Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




, “ )
Ly / Price; |

AIX CENTS ;

ee



1950. / Year 35.

cc Sunday



AS _
DEAF PEOPLE HEAR MYSTERY NOISE

“Pope Pius Will gum gue Nobody Knows What

Bless World Today Which Side lt Can Be
500,000 Will See Holy Year Climax Is Egyp t On? “HIGH P I'TCHED WHINING”





eres

j ROME, April 8.
EARLY 500,400 CATHOLICS massed in St. Peter’ s|
Square will see the climax of the Holy Year to-morrow

when Pope Pius XII will appear on the baleony of the Bas-

ilica to give his blessing to “the city and the world.”

CAIRO, April 8, LONDON, April 8
en : ang new sanore A NOISE, rivalling i in mystery the flying saucers,
Al ram repor.ed to-day that

| Britain, Supported by the United is baffling hundreds of people in many parts
| States, had asked Egypt to define} Of London. The noise sounds like a distant jet

er r¢ le in the event of a world

‘
war between the Fastern and} @M@gime, a factory siren, a tuning fork, an angry
West rn Bloes wasp, but nobody knows what it can possibly be. :





| Pilgrims poured into Rome to-







| noise.



a. re ing > 0 r % yr it nor ateg la
Britain on Wednesday ai the end {rejoicing in the chureh liturgy | categorically denied

Returns To France | ,,02* :{cpres(oaay, that, even



of their two months West Indian | ®S the Pope, in festive robes otf 1 report in the ryptian news some deaf people “heard” it. He
iy white and gold, celebrates solemn |

CANNES, April 9, || Und himself that it continued



e ] . I I ace ng t h .
day by every means of travel, 5 \, eecraing to this report,
te their special trains throwing out kepued that she is “not prepared No one spoke about it until today; when the
2B S il ee a over a large}! | AC aetna pg — ane oe teen Daily Mail decided the subject could
‘i part of western Europe. ey speamons are complete
Alice at Ss Rome airport reported more P aa ; ; © ignored no longer and gave ita front page half j
« fe planes landing than ever before. Tee \hi ded that the column.
; - Bb Government ad inst t. “

For Britain About 400,000 of the pilgrims| d satel ay oan A retired London barrister, Mr, Ralph B. Cox, living 4
cone from = representing EAE minha ean thst: " the ce 1 North London started an inquiry, : =
early every nation in the world, | coh Rice i Se > + . ‘

ON WEDNESDAY including Indonesia, Madagascar | ot Aaa I egotiations, | ie said the noise is like the wind humming through
and Vietnam. nd claimed i mier Musta- a telephone wire and had become louder in the last two

KINGSTON, Jamaica, | ha El Nahas Pa was consid- months.

April 8. The 500,000 fortunate pilgrims ring < rae etl ie in order + His wife hears it too 3

F Princess Alice and the Earl of [Wo have Balned admission tick- : Pagar ernment ae > _ Other men, who replied to Mr. §
® Athlone reached Jamaica to-day | ets to the Basilica, will to-morrow , eS ERATE K panish I retender Cox's inquiry said ey heard the |
from Trinidad, and will sail for|S€e one of the richest scenes of L. Fe Office spokesman :

‘

t

'

|

















































: ; “4
|} paper “Al Ahram” that the Brit-
pontifical high ‘mass at the Pap?l| ish Gove ronment had sounded Norty-onesyear-oldy Don Jaime when he stuffed his ears with
E During the tour, Princess Alice} Altar above St. Peter’s tom. | | pt about its attitude in a fu- anaes tothe. Sbanish: ths ae , cotton wool
® was installed as the Chancellor|After the penitential weeks 92f) ture war. : spans one;{ A businessman at fevbridve
wa) é ' p : ¢ el oe on : acl meee af He colt tha sinee returned here to-day from his bridge,
of the new University College 31] Lent, The giant basilica will pre- ION. AND MRS, N. E. TANNER, pictured as_ they arrived at Seawell yesterday. Hon. Tanner ees vation) Vas totally | frst visit: for many. years. to his {ea fis had heard tap’ caleiee
£ ” ici , : ial . + ‘ : + W 1 - y . } ;
the West Indies. They also visited]sent a scene of unparalleled is Minister of Mines and Minerals in the Alberta Government and has come to Barbados Penour Foundation t mother, the exiled Queen Ena in id he had heard the noise two
Lag ae ae. a ns speetol ss seapee with pct gape at the invitation of the Barbados Government to advise them on their future oil developmont | Reuter | Switzerland {u worg ago. Cox tried Govern-
and British Guiana, but cancelled{hangings, lit by thousands of ay Tati oan wo ee ; 2 = a rey ih ‘ ~ ] ment Departnents for an explana-
a trip to British Honduras be-| candles and by the shafts of sun- policies. They are staying at Government House, and were met at the airport by the Governor's | Don Jaimé, Duke of Segovia, } tion His inquiries disproved }
cause of political tension there, light streaming thrcugh the wia- Private Secretar Mr. W. Lambert. 8 e, D 2 2 born a deaf mute, was taught to snecrie utting the noise down i
& ' ) : '
—Reuter. dows of the dome, every altar( rr - - aap errerer naa Speak t his blonde hat trian tay et engine tests i
banked with spring floweis pera Singer wife, Charlotte Tide-}| and siren f
a ‘ * (3 \ ) ; } \ He } 1 } le nf lat ,
of yellow and white—the Papil i t ~ | a / > i man (30 ho announced last pe ‘, ud he i indreds of let- §
e e colours nsurgen 5 he 0! 7 oO e ce eC | cember that she would divorce h jt rs Irom ¢ rvel ho heard the t
" | ather than stan between iSe ide I ‘ rl ne
To Visit Sittin: Winkel Ls hF NEW DELHI, Apri a | rater tim Stand between him” ne arly morn- |
ete umpets aunec res lr 66 oe The Prime Minister of India| Duke also regained his hearin; } ‘
™ “ sions , : oe © e F and Pz tan } é re hed 1+ ; ; yr Before they heard f Mr. C
The shrill notes of six silver | oO ul eC atc et Pak I ay ached ! \ result of the eeting witt if. t Mr OX,
U.S. Cities trumpets will resound througn | Attack / / &. ~ | agreement on the minorities prot mother at her Lausanne home, r could hay ead che newspaper f
' Y r act > ¢1 th my report I t nea ‘os ne
the dome to herald the entrance | £ | MILAN. 2 bids | In east and west Bengal, it/the Duke’s two sons—Don Alf via), en ; ie lear Central '
WASHINGTON, April 8. of the Pope, carried high above | $ 4AAIN, SSPPIL O was. learned author tatively here Oo (14).and Don Gonzale (13), §20nGon, ere Inquiring In other
The Argentine Finance Minis-|the heads of the crowd on_ hi } IN INDO-CHINA | COUNT CARLO SFORZA, Italian Foreign Minister,| . Their talks, which began seven! have returned to live the §! chin rs_ abo 1 high pitched
c . “ i ‘aris » “ | ; r li », were ) ded to-da I > an fi > ¥ ning NOI1S¢ I he lear:
ter, Senora Beamon A. Contioy. is throne of white damask and gold. | today made a major appeal to Marshal Tito to “bury the; ‘ er a those tales a ec to-da a ee - hess here TARE RT cui 7 id heard
} due to leave here next week for|Wrapped in the heav; papal SAIGON, April 8 j bade bint?? ith ie, NY 2 } we, } ring elr talks, the minister ey lac bec ta with f? . ’
‘ : rd Fe i avy papa ‘ ne “ee . hatchet” with Italy, and to negotiate an all embracing| were belie { it th 1dmother, Q ; _ or )
fm 2 12-day tour of six American| mantle, the triple papal crown| Vietnam Nationalist’ insurgent| (lee “ é Ones © in a ‘ é 8\ Vv it be li¢ ved to have dealt : heir grandmother, Queen Ena, and’ Reuter.
im cities to confer with leading busi- upon his head, the pope will lean | troops are launching a new attack: “°CCC'™G ™ hich would not affec m. x ugosla\ la's independence Ly ; ae Indo-Pakistan prob-| attending school it pease }
ime nessmen and bankers on trade}from side to side blessing the|in Indo-China in the province +:| Of both Russia and America. The 77 year old spokesman nj i g he agreement will be Peis eer accompanied het
: n * Yaris as . i ; ‘ * 7 x ve | . : , , , > .p < . De husbar iis visit to Sw
(ae problems. Cerijo has been in| pilgrims as he is carried up the|Soctrang, 10 miles south ci| said that understanding between Italy and Yugoslavia was| 8%e4 before the Pakistan Prime Se et eae ean cena FE ?
Washington since March 15 as] central aisle Saigon in the delta of the tes Ri fothas: -ginghe v4 Pama | Siriaas} Liaquat Ali Khan leave and, but was not present at > S/
im head of the Argentine Delegation ‘Mekong river along the sea coast er d in meee an imp Cis : uC ee ee | for Karachi to-day 1eeting with hi et
im and President of the special ses- Papal gendarmes in uniforms] A French military communique} _ “Ween Germany and France or between France and Italy At their final meeting to-day M : FRANCE, A
iy sion of the Inter-American Eco-|of blue and red will line the ais'e|this morning announced: Rebel “A ; ' Tr Count Sforza peaking to} the two inisters conferred fc Many Letters nc eRe ae ae oll pri 7
; é Soci ¥ i as > Ng rocessi a ee ioe e io . the tut of nte t about an hour and ; . it Os ver
me nomic and Social Council. jas the Pope’s procession headedjaction of a certain extent was he Institute of International tape Que and The Minister will be in New by priests, bishops. and cardinals‘ started during the night of ~ Studies here to-day, one week be- | —Reuter man for the Dul said . av yste
l / York on Wednesday and remain| marches the 200 yard length.of the April 5 and 6 i: Soctrang nray- || SPOR’ ‘ ‘S | fore elections in the Yugoslav ae ioe ee ike, — i” day ported haying seen a mysterious
there until April 16, when he will} nave p : f ae rr | Zone’ of the free térritory* of Tri- SST ine pitt aad ae en. many letters from}object flying. at a. great height
: b ince. : | friends Of the family with the]last night.
go to Boston Last of all comes the Pope »|]° At the ; ‘ | “aig este. | 6 9 ct of gn
. $ jhe . ’ 1 é J >, sec é : } 1 al t Cc ling ji :
/' In New York,’ he will have dis-| his throne, sheltered by a canovy| actions wer Pabchsned. the obje Bt W INDOW Italians clala that these clec- | fron Curtain pean pace mh fie Hi vine Madame Marguerite Camps, the
eusions with bankers and indus-] of white ; rer BAA Uatek 24 pry oe Pas tions are being carefully staged eeond | s ENE late Ding wife of Dr. Georges Camps, tok
rps <4 j ‘oh au white and silver damask, and) tive of which is the e of cor : >» fonso (18) with his mother ‘ b>
ie ‘tialists, doing business with| qanked by two fanders carrying|munications towards Soctran, avi ohe a iaehaik ints as a plebiscite in ( Prelate Goes Reuter “I was in my garden, when |
, » Argentina. In Boston, he will con-} long-handled white ostrich feath-| The ; ; 4 ; ae an oe “ a re |; nexation of the ) » Yugosla- | lhe Duke gave up his claims to}! first noticed a fiery circle very '
, § an t é h comn que ded very ton al 9 ; es }
fer with leading wool importers, | ors fans. bmi feelin ty ooo ee Wain ery interesting || Via, 8 a a i oO Rome he succession in 1932, because he high in the sky. It was followed §
, ay > , } >: } . { S ‘ ( I uit y 1 1 .
; who have done extensive buying | Before sayin mass it the vers ‘ond fel both side lave | Count Sforza yer { { va deaf mute ar ilsc ifferediby a small t ( oke and
‘ ate say £ ass, ; ! 3% y st g rebe re et f vet the Idirect negotiatio1 I \ Ak ’ . { y ; : , ;
in Argentina. a central altar, the Pope wil) French aircraft. frequently in E ) eated Empire 2—1 er steels rele \TICAN CITY, April 8 rom haimophilia (incessant ail-}travellin lower than plane
On April 18, he will visit Schen-| receive the homage of the Cardi-|tervened, taking important Vie:- | ao oy sward a Vag ey im Stefan Sapieha,|/28 ‘rom any injury) the curse} generally
s 7 > > > are ~ ys . : _ ‘= q ) f | € € nd I is) V > £5 | f T « t alt « . ; ht Y ; ) th Bo 0 7
ah the home of the cote! nals, who will kiss his slipper as|}nam_ concentration Nasa hae Vocab ~ visior YM ( floes | ld Are} hop of Cracow | 2 e Bourbons, lo mak ure that I could be-
. “hay COTPOr at OD; whic ‘ has | he sits on the silken-hung throne; and inflicting ver n u Os | i 1 B ( *Des anes nv { { : lieve my own eyes I called ms
an important subsidiary in Argen- | eractea: neor the Papal. Altar. + ct ean | B.A.F.A.—DIVISION I B the ieste otia | from Poland I Yr week, Vati-| A year later the Prince of the husband in friend and we
: , , . | Thurs., April 13 :—Evertor said, must sté ’ 1 intial | Asturias, th jest son | »~ | ; ae 4
vn. > fol y ? | After mass, the relics of the She chiviesansioni ided. Batho || pril i Ne | Frag’ sat a rh: t ; A fu iS, e el le | e- | watched ‘ es about.” ehten
e following day, he will go) passion—part of the Holy Cross, post hioh Sete ; | Reteme: S68 | wide’ Pree ‘ters ee ( ( ported ounced hi gh e Throne,} minute
on to Detroit to meet American the Sacred Lance and the veil of| violently att ? aye 1 |Â¥ free terri 1g nnounei nd the ecessic I passed t Darlin 's ee ts "
car manufacturers. General Mo- St ‘euadesiol ener Be asad! duet i
tors and Ford both have assembly | *)*’ ae 7 itr ea: aah ee Sone or SOS, ADEE 1) I--seRRen }|troops be incorporated in I H Ye Pil 1g After regaini peech and}... “,°P** Rd. aDPeared to. ROE
> regation from a loggia!l my is retreat suf | Pickwick Rover fa: added: * tte +} a ——s Panag 7 ren t distanc t disar
plants in Argentina, and the! ee cea epg ond dome above. the se : are: si > iterit Refer P. Wilkin | He a aa d “We t ore. ¢ . | The A sho u be the| hearing the Duke announced that} a . RRO It disappeare
Chrysler Corporation is building sie ; ut é be a we ) ay y. los RS 3; u a : I 3 Line en S. Gittens and O. S }} sion ws at Narshal Ito as rom n| he as considering claiming the owarus Lourdes
an assembly plant on the outskirts | @!ta’- V6; Sein: Comer Olelts’ ROS G0R~.,| ~ORSIVISION It Government, sharply Communist | «tron ( ount to make} Spanish Throne in place of Don The Virgin Mary is said
of Buenos Aires. Blessing munique added | Tues, April’ 11 !—¥.M.P.C, vs as they are, want to remain *| the Hol ‘ Pp mage, it was| Jua }appeared to 13-year old | 1
On April 20 and 21, Senor Cerijo sida ae PADS ey sa rope ty = pats 4 a ere added, lhe Duke and Duchess, with the| dette Soubirous at Lourdes ir
is’ Scheduled to visit Chicago to Immediately after the two-hout wt ra ‘the. vi ae | Wea April 12 Notre Dame vs ree | —Reuter wo chudren, have moved into a| 90S
discuss Argentina's programme to] .....;... ; Dana wilt ar on] Moet?) te. Viena. aut Everto 1" Pied ne 1ome here, the “Villa Mor-} Dr. Camps said the object wa
- . ; : service, the Pope will appear le ffens 19 I'wo Zones
m increase agricultural production lthe balcony of St. Peter’s, high violent offensive i¢ en eee 2 - =a e ere on eee gon,” Avenue Descoteaux “flat and rounded and brilliantly
RE ee eee ian nine. 4. fash € ) am wh , ©""| Operations are tinuir ) 4: M.P.C. 1 oo . , 99 ; F
@ involving heavy purchases of farm} |) .4 the central door, to give hi mnie ve re he | ee sg Trieste had been divided since Berli ‘ —Reuter. | red.” —Reuter.
cy ‘als ¢ ; 5 av sec . whe " x arta | ’ . ’
AG chemicals. sssing “ur , bi”. the Seta ene en . | re¢ G. I \mory, in the closing stages of the wat el in Gangster —— -—- - _ - s
: , blessing “urbi et orbi”—to the) troops are clearing up in difficult DIVISION UA || g 5 SS a
i He is due to visit New Orleans city and to the world | m4 titi ie i oe 7 ues. Aor tis taaaet with Italy, it was split into two | mai ? lei inne
on April 22 and 23 before return-|~ % ae to the balcony, Cae es Pickwick-Rovers at Lodge zones—the Allic ccupling zone} ] oO D e At 18
ing to Washington. New Orleans As he steps on A < Soctrang and Travinh are ex- Re St Ch amiga - RE Ee aay f Trieste. | I l
‘ 7 2 €aNs,/ on immense tapestry bearing near made ay tae “bred pene ; || ‘A’, containing the city ¢ ieste, |
which has been attempting to|‘" / avming of the: Pope with aaa ly _ thick! sings atten Rm oll vs. Combermere at Shell |! and the Yugoslav Zone “B” in the BERLIN, April 8. | 5
make its port a centre for Latin |°0°! 0% arms of th I marshy, traversed by innumera- ee: 1. King : te ait : amar, APIO, |
American trade, set u free port {Papal crown and crosskeys an) bie streams and river backwate oe oe eee eee | rh P T Ttal Berlin's would-be Al Capone,j en Ss
é ade, se p a free por : >A aCe ll be Ghenile : bth Pye arte ark ermert 1e eace reaty with Italy | jg.ve ld g leade .
there for Argentina a few years | tie dove of, peace, wi making French infantry action Referee: P, Wilkin l haat ty ; s-year ol leader Werner|
f aa few years : || stipulated that a United free te



ago f ed from the balcony over th

Gladow, was s€
central door of the Basilica

anttentie 1 : Aa Carlton vs. Y.M.C.A. at Blacl :
practically impossible. Reuter. Rock ” ritory should be established un-

a
q \t ) t Y ‘ ors - ;
wt tere F. Edwards der the administration of a Gov-| oaney. vs wo murders, fifteen at
ed pril 12:—B’dos Reg. vs sae i, bs the nited emptec murders ing numerous
50 Dead In Y.M.P.C. at Garrison ernol appointed re he Unite Ment oubtasian
Referee A. Ishmael | Nations But no Governor has eS.

cheers of half a million people, e ‘i 7
the white figure of the Pope will Shel Fortress at Shell yet been appointed, and the two I'wo other members of Glad-
g ¢

e
.

Tra A id. £ Referee; G. 3 Amary s cont » to f tior sep- |0W’s gang, Gaebriel and Rogesch
appear, to raise his arms Jn tn ce en Fri, April 14:—Cable Wireless v zones continue to sunclion as Pp 5 » We an gesch, |
blessing over the massed org Lodge at Boarded Hall arate entities, were also sentenced to death byl

Seven first aid posts have be RIO De JANEIRO, April 8 Referee H. Thoma Thousands of inhabitants of the|a Berlin court for araseet
oo The roll

ntenced to death

It is also the home of a ship}
ping line serving the east coast of}
South America, including Buenos
Aires.—Reuter,

|
Then, amid the tumultuous
|
|





R Combermere ‘ ted 1 }
‘ L. F. Harri a petition asking the United Na- oldu and felotr

Empire Police at Bank Ha jtions help to “save th




; U.S, Plans To erected inside St Peter's fo death in the Tar e F ao

, on Y ck Anglo-American Zone have signed | residents of Berlin with murders
; a onan train disaster this morning had|
to-morrow § 2 nony

<

risen to 50, according to a state-

In your favourite colours

‘a m4 « . se foslav The gang wa antubed: lest
a ’ the 74 year old pope biak elf, ant
St engthen Navy the rest for the crowds ol peopie
y “ This morning, the bells of Rome
The ‘ ASHINGTON, Apel, 6. rang out after two days of silence
ir . American Navy plans to marking the end of Ho ly week
ncrease its squadrons of log nd breaking into the and
range anti-submarine bombers 2 s a silty
P 7 & solemn
ge 20 to 30, and the numbe: “a va
OF destroyers from 140 to 170 in rt A ,
3 Vs ' the white vestments
the next 12 months, according to} Cl@d in te

ment by Tangua Police depart- | Zone from annexation rh Yu-

, June after a fierce gun battle ]
ilready



ment early to-day The tat goslavy Government

1 with the police

Referee A. Ishmz

LAST WEEK'S BASKETBALI
RESULTS



|
|
ment added that one submerged 1]
coach has been raised, in which |

|

introduced the Yug¢ linarias y

=o fos RB? Gladow told the Court. that
voslavia with a | crime tories and muréer films
'

of green and black,



as the currer
only eight bodies were found, The linked it t
coach was crowded with pa on
gers, when it plunged into tt
river, and was completely sub Y.M.P.C. beat Lyne Secondats and jobs |
merged. Police believe at least 50 ‘ 6 | Count Sforza declared: “If the ‘Policemen are not as dangerous

Div. I



. | i promot ’
Y.M.C.A. beat H.C. 3817 | Custom’s Unior evicted many |!ad promoted his amition to be-

|
M.P.C. beat H.C.O.B, 35—23 Italians from their land, homes;Come “an American-style gang-
Div. 1 |

With or without
dyno hubs

atmosphere set ae Good
| ster

rejoicing, priests, LaNODS Ane



“uthorities here. ey 2.000 ;| or 40 bodies may have been wash- Y.MC.A. beat YMPC_30-i% | Yugoslav Government i long-|as they look”, he said, when he
ardinals said between ancl ed away by a strong current in Modern High School beat HC sighted, it will see that its inter- | told the Court that he had “dis- ? d
Anti-submarine warfare ia: {3,000 masses for the throngme) the fooded river. Throughout the} 24-23 ests coincide with ours. We arelarmod eight Berlin policemen an 3 or
now been given the top priority pilgrims. night, the river was dragged neat ready for any ord, provided Jone night.”

mM naval planning, A fire lit from a flint was bless-

ed in each porch, in imagery

At the same time, the Navy is |of the “light of lights rising agai

carrying out an intensive pro-|like the sun in his strength”

sramme to modernise its anti-| From the Holy Fire was lit

Submarine vessels. and planes,| great paschal candle, with five
and to perfect new inventions.| grains af incense pressed into

the scene of the disaster. Late} R oe ee - -" ss it does not t« uc h our natic _ | Lucie Gladow,
last night the body of a wo } honour, provided that, by wound-| chief accused, ons nomad
was found on the bank of "the | Bank- holiday Notice @ | ing our deepest fecling, it does not we
river, a mile down stream make even more diffic ult a general
Reports of the number dead} understanding.

|

are still most conflicting, but au- AS Monday isa public

mother of the

4 speed



Sturmey

Adjustment Archer

thorities on the spot have now |

| De Gasperi |





























There were frest e . opp { 0 to 1 holiday, the next issue of
*sh rumours this} waxen side as of ! estimated that 80 to 100 may be 1Olday, the ne _ OM
week of foreign submarinvs|wounds and the di cael killed He added that a direct accord Br casts
: : suDir woun Bee eae the Ad t ill be on would imply tment of tl
cruising off the Unite States ad } was anointed in the Niteroi morgue this n 1 Advocate wi ) pt adjustment of the , : :
Racine’ s d ates }which he ’ _In Nite eee ant Italo-Yugoslav frontier in the in- > MILAN, April 8, Gears.
c coast, tomb. eight bodies were still unide 7 \ f leseetn oF the Yorat Gowulat! att Premier Alcide De Gasperi will
. . > , s ‘DL « t ONS ¢
—Reuter. —Reuter, fied. —Reuter | Tuesday afternoon, ia Iberal free 7 Pot yee mA a to-night make an important radio P
soit eh ak lis * ; v3 | Trieste nh tn Ae itie gateway |SPeech to the country, it was 22 inch
| to Central Europe. _ , ““* Tannouneed here to-day,
On Pare § Che spokesman refused to dis-
w _ close its subject, but it was and
alter ‘quenenceaeennpnmamentastiiie | thought likely concern domes-
tic issues, particularly the grow- ‘
S o-cret Wi edding lin’ tension between the Govern- 24 inch
ent and Camm -led Tabour |
- e ot ia tio |
: SAN FRANCISCO, April 8. | | Frames.
rincess Faikah 23-year ol) ns -
sister of Kin Farouk va | }
secretly married here on We ‘ s = , ,
= haart ag (| Midwives Talk |
ue Official, it wa ‘ ed t | oni : |
ae Her bridegr i of tae ead ant é
ne Sadek, of Cari ° . ' rid will |
ee in ' ton

Burp in Septembc, to debat THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE

| A





| PICTURE AT LEFT shows a group of Venezuelan tourists on a sidewalk on Broad Street, discussing shopping problems. Centre | Queen N snake is te ole distributors: CAVE, SHEPHERD & CO., LAID.
I Picture shows a breadfruit tree growing out of a moter car window or so it appeared to our roving camera man. At right an attractiv ; : | 10, 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

Young vir a » ; bag r he url ooks wistfully across the street j j ace oppor ' i

eung Spanish girl with her “Avensa” travelling Bb. ver het Tm, 106 y ary ne street at the sho pposite M4 Réutes i ~—Reuter t





oe A SC SSR Sek a AN NY Re | AVON SOR NETS a SRT TSO ES A EO NY (A LY eS CS OO LEN CS NN Ce Ae eC Ao

‘ PAGE TWO SUNDAY














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MATINEE: MONDAY at 5 p.m.
TO-NIGHT to TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30

ERROL FLYNN «s) “THE SEA HAWK”

with Brenda MARSHALL—Claude RAINS—Donald CRISP
and Alan HALE
A Warner Bros. Picture














ROODAL THEATRES presents:
SPECIAL EASTER WEEK-END ENTERTAIN-
MENT
EMPIRE

TO-DAY and Mon. at 4.

The Marine Hotel

Special EASTER DECORATIONS in our
magnificent Ballroom.

COLD DANISH
BUFFET SUPPER

From 7 to 11 o'clock

5 and 8.30








stow
- TYRONE

POWER »
‘wannasH ENDRIX

RONY

TO-DAY and Mon. at 4.45 and 8.15

B — 3513


























‘CINECOLOR

A Nat Holt Praguction
Reteesed by 20m Coptury fon





OLYMPIC

TO-DAY and Mon. at 4.15 and 8 15






a todos los

ne la
; ezue
Visitantes de Ven :
We are all strangers in the house ‘ e Pascu
of our mother... for the sins Especial di ie
| of our father have torn us apart. a nues

BUFFET FROID
| DINAMARQUES
de los Domingos

MAX...

seven lost years —
he hungered for them!

H OUSe of
ANGERS





ROYAL
TO-DAY and Mon., 5 and 8.30
COLUMBIA DOUBLE
NINA FOCH GEORGE MACREADY
| “MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS”
and

CHARLES STARRETT TEY HARDING
“THE RETURN OF THE DURANGO KID”
ACTION THRILLS SUSPENSE.
ENJOY YOURSELF FOR EASTER AT ONE OF

THEATRES



Tson,

$2.50

THE



Under the
THE BARBADOS CIVIL

Captain Sealey Paul
Cedric Phillips

George Morris G,



Plus the Stage Play
Orchestra Seats 3/-; Circie





PHILIPS

| SUPER DELUXE
TABLE MODEL

*
THE LAST WORD IN RADIO MANUFACTURE

provides undisioried reception. It is excellent

iW

|i

MANNING & |}

in sound volume and full control of reproduc- CO., LTD.

tion, atiractive and artistic appearance

in

AGENTS.

with all the PHILIPS qualities embodied.

RRR NN a nec heer Sen en ee cece near

———
nr eer

*jand Mrs. C

Grand Variety Concert

Auspices of

with these Supporting Artistes :
Wilkin
Ben Gibson

F. Thompson
The Milton Quartette and several others

“THE CHANGELING”

2/-; Balcony 1/6; Boxes 2/-

2 Hours of Superb Entertainment !



SS O—EEE—EE———E—EE—EEEe



From Recent Arrivals

We offer
VERITAS PRESSURE LAMPS—350 Candle Power

GALVANISED MESH WIRE 1” to 2”—Various widths
GALVANISED PIPE & Fittings *%” — 2” sizes.

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.

ADVOCATI

SAVAGE has
distinguished
> Annual Sacred
r the Bethe
i, 1 takes place
el Church or Sunday
at 4.30 pm.

he Police Band being
ce, Mr. Edward Cook,
Mr. Norman Wood, Mr. William
Clairmonie, Miss Elaine Jordan
and Mrs. J. B. Broomes will each
in their own way be helping to
entertain those attending.

Now They Go

EAWELL over the week-end
will be once more jammed
with our South American friends
for, besides the fifty Venezuelans
who arrived on Wednesday by
Avensa, about sixty five arrived
by B.W.1LA. from Venezuela be-
tween Wednesday and Thursday,
to spend the Easter week-end
here. The majority of these visit-
ors will be returning by special

flights on Sunday and Monday.

Opposite The Trees

R. JOHN PELTZ, who left

Barbados yesterday by
B.W.1A. for St. Croix via Antigua
has been working for the Ameri-
ean Red Cross for twenty years.
Here for two and a half weeks he
was staying at the Marine Hotel.
| His wife he said was unable to
join him as she is in charge of the
Publicity Department of the
Metropolivan Opera in New York,
and it was not possible for her to
leave at the present time.
| Mr. Ronald Tree, he told Carib,
has recently bought a house in
New York 4just across the road










®




from his home. f
\ His associavion with the Red
Cross has vaken him on some

strange missions, one of his first
| jobs when he joined was to dash off
| to a flood in Massachusetts where
he was given a row boat and he
| had to go around to the rows of
houses and rescue people from
the second story of vhe buildings
in the flooded area. Mr. Peltz
lives on East 79th Street, New
York.

Much Better

POKE to Mr. Reggie Eckstein
yesterday at Seawell. He had

just rev i from visiting his
son Rex, who over the last week-
end was critically ill in Trinidad.
He tells me that Rex is much
better and is once more at home.
His many friends will be glad to
hear the good news and wish him
a speedy and comple%e recovery

To Visit Her Morher
RS. KENNETH PERKINS lefv
yesterday by T.C.A. for
Montreal, and will then fly across



Canada to visit her mother who
lives in Victoria, B.C.

She will be away for three
months.

Studying Animal Nutrition
| «& RRIVING by T.C.A. yesterday

f Mr. H. N. Haskell,




jeadmaster of Harrison
College and Mrs. Haskell of
“Rydal,” Pine Hill, who has ar-

| rived to spend a holiday wivh his
parents.
Stz now at MacDonald





College, Ste. Anne de Belle Vue,
|which is just about twenty miles
lout of McGill. Studying Animal
| Nutrition, he hopes vo get his
M.Sc., this Spring. He will be
‘returning after his holiday to

| spend another two years at College
| continuing his studies.

}

Intransit
NTRANSIT for Trinidad yes-
| terday by T.C.A. was Miss

| Madge Gayadeen, daughver of Mr.
| ; G. Gayadeen of St.
Port-of-Spain Mr.
Inspector of Schools
lin Trinidad. Madge is studying
| for her B.Sc., and this is her first
| trip home in three years.

With Relations
|" ARS. JOE KERNAHAN arrived
{

MoM‘

} Augustine’
| Gayadeen is

by B.W.LA. to
few weeks with
Belleville.

yesterday ne
jspend a ner
jrelavions in





ASSOCIATION |

SERVICE

On
THURSDAY, APRIL 13TH, AT 8.45 P.M.
Music by the Police Band under Captain Raison

Evans Bascombe
Gerald Bannister

Miss Nell H@lls












COTTON





’



Will Be Missed

Me AND MRS. L. V. WALKER
and their two children were
passengers by the “Lady Rodney”
on Wednesday nighy fcr Trinidad.
Mr. Walker has been a mathemat-
ical master at the Lodge School
since 1937, and will be very much
missed there now that he hag
gone to join the staff of the
Queen’s Royal College. On the day
before school ended ‘ais term, Mr.
Walker was presented with gifts
from the Staff and the boys.

Also leaving ,on Wednesday
night was Miss M. Boult,
Matron of the Lodge School. She
was a passenger for England by
the “Misr.” She has gone to visit
her parenvs and it is hoped that
she will be returning early in
September.

Several friends of the Walkers
and Miss Boult, including mem-
bers cf the Lodge School stat!,

Caub Calling











SUNDAY, APRIL 9 1950
ee ee se nl
Fond Of Sailing
IV? rituda i

a" at ann whe bis tuut,

ivr @ mon Wild

as is Dnisning ner educg: a

were at the Baggage Warehouse 4 Codrington High Scnogee ie
to wish them Bon Voyage. as very tona of saiipg. Heng.
a s Norwegian, born in peat ‘
Spanish in 3. Months in Venezuela, and hens diy
R. C. W. DANIEL who has Barbados. Ying

been working with Shell
Petroleum Co., in Maracaibo for a
little over one year is a Canadian
from Toronto, and is a Petroleum
Engineer. He returned to Vene-
zuela yesterday by B.W.I.A. after
three weeks’ holiday staying at
we Ocean View Hotel. He was
accompanied by his wife and their
young son David.

“The first thing to do when a
stranger goes to Venezuela to live
is to learn the language. Without
it you might as well go home.” He
vold Carib that he learnt Spanish
in about three months. “It is sur-
prising how quickly you pick it up
when you live amongst Spanish

people.”
He is on: a three year contract
and may or may not return to

Canada when it verminates.



Barbados returned to Venezuela
are being checked out by B.W
background, and Louis Brooks,

MR. AND MRS. MARIO OLIVER who spent their honeymoon in

~

yesterday by B.W.LA. Here they

.1.A, staff : Ken O’Neale, centre

at typewriter, who are wearing

their recently issued new uniforms which look very smart indeed.



MR. AND MRS. MOORE who were married yesterday.

Here For a Fortnight
R AND Mrs, P. E. Thompson
are off to the Crane House
Club where they will be staying
for two weeks. Mr. Thompson,
who in the oil business in
Venezuela is an Englishman and
has been in Venezuela for two
and a half years. He arrived
from La Guaira yesterday. by
B.W.LA, via Trinidad.
Amateur Photographer
R. HUGH BLANC who is a
lawyer in Trinidad, with his
wife and two sons arrived yester-
day to spend one month’s holiday
at the Paradise Beach Club. He
is a keen amateur photographer
and armed with two cameras and

1S

\some cine-colour film he plans to

GLOBE |

| spend a holiday in Barbados stay-
jing with Mr. and Mrs. Jack Dear
jin Maxwells.
| Mrs. Dear are sisters.

capture much of our local scenery
during his stay here.
Sisters

ISS AVRIL RAWLINS was

another arrival yesterday to

Miss Rawlins and

Advertise

R. AND Mrs. Antonio
Monaco, who lunched
Friday at the Colony Club have en-
joyed their week’s holiday in
Barbados, With their two young

sons they have been staying at

the Ocean View and are planning |
to return to Barbados in August. |
They left for La Guaira yesterday |

by B.W.LA.

“Barbados still wants to be more |
widely advertised in Venezuela, he |

Baid. “I was preparing to go to
Miami when by chance a friend

Suggested that I bring the family |

to Barbados instead. I have not
regretted the change one bit in
fact I was delighted that I decided
on coming here,

“But you must advertise much |
There are about four long |

more.
week-ends in Venezuela
these wisses everyone is anxious
to go away for the few
Barbados is the ideal spot to come
to, so you must tell us more by
advertising, and many more peo-
ple will visit your island.”

and at

~Here's how to work it:

AXYDLBAAKXR

is

LONGFELLOW
One letter simply stands for another
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc

In this example A is used
Single letters, apos-

tvophies, the length and formation of the words are al! hints.
Each day the code letters are different

A Cryptiogram Quotation

CSBZELL
VMQxX
—~¥SEDTS

LYDL UEZDL
AX QS SE XAWWZE

EZCESDTY,
DJILYMJIYV

Cryptoquote: THE GODS ARE CAREFUL ABOUT
GREAT THINGS, AND NEGLECT SMALL ONES—CICERO.









on}

days. |

Keturns To St, Kitty
M= EVELYN WaNGaae ae
who has been holiday, i
the past seven months wee 2
and Mrs. H. Walton jn ae
black Rock, returned by 8

yesteraay “o her jh wa
iXitts, eres &
’
What's All This
TEWiave ’

4CGuuig y
Stylist has decreed that we
without long locks ang
whiskers are going to look pp,
tically undressed in the 1950
book. Me

Hans Kafka, recent wi
an all~Austrian hair-dressingt

test, said men’s hair will bee

with “natural lookin

waves.” .
For the “True gentleman»

mustache also is required

whiskers. According to ata
must be narrow and tapered.
the ends. %

Americans in Vene

R. HAROLD KAPLAN a
American from Loui i

on his second visit to B ;
A geologist working in Ve
he is here for two weeks ay
staying at the Royal Hotel,
arrived yesterday from Venezuei
via Trinidad.

Other passengers from Ven.

zuela yesterday were Mr, and Mr
John Bergendahl. Mr. Ber

is with Creole Petroleum (gp,
pany and will be here for ty
weeks staying at the Ocean View
Hotel. He is also an Americe’
and comes from Texas.

Au Revoir

M* and Mrs. W. S. Atkinson.ie
4 through Carib—would lip ;
to say Au-Revoir to their many
friends in Barbados, who haya
helped fo make their stay such;
delightful one.
They have been
“Cacrabank” with
son’s father,—Mr.
from England.
They are

wintering 2a
Mrs. Atkin ite
R. L. Clarkia
returning

to there

home in Quebec, Canada.

SKELETON UP
cRessworp |





| CLUES ACKOSS “
1. In which a dictator may fild
imself taken down by a MeN s
vornan,
6. Pardon, it might make ms
| 8. ¢ z
, ) bubbles ~





however, are Ul
in one,
hundreds,
Obviously n0b







Dts
ai



from Win!

earn for a ae
them in Ome
t with,
‘y rural dignitary.
the family, bi
) g. ie
26. By which Henry's programme >
is recognised ? ee
CLUES DOWN
1 bly a scrum haif-{s not)
ved, ae
oncomitant. ;
ainly a dry sort aie
Hall a potato to so many is Vel
t i cours

,_ Athenian who pue
ple first.

in a monarchy,

length ?

: mainly concerned
waters under the 4
bank

distance













} 9%



10. erred from “one |
13. } centre,
15. Word used by-a. poet, .pechaps



in the end,
18. Very fertile class.
20. Mackintosh?

|

| Could bey!

| 21. Plant tn the Hindustant la
}

|



fuage,
22. This side's on the left,

Moluiion on Page Nine
SOLUTION





Beautiful Lines =

by Butterick!

for your selection
at

WHITFIELDS)



| FoR your greater conve))

nience, ALL BUTTERICS
PATTERNS are now held
at WHITFIELDS, 15 Broad |

Street Only.

RVANS & WHITPIBLDS

}
.
.







4

a ee ae ee ee

evchtanaat tie tin ee die ee

/_

> ais seh ee

a i one tein hee A on ct Otte be







SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1950



:
Considerable Disagreement
INCE the first Calypso records

S were made in England a cou-
ple of months ago, there-has been
considerable disagreement among
parties concerned. It now
seems unlikely that the Trinidad
singers who took part in the first
recording will make any more re-
cords for the Parlaphone Com-
pany-—a subsidiary of H.M.V
And is it just a co-incident first
three members of Cyril Blake's
Calypso Serenaders, who provide
the accompaniment for the origin-
al recording have now teamed up
with Errol Barrow’s band at the
Caribbean Club?

Bought Hotel

IR Harold Wernher, the art con-
noisseur, has bought one of
Bermuda’s big hvtels. It is the
250-room Bermudiana, overlook-
ing Hamilton Harbour. It is be-
lieved he paid more than £300,000
for it. Sir Harold, who is 57, is
chairman of Electrolux and ot
Ericssen Telephones. He lives at
Luton Hoo, in Bedfordshire; there
he has his own art gallery.

Foreword By Sir Pelham
HE complete history of West
Indian Test cricket is review-

ed in the Playfair Publication
“Cricketers from the West Indies”
which was brought out on April
14th. It is the official brochure of
the tour and copies will be on sale
in the West Indies about April
19th.

The foreword has been written
by Sir Pelham Warner who ex-
presses the view that he will
watch the test matches with
mixed feelings. He was born in
the West Indies but has captained
England on several occasions. He
would prefer a narrow victory for
one side by a margin of seven
runs or one wicket. But if you
want to find out which one, you
will have to obtain a copy of the
brochure,

+h
tn

BY THE WAY 5:

HERE IS now said to be an

ultra-violet ray which will
stop fruit falling from trees when
it is ripe. The old bohemians of
Montmartre, according to one of
them, M. Carco, had a more
picturesque method of dealing
with ripe fruit. They used to make
up a party to visit a village on
the Marne. There they would
shoot the ripe fruit off the trees.
I would have liked to see Utrillo
winging an apple, or Marie Lau-
rencin, on all fours, retrieving a
brace of plums brough’ down by
Max Jacob. In those days it was
not considered unsporting to shoot
a sitting pear.

MimsieSlopcorner GetsReady

IMSIE SLOPCORNER is the
lucky girl chosen to tour
America as the British Laundry
Queen. She will leave next week
by air, dressed in vhe smart uni-

form of the Wringing Machine
Rovers. Round her hat will be
printed “Laundry Good Will

Crusade.” Mimsie said yesterday,
“I do so think it’s up to every

Britisher to develop a better and .§

closer spirit between our laundries
and vhe Americans’ laundries.”
Mrs. Slopeorner said. “I can only
say I’m proud: that’ my girl is
chosen to cement the ongtont
cordial in the laundry’ world.
There’s no reason why interna-
tional laundry friendship should
remain a mere ideal.” Mrs. Slop-
corner said, “This ought to just
abouv save the Western way of
laundry life, if being plumb daft
will do the trick.”

Rats At Play

HE SCHOOLBOY who burned

the examination papers in
the headmaster’s study had a good
idea, but not good enough. At
Narkover the boys used to enver
the headmaster’s study by night
and copy the papers. But when
even the stupidest boys got 100
per cent. marks Smarv-Allick
smelt a rat—or rather, several. So
he carefully left about the wrong
papers to be copied. and the clev-
erest came a cropper. The boys
got their own back by inducing a
master vo abstract the real papers.

THIS —





@ YOU
FEEL LIKE

TAKE

WINCARNIS

TONIC WINE



—

Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

To Open Fair

RS. D. G. Leacock has kindly
consented to open the Bethel
Easter Fair tomorrow afternoon at
3 o'clock on the Bethel Grounds.
This is the first effort on the part
of the Bethel Sunjay School to
eeorie fete for the Annual THE ROCK GARDEN

ary eeting which is} A ROCK-GARDEN is one of th
scheduled for the month of June {simplest and mosv’ effectiv . he

‘ of transforming an ugly corner, or
Broadcasting Stations | g ugly corner, ¢



MV



brother was in Barbados last stone lending itself perfectly to its
month arriv arrangement.
acounpentng® eo 1 ie Rock-garden should be ter-
Pearson is fvom Fame ton, | 2°84. That is to say, there should
Canada and is in th ad a be several feet of difference in
businens-of the @ e wholesale! height from the lowest level to
Pears hi tm of Taylor and|the highest. The general all-over
: on, which operates Broadcast-| height too should at first be exag-
ing Stations in various parts of

é geraved, as after a few weeks
Canada. They will be here for|there will be considerable shrink-
twelve days and are staying at

age, resulting in a di inti
the Hotel Royal. 8 g in a disappointing

a if is not allowed for.
4 - or your Rock-garden you will
First Flight

7: Y:. AIRWAYS LTD., made

Haiti, Puerto Rico and Miami on

need a few loads of the local

broken coral stone (the larger, the
their first flight from here to
Thursday. Three passengers from
Barbados left fer jiami. They

better), and mould for filling in.
Arrange the svone in groups of dif-
ferent size and shapes, working
up from the lower terrace to the
were Mr. Alan Hodgson, Director .
General of Tele-communications,
Aeronautical, for the B.W.I., Mr.
Kenneth Girling, his assistant and
Mrs. R. Caldwell, a visitor to the
island who was staying at Hotel
Hastings.

Things To Come

"he word was spreading in

Wimbledon tennis circles the
other day that “Gorgeous Gussie”
Moran, who introduced lace pan-
ties to the British courts last year,
wants a “really sensational’ out-
fit this year,

Teddy Tinling, who created the
frilly panties for the California
star, won't say what he has in
mind for her this year. But one
of his new designs to be shown
April 13, is called “The Shape of
Things to Come.”

CARDENING
CORRESPONDENT



“Dear Mr. Streeter, | have recently
started a mushroom firm . . ,“

London Express Service.

EACHCOMBER

Smart-Allick countered by setting
the exam. on the, false papers,

higher. Have a rough idea or plan
in your mind before you start,
and you will find that fresh ideas
will come as you proceed with this
fascinating work. When all the

which nobody had troubled to|rocks are in place, continue mak-
steal. This internecine war,” |ing your garden by filling in the

comments the curren’ number of
the “Narkover Magazine’, will na
doubt continue, but it seems to

pockets and little valleys between
the stones with fine well prepared
mould. Press it down very firmly

bring the whole examination and heap high to allow for ‘ne
system to disrepute, sinking that will occur after wa-
Work It Out tering. Let it all settle for a few

days and then start your planting
Arrange the plants in massed
groups or clumps, placing them
about irregularly with plenty of
rock thrown in between and mak-
ing allowance for their spreading.

PLANTS FOR THE ROCK-
GARDEN.
Among the many planvs suitable
for a rock-garden nothing is more

E are now asked to take it

as an axiom vhat the more
food there is in the store the lesa
likelihood is there of anybody
being allowed to eat it. By leaving
it to go bad we avoid the appall-
ing consequences of distributing
i’. So, by piling up stocks bought
abroad, which must not be eaten,
and discouraging production at

home, we may one day be in a
position to give up eating alto-
gether. And that will bridge tha
gap, my pets,

GUESS STAR

or Little Yellow Daisy.
dainty plant, which grows into
fairy like greenery with a strong
aromatic scent, terminating
hundreds of tiny golden yellow
daisy-like flowers.

Little Yellow Daisy is a native
of Malaya. The seeds were brought

mer Direcvor of Agriculture, and
it is now fairly common in Bar-
badian gardens. Yellow Daisy

under almost any conditions,
poor rocky soil, on gravel or crazy
paths, on grass lawns, or in an or-
dinary garden bed.
good, springing up all over
place and bearing periodically,
although its best flowering tims
jis in the dry monvhs of the year,
in other words between December
and July. Yellow Daisy seeds pro-
fusely, but the seeds are slow t
spring, taking about three week
to germinate, so, if you want thi
charming livile plant for your
Rock-Garden beg a few seedlings
from a friend’s garden.

OTHER SUITABLE ROCK-
GARDEN PLANTS.

Among other plants suitable for
| a Rock-garden, are Sweet Allisum
Verbena, Nastursium, Baby’
Brea’a (fern) Pinks, Dwarf As-
surfatum, Single Balsum.

LAST WEEK’S WINNER

WINNER of last week’s guess
Star is Miss Joyce Smith, Palm
Cottage, Black Rock, St. Michael.
The Star is Jane Powell.











AND FEEL
LIKE THIS!

BE HEALTHY»
& HAPPY.

a bank in a garden. It is quickly |
Me H. E. PEARSON, whose|#"4 inexpensively made, the local |

attractive than the Hematherum, |
This |

quive sizable rounded bunches, has |

to this island by Mr. Miller, a for- |

extremely hardy, and will flourish
in|

Once estab-|

lished in a garden it is there for
vhe







SUNDAY ADVOCATE





eee are se ee



— ee rn nm



FOR GREY HAIR

SHADEINE

ts safe, sure end simple
to use; one liquids;
nothing injurious ; per-
manent and wash-

a. ES . Q
At Ghe Giemsa:

BOILING OIL

























able. 50 years’
reputation, soidin , y
j \ all natural cints. 3
| | SiS: Kmade bY
| Si y mw avail. ; Fi
By G. B. ie ae Sah for you trom his Whole- ; «i
j | The SHADEINE COMPANY, :
THERE is one thing about this business of reviewing—| % Sargyine Road. Acton, W.2,
you can’t please everyone, and amongst reviewers them-} .
| selves, there is apt to be diversity of opinion. After I had
} seen “Prince of Foxes” now playing at the Empire Theatre, z
I thought it would be interesting to check my reaction with
a criticism in a well known American periodical.
Apparently, that reviewer had 2, settings in an historical film of
great dislike of historical films | this kind would be almost insur-
that are not up to the standard of | mountable, but in “The Prince of
| Henry V, or perhaps the Italian Foxes”, the entire picture is filmed
Renaissance period and the ex-| in Italy against the background of
ploits of the infamous Cesare] buildings and scenes of the Renais-
Borgia did not appeal to him. Any- | sance period. The Palazzo Publico
way, the film was very summarily] in Siena, which is the setting of
dismissed. Now—I may be all] several scenes, contains murals ye
wrong, and certainly my experi-| considered the finest examples of| iit
ence of reviewing is limited—but | 13th and 14th century Sienese art. iN
I entirely disagree with him. {Scenes in Venice, Rome, Florence §
I found the picture enjoyable and | are all shown, and the tiny king-
interesting. dom of Varano is none other than
The story of “The Princé of} 8 Mario, the world’s oldest and
Foxes” takes place in Italy during | Smallest republic. The storming of Fo
the first part of the sixteenth this medieval fortress is the THE FINAL ouch
a tdi aes . + iramatic climax to the film, and
century, at which time the Italian | ‘ » an
Renaissance achieved its ” full due to a novel technique in photo- TO YOUR MAKE-UP
development. It concerns two] 8taphy, the audience is on the ‘
episodes in the life of Cesare| ceiving end of the boiling oil| «+. ssa enanicuned colt WHEN you start losing energy and
Borgia — ambitious, cruel, un- which is poured over Borgia’s _ _ interest in life—when you no longer
scrupulous. and ruthless-—-who soldiers. 2 feel equal to the demands life makes on ;
dreamed of building an independ- |, The cast is a well-chosen one. C U TEX you-this, means that you're becoming :
ent kingdom in central Italy. The} TYÂ¥rome Power as Orsini is hand- Slowly starved of two essential strength- ;
picture opens with Borgia sending | S°me and entirely competent in building foods phosphorus and protein, ;
his henchman Orsini to arrange | his portrayal of the role, and| Magic-wear CUTEX, so Blood and nerves enriched
the marriage of his sister Lucrezia Borgia, as played by Orson Welles} ° wWhase a : ” P the grand effects of ‘Sanatogen’ ,
to Alphonse d’Este, who would one | }S Machavellian throughout. In easy to apply— gives seen Tonle F ee ee ,
day be Duke of Ferrara, an impor- | ‘ popes contrast i. jpee re bs é on pasignaed ee On sale at good chemists i
tant town on the north east coast} Characters, was nS. Tole. a eauty to your fi i hog 4 ot — xi :
of Ita. tab nenhee as han js] Varano, played by Felix Aylmer. ] y ngertips. phonpboret and protein — in their ; and druggists :
essential to Borgia’s plans. On As the elderly Italian nobleman, cached Tae so that See are peeked vitality flow back into your body ;
Ss plans. : oe aadtaad a. Ey . : ‘ abse into your system. 2 again 3 Fe rene. ane. « ;
the successful conclusion of this{ is Kindliness, philosophy and This incredibly long- day glorious new heaithe a s pgp pend of Serene and sini
mission, Orsini is elevated to the} SPiritual outlook, combined with ; : va VORA heel ae dale c alapnns
rank of ambassador and sent to} @ keen sense of perception to the wearing polish resists @ aN AT ‘ x 1)
the elderly Duke of Varano as] iMtrigues of which he was un- ae . a : a ( an Re X
Borgia’s representative. He has| Willingly the object, made the} chipping and peeling. eae : —_

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the picture, Katrina Paxinou, who}
will be remembered in “For Whom

instructions not only to kill the
duke, but to obtain all information
possible concerning the territory

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sae aac tae ne acces

so that, at the propitious moment,| The Bell Tolls” plays the part| ¢ word ‘Sanatogen’ is a registered tr

Borgia’s armies can take it by]of, Orsini’s mother. Hers is a CUTEX’s clear, non- . vaihipaeaneaate "nla tie
force. Orsini, and his companion|forceful, dramatic personality ecient

intrigue, Belli, remain at the|Which is evident throughout the fading shades never seem

portrayal of her role.
On the programme is included
a new Merch of Time which deals

duke’s court, during which time
Orsini changes his allegiance from
Borgia to the duke, and helps to

to lose their

brilliance lustre.























ganize the tiny army against his] With agricultural and food pro- H
former master. During the storm- [duction generally in the United * oe Gib sol }
g of Varano, the duke is killed. | States. As always, this documen-| TONITE 8.30 and continuing
y, Orsini saves the life] tary is interesting and informative. ‘
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where, with the help of Belli, he} a snake 315 feet long. Hearing
| makes plans to return to Varano}the hens makins 1 noise the eae ~—_
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Rule ing the snake, SE ee
| Ordinarily, the difficulties of TR) NEW DANCES! NEW SONGS!



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PAGE FOUR





‘ “*
"PYHE WEST INDIES cricket team are due to arrive in England

to-morrow for their 1950 tour of England. Although the official
brogr: e does not begin until May 6, with a three-day fixture
Roakas? Wotcneter yet cricket fans in the West Indies will be anxiously
‘waiting accounts of the team’s activities from the time they set foot
om English soil.

This is a safe assumption since the team wil! be finding their land
egs and acclimatising themselves to English conditions by means of
“ome interesting one-day fixtures before the tour proper opens.

W.I. VS. CLUB CRICKET CONFERENCE
. EY are due to play against the Club Cricket Conference team at
; Hawker’s Ground, Kingston on Friday, April 28, after having
ractised at Eastbourne from April 18 to April 27. This might include
practice game against Eastbourne Cricket Club.

Another of the interesting preliminary skirmishes is that against
‘ne Indian Gymkhana at Osterley on May 4. This is another one-day
xture but will provide a stern test for the West Indies team before
aey lay down the gauntlet to Worcester two days after that fixture.
"In this fixture the Indians wil be reinforced by four Test men in
ne persons of Umrigar, Phadkar, Mankad and Hazare, all wef
nown in World Test Cricket circles and all of whom have already
4urned out against the West Indies.

Mankad and Hazare are joining Lancashire League teams this
2ason
o On Sunday April 30 the West Indian community in London plan
._n official welcome for the West Indies team. This will involve
It is however expected that this will be
ather more of a social affair. The idea is to have a long tea interval
nd so allow the tourists and London residents to renew acquaintance.

PLAY B.G. TESTS IN SEPTEMBER

OW that I am on the subject of cricket I would like to throw out
.N the suggestion that the Barbados-British Guiana Tests should be
layed in September this year, as has been suggested in certain
uarters in British Guiana. I support this view since the tests, if they
ake place, will do so while the West Indies team are still in England
ron the high seas bound for home. :

This being the case, ample scope will be provided for the dis-
overy of new talent to fill the chinks in our international cricket
rmour which must surely be revealed in the 1950 tour.

The West Indies, up to now do not know to what extent fhe
taging of the 1949 Intercolonial games between Trinidad and Barba-
‘os while the West Indies team was still in India has served the West
ndies. It is known that so far they have served to establish the out-
‘anding capabilities of Roy Marshall as an opening batsman and good
hange bowler, the all round possibilities of Kenny Trestrail and the
otentialities of C. “Boogles” Williams as a spin bowler and batsman

Thanks chiefly to that tour these three are all now members of the
950 West Indies team to England and are expected to play their
ul part in bringing success to the 1950 West Indies team.

TWO GOOD FOOTBALL GAMES
OOTBALL last week was very good and very poor at times
observation is made chiefly with regard to the
‘ivision fixtures played at Kensington.

Monday saw a determined Pickwick-Rovers team defeat College
y three goals to one in a very good game in which the College, al-
10ugh losing, gave an improved display on their general performance
lis season,

Morris scored the lone goal for College, climaxing a fine forward
10ovement by converting from close range, a good centre by Smith
»om the left wing.

For Rovers, Taylor on the left wing scored from an almost im-
possible angle after having cut in from the left wing while Wells,
eaded from an accurate corner to put his side another one up.
Tilkes scored from close range as the result of a quick forward move-
ient that took the Pickwick-Rovers front line within a yard and a
alf of their opponents’ goal line. Pickwick-Rovers truly merited a
‘in in this entertaining game.

BEST GAME OF ALL

This
three First

UT the Spartan-Carlton fixture has been placed by common con-
sent among the best seen in the First Division at Kensington

It might be baffling to those who have not seen the game when I

rite that the margin of victory—four goals to love in favour of

partan is no true indication of the respective performances of the
vo teams. Indeed a win for Spartan by one goal to love, or even a

»‘taw would have been a truer indication of the contest.

This must not be construed to detract in any way from the
scellence of the play by both teams but certainly Spartan have never
een backed up by a greater measure of the luck of the game






King the Carlton goalkeeper did not reproduce his best form, and
ve Park team did not fail to exploit this temporary weakness

Chase on the left wing for Spartan was outstanding and was
stremely speed Neville Medford played his best game of the
sason, He was a tower of strength in the defence and initiated
‘any a dangerous forward movement from his position at left full
ach

VERY GOOD AT CENTRE-HALF

~é n playing at centre-half worked with the precision of a

oiled machins He tackled and cleared well and fed his for-
ards with umcanny accuracy.

h hall was again outstanding for Cariton. He shifted from the

osition to the left wing during the game but wa lways
ving so thing. He is an apparently tireless player

Empire won from Harrison College yesterday afternoon in the
porest game of the season The College forwards never produced
ny finishing touches to their forward movements It seerns as if no
ne has told them that it is not a foul to shoot'when they reach their
»ponents’ penalty area or anywhere in that vicinity Time and
gain they got within striking distance only to falter and be robbed
: the ball.

Empire on the other hand, possessing the greater dash and
unch seemed unable to make the fullest use of these conditions
me and again, to the utter disappointment and disgust of their
ypporters and the fans in general,

Some might charitably attribute Empire’s performance to over
onfidence or lack of a stronger opponent but all things being con-
idered, if they are to figure prominently in the fight for major

‘Snours in the senior division this season they must weld themselves
ato a more exacting machine capable of making the any
dbnditions that may obtain in any particular fixture.

;

most out of

REFEREES SECRETARY RESIGN
R. IGNA .BYER, Secretary of the Barbados Referees Association
for the past six years has tendered his resignation since he has
‘een appointed Headmaster of an Elementary School in St Lucy
; Mr. Byer has been the moving spirit in placing refereeing in
tarbados in the healthy position in which it now flourishes. His
{sion, industry and abounding optimism has served refereeing and

»pnsequently, Barbados football in good stead,

He can rest assured that his labours have already borne hand-

» bme fruit and will continue to be reflected in the upward march of
: efereeing and Barbados football in the years to come







THERE'S PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BENEFIT

Yes!— Yeast-Vite

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Yeast-Vite helps you
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em somes nent manera meer | eA --A ANCL CN: CT LE
oe ee

Empire

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Defeat

College 2-0

IN THE FOOTBALL MATCH at Kensington Oval yes-
terday in which there were few thrills, Empire defeated

"3 Shatter
Speed Records

PAU, Southwest France, April 8.

Three drivers entered for the
Grand Prix Automobile to he
contested here on Monday, to-day
successively set up new course
records during trial runs over
the 2 mile circuit.

First to beat the twelve years
record of one minute 47 seconds
was Luigi Villoresi of Italy, who
clocked one minute 46.4 secs., an
average speed of 60 miles
hour.

Then the Argentine ace Juan
Manuel Fangio broke - Villoresi’s
new record by returngng one
minute 46.2 seconds with an aver-
age speed of 62 miles per hour.

Both new records were finally
shatteréd by the French driver
Raymond Sommer, who clocked
1 minute 44.6 seconds for an aver-
age speed of 95.3 kilometres
per hour. The old record was set
up in 1938 by the driver Carra-
ciola, and equalled the following
year by another German, Von
Brauchitsch.

There will be 13 competitors in
the race on Monday.

The Italian driver, Nonetto*has
dropped out because of engine
trouble. —Reuter

B’dos Friendly
Football
Association

The results of matches played
last week are as follows: —
April 3:

National beat Harkliffe 1—0.

Wavel Sports Club beat Advo-
cate 2—1.

Arsenal forefeited their match
to St. Mary’s Old Boys’ Associa-
tion.



April 4:

Reeds United beat Advocate
6—0.
April 5:

Westerners beat St. Matthew’s

Old Boys’ Association 2—0.
April 6:
Rangers beat St. Mary’s Old

Boys’ Association 7—0

THIS WEEK’S GAMES

This week's fixtures are: —
Tuesday, April 11:

Harkliffe vs Reeds United at the
Bay. Referee: Mr. E. Branch.

Advocate vs St. Matthew's Old
Boys’ Association at St. Leonard’s,
Referee: Mr. C. E. Jemmott.
Wednesday, April 12:

Tambrose vs Berwick at the Bay.
Referee: Mr, E. Reece.

Maple vs Arsenal at St.
Leonard’s. Referee: Mr. C. E.
Jemmott.

Friday, April 14:
Harkliffe vs Advocate at the Bay.
Referee: Mr. E. Reece.
Colts vs St. Mary’s
Association at St.
Referee: Mr. J. Archer.
Wavell Sports Club v. Western-
ers at Shell. Referee: O. Graham.

Old Boys
Leonard's.



Toweel Outpoints

Canadian
JOHANNESBURG, April 8.

Harrison College by two goals to nil.

——+1

Empire took the kick-off from
the Screen Eng and carried the
ball in their opponents’ goal area
from the start. The Coilege
defence was quite alert how-
ever, and negatived alj the ini-
tial attacks.

Soon after the College forwards
were sweeping down the field
but weakened as they approached
Empire’s goal area. With the area
cleared the “Blues” started to
press the game and Harper on
the left wing centered. College’s
defence tried to clear but not well
enough and Drayton at imside
right got possession of the ball
and converted at close range. At
this stage the Empire forwards
were combining nicely and were
well supported by the half back
line.

Empire scored their second goal
when in another raid on their
opponents’ goal area, MacCollin
on the right wing sent in g try
that beat goal-keeper C. W. Smith
and entered the right hand cor-
ner of the goal. Drayton nearly
scored soon after, the ball strik-
ing one of the uprights of the
goal and rebounding on the field.

It was fortunate for College, as
goal-keeper Smith had been un-
able to regain his position in the
goal after doing some clearing.

When the whistle blew for the
half time interval the “Blues”
were still making every effort to
increase their lead.

Cn the resumption the Colleg-
jans were on the offensive for the '
most part but again their for-}4

wards repeatedly failed to make

use of the opportunities that
were offered. The best of the
very few tries taken, was sent in
by Medford on the right wing,
but the ball found S. I. Smith
the goal keeper for Empire, ing

position and he saved easily.
Empire made some _ spirited

attempts to increase their lead

but their shooting was very in-

accurate: They might have ac-
complished their purpose on a
few occasions, however. ut

Smith was always in position and
saved brilliantly. The game en-
ded tamely with the players on
both sides evidently tired.



Leads Field
By 4 Strokes

GEORGIA, April 8.
Jim Fereira born in San Fran-
cisco, led the field by four strokes
the

at the half way stage in
United States Masters Golf Tour-
nament here with a thirty six

holes aggregate of 137.

He shot a five under par 67 in
his second round which included

six birdies. Ben Hogan who
fourteen months ago Was near
death after.a motoring accident

also had six birdies in a second

round of 68 which put him in

second place with a total of 141.

Jimmy Dematet in a_ second

round of 72 was third with 142.
—Reuter.



RESPONDING

partner

A FTER

has ope

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Gauntlet Wins
In Trinidad

Barbados Advocate Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 8.
The Gauntlet, big Jamaican
bred scored a thrilling win over
Beacon Bright of Barbados in the
feature attraction when the New
Union Park Turf Club Easter
meeting got underway at South

Trinidad to-day.

The only “A” Class horse
Beacon Bright gave away ten
pounds in the eight furlongs
event but could not catch up with
Gauntlet who led from start to
finish. The first day of the four-
day programme provided keen
racing. Miss Friendship scored
the lone Barbados victory whip-
ping the G Class bunch over five
furlongs.

In the day’s opener old Bright
Boy put the first lacing on D and E

The results were:—

McENEARNEY eee Furtengs

an

D gE.

1, BRIGHT BOY (129 Ibs.) Reid.

2. TIDUC (119 Ibs.) Yvonet.

3%. ALE BABA (114 Ibs.) Lattimer.

4. FAIR PROFIT (92 Ibs.) Lutchman.

Time: 1.29% secs.

STAUBLE TROPHY—5 Furlongs F & F2

1, WAVECREST (116 lbs.) Hardwidge.
. LEAP ON (114 Ibs.) Newman.
. PRINCESS RAFIYYA (106
Lutchman.

LA FRANCE (104 Ibs.) Ali.
Time: 1.028 secs.
APEX PLATE—?7 Furilonges F & F2.
NEGLECTED (113 Ibs.) Ali,

RADAR (122 Ibs.) Hardwidge.
GOBLIN (124 Ibs.) Latimer.

Ww LMINA (122 Ibs.) Lutchman.
Time: 1.31% secs.

UNITED BRITISH CUP—8 Furlongs

C and C2.
1, MISS VIC (126 Ibs.) Lattimer.
2. BROWN JACK (129 Ibs.) Reid.

en

Ibs.)

+

ewe

3. BEAUFILS (124 ibs.) Yvonet.
4. CAPANIA (115 Ibs.) O'Neil.
Time: 1.41% secs,

ROBERTSON TROPHY—5 Furlonss

G and G2

FRONT HOPPER (111 Ibs.) Hard-

widge.

2. MISTER PITT (114 Ibs.) A. Joseph.

3. HIS WORSHIP (128 Ibs.) Romeo.

4. THE PHANTOM (128 Ibs.). Fingh.
Time: 1.048 secs.

HARDWARE AND OILFIELDS EQUIP-
MENT PLATE—5 Furlongs G & G2.
1. MISS FRIENDSHIP (125 Ibs.) Yvonet
2. VICTORY (126 Ibs.) Hardwidge.

3. VIXEN (126 Ibs.) Holder.
4. LIBERTY (129 Ibs.) Lewman.
Time: 1.03% secs.
TRINIDAD LEASEHOLDS PLATE—
8 Furlongs A and Lower
1, GAUNTLET (119 lbs.) A. Joseph.

2. BEACON MRIGHT (129 Ibs.) Lat-
timer

3. ICE BOY (119 Ibs.) Reid.

4. SUNBEAM (110 Ibs.) Hardwidge.
Time: 1.422 secs.

CANNING TROPHY—5 Furlonss E and

Lower
1, FLYAWAY (115 Ibs.) Lattimer.
2. WELLINGTON (129 Ibs.) Holder.
3. FUNGLEE (115 Ibs.) Hardwidge.
4. NATURE BOY (118 Ibs.) Romeo.
Time: 1.02% secs.



Longden Figures
In, Photo Finish

MELBOURNE, April 8.
Yorkshire-born Johnny Long-
den, leading United States jockey,
after riding three losers figured
in a photo finish when making

his Australian debut at Caulfield 4 }

Racecourse today.

Riding topweight Derrymore in
the last race of the day, Longden
had a thrilling struggle in the
straight with Victoria’s crack
jockey Jack Purtell on Bidwell,
who had a ten pounds pull in
the weights.

The judge called for the
camera, which showed that
Longden’s mount had been nar-
rowly , beaten into second place.

The American, who is on a
short visit. to Australia showed
great racing skill.

Longden rode.in England and
Ireland last September during a
holiday trip to Europe.

—(Reuter.)



by

M. Harrison-Gray
























TO PARTN

Drub
Liverpool 5-1

LONDON, April, 8.

Liverpool’s clear lead at the
top of the first division—gained
yesterday was short lived as their
second engagement of the Easter
weekend football programme saw
them crash heavily at Newcastle
while their rivals Manchester
United saved a point at Wolver-
hampton which allowed them to
draw level on points: with Liver-
pool. But Sunderland came to
London and won handsomely
which enabled them to overtake
both Liverpool and Manchester
United: to give additional zest to
the closing matches of the lead-
ing clubs.

In division 2, Totenham Hot-
spurs safe for promotion looked
like taking a tumble at home
from Preston North End who led
by two goals at half.ime. Toten-
ham however stormed back to a
win which, with Sheffield United
beaten, increased their advantage
in the table.

The meeting of Notts County
and Torquay produced the anti-
cipated keen duel between vhe
first two teams in the southern
section of Division 3 and Notts
County saved a point after being
behind at the interval to virtually
assure them of the sectional hon-
ours. Notts Forest are still in the
chase for second place and the
two Notts teams may well finish
in the first two places at the
seasons close.

With Doncaster and Rochdale
drawing away games there is
no change in the northern section
where Doncaster retain a, three
points lead, but Gateshead by win-
ning away drew level with Roch-
dale in second position.

Results are as follows:—

Scottish League Division B; Airdrian-
iams 2, Dundee United 0. Dumbarto!
2.

Newcastle |

Dungermere Athletic 4. Queens Park
2. Arbroath 2. Muir 2. Mor-
ton 1. St. Johnstone 4. Co

wdenbeath 2.
Amateur International Match : England
0, France 0. Friendly Matches : Hamilton
cashire). Ayr United 3; Celtic 4.
Academicals 1; Albion Rovers 3; (Lan-
Third Division Northern: Accrington
Stanley 4, South Port 0. Barrow 2, Dar-
lington 1, United 0. Doncaster

Rotherham United 1, Gateshead
Transmere Rovers 2. Halifax Town
1. Wrexham 1, Chester 1. York City 2,
Rochdale 2,
Second Division: Blackburn Rovers 3,
Grimsby Town 0. Bradford 0,
ton 0
Bury 1, Swamsea Town
‘, Queen's Park Rangers 0. Chesterfield
ham United 3, Leicester City 1,
9, Coventry City 1, Hull City 2, West-
United 1; Plymouth Argyle 0, Luton
Town 0, Sheffield Wednesday 2, Barns-
ley 0, Toten Hotspurs 3, Preston
Northend 2,
Scottish League Division A: Aberdeen
. Hearts 5; Hibernian 6, Clyde 3, Partick
Thistle 5, Queen of the South 2; Raith
Rovers 4, Dundee 1; Rangers 2, East Fife
2; Stirling Albion 1, Motherwell 4.

First Division: Aston Villa 4, Chelsea
0; Blackpool 2, Arsenal 1; Chariton Ath-
letic 2, Stoke City 0; Everton 0, Birm-
ingham City 0; Fulham 0, Sunderland 3;
Huddersfield Town 2, Derby County 0.
Manchester City 1, Burnley 0; Middles-
brough 2, Bolton Wanderers 0; Newcastle
United 5, Liverpool 1; Portsmouth 0, West
Bromwich Albion 1; Wolverhampton
Wanderers 1, Manchester United 1,

Third Division Southern: Bourne-
mouth 1, Northampton 2; Bristol Rovers
0, Nottingham Forest 3; Crystal Palace 2,
Norwich City 0; Exeter City 2, Walsall 1;
Ipswich Town 0, Millwall 3; Leyton
Orient 0, Brighto§} and Hove 1; Notts
County 1, Torquay United 1; Port Vale
0, Swindon Town 1; Reading 1, Bristol
City 0; Southend United 3; Aldershot 0;
Watford 0, Newport County 1.—Reater.

ER’S Bis

The same principle applies in

City 1.
2



tha use

e494 K,Q 109.63. 44,
7.4@A
the bidding proceeds Two
Hearts-Two No Trumps; Three
Diamonds-Three Spades, North
with the above hand should pass.
South clearly has not support tor
the red suits, and it is better to
puck up before the partnership
gets well out of its depth on a
misfit hand.

fo wind u this series on
Intermediate Two-bids, we must
consider the meaning of a jump
bid, as in the sequence of Two
Hearts-Two Spades; Four
Hearts

Opener has made a jump
rebid of his suit, although a
forcing situation exists after the
positive response of Two Spades.
This can only mean that the
Hearts are completely solid and
are now set as the trump suit.
Any further calls will therefore
be treated as cue bids

If the bidding starts with Two
Hearts-Three Spades, responder
indicates that his Spades are
dead solid. A suit is deemed to
be solid if it consists of seven
cards headed by the Ace-King-
Queen ; if six cards only are held,
they must be headed by the four
top honours.

London Express Servicg,

SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1954





THE Union meeting was off to a start yesterday with a Surprise
in the very first race. This was a win by Mr. Sydney Lid
black’ gelding Bright Boy. Of course this was not Bright Boy’s first
win by any means. He has won about a dozen, his last only in
January in Port of Spain. But that was a handicap and he was je
in with light weight. What surprises me most is the di
which this aged gelding has been able to reproduce when it
certain only a few months ago that he was on the decline. He
nearly the whole year through in 1949 without getting a first.
his demotion from class B.all the way down the ladder to D,
now he appears to have come to a full stop in his downward trend,
he keeps up this form he will soon be on his way back up. Old gelq,
ings have a habit of doing things like this. ' ; ‘

Bright Boy’s victory was not the only surprise which I
in this race. The form of Fair Profit was much more so, and especial
ly as his weight was a ridiculously low 97 lbs. Surely this cannot be
the same horse who only last December dished out a sound beating
to the best two-year-olds in the South Caribbean,

If Fair Profit had run second I might not have been so bewil
because Bright Boy on form is quite a formidable proposition ang
would probably have given his old rivals in B class as much trouble
as he meted out to these creoles in D class, But Fair Profit ran 4h
In Front of him were also’Tiduc and Ali Baba. These two horses ate
not bad ones but I cannot’ believe they are really 22 and 17 lbs. better
than Fair Profit. If they ate, then our two-year-olds in 1949 wer
were an inferior type-indeed. + shale

Fair Profit’s defeat in the McEnearney Trophy makes the thirg
in a row for horses of this age racing at Union Park in this particy.
lar race. On each occasion it has been a creole with some kind of
reputation who has been beaten. In 1948 it was Brown Rocket, and
last year Ocean Pearl. Indeed the only three-year-olds of note who
have come through the fire of racing with the older horses in D class
at Union Park, have been Gleneagle, Jetsam and Pippin. All three
outstanding creoles, the first two exceptionally so, Of coursé there
was a good excuse for Ocean Pearl last year. She went down on her
knees at the start and after that she had little chance of catching
them. But I have never:been able to find out what was wrong with
Brown Rocket and now I must wait to hear what’s up with Fair
Profit. I am quite certain that it is not his true form.

The other three-year-olds who had a special race all to them
selves in F class substantiated the Free Handicap which I made last
January. Wavecrest, the winner, it will be remembered I had placed
on a par with Lazy Bones and Bow Bells. I did so on his two wins
gained at Arima last year and also his looks which pleased me very
much. What I liked about his race yesterday was the fact that he
was headed. by Leap On after about a furlong, but came back to win
a hard fight for the finish. Of course Bob Hardwidge is never to be
caught hanging on to the front early in the race if someone else likes
this position better than he does, need never have been headed at all. Therefore, in spite of such a
strong finish, Wavecrest’s time of 1.02 2/5 was quite good. However,
from the time of the C class mile, I gather that the track must be very
fast. Fancy Miss Vic doing a mile in 1,41 2/5. She must be im
proving—it’s about time!

Wavecrest’s victory also opens up avenues of thought on what is
going to happen in the Classics. The first one, the Trial Stakes in Port
of Spain, being no more than a rehash of the two-year-old Breeders’
Stakes over six furlongs. I see no reason why Wavecrest should not
be made favourite. He has everything to recommend him. Plenty
of speed and obviously more strength than any of his contemporaries,
He is in fact uncommonly like War Lord, Gun Site and the more robust
looking of O.T.C.’s sons. This must be acquired from his dam Tele
vision who is by the famous sire. He looks nothing like the other
horses by Coat-of-Arms whom we have seen on the track so far
I look forward to seeing him play a prominent part in the three-year
old racing this year and having now won three races out of three
starts in F class we will probably see him tackling Fair Profit at the
next meeting at which he races.

THE GAUNTLET AGAIN

Of all the horses who have won siow races on fast tracks The
Gauntlet takes the cake. Only last year at Union Park he won two
races, the first a mile which he did in exactly the same time it took
Nature Boy, a three-year-old of no account, to do it in a D class race;
and the second a 6} furlong which he just managed in a fifth faster
than C class. Yesterday he won again over a mile, this time a second.
slower than the very mediocre Miss Vic, a mare who after racing for.
a number of years is still in C class. This comprises The Gauntlet’s
winning record since he arrived in Trinidad from Jamaica in 1948
Not a very impressive one.

Yet, as slow as his race might have been, The Gauntlet evidently
won very easily. He took over from Ice Boy after a furlong had been
covered and was never headed again. Beacon Bright came with a late
bid and although he passed Ice Boy fairly easily he could not make any
impression on the leader. Not being there myself I am not sure exactly
how this race must be read, but I do know that Beacon Bright takes @
lot of roughing up quite early in a race and it seems that Lattimer:
forgot this all important factor. If this is not the case then Beacon
Bright cannot be thoroughly fit. This is also quite likely as he is
notorious for his dry coat. But I am firmly of the opinion that he can
run a faster mile than this and particularly so on a hard dry track
like Union Park. The rest of the meeting will surely reveal the real
trouble. ;

Meanwhile I also notice that the errati i
Jetsam and Ligan, won the last race. me dae 7 le
from Wellington and Sun Glee. At once I turned back the leaves ot
my book and comparing this with Wavecrest’s effort over the same
course I find the time figure is exactly the same. This, of course,
sends Wavecrest further up in my estimation, because he is three
and Flyaway four. Furthermore he carried a pound more than her,
whereas at weight-for-age she would have to give him 11 lbs.

_ I also conclude from the above that the average three-year-old
this year is better than those of last year because Flyaway was one
the leaders among the second string to Ocean Pearl. By the laws
of averages she should now be better at four. Yet she would
have won had she run against Wavecrest, Leap On and Princess

Rasiyya. I think we are in for a really hot season among the three-
year-olds Fair Profit had better buck up.







Vie Toweel, the British Empire
Bantamweight champion, tonight : Two No Trumps although a p
retained his title by outpointing fc tive response of Two Spades
Fernando Gagnon of Canada Pi would be Correct if he held the
Toweel won nearly every one @ J.:10, 2 King of his suit instead of the
of the fifteen rounds and Gagnon Ne h «uzen but on the next round he
had little to offer apart from Bai rite a is justified in bidding Three
toughness and clever spoiling Two No. Trumps Spades
tactics. Gagnon was warned sev- ebid is Three Dian This calling clearly indicates
eral times for holding and in the no oblast in show -ne character | his hand, a
I was told that he ort o as announce é rong long ser 1-solia sult without
Sound re iif i if he ‘eas two-suited hand, and the chance to North should appreciate
would be disquailied | . = of finding nim with © Spade he combined nands will
again guilty. support is remote more tricks if played in
Over the latter rounds Toweel South however, has a hand 31 e should therefore
relied mainly on his left hand that is sure to be useful in a ‘aise to Fo Sp oes . is on :
and his father manager said he Heart contract, and he should 48 4 S'ngieton honour o smal
; nun Sheen main ubleton, provided he has good
hurt his right midway through conver as ae ee to coun. 1G _ seat al
: : our Hearts. ne bids Three is in U suits
= oot ‘oe eed oe Hearts only (simple preference), North's hand may be something
ougnt a two-fisted siamm. North will visualise a weaker like this
and oo at ae = he scored hand a am Oe aby bere #9 A, Q, 10.9.4 2 @ A,
repeatec with clean crisp so that a game may be missed » ;
iehes "ies Gagnon’s abilits A somewhat different case is os nh :
: : : of where South holds this hand: Responder s Three Spudes
to keep the fight at close range ‘ Sees - . . should be raised to Four vid
at times and his toughness pre- J. 10, 9, 7% 3 Y 7. of Three No Trumps be
vented Toweel from winning by % 2 @Q54 ic $ th is know o be
a knockout, If North vupens Two Hearts, trick t s the hand is
—Reuter. South is well-advised to respond played Spades
an loOK + *
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SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1950



n
ENGLAND'S famous intervarsity Boat

Picture Shows: Cambridge, the winners,



“Germany will realise that the
Epoch of fraticidal strife between
the Western nations is closed for

Sforza Appeals

Race is won for the fourth year in succession by 3% lengths.
leading towards the end of the race.



Archaeologists
Find Literature

ever and that one destiny links
To Tito them henceforth.
, ‘We hope that the coming 000
months will see completion oa 4, Years Old
Western entry into the commun- *
@ From Page 1. ’ : : { PHILADELPHIA, April 8.
The Minister pointed out that %#Y of free nations with equal Clay tablets believed to be

eo On Fame: 06 14.

Two Men With
£10 Plan
India Hike

Two men with an urge to svudy|
life in foreign countries are short-

stable contact between the two
Governments would lead to agree-
ments on railways, tariffs, and
schools. “In fact a whole sphere
of life which counts a gpod deal
mor than a few valleys,
irthermore, since the meth-
ods of overcoming political diffi-
culties of post-war ' international
politics, we are ready for the most
audacious initiatives in this field,
happy if with us Yugoslavia will
have the honour of giving the



world an example of the breadth jy jeaying England on an 18-
of view which Europe to-morrow jonth trek to India and back.
will admire. Aidan Phillips and Leonard#

Count Sforza went on to speak
of the Vital necessity for a Euro-
pean Union.

“If we suppress the dozen cus-

Strong, 29-year-old chiropodists,
intend to set-up in business to-
gevher when their trip is over.
They. are now. getting their
muscles in trim by doing digging

Europeans will quickly become as nq jevelling work at Manor Park,







4,000 years old, and bearing in-
criptions regarded by experts as
the worlds oldest known litera-
ture, have been found in the an-
cient city of Nippur, 140 miles
south of Baghdad, it was an-
nounced here to-day.

American archaeiogists from the
University of Pensylvania
suuseum and the University of
Shicago’s Institute made the dis-
eovery after months of excava-

tions, the cost of more than
50,000.

The expedition was in the field
in TIraq—once Mesopotamia—

trom last November to last month.
About 750 clay inscriptions were
found: including what is consid-
ered the oldest agricultural bulle-
tin known to man.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE
APRIL 9 — NO, 114



‘AleoaRoamer’
_ Brings
_ Cornmeal

A shipment of 2,988 bags of
| corniial arrived for the island

The Topic

of



yesterday morning from New
| Orleans; by the SS. “Alcoa > says ELSIE the BORDEN cow ©
Oamer”.
a ae also pean 4,800 “Ke. iLK
m tim! staves, gum tim-
igh oe pe ee ch She L t Ww k FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER |
wood turpentine. Part of the as ee

cargo was taken at Mobile, Ala-
bama.

The “Alcoa Pilgrim” also called
yesterday. From Trinidad and
ieee packages of cocoa pow-

popcorn, women’s apparel
and fresh fruit arrived by this

ert eine ee ~

No ——

vetne

e “Alcoa Pilgrim” is consign-
€d to Messrs. Da Costa & Co., Ltd.,
while the “Alcoa Roamer’s”
og are Messrs. Robert Thom

Plane Arrives
At Midnight

An Aé?o Supply ee iateg D.C.
3 plane arrived at Seawell air-
borv at about 12.45 a.m. on Good
Friday from Aruba. No notifica-
tions of this flight, nor its time of
arrival Was made to the airport





We passed a certain village |
It was around midnight }
Some men were chatting freely
It gave us great delight,
+ * *

One youngster in the twenties
Said, “To-day the House prorocue,
And still in this fair island
Some things are out of vogue.”
. . . *




geen, nor to Internavional Re said, soe by in may Street,
i 3 7 i Especially a sunny day,

eradio _ Limited who provide} youn see “old people “hned-up"
eae telecommunications And panting all the way.” |
and navigational aid at Seawell, > + . rs

d s It may be old age pension There’ 8 nothing better than
and were not in operation, since But diac ab Sou Hey, PHOSFERINE when feed | ‘
the normal operaiive hours of Those very poor old
Seawell airport are from dusk to Worked for it yesterday. miserable, It ye the

.

dawn unless previous notice
given of ldte flights. The plane
had to circle the airport while
the flare path was being laid out,
and as soon as this was completed
landed safely.

}
" We went to dient Park Tuesday

To see a football game

And every Spartan hailer,
Ah boys! They were too tame
‘ ‘ . .

puts back much-needed
PHOSFERINE today !

YOU NEED

o
°
§

a IRE a aE

; 2 . This time they were defeated
bodied in one of these literary Believe it if you may,









tablets—to others as well as to’ On questioning the pilot, the Be tdi eth ae the ey,
himself” We still have mucii to] airport manager ascertained that aoe . ° * | {
find out, but already we can tell; no agents had been appointed foi Those boys played brilliant football | :
that the Sumerian had a well-|this flight, and consequenvly the} ,,)"¢y set & very Bot pace, oo i
= moral sense for his wens and the Port Health au- Enriched Bread is in their face
time. orities had not been notified, and ; p ened amas t
The tablets show he was mov- | had then to be summoned to clear} "s..vsydeves inte, Chins era Ly GREATEST OF ALL TONICS
ing gradually towards a higher| ‘he aircraft and passengers. The} And boys look out to-morrow H
concept of society, of the admin- | Pilot of the aircraft also informed There'll be the big boat race. sat | —— nd opal | Indigestion, i§
istration of law and of individual ees et on Ped 0} To-morrow morning early Fae » and after Influenza, f
, in well at midnight on Right in, Trafelgar, Square, | Phoaferine is availab vaila let
responsibility, ; Monday April 10th., vo. fly the} A marathon begins it, ne is available in Tablet and Liquid form, i
Mr. McCown said that on the Our only “care-free” day |

tablet was recorded a hymn to passengers back to Aruba, most of

I —







rich as the United States and en-
dowed with more raw materials
than Russia.” 4

Peace
This Wealth, he said would
mean peace and a higher level of
life for all.
Coutit Sforza briéfly reviewed

| the progress of Italian relations

with other Western European Na-
tions.

“Our policy towards Britain has
already created fruitful bonds,

| despite the fact that the war had
, dug a great gulf between the two

countries.
“There is still much to do, both
in regard to a strictly European

' policy and in regard to collabo-

rating in Africa, .
He said Italy’s relations with

_ France were also gyverned by her
| overall aim at European Union.

We are slicing through the wood
when we strive for an Italo-
French Customs Union, excellent
in itself but also excellent as an
intermediary towards that vaster
union at which we aim,

Count Sforza said: “We were

/always of the view that any seri-
ous attempt at European recon-

struction must try to gain the
German people to democracy, not
to reject it and to hold it outside

our Western communityt

i
4
:
;
:





Sutton, Surrey.
They hope to set off in about
three weeks’ time. By hitch-

hiking mosv of the way they plan
to reach Bombay via France, Italy,
Egypt, Israel, Syria and Persia.
They will each take with them
£5 in English money—the maxi-
mum permitted—and a_ similar
amount of Freneh money.

“We are anxious to study the
psychological and_ sociological
aspecis of life abroad, and are
taking this opportunity before
we settle down in _ business
together,” said Mr. Strong. “Wa
hope to write a book about our
experiences.”

Both unmarried, Mr. Phillips
lives av’ Nova Road, West Croy-
don, and Mr. Strong at Malvern
Road, Thornton Heath, Surrey,

—L.E.S.

Philippines
Leading Pakistan

MANILA, April 8.
The Philippines gained a 2—1
lead over Pakistan to-day, when
their first round European Zone
Davis Cup match opened here.
it is fhe first match to be played

=
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Smiths Alarms are the pop-
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LOGA. SMITHS CLOCKS

STOCKISTS

Nippur was once important as
the religious and cultural centre
of Sumer, non-Semitic . nation
which flourished before the Baby-
lonians, and then the Assyrians
took over.

It was the Sumerians,
took the first civilisation
Mesopotamia in the fourth
Iennium before Christ.

Many of the tablets came from

who
to
Mil-



880 Record

(By the Advocate’s Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, April 8.
Whitfield (U.S.A.) won the 880
yards flat in 1 minute 54.6 seconds
beating the track record held by
Roseoe Browne of the U.S.A.





RUPTURE
RELIEF

Thousands of ruptured men and women |
have found instant relief by wearing :
Beasley Air Cushion Appliance. |

Fitted with a real inflatable air-cushign,
light, strong and easily washed, it hold
the hernia with such gentle firmness that

Love the famous J.

ENRICHED

in



the private “libraries” of Scribes 194% Brows. time was 1 talc prone, cisuse have increased chances

who worked in the Temple ite 55 seconds. For full details and Free Booklet write

under the patronage of rich mer- Stanfield, U.S.A., equalled the to

chants. _ 100 yards record of G. Lewis} BEASLEY’S LTD, Dept. 190 | J&R
Some of them were used for (1945) of 9.4 seconds. Montemage| 4 Cork Street, London, W.1, England. |

teaching or filed away for refer-
ence, They included exercises in
arithmetic, touched on obtruse
legal problems, or recorded the
development of the Word.

Dr. Donald E. McCown leader
of the Expedition, who has just
returned to the United States,
said, “The oldest known invita-
tion to learning we have is em-

in the third.



in this season’s competition.
R. Deyero, Filipino No. 2 beat
Istikhar Ahmade 6—2, 6—0, 6—3,

near here
mother, Mrs.

early

and Flicisimo Ampon defeated we}j,
Mahmund Alah 6—0, 6—1, 6—0. children.
—Reuter



fell in two races and did not place

QUADS BORN
IN ALABAMA

LOUISVILLE, ALBANIA.

Quadruplets, girls were born to
the 33-year-old wife of a farmer
to-day.
Mackie,
four babies were reported doing
The parents have six other




BATHSHEBA

This newly erected modern hotel is situated
most picturesque part of the island.

April, 9

The
and the
in Fish and Lobster Luncheons, — Well Stock

—Reuter.



Will see why so many bajans

sponsored by

J&R BAKERIES
makers of

and the blenders of



VISIT the beauty spot of the island
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Goddess Nanshe, showing her as we LS oa eee sre Uretambet the Gaal SSS
the oldest known goddess of jus- _ r Will witness Joe and Robert '
tice interested in the social and if Tee NSE er ter cane ¥
moral welfare of human beings. Price 0, Coal There will be hours of Dancins The Amateur Athi i¢ |
Yet another clay document, he oth Sponsored by Aberdeen, }
said, “carries the. advice of a Up I Cent ~Naone Hak oes alan
oper “ coors what, roms The price of charcoal has risen Hep! Hep pave hot ial maenliiie } ie ' * «
and how to plant. You might call] from three cents per pound to NEA ANA eetcy thie spree Fae SSOClA On 0 ar a OS
this the oldest agricultural bulle-{| four cents per pound. Don't miss Christ Church to-morrow,
tin known to man, “When this This is the effect locally be- You know the admission's free ‘ :
is fully translated, we shall| cause of British Guiana increasing} yes sister, if you're coming. . Presents...
know how well the father ad-| the price of the commodity due “Bring along the tambourine; i
vised.” + to the sterling devaluation. Youstoo, will, be aces Its ANNUAL INTERCLUB AND LOCAL CHAMPION-
The joint expedition will start A bag of charcoal was formerly "s ' ’ fila “ 6 é
a second full Jensen in the field ge for $2.60 ex-schooner ancl So if vou Join the thousands SHIPS CYCLE AND ATHLETIC SPORTS MEETING
in 1951.—Reuter. 2.75 ex-store. Today, a bag) wo oromise youa grand time )
brings $2.78, excschovner on] “GR i am TO-MORROW
This is the annual ‘free-spree’ x
itfi : And friends from near and far EASTER MONDAY, APRIL 10TH 1950
Whitfield Breaks :

=: At te
KENSINGTON OVAL, Beginning at 12.30 p.m.
Under the distinguished patronage of His Excéllency }

the Governor,
25 — THRILLING EVENTS — 2
Come and see the improved Cyclists and “iti of
our C olony do battle on the green of “Kensington.”

Not a dull moment.
armichael, Stuart, Keizer and “Nazi”
Hunte, Marshall, Lynch, Archer and the
Clarke & Company, thrill you for hours,

Watch C
Yearwood;
School Boys



Prices of Admission:

KENSINGTON & CHALLENOR STANDS _ :
JNCOVERED STANDS 1/6

A

3/«
GROUNDS 94.



J. W. MAYNARD,
c/o Civic Society, Lucas Street.
Hon. Secretary.



KENWYN,

Rockley New Road.

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Published by Th. Advocate Co. Ltd., #4, Broad St, Bridgetcws

Sunday, April 9, 1950

For Pedestrians

SOME WEEKS have passed since studs
were placed in Broad Street and pedestrians
were invited to cross the street only at
those places where the studs are placed.
The only response has been a complete
disregard of the crossing signs.

As traffic has increased in recent years
a spate of regulations has emerged to
govern the use of vehicles on the public
highway. Little or nothing has however
been done to control pedestrians. The
result is that pavements are ignored, the
middle of the road is used as a promenade
and it is a regular occurence for a group
of persons to meet and carry on a conver-
sation on the public highway.

All the more regrettable is it when per-
sons who should know better set the bad
example of ignoring signs set up to ensure
road safety. Nor are the police exempt
from the general criticism. It is high time
that energic steps were taken to control
the manner in which pedestrians waltz
all over the road.

It is ridiculous for the crossing signs

to be put if the police are not prepared
to see that they represent something more
than a pious exhortation. There is no
reason why compulsory crossing should
not be enforced. It could be easily em-
bodied in a regulation. The result would
help to reduce the risk of accident and
bring a degree of order to the chaotic
manner in which the road is used.
j The motorist now operates under a
heavy burden of regulations. The side of
the road on which he must drive, his
maximum speed, the corners at which he
must stop and a host of other matters
are prescribed for him. Bus drivers, and
taxi cab drivers are subject to an even
greater number of regulations.

The pedestrian has, however, continued
on his way, heedless of alterations in vehic-
ular traffic, and confident that he is always
in the right. It is true that on many roads
of the island no pavements exist and the
pedestrian has no alternative but to walk
in the road or in the gutter. On those
roads which do have pavements the people
appear reluctant to use them, and on streets
such as Broad Street this causes inconven-
ience and increases the danger to motorist
and pedestrian alike.

It is time that the authorities address
themselves to this problem.. More street
crossing signs should be erected and the



public required to use them on pain of a
fine. The police must exert themselves
to see that pedestrians as well as motorists

conduct themselves in such a way that all
users of the highwzy should be protected
in their rights.

They have recently done good work in
regulating traffic in the city. Let them
now turn their attention to the regulation
of pedestrians and their misuse of the
road. ‘sy
One method of educating the adult uae
lic is by means of cinemas, loud speakers
and poster advertisements,

It might be very tiresome for four or
five thousand spectators at a football match
at Kensington to be reminded not to walk
in the road, but the reminder would be
productive of good results. Similarly the
local Radio Distribution service could be
utilized, for a month say, to remind
pedestrians to cross only in traffic lanes.

The columns of the Press can also be
employed to boost a campaign for safe
walking. For children, the sooner that
schools include in their curriculum, les-
sons inculcating safety on the road, the
better educated will school children be.

The old attitude that nothing can be
done in Barbados is dying. Many things
have been done in the past, many are being

“OUR READERS SAY:



done, but some things require more effort
from the public than others. The educa-
tion of pedestrians is one of these things.

Easter

EASTER, the greatest of Christian festi-
vals, has come once again as a reminder
of the great work of redemption of man-
kind. Man too can rise from the life of
selfishness and sin to obedience of the
great commandment to love his neighbour.

The world has travelled far from the
condition of things where the Fatherhood
of God and the Brotherhood of man was
the guiding principle of life. The modern
order of things is nation against nation
and a race in armaments in an effort to
dominate each other, From this depressing
condition the world needs an Easter : a
rebirth to a life of peace.

In the life of the individual the need is
as urgent as that of the nation. The dis-
tractions of a work-a-day world are suffi-
cient to make one forget for a brief while
the injunction to love one another, but at
Easter, Nature herself is in her kindliest
mood. “For the winter is past; the rain
is over and gone; the flowers appear upon
the earth; the time of the singing of birds
is come, and the voice of the turtle dove
is heard”.

At this period of the world’s history
when men and nations look out for peace
and safety, Christendom looks over an
altered landscape, Many changes have
been made and things which once looked
considerable and important have fallen
into obscurity leaving only the main struc-
tures which still stand out clearly. Signs
are not wanting. The attempt at a uni-
versal church is the clearest indication of
the strong desire moving mankind towards
his Easter. Denominational claims, shib-
boleths, and even vested interests now
bear an aspect of pettiness while Christian-
ity rises above them in a majesty which
precludes rivalry and confusion. In this
lies the salvation of man still groping in
the outer darkness for the light of a true
Easter

Easter brings a reminder of that hope
when man will rise from the abyss into
which strife has brought him to see the
light guiding to a better future; when God
our inerrant Father, our infallible guide,
will lead us through the still darkness to
the light of eternal day. This then is the
story of Easter, the queen of festive
seasons.

‘ * y
Going Up

THE general increases in the cost of liv-
ing introduced by the changes in the price
schedule during last week present a chal-
lenge to everyone. It is clear that produc-
tion of home grown foods must be increased
in order to satisfy the demands of the local
market. This necessity was emphasised
during the war years when the submarine
menace threatened this island with short
rations. It is no less important today in
the face of the present circumstances.

But this is not the only problem. In
producing more food to be sold at lower
prices instead of the imported product
there is also the danger of upsetting our
general economy, The number of people
who derive incomes from the sale of goods
must not be decreased. This will add to
the problem of unemployment. The income
derived by salesmen must not be reduced.
This will throw greater weight on some
other avenue for earnings.

There is still the necessity to produce
food in every form although in some in-
stances there can be little hope of price
reduction. Vegetables and meat can be
produced but the incomes of the producers
must be maintained. They cannot be
expected to increase production merely to
cushion the shock of devaluation.

The necessity for revision of the subsidis-
ation scheme is clear. The foods produced
locally might need the support of the
scheme if the producers are not to be sacri-
ficed. And the agriculturists comprise one
section of the community tied to their
posts. The increase in the price of man-
ures, the price of seed, the cost of labour
and the increase in taxation find him as
their target and the only relief is reason-
able prices for his products.





To, The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—At vhe beginning of this
year vhe Director of Education
introduced into our elementary
schools what he called a “com-
mon course”, (Incidentally the
inflexibility of its prescriptions
flies in the face of the bible of
elementary school teaching, the
“Handbook of Suggestions for
Teachers”, which strongly depre-
cates any attempt at imposing uni-
formity on the schools.) There
were two controversial issues to
this “course”: One, that it added
pew subjects the curriculum;
the other, that it requesved an
extension of the school time to
4 pm. The Barbados Elementary
Teachers’ Association met to dis-
cuss this course, and it is charac-
teristic of the inertia and irre-
sponsibility of that body that
while it (rightly) took a firm stand
agains’ the lengthening of the
school hour, 1¢ did not reject, for
the most cogent reasons, the con-
tent if not the general policy of
the “common course”.

For, judged as a whole, the
“common course” is a snare and
a delusion, a laiver version of the
story of the dog th bone and
the shado

The public has been universally
silent about this course. The rea-
sons for this are, I think: firstly,
that for all their boasting Bar-
badians are not s ich interest-
ed ,in education as in hoolir
am nai ww t the ; rer
ela
what th

SUNDAY

|



DAVID GAMMANS, who visited
Barbados in early 1947 tells the
story of a speech he once made
to some business tycoons in North
America. David Gammans is a
Tory Member of Parliament and
would probably have been Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies, had
the Conservatives won the last
General Election. When I finished
speaking, Captain Gammans said,
the tycoons accused me of being
a Red.

I heard that story from David
Gammans himself, although after
this lapse of time I cannot recall
precisely the exact words. But
he will, I know, forgive me using
it to point a moral which I want
to offer to the Barbados Electors
Association. I am not suggesting
that the supporters of the Eleci{rs
Association are tycoons, but 1 am
suggesting that the Association it-
self, which probably would like
to be considered a Conservative
Association does not show, either
in the speeches of its Parliament-
ary representatives or in the
writings of its favourite scribe
“The Archer” (consistently mis-
spelt Saggitarius) “more than the
remotest understanding of the
constructive side of Toryism as a
political philosophy.

I myself am a Tory by inclina-~
tion and although I take no active
part in local politics in this island,
I am seriously perturbed by the
lack of a constructive party pro-
gramme offered by the Electors
Association. I could not, because
of my personal detestation of
Socialism as a political philosophy,
and because of my lack of con-
fidence in its local manifestations
here, vote for the Left, so I must
consider voting for the Right or
not voting at all.

But when I review the speeches
of members of the local Assembly
who are wearing the flag of the
Electors Association, I find that
like their favourite columnist

Saggitarius they are much better

gramme with constructive sug-
gestions for improving or outdis-
tancing them. Whereas’ vast
quantities of heat are generated
in abusing the Imperial Govern-
ment and sad lapses of good taste
are evidenced in devastating at-
tacks on individuals who cannot
answer back, I am yet to notice
any signs of political ability in the
Electors Association of a _ kind
which would lead me to support
their cause rather than that of
the rival association.

Tndeed were it not for the fact
that I am a_ convinced anti-
Socialist, my political sympathies
would lie more with the members
of the Government party, who are,
at least trying to improve in their
own way the appalling low
standards of life which the
majority of this island’s people
are supporting.

It seems to me that any political
party which depends on denigra-
tion and abuse of its opponents

) aS a Substitute for political thought
and action is doomed to die the
death.

I can see the signs of the grave

at “shooting arrows” than at op-
posing the Government’s pro-



ADVOCATE

; nigh” ~ OF. ‘Broad Street of the future ?

TORIES AWAKE!

By Capricornus

already hanging over the Electors
Association unless they change
their present tactics or find some-
where within their ranks or sup-
porters a new energiser of life.

“It is not enough” as Lord
Altrincham’s elder son wrote re-
cently, “to limp along in the wake
of progress, complaining all the
way, and cursing the day man-
kind ever started on its travels.
The greatest Tory triumphs have
occurred when change has been
not merely accepted but antici-
pated by Tory statesmen. Can-
ning once said that “those who re-
sist improvements as innovations
will soon have to accept innova-
tions which are not improve-
ments.”

I am not naive enough to sug-
gest that the Electors Association
should try to “out-progress” the
“Progressive League” and call
that a policy. Progress is not in-
evitable. But what I am sug-
gesting is that they should realise
that they are the only possible
party to replace the present
political party when it is defeated
at the next election, and that un-
less they come out of their present
Blimpish stage of seeing a Social-
ist behind every red tie or every
suggestion for social or economic
improvement, then they are
doomed to perish or at the very
least to lose my vote and the
votes of thousands who share my
views. If I may borrow from the
Hon. John Grigg again” the need
to obtain power by means of a



POCKET CARTOON |

b» OSBERT LANCASTER |



akes and Ladders auriny
evening chapel! Frank
Sinatra's photo in the dormy !
It seems to me Lillian that
it’s high time someone made
it quite clear to you and
Patience that St. Winifred's

is NOT Holloway /“





Today's Thought

ROUND dealing is the honor
of man’s nature; and a mix-
ture of falsehood is like alloy
in gold and silver, which may
make the metal work the bet-
ter, but it embaseth it.

—FRANCIS BACON.

The Dog. The Bone And The Shadow

lief that their children are now
getting free secondary education,
(Are not algebra, geometry, gen-
eral science and foreign lan-
guages supposed to be taught?)

The palpable truth is that under
the new course their children ure
not getting education at all. Teach-
ers’ energies are being frittered
awey and children are bemused
before a course so wide, so unsuit-
ed to the conditions of elementary
education in this island that a
large portion of the money being
spent on it may be written off as
a loss. Not even in England, with
its slightly longer school hours,
its better vrained teachers, its far
better and more adequate equip-
ment, is the Senior School Course
so comprehensive.

It would clearly be impossible
for me to deal adequately with
the common course in a single lev-
ter. There is a great deal to be
suid about it. Indeed, were I in
a country more, acoustomed to
moving easily in the realm of ideas
or less allergic to just, if scathing,
criticism, I could with profit w rite
a volume on this innovation. Bu
in order to deal subsequently with
the jiscu able portion of ti
course, it 1 recessary |
some of the deadwood. to exclude
once and for all fr om our dis-
cussion an aspect of the course
which I would hay regarded as
comic if the Head Te her f tha
elementary schools

That the absurdity of the posi-
tion may bé appreciated it is
necessary to sketch the back-
ground to the Spanish teaching
now being done in our schools.
In the original course issued by
the Education Department it was
set out that Spanish would be
taught for one period of 45 minutes
each day which was an essential
part of the new scheme, it was no
longer possible to give that amount
of time to the subject. Actually,
at present two periods a week is
the general rule. This alone
would have killed any idea of
foreign language teaching, as any
one with experience knows. It is
true that when the course was
being drawn up the Education
Department could not have known
that the extra hour would have
been rejected. But there were
initial and nullifying obstacles
which the Department could not
but be aware of. It could not but
know that there were no text
books with which to supply the
pupils that they might begin the
learning f the language. In fact,
many Head Teachers found them-

t ] when their schools
to teach this new
them, Spanish had
ner an English
igus age Spo. »ken by
idea of
yila-






elementary teachers, indeed, very
few school children in Barbados
had ever learnt Spanish. In fact,
such had been the tradition of
Spanish teaching here that only
the dull and backward learnt that
language. Then whom did the
Department expect to teach it?
Apparently the teachers them-
selves knew the answer better
than the Department. For it is
amusing, if pathetic, to see num-
bers of them now after a_ hard
day's work, trooping dutifully to
the few available Spanish teachers
and blundering badly on the lesson
which tomorrow they will have to
teach to their twelve-year-olds.
Teach-as-you-learn has now
become a policy of enlightened
education in this island. Keep one
lesson ahead of the pupil is good
enough for Barbados.

But perhaps the Education De-
partment did not have this neces-
sary knowledge Indeed, its
Spanish teaching prospectus is so
naive and divorced from reality
that one womders whether that
Department is still located firmly







on the ground. Let me quote

Reasons for learning a foreign
language. (1) t inderstand more
fully throu lear ga

other tha: an English hx

and ideas are expressed in
(2) in order to 5

standing
their





to discuss it. I wish only to ask
one question: How many good
secondary students doing School
Certificate French or L.C.C. Span-
ish are moved to “gain some un-
derstanding of other countries” or
able to “communicate with people
of other countries”? If the answer
is, as I think, ‘hardly any’, can an
equivalent or better result be
achieved by a primary school in
three years less and with a major-
ity of children of less general
ability? And to crown it all—
again I quote from the syllabus:
“the South American pronuncia-
ation should be used as it is im-
portant that correct pronouncia-
tion should be acquired from the
beginning.” One would smile if
one were a foreigner regarding
with detachment the fantasies of
an opium-happy people. But to a
Barbadian the sight of the mess
being made of our education is a
cause for tears—or tumbrils.

Thus 90 valuable minutes are
being wasted at a time when
teachers are begging for opportun-
ity, within —_ existing framework,
te tials Pu pils who





XTDOOKS, trom
t know i
suggest



ions





a — ee SS










good programme, and to retain it
by a good performance in office,
rather than by an unwholesome
reliance upon Fate and the folly
of opponents—these are surely
some of the things which history
can teach us.” And surely that
is why we are Tories.

Because we do not neglect our
history. Why should we Tories
(and why. should the Electors
Association if they want to be-
long?) hang their heads in shame
and be content to be called re-
actionaries?

As far back as 1822 Toryism
under Canning, Peel and Huskis-
son became a great liberal reform-
ing movement.

And it was that grand old Tory
Disraeli whose Reform Act of 1867
first established a truly democratic
franchise in the United Kingdom.
It was Disraeli’s Tory Ministry
which together with social reform
measures and trades union legis-
lation, introduced the new con-
cept of Tory Democracy.

If the Electors Association wani
us to believe that they are follow-
ing in the concepts of that greai
evolutionary political philosophy }
affectionately described as English |
Toryism, then they must make it|
clear that they are at least keep-
ing as up-to-date -with the new
Toryism as their left-wing op-
ponents here are imbibing the
output of British Socialists.

When the present Government
is defeated at the next elections!
(and they wil] not be unless the}
Electors Association take early |
action) the electorate of Barbados |
will want to have known for|
many months in advance what are |
the intentions of the Electors
Association.

A political party. even a young _

ation have told us, the voters, by
their records in the House and
through their mouthpiece in the
Press, we are not over-impressed
and we look forward to a much
rnore vigorous approach and a
constructive statement of aims in
the next Parliamentary session.
And it is our right to expect that
whenever members of a political
party so far forget the decencies
as to abuse private individuals
who have no possibility of answer-
ing back that the Leader of that
party should publicly disclaim
party approval of such tactics.

No political party worthy of its
name can hope to keep the confi-
dence of any voters unless it ob-
serves certain fundamental rules
of ethical conduct.

Only demagogues look for sup-
port among the rabble. It is a
great misunderstanding of the
Barbados political scene to sup-
pose that the majority of its vot-
ers come from the rabble. They
are largely drawn from simple
people like myself and I certainly
will not vote for rabble-rousers
who hope to achieve cheap popu-
larity by cussing the tinker.



be reasonably proficient in the use
of their own language”. The
Director tacitly acknowledges this
lack of proficiency when in a Cir-
cular to the schools he suggests
that pupils should fill in blanks
rather than be required to write
complete sentences,

Why, then, in face of all the
obstacles outlined, the teaching of
a foreign language was insisted
upon? Perhaps we shall never
know. One thing we know is that
Barbados is following in the foot-
steps of her betters. For in 1945
the late Miss Ellen Wilkinson
then Minister for Education in
England, proclaimed that in the
following year the school leaving
age would be raised whether or
no there was adequate staffing and
or accommodation. Barbados,
always priding itself on being
behind England, had to emulate
this monument to the new meth-
ods, It issued a ‘common course’,
which in its prescriptions implies
that Spanish shall be taught in all
schools whether or no the teach-
ers are acquainted with the lan-
guage.








tere st in
ire the two]











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political party still in its teething
stage, is expected to decide upon
and to tell the electors what are
the main outlines of the oro- ]|;
gramme which they will follow,
if they are entrusted with admin-
istration.

So far as the Electors’ Associ-

:

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Sear GOLD BRAID one

SUNDAY, APRIL. 9, 195





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SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1950

Bridgetown
Very Busy
For Easter

One had to thread his way
through the main streets of the
City yesterday as busy shoppers
made last minute preparations for
the Easter holiday.

With the prospect of bright sun-
shine large numbers of people

be spending the bank-
holiday away from their homes,
some on sight-seeing tours, some
picnicing af some of the beauty
spots of the island, while others
will find their greatest amuse-
ment on the dance floor.



re are several-items of pub-
ber entertaitamnentt which will
undoubtedly = the attention
ople.
+o oe be the athletic sports
at Kensington Oval, and at which
there is the likelihood of some
records being broken
Another big item will be the
fair at Coleridge School, St. Peter.
the programme of which is sure
to attract a good attendance.
Then there are the Aquatic
Sports at Oistins. Such sports are
liked by many people, young and
old and the day’s programme
promises to give satisfactory en-
tertainment to all who attend.

PRIVATE SHOW will be
A given by the Mobile Cinema
at the Leper Hospital on Tuesday,
April 11. Monday, being a Bank-
Holiday, the Cinema will give no
“ Wednesday a show will be
given at St. Catherine’s School
pasture, St. Philip, for the benefit
of residents of the St. Catherine’s
area and another will be given at
the Cambridge Plantation yard on
Thursday for residents of the
Cambridge area of St. Joseph. s

The last show of the week will
be at Friendship Plantation yard,
St. Michael, for residents of the
Hothersal Turning area.

T A MEETING held yesterday
at the Town Hall, the follow-
ing were elected to serve as
Delegates from the Barbados
Civil Service Association at the
forthcoming Conference of the
Feuerated Civil Service Associa-
tions of the Caribbean:
Messrs. C. A. Coppin, L. N.
Chenery, C. W. Cumberbatch,
M. W. Clarke, L. A. Hall, A. I.
Jordan, A. F. C. Matthews, E. L.
Morris;, _R.. Ps Parris, C:' BR. C.
Springer, H. A. Vaughn and D. A.
Wiles.

CRICKET MATCH will be

played on Easter Monday at
Parry School Ground, St. Lucy,
between Northern Progressive
and Visitors, a team from the
City. Visitors are made up of
Empire and B.C.L. players and the
“match is due to begin at 11.30
a.m.



The teams are:

Visitors; Geo. Johnson, (Capt.),
C. Gaskin, BE. Austin, M. Crichlow,
H. Sealey, Frank- Taylor, C. Mul-
lins, J. Wiltshire, Vi. Taitt, D.
Estwick, E. Cox, C. Dowrich, C.
Bowen, Tony Hinds and St. E.
Phillips.

Northern Progressive: G. Fitz-
patrick, (Capt.), A. T. Yearwoou,
R. A. Yearwood, G. Yearwood,
Rev. A. E. Simmons, V. Balgobin,
L. Spencer, V. Bowen, O. Colly-
more, H. Boyce, I. Norville, W.
Cadogan, H. Husbands, R. Phillips,
E. Green and N. Slocombe.

HE LOSS of a Raleigh bicycle
valued $75 was reported by
Allan Jones of Tenth Avenue,
Belleville. He stated that the
bicycle was removed from outside
the residence of Denton Sayers at
Pine Road on Thursday.

NDER THE competent direc-

torship of Mr. McCarthy,

the Organist of St. Joseph Church,

and Mr. Rock, who assisted. the

St. Joseph Choir renderec J. S.

Tayler’s “Crucifixion” on Good
Friday, at 8 pm.

This pathetic form of meditation
was carried out in such a manner
as can be indicative of the frue
crucifixion of Christ. The service
lasted for about an hour, and was
well attended,

ORTY - FIVE .YEAR ,OLD
Charles Skinner of Brittons
Hill died suddenly at his residence
on Thursday at abouv 1.00 p.m.
An autopsy was performed by
Doctor A. L.Qtuart and death was
attributed to natural causes.

—



INSTAL - -




3 K.W. Ne
5 K.W. an
10.5 KW.

16 K.W
22 K.W




w COMPLETE RANGE OF



SPARE





SUNDAY

“Now, be good bays and fix the lawn mower, and Daddy will buy you @
whole shop load of Faster eggs.”

THE BIG ? QUESTION

IF MOLOTOV SUCCEEDS

STALIN

London Express Service

By . . . Lieut. General Sir Giffard Martel, Head

policy.

Let us first examine the char-
acteristics of these two great men,
and we will start with

Stalin,

Stalin’s father was a very skil-

His son, Joseph
destined
received a good

ful shoemaker.

Stalin, was

Church and he

education.
As he
strong

grew
attraction

he

Of British Military Mission to

R. MOLOTOV is taking over

a great deal of the work

from Marshal Stalin to ease the
strain and enable the Marshal to
conserve his strength. What can
we deduce from this? Shall we
see any major changes in Russian

for

towards

teachings of Karl Marx.

Eventually

Allowed to visit Front

On my first visit to Russia in

he

1936 Stalin never

him.

When I went to Russia in 1943
as head of the britsn
the position was que

I saw Stalin and ais-
cussed matters with him on many

Mission,
aurevent,

occasions,

He gave me full facilities to
visit the front and see the
Russian forces and discuss the
Russian

situation

with
troops and commanders

was abhsarbed
into the revolutionary movement
in Russia, and became its leader.

emerged from
the Kremlin and none of us saw

the

many different sectors.

When

had long

I returned
visit I found that I could not get
much interchange of ideas with
the Communist
was Marshal Stalin who arranged
for me to have discussions with
the Russian General Staff and I
meetings

1

from

eaders,

with

about three times a week.
We discussed everything

gether, and
each other.

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Marshal

developed

Military

but

much from

Mo

This was the turning point of
the war, and a little later the
Russians launched their offensive
operations which led to final
victory.

Used to call me ‘Old Friend’

I Remained on friendly terms
with Marshal Stalin and he
used to call me “Stary Dost’—
which means “Old friend.”

As a man he was ruthless
and probably unscrupulous, but
he undoubtedly held the con-
fidence of the Russians.

I formed the opinion that he
would have liked to co-operate
more closely with the Western
world, and that he was pre-
vented from doing so by pressure
from his associates such as
Molotov.

Later I realised that I was
wrong, for Marshal Stalin is now
in entire agreement with the
other Communist leaders and
determined to spread their Com-
munist autocracy all over the
world, calsal aa

A read sense of humour

Marshal Stalin ‘iad, however,
a real sense of humour

In discussing him Mr. Win-
Bton Churchill once said ‘
above all he is'a man with a
saving sense of humour, which is
of high importance to all men
and to all nations.”

I decided to test his sense of
humour on one occasion.

It was at a Kremlin banquet
which I had to attend. I knew
I would have to reply to a toast
from the Russians to the British
military forces, and I prepared
my speech in Russian.

All rocked with laughter

When my turn came I said
that I had been informed before
I came to Russia that I would
have great difficulty in establish-
ing liaison with the Communist
leaders.



GENUINE
WEST INDIAN
HANDCRAEFTS

See The
Dominica
Handcrafts
Company

Bridge & Trafalgar Streets

.




























ScOoWw,

Actually I
well with them, and particularly

1943

had got on

with their General Staff.

I then
between
problerr:

went on
us we had

to say
solved

each other.

There was then a dead silence,
while they waited to hear how
this problem had been
and I explained that the solution
was to
pravdu,”
quite openly and nothing but the

truth.

After a moment's silence, they
rocked with

all
Stalin,

his chair, slapped his thigh with
delight

“gavaritz atcrita e
which means to

laughter,

who was sitting back

and repeated my

sentence.

He then called me up and we

had a

of

long friendly talk.
course,

of humour

seemed to enjoy it.

A

Compared with the bluff man-
ner of Marshal Stalin,

colourless individual

ways were much less attractive.

He
great

worker, but I cannot
a_ single
Military
getting anything from him which

was obviously a
ability and a very

man

when
succeeded

occasion
Mission

we needed.

In all the conversations I had
with him I never got anything
tangible out of him.

giving

would politely say, “I don’t think

so.”
I cannot imagine a more
colourless individual t han
Molotov.

His dark-coloured suit, his be-
spectacdled poker-face,

°



A FEW EASTER FOOD

Instead

me his famous “No”

his

fairly

that
this
x how to get on with

solved,

tolka
talk

and

last

no Communist
leader ever talks openly, and
he is not always very truthful.
Stalin’s sense
abled him to see that it was a
complete leg pull and they all

en-

Molotov’s

hard
remember
the

thin

ADVOCATE

Seout Notes
Signalling
Competition
This Week

The South Western District will
be staging its Inter-Troop Sema-
phore Signalling Competition on
Tuesday next, llth April at 4.00
p.m. at vhe Erdiston College. Each
of five troops will be entering a
four-man team, and we are look-
ing forward to a very keen compe-
tition in which the winner will
meet the winning teams from the
other Disvricts for the final.

Each team is required to provide

signalling flags.



two pairs of b
Continuing his scheduled round
of visits to the Groups in the
District, Mr. Charles Springer,
D.C., of the S.W. Districe on
Thursday last paid a visit to the
2nd Barbados (Y.M.C.A.) Group.

Wood Badge

Scouters! Are you V/rking on a
definite and correct line in train-
ing your boys in the Game: of
Scouting ? Of course you may be;
but you can only be sure of vais
by taking Wood Badge Part I
(Theoretical),

Cub and Scout Wood Badga
Part I (194950) Studies can be
obtained fr.sm Scout Headquarters,
Beckles Road. Call in for a copy
this week. j

We are sorry to hear of vhe ill-
ness of the Island Commissioner,
Mr. W. H. Carter, M.B.E., who is
at present in hospital. We wish
him a speedy return of health and
vigour.

_ Kaster Wishes

May we wish all sections of the
Movement a pleasant Easter, and
hope vhat by the merits, death
and example of selfishness of Him
who died that we might live, we
may also achieve and display in
our lives on. earth the Spirit of
Service to others.

hair and small moustache would
give a stranger the impression
that he was a middle-class pro-
fessional man—probably a
citor.
Always friendly and smiling

In our official conversations,
it was always Molotov who knew
the answers. All the intricate
figures were at his fingertips.

He was always with Stalin at
the talks, and if the Marshal was
ever in doubt on a_ particular

soli-



Barbados Branch
Included In
Pension Scheme

, Messrs. Wm, Fogarty, Ltd. have
informed the Advovate that the |
Fogarty Pension Scheme, referred
to in Friday’s issue as now in
operation in British Guiana, Trini-
dad, and Tobago, also covers the
Barbados Branch,

The Scheme, which is now com-
pulsory for all employees who
have completed the qualifying
period of service, is designed to
provide all the employees of the
firm with a suitable pension on
their retiremenv, |



Memorial Service
To-morrow
Advocate Correspondent

LONDON. |
A requiem service in memory



of Miss Joan Neckles Knight,
daughter of Mr. John Knight, |
M.B.E., Postmaster of the Wind-
ward Islands, is to be held in
Christ Church, London, on Easter
Monday. Miss Knight, who was
studying must in this country, |
died of pneumonia exactly one
year ago, following an accident in
which she was badly burned.



|
25 YEARS AGO (ADVOCATE |
|

1925)
x THE third match of the Russel |
Cup competition was played yes-
terday between Spartan and Em-
pire and ended in a victory for the
home team, who def&ated the |
visitors by two goals to nil.
The playing of the Empire team
was fast and strong and the com-
bination produced two goals in|

less than five minutes play. Em- |

pire thus wins her second match
in this cup in which she has four
points to her credit.

|

By using this technique the
Communist leaders have now
seized half Europe and most of
China and Burma. It is unlikely

Why should they do so? It has

+served them well,

The danger of the subjuga-
tion of the whole world to this |
bestial form of life is there for

all to see.
It is now generally realised |
that if we turned cold

warfare,

point Molotov was instantly ready |0nm to Russia we could free the

to refresh his memory.

Subjugated countries in Europe

Although I could never detect | Which are behind the Iron Curtain

what went on behind his poker-
face,
was always friendly, courteous,
and smiling. He had no outstand-

ing mannerisms, and his habits
and conversation were also col-
ourless,

Stalin was never without his

pipe, but Molotoy smoked only an] of fear,

occasional

very little.

his work.
Kept as a deadly Secret

The inner workings of the
Politburo are kept as a deadly
secret.

I do not myself
any change, such
of more power in the hands o
Molotov, or even the eclipse ot!
Marshal Stalin, would alter their
policy.

I believe that they have made
the necessary plans to deal with
every eventuality of that nature. |

They have a fanatical deter- |
fmination to spread their Com- |
munist, autocracy over the!
whole world. To achieve this|
result their plan is simple and |
sound, }

By spreading Karl Marx Com-
munism in the early days the
Communist leaders succeeded ir
overthrowing the Czarist regime
and capturing the whole of Rus-
sia in a year. |

They then exported these
teachers to other lands as a
softening-up process to pave the
way for further expansion, and
in the meantime they established
complete autocracy— which is
the exact opposite of Commun-
ism—in Russia.

As they advanced after
war this process continued.

Every country which they took |
was placed under autocratic Com-
munist rule complete with con-

He talked only oi

believe tha
as the placing



the

centration camps and a_ slave |
army. |
The Kar) Marx Communists

were sent further afield to con-
tinue their softening processes

cigarette and drank|clever propaganda, in

armour
ing with
we
from a

until


















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But this might lead to war.|

I must say that Molotoy| W@ are not prepared to face this

at present.
Hence we must build up thé

necessary forces as a first step
Useless to talk without
Strength

to keep us in a sts

has succeeded,

ate |
by very |
making I

Russia,

think that her forces are not only

jiarge, but also very well equip

ped,

If the Western
a comparatively
killed army making full
and mobility and worl
a strong tactical air f
would have nothing to fear}
Russian attack
It is useless to
we have thi

nations ral ed|
mall but highly |

strength |
L.E.S.!

—_—_____ SS

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~PAGE EIGHT

~





POMPEO EES ERT a EaG

@F N the spring of 1944, when
e Allies were preparing the
invi of Normandy, Rommel
wads nade Commander-in-Chief
of alt the German Armies from
the Netherlands to the Loire,
Rundstedt was his superior, in
Supreme command in the West.

No one was better than Romme)
at rousing the spirit of tired and
apathetic troops.

And for his new responsibility
he needed all the energy he could
muster.

He had a knack of handling
men, Viee-Admiral Ruge, his ad-
viser on coast defences, wrote of
him :-—

“He had done some deep
thinking about the relations
between officers and men.
That is one of the reasons,

I think, whY our army and

navy. kept their discipline.

“Wherever we went he
spoke. freely to all ranks.
© explained his idens to
them and told them exactly
what he wanted them to do.





“A new spfrit \ very
soon evident in the troops,
and the work f preparing

resist the invasion began t
g0 ahéad”’

Pep-Talks

On the other side of the
hannel Montgomery was
speaking in the same effective
fashion to the troops and
factor’ wor!ers
In neithe é
“pep-t
higher
ers we “su ect
persor build-up
TT

re these

ng at a

The B&tish
ing to Atar
cou! i n Mont
gon

As far '
1941 I
partme 1 it
parent ral Halder,
Hitler visers
make t n ymmel,

Rhommeél high place
now content themselves with
aescribing t as nountebank
and a seeker after r riety

Rommel, mear ke

immer

De

ap-
one of

not to

ganda
ructed

gomer ea lise that pagand
and the exploitation of |
personalit ere merely
weapon

“You can do what



anothe

with
lief camera-
postponing





n i week YY
) y niral Ruge
he remained modest and unassum
ing
Personal e ie Rommel
scarcity of material
ercome
At this period enormous quan-
tities of steel and concrete were
being used for submarine shelter
and for the launching-sites of
Vl's and V2's
Rommel had, therefore, to make
do with what he could get
Hitler might agree that all
coastal batteries should be put

into concrete emplacements with
six feet of concrete overhead. But
even armed with this order Rom-
mel could not get the concrete

No Cover
@ When the invasion came,
many batteries had no over-
head cover at all and were

quickly blotted out from the

air.

Rommel! nevertheless managed
to get a prodigious amount of

work done

In a few months 4,000,000 mines
were laid against fewer than
2,000,000 in the previous three

yeal

Given tine he proposed to lay
50 to 100 million and, after sur-
rounding all strongholds with
deep minefields, to fill up the

country between them with mines
wherever 4t was “tankable.”
Becauseé= mines, like everything
else, were’ scarce, they were not
at all of conventional construction
Rommel raided depots and ar-
senals, where he discovered stocks
of hundreds of thousands of old
shells, which he made into mines
Nor were the minefields laid in
conventional pattern Rommel’
idea was to employ mines in as
many different ways as possible

:
*Tin-Openers

Among his gadgets were beams
driven into the beaches below low-
water mark, some with mines on
the top, some with steel cutters to
act as “tin-openers.”

There were home-made “nut-
crackers” mines in blocks of con-
crete. There were mined logs
with a seaward slope.

There were the obsolete tank
obstacles, made out of three iron;
bars at right-angles, which were’
how useless against tanks but
could still impede infantry if set
below high-water mark.

There were naval mines
in shallow water with
lines attached to the horns

Ashore there were poles driven
in on open fields and wired to-
gether with mines on top to im-

sunk
floating

pede glider landings. But many
were not ready by June 6 D Day

Among the de ception were
dummy minefield though Rom-
mel } Nplain they v ild
ha recon
graze

The i¢
Whicr I ‘ t il
bombe

Whe



The Last Duet With Montgomery
io ‘Dunkirk’ This Time:
A Case of ‘Too Little

And Too Late’

By DESMOND YOUNG



s

¢

7



ONE OF

convalesc

THE

ing
sitting

last
atter
the

being
in garden

He refused because there
vere not yet enough V1's to allow
of a continuous fire being kept up.
It was perhaps too late.

But it is interesting to note that
General Eisenhower says that, had
the Germans succeeded in perfect-

ng these weapons six months
earlier and had they been used
principally against the Ports-

mouth-Southampton area, “the in-
vasion of Europe would have
proved exceedingly difficult and
perhaps impossible.”

Similarly, Rommel wanted the
navy to mine the navigation chan-

nels and the Luftwaffe to drop
the new pressure-box mines all
round the Isle of Wight

The navy objected to laying

mines too close to the shore, and
the Fuehrer would not allow the
pressure-box mine to be used be-
cause there was no known method
f sweeping it, and the Allies
might lay similar minés.”

‘in Water”

@ The real confifet of opin-
ion was, however, on the
whole broad question of how
the invasion could best be
resisted.

Rommel apparently had no
doubts. We must stop the enemy
in the water,” he said, “and destroy
his equipment while it is still
afloat.”

The first 24 hours, in his yiew,
would be decisive. Once the Allies
secured a bridgehead it would be
impossible to drive them batk into
the sea or to prevent them break-
ing out.

He based his belief entirely on
the factor of air superiority,

Tne Luftwaffe would be shot
out of the skies and the reinforce-
ments, like the supplies for North
Africa, would never appear.

Road and rail traffic would be
completely disrupted and move-
ment in the back areas would
become impossible

If this reasoning were correct,
then the main line of resistance
must be thé beach

It this strong belt of resistance
were eventualiy broken, at least
it would hold up the invaders for

some time and their break-out
would be local.
Alternative

2 The Army Command,
undstedt the Commander-in-
Chief West, his staff and the
majority of the army, corps
and divisional commanders,
took the more orthodox view.
With 3,000 miles of coastline to
defend, with only 59 divisions,
most of them second-class and
only ten of them armoured, with
which to defend it with no cer-
tainty where the main landing
would be made, it was useless to

think of preventing the _ Allies
Setting foot above high-water
mark

The only correct course was to
Keep the reserves, including the
armour, well in rear, to wait
until the main effort was identi-
fied beyond doubt and then to
launch a large-scale counter-
offensive at the right moment

For Rommel it may be said tha’
his appreciation of the effects of
Allied



air power was proved a

curate

It wa or witt the

: ai
formation

One division f
F ’ ,
‘ ne € 1

pictures

wounded

et Na a,

of

Rommel while he was
Here he is with his dog

\
raken

of his home at Herrlingen.

with destroyed equipment and
with dead men and animals, says
General Eisenhower, “that it was
literally possible to walk for hun-
ireds of yards at a time stepping
on nothing but dead and decaying
flesh.”

Dug-Oui Hoys

On the other nand, Rommel can
be accused of grossly over-estim-
ating the chances of holding the
Atlantic Wall.

His defences were not even a
quarter complete. Nor could he
have fought his last battles in the
men who manned them.

Dug-outs, convalescents from
the Eastern Front, boys without
battle experience, with a residue
of renegade Poles, Rumanians,
Yugoslavs and Russians, they were
not likely to stand up to the sort
of sea and air bombardment he
had himself foretold.

His reputation as a strategist
would rank higher if he had back-
ed Rundstedt’s proposal for evacu-
ating before the invasion, the
whole of southern France up to
the Loire.

Had that been done, he might
have fought his last battles in the
moving warfare of which he was
a master.

But selling ideas of retreat to
thé Fuehrer was a task more hope-
legs than that of defending the
Atlantic Wall

Montgomery had no doubt what
Rommel would do, His analysis
of his old opponent’s plans was a
masterpiece.

= It is now clear,”
said, “that Rommel’s inten-
tion is to defeat us on the
beaches, . . He is an energetic
and determined commander ;
he has made a world of differ-
ence since he took over.

“He is best at the spoiling
attack; his forte is disruption;
he is too impulsive for a set-
piece battle. He will do his
level best to ‘Dunkirk’ us.

“We must blast our way on
shore and get a good lodg-
ment before he can bring up

he

sufficient reserves to turn us
out

“Armoured columns must
penetrate deep inland and
quickly We must gain
Space rapidly and peg out
claims well inland ‘
While we are engaged in

doing this, the air must hold
the ring and must make very
dificult the movement of
enemy reserves towards the
lodgment areas.”

Ring Held

@ it came about as both
men predicted, Rommel did
try to “Dunkirk” us. The air
did hold the ring.

The first 24 hours were deci-
sive Once the Allies secured
their bridgeheads, only by some
gross mistake could they have
been thrown back into the sea

Would Rundstedt have had a
better chance of defeating them

in open warfare when they de-
bouched from it? With the troops











at his disposal and in face of
Allied air supremacy, it seems
unlikely
In the first critical phase of the
inva was Rommel’s old 21st
Par ivision, now reformed, |
! ted the capture
ngiy, Rommel
1 that it commar :
Ma { era Feuchtinger
le t with the boldness of

Lost Chance

SUNDAY



IN THE town hall of Ulm, with R¢
von Rundstedt delivers the funeral
dom was displayed at the funeraof Rommel, who died by his own

hand, at the o

there?” asked Rommel, “Hun-
dreds and hundreds,” replied
Feuchtinger.

“How many did you. shoot
down?” “Three or four.” “You

have lost your chance,” said Rom-
mel.

Very shortly after the bridge-
head had been secured Rommel
and Rundstedt found themselves
for the first time in complete and
open agreement.

Asked by Captain Liddell Hart
long afterwards whether he had
hopes of defeating the invasion at
any stage after the landing, Rund-
stedt replied: “Not after the first
few days. The Allied Air Forces
paralysed all movement. This
greatly delayed the concentration
of reserves there—they took three
or four times longer to reach the
front than we had reckoned.”

The word “we” did not include
Rommel, who was thus posthum-
ously proved correct in his diagno-
sis, if not in his proposed treat-

ment
. 7
Shot-Up
On July 17, 1944, the

Allied Air Force at last over-

took Rommel.

Captain Helmuth Lang, who
was in the car, gives the facts

“As he did every day,” writes
Captain Lang, “Marshal Rommel
made a tour of the front.

“All along the road we could see
transport in flames; from time t
time the enemy bombers forced us
to take to second class roads.

“About 6 p.m. the Marshal’s cai

was in the neighbourhood of
Livarot. Transport which had
just been attacked was piled up

along the road and Strong gre
of enemy dive-bombers were





at work. That is why we tu 1
off along a sheltered road. t om
the main road again two and a

half miles from Vimoutiers

‘ °
Car Hit

“When we reached it we saw
above Livarot about eight enemy
dive-bombers. We thought they
had not seen us, and continued
along the main road from Livarot
to Vimoutiers.

“Suddenly Sergeant Holke our
Spotter, warned us that two air-
craft were flying along the road
in our direction.

The driver, Daniel, was told
to put on speed and turn off on
to a little side road to the right
about 300 yards ahead of ;
which would give us some shelte:




“Before we could reach it, the
enemy aircraft, flying at great
speed only a few feet above the

Writers Strike

“NOT

By DON GILBERT
LONDO}

The Treasury is being reminded
by some of Britain’s leading
authors of Dr. Samuel John s
pronouncement 200 years ago tha’
“no man but a blockhead «
wrote for money,”

The writers are in ouc of t
periodic moods for protest a;
a taxation system which le
them little incentive to push their
earnings beyond a modest level!

As a result, a number of well-
known authors are rationing theit
output. They work for a few
months to ensure solvency in
household budget, then “hi -
nate” for the rest of the year

The current discussion of t

tion on literary earnings is
touched off by R. C. Sherriff
author of “Journey's End,”

of the best plays about the F
World War. Sherriff disclosed









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wamel lying in state, Field-Marshal
oration. All the pageantry of Nazi-

rder of Hitler.

road, came up to within 500 yards
and the first one opened fire.

“Marshal Rommel was looking
back at the moment. The left-
hand side of the car was hit by
the first burst. A cannon-shell
shattered Daniel’s left shoulder
and left arm.

“Marshal Rommel was wound-
ed in the face by broken glass, and
received a blow on the left temple
and cheek-bone which caused a
triple fracture of the skull and
made him lose consciousness im-
mediately.

“Daniel, the driver, lost control.
The car struck the stump of a
tree, skidded across the road, and
turned over in a ditch.

“Marshal Rommel, who, at the
start of the attack, had hold of
the handle of the door, was thrown
out, unconscious, when the car
turned over, and lay stretched out
on the road about 20 yards behind

: Many Wounds

“A second aircraft flew over and
tried to drop bombs on those who
were lying on the ground.

“Marshal Rommel was carried
into shelter by Captain Lang and
Sergeary Holke. He lay on the
ground unconscious and covered
with blood, which flowed from the
many wounds on his face, particu-
arly from his left eye and mouth.

“Even when we had carried him
to safety he did not recover con-
c1ousness,

Captain Lang tried to

It took him about
arters of an hour.

°
Little Hope
Marshal Rommel had_ his
suunds dressed by a French
religious hospital,
They were ,very severe, and the
ctor said that there was little
1ope of saving his life,

‘Later he was taken, still un-

nscious, with Daniel to an air

ce hospital at Bernay.

The doctors there diagnosed
evere injuries to the skull — a
racture at the base, two fractures
on the temple, and the cheek-bone
destroyed, a wound in the left eye,
wounds from glass, and concus-
sion,

“A few days later Marshal Rom-
mel was taken to the hospital of
Professor Esch at Vasinet, near St.
Germain.”

And so he passed out of active
partucipation in the war, into the
political net and to death by
order of Hitler

THE END.
London Express Service,
[World copyright]

find a
three-

ctor in a

Against Taxes

BUBBLES"

turned
wood

down a
contract

lucrative
one that
have brought Britain a
wad of dollars—because
treasury wouldn’t play ball.

The playwright wanted the
British surtax on his earnings
waived. In return he would have
endowed some archaeological
work on a Roman site in Norfolk.
The government turned thumbs
iown and Sherriff stayed home.

Other authors chimed in that
they, too, would earn more dollars
t the surtax were not so heavy.
Said nor Nevil Shute:

Holly-

would

useful
the

aliot

About two-thiras of my in-
ome comes in dollars. I could
double my dollar income by work-

harder—but why? I cannot
set any benefit for myself or for
ny children by doing so,”

Shute said he had followed a
policy of rationed output for
years,

LN.S.





2 & 1-Burner
OVENS — Doable & Single

TOVE is the First Word in
and Cleanliness

ADING €0., LTD.

—









end ete





ae
Every day



a re





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The tests which consist of boiling samples under 100 Ib. per
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Ul always be True

If all beaux were as true as Ford Spare parts, their
sweethearts would have no worries,

on genuine Ford parts when your Ford needs a spare,

you'll have nothiag to worry about, either. Ford



And if you insist

Spare parts cur. off the same line as the ofiginals, from
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4, using the same high quality
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Same

Perhaps that’s one
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It’s dn esse

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ee ——
*

© sUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1950 SUNDAY











pia? y
4 W an to W
om oman - + « « by SUSAN DEACON
ae lla sO i. Le
Co 4
“4 A cotton dress for
beach d evenings
eR oe &
haps, but there is no mistaking
their meaning,
Lipstick tips

'7 is surprising how many
women who have been using
ipstick for years still do not
get a good shape and outline to
their lips,

Revion, in america, have com-
piled a lis€ of do’s and don’ts
for making up the mouth.
They say, wear deeper blue
reds under electric light, and
soft pink colours under blue-
white neon lighting.

DO’S.—1. Highest part of the
curve of upper lip should be
—_ under opening of

2. Lip line should extend to
corners of the mouth.

3. Lower lip line should be
brought up to a point slightly
inside corners of upper lip,

DON'TS.—1,. Don't make a
Cupid’s bow.

¢- Don’t exaggerate outer curve

. of upper lip.

Strapless heach Ownkey, Puage, Toast, ana 3+ Don't transfer lipstick from ,
dresses with well- Caramel--stockings in Morning tines 7 to lower’ by pressing
etn oun rive Mist, Whisper, and Honeymoon. ore
cotton prints Men's shirts were in Sahara (this Raking a fire
me ps9 mage flamorous turned out to be a muddy beige D O you know that. it is
4 @ practical of these (see colour) P 1a— : raat.
OMEN needing photographs) ie made in Wet nalne and Panama—a yellowy better to rake ‘out ‘a fire
cotton dresses this African print in dar’: mined v When it is hot as all the dust
year are to have colours. Down to earth cream distemper then flies up the chimney
: It has a slim, straight skirt and is called Sable, instead of into the room. . . .
the happy and unusual ‘strapless swathed Todiee. Danube, which I would have You should apply ne pen
experience of buying A brief bolero transforms this for thought had to be a shade of With a piece of old .
ue: *rath cocktails, and a separate ankle jaa f polish windows with a soft
what they like ‘rather jength skirt draped and swathed blue, is @ pale leaf green, cotton duster, and furniture
than what they can find. on one side turns it into a 4 true, clear pink is called with an old piece of silk.
Regardless of the weather, shops _,,,/0Vely evening dress. Cyclamen, Hot milk is good for leat
Teport that cotton dresses have Titis three-piece sells for approxi- Looking through a 1920 edition of fuente, ap 4 has becon
been selling well since mid- ™ately 9gns, the Sunday Express, I find that white ;And cracked. . » Soliahod
February. Bewilderin the new colours of the year surface can be removed. by
I have seen evening dresses in g were Pillar Box Onion rubbing cigar or cigarette ash
cambric, which looks like silk D9 we need to have these be Skin Yellow, Carrot » Nut- into the mark, or way
. . . Sophisticated dark cottons wildering names for colours ? meg Brown, and Lettuce Green. is to use a cloth a with
for town wear, and glamorous T am shown fabrics in Elephant, Not such glamorous names, per- sal volatile,
—IT IS EASTER im the
GE T UP: ADVERTISE in the
HY does it take most people i low note is sounded near a hive Ji,
about two hours to foal fully By CHAPMAN PINCHER it acts like a factory siren. The ads ocate
after waking up in the morn- a workers immediately pour out,
Why is the body’s grip on life DR. ELSIE WIDDOWSON. and scientists report.
kest in the small hours of the PROFESSQR ROBERT McCANCE = When the note is pitched higher
ht? Why does getting up from found that the blood’s ups and even the drones fly out excitedly,
k bed have a delayed-action downs are due entirely to changes and the queen may answer with
t, so that you feel groggiest a in the body’s position. It imme- g thin piping sound.
ble of hours iater? diately begins to weaken when hy ?
discovery which seems to you lie down, whether you go to Y it talon’
sweever these quest.ous has just sleep or not—which may explain i stants oa ee
b mad: by two Medteai Re~ Why I felt so dreadful after yester- 4f) Semen all their time to hold
h Cowich scientists w.uiking day’s lunch-hour doze in the sun. e nozzle of a hose, a reader asks.




se University.

ey have tound that your blood

Bmatical'y weakens when you

Hown. It gets more and more
ry during the ‘irst two rours

leep. Its power to supply the
with oxygen and nourish-
falls rapidly.

his may explain way the bogy’s
tance to illness slumps around

pur blood soon begins to recov-
s strength, but does not get
to normal until you have
up and about a couple of

you stay in bed, your blood
s about 48 hours to get back
ll strength. After that it
mes super-rich, probably
ting your ability to fight ill-

But as soon as you get up,
rength falls sharply, reaching
Owest level when you have
out of bed two hours or so.
er tests on hospital patients,

Pen Pals

ODFREY CORRY, 91 Garnett
pet Newton Kitty British

a. Is interested in stamp
ting, wants Pen Pals be-
m the ages of 13 and 14,

EST LIMERICK, 92 Laluni

» Queenstown, Georgetown,
Guiana, wants Pen Pals be-
m the ages of 15 and 17,



KILLS TICKS

SAKA, Northern Rhodesia
new machine which sprays a
of insecticide and kills ticks
attle will soon be put to use
orthern Rhodesia. The ma-
eliminates the need for dip-
and is said to be much more

ve,
—(C.P.)



Made roe ‘the Ginest,. coset o>
Ye Per moed Lunt obehe epee
NOITe ty the air,

DARECTIONS =.
‘kee tay and apply the Shama
Pa * Fh tether aed | Heatly

4 ieticaty
* ee

Trapped
THIS TRUE story—the most
* terrifying I have ever heard
—comes from Swiss strato-sphere-
balloonist AUGUSTE PICCARD.*

Three Russian scientists were
10 miles up in a balloon when
the cables holding their sealed
metal cabin snapped.
cabin’s fall checked slightly by a
parachute, the men had a few
minutes in which to bail out, But
there was only one escape hatch
—fastened by 24 bolts, And they
had only one spanner.

When the wreckage was dug
out of the earth rescuers found
that during the dreadful fall the
men had managed to get seven
nuts off. With a spanner apiece
they might just have made it.

Like a Siren
HONEY-BEES, believed by
* biologists to be deaf can
hear after all, it seems. When a

With the :

Answer ; Because the ‘water
streaming from the nozzle pro-
duces a jet-propulsion effect, driv-
ing the hose backwards just as the
jet of gas streaming from a Vam-
pire’s engine propels the plane.

Whe... ?
reyes have shown
that a chemival called gluta-
mic acid often improves intelli-
gence in mentally retarded chil-
dren, and may boost thinking pow-
ers in normal folk. Now scientists
report that the acid occurs natur-
ally in certain foodstuffs. Richest
sources? Mushrooms and peas
Their Problem
Se eee to U. S. diet
expert DR. ANCEL KEYS,
America is developing a__ serious
national nutrition problem
over-eating.
*Told in his book “Between Earth
And Sky” (Falcon Pressl5s).

| —L.E.S.



Rup

Py

Whe ts





ipert’s sharp eyes have seen a
wisp of smoke at the very top of
a pine tree and it makes him very
excited. ‘‘ Pine trees don’t smoke,”
he mutters, ‘* There’s only one
thing that can be causing that.
The young dragon must be up
there.” He runs across. and gazes

envy!) in others

treatments . .
specially suitable for
=STOK & BYNO D.~AGENTS.

ert and the Dragon

TS NEVER JUST LuUCK!

.... that lovely head of hair you admire (and

is never

SHAMPOO

7

Ne










up into the

Dranches
enough, he catches a glimpse of the

and sure
truant, He calls in a coaxing way,
but tie little creature will not come
downy so Rupere climbs carefully
upwards. The dragon has stopped

breathing fire, b t
near his a et ae






just luck, : but the



reflection of constant care and attention.

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ADVOCATE

For Stamp
Collectors

(By JOHN CAMSELL)

FOREIGN stamps valued at
$7,000,000 will be shown at the
International Stamp | Exhibition
which will be held in’ London
during May.

The King, as President of the
| Royal Philatelic Society, has given
| permission for some: of -his price-

less collection to be exhibited and
/a large selection from his 48
| albums will be shown:
| Sir John Wilson, Chairman of
| the Exhibition, said of the King.
“He’s a keen collector, but he
| doesn’t know much about the old
stamps. The value of the Collec-
tion? If you said in’ a million
pounds I wouldn’t disagree. But
some of the stamps are valueless.”
The selections from the King’s
albums will include rare items
from both the original collection
formed by King George V and of
stamps issued during the present
| reign.
{

| Outstanding
Outstanding exhibits will be a
fine mint block of four of the
| Twopence “Post Paid” Mauritius
| (1848) containing the error
“Penoe”, the first “Lady McLeod”
; Stamp of Trinidad (1847) an
‘ original cover, and examples of



the two scarce “Postmaster’s
|stamps” of Hamilton, Bermuda
(1848).

Another rare item will be an
| envelope bearing the original one-
penny and 3 penny stamps of
Victoria, used on the first day of
| issue, January 10, 1850.

| Also included in the King’s
exhibits will be one of the surviv-
ing blocks of the St. Vincent, one
pound purple, issued for the
King’s Wedding Com-
memoration.

The King owns blocks of this
issue. The rest of the stamps dis-
appeared somewhere between the
printer and the colony.

Silver



Interesting
Apart from the value of the
| Royal collection it will be particu-
| larly interesting to collectors be-
| cause it contains artists’ sketches



|
|

| Submitted for the King’s approval.

YES;it's:fact..
*

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©., P.O, Bex 27, Bridgetown, BARBADOS.



PAGE NINE






USED SN
TO WAKE |

FEELING

Stak





What a bad start for a
day’s work if you wake
up feeling tired and
listless, instead of being
brisk and full of energy.
One woman who can
appreciate the difference from
her own ce, writes to

us i
“Before taking Kruschen, I
morning feeling aired? New
mor: .
| wake: feeling foll of onevey.
wake’ e 3
Kruschen has made me feel years
younwee. I - setered Bi
eumatic pains
fon swellings. ro away ankles.
Iam now comple o of
swe) . I take

FIND OUT THE SECRETS FROM
MISS BERTHA LAMAS

of the



Dory Grow

en ly and
cannot speak too h of it.’’
- —L.W.

kee! you yo

besatse ft use it tones. up the iver,

t Gag smoothly and

8: wor

efflolontiy, reward this

internal eamieneeaiee

and invigora’

Tefal oman Seas
8 le

And ou continue wi! -

gohan. 3 your whole body responds

to its p fe

Kruschen is.o ble from all
Qhemists and Stores.



about looking prtter!
|

NEW YORK SALON
WEEK AFTER NEXT

g
@

COLLINS DRUG STORE

‘What other COLD remedy:
does ALL this?

CLEARS STUFFY NOSE!
SOOTHES SORE THROAT!
EASES ACHY CHEST!
CALMS RASPY COUGH!

-——o





tk

n~ocnmne--—
— <— mon a ee ee ae a ee ee -
—_

i i ch relief... in so many
2* eek ee 8 en pleasant VapoRub is simply

rubbed on at bedtime —

works OUTsive

is chest, back and

Peo at once feel

warm, relaxed and comty as

VapoRub’s deep-reaching

poultice action eases ac y

tightness and helps break up
congestion. Feels so good |

J insi ad outside, hour
This double action works both on as, usually, the

hour lh the night. By m' :
e om of ey over, and Baby feels much better

WORKS INswe

With every breath,
VapoRub’s medicinal
trate into every
of the troubled

: ana
‘r-passages, clearing thenose,
oir taing. the throat, easing
the bothersome cough.



ICKS,

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After tests on 1,384. women for 14 days, 39 doctors (includingJeading skin
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All you have to do is what these women did: follow the ‘ Palmolive Beauty Plan.”
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Do this for 14 days and prove for yourself that the

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KEEP THAT SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION

. _ a







—

PAGE TEN

SITTING ON

Ky Nathaniel Gubbins

EING (probab the result of
spring.

The Editor i in conference

with his staff and some chorus
ome ond is rehearsing a little
number called “Sex for Circula-
tion.” ,
THE EDITOR:
If the circulation’s dropping
and the paper doesn’t sell
THE OTHERS:
What are we to do, sir, what are
we to do?
THE EDITOR:

What kind of hwmun stories do
you think we ought to tell?
THE OTHERS:

Something very nei, sir, some-

thing very new.
THE EDITOR:

That is where you're very
wrong, you're very wrong
indeed.

Something new is never what

the British public need.
The oldest story in the world is
all they want to read
ALL:
Sex For Circulation.

CHORUS:

Sex for circuianon, mm every social
station

The tempo of the nation, the
ghastly ghoulish nation;
You may give them pars on

of every kind
reader has a

politics and views
But as every littl

dirty little mind
If you want fo make the paper a

we think you'll always find
Sex For Circulation

THE EDITOR
The sort of
print are articles

THE OTHERS

thing we ought to

on beauty—

That's a new idea, sir, that’s a
new idea
THE EDITOR
But not the usual sort of stuff
—we'll make ther pretty
fruity.

THE OTHERS













We'll do it, never fear, sir; we'll UNCLE OOMS (taking a run was that Chelsea factory was de-
do it never fear ath Good luck, lad. prived of its chief raw materi
OLS OLSSEN (groaning): and was forced to cease produc-
THE EDITOR Goo Cousin Bol tion
When telling women how to put BO! BOLSSEN (savagely) The exhibtion of painting
the powder on their nose Goo ck—good luck—good the Museum by Arnold Prince 1
And how to wash their k huct Garner Francis is to remal:
limbs in essences of r a ’ view for a further week, a
Print photograph of gorda Ol OLSSEN (half fainting) se on 15th April
girls i 7 t inoitt C700 every body
ALL: T ike a corberted rusi —-—
Sex For Circulatio hirn, bu e escapes into Pe car- j ‘i
“hort efor riage the train moves o Little
st of oo he een ee fron Certain
THE EDITOR f Uncle Ooms in e
Opinio: huprcl c Oor then kick B W ll
relation of f x B icks Old Ol uyers l
THE OTHERS A the stationmaster. A ;
That sounds pretty hot that etre¢ i“ d everybody i B At BIF
sounds pretty hot 4 te e :
THE EDITOR ?
And articles by expert ‘ i Rural conversation Russian buyers are among those
; a pre " ror behind the Iron Curtain
THE OTHERS iT! fol conversation took expected to attend this
That should sel! a lot it] place o the olde tide British Industries Fair béing he!
should sell a lot cotta bedroome windowée in London and Birmingham fr«
THE ED!'rorR First Rural Voice: They Mav 8 to 19
Police ts and assizes si be 1 eddles¢ Others are coming
be « bed for items sh ’ Second Rural Voice; Czecho-Slovakia. Rumania, Hun-
And tales of human follies tl at er be gary and Poland
will set the readers rocki +} «=First Rural Voice: Ar-1 They wil, join the thousands
A simple girl's vetraya! or a Second Rural Voice: Ar-: arrivin from all parts of ine
clergyman’s unfrocking + First Rural Voice: Ef ’er be wot world. Buyers from Hongkong
ALL: ; the , er be the er ain't no and Singapore are leaving soon
Sex For Circulatio a-gallivantin’ about like The tallest exhibit at the Fair
Lullaby ripstitch rantipole ~an 80ft. high pile-driver with
‘ Second Rural Voice: 4; ¢ that Sliding leaders and a_ six-ton
— - ; single-acting hammer, worked by |!
oes he United AeA steam—-is being moved into posi-
are becoming more intellige First Rural Voice: Ar-r, That tion shortly at Castle Br t
They don’t like bat talk hey % be Birmingham.
— 1 t ‘ Second Rural Voice: ‘Er’ id Stone Crusher
art ; buried fower j
e First Rural Voice: An’ ‘ert {] Other “heavies are tone
h of the jullabie m } Michaelmas. "Er be a pre- {crusher of 40 tons and a road-
f rewrttter per owdaci fioi-boi-noight ' making “factory” 90ft. long and
; 27ft. wide
eMart and 10 s.ond Rural Voice: That ‘er be A 15-ton mixing machine for
Child of the Wesfer : Third Rural Voice (with a note| the artificial silk industry has
Low, lov ecracks Di alit That ‘er be ilready arrived
Over the n er tea Who re? What ha 1e | These até included in the 000
Jokes that hould ney be done? Am 1 going mad? tons of engineering exhibit be
heard in the home London Express Service



Alka- seltzer brings pleasant relief

When over-indulgence in food and
drink causes headache or stomac!
discomfort Alka-Seltzer brings you
tablets
Watch it fizz and
a Sparkling, pleasant

First Aid
in a glass
dissolve int
tasting solution. Not a laxative

Drop one or two

ot water



ee i ———

THE FENCE



Figures At"



Over the shivering tea cups .
ss The Museum
Tell them again to me— °
Ni y pretty one
Cracks a dirty one A PAIR of Chelsea-Derby

figures, which have been loaned
to the Museurn, will be on special
exhibition until’ 22nd. April. The
figures are dated 1780, and were
made during a period when some
exceedingly fine work was being
produced. The male musician,
with a dog at his side, plays the
bagpipes, and the femule figure,
with a lamb; plays the mandoline.
Both figures are seated with boc-
age backgrounds of delicate col-
ouring.

The Chelsea procelain factory
was founded in or about 1745, and
it employed very fine artists. The
factory was advertised for sale in
1764, but it did not find a pur-

Keep the best, keep the best
Father will come to thee soon—
Father will come to his babe in
the nest
To hear one of the pretty one’s
latest and best
Then s-l-e-e-p

What big ears you've got,
granny

“After applying a tape measure
to thousands Dr. Hrdlicka says
that the human nose gets longer
and broader, fhe ears get larger,
and the mouth wider as a person
grows older.”—From the News.

AY by day your mouth chaser until 1769. Josiah Wedge-
granny, grows and grows wood, the owner of the famous
and grows. factory of that name, was interest-

ed in the purchase of some of the
motilds, models, etc., but did not
wish to purchase the entire plant.
Eventually the Chelsea factory to-
gether with its models, moulds
and unfinished ware was pur-
chased by Mr. Duesbury of Derby,
who also owned the Derby Porce-
lain Works. Duesbury carried on

Day by day your ears expand and
bigger grows your nose.

But shovld you live two hundred

years my love will never tire—

When you're just a nose and a
pair of ears, flapping by the fire.

A Swede's farewell

“Captain Ahrenberg and his both factories simultaneously
friends drank a glass of beer, and until 1784 The period from
the captain, before leaving, was 1770-1784 is the Chelsea-Derby
subjected to a kick on the seat of period, when much excellent work
his trousers. This is the equivalent was produced.. In 1784 the works
ih Sweden of wishing a man good were discontinued, and whatever

was of use was transferred to
Derby.
The cause of the sudden end of

which

luck News Item.

PMNVMUE scene is a Swedish railway




station. Ols Olssen is going the Chelsea factory, pro-

to America and his family, wear- duced excellent ware and was
ing hobnailed boots, have come to highly patronised, was shortage of
see him off raw material. English merchant
OLS OLSSEN (nervously): vessels engaged in the tea trade
Good-bye, dad. with China were in the habit of
OLD OLS (lashing out with carrying clay as ballast on the re-
both feet): Good luck, lad turn journey. Eventually the
OLS OLSSEN (backing to- Chinese became suspicious, so
wards the train) Good-bye, great was the demand for « as
Uncle Ooms ballast, and prohibited the use of

clay for this purpose. The result




























Chelsea-Derby *%ew Books: ee

PORTRAIT OF A GENIUS, BUT

—

SUNDAY, APRIL 9, igg |

SUNDAY ADVOCATE
























Private Utopia of a Man * Seer
- THEODORA BENSGN, the JX
Who Was Denounced ees
For Immorality =~

Central. Et Canada and
America, Italy and France
PRATRIAL.—By Lavra Talbot

Macmillan, 9s. 6d. 236 pages.

rope,

Hy George Malcolm Thomson

another, situated in Cornwal:



By Richard Aldington. Heine- Italy, Fort Myers in Florida, o1 EMILY, a highly-strung wo- :
mann 15s. 367 pages. the Andes, according to'the enthu- man, married to William, a land- |
iasm of the moment. owner suffering from neuralgia,
D. H. LAWRENCE was at The nearest that Rananim commits adultery with Hayton,;
English Dissenting working man, came .o realisation was om: one of her husband's tenants, the
with a great deal of the Puritan- night in the Cafe Royal when six acrid emanations from whose If your hair
ism and prejudice of his kind mut of Lawrence’s seven guests strong, healthy body are pungent :

Nobody























would pretend as the autumn itself i is coming out

he agreed to sail with him to New

































was a typical product Mexico This idea was borrowed by remember
gregational chapel an Only one of the dinner party Lawrence from Wells, by Wells| j yy
village W to New Mexico. When she from Strindberg, and by Strind- on Y

But nobody, read arrived, she went about with « berg from — But to return t ‘
Aldington’s pert read- knife to defend herself. Emily. She has a daughter by Si = =
able biography, will fail ) Hayton, which is a bitter blow | 1 Vil rin
recognise how much The importance of Lawrence to William who was willing t
Original environment the authr: I time did not, of course, overlook her lapse if she woul
of Lady Chatterley’s Lover car- in his social vapourings. Hesproduce a son whom he could DOES GROW HAIR
ried with him through life. i brilliant eye. He could make his heir

; d , convey that there was more in a As things turn out, there Use Pure Silvikrin in severe cases of dandruff and f

He hated womet who painted § scer or a situation than the nothing for William to do but ss han ative, a y
their faces nated xual ost brilliant eye could perceive. go on having neuralgia and for thinning hair. As a daily restorative dressing use
promiscuity, hated bul *» He was a Magician and a mystic. Emily, who has been toying with} Silvikrin Hair Tonic Lotion containing Pure Silvikrin, qe
hated foreigners ounce He believed that the 1914—-13 the idea of madness from Pz Hair’s Natural Food. From all chemists, hairdressers
the English), he potterir var had brought a whole work: 27 onwards, to depart with Dr «ae
about the house ciping 19 of ideals to an end — liberty. Grunbaum to his “home” Silvikrin Laboratories Ltd., London, N.W.10,
the kitchen. He looked English, ceracy, the belief that human Highgate pe ae ;
felt English, and, like all th ergs wanted peace and love It only snows that, if you
English, wanted to remake th And what was to replace these something enough, you will
world. to a new pattern ef h ead ideals? surely achieve it. Nobody, in all}}
own devising. fiction, worked so hard as Emily }}

: The answer was confused, to get herself certified |

How 1 pical, that he, often self-contradictory. In mak D Grunbaum does not kee} our r 2
Bertrand Russell, wa ntent in j; Lawrence ran into a Emily very long. Pity, it way !
1915 on a complete social recon storm: was denounced for im- *
struction of the world. The morality. It hurt. “I am not vers Library List Skilled Staff and Modern Fyuipment
collaboration took the form Of mych moved,” he said,. when P ee 5

Lawrence

|

| Dissolved First Day

ni}
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a

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The Marines Were There.



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Bae Rainbow to be destroyed, “I only Robert Bruce Lockhart Putn
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ere : root, braneh and leaf, to eterni ; nest exploits, recorded @ SPEEDY and EXPERT REPAIRS
“3 : 5 camnation . vith zest, admiration and a gift
ne whole — The record of a self-torment: ‘ narration. During @® MAINTENANCE ;
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oug I erie’ almost synonymous); of a cot tre om 12,000 to 80,000; @ SPARE PARTS
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‘For man, the vast marvel ener hands”: provided { '
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Co RICHARD auwvINGTON Remy 8 CANOE: ED oe eee es
group novelist, poet, essayist, translator Re ee eee ee Ee
mile hal $ rved in the Guards im th oD, Fe AMONG a0 t off
tier 1914-18 war. Since then he has One Omen, M. Woodhouse
ent his time in writing, chief Hutchinson 9s. 6d. 208 pages
SUNDAY HAIRCUT he South. of Prance tories, half-fiction, busi
THE MAN FROM THE TUNNEL picture of the Greel
HAMBROOK, Somerset By Theodora Benson. Gollancz. spre ee! os ath Do ee:
10s. Gd. 271 pages. Fae goons Alm
' Ree ge NINETEEN stories. Nineteen, >°¥ oe ee ae
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rlorse ern here not only ord tory. Thaf is the trouble wit ees ee, ota ae, Oe
ies eet lar pint t arc this book. pi
wer ‘ca oe get ae ' va It is easy enough to say of Faster! Faster! Patrick Bair =O ) |
a liga: = — ‘3 o ; How clever! Whdt an expe Eyre Spottiswoode. 9s. 6d
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, technigue! 3ut it is harder ction, and under the image of <
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rt of story you will like nereasing speed Bair paints
Bail Which’ makes it all the more society, its class divisions, _ its ECKSTEIN BR
ae eke using rrently nportant to remark that Miss upheavals and the tendency,
> o 710 countrie Benson has written some délight- exhibite y é volts against :
Site preparations fe rt London ful stories For instance, Thy SAE Whedon’ tc. counts ~ et BAY STREET.
sections of the Fair—which iS Lion and the Prey, with tructure, equally unjust. Tract] :
being held av Olympia and Earls funny, despairing glimpse of for the times, disguised as adven-|
Court—-are beginning this week Veronica. who, one feels, is a nice ture story, . x od Phone: 4667 W/Shop ven
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| CLASSIFIED ADS. |" """_| H ARBOUR, LOG | SHIFE ING NOTICES [| tara ta

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m wewonue =| PUBLIC NOTICES | 02s 2.0 os eye | ror spe Se ht erste Se Canadian National Steamships }

Telephone rh Lg.
24.50.—~a | aia a Henn etta, Sch. Everdene, CMV. Weils, from St. Kitts. Age
Led

PAGE TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE

























































































































*&



DaCosta % } er

























ae. ae Sch. Bive Nose Mac, Sch. Manuata, Co 1 er {
We atten stand Detide row erave, Sccies seco ee ener D’Ortac, Sch Zita Wonita, Sch S'S. “Stuyvesant.” 2.541 tons net Capt a ig FOR
‘ rs . ete | a C. Gorrion, Sch. Burma D., Sch. Molenaar, ftom midad. Agents: es : ails Ar ils | FURNTS
; And@ think we hear those loving words “© £25 tasily earned by obtaining orders from the Ist ef May, 1830. For further |... ul Counsellor, Sch. Frances W. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd. Salls B.. is = ao Barbados Barbador |B) cy for prvigtbe |
eee set Se eee for private Christmes Cards trom { Daf tubers, Dial S177. sy. | Smith, Seb. W. L. Bunizia. SOUTHBOUND Monire Halitax | adult only; every
; To dwell with him forever more. 9.4.50. ARRIVALS DEPARYURES | fence, cool well furans
The Garner Family. your friends. No previous experience | - me. SS. “Akoa Filgrin,” 3.931 tons net, M.V.*“Lady Joy,” 46 tons net, Capt i aie: Sth Apr | . uuraished
e burch ‘Village, pecusmar?. Write today for besutitei free = eee enien se wee | Capt. Haagensen, . Trinided. Agents: Parsons, for St Lucia. Agent: D. L.| LADY RODNEY 23rd
: ee Sample Book to Britain's largest ang, Cosst, Excelie:it sca bething Fully fur-) poco & Co. L Johnson Esq. LADY NELSON

. : . = = 26th 27th Ma Cottage on-sea, two ph
‘ ¢4.50—In. | #"etsest Publishers; highest commission,| “ished: four bedrooms, Refrigersios





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|
oe ae | ST. JAMES COAST _





























: }
Schooner “Alcoa Roamer,” 4233 tons SS. “Stuyvesant,” 2,541 toms net, Cap- | LADY RODNEY 14 Jaa tse } modern conveniences
*Y . marvellous money making opportunity. telephone, radio. Apply opposite ont *t. Capt. Pedersen, from Aruba. Agents: tain Molenaar, for Plymouth. Agents: | LADY NELSON mae i Jat | otherwise to an apy
hi grat memo: 4 my! Jones, Williams & ® Victorias | Phome 6286. - 3 Robert Thom Ltd S. P. Musson, Son & Co., Lid. LADY RODNEY oe me WANTED {for two B
-- afi ectened aod aeren DELLE Works, Preston, Co., oe i 9.450.—tin. Schooner “Lucille M. Smith,” 74 tons M.V. “Daerwood.” 94 tons net, Capt bungalow of house
oe) —_ inode this life on Good } net. Capt. Sealy rom British Guiana. DeCouteau, for St. Lucia. Agents: Schoon- Arrives Arrives rooms modern am
7 me ea | KILDARE—Eediord Avenue, St. Mi-! Agents: Robert Thom Lid. et Owners’ Association. J Hulifax Monitre: residential —_
‘oft a a } NOTICE |chael. 2 minutes, Yacht Ciub, well fur- : NORTHEOUND = Barbados ohn Hulifa res reldentie: core
Re eee cena ished bungacw, drawing room. dine) JN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION LADY RODNEY oh Apr. aed Mt er
ae The one whom I loved PARISH OF ST. ANDREW | eee ratrineconer. catace "a be let fot} Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd. Loide Sso Damingos, Alcoa Pegasus. | LADY NELSON 6th Mas ee ee ee ee FOR §
Was called away in Peace. Applications for the yacant post of| 7 inontns after ist May. Telephone 4631.| @¢vise that they can now communicate North Haven, South Mountain, Boskoop, | LADY RODNEY Sth Ju: Wi duce §=——— Bef dun, 3a du
: Gone but not vase ened by organist at St. Saviours will be received $450-—-1n | with the following ships through their Me De Noir, Moutier, Siren/L.C.A.Q. Meg-}| LADY NELSON 2th June 2, 4. se i ¥ — os Fe ae BLACKMAN’S, st.
t ee yee ART a > by the undersigned up to Saturday 15th Barbados Coast Station :— na, Lydia, Winston Churchill, Herdsman, | LADY RODNEY 27th nh Ju ‘ 2 ir house ‘built about

Capt. John D. P. Ampac, California,





in about 5 acres 1
room, dining room,
room, 6 rooms, 2”
| garden, orchard, water, §
telephone.

PINE HOUSE, st,

}
April. Further particulars may be had s
; Gon taken 3 tae ie Flagship Sinco, SS. Alcoa Pilgrim, Robert C. Tuttle, Rio Orinoco, Spurt All vessels fitted with cold storage cha:
drawing Rooms. Apply, Mrs. A. Rudder, Grenanger, Helena/P.E.P.T., Anna LM.O.Z., California/H.P.N.T., Seabreeze, | N.B.—Subject to change without notice. Al! vessels fitted wi id st
Vestry > . - ‘1 L. Condylis. San Wilfrido, San Vulfrano, Mormac Tide, Clan Macleod, Merestor. bers. Passenger Fares and freight rates on application to :—







St. Andrew. | Dia! 3186. $450—1n.| Texia/O.ZHX., Tista, Casablanca, Misr, Kvint, Balaklava/S.H.A.T., Salinas/Y.V.B }
|

and brother ALAN EAST Canadian Challenge: Hel . Geisha, Fagerije — e
Rt Dial] Esso Pittsburgh, Brazil, ‘Meee Pennant, 2 ea pois GARDINER AUSTIN & CcO., LTD. Agents

»
a
* ERN CYRUS, who lost his life in Colon,
: RP... on April 10th, 1946

“LEOPOLDVILLE”, Hastings.



2616 or 3934. 450—2nr



ia to be remembered by your Dear











|
|
|
Stone house standing in















































































































































































































































































































































a6 or oe ae } ee
eS vas mace FARAWAY", St. Philip Const. Pulls Seawell ' ; dining room, 4 bedrowe
: Corts and the rest of the family PARISH OF ST. PETER. shed, 3 3 servants rocens outbuildings, water, eh
q 9.4.50.—In./ ‘The Parochial Treasurer's Office will be} c@™park, ene peat eee: an ARRIVALS—By B.W.LA.L. Windy Spradiin. Tanya Roberts, Susan AT YOUR SERVICE telephone. inspection by
| open on the following days as from| Bething beach. From May ist. Dia! From TRINIDAD: Harold Pogson, Syl- Roberts, Ana DeCastro, Maria E. DeCas- ce iy ment only,
3 teen April Lith to May 2nd. via Field, Angela Field, Rufus Field, An- tro, Samuel Beam, Margaret De Bean, IN CLE ANING, DYEING, | Anata "
i” Saturday April 15th from 10 am. to| APARTMENT: Unfurnished Ground-| tonio Navarro, Eddie Texiera, Jean Sealy, Elizabeth Jean Lund, Mary E. LAUNDERING AND HAT i E Guest ¥
In ever loving memory of our foe i een | fear apartment, near town and Club | Michal Sealy, Hilda Skinner, Irving Skin. Wedderburn, William Musgrave. ; DRESSING 4 iy) thing. _ Furnished
. re et ae an Saturday April 22nd from 10 a.m. to| {No Pets, no Children). For further par-| ner, Walter Keefe. Catherine Keefe, John From ADA: Fred Toppin, Joyce RAYMOND JORDAN. en Sn Sq.
TA — departed this life on! so) hoon ticulars Daal 2686 io eal a aera Sone, Rentick, Sealy, Arnci- Johnso: Tudor, Ignatious MecWeen | Bay Street, Opp. Combermere St. | bedrooms, *. a
by “Phey marked the footsteps that He trod] ,.Sstusdey. April 2&h from 10 am, to —| Helmut Kasiske. Nicholas ‘Robins, view 4 ANTIGUA: Cicely Grant, Christo- mabey cyt aNc.) : ] water, electricity,
His 2ea) inspired ae ae Signed, “NEW HAVEN”, Crane Coast fully fur-| toria Robinson. Donald Opperman, Peggy pher MeConpey. Consignees. { : | ages, garden.
* And cma Ha Lect — God G. S. CORBIN, praerey 3 er ee rooms | Dalton, Nei! Mackenzie, Elsie Lumsden, TEL. «4 { | _ ROSLYN. 8th Ave,
: Possess the prom) Parochial Treasurer, doub @arage, lighting plant, woter] Arturo DeLima, John Adamson, John J : = j j Woode hy di
Elton and Gwen Moore, Reg Fonte = St. Peter.| mill, Superb bathing beach. Dial 447§] Adamson, Josn Simmers, Mary Campbelj, URES—By T.C.A. PROFESSIONAL NOTICE \ j ae closed verandape
“2 children, Margot, Bever 7 Florette alia November, December. John Campbell, Jane Macintosh, Robert For PoROnto. James Clancy, Eliza- } i { | Ms acre land, water,
Ptiny Ronald igrand children), Emeline or 19.3.50—t.f.m} MacIntosh, Carmen Johnson, Rupert beth C , Vilda Woodroffe, Worthing- ; DR. C. Mc CONNEY a! Ww :
‘ caaet) 9.4.50—In. NOTICE ee - : noni Cheeks. John Robinson, Dorothy Robin- ton mie erie Hughes, Harley Hughes, | Chirepracter | ing rasan es ean von te
“SEA SEEN’ —Hastings m isti«con. Max ungarten, Ruzia Baungarten, Mabel . Geo fC r ty, |
1 ——————" | TENDERS for removing and replacing} May. Apply: Mrs. Marion Gibbs. Dis!| Pedro Baungarten, Roderick Stewart, Archie aad Kathe Grier” Maney, Per Office re-opens on | Dover, Christ Ch
ie the Ceiling of St. Philip's Parish Church, | 4568. 1.4.50—4n.| May Stewart, Bertie McLean, John kins, Hamilton Gardiner, Audrey Pape, TUESDAY, llth APRIL |@| Philip and in the City,
FOR SALE | will be received by me up to 30th April, - se — | Stanley, Anthony Corrie, Charlies Peirce, David Pape, Goldie Smith, Ann Cording- } Ee aa ) a | et
1950. pete sn ee Cia —_ — A aoe Blanc, John ly, Ethel Groves, John Kestle, Florence | ————— SO ——~ : poco | a cn:
fh a ~. U GOCEERG, pow segue ickeker” Fiicidaire. | ticles Fane ene ee weyin Siene, Eustle, Sianler Sepien, Panes Seater SSS SSS im
Parochial Treasurer, Mitchen, c. complete igidair Helen King, Mary Kernahan, Yvonne Al- For BERMUDA: William Atkinson, } eee wh) |
‘ AUTOMOTIVE St. Philip’s.| 8%2 miles from Bridgetc iadin, Valerie Chimasing, George Jack- Gweneth Atkinson, Ulrick Brandtzaeg, : : a
; 7.4.50.—6n.| lovely St. James Beach. m vine Drakes, Avril Rawlins, Regi- Frances Ince, Claude Gausden, Madelaine VISITORS TO OUR ISLAND REAL EST, ik
1 rd 8 HP. 187. Recently J. A. Reid, Lone Star Gar in, John Bergendahl, Lovely Gausden, Edward Love, Betty Love, An-! fares . ia ee 9 ft |
aa punters 2S ali Ring QUEEN'S COL I EGE fast,.St. James or Phone 91 Harold Kaplan, Patrick nette Greer, Thomas Bamford. Aileen WHY HA VE BAGGAGE w ORRY < '
. Gm, ber wendand Spm From LA GUAIRA, Gervase D Sprad Bfor PRINIDAD. Winitred Watson. You can leave your Baggage with us for despatch by our | DIX
a % ym Lé : tvase D. Jo ‘or inifred Watson, Her- ave you gage wilt! s f :
1 94s0—2n.}| ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS } BLUE HOUSE-—1ucas Street. A de-| tin, Nell Spradlin, Tamara Spradlin, bert Watson. ar service. You can be assured of its safety.
| sirable business stand. With or with =
' CAR—One Morris 8 H.P. Sedan in Al 1950 fixtures and furniture. Contact un Remember ! , e c }
y 0 ay nang gag L. Al Eel any 1 a es ene for ~ ree en , Prince wi r GO RN N I WE GIVE PERSONALIZED SERV ICE | AND
yet ir a mr ueen's college wil he in reet. 66. 31.3 7 VE MENT OT cES }
November, 1950, for candidates who eas en nt ee ee = y YY T
’ ie edieans ana Vanguard Cor 4 tr| pes nore ones ian "7. se prams ie tin stab! - SMITHS SHIPPING SERV ICE | |
1 . mileage uncer 3. years on Sist ¥. , and who an e Suitabi x ss
‘ aver veaving Barbados , a wit pot be ever 12 years of age on | fon fees or ee oe , ATTENTION is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) 4 WARDERS if (JOHN M. E
1 Phone: ndso st July, immed: ? « 7 & | BLADC
¢ Hoe, = . 6.4 50—3n 2. Candidates from this Examination] Swan Street. 31 .3.50—+.f.n (Amendment) Order, 1950, No. 14 which will be published in the MOVERS — PACKERS — & FREIGHT FOR | : re
t will be admitted as vacancies occur ms fficial Gazette of Thursday 6th April, 1950. Alexander House, if
1947 Ford Anglia in really good (i) in January, 1951 BUNGALOW, also Fiat, facing sea m ‘ . a FOR SALE
‘ eahattion $750.00 Dial 2592 (ii) in Septic, 1951 road, Hastings, furnished from M 2. en this Order the maximum wholesale and retail ve ide Street, if
shi , t nes, rey ee m| weil known and lux
. BEDFORD TRUCK—2-3 ton with cab ‘ phone 2949. $1.3.90-—-t.? : ehene - are eeeree Ss; Se = | in lovely surroundings,
j pirtenr Dial 4616. BARBA ARTICLE WHOLESALE Ons pease a ee : =e i
(New). Courtesy Garage, Dial #16. BADOS CLERKS’ UNION “OFFICE One Qfice ones _ Seni 00 em os Pace — — — . > ee a ;
A General Meet will be held at the unary é \ | Delightful stone seaside
CAR—Ford V-8. Well kept and —— ae on 13th i ts r Sa y : $2.7 omanarete a ra i Sahensé Your BEAUTY | overlooking ocean.
7 condition. Always owner driven ew ou are spec ed t nd ~farcoal es ° -75 per bag of 110 i : h h |
: es aan ‘Sa win horns.) Come and make your suggestions and _ with these | STANMORE LODGE,
; (M. 17 Apply N. Niles or Dial 3213 or| take part in the r roceedi nes lbs. ex ship $2 95 per | A A R chael (near Paradise B
some, Taal at Belle Gu Fe Road Peat eee. hag of 110 lbs. ex ? M XF CTO Products | Large 2 storey residences
or James Street 5o—: t ret 7
. sail 9.4.50- | store. 4c. per Ib. { Face Powder Brushes, | acres. fe
: ; =ane & —— — sece ma. -_ \ Max Factor make up Blend PLEASANT HALL, St
hand ply é na i h April, 1950 Almond Crea Beautiful old Estate hous)
: Roebu - Str | 7 ‘ . at 7 Pe £ 2 _ 44% acres,
| PUBLIC SALES Votice:—-The above change in price has been necessitated by the in- ” + amp ey ee ” ;
creased Cost of Charcos iii » » Astrigent Fe | HOUSE & GENERAL SN
, ELECTRICAL ost of Charcoal from British Guiana. : “si | Matthias Gap. A 2 stam
FRIDGE—English Elect Fridge, as| AUCTION 7.4,50.—2n. Pan Cake | erty and profitable busing]
new. Ring 4123 ,between 4 and 5 5 | TRELAWNY &
9.4.50—2n 1 HAVE been instructed by the receiver | ne
ot: Wasdhe to cher Sere te Oat JOIN THE BARBAD | Hastings Road, | A bunealag
WASHING MACHINE — New unused] Sue yon eee aay i day fA sie 08 POLIOE FORCE { | eae house, May bed
General Electric ! mpacky. (Seriuing | St © ees Se 2) fans. PEnSee CanAS | Lt samils. soust b > Anat An interesting car i
Beeminin tor $180.0 wig Soles 6 Bee: eee, pin Bg | Box 88 70 Advocate ¢ 1450-1 & career with good prospects | THE MOORINGS
jee Lid in > OS ec OF > is Y 7 7 | > je
i alr eriacieentmeniinenenaeemninnegterne | Whar te Copper tastene’ anh bas to} em 1. Men of character and education are required for enlistment Lim Gene. Wall Bnown 3
i WASHIN MA Canadian’ @ Marine engine. Terms cash j OK—A wood ¢ nce n this Force i | Seen Yee any
| Electric, irreplacs 9 Cash D'ARCY A. SCOTT, Salary good and sleeping a * ‘a \ r ous 1@i| FRIENDLY HAL
Thesy Ga sge. Dial 4616 : ee Gov. Auctioneer Apply Mrs. H.W Spla I 2. The pay of a constable on joining is $52.00 a month rising by } | J alues A& Oualities at the | One of the larger LL,
6450—3 5.8.8 7 Sass Ot Supeee s on a in l increments of $48.00 to 0 } a beautiful position overs
: . = , nail | | 1 2 ee $80.00 per month, plus $2.00 a month BRO ADW AY Ae eee
: LIGHTING P! Climax 273 KVA-| UNDER THE SILVER < pan wth othe. tan allowance. After 4 years service he is eligible for a marriage £ é )
HA ER & P visi an Roeb s . allow an e to a maximum of $7.20 per month. The minimum pay of ) PLASTIO RAINCOATS with Hoods at S2.10 & $4.03 (a bargain) }j eet ne iad nea
MM eal ats “ jad ve eee eee 4) Non Commissioned Ranks is, Cor poral $80.00, Sergeant $92.00, Station { oO Fe : 3 : ‘ } able for flat conversion,
1 LIGHTING PLANT—One D< Lister ante woes [se or 1 jer ‘ os nt $100.00. Promotion t. ad 4 th } PLASTIC BAGS in latest styles Black, Brown, White etc. from $3.95 to $4.95 {Ki ‘
4 , yr Light > 1 KW. 110 : Gweet's 3 i ARTY Figs FOX 4 4 4 sergeant ( omotion is made on merit, an lepends on the } ; “
+% Volts. Petrol crive i ok Wl amuse tense Weaione to Che s) : fant Mist ; the Cl nan There is opportunity for promotion to the Inspectorate and to | PLASTIC CHILDREN'S BAGS $1.92 cach in White, Black and Red | ane Dusaatw oith © aan
* kson, Belvedere Plantation, St. Peter | 901 ne . ‘| : ma : ‘ / } .
— 44.50—3n “BRANKER eeOnMAN & 06 Foundation § fror ymmissioned Rank. ) CHILDREN’S CLARKE SHOES in White, Brown from 3% to 74% iat Sone eee
: cones t + eeetnienen | dle oe 3. Requirements for enlistment )} CHILDREN'S ANKLETS in White, Brown & Pink sizes 5—® 86e., 400 | Well beult sone Cann
9.4.50.—In apy ed 6 rding % PN ee cee ck yr oee cs oe ee a : 5 ft. 8 ins. { i | position
qualifica a expe c i >
st aati . \pplications sb t Chest 34 ins. , ce . 5) i aa
: HARRIER PUPPIES Re inder of } » . " k . . Pam ced ole oben ec Renee i W / » ( } RESIDENCE, Brighton
‘ Vitter at reduced price. Pt ne Sr. ihe Binanater ter ian Shes Education . «inde « eeniolhe Not less than Standard VII BROAD AY DRESS SHOP. i | Michael. Well. placed @ im
: “ UNDER THE SILVER | 42 a a | Se 4. Applicants will be seen at District “A” at the following | ===> ao Ny] | with upto 4 ccmes if
: eee mere laek HAMMER Sec. to Gov. Body imes: — 3 iff) .MAYNARDS, St. Pe
| Geeaten by OFC. in los aia mad Tuesday 18th April 10 am 21 ee te ae ee ae
: : Or 4 a f 3 t Oare 4 Hh. ! eres by arra:
, Plant, St. T A. Bond, we will sel! his furniture at No All persons who have sat t ior Cambridge or School N J e if) 7
} — — . a 4, Abergeidie Fiat, Dayrells Road, “artificat . “ite : - he ian c . 4 | LENOLEU! i CARPETS | BLACKMAN'’S, St. Jo
} _ MULE—One Island Mule. 1 which aa } MISCELLANEOUS Certificate Examination. Documents to support this must be produced. : oe | tate property with histore
to work ‘single. Canefield Plant, § : nd D Upr and re em Wednesday 19th April 10 a.m. \§ Sizes: 9 ft. by 744 ft. and 1014 ft. by 9 ft. | os: Beautiful locations |
homa 2 hairs, 6 « lorr cr * with 1 Pé NG GUESTS at v 4 . . :
: 3 5 : ns, Coffee and Ornament Tables, Flat| Leith Worthing on the se rT All other applicants who fulfil the requirements of paragraph | Also | ESTATE HOUSE, St
MECHANICAL Tow Des China Cabts et all mahog-| res sonable 2.4.50—5n. 73 above. | 18 Near Colony Club,’ Optond
: seca any; lassware, Rugs Wr _Painted| ——. . - - } , y 7 | 25 acres.
1.4 SiCTCLES iceeules & Prittipe. tow-| Beck, Mhelvge. Wall “Mirtors, Verandah | “PAYING GUESTS — Working gent (Sgd.) R. T. MICHELIN, LINGLEUM IN ROLLS 6ft. wide | WEMBLEY, Navy
est prices. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4391. | Lamps,Pine and other Tables, Duchesse e, Hastings, Comfortable cool room Commissioner of Police. All very reasonable in Price 2 storey house with sai
; 6.450—3n Dressing Fable, Beds ac Table in m 108 | with running water. Phone 3390 Police Headquarters, P ; | den. Very moderate prich
i any; Ge immor ingle gs anc 945 : Rpae .
€ Fibre Mattresses; Divan Bedsteads and Bridgetown, i) LITTLE BATALLYS, St
L FURNITURE Deep en. Pattresses: Cra ile. iiss ‘ BILLIARD TABLE By The dc 6th April, 1950. “stablisheo l. HERBER | | {¢j Incorporated Charming re- A ot F
: q . © Burner Stove Regimer Officers’ Mes One Zz x . ‘ i i
; STEEL OFFICE FURNITURE—Filing| and Oven, Larder, Ironing Board, Kitchen] Billiard Table “Pleas e commu t 9.4.50.—3n, 86 1926 p: eevee. ini. ners wri
§ ab (4 drawer, letter foolscap | Utensils, Electric Hot Plate and Iron, Step| the Adjutant stating price 5.4. 5 10 & 11 Roebuck Street
, Locks), Stationery cupboards oe ewe pee eh Bicycle with new LEETON-ON-SEA,
i with Ic ete. Courtesy Garage, Dia)| Inner Tubes, Plants and other items THANK N J PANCE—Finding BEAESOBES FLAGS of Ot
1 391 é 64:50—Sn.| Sale 11.90 g'eleck — Terms Cash.| seit unatle to purchare, f remain ot the SELL LL LAIST ee ao end bangle -"
! c BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO, discretion of those that are in positior PART ONE ORDERS
: ————— to help 1 am greatly in need of an old ~ . SALISBURY, Gun Hill 0
Auctioneer. a : N a A Ng r lg : :
: | convey milk, HALDANE JOHN BY 7 H > ly ‘ the most attract
MISCELLANEOUS #.4.50.—2n.| SON, Higck Rocks St Michael oO fie Tk gullies ‘Biidel snk A Very Happy EASTER To All 3/B) ccc? 'iccttt™*ite, im
i | 4.56 I 4 t-LCOl. J. »V.DE., B.v., } * ({#| available with 8 acres, xi
; Over the holidays try a morning swim : | ; | duced in price for quick 4
t and Pimr with real lemonade, at REAL ESTATE — | “ Commanding, } Of Y ou { ; ra
5 Crane House Club S450-n. | “ir Bratege having @ecided to leave! TUITION The Barbados Regiment. | |, CARLDIEM, st aa
i UES— ne “| Melbourne House, Belmont Road, at the | Issue No. 14. 6 Apr. 50. } Wop . 1M ten ree oe
: GANTiQuzs- on Jewels, fine’ ever 30th April, the property, which stands SPEECH TRAINING—Do peak oe ee a ae ee eta i IS THE SINCERE WISH OF THE BLENDERS OF fect beach and bathing.
: Watercolours Early books, Maps, Auto- fen, Peet Done one 7 excellent condi-| weil, or is your accer idrar S] 1. PARADES—TRAINING | | INCH MARLOWE,
erabhe. ote. At Gorringns {ntique Shop. | ‘interested parties please dial 2480—| re heip you to overoome tt ; All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700 hours TAYLOR'S P I ' | | alow sth acre
adjoinin oye. ated - : ¥ ae — 29 ,- = Ss } galow wit 2 acres
1.9.49.—t..n, | Brittons Nursing Home 0.4.50—6r ple method. Moderate term Thursday 13 > ) I coastland.
1 er a iie-———| GIIGInd Lkeboie-Ginere i on Thursday 13 April ’50. ) stland.
VALOR STOVE PAKTS — Flame] “REST HAVEN", Brighton Beact y experienced teacher ar i Medal-}2. VOLUNTARY CLASSES ROUMAIKA, Navy
' Sirantae OW i Smal) home, all conveniences, near beact { the Guildhall Sctiool of Mus ada : r : NT" . STINCTIVE F TOT . ¥e-modaihel
4 f Rives, Galle a duaaae as pl and bus, low land rent. Inspection ‘neday | Moderate te ~ LEILA BOXILL. 2 NCOs who are attending the voluntary class on Tuesday 18 April (WITH THE DISTINCTIVE FLAVOL R) a a ee
i items, enquire Auto Tyre Co., Trafalgar) 4nd tomorrow or phone owner at 3188] Walpole Street, London S. W. 3. Tel are asked to read and learn Lesson 4 of the LMG Pamphlet. They THE REAL “FAMILY BLEND ; ¥
: St. Dial 2696 §450—t.i.n | Tuesday 9.4.80—1n, | Sloane 8674. Going to Lond Cut ou : 7 7 os Se , SUNNYSIDE (Near
Ae * - Facneney lee ee these Ads if you are, They_ mey > will be called upon to teach this lesson. | AOR | Treasury), St. Lay,
a AUTO ACCESSORIES—-Chamois leath- aluable property, wide ; : “13. ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDEBLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK * structed 3 years old
ot ers, dust cloths, cheese cloth, waxes,| ffontage, productive orchard \% acre of ber bungalow
Polishes, gas tank locking caps for Eng-| land, electric, water, going at a reason- ENDING 17 APRIL ’50. Joh D. Taylor & Ss, Ltd. for removal. ~
>t lish and American Cars and Trucks. | able price. Owner leaving colony soon Orderly Officer 2/Lt. S. G. Lashley ons | :
j Dial 4391, Courtesy Garage 6.4.50—3n eg Arnold Lowe, Bonnets, ‘Baen's rderty cer .. “ oa . , . » Las . ty | WINDY RIDGE, St 3
: 4.50—In. | Orderly Serjeant .. 16 Sjt. Storey, B. W. == of the most attrac
PIMs ind a morning swim at Crane} -> - — > : ‘ states | erties
‘ mit Seka + ee offer for sale Public Com- Next for Duty <<< So } oe a
petition at my office VICTORIA STREET arly Acer i nee ea eo” Hii acre: Te ‘
GALVANISE SHEETS tn 74 and @| ° Wednesday 12th at 2 p.m. i acre lan Orderly Officer .. a Lieut. P. L. C. Peterkin } } | acres. of. Inid. out
abt gauge St. 6ft. Gins. 8ft. and ott. penethe at PROMENADE ROAD, SPOONEPS Orderly Serjeant .. oe 209 Sjt. Long, C. B. } ia ied .
a fo | Bias aos sh See | | Vee
R/1 “38 in various does En use nding m double roofed bi : } ' a
‘s Auto — Company, Trafalgar Enquire house, with usual outoffices—painited— M. L. D. SKEWES COX, Major, |} Vel peeees oe oe if
' 1.3.50—t fn oe at ee of read a other S.0.L.F. & Adjutant, | : ;
GALVANISED PIPE. HERF)—Hialfinct | terms for sale apply to:— The Barbados Regiment. |) ° | ott GRARME AIS
. to Two-inch galvanised pipe. 26c¢. to $1.0 | Christ Church. m
‘ hae BARNES 2 CO, LTD R. ARCHER McKENZ: storey coral stone
: : 25.3.50—t f.n Victorig Street unusual design
2.4.50—In Offered at a very

. i figure.
CAMERA—Kodak Refiex 3.5 Anistigmat
; Lens, with flash gun attachment and “SUNSET VIEW"—Rockley. (Adjoin
yellow, dark yellow, green ond red.| ing BLUE WATSRS), on the land sid
Piters; and Weston exposure meter | Of the road faciny the Bay with 13,40
Price $350.00 or nearest offer. Telephone | square feet of land ineluding the lan
RS. Nicholls at 3925, between 10 a.m.| across the read running to the water's
and 4 p.m. 4.4.50—t.f.n | edge. The house contains verandah
hcceeilipaanrainmaanareninciaat oe ae dining rooms, three bed-
You'll regret not having your Pimms] fooms w ru water, and all othp
@ kitcben with

{
;
4

COLD SPRING 06
James, Well positi
| on coast with

A. M. WEBB

=
—
”
a
ip





Offering $96,000 TRINIDAD

GOVERNMENT 3% RETREAT, St.

stone property with 1
own beach. Open |







t Crane House Club. 6.4.50—3n. | offices inclu cupboards DEBENTURES
eee ee te Water, Electricity, and Radic as lle ada BEULAH, Hastings
installed. Garage and rvants rooms placed 3 bedroomed

in yard

PERSONAL pacer nt SY Or Shee WR. we.
4

The abeve will be set up to public
competition at the office of the under-
The public are hereby warned against signed on Friday, the 2ist of April, 1950,

low.

SILVER SPRAY,
Stone built 2 b .
bungalow facing sea.






155 Roebuck St., Bridgetown
Dial 3188. -:- Hours : 9-3




























wanted.
giving credit to my wife Eugene N | 94 2 P.m, Above is the Photograph of the
Bovell inee Yearwood) as 1 do not hold CARRINGTON & apALY, REV. A. R. BROME, approved and ap- |, oS BLUE VISTA,
myself responsible for her or anyone else m3 13n Uawas Btreet.| nointed by the Elders’'—Council as Col- = ly built imposing co
= any debt ao in 4 name x . lecting Officer to receive Subscriptions, SUGAR FA dence near Golf
unless by a written order signe me : Donations, Love-tokens 1d Gifts, § y,
Tijlancd W. E DOVER” | The undersigned will offer for sale by | Rye ee ee tant City CTORY MACHINERY



HILLCREST, Come
ly constructed pi
acres. Offers wanted,

Formerly Bank Hall, public competition at their office. James | Gog
=r or Michael, | Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the Ith =
9.4.50—In |4@y of April, 1960, at 2 p.m

1 The dwellinghouse called “RAD- |
COURT” standing on 8.436 square feet) INSURED MOVING!

of land at Navy Gardens, Christ Church

(Religious Assembl Barbados



FAIRHOL?*E, Maxwell 24
stone house with appl





(as a whole or piecemeal)

| FOR SALE













ee
















acre further §
& FO Bb es on application to the under H) ‘Crai ts et at Lah,
LOST UN ; signe: ) raign’ Estate, Princestown. Marine
2 The dwellinghouse called “SAN- i TRINIDAD. , Modena and teresa
x powr standing ‘on 10,500 square feet i IN OU with double
of land at Fontabelle, St. Michael. Ir { / ,
LOST ee on seaebieation te the i )) ALL TTEMa of MACHINERY in the Factory comprising, R ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT a
tween the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. / tt inter alia, Cane Hoist; Engine; | N Recently
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series rained For further particulars, apply to : (‘*) it Triple Effect; "Cc Svehaliboiess tte ne: Sule, Heater, W } aie anna houst,
Finder please return same to Oliver HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD, | tf Rust um en ugals; e can quote you figure wanted for q
Leacock. New Orleans, &th Avenue, St. Solicitors, vON'T worry YOURSELF ABOUT ( anes Engine (90—-110 h.p.); Generating ‘Set (20 k.w.); }
Michae! 7.4.50—2n. 7.4.50.—5n. | MOVING Filter Presses; Sundry Engines, Pumps, Tanks, etc., etc. The above list is am
(AHUNGALOW AT NAVY GARDENS. | LET US TAKE CARE OF ALL \ on of some cf the prope
. af “~ Na { t y t: r
| Fuiilt December 1942. Cool quiet locs Personal S ip ian hon wee { Purchaser(s) te bear all costs of dismantling eeumeni ae
PROFESSIONAL NOTICE | Stone roofed Everite. Verandah, Draw- Phone 3305 ; and removal. em
} nk D 2 and Breakfast Rooms.| BARBADOS FURNITURE REMOVER oui } ; a ocally,
i : i Kithe otte w ith built in larder and cup For full partic — a whi — A y f | may be ol
DR. FERREIRA of “Chiroville” Upper| boahds, toilet and tiled bath, 3 S. CODRING? | paruculars and inspection apply >— ike oe Hoover
SG i ractic| oe wee ; y,| Britt xX Ra ; ‘ \ } REAL ESTATE
ra ; Baree, servants’ roon silet - WM. FOGARTY, LTD. 1/6, 1 i} &
corrects diseases of eyes, ears, | bres es, la = : Port of Spain. 6, %4, M4, 1/3 BLP. 50 Cye Auctioneers
i” hoger ; Prk Miacde anot-oomaminn ‘ » 2, “4, 1/3 BLP. 50 Cycle 110 Volts TIO
” , trons, jung a“ mach, kidneys and) souintment only. Archie Cake. ‘Ph =| ADVERTISE... it TRINIDAD. 3 olts , PLANTA NS 5
wer organs. Dial 2881. i 4538, § to 4 4.4, 50-40 it pays | === Phone
_—————— ——— j zs



SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1950



1B.B.C. Radio Notes:

West Indian Poems
For Today

‘Caribbean Voices’ for Sunday,
April, will, present special
Mioems for Easter from no fewer
Han four islands in the West In-
ies. The programme opens with
Trinidad which is represented by
rrol Hill and Barnabas Ramon-
ortune, continues with St. Vin-
ent in the person of Owen M.
ampbell, a newcomer to ‘Carib-
n Voices’, Jamaica with an-
her newcomer, Mary Swaby,
nd concludes with Dominica with
pme more of the excellent poems
Emily. Lockhart. After this
petry miscellany the half-hour
nds with a short story by
fichael Browne of Trinidad.
Handel’s yg oe =
Easter sees t h an-
oo y of the —? oe
Handel’s ‘Messiah.’ It was first
iormed in public at Dublin on
0! 13, 1742. In the B.B.C’s
Music Magazine’ in the coming
eek Julian Herbage will talk
bout that first performance and
ustrate his talk with gramo-
hone records of the music. An-
ther broadcast in the G.O.S., and
notable one, is a performance of
sic from the ‘Messiah’ by the
pyal Choral Society with the
ondon Symphony Orchestra con-
ted by Sir Malcolm Sargent
he soloists will be Ena Mitchell
oprano), Mary Jarred (contral-
), Heddle Nash (tenor), Trevor
nthony (bass), and Arnold Greir
piano). ‘Music Magazine’ will be
the air on Sunday, 9th at 2.15
m. and also on Friday, 14th at
.30 p.m. while the music from
fandel’s ‘Messiah’ will be on Sun-
y at 2.30 p.m. right after ‘Music
gazine’ and can also be heard
Monday, 10th at 6.00 p.m.
The Hydrogen Bomb
‘The Hydrogen Bomb’ is_ the
He of a talk by the distinguished
entist, Sir George Thomson,
R.S., which will be broadcast in
e G. O. S. in the coming week.
he speaker discusses the possib-
ties of imitating on the earth
lear reactions of the sort from
hich the sun derives its energy:
mely. the synthesis of heavier
ments from hydrogen or its
opes. It will be on the air at
0 p.m. on Saturday, 15th inst,
Life on the Planets?
other talk on the science side
ich should appeal to the layman
ll be given in the coming week.
is really a double talk—and not
the American slang meaning of
at—with two scientists giving
views on the question ‘Is
ere Life elsewhere in the Uni-
se?’ The scientists are Dr. Fred
le, Lecturer in Mathematics at
mbridge, and Dr. C. D. Darling-
F.R.s., Director of the John
nes Horticultural Institute. The
er gives his reasons for be-
ying that there must be large
mbers of pianets in the Uni-
e supporting life similar to
t on the earth, and Dr. Darling-
will speculate on the form
h life might take. The pro-
mme, under the title of ‘From
Third Programme’ will be
badcast on Friday, 14th at 5.30

adio Programmes

Sunday, April 9, 1950

00 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m, News
ysis; 7.15 a.m, Nights at the Opera;
am. From the Editorials; 8.10,

Programme Parade; 98.15 a,m.
h Orchestral Music; 8,30 a.m. Don-
Peers; 9,00 a.m. Close Down; 12.00
The News; 12.10 p.m. News Analy-
12.15 p.m. Carroll Calls the Tune;
0 p.m. Sunday Service; 1.00 p.m, Peo-
and Places Around London; 1,15 p.m.
o Newsreel; 1.30 p.m. Ray's a Laugh;
p.m, The News; 2.10 p.m. Home News
m Britain; 2.15 p.m. Music Magazine;
p.m. Handel's Messiah; 3.30 p.m,
niry Magazine; 4.00 p.m, The News;
p.m. Interlude; 4.15 p.m. Michael

Saxophone Quartet; 4.30 p.m. Sun-
Half-Hour; 5.00 p.m. Variety Band-
; 6 pm. Programme Parade, 6.15
. From the Children’s H o wu r;
P.m. Swing Music; 7.00 p.m. The
3 7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15 p.m.
bbean Voices; 7.45 p.m. Easter Mes-









kk ai

Sage; 8.00 p.m. Radio Newsree) 8.15 p.m.

Voice of the Violin: 8.30 p.m. Sunday
9.10 p.m,

Service; 9.00 p.m. The News
Home News from Britain;
ple and Places Around London; 9.36 p.m
Tip Top Tunes; 10.00 p.m. London Forum;
10.30 p.m. Much Binding in the Mars
11.00 pm. The News ;

BOSTON
ast ge Mc, WRUW 11.73 Me, WRUK

7.75 Me.

430 p.m. Christian Science Pro;
3.5 p.m,

gramme

Lecture on Christian Science,
se Monday, April 10, 1950.

7.00 am. The News: 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m. Listeners Choice; 7.45
Places of Interest; 8.00 a.m. From the
Editorials; 8.10 a.m. Programine Parade;
8.15 aa. Journey into Melody; 9.00 a.m.
Close down; 12.00 noon The News; 12.10
p.m. News Analysis; 12.15 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade; 12.18 p.m. Music From
Grand Hotel; 1.00 P.m. Science Review
1.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 1.30 p.m. Have
& 0; 2.00 p.m. The News; 2.10 p-m. Home
News from Britain; 2.15 p.m. Sports
Review; 2.30 p.m. London Forum; 3.00
ban. From the Third mime; 4.00
p.m. The News; 4.10 p.in. The Daily Ser.
vice; 4.15 pam. Sweet Serenade; 5.00 Lis-
teners Choice; 5.15 p.m. Programme Par-
ade; 5.30 p.m. Places of Interest: 5.45
p.m. Accordeon Interlude; 6.00 p.m. Han-
del's Messiah; 7.00 p.m. The News: 7.10
p.m. News Analysis; 7.15 p.m, John Bull’s
Band; 7.45 p.m. Glad to Meet You; 8.00
Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. London Light
Concert Orchestra; 9.00 P.m. The News;
9.10 p.m. Home News from Britain; 9.15
p.m. Science Review; 9.30 P.m. David
Willeocks; 10.00 p.m. The Adventures of
Richard Hannay; 10.30 P.m. Three's com-
Pany; 10.45 p.m. Meet the Common-
wealth; 11.00 The News.



Tuesday, April 11, 1950,

7.00 am. The News; 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m. Scottish Variety Or-
ehestra; 7.45 a.m. Generally Speaking;
8.00 a.m. From the Editorials; 8.10 a.m,
Programme Parade; 8.15 a.m. Souvenirs
of Music; 9.00 a.m. Close down; 12.00
noon The News; 12.10 p.m. News Anaiy-
sis; 12.15 Accordeon Interlude; 12,30 p.m,
Tip Top Tunes; 1.00 P-m. On the Job;
1.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 1.30 p.m. John
Bulls Band; 2.00 p.m. The News; 2.10
p.m. Home News ffom Britain; 2.15 p.m,
Sports Review: 2.30 p.m. Ring up the
curtain; 3.30 p.m. Your Song Parade;
4.00 p.m, The News; 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service; 4.15 p.m, The Adventures of
Richard Hannay; 4.45 p.m. Voice of the
Violin; 5.00 p.m. British Orchestral Music;
5.15 p.m. Programme Parade; 5.30 p.m,
Generally Speaking; 5,45 p.m. Sandy Mac
Phersan at the Theatre Organ; 6.00 p.m,
Ring up the Curtain; 7.00 p.m. The News:
7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15 p.m. West
Ward Ho; 7.45 p.m. Letter from London;
8.00 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. Sou-
venirs or Music; 9.00 p.m. The News;
9.10 p.m. Home News from Britain; 9.15
p.m. On the Job; 9.30 p.m. BBC Midland
Light Orchestra; 10.00 p.m. The Story-
teller; 10.15 p.m. Dance Music; 10.30 p.m,
Michael Krein Saxophone Quartet; 10.45
p.m, Report from Britain; 11,00 P.m, The
News,



Must Quit Poland
IN 18 DAYS

WARSAW, April 8.
The Polish Government has
extended from seven to 18 days
the period Reuter’s correspondent
in Poland will be allowed to stay
in the country, following the
expulsion order issued against

him.

The correspondent, Vincent A.
Buist, the last representative of
the British Press in Poland, was
told on Tuesday that he had to
leave the country within a week,
because of “unobjective report-
ing”

He will now leave on April 24.

It now appears from the state-

ment made to the correspondent

that the charge, which he strongly

denies, is based solely on a very
brief version in a London morn-
ing paper of his lengthy report of

a Polish trial.

The paper summarised his

report of the trial of Mrs, Halina

Firth—a British subject sentenc-

ed for harbouring a Pole and a
German—giving only the charge,

the verdict, the sentence and the
fact vhat, she has been held in
communicado by the Polish au-
thorities—Reuter,

Don’t Tell Your Friends
Tell the Advocate,

- The Advocate Pays

For News

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Who Knows
Contentment?

NEW book captures America



SUNDAY

Church Services

ANGLICAN
ST. PAULS
Easter Day
5.00 a.m. Sung Mass and Holy C
munion; 7.30 a.m. Holy Communion;





Not a thriller, a novel, or ah a.m. Procession, Solemn Mass and Ser-

€Seapist romance, but a serous

work on the world’s most sought-

after, elusive, and

unbuyat.e

thing—the contentment that comes

with peace of soul.

The author is slow-speaking,
silver-tongued Monsignor Fulton
J. Sheen, America’s best-known

Roman Catholic preacher.

And now his book—its title is

“Peace of Soul’*—after

Britain tomorrow.

Consider these extracts from
the philosophy of Fulton Sheen:

THE OLD theological division,
‘of those who are in tne state of
grace and those who are not, has
given way to the political separa-
tion of Rightists and Leftists. The

modern soul has definitely limited
its horizons; having negated the

eternal destinies, it has even lost

its trust in nature, for nature with-
but God is traitorous ....
UNLESS souls are savéd, noth-
ing is saved; there can be no
world peace unless there is soul
peace. World wars are only pro-
Jections of the conflicts waged in-
side the souls of modern men, for
nothing happens in the external
world that has not first happened
within a soul.

THE MODERN man is no longer
a unity, but a confused bundle of
complexes and nerves.,...There
is no single overall purpose in his
life....he may be likened to a
radio that is tuned in to several
Stations; instead of getting any
one clearly, it receives only an
annoying static.....,

A SOUL with a fight inside itself
will soon have a fight outside
itself with other. Once a man
ceases to be of service to his
neighbour, he begins to be a
burden to him; it is only a step
from refusing to live with others
to refusing to live for others.....

EVERY person has a little
corner in his heart that he never
wants anyone to venture into,
even with a candle. That is why
we can deceive ourselves, and why
our neighbours know us better
than we know ourselves

SOME psychologists, by the
proper use of their method, have
brought mental peace to indivi-
duals, but only because they have
found a safety valve from mental
pressure. They have let off steam,
but they have not repaired the
boiler. That is the business of the
Church....

AN AGE of carnal licence is
always an age of political anarcny.
The foundations of social life are
shaken at the very moment when
the foundations of family life are
destroyed....

THERE is no such thing as the
problem of the atomic bomb;
there ‘s, rather, the problem of
the man who makes and uses
A

A MAN is tempted, not because
he is intrinsically evil, but be-
cause he is fallen man. No in-
dividual has» a menopoly' on
temptation; everyone is tempted.
Saints do not find it easy to Be
saints, and devils are not happy
being devils....

INDIVIDUALS who say, “I will

serve God In my way, and you
serve God in your way,” ought to
inquire whether it would not be
advisable to serve God in His
er

THE GRAVEST error of the
nice people in all ages is the
denial of sin,.....

—L.E.S.

*“Peace of Soul’ (Blandford,

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other parts that must be

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being
high on the U.S.A. best-seller lisis
for manv months, is published in

|
|

}

mon, Preacher : Father Hopkins; 3.00 p m
Egs Service and Presentation of Lenter

ADVOCATE

a4

Self-denial; 7.00 p.m. Solemn Evensong |
and Procession, Anthem. Preacher: The

Archdeacon,
ST. LEONARDS

e
tl
5 a.m. Choral Eucharist and Sermon; & |

ong fine

a.m. Holy Communion; 9 a.m, Choral

Eucharist and Sermon; 3.15 p.m. Sunday
Sehop!; 4 p.m. Children’s Service; 7 p.m
Evensong, Sermon and Procession.

METHODIST

James Street—é6 a.m. Rey. Ernest Griffin

Holy Communion; 11 a.m. Rev. Ernest
Griffin Holy Communion 7 p.m_ Rev. R.
McCullough, Holy Communion,

Paynes Bay—9.30 a.m. Rev. R. MeCul-

jough, Holy Communion; 7 p.m. Mr. F.
Moore.

Gill Memorial—il am. Mr. J. Harper;
7 p.m. Rev. Ernest Griffin, Holy Com-
munion.

Holetown—8.30 a.m. Rev. Ernest Griffin,
Holy Communion; 7 p.m. Mr. Darcy Scott.

Bank Hali—9.30 a.m. Mr. J. A. Griffith;

er Edwin Taylor, Holy Com- | ¢ K E P L E R s Sicihen

COD LIVER O1L WITH MALT EXTRACT

Speightstown—11 a.m. Mr. G. Marville;
7 p.m. Rev. F. Lawrence, Holy Com-
munion.

Selah—9.30 a.m. Rev. F. Lawrencé, Holy
Communion.

Bethesda—i1 a.m. Rev. F. Lawrence,
Holy Communion,

Bethel—5 a.m. Easter Communion; 11
a.m. Rey. B, Crosby; 7 p.m. Rev. K. J.
Payne, Holy Communion after each Ser-
vice.

Dalkeith—i1 a.m. Rey, E. Taylor, Holy
Communion; 7 p.m, Mr, H. Grant.

Belmont—1i1 a.m. Mr. P. Bruce; 7 p.m,
Rev. B. Crosby, Holy Communion.

South District—9 a.m. Mr. A. St. Hill;
7 p.m. Mr, A. B, Curwen.

Providenee—11 a.m, Mr. J. Clarke; 7
p.m. Mr. G, be.

Vauxhall—i1 a.m. Mr. G. Harris; 7 p.m.
Mr. A. L. Mayers.

MORAVIAN

Roebuck—5 a.m, Mr. E. C. Hewitt; 11
a.m, Rev, A. C. H. Pilgrim; 7 p.m. Rev.
A. C, KR. Pilgrim.

Grace HiN—11 a.m. Mr. Downes; 7 p.m.
Mr. Deane.

Fulneek—i1 a.m. Mr. O. Weekes; 7 p.m,

Mr. Francis,

Montgomery—il am. Mr. Greene: 7
p.m. (from Mt. Tabor).

Dunscombe—11 a.m. Mr. F. Deane; 7
p.m, Mr. A. Graham.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Chureh of Christ, Scientist,
Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street

Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m,

Wednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which in-
cludes Testimonies of Christian
Sctence Healing.

Sunday, April 9, 1950

Subject of Lesson-Sermon; Are sin,
disease and death real ?

NEW TESTAMENT
CHURCH OF GOD

St. Michael—11 a.m. & 7 p.m, Eckstein
Village, Elder R. H. Walkes.,

Christ Chureh—11 a.m. Vauxhall, Rev
i. W. Weekes; 7 p.m. Cox Road, Rev. E
W. Weekes.

St. Andrew—il a.m. Rock Hall, Rey. J
B. Winter.

St. Peter—7 p.m. Foe Hill, Rev
Winter,

ANGLICAN
(Easter Sunday)

St. Mary’s: 5 a.m. Procession and Sung
Mass, 7.30 a.m, Matins and Litany, 8 a.m,
Mass. 9 a.m. Procession, Sung Mass and



Sermon. 4 p.m. Children’s Solemn Ves-
pers. 7 p.m. Solemn Evensong, Sermon
and Procession.



BRINGING CHRIST TO THE NATIONS

The Nations Lutheran Church, Corner
Whites Alley and Swan Street: 11 a.m,
and 7 p.m, Rev. W. F. O’Donohue. Sub-
ject ‘Sorrowing Sympathy.” You are
warmly encouraged to visit this Church

and to pray for these forty Lenten de-
votions, by the Christian Church to com-
memorate our Saviour’s passion and

death, and a meditation upon our Re-
deemer’s suffering, a Chris t-centred
prayer, “Behold the Lamb of God
strengthen your faith and deepen your

ust in Him who is fairer than the

children of men,”

_



COUNTING INDIANS

NEW DELHI.

Plans for India’s first census it
1951 are being discussed here.
The Indian census will involve
visits by more than _ 1,000,000
enumerators to 64,006,000 homes



inhabited by about 350,000,000
citizens.

—(C.P.)

} MAPLE MANOR {

‘) GUEST HOUSE }

Opposite Hastings Rocks

I. BOURNE, (
Tel.—3021. Manageress
26.6.49—t.f.n

Lh _— — —SSSaSSSS-—





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For MARL, SAND, {

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and LIME
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Gaster
Greetings

from
G. A. SERVICE






COMPETITION

“IT am Alpha & Omega”
The Competition that should have
taken place at Kensington on
April 10th, will now take place at

the Steel Shed, Queen’s Park,
at 6.30 on Monday night, May Ist,
1950. Officials are: Capt. C. E,
Raison, Father Hopkins and Mr
Gerald Hudson.

ADMISSION 1/-

Choir selected and addresses
Mr, P. Freeman, Silver Sands
Philharmonic, Christ Church; Mr
Cc. Harvey, Silver Sands, Christ
Church; Reuben Hewitt, Govern-
ment Hill, St. Michael; C. Hus-
bands, Plum Tree, St. Michael;
MeD_ Hobbs, Halls Road, St. Mi-
chael, C. Hinds, Eagle Hall Modern
Choir, St. Michael; Mr, x a
Surprise, St. Michael; M, Ny
Hillaby Star, St: Thomas, D. Mil-
lar, Orange Hill, St. James, S. Mil-
lar, Enterprise, St. James; EF.
Green, Crab Hil, St. Lucy; M
Boyce, Six Men, ma — C
Bailey, Edgecliff, St. John,
Chairman—Mr. John Beckles.






Life Assurance Society

ORDINARY GENERAL
MEETING



that the one Hundred and
Ninth Yearly Ordinary
General Meeting of the
above-named Society will b«
held at the ‘Society's Office,
Beckwith Place, Bridgetown,
on Friday, 14th April, 1959,
at 2 o’clock p.m. for the
purpose of —

(1) Receiving, from the
Directors their Report
on the transactions of
the Society for the
year ended 3ist De-
cember, 1949.

(2) Electing Directors and



current year ))

NOTICE is hereby given

)

( Cc. K. BROWNE,

{ Secretary.

Beckwith Place, i
Bridgetown. }

|

J. |
{








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SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 195

an



PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE

LL A A AOC
ee ———

B.G. Government Plan Stuyvesant Sforza Appeals To Tito “Comedian Brings ==









sev een omen








































| \ . Herrings, Toys Keep
ac From Page 5 t 2a Wwith-
: Homes For 10,000 Makes Last ao Ee ans... gala ia oak a
ml S Thr in ¢ that sult = " ‘ : herrings,
: artados Advo orrespondent) : t guilt ita esire greed sol- mi food, 5 . 4
; ee ae Call Here ne ebalee 46 Serene, ‘whith dab) canoe ea cle ee ta, aed abana sama: ae Your Eye i
P sU TA’'S C isi and Pl in t ! se ¢ t to those <4:., ‘ " ‘ ns ree oys, of d
; BRITISH GUIANA’S Central Housing an anning t but © disquie ts ting betwee . yuntries r hen i
[} Authority during the past year prepared a scheme for 2,006 etait “Stiyvenent,” pase hea 1 S . é ; +i pi- a a ence ot “
Bi | dwellings mainly designed to suit the needs of the lower enger freighter of the Royal Neth- h at bee, ms a aa “ the
me and middle income groups. This was revealed in @ broad~- erlands SS. Company, made its at CET Os ieee
Vv : 1 we + Bs opeiie e said. prised the cargo of Harris
; cast on Sunday by Mr. M. B. Laing, C.M.G., O.B.E., Chair- last call at Barbados on Thursday declar- Comedian” which arrived here|
+ 3 man of the Authority. / night when it stopped here from Powers on Thursday evening. °
, : $9 Mr. Laing Said that at an aver- er en route to Plymouth, de inate ' 1 The “Comedian’s’” cargo came B Tt sul
r house, this ** it ee a 3 tee; oe ssrs. Da sta a i
\ i U le t ee — kaos On completion of this voyage speculating at t : from Liverpool aa Co:
” nemp oymen seople—about.10 per cent. of the [0 England, the “Stuyvesant” will the hostile eee oe S ‘on hs ee M TRUNKS
e. ‘ I B é Tecate of Georgetown be taken off the West Indies-U.K —— i —- Yug : ria Sch B a 5 JANTZEN | ~~
x n «UG. “that the un and transferred to some other order to win this war. for er Brin ‘or Boys
r : hi a Sais. de so great service of the above company. » to-nigat DY, intimidation what does not aching 8 Made of Wool in shades of
| i Advocate Correspondent ar ee short of the fullest , Few passengers embarked here Setanta “tind “= belong to her. 1 000 B Of Rice | 1 and Maroon.
a GEORGETOWN. erg , S for U.K. by this opportunity. The U"Ger @ Hon eae Csi ags Roya se
. His Excell the > . co-operation of Government, the vessel brought up quite a few in- Count Sforza d im his Count Sforza obviously r>- ? ;
a Chathe Wonrey told a delees, Central Housing ehd ‘Planning f T » a d ~ -- speech that the only way to reach sorted to these methods precisely One thousand bags of rice| 1
d ¥ Sir Charles Wootiey, told a delega- thority blic bodies, and the ‘Tansits from Trinida ae oad T eLaer ed oe nds pre ; t \ nae 7
d ion from the Trades Union Coun- Authority, a , : This makes the second Dutch @8â„¢eeâ„¢ i it contained because he knows full well that arrived in the colony from Bri
: tion from the Trades Union i~ general public will suffice to wipe Be tas . > the ; tite dec n, ac Italy's expansionist demanss jsh Guiana’ on Friday by the 74-/
d cil on Saturday that Government t sl conditions and bring P2Ssenger ship to be taken off th . gy s ith” e
; i dontuid “the wioy. , rr bathe West Indies-U.K. run recently ne le of th? cannot be justified by real argu- ton sthooner “Lucille M. Smith’,}
4 was watching the unemploymen pousing in British Guiana up to a They will, however, be replaced in T incluc- ments based on facts.” The re- whose local agents are Messrs. | %,
ey ean money, Se A ed ena a0 proper standard. . the near future by two others, the slav Z e to (© port went on “he even went se Robert Thom Ltd. a | JANTZEN BEACH f
} : Everything possible to create new “The Central Housing and «wijiemstad” and the “Oranje- rated : y The far as to call these demands a The “Lucille M. Smith” has} SHORTS }
i sources of employment _... Planning Authority, he said, “has 444” > sai “At the same time. magnanimous proposal towards also brought 790 bags of charcoal, | Voven. Sizes 30 to 34
: During the Conference which jn the past year prepared schemes " { ittie cargo was discharged here Count Sforza called in his speech an agreement on the open ques- 50 tons of firewood and 100 cases |
te ae 7 i eae ol ; oe = ve gant Se a. by the “Stuyvesant.” Packages of 9m the Soviet Union to join hands tions between the two countries”, of Toucan matches. $6 51 > -GENTS ‘Vv’ )
, Resolution on the unemployment mainly design s a ca Miers from. with Italy “ nsioni:t the: tues senert ebinokaied i ;
1 situation, the Governor disclosed of the lower income group and Gated; Sektan from ‘Ladunere request”, it added vr Reems eee lipiglis ae, SLIPOVERS
3 that Government was arranging middle income group. At an aver- ang radio parts from Trinidad! — enlaces ca ca Bile : .
for a soil utilisation survey to age of five persons per dwelling, srrived. ANNIVERSARY JANTZEN RACER Knitted wool, slee <%
3 enadle the embarkation of schemes this amounts to housing for 10,000 ~The vessel sailed the sarie Sun- \ = TaN In Dark Grey, Lij
of planned farming to utilise such gpeople, or approximately 10 per gay night. It is represented here SWI Light | i







maby rors - Mechanics, invite you to. their
anniversary service on Sunday

16th April 1950 at their lodge



a areas as would prove of economic)j-ent. of the population of George- by Messrs. S. P. Musson, Son & I

a benefit. His Excellency alscgjown-. The preparation of these Company Ltd { 7 in shades of Navy, Coral Sizes 36 to 40.
E nted out that work had begut: schemes and the negotiations for } The Officers anc Members of and Maroon

: eee yn Dornier, Rosa whicti ne acquisition of land at Camp- “= 1M origin Chapter Lodge No. 1 of :

‘ on the Corentyne I on selville, Bel Air Park, Ruimveled, Final Curreney |) the Independent United Order of $6.99

Sizes 30 to 38.



many worke for time towand La Penitence, represent a very
many workers for s¢ im

'
|
4 SERVICE (For Men — Woollen) Grey and Fawn,
| |
' come oe iReitcs” Weeding oak’ “Peenbade Meet Takes Place |




























































































me. ws room 118 Roebuck Street at 3 30 $4 15 ’ d
e onference aiscuss¢ed 3 é +* a 4 n
d situation at the Macke Bauyite on a 4 deers york na mre Sa On Tueeda | Pe os saan Heya Bok "9 GENTS JAEGER
A ituation at the Mack uyite of cesta tie saan si eo re
n ; Mines where a number of workers o¢ such an undertaking is most v wilt Pe NSilver Collection RIBBED WOOL
‘ i 1a ecently been laid off. The oy t » final sorte poe | All are invited 2
tm Sar wyensstes mis tat my Ooi ae pectin the coer nena Wo nell] GENTS’ ANKLE SOCKS HALF-HOSE
a I : t said that : he Preparatory Committee SE | ; : 5 3
v4 ( : this © “When it is understovc. that even Unified Currency Scheme tha; | SSS | White or turn-over in shades of Lovat,
1 resuss OF XS” at the moderate figure of $5,000 Brivish Caribbean Terri wh | Spend your {| Si 7 11 B Wi Bh
; niur C= nit of house ‘and land (and ‘t@Ke place at Hastings H« under iq # J . i Sizes 10 to 11} rown, ine, Grey, y
J Cie. i re 2 the Chairmanship of Honourable 1} . ; ; i}
5 : 5 it ay prove impossible to reduce : : * “ = i 3 @ ie | Cc
y ' 3 , ; average costs to that figure) the ee M G = BE... Laster Holiday Pien | $1.55 $1.57 v
ut t pee Soe Siovesnor ante that he S80 “otal ost af tees aereteee WOTkE Coos oe OF. Eten — A doubl ction 1] at the {| o
a G Been informed by the Management ‘64+ at $10,000,000, it is worthy to “Yama it e-a ||} BUCCANEER LODGE {i it
a t the Demerara Bauxite Coy., note how they may be financed. _â„¢T. Mc avid to d the Advocate ROOM ae
; ‘ that the retrenchment was As regards the Campbelville and yesterday so ‘Us pt ei eat dot medicated ointment for the J :
arnt easonal Bel Air Park Schemes, it is ex- "84rd to the Unitied Currency, trestment- of 4 a Baywood, St. James AVE HEPHERD & () 1D. :
pb { vas pected that Government will eae 2) j Mz wer C recoup its expenditure on the pur- Se a oe ee Colds, Bronchitis Coughs 1 will supply Music i
r tion should seek f ’ a nia laying out of the land Barbados in 1946. Cc s P \ | 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET f
‘ 1 snould seek 4 nas é J ” j et « S } j |
f view he Mana hw sale of the lots and the con- ond said that fe oe eee Bera acoren, Tore Throat, Rheumatism, Lumbago, Sciatica, | ( Dancing 12—6 & 9—3 a.m. j 4
4 . Company at Mackenzie in « struction of the houses will be by frcePter’ y te ened noel, Muscular Pains and Strains; Bruises, Typ ~ [{j Promoters: O ox %
that the position might be clarified. private enterprise Sonnet Tidstas torte ; i : G C
al, i aa reaeeisen Soon "Uhdend- andl drovisicin Barbe jos, British Gui Scratches, Influenza, Neuritis, Neuralgia, oe Gigs ee Se a be
ui , a 8 oh: Lime tat +» of housing for the lower income —"" °°". “ ee T , . ot SSS eS eae
discuss é ma ‘ housing . inidad r oothach 725% SSS SS ae eee ; ~ 0
dis management group will be principally by Gov- = 7" ‘apores . oe f &, Insect Bites and other Aches > Ki , ” PISSIOSSSOS OOS FIO ISG YOOS ,
: tt ag ee t y resc i ‘ 7 ; .
With reaerd to the fara res or. PEAS cae | ace as and Pains. Healing! Soothing! Relieving! CNS Vy i 4 GRAND BALL q ° .
art will € made imme- . @; 1
trenchment ‘ ng i Nb ea i ir Megha te followed preparation of Tr it— you will say it j r 1 SSF i i t B lv. NOMULL '
' dust 4 ois . i Jitea dankee a the necessary legislation and other y Y yitisa real blessing , SF fl Will be given bs 2 Lb LO. . |
; } the repatriat i Path where Matter en a a ~~ )) 1y s
12 uml ac dation will be “fect. e THERMOGENE )} CLARENCE C. DEANE so ROME 2 '
} y i I 1c of the familie oe =i iN} Pee ere |
f to ar ) 5 ve the revised draft legisla- { {known as “Ber opkeeper
ion to be introduced | eact f }) at King George V. Men al Park, Pp
Es oportion t ({ | a |
Tuon ¢ the participaving colonies and t \ ot. SE |
: t and tenders for the venty idte MEDICATED RUB i} On Monday Night, 10th April | ‘ie.
; I r »p st i be within its . eer 5 Pea ) fusic by Leslie Clark’s Orchestra | ‘
€ group snoul in iS which had been sut ———— } }
: : e grou; i | ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT
| th , fe eee iddsivie neh ta tae Sin , In Jars and Tins {)) ADMISSION: Gents 2/- Ladies 1/6 {|
, would be at y has been most The C i , iM} Refreshments on Sale The relentless Enemy of Rust.
oe gem ; : » reduce housing costs consider and cx e de 4
‘ situatior : e ver means that would not sion on the prot ils “g = j
2 very means the would ho pr i ega
Maued : ee ee ee eee ee ee oy ere ee aN) Oe The Proved Protector of Iron and Steel.
: could not accept the T.U.C.., fis Td atin eae tie Eilding echemen Mint Or , AN ANNOUNCEMENT !
i l Adth vl ; ; ment =! ne as the housing ee aca an : i i NOT Talent Night at the Globe
t ‘ a Oa : I yeing prepared a great deal act embe ws e Commi } NOT Rommel in the Desert | GOES FARTHEST -I- LASTS LO
9 _— . : ; f consideration has been given ‘ee Wili be : Hon’ble H. A. Cuke i} BUT a solid reminder
~ * Governor stated that Government 7 jy ne oe ing O.B.E, M.L.C Barbados '\)} WEDNESDAY NIGHT 26th April,
» the best mear f roducing
; , was close the situation | houses whjch vould be re. Hon'ble A. W. R. Robertsi } 1950 is the date One gallon will cover 700 — 1,000 sq. feet, one coat,
1 : and Ww & possidte da for these schemes C.B.E., Financial Secretary (Trin- / fixed for the | 7
.- a 4 a : idad); Hon’ble L. Cools-Lartigue i
PS Three Bedrooms ieee), monte L. CooesLarngus rs i} Annual Dance |} 8 Stockea in Rea, Grey, Black and Super Black (Heat Real
i It was decided that family fy ia. (Windward Islands Hon'- 5 ; ee rr | y
‘ ouses should have three bed- bile £. A. Thompson, Federal | \K , “Riese NAAMAN BOLDER and. {\\| ~: PHONE 4456 :- AGENTS,
\ *lEe . rooms as well as a moderately- Treasurer (Leeward Islands | WITH A GOULDBOURNE PHILLIPS |
' $! lillion Radio sized living room, and that thes€ Ajco attending will be Mr. A. C. | aa nL | {
5 houses hould be ae i to be Dos Santos 1280 Executive | ‘ x t ’ at the Children’s Goodwi eague
. : , . . tr + , na n vo : ’ * ~ y Ork. | *
Cov Reg stere economic in both materials and Officer of the Committee together | SMILE Music by P. Green's
2 #! stere d n the labour required for their with Mr. Louis Spence, Comptrol Sa ee arenes 5 {| fea ali Ae i ee |
GEORGETOWN construction. It was also deciaed ler of Customs, Trinidad, who it is | | ane ea ee es RR RET ACT ER eS egET:
A‘ I that the maximum use of local expected, will replace Mr. Dos i oo PIPL OLSSOPIOPR, | ~
any incorporated materials would give the best re- Santos } $
“en registered in gults, since in that way most of be pects op x T ‘ONCERT % ,
with a view to the money spent would be spent «€ & % BAND ( 1 3
a wireies m= locally and thus give maximum J Months % By kind pormiasion = the Com- x There was .
{ 2 part f th mployment 7 x missioner of Police ¥% e
j > % ° : :
" oy a Te “The question of cheapening For Larce ny 5 eo aes * R h
Vapital of 290,000 the houses by the use of pre- Wilfred Gill of Britton’s Hill ‘ Capt. C. E. RAISON, A.R.C.M. a us
c at ff the fabrication instead of traditional ,,. ; eesttOns {ill * will render a Band Concert |
‘ zi i office eth a : wa als investigated was eae pay of stealing vo & at the Speightstown Church Girls’ |
3 hed a place emote s sO Stiga+ec, pieces o: umber v ied at * School g| -
mae . e and it was found that prefabrica- £3, 3/4 and the » roperty of 4 on WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12, 1950 ¥ this Easter.
: i niniaian one tion would reduce the cost con- Caribbean Theatres Ltd., yester- & The Proceeds are to assist in X&
{}% the establishment Siderably, since the turnover was day of the houses %
; include the operation of radio and Sufficient to justify the installation Mr. D.D. Morris before whom re x Git sataah Aid wan oat eveanee
of the required mechanical plant, the case was hear sentenced | }j “ ADMISSION: 1/6; 1/-; 64, The e
s Doors Open at 7 3 p.m ere will
. |
© pp BOCCCOSSSLL SEO





















; equipment business desirable for of getting the machinery quickly . be @

f communication With regard to this matter it is The Weather || GENUINE PARTS We specialise in the kind of service for Bedford always

»ssible that the Colonial Develop- ) All parts sold and fitted ae '

es a i: Reena Reet 10-DAY |) Severe end vane which is approved by the mammr {/}} PICNIC & DANCE rush for-*
3,000 Catholic position to lend assistanc« |)) cation as those originally fitted

in aid of
MAJESTIC CRICKET CLUB
GUN HILL BARRACKS,
St. George
On EASTER BANK-HOLIDAY
10th April, 1950

Sun Rises: 5.53 a.m. })) to the vehicle No other and the experience for just that kind of service,
parts will give you the same

Women March 8G NursesGetState Nurses | Sen hy ote ban i If you are 0 Badord owner, you shoul be estinfied
1)
))

rae

Moon (La-Quarter) April

s ( cores” with 00 les, .-——- «
Advocate Correspondent Bar Certificate In U.K. pachting: 6.30 pm \ ; ao + "mY 7 mare
eae genet Fae —_ =. GEORGETOWN High Water: 9.14 a.m | ROBERT THOM LTD.
More han 3, Catho furses Stelle Se hiates alas ; {| s i
nies 4cincal Sdares oo “i Nurse Stella Benjamin and 11.38 p.m. COURTESY GARAGE aiut White Park

‘Sh Joyce Pollydore former _ staff

| ALLEYNE ARTHURS
| SPECIAL RUM.

BLENDED ESPECIALLY FOR YOU.

me

Admission :
GENTS 2?/- —:o:—- LADIES i/6

}
{ >> 2
wireless statics i\ plants fo om Brees ee
' trans ig isting, man- The cost of the factory required him to three month mprison- reg =)
aging and assi in the man- is however subAantial and per- ment with hard labour *
& agement of any wireless and radio haps more serious is the difficulty i) ervice your |
|

_—_-

Music by Mr. Colis Rock and his
Orchestra

REFRESHMENTS ON SALE

the streets of Georgetow " nurses at the Public Hospital YESTERDAY i — aa. -

wh on at
Sunday afternoon, en act of public

Georgetown, have been awarded i































qaemon ior of t Fait Whica the State Nurses Certificate in Rainfall (Codrington) nil {Dial 1616 _— Dial 4391 ie Please invite your friends eee
| = med pat H, f th = y Year } England The two nurses left Total for month to yesterday | | == —— aS — = } ;
' gramme in British Guiana. ee ‘ a ek : 21 ins. ‘4 ' oe .
. ' British Guiana for England in | P
it _ The procession gathered at the 194¢ on C.D. and W. Scholarships Temperature (Min) 71.5 F || POSS SSOSSSSSS GF SF OSOSS P be
Lu fel Ursuline Convent a 1 short . oe, S . Seneeoenes Wind Direction (9 am.) E | / ; " (
* service was held with enediction ties and the general laity. At the (11 a.m.) E | ue I
; of the Blessed Sacrament. After Cathedral the Vicar Delegate, Wind Velocity: 11 miles per | | S Just Received ’
} Benediction the March moved on Very Rev. Fr. Peter MacCaffrey, hour | % yr , :
Ao to the Cathedral of the Immacu- §.J., delivered a sermon during Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.010, % A LOVELY | J
He late Conception and included hun- another service which brought the (11 am.) 29,997 | % '
} : dreds drawn fro various Sodali sroceedings to a ¢ lose j ‘ ASSORTMENT ,
! : " eens - | 5
Pe - =. meme ion , OF
_ etheyil Do dr Every Time 9 seme imne. By Jimmy Hatlo ' | i REAL
’ a P FS a fa. desmmcimtaiiiatiaaiis YES! every s Y |
HEN IODINE SHOWS OFF = [ YA'AS:A CHIPOFF THE OLD SES AREAL UTTLE es
FOR COMPANY AND DOES «BLOCK I MAZORED IN vf ACTRESS: THE Way SHE | | fa
ALL RIGHT PO2 AND MOM \ELOCUTION Y'KNOW ~6Q_)\ RESPONDS TO ALL. Mty made by us is » }
; L RIGHT, PO? AND NON \ON, ZCONE=+= // | DIRECTION IS TRULY ‘= . | 5
SHOOT IF YOu
MUST T U ARL )
| an ST THIS OLO my specially tailored ( ¢ TON EROWNE | |
. Wholesale & Retail |
| - ¢ : ~wod | BY OBTAINING
a to “FIT TO | "
esd : 136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813 ¥|
1 &
te kt | y

| PERFECTION






TOURISTA DE












— | isn | VENEZUALA THAT IS ALWAYS A
hs BU EX cue Dp / THE WAY THEY LEARN THE \/ I TOLD THE PRIN- iy
t OUT WHEN SHE DOES / LO THE PRIN
i a Ae CHILDREN IN SCHOOL TopAyY |\ ciPA il. the PLE AR
: ohana ta. & HER is CRIMINAL! THE Toaune Gibnlen TRACORD. Wit 9 Oe es ORIENTAL ASURE TO WE
SHER WHO TAKE JUST FON GIVE A DARNE“ \ TLL TAKE TODINE ors
} s o tons = } and ailors w can
ae HTH [he lly our oF serooee TH |} Se ARTICLOS FROM
t i insta - ope f TWO TIMES TWO \ tl C. 4 ¢: ~ | i ' if boast t be Re Bi a M art S andalo *
' SS 2 5 a Etat 4+) |i ECA, JOYERIA, SEDAS ’
o). (4 ey “U a S|} oe . TOLBRIA, SE ~ 3
mm (a fo J Tre torscons eee C. B. RICE & Co.
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Wm. Hry. S

BOLTON LANE

Dial 3486



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Full Text

PAGE 1

sLMUV. APRIL I SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN Bridgetown Very Busy For Easter One had to thread his way ihrou*h the main streets of the City yetterday at busy shoppers made last minute preparations for the Easter holiday. With the prospect of brikht sunshine large numbers of people Will be spendins the bankholiday away from their homes, some on sight-seeing tours, some Dtcnlctng at so !" * ,he 1 * aut >' ipots of the island, while others wffl nnd their greatest amusement on the dance floor. There are several items of publip entertainment which will undoubtedly attract the attention of many people One will be the athletic sports at Kensington Oval, and at which there is the likelihood of some records being broken Another big item will be the fair at Coleridge School. St. Peter, the programme of which is sure to attract a good attendance. Then there are the Aquatic Sports at Oistins. Such sports are liked by many people, young and old and the day's programme promises to give satisfactory entertainment to all who attend. A PRIVATE SHOW will begiven by the Mobile Cinema at the Leper Hospital on Tuesday. April 11. Monday, being a BankHoliday, the Cinema will give no •how. ,,, On Wednesday a show will be riven at St. Catherine's School pasture, St. Philip, for the benefit of residents of the St. Catherine's area and another will be given at the Cambridge Plantation yard on Thursday for residents of the Cambridge area of St. Joseph. The last show of the week w.ll be at Friendship Plantation yard, St. Michael, for residents of the Hothersal Turning area. A T A MEETING held yesterday at the Town Hall, the following were elected to serve as Delegates from the Barbados Civil Service Association at the forUicoming Conierence of the Federated Civil Service Associations of the Caribbean:— Messrs. C. A. Coppin, L. N. Chtnery, C. W. Cumberbatch, M. W. Clarke, L. A. Hall. A. I. Jordan, A. F. C. Matthews, E. L. Morris, K. P. Parris, C. R. C. Springer, H. A. Vaughn and D. A. Wiles. A CRICKET MATCH will be played on Easter Monday at Parry School Ground, St. Lucy. between Northern Progressive and Visitors, a team from the City. Visitors are made up of Empire and IJ.C.L. players and the match is due to begin at 11.30 ajn. The teams are: Visitor*: Geo. Johnson, (Captj, C. Gaskin, E Austin, M. CrlctUOW, H. Sealey. Frank Taylor, C. Mullins, J. Wiltshire, M. Taitt, D. Estwick. E. Cox, C. Dowrt Bowen. Tony Hinds and St. F. Phillips. Narthern Progreaalvc: G. Pltlpatrick, (Capt.), A. T. Yearwuou. R. A. Yearwood, G. Yearwoou, Rev. A. E. Simmons, V. Balgobin, L. Spencer, V. Bowen. O. Collymore, H. Boycv, I. Norville, W. Cadogan, H. Husbands, H. Phillips, E. Green and N. Slocombe. TU LOSS of a Raleigh bicycle %  %  valued $75 was reported by Allan Jones of Tenth Avenue, Belleville. He stated that the bicycle was removed from OUtaMe the residence of Denton Sayers at Pine Road on Thursday. U NDER THE competent directorship ol Mr. McCarthy, the Organist of St. Joseph Church, and Mr. Hock, who assisted the St. Joseph Choir rendcrer' J. S. Taylers • "Crucifix ion" on Good Friday, at 8 p'jn. This pathetic form of meditation was carried out in such a manner as can be indicative of the true crucifixion of Christ. The service lasted for about an hour, and was well attended. F ORTY-FIVE YEAR OLD Charles Skinner of Brittons Hill died suddenly at his rasldaocfl on Thursday at about.' l.Ou p.m. An autopsy was performed by Doctor A. L. \tuart and death WH attributed to natural causes. "Now, be good boys and fix the latin memer, and Daddy >%iil buy you a whole shop foau of Fcistc* cflgt* N London Express Semes Sfiiul \€ % ! %  *. Signalling Competition This Week The South Western District will be staging its Inter-Troop Semaphore Signalling Competition on Tuesday next. 11th April at 4.00 p.m. at .tic Er; but you can by taking Wood Badge Part 1 (Theoretical). Cub and Scout Wood Badge Part I (1P49—60) Studies ran bu obtained f. -m Scout Headquarters. (ieckles Road. Call in for a cony this week. !" We are sorry to hear of .tie illPf",? }? e H'and Commissioner. Mr W. H Carter. M.B.E. who is at present in hospital. We wish him a speedy return uf health and vigour. !;.>.., Wisli.-s .day w wish all stctlons of I ho .Movement n pleasant Easter, and hope ihal bthe merits, death and example of selfishness of Him who died that we mifht live, we may also achieve and display in our lives on earth the Spin! of %  Service to others Barbados Branca Included In Pansiofl Scheme "•?. Wm. Fojartv. Ltd. have informed the Advoaue thai th; Fogarty Pension Scheme, referred to in Friday's issue as now l n operation in British Guiana. Trinidad and Tobao. also covers the Barbados Bra The Scheiiu'. which is now compuUory for all nave completed the qualifying period of service, is da ccs of the firm with a suitable pension on their retiremen.. FOR LINOLEUM WOOD FLOORS AND FURNITURE li Memorial Service To-morrow Advocate Corr-spondent LONDON. %  J?* !" mssnory or Miss Joan Neckles Knight, daughter of Mr. John Knight. H.B.I.. Postmaster of ti ward Islands, is to be held In Christ Church. London, on Easter Mondav Mitt Knight, who was studying musfc in this country. died of pneumoni.i v year ngo. following .in accident in which she was badly burned. MANSION HYGIENIC WAX POLISH FOR BRIGHT AND HEALTHY HOMES 25 YEARS AGO (ADVOCATI. IMS) THE third match of the Hussel Cup competition was plavi-n terday between Spartan and Em home team, who deftalcd visitors by two tfoals to mi. The playing of the BmptN was fast and strong and the combination produced two goals in less than live minutes play. Empire thus wins her second match in this cup In which she has four to her credit. nit: UK. OM-:vrio\ IFMOLOTOV SUCCEEDS STALIN By . Lieut. General Sir Giffard Martet, Head Of British Military Mission to Moscow, 1943 M B. MOLOTOV is taking over a great deal of the work from Marshal Stalin to strain and enable the Marshal to conserve his strength. What can we deduce from this? Shall we see any major changes in Russian policy. Let us Alft examine the characteristics of these two great men, and we will start with Marshal Stalin. Stalin's father was a very skilful shoemaker. His wn. Joseph Stalin, was destined for the Church and he received a good education. As he grew he developed a strong attraction towards the teachings of Karl Marx. Eventually rrc wiss absorbed revolutionary movement in Russia, and became its leader. Allowed U> visit front On my first visit to RuNtl In 193b Staiin never cmergej troni the Kremlin and none %  : him. wnen 1 went to Russia in UHJ as ned of the Bnuo Mission, the position was quite ouie.ent. 1 saw statin ana uiscusscd matters witn turn on many DcestflODi. He gave LI. full facilities to visit the front and see the Russian forces and dlscuM. the s.tualion with the Russian troops aiiu commander* in many different sectors. v> hen I returned from this visit 1 found that 1 could not get much interchange of ideas with the Communist leaders, but it was Marshal Stalin who arranged for me to have discussions with the Russian General Stan* and 1 had long meetings with them about three times a f We discussed everything together, and learnt much from each other. This was the turning point of the war. and a little later the Russians launched their offensive operations which led to linal victory. Used to call me Old Friend' I Remained on friendly terms with Marshal Stalin and he used to call me "Stary Dost"— which means "Old friend." As a man he was mild.%  AiMi probably unscrupulous, mil he undoubtedly held the con* Itdence of HitRussians. 1 formed the opinion that he would have liked to more closely with the Western world, and that he was prevented from doing so b> from his associates such as Molotov. Later 1 realised thai I wsU wrong, for Marshal Stalm is now m entire agreement with the other Communist leaders and determined to spread their Communist autocracy all over the world. %  _,,, A read sense of humour Marshal Stalin 'iad. however, a real sense of humour In discussing him Mr. Winston Churchill once said ". above all he is a man with %  saving sense of humour, which is of high importance to all men and to all nations." 1 decided to test his sense of humour on one occasion. It was at a Kremlin banquet which I had to attend I knew I would have to reply to a toast from the Russians to the British military forces, and I prepared my speech in Russian. All rocked with laughter When my turn came I said that I had been informed before I came to Russia that I would have great difficulty In establishing liaison with the Communist leaders. Actually I had got on fairly well with them, and particularly with their General Staff. I then went on to say that between us we had solved thi> proble-r i* how to get on each other. There was then a dead silence, while they waited to hear how this problem hod been %  olved, and I explained that the solution wasj u> "Kavaritz atcrita c tolka pravdu," which means to talk quite ope.ily and nothing but the truth. After %  UtM all roclicd with laughter, and who was sitting back in his chair, slapped his thigh with delight and repeated my last He then called me up and we had a long friendly talk. Of course, in. Communist leader ever talks openly, and he is not always very u-uthlul Stalin's sense of humour enabled him to see that it was a lOtt leg pull and they all seemed to enjoy it. A n.lourlcsN imlnidiial Compared with the bluff manner of Marshal Stalin, Molotov's He was obviously a man of great ability and a very hard worker, but I cannot remember a single occasion when the Military MatsJon succeeded in getting anything from him which we needed. In all the conversations 1 had with him I never got anything tangible out of him. Instead of Kiving me his famous "No" he would politely say, "1 don't think 50." I cannot imagine a more colourless individual t h s n Moletov. His dark-coloured suit, his bespectacled poker-face, his thin hair and small moustache would I icssion that no was a middle-class professional man—pt.^l I cJtor. rnlWayi iriendly and smiling In our official conversutujira, it was always Molotov who knew the answers. All the n : Dgura were at his fingertips. H, was always with Stalin -. the talks, and if the Marshal was •vcfl In doubt on a particular point Molotov was mslanth to refresh his memory. Although I coulo what went on behind his pokerface, 1 must say that Molotov was always friendly, courteous, and smiling. He had no outstanurtMBf, and his habits "iiversation were also colntirloas. Stalin was never with, pipe, but Molotov smoked occasional cigarente very little. He talked ml) 4 )iis work. Kepi M deadly Secret The inner workings of t*h* Politburo are hi secret. 1 do not m> %  any change, such as On of more power in the Molotov. or .-veil (be I Marshal Stalin, would alter their %  I believe that they hi the necessary plans to every eventuality of that nature They have a faiutic.il drirt luiii.iiiiii t 0 .ipi-rid their Com munUt autocracy over tin whole world. To achieve Ihis mult their plan i simplr AM* gsssjgf. By spreading Karl Marx Cornin the early days the Communist leaders succeeded n ring the Ciarisi ragdmi and capturing the whole of Russia in a year. They then exported thcsteachers to other lands as a softenlng-up process to pave the way for further expansion, and in the meantime they cstablisiu-d complete autocracy— wlucii is %  opposite of Communism—In Russia. As they advanced) after the war this process continued. Every country ayMCfl was placed under autocratic Comile complete with concentration camps and a slave army The Karl Marx Communist' Id to continue their softening processes By using this BKhniqusj % %  seized half Kuropc and most ol China ana Uurma. It is unimel. that they will urcel this process iould they do The dancer of ihe nubjuiatlon of the whole world io ihi> bestial form of life is there tur all to see, ;ow general. that it we turned c id on to Russia we could subjugated countries in BurofM behind the Iron Curtain But this might lead to war. We are not prepared at present. Hence we must build up the necessary forces as a I ISjaiMi io halt, without Strength Russia, to keep of fear, has succeeded, by very clever propaganda, in think that her rOTO targe, but roll equipped. If the V. i mi highly my inakitii; b, itimour .Hi %  we would haw nothing to feai • less to talk %  inti. we have U l. I ^ HARRISON'S BROAD ST GOODS RECENTLY RECEIVED INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING ITEMS CHRO. PLATED BIB AND STOP COCKS NECKED BOLTS 3 in., to 6 in C. P. AND BRONZE FINISH. BRASS RACKING COCKS H. P. BALL VALVES CASEMENT STAYS Black 18 in.. ALUMINUM CURTAIN RAILS COMPLETE WITH FITTINGS. PERFORATED ZINC SHEETS MAd. • % %  M UNI V+ttl l-M.IV>. %  %  V MM II VI IS |M The Ogmlnira Handcrafts Cumpany Hrldir A Trafalgar Slrrrai %  %  %  Fresh for your Pets ! I'l lil.V. DOG CHOW PURINA RABBIT CHOW h Jason Jonas & Co, Ud Diatribe tors. 0\ lYI.AIl Happy Times Prints in .MI .is^orinu'iit of llruutiful Patten* 36 mi. wida P*>4*. Printed Wincyette [rtinniiimi le. FANCV sillHTINt.-. 11 >r|a)* :*i idr .0*. 7SC. DYI li I.WNKI.I I 11 in I'ink & Blue ::ii MIIII76c. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10. 11, 12 & IJ IIHllAI) S1UII T LIGHT & POWER TNSTAL TROUBLE FREE "LISTER" ALTERNATOR SETS I ?4 K.W. DIKNf.l. DFIVKN ALTERNATORS I -W. stW. W • K-W. W B.W. • .W All eaa*ltta IIB Switchboards and Aulaoutfe Valtata %  ulaMn. COMPLETE RANCE OF SPARK PABTS IN STOCK THE HlHll IIM>S FOlXIHiV LUL t ooo ui ieoop u i i oogofloieoooeo a ai \ A FEW EASTER FOOD SPECIALS mmtrimi \ll. BISCUITS In,, SODA I OOOD HAMS SMOKED lb %  SAJ-TRP PEANUT*—B0. OXKTAII. 'iMnRMili CMERKIES POTAT< > -IHNO APPLE SAUCE %  .AlsftHot*. FOOD YIAH Pkif. QINriot. PLRKCSS & CO., LTD. Roebuck Street, — Dial 2072 & 4502 HMMMMtMH(NMMMMMMMMWMH||M ixJBjddinq DISTINCTIVE AND DIFFERENT Our Buyer goej yeaily lo ihe British Industries Fair %  as?* It quarantees Low Prices .' YOUH JEWELLERS Y. DELIMA & CO., LTD: Phone 4*44 o20, Broad Slreel For... 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res StNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, AP RIL I, ^ SITTING ON THE FENCE II* \fliMniri l.tfbbins B BNG (probably) the r-sult of %  wffsk hi.* stall and MMM gtrta, mraibe: tian." TfflC EDITOR: if '' %  n't dropping %  IK! I fit]Uf r THE <> What ar,i.. >,. go, M >, what are lo do? THE EDITOR What kind n/ hirtnun stories do Won fliint •. ougt I %  THE OTHEBS I rhino "Ti ffttnp awry new. THE EDITOR That I* whl n MoVrr trrot(j. '.'.ir* pan i inaVcd. Jometniiiij MiiJ' IJ neper the Brtti'li public need. The olden Btory iti the irorld is all They treat f-< read ALL: Sex For Orrulo'ion. "ring in cups r ft*" longer oioader, fhf •&•<; get larger, and the mouth wider as a person grow I tlir rVeaaa, rrmo (Wiflt I) AY by granny. nd tr< day >our grows and month grow* CHORDS Sear 1or rirctuf % social aWoa The fempo of the nation, the (jhoiflv yhouluh nation; You tnap ata* rhrm para on politicj and win of rrrrjy kind. But at iwru Mftti reader ha* a dirty lift I. 1/ yon i trc think you'll alien Sex For CfrlattOH Day by day your ears expand and hiJttT grows your naae Rait should yoa live two hundred trjiv m\ luv will never tire— When yoa're jn*t a nose and A p?.lr of ears, flapping hv the fire. \ <**4v\ farrwell Ahrenberg and his ank a glass of beer, and ..mg, wag equivalent n of wishing a man food n T"*"lwarn is a Sweetish raHway %  THE EDITOR: The sort of 'htur ')• prrt'i/ Qood lurk, lad OLS THE OTHERS We'll do it nceer fear, sir; ioe*U do it ajevar /cor. THE BH iVheii fii: ro put And %  Prit I % %  ALL: (Chorus its I %  THE EDITOR Op* m v relo* re. THE Oi : Tliflt anrawli .tuu'idi pretta IITOR And ajrHcIn b i rperil o>. n' preaaV Thar rhottid pell i, I should aril a lot. THE EDI Polirr rourta a*d saalMi And tflle ( • idev | A ftimpia orrTi bftraanil clrrpyman i ALL: Sex "of C'i'i l.ulUhx A ' %  are betuininf more InlelL.Kent prefer %  .. sr1ti diirina; a pert-d when BMM 'eedMlfJh ''' work was being (ifxlueed. The male i with a flog at hla -ide. plays the bagpipes, and thf female figure, with a l^mb. plays the mandolin-' Both figures are seated with boc! %  rounds of delicate colouring The Chelsea procelain factory was founded in or about 1745. and it employe! rery fine artist' The factory was advertised for sale in 1764. bm it did not Jmd a purrhavr until !?W Joslah Wedgewood, the owner of the famous factory of that name, was Interested in the purehaae of some of the moulds, models, ett t>ut did Ml wish to purchase the entire plant Eventually the Chelsea factory toaatlMf Aiih its models, moulds ind jnfinlsned ware was purchased by Mr Duesbury Of Darby who also owned the Derby Porcelain Works. Duesbury carried on both factories simultaneouslv until 1784 The period from I77g-I784 Is the Chelaea-Darby period, when much ecelletrt work was produced In 17*4 the works were discontinued, and whatever was of gag gMM trajufgeri %  u Derby. The cause of the staaden end -1 the CheNca factory, which pro. Ilent ware and was highly (.jtronised. was ih raw material Engti*h merchant vessels engaged m the tea trade arlth CbUN were in the habit of aagTylgfj elay aa ballast on the return Journey. Evert I il Chi naae became suspicious, so great was the demand for clay aa ballast, and prohibited \ was deprived of Ha i to cease producTMrxhibtlnr. new. for .i fVrthar a 11 n ir>th April Xm Rnna*-: %  Km il i on\(-isntmn %  PlrM I v rlll r.,l Km Jl \-M-r l at i. al I g||. .\r-i second i;ui*l Voice .1 I %  lUvantin' ^nout like Ra< .i \> m i| -h.t %  MM Raeal T4rr. Ar-r Thai Aeeoad Raral Vafec I Iral Rar.l \ ^ r.e pro%  afait. • i iim.i \*n i in* in. i %  1 FIRST AID Alkl illl;ii tusrs plitsi r tin I When in t^Kj BW | ha leoaani '"> lake Alka-Selt/ei at ANY time. Iron Curtain Buyers Will Be At BIF bsiyggj an;imong those from behir t rhe lion Curtain to atteiiu IhJ nritih Industria in i/tndon and Birmlngti 19 Other fgH i ruj Poland tuygn from Hongkong and Singapore an rJ ibit at trie Fair high plle-drl b'iding leaders %  i i tion abortlj -it I Rirmtngham. BtfftN < radwr %  making facias *" ft long -.nd Tin wide n| %  %  dbsne for %  torn of cnglmt: in Ta.. .1 HIM ishUn, A ANtlTHEPt REMARKABLE THING ABOUT WHITE ANTS Private Utopia of a Man Who Was Denounced For Immorality MT U r f r si *" Walrlfgg II ISIHI In lo\-e >aii sober With what a ripple -ison is aaaun reckless m bet havh-1 will mtfch of hrORTRAIT Ot \ (.1 MI M i By Richard \ld.-it..., ||r,nr manii ISa. 3*7 iu" D H LAWRENCE was ar English Dissenting working man ism and prejudice of his kind was a typical pi %  gregational chapel and tl vi! l,i, But nobody, Aldingtons pert. recognise how original environment the aulh* r %  I ried with him through He hat* M painted their faces hated aexuai promsscuity. hated bull-hghtmi:. hated foreigners (and denounced the English), he loved potterta? about the house and the kltrrfelt Engi English, ansggajd work) to a in % %  • %  own devising. ,d Russell, wa )BI5 on ft complt-t.%  collaboration took the form of Lawrence issuing a afrrh to Russell—I gtCk or well :ne whole oca %  All peo. SUNDAY HAIRCUT trgn, wall The local bai Adair -(C p i shown They are beine %  Site arepMn<>> %  gV gf the Fair heang held if Olympla and Ear* i nv* this weak i — L.E.S. .not her. situated in I Italy. Fort Myers in Florida, oi ilw Andes, according tmthc cnthu:he moment, earest that Ranann.. realisation was on night in the Cafe Royal when six out of Lawrence's seven guest agreed to sail with him to mv Only one of the ainner pam went to New Mexico When shrarrived, she went about with .< knife to defend herself The importance of Lawrenc. Ibne did not. of course. social vapourings H< rtlUant eye. He coulo convoy that there was n Itygtton than thi .<• could perceive He was a magician and a mystic -ved that the 1914—1.; war had brought a whole worli of ideals to an end — !ibert> the belief that humai. .mterl peace and love Ana what was to replace Quasi nswer was confused. in mak ing it. Lawrence ran into a aoouncad fag In It hurt. "I am not ver> %  ved." he Mid .-Magistrate ordered his i Rainbow to be destroyed. "I onl; am all. body root, iwanch and leaf. The record of a sell-* life; of its loves and hat< %  : %  sumptive of genius % ,ind wandered to igajf lasting value in ItWntun ,. .reed: %  to be alive \RD ,._ui % GTOS ,*)ei, cMiiyiit, (ranikiloT. il m tfw I9I4-I* b %  in I HI. MAN IKiiM I llf | | Wll Bv TheaOara BeiiMin QtffgUsea Its. 6d. 271 page-. NINETEEN stones NinetM_:. "i.neleen. aitT %  %  this book. % %  :' H n* Hrver' Whaan oicpei touch! What a command twlinlguc: But nadH %  Whicn makes Kg liiiportant to remark that Mis Benson has written some dehgh-Por instance. The funny, dc-apairing glimpse i.f is a nice rl even when drunk, and mad! 1 Dr. Johnson as* la LoWdoa i-i a nnolf Regency, PKAKIAI —Bv Laura TahVat MaeaasllaJi. 9a. fid. 2U laagv* EMILY. | highly-strung woman, married to William .i landowner suffering} from nourej commi' one of her husband's tenants, the acrid emanations from whose) strong, healthy body are pi .tumn itself This idea was borrowfc 1 by Lawrence from Wells, by from Strindberg, and by Stl berg from — But to return to I Emily She has a daughter b) Hayton. which is a bitter l.am who was wilh; overlook her lapse U • produce a son whom he make his heir As things turn out. than nothing for William %  go on having neuralgn and for Emilv who has been trying with i( madness from Page 27 onwards, to depart Grunbaum to his Hiphir.'It only snows that. If dy, In all %  to get herself certified Dr Orunbaum doe* ml Frnily ol Commandos; fought hi %  i the tradtI One Omen. • %  %  %  %  of Xhv richer etkataa %  quality. f'a*ter: Faafssrl I of rtcrc^ k "ain going in" Its. class divi — and th exhibited by all revoll social injusticf. to cnati structure, equally ttnjh London Express Si If your hair is coming out remember thai — Silvikrin DOES GROW HAIR l.se Pure Silvikrin in severe cases of dandruff and thinning hair. As a daily restorative drcssiny inc Sihikrn Hair Toms Lotion .ontaining Pure Sirrtkfs fl Hair's Natural Food, from nil ihemhtx. hairdreu Sibikrin laboratories Lid.. I aaoa. N.W.lo. Lnghat ] At Your Servidl Skilled Stall and Modfrn F-pilpaM FOR • SPBEOT and KXPRRT REPAIRS • MArNTGNANCK • SPARE PARTS • TYRE SERVICE • SPRAY PAINTING J^~ See us lirsi for REPAIi ECKSTEIN BROS BAY STREET. Hum,-. 1667 W/Shop :—: jy ASTHMA MUCUS Dissolved First Day Aaibsaa u4 h 7^ur .)-t-i... U|l Vour tu^rj,.. n ,i n %  > K'-nhsn Your hr| Ihart•I a faii,ou U-. %  %  •;•• ihr.,u;n la* kiood .. mi thaattarka Th^ vaty flmt day tha %  jraaaa inj •<•<• la .1 %  ivitir '•—. I-Y fcr*aihtn and r*aiI %  lk p!*.-4,l taatr%  y Iraa from A In nail to n %  i ihoual! ; i. tna* hav luff.rtd for yasra MKM'Aid i a .., lhat II la BuaimP,l io > ay br.thii c la * hourand in (oanpl*!*-:, atop y.-ur Athrn* In I da-, a a.rnona. ba. k nn raiutn t (i—it. Tha ( MI aniaa pi Bt WITH THIS NEW MULTI-PURPOSE LUBRICANT r-Cr Alka-Seltzer Ollli IMOiaiOIIII IK(. (IICHIVII I mh mUtff D Oyoagp each mgh :dre-j log a sudden stuck of Asthma? Thai dttad, by itself, cast 1 rob you i (i ~\ CtMeieaal su a n an t oV worry by ahnyi bavins a hottk of ll gkaa n a L ubim by your bedside. Og l ;i.i.' aa igW I alaai i I:i > Ui':.. .*_' -iiii£. aksM I IgSBSk) ODraadUagjaatg heaHog agcau arc •Max the ganai aadirsi o^uniutauoua wbkti choke the broaJual 'j tubes. ^r Apart trom beipBDig yuu obuai a good aoaht'i ataep, H phaaun c biuldt up rtsaataocc tu future Asthau aiu.k, It b ah ol graM acorkt ar. cast* ol Hron dastas aad BrotuDul (.tsrrb. ;V) UNIVfBSAL BHa> or b-.n lor i }k-r (K>t.i... P^*M,O tgsbiM Whu* < %  > Anu. lor.n Roi "d fuig' P*"" ' I iVgr .oiaicd wood. No odour. •^ Nof.-a-ik J*. KMOHKAL rtffgi totemS; i.irj u*ai carrtags <%ntn dii.ied % ; to' UM oa lf(har ,*4 tout IMS. I oow. There's ootksflg tJ astute. oothsag to asieot. iOR ASTHMA AND IRONCbiTIS TAKE fJJ!r>M:ia 'agillSa-Pd taaaMBSj, II a-y iBkii j a*iia t M -iih-otr ••Ipo'itt Ccm6n .. Hwtt lougKai-M ih i ma*' and *"iaei I) f>rtn Atlas fttr/*st/>e KtfH, Cifentf AGENTS WAkNon A rttynei ft Co. (Vidgatown, garsackn. For strnurtant protocuon— ;HELL3 w i• < I WTOM 4 MU lit ' lu at. i^tt—. J -$& ATLAS A I^BgBMfffA^irogfsffa nriiiHnmiii Agents-DA CX)STA & CO.. LTD. Sub Agents-BARBADOS FOUNDRY DRY m



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PAGE FOUR SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. APRn. 9, 1, Empire Defeat College 2-0 Gauntlet Wins In Trinidad Newcastle Drub Liverpool 5-1 LONDON. April. 8. Uverixxil's clear leid at lh* I Irom Speed Records 2J PAU, Southwest France. April R. Three driven entered for the ?^^S X H^ A ^\!£^ Jn.H bu! w kened is they approached pteflhe C'class bunch over five boih"Uwrriooi ~and Manchester l *22SL l ? tJ? B ""fiZ" *££. Empire", E onl arc, w.th the are;, ?„[[ Unlted l0 %£ addj ,ional zest to El gnu I X to-morrow for their IftiO tour of Engl.tr.it Although the official irograjnme does not begin until May 6. with a thrH--clii) fixture igaimt Worcester yet cricket fans in the West Indies will be anxiously wailing accounts of the team's activities from the time they set foot d English soil. This is a safe assumption since the team will 1* finding their land ?ga and acclimatising tnemselve* to English conditions by means of ome interesting one-day flxn. tour proper opens W.I. VS CLUB CRICKET CONFERENCE r HEV are due to play against the Club Cricket Conference team at successively set up new course ^j^ lne "Blues" surfed Hawker's Ground. Kingston on Friday, April 21. after having records during trial runs over press lne game anc | n., ractised at Eastbourne from April 18 to April 27. This might include lnc 2 mll circuit. thf Mt Wlng centered. College's practice game against Eastbourne Cricket Club First to beat the twelve years defence tried to clear but not well Another of the interesting preliminary skirmishes is that against record of one minute 47 seconds enough and Drayton at inside le Indian Gymkhana at Osterley on May t. This is another one-day was Luigi Villoresi of Italy, who right got possession of the ball xturc but will provide a ?tern test for the West Indies team before docked one minute 46 4 sees., an and converted at close range. At down the gauntlet to Worcester two days after that fixture average speed of 60 miles par this stage the Empire forwards In this fixture the Indians wil IMreinforced by four Test men in hour. were combining nicely and wen -e penow of Umrigar. Phadkar, Mankad MdHn irt, ill wefl Then ^)ie Argentine ace Juan well supported by the half back Manuel Fangio broke Viif> new record by return*iig one minute 46.2 seconds with an averDMd <>f 62 miles per hour. Both new records wn R.rh.4.. \4\ — .1* 1 ."• %  > al PORT-OF-SPAIN. April 8The Gauntlet, big Jarra.can bred scored a Oa illing IN THF FTKiTBAI I. MATCH Bl Kensington Oval yetReean rV-rM of Barbados in the ti which there were lew thrills. Empire defeated feature attraction when the New ^ ^ fl[ft 0 vW ^_ ttln€ "^ was short lived a.;the.r 3 Shatter "SMSSS &t^ 2 Wv^SZES from the start. The College pounds in the eight furlones whUe their rivals Manchester defence was quite alert howevent but could not catch up with United saved a point at Woiverver, and negatived all the iniGauntlet who led from start to hampton which allowed them to attacks. finish. The first day of the fourdraw level on pointswith Liverday programme provided keen pool. But Sunderland came to Soon after the College forwards racing. Miss Friendship scored London and won handsomely were sweeping down the field the lone Barbados victory whipwhich enabled them to overtake nown in World Test Cricket circles and all of whom have already irned out against the WVM Indie*. Mankad and Hazan .ms this %  ana Cm Sunday April 30 the West Indian community in Ixmdon plan official welcome for the Waal tndaai tea will involve r*ther one-dav game. It is however expect •** ''> u ' Fremh ather more of a social affair. The idea is to have a long tea Lnb nd so allow the tourists and London residents to renew acquaintance line. Empire scored their second goal when In another raid on their opponents' goal area, MarCollin on the right wing saal that beat goal-keeper C W Ravmund Summer, who clocked and entered the right hand corI minute 44.6 seconds for an aver%  the goal Drayton nearl> speed of 95 3 kilometres scored soon after, the ball stnkIn the day's opener old Bright In ^ dosing matches of the leaI ltM-i Latliir.rr I BROWN JACK <1 lb* > R..l 1 HFAUFIIJI tlJ4 lb> %  4 CAPANIA ill.', lb. UN-.l Ttaw nil *rv. BOBBRTION iaorii\-. i uri. i rwiisss B\lo8 Friendly Football Association in the table. The meeting of Notts County and Torquay produced the anticipated keen duel between '.tie first two teams in the southern section of Division 3 and Notts IB ii i uitcamwi. County saved a point after being behind at the interval to virtually assure them of the sectional honours. Notts Forest are still in the chase for second place and the two Notts teams may well finish m the first two place*i at the reasons close. With Doncaster and Rochdale drawing away games there no change In the northern section where Doncaster retain a three points lead, but Gateshead by winning awy drew level with Rochdale in second position. H.rd1 FRONT HOPPER w i dsj I MISTER PITT 114 lb. I A Jovph. J. HIS WORSHIP •! lb. Romw. THE PHANTOM IB lb*.. Tinsh. Tim* I Ml Mci. NXRiiwiii unj Oil M I IIrytip MKNT FLATK—1 Fartoaa* G Of. I. MUM rBIENDSHIP -115 lb. %  Yvonet VICTORY 'IB It*.HM-.'* Old Boys' Associa> %  three goals to one in a very good game in which the College, idtion, tough losing, gave an improved display on their general performance April I us season. Reeds United beat Adt Morns scored the lone goal for College, ilimaxing a line forward 6—0. log from close range, a good centre by Smith April 5: be left wing. Tayloi on the left wing scored from an almost unOld Boys Association 2—0. DSMble angle after having cut in from the left wing while WellApril • i ended from an accurate corner to put his side another one up. r iikcM scored from close range as the result of a quick forward move%  alf of their opponents' goal line Plckwkk'Rovari irul) Jlu in this entartalnlng game. tlKl of matches last week are as follows: — April 3 : National beat Harkliffe 1-0. Empire made some >iKrts Club beat AdVOattempts to increase their lead cate 2 1 bul tneir shootltl K Arsenal forefeited their matcn accurate: They might have accomplished tneir purpose — few occasions, however but Smith was always in position and saved brilliantly. The game ended tamely with the players on s evidently tired. TKIMDAD LEASEHOLD*! PLATE— %  lurl.*(. A aa* L.--r 1 flAL'NTIXT .lit lb* i A J<*rph. 2 BEACON MRIGHT IB lb. L* t J ICE BOY ll lb* H,ia 4 SITOIEAM tllO lb. i Hardtvitlac. Tim* : l.t| aye*,. spintcl C*W" "TSJ '""•"" " FLYAWAY MIS lb* L*llimrt WELLINGTON IB lb... HoM. rUHOLR* .III lb. tUrtwtdgc NATURE BOY '111 lb. > Roiro. Time : 1021 sea Rangers beat St. Mary's Old Boys' Association 7—0. THIS WKMK'S GAMES week 1 fixtures are: — luesd**. April Hi HBJ d .a the % %  .,,,Mi B. B M Matthew's Old BEST GAME OF ALL J UT the Spartcn-Carlton llx: sent amonj I in tr, It might '. %  . baflttng to thoee irho hat Boys' Aaaoelatlon at 81 Leonard'a n:f eferee: Mr. C. K. Janunott. Dartan is no true inc.. \\rdneda). April It: vo teams. Indeed a win f..i BpEfftaa I B T.unbroae vs Berwick il T.W would have been a truer indication of the coi Rafaras Ml K Reeee. • This must not be construed to detract in any way from the Maple vs Arsenal at St tcelleace of the play by both tejms ) ten backed up b] J X'eater ine.i-uic of the link • %  '. I %  %  l .i.j a aai left full Leads Field By 4 Strokes C.EOKG1A. Apnl 8. Etfa born in San FranLongden Figures In Photo Finish BOURNS, April 8. Yorkshire-born Johnny Longden, leading United States Jockey, after riding three losers figured photo finish when makm.; .Nuruwmd R**ulia *n am loUow*:— xdiiU Li IIIVUNB B I Airdrtanma 2. DunttM United 0 Dvuntarlon 1 DuiMfannara AUilMIc 4. Qucviia Park 2 Artwr-un J. Sunhou*. Muir 2 Mw•—. 1 91. JonnMotw 4. CowdmbMUi J AaiUif lat.tB.n.n.l al.Kh : England 0. Franc* 8. Irlaaalr Malrbai Hamlllon raahtr*> Ajr Unltad ft OalUC 4 A.-adaaruaaaa l ; Albion Row* 3; 'Lauv Thtatl D I* la.au NarUtarn I Acvnnston SlanUT 4, BtnaUa Port 0. BsfTOW 2. Dal lUiEUm 1. Cmtriakm Urstttd 0. Do ncMt w Ravcn 0. CWWB AlexaiiUrB L New Biia^itori 2 Lincoln Clly 6. HanltvooK ImW 0 atajMBcId Town 3. Siorvtpon Count v 0 OkSun Athletic I BraaUoni Clly I Roh*rti*Mn UMt ml I, Oa***ajd I TIMIMIMI** Rovsn 2. Halifax Town 1 Wrnhm 1. ChnUSf I. Yoi* CUT ?. KocnckU* 1. tt—mt imuian BUHlibum Rov*ra 3. Grlntaey Town 0. Qtwefctort 0. Soutnamp ion 0 BntitSord I. Sheffleld UnilM Bury 1, rSw*na>il Town I. CWeirt Clt> .. wiMwna Pnrk Rsnspra 0. ChaaWrftrid i*n> United S. Lnctwtar Clly 1. L*ada . Ctntntry City 1. Hull City 2. WtL' ruled 1: Ptyrnoulh Al*fyl 0, Luton Town 0, SaMfflald WUi*wUy 1, BafinTotaaeaMn Hat spur* 3. Preaton iltan debut at Caulrleld Racecour>e today Riding topweight Derrymore in the Held by four strokes the last race of the day at tinball way tfaga in the had a thrilling slru(K • laatera Golf Tom with Victor 1 i Ith J MnlWell. who had a ten pound., pull in Igbta. The j udge called which sh Referee Mi C tVERY GOOD AT CENTRE HALF Cadaaan Blav*t >•' n I got within striking ball her hand Leonard's. Jemmott Krlday. April 14: HarklirTi I lha Bay. %  %  %  Cults \ Old Boys Association at St. I %  cis at Shell. Referee: O. Graham. i la oi 137. %  his second round which OOBM who montha ago i ,fler a motoring Bees) also had %  •< a second s |. | t>8 wbWh put him In second place with a total of HI | %  round <>f ~'i was third with 141, —Reuter lU.b L*>aa*ia Dlvl.lan A Aberdeen 0 HearU It Hibernian B. Clyde X Parttck Thutl*i 5. Queen o( the Soutti 2. Rslth Hoera 4. DutMlee 1: Ranser* 2, Bail File :. StLtllna Albion I, Moinenrell 4. Fim DKUU i Aton Villa 4. Chelsea i. Blackpool 2. Arsenal I; Chariton AlhI.ILC 2, 0; E\erton 0, Blrmi.ham City 0. Pulham 0. Sundeiland 3. Hndder*lieidon Town I; Readme I, Brntol holiday trip to Europe. C(lv 0 soulhend United 3; Alder.hol 0. — 'Kewer.i Walford O. Newport County 1 — R'ain Toweel Oatpolata Cunudiun LESPONDING TO PART NERS Bli>S A FTER Ham.,:: pion, tonight %  Fernando tiagnToweel won neat i %  %  ibly attribute 1 e l .. jto a mor< ax* auditions thai may obtain in any rsgrl REFEREE8 SECRETARY RESIGN M R, K,.\.\ BYER, s<> ratai i (or tin teen ap] Mr. Byer has belittle t<> Oafac apail tougtuu Qagaon wai %  holding and in lha ninth round waa told that ha be ttsaqusilfied il ha araj again guilty. r the latter rounds 1> %  I and his fathi-r nuiugci hurt his ughl midway through rtght Earlier Taari two listed slamming fight ..hen at long range he scored i lha moving iptrll ng in repeatedly i poaitton in which it now -iagnon's ability keei thl tight at close rangi> Harbados football in good >i. at times and his toughn. Pawn '1 lrm winning by nt .md will contlnw I I %  Inwckovt* —Renter r n..$ Dpaaa i %  E to give %  e> J. : I V %  UM announced %  chance %  %  upport I* remot* i a hand ihat it ure to be useful la a j:-.d he ahoulq >:-,da to Four II. ..is Three North l nand nrd will > i |.imi'iny tit' I land : 4> Q J P H T. i • '. &f 4. I a i • iClpU appa by M. Harrison Crof r.-umsi although a oo*lSp.idfi : K h.held ihe .1 of the lit on the n^st round He I Spadea I '.o ch.. i it mi-solid tui: *. more Hicks If oia>ed in i Four Sp-ides on at a |ln| a email led he hj* iocxl •>KVA, knoAn to ne ihe I • 4 ? K, g 1U. I u • A, I 4 A It tnc bidding proceed! Two He.rts-Two No Trumps. Three Di-iinondi-Thr-'e Spacfes. North *ith ihe abov* hand ihould pass. South uleerly has not tupoort ior the red iul'a. and il is betu-r to puck up before the partner.hip k**t well out of Its depth on a misfit hand. fo wind up tnis series on Intermediate Two-bids, we muat COBS Ida l the meaning of a jump Did. as In thi sequence of Two Mrarts-Two Spades; Fsar Opener naa made a Jump rebld of his uit. although a rorchlg situation exists after the S ntive repon< of Two Spadei. mean that the Hearts are completely solid and are now set a* the trump aulL i will therefrre be treated at cue nidi If the bidding ttarta with Two Hearts-Three Spi tiet. responder indicates that hit Spades are dead solid. A *uit is deemed to be solid If it comista of seven cards headed by the A S een : if ux cards only are held, % %  IKi-eaded by the four top honours. L-jnd^r, tifiu SartHe. THE Union meeUng was off to a start yesterday with a sr-rpn,, in the very first race. This was a win by Mr. Sydney Liddeiov, black gelding Bright Boy. Of course this was not Bright Boy*i ^ win by any means. He has won about a dozen, his last only ^ January m P 0 of s P in Bul lhat was a hantuca P and he was ig in with light weight. What surprises me most is the dashing ftta. which this aged gelding has been able to reproduce when it seen*] certain only a few months ago that he was on the decline. He rseaj nearly the whole year through in 1949 without getting a first rle** his demotion from class B aU the way down the ladder to D. BB now he appears to have come to a full stop in his downward trend, U he keeps cp this form he will soon be on his way back up. Old sail ings have a habit of doing things like this. Bright Boy's victory was not the only surprise which 1 recerf*] in this race. The form of Fair Profit was much more so. and espec**. ly as his weight was a ridiculously low 97 lbs. Surely this cannot ot the same horse who only last December dished out a sound beaUse, to the best two-year-olds in the South Caribbean. If Fair Profit had run second I might not have been so bewilocr*], because Bright Boy on form is quite a formidable proposition asg would probably have given his old rivals in B class as much trouble as he meted out to these creoles in D class. But Fair Profit ran In Front of him were also Tiduc and Ali Baba. These two horses an not bad ones but I cannot believe they arc really 22 and 17 lbs. batar than Fair Profit. If they afe, then our two-year-olds in 1849 wan were an Inferior type indeed. Fair Profit's defeat in the McEnearnev Trophy makes the third in a row for horses of this age racing at Union Park in this parties, lar race. On each occasion it has been a creole with some kind * reputation who has been beaten. In 1948 it was Brown Rocket, ant last year Ocean Pearl. Indeed the only three-year-olds of note *fc* have come through the fire of racing with the older horses in D clan at Union Park, have been Glcneagle, Jetsam and Pippin. All thra> outstanding creoles, the first two exceptionally so. Of course ttwn was a good excuse for Ocean Pearl last year. She went down on bar knees at the start and after that she had little chance of catchiit them. But I have never been able to find out what was wrong wttt Brown Rocket and now I must wait to hear what's up with Fiji Profit. I am quite certain that it is not his true form. The other three-year-olds who had a special race nil to themselves in F class substantiated the Free Handicap which I made lag January. Wavecrest. the winner, it will be remembered I had placed on a par with Lazy Bones and Bow Bells. I did so on his two wka gained at Arima last year and also his looks which pleased me van; much. What I liked abort his race yesterday was the fact thtt he was headed by Leap On afi A r about a furlong, but came back to irk, a hard light for the finish. Ot course Bob Hardwidge is never to at caught hanging on to the front early in the race if someone else lUtaj this position better than he does, LO it is highly probable that Wavecraa need never have been headed at all. Thm-furr. in spite of such I strong finish, Wavecrest's time of 1.02 2/5 was quite good. However. from the time of the C class mile, 1 gather that the track must be very fast. Fancy Miss Vic doing a mile in 1.41 2/5. She must be is> proving—it's about time! Wavecrest's victory also opens up avenues of thought on what It going to happen in the Classics. The first one. the Trial Stakes in Part of Spain, being no more than a rehash of the two-year-old Breed*!* Stakes over six furlongs. 1 see no reason why Wavecrest should Ml be made favourite. He has everything to recommend him. Pleat; of speed and obviously more strength than any of his contemporaries. He Is In fact uncommonly like War Lord, Gun Site and the more robM looking of O.T.C.'s sons. This must be acquired from his dam Television who Is by the famous sire. He looks nothing like the other horses by Coat-of-Arms whom we have seen on the track so fat. I look forward to seeing him play a prominent part in the mree-yast* old racing this year and having now won three races out of thm starts In F class we will probably see him tackling Fair Profit at tit) next meeting at which he races. THE GAUNTLET AGAIN Of all the horses who have won slow races on fast tracks TH) Gauntlet takes the cake. Only last year at Union Park he won tva races, the first a mile which he did in exactly the same time it task Nature Boy, a three-year-old of no account, to do it in a D class rasa; and the second a 6i furlong which he just managed in a fifth fasts than C class. Yesterday he won again over a mile, this lime a secosa slower than the very mediocre Miss Vic. a mare who after racin| fat a number of years Is still In C class. This comprises The Gauntlet! winning record since he arrived in Trinidad from Jamaica in 1HL Not a very impressive one. Yet, as slow as his race might have been. The Gauntlet • -\ idently won very easily. He took over from Ice Boy after a furlong had bean covered and was never headed again. Beacon Bright came with a 1st* bid and although he passed Ice Boy fairly easily he could not make aay impression on the leader. Not being there myself I am not sure exactly how this race must be read, but I do know that Beacon Bright takes l lot of roughing up quite early in a race and it seems that Laities* forgot this all important factor. If this Is not the case then Baacsa Bright cannot be thoroughly fit. This is also quite likely as ha h notorious for his dry coat. But I am firmly of the opinion that he CM run a taster mile than this and particularly so on a hard dry trass like Union Park. The rest of the meeting will surely reveal the raa trouble. Meanwhile 1 also notice that the erratic Flyaway a full sister k Jetsam and Ligan, won the last race. She did so in a driving flnut from Wellington and Sun Glee. At once I turned back the leaves d my book and comparing this with Wavecrest's effort over ihe sane course I find the time figure is exacUy the same. This, of count, sendi Wavecrest further up in my estimation, because he is tank and Flyaway four. Furthermore he carried a pound more than ha*, whereas at welght-for-age she wou'd have to give him 11 lbs. I also conclude from the above that ihe average three-year-tli this year is better than those of last year because Flyawav was one a" the leadeis among the second string to Ocean Pearl, By the tenor averages she should now be better at four. Yet she would hardly have won had she run against Wavecrest, Leap On and Princes* Raslyya. I think we are in for a really hoi season among the threeyear-olds Fair Profit had better buck up. 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[W ta l.nl. mrn. mi*. % % %  .,. j^,, aaawTii ALIC IUIIIU a eo., •aaaaae* —•••'•< -wMt --jim IMofcJoJ Mp k „ p y0ul ^ •* %  • frt. ol a.poi.i. ftioi „„ "•a/, .on, tu,| ana oi Don't ink "oubl.. Chongo lo Htm Mobfoil %  odoy. JMobiloil] WORLDS LA RGEST %  SELLINfi MOTOR Oil ouswxa uim oo. u.;



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%  I NDAY, Vl'lill I' 101 IV ADM" CLASSIFIED ADS. FOR RE.>'T IN MEMORUM IT IIIH Ml I II IS Not •* %  jwat m To d Cti J" Vi ll a ga. £ 2| oaafly agfw— by #W 1 r priaaaa C hi to tanaa on dp No pre* tou a ewpi WrRa lily tar hoaaaRRei trap FTI**!• Ta-da> doth morn arve* ] •Mac. ihot *pd *** •* rM ,. r-~ 1 loved Wocalled away m F-aace Gene but not Ww. Mr J K ART! %  Hn EDITH PROUT .SMpwothrri Till. I M and bralhrt ALAN EASTERN CYRUS Wo W Kb I* It Colon. Vprl! lath. tMt toVte im**** FRILIP-A MATILDA CTRL"* M* t pt *r the '•?''!_ n ini __.RET Ith. 1*W M rM the Itaot-te-" (Ml H. irr* Bk> Mi .-'! %  • " % %  a n ao. .:e God r— ••* p romiaad raV EHpr and Gwen Moore Daphne Ha-iuMwi rUHfrr Marso< Be •*• Ftore*-%  — %  • %  (rand children ErnetoM pO l OTeU ^ %  "" •' %  TA MOORE who deported rhl S*V! i I FOR BALI HOUSES 04 -•' i cm Floor cv; Co Large ar-i Airy PTHM Ik MII/VOI 1 HOI -1 lot of Magr. :*aa per%  I1FRAI DHr.mrt. lour BiSognma tiligmai. rod. phooe OK HARBOUR LOG aHlF* In Carlwlr IUy Soft. AlrawhlM R. Sell. IS 'Comedu.*. 11*1 '-" %  • --*• %  Cap! HOOJ.^a*nt DoConU NOTICE rui-i Uf ST. AttDBIM Appl-cation* ter She vacant pool of organ** oi II. Saviour* will ho received by dot urdirwgpid up to Botiartaay 1KB BSfJJI .1 raoary Clack. NOTICE %  MMMfj b_ l rnpan, t double bedrc TUB. W foc BM *f. IIHla -*VT> ( i \*\ glN Oof '.'i Bbaf J boorwowft, RMM drawing Room Apply. Mra A Rudder. Dial Hot tlAS-ln MIMI OF ST 1-ITiB opoo on in* fall. mc %  > *• from Apnl Hut to M> M ftairda> April 15th from lo %  w. In It I Seturdai April Bnd from 1* IS noon, Sa'urea> April Jfcfi from lo PhlUp Crwaa P J MI*U f il l BghUh* ptont. -• %  llwiMI *Mh Prom Hoy lot Dial tu C S CORBIN. ^ronouroT. •1 Petal *ajT0wK)TlVE CAR—ou^dord I HP. 1MT Recentl* Perfect condition Ring CAI • Morm %  HP Soddn U>_A1 omdttion L. AUrTno. Fort t. Ltd toSft-th. Mb. miloopr undor liW Good OVTMT to*vin Rorbodco May 1HPTKO %  M Apply bl Phono MpOT. Wlndoo: i.:-.. K ii wiOi tab iiUof GorodoDial fo>. (tU> r CAR Ford VI Wrll fc.pt m condition Alwa>i owlyroi and oa*Wt i horw 3111 ot 3PTI Cin br ! II I%  hppd A(,;.' Mi •oaf ftlRJMG MM HIM 1 Cour.*.v Oa ItW-ln PwBoi opor-i • : HRM KVA i.n.HTiM. %  %  %  f K n LJVCSTOO %  Marc* tanatVId MVLE-Ono Ul 'n wo-. Thoaaai MECHANICAL nine i draw %  4MI NOTICE TENDERS (or roinoviaMI and r op lacing tko C.IIIBI of Si Ph wUi C* rvraivad by nw up to Mth April. W U OOODING Paroctiial Trooourar. TAJ*—dp QUEENS COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 1950 I Tha I *;ionj for hold in I .•(-tar: ;r-t KM oaf|oSffAol % %  will hgva aitainod (M M> I I >•'• oa Hot July. 1I. and who will not W orot IS oarof aaa or I mi 1 Candida -'iirnwfl a vai* 1M>1. hrptombrr. IMI • rolooi Ud Loado Soo Da ra inpoa. Alcoa Pop* %  -. now inoimailiailn ptortn Hnta. SouiK Mountain. Boofci witfi tho teuowing ahtpa through ih*.r lie D^ MOIT MowUoi Cogat Stauon no. Lydio. Winston Churchill. Hordsman, Coot John D. P Ampac CaiMornu. %  g PlUrnm. Robert C. Tultlo. Rto Orinoco, Spurt %  P t P T Anna L M O Z California HPST. S ao h ra ra a, %  too Wsifndo. Son Vutfrann. Iformac Tkla, Clan M*rL Tr.-a oznx T.'^. CaaabUnca. Mi.r. K*>nL Bolafclava S H A T Salina* T V B Canadian ChaOengor. Hahrlpg. Goioha. Pbparuoll. Tociticnn G 3 V I t-., PoMfapBRfljt ii.-.-.: A..j Prr.-.a:.'. Wm oySB* a^RaoRfffal RhhMSKwa Seawell Canadian National Steamship Kariudt) Real fj^ A^riiry %  OITHO(M) uun p. Dsorr LADY NHA'S LADY RC-DNXY •ADY moum "KEW HAVEN Crarf nlanad. I u aq rpu i ii 1 aarvanta* rooana dpublo fhrapa. lighting p mil. BMpwrb bafhang boarh. Dtoi 41f Himlir, Par—bar it a so-1 f %  d. 1 oawroorna, drawn** r< %  lo*-aly It. Jamoa Hooch Apply to J J A Rolrt. Lor* Star ';%  - %  Mt St faat. %  ! Jarre, or Phone I-13 BARBADOS CLERKS' UNION Mooting will bo hold at thc CHR1STIE SMITH. %  •I III II SALES HI.CE HOOSSI Ltataa Stroot A do arrablo b ut lrwaa MM V flsuroa phfl fim.ii .•' Com Broa Prj-J-a w Stroot Dtol MM 31 3 FOR I Pram in A Fratmia HP • Rwan *•"• fgf Adjoha or t;n..Ur •' %  'J: .Coniopt ha—g dl alily an P-s:^31 3 BUNGALOW. a'F %  RMHPOTI toaosatooa* r. • Uh. Tr phaaia RMR H tirriCR '• Ofrlta pvoa SanrUf • -DO* aUrhill Stroat App; Samtarr Laundry Co Tol SMS 11 3 SO—t f.n APARTVfEN %  '* -. Bar > fl.|l|iiiigpJ1 IgpfRd EASa—An AUCTION I HA\T boon icjtruetad by tho roroivooi Wrarkt to ofter for %  < aurlton on ThufMi-> •. .. \u< UfRMRffl UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER A Bonn Itoob SKalvo. Lagapa I'.^e m Illaoalrig Tabw %  FiMa MaHraaaa Eaaap Uaap M WAMIH HELP *!' *l -%  %  LA4. '•:DAD Harold Pugpoti. tol%  %  Irving Shm% %  Kmnch Soolr. ArranBawa. -^, Uooro. Thoa—a Sanith. • Nicnoito. Robanoon. Vlo, h. :> -i.^ OppgnHoM P Macfcenno. Elato Lughwarm. Adogji nn Joan Simmon. Mary C aiopboli John Campbri: Jano Marlntoah, Ro b ort Ma I Woddorburn. William Huagnna From tjaTftylADA Frod Toppm. JOTOT Jonruc^tjKmP Tudyr. Unaiioua MoWaon KB*, Ca mwaB pr.er Vtf, Mpj RSPABTI BBS—Ri Ii \ F TORONTO Jgmoa Claptt, Ell both Clamry Viki. ton Caro.Hartal Mabel Void. Goorgo Wrid li Katnrvn Grior. Nancy PorUmutoa Gardinor. Ajdro> Pape DJ Pap-. Goldio Smith. Ann C 1>. Ethgl Orooaa. I. • %  toJUg Seaton. Penny Soaton For BERMUDA Willlgm Atkioaon.l oa, Ulr.ck BrandUaog.' Franco* Inco. Claude G .T MadoUiino I natlo Groor. Thomas P-i Bamford. Ida Fioru T %  TR'NTDAD W ;.-.-i wtaon. Hr bort Wataan I.OMUWIIM Minus ATTENTION u drawn to the Control of Prices i Defence) 'Amendment) Older. 1950. No. 14 which will be pubhshed in the iZfKta of Thursday 6th April. 150. Set this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling Charcoal" are as follows: — WHOLESALE PRICE (not more than) pur bag of HO lbs. ex ship 12 95 per ag of 110 lbs. ex store. RETAIL PRICE (not more than) 4c. per lb. 6th April. 1950. r.ge in price bas been necessitated by the inrrfltn British Gutana. T 1 50.-2n MISCELLANEOUS r* BRgjBj I 1 4 10—An SIM BIIL1AI MISCELLANEOUS %  .1 loanonado. al • AJB—In. i %  I r.w% a. ....! Joweit Ana SEbror Watorralcjura Early booh*. Map* Auto rrtngjM Ant-juo bnop %  : .al Yacht Club llo, Hn 1 TAHTS Flama . w Ci and o*haTyie I".< TiafalgB' t Dial M* MM tin AUTO ACCESSORIES Cliamolg VralK%  GargfM Kit* 3n tomlng aU" i **!•+-in 1. %  and > gaugf Cft . %  'Woo or nagroal roter TalophonR S N'choUa at MS. botwaan Warn and • pm 14 H—4 ll I'I IISII> AI inyofM oUc Signed W R BOVfll T laraai * In LOST 4% FOI .Ml KRWKI.K IKOIM \\ I i 0 Abwtfcfj REAL ESTATE it • li-....oni H.JJ al I .e proportt. hi tola Inlaioatrd i—nieptea a TUITION -BERT HAVEN Brighton Be. • II con van too caa. noar i. • or phong owwat at I B % %  a loaaon tony aon Rnitoi SH % %  I mil oftac lor %  v offkc VICTOR I negitaadai lRfc I at PROMRNADE ROAD SJpOwM'i> %  r. rbaltoi bouao rtar duig Ib dri H n '"'alt* WAtol ouloffWea pplnlad wa>or at loot of roaaJ paar lo i'rtrMcwa pp%  apptv I so In "SUNSET VIEW Rockici lAdjptP %  IU.UE WATXRvS ( Iho r*d Bhrtrt tho Bay alth 11.40 >q-ar trot of land Including tha Ian aciaaa tha road running] to tho water*' edge The bouao corttmoJ verandah dining room), thirt bod nnlng wgtor and nil oty* m. c including kJtoban lm cupboard. Hater. Dortrfclry. Oog and Rad:. lijtaliad Garaga ard Scrvanta roomi in vard InapaclwD any day—Phono BBSS Mr Bollamy The abeta wUl bo oat up lo public l too ofRce ci tho underMgnod on Fnday. Uw CM of Apnl 1MB Hlpn rARRDfOTON *. St Lmraa Rtree' II 3 JO IIn JOIN THE BARBADOS POLICE rORCE An interesting; career with good prospects and education are required for c> %  : ..-.table on joining is $52.00 a month rising by -'.(100 to 580.00 per month, plus $2.00 a month llowance. After 4 years sen-ice he is eligi!-.ru of $7 20 per month. The minimum pay of ed Ranks is. Cuipural $80.00. Sergeant $92.00. Station made on merit, and depends on the ;.portunity for promotion to the In"iied Rank. 3. Requirements far enUsCTitent 5 ft. 8 ins. 34 ins Educ.i-.. NoMess than Standard VII 4 A], oe 5 ccn at District "A" at the following Tuesday 18ih April 10 ajn. All person* who have sat the Junior Cambridge or School r nation. Documents to support this must be produced, '.esdau 19lh April 10 am All other applicants who fulfil the requirement of paragraph 1 ..u.ve (Sgd.) R. T. M1CHELIN. Commissioner of Police. Bndgjbl 6th April, 1B50. 9.4.50— 3n. PART ONE ORDERS I'.V NKO+U O.B.E.. ED.. Commanding, The Barbados Regiment. Apr. 50. Ivdo No. 11 PARADES TRA1N1NO parade al Rt^ \K> hours II April 50. VOLUNTARY CLASSES ho are attending the voluntary class on Tuesday 18 April Lesson 4 of the LMG Pamph: I upon to teach this lesson. ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING 17 APR Orderly Officer .. 2,Lt. S G Lashley 2!'H. W. i Duty I .. Ueut. P. L C ''< 209 Sjt. Long. C. B. M L. D. SKEWES-LOX. Major. I S.O.L 1 I The Barbados Regiment, j V Verj Happj EASTER To VII <>i You IS THE SINCERE THE BLENDERS OF TAYLORS SPECIAL BLENDED RIM •loSMI it. Taylor A SOMM Lid. WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD. LOST oa D 1061 %  ama to Otraer PW (j:^ai.. BBj Rwggagg, n The *i S *"pellln at thair %  -fn.-e Jimi tip) of April. ISM at 2 pan I Thi \COI BI lUemlpg • m* <^ %  BMSaMthM pp appliioivm lu \i,. (jpppf BBBabf not \ I -:.blk St Mu-nae: I i 4 p m iin. Solirllora INSURED MOVING! PROFESSIONAL NOTICE DR FERRBtKA i,l C.f '-i.uupracuc BkatBmg oaawaebj dtoaaon of oypa. oa %  V AT NAVY GARDENS RulR P i c o wib a i llHS cooi Q lah Draw. |f* DlnUlC and Broahfart Room* j RBfcr.or.Ma wttt buiR In tow badbdi touot and tttod bath S balmapii I KfTN r WOBBT l B\1> OOt I INMI > ft mail umi I/M > %  a Dkcoum. IU Rarbu.k SI.. Brhlgrlown DW -1M. -:. Hour. : -l SEA YHW CtEST HOIM HASTINGS, BARBADOS I \1 I I I I \ I (1 MM ri'LLV STOCKED BAR RATES; S5.M Kr D> upwards lUdwIn) Appl> lr W. S. HOWELL Inc. B. G. Grasp This Opportunity -II.VK >AtlORY M\IIIIMK\ FOII SALE fjitiiij) l.uip 1'fiii.r.WHii TRINIDAD rUNERY in the raclory casprlUn: KniXt tagmt. Ji i Pans; Ceolnlunla, Entln, ((a—110 h.p.). Ctnentlni Sal (M k>); fsies. Sundry Enjina. Pumpa, Tanks, c rurkaarriti u War all roau al •ai reaaaval. ulars ana .nipection apply .ADVERTISE... it pays M. KMiARTT. LTD. rart al Spaha IRIMDAD. IX OIK ELrXTKIl \l. DO \IIIMIA T We can mmic you A.C. MOTORS (Hoover) LauTTi Sg OB) ~l A .in flat log and aandy iCARLDIEM. Si Ua gBl .lenao wEI %  act beach and %  %  I uUU 'WE, CI .^uy ahw* galow with 2 ictn -m Bfj coaatUnd, % %  Ga Z rtafBT I acrra. 11 %  ~ : bUBfSaSpw BBBSR -S3 UlNDV IUDGE, St Jaj CLOUD WALK ar awa as 1 "?£ in ii -rui.s.. < oiTbul %  .-•* ba on coiui-. -U Bal RETKEAT, Si Vetaf. *| 11 fau own beach. Opai. M •*< BEULAI1. HgStBBJI •••* :&m* BBw. SILVER ERRAY. SlRJ Siono built t bodmSRSBJ bungalow facing -•• w* aracdgaL BLUE VISTA. Hl'"^B >U'.'-. Ma %  .r-.TM % % %  •-. Wariaa %  %  ;-.:aclW J with d,. ib .ii''** wallod garden ILL. "—wS EfJJJ Asure 1 The i Kl \l. RMBM At*



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T Sl'N'DAY. M lill I MM M \|).\V M)\H, iu;i; Considerable Disagreement To Open Fair England a COUEa ,, f ^S*' n , '" <>P !" the Bethel in tomorrow afternoon a1 %  THIS iTL o "^; e j" h *' G rom,d8 •he Dirties concerned. It now ,*. u !" •" effort on the part seems unlikely thet the •'' Bh SurUa, School tc singers who look part in the nr..l ?,' funds for the Annual more reMissionary Meeting which is -ords for the Parlaphone Con% "wauled, for the month of June uanv—• subsMlarjr of H.M.V And is just a co-mcident In Broadcasting Stations :hree members of Cyril Blake's UK H. E. PEARSON. WDOM "* %  brother was in Barbados lass C\ilypso Serenaders, who provide „animent for the originmonlh ^^ yesterday byTcT al recording have now ton, !" up aceornpuileT ClT'^ Mr' Caribbean Club? Bought Hotel Al The Cinema : -rom Edmonton. .' and U in the wholesale business of the Arm of Taylor and S ,R Hoioid Wernher. ,„„ ^^n^r^Hr a noismr. has bought one of Canada. They will be here for Bemudas btelvel, I ,, ,he W elve days and are staying at 250-room Bermuiliana overtookthe Hotel Royal ing Hamilton Harbour. It is be* luv.d he paid more than £300.00.1 First Fliffht fur it. Sir Harold, who is 57. I, _... ,,,„,''"' chairman of Electrolux and ... R ,, A1HWAYS LTD.. made phone. He lives at u ,, llr lsl 1, •' in, rom nerc to LuWe Hoo. in Bedfordshire: there """• J Puw 'S r co ""* Miami on he has his own art gallery. inursday. Three passengers from Barbados left for Miami The> Foreword By Sir Pelham %  %  '"' Mr A '" Hodgson, Director T HE complete history of West ?! ner l ."' Tele-eommunlcations Indian Tost cricket SSrallif? M S BW .' • Mr I ed in the Wayfc.it Publication ST*. Caldwell f S',"^ ",K. -CrickeMcs from the Weal Indies" r.HnH Jh„ TL. ', %  '',', as brought out on April S, ho *" """" '" """' 14th. It Is the official brochure nf the tour and copies will be on sale in the West Indies about April Uth. 'T'HE word was spreading in The foreword has been written %  W| mbledon tennis eireles the bv Sir Pelham Warner who exother day that "Gorgeous Gussie" presses the view that he will "oran, who introduced lace panwatch the test matches with UPS IO the British courts last year, mixed feelings. He was born in wan a "really sensational" outthe West Indies but has captained "• this year. England on savera] o c rssllo n i. H. Teddy Tinling, who created the would prefer a narrow victory for frilly panties for the California one side by a margin of seven star, won't say what he has In runs or one wicket. But if you mind for her this year. But one want to llnd out which one. you of his new designs to be shown will have to obtain a cupy ..I the April 13. is called "The Shape of brochure. Things to Come." For Amateurs ITIt ROCK (.AI..II S A ROCK-OAJUMEft simplest and m. of transform.!'.* H a bank m a mr4m and inexpensively made, the local %  toot landing itaelf perfectly to its arrangement. A Hock-garden should be terraced. That is to say, .nerc should be several feel height from the lowest the highest. The general all-over height too should at firs; gera.'ed. u there win be considerable %  bzink•ing in a disappoint in a flatness if this is not allowed for For your Rock-garden you will need a few loads of the local broken cor..l -tone (the larger the LDd mould for tilling in njTsMfi tht ROM In groups f dlf> I and shapes, working up from the lower terrace to the BOILING OIL By G. B. THERE is one thing about th you can'i plea rs ihemto i>e diversil ter I had : he Empire Theatre, ht it would be Interesting to check my reaction with a criticism in a well known American periodical 'oi oaiv H*|R SHADE.NE r !"!" *^:^!^ i ^6made by GADBURYS 74 fAM/LYFoodDrMk !^eM '^i His SHADEINE COMPANY, t. CharcMvM Ho.d, !" WJ. LONDON. f nfiutd. Thingt To Come BY THE WAY T HERE Is now ?aid to be an ultra-'. slop fruit falling from trees when it is ripe. T: i ..HIS or %  1 tiro, had a more OMtbod. of dealing with ripe fruit They used u up a party to visit a vill. the Maine. There I shoot the rip' I would have like i to sea UtrlUo winging an ai %  Lau. tin all (owi. Max Jacob, iii ttaoae %  MiinxivSiujirornrrUi-tfiKouih M DMA HV0P1 OINBI Ii tha to tour ai the Brrtun Laundry Queen. Sho wilt leave nex. a marl uniform of the Wringing Machine hat wlU be printed "Laundry Qood Will larday. ok Ifi up b i our laundrtas %  %  i. g i Q only 'ay I'm proud that my chosen ' :igtonl undry world. %  tional laundry friar* remain %  -ibou,' save laundry life, if heing plumb da'l %  tha trick" Hutu U Play T ill, ^t BOOLBOI aho burned %  ut not good enoui: Narkovir the boyi u the (it tudy by night and 00| l>"t when '.. per cent, raarki BmarV ^melt %  r.it QI rath* he can Ut the wrong %  nd the ilevEot their own back by inducing a master .'n abstract the real p %  % %  By BEACHCOMBER Sniiii t-Alliek countered by selling Is* papers. which nobody had troubled to itaaL TIJUI Iniarnw %  %  commanti the currant number of The 'Narkovcr Magazine'", will no doubt continue, but it bring the whoie lamination s>5tcm io disrepute." Work II Out W E are now asked to take it as an axiom .'hat the more re the less likelihood is there of anybody boinfl Blloand to eat it. Uy leaving it to go bad we avoid U i %  quancet of diMribuUni i.'. So, by piling up stocks bought abroad, which must not be eaten, and discouraging production at home, we may one day be in a position to give up eating alloAnd ihal will bridge tha K-'p. in.l I SS MVH N ^ "Df Mr. Strttltt, I hert rtctnl'y Jto/trt a muih'ocm Inn . L::*QH !:?" i Stnia. LA9I WEEKS WINNER WINNER of last week's guess Star Is Miss Joyce Smith. Palm Cottage, Hlack Hock, St. Michael. Is Jane Powell. higher Have a rough idea or plan in your mind it i and you will find that I will come as you proceed with tin* fascinating work. When all tb rocks are in place, contli ing your garden by 01111 pockets and litti, valta with tine well prepared lould. Press it down vi and heap high to aUoa linking that will occur tcring. Let it all aattl then start your planting. Arrange the plants la groups or clumps, placing them about irregularly with ; •k thrown fn between Ing .illowae.ee for theil PLANT8 FOR THt MM I GAKIH H Among the many plan for a rock-garden nothing is more %  or Little Yullow Daisy. This dainty plant, which gn ibla rounded bunches, has fam lik< i .. Iron] aromatic scent* Lea n %  daisy-Ilk*Aowei Little Y< lUn Dalaj %  mer Director of Agrlcull it is. now n11r I v i bailian gBl noal any cond poor rock> n M oraij patiUi "n Craai law dinary gartkn I* d -tolled in a garden it II tftod. springing up all ovei ma ca an %  U in the di in other words betwi ei and July. Yellow 11 fusely, but fpring. taking about tl %  to germinate, so, if you want th. charming liJde plant for your i | a few seedlingfrom i (rien.i"%  garden. til in.i: 91 n Mill MM K (..\ltin s PLANTB Among other plants IU a Rock-gai %  t Alllaum Verbena. Baby*. Hnaui (fernj Pinks, Dwarf A.-burfaliiin. Sn.^ %  greet dis.. %  %  %  Renaissance period and tha exploits o( the infamo'.. Mm. Anyummorlly %  wrong, an .th him. %  %  %  %  %  came two %  scrupulous and nittuN %  [tab The WOUld one day !>,• Duki .in impori "ii the north %  of Italy, the control of which is to Borgia's plans. On :i of this %  the elderly Duke of V. Me has kill the duke, but • mmation i terrrtory m moment. i take it by at the %  %  I l I -' %  %  %  %  %  sellings in an historical him of tins und mnuntnble. btfl ID 'The Prim ol irunet the background o* buildings and see sauce i-enod Tha POtatOO Publ m murals 13th and I M %  %  are all shown, and tha tmv kingdom of Varano la none other than 0, the world's The storming of tha dramatic climax to the due to a novel tgchnlque In photography. Ha and : the beahmg oil which is poured over Borgta 1 .soldiers. *. is a weil-< be Oralnl is band.aome and was the role of Varano, playad I Pi Its ^vytasu lobleman. hit kindliness, phi lost ; .spiritual OUtlOOk, •m to the willinglv nade the •anding in %  Toils' 1 plays the perl of Orsini'; m other. Hi %  which is < %  %  KILL SNAKE CHADOCX %  i %  the hens makh %  THE FINAL -Uur/t TO YOUR MAKE-UP CUT EX Magic-wear (UTEX, so easy to apply—gives beauty to your fingertips. This incredibly longwearing polish resists chipping and peeling. Stays perfect longer — CUTBX'l clear, nonfading shades never seem to Ion theii brilliant lustre. [• CBUTBESX r ^ IF YOUFEEL LIKE THISTAKE WINCARNIS TONIC WINE AND FEEL LIKE THIS! BE HEALTHY & HAPPY. ^a* So beautifully easy. • • so easily beautiful hcCClUSe %  "•nstttsofsfewmomenl. Btylfaam CI !" HKI >oa whole head, leaving your hair Rlowiog will, beautr. Jut iqueen Brylfoun from the lube and walch how ic whip, up ,nlo a IJthcri ^ce how >yur hair glows with health; feel how manageable u a. whsl • wonderful djlfcrence Brylfoam make, ro bait .-tounof. No prepanuioa, no ipecial aaa-m ifi so beauufuUr ess, i„ Bnllosm ,** hau. In lube., the as*lyand|sa large tammy .Uc. ^ here's more foam in BRYLFOAM THE ORIGINAL CREAM SHAMPOO IN A IUIE %  lltrufffs lit-t'/t SACROOL IN IIIK IIOMt ! Illl I \ .11.1 Kl Ml lit t -I'K \l\s v Kill I M.\ IM Mm \l l> I.IKI. MM.II Hit sale at . MI. IIKI < ; rrosU %  KNIGHTS LTD. T"e*.*qu;il !•> ll hinl'lniElood* RkMdand %  Nt lorn. I %  phoiphorus JI ibastbaf hue %  tlari kHini cnerfy sod kft -hcn>ou no looser ilcnunili lire maketon ihai you U I Micn.ihphossasirai nerves cnrichca • .in.ili%  oam' eosak Ml lOOsis :.l pioiem ii) IlKlf a ihal the) -ic aakkb j VOW ivaMn, I>JV l<> 2S.0D0 ., BtHssI |ti iiw gnxHi sgon. On Mia „i go,„i, leoelgts eesl •IruugUlm sSA>AT1Mni:\' VSRI E ; <>.\;. NttWM heallh. youth and \iialin 1.1 Oil I TOM HAM; HOLIDAY KSDAY rMMMaar,.|. l4 |. r |aaataag)g.1 tmt I.M., ttow „ am,,, All0 ,. „ mM h cmm mnn rtiM h UIM im ruSBS "III. in; MATINEE SHOWS EVEBYDA, FBOMI HANK HOLIDAY (MONDAY) BIG EASTER SPECIAL ta WARNER WITH LOTS OF ACTION and THRILLS! AT YOUK POI'l I.AK CD4SHA NOW5 & 8.30 p.m. PLAZA FEARLESS DEFIANCE! ENDLESS EXCITEMENT Shave smoother, closer, more comfortably than ever before. ERE THEIR LOVE BRINGS THEM!... HIGH IN THE ROCKIES' LOT' TV OF THE MOON'-A GIRL WITH PRICE ON HER KISSES AND A MAN WITH A PRICE ON HIS HEAOI OEL M C CREA VIRGINIA MAYO it i: i;: PK K K : v u 3,000 Alan Ladd Pictures lo be civen In Patrons visiting the Plaia lhr Week SPECIAL MATINEES ON MONDAY HANK lltii.ll) \Y •'" %  2.3 |..m. Musical Wealerng Double Bill. SONG OF THE WASTELAND" & OKLAHOMA BL1 Featuring JIMMY WA..



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PAGE TWO II\\ U.VlN \Ii M WAY, M'ltll. !i. AQI ATM f'LI CINEMA (Member, Only) MATINEE: MONDAY at 5 pm. TO-NIGH^ U; TUESDAY NIGHT a! 8 30 ERBOl ril.W "THE SEA HAWK with Brerda MARSHALL-1 s-Donald CRISP and Alan HALF. A Warner Bro Picture CaJiib CaUinq M F "J of slli^r M RS A SAVAGE has i her distinguished %  nual Sacred • %  Bethel *c< place Suuaay I at 4 30 pm. the Police Band boin,: nee, Mr. Edward Cook. an Wood. Mr William Clairmor,-'. Misa Elaine Jordan and Mr* J B Broome* will tact) in their own way be helping to entertain those attending. Now They Go S EA WELL over the week-end will be once more jammed with our South American friend* for. beside? the fifty Venezuelans who arrivi-d m Wednesday by Avensa. about sixiv five arrived by BW1A from Venezuela between Wednesday and Thursday. to spend the Easter week-end here. The majority of these visitors will be returning by special flights or Sunday and V Opposite The Trees M R JOHN PELTZ. who left Barbados yesterday by BW1A tor SI ("mix via Antigua has been working for the American Bed Cross for twen.'y years. Here for two and a half weeks he was staying at the Marine Hotel. atalsj to join him aa she is in charge of 0M Publicity llepartment of the Metropolitan Opera in New York. and it wag not possible for her to leave at the present time. Mr. Ronald Tree, he told Carib. has recently bought a house in New York 'just across the road from his home. His association with th.Cross has caken him on some; strange missions, one of his first jobs when he joined was to dash off to a flood in Massachusetts where he was given a row boat and he had to go around to the rows of houses and rescue people from the second story of itie building* in the flooded area Mr Peltz lives on Ea^t 79th Street. NewYork. Much Better S POKE M Mr ilcKgie E yesten: He had just re Aimed from visiting hlfl son Rex. who over the last week. .illy ill In Trinidad. He tells me that Rex is much better and is once more at home. His man\ MsfMal will be glad to hear the good news and wish him a spec-"very To Visit Her Morher M RS. KENNETH PERK r.CJL for across la to vlalt her mother who lives in Victoria, B.C. She will be away for three months. Studying Animal Nutrition A RRIVING by T.C.A. i vrM Mr. Stanley H N. Haskell, irrison tiasksU of c Hill, who ha %  spend a ho.;-. It Mat-Donald %  %  which is lust about twi out pi Ma.ill. Studying Animal n, he hopes vo get hi* :-.r his holio. irsat Collegrcontinuing his tl Will Be Misted M R. AND MRS L V WALKEH rest iW > Rodney* vn Wednf l Trinidad Mr. Walker has been a mathematical master at trie Lodge School since 1*3T and will be very much missed there now tnat he has %  ana to loin the staff of the Queen's Royal College On the day before school ended ..us term. Mr Walker was presented with gift> from the Staff and the boys. Also leaving on Wednesday pMri araa Mas. C M Boult. Matrcn of the Lodge School. She was a passenger for England by •he Mat She baa gone to visit her parent's and it i^ hoped that -he will be returning early III September Several friends of the Walker> and Miss Boult, including members cf the Lodge School slait. were at the Baggage Warehouse them Bon Voyage. Spanish in 3 Months M aj LMMBL who has been working with Shell Petroleum Co.. in Mara, one yenr is .< from Toronto, and is a 1 Engineer He return**, to Vene* rda> by B-W A after three weeks' holiday ,.ic Ocean View Hotel. He vrM had by his wife and their young -on David. The first thing to do when a stranger goes to Venezuela to live is to learn the language Without it you might as well go home." Ha .'old CarlD that he learnt Spanish in about three months. "It is surpi ising bow auackl) you pick it up Alien you live amongst Spanish people He is on a three year contract, and may or may not return to Canada when it terminates. %  *tay.ng tor a m a. coonnpon „f sn ^, !" > HI n^* VMT' Hatb.vi, s. "n*| MR. AND MRS. MARIO OLIVER who n Trinidad yest Madge Ga>adeer.. daughter of Mr. C a Gayadcen of St. Augustine'-. I'ort-of-Si I pector of School* ijjge is studying is her first .oars. With Relation! M RS. JOE KEKNA1I V. w I A. to with hot m Belleville. (.LOBE Grand Yarivtu ianvvri I mifi the Aiupiees of THE B\RB.\mis UM1 lUnCI \>MHl.TION %  111 RSI>AV. APRIL 131 It \l !." I v Music bt the Palire Band und will be staying lor two vraasss. Mr. Thompson, WHO is in trie oil btl Veat'iucla |g M\ tngli~. has been ID Vanaimla (or two from La Gualra yesterday by bW.l.A. via Trt Amateur Photographer M R. HUGH BLANC who is a lawyer in Trinidad, with his wile and two sons arrived yesterday to spenS one month's holiday at the Paradise Beach Club. He is a keen amateur photographer and armed with two cameras and -colour film he plans to capture much of our local scenery during his stay here. Sisters M ISS AVRIL RAWLINS was another arrival yesterday to spend a holiday in Barbados staying with Mr and Mrs. Jack Dear < lls. Miss Rawlins and Mrs. Dear are sisters. Advertise V|R. AND Mrs. Antonio del A" Monaco, who lunuhed on Friday at the Colony dub joyed tii, Barbados. With ihvn two young i.on s they have been staying at the Ocean View and are planning to ulurn to Barbados in August. They left for La Guana yesterday by B.W.IA. "Barbados still wants to be more widely advertised in V*LV Said. I was preparing to go to Hans! when l>> suggested that I bring the family to Barbados insit-d. I pag ratla d the cbanssj MM bit m fact I was delighted that I decided on coming here. "But you must advertise much more. There are about four long week-ends in Venezuela and at these U...0S everyone is anxious to go away for the %  Barbados is the ideal spot to come to, so you must tell us more by advertising, and many more people will visit your island.*' THE LAST WORD IN RADIO MANUFACTURE proridM uniialortad recaption. It ii axctli.nl In sound volums and hill control oi raproducdon. attractive and artiatic in appaaranca with all the PHILIPS qualities embodied. From Recent Arrivals We oder VERITAS PKKSSl RE LAMPS—3M Candle !' GALVANISED MESH WIRE 1 to 2—Various •sridthj GALVANISED PIPE & Fittiufa H'-Ti BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LTD. -Here's ho to work it: A X V D L 8 A A X R la L O N G r* E L L O W One IctU'i dimply atanila (or anothrr In this rtamplc A u uaed tor the Ihr.e L's. X (or the two Os. etc Single letter-, aposthe length and formation of the uorde arc al! hinta Each day the code letters are different A (>>plograni Quotation CSB7KLI. LYDL UEZDL [ICIIDTT, VMQX AX S SE XAWW7E DJILIMIU V S E U T Z I rjllisllll: THE GODS ARE CAREFUL ABOUT r.REAT TH:NOS. AND NEOLECT SMALL UNKS ] 1 (1 c < Li ba \< mi" t am .. II migni LOSS i of %  DSL %  %  : %  nundrmla. | .. -. . Hi '-usance trosa • in for a at i tU Stiilt WlUl. irai uiinltan, tan.,... ttfQtSV %  %  i • otutnam • u m DOWN 1. ITcwintublv a ftcrum iiMflsaH -itant. ill %  drr nrt at I • w. maF %  %  J it, Aiii.-t.iaa l •ii a mouarehf, • %  niUi 7 %  .i-a from on* another. • -ntre, traps* 21. Plant in : o lin.dunanl | us, Ide'. on tnt left. kaiunwi ou nw k'las SOLUTION ffrftS^ K.H iSacfro . N|cllo'J. nlBlo] -ii-1l' R %  £-'') Beautiful Lines — by Butterick /or your selection at WHITFIELPS Butterick 5231 pOR your greater com* niencc, ALL BLTTESK* PATTERNS w r*M|l at WHITFIELDS. 15 Bread Street Only. IVANS & WHlTffllJ&l!



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DAY, U'KII. . ISM M M)AY ADVtH IB.B.C. Radio Notes: West Indian Poems For Today %  Caribbean Vole**' for Su ^th April, will present special ns tor Easter from no fewer -lands In the Wen InKes. Th programmp opet, i.'presented by il Hill and Barnabas Ramonune. continues with St. Vlnin the parson of Owen M ampbell. a newcomer to •n Voicca', Jamaica with anBer newcomar. Mary Swaby, i ri concludaa with Dominica with me more of the excellent poems Emily Loekhart. After this :ry miscellany the half-hour %  eds with a short story by hael Browne of Trinidad. Handel's 'Mewiah' This Easier sees the 206th anreraary <*t the flrst performance Handel's 'Messiah.' It was first formed in public at Dublin on B rfl 13. 1742. In the B.B.C's lltlc Magazine' in the coming He Julian H'baee will ***X jut 'hat first performance and ustrate his talk with gramoione records of the music. Anbroadcast in the G.O.S., and notable one. is a performance of usic from the 'Messiah' by the lyal Choral Society with the ndon Symphony Orchestra conicted by bir Malcolm Sargent t soloists will be Ena Mitchell r jprano), Mary Jarred (contrnl), Heddlc Nash (tenor). Trevor ithony (bass), and Arnold Grcir iano). 'Music Magazine' will be the air on Sunday. 9th at 2.15 u. and also on Friday. 14th .it 30 p.m. while the music from ^andel's 'Messiah' will be on Sunat 2.30 p.m. right after 'MUMC Hagazine' and can also be heard Monday. l()th at 6.00 p.m. The Hydrogen Bomb trogen Bomb' is the %  of a talk by the distinguished %  ntlst, Sir George Thomson, :i will be broadcast in G. O. S. in the coming weak. i speaker discusses the possib•B of imitating on the earth tear reactions of the sort from ich the sun derives its energy: ily. the synthesis of heavier ments from hydrogen or its opes. It will be on the air at ) p.m. on Saturday, 15th jnst. Life on (he Planets? mother talk on the science side &ch should appeal to the layman be given in the coming week. really a double talk—and not the American slang meaning of it—with two scientists giving U views on the question Is are Life elsewhere in the Unise?' The scientists are Dr. Fred fie, Lecturer in Mathematics at abridge, and Dr. C. D. Darling, F.R.J. Director of the John les Horticultural institute. The pier fives hi* reasons for beig that there must be large ibers of pianets in the Unie supporting life similar to on the earth, and Dr. Darling* will speculate on the form h life might take. The pronme, under the title uf From Third Programme' will be ideast on Friday. 14th at 5.30 •. 1.00 p.m. RMK> NmiMl. a ;j Dtn Jew of ib VIOHB: I rl iL£L Horn, Naw, t&m R SI,n:7 p'" ££. KKSTaSi** 52 WWII. ISM Mr. WBJW"..;, %  *, Um-v "^ Maada*. ASM M. tees, ihing—(he come; % %  Who Kmmn Coiitrntiiiriit.' A NEW booh cap) PACK miKTKIA %  in*OW: T 11 a.oi I<^c-. 'J _„ Tno a ^'i-eaking. IJf.l: BOO ,r | J. bheen. America's best-known rlom 2?**"-; "00 noon It* N**N\i 'in "" "••' "' niiiwreu ort ^tStL^^Tti %  " •" %  p ~Roman Catholic preacher. Qread mS^m&'+JST^ZZ And ow >>* book—iu title is iispm R-OIO *,!. i M Dm 5** Peace of Soul'-—after being i&tnS^5£J!'V[? l l£ m -2!l'2 '"*" on lhc U-^-Abest-seller lisis ."•"•Li".'* 1 ***** F^m^M for !" v months, is published in lm -nlrfiLw /*"* """Spam..: * Britain tomorrow. U.VrsSTsil^J^k^; Consider these extracts from •AT !" *^?!! 5 !?. p m **an.inm Pirtne philosophy of Fulton Sheen: •srt MoMMbi TeaT^Tt* N,W, -"A 0l tno3e wn are " "e sute of %  a^^pfJsPmMw^fe^a Kract and ;hose wno "* not nas R.d.o mm*** HI Pm EJo^iiB iven a way to ,he ^ litlc ^ separa^mH^l"; ; • 00 PJ %  ni K **>' Uon of R'Khtis" and Leitists. The pi P fci^oTR^^; t5 ?m'V:m0dern soul nas definitely hmiteo HwiS^'ii^; 08 p , Th '' Aav "'" o! lu horuons; having n,. """'' '** trust in nature, for nature witheu: i ... traitorous . UNLESS souls are saved, nothChurch Services UeQLH ID -I PAVU >cMf I.. SOB %  m. Sunc MMM *1 ,i %  • %  MOOOOhM, Siilin HHi II<1 Mr moti. Prvachrr Tdlhcr lnriinv. ]B)pm Eat S*rvl ..nd Prnrauiir %  and ProcnaMtn. Anil nn Pri-.. Aavaasaaaa Da TH! %  Eucnari>( and Vnnon. S Sucbartat and Somon. 115 p i: p.m. cnikfrvn-i Sr\-Ki 'ermon atvd Proiaaiiun. MtTlHHMST Jaaiaa H.M1-, a.m. Rrv EIDW Onflta 'nmuniiHi. 11 am R*v ErnaM C-rtflln H(5 Communion T pm %• H M Com*UkUlawa-U mm. Mr G. Morvillc; F. Lawrenc*. Holy ComVoinq fuvb on KEPLER'/ $ "On the go" all day and yruunig. too; no wonder children need rxlra nourishment. Cit them Kepler' and tee how they tkhvt and gain weight —it is rich in the vitamins their growing bodiea need. Its malty-tweet flavour is so pleasant too. Adults will find Eepler' a real strengthen? in roavaletcence. -^s tilth: U.M TluNtwi munwn. laaa, TaaadaT Vtttl TOO am The NcK Tr. -..^..^o auuo iirv AAVCO, noinSSO'mlf "" %  ~"" v.„.„" or,n K saved; ihcre can be no %  V '." m ',„, u"Z'H W."SWOr d "^^ UDl S "W s^ p.,..r.mm. p.rt,: %  is .,„ s !" peace, World wan are only proZJ?r£J£ Wi."*" : " !" nllicls wagedI Inw i>.u toiVoUi ?ni..7 Ja ;'"';";"d*" ,ne soul o' modern men. for MI I* I"!"'1 pm " %  "• *S noU n happens In DM Mb' lL,!r?'Z'!ir' : rL"'£'"J ;",5 wrkl lh 1 has no > happened P.m. Horn. N,.. rtom' .1 "u, n 1 l's ,f,, hin .i soul Sport. Revww. :.S0 o.m. Kliiu I,B IK. V !" "!" '-if t !" V " 8 !" "•*• T,IE ,lol, KRN % %  '• % %  •< no longer tZ£H TS p'ni£ P A;^"^*"J a ulUty bul corJused bundle ol n.ch. Haeawj 4. ?m vSE S"m. "> m P'"cs and Mrvas... There !l> „„ W r !" !" ^"""p 0 "'"'"" 1 Mu, :: ,S u M s 1 """ purpose in his •WallrBWunaMupm s^" ';,;: Jll< • ">> %  bu likened lo a %  ."""• "'""-"OH";."." r Ul mat is tuned in lo several Syt'Wna^.'ffl^'^ ~ U W mitead ol geuin, an, w. !" Ho. it, „.m. .,i„, ,„„! !„,.., a only U 100 p.m Radio N.wintrl. I .'.".'".m" .JSTiti? iriS .5R:,„ N 7;i A ""' %  "" ms.de iuell P m. On U. Jo„. sp.,„ BBC Miil.ndI *"" *" %  %  "i*t OUllldC ''„",• rl!S. S. !" ^i s ""'1Uc w '"' "*• %  ncc a man SSy^r.^iSS^"^^ ,'.'.", a N -to hi. pnt. Rtpon from Britain, noo p.m. T!.* ne'Rhbour. he begins to be a m. Ittv r Ldnnrncr Holy — il 4m. R,v. F. Law Moiv l omrnuninn. Ilrlhrl | f^.t C r Comn-. U niQi>. II an it., ^ii Cntbr; I p %  itrv K j laynr. llnl> Comniunion t!i A BURROUGHS WELLCOME A CO. PRODUCT Balfctatt). II ax ——• ."i|uu ill UK a burden to him; || is only a step from refusing to h. UU8t Oll'lt PtJttntl KVE Y iwrson has %  ht-lc lid 10 nVC want* ;myone to venture into, / %  io UAT$ That is wfc> WARSAW A,..,i a u c n of earna, Heence Is ing-j^^.* .cnpon alwayiandBeoriioliiic.il.: He will now leave on April 24 ? ie io ndaU o n s f social life are It now appears from the states 1 h "* en al ,h v vcr y mo: ment made to the correspondent oundal ion> of family life are at the charee. whi. h hn afMnatt* destroyed.,.. RI Taylor. Holv i>. Mr. H. (Irani, rwim.ni— u .. n Mr. P. Dnif*. 7 pm. h>v 11 fimUx. Holy CUMMi HaalA niatoial-a •.> %  Mr. A SI Hill. 1 p.m. Mr. A. B. Curwan l-r.idaa— II a.m. Mr J. Cldlkt: G. Baacumba. %  H A. L. Mayer*. MORAVIAN "'"*-• %  ' C Hawtli. .' % %  IU* A. C. M. PlUrin. 7 p nu BV t %  M PllBTim Orasa IHM—11 a_m. Mr. Dourkt*. 7 p.m I—II in. Ml O. Weak*.. 7 p.m Mr. \: f Dean. Ii Mr A Oratiani THRISTIAN SCItNC'fc I tral (Sarah a( (arid. McimUM. lir.daa*awa. I ppr M.. Mrtcl Oaaday. II a.m. and 7 p.m. """"' %  )• • M lucri Uv I >naM ol Cb" - April 1 Subjact <>l Lcnauii-Sarmon Aiti i-raat and ddHUi rtdJ • NEW rralAMt.VI CB1URC11 OK '.(Ml %  L Mtrkaal—II an> 4 7 Pl „, fckw .r. [Ma* H II Walkr. i h.i.i Ckartk li am. Vauxhatl 1 %  V1 "Nsa. ,i..ad. Rtv. i e/asfeat %  Mall. Ha-. -1 p.m. ret Hill Hrv t, USaUCAH laai Araaai fm aa-taaa. ';. Mlraaa I^aat. Mtnli-riiizf t/imr hi lihi-it ami ENAMEL [ABLE TOPS which can :il. n( i | U i_ v \. B. II o u i; L I. adio Programmes MnJ.J. April t, ISU a. TtN,w. ; 7 10 a.m. Nawa NithU al lhc Upara; in. rrum the Bdllorlaia; S.10. %  rasnamnke Paradd; S. IS am. Erth Orchr.lrai Muntc; 6 30 a.m. DonOar.; 900 -in Clot* Itoian. 1200 k Tnc Nswti II 10 II in. Ncwa Analy13.15 p.m. Cairoll Call* the Tune; I p m. Sunday Scivict; 100 p.m. OoIM Fbtcta Around London. 1 11 (MA. lewaracl; 1 10 p.m. Ha, %  a Lautl.. i Tha Nf'. 110pm Horn* N* rlW Muatc atsSftUiw; pjn. Hand*l> MniltK. J JO p.m. BU> "faT—" %  1", pm. TIM N. .. p.IB. Interlude. *.1S p.m. Mlrharl n afexopnunv Qiurtai; 4 3D p.m. 9unHaU-Houi. sot p.m. Variety BandS p.m. ProaTmntm* P-i I Tr*m\ tn Cruldiw! Hour, rlns Muaic. T.0S p.m. Thr *; 7.10 put. Newt Analy.i.. 7 IS p.m. bbaan VoaMt, 7 *;> i-m. Ea-t*r \\e...ide to the correspondent "Z, T that the charge, which he -tronglv de troyed.. inL£?Z?u? J L L ?. d0n mcrn ; Problem of the atomic bom >; a-ittjj .ed.no, because rbourim a Pols and ., nc li '"' |Mn only th. the verdict, the entenc. Be **' J fact tSfeftt, she he tempted. rommunicado bv the PoUth BU, '" ;,5y to ^ thorities.—Reuter. happy l>eing devils.... IMHVIDI'AXS who say. "1 will d In my way, and you ought to Inquire wl .M not ty? J3od In His nil QKAVB81 Li the denial of sin —LI a, •"Peacr of Soui' (Hlandford. 10s. 6d.), %  — MM 7.3t a.m. Maimand Ulan) S a . S*i,„.m. 4 p.r. ChUdr...-. SoK-mr, Vdf ptr. i p.m ^olrn II and Protrxion IIKIM.IM. • MKj.t to 1M1 NATIONt ra. KratfeMt ii in .**. c !" .. and Suan Street: II a ln I Rrv W l\ O'Dotiolm* Sub. %  warmly aaeuraaed to VM.I %  Q for iheic forf voiiont. by the Chrttt memorat* our Saviour'i i %  %  : ., ,..'pimt. a Chi prastr, B*hoid Pie Umfe n.-nailvan v, ur lann and dcpi Yoiir %  children ot men,' Dnn't Tell Your Friends Tell liiAdvi.ci.le The Advocate Pays For Naaa ... Dial 111] Dy or Nl|hl COUNTING INDIANS NKW DELHI. Plans for India 1MI anbatai ThiIndian ceosjui will involvi more than 1.000.001. %  numerators to M.ooo.tKM homeinhabited by about 350.000.000 citizens. —tc r.i ^4\A /W0,HOT New ESSO EXTRA Motor Oil I. umbel .iinl Efardwan, Bay Street. N t %  v. Iniiilsmn Has.-. it lleaa Ina re th ol rapkUj ie41ni microbw bkr ? ; Blanayl i %  % %  u.. .\in.ii ^uv Bsrbrr's Rath, g UviU Impetigo and Undjnoiwi i'ne V.M.itt i:.'! v foi ' Barbt-r's Ki-ii. tmneUce. ltoii~ ^thleta'i Foot. rte.. eie. \ BOOKER'S \*m DRUG tOBES LTD. \ Bro.ii v ll.iNilnst. I There's health in this sparkling drink TAUN IN A ruasit.sK or WATER. Boots Fruit Sahne is a toott id'ruhing aperient for people of all dam. It cJesnses the stomach, ckan toe tanajBSj and punnet the Mood. /a rataat of A atafa n w. ndawv. tk n ikm t* ami skkmss. Boots Fruit Sato* gins almost instant rthtt. Got a bottle today from your or drat store$20 Fruit Salim* Maaa fc. Bdoa Part Dmt Co IU bolauto aaquaraM w N.-lungluin I nclaad P O B..i Wl. BridpMoM. AHENTION STAMP COLLECTORS Supplies of the followtn, ira LM BVeunatUa i Stiiinp Albums. Kxtrn Lenves lor LINIMLeaf Album*. MaSaUaWl, Rooklels ol Titles for (/otmiries. Twcesers. ti.iu^rs. Watermark Trays and Books for Duplicate Stamps. : ALSO We are now accepting orders for STANLEY GIBBONS STAMP CATALOGUE lSiio BRITISH EMPIRE which will be published in May. Letter Balance* with Weights. ROBERTS & CO. aiAZ am *v>wvw . .v wv*-.wv.v *v. r ,-,.,', Surfical UrrMinc. and %  Mulen Randagea sour next PrnerlpUaD llrlnklni Tubra llol IValet lloiil,. I i i|. COLLINS' DRUG STORES NOW ... let us service your car for those Xnias *acatton and travel days ahead For those tough. hot must 8ft erft-s protection with SEW ESSO EXTRA MOTOR OIL ... the afl with these 3 Big Extras : Estra PTOUCUMunequalled Hili V. d ' . katpt lubrk.Un* value undet extreme be.t ot summer driving I •-ttra Oil Economylasit lwnger ur.ui. ho: engine temperaturr. . rM let I u L-O-N-O mileage < %  Kan Ugreataens Aede4—special detergeni flghts hannlul. power-roooing carbon and vsmish dePoaiu. Enjoy a rhntiter, smoother-running engine %  • with less wear and tear I Here's soiuetrdnt; ffa tor your money Get 0r Stanner "Pev-oa" Special I I. Oaaa r taa draaiad. SuaUd Mih I | >;. %  '.:.,! 3. Kailla-.! did. 3 all. of fi-ah naar FOR VOIVK PROTECTION tout 'Hoppy Motoiing' Hails ol THE ESSO SIGN DLtributor.—R. M. JONES & CO., LTD.



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I'M,I MH \DVOCATE SINDA Y, APRIL <, i^ B.G. Government Plan Homes For 10,000 Ifclll—ill AC""*"*'* CoItr^o-dt"l' GEORGETOWN BRITISH Central Housing and Planning ty during the past year prepared a scheme for lOOC lesigncd to suit the needs of the lower and middle income groups Thi* was revealed in a broad' B. Laing. C.MG. O.B.E.. Chairman of the Auth-" • Mr Lama aid thai at in average of five persons per house, this amounts to housing for 10.0(0 people—about 10 per cent of the population of Georgetown. He itmirt however, thai the housing problem was %  great -thai nothing short of the fullest co-operation of Government, in • Central Housing and Planning Authority, public bodies, and the general public will suffice fa out slum condition* and bring Stuyvrsant Makes Last Call Here Sforza ippeals To Tito liom f*r -> I nemployment In B.G. tdvarale *rrr|Hn#>nl GEORGETOWN Hi BxcaUi B/O0UC7, told a deleg i' >m the Trades Urrtor cil on Saturn was watching the unemployment noustng in British Guiana up to a situation doselj and would cio proper standard thing possible to create new %  •7 ne Central Housing and sources of emp'. During the Conference which was called to discuss T.C'.C Resolution on the unemployment the Governor disclosed that Government was arranging for a soil utilisation rnadle the embarkation of schemes Planning Authority,* 1 he sand, "has in the past year prepared schemes for no less than 2.000 dwelling* mainly designed to suit the need* of the lower income group and middle income group. At an average of Ave persons per dwelling, this amounts to housing for 10.000 P*i of planned farming to utilise such .people or approximatel ould prove of ccono' Popul of G"'**" His Excellency ali.i"' .^_ PWti %  %  of local '.c rials would fj i assm nagtassrad in ulls. since in that way most of %  %  money spent would be spent locally and thus give maximum of th" employment. 'The question uf cheapening 250.000 y,, houses by the use of prefabri methods was also lnvatUga>ed l %  found that prsrl tion would reduce the cost condustf the n to an %  1 caulc %  total *< / cale emplcn %  SMillion Itudio Coj Registered all putt r mm p m r y with iu reg,.r I •assd has ssMBMataahac hi 1.-: C.u.-na at % %  %  .,' % %  sufficient to Justify the insUIlation orts and plants fo: of lhe rp Q" lr *d mechanical plant trmtw manThe cost of the fad man>* howi S I radio haps more serious is the difficulty equip'i for of getting the gagchtt %  %  ation. With regard to this mat' possible that the Cal 't iutti /' Wi I' ment Corporations are in I .i.f/f/f/ fyfllflOlIC i>ositlon to lend aasi-' W omen Hard: \dn all i arraaaaaalial %  %  fore• liana. %  %  iniacj%  %  %  enger freighter of the H< erlands S 5 last rail at Barbados on Thursday an it stopped here from Trinidad en route to Plymouth, England On completion of ttl to England, the Stuyvesant" will be taken off the W> run and transferred to some other service of the above company Few passengers embarked here rot (J K b\ thai Opporl vessel brought up quite a few m''om Trinidad This makes the second Dutch passenger ship to be taken off thr West Indies-U K. run recenth however, be replaced In the near future far) two others, the Willemstad" and the "Granfestad Little cargo was discharged her^ by the 'Stuyvesant." Packages of vacuum flasks and t Cristobal; oakum from I-aGuaira and radio parts from Trinidad gflfivad The vessel sailed the same Sunday nighi "ted here by Messrs. S. P Musson. Son At Company Ltd final Currency Meet Takes Plaee On Tuesday The Anal series of n :-tary Conunitti .rrency Scheme for UVj I tones will take place at Hast the cnaiii CUE. Financial Guiana. David told the Advocate yesterday that th* proposals Wltfl iCg.iid to the Unified I arose out of the Revi Conference which took place in Barbados in 1946. He said that a scheme had bee-, accep.ed the colonies concerned Barbados. British Oul Leeward and Windward .Islands. Trinidad and Tobago been approved by re-olutions of the various legislatures. What now followed, was Ufc %  %  tion to be introduced i the participa;n colonies and to %  and tenders for the curri which had various tired Kingdom The C consider and come ti some decision on the pro; %  %  %  %  %  O M E ML) A w n %  V Lucia. (Wl bit F A T:. Aiso altendini; Dos SanExecutive Officer of the Committee together %  ritS Ml i who It |f expected, will raplaee Mr Dot Santos 3 Months For Lareeny Wilfred Gill of Button 1 11.11 was found guilts ... Mr 1) I) MOT %  : sKier.*.:h.bouring %  Taovni speech thai I agreement was •t-claration, ac%  e inclut%  -eport said "At the same time. Count Sfi 'is speech on the So* led. %  te declaration of the Western Powers. boasting that he was its author .•peculating at the gam? time with the hostile policy of the Soviet Union towards Yugoslavia M win this war for Italy : a tion what does not belong to her." "Count Sfor/. sorted to these methods precisely because he %  well thit demon "s cannot be justified by real arguments based on facts The report went on "he even went au far as to call these demands a magnanimous proposal toward* an agreement on the open questions bet'veen the two countries". the tany report concl % %  ('.oiiiedian" Brings H'rrinu>. T<\^ -elly. salad cream, tea. %  aim foenernngs. tinned preser\-es. sausages, pharrr.actuncal spec... stoves, cod liver sA, linseed oil. j ..-cessori'*, confecuonery and cement com-1 prised the cargo of rtarriarn •Comedian" which arrive on Thursaay evenuig. %  Da Costa Id are local agent* >ihooiHT Brings 1.000 Bags Of Rice Ont thousand bs of r nrrivKl in the colony from British Guiana on Friday by the 14ton schooner "Lucilie M. Smith whose local agents are Messrs. Robert Thorn Ltd. The Lucille V Smith has also brought 790 bags of charcoal. 50 tons of firewood and 100 cases of Toucan matches ^ ANMVIRSARV SIKYIII Th Ofarfer* •*•Member* o* .oda* f l ol U*e lrxSnwivSfni Vn.tl Ordt at T-. awrita >•" to "*" %  ' *•• % ** "IS Ibivburh Street n l" will br medicated ointment for the treatment of Head and Chest Colds, Bronchitis, Coughs, Catarrh, Sore Throat, Rheumatism, Lumbago. Sciatica, Muscular Pains and Strains, Bruises, Scratches. Influenza, Neuritis, Neuralgia, Toothache, Insect Bites and other Aches and Pains. Healing! Soothing! Relieving!, Tr X h — you will say it is a real blessing 1 THERMOGENE *p*ml .our lu-slrr Holiday 1'irnir at the RICCASEER LODGE KOOM bVivwood. St Jame* Police Band Danoe Oreheirj V111 Mlppt* MUMf '| Danehif 12—a *~J a M%  %  %  C ROCK las Yintr Fye H UN Bathsuit JANTZEN SNWM TRUNKS tor Boys Made of Wool in shades of Royal and Maroon $3.01 JANTZEN" BEACH SHORTS \.'oven. Ban* :i" la -14 *6.51 JANTZEN RACER SWIM TRINKS (For Men — Woollen) in shades of Navy. Coral and Maroon. Sizes M to 18. $4.15 GEN rs' ANKLE SOCKS White Viyella lurn-over top. Sizes 111 to II) $1.55 GENTS 'V NKXi SLIPOVERS Knitted wool, '.leevaha; In Dark Grey, l.irli C.rey and Fam. Siies 38 to 44. $6.99 CENTS' JAEC.EI RIBBED WOOL HALF-HOSE in shades of l^ivai. Brown. Wine. Grey. $1.57 CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.. LA 1. 11. 1Z n BROAD STREET 0k WLia — £cotwmiM WITH BOWRANIT& i \ n-coRRosm: p u n / Thr relentless Enemy at Rasl. The Proved Proterlor of Iron ind Steel. COES FARTHEST LASTS LOMaV One gallon will cover 700 — 1.000 9q. feet, one coal storked in Red. Grey. Black and Saper Black (Heat I -: PHONE 445 :AGMU* WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LA .1 hcy'il Do Ii Even i ime \v YA-AS-A C-?0=t: F09 COMPAS v AS; EOBT v 'iSSc&Z*?** ALLR.c OS -N= ALUT SHOOT I L*T --S 0-0 SAY -6A? R 1 \ ~ AS l \.'\i (jpirr .s -=s S-E oo=s \o~-so-yxyD -= -=R TEACr-ER WHO ~---=S t RA8G Nurses Get Sfatr Nurses Certi/icafe In U K OEOl :' nurses al %  awarded Eniflaixt %  d the general tail) Al U CathadraJ the Fr Peier MarCaffrey. iverad a sernv t notlver M There ivas a Rush this Easier* There will always be I rush for-ALLEYNE ARTHUR'S THE WAY THe* LAf*X TMeT^I TOLO T-E PO -. \. CMILOPEN IN SCHOOL -^OAV h OR*. ,F ME WON \ IS CWMIK'.'--E -E4C-EOS/ CAsfiE TEAC-EW-jaf HAVE REAL ENJOYMENT BY OBTAINING .1 SUMT THAT IS ALWAYS A PLEASURE TO WEAR FROM C B. RICE & Co. OF BOLTON LANE



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7T SUNDAY. APRIL 9. 1930 SUNDAY ADVOCATE Woman b y PAGE -VINE SUSAN DEACON A cotton dress for beach and evenings W OMEN needing cotton dresses this year are to nave the happy and unusual experience of buying what they like rather than what they can And. Regardless of Uw weatner. shop* report that cotton dresses have been selling well since midFebruary. I have seen evening dresses In cambric, which look* like silk . sophisticated dark cottons for town wear, and glamorous with **nthe Q< cotlon The most K la moron* -ind practical of these .$?? vh"looraphii is made in West Airtcan print in dm colours. II has a slim, straight skin nd %  irapless swathed bodice. A brier bolero transforms this foi cocktails, and a separate ankle length skirt draped and swathed on one side turns it into a lovely evening dress. This three-piece sells for appro*!matcly Dgns. Bewildering |~iO we need to have these be* *-* wllderlng names for colours f I am shown fabrics In Elephant. POM na klogl ,n Morn.ng EVMsBSt. and Honeymoon. rtlm were :n Sahara (tola turned out to be a muddy beige colour i and Panama-a yellowy beige. Down to earth cream distemper is called Sable. Danube, which I would haw thought 'tad to be a shad* of blue, is a pale leaf green. A true, clear pink is called Cyclamen. 1 ooking through a 19M edition of the Sunday Express, 1 find that the new colours of the rear were Pillar Bos Red. Onion Skin Yellow. Carrot Red. Nutiieg Brown, and Lettuce Qreen. No*, such glamorous names, pernape, but theie U no inuiaMlng 'heir meaning. Lipstick tips surprising now many tomen who have been using pstick for years still do not ei a good .shape and outline to ;tieir Tips. KcWon. m America, have compiled a its* or do-s and dome for making up the mouth. Thev say. wear deeper Liu.ils under electn-r liant. and sol; pink colours under bluewnti* neon light .ng. DO'S.—1. Highest part of the curee of upper lip should b( l. f in bed, your blood I about 46 hours to get back ill strength. After that it mes super-rich, probably ting your ability to light HISS you Ket up. rength falls sharply, reaching Owes! level when you have out of bod two hours or so. Str tests on hospital patients. By CHAPMAN PINCHER DR. I, MI WIIiDOYVSON and PROFESSOR ROBERT Met AISLE found that the blood's up* and downs are due entirely to changes in the body's position, it immediately begins to weaken when you lie down, whether you go to sleep or not—which may explain wny I felt so dreadful after yesterday's lunch-hour doze in the sun. Trapped • THIS TRUE story—the most terrifying 1 have ever heard —comes from Swiss strato-spherebailoonist AUGUST!. PICCARD.' Three Russian scientists wen10 miles up in a balloon when the cables holding their scaled metal cabin snapped. With thu cabin's fail checked slightly by a parachute, the men had a few minutes in which to bail out. But there was only one escape hatch —fastened by 24 bolts. And they had only one spanner. When the wreckage was dug out of the earth rescuers found that during the dreadful fall the men had managed to get seven nuts off. With a spanner apiece they might just have made it. Like a Siren • HONFY-BEES. beU biologists to be u< hear after all. it Menu. When %  low note is sounded near %  hive it acts like a factory siren. The workers immediately pour out, .• %  dentists leport. When ihe note is pitched higher even the drones fly out excitedly, and the queen may answer with a thin piping sound. Why ... ? • Mil does it lake two strong liremen all their lime to hold the nozzle of a hose, a reader asks. Answer : Because the water streaming from the nozzle produces a jet-propulsion effect, driving the hose backwards Just as the jet of gas streaming from a Vamngine propels the plane. Why .... ? • EXPERIMENTS huve : .huwi. i %  hemkal called gluts mic acid often improves intelliln mentally retarded chllOK n, and may boost thinking powers in normal folk. Now scientists rSSBOrt that the ncid occurs natureertain foodstuffs. Richest sources? Mushrooms and peas Their Problem • ACCORDING 1o U. S. diet •xngti DR. ANCEL KI.VS. America is developing a serious national nutrition problem — %  over-rating. 'Told in his book "Between Earth And Sky'' (Falcon PreaalSa). YltVI HI IM i n ,-„> Mdncmte Pen PuK ODFREY CORRY, 91 Garnctt let Newton Kitty British ins. Is interested in Wing, wants Pen Pals bell the ages of 13 and 14. WEST LIMERICK, 92 Laluni It, Queenstown, Georgetown. Guiana, wants Pen Pals bell the ages of IS and 17. KILLS TICKS JSAKA, Northern Rhodesia trine Alucii sprays a of insecticide und kills ticks %  ttle will .soon be put to use lotthem Rhodesia. The miI eliminates the need for dipi and is said to be much more uve. —(C.P.) Rupe rt and the Dragon Pills—15 %  pert .harp <, ruv *,. *isp ol .most ac (he very IOL, ol pine tree and IT make* him v,w eMcitcd. Pint ireej don'i wwke/' he muitera. "There's only one tn.ni ihat can be cauung thai. fne young dtagon must Of rhttt." Hj 1 rum icroia and ga enough, lie cauhca a gumpM ol i"h* miSS*. He calls in eoaiin, way. but ie little creature will not comdown, to Kupen climbs uttiullv upwards. The dragon ha. topped bruthing fire, but SIUJ woa'r to near nun. LOVELY HAIR tS NEVER JEST LECK! .... that lovely head of hair you admire (and envy!) in others is never just luck, bul tinreflection ol constant care and attention A good SHAMPOO is the beginning of all hair 4* treatments . begin to-day with . LUSTROLENE SHAMPOO Delightful cocoanut oil shampoo scientifically treated to remove all the cocoanut smell and specially suitable for normal or dry hair. OB Sale at all Good Stores irons • arNOC LID-AGDIIS.: For Stamp Collectors (By JOHN CAIS£1X) FOREIGN stamps valued at $7,000,000 will be shown at the nil Stamp Exhibition whlth will tx> held ,n London %  The King, u President of the Ewyal Philatelic Society, has given %  less collection to be exhibited and a large selection from his 48 albums will be shown: Sir John Wilson, Chairman of the Exhibition, said of the King. "He's a keen collector, but he dosant know much about the old stamps. The value of the Collection? If you said In a million pounds I wouldn't disagree. But some of the stamps ore valueless." The selections from the King's albums wilt include rare items from both the original collection formed by King George V ond of stamps issued during the present reign. Outstanding Outstanding exhibits will be a Oat mint block of four of the 1 Twopence "Post Paid" Mauritius (1848) containing the error ( "Penoe". the first -Lady McLeod stamp of Trinidad (18471 an original cover, and examples of the two scarce "Postmaster's stamps'' of Hamilton, Bermuda (1848). Another rare item will be an envelope bearing the original oneI penny and 3 penny stamps of J Victoria, used on the lirst day of issue, January 10, 1880. i Also Included in the King's exhibits will be one of the surviving blocks of the St. Vincent, one pound purple, issued for the King's Silver Wedding Commemoration. The Kinx owns blocks of this Issue. The rest of the stamps disappeared somewhere between tne 1 printer and the colony. Interesting rt from the value of the 1 Royal collection it will be particu. larly interesting to collectors beitist-.' sketches I submitted for the King's approval. With this NATURAL-TONE I'OWDER II i* oo( JO* (. potadVi looks in lb* pack, but >n yoor sM*i 'hut msUrm. t\rainy In Pahs powder is mluisllytoaed to give ihe com plesioo tbat aofl golden glow of youiUui kin...luutefina. alkui.li. SupiT-ifced sod in >fveral wan %  ** % %  Lvceuog in Ten* i* ibe BSSfSai of perfection youi *ital aid %  > a flawk-M make-up. POWDER \ •"'! %  a mHrn IWllIlM %  mkUi. nn • -tkemkato -" KIWI DARK TANi Tk, OUC1NAL Qmthi, STAIN Sit F1M KIWI "BLACK I. Hit TK. i>0WM. OX tLO• anil NaaOSMV. Pw hw U.i ~ M a cMmn > mm U>>l> KIWI luatsruiMT (Hani). nm CfNiflAL ACCNCT COtja. Urn 17, lftA|.WM.. BAMAOOS USED^ TO WAKE FEELING TIRED Now ri set full •>. What a bad start for a day'a work If you wake up foaling tired and listless, instead of being brisk and full uf rnenry Ono woman who can Lie tbe diflerence from her own experience, writes to us :— Before taking Kruscaen. I always used to wake In the mornimr feeling vary tired. Now I have lost all that tiredness and I wake feelingrail of mervy Kruachen has made me feel yrarn youojjer. I also suffered with rheumatic pains In my shoulders and swellings round my ankles. I am now completely cored of these pal no and swellings. I take Kruschen Salts regularly and cannot speak too hfuhly of it." —L.W. Ertssoban keeps you young because It tones up the Hear. kidneys and bowels and knaps them all working smoothly aid efficiently. The reward of this Internal cleanliness la nfreshened and Invigorated body. POISOSMOS waste materials are expelled and the pains of rheumatism c e ase. And as you continue with Krusohen, your whole body responds to its purifying' force. Krnaohsn is obtainable f*om all Ok*mists and Stores. FIND OUT TIIK SECRETS FROM MISS BERTHA LAMAS of ttw Jb&VcU^M \A%OAA NEW YORK SALON WEEK AFTER NEXT COLLINS DRIi(i STORE What other COLD remedy does ALL this?, CLEARS STUFFY NOSE! SOOTHES SORE THROAT! EASES ACHY CHEST! CALMS RASPY COUGH! j • Y.W U.le gttW •"* SS^'VapoR* "*3> %  g place, and *•/••• h" pl n > % • rubbid on at btdllnw — rubbJd on at btdtlmc — am *o. OUT.IDI sm ^KL ni> .!•!. i— k "* SC' V.poUub'a decp-raaching poillict action CMI chy Juhtnaa. and helpa break up coniatton F.b > ood I ThladMbla ocliori-oik' •out IHnoi Wtth cv.y brcth —I VapoRub'amedKinal ihe nothcraom.ouh. UJ. w l outakk. loi alui IMMII. I worat |


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I'.W.i EIGHT SUNDAY ADVOCATE Eoininel The Last Duel With Montgomery \o "Dunkirk* This Time: I A GftM of I .of Rommel, who died bv his own hand, at the r.rder of Hitler. II* 1,1 SMOMI oi \. #| 5 ihe sprint of 1944, when the Allies were prepsrlni the — the Allies were prepirinf the invartar. of Noimandy, Rommel was made Commsnaer-in-Chlef of all the German Armies from the %  h*rlands to the Loire. R„n.lste On the other side of the Channel Montiomcr? was speaklpi it. thr samr rffertlve fashfua in iii. troop, md factor! o -s In nejtl i %  .: at a %  ing A m. ...,. %  pai;:i.< ie i. apv.san not to makf %  • %  n el. %  I>M oi mi -t(iin B | ill. %  p.-rur. tfnJeJ %  arden ol hi. >t R.-mmrl hllc he wit Hera he U with hi. dog orne -it Hrrrllnicn. %  i OB %  and Ihe m "You can do what you ..iTiera%  i-l Huge, he ^-r.ained modest and in ing Personal jealousies Rommel could ignore scarcity of material could no! he o\ i mow quantities of m and being used foi aubn and foi iin' Latin VIS 81%  inel had. Ihercfoi.v to make do with what he coul<' Hitlei coastal batteries should %  %  SIX leet of %  %  1 But even armed with this ordei Rommel could not c.et the cot 4) When thr invasion c*me. man) batteries had no overhead mvrr at all and wore quick I >. blotted uul from BM *ir mi of Ion*. months 4.000,000 mines i thai 2.000.000 HI ihe pravtoui Inn* Given tftne he proposed to lay %  strongholds with deep minefields, to HU .., %  en them with %  • • I %  %  not R v n i-pots and atcovered stocks of huiidrod.oi thousands of old *lnci ii* ii ., Nor were tl i :aid in conventional pattern R> idea siral t> vn.pl, many different way. a* possible 'Wo ta inns' Among h^ gadgets were I driven into the beachi wafer mark, some with mines or the top. tome with MeH rilttl There were home-made "nutcrackers" mines in blocks of conned logs with a seaward slope. There were the obsolete tank obstacles, made out of t] bars at right-angles, v. I less against tanks but could itlU impede infa:.' below high-water mark Mow sunk in shallow u.,!ei *ith floating lines attached to the horns ere poles driven in on open fields and wired toes on top to Impede glider land 6 D Day. I Aa*.*.. though Rora' *anai be eaan-aarir.g to air racun•aauar... | gagU .:,: ,we I Army Command md.irdl ihe Commander-inchief Heal, his staff and the mjjorit} u f Ihe arm), corpa and divisional rosamaaders. Uok the awe orthodox view Wilh 3.000 miles of coastline l< defend, uith only 59 divi most of thorn second-clas only ten of them armoured, with which lo defend it with no cathere the main landing )*e made, ii was useless to think of preventing the setting foot above high-water mark The only correct course was to keep the reserves, mcludli armour, well in rear, to \ail antil ihe main effort was fled beyond doubt and taw launch a large-scale ^.unteroffensive at the right moment Rornmei it may be said tha' ion of the effects of Ied accurate. difficulty that troop i the front and then across .-mall ith of lays to ii hundred n. Normandy and had to do most of it on foot. UK gap. roads. e so choked with destroyed equipment and with dead men and animals, says General Elsenhower, "thai It a* literally possible to walk for hunrards at a tirm on nothing but dead and decsving flesh II..U-O..I II..,. On the other Hand. Rommel can be accused of grossly over-estimating the chances uf holding the Atlantic Walt fsflcoj were not even a quarter complete. Nor could he have fought his last battles in the men who manned them. Dug-outs, convalescents from the Eastern Front, boys without battle experience, with a residue of renegade Poles. Rumanians, Yugoslavs and Russian*, they were not likely to stand up to the sort of sea and air bombardment he had himself foretold. His reputation as a strategist would rank higher if he had backed Rundltedt's proposal for evacuating before the invasion, the whole of southern Krance up to the Loiie Had that been done, he might have rough; his last batl moving warfare of which he was a master Put .selling ideas of the Fuehrer was a task mole hopeless than that of defending the Atlantic Wall Montgomery had no doubt what Rommel would do His analysis of his old opponent's plans was a masterpiece. It is now el. I lhal Rommel's intenon the beaches. He is an and determined cosnj he has made a world oi ence since he took over. Hi IS best al trie spoiling his forte is disruption, he is too impulsive for a setpiece battle He will do his beat to Dunkirk' us "We must blast our wav on shore and get a good lodgment before he can bring up turn us out. red coltimn> We must gain ipidly and peg out #tll inland *e are engaged m doing tins, the air must hold I and must make \ei> moot oi M Vet toward* Ihe I -Jfment areas n... n. I.I a) It rame abot as boia men predicted. Rommel did try to "Dunkirk" as The air did hold the ring. ral 24 hours wan decl•> v Once the Allies secured their bridgeheads, only by some gross mistake could they have • n back into the sea iwindsledt have ha.i a ice ol defeating them in open warfare when thev defrora nWith the troopd Allied air supremacv, it >nmi Bra! mural phase of the : was Rommel's old 21st now reformed. i the capture of Caen am lb* ftrsi day. t-i rigftu. or wrongly, Rommel dad OJOI ; l Feuchtinger. I.MI ChaafalM :ront he ii by airborne den were there-" asked Rommel. "Hundreds and hundreds." replied Feuchtinger "How many did you shoot down*" "Three or four." "You have lost your chance." said Rommel. Very shortly after the bridgehead had been secured Rommel and Rundstedt found themselves for the flrst time in complete and open agreement Asked by Captain Llddell Hart long afterwards whether he had hopes of defeating the invasion at any stage after the landing. Rundstedt replied : "Not after the first o The Allied Air Forces paralysed all movement. This greatly delayed the roncer' Of reserves there—they took three or four times longer to reach the front than we had reckoned." The word "we" did not Include Rommel, who was thus posthumously proved correct in his diagnosis, if not in his proposed treatment SI M.I-I | J On July 17. 1944. the Died Air Force at last overtook Rommel. Capta.n Helmuth Lang, who was in the car, gives the facts. "As he did every day," Captain Lang. "Marshal Rommel made a tour of the front. All along the road we could see transport in flames, from time to Ihe enemy bombers fore to take to second class roads. "About 6 p.m. the Marshal's cat n The neighbourhood of Livarot. Transport which .< ked was piled up along the road and strong groups of enemy dive-bomb<>i at work. That off along a sheltered road. %  in road again two half miles from Vim(>< Car llii %  %  %  Livarot about eight enemy aive-bombers. We thought they had not seen us. and continued along the mam road from Livarot MtaeTf, Suddenly Sergeant Hoik.' our spotter, warned us that tw -ere flying along ihe road m our direction. The driver, Daniel, to put on speed and turn to a little side road to the about 300 yards ahead which would 1 helter "Before we could reach it. the enemy aircraft, flying at speed only a few feet abtn road, came up to within 500 yards and the first one opened Are. Maishal Rommel wa looking back at the moment. The lefthand side of the car was hit by the flrst burst. A cannon-shell shattered Daniel's left shoulder and left arm. "Marshal Rommel was wounded in the face by broken glass, and r"ceived a blow on the left temple and cheek-bone which caused a t.ple fracture of the skull and made him lose consciousness immediately. "Daniel, the driver, lost control. The car struck the stump of a kidded across the road, and v.rned over in a ditch. Marshal Rommel, who. at the start of the attack, had hold of' the handle of the door, was thrown out, unconscious, when the car turned over, and lay stretched out on the road about 20 yards behind >I.III* W omuls A second aircraft flew over and tned to drop bombs on those who 'vere lying on the ground. Marshal Rommel was carried into shelter by Captain Lang and A Holke. He lay on the ground unconscious and covered with blood, which flowed from the voundi on his face, particuI .>m his left eye and mouth. "Even when we had carried him to safety he did not recover conKiOUfDSSIJ, Captain Lang tried lo find a H took him about threeuf an hour. I.illlallo|M thai Rommel had h,s dressed by a French i-eliglous hospital. ory severe, ancl the I 1 said that there was little t.e of saving hi.s life. 'Later he was taken, still un1th Daniel to an an hoapitaj at Bernay. The doctors there diugnosed injuries to the skull — %  ire at the base, two fractures on the temple, and the cheek-bone ved, a wound in the left eye, wounds from glass, and concussion. v days later Marshal Rommel was taken to the hospital of Professor Esch at Vasinet. near St. Germain." Ana so he passed out of active ipation in the war. into the political net — and to death by order of I THE END. London Express Service. [World copvHuht] Writers Strike Against Taxes "NOT BUBBLES' By DON GILBERT LOM The Treasury is being remin led by some of Brltali authors of Dr. Samuel pronouncement 200 years ago t.ta' "no man but a blockhead 1 1 wrote for mone> The writers are in IMU periodic moods for protest a taxation system whi them little inccnt.. earnings beyond a modi lilt, a numbe. known authors are ratio: output. They w %  :. v in %  e household budget, than Ih* rest if • The currant eUoo ungs w touched off by K I author of Journey's End." of the best plays about the F 1 World War. Shvrrif! di turned down a lucrative Hollywood contract—one that woulu of dollars—because the %  wouldn't play ball. The playwright wanted the H surtax on his earnings waived. In return he would have endowed .some archaeologtc.il work on a Roman site in Norfolk. The government turned thumb.; Ihe 1 A Mayad home authors chimed in that loo. would earn more dollars surtax were not so heavy. NUwfl Shute: SJl two-thirus of my monie comes iii dollars. I coulu m> dollar income by woTkardtr but wh> 1 cannot oj benefit for myself or for ildtftt) by doing so." Shute said he had followed fl of rationed output for l.N.8. YES! l/i />/!/ M #OOA#Vfa ALWAtS O.4V. uith u *FLQMBXVE m WE CAN SUPPLY FLORENCE STOVES in I :i I & l-Burnrr OVENB Doable & thk(* Krmriubt-r %  H IIKI N( I rd in Quulil. Ecoiiin> und Ckjiilincsv flTi (lAKACit TRADIMi (0.. LTD. SU NPAT, AWa, , f Every day WE BOIL A BOMB You may well ask why we permit our scientists to do anything so foolhardy. But the plain answer is lhal we have to do it 10 satisfy ourselves (hat even after prolonged storage. REGENT will not form gum lo stick valves and clog fuel lyrtBttt. The tesis which consist of boiling samples under 100 lb. per iq. inch oxygen pKfStuTtf in "bombs", are quite ^.ifc. Wc have never lost a scientist—or for that matter—.1 customer because of a sticky valve. This test ]* one of many winch guarantee the quality and performance of RECJE\T petrol. REGENT PET OL sterling Quality Dittributorv— DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. JAMES A. LYNCH & CO., LTD name your wish! Drter/tency. Long Life. Btilnncptl Oilineu. Safely. Stability. Value Germ has Got it! The Oil that never leavei the bearing*! GERM LUBRICANTS LIMITED. The Pioneers of Additive) CENTRAL FOUNDRY LIMITED. Sole Agents. 1. all beaux M as true as Ford spare pws, ft* metjftaro would have no worries. And if fa, on genuine 1-o.d panwhen foot Ford need, i ,pare. vou II have HdStg to worry aboui, either Ford P re r he..nie line as the ongiiuls, from """ u >">8 • same high quality "> % %  < (NcUoa engineered. That h why *e always ,„ genuine 1 o.d qMm. Pcrtups lhal s ,„ "f" 1 ^ load Ford owner, true to usi b in essenuil safeg^u !0 ^^^1 motoring CHAS. McENEARNEY & CO.. UL



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SUNDAY. APRIL 9 lrni SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE 'AleoaRoainer* Brings Cornmeal A shipment of 2.'>38 bags cf tommaBI arrived for the island %  rday momlnc from Orieaas bv the SS Roumer". This steamer also brought 4.K0U gum Umber slaves. 250 gum tim| ber heads, gun ifti wood turpentine. Part of Ihe cargo was taken at Mobile. Ala. bama. The Alcoa Pilgrim" also called vesterday. FYom Tnnida I | Jamaica package* nf cocoa powder. popcom. women's npparci ind fresh fruit arrived vessel. Thi Alcoa Pilgrtm" i cd lo Messrs. l>:t Costa A Co.. Ltd j while ihe "Alcoa Rooi agent* are Messr* Robert Thorn Ltd. ENGLAND'S famous IHL-IY.II f. IVat Hart Picture .S'hou-s: Cambridge, the wini 1D| i for the fourth yaai tD succession by 3>n h l %  < %  end of the race ngths Sforza Appeals To Tito a) From Page 1. The Minister pointed out that stable contact between the two Governments would lead to agreements on railways, tariffs, and schools. "In fact a whole Sahara of life which counts a apod deal more than %  lew valleys.' "Furthermore, since the methods of overcoming politic. H cullies of post-war International politics, we are ready for the most audacious initiatives In this Held, happy if with us Yugoslav] have the honour ol tfvSrifl the world an example of the breadth of view which Europe to-morrow will admire." Count Sforza went on to speak of the Vital necesslt 1 for a European Union. "If we suppress thi toms' frontiers that divide us, we Europeans will quickly be-11 rich as the United States and endowed with more raw materials than Russia." Peace This Wealth, he said would mean pence and a higher U life for all. Count Sfor7a briefly reviewed the progress of Italian relations with oth Western European Nations. "Our policy towards Britain has already created fruitful bonds. despite the fact that the war had dug a great gulf between Ihe two countries. "There is still much to do, both in regard to %  strictly European policy and in regard to collaborating in Africa. He said Italy's relations also governed by hei overall aim at European Union. We arc slicing through the wood when we strive for an ItaloFrench Customs Union, excellent In itself but also excellent as an intermediary towards that vaster union at which we aim. Count Sforza said: "We were always of the view that ID ous attempt at European reconstruction must try to gain Uv German people to democracy, not to reject It and to hold it outside our Westein community* e that the Epoch of fratlcldal strifi %  evta and thai one daatiny links %  •We DOM that the coming months A ill see i "inplctiou of* We DM community ol wkh equal # On Page H TwoMenWithf £10 Plan India Nike Tvt ilia men with an urge fOK': inland on month In Phillip, and %  to M*udy re shortback. Leonard podifb Jfroi Archaeologists Find Literature 4,000 Years Old PHILADELPHIA. April a. %  j Claj aheved to be p,0W years old, and bearing nicriptioru. retarded he worlds oldest known literature, have been iound li ciem city ol Nippur. 14u Pbouth ol Baghdad, it was an%  d here to-day. Aineiu ii rrota Urn JmveiMty ul l'c: useuin and the University ol Ch ica go's institute iovi rj IXDM pnonthi oil 11 the *-ost ol more than lv;ll,lhll The expedition was m thi in Iraq—once Mesopotamia— om last November to last month. bout 750 clay inscriptions were ttlng their found: including what is considby doing digging ered the oldest agricultural bulleManor Park. an known to man. Sutton, Surrey. They hope to set off in about Mippur was once import ant as teanV lime. By hitchthe religious and cultural centre hiking in'. ney plan ol Suiner, non-Senuti to reach Bombsfl via Franca, Mai). winch nourished beiore the HabyEgypt, Israel. Syria and Persia, lonians, and then the Assyrians They will cacti take with them took over. # £0 In English *1it was the Sumeiians, who mum permitted—and a similar look lhi lint clv Uisatlon t< |vn; "' Mesopotamia in the fourth MilWr ai WJ lie i.„„ ; ,,_, ....„,„ fkpi.i s^Ss — *pr.vata.libraries" of Scribes tie Mown m l>usmes, who worked in the Temple togethei (Irons; -Wo "*>>.|. GEORGETOWN. April 8. Whitflela (UAAj won the 880 yards flat In 1 minute 54.6 seconds beating the track record held by Roscoo Browne of the V s A m 1947, Browne's time was 1 nunate 55 seconds. Stanileld, U.S.A., equalled the lOu yards record of G. Lewis C!9-i5> of 9.4 seconds. Montemage fell in two races and did not place m the third QUADS BORN IN ALABAMA LOUISVILLE, ALBANIA. April, 9 Quadruplets, girls were born to the 33-year-old wife of a farmer near here early to-day. TBO mother. Mm. Mackie, and the four babies were reported doing well. The parents have six '"her children —Renter. Plane Arrives At Midnight An Aefo SuppU 3 plane arrived at Sea well airport' at about 12.45 a in. on Good Friday from Aruba. No notitlcaUOTMl "1 thi its time ol .• %  rrival was mad* authorities, nor to International Aeradlo Limltco who provide aeronautical telecomnuinuatlons and navigational aid g| SaaWatt, and were not in the normal op) Seawell airport dawn unll given of late Bights, had to circle it. the flare path was being laid out and ns soon as thi landed safely. On <|uestJonins the ; airport iruuMget isceVtained thai no agents had !>cei, apf this flight, and consequently the Customs and the Port K< thorities had not had then to be sununoran ihe aircraft and passem^ pilot f the aircraft also informed %  return to Seawell at midrdghi on Honda} Arm passengers back to Aruba, most of whom had come :o spenl Easter week-end. Price Of Coal Up 1 Cent The price ol i fi \tt ! has risen from three cents per pound to four cents per pound This is the effect locally be1 'raisri Qulana the price of the commodity due to the sterling devaluation %  sold for S2 GO $2.75 ex-store. Today, a bag brings $2.75 es $2 95 ex-store. APRIL 9 — NO. 114 The Topic %  HIGH at LOW NEAR or FAR ^LMisthe'SAAffi^ ioyi ELSIE Ihe BORDEN cow • KUM MILK FUST IN MiriMMCf THI WORLD OVIR No energy %  %  poor appetite IM IT. m mi HI Ttitm'WMl* or luptiinj in*n a Have found imlni **.!# Air Cotklan \ppl. r'lttod wall A iral inlij—l inbi. tron nd taill th hmln u IN hnvr mnruv I rt unit inn. Tor full dataiIn and Fre* J' OrASLEY'S LTD.. IM I IIII ttr uaurd a tntain vllUlr li • around midnight %  II wars chaiuiui fi*fl> II n*f iiair--. .M*ln HI inr lav Said. TO day ih* lluuar | And .nil in Om lair lar>d ban art KUI ul voau* paaS BV IT> llay Slrret. iui\ day. Yuu'll IM .>ld P*ple %  'liMd-'ip" And pandni all in* way ... priiuun Bui argur a* you may. | .%  ultl paoftat Wa -THI to Quaaa*! raik To %  .. l-jiball lawr spartan l.allii. • lanw .-iratrd %  ...i.. ina %  iiimiv. The taant frum up tlw May i bnlHSM fiwlball "t i>acv. i and .aid: look 1 Rob*". •Si fan .an iu\r tnat placa ii to rnocro* %  na railv Idaht in Trafalgar Hajuara. A nuiralhuii bagina It, . %  .1 l*fi Carnival I i^-idaan. A BraaifT da ol %  and feun %  Ctiurch ion I .l.mlUM %  UM annual ftva-nptrr' . %  Will MT why >o manv bajan< Leva ina lamouJ. a R. sponsored by .1 & R BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of J & R RUM tatn There's nothing better t* PHOSFER1NB when yon ftel saw i miserable. It rerwes the ^ijlllall, banishes weakness sad depics>an, pots hack much-needed niaW Tg PHOSFERINE todari YOU NEED PHOSFERINE THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS 0 Otpriu.on, Dtblllty, InilfU _Slwp/anne!s, < m4 of ur lafomiam. if •viiUH, ~~ VISIT the beauty jpot of the iiland KIM.I-: WATER HOTEL IIAIIISIIIHA This newly erected modern hotel Is situated In tV most picturesque part of the Island. TELEPHONE 9ftKl i OB RESERVATIONH Bcoms with or without private bath etc. We specialise in Fish and Lobster Luncheons. — Well Stocked Bar. Ihe Amateur Athletic Association of Barbados Presents . Its ANNUAL INRRCUn AND LOCAL CHAMPIONSHU's < Y< LL. AMI ATHLETIC SI'ORTS MEETING TO-MOKKOW I:\STER MONDAY APRIL lOTn. 1950 -: At %  Rl NSINGTON OVAL, Bexinning at 12.M p.m. the distinguished patronage *>( His Excellency the Governor. THRILLING EVENTS -JB Coax nil IM ih, IniprovaJ < j.lisian.l Athletes ol our ( ninny do liuttlimi ihe green of "KeminKton." Not %  .lull inomenl. IBd "Nazi" Yearu Marshall. Lynch, Archer and the School Hoy.-—Clarke & Company, thrill yuu for i Prices ol Atlinitsinn : KENSINGTON • CHALLBNOB STANDS : 3/. I'NtOVI Kill STANDS l/H GROUNDS 9d. Over 50.000 people buy them every week British -made hartweiiml Smith* Alarm* are ihr \-y ular choice benuw n< outstanding in tht-ir ifJlabUity, style and value. Thrrr are models to sail all u-(ia dalifhtfal hade* to mat. li any bedroom furnishing*. Bs alad to own one I 100% BRITISH MADE *•••. TiaraiY. b puui !*• >r4M> whk ou ran 'nakf than with . MATRDIL OILBOUND WASHABLE WATER PAINT It I*I quite the moi economical tlurabie rang* *.f 22 deli to chooM from; rolours which will add beauty and dignity to your home at the least eost. In Barbados today many of the lot home have been decorated MATIOII. Ask your Dealer for a Calear Card or apply to GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD. RRIIK.I TIIHS J. W. MAYNARD. c/o Civic Society, Lucas Street. Hon. Secretary. KENWYN, Rockley New Road. THE WALLS OF THIS HOUSE ARE WATERPROOF In addition to .le.orating and giving your frvtoiy %  rolourful, attractive appt-araii. protective antaaaV %  rcoat. It does not flake, peel or brush off and is washable. SNOWCEM DECORATIVE WATERPROOF COATING ObtmtmU: Whltr. rrea '-*>*•*. green. Yellow a rrrro-cottfl. A. BARNES I I1BRT. LTD.



PAGE 1

j—XDA V. APRIL '.'. 1930 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGl ELEVEN Gift f ATFULVTIfllfff !• HJL rat cmci n. T _,..., t .h.u.l J 4. Gordons $ta*ul$*Sup t t&4HJL ) SUPPLIES AGAIN AVAILABLE ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE Ltd. WILL DO YOUR WIRING FOR YOU. . With the Finest Materials . The Best Workmanship AT THE MOST COMPETITIVE PRICES See Us For:— DOMESTIC : COMMERCIAL : INDUSTRIAL WIRING INSTALLATIONS ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LTD. TWEEDSIDE RQAD, ST. MICHAEL Phone. 4629, 4271. Write Direct or Airmail for Fatherly Advice—Free You, too, can get to the Top WITH OUR HELP —by POST Dan'f bo content to atay .mono HM t'B-dISl to tho tepmoit. boil P ,d uppo.MmaM, by ,Oui o.n.lloiti Tho Sannolt Cellooo tra.n you to oot to tho lop. by oott.il tuition you. iparo t,mo-,uat „ thooaandt ot cth boon holpod to .(„, and pioip# § _._. ~—..•. i.Mm koiiogo a" I -l..h fli.| PIBSONAL tu.l.on to OKI •nd...dual .lud.nl and you ul | cannot '•'' *• •*• %  • d D.alanca 4,,, M lo'onco 4 Thi %  (ha faraoua Coxoapondonio Collooa PtRSONAL tu.l.on to tkh 1:79 WHATEVER YOUR GOAL WE i Im-JtSKi SIMPLY CHOOSE YOUR CAREER """"•" • %  n mi r?L H %  -.., c..,..,„i WILL TRAIN YOU FOR IT § /£ &~?SZ R -h. ,1 Haa|*/M Toilet Paper Holder. PLANTATIONS I I >1 II ll> ^OW'Sihctinicl.inhi, young man lo learn ihc safe, gentle way io Inntr Cleanliness! A glass of sparkh; -Jrcws is i delightfully refreshing drink. More important Mill, however, cver>Jjy good health by cleaning the mouth, settling the stomach and toning up the ully, Andrews gcntlv dan the bowels. Ju I J teaspoonlul in i glass of tta and here's an exciting, sparkling c'riok — here's the way to 2mm CUaniimss/ ANDREWS UVEP. SALT THE^IDEAL FORM OF LAXATIVE



PAGE 1

Sundai April J isi. !" ^unta Itowcate Price; IX i K.MS Year j.. DEAF PEOPLE HEAR MYSTERY NOISE Pope Pius Will Bless World Today 500,000 Will See Holy Year Climax ROME. April 8. ^KAKI.V 500,400 CATHOLICS massed in -' |Vlor\ f-~ Square will see (ho (Umax of (he Holy Year la-momm wlieii POM I'ius XII will appear mi (he balcony of (InItasilica In (TM Hi Messina In "(he city anil the World." Princess Alice Sails For Britain ON WEDNESDAY KINGSTON, Jamaica, April 8. Alice and Hit' Bai i i Athlone reached JamuicB to-day from Trinidad, and will Mil for %  of their two months West Indian tour. During tna toui ailed as tba Chancelloi v. University Collage I the \\< it Indit Jso vlsltad DM I-11 ward 111 ia, bul cancelled I ollth i| tension there, —Reuler pound into Rome toda] trams throwing out %  tiding than avi 100,000 % %  thi came front ebro Including i and Vietnam. % %  n.ooo fortunate %  i : | %  %  %  %  | m the rhurrh's liturgy the Pope, %  pontifical hixn man i I the Pap %  After the penitential Lent, DM giant baiillca will present a toene ol m %  i M ah crimson hangings, 111 b candles and by Uv h the windows of the dot banked with Pprittg iloweis ol yellow b the Pap: I To Visit U.S. Cities WASHINGTON, April 8. %  %  tar, Sanora Kan. 1 due to leanhare next week (or American iili leading businessmen and bankers on trade problems. Cerijo has bean in Washington since March 15 as head of the Argentine Delegation and President of the special sesi Inter-American Economic and Social Council The Minister will be in New York on Wednesday and remain there until April 16. when he will go to Boston. In New York, he will have disii.'.i Industrialists, doing business with Arg en tina, tn Boston, be will confer With leading wool importers. uho have done extensive buying in Argi On April 18. he will visit Schcnectady. the home of the General Electric Corporation, which has an important subsidiary in At* AItar mi it .. ... I Aftc. elici of the The followmg day. he will go, |>HSslon |1]iV ,„ I onontioa i> hu.ldinn Wj* •"• !" *• d !" •"'" ,nc an assembly plant on the outskirts of Buen. On April 20 and SI, BttMN Ounis scheduled lo visit < %  discuss A liimme tu increase agricultural production involving heavy purchases of farm %  %  H] visit New Orleans on April 22 and 23 before returning to Washington. New Orleans, heen attempting to port %  eentn I %  %  Ben ago. I' I also the home ol I Ping luv South 1 K ruler. Silver Trump.!, The thrill noli i throusn t entrance %  %  A on bis %  nianiie, the triple papal crown upon hii I %  i will lea.i %  Led Up tue I uniforms of blue and red will Una the att'e as the Pope's pi by priests, bishops ami marches the 200 yard length of the nave. Last cf .ill comei he Pope lit his thrum n( white 1.'. 1 Led %  centrul altar, receive Uv homag, ol l nals. who will kiss his slipper ai tan-hung throue Nobody Knows What It Can Be MOV \M1 MIES \ I IWMIt. pi.iurrd s is Wsjsaar el Mines tad Mmiiiala in the at lite hiviUlion id the ll.nh.olos (.,n ci "in--i)i policies. Thej .ire sluwni, at (iuietn m llmix' Mesas SeeretalTi Mr W, Lambert. Max .irived al 8aaal *esli*nli>. Mm. lannn Albarta GaveraaaaM and has < >m. 1, BaajHutaa tu .idvise Hum 011 tlieir future oil d %  rlo|m r.l .mil were R*M at the airport h> ihf flareiaei Insurgents Sforza Appeals To Tito Launch Fresh Attack IN INDOCHINA in leasing Oft Plans To Strengthen Navy WASHINGTON, April B. rhe American .Saw plan I of io'ig ""** Mil bombers %  to .in. Bad the :.' m Ota iiutiitiiiti, >n naval planning. inodarnise it %  mere were freafa run week of —Reuter 'wo-hoir the balcony of St Pat %  > %  —to the hi COal "f arms of till P ... .. w iii be unrollIlka, Then, amid the tumultuous the White tigure of the Pope will %  %  blessing over the %  to-morrow %  %  Cod In the whll %  rdinala Illinois A tire ht from ed in each porch. In imagery oi the bght nt lights n like the sun In From thS H %  with flv< %  %  %  %  %  —Rrutrr SAIOON, April 8. Soctrang, 10 miles south ull %  Mekong river along thi A Freiui immunlQUt this morning announced: Rebel action of a certain extent was started during the night ol wig nrnv-, 1 At the -am. Hme, %  %  Ranch 11am con.. 1 I and .nflictii on them. %  Post, which %  has now %  munique added. Soctrang \ %  OperationTravinh sector, when ing up in difficult conditions. Soctrang %  %  making French practical!* —Reuter. 50 Dead In Train Accident %  ... %  %  coach hai were found The %  1 1 river Throughout the night, the last night the bOi was foui: k of the %  thoiiue ted that 80 to HHI n %  In Nib eight bixlies 1 Heel —Rrutrr SPORTS WINDOW %  1 It V I hlVI-lm I Thin. I, %  psrbui %  %  -JI *p.a Fbrfni a ni\ IStOM 11 [. kprll 11 v U i'C v.. > B, Coppin. 4. \nl || ; Ni-tre DflTiw V*. %  1.1 \|.I,I 11 ^ II.. I "> M C A l*Jl II t Hi. II %  %  %  Which Side Is Egypt On: CAIRO, April 8. tial < %  Britain, upporti 1 %  replied thai tO commit herself unt 1 ompletely 1 "Al U11 %  % %  %  %  1 illy denied ; the Egypt! 1 that the Hi it • rnmeni had Egypt shout Its %  I foundation —Reuter Agreement Reached \pril H 1 l on thi 1 %  %  %  %  1 with other [ndo-Paklsts will be R %  %  half, —Rruler "HIGH PITCHED WHINING" LONDON, April 8 J^ NOISE, rivalling in mystery the flying saucers, is baffling hundreds of people in many parts of London. The noise sounds like a distant jet engine, a factory siren, a tuning fork, an angry wasp, but nobody knows what it can possibly be. No one spoke about it until today, when the newspaper "Daily Mail" decided the subject could be ignored no longer and gave it a front pace half column. A retired Uond Mr. EUlph B Cm UviM in Norili London started an Inq Hi nid th< -'lrouKli i phona wire and had h. ,i tWl moatha, GU. ...• I II %  l Othei i ;o Mr. >|iaiHSll I l-.-leilll, I Cm 111 %  trtinuad when cotton i>i>i Itriiirns To France < % ANNF.S. April 8. Porl %  %  U from his L £ %  ither, Switierlond, 1 %  %  %  %  i i last Death, i than Btanu beli ii Throne. The %  i i ting with us motln inne home, BO i Hi with thf 1 Thej i a %  i %  Man) Letters %  %  "Iron Curtain" Prelate Goes To I'HIIII \ %  in Rome 1 %  uld be the %  %  te. u w is —Reuter I'i.nk -lidliflav Notice \S Moiiihn is :i puhlir holMaj Uhe) nexi lanif oJ the AiUoiiiii w/UI ag aa I intla> alterniMilt. \ilii|s|jiu-n| would unpl) of the %  to Centra a> Da Page 5 Secret I! edding ,ik wai %  Berlin Gangster To Die Al 18 BUI I %  would-be Al Capone,! ild gang lead, %  %  tempted murden and numeious .loleni rol Twd oUk df Glad%  .,...! ,.i. CI.MI1 MM': dlftruulHi sltoppinc I'mMrni. I rnirr i IHMIII: rimfTi mil, Uriah, Mini Spiut ilrl n-llk her "Mtrnf (nvrlllu lw< ovrr hrt arm. la lll, 9dHt. ol IM7. —tWalrr. Miflwivca Talk ROM l \ % %  RALEIGH THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE Solo dhtribMon: CAVI I iili .s. CO, LTD. (0. II. tl a 13 1HOA0 STRUT.






, “ )
Ly / Price; |

AIX CENTS ;

ee



1950. / Year 35.

cc Sunday



AS _
DEAF PEOPLE HEAR MYSTERY NOISE

“Pope Pius Will gum gue Nobody Knows What

Bless World Today Which Side lt Can Be
500,000 Will See Holy Year Climax Is Egyp t On? “HIGH P I'TCHED WHINING”





eres

j ROME, April 8.
EARLY 500,400 CATHOLICS massed in St. Peter’ s|
Square will see the climax of the Holy Year to-morrow

when Pope Pius XII will appear on the baleony of the Bas-

ilica to give his blessing to “the city and the world.”

CAIRO, April 8, LONDON, April 8
en : ang new sanore A NOISE, rivalling i in mystery the flying saucers,
Al ram repor.ed to-day that

| Britain, Supported by the United is baffling hundreds of people in many parts
| States, had asked Egypt to define} Of London. The noise sounds like a distant jet

er r¢ le in the event of a world

‘
war between the Fastern and} @M@gime, a factory siren, a tuning fork, an angry
West rn Bloes wasp, but nobody knows what it can possibly be. :





| Pilgrims poured into Rome to-







| noise.



a. re ing > 0 r % yr it nor ateg la
Britain on Wednesday ai the end {rejoicing in the chureh liturgy | categorically denied

Returns To France | ,,02* :{cpres(oaay, that, even



of their two months West Indian | ®S the Pope, in festive robes otf 1 report in the ryptian news some deaf people “heard” it. He
iy white and gold, celebrates solemn |

CANNES, April 9, || Und himself that it continued



e ] . I I ace ng t h .
day by every means of travel, 5 \, eecraing to this report,
te their special trains throwing out kepued that she is “not prepared No one spoke about it until today; when the
2B S il ee a over a large}! | AC aetna pg — ane oe teen Daily Mail decided the subject could
‘i part of western Europe. ey speamons are complete
Alice at Ss Rome airport reported more P aa ; ; © ignored no longer and gave ita front page half j
« fe planes landing than ever before. Tee \hi ded that the column.
; - Bb Government ad inst t. “

For Britain About 400,000 of the pilgrims| d satel ay oan A retired London barrister, Mr, Ralph B. Cox, living 4
cone from = representing EAE minha ean thst: " the ce 1 North London started an inquiry, : =
early every nation in the world, | coh Rice i Se > + . ‘

ON WEDNESDAY including Indonesia, Madagascar | ot Aaa I egotiations, | ie said the noise is like the wind humming through
and Vietnam. nd claimed i mier Musta- a telephone wire and had become louder in the last two

KINGSTON, Jamaica, | ha El Nahas Pa was consid- months.

April 8. The 500,000 fortunate pilgrims ring < rae etl ie in order + His wife hears it too 3

F Princess Alice and the Earl of [Wo have Balned admission tick- : Pagar ernment ae > _ Other men, who replied to Mr. §
® Athlone reached Jamaica to-day | ets to the Basilica, will to-morrow , eS ERATE K panish I retender Cox's inquiry said ey heard the |
from Trinidad, and will sail for|S€e one of the richest scenes of L. Fe Office spokesman :

‘

t

'

|

















































: ; “4
|} paper “Al Ahram” that the Brit-
pontifical high ‘mass at the Pap?l| ish Gove ronment had sounded Norty-onesyear-oldy Don Jaime when he stuffed his ears with
E During the tour, Princess Alice} Altar above St. Peter’s tom. | | pt about its attitude in a fu- anaes tothe. Sbanish: ths ae , cotton wool
® was installed as the Chancellor|After the penitential weeks 92f) ture war. : spans one;{ A businessman at fevbridve
wa) é ' p : ¢ el oe on : acl meee af He colt tha sinee returned here to-day from his bridge,
of the new University College 31] Lent, The giant basilica will pre- ION. AND MRS, N. E. TANNER, pictured as_ they arrived at Seawell yesterday. Hon. Tanner ees vation) Vas totally | frst visit: for many. years. to his {ea fis had heard tap’ caleiee
£ ” ici , : ial . + ‘ : + W 1 - y . } ;
the West Indies. They also visited]sent a scene of unparalleled is Minister of Mines and Minerals in the Alberta Government and has come to Barbados Penour Foundation t mother, the exiled Queen Ena in id he had heard the noise two
Lag ae ae. a ns speetol ss seapee with pct gape at the invitation of the Barbados Government to advise them on their future oil developmont | Reuter | Switzerland {u worg ago. Cox tried Govern-
and British Guiana, but cancelled{hangings, lit by thousands of ay Tati oan wo ee ; 2 = a rey ih ‘ ~ ] ment Departnents for an explana-
a trip to British Honduras be-| candles and by the shafts of sun- policies. They are staying at Government House, and were met at the airport by the Governor's | Don Jaimé, Duke of Segovia, } tion His inquiries disproved }
cause of political tension there, light streaming thrcugh the wia- Private Secretar Mr. W. Lambert. 8 e, D 2 2 born a deaf mute, was taught to snecrie utting the noise down i
& ' ) : '
—Reuter. dows of the dome, every altar( rr - - aap errerer naa Speak t his blonde hat trian tay et engine tests i
banked with spring floweis pera Singer wife, Charlotte Tide-}| and siren f
a ‘ * (3 \ ) ; } \ He } 1 } le nf lat ,
of yellow and white—the Papil i t ~ | a / > i man (30 ho announced last pe ‘, ud he i indreds of let- §
e e colours nsurgen 5 he 0! 7 oO e ce eC | cember that she would divorce h jt rs Irom ¢ rvel ho heard the t
" | ather than stan between iSe ide I ‘ rl ne
To Visit Sittin: Winkel Ls hF NEW DELHI, Apri a | rater tim Stand between him” ne arly morn- |
ete umpets aunec res lr 66 oe The Prime Minister of India| Duke also regained his hearin; } ‘
™ “ sions , : oe © e F and Pz tan } é re hed 1+ ; ; yr Before they heard f Mr. C
The shrill notes of six silver | oO ul eC atc et Pak I ay ached ! \ result of the eeting witt if. t Mr OX,
U.S. Cities trumpets will resound througn | Attack / / &. ~ | agreement on the minorities prot mother at her Lausanne home, r could hay ead che newspaper f
' Y r act > ¢1 th my report I t nea ‘os ne
the dome to herald the entrance | £ | MILAN. 2 bids | In east and west Bengal, it/the Duke’s two sons—Don Alf via), en ; ie lear Central '
WASHINGTON, April 8. of the Pope, carried high above | $ 4AAIN, SSPPIL O was. learned author tatively here Oo (14).and Don Gonzale (13), §20nGon, ere Inquiring In other
The Argentine Finance Minis-|the heads of the crowd on_ hi } IN INDO-CHINA | COUNT CARLO SFORZA, Italian Foreign Minister,| . Their talks, which began seven! have returned to live the §! chin rs_ abo 1 high pitched
c . “ i ‘aris » “ | ; r li », were ) ded to-da I > an fi > ¥ ning NOI1S¢ I he lear:
ter, Senora Beamon A. Contioy. is throne of white damask and gold. | today made a major appeal to Marshal Tito to “bury the; ‘ er a those tales a ec to-da a ee - hess here TARE RT cui 7 id heard
} due to leave here next week for|Wrapped in the heav; papal SAIGON, April 8 j bade bint?? ith ie, NY 2 } we, } ring elr talks, the minister ey lac bec ta with f? . ’
‘ : rd Fe i avy papa ‘ ne “ee . hatchet” with Italy, and to negotiate an all embracing| were belie { it th 1dmother, Q ; _ or )
fm 2 12-day tour of six American| mantle, the triple papal crown| Vietnam Nationalist’ insurgent| (lee “ é Ones © in a ‘ é 8\ Vv it be li¢ ved to have dealt : heir grandmother, Queen Ena, and’ Reuter.
im cities to confer with leading busi- upon his head, the pope will lean | troops are launching a new attack: “°CCC'™G ™ hich would not affec m. x ugosla\ la's independence Ly ; ae Indo-Pakistan prob-| attending school it pease }
ime nessmen and bankers on trade}from side to side blessing the|in Indo-China in the province +:| Of both Russia and America. The 77 year old spokesman nj i g he agreement will be Peis eer accompanied het
: n * Yaris as . i ; ‘ * 7 x ve | . : , , , > .p < . De husbar iis visit to Sw
(ae problems. Cerijo has been in| pilgrims as he is carried up the|Soctrang, 10 miles south ci| said that understanding between Italy and Yugoslavia was| 8%e4 before the Pakistan Prime Se et eae ean cena FE ?
Washington since March 15 as] central aisle Saigon in the delta of the tes Ri fothas: -ginghe v4 Pama | Siriaas} Liaquat Ali Khan leave and, but was not present at > S/
im head of the Argentine Delegation ‘Mekong river along the sea coast er d in meee an imp Cis : uC ee ee | for Karachi to-day 1eeting with hi et
im and President of the special ses- Papal gendarmes in uniforms] A French military communique} _ “Ween Germany and France or between France and Italy At their final meeting to-day M : FRANCE, A
iy sion of the Inter-American Eco-|of blue and red will line the ais'e|this morning announced: Rebel “A ; ' Tr Count Sforza peaking to} the two inisters conferred fc Many Letters nc eRe ae ae oll pri 7
; é Soci ¥ i as > Ng rocessi a ee ioe e io . the tut of nte t about an hour and ; . it Os ver
me nomic and Social Council. jas the Pope’s procession headedjaction of a certain extent was he Institute of International tape Que and The Minister will be in New by priests, bishops. and cardinals‘ started during the night of ~ Studies here to-day, one week be- | —Reuter man for the Dul said . av yste
l / York on Wednesday and remain| marches the 200 yard length.of the April 5 and 6 i: Soctrang nray- || SPOR’ ‘ ‘S | fore elections in the Yugoslav ae ioe ee ike, — i” day ported haying seen a mysterious
there until April 16, when he will} nave p : f ae rr | Zone’ of the free térritory* of Tri- SST ine pitt aad ae en. many letters from}object flying. at a. great height
: b ince. : | friends Of the family with the]last night.
go to Boston Last of all comes the Pope »|]° At the ; ‘ | “aig este. | 6 9 ct of gn
. $ jhe . ’ 1 é J >, sec é : } 1 al t Cc ling ji :
/' In New York,’ he will have dis-| his throne, sheltered by a canovy| actions wer Pabchsned. the obje Bt W INDOW Italians clala that these clec- | fron Curtain pean pace mh fie Hi vine Madame Marguerite Camps, the
eusions with bankers and indus-] of white ; rer BAA Uatek 24 pry oe Pas tions are being carefully staged eeond | s ENE late Ding wife of Dr. Georges Camps, tok
rps <4 j ‘oh au white and silver damask, and) tive of which is the e of cor : >» fonso (18) with his mother ‘ b>
ie ‘tialists, doing business with| qanked by two fanders carrying|munications towards Soctran, avi ohe a iaehaik ints as a plebiscite in ( Prelate Goes Reuter “I was in my garden, when |
, » Argentina. In Boston, he will con-} long-handled white ostrich feath-| The ; ; 4 ; ae an oe “ a re |; nexation of the ) » Yugosla- | lhe Duke gave up his claims to}! first noticed a fiery circle very '
, § an t é h comn que ded very ton al 9 ; es }
fer with leading wool importers, | ors fans. bmi feelin ty ooo ee Wain ery interesting || Via, 8 a a i oO Rome he succession in 1932, because he high in the sky. It was followed §
, ay > , } >: } . { S ‘ ( I uit y 1 1 .
; who have done extensive buying | Before sayin mass it the vers ‘ond fel both side lave | Count Sforza yer { { va deaf mute ar ilsc ifferediby a small t ( oke and
‘ ate say £ ass, ; ! 3% y st g rebe re et f vet the Idirect negotiatio1 I \ Ak ’ . { y ; : , ;
in Argentina. a central altar, the Pope wil) French aircraft. frequently in E ) eated Empire 2—1 er steels rele \TICAN CITY, April 8 rom haimophilia (incessant ail-}travellin lower than plane
On April 18, he will visit Schen-| receive the homage of the Cardi-|tervened, taking important Vie:- | ao oy sward a Vag ey im Stefan Sapieha,|/28 ‘rom any injury) the curse} generally
s 7 > > > are ~ ys . : _ ‘= q ) f | € € nd I is) V > £5 | f T « t alt « . ; ht Y ; ) th Bo 0 7
ah the home of the cote! nals, who will kiss his slipper as|}nam_ concentration Nasa hae Vocab ~ visior YM ( floes | ld Are} hop of Cracow | 2 e Bourbons, lo mak ure that I could be-
. “hay COTPOr at OD; whic ‘ has | he sits on the silken-hung throne; and inflicting ver n u Os | i 1 B ( *Des anes nv { { : lieve my own eyes I called ms
an important subsidiary in Argen- | eractea: neor the Papal. Altar. + ct ean | B.A.F.A.—DIVISION I B the ieste otia | from Poland I Yr week, Vati-| A year later the Prince of the husband in friend and we
: , , . | Thurs., April 13 :—Evertor said, must sté ’ 1 intial | Asturias, th jest son | »~ | ; ae 4
vn. > fol y ? | After mass, the relics of the She chiviesansioni ided. Batho || pril i Ne | Frag’ sat a rh: t ; A fu iS, e el le | e- | watched ‘ es about.” ehten
e following day, he will go) passion—part of the Holy Cross, post hioh Sete ; | Reteme: S68 | wide’ Pree ‘ters ee ( ( ported ounced hi gh e Throne,} minute
on to Detroit to meet American the Sacred Lance and the veil of| violently att ? aye 1 |Â¥ free terri 1g nnounei nd the ecessic I passed t Darlin 's ee ts "
car manufacturers. General Mo- St ‘euadesiol ener Be asad! duet i
tors and Ford both have assembly | *)*’ ae 7 itr ea: aah ee Sone or SOS, ADEE 1) I--seRRen }|troops be incorporated in I H Ye Pil 1g After regaini peech and}... “,°P** Rd. aDPeared to. ROE
> regation from a loggia!l my is retreat suf | Pickwick Rover fa: added: * tte +} a ——s Panag 7 ren t distanc t disar
plants in Argentina, and the! ee cea epg ond dome above. the se : are: si > iterit Refer P. Wilkin | He a aa d “We t ore. ¢ . | The A sho u be the| hearing the Duke announced that} a . RRO It disappeare
Chrysler Corporation is building sie ; ut é be a we ) ay y. los RS 3; u a : I 3 Line en S. Gittens and O. S }} sion ws at Narshal Ito as rom n| he as considering claiming the owarus Lourdes
an assembly plant on the outskirts | @!ta’- V6; Sein: Comer Olelts’ ROS G0R~.,| ~ORSIVISION It Government, sharply Communist | «tron ( ount to make} Spanish Throne in place of Don The Virgin Mary is said
of Buenos Aires. Blessing munique added | Tues, April’ 11 !—¥.M.P.C, vs as they are, want to remain *| the Hol ‘ Pp mage, it was| Jua }appeared to 13-year old | 1
On April 20 and 21, Senor Cerijo sida ae PADS ey sa rope ty = pats 4 a ere added, lhe Duke and Duchess, with the| dette Soubirous at Lourdes ir
is’ Scheduled to visit Chicago to Immediately after the two-hout wt ra ‘the. vi ae | Wea April 12 Notre Dame vs ree | —Reuter wo chudren, have moved into a| 90S
discuss Argentina's programme to] .....;... ; Dana wilt ar on] Moet?) te. Viena. aut Everto 1" Pied ne 1ome here, the “Villa Mor-} Dr. Camps said the object wa
- . ; : service, the Pope will appear le ffens 19 I'wo Zones
m increase agricultural production lthe balcony of St. Peter’s, high violent offensive i¢ en eee 2 - =a e ere on eee gon,” Avenue Descoteaux “flat and rounded and brilliantly
RE ee eee ian nine. 4. fash € ) am wh , ©""| Operations are tinuir ) 4: M.P.C. 1 oo . , 99 ; F
@ involving heavy purchases of farm} |) .4 the central door, to give hi mnie ve re he | ee sg Trieste had been divided since Berli ‘ —Reuter. | red.” —Reuter.
cy ‘als ¢ ; 5 av sec . whe " x arta | ’ . ’
AG chemicals. sssing “ur , bi”. the Seta ene en . | re¢ G. I \mory, in the closing stages of the wat el in Gangster —— -—- - _ - s
: , blessing “urbi et orbi”—to the) troops are clearing up in difficult DIVISION UA || g 5 SS a
i He is due to visit New Orleans city and to the world | m4 titi ie i oe 7 ues. Aor tis taaaet with Italy, it was split into two | mai ? lei inne
on April 22 and 23 before return-|~ % ae to the balcony, Cae es Pickwick-Rovers at Lodge zones—the Allic ccupling zone} ] oO D e At 18
ing to Washington. New Orleans As he steps on A < Soctrang and Travinh are ex- Re St Ch amiga - RE Ee aay f Trieste. | I l
‘ 7 2 €aNs,/ on immense tapestry bearing near made ay tae “bred pene ; || ‘A’, containing the city ¢ ieste, |
which has been attempting to|‘" / avming of the: Pope with aaa ly _ thick! sings atten Rm oll vs. Combermere at Shell |! and the Yugoslav Zone “B” in the BERLIN, April 8. | 5
make its port a centre for Latin |°0°! 0% arms of th I marshy, traversed by innumera- ee: 1. King : te ait : amar, APIO, |
American trade, set u free port {Papal crown and crosskeys an) bie streams and river backwate oe oe eee eee | rh P T Ttal Berlin's would-be Al Capone,j en Ss
é ade, se p a free por : >A aCe ll be Ghenile : bth Pye arte ark ermert 1e eace reaty with Italy | jg.ve ld g leade .
there for Argentina a few years | tie dove of, peace, wi making French infantry action Referee: P, Wilkin l haat ty ; s-year ol leader Werner|
f aa few years : || stipulated that a United free te



ago f ed from the balcony over th

Gladow, was s€
central door of the Basilica

anttentie 1 : Aa Carlton vs. Y.M.C.A. at Blacl :
practically impossible. Reuter. Rock ” ritory should be established un-

a
q \t ) t Y ‘ ors - ;
wt tere F. Edwards der the administration of a Gov-| oaney. vs wo murders, fifteen at
ed pril 12:—B’dos Reg. vs sae i, bs the nited emptec murders ing numerous
50 Dead In Y.M.P.C. at Garrison ernol appointed re he Unite Ment oubtasian
Referee A. Ishmael | Nations But no Governor has eS.

cheers of half a million people, e ‘i 7
the white figure of the Pope will Shel Fortress at Shell yet been appointed, and the two I'wo other members of Glad-
g ¢

e
.

Tra A id. £ Referee; G. 3 Amary s cont » to f tior sep- |0W’s gang, Gaebriel and Rogesch
appear, to raise his arms Jn tn ce en Fri, April 14:—Cable Wireless v zones continue to sunclion as Pp 5 » We an gesch, |
blessing over the massed org Lodge at Boarded Hall arate entities, were also sentenced to death byl

Seven first aid posts have be RIO De JANEIRO, April 8 Referee H. Thoma Thousands of inhabitants of the|a Berlin court for araseet
oo The roll

ntenced to death

It is also the home of a ship}
ping line serving the east coast of}
South America, including Buenos
Aires.—Reuter,

|
Then, amid the tumultuous
|
|





R Combermere ‘ ted 1 }
‘ L. F. Harri a petition asking the United Na- oldu and felotr

Empire Police at Bank Ha jtions help to “save th




; U.S, Plans To erected inside St Peter's fo death in the Tar e F ao

, on Y ck Anglo-American Zone have signed | residents of Berlin with murders
; a onan train disaster this morning had|
to-morrow § 2 nony

<

risen to 50, according to a state-

In your favourite colours

‘a m4 « . se foslav The gang wa antubed: lest
a ’ the 74 year old pope biak elf, ant
St engthen Navy the rest for the crowds ol peopie
y “ This morning, the bells of Rome
The ‘ ASHINGTON, Apel, 6. rang out after two days of silence
ir . American Navy plans to marking the end of Ho ly week
ncrease its squadrons of log nd breaking into the and
range anti-submarine bombers 2 s a silty
P 7 & solemn
ge 20 to 30, and the numbe: “a va
OF destroyers from 140 to 170 in rt A ,
3 Vs ' the white vestments
the next 12 months, according to} Cl@d in te

ment by Tangua Police depart- | Zone from annexation rh Yu-

, June after a fierce gun battle ]
ilready



ment early to-day The tat goslavy Government

1 with the police

Referee A. Ishmz

LAST WEEK'S BASKETBALI
RESULTS



|
|
ment added that one submerged 1]
coach has been raised, in which |

|

introduced the Yug¢ linarias y

=o fos RB? Gladow told the Court. that
voslavia with a | crime tories and muréer films
'

of green and black,



as the currer
only eight bodies were found, The linked it t
coach was crowded with pa on
gers, when it plunged into tt
river, and was completely sub Y.M.P.C. beat Lyne Secondats and jobs |
merged. Police believe at least 50 ‘ 6 | Count Sforza declared: “If the ‘Policemen are not as dangerous

Div. I



. | i promot ’
Y.M.C.A. beat H.C. 3817 | Custom’s Unior evicted many |!ad promoted his amition to be-

|
M.P.C. beat H.C.O.B, 35—23 Italians from their land, homes;Come “an American-style gang-
Div. 1 |

With or without
dyno hubs

atmosphere set ae Good
| ster

rejoicing, priests, LaNODS Ane



“uthorities here. ey 2.000 ;| or 40 bodies may have been wash- Y.MC.A. beat YMPC_30-i% | Yugoslav Government i long-|as they look”, he said, when he
ardinals said between ancl ed away by a strong current in Modern High School beat HC sighted, it will see that its inter- | told the Court that he had “dis- ? d
Anti-submarine warfare ia: {3,000 masses for the throngme) the fooded river. Throughout the} 24-23 ests coincide with ours. We arelarmod eight Berlin policemen an 3 or
now been given the top priority pilgrims. night, the river was dragged neat ready for any ord, provided Jone night.”

mM naval planning, A fire lit from a flint was bless-

ed in each porch, in imagery

At the same time, the Navy is |of the “light of lights rising agai

carrying out an intensive pro-|like the sun in his strength”

sramme to modernise its anti-| From the Holy Fire was lit

Submarine vessels. and planes,| great paschal candle, with five
and to perfect new inventions.| grains af incense pressed into

the scene of the disaster. Late} R oe ee - -" ss it does not t« uc h our natic _ | Lucie Gladow,
last night the body of a wo } honour, provided that, by wound-| chief accused, ons nomad
was found on the bank of "the | Bank- holiday Notice @ | ing our deepest fecling, it does not we
river, a mile down stream make even more diffic ult a general
Reports of the number dead} understanding.

|

are still most conflicting, but au- AS Monday isa public

mother of the

4 speed



Sturmey

Adjustment Archer

thorities on the spot have now |

| De Gasperi |





























There were frest e . opp { 0 to 1 holiday, the next issue of
*sh rumours this} waxen side as of ! estimated that 80 to 100 may be 1Olday, the ne _ OM
week of foreign submarinvs|wounds and the di cael killed He added that a direct accord Br casts
: : suDir woun Bee eae the Ad t ill be on would imply tment of tl
cruising off the Unite States ad } was anointed in the Niteroi morgue this n 1 Advocate wi ) pt adjustment of the , : :
Racine’ s d ates }which he ’ _In Nite eee ant Italo-Yugoslav frontier in the in- > MILAN, April 8, Gears.
c coast, tomb. eight bodies were still unide 7 \ f leseetn oF the Yorat Gowulat! att Premier Alcide De Gasperi will
. . > , s ‘DL « t ONS ¢
—Reuter. —Reuter, fied. —Reuter | Tuesday afternoon, ia Iberal free 7 Pot yee mA a to-night make an important radio P
soit eh ak lis * ; v3 | Trieste nh tn Ae itie gateway |SPeech to the country, it was 22 inch
| to Central Europe. _ , ““* Tannouneed here to-day,
On Pare § Che spokesman refused to dis-
w _ close its subject, but it was and
alter ‘quenenceaeennpnmamentastiiie | thought likely concern domes-
tic issues, particularly the grow- ‘
S o-cret Wi edding lin’ tension between the Govern- 24 inch
ent and Camm -led Tabour |
- e ot ia tio |
: SAN FRANCISCO, April 8. | | Frames.
rincess Faikah 23-year ol) ns -
sister of Kin Farouk va | }
secretly married here on We ‘ s = , ,
= haart ag (| Midwives Talk |
ue Official, it wa ‘ ed t | oni : |
ae Her bridegr i of tae ead ant é
ne Sadek, of Cari ° . ' rid will |
ee in ' ton

Burp in Septembc, to debat THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE

| A





| PICTURE AT LEFT shows a group of Venezuelan tourists on a sidewalk on Broad Street, discussing shopping problems. Centre | Queen N snake is te ole distributors: CAVE, SHEPHERD & CO., LAID.
I Picture shows a breadfruit tree growing out of a moter car window or so it appeared to our roving camera man. At right an attractiv ; : | 10, 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

Young vir a » ; bag r he url ooks wistfully across the street j j ace oppor ' i

eung Spanish girl with her “Avensa” travelling Bb. ver het Tm, 106 y ary ne street at the sho pposite M4 Réutes i ~—Reuter t


oe A SC SSR Sek a AN NY Re | AVON SOR NETS a SRT TSO ES A EO NY (A LY eS CS OO LEN CS NN Ce Ae eC Ao

‘ PAGE TWO SUNDAY














AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE: MONDAY at 5 p.m.
TO-NIGHT to TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30

ERROL FLYNN «s) “THE SEA HAWK”

with Brenda MARSHALL—Claude RAINS—Donald CRISP
and Alan HALE
A Warner Bros. Picture














ROODAL THEATRES presents:
SPECIAL EASTER WEEK-END ENTERTAIN-
MENT
EMPIRE

TO-DAY and Mon. at 4.

The Marine Hotel

Special EASTER DECORATIONS in our
magnificent Ballroom.

COLD DANISH
BUFFET SUPPER

From 7 to 11 o'clock

5 and 8.30








stow
- TYRONE

POWER »
‘wannasH ENDRIX

RONY

TO-DAY and Mon. at 4.45 and 8.15

B — 3513


























‘CINECOLOR

A Nat Holt Praguction
Reteesed by 20m Coptury fon





OLYMPIC

TO-DAY and Mon. at 4.15 and 8 15






a todos los

ne la
; ezue
Visitantes de Ven :
We are all strangers in the house ‘ e Pascu
of our mother... for the sins Especial di ie
| of our father have torn us apart. a nues

BUFFET FROID
| DINAMARQUES
de los Domingos

MAX...

seven lost years —
he hungered for them!

H OUSe of
ANGERS





ROYAL
TO-DAY and Mon., 5 and 8.30
COLUMBIA DOUBLE
NINA FOCH GEORGE MACREADY
| “MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS”
and

CHARLES STARRETT TEY HARDING
“THE RETURN OF THE DURANGO KID”
ACTION THRILLS SUSPENSE.
ENJOY YOURSELF FOR EASTER AT ONE OF

THEATRES



Tson,

$2.50

THE



Under the
THE BARBADOS CIVIL

Captain Sealey Paul
Cedric Phillips

George Morris G,



Plus the Stage Play
Orchestra Seats 3/-; Circie





PHILIPS

| SUPER DELUXE
TABLE MODEL

*
THE LAST WORD IN RADIO MANUFACTURE

provides undisioried reception. It is excellent

iW

|i

MANNING & |}

in sound volume and full control of reproduc- CO., LTD.

tion, atiractive and artistic appearance

in

AGENTS.

with all the PHILIPS qualities embodied.

RRR NN a nec heer Sen en ee cece near

———
nr eer

*jand Mrs. C

Grand Variety Concert

Auspices of

with these Supporting Artistes :
Wilkin
Ben Gibson

F. Thompson
The Milton Quartette and several others

“THE CHANGELING”

2/-; Balcony 1/6; Boxes 2/-

2 Hours of Superb Entertainment !



SS O—EEE—EE———E—EE—EEEe



From Recent Arrivals

We offer
VERITAS PRESSURE LAMPS—350 Candle Power

GALVANISED MESH WIRE 1” to 2”—Various widths
GALVANISED PIPE & Fittings *%” — 2” sizes.

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.

ADVOCATI

SAVAGE has
distinguished
> Annual Sacred
r the Bethe
i, 1 takes place
el Church or Sunday
at 4.30 pm.

he Police Band being
ce, Mr. Edward Cook,
Mr. Norman Wood, Mr. William
Clairmonie, Miss Elaine Jordan
and Mrs. J. B. Broomes will each
in their own way be helping to
entertain those attending.

Now They Go

EAWELL over the week-end
will be once more jammed
with our South American friends
for, besides the fifty Venezuelans
who arrived on Wednesday by
Avensa, about sixty five arrived
by B.W.1LA. from Venezuela be-
tween Wednesday and Thursday,
to spend the Easter week-end
here. The majority of these visit-
ors will be returning by special

flights on Sunday and Monday.

Opposite The Trees

R. JOHN PELTZ, who left

Barbados yesterday by
B.W.1A. for St. Croix via Antigua
has been working for the Ameri-
ean Red Cross for twenty years.
Here for two and a half weeks he
was staying at the Marine Hotel.
| His wife he said was unable to
join him as she is in charge of the
Publicity Department of the
Metropolivan Opera in New York,
and it was not possible for her to
leave at the present time.
| Mr. Ronald Tree, he told Carib,
has recently bought a house in
New York 4just across the road










®




from his home. f
\ His associavion with the Red
Cross has vaken him on some

strange missions, one of his first
| jobs when he joined was to dash off
| to a flood in Massachusetts where
he was given a row boat and he
| had to go around to the rows of
houses and rescue people from
the second story of vhe buildings
in the flooded area. Mr. Peltz
lives on East 79th Street, New
York.

Much Better

POKE to Mr. Reggie Eckstein
yesterday at Seawell. He had

just rev i from visiting his
son Rex, who over the last week-
end was critically ill in Trinidad.
He tells me that Rex is much
better and is once more at home.
His many friends will be glad to
hear the good news and wish him
a speedy and comple%e recovery

To Visit Her Morher
RS. KENNETH PERKINS lefv
yesterday by T.C.A. for
Montreal, and will then fly across



Canada to visit her mother who
lives in Victoria, B.C.

She will be away for three
months.

Studying Animal Nutrition
| «& RRIVING by T.C.A. yesterday

f Mr. H. N. Haskell,




jeadmaster of Harrison
College and Mrs. Haskell of
“Rydal,” Pine Hill, who has ar-

| rived to spend a holiday wivh his
parents.
Stz now at MacDonald





College, Ste. Anne de Belle Vue,
|which is just about twenty miles
lout of McGill. Studying Animal
| Nutrition, he hopes vo get his
M.Sc., this Spring. He will be
‘returning after his holiday to

| spend another two years at College
| continuing his studies.

}

Intransit
NTRANSIT for Trinidad yes-
| terday by T.C.A. was Miss

| Madge Gayadeen, daughver of Mr.
| ; G. Gayadeen of St.
Port-of-Spain Mr.
Inspector of Schools
lin Trinidad. Madge is studying
| for her B.Sc., and this is her first
| trip home in three years.

With Relations
|" ARS. JOE KERNAHAN arrived
{

MoM‘

} Augustine’
| Gayadeen is

by B.W.LA. to
few weeks with
Belleville.

yesterday ne
jspend a ner
jrelavions in





ASSOCIATION |

SERVICE

On
THURSDAY, APRIL 13TH, AT 8.45 P.M.
Music by the Police Band under Captain Raison

Evans Bascombe
Gerald Bannister

Miss Nell H@lls












COTTON





’



Will Be Missed

Me AND MRS. L. V. WALKER
and their two children were
passengers by the “Lady Rodney”
on Wednesday nighy fcr Trinidad.
Mr. Walker has been a mathemat-
ical master at the Lodge School
since 1937, and will be very much
missed there now that he hag
gone to join the staff of the
Queen’s Royal College. On the day
before school ended ‘ais term, Mr.
Walker was presented with gifts
from the Staff and the boys.

Also leaving ,on Wednesday
night was Miss M. Boult,
Matron of the Lodge School. She
was a passenger for England by
the “Misr.” She has gone to visit
her parenvs and it is hoped that
she will be returning early in
September.

Several friends of the Walkers
and Miss Boult, including mem-
bers cf the Lodge School stat!,

Caub Calling











SUNDAY, APRIL 9 1950
ee ee se nl
Fond Of Sailing
IV? rituda i

a" at ann whe bis tuut,

ivr @ mon Wild

as is Dnisning ner educg: a

were at the Baggage Warehouse 4 Codrington High Scnogee ie
to wish them Bon Voyage. as very tona of saiipg. Heng.
a s Norwegian, born in peat ‘
Spanish in 3. Months in Venezuela, and hens diy
R. C. W. DANIEL who has Barbados. Ying

been working with Shell
Petroleum Co., in Maracaibo for a
little over one year is a Canadian
from Toronto, and is a Petroleum
Engineer. He returned to Vene-
zuela yesterday by B.W.I.A. after
three weeks’ holiday staying at
we Ocean View Hotel. He was
accompanied by his wife and their
young son David.

“The first thing to do when a
stranger goes to Venezuela to live
is to learn the language. Without
it you might as well go home.” He
vold Carib that he learnt Spanish
in about three months. “It is sur-
prising how quickly you pick it up
when you live amongst Spanish

people.”
He is on: a three year contract
and may or may not return to

Canada when it verminates.



Barbados returned to Venezuela
are being checked out by B.W
background, and Louis Brooks,

MR. AND MRS. MARIO OLIVER who spent their honeymoon in

~

yesterday by B.W.LA. Here they

.1.A, staff : Ken O’Neale, centre

at typewriter, who are wearing

their recently issued new uniforms which look very smart indeed.



MR. AND MRS. MOORE who were married yesterday.

Here For a Fortnight
R AND Mrs, P. E. Thompson
are off to the Crane House
Club where they will be staying
for two weeks. Mr. Thompson,
who in the oil business in
Venezuela is an Englishman and
has been in Venezuela for two
and a half years. He arrived
from La Guaira yesterday. by
B.W.LA, via Trinidad.
Amateur Photographer
R. HUGH BLANC who is a
lawyer in Trinidad, with his
wife and two sons arrived yester-
day to spend one month’s holiday
at the Paradise Beach Club. He
is a keen amateur photographer
and armed with two cameras and

1S

\some cine-colour film he plans to

GLOBE |

| spend a holiday in Barbados stay-
jing with Mr. and Mrs. Jack Dear
jin Maxwells.
| Mrs. Dear are sisters.

capture much of our local scenery
during his stay here.
Sisters

ISS AVRIL RAWLINS was

another arrival yesterday to

Miss Rawlins and

Advertise

R. AND Mrs. Antonio
Monaco, who lunched
Friday at the Colony Club have en-
joyed their week’s holiday in
Barbados, With their two young

sons they have been staying at

the Ocean View and are planning |
to return to Barbados in August. |
They left for La Guaira yesterday |

by B.W.LA.

“Barbados still wants to be more |
widely advertised in Venezuela, he |

Baid. “I was preparing to go to
Miami when by chance a friend

Suggested that I bring the family |

to Barbados instead. I have not
regretted the change one bit in
fact I was delighted that I decided
on coming here,

“But you must advertise much |
There are about four long |

more.
week-ends in Venezuela
these wisses everyone is anxious
to go away for the few
Barbados is the ideal spot to come
to, so you must tell us more by
advertising, and many more peo-
ple will visit your island.”

and at

~Here's how to work it:

AXYDLBAAKXR

is

LONGFELLOW
One letter simply stands for another
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc

In this example A is used
Single letters, apos-

tvophies, the length and formation of the words are al! hints.
Each day the code letters are different

A Cryptiogram Quotation

CSBZELL
VMQxX
—~¥SEDTS

LYDL UEZDL
AX QS SE XAWWZE

EZCESDTY,
DJILYMJIYV

Cryptoquote: THE GODS ARE CAREFUL ABOUT
GREAT THINGS, AND NEGLECT SMALL ONES—CICERO.









on}

days. |

Keturns To St, Kitty
M= EVELYN WaNGaae ae
who has been holiday, i
the past seven months wee 2
and Mrs. H. Walton jn ae
black Rock, returned by 8

yesteraay “o her jh wa
iXitts, eres &
’
What's All This
TEWiave ’

4CGuuig y
Stylist has decreed that we
without long locks ang
whiskers are going to look pp,
tically undressed in the 1950
book. Me

Hans Kafka, recent wi
an all~Austrian hair-dressingt

test, said men’s hair will bee

with “natural lookin

waves.” .
For the “True gentleman»

mustache also is required

whiskers. According to ata
must be narrow and tapered.
the ends. %

Americans in Vene

R. HAROLD KAPLAN a
American from Loui i

on his second visit to B ;
A geologist working in Ve
he is here for two weeks ay
staying at the Royal Hotel,
arrived yesterday from Venezuei
via Trinidad.

Other passengers from Ven.

zuela yesterday were Mr, and Mr
John Bergendahl. Mr. Ber

is with Creole Petroleum (gp,
pany and will be here for ty
weeks staying at the Ocean View
Hotel. He is also an Americe’
and comes from Texas.

Au Revoir

M* and Mrs. W. S. Atkinson.ie
4 through Carib—would lip ;
to say Au-Revoir to their many
friends in Barbados, who haya
helped fo make their stay such;
delightful one.
They have been
“Cacrabank” with
son’s father,—Mr.
from England.
They are

wintering 2a
Mrs. Atkin ite
R. L. Clarkia
returning

to there

home in Quebec, Canada.

SKELETON UP
cRessworp |





| CLUES ACKOSS “
1. In which a dictator may fild
imself taken down by a MeN s
vornan,
6. Pardon, it might make ms
| 8. ¢ z
, ) bubbles ~





however, are Ul
in one,
hundreds,
Obviously n0b







Dts
ai



from Win!

earn for a ae
them in Ome
t with,
‘y rural dignitary.
the family, bi
) g. ie
26. By which Henry's programme >
is recognised ? ee
CLUES DOWN
1 bly a scrum haif-{s not)
ved, ae
oncomitant. ;
ainly a dry sort aie
Hall a potato to so many is Vel
t i cours

,_ Athenian who pue
ple first.

in a monarchy,

length ?

: mainly concerned
waters under the 4
bank

distance













} 9%



10. erred from “one |
13. } centre,
15. Word used by-a. poet, .pechaps



in the end,
18. Very fertile class.
20. Mackintosh?

|

| Could bey!

| 21. Plant tn the Hindustant la
}

|



fuage,
22. This side's on the left,

Moluiion on Page Nine
SOLUTION





Beautiful Lines =

by Butterick!

for your selection
at

WHITFIELDS)



| FoR your greater conve))

nience, ALL BUTTERICS
PATTERNS are now held
at WHITFIELDS, 15 Broad |

Street Only.

RVANS & WHITPIBLDS

}
.
.







4

a ee ae ee ee

evchtanaat tie tin ee die ee

/_

> ais seh ee

a i one tein hee A on ct Otte be




SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1950



:
Considerable Disagreement
INCE the first Calypso records

S were made in England a cou-
ple of months ago, there-has been
considerable disagreement among
parties concerned. It now
seems unlikely that the Trinidad
singers who took part in the first
recording will make any more re-
cords for the Parlaphone Com-
pany-—a subsidiary of H.M.V
And is it just a co-incident first
three members of Cyril Blake's
Calypso Serenaders, who provide
the accompaniment for the origin-
al recording have now teamed up
with Errol Barrow’s band at the
Caribbean Club?

Bought Hotel

IR Harold Wernher, the art con-
noisseur, has bought one of
Bermuda’s big hvtels. It is the
250-room Bermudiana, overlook-
ing Hamilton Harbour. It is be-
lieved he paid more than £300,000
for it. Sir Harold, who is 57, is
chairman of Electrolux and ot
Ericssen Telephones. He lives at
Luton Hoo, in Bedfordshire; there
he has his own art gallery.

Foreword By Sir Pelham
HE complete history of West
Indian Test cricket is review-

ed in the Playfair Publication
“Cricketers from the West Indies”
which was brought out on April
14th. It is the official brochure of
the tour and copies will be on sale
in the West Indies about April
19th.

The foreword has been written
by Sir Pelham Warner who ex-
presses the view that he will
watch the test matches with
mixed feelings. He was born in
the West Indies but has captained
England on several occasions. He
would prefer a narrow victory for
one side by a margin of seven
runs or one wicket. But if you
want to find out which one, you
will have to obtain a copy of the
brochure,

+h
tn

BY THE WAY 5:

HERE IS now said to be an

ultra-violet ray which will
stop fruit falling from trees when
it is ripe. The old bohemians of
Montmartre, according to one of
them, M. Carco, had a more
picturesque method of dealing
with ripe fruit. They used to make
up a party to visit a village on
the Marne. There they would
shoot the ripe fruit off the trees.
I would have liked to see Utrillo
winging an apple, or Marie Lau-
rencin, on all fours, retrieving a
brace of plums brough’ down by
Max Jacob. In those days it was
not considered unsporting to shoot
a sitting pear.

MimsieSlopcorner GetsReady

IMSIE SLOPCORNER is the
lucky girl chosen to tour
America as the British Laundry
Queen. She will leave next week
by air, dressed in vhe smart uni-

form of the Wringing Machine
Rovers. Round her hat will be
printed “Laundry Good Will

Crusade.” Mimsie said yesterday,
“I do so think it’s up to every

Britisher to develop a better and .§

closer spirit between our laundries
and vhe Americans’ laundries.”
Mrs. Slopeorner said. “I can only
say I’m proud: that’ my girl is
chosen to cement the ongtont
cordial in the laundry’ world.
There’s no reason why interna-
tional laundry friendship should
remain a mere ideal.” Mrs. Slop-
corner said, “This ought to just
abouv save the Western way of
laundry life, if being plumb daft
will do the trick.”

Rats At Play

HE SCHOOLBOY who burned

the examination papers in
the headmaster’s study had a good
idea, but not good enough. At
Narkover the boys used to enver
the headmaster’s study by night
and copy the papers. But when
even the stupidest boys got 100
per cent. marks Smarv-Allick
smelt a rat—or rather, several. So
he carefully left about the wrong
papers to be copied. and the clev-
erest came a cropper. The boys
got their own back by inducing a
master vo abstract the real papers.

THIS —





@ YOU
FEEL LIKE

TAKE

WINCARNIS

TONIC WINE



—

Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

To Open Fair

RS. D. G. Leacock has kindly
consented to open the Bethel
Easter Fair tomorrow afternoon at
3 o'clock on the Bethel Grounds.
This is the first effort on the part
of the Bethel Sunjay School to
eeorie fete for the Annual THE ROCK GARDEN

ary eeting which is} A ROCK-GARDEN is one of th
scheduled for the month of June {simplest and mosv’ effectiv . he

‘ of transforming an ugly corner, or
Broadcasting Stations | g ugly corner, ¢



MV



brother was in Barbados last stone lending itself perfectly to its
month arriv arrangement.
acounpentng® eo 1 ie Rock-garden should be ter-
Pearson is fvom Fame ton, | 2°84. That is to say, there should
Canada and is in th ad a be several feet of difference in
businens-of the @ e wholesale! height from the lowest level to
Pears hi tm of Taylor and|the highest. The general all-over
: on, which operates Broadcast-| height too should at first be exag-
ing Stations in various parts of

é geraved, as after a few weeks
Canada. They will be here for|there will be considerable shrink-
twelve days and are staying at

age, resulting in a di inti
the Hotel Royal. 8 g in a disappointing

a if is not allowed for.
4 - or your Rock-garden you will
First Flight

7: Y:. AIRWAYS LTD., made

Haiti, Puerto Rico and Miami on

need a few loads of the local

broken coral stone (the larger, the
their first flight from here to
Thursday. Three passengers from
Barbados left fer jiami. They

better), and mould for filling in.
Arrange the svone in groups of dif-
ferent size and shapes, working
up from the lower terrace to the
were Mr. Alan Hodgson, Director .
General of Tele-communications,
Aeronautical, for the B.W.I., Mr.
Kenneth Girling, his assistant and
Mrs. R. Caldwell, a visitor to the
island who was staying at Hotel
Hastings.

Things To Come

"he word was spreading in

Wimbledon tennis circles the
other day that “Gorgeous Gussie”
Moran, who introduced lace pan-
ties to the British courts last year,
wants a “really sensational’ out-
fit this year,

Teddy Tinling, who created the
frilly panties for the California
star, won't say what he has in
mind for her this year. But one
of his new designs to be shown
April 13, is called “The Shape of
Things to Come.”

CARDENING
CORRESPONDENT



“Dear Mr. Streeter, | have recently
started a mushroom firm . . ,“

London Express Service.

EACHCOMBER

Smart-Allick countered by setting
the exam. on the, false papers,

higher. Have a rough idea or plan
in your mind before you start,
and you will find that fresh ideas
will come as you proceed with this
fascinating work. When all the

which nobody had troubled to|rocks are in place, continue mak-
steal. This internecine war,” |ing your garden by filling in the

comments the curren’ number of
the “Narkover Magazine’, will na
doubt continue, but it seems to

pockets and little valleys between
the stones with fine well prepared
mould. Press it down very firmly

bring the whole examination and heap high to allow for ‘ne
system to disrepute, sinking that will occur after wa-
Work It Out tering. Let it all settle for a few

days and then start your planting
Arrange the plants in massed
groups or clumps, placing them
about irregularly with plenty of
rock thrown in between and mak-
ing allowance for their spreading.

PLANTS FOR THE ROCK-
GARDEN.
Among the many planvs suitable
for a rock-garden nothing is more

E are now asked to take it

as an axiom vhat the more
food there is in the store the lesa
likelihood is there of anybody
being allowed to eat it. By leaving
it to go bad we avoid the appall-
ing consequences of distributing
i’. So, by piling up stocks bought
abroad, which must not be eaten,
and discouraging production at

home, we may one day be in a
position to give up eating alto-
gether. And that will bridge tha
gap, my pets,

GUESS STAR

or Little Yellow Daisy.
dainty plant, which grows into
fairy like greenery with a strong
aromatic scent, terminating
hundreds of tiny golden yellow
daisy-like flowers.

Little Yellow Daisy is a native
of Malaya. The seeds were brought

mer Direcvor of Agriculture, and
it is now fairly common in Bar-
badian gardens. Yellow Daisy

under almost any conditions,
poor rocky soil, on gravel or crazy
paths, on grass lawns, or in an or-
dinary garden bed.
good, springing up all over
place and bearing periodically,
although its best flowering tims
jis in the dry monvhs of the year,
in other words between December
and July. Yellow Daisy seeds pro-
fusely, but the seeds are slow t
spring, taking about three week
to germinate, so, if you want thi
charming livile plant for your
Rock-Garden beg a few seedlings
from a friend’s garden.

OTHER SUITABLE ROCK-
GARDEN PLANTS.

Among other plants suitable for
| a Rock-garden, are Sweet Allisum
Verbena, Nastursium, Baby’
Brea’a (fern) Pinks, Dwarf As-
surfatum, Single Balsum.

LAST WEEK’S WINNER

WINNER of last week’s guess
Star is Miss Joyce Smith, Palm
Cottage, Black Rock, St. Michael.
The Star is Jane Powell.











AND FEEL
LIKE THIS!

BE HEALTHY»
& HAPPY.

a bank in a garden. It is quickly |
Me H. E. PEARSON, whose|#"4 inexpensively made, the local |

attractive than the Hematherum, |
This |

quive sizable rounded bunches, has |

to this island by Mr. Miller, a for- |

extremely hardy, and will flourish
in|

Once estab-|

lished in a garden it is there for
vhe







SUNDAY ADVOCATE





eee are se ee



— ee rn nm



FOR GREY HAIR

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to use; one liquids;
nothing injurious ; per-
manent and wash-

a. ES . Q
At Ghe Giemsa:

BOILING OIL

























able. 50 years’
reputation, soidin , y
j \ all natural cints. 3
| | SiS: Kmade bY
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By G. B. ie ae Sah for you trom his Whole- ; «i
j | The SHADEINE COMPANY, :
THERE is one thing about this business of reviewing—| % Sargyine Road. Acton, W.2,
you can’t please everyone, and amongst reviewers them-} .
| selves, there is apt to be diversity of opinion. After I had
} seen “Prince of Foxes” now playing at the Empire Theatre, z
I thought it would be interesting to check my reaction with
a criticism in a well known American periodical.
Apparently, that reviewer had 2, settings in an historical film of
great dislike of historical films | this kind would be almost insur-
that are not up to the standard of | mountable, but in “The Prince of
| Henry V, or perhaps the Italian Foxes”, the entire picture is filmed
Renaissance period and the ex-| in Italy against the background of
ploits of the infamous Cesare] buildings and scenes of the Renais-
Borgia did not appeal to him. Any- | sance period. The Palazzo Publico
way, the film was very summarily] in Siena, which is the setting of
dismissed. Now—I may be all] several scenes, contains murals ye
wrong, and certainly my experi-| considered the finest examples of| iit
ence of reviewing is limited—but | 13th and 14th century Sienese art. iN
I entirely disagree with him. {Scenes in Venice, Rome, Florence §
I found the picture enjoyable and | are all shown, and the tiny king-
interesting. dom of Varano is none other than
The story of “The Princé of} 8 Mario, the world’s oldest and
Foxes” takes place in Italy during | Smallest republic. The storming of Fo
the first part of the sixteenth this medieval fortress is the THE FINAL ouch
a tdi aes . + iramatic climax to the film, and
century, at which time the Italian | ‘ » an
Renaissance achieved its ” full due to a novel technique in photo- TO YOUR MAKE-UP
development. It concerns two] 8taphy, the audience is on the ‘
episodes in the life of Cesare| ceiving end of the boiling oil| «+. ssa enanicuned colt WHEN you start losing energy and
Borgia — ambitious, cruel, un- which is poured over Borgia’s _ _ interest in life—when you no longer
scrupulous. and ruthless-—-who soldiers. 2 feel equal to the demands life makes on ;
dreamed of building an independ- |, The cast is a well-chosen one. C U TEX you-this, means that you're becoming :
ent kingdom in central Italy. The} TYÂ¥rome Power as Orsini is hand- Slowly starved of two essential strength- ;
picture opens with Borgia sending | S°me and entirely competent in building foods phosphorus and protein, ;
his henchman Orsini to arrange | his portrayal of the role, and| Magic-wear CUTEX, so Blood and nerves enriched
the marriage of his sister Lucrezia Borgia, as played by Orson Welles} ° wWhase a : ” P the grand effects of ‘Sanatogen’ ,
to Alphonse d’Este, who would one | }S Machavellian throughout. In easy to apply— gives seen Tonle F ee ee ,
day be Duke of Ferrara, an impor- | ‘ popes contrast i. jpee re bs é on pasignaed ee On sale at good chemists i
tant town on the north east coast} Characters, was nS. Tole. a eauty to your fi i hog 4 ot — xi :
of Ita. tab nenhee as han js] Varano, played by Felix Aylmer. ] y ngertips. phonpboret and protein — in their ; and druggists :
essential to Borgia’s plans. On As the elderly Italian nobleman, cached Tae so that See are peeked vitality flow back into your body ;
Ss plans. : oe aadtaad a. Ey . : ‘ abse into your system. 2 again 3 Fe rene. ane. « ;
the successful conclusion of this{ is Kindliness, philosophy and This incredibly long- day glorious new heaithe a s pgp pend of Serene and sini
mission, Orsini is elevated to the} SPiritual outlook, combined with ; : va VORA heel ae dale c alapnns
rank of ambassador and sent to} @ keen sense of perception to the wearing polish resists @ aN AT ‘ x 1)
the elderly Duke of Varano as] iMtrigues of which he was un- ae . a : a ( an Re X
Borgia’s representative. He has| Willingly the object, made the} chipping and peeling. eae : —_

character the most outstanding in
the picture, Katrina Paxinou, who}
will be remembered in “For Whom

instructions not only to kill the
duke, but to obtain all information
possible concerning the territory

NERVE TONIC FOOD

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so that, at the propitious moment,| The Bell Tolls” plays the part| ¢ word ‘Sanatogen’ is a registered tr

Borgia’s armies can take it by]of, Orsini’s mother. Hers is a CUTEX’s clear, non- . vaihipaeaneaate "nla tie
force. Orsini, and his companion|forceful, dramatic personality ecient

intrigue, Belli, remain at the|Which is evident throughout the fading shades never seem

portrayal of her role.
On the programme is included
a new Merch of Time which deals

duke’s court, during which time
Orsini changes his allegiance from
Borgia to the duke, and helps to

to lose their

brilliance lustre.























ganize the tiny army against his] With agricultural and food pro- H
former master. During the storm- [duction generally in the United * oe Gib sol }
g of Varano, the duke is killed. | States. As always, this documen-| TONITE 8.30 and continuing
y, Orsini saves the life] tary is interesting and informative. ‘
he d $s young wife | TL y . ’ smeasiotet aadenll ca “eas 5
; es a oe nee one BANK HOLIDAY MONDAY and TUESDAY ‘
it complete razing of the KILL SNAKE World's most popular at 5.00 and 8.30 p.m i
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ing torture, he goes to his home,{a farmer here attacked and killed i
where, with the help of Belli, he} a snake 315 feet long. Hearing
| makes plans to return to Varano}the hens makins 1 noise the eae ~—_
to free its people from the Borgian]} farmer found the hens busy fight- Starts THURSDAY
Rule ing the snake, SE ee
| Ordinarily, the difficulties of TR) NEW DANCES! NEW SONGS!



in a glorious musical!
wos” Their happiest
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SACROOL

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SSS ae,
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“nother one-day game.



PAGE FOUR





‘ “*
"PYHE WEST INDIES cricket team are due to arrive in England

to-morrow for their 1950 tour of England. Although the official
brogr: e does not begin until May 6, with a three-day fixture
Roakas? Wotcneter yet cricket fans in the West Indies will be anxiously
‘waiting accounts of the team’s activities from the time they set foot
om English soil.

This is a safe assumption since the team wil! be finding their land
egs and acclimatising themselves to English conditions by means of
“ome interesting one-day fixtures before the tour proper opens.

W.I. VS. CLUB CRICKET CONFERENCE
. EY are due to play against the Club Cricket Conference team at
; Hawker’s Ground, Kingston on Friday, April 28, after having
ractised at Eastbourne from April 18 to April 27. This might include
practice game against Eastbourne Cricket Club.

Another of the interesting preliminary skirmishes is that against
‘ne Indian Gymkhana at Osterley on May 4. This is another one-day
xture but will provide a stern test for the West Indies team before
aey lay down the gauntlet to Worcester two days after that fixture.
"In this fixture the Indians wil be reinforced by four Test men in
ne persons of Umrigar, Phadkar, Mankad and Hazare, all wef
nown in World Test Cricket circles and all of whom have already
4urned out against the West Indies.

Mankad and Hazare are joining Lancashire League teams this
2ason
o On Sunday April 30 the West Indian community in London plan
._n official welcome for the West Indies team. This will involve
It is however expected that this will be
ather more of a social affair. The idea is to have a long tea interval
nd so allow the tourists and London residents to renew acquaintance.

PLAY B.G. TESTS IN SEPTEMBER

OW that I am on the subject of cricket I would like to throw out
.N the suggestion that the Barbados-British Guiana Tests should be
layed in September this year, as has been suggested in certain
uarters in British Guiana. I support this view since the tests, if they
ake place, will do so while the West Indies team are still in England
ron the high seas bound for home. :

This being the case, ample scope will be provided for the dis-
overy of new talent to fill the chinks in our international cricket
rmour which must surely be revealed in the 1950 tour.

The West Indies, up to now do not know to what extent fhe
taging of the 1949 Intercolonial games between Trinidad and Barba-
‘os while the West Indies team was still in India has served the West
ndies. It is known that so far they have served to establish the out-
‘anding capabilities of Roy Marshall as an opening batsman and good
hange bowler, the all round possibilities of Kenny Trestrail and the
otentialities of C. “Boogles” Williams as a spin bowler and batsman

Thanks chiefly to that tour these three are all now members of the
950 West Indies team to England and are expected to play their
ul part in bringing success to the 1950 West Indies team.

TWO GOOD FOOTBALL GAMES
OOTBALL last week was very good and very poor at times
observation is made chiefly with regard to the
‘ivision fixtures played at Kensington.

Monday saw a determined Pickwick-Rovers team defeat College
y three goals to one in a very good game in which the College, al-
10ugh losing, gave an improved display on their general performance
lis season,

Morris scored the lone goal for College, climaxing a fine forward
10ovement by converting from close range, a good centre by Smith
»om the left wing.

For Rovers, Taylor on the left wing scored from an almost im-
possible angle after having cut in from the left wing while Wells,
eaded from an accurate corner to put his side another one up.
Tilkes scored from close range as the result of a quick forward move-
ient that took the Pickwick-Rovers front line within a yard and a
alf of their opponents’ goal line. Pickwick-Rovers truly merited a
‘in in this entertaining game.

BEST GAME OF ALL

This
three First

UT the Spartan-Carlton fixture has been placed by common con-
sent among the best seen in the First Division at Kensington

It might be baffling to those who have not seen the game when I

rite that the margin of victory—four goals to love in favour of

partan is no true indication of the respective performances of the
vo teams. Indeed a win for Spartan by one goal to love, or even a

»‘taw would have been a truer indication of the contest.

This must not be construed to detract in any way from the
scellence of the play by both teams but certainly Spartan have never
een backed up by a greater measure of the luck of the game






King the Carlton goalkeeper did not reproduce his best form, and
ve Park team did not fail to exploit this temporary weakness

Chase on the left wing for Spartan was outstanding and was
stremely speed Neville Medford played his best game of the
sason, He was a tower of strength in the defence and initiated
‘any a dangerous forward movement from his position at left full
ach

VERY GOOD AT CENTRE-HALF

~é n playing at centre-half worked with the precision of a

oiled machins He tackled and cleared well and fed his for-
ards with umcanny accuracy.

h hall was again outstanding for Cariton. He shifted from the

osition to the left wing during the game but wa lways
ving so thing. He is an apparently tireless player

Empire won from Harrison College yesterday afternoon in the
porest game of the season The College forwards never produced
ny finishing touches to their forward movements It seerns as if no
ne has told them that it is not a foul to shoot'when they reach their
»ponents’ penalty area or anywhere in that vicinity Time and
gain they got within striking distance only to falter and be robbed
: the ball.

Empire on the other hand, possessing the greater dash and
unch seemed unable to make the fullest use of these conditions
me and again, to the utter disappointment and disgust of their
ypporters and the fans in general,

Some might charitably attribute Empire’s performance to over
onfidence or lack of a stronger opponent but all things being con-
idered, if they are to figure prominently in the fight for major

‘Snours in the senior division this season they must weld themselves
ato a more exacting machine capable of making the any
dbnditions that may obtain in any particular fixture.

;

most out of

REFEREES SECRETARY RESIGN
R. IGNA .BYER, Secretary of the Barbados Referees Association
for the past six years has tendered his resignation since he has
‘een appointed Headmaster of an Elementary School in St Lucy
; Mr. Byer has been the moving spirit in placing refereeing in
tarbados in the healthy position in which it now flourishes. His
{sion, industry and abounding optimism has served refereeing and

»pnsequently, Barbados football in good stead,

He can rest assured that his labours have already borne hand-

» bme fruit and will continue to be reflected in the upward march of
: efereeing and Barbados football in the years to come







THERE'S PAIN RELIEF
AND TONIC BENEFIT

Yes!— Yeast-Vite

pains —but it does
something else too!
Because of its valu<
able tonic properties
Yeast-Vite helps you
to feel brighter, look
better, sleep more
«asily and enjoy more
,*energy. Next time
you want pain relief
take Yeast-Vite end
get tonic benefit too!



em somes nent manera meer | eA --A ANCL CN: CT LE
oe ee

Empire

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Defeat

College 2-0

IN THE FOOTBALL MATCH at Kensington Oval yes-
terday in which there were few thrills, Empire defeated

"3 Shatter
Speed Records

PAU, Southwest France, April 8.

Three drivers entered for the
Grand Prix Automobile to he
contested here on Monday, to-day
successively set up new course
records during trial runs over
the 2 mile circuit.

First to beat the twelve years
record of one minute 47 seconds
was Luigi Villoresi of Italy, who
clocked one minute 46.4 secs., an
average speed of 60 miles
hour.

Then the Argentine ace Juan
Manuel Fangio broke - Villoresi’s
new record by returngng one
minute 46.2 seconds with an aver-
age speed of 62 miles per hour.

Both new records were finally
shatteréd by the French driver
Raymond Sommer, who clocked
1 minute 44.6 seconds for an aver-
age speed of 95.3 kilometres
per hour. The old record was set
up in 1938 by the driver Carra-
ciola, and equalled the following
year by another German, Von
Brauchitsch.

There will be 13 competitors in
the race on Monday.

The Italian driver, Nonetto*has
dropped out because of engine
trouble. —Reuter

B’dos Friendly
Football
Association

The results of matches played
last week are as follows: —
April 3:

National beat Harkliffe 1—0.

Wavel Sports Club beat Advo-
cate 2—1.

Arsenal forefeited their match
to St. Mary’s Old Boys’ Associa-
tion.



April 4:

Reeds United beat Advocate
6—0.
April 5:

Westerners beat St. Matthew’s

Old Boys’ Association 2—0.
April 6:
Rangers beat St. Mary’s Old

Boys’ Association 7—0

THIS WEEK’S GAMES

This week's fixtures are: —
Tuesday, April 11:

Harkliffe vs Reeds United at the
Bay. Referee: Mr. E. Branch.

Advocate vs St. Matthew's Old
Boys’ Association at St. Leonard’s,
Referee: Mr. C. E. Jemmott.
Wednesday, April 12:

Tambrose vs Berwick at the Bay.
Referee: Mr, E. Reece.

Maple vs Arsenal at St.
Leonard’s. Referee: Mr. C. E.
Jemmott.

Friday, April 14:
Harkliffe vs Advocate at the Bay.
Referee: Mr. E. Reece.
Colts vs St. Mary’s
Association at St.
Referee: Mr. J. Archer.
Wavell Sports Club v. Western-
ers at Shell. Referee: O. Graham.

Old Boys
Leonard's.



Toweel Outpoints

Canadian
JOHANNESBURG, April 8.

Harrison College by two goals to nil.

——+1

Empire took the kick-off from
the Screen Eng and carried the
ball in their opponents’ goal area
from the start. The Coilege
defence was quite alert how-
ever, and negatived alj the ini-
tial attacks.

Soon after the College forwards
were sweeping down the field
but weakened as they approached
Empire’s goal area. With the area
cleared the “Blues” started to
press the game and Harper on
the left wing centered. College’s
defence tried to clear but not well
enough and Drayton at imside
right got possession of the ball
and converted at close range. At
this stage the Empire forwards
were combining nicely and were
well supported by the half back
line.

Empire scored their second goal
when in another raid on their
opponents’ goal area, MacCollin
on the right wing sent in g try
that beat goal-keeper C. W. Smith
and entered the right hand cor-
ner of the goal. Drayton nearly
scored soon after, the ball strik-
ing one of the uprights of the
goal and rebounding on the field.

It was fortunate for College, as
goal-keeper Smith had been un-
able to regain his position in the
goal after doing some clearing.

When the whistle blew for the
half time interval the “Blues”
were still making every effort to
increase their lead.

Cn the resumption the Colleg-
jans were on the offensive for the '
most part but again their for-}4

wards repeatedly failed to make

use of the opportunities that
were offered. The best of the
very few tries taken, was sent in
by Medford on the right wing,
but the ball found S. I. Smith
the goal keeper for Empire, ing

position and he saved easily.
Empire made some _ spirited

attempts to increase their lead

but their shooting was very in-

accurate: They might have ac-
complished their purpose on a
few occasions, however. ut

Smith was always in position and
saved brilliantly. The game en-
ded tamely with the players on
both sides evidently tired.



Leads Field
By 4 Strokes

GEORGIA, April 8.
Jim Fereira born in San Fran-
cisco, led the field by four strokes
the

at the half way stage in
United States Masters Golf Tour-
nament here with a thirty six

holes aggregate of 137.

He shot a five under par 67 in
his second round which included

six birdies. Ben Hogan who
fourteen months ago Was near
death after.a motoring accident

also had six birdies in a second

round of 68 which put him in

second place with a total of 141.

Jimmy Dematet in a_ second

round of 72 was third with 142.
—Reuter.



RESPONDING

partner

A FTER

has ope

n an i




















Gauntlet Wins
In Trinidad

Barbados Advocate Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 8.
The Gauntlet, big Jamaican
bred scored a thrilling win over
Beacon Bright of Barbados in the
feature attraction when the New
Union Park Turf Club Easter
meeting got underway at South

Trinidad to-day.

The only “A” Class horse
Beacon Bright gave away ten
pounds in the eight furlongs
event but could not catch up with
Gauntlet who led from start to
finish. The first day of the four-
day programme provided keen
racing. Miss Friendship scored
the lone Barbados victory whip-
ping the G Class bunch over five
furlongs.

In the day’s opener old Bright
Boy put the first lacing on D and E

The results were:—

McENEARNEY eee Furtengs

an

D gE.

1, BRIGHT BOY (129 Ibs.) Reid.

2. TIDUC (119 Ibs.) Yvonet.

3%. ALE BABA (114 Ibs.) Lattimer.

4. FAIR PROFIT (92 Ibs.) Lutchman.

Time: 1.29% secs.

STAUBLE TROPHY—5 Furlongs F & F2

1, WAVECREST (116 lbs.) Hardwidge.
. LEAP ON (114 Ibs.) Newman.
. PRINCESS RAFIYYA (106
Lutchman.

LA FRANCE (104 Ibs.) Ali.
Time: 1.028 secs.
APEX PLATE—?7 Furilonges F & F2.
NEGLECTED (113 Ibs.) Ali,

RADAR (122 Ibs.) Hardwidge.
GOBLIN (124 Ibs.) Latimer.

Ww LMINA (122 Ibs.) Lutchman.
Time: 1.31% secs.

UNITED BRITISH CUP—8 Furlongs

C and C2.
1, MISS VIC (126 Ibs.) Lattimer.
2. BROWN JACK (129 Ibs.) Reid.

en

Ibs.)

+

ewe

3. BEAUFILS (124 ibs.) Yvonet.
4. CAPANIA (115 Ibs.) O'Neil.
Time: 1.41% secs,

ROBERTSON TROPHY—5 Furlonss

G and G2

FRONT HOPPER (111 Ibs.) Hard-

widge.

2. MISTER PITT (114 Ibs.) A. Joseph.

3. HIS WORSHIP (128 Ibs.) Romeo.

4. THE PHANTOM (128 Ibs.). Fingh.
Time: 1.048 secs.

HARDWARE AND OILFIELDS EQUIP-
MENT PLATE—5 Furlongs G & G2.
1. MISS FRIENDSHIP (125 Ibs.) Yvonet
2. VICTORY (126 Ibs.) Hardwidge.

3. VIXEN (126 Ibs.) Holder.
4. LIBERTY (129 Ibs.) Lewman.
Time: 1.03% secs.
TRINIDAD LEASEHOLDS PLATE—
8 Furlongs A and Lower
1, GAUNTLET (119 lbs.) A. Joseph.

2. BEACON MRIGHT (129 Ibs.) Lat-
timer

3. ICE BOY (119 Ibs.) Reid.

4. SUNBEAM (110 Ibs.) Hardwidge.
Time: 1.422 secs.

CANNING TROPHY—5 Furlonss E and

Lower
1, FLYAWAY (115 Ibs.) Lattimer.
2. WELLINGTON (129 Ibs.) Holder.
3. FUNGLEE (115 Ibs.) Hardwidge.
4. NATURE BOY (118 Ibs.) Romeo.
Time: 1.02% secs.



Longden Figures
In, Photo Finish

MELBOURNE, April 8.
Yorkshire-born Johnny Long-
den, leading United States jockey,
after riding three losers figured
in a photo finish when making

his Australian debut at Caulfield 4 }

Racecourse today.

Riding topweight Derrymore in
the last race of the day, Longden
had a thrilling struggle in the
straight with Victoria’s crack
jockey Jack Purtell on Bidwell,
who had a ten pounds pull in
the weights.

The judge called for the
camera, which showed that
Longden’s mount had been nar-
rowly , beaten into second place.

The American, who is on a
short visit. to Australia showed
great racing skill.

Longden rode.in England and
Ireland last September during a
holiday trip to Europe.

—(Reuter.)



by

M. Harrison-Gray
























TO PARTN

Drub
Liverpool 5-1

LONDON, April, 8.

Liverpool’s clear lead at the
top of the first division—gained
yesterday was short lived as their
second engagement of the Easter
weekend football programme saw
them crash heavily at Newcastle
while their rivals Manchester
United saved a point at Wolver-
hampton which allowed them to
draw level on points: with Liver-
pool. But Sunderland came to
London and won handsomely
which enabled them to overtake
both Liverpool and Manchester
United: to give additional zest to
the closing matches of the lead-
ing clubs.

In division 2, Totenham Hot-
spurs safe for promotion looked
like taking a tumble at home
from Preston North End who led
by two goals at half.ime. Toten-
ham however stormed back to a
win which, with Sheffield United
beaten, increased their advantage
in the table.

The meeting of Notts County
and Torquay produced the anti-
cipated keen duel between vhe
first two teams in the southern
section of Division 3 and Notts
County saved a point after being
behind at the interval to virtually
assure them of the sectional hon-
ours. Notts Forest are still in the
chase for second place and the
two Notts teams may well finish
in the first two places at the
seasons close.

With Doncaster and Rochdale
drawing away games there is
no change in the northern section
where Doncaster retain a, three
points lead, but Gateshead by win-
ning away drew level with Roch-
dale in second position.

Results are as follows:—

Scottish League Division B; Airdrian-
iams 2, Dundee United 0. Dumbarto!
2.

Newcastle |

Dungermere Athletic 4. Queens Park
2. Arbroath 2. Muir 2. Mor-
ton 1. St. Johnstone 4. Co

wdenbeath 2.
Amateur International Match : England
0, France 0. Friendly Matches : Hamilton
cashire). Ayr United 3; Celtic 4.
Academicals 1; Albion Rovers 3; (Lan-
Third Division Northern: Accrington
Stanley 4, South Port 0. Barrow 2, Dar-
lington 1, United 0. Doncaster

Rotherham United 1, Gateshead
Transmere Rovers 2. Halifax Town
1. Wrexham 1, Chester 1. York City 2,
Rochdale 2,
Second Division: Blackburn Rovers 3,
Grimsby Town 0. Bradford 0,
ton 0
Bury 1, Swamsea Town
‘, Queen's Park Rangers 0. Chesterfield
ham United 3, Leicester City 1,
9, Coventry City 1, Hull City 2, West-
United 1; Plymouth Argyle 0, Luton
Town 0, Sheffield Wednesday 2, Barns-
ley 0, Toten Hotspurs 3, Preston
Northend 2,
Scottish League Division A: Aberdeen
. Hearts 5; Hibernian 6, Clyde 3, Partick
Thistle 5, Queen of the South 2; Raith
Rovers 4, Dundee 1; Rangers 2, East Fife
2; Stirling Albion 1, Motherwell 4.

First Division: Aston Villa 4, Chelsea
0; Blackpool 2, Arsenal 1; Chariton Ath-
letic 2, Stoke City 0; Everton 0, Birm-
ingham City 0; Fulham 0, Sunderland 3;
Huddersfield Town 2, Derby County 0.
Manchester City 1, Burnley 0; Middles-
brough 2, Bolton Wanderers 0; Newcastle
United 5, Liverpool 1; Portsmouth 0, West
Bromwich Albion 1; Wolverhampton
Wanderers 1, Manchester United 1,

Third Division Southern: Bourne-
mouth 1, Northampton 2; Bristol Rovers
0, Nottingham Forest 3; Crystal Palace 2,
Norwich City 0; Exeter City 2, Walsall 1;
Ipswich Town 0, Millwall 3; Leyton
Orient 0, Brighto§} and Hove 1; Notts
County 1, Torquay United 1; Port Vale
0, Swindon Town 1; Reading 1, Bristol
City 0; Southend United 3; Aldershot 0;
Watford 0, Newport County 1.—Reater.

ER’S Bis

The same principle applies in

City 1.
2



tha use

e494 K,Q 109.63. 44,
7.4@A
the bidding proceeds Two
Hearts-Two No Trumps; Three
Diamonds-Three Spades, North
with the above hand should pass.
South clearly has not support tor
the red suits, and it is better to
puck up before the partnership
gets well out of its depth on a
misfit hand.

fo wind u this series on
Intermediate Two-bids, we must
consider the meaning of a jump
bid, as in the sequence of Two
Hearts-Two Spades; Four
Hearts

Opener has made a jump
rebid of his suit, although a
forcing situation exists after the
positive response of Two Spades.
This can only mean that the
Hearts are completely solid and
are now set as the trump suit.
Any further calls will therefore
be treated as cue bids

If the bidding starts with Two
Hearts-Three Spades, responder
indicates that his Spades are
dead solid. A suit is deemed to
be solid if it consists of seven
cards headed by the Ace-King-
Queen ; if six cards only are held,
they must be headed by the four
top honours.

London Express Servicg,

SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1954





THE Union meeting was off to a start yesterday with a Surprise
in the very first race. This was a win by Mr. Sydney Lid
black’ gelding Bright Boy. Of course this was not Bright Boy’s first
win by any means. He has won about a dozen, his last only in
January in Port of Spain. But that was a handicap and he was je
in with light weight. What surprises me most is the di
which this aged gelding has been able to reproduce when it
certain only a few months ago that he was on the decline. He
nearly the whole year through in 1949 without getting a first.
his demotion from class B.all the way down the ladder to D,
now he appears to have come to a full stop in his downward trend,
he keeps up this form he will soon be on his way back up. Old gelq,
ings have a habit of doing things like this. ' ; ‘

Bright Boy’s victory was not the only surprise which I
in this race. The form of Fair Profit was much more so, and especial
ly as his weight was a ridiculously low 97 lbs. Surely this cannot be
the same horse who only last December dished out a sound beating
to the best two-year-olds in the South Caribbean,

If Fair Profit had run second I might not have been so bewil
because Bright Boy on form is quite a formidable proposition ang
would probably have given his old rivals in B class as much trouble
as he meted out to these creoles in D class, But Fair Profit ran 4h
In Front of him were also’Tiduc and Ali Baba. These two horses ate
not bad ones but I cannot’ believe they are really 22 and 17 lbs. better
than Fair Profit. If they ate, then our two-year-olds in 1949 wer
were an inferior type-indeed. + shale

Fair Profit’s defeat in the McEnearney Trophy makes the thirg
in a row for horses of this age racing at Union Park in this particy.
lar race. On each occasion it has been a creole with some kind of
reputation who has been beaten. In 1948 it was Brown Rocket, and
last year Ocean Pearl. Indeed the only three-year-olds of note who
have come through the fire of racing with the older horses in D class
at Union Park, have been Gleneagle, Jetsam and Pippin. All three
outstanding creoles, the first two exceptionally so, Of coursé there
was a good excuse for Ocean Pearl last year. She went down on her
knees at the start and after that she had little chance of catching
them. But I have never:been able to find out what was wrong with
Brown Rocket and now I must wait to hear what’s up with Fair
Profit. I am quite certain that it is not his true form.

The other three-year-olds who had a special race all to them
selves in F class substantiated the Free Handicap which I made last
January. Wavecrest, the winner, it will be remembered I had placed
on a par with Lazy Bones and Bow Bells. I did so on his two wins
gained at Arima last year and also his looks which pleased me very
much. What I liked about his race yesterday was the fact that he
was headed. by Leap On after about a furlong, but came back to win
a hard fight for the finish. Of course Bob Hardwidge is never to be
caught hanging on to the front early in the race if someone else likes
this position better than he does, need never have been headed at all. Therefore, in spite of such a
strong finish, Wavecrest’s time of 1.02 2/5 was quite good. However,
from the time of the C class mile, I gather that the track must be very
fast. Fancy Miss Vic doing a mile in 1,41 2/5. She must be im
proving—it’s about time!

Wavecrest’s victory also opens up avenues of thought on what is
going to happen in the Classics. The first one, the Trial Stakes in Port
of Spain, being no more than a rehash of the two-year-old Breeders’
Stakes over six furlongs. I see no reason why Wavecrest should not
be made favourite. He has everything to recommend him. Plenty
of speed and obviously more strength than any of his contemporaries,
He is in fact uncommonly like War Lord, Gun Site and the more robust
looking of O.T.C.’s sons. This must be acquired from his dam Tele
vision who is by the famous sire. He looks nothing like the other
horses by Coat-of-Arms whom we have seen on the track so far
I look forward to seeing him play a prominent part in the three-year
old racing this year and having now won three races out of three
starts in F class we will probably see him tackling Fair Profit at the
next meeting at which he races.

THE GAUNTLET AGAIN

Of all the horses who have won siow races on fast tracks The
Gauntlet takes the cake. Only last year at Union Park he won two
races, the first a mile which he did in exactly the same time it took
Nature Boy, a three-year-old of no account, to do it in a D class race;
and the second a 6} furlong which he just managed in a fifth faster
than C class. Yesterday he won again over a mile, this time a second.
slower than the very mediocre Miss Vic, a mare who after racing for.
a number of years is still in C class. This comprises The Gauntlet’s
winning record since he arrived in Trinidad from Jamaica in 1948
Not a very impressive one.

Yet, as slow as his race might have been, The Gauntlet evidently
won very easily. He took over from Ice Boy after a furlong had been
covered and was never headed again. Beacon Bright came with a late
bid and although he passed Ice Boy fairly easily he could not make any
impression on the leader. Not being there myself I am not sure exactly
how this race must be read, but I do know that Beacon Bright takes @
lot of roughing up quite early in a race and it seems that Lattimer:
forgot this all important factor. If this is not the case then Beacon
Bright cannot be thoroughly fit. This is also quite likely as he is
notorious for his dry coat. But I am firmly of the opinion that he can
run a faster mile than this and particularly so on a hard dry track
like Union Park. The rest of the meeting will surely reveal the real
trouble. ;

Meanwhile I also notice that the errati i
Jetsam and Ligan, won the last race. me dae 7 le
from Wellington and Sun Glee. At once I turned back the leaves ot
my book and comparing this with Wavecrest’s effort over the same
course I find the time figure is exactly the same. This, of course,
sends Wavecrest further up in my estimation, because he is three
and Flyaway four. Furthermore he carried a pound more than her,
whereas at weight-for-age she would have to give him 11 lbs.

_ I also conclude from the above that the average three-year-old
this year is better than those of last year because Flyaway was one
the leaders among the second string to Ocean Pearl. By the laws
of averages she should now be better at four. Yet she would
have won had she run against Wavecrest, Leap On and Princess

Rasiyya. I think we are in for a really hot season among the three-
year-olds Fair Profit had better buck up.







Vie Toweel, the British Empire
Bantamweight champion, tonight : Two No Trumps although a p
retained his title by outpointing fc tive response of Two Spades
Fernando Gagnon of Canada Pi would be Correct if he held the
Toweel won nearly every one @ J.:10, 2 King of his suit instead of the
of the fifteen rounds and Gagnon Ne h «uzen but on the next round he
had little to offer apart from Bai rite a is justified in bidding Three
toughness and clever spoiling Two No. Trumps Spades
tactics. Gagnon was warned sev- ebid is Three Dian This calling clearly indicates
eral times for holding and in the no oblast in show -ne character | his hand, a
I was told that he ort o as announce é rong long ser 1-solia sult without
Sound re iif i if he ‘eas two-suited hand, and the chance to North should appreciate
would be disquailied | . = of finding nim with © Spade he combined nands will
again guilty. support is remote more tricks if played in
Over the latter rounds Toweel South however, has a hand 31 e should therefore
relied mainly on his left hand that is sure to be useful in a ‘aise to Fo Sp oes . is on :
and his father manager said he Heart contract, and he should 48 4 S'ngieton honour o smal
; nun Sheen main ubleton, provided he has good
hurt his right midway through conver as ae ee to coun. 1G _ seat al
: : our Hearts. ne bids Three is in U suits
= oot ‘oe eed oe Hearts only (simple preference), North's hand may be something
ougnt a two-fisted siamm. North will visualise a weaker like this
and oo at ae = he scored hand a am Oe aby bere #9 A, Q, 10.9.4 2 @ A,
repeatec with clean crisp so that a game may be missed » ;
iehes "ies Gagnon’s abilits A somewhat different case is os nh :
: : : of where South holds this hand: Responder s Three Spudes
to keep the fight at close range ‘ Sees - . . should be raised to Four vid
at times and his toughness pre- J. 10, 9, 7% 3 Y 7. of Three No Trumps be
vented Toweel from winning by % 2 @Q54 ic $ th is know o be
a knockout, If North vupens Two Hearts, trick t s the hand is
—Reuter. South is well-advised to respond played Spades
an loOK + *
our hair ¢?
stier YOU
ch love!
how mu
show him y




)
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beautiful, lustrous hair
Te can Séé w she
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VACATOR

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wR OAS EEA REED SOLAN ANNA TIES EBERT

RS EN
' toms’ frontiers that divide us, we

SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1950



n
ENGLAND'S famous intervarsity Boat

Picture Shows: Cambridge, the winners,



“Germany will realise that the
Epoch of fraticidal strife between
the Western nations is closed for

Sforza Appeals

Race is won for the fourth year in succession by 3% lengths.
leading towards the end of the race.



Archaeologists
Find Literature

ever and that one destiny links
To Tito them henceforth.
, ‘We hope that the coming 000
months will see completion oa 4, Years Old
Western entry into the commun- *
@ From Page 1. ’ : : { PHILADELPHIA, April 8.
The Minister pointed out that %#Y of free nations with equal Clay tablets believed to be

eo On Fame: 06 14.

Two Men With
£10 Plan
India Hike

Two men with an urge to svudy|
life in foreign countries are short-

stable contact between the two
Governments would lead to agree-
ments on railways, tariffs, and
schools. “In fact a whole sphere
of life which counts a gpod deal
mor than a few valleys,
irthermore, since the meth-
ods of overcoming political diffi-
culties of post-war ' international
politics, we are ready for the most
audacious initiatives in this field,
happy if with us Yugoslavia will
have the honour of giving the



world an example of the breadth jy jeaying England on an 18-
of view which Europe to-morrow jonth trek to India and back.
will admire. Aidan Phillips and Leonard#

Count Sforza went on to speak
of the Vital necessity for a Euro-
pean Union.

“If we suppress the dozen cus-

Strong, 29-year-old chiropodists,
intend to set-up in business to-
gevher when their trip is over.
They. are now. getting their
muscles in trim by doing digging

Europeans will quickly become as nq jevelling work at Manor Park,







4,000 years old, and bearing in-
criptions regarded by experts as
the worlds oldest known litera-
ture, have been found in the an-
cient city of Nippur, 140 miles
south of Baghdad, it was an-
nounced here to-day.

American archaeiogists from the
University of Pensylvania
suuseum and the University of
Shicago’s Institute made the dis-
eovery after months of excava-

tions, the cost of more than
50,000.

The expedition was in the field
in TIraq—once Mesopotamia—

trom last November to last month.
About 750 clay inscriptions were
found: including what is consid-
ered the oldest agricultural bulle-
tin known to man.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE
APRIL 9 — NO, 114



‘AleoaRoamer’
_ Brings
_ Cornmeal

A shipment of 2,988 bags of
| corniial arrived for the island

The Topic

of



yesterday morning from New
| Orleans; by the SS. “Alcoa > says ELSIE the BORDEN cow ©
Oamer”.
a ae also pean 4,800 “Ke. iLK
m tim! staves, gum tim-
igh oe pe ee ch She L t Ww k FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER |
wood turpentine. Part of the as ee

cargo was taken at Mobile, Ala-
bama.

The “Alcoa Pilgrim” also called
yesterday. From Trinidad and
ieee packages of cocoa pow-

popcorn, women’s apparel
and fresh fruit arrived by this

ert eine ee ~

No ——

vetne

e “Alcoa Pilgrim” is consign-
€d to Messrs. Da Costa & Co., Ltd.,
while the “Alcoa Roamer’s”
og are Messrs. Robert Thom

Plane Arrives
At Midnight

An Aé?o Supply ee iateg D.C.
3 plane arrived at Seawell air-
borv at about 12.45 a.m. on Good
Friday from Aruba. No notifica-
tions of this flight, nor its time of
arrival Was made to the airport





We passed a certain village |
It was around midnight }
Some men were chatting freely
It gave us great delight,
+ * *

One youngster in the twenties
Said, “To-day the House prorocue,
And still in this fair island
Some things are out of vogue.”
. . . *




geen, nor to Internavional Re said, soe by in may Street,
i 3 7 i Especially a sunny day,

eradio _ Limited who provide} youn see “old people “hned-up"
eae telecommunications And panting all the way.” |
and navigational aid at Seawell, > + . rs

d s It may be old age pension There’ 8 nothing better than
and were not in operation, since But diac ab Sou Hey, PHOSFERINE when feed | ‘
the normal operaiive hours of Those very poor old
Seawell airport are from dusk to Worked for it yesterday. miserable, It ye the

.

dawn unless previous notice
given of ldte flights. The plane
had to circle the airport while
the flare path was being laid out,
and as soon as this was completed
landed safely.

}
" We went to dient Park Tuesday

To see a football game

And every Spartan hailer,
Ah boys! They were too tame
‘ ‘ . .

puts back much-needed
PHOSFERINE today !

YOU NEED

o
°
§

a IRE a aE

; 2 . This time they were defeated
bodied in one of these literary Believe it if you may,









tablets—to others as well as to’ On questioning the pilot, the Be tdi eth ae the ey,
himself” We still have mucii to] airport manager ascertained that aoe . ° * | {
find out, but already we can tell; no agents had been appointed foi Those boys played brilliant football | :
that the Sumerian had a well-|this flight, and consequenvly the} ,,)"¢y set & very Bot pace, oo i
= moral sense for his wens and the Port Health au- Enriched Bread is in their face
time. orities had not been notified, and ; p ened amas t
The tablets show he was mov- | had then to be summoned to clear} "s..vsydeves inte, Chins era Ly GREATEST OF ALL TONICS
ing gradually towards a higher| ‘he aircraft and passengers. The} And boys look out to-morrow H
concept of society, of the admin- | Pilot of the aircraft also informed There'll be the big boat race. sat | —— nd opal | Indigestion, i§
istration of law and of individual ees et on Ped 0} To-morrow morning early Fae » and after Influenza, f
, in well at midnight on Right in, Trafelgar, Square, | Phoaferine is availab vaila let
responsibility, ; Monday April 10th., vo. fly the} A marathon begins it, ne is available in Tablet and Liquid form, i
Mr. McCown said that on the Our only “care-free” day |

tablet was recorded a hymn to passengers back to Aruba, most of

I —







rich as the United States and en-
dowed with more raw materials
than Russia.” 4

Peace
This Wealth, he said would
mean peace and a higher level of
life for all.
Coutit Sforza briéfly reviewed

| the progress of Italian relations

with other Western European Na-
tions.

“Our policy towards Britain has
already created fruitful bonds,

| despite the fact that the war had
, dug a great gulf between the two

countries.
“There is still much to do, both
in regard to a strictly European

' policy and in regard to collabo-

rating in Africa, .
He said Italy’s relations with

_ France were also gyverned by her
| overall aim at European Union.

We are slicing through the wood
when we strive for an Italo-
French Customs Union, excellent
in itself but also excellent as an
intermediary towards that vaster
union at which we aim,

Count Sforza said: “We were

/always of the view that any seri-
ous attempt at European recon-

struction must try to gain the
German people to democracy, not
to reject it and to hold it outside

our Western communityt

i
4
:
;
:





Sutton, Surrey.
They hope to set off in about
three weeks’ time. By hitch-

hiking mosv of the way they plan
to reach Bombay via France, Italy,
Egypt, Israel, Syria and Persia.
They will each take with them
£5 in English money—the maxi-
mum permitted—and a_ similar
amount of Freneh money.

“We are anxious to study the
psychological and_ sociological
aspecis of life abroad, and are
taking this opportunity before
we settle down in _ business
together,” said Mr. Strong. “Wa
hope to write a book about our
experiences.”

Both unmarried, Mr. Phillips
lives av’ Nova Road, West Croy-
don, and Mr. Strong at Malvern
Road, Thornton Heath, Surrey,

—L.E.S.

Philippines
Leading Pakistan

MANILA, April 8.
The Philippines gained a 2—1
lead over Pakistan to-day, when
their first round European Zone
Davis Cup match opened here.
it is fhe first match to be played

=
â„¢m
a
<
â„¢m
a
S
S
Ww
me

Over 50,000
people buy them
every week,



British - made handwound
Smiths Alarms are the pop-
ular choice because they arc
outstanding in their reliabil-
ity, style and value, There
are models to suit all tastes
in delightful shades to match
any bedroom furnishings. Be
glad to own one!

100% BRITISH MADE



AVAILABLE FROM YOUR

LOGA. SMITHS CLOCKS

STOCKISTS

Nippur was once important as
the religious and cultural centre
of Sumer, non-Semitic . nation
which flourished before the Baby-
lonians, and then the Assyrians
took over.

It was the Sumerians,
took the first civilisation
Mesopotamia in the fourth
Iennium before Christ.

Many of the tablets came from

who
to
Mil-



880 Record

(By the Advocate’s Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, April 8.
Whitfield (U.S.A.) won the 880
yards flat in 1 minute 54.6 seconds
beating the track record held by
Roseoe Browne of the U.S.A.





RUPTURE
RELIEF

Thousands of ruptured men and women |
have found instant relief by wearing :
Beasley Air Cushion Appliance. |

Fitted with a real inflatable air-cushign,
light, strong and easily washed, it hold
the hernia with such gentle firmness that

Love the famous J.

ENRICHED

in



the private “libraries” of Scribes 194% Brows. time was 1 talc prone, cisuse have increased chances

who worked in the Temple ite 55 seconds. For full details and Free Booklet write

under the patronage of rich mer- Stanfield, U.S.A., equalled the to

chants. _ 100 yards record of G. Lewis} BEASLEY’S LTD, Dept. 190 | J&R
Some of them were used for (1945) of 9.4 seconds. Montemage| 4 Cork Street, London, W.1, England. |

teaching or filed away for refer-
ence, They included exercises in
arithmetic, touched on obtruse
legal problems, or recorded the
development of the Word.

Dr. Donald E. McCown leader
of the Expedition, who has just
returned to the United States,
said, “The oldest known invita-
tion to learning we have is em-

in the third.



in this season’s competition.
R. Deyero, Filipino No. 2 beat
Istikhar Ahmade 6—2, 6—0, 6—3,

near here
mother, Mrs.

early

and Flicisimo Ampon defeated we}j,
Mahmund Alah 6—0, 6—1, 6—0. children.
—Reuter



fell in two races and did not place

QUADS BORN
IN ALABAMA

LOUISVILLE, ALBANIA.

Quadruplets, girls were born to
the 33-year-old wife of a farmer
to-day.
Mackie,
four babies were reported doing
The parents have six other




BATHSHEBA

This newly erected modern hotel is situated
most picturesque part of the island.

April, 9

The
and the
in Fish and Lobster Luncheons, — Well Stock

—Reuter.



Will see why so many bajans

sponsored by

J&R BAKERIES
makers of

and the blenders of



VISIT the beauty spot of the island
EDGE WATER HOTEL

TELEPHONE 9dx%7e ©OR RESERVATIONS
R>oms with or without private bath etc, We specialise

& R.

BREAD

RUM






in the




ed Bar.








Th











For comfort
ond ease of
riding, the
Hercules 3-
Speed Geor—
fitted with the
new Synchro-
Switch Handle.

oe

owe

@eer today.

“Hercules .

THE HERCULES CYCLE & MOTOR COMPANY LTD
BIRMINGHAM ENGLAND.

T. GEDDES GRANT LTO.,

e FINEST BICYCLE BUILT to-day






BRIDGETOWN

of London.



When you are thinking of redecorating

the rooms in which you live, picture

how attractive you can make thém

ee

MATRULL

OILBOUND WASHABLE
WATER PAINT

It is quite the most economical durable

wall finish obtainable, and you have a

range of 22 delicate pastel colours

to choose from; colours which will add
, beauty and dignity to your home at the

least eost.

Tn Barbados today many of the lovliest

homes have been decoratéd with
MATROIL

Ask your Dealer for a Colour Card

or apply to

‘oe GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.

BRIDGETOWN SOLE AGE

£AS/1 4/50

Paints by Lewis
Berger & Sons, Ltd.

LTD.

NTS



Goddess Nanshe, showing her as we LS oa eee sre Uretambet the Gaal SSS
the oldest known goddess of jus- _ r Will witness Joe and Robert '
tice interested in the social and if Tee NSE er ter cane ¥
moral welfare of human beings. Price 0, Coal There will be hours of Dancins The Amateur Athi i¢ |
Yet another clay document, he oth Sponsored by Aberdeen, }
said, “carries the. advice of a Up I Cent ~Naone Hak oes alan
oper “ coors what, roms The price of charcoal has risen Hep! Hep pave hot ial maenliiie } ie ' * «
and how to plant. You might call] from three cents per pound to NEA ANA eetcy thie spree Fae SSOClA On 0 ar a OS
this the oldest agricultural bulle-{| four cents per pound. Don't miss Christ Church to-morrow,
tin known to man, “When this This is the effect locally be- You know the admission's free ‘ :
is fully translated, we shall| cause of British Guiana increasing} yes sister, if you're coming. . Presents...
know how well the father ad-| the price of the commodity due “Bring along the tambourine; i
vised.” + to the sterling devaluation. Youstoo, will, be aces Its ANNUAL INTERCLUB AND LOCAL CHAMPION-
The joint expedition will start A bag of charcoal was formerly "s ' ’ fila “ 6 é
a second full Jensen in the field ge for $2.60 ex-schooner ancl So if vou Join the thousands SHIPS CYCLE AND ATHLETIC SPORTS MEETING
in 1951.—Reuter. 2.75 ex-store. Today, a bag) wo oromise youa grand time )
brings $2.78, excschovner on] “GR i am TO-MORROW
This is the annual ‘free-spree’ x
itfi : And friends from near and far EASTER MONDAY, APRIL 10TH 1950
Whitfield Breaks :

=: At te
KENSINGTON OVAL, Beginning at 12.30 p.m.
Under the distinguished patronage of His Excéllency }

the Governor,
25 — THRILLING EVENTS — 2
Come and see the improved Cyclists and “iti of
our C olony do battle on the green of “Kensington.”

Not a dull moment.
armichael, Stuart, Keizer and “Nazi”
Hunte, Marshall, Lynch, Archer and the
Clarke & Company, thrill you for hours,

Watch C
Yearwood;
School Boys



Prices of Admission:

KENSINGTON & CHALLENOR STANDS _ :
JNCOVERED STANDS 1/6

A

3/«
GROUNDS 94.



J. W. MAYNARD,
c/o Civic Society, Lucas Street.
Hon. Secretary.



KENWYN,

Rockley New Road.

THE WALLS OF
THIS HOUSE
ARE WATERPROOF |

In addition to decorating and giving your factory 4 colourful,
attractive appearance, Snoweem provides a protective weath«

proof overcoat.

It does not flake, peel or brush off and is washable,

SNOWCEM

: “DECORATIVE WATERPROOF COATING



Obtainablz in:—
White, cream, pink, silver-grey, green, blue,

Yellow & terro-cotta,
froih— 4
BARNES & CO., LTD—PLANTATIONS LTD., %
PITCHER & CO.—T. HERBERT, LTD. vn

‘ iain yan etn i At eas prem
cen ae — naa




|
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i:
'
!
eae
ee
Mee
r
lid
‘cae
i
i
Hees
it
1 i
.
Aida
. oe
{
'
'
t
4
eT
ae





Published by Th. Advocate Co. Ltd., #4, Broad St, Bridgetcws

Sunday, April 9, 1950

For Pedestrians

SOME WEEKS have passed since studs
were placed in Broad Street and pedestrians
were invited to cross the street only at
those places where the studs are placed.
The only response has been a complete
disregard of the crossing signs.

As traffic has increased in recent years
a spate of regulations has emerged to
govern the use of vehicles on the public
highway. Little or nothing has however
been done to control pedestrians. The
result is that pavements are ignored, the
middle of the road is used as a promenade
and it is a regular occurence for a group
of persons to meet and carry on a conver-
sation on the public highway.

All the more regrettable is it when per-
sons who should know better set the bad
example of ignoring signs set up to ensure
road safety. Nor are the police exempt
from the general criticism. It is high time
that energic steps were taken to control
the manner in which pedestrians waltz
all over the road.

It is ridiculous for the crossing signs

to be put if the police are not prepared
to see that they represent something more
than a pious exhortation. There is no
reason why compulsory crossing should
not be enforced. It could be easily em-
bodied in a regulation. The result would
help to reduce the risk of accident and
bring a degree of order to the chaotic
manner in which the road is used.
j The motorist now operates under a
heavy burden of regulations. The side of
the road on which he must drive, his
maximum speed, the corners at which he
must stop and a host of other matters
are prescribed for him. Bus drivers, and
taxi cab drivers are subject to an even
greater number of regulations.

The pedestrian has, however, continued
on his way, heedless of alterations in vehic-
ular traffic, and confident that he is always
in the right. It is true that on many roads
of the island no pavements exist and the
pedestrian has no alternative but to walk
in the road or in the gutter. On those
roads which do have pavements the people
appear reluctant to use them, and on streets
such as Broad Street this causes inconven-
ience and increases the danger to motorist
and pedestrian alike.

It is time that the authorities address
themselves to this problem.. More street
crossing signs should be erected and the



public required to use them on pain of a
fine. The police must exert themselves
to see that pedestrians as well as motorists

conduct themselves in such a way that all
users of the highwzy should be protected
in their rights.

They have recently done good work in
regulating traffic in the city. Let them
now turn their attention to the regulation
of pedestrians and their misuse of the
road. ‘sy
One method of educating the adult uae
lic is by means of cinemas, loud speakers
and poster advertisements,

It might be very tiresome for four or
five thousand spectators at a football match
at Kensington to be reminded not to walk
in the road, but the reminder would be
productive of good results. Similarly the
local Radio Distribution service could be
utilized, for a month say, to remind
pedestrians to cross only in traffic lanes.

The columns of the Press can also be
employed to boost a campaign for safe
walking. For children, the sooner that
schools include in their curriculum, les-
sons inculcating safety on the road, the
better educated will school children be.

The old attitude that nothing can be
done in Barbados is dying. Many things
have been done in the past, many are being

“OUR READERS SAY:



done, but some things require more effort
from the public than others. The educa-
tion of pedestrians is one of these things.

Easter

EASTER, the greatest of Christian festi-
vals, has come once again as a reminder
of the great work of redemption of man-
kind. Man too can rise from the life of
selfishness and sin to obedience of the
great commandment to love his neighbour.

The world has travelled far from the
condition of things where the Fatherhood
of God and the Brotherhood of man was
the guiding principle of life. The modern
order of things is nation against nation
and a race in armaments in an effort to
dominate each other, From this depressing
condition the world needs an Easter : a
rebirth to a life of peace.

In the life of the individual the need is
as urgent as that of the nation. The dis-
tractions of a work-a-day world are suffi-
cient to make one forget for a brief while
the injunction to love one another, but at
Easter, Nature herself is in her kindliest
mood. “For the winter is past; the rain
is over and gone; the flowers appear upon
the earth; the time of the singing of birds
is come, and the voice of the turtle dove
is heard”.

At this period of the world’s history
when men and nations look out for peace
and safety, Christendom looks over an
altered landscape, Many changes have
been made and things which once looked
considerable and important have fallen
into obscurity leaving only the main struc-
tures which still stand out clearly. Signs
are not wanting. The attempt at a uni-
versal church is the clearest indication of
the strong desire moving mankind towards
his Easter. Denominational claims, shib-
boleths, and even vested interests now
bear an aspect of pettiness while Christian-
ity rises above them in a majesty which
precludes rivalry and confusion. In this
lies the salvation of man still groping in
the outer darkness for the light of a true
Easter

Easter brings a reminder of that hope
when man will rise from the abyss into
which strife has brought him to see the
light guiding to a better future; when God
our inerrant Father, our infallible guide,
will lead us through the still darkness to
the light of eternal day. This then is the
story of Easter, the queen of festive
seasons.

‘ * y
Going Up

THE general increases in the cost of liv-
ing introduced by the changes in the price
schedule during last week present a chal-
lenge to everyone. It is clear that produc-
tion of home grown foods must be increased
in order to satisfy the demands of the local
market. This necessity was emphasised
during the war years when the submarine
menace threatened this island with short
rations. It is no less important today in
the face of the present circumstances.

But this is not the only problem. In
producing more food to be sold at lower
prices instead of the imported product
there is also the danger of upsetting our
general economy, The number of people
who derive incomes from the sale of goods
must not be decreased. This will add to
the problem of unemployment. The income
derived by salesmen must not be reduced.
This will throw greater weight on some
other avenue for earnings.

There is still the necessity to produce
food in every form although in some in-
stances there can be little hope of price
reduction. Vegetables and meat can be
produced but the incomes of the producers
must be maintained. They cannot be
expected to increase production merely to
cushion the shock of devaluation.

The necessity for revision of the subsidis-
ation scheme is clear. The foods produced
locally might need the support of the
scheme if the producers are not to be sacri-
ficed. And the agriculturists comprise one
section of the community tied to their
posts. The increase in the price of man-
ures, the price of seed, the cost of labour
and the increase in taxation find him as
their target and the only relief is reason-
able prices for his products.





To, The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—At vhe beginning of this
year vhe Director of Education
introduced into our elementary
schools what he called a “com-
mon course”, (Incidentally the
inflexibility of its prescriptions
flies in the face of the bible of
elementary school teaching, the
“Handbook of Suggestions for
Teachers”, which strongly depre-
cates any attempt at imposing uni-
formity on the schools.) There
were two controversial issues to
this “course”: One, that it added
pew subjects the curriculum;
the other, that it requesved an
extension of the school time to
4 pm. The Barbados Elementary
Teachers’ Association met to dis-
cuss this course, and it is charac-
teristic of the inertia and irre-
sponsibility of that body that
while it (rightly) took a firm stand
agains’ the lengthening of the
school hour, 1¢ did not reject, for
the most cogent reasons, the con-
tent if not the general policy of
the “common course”.

For, judged as a whole, the
“common course” is a snare and
a delusion, a laiver version of the
story of the dog th bone and
the shado

The public has been universally
silent about this course. The rea-
sons for this are, I think: firstly,
that for all their boasting Bar-
badians are not s ich interest-
ed ,in education as in hoolir
am nai ww t the ; rer
ela
what th

SUNDAY

|



DAVID GAMMANS, who visited
Barbados in early 1947 tells the
story of a speech he once made
to some business tycoons in North
America. David Gammans is a
Tory Member of Parliament and
would probably have been Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies, had
the Conservatives won the last
General Election. When I finished
speaking, Captain Gammans said,
the tycoons accused me of being
a Red.

I heard that story from David
Gammans himself, although after
this lapse of time I cannot recall
precisely the exact words. But
he will, I know, forgive me using
it to point a moral which I want
to offer to the Barbados Electors
Association. I am not suggesting
that the supporters of the Eleci{rs
Association are tycoons, but 1 am
suggesting that the Association it-
self, which probably would like
to be considered a Conservative
Association does not show, either
in the speeches of its Parliament-
ary representatives or in the
writings of its favourite scribe
“The Archer” (consistently mis-
spelt Saggitarius) “more than the
remotest understanding of the
constructive side of Toryism as a
political philosophy.

I myself am a Tory by inclina-~
tion and although I take no active
part in local politics in this island,
I am seriously perturbed by the
lack of a constructive party pro-
gramme offered by the Electors
Association. I could not, because
of my personal detestation of
Socialism as a political philosophy,
and because of my lack of con-
fidence in its local manifestations
here, vote for the Left, so I must
consider voting for the Right or
not voting at all.

But when I review the speeches
of members of the local Assembly
who are wearing the flag of the
Electors Association, I find that
like their favourite columnist

Saggitarius they are much better

gramme with constructive sug-
gestions for improving or outdis-
tancing them. Whereas’ vast
quantities of heat are generated
in abusing the Imperial Govern-
ment and sad lapses of good taste
are evidenced in devastating at-
tacks on individuals who cannot
answer back, I am yet to notice
any signs of political ability in the
Electors Association of a _ kind
which would lead me to support
their cause rather than that of
the rival association.

Tndeed were it not for the fact
that I am a_ convinced anti-
Socialist, my political sympathies
would lie more with the members
of the Government party, who are,
at least trying to improve in their
own way the appalling low
standards of life which the
majority of this island’s people
are supporting.

It seems to me that any political
party which depends on denigra-
tion and abuse of its opponents

) aS a Substitute for political thought
and action is doomed to die the
death.

I can see the signs of the grave

at “shooting arrows” than at op-
posing the Government’s pro-



ADVOCATE

; nigh” ~ OF. ‘Broad Street of the future ?

TORIES AWAKE!

By Capricornus

already hanging over the Electors
Association unless they change
their present tactics or find some-
where within their ranks or sup-
porters a new energiser of life.

“It is not enough” as Lord
Altrincham’s elder son wrote re-
cently, “to limp along in the wake
of progress, complaining all the
way, and cursing the day man-
kind ever started on its travels.
The greatest Tory triumphs have
occurred when change has been
not merely accepted but antici-
pated by Tory statesmen. Can-
ning once said that “those who re-
sist improvements as innovations
will soon have to accept innova-
tions which are not improve-
ments.”

I am not naive enough to sug-
gest that the Electors Association
should try to “out-progress” the
“Progressive League” and call
that a policy. Progress is not in-
evitable. But what I am sug-
gesting is that they should realise
that they are the only possible
party to replace the present
political party when it is defeated
at the next election, and that un-
less they come out of their present
Blimpish stage of seeing a Social-
ist behind every red tie or every
suggestion for social or economic
improvement, then they are
doomed to perish or at the very
least to lose my vote and the
votes of thousands who share my
views. If I may borrow from the
Hon. John Grigg again” the need
to obtain power by means of a



POCKET CARTOON |

b» OSBERT LANCASTER |



akes and Ladders auriny
evening chapel! Frank
Sinatra's photo in the dormy !
It seems to me Lillian that
it’s high time someone made
it quite clear to you and
Patience that St. Winifred's

is NOT Holloway /“





Today's Thought

ROUND dealing is the honor
of man’s nature; and a mix-
ture of falsehood is like alloy
in gold and silver, which may
make the metal work the bet-
ter, but it embaseth it.

—FRANCIS BACON.

The Dog. The Bone And The Shadow

lief that their children are now
getting free secondary education,
(Are not algebra, geometry, gen-
eral science and foreign lan-
guages supposed to be taught?)

The palpable truth is that under
the new course their children ure
not getting education at all. Teach-
ers’ energies are being frittered
awey and children are bemused
before a course so wide, so unsuit-
ed to the conditions of elementary
education in this island that a
large portion of the money being
spent on it may be written off as
a loss. Not even in England, with
its slightly longer school hours,
its better vrained teachers, its far
better and more adequate equip-
ment, is the Senior School Course
so comprehensive.

It would clearly be impossible
for me to deal adequately with
the common course in a single lev-
ter. There is a great deal to be
suid about it. Indeed, were I in
a country more, acoustomed to
moving easily in the realm of ideas
or less allergic to just, if scathing,
criticism, I could with profit w rite
a volume on this innovation. Bu
in order to deal subsequently with
the jiscu able portion of ti
course, it 1 recessary |
some of the deadwood. to exclude
once and for all fr om our dis-
cussion an aspect of the course
which I would hay regarded as
comic if the Head Te her f tha
elementary schools

That the absurdity of the posi-
tion may bé appreciated it is
necessary to sketch the back-
ground to the Spanish teaching
now being done in our schools.
In the original course issued by
the Education Department it was
set out that Spanish would be
taught for one period of 45 minutes
each day which was an essential
part of the new scheme, it was no
longer possible to give that amount
of time to the subject. Actually,
at present two periods a week is
the general rule. This alone
would have killed any idea of
foreign language teaching, as any
one with experience knows. It is
true that when the course was
being drawn up the Education
Department could not have known
that the extra hour would have
been rejected. But there were
initial and nullifying obstacles
which the Department could not
but be aware of. It could not but
know that there were no text
books with which to supply the
pupils that they might begin the
learning f the language. In fact,
many Head Teachers found them-

t ] when their schools
to teach this new
them, Spanish had
ner an English
igus age Spo. »ken by
idea of
yila-






elementary teachers, indeed, very
few school children in Barbados
had ever learnt Spanish. In fact,
such had been the tradition of
Spanish teaching here that only
the dull and backward learnt that
language. Then whom did the
Department expect to teach it?
Apparently the teachers them-
selves knew the answer better
than the Department. For it is
amusing, if pathetic, to see num-
bers of them now after a_ hard
day's work, trooping dutifully to
the few available Spanish teachers
and blundering badly on the lesson
which tomorrow they will have to
teach to their twelve-year-olds.
Teach-as-you-learn has now
become a policy of enlightened
education in this island. Keep one
lesson ahead of the pupil is good
enough for Barbados.

But perhaps the Education De-
partment did not have this neces-
sary knowledge Indeed, its
Spanish teaching prospectus is so
naive and divorced from reality
that one womders whether that
Department is still located firmly







on the ground. Let me quote

Reasons for learning a foreign
language. (1) t inderstand more
fully throu lear ga

other tha: an English hx

and ideas are expressed in
(2) in order to 5

standing
their





to discuss it. I wish only to ask
one question: How many good
secondary students doing School
Certificate French or L.C.C. Span-
ish are moved to “gain some un-
derstanding of other countries” or
able to “communicate with people
of other countries”? If the answer
is, as I think, ‘hardly any’, can an
equivalent or better result be
achieved by a primary school in
three years less and with a major-
ity of children of less general
ability? And to crown it all—
again I quote from the syllabus:
“the South American pronuncia-
ation should be used as it is im-
portant that correct pronouncia-
tion should be acquired from the
beginning.” One would smile if
one were a foreigner regarding
with detachment the fantasies of
an opium-happy people. But to a
Barbadian the sight of the mess
being made of our education is a
cause for tears—or tumbrils.

Thus 90 valuable minutes are
being wasted at a time when
teachers are begging for opportun-
ity, within —_ existing framework,
te tials Pu pils who





XTDOOKS, trom
t know i
suggest



ions





a — ee SS










good programme, and to retain it
by a good performance in office,
rather than by an unwholesome
reliance upon Fate and the folly
of opponents—these are surely
some of the things which history
can teach us.” And surely that
is why we are Tories.

Because we do not neglect our
history. Why should we Tories
(and why. should the Electors
Association if they want to be-
long?) hang their heads in shame
and be content to be called re-
actionaries?

As far back as 1822 Toryism
under Canning, Peel and Huskis-
son became a great liberal reform-
ing movement.

And it was that grand old Tory
Disraeli whose Reform Act of 1867
first established a truly democratic
franchise in the United Kingdom.
It was Disraeli’s Tory Ministry
which together with social reform
measures and trades union legis-
lation, introduced the new con-
cept of Tory Democracy.

If the Electors Association wani
us to believe that they are follow-
ing in the concepts of that greai
evolutionary political philosophy }
affectionately described as English |
Toryism, then they must make it|
clear that they are at least keep-
ing as up-to-date -with the new
Toryism as their left-wing op-
ponents here are imbibing the
output of British Socialists.

When the present Government
is defeated at the next elections!
(and they wil] not be unless the}
Electors Association take early |
action) the electorate of Barbados |
will want to have known for|
many months in advance what are |
the intentions of the Electors
Association.

A political party. even a young _

ation have told us, the voters, by
their records in the House and
through their mouthpiece in the
Press, we are not over-impressed
and we look forward to a much
rnore vigorous approach and a
constructive statement of aims in
the next Parliamentary session.
And it is our right to expect that
whenever members of a political
party so far forget the decencies
as to abuse private individuals
who have no possibility of answer-
ing back that the Leader of that
party should publicly disclaim
party approval of such tactics.

No political party worthy of its
name can hope to keep the confi-
dence of any voters unless it ob-
serves certain fundamental rules
of ethical conduct.

Only demagogues look for sup-
port among the rabble. It is a
great misunderstanding of the
Barbados political scene to sup-
pose that the majority of its vot-
ers come from the rabble. They
are largely drawn from simple
people like myself and I certainly
will not vote for rabble-rousers
who hope to achieve cheap popu-
larity by cussing the tinker.



be reasonably proficient in the use
of their own language”. The
Director tacitly acknowledges this
lack of proficiency when in a Cir-
cular to the schools he suggests
that pupils should fill in blanks
rather than be required to write
complete sentences,

Why, then, in face of all the
obstacles outlined, the teaching of
a foreign language was insisted
upon? Perhaps we shall never
know. One thing we know is that
Barbados is following in the foot-
steps of her betters. For in 1945
the late Miss Ellen Wilkinson
then Minister for Education in
England, proclaimed that in the
following year the school leaving
age would be raised whether or
no there was adequate staffing and
or accommodation. Barbados,
always priding itself on being
behind England, had to emulate
this monument to the new meth-
ods, It issued a ‘common course’,
which in its prescriptions implies
that Spanish shall be taught in all
schools whether or no the teach-
ers are acquainted with the lan-
guage.








tere st in
ire the two]











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political party still in its teething
stage, is expected to decide upon
and to tell the electors what are
the main outlines of the oro- ]|;
gramme which they will follow,
if they are entrusted with admin-
istration.

So far as the Electors’ Associ-

:

J.N. GODDARD & 7 LTD)
Sear GOLD BRAID one

SUNDAY, APRIL. 9, 195





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SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1950

Bridgetown
Very Busy
For Easter

One had to thread his way
through the main streets of the
City yesterday as busy shoppers
made last minute preparations for
the Easter holiday.

With the prospect of bright sun-
shine large numbers of people

be spending the bank-
holiday away from their homes,
some on sight-seeing tours, some
picnicing af some of the beauty
spots of the island, while others
will find their greatest amuse-
ment on the dance floor.



re are several-items of pub-
ber entertaitamnentt which will
undoubtedly = the attention
ople.
+o oe be the athletic sports
at Kensington Oval, and at which
there is the likelihood of some
records being broken
Another big item will be the
fair at Coleridge School, St. Peter.
the programme of which is sure
to attract a good attendance.
Then there are the Aquatic
Sports at Oistins. Such sports are
liked by many people, young and
old and the day’s programme
promises to give satisfactory en-
tertainment to all who attend.

PRIVATE SHOW will be
A given by the Mobile Cinema
at the Leper Hospital on Tuesday,
April 11. Monday, being a Bank-
Holiday, the Cinema will give no
“ Wednesday a show will be
given at St. Catherine’s School
pasture, St. Philip, for the benefit
of residents of the St. Catherine’s
area and another will be given at
the Cambridge Plantation yard on
Thursday for residents of the
Cambridge area of St. Joseph. s

The last show of the week will
be at Friendship Plantation yard,
St. Michael, for residents of the
Hothersal Turning area.

T A MEETING held yesterday
at the Town Hall, the follow-
ing were elected to serve as
Delegates from the Barbados
Civil Service Association at the
forthcoming Conference of the
Feuerated Civil Service Associa-
tions of the Caribbean:
Messrs. C. A. Coppin, L. N.
Chenery, C. W. Cumberbatch,
M. W. Clarke, L. A. Hall, A. I.
Jordan, A. F. C. Matthews, E. L.
Morris;, _R.. Ps Parris, C:' BR. C.
Springer, H. A. Vaughn and D. A.
Wiles.

CRICKET MATCH will be

played on Easter Monday at
Parry School Ground, St. Lucy,
between Northern Progressive
and Visitors, a team from the
City. Visitors are made up of
Empire and B.C.L. players and the
“match is due to begin at 11.30
a.m.



The teams are:

Visitors; Geo. Johnson, (Capt.),
C. Gaskin, BE. Austin, M. Crichlow,
H. Sealey, Frank- Taylor, C. Mul-
lins, J. Wiltshire, Vi. Taitt, D.
Estwick, E. Cox, C. Dowrich, C.
Bowen, Tony Hinds and St. E.
Phillips.

Northern Progressive: G. Fitz-
patrick, (Capt.), A. T. Yearwoou,
R. A. Yearwood, G. Yearwood,
Rev. A. E. Simmons, V. Balgobin,
L. Spencer, V. Bowen, O. Colly-
more, H. Boyce, I. Norville, W.
Cadogan, H. Husbands, R. Phillips,
E. Green and N. Slocombe.

HE LOSS of a Raleigh bicycle
valued $75 was reported by
Allan Jones of Tenth Avenue,
Belleville. He stated that the
bicycle was removed from outside
the residence of Denton Sayers at
Pine Road on Thursday.

NDER THE competent direc-

torship of Mr. McCarthy,

the Organist of St. Joseph Church,

and Mr. Rock, who assisted. the

St. Joseph Choir renderec J. S.

Tayler’s “Crucifixion” on Good
Friday, at 8 pm.

This pathetic form of meditation
was carried out in such a manner
as can be indicative of the frue
crucifixion of Christ. The service
lasted for about an hour, and was
well attended,

ORTY - FIVE .YEAR ,OLD
Charles Skinner of Brittons
Hill died suddenly at his residence
on Thursday at abouv 1.00 p.m.
An autopsy was performed by
Doctor A. L.Qtuart and death was
attributed to natural causes.

—



INSTAL - -




3 K.W. Ne
5 K.W. an
10.5 KW.

16 K.W
22 K.W




w COMPLETE RANGE OF



SPARE





SUNDAY

“Now, be good bays and fix the lawn mower, and Daddy will buy you @
whole shop load of Faster eggs.”

THE BIG ? QUESTION

IF MOLOTOV SUCCEEDS

STALIN

London Express Service

By . . . Lieut. General Sir Giffard Martel, Head

policy.

Let us first examine the char-
acteristics of these two great men,
and we will start with

Stalin,

Stalin’s father was a very skil-

His son, Joseph
destined
received a good

ful shoemaker.

Stalin, was

Church and he

education.
As he
strong

grew
attraction

he

Of British Military Mission to

R. MOLOTOV is taking over

a great deal of the work

from Marshal Stalin to ease the
strain and enable the Marshal to
conserve his strength. What can
we deduce from this? Shall we
see any major changes in Russian

for

towards

teachings of Karl Marx.

Eventually

Allowed to visit Front

On my first visit to Russia in

he

1936 Stalin never

him.

When I went to Russia in 1943
as head of the britsn
the position was que

I saw Stalin and ais-
cussed matters with him on many

Mission,
aurevent,

occasions,

He gave me full facilities to
visit the front and see the
Russian forces and discuss the
Russian

situation

with
troops and commanders

was abhsarbed
into the revolutionary movement
in Russia, and became its leader.

emerged from
the Kremlin and none of us saw

the

many different sectors.

When

had long

I returned
visit I found that I could not get
much interchange of ideas with
the Communist
was Marshal Stalin who arranged
for me to have discussions with
the Russian General Staff and I
meetings

1

from

eaders,

with

about three times a week.
We discussed everything

gether, and
each other.

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Marshal

developed

Military

but

much from

Mo

This was the turning point of
the war, and a little later the
Russians launched their offensive
operations which led to final
victory.

Used to call me ‘Old Friend’

I Remained on friendly terms
with Marshal Stalin and he
used to call me “Stary Dost’—
which means “Old friend.”

As a man he was ruthless
and probably unscrupulous, but
he undoubtedly held the con-
fidence of the Russians.

I formed the opinion that he
would have liked to co-operate
more closely with the Western
world, and that he was pre-
vented from doing so by pressure
from his associates such as
Molotov.

Later I realised that I was
wrong, for Marshal Stalin is now
in entire agreement with the
other Communist leaders and
determined to spread their Com-
munist autocracy all over the
world, calsal aa

A read sense of humour

Marshal Stalin ‘iad, however,
a real sense of humour

In discussing him Mr. Win-
Bton Churchill once said ‘
above all he is'a man with a
saving sense of humour, which is
of high importance to all men
and to all nations.”

I decided to test his sense of
humour on one occasion.

It was at a Kremlin banquet
which I had to attend. I knew
I would have to reply to a toast
from the Russians to the British
military forces, and I prepared
my speech in Russian.

All rocked with laughter

When my turn came I said
that I had been informed before
I came to Russia that I would
have great difficulty in establish-
ing liaison with the Communist
leaders.



GENUINE
WEST INDIAN
HANDCRAEFTS

See The
Dominica
Handcrafts
Company

Bridge & Trafalgar Streets

.




























ScOoWw,

Actually I
well with them, and particularly

1943

had got on

with their General Staff.

I then
between
problerr:

went on
us we had

to say
solved

each other.

There was then a dead silence,
while they waited to hear how
this problem had been
and I explained that the solution
was to
pravdu,”
quite openly and nothing but the

truth.

After a moment's silence, they
rocked with

all
Stalin,

his chair, slapped his thigh with
delight

“gavaritz atcrita e
which means to

laughter,

who was sitting back

and repeated my

sentence.

He then called me up and we

had a

of

long friendly talk.
course,

of humour

seemed to enjoy it.

A

Compared with the bluff man-
ner of Marshal Stalin,

colourless individual

ways were much less attractive.

He
great

worker, but I cannot
a_ single
Military
getting anything from him which

was obviously a
ability and a very

man

when
succeeded

occasion
Mission

we needed.

In all the conversations I had
with him I never got anything
tangible out of him.

giving

would politely say, “I don’t think

so.”
I cannot imagine a more
colourless individual t han
Molotov.

His dark-coloured suit, his be-
spectacdled poker-face,

°



A FEW EASTER FOOD

Instead

me his famous “No”

his

fairly

that
this
x how to get on with

solved,

tolka
talk

and

last

no Communist
leader ever talks openly, and
he is not always very truthful.
Stalin’s sense
abled him to see that it was a
complete leg pull and they all

en-

Molotov’s

hard
remember
the

thin

ADVOCATE

Seout Notes
Signalling
Competition
This Week

The South Western District will
be staging its Inter-Troop Sema-
phore Signalling Competition on
Tuesday next, llth April at 4.00
p.m. at vhe Erdiston College. Each
of five troops will be entering a
four-man team, and we are look-
ing forward to a very keen compe-
tition in which the winner will
meet the winning teams from the
other Disvricts for the final.

Each team is required to provide

signalling flags.



two pairs of b
Continuing his scheduled round
of visits to the Groups in the
District, Mr. Charles Springer,
D.C., of the S.W. Districe on
Thursday last paid a visit to the
2nd Barbados (Y.M.C.A.) Group.

Wood Badge

Scouters! Are you V/rking on a
definite and correct line in train-
ing your boys in the Game: of
Scouting ? Of course you may be;
but you can only be sure of vais
by taking Wood Badge Part I
(Theoretical),

Cub and Scout Wood Badga
Part I (194950) Studies can be
obtained fr.sm Scout Headquarters,
Beckles Road. Call in for a copy
this week. j

We are sorry to hear of vhe ill-
ness of the Island Commissioner,
Mr. W. H. Carter, M.B.E., who is
at present in hospital. We wish
him a speedy return of health and
vigour.

_ Kaster Wishes

May we wish all sections of the
Movement a pleasant Easter, and
hope vhat by the merits, death
and example of selfishness of Him
who died that we might live, we
may also achieve and display in
our lives on. earth the Spirit of
Service to others.

hair and small moustache would
give a stranger the impression
that he was a middle-class pro-
fessional man—probably a
citor.
Always friendly and smiling

In our official conversations,
it was always Molotov who knew
the answers. All the intricate
figures were at his fingertips.

He was always with Stalin at
the talks, and if the Marshal was
ever in doubt on a_ particular

soli-



Barbados Branch
Included In
Pension Scheme

, Messrs. Wm, Fogarty, Ltd. have
informed the Advovate that the |
Fogarty Pension Scheme, referred
to in Friday’s issue as now in
operation in British Guiana, Trini-
dad, and Tobago, also covers the
Barbados Branch,

The Scheme, which is now com-
pulsory for all employees who
have completed the qualifying
period of service, is designed to
provide all the employees of the
firm with a suitable pension on
their retiremenv, |



Memorial Service
To-morrow
Advocate Correspondent

LONDON. |
A requiem service in memory



of Miss Joan Neckles Knight,
daughter of Mr. John Knight, |
M.B.E., Postmaster of the Wind-
ward Islands, is to be held in
Christ Church, London, on Easter
Monday. Miss Knight, who was
studying must in this country, |
died of pneumonia exactly one
year ago, following an accident in
which she was badly burned.



|
25 YEARS AGO (ADVOCATE |
|

1925)
x THE third match of the Russel |
Cup competition was played yes-
terday between Spartan and Em-
pire and ended in a victory for the
home team, who def&ated the |
visitors by two goals to nil.
The playing of the Empire team
was fast and strong and the com-
bination produced two goals in|

less than five minutes play. Em- |

pire thus wins her second match
in this cup in which she has four
points to her credit.

|

By using this technique the
Communist leaders have now
seized half Europe and most of
China and Burma. It is unlikely

Why should they do so? It has

+served them well,

The danger of the subjuga-
tion of the whole world to this |
bestial form of life is there for

all to see.
It is now generally realised |
that if we turned cold

warfare,

point Molotov was instantly ready |0nm to Russia we could free the

to refresh his memory.

Subjugated countries in Europe

Although I could never detect | Which are behind the Iron Curtain

what went on behind his poker-
face,
was always friendly, courteous,
and smiling. He had no outstand-

ing mannerisms, and his habits
and conversation were also col-
ourless,

Stalin was never without his

pipe, but Molotoy smoked only an] of fear,

occasional

very little.

his work.
Kept as a deadly Secret

The inner workings of the
Politburo are kept as a deadly
secret.

I do not myself
any change, such
of more power in the hands o
Molotov, or even the eclipse ot!
Marshal Stalin, would alter their
policy.

I believe that they have made
the necessary plans to deal with
every eventuality of that nature. |

They have a fanatical deter- |
fmination to spread their Com- |
munist, autocracy over the!
whole world. To achieve this|
result their plan is simple and |
sound, }

By spreading Karl Marx Com-
munism in the early days the
Communist leaders succeeded ir
overthrowing the Czarist regime
and capturing the whole of Rus-
sia in a year. |

They then exported these
teachers to other lands as a
softening-up process to pave the
way for further expansion, and
in the meantime they established
complete autocracy— which is
the exact opposite of Commun-
ism—in Russia.

As they advanced after
war this process continued.

Every country which they took |
was placed under autocratic Com-
munist rule complete with con-

He talked only oi

believe tha
as the placing



the

centration camps and a_ slave |
army. |
The Kar) Marx Communists

were sent further afield to con-
tinue their softening processes

cigarette and drank|clever propaganda, in

armour
ing with
we
from a

until


















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But this might lead to war.|

I must say that Molotoy| W@ are not prepared to face this

at present.
Hence we must build up thé

necessary forces as a first step
Useless to talk without
Strength

to keep us in a sts

has succeeded,

ate |
by very |
making I

Russia,

think that her forces are not only

jiarge, but also very well equip

ped,

If the Western
a comparatively
killed army making full
and mobility and worl
a strong tactical air f
would have nothing to fear}
Russian attack
It is useless to
we have thi

nations ral ed|
mall but highly |

strength |
L.E.S.!

—_—_____ SS

—



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~PAGE EIGHT

~





POMPEO EES ERT a EaG

@F N the spring of 1944, when
e Allies were preparing the
invi of Normandy, Rommel
wads nade Commander-in-Chief
of alt the German Armies from
the Netherlands to the Loire,
Rundstedt was his superior, in
Supreme command in the West.

No one was better than Romme)
at rousing the spirit of tired and
apathetic troops.

And for his new responsibility
he needed all the energy he could
muster.

He had a knack of handling
men, Viee-Admiral Ruge, his ad-
viser on coast defences, wrote of
him :-—

“He had done some deep
thinking about the relations
between officers and men.
That is one of the reasons,

I think, whY our army and

navy. kept their discipline.

“Wherever we went he
spoke. freely to all ranks.
© explained his idens to
them and told them exactly
what he wanted them to do.





“A new spfrit \ very
soon evident in the troops,
and the work f preparing

resist the invasion began t
g0 ahéad”’

Pep-Talks

On the other side of the
hannel Montgomery was
speaking in the same effective
fashion to the troops and
factor’ wor!ers
In neithe é
“pep-t
higher
ers we “su ect
persor build-up
TT

re these

ng at a

The B&tish
ing to Atar
cou! i n Mont
gon

As far '
1941 I
partme 1 it
parent ral Halder,
Hitler visers
make t n ymmel,

Rhommeél high place
now content themselves with
aescribing t as nountebank
and a seeker after r riety

Rommel, mear ke

immer

De

ap-
one of

not to

ganda
ructed

gomer ea lise that pagand
and the exploitation of |
personalit ere merely
weapon

“You can do what



anothe

with
lief camera-
postponing





n i week YY
) y niral Ruge
he remained modest and unassum
ing
Personal e ie Rommel
scarcity of material
ercome
At this period enormous quan-
tities of steel and concrete were
being used for submarine shelter
and for the launching-sites of
Vl's and V2's
Rommel had, therefore, to make
do with what he could get
Hitler might agree that all
coastal batteries should be put

into concrete emplacements with
six feet of concrete overhead. But
even armed with this order Rom-
mel could not get the concrete

No Cover
@ When the invasion came,
many batteries had no over-
head cover at all and were

quickly blotted out from the

air.

Rommel! nevertheless managed
to get a prodigious amount of

work done

In a few months 4,000,000 mines
were laid against fewer than
2,000,000 in the previous three

yeal

Given tine he proposed to lay
50 to 100 million and, after sur-
rounding all strongholds with
deep minefields, to fill up the

country between them with mines
wherever 4t was “tankable.”
Becauseé= mines, like everything
else, were’ scarce, they were not
at all of conventional construction
Rommel raided depots and ar-
senals, where he discovered stocks
of hundreds of thousands of old
shells, which he made into mines
Nor were the minefields laid in
conventional pattern Rommel’
idea was to employ mines in as
many different ways as possible

:
*Tin-Openers

Among his gadgets were beams
driven into the beaches below low-
water mark, some with mines on
the top, some with steel cutters to
act as “tin-openers.”

There were home-made “nut-
crackers” mines in blocks of con-
crete. There were mined logs
with a seaward slope.

There were the obsolete tank
obstacles, made out of three iron;
bars at right-angles, which were’
how useless against tanks but
could still impede infantry if set
below high-water mark.

There were naval mines
in shallow water with
lines attached to the horns

Ashore there were poles driven
in on open fields and wired to-
gether with mines on top to im-

sunk
floating

pede glider landings. But many
were not ready by June 6 D Day

Among the de ception were
dummy minefield though Rom-
mel } Nplain they v ild
ha recon
graze

The i¢
Whicr I ‘ t il
bombe

Whe



The Last Duet With Montgomery
io ‘Dunkirk’ This Time:
A Case of ‘Too Little

And Too Late’

By DESMOND YOUNG



s

¢

7



ONE OF

convalesc

THE

ing
sitting

last
atter
the

being
in garden

He refused because there
vere not yet enough V1's to allow
of a continuous fire being kept up.
It was perhaps too late.

But it is interesting to note that
General Eisenhower says that, had
the Germans succeeded in perfect-

ng these weapons six months
earlier and had they been used
principally against the Ports-

mouth-Southampton area, “the in-
vasion of Europe would have
proved exceedingly difficult and
perhaps impossible.”

Similarly, Rommel wanted the
navy to mine the navigation chan-

nels and the Luftwaffe to drop
the new pressure-box mines all
round the Isle of Wight

The navy objected to laying

mines too close to the shore, and
the Fuehrer would not allow the
pressure-box mine to be used be-
cause there was no known method
f sweeping it, and the Allies
might lay similar minés.”

‘in Water”

@ The real confifet of opin-
ion was, however, on the
whole broad question of how
the invasion could best be
resisted.

Rommel apparently had no
doubts. We must stop the enemy
in the water,” he said, “and destroy
his equipment while it is still
afloat.”

The first 24 hours, in his yiew,
would be decisive. Once the Allies
secured a bridgehead it would be
impossible to drive them batk into
the sea or to prevent them break-
ing out.

He based his belief entirely on
the factor of air superiority,

Tne Luftwaffe would be shot
out of the skies and the reinforce-
ments, like the supplies for North
Africa, would never appear.

Road and rail traffic would be
completely disrupted and move-
ment in the back areas would
become impossible

If this reasoning were correct,
then the main line of resistance
must be thé beach

It this strong belt of resistance
were eventualiy broken, at least
it would hold up the invaders for

some time and their break-out
would be local.
Alternative

2 The Army Command,
undstedt the Commander-in-
Chief West, his staff and the
majority of the army, corps
and divisional commanders,
took the more orthodox view.
With 3,000 miles of coastline to
defend, with only 59 divisions,
most of them second-class and
only ten of them armoured, with
which to defend it with no cer-
tainty where the main landing
would be made, it was useless to

think of preventing the _ Allies
Setting foot above high-water
mark

The only correct course was to
Keep the reserves, including the
armour, well in rear, to wait
until the main effort was identi-
fied beyond doubt and then to
launch a large-scale counter-
offensive at the right moment

For Rommel it may be said tha’
his appreciation of the effects of
Allied



air power was proved a

curate

It wa or witt the

: ai
formation

One division f
F ’ ,
‘ ne € 1

pictures

wounded

et Na a,

of

Rommel while he was
Here he is with his dog

\
raken

of his home at Herrlingen.

with destroyed equipment and
with dead men and animals, says
General Eisenhower, “that it was
literally possible to walk for hun-
ireds of yards at a time stepping
on nothing but dead and decaying
flesh.”

Dug-Oui Hoys

On the other nand, Rommel can
be accused of grossly over-estim-
ating the chances of holding the
Atlantic Wall.

His defences were not even a
quarter complete. Nor could he
have fought his last battles in the
men who manned them.

Dug-outs, convalescents from
the Eastern Front, boys without
battle experience, with a residue
of renegade Poles, Rumanians,
Yugoslavs and Russians, they were
not likely to stand up to the sort
of sea and air bombardment he
had himself foretold.

His reputation as a strategist
would rank higher if he had back-
ed Rundstedt’s proposal for evacu-
ating before the invasion, the
whole of southern France up to
the Loire.

Had that been done, he might
have fought his last battles in the
moving warfare of which he was
a master.

But selling ideas of retreat to
thé Fuehrer was a task more hope-
legs than that of defending the
Atlantic Wall

Montgomery had no doubt what
Rommel would do, His analysis
of his old opponent’s plans was a
masterpiece.

= It is now clear,”
said, “that Rommel’s inten-
tion is to defeat us on the
beaches, . . He is an energetic
and determined commander ;
he has made a world of differ-
ence since he took over.

“He is best at the spoiling
attack; his forte is disruption;
he is too impulsive for a set-
piece battle. He will do his
level best to ‘Dunkirk’ us.

“We must blast our way on
shore and get a good lodg-
ment before he can bring up

he

sufficient reserves to turn us
out

“Armoured columns must
penetrate deep inland and
quickly We must gain
Space rapidly and peg out
claims well inland ‘
While we are engaged in

doing this, the air must hold
the ring and must make very
dificult the movement of
enemy reserves towards the
lodgment areas.”

Ring Held

@ it came about as both
men predicted, Rommel did
try to “Dunkirk” us. The air
did hold the ring.

The first 24 hours were deci-
sive Once the Allies secured
their bridgeheads, only by some
gross mistake could they have
been thrown back into the sea

Would Rundstedt have had a
better chance of defeating them

in open warfare when they de-
bouched from it? With the troops











at his disposal and in face of
Allied air supremacy, it seems
unlikely
In the first critical phase of the
inva was Rommel’s old 21st
Par ivision, now reformed, |
! ted the capture
ngiy, Rommel
1 that it commar :
Ma { era Feuchtinger
le t with the boldness of

Lost Chance

SUNDAY



IN THE town hall of Ulm, with R¢
von Rundstedt delivers the funeral
dom was displayed at the funeraof Rommel, who died by his own

hand, at the o

there?” asked Rommel, “Hun-
dreds and hundreds,” replied
Feuchtinger.

“How many did you. shoot
down?” “Three or four.” “You

have lost your chance,” said Rom-
mel.

Very shortly after the bridge-
head had been secured Rommel
and Rundstedt found themselves
for the first time in complete and
open agreement.

Asked by Captain Liddell Hart
long afterwards whether he had
hopes of defeating the invasion at
any stage after the landing, Rund-
stedt replied: “Not after the first
few days. The Allied Air Forces
paralysed all movement. This
greatly delayed the concentration
of reserves there—they took three
or four times longer to reach the
front than we had reckoned.”

The word “we” did not include
Rommel, who was thus posthum-
ously proved correct in his diagno-
sis, if not in his proposed treat-

ment
. 7
Shot-Up
On July 17, 1944, the

Allied Air Force at last over-

took Rommel.

Captain Helmuth Lang, who
was in the car, gives the facts

“As he did every day,” writes
Captain Lang, “Marshal Rommel
made a tour of the front.

“All along the road we could see
transport in flames; from time t
time the enemy bombers forced us
to take to second class roads.

“About 6 p.m. the Marshal’s cai

was in the neighbourhood of
Livarot. Transport which had
just been attacked was piled up

along the road and Strong gre
of enemy dive-bombers were





at work. That is why we tu 1
off along a sheltered road. t om
the main road again two and a

half miles from Vimoutiers

‘ °
Car Hit

“When we reached it we saw
above Livarot about eight enemy
dive-bombers. We thought they
had not seen us, and continued
along the main road from Livarot
to Vimoutiers.

“Suddenly Sergeant Holke our
Spotter, warned us that two air-
craft were flying along the road
in our direction.

The driver, Daniel, was told
to put on speed and turn off on
to a little side road to the right
about 300 yards ahead of ;
which would give us some shelte:




“Before we could reach it, the
enemy aircraft, flying at great
speed only a few feet above the

Writers Strike

“NOT

By DON GILBERT
LONDO}

The Treasury is being reminded
by some of Britain’s leading
authors of Dr. Samuel John s
pronouncement 200 years ago tha’
“no man but a blockhead «
wrote for money,”

The writers are in ouc of t
periodic moods for protest a;
a taxation system which le
them little incentive to push their
earnings beyond a modest level!

As a result, a number of well-
known authors are rationing theit
output. They work for a few
months to ensure solvency in
household budget, then “hi -
nate” for the rest of the year

The current discussion of t

tion on literary earnings is
touched off by R. C. Sherriff
author of “Journey's End,”

of the best plays about the F
World War. Sherriff disclosed









VES! MY DE.

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ADVOCATE



wamel lying in state, Field-Marshal
oration. All the pageantry of Nazi-

rder of Hitler.

road, came up to within 500 yards
and the first one opened fire.

“Marshal Rommel was looking
back at the moment. The left-
hand side of the car was hit by
the first burst. A cannon-shell
shattered Daniel’s left shoulder
and left arm.

“Marshal Rommel was wound-
ed in the face by broken glass, and
received a blow on the left temple
and cheek-bone which caused a
triple fracture of the skull and
made him lose consciousness im-
mediately.

“Daniel, the driver, lost control.
The car struck the stump of a
tree, skidded across the road, and
turned over in a ditch.

“Marshal Rommel, who, at the
start of the attack, had hold of
the handle of the door, was thrown
out, unconscious, when the car
turned over, and lay stretched out
on the road about 20 yards behind

: Many Wounds

“A second aircraft flew over and
tried to drop bombs on those who
were lying on the ground.

“Marshal Rommel was carried
into shelter by Captain Lang and
Sergeary Holke. He lay on the
ground unconscious and covered
with blood, which flowed from the
many wounds on his face, particu-
arly from his left eye and mouth.

“Even when we had carried him
to safety he did not recover con-
c1ousness,

Captain Lang tried to

It took him about
arters of an hour.

°
Little Hope
Marshal Rommel had_ his
suunds dressed by a French
religious hospital,
They were ,very severe, and the
ctor said that there was little
1ope of saving his life,

‘Later he was taken, still un-

nscious, with Daniel to an air

ce hospital at Bernay.

The doctors there diagnosed
evere injuries to the skull — a
racture at the base, two fractures
on the temple, and the cheek-bone
destroyed, a wound in the left eye,
wounds from glass, and concus-
sion,

“A few days later Marshal Rom-
mel was taken to the hospital of
Professor Esch at Vasinet, near St.
Germain.”

And so he passed out of active
partucipation in the war, into the
political net and to death by
order of Hitler

THE END.
London Express Service,
[World copyright]

find a
three-

ctor in a

Against Taxes

BUBBLES"

turned
wood

down a
contract

lucrative
one that
have brought Britain a
wad of dollars—because
treasury wouldn’t play ball.

The playwright wanted the
British surtax on his earnings
waived. In return he would have
endowed some archaeological
work on a Roman site in Norfolk.
The government turned thumbs
iown and Sherriff stayed home.

Other authors chimed in that
they, too, would earn more dollars
t the surtax were not so heavy.
Said nor Nevil Shute:

Holly-

would

useful
the

aliot

About two-thiras of my in-
ome comes in dollars. I could
double my dollar income by work-

harder—but why? I cannot
set any benefit for myself or for
ny children by doing so,”

Shute said he had followed a
policy of rationed output for
years,

LN.S.





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TOVE is the First Word in
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ADING €0., LTD.

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The tests which consist of boiling samples under 100 Ib. per
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Ul always be True

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© sUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1950 SUNDAY











pia? y
4 W an to W
om oman - + « « by SUSAN DEACON
ae lla sO i. Le
Co 4
“4 A cotton dress for
beach d evenings
eR oe &
haps, but there is no mistaking
their meaning,
Lipstick tips

'7 is surprising how many
women who have been using
ipstick for years still do not
get a good shape and outline to
their lips,

Revion, in america, have com-
piled a lis€ of do’s and don’ts
for making up the mouth.
They say, wear deeper blue
reds under electric light, and
soft pink colours under blue-
white neon lighting.

DO’S.—1. Highest part of the
curve of upper lip should be
—_ under opening of

2. Lip line should extend to
corners of the mouth.

3. Lower lip line should be
brought up to a point slightly
inside corners of upper lip,

DON'TS.—1,. Don't make a
Cupid’s bow.

¢- Don’t exaggerate outer curve

. of upper lip.

Strapless heach Ownkey, Puage, Toast, ana 3+ Don't transfer lipstick from ,
dresses with well- Caramel--stockings in Morning tines 7 to lower’ by pressing
etn oun rive Mist, Whisper, and Honeymoon. ore
cotton prints Men's shirts were in Sahara (this Raking a fire
me ps9 mage flamorous turned out to be a muddy beige D O you know that. it is
4 @ practical of these (see colour) P 1a— : raat.
OMEN needing photographs) ie made in Wet nalne and Panama—a yellowy better to rake ‘out ‘a fire
cotton dresses this African print in dar’: mined v When it is hot as all the dust
year are to have colours. Down to earth cream distemper then flies up the chimney
: It has a slim, straight skirt and is called Sable, instead of into the room. . . .
the happy and unusual ‘strapless swathed Todiee. Danube, which I would have You should apply ne pen
experience of buying A brief bolero transforms this for thought had to be a shade of With a piece of old .
ue: *rath cocktails, and a separate ankle jaa f polish windows with a soft
what they like ‘rather jength skirt draped and swathed blue, is @ pale leaf green, cotton duster, and furniture
than what they can find. on one side turns it into a 4 true, clear pink is called with an old piece of silk.
Regardless of the weather, shops _,,,/0Vely evening dress. Cyclamen, Hot milk is good for leat
Teport that cotton dresses have Titis three-piece sells for approxi- Looking through a 1920 edition of fuente, ap 4 has becon
been selling well since mid- ™ately 9gns, the Sunday Express, I find that white ;And cracked. . » Soliahod
February. Bewilderin the new colours of the year surface can be removed. by
I have seen evening dresses in g were Pillar Box Onion rubbing cigar or cigarette ash
cambric, which looks like silk D9 we need to have these be Skin Yellow, Carrot » Nut- into the mark, or way
. . . Sophisticated dark cottons wildering names for colours ? meg Brown, and Lettuce Green. is to use a cloth a with
for town wear, and glamorous T am shown fabrics in Elephant, Not such glamorous names, per- sal volatile,
—IT IS EASTER im the
GE T UP: ADVERTISE in the
HY does it take most people i low note is sounded near a hive Ji,
about two hours to foal fully By CHAPMAN PINCHER it acts like a factory siren. The ads ocate
after waking up in the morn- a workers immediately pour out,
Why is the body’s grip on life DR. ELSIE WIDDOWSON. and scientists report.
kest in the small hours of the PROFESSQR ROBERT McCANCE = When the note is pitched higher
ht? Why does getting up from found that the blood’s ups and even the drones fly out excitedly,
k bed have a delayed-action downs are due entirely to changes and the queen may answer with
t, so that you feel groggiest a in the body’s position. It imme- g thin piping sound.
ble of hours iater? diately begins to weaken when hy ?
discovery which seems to you lie down, whether you go to Y it talon’
sweever these quest.ous has just sleep or not—which may explain i stants oa ee
b mad: by two Medteai Re~ Why I felt so dreadful after yester- 4f) Semen all their time to hold
h Cowich scientists w.uiking day’s lunch-hour doze in the sun. e nozzle of a hose, a reader asks.




se University.

ey have tound that your blood

Bmatical'y weakens when you

Hown. It gets more and more
ry during the ‘irst two rours

leep. Its power to supply the
with oxygen and nourish-
falls rapidly.

his may explain way the bogy’s
tance to illness slumps around

pur blood soon begins to recov-
s strength, but does not get
to normal until you have
up and about a couple of

you stay in bed, your blood
s about 48 hours to get back
ll strength. After that it
mes super-rich, probably
ting your ability to fight ill-

But as soon as you get up,
rength falls sharply, reaching
Owest level when you have
out of bed two hours or so.
er tests on hospital patients,

Pen Pals

ODFREY CORRY, 91 Garnett
pet Newton Kitty British

a. Is interested in stamp
ting, wants Pen Pals be-
m the ages of 13 and 14,

EST LIMERICK, 92 Laluni

» Queenstown, Georgetown,
Guiana, wants Pen Pals be-
m the ages of 15 and 17,



KILLS TICKS

SAKA, Northern Rhodesia
new machine which sprays a
of insecticide and kills ticks
attle will soon be put to use
orthern Rhodesia. The ma-
eliminates the need for dip-
and is said to be much more

ve,
—(C.P.)



Made roe ‘the Ginest,. coset o>
Ye Per moed Lunt obehe epee
NOITe ty the air,

DARECTIONS =.
‘kee tay and apply the Shama
Pa * Fh tether aed | Heatly

4 ieticaty
* ee

Trapped
THIS TRUE story—the most
* terrifying I have ever heard
—comes from Swiss strato-sphere-
balloonist AUGUSTE PICCARD.*

Three Russian scientists were
10 miles up in a balloon when
the cables holding their sealed
metal cabin snapped.
cabin’s fall checked slightly by a
parachute, the men had a few
minutes in which to bail out, But
there was only one escape hatch
—fastened by 24 bolts, And they
had only one spanner.

When the wreckage was dug
out of the earth rescuers found
that during the dreadful fall the
men had managed to get seven
nuts off. With a spanner apiece
they might just have made it.

Like a Siren
HONEY-BEES, believed by
* biologists to be deaf can
hear after all, it seems. When a

With the :

Answer ; Because the ‘water
streaming from the nozzle pro-
duces a jet-propulsion effect, driv-
ing the hose backwards just as the
jet of gas streaming from a Vam-
pire’s engine propels the plane.

Whe... ?
reyes have shown
that a chemival called gluta-
mic acid often improves intelli-
gence in mentally retarded chil-
dren, and may boost thinking pow-
ers in normal folk. Now scientists
report that the acid occurs natur-
ally in certain foodstuffs. Richest
sources? Mushrooms and peas
Their Problem
Se eee to U. S. diet
expert DR. ANCEL KEYS,
America is developing a__ serious
national nutrition problem
over-eating.
*Told in his book “Between Earth
And Sky” (Falcon Pressl5s).

| —L.E.S.



Rup

Py

Whe ts





ipert’s sharp eyes have seen a
wisp of smoke at the very top of
a pine tree and it makes him very
excited. ‘‘ Pine trees don’t smoke,”
he mutters, ‘* There’s only one
thing that can be causing that.
The young dragon must be up
there.” He runs across. and gazes

envy!) in others

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specially suitable for
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TS NEVER JUST LuUCK!

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7

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up into the

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and sure
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but tie little creature will not come
downy so Rupere climbs carefully
upwards. The dragon has stopped

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near his a et ae






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ADVOCATE

For Stamp
Collectors

(By JOHN CAMSELL)

FOREIGN stamps valued at
$7,000,000 will be shown at the
International Stamp | Exhibition
which will be held in’ London
during May.

The King, as President of the
| Royal Philatelic Society, has given
| permission for some: of -his price-

less collection to be exhibited and
/a large selection from his 48
| albums will be shown:
| Sir John Wilson, Chairman of
| the Exhibition, said of the King.
“He’s a keen collector, but he
| doesn’t know much about the old
stamps. The value of the Collec-
tion? If you said in’ a million
pounds I wouldn’t disagree. But
some of the stamps are valueless.”
The selections from the King’s
albums will include rare items
from both the original collection
formed by King George V and of
stamps issued during the present
| reign.
{

| Outstanding
Outstanding exhibits will be a
fine mint block of four of the
| Twopence “Post Paid” Mauritius
| (1848) containing the error
“Penoe”, the first “Lady McLeod”
; Stamp of Trinidad (1847) an
‘ original cover, and examples of



the two scarce “Postmaster’s
|stamps” of Hamilton, Bermuda
(1848).

Another rare item will be an
| envelope bearing the original one-
penny and 3 penny stamps of
Victoria, used on the first day of
| issue, January 10, 1850.

| Also included in the King’s
exhibits will be one of the surviv-
ing blocks of the St. Vincent, one
pound purple, issued for the
King’s Wedding Com-
memoration.

The King owns blocks of this
issue. The rest of the stamps dis-
appeared somewhere between the
printer and the colony.

Silver



Interesting
Apart from the value of the
| Royal collection it will be particu-
| larly interesting to collectors be-
| cause it contains artists’ sketches



|
|

| Submitted for the King’s approval.

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PAGE NINE






USED SN
TO WAKE |

FEELING

Stak





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One woman who can
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morning feeling aired? New
mor: .
| wake: feeling foll of onevey.
wake’ e 3
Kruschen has made me feel years
younwee. I - setered Bi
eumatic pains
fon swellings. ro away ankles.
Iam now comple o of
swe) . I take

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en ly and
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—

PAGE TEN

SITTING ON

Ky Nathaniel Gubbins

EING (probab the result of
spring.

The Editor i in conference

with his staff and some chorus
ome ond is rehearsing a little
number called “Sex for Circula-
tion.” ,
THE EDITOR:
If the circulation’s dropping
and the paper doesn’t sell
THE OTHERS:
What are we to do, sir, what are
we to do?
THE EDITOR:

What kind of hwmun stories do
you think we ought to tell?
THE OTHERS:

Something very nei, sir, some-

thing very new.
THE EDITOR:

That is where you're very
wrong, you're very wrong
indeed.

Something new is never what

the British public need.
The oldest story in the world is
all they want to read
ALL:
Sex For Circulation.

CHORUS:

Sex for circuianon, mm every social
station

The tempo of the nation, the
ghastly ghoulish nation;
You may give them pars on

of every kind
reader has a

politics and views
But as every littl

dirty little mind
If you want fo make the paper a

we think you'll always find
Sex For Circulation

THE EDITOR
The sort of
print are articles

THE OTHERS

thing we ought to

on beauty—

That's a new idea, sir, that’s a
new idea
THE EDITOR
But not the usual sort of stuff
—we'll make ther pretty
fruity.

THE OTHERS













We'll do it, never fear, sir; we'll UNCLE OOMS (taking a run was that Chelsea factory was de-
do it never fear ath Good luck, lad. prived of its chief raw materi
OLS OLSSEN (groaning): and was forced to cease produc-
THE EDITOR Goo Cousin Bol tion
When telling women how to put BO! BOLSSEN (savagely) The exhibtion of painting
the powder on their nose Goo ck—good luck—good the Museum by Arnold Prince 1
And how to wash their k huct Garner Francis is to remal:
limbs in essences of r a ’ view for a further week, a
Print photograph of gorda Ol OLSSEN (half fainting) se on 15th April
girls i 7 t inoitt C700 every body
ALL: T ike a corberted rusi —-—
Sex For Circulatio hirn, bu e escapes into Pe car- j ‘i
“hort efor riage the train moves o Little
st of oo he een ee fron Certain
THE EDITOR f Uncle Ooms in e
Opinio: huprcl c Oor then kick B W ll
relation of f x B icks Old Ol uyers l
THE OTHERS A the stationmaster. A ;
That sounds pretty hot that etre¢ i“ d everybody i B At BIF
sounds pretty hot 4 te e :
THE EDITOR ?
And articles by expert ‘ i Rural conversation Russian buyers are among those
; a pre " ror behind the Iron Curtain
THE OTHERS iT! fol conversation took expected to attend this
That should sel! a lot it] place o the olde tide British Industries Fair béing he!
should sell a lot cotta bedroome windowée in London and Birmingham fr«
THE ED!'rorR First Rural Voice: They Mav 8 to 19
Police ts and assizes si be 1 eddles¢ Others are coming
be « bed for items sh ’ Second Rural Voice; Czecho-Slovakia. Rumania, Hun-
And tales of human follies tl at er be gary and Poland
will set the readers rocki +} «=First Rural Voice: Ar-1 They wil, join the thousands
A simple girl's vetraya! or a Second Rural Voice: Ar-: arrivin from all parts of ine
clergyman’s unfrocking + First Rural Voice: Ef ’er be wot world. Buyers from Hongkong
ALL: ; the , er be the er ain't no and Singapore are leaving soon
Sex For Circulatio a-gallivantin’ about like The tallest exhibit at the Fair
Lullaby ripstitch rantipole ~an 80ft. high pile-driver with
‘ Second Rural Voice: 4; ¢ that Sliding leaders and a_ six-ton
— - ; single-acting hammer, worked by |!
oes he United AeA steam—-is being moved into posi-
are becoming more intellige First Rural Voice: Ar-r, That tion shortly at Castle Br t
They don’t like bat talk hey % be Birmingham.
— 1 t ‘ Second Rural Voice: ‘Er’ id Stone Crusher
art ; buried fower j
e First Rural Voice: An’ ‘ert {] Other “heavies are tone
h of the jullabie m } Michaelmas. "Er be a pre- {crusher of 40 tons and a road-
f rewrttter per owdaci fioi-boi-noight ' making “factory” 90ft. long and
; 27ft. wide
eMart and 10 s.ond Rural Voice: That ‘er be A 15-ton mixing machine for
Child of the Wesfer : Third Rural Voice (with a note| the artificial silk industry has
Low, lov ecracks Di alit That ‘er be ilready arrived
Over the n er tea Who re? What ha 1e | These até included in the 000
Jokes that hould ney be done? Am 1 going mad? tons of engineering exhibit be
heard in the home London Express Service



Alka- seltzer brings pleasant relief

When over-indulgence in food and
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Watch it fizz and
a Sparkling, pleasant

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ot water



ee i ———

THE FENCE



Figures At"



Over the shivering tea cups .
ss The Museum
Tell them again to me— °
Ni y pretty one
Cracks a dirty one A PAIR of Chelsea-Derby

figures, which have been loaned
to the Museurn, will be on special
exhibition until’ 22nd. April. The
figures are dated 1780, and were
made during a period when some
exceedingly fine work was being
produced. The male musician,
with a dog at his side, plays the
bagpipes, and the femule figure,
with a lamb; plays the mandoline.
Both figures are seated with boc-
age backgrounds of delicate col-
ouring.

The Chelsea procelain factory
was founded in or about 1745, and
it employed very fine artists. The
factory was advertised for sale in
1764, but it did not find a pur-

Keep the best, keep the best
Father will come to thee soon—
Father will come to his babe in
the nest
To hear one of the pretty one’s
latest and best
Then s-l-e-e-p

What big ears you've got,
granny

“After applying a tape measure
to thousands Dr. Hrdlicka says
that the human nose gets longer
and broader, fhe ears get larger,
and the mouth wider as a person
grows older.”—From the News.

AY by day your mouth chaser until 1769. Josiah Wedge-
granny, grows and grows wood, the owner of the famous
and grows. factory of that name, was interest-

ed in the purchase of some of the
motilds, models, etc., but did not
wish to purchase the entire plant.
Eventually the Chelsea factory to-
gether with its models, moulds
and unfinished ware was pur-
chased by Mr. Duesbury of Derby,
who also owned the Derby Porce-
lain Works. Duesbury carried on

Day by day your ears expand and
bigger grows your nose.

But shovld you live two hundred

years my love will never tire—

When you're just a nose and a
pair of ears, flapping by the fire.

A Swede's farewell

“Captain Ahrenberg and his both factories simultaneously
friends drank a glass of beer, and until 1784 The period from
the captain, before leaving, was 1770-1784 is the Chelsea-Derby
subjected to a kick on the seat of period, when much excellent work
his trousers. This is the equivalent was produced.. In 1784 the works
ih Sweden of wishing a man good were discontinued, and whatever

was of use was transferred to
Derby.
The cause of the sudden end of

which

luck News Item.

PMNVMUE scene is a Swedish railway




station. Ols Olssen is going the Chelsea factory, pro-

to America and his family, wear- duced excellent ware and was
ing hobnailed boots, have come to highly patronised, was shortage of
see him off raw material. English merchant
OLS OLSSEN (nervously): vessels engaged in the tea trade
Good-bye, dad. with China were in the habit of
OLD OLS (lashing out with carrying clay as ballast on the re-
both feet): Good luck, lad turn journey. Eventually the
OLS OLSSEN (backing to- Chinese became suspicious, so
wards the train) Good-bye, great was the demand for « as
Uncle Ooms ballast, and prohibited the use of

clay for this purpose. The result




























Chelsea-Derby *%ew Books: ee

PORTRAIT OF A GENIUS, BUT

—

SUNDAY, APRIL 9, igg |

SUNDAY ADVOCATE
























Private Utopia of a Man * Seer
- THEODORA BENSGN, the JX
Who Was Denounced ees
For Immorality =~

Central. Et Canada and
America, Italy and France
PRATRIAL.—By Lavra Talbot

Macmillan, 9s. 6d. 236 pages.

rope,

Hy George Malcolm Thomson

another, situated in Cornwal:



By Richard Aldington. Heine- Italy, Fort Myers in Florida, o1 EMILY, a highly-strung wo- :
mann 15s. 367 pages. the Andes, according to'the enthu- man, married to William, a land- |
iasm of the moment. owner suffering from neuralgia,
D. H. LAWRENCE was at The nearest that Rananim commits adultery with Hayton,;
English Dissenting working man, came .o realisation was om: one of her husband's tenants, the
with a great deal of the Puritan- night in the Cafe Royal when six acrid emanations from whose If your hair
ism and prejudice of his kind mut of Lawrence’s seven guests strong, healthy body are pungent :

Nobody























would pretend as the autumn itself i is coming out

he agreed to sail with him to New

































was a typical product Mexico This idea was borrowed by remember
gregational chapel an Only one of the dinner party Lawrence from Wells, by Wells| j yy
village W to New Mexico. When she from Strindberg, and by Strind- on Y

But nobody, read arrived, she went about with « berg from — But to return t ‘
Aldington’s pert read- knife to defend herself. Emily. She has a daughter by Si = =
able biography, will fail ) Hayton, which is a bitter blow | 1 Vil rin
recognise how much The importance of Lawrence to William who was willing t
Original environment the authr: I time did not, of course, overlook her lapse if she woul
of Lady Chatterley’s Lover car- in his social vapourings. Hesproduce a son whom he could DOES GROW HAIR
ried with him through life. i brilliant eye. He could make his heir

; d , convey that there was more in a As things turn out, there Use Pure Silvikrin in severe cases of dandruff and f

He hated womet who painted § scer or a situation than the nothing for William to do but ss han ative, a y
their faces nated xual ost brilliant eye could perceive. go on having neuralgia and for thinning hair. As a daily restorative dressing use
promiscuity, hated bul *» He was a Magician and a mystic. Emily, who has been toying with} Silvikrin Hair Tonic Lotion containing Pure Silvikrin, qe
hated foreigners ounce He believed that the 1914—-13 the idea of madness from Pz Hair’s Natural Food. From all chemists, hairdressers
the English), he potterir var had brought a whole work: 27 onwards, to depart with Dr «ae
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felt English, and, like all th ergs wanted peace and love It only snows that, if you
English, wanted to remake th And what was to replace these something enough, you will
world. to a new pattern ef h ead ideals? surely achieve it. Nobody, in all}}
own devising. fiction, worked so hard as Emily }}

: The answer was confused, to get herself certified |

How 1 pical, that he, often self-contradictory. In mak D Grunbaum does not kee} our r 2
Bertrand Russell, wa ntent in j; Lawrence ran into a Emily very long. Pity, it way !
1915 on a complete social recon storm: was denounced for im- *
struction of the world. The morality. It hurt. “I am not vers Library List Skilled Staff and Modern Fyuipment
collaboration took the form Of mych moved,” he said,. when P ee 5

Lawrence

|

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a

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The Marines Were There.



FOR
























Bae Rainbow to be destroyed, “I only Robert Bruce Lockhart Putn
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ere : root, braneh and leaf, to eterni ; nest exploits, recorded @ SPEEDY and EXPERT REPAIRS
“3 : 5 camnation . vith zest, admiration and a gift
ne whole — The record of a self-torment: ‘ narration. During @® MAINTENANCE ;
Fon weare a life; of its loves and hat the w the Marines ose in/ s
oug I erie’ almost synonymous); of a cot tre om 12,000 to 80,000; @ SPARE PARTS
ersua iptive of genius who frett kept he evacuating de stroyers |
hat e, and wandered to death; whos ting 20 minute Norwe @® TYRE SERVICE
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‘For man, the vast marvel ener hands”: provided { '
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Co RICHARD auwvINGTON Remy 8 CANOE: ED oe eee es
group novelist, poet, essayist, translator Re ee eee ee Ee
mile hal $ rved in the Guards im th oD, Fe AMONG a0 t off
tier 1914-18 war. Since then he has One Omen, M. Woodhouse
ent his time in writing, chief Hutchinson 9s. 6d. 208 pages
SUNDAY HAIRCUT he South. of Prance tories, half-fiction, busi
THE MAN FROM THE TUNNEL picture of the Greel
HAMBROOK, Somerset By Theodora Benson. Gollancz. spre ee! os ath Do ee:
10s. Gd. 271 pages. Fae goons Alm
' Ree ge NINETEEN stories. Nineteen, >°¥ oe ee ae
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rlorse ern here not only ord tory. Thaf is the trouble wit ees ee, ota ae, Oe
ies eet lar pint t arc this book. pi
wer ‘ca oe get ae ' va It is easy enough to say of Faster! Faster! Patrick Bair =O ) |
a liga: = — ‘3 o ; How clever! Whdt an expe Eyre Spottiswoode. 9s. 6d
: vern I uch! What a command 226 pag In tern of fierce b
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rt of story you will like nereasing speed Bair paints
Bail Which’ makes it all the more society, its class divisions, _ its ECKSTEIN BR
ae eke using rrently nportant to remark that Miss upheavals and the tendency,
> o 710 countrie Benson has written some délight- exhibite y é volts against :
Site preparations fe rt London ful stories For instance, Thy SAE Whedon’ tc. counts ~ et BAY STREET.
sections of the Fair—which iS Lion and the Prey, with tructure, equally unjust. Tract] :
being held av Olympia and Earls funny, despairing glimpse of for the times, disguised as adven-|
Court—-are beginning this week Veronica. who, one feels, is a nice ture story, . x od Phone: 4667 W/Shop ven
rea —L.ES. even when drunk, and mad! London Express Service





























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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

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BY CARL ANDERSON

PAGE ELEVEN







j 1 | aE
WARNING /












WARNING: /
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MUST WEAR MUST WEAR

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MICKEY MOUS

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WHAT DID TI












@ “Where the Dead ~A ELSE SAY 2
ON: NOW THAT Se ee Still live and COULD |T
FRE MEAN? WAX '
SAID A FIGURES INA
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"BUT WHAT
ABOUT





THE GUN WE LEFT FOR RHINO
WAS LOADED WITH BLANKS!

s





PLAN WORKED, MARSHAL RIGHT!

INO IS ESCAPING WITH
Oy a







You, too, can get
to the Top

WITH OUR HELP
—by POST










BY GEORGE MC MANUS Don't be content to stay among the crowd—-
pe : RISE to the topmost, best-paid appointments
| by your own efforts. The Bennett College will
piesa | | train you to get to the top, by costal tuition in
( piainitininsiniaainiine ee eee your spare time—just as thousands of others
WHY OON'T HAND ME THAT | ( \}] [| WHY DIDN'T you Mas
Suen | TeLemwone | || | Odewuy-ge-HeLioy ||| | ANswaR THat | Ms io tes, lies Seer ses renee SIMPLY
1 "LL ANSWER IT. . || INE? P YOU } -tHts . . ’ e ege —
THAT PHONE? AN IF IT'S ANY OF || YES Ou--yES- | KNOW I DeTESsT | ules which gives PERSONAL tuition to each // CHOOSE
P ) YOUR LOW-BROW | I THINK SO --- || | THAT WOMAN // | individual student, and you just cannot
|| sbi iia

@ a) FRIENDS -/’LL | 1] nee

ek: aie ieetace fail to make good. Distance makes no /; a7 YOUR
‘ Os) difference. / ne / CAREER
PM WHATEVER YOUR GOAL—WE [4 // ssuosttth sens

Building, Carpontry &

WILL TRAIN YOU FOR IT /; / ieee: Comma

z he} 7 clal Art, Draughtsman

Let us advise you NOW. Write to-day - / / shio, Engineering. 6.P.0.

tellirg us the work in which you are Fag. Dest. Journallem,

intetested. We shall be glad to give Plesties. 0 euliy. ton

| / » Quantity Sur

you full and free information of how /¢ 7 / veying, Secretarial Exams.,

The Bennett College can train you / t // Shorthand (Pitmaans),
at home to reach the top ranks in a / rey Felevision.

very short time and at very 1 LLM reat requirements

smal! cost,







KIRBY
Y” LOOK! THE VE —

are not listed above,
write us for free advice.

Direct Mail to DEPT. 188 -—_—

THE BENNETT COLLEGE LTD.

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND









I'M WORRIED ABOUT ONE OF THE] (Te
MAN AT ‘THE ¢ 1) LADIES, SIR... SH.) WEN T //
SIDE ENTRANCE... pi
(d «
a

ASK HIM! ae













AND IT’S SNOWING HARDER!

ie







—











R
A WALK AND HASNT CONE BACK..|



MAKE
YOUR
HOME
MODERN
FROM EVERY
ANGLE !!



|
(





In the Modern House an attractive Bathroom is an

essential feature, and to get this you need the nicest





THAT~PHANTOM + DESERTED MY



WAITA MINUTE TYDORE?






aie Nf DAUGHTER «BROKE HER HEART 4 | | WHAT Fittings :—
PPEDINTOTHE JUNGLE, W SHAT ILL FIND HiM« (LL TEAR, UTT ne hee .
aT D TAKE SIX ARMIES” WHAT WE HIM APART+ Let us show you or new stock of 5






OFIND HiM_ ~-——— FIGURED,
ee

MIGHNESS @ Pedestal Basins
@ Bath Curtain Rails

@ Bath Roses

@ Tooth Brush Holders



@ Shaving Mirrors
@ Glass Shelves

@ Towel Rails

@ Toilet Paper Holders '

= | PLANTATIONS LIMITED













DOMESTIC : COMME RCIAL
WIRING INSTALLATIONS





| AT THE MOST COMPETITIVE PRICES

: INDUSTRIAL





ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LTD.

TWEEDSIDE ROAD, — ST, MICHAEL

— Phones 4629, 4271.



» | Mi”
iZ

f
Now's the time for this young
man to learn the safe, gentle
way to Inner Cleanliness! A glass
of sparkling “‘fizzy” Andrews is
a delightfully refreshing drink,
More important still, however,
it ensures everyday good health
by cleaning the mouth, settling
the stomach and toning up the
liver, Finally, Andrews gently
clears the bowels.
Ju ¢ a teaspoonful in a glass of
cald water and here’s an excit-
ing, sparkling ¢rink — here's
the way to inner Cleanliness !

ANDREWS uver'sait

THE SIDEAL’ FORM. OF LAXATIVE








A

| CLASSIFIED ADS. |" """_| H ARBOUR, LOG | SHIFE ING NOTICES [| tara ta

| Ageney
= HOUSES in Carlisle Hay eet.
m wewonue =| PUBLIC NOTICES | 02s 2.0 os eye | ror spe Se ht erste Se Canadian National Steamships }

Telephone rh Lg.
24.50.—~a | aia a Henn etta, Sch. Everdene, CMV. Weils, from St. Kitts. Age
Led

PAGE TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE

























































































































*&



DaCosta % } er

























ae. ae Sch. Bive Nose Mac, Sch. Manuata, Co 1 er {
We atten stand Detide row erave, Sccies seco ee ener D’Ortac, Sch Zita Wonita, Sch S'S. “Stuyvesant.” 2.541 tons net Capt a ig FOR
‘ rs . ete | a C. Gorrion, Sch. Burma D., Sch. Molenaar, ftom midad. Agents: es : ails Ar ils | FURNTS
; And@ think we hear those loving words “© £25 tasily earned by obtaining orders from the Ist ef May, 1830. For further |... ul Counsellor, Sch. Frances W. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd. Salls B.. is = ao Barbados Barbador |B) cy for prvigtbe |
eee set Se eee for private Christmes Cards trom { Daf tubers, Dial S177. sy. | Smith, Seb. W. L. Bunizia. SOUTHBOUND Monire Halitax | adult only; every
; To dwell with him forever more. 9.4.50. ARRIVALS DEPARYURES | fence, cool well furans
The Garner Family. your friends. No previous experience | - me. SS. “Akoa Filgrin,” 3.931 tons net, M.V.*“Lady Joy,” 46 tons net, Capt i aie: Sth Apr | . uuraished
e burch ‘Village, pecusmar?. Write today for besutitei free = eee enien se wee | Capt. Haagensen, . Trinided. Agents: Parsons, for St Lucia. Agent: D. L.| LADY RODNEY 23rd
: ee Sample Book to Britain's largest ang, Cosst, Excelie:it sca bething Fully fur-) poco & Co. L Johnson Esq. LADY NELSON

. : . = = 26th 27th Ma Cottage on-sea, two ph
‘ ¢4.50—In. | #"etsest Publishers; highest commission,| “ished: four bedrooms, Refrigersios





'
|
oe ae | ST. JAMES COAST _





























: }
Schooner “Alcoa Roamer,” 4233 tons SS. “Stuyvesant,” 2,541 toms net, Cap- | LADY RODNEY 14 Jaa tse } modern conveniences
*Y . marvellous money making opportunity. telephone, radio. Apply opposite ont *t. Capt. Pedersen, from Aruba. Agents: tain Molenaar, for Plymouth. Agents: | LADY NELSON mae i Jat | otherwise to an apy
hi grat memo: 4 my! Jones, Williams & ® Victorias | Phome 6286. - 3 Robert Thom Ltd S. P. Musson, Son & Co., Lid. LADY RODNEY oe me WANTED {for two B
-- afi ectened aod aeren DELLE Works, Preston, Co., oe i 9.450.—tin. Schooner “Lucille M. Smith,” 74 tons M.V. “Daerwood.” 94 tons net, Capt bungalow of house
oe) —_ inode this life on Good } net. Capt. Sealy rom British Guiana. DeCouteau, for St. Lucia. Agents: Schoon- Arrives Arrives rooms modern am
7 me ea | KILDARE—Eediord Avenue, St. Mi-! Agents: Robert Thom Lid. et Owners’ Association. J Hulifax Monitre: residential —_
‘oft a a } NOTICE |chael. 2 minutes, Yacht Ciub, well fur- : NORTHEOUND = Barbados ohn Hulifa res reldentie: core
Re eee cena ished bungacw, drawing room. dine) JN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION LADY RODNEY oh Apr. aed Mt er
ae The one whom I loved PARISH OF ST. ANDREW | eee ratrineconer. catace "a be let fot} Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd. Loide Sso Damingos, Alcoa Pegasus. | LADY NELSON 6th Mas ee ee ee ee FOR §
Was called away in Peace. Applications for the yacant post of| 7 inontns after ist May. Telephone 4631.| @¢vise that they can now communicate North Haven, South Mountain, Boskoop, | LADY RODNEY Sth Ju: Wi duce §=——— Bef dun, 3a du
: Gone but not vase ened by organist at St. Saviours will be received $450-—-1n | with the following ships through their Me De Noir, Moutier, Siren/L.C.A.Q. Meg-}| LADY NELSON 2th June 2, 4. se i ¥ — os Fe ae BLACKMAN’S, st.
t ee yee ART a > by the undersigned up to Saturday 15th Barbados Coast Station :— na, Lydia, Winston Churchill, Herdsman, | LADY RODNEY 27th nh Ju ‘ 2 ir house ‘built about

Capt. John D. P. Ampac, California,





in about 5 acres 1
room, dining room,
room, 6 rooms, 2”
| garden, orchard, water, §
telephone.

PINE HOUSE, st,

}
April. Further particulars may be had s
; Gon taken 3 tae ie Flagship Sinco, SS. Alcoa Pilgrim, Robert C. Tuttle, Rio Orinoco, Spurt All vessels fitted with cold storage cha:
drawing Rooms. Apply, Mrs. A. Rudder, Grenanger, Helena/P.E.P.T., Anna LM.O.Z., California/H.P.N.T., Seabreeze, | N.B.—Subject to change without notice. Al! vessels fitted wi id st
Vestry > . - ‘1 L. Condylis. San Wilfrido, San Vulfrano, Mormac Tide, Clan Macleod, Merestor. bers. Passenger Fares and freight rates on application to :—







St. Andrew. | Dia! 3186. $450—1n.| Texia/O.ZHX., Tista, Casablanca, Misr, Kvint, Balaklava/S.H.A.T., Salinas/Y.V.B }
|

and brother ALAN EAST Canadian Challenge: Hel . Geisha, Fagerije — e
Rt Dial] Esso Pittsburgh, Brazil, ‘Meee Pennant, 2 ea pois GARDINER AUSTIN & CcO., LTD. Agents

»
a
* ERN CYRUS, who lost his life in Colon,
: RP... on April 10th, 1946

“LEOPOLDVILLE”, Hastings.



2616 or 3934. 450—2nr



ia to be remembered by your Dear











|
|
|
Stone house standing in















































































































































































































































































































































a6 or oe ae } ee
eS vas mace FARAWAY", St. Philip Const. Pulls Seawell ' ; dining room, 4 bedrowe
: Corts and the rest of the family PARISH OF ST. PETER. shed, 3 3 servants rocens outbuildings, water, eh
q 9.4.50.—In./ ‘The Parochial Treasurer's Office will be} c@™park, ene peat eee: an ARRIVALS—By B.W.LA.L. Windy Spradiin. Tanya Roberts, Susan AT YOUR SERVICE telephone. inspection by
| open on the following days as from| Bething beach. From May ist. Dia! From TRINIDAD: Harold Pogson, Syl- Roberts, Ana DeCastro, Maria E. DeCas- ce iy ment only,
3 teen April Lith to May 2nd. via Field, Angela Field, Rufus Field, An- tro, Samuel Beam, Margaret De Bean, IN CLE ANING, DYEING, | Anata "
i” Saturday April 15th from 10 am. to| APARTMENT: Unfurnished Ground-| tonio Navarro, Eddie Texiera, Jean Sealy, Elizabeth Jean Lund, Mary E. LAUNDERING AND HAT i E Guest ¥
In ever loving memory of our foe i een | fear apartment, near town and Club | Michal Sealy, Hilda Skinner, Irving Skin. Wedderburn, William Musgrave. ; DRESSING 4 iy) thing. _ Furnished
. re et ae an Saturday April 22nd from 10 a.m. to| {No Pets, no Children). For further par-| ner, Walter Keefe. Catherine Keefe, John From ADA: Fred Toppin, Joyce RAYMOND JORDAN. en Sn Sq.
TA — departed this life on! so) hoon ticulars Daal 2686 io eal a aera Sone, Rentick, Sealy, Arnci- Johnso: Tudor, Ignatious MecWeen | Bay Street, Opp. Combermere St. | bedrooms, *. a
by “Phey marked the footsteps that He trod] ,.Sstusdey. April 2&h from 10 am, to —| Helmut Kasiske. Nicholas ‘Robins, view 4 ANTIGUA: Cicely Grant, Christo- mabey cyt aNc.) : ] water, electricity,
His 2ea) inspired ae ae Signed, “NEW HAVEN”, Crane Coast fully fur-| toria Robinson. Donald Opperman, Peggy pher MeConpey. Consignees. { : | ages, garden.
* And cma Ha Lect — God G. S. CORBIN, praerey 3 er ee rooms | Dalton, Nei! Mackenzie, Elsie Lumsden, TEL. «4 { | _ ROSLYN. 8th Ave,
: Possess the prom) Parochial Treasurer, doub @arage, lighting plant, woter] Arturo DeLima, John Adamson, John J : = j j Woode hy di
Elton and Gwen Moore, Reg Fonte = St. Peter.| mill, Superb bathing beach. Dial 447§] Adamson, Josn Simmers, Mary Campbelj, URES—By T.C.A. PROFESSIONAL NOTICE \ j ae closed verandape
“2 children, Margot, Bever 7 Florette alia November, December. John Campbell, Jane Macintosh, Robert For PoROnto. James Clancy, Eliza- } i { | Ms acre land, water,
Ptiny Ronald igrand children), Emeline or 19.3.50—t.f.m} MacIntosh, Carmen Johnson, Rupert beth C , Vilda Woodroffe, Worthing- ; DR. C. Mc CONNEY a! Ww :
‘ caaet) 9.4.50—In. NOTICE ee - : noni Cheeks. John Robinson, Dorothy Robin- ton mie erie Hughes, Harley Hughes, | Chirepracter | ing rasan es ean von te
“SEA SEEN’ —Hastings m isti«con. Max ungarten, Ruzia Baungarten, Mabel . Geo fC r ty, |
1 ——————" | TENDERS for removing and replacing} May. Apply: Mrs. Marion Gibbs. Dis!| Pedro Baungarten, Roderick Stewart, Archie aad Kathe Grier” Maney, Per Office re-opens on | Dover, Christ Ch
ie the Ceiling of St. Philip's Parish Church, | 4568. 1.4.50—4n.| May Stewart, Bertie McLean, John kins, Hamilton Gardiner, Audrey Pape, TUESDAY, llth APRIL |@| Philip and in the City,
FOR SALE | will be received by me up to 30th April, - se — | Stanley, Anthony Corrie, Charlies Peirce, David Pape, Goldie Smith, Ann Cording- } Ee aa ) a | et
1950. pete sn ee Cia —_ — A aoe Blanc, John ly, Ethel Groves, John Kestle, Florence | ————— SO ——~ : poco | a cn:
fh a ~. U GOCEERG, pow segue ickeker” Fiicidaire. | ticles Fane ene ee weyin Siene, Eustle, Sianler Sepien, Panes Seater SSS SSS im
Parochial Treasurer, Mitchen, c. complete igidair Helen King, Mary Kernahan, Yvonne Al- For BERMUDA: William Atkinson, } eee wh) |
‘ AUTOMOTIVE St. Philip’s.| 8%2 miles from Bridgetc iadin, Valerie Chimasing, George Jack- Gweneth Atkinson, Ulrick Brandtzaeg, : : a
; 7.4.50.—6n.| lovely St. James Beach. m vine Drakes, Avril Rawlins, Regi- Frances Ince, Claude Gausden, Madelaine VISITORS TO OUR ISLAND REAL EST, ik
1 rd 8 HP. 187. Recently J. A. Reid, Lone Star Gar in, John Bergendahl, Lovely Gausden, Edward Love, Betty Love, An-! fares . ia ee 9 ft |
aa punters 2S ali Ring QUEEN'S COL I EGE fast,.St. James or Phone 91 Harold Kaplan, Patrick nette Greer, Thomas Bamford. Aileen WHY HA VE BAGGAGE w ORRY < '
. Gm, ber wendand Spm From LA GUAIRA, Gervase D Sprad Bfor PRINIDAD. Winitred Watson. You can leave your Baggage with us for despatch by our | DIX
a % ym Lé : tvase D. Jo ‘or inifred Watson, Her- ave you gage wilt! s f :
1 94s0—2n.}| ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS } BLUE HOUSE-—1ucas Street. A de-| tin, Nell Spradlin, Tamara Spradlin, bert Watson. ar service. You can be assured of its safety.
| sirable business stand. With or with =
' CAR—One Morris 8 H.P. Sedan in Al 1950 fixtures and furniture. Contact un Remember ! , e c }
y 0 ay nang gag L. Al Eel any 1 a es ene for ~ ree en , Prince wi r GO RN N I WE GIVE PERSONALIZED SERV ICE | AND
yet ir a mr ueen's college wil he in reet. 66. 31.3 7 VE MENT OT cES }
November, 1950, for candidates who eas en nt ee ee = y YY T
’ ie edieans ana Vanguard Cor 4 tr| pes nore ones ian "7. se prams ie tin stab! - SMITHS SHIPPING SERV ICE | |
1 . mileage uncer 3. years on Sist ¥. , and who an e Suitabi x ss
‘ aver veaving Barbados , a wit pot be ever 12 years of age on | fon fees or ee oe , ATTENTION is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) 4 WARDERS if (JOHN M. E
1 Phone: ndso st July, immed: ? « 7 & | BLADC
¢ Hoe, = . 6.4 50—3n 2. Candidates from this Examination] Swan Street. 31 .3.50—+.f.n (Amendment) Order, 1950, No. 14 which will be published in the MOVERS — PACKERS — & FREIGHT FOR | : re
t will be admitted as vacancies occur ms fficial Gazette of Thursday 6th April, 1950. Alexander House, if
1947 Ford Anglia in really good (i) in January, 1951 BUNGALOW, also Fiat, facing sea m ‘ . a FOR SALE
‘ eahattion $750.00 Dial 2592 (ii) in Septic, 1951 road, Hastings, furnished from M 2. en this Order the maximum wholesale and retail ve ide Street, if
shi , t nes, rey ee m| weil known and lux
. BEDFORD TRUCK—2-3 ton with cab ‘ phone 2949. $1.3.90-—-t.? : ehene - are eeeree Ss; Se = | in lovely surroundings,
j pirtenr Dial 4616. BARBA ARTICLE WHOLESALE Ons pease a ee : =e i
(New). Courtesy Garage, Dial #16. BADOS CLERKS’ UNION “OFFICE One Qfice ones _ Seni 00 em os Pace — — — . > ee a ;
A General Meet will be held at the unary é \ | Delightful stone seaside
CAR—Ford V-8. Well kept and —— ae on 13th i ts r Sa y : $2.7 omanarete a ra i Sahensé Your BEAUTY | overlooking ocean.
7 condition. Always owner driven ew ou are spec ed t nd ~farcoal es ° -75 per bag of 110 i : h h |
: es aan ‘Sa win horns.) Come and make your suggestions and _ with these | STANMORE LODGE,
; (M. 17 Apply N. Niles or Dial 3213 or| take part in the r roceedi nes lbs. ex ship $2 95 per | A A R chael (near Paradise B
some, Taal at Belle Gu Fe Road Peat eee. hag of 110 lbs. ex ? M XF CTO Products | Large 2 storey residences
or James Street 5o—: t ret 7
. sail 9.4.50- | store. 4c. per Ib. { Face Powder Brushes, | acres. fe
: ; =ane & —— — sece ma. -_ \ Max Factor make up Blend PLEASANT HALL, St
hand ply é na i h April, 1950 Almond Crea Beautiful old Estate hous)
: Roebu - Str | 7 ‘ . at 7 Pe £ 2 _ 44% acres,
| PUBLIC SALES Votice:—-The above change in price has been necessitated by the in- ” + amp ey ee ” ;
creased Cost of Charcos iii » » Astrigent Fe | HOUSE & GENERAL SN
, ELECTRICAL ost of Charcoal from British Guiana. : “si | Matthias Gap. A 2 stam
FRIDGE—English Elect Fridge, as| AUCTION 7.4,50.—2n. Pan Cake | erty and profitable busing]
new. Ring 4123 ,between 4 and 5 5 | TRELAWNY &
9.4.50—2n 1 HAVE been instructed by the receiver | ne
ot: Wasdhe to cher Sere te Oat JOIN THE BARBAD | Hastings Road, | A bunealag
WASHING MACHINE — New unused] Sue yon eee aay i day fA sie 08 POLIOE FORCE { | eae house, May bed
General Electric ! mpacky. (Seriuing | St © ees Se 2) fans. PEnSee CanAS | Lt samils. soust b > Anat An interesting car i
Beeminin tor $180.0 wig Soles 6 Bee: eee, pin Bg | Box 88 70 Advocate ¢ 1450-1 & career with good prospects | THE MOORINGS
jee Lid in > OS ec OF > is Y 7 7 | > je
i alr eriacieentmeniinenenaeemninnegterne | Whar te Copper tastene’ anh bas to} em 1. Men of character and education are required for enlistment Lim Gene. Wall Bnown 3
i WASHIN MA Canadian’ @ Marine engine. Terms cash j OK—A wood ¢ nce n this Force i | Seen Yee any
| Electric, irreplacs 9 Cash D'ARCY A. SCOTT, Salary good and sleeping a * ‘a \ r ous 1@i| FRIENDLY HAL
Thesy Ga sge. Dial 4616 : ee Gov. Auctioneer Apply Mrs. H.W Spla I 2. The pay of a constable on joining is $52.00 a month rising by } | J alues A& Oualities at the | One of the larger LL,
6450—3 5.8.8 7 Sass Ot Supeee s on a in l increments of $48.00 to 0 } a beautiful position overs
: . = , nail | | 1 2 ee $80.00 per month, plus $2.00 a month BRO ADW AY Ae eee
: LIGHTING P! Climax 273 KVA-| UNDER THE SILVER < pan wth othe. tan allowance. After 4 years service he is eligible for a marriage £ é )
HA ER & P visi an Roeb s . allow an e to a maximum of $7.20 per month. The minimum pay of ) PLASTIO RAINCOATS with Hoods at S2.10 & $4.03 (a bargain) }j eet ne iad nea
MM eal ats “ jad ve eee eee 4) Non Commissioned Ranks is, Cor poral $80.00, Sergeant $92.00, Station { oO Fe : 3 : ‘ } able for flat conversion,
1 LIGHTING PLANT—One D< Lister ante woes [se or 1 jer ‘ os nt $100.00. Promotion t. ad 4 th } PLASTIC BAGS in latest styles Black, Brown, White etc. from $3.95 to $4.95 {Ki ‘
4 , yr Light > 1 KW. 110 : Gweet's 3 i ARTY Figs FOX 4 4 4 sergeant ( omotion is made on merit, an lepends on the } ; “
+% Volts. Petrol crive i ok Wl amuse tense Weaione to Che s) : fant Mist ; the Cl nan There is opportunity for promotion to the Inspectorate and to | PLASTIC CHILDREN'S BAGS $1.92 cach in White, Black and Red | ane Dusaatw oith © aan
* kson, Belvedere Plantation, St. Peter | 901 ne . ‘| : ma : ‘ / } .
— 44.50—3n “BRANKER eeOnMAN & 06 Foundation § fror ymmissioned Rank. ) CHILDREN’S CLARKE SHOES in White, Brown from 3% to 74% iat Sone eee
: cones t + eeetnienen | dle oe 3. Requirements for enlistment )} CHILDREN'S ANKLETS in White, Brown & Pink sizes 5—® 86e., 400 | Well beult sone Cann
9.4.50.—In apy ed 6 rding % PN ee cee ck yr oee cs oe ee a : 5 ft. 8 ins. { i | position
qualifica a expe c i >
st aati . \pplications sb t Chest 34 ins. , ce . 5) i aa
: HARRIER PUPPIES Re inder of } » . " k . . Pam ced ole oben ec Renee i W / » ( } RESIDENCE, Brighton
‘ Vitter at reduced price. Pt ne Sr. ihe Binanater ter ian Shes Education . «inde « eeniolhe Not less than Standard VII BROAD AY DRESS SHOP. i | Michael. Well. placed @ im
: “ UNDER THE SILVER | 42 a a | Se 4. Applicants will be seen at District “A” at the following | ===> ao Ny] | with upto 4 ccmes if
: eee mere laek HAMMER Sec. to Gov. Body imes: — 3 iff) .MAYNARDS, St. Pe
| Geeaten by OFC. in los aia mad Tuesday 18th April 10 am 21 ee te ae ee ae
: : Or 4 a f 3 t Oare 4 Hh. ! eres by arra:
, Plant, St. T A. Bond, we will sel! his furniture at No All persons who have sat t ior Cambridge or School N J e if) 7
} — — . a 4, Abergeidie Fiat, Dayrells Road, “artificat . “ite : - he ian c . 4 | LENOLEU! i CARPETS | BLACKMAN'’S, St. Jo
} _ MULE—One Island Mule. 1 which aa } MISCELLANEOUS Certificate Examination. Documents to support this must be produced. : oe | tate property with histore
to work ‘single. Canefield Plant, § : nd D Upr and re em Wednesday 19th April 10 a.m. \§ Sizes: 9 ft. by 744 ft. and 1014 ft. by 9 ft. | os: Beautiful locations |
homa 2 hairs, 6 « lorr cr * with 1 Pé NG GUESTS at v 4 . . :
: 3 5 : ns, Coffee and Ornament Tables, Flat| Leith Worthing on the se rT All other applicants who fulfil the requirements of paragraph | Also | ESTATE HOUSE, St
MECHANICAL Tow Des China Cabts et all mahog-| res sonable 2.4.50—5n. 73 above. | 18 Near Colony Club,’ Optond
: seca any; lassware, Rugs Wr _Painted| ——. . - - } , y 7 | 25 acres.
1.4 SiCTCLES iceeules & Prittipe. tow-| Beck, Mhelvge. Wall “Mirtors, Verandah | “PAYING GUESTS — Working gent (Sgd.) R. T. MICHELIN, LINGLEUM IN ROLLS 6ft. wide | WEMBLEY, Navy
est prices. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4391. | Lamps,Pine and other Tables, Duchesse e, Hastings, Comfortable cool room Commissioner of Police. All very reasonable in Price 2 storey house with sai
; 6.450—3n Dressing Fable, Beds ac Table in m 108 | with running water. Phone 3390 Police Headquarters, P ; | den. Very moderate prich
i any; Ge immor ingle gs anc 945 : Rpae .
€ Fibre Mattresses; Divan Bedsteads and Bridgetown, i) LITTLE BATALLYS, St
L FURNITURE Deep en. Pattresses: Cra ile. iiss ‘ BILLIARD TABLE By The dc 6th April, 1950. “stablisheo l. HERBER | | {¢j Incorporated Charming re- A ot F
: q . © Burner Stove Regimer Officers’ Mes One Zz x . ‘ i i
; STEEL OFFICE FURNITURE—Filing| and Oven, Larder, Ironing Board, Kitchen] Billiard Table “Pleas e commu t 9.4.50.—3n, 86 1926 p: eevee. ini. ners wri
§ ab (4 drawer, letter foolscap | Utensils, Electric Hot Plate and Iron, Step| the Adjutant stating price 5.4. 5 10 & 11 Roebuck Street
, Locks), Stationery cupboards oe ewe pee eh Bicycle with new LEETON-ON-SEA,
i with Ic ete. Courtesy Garage, Dia)| Inner Tubes, Plants and other items THANK N J PANCE—Finding BEAESOBES FLAGS of Ot
1 391 é 64:50—Sn.| Sale 11.90 g'eleck — Terms Cash.| seit unatle to purchare, f remain ot the SELL LL LAIST ee ao end bangle -"
! c BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO, discretion of those that are in positior PART ONE ORDERS
: ————— to help 1 am greatly in need of an old ~ . SALISBURY, Gun Hill 0
Auctioneer. a : N a A Ng r lg : :
: | convey milk, HALDANE JOHN BY 7 H > ly ‘ the most attract
MISCELLANEOUS #.4.50.—2n.| SON, Higck Rocks St Michael oO fie Tk gullies ‘Biidel snk A Very Happy EASTER To All 3/B) ccc? 'iccttt™*ite, im
i | 4.56 I 4 t-LCOl. J. »V.DE., B.v., } * ({#| available with 8 acres, xi
; Over the holidays try a morning swim : | ; | duced in price for quick 4
t and Pimr with real lemonade, at REAL ESTATE — | “ Commanding, } Of Y ou { ; ra
5 Crane House Club S450-n. | “ir Bratege having @ecided to leave! TUITION The Barbados Regiment. | |, CARLDIEM, st aa
i UES— ne “| Melbourne House, Belmont Road, at the | Issue No. 14. 6 Apr. 50. } Wop . 1M ten ree oe
: GANTiQuzs- on Jewels, fine’ ever 30th April, the property, which stands SPEECH TRAINING—Do peak oe ee a ae ee eta i IS THE SINCERE WISH OF THE BLENDERS OF fect beach and bathing.
: Watercolours Early books, Maps, Auto- fen, Peet Done one 7 excellent condi-| weil, or is your accer idrar S] 1. PARADES—TRAINING | | INCH MARLOWE,
erabhe. ote. At Gorringns {ntique Shop. | ‘interested parties please dial 2480—| re heip you to overoome tt ; All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700 hours TAYLOR'S P I ' | | alow sth acre
adjoinin oye. ated - : ¥ ae — 29 ,- = Ss } galow wit 2 acres
1.9.49.—t..n, | Brittons Nursing Home 0.4.50—6r ple method. Moderate term Thursday 13 > ) I coastland.
1 er a iie-———| GIIGInd Lkeboie-Ginere i on Thursday 13 April ’50. ) stland.
VALOR STOVE PAKTS — Flame] “REST HAVEN", Brighton Beact y experienced teacher ar i Medal-}2. VOLUNTARY CLASSES ROUMAIKA, Navy
' Sirantae OW i Smal) home, all conveniences, near beact { the Guildhall Sctiool of Mus ada : r : NT" . STINCTIVE F TOT . ¥e-modaihel
4 f Rives, Galle a duaaae as pl and bus, low land rent. Inspection ‘neday | Moderate te ~ LEILA BOXILL. 2 NCOs who are attending the voluntary class on Tuesday 18 April (WITH THE DISTINCTIVE FLAVOL R) a a ee
i items, enquire Auto Tyre Co., Trafalgar) 4nd tomorrow or phone owner at 3188] Walpole Street, London S. W. 3. Tel are asked to read and learn Lesson 4 of the LMG Pamphlet. They THE REAL “FAMILY BLEND ; ¥
: St. Dial 2696 §450—t.i.n | Tuesday 9.4.80—1n, | Sloane 8674. Going to Lond Cut ou : 7 7 os Se , SUNNYSIDE (Near
Ae * - Facneney lee ee these Ads if you are, They_ mey > will be called upon to teach this lesson. | AOR | Treasury), St. Lay,
a AUTO ACCESSORIES—-Chamois leath- aluable property, wide ; : “13. ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDEBLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK * structed 3 years old
ot ers, dust cloths, cheese cloth, waxes,| ffontage, productive orchard \% acre of ber bungalow
Polishes, gas tank locking caps for Eng-| land, electric, water, going at a reason- ENDING 17 APRIL ’50. Joh D. Taylor & Ss, Ltd. for removal. ~
>t lish and American Cars and Trucks. | able price. Owner leaving colony soon Orderly Officer 2/Lt. S. G. Lashley ons | :
j Dial 4391, Courtesy Garage 6.4.50—3n eg Arnold Lowe, Bonnets, ‘Baen's rderty cer .. “ oa . , . » Las . ty | WINDY RIDGE, St 3
: 4.50—In. | Orderly Serjeant .. 16 Sjt. Storey, B. W. == of the most attrac
PIMs ind a morning swim at Crane} -> - — > : ‘ states | erties
‘ mit Seka + ee offer for sale Public Com- Next for Duty <<< So } oe a
petition at my office VICTORIA STREET arly Acer i nee ea eo” Hii acre: Te ‘
GALVANISE SHEETS tn 74 and @| ° Wednesday 12th at 2 p.m. i acre lan Orderly Officer .. a Lieut. P. L. C. Peterkin } } | acres. of. Inid. out
abt gauge St. 6ft. Gins. 8ft. and ott. penethe at PROMENADE ROAD, SPOONEPS Orderly Serjeant .. oe 209 Sjt. Long, C. B. } ia ied .
a fo | Bias aos sh See | | Vee
R/1 “38 in various does En use nding m double roofed bi : } ' a
‘s Auto — Company, Trafalgar Enquire house, with usual outoffices—painited— M. L. D. SKEWES COX, Major, |} Vel peeees oe oe if
' 1.3.50—t fn oe at ee of read a other S.0.L.F. & Adjutant, | : ;
GALVANISED PIPE. HERF)—Hialfinct | terms for sale apply to:— The Barbados Regiment. |) ° | ott GRARME AIS
. to Two-inch galvanised pipe. 26c¢. to $1.0 | Christ Church. m
‘ hae BARNES 2 CO, LTD R. ARCHER McKENZ: storey coral stone
: : 25.3.50—t f.n Victorig Street unusual design
2.4.50—In Offered at a very

. i figure.
CAMERA—Kodak Refiex 3.5 Anistigmat
; Lens, with flash gun attachment and “SUNSET VIEW"—Rockley. (Adjoin
yellow, dark yellow, green ond red.| ing BLUE WATSRS), on the land sid
Piters; and Weston exposure meter | Of the road faciny the Bay with 13,40
Price $350.00 or nearest offer. Telephone | square feet of land ineluding the lan
RS. Nicholls at 3925, between 10 a.m.| across the read running to the water's
and 4 p.m. 4.4.50—t.f.n | edge. The house contains verandah
hcceeilipaanrainmaanareninciaat oe ae dining rooms, three bed-
You'll regret not having your Pimms] fooms w ru water, and all othp
@ kitcben with

{
;
4

COLD SPRING 06
James, Well positi
| on coast with

A. M. WEBB

=
—
”
a
ip





Offering $96,000 TRINIDAD

GOVERNMENT 3% RETREAT, St.

stone property with 1
own beach. Open |







t Crane House Club. 6.4.50—3n. | offices inclu cupboards DEBENTURES
eee ee te Water, Electricity, and Radic as lle ada BEULAH, Hastings
installed. Garage and rvants rooms placed 3 bedroomed

in yard

PERSONAL pacer nt SY Or Shee WR. we.
4

The abeve will be set up to public
competition at the office of the under-
The public are hereby warned against signed on Friday, the 2ist of April, 1950,

low.

SILVER SPRAY,
Stone built 2 b .
bungalow facing sea.






155 Roebuck St., Bridgetown
Dial 3188. -:- Hours : 9-3




























wanted.
giving credit to my wife Eugene N | 94 2 P.m, Above is the Photograph of the
Bovell inee Yearwood) as 1 do not hold CARRINGTON & apALY, REV. A. R. BROME, approved and ap- |, oS BLUE VISTA,
myself responsible for her or anyone else m3 13n Uawas Btreet.| nointed by the Elders’'—Council as Col- = ly built imposing co
= any debt ao in 4 name x . lecting Officer to receive Subscriptions, SUGAR FA dence near Golf
unless by a written order signe me : Donations, Love-tokens 1d Gifts, § y,
Tijlancd W. E DOVER” | The undersigned will offer for sale by | Rye ee ee tant City CTORY MACHINERY



HILLCREST, Come
ly constructed pi
acres. Offers wanted,

Formerly Bank Hall, public competition at their office. James | Gog
=r or Michael, | Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the Ith =
9.4.50—In |4@y of April, 1960, at 2 p.m

1 The dwellinghouse called “RAD- |
COURT” standing on 8.436 square feet) INSURED MOVING!

of land at Navy Gardens, Christ Church

(Religious Assembl Barbados



FAIRHOL?*E, Maxwell 24
stone house with appl





(as a whole or piecemeal)

| FOR SALE













ee
















acre further §
& FO Bb es on application to the under H) ‘Crai ts et at Lah,
LOST UN ; signe: ) raign’ Estate, Princestown. Marine
2 The dwellinghouse called “SAN- i TRINIDAD. , Modena and teresa
x powr standing ‘on 10,500 square feet i IN OU with double
of land at Fontabelle, St. Michael. Ir { / ,
LOST ee on seaebieation te the i )) ALL TTEMa of MACHINERY in the Factory comprising, R ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT a
tween the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. / tt inter alia, Cane Hoist; Engine; | N Recently
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series rained For further particulars, apply to : (‘*) it Triple Effect; "Cc Svehaliboiess tte ne: Sule, Heater, W } aie anna houst,
Finder please return same to Oliver HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD, | tf Rust um en ugals; e can quote you figure wanted for q
Leacock. New Orleans, &th Avenue, St. Solicitors, vON'T worry YOURSELF ABOUT ( anes Engine (90—-110 h.p.); Generating ‘Set (20 k.w.); }
Michae! 7.4.50—2n. 7.4.50.—5n. | MOVING Filter Presses; Sundry Engines, Pumps, Tanks, etc., etc. The above list is am
(AHUNGALOW AT NAVY GARDENS. | LET US TAKE CARE OF ALL \ on of some cf the prope
. af “~ Na { t y t: r
| Fuiilt December 1942. Cool quiet locs Personal S ip ian hon wee { Purchaser(s) te bear all costs of dismantling eeumeni ae
PROFESSIONAL NOTICE | Stone roofed Everite. Verandah, Draw- Phone 3305 ; and removal. em
} nk D 2 and Breakfast Rooms.| BARBADOS FURNITURE REMOVER oui } ; a ocally,
i : i Kithe otte w ith built in larder and cup For full partic — a whi — A y f | may be ol
DR. FERREIRA of “Chiroville” Upper| boahds, toilet and tiled bath, 3 S. CODRING? | paruculars and inspection apply >— ike oe Hoover
SG i ractic| oe wee ; y,| Britt xX Ra ; ‘ \ } REAL ESTATE
ra ; Baree, servants’ roon silet - WM. FOGARTY, LTD. 1/6, 1 i} &
corrects diseases of eyes, ears, | bres es, la = : Port of Spain. 6, %4, M4, 1/3 BLP. 50 Cye Auctioneers
i” hoger ; Prk Miacde anot-oomaminn ‘ » 2, “4, 1/3 BLP. 50 Cycle 110 Volts TIO
” , trons, jung a“ mach, kidneys and) souintment only. Archie Cake. ‘Ph =| ADVERTISE... it TRINIDAD. 3 olts , PLANTA NS 5
wer organs. Dial 2881. i 4538, § to 4 4.4, 50-40 it pays | === Phone
_—————— ——— j zs
SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1950



1B.B.C. Radio Notes:

West Indian Poems
For Today

‘Caribbean Voices’ for Sunday,
April, will, present special
Mioems for Easter from no fewer
Han four islands in the West In-
ies. The programme opens with
Trinidad which is represented by
rrol Hill and Barnabas Ramon-
ortune, continues with St. Vin-
ent in the person of Owen M.
ampbell, a newcomer to ‘Carib-
n Voices’, Jamaica with an-
her newcomer, Mary Swaby,
nd concludes with Dominica with
pme more of the excellent poems
Emily. Lockhart. After this
petry miscellany the half-hour
nds with a short story by
fichael Browne of Trinidad.
Handel’s yg oe =
Easter sees t h an-
oo y of the —? oe
Handel’s ‘Messiah.’ It was first
iormed in public at Dublin on
0! 13, 1742. In the B.B.C’s
Music Magazine’ in the coming
eek Julian Herbage will talk
bout that first performance and
ustrate his talk with gramo-
hone records of the music. An-
ther broadcast in the G.O.S., and
notable one, is a performance of
sic from the ‘Messiah’ by the
pyal Choral Society with the
ondon Symphony Orchestra con-
ted by Sir Malcolm Sargent
he soloists will be Ena Mitchell
oprano), Mary Jarred (contral-
), Heddle Nash (tenor), Trevor
nthony (bass), and Arnold Greir
piano). ‘Music Magazine’ will be
the air on Sunday, 9th at 2.15
m. and also on Friday, 14th at
.30 p.m. while the music from
fandel’s ‘Messiah’ will be on Sun-
y at 2.30 p.m. right after ‘Music
gazine’ and can also be heard
Monday, 10th at 6.00 p.m.
The Hydrogen Bomb
‘The Hydrogen Bomb’ is_ the
He of a talk by the distinguished
entist, Sir George Thomson,
R.S., which will be broadcast in
e G. O. S. in the coming week.
he speaker discusses the possib-
ties of imitating on the earth
lear reactions of the sort from
hich the sun derives its energy:
mely. the synthesis of heavier
ments from hydrogen or its
opes. It will be on the air at
0 p.m. on Saturday, 15th inst,
Life on the Planets?
other talk on the science side
ich should appeal to the layman
ll be given in the coming week.
is really a double talk—and not
the American slang meaning of
at—with two scientists giving
views on the question ‘Is
ere Life elsewhere in the Uni-
se?’ The scientists are Dr. Fred
le, Lecturer in Mathematics at
mbridge, and Dr. C. D. Darling-
F.R.s., Director of the John
nes Horticultural Institute. The
er gives his reasons for be-
ying that there must be large
mbers of pianets in the Uni-
e supporting life similar to
t on the earth, and Dr. Darling-
will speculate on the form
h life might take. The pro-
mme, under the title of ‘From
Third Programme’ will be
badcast on Friday, 14th at 5.30

adio Programmes

Sunday, April 9, 1950

00 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m, News
ysis; 7.15 a.m, Nights at the Opera;
am. From the Editorials; 8.10,

Programme Parade; 98.15 a,m.
h Orchestral Music; 8,30 a.m. Don-
Peers; 9,00 a.m. Close Down; 12.00
The News; 12.10 p.m. News Analy-
12.15 p.m. Carroll Calls the Tune;
0 p.m. Sunday Service; 1.00 p.m, Peo-
and Places Around London; 1,15 p.m.
o Newsreel; 1.30 p.m. Ray's a Laugh;
p.m, The News; 2.10 p.m. Home News
m Britain; 2.15 p.m. Music Magazine;
p.m. Handel's Messiah; 3.30 p.m,
niry Magazine; 4.00 p.m, The News;
p.m. Interlude; 4.15 p.m. Michael

Saxophone Quartet; 4.30 p.m. Sun-
Half-Hour; 5.00 p.m. Variety Band-
; 6 pm. Programme Parade, 6.15
. From the Children’s H o wu r;
P.m. Swing Music; 7.00 p.m. The
3 7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15 p.m.
bbean Voices; 7.45 p.m. Easter Mes-









kk ai

Sage; 8.00 p.m. Radio Newsree) 8.15 p.m.

Voice of the Violin: 8.30 p.m. Sunday
9.10 p.m,

Service; 9.00 p.m. The News
Home News from Britain;
ple and Places Around London; 9.36 p.m
Tip Top Tunes; 10.00 p.m. London Forum;
10.30 p.m. Much Binding in the Mars
11.00 pm. The News ;

BOSTON
ast ge Mc, WRUW 11.73 Me, WRUK

7.75 Me.

430 p.m. Christian Science Pro;
3.5 p.m,

gramme

Lecture on Christian Science,
se Monday, April 10, 1950.

7.00 am. The News: 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m. Listeners Choice; 7.45
Places of Interest; 8.00 a.m. From the
Editorials; 8.10 a.m. Programine Parade;
8.15 aa. Journey into Melody; 9.00 a.m.
Close down; 12.00 noon The News; 12.10
p.m. News Analysis; 12.15 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade; 12.18 p.m. Music From
Grand Hotel; 1.00 P.m. Science Review
1.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 1.30 p.m. Have
& 0; 2.00 p.m. The News; 2.10 p-m. Home
News from Britain; 2.15 p.m. Sports
Review; 2.30 p.m. London Forum; 3.00
ban. From the Third mime; 4.00
p.m. The News; 4.10 p.in. The Daily Ser.
vice; 4.15 pam. Sweet Serenade; 5.00 Lis-
teners Choice; 5.15 p.m. Programme Par-
ade; 5.30 p.m. Places of Interest: 5.45
p.m. Accordeon Interlude; 6.00 p.m. Han-
del's Messiah; 7.00 p.m. The News: 7.10
p.m. News Analysis; 7.15 p.m, John Bull’s
Band; 7.45 p.m. Glad to Meet You; 8.00
Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. London Light
Concert Orchestra; 9.00 P.m. The News;
9.10 p.m. Home News from Britain; 9.15
p.m. Science Review; 9.30 P.m. David
Willeocks; 10.00 p.m. The Adventures of
Richard Hannay; 10.30 P.m. Three's com-
Pany; 10.45 p.m. Meet the Common-
wealth; 11.00 The News.



Tuesday, April 11, 1950,

7.00 am. The News; 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m. Scottish Variety Or-
ehestra; 7.45 a.m. Generally Speaking;
8.00 a.m. From the Editorials; 8.10 a.m,
Programme Parade; 8.15 a.m. Souvenirs
of Music; 9.00 a.m. Close down; 12.00
noon The News; 12.10 p.m. News Anaiy-
sis; 12.15 Accordeon Interlude; 12,30 p.m,
Tip Top Tunes; 1.00 P-m. On the Job;
1.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 1.30 p.m. John
Bulls Band; 2.00 p.m. The News; 2.10
p.m. Home News ffom Britain; 2.15 p.m,
Sports Review: 2.30 p.m. Ring up the
curtain; 3.30 p.m. Your Song Parade;
4.00 p.m, The News; 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service; 4.15 p.m, The Adventures of
Richard Hannay; 4.45 p.m. Voice of the
Violin; 5.00 p.m. British Orchestral Music;
5.15 p.m. Programme Parade; 5.30 p.m,
Generally Speaking; 5,45 p.m. Sandy Mac
Phersan at the Theatre Organ; 6.00 p.m,
Ring up the Curtain; 7.00 p.m. The News:
7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15 p.m. West
Ward Ho; 7.45 p.m. Letter from London;
8.00 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. Sou-
venirs or Music; 9.00 p.m. The News;
9.10 p.m. Home News from Britain; 9.15
p.m. On the Job; 9.30 p.m. BBC Midland
Light Orchestra; 10.00 p.m. The Story-
teller; 10.15 p.m. Dance Music; 10.30 p.m,
Michael Krein Saxophone Quartet; 10.45
p.m, Report from Britain; 11,00 P.m, The
News,



Must Quit Poland
IN 18 DAYS

WARSAW, April 8.
The Polish Government has
extended from seven to 18 days
the period Reuter’s correspondent
in Poland will be allowed to stay
in the country, following the
expulsion order issued against

him.

The correspondent, Vincent A.
Buist, the last representative of
the British Press in Poland, was
told on Tuesday that he had to
leave the country within a week,
because of “unobjective report-
ing”

He will now leave on April 24.

It now appears from the state-

ment made to the correspondent

that the charge, which he strongly

denies, is based solely on a very
brief version in a London morn-
ing paper of his lengthy report of

a Polish trial.

The paper summarised his

report of the trial of Mrs, Halina

Firth—a British subject sentenc-

ed for harbouring a Pole and a
German—giving only the charge,

the verdict, the sentence and the
fact vhat, she has been held in
communicado by the Polish au-
thorities—Reuter,

Don’t Tell Your Friends
Tell the Advocate,

- The Advocate Pays

For News

Dial 3113
Day or Night

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9.15 p.m. Peo-



Who Knows
Contentment?

NEW book captures America



SUNDAY

Church Services

ANGLICAN
ST. PAULS
Easter Day
5.00 a.m. Sung Mass and Holy C
munion; 7.30 a.m. Holy Communion;





Not a thriller, a novel, or ah a.m. Procession, Solemn Mass and Ser-

€Seapist romance, but a serous

work on the world’s most sought-

after, elusive, and

unbuyat.e

thing—the contentment that comes

with peace of soul.

The author is slow-speaking,
silver-tongued Monsignor Fulton
J. Sheen, America’s best-known

Roman Catholic preacher.

And now his book—its title is

“Peace of Soul’*—after

Britain tomorrow.

Consider these extracts from
the philosophy of Fulton Sheen:

THE OLD theological division,
‘of those who are in tne state of
grace and those who are not, has
given way to the political separa-
tion of Rightists and Leftists. The

modern soul has definitely limited
its horizons; having negated the

eternal destinies, it has even lost

its trust in nature, for nature with-
but God is traitorous ....
UNLESS souls are savéd, noth-
ing is saved; there can be no
world peace unless there is soul
peace. World wars are only pro-
Jections of the conflicts waged in-
side the souls of modern men, for
nothing happens in the external
world that has not first happened
within a soul.

THE MODERN man is no longer
a unity, but a confused bundle of
complexes and nerves.,...There
is no single overall purpose in his
life....he may be likened to a
radio that is tuned in to several
Stations; instead of getting any
one clearly, it receives only an
annoying static.....,

A SOUL with a fight inside itself
will soon have a fight outside
itself with other. Once a man
ceases to be of service to his
neighbour, he begins to be a
burden to him; it is only a step
from refusing to live with others
to refusing to live for others.....

EVERY person has a little
corner in his heart that he never
wants anyone to venture into,
even with a candle. That is why
we can deceive ourselves, and why
our neighbours know us better
than we know ourselves

SOME psychologists, by the
proper use of their method, have
brought mental peace to indivi-
duals, but only because they have
found a safety valve from mental
pressure. They have let off steam,
but they have not repaired the
boiler. That is the business of the
Church....

AN AGE of carnal licence is
always an age of political anarcny.
The foundations of social life are
shaken at the very moment when
the foundations of family life are
destroyed....

THERE is no such thing as the
problem of the atomic bomb;
there ‘s, rather, the problem of
the man who makes and uses
A

A MAN is tempted, not because
he is intrinsically evil, but be-
cause he is fallen man. No in-
dividual has» a menopoly' on
temptation; everyone is tempted.
Saints do not find it easy to Be
saints, and devils are not happy
being devils....

INDIVIDUALS who say, “I will

serve God In my way, and you
serve God in your way,” ought to
inquire whether it would not be
advisable to serve God in His
er

THE GRAVEST error of the
nice people in all ages is the
denial of sin,.....

—L.E.S.

*“Peace of Soul’ (Blandford,

10s. 6d.),

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being
high on the U.S.A. best-seller lisis
for manv months, is published in

|
|

}

mon, Preacher : Father Hopkins; 3.00 p m
Egs Service and Presentation of Lenter

ADVOCATE

a4

Self-denial; 7.00 p.m. Solemn Evensong |
and Procession, Anthem. Preacher: The

Archdeacon,
ST. LEONARDS

e
tl
5 a.m. Choral Eucharist and Sermon; & |

ong fine

a.m. Holy Communion; 9 a.m, Choral

Eucharist and Sermon; 3.15 p.m. Sunday
Sehop!; 4 p.m. Children’s Service; 7 p.m
Evensong, Sermon and Procession.

METHODIST

James Street—é6 a.m. Rey. Ernest Griffin

Holy Communion; 11 a.m. Rev. Ernest
Griffin Holy Communion 7 p.m_ Rev. R.
McCullough, Holy Communion,

Paynes Bay—9.30 a.m. Rev. R. MeCul-

jough, Holy Communion; 7 p.m. Mr. F.
Moore.

Gill Memorial—il am. Mr. J. Harper;
7 p.m. Rev. Ernest Griffin, Holy Com-
munion.

Holetown—8.30 a.m. Rev. Ernest Griffin,
Holy Communion; 7 p.m. Mr. Darcy Scott.

Bank Hali—9.30 a.m. Mr. J. A. Griffith;

er Edwin Taylor, Holy Com- | ¢ K E P L E R s Sicihen

COD LIVER O1L WITH MALT EXTRACT

Speightstown—11 a.m. Mr. G. Marville;
7 p.m. Rev. F. Lawrence, Holy Com-
munion.

Selah—9.30 a.m. Rev. F. Lawrencé, Holy
Communion.

Bethesda—i1 a.m. Rev. F. Lawrence,
Holy Communion,

Bethel—5 a.m. Easter Communion; 11
a.m. Rey. B, Crosby; 7 p.m. Rev. K. J.
Payne, Holy Communion after each Ser-
vice.

Dalkeith—i1 a.m. Rey, E. Taylor, Holy
Communion; 7 p.m, Mr, H. Grant.

Belmont—1i1 a.m. Mr. P. Bruce; 7 p.m,
Rev. B. Crosby, Holy Communion.

South District—9 a.m. Mr. A. St. Hill;
7 p.m. Mr, A. B, Curwen.

Providenee—11 a.m, Mr. J. Clarke; 7
p.m. Mr. G, be.

Vauxhall—i1 a.m. Mr. G. Harris; 7 p.m.
Mr. A. L. Mayers.

MORAVIAN

Roebuck—5 a.m, Mr. E. C. Hewitt; 11
a.m, Rev, A. C. H. Pilgrim; 7 p.m. Rev.
A. C, KR. Pilgrim.

Grace HiN—11 a.m. Mr. Downes; 7 p.m.
Mr. Deane.

Fulneek—i1 a.m. Mr. O. Weekes; 7 p.m,

Mr. Francis,

Montgomery—il am. Mr. Greene: 7
p.m. (from Mt. Tabor).

Dunscombe—11 a.m. Mr. F. Deane; 7
p.m, Mr. A. Graham.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Chureh of Christ, Scientist,
Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street

Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m,

Wednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which in-
cludes Testimonies of Christian
Sctence Healing.

Sunday, April 9, 1950

Subject of Lesson-Sermon; Are sin,
disease and death real ?

NEW TESTAMENT
CHURCH OF GOD

St. Michael—11 a.m. & 7 p.m, Eckstein
Village, Elder R. H. Walkes.,

Christ Chureh—11 a.m. Vauxhall, Rev
i. W. Weekes; 7 p.m. Cox Road, Rev. E
W. Weekes.

St. Andrew—il a.m. Rock Hall, Rey. J
B. Winter.

St. Peter—7 p.m. Foe Hill, Rev
Winter,

ANGLICAN
(Easter Sunday)

St. Mary’s: 5 a.m. Procession and Sung
Mass, 7.30 a.m, Matins and Litany, 8 a.m,
Mass. 9 a.m. Procession, Sung Mass and



Sermon. 4 p.m. Children’s Solemn Ves-
pers. 7 p.m. Solemn Evensong, Sermon
and Procession.



BRINGING CHRIST TO THE NATIONS

The Nations Lutheran Church, Corner
Whites Alley and Swan Street: 11 a.m,
and 7 p.m, Rev. W. F. O’Donohue. Sub-
ject ‘Sorrowing Sympathy.” You are
warmly encouraged to visit this Church

and to pray for these forty Lenten de-
votions, by the Christian Church to com-
memorate our Saviour’s passion and

death, and a meditation upon our Re-
deemer’s suffering, a Chris t-centred
prayer, “Behold the Lamb of God
strengthen your faith and deepen your

ust in Him who is fairer than the

children of men,”

_



COUNTING INDIANS

NEW DELHI.

Plans for India’s first census it
1951 are being discussed here.
The Indian census will involve
visits by more than _ 1,000,000
enumerators to 64,006,000 homes



inhabited by about 350,000,000
citizens.

—(C.P.)

} MAPLE MANOR {

‘) GUEST HOUSE }

Opposite Hastings Rocks

I. BOURNE, (
Tel.—3021. Manageress
26.6.49—t.f.n

Lh _— — —SSSaSSSS-—





SSS SS = SVS

For MARL, SAND, {

GARDEN MOULD,
and LIME
Dial 4503



Gaster
Greetings

from
G. A. SERVICE






COMPETITION

“IT am Alpha & Omega”
The Competition that should have
taken place at Kensington on
April 10th, will now take place at

the Steel Shed, Queen’s Park,
at 6.30 on Monday night, May Ist,
1950. Officials are: Capt. C. E,
Raison, Father Hopkins and Mr
Gerald Hudson.

ADMISSION 1/-

Choir selected and addresses
Mr, P. Freeman, Silver Sands
Philharmonic, Christ Church; Mr
Cc. Harvey, Silver Sands, Christ
Church; Reuben Hewitt, Govern-
ment Hill, St. Michael; C. Hus-
bands, Plum Tree, St. Michael;
MeD_ Hobbs, Halls Road, St. Mi-
chael, C. Hinds, Eagle Hall Modern
Choir, St. Michael; Mr, x a
Surprise, St. Michael; M, Ny
Hillaby Star, St: Thomas, D. Mil-
lar, Orange Hill, St. James, S. Mil-
lar, Enterprise, St. James; EF.
Green, Crab Hil, St. Lucy; M
Boyce, Six Men, ma — C
Bailey, Edgecliff, St. John,
Chairman—Mr. John Beckles.






Life Assurance Society

ORDINARY GENERAL
MEETING



that the one Hundred and
Ninth Yearly Ordinary
General Meeting of the
above-named Society will b«
held at the ‘Society's Office,
Beckwith Place, Bridgetown,
on Friday, 14th April, 1959,
at 2 o’clock p.m. for the
purpose of —

(1) Receiving, from the
Directors their Report
on the transactions of
the Society for the
year ended 3ist De-
cember, 1949.

(2) Electing Directors and



current year ))

NOTICE is hereby given

)

( Cc. K. BROWNE,

{ Secretary.

Beckwith Place, i
Bridgetown. }

|

J. |
{








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PAGE THIRTEEN












ATTENTION STAMP COLLECTORS

Supplies of the following are now available :
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SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 195

an



PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE

LL A A AOC
ee ———

B.G. Government Plan Stuyvesant Sforza Appeals To Tito “Comedian Brings ==









sev een omen








































| \ . Herrings, Toys Keep
ac From Page 5 t 2a Wwith-
: Homes For 10,000 Makes Last ao Ee ans... gala ia oak a
ml S Thr in ¢ that sult = " ‘ : herrings,
: artados Advo orrespondent) : t guilt ita esire greed sol- mi food, 5 . 4
; ee ae Call Here ne ebalee 46 Serene, ‘whith dab) canoe ea cle ee ta, aed abana sama: ae Your Eye i
P sU TA’'S C isi and Pl in t ! se ¢ t to those <4:., ‘ " ‘ ns ree oys, of d
; BRITISH GUIANA’S Central Housing an anning t but © disquie ts ting betwee . yuntries r hen i
[} Authority during the past year prepared a scheme for 2,006 etait “Stiyvenent,” pase hea 1 S . é ; +i pi- a a ence ot “
Bi | dwellings mainly designed to suit the needs of the lower enger freighter of the Royal Neth- h at bee, ms a aa “ the
me and middle income groups. This was revealed in @ broad~- erlands SS. Company, made its at CET Os ieee
Vv : 1 we + Bs opeiie e said. prised the cargo of Harris
; cast on Sunday by Mr. M. B. Laing, C.M.G., O.B.E., Chair- last call at Barbados on Thursday declar- Comedian” which arrived here|
+ 3 man of the Authority. / night when it stopped here from Powers on Thursday evening. °
, : $9 Mr. Laing Said that at an aver- er en route to Plymouth, de inate ' 1 The “Comedian’s’” cargo came B Tt sul
r house, this ** it ee a 3 tee; oe ssrs. Da sta a i
\ i U le t ee — kaos On completion of this voyage speculating at t : from Liverpool aa Co:
” nemp oymen seople—about.10 per cent. of the [0 England, the “Stuyvesant” will the hostile eee oe S ‘on hs ee M TRUNKS
e. ‘ I B é Tecate of Georgetown be taken off the West Indies-U.K —— i —- Yug : ria Sch B a 5 JANTZEN | ~~
x n «UG. “that the un and transferred to some other order to win this war. for er Brin ‘or Boys
r : hi a Sais. de so great service of the above company. » to-nigat DY, intimidation what does not aching 8 Made of Wool in shades of
| i Advocate Correspondent ar ee short of the fullest , Few passengers embarked here Setanta “tind “= belong to her. 1 000 B Of Rice | 1 and Maroon.
a GEORGETOWN. erg , S for U.K. by this opportunity. The U"Ger @ Hon eae Csi ags Roya se
. His Excell the > . co-operation of Government, the vessel brought up quite a few in- Count Sforza d im his Count Sforza obviously r>- ? ;
a Chathe Wonrey told a delees, Central Housing ehd ‘Planning f T » a d ~ -- speech that the only way to reach sorted to these methods precisely One thousand bags of rice| 1
d ¥ Sir Charles Wootiey, told a delega- thority blic bodies, and the ‘Tansits from Trinida ae oad T eLaer ed oe nds pre ; t \ nae 7
d ion from the Trades Union Coun- Authority, a , : This makes the second Dutch @8â„¢eeâ„¢ i it contained because he knows full well that arrived in the colony from Bri
: tion from the Trades Union i~ general public will suffice to wipe Be tas . > the ; tite dec n, ac Italy's expansionist demanss jsh Guiana’ on Friday by the 74-/
d cil on Saturday that Government t sl conditions and bring P2Ssenger ship to be taken off th . gy s ith” e
; i dontuid “the wioy. , rr bathe West Indies-U.K. run recently ne le of th? cannot be justified by real argu- ton sthooner “Lucille M. Smith’,}
4 was watching the unemploymen pousing in British Guiana up to a They will, however, be replaced in T incluc- ments based on facts.” The re- whose local agents are Messrs. | %,
ey ean money, Se A ed ena a0 proper standard. . the near future by two others, the slav Z e to (© port went on “he even went se Robert Thom Ltd. a | JANTZEN BEACH f
} : Everything possible to create new “The Central Housing and «wijiemstad” and the “Oranje- rated : y The far as to call these demands a The “Lucille M. Smith” has} SHORTS }
i sources of employment _... Planning Authority, he said, “has 444” > sai “At the same time. magnanimous proposal towards also brought 790 bags of charcoal, | Voven. Sizes 30 to 34
: During the Conference which jn the past year prepared schemes " { ittie cargo was discharged here Count Sforza called in his speech an agreement on the open ques- 50 tons of firewood and 100 cases |
te ae 7 i eae ol ; oe = ve gant Se a. by the “Stuyvesant.” Packages of 9m the Soviet Union to join hands tions between the two countries”, of Toucan matches. $6 51 > -GENTS ‘Vv’ )
, Resolution on the unemployment mainly design s a ca Miers from. with Italy “ nsioni:t the: tues senert ebinokaied i ;
1 situation, the Governor disclosed of the lower income group and Gated; Sektan from ‘Ladunere request”, it added vr Reems eee lipiglis ae, SLIPOVERS
3 that Government was arranging middle income group. At an aver- ang radio parts from Trinidad! — enlaces ca ca Bile : .
for a soil utilisation survey to age of five persons per dwelling, srrived. ANNIVERSARY JANTZEN RACER Knitted wool, slee <%
3 enadle the embarkation of schemes this amounts to housing for 10,000 ~The vessel sailed the sarie Sun- \ = TaN In Dark Grey, Lij
of planned farming to utilise such gpeople, or approximately 10 per gay night. It is represented here SWI Light | i







maby rors - Mechanics, invite you to. their
anniversary service on Sunday

16th April 1950 at their lodge



a areas as would prove of economic)j-ent. of the population of George- by Messrs. S. P. Musson, Son & I

a benefit. His Excellency alscgjown-. The preparation of these Company Ltd { 7 in shades of Navy, Coral Sizes 36 to 40.
E nted out that work had begut: schemes and the negotiations for } The Officers anc Members of and Maroon

: eee yn Dornier, Rosa whicti ne acquisition of land at Camp- “= 1M origin Chapter Lodge No. 1 of :

‘ on the Corentyne I on selville, Bel Air Park, Ruimveled, Final Curreney |) the Independent United Order of $6.99

Sizes 30 to 38.



many worke for time towand La Penitence, represent a very
many workers for s¢ im

'
|
4 SERVICE (For Men — Woollen) Grey and Fawn,
| |
' come oe iReitcs” Weeding oak’ “Peenbade Meet Takes Place |




























































































me. ws room 118 Roebuck Street at 3 30 $4 15 ’ d
e onference aiscuss¢ed 3 é +* a 4 n
d situation at the Macke Bauyite on a 4 deers york na mre Sa On Tueeda | Pe os saan Heya Bok "9 GENTS JAEGER
A ituation at the Mack uyite of cesta tie saan si eo re
n ; Mines where a number of workers o¢ such an undertaking is most v wilt Pe NSilver Collection RIBBED WOOL
‘ i 1a ecently been laid off. The oy t » final sorte poe | All are invited 2
tm Sar wyensstes mis tat my Ooi ae pectin the coer nena Wo nell] GENTS’ ANKLE SOCKS HALF-HOSE
a I : t said that : he Preparatory Committee SE | ; : 5 3
v4 ( : this © “When it is understovc. that even Unified Currency Scheme tha; | SSS | White or turn-over in shades of Lovat,
1 resuss OF XS” at the moderate figure of $5,000 Brivish Caribbean Terri wh | Spend your {| Si 7 11 B Wi Bh
; niur C= nit of house ‘and land (and ‘t@Ke place at Hastings H« under iq # J . i Sizes 10 to 11} rown, ine, Grey, y
J Cie. i re 2 the Chairmanship of Honourable 1} . ; ; i}
5 : 5 it ay prove impossible to reduce : : * “ = i 3 @ ie | Cc
y ' 3 , ; average costs to that figure) the ee M G = BE... Laster Holiday Pien | $1.55 $1.57 v
ut t pee Soe Siovesnor ante that he S80 “otal ost af tees aereteee WOTkE Coos oe OF. Eten — A doubl ction 1] at the {| o
a G Been informed by the Management ‘64+ at $10,000,000, it is worthy to “Yama it e-a ||} BUCCANEER LODGE {i it
a t the Demerara Bauxite Coy., note how they may be financed. _â„¢T. Mc avid to d the Advocate ROOM ae
; ‘ that the retrenchment was As regards the Campbelville and yesterday so ‘Us pt ei eat dot medicated ointment for the J :
arnt easonal Bel Air Park Schemes, it is ex- "84rd to the Unitied Currency, trestment- of 4 a Baywood, St. James AVE HEPHERD & () 1D. :
pb { vas pected that Government will eae 2) j Mz wer C recoup its expenditure on the pur- Se a oe ee Colds, Bronchitis Coughs 1 will supply Music i
r tion should seek f ’ a nia laying out of the land Barbados in 1946. Cc s P \ | 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET f
‘ 1 snould seek 4 nas é J ” j et « S } j |
f view he Mana hw sale of the lots and the con- ond said that fe oe eee Bera acoren, Tore Throat, Rheumatism, Lumbago, Sciatica, | ( Dancing 12—6 & 9—3 a.m. j 4
4 . Company at Mackenzie in « struction of the houses will be by frcePter’ y te ened noel, Muscular Pains and Strains; Bruises, Typ ~ [{j Promoters: O ox %
that the position might be clarified. private enterprise Sonnet Tidstas torte ; i : G C
al, i aa reaeeisen Soon "Uhdend- andl drovisicin Barbe jos, British Gui Scratches, Influenza, Neuritis, Neuralgia, oe Gigs ee Se a be
ui , a 8 oh: Lime tat +» of housing for the lower income —"" °°". “ ee T , . ot SSS eS eae
discuss é ma ‘ housing . inidad r oothach 725% SSS SS ae eee ; ~ 0
dis management group will be principally by Gov- = 7" ‘apores . oe f &, Insect Bites and other Aches > Ki , ” PISSIOSSSOS OOS FIO ISG YOOS ,
: tt ag ee t y resc i ‘ 7 ; .
With reaerd to the fara res or. PEAS cae | ace as and Pains. Healing! Soothing! Relieving! CNS Vy i 4 GRAND BALL q ° .
art will € made imme- . @; 1
trenchment ‘ ng i Nb ea i ir Megha te followed preparation of Tr it— you will say it j r 1 SSF i i t B lv. NOMULL '
' dust 4 ois . i Jitea dankee a the necessary legislation and other y Y yitisa real blessing , SF fl Will be given bs 2 Lb LO. . |
; } the repatriat i Path where Matter en a a ~~ )) 1y s
12 uml ac dation will be “fect. e THERMOGENE )} CLARENCE C. DEANE so ROME 2 '
} y i I 1c of the familie oe =i iN} Pee ere |
f to ar ) 5 ve the revised draft legisla- { {known as “Ber opkeeper
ion to be introduced | eact f }) at King George V. Men al Park, Pp
Es oportion t ({ | a |
Tuon ¢ the participaving colonies and t \ ot. SE |
: t and tenders for the venty idte MEDICATED RUB i} On Monday Night, 10th April | ‘ie.
; I r »p st i be within its . eer 5 Pea ) fusic by Leslie Clark’s Orchestra | ‘
€ group snoul in iS which had been sut ———— } }
: : e grou; i | ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT
| th , fe eee iddsivie neh ta tae Sin , In Jars and Tins {)) ADMISSION: Gents 2/- Ladies 1/6 {|
, would be at y has been most The C i , iM} Refreshments on Sale The relentless Enemy of Rust.
oe gem ; : » reduce housing costs consider and cx e de 4
‘ situatior : e ver means that would not sion on the prot ils “g = j
2 very means the would ho pr i ega
Maued : ee ee ee eee ee ee oy ere ee aN) Oe The Proved Protector of Iron and Steel.
: could not accept the T.U.C.., fis Td atin eae tie Eilding echemen Mint Or , AN ANNOUNCEMENT !
i l Adth vl ; ; ment =! ne as the housing ee aca an : i i NOT Talent Night at the Globe
t ‘ a Oa : I yeing prepared a great deal act embe ws e Commi } NOT Rommel in the Desert | GOES FARTHEST -I- LASTS LO
9 _— . : ; f consideration has been given ‘ee Wili be : Hon’ble H. A. Cuke i} BUT a solid reminder
~ * Governor stated that Government 7 jy ne oe ing O.B.E, M.L.C Barbados '\)} WEDNESDAY NIGHT 26th April,
» the best mear f roducing
; , was close the situation | houses whjch vould be re. Hon'ble A. W. R. Robertsi } 1950 is the date One gallon will cover 700 — 1,000 sq. feet, one coat,
1 : and Ww & possidte da for these schemes C.B.E., Financial Secretary (Trin- / fixed for the | 7
.- a 4 a : idad); Hon’ble L. Cools-Lartigue i
PS Three Bedrooms ieee), monte L. CooesLarngus rs i} Annual Dance |} 8 Stockea in Rea, Grey, Black and Super Black (Heat Real
i It was decided that family fy ia. (Windward Islands Hon'- 5 ; ee rr | y
‘ ouses should have three bed- bile £. A. Thompson, Federal | \K , “Riese NAAMAN BOLDER and. {\\| ~: PHONE 4456 :- AGENTS,
\ *lEe . rooms as well as a moderately- Treasurer (Leeward Islands | WITH A GOULDBOURNE PHILLIPS |
' $! lillion Radio sized living room, and that thes€ Ajco attending will be Mr. A. C. | aa nL | {
5 houses hould be ae i to be Dos Santos 1280 Executive | ‘ x t ’ at the Children’s Goodwi eague
. : , . . tr + , na n vo : ’ * ~ y Ork. | *
Cov Reg stere economic in both materials and Officer of the Committee together | SMILE Music by P. Green's
2 #! stere d n the labour required for their with Mr. Louis Spence, Comptrol Sa ee arenes 5 {| fea ali Ae i ee |
GEORGETOWN construction. It was also deciaed ler of Customs, Trinidad, who it is | | ane ea ee es RR RET ACT ER eS egET:
A‘ I that the maximum use of local expected, will replace Mr. Dos i oo PIPL OLSSOPIOPR, | ~
any incorporated materials would give the best re- Santos } $
“en registered in gults, since in that way most of be pects op x T ‘ONCERT % ,
with a view to the money spent would be spent «€ & % BAND ( 1 3
a wireies m= locally and thus give maximum J Months % By kind pormiasion = the Com- x There was .
{ 2 part f th mployment 7 x missioner of Police ¥% e
j > % ° : :
" oy a Te “The question of cheapening For Larce ny 5 eo aes * R h
Vapital of 290,000 the houses by the use of pre- Wilfred Gill of Britton’s Hill ‘ Capt. C. E. RAISON, A.R.C.M. a us
c at ff the fabrication instead of traditional ,,. ; eesttOns {ill * will render a Band Concert |
‘ zi i office eth a : wa als investigated was eae pay of stealing vo & at the Speightstown Church Girls’ |
3 hed a place emote s sO Stiga+ec, pieces o: umber v ied at * School g| -
mae . e and it was found that prefabrica- £3, 3/4 and the » roperty of 4 on WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12, 1950 ¥ this Easter.
: i niniaian one tion would reduce the cost con- Caribbean Theatres Ltd., yester- & The Proceeds are to assist in X&
{}% the establishment Siderably, since the turnover was day of the houses %
; include the operation of radio and Sufficient to justify the installation Mr. D.D. Morris before whom re x Git sataah Aid wan oat eveanee
of the required mechanical plant, the case was hear sentenced | }j “ ADMISSION: 1/6; 1/-; 64, The e
s Doors Open at 7 3 p.m ere will
. |
© pp BOCCCOSSSLL SEO





















; equipment business desirable for of getting the machinery quickly . be @

f communication With regard to this matter it is The Weather || GENUINE PARTS We specialise in the kind of service for Bedford always

»ssible that the Colonial Develop- ) All parts sold and fitted ae '

es a i: Reena Reet 10-DAY |) Severe end vane which is approved by the mammr {/}} PICNIC & DANCE rush for-*
3,000 Catholic position to lend assistanc« |)) cation as those originally fitted

in aid of
MAJESTIC CRICKET CLUB
GUN HILL BARRACKS,
St. George
On EASTER BANK-HOLIDAY
10th April, 1950

Sun Rises: 5.53 a.m. })) to the vehicle No other and the experience for just that kind of service,
parts will give you the same

Women March 8G NursesGetState Nurses | Sen hy ote ban i If you are 0 Badord owner, you shoul be estinfied
1)
))

rae

Moon (La-Quarter) April

s ( cores” with 00 les, .-——- «
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PAGE 1

PAGE MX SU.NDVV U LOCATE si M.AV, APRIL | BARBADOS ADVOfiSTE Sunday. April . 1)50 For 1'edewfriane SOME WEEKS haw passed since studs were placed in Broad Street and pedestrians were invited to cross the street only at those places where the studs are placed. The only response has been a complete disregard of the crossing signs. As traffic has increased in recent years a spate of regulations has emerged to govern the use of vehicles on the public highway. Little or nothing has however been done to control pedestrians. The result is that pavements are ignored, the middle of the road is used as a promenade and it is a regular occurence for a group of persons to meet and carry on a conversation on the public highway All the more regrettable is it when persons who should know better set the bad example of ignoring signs set up to ensure road safety. Nor are the police exempt from the general criticism. It is hiph time that energic steps were taken to control the manner in which pedestrians waltz all over the road. It is ridiculous for the crossing signs to be put if the police are not prepared to tee that they represent something more than a pious exhortation. There is no reason why compulsory crossing should not be enforced. It could be easily embodied in a regulation. The result would help to reduce the risk of accident and bring a degree of order to the chaotic manner in which the road is used. j The motorist now operates under a heavy burden of regulations. The side of the road on which he must drive, his maximum speed, the corners at which he must stop and a host of other matters are prescribed for him Bus drivers, and taxi cab drivers are subject to an • I greater number of regulations. The pedestrian has, however, continued on his way, heedless of alterations in vehicular traffic, and confident that be is a) m the right. It is true that on many roads of the island no pavements exist ai pedestrian lias no alternative but lo walk in the road or in the gutter. On II roads which do have pavements the j H appear reluctant to use them, and on el such as Broad Street this causes inconvenience and increases and pedestrian aliitr. It is time that the Buthoritji themselves to this prol>!' crossing signs should be erected and the public requJn I of a to see that ;, %  I well as mot cond.. ..in such a way thai users of the highwiy should be pr< in their rights. They have recently done food work in regulating traffic in tincity. Let them now turn their attention to On of pedestrians and their misuse of the road. 1 One method of educating the aduli pubby means of cinemas, la and poster advertisements. It might be very tiresome for four or five thousand spectators at a football match at Kensington to be reminded in the road, but I %  would lxproductive of good results Similui local Radio Distribution service could be utilized, for a month say. to remind pedestrians to cross only in traffic lanes. The columns of the Press can also be employed to boost a campaign lor safe walking. For children, the MOM schools include in their curriculum sons inculcating safety on the road, the better educated will school children be The old attitude that nothing can be done in Barbados is dying. Many things have been done in the past, many are being done, but some things require more effort from the public than others. The educaI pedestrians is one of these thil Eaftter EASTER, the greatest of Christian festivals, has come once again as a reminder of the great work of redemption of mankind. Man too can rise from the life of selfishness and sin to obedience of the great Lommandment to love his neighbour. The world has travelled far from the condition of things where the Fatherhood of God and the Brotherhood of man was the guiding principle of life. The modern order of things is nation against nation and a race in armaments in an effort to dominate each other. From this depressing condition the world needs an Easter : a rebirth to a life of peace. In the life of the individual the need is as urgent as that of the nation. The distractions of a work-a-day world are sufficitiii it. make one forget for a brief while the injunction to love one another, but at Easter. Nature herself is in btf kindliest mood "For the winter is past; the rain the ilowers appear upon the earth; the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle dove is heard". At this period ol the world's history* when men and nations look out for peace and safety, Christendom looks over an altered landscape. Many changes have been made and things which once looked considerable and important have fallen into obscurity leaving only the main structures which still stand out clearly. Signs are not wanting. The attempt at a universal church is the clearest indication of the fttJ moving mankind towards his Easter. Denominational claims, shibtha, and even vested interests now bear an aspect <•( pettiness while Christianity rises above them in a majestv which precludes rivalry and contusion. In this Ins rt ol man still groping in liter daikiK ht of a true %  minder of that hope when man will rise from the abyss into which strife has brought liim to see the hi-ht guidint; to a better future; when God OUT irierrant Father, our infallible guide, will lead us through The still darkness to rn is the story the queen of festive seasons. laOilll* I |> In the price lie during ... ,h.il-h;i\ producmuM be lm : i ;, i oixl the (h-munds ..f the local emphasised durin > hen the %  ubn men* i with ihorl ma, It is no less important today In .. Hut thil Ll not the only problem. In pnxi to be sold at lower toad "f the Imported pnHiurt then danger of upsetting our "fn> TinnumtM'r •>{ people who derive informs from the air ol gOodl must not be decreased. This will add to i oblein of unemployment The income derived by %  aJesmsn must not be rediu.-d Tins will throw greater weight 00 BOOM earnings. || still the necessity to produce food in ev'i\ form although in some instances there can be little hope of price reduction. Vegetables and meat can be produced but the kieomaa of the producers must be maintained. They cannot be iae production merely to cush. valuation The m. | vision of the subsidism. ha clear The foods produced locally pailht need the support of the scheme if the producers are not to be sacrificed. And the agriculturists comprise one immunity tied to their aaa in the price of manures, the | : that I st i>f labour and tie Increase >>i taxation And him as thur target and the only relief is reasonable prices for his products. 7 *6q yi.itAin 4 panuth £* or Broad Street of the future ? I OltllS AWAKE! SAVE VOI H CHICKS! WE NOW OffU t..\t.\. MESH WIRE for FISH POTS A CHICKEN R| >, 1,1 l-ln.. l'.-ln.. lh-1". w h : " m Uleh '* •• •*• — Ah* — i inch. I Ineh by 4 feet GALVANISED LASHING WDUt from It t II Osusr WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTDSuccess*, „ C. S. PITCHER & CO., LTD. PHONES: 4672; 4487 hVckwith ty C'apricornu% DAVID GAUMANS, who visited Barbados In early 1947 tell story ol a speech he once made already hanging over the Electors to some business tycoons in North Association unless they change America. David Gamroans u a their present tactics or bnd someTory Member of Parliament and where within their ranks or supwould probably have been Secreporters a new energiser of life, tary of State for the Colonies, had "It is not enough" as Lord the CocisexvaUves won ine last Altrincham's elder son wrote reGeneral Election. When 1 linishe-i cenUy. "to limp along in the wake speaking. Captain Gammans said, of progress, complaining all the the tycoons accused me of being way. and cursing the day mana Red. kind ever started on its travels. I heard that story from David The greatest Tory triumphs ha\t Gammans himself, although after occurred when change has been this lapse of time I cannot recall not merely accepted but anUeiprecisely the exact words. Hut pated by Tory statesmen. Canhe will. I know, forgive me using ning once said that "those who reit to point a moral which 1 wan: list improvements as innovaUon* to offer to the Barbados Electors will soon have to accept irsnovaAssociation. I am not suggesUng Ubn* which are not improve that the supporters of the Bacttn menta." AisociaUon are tycoons, but I am I am not naive enough to sugsuggesting that the Association itgest that the Electors Association self, which probably would like should try to "out-progress" the to be considered a Conservative. "Progressive League'' and call Association does not show, eitner that a policy. Progress is not inm the speeches of its Parliamentevitable. But what I am sugary representaUvea or in tnc gesting is that they should realise writings of its favourite sent*: that they are the only possible "The Archer" (consistently misparty to replace the present •pelt Saggitarius) "more than the political party when it is defeated remotest understanding of the at the next election, and that unconstructlve side of Toryism a.s %  less they come out of their present political philosophy. Blimplsh stage of seeing a SocialI myself am a Tory by inclina1st behind every red tie or every ttoa and although I take no acme suggestion for social or economic part In local politics in this Island, improvement, then >usly perturbed by ire doomed to perish or a' lai-k of a constructive party proleast to lose nrj gramme offered by the Fkvtirs votes of thousands who i I could not, because vtawe. If I may borrow from the of my person-1 of Hon. John Grigg again" Socialism as a political philosophy, to obtain power by means of a and because of my lack of tidence In its local manifestations i for the Left, so I must consider voting tor the High; or not voting at all. But when t review the nMMehai of members of the local A who are wearing the Mag of the Electors Association, 1 find that k. '.neir favourite columnist Saggitarius they are mil ting arrows" ihan at opposing the Governmti gramme with constnn'. gestions for improving or outdistancing them. Whereas vast quantities of heat are generated In abusing the Imperial ment and sad lapses of good taste are evidenced in devastating attacks on iiunvi.iu.ilwho cannot answer back, 1 am yet to notice any signs of political ability in the Electors Association of a kind which would lead me to support their cause rather than that of the rival association Indeed were It not for the fact that I am a convinced antiSoclallst. my political sympathies would lie more with the members of the Government party, who are at least trying to improve in IhefJ own way the appalling 1< m standards of life which the majority of this island's people are supporting. It seems to me that any political party which depends on denigration and abuse of its opponents as a substitute for political thought and action is doomed to die the death I can see the signs of the grave THERE'S A WEALTH OF POCKET CARTOON t* oSBf-Ki i ANCASI t e i r n i ntj chaix.: Sinatra'* ohotv m the durmi, '< %  me Lillian that Ifl 'IIO'I ttmr ui'neoae mad< If chile cleat to boit nnrt \hat St Wtni"< %  • T HcH/OeM*'*' Toclav'w I houithl ROl'ND desluif U the honor of man's nature: and a mixture of falsehood Is like allo> in gold and silver, which mat m >• %  the metal work the better. but it embaseth It —FRANCIS BACON. good programme, and to retain it by a good performance in offlce, rather than by an unwholesome reUance upon Fate and the folly of opponents—these are surely some of the things which history can teach us." And surely that is why we are Tones. Because we do not neglect our history. Why should we Tories (and why should the Electors Association IT they want to belong?) hang their heads in shame and be content to be called reactionaries? As far back as 1822 Toryism under Canning. Peel and Husklsson became a great liberal reforming movement. And it was that grand old Tory Disraeli whose Reform Act of 1867 tint established a truly democrat:, franchise in the United Kingdom It was Disraeli's Tory MtUstq which together with social reform measures and trades union legislation, introduced the new concept of Tory Democracy. Ii the Electors Association wan us to believe that they are following in the concepts of that grea, • nary political philosophy i affectionately described as English i a, then they must make it' clear that they are at least keeping as up-to-date with the new Toryism M their left-wing opponents bare are imbibing the output of British Socialists. When the present Government ts defeated at the next elections (and they will not be unless the Electors AssociaUon take early action) the electorate of Barbados will want to have known for advance what are the intentions of the Electors Association. .il party, even a young I arty still In its teething stage, is expected to decide upon and to tell the electors what are the main outlines of the orogramme which they will follow, if they arc entrusted with admintrata r So far as the Electors' Association have told us. the voters, by their records in the House and through their mouthpiece in the Press, we are not over-Impressed and we look forward to a much more vigorous approach and a constructive statement of the next uy session. And It Is our right to expect that i political far forget the decencies as to abuse private Individuals who have no possibility of answering back that the Leader of that party should publicly disclaim party approval of such tactics. No politica'. party worthy of its name can hope to keep the confidence of any voters unless it observes certain fundamental rules of ethical conduct. Only demagogues look for support among the rabble. It u a great misunderstanding of the Barbados poliUcal scene to suppose that the majority of its voters come from the rabble. They are largely drawn from simple people like myself and I certainly will not vote for rabble-rousers who hope to achieve cheap popularity by cussing the Unker. HAPPINESS u Ht EVERY SIP OF YEAR OLD COCKADE FINE RUM Try %  !!-$..< a ioii..ii s / I \ Si # / ##, SCOTT A Co.. OUR HEADERS SAY: To, Ths Editor, The Adwocale, SIR. -At die beginning of this yu \Tte Dlrectoi of Education Introduced into oui schools what he called a mon course". (liuidei.taUinflexibility of lU prescriptions flies In the face of the bible of asSmantary school teaching, the "Handbook of Suggestions for Teachers", which sti cates any attempt at imposing uniformity on the school* > were two controversial issues to this "course". One. that il added new subject* to QM < urnculuiv.. the other, (hat it requesird an extension of the *.chool th 4 pjn. The Barbados Elen %  Teachers' Association met | cues this course, and it is characteristic of the inertia and irresponsibility of that bod] wl.ile it (rightly) look a firm stand agalnsi the lengthening of the school hour, 't did not reject, for the most cogent reasons, the content if not the general policy of the "common course". For, Judged as a whole, the "common course" is a snare and a delusion, a story of the dog, the bone and the ass The Dublk h I about this cou sons for this arc. I that for all then boasting Barbadians are I •d lii -atfeng and, secondly, that the poorer classes among u weaca what they hear ..: Tin I Km. The Bwne And The Shadow lief that their children are now getting free secondary education .algebra, geometry, gen;..e and fmeign languages supposed to be taught") The palpable truth Is that under %  Una their children wa not getting educaUon at all Tetwh. :es ate beir,; ew.y and children .re bemused •0 unsuitCOOdRaMU of elementary education ui this Island Hi.it a large portion of the money being USD off ..a loss Not even in Bngl Its slightl> tanas* school hours. i is its tar lOT School Course so comprehensive. It would .possible for me to deal adequately with the common course in %  ter. There u a great d Ei-id about It Indeed. a country more, acoi. moving 11 or less allergic to Just, if scathing, criticism, I could with profit write in order to deal subsequataiy with the discussable portkm cf two <>sary to rniii some of the deadwood b> rsibjd* once ami CUM ion an asp. That the absurdity of the position may be' appreciated it is necessary to sketch the background to the Spanish teaching now bsassj done In our schools, i.glnal course Issued by ihe EducaUon Department it was set out that Spanish would be taught for one period of 45 minute* each day which was an essential K it might begin the learning eg the language In fact. awaay awaad Teachers found them.. lots when their schools wore rwautred'to teach this new suagwrt To tr. ( i %  DO idea of I the syllaI helpful on this point. Lfetsttal elementary teachers, indeed, very few school children In Barbadoa had ever learnt Spanish. In fact, such had been the tradition of Spanish teaching here that only the dull and backward language Then whom did the Danartnant expect to teach it? Apparently the teachers themselves knew the answer better than the Department For it -s amusing, if pathetic, to see numbers of them now after a hard flV, trooping dutifully to the few available Spanish teachers and blundering badly on the leo&on which tomorrow they ill have to teach to ; ear-olds Teach -as-you-learn has now become a policy of enlightened education In this island Keep one lesson ahead of the pupil Is good enough for Barbados. But perhaps the EducaUon Department did not have this necessary knowledge Indeed. Its Spanish teaching prospectus is so naive and divorced from reality that one wonders whether that Department is still located firmly on the ground. Let me quote: Reasons for learning a foreign language (1) to understand more fully through learning a language other than English how thoughts and ideas are expressed in words: <2) in order to gain -..::.e understanding of other countries and of order to communicate more ea to discuss it. I wish only to ask one question: How many good secondary students doing School Certificate French or I. v ish are moved to "gala ing of other ci>; i tth people Ol other oi :ne answer is. as I think, 'hardly anj equivalent or better result be achieved by a primary school in three years less and with a majority of children of less general tnd t.. crown it ailagain I quote from the syllabus: "the South American pronunciation should be used as portant that correct pronounclation should be acquired I beginning | smile if one were a foreigner regarding an opium-happy people Barbadian the sight of being made of our edu. cause for tears—or tumbrils. Thus 90 valuable minutes are being Wasted at a Ume when teachers are begging for opportun•amework. to teach essentials. Pupils who %  ;d to learn it textbooks, from teachers w know it In %  ook of suggestions for lo confute peopl. revered language I % %  :i shall be reasonably proficient in the use ol their own language". The Director tacitly acknowledges this lack of proficiency when in a Circul.ii to the schools he suggests that pupils should fill in blanki rather than be required |o writ* compLsti M ntsnesi Why. then, in face of all the obstacles outlined, the teaching of a foreign language was insisted upon? Perhaps we shall never know One thing we know is that Barbados is following in the footsteps of her betters. For in 1945 the late Miss Ellen Wilkinson then Minister for E

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