protestant. P*" <" •• %  That wa. In ,„. m „, d „ m uc „. mp le ol 22SEL such a small number in ' • nd olher P"*"'""' Pf 1 ?' 5 protestant reprewion of Ihe postthal P predormn.nu? MoaSnUnS apparaaUy took the hint and for w „ „ behind the "Iron CurtainK! .he? are"n*o\"e S ve„ten.loned £ most p* have steered dear wh < h ,„ ,5 ,e,ders were pul a, ihe latert available statistics, hi "" Pouuea. „ ., on trial in Sofia a year ago The Bu liari! about 1S,SKTare luted .P"*"""' "I"* !" %  J"* h n „. "> ur '"" " m """"I "" lm In, .TcountrTof 7 048 000 ebjewhere in Europe admit that rlK)nmen on cn r ges ot treaw.ii „~ua. ~J !" M neures of *--.„„,,,. „ nd blackmarketing. ...1 others received stifl lower where behind the "Iron Curtain ho are difflcull to obUin. but It c^uentiy 'STeinmunW. -mp.e. co-ordinated Mure, 1 gj SsSH^WpfSi SjWSSs JSSSSS waY-foundedBwSaci of Cehoilov^tl. and >ant clergymen also have been ]M amJ mbnm ,5, protestant sentences. Leader, of the World Council ot populace o. — — jnipriKMd in Yugoslav i-.de. being In the minorIn Hungary, three Ugh"dmdcd.nto Evjnge.ic.1 Church ofncial, ere denominations admit that they are fraU to tend so much as a postisMSS^SS ^ST^Dz^^ iffiti^^s^ss: Irader? l vho were passports in "Iron to go lo Rome luth'or '" %  IIol > Year observances, iiiHi %  .! OB no central tiie sUte foe loyalty as in inc amm • % %  -•• ~ "l---, mBf i, dlrectlv wia ,v re'"w t" td lh. I'atholici' Vatican. And U]t Jhc> dJ l ..^f Thi most Curta..." countries itH h no mlcmationa. sv.nbol ^^^^.S! (or the Ho.y Ye. such M the State of Israel in the prominent c^e of the .lev.* U> mfec, the pro^^S^SJ^L^l l*WUn1r v itl. th .TsolitaniMi..' 3 UnlUte the Catholic Church "". %  S!!i.i !" ,.a 1 .. two Amerl(ate SS April. 1.49: ^ %  r.",.u^t^,„ n co m nS,^ f S-^|~ f.^ ."^ Uke c.tnoi.c feet the proana %  "•"OP J-l" ^TneDe^ eonun.ini.ed land, are .e.u^ and redUtrlbutn.ii Their schools Idano raiu, ""'-•• .T^-Tt" Clergy, the Communist governwere^werndlhe,rprefrle, ;n February ^J"W "'^'TheV menu have demanded Oath, o urion? with thi Loyalty from the Proteat.n. tion than that ,., -he, fe*Sffi Not confronted loyalty ith the central '~ ISSSgiW-S S£X .uch-a.'u^atic.n-r )".r>ll voiced eritlcum ..meruthhave been advised of their impendCM. '• %  us the nge.pulsion NEW lUMiKS Here Is A Magnif icent Sea Adventure Story y Ceurge MaliaJM TUOSSIMMI "'" -",""; 1 ""'" ^^VS**X1££ "head arsl KiencM. ,KSJ-rttd „t the raft. Schools of dolphins „ ont'-rooni ;oolooical muaeum. ma ot tne ran. .. %  — -K— uhrn (|)r KMU ,„,. ndcd Noru 0 y It U 11 tale lollowed It. % %  olu i joined Ihe Free Noneeetan .HI Th. ; Kon-t,kl. umber, am ^ ^ r )|> nu| inl the home of countleM "alu'(m^^ptrt his .cieiilinc uiork ,Hlud.„g .e large crab ha BJg ^^ ,.„,„, ln ,„ „ K became a domertic "" %  }. %  ;'"' h e lerwd tn a Parachute CornMob. Uick itwlf the *n WM sh with bnlli.ntl> nunlcallo „ „„„ ,„ Arctic Noral.,.. 1 inall lish coming up fro .1 MAI PASSANT. By Fraacu Steegmullei. t'olllna. It.. 8 12. 6d HB I Si s ; outlive th. action uf Conrad u much of '.' alli.osplie.e ol and peril a It tells ho* si* young men. %  OS, Ihe lower depths. crossed Hi. Pa. illutnlnated It.h coming ie lower depths. There were giants ray craft moni ; %  ImltlVS by far than than the whole rntt bigger There were that uaed b) Utstf -..eeslors. the V.kings of reasull Ihe Atlantic I prossd, at any rate supported, by lite voyage Kui IBS purpose, or at lasat tinsseuss Of the .,.,. the belli I t„ Win mill Il.ropologlst '! II.-. 1 lal 1 "hen he was in the war. that .... b] .. whits %  ." eoaslnl from South A... ...lure ihe arrival IS ihe present iiiiM arktlas psopls osuld sol Ho* than could urn reiuvi.ni .....si' llevenlahl said, 0 li.e west Lowing llilinuoldl Current rafu of baua wood •together by baua rope. When the expert, .aid that this wa. Imposaible. rUyerdah! w into retorting Very I shall d. %  sc-u-., .... AoaU of whales hurtling BtlOP |g ^^ onlv h.gh-clas. thouune. ,1 toward, the raft and swirl, lalJon8 and ,i w ays rMpected ng SWai when within a tool or Wj molhcr ., house." This .0111two placent tribute to her m Guy, b) I...uie de MaupasMnt. wa. on evidence presented by hu industrious but sprightly l.iogr.iphei. Slei'ginullei, not justified for "when Ihe family fortune foundered alter the war ol 187(. Maupassant went to live IB Paris (where he suyed untd the builduig ul the Eiffel Towei dram him, disgusted, to the Kiviera. in a house where charming N War THE rather Irtgtrtsnlng pgopbss U l gentle' "•'' disappa* of the kladitsoTanaari, ths sod ..1 tin and the uutbreak as war 111 195" are less dreadful by a storv winch is foil rounds. When Mr Strachcy was M Ur of Food w1 "' ""'" tonijues 111 then eh.ek 'We ,,.! DO food^ Now that he ul Minister of War vvhv we U get no war." Comforting ? .,1.1 in lahe.l nil Automobiles For Bonus Hy Pass 0hea DETROIT. II 8 SIXTH-GRADE teacher probably would not have thought of Dallas B. Winslow if she had been asked which pupil would become a multi-millionaire. There is no way of telling for certain but the record shows this is the griMle wher Winslow. son of a poolroom owner, left school He not only became a manufacturer whose fortune is near two million dollars, but he gave all of his employees automobiles some weeks ago as a bonus. And the cars were just another in the lone line of unusual or spectacular bonuses the 56-year-old tycoon has showered on his workers i.r. as he calls them, his "associates." Winslow was born in Holly. Michigan, ol native Michigan people. Although his fathei managed the poolroom of the small rural community both parents, their son and daughter lived on a small farm nearby If* Scholar His mother and sister arc still aiive but the elder Winslow died last year at the age of 86. Winslow can recall few highlights from his 1 prc-wi.rkine, days—before he was 12, that is. He did not participate in sports, had no hobbies, and was not a scholar. When he discussed his limited schoolbag, he said with a characteristic half smile and emphatic wave of the hand: "You can say I definitely wasn't spectacular |J —but I was good at mathematics." Possibly his liking for numbers started him on the excutive career that originated with purchase ot a "gas station at 17 years of age— two years before his marriage— and resulted in his present post as head of the Mass Food Company. The firm, of Springfield. Ohio, has four subsidiary companies, one in Toronto. Canada, .X with products ranging from mowers to autoparts. Winslow said his real business is buying companies that show a deficit or whose owners want to retire. He has owned Mass Food Company for nearly 20 years and through it purchased a score of other firms He and his executive staff, whose main offices are in Detroit near his home, would put the firms in the black and resell them when a profitable offer was presented. tfVffaW Jokr* Winslow is a stocky man with a full head of gray-black hair. He is of less than medium height and his manner is cordial and relaxed. He smiles often but never jokes. When queried about his benevolent attitude toward his "associates" he rattled change in his pocket—his one noticeable habit—and let .l| the conservation take a religious turn. He said: "I do it because of the Lord and Mrs. | Winslow." He explained that his wife agrees with him lh,,! an employer should share profits with his I workers. His reference to "The Lord" was due to .chings as he understands them through the Baptist Church — which he attend! regularly — and his sternly religious -mother. Winslow has given his employees cash bonuses many times Each business quarter he • riein either cash or a present. Somenines ... atvaral months agothe present is FRIDAY, APRIL 14, !, a CO., LTD. at the COLONNADE t'suallv N.w CAKE MB ASST FIAVOIUS M 41 ( III M SALMON J — U t ROWS MALT EXTRACT It — U WALLABA POSTS 8 and 10ft GALVANISE SHEETS 24 Gnu,* 7, 8, ft ALUMINUM SHEETS 6, 8, 10ft AT WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD-, Successors to C. S. PITCHER & CO, LTD. 'PHONES : 4113, 4472. 4887 %  11.1 fci ts Dr i -o\ 1 dif I %  f WHEN SELECTING YOUR place wa. inhabited exclusively by prosUtutes." In such company Maupassant caught .ypnilis (which killed Urn at 42) and wrote hi. famous story of a fat prostitute. Boule de Suif. Flaubert. Maupassant's master iii literatuie. recognised Its mart! "Your prostitute i. charming. 11 pulled you eould reduce her stomach a aboard by the tall US"*. >"" "a" 1 H 1 "" " ""*•...•re was. Iiugct ll.h the whale shark, SOU Maupawant's excealve love for voice. Invited the visitor, in 1 or eve ..lures to the work"Apart from Maupassant, th. \ %  v THOU HfVfsDAM. There were sharks. Sl.' ina uiicon. pi Hated love atTu.ri ^S uf timeS'^^dr Lhlllty ,0 have a„,bu, ce,r.e to accompany South ho a %  .... Ai!£rT,iiinu with the neatest He had three clow women ,„„ set off from South *""•*£*^"^J R^'ai friend. In Bohemian wdel %  '".H. *!£2L? S ; piled up ^co !" .^SI and w„„ blanche Hocevelt, married to tioiu, .! early *•• %  J >" >> ^, bu , lu i„„ maiquij who kept on the clumsy i.ft. IBS Kon-tiki. woui" l "' HjA „,„, t Th (, r .ide ol the Alps; Hermine '"'the .ify" !" ,^dltntu'ie^'magn,!;MeomU, d. Nou, who^ husl...n„ bwnjed. gave themselves lived in Rumania, as I the queen; Countatw iMwai Potocka, whose husband lived in ":,:;,.i"drowT",u;ciiy-o. ., -1 % for.. p..i.d. 111•et inueh assuuince ri—. S '";;: !t tS^S. t:i ST1, u^"i^.u-^nd %  . .,„ ,l,e„ Polynesian hosts v u ,„ drawa QUtokly or ^ttto baUlYacU He loved none of Ihem Lv made a voyage, that make up a Bn. achievement. Btethar returned his adoration '" a'i „,,h Lr^tenture .11. but al. th. exhilaration. IBS When he died, she (a l.eecrowded with gay adventuie ah ^ ,„, ln ,„p ldl y .hinkerl said In her griel II tS'i to a coral the cool curieeity. which shat(M exists. I will ay. him and Iroiri South fc^.TTi'kliw exactly lenge. such adventure., and we will have It out ,„l"diri, ""v., Vs.'' SI lh"" %  % %  .World Copyright Rerv_ed_, „„pt, ocean. Ihrough. —I. E S ers who need them. The workers in his subsidiary companies, which he visits regulaiy. feel they can come to him With their personal problems — but none of them call him by his Brat name. He never has had labour-relations problems One of his present plants has a union In Springfield. Ohio. Winslow sees the union officials so seldom he cannot remember which one of them wanted to run Ins picture under Ihe headline: "One Fair Employer." I.rvs I ill. M.I I i. MIMI. One of Wir.sluws employees, Kenneth Blakelv, a shipping clerk at the Springfield plant savs that "if other eiii|.l..veis had shown ins BUM attitudt ai Mi wiulow, there WOuM be less labour trouble throughout the COUntXJ Another, Mrs. Marie Massie a stenographer at the Springfield plant say. her employer's policies, "make us work harder knowing Mr. Winslow thinks ol is and ,i|,i.i. eiates OUT efforts." Although workers who have been with his firms for at least six months get yearly paid vacations—Winslow said he never has had a vacation in his life—I N.S KNITTING WOOL SEE THAT YOU GET THE BEST NOW IN STOCK In a full Assortment of Colours RAMADA" "BLUE BIRD" "CREPE MISTBOUCLE" AND AJAX" i i'.-i h i Wti a r %  1 H Hi........ High. 1 tural lilt of the community, to o/|fi enjoy the art. .nd to share in """ seientinc advancement .nd ns benefits READERS SAY: Yesterday the Ad ,ned twenty two of th. %  ",ai the "Umveraal DeclaraUun ol :Human Rights". Today It carrta. the aaai etgei Truimliif 4MHM „1H aa or other lack ol hvel.ho.-i lias tlw light to ..I the moral and To Ihe CdUor, Tne Advocate '-',„ Motherhood and ehUdZS^LSFfcS^rtZ SIR.-The recent .por„ meeting hood are enUtled to p.oduction of Art.cie.i3U) tvc,..,. Ia> and —Unce All chddren. author th rlfjht to uurk. to fa •A employment, to conditions %  prolceOoi) asjainst unan I <2i a W aryooa. without any lias ih.* right lo equal pay for equal work nas ~~ — ; „. „ „„...„, |g Athletic Association of Barbado. thu dwth of sporu 1,1 th, %  ,!.,,. i "T," Everyone ha. the rujl, this DecUration c.i, athletic, are concerned l^ied.. to lhe wh! lo educalion. Iducatnui Basil bs b. fully leahsed free, at least In the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary 28. education shall be is a small bullet She can carry Culture would do the island a %  IT all the prise, in any local nice tot of good. I think too that it be but when she is ent away BBS worth scouting the Idea of Intcr,.n only come back with second iolonii.1 School Athletics Interaud thud places. I am not atttaelolonial Schiail rootball ana ting Irom the lady's proweu as a Inleie-lenial School Cricket. UW runner, but the performance show, three being independent ot eaca %  lack of coaching Then again, other The mum ol the various school, may ll.cn take I keener interest In athletic other than thi. dearth ol sports in the WandT lust officiating at the school an because there are not men 1<*"1 P m 5t! m **;„s., AN OLD BOY Impart their ,j ,t tml Ikr ',,„,,,. „ most There a. as far as I know, To The Editor, The Advocate, < record' h,, in' T. 1,"' B*u, S ^ B^trlunti: ."£? X A libbTu being U,d above, community in wljtsh ala n. records In one ttay But t h. ,,„ M .^ lhit „ Mr Bruce St John For a v.ry large part,. (3) Bveryone who work, has Technical sad I "f, ' 1 ^;f'P m,n "' „„, f h o ,0, far M I to !" never Combermeie School, but ne K, a very caieleai Walter, niit to ,u and rovourobl. Hoi, shall be mad "allhis persoualllv I. pouible. S^ ,"„" evenu uTtil now %  "" ""' h '' b, l s • •'""*"" : "" huM elf .bl..iidh„heduc.t..m.h.Ube ^ „, hu i'S^J^'nvoA b.'LC a b^! !" ure -land W. need more ot 'Saucer./this type. The same as we need Next, we shall be letting the ,l,e r„h, to ,„* and f.vour.b EZSS* ""' Siure^V*..'^ SJui^S rnuner.tion maurlng for hunwlf ble and higher^education shall be (J| |n ^ fxmat „, „„ and whJ u mon „.„„„,, b,,,. nd hi. faauly an cxirtence worthy co.uaUy acceaatble to all on in. r||hu uld lnriml : everyon. He Is a man 1 would like to know i human dignity, and supplebasis of merit. .h.ll be .ubject only to such linnvlit: a wrong with the Khoolbovs mented. U neceaury. by othei Ul Cduc.tloii shall b('directUUon „ ,„ d „ OTUnC(1 b Ur,. „, „,„ ei c „„ on j^ c ,„ ru „ ariMn. ef social protection. ed to the u 'J<'^ lo n J ,, 1 0 !" solely lor the right, and freedom, very well .gainst inferior Khools (4) Everyone has the light human personality and to th. u „ lner , nd „, mml „, thr u „ ,„ ho mt^.^ho,,, ,„„„, n d „„, to form and to Join trade unions strengthening ol reipecl loi rcqmremenU ol morality, public ,,,, ., rv ,,,,1 lim „ bu w w-, IK., for th. pKKcetion of hi. l..l.re.U human rights and fund.. % %  gweral welfare in "^'^.,1 !" ^Iruiirs 34 Everyone ha. the i. gin t.. : ol.tamin. the. m luS mediocre reel and leisure. Including reamasundins ?! um ,S. ouUlder who hiaTbad aUUUon of working hours among all nal or rell(3) These righu and freedom. ?S.~ „„,",„,„ ^S ESS5* hoUday. with pay giou. "> '''<" no >" "i^" Tveryone hu Ihe nght artivltle. of th. t !" one day. and the ,:p.. art in the various schools w. need athletic, too. for there is no And finally, he will quite likely better nation-builder than a good spill' The whole "Jug" ol "Atomic Why could we not secure some Brew more scholars:. OI.ENIC ird of In VBBMBT OSS. ^^^ %  ^d. cl. an ^^^ %  BK. CO Nothing in this Declaration whom the is.. a. the II) ParenU I. I as implying lor future athletes cannot put up a group or person any dec. that shall be sage in any activity or that we did something a of athletics tor our boy. and 27 (li Everyone ha. the ri* Ihtl gul. In Barbados Or ixmms wklea are stgaei wstk • a.m do Hwase, aat a>%  li.aaiiiBl-il by Ibe taateasary kea. Ma will be Ignored. Maay nsck reach UM Edator's aaak sack weak, aad reader. are uala rounded ot ike aoceasHy for the writer', aaaae to k. kaewa to tke Editor, eel far aeklkettea, kat .. aa saeeru ef geed auak. fig §mmdf tM II* COM FOB a H STONES DRIMir* STRAWS CROWN DRINKS ~i S< Rl^l I1M M'l'l I MUOSAPI OBANGl SORREL Order now from GODDARDS



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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. APRIL 14. ^ 1 UPNRY BY CARL ANDERSON // / ^ POSITION J| | WHV CAN'T -*CU i*^/SlT IN A CHAIR Jb-? ( ANT BE COMFORT*!* J ^WHEN "0U WAD' r F MAMA ^. f AND PA(=* WOU'^O ) V LIE APOUNO THE < 7 HOUSE LIKE THIS ) -O DO OLlB ,-^ T PSAO'NG' i-/ ->-> y ^_ If B K..O. .VV\0.\ . Hi.Hi.I.II. ... %  !„. ||,,I l.......... V I DlD* T rt'lCI AT MYffLF IVlMV TlMl | SHAVff-I'D foTMi KID M11AM /MtOVt Thin, GOiS *0| <& PAC'lt 1 THE LONE RANGER -:: 60 1 01 A MA6K£D MAM. BY FRANK __STRIKL -00&4T *E WAS Wt r* OFfERED ME A CHANCE / TJSEJ ^.RHIK BRINGING UP FATHER IWff IMV .M-*MA£> %  VOND *Mp |IC I to* CAU. %  t-.r. BY GEORGE MC.MANUS U*TI-V..-*M A M*TEB AAP CALL,* TO Ml 'MI AM %  *• %  > %  n<# PONT MONBV* FtfS BY ALEX RAYMOND i 5 i .* • jj PHANTOM |C-EETiN6SCSH0T .JJl %  .,M: %  in isvWBf>'ev BY LEE FAI.K & RAY MOOR! '? .' ';v %  I %  •-' %  .^rf<.f4/A fl "' /K r. %  .; i MA.iioManou"*"-^afc L^t ?%; *BVAN t.SPARKLlf BEE* HEALTHY I "lit ASK FOR THE BEST Me E WANS. I dciifbtfu^c-cAin-likt latbctof i I Omani ^osr* li %  -ribam j I ea<.-ll.en: ufl i pri-pcrwtwlucb keephi -. KB let tkin healthy md [i I (tec from Mcauihn. t* %  *i^ I ^uii€lytoftndvelny. _ii4 futicur V* SOAP JOINT AND MUSCLE PAIN mean kidnmy tro44, A 'uncboci of the Kidae** %  <• rhin.natc tuumlul impuntinfag. II '!vkiilneyi sluggish, these impurities*^ ulate and settle and often bte*M n muse of pain m |otati J muscles. The wu,to'tackle*. troable is to help rhe Ufa,. They should be toned ug2 Dc Wilts Pills the n*j4 made specaally lor this oorm De Wilt's Pills have a uotC ciransintr and antisejitic f*U the Iciili.cys that bnop £, bark to petform ihetr tm* %  property. Thki v .... u.r is sold IM k.. the world and wr hatt f^_ %  ftom -'Uterers t^C ^ Ofrelici ,'a:ncd, aftef j3 of sulfermg, T, takawtk yc.uiKouUt.Gtt your I'hentiK tM ""X OUR GUARANTEE De Witt" Pil's • fnanulattuicdundtf --tti<_ily h*fivst| conditions and the ingredients ess. (cum to rigid standaida of DE WITT'S PIU | lor Kidney and Bladder '. Children grow husky and tall . bigger, sirongur — better equipped for school and play, and for the future, with a hearty Quaker Oats breakf.i,i EVERY MORNINC! No other whole grjin cereal is more delicious and satisfying, no other gives greater nourish, ment at less cost. GUIAT MAUH FOOD ... cjuu !" o*. u M. i. *. .: "".'.'.'.' n Jcd *l""""<•" V** "'>• --Kh .nd hchh. II wpplM* o...l miners pnuuut cboh|d..i.,. and eua. ,,al Wo B, thutma/mlhu, !" *,. Qud. Oal, I, a heal.b. lul, dclacaum BREAKFAST FOOD fur curybod) ,,V k .."fK*u"L',"'•' J %  "" f 10 ""•" 0 -y U .kcr < >ai. llealih HrtaLla.i, e.eodai' LOOK! QUAKER OATS GIVES YOU 4*2# t N * • r.ridil.^MMn '^^ $ TR,N0TH *-,..*....., MgkC STAMINA lk-4, ,. f^^ BSJBAI (vlNrtl ,,, ,Wfl£|? ENJOYMINT aajH, %  „,, „ Kyh-> ^ F 'ND ( >i : CRETS llio.VI MISS BEBTHA LAMAS NEW YORK SALON NEXT WEEK AT COLLINS LTD. BROAD STREET, WILLIAM FOGAMY LT1 Inc. B. G. Grasp This Opportunity \ Wi.r^a I cup of Quaker Oats. SK surriog, for %  *—• That's aU. IN in K 1:1.1.1 IKIIAI. DBVABTkflDR We can quole you on A.C. MOTORS (Hoover) 1/H. 'j. ',. 1 :ill.l'. .-.OCy.lf I 111 Volls '-'*'>'--*--'*-,'.'. HMtiini lilMIH Sites: I . by 7Vj ft and liy, a by fi Ah-j I l\l El H L\ ROLLS 6 ft wide All ver y reasonable iu Price. --?" I. HERBERT Ltd. —— 10 ft 11 Bortu* s tmo.vim \v 11. .lk iu_a. „ „ ,, „ u M u aaMI %  ... I. HMM, %  !.. .a. •** '"""' nt.to.Mni n...-. na ..... i-. -^ • "MK.VI.M V\ DRESS MIOP.



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PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. APRIL 14, 1J, Qahib Calling Since 1840 i m H IS Excellency the Governor wu be attending the ineeUnj .t thY M.C A on Mi :.15 p.m.. when Mr V V Iberlock, Vk-e-Prlnfipal of Jn!ver*ity College of the *< ndies will speak on Ihe •f The University College H Vlll be supported by Dr. J H *arry. Processor of Histor> a-.i >r. P. H. Bow-en. Senior L*rtu<-e> Physies. Still A Mystery E VERYONE >e#terday wa* talking about the tupposed Kly ng iaurers which have been seen for he pst four nights over Bsrbalos. Some people were very ceptic.il about the whole thing. •thers showva great concern ana nterest about the two object? Some think that thej %  Insets, others will not give the •pinion. Anyway whatever thsa re many Barbadians are losing lulte a bit of sleep, waking up b he middle of the night trying ee the two mystery "' hemselves. Welcome f^ARIB welcomes the arrival of *~* UN M.S. Karel Doorman the ; jutch aircraft carrier which Is I iue to arrive here today from %  Curacao. This is the second Dutch Warihip to visit Barbados in under Ive months. H.N.M.S. Vdn Speijk vas here in late November 19*9. It was the H N MS Karri Doornan, which look Prince if the Netherlands on his visit n the Dutch West Indies an" 1 Jouih America a few months a. md she is now returning to H-i ; and. It is hoped that during %  %  hort visit all Barbadians will d heir utmost to give the officermd men of the Karri Doorman a lappy stay here Ask Mr. Jiff*, C AR1B Us met a guntlemn'i who says he has seen a Flying Saucer. "Yesterday," he said. "I innoyed my wife and i saucer ol mi Another bright fellow suggested try and interview Mr. Jiggs. of •Bringing Up Father" fame. 'Maggie has throw i taucen at him; he should know A-hat they look I li W I A fine was in Biubado Hlaughter Ramon;., wadding, who [I was married to Mr A %  >n Wadm .'i ,ii St [ Patrick's Chuiiii. Jemotts Lane I Mr. Comgan U -able and Win On Honeymoon PPENDING thai] J L—ton ire Mr. and Mrs. Harcourl Tt arc married In Trin] I .'Caster Sunday Mr Tlmrni? he Trlafciad Guardian and 3arbad(>N foi the B.C Test Ma* 'or his i former Miss Irn and tlie late Jai Staying With His Aunt M R. AND If] A> B.W I A for a short visit i • staying with i_ Mc CuLtsV tog with than) to pend %  i in Barbados. But Stops *T-MIEHE arc two Bus Stops X batwsjan the Pavilion and the i a v. lion Court. If., uent in that an he goes outside to catch Ksra Is a car or cars parked light undv %  r both of MM 1ms PStSBj M R AND MRS. ROY WILSON of Trinidad are now in Barbados fur a couple of weeks' holiday. They arrived last week by the S.S. Stu>vesant" and are staying .it tne Windsor Hotel Mr Wilson told Carib that his grandfather, originally from Scotland, first went out to T;inidari about the year 18*0 and since then, his family had been connected with that colony The Wilson's have two sons, one a Major who served in the last war with the First Battalion. Trinidad Regiment and later wi'.h the Windward Islands Battalion unfit 1 r Col. Dennis in St Lucia Their vounger son, a graduate of McGill University has been with the. International Film Board Canada In Ottawa for the past five years. At present, he is on g 1 nig vacation in Trinidad an'! is contacting everyone interested in his sphere of work, namely, Vlsuil Education and Educational •nd D-Kiimentary Films etc Mr Wilson Is a Director oi Wtisun and Johnstone. Ltd.. Merchants and Agents of Trinidad Toronto Tourists S KVf.KAL visitors from Toronto lelt the Island recent!-i Mi 1. J. L V thn wks at the Marine Hotel during which lime they del imfts a bit of llshing and played olf returned home by TCA. Mi Hamilton H Uardineiwho is President of the MBKO Electrt*Co in Toronto and Ins daughyjr MrAudrey Pape and grandsi '.ivnig at th<> Ma ine returned to Canada T.C.A.. recently cnosswoRD MR WILLIAM VAN YPEREN of Bay M Arriving On Sunday D l ]\\\ I Bertha II be acalM KmOu Mot mas, asslit: M Kivitii: lemonstration at Windsor Hotel I Leaving Tomorrow M .-. PHONV EDV by T i nag '*en hen %  mg thi %  r home ii .i is not %  Ik' I II visit btfon MK> \MHON\ ||l|\ is seen here sitting In the gi r a scene i I Aim Dutch Artist Here T HERE Vftaj -1 small crowd gathered along the whail %  i i wus going on. They king at an artist. Mr. .i, yparan, I Dutchman jointing in aratei eoloui i if one section of the nan. Mi. Van Yperen with Ins write, iicre on Saturday froni %  they i % %  are touring Barbados. Trinidad. Bermuda and Haiti, bef nig to Dutch Guiana. \iect to be In Barbadoi for one month U one of the flats at Bay Mansion Caiib visited his flat Later in mm some of bii %  ..rerj food Indeed %  iTiv oil paintings as well, and is also very good at portraits does in oil. He says he give an exhibition In of his work, whist) In eludes scsoes in Holland during Dutch street scenes, and ,,so some paintings dom lad and Dutch Q i local scenes. •> who is also from Holland H a sculptress and has studied in Italy and Paris. In pnris sin exhibited her work at the Sahn ind had %  > private sst it lbs QnUerj %  Assistant Manager M n MRS. EDDIE O'CON %  %  from Trii Ung thrv Worthing i.int Man Barclays Hank %  With Creole Petroleum M R and Mrs Charles F Und* i htldrei B.W I A tma i-i Chain t spend OSM %  i Angelc> ks In Venezuela with i euni. No Papers US Thorn*• llisrdi*' LE HAVRE Nina von Mark is typical of the shifting tide of displaced persons which i sweeping back and forth over Europe today She has sptnt 23 ->f her 39 years 'jut without committing i single criminal offence. Her mistake was that she was born of parents of mixed nationality This lime she has beerv Jailed for a month, and for the usual offence. "no papers" Her mother was White Russian and her father a Prussian aristocrat, a combination which she %  alb "criminal". As :i result her paper* have never been "in order She has been tortured by Germans and Russians, and arrested by French and Americans as well, she %  am Nina's father was shot by the Russians, and her mother dud while she was still a baby. At 10 she was condemned to life imprisiment for being the daughter of White Russian She was released after 12 years a Russian jail, following the Russo-German alliance of 1939 St e made her way to Berlin. She was again sentenced to life mprisonment. this time for helpng Allied prisoners escape from a German concentration camp. But she too escaped, and reached France to join the Resistance. And fall in love After the Liberation she nsked American authorities—who had arrested her—for the "papers" necessary to get married. After, a long dclav she was advised to ask the Russians. But the latter only shipped her off to Eastern Germany. Last year she slipped into the American Zone of Western Gerind eventually hitched a ride to Alsace in the hope of finding her long-lost fiance. But she could And no traces of him She then came to Paris, and hopped train to Le Havre to board "any shin sailing away Aram Europe When caught by French police, who like everyone else demanded 'papers", she only said: •I envy animals, birds—even beasts of prey." And when her month in the Le Havre jail is completed, she may still have "no papers."— INS. BY THE WAY s, BEACHCOMBER aaress %  ana I Uown Bn.LUiut prriurm sncea *hl.h *• •• Wrm < 11 S. Th word Uea in conYSlUon Is not an It should t>#. II o Hi* isst CSM m irte one moat read. (Si il You can aec PU mm ahao* II %  J ThU rot U tBttid |3> %  i TUP put that ma* mare *ou :• 4. Limb of fnn urvsnu tSi I, Just one of thaw llttls oornem H. Slept to aKlDa. (Si Bean L TIM tori ol parson sou cannot trustll Put u tu*J to v>"0P*u* 'SI It's m acant. (Si Appasra to be a tamporarf ur fl. Rslatln'f to a cAaoga ot mualcaf InatruroMt. <8i /. ass S Acroaa. i. You ciptct to set a anora rrom thtm. Til It, Vhla Ql ia OSUV *aao a.Jnw>*. IS. Mr-It ao that too intarrera. (Si ,, ifnidsBTuus. i5) IV. All oar. (Si ii Tssen from trail IsOlaa ui V earnaaiii: Foal: a. Proiiflc :* r f. iSTOroaa; 1*. Wa; IT. Dooi. ill: iQ. UNOW PLAYING AT YOl'R POPl'LAR (IN KM A PLAZA LADD PAYS OFF for a Mm DEMONSTRATION A Beauty Demons t rat ion will be slaved by Miss Bertha Lamas if the Dorothy Gray Park Avenue Bnlon .'t the Windsor Hotel on in April, ai 5 p m.. :.>ultatiotu) to those interested. 14 4 SO. 3.i { DOTE on n., radio 'anced enounh U Mars ana back talics). I iriiu'i: in some -averns near Syracuse ai %  >f my shout returned t> I vhut I u anted was an answer to doc If lbs li' |o Mars (ram the top ol Tower BUI ll you faki "li thai Mai U n advanced tcu Uoor nnafl n Jid you think N t.illiv IIoi. /i n E United Nation: that the fon of Bikom lia> 110 w. >lded that an> action to be taken hould be felt to the • he case of the Uwph i a-ho had 31T wlv< %  became op. %  • I collar, thn %  %  Mssw Tki*4 gle. Us i all other pal I tti, i on UunlA HuJJn flssjfj N .. than the present t.ilk in the City ot U out ol a %  locks of tin tock-piles be %  :i.uiiinii,iii-i Bb Henr] l y Of • pofl priei tnanlpulatlon* And, in II could only apply U vvhuh ll without btvantlni .i A buffer pool, I" OS pi.uti.alile. must be %  I luCtlOB, and how u> that i a system i v ring ivm tin f"' level *. BBH >N' UK^ a^^^ ass^T vV^j YOU WANT KHAKI DRILL— EVANS AND WHITFIELOS •dAVE IT — ii KHAKI DRILL .79 .89 .99 1.17 AT THE RIGHT PRICE MARINE HOTEL SUPPER DANCE MAT! HUAV Ml.lll April I wl. From 7 ro 11 pm, PERCY GREEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA. IM\MII S2.50 From Recent Arrivals He ofler VERITAS PRESSCRE LAMPS—350 C,ndl Pnwer GALVANISED MESH WIRE 1" to 2"—Varioui ^idlhs GALVANISED PIPE & Fining! V — t" tilM. BARBADOS COOPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LTD. IIOVAI. Worthings Judy OAJUJUTO. (W KD.LY •TIIK PIHATF" Color by Teotvucoler WlUl Waliar "MXZAK GlwJy* COOPWl A \n**vn cha ol * %  EMPIRE To-day 2.30 & 8.30 and Continuing m JUST RECEIVED i 3SS' MS mT3Sij He wore his heart on wings! MORSES SPILLS jwocr f W6V Fkgs. Goddards' Pl a t Powder Lux Flakw „ Rinso Tin.. Silvo .. Windolenc „ Shinio ,. Chemico ., 1-0-1 Cleanser Ilarpic Bols. O'Cedar Polish I COMSTOCK'S WOBM PlUITS j datotb.—k-r.o(T)r M;-JJ te I i1„td *w i*oW*Uoa for your.lauuly. • INCE & Co.. Ltd. J DIAL 2236 ROEWJCK SI. .XnVKHTISK in lh EVENING ADVOCATE IIOXY Tto*L.v k NSondk} *5 A I IS Alrundrr DL'MAS IfwcnU; Son of Monte Cristo" Btansai Louli HAYWORD: Jc-ii BKNNK'I'I Qoorso SANDSmfcSwordt I si" ;<•* with doiifw UI.VMI>I4 To-on's SOIUIOWMI MtNBS with W1LUAM DAMEIIKST BRUCE LAIIOTTHOMAS GOMEZ and inlrmmcmt MARY JANE SAUNDERS GLOBE STARTING TODAY .". & 8 :I0 P.M. TIIK TI.MK BOMB FILM darin is the %  • PEGGY JOHN CUMMINS-MIL Produced by frank & Maurice KING Directed by Joseph H. Lews PHILIPS SUPER DELUXE TABLE MODEL • THE LAST WORD IN RADIO MANUFACTURE proYldet undiitorMd reception. Il ie excellent m lound yolume and hill conlroi ol reproduction. attractiTe and aruetic in appearance with all In. PHILIPS qualinet embodud. MANNING & CO., LTD. AGENTS.



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^r FKIDAY. APRIL ; BARBADOS ADVOCATr. Counsels Address Jury In Murder Cast* i, ,. %  i-. l>t lopUi.U Mr W „„U: A mailer of (act .. ^ "_ ,n me light < what you know and I ,l t .-hat you tew heard since, do you T.. .be Cant i Ant puZ ^Ueve il was a much more senoui mailer than just drunkenness.' noaprl ,.„,,„ llK Dr. Copland: V i litario .. ls Mr imyalt: You would not Ufler (rom Dr. Cslo 8 opinion and has be. Dr. Uyock, thattba was suffering from what is known Mr. whvstt: w.„ „ a conlre-coup Injun Dr. Copland: Mc had conlrecoup injury Mr Hh.all: When you „ r Kir ., : evidence before the magistral. „, m my Learned mend im for the defence, a number of ,b.m R h. l o called,., turns put to :ui expert %  %  „f what you saw. One was. if a man got a blow would luematoma M r. tVagatt; take lonij to appear. You had said > %  %  you did not know how long it would take. Or, K.rtMi. Yes or. Coplui: Yea Mr „ Mr, WayaM: .on were also „ asked If a mail fell off a bed and struck his head on the floor would lhat produce haemorrhage, and you said vou could nol say. Dr. ('itpljiid: Alcoholic mtoxiSSSrrtSi" r " UC "* '" Mr. Wfcjfatt: Finally you ium*J "' '"' these hypothetical opm*• % %  ,( tying that in the matter;; "• referred to you were not prepare ,. .HI opinion. Dr. t upland: All these guestiui. depended on several factors. .1 third Whether a man would haenwri Dr. Urtaj hagc Of factors. %  ATong dia l.r Kin,.,, Mr. Whj kit! %  it would %  I Dr. Klrten Mr ','. ,%.-,, these cases could Mr. U'hyatt: You would not toil opinion that is in contradiction to the evidence given by Dr. Cato and Dr. ^Ooaland: 1 would not exj* Eowhat 1 have 1 '* %  K:I *lr. Dear: Tinlaal lime you Mr Wnwatti Sb .. %  d or "lying what you asked her was whether i> aiaad: That was the lasi the patient was drunk 01 time, soon after 1 a.m. Dr. Kin 1, Mr. Dear: On the ooca Mr wii.it plied thai he jfU aw him, t In drunk, %  arki p.' Dr. t upland: No. lol j, Mr Dear :'... i>r." Kirte*: • him he was lying on the Moot „ of the Casually. Dr. T"i IMKI %  WiUi Mr. Daar: Vou said then vou account ..1 him to be put in the 100m 111 the Inquiry Office ,,r Klrton; || Dt: Copland: Yes. Mr Dear: YOU laid thai Mr. \\hwtt acfc tu your quai eeson to doubl you received a message and 1 Dr. Urteau No. turned to Mr. virn.ui \ see the man lying on the ilo.,i Dr. Kirn.11 Dr. Copland: on the outer bed on which 1 tn;i | <. orl ordered him to bo placed. g, ,M,,., M PAGE TIIKEL [/Don't let this { *![{ happen to you. raw sorry— safe using Amolir Rebel Leader Scuds ; "Sorry TtoiVt see you! A "IVarc" Message I 1 A. Apnl 13. way (o UM >Qd %  measures' 1 to be taken agi .m announced here ruer today %  %  % %  %  %  %  "peace" message to thi GovtnuiMfil in Diakarta I %  ulti m atu m to loan gaa I par, %  %  %  the reder.ll r.ovcirnm'iU's plan to Uscerporate East Indent Last Fi I 1 Ivan *"< hours In which int for thlevoll— Kentrr. DOHJ NIQUCT Limi BURNS^ THI THING TO USI IS UNGUENTINE No ho.l -a, NWI*I tan •So *ttol lOOlrxrtg. cMntplK UNGUENTINE -ill do io> • tlUIVl FIN • I1QMT INMCJION • f 10 MOT I HIAUNO A NOaWICH SLIGHTLY MIXED BATHING Mr. IHar: U) LOOXTM hssulUKl .vou ,f vou agre. the niiinmnt if lir T^BffwIt an the opinions of Dr I^earock nn very one of those opim Dr. cpUud: Which Do you mean opinions 1 morteaa 1. ... eompu. %  said or whether you have any I am putting to you is. that yon %  iiiier. ... >,.....,. >j,, Mr. Uh> MI %  •1 that the inKtrtati! Argentine Ambassador In Britain I -ON, April 13. Chaloa A. : UM Ambassador io B %  %  %  %  %  1 denu He was accot 1 In a RataB said "under the Oovariuni I'eron. Ai %  I upon a now era| %  vonuiiiic 111dependi 1 Sanor Hogan ^aid all thai \i i.ouln •vtth Britain the 3.500,000 HAITIANS WILL GET PENICILLIN In V.D. Fight NSW Y'lKK K\ [HI nRST \TTEMPTinworldhlslor? will be given to the entire popul&ti New York Time-, trp-ntu.. ! "" Thi' ; I %  1 .-lit of the Dopul tt creal dlaaa Pan-Ameii U. S. Asked To Help Starving Chinese HONG KONG. April 13 laws to Chlanf Kal Shaft "' %  '<• M Hesin il \-,-i„{,h" ham vici i lab who went aboard ilcs Conr urajna !" programme will I* vkn [la : -1 r. 'li>tit..wli ... tl %  the i'remdi'iifr %  Dr. ( opland; location l tlnnK I rnlghl whethci it was \*>*>. ble to distinguish Sil WliyaM differeiu Iher. "uree? had Id The pos: Dr. K i r aw Hr, \\n\ati Dr. hiilon Mr. Hln.ll %  p %  1 %  Dr. KMU./I Mr \Mi..ll vou Id look out for would haemoi 11. would sh ance. io UM ii.un Thai would be, you woui • .haiiKe taki .. n Deal you ma. have :i us understood the qucsiion which 1 had put t Dr. Cato and Mr. lA-acocK. 1 that question "1( %  man alter uinjury by a hlow lo the I %  Dr. Klrlon: Yes oxaminayu Uhl (ll I haamonhasc'.'" like that Dr. Copland: That would i i'.ie time the MI DC Kirimi; Ye*, hap happened. It woiili ktr. u hvatt: In % %  on how man) h< after mishji. I and !. Dr. Klnon %  f doctor to diagnoau ieparlment of th. I Dr. Ki Mr. Whyall: A %  in Kin. .ii. Yes. M, m mnde a lal diagnosis '' i mtfttuious iav %  i.irton: Theie was 110 Mi HsU/att: Woul i nada not CO .W \U Uh>. -.: was brouslil m i I %  on my right. 1 was sitting at in*i %  Shortly jftei N.. I want ,u ihe other end OL U nl Lver to tin look at him. On *y tck to my desk 1 askoj to which M. I sat at my > lU'ile whu> A nu rse f rom [liv other end of -i room started to go to him. opped her and went hi When 1 Bx saw all lying on his back on AM left k M the man's ms face with his face pointing cai ean traces wthe wall When 1 sow him would not *erond time he had turned his face ( .;. K k examinod %  •'"• 1 smi u 1 1 800 £. pu i* c be 1 ** 011 70 blood in whora I stood. I am absolutely 'adlai^,,.. %  action to arouse ductad ; %  %  ver to face the Chinto th.' Vickers Aimstroii' 0 ** na,1 "" at-.-oraing to the iNo,,( "-"' Company that workara from thi ,lon 1 *J central News Aiancy. iiitenmUonal firm's shipyard had not been J** telegram spoke of the "nni'"; %  ^'u"dinvited to a luncheon for Uu 1 "" ;, r P>Plo "" -he verge ol The projec. will launching of the Art. •.'iv.aion" on the Communist end of this month.. 17 De OcfWe. held Chinese mainland. This it '' %  Sanor Hogan with a smile told a 8 *"_ d rM il l from Soviet policy which was "to extinguish half very fluently. Sanora Hogan spoaht p WM ' population of 4S0.uu,uuu at all" The new \m"' ; movt l0 ton, Juer. firstly the rteaof South East Asia, and i ha could expi j 0 ovc r,,un the (Keuter.) baaiador "m hial %  Britain. England has been our friend from the day ol oui Inde%  grown in rtri vill he to do everything In I "his friendship Thisacred ti —Reutrr. Insecticide Kills Men Ten Million Flee Famine HONGKONG. April 13. Lord Lyle Champions Empire Sugar DON .iscement from tfaa Brit%  VICT %  %  %  lUuadlan equipmeni during the Official Communist dispatches parathi. from Peking to-day admitted there it was tested and :>i.OUO.noo laimne refugee* firsl tune il I CantraJ and South China fruit-growers last ...iministrative n-gion alone. Q .1 Spai I The region conjaruog the pro( ity ,,f Brit Ki.mnsi. Hupeh, rlosed. Hunan, Kuaugiung and Kwanga. para) the East China area larv s„ i conditions in the provinces Xo UnM, Ol Anhwei, Kiangsu. and Shangln ,. ,. ml ll( ;| ., lung are understood to be mfln, l5e ,|„ W eShallProve Stronger Says U.S. Defence Secretary %  Virginia, %  raaag allies the hjlleol extant .. %  ;. i I : Hajiua, was i defence %  %  i %  % %  wi ....ii win the %  !. huma matching of man tank fol ml game and mj through %  danraa%  military ex perin %  "Ving ourmgei .i>::, %  KruUrr Italy worse. The dispatches said ne of 10.000.000 had been %  Oeneral Lin Plao, Chairman of the Central and South in his right ear, could have ^est. 1 was not %  : Mere was no re dr ui 'lad beet. of h i vr ai.;" mad examuiM both sides of hit naad looking down on hi "Jg over his chest I noticed a fain' •inch looked Ii This was in a position abou* ..nn. I-iokmg down at what I think -. as the blow and then looking up she patient gjm below, ., w nu S£ rSh £ 0m ha •""• nos€ terwairos the nurses stood ean new for a* iol. '. According to the dispatches, Lm lnMeU ., worlds II. %  %  the feet and i II".. /.. %  I fatal to IBM ad agonizing the United Stati genre m handlui, ould be produced within dela of Ch.lo wag visiting I others have nan c „.„.,v„ .. ; Mim.r.a.i.lPo. La London %  ,. w loW the State Council that 1 would like to see every of lo.OOO.OOO refugees, fou, pound of HUUM (i) miI 10I1 WC|( n %  light he said. "Your eonipam H e urged a reduction In d further food loan* I %  n Inuiet u willing t< \. i.rouragemcnt from the Government*. ixnd Lyle said that even though it were decided to spent Han on sugar, w i short ten; —Reuter. SffS WASHINGTON'S TOMH WASHINGTON. A| PYesident Gabriel Oetu the Empire ns ehaapl] i ge Washington's tomb ai ,.^4^ death. While Lount Vernon and the a potential market In tti Tin.Unknown Soldier" here ioXrgenlina Will Reply nl II %  it %  %  %  %  .... 'Ml %  oposal for increase to %  1 I %  %  %  %  1 oth" '%  ear from Empire sources iddtion, a far iiiand. i nti %  p, let them be mi r> %  of paratln %  utlon should State Dean Acliesn.'. :, tmil.lll ., in. I or Videla dined last night He wasdining u.: might 1 iture .. -.idem Truman who preportent of .11 -tad Mi arttli ol %  u 1 laliion to comnv about these The Chilean President then ,ielong-i.. elared mat the policy of his Govsa '. the biologist rrlanob co-operaHe Mid th at he had 1 ai with the United States. reports that paralhion Wl President Truman, in reply, "">i"g bird life. ularltv of the West"Th*" public is n substance. 1 ..enllal th e dreadful %  1 to \tic peace of the world.**— Inns brought Int Mr. Whyall: You do not rii:l. Rruler insects." he added nationalisation of sugar. about the opinion expressed by Dr. CHto. that the bio// on the lefhead und the world speed record, landed" bock here to-day— 10 days too late. Their hopes .ie dashed when that, ed Mosquito bomber developed ine ti up four days In Col e turthei ed by enable in Tokyo. —( cue. Others will knows what long thev will ai /.T Wlfod In SUtlHfH'llf ,] 11 %  I Hindu ptlsj I making their way today lb the %  KOb for a purifying hath at Hard 1 i.ms took a on th* gala — the .it Hardvar indiii Ing into Hardwai %  day*; by train I and foot for the 1 Outer. PILOTS KILLED IN JET PLANE CRASH tVatraaii any oj 9 OB Page S LONDON. April 13 Brttaln'i latcat a meteor and a van Killed. Plan To Link Policies In Europe \IMI \-i;. L0MDI IN %  ers linking tr 1 and Asia Is emeron* %  ^v->! Rout of the Rattlers OKEENr tsM was the "iain item on the menu ;n Okeer.. d the InDUon The tkoaated the world's odddancing round and girls danc:.ake:. round their nock/ hi 1ntertairuucnt wa? ihe ir.'r ,ke hunt— Frjr-. h snake mi hunterFor till trhite HIIWHs muster /." ^^-^v Ji V* hue shoes, Io pass r HI M>inp.iny, must he \pufCioivri s White Kciiovato '^l 1 .'^ r?|^1 or I'ropcrts ihuwhite. No VUICI way of making sure R thai uhiic ihoag .ite MMWI lltOIKHTS~ SBI mini A nutn KKNOVATO* "^-^^ To Mothers **^\ s who cannot feed their babies l>on'i worry II'.' milk van be prepared to ihaiilic youngeu haby can digest 11 wirhoui trouble. Fhr addition of Robin.on'v I'aienr Itarley prevents the mils lonmng large elotl in baby making 11 mtj lor ihe dchane dJsaattiVC organs h) d*> ihcu u.nk an read] in life.Th;n ,v ] .v nur-^ andni.xhi isaln„_. Bartay & ROBINSON'S %  PATENT' BARLEY LIGHT & POWER TROUBLE FREE INSTAL "LISTER" ALTERNATOR SETS I 7J K.tt. I.IKSH. DSITSH ALIKIINATOIUS S K.W. I KM. It S K..W. ' %  . * •*. ; All .umplrir -IIU Sullcbboaraa and Aulon.au, VolUis KrauLilors. COMF1LZTE HANOK OF SI'AIII PAilTS IN S. flaW MAHIIAOOS HH VWIl | rf HAM FOGMTY LTD. INC. IN B. G. 1 . i:sclnni\iI tag) %  •). -.Mitisais HARRIS & SPORTS TWEEDS GABERDINE, SERGES & DOESKINS Please call and see | be our ynu ar;' %  luXGl MF-RS Ii is more "IB HOliSL OF FMAIir aea Tailor>iu <>aJuuasansh:| uh iiiih Grade i loihing .1 KII.MM IHH 1-N



PAGE 1

FRIDAY. \PBIl 14. i9sn CLASSIFIED ADS. Bri W „ M a.i I ... Us Live l*TB§ BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN FOR HBVT union** 0 "* !" ,„. aux — ""** HCT rctuc SAU AlCtHW AND RIAL BWTT P" •* ""* Mftilia'ifh "*** KTM.1C NO !" ? 5 F" %  "•"'£• Haamum ca.1* . ADVOCATE ,llonC> *f sxs SB" 11.4 St—| I n da*. raTi .T2 r >BV f eea. from | 30 BIRTH MN a. Frank nd *nt*" '" Tnnl,third child: *W: GnSnea-or. ol „ IS 4.a* Tn. %  s %  M,h.n B„I atmttar, t^iMdry Co Tei un ri> fur'lih'f) (i %  Engliih bath, •irphoe.*.. vmi • Front Pur I definitely i cwmics must definitely m.k %  nod If truBritish want our loyalty hey mutl make it pt.Me for ut to live and r l our expense Counsels Address Jury In Murder Case # Vrmrn Page 5. sometime after a drunk. He had said he had thus diagnosed him "provuionally" If thev attitude ---, n. g. ^ g; g a jj-^gwJI WM not surprism*. 10 : .... Mm. '. h '!< "** no J *-. persist in iho present J the suaai they will become the chief instiJjlor. o( political ,.,„, West Indies and will destroy forinspects of .table Boliti. —; Ml profress in these lerntones 'onfiuion arose which can only be nude possible ne STCOn d "Hie bv co-operation between the Britun Government and ourselves —(By Cable) msmi RM war HMUTUD %  ... .., May Apply Mr. Mirloi. <; rj,'. J !" 14 4 5*-*,. •*>... ** w Tt TO MM SMALL Pumiahed rut. neat sen. May '"„ <*#* Stale Price Wrw Bag a 14 4 JO-* n^AlXll/IX 1*6 SAI.OON — U4T l.ftOOO Curio Garage 14 4 SO-Jn Al condition ..:•!( V < .... -•I* 4 In HEAnniEtJ>-. h thm cn^ r ,„„ for ih. "vorrth. of M.v. j^. & Ju)y Chriai CiriurPh Phone mas 14 4 --*. HELP_ '—imaiilj •nc*a rook and %  •n*ial maid Apply was bUmewor.ri:' for ut. It was exrusabla The W ma l ,e?S p-^f theirev,£? ^'tr^ I a,C dence was what they told of the KL ^^ !" ?u2g t hU man iual occurrence befor* the flnd **** hoble t0 crr Where medical opinion in t*Uj un of their cat* was concerned, it was lh evidence was that they had de< pinion of Dr. Caito. Mr. Leacock posed to the prL-Mner having nnd Dr. Copland that when Anstruck three blows, while there thony Georce was admitted into was no evidence of bruises in the the Casualty he had no chance of i woodrar*. MM niti 114 50—to. .SSg**T^ -"'Ho... twIwM y^y, %  poken. •rllUna. sad <-ap.bi. T ^' of l,M ** butlm -tnr by letter lol.FW. *oplv %  TinAav,., u*5o • %  • -ell-. CoaM [un ijininf 4 bedroorrn. fully furm-hed Pov ilw month* of May. October nd Mov-fmMr. Apply J H Wilklnaon. Phon* I*M __ 1 4 4 503n TAILORS. ^%  w !" n nitan, .pply rJ..,J\. '" Tail< Ford V- ISM model. ._ CA ^ cr ^uSd and Painted. PIHHM| ^.l OfSw I, o Liwne Gatasc. Twe*dtide | EvUl-1 Chrysler Car 1*40 S^an. Perj -otxlltton D,-l Mi. Owmopolittr. | I, Masailne I-IM' I2.4.S4> in. fAR-'iPrrttd r&rd Cr I4U Modrt •siCfi-*^' condlti..!. App.) UntUd lor Corntssij'* Roabie Hret. | IT4L 'J LECTrtlCAL |np LllARGEB A BATTRBrj 31 "I Wind rl-iiyri & IbttterlM in foot' m Applv uh* >• %  PtanUdion. St —.. 14 4,M>-On IrtflT — A beautUu] pri', utr Trr %  Otal to find out how nl wt-i AU %  > I UKAOO DKADLINC" pi AZA t "^ jp *' Id.d.aa-aB PI III ,14 S .1 IS lADIor.V i-rd Au'i Chans*. In par*W woni B G ai^l'". 'CIlremont' ral 3and> Gap. Worthln*. Ch. Ch SCELLANEOUS ALOB TOVr! PAUTS — Flame waati Wkk. Wtrk-Canier* P'ar" n. GI1*M**. Generator^ and olhei ,-M, epquire Auto Tyr Co. Trfali Dial 7m 5 4.9a—t.fn. AUCTION BY inatructtoi pany. I win •• % %  %  I Hi . V la t form Lorrv %  > %  i % %  '. i aos %  FRIDAY 14Ui al 2 V* Oenase. I Ford DAMAGED TertnARCHSIR Mc KISNZIE II 4S*-3n I %  %  wn r .nd ' lfr>rti i.lM ifeti t>l &f *• ', Id variw *l*r Ermuir Tin Cositpanj Trafaliai •*-r*r Ht.VANISED PIPEi %  O-IIKIsslvsnlaad pip* foot A BARNKS fc CO LIT IfBM MASKS sabei dlvtni bvd % Cbrml. etc SI 40. C\-e Shephet' *, Parndlw Bawl Cl 13 4 SOto MOU81E rt-APS. Jealounie W.ln •-(! Ilnnrei To be laati (it "Km- SbMirxlyd'. 4 | | I i i.W Isaarj L *. %  "**"> YTAST vablr fmm ADtEB BROWN II 4 VI-7I'RCHIIJ. Maxwell CON* %  * %  %  MM, fuliv fit-nialied A>I riata rawwiclon Apn'v Ra'"h A 1 Hardwood Allev. Phone *"** IS 4 SO-to ruin %OTIIF K atalij aarned or obtatnlns nrda*' for private ChrUtmaa Caroa fiorr lT*erid" No prevloua expeiler.r %  BUT. Wriw today tor beautiful fraBook to Britain'! UrflMt anc PublUhara; hlstvrat commlaalon ••ilouj monry roakins oppertuiUly William* Co Depl 14 Victor" Praaton. Snclar '* rHi HA I'Mivil Service Association &f holdina damp at the Cmara School lUli on Saturday, ttod t law m Honour of the vialtU.g mm oi thFedamtwn o( Oivil Sar^Aaaocution.. M,iuc will be •upplied Arnold Maanwella Onhawlra X p m Qraaa Formal Hon SI 00 NOTICE i \III-II or it, i i 11Pjjtd b> iba [•„,,, I-w auardlam m J full, qualified Nurne o* Uklna rhanu of Midwifery SM.04 per monln. mut preient themeelvca MiBcata and credentiaU to hia raUdcncc Roacville," H twiura April Klh tip to Siflned. G. 8. CORBIN. %  rk. Poor Law Guardian*. M I'clcr lt4.SO~4o. Un'. r-SIO 4i Pater .. %  UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER CHASE Mr* will •rll her Kmrtltuie al Bevnrar'' Navy Garden* which iitcludci •--. Bat'aa rz card Table. Cordea Arm Chain. T.R Service, Whit,. Dii U r set. invalid Cftalra. Oo.Ms Hot PUte Or Hon. RJ,* Bedroom Suite, fron Radataad, Praar, ire Mly* in.-w.in* Tablet. Wrillna t. Bad tide r bra^iatiiM Low Dlvsn "nla. Kitchtwi Cnbinet, Lardar and other llama Aal* II 30 o'clock Terms Cath Hi: Whl i:. TROTMAN % CO.. \U( tionrer. 14 4 50—an ,Un Waiter for the Chri.i .i ,un, '* ,n School, from rm fcb/is** €h Sp-n n nd i upproved Scale aocordina to • anrt rkprrirnre mi thould be -e not later with full %  penence. I "an Sine ANTR^,Us, ^rr to Onv Body. %  WS" Foundation School S 4 SO—Tn side or on the feet. Firs! Blow it would bo rcmcrtit.,; Whyalt told the jury that the first blow had made the man atatftr and totter, and that although the second blow might have been aimed with force, the deceased might not have got the full force of it. They would remember too that those two last blows had not fallen on the bare recovery. It was a fact, in spite of what his learned friend had cubmi.ted. that there were cases which doctors could say positively were fatal. tbi possibili;y of falling rut of bed was concerned, hq would say that thev were not then* to spcculave but to decide (he OssM < n the evidence. The evidence waa that the nurse heard the noise of ;i movement on the bed. There was no evidence that he had fallen In ( arlialr Hay IN POUT Sett AlexandrUu K Sea. •*,, from TTUltdad. A*cnt> : Da Co>ti Uarea Hannetia. Saa Everde-a. C M V Co.. Ltd Ipaaa. Sen. Blue Naa* Mac. Satt Manuata. II P*T Pathfinder. 4 411 .on* net Sch 7.IU WoniU. Sen Emanual C OorCapt Floren. from SanoU. Braul don. Sell Burma D Sen Wonderful Aaenu Da Coat* 4. Co, Lid. Counaellot Sch Prancaa w Smith. Sen. Schooner Mary M LayMa, at torn net W L BuntrM. Vrt Lucille M Smith. Cap! Marahall. (miRrttith Guiana. Mat I'nm-e*. Iuiae. Sch Philip II Aientt Schcuner Ownen' AaaoctaUOn Davidson. Sch Mandalav II. MV I nenvar, Sch Mary E Caroline. M V Schooner Prancaa W. Smith. : lot La Havre. Sch Providence Hark. Sch net. Capt. Haawl. for HittKh OulaM ^ 11011 Belle Wolfe. Sch laudalpha. Atento Schooner OwtveiV Aaoctatioii V Dlur Star. Yacht Beeaie. Sch Mollv SS P t, T. Pathfinder. 4.S71 torn tw N JoneCapt r lomi M *" Ftaneiaco. AKent SB. Inaare. ajTI tSRl ivrt. Capt. lUmDa CoiU a. Co. Lid. V^LUmil -0cm ol the deceased, but „„ cloU.es ""' <^. "" d .LI"* ""I 1 member that on the second occasion the deceased had been found aie5r*a > s&.r *'SS 14 4.50—3: FIOOH lADY-To take full r nara of and .upervia, „ U r tnmmiru. department ppnra lad i ,. i I perwn .• pevSarrM and %  tfiortuan krtownineiv TO.lt naadlawork, PMI -nd dean*, for uTrrunlns .... ""' %  A ^ry .ittnactive adary |, I for a prnon with proper quali.Awlj_ ., OSM Ln wTliiW Box 21. Ilridte.%  %  ..!.., %  %  M.9,M m MODFIUM F'.IIII.,. B I ;-.,., ., REAL ESTATF %  •rNsrr virw-'-Rockiay. (Adjoin 'ng IU.lt WATERSi. on the land •:". -flee. Including kitchen wltn cupboani Water. EJactnclty. Oai and Rarl "urtalled Garag* and Sarvraiti roomi %  n yard In.pectlon Miy day—Phone tSaft. Ml .tcllamy Thc abova will bt Nt up lo public '-ninprtlUon it the office of the under •lined on Friday, the Slit ol April. 1B al 2 p.m. CAIUtlNGTON A Sf.AI Y. Lucai Bsraai 11.S SO— Un. ^ 'yELLANEOUS WAGON WHEELS with a.la, with or ^an'i'pUn.'.V A i? ly "'"-"• "•*• m*n- Plantation. St. Joseph. ^_^^_ 114.60—n. *J" n, , 1 "--I Poataa* sump, miad, will pay cash or -and marcnanM Chaplin. Box USA 14 4 50—to '•<*mm Ptai nottie, r -^t. r-, uad interposed. Trcriticisms that had been __, made did not enUtle them tolay ^ lhe floor v n"'inR. that those witnesses were unIf he had fallen out of bed and %  nSL .K teeeived the injuries from which lTiosc three eye witnesses had he was suffering, he would not spoken about bleeding, and In thai have been found sitting. He would part of their story they had been haw been found unconscious corroborated by three other mYou will vmember" said Mr uependent witnesses. Whyatt, "thai 1 pun that to Dr' As far as Cobham was conKirton. and he adnu!ti\l thai h,. ccrned. he thought it would ce had not though" of .habefore" agreed that Cobham had told a watered down story He had even Chronic Alcoholic reminded them in the course of ,_ --—-**-_ ,. h ins evidence that he was speaking f~ d€rm *. ,hl !*•• *• the truth. They would ter. said Mr. Whyatt. outline he had said that the I^c* AaMVAL*— R, It w | •, I, laVOM iRIMIMIi Fwui ParraV. Rpbart Sao..-. Curley. Sheila Spounar. Mild.. V Fnank Aiikaii. Woodalde. Clark. • Kt.M V\ Hit l'nnal oul I "BOM *1 It t I \ i •> CraiiidMw. Kennetn Graraium. Joan K. Michael Urwtnutn. dccley Graruit'OIl, David GrWeWMlTII taoM at Kirra: Uliiund Gw-yn. U.n Setli Whit* DeOnte. KkPAaTIIUS—Sty Ml A I. IOB AN I MI \ capj. l>tc Burio.1 IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION Oable and Wtrelea. v.aih Inan In BnUrtti., I'rvatuu. WU Iktrtatdoa Coaa* SUUnn a aiwsn. Natyade. .Meataliai .Jian RuAna KelmaTMtl. l/TP-i raasrlan. Helm^Ptin IV ... i-.uerv.. 4 Fa,. Mvrma.ktl Taonira. A m aiaa WattUngUHi. 1 i (l .. i.,(|eU. Ciaeper. l*o> iHepfaai. Ikmul. Aurto. Ntlt.. II Caso Apalachach*.-. M V .--.. Ude. Ltae I'eru. Vigor. WadUngti. i. era. Stair* Miarin-h ... han to them that Cobham's evidence was not reliable. a' SS '"*' " ^ Pic,,..,,,,,, bg ..uvtt lha! mX, l nin,{ ,hal thv > "-' h^d about S*. the Pii!SfV*-& t '* u ** torn i>id and he was sUlT s iieJtmi ^ tVt Jl ?*5 ian *" **• " "• had no one there to speak for him. "If he had bad ppjjl] Whyatt said, he imgltt have had Mr Whyatt then told the jury K 0041 "•* •"He cannot speak thai if they reached the conclusion ,or hirnseif, uud he will never be that the prisoner's mind had l>c?!i ublc to do so. Vou mui so obscured by drink that he was m nd t* 101 lnc ' of this islan.i incapable of forming a. specific —the English Common Law. holds intention to do :rievons bodT.v ta cred a human life, whether i harm to the deceased, they would j* lnc ll(< art or not. oe entitled to say that he was Therefore you must oonsidei :'JIS guilty not of murder, but of mancas M " e >" which a human life slaughter But they would havhas ** n '-hen to be .iatislled that his mind had been so obscured. "The scene shifts," said Mi Whyatt. "The deceased is taken "If you artrdattoubta doubt that I taWd Anthony Georyeaj :nflictel by th< lo the hospital as a senseless j* nd that when he inflicted .lie drunk, says the Defence, and sufblow ne intended to cause him fering from a severe brain injury, tff'evous bodily harm, you will anuej. 1 The dwelling houaa which Is a sub%  •-nlLilly rravtad Moitawall bulUUng at parrad i-ondltlon comprlaaa:— IKJWNSTAIRS ftpaclou* cool vcrandaha on two aid—, large drawing -aid '.unrw rxjorn*. Buttary, lardar room. .... I-PSTAIHS i bedroom., toilet and bain room. There la a unall lawn to the naat ot the home, a* wall aa r padouj back >Md with lime and fruit treaa planted YARD latraa garage and washroom Klctnc light, water and gaa are intailed throughout. Inspection bv apoointmenl with Mr. Walte. th-k ownrr. Telephona US) By public auction, on Frtda* the V l>nl ISM at 1 p.m. at tne office a* ".' .ladeniignad from whom further particulara and oondlUona of aalc may be ob'alnad. B. t. NaCHOLl* & CO ISI 1U Rooburk Sb-ret BfaM %  PM 11*90St! r d i Emtage having decided lo leave Melbourne Route. Belmont Road, at the oth April, the property, which ttandt or '. aciea land and it In excellent condiun. ti offered for aalc. Inter*.ted pntlea pleaaa dial NM%  tiittunt Nurr-ng Home. S 4.50€i. The undenlgnad will oiler for tale by public coi up*Mien at thatr office. ftSBM llraet, Bridgetown, on rrldaj the Klh lay ol April. IBM, al I two. I The dwtllingaouae called "RAPCOt'BT' %  .landing on MM aquare fret of land at Navy Garden*. Chrut Church InapecUon on application to the undeiilgned 1 The dwellinghouM called "SANDOWN-' rundlna on 10.500 touarc fert ..f land at FonUballe. Bt. Michael In •pectlon on application to the tenant 1-etw.en the houn of !• a m. and 4pm NOTICE removing and replacing Ung .,( st Pinup- p, rllh rhuirh. %  receirrd by rue up to 3th April. %  roch kl TraaMtflr. TIM an NOTICE %  : A SPEARWATIH Malcr r. beg u, BSBB. wT!L "^ Jfi"" *-*~ai"""V l-^ila^r m ' .1! !" ^*' l^nnl""n during La 1L.!!lf Por1 ' Bridgetoan Dated th!. nth day of April %  ASPEAR WATER >VERTISE the ADVOCATE the WEST INDIA Hlr-Jl.'IT co uumD n aaarao In the RARAAIXM. FIRE \\ BUXANCE CO. 13 daw wa In tint WaaTTMNDlA HUM IUTINKHY LTD 0 aharea In the BARRADOrl SHIPPWO St TRADING CO CARRTNGTON A SEA1.V 14 4 SO *n LrOUOa UCFNSE NOTICE i 5" fPfilif-"*" of D V scnu & Co * auJxnJasion is that he hnd been knocked out by that blow and was a proper subjeil to be taken ,u the hospital Mr. Whyatt continuing reminded the Jury that Dr. Kirton had faid that he had diagnosed him ai PERSONAL The nubia? ay. hereby warned i nvlng cremi to any parann or p wnornaoevar In my ruunh as I i now no-elf raapnruilble fuj.!•• debt riedrt* sv M>. CAfclXRuN CODRfNOTOI Ring wl VOVEH.\lMK.\T NOTICES Vacancy For Exammalion Secretary, Education Department. British Ouiana Applications are invited tor the vacant post ol Examination, Kducatioi, Department. BriUsh Guiana. The Examinations Secretary will be required to take charje. under the Director nl Education, of arranjemenl. (or all Local and External Examination. Held itish Cuiana Education Department. Applicants should l Unlveraity Graduates, prelerably with experience of the oreanlwion and supervision ol examinations. 2. The post is on the Pensionable Establishment of :i and the salary Is on the scale $3,000 per annum rising to J3,00 pa annum by annual increment, of S120 per annum The candidate selected will be appointed on one year's probauon. 3. Applications, statin, ace and lull particulars of quail and experience, accompanied by not lesa than two testimonials, should be addressed to the Director of Education. Education l>. Georgetown. British Guiana, tu reach him not later than the lit nf May, 1850. M.I.'SO—2n. DEPARTMENT OP EDUCATION REGISTRATION OF RELIEF TEACHERS A PP ]u .;•!! from suitably qualilled persons lor Mfla. iitration ., ..ill be given to persons holding the School Certificate or some equivalent qualification. Applications, to be submitted on Form E/7 M (Mem or Form E/7 W (Women) obtainable from the Department of Educati. reach the Director of Education not later than Saturday the 22nd of April, 1050 REGISTEIIED RELIEF TEACHERS, WHO WISH TO HAVE THEIR NAMES HETAINED ON THE REVISED LIST MUST INFORM THE DEPARTMENT I1Y LETTER NOT LATER THAN SATURDAY, THE 22ND OF APRIL. 1850. I4.4.50—2n. Stop Pyorrhea In 24 Hours Bleeding Gum* Loose Teeth and Sara Mouth mean (bat yoa hare Pyorrhra. rranck Mouth er a bad dlaeaaa which ...onei or later will make your teeth fall Jut and mar canee Rheumatlem and Heart Trouble Stop lala 'U-eee now with (he rry Ametan. Stop* bleedlag enda %  aWtatt a guma la II hoara, llghtena teeth. II. Arnaaa^ muet make yanr anoata "• %  aad •** raSji teeth at meaey ia*t " r.i H ra f empty rarkagt Oaf Aiaaaa* from year %  maUataaPia*BaVaafi pe^ecl! yo f4>p PgmrrkfTfmck Mas.* PROPERTY-FOR SALE %  M Baaaa and kae Verandah. Drawing and Dining i. •an a-MB) lanmns -ater. Kitcnanetla. Lavatory and Rath tiled. v and p.oaerly made. II It wall funuahad with properly made Mafioaany Furniture and Hand* on ', of an acre of land I poalte the aea. Price reasonable. r-".( co.. %  find the pel .,f murder if you arc ^.u-iUu thai \w a.i not .he intention of causing grievous bodily harm but that h# iniiictcn Uw blow, you will be entitled to return | verdict of uuiKV of manslaughter. "It will be youi ,iut> to relurn one or the o.her which the ... i ta k ,. further %  ratling W*4 adjourned until ;. Apply i I. AHCY A SCOTT, Megaune !JU A. M. WEBB IlKkl — Banda — aaaWM Itoth LOCgl Mad l^aTaafB Bought and Sold 15S Roeburk St.. HridgeUwti 1MB. ,188. Hours : 8-3 REAL ESTATE IflVOS AND BLADON. (JOHN M. BLADON) FOR SALE HU4IDENCE || (Ira,,,, lull H-aid Attract ivelv daaianad modem l*u vtoray hoant' orll act back In nup,,,, ] j „), er,. tround with wide frontage Caral iloia. walla with aabeetua roof, foamed nanelled doora, all biUllirl cupboard* There U .. large lounga. aial dinlitg room with gallery 3 heir—,,„. kllchen, 1 earvanta rooma. room for I oara, on for nilar healer Thl. fumlUied if required a. rcaaDnaMe ftgia-e P1NX MILL, Two recently built lona propertlea 'bt:ngaliit* A two .tarry hnan Both well conatruii t l .,n.i ..tinaii..IC-I dence. anl. 3 U-drooin. i-bla in the madium price range Pleads Guilty of Anti-State Activilirs PRAGUE. April 13. the same charges, pleaded "not Miss Dagmar Kucercvkk... 23Itlitty". vear-old Czechoslov.ikian emThe indiclment against ihttwo ptogroa rj| the United States Inaccused Included sprean.. formation Service (USIS) here, propaganda against Czechoslopleaded "partly guilty" when iha v.iki.t. t^pion.tge acthrit] COMING SOON amaSJ Portable %  '.. %  Builang Kingc lOOK OLT la* is easy Ik Moiin-Siiiinijnay -Mon i. or asivuftc d other %  %  %  UB nauae %  •( Waggona. %  appeared before the State Com here today on charges of hostile ;i<-tivitic against the state. Lubomir Eisner. 26. another plying state secrets to the ni.ui ol the Press Department of tlM IJDitad States Embassy. The indictment named both • Czechoslovak; employee of USIS. u enfinies of the Raj who is being tried with bat 0O —(Renter.) SHIPPING NOTICES Canadiaii National Steamship* %  Ot'TUOl'NP IADY NIBAON LADY BavONEY IA1IV SSLhON UADYnoOffaTY MUtTBBOI.su LADY RODNEY I-ADV NELnUN IADY BODNEY LADY NELaON LADY RODNEY 11th Apr lith Mai Sr.1 Jun. ard July tfc T*li I flu. Ma: lath J in lth .'-. 17th Apr It-ti A. .1 nth Apr •Ui Mav til. May lUb May Jib June Ittit Jun. ISUi June ITtb June Jain Jut. tth July nth Ju SRh July Tib Aua BMA Apr JrJ M. IBUi M.i — Slat Jun 34lh Jun. %  oth July nth Jul< — sth Aug inn A-* N.B.—Subject to clianae wllbout ttvUM. / bara. P a aaa n air laraa and freight GARDINER AUSTIN A CO., LTD. Agent.. st .lAMER-A variety <, client building Uiida at* o ,ble lit thtt nrr„ ildarnbty In price per aq locaUon and area. WINDY RIDQE. w Thia vary attradivaiy modarn itona burgajalo' large bedtboma ^lew can never be tpollad and pm-aillng hreerei are uriobasruried. S nuara town RENTALS WHITi: , .ept CMtgi' aial I rtDtrurUra, Anllgvui. .MoirM.e i.. i St KHU-Nen.U agllliig 2Ut April The M.V. %  Daerweaod will ... cent Caxgo nal Pa i S Lucia. St Vlra A. BB %  aaas ^t —.i II B '^iii h given B.WJ. aCHOONER OWNERS' AaaOCIATION 'INC.i C-nngnea. TE, 4041 MAIL Mllllt AUils lor United Kll I. sed ..I %  Qaai I'ARCSL MAII ,i 4 |.ii. Hlh April ISI50. REGISTERED MAIL ... in .,n the 15th April 19511. 01 IIINAHY MAII. lit III 11 .. m .950. HE. 1.LE.. IIIAWVIIlMtoil f*f/VCH USE M 1 SB" "QASCOONE" "MISR" OASCOGNE' "OASCOCNK .•oiliiiu fo I riiiidau' April May May June 19Ui. 1950 9th, 1950 2h. 1950 28th, 1950 Sailing fo %  lymout/i April MB, 1950 April MB, I95U May 13lh.T950 May3 lit. 1950 July %  '.th. 1M0 For further particuUn apply to :— R. M. JONES & CO, LTD.-Agents. REMEMBER! IT'S UI.HM #.o HM.Wtt.n OILIJMiSS CEAITHAL lOIMMII I.TII. Trafalgar St Fly to NEW YORK via PAN AMERICAN CLIPPER' BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD. > 14 ft. I IHIII'I ->l V I. I... ...I i. ..I. I l.,lk ii.,, Wl] Hi.iiii.l Trip it HI i Milan • \u i lulll.M | Nrl


PAGE 1

TT F r %  cl it v April 14 I05O. Barbatos Quorate Year S3. GREAT BRITAIN MUST LET US LIVE Counsels Address Jury In Hospital BeachMurderCase Judge Sums Up To-dav '-pill < HIKI JUSTICK will sum up to Uw Jury in the case Cudny in which McDoaall ll„IHr baa been barged wilh llumurder of Anlhnny QMTge. f'ounu.1 for ihc Drfinrr arid ihi. ProMturton aiMraaM Ihc Jurv viMrrtluy alti-r wlllimm Pi c Dpland mil Hi Kirinii who hud heen called hy Hi,. Court, hud (iven theii evidence. In 'In can which bCKon oo %  :iv. UK C Holder ,.iLufci uy sinkini. :^.„i „,, ihc head with .1 piece of pine wood, once oortioo keel (,| n liihinK hnnl. IIIIU Innt by that blow he inflicted .. n brain injuiy ae^cribed bl the doctors as a "contre-coup" I).,te „l th, November 24. liMi. I At the end of Mr. Whvim-s adtir !" yesterday afternoon the uua, Justice adjoin 'licarina until 10 a.m ti When the ease raaumad du Dr. Copland again entered the %  land. I Mr. Whyall asked !'!., % % %  I doubt you diajnoscd Anthonv Oeorce as iicing a drunkard Dr. Copland: What I Mid before the Magistrate was that from what I observed I conidered Di Knthe man was in a deep ..talc ol Know Ev*rythin About Nothing BRIGHTON Dr. C. B. JcfTery. director of London University s Institute of Education, blasted .British education techniques and pleaded for a •slowdown in specialisation nt our wiivrr He told the Congress of the National Union of Students: "One can we no end lo th* process of knowing more and more about less and less. until m ttw and it is knowing eviTvthinn about nothing" JeftV: i.me rO— %  i unlverattli behind th* schools, "Anv decent schoolmaster mini; 'o chariiulding in thinkini; about his work, but how mam professors foci thai character building is an imporlani p;irt nf their job? Wallace Sharps. 25-yeorold president of the Association of London Students, agreeing with Dr. said: "Degree-bearing l| muses an In no short supph in this eountr] ;.NS. IF THEY WANT LOYALTY on one ki.ee %  (Spartan iliik 40 Atom Bombs A Month April 13. Dr. W. Lion Godshall of Leigh Iniversi.y believes Russia has en making 4U atom bombs a tonth at three plants in Siberia. cntral Mongo.1,1 and Turkestan Dr. Godshall gave no source foi a belief when ha addressed the iochestei AssociMion of CredU len last night. Dr. Godsh:ili. head of the Deirrment ..i [nterrutttonal Ratalons at Leigh, -..id: "1 know this ad a lot of othei people kir Qovernmeni has been mtoesding us b> withholding thil rformatlon from the American "Xipli K.ulr Bevin In Hospital LONDON. April 13. rhe British Foieign Se. H-.I.V Hevm. und'i %  peration for hnemorrholds in .1 ndoi, hoapitaJ today. A Foreign Ofllce ann< u ud that the opera Aon esshil". Mr Bevln is expected to remain the hospital for about a fortRht—Reuler intoxication I told ha. the man could not 1 emain where lie was %  lo place him on I lied out frequently used for drunk*. Mr. Wh..,n ..,. undei standing Dr. Klrton %  tim .n-.ordmgly, and consequently did not make that detailed metlculo which Dr. Lcacixrk told us about Dr. Copland: :i JS 0 drunkard there would be no need to make .. detailed examination. Mr. Whyall: 1 think a little later von began to wonts* or your diagnosis 01 this man being a drunkard waB Dr. Copland: I did qu. time about 11 o'clock, hut m the absence of any history of l>eing struck on the hes ol DM history th in hospital all in hospital—it MM I onable He was m alcoholic coma. Mr. Whyalt: You di I message from one ol tinnurses 1 he was foaming at the mouth. Dr. (upland: That lu l not sur. that was o'clock. Mr. Whyall : You would not normally expect that. Dr. Copland: [ %  pinition end the feel th been von %  1 roamed at tin. mouth. His deep respiration would make him foam. Mr. .\hyatt: It might 1 rated some olhei complicated tniioi Dr. Copland : It mlgll Mr. VYhyatl: I think It was n little later in Uh %  beaten up Dr. Copland: That ... 11130 and I i when I came out of : time Mr. Whyall: That again might have been some ground for causing you to reconsider youi original #> on page | Secret Arms U.S. TIGHTER THAN Reach France EyER BEF()RE CHW treightei fked here I ng with the %  the Atlanti The "Ara or iean Importer", which docked at the '%  Quay, wai ettunated %  Republics! police were standing I 1 a> began unl % %  morning The unloading wenl on undei bnght sunshine. %  lore than BOO [ thi well .v had I %  'tohed I the unlouding of the flrM shipment I ol Atlantic Pact inn %  said : -The example set b> Cherbourg Is the best answer lo the Insolent rhallengr of 4 certain prupaianda" dernonstration in B rotest against •(: %  nited Slates militaiv Mipplie.-. Bzxled out. tjl military plane to watch thi mg operation and guvc the local Dockers Union a chl .10.000 Fran in of keen lion". Late, ihi eaall but very 1 s lour ships unloading arms at tl Bin that the Fiench people want tu be bTea." 11 .iiMinr wants to take a hlle at Chernours. hr will break his trelh." I'leveii said. "In loss than elf artillery will be riehv. During the unloading, EmiliecM Gabciei Communist deputy from northern Franci ited leallets urging the do dockers tore up the ihout reading them Keulei Says Truman WASH?NtJTGN April %  that ihc inter B |jt tm %  %  %  Preaideni revfc wed .,.. %  April I 1 that m the Intei nati >nal I94fl wi nembi Keep* 1 ihtjask. 1 America ted the prograii aid to Greece and Tui kt -; feuropcan Economic Recovat 1 %  %  1 situation than in 1 fMtl BERMUDA DOCKYARD SHUTS NEXT MARCH "Settle Macussar Affair" Says Soekarno (Prom Our OHII CMTaa|MMHtatt) LONDON April 13. close the Naval Dockyard in Hmnuda > LSoak Slates of Indonaav forces in a bvoadcaal toniahi '.. fie Mn.aiw.ar alUii". ^ .... .,, Hi OKISIOII lo close the Naval Dockyard in Bermuda is *!>"' unlikely „ lf ioc ,hc MHcicy ,,f .he Americ W.*J lnuics riquiKiron. '-This is tin view „f Naval obetrveri hen ation ol th e Admiralty announc hlmultaneouily In London and Bcrnuda this n The fact that Atn West hull. A. II In future be maintained b) Fleet *hips. does nol ft < is that the Home Fleet will bo reinforced by the Ami West Indies 8dui .:. i Ilnue lo h %  % %  to close the dot k %  of time .Miian W ill nl I a\ It Is fon .• %  olt* I completing break (uture .. R overhaul altei tin e or t and then return to con ; commission 12 Injured As Truin Runs Off Kails %  UKLHI. April II Iwelve pas^ciiKeis were Injured ilwn il„. ixih, Expiess rail oil !" mils lasl nifjil about mil" >n from Fyrauad. Ulllled Pro"lees. rrhor.< received bv the lajlway rfi„i„ IV her M|d %  "K tram resumed it. ,ournrv w a delay of about Km Heura. i Be cause of the incident wai ur un|fnowii This was the scronu ualn accl• "i the United Provinces on *'* m day the fu !"!" serious was thai • %  arlj yesterday, In which. fj"0ins to latest fl*.. "•• M people died and ^lured -,i„ aecounl ti Indonesia i.icaanar. The 28-year-old rebel I* hud occupied the portf on A| I to oppose the i East [i • Soekamo said In hi> broadcast thai as Supi. ; mandci of th
-...tcs of Ind.".. Thi Praaldent'i li plannad Nine-Point Anti-Stalin Plan Outlined NKW hlAVXN, Cnnneelicut. A pill 13 Ml loieign xranune "to wreel th.' rrom Stalin" was outI v Mr William %  % %  ten be no ired, ':is long as the peo% %  %  octrim i. %  ii but we shall have to t %  top Stiilin" Thi Builitt's programme, o i It \'.tl< i To build u| %  tl %  i Europe am i ma Qen %  iths hron /..-i Berlin %  in .iii %  %  i rrom the anlsts and tl %  Iron Our%  Persls %  Viennese and the I %  i hat tl %  shoulii runctli W.I. Should Unite With ( IIIHIt/ll From Our (.n (lirrrvpondrnt LOlffDON \i M. 13 The imposition B| structure to the Colonies, alrea heavily burdened with the e\Dense ni jidmimstnitions ihoj haire might well much This point is morning b> ;i special correspondent of The Times, writing from thi w,-st Indies on the 'Tlosei Bali union He savs ihe hgure ol C 180,000, %  ture consequent upon Fed. ha< been greeted with . %  urenucrscv Fur the British Colonies, in re solution with eertam definite attraeUone would be union with Canada, but all things considered, the found : %  nig with the l peo p les.' it is pointed out thai lalon iv to be evolved, ihe drst need wlU be leadership rhe West radii frill ihow .. ing to foim a Aral taai should be %  1 alth % %  null onui 100.000 to isoo.ooo. are not llkeij %  I %  %  %  %  %  %  that ni. -should be tat | 1 to make its voice heain katsonal n d Commonwealtl •enable the ten ooeki 1'ieseutlv surviving Tn • —(By Oablel in the demesne nekt; the Preaideni painted .1 glowing picture B iy prosperity in the nlted states at work in the United Si in an] country In the wot 1 proapei ia buslnesfi activit* in Amen-'..' hMeT) 1 %  cult but thi is still on itu ole. The countr) ^.is Li Thiilrai post-wai been anatei on the Un than the ^. | But, as President, he pv —Reulrr. fi/DAUtr RECEIVES AMBASSADOR PARIS. Apnl 13 res Bidault. Pi %  Vmbassa-. ^ou,!, ( t traHotel Malignon. the Prime Reuter. 1 M|D —Reulrr. ing in Insulted Hird: Demoted M JOHNS adersUMM that 1 merit Is iieing reached between 'in lirM ..1 Gee V. LguaTiadei tt Labour Union four days last waaa beofl exercised upon Wlllian Knlgnt %  forem.ui of the sugai room who it is claimed abuaad th. thutm'i Preaideni H t %  Bird Kmghi tu to an ordinary labourer Taxis which lined UM wl -iKrHIri w aSea last Tuesday lost thi cipated trade from the Amhcrst" .ind trade which is gen ted m the shops wa also lost. Few shipAntiiu.i and such caves .1 loss to an island which 1 now in search of every avenu* loUars. Although the strike was consid^ M, Antigua on Saturday morning ano left without discharging th. Vim Zeeland Sees Leopold QEWEVA, April I] M Paul Van Zeeland. Belgian ... %  by uir today on the ursj mons ol King Ufopol.i %  7.eeland lot lents: "I can n %  %  ki it here 1 ;.n audteni 1 through disi 1' anything %  glah Air Fore. %  %  1 ha .ina mat thoy had .. .-lu.rt uuh in th. M Van taess nol know to the Hli %  %  1 1. anted s prauoall in 7-eelsnd ''in les had itnectlon wtth 1 MtlOII %  1 l'. lllrl On Foreign bicomes TOKYO \, The Japanese rl Hayato uu International Taxi . The bits*"*, prublrm n rartfl rriiiudar aatheftahsi h arhal U "BEST THING IN LIFE" franco's Son-In-Law (Jails Marriug*> LISBON, April IS of Hfiinudan aulh Stewardess Falls Front Plane Jh* Britiih Bkiroi>aan*Alrw^ ncWRi s c5m r. JJJf on from N ii, aeveral baasgreel n-'b-' F |g,,Mlb) half the proposed M *%',: „ ar w %  Latest • 'i noiinced th -*•"!' %  %  ) Cable). p k Wl t,, .j,, proposal*-Iteuier [tether's B l0> also 'd were married in Pardo Paiace near U 1.day. irraallaas what h< %  It's a marvellous marriage Is the Carmci; happy 1. %  I '.lung to tw llvi Ambassa. bride's u phers %  • ramen attended but no rhe couple had nof beei expected today —Renter Yla\ BUnonrider Mtiliidt On (SeretM*ii Return %  %  le night hinted Its attitude towards 1 %  Khama. esdJM Hamaugj 1.n f to the I 1 •ind. might hi considared u .i result -it dfattui b%  week %  Pcven Africans arrrsteu after] nots tit Serowe, the tribal capital ed in custody when they appeanec Assistant Dtau maaslonar, charsjad with disaurbing the %  %  %  1 that hit ances eOfiieining Seielse'a lehavioui there. •ddrd that Hull KI L-ouId vnut bsn time Patrick Coulon WaUu %  told Perils %  %  that the % %  %  — (Hewier.) GOMES CALLS FOK EARLY START PORT OF SPAIN, April 13. J-JON'BLE ALBERT GOMES, one of Trinidad's two political delegates to the Sugar Conference in the United Kingdom, thinks it important that the delegation should reach England as soon as possible. %  said must be to tell the English public what political repercussions are likely to n ihe We*t Indies from the tug obtuseness which the B) i-nt seem de1 10 follow". as thinks the recent statement t)j the Pood Minister that %  ernment will nol budge FLYING SAUCERS IN THE llllll. I Nu the lyhtg saecata bars beea MM.ned la ihe 11,1.1. (rom lh€ B40i000 on llft>r „, tfi, I'arK oe.T !" JT"" "' "* WW ''* KX hallenge \ineri Mouuel. rller lor Ihe BU gai | roducins leirilnrim achlrvaeaaUy Mmrvatrra la ID „.„,., I. 1 luunir told hi, readers thai the uurrn ver> ell might he thr slgiiH In Ihe iky" mentioned in Ihe Rlhlr. Mr waa irfrrrlnc lo l.ukr. ( hapler 'I. Vei-xr 11 vthlrh reads There ill be vrral enrlh quakes, thrre .vill he terrlblr phriioniena and .treat the ^k. N.itlnm nr al all In ihe vaurert. explained Muunvrl lust hmk .it luMon In 1530 InhahltsiiU uf Hie Kuropean I inpirr m OharlOB > • lejrl* obhervrd in .iron ,.| kalghla nui ,,.,,rd |.. rf ,.,, : i. niarrhini rliht ... na Ihe lie^v < us M |.|.nii . itu new oi > t.ui face. Vnd lust (\iu v.,1. .ifler that all Germany krpt oputliiic bangs of dragons swooplns through the ikies .iih Ucn like plgv t ren if sagaghle ^i %  *-, re peeesd seetna allegerleal uwnei m. Ir.l ill (hifluuds .,11,1 |||,s in bread da>iichi. DIMni the i>rsi caleatlal -P.-. taalas teal 01008 la Ihs ikies al Silesia la IMS wbea the nopu an lulu .tn nproji %  \l Hi •: I OtlMRS (.ur a J(h aj ihe %  Ighl al J altaRed i>.iitii between two araatas Oats ami • •iiinii .mini h\ i tioii Hie OthOI by sii eagle. \ forerunner nt -k. anrttlBI evolved in ita*. v* II i on i i peon* Meenai i :ie., ihr Set trail al the lluke ol UUMBJ .'merged from the rloouMHioiifii the Hying iau<-ers have not yet made a dehui m Ho I'.i'N area, therr f,rotn U*\r hern 4ii ahondanre p| bearenlj aafjaraVaai "•.-! ths Kreneh eaplUl In SBelenl i a, In 1578 ParKlans .irr supposed t have %  litM.-ssi-d "Rrse in ihr Jir .reatlng ireat light .,ns i>, the lth i enlury. do we n.n Irve asm la .i lurbuI period oi Mater) i \ v ,i would %  W I that ted timid ' important n must reach • i as possible seeing lhat t^ neat be to tell Itsh public whal i-hticai •Taai Indies %  ull rrom the poluv ihe ftrltbut %  %  Ing paradox L ibour Ciov' %  '. On i most kms, on %  n the rs two, t.iuce %  ti re%  loral Dovorni %  %  The %  %  %  a on i K. W. V. Aromatic Wines PA vi;l li \ ni KI \n iWI KT VI RMOl III %  ihi \i I:\HII III in vxcellenl I it h 11 > areethdi ioooUser, tee ts K am svnih.ii, rob \'i hand' NI l in ahUI I'Hii; BOUSlBl BOS lo ! %  addr). Bosh IMaee hat %  %  \. H lenl quSlrUes is bei md lor ii„ ..111, i un liu IBSSBSBS 1 ^ m ( achUlls rhe i ITS NSaJa rimn ,.„(, \Mi,| ( Irusea niia thr seMhlaa ICta o| healthIVbh] herb* Liqueurs RW.V. VAN lifR IllM DetlfhihsUj lUtourrd lh.1 mimilahlr old Oat* li'llirur has Irr i.U won for itsrlf irat l d %  LW.t i \m i WINEI 4HBHJUBJ MUI.I WINRfl M\r.Kl.lN4, Hisr.s, BedaiaWhite) h \\ V l\\[ \M,i WH* Incli rslrr SSHWll mw bread rd Tar Ur in llii,|, l(l |. and Nor


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