Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
wednesday

1950.

1,30













pPOLD
=

--—@

'

|



) March 21.
Party leaders to-
the formation of
‘galition Government.
of the Centre leaders,
~ Venizelos, Nicholas
, Papandrou,
ol some 137 Assem-
the Greek General
t ago. The
was anuel Tsou-
oder of a small group of
ves.
leaders were meet-
tonight.
General Napoleon Zer-
med to enter the Centre
th his seven-seat Con-
National Party. Observ-

. a new Gov-
te formed to-day or















- CAIRO, March 21.
authorities said today
y believed their arrest of
Cemmunists yester-
ck the hardest blow
inst the underground
movement in the



ted—some of them

he Central Com-

in Communist
Schwartz,
‘Russian origin, born in
his wife








two houses in the
lle class Cairo suburb
lis, Police seized a
of Communist pro-
of which, they said,

new type.
ions were
, tian workers,
revolt against their

conditions. The
seized the Central
counts, showing the
funds to spread
-in Egypt and how
E been spent. The
: try of the Interior
‘in 1947 to arrest Schwartz,
known as a professional
agitator and propa-

a




































4

fartz disappeared for three
years, but turned up
the eve of the Egyptian
this year.

—Reuter. |



Swap Kidneys

GO, March 21,
Ss at Chicago Hos-
» successfully
a kidney from
to another, They
will one day be pos-
r opera-
beings, and
or prolong the
of such dis-

—Reuter

1, Got Some
1700 Million
US. Dollars

HINGTON, March 21

re bent American tourists
‘neeord_ total

in.
of
West

Ic
a.
af

of nearly
: ae last
Went to Canada,
Indies, and Cen-
commerce de-
of business
this, and re-
. and the
countries drew
in American travel

Americans spent
in Canada and 135,-
Heo, The 1949 total
seit was about
than in 1948.
—Reuter.




a

NOT RESIGNING
neg DON, March 21

‘ ; “Ources to-day de~
a p stlation t Chancellor
Be Sir Stafford
&.—Reuter



a ee former Socialist Prem. |
ionight appealed to King Leopold to send back his
tonigh in, around whom all Belgians rally, ,
letter published in the Socialist Le Peuple. |
ised the King to stay away and be content with
victory which, according to Spaak, the referer

‘on the question brought him. |
: who has led the anti-Leopold campaign, has |
on a free hand by his party’s fierce anti-Leopolc |
m. Max Buset, to negotiate with Eyskens on . |
‘oy in the national interest, it was learned tonight.



Barhados
0 MILES IN

TO STAY OUT
Rut Send Prince Baudouin

BRUSSELS, March 21.

Spaak’s free hand implies that |
the Socialists have softened ther
standpoint and would probably
eecept a formula providing for the
King’s return for a limited period
only. |

He ould then he succeeded by
his 19 year old son Prince Bau- |!
douin. Spaak is understood to
have favoured a formula of “de
ferred abdication” from the time
a referendum was first mooted
but his party opposed it.

No Government Yet

Bligium tonight is still without
a Government. Caretaker Premier
Gaston Eyskens has so far been
unable to form an administration
to replace his Catholic-Liberal
coalition, which resigned on Sat-
urday.

In talks between leaders of vhe |}
Catholic and Liberal Parties, a
hardening of the Liberal Opposi-
tion to the return of King Leopold
appears tonight to have compro-
mised plans for vhe early forma-
tion of a new coalition.

Earlier, Prime . Minister Eys-
kens had forecast a new Coali-
tion “within hours”.

Meanwhile, Socialist members
of Parliament announced that
they would lead “Stop Leopold”
parades in the industrialised
south on Friday, when 3,000,000
workers will stage a strong one
day “warning” strike against the
King’s restoration.

They said they would
demonstrations through Liege,
Mons and Charleroi centres of
French-speaking, anti - Leopold
Wallonia. Re-affirming their op-
position to Leopold’s restoration,
the Socialist members of Parlia-
ment also today gave 10,000 Bel-
gian francs to the fighting fund
of “Stop—Leopold” action commit-

lead



tees’, formed for the party,
trade unionists. and other social-
ist supporters.

The tense labour situation eased
a little today when Antwerp and
10,000 Brussels “Stop Leopold”
strikers return to work.

The growing threat of stop-
pages is causing a ruin on food-
stuffs, and some shopkeepers have
sold out their tinned stocks.
Workers were today reconstruct-
ing and reconditioning the Royel
Palace at Laeken, outside Brussels.

Circles close to the Government
said the Liberal call for party
discipline along the lines of the
party’s official opposition to the
King’s return was regarded as a
“delaying tactic’ by the Anti-
Leopold faction within the party.

—Reuter.

FOUR AMBUSHED |
AND KILLED |

SINGAPORE, March 2}.
Terrorists ambushed a mobile,
police patrol today on an estate
in Kedah, killing a British Police



Sergeant and three Malay con-
stables and wounding a special
constable.—-Reuter. |



ITAIN WILL SPEND —
223,000,000 ON R.A.F.—

LONDON, March 21.

din is developing advanced types of jet fighters with| pathy are displayed by all parties
approaching that of sound—well over 600 miles an |
Minister, Arthur Henderson, told Parliament)

—_—_—_-——-»i These fighters, able to fly at |
textreme heights, and

area will
jet fighter, the
Royal Air Force
squadrons will be using next year.
All Britain’s day fighter and
ground attack squadrons overseas
are equipped with this jet aircraft,
except three squadrons in the Far
East, Henderson said. oom
Henderson said that Britain
has a jet night fighter in an ad-
vanced stage of development with
a performance comparable to
other jet fighters. ;
All the jet night fighters, now
being fitted with up to date radio
and radar aids, would also be able
to fight by day in weather that
would ground day fighters.

Guided Missile

Henderson said that scientists
wate working on a new advanced
“air - to - air” guided relele,
Fighter planes, keeping out -
range of the enemys guns, om
launch it against modern bomb-
ers. ; >
The Air Minister said Britain
was “very grateful” to the Ameri-

the 70 Superfortresses.
Ca rital bomber force would

follow the new
Venom, which

Britain’s 1 r¢ d
be mainly equipped vo —
and the new jet bom r, “|
Canberra, until ‘he advance

model went to production.

nderson, who was opening 4
debate on the estimates for oe
year’s R.A.F. programme, =
£223,000,000 would be spent ins
year, an increase of £5,500,0 D
"He said recruiting was unsatisfac-
tory, and the general level =
experience in the service would
decline, unless more men — wee
willing to stay for further service

the





The strength of Ad :
April 1951, was ‘ «pected to
fabout 198,800 yparec

22 AOC

'

} 220,000 a year agi
day.—Reuter



3







WORK COMMENCED YESTERDAY on iemporary alterations to the Terminal Building at Sea-

well,

Workmen are seen on the job which is expected to be finished in ten days. The terminal

building has had to be temporarily vacated and incoming and outgoing passengers are dealt
with in the Airport Manager's quarters which has been hurriedly “pressed into service.”

Finds £10,000
In Backyard

MELBOURNE, March 21
Wedderburn, normally a quié
little country town 140 miles nort!
of

Between

here, was firmly established
today as the world’s latest “boon
town’ Visitors and sig eer




newsreel cameramen a

Lie, United

, press photo irygve
graphers, and reporters Nave
poured into the town since tt

news broke over the weekend that
farmer Dave Butterick had quiet)
and secretly dug
(Australian) worth
backyard

|
up £10,009 |
f gold in hi: j
during the last If

Sports Window



months EMPIRE meet Notre Dame
“House Full” notices now swit in a Second Division fixture
over the doors of the two loca at Queen Park this eve-
hotels. No more accommodation i ning. This will be the first
available. | outing for Notre Dame in
Feverish digging is going on it the Second Division, they

having won the Third Divis-
on Competition in the 1949
season.

On the strength of their
win they have been pro-
moted to the Second Divis-
ion, Mr. F. Edwards will he
the reféree, , ,

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL

the back gardens, and streets a:
being torn up.

The Town Council has approved
the sinking of seven shafts in two
streets, and nine applications for
miners’ rights have been lodged
Two. residents, who have sunk
Shafts in their backyards — aré
getting some gold at 10 feet,

Already the local grocer, Albert







Czechs Will

an Strengthen Bond |
oan

Response ts PRAGUE, March 21.
CHELMSFORD, March 21. | y, iia Siroky, | Czechoslovak
% in page pore > ice-Premier, in his first state-
The Anglican Bishop of Chelms- | nent as Foreign Minister said to-
ford, Dr. H. Wilson, said today day that Fs
that a move to unite all Christian! 57 .

of gold, a fortune in wealtt

Smith, has found a 75 ounce gold ASSOCIATION

nugget in the mainstreet, and Today’s Fixture

yesterday farmer Butterick’s mine Harkliffe vs. St. Mat-

yielded a 70 ounce nugget, estim- thew’s Old 30ys" A ssoaiem

ated to be worth from £738 to tion at St. Leonard’s

£1,000 (Australian). Grounds

It was found at a depth of 12 Referee: Mr. O. Graha

feet. The residents of Wedderburn Se

are convinced that beneath the

town’s main streets runs a channel } |
|



; Czechoslovak Foreign
Policy was based on intensifying

forces “in face of anti-Christian 7, lok ’
Communism” had produced only [and Strengthening Czechoslovak
“lukewarm and patronising” re- friendship with Soviet Russia and

all the People’s Democracies.

sponse from the Church of Rome. at ‘ /.
po 2 y Siroky, appointed Foreign

In his monthly letter, Dr. Wilson

: " Minister " 7

said Rome had conceded only|Minister to succeed Vladmier

“conversation of a limited type- Clementis, was addressing the
7 : Parliamentary Committee debat-

sdged about by safeguards.” : : os ’
neethis sort of approach can never - ae Foreign Ministry a budget
get anywhere, for differences of ee Bo — ‘eg ne
any sort and particularly religious | ,; >. i ituatd _ eran aera
differences can never be resolved, | onal situation was characterised
unless complete frankness and ‘le bres sepa ae of the strug-
wholehearted honesty and sym- ro een ee same of Capital-

ist reaction” and the “camp of

peace and progress”,

Siroky said that within Czecho-
| slovakia the struggle was going on
between the new Socialist world
and the dying remnants of Capi-

teuter,



Bogota Rains

talism.
‘ - Attempts were being made
Disrupt Transport from abroad to give systematic

issuance to members of Czecho-

ry Nations Secretary-General,
called on the United States and Russia to adopt a “twenty

R.A.F a)

BOGOTA, March 12 slovakia’s former capitalist class
Unusually heavy rains in Co~j}and to organise espionage and
lumbia have disrputed transpor', | sabotage.
and petrol has had to be severely He said the Vatican and the
rationed in Bogota because of| High Church Hierarchy in

floods hampering railways into

the capital.

Czechoslovakia were attempting
to abuse the religious feelings of

The highway from Popayan to| the people for the aims of Capital-

Cali in western Colombia has been
cut,—Reuter.

BAR DR. SANDER

MANCHESTER, New Hamp-
shire, March 21
Two Roman Catholic hospitals
here have now barred Dr Her-
mann N. Sander, recently acquitted
of a “mercy murder” charge.

The Notre Dame and Sacred
Heart hospitals both said. their

staffs had voted to bar Dr. Sander

from practising in their institu-
tions. E
Dr. Sander, who was found

not guilty on March 9 of having
murdered a cancer ridden patient
Mrs. Borroto, also faces an ul!
disclosed accusation by the, Hills-
borough County Medical Society
—Reuter.



THREE STILL TO REPLY

LONDON, Marc

Cuba, Ecuador, and E
not yet replied to British attempts
to end the deadlock in the United
Nations Security Council over the




admission of the Chinese C
' nist Gove me t B
5 om n
Foreign
Press repor i I pproach
Ihad failed were untrue, he added.

—Reuter





ist reaction.

“We are firmly determined to
render such interference with our
internal affairs useless” Siroky
declared.—Reuter.



TWO PILOTS KILLED
IN PLANE CLASH

TOULON, March 21.

Two military training planes

|collided in mid-air near here to-
day killing the two pilots. One

plane had its tail torn off before

|erashing in a backgarden. The
\other exploded in the air.
—Reuter.

Lie Calls For 20
Year Programme

U.S.—Soviets

WASHINGTON, March 21.
tonight

year programme to win peace”.
«' He urged East and West to use

the United Nations for “give and
take”’ negotiations

Speaking before the National
Convention of Bnai Brith, a Jew-
ish organisation, Lie asked the
two great Powers to “get to-
gether on the first steps of such
a United Nations Peace Pro-
gramme without delay”.

“I do not believe in political
miracles,” Mr. Lie said. “It will
take a long series of steps to re-
duce the tensions of the conflict
and bring the great Powers to-
gether,”

“Equally I do not think the
word can ‘safely delay taking the
first’ steps on this read of nego-
tiation and conciliation”

The danger of an_ indefinite
continuation of the cold war in
this age of the atom bomb, the
hydrogen bomb and bacteriologi-
cal weapons is too great”.

Mr. Lie made it clear that his
definition of negotiation did not
mean “surrender or appeasement”
by either side.

“T mean negotiation which
requires honest give-and-take by
both sides” he said. “I have been
encouraged by the genuine re-
affirmations fron: the two lead-
ing Great Powers — the United
States and the Soviet Union-
about the possibilities of peaceful
co-existence between them and
between the different economic
and political systems they repre-
sent.” The United Nations was
founded upon that belief and the
hope of world peace depends
upon its validity —Reuter



Poland Releases
British Subject

WARSAW, March 21.

Four hours after receiving a
British protest, Polish authorities
to-day released a British subject

from Krakow prison.

Sir Ronald Gainer, British Am-
bassador, protested to the Polish
Foreign Ministry against the seiz-
ure of Polish born Otakar Korn-
hauser, who had disappeared on
February 2.

The mystery of Kornhauser’s
failure to catch the plane to
Britain was explained yesterday
in a Polish note saying he had
been arrested. No reason was
given.

The Foreign Ministry tele-

phoned the Embassy later to-day
to say that Kornhauser had been
released.—Reuter.



Cadogan Resigns
U.N. Council Job

LONDON, March 21.

“perfect diplomat,’ whose suave
hard hitting speeches often riled
the Soviet delegates, is retiring «s
| British representative on
Security Council, the Foreign



Office announced today.

Sir Alexander, who is 66, wiil
be succeeded by Sir Hubert
Gladwyn Jebb, a leading Foreign

expert on
Nations.
—Reuter.



LONDON, March 21,

| The Government today

| phatically rejected flogging as the}

answer to Britain’s crime wave.
Viscount Jowitt, the

Chancellor (Britain's

judicial functionary, said in

House of Lords, “We have

intention of reintroducing it.”
Last year, Parliament

' deliberately abolished flogging, an

would be politically quit

it € 1 I K ! uw
; Jowitt aS Opening a two day
debate on the present outbreak

the

no}

had |



4

}



a er en ee tee

29 MINS.

Jet Plane Breaks Record:

JP vices

Aduncate gen ~



Controlled By Radar

U.S. Senate
Approve
K.R.P. Fund

WASHINGTON, March 21
The Senate Foreign Relations
Committee today unanimously
approved the
full $3,100,000,000
covery Programme.
The House of Representative:
has voted to cut $1,000,000,000 oi

European Re-

value in
pluses for European Recovery

There will presumably be
Senate-House dispute before the |
figures are finally
the Chairman of the Senat
; Committee said he vaought Con-|
gress would eventually reject the
House Committee’s proposal

The House Foreign Affairs Com-
mittee vVoday approved a state-
ment favouring collaboration by
the free people of Asia for self

he

help to protect their indepen-
cence. |
The policy statement was ap

proved as parv of the Foreign Aid|
Bill for the 12 months beginning |
July 1 The Committee is near
the end of work on this measure

Chairman John Kee said the
Committee contemplated on!)
economic co-operation, nov mili-|
tary, with nations of Asia

The Senate Committee als
approved;





1. An amendment declaring “it
is the sense of Congress,” that}
no Marshall Plan nation shall |
discriminate against Unit
States business. This replac« |
an earlier proposal to cut off!
dollars from countries who did
discriminate.

j
a
\

2. Am amendment authorisi
the Economic Co-operati
Administration to spe
$600,000,000 to establish
currency clearing house
Western Europe the Bur

pean Payments Union

3. An amendment requiring th«
E.C.A., wheneyer practical, t
use counterpart funds to}
promote the economic unity |
of Western Europe. (counter- |
part funds are funds allocated |

Administracion’s ;

eash from the fund and substicut. |
American farn ur- |

reconciled. Buy

H=RTFORDSHIRE, March 21
RITAIN’S De Havilland Comet—the world’s
first all-jet passenger plane—flew 1,300 miles
to Copenhagen and back today in 3 hours and 29

minutes.

The De Havilland “Comet” was controlled on the first
part of the flight by a radar unit in London. It was followed
by long distance radar for more than 100 miles at 30,000
feet cruising speed. The radar operators found no diffi-
culty in controlling the fast moving plane. ;

omer +! Normal time for the return air
| trip is about seven hours. Five
| days ago, the Comet—the “plane
lof the future’——set up a record
/in streaking to Rome and back to
| Britain in under four hours.
There is no official record for
/the London-Copenhagen _ flight.

Truman
Defends

Captain Connsnenrn £28 or 4
Aeheson | Hravilland’s chief test pilot.

|

The famous night fighter pilot,
John Cunningham, took the Comet
/to the Danish capital in 1 hour
and 42 minutes this morning. But
his time from checkpoint to
checkpoint, once he was in the
air, was only one hour and 20
minutes.

Headwinds slowed him coming
back to one hour 47 minutes from
take-off to landing.

British Overseas Airways Cor-
poration official, Sir Wiles Comas
said later that by the end of next



WASHINGTON, March 21
Republican Senator Wherry of
Nebraska today accused Secretary
of State Dean Acheson of ‘“under-
mining our national economy and
losing the peace” in a speech pre-

pared for delivery in his state
Wherry said: “Apparently he has
become so powerful as the idol of
the leftwing “Appease Russia”
agitators, that President Truman
is fearful, should he fire Acheson,

he y Tal t > 1 t 0 ’ oa
: ot . on ~ , Dh \ wuppee OF eT vear, or early 1952, the Comet was
. “Tw 1s mR Se hiiien grout expected to be on regular service
, > san ongressm Pet
Wo Nepublican Congressmei! from Britain, through Cairo to
attacked Acheson in the House

Karachi and Calcutta, and might

vesterday for allowing Valentina

Gubitchey, convicted Rudsian spy,| 28" £9).0m te Sydney in a ser-
x ae de a i eed a aie : N Ps vice which would link London
I iScyenn. er caine ws with Australia in under 40 hours.
-year prison sentence Reuter
President Truman last night 7 rs

made it clear that he approved] +e
Acheson’s conduct and policie Peru Files
Renter ‘
Â¥
sad Counter-Charge
THE HAGUE, March 21.

Woman Denies
Charge In
Spy Trial

PRAGUE, March 21

lhe Peruvian Government filed
|} a lengthy counter charge in the
| International Court of Justice here
day, giving its views in the
Colombia-Peruvian Asylum case,
submitted to the Court last Octo-
ber.
Che case arose from the asylum
iven by the Colombian Embassy



Three of the 16 defendants in Lima to Mr. Victor Raul, a Peru-
the Czechoslovak Spy trial at! Vian citizen, who was chief of a
Hondonin, Southern Moravia, | political group, and who believed

he was in danger of imminent

were questioned to-day about the ’
arrest., when the refugee was re-

murder of a Czech Police Office:



by. each country in local|last January, the News Agency | fused_a safe conduct by Peru on
currency to equal E.C.A | reported. All 16, who included | the grounds that it had no legal
assistance.) two priests, are accused of spying, | obligation to refer the dispute to
4. An amendment instructing| high treason and terrorist activi- | the International Court. The
E.C.A. wherever possible “to} ties against the regime. court is asked to state whether
minimise the burden of the . Colombia was competent to grant
European recovery _—opt ml meine of the accused, Antony asylum, and whether Peru is
gramme on the American | her pe alleged to-day that ‘he | hound to give safe conduct to the
ea 98 : defendant Czech Army deserter, | .ofigee s : “4n leave the
taxpayer by reducing the! Jaroslav Vetejska, shot the officer refugee so that he could aoe
amount of dollar purchases "\ from behind, but Busik admitted Country. ais —

—Reuter. |

Scelba
Clamps
“Red Belt”



ROME, March 2}
Amid mounting tension in
Italy's northern industrial “Red

belt”, the Communist led Confed-
eration of Labour was to-day de-
ciding whether to stage a new
trial of strength with the Govern-
ment,
Police
ary
with

were taking “prelimin-
security measures” to deal
any fresh clashes between

|workers and police,

The Confederation’s Executive
Committee was holding an emer- |
gency session to plan country-
wide reaction to new Government
orders for “suppression of dis-
order.”

The orders were issued over the

| weekend by Signor Mario Scelba, |

Minister in the
Coalition Govern-
ment. They revised a law “pre-
viously not applied forbidding
meetings in factories, without the
management's consent.

They also empowered provin-
jcial Prefects to forbid public
j}meetings or demonstrations in
troubled areas.-Reuter

“iron” Home
three-Party



| Report Denied

LONDON, March 21
A Ministry of Supply spokes-



the

the’ United

| Flogging Is Not The Answer

|in Britgin of assaults and gangster

em- | operations.
Lord Goddard, The Lord Chief

| they consider a deterrent to crimes

of violence.

Justice, and other judges have
Lord|recently deplored their loss of
highest;}power to order flogging, whic

) an in London to-day denied
| that two atom scientists were
‘missing from Harwell

commenting on a rt in the
London “Daily Graphic’ ’ this

morning, which said two top-level |

United States-born atom scientists
“have suddenly disappeared from
Britain”.
Scotland Yard also categorical-
ly denied the report to-day.
—(Reuters)



4,700,000 Unemployed
In The States :

WASHINGTON, March 21

A Government economist to-
day expressed concern over
“creeping” unemployment

throughout the United States.
Unemployment figures last
month reached a new postwar re-
cord of 4,700,000 and officials pre-
dicted it would reach the five
million mark in early summer.

Atomic |
; |. | Energy Research establishment, |
Sir Alexander Cadogan, Britain's; or from any other Ministry atomic

research establishment. We were |

|
|
|



that he himself fired several shots
at the dying office A woman
jefendant charged with having

Pope Receives

lured the officer into a dark alley, | - a >

where he was murdered, denied Spanish I retender

she had acted with the intention

of damaging the regime. | VATICAN CITY, March 21.
Prague radio said one defen-} Don Juan, Pretender to the

dant, Josef Pospisil, had pleaded | Spanish Throne, was received in

guilty and confessed to taking| private audience with the Pope
part in acts of terrorism, aimed | to-day in the Vatican Palace. The
at causing alarm among the popu- | Audience lasted 20 minutes. Don

Juan is on a Holy Year pilgrim-
age to Rome. —(Reuter.)

lation.
——Reuter



Gf VI only Vhe bes will de

R
ae








> ‘

i

g 4! /
: rh
4 (3
iD
;

To mark those occasions
when charm, perfection
and easy confidence are

the keynote, nothing could
be more in keeping

than a cigarette bearing
the hallmark of

Benson & Hedges,
Old Bond Street, London=—
when only the best will do.

In tins of 50

$1.06





BY APPOINTMENT
TOBACCONSTS To *
HE MAUESTY THE KING

SUPER VIRGINIA CIGARETTES
BY

BENSON «./ HEDGES

Describing the present crime D
wave as “very grave” in some re- A partment of Commerce | OLD BOND STREET, LONDON
lspects, the Lord Chancellor said | Spokesman said the growth in ° é ,
lthe had still ¢ 7 so if long , | Population was outstripping job
¥ ag ‘ A oO © On. “ht : 5 : a : ~s
i ee . Santi, | capacity ft ih nt oft jg gf
Se eee ne ann | The unemployment trend at the crt Pe ttt “rte mn
‘ ren nan ort =SeTIVENCeS } moment was not a cause for any | bas



jcoupled

th flogging.
—Reuter.

alarm, he said.—Reuter



:





RSS et ae re ee ee

wednesday
March sz
19590.













4AK TELLS KING —
OLD TO STAY OUT
pat Send Prince Baudouin

* BRUSSELS, March 21.
HENRI SPAAK, Belgium’s former Socialist Prem. |

ight appealed to King Leopold to send back his)
Baudouin, around whom all Belgians rally.
ran open letter published in the Socialist Le Peuple. |
1d the King to stay away and be content with
victory which, according to Spaak, the referer












the question brought him. |
*ivean a free hand by his party’s fierce anti-Leopolc |
, Max Buset, to negotiate with Eyskens on
———e Spaak’s free hand implies that |
: the Socialists have softened the r|.
arty secept a formula providing for the |
el | King’s return for a limited period
@ His 19 year old son Prince Bau-!
: Greece }douin. Spaak is understood |
! 24 “de- |
‘ ferred abdication” from the
ATHENS, March 21. |a referendum was first mooted,
i the formation of No Government Yet
ition Government. Bligium tonight is still without
Gaston Eyskens has so far been
unable to form an administration

who has led the anti-Leopold campaign, ha:

don in the national interest, it was learned tonight.
standpoint and would probabiy}
ee n | only. |
hi wo | He would then be succeeded by |
to|

have favoured a formula of

time |
6 Party leaders to- | but his party opposed it. |
a Government. Caretaker Premier |
tied Generel to replace his Catholic-Liberal


















t ago. The
M. Emanuel Tsou-
of a small group of

ves,

leaders were meet-
a‘ Napoleon Zer-
wed to enter the Centre
‘with his seven-seat Con-
National Party. Observ-

ke

igypt

mmunists
CAIRO, March 21.
authorities said today
pélieved their arrest of
t Communists yester-
‘struck the hardest blow

inst the underground
movement in the















ic





ome of them
Central Com-
n Communist

‘a new Gov- kens had forecast a new Coali-

Oo formed to-day or tion “within hours”, ;
; Meanwhile, Socialist members
of Parliament announced that

coalition, which resigned on Sat-
urday.

In talks between leaders of ‘he |
Catholic and Liberal Parties, a
hardening of the Liberal Opposi-
tion to the return of King Leopold
appears tonight to have compro-
mised plans for vhe early forma-
tion of a new coalition.

Earlier, Prime .Minister Eys-

they would lead “Stop Leopold”
parades in the _ industrialised
south on Friday, when 3,000,000
workers will stage a strong one
day “warning” strike against the
King’s restoration.

They said they would
demonstrations through Liege,
Mons and Charleroi centres of
French-speaking, anti - Leopold
Wallonia, Re-affirming their op-
position to Leopold’s restoration,
the Socialist members of Parlia-
ment also today gave 10,000 Bel-
gian francs to the fighting fund
of “Stop—Leopold” action commit-
tees’, formed for the party,
trade unionists. and other social-
ist supporters.

The tense labour situation eased
a little today when Antwerp and

lead



ied Hilel Schwartz,| 10,000 Brussels “Stop Leopold”
‘Russian origin, born in| strikers return to work.
wife. The growing threat of stop-










on two houses in the
le. class Cairo suburb
Polis,’ Police seized a
of Communist pro-

om






of which, they said,
new type.

ons were
: workers,
h to revolt against their
living conditions. The
seized the Central



s accounts, showing the “delaying tactic” by the Anti- |
ot their funds to spread}; eonold faction within the party. |
-in Egypt and how —Reuter.

Wy has been spent. The
n try of the Interior
in 1947 to arrest Schwartz,
mown as a professional
agitator and propa-



tz disappeared for three
phalf years, but turned up
im the eve of the Egyptian
early this year.
: —Reuter. |



at Chicago Hos-
» — successfully
“a a kidney from
og to another. They
pra one day be pos-

F opera-
oh human beings, and
PS or prolong the
, of such dis-
‘8 cancer.—Reuter

Got Some

, 700 Million
US. Dollars

SHINGTON, March 21

ican tourists
of nearly

Sh

in,

of it went to Canada
ihe West Indies, and Cen-
commerce de-
Office of business
mt this,’ and re-
: Europe ‘and
“countries
in Amer:

icans

Pendit 7 R.A.F. programme, .
Migher naes, SBOE RE on 00 would be spent this| THREE STILL TO REPLY
F —Renter. |year, an ote ee. LONDON, March 2i
; sai P atany *u 3 "1 0. anc t, pt nave
! Feeney aoe mate ae enael level of Cuba, Ecuad r, nd Eg pt have
ete in the’ service would not yet replied to British attempts
NOT RE expersence : more men were to end the deadlock im the United
SIGNING Gecline, unless â„¢m ; ima avd the |

quer,
} &-—Reuter













































RITAIN WILL SPEND —
23,000,000 ON R.A.F. —

is developing advanced types of jet fighters with
approaching that of sound—well over 600 miles an |
Minister, Arthur Henderson, told Parliament

dn nate teal

travel last | e

the

1 drew
ican travel
! spent
in Canada and 135,-

: ' Mexico, The 1949 total

Sir Stafford

pages is causing a ruin on food-
stuffs, and some shopkeepers have
sold out their tinned stocks.
Workers were today reconstruct-
ing and reconditioning the Royel
Palace at Laeken, outside Brussels.

Circles close to the Government
said the Liberal call for party
discipline along the lines of the
party’s official opposition to the
King’s return was regarded as a



FOUR AMBUSHED
AND KILLED
SINGAPORE, March 2}.

Terrorists ambushed a mobile
police patrol today on an estate
in Kedah, killing a British Police
Sergeant and three Malay con-
stables and wounding a special
constable.—RKeuter.

LONDON, March 21.

|} sponse from the Church of Rome.

|



able to fly at

These fighters,

§ . textreme heights, and se rs
wap follow the new jet fighter, the

Kidneys Venom, which Royal Air ae
CAG squadrons will be using next year.
ie ar Crees, 3: “All Britain’s day fighter and

ground attack squadrons overseas
are equipped with this jet aircraft,
except three squadrons in the Far
East, Henderson said. ae
Henderson said _ that Britain
has a jet night fighter in an ad-
vanced stage of development with
a performance comparable to
jet fighters.
oh the jet night fighters, now
being fitted with up to date radio
and radar aids, would also be able
to fight by day in weather that
would ground day fighters.

Guided Missile

Henderson said that scientists
were working on a new advanced
“air - to - air” guided missile.
Fighter planes, keeping out
range of the enemy’s guns, coul
launch it against modern bomb-

rs. ; Jr
The Air Minister said Britain
was “very grateful” to the Ameri-
cans for the, 70 Superfortresses. | |
Britain’s bomber force woud
be mainly equipped with =
and the new jet bomber, ow
Canberra, until the _ advance
model went to production.

Henderson, who was opening a

said

willing to stay for further servic®



} 220,000 a year ag
day.—-Reuter

debate on the estimates for next

; n
: IN, March 21 The strength of
noes to-day de- jApril 1951 e?
that Chancellor jabout 198,800 .

Barbados

a

200 MILE









Aduncate o



IN 3 HOURS 29 MINS.



WORK COMMENCED YESTERDAY on temporary alterations to the Terminal Building at Sea-

well,

vacated and incoming

and outgoing

Workmen are seen on the job which is expected to be finished in ten days. The terminal
building has had to be temporarily

passengers are dealt

with in the Airport Manager’s quarters which has been hurriedly “pressed into service.”

Finds £10,000
In Backyard |

MELBOURNE, March 21.
Wedderburn, normally a quie
little country town 140 miles nortl



of here, was firmly established
today as the world’s latest “boon
town”. Visitors and sights
newsreel cameramen, press tu
graphers and reporters havs
poured into the town since tt

news broke over the weekend tha
farmer Dave Buttevick had quietly |

and secretly dug up £10,009
(Australian) worth of gold in h
backyard during the lest lf
months

“House Full” notices now swit
over the doors of the two local
hotels. No more accommodation i
available,

Feverish digging is going on it
the back gardens, and streets ai
being torn up.

The Town Council has approved
the sinking of seven shafts in tw
streets, and nine applications fox
miners’ rights have been lodged
Two _ residents, who have sunk
Shafts in their backyards are
getting some gold at 10 feet.

Already the local grocer, Albert
Smith, has found a 75 ounce gold
nugget in the mainstreet, and
yesterday farmer Butterick’s mine |
yielded a 70 ounce nugget, estim- |
ated to be worth from £73@ to |}
£1,000 (Australian).

It was found at a depth of 12
feet. The residents of Wedderburn
are convinced that beneath the
town’s main streets runs a channel |
of gold, a fortune in wealtt }



Lukewarm

Response |

CHELMSFORD, March 21 |

The Anglican Bishop of Chelms-
ford, Dr. H. Wilson, said today
that a move to unite all Christian
forces “in face of anti-Christian
Communism” had produced only |
“Jukewarm and patronising” re-



Siroky, appointed Foreig

Ss y letter, Dr. Wilson _ eign
In. his monthly Dr. W nl aainister’ “tor” sipeeaa Victabe
said Rome had conceded only ements Sen alee te
“conversation of a limited type- ey as addressing the

hedged about by safeguards.” |
“This sort of approach can neve!
get anywhere, for differences of |
any sort and particularly religious
differences can never be resolved,
unless complete frankness and
wholehearted honesty and sym-
pathy are displayed by all parties
Reuter,



Bogota Rains

Disrupt Transport

BOGOTA, March 12

Unusually heavy rains in Co-
Jumbia have disrputed transporv,
and petrol has had to be severely
rationed in Bogota because of
floods hampering railways into
the capital.

The highway from Popayan to
Cali in western Colombia has been
cut.—Reuter.

BAR DR. SANDER |
|

excites tiniest eee

MANCHESTER, New Hamp-
shire, March 21
Two Roman Catholic hospitals
here have now barred Dr. Her-
mann N. Sander, recently acquitted
of a “mercy murder” charge,
The Notre Dame and Sacred
Heart hospitals both said their



|

staffs had voted to bar Dr. Sander |

Vice-Premier,

day
Policy was based on intensifying

Lie Calls For 20
Year Programme

Between

irygve

ql

‘Sports Window

EMPIRE meet Notre Dame
in a Second Division fixture
at Queen’s Park this eve-
ning. This will be the first
outing for Notre Dame in
the Second Division, they

having won the Third Divis-
on Competition in the 1949
season.

On the strength of their
win they have been pro-
moted to the Second Divis-
ion, Mr, F. Edwards will he
the refétee, :

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL
ASSOCIATION
Today's Fixture

Harkliffe vs. St. Mat-
thew’s Old Boys’ Associa-
tion St. Leonard’s
Grounds

Referee: Mr, O. Graham.

—_—
a a SS. a



Czechs Will
Strengthen Bond
With Russia

PRAGUE, March 21.

Siroky, Czechoslovak
in his first state-
ment as Foreign Minister, said to-
that Czechoslovak Foreign

Vilia

and Strengthening Czechoslovak
friendship with Soviet Russia and
all the People’s Democracies.

Parliamentary Committee debat-
ing the Foreign Ministry’s budget
estimates for 1950,

Siroky said the present interna-
tional situation was characterised
by the intensifying of the strug-
gle between the “camp of Capital-
ist reaction” and the “camp of
peace and progress”.

Siroky said that within Czecho-
slovakia the struggle was going on
between the new Socialist world
and the dying remnants of Capi-
talism.

Attempts
from abroad
issuance to
slovakia’s

were being made
to give systematic
members of Czecho-
former capitalist class

and to organise espionage and
sabotage.

He said the Vatican and the
High Church Hierarchy in

Czechoslovakia were attempting
to abuse the religious feelings of
the people for the aims of Capital-
ist reaction.

“We are firmly determined to
render such interference with our
internal affairs useless” Siroky
declared.—Reuter.



TWO PILOTS KILLED
IN PLANE CLASH

_TOULON, March 21.
Two military training planes
collided in mid-air near here to-

‘day killing the two pilots. One

plane had its tail torn off before

" ractising institu- |¢crashing in a backgarden. The
ae practising in their instity loiear exploded.tn tat ae
Dr. Sander, who was found —Reuter.

not guilty on March 9 of havin
murdered a cancer ridden patient
Mrs. Borroto, also faces an un
disclosed accusation by the, Hills-
borough County Medical Society
—Reuter.





Na Security ¢

on of e Chinese €



Gove €



Press repo! the ppr
Ihad failed were untrue, he added.

—Reuter



i

Flogging Is Not The Answer

LONDON, March 21,
| The Government today em-
|phatically rejected flogging as the





answer to Britain’s crime wave. |Justice, and other judges have throughout the United States, | SUPE +a
Viscount Jowitt, the Lord|recently deplored their loss of Unemployment figures last SUPER VIRGINIA CIGARETTES
Chancellor (Britain's highest|}power to order flogging, whic! month reached a new postwar re- BY
judicial functionary, said in the| they consider a deterrent to crimes cord of 4,700,000 and officials pre- | Tey “Ty ¥
House of Lords, “We have no! of violence. dicted i would reach the five | EVSON and. EDGES
intention of reintroducing it.” Describing the present crime ee eae eres | ; Ta
ust year, Parliament wave as “ve ave” in some re- oT VD STREET. nb s
i lg os, guage a >| the rte ‘a till ; oA if le ngex population was outstripping job ; :
olitically qu ey had still to's f lon | capacity ae 0 a ae
per tee $- Uaide rita oesie taal ffective | ‘The unemployment trend at the Serle Le et tt eg”
eterre than ort entence . as monn © ain wos
j : . vnestaee ty . innsde th flogging ee ae ean a cause for any | &
_ Jowit $s opening a two day|coupled with fi ng. ym, he said—Reu
debate on the present outbroak Reuter. ante, nee

‘ Jet Plane Breaks Record:

Controlied By Radar.

U.S. Senate |
_ Approve
_ EL.R.P. Fund

WASHINGTON, March 21

The Senate Foreign Relations
Committee today wnanimously
approved the Administracion'’s

full $3,100,000,000
covery Programme.

The House of Representative
has voted to cut $1,000,000,000 oi
‘ash from the fund and substivut
ne value in American farn. sur- |
pluses for European Recovery

There will presumably be
Senate-House dispute before the |
figures are finally reconciled, Bb
Chairman of the Senate
| Committee said he vaought Con |
gress would eventually reject the
Hiouse Committee’s proposal, |
The House Foreign Affairs Com-
mittee voday approved a state-
ment favouring collaboration by
the free people of Asia for self

European Re-

the

help to protect their indepen-
cence.
The policy statement was ap-|

proved as parv of the Foreign Aid|

H=RTFORDSHIRE, March 21
BRITAIN’S De Havilland Comet—the world’s
first all-jet passenger plane—flew 1,300 miles
to Copenhagen and back today in 3 hours and 29

minutes.
The De Havilland “Comet” was controlled on the first

part of the flight by a radar unit in London. It was followed
by long distance radar for more than 100 miles at 30,000
feet cruising speed. The radar operators found no diffi-
culty in controlling the fast moving plane.

WASHINGTON, March 21
Republican Senator Wherry of
Nebraska today accused Secretary
of State Dean Acheson of “under-
mining our national economy and
losing the peace” in a speech pre-

pared for delivery in his state
Wherry said: “Apparently he has
become so powerful as the idol of
the leftwing ‘“Appease Russia”

omearesigni 4! Normal time for the return air
\trip is about seven hours. Five
| days ago, the Comet—the “plane
ruman | of the future’”—set up a record
lin streaking to Rome and back to

| Britain in under four hours.”
Defends | There is no official record for
|the London-Copenhagen flight.
} Captain Cunningham also flew the
|Comet to Rome, He is now De

Cc eson | Havilland’s chief test pilot.

| The famous night fighter pilot,
| John Cunningham, took the Comet
/to the Danish capital in 1 hour
and 42 minutes this morning. But
his time from checkpoint to
checkpoint, once he was in the
air, was only one hour and 20
minutes. :
Headwinds slowed him coming
back to one hour 47 minutes from
take-off tc landing.
British Overseas Airways Cor-



Lie, United Nations Secretary-General,
called on the United States and Russia to adopt a “twenty
year programme to win peace








Bill for the 12 months beginning | agitators, that President Truman) notion official, Sir Wiles Comas
July 1. The Committee is near] is fearful, should he fire Acheson, “By : “pew that b the end of next
the end of work on this measure.’ he will lose the support of the ihn ae rarl 1952 the Comet was
Chairman John Kee said the; Socialistic pressure group.” oecaai te ts on regular service
Committee contemplated only Two Republican Congressmen nr : Britain, through Cairo to
economic co-operation, nov mili-| attacked Acheson in the House Kare ‘hi and Calcutta, and might
tary, with nations of Asia. yesterday for allowing Valentin pomp ; te, Sedinen. ie a ser-
ma m The Senate Committee also Gubitchev, convicted Russian sp) spr Siem pl, link London
U.S.—Soviets approved; ; ,'0 be deported and so escape “) ity Australia in under 40 hours.
he An amendment aeciaring it/ 15-year prison sentence —Reuter
WASHINGTON, March 21. is the sense of Congress,” that| President ee last night :
; no Marshall Plan nation shal!| made it clear that he approv: ae
tonight discriminate against Unit Acheson's conduct and polici¢ Peru Files

States business. This replace Reuter

an earlier proposal to cut oft |
}
}

”

Counter-Charge



a pe ues’ west and West to use dollars from countries who did}
he United Nations for “give and discriminate. . © THE HAGUE, March 21.
take” negotiations, : 2. Am amendment authorising | oman Denies The Peruvian Government filed
rene before the National the Economic Co-operation | a lengthy counter charge in the
Sonvention of Bnai Brith, a Jew- ; | on | Inte ional Court of Justice here
: cater wef Administration to — spent Ch. ly ETRE EEE OU Se Sean
ish organisation, Lie asked the $600,000,000 to establish arge 1 oday, giving its views in the
two great Powers to “get to- Givveney claaeine house : es | Colombia-Peruvian Asylum case,
gether on the first steps of such ietasin a ee nee ' . ls | submitted to the Court last Octo-
a United Nations Peace Pro- SUFeER sUrOpe s the Euro-| Py ria { ber.
gramme without delay’ oa - gg Payments Union lhe case arose from the asylum
“IT do not believe in political | °- oe amendment requiring PRAGUE, March 21 siven by the Colombian Embassy
miracles,” Mr. Lie said. “It will “.C.A., wheneyer practical, t¢| Phyree of the 16 defendants in Lima to Mr. Victor Raul, a Peru-
take a long series of steps to re- use counterpart funds the Czechoslovak Spy trial at! Vian citizen, who was chief of a

duce the tensions of the conflict
and biing the great Powers to-
gether.”

promote the economic unity! Hondonin, Southern Moravia,
of Western Europe. (counter-| were questioned to-day about thé
part funds are funds allocated | murder of a Czech Police Office:

political group, and who believed
he was in danger of imminent
; arrest., when the refugee was re-
think ’

do not the

“Equally I by each country in local| las ry WSs . sed a si : >
x . aljlast January, the News, Agency | fused.a safe conduct by Peru on
TN itepe ta ie fab oe seee- currency to equal £E.C.A./reported, All 16, who included | the grounds that it had no legal
tiation and conciliation” assistance.) | two priests, are accused of spying, obligation to refer the dispute to
The. danger of an indefinite 4. An amendment instructing; high treason and terrorist activi- | the International Court. The
continuation of the cold:-war in E.C.A. wherever possible “to ties against the regime. court is asked to state whether
this age of the atom bomb, the minimise the burden of Che” enn Ge: dhe ioctl. hci Colombia was competent to grant
hydrogen bomb and bacteriologi- European recovery —_pro-| Busi, alleged to-day that the | (Yim | ane whether Peru is
cal weapons is too great”. gramme on the Amer ican | dete dant ‘Cre ‘} ‘aeno Gacerter, | ane tere bans conduct to..the
Mr. Lie made it clear that his taxpayer” by reducing the! Scrosinn Veicicka, shot eserter's | refugee so that he could leave the
‘ ‘ ’ : Jaroslav Vetejska, shot the officer |

country. Reuter.

amount of dollar purchases:”

—Reuter,

definition of negotiation did not
mean “surrender or appeasement”



jfrom behind, but Busik admitted
|that he himself fired several shots





by either side. iiliia at the dying officer A woman 2

“T mean negotiation — which na Jefendant Chavet with havins Pope Receives
reunaes oe gre eae, by lb lured the officer into a dark alley,| ., - h P d

»oth sides” he said. “ ave been Se where he was murdered, denied | 2 »
encouraged by the genuine re- e a she had acted with the intention Spanis reten er
affirmations fron: the two lead- : i of damaging the regime. | VATICAN CITY, March 21.
ing Great Powers — the United Clam s Prague radio said one defen-| Don Juan, Pretender to the
States and the Soviet Union- Pp dant, Josef Pospisil, had pleaded |Spanish Throne, was received in
about the possibilities of peaceful 66 Hg? guilty and confessed to taking} private audience with the Pope
co-existence between them and Red Belt : part in acts of terrorism, aimed | to-day in the Vatican Palace. The
between the different economic at causing alarm among the popu- | Audience lasted 20 minutes, Don

and political systems they repre-
sent.” The United Nations was
founded upon that belief and the
hope of world peace depends
upon its validity.—Reuter

Juan is on a Holy Year pilgrim-
age to Rome. — (Reuter.)

ROME, March 21, | ‘tion.

Amid mounting tension in
Italy’s northern industrial “Red
belt”, the Communist led Confed-
eration of Labour was to-day de-
ciding whether to stage a new
trial of strength with the Govern-
| ment.

Police were taking “prelimin-
Jary security measures” to deal

Poland Releases
}with any fresh clashes between

British Subject
} workers and police,

ee March 21. | ‘The Confederation’s Executive
Four hours after receiving ®|Committee was holding an emer-
British protest, Polish authorities |cency session to plan country-
ey aes oe aged = ne subject | wide reaction to new Government
ro a r 1S . “ 2 He atl
Sir Ronald Gainer, British Am- ae foe “euapeeeme: Of dis-
bessedat, pamaees to ya Polish The orders were issued over the |
ure of Polish Soe Ouaag ‘Mord somes ae vous Tee ports
“iron” ome inister in the
ee woe had disappeared OM |three-Party Coalition Govern-
ra Pee: em ,.|ment. They revised a law “pre-
The mystery of Kornhauser’s|viously not applied forbidding
— to are ae plane Med |meetings in factories, without the
ritain was explained yesterday | management's consent.
in a Polish note saying he had| They also empowered provin-

~—-Reuter



|





Whew only the best wilt ber









been arrested. No reason was |cial Prefects to forbid publi
given. , Ar |meetings or demonstrations in }
The Foreign Ministry tele-|troubled areas.—Reuter

phoned the Embassy later to-day
to say that Kornhauser had been
released.—Reuter.



\ §



_ Report Denied

. | arch 9 |
Cadogan Resigns LONDON, Merch .3} To mark those occasions
when charm, perfection
and easy confidence are
the keynote, nothing could
be more in keeping
than a cigarette bearing
the hallmark of

Benson & Hedges,
Old Bond Street, London=—

when only the best will de.

A Ministry of Supply spokes-
sg in London to-day denic:| |

U.N. Council Job that two atom scientists wer
‘missing from Harwell Atomic |

: LONDON, March 21. | Energy Research establishment,
opations diel ahtae taave \ or ohne yd oe Mey atomic
, s v . lishm 7 were
hard hitting speeches often riled corasnaiiel on a = rt ~ the!
| the Soviet delegates, is retiring “s| London “Daily Graphic’ ’ this’
British representative on the) morning, which said two top-level |
Security Council, the Foreign} United States-born atom scientists |
ee tee, that ia 0 will | eere meaner Giangpeared. from |
be succeeded by Sir Hubert Scotland Yard also categorical-|
Gladwyn Jebb, a leading Foreign ly denied the report to-day.
te expert on the United — (Reuters) |
a

man



—heouter. }
4,700,000 Unemployed
In The States

WASHINGTON, March 21.







In tins of 50



| in Britain of assaults and gangster A Government economist to- | .
operations. , day expressed concern over | > 1.06 ee :
| Lord Goddard, The Lord Chief{“¢ ' @.¢@ ping” unemployment | | WS MAJESTY THE KONG












“SDNESDAY, MARCH 99

ae » 195

PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE



cee ee rem gn Ne



eee te tn erate “eS SIA ee NE NR TTL AER SRR ee ert nes Meme eee Oe neater

7 “Miss Lee says she has been playing the pj
: . : [ OOK UP! unable to continue her activities movement en re My
ee ees et PL ae Mae i . with an operatic society. She is she demonstrates, ‘ingen,
See ; : MANCHESTER; (By Mail) unable to play tennis which she say she must “have ne ly 4



















































A Manchester court has upheld enjoyed before able skill.” ad
British women’s right to waik “She has had to discontinue
down the street with their noses
the air.
Miss Beatrice Rathbone Lee,

38-year-old book tog ll Eh Rupert and the Dragon Phe
ee 4 Uy ~



R. G. F. CLAY, Agricultural ~
Advisor to the Secretary of
State for the Colonies and Mr,

:. A. de K.. Frampton, Agricultural

« Made Him Very Popular
"Wi INNER last week of the

Men’s Singles ‘in the P.O,
Savings Bank, London, Table



—




POCKET CARTOON
By OSBERT LANCASTER




treasurers department













Advisor of the Colonial Develop- Tennis Championships is Theo chester Corporation, hurt her

i ment and Welfare in Barbados Campbell of Jamaica. He was shoulder and knee when she

arrived yesterday from British also runner -up in the Men's tripped’ on a tilted sidewalk block

; Guiana by B.W.1.A., on their way Doubles. “Theo played very well near her home at Didsbury,

; to Dominica, St. Vincent, Grenada and cleverly”, said one official of Manchester.

1 and St, Lucia. They will leave the Post Office, Theo plays cricket She sued Manchester Corpora-

; for Dominica on the ‘Lady Nelson’. too, in fact, is an _ all-round tan ,

! Mr. Clay was met at the airport sportsman. This, has made him a s

i by the Governor's Private Secre- a very popular figure in the Sav- Judge Wallington, deciding

: tary, Mr. W. Lambert and he is ings Bank, where he is employed there had been negligence in re-

; staying at Government House. as 4 Clerical Officer. pairing the sidewalk, awarded her

On Five-Day Visit Farewell Party damages of $1,430,800 as well as

R. J. T. MUSE, Export HERE was a farewell party Miniature straw hats decorate : costs. (The bill for legal costs is

a M aaa > on Saturday night for Miss he ad - which secure this estimated at $1,400).

: Manager for Andrews Livet Daphne Rocheford, daughter of je Mirman G 98 the § eens Beatrice had insisted that she .

| Salt arrived from British Guiana ad shee eT eee, 2. cite "Welee eT 9 gg gg eon pesto mx auaals diy: dine,

ee ae Se indsbury Road. She is one stray. ces her ered et ear Basi Nield, cited an a peal court Soon the shouting ceases. Pong- ,
\ in rake tha’ Cmat Hindsbury Road. She is one of cia a eae Basil Nie e p 0 : , oo t-te :
Barbados. He is touring t yee ‘4 Fi the girls who left last night on London Espress Service Same et judgment which he claimed set Ping comes out, and instead of weer eh tt back and
: will b 7 Pcs tan Wanward ° a a auraer ‘i oa the Gascogne to do auxiliary work oe out clearly that even when step- looking angry he is smiling all over another one."

wi e going to ard comes ‘ in U.K. Hospitals. ——--———_ ping onto a curb a pedestrian 1s his face. ‘* Hullo, Rupert,” he cries, him," enum

and Leeward Islands when ne private enterprise and Barbadian Ambassador not bound to look down. “I'm sorry | passed you so rudely laughs, "Come

i leaves here. He is a guest at the allowing people to marry HEE latest hawa of Adee Hume Regular Visitor 4 + Judge Wallington, giving judg- just now, | was a bit worried. } this rocket,” he ae
f Marine Hove. . just whom they like, with- "El oe ‘Wa ont, 0 . . ' . R RAYEOND HORNIEU Bri e ace ment, said: hought some: Srawcrks feo @8r:. of

i To Be Married out a properly regulated seuiant in England’ plying pro- who is a regular visitor 6 ta Pater 1ap asnem. seein

i Shortly system of Government-issued 0 eg “4 ’ Sees



enjoying his stay immensely. He from Martinique. He returned io Bridegrooms throughout Brit-
of Hon. H. A. Cuke, O.B.E..

admires England and finds Mid- Martinique yesterday by ihe ain afte “setting the date” before { | te
; M.L.C,, and Mrs. Cuke left for Hote! Manager dlesbrough, where he.is living at Gassagns. From Martinique he Easter to gain $100 in sneune wae SEA VIEW GUEST

‘ British Guiana yesterday by M* Cc S. GONSALVES, Present, interesting and pleasant. will be going to Rio and New reliefs through the possession 0 HOUSE ith °
B.W.LA. Manager of the Park Hotel, He was recently interviewed York and then returning for a wife.

: / 9a weakly hewans i " ister offices
On March 30, she will be one of Georgetown’s largest hotels, by & weekly ith oi areal, Eng- another short stay. He was the Churches and reg ‘a
married to Mr. Enzo Giglioli, son which is situated along Main land, and he did some useful work guest of Mr. and Mrs. P. Blondin are swamped with wedding appli

| ISS MADGE CUKE, daugh matrimonial permits.” bation methods is that he is Barbados is a retired businessman LONDON. Pr ee ae
3 =, daughter és: |

HASTINGS, BARBADOS



tiglioli ater” Abpan eee Lg sveq{ 2 telling the people of England ¢r ardé cations for March 25 — the last}}) EXCELLENT CUISINE cece

seneciet o Sisk waar gee oe aaa ra ; org 7 what life in Barbados is like. ° Leneiireh aeme arene. date on which cneeereons be t FULLY STOCKED BAR

7 ; s a oat i ees a nd ro"! He was amazed at their ignor- . im marriage allowance for : \

wedding will take place at St. British Guiana to spend two ance about one of Britain’s oldest On Long Leave wreale of the present financial |: RATES: $5.00 per Day & {|

Andrew’s at ne months’ holiday here. Temporarily colonies R. GORDON KINCH, son of year. ) upwards
: and Hon. anc rs. Cuke and their he js a guest at the Marine Hotel a 3 y Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Kinch, of * Londen. Came alias :
i son Mr. Henry Cuke will be leav- May Visit Barbados Left By ‘Gascogne Worthing who has been spending he senaee? ft See cb Sane | (Inclusive)
| ing here on March 28., to attend ce : ae RS. Annie J. Douglas-Smith, two months with his parents here, '°" t Apply—
NRACITA FAULKNER, | the P. liament, has thirty couples te Mrs. W. §. HOWELL

the wedding. G . rn eee At wife of Mr. Aubrey Douglas- left yesterday by the Gascogne for arry on March 25. Most regis-

Her parents and many of her ‘\* celebrated Soprano from New gmith, Resident Tutor of the West England where he will spend ™












































































































































SHIRTS —

from AMERICA!
The ‘SAGAMORE’ Shirt | |

in Plain Shades

$6.98

Tke “RHODE” shirt

in White Only

$5.03
EVANS & WHITFIELDS

The English AERTEX SPORTS

in White Only o-

The “BUSHMAN” Shirt

Pe) Or
in Khaki d: 2

aad Talend Ane : : Q and ministers in London ‘Ask your
: friends were at Seawell to see her York may soon be making final Jydian University, and their young another four manths with his! —_ rovinces expect to work x Askton & PB 7 lafants’ 1
; plans and arrangements that will n Geoffrey left for England H t Scotl ane ep shton ‘arsons lufants’ owders ure
. off. ce : na : son Geoffrey left for ngland sister. He hopes to visit Scotland,| -entime —IN-S. Mother to soothing at teething time, ‘They ensure
f Please Mention — 7” ica ; eee (tour of the yesterday by the Gascogne. She Ireland and possibly France. ; motions, cool the blood and ss i
? HORT, grey haired, soft spoken puto principal localities in the has been in Barbados Since Gordon works with the United| ato $$$ GLOBE give you them next time baby is fretful through od
: and is densi man is Rev Islands the eeench’ Wert Indies September, Mr. Douglas-Smith is Geophysical Co., with headquar- |
: ; ae an ey ag -slands, the French West Indies expected to remain here until ters in Caracas < is on lon r ; i 5
C. E. eBiles of the Church cf and other points of interest along se 1951 h aoe Caracas and is on long CROSSWORD Last Showing TONITE 8.4 ie
Scotland, who has been spending the line. Short Surprise Visit oe ; JOHN GARFIELD in...
\ six weeks’ vacation at the [f everything is working accord- ‘ lida | | a wel ” ,
Y.M.C.A. He returned to Demerara jing to plan, she may have already R. H. H. HART, Controller of on Be. Ho | FORCE OF EVIL TF
| yesterday by B.W.1.A. _ started on her tour, but no con- Finance, and Mrs. Hart iia rectiily “griiedl i ian —_—— a s
ss He has been in , Beltiats Gulati firmation has yet been received le tt Barbados some time ago for Relies Ailane@ tian the THU IRSDAY 8.30 p.m.
sifce 1905, preacning the good Mr. Walter G. P. Chambers, Trinidad, where they were to join Guse %#g arrival. left on. this THE HOT-SHOTS
; word. Now he lives in Clonbrook, Organist and Pianist of St. John's a Tanker which would take them ie fentetnes ae 7 ote in 3 ;
East Coast, Demerara, and he told Antigua will be her accompanist {> England. Yesterday afternoon, a GK. Mr “Stockdale pedicel vs,
t es ee he comes here See throughout the tour. they paid nae a ee = Attiched et Hecaiee ens oe AN ALL SPAR
almost once every two years, He : ‘ » prise return visit. Apparently ’ rey aMshAoathad BARBADOS BAN
never gets tired of the beautifi! Returning On The ‘Nelson’ tanker has been delayed and they while they vee i ae ees ; TWO SHOWS DAILY a
scenery Barbados has to offer. VAR. AND MRS. B.E.T. ELLISS, were able to secure passages on ate eee Ww ‘y oe _ pn | MATINEE 5 p.m EVENING 1.
“There is one point about most of Oakville, Toronto, Ontario the Gascogne, and Carib saw them oes. ane ae es. ——= TODAY AND TOMORROW (ONLY)
of the people who you write about are returning on the ‘Lady Nelson’ as they came ashore at the Baggage “@nning. WARNER'S EXCITING DOUBLE
in your column,” he told Carib, to Canada, Warehouse for the few hours that fF : , ‘ “THAT WAY “
“most of them say—‘they art Mr. Elliss is an Architect, well the Gascogne was at anchor in En route to England. il | ROYAL Worthings w arett to i any ty Ta i
coming again next year ‘and’ they known in England, as well a Carlisle Bay. |} RS. BEGG, wife of Lt. 3 me ’ ee a ny DARK’ (Acti)
have already made reservations Canada—They have been winter- Ian Begg, left yesterday i : ACTOss NO SHOW TO-DAY Dane CLARK — William LUNDIGAN
es ts ideas g Sacrat <, ar re of cn route for England by the} 4 48 cunning as a fox. (7) 4 ~ 5, J
for a return trip.’ No one eve ing oS eet rene and are full cf Tour Of of. a ne, to spend about three or 8. It’s in a real ee ee (Sy Last Show Thursday Coming Soon — TREASURE OF SIERRA MADRE"
ks 55 , ‘If God wills it,’ the delightful time they have spent > 7 =r ES Tice Presi. “ascogne, to s id abo s ‘0 The girl the green idol absor at 8.30
20, if you wey ‘that I hope to re- in Barbados—They love every. Mf": J, A. STEAD, Vice Presi- ‘oir months’ holiday there. bs am ie ee Tae DIAL _8404 FOR RESERVATION
ao, 24 “" , , nia ied B : dent of Methodist Confer- Lt. Col. Begg is also leaving| ‘!- This*ember lasts for days even REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL
turn in two years please mention thing about the island ence in England, and Mrs. Stead - : ; when it's cold, (8) Robert KENT, Peggy STEWART
‘If God wills it.’ Returni Tod ’ ae ao , 4“ Barbados shortly. He is going tc| iz, Nursery horse in a storm? (6) Ens ere
x0d wills it. teens oday left reaherey for waren by ae Dominica to work with the Colo t. $ranstormation in Kate. (0) . ie anne
° ETURNING home to-day by Gascogne. While in Barbados they be ° i to! 16. ch enigma has the layer “THE PHANTOM RIDER”
, “ : f ~* nial Development Corporation 3) Y _ NEMA
j Government Engineer B.WLA. via Trinidad is Mr. were the guests of Rev. and Mrs. jn 9 Citrus and Banana Planta-| 17. Sow the scot tells the crew to with LeROY MASON, George AQU ATIC CLUB CI (Mabers Co
HE Government Engineer who Ben Tishler, a representative of E. Griffin, at their home Epworth {ion | go. (4) J. LEWIs ” TONITE (WEDNESDAY) at 820 3
is Supervising the construc- Adam Hats and the Yan Heusen House, Fontabelle. They have “"t¢ is que to leave by the Lady | 4% Prin trom a steaming cup, (3) See Thrills, Chills, Thundering i Fy
: the »GP I viride tc 4 abel ; oh Sadhana’ Pash etiecie aere ae He is due to leave by the Lady | 91° radtes’ men. (5) Action BING CROSBY—ANN BLYTH—BARRY FITZGERALD |
tion of the new G.P.O. in George- Shirt Company of Canada He been here for two weeks. Mr. Stead yoison on Thursday. Mrs. Begs | 23. The measure of a fellow’s gown. HUME. CRONYN
town, Mr. R. V. Edwards, arrived was here for the past 1! days as_ has been on a tour of inspection of will probably be returning to ut (9) ‘ sale iui Wibiahetiatiie
nanteieiha ; ba Re santa ee at i stings: Hotel ethodist work > ies . | ae * if ’ said only a bra: rs0n ara
yesterday by B.W.LA., from B.G., j gu t at accompanied by his wife and they Mr. Tishler said i i I whic nh inclu ed visits to Jamaica, band in Dominica. 2b. Ate you sure he regrets? (4) TOP Oo z NIN
are spending two weeks’ holiday visit to the island and he had the Bahamas, Trinidad, St. Lucia, 2 My a 4 eS - Last Show tonight at 9.15 Hear Ann and Bing sing “You're in Love with
at Super Mare Guest House, enjoyed it so much that he plans St. Vincent, British Guiana and Off to U.K. pl Seaton tn teeth: aay ee ii iti ieee Bing sing other wonderful hits inculding “When Irish Byes Are Sm
Worthing. 40 TetUrn ext. yea Barbados, He is now returning T. COL. & Mrs. E. J. Haywood} 28. Is roe got from willow ? (5) GENE TIERNEY, Richard CONTE
7 } : g , . ‘ » ere aes . , Please note: Shows instead of Tuesday and Thandley wil
‘ the. oid nae CBee was Pe. Graduate Of Harvard fra aha Stuches anann Sieaitomins of British Guiana, a the | ' Down * in and Wednesay by arrangement with the Electric Company.
royec ry 1e rea ire Oo R R. MACKENZIE, Head 8 * “ting A 4 s 7 re > s.s. “Gas- | | Safety precautions taken up in a “ ”
February 23rd, 1945. The corner D . ‘ h at Wet. Missionary Society which will be ‘and yesterday by the s fora |. Bg fight. 49) WHIRLPOOL
y 4 ; I ads sssor of English at Wash- ss . : cogne” for the United Kingdom | , As we move along this berry may . i ’
stone of the new Post Office was ington University, St Louis, held in London, at which meeting on five months’ holiday. They | p ae ee ane with Jom TERED, Charles
laid by British Guiana’s Governor 1.5.4, who has been spending be, Will be joined by the Rev. were accompanied by their little} 4 What point is there to gain in oe
i Sir Charles Woolley and work has the winter, with his wife as guests Griffin who will be representins son Charles and had spent a cou- | climbing Everest? (4)
already commenced on the new at Cacrabank leaves by TCA. Barbados. Trinidad and the Wind- * f days here as guests of Mr.| ” tahooene ashe tom A SROLORy ROXY
ony a acrabank é 3 y i Bod. Takai ple of days e as g sts ROR Ts a ent ar ae ik, *
be ay C saabniah a4 ; Halifax, Canada, on Sat naay wal ands. Norman Inniss_ of Rudkip”,} 4 Que sass bed hoping to have
r. Edwards has been in Britis Joth «are Canadians of Jova : ’ srittons Hill. aay or whe Tonight only at 7.30
Guiana for about nine months Scotia and the _ Professo1 i For Labour Officers Course Lt Col, Haywood is the Officer ons thee in red es Rate Oe are
Graduate of Harvard University M* FRANK ODLE, Clerk of ‘ommanding the British Guiana] 4 Yearm. (4) Republic Presents
Rain Coats Dr. MacKenzie is also a_ well * the Labour Department, left olunteer Force. yi" Sesome's wader tae ee ‘LOVE HONOR AND GOODBYE”
| FTER two week at the know n author and has written tne i an af! nigh’ for England " | |o9 Strange, but it does give a bieat eo OOOH
A cy sine ms 1 ne ols 6 ‘ol ore and Folk Songs on the S.S. “Gascogne” attend i (5) Starring Virginia BRUCE
Ne ee a cooks a 1 Aish oa Labour Officers’ Training Course To Reside Here rin; | ‘4 Stroiung Diayers ana angiers | Edward ASHLEY, Victor
M1 P. A. Snijders, and their as well as on Englist oe High da aeekane | ‘ es, e R. & MRS. E. LAWSON KING | nave used it, and some have Mc LAGLEN pee
daughte aria returned to British . ° ~ vhich is expectec 0 las or Mf That 7 java, | blown it. (4) is ‘ °
& ghtey et f im \ te : . For Secretarial Course Cree. wen Ole oft Trinidad, ee : rE ne 0 How slovenly she 1s, (4) @ ma > /~ ; [ Mi We | i
rulané sterda y ‘ svening , 1 4 2 Pr ars’ mai 3 4 3 f
where Mr. Snijder is a Bauxit N ISS ANN SCOTT, daughter of For One Week sore; ‘They. Have ihe come | i eae a vs Or YMPIC gt aad id S aa
1 Mining Engineer at Mackenzie Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Scott of M RS R MAC CARTHY ' Sate in Barbados and have| , 3ylusion one: 1 Molen Be Pures tL, rm as JUNGLE JIM
1 uM | gwood" Ss é TR e S es e 3i 5S, Oane; 7, : & re; 11,
Both Mrs. Snijder and her “Longwood” Sandy Lan as a O'LEARY left Barbados jen up residence in Spruce | Py sya 18 oun: is, “Trepan; 15, Deride: Last Show tonight at 9,00 ja Ti)
daughter carried rain coats in their passenger on the Gascogne yester+ yesterday by B.W.I.A. on one Street { Millenary, 30 ao Witte Doak a5. E hol ST RIBE
‘ s > ow \ ’ , Ww day englan whe she will k's vie Britic Sot ee oy r 4 . TUDE. 24. aarar i. + 2, Republic Pictures Presents
hands, something which very few cay for I ngland where week's visit to British Guiana. Mr. King was formeriy Secre- | ona: 5. Suge, 4, "Vert, §. Oured: 6, John WAYNE, Vere MabaTON x cout” ‘
people who live in B.G., travel be taking a Secretarial Course in She was accompanied by Miss ary of West Indies Product 54 a. ee 15," Dials: Hope; 0: in E £ hi
b without, and which they probably London. Her parents were at the Jean Field and Miss’ Eileen dustries : 18, Leno; 19, Abut: @k Say. - H ; : y Tees “Jungle Jim’ the famous Ki eee eke per looky
; never used in Barbados Baggage Warehouse to see her off. Weston. ‘i THE FIGHTING KENTUCKIAN” omens “ 1 onemsseinsoitl
. \
: . scnleniiesiniiininianenaippitiiadbeaanedinat i with Oliver HARDY, Marie r March
BY HE AY CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it: ete Opens FRIDAY 24th: 1 |
| B ; AXYDLBAAXR
| W y BEACHCOMBER Ax ea
is LONGFELLOW
: s ; ‘ oY $ ex is used
NCE upon a time, and a very The Flower Menace industrial purposes, Collect cows One to__or simply stends-for another. ae os tee apos-
Os time it wa as I sat -7YAHE Bridlington Committee !" batches of 1,000, trap the mois- for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. ingle we . bs .
drinking a thick, dark wine the I } wants to ban flowers of ‘Ure 1. hygienic saucepans, and trophies, the length and formation of the words are a ints.
fonda of Delgado in the town of «more than a specif ail height” in %0U Will have 2,000 gallons a day Each day the code letters are different.
Medina-Sidonia, there entered a avdens oh @ housi gutnte which is enough to keep a con- : "
gipsy; tall, bold and swaggeri deserves 40). coconeration fro veyor belt, 90 feet long, moist for A Cryptogram Quotation
, , re ‘ : aa iin 34 hours. Alternatively, you could : ople who oug to think em fi - y 9 J !
i oo —- ou either be fought earn ts ed an iu or boil 40 tons of turnips with 75 VXB-FBOLHRBAA ZMDVX, XNA VDVMI
or flatterec was about to flatt , ES ear een | ee Blo illons of cow's breath > 1p .
; him grossly, when he began to owers at 1) a nr . FBNEP Ov RBEPVX HNAYNAABH,
, flatter me. The Spaniards have : 8 Ae SeRerE, ABE MmAY C lhe only trouble is that perhaps » +t , t WB
r word for that kind of flattery ract the . oC Ene: Civ) ; | cows do not breathe out the BEANPXVA NE XMIABAHMIO :
mn ¥ . . : if units « perso ry } . , ;
; whieedlitg tos as Kit to go on as they plea ai, i thes teanane ieee @ Cryptoquote: WE ARE NOT ALL ANNOYED IN
y y Ye yy gipsic acs aet ; : \gain, is the moisture breathed ; = WAY—SENECA
} This man knew every wick, and a he . Page « " i . hears it in summer of the same density? CHE SAME WAY ;
} the more he abased himself anc te “hind hath ee \nq in 1934 Gottlinger of Dortmund
t — me, - more a ey MR at ammieiins Akad 3 nediate Proved that the breath of 1,498 = PS SS
dom imeering yYecame. Suddenl ee ee = : pn cows would be powerful enough (
“ rac > Tix eviction confiscation of tior ‘ ‘or is
i he anes His paaneee Hi J r aia - i ~ Rs: hirn a sfMnll decnestic wdndanitt \ Special: “NYLONS” 54 gauge — $2.25 per pair
i voice roughenec Sut changed efGs, PUES eupys hare a : : aickiad amie ee | : ‘ J ; i sa
j tov, and began to fawn, Finally, eventual removal to a te eee et ee Q GENT’S SOCKS and ANKLETS at 36¢., 42c., 62c, 65¢. per pair
} I asked him for a peseta for my &&™Mp " | CHILDREN’S ANKLETS white, pink. blue at 32c. & 36c. per pr.
i poor old grandmother. He saw the . ’ ie W aggling Parva |
i : a = s Cow’s Breath
} joke, and we both began to laugl TH * “e ve THE
i} and drink together, I saw someone mr LD you say, offhand, how I ee — . 1e Rocket SHOE
4 very like him, grown old, in the A much moisture a cow breathe was slowly wheeled to the
i street the other day, I went up to out per day’? The answer, which | door of its large shed at Waggling { BRITISH co LTD
4 him and asked him for a peseta have not checked, is two gallon Parva yesterday. The rear nozzle { °9 le
‘i for my poor old grandmother. He It occurs to me that the scientist stuck in the entrance, and then ; R 4
y said, in English, “I don’t under- Who discovered this fact s! fell off, and the Rocket was wheel- } a All Customers who have overdue Repairs kindly redeem
stand. Ask a policeman, sorry.” be able to use the moisture for ed back again for repairs. i\ same in order to make space for new ones,
| } With thanks, SHOE-REPAIR DEPARTMENT HAIR BROOMS
: SMART | STRAW BROOMS
| =
‘ | YARD BROOMS
,} ‘
4 i CALLING BANNISTER BRUSHES

SCRUB BRUSHES
BOTTLE BRUSHES

CARPET BRUSHES
TOILET BRUSHES




ALL

FISHERMEN

*
and HOLDERS
Land your

Caich safely

We are fully stocked with
Fish Hooks, Fishing Lines,

SELECT EARLY
FROM

Seine, Mullet and Herring



Twines, Brass Swivels,

THE BARBADOS Rowlocks, Mesh Wire,
CO-OPERATIVE Lacing Wire, Cleat Hooks,
COTTON FACTORY Ltd. |catvanisea Putters



THE CORNER STORE













WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22, 1950

























nthe money.

the House should de-
90,000 was finally put to
“the motion for deletion
‘by a 10—5 majority.
were: Mr. Foster
(L), Mr. Craw-
, Brancker (C), Mr.
Mr. Gill (E), Mr.
}, Mr. E. K. Walcott
kinson (E), and Mr,

Against the deletion
\ . Bryan (L), Mr. Cox

f ir . F. L. Walcott (L).
dhe motion for the deletion,
told the House that
4 move it, if he stood alone.
emmation was seconded by Mr.
who said he saw no jus-
»» for the spending of
ney on drawings. After the de-
Min the Head was passed.
Criticisms were also levelled at
ihe Architect and Town Planning
tee Mr. Mottley said that it
we but fair to the other colonies
Fe ich he would most likely go
Be waving Barbados, that they
wid publicly tell how he had
3 to convince them as to his

Plans Not Ready
The Head came up for dis-
(L) said that
nt had then arrived at a
me over the following
It had been said on
year that it had been

gramme. They had
time thought it an am-
tious programme, but had em-
upon it in good faith. As
i d in a few instances

ey were ready to proceed
the mentioned, they

4 that an officer had been
ng in his duty and the plans
enot ready. As a result they

















5 previo

Pall

had had to come during
year with a revised
There were certain schools
ould not be finished owing
an underestimation in costs.
ne had turned out to be rather
borate and costly and they had
toreview the plans.
F. L, Walcott (L) said that
Senior Member for the City
4 made some allegations about
Architect and Town Planning
which in his way of think-
were of a serious nature. He
ht that if anyone knew any-
fof a doubtful inclination
any officer, that person
id let the head of the admin-
ration know.

Misquoted

ft, E. D. Mottley (E), rising
point of order, said that the
able Member who had just
had misquoted him. He
that he had made alle-
ms against the Architect and
Planning Officer. He had
made allegations against the
;but against the office. He,
Spart, could repeat what he

tt. F, L, Walcott 6bserved that
Honourable Member was
ing his statement, that was
























y said it never was
ould be his policy to
, L. Walcott said that the
Member had been so
unake insinuations about
of the Government.

m had not in his
en ambitious. They had
ed by the Architect and
mning Officer who had
ily aware of local con-
had thus made an
For many of the plans they
most likely have to vote
money before they could be

What had happened could
" ed in private life ag
da public. Some of the
ever, had been then
completed .

Dollar Token

token was more or







‘PONI'S

COLD & VANISHING

Quick,

to new

Post Office Estimates
Get $20,000 Cut

aT THE MEETING of the House of Assembly on Mon-
Mr. E. D. Mottley strongly criticised

for the General Post Office under Capital Expendi-
He said that the Government could find better uses

the inclusion of

less by way of saying that the
House would give authority to go
ahead with the finishing of the
buildings. He thought they could
complete the programme within
the financial year,

He could state that the Public
Works Department had carried
out its estimates well, working
them on a sound scheme, He would
remind honourable members that
Government was responsible for
that department.

With regards to the Architect
and Town Planning Officer, that
officer had been the most unpopu-
lar officer in the House. Govern-
ment was really saved from an
embarrassment when his contract
came to an end in pril.

Mr. Mottley said that vhe hon-
curable member had disarrned
him by Saying so plainly what the
position was, but sometimes one
spoke by instinct. He had admitted
that they had been guided by the
Architect and Town Planning
Officer. He had failed to produce
the plans at the decided time. In
other words, they had had their
labour but no plans. That was
partiy saying that while they did
not look at it as an ambitious
programme, the Architect had
given them schemes and assured
them that they could be got
through within the specified time,

No Architects

He asked members to be quite
serious. It must surely have been
more than an ambitious pro-
gramme. They on that side were
no architects, experts nor special-
ists, but they had said then that
the programme did not seem
possible to them. Yet, he dared
say, if he were in the Government
he would have accepted the
recommendations of an expert on
the matter.

When they took item one, St.
Leonard’s Girls’. they

. were re-
minded of the economy of the
island.

If the honourable senior

member for St. Thomas thought
that he would retract his words
he was grossly mistaken. That
honourable member never walk-
ed with his face in the clouds.
That member kept his ear to
the earth as he (Mr. Mottley)
did. That member had heard
as much as he had heard. If he
wanted to go to the head of the
administration and talk about
things going wrong, why did he
not go?

Honourable
read the
said that
building of
exhausted
incomplete, There was the pos-
sibility that a builder or con-
tractor might err by 10 per cent,
sometimes 20, but for one to err
by about such a wide margin
made one to think,

He would think it a crime to
allow that gentleman to go from
Barbados and probably be push-
ed into some other colony under
under a mistaken identity. He
had come to the colony, an Eng-
lishman with many fancy degrees
—a big shot. He would go from
Barbados and say he had advised
the Barbados Government in the

members could
note to item one which
the provision for the

the school had been
but the

capacity of an architect. But he
would have left Barbados, not
really an efficient man. There-
fore it was their duty to offer
those criticisms so that they
would be Known in the outside
world.

If they could only believe that
it had been an honest error! But
no! If they had as an instance

only the St. Leonard’s crime! But
they had in the Parry and Coler-
idge Questions the same thing—
exhausted provisions.

The Government had at last
seen the wisdom in calling in the
Public Works Department, the
good old Public Works Depart-
ment. In the end they all had

easy way

loveliness

CREAMS

1 FACE POWDERS
LIPSTICKS





building was !



ee

to fall back on the hard-headed
3arbadian foreman.
Suspicion

He thought that in fairness to
the people of the country, seeing
that they had taken all those
recommendations to the Govern-
ment in Good faith, an investiga-
tion should be made. There was
no sense denying it, there was
Suspicion which could only be
proved if the Government caused
an investigation to be made into
the matter.

That gentleman was leaving
because he really did not want to
be dismissed. For he (Mr. Mot-
tley) could not see the Govern-
ment, whether or not there had
been a contract, allowing him to
go on in his capacity. They were
bound to dismiss him. It was not
right then that thgy should let
him go and be thrown on another
colony. He had fleeced Barbados.
o had held a “get rich quick”
job.

When they voted that token
vote of one dollar, it was by way
of a moral commitment implying
that they would finish the work.
They had a right to know exactly
how things stood.

But for all that, they had to
finish it. They could not let the
children suffer because the money
had been spirited or strayed
away.

Anovher point of some moment
was that the people were not sat-
isfled with the designs of the
school. Some called them cow-
sheds, He was reminded of a
lieutenant in the Brivish Army
who once remarked to him that
the people out his side most like-
ly got on very well, but how did
they manage vo get up in the trees
to sleep. He was not s
when such a thing was built. How
could such a monstrosity like that
be built? Were they housing cav-
tle? ‘wo out of every three peo-
ple one met in the parish was
asking whether the members who
represented that parish were not
ashamed of the school or whevher
he could not protest. Up till then
$168,000 had gone, There was no
school and Crowe was going.

Mr. Mottley then went to itera
fourteen, General Post Office.

No Government, he said, who
could draw up a plan for $20,000
was conscious of their responsi-
bility.

Mr. F. L. Walcott rose to a point
of order. He said that the amount
was the approximate cost, and
having that in mind they had
based the fee in vhat region.

Mr. Mottley said that that made
the case worse. He would move
if he stood alone on his motion,
thav the amount be deleted. It
was no wonder that they could
get nothing done—$20,000 for one
plan! Did the honourable member
know that they could buy plans
in England from £10 and up, H@
aw that members of the Govern-
ment would attempt to defend it
though they did not really under-
stand it.

Bringing Up Plans

Mr. F, L. Waleett pointed out
that an arehitect was bringing up
plans for the consideration of vhe
Government. If the plans were
approved and supplementary esti-
mates were provided, that provi-
sion they sought would cover vhe
cost.

Mr. E. K. Walcott (E.) said that
the British architect charged six
per cent. of the overall cost of the
building for the plan and detail
investigations. He wondered
whether Government had anybody
in mind when thinking of an
architect,

Dr. Cummins (L) said that Mr.
Anthony Lewis had been recom-
mended,

Mr. F. L. Walcott said that hon~
ourable members were thinking
in terms of personalities, For at
the mere mention of the name
they had exclaimed —Oh no! Oh

0
, Honourable members had to re-
alise that Government had to have;

same basis for arriving at the
rnoney. !
‘Mr. Mottley said that if they

———

|



Tork,

MARY

HE LA»

MORGAN ND



were going in



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
for housing they Mr. F. kL. Waleott said that
had to appoiny another architect was sometimes a very pathetic
The honourable senior member for circumstance to hear some hon-

St. Peter had admitted that the
Public Works Department coul’d
not underiake the housing.

The honourable Leader of the
House had said that they should
not take it as a natural indica-
tion thay they intended to aban-,
don the schemes because of mis~
calculation. Why did they not
bring in another man? They might
say what they liked, but he would
vell them that it was nothing more
than grawings. They could get an
architect from anywhere — Eng-
land, Canada, America. He would
stick to no personalities whether
it was Mr. Crowe or anybody
else. They were many architects
in the outside world who could
not even work for a living. It was
more practical for the Govern-
ment to have another architect.

Under Review

Mr. F. L. Walcott (L) reminded
the House that the matter was
under review. Any decision would
be a matter for the Executive
Committee,

Mr. Mottley said he fully saw
the honourable member's position
then. He was perfectly willing
to agree. He intended to em-
barrass no one. He would, how-
ever, if he stood alone, move that
the item be deleted.

Mr. Reece (E) said that if it
were said that an architect was
bringing up plans, it meant that
the Executive Committee had
committed themselves. If they
(the HouSe) followed that up and
put a token vote there it would
mean that they were in agree-
ment with the action of the
Executive Committee in their not
bringing the matter before the
house ever by way of an Address.

Mr. F. L. Walcott said that
since it was agreed that Gov-
ernment could not carry on
with their present man, they
had asked Mr. Lewis to see the
plan but they had entered into
no agreerent with him. It was
very obvious that if they in-
tended to make a purchase, they
would have to find out about
the price before they decided

to come to the House. He did

not see how they had broken

confidence of the House.

Position Worse

Mr. Mottley held that the posi-
tion was even made worse. He
hoped honourable members would
adjust their minds to the facts and
let no party allegiance sway them
in their views about what was
not above board. They said they
could not barter with professional

ourable members speak. To hear
the last member had _ introduced
such a pathetical instance.
Imagine, he said, that an hon-
ourable member couid come into
the House and just make a lot of

suppositions. The s c hoo 1 in
question had leng since been
finished. He would advise that

member to make sure of his facts
before he embarked upon un-
founded criticisms.

Wasting Money

Mr. Koster asked why, if the
school was finished, they were
wasting the Government's money
in keeping a watchman around it
instead of allowing the children
to go into it,

Mr. Mapp (L) said vhat admit-
tedly the Government had been
placed in an extremely difficult
position with regards to Capital
Expenditure. But Government had
vo go ahead and get a plan from
Some new architect or get a plan
from the then architect, Since the
latter case was not to be thought
of, they were left with but the
one alternative. They were pleased
to hear that a contract had not
yet been entered with Mr. Lewis,

There were tangible reasons why
the House should vote for the
money. The Government could not
appoint an officer until the one in
office was removed. The building
had been bought. It was being
used as a car park and people of
the community who were inter-
ested in its progress were won-
dering what would be done about

Mr. Brancker (C) said that the
case of the schools was much to be
regretted. He said that a site had
been suggested for Half Moon
Fort. It was an ideal site and one
which the Sanitary Commission-

ers of Health had agreed was
satisfactory.
He wondered whether they

could not get a good job done with-
out having to pay the immediate
sum of $20,000.

He heard it was suggested to
remove the Registrar’s oftice
the Public Building. He was of tho
opinion that it was more conveni-
ent to the majority if it remained
in the main judiciary building.

Modern School

Mr. Allder (L) said that he re-
gretted very much that provision
had not been made for a modern
school in St. John. When he had
brought up in the House the ques-
tion of extensions to the present
boys’ and girls’ schools, he had
been told that preparations were

upderway for getting a modern

men. Yet they had done so. building.
Mr. F. L. Walcott said that he Mr, Cox said he would make it
would challenge any member to perfectly crystal clear then that

speak about his personal integrity.
It was said that the case had been
made infinitely worse.

Mr. Mottley interrupted. He
had, he said, questioned no one’s
integrity. He had only said he
was suspicious about the amount
of money and its smooth way of
evaporating. If the honourable
member felt it had been implied
it was a matter for him.

He then moved that the sum of!
$20,000 be deleted.

Mr. Crawford (C) seconded the
motion, He said that the ques-
tion was whether or not another
architect was needed. If they
decided that they would get
another architect, then he would
advise that they postpone that
matter and let that architect do it
along with his duties. As he saw
it that $20,000 was only for the
drawing up of plans.. He did
not see the justification in spend-
ing the money merely for the
drawing ur.of plans.

Did Nou. Harmonise

Mr. F. L. Walcott said that the
fmatter was one with which post-
ponement did not harmonise.
Government had been told when
the last estimates were being
considered, that it was a case
that should hold priority. The
point that Government had to
seek after was the getting of some
drawings made.

Mr. Foster (L) said that there
was much imwhat the honourable
member for the City had said,
He, for one, would give his vote
in that direction. There was the
Chalky Mount Boys’ School in St.
Andrew which was still to be
completed. He thought the
$20,000 could be better spent.

of em
doubie-otrengin bolts #8 i:
Tabs seks pee

Vena i Teaconnoneocnasnsessensensoacocssccosenseneceoeee

there never was nor could ever
be anybody living for whom h>
was afraid. He had done nothing
in his public or private life of
which he should be ashamed
They was much scepticism on thc
question of certain expenditure but
e knew jt to be the habit of many
to judge others by their own yard
stick. The people were still alive
They were awake too. The people
knew who meant well for them

Mr. Cox then talked at length
about the unemployment situation
and how the work would be a
relief to it.



Overseas Issues

Get Most Business

LONDON, March 21
Tea shares were prominent with
widespread gains on London Stock

Exchange today. With domestic
issue idle, and lacking lead,
political or otherwise, market

operators are giving more atten-
tion to commodity shares, and are
searching for investment mediums
promising capital appreciation.
Thus overseas issues are receiving
most of business in stock markets
Gains of two shillings were shown
by ‘tea issues with single this
amount at 25 shillings.

In Foreign Bond _ Section,
Chilean bonds moved higher, and
Japanese issues recovered from an
initial dullness. Rubbers, how-
ever, encountered some _ profit-
taking, and eased by few pence.

Irrawady flotilla with a fall of
one shilling at 31 shillings re-
flected the news of Burma Gov-
ernment appeal against compensa-

tion award.
—Reuter.

Sizes: 9 ft. by 7 ft,

LINOLEUM IN

Home Look

nnn oS emma

LINOLEUM

Also

All very reasonable in Price.

1. HERSERT Lid.

10 & 11 Roebuck





Two Will Get |
C.O.L. Bonus

BECAUSE two members of the
Parochial Service in St. Michael
still draw Cost of Living Bonus,
the Legislative Council yesterday
passed a Bill which would enabie
them to do so during the next
financial year,

The Bill was cited as the
Vestries (Cost of Living Bonus to
Employees) Act, 1950.

Hon’ble V. C. Gale who moved
the second reading said that it
was necessary the Bill should be
passed for the reason that when
the consolidation of the salaries
and cost of living bonus of Vestry
employees of St. Michael took
place, there were two employees
whose emoluments were fixed by
statue. These were the Paroch- !
ial Treasurer and the Clerk to the
Churchwarden and the Poor Law
Guardians.

No Bill had been passed to
amend the Acts and those two
officers were continuing to draw
their cost of living bonus on thei:
salaries. It was therefore neces-
sary for the Bill to be passed that
day.

Motion for the passing of the
Bill was seconded by Hon'bis
A. G. Gittens.



Council Amend
Pensions Act
For Parochial Employees

The Legislative Council yester-
day passed a Bill amending the
Parochial Employees Pension Act
in order to enable the vestries to
continue to pay cost of living
bonus to vestry pensioners. |

Hon’ble V. C, Gale took charge
of the Bill. Moving the second
reading he said that the Bill was
an annual Bill to enable the sev-
eral vestries to pay bonus on the
cost of living given to pensioners |
from time to time during the war. |
These were pensioners who had |
retired for some years and it was
necessary that this Bill should be |
passed to allow the vestries to |
continue to pay these pensions |
and the cost of living allowance |



granted to these people. He then |
asked that the Bill be read aj}
second time. Hon’ble A. G. Git- |

tens seconded, and the Bill was| |

passed



In The Council
Yesterday

Excuse was made for the ab
Sence of six members as th«
Legislative Council met yester- |
day. They were, Hon’bles J. D. |
y Chandler, G. D. L. Pile, F. C
Hutson, the Lord Bishop, G. B |
Evelyn, Mrs. M. Hanschell.

Those present were the Hon’'- |
bles the Acting Colonial Secre-
tary, D. G, Leaeock (President),
H. A. Cuke, Dr. H. G. Massiah,
V. C, Gale, Dr. C. H. St. John,
R. Challenor, A. G. Gittens.

The Acting Colonial Secretary
laid Message No. 12/1950, rela-
tive to the temporary secondment
of an oificer of the (¢

Office to act
tary

He also laid
documents :—

Report on the Barbados Gen-
eral Hospital by Major T. J.
Hallinan

The Civil Establishment (Gen-
eral) (Amendment) No. 2 Order,
1950,

The Civil Establishment (Gen-
ecal) (Amendment) No, 3 Order,
1950.

The Civil Establishment (Part-
time Officers) Order, 1950,

slonia

as Colonial Secre

the following

The Parking and Restricted
Places (Amendment) Regula-
tions, 1950.

Statement showing gross Cus-
toms and Excise Receipts for ten
months ended 3lst of January,
1950,

The Council passed a Bill to
amend the Parochial Employees
Pension Act, 1944. ,

Bill cited as the Vestries (Cost
of Living Bonus to Employees)
(Amendment) Act, 1950,

The Council adjourned
die.

sine

CARPETS
and 10%, ft. by 9 ft.

ROLLS 6ft. wide





;

$ N

¢ 4

os. 33 & 52 Swan Street.



We can supply you with



Pay us a visit before purchasing elsewhere

The Barbados Hardware Co.,Ltd. 3

5 (The House for Bargains)



Phone 2109 or 4406

%

:
8
with :
%|%

CONGOLEUM
Various Sizes in Attractive Patterns
: also :

FIBRE and RUBBER MATS ,
>
-

>,



SOCPOSCOCCOS

ES —- ee





PAGE THREE

So deliciously light!
And you can make it



... success guaranteed
with this recipe



COFFEE SPONGE

Be ready for compliments when you make this
scrumptious pudding for the family! And don’t
think there’s a special knack in getting that melt-
in-the-mouth lightness into your puddings! With
Royal Baking Powder to guarantee success, you

can’t fail! Here’s the recipe:

Sift together 5 oz. plain flour, 1 rounded teaspoon
Royal Dok ing Powder, a pinch of salt, and 2 oz. sugar.
Rub in 2 oz. butter, Add I beaten egg and sufficient
warm black coffee to make a stiff batter. Pour the
mixture into a greased basin (6-inch size), cover
with greased paper, and steam for 2 hours. Serve

with a sweet sauce,

This makes

a really delicious, light, steamea

sponge pudding with a marvellous flavour. You
see, you can rely on Royal for a perfect light sy

texture, because it’s blended so that it raises
evenly all through, Expert cooks always use we /
Royal. It makes successful baking sure. =

ROYAL BAKING

+ centenarians een a.

e
For lovely hair use

BRYLFOAM

—THE cream SHAMPOO

IN A TUBE

See how Brylfoam—the cream shampoo

quickly removes the sticky coating of dust,
grease and
leaving it clean and radiant. Restored are the
beautiful glinting highlights of healthy hai,
silken soft and enchanting.
straight-from-the-tube, nothing to mix or apall
quicker to apply and dry, Bnough for chess
shampoos in each tube.

soap-scum from

your hair,

Use Brylfoam

Sateen

EL Tzey VF

Made by the.makers: of .BRYLCREEM





MAKE
part our

eflecti

imp

c ere
i) THE SAFE,

GENTLE |

PLEASANT.
TO-TAKE

ne

WILLIAM FOGARTY LID.

INC, IN B.G.

Leading Centre for

Exelusive English Suitings

HARRIS & SPORTS
TWEEDS,

GABERDINE, SERGES
& DOESKINS

Please call and see us, when it will
be our privilege to see that you are
fully satisfied which is much...

And become one of our. ...
REGULAR CUSTOMERS

“THE HOUSE OF FOGARTY”

combines Tailoring
with High-Grade Clothing
AT KEENEST PRICES



parkling gla

cleaniiness means vigorous
Andrews keeps you fit as a fiddle, by
helping rid your system of ctrouble-making

Craftsmanship



tec

ee
POWDER





* Nothing to get ready
x» Nothing to mix

& Nothing to spill

* Quicker to apply

we Quiciar to-day

SL Lelei)

(

}

))
i






f Andrews Liver Salt
daily health routine, for inner
fitness. Gentile,

ANDREWS

LIVER SALT



4,

$

.
*
‘
;
+
*
.
.
>
.
;



4
FODSO GO 9O66 GGG FEISS GOO SSOSOO GG FO SOOGA,





:
4
q
ki
i
Â¥




|
)

%
4
3

seta bbe ren algueiaamas mmm ee momma: erie iia iii



a

gemneupane
‘ ae













PAGE FOUR



ADVOGATE

oe To SRST Poweaey

Published by Tho Advocate Co. Ltd., 34, Broad St., Bridgetow:

Wednesday, March 22, 1950

Swift Action

THE contents of the Report on the
Barbados General Hospital by Major T. J.
Hallinan have been made public.

The Report contains little that has not
been broyght to the attention of Govern-
ment before by members of the Hospital
Staff through normal channels. And many
of the defects and difficulties enumerated
in the Report have been noted in previous
reports on the Hospital.

But because the report underlines what
previous reports have noted that is no
reason for its suffering the fate of earlier
reports. The present report was undertaken
as a result of intense criticism by politicians
and members of the public.

It is an answer to that criticism and its
recommendations are a challenge to the
Government to act and to remove grounds
for future criticism.

If the Barbados Government wants a
first class hospital it has got to employ an
adequate number of medical personnel.
Dr. Hallinan recommends the employment
of one medical superintendent, one special-
ist Surgeon, one specialist Physician, one
Specialist Radiologist and seven medical
officers for general duty as an increased
permanent staff.

At present there is no Specialist Physi-
cian and only two of the three House Sur-
geons provided by the Government esti-
mates are working, while another is due to
leave in May.

To increase the permanent cadre would
cost approximately £5,000 per annum. It
is worth digressing here to make a com-
parison with the cost per head per week of
patients in other countries’ hospitals. In
the United Kingdom this cost is £12, in
Sweden £13, in the United States 109 U.S.
dollars. In Barbados the cost per patient
per week is £7.

The moral is that nothing can be got for
nothing. It has got to be paid for.

Extracts from Dr. Hallinan’s report sound
terrible enough to the lay reader,

“Owing to the shortage of beds in the
public wards the medical cases are all of a
serious nature, many being admitted in a
hopeless condition. The deaths are conse-
quently large in number.” Or again, “there
is a waiting list for the public wards of
over 500 patients needing surgical oper-
ations, This list extends as far back as
July 1949.”

Sentences like these taken from their
context have a horrifying sound, and, in

emselves explain much of the concern
and criticism which preceded the writing
of the report.

It is very difficult to sum up Dr. Halli-
nan’s recommendations, but there is plenty
of comment and suggestions in the report
for improving the Hospital.



And there is a main current running
through the report which seems to em-
phasize that without adequate staffing and
without greater necessary delegation of
authority, the Hospital cannot be run on
the most efficient lines, The important thing
is for the Barbados Public to have confi-
dence in their own hospital. It cannot have
that confidence if, for example, day to day
working of the Hospital is to be the subject
of political interference.

To run a hospital, or to run any organisation
efficiently, authority must be vested in certain
individuals. There is in Barbados a_ loose
impression that anybody can do a job better than
the man or woman doing the job. The Hallinan
report is a vote of confidence in many doctors who
have previously pointed out most of the defects
and difficulties which are now unfolded to the
public gaze. It is up to the Government now to
see that Dr. Hallinan’s suggestions and recom-
mendations are immediately discussed and deci-
sions taken. It is unfair to criticise individuals.
The circumstances for efficiency must exist. Unless
the Government advertises for increased person-
nel and pays the salaries likely to attract them
here it is impossible to expect more from an un-
derstaffed hospital than it can provide, All the
other recommendations hinge on this—adequate
staffing and an administration with powers to act
and enforce swift discipline,

OUR READERS SAY:







RECENTLY we have been read-
ing of the amazing performances
of the Comet, the jet-propelled
gas vurbine powered airliner.

We have heard of the trials of
a gas turbine railway locomotive.

Now the first gas turbine car
is being demonstrated.

A new kind of engine is being
used on land, at sea, and in thé
air.

It has already produced a
vechnical revolution in the air,
and we wonder whether there
will be similar revolutions on
lend and at sea.

To understand how all these
new developments are possible
we must first be clear about
“gas turbines” and “jet propul-
sion”. These are ‘two completely
different ideas.

In a jet aircraft they are
brought together, but in gas tur-
bine-driven trains, ships or land
vehicles the gas turbine princi-
ple would be used wivhout jet
propulsion, which is very waste-
ful except at high speeds of
travel.

Jet Propulsion

JET propulsion is “motion of
a vessel in a certain direction by
squirting a jet of fluid from it
in the opposite direcvion.” s

If you stood on ice and blew
hard enough you would go back-
wards.

This has not yet been done,
but squids use a similar means
for travelling under water.

Jets avoid the use of a pro-
peller, and are delighifully sim-
ple, but unfortunately they are
inefficient at ordinary speeds of
|travel, most of the effort being
wasted in stirring up vhe air left
behind.

A turbine is an engine in which
the main driving part rotates, in
contrast to the visvYon engine, such
as in our motor-cars, in which
the main driving parts move to
and fro.

POWER is produced as the re-
sult of compressing, heating, and
expanding a fluid.

When vhe fluid is steam, we
{have the steam turbine. When
'the fluid is a gas—usually air—
| we have the gas turbine.

The seed of revolution develops
slowly at first. In the case of jet
propulsion it seems vo have been
planted in 150 BC by Hero of
Alexandria, who applied steam
jets to drive an engine.

In the case of the gas turbine,
a design recognisable as such was
patented by an Englishman, John
Barber, in 1791.

BERNARD WICKSTEED in Darkest Africa, where=

Wives Can Be Bought
| On The Never-Never

THE SCENE: A

I'VE been sitting in the shade
of a banana tree in front of a mud
hut talking to an African chiet
about economic conditions in the
post-war world.

He complained at the difficulty
he had getting the B.B.C. on his
radio, the overcrowding on the
buses and the late arrival of his
airmail edition of the Times.

But most of all he complained
about the high cost of buying a
wife. Twenty years ago when he
{ first married you could get quite

a good wife in any of the villages

round Nairobi for an outlay of

30 goats.

Now they were a shocking price.
| You’d be lucky to pick up a utility
|model for 80 goats, and they have
been fetching as much as 150.

He pointed to a girl going by
and said; “Look at that one, for
instance. How much do you think
I had to pay for her?”

I said I couldn’t imagine. I'd
never bought a wife, I got mine
for nothing.

“Ninety goats and a cow,” he
answered, raising his hands in
horror. Her father wouldn't take
a billy goat less. He didn’t know
what the world was coming to,

Of course, as he explained, he
could have bought her on the in-
stalment system for so many goats
down and the rest in easy pay-
ments, Lots of husbands did that,
but in his position as a chief it
wasn't quite the thing.

Besides, wives bought on the
never-never system didn’t work as
hard as those you paid for on the
nail. They knew that if you got
in arrears with your instalments
they’d have to go back

“CRILING” WIVES

I ASKED the chief if it wasn’t
possible to stop the rot by put-
ting a ceiling price on wives as
we'd done with fish and potatoes
in England. He said that had









BARBADOS ADVOCATE



By Professor 0. A.
Saunders M.A: D.Se.

The name of Whittle is asso-
ciaved with both jet propulsion
and the gas: turbine — and they
are both old ideas. What, then,
was the great thing he did?

The answer is that he brought
vhe two together. He said, “Let
us use a gas turbine to produce
a powerful jet of exhaust gases.”
His great achievement was that
he did it.

One of the defects of the jev
engine is its emtravagance on
fuel. For many purposes this is
more than outweighed by its
extraordinary lightness, which
enables more fuel to be carried.

Buv for longer flights, especial-
ly at lower altitudes and speeds,
the turbo-prop is better. The
turbo-prop uses a gas turbine
engine to drive a conventional
propeller.

Technieal Race

THE remarkable developments
in aircraft since 1941 have not,
of course, been confined to this
country.

In the early days of the war
we informed the Americans of
our progress, and in 1941 sent a
Whittle engine to the U.S
‘Out of vhat have grown in
America revolutionary changes in
aircraft design. The Germans are
out of the technical race, but the
Russians are not, and the French
have made great progress since
vhe war.

The thrust of the jet in the
E28/39, the first jet-propelled air.
plane—built by the Gloster Air-
craft Company in 1941—was abouv
800lb. Recently Rolls-Royce an-
nounced the thrust of one of theiy
latest engines as 6,250lb.

The E28/39 flew at about 360
miles per hour. In 1946 the Meteor
reached 616 miles per hour, and
voday the official record is 67).
miles per hour.

Infancy Yet

UNDOUBTEDLY the gas tur-
bine type of engine will be used
on land and sea for many pur-
poses. It is compact and light,
needs little or no water and no
boiler, and does not require a
special oil fuel, as does the petrol
engine.

So far iv is in its infancy and
moderately efficient, but it is po-
tentially capable of development
to efficiencies level with the best
steam vurbine plant and better.

Village in Darkest Africa.

been tried in some parts of East
Africa, but it didn’t work,

Fathers with unmarried African
daughters were the same under
the skin as people with houses
to let. The only result of bride-
price control was a rollicking
black wife market.

“I forget whether it was in
Punch or the New Yorker,” the
chief went on, fingering the rings
in his ears, “but one of them had
a joke about too many cattle
chasing too few wives. It was
very funny, but it wasn’t entirely
true,

“There are plenty of wives.
I’ve got 17, and I know where I
can get as many more as I want.
The real trouble is they’re inflated
and going steadily higher in up-
ward spirals.”

I tried to picture an inflated
wife going upwaris in spirals, but
the chief, who was evidently a
student of the radio speeches of
Sir Stafford Cripps, went on talk-
ing.

Take, for instance, a parent with
a couple of dozen sons and
daughters, he said. He may have
bought his own wives when prices
were low, but when he comes to
marry off his boys he finds there’s
a wife-sellers’ market.

What can he do? In order to
get wives for his own sons he’s
got to get as much as he can for
his daughters. And so the prices
go spiralling up.

“Well,” I said, “wouldh’t it be
better to scrap the whole system
and marry for love, as we do?
It’s a quaint idea but it seems to
work.”

“Oh, dear, no. We couidn’t do
that,” said the chief, adjusting his
top-hat. “There are too many
vested interests. That would be
a form of the capital levy. Every
man with an unmarried daughter



' Unification Of Public

| The New Power On

Land. Sea And Air

In modern gas turbine engineer-
ing twe countries have pioneered
the way, our own and Switzer-
land.

While we in this country were
developing the gas turbine for air-
craft, the Swiss were developing
the gas turbine for industrial
purposes. :

Today the Swiss have built more
industrial gas turbines, “for. them-
selves and other countries, vhan
any other nation. ; by

e are now very active here in
the same field.

The Metropolitan-Vickers Com-
pany is building a 15,000 kw. set
for the Strevford power station.
C. A. Parsons, Ltd., are building
a 15,000 kw. sev for the Dunston
station and a 10,000 kw. set for
the National Gas Turbine esvab-
lishment.

JOHN BROWN AND COMPANY
are building a 12,500 kw. set for
the Dundee station. i

All these gas turbines are oil
burners. Because oil has to be im-
ported, their fuel bills may be a
little discouraging.

This is counterbalanced by
other advantages, but if it burn-
ed a really cheap fuel the gas
turbine overall economy would be
so.much greater.

For us here vhere are only two
such fuels—coal and peat. A great
effort is, therefore, being made to
adapt the gas turbipe to burn
these fuels.

The economic impulse towards
vhe coal-burning gas turbine for
land use has no parallel for the
marine gas turbine.

Will Gas Turbines
Displace Steam ?

SHIPS have moved away from
coal to oil, and the most economi-
cal marine engine is likely to be
that which burns the lowest
grades of oil. s .

Whether vhe gas turbine will
ultimately displace the steam tur-
bine and the diesel engine will
not be decided for_some years.

The first gas turbine to drive a
ship is Brivish. In 1947, MGB2009
began trials with a Metropolitan-
Vickers gas turbine adapted from
one of that firm’s aircraft engines.

This vessel uses diesel engines
for slow speeds and the turbine
for high speeds, and has had a
very successful debut.

There has not yet been demon-
strated, however, a marine gas
turbine for long continuous, steady
running, such as the main power
plant of an ordinary ship demands,
But tesis of this kind of engine
will not be long delayed.

Lendon Express Service

The Time 1950

would cry out that he was being
robbed.
WEALTH IN WIVES

“THIS system of buying a wife
is based on an age-old economy,
and isn’t as crazy as you’d think.
We don’t have stocks and shares
and banks as you do. Our wealth
is our land, our female stock—
cows and nanny goats—and our
women.”

Get the idea? Instead of put-
ting another pound in the bank
they put another cow in the field
Instead of buying a_ savings
certificate they take another wife.

Every family has so much land,
so many head of stock and so many
women. If they hand over a girl
as a wife to another family they
are giving up some of their capital,
and they expect something back
for her.

If she is divorced and returns
to her family the purchase price
is returned, less a discount for
each child.

From the African point of view
there was nothing much wrong
with the system until this awful
business of the inflated or rocket-
ing brides going upwards in
spirals.

DEVALUED WIFE

WHEN the cost of living goes
up in Europe you print more
banknotes to pay for things. In
Africa, when the cost of wives
goes up, you have to increase
your goat and cow circulation.

But cows, unlike banknotes,
have to eat, and with brides at
their present price ihere is more
stock than the land can support,
and vast areas are becoming dust
bowls through overstocking.

“There’s only one thing for it,”
said the African chief who reads
the Times and listens to the B.B.C. |

a a ee



“and that is to devalue wives as
you've done the pound.”
—L.E.S.

—_—





Services Report (coned)

THE report. in this instalment makes refer-

ence to the despatch by the Secretary of

State for the Colonies, concerning conditions

of service.

IN the preceding paragraphs we have made cer-
tain recommendations designed to meet the wishes
of the Secretary of State, as set out in paragraph
6 of his draft despatch, in regard to common
conditions of service in respect of leave, passages,
pensions, and the like. Certain circumstances
have, however, arisen which make if doubtful
whether these recommendations will be accepta-
ble to the Governments of some of the colonies.
We mentioned in paragraph 94 that in four of
the colonies conditions of service were or recently
had been under investigation by separate Salaries
Commissions. The situation, therefore, which
has developed is that at one and the same time
conditions of service are under review in four
of the territories on a colony basis and under
review by ourselves on a regional basis. It is
jot our business to criticise this state of affairs,
but We can legitimately draw attention to the
consequences which will inevitably flow from it.
This we can best do by way of example. In
paragraphs 115 and 116, we have recommended
that after a tour of duty of four years (three in
the case of British Guiana and British Honduras)
free passages for himself and his wife should be
granted to an expatriate officer. The Government
of Trinidad & Tobago, as we have pointed out
nas recently adopted an arrangement whereby
senior expatriate officers are allowed up to three
full passages to and from their homes after a
minimum tour of two and a half-years. _ Again
in British Honduras, officers above a certain sal-
ary point are eligible for two free passages to
and from the United Kingdom after two years

of duty.
FARCICAL

What then will the Governments of these col-
onies do when faced with our recommendations?
To accept our recommendations in respect of the
holders of scheduled posts in unified services,
who comprise most of the senior officers | in the
colonies, and to apply their own conditions to
the rest would produce a situation which can only
be described as farcical. The most likely conclu-
sion is that tnese Governments will reject our
recommendations on this matter and will adhere
to the arrangements which are now in force.
But it would have been quite idle for us to recom-
mend the general adoption throughout the region
of the special arrangements which obtains in these
colonies, since they would have been unacceptable
to some of the other colonies on grounds of expense.
Our recommendations on these and other matters
relating to conditions of service should therefore
be regarded as constituting the minimum provi-
sions necessary to secure free transferability from
one colony to another. In so far as any colony
may have adopted more favourable conditions, we
do not suggest any abetement of those conditions,
though we recognise that any variations in con-
ditions of service diminish pro tanto the possi-
bilities of transfer.

ENTRY STANDARD

In his draft despatch of May, 1946, the Secre-
tary of State contemplates the setting up of a
regional executive authority to which would be
delegated the powers of selection and posting of
candidates to posts in unified services, subject to his
approval in cases where that is required under the
Colonial Regulations. Later, he elaborates the
functions of such an authority by saying that it
would set and maintain a common service and
nominate the persons to be appointed, whether by
recruitment or by promotion to vacant posts. He
also points out that the difficulties inher@nt in the
task of assessing claims to promotion are greatly
increased when the candidates concerned are serv-
tng in different colonies, and goes on to say: —“it is
certainly not a task which the Secretary of State
could successfully undertake at a distance in re-
spect of purely local staff. It must be done on
the spot by an authority which is not only in a
position to estimate the relative merits of candi-
dates but to give effect to its conclusions.’’ While
we are in entire agreement with the Secretary of
State as to the need for such an authority, it is,
we venture to say, a great deal easier to postulate
its creation than to formulate proposals for
clothing it with the attributes which he prescribes.
The words “on the spot” are no doubt used in a
colloquial sense, but it is pertinent to point out
that the colonies with which we are concerned
constitute fifteen different spots, all separated
from one another by water, in some cases several
hundred miles of it. It will be appreciated, there-
fore, that no regional authority, however consti-
tuted and wherever situated, can escape the dis-
ability which, as the Secretary of State implicitly
recognises, must arise if its headquarters are
widely separated from the various colonies which
come within its ambit. In the later paragraphs of
this chapter, we make suggestions for minimising
this disability, but its existence cannot be ignored.

TITLE

We now have to consider the title of the re-
gional executive authority, its constitutional posi-
tion, its functions, and its composition.

The functions referred to in paragraph 125 are
such as are usually discharged in other colonies,
either directly or through the agency of promo-
tion boards, by Public Service Commissions, and
having regard to what we recommend later in
the matter of functions, we consider this an appro-
priate nomenclature for the body referred to by
the Secretary of State as a regional executive
authority. »

As regards its constitutional position, it is not
for us to hazard a guess as to the constitutional
form which the association of the British Carib-
bean colonies may take. Various possible
alternatives are canvassed in “Closer Association

of the British West Indian Colonies” (Cmd. 7120), ||

but we are satisfied that a Publie Service Com-
mission, however constituted and however wide
or narrow its functions, must either rest on some
form of central organ of government, charged by
the instrument which creates it with responsibility
for setting up and maintaining the Public Service
Commission, or, alternatively, must be set up by
the Secretary of State, its constitution and func-
tions and the remuneration of its members being
determined by him, Though we can lay no claim
to expertise on constitutional issues, we can
envisage no central organ of government short of
a federal Government which could discharge the
duties to which we have referred.
To Be Continued,



re

Parents Have A Right To Know About Their Children

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,— In the recent debate on
the estimates the Leader of the
Government admitted that for
some time he had not given edu-
cation the attention it deserved.
I do not know what the more
complacent among us thought,
but to me this is not merely a
most damaging admission; it is a
tragic fact. It is tragic because
the Leader is one of the only two
men of his Government capable
of discerning and appreciating
the presenty educational trends
and balancing them against what
we know to be good for the
island’s progress. For never has
there been a time when educa-
tion in this island needed to be







regarded with more attention,
mere apprehension and, in some
cases, with more dismay than
now.

I write this letter, however
deal with only one pect
education as under the « lé
I understand
the sum voted to be spent on an
item called Record Card Now
in as much as I have long 1cé
given up the foolish fancy
our busy politicians have th
time to know anything about



anything, I do not expect them
to know what Record Cards
really are. But I hope here to
enlighten the parents with whose
children these cards deal as to
what they are (Parents who are
not themselves teachers or who
do not number teachers among
their intimate friends will not
until now have heard of Record
Cards. For these are designed
to secret and confidential docu-
ments. But let us begin at the
beginning

A Record Card is a document
on which are recorded certain
facts and opinions relating to
a pupil’s school life. There is
one for each pupil and it is pro-
posed that these Cards shall be
retained by the Department of
Education for ten years after the
pupil leaves school. On one side
are the usual facts of name,
birth date, etc. « below
the i v



other marks
I make no observation on tix
marks except to say that
practical purposes they
worthless They

because among the

schools there is no standardised



system of setting and marking
examination and other papers;
so that a pupil getting into
Percentile Group I in School A
might be no more than the equai
of a pupil in P.G, 3 in School B.
{In short, such information as is
contained under the Head Attain-
ment is worthless for a com-
parative study and quite mean-
ingless to any but the teachers
concerned in that particular
school, unless the examination
paper is seen along with it. The
information can mean little to
the Education Department whose
property the Cards eventualy
become. On the subject of
Record Cards I can speak with
more authority than any mem -
ber of the Education Department

for, as another meddler, one
Socrates, was always drumming
into the heads of his hearers, it
; not the maker but the user ot
1 thing who has most knowledge

of its utilitarian

worth
On the other side of the Card
are recorded the '

Tests

results 0
There is

against these

Intelligence

wthing to be said



provided they ‘
eriously; provided that where
these results clash with the Class

» have two disvinct weaknesses

Teacher’s considered opinion of
the pupil more credence is given
the latter; though the way some
of the local experts,talk, one
would think that vhe results of
these Tests were as indisputable
and accurate as Holy Writ. But
to those of us who do not think
iv good for our souls to accept the
statements of local officials push-
ing their own special predilections,
we find that the designers and
skilled users of these Tests, men
like Sir Cyril Burt and R. A. C,
Oliver, repeatedly warn thay un-
less these Tests are administered
by carefully trained e and
under the most favourable condi-
tions, the results obtained can be
very unreliable indeed.

Below this is a seciion dealing
with the vemperament of the pupil.
Now, the information recorded
here is not even pseudo-factual,
as before, but are purely subjec-
tive opinions. In this seciion the
teacher is required to say whether
the pupil is lazy or industrious,
careful or careless, co-operative or
non-co-operative and such other
opinions. This information must
(a)
Teachers, even Head Teachers,
bave prejudices like other human

;

beings and their nerves are seldom
tranquil; and (b) according to
Alien Hunt and Percival Smith in
“A Guide to Intelligence and
Other Psychological Testing,” ra-
ters vary considerably in their de-
finivion of temperamental traits;
e.g. different raters have probably
very different ideas in mind when
assessing the trait “perseverance.”

But I should be quite indiffer-
ent to all this information being
recorded if it were not for one
considerable fact. These documents
are secret and confidential and no
one but the teachers concerned
and the officers of the Education
Department is allowed to see what
“facts are written on this Card
under the pupil's name. No par-
ent may be granted the opportu-
nity te see what the school thinks
ef his or her child. This is an
alarming statement, but the Di-
rector of Education has repeatedly
said this vo gatherings of teachers,
who have for the mosy part re-
mained silent before this incredi-

ble pronouncement. There are, of

course, various reasons for this si- t

lence. Some teachers concern

themselves only with teaching and b

take no interest in broader issues;

others, in the hope of prefermeny. ‘

would be oleaginous with the De-

I



vil himself if it would secure them
promotion; and still others, to
whom the verras ‘human rights’
and ‘democracy’ really mean
something, have been too flabber-
gasted and indignant to trust

themselves to make any immediate com
ment, “Not even a member of the House
of Representatives may see these caru
has pontificated the Director. Well, I do
“ot care so much about the rights of the
-epresentatives, but I consider that a
parent has an Inalienable right to all
written information a school has about
his child and that to contravene that
right is a sin unpardonabie. It is intoler-
able that in a country professedly demo-
cratic, officials may hold secret informa-
tion about all its future citizens who
attended government schools and may
use that information, one way or another,
shold the young citizen at the age ot
or thereafter require agsistance th
government channels. No excuse {:
taken without warni
to the public, can be convincing, If the
usual expuse is offered that it is now
done in England, | beg to remind defend-
f this
has

ers

totalitarian course that Eng-
a to be really democratic
years now, and young
hool are acquainted
he forms but little
democracy I would

$ practice of collect-
ecret info atic abdout its citizens
t core of German life under
i the totalitarians of
1 means of “check-
hy the




















ITHURIEL”

Political |
ar pupils’ |
Re-

|







|
|












secant imam
eS r

OIL STOVES
PRESSURE COOKERS
SAUCEPANS—Iron, Enamel and Aluminum
DOUBLE BOILERS

NEGRO POTS—2, 3, and 4 gallon

DANISH POTS—1, 2, and 3 gallon

FRY PANS—11” and 12” and FRENCH FRIERS
COFFEE MILLS—Nos. 2 and 3

MEAT MINCERS—Nos. 1, 2, and 3 |

TINNED AND ALUMINUM KITCHEN WARE
BOX IRONS

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD,, Sy

PICNIC HAMS
LIPTON’S TEA
DALTON’S CEREAL FLAKES ..........
CATELLI EGG NOODLES
DOMINION VERMICELLI
MUFFETS
FOODYEAST
SALAMI SAUSAGE
TABLE BUTTER

EASTPACK BEEF

| GENTLEMEN





WEDNESDAY,

D. V. SCOTT
& CO.,.LTD.

Oey Oa
eRe



TINS nly
TRINIDAD G
HEARTS : ~_ RUrr

7 =

OVALTINE—LARGE 1,04 Lig
TINS*DUTCH SLICED BEANS
33



38

select from this
wide range



WooD AND COAL STOVES—Nos. 6,7 and 3

COAL Pots

ETC,, ETC,, ETC,

ecessors ty

C.S. PITCHER & CO, Lm}

*Phones : 4672, 4487








EASTER
SPECIALS!

SELECT THESE NOW!

CUPKAFE

Reduced from 85c. to 4Â¥e.





STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO, LID.



tt

vat

«

WHEN THINKING OF |

MENS’ SUITING

JUST THINK OF—

DA COSTA!

DA COSTA & CO, LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT.

Aid

Q

—

HE FOWLS ARE NOW
LAYING THE BEST

EASTER EG6

AT

GODDARD!

—_
























ke

TC,
i)

Ae

. Imprisoned
For P laying
Sergeant

TE



$5.00 by

Mrs.
on

— to
: that he was a
his
would

and he promised to repay

the money the next day.

ons for obtaining money
py false pretence.

FINE of 40/- to be paid in
ep months or in default one

’s imprisonment was im-
/ on Golbourne King

Spooner’s Hill by His Worship Mr.


















: wr M-2474 with inefficient brakes
on the Garrison Road on January

Ashby’s Alley was ordered to
y 40/- in 14 days or one month’s
onment by His
A. Talma yesterday when
was found guilty of wounding

Downes on March 2.

ARE of unknown origin broke

out at the Belle Tenantry
] onday and burnt } acre of
tanes. This fire spread and burnt
12 holes of 1st crop canes be-
longing to Edward Mallet.

4 RIGHT SHAFT of the cart
; was broken when a_ horse
‘ya ‘owned and driven by Shelton
yh Haynes of Dash Valley bolted
when it saw an approaching lorry.
» The right knee of the horse was

]

iW ALLAN SEALE of Rock Dundo
A reported that three pigs
- § valued at $22.00 was stolen from

,

| his open yard on Saturday night.

LORRY X-1072 owned and

driven by Fred King of

Christ Church ran over a bicycle

in Mason Hall Street on Monday.

The bicycle was placed on the

. Side of the road by Ralf Cumber-
ch a bicycle repairer,

LORRY E-58 owned and

driven by George Cox of

Farm Road St. Peter was involved

_# in an accident with another lorry

_ Bf} 1-223 owned by Haymans Factory
ff ad driven by Claude Eastmond

_ of St. Peter on Monday about 1.10
pm.

The right front fender of E-223
| was damaged.
PHILLIPS of Indian
* Ground received minor in-
juries after he fell from the lorry
_ § 4-115 which was being driven by
iT fie Nicholls on Sunday about
7 410 am.

i} @ The truck was travelling along

| Checker Hall Road.

COURTS’ XI tcored 181 runs

in their first innings on
| Saturday when they engaged a
Shell C.C. in a cricket match.
|S, Miller top-scored with 60 not
_ out and R. King bowling for Shell
meee — for 30. Shell C.C.
now 50 for six in their first
innings











The match continues on Satur-

WEEK there will be three

in
|

A the British Council this after-

Pm. and on Saturday, March

2th,

ily).
B tickets obiar
British

Council,

WY gs,
AG

John

ter and Mystic.

deems
ing

This programme, whi
B ch is a
ientation of The British Coun-
heard over the local

!

“| © Heaviest Rains
In St. Peter

+ Can be
east tonight at 7.30.











iagHlARP showers fell all over the

on Monday night and early
Yesterday Morning. The returns
lice Stations show that
Was heaviest in St. Peter

at
ow

on ‘41 parts were recorded,

Cen other returns

hes me, Station 18

ie ’ 18 parts, District “B’
‘— George






Al
20

° Femail




Parts,

n oa Crab Hill (St.

eee en a eee a eo a

“I am a proud consumer of ...-

GOAT CHOW

—=—-_

The cows



25»
te a



. FOUR - YEAR -OLD
Harding of Dayreils
sentenced to 12 months’
imprisonment with hard! labour
i he appeared before His
nlp Mr. H. A. Talma on Mon-

“He was found guilty of obtain-
false pretence from

Yearwood of
on Court. Hastings, on March

Winifred Yearwood said
March’6 in the afternoon
peard a knock at her door and
the servant to answer it.
servant came back and said
a man wanted to speak with
her. She (Mrs. Yearwood) went
the door and the man told her
Sergeant Sobers and
car had broken down and he
like her to lend him some

She gave him $5.00 made of
single notes in the presence of the

has had 15 previous

of

B. A. McLeod yesterday when he
found guilty of driving the

KinzGERALD AGARD of

Worship

.* film shows for school children
M and tomorrow afternoon at

at 9.30 am. The programme
as follows:—British News, St.
Paul's Cathedral, Gardens of Eng-
- land, and House of Windsor (The

Royal Admission is by
obtainable free from the

; THIRD TALK in the series
rary Figures,” in which
Dryden and Dr. Johnson

ol already been featured, will
| © evoted to William Blake. Poet,
In addition
the talk several of Blake’s
will be read and a record-

of Edith Evans reading “The

were:— suxiliary schooners “La
parts,

€ and Christ Church)
, District “C” (St. Philip)
ae “F” (St. Josep)
Oletown (St. James)
Parts, Four Roads (St. John)
Belleplaine (St, Andrew)

Thirty-four-Year-Old Ownerless

Found Guilty Of

SENTENCE
“Sam”, was
Acting Chief
terday. An Assize Jury,
ation, found Gibson guilty
larceny from the person,

a residen
‘ € Rock,

along with 34-yea
coer alias “Bod
0

t of Uppes
es pper

SO ty Sulty”.
_ ar. W. W. Reece, K.C. ici
peaenel: prosecuted for thes cian
Bene, ba aebresented by Mr
se | eae ri i i
unrepresented, while Gibson was
.“lbson has three ious
victions for larceny.” On Janey
1, 1949 he was sentenced to one
month shard labour for the larceny
of a bicycle, For the larceny of
a sheep on October of the
Same year, he was sentenced to
two toon ths’ hard labour. His other
conviction was on January 1 1944
when he was sentenced to six
months’ hard for t
larceny of a Raleigh bicycle,
Leroy Browne, principal wit-
ness for the Prosecution said that
on November 9, 1949, he went
into Jones’ shop at Upper Colly-
more Rock to buy a package of
cigarettes. He spoke to Jones,
He went to another part of the
shop to have a drink. Christopher
Gibson was in the shop. Merton
Lashley entered the shop about
15 minates later,

Held On To Hand
Lashley asked him his name.
He (Lashley) next asked him
what he was doing in the shop so
late and he replied that he came
for cigarettes,

Lashley told him to go home
and offered to accompany him.

Browne said that Lashley then
held on to one hand while Gibson
held the other and they pulled
him into the road.

Gibson held on to his hand that
had on the wrist-watch. He was
struggling with Gibson to prevent
him from taking off his watch.

While struggling, he received a
blow at the back of his neck and
one on his shoulder.

Another man then struck hira
a blow on his left shoulder and
broke it. He fell to the Ground
and while he was there Gibson
took off the watch.

After he got outside in the road
Someone called Lashley and he
(Lashley) left. He did not see
Lashley after he was pulled out
of the shop. He had never seen
Lashley before that night.

Browne said that he had _ his
diary, some papers and 2/- in his
pocket but they were taken out by
another man.

Unconscious

After receiving the blow that
broke his shoulder bone he was
unconscious. When he regained
consciousness he went to one
Mapp’s joiner shop. He afterwards
went home and then to the General
Hospital. He was admitted by Dr.
Copeland and at about 10.00 a.m.,
the same morning he was
examined by Dr. Cummins,

To Mr. Ward: “On the Sunday
after this incident P.C. Austin
and Lashley came to my home. J
told Austin, in the presence oi
Lashley what I subsequently told
the Police in a statement. Lashley
was not arrested until the
morning. the case came up for
hearing before the Police Magis-
trate. k

A Warning

Lawrence Mapp, a carpenter
and joiner of Upper Collymore
Rock, told the Court how Brown
entered his joiner’s shop on the
night in question.

At this stage His Honour
warned Mapp that next time he
was coming to the Court to give
evidence he should come sober
because if he came drunk again
he might find himself in Glen-
dairy. ‘
Gibst who addressed the jury

on his behalf, told the jury that he
bought rum for Browne. He said
that when Browne came to Jones
shop he had an inflamed shoulder
and was not wearing the wrist
= Ward then addressed the
jury after which His Honour sum~-
ned up. 5
nee the jury returned their
verdict the Court adjourned until
10.00 a.m, to-day.

“Daerwood”
Brings Fruit

The 94-ton motor vessel Daer-
wood arrived in port yesterday
bringing a cargo of charcoal,
copra, cocoanuts, pumpkins an
fresh fruit from St. Lucia for
local dealers.

The Daerwood, which was re-
cently skippered by Captain
Archibold is now under the com-
mand of Captain De Coteau of
St. Vincent.

Captain De Coteau has been a
skipper for about 12 years during
which time he commanded the
aoe
and “Minita”. He was formerly
‘mate of the motor vessel Lady
Patricia which pays occasional
visits to Barbados for docking

urposes.
* He will take out the Daerwood





St. Vincent, Grenada and Aruba.

Lucy) Messrs Schooner Owners’ Asso-
ciation are agents.
a arseos
BEBBBaun e's a eB

begin their young ones on. - -

CALF STARTENA

Ybtainable from H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd.

a

some time to-day for St. Lucia,

= }

Robbery With Violence ,

on 34-year-old Christopher Gibson alias
postponed by His Honour Mr,

Justice, at the Court of Grand Sessions yes-
after about 20 minutes’ deliber-

G. L. Taylor,

of robbery with violence and

Jury Acquits
Ex-Postman

Twenty-nine-year-old Louis
Oswald Boxill, a former Postman
at the General Post Office, was
yesterday acquitted by a petit jury
at the Court of Grand Sessions of
wilfully delaying a_ registered
letter, No. 21580.

His Honour Mr, G. L. Taylor,
Acting Chief Justice, presided.
Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor
General, prosecuted on behalf of
the Crown while Boxill was repre-
sented by Mr. J. E. T. Brancker.

The story, as given on Monday
by witness for the Prosecution,
alleged that Boxill, then a Post-
man on the Jackson route, was
given three registered letters to
deliver. These letters were all from
the U.S.A. and supposed to con-
tain Amcrican Currency, but when
the recipients opened the letters
they found West Indian Currency
They wrote relatives in the U.S.A,
and after receiving replies, con-
sulted Mr. H. N. Armstrong,
Colonial Postmaster.

Further allegations by the Post
Office officials were to the effect
that the dates on two of the
Registered Letter Receipts were
not correct.

When the case resumed yester-
day morning, Mr. Brancker in
his addrgss to the jury, said that
Boxill was charged wit a mis-
demeanour. The particulars of the
offence are that Boxill, being an
Officer at the General Post Office
did contrary to his duty by wil-
fully delaying registered letter
No. 21580.

Three Aspects

He read a section of the Post
Office Act, under which Boxill was
charged, and submitted that there
were three different aspects to the
case. There was the evidence of
the G.P.O. officials who told the
Court about the routine as to
delivery of letters. Boxill in his
statement to the Police Magistrate
said that he had delivered all
three letters and returned the
receipts to the G.P.O. on the
same evening and he pointed out
that there was not one witness
that could say in Court that the
receipts were not returned,

He next read a passage from
Dr. Taylor’s Treatise on the Laws
of Evidence and submitted that it
was not for them to take directions
from anyone except His Honour.

He told them that it was for
them to consider, after hearing
the evidence of the Prosecution,
whether all reasonable doubt was
excluded from their minds. He
told them that the evidence put
to them was not sufficient to
establish criminal fact and once
they were in doubt, they should
return a verdict of “not gu'lty”.

He pointed out that the subject
of the case was not what might
have been put into the envelope
of the letter in the U.S.A. because
this could have been removed on
a ship, plane or at the G.P.O.,
but what they were dealing with
was delaying and that was the only
thing they were to think about.

Different Notes

He then pointed out the dis-
crepancies in the evidence of the
Codrington’s and told the Jury
that in one instance Irene said
that the money inside the letter
was a Barbados Government $5
note and a Royal Bank of Canada
$5 note, while Louise, whom she
said was present when she opened
the letter, said that the envelope
contained two Barbados Govern-
ment $5 notes.

In another instance another
witness, Edith Codrington claimed
that she opened her letter while
her daughter, Louise, said that it
was she that opened the envelope.
Edith then said that she always
opened her own letters.

He told the Jury that this left
them wondering who they must
believe. He did not think the
facts of the case were so numer @1s
as to “wilfully” detain them any
undue length of time but submit-
ted that once they fully ap-
preciated the legal presumption
before addressing their minds.
they would return a verdict of
‘not guilty”.

Mr. Reece, in his address, told
the Jurv that when they examined
the receipt and in their minds the
letter “six” in 16. 5. 49 on the
receipt, was a “six” and not a
“nought”, and they also accepted
the evidence of the Codringtons,
then there would be no doubt to
the guilt of Boxill

The Verdict

He said that he was not asking
them to convict any person but
to examine the case carefully. He
said that it was his duty to put
the case on behalf of the Crown,

His Honour, when summing-up,
told the Jury if they had reason-
able doubt in their minds they
would have to give Boxill the
benefit of the doubt and return
a verdict of “not guilty” but if
there was a strong conviction in
their minds they should return a
verdict of “guilty”.

At this stage the Court adjourn-
| ed for lunch and on resumption
the Jury returned their verdict.

—_————————————

10.00 a.m.

Police Band at Holetown

Memorial Site at 4.30 p.m.

Football at Queen's Park at
5.00 p.m.

Fourth Annual Meeting, Bar-
bades Girl Guides at Pax
Hill at 5.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema, Frizers Plan-
tation Yard, St. Joseph at
7.30 p.m.

Court cf Grand Sessions at
|
/

WHAT’S ON TODAY

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Dogs Cause
or Concern

His Excellency the Governor
r. A. W. L. Savage presided
over the forty-fourth Annual

General Meeting of: the S.P.C.A.
at the Y.M.C.A. hall last night.

During a review of the year’;
work, Mr. A. H. C. Campbell
sa‘d that a matter which had giv-
en their committee great concern
was the excessive number of ap-
parently ownerless dogs which
roamed at large. They had con-
stituted a traffic hazard on the
highways, destroying poultry and
sheep, and damaging flower gar-
dens.

Among those present were Mrs
Savage, Hon. G. D. L. Pile, Mr.
L. T. Gay, Col. R. T. Michelin
and Mr. V. C. Gale, M.L.C.

At the beginning of the meeting
Mr. Pile thanked His Excellency
for attending the meeting. He
said that His Excellency’s. coming
was even more appreciated when
they considered how busy a man
he was.

The financial statement for 1949
was then presented.

In a short review Mr. Gay re-
minded members of the Mercy
Movement of the institution. He
said that although no mention had
been made of that movement in
the report, it did not mean that
they had not been active.

Help Wanted

They were calling on people
who had the time to spare to give
voluntary help to teachers who
were willing to form bands at
their schools. Extra-Mural ac-
tivities like the Mercy’ Band
were best run if they were
not under the immediate — con-
trol of members of a_ school.
It was thus that he would call for
outside help. *

During question time, a sug-
gestion was made from the aud-
ience that ill-conditioned live-
stock skwuld not be shot, but
there should be an animal farm
where they could be re-condition-
ed.

When the Hon. V. C. Gale
seconded the proposal of thanks
to committees an the election of
officers for the current year, he
said that he doubted whether any
livestock were killed. The killing
was confined to do~s and cats. In
any case no one would easily
allow his animal to be shot.

Canadians
Unhappy

OVER LOCAL
RESTRICTIONS

Canadian manufacurers who
had been supplying goods to
Barbados during the war years,
are very unhappy that they are
no longer able to do so owing to
the restrictions by the local Gov-
ernment Mr. B. A. Usheroff,
President of the Justine Hat
Manufacturing Co., Ltd of Mon-
treal and President of the Millinery

Manufacturers’ Association of
Canada told the Advocate yester-
day.

Mr. Usheroff said that the
goods with which they had
been supplying these markets

during the war years could have
easily been disposed of at even
higher prices in their own markets,
but they felt that they should
encourage their manufacturers in
Canada to supply these islands
with goods in the hope that they
would be building up trade with
them for the future.

Unfortunately, he said that their
goods were no longer required.
not because the people did not
want them, but due to the fact
that the; were not permitted to
bring them in on account of the
restrictions.

Shut Out

Since his arrival in Barbados

eleven days ago, he had in|



viewed some of the people with
whom he had been doing business
and the information rece'ved was
that the people had learnt to use
their Canadian made goods very
advantageously, but they had now
found themselves entirely shut

800 Sign

At the final count yesterday the
number of people who had signed
the Electricity Consumers’ Peti-
Vion was well over 800. The
petition will be handed to His
Excellency the Governor today.



Assize Diary

WEDNESDAY
No. 24 & 25: Rex vs. Evans
Carlisle Dow-
ding
THURSDAY
No. 14: Rex vs. Clyde Green
Reuben Green
and Lionel
Green
No, 15 & 16; Rex vs. Lionel
Green and
Reuben Green







|
‘





Judge Chenery
Reviews SCAC

Report

The recommendations of the
Standing Closer Association Com-
mittee did not give the West Indies
the Opportunity to reverse the
verdict of the Cambridge Modern
History when the authors of that
great work had declared that na-
ture, circumgtances and human
policy had forbidden the West In-
dies from aspiring to the great-
ness and national being which
other groups of colonies had at-
tained, Mr. Justice J. W. B.
Chenery told an audience at the
British Council last night.

Mr. Chenery was speaking on
the Report of the Standing Closer
Association Committee on West
Indian Federation:

He began with a review of the
earlier attempts at federation and
recounted the difficulties which
had hitherto played so insuper-
able a part in delaying the
achievement of the goal of fed-
eration,

Opponent

In the course of his remarks he
said thatChe felt it his duty to
recall that*so eminent an author-
ity and so great a friend of the
West Indies as Lord Qlivier, at
one time Governor of Jamaica
and head of the 1929 Commission
which had visited the West In-
dies, had constantly opposed fed-
eration as the solution for the
ills of the West Indies.

He then referred to the recom-
mendations of the Royal Commis-
sion of 1938-39 which stated: “Po-
litical federation is not of itself
an appropriate means of meeting
the pressing needs of the West
Indies. Neverthele§s, it is the
end to which: policy should be
directed.”

Mr. Chenery said thai the Mon-
tego Bay Conference of 1947,
committed the West Indies to the
federal solution of the problem
based on the Australian model as
a federal structure most suited to
the |circumstances of the West
Indies.

He then gave a short ac.ount of
vhe struggles that confronted fed-
erationists in Australia before the
Commonwealth Act of 1900 be—
came law and dilated on the dif-
ficulties that the working of vhe
federal constitution had brought
to light during the past half cen-
vury, particularly the grievances
suffered by the less important
states such as Western Australia
which culminated in the move-
ment for secession in 1934 when
Western Australia volved by an
overwhelming majority in favour
of seceding from the Common-

wealth.
Good Job
He then dealt with the report
of the Svanding Closer Association
Committee and commended them



for laying, stress on the necessity |

for securing economic stability if

true national independence was
to be avtained.
The lecturer also dealt with the

detailed recommendations in re-
gard to the federal legislature and
the establishment of a Council of
State. The failure to adopt the
elected number in regard to mem-
bership of the Senate was com-
mented on with the observation
that it might be difficult to get the
legislatures of the several colonies
to agree vo a proposal which
seemed so little in accord with
modern democratic practice.

At the conclusion of the lecture,
the audience joined in the debave
and consideration of such matters |
as the Federal Judiciary and thej
Financial Structure of the Federal |
Government were reserved until |
nexi Tuesday.



More Flour Arrives

Hight hundred bags of flour
along with quantities of feed,
pickled pork, apples, kippers and
personal effects arrived by the
Alcoa Pilgrim on Monday from
Halifax.

ei ig ga thin
"Votes
nites

5
fi fry?

m?




CARRY
RENNIES

QUICK
RELIEF



At the first sign of acidity, suck
two Rennies, one after the other.
As they dissolve, their antacid
ingredients are carried by your
own saliva gtraight to where
they're needed in your stomach,

Discomfort after meals need
never worry you again, if you
carry a few Rennies (they're
wrapped separately like sweets)
in your pocket or handbag.
If they don’t bring you relief,
it’s time you saw your doctor.
Get Rennies at any chemist.

R ENN HE 9

NO SPOON, NO WATER...
Suck them like sweets

Cleaning
with Vim!





is quicker, smoother
A rub or two—and
your oven dishes are clear and
brilliant again without a scratch!
Start using Vim today! It does all
your cleaning so speedily —saves
you so much work.

20 Barbadian
Girls Leave
for Work In U.K. |

Thirty-five passengers left the
island yesterday evening by the

|

“Gascogne” for Plymouth, Eng-|
land. |
These included Mr. and Mrs.

Payne wiih their three children, |
Mr. David Pursey, Mr. and Mrs.
Stead, Mrs. Annie Douglas-Smith,
Master Jeffrey Douglas-Smith, Mr.
Richard Budd, Mrs. Drummona
Miss Drummond, Mr. Gordon
Kinch, Mr. Oscar Morris and Mrs |
Edith Begg.

|

Twenty Barbadian girls left by |
the same opportunity for work 1
United Kingdom hospivals,

They were: veeda U. Als, Doro-
thy J. Bailey, Sylvia Breedy, Eve-
lyn Challenor, Audrey U. Cum-
berbatch, Roselery Gittens, Mar-
garet Hoad, Dorotny G, Holdip,
Phyllis P. Inniss, Ruby E. King
Sybil King, Margaret R. Lewis,



Gertrude Maxwell, Emmalinc
Moore, Vera G. Phillips, Daphne
I. Rocheford, Margery Sargeant,
Adgla Shaw, Myrtle Gollop and
Cleone C. Haynes.

Hundreds crowded pave-=
ment of the Baggage Warehouse
t ee them off—family, intimate
and the merely curious. The w«
men stood in groups, dressed in :
bevy of colours.

he

Among the many people there
was a high degree of mixed fee!

ings. Some had a_melanchol
touch upon their faces. Their close
friends were going away from |

them—maybe for ever. But as re- |
gards the girls who are now aboar

the S.S. “Gascogne”, most of them |
had a decided iook on their faces. |
They were going out into tho}
world. They would see a differen ' |
sort of life. Some had a gay look |
about them, but it was evident ¢

the keen observer that the gaievy |
was only a coverlet to hide thei)

entiments. :



_—_—_——
————o—





a








a LEVER rropuct

WITH THE

See the PREFECT
at our showrooms to-day

Ce een

| JUST IN TIME FOR EASTER





sia

$49.00

MONEY GOES

A fine car that saves money all the way—that’s the
Prefect! You get smart body styling, roomy comfort for four
and big luggage space. Smooth riding on the roughest roads

and there's ample ground clearance too! Its eager, precision
|
built 10 hp. Ford engine saves petrol and oil, service charges

are at low prices.




CHARLES McENEARNEY & CO., LTD.

cleans everything smoothly
and speedily!

a me a nr

re ee

PAGE FIVE



HYMN & PRAYER BOOKS

AT THE ADVOCATE STATIONERY.


















A

RIPPINGILLE'S
OVEN



MAKES
YOUR BAKING

EASIER

CARPETS

of French Silk woven with Ejyptian Cotton

$151.00 $252.00
See them on show at —
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID.

10, i1, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

AN EXCLUSIVE LINE OF

a& 13





FURTHER...











I)
i; |










thy
aed A

















PAGE SIX





REPORT OF HOSPITAL ENQUIRY CONDUCTED BY DR. HALLINA.

To Mis Excellency ALFRED WILLIAM LUNGLEY SAVAGE,

Companion of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and
Saint George, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Island of
Barbados.

Your Excellency,

I hava the honour to submit the following Report, in accordance with the
terms of the Colonial Seeretary’s letter No. 6585, appointing me to enquire into
and report on the organisation and administration of the Barbados General Hos-
pital and, where necessary, to make recommendations for improvement.

I. PRELIMINARY,

1. The enquiry commenced on 14th January and continued daily until its
close. 1 was given an office at the General Hospital where every facility was
afforded me to observe the general running of the Institution in all its many activ-
ities. All the hospital personnel were at my disposal for private investigation
and I had full access to the hospital records and correspondence. There was no
disposition in the senior officials to withhold any information and after the staff
in the lower grades realised that [ was not holding a form of court martial, but
that my object was to obtain information with the object of improving existing

-conditions, they overcame their preliminary shyness and gave equally full and
frank information about conditions in the Hospital.
»

2. Members of the Public were invited by advertisement to give evidence
or information that they desired to communicate, and several persons who had
given publicity to complaints or criticisms of the Hospital were invited to dis-
euss the hospital conditions with me. The response to these invitations was
small but valuable,

3. (1) Six Memoranda were veceived, including a Statement from the
Staff Committee of the General llospital of their views on the organisation and
improvements necessary for the better rnnning of the Hospital for which I must
express my indebtedness”

(2) 1 also received a deputation from the Civil Service Association to
represent grievances of hospital employees, mainly concerning the nursing staff,
which I discussed at some length with members of the deputation.

(3) Another deputation with a memorandum was received on Friday,
the 10th of February on behalf of the porters and some of the other members of
the subordinate staff, which entailed a long discussion on the subjects which
were brought up.

(4) The Chief Medical Officer, Dr. J. P. O'Mahoney, gave me the fullest
assistance and information within his power and I appreciate the care with
which he left me entirely free to form my own opinions.

Il. REASONS FOR THE ENQUIRY

4. This enquiry has been occasioned by recent complaints in the Legisla-
ture and letters to the Press of wusatisfactory conditions at the Barbados Gen-
eral Hospital. The allegations avainst the Hospital may be summarised as fol-
lows :—

(a) Deterioration in the administration since the Government took
over control. Opinions were expressed that a lay Board, under the
same conditions as the eld Hospital Board, can administer better
than Departmental Officials.

(b) Lack of attention by Medical and Nursing staffs in the casualty

ward, combined with lack of senior supervision,

Inability of senior nursing expatriate staff to adapt themselves to
local conditions, especially in their relations to local and subordin-
ate staff, Inadequate numbers of local nursing staff necessitating
long hours of work :;

Unsatisfactory conditions for nurses who live outside the Hos
pital :

Lack of vocation to service in the Nursing Department :

Rudeness of nurses aud indifference to patients’ requirements

Lack of discipline in nurses and in the subordinate staff

d) Inadequate provision for accommodation and care of patients ad
mitted to publie wards

Excessive fees charged by the Government for operations and
X-Ray work

Reeent Gosuré of certain paying wards due to alleged break
down of the Hospital Adininistration in not making adequate pro
vision for nursin:: supervision of patients:

(e) Improper action of nursing and subordinate staff in reporting
deaths to unclertakers before the TLospital Authorities had inform -d
the relatives of the deceased persons;

(1) Inadequate salaries were responsible for vacancies in certain posts:

g) Cases were cited anonymously in support of some of thes
allegations.

Ili. DESCRIPTION OF THE HOSPITAL.

5. General lhe llospital oceupies a long narrowish site of a little over 7
acres extending from Bay Street along Jemmotts Lane to the corner of River
Road with a site of half an acre on the opposite side of Bay Street facing the
sea, which houses the Eye Hospital and Eye Out-Patient Department as well
quarters for one of the resident doctors. An area of 3% acres was also purchase:
more, than twelve years ago on the north side of River Road opposite to the
Hospital for the requirements of the Hospital in the event of extension. ‘This
area still remains unused, In 19389 the Hospital Board decided to ask ¢!
Government to provide funds for converting this property into a ‘‘ Maternity
Unit.’

Accommodation,

6. The Hospital accommodation is as follows

Males Females Children Infants Total

Medical Wards 4 9 53
6 Surgical Ward is i2 120
2dpht mie Ward 1] l4 25
t Kever Wards Is Is JO
2 Venereal Disease Wards 6 6 12
f Maternity Ward 9 10 19
1 Children’s Ward 40 30
Pay Wards ‘AG OR”? 1a 12 22
‘Pereentenary Pay
: Wards ‘*B”’ mt Cys G s 14
Pay Ward ‘*T)”’
(Ophthaltinic 2 3 - 5
TOTAL 24 Wards
affording beds for ; 125 171 80 10 336

an ; p $
Che number of beds assigned to each ward is, however, liable to fh etuations
In cases of emergency

Buildings,
3... leneral a) Owing to the slow development of the Hospital over a
long, period to no preconceived plan these are now distributed in a somewhat
haphazard fashion over the whole oecupied area. This oceasions considerable
inconyenience and difficulties in the administration of the institution and that
will negessitate the demolition of a number of otherwise quite useful buildings
in the event of enlargement of the Hospital heing undertaken on the present
site.

“4 (b) With the exception of the laundries, kitchen and other
domestic offices, and of the recently constructed Pay Ward “A”, all the build-
ings are well and solidly constructed in coval limestone, their ages varying fronr
over‘one hundred yon. to very recent years. The lower fever ward is depress
ingly:dark but the other wards are generally suitable for their purposes, though
some-have inadequate facilities for ward kitchens, duty rooms and rooms for
dressings and minor surgical treatments. :

8. Pay Ward *‘A’’. The accommodation of this ward is of good standard
but the construction in wood for a two storey building carries some slight risk
in the event of fire

Di al'he Tercentenary Ward provides luxury accommodation comparable
with private ward accommodation anywhere in the world. The rooms are larger
ihan necessary and larger than general practice for such rooms. More accom
modatien void have been provided for the same cost with smalier rooms which
would»atill have been of more than adequate size and comfort. A very fine
Operation Theatre with full equipment exists in this building but it is im
practical to use it for reasons of economy and shortage of staff
maing practicaily unused as a ‘‘show piece’’

HiPhe X-Ray Department and Theraphy Block are well built and ade
quate for their purposes

The Bacteriological Laboratory is also well housed,

80 that if re



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

——



11. (1) The Operating Theatre which serves for most of the surgical
work of the Hospital both for public and paying patients is situated above
the X-Ray Department. It possesses hardly any of the requirements of a
modern Operating Theatre beyond a good eqnipment of instruments and is
quite unsuited for ifs purpose. It frequently has to cope with a programme
of as many as fiftecn operations in a day. The sterilizers work unceasingly in
the Operating Theatre itself during and between operations and also the
sloectors change gowns and wash up in the Operating Theatre. A small room
serves, inconvenientiy, for anaestheties and a waiting room but the majority
of anaesthetics are given in the operation room itself.

(2) Lifts. The lack of a Lift to the Operating Theatre necessitates
practically all cases for operation being carried on stretchers up a staircase
from the ground floor from all but one of the public and paying wards. It
is cupossible to avoid some shaking of patients during the process which, on
rare occasions, might be to their detriment. It sometimes happens that a seri-
ously ill case has to remain in the theatre under supervision until he has
sufficiently recovered to bear the inconvenience of being carried downstairs.
A hand-worked lift exists but it is umworkable. It would be of great advan-
tage to the patients and the staff to instal an electric lift. Lifts are eompara-
tively cheap to purchase and to maintain. Should the Operating Theatre be
moved, the fittings of the lift can be moved at small expense for installation
in another part of the Hospital.

12. The Out-Patient and Casualty Department Buildings whieh also in-
elude a Fracture Clinie are very inadequate for their purpose. They are
small, dark, cramped and uncomfortable for waiting patients.

13. The V.D. Clinie Wards are well housed in a new building.

The Obstetric Ward is in a suitable block.

The Eye Wards and Clinic are well housed on a site adjacent to the
roain hospital.

14. (1) The Laundry is an old unsuitable building where all work is
manual without mechanical assistance. Drying of linen depends on the sun
which was invisible during a large part of the period of this enquiry, so that
it was impossible to return completely dried linen to the wards. It is surpris-
ing, however, to find that the laundry was turning out such.a good standard
of work under such diffieult conditions.

(2) Disinfecting arrangements. Arrangements for proper disinfec-
tion of linen and bedding at the Hospital are most unsatisfactory and ineffec-
tive. There is no steam disinfection nor adequate arrangements for boiling
linen. It would be possible under present conditions, as a temporary measure,
to instal a large steam ‘boiler where water could be rapidly heated with leads
to a disinfecting chamber and to cement tanks. The boiler and disinfecting
chamber could subsequently be transferred to a permanent site at little cost
when the Hospital is re-arranged.

IV. STAFF:

15. (1) The Staff of the Medical Department consists of :—
(a) Whole-time Officers :—
| Medical Superintendent,
| Specialist Surgeon,
t Radiologist,
| House Surgeon and Anaesthetist,
3 House Surgeons,
lL Matron,
1 Assistant Matron,
1 Tutor Sister & Home Sister,
1 Assistant to the Sister Tutor & Home Sister,
128 Nurses.
2 Radiographers,
1 Assistant to the Radiologist,
| Dispenser,
2 Assistant Dispensers.
(b) Part-time Officers.
3 Visiting Surgeons,
3 Assistant Visiting Surgeons,
1 Ophthalhuiec Surgeon.
1 Assistant Ophthaimie Surgeon,
1 Ear, Nose & Throat Surgeon,
1 Assistant Ear, Nose & Throat Surgeon,
1 Medical Officee,-—-V.D. Department,
1 Assistant Medical Officer -V.D. Department,
1 Masseuse,
Temporary Visiting Out-Patient Medical Officers,
1 Dental Surgeon.
) The Staff of the other Departments of the Hospital consists of :-—
1 Steward & Secretary,
i
>

(2

Accountant,
2 Female Clerks,
4 Long Grade Clerks,
2 Steno-Typists,
and
a fluctuating number, about 141, of other employees.
Doctors — Whole-time Officers.

16. (1) The post of Medical Superintendent is at present held, as an
acting post, by a doctor with previous experience in resident posts in Northern
ireland, who has already completed his term of House Surgeon in Barbados
and is awaiting return to England in a few months.

(2) The Radiologist bas reeently arrived from England on a three-
sear contraet.

\

(3) The post of House Surgeon and Anaesthetist is vacant.

(4 a) Three posts of House Swrgeon are at present filled by two
Garbadians and one from Grenada. Two of these doctors have given notice ot
tomination, one to leave in Mareh next and another in May and the third, I
understand, is considering termination, ‘lwo of them will set up private
practice in Barbados and one will return to England to obtain better medical
experience,

(b) The House Surgeons are at present detailed, one to Surgical
Service A, one to Surgical Service B and one to the Medical Ward and the
Maternity Ward. ‘hey take the duties of Casualty Officer for 24 hours i:
rotation. They are responsible for the continuous general care and treatment of
all patients in the surgical wards of Service A and Service B and the medical
wards, which include the maintenance of case sheets, the ordering of diets and
wedicines, and assistance at operations and the giving of anaesthetics on the
operating days of the Services A and |}, and the charge of all cases in the
Maternity Ward and the V.D, Wards. The designation House Surgeon is
somewhat a misnomer, as they are more properly General Duty Medical Officers
und may be changed from one set of duties to another as occasion arises.

(5) The Specialist Surgeon holds a post created for the first time in
\947. His duties are the charge of Surgicat Service A and the general super-
vision of all surgical cases in the Hospital. Ou fivst appointment he also held
the post of Medical Superintendent but subsequently found ic impossible to do
these duties in addition to the work cf Specialist Surgeon. He may admit
patients to the paying wards of the Hospital and he may also be called in con-
sultation. Half the fees that he receives for operations, treatments, and con-
sultations are paid into the Public Treasury.

Visiting Siaff.

17. (1) Visiting Surgeons and Assistant Visiting Surgeons. These are
joctors in private practice who assist in the work of the Hospital. They make
up the Surgical Services A and B and ihree of them visit, on one, two or three
days a week, the medical Ward allocate:| to them so as to supervise and advise
on the treatment of the medical cases, all of which are in the immediate charge
of one of the junior permanent staff.

2) The Ophthalmie, Bar, Nose and Throat Surgeon and the Assistant
Ophthatmic, Har, Nose and Throat Surgeon carry out practically the entire work
of the Eye Hospital and of the Eye Out-Patient Department and deal with most
of the ear, nose and throat work of the Hospital.

(3) The services of the Visiting Staff are of very valuable assistance
to the work of the Hospital. In addition to their small salaries they gain useful
experience and they receive the sole privilege of admitting and treating patients
in paying wards of the Hospital.

Other Part-iime Officers,

18. (1) Medical Officers and Dental Surgeon. These comprise the Dental
Surgeon, the Medieal-Officers and Assistant Medical Officers of the V. D. Depart
ment and three Out-Patient Medical Officers who attend on two days a week each,
‘n the afternoons, The work of the Out-Patient Medical Officers is particular],
heavy.

(2) The Masseuse attends the Hospital for two hours a week for
Which she receives $80 a month. The availability of her services to the paying
wards is under discussion.

15. Despite this large list of staff it must be realised that the continuity

i the routine treatment of patients in the Hospital depends on the small hard-
working permanent staff of five which is hopelessly inadequate for the purpose.
Nurses,
nt. staff consists of :-
1 Matron,
1 Assistant Matron,
L Sister Tutor & Home Sister,

oO Sister

20 Phe pres

1 Assistant to the Sister Tutor & Home Sister,









































































WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22 ity,



28 Charge Nurses,
22 Staff Nurses,
10 Ward Nurses,
68 Nurses in training.
21. (1) The posts of Matron, Assistant Matron, Sister Tutor

are appointments under contract from overseas. The remaj ANd 8 gig
staff are Barbadians recruited locally and trained in the Genera the maps

(2) The present cadre is barely sufficient for adequate
various wards, the lay out and distribution of which do not eonqe
in nursing staff. ndnee to
(3) The position is further complicated by the
ing of Midwives for the Island’s requirements, wae whic eement f ,
of the Charge or Staff nurses at the General Hospital are
training at the Maternity Hospital, their places being temporarily 7
appointments of outside nurses. Si of nurses throws filled Yay
the existing staff and the position is made more difficult by totam Stray,
and the Radiologist’s staff are the only classes of hospital e that ny
there is no budget provision under the terms “Replacemen he ‘
sickness’’, thus necessitating special reference to the overworked (yl €
Financial Secretariats and to the Governor and the Legislature “Onis
is required for expenditure for the employment of extra nurses during pio:
shortages of staff. :
(4) The recent closure of the Tercentenary Pay; ee
ject of public comment, was due to this position. | cade Wards n
the wards were not actually closed and emptied but that the aden
more patients except for grave emergencies was suspended by
Superintendent owing to sickness amongst the nursing staff until he oe
sanction to employ sufficient temporary replacements. This ,
be remedied in the future by making special budget provision to mul
emergencies. nee
(5) The present cadre (exclusive of provision of relief for a
sickness) and the distribution of nurses is based on a time table fs
64 hours of work a week from nurses. ‘To reduce the worki hours to,
week would need an increase of the present cadre of nurses from 1994
To reduce the working hours to 44 a week, would require a stil] larger
(6) (a) There is a great disproportion between the number
manent staff (including ward nurses) who are all trained, a
number of nurses under training who make up the majority of nupser
in the wards. As a result of this it is difficult to arrange that 4
times should be in charge of a qualified nurse. It further h; words -
ing of nurses in that it is not possible for tl trainees to work under i,
guidance or continuous effective supervision of senior qualified nurses, :
(b) Recommendation. Any future increase of the nursing a.
should be of trained nurses only, until this disproportion js remedlagt "_

(7) The local nursing staff is generally discontented and unhappy,
The chief cause of this, is in my opiion, that at present they are in a deg
service with no prospect of advancement beyond the post of Charge Ny
the senior posts of responsibility being reserved for imported offieiale «
work and conditions of service, with higher pay and individual quarter
der them as somewhat superior beings apart from the general body of ay
The nurses hostel is rum on such conditions of equality that no distineis
made between the permanent staff and the 68 nurses under training,

a



(8) There is no separate sitting room nor separate dining ¢ .
separate toilet facilities nor any special privileges for the permanent staff.
they live in an atmosphere of control that is proper and essential for ny
under training, but that must be somewhat irksome for qualified nurses whos
sive the amenities of privacy and independence in their non-working hours, Ths
conditions cannot but weaken the authority of the permanent nurses over
trainee nurses when on duty. ,

(9) (a) I have received widely different opinions from Barhadis
themselves as to the efficiency of the local staff of nurses and their capg
for holding responsible positions and it would have been impo
during my enquiry to judge the capabilities of all the
staff. Lt seems to me, however, from my experience in Jamaica
nurses work efficiently in all grades of nursing posts, ineludin
crade, that of Matron, that there must be a few nurses in the Barbados
vice who are now capable of holding posts of higher responsibility or y
could be schooled for such posts in the early future. “A

(b) Recommendation. To this end I would recommend
two new posts of Sister asked for in next year’s estimates should no
iy recruitment for Overseas until a trial has been made of acting appoint
of local nurses in these posts, =

(10) The nurses recruited from overseas are similarly s mewha
happy owing to their difficulties in maintaining an adequate nu
in an ill-arranged hospital, for which they are held primarily
a barely sufficient staff at its best, without sickness and shortages,
the constant care of training a large number of nurses which falls more he
upon them owing to the small number of permanent local staff. The pr
staff of overseas nurses is very efficient and herd working. They havein
ed a very long-standing unsatisfactory state of affairs for which they are
way responsible. It will be a long time before highly trained ses f
ovenneas will not be essential for the efficient running of the Barbados Gent
Hospital. a

The Civil Service Association and Grievances of Hospital }
22. I received a deputation from the Civil Service Association to di is
grievances of hospital employees mainly conneeted with the nurses, Ther
representations are summarised herein and commented on as follows:—

(A) The need for machinery for joint consultation between the me

ployees and the administration by the establishment of r
Departmental Whitley Council. a

I agree that such machinery is necessary but feel that its value will &
pend entirely on the spirit with which it is employed. An understanding
sympathetic administration discussing its work, projects and diffie ,
far as they effect its employees with their representatives who
standing and sympathetic, with the joint object of maintaining an
public service, even at the temporary sacrifice, for expediency, of pri

Ya

,

eye
personal gain, can be of great advantage. On the other hand a nil
ministration in such a Council, dealing with employees’ rep on
their flag nailed to the mast of resolutions passed by the In’ wes
Federation which many of the countries of the world have not
implemented, and not prepared to give and take with understand it
ing a strong stand over trivial matters that conflict with labour Prine?
without considering that the main object of both parties is the good @â„¢
eopmnnniy, mee ae an unmitigated nuisance and be to the gm
running of the Hospital.
(B) The appointment of a nominee of the hospital employees
Hospital Advisory Committee. ~
I see no advantage from this. The Advisory Committee deals with BO
matters other than the conditions of work of employees, for te
diets, fees for paying patients, supplies of drugs, contraets for food su
ete, Tt would be sufficient when a consultative council has been esti”
that where matters affecting the conditions of service of h Petal
are referred to the Advisory Committee, that a representative of the hosp! |
employees should be called in to give their point of view. |;
(C) General conditions at work of the Nursing staf.

(i) They now work 64 hours a week which és 4
The delegation recommended a 44 hour week.

I agree that the hours should be reduced by increase of sta
expedient within the Island’s finances which will most p
to better than a 48-hour week.

(ii) Leave regulations are extremely wnfavourable
Civil Servants. i

T agree, that as far as possible with the hospital service, that they om

receive equal treatment. pe is
(D) Hospital Rules. These should be arrived at by joint ¢ tha Ie

etant rules are considered as not in keeping ae

or the spirit of the Colonial Regulations. . e

(i) I consider that the need for new hospital rules is so urgent "
should be issued without delay. The present hospital
eighty years ago, are entirely out-of-date and do not meet the ,
tions of the institution. They are acted wpon, or disregarded, a8 ;
administration finds convenient for the best running of the institut 5
ly, hospital rules are prescribed to be drawn up by the Hxecutiv? pe
of the Government, which would result in a long time to | the 9
tion, reference to the medical administration, and diseussion ovet vd
details.

(ii) To extend this time by formal joint discussions between
administration with an (at present non-existent) consultative future. ma
postpone the issue of hospital rules to an indefinite far-distant } with

(iii) I consider that the Chief Medical Officer, in consultati@® 7 gi
Medical Superintendent and, where necessary, by informal ey
the members of the hospital staff, could very quickly draw @P 2h E
that would meet present conditions and which would be
Executive Committee for very early adoption and promulgation.

(iv) Amendments to these rules could be made in due
experience of their running, but it is essential that some form

visas ot

fr |
course
of ade

rules should be issued without. delay. by. the nei
(v) ‘‘Rules for the Nurses’’ were issued two years 880 ht up 10
administration. Some of these should be reviewed and browgit ion be

3s tia
e.g., on the liability of nurses to pay for breakages, the @ ere

@ on page 7



pppNESDAY, MARCH 22, 1950



: @ trom page 6
i rmanent staff and nurses under training in the nurses’ hoste
FS 430 eonditions ae be seg a cae S service can be terminated ~—
i The unsatisfactory conditions of life of the senior nurs,
E i nurses’ hostel, were represented. f promt fe

: Jready come to an independent opinion on this whic
J had ana in this Report. 3 which has been
sd (F) The deputation of the Civil Service Association also recommended
x the establishment of a nurses’ committee to + :

the Warden under their supervision, a ee

9 like the somewhat Soviet flavour of this pr
1 do not committee should be established to Feprivent, ‘wie ee
4 tg and suggestions for improvement. This committee would also be
I e of entertainments for nurses and should be consulted with,
‘e hospital administration on the disposal of the Nurses Benevolent



















) All the nurses feel a strong grievance that they a i
(@) arrange for the lawndry of their uniforms at holt one. yess
and by individual private arrangement outside the hospital, while
the uniforms of porters and maids are laundered free in the
hospital ee
js no doubt that the present hospital laundry o i
tm even if the Government agreed to sen Reap "bs eabitie
ment could be made with a private contractor for collection and
rates, which sees be see ge a to fs ere situation.
“ memorandum received from the hospital porters i
. hospital, contains a long list of grisvencss on small ieee,
; dy which their working conditions could be improved. These
Fave already been represented to the hospital authorities. Their
tations, such as a change of title of ‘‘Porters’’ to ‘‘Hospital Attend-
‘ene of badges, better sleeping accommodation in the porters’ dormitory.
et antiseptics, rubber shoes and aprons for laundry staff, ete., can be
nall expense to the Government, and are recommended as far as it is
“hie to implement them.
Vv. WORK OF THE HOSPITAL,
; ee kients
With the exception of the Parochial Almshouses, which i -
tion for the infirm poor, the Maternity Hospital for the steele
and a few small private Nursing Homes, the Barbados General Hos-
des the only facilities for treatment of medical and surgical cases
Island. The following summary shows the development of this work
tion with ‘“In-Patients” during the last ten years,

Hy

Summary

X—Ray work, “In”

Numbers treated Surgical operations} and “Out” patients


























Free Pay Examina- | Treat-
_| Wards | Wards Total | General Eye tions ments
5,367 + 453 5,820 2,433 2,592 *
| 5,465 466 | 5,931 2,207 | 146 2048 |
5285 | 521 | 5,806 2,588 {| 182 2,432 216
5566 644 | 6,210 2,534 161 1,991 °
4929 | 690 | 5,619 2,588 150 | ‘2,015 *
5,278 725 | 6,003 2,968 148 2,569 e
6,116 854 6,970 3294 | 156 2,848 °
6,826 933 1,759 3385 | 126 3,411 ‘
6,928 887 7,815 3,216 111 4,033 690
1,58” 981 8,568 3315 1 4,681 Nil



* means, numbers were not reported.
NOTE:— The post of Radiologist was vacant during 1948—49.

%, (1) Hospital accommodation for the National Health Scheme in the
ingdom is developing on an estimated requirement of 800 beds for
BN) 000 0: population, with a staff of 30 doctors. In the Barbados General
ital 886 beds are provided for a population of 200,000. This includes a
nity ward of 19 beds (9 for mothers and 10 for infants) which should
rly be counted amongst the General Hospital accommodation, and
eludes about 12 permanently empty beds in the ophthalmie wards thus
reducing the beds available for all purposes to little more than 300.
wh (2) It is evident that, even on one-third of the standard of Great
Barbados is still far short of enough hospital accommodation for
population, even for, serious sick cases for which hospital accommo-
nis essential.
, This Hospital provides 41 beds for paying patients who pay a daily
Jor their accommodation and nursing in the Tercentenary Wards, Pay
“A” and “E””, and the Ophthalmic Pay Ward “D”. They also pay fees
ment to the Visiting Staff or to the Specialist Surgeon, and extra
at rates fixed by the Government for operations, the use of the oper-
theatre, X-Ray examinations, electrotheraphy and Laboratory examina-
For the non-paying public there are 120 surgical beds, 138 medical beds



and 12 beds for V.D. cases. Patients in these wards receive treat-
free of all charges for operations, special examinations, ete.

. The work of the Hospital wards, during the last ten years is shown
ithe following summary.

(sfep)
Avs ode19ay

















: 4 ,) Seemanaaae
| agges
& aseroae Atreq ARRARRASAR
| 5
| Ef TTL
7. az
ed ? cuommpy | SRSRSRSSS2
ceo oo NNO WH
spgq| SRERSSRRRR





AAVUOAAATARHS
(s&Bp) SEASSSSSSas
Avis a3ersay







. *
- agaaanaasa
2 osvreae ATTed
ws
* BE :
a “ —
. >
= | a suowsrupy | ARRRIISERS *
oT Seemann aman
il spgq | “Xe nnnnone
ET
UE mt O02 DH] MO IQ
(s&ep) Saessesane

Ae4s adeieay

asviaae Alred





Tercentenary B. & C.







SUMMARY for the last ten years of the Numbers of Ia-Patients in the Barbados Geueral Hospital.



ee sped |
1
% OOH
. ; wae) | Sasseassen
| s Aeqs o8es0ay
ot 410

5s | seguaass33
ol SQ | esezeav Aprea |
‘g <4 b Eee a

3S | —eneeen

> i : } wore ©
3 $ | smi | gageg3s2g2
is : ee
in ae
: | cpg | Sasaaaasae
si |

| | eons sl md 7
a
| * | 8959883888
'



ing children), 9 maternity beds (plus 10 cots for infants), 25 beds for



\REPORT OF HOSPITAL

|
|
|

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

27. (1) It will be observer) that the numbers of admissions have increased
by over 60% though the number of staff and hospital beds have been only slightly
increased during that period. This has been effected mainly by reducing the
average stay-in of patients in the public wards to the rather short period of 12.4
days to make room for urgent cases. This class of patient has not the facilities
for convalescence at home enjoyed by patients who use the paying wards.
Shortage of bed accommodation has also forced on the administration the custom
of putting two patients in one bed whenever this is practicable and beds are
required.

28. There is a waiting list for the public wards of over 500 patients needing
surgical operations. This list extends as far back as July 1949. The waiting
list for Pay Ward *‘ A’? (5/- daily charge) is 54 cases going back about one month
and the waiting list for the Tercentenary Wards (£1 daily charge) shows that
patients, except on rare occasions, can enter at their convenience usually booking
a week or fortnight in advance. Surgical operations are done as a routine 4 days
a week by Services A and B on alternate days, about 10 to 15 cases being dealt
with each day starting about 8 a.m. and ending between 6 and 10.80 pm. The
programme of operations is drafted by the House Surgeon of the Service operat-
ing who first selects the cases for his Service marked ‘‘Urgent’’, on the pubiic
ward waiting list, and then cases from the long outstanding cases to make up a
reasonably possible programme for the day. The list then goes to the Visiting
Staff of the Service who add their requirements of paying ward patients who
have been or are being admitted for operations. Should the programme be too
long some of the outstanding public ward patients may have to wait a little
‘onger. The position does therefore exist that patients of the poorer class with
shsabilities, not necessitating immediate or early operation, can obtain early
relief by electing to enter one of the paying wards, i.e. by paying fees for treat-
ment and operation which they cannot afford, and in some cases can only raise
by the sale of their possessions. This position has been created in the last ten
years by the lack of hospital accommodation to meet the public requirements,
and is a source of embarrassment to the Visiting Staff and the Specialist Surgeon.

29, The medical work of the Hospital is carried out almost entirely in the
public wards, very few medical cases being treated in the paying wards. Owing
to the shortage of beds the medical cases are all of a serious nature, many being
admitted in a hopeless condition. The deaths are consequently large in number.
‘The attendance ot doctors to these patients consists of six afternoon visits by
three members of the Visiting Staff to their alloted beds, some patients being
seen by them three days a week, other patients two days a week and others one
day each week. A House Surgeon is in general charge of all patients in the
medical wards in addition to many other duties. It is therefore possible, and
actually does occur, that days may arrive when patients in the medical wards
are not seen by a doctor at all. Examination of the case sheets of patients shows
that every effort is made by the overworked permanent staff to provide a reason-
able standard of treatment for these cases, but it can hardly be described as
adequute. It is certainly not the standard that should be maintained in a first
class hospital. The excellent facilities that exist in the Bacteriological Laboratory
Yor highly technical examinations and the finer points of diagnosis are not used
to the extent that they should be since the doctors have not the time to spend on
the detailed examination of cases that would require them, There is little call
for comment on the work of the V. D. Department which functions adequately,
beyond the fact that it.requires regular visits by one of the House Surgeyns in
addition to the Visiting Staff.

30. (a) The maternity ward of the Barbados General Hospital deals with
complicated or difficult cases of labour sent in by doctors or brought into hospital
in urgency, and is under the charge of a House Surgeon. The Maternity
Hospital maintained at Verona by the Government was apparently planned to
receive cases of labour for the purpose only of training midwives and not to
provide a Midwifery Hospital for general requirements of the public. It might
be reasonably argued that a knowledge of the treatment of complications of
labour is also of value in the training of midwives.

(b) Recommendation: I would recommend that consideration be given
to the enlargement of the Maternity Hospital to take all cases of labour and so
release the present burden on the General Hospital of dealing with these cases
amounting to over 300 a year.

31. (a) The Ophthalmic Hospital deals very completely with all the eye
work of the Hospital but its records show that its 24 beds are rarely more than
half occupied. From its position apart from the Hospital it requires a nursing
staff sufficient for its full number of beds.

(b) Recommendation: Under the present circumstances of ex-
treme shortage of accommodation it is recommended that arrangements be made
to use these vacant beds to relieve congestion in other wards, e.g., for all ear,
nose and throat cases or patients making uninterrupted recovery from simple
surgical operations,

Hospital Diets
32. These are ample and well prepared in Wnglish and American stand-
ards which are higher than that to which the majority of patients in the free
wards are accustomed, There would appear to be the possibility of savings
in the case of hospital diets now standing at £27,500 yearly and I recommend
that the present hospital diets be carefully examined and, if necessary, re-
vised to affect any possible economy while retaining the necessary standard

of nourishment.
Out-Patients

33. (1) The numbers of these dealt with in the last ten years are shown
in the following summary :

Summary

New patients No, of attendances





Year |—__—. rabid
General V. D. | Total | General V. D. | Total
193940 | 17,704 | 827 | 18531 | 33,216 | 17,577 | 50,793
1940—41 20,901 1,066 | 21,967 37,874 20,893 | 58,767
1941—42 20,054 1,138 | 21,187 37,208 | 22,766 | 59,974
1942-43 | 21,154 1,223 22,377 37,033 | 19,656 56,689
1943—44 22,500 1,324 23,824 39,109 | 22,961 62,070
1944—45 25,024 1,209 | 26,233 42,097 | 25.024 67,121
1945—46 28,934 1,181 30,115 46,559 16,242 | 2,791
1946—47 30,354 815 | 31,169 47,605 11,552 59,157
194748 | 27,766 163 28,529 40,373 9,837 50,210
1948—49 21,153 957 22,119 53,567 | 10,496 6#063
(2) These patients come from all parts of the Island, about 80%

coming from St. Michael and Christ Chureh, Most of the out-patients are
dealt with by the Out-Patient Medical Officers between the hours of 2 to 4
p.m., their session frequently being extended later than this.

34. An excellent feature of the work of the Out-patient Department is
the arrangement for diabetes patients to attend regularly to receive insulin
treatment. It would be of great benefit to the diabetic cases living in the
outer parishes if such facilities could be furnished by dispensaries in their
parishes, as many cannot afford the expense of regular journeys to Bridgetown
or the alternative expense of local treatment.

‘ Casualty Cases

35. Cases for dressings and other cases oceurring out of regular hours are
dealt with by the Casualty Officer on duty for the day who is one of the House
Surgeons performing this work in addition to his ward and other duties.

36. On the operating days the Casualty Officer relieves the House Surgeon
of the service at 3 p.m., and carries on giving anaesthetics for the remainder
of the operations which may keep him so employed up to sometimes after 10
p.m. During this period the nurse in charge of the casualty department
reports all cases by telephone to the Casualty Officer in the operating theatre
and receives his instructions from there. Should a case be or serious
it is sent up walking or brought by streteher to the door of the operating
theatre for the Casualty Officer to see it personally after which he issues
instructions and returns to his anaesthetics. Measures of emergency are car-
ried out by the casualty staff in a small room adjoining the Operating Theatre,
and in very great emergency the Casualty Officer is temporarily from
his anaesthetic duties while one of the Visiting Staff carries on in his place.
During the period when a Casualty Officer is engaged in giving anaesthetics
minor casualty cases are kept until he is free to attend to them or, if they
so wish, may be attended by the nurses. Occasionally a case gets tired of
waiting and leaves the hospital to obtain treatment outside.

37. An arrangement exists in theory that a second Casualty Officer should
be on call but with only 3 House Surgeons available and no Anaesthetist this
would result in practice that they would be almost permanently on duty or
call. At times it is necessary for the Medical Superintendent to treat casualty
cases to relieve the situation. There is no suitable place for detaining a case
under observation in the casualty department, e.g. the very comimon case of
a man brought in insensible, smelling strongly of drink, and with signs of
slight head injury, which might be a simple drunk or a fractured skull. Such
cases now have to remain on a couch in the casualty room while a nurse
is present on duty, or be transferred to an already overloaded ward where it
ean be under observation. The small nursing cadre does not permit of a
nurse being permanently on ducy in the casualty department and casualties
arriving at night are dealt with by a nurse from the near by medical ward.

VI. HOSPITAL FEES AND OTHER CHARGES.

38. A summary of the vost to the Hospital and of the fees charged dur-

ing the last ten years is given in the following table.



ee



PAGE SEVEN































NOTE.

a
‘quaned Paes BS
om Aq ved | ZERRRRERER we:
ot O} aBreyo | ge
® " EE Sxanaegonan #23
. 2 yeom sad | Svciggg dsaeed age
g ge [MeOH 49900) i ii icici ct i Wil i wi
® a g
2 p 3
4 B AQAA BBO YS omic
k& 4
quepfsar | Sages
: aBVreae AlTed SS8RS8S8288 Hee
6 | SaRaRRERRR |
4 7
a ile
me] lt)
5 iad quened PEeererenrreenr& 4 ae fs
e) a Wivivi giwiwiaiaiaid se
yo a is eis
8 os Hmm wtoakteag Fag,
ns . SésHeneaie gp
| 3 yam tod rl ae i ial 3° me
= a [lBdsoH 9900) Sora ae as ;
= at a ) 3
Bi Sees a
a *| wee |. Sketanea ss A
4 ia STS gaz
BRL
oO “speg INN INN HH Hw ane
Be
a6 nat
ST
Be a | oe
an qed = juayed Peer rere ee : ES ¢
»8 out Aq PRU | ai i wi wi wi wi i wi wi g see
5 oO | aq OF aBrIeYO a 3 oEe
) . . . . . a .
we 2 yom ed | Arse gies 3 ahs
Se (HESOH 9800] Bune ern 8 3g83
E> | § i ° » dpge
a4 8 ~avonree? QMRQCOAHOrA 3 its
Os ue Ue pts CODHAKMH RAH 2 ¢ hz
z5 & | o8Bz0av Aired ray eer § iiss
3 & 4508
o 8 a §.2e
oS -— ARAAASAASS : Le
ia yoo | 3%
g # | wd qn | S444seeeds ae
° ous Aq pred | seh. who od eh uel pa EE
. & | 1% OBIBUD | iw , asses
8 eo | CHANSWNHONG Z ais
° |
3 sa Youd KG grvaods j Hi
2 of ne YiddsiGeee : ey
~ = Be
5 < x B58
~ yupmer | idcaessceas ey
& | esesoae Ayreq a ae b 3 ad
is 1 a
e
: E ‘spa | Sitddaadaa : Ge as
s
a =
z

|
39. The present seale of Fees is fixed by the Barbados General Hospital

(Fees) Regulations, 1949, which came into foree on 1st June, 1949. In the

three next following paragraphs, comments are offered on the Schedules at-
tached to these Regulations.

First Schedule.

40. (1) The fees for maintenance are remarkably cheap for the aecom-
modation and service provided. The Government, loses on all classes of paying
patients as will be seen from the Table given in paragraph 38, which shows dur-
ing the year 1948—49 a loss of £5 per week per patient for all classes of “paying
patients’’ as compared with £5. 1. 0. per week for patients in the ‘‘Free’’
wards. All classes of the community are thus receiving equal assistance.

(2) The fees for visits by doctors to ‘‘medical patients’’ in the pay-
ing wards, are fairly reasonable.

Second Schedule.
_ 41. (1) The fees for operations are based on those current in the United
Kingdom where the incomes of all classes are far higher than those of corre-

_ sponding classes in Barbados.

(2) Recommendation. I recommend

(i) that all fees above $100 in this scale should be reduced for
patients in the Tercentenary wards and Ikye Ward “‘D”’ to
907% of the present scale, and for patients in Pay Ward,
“A’’, to 33 1/3 % of the present seale, ang

(ii) that all fees below $100 in this scale should be reduced to
66 2/3 % for the Tercentenary and Kye Ward ‘‘D”’ patients
and to 50% for Pay Ward ‘‘A’’ patients,

Third and Fourth Schedules,

42. (1) Comment and recommendation. These charges are far too high
and should be revised and reduced to figures that roughly represent the actual
vost to the Government of each examination. The list could also be greatly
simplified into more general classes of X-Ray examinations. Such cost would
be based on the total cost of running the X-Ray Department, i.e. salaries,
maintenance of apparatus, cost of films, ete.

(2) This recommendation may seem somewhat meticulous, but it is
made for the reason that the British Medical Association has banned all ad-
vertisements in its Journal for posts in Barbados on the complaint of a Radi-
ologist, recently resigned from the Barbados General Hospital, that, his
services were being used by the Government to its own profit, in that he
was given no part of the fees for X-Ray examinations and treatment received
from paying patients in Hospital or sent by outside doctors for examination.
The action of the British Medical Association regardless of its effect on 200,000
people of this Colony may seem deplorable, but it is better to avoid conflict
on a point of principle.

43, These recommendations for reduction of Fees are supported by. the
fact that many patients now find it impossible to pay them and the hospital
administration is frequently called upon by the Casualty Surgeon and mem-
bers of the Visiting Staff to sanction reduction of fees for paying patients

under their care,
Vil. DISCIPLINE. ”

44. I could find no evidence of indiseipline amongst the hospital st
who appeared to be as well conducted and respectful to authority as the staft
of any similar institution elsewhere. Their work generally is onerous and exact-
ing and the faults brought to my notice were of same of cases that occas-
ionally have to be dealt with in institution, oa Meas carelessness
frestion of minor. wales, minal peenlations of 200d ele, Seaelimen eacisne ta
themselyes, but not occurring so frequently as to reflect on the general
duct of the hospital staff. It would, however, strengthen the new tal
administration if any case recommended for dismi were dealt wi
quickly as possible. The old Hospital Board the power of imme-
diate dismissal and not infrequently used it, but under the existing machinery
of Government control, the dismissal of even the lowest

5

edging
employees requires the procedure of long inyestigation ending with the pds

consideration and sanction of the Governor’ who must be overburdened with

Sus

matters, which, owing to their complexity and magnitude, are obliged to be»

settled at this high level. One such recent casé in which dismissal was recom-
mended, carried-on, on account of one delay or another for about nine
and, during that time remained a point of embarrassment to the
administration.

45. I can find no substantiated case of rudeness of a nurse to
though one complaint was recently made of sharp replies of a nurse to a

too distressed to realise that the nurse has duties and responsibilities for’ a
number of other patients. ‘ ”
46.
which the persons who considered themselves to be of more or less importance
in the community had endeavoured to iediwenes members of the administra::
@ on page att

patient's relatives. This case was not sbstantiated, it is quite possible
that some may have occurred in the present conditions of medieal: .
_ staff and a large proportion of worked nurses under trait who have.
not yet learned to exercise the forbearance that is so necessary —
between nurses and patients and their anxious relatives are sometimes



|
|
,

a. maa mcmama an ama ie aaa earn aa aera



AREAL SRE SSE REGRESS Petes | SIPEG 2) RRS ree Ve PO ee NO IY ONL CORO TW! Ge Mae Re =! REREAD NOON ROS AONE GEER GOI IES OO) WNL VSN



~ \











ron ae WEDNESDAY, Mape .
PAGE EIGHT ; B ARB ADC S ADV OCATE < eee iain i ak ial i alain er ee ——_
BY CARL ANDERSON ‘
asians © you
Se Se oe Z\ ] wake wp i,



MICKEY MOUSE



_BY WALT DISNEY




afl
wan














\ CLINK 4
Fa
ae
ee a



K. @. CANNON ...... The Riddle of the Red



/ YOU, TOO, ARE A BUNGLER!
WHERE DID THEY GOP VOU
KNOW MOTA/NG! NOTHING
EXCEPT THAT YOU
MAY LOOK FOR A



a / YOU TAKE \
| IT, SIR, - IT

\. MAY BE..

PAUNCH - | SAY YOU ARE /
BLUNDERING FOOL TO HAVE LF |
CANNON TRICK YOU. AT THIS

\ VERY MOMENT HE WILL BE

SCOURING LONDON TO FIND

‘ a WHISPER -AH! |








_ Ea MA. PROFILE ?
a THE PHONE J BAD NEWS. 1 FEAR.
; cr WHISPER 15 GONE ~ |
: SNATCHED AWAY?4








YES! IT WAS CANNON.
OF COURSE, WE FOUGHT
\. "BUT HE HAD HORDES
_.OF MEN WITH HIM, ~







BY FRANK STRIKER

_ ae | IF YOU WANTED TC
~ BREAK AWAY FROWN

) TEAM VI WANT TO TEAM |
\, UP WITH A |
O? / BETTER MAN |
—-{ THAN YOU ARE!)





par.



BRINGING UP FATHER

[—
| ;
HUH
ELEVATOR
2 fill a r NO
BREAKFAST ? r YOUR OWN E
AKFAGT ~-I'M \h A AFRAID
} : NOT GETTIN’ WAKE UP
} \ UP YET! a
5

ie








7-—_--—-

RIP KIRBY

at eae LiKké
fi," “ FINGERS! LEA\
> ME HERE Ww A

' | COPPER YOU'VE
ry | KNOCKED COLD!

BY ALEX RAYMOND
VERY $0 RRY, MRS, Y





= \

2) OVE) Ob AR EE + A a —

THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES
VRE] fog Dip S0 wccnaaie? “AL LIEDLONG) WSR

/\ MeCoy

OR.\ HUSBAND SHELL) 7am
; EFOR ay { |
n *







early Morning
i can’t go back ia



CARE YOUR BUILDINGS!!
REPLACEMENTS COST £s

Corrosion costs you £ ? a year
‘ > | l ‘B: De you know the amount of
y Corrugated Iron imported inte
tropical countries every year ?
The figure is astonishingsy high, ang
|




Your Nerves a: ]
bad;




Then it js time ig












after allowing for new orks the
balance represents a heavy forfeit fos
jack of taking proper precautions.

Protection is easy with

LOGE

Anti-Corrosive Paint
for every INCH of metal.

FERROGENE is an _anti-corrosive

\ paint designed for the tropics. It clings
closely te the surface of metai-work, forming
a Camp-proof, air-proof skin which preserves |
|











tonic. Taken in dr
it quickly tones w 4
nerves and enables wit
to get a 00d nisl
rest. Try it and be g
vinced,

itslife~Imost indefinitely, In three attractive
shades «Red, Grev and Green.

Manufacturers; BURRELL’S PAINTS, Mitcham, Surrey
(Props.: R. J. HAMER & SONS (Paints)
Limited)

Also makers of - -
“PEDIGREE” Implement and Machinery
1

Ename

“PERFECTO” Oil Bound Washable
Water Paint

“AQUATITE” Waterproofing Composition



















|
|






ON SALE ar

Price 36+. per bo

All Good Drug



My Toni perm looked
natural from the start!”

says the Twin who gave herself



a Toni at home



f

so ° ' Y 4 5 ee
ee 86% ~~

2 me WHICH TWIN HAS THE ‘TONI -_ eee ere

and whith has the expensi rm?*

if <2 ~ \)

4“ tyl ya
-m . + ss /. 4 Fa
The wave that gives that Three Simple Steps ;
natural look no lovelicr fe | 1 Roll your hair up in Y. r e °
: ) | Toni curlers, Dab on > 7

rm at any price 5 WAAR) 2 Wy i yre t i
perm at any price Fives Crame‘diaien. a Our Dain’ s Merit
Soft, satura/-loo!) curl Poets | » If you like ask a _ '
deep, graceful \ i i








trend to help you with

last tor months and 1 the back ¢

OUR baby is entitled to have the best possible st

You'll say your Toni

lovely and lasts as lon a Tie a turban sround: (ee in life, for on this wil! grcot!y depend his future wt
ovely ¢ asts as long bude diis. eee ‘| \ Zz B ‘9 + i
expensive perm, And aisle chueyidiicn a being. . For this reason you wi!l kaow how importanti(g
ies alee eandiee Wverage. Pech aiem | is that your baby should be fed from the breast
? -- F vil ‘ nly Guoczi ley r
Toni waves any hair that wil Breast milk is the one perfect food tor babies. It is natunll
ee ee , . F constituted to suit their delicate digestions and to provide the nut
baby-fine hair. Average wa pre | 2) Caturate. eae curl tive elements required to ensure healthy ». owth and develop
ume is only 14 hours. } t ith ‘oni Neutralizer, ee :
¢Whink ; : | 4 then set in your Be guided by the experience of Nurses anJ others who testify
Which Twin has the Toni ? | write hair — style the value of ‘ Ovaltine’ to expectant mothers. Taken
Ella Wi oni is in — just after baby comes, delicious ‘ Ovaltine ', owing to its restorative
Joni Twin. ou want it! nutritive properties, stimulates lactation and thus helps to ensutth
ich ¢ , st-mi '
Important Saving ! roni Kit rich and ample supply of breast-milk.

. ” In addition, ‘Ovaltine’ supplies the form of concentrated a,
S143 balanced nourishment which does much to maintain the
strength and vitality during the nursing period.

Give yourself a natural-looking

e
a @ vaitine
My a wth 06 ate : . Dk
COVE sg ee Fnables / others lo breast Feed their
a Sold in airtight-tins by all Chemists and Stores. Po
ZENE SNL ILE NIL IIE NUE MWEN



A PRODU
ote

seeereresereseeeesoseoseses ,
Trade enquiri GED



i

















New Florida
5 WAYS SKIRTS

One and the same skirt you can wear in 5 different ways
1. with a blouse as an ordinary skirt,
2. with a blouse as a pinafor skirt.
3. sundress,
4. ordinary dress.
5. dancing dress,





“ PLORENG



Price $5.48

BROADWAY DRESS SHOP.











— ~~~

LIG

INSTAL - -

o_w~~»~oJ_~.~"“—=—["F CE

HT

TROUBLE FREE



We now have in stock

FLORENCE .
STOVES

AND

OVENS

8 BURNERS $7186 =
2 BURNERS $44





‘LISTE R"”
ALTERNATOR SETS

a Mey DIESEL DRIVEN ALTERNATORS
; ° % “




”





oe es :

All complete with Switchboards and A
Regulators.
COMPLETE RANGE OF SPARE PARTS
Apply -

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lid.

White Park Road



utomatic Voltage



IN STOCK



oe
CITY GARAGE TRADING (0. Hh







is Dial 4546
= = Se a
SSS aes 1







. ICH 25 ite E
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22, 1950 THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE rico



E




























































































































3
an ate ree! cso papshet cf . i
T ’ , Sa 8 +4
4 CLASSIFIED ADS. | PuBute vevices R r | ry Conducted y
) | eioninetinericsae epo ospital Enqui ‘
ee ee er = a
eee Pp ‘
i “£25 easily earngd by obtaining orders ;
DitD For R for private Christmas Cards fro 4
| EN Your friends No previous experies # 4
povcr—EDWARD ee! Bed * T | a ontes for beautiful free oe a triad i J
a wil Bank Hall at 9.00 am | 00 ee | pple Publisherss eee, Wareeet ane 3 ‘
: * an! ‘ Se ea ost Publishers; highest commissio::, : ; er ‘s tof ig 7 m om
> ening for the Westbury Ceme- | HOUSES | marvellous money ating dae ri @ from page 7 modera stancani's of treatment and this figure - ci me peg se es :
Barts Borce | tmother), ghceet Hy ee, DUNDEE, St. Lawtence Gap | Works, "Presmns, © 2. Dept. Ys tion of the Hospatal over matters of discipline, promotion and duties of hos: | to be arrive’ »t. An inercase of Se eee 7 ital be 65 iens oe
parce geginer), Elsie Sareea 333.80. | and the 1a. Suntenbe ane: anes ‘area or - pital employees. The interference was quite properly .disregarded uy the considerably «se the Nee ee provi ook a oe oo vadtetiga’ taal 4
TALE A Dial soe re Dundee, St rence, | 2 fficials eoneerned | that they can be used to the best advantage. erence § id
ANNE BUTCHER. | ‘ dee, St. Lawrence, | ATHLETIC SPORT. ficials eoncernec : : | SHSe tHe) ; : . ‘ ; i b
BCE er ttancion Road, Bent ret EET ig ANNUAL see ne mere 47. The allegation that nurses and subordinate staff were improperly /ed jn'this Repori will show that the daily average of patients in ae
fi, Funeral will leave her late| | MAZLEWOOD,” Bishops Count Hin | MEETING “a AT OMBERMERE conveying information about deaths of patients to undertakers was carefully | ont the year 1 13% less that the official bed aceommodation, despii
: Hal 4.30 p.m. for the West-| f furnished, Telephone, Refm or.) SCHOOL, will take pit ying pa ; ) i } ; A aaenie ane eal s
reaieremetery this evening. Garage and Garden, Available ist Ari, | 0. Thursday, acne Place this yeas investigated. One case only was found in which, after the most ¢areful in- | fact that the | ospital has frequently to turn away p acecomm
Gales Butcher Teuton (Son U.S.A.) | en Telephone $388, 21.3.50—2n | 12.30 vim. parents 1s vestigation, it could not be ascertained by what channel the undertakers had | some patients two in a bed at times.
un matcher (Grend-Deughier HoT ICE—Marhill St. next to W. B are cordially obtained the information. The nurses and porters of the hospital were warned | = . ‘
vreat-Grand) Tutehings, & oC me es ae es a : . ; . sii
Yvonne Butcher | 23.3.50—1n,| lars avply Wo B "ihe Particu-| sin at 3.00 pin. Olt Boys’ Race will be (to exercise the greatest care to prevent any leakage of information. : Site c ange o 7
14 n| 19.3.50—3n; 48. I was informed by a doctor in general practice in Bridgetown that | 55. On tho choiee of site the main faetors to be considered are:—
] rie * . ar eaneenseheensneeseewenanatinameeen P «4 ‘ A * * * . . if
ye meaatmaaas NLICE over Sanitary Laundry Depot ,; some of the undertakers of less repute were so enterprising in touting for (a) Convenience to the publie
IN MEMORIAM f erca. conn Raabely Senitary Lau NOTICE | their business that three agents had called at the house of one of his patients thy: Cet ‘08. conmthadian
> “ 6.3. 5¢ - >. > A ‘ ;
: eciedesai before his Jeath. The remedy for this state of affairs would appear to be in : : ; ; d
OR Oe SP eee ING! Rinden Ban shake aes . Sie: : | ») Maintenance of an adequate hospital service during the build-
IN loving ADNE HINDS who depart-| unfurnished ts mim Mede™n Bung SAMUEL HAMPDEN the hands of the community, i.e. not to deal with such firms. (¢) Mi ance an ade
< ‘ : t above Highuats ees | : :
ants fe on Mine! sad SE day} Popetrooms, dining or: Be NOTICE 1§ HERES GIVEN that a Vil. PERMANENT STAFF FOR THE GENERAL HOSPITAL. | ing period,
: one year Nee loved was galled away | | uing water “Dial ee Too, ru ae Se ane Sabt or claten ast fey General Remarks. ' Of the three suggested sites, Waterford, Bay Area and the present
cee Te ly but God love . the of Samue ampden : ic F ma, ies
as cog — ee ech obahidad as O8 | in this, Island, ape, wy, OF Bricuetows | 49. The work of the Hospital has long outgrown the old arrangements | Site of the Hosp'tal - : : a ae
: st. tN Sn ne Slo » Baker, who if this : . . J . + » .
Bo he took Ne eae ted by Millicent | Te Cue, Hill, fully furnished, | Island on the Sth day’ of September 19:8 | Under which it was carried out by a small body of permanent young doctors The present site is } mile from the omnibus reer or &
Be Mor Hinds, Parents. Celeste.) rroved tenant Reason ave Apoly, | tleulass of thant cinta an Be |(Housemen) under the direction of a Visiting Staff of private practitioners routes to Bridgetown and is most convenient to the Public. ;
4, vian, el. "4 " —_ _ ent. Apr ; on ~ & 1a uly a stec ‘ ‘ “ ; 7 . : : :
- and Cloner s) Raymond and Clara | 2°> King C/o Alleyne Arthur Soo te | UT ae hindersigned = GEORGE HENRY | who are all busy men with limited time that they ean spare for such work. No The Bay Area site 1 mile from the terminus is somewhat less
35:8.00-~-1n. | “Sanco poreicotes | MitllibeanGt Ease: Mena Gridgetorn os | SUch arrangement exists elsewhere for any but very small hospitals of limited convenient. : ; : :
; a Open gallery looking heat thee | or oP ay Meth April 1950, after whe'n | scope and it is a matter of surprise that it has existed for so long in Barbados, The Waterford site 2 miles from the terminus is definitely in-
ca SALE pe {oom dining room, three bed ‘sets of the deceased amon te partic, | and for congratulation to the civil practitioners of the Island for the devotion convenient.
} Pantry, hen, Serve b) * eihiane on : cast oe = ; .t z . . « : ° ‘
it FOR | ior Cooking, Electric Ligne ve ©, Tel ah aan on witee t thal then nave | ®2d public spirit with which they have kept it going, Although It might 80 New Construction or Re-Construction. Probable Cost.
bo Phone. | Dial Ms Kad notice and 1 will not be for | appear, it is not comparable with a big hospital in the United Kingdom with a | 56. (1) The cost of a construction of an entirely new hospital of 450 ._
. | yo mene | HE assets or any par he 3 72 bas * ‘ hs 3 . : . a
STONOTIVE | FROM MAY 8th for six months furnish distributed to tae yn Sear dant ; number of Visiting Staff. In such a hospital, the Visiting Staff are all Consult- beds on present day prices may be estimated at an actual figure of £1,500 a tt
a, new | Modern amenition CMP Adults only al Eek ail ‘paeerae aan eee i | ing Specialists, not engaged in general practice and the hospital has a large bed, i.e. £625,000, with subsequent extensions at the rate of £1,000 a bed. Op- = &
eae oe ents ter, model 1942, new | co on AGEon St. James Coast furnish | Mitate are requested to seitle ther i+ | permanent staff quite competent to carry on with all the general medical and | jin)\cm in low building estimates almost invaribaly results in sad disillu- i
ie 23,3.50—3n-| monthly of otheewlee, Peay “ated this 35th dag se popruary veo. | SURgieal work of the hospital and calling on ee are ae sialemtiniih: bs
au { Estate Agency Office Hastings Hotel La 3EORGE HENRY WILKIE, /for speci w a compelled the Hospital to : i k
ary etasah ck xe) | Tmphee Mae ual ie | Quelines Ancien aaeiaom ae Ricca mabe pape te ter go Rise tm for owlan and (2) The cost of re-constructon of the hospital upon its present site ¥
paase) Secerymouth, (1) Morris 8, (1) ee ae eee | of Samuel Haiipden, ener te h satire eal later a surgical specialist Now it becomes essential | for 420-450 beds should be possible for £350,000 by utilisation of some
ee aS Metee Te ai PET oa Ppaicnst: 1 ea . oa : oe : : ee sis , ; T
_-N.B.—These igen ipa et Pt BL SALES | | to provide a permanent staff efficient to cope with most of the general require- | of the existing buildings for their present or other uses. Under such a plan:
on the hire Arty A. Scott, Auctionee, | —— ATHLETIC SPORTS /ments of the Institution. The permanent staff of an 800-bed general hospital (a) The main Building, now used for medical wards would make
‘ F 3.5 Oo : ; om ‘ : : » : . . cs cer ad .
reer AUCTION THE Annual Athlete Sports Meeting | in the United Kingdom, is estimated at 30 full-time doctors. On this basis the an excellent Out-Patient and Casualty Department with its Hospital Adminis- f.
| — ‘ke place this seat un Phureey Sard | Barbados General Hospital, at present, should have 12 full-time doctors. tration Offices upstairs. i



| UNDER THE SiLvER HAMMER Fe ea eee ae hove ties se | Counting, however, upon continued assistance from the present organisation




















; : . (b) A very fine Operating Theatre Block could be made in the
the School and all Old Boy's are condi. | of the Visiting Staff, it may be possible to do with less.














































: ry 23 AaS . F 4
“FUPPIES ' Male | Thur apper storey of the present Tercentenary Ward Building, the lower storey of
— Half bred Labrador On Thursde by order of Mi ip invited te a dion emeinaey - ; PI » s S r B J ay
Puppies 98.00 each. Piya 80-38 anual Walter Boyce we will sell the furniture | Hf. a; Tula. aap aha, conmeaa 4 | Recommendations. which could well serve for the X-Ray Examination and Therapy Department.
3. a at “Summer att stings, h in- | distribute the rizes c fe 3° _ $ i ase , i i isi
cludes Round ‘Tip-Top Table. een ca, | Sistrtbute the prize 22.3.50—2n 00. Tt is therefore recommended that the permanent sta‘? be increased to (c) The Nurses Hostel could remain unchanged with provision
Veanler, Gammon: The? | = oom. | the following adie a lines : aia for future extension and better quarters for the resident permanent nurses.
}all in Maho . Congoleum 9 x ¢ Medical Superintenden s adiiaehe ‘
“TDDING MACHINE (1 aera | apie hs p De hn Oak. Bakker Gla WANTED 1 Specialist Sur n, , (d) The nm 3 il sia ea sia cake bial of the
ey eae : *| Ware Dinner and Tea Ware, Pyrex Dis 7 es REO) (d e new main wards couk on e >
Josta’s Hardware =| Pictures, Rush Chairs Mate ha cas 5 7 : “ he tat p ;
a Peer 21.3. 50- 3n. | >. takes Worse Bo ahi — SS 1 Specialist Physician, present Tereentenary Ward, in two storey blocks with foundations adequate
——_——_ | Sleep, Beds tenn eo, springs and I HELP 1 Specialist jachiogia, a for their conversion later to three storeys. The new wards should be for
a . ro CdS Lea > Viah % ’ : , w 1 7A F P g
ANEOUS Rureau, Cedar Press, Westinghouse Re- | “GoOK--A Good Cook. Apply to Mrs x Medical Officers (General duty). a 22—24 beds arranged in pairs with central ward offices for each pair and
_-MISCELLAN Pardes, kitchen *Feties, Serene: Gij | > Gittens, “The Bonyans’” Bay Sweet. | CGonerally two Medical Officers would work under the Specialist Surgeon, tw: lavatories and baths at the end of each ward. This would effect economy in
————— . sription. | a: ; . 9 Sure . —4n : ae + 9s $s : 7 : : : : : aan iiehama
ANTIQUES— of every peter nar, | stove: 2 Pouble Doors, is Jalousies and 2 Medical Officers under the Specialist Physician and three Medical Officers woul the use of nursing staff on night duty and provide a better service.
ewels, e ‘| 2 pairs *4 Jalousie S 8 othe 2m: = ; . > ee > i "
WEeeecisure Reriy books, Maps, Auto- | Scie 11.30 o'clock, emntnd, other items = be available for other general duties, such as anaesthetics, out-patient work e) The Pay Wards and Tercentenary Ward should be trans-
Watercolours i ‘Antique Shop, | Trotman & Co. ‘Aus : MISCELLANEOUS . ee : . iv. . . ; ( , j \ ; :
foots es ayal Yacht Club. NERO. Se: ARNON 19.3.50—2n, Nien CoUEET aes ae lat midwifery, V.D. Wards, relief for doctors called to give evidence in the courts, | ferped from the site of the main hospital and housed in new wards to be built
EIST RORE | + ntemeeeeticsere sree eennenstrrintions| gicet he 2 NCHS Puy Ear Oe late, aka, AAOp mite on a roster for night casualty duties. Preferably all the on the 3 aere site north of River Road. If these wards were housed in one



“GAS RANGE—Two Burner Gas Range; UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER ——) \ledical Officers should have previously held House Appointments in large building with different classes of accommodation, a better nursing service
as new Price $20.00 Phone BY instructions received I will sell

as {| hospitals elsewhere. The post of Specialist Anaesthetist might later be could be effected. This site would also serve for quarters to be erected for

- Spaigah a am 94.3,50—8n: | Pee ach att at Rea ae Cte sidered. additional staff.

SacteARighStringless Beans 14 cts| Demnged Trees herms Cash rd FOR SALE Suggested Salaries, (f) The present Eye Hospital and its Out-Patient Block and

per Ib. Carrots 16 cts. per Ib. Dial 3756 r Auctioneer BY 51. The present salaries of House Surgeons in Barbados are too low to Paying Wards could then be closed and its patients accommodated (i) in the

eee e Sherhere 7 3,00—2n SHI ED: HOUSE SPOTS obtain recruits in these days other than a few young Barbadian doctors who| new liospital Wards, (ii) in the newly cited Out-Patient and Casualty Depart-
return to use the Hospital as a short stepping-stone to private practice in the| ment. and (iii) in the new Paying Ward Block. The present Eye Hospital

entre
UND UITO NET HOOPS can c Sh R ! f eaten oe oe

te had again, “they are. stronger . al BUILDING SITES island, The salaries and conditions for these posts should offer equivalent| Buildings could be re-constructed and used for Staff Quarters,
neater than the square ones, size 28 LAND—1,637 square feet of land at













































































































































5 Wr and 26" diameter. Phone 8332. | Dunlow Lane, off Bay Street, Apply emoluments to those offered in similar posts in England and this might induce (g) There is ample room on the 11 acres for all the requirem nts
. 17-5.50—3n| G. L. W. CLARKE & CO., Solicitors Cash or Easy Terms a certain number of Barbadian doctors, who now prefer to remain in England, | of a 600 bed hospital. If a new paying patients block were constructed it
PURE CANE JUICE. Bight (8) cents} 22™mes Street. wees | to return to Barbados. The salaries of the proposed cadre should be :— should also include an operating theatre (for which all the equipment now
eee SRE on River Road, | pi PAYABLE WHOLESALE LIQUOR f Salary Fees Other | Galata) It would then be possible for paying patients to be operated upon at
hone 2382. uaneneeiies | Clay with Brrohaaing fuga wot ‘eae From 10c.;per.8q. toot up z emoluments | any time convenient to the Visiting Staff without conflict with the needs of the
; DOORS, (12) French| Will. Conditions of Sale very Attrac- ELECTRIC, BUS and WA'TER Bie ia o 10n-paying patients.
WINDOWS & DOORS, (12) French | tive and No Big Capital involved or Se hare j ' A, ; . ‘ A oak 7
Pant Chpen tis Fea doe aed Chas 200k ‘Debts. Dial Silt or 2113, Con PEANICES. ose Medical Superintendent .. ri £1,200 Nil Quarters and (3) Maintenance of hospital service during the building period would
. 1 ee “ i a aren Toe., 4 : . ‘e . . . . e a T< - , .
eee va hen: Se eer, Tudor Street, Near ‘Mason Hall. Street 1, PICKWICK ROAD, KENSING- passages be simple if an entirely new hospital were built on either of the W aterford or
“all these ere nowy wt of Pitch aang be eh TON, St. Michael. | Specialist Surgeon ie .. £1,000 x 100—1,300 Ilalf do. Bay-area sites, It would involve much difficulty during re-construction of the
a Weatherhead, Max-| " 3fOUSE,—One board and ingle gen teraemaeme, Savers | Specialist. Physician sa - do. Ilalf do. Hospital on its present site, but it is not impossible, The problem has already
‘, 5 » 200 x < BY 7 rc ad of uvning, St. Michael. . as . ) ieee ee a .
— 17,3.50—4n Pik & wens Situated shove Pins 3, THE PINE CROSS ROAD, St Specialist. Radiologist re ar do. Nil do. been studied by Mr. Leacock, the Specialist Surgeon, who when functioning as
> RVPRTE ASBESTORS SHEETS 6 to| Theatre, | Enterprise Ch. Ch. Apply "G! cetinth. xmoetaik Medical Officers .. . ok .. & 750 x 50—£1,000 Nil do. Medical Superintendent, drew up a scheme and plan for reconstruction showing
| itve tte ef pends and eee Senin GARDEN & KINGSTON” TER: || | This would increase the cost of the cadre, as at present maintained, by| that it was quite possible by following a careful programme of demolition and
) is. B. Taylor Ltd. Coleridge Street. | POST yN—eih Ave Belleville. woo | fill to Kingéien Road, Se Michael, approximately £5,000 per annum. , reconstruction to maintain hospital services. ‘These proposals are more apeeping
4100. 18.3,50—8n - : : ; awing, i i Oo Kingston Road, St. J ael, { rox Usty « ? . ” rl i ‘ 5 . i . a . Sd Goa ne ] for r sliminarv construction 0: .
SS ——_____—____——"- | house, Good condition. drawing, dining {jf 1" 19 neon et 62. The post of Medical Superintendent requires a man with some/ than his but by the use of the vacant 3-acre plot for preliminary eo
& |GALVANISE PIPES & FITINGS, Size) Oe toe ; St Re OTH | ve: ; : ital aad apable of exercising control over all} quarters and paying patients wards, thus releasing a large area of the Hospital
Bi %, 1 inch, 14, 1a, 25 242, 3, & 4 inch | “"CENWORTH — Pinfold, Street. Wood See Saar | experience Of hospital managemen ec for d liti AE teen late they become equally possible.
Prone ig? TIE SO So t.t.n | House, good condition, reception room| Apply : ERNE RTLE | classes of the hospital per ‘1. The respective salaries for these posts under | +0F Gemolition and ne f Ons ’
16.3.50—t.f.n | House, th ites tee Apply : ERNEST D, MORTLEY, classes of the hospital personnel. e pe P y 2
a ly now in| electricity, enclosed. yard, | Sane ceo eonee eons | the National Health Service in England is very much higher than those now ; X. MEDICAL eect cal
SEMI ct your groom amit you.are | , BARMYEDDE: — one part wood. {{| Dial 3927 Bridgetown | obtaining in Barbados. It is still doubtful if the salary now suggested would 57. Barbados possesses a Hospital but no sy ye of oe ae es
tat using this most delicious and econ- | 3 bedsoome, 3. ivi mi», kitchen, | - | chtain any but a young man awaiting opportunity of a better appointment, but| throughout the Island that in ene with the Hospital, would form an
f all tens, dr tn SAG 36 aS 7 lectricits ane '¢ yan a i . are i ¥ ° sieaiat nla, “lie apvice for 8 .
ad you cifeas’ sdnple. without .A0y WTS SPRING HOUSE T 3 ‘it might be attractive to some retired R.A.M.C. or I.M.S. officers on pe nsion, adequate medical rere for “e Doye ae oa: unde ‘ish control treat sick
Bampton to, buy Pe SiS need Beane SER — ho would prefer a life in the tropies to present conditions in the United 58. Dispensaries in Parochial Almshouses under parish control tree sick
John F. Hutson Limited—Agents. MS yndahs overlooking the W | \N Ho would prefer a ile m2 P Pp yg 1 aupers, and a system exists in the parishes under which poor persons may obtain
ae | eae 1 Barbados. Ra P| TOR % aa K Fees, paryAgenall pad cwn yon 2" 3 gt ht tinea hl rcs 4 ean in the Almshousé Dispensary by the Parochial Medical Officer at
a raat liculars from arbados oe ate) By } : ; 3 a rent cad ‘ se Dispens . } £
> BATH TUBS—Four English Bath Tubs 2 9 Office Hastings Hotel Lid | @| rd 484 touch with sneh retired service officers. - 4 : : 1 s I ws .
to clear $100. Less 10% eeeaieaeeesk 22.3.50—2n | a IX. HOSPITAL CONTROL. reduced charges on the recommendations of Inspector of Poor after enquiring
A, Barnes & Co., Ltd 50 t ————SSSSSSSS | Genesal into his cireumstances. Although this resembles the procedure for out-patients
s aa _ ‘GY Eg) | . c F ’ oa 2 z *
BE He Gin See ant bat. lenaths J | 4 wo Be : . was ; e General Hospital where patients pass an enquiry officer it is very different
Ble wild. ‘steel plates “1/16. 1/8 te | PERSONAL | BEAL BRPATE | 53. The present unsatisfactory conditions at the Hospital are not due to ia has the sahaate are even taliah onde the poor law which carries the un-
A rild steel lates 6, t 4s | ‘ { * .. B ¢ .
ty ~ ORG street. | DILON tse change. Tree tae old Baga as Management » gives ae ar See Sas deserved stigma of pauperism. That this is resented is shown by the compara:
i ‘huto Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street. . ps dale ian | / t ernment through its own executive officials. These conditions have been de- ciel large number of patients from country parishes who seek treatment at
| GHOSE RRCORDS YOU WANTED et ret (my ek el | ND | | Seloping through a numbor of years and the time has = 7 wert “= + » the Hospital Out-Patient Department. ‘he Parochial Medical Officers are not
; 1 : n| Callender) og J do. nes HOU ee 1h A spital i small to e ith the needs of the population while its wor 2 | TLMent. : veer ;
Tev're here and they're __ keen | Callender) as I yone else contract- | Hospital is too small to cope with the needs of the poy ) ; : nieol of the Chie! Macical(@iesr-theumh thelr diememeeeian aan
= by, bam Rowe vocals by An ine sme a oa doy me. QT | has co increased ip sinannt And eemplexity that 3 would, be impaniine 209. 8 ietibe nce cakcen th his beapectitn and although nee may saaetee his advice
gr Sites, Mins rn ee te co. |” * Staned EDMUND SRANGG Bi ADON |f | Board of lay business men, meeting once a month or even oftener, fully to/! rr sommendations they are not bound to follow his instructions in any duties
OTe ate —T es | understand and cope with it efficiently. It is quite certain that no business | #¢ he eis Thabe in thus little or mo co-operation between these doctors
C/T + mae | | (JOHN M. BLADON) | men willing to sit upon such a Board would agree to his own business being| that they perforin. There is thus little G Sas sdeat the clei Ga ie
Tag Saha lal tor y warned again * | fl ; b ‘mi ; f had the advan-| and the General Hospital, as is evidenced by the fact that very few cases can
1 Refreshing. | The public are hereby warned agai: | LAN terprise Road. (On | condueted by a similar body. The old Board of Management a, re : ee ae ee
BAilities af you Grocers or Drug- | giving credit to anyone ih my name wit ost Rae Canter harden: ‘ae ” > eee § f swift di swipline and a certain fluidity in powers} found on the Hospital's records of patients admitted for diseases such as tetanus,
* ct 3.50—2r a 4 tten order signed by me 1 J gt ' re tage of powers o entoree swi ae e@ & J. . or : a : eae coe : reliminar’ dose of curative
i a oe fe .Stirective building 4 : oor for the engagement of extra staff or other emergencies that the| 2mterie fever, and diphtheria who have received a pre V; Gone 08 cu
vad t rm of expenditure for the engageme e ee ae at] E
SrrEL CABINETS — Four Roneodex coun. Micha b ed. and | P state ' ; remedied or prophylactic serum, although the Government Medical Administration is pre
el Cabace Tacnclate ‘wits Tray ad St, Michael, "ty Alwake cool wile’? present hospital administration does not possess. These might be remedied — paved to provide such remedies free of charge to private practitioners, and like
Card, { *s Ltd aid ind swe r | ig ae = & ‘ . . 7 °
. oe 3 50—-3n BARBADOS CIVIL SERVICE leciriclty sale. | (1) By delegation of disciplinary Terie tad et to some issued circulars to Parochial Medical Otticers recommending their a patients
—=—==—— | | int further dow » line i : oerd an ots. N sthinery therefore exists under which a case treated free in the
BARBADOS “DIXON & BLADON”’ point further down the line, for instance to a Disciplinary and contacts. No machinery therefore exists under ¢
a ON 2) By POvisi i i ital can be ret d to his parish to reeeive free treatment to com-
ma | ASSOCIATI LEETON ON SEA--Near Oistins (2) Bs budget provision to meet contingencies. : General Hospital ean returned to his p } ’ Te LY
T NOTICE ion of Council members Suilt “Weak Oko ena Benet. | Measures to manage Hospital Accommodation. plete his recoyery, for example, cases of diabetes requiring regular insulin
" 5 a ua right onto a sandy beac * ; ‘ i a . re : 7 rs .
m THIS serves to inform my Polling for the election of five pale | 1 oy lient bathtt g fecilities | 54. There is no question that more hospital accommodation is necessary treatment for the rest of their life, or, cases discharged from hospital whieh need
ey Clets and the General Public to. seve om, the Council tor Trey of re, 59 wae. mon). vesandah and there can be little doubt that Barbados will never be able to provide this} obgeryation (uring their convalescence, or further treatment or occasional
/]] that I have opened my own Tail- 1950, will take place he iber, Public extending the entire frontage. 4 | and there can > : sas : f {l : § itates | j rneys to the Hospital
b Oring Fstablishment at home and the Legislative Counc ee asth April. |i} > cin ap. (3 with basins) ange | on the standard now adopted in richer communities. 600 Hospital beds for all] medical exa:sination that at present necessitates long journe ” e " bite
. a 34, i ss, on § ) . shaped loung ith cocktail | ' coe r : : , : 4 8
Ea intertake the making of 1950, between the hours of 10 am. 90 ber, klinhen, garage and, servants purposes would seem to be the limit possible for the Island to maintain for} that can ill- be afforded by them. An attempt has been made to remedy this
Teno cnsure satisfaction. to all. Sede ing Candidates have been|(§| quarters. Enquiries invited ition by the Act to establish a Department of Medical Services (1947) which
j p x ni “a Pen | ? ; : . at
nae ‘ ares nominated “DIXON & BLADON” a Th S M ct , A ‘ ti oe not ™ been promulenen a oe ere the oer oll ool rye
‘ ABR, Tailor Cutter Miss D. F a STATE TYPE HOUSI St. | . ssocia on owers 0 supervision an irection of and responsibili y for medica
formerly of C. B. RICE & Co.) Mr. F. H, BARKER Jegiigia. PRopertay’ Ya. comananding | e€ ugar anufa urers powe ; ie
7 i : & COUARK! : a ‘ f the Island, which he does not at present possess, but appears expressly
No. 76 Housing Scheme, Mr e CO EARKE See nee eae oe ae services 0. > i : , snl ?? ‘ ee
ine MB MOEWIs intel toaities In. this coke’ | (of Jamaica) Limited to differentiate (Section 4 (¢) ) between “‘public’’ and ‘‘ parochial’? Institutions
mar i tar we ow c.. SPRINGER idaho obese ee ee over the latter of which he is apparently given the powers only of visit and
a p . a to a modren heme without heavy | inspection. : 4 ee et ie
: Mies ML. ST tek clams areal land troy ie | The best solution would appear to be that the Government take
: Miss M. STUART sdrawn first class arable land may be as yr 59. he ‘ f e )
= "Tag g | Miss E. V. CARTER has with af first clase arable land may be | invite applications for two posts in their Research Department -“ over the maintenance of all Parochial Dispensaries and take the present Paro-
ale” ee io tie ental ee ens | duties connected with the breeding, selection, and field testing o ehial Medica! Officers in the country parishes into Government service as
| & FOUND building development which can | sugar canes, with special reference to resistance to virus and other Medical Officers at, roughly, their present pay and emoluments with the right
Lost be attracted here 4 diseases as well as to other normally desirable characters. to private practice. Their duties would be to maintain Government Dis-
i, _ ; “DIXON & BLADON a (a) Botanist, salary £1,000 rising to Biase yn annum pensaries, treat the sick in local Almshouses and to earry out public health
, . : LOST Series 2.0001 a en” Geotax tee | (b) Agronomist, _ &, @Or~ £1,000. par. annum. \ i measures under the direction of the Chief of the Government Medi-
in inules bh os gos hp A same to the Advo- Dayrelis Road.’ Spacious rece'gtly | Applicants should possess a research degree or rn _ oe eal Administration. It would cost the Government little extra and it would
ease ; varded. remodel Bor ee need Wiis , : \
Rakin has neari Tite “Advertising Dept. Rewarded, 4 lle I err So + : re Be yn or ered cones See ion, a 19 - - ia a sailed
aa nearly 60 million tinyseams | 010 vunts’ quarters, storerooms, gar- | nave had e e breeding and selection . ‘ : tan stania roviding an adequate medi senvied
me seers hide and case tee | ———————— cre, loride eek 0 anes in \ The Botanist will also be expected to advise on plant pathology. sateMiink > ss eines oe . nly tae nein - Sir John Maude on
eine Tingworm, Beotiasts, a ae ad extent my Srivogey asked. © | The initial period of service will be three years ow by-7 to mn ere Moet a ro recommends & consolidation of parishes inte
aS mples, Foot Itch and other G o reas ed for’ this desirable well buil a . The selected candidates Loe ro i . ‘ ,
oe teller we treatments give ony } BETTER to cook on j nate esira with prospect of oe ee ee B.W1, and required three districts of Loeal Government, whieh, if adopted, will throw the present
BeAuse, The Hew discovery, Nixa. ||{ BEST to own it — a ia ie x lated them 198 November, 1950. A local allowance Parochial Medical Serviees in the melting pot. If eg ie now taken over by
ote Mae tt a s a riddle ; 28 : > RSSURE Spt NO a r yerminent it Wi ve mueh discussion as to their future.
give von a soft. clear, attrac= IT'S not a . REAL ESTATE AGENTS, | in lieu of quarters is provided and leave with passages paid after the Governinent it will save ONCLUDING REMARKS. son
es skin in one week, or money | IT'S The Last Unsol 5 Auctioneers & Surveyors : nsion scheme a, C
on yturn gt empty package, Get ii white Enamelled Gas Cuoker d ce ea three year service pete There is . nates re 2 eee In conclusion | must express my appreciation of the kindness and cour-
ixoderm from your chemist an Showroom. Furth sarticulars may obtained ’ : e T
: : 5 Pee j ‘S BU Se yone througliout the en am par-
yore theres Why not call and have a look PLANE AE years Severe Sugar Researsh Department, Mandeville, deamtion, BALE 2 Spee tesy eg ets Bing Sg 7 ae ys ae ney pact in
9 se of skin ” it? ean Sree er t ieulars ai ences ticular’ { ) a ae C rae ting
Mla Tronbles trou. yo Da ee, oe secant); Medical Superintendent of the General Hospital, ior ts wae . angionece
“a eT eee Y 504 iry that necessitated such frequent calls from
: 1 ie a ven me throughout the enquiry tha
| , : ;
you GET many duties. '
i ss to my Secreta: jor A. De V.
EXTRALOW COST PTs MA, 90 RANE Cee one Chess an encpelopeotis ef tincwioags cat Batealiah Saemanniaaae ame
RATION | A Limited number of vacancies will occur in tember, 1950 in am avd tony areaten Paallithiod tad suaniee
OPE | the Preparatory Department and in the Main Sehool. Applications for oe ot ¥ Ansa takis V. Boiron fos the willing paleatittine as
eZ entry must be made to the Headmaster by Parents/Guardians ona stein Y t ei 7” % Bo a es doe ae ’ 3
eS Waiting List Form, accompanied by a Birth/Baptism Certificate, on or e nt manner °
before 31st May. Unsuccessful applications made for previous years do Tihéve the henieaeia be
not hold good. New applications for 1960 must be oe 7 —_ a
i¢ cation can normally be accepted for a boy who will be under 8 years s ? :
5 otified of the Your Excellency’s most obedient servant,
DEPENDABLE BATTERIES months in September 1950. Parents/Guardians will be no! 9 y TT eeAN,
FOR 61 YEARS! dates and time of the Entrance Examination by a notice in the Press ; AN
2 ( and by letter, The Barbados General Hospital,
me Department of Education, 14th February, 1960,
Sig EO,” aimnanmaaactta 19,3.50—Sn.
Distributors: CITY GARAGE CO., 13th March, 1950.







—

Pi AGE TE N








































E ngland Looking

TUESDAY, April the 4th
Sensational Welterweight





BARBADOS ADVOCATE









¢ ollege

Harrison





because



'B.B.C. Radio Programme



WEDNI SDAY

MARCH

ee,









1954

—.














































































300 Candle Power

British Make 99990966896¢

SSSOSGCSSS



COOSSS

00669909999990009

| tel aio NO MORE GREY
| > WEDNE ns BAECS ; Nes
| Defeats Y.M.F C. | 7a Fg AE | AFRICAN MIXTURE
j le The Pleasure of Poking About. 8
| : ABOUT 300 _ spectators iticun Won thee Weilterisls, &10. 000, Pro Colours the Hair instantly.
) or : ¢ Ts Queen’s Park yesterday saw | gramme Parade a 15 ass oe a i it is absolutely what Is professed of it :
OO a is ? >c | Wo 9 3 lose Down. 12 1
| Harrison College defeat Y aa oat The News 12.10 oan News Analysis A catia or hey SOLOUMNS
2 , il econd division footba 12.15 Music for Dancing p.m llable in andy sizes
iby Joe Thomas lgiecen 4s Gerald Barrs Speaking, Pe nian of “ Obtainable me
LONDON | During the first half. play was! â„¢ wsreel 1.30 p.m. The, Technique
g the f ail, pla) « p.m. The News. 2.10 p.m. Home , akes
THE British Football Association selection committee has not enterprising. A single goal was| News From Britain. 2.15 p.m. Sports Re BOOKER S (Barbados) the hair
¢ li I BK y 7 eno are oe ° 5 99 | College view. 2.30 p.m. British Concert Hall. 3.30 R E S LT soft and g
in artisie aay almost completed the task of naming the 22 players wh a y oa if found both|? Donald Peers. 4 p.m. The News DRUG STO Db. | Sota
> Pus ; { e second 1a oun bpotn I > ai Service. 4.15 pm |
s es will represent England in the ; orld Cup tournament at a oe a : oe aaa eras AP ge: 410 p m. The Dally nerves Be aS BROAD STREET, BRIDGETOWN 2 Sixes
2 sch. Alexandrina R., Sch Schooner ted Pilgr 7 ton . a bool July. ams 7 Music. 5.15 p.m. The Lord M 3 sate
Mutton Belle Wolfe, Sch Mary M Lewis set, Capt t, from St. Lucia tio de Janeiro next June and Ju J a SARE Pare them notched up a goal era ee she shiee oe Lane, BaOr 2 | Manufactured by E. FLOUTIER LTD., Stana ea aa Eng, de
Aux. Sch. Cachalot, Sch. E, M, Tannis, Agents : S« Wer meree foe There ST des tet ae a ; an As play was coming to a close | astery. 7 p.m. The News. 7.10 p.m. News | — mn ner 19
Sch. Adina Mac, Sch. Zita Wonita, Sch. 8.3. Gascogne, 2.681 tons net, Ca St ial tainties for the trip, and not more ht hard to score the] Analysis. 7.15 p.m. Books to Read. 7.30 | ——— as
Cyril mn Ficary, gene artis Dove Se. home h co. pe were ee i Savannah Club jthan a dozen real candidates for sonata ry wale often stopped | Pn Calls tt Masterpigems. 7:45 p.m, Cer- re .
Preedom ear Sch. Turtle ve, Sch one = Dee } , a ft . ee S \ ro calls the Tune > News- |
M.V. T. B. Radar, Sch. Provi- : IRES " So the remaining six places, by the College backs. reel. 815 pm. The Lord Mayor's
“Mark, Sch, Sea ante Se“v0oner france We we eith, 74 tons 1 ennis The spectators at Rio are almost} “phe evening’s first goal was| Thanksgiving Banquet. 8.45 pam. Inciden- |
Ie 28.8. Alcoa Pilgrim, Sch hilip yet Capt. Hassel, for British Guiana; YESTERDAY'S RESULYS sure to see some of the follovring taken by College about five #. ee ee tare Bene TENE,
co ABRIVALS ate ie eS Cones Orta aerteeene Mer’s Singties | Htttish ple yers In ROGERS ) q,| Minutes before half-time—when p.m Gerald Barry | Speaking 8.30 pin
pit 2. een ory Lucia; Agents ; Schoon ap’. Olivier or Trinidad; Agent Dr. C. G. Manning beat D. E Bert Williams (goalkeeper). He Gibbs, playing at inside lef nor « i oe es ee eee aed
er Owners’ Association. Tene biel tees hat: Can orine 4-6) 6-1) el, jhas been in grand form through- received a pass from Talma ct} SO cinta Commentary. Il pin. The | R
BE ODSE URS se crenadas Awents Prikent, for Mactinigué: Awente: Ht. M D. I. Lawless beat P. K. Roach |out the present season in inter-|jnside right and shot accurately. | News | YOU
oe by ge Weel ree "o & Co, Ltd 8—10, 8-—-6, 9—7. |national matches and for his club Without any further scoring, the |
gas Men’s Doubles Alf Ramsey (right back). He] whistle went off for first vw |
, , * ~ y Nec in tb eens ‘ is a str sure kicker wh ver Shortly after resumption,
J J 3 S COAST STATION P. McG. Patterson and G. H. |is a strong, sure kicker who nev s ; ry
IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS Manning beat O. M. Wilson and \s ets flustered. College took pe oe rs eis th Mr. L. Par | WARDROBE
fed ‘ ee Ste} oe ; ‘ > : 4 i i en al res > rom }
Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd ovig, Fosna, M/S Curate, ree J. H. C. Edghill 6—1, 6—1. | Laurie Scott (right back.) His Their second goa’ resu fa i : :
advise thas they can, now SEN hall. ceuariss San Vedtha, Geapeanasn, Oneroe TODAY'S FIXTURES experience against many foreign|a melee in Y.M.P.C., goal area. = Shoots Best |
Barballos Cont Batons eee anves H, Land, Hellinie Sky, Krios Men’s Singles clubs will be invaluable to the}the ball was ee ie “ ” Sat
: se ea ee Cape Junction, Uniguay, Alcoa Cavs lie . fa cae’ "ea British team; another strong] goalie got hold of it and lay « THERE was a practice on Satur | NOW
S.S. Geiruly, Durango, Thelidon u ane Se, ee, Ld nartt R S. Nicholls vs. G. H. Man- cited & the ground with it between his day at 200, 500, and 600 yards. |
Queen Adelaide, G. C. Brovig ae os ee Alooa’ Polaris,,) "ing ; | M a Conditions at 200 & 500 yards were
epnera, Cites, Regent titer aa’ -opne. NES De. ee Ladies’ Doubles Johnny Aston (left back). He Con e’s forwards gathered good but at 600 yards were difficult
Siancirilo, Lov a, Wave King, “ei Bea ‘pitreee (ode beeen Wredect 2, a PCS Mrs. J. | has proved himself quite the most ollege s aoe eo am nha thaws Nat cb betta > e
ciiell, “Petter, San Mateo, Argent! Cran’ “Eitactegatal, “Oleg Mrs. F. D, Barnes and Mrs. J. i around him. He tried to throw they que to changing light. The follow-
: “ena, Esso Reading, Rammhilé- Alcoa Ranger, Silversandal, Otco New { * ; The Misses Lenagan. |reliable left back in England, is aol 7 é Se ae
Golden Ocena, : : jet is Connell vs. The Misses Lenagz play while in his s are the eight best scores.
York, Bowrio, Martha Kleppe, PB ‘ known as “stone-wall” Aston’ by| ball back into pla ing are the eig arts ‘
(cuba, Chuertour, mouthen Cites Mixed Doubles ar lying position. The ball struck one HPS. 150/11 WHE areina
Niewe Arve, Cla ee tuatente |: Mré. .P, McC. Patterson and Cr a (wing-halt){of the forwards and rebounded) Mr. L. E. R. Parry 4 |
Dunedin EO June ne ‘ oe ie rkins ‘ ’ s iy ‘ ‘ i ee 3s ° or
Copra, Coconuts And Icotea, Wellandoc, Mormacsurf, Thoma |, S, Bancroft vs. Mrs. D. Perkins | | best wing half-back in the| toward the bars to be kicked back! Capt. C. R. E. Warner - Unique Position
Charcoal Arrive F, “Baker, Canadian Challeng ind Dr. A. C. Edwards. 8 out by one of the Y.M.P.C’s backs.] Mr. T. A. L. Roberts aa tt
= serday from ~ Miss E. Worme and J. 1. |game today. . It did not get far however aS} Mr. T. G. McKinstry 136 | t 1 ith
ARRIVING here eo a ae St. Hill vs. Mrs. D. E. Worme| Willie Watson (wing-half) the| tre forward Hewitt received} Capt. J. R. Jordan 135 | O supply wi
oa a ee at yen ren MAIL NOTICE and C. C, Worme. most constructive wing-half in| i+ at close range and easily scored Lt. C, E, Neblett 135 |
“United Pilgrim S.” with a cargo Mrs. G. D. Bynoe and C. de L. | England, is a grand ball player. Bourne, inside left for Y.M.P.C. Lt. Col. J. Connell 134 | THE FINEST
of 379 bags of copra, six bags r Mails for St. Vincent, Grenada, Arube | {nniss vs. Mrs. R. S. Bancroft and Billy Nicholson (wing-half), ¢ shot his team’s first goal to bring Mr. G. Pilgrim 134 |
coconuts, 266 bags of Ng Dartg ane’ by the MV lace hf Will be closet #1 Pp. McG. Patterson strong tackler, very enterprising |}46 score to 2—1. His low shot
resh fr the Geners ‘ “e as unde : y . ; ’ + SS AC ,
a smal] supply of fresh a” is con- 6 ater Aa REGISTERED MAIL a | Mixed Doubles (Handicap) | and enjoyable to watch. passed to the left of College’s | Sl ITS
The “United suger i ‘ ( as 30 p.m. on the 22nd March 1950 i Miss P. Wilson and A. M. Wil- Billy Wright (half-back), prob- goalie who was running out to Th W ather |
signed : to Messrs Schoor ee ae at 2 30 p.m. or ‘on vs. Miss D. Wood and Dr. | able captain of visiting team: ¢ oes the ball. e e.
Owners’ Association ene es 7 G. Manning very constructive player. End of play found the score TODAY MADE TO ORDER
\itate +k il fuera ” ‘Laurie Hughes (center-half), is ‘hanged
vemmmen TE unchangec |
St BS PITUTE” ant at beginning to establish himself as < Sun Rises: 6.06 a.m. | IN OUR TAILORING DEPT
SHIPPING NOTICES) aie Line ac ' a England’s first choice for center- Wi ° 3 De eals Sun 8 6.14 p.m. : .
| the next start in the We' “ |half; tall, strong minati is fe first Quarter) March
| racehorse trotter named “Substi- aes seneaaae act ating, i es ‘ e — (First Qu WE FIT You WITH EASE
“{ tute”. Waile —eing taken’ 0 | Stanley Matthews (wing for eter ighting: 6.30 p.m
—-—-— : ak iene broke away, Stanley Matthews (wing for- Lig ng: Do tee
‘We seers ——— me ac " saoeets a ae walked | ward); his skill would be of great , RIA. March 20 High Water: 5.18 a.m., 5.54 WE FIT TO PLEASE
cemennncat aia dashed for the beach ‘a -s | value at Rio; deceives his op- ALEXANDRIA, March 20. p.m. |
1" DABRW OOD ae straight into the sea. Three op ponent’. by his body swerving ahd Meraldo Weiss of Argentina YESTERDAY nA
aicerit aoe 5 fo later when it was overtaken ny brilliant foot-work I a reached _ the third round of sd Rainfall: (Codrington) .64 in. CAVE SHEPHERD & (0 Lid.
St, Lucia, St d Wis 1 fishing launch, it had cleared Wilt L a ; . iy Men's Singles in the Egyptian Total for month to yesterday: “9
Aruba wailing Wednesda 2 the Wellington heads, some pet anaae stylis ph Ser eat ence ‘owe be ag ri 1.61 ins. T i D
arch Fs » starting int, and was clever, stylis ayer a hips here by beating é c : 29° R
rh v. CARIBBER will ac from the starting poin hive i ; pionship: erature (Max.) 83.0° F. § °
tio Gogo va Passengers for GiyceRint | 4 PASTILLES « still swimming strongly. terrific shot in both feet. International Jacques Paton, eve tens (Min,) 72.0° F. | a orin ept. i
us ontserra pCa CURRA eee m bd : ;
ee ere Malling Frida} - i I very speedy stay ee ne, orward), |to-day. Weiss won 63, Other || int pireotion: (9 a:m.) E. :
24th March I H} Something New! ! {cence ane as who will need on er Gcetk shite dae by N. (3 p.m.) E., by N. ; aH
oner LAUDALPHA { "lal Aenats) STYLE {| careful watching the self-exiled Czech stars if ity: 15 miles | $A SSSSSesssessssss SSOSSS ;
recep Cargo and. Passenge' 1 ae a : Stan Mortensen (center for-|slav Drobney and ae Cer- aor 15 miles per | , SSSSseesssessossesenas
ling Tuese \( 1 . Yr 5 . | ;
| a \} SHOW & DANCE ey eke a Saas ro aoe Davin Sian ‘Sager, and Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.056; 1% ’ e
{ : old dash but very fe é é 7 < ‘ : . . 4 2 i Bol
B.W 3;CHOONER OWNERS Soothe your 1 AT DRILL HALL (Garri his power in te aca ee Australian International. (3 p.m.) 29.997, | % : os
ASSOCIATION (INC@.) { n FRIDAY MAY S5th., 1950 | 3 on RE ; Fa
re ac et aruaioe i Ther at 8.30 p.m ' 1 Jack Milburn (center forward), een : ) Bon
Pel, S047 irs AN (tte inluha PRODUCT IN AID OF CHRIST CHURCH }| 2 dashing forward who shoots - z | me fo
lel tale al al MADE IN ENGLAND BY: ALLEN 6 MANBURYS UB i BABY WELFARE LEAGUE {; with deadly accuracy when near ward), another newcomer to big- 1y
ae Tod. cietme Me ‘} goal : time football who is definitely 1% | Heute.
to help Babies in St. John - ~ 7 . |
Mires, Sin mons-Hpwell, a @ ud Eddie Bailey (inside forward),| above the average class player. | % ) bi
» H. ARRIS DIN LINE | Se ee ee re 18 a a eet oe *~ re a * ee 5 } !
presents her lovely models with | ball who will need careful watch- ; for Rio ~=wwi probably - | + Bato
i be watiful ces seein her ing when in possession of the ball. ! nounced at the end of this month 1 y 3 .
“el ME rae : | Redfern Froggatt (inside for- | —LN.S. | e
OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM its Gina arntea has Sh iat \\~= ms I | | DRINK CE Q
{ Owen Allder, M.C.P. Mr. W. W
Due ) Recce KC. MCLE. Me B. ¢ i } 1% - EREALS NOW abl)
Vessel. From Leaves Barbados } a ai tited tosis PCS | SPEA KING OF ENRICHED BREA D? AND ENJOY TO DAY’S PRICE,
or " tra in Atyendance | - S ,
3S NTIAN” Liverpool 8th Mar. 23rd Mar i 9 | . t
Ae S. “Gc ME DIAN” tonto. 14th Mar. $rd Mar. ADMISSION — $1.00 f it fics ——_ . ba ’ 0 \
ss TATE :SM AN” Glasgow 24th Mar. 7th Apt Dancing after Show | : : of water, watch Post Toasties Pabena is
SS “MEG NA London 25th Mar 10th Apr. J? ne . Swan and Roebuck Streets ” Ss Te a Welgar Shredded Wheat Cerevim ac
$.S. “OREGON STAR’ Liverpool 40m Mar. 1h Apr. 1) au, ee Rowe Optima Shsenbiinin inhibi Weelibiin allt Alka-Seltzer Quaker Corn Flakes poctabix (small & lange) in
HOMEWARD FOR UNITED KINGDOM. and help a worthy cause ks Puffed Wheat Ryvita Biscuits 5
| an } Dalton Cere: akes
Vessel. For Closes in Bucbades | SSS Sara) Tieiee Cream of Whee (aaa
S.S. “TEMPLE ARCH” London 25th Mat BOXING! BOXING! na
: om Nu! |
For further particulars apply to , MING! KEROSENE
ar THE ENRICHED ALLE
USTA & CO., LTE -Agents. RTHUR & CO
DA C ” YANKEE STADIUM ) , TILLEY LAMPS » LED,
ritton’s



Canadian National Steamship:









Sails Sails Sails Arr Sails
SOUTHBOUND Montrea Halifa Bosto Barbados Barbador |
CANADIAN
‘CHALLENGER 10th M rd. Mat rd. Mar
LADY RODNEY 25th Mar 27th Mar Sth Apr 6th Api
ADY NELSON 12th Apr 13th Apr j pi 24th Ap
LADY RUDNEY 12th May iSth N 11th May 26th N 27th Ma
LADY NELSON Sist May 3rd June h l4th June 15th J
LADY RODNEY 30th May 3rd Jul Sth July 4th Jul 15th Jul
rive Sails Arrives Arrive Arrives Arrives
NORTHBOUND Barbados Barbados Bo n St. John Halifax Montre
LADY NELSON 2 Mar 23rd. Mar. Ist Apr 2nd Appr
LADY RODNEY 17th Apr 19th Ay 28th Apr 2th Ap 1 oN
LADY NELSON 6th May 8th May 17th May 18th Mar
LADY RODNEY 8th June 10th Ju 19th June 2Zist Jur 24t Ju
LADY NELSON 27th June 2h J 8th July 10th Ju hat
LADY RODNEY 27th Ju. 2th Ju 7th Aug — 9th Aug. 1l2tn Aw
N.B.—-Subject to change without notice. A!) vessels fitted with cold storage ct
bers. Passenger Fares and freight rates on application to :—
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD. — Agents.
, — =|
‘ . ‘ . ~ ‘ ee _ , |
CIE. GLE., TRANSATLANTIQUE |
1
|
Sailing te Trinidad Sailing to i]
Plymouth |
| “GASCOUNE” March 14th March 21st
\\ “MISR” April 4th |
|

“GASCOGNE”
*“MISR”
*“GASCOGNE”

April 19th
May 9th
May 24th

April 26th
13th
sist

May
May

For further payticulars apply to

R. M.

FRENCH LINE |
|
|

JONES & CO., LTD.- Agents. |







They il Do Te Ev ery Time



Contest
KENNY SEAMAN

145 lbs,

va
KID HINDS 149 Ibs.
10 Rounds 10
last encounter these
fought to a thrill-

In their
two boys

ing draw. They sparkled the
ying embers of local fisti-
dying members of local fisti-
ana causing the crowd to
request a return,

In the last bout the

thoughts of fight fans wan-



ees CARRIES A BUMBERSHOOT BUT VYer in IN HIS CAR AT A GAS STATION HE

| WALKS UNJER THE AWNINGS, SHOVING

| me UMBRELL ve OUT INTO THE RAIN"
| FILL ‘ER UP
AND CHECK

ALL MY TIRPFES



THINKS A CANOPY |S SOMETHING HIS
WIFE SERVES AT COCKTAIL FARTIES ---

































it's mixed

with

MILK

}
———e BUTTER BREAD















dered back to the gladiators { PS —- ————————
f old. Busy Billy, Fearless
Freddie, Lionel Gibbs, Joe ee . A
Payne and all of the others. | Housek pers Benefit When
others 4 7
What will happen in this They Buy Krom Us.
encounter nobody knows, Mixed Peel Tins Cheeselets — Egg Noodles — Prepared
oo ee . os can be Mustard Tins Standard Yeast Mayonnaise Botts
r ea the Semi-final = Curry Powder—Toffee in Valise 7-lb. — Clozone—Lux Flakes
(6 Rounds 6) Flakettes Dispa Rinso Windowlene Palm Olive
AL MAULER (147 Ibs.) Soap.
vs
AL DAVIS (146 Ibs.) BUTLERS ALL MALT STOUT
Kid Ralph, who is to meet HIBBERTS GOLDEN LIGHT BEER
Fighting Bailey will meet
Joe Hall 4 Rounds Exhibi- Johm PD. Taylor «& Sons Ltd.
tion, ”
KID RALPH JOB HALL Grocery &
(163 Ibs) (165 Ibs) \\ Provision 3740 Grocery 4335
Sparkling Preliminary .
BELFIELD KID (126 Ibs) Ss = pa ee
va. ‘
KID SMILES (127 Ibs.) x
| Rounds 4 | We Make....
PRICES OF ADMISSION:
Ringside $1.50, Balcony $1.20,
Cage 84c.,, Bleachers 48c.
MARCUS BARROW, |
Promoter
SSS
ae Jimmy | Hatlo THAT FIT
YOUR FIGURE
}
| |
i |
en | || AT
A)

ee

———



Top Scorers



P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd.

SUIT

YOUR POCKET

SEE US FIRST

in Tailoring |

Lighting by Tilley Lamps
mea.s a Bright Light for
two evenings at one filling.










We have received new stocks of...

RED HAND HARD GLOSS
PERMANENT GREEN PAINT

This Paint possesses outstanding capacity
and spreading power and a th
reliable permanency of colour.

A. S. HUSBANDS,—Agent,

Babbs, St. Lucy.

BURN ORDINARY |S
|

ORIENTAL
Goons!!

CURIOS, JEWELLERY
BRASSWARE, TEAKWOOD
SANDAL, IVORY, ETC.















1 gin. tins . $11.56
KASHMERE 14 gin. tins 5.81
THANI BROS. 16 oft, te.) us cee 3.00
Pr. Wm. Hy. Street
The Sign of Special

Undercoating in
Dial 3466 — $9,

1 gin, tins

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, MfD.

Agents.

Quality 9.16











—=—



Always keep ..

SACROOL

IN THE HOME !!

"Phone 4456

ee









| SESRRRGTS AR | WOOLLENS — q
| ACTS LIKE MAGIC
| °* (LL DRUG STORES. WORSTEDS
| KNIGHTS LTD. CASHMERES
iy $9999999995959050055008
3 Just Received S POR
A LOVELY ‘
sssormenn jl] MEN «xo “WOMEN
EASTER BOGS r
; .. f CS maem
S ¢ CARLTON BROWNE. ¥ ae
. a :/ ania LANE
% 136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813 $ |
Yoooessoos SSSSS00SSN000" eee







Full Text

PAGE 1

PACE TWO n \ i; IJA DO s A nvoc ATE WEDNESDAY. MABCB 2 2 ISM Qahib QaUinq M R O. F. CLAY. Agrlrultunl Advisor to tho Secretary Of Stair A. do K FTS *.g1 and Welfar. to Dona I .went, (irenada and St LUCM. They will lor Dominica on the 'Lady V Mr Clay was met at the airport by the Governor'! Prlvata SecrcMr. W. Lambert on. 1 iovernment Home. On Five-Day Viiit M R. J. T. MUSI ifW for Audi* Salt arrived from \\ Barb.n Indies and British Qulau will bo Koine to thr Windward %  mU Leeward Islands wha bore He is .1 Marine Hotel To Be Married Shortly M ISS MADGE CUKE, daughter of Hon. H A Cuk. 0 B E Mi.1 and Mr Cul 1 1 B.WI.A. On March 30, she will ba married to Mr. Enio Qlglii POCKET CARTOON By OSBERT LANCASTER "A typi.at txumplt %  >/ mkl r>ri< uir .-,> i.-.Jn .r and nllditinx peoplr Co marry lief uliom rhfy JiVr, without a properly rczulatcd tyiirm o| (,oi. mwMM i..uf.I I Hold Mann, ; v fM" '' s ; : Manager ION %  which la of Dr. n CiKlioli. well known f. srlentlft ol Rr.i h G wedding will ll 1 .,., ,„ ,p<. nd Andrew's Church son Mr. Henry Cuke will In!< %  % %  ... v;.:§ R..I....J Inn here on M,rc h 2 fa. ,•** ..Y ,,, t %  •* d ' ihc nd %  HIT ptrnl 1 her VJ celebr.il Menl off. PI-.... M-HtlnH o| |hC ~U.JP Mention uinm|n Ul M ,„ HORT. grej and a charm.:.' • %  ltd, who has I SIX weeks v.iradoTi V.Mf A Ha rchirned 10 1 >i-meraia yesterday by B.W.I.A. Islands, Uv ft %  %  UW line %  %  Hig to plan He has ban li lBOV pna-iniiK trh ir. Walter O. 1 %  rrl Now he l.v.,,. ( Innhrnok. Organist U 1 HffUa will ba Carlbthatheconwsh.il luUI never Rets Urad ol tha bM liar, "There Is OfM ! %  Returning On The 'NeUon* b *JH AND 10 .LISS, %  to C.iii. % %  Mr I I %  full < ( so. if you say that I hope turn in two %  If God a Government Engineer |\ ( f the people who you writ* : Column," h<* told c "moat Ofc* tbi Oming attain IM*VI have alrOOd) mam thinks 0 and. Returning Today ETI • B W I A Vld Tun; T" 1 1 '.%  ; %  Uon of tho ii'. He town. Mr R, %  ore gpandlni two areel Won Graduate Of Harvard towed by the r... %  p.|i W. H. MA.KKA7.li U ?"*. £* ta who hm be. Sir h %  for H Mi I Kain Coats n, A 1 kd the %  t bar %  .veil For Secretarial Course *ISS ANN SCOTT, daughtei of 1 %  %  %  Made Him Very Popular \\T r *eek of the TV Men's Singles in the P.O. nk. I-nnrion. Table .p* is Theo Jamaica. He was up in the Men's 1 y we) l 'icial of l plays cricket fact, is an all-round sportsman Tola, has made him popular figure in the SavBank, where he is em plover. larlcal Officer. Farewell Party T HERE was a farewell party on Saturday night 1*01 tfJsg 1 Rocheford. daughter of Mi ami Mrs V Hrxheford of bury Road. She is one of Irii who h'ft last night on in do auxiliary work 1.1 U K. Hospitals. Barbadian Ambassador T of Mr. Humphrey WaUott. who is at in England studying promethods is that he is Dg his -lay iinmcnaely. He England and finds Middlesbrough, arbcra he is living at nd pleasant. A, is recently interviewed ipapar in Engil work in telling the people of England I if lit'' in Barbados is lik.' rernaaUY left I. !' %  W A mi one v\ • lulana. >!..,.. .'.: M. Field and Mis-. Eileen >t4 m LOOK LP! Minnlyri tlriw kid *•<•. J"> I rllt ti*l tint wKich Mtw* >ht I na*V S'tmmm Mwn WEABINfi n off the forehead IN plMtt^t p4ci hfslun rtraw bonntl with roll *srlm i.'iw iliii £irl bjUnrea hn eo*prr4 MI London ravrcii SP1M elect with s crystal-bal' rsrrlng. Regu ular Visitor M R. RAYMOND DURRIEU. who is a regular 11 Barbados is a retired businessman fiom Martinique. He retui; Martinique yesterday by .ha GaecOBM From Martinique he will be going to Rio and New York and then returning for another short stay. He was the guest of Mr and Mrs. P. Blondin of Lyndhurst. Marine Gardens. On Long Leave M R GORDON KINCH. son of Mr. and Mrs. H J Kinch. ol Worthing who has been spending two months with his parents here. l< ft yesterday by the Gasco, England where he will another four months with hi sister. He hopes to visit Scotland. Ireland and possibly Franci Cordon works with U Geophysical Co., with headquarters in Caracas and is >.n Ion %  For U K Holiday who recently arrived (rom British Guiana to awan Gascoonr's arrival, left oil ship yesterday for a holiday in the UK Attorney of Brookur Bins, and while they were in Barbados they ood and Mrs Hai 1 i Manning. En-route to England M RS BIGG wife %  I : Ian Begg. left n route for England by the Gascocnie. to spend about thn four months* holiday there. Lt Col. Begg is also leaving is shortly. He is foil ilca to work with Ih. nlal Development Corporation t %  Citrus and Banana Pi tion. He Is due to leave by the I Veboa ton Hall, near the House of Parliament, has thirty couples tc u on March 25 Most regisitrari and ministers in I^indon and the provinces expect to work overtime — I.N.S. MANCHESTER. (By Mad! %  %  — — A Man .held enjoyed before women's right to walk Miss Beatrice It. :iH-ve*r-o!d book-keeper In the • -. ST Corporation, hurl shoulder ana km" when sr>e block near her home at Dldstmry. ster. Snc, sued Manchester Corpor.iWallington, %  tad been neglu airing the sidewalk, awarded he. es of $1.430,8410 as a coats. (The bill for legal 11 ted at $1.4001. Beatrice had insisted tf ml caroless. Her lawyer. Basil Nleld. cited an appeal court judgment which he claimed set out clearly that even when stepping onto a curb a pedestrian is not bound to look down. Judge Wellington, giving judgment, said: Miss Lee says -he has been playing the a \ ^^*** able to continue her novement tf K ***. 1 s she demcinsbfata? fl *lfc able to play tennis which she sav she must h to %  *'' toyed be! able skill f ^ -12 'She be una. with _. Rupert and the Dragon Py/j i UpM wails outside (he ihop. Soon che ^houlinp ctiut. PongPinfc x.me oui. and uutead ol ookina ingry he it smiling all over nit Uce. "Hullo. Rupert." be cnei. I'm ftotrv I passed you so rudely .iti now. I wit bit worried. 1 vi'iuhi tome Tireworki Irom Mr. .itoioer one." "y rm l_^% 'a** -com, z>Jy in IHE WAi y CEACHCOMBER %  1 .. %  1 %  %  This 1 %  %  he rhatujad it. ey I 1 Fnt 1 1 %  a the I up to him and asked bin for my P*K>I old grandmotl said. In English, "1 stand. Ask a policeman I lw Huiri 1 i/\ t,,i< e % %  think them%  %  Casy-g aVaejIsV %  %  %  %  lure In hygtanio saucepans, and 2.000 gallons keep a 1 %  : a could %  :th 75 the moisture bn I the breath of 1.498 .1 ; %  W ITH infinite eare the ReehM wheeled i" uas K 4 Its large shed si 1 ., tkH sntfano sad then %  CRYPTOQIOTK—Here's how to work it: 1ITOL1\ A \ K itLONIil I I I OH One 1* Sff simply stands for another. In this example A is used lor the three L's. \ lor the two 08. etc. Single letters, apostrophies. the length and formation of the words are all hints. Each dy Uc code letters art different A < ryplogruin Quotation VXB FBOIHRBAA. ZMDVX, XNA VDVMI FBNEP OV RBEIVX HNAYNAABH. HBRNPXVA NE X M I A B A — XMIOWB t t rjgaiaaetai u 1 ARE NOT ALL ANNOYED IN THE SAME WAV -SEN!.' \ HASTINGS, BARBADOS EXCELLENT CUISINE FULLY STOCKED BAR RATES: I5.90 per Day It upwards (Inclusive) Pl> Mrs. W. S. HOWEI.L Aihion A l'.-.n. I,.lm.' lv~.ln,_Jj GLOBE -Askyour Mother to git>e you ASHTON & PARSONS INFANTS P0WDIRI •uOtliiiiK Jl n ili'iii next liine liahv 1Iteilul Uix^fe tiuV TWO SWOWS DAILY TODAY AND THAT WAV WITH WOMIN lUmri)) Dan* Cl-AHK roMoaaow loaivi rxciTma DOUBLB AND DinT DAUr-WillUrr. I.UN01QAN SMART SHIRTS from AMIKUA The SAGAMORE'Shirt : ill I'l.lin Sluules $6.58 The "RHODE" Shirt in WhileOnly $5.03 EVANS & WHITFIELDS The English AERTEX SPORTS www a* $4.98 The BUSHMAN" Shirt in Khtkl THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COnON FACTORY Ltd. Speci.1: "NYLONS" OBNTI si.i h> .1,1,1 \\h 1 DUUBri vshi 1 1„ BRITISH mM~4 Al auge 1 is i( III iMe pink hi out — S2.2A per pair Hh BSff pair I lit. per pr. 1 0m^ SHOE %  •••09, LTD. \ll CasAsMSBti ho h*,e overdue Repair* klndlv redeei same In order to nuke S|BMS for new ones. With thinks. slIOE-REFAIR DLFARTMENT



PAGE 1

g e 4meday .Ha* eh 22 |JJO. Barbate Jftwcate rice; VE fEXTS Year 53. 1,300 MILES IN 3 HOURS 29 MINS. SPAAK TELLS KING ^OPOLD TO ST.U 0U1 gut Send Prince Baudouin BBUSSBLS, March U. 11F.NM SPAAK. Belgium's former Socialist Prrni L lonixhl appealed lo King Leopold to send hack his .fi cf Baudouin. around whom all Belgians rail) ujnopen letter published in the Socialist l.e Peuplc. Jkaovised the King to stay away and n CI ntent with l-tnl victory which, according to Spank, the i ;"_, the question brought him. Cfc who has led the anti-Leopold campnigi fnm %  > '"* nand bv ,lls P ar, y' s lk r SJUBV. Ifel Iwr Party Coalition |for Greece ATHENS. March 21. -On* Party leaders toLiUri ihc formaUon of %  Cotftton Government, j the Centre leaders, %  Venixelos, Nicholas i ud George Papandrou. aatrol some 137 Asscm[ rfter the Greek General I fortnight ago. The m M. Emanuel TsouIfj^rr of a small group of I ftopessives. (Saw leader? were meetto tonight |U}aieril Napoleon Zer^^d to enter the Centre mtta his seven-seat Conditional Party. Observ%  expecting a new Gov, u I* formed to-day or faces On mmunists CWRO, Mnrch 21. i authorities said today ortieved their arrest of _mt Communists yester, murk the hardest blow %  gainst the underground movement in the Max Busel, to negotiate with E m the national interest, it was lean • Sp.i;.k\ free hand In p the Socialists hav< standpoint and inf for the King's re'.urn for a limited peno<, only, Ma would loci %  ttouln Spaah ui dei hi va favi urn troni the tlmej a referendum but his party opposed it No Government Y.-t BUglum tonight is .-till wtthoul a Government Caretaker Premier Gaston Byakau has -t unable to form an admli coalition, which resigned on Saturday. In talks between leaders of mc Catholic and Liberal Parties, a hardening of the Liberal Oppoaltion to the return of King Leopold appears tonight to have compromised plans for .lie early formation of a new eoc Earlier, Prime Minister Evskeni had forecast a new Coalition "within hi I Meanwhile. Soelallsl of Parliament they would lead "Stop Leopold" f parades in the Industl Ed&VOt •""* "" Wday, whan 3.000,000 c\71 workers will rtagB B >trong one day "warning" strike against the King's restoration. They said thai would lead demonstrations through Liege. Mom and cii.iin.-Kii French-sp-akin,;. -"*11 Leopold A (firming their oppotltlon to Leopold's restoration, the Socialist maraben today gave M.OOO Belgian francs to the fighting fund of "Stop-Leopold" action committees", formed for the party, trade unionists, and othai social ist supporters. The tense labour situation easud a little today when Antwerp end 10.000 Brussels "Stop strikers return to work. The growing threat of stoppages is causing I ruin on foodstuffs, and some shopkee p er s have sold out their tinned stocks. today reconstructing and reconditioning the Royi.1 Palace at Laaken, outside Brussels. Circles close to the Government said the Liberal call lor party discipline along the hnes of tbfl %  ' King's return was regarded as i "delaying tactic" by Leopold faction within the part) —Renter. Jet Plane Breaks Record: Controlled By Radar i _arrciled—some of them i of the Central Comgtftf Hg\[iii;>n Communist 11,1c! Schwartz, if Rimim. origin, t>om In his wife. .__ at two houses in the aiddle class Cairo suburb PoUs, Police %  lb; of Communist proJane of which, they said, sanely new type. at publications were | to Egyptian workers, an to revolt against their Bring conditions. The an seized the Central Ml accounts, showing the if their funds to spread I In Egypt and how %  %  0 hi* ben spent The i Maustry of the Interior a 1M7 to arrest Schwartz, known as a professional B*awt agitator and propai disappeared for three f rears, but turned up a* eve of the Egyptian %  early this year. —Reuter. WORK COMMENCED .l-lli:ii\. Bparan .ilteratloiu. lo the lermnul IIIIIIIIIUK at IM well. Workmen are sf-eii <>n ihe job uhieh ,s r*OI M u, \u t.niO.e.1 in leu dam I tir UIIIUMJI I'Kildiiii; hai had to he lemp .r.irily vacated .mJ lacnilni and oilUmni paaMBatan .rr dralt "iOi in HM rslraael Maatagar*! ^aarten. whlrli has been hurriedly "premed inlo .-r\ % %  .Finds <: 10.000 In Backyard MB Wedderburn. not little countr) town no mllaa north teat •boon town 1 *, v .' 1 %  %  ii< the tOWII %  attend thai : %  and secretly ,iug u] A %  months "H< .-i I %  %  beiiu: torn up. Thr Town COUD nd nine appU i miners' right's have heen lodge! : %  ocer, AJbert Smith, has found a 75 <> nugget in the mainsti< jaatardilj fanner Huttrt yielded %  70 ounce nufgi ated to be wortt ETM a; 1.000 %  th Of 12 feet. The residents of Wedderburn an coBflnced thai \ 11 %  of fold a fortnm Lukewarm Response Lie Calls For 20 Year Programme lietween U.S. — Soviets WAffl March 21. Lie, United Nations s ineral, tonight >n the United Slates and Ruaaig year programme to win peace". •' Be nd West to use the United 1 give 11 Sports Window Dame %  nd Division %  i Mill be a tame in tbay having won -i. Third %  petition in the 1949 ataon ranatti of their win they have been promoted to UM Strond DiviaIHI.Min POOVBAU. ISaXH lATfON I'IHIJ* H\ture 91 Mat%  %  : %  lr. O. Graham. FOUR AMBUSHED AMQ KILLED CHELMSTORD. March -'. ^T I/.J;L u.iiir.^ Hi.inn Police forces in face of ami •LiiriMnui Communism" pecial in Kedan, Killing %  nnu-u i •••• %  •>-„ %  „,_,._.. Se, :B ,an, :m fl Sr. Malay_con-|t !" £and patrol stables and WOUDding ble, Reuter. sponse from the Church | In his monthly letter. j said Rome had conceded only i "conversation of .i linn'' i %  -This sort of u I rj religious %  unless complete frankness ano wholehearted honest) 1 Swap Kidneys LffCAGO, March 21. "'" Chicago Hossuccessfully kidney from HI to another. They | wm one day be posr .*> similar opera human beings, and ITS Prolong the !rieums of such dis' cucer.—Renter *i These lighters, MITAIN WILL SPEND 123,000,000 ON R.A.F. LONDON, March 21. I a developuiH advanced types of jet homers wiilij patny nre displayed by ah I approachinn ,nat ' sound—well over 600 miles ail f-Air Minister, Arthur Henderson, told Parliament liogolu Ruins Digru'il Transport BOGOTA. M in 111 Columbia hav,dttrputed and pclrol has hud to be severely .11 Bogota because of floods hampering rail" tin.' capi!l The highway from Popoyan to Call in wttrn cut.~lteter. BAR UK. SANDER able to fly at i extreme heights, and follow the new jet lighter, the Venuin. which Royal Air For,.' next ve.il All Britain's day lighter and '•• Got Some 700 Million •^ Dollars •JNGTON. March 21 cent American tourisU H total ol nearly .Eortign travel last It went to Canada, **t Indies, and Cen" TV commerce dentce of business *"el this, and re•irope and the countries drew American travel Americans spent "Canada and 1S5.• The IMS total l was about than in IMS —Renter *s N 0T RESIGNING Jj n, 0". Marrh 21 ^""><" to-day de& %  Sir Staftord %  •grui.K around ..Hack SauadTOn, •** %  > are muipped with this jet aircraft, except three squadrons in the Jar East, Henderson said. Henderson said that Britain has a jet night lighter in an advanced stage of development with a IKTf.irmaiice comparable to other let lighters. All the let night lighters, an being fitted with up to date radio .nd radar aids, would al be able lo light by day in weather lhat would ground day fighters. OalaX Missile Henderson .aid that were working OB %  new *ranccti to air" guided missile. launch it against modern bomb"The Air Minister said Britain w.s'W.r.tHur to J*-J* cans for the 70 Su P e ?"J*?!!;, ( Britain's Domber force •joule be mainly equipped th B.W model went lo producUon. — who was openiriB debate on the esUmates for next year's RAF. programme, Mid £223.000.000 would be "P"* "H' rear, an increase of Z*J*>> !" H. said recruiting was unaatWac -' ->~ general level the service would Two Roman I H p of a "mercy murder" charm The Notre Dl Heart hospiuls both said then stalls had voted to bar I < from practisuiit In the,! lions Dr Sander, who was fouio. not guilty on March 9 murdered a cancer ridden patlct Mrs. Borroto, also faces an i.n disclosed accusation by the Hill-borough County Medical Soou-i, —Beater Caeclie \\ ill Strtiigthtii ItiHut With Riusia PRAGUE. March tl. i .hoalovak •ar, in tue nrat sutei \1 mistelief and the hope ot world paaea dMoandi upon its \ lllditj Reuter S. Senali* Approve E.R.P. Fund WASHING ; %  Committee today luvmUnoush t h 0 Adini .. full 11,100,000,000 European Recovery Progr a mma, The Houae of Representaiivo. to cut $1.00.1." .-ash fron-. n American A iii presume! rianem llouaa diaputa ; i |ure -'if ully %  onciled H %  ugb| Con . refect the The Houae Foreign Afl iiiittee (today approved a suite %  ourlng coUaboratton tn lha free pe\pie ol Aala itn sail help to protect their kndepei %  %  Truman Defends Aeheson Cornmittaa i mrtamplaiar) on > economic %  '-.ipri.itum, uoi 1 military, Wttb nations of ASI.I The Senate CODDO*. approved: 1. An Hiiiciuiiiu'lit leciaring 11 u-SS,'" that no Marshall Plan nation aha discriminate against Unit.Statcan earlier proposal to cut >i\ dollars from counl iiQatc. 2. i\n amendment auUMriali • the Econoiio. Administration to $000,000,001) any rlaaiing i 'i Burope pean Paymenis Union 3. An amendnn use counterpart ti promote the ecoiiomuunit] of Western Europe (countei part funds are funds allocate.) by each country DCy to equal assistance.) A An umeiidnieiit i-: c A i ihi.' nnmim.se tot European racove iy pnv taxpayer" by reducing the amount of rloll JiSRTFORDSHIRE, March 21 URITAIN'S De HaviUand Comet—the world's first all jet passenger plane—flew 1,300 miles to Copenhagen and back today in 3 hours and 29 minutes. The De Havilland "Comet" was controlled on the first parl Ol the) fUght by a radar unit in London. It was fu..->w*d by loo radar for more than 100 miles at W I i The radar operators found no difncuUy m GontrYjIJfju tha fa* movin| plane. i Normal time for the return air ibov %  ran I %  an Iwo days ago. the Comet— the "plane ip a record king to Home and bock to i four hours. i tl record for the London-Copanhaftari flight Captain Cunningham also flew th.C <-t ROOM He is now De bn i leal pilot. The famous night tighter DUO. [nningham, took the Co aatj lo the Danlan eapltal In 1 hour "lorning. But BM rrvm .heck point to (heckix-inl. .nice DO WBO LB Hw lv otM hour ami 20 Headwinds slowed him co ming %  ue hour 47 minutes from take-off to landing. i-rsoas Airways Corporauon official. Sir Wiles Comas %  end of next ltlaZ. the Comet was on regular service Britain, through Cairo to %  Icutta, and might Bydnaa m %  aar,I,I, arould link London with Australia In under 40 houn —Renter. lilen Counter-Charge %  %  .. lengthy counter chargai la UM Ion t ol Juetl i ivli .lews in tha \syium caaa, ted to the Court last October. The caae aroaa from the asylum I the Colombian Embassy In i.im.i lo Mi Victor Haul, a Peru%  vbo aim duel of e who believed iangar "I imminent rag refused a sate conduct by I'ecu on thai it bad no legal two priaata, an ,|| dispute *.o high treason and terrorist %  ctlvithe International Coiut. Tha regtea. WASH %  I "undernuniiiK oui atomy an I %  peace In a i % %  %  I Iti el I Wherr> said: "ApparenUy he has %  %  as part,'of the Itoralgn A. I the Rugate'' Mill for the 12 months begii lent Truma i July i Thti Conunl %  i D an John Kee ai I roup." Fwu RepubJ i tha lloi.se How mi; Valenti i %  i r-yeai prl rutnai Urn!.. W'oman Denies Charge hi Spy Trial [arch 21 %  %  Uondonln, Sou %  murder of Cw *eru local | last Jauuaiy, the News nnj ; • %  i poi h d nl S, %  ho Included Scelba Clamps 'Red Belt" I'olaml Kelea^es British Subjtassador, protested to the Polish Foreign Ministry against the seizin e of Polish born Otakar Kornhauser, who had disappeared on February 2. The mystery of Komhauser's failure to Oatofa the plain Britain was explained fl onsent. PoUah note laying he hail They also empowered pri been arrested. No reaaoi The Foiekgn Ministry phoned the Embassy later to-da m had bee icleased Kraler. HOM*^ March 21 Amid mounting tension in %  UM I '.iiwiiUiUM led I O of Labour was to-day deciding whether to stage a new trial of jitrength with the i, l'olice were taking "pi., ary security measures" to deal fresh clashes bOtWOi n workers and pal %  The Confederations BsecuUvc i 'niniiiKU'e was holding an emergency session to plan kwernmeni orders for "suppression of disorder. Itn were Issued over the weekend by Signor Mai. "iron" Home Minister in the three-Party Coalition Government They revised u law "previously not applied forbidding meetings in factories, without the Antony %  defendaiit Jaroalav Vatejaka, shot U i ; .1, but Buatt admitted -Keuter. n,..' .it '! A woman of damaging >he regum i'i..i dant, Joaaf Posplsil, had lullty tong the popul.r.nin asked to state whether ton) to grant asyluni, and whether Peru Is bound lo five safe conduct I it he could leave the rountry. Keulrr. Pope Rexreives >|mnish Pretender VATICAN CITY, March 21. Don Juan, Preiei %  Throne, was tcceived in i rtvau Lth the Pope %  Vatican i'alace. The Audience lasted 20 minutes. Don Juan is on a Holy Year pilgrimage to Home. — (Realer.) ifwen NDON, March 21 Sir Alexander Cadogan, Britaii ii.se sua' bard hitting speeches often riled the Soviet delegates, is retmnit I on the Security Council, the Fnreun Office announced today. Sir Alexander, who is 6g, *• I be succeeded by Sir Hub*-: | Gladwyn Jehb %  leading Forei %  Office expert on the Unit' % %  Nation:—fc.nler. Report Denied LONDON, Mi A Ministry of Supply man in London to-day denm I that two atom scientists wei missing from Harwell %  oargy Kesearch establiahmem •0 any other Ministr. research establishment. We war (ommenting on a report in thi London "Dally Graphic thi morning, which said two top-leve. United States-born atom ariantlstJ "have suddenly diaappeared from Britain". Scotland Yard also categoricallv denied the report to-day. — (Keatn.i Flogging Is Not The Answer nd the experience In decline, unless more !" The strengt" "' hl ,"A.'!l April IM aCut 1MJ00 210.000 a year Mo" day. THREE STILL TO REPLY LONDON, Mnrch 21 Cuba, Ecuador. not yet r., %  -. orti o.undl aver 'ha % %  %  Foreign spoK.,. aui aid a -i* Press report* i had failed were untrue, he added —Renter LONDON. March 21, ment today emphatically rejected flogging as the Vi*c< in Britain of assaults and gangster operations. Lord Goddard, The Lord Chief Jus'i i ai judges have u-plored their loss irf highest power to order flogging, whic' ey consider a deterrent to crimes ience. Describing the prcs very grave" In some rea ects, the Lord Chain i iey had still to see If long.-i sentences were not a more effectiv* .ith flogging. %  %  %  .uliament had bed flogging, and it would be rae opening a two day debau on Uw pr.;c;. 4,700,000 Unemployed In The States WASHINGTON. March 21 A Government Tonomirt to-t'icsaed eona. "creeping" unemployment throughout the United States Unemployment figures last month reached a new postwar record of 4.700,000 and (ifflclals pret would reach the five million mark in early summer. A Department of Con." spokesman said the grow: population was outstripping job naneetty The unemp. moment was not a cause for any, alarm, ha said.-Bea4sr



PAGE 1

I'M.I II \ BARBADOS ADVOCATE -•I) \Y MABCHa ,, In i iirlish' Ha* %  -.. H. Sth i l. Marx M LrWU %  ch K M. TanmWonlta. Sch %  h fch. Ant.. 1 ; ; T H i ifllphn. MV Lad] %  AUBM \l %  I %  -•.I Capf %  %  %  I'PMHTI Kl s %  -< %  Capl H %  %  U %  n %  IN TOITII WITH BMtr. >IM>S COAST STATION duar ih Avtla. "riViiW.. Brill* Omrt* I %  ... Ftanj|rr. *Uvn>raant-iiba, Ctwrboum. *a.ithar CIO* MHkam. rUn M %  I Hnlm CtinwIUwi OK, '• MAIL NOTICE ...... ... is ii... \iv Daw-wood will ll Pnat ffllWr % %  un*t Ml I he 22 !" i M.ilt-h 1" %  ) %  Mill. av | U irti lao England Looking For 22 Footballers II* JAMI hoili.is LOND THE British Football Aa mmiitee has %  i-nent at Rln Hi % % % %  -ibout 16 rer. and not more real i-iindkl .' the remaining >ix places. Th-> .ilrnost aura % %  I the foUovMng BtH wntuni". igoalkeep through' Out II* Ml for his club Alt Ramsey (right hack). He >n\iirmuli Club Tennis SHIPPING NOTICES %  %  %  March %  %  Ua. Mwiurtt,i mit Match %  I' . : I VKSTIKH U *> Hi I I g Mil 1 Sin hi c Q Manning v. %  i i %  I Hen'i Double* %  .... I li C Kdghill 6—1, 6—1. TODA1 5 PIXTUBES Men'i sinlcv it s NlehoUi Q H Manning Lading' Doubles %  Connell \ I-enaRiin. Mhwd luhles on and D Pert i %  Worm* an si Mill vMr* n I rod c c Worme. Mi G. D Byi and C. de L. ft. SB .ncroft and rson. Mixed Oouhlis (llandirnp) v and Dr C G Manning sITWriTITK %  Ing taken to a %  tnd walked %  lag itrongl) HARKISON LINE Jootfie yoiU] %  rs *n (iftintullut PRODUCT .11 1 U ll.i 1 I:I II III 1 Mllll KINGDOM Vnari. 1 ...... 1 r... M Dor ll.iilM.lMr. N HAN IR" %  i %  .Ion 1 %  i rarnom 8th MaT 24th M..i :'.. %  !. Mai 2eth Mai "Ih Apr. Ililh Apr. HuMllMlil. FOR DMItn UMUMM Vaaael. I ARCH" Fee 1. %  doeee la bjluta IN All" OV CKFUai (miicii liAir, AOtJl p I I ...-,. %  N %  on*, .iaiitw hrr rwMtM y Mi u HI < < %  M For further particulars apply to DA COSTA & CO.. LTD Agent a. | tered Laurie Srolt (right back ) If IF %  i be invaluable to the llntish taani SaXtiagr strong kicker. Johnn* Anton (left back* H< has proved himself quite the most reliable left back In England, b known as "stone-wait" Aston by his opponent*.. Jimmy Dlekinaon UM beet win halff-baek in the Willie IVihMi (wing-half) the most constructive wlng-baU ir England, i-; ;. grand ball player. nillv NIYhoNon (wing-half), r strong tackier, very enterprisini %  nd enjoyable to watch Billy Wright (half-back), prob' tin Of Vuriting team; j Uve player 'l.anrie Hughes (center-half), it beginning; himself a? half; tall, strong, dor: I ball player Stanley Matthew a ward); hi %  skill woul value 1 by ins body iwerving and brilliant font-work Wllf Mannion (forward) • lever, stylish player with %  Tom Kinney (wing forward) very speedy player who will need watching. SUn Mortensen (center forward), may be losing some of his eld dash but very few %  1 r In front of goal. IJ k Milburn center forward* King forward who shoot' with deadly accuracy win l goal Eddie Bailev (faatlde CO) i ho will need careful Inf when f !| 1( h ,|i Kt-dfern EMigatt Harrisoa CoDege Defeats i.M.P.L. .. Harrlaon Ion lootball fixture Duriok %  The s'< uid both teams in better them notched up a g Aa play was comini; Y.M-P.C. fought hard to %  by the College anlng'a first goal was taken by College about nv.minutes before half-time-—when Gibbs, plaving %  Inside lef i pass from Talma : M ,nd shot accurately. Without any further aCOflng, the whistle went off for tit Shortly liter Their second goal resulted from meiwn, Y M P.C goal area, Aa the ball w. B bars, the lie got hold of it and lay on the ground with it between MJ rnvs College's forwards [B.B.C. Radio Programme H I > I -n V\ M \H< I %  I • r.mnif Pataor 8.15 an 1 Work and 9am Cloaa Down. !> Noon Thr N*-13 10 pm Ml i Danrma I p m ma IIS pm Rartm l p in ThiT. Ariina j p m Th Nf*< 1 M ilrliatn 2M p m vl*w I Ja p wrt Hall 3 l %  i;rand Holal I i Ttie Ird Mayor ..• Ilanquct • p ii' Tin.Mm %  . I p m Car. % %  Tnnr Ipm Hadio Nawflrwl an pal Thi1-ord Max,r'i, Thank-aivtoa Banqurt II |> %  NO MORE GREY HAh? AFRICAN MIXTURE "Coloun iha Hair imunilj,. It I* kbaolutaly what H profatiad of it: A GENUINE HAIR COLOURING Are'loofe i r>oid)> Kiel gUi • • Ikaa BOOKER'S (Barbados) DRUG STORES LTD. BROAD STREET. BRIDGETOWN M,nulourl br E. FlOUTIf R LTD • % %  *lat^ R.EUR0H "•UlMlTim M ='n id, tat .oft m tknj 5^dl. 1Vui ') % % % %  1AM n m Mr. L. Parry Shoots Best around hir He tried to throw th ball beck Into play while in hiking position Th.ball struck on of the forwarda and rebounde i toward the burto be kleked bai %  ; %  %  n did not gel far In centre forward it at close rang* i Bourne, inside left for Y.M.P.C team's Brat noai to brtnr (0 2 -I. His low shot passed to the left of goalie who sras ui nil meet the ball I : play round the so unchangi I Weiss Defeats Peten ALlXANDfUA, March 20. Hea ddc Bfeii of \rganttna reached the third round of the Unglea In the Egyptian Intcrnntioiial Lawn Tennis championships here by beating Belgian International Jacques Peten here to-day. Weiss won fl3, Other second round winners included the self-exiled Csecb it My and Vladimir Cerm, former German Davis Cup pi ., .. %  International -Reuter. THERE day at 200, f.oo. and 600 yards. Conditions jit 200 & 500 yai I .iifflrult Sue to ehangSng Light. Tl • .rores Mr i. E Hi' Copt, ( R. E W i %  i it Jordan Met! I .i Connell Mr <". Pilgrim 140 133 137 IS6 ISO l SB 134 134 %  .ill who i -' J %  %  %  The official lilt of the %  %  %  • %  ;, and Of Ihli month -INS. The Weather sun Us**: 'i.tiK tun, -on aeti Ml i*' Muon (Eirsl tjuarter) Mjnli 00, Ughttng: >. : p.m. High Ujter: UI ...m. "M p.m. YESTEKOW Rainfall: (CodriiiRton I M Total for month to yeah I da] 1.61 ins. Teinperaliir..Mavi S3.u I Temperature (Hin.) Tl. It F, Wind IHrerlioii: tl a.m.I r'. by N. (3 p.m.) E., bj N Wind Velocity: 15 miles per hour. Barometer: V M l iiDNKY istn M %  Jlit M-i Mth M.> Ih A|>i itih lla] Id, jiii' mi. M.i li-n Jui. a. Jkn Hr4 ktai lath Ape tin Maj llili 14a> ;.'l, JUM SIM % %  Ma I,11. Au| Vlli Ail* 121 %  GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD. Afent. in:, (.ii:.. ni\>s\ii ANTIQUE FRENCH LINE Wltal io 111....1..1 Much 14th %  MMft" 1 A|ir.l IKIli M COONI :,'.... :-4ii, % %  aba] Io II. ..I..I.II. March Jl April 4ih 2mii 1 Ull. Maj lla | R. M. JONES & CO., LTD.-Agents. AT THI YANKEE STADIUM BrUtoii'it mil TUESDAY. April ll„4Ul COM KI1NNV SEAMAN 1, KID HINDS MB lbs 10 Hounds 10 .1,' Io .. Ihnllklad the .1 n.ii%  turn, in UM I.,st bo %  ..i tiniii f.ms anoe idlaion S. JOO Payiw ..mi all „r ih, It will Imppen in llns ill that can be In Ihc Svinl-lmtil AL MAULER (117 lb. I AL DAVIS III,. II, I .1... Hall l n turn KID RALPH JOE HALL in ; (166 Iba) ,, %  BELFIELD KID 11: Kill SMILES (117 lb. I I II • puoaa or ADMISSION Hmiisidff ll.bri, Balcouy ll.an. c*go U I Me. MARCU8 BARROW, l*i... SPEAKING OF ENRICHED BREAD? ZEPHIRINS BWOD and Roebuch %  K.-.oj-ni,,-,! tfualitv Bakers offer ENRICHED HITTER DREAD • Alka-SItaabraaaxlaaat|saa of watvr, watch it flia — diln t t It WIINK CEREALS NOW AND ENJOY TO-DAY'S PRICES. %  d Wheat lorn Flakes I %  Dalton Cereal B Pa hi 11 in *'***''*-'''-'''''•'''-'.-.'--.-----.*-*,',*,'.*,',•;.* ll"fN'A'7ff-s IS* II, IH || h t t I ht'ig Ititii lrimi #'*. \iwdlca — Pn nnj Standard \ i affaVOtaiiolaa Curry Powder—Toffee in Valise 7-lb. Clo/. t ul.ux K fa I ', | HI IIIKs u.i HALT STOIT lllltlttKIs QOLMH LHillT KEEK Jwhn f#. lui/ltH 4% s„i,s I til. K.iuiery St I'mvision 37411 Grocery 1335 Pabena i 'A nrtrln '" etebix (small & large) Hyvita Biscuits Wheat (large eg .-mall) ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO., LTD. %  We km rr. rivi-ri new .larks of . IINI HANI) HARD GLOSS PERMANENT (iREEN PAIN1 nl |,.i'M.i^ ouUtandlns cipicity < idlng power and a thorouiUy relliilu, | ol colour. 1 iln. tin. 11J 1 / ln. Una W '. tin. Una U* %  .1HH..I (irr. rnUrrraaliai la I (In. Una .... •" Thc\ II Do It Every Time — %  — %  li\ |imm\ Il.itlo ^r6cc*\£ oumas A BJMBERSHOO T BUT "ykt IN HIS CAR AT A GAS STATON HI rVAL


PAGE 1

mNBSPAY. MABCII 22, Post Office Estimates Get $20,000 Cut g T |(K MEETING of the H ,„, haH-hW %  f 0 r the General Port Offlc* maV SmytcUe E£lfe sa' d ,hal ''"' government could find belter uses lh "' JSJ*" lal ln 0,rl wibe money BARBADOS ADVOCATE •V fairness to -. seeing j HOUS, should ,:,\Sj^Si &">£ V' J ;h SSS*? 1 ^""-O^K •^1090 was Anally put In „„„', JJS^ u "\ r "v < f" ,7 nl ' ?<>d faith, an invwtl,.. B -rl,,.notion for deletion h M I n^V ,|, o,''^,, n* "' '£ £" """"'^ "* m fln TherTtK. 'SJ to • I"5 majority. rom „"£ !" !" ^' ,ho > %  %  * " J" !" dtny ln it. ihrr* nTnniTJT pro r,mm ''thin raapicioii which ,ould „nlv be Die llnancial year. irovrd ,, the Government c.u-rf %  cm -^^HBoon were r*X, Ailder (L). Mr. CrawMr. Mi E Mi E. K. Walcoll (), and Hi ?Liil Against the .lelctiun JJ". %. aryan (D.Mr. Cox EV*U*er (LI. Mr. C. gji 1 '.E.. Mr. Gill (El. IB. i Mi '•I M th at the PubU( i'n"o\ve'imwLT7 1 e n made' l inS ..arlinent bad arrlad the matter. la. well, working T^*' mntleman was Laving i sound scheme. He wool, becaum he really did not want U • %  nourablr awmliw. that <* disnusaed. For he (Mr. Mot!" reaponsible for 'S ey) !" uld not * %  'he Govern.hether or not there had them i i %  t i'i nrnant %  "•."ruM is (LI, Mr. Mapp X "t "• %  I'-'rtmonl. cm. whether or not there I #2STF L. Walcott (L). „"'' h %  "£*• 10 the Architect £" • <-n'ract, allowing him "2 *.raoUon to. the deletion. !" '"" Planning Ollicer, that W on in W. capacity. They .„„ %  "Jiilcvtold the House that "'"cor had been the most unpopu'?" nd d"""** hlm aa not fl,,,j he stood alone. Iar ffl "' r "> %  Home (lovern" ht lhe '<•> lhay should let mem was really saved (rom an lm " Jl,d ^ 'hrown on another embarrassment when his conn. %  '"•' Heeccd Bubedoa. IB end ,n Apni e "3d held a "get rich quick" Mr. >l„i|| r .„,, hcil ^ job "ember had diwimv """ %  '" lcv volcd u l toktn M dollar, it was by way fJSdSve ,t .1 he stood alone. a7Sa> was seconded by Mi 2-tard who said he saw no Jus9L, for the spending of •Son drawings. After the deJ5 Htad pgajged. %  . % %  ,, i •—disarmed aa were also levelled at """ l,v %  Wlnj so plainly wl. .-~ "*?T_ i T nu ,n BUnnln. poiltion wag, but someti-nra r.i, ", J l " raI commitment implying sfSSnce them as to his "Jfer^wordfc they had hnTthelr had Tce^^ ---"—"" 5HS WbOtt but no plans .?" %  "• -h-ey did ;.plrited PIMS .>ol Iteuy ;. ..".. wnue ,,,ey did Ano,,,^ „„„„ oI ,„„,,, momcnl ll.iH came up for d,s^gramme he Architect h"2S ,hal "" """•' ""• ot •*" ^ %  Br.cama^na tLI said that ''"" Xea' Jh !" I nad isfled with the designs of the gj !" had then arrived at a !" ,h !" "h !" JJ" !" "red .chool. Some called them cowJ00U* over the folIowltiK SBBnou 8 >' ear ,hal had been .^ %  sw proirra mme They had — K Hit time thought it an amHK procrarrime, but had em~ni upon it in good faith ifcjjnirnl in a few instance." pMnwr werc r cady to proceed • JT* 01 mentioned, thej ^(fjun^ 'hit an oflicer had been fjBj JI lus duty and the plans ~~ ut red>*. As a result they ^not proceed. TVT rid had to come during pmetit year with a revised Tfcere were certain schools uld not be llnished owing underestimation in costs. bad turned out to be rather I* _it and costly and they had wrrview the plans. T.U Walt-alt (L) Member for the City some alien;!lions about Airhitect and Town Planning -.I thinkicnous nature. Uv through withinth,. '^'irirttlme. ltt£,? r*atedtd pi the BriiUh Army N*o ArchitiTis wno ooce "^marltod to him that He uskoH rn-nita*..! ,be People out his side most likething was built. How i^' hu -T, ,' 1 X| !^ ^, ', 0r 8 > w, iaI ul> aid it never was had ougnt would 00 would be his policy to Ifchman with in n; jsottements. M. I K. W-leatt (B.) said that I.L. Walcott said that the Barl kaad :;i British arehltecl chat ^•le Member had been so the i nl In the P*r cent, of "-t of the %  make insinuations about ,.,,,., Ltd detail If of the Government. l> IWnmes had not in his vernment had anybody Men ambitious. They had f ol Mien thinking of Bringing Up i'lans MI. i : Mates*, potatsd out bltCCt was hrmging up ..ration tif lhe> % % % %  d by the Architect and ^ %  soiling onicer H^HB* aware of local l and had thus made an I larmany of the plans they I BOH likely have to vole h lr Cummin*. I. world. Anthony Ix'wis had been recomIf the that mended. i m Mr. I I.. Walcoll "*>id that honno! If :i %  tiunkinii M before they could be „„,,, th .1 personallf. Tit. k-j v j .^ Ibev had in the I : of the n.me inat had happ,.iied could w ; :1 „,l -Oh no' Oh "wmed.rn private lid *?h2!. bl s '"" [ali at ''" JLT". ,''' %  %  < ln ""' £*:, Publl Dollar Token good ..id Pi tlar tokci, In ih. end l mbers had to re...d to have; ..lining at the Mi. M..itl.-> ld that II th... Quick, easy way to new loveliness PONDS COLD & VANISHING CREAMS FACE POWDERS LIPSTICKS POND'S ,..y MABV %  oW lm for I.VHISIM,. "Die henourat U %  asusf mamber foi tied that the Public Works DspartmasM not undt .iking The i..dT of* tho House had said that the> should .ke U as a natural b) don tl oakuM brini in another man'.' They imnht say what they Iskad, but he would • m that it was nothing more than d/a^ingik rhi-.v could get an architect Irom .m> where — England, Canada. > stick to no it wl** Hi Crowa i i else. They wl i mtei-ls in me outside world who could not even work for I living It was practical for the Guvcmment to have another architect Under Re\ iew Mr. F. L. Walcott (L) iiminti.d the House that the matter was under review. Any decision would be a matter for the Executive Committee. Mr. Mattltr said he fully saw the honourable members position then. He was patfacUj wtlUnfl to agree. He intended to embarrass no one. He would, however, if he stood alone, move that the item be deleteo Mr. Baeoa (El said that if it wore said that an architect was bringing up plans, it meant that the Executive Committee had committed themselves. If they (the House) followed that up and put a token vote there it would mean that they were in agreement with the action of the Executive Committee m their not bringing the matter before the house ever by way of an Address Mr. P. u Walcott said that since it was agreed that Government could not carry on with their present man. they had asked Mr Lawfi to see the plan but they had entered into no agreement with him. It was very obvious that if they intended to make a purchase, thev would have to tlnd out about the price before they decided to come to the House. He .lid not see how they had broken confidence of the House. Position Worse Mr. Mottle* held that the position was even made WOTMMfl hoped honourable members would adjust their minds to the facts and let no party allegiance swav them IB their views about what was not above board. They said they could not barter with professional .ad done so. Mr. F. u Walcott said that he would challenge any member to speak about his (personal integrity. It was said that the case had been %  Mr. Molt ley interrupted lie had. hiIntegrity. He had Otalj said he •: %  mount n ooth way of evaporating. If the hont!. member felt it hud been implied. It was a matter for hlm He then moved that the ~un> ,>f $20,000 be deleted Mr. Crawford (C) seconded the motion. He said that tha tlon was whether or architect was needed (l decided that thev worn another axcfaHi that 'hey matter nnd let that architect do it along with his duties As I %  it that $20,000 was only for the drawing up of plans ih not se ) He. for one. would in that direction. Than • Chalky Mount Boys s. bool In Bl Andrew which was still to be completed. He thought the $20,000 could be hetlii BACKACHE IS YOUR | WARNING! BadudM u (MM*!? tht fat ucs a! Ittaaa* TraaU*. Tht kMfewy. M Ih. titad %  i*~.. WhaniWr Mai* of MOM, iastaail W > %  •, bUad IbvaM la arcr* aarn and Uaaa MTUM • %  hMf)> wab i BSa acitb. Than ran IMI rattwa. Half a <*,' %  cipwkMMt HJ KMSSUSV taU by eadan in fasma rifiaka pt.-r that Oaas-'i Kimw, TMU ^mcilj Mymm af -KM. Kiss and ram TW blaW is charymm backi •nd >— l.rj lM Uf • %  n#Ucaa h 'rdail lw.kh and win. fan laal raari rat lawst aa (Wd %  Kidaay PaV W; hw 1M|> batik) al all rhwMili m JH Dodd's Kidney Pills Mr. K L Waieaal sal wfl 1 sometimes circumstance to hear some honthe lasi i .ntroductvl such a patheUcal inaUnce. Imagine, he said, th..' uurable memuer could .md Just make a lot of ni The school ni had long since been %  member to make before he embarked upon unfounded criticisms. Wasting Menc\ Mr NaMrr asfa school mm wasting tl u in keeping a wairhmm instead of allowing tha Mr Mapp ,L> said v tedly the OovertUMal had been placed in dlmcull position with regards I Uture (in: Govornm ro go ahead and get a plan from some • to ho thought of. they were left with but tha %  to hear that a eon; The*. the H money The Cover: ppi tit an %  had been K. used as a car park m the commui..* tntSTested in its progresderlng what would ba it. Mr. Branrker iC) said that the ease ei regretted Ha SaU tl been suggested for Hall Foil. It ws an Ideal which %  ers of Health had ...! %  : • He ssondet i could not i .one without havi:.., sum of $20,000. He hoard ufgaBtod u> remove the !(< the I'uoiu Bulldini He opinion that it was more convemin the main ,ml.. Mixii in Sthoul Mr. Ailder (L, i.v much that provision had not been made for ( inodein i:: When he had brought up in the House the ques•na to the present %  c %  m a modern building. m i si • i wag nor cotild ava bo anybody llvinfl for %  %  I nuach cepUcisai on tin dlture %  he knew it to be thi tbi sink. Tha S knew who meant well t %  %  tMWt MM UlionipioM'tfi %  and how to it. Two Will Get C.O.L. Bonus ol the %  financial year. The Bill was cited as the lea (Cost of Uvmg It,.. Kmployeesl Act, 1950. Hon v ,. wno naiTlrt th. aacond reading said that it was necessary the Bill ibo passed for the reason that when the consolidation ol and cost nf I.. tool were two onv whose t-moliiinents were 'ised b) %  %  asurer and the Clerk to the -.warden :ind the Poor Law Guardians. No Bill had been passed to the Acts and thoaa ontinuing to Oat of hving I salaries. It was therefoni the Bill to be pass*, day M otion tot Rill was seconded i>v M A. G. G Council Amentl tensions Act For Parochial Employees The Lagsalattva Council >c aj day passed a Bill amending the %  %  . . %  continue to pay cost of bonus to vestry peiisi. V C. Gale took charge 1 tha Bill. Moving U roodlng he said that the Itil! mi an annual Hill to enable the sevpn> bonus on the rt lag Kiven to iH'iisioin'i These were pensioners who rotiftd for son> asj %  %  passed to allow the vestries to continue to pay these DM %  Dd the cost of living aIlou,,m. granti>d to these people, rig asked that the ihll i %  acond tune llon'ble A. G Oil and tho Bill i OverMai [Maei Got Most Biittoen LONI*' I Tea shares a i widespread gaj 'iige today. \V. .. politicai operators arc giving' tion to coinn d od are searching for promising Thus oversea I must of :, Gains ol two itdUlni by tea Issues with sin... %  %  In Fon : JgMaaM lasua i si ova rd fron initial dullness Rubbi .' proot' talcing, and cased by few ptnot Irrawady flotilla with a fall of one shilling at ill shillings reflected the news of Burma Government appeal against compensation award. —Renter. i raw GlandjMadeYounfl 'Vigour Renewed Without Operation %  f su r*ai old baler* | from nrrva. brtun kna rhytteml j. TlVnnd W'haTfTelnM* \mi "h**lih I In The Council ) <'sterday srs as Ihe %  day. Tl %  %  .. i id Bishop, tl H I He Hon \i tin,! <'..ioTu.a B> %  • iry, ii i Presideni I II. A. Cuke. I>r H (J. Massiah. V. C, (iale. Dr. C H SI Jol ii %  %  • I |so laid the following tnta :— i on the Barboj i ral Hospil il bj Major T J. HaUig .il Kstablishnu | .iicudment) No. 2 Order, 1930. ,\il Kslablishment (Ocn. I too. .1 Kslablishment (Part I hrdor, itfiMt. The Parking and Ileslnctol *j i,.in*nt) Regulations, l50 wing gross Cus. ipts for ien months %  January, iy5u. The Council passod •he Parochial aannsoy* as a Act. 11*44. ed as the Vestries (Cost ol laving Bonus to KinployecM (Amendment) Act. 1M. TinCouncil adjourned sine ... *,', •*'. '**,**; ->', *> ',*,•, ->*>'yo*o"-^/v>vcKw*->*> nssnnBH *'***'** n LINOLEUM • Alll'i is Sii*.: 9 a by V/ 2 ft and 10y, It by I 11. Als-i LIMOLELM l.\ IIOLL 6 it. w.da All very reaaunable in Frier. LiabllUku !.IIMi!iUill.Hl. 10 4 11 Hoabuck SUM) Inwporalau S r ( ry >bbrh t— •>*uthfu) viawuf attd viutiiu quickat than fland oaarallonj II Ii 'ImpW torn* lr*mtmrnt In i.t !•>( ffcrm. dtneavtrad by •• | ASMrtaan L*Miar. A^aaUK*lr aartalaas aaO mft *a tafe*. bt tM M*aM Jmal pa*. •rfnl tnvUnuralor haeva I* aclaaaa. II UII Slraaur aa yaw alrli aarva*. •as •wta m rM italTNui aMUklrUl n.w fcca poww US vicW I.UUU htxir. Bnim af lu aa4arai acQaa oa liSi t.j I.T-M yaiu braia aawar, ataaMrr >4 -raMaM aftM iwprwt ktaaaiafir *J4a % %  kutasaaw aland sad vi*o-r raMatar. raflH vi.Taa, Ii luanaiaai it hM ba*a IHII4 >4 wr*wi ay Qjayaa n Si in Assartaa, ul to aaw avansM* m J' ctWMtota hmi, O.i VLTrti frwn yawr =aatoiat iaa> l-t it la tha Uat Saa tb a lanm ai M In 14 wi Taka >ha SottU. wfci, S UaU MSB4 Sftya. •** tha |MHI* ftUUU. thai II MhM %  %• ran rD of tmmt. •anray aaS vUalHy. *nu '••! l( (• l yaaan Voii'i.r or %  Many naeh tm mean, of M>U, pnraaga. mwciai. 4Mk-M>MfUi tottu al u VI. TVTnba^s-; !" ,; -aa*r Make Your Home Look Attractive with CONGOLEUM Wr ran supply \,,u with \ IffftwH Siars in Allrartivp Palt.rna I lllltl III.I HIBBKK MATS St> (ielieiouslv light! And you can make it . success guarun with this recipe Be ready for compliments when you make this scrumptious pudding for the family! And don't think there's a special knack in getting that meltm-the-mouth lightness in to your puddings! With Royal llaking Powder to guarantee success, you I Hetcs the redpe: I of, plam flour, 1 rounded teaspoon /'.'H.fer.ii pinch of tall, anal Rub in .' b*ttm>. Add / /Vstfrnee^andstilticicnt *""' Like a stiff batter. Four the mixture into a greased basin (6-inch size), cover BjUn ajissngj paper, and steam for 2 hour* Scr\c Mlh | ISngal siUCC. This u/us, light, stcamca sponge pudding unn toynl ior a perfect light Alan. asatun dod *' ttaot It ra Ipnrt cooks always "** jL$ij %  tul baking sure. V?'"?y Ittn.VL BAKING POWDEB For lovely hair use BRYLFOAM -THE cream SHAMPOO IN A TUBE See how Ftrvltouu : h$ mmmt A-wnaoa— I 0TM Btoj |t|gk ., u uiig oi dant, grease aad >oap-Maun troni your base, asndaflhcsnniaadradaun. Rc^^^>ra^aeB^hs bcsuulul glinung hiiUilighU ot hcsichy base, wiken MA g. Vtc Hrysl nrasfaVraa>4BaHaaaj noiluug D UMSSC quicker ioppiv and dry. Itaajugbaarfl •aampoos in each lu Nothlaf to gat iaa*y Ho(hutoau .Notkia(tapa .(WrtetoavrtT "•.„.,Toi %  %  %  %  Ir-mak-niH ANDREWS UVER SALT WILLIAM mum LTD. Pay us u \isil heiore purchasing elsewhere The Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd. (The Huns.' Ins Bargains) 1% m Swan Street. Phssne 211* or 44M INC. IN B.G. Leading Centre for >.\


PAGE 1

T -DJIESDAV. MAR" THE n.\i:n.MMis \nvor.\Ti: CLASSIFIED ADS. ."— %  -— Report Of Hospital Enquiry Conducted UltU %  •J tl „ M fOClr„ %  Ruwnet %  I*,-.*-""' HHI llEvr IN MEMORIAM HMrt Mr drly u Hill, lull, for pnv .:. Chrt, jna. < % %  ATHLETIC SPORTS ... on Thur.d,, Mi. -lllaaal MMI ^Alfe %  '< IJ*h NOTICE s\Wili HAH %  %  WWHOTIVI •in, r !" i / %  fTT r mi \ i1 IT 11,. ilii-Iii %  LIVESTOCK hrf* I*l>raloi Mala %  MIII.M SALES AUCTION UNDER THE SiiVKR HAMMER %  i i •I'MrUMiiiM %  %  %  MECHANICAL ^ISQ ACHWE—Ml Ona M. ia' lurdwar* ATHLETIC SPORTS %  WAITED M ISCELLANEOUS (-i CfTO o' 1 **WS*A r ""* S^rf. tSmmun n*riv booto. Wtopi. *"'• JL. .* %  it Son %  *•!*• Own Grocer* Cto Shepherd St. ROUND MOSQUITO N'ET I ,!*, Dun ih* %  quw* on. .. M *and *' diameler. rnow MB Wallibrook". River Ro.J P* I1K -"tDTOOWS DOORS. IMooftOM. 141 TtauhV Jan and Caw-. 11 Frtmi lnor nnd Cam Mfc u> window*. <2 JalouW* Soon ml Cats. 'If i Bedroom-doi> tfOwBt itn are • '.VntdirrtWMd. Man•tii. PiuMte ana. H .: 'ii • "ivEHlTi; ASBESTURS SHE! Ift x Ml hanie *' Piix* S 1" ft •ii K F T. ....: Coii-ndae HTMI ftUCQ* 18.3 :-i.-i n iructt %  % %  'ofp in iMa vi DamwrBd in Accidem T. i VMC Auction REAL ESTATE HELP MISCELLANtOUS %  '37 aquva leel of Und l ihinlow I..ne. oft Bay Slrevt Apply Aoreu at Cartar Broa., ;.. i '.-.. :.... I. ., 1 GALVANISE I'IPFS At FIT : I i T*m Co Tral Eii y>* li.t.M UPTONS TEA Ft dt u| P tin I... ll ari wlntt ihii vin-.i n>llclotu %  .muni any 1 John r H %  ATM TI'I'N I" -.; 1 nKli I. k rtoar |mo C, i M H.3 •"* t r n %  hria Tye O THOSE RECORDS YOU VSm'n i. ic ***<> Obpaa pUtten and Blni r-x-ord*. RHunia b% Edmni'.iti Ri-->. voeaJi m* turn -r %  It 3 M HOUSE Maa 2D H %  Rntarprlae Ch Ch Apply 1 fMrltU' 1 1 M J J*i lr ru-l is immi, 3 %  -. I I II Hiiu-r. 0"i I %  K M:IA II i i %  Oil SALE IIOINI: SPOTS HHIUIMi SHIS Cash or Easy Terms From 10c. per Sq fool up j mi. a THl Hill lo Kim %  I %  %  %  !>I:HSO.V\I. TVPHOOTCA Tha T Denr|t*i< )• n-lre-hind FT tM a 3 S-B IB. CABLVEl's 'w. CaMiHrti complcic '!" TM: %  %  ay*. S>v K i(M'Ud dan H i so 3i hmli ..,!,I I i 1 do i*ot hold II or .myona el" i ..ion alfnad by me CUHOB %  NOTICE ( %  Ma and the G< %  •run fMablixhitu-i't al hune ,nri ll c the making "1 %  to ftuure Mllata w PtMra Daacona Ro-d, %  21 3 M—In Germs Killed in 7 Minufes •5 Mr U 1 %  CLTIrftUMler***,*.' < ID*. Ptalirtf, •5v % %  fltapfeMii • %  in TroiifcJ.s BARBADOS CIVIL SERVICE ASSOCIATION the noun oi ra •. %  aavkaj Candldai.. .i tfOWUS Mr A cunris %  •Mini Mlaa M STX1ABT MNST 111W* LOST r.attnc* OOOD I K i'. I SI IOII SALE HI;AI. i>i AII: ll\ON AND ita tiMis IOBK M. 111. MMIV ) "DIXON & BLADON" DIXON & BLADON' 'DiXON & BLADON" lit \i 01 NT 1'llUIK \ i IONS Bl H S( WITH AN .i^fessi BATTERY you GET EXTRA LOW COST OPERATION OtriNDAaLE JAt'r.ltlES FOR SI YEARS! DUDItuurr: CITYOAHAMCO By Dr. Hallinan 0 from pair T UP. promotion anil lUtiM %  -ia(T werr n;. udtrUken iru -arcl'iilly iily was found in uhn'h. rtfqj inrtaiiutd by vrhal ^hnmii'l the undertaken hnd IOI Tii.hospital were | % %  %  : % %  :" 18 I was informed by a doctor in general practice in Bridiretown thai .tuiertakers of lam tpote were u onterpriainK in lont p their bnainesA ihat three atrent** had sallod al the honae of one of hu | !iU It-ath. The remedy for thi* atala of affair* would appear la ba in lh* Imn.is of the eommuaitr. i *. not to deal with inch tirnis VIII tMKMANKNT STAFF FOR TIIK tiFNF.RAI, HOSPITAL. General Remarks work of the llospitiil lias law Ottf gW W U taH old arrunei'iniiiis i: was earriad out Ysj i small body of pamaaanl youna-doctors %  n .1 i Viaitina; st.m of private pracl i who are all bnay men with limited time that they en spanfor Bull work. \ T o •nch ;r • -. ni bat vary small hoapitab of limited if rarpriae that u has axiatad for so long in l{arba'. l Medical Buperin|endent, 1 Specialist Surgeon. i Hpaaialial Physician. ) Specialist Kadiolugist. 7 Medical Officers ((jeneral duty). two Medical Ottoera would work under the QnaaiaUal 8J 1 I sen under ihc Specialist 1'liysiciau ami three Medi al I I nrrvi ittog % % %  oinmndation to 420 beds naJhtlj Bd thnt the hospital b) that thej ,.,1 ,., tinR] |o of patients in hospital throiiuiitut the y.-.t: % %  ofnedal bed accommodation, despite the actual .'act that the ntly |Q turn away patients and accommodai • -'•me patient%  %  uul aiUblc tor other general duties, such aa anaesthetics, at patieul work %  D. Wards, relief for dm I the < DUIH All could be "ii a rooter for night casualty dutiei Ptt I Ofioen ihouk) have previously held House Appoiutnients n: largu where The of P rturt might later be SutiKChtcd Salaries. %  I a Barhgd reeruita in uaeat day:other than i fen young Barbadian doeb i 1 tapping itoiM to prh %  in the hMM tor thaai Eat eqaivalent % % %  : ir poata bj Kuglaud and this might induce tin number ol Barbadian dootoia, who now prefer to remain in England irn to Barbadoa. The salaries of the proposed cadre shoul.l bd rVea O \ :*} ii.irou Nil Quarters and passages do. do. do. do. luperii odant ii 0 %  n .. the cost of the cadre, aa at present maintained, by 10 per annum. Superintendent requires a man with BOJM %  ant and capable of exercising tOntrol over all '.il personnel. The raapee ti va salaries for these poats Ittder Itiooaj Health Service in England is very much higher than tic retaining in Barbadofl It is still doubtful if the salary now suggested would anj bul a young man awaiting opportunity of a belter appointment bin i soine retired ELA.M.0. or I.MS offlwra on %  ii the tropics to praaani oonditiona In tha I nited II. and recruitment might ! %  effected directly through source* In geaMval nicerfl. IX. HOSPITAL CONTROL General. Bctorj Bonditiona at tha Hospital are not daa la of Saanngement to direct control by tic Q rrnmenl Leeutive oflBeiala, Theae conditionn hav* baa) veJoping through a numb* r Of years and the time lia* now arrived when tIs— Musi.,: %  rith tha needa of the population while Ita I and oomplaxitj thai it would be impoaaible for a of lay business men. meeting onee a month or even oftaner, fully to Dtly, It is quite certain that no bu Board arould Rgrce to Ins own biuuness being The "Id Hoard of Management had the advan iwlfl %  11. %  11 %  !i ii.and a pertain "luidity in powers eapendlture for tl %  m of extra staff or other at hat the possess. Theae might !• ieme.lie.lplinary powers of the Governor to some ii -: ..i %  mar\ Hoard and (2'l Bj bu i %  ntingeiieies. Measures to manage Hospital Accommodation. %  i .ii spital aeeaani that Barbavdoa will navaar !%  able to nrovida Ihta i %  iiiuiiitiea. WX) Hospital beds for all mid seem ta bj 'he limit possible for the Island to maintaiu for Site — Change ol VY On th boie nl -it • the main factors to be considered are.— \.< i the public -nsirnetioii. (c Uaintcuanoe of an adequate hoapitnl service during the building period, of the three BUggeari i I Watarford, Bay Area and the present 11 r sent Bite is tank from the onmibua terminus for all to Bridgetoa a snient to the Public. il i' V; %  '•• 1 mile from the terminus is somewhat leas convenient The WataffOrd lita I miles from the 'erminus is tleflnitely UV i onvanleal Now t 'oiist ruction or Rc'ConsCriuiion. Probable Cost. "•6. (1) The cost of a construction of an entirety new hospital %  present daj itbnatec ai %  of s. 1,500 n bed, i.e. £625,000. with suhacquenl extenaionfl al the rate of C1.000 a bed. i.ptinnsm in low building estimates almost nivanbaly results in sad disillusionment ^2) The aoat of re-oooatruoton of the hoapitaJ upon Its praaani aite for rjo—50 pada ahould be r-oasible for 000 atiliaatioo ol of the existing buildings for their pre**nt or other uaaa, I'nder such a plan: (.a) The mam Building, now use. a| wards would makr .in \cellent Ont-Pntienl an enl with ita Hospital AdmhuW tration Oflleea npataira. \ %  Iperating Tie luld be made in the inner atorej of tha pi aenl Pe mtenarj Wai Ituilding, the mid well aerve ror the X Ra,i Bramination and Therapy %  (o) The Nuraaa Boat il could i onehanged with provision for future extension and bettor quartera tl ealdenl permaaenl nurse.. mSanl id) Thi a either side of the .:. bj two atorey blocks ii itiona adequate tor their eonveraion later to thro atoreya. riu new warda should be for 22 24 bada arranged in pans with central ward offleei for eaoh pair and la\ alori.-s and baths Thia WOUM %  f ir in 'i night duty and provide a better service The Pgj w.i i is and Tereentenan Ward ahould ba troaaI in new warda in of lu\ er Road. If tl budding with different elas otuuiodatiou. a better nursing service eould be effected* This Mte would alao serve for quarten to ba additional staff. if) The j reaenl Bye H< q Patieul Bl Paying Warda eould in the spital Warda, (ii) in the newly eitod Out-Pati utftj Dei irt".I ii.: in the new Paying Ward Bio aaenl Rye Hospital liuudiiigs could bo re-eonatruoted and Quarters, vg) There is ample room on the il acrea for all the nquirem^nta uts block a i i ited it aral ing theatre t a bicl ixhrta It would th< i i la to be operated upon ai aaj tune aonvenienl to the Visiting Staff without conflict with the needs of the non-paying pal i woujd be simple ii .ni entirely new hospital were built on aithei ol the ( The Sugar Manufacturers Association (of Jamaica) Limited Invite application! for two posts In their Research Departmeni for ted with the breeding, selection, and rleld testing of . e tu resistance to virus and other o othag normiiily desirable characters. (a) Botanist, salary £1,000 rising to £000 per annum (bj Agronomist. £ 800—111,000 per annum. Applicants should possess s research degree or equivalent quah'mver.ity or other similar lostitutioi -nt breeding and selection work. • be expected to advise on plant pathology. %  4rvice will be three years under contract. nl engagement. The selected candidates aaaiK to Jamaica, B.W.I. and required to assume duly not later than 1st November, 1050. A local allowance In He., -,'iecl and leave with passages paid after i lods. There Is a contributory pension scheme %  obuUaanl 'rom the Director oi Research, i* Mandeville. Jamaica, BWI. to whom ill personal particulars and three references, ed 11.3.50—so l MI id -sAKaUSON (OLUGi: TEAR ltsa—61. .11 on in in September. 1950 in y Departmeni and In the Main .School. Applications for must be made to the Headmaster b> Parents Guardians on a Lompanied by n Birth, Baptism Certificate, on or before 3lit May. Unsuccessful Applications made for previous years do '1 goodNew applications for ISM must be submitted. No applli an normally be accepted for a boy who will he under 8 years 8 months in September ltOO. Parents/Guardians will be notined ol the dates and time of the Entrance Examination by a notice m the Press etter. Department of Edu.,' 13th March. 1I0. t.3.50—3n. Baj irea ail it would Involve mnoh difficult) during re-oonatruction of tha llonpitnl on ita %  ..I unpoaaible, The pi I been studici b\ Mr. Ueacoek, the Bnecialial Burgeon, who when functioning as aeofiatruoi bowing that it was quite pooaiuw by following a careful programme of demolition nut i nation to maun am hoop tad aarvi %  pronoaalaare more awj than his but bj the use of !. re plol for pndiminary construction of paying patienta warda, thua : tha Hospital for demoliti n and .. conatruetioa, they bee,me equally possible. X. MEDICAL ORGANISATION. • il pital but no itaida Dianaii througooul ihe Island thai in eonjiiuetiou witli the HoHpitaf, would form an t ice [or its population i i %  . i pariah outrol treat i^ and a ayatem exists in the pariahea untl oa may obtain ircatmeal In the Aid-house Diapenaarj '•> the Parochial Uedioal Off tha rci ommandationa of [nap into his eMciiiM. unco. Although this reaemblea the ci the Qenei i Hospital where patienta pass ,n.. oquiry uffloer it is very different a that the in 'ii relief under the poor law which carriea the un%  ..i of paupeham That thia is raaantad is shown bj tha compara lively large number of patients from country pariahea wl tent al rioanital OutvPatiant Departmaat The r. : ,,. a l < :iieers ... the control of the Chief M.e< i though thai .-sand hoHpitals arc subject to his inspection ami although they maj adviaa .ni.! re. ... %  bound to follow bia inatrnationa in anj dutiaa operation between theae doctor* ary few caaaai an ba found on i h> HoapitaJ bastetauue, ind diphtheria who have i i iimiuary dos.oi curative orptophyla tie aeruai, aith Uedioal Administration ia prnnd haa ismied eii nnd contacts Nomai'fa lathe Ueaaral B in <••• rotarnad to Ins parish t.. rataiva free lioalim ol r pletc his i' M ry. for example, eaaaa t diabatea rtaauring regular insulin treatiieiii I of their life, lal which need obaervation luring their eoawrasaaaauea, or rutaar treatmenl or oceaaional medical Bl I preeenl neei-MUtatea long joumcya to the Hospital that can Ul be sfforded hg then, An attempt has been avade to ramedj this C 'it ion b> • Ael t" >tnbi:-ii a Departmeni ul lledieal Bei .. which not yet n promulgated The Act givaa tha Di %  n: raapoaaihiUtj for all public medieai service* of ti • Island, which be does not at present poBBaaa, but appears ex| to differs ion l I bcu.-cir pi,bl' and "parochial" Inatitl over the hut *r of wl apparantl] inspection. o'J. Tl best solution would appear to b*: amends a consolidation of paruuau three < rornment, i, i pted, will throw tha paeatal Psroelnal M -; in tha malting ]•<>> If they be now |aj I is lo 'heir future M CONCLUDING RI MARKS In con my apnrcciatioo of the kindness and teay that I have reeeived from everyone taroughoul the anqulry and ticulsrly grateful to Dr. .1 I nt and enerp Medical Sanerintenda Hospital, for the valuable aaaiatanre given me throughout tha enquiry thai rx< tatcd inch rrequeaf call bia many duties. I also must tfpreal Day great Indebtedne** to my Secretary. Major A. Do V [Chase, an encyclopaedia of knowledge on BarbaaUh rVdadnaatialion, services have very greatly facilitated m> %  in|uiry. My thanks are also due t tynn for the willing, painstaking and efficient manner in which she carri-d out hci 1 have the honour to be ant. T .1 HALI.INAN. t radoa Gaaaaal 14th February, 1M0.



PAGE 1

PACK EIGHT .Dos \n\or,\TE JVEDNESnAT_M A R Cn HLNHY BY CARL ANDERSON 7~ ^^ MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY &, BLONCHE .MB BY CHIC YOUNG SLEEP WITH %  A CLUM< BUT NOT WlTM %  K. O. / UNtatMLY F A THMK I KNOW HC Q ( TO AIT YOU a-OCi ft THE LONE RANGER ** BY FRANK STRIKER S^ .. .": J D TEW\1 WMT 0HAMI BRINGING UP FATHER %  NOT 0TT*j' IPVITBY GEORGE MC.MANUS &f wo .| *•** UP ^ -NOT IT_ • COP* •""^4 waTCMN' FBI CM B *-_ AN MOXJB" JlIP KIRBY i L %  *, £"H Vo„ f n n M %  Ml| Red or s Phost one A CONCENTH^ "•"OSPHFJiOK PREPAIlAnov lonic T'keni,^ 1""*ly tone „, "erves and embla to Wt m "• Try it m, vinced. -:: Price 36r. pet botu ON SALE AT All Good DrugStofp The **v.' thul gSvM llt.it nulurul look m. loti-li (NTIlt al UI.V |M|>. %  %  %  %  %  l %  I %  %  %  %  %  •*lmli I I ik I %  %  ipla Supa .' %  ., i %  ach curl Imp.. II. .i lavl ... %  i-1: . .. ill;; /cut -n-i'*l hv M million I HI in. it -W'Mi Vlarida WV.S SKI II l\ One indthc uma IUH yi u can MPMC In B different way* i uitn i olouse as uu ordinary skut I. with u blouM.' as %  pinafor 3. Sli. 4. ord 5. dancing ITirr $5.48 Your Ktilr.'M HeritiH| Y OUR baby is entiil.J to I in life, for on tliis will r Heinn. For this NMOfl \ >u is that vour baby iktould be U BrcM milk |a llir i\, ptW) i .oiwiluit-J M tuit ili.ir .1. live >l. ni, in. required c.. | %  Be '.;in.u-j bf ihc iipuhmca ol *^" tha vahaa ol OvaUaw' to axptciai %  fter babv coata*. dalldoua I rnUtli nulrilitr pr.>perlie%. ftttmulttci lacia rich in.i .ui.pi,>upplv *>i btaaat*aall In -JJitum, 'OvaltlM luppllea f baaaaoad aottriatMaau durinn the nun I.I the heat postibltn .irpt'nd his future i ill \ .iow how import*! I n the bnri-t. >,l lor StUn. It i'Mia* utioptovidrWaB' lrl. -HttiaadJorkfaK ihfi. toKirit raktor**criod. Ovaltine Enables MoUirrs to Hn-u.il Friii'thtirM> Sold in utrtight urn by all OumuU mJ Swa"*H >\t£ iMi. >Wi >Wt }W< >/ t-'t'l u H IMIOVI.U \\ IMIISS SIMM' LIGHT & POWER TROUBLE FREE INSTAL "LISTERALTERNATOR SETS l DKSKL Mm HIMUmiltM cw! l 5 K.W. All WDM, iu, s '£2J*a AU.m..l rHi ASSU^"?* RANGE F SPAM PARTS IN STOCK' "FLORENCE" BAKES THINGS LOVELY We now hava in slock FLORENCE STOVES AND OVENS 3 BURNERS $71.86 ^ 2 BURNERS $ 44 &f (IT. GARAGE TRADING CO, l


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EIQDXBFA2_GKJNZ0 INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T14:52:31Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02340
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

ytDSES UAV. MARCH a. 19.-.U Imprisoned For Playing Sergeant Ttwrton Harding of Doyrell %  „,! sentenced 10 12 months' ^nMjQinent with hard labour I32oI)* appeared before His (Sup *• H A T lm on Mon *L ,.as found iiuilly of obtaln-TtiOO by false pretence Irom 5. Winifred Year wood of JJ^ion Court. Hastings, on March Thirty-four-Year-OJd Found Guiltv Of Robbery With Violence BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE Ownerless Dogs Cause For Concern Judge Chenery Reviews SCAC Report 20 Barbadian Girls Lea re For Work In U.K. I no recommendations of the island yesterday .veiling by the anoiiut Closer Association Com' Gascognc" for ; N TIME FOR EASTER HYMN & PRAYER BOOKS AT THE ADVOCATE STATIONERY. Ha Winifred Yearwood said along with 34_ v — minutes' deliber?a:cnvrm?he> rs 8 o U „ ,Uy ' "***" ^ ****• ^ *•>" %  ".resident of Upper' Collymore Rock, charge! Jl'i March 6 in"the afternoon LulUe* "Sm^SSSHS, Merto, ffiT. knock at her door and ...Upper SlJynS. ,ta aaftaan, %  •jie servant answer it. robbery I xcellenry the (governor W L Savaga preaadad mittee did not give the Weit Indies >' % %  SENTENCE on 34-vear-old Phr.etnr.ha... r,u u o V \ he ,. tc p>to ^ ****** Jhe opportunity lo reverse UM ad Un "Sam", was Dosliwn^ (• u u P „ r Gibson, alias UM Cambridge Mode,, i their three Art.no !" ?L T ^ d "IS Honoui night. History when the rtciing chief Justice, at the Curt of t.rand Sessions "ves'"" f r0at work had d la red that naWaa. terday. An Assize Jury, after about '0 minuW .Juki. work Mr A L CMJPJMII "•, eircua 'liberM d ,hat a matter which had givPolicy had forbidden the Wc "Pi^tadby *J' %  *•* "quitted \ insupcrWU Ktafc W ^uk her -Q lend him some L Ward while Gibson ^ a ^ AA J_. Gibson has threo nnH „ letter. No -ii.Van was ev. I. Ri .an Opponent Adgla Shaw. Myrtle Gollop and he was In the course of his remarks he t -' lct > c C. Bayi The financial statement for 1M8 a,( '.hat he lelt it his dul %  ntad, reca:. aothorin .i sh it m lew Mr. ad of the minded members of the Mercy w st Indies as Ix>rd q Movement of the institution. He on* ,0'ne Governor <'t Jamaica said that although no mention had and head of the 1929 O i ~'tucn had visited the West In.Jury Acquits Ex-Postman Twenty-nine-year-old Oswald Boxill Louis Potto an i^ the servam w •uunvr ii. -" %  —.j wnn v olanro „ k gZvt come back and said J !" JpmUon^Kltari. m an wanted to speak with 'e person The jury ClS SJ She (Mrs. Yearwood) went lcJ Mr no lu'lt.v lin Ttie doof " " man ,olti her (:,^ P ,7 W ". K.C. Solicitot Sahrwas a Sergeant Sobers and V^JT, !" %  f !" secutod for -.he Crow, :J I fost Ofllce. was '"led by Mr lury J while Gibson was ". Cour "' Grand SssW WIBully delaying a res B, nione.the next day. of a bicy -jp h —-- Hudinj has had 15 previous a sheep on October i,*. •^"""JSiee"" m0 Cy IIT SX-.Z' """ *"tced"io tlbyMr. J. E:"T. Brancker W W !" %  conv^ n n'.i" d la bour HL <•'" General, prosecuted on behalf .>! the Crown while Boxill was repre HUE of 40/to be paid In Sh""!?" "" " '• 1. 1944 Alo months or in default one mo nJ hs !' " Tf !" *'" sl King ol Lorn.. ii row „ p ,„,„_,„ [tvet. an Monday tnaaa for the Prosecution. m^"ihe 5.c! ( io„ h ?ou,'e P S; '"''^^ 'nTSTIhS -Ji ^ constamiy ^posed" & ad H e. B "w„„,,l '"'"" %  itself three registered letters to months' jnooth's imprisoiunent M found iuilty of driving the into Jones' shop at Upper cSK %  *P M 'others who f?u? a ? M?r.t?on %  M-2474 with inefficient brakes more Rock to buy a tnckaae ol l '~'" on the Garnson Hoad on January -'Rarettes. He ..poke to Jon ;l Me went to another part of the a,lrt af: <'' racetvia F ITZGERALD AGARD of n D l0 have a drink. Christopher Aihby's Alley was ordered to ?^? n W "i in ,hc ho P MerT ^' pr 40 in 14 days or one month's M.,? 1 ) !" 1 lhc ho P about CJnMnment by His Worship ''' mm 1 ^ later. Hi. H. A. Talma yesterday when la was found guilty of wounding fjvie Dowries on March 2. acthe pressing needs of the West They wn %  Cxtra-Mural \, U ^V "and | ndlcs Ih( I! N \t Mi :. war* best run if they wax iul; ,„ llo Colonial Post i ; under the imniedate condirected." Further ,-h... %  !. ,. ;il llai xhv M on Office ofl dates on t\. %  Hindi ment of the .md the merely am men stood in groupbevy of colours was a Ugh dag] nigs. Some (no %  %  %  rrtandi from them—mavN' for evei Bui had a udi„ model icnce that ill-conditione.l live., ttdaral ItructUn inu^l suiletl to lock slliuld not be shot, but the circumstances of the West A out at the Belle Tenantry "i" f" d h .? r 'P u d ""t he came his addruss to the lury, said ,hal there should l? an animal farm Indies. %  Monday and burnt I acre of rlS"^;. „_ .. . I ,' < i 11 "" <** !" M "• le-condiUonHe tl Lashley told him to go home demeanour. The I the ed ITof u, P !" „ !" £ "o oflered "company him. offence are Browne said that LasMey then Ofl fully data) No 21580 ing regl ilThrec Aspects ajai 111 holes laving to Edward Mallet held on to one hand while Gibson T HE RIGHT SHAFT of the eart Jffi %  „£ th?^ > ^ 1 was broken when a horse Gibson held on to his hand that •mad and driven by Shclton had on the wrist-watch He was Hayoa ot Dash Valley bolted struggling with Gibson to prevent %  ten it saw an approaching lorry, him from taking oft* his a. The right knee of the horse was While struggling, he received %  Cruised. blow at the back of his neck and one on his shoulder, A i 1 \.N SEALE of Rock Dundo Another man then itru I reported that three pigs a blow on his left shoulder and the G.P.O. officials who told th nlued at $22.00 was stolen irom broke it. He fell to the Ground Court about the routine as to hit open yard on Saturday night, and while he was there Gibso?i delivery of letters. Boxill in his r r i.v . .-. > J took off thc statement to the Police Magistrate IE LUKKt X-I07Z owned and After he got-.utslde in the ro^d said that he had delivered all .triven by Fred King of Someone called Lashley and ha three letters and returned the Orist Church ran over a bicycle (lashley) left. He did not tea receipts to the Q.P.O fa Mason Hall Street on Monday. Lashley after he was pulled out same evening and he pointed out The bicycle was placed on the of the shop. He had never seen that there was not one aoe of the road by Half CumberLashley before that night. that could say in Court that U> latch a bicycle repairer. Browne said that he had hit receipts were not returned. diary, some papers and 2 m nil __ He_next read a passage from then gave a short ac ->unt of t niggles that confrohTed fedUM lion V. C. Gale eraUontata In Auatralia beta proposal of thanks to committees tha difi the current that the working of cha id brough livestock were killed. The killinn %  i cats. In any caae no one wou'd east I; a* _^ aaaaj vsasanv ttv ... %  Charted, and submitted that there were ihree different aspects to the ase. There was the evidence of Canadians Unhappy OVER LOCAL RESTRICTIONS light during the past half cen.vances lha lass Important which culmini In 1!34 when %  halmtng raajsi 11 cding from the Commonwealth. Goad Job Ha thai th tna report S andini Cloi i Commltt I .iring econORUC stability if %  A RlPPINGILLE'S OVEN MAKES YOUR BAKING EASIER > had been supplying gooda to to l-e .. durtm the war years. The lecturei also dealt with the .nhappy that they an ,. „, ,^. u. LUHKI I-.-SS owned anu po,^, i, ut ( hey were taken out by Dr. Taylor's Treatise on the Laws < l-s until the but what they %  •iHealing with ihem for the futute. V T, "* % %  i ii.i i ; • """..gs o„ "' l n VL" !" CM r uD for was delaying and that was the only Unfortunately, he said that their _,.'" ...;"'"":'' ..'.-' s ".' .< *!' iss. i^TcriSs nssr • xiz'>xsz ss. &+. * %  S Miller top-scored with 60 not m,u ..•„„,;„,, Different Notes •"I King bowling for Shell tmed three for 31). Shell CO —T',',';' fSil „. crepancies in iST-aW. co„„„ues on Sa.ur-Te r'ed L ,oi„ers shop on the U-J to oneins.ai -v night in question. r BS WEEK there will be three A1 ."V? ,u "^. .„ Ita shows for K hool children war,ied M,D P **' HHt^*goods were no longer '"" Wl,h ojiantltsea of feed, not because the people did i •ant than but I let "f. r Qna ' I by the Alcoa Pilpnm on Mondav from Halifax. He then pointed out the dis££ '^ "'" •"" Perniitted to thc evidence of the bn " hem ,n on 3ccoun "' lhc > uons. told *a British Council this alter•"> and tomorrow afternoon at thc Jury aid that the money inside the latter Honour was a Barbados Government $5 be note and a Royal Bank of Canada S5 note, while Louise, whom she Shut (lilt Since his arrival in Barbados eleven days ago. he I %  %  pie with vrhota ha bad bean lolni business and the Information re i that the people had learnt to IN pro. and on Saturday. March was coming to thc Court to gievidence he should come sober said was present when she because if he came drunk again the letter, said that the envelope hc i r Cana.i he might find himself in Glencontained two Barbados Governadvantag.ro..ad now ,l, irv ment 55 notes. found themselves entirely shut -. „„...,„*. o. Qiiion w ho addressed the jury In another Instance another out. ls Cathedral. Gardens of Eng„_".jTSfiaif ">ld the jury that he witness, Edith Codrlngton claimed •"-.and House of Windsor (The bought rum for Browne He said that she opened her letter while ** %  30 a.m. The programme follows:—British News. St. .kftMift! "? USC f Winusor < The bouglil rum for Browne. He said that she opened her letter while QAA Cw jai family). Admission is by t hat when Browne came to Jones her daughter. Louise. *nid that it |)IIW Oliill ^ !" obtainable free from the 5 hop he had an inflamed shoulder waa she that oncne.1 the envelope O *f"' y f'oijneil and waa not wearing the wrist Rdlth then laid 'hat *he always At the final count yestert At the final count yaati I number of people who had signed T and was not wearing "* %  THIRD TALK in the scries watch. opened her own letter-i :erary Figures in which MrWard then addressed uie ,, e toH lhe Jurv nat [n j B wt the Electricity Consumers 1 WiJJ Dryden and Dr. Johnson Jury %  • %  r which Mis Honour sum them wondering who thev must tSon was well over tocnad up already been fealun maladtowili at, SffifoSV ?? Si "S2S l n %  S? 1 *^ oK-to? %  !" talk several of Blake's *"" %  ;ill be read and a record^£ Edilh Evans reading -The JJ* nrogramme. which is a "enlation of The British Counr-"" be heard over thc local "•""it temght at 7 30 balUra He did not think the petltli ,f,cr ^^ *S !" l l 5Sl' day. ivill ba handed to His as to "wilfully" delain them any undue length of time bul submitted that once they fulK apthe leifal nresumntion their minds. 1 return a verdut Of "nil ruiltv" Mr. Reece. in his addri the Jnrv that when thev examine' The 94-ton motor vessel Daerthe receint and In their minds thc wood arrived in port yesterday i„,,>r 'six" in 16. S 49 on thc bringing a cargo of charcoal, receipt, was i 'six' and not a •M". and thev alo < "DaerwootT Brings Fruit Heaviest Rains In St. Peter £ Sonda? nit" nTeaFiy w a monunJ TL !" f^ niand of Captain De Coteau of "• LSXtXJTZ. "S'il !" St. Vincent. *" opra, cocoanuts, pumpkins and fresh fruit from St. Lucia for '.ocal dealers. Thc Daencood, which was recently skippered by Captain Archibold is now under the com. % %  •".. 11V Hllil.il j |,"„ ollce Stations show that J !" "as heaviest in St PaW j^ 'l parts were recorded. .Centri rt turn .sllltll auxiliars schooners I "^ A '8 Paris. District Christ Church, "£&£' which 5rttsfi r n '' C '' ,S ''"""" eisits lo Barbi *VUufTrt , F ,S '-Jtip, aial Ladi/ -old the Jury if tna) bad reaaon. h pays occasional rtD ie doubt in their minds they Barbados for docking WO{t \^ have to give Boxill thc ut and return H a strong conviction in their nimds they should rclurn a verdict of "guilty" At this stare the Court adjourned for lunch and on n the Jury returned 'heir verdict Excellent l today. Assist* Diary WHIM M)\i N'e, 24 A Si: Re* v. I U % %  i .ilt.le howdine ill! UDA1 Mai. 14: Rex v Clyde tireeo Reuben Green and LioiiH (ireen No. IS A 16: Rex if, Lionel (.rern ml Krutx-n Green Heartburn? RENNIES Ai ihc BrM Mgn .t acidity, tuck ran Rannlea, one after the other. At they datolvt, their antacid ingrcdicnti .ii-' tarried hy your ..iva straight to wtierc they're needed m your itomach. i ri afbtf nicab need never worry v ,,u again, if you carry %  lew Rcnniei they're v.rjj>ped scpaialely like *weett> r-nkei or handbag. If they don': hung you relief, r I you >aw fOH Get lUaaaai -t any Lhcnuu. MONEY COES FURTHER... WITH Tilt : > A built H)h p. Potd -tiaigea DIGISTIF KENNIES Mi SPOOV SO II i II H S$$ 'he MUICT aftsar CHARLES MC.ENEARNEY & Co.. LTD. %  %  _* %  J %  **I am a proud ronsumer of ... GOAT CHOW Th. COSTS begin their renag assaa oa . CALF STARTENA lhuinahle from 11 lasM IsWasI r LU • %  •v.v.w.v.v.v.v. WHAT'S ON TODAY Coart af ftrand fl t aaU na at ItOaara. Patllce Banc" at Holelown MeaaorLaJ Site at 4.3 p.m. Football at Queen's Park at 3.04) pm. (ourth Annu-al Met tin*. BarbadM Qarl (iaidn. it Paa Mill sl 5.S* pmMobile Ctaaaaa, Prtaata PlanUUon Yard. Hi. Joseph at ?.M p.m. VIM Cleaning is quicker, smoother with Vim! A rub or tuo-and your oven dishes are clear and brilliant aaain without a scratch I Start using Vim today I It does all your cleaning so speedily— saves you so much work. cleans everything smoothly and speedily!



PAGE 1

f'AC.t SIX ISAltD.UlON U)\IKA!I WKDWESDAY, MABfn ^ REPORT OF HOSPITAL ENQUIRY CONDUCTED BY DR. HALLINAft i MAM i.i NGLEY SA\ \ icl And the Island of Harbsdos. Y*ur Excellency, 1 hai *rrm i I 'lie Harbados General 11 pital and to maki recommendations foi improvement I. PRELIMINARY. 1. The enquiry %  14th January and eontinued daily Dnl class, I ns given an office HI the Ceaneral Hospital %  %  iei rt theg -.ii/ of the institution in all il ities. All the hospiini personnel v i %  *%  %  • %  mj disposal for prlvste ini sstigstion and 1 had full sec* to thi I md correspondence, Then vsi no disposition in the sen t af tei th< itsil in the lower grades realised that I was not holding a form of court martial, but that my object was to obtain information with the object of improving existing • condition*. they overcame I re squally full and frank information about eonditions in the Hmpttjd t 2. Members of the Public s sra Ini ited by advertisemi a\ idsnoc or information that they desired to eoinniunicate. and several persons who had given publ aty b mplainl BU of the Hospital war invited to discuss the hospiisl eendttionti with me The rewpone in thene invitations vu small hut valuable 8. (1) Sii Mi .... • • %  (,-..,. r(|P Staff < onunitl %  taJ of their views on the organiaation and intprovemenl tofthi Hospital for whien I must Civil ttion to %  i u" the nursing staff, *hich l : ... deputation Miidu.n was receive 1 0D Friday, the 10th ox PH : and wine of the other meml the Bttbordhtai ion on the subjects. %  v ere brought up. i) I*. 0 Uahoney, m\ me the fulleat %  i .'i i appro • care with opinions II. in ASO iS FOB THE BNQUttY I. Tl i ints in the Leg ture and let* itious .it the I era! HOB] | n folio ws -'I' Unven men Board, under the i Hospital \'-< rd, nan administer betti r iasln (b) Lack o staffs in : %  i to adapt to In al and subordin %  i il %  b il al %  itioii .ui.i lue to i adequate pro %  %  %  I I 1 'in support 111 DESCRIPTION Ol mi HOSPITAL. % %  I Eye I MII Patient Dene %  R the Hospital in th< %  ipital Board %  converting this property into "Mat Unj] imodaUoo, 1/ II 11' 1 1 171 III llllllilill:... I. '• Inu ,., i ...I (u Ihi |i "'""• %  > "" r •"' %  %  %  I km on Iho : \ ill tbi build evfrou Mil imrlj .;„ d boUdiug cirri tj lituated above ri lood equips at ota and it If frequently a programme ay. The sterilisers work unceasingly in luring and between operations and also the n the Operating Theatre. A small room m btrl the majority %  %  nx I a Lift to Ux I hontre i sanitates i 'ii being can q i %  tairnaaa %  : i 1 %  '! %  fron %  i i-;t us of the public and paying wanta ft patients during the process which, on %  that a serl OUsly ill ea under supervision until he has i to bear the inconvenienee of being carried downstairs. A band-worked lift exists hut it ;. nworkable It would be of great advani Hie lift. Lifts are comparatively aheap 1 | the Operating Theatre be moved, the fiti I ft a be moved al mall expense for installation MI another part of the Boapital IS. ng§ wbiefa rilso Include i Fracture Clinic for their purpose They are %  mall, dark ig patients. IS. The V /' in a new hnildintr !l a a at uhle block. I are wall homed on a. site adjacent to the hospital. -I tding where all work is manual Or, linen depends on the sun whieh i it of the period of this enquiry, so that return completely dried linen to the wards, it is rarpriaing, however, to find thai the laundry was turning out such a good standard of work under such difficult eonditions. a) D Arrangements for proper disinfec%  Hoapita] are most unsatisfactory and ineffecPhere I r ad te arrangements for boiling linen It would be posa temporary measure, Alter could be rapidly heated with leads to a disinfecting chamber and to cement tankThe boiler and disinfecting I lit site at little cost when i InHospital is re*srranged. IV. STAFF: i i (. Stall oi %  d dical Uepartm n uuusts of:— (a) Whole-time Officer*:— I M pei Uiteodsnl I Ra I ill. ; House Su i*geuus. i afatron, i Assistant Matron. I Tutor S ster ft i 1 1 Assistaul baf Tutor \ IIme Sister, 2 Radiograp lludiologist, %  i i ib Pari-Uasc 01 I v one, ..' Surgeons, I Ophl i \ Boon, %  %  i l Med \" 1) i wpai l Asa 1>. Departu I Masseuse, i tmg Ont Patient Med cal Offlcera. 1 Dei 9 The Staff of I I the Hospital eoaaists ar>, i A. %  %  mtaat, i'-i % %  Ri %  and l Do. ton Wimle-lim, OflcatS. tfvpen .at present held, as an lets in Northern i of House Surgeon in Barbados Igland ;n a ISW nmnliis. illy arrived from England on s Ihlwl %  i j .... BUad bj I lectors have given notiee <-t i the third, 1 riU set up private nd to obtain better medioal KDCJ '• Ph House Sui -ii detailed, one to ~ U one to the Medical Ward and the VUternit> VVi be do t idtna caent of ardi ordei :.. %  of diets and i I ag of anaeatheties on the A aim i>, and the charge of all cases in the 11 H The d.'-MLinatioii Houa i ly QcneraJ Duty htedieal Omeeri % %  -iwion arises. ins! Uve m charge of Su A and the general super a the ii %  : i -i appouiUuenl be alao held ntendent but kubsscjucntly found ic impossible TO do i in addition to the work >n ll" nuu admil din con imitation Half the fees thut he T and con sultan. ato the Publi I Visit in S l %  ../ i pi who assist k I I They make i-. B an %  two or three rd allocs! ... i adi iai i %  distc eharge ll staJf I the entire work .: IN pertinent and deal with most I %  *Uentn in paj in OSBBSS PSBTt; UO| I \ ticularlj i week i<*i ossion. %  ..I hardi sing 28 Charge N'urses, 22 Staff Nurses, 111 Ward Xiirses, |i Nurses in training. posts of Matron. Assistant Matron. Sawkf Tut, under cont ,-taff are Barbadians recruited Uieally and trained in the (ien-rat u "• 2 The present cadre is barely sufficient :".. r adeour Him f^i 31 1 Th ire appointmenl F.saiii tdequet), rartons wards, the lay out and distribution <>t which lo not'"^a, 011 ^ SM nursing staff. '^Toeft^Bj [H) The position is further complicated by the arrant***.** I of Mid wives for the Island's requirements, under whil. f M '**tfc ng if the Charge or Staff nnrsea ai the General Hi training "" the Maternity Hospital. tii,., r places being temper iptM.intnient.s of miisi.li> nurses. Sickness oi nurses thro Ws ' T* 1 m "w"* %  '"" mialion. Any future should he oi trained nurs-s only, until t li manent staff (incl number of nurses u in the wards As a rsanll of this il is difficult t times should be in charge of a qualified nur increase of thsBswaste disproportion inmedied. (7) The local nursing staff ii generally .nsiontented and mh^ The ehiel cause of this, is in my opinion, that at present thev are^aa? !" %  with no prosped ( .f advancement beyond the post of Clutft.2Laj the senior posts of responsibility being reserved lor imnortwl ,.**;'.' %  work and conditions of service, with higher pay and individual uuu der them as somewhat superior be ink's uparl from i h* ^renersl body g(u^ The nursehostel i n run on such i-ondil s „l -.piahiy i hat no aisuiS made between the permanent staff and the tirJ nurses nnd.T trainiae H There is no separate sitting room nor separate dinias UbUw 1 %  ill facilities .ui> spivial privileges fur Ihe [HTmim-m Maf they live m an atmosphere of control thai is proper and ••temj a | fornn ler training, bill that must be somewhat irksome fm ^ualinednunmah .i i. ties r privacy and independence in tin i mm-worlonglMlB&>9 eonditions cannot but weaken the authority ol the permanent nuneKswat trainee nurses when on duty. 1 >i I have r ived widely different opinions from themselves as to H fflciencj of the local staff of nunwa and their, for holding responsible positions and it would have been lmpowibk? during m> enquiry to judge the capabilities ol all the (lermaneRt staff. Ii set-ins to me, however, from my experienee in .Jamaica when nurses work efficient]} in all grades of nu minding the that of Matron, (hut then' must |„. ;i %  ,.„ IHIIM-S m the Harbades vice who are now capable of holding posts of higher responsibility or hi Bould be sehooicd for mch poati III the early future, (b Hecommrnilation. To this end I would reeuiaiiienu tatmj Sister asked lor in next \ ear's Mmi.ite^ should out UfaW • ''. i mill a irral has been made of aethsl appsaM -' loeal nui's, s in these posts, eeruited from overseas are similarly w>nie*hitU'_ l happy owing to their difficulties in maintainiuK an de<|uate narna|nri| in an ill-arranged hospital, for which tiny are held primarily mponubhis^ a barely aufHcient staff at its best, without sickness and shortage*, tsdriu the constant care of training - large number oi nurses winch falls more bank upon them owing to the small number of permanent local staff. The praaf staff of overseas Durscs is I erj efficient and hard working. They have inssv ed a very long-standing unsatisfactory state of jiffnirs for which tseyareas way responsible. It will be a long time before highly trained nonet fss overseas will nut be essential for the efficienl running of the Itob*a>QesnP Hospital. The Civil Service Association and Grievances of Hospital S^pwyss 22. I received a deputation from the Civil Service Assoeistieatdans ansss of hospital employees mainlj com ted with the none*. Th saantatioM arc Nunmarised herein and commented on as follows:— A Tht 'a i'I '" iffOH hilKtt* tk<+ tmd thi admim*lrolion by tht tttabfokwunt tit l>firlrnninl Whilini C<>,ut<-! 1 agree that such machini mry but feel that us valatsilispand entire)} ou the spirit with whieh it is employed, An uudersuuidini 111 aympathetlr HdminiMralii its vvoik. projects and dinValoeiaJ i thej effect its employees with thcii repi who sresUondrstauding and sympathetic, with the join; object of maintaining Messrs puhlie service, even at the temporary sacrifice, for expediency, of pnaeipwsi personal gain, can he of great advantage. On the other hand s Ksaw ministration in such a Council, dealing with employees' representstite>vs their tlag nailed to the maal of resolutions passed by the Internsuonsl'sss Federation whieh main of the countries of the world have not nafjj implemented, and not prepared to give and take s-ith understanding.?*** ing a stroug stand over trivial matters that conflict with lsbonr l**JJ without L'unsideiing thai the mam object of both parties u tat gsod< %  community ausj result in an unmitigated nuisance and be harmful to tan* running of the Hospital (B; u'fiet of tht hospitml employ*** *f** Hospital Advisory Committee. I MM BO sdvaatage from tins The Advisory 'oiuiiiittee dtatowtfcssi matUn other than the % %  litions of work ol empl M.iuple. m diets, fees foi paying patients, supplies ol drugs, contracts lorftoaisj etc. Ii would | M Ruffioienl when a consultative council ha ^"""jS that where matters affe.lin^ the eonditions of service of hospital iura( ( %  ninfions at work of tht Nursing staff. u Vserdtstfrlt I* a I agree ihal the hours should be redu ease of u &*j£f "xpedn. the Island's tuiam-i-. which wiU most probably not ** to better than I 48-hour week ^ iiil Lean rtgutatiunt are eztremdu unfavounbU ra*** Uiiil Servant*. sN*ble with Ihe hospital iierviee, thattnsynsm i equal trestssant, [Mj i h // .„ %  •< """•^JJIT .(/ as nut in keiping vitknt** r > or lh> sf.tnt of thOetewal lit nutations. ouuder that Ihe need for ne hospital rule, is ul ^ t ? 1 fcnt pital rules, drawaop^ eighty years ago. are entirely out-of-date and do not meet the P r **7^a list it ul ion Tl .1 upon, oi d.sre tf aruVd. at tn "£ adminiatratioii llndx ly. hosp ... b the KxecutiTeoeaj-^ of the Qovernmeut, which would rvastll in s long tune u< be spent ""n. referen*^ to the medical administration, mid discussion ovt details. tns **the ae= rf xtend tintime by formal joint discussions b, ' n loC ji •*" %¡ "till an I at pies, nt n fmrt .. ir distant .""Jj^iir thai the Chief Hi in %  ,tl *! lll *"Jii t* HsdsMl ,: %  -.. by informal '" %  JLS'** 11 UP table %  : aid be aeeeatw* Igstjt* as %  *** I e.g., on the liability .,f nurses to pay for breakages M MS'



PAGE 1

ftVESDAV, T HABCH 22, iwu DAUUAiMis VDVOCATE PAGE StVEN REPORT OF HOSPITAL ENQUIRY CONDUCTED BY DR. HALLINAN • Iran pice j %  '-','" "'" %  %  %  ltwillb..ul is ..rv,. that the nun,,.,: %  ,,„,road nnitq'Twl 8888838881 *J ft* condition ui. 1. r IMen a nut* i ,, .,,,. an ,, c tm ^ t n *q PPM uulir.Mi ,| can be terminated. of the tenior aarwi at th. BTjiTeonditions under win. I, ,„ bc ,„„,(. •* E' I'"' unsatisfactory condition, ,,< ,,. .yd already I lent ophioa ..„ this wUak ha, been I \^ faem*^ in lls rceporo. ,i< ITaraY* under tli.tr supenision. n like the somewhat Soviet llavour of this proposal, but agree oomnuttee should >< ^' n.pre*Mit ,o ,h.> Matron (do i 1B Ml nDW* . ~ _"' 'vpi-,-s.'nt TO tne Matron Eii.H.nd '. ._ %  • by which their working are il £ %  • .„„, %  . ";'",'' % % %  •." -rt~i-" ..anon in tne porters' dormitorv, 4 Ek of antiseptics, rubber shoes and aprons for laundrv staff, elc can be 1 JIBMII opense to the (.overniueut, and are recommended as far as it is h,, to implement them. V. WORK OF THE HOSPITAL. In-patients Jt With the exception of the Parochial Almsbouses, which provide ar^odstion for the infirm poor, the Maternity Hospital for the training of i| fl vfs,and a few small private Nursing Homes, the Barbados (leneral Hos m! itoiides the only facilities for treatment of medical and surgical oases !„ Island. The following summary shows the development of this work |MI Kiiou with "lii-1'atients" during the last ten years. Summary oil ll : H-tS wi m..na. number* . not reported. NUT.. The poll o( IUd.olo.Ut wu vecan. dur.n. l*_ S. 1) Hospital accommodation for the National Health Scheme in the Ud Kingdom is developing on an estimated requirement of 800 beds for WOOof the population, with a staff of 30 doctors. In the Barbados General iul 336 beds are provided for a population of 200,000. This includes a Unity ward of 19 beda (9 for mothers and 10 for infante) which should properly be counted amongst the (ieneral Hospital accommodation, and hscludes about 12 permanently empty beds in tl phthalmie wards thus hr reducing the beds available for all purposes to little more than 300. (2) It is evident that, even on one-third of the standard of Great %  tin, Barbados is still far short of enough hospital accommodation for populate.!!, even I",,,serious sick uses for which hospital aecommotial jB. Tins Hospital |. Is for paying patients who pay a daily •i ifor their .neomuiodalion and nursing in the Tercentenary Wards, Pay itb'A" and "K", and the Ophthalmic Pay Ward "D". They also pay fees nMlment to the Visiting Staff or to the Specialist Surgeon, and extra *J tfss at rates fixed by the Government for operations, the use of the oper%  Jthfi.li.'. \ Kay examinations, el.. ti..,li. i.iphy and 1. I xaminaa For 'lie iinii-paymg publie there are l'-''i -inr eai beds tetldlDk'eliihlren .. 'I Ttii.trrl.i1v beds phis 10 cots for infants i. 25 ; %  ^ laws, and 12 beds for V.D. eases. Patients in these wards receive treatTfrw of all charges for operations, special examinations, etc. 17. The work of the Hospital wards, during the last ten years is shown th following summary. Numbers treated Free Wards '5 387 5.465 5285 5,666 4,928 5.278 6.116 6.626 6828 7,58" Pay W.ni:. 521 644 690 723 854 m 807 981 Total 5.820 5.931 5,806 6.210 5.01il 6,003 6,970 7,759 7,815 8568 X—Ray work, "In" Surgical operations and "Out" patients Qeneral Eye 2,433 2,297 2,583 2,534 2.588 2,966 3.294 3,385 S.216 3.315 146 132 161 150 148 156 126 111 71 Rx a m l na Treattlons menu m • 2,543 • 2,432 216 1.991 2,015 2,569 2,848 3,411 4.033 4,6*1 6M Nil lArp) ,\B|S' aSBJdAV .n in co ,b ^1 n n ci ,.acjoA Xirea CIMSMCMMCIMW u^in'tnu^vaoioviniS tptjtsi.'CfiriS'n J£81B a>Bja*A' n (SKBP) 3BJO4B JCHBQ i — -* — ^ ffUOVTBUUpV lS§S3SSgsi spaa IMM5*2S22 ,c. n > %  >.. "1 f-. 5 Xe;s aSejaAV ntuui *nnj •••S95S5S2S9 r-r-fOoo222I SUOTKltupv =§IS§§5Si3 aaaasaasal i li will be obwrrv that the nmubi ma htm UMV by uv.-r hO', thi.uirh the ui lightly increas-Mi duiag tiiat pariod Thi* bm bwn effected ma.: iag tkt KTWlffl st> in Oi p..tw.its in the I'utlie wards to [hp rr-Iher short period ol 12 t dajn io rankc room for urp'nt eaa %  of patient has not the fa for eouvales. enjoyed bj '>iug wardi. Shortatre of bed awomnHlatiini bin ll itntion the euitom of putting two patients m DM bed whenever this is practicable and bed* an required. 28. There is a waiting list for the publie wards of OTaf 500 patients paedim suririral ("rations. Tins n far back as July 194^. The waiting Pay Ward "A 1 daily ahaia? tut one moBta mill the waitinaj liat i"i the rerce-ataBar] dailj ebajryaj aaowa that patients, except mi rare nnnarimia can enter at their convenience usually booking a week or foHariffht in idvaaea. Surgical operation are done as a routine 4 days a week In Barrleea A and B MI altanata days, about ll> to lb eases being dealt with each day starting about 8 a.m. and ending between 6 and 10.30 p.m. The programnii' oi operationi is drafted foy tha tlooj operating who first selects the cases for his Service marked Urgent", on tha | ward waiting list, ami than caaea from the Long outstanding oaaaa to make up a reasonably possible programme for the day. The list then goes to the Visiting btall of the Service who add their requirements of paying ward patients who have been or are being admitted for operations. Should the programme be too Long naaa "f the outstanding public ward patients may have u< wait a little longer. The position does therefore exist that patients of the poorer elaaa with disabilities, not necessitating immediate or early operation, can obtain earl> relief by electing to enter one of the paying wauls. a. by paying fees for treatDk m and operation whicb *hey cannot afford, and in some cases ean only raise by the sale of their possessions. This position has been created in the last ten yean by the lack of hospital accommodation >u meat '*"* public requirements, aud is a source of embarrassment to the Visiting Staff and the Specialist Surgeon. 29. Tha medical work of the Hospital is carried ottt almost entirely in the public wards, very few medical eases being treated in the paying wards. Owing to the shortage of beds the medical caaea are all of a serious nature, many being admitted in a hopeless condition. The deaths are consequently large in number. The attendance ol doctors to these patients consists of six afternoon ridts bj three members of the Visiting Staff to their alloted beds, some patients Iveing seen by tht-rn thiea daya a week, • *tti--r patienta two dan • week and others one day each week. A House Surgeon is in general charge of all patients in tha jiiedieal wards in addition to many other duties. It is therefore possible, and actually does occur, that days may arrive when patients m the medical warda are not seen by a doetor at all. Examination of the case sheets of patu-iius ihowl that every effort is made by tliimiin minium I would ivrotimieitd that eon si deration be given to the enlargement of the Maternity Hospital to take all eases of labour and so release the present burden on the General Hospital of dealing with these caaea amounting to over 300 a year. 31. (a) The Ophthslmie Hospital deala wrj oonwletekj with all tha en work oi' the Hospital but its records shoe re rarely more than half occupied. From its position apart from the Hospital it requires a nursing MalT sufficient for its full number of beds. (bj Reeommemlation : Under tinpresent %  iivuiiuiunees ol at> treme shortage of accommodation it is recooiuiended thai arraugeinent-s I %  to use these vacant beds to for all ear, nose and throat eases or patients i taking uninleiiir | from Minnie surgical operations Hospital Diets :t'_' Theas arc ample and wall prepa standards whiali are higher than thai to whiefa th [rntrnrti In the free warda are aceustoaaed. There would appear to be the possibility of savings in the case of boapital diets now standing at 127,500 yeariy and I recommend that the prea refully examined and, if Daoeamurj vised to affect any possible economy while retaining the necessary standard of nourishment. Out-Patients (3. (1) The numbers of these dealt with in the last ten years are shown in the following eonimarj Summary New patients No of attendaucaa Yftr Oanaral V. D. Total Oeiierul V. D. Total luaa 40 17.704 827 lrUl 33.210 17.577 i 1D40—41 20,901 1,068 %  i -,,' 37,874 20,893 1,7*1 1941—42 20,054 1,133 21.187 11 DM 22.760 tjnt 1942—43 21,154 1.223 11JM 19,656 S6,68 1943-44 22,500 1.324 %  :..1U!) i um 1944—45 25,024 ; Ml 42,0*1 25 024 67,121 194S—4S 28.934 1,181 30.115 46,559 16232 2.791 1948—47 30.354 815 31.189 47,605 11.552 59,157 1947—41 27.788 783 28.529 IM7! 9,837 50.210 1948 l 21,153 957 22.110 51 M7 10.496 64W63 (8) These patients i-iaud. aboaU BOfJ eoaaing from Bt M i it ,,i the out patients are dealt with by the Out-Patienl Hi iflaera between the hours of I p.m.. their session hajqaantiy being extended later than this. 84. An enettant feature of \\w arnrk of tha Ont-patianl Department is the srrangi'inent for diabetes patients tn attend regularly to receive insulin It would be of great benefll to tha diabetie" caaea living in the outer p a rlah aa if sues faeilitiaa eonld be Lurniahed by diapenw i pstfiahaa, aa many cannot afford the expense of regular journeys to Bridgetown i i id. alternative expense of local treatment. Casualty Cases 90 Caaea for dreaainga and other oases oeeurring out of regular hours are dealt with by the Casualty Officer on duty for the day who is one of the House Mirgeon* performing this work in addition to lus ward and other duties. 36 On the operating daya %  u reUavea the House Surgeon Of the aarviea at 3 pin, and carries on giving anaesthetics for the remainder of the operations which may keep him so employed up to sometimes after 10 p.m. During tins parsed tha aam in <-harge of th.eawnalry department reports BU %  aaea bj •lepl on I rating theatre and reeeivea Id*. Inatraetsoas Proai thera. Should a case be doubtful or serious it is Rent iij. iralking or brought bj stretehat to the door of the operating %  after whieh he issues ind retnma I isures of emergency are earried onl by tha eaaualty staff in s small room operating Theatre. and In rary great emergency the Casualty OaMsV La temporarily released from in his place. Daring tha period when a Casualty Oaaear is engaged in giving anaesthetic* minoi kept until I to them or, if they ttended by the nora Oeeasdonally a ease gets tired of waiting and leave* the hospital to obtain treatment outside. 37. An arrangement exists in theory that a second Casualty Officer should be on call but with only 3 House Surgeons available and no Anaesthetist this would result in practice that they would be almost permanently on duty or call. At times it is necessary for the Medical Superintendent to treat casualty caaea to rattan the situation. There is no suitable place for detaining a case under observation in the rasualtv daps 'he very common case of a man brought MI inKcm>iblr. smelling strongly of drink, and with signs of slight head injury, wined aright !' a simple drunk or a fractured skull. 8neh cases now have to remail alty room while a nurse \\ present on duty, or be transferred to an already overloaded ward where it ran be under observation. The small nursing cadre does not permit of a i nd '-asusJties il ward. vi. iiosi'iiM. rna IND OTBBB CUABOI 38. A the fees charged dnr ing the last ten years is given in the following table. to i s A lUinad Jill Xq pid %  H Ol 110 i y^n ltd [lllclsoH oi ITOO m trn i iUMU XIPKI sp^a j*d )ua|isd •"u 1 loo M liwpiwi aaeje Xiraa co6ni-i-emN2 %  > o M M in iA' ff' > 4n io . m in m i ^J.i.w jod lurried din ^q ppwt JQ OJ OIJJBIIO ](NM JJd ; !lldsoH oj isoo lll.l)IS.l.l .i8WAS Xirsa wwwvwwmm w "o'noe*-^ .-•'.*) IllII0 0) M CINCIM*-**** K,I q oj jsjato 1JO.W JJ,,, deeien to "atadinal patients" in the paying wards, are fairly naaaaaibai Second Schedule. 41. (1) The fcea for apt rations are based OB those current in the United Kingdom where the incomes of all classes are far higher than those of corresponding classes in Barbados. (2) HecommendatKiu. 1 recommend 0 that all fees ahove $100 Lu this scaJc sliould be reduced for patienta In the rii.nit.iiat> wards and hn Ward "1>" to ,iir,.i of the praaant seale, and For patienta In I'av Ward "A", to 33 1,3 V of the preernt scale, and ii that all fee* below $100 in this seale should be iwluced to M 9 8 %  foi Ins Tercentenary and Bye Ward "D" patienta aud %  'iv Ward \" patit nta. Third and Fourth Schedules '-' i rasassnl anal rsc ea i ais ad a K aa. Than eliargea are far too high and should be reviled and reduced to figures that roughly represent the actual coat to taa Qovo rnia e rtf of each examination. ThLtoteoud also be greatly a i mpl i fl ad Into more general da*** of X-l(av ixamiuaiioiis. Such eoat would Im based on tintotal BOBS of running the X-Kay Departtn-nt. La. salaries, maintonaam of appamtna. eo*t of films, etc. Phis recotiiinendatiou may seem somewhat meticulous, IM; made for the roaaon that the Itntish Medical Association has banned all adv. rtis. nients in it* Journal for posts in Barbados on the complaint of a Kadi recently resigned from (lie Lttrbados Qeneral MoNjutal. that his i were being used b\ t| n t to its own profit, in that he was given no part of the fees for X-Kay examinations and treatment received from paying patienta in Hoapital "i aanl bj outaids doetora for aaao The action of tinMrttish Medical Association regardless of its effect en '200,000 people ol th Q seem deplorable, but if la letter to avoid conflict ; .nit of principle. 43. These r-eommendations for reduction of Fees are supported by the fact that many patients now find it imjHJssibla to pay them aud thv iidminntratioii ja frequently called upon by the Casualty Surgeon and members of the Visiting Staff to aanction reduction of fees for paying patients under their care. VII. DISCIPLINE. 44. I could find no evidence of indiscipline amongst the hospital statT who apj-eared to be aa well conducted and respectful to authority as the staff of any similar institution elsewhere. Their work generally is onerous and exact. ing and the faults brought to my notice were of same type of caaea that occas' ionally have to be dealt with in any institution, -.g., laainess, eareleaaneaa in fraction of minor rules, small peculations of food, etc. Sometimes serious in themselves, but not occurring so frequently aa to reflect on the general con duet of the hoapital BtaaTi it would, asrwenv, strengthen the new hospital administration if any ease recommended for dismissal were dealt with as quickly as possible. The old Hospital Board poaaeased the power of immediate dismissal and not infrequently used it, but under the existing machinery of Uoveniment uiitrol, the dismissal of even the lowest grades of hospital emplovees reijuiics the procedure of ition ending with the final iisnirration and aanction of the Governor w^o must be overburdened with matters, whieh, owing to their complexity aud magnitude, are obliged to bc settled at this high level. t)ne such recent case MI which dismissal was recommended, carried-on, on account of one delay or another for about nine months, and, during that time remained a point of embarrassment to the hospital administration 45. I can find no substantiated case of rudeness of a nurse to a patient though one complaint waa recently made of sharp replies of a nurse to a patient's relatives. This case was not substantiated, though it is quite possible that Home may have occurred in the present conditions of shortage of medinl staff and a large proportion of hard-worked nurses under training who have not yet learned to exercise the forbearance that is ao frequently necesaarwbetween nurses and patienta and their anxious relatives who are sometimes too distressed to realise that the nurse has duties and responsibilities for a number of other patients. 1 46. A few cases A outside tnterfe r a n aa wan brought to my notice in which the persons who considered themselves to be of more or leas importance unity had endeavoured to influence members of the administra• M pass •


wednesday

1950.

1,30













pPOLD
=

--—@

'

|



) March 21.
Party leaders to-
the formation of
‘galition Government.
of the Centre leaders,
~ Venizelos, Nicholas
, Papandrou,
ol some 137 Assem-
the Greek General
t ago. The
was anuel Tsou-
oder of a small group of
ves.
leaders were meet-
tonight.
General Napoleon Zer-
med to enter the Centre
th his seven-seat Con-
National Party. Observ-

. a new Gov-
te formed to-day or















- CAIRO, March 21.
authorities said today
y believed their arrest of
Cemmunists yester-
ck the hardest blow
inst the underground
movement in the



ted—some of them

he Central Com-

in Communist
Schwartz,
‘Russian origin, born in
his wife








two houses in the
lle class Cairo suburb
lis, Police seized a
of Communist pro-
of which, they said,

new type.
ions were
, tian workers,
revolt against their

conditions. The
seized the Central
counts, showing the
funds to spread
-in Egypt and how
E been spent. The
: try of the Interior
‘in 1947 to arrest Schwartz,
known as a professional
agitator and propa-

a




































4

fartz disappeared for three
years, but turned up
the eve of the Egyptian
this year.

—Reuter. |



Swap Kidneys

GO, March 21,
Ss at Chicago Hos-
» successfully
a kidney from
to another, They
will one day be pos-
r opera-
beings, and
or prolong the
of such dis-

—Reuter

1, Got Some
1700 Million
US. Dollars

HINGTON, March 21

re bent American tourists
‘neeord_ total

in.
of
West

Ic
a.
af

of nearly
: ae last
Went to Canada,
Indies, and Cen-
commerce de-
of business
this, and re-
. and the
countries drew
in American travel

Americans spent
in Canada and 135,-
Heo, The 1949 total
seit was about
than in 1948.
—Reuter.




a

NOT RESIGNING
neg DON, March 21

‘ ; “Ources to-day de~
a p stlation t Chancellor
Be Sir Stafford
&.—Reuter



a ee former Socialist Prem. |
ionight appealed to King Leopold to send back his
tonigh in, around whom all Belgians rally, ,
letter published in the Socialist Le Peuple. |
ised the King to stay away and be content with
victory which, according to Spaak, the referer

‘on the question brought him. |
: who has led the anti-Leopold campaign, has |
on a free hand by his party’s fierce anti-Leopolc |
m. Max Buset, to negotiate with Eyskens on . |
‘oy in the national interest, it was learned tonight.



Barhados
0 MILES IN

TO STAY OUT
Rut Send Prince Baudouin

BRUSSELS, March 21.

Spaak’s free hand implies that |
the Socialists have softened ther
standpoint and would probably
eecept a formula providing for the
King’s return for a limited period
only. |

He ould then he succeeded by
his 19 year old son Prince Bau- |!
douin. Spaak is understood to
have favoured a formula of “de
ferred abdication” from the time
a referendum was first mooted
but his party opposed it.

No Government Yet

Bligium tonight is still without
a Government. Caretaker Premier
Gaston Eyskens has so far been
unable to form an administration
to replace his Catholic-Liberal
coalition, which resigned on Sat-
urday.

In talks between leaders of vhe |}
Catholic and Liberal Parties, a
hardening of the Liberal Opposi-
tion to the return of King Leopold
appears tonight to have compro-
mised plans for vhe early forma-
tion of a new coalition.

Earlier, Prime . Minister Eys-
kens had forecast a new Coali-
tion “within hours”.

Meanwhile, Socialist members
of Parliament announced that
they would lead “Stop Leopold”
parades in the industrialised
south on Friday, when 3,000,000
workers will stage a strong one
day “warning” strike against the
King’s restoration.

They said they would
demonstrations through Liege,
Mons and Charleroi centres of
French-speaking, anti - Leopold
Wallonia. Re-affirming their op-
position to Leopold’s restoration,
the Socialist members of Parlia-
ment also today gave 10,000 Bel-
gian francs to the fighting fund
of “Stop—Leopold” action commit-

lead



tees’, formed for the party,
trade unionists. and other social-
ist supporters.

The tense labour situation eased
a little today when Antwerp and
10,000 Brussels “Stop Leopold”
strikers return to work.

The growing threat of stop-
pages is causing a ruin on food-
stuffs, and some shopkeepers have
sold out their tinned stocks.
Workers were today reconstruct-
ing and reconditioning the Royel
Palace at Laeken, outside Brussels.

Circles close to the Government
said the Liberal call for party
discipline along the lines of the
party’s official opposition to the
King’s return was regarded as a
“delaying tactic’ by the Anti-
Leopold faction within the party.

—Reuter.

FOUR AMBUSHED |
AND KILLED |

SINGAPORE, March 2}.
Terrorists ambushed a mobile,
police patrol today on an estate
in Kedah, killing a British Police



Sergeant and three Malay con-
stables and wounding a special
constable.—-Reuter. |



ITAIN WILL SPEND —
223,000,000 ON R.A.F.—

LONDON, March 21.

din is developing advanced types of jet fighters with| pathy are displayed by all parties
approaching that of sound—well over 600 miles an |
Minister, Arthur Henderson, told Parliament)

—_—_—_-——-»i These fighters, able to fly at |
textreme heights, and

area will
jet fighter, the
Royal Air Force
squadrons will be using next year.
All Britain’s day fighter and
ground attack squadrons overseas
are equipped with this jet aircraft,
except three squadrons in the Far
East, Henderson said. oom
Henderson said that Britain
has a jet night fighter in an ad-
vanced stage of development with
a performance comparable to
other jet fighters. ;
All the jet night fighters, now
being fitted with up to date radio
and radar aids, would also be able
to fight by day in weather that
would ground day fighters.

Guided Missile

Henderson said that scientists
wate working on a new advanced
“air - to - air” guided relele,
Fighter planes, keeping out -
range of the enemys guns, om
launch it against modern bomb-
ers. ; >
The Air Minister said Britain
was “very grateful” to the Ameri-

the 70 Superfortresses.
Ca rital bomber force would

follow the new
Venom, which

Britain’s 1 r¢ d
be mainly equipped vo —
and the new jet bom r, “|
Canberra, until ‘he advance

model went to production.

nderson, who was opening 4
debate on the estimates for oe
year’s R.A.F. programme, =
£223,000,000 would be spent ins
year, an increase of £5,500,0 D
"He said recruiting was unsatisfac-
tory, and the general level =
experience in the service would
decline, unless more men — wee
willing to stay for further service

the





The strength of Ad :
April 1951, was ‘ «pected to
fabout 198,800 yparec

22 AOC

'

} 220,000 a year agi
day.—Reuter



3







WORK COMMENCED YESTERDAY on iemporary alterations to the Terminal Building at Sea-

well,

Workmen are seen on the job which is expected to be finished in ten days. The terminal

building has had to be temporarily vacated and incoming and outgoing passengers are dealt
with in the Airport Manager's quarters which has been hurriedly “pressed into service.”

Finds £10,000
In Backyard

MELBOURNE, March 21
Wedderburn, normally a quié
little country town 140 miles nort!
of

Between

here, was firmly established
today as the world’s latest “boon
town’ Visitors and sig eer




newsreel cameramen a

Lie, United

, press photo irygve
graphers, and reporters Nave
poured into the town since tt

news broke over the weekend that
farmer Dave Butterick had quiet)
and secretly dug
(Australian) worth
backyard

|
up £10,009 |
f gold in hi: j
during the last If

Sports Window



months EMPIRE meet Notre Dame
“House Full” notices now swit in a Second Division fixture
over the doors of the two loca at Queen Park this eve-
hotels. No more accommodation i ning. This will be the first
available. | outing for Notre Dame in
Feverish digging is going on it the Second Division, they

having won the Third Divis-
on Competition in the 1949
season.

On the strength of their
win they have been pro-
moted to the Second Divis-
ion, Mr. F. Edwards will he
the reféree, , ,

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL

the back gardens, and streets a:
being torn up.

The Town Council has approved
the sinking of seven shafts in two
streets, and nine applications for
miners’ rights have been lodged
Two. residents, who have sunk
Shafts in their backyards — aré
getting some gold at 10 feet,

Already the local grocer, Albert







Czechs Will

an Strengthen Bond |
oan

Response ts PRAGUE, March 21.
CHELMSFORD, March 21. | y, iia Siroky, | Czechoslovak
% in page pore > ice-Premier, in his first state-
The Anglican Bishop of Chelms- | nent as Foreign Minister said to-
ford, Dr. H. Wilson, said today day that Fs
that a move to unite all Christian! 57 .

of gold, a fortune in wealtt

Smith, has found a 75 ounce gold ASSOCIATION

nugget in the mainstreet, and Today’s Fixture

yesterday farmer Butterick’s mine Harkliffe vs. St. Mat-

yielded a 70 ounce nugget, estim- thew’s Old 30ys" A ssoaiem

ated to be worth from £738 to tion at St. Leonard’s

£1,000 (Australian). Grounds

It was found at a depth of 12 Referee: Mr. O. Graha

feet. The residents of Wedderburn Se

are convinced that beneath the

town’s main streets runs a channel } |
|



; Czechoslovak Foreign
Policy was based on intensifying

forces “in face of anti-Christian 7, lok ’
Communism” had produced only [and Strengthening Czechoslovak
“lukewarm and patronising” re- friendship with Soviet Russia and

all the People’s Democracies.

sponse from the Church of Rome. at ‘ /.
po 2 y Siroky, appointed Foreign

In his monthly letter, Dr. Wilson

: " Minister " 7

said Rome had conceded only|Minister to succeed Vladmier

“conversation of a limited type- Clementis, was addressing the
7 : Parliamentary Committee debat-

sdged about by safeguards.” : : os ’
neethis sort of approach can never - ae Foreign Ministry a budget
get anywhere, for differences of ee Bo — ‘eg ne
any sort and particularly religious | ,; >. i ituatd _ eran aera
differences can never be resolved, | onal situation was characterised
unless complete frankness and ‘le bres sepa ae of the strug-
wholehearted honesty and sym- ro een ee same of Capital-

ist reaction” and the “camp of

peace and progress”,

Siroky said that within Czecho-
| slovakia the struggle was going on
between the new Socialist world
and the dying remnants of Capi-

teuter,



Bogota Rains

talism.
‘ - Attempts were being made
Disrupt Transport from abroad to give systematic

issuance to members of Czecho-

ry Nations Secretary-General,
called on the United States and Russia to adopt a “twenty

R.A.F a)

BOGOTA, March 12 slovakia’s former capitalist class
Unusually heavy rains in Co~j}and to organise espionage and
lumbia have disrputed transpor', | sabotage.
and petrol has had to be severely He said the Vatican and the
rationed in Bogota because of| High Church Hierarchy in

floods hampering railways into

the capital.

Czechoslovakia were attempting
to abuse the religious feelings of

The highway from Popayan to| the people for the aims of Capital-

Cali in western Colombia has been
cut,—Reuter.

BAR DR. SANDER

MANCHESTER, New Hamp-
shire, March 21
Two Roman Catholic hospitals
here have now barred Dr Her-
mann N. Sander, recently acquitted
of a “mercy murder” charge.

The Notre Dame and Sacred
Heart hospitals both said. their

staffs had voted to bar Dr. Sander

from practising in their institu-
tions. E
Dr. Sander, who was found

not guilty on March 9 of having
murdered a cancer ridden patient
Mrs. Borroto, also faces an ul!
disclosed accusation by the, Hills-
borough County Medical Society
—Reuter.



THREE STILL TO REPLY

LONDON, Marc

Cuba, Ecuador, and E
not yet replied to British attempts
to end the deadlock in the United
Nations Security Council over the




admission of the Chinese C
' nist Gove me t B
5 om n
Foreign
Press repor i I pproach
Ihad failed were untrue, he added.

—Reuter





ist reaction.

“We are firmly determined to
render such interference with our
internal affairs useless” Siroky
declared.—Reuter.



TWO PILOTS KILLED
IN PLANE CLASH

TOULON, March 21.

Two military training planes

|collided in mid-air near here to-
day killing the two pilots. One

plane had its tail torn off before

|erashing in a backgarden. The
\other exploded in the air.
—Reuter.

Lie Calls For 20
Year Programme

U.S.—Soviets

WASHINGTON, March 21.
tonight

year programme to win peace”.
«' He urged East and West to use

the United Nations for “give and
take”’ negotiations

Speaking before the National
Convention of Bnai Brith, a Jew-
ish organisation, Lie asked the
two great Powers to “get to-
gether on the first steps of such
a United Nations Peace Pro-
gramme without delay”.

“I do not believe in political
miracles,” Mr. Lie said. “It will
take a long series of steps to re-
duce the tensions of the conflict
and bring the great Powers to-
gether,”

“Equally I do not think the
word can ‘safely delay taking the
first’ steps on this read of nego-
tiation and conciliation”

The danger of an_ indefinite
continuation of the cold war in
this age of the atom bomb, the
hydrogen bomb and bacteriologi-
cal weapons is too great”.

Mr. Lie made it clear that his
definition of negotiation did not
mean “surrender or appeasement”
by either side.

“T mean negotiation which
requires honest give-and-take by
both sides” he said. “I have been
encouraged by the genuine re-
affirmations fron: the two lead-
ing Great Powers — the United
States and the Soviet Union-
about the possibilities of peaceful
co-existence between them and
between the different economic
and political systems they repre-
sent.” The United Nations was
founded upon that belief and the
hope of world peace depends
upon its validity —Reuter



Poland Releases
British Subject

WARSAW, March 21.

Four hours after receiving a
British protest, Polish authorities
to-day released a British subject

from Krakow prison.

Sir Ronald Gainer, British Am-
bassador, protested to the Polish
Foreign Ministry against the seiz-
ure of Polish born Otakar Korn-
hauser, who had disappeared on
February 2.

The mystery of Kornhauser’s
failure to catch the plane to
Britain was explained yesterday
in a Polish note saying he had
been arrested. No reason was
given.

The Foreign Ministry tele-

phoned the Embassy later to-day
to say that Kornhauser had been
released.—Reuter.



Cadogan Resigns
U.N. Council Job

LONDON, March 21.

“perfect diplomat,’ whose suave
hard hitting speeches often riled
the Soviet delegates, is retiring «s
| British representative on
Security Council, the Foreign



Office announced today.

Sir Alexander, who is 66, wiil
be succeeded by Sir Hubert
Gladwyn Jebb, a leading Foreign

expert on
Nations.
—Reuter.



LONDON, March 21,

| The Government today

| phatically rejected flogging as the}

answer to Britain’s crime wave.
Viscount Jowitt, the

Chancellor (Britain's

judicial functionary, said in

House of Lords, “We have

intention of reintroducing it.”
Last year, Parliament

' deliberately abolished flogging, an

would be politically quit

it € 1 I K ! uw
; Jowitt aS Opening a two day
debate on the present outbreak

the

no}

had |



4

}



a er en ee tee

29 MINS.

Jet Plane Breaks Record:

JP vices

Aduncate gen ~



Controlled By Radar

U.S. Senate
Approve
K.R.P. Fund

WASHINGTON, March 21
The Senate Foreign Relations
Committee today unanimously
approved the
full $3,100,000,000
covery Programme.
The House of Representative:
has voted to cut $1,000,000,000 oi

European Re-

value in
pluses for European Recovery

There will presumably be
Senate-House dispute before the |
figures are finally
the Chairman of the Senat
; Committee said he vaought Con-|
gress would eventually reject the
House Committee’s proposal

The House Foreign Affairs Com-
mittee vVoday approved a state-
ment favouring collaboration by
the free people of Asia for self

he

help to protect their indepen-
cence. |
The policy statement was ap

proved as parv of the Foreign Aid|
Bill for the 12 months beginning |
July 1 The Committee is near
the end of work on this measure

Chairman John Kee said the
Committee contemplated on!)
economic co-operation, nov mili-|
tary, with nations of Asia

The Senate Committee als
approved;





1. An amendment declaring “it
is the sense of Congress,” that}
no Marshall Plan nation shall |
discriminate against Unit
States business. This replac« |
an earlier proposal to cut off!
dollars from countries who did
discriminate.

j
a
\

2. Am amendment authorisi
the Economic Co-operati
Administration to spe
$600,000,000 to establish
currency clearing house
Western Europe the Bur

pean Payments Union

3. An amendment requiring th«
E.C.A., wheneyer practical, t
use counterpart funds to}
promote the economic unity |
of Western Europe. (counter- |
part funds are funds allocated |

Administracion’s ;

eash from the fund and substicut. |
American farn ur- |

reconciled. Buy

H=RTFORDSHIRE, March 21
RITAIN’S De Havilland Comet—the world’s
first all-jet passenger plane—flew 1,300 miles
to Copenhagen and back today in 3 hours and 29

minutes.

The De Havilland “Comet” was controlled on the first
part of the flight by a radar unit in London. It was followed
by long distance radar for more than 100 miles at 30,000
feet cruising speed. The radar operators found no diffi-
culty in controlling the fast moving plane. ;

omer +! Normal time for the return air
| trip is about seven hours. Five
| days ago, the Comet—the “plane
lof the future’——set up a record
/in streaking to Rome and back to
| Britain in under four hours.
There is no official record for
/the London-Copenhagen _ flight.

Truman
Defends

Captain Connsnenrn £28 or 4
Aeheson | Hravilland’s chief test pilot.

|

The famous night fighter pilot,
John Cunningham, took the Comet
/to the Danish capital in 1 hour
and 42 minutes this morning. But
his time from checkpoint to
checkpoint, once he was in the
air, was only one hour and 20
minutes.

Headwinds slowed him coming
back to one hour 47 minutes from
take-off to landing.

British Overseas Airways Cor-
poration official, Sir Wiles Comas
said later that by the end of next



WASHINGTON, March 21
Republican Senator Wherry of
Nebraska today accused Secretary
of State Dean Acheson of ‘“under-
mining our national economy and
losing the peace” in a speech pre-

pared for delivery in his state
Wherry said: “Apparently he has
become so powerful as the idol of
the leftwing “Appease Russia”
agitators, that President Truman
is fearful, should he fire Acheson,

he y Tal t > 1 t 0 ’ oa
: ot . on ~ , Dh \ wuppee OF eT vear, or early 1952, the Comet was
. “Tw 1s mR Se hiiien grout expected to be on regular service
, > san ongressm Pet
Wo Nepublican Congressmei! from Britain, through Cairo to
attacked Acheson in the House

Karachi and Calcutta, and might

vesterday for allowing Valentina

Gubitchey, convicted Rudsian spy,| 28" £9).0m te Sydney in a ser-
x ae de a i eed a aie : N Ps vice which would link London
I iScyenn. er caine ws with Australia in under 40 hours.
-year prison sentence Reuter
President Truman last night 7 rs

made it clear that he approved] +e
Acheson’s conduct and policie Peru Files
Renter ‘
Â¥
sad Counter-Charge
THE HAGUE, March 21.

Woman Denies
Charge In
Spy Trial

PRAGUE, March 21

lhe Peruvian Government filed
|} a lengthy counter charge in the
| International Court of Justice here
day, giving its views in the
Colombia-Peruvian Asylum case,
submitted to the Court last Octo-
ber.
Che case arose from the asylum
iven by the Colombian Embassy



Three of the 16 defendants in Lima to Mr. Victor Raul, a Peru-
the Czechoslovak Spy trial at! Vian citizen, who was chief of a
Hondonin, Southern Moravia, | political group, and who believed

he was in danger of imminent

were questioned to-day about the ’
arrest., when the refugee was re-

murder of a Czech Police Office:



by. each country in local|last January, the News Agency | fused_a safe conduct by Peru on
currency to equal E.C.A | reported. All 16, who included | the grounds that it had no legal
assistance.) two priests, are accused of spying, | obligation to refer the dispute to
4. An amendment instructing| high treason and terrorist activi- | the International Court. The
E.C.A. wherever possible “to} ties against the regime. court is asked to state whether
minimise the burden of the . Colombia was competent to grant
European recovery _—opt ml meine of the accused, Antony asylum, and whether Peru is
gramme on the American | her pe alleged to-day that ‘he | hound to give safe conduct to the
ea 98 : defendant Czech Army deserter, | .ofigee s : “4n leave the
taxpayer by reducing the! Jaroslav Vetejska, shot the officer refugee so that he could aoe
amount of dollar purchases "\ from behind, but Busik admitted Country. ais —

—Reuter. |

Scelba
Clamps
“Red Belt”



ROME, March 2}
Amid mounting tension in
Italy's northern industrial “Red

belt”, the Communist led Confed-
eration of Labour was to-day de-
ciding whether to stage a new
trial of strength with the Govern-
ment,
Police
ary
with

were taking “prelimin-
security measures” to deal
any fresh clashes between

|workers and police,

The Confederation’s Executive
Committee was holding an emer- |
gency session to plan country-
wide reaction to new Government
orders for “suppression of dis-
order.”

The orders were issued over the

| weekend by Signor Mario Scelba, |

Minister in the
Coalition Govern-
ment. They revised a law “pre-
viously not applied forbidding
meetings in factories, without the
management's consent.

They also empowered provin-
jcial Prefects to forbid public
j}meetings or demonstrations in
troubled areas.-Reuter

“iron” Home
three-Party



| Report Denied

LONDON, March 21
A Ministry of Supply spokes-



the

the’ United

| Flogging Is Not The Answer

|in Britgin of assaults and gangster

em- | operations.
Lord Goddard, The Lord Chief

| they consider a deterrent to crimes

of violence.

Justice, and other judges have
Lord|recently deplored their loss of
highest;}power to order flogging, whic

) an in London to-day denied
| that two atom scientists were
‘missing from Harwell

commenting on a rt in the
London “Daily Graphic’ ’ this

morning, which said two top-level |

United States-born atom scientists
“have suddenly disappeared from
Britain”.
Scotland Yard also categorical-
ly denied the report to-day.
—(Reuters)



4,700,000 Unemployed
In The States :

WASHINGTON, March 21

A Government economist to-
day expressed concern over
“creeping” unemployment

throughout the United States.
Unemployment figures last
month reached a new postwar re-
cord of 4,700,000 and officials pre-
dicted it would reach the five
million mark in early summer.

Atomic |
; |. | Energy Research establishment, |
Sir Alexander Cadogan, Britain's; or from any other Ministry atomic

research establishment. We were |

|
|
|



that he himself fired several shots
at the dying office A woman
jefendant charged with having

Pope Receives

lured the officer into a dark alley, | - a >

where he was murdered, denied Spanish I retender

she had acted with the intention

of damaging the regime. | VATICAN CITY, March 21.
Prague radio said one defen-} Don Juan, Pretender to the

dant, Josef Pospisil, had pleaded | Spanish Throne, was received in

guilty and confessed to taking| private audience with the Pope
part in acts of terrorism, aimed | to-day in the Vatican Palace. The
at causing alarm among the popu- | Audience lasted 20 minutes. Don

Juan is on a Holy Year pilgrim-
age to Rome. —(Reuter.)

lation.
——Reuter



Gf VI only Vhe bes will de

R
ae








> ‘

i

g 4! /
: rh
4 (3
iD
;

To mark those occasions
when charm, perfection
and easy confidence are

the keynote, nothing could
be more in keeping

than a cigarette bearing
the hallmark of

Benson & Hedges,
Old Bond Street, London=—
when only the best will do.

In tins of 50

$1.06





BY APPOINTMENT
TOBACCONSTS To *
HE MAUESTY THE KING

SUPER VIRGINIA CIGARETTES
BY

BENSON «./ HEDGES

Describing the present crime D
wave as “very grave” in some re- A partment of Commerce | OLD BOND STREET, LONDON
lspects, the Lord Chancellor said | Spokesman said the growth in ° é ,
lthe had still ¢ 7 so if long , | Population was outstripping job
¥ ag ‘ A oO © On. “ht : 5 : a : ~s
i ee . Santi, | capacity ft ih nt oft jg gf
Se eee ne ann | The unemployment trend at the crt Pe ttt “rte mn
‘ ren nan ort =SeTIVENCeS } moment was not a cause for any | bas



jcoupled

th flogging.
—Reuter.

alarm, he said.—Reuter



:


RSS et ae re ee ee

wednesday
March sz
19590.













4AK TELLS KING —
OLD TO STAY OUT
pat Send Prince Baudouin

* BRUSSELS, March 21.
HENRI SPAAK, Belgium’s former Socialist Prem. |

ight appealed to King Leopold to send back his)
Baudouin, around whom all Belgians rally.
ran open letter published in the Socialist Le Peuple. |
1d the King to stay away and be content with
victory which, according to Spaak, the referer












the question brought him. |
*ivean a free hand by his party’s fierce anti-Leopolc |
, Max Buset, to negotiate with Eyskens on
———e Spaak’s free hand implies that |
: the Socialists have softened the r|.
arty secept a formula providing for the |
el | King’s return for a limited period
@ His 19 year old son Prince Bau-!
: Greece }douin. Spaak is understood |
! 24 “de- |
‘ ferred abdication” from the
ATHENS, March 21. |a referendum was first mooted,
i the formation of No Government Yet
ition Government. Bligium tonight is still without
Gaston Eyskens has so far been
unable to form an administration

who has led the anti-Leopold campaign, ha:

don in the national interest, it was learned tonight.
standpoint and would probabiy}
ee n | only. |
hi wo | He would then be succeeded by |
to|

have favoured a formula of

time |
6 Party leaders to- | but his party opposed it. |
a Government. Caretaker Premier |
tied Generel to replace his Catholic-Liberal


















t ago. The
M. Emanuel Tsou-
of a small group of

ves,

leaders were meet-
a‘ Napoleon Zer-
wed to enter the Centre
‘with his seven-seat Con-
National Party. Observ-

ke

igypt

mmunists
CAIRO, March 21.
authorities said today
pélieved their arrest of
t Communists yester-
‘struck the hardest blow

inst the underground
movement in the















ic





ome of them
Central Com-
n Communist

‘a new Gov- kens had forecast a new Coali-

Oo formed to-day or tion “within hours”, ;
; Meanwhile, Socialist members
of Parliament announced that

coalition, which resigned on Sat-
urday.

In talks between leaders of ‘he |
Catholic and Liberal Parties, a
hardening of the Liberal Opposi-
tion to the return of King Leopold
appears tonight to have compro-
mised plans for vhe early forma-
tion of a new coalition.

Earlier, Prime .Minister Eys-

they would lead “Stop Leopold”
parades in the _ industrialised
south on Friday, when 3,000,000
workers will stage a strong one
day “warning” strike against the
King’s restoration.

They said they would
demonstrations through Liege,
Mons and Charleroi centres of
French-speaking, anti - Leopold
Wallonia, Re-affirming their op-
position to Leopold’s restoration,
the Socialist members of Parlia-
ment also today gave 10,000 Bel-
gian francs to the fighting fund
of “Stop—Leopold” action commit-
tees’, formed for the party,
trade unionists. and other social-
ist supporters.

The tense labour situation eased
a little today when Antwerp and

lead



ied Hilel Schwartz,| 10,000 Brussels “Stop Leopold”
‘Russian origin, born in| strikers return to work.
wife. The growing threat of stop-










on two houses in the
le. class Cairo suburb
Polis,’ Police seized a
of Communist pro-

om






of which, they said,
new type.

ons were
: workers,
h to revolt against their
living conditions. The
seized the Central



s accounts, showing the “delaying tactic” by the Anti- |
ot their funds to spread}; eonold faction within the party. |
-in Egypt and how —Reuter.

Wy has been spent. The
n try of the Interior
in 1947 to arrest Schwartz,
mown as a professional
agitator and propa-



tz disappeared for three
phalf years, but turned up
im the eve of the Egyptian
early this year.
: —Reuter. |



at Chicago Hos-
» — successfully
“a a kidney from
og to another. They
pra one day be pos-

F opera-
oh human beings, and
PS or prolong the
, of such dis-
‘8 cancer.—Reuter

Got Some

, 700 Million
US. Dollars

SHINGTON, March 21

ican tourists
of nearly

Sh

in,

of it went to Canada
ihe West Indies, and Cen-
commerce de-
Office of business
mt this,’ and re-
: Europe ‘and
“countries
in Amer:

icans

Pendit 7 R.A.F. programme, .
Migher naes, SBOE RE on 00 would be spent this| THREE STILL TO REPLY
F —Renter. |year, an ote ee. LONDON, March 2i
; sai P atany *u 3 "1 0. anc t, pt nave
! Feeney aoe mate ae enael level of Cuba, Ecuad r, nd Eg pt have
ete in the’ service would not yet replied to British attempts
NOT RE expersence : more men were to end the deadlock im the United
SIGNING Gecline, unless â„¢m ; ima avd the |

quer,
} &-—Reuter













































RITAIN WILL SPEND —
23,000,000 ON R.A.F. —

is developing advanced types of jet fighters with
approaching that of sound—well over 600 miles an |
Minister, Arthur Henderson, told Parliament

dn nate teal

travel last | e

the

1 drew
ican travel
! spent
in Canada and 135,-

: ' Mexico, The 1949 total

Sir Stafford

pages is causing a ruin on food-
stuffs, and some shopkeepers have
sold out their tinned stocks.
Workers were today reconstruct-
ing and reconditioning the Royel
Palace at Laeken, outside Brussels.

Circles close to the Government
said the Liberal call for party
discipline along the lines of the
party’s official opposition to the
King’s return was regarded as a



FOUR AMBUSHED
AND KILLED
SINGAPORE, March 2}.

Terrorists ambushed a mobile
police patrol today on an estate
in Kedah, killing a British Police
Sergeant and three Malay con-
stables and wounding a special
constable.—RKeuter.

LONDON, March 21.

|} sponse from the Church of Rome.

|



able to fly at

These fighters,

§ . textreme heights, and se rs
wap follow the new jet fighter, the

Kidneys Venom, which Royal Air ae
CAG squadrons will be using next year.
ie ar Crees, 3: “All Britain’s day fighter and

ground attack squadrons overseas
are equipped with this jet aircraft,
except three squadrons in the Far
East, Henderson said. ae
Henderson said _ that Britain
has a jet night fighter in an ad-
vanced stage of development with
a performance comparable to
jet fighters.
oh the jet night fighters, now
being fitted with up to date radio
and radar aids, would also be able
to fight by day in weather that
would ground day fighters.

Guided Missile

Henderson said that scientists
were working on a new advanced
“air - to - air” guided missile.
Fighter planes, keeping out
range of the enemy’s guns, coul
launch it against modern bomb-

rs. ; Jr
The Air Minister said Britain
was “very grateful” to the Ameri-
cans for the, 70 Superfortresses. | |
Britain’s bomber force woud
be mainly equipped with =
and the new jet bomber, ow
Canberra, until the _ advance
model went to production.

Henderson, who was opening a

said

willing to stay for further servic®



} 220,000 a year ag
day.—-Reuter

debate on the estimates for next

; n
: IN, March 21 The strength of
noes to-day de- jApril 1951 e?
that Chancellor jabout 198,800 .

Barbados

a

200 MILE









Aduncate o



IN 3 HOURS 29 MINS.



WORK COMMENCED YESTERDAY on temporary alterations to the Terminal Building at Sea-

well,

vacated and incoming

and outgoing

Workmen are seen on the job which is expected to be finished in ten days. The terminal
building has had to be temporarily

passengers are dealt

with in the Airport Manager’s quarters which has been hurriedly “pressed into service.”

Finds £10,000
In Backyard |

MELBOURNE, March 21.
Wedderburn, normally a quie
little country town 140 miles nortl



of here, was firmly established
today as the world’s latest “boon
town”. Visitors and sights
newsreel cameramen, press tu
graphers and reporters havs
poured into the town since tt

news broke over the weekend tha
farmer Dave Buttevick had quietly |

and secretly dug up £10,009
(Australian) worth of gold in h
backyard during the lest lf
months

“House Full” notices now swit
over the doors of the two local
hotels. No more accommodation i
available,

Feverish digging is going on it
the back gardens, and streets ai
being torn up.

The Town Council has approved
the sinking of seven shafts in tw
streets, and nine applications fox
miners’ rights have been lodged
Two _ residents, who have sunk
Shafts in their backyards are
getting some gold at 10 feet.

Already the local grocer, Albert
Smith, has found a 75 ounce gold
nugget in the mainstreet, and
yesterday farmer Butterick’s mine |
yielded a 70 ounce nugget, estim- |
ated to be worth from £73@ to |}
£1,000 (Australian).

It was found at a depth of 12
feet. The residents of Wedderburn
are convinced that beneath the
town’s main streets runs a channel |
of gold, a fortune in wealtt }



Lukewarm

Response |

CHELMSFORD, March 21 |

The Anglican Bishop of Chelms-
ford, Dr. H. Wilson, said today
that a move to unite all Christian
forces “in face of anti-Christian
Communism” had produced only |
“Jukewarm and patronising” re-



Siroky, appointed Foreig

Ss y letter, Dr. Wilson _ eign
In. his monthly Dr. W nl aainister’ “tor” sipeeaa Victabe
said Rome had conceded only ements Sen alee te
“conversation of a limited type- ey as addressing the

hedged about by safeguards.” |
“This sort of approach can neve!
get anywhere, for differences of |
any sort and particularly religious
differences can never be resolved,
unless complete frankness and
wholehearted honesty and sym-
pathy are displayed by all parties
Reuter,



Bogota Rains

Disrupt Transport

BOGOTA, March 12

Unusually heavy rains in Co-
Jumbia have disrputed transporv,
and petrol has had to be severely
rationed in Bogota because of
floods hampering railways into
the capital.

The highway from Popayan to
Cali in western Colombia has been
cut.—Reuter.

BAR DR. SANDER |
|

excites tiniest eee

MANCHESTER, New Hamp-
shire, March 21
Two Roman Catholic hospitals
here have now barred Dr. Her-
mann N. Sander, recently acquitted
of a “mercy murder” charge,
The Notre Dame and Sacred
Heart hospitals both said their



|

staffs had voted to bar Dr. Sander |

Vice-Premier,

day
Policy was based on intensifying

Lie Calls For 20
Year Programme

Between

irygve

ql

‘Sports Window

EMPIRE meet Notre Dame
in a Second Division fixture
at Queen’s Park this eve-
ning. This will be the first
outing for Notre Dame in
the Second Division, they

having won the Third Divis-
on Competition in the 1949
season.

On the strength of their
win they have been pro-
moted to the Second Divis-
ion, Mr, F. Edwards will he
the refétee, :

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL
ASSOCIATION
Today's Fixture

Harkliffe vs. St. Mat-
thew’s Old Boys’ Associa-
tion St. Leonard’s
Grounds

Referee: Mr, O. Graham.

—_—
a a SS. a



Czechs Will
Strengthen Bond
With Russia

PRAGUE, March 21.

Siroky, Czechoslovak
in his first state-
ment as Foreign Minister, said to-
that Czechoslovak Foreign

Vilia

and Strengthening Czechoslovak
friendship with Soviet Russia and
all the People’s Democracies.

Parliamentary Committee debat-
ing the Foreign Ministry’s budget
estimates for 1950,

Siroky said the present interna-
tional situation was characterised
by the intensifying of the strug-
gle between the “camp of Capital-
ist reaction” and the “camp of
peace and progress”.

Siroky said that within Czecho-
slovakia the struggle was going on
between the new Socialist world
and the dying remnants of Capi-
talism.

Attempts
from abroad
issuance to
slovakia’s

were being made
to give systematic
members of Czecho-
former capitalist class

and to organise espionage and
sabotage.

He said the Vatican and the
High Church Hierarchy in

Czechoslovakia were attempting
to abuse the religious feelings of
the people for the aims of Capital-
ist reaction.

“We are firmly determined to
render such interference with our
internal affairs useless” Siroky
declared.—Reuter.



TWO PILOTS KILLED
IN PLANE CLASH

_TOULON, March 21.
Two military training planes
collided in mid-air near here to-

‘day killing the two pilots. One

plane had its tail torn off before

" ractising institu- |¢crashing in a backgarden. The
ae practising in their instity loiear exploded.tn tat ae
Dr. Sander, who was found —Reuter.

not guilty on March 9 of havin
murdered a cancer ridden patient
Mrs. Borroto, also faces an un
disclosed accusation by the, Hills-
borough County Medical Society
—Reuter.





Na Security ¢

on of e Chinese €



Gove €



Press repo! the ppr
Ihad failed were untrue, he added.

—Reuter



i

Flogging Is Not The Answer

LONDON, March 21,
| The Government today em-
|phatically rejected flogging as the





answer to Britain’s crime wave. |Justice, and other judges have throughout the United States, | SUPE +a
Viscount Jowitt, the Lord|recently deplored their loss of Unemployment figures last SUPER VIRGINIA CIGARETTES
Chancellor (Britain's highest|}power to order flogging, whic! month reached a new postwar re- BY
judicial functionary, said in the| they consider a deterrent to crimes cord of 4,700,000 and officials pre- | Tey “Ty ¥
House of Lords, “We have no! of violence. dicted i would reach the five | EVSON and. EDGES
intention of reintroducing it.” Describing the present crime ee eae eres | ; Ta
ust year, Parliament wave as “ve ave” in some re- oT VD STREET. nb s
i lg os, guage a >| the rte ‘a till ; oA if le ngex population was outstripping job ; :
olitically qu ey had still to's f lon | capacity ae 0 a ae
per tee $- Uaide rita oesie taal ffective | ‘The unemployment trend at the Serle Le et tt eg”
eterre than ort entence . as monn © ain wos
j : . vnestaee ty . innsde th flogging ee ae ean a cause for any | &
_ Jowit $s opening a two day|coupled with fi ng. ym, he said—Reu
debate on the present outbroak Reuter. ante, nee

‘ Jet Plane Breaks Record:

Controlied By Radar.

U.S. Senate |
_ Approve
_ EL.R.P. Fund

WASHINGTON, March 21

The Senate Foreign Relations
Committee today wnanimously
approved the Administracion'’s

full $3,100,000,000
covery Programme.

The House of Representative
has voted to cut $1,000,000,000 oi
‘ash from the fund and substivut
ne value in American farn. sur- |
pluses for European Recovery

There will presumably be
Senate-House dispute before the |
figures are finally reconciled, Bb
Chairman of the Senate
| Committee said he vaought Con |
gress would eventually reject the
Hiouse Committee’s proposal, |
The House Foreign Affairs Com-
mittee voday approved a state-
ment favouring collaboration by
the free people of Asia for self

European Re-

the

help to protect their indepen-
cence.
The policy statement was ap-|

proved as parv of the Foreign Aid|

H=RTFORDSHIRE, March 21
BRITAIN’S De Havilland Comet—the world’s
first all-jet passenger plane—flew 1,300 miles
to Copenhagen and back today in 3 hours and 29

minutes.
The De Havilland “Comet” was controlled on the first

part of the flight by a radar unit in London. It was followed
by long distance radar for more than 100 miles at 30,000
feet cruising speed. The radar operators found no diffi-
culty in controlling the fast moving plane.

WASHINGTON, March 21
Republican Senator Wherry of
Nebraska today accused Secretary
of State Dean Acheson of “under-
mining our national economy and
losing the peace” in a speech pre-

pared for delivery in his state
Wherry said: “Apparently he has
become so powerful as the idol of
the leftwing ‘“Appease Russia”

omearesigni 4! Normal time for the return air
\trip is about seven hours. Five
| days ago, the Comet—the “plane
ruman | of the future’”—set up a record
lin streaking to Rome and back to

| Britain in under four hours.”
Defends | There is no official record for
|the London-Copenhagen flight.
} Captain Cunningham also flew the
|Comet to Rome, He is now De

Cc eson | Havilland’s chief test pilot.

| The famous night fighter pilot,
| John Cunningham, took the Comet
/to the Danish capital in 1 hour
and 42 minutes this morning. But
his time from checkpoint to
checkpoint, once he was in the
air, was only one hour and 20
minutes. :
Headwinds slowed him coming
back to one hour 47 minutes from
take-off tc landing.
British Overseas Airways Cor-



Lie, United Nations Secretary-General,
called on the United States and Russia to adopt a “twenty
year programme to win peace








Bill for the 12 months beginning | agitators, that President Truman) notion official, Sir Wiles Comas
July 1. The Committee is near] is fearful, should he fire Acheson, “By : “pew that b the end of next
the end of work on this measure.’ he will lose the support of the ihn ae rarl 1952 the Comet was
Chairman John Kee said the; Socialistic pressure group.” oecaai te ts on regular service
Committee contemplated only Two Republican Congressmen nr : Britain, through Cairo to
economic co-operation, nov mili-| attacked Acheson in the House Kare ‘hi and Calcutta, and might
tary, with nations of Asia. yesterday for allowing Valentin pomp ; te, Sedinen. ie a ser-
ma m The Senate Committee also Gubitchev, convicted Russian sp) spr Siem pl, link London
U.S.—Soviets approved; ; ,'0 be deported and so escape “) ity Australia in under 40 hours.
he An amendment aeciaring it/ 15-year prison sentence —Reuter
WASHINGTON, March 21. is the sense of Congress,” that| President ee last night :
; no Marshall Plan nation shal!| made it clear that he approv: ae
tonight discriminate against Unit Acheson's conduct and polici¢ Peru Files

States business. This replace Reuter

an earlier proposal to cut oft |
}
}

”

Counter-Charge



a pe ues’ west and West to use dollars from countries who did}
he United Nations for “give and discriminate. . © THE HAGUE, March 21.
take” negotiations, : 2. Am amendment authorising | oman Denies The Peruvian Government filed
rene before the National the Economic Co-operation | a lengthy counter charge in the
Sonvention of Bnai Brith, a Jew- ; | on | Inte ional Court of Justice here
: cater wef Administration to — spent Ch. ly ETRE EEE OU Se Sean
ish organisation, Lie asked the $600,000,000 to establish arge 1 oday, giving its views in the
two great Powers to “get to- Givveney claaeine house : es | Colombia-Peruvian Asylum case,
gether on the first steps of such ietasin a ee nee ' . ls | submitted to the Court last Octo-
a United Nations Peace Pro- SUFeER sUrOpe s the Euro-| Py ria { ber.
gramme without delay’ oa - gg Payments Union lhe case arose from the asylum
“IT do not believe in political | °- oe amendment requiring PRAGUE, March 21 siven by the Colombian Embassy
miracles,” Mr. Lie said. “It will “.C.A., wheneyer practical, t¢| Phyree of the 16 defendants in Lima to Mr. Victor Raul, a Peru-
take a long series of steps to re- use counterpart funds the Czechoslovak Spy trial at! Vian citizen, who was chief of a

duce the tensions of the conflict
and biing the great Powers to-
gether.”

promote the economic unity! Hondonin, Southern Moravia,
of Western Europe. (counter-| were questioned to-day about thé
part funds are funds allocated | murder of a Czech Police Office:

political group, and who believed
he was in danger of imminent
; arrest., when the refugee was re-
think ’

do not the

“Equally I by each country in local| las ry WSs . sed a si : >
x . aljlast January, the News, Agency | fused.a safe conduct by Peru on
TN itepe ta ie fab oe seee- currency to equal £E.C.A./reported, All 16, who included | the grounds that it had no legal
tiation and conciliation” assistance.) | two priests, are accused of spying, obligation to refer the dispute to
The. danger of an indefinite 4. An amendment instructing; high treason and terrorist activi- | the International Court. The
continuation of the cold:-war in E.C.A. wherever possible “to ties against the regime. court is asked to state whether
this age of the atom bomb, the minimise the burden of Che” enn Ge: dhe ioctl. hci Colombia was competent to grant
hydrogen bomb and bacteriologi- European recovery —_pro-| Busi, alleged to-day that the | (Yim | ane whether Peru is
cal weapons is too great”. gramme on the Amer ican | dete dant ‘Cre ‘} ‘aeno Gacerter, | ane tere bans conduct to..the
Mr. Lie made it clear that his taxpayer” by reducing the! Scrosinn Veicicka, shot eserter's | refugee so that he could leave the
‘ ‘ ’ : Jaroslav Vetejska, shot the officer |

country. Reuter.

amount of dollar purchases:”

—Reuter,

definition of negotiation did not
mean “surrender or appeasement”



jfrom behind, but Busik admitted
|that he himself fired several shots





by either side. iiliia at the dying officer A woman 2

“T mean negotiation — which na Jefendant Chavet with havins Pope Receives
reunaes oe gre eae, by lb lured the officer into a dark alley,| ., - h P d

»oth sides” he said. “ ave been Se where he was murdered, denied | 2 »
encouraged by the genuine re- e a she had acted with the intention Spanis reten er
affirmations fron: the two lead- : i of damaging the regime. | VATICAN CITY, March 21.
ing Great Powers — the United Clam s Prague radio said one defen-| Don Juan, Pretender to the
States and the Soviet Union- Pp dant, Josef Pospisil, had pleaded |Spanish Throne, was received in
about the possibilities of peaceful 66 Hg? guilty and confessed to taking} private audience with the Pope
co-existence between them and Red Belt : part in acts of terrorism, aimed | to-day in the Vatican Palace. The
between the different economic at causing alarm among the popu- | Audience lasted 20 minutes, Don

and political systems they repre-
sent.” The United Nations was
founded upon that belief and the
hope of world peace depends
upon its validity.—Reuter

Juan is on a Holy Year pilgrim-
age to Rome. — (Reuter.)

ROME, March 21, | ‘tion.

Amid mounting tension in
Italy’s northern industrial “Red
belt”, the Communist led Confed-
eration of Labour was to-day de-
ciding whether to stage a new
trial of strength with the Govern-
| ment.

Police were taking “prelimin-
Jary security measures” to deal

Poland Releases
}with any fresh clashes between

British Subject
} workers and police,

ee March 21. | ‘The Confederation’s Executive
Four hours after receiving ®|Committee was holding an emer-
British protest, Polish authorities |cency session to plan country-
ey aes oe aged = ne subject | wide reaction to new Government
ro a r 1S . “ 2 He atl
Sir Ronald Gainer, British Am- ae foe “euapeeeme: Of dis-
bessedat, pamaees to ya Polish The orders were issued over the |
ure of Polish Soe Ouaag ‘Mord somes ae vous Tee ports
“iron” ome inister in the
ee woe had disappeared OM |three-Party Coalition Govern-
ra Pee: em ,.|ment. They revised a law “pre-
The mystery of Kornhauser’s|viously not applied forbidding
— to are ae plane Med |meetings in factories, without the
ritain was explained yesterday | management's consent.
in a Polish note saying he had| They also empowered provin-

~—-Reuter



|





Whew only the best wilt ber









been arrested. No reason was |cial Prefects to forbid publi
given. , Ar |meetings or demonstrations in }
The Foreign Ministry tele-|troubled areas.—Reuter

phoned the Embassy later to-day
to say that Kornhauser had been
released.—Reuter.



\ §



_ Report Denied

. | arch 9 |
Cadogan Resigns LONDON, Merch .3} To mark those occasions
when charm, perfection
and easy confidence are
the keynote, nothing could
be more in keeping
than a cigarette bearing
the hallmark of

Benson & Hedges,
Old Bond Street, London=—

when only the best will de.

A Ministry of Supply spokes-
sg in London to-day denic:| |

U.N. Council Job that two atom scientists wer
‘missing from Harwell Atomic |

: LONDON, March 21. | Energy Research establishment,
opations diel ahtae taave \ or ohne yd oe Mey atomic
, s v . lishm 7 were
hard hitting speeches often riled corasnaiiel on a = rt ~ the!
| the Soviet delegates, is retiring “s| London “Daily Graphic’ ’ this’
British representative on the) morning, which said two top-level |
Security Council, the Foreign} United States-born atom scientists |
ee tee, that ia 0 will | eere meaner Giangpeared. from |
be succeeded by Sir Hubert Scotland Yard also categorical-|
Gladwyn Jebb, a leading Foreign ly denied the report to-day.
te expert on the United — (Reuters) |
a

man



—heouter. }
4,700,000 Unemployed
In The States

WASHINGTON, March 21.







In tins of 50



| in Britain of assaults and gangster A Government economist to- | .
operations. , day expressed concern over | > 1.06 ee :
| Lord Goddard, The Lord Chief{“¢ ' @.¢@ ping” unemployment | | WS MAJESTY THE KONG









“SDNESDAY, MARCH 99

ae » 195

PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE



cee ee rem gn Ne



eee te tn erate “eS SIA ee NE NR TTL AER SRR ee ert nes Meme eee Oe neater

7 “Miss Lee says she has been playing the pj
: . : [ OOK UP! unable to continue her activities movement en re My
ee ees et PL ae Mae i . with an operatic society. She is she demonstrates, ‘ingen,
See ; : MANCHESTER; (By Mail) unable to play tennis which she say she must “have ne ly 4



















































A Manchester court has upheld enjoyed before able skill.” ad
British women’s right to waik “She has had to discontinue
down the street with their noses
the air.
Miss Beatrice Rathbone Lee,

38-year-old book tog ll Eh Rupert and the Dragon Phe
ee 4 Uy ~



R. G. F. CLAY, Agricultural ~
Advisor to the Secretary of
State for the Colonies and Mr,

:. A. de K.. Frampton, Agricultural

« Made Him Very Popular
"Wi INNER last week of the

Men’s Singles ‘in the P.O,
Savings Bank, London, Table



—




POCKET CARTOON
By OSBERT LANCASTER




treasurers department













Advisor of the Colonial Develop- Tennis Championships is Theo chester Corporation, hurt her

i ment and Welfare in Barbados Campbell of Jamaica. He was shoulder and knee when she

arrived yesterday from British also runner -up in the Men's tripped’ on a tilted sidewalk block

; Guiana by B.W.1.A., on their way Doubles. “Theo played very well near her home at Didsbury,

; to Dominica, St. Vincent, Grenada and cleverly”, said one official of Manchester.

1 and St, Lucia. They will leave the Post Office, Theo plays cricket She sued Manchester Corpora-

; for Dominica on the ‘Lady Nelson’. too, in fact, is an _ all-round tan ,

! Mr. Clay was met at the airport sportsman. This, has made him a s

i by the Governor's Private Secre- a very popular figure in the Sav- Judge Wallington, deciding

: tary, Mr. W. Lambert and he is ings Bank, where he is employed there had been negligence in re-

; staying at Government House. as 4 Clerical Officer. pairing the sidewalk, awarded her

On Five-Day Visit Farewell Party damages of $1,430,800 as well as

R. J. T. MUSE, Export HERE was a farewell party Miniature straw hats decorate : costs. (The bill for legal costs is

a M aaa > on Saturday night for Miss he ad - which secure this estimated at $1,400).

: Manager for Andrews Livet Daphne Rocheford, daughter of je Mirman G 98 the § eens Beatrice had insisted that she .

| Salt arrived from British Guiana ad shee eT eee, 2. cite "Welee eT 9 gg gg eon pesto mx auaals diy: dine,

ee ae Se indsbury Road. She is one stray. ces her ered et ear Basi Nield, cited an a peal court Soon the shouting ceases. Pong- ,
\ in rake tha’ Cmat Hindsbury Road. She is one of cia a eae Basil Nie e p 0 : , oo t-te :
Barbados. He is touring t yee ‘4 Fi the girls who left last night on London Espress Service Same et judgment which he claimed set Ping comes out, and instead of weer eh tt back and
: will b 7 Pcs tan Wanward ° a a auraer ‘i oa the Gascogne to do auxiliary work oe out clearly that even when step- looking angry he is smiling all over another one."

wi e going to ard comes ‘ in U.K. Hospitals. ——--———_ ping onto a curb a pedestrian 1s his face. ‘* Hullo, Rupert,” he cries, him," enum

and Leeward Islands when ne private enterprise and Barbadian Ambassador not bound to look down. “I'm sorry | passed you so rudely laughs, "Come

i leaves here. He is a guest at the allowing people to marry HEE latest hawa of Adee Hume Regular Visitor 4 + Judge Wallington, giving judg- just now, | was a bit worried. } this rocket,” he ae
f Marine Hove. . just whom they like, with- "El oe ‘Wa ont, 0 . . ' . R RAYEOND HORNIEU Bri e ace ment, said: hought some: Srawcrks feo @8r:. of

i To Be Married out a properly regulated seuiant in England’ plying pro- who is a regular visitor 6 ta Pater 1ap asnem. seein

i Shortly system of Government-issued 0 eg “4 ’ Sees



enjoying his stay immensely. He from Martinique. He returned io Bridegrooms throughout Brit-
of Hon. H. A. Cuke, O.B.E..

admires England and finds Mid- Martinique yesterday by ihe ain afte “setting the date” before { | te
; M.L.C,, and Mrs. Cuke left for Hote! Manager dlesbrough, where he.is living at Gassagns. From Martinique he Easter to gain $100 in sneune wae SEA VIEW GUEST

‘ British Guiana yesterday by M* Cc S. GONSALVES, Present, interesting and pleasant. will be going to Rio and New reliefs through the possession 0 HOUSE ith °
B.W.LA. Manager of the Park Hotel, He was recently interviewed York and then returning for a wife.

: / 9a weakly hewans i " ister offices
On March 30, she will be one of Georgetown’s largest hotels, by & weekly ith oi areal, Eng- another short stay. He was the Churches and reg ‘a
married to Mr. Enzo Giglioli, son which is situated along Main land, and he did some useful work guest of Mr. and Mrs. P. Blondin are swamped with wedding appli

| ISS MADGE CUKE, daugh matrimonial permits.” bation methods is that he is Barbados is a retired businessman LONDON. Pr ee ae
3 =, daughter és: |

HASTINGS, BARBADOS



tiglioli ater” Abpan eee Lg sveq{ 2 telling the people of England ¢r ardé cations for March 25 — the last}}) EXCELLENT CUISINE cece

seneciet o Sisk waar gee oe aaa ra ; org 7 what life in Barbados is like. ° Leneiireh aeme arene. date on which cneeereons be t FULLY STOCKED BAR

7 ; s a oat i ees a nd ro"! He was amazed at their ignor- . im marriage allowance for : \

wedding will take place at St. British Guiana to spend two ance about one of Britain’s oldest On Long Leave wreale of the present financial |: RATES: $5.00 per Day & {|

Andrew’s at ne months’ holiday here. Temporarily colonies R. GORDON KINCH, son of year. ) upwards
: and Hon. anc rs. Cuke and their he js a guest at the Marine Hotel a 3 y Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Kinch, of * Londen. Came alias :
i son Mr. Henry Cuke will be leav- May Visit Barbados Left By ‘Gascogne Worthing who has been spending he senaee? ft See cb Sane | (Inclusive)
| ing here on March 28., to attend ce : ae RS. Annie J. Douglas-Smith, two months with his parents here, '°" t Apply—
NRACITA FAULKNER, | the P. liament, has thirty couples te Mrs. W. §. HOWELL

the wedding. G . rn eee At wife of Mr. Aubrey Douglas- left yesterday by the Gascogne for arry on March 25. Most regis-

Her parents and many of her ‘\* celebrated Soprano from New gmith, Resident Tutor of the West England where he will spend ™












































































































































SHIRTS —

from AMERICA!
The ‘SAGAMORE’ Shirt | |

in Plain Shades

$6.98

Tke “RHODE” shirt

in White Only

$5.03
EVANS & WHITFIELDS

The English AERTEX SPORTS

in White Only o-

The “BUSHMAN” Shirt

Pe) Or
in Khaki d: 2

aad Talend Ane : : Q and ministers in London ‘Ask your
: friends were at Seawell to see her York may soon be making final Jydian University, and their young another four manths with his! —_ rovinces expect to work x Askton & PB 7 lafants’ 1
; plans and arrangements that will n Geoffrey left for England H t Scotl ane ep shton ‘arsons lufants’ owders ure
. off. ce : na : son Geoffrey left for ngland sister. He hopes to visit Scotland,| -entime —IN-S. Mother to soothing at teething time, ‘They ensure
f Please Mention — 7” ica ; eee (tour of the yesterday by the Gascogne. She Ireland and possibly France. ; motions, cool the blood and ss i
? HORT, grey haired, soft spoken puto principal localities in the has been in Barbados Since Gordon works with the United| ato $$$ GLOBE give you them next time baby is fretful through od
: and is densi man is Rev Islands the eeench’ Wert Indies September, Mr. Douglas-Smith is Geophysical Co., with headquar- |
: ; ae an ey ag -slands, the French West Indies expected to remain here until ters in Caracas < is on lon r ; i 5
C. E. eBiles of the Church cf and other points of interest along se 1951 h aoe Caracas and is on long CROSSWORD Last Showing TONITE 8.4 ie
Scotland, who has been spending the line. Short Surprise Visit oe ; JOHN GARFIELD in...
\ six weeks’ vacation at the [f everything is working accord- ‘ lida | | a wel ” ,
Y.M.C.A. He returned to Demerara jing to plan, she may have already R. H. H. HART, Controller of on Be. Ho | FORCE OF EVIL TF
| yesterday by B.W.1.A. _ started on her tour, but no con- Finance, and Mrs. Hart iia rectiily “griiedl i ian —_—— a s
ss He has been in , Beltiats Gulati firmation has yet been received le tt Barbados some time ago for Relies Ailane@ tian the THU IRSDAY 8.30 p.m.
sifce 1905, preacning the good Mr. Walter G. P. Chambers, Trinidad, where they were to join Guse %#g arrival. left on. this THE HOT-SHOTS
; word. Now he lives in Clonbrook, Organist and Pianist of St. John's a Tanker which would take them ie fentetnes ae 7 ote in 3 ;
East Coast, Demerara, and he told Antigua will be her accompanist {> England. Yesterday afternoon, a GK. Mr “Stockdale pedicel vs,
t es ee he comes here See throughout the tour. they paid nae a ee = Attiched et Hecaiee ens oe AN ALL SPAR
almost once every two years, He : ‘ » prise return visit. Apparently ’ rey aMshAoathad BARBADOS BAN
never gets tired of the beautifi! Returning On The ‘Nelson’ tanker has been delayed and they while they vee i ae ees ; TWO SHOWS DAILY a
scenery Barbados has to offer. VAR. AND MRS. B.E.T. ELLISS, were able to secure passages on ate eee Ww ‘y oe _ pn | MATINEE 5 p.m EVENING 1.
“There is one point about most of Oakville, Toronto, Ontario the Gascogne, and Carib saw them oes. ane ae es. ——= TODAY AND TOMORROW (ONLY)
of the people who you write about are returning on the ‘Lady Nelson’ as they came ashore at the Baggage “@nning. WARNER'S EXCITING DOUBLE
in your column,” he told Carib, to Canada, Warehouse for the few hours that fF : , ‘ “THAT WAY “
“most of them say—‘they art Mr. Elliss is an Architect, well the Gascogne was at anchor in En route to England. il | ROYAL Worthings w arett to i any ty Ta i
coming again next year ‘and’ they known in England, as well a Carlisle Bay. |} RS. BEGG, wife of Lt. 3 me ’ ee a ny DARK’ (Acti)
have already made reservations Canada—They have been winter- Ian Begg, left yesterday i : ACTOss NO SHOW TO-DAY Dane CLARK — William LUNDIGAN
es ts ideas g Sacrat <, ar re of cn route for England by the} 4 48 cunning as a fox. (7) 4 ~ 5, J
for a return trip.’ No one eve ing oS eet rene and are full cf Tour Of of. a ne, to spend about three or 8. It’s in a real ee ee (Sy Last Show Thursday Coming Soon — TREASURE OF SIERRA MADRE"
ks 55 , ‘If God wills it,’ the delightful time they have spent > 7 =r ES Tice Presi. “ascogne, to s id abo s ‘0 The girl the green idol absor at 8.30
20, if you wey ‘that I hope to re- in Barbados—They love every. Mf": J, A. STEAD, Vice Presi- ‘oir months’ holiday there. bs am ie ee Tae DIAL _8404 FOR RESERVATION
ao, 24 “" , , nia ied B : dent of Methodist Confer- Lt. Col. Begg is also leaving| ‘!- This*ember lasts for days even REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL
turn in two years please mention thing about the island ence in England, and Mrs. Stead - : ; when it's cold, (8) Robert KENT, Peggy STEWART
‘If God wills it.’ Returni Tod ’ ae ao , 4“ Barbados shortly. He is going tc| iz, Nursery horse in a storm? (6) Ens ere
x0d wills it. teens oday left reaherey for waren by ae Dominica to work with the Colo t. $ranstormation in Kate. (0) . ie anne
° ETURNING home to-day by Gascogne. While in Barbados they be ° i to! 16. ch enigma has the layer “THE PHANTOM RIDER”
, “ : f ~* nial Development Corporation 3) Y _ NEMA
j Government Engineer B.WLA. via Trinidad is Mr. were the guests of Rev. and Mrs. jn 9 Citrus and Banana Planta-| 17. Sow the scot tells the crew to with LeROY MASON, George AQU ATIC CLUB CI (Mabers Co
HE Government Engineer who Ben Tishler, a representative of E. Griffin, at their home Epworth {ion | go. (4) J. LEWIs ” TONITE (WEDNESDAY) at 820 3
is Supervising the construc- Adam Hats and the Yan Heusen House, Fontabelle. They have “"t¢ is que to leave by the Lady | 4% Prin trom a steaming cup, (3) See Thrills, Chills, Thundering i Fy
: the »GP I viride tc 4 abel ; oh Sadhana’ Pash etiecie aere ae He is due to leave by the Lady | 91° radtes’ men. (5) Action BING CROSBY—ANN BLYTH—BARRY FITZGERALD |
tion of the new G.P.O. in George- Shirt Company of Canada He been here for two weeks. Mr. Stead yoison on Thursday. Mrs. Begs | 23. The measure of a fellow’s gown. HUME. CRONYN
town, Mr. R. V. Edwards, arrived was here for the past 1! days as_ has been on a tour of inspection of will probably be returning to ut (9) ‘ sale iui Wibiahetiatiie
nanteieiha ; ba Re santa ee at i stings: Hotel ethodist work > ies . | ae * if ’ said only a bra: rs0n ara
yesterday by B.W.LA., from B.G., j gu t at accompanied by his wife and they Mr. Tishler said i i I whic nh inclu ed visits to Jamaica, band in Dominica. 2b. Ate you sure he regrets? (4) TOP Oo z NIN
are spending two weeks’ holiday visit to the island and he had the Bahamas, Trinidad, St. Lucia, 2 My a 4 eS - Last Show tonight at 9.15 Hear Ann and Bing sing “You're in Love with
at Super Mare Guest House, enjoyed it so much that he plans St. Vincent, British Guiana and Off to U.K. pl Seaton tn teeth: aay ee ii iti ieee Bing sing other wonderful hits inculding “When Irish Byes Are Sm
Worthing. 40 TetUrn ext. yea Barbados, He is now returning T. COL. & Mrs. E. J. Haywood} 28. Is roe got from willow ? (5) GENE TIERNEY, Richard CONTE
7 } : g , . ‘ » ere aes . , Please note: Shows instead of Tuesday and Thandley wil
‘ the. oid nae CBee was Pe. Graduate Of Harvard fra aha Stuches anann Sieaitomins of British Guiana, a the | ' Down * in and Wednesay by arrangement with the Electric Company.
royec ry 1e rea ire Oo R R. MACKENZIE, Head 8 * “ting A 4 s 7 re > s.s. “Gas- | | Safety precautions taken up in a “ ”
February 23rd, 1945. The corner D . ‘ h at Wet. Missionary Society which will be ‘and yesterday by the s fora |. Bg fight. 49) WHIRLPOOL
y 4 ; I ads sssor of English at Wash- ss . : cogne” for the United Kingdom | , As we move along this berry may . i ’
stone of the new Post Office was ington University, St Louis, held in London, at which meeting on five months’ holiday. They | p ae ee ane with Jom TERED, Charles
laid by British Guiana’s Governor 1.5.4, who has been spending be, Will be joined by the Rev. were accompanied by their little} 4 What point is there to gain in oe
i Sir Charles Woolley and work has the winter, with his wife as guests Griffin who will be representins son Charles and had spent a cou- | climbing Everest? (4)
already commenced on the new at Cacrabank leaves by TCA. Barbados. Trinidad and the Wind- * f days here as guests of Mr.| ” tahooene ashe tom A SROLORy ROXY
ony a acrabank é 3 y i Bod. Takai ple of days e as g sts ROR Ts a ent ar ae ik, *
be ay C saabniah a4 ; Halifax, Canada, on Sat naay wal ands. Norman Inniss_ of Rudkip”,} 4 Que sass bed hoping to have
r. Edwards has been in Britis Joth «are Canadians of Jova : ’ srittons Hill. aay or whe Tonight only at 7.30
Guiana for about nine months Scotia and the _ Professo1 i For Labour Officers Course Lt Col, Haywood is the Officer ons thee in red es Rate Oe are
Graduate of Harvard University M* FRANK ODLE, Clerk of ‘ommanding the British Guiana] 4 Yearm. (4) Republic Presents
Rain Coats Dr. MacKenzie is also a_ well * the Labour Department, left olunteer Force. yi" Sesome's wader tae ee ‘LOVE HONOR AND GOODBYE”
| FTER two week at the know n author and has written tne i an af! nigh’ for England " | |o9 Strange, but it does give a bieat eo OOOH
A cy sine ms 1 ne ols 6 ‘ol ore and Folk Songs on the S.S. “Gascogne” attend i (5) Starring Virginia BRUCE
Ne ee a cooks a 1 Aish oa Labour Officers’ Training Course To Reside Here rin; | ‘4 Stroiung Diayers ana angiers | Edward ASHLEY, Victor
M1 P. A. Snijders, and their as well as on Englist oe High da aeekane | ‘ es, e R. & MRS. E. LAWSON KING | nave used it, and some have Mc LAGLEN pee
daughte aria returned to British . ° ~ vhich is expectec 0 las or Mf That 7 java, | blown it. (4) is ‘ °
& ghtey et f im \ te : . For Secretarial Course Cree. wen Ole oft Trinidad, ee : rE ne 0 How slovenly she 1s, (4) @ ma > /~ ; [ Mi We | i
rulané sterda y ‘ svening , 1 4 2 Pr ars’ mai 3 4 3 f
where Mr. Snijder is a Bauxit N ISS ANN SCOTT, daughter of For One Week sore; ‘They. Have ihe come | i eae a vs Or YMPIC gt aad id S aa
1 Mining Engineer at Mackenzie Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Scott of M RS R MAC CARTHY ' Sate in Barbados and have| , 3ylusion one: 1 Molen Be Pures tL, rm as JUNGLE JIM
1 uM | gwood" Ss é TR e S es e 3i 5S, Oane; 7, : & re; 11,
Both Mrs. Snijder and her “Longwood” Sandy Lan as a O'LEARY left Barbados jen up residence in Spruce | Py sya 18 oun: is, “Trepan; 15, Deride: Last Show tonight at 9,00 ja Ti)
daughter carried rain coats in their passenger on the Gascogne yester+ yesterday by B.W.I.A. on one Street { Millenary, 30 ao Witte Doak a5. E hol ST RIBE
‘ s > ow \ ’ , Ww day englan whe she will k's vie Britic Sot ee oy r 4 . TUDE. 24. aarar i. + 2, Republic Pictures Presents
hands, something which very few cay for I ngland where week's visit to British Guiana. Mr. King was formeriy Secre- | ona: 5. Suge, 4, "Vert, §. Oured: 6, John WAYNE, Vere MabaTON x cout” ‘
people who live in B.G., travel be taking a Secretarial Course in She was accompanied by Miss ary of West Indies Product 54 a. ee 15," Dials: Hope; 0: in E £ hi
b without, and which they probably London. Her parents were at the Jean Field and Miss’ Eileen dustries : 18, Leno; 19, Abut: @k Say. - H ; : y Tees “Jungle Jim’ the famous Ki eee eke per looky
; never used in Barbados Baggage Warehouse to see her off. Weston. ‘i THE FIGHTING KENTUCKIAN” omens “ 1 onemsseinsoitl
. \
: . scnleniiesiniiininianenaippitiiadbeaanedinat i with Oliver HARDY, Marie r March
BY HE AY CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it: ete Opens FRIDAY 24th: 1 |
| B ; AXYDLBAAXR
| W y BEACHCOMBER Ax ea
is LONGFELLOW
: s ; ‘ oY $ ex is used
NCE upon a time, and a very The Flower Menace industrial purposes, Collect cows One to__or simply stends-for another. ae os tee apos-
Os time it wa as I sat -7YAHE Bridlington Committee !" batches of 1,000, trap the mois- for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. ingle we . bs .
drinking a thick, dark wine the I } wants to ban flowers of ‘Ure 1. hygienic saucepans, and trophies, the length and formation of the words are a ints.
fonda of Delgado in the town of «more than a specif ail height” in %0U Will have 2,000 gallons a day Each day the code letters are different.
Medina-Sidonia, there entered a avdens oh @ housi gutnte which is enough to keep a con- : "
gipsy; tall, bold and swaggeri deserves 40). coconeration fro veyor belt, 90 feet long, moist for A Cryptogram Quotation
, , re ‘ : aa iin 34 hours. Alternatively, you could : ople who oug to think em fi - y 9 J !
i oo —- ou either be fought earn ts ed an iu or boil 40 tons of turnips with 75 VXB-FBOLHRBAA ZMDVX, XNA VDVMI
or flatterec was about to flatt , ES ear een | ee Blo illons of cow's breath > 1p .
; him grossly, when he began to owers at 1) a nr . FBNEP Ov RBEPVX HNAYNAABH,
, flatter me. The Spaniards have : 8 Ae SeRerE, ABE MmAY C lhe only trouble is that perhaps » +t , t WB
r word for that kind of flattery ract the . oC Ene: Civ) ; | cows do not breathe out the BEANPXVA NE XMIABAHMIO :
mn ¥ . . : if units « perso ry } . , ;
; whieedlitg tos as Kit to go on as they plea ai, i thes teanane ieee @ Cryptoquote: WE ARE NOT ALL ANNOYED IN
y y Ye yy gipsic acs aet ; : \gain, is the moisture breathed ; = WAY—SENECA
} This man knew every wick, and a he . Page « " i . hears it in summer of the same density? CHE SAME WAY ;
} the more he abased himself anc te “hind hath ee \nq in 1934 Gottlinger of Dortmund
t — me, - more a ey MR at ammieiins Akad 3 nediate Proved that the breath of 1,498 = PS SS
dom imeering yYecame. Suddenl ee ee = : pn cows would be powerful enough (
“ rac > Tix eviction confiscation of tior ‘ ‘or is
i he anes His paaneee Hi J r aia - i ~ Rs: hirn a sfMnll decnestic wdndanitt \ Special: “NYLONS” 54 gauge — $2.25 per pair
i voice roughenec Sut changed efGs, PUES eupys hare a : : aickiad amie ee | : ‘ J ; i sa
j tov, and began to fawn, Finally, eventual removal to a te eee et ee Q GENT’S SOCKS and ANKLETS at 36¢., 42c., 62c, 65¢. per pair
} I asked him for a peseta for my &&™Mp " | CHILDREN’S ANKLETS white, pink. blue at 32c. & 36c. per pr.
i poor old grandmother. He saw the . ’ ie W aggling Parva |
i : a = s Cow’s Breath
} joke, and we both began to laugl TH * “e ve THE
i} and drink together, I saw someone mr LD you say, offhand, how I ee — . 1e Rocket SHOE
4 very like him, grown old, in the A much moisture a cow breathe was slowly wheeled to the
i street the other day, I went up to out per day’? The answer, which | door of its large shed at Waggling { BRITISH co LTD
4 him and asked him for a peseta have not checked, is two gallon Parva yesterday. The rear nozzle { °9 le
‘i for my poor old grandmother. He It occurs to me that the scientist stuck in the entrance, and then ; R 4
y said, in English, “I don’t under- Who discovered this fact s! fell off, and the Rocket was wheel- } a All Customers who have overdue Repairs kindly redeem
stand. Ask a policeman, sorry.” be able to use the moisture for ed back again for repairs. i\ same in order to make space for new ones,
| } With thanks, SHOE-REPAIR DEPARTMENT HAIR BROOMS
: SMART | STRAW BROOMS
| =
‘ | YARD BROOMS
,} ‘
4 i CALLING BANNISTER BRUSHES

SCRUB BRUSHES
BOTTLE BRUSHES

CARPET BRUSHES
TOILET BRUSHES




ALL

FISHERMEN

*
and HOLDERS
Land your

Caich safely

We are fully stocked with
Fish Hooks, Fishing Lines,

SELECT EARLY
FROM

Seine, Mullet and Herring



Twines, Brass Swivels,

THE BARBADOS Rowlocks, Mesh Wire,
CO-OPERATIVE Lacing Wire, Cleat Hooks,
COTTON FACTORY Ltd. |catvanisea Putters



THE CORNER STORE










WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22, 1950

























nthe money.

the House should de-
90,000 was finally put to
“the motion for deletion
‘by a 10—5 majority.
were: Mr. Foster
(L), Mr. Craw-
, Brancker (C), Mr.
Mr. Gill (E), Mr.
}, Mr. E. K. Walcott
kinson (E), and Mr,

Against the deletion
\ . Bryan (L), Mr. Cox

f ir . F. L. Walcott (L).
dhe motion for the deletion,
told the House that
4 move it, if he stood alone.
emmation was seconded by Mr.
who said he saw no jus-
»» for the spending of
ney on drawings. After the de-
Min the Head was passed.
Criticisms were also levelled at
ihe Architect and Town Planning
tee Mr. Mottley said that it
we but fair to the other colonies
Fe ich he would most likely go
Be waving Barbados, that they
wid publicly tell how he had
3 to convince them as to his

Plans Not Ready
The Head came up for dis-
(L) said that
nt had then arrived at a
me over the following
It had been said on
year that it had been

gramme. They had
time thought it an am-
tious programme, but had em-
upon it in good faith. As
i d in a few instances

ey were ready to proceed
the mentioned, they

4 that an officer had been
ng in his duty and the plans
enot ready. As a result they

















5 previo

Pall

had had to come during
year with a revised
There were certain schools
ould not be finished owing
an underestimation in costs.
ne had turned out to be rather
borate and costly and they had
toreview the plans.
F. L, Walcott (L) said that
Senior Member for the City
4 made some allegations about
Architect and Town Planning
which in his way of think-
were of a serious nature. He
ht that if anyone knew any-
fof a doubtful inclination
any officer, that person
id let the head of the admin-
ration know.

Misquoted

ft, E. D. Mottley (E), rising
point of order, said that the
able Member who had just
had misquoted him. He
that he had made alle-
ms against the Architect and
Planning Officer. He had
made allegations against the
;but against the office. He,
Spart, could repeat what he

tt. F, L, Walcott 6bserved that
Honourable Member was
ing his statement, that was
























y said it never was
ould be his policy to
, L. Walcott said that the
Member had been so
unake insinuations about
of the Government.

m had not in his
en ambitious. They had
ed by the Architect and
mning Officer who had
ily aware of local con-
had thus made an
For many of the plans they
most likely have to vote
money before they could be

What had happened could
" ed in private life ag
da public. Some of the
ever, had been then
completed .

Dollar Token

token was more or







‘PONI'S

COLD & VANISHING

Quick,

to new

Post Office Estimates
Get $20,000 Cut

aT THE MEETING of the House of Assembly on Mon-
Mr. E. D. Mottley strongly criticised

for the General Post Office under Capital Expendi-
He said that the Government could find better uses

the inclusion of

less by way of saying that the
House would give authority to go
ahead with the finishing of the
buildings. He thought they could
complete the programme within
the financial year,

He could state that the Public
Works Department had carried
out its estimates well, working
them on a sound scheme, He would
remind honourable members that
Government was responsible for
that department.

With regards to the Architect
and Town Planning Officer, that
officer had been the most unpopu-
lar officer in the House. Govern-
ment was really saved from an
embarrassment when his contract
came to an end in pril.

Mr. Mottley said that vhe hon-
curable member had disarrned
him by Saying so plainly what the
position was, but sometimes one
spoke by instinct. He had admitted
that they had been guided by the
Architect and Town Planning
Officer. He had failed to produce
the plans at the decided time. In
other words, they had had their
labour but no plans. That was
partiy saying that while they did
not look at it as an ambitious
programme, the Architect had
given them schemes and assured
them that they could be got
through within the specified time,

No Architects

He asked members to be quite
serious. It must surely have been
more than an ambitious pro-
gramme. They on that side were
no architects, experts nor special-
ists, but they had said then that
the programme did not seem
possible to them. Yet, he dared
say, if he were in the Government
he would have accepted the
recommendations of an expert on
the matter.

When they took item one, St.
Leonard’s Girls’. they

. were re-
minded of the economy of the
island.

If the honourable senior

member for St. Thomas thought
that he would retract his words
he was grossly mistaken. That
honourable member never walk-
ed with his face in the clouds.
That member kept his ear to
the earth as he (Mr. Mottley)
did. That member had heard
as much as he had heard. If he
wanted to go to the head of the
administration and talk about
things going wrong, why did he
not go?

Honourable
read the
said that
building of
exhausted
incomplete, There was the pos-
sibility that a builder or con-
tractor might err by 10 per cent,
sometimes 20, but for one to err
by about such a wide margin
made one to think,

He would think it a crime to
allow that gentleman to go from
Barbados and probably be push-
ed into some other colony under
under a mistaken identity. He
had come to the colony, an Eng-
lishman with many fancy degrees
—a big shot. He would go from
Barbados and say he had advised
the Barbados Government in the

members could
note to item one which
the provision for the

the school had been
but the

capacity of an architect. But he
would have left Barbados, not
really an efficient man. There-
fore it was their duty to offer
those criticisms so that they
would be Known in the outside
world.

If they could only believe that
it had been an honest error! But
no! If they had as an instance

only the St. Leonard’s crime! But
they had in the Parry and Coler-
idge Questions the same thing—
exhausted provisions.

The Government had at last
seen the wisdom in calling in the
Public Works Department, the
good old Public Works Depart-
ment. In the end they all had

easy way

loveliness

CREAMS

1 FACE POWDERS
LIPSTICKS





building was !



ee

to fall back on the hard-headed
3arbadian foreman.
Suspicion

He thought that in fairness to
the people of the country, seeing
that they had taken all those
recommendations to the Govern-
ment in Good faith, an investiga-
tion should be made. There was
no sense denying it, there was
Suspicion which could only be
proved if the Government caused
an investigation to be made into
the matter.

That gentleman was leaving
because he really did not want to
be dismissed. For he (Mr. Mot-
tley) could not see the Govern-
ment, whether or not there had
been a contract, allowing him to
go on in his capacity. They were
bound to dismiss him. It was not
right then that thgy should let
him go and be thrown on another
colony. He had fleeced Barbados.
o had held a “get rich quick”
job.

When they voted that token
vote of one dollar, it was by way
of a moral commitment implying
that they would finish the work.
They had a right to know exactly
how things stood.

But for all that, they had to
finish it. They could not let the
children suffer because the money
had been spirited or strayed
away.

Anovher point of some moment
was that the people were not sat-
isfled with the designs of the
school. Some called them cow-
sheds, He was reminded of a
lieutenant in the Brivish Army
who once remarked to him that
the people out his side most like-
ly got on very well, but how did
they manage vo get up in the trees
to sleep. He was not s
when such a thing was built. How
could such a monstrosity like that
be built? Were they housing cav-
tle? ‘wo out of every three peo-
ple one met in the parish was
asking whether the members who
represented that parish were not
ashamed of the school or whevher
he could not protest. Up till then
$168,000 had gone, There was no
school and Crowe was going.

Mr. Mottley then went to itera
fourteen, General Post Office.

No Government, he said, who
could draw up a plan for $20,000
was conscious of their responsi-
bility.

Mr. F. L. Walcott rose to a point
of order. He said that the amount
was the approximate cost, and
having that in mind they had
based the fee in vhat region.

Mr. Mottley said that that made
the case worse. He would move
if he stood alone on his motion,
thav the amount be deleted. It
was no wonder that they could
get nothing done—$20,000 for one
plan! Did the honourable member
know that they could buy plans
in England from £10 and up, H@
aw that members of the Govern-
ment would attempt to defend it
though they did not really under-
stand it.

Bringing Up Plans

Mr. F, L. Waleett pointed out
that an arehitect was bringing up
plans for the consideration of vhe
Government. If the plans were
approved and supplementary esti-
mates were provided, that provi-
sion they sought would cover vhe
cost.

Mr. E. K. Walcott (E.) said that
the British architect charged six
per cent. of the overall cost of the
building for the plan and detail
investigations. He wondered
whether Government had anybody
in mind when thinking of an
architect,

Dr. Cummins (L) said that Mr.
Anthony Lewis had been recom-
mended,

Mr. F. L. Walcott said that hon~
ourable members were thinking
in terms of personalities, For at
the mere mention of the name
they had exclaimed —Oh no! Oh

0
, Honourable members had to re-
alise that Government had to have;

same basis for arriving at the
rnoney. !
‘Mr. Mottley said that if they

———

|



Tork,

MARY

HE LA»

MORGAN ND



were going in



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
for housing they Mr. F. kL. Waleott said that
had to appoiny another architect was sometimes a very pathetic
The honourable senior member for circumstance to hear some hon-

St. Peter had admitted that the
Public Works Department coul’d
not underiake the housing.

The honourable Leader of the
House had said that they should
not take it as a natural indica-
tion thay they intended to aban-,
don the schemes because of mis~
calculation. Why did they not
bring in another man? They might
say what they liked, but he would
vell them that it was nothing more
than grawings. They could get an
architect from anywhere — Eng-
land, Canada, America. He would
stick to no personalities whether
it was Mr. Crowe or anybody
else. They were many architects
in the outside world who could
not even work for a living. It was
more practical for the Govern-
ment to have another architect.

Under Review

Mr. F. L. Walcott (L) reminded
the House that the matter was
under review. Any decision would
be a matter for the Executive
Committee,

Mr. Mottley said he fully saw
the honourable member's position
then. He was perfectly willing
to agree. He intended to em-
barrass no one. He would, how-
ever, if he stood alone, move that
the item be deleted.

Mr. Reece (E) said that if it
were said that an architect was
bringing up plans, it meant that
the Executive Committee had
committed themselves. If they
(the HouSe) followed that up and
put a token vote there it would
mean that they were in agree-
ment with the action of the
Executive Committee in their not
bringing the matter before the
house ever by way of an Address.

Mr. F. L. Walcott said that
since it was agreed that Gov-
ernment could not carry on
with their present man, they
had asked Mr. Lewis to see the
plan but they had entered into
no agreerent with him. It was
very obvious that if they in-
tended to make a purchase, they
would have to find out about
the price before they decided

to come to the House. He did

not see how they had broken

confidence of the House.

Position Worse

Mr. Mottley held that the posi-
tion was even made worse. He
hoped honourable members would
adjust their minds to the facts and
let no party allegiance sway them
in their views about what was
not above board. They said they
could not barter with professional

ourable members speak. To hear
the last member had _ introduced
such a pathetical instance.
Imagine, he said, that an hon-
ourable member couid come into
the House and just make a lot of

suppositions. The s c hoo 1 in
question had leng since been
finished. He would advise that

member to make sure of his facts
before he embarked upon un-
founded criticisms.

Wasting Money

Mr. Koster asked why, if the
school was finished, they were
wasting the Government's money
in keeping a watchman around it
instead of allowing the children
to go into it,

Mr. Mapp (L) said vhat admit-
tedly the Government had been
placed in an extremely difficult
position with regards to Capital
Expenditure. But Government had
vo go ahead and get a plan from
Some new architect or get a plan
from the then architect, Since the
latter case was not to be thought
of, they were left with but the
one alternative. They were pleased
to hear that a contract had not
yet been entered with Mr. Lewis,

There were tangible reasons why
the House should vote for the
money. The Government could not
appoint an officer until the one in
office was removed. The building
had been bought. It was being
used as a car park and people of
the community who were inter-
ested in its progress were won-
dering what would be done about

Mr. Brancker (C) said that the
case of the schools was much to be
regretted. He said that a site had
been suggested for Half Moon
Fort. It was an ideal site and one
which the Sanitary Commission-

ers of Health had agreed was
satisfactory.
He wondered whether they

could not get a good job done with-
out having to pay the immediate
sum of $20,000.

He heard it was suggested to
remove the Registrar’s oftice
the Public Building. He was of tho
opinion that it was more conveni-
ent to the majority if it remained
in the main judiciary building.

Modern School

Mr. Allder (L) said that he re-
gretted very much that provision
had not been made for a modern
school in St. John. When he had
brought up in the House the ques-
tion of extensions to the present
boys’ and girls’ schools, he had
been told that preparations were

upderway for getting a modern

men. Yet they had done so. building.
Mr. F. L. Walcott said that he Mr, Cox said he would make it
would challenge any member to perfectly crystal clear then that

speak about his personal integrity.
It was said that the case had been
made infinitely worse.

Mr. Mottley interrupted. He
had, he said, questioned no one’s
integrity. He had only said he
was suspicious about the amount
of money and its smooth way of
evaporating. If the honourable
member felt it had been implied
it was a matter for him.

He then moved that the sum of!
$20,000 be deleted.

Mr. Crawford (C) seconded the
motion, He said that the ques-
tion was whether or not another
architect was needed. If they
decided that they would get
another architect, then he would
advise that they postpone that
matter and let that architect do it
along with his duties. As he saw
it that $20,000 was only for the
drawing up of plans.. He did
not see the justification in spend-
ing the money merely for the
drawing ur.of plans.

Did Nou. Harmonise

Mr. F. L. Walcott said that the
fmatter was one with which post-
ponement did not harmonise.
Government had been told when
the last estimates were being
considered, that it was a case
that should hold priority. The
point that Government had to
seek after was the getting of some
drawings made.

Mr. Foster (L) said that there
was much imwhat the honourable
member for the City had said,
He, for one, would give his vote
in that direction. There was the
Chalky Mount Boys’ School in St.
Andrew which was still to be
completed. He thought the
$20,000 could be better spent.

of em
doubie-otrengin bolts #8 i:
Tabs seks pee

Vena i Teaconnoneocnasnsessensensoacocssccosenseneceoeee

there never was nor could ever
be anybody living for whom h>
was afraid. He had done nothing
in his public or private life of
which he should be ashamed
They was much scepticism on thc
question of certain expenditure but
e knew jt to be the habit of many
to judge others by their own yard
stick. The people were still alive
They were awake too. The people
knew who meant well for them

Mr. Cox then talked at length
about the unemployment situation
and how the work would be a
relief to it.



Overseas Issues

Get Most Business

LONDON, March 21
Tea shares were prominent with
widespread gains on London Stock

Exchange today. With domestic
issue idle, and lacking lead,
political or otherwise, market

operators are giving more atten-
tion to commodity shares, and are
searching for investment mediums
promising capital appreciation.
Thus overseas issues are receiving
most of business in stock markets
Gains of two shillings were shown
by ‘tea issues with single this
amount at 25 shillings.

In Foreign Bond _ Section,
Chilean bonds moved higher, and
Japanese issues recovered from an
initial dullness. Rubbers, how-
ever, encountered some _ profit-
taking, and eased by few pence.

Irrawady flotilla with a fall of
one shilling at 31 shillings re-
flected the news of Burma Gov-
ernment appeal against compensa-

tion award.
—Reuter.

Sizes: 9 ft. by 7 ft,

LINOLEUM IN

Home Look

nnn oS emma

LINOLEUM

Also

All very reasonable in Price.

1. HERSERT Lid.

10 & 11 Roebuck





Two Will Get |
C.O.L. Bonus

BECAUSE two members of the
Parochial Service in St. Michael
still draw Cost of Living Bonus,
the Legislative Council yesterday
passed a Bill which would enabie
them to do so during the next
financial year,

The Bill was cited as the
Vestries (Cost of Living Bonus to
Employees) Act, 1950.

Hon’ble V. C. Gale who moved
the second reading said that it
was necessary the Bill should be
passed for the reason that when
the consolidation of the salaries
and cost of living bonus of Vestry
employees of St. Michael took
place, there were two employees
whose emoluments were fixed by
statue. These were the Paroch- !
ial Treasurer and the Clerk to the
Churchwarden and the Poor Law
Guardians.

No Bill had been passed to
amend the Acts and those two
officers were continuing to draw
their cost of living bonus on thei:
salaries. It was therefore neces-
sary for the Bill to be passed that
day.

Motion for the passing of the
Bill was seconded by Hon'bis
A. G. Gittens.



Council Amend
Pensions Act
For Parochial Employees

The Legislative Council yester-
day passed a Bill amending the
Parochial Employees Pension Act
in order to enable the vestries to
continue to pay cost of living
bonus to vestry pensioners. |

Hon’ble V. C, Gale took charge
of the Bill. Moving the second
reading he said that the Bill was
an annual Bill to enable the sev-
eral vestries to pay bonus on the
cost of living given to pensioners |
from time to time during the war. |
These were pensioners who had |
retired for some years and it was
necessary that this Bill should be |
passed to allow the vestries to |
continue to pay these pensions |
and the cost of living allowance |



granted to these people. He then |
asked that the Bill be read aj}
second time. Hon’ble A. G. Git- |

tens seconded, and the Bill was| |

passed



In The Council
Yesterday

Excuse was made for the ab
Sence of six members as th«
Legislative Council met yester- |
day. They were, Hon’bles J. D. |
y Chandler, G. D. L. Pile, F. C
Hutson, the Lord Bishop, G. B |
Evelyn, Mrs. M. Hanschell.

Those present were the Hon’'- |
bles the Acting Colonial Secre-
tary, D. G, Leaeock (President),
H. A. Cuke, Dr. H. G. Massiah,
V. C, Gale, Dr. C. H. St. John,
R. Challenor, A. G. Gittens.

The Acting Colonial Secretary
laid Message No. 12/1950, rela-
tive to the temporary secondment
of an oificer of the (¢

Office to act
tary

He also laid
documents :—

Report on the Barbados Gen-
eral Hospital by Major T. J.
Hallinan

The Civil Establishment (Gen-
eral) (Amendment) No. 2 Order,
1950,

The Civil Establishment (Gen-
ecal) (Amendment) No, 3 Order,
1950.

The Civil Establishment (Part-
time Officers) Order, 1950,

slonia

as Colonial Secre

the following

The Parking and Restricted
Places (Amendment) Regula-
tions, 1950.

Statement showing gross Cus-
toms and Excise Receipts for ten
months ended 3lst of January,
1950,

The Council passed a Bill to
amend the Parochial Employees
Pension Act, 1944. ,

Bill cited as the Vestries (Cost
of Living Bonus to Employees)
(Amendment) Act, 1950,

The Council adjourned
die.

sine

CARPETS
and 10%, ft. by 9 ft.

ROLLS 6ft. wide





;

$ N

¢ 4

os. 33 & 52 Swan Street.



We can supply you with



Pay us a visit before purchasing elsewhere

The Barbados Hardware Co.,Ltd. 3

5 (The House for Bargains)



Phone 2109 or 4406

%

:
8
with :
%|%

CONGOLEUM
Various Sizes in Attractive Patterns
: also :

FIBRE and RUBBER MATS ,
>
-

>,



SOCPOSCOCCOS

ES —- ee





PAGE THREE

So deliciously light!
And you can make it



... success guaranteed
with this recipe



COFFEE SPONGE

Be ready for compliments when you make this
scrumptious pudding for the family! And don’t
think there’s a special knack in getting that melt-
in-the-mouth lightness into your puddings! With
Royal Baking Powder to guarantee success, you

can’t fail! Here’s the recipe:

Sift together 5 oz. plain flour, 1 rounded teaspoon
Royal Dok ing Powder, a pinch of salt, and 2 oz. sugar.
Rub in 2 oz. butter, Add I beaten egg and sufficient
warm black coffee to make a stiff batter. Pour the
mixture into a greased basin (6-inch size), cover
with greased paper, and steam for 2 hours. Serve

with a sweet sauce,

This makes

a really delicious, light, steamea

sponge pudding with a marvellous flavour. You
see, you can rely on Royal for a perfect light sy

texture, because it’s blended so that it raises
evenly all through, Expert cooks always use we /
Royal. It makes successful baking sure. =

ROYAL BAKING

+ centenarians een a.

e
For lovely hair use

BRYLFOAM

—THE cream SHAMPOO

IN A TUBE

See how Brylfoam—the cream shampoo

quickly removes the sticky coating of dust,
grease and
leaving it clean and radiant. Restored are the
beautiful glinting highlights of healthy hai,
silken soft and enchanting.
straight-from-the-tube, nothing to mix or apall
quicker to apply and dry, Bnough for chess
shampoos in each tube.

soap-scum from

your hair,

Use Brylfoam

Sateen

EL Tzey VF

Made by the.makers: of .BRYLCREEM





MAKE
part our

eflecti

imp

c ere
i) THE SAFE,

GENTLE |

PLEASANT.
TO-TAKE

ne

WILLIAM FOGARTY LID.

INC, IN B.G.

Leading Centre for

Exelusive English Suitings

HARRIS & SPORTS
TWEEDS,

GABERDINE, SERGES
& DOESKINS

Please call and see us, when it will
be our privilege to see that you are
fully satisfied which is much...

And become one of our. ...
REGULAR CUSTOMERS

“THE HOUSE OF FOGARTY”

combines Tailoring
with High-Grade Clothing
AT KEENEST PRICES



parkling gla

cleaniiness means vigorous
Andrews keeps you fit as a fiddle, by
helping rid your system of ctrouble-making

Craftsmanship



tec

ee
POWDER





* Nothing to get ready
x» Nothing to mix

& Nothing to spill

* Quicker to apply

we Quiciar to-day

SL Lelei)

(

}

))
i






f Andrews Liver Salt
daily health routine, for inner
fitness. Gentile,

ANDREWS

LIVER SALT



4,

$

.
*
‘
;
+
*
.
.
>
.
;



4
FODSO GO 9O66 GGG FEISS GOO SSOSOO GG FO SOOGA,





:
4
q
ki
i
Â¥




|
)

%
4
3

seta bbe ren algueiaamas mmm ee momma: erie iia iii
a

gemneupane
‘ ae













PAGE FOUR



ADVOGATE

oe To SRST Poweaey

Published by Tho Advocate Co. Ltd., 34, Broad St., Bridgetow:

Wednesday, March 22, 1950

Swift Action

THE contents of the Report on the
Barbados General Hospital by Major T. J.
Hallinan have been made public.

The Report contains little that has not
been broyght to the attention of Govern-
ment before by members of the Hospital
Staff through normal channels. And many
of the defects and difficulties enumerated
in the Report have been noted in previous
reports on the Hospital.

But because the report underlines what
previous reports have noted that is no
reason for its suffering the fate of earlier
reports. The present report was undertaken
as a result of intense criticism by politicians
and members of the public.

It is an answer to that criticism and its
recommendations are a challenge to the
Government to act and to remove grounds
for future criticism.

If the Barbados Government wants a
first class hospital it has got to employ an
adequate number of medical personnel.
Dr. Hallinan recommends the employment
of one medical superintendent, one special-
ist Surgeon, one specialist Physician, one
Specialist Radiologist and seven medical
officers for general duty as an increased
permanent staff.

At present there is no Specialist Physi-
cian and only two of the three House Sur-
geons provided by the Government esti-
mates are working, while another is due to
leave in May.

To increase the permanent cadre would
cost approximately £5,000 per annum. It
is worth digressing here to make a com-
parison with the cost per head per week of
patients in other countries’ hospitals. In
the United Kingdom this cost is £12, in
Sweden £13, in the United States 109 U.S.
dollars. In Barbados the cost per patient
per week is £7.

The moral is that nothing can be got for
nothing. It has got to be paid for.

Extracts from Dr. Hallinan’s report sound
terrible enough to the lay reader,

“Owing to the shortage of beds in the
public wards the medical cases are all of a
serious nature, many being admitted in a
hopeless condition. The deaths are conse-
quently large in number.” Or again, “there
is a waiting list for the public wards of
over 500 patients needing surgical oper-
ations, This list extends as far back as
July 1949.”

Sentences like these taken from their
context have a horrifying sound, and, in

emselves explain much of the concern
and criticism which preceded the writing
of the report.

It is very difficult to sum up Dr. Halli-
nan’s recommendations, but there is plenty
of comment and suggestions in the report
for improving the Hospital.



And there is a main current running
through the report which seems to em-
phasize that without adequate staffing and
without greater necessary delegation of
authority, the Hospital cannot be run on
the most efficient lines, The important thing
is for the Barbados Public to have confi-
dence in their own hospital. It cannot have
that confidence if, for example, day to day
working of the Hospital is to be the subject
of political interference.

To run a hospital, or to run any organisation
efficiently, authority must be vested in certain
individuals. There is in Barbados a_ loose
impression that anybody can do a job better than
the man or woman doing the job. The Hallinan
report is a vote of confidence in many doctors who
have previously pointed out most of the defects
and difficulties which are now unfolded to the
public gaze. It is up to the Government now to
see that Dr. Hallinan’s suggestions and recom-
mendations are immediately discussed and deci-
sions taken. It is unfair to criticise individuals.
The circumstances for efficiency must exist. Unless
the Government advertises for increased person-
nel and pays the salaries likely to attract them
here it is impossible to expect more from an un-
derstaffed hospital than it can provide, All the
other recommendations hinge on this—adequate
staffing and an administration with powers to act
and enforce swift discipline,

OUR READERS SAY:







RECENTLY we have been read-
ing of the amazing performances
of the Comet, the jet-propelled
gas vurbine powered airliner.

We have heard of the trials of
a gas turbine railway locomotive.

Now the first gas turbine car
is being demonstrated.

A new kind of engine is being
used on land, at sea, and in thé
air.

It has already produced a
vechnical revolution in the air,
and we wonder whether there
will be similar revolutions on
lend and at sea.

To understand how all these
new developments are possible
we must first be clear about
“gas turbines” and “jet propul-
sion”. These are ‘two completely
different ideas.

In a jet aircraft they are
brought together, but in gas tur-
bine-driven trains, ships or land
vehicles the gas turbine princi-
ple would be used wivhout jet
propulsion, which is very waste-
ful except at high speeds of
travel.

Jet Propulsion

JET propulsion is “motion of
a vessel in a certain direction by
squirting a jet of fluid from it
in the opposite direcvion.” s

If you stood on ice and blew
hard enough you would go back-
wards.

This has not yet been done,
but squids use a similar means
for travelling under water.

Jets avoid the use of a pro-
peller, and are delighifully sim-
ple, but unfortunately they are
inefficient at ordinary speeds of
|travel, most of the effort being
wasted in stirring up vhe air left
behind.

A turbine is an engine in which
the main driving part rotates, in
contrast to the visvYon engine, such
as in our motor-cars, in which
the main driving parts move to
and fro.

POWER is produced as the re-
sult of compressing, heating, and
expanding a fluid.

When vhe fluid is steam, we
{have the steam turbine. When
'the fluid is a gas—usually air—
| we have the gas turbine.

The seed of revolution develops
slowly at first. In the case of jet
propulsion it seems vo have been
planted in 150 BC by Hero of
Alexandria, who applied steam
jets to drive an engine.

In the case of the gas turbine,
a design recognisable as such was
patented by an Englishman, John
Barber, in 1791.

BERNARD WICKSTEED in Darkest Africa, where=

Wives Can Be Bought
| On The Never-Never

THE SCENE: A

I'VE been sitting in the shade
of a banana tree in front of a mud
hut talking to an African chiet
about economic conditions in the
post-war world.

He complained at the difficulty
he had getting the B.B.C. on his
radio, the overcrowding on the
buses and the late arrival of his
airmail edition of the Times.

But most of all he complained
about the high cost of buying a
wife. Twenty years ago when he
{ first married you could get quite

a good wife in any of the villages

round Nairobi for an outlay of

30 goats.

Now they were a shocking price.
| You’d be lucky to pick up a utility
|model for 80 goats, and they have
been fetching as much as 150.

He pointed to a girl going by
and said; “Look at that one, for
instance. How much do you think
I had to pay for her?”

I said I couldn’t imagine. I'd
never bought a wife, I got mine
for nothing.

“Ninety goats and a cow,” he
answered, raising his hands in
horror. Her father wouldn't take
a billy goat less. He didn’t know
what the world was coming to,

Of course, as he explained, he
could have bought her on the in-
stalment system for so many goats
down and the rest in easy pay-
ments, Lots of husbands did that,
but in his position as a chief it
wasn't quite the thing.

Besides, wives bought on the
never-never system didn’t work as
hard as those you paid for on the
nail. They knew that if you got
in arrears with your instalments
they’d have to go back

“CRILING” WIVES

I ASKED the chief if it wasn’t
possible to stop the rot by put-
ting a ceiling price on wives as
we'd done with fish and potatoes
in England. He said that had









BARBADOS ADVOCATE



By Professor 0. A.
Saunders M.A: D.Se.

The name of Whittle is asso-
ciaved with both jet propulsion
and the gas: turbine — and they
are both old ideas. What, then,
was the great thing he did?

The answer is that he brought
vhe two together. He said, “Let
us use a gas turbine to produce
a powerful jet of exhaust gases.”
His great achievement was that
he did it.

One of the defects of the jev
engine is its emtravagance on
fuel. For many purposes this is
more than outweighed by its
extraordinary lightness, which
enables more fuel to be carried.

Buv for longer flights, especial-
ly at lower altitudes and speeds,
the turbo-prop is better. The
turbo-prop uses a gas turbine
engine to drive a conventional
propeller.

Technieal Race

THE remarkable developments
in aircraft since 1941 have not,
of course, been confined to this
country.

In the early days of the war
we informed the Americans of
our progress, and in 1941 sent a
Whittle engine to the U.S
‘Out of vhat have grown in
America revolutionary changes in
aircraft design. The Germans are
out of the technical race, but the
Russians are not, and the French
have made great progress since
vhe war.

The thrust of the jet in the
E28/39, the first jet-propelled air.
plane—built by the Gloster Air-
craft Company in 1941—was abouv
800lb. Recently Rolls-Royce an-
nounced the thrust of one of theiy
latest engines as 6,250lb.

The E28/39 flew at about 360
miles per hour. In 1946 the Meteor
reached 616 miles per hour, and
voday the official record is 67).
miles per hour.

Infancy Yet

UNDOUBTEDLY the gas tur-
bine type of engine will be used
on land and sea for many pur-
poses. It is compact and light,
needs little or no water and no
boiler, and does not require a
special oil fuel, as does the petrol
engine.

So far iv is in its infancy and
moderately efficient, but it is po-
tentially capable of development
to efficiencies level with the best
steam vurbine plant and better.

Village in Darkest Africa.

been tried in some parts of East
Africa, but it didn’t work,

Fathers with unmarried African
daughters were the same under
the skin as people with houses
to let. The only result of bride-
price control was a rollicking
black wife market.

“I forget whether it was in
Punch or the New Yorker,” the
chief went on, fingering the rings
in his ears, “but one of them had
a joke about too many cattle
chasing too few wives. It was
very funny, but it wasn’t entirely
true,

“There are plenty of wives.
I’ve got 17, and I know where I
can get as many more as I want.
The real trouble is they’re inflated
and going steadily higher in up-
ward spirals.”

I tried to picture an inflated
wife going upwaris in spirals, but
the chief, who was evidently a
student of the radio speeches of
Sir Stafford Cripps, went on talk-
ing.

Take, for instance, a parent with
a couple of dozen sons and
daughters, he said. He may have
bought his own wives when prices
were low, but when he comes to
marry off his boys he finds there’s
a wife-sellers’ market.

What can he do? In order to
get wives for his own sons he’s
got to get as much as he can for
his daughters. And so the prices
go spiralling up.

“Well,” I said, “wouldh’t it be
better to scrap the whole system
and marry for love, as we do?
It’s a quaint idea but it seems to
work.”

“Oh, dear, no. We couidn’t do
that,” said the chief, adjusting his
top-hat. “There are too many
vested interests. That would be
a form of the capital levy. Every
man with an unmarried daughter



' Unification Of Public

| The New Power On

Land. Sea And Air

In modern gas turbine engineer-
ing twe countries have pioneered
the way, our own and Switzer-
land.

While we in this country were
developing the gas turbine for air-
craft, the Swiss were developing
the gas turbine for industrial
purposes. :

Today the Swiss have built more
industrial gas turbines, “for. them-
selves and other countries, vhan
any other nation. ; by

e are now very active here in
the same field.

The Metropolitan-Vickers Com-
pany is building a 15,000 kw. set
for the Strevford power station.
C. A. Parsons, Ltd., are building
a 15,000 kw. sev for the Dunston
station and a 10,000 kw. set for
the National Gas Turbine esvab-
lishment.

JOHN BROWN AND COMPANY
are building a 12,500 kw. set for
the Dundee station. i

All these gas turbines are oil
burners. Because oil has to be im-
ported, their fuel bills may be a
little discouraging.

This is counterbalanced by
other advantages, but if it burn-
ed a really cheap fuel the gas
turbine overall economy would be
so.much greater.

For us here vhere are only two
such fuels—coal and peat. A great
effort is, therefore, being made to
adapt the gas turbipe to burn
these fuels.

The economic impulse towards
vhe coal-burning gas turbine for
land use has no parallel for the
marine gas turbine.

Will Gas Turbines
Displace Steam ?

SHIPS have moved away from
coal to oil, and the most economi-
cal marine engine is likely to be
that which burns the lowest
grades of oil. s .

Whether vhe gas turbine will
ultimately displace the steam tur-
bine and the diesel engine will
not be decided for_some years.

The first gas turbine to drive a
ship is Brivish. In 1947, MGB2009
began trials with a Metropolitan-
Vickers gas turbine adapted from
one of that firm’s aircraft engines.

This vessel uses diesel engines
for slow speeds and the turbine
for high speeds, and has had a
very successful debut.

There has not yet been demon-
strated, however, a marine gas
turbine for long continuous, steady
running, such as the main power
plant of an ordinary ship demands,
But tesis of this kind of engine
will not be long delayed.

Lendon Express Service

The Time 1950

would cry out that he was being
robbed.
WEALTH IN WIVES

“THIS system of buying a wife
is based on an age-old economy,
and isn’t as crazy as you’d think.
We don’t have stocks and shares
and banks as you do. Our wealth
is our land, our female stock—
cows and nanny goats—and our
women.”

Get the idea? Instead of put-
ting another pound in the bank
they put another cow in the field
Instead of buying a_ savings
certificate they take another wife.

Every family has so much land,
so many head of stock and so many
women. If they hand over a girl
as a wife to another family they
are giving up some of their capital,
and they expect something back
for her.

If she is divorced and returns
to her family the purchase price
is returned, less a discount for
each child.

From the African point of view
there was nothing much wrong
with the system until this awful
business of the inflated or rocket-
ing brides going upwards in
spirals.

DEVALUED WIFE

WHEN the cost of living goes
up in Europe you print more
banknotes to pay for things. In
Africa, when the cost of wives
goes up, you have to increase
your goat and cow circulation.

But cows, unlike banknotes,
have to eat, and with brides at
their present price ihere is more
stock than the land can support,
and vast areas are becoming dust
bowls through overstocking.

“There’s only one thing for it,”
said the African chief who reads
the Times and listens to the B.B.C. |

a a ee



“and that is to devalue wives as
you've done the pound.”
—L.E.S.

—_—





Services Report (coned)

THE report. in this instalment makes refer-

ence to the despatch by the Secretary of

State for the Colonies, concerning conditions

of service.

IN the preceding paragraphs we have made cer-
tain recommendations designed to meet the wishes
of the Secretary of State, as set out in paragraph
6 of his draft despatch, in regard to common
conditions of service in respect of leave, passages,
pensions, and the like. Certain circumstances
have, however, arisen which make if doubtful
whether these recommendations will be accepta-
ble to the Governments of some of the colonies.
We mentioned in paragraph 94 that in four of
the colonies conditions of service were or recently
had been under investigation by separate Salaries
Commissions. The situation, therefore, which
has developed is that at one and the same time
conditions of service are under review in four
of the territories on a colony basis and under
review by ourselves on a regional basis. It is
jot our business to criticise this state of affairs,
but We can legitimately draw attention to the
consequences which will inevitably flow from it.
This we can best do by way of example. In
paragraphs 115 and 116, we have recommended
that after a tour of duty of four years (three in
the case of British Guiana and British Honduras)
free passages for himself and his wife should be
granted to an expatriate officer. The Government
of Trinidad & Tobago, as we have pointed out
nas recently adopted an arrangement whereby
senior expatriate officers are allowed up to three
full passages to and from their homes after a
minimum tour of two and a half-years. _ Again
in British Honduras, officers above a certain sal-
ary point are eligible for two free passages to
and from the United Kingdom after two years

of duty.
FARCICAL

What then will the Governments of these col-
onies do when faced with our recommendations?
To accept our recommendations in respect of the
holders of scheduled posts in unified services,
who comprise most of the senior officers | in the
colonies, and to apply their own conditions to
the rest would produce a situation which can only
be described as farcical. The most likely conclu-
sion is that tnese Governments will reject our
recommendations on this matter and will adhere
to the arrangements which are now in force.
But it would have been quite idle for us to recom-
mend the general adoption throughout the region
of the special arrangements which obtains in these
colonies, since they would have been unacceptable
to some of the other colonies on grounds of expense.
Our recommendations on these and other matters
relating to conditions of service should therefore
be regarded as constituting the minimum provi-
sions necessary to secure free transferability from
one colony to another. In so far as any colony
may have adopted more favourable conditions, we
do not suggest any abetement of those conditions,
though we recognise that any variations in con-
ditions of service diminish pro tanto the possi-
bilities of transfer.

ENTRY STANDARD

In his draft despatch of May, 1946, the Secre-
tary of State contemplates the setting up of a
regional executive authority to which would be
delegated the powers of selection and posting of
candidates to posts in unified services, subject to his
approval in cases where that is required under the
Colonial Regulations. Later, he elaborates the
functions of such an authority by saying that it
would set and maintain a common service and
nominate the persons to be appointed, whether by
recruitment or by promotion to vacant posts. He
also points out that the difficulties inher@nt in the
task of assessing claims to promotion are greatly
increased when the candidates concerned are serv-
tng in different colonies, and goes on to say: —“it is
certainly not a task which the Secretary of State
could successfully undertake at a distance in re-
spect of purely local staff. It must be done on
the spot by an authority which is not only in a
position to estimate the relative merits of candi-
dates but to give effect to its conclusions.’’ While
we are in entire agreement with the Secretary of
State as to the need for such an authority, it is,
we venture to say, a great deal easier to postulate
its creation than to formulate proposals for
clothing it with the attributes which he prescribes.
The words “on the spot” are no doubt used in a
colloquial sense, but it is pertinent to point out
that the colonies with which we are concerned
constitute fifteen different spots, all separated
from one another by water, in some cases several
hundred miles of it. It will be appreciated, there-
fore, that no regional authority, however consti-
tuted and wherever situated, can escape the dis-
ability which, as the Secretary of State implicitly
recognises, must arise if its headquarters are
widely separated from the various colonies which
come within its ambit. In the later paragraphs of
this chapter, we make suggestions for minimising
this disability, but its existence cannot be ignored.

TITLE

We now have to consider the title of the re-
gional executive authority, its constitutional posi-
tion, its functions, and its composition.

The functions referred to in paragraph 125 are
such as are usually discharged in other colonies,
either directly or through the agency of promo-
tion boards, by Public Service Commissions, and
having regard to what we recommend later in
the matter of functions, we consider this an appro-
priate nomenclature for the body referred to by
the Secretary of State as a regional executive
authority. »

As regards its constitutional position, it is not
for us to hazard a guess as to the constitutional
form which the association of the British Carib-
bean colonies may take. Various possible
alternatives are canvassed in “Closer Association

of the British West Indian Colonies” (Cmd. 7120), ||

but we are satisfied that a Publie Service Com-
mission, however constituted and however wide
or narrow its functions, must either rest on some
form of central organ of government, charged by
the instrument which creates it with responsibility
for setting up and maintaining the Public Service
Commission, or, alternatively, must be set up by
the Secretary of State, its constitution and func-
tions and the remuneration of its members being
determined by him, Though we can lay no claim
to expertise on constitutional issues, we can
envisage no central organ of government short of
a federal Government which could discharge the
duties to which we have referred.
To Be Continued,



re

Parents Have A Right To Know About Their Children

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,— In the recent debate on
the estimates the Leader of the
Government admitted that for
some time he had not given edu-
cation the attention it deserved.
I do not know what the more
complacent among us thought,
but to me this is not merely a
most damaging admission; it is a
tragic fact. It is tragic because
the Leader is one of the only two
men of his Government capable
of discerning and appreciating
the presenty educational trends
and balancing them against what
we know to be good for the
island’s progress. For never has
there been a time when educa-
tion in this island needed to be







regarded with more attention,
mere apprehension and, in some
cases, with more dismay than
now.

I write this letter, however
deal with only one pect
education as under the « lé
I understand
the sum voted to be spent on an
item called Record Card Now
in as much as I have long 1cé
given up the foolish fancy
our busy politicians have th
time to know anything about



anything, I do not expect them
to know what Record Cards
really are. But I hope here to
enlighten the parents with whose
children these cards deal as to
what they are (Parents who are
not themselves teachers or who
do not number teachers among
their intimate friends will not
until now have heard of Record
Cards. For these are designed
to secret and confidential docu-
ments. But let us begin at the
beginning

A Record Card is a document
on which are recorded certain
facts and opinions relating to
a pupil’s school life. There is
one for each pupil and it is pro-
posed that these Cards shall be
retained by the Department of
Education for ten years after the
pupil leaves school. On one side
are the usual facts of name,
birth date, etc. « below
the i v



other marks
I make no observation on tix
marks except to say that
practical purposes they
worthless They

because among the

schools there is no standardised



system of setting and marking
examination and other papers;
so that a pupil getting into
Percentile Group I in School A
might be no more than the equai
of a pupil in P.G, 3 in School B.
{In short, such information as is
contained under the Head Attain-
ment is worthless for a com-
parative study and quite mean-
ingless to any but the teachers
concerned in that particular
school, unless the examination
paper is seen along with it. The
information can mean little to
the Education Department whose
property the Cards eventualy
become. On the subject of
Record Cards I can speak with
more authority than any mem -
ber of the Education Department

for, as another meddler, one
Socrates, was always drumming
into the heads of his hearers, it
; not the maker but the user ot
1 thing who has most knowledge

of its utilitarian

worth
On the other side of the Card
are recorded the '

Tests

results 0
There is

against these

Intelligence

wthing to be said



provided they ‘
eriously; provided that where
these results clash with the Class

» have two disvinct weaknesses

Teacher’s considered opinion of
the pupil more credence is given
the latter; though the way some
of the local experts,talk, one
would think that vhe results of
these Tests were as indisputable
and accurate as Holy Writ. But
to those of us who do not think
iv good for our souls to accept the
statements of local officials push-
ing their own special predilections,
we find that the designers and
skilled users of these Tests, men
like Sir Cyril Burt and R. A. C,
Oliver, repeatedly warn thay un-
less these Tests are administered
by carefully trained e and
under the most favourable condi-
tions, the results obtained can be
very unreliable indeed.

Below this is a seciion dealing
with the vemperament of the pupil.
Now, the information recorded
here is not even pseudo-factual,
as before, but are purely subjec-
tive opinions. In this seciion the
teacher is required to say whether
the pupil is lazy or industrious,
careful or careless, co-operative or
non-co-operative and such other
opinions. This information must
(a)
Teachers, even Head Teachers,
bave prejudices like other human

;

beings and their nerves are seldom
tranquil; and (b) according to
Alien Hunt and Percival Smith in
“A Guide to Intelligence and
Other Psychological Testing,” ra-
ters vary considerably in their de-
finivion of temperamental traits;
e.g. different raters have probably
very different ideas in mind when
assessing the trait “perseverance.”

But I should be quite indiffer-
ent to all this information being
recorded if it were not for one
considerable fact. These documents
are secret and confidential and no
one but the teachers concerned
and the officers of the Education
Department is allowed to see what
“facts are written on this Card
under the pupil's name. No par-
ent may be granted the opportu-
nity te see what the school thinks
ef his or her child. This is an
alarming statement, but the Di-
rector of Education has repeatedly
said this vo gatherings of teachers,
who have for the mosy part re-
mained silent before this incredi-

ble pronouncement. There are, of

course, various reasons for this si- t

lence. Some teachers concern

themselves only with teaching and b

take no interest in broader issues;

others, in the hope of prefermeny. ‘

would be oleaginous with the De-

I



vil himself if it would secure them
promotion; and still others, to
whom the verras ‘human rights’
and ‘democracy’ really mean
something, have been too flabber-
gasted and indignant to trust

themselves to make any immediate com
ment, “Not even a member of the House
of Representatives may see these caru
has pontificated the Director. Well, I do
“ot care so much about the rights of the
-epresentatives, but I consider that a
parent has an Inalienable right to all
written information a school has about
his child and that to contravene that
right is a sin unpardonabie. It is intoler-
able that in a country professedly demo-
cratic, officials may hold secret informa-
tion about all its future citizens who
attended government schools and may
use that information, one way or another,
shold the young citizen at the age ot
or thereafter require agsistance th
government channels. No excuse {:
taken without warni
to the public, can be convincing, If the
usual expuse is offered that it is now
done in England, | beg to remind defend-
f this
has

ers

totalitarian course that Eng-
a to be really democratic
years now, and young
hool are acquainted
he forms but little
democracy I would

$ practice of collect-
ecret info atic abdout its citizens
t core of German life under
i the totalitarians of
1 means of “check-
hy the




















ITHURIEL”

Political |
ar pupils’ |
Re-

|







|
|












secant imam
eS r

OIL STOVES
PRESSURE COOKERS
SAUCEPANS—Iron, Enamel and Aluminum
DOUBLE BOILERS

NEGRO POTS—2, 3, and 4 gallon

DANISH POTS—1, 2, and 3 gallon

FRY PANS—11” and 12” and FRENCH FRIERS
COFFEE MILLS—Nos. 2 and 3

MEAT MINCERS—Nos. 1, 2, and 3 |

TINNED AND ALUMINUM KITCHEN WARE
BOX IRONS

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD,, Sy

PICNIC HAMS
LIPTON’S TEA
DALTON’S CEREAL FLAKES ..........
CATELLI EGG NOODLES
DOMINION VERMICELLI
MUFFETS
FOODYEAST
SALAMI SAUSAGE
TABLE BUTTER

EASTPACK BEEF

| GENTLEMEN





WEDNESDAY,

D. V. SCOTT
& CO.,.LTD.

Oey Oa
eRe



TINS nly
TRINIDAD G
HEARTS : ~_ RUrr

7 =

OVALTINE—LARGE 1,04 Lig
TINS*DUTCH SLICED BEANS
33



38

select from this
wide range



WooD AND COAL STOVES—Nos. 6,7 and 3

COAL Pots

ETC,, ETC,, ETC,

ecessors ty

C.S. PITCHER & CO, Lm}

*Phones : 4672, 4487








EASTER
SPECIALS!

SELECT THESE NOW!

CUPKAFE

Reduced from 85c. to 4Â¥e.





STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO, LID.



tt

vat

«

WHEN THINKING OF |

MENS’ SUITING

JUST THINK OF—

DA COSTA!

DA COSTA & CO, LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT.

Aid

Q

—

HE FOWLS ARE NOW
LAYING THE BEST

EASTER EG6

AT

GODDARD!

—_





















ke

TC,
i)

Ae

. Imprisoned
For P laying
Sergeant

TE



$5.00 by

Mrs.
on

— to
: that he was a
his
would

and he promised to repay

the money the next day.

ons for obtaining money
py false pretence.

FINE of 40/- to be paid in
ep months or in default one

’s imprisonment was im-
/ on Golbourne King

Spooner’s Hill by His Worship Mr.


















: wr M-2474 with inefficient brakes
on the Garrison Road on January

Ashby’s Alley was ordered to
y 40/- in 14 days or one month’s
onment by His
A. Talma yesterday when
was found guilty of wounding

Downes on March 2.

ARE of unknown origin broke

out at the Belle Tenantry
] onday and burnt } acre of
tanes. This fire spread and burnt
12 holes of 1st crop canes be-
longing to Edward Mallet.

4 RIGHT SHAFT of the cart
; was broken when a_ horse
‘ya ‘owned and driven by Shelton
yh Haynes of Dash Valley bolted
when it saw an approaching lorry.
» The right knee of the horse was

]

iW ALLAN SEALE of Rock Dundo
A reported that three pigs
- § valued at $22.00 was stolen from

,

| his open yard on Saturday night.

LORRY X-1072 owned and

driven by Fred King of

Christ Church ran over a bicycle

in Mason Hall Street on Monday.

The bicycle was placed on the

. Side of the road by Ralf Cumber-
ch a bicycle repairer,

LORRY E-58 owned and

driven by George Cox of

Farm Road St. Peter was involved

_# in an accident with another lorry

_ Bf} 1-223 owned by Haymans Factory
ff ad driven by Claude Eastmond

_ of St. Peter on Monday about 1.10
pm.

The right front fender of E-223
| was damaged.
PHILLIPS of Indian
* Ground received minor in-
juries after he fell from the lorry
_ § 4-115 which was being driven by
iT fie Nicholls on Sunday about
7 410 am.

i} @ The truck was travelling along

| Checker Hall Road.

COURTS’ XI tcored 181 runs

in their first innings on
| Saturday when they engaged a
Shell C.C. in a cricket match.
|S, Miller top-scored with 60 not
_ out and R. King bowling for Shell
meee — for 30. Shell C.C.
now 50 for six in their first
innings











The match continues on Satur-

WEEK there will be three

in
|

A the British Council this after-

Pm. and on Saturday, March

2th,

ily).
B tickets obiar
British

Council,

WY gs,
AG

John

ter and Mystic.

deems
ing

This programme, whi
B ch is a
ientation of The British Coun-
heard over the local

!

“| © Heaviest Rains
In St. Peter

+ Can be
east tonight at 7.30.











iagHlARP showers fell all over the

on Monday night and early
Yesterday Morning. The returns
lice Stations show that
Was heaviest in St. Peter

at
ow

on ‘41 parts were recorded,

Cen other returns

hes me, Station 18

ie ’ 18 parts, District “B’
‘— George






Al
20

° Femail




Parts,

n oa Crab Hill (St.

eee en a eee a eo a

“I am a proud consumer of ...-

GOAT CHOW

—=—-_

The cows



25»
te a



. FOUR - YEAR -OLD
Harding of Dayreils
sentenced to 12 months’
imprisonment with hard! labour
i he appeared before His
nlp Mr. H. A. Talma on Mon-

“He was found guilty of obtain-
false pretence from

Yearwood of
on Court. Hastings, on March

Winifred Yearwood said
March’6 in the afternoon
peard a knock at her door and
the servant to answer it.
servant came back and said
a man wanted to speak with
her. She (Mrs. Yearwood) went
the door and the man told her
Sergeant Sobers and
car had broken down and he
like her to lend him some

She gave him $5.00 made of
single notes in the presence of the

has had 15 previous

of

B. A. McLeod yesterday when he
found guilty of driving the

KinzGERALD AGARD of

Worship

.* film shows for school children
M and tomorrow afternoon at

at 9.30 am. The programme
as follows:—British News, St.
Paul's Cathedral, Gardens of Eng-
- land, and House of Windsor (The

Royal Admission is by
obtainable free from the

; THIRD TALK in the series
rary Figures,” in which
Dryden and Dr. Johnson

ol already been featured, will
| © evoted to William Blake. Poet,
In addition
the talk several of Blake’s
will be read and a record-

of Edith Evans reading “The

were:— suxiliary schooners “La
parts,

€ and Christ Church)
, District “C” (St. Philip)
ae “F” (St. Josep)
Oletown (St. James)
Parts, Four Roads (St. John)
Belleplaine (St, Andrew)

Thirty-four-Year-Old Ownerless

Found Guilty Of

SENTENCE
“Sam”, was
Acting Chief
terday. An Assize Jury,
ation, found Gibson guilty
larceny from the person,

a residen
‘ € Rock,

along with 34-yea
coer alias “Bod
0

t of Uppes
es pper

SO ty Sulty”.
_ ar. W. W. Reece, K.C. ici
peaenel: prosecuted for thes cian
Bene, ba aebresented by Mr
se | eae ri i i
unrepresented, while Gibson was
.“lbson has three ious
victions for larceny.” On Janey
1, 1949 he was sentenced to one
month shard labour for the larceny
of a bicycle, For the larceny of
a sheep on October of the
Same year, he was sentenced to
two toon ths’ hard labour. His other
conviction was on January 1 1944
when he was sentenced to six
months’ hard for t
larceny of a Raleigh bicycle,
Leroy Browne, principal wit-
ness for the Prosecution said that
on November 9, 1949, he went
into Jones’ shop at Upper Colly-
more Rock to buy a package of
cigarettes. He spoke to Jones,
He went to another part of the
shop to have a drink. Christopher
Gibson was in the shop. Merton
Lashley entered the shop about
15 minates later,

Held On To Hand
Lashley asked him his name.
He (Lashley) next asked him
what he was doing in the shop so
late and he replied that he came
for cigarettes,

Lashley told him to go home
and offered to accompany him.

Browne said that Lashley then
held on to one hand while Gibson
held the other and they pulled
him into the road.

Gibson held on to his hand that
had on the wrist-watch. He was
struggling with Gibson to prevent
him from taking off his watch.

While struggling, he received a
blow at the back of his neck and
one on his shoulder.

Another man then struck hira
a blow on his left shoulder and
broke it. He fell to the Ground
and while he was there Gibson
took off the watch.

After he got outside in the road
Someone called Lashley and he
(Lashley) left. He did not see
Lashley after he was pulled out
of the shop. He had never seen
Lashley before that night.

Browne said that he had _ his
diary, some papers and 2/- in his
pocket but they were taken out by
another man.

Unconscious

After receiving the blow that
broke his shoulder bone he was
unconscious. When he regained
consciousness he went to one
Mapp’s joiner shop. He afterwards
went home and then to the General
Hospital. He was admitted by Dr.
Copeland and at about 10.00 a.m.,
the same morning he was
examined by Dr. Cummins,

To Mr. Ward: “On the Sunday
after this incident P.C. Austin
and Lashley came to my home. J
told Austin, in the presence oi
Lashley what I subsequently told
the Police in a statement. Lashley
was not arrested until the
morning. the case came up for
hearing before the Police Magis-
trate. k

A Warning

Lawrence Mapp, a carpenter
and joiner of Upper Collymore
Rock, told the Court how Brown
entered his joiner’s shop on the
night in question.

At this stage His Honour
warned Mapp that next time he
was coming to the Court to give
evidence he should come sober
because if he came drunk again
he might find himself in Glen-
dairy. ‘
Gibst who addressed the jury

on his behalf, told the jury that he
bought rum for Browne. He said
that when Browne came to Jones
shop he had an inflamed shoulder
and was not wearing the wrist
= Ward then addressed the
jury after which His Honour sum~-
ned up. 5
nee the jury returned their
verdict the Court adjourned until
10.00 a.m, to-day.

“Daerwood”
Brings Fruit

The 94-ton motor vessel Daer-
wood arrived in port yesterday
bringing a cargo of charcoal,
copra, cocoanuts, pumpkins an
fresh fruit from St. Lucia for
local dealers.

The Daerwood, which was re-
cently skippered by Captain
Archibold is now under the com-
mand of Captain De Coteau of
St. Vincent.

Captain De Coteau has been a
skipper for about 12 years during
which time he commanded the
aoe
and “Minita”. He was formerly
‘mate of the motor vessel Lady
Patricia which pays occasional
visits to Barbados for docking

urposes.
* He will take out the Daerwood





St. Vincent, Grenada and Aruba.

Lucy) Messrs Schooner Owners’ Asso-
ciation are agents.
a arseos
BEBBBaun e's a eB

begin their young ones on. - -

CALF STARTENA

Ybtainable from H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd.

a

some time to-day for St. Lucia,

= }

Robbery With Violence ,

on 34-year-old Christopher Gibson alias
postponed by His Honour Mr,

Justice, at the Court of Grand Sessions yes-
after about 20 minutes’ deliber-

G. L. Taylor,

of robbery with violence and

Jury Acquits
Ex-Postman

Twenty-nine-year-old Louis
Oswald Boxill, a former Postman
at the General Post Office, was
yesterday acquitted by a petit jury
at the Court of Grand Sessions of
wilfully delaying a_ registered
letter, No. 21580.

His Honour Mr, G. L. Taylor,
Acting Chief Justice, presided.
Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor
General, prosecuted on behalf of
the Crown while Boxill was repre-
sented by Mr. J. E. T. Brancker.

The story, as given on Monday
by witness for the Prosecution,
alleged that Boxill, then a Post-
man on the Jackson route, was
given three registered letters to
deliver. These letters were all from
the U.S.A. and supposed to con-
tain Amcrican Currency, but when
the recipients opened the letters
they found West Indian Currency
They wrote relatives in the U.S.A,
and after receiving replies, con-
sulted Mr. H. N. Armstrong,
Colonial Postmaster.

Further allegations by the Post
Office officials were to the effect
that the dates on two of the
Registered Letter Receipts were
not correct.

When the case resumed yester-
day morning, Mr. Brancker in
his addrgss to the jury, said that
Boxill was charged wit a mis-
demeanour. The particulars of the
offence are that Boxill, being an
Officer at the General Post Office
did contrary to his duty by wil-
fully delaying registered letter
No. 21580.

Three Aspects

He read a section of the Post
Office Act, under which Boxill was
charged, and submitted that there
were three different aspects to the
case. There was the evidence of
the G.P.O. officials who told the
Court about the routine as to
delivery of letters. Boxill in his
statement to the Police Magistrate
said that he had delivered all
three letters and returned the
receipts to the G.P.O. on the
same evening and he pointed out
that there was not one witness
that could say in Court that the
receipts were not returned,

He next read a passage from
Dr. Taylor’s Treatise on the Laws
of Evidence and submitted that it
was not for them to take directions
from anyone except His Honour.

He told them that it was for
them to consider, after hearing
the evidence of the Prosecution,
whether all reasonable doubt was
excluded from their minds. He
told them that the evidence put
to them was not sufficient to
establish criminal fact and once
they were in doubt, they should
return a verdict of “not gu'lty”.

He pointed out that the subject
of the case was not what might
have been put into the envelope
of the letter in the U.S.A. because
this could have been removed on
a ship, plane or at the G.P.O.,
but what they were dealing with
was delaying and that was the only
thing they were to think about.

Different Notes

He then pointed out the dis-
crepancies in the evidence of the
Codrington’s and told the Jury
that in one instance Irene said
that the money inside the letter
was a Barbados Government $5
note and a Royal Bank of Canada
$5 note, while Louise, whom she
said was present when she opened
the letter, said that the envelope
contained two Barbados Govern-
ment $5 notes.

In another instance another
witness, Edith Codrington claimed
that she opened her letter while
her daughter, Louise, said that it
was she that opened the envelope.
Edith then said that she always
opened her own letters.

He told the Jury that this left
them wondering who they must
believe. He did not think the
facts of the case were so numer @1s
as to “wilfully” detain them any
undue length of time but submit-
ted that once they fully ap-
preciated the legal presumption
before addressing their minds.
they would return a verdict of
‘not guilty”.

Mr. Reece, in his address, told
the Jurv that when they examined
the receipt and in their minds the
letter “six” in 16. 5. 49 on the
receipt, was a “six” and not a
“nought”, and they also accepted
the evidence of the Codringtons,
then there would be no doubt to
the guilt of Boxill

The Verdict

He said that he was not asking
them to convict any person but
to examine the case carefully. He
said that it was his duty to put
the case on behalf of the Crown,

His Honour, when summing-up,
told the Jury if they had reason-
able doubt in their minds they
would have to give Boxill the
benefit of the doubt and return
a verdict of “not guilty” but if
there was a strong conviction in
their minds they should return a
verdict of “guilty”.

At this stage the Court adjourn-
| ed for lunch and on resumption
the Jury returned their verdict.

—_————————————

10.00 a.m.

Police Band at Holetown

Memorial Site at 4.30 p.m.

Football at Queen's Park at
5.00 p.m.

Fourth Annual Meeting, Bar-
bades Girl Guides at Pax
Hill at 5.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema, Frizers Plan-
tation Yard, St. Joseph at
7.30 p.m.

Court cf Grand Sessions at
|
/

WHAT’S ON TODAY

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Dogs Cause
or Concern

His Excellency the Governor
r. A. W. L. Savage presided
over the forty-fourth Annual

General Meeting of: the S.P.C.A.
at the Y.M.C.A. hall last night.

During a review of the year’;
work, Mr. A. H. C. Campbell
sa‘d that a matter which had giv-
en their committee great concern
was the excessive number of ap-
parently ownerless dogs which
roamed at large. They had con-
stituted a traffic hazard on the
highways, destroying poultry and
sheep, and damaging flower gar-
dens.

Among those present were Mrs
Savage, Hon. G. D. L. Pile, Mr.
L. T. Gay, Col. R. T. Michelin
and Mr. V. C. Gale, M.L.C.

At the beginning of the meeting
Mr. Pile thanked His Excellency
for attending the meeting. He
said that His Excellency’s. coming
was even more appreciated when
they considered how busy a man
he was.

The financial statement for 1949
was then presented.

In a short review Mr. Gay re-
minded members of the Mercy
Movement of the institution. He
said that although no mention had
been made of that movement in
the report, it did not mean that
they had not been active.

Help Wanted

They were calling on people
who had the time to spare to give
voluntary help to teachers who
were willing to form bands at
their schools. Extra-Mural ac-
tivities like the Mercy’ Band
were best run if they were
not under the immediate — con-
trol of members of a_ school.
It was thus that he would call for
outside help. *

During question time, a sug-
gestion was made from the aud-
ience that ill-conditioned live-
stock skwuld not be shot, but
there should be an animal farm
where they could be re-condition-
ed.

When the Hon. V. C. Gale
seconded the proposal of thanks
to committees an the election of
officers for the current year, he
said that he doubted whether any
livestock were killed. The killing
was confined to do~s and cats. In
any case no one would easily
allow his animal to be shot.

Canadians
Unhappy

OVER LOCAL
RESTRICTIONS

Canadian manufacurers who
had been supplying goods to
Barbados during the war years,
are very unhappy that they are
no longer able to do so owing to
the restrictions by the local Gov-
ernment Mr. B. A. Usheroff,
President of the Justine Hat
Manufacturing Co., Ltd of Mon-
treal and President of the Millinery

Manufacturers’ Association of
Canada told the Advocate yester-
day.

Mr. Usheroff said that the
goods with which they had
been supplying these markets

during the war years could have
easily been disposed of at even
higher prices in their own markets,
but they felt that they should
encourage their manufacturers in
Canada to supply these islands
with goods in the hope that they
would be building up trade with
them for the future.

Unfortunately, he said that their
goods were no longer required.
not because the people did not
want them, but due to the fact
that the; were not permitted to
bring them in on account of the
restrictions.

Shut Out

Since his arrival in Barbados

eleven days ago, he had in|



viewed some of the people with
whom he had been doing business
and the information rece'ved was
that the people had learnt to use
their Canadian made goods very
advantageously, but they had now
found themselves entirely shut

800 Sign

At the final count yesterday the
number of people who had signed
the Electricity Consumers’ Peti-
Vion was well over 800. The
petition will be handed to His
Excellency the Governor today.



Assize Diary

WEDNESDAY
No. 24 & 25: Rex vs. Evans
Carlisle Dow-
ding
THURSDAY
No. 14: Rex vs. Clyde Green
Reuben Green
and Lionel
Green
No, 15 & 16; Rex vs. Lionel
Green and
Reuben Green







|
‘





Judge Chenery
Reviews SCAC

Report

The recommendations of the
Standing Closer Association Com-
mittee did not give the West Indies
the Opportunity to reverse the
verdict of the Cambridge Modern
History when the authors of that
great work had declared that na-
ture, circumgtances and human
policy had forbidden the West In-
dies from aspiring to the great-
ness and national being which
other groups of colonies had at-
tained, Mr. Justice J. W. B.
Chenery told an audience at the
British Council last night.

Mr. Chenery was speaking on
the Report of the Standing Closer
Association Committee on West
Indian Federation:

He began with a review of the
earlier attempts at federation and
recounted the difficulties which
had hitherto played so insuper-
able a part in delaying the
achievement of the goal of fed-
eration,

Opponent

In the course of his remarks he
said thatChe felt it his duty to
recall that*so eminent an author-
ity and so great a friend of the
West Indies as Lord Qlivier, at
one time Governor of Jamaica
and head of the 1929 Commission
which had visited the West In-
dies, had constantly opposed fed-
eration as the solution for the
ills of the West Indies.

He then referred to the recom-
mendations of the Royal Commis-
sion of 1938-39 which stated: “Po-
litical federation is not of itself
an appropriate means of meeting
the pressing needs of the West
Indies. Neverthele§s, it is the
end to which: policy should be
directed.”

Mr. Chenery said thai the Mon-
tego Bay Conference of 1947,
committed the West Indies to the
federal solution of the problem
based on the Australian model as
a federal structure most suited to
the |circumstances of the West
Indies.

He then gave a short ac.ount of
vhe struggles that confronted fed-
erationists in Australia before the
Commonwealth Act of 1900 be—
came law and dilated on the dif-
ficulties that the working of vhe
federal constitution had brought
to light during the past half cen-
vury, particularly the grievances
suffered by the less important
states such as Western Australia
which culminated in the move-
ment for secession in 1934 when
Western Australia volved by an
overwhelming majority in favour
of seceding from the Common-

wealth.
Good Job
He then dealt with the report
of the Svanding Closer Association
Committee and commended them



for laying, stress on the necessity |

for securing economic stability if

true national independence was
to be avtained.
The lecturer also dealt with the

detailed recommendations in re-
gard to the federal legislature and
the establishment of a Council of
State. The failure to adopt the
elected number in regard to mem-
bership of the Senate was com-
mented on with the observation
that it might be difficult to get the
legislatures of the several colonies
to agree vo a proposal which
seemed so little in accord with
modern democratic practice.

At the conclusion of the lecture,
the audience joined in the debave
and consideration of such matters |
as the Federal Judiciary and thej
Financial Structure of the Federal |
Government were reserved until |
nexi Tuesday.



More Flour Arrives

Hight hundred bags of flour
along with quantities of feed,
pickled pork, apples, kippers and
personal effects arrived by the
Alcoa Pilgrim on Monday from
Halifax.

ei ig ga thin
"Votes
nites

5
fi fry?

m?




CARRY
RENNIES

QUICK
RELIEF



At the first sign of acidity, suck
two Rennies, one after the other.
As they dissolve, their antacid
ingredients are carried by your
own saliva gtraight to where
they're needed in your stomach,

Discomfort after meals need
never worry you again, if you
carry a few Rennies (they're
wrapped separately like sweets)
in your pocket or handbag.
If they don’t bring you relief,
it’s time you saw your doctor.
Get Rennies at any chemist.

R ENN HE 9

NO SPOON, NO WATER...
Suck them like sweets

Cleaning
with Vim!





is quicker, smoother
A rub or two—and
your oven dishes are clear and
brilliant again without a scratch!
Start using Vim today! It does all
your cleaning so speedily —saves
you so much work.

20 Barbadian
Girls Leave
for Work In U.K. |

Thirty-five passengers left the
island yesterday evening by the

|

“Gascogne” for Plymouth, Eng-|
land. |
These included Mr. and Mrs.

Payne wiih their three children, |
Mr. David Pursey, Mr. and Mrs.
Stead, Mrs. Annie Douglas-Smith,
Master Jeffrey Douglas-Smith, Mr.
Richard Budd, Mrs. Drummona
Miss Drummond, Mr. Gordon
Kinch, Mr. Oscar Morris and Mrs |
Edith Begg.

|

Twenty Barbadian girls left by |
the same opportunity for work 1
United Kingdom hospivals,

They were: veeda U. Als, Doro-
thy J. Bailey, Sylvia Breedy, Eve-
lyn Challenor, Audrey U. Cum-
berbatch, Roselery Gittens, Mar-
garet Hoad, Dorotny G, Holdip,
Phyllis P. Inniss, Ruby E. King
Sybil King, Margaret R. Lewis,



Gertrude Maxwell, Emmalinc
Moore, Vera G. Phillips, Daphne
I. Rocheford, Margery Sargeant,
Adgla Shaw, Myrtle Gollop and
Cleone C. Haynes.

Hundreds crowded pave-=
ment of the Baggage Warehouse
t ee them off—family, intimate
and the merely curious. The w«
men stood in groups, dressed in :
bevy of colours.

he

Among the many people there
was a high degree of mixed fee!

ings. Some had a_melanchol
touch upon their faces. Their close
friends were going away from |

them—maybe for ever. But as re- |
gards the girls who are now aboar

the S.S. “Gascogne”, most of them |
had a decided iook on their faces. |
They were going out into tho}
world. They would see a differen ' |
sort of life. Some had a gay look |
about them, but it was evident ¢

the keen observer that the gaievy |
was only a coverlet to hide thei)

entiments. :



_—_—_——
————o—





a








a LEVER rropuct

WITH THE

See the PREFECT
at our showrooms to-day

Ce een

| JUST IN TIME FOR EASTER





sia

$49.00

MONEY GOES

A fine car that saves money all the way—that’s the
Prefect! You get smart body styling, roomy comfort for four
and big luggage space. Smooth riding on the roughest roads

and there's ample ground clearance too! Its eager, precision
|
built 10 hp. Ford engine saves petrol and oil, service charges

are at low prices.




CHARLES McENEARNEY & CO., LTD.

cleans everything smoothly
and speedily!

a me a nr

re ee

PAGE FIVE



HYMN & PRAYER BOOKS

AT THE ADVOCATE STATIONERY.


















A

RIPPINGILLE'S
OVEN



MAKES
YOUR BAKING

EASIER

CARPETS

of French Silk woven with Ejyptian Cotton

$151.00 $252.00
See them on show at —
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID.

10, i1, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

AN EXCLUSIVE LINE OF

a& 13





FURTHER...











I)
i; |










thy
aed A














PAGE SIX





REPORT OF HOSPITAL ENQUIRY CONDUCTED BY DR. HALLINA.

To Mis Excellency ALFRED WILLIAM LUNGLEY SAVAGE,

Companion of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and
Saint George, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Island of
Barbados.

Your Excellency,

I hava the honour to submit the following Report, in accordance with the
terms of the Colonial Seeretary’s letter No. 6585, appointing me to enquire into
and report on the organisation and administration of the Barbados General Hos-
pital and, where necessary, to make recommendations for improvement.

I. PRELIMINARY,

1. The enquiry commenced on 14th January and continued daily until its
close. 1 was given an office at the General Hospital where every facility was
afforded me to observe the general running of the Institution in all its many activ-
ities. All the hospital personnel were at my disposal for private investigation
and I had full access to the hospital records and correspondence. There was no
disposition in the senior officials to withhold any information and after the staff
in the lower grades realised that [ was not holding a form of court martial, but
that my object was to obtain information with the object of improving existing

-conditions, they overcame their preliminary shyness and gave equally full and
frank information about conditions in the Hospital.
»

2. Members of the Public were invited by advertisement to give evidence
or information that they desired to communicate, and several persons who had
given publicity to complaints or criticisms of the Hospital were invited to dis-
euss the hospital conditions with me. The response to these invitations was
small but valuable,

3. (1) Six Memoranda were veceived, including a Statement from the
Staff Committee of the General llospital of their views on the organisation and
improvements necessary for the better rnnning of the Hospital for which I must
express my indebtedness”

(2) 1 also received a deputation from the Civil Service Association to
represent grievances of hospital employees, mainly concerning the nursing staff,
which I discussed at some length with members of the deputation.

(3) Another deputation with a memorandum was received on Friday,
the 10th of February on behalf of the porters and some of the other members of
the subordinate staff, which entailed a long discussion on the subjects which
were brought up.

(4) The Chief Medical Officer, Dr. J. P. O'Mahoney, gave me the fullest
assistance and information within his power and I appreciate the care with
which he left me entirely free to form my own opinions.

Il. REASONS FOR THE ENQUIRY

4. This enquiry has been occasioned by recent complaints in the Legisla-
ture and letters to the Press of wusatisfactory conditions at the Barbados Gen-
eral Hospital. The allegations avainst the Hospital may be summarised as fol-
lows :—

(a) Deterioration in the administration since the Government took
over control. Opinions were expressed that a lay Board, under the
same conditions as the eld Hospital Board, can administer better
than Departmental Officials.

(b) Lack of attention by Medical and Nursing staffs in the casualty

ward, combined with lack of senior supervision,

Inability of senior nursing expatriate staff to adapt themselves to
local conditions, especially in their relations to local and subordin-
ate staff, Inadequate numbers of local nursing staff necessitating
long hours of work :;

Unsatisfactory conditions for nurses who live outside the Hos
pital :

Lack of vocation to service in the Nursing Department :

Rudeness of nurses aud indifference to patients’ requirements

Lack of discipline in nurses and in the subordinate staff

d) Inadequate provision for accommodation and care of patients ad
mitted to publie wards

Excessive fees charged by the Government for operations and
X-Ray work

Reeent Gosuré of certain paying wards due to alleged break
down of the Hospital Adininistration in not making adequate pro
vision for nursin:: supervision of patients:

(e) Improper action of nursing and subordinate staff in reporting
deaths to unclertakers before the TLospital Authorities had inform -d
the relatives of the deceased persons;

(1) Inadequate salaries were responsible for vacancies in certain posts:

g) Cases were cited anonymously in support of some of thes
allegations.

Ili. DESCRIPTION OF THE HOSPITAL.

5. General lhe llospital oceupies a long narrowish site of a little over 7
acres extending from Bay Street along Jemmotts Lane to the corner of River
Road with a site of half an acre on the opposite side of Bay Street facing the
sea, which houses the Eye Hospital and Eye Out-Patient Department as well
quarters for one of the resident doctors. An area of 3% acres was also purchase:
more, than twelve years ago on the north side of River Road opposite to the
Hospital for the requirements of the Hospital in the event of extension. ‘This
area still remains unused, In 19389 the Hospital Board decided to ask ¢!
Government to provide funds for converting this property into a ‘‘ Maternity
Unit.’

Accommodation,

6. The Hospital accommodation is as follows

Males Females Children Infants Total

Medical Wards 4 9 53
6 Surgical Ward is i2 120
2dpht mie Ward 1] l4 25
t Kever Wards Is Is JO
2 Venereal Disease Wards 6 6 12
f Maternity Ward 9 10 19
1 Children’s Ward 40 30
Pay Wards ‘AG OR”? 1a 12 22
‘Pereentenary Pay
: Wards ‘*B”’ mt Cys G s 14
Pay Ward ‘*T)”’
(Ophthaltinic 2 3 - 5
TOTAL 24 Wards
affording beds for ; 125 171 80 10 336

an ; p $
Che number of beds assigned to each ward is, however, liable to fh etuations
In cases of emergency

Buildings,
3... leneral a) Owing to the slow development of the Hospital over a
long, period to no preconceived plan these are now distributed in a somewhat
haphazard fashion over the whole oecupied area. This oceasions considerable
inconyenience and difficulties in the administration of the institution and that
will negessitate the demolition of a number of otherwise quite useful buildings
in the event of enlargement of the Hospital heing undertaken on the present
site.

“4 (b) With the exception of the laundries, kitchen and other
domestic offices, and of the recently constructed Pay Ward “A”, all the build-
ings are well and solidly constructed in coval limestone, their ages varying fronr
over‘one hundred yon. to very recent years. The lower fever ward is depress
ingly:dark but the other wards are generally suitable for their purposes, though
some-have inadequate facilities for ward kitchens, duty rooms and rooms for
dressings and minor surgical treatments. :

8. Pay Ward *‘A’’. The accommodation of this ward is of good standard
but the construction in wood for a two storey building carries some slight risk
in the event of fire

Di al'he Tercentenary Ward provides luxury accommodation comparable
with private ward accommodation anywhere in the world. The rooms are larger
ihan necessary and larger than general practice for such rooms. More accom
modatien void have been provided for the same cost with smalier rooms which
would»atill have been of more than adequate size and comfort. A very fine
Operation Theatre with full equipment exists in this building but it is im
practical to use it for reasons of economy and shortage of staff
maing practicaily unused as a ‘‘show piece’’

HiPhe X-Ray Department and Theraphy Block are well built and ade
quate for their purposes

The Bacteriological Laboratory is also well housed,

80 that if re



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

——



11. (1) The Operating Theatre which serves for most of the surgical
work of the Hospital both for public and paying patients is situated above
the X-Ray Department. It possesses hardly any of the requirements of a
modern Operating Theatre beyond a good eqnipment of instruments and is
quite unsuited for ifs purpose. It frequently has to cope with a programme
of as many as fiftecn operations in a day. The sterilizers work unceasingly in
the Operating Theatre itself during and between operations and also the
sloectors change gowns and wash up in the Operating Theatre. A small room
serves, inconvenientiy, for anaestheties and a waiting room but the majority
of anaesthetics are given in the operation room itself.

(2) Lifts. The lack of a Lift to the Operating Theatre necessitates
practically all cases for operation being carried on stretchers up a staircase
from the ground floor from all but one of the public and paying wards. It
is cupossible to avoid some shaking of patients during the process which, on
rare occasions, might be to their detriment. It sometimes happens that a seri-
ously ill case has to remain in the theatre under supervision until he has
sufficiently recovered to bear the inconvenience of being carried downstairs.
A hand-worked lift exists but it is umworkable. It would be of great advan-
tage to the patients and the staff to instal an electric lift. Lifts are eompara-
tively cheap to purchase and to maintain. Should the Operating Theatre be
moved, the fittings of the lift can be moved at small expense for installation
in another part of the Hospital.

12. The Out-Patient and Casualty Department Buildings whieh also in-
elude a Fracture Clinie are very inadequate for their purpose. They are
small, dark, cramped and uncomfortable for waiting patients.

13. The V.D. Clinie Wards are well housed in a new building.

The Obstetric Ward is in a suitable block.

The Eye Wards and Clinic are well housed on a site adjacent to the
roain hospital.

14. (1) The Laundry is an old unsuitable building where all work is
manual without mechanical assistance. Drying of linen depends on the sun
which was invisible during a large part of the period of this enquiry, so that
it was impossible to return completely dried linen to the wards. It is surpris-
ing, however, to find that the laundry was turning out such.a good standard
of work under such diffieult conditions.

(2) Disinfecting arrangements. Arrangements for proper disinfec-
tion of linen and bedding at the Hospital are most unsatisfactory and ineffec-
tive. There is no steam disinfection nor adequate arrangements for boiling
linen. It would be possible under present conditions, as a temporary measure,
to instal a large steam ‘boiler where water could be rapidly heated with leads
to a disinfecting chamber and to cement tanks. The boiler and disinfecting
chamber could subsequently be transferred to a permanent site at little cost
when the Hospital is re-arranged.

IV. STAFF:

15. (1) The Staff of the Medical Department consists of :—
(a) Whole-time Officers :—
| Medical Superintendent,
| Specialist Surgeon,
t Radiologist,
| House Surgeon and Anaesthetist,
3 House Surgeons,
lL Matron,
1 Assistant Matron,
1 Tutor Sister & Home Sister,
1 Assistant to the Sister Tutor & Home Sister,
128 Nurses.
2 Radiographers,
1 Assistant to the Radiologist,
| Dispenser,
2 Assistant Dispensers.
(b) Part-time Officers.
3 Visiting Surgeons,
3 Assistant Visiting Surgeons,
1 Ophthalhuiec Surgeon.
1 Assistant Ophthaimie Surgeon,
1 Ear, Nose & Throat Surgeon,
1 Assistant Ear, Nose & Throat Surgeon,
1 Medical Officee,-—-V.D. Department,
1 Assistant Medical Officer -V.D. Department,
1 Masseuse,
Temporary Visiting Out-Patient Medical Officers,
1 Dental Surgeon.
) The Staff of the other Departments of the Hospital consists of :-—
1 Steward & Secretary,
i
>

(2

Accountant,
2 Female Clerks,
4 Long Grade Clerks,
2 Steno-Typists,
and
a fluctuating number, about 141, of other employees.
Doctors — Whole-time Officers.

16. (1) The post of Medical Superintendent is at present held, as an
acting post, by a doctor with previous experience in resident posts in Northern
ireland, who has already completed his term of House Surgeon in Barbados
and is awaiting return to England in a few months.

(2) The Radiologist bas reeently arrived from England on a three-
sear contraet.

\

(3) The post of House Surgeon and Anaesthetist is vacant.

(4 a) Three posts of House Swrgeon are at present filled by two
Garbadians and one from Grenada. Two of these doctors have given notice ot
tomination, one to leave in Mareh next and another in May and the third, I
understand, is considering termination, ‘lwo of them will set up private
practice in Barbados and one will return to England to obtain better medical
experience,

(b) The House Surgeons are at present detailed, one to Surgical
Service A, one to Surgical Service B and one to the Medical Ward and the
Maternity Ward. ‘hey take the duties of Casualty Officer for 24 hours i:
rotation. They are responsible for the continuous general care and treatment of
all patients in the surgical wards of Service A and Service B and the medical
wards, which include the maintenance of case sheets, the ordering of diets and
wedicines, and assistance at operations and the giving of anaesthetics on the
operating days of the Services A and |}, and the charge of all cases in the
Maternity Ward and the V.D, Wards. The designation House Surgeon is
somewhat a misnomer, as they are more properly General Duty Medical Officers
und may be changed from one set of duties to another as occasion arises.

(5) The Specialist Surgeon holds a post created for the first time in
\947. His duties are the charge of Surgicat Service A and the general super-
vision of all surgical cases in the Hospital. Ou fivst appointment he also held
the post of Medical Superintendent but subsequently found ic impossible to do
these duties in addition to the work cf Specialist Surgeon. He may admit
patients to the paying wards of the Hospital and he may also be called in con-
sultation. Half the fees that he receives for operations, treatments, and con-
sultations are paid into the Public Treasury.

Visiting Siaff.

17. (1) Visiting Surgeons and Assistant Visiting Surgeons. These are
joctors in private practice who assist in the work of the Hospital. They make
up the Surgical Services A and B and ihree of them visit, on one, two or three
days a week, the medical Ward allocate:| to them so as to supervise and advise
on the treatment of the medical cases, all of which are in the immediate charge
of one of the junior permanent staff.

2) The Ophthalmie, Bar, Nose and Throat Surgeon and the Assistant
Ophthatmic, Har, Nose and Throat Surgeon carry out practically the entire work
of the Eye Hospital and of the Eye Out-Patient Department and deal with most
of the ear, nose and throat work of the Hospital.

(3) The services of the Visiting Staff are of very valuable assistance
to the work of the Hospital. In addition to their small salaries they gain useful
experience and they receive the sole privilege of admitting and treating patients
in paying wards of the Hospital.

Other Part-iime Officers,

18. (1) Medical Officers and Dental Surgeon. These comprise the Dental
Surgeon, the Medieal-Officers and Assistant Medical Officers of the V. D. Depart
ment and three Out-Patient Medical Officers who attend on two days a week each,
‘n the afternoons, The work of the Out-Patient Medical Officers is particular],
heavy.

(2) The Masseuse attends the Hospital for two hours a week for
Which she receives $80 a month. The availability of her services to the paying
wards is under discussion.

15. Despite this large list of staff it must be realised that the continuity

i the routine treatment of patients in the Hospital depends on the small hard-
working permanent staff of five which is hopelessly inadequate for the purpose.
Nurses,
nt. staff consists of :-
1 Matron,
1 Assistant Matron,
L Sister Tutor & Home Sister,

oO Sister

20 Phe pres

1 Assistant to the Sister Tutor & Home Sister,









































































WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22 ity,



28 Charge Nurses,
22 Staff Nurses,
10 Ward Nurses,
68 Nurses in training.
21. (1) The posts of Matron, Assistant Matron, Sister Tutor

are appointments under contract from overseas. The remaj ANd 8 gig
staff are Barbadians recruited locally and trained in the Genera the maps

(2) The present cadre is barely sufficient for adequate
various wards, the lay out and distribution of which do not eonqe
in nursing staff. ndnee to
(3) The position is further complicated by the
ing of Midwives for the Island’s requirements, wae whic eement f ,
of the Charge or Staff nurses at the General Hospital are
training at the Maternity Hospital, their places being temporarily 7
appointments of outside nurses. Si of nurses throws filled Yay
the existing staff and the position is made more difficult by totam Stray,
and the Radiologist’s staff are the only classes of hospital e that ny
there is no budget provision under the terms “Replacemen he ‘
sickness’’, thus necessitating special reference to the overworked (yl €
Financial Secretariats and to the Governor and the Legislature “Onis
is required for expenditure for the employment of extra nurses during pio:
shortages of staff. :
(4) The recent closure of the Tercentenary Pay; ee
ject of public comment, was due to this position. | cade Wards n
the wards were not actually closed and emptied but that the aden
more patients except for grave emergencies was suspended by
Superintendent owing to sickness amongst the nursing staff until he oe
sanction to employ sufficient temporary replacements. This ,
be remedied in the future by making special budget provision to mul
emergencies. nee
(5) The present cadre (exclusive of provision of relief for a
sickness) and the distribution of nurses is based on a time table fs
64 hours of work a week from nurses. ‘To reduce the worki hours to,
week would need an increase of the present cadre of nurses from 1994
To reduce the working hours to 44 a week, would require a stil] larger
(6) (a) There is a great disproportion between the number
manent staff (including ward nurses) who are all trained, a
number of nurses under training who make up the majority of nupser
in the wards. As a result of this it is difficult to arrange that 4
times should be in charge of a qualified nurse. It further h; words -
ing of nurses in that it is not possible for tl trainees to work under i,
guidance or continuous effective supervision of senior qualified nurses, :
(b) Recommendation. Any future increase of the nursing a.
should be of trained nurses only, until this disproportion js remedlagt "_

(7) The local nursing staff is generally discontented and unhappy,
The chief cause of this, is in my opiion, that at present they are in a deg
service with no prospect of advancement beyond the post of Charge Ny
the senior posts of responsibility being reserved for imported offieiale «
work and conditions of service, with higher pay and individual quarter
der them as somewhat superior beings apart from the general body of ay
The nurses hostel is rum on such conditions of equality that no distineis
made between the permanent staff and the 68 nurses under training,

a



(8) There is no separate sitting room nor separate dining ¢ .
separate toilet facilities nor any special privileges for the permanent staff.
they live in an atmosphere of control that is proper and essential for ny
under training, but that must be somewhat irksome for qualified nurses whos
sive the amenities of privacy and independence in their non-working hours, Ths
conditions cannot but weaken the authority of the permanent nurses over
trainee nurses when on duty. ,

(9) (a) I have received widely different opinions from Barhadis
themselves as to the efficiency of the local staff of nurses and their capg
for holding responsible positions and it would have been impo
during my enquiry to judge the capabilities of all the
staff. Lt seems to me, however, from my experience in Jamaica
nurses work efficiently in all grades of nursing posts, ineludin
crade, that of Matron, that there must be a few nurses in the Barbados
vice who are now capable of holding posts of higher responsibility or y
could be schooled for such posts in the early future. “A

(b) Recommendation. To this end I would recommend
two new posts of Sister asked for in next year’s estimates should no
iy recruitment for Overseas until a trial has been made of acting appoint
of local nurses in these posts, =

(10) The nurses recruited from overseas are similarly s mewha
happy owing to their difficulties in maintaining an adequate nu
in an ill-arranged hospital, for which they are held primarily
a barely sufficient staff at its best, without sickness and shortages,
the constant care of training a large number of nurses which falls more he
upon them owing to the small number of permanent local staff. The pr
staff of overseas nurses is very efficient and herd working. They havein
ed a very long-standing unsatisfactory state of affairs for which they are
way responsible. It will be a long time before highly trained ses f
ovenneas will not be essential for the efficient running of the Barbados Gent
Hospital. a

The Civil Service Association and Grievances of Hospital }
22. I received a deputation from the Civil Service Association to di is
grievances of hospital employees mainly conneeted with the nurses, Ther
representations are summarised herein and commented on as follows:—

(A) The need for machinery for joint consultation between the me

ployees and the administration by the establishment of r
Departmental Whitley Council. a

I agree that such machinery is necessary but feel that its value will &
pend entirely on the spirit with which it is employed. An understanding
sympathetic administration discussing its work, projects and diffie ,
far as they effect its employees with their representatives who
standing and sympathetic, with the joint object of maintaining an
public service, even at the temporary sacrifice, for expediency, of pri

Ya

,

eye
personal gain, can be of great advantage. On the other hand a nil
ministration in such a Council, dealing with employees’ rep on
their flag nailed to the mast of resolutions passed by the In’ wes
Federation which many of the countries of the world have not
implemented, and not prepared to give and take with understand it
ing a strong stand over trivial matters that conflict with labour Prine?
without considering that the main object of both parties is the good @â„¢
eopmnnniy, mee ae an unmitigated nuisance and be to the gm
running of the Hospital.
(B) The appointment of a nominee of the hospital employees
Hospital Advisory Committee. ~
I see no advantage from this. The Advisory Committee deals with BO
matters other than the conditions of work of employees, for te
diets, fees for paying patients, supplies of drugs, contraets for food su
ete, Tt would be sufficient when a consultative council has been esti”
that where matters affecting the conditions of service of h Petal
are referred to the Advisory Committee, that a representative of the hosp! |
employees should be called in to give their point of view. |;
(C) General conditions at work of the Nursing staf.

(i) They now work 64 hours a week which és 4
The delegation recommended a 44 hour week.

I agree that the hours should be reduced by increase of sta
expedient within the Island’s finances which will most p
to better than a 48-hour week.

(ii) Leave regulations are extremely wnfavourable
Civil Servants. i

T agree, that as far as possible with the hospital service, that they om

receive equal treatment. pe is
(D) Hospital Rules. These should be arrived at by joint ¢ tha Ie

etant rules are considered as not in keeping ae

or the spirit of the Colonial Regulations. . e

(i) I consider that the need for new hospital rules is so urgent "
should be issued without delay. The present hospital
eighty years ago, are entirely out-of-date and do not meet the ,
tions of the institution. They are acted wpon, or disregarded, a8 ;
administration finds convenient for the best running of the institut 5
ly, hospital rules are prescribed to be drawn up by the Hxecutiv? pe
of the Government, which would result in a long time to | the 9
tion, reference to the medical administration, and diseussion ovet vd
details.

(ii) To extend this time by formal joint discussions between
administration with an (at present non-existent) consultative future. ma
postpone the issue of hospital rules to an indefinite far-distant } with

(iii) I consider that the Chief Medical Officer, in consultati@® 7 gi
Medical Superintendent and, where necessary, by informal ey
the members of the hospital staff, could very quickly draw @P 2h E
that would meet present conditions and which would be
Executive Committee for very early adoption and promulgation.

(iv) Amendments to these rules could be made in due
experience of their running, but it is essential that some form

visas ot

fr |
course
of ade

rules should be issued without. delay. by. the nei
(v) ‘‘Rules for the Nurses’’ were issued two years 880 ht up 10
administration. Some of these should be reviewed and browgit ion be

3s tia
e.g., on the liability of nurses to pay for breakages, the @ ere

@ on page 7
pppNESDAY, MARCH 22, 1950



: @ trom page 6
i rmanent staff and nurses under training in the nurses’ hoste
FS 430 eonditions ae be seg a cae S service can be terminated ~—
i The unsatisfactory conditions of life of the senior nurs,
E i nurses’ hostel, were represented. f promt fe

: Jready come to an independent opinion on this whic
J had ana in this Report. 3 which has been
sd (F) The deputation of the Civil Service Association also recommended
x the establishment of a nurses’ committee to + :

the Warden under their supervision, a ee

9 like the somewhat Soviet flavour of this pr
1 do not committee should be established to Feprivent, ‘wie ee
4 tg and suggestions for improvement. This committee would also be
I e of entertainments for nurses and should be consulted with,
‘e hospital administration on the disposal of the Nurses Benevolent



















) All the nurses feel a strong grievance that they a i
(@) arrange for the lawndry of their uniforms at holt one. yess
and by individual private arrangement outside the hospital, while
the uniforms of porters and maids are laundered free in the
hospital ee
js no doubt that the present hospital laundry o i
tm even if the Government agreed to sen Reap "bs eabitie
ment could be made with a private contractor for collection and
rates, which sees be see ge a to fs ere situation.
“ memorandum received from the hospital porters i
. hospital, contains a long list of grisvencss on small ieee,
; dy which their working conditions could be improved. These
Fave already been represented to the hospital authorities. Their
tations, such as a change of title of ‘‘Porters’’ to ‘‘Hospital Attend-
‘ene of badges, better sleeping accommodation in the porters’ dormitory.
et antiseptics, rubber shoes and aprons for laundry staff, ete., can be
nall expense to the Government, and are recommended as far as it is
“hie to implement them.
Vv. WORK OF THE HOSPITAL,
; ee kients
With the exception of the Parochial Almshouses, which i -
tion for the infirm poor, the Maternity Hospital for the steele
and a few small private Nursing Homes, the Barbados General Hos-
des the only facilities for treatment of medical and surgical cases
Island. The following summary shows the development of this work
tion with ‘“In-Patients” during the last ten years,

Hy

Summary

X—Ray work, “In”

Numbers treated Surgical operations} and “Out” patients


























Free Pay Examina- | Treat-
_| Wards | Wards Total | General Eye tions ments
5,367 + 453 5,820 2,433 2,592 *
| 5,465 466 | 5,931 2,207 | 146 2048 |
5285 | 521 | 5,806 2,588 {| 182 2,432 216
5566 644 | 6,210 2,534 161 1,991 °
4929 | 690 | 5,619 2,588 150 | ‘2,015 *
5,278 725 | 6,003 2,968 148 2,569 e
6,116 854 6,970 3294 | 156 2,848 °
6,826 933 1,759 3385 | 126 3,411 ‘
6,928 887 7,815 3,216 111 4,033 690
1,58” 981 8,568 3315 1 4,681 Nil



* means, numbers were not reported.
NOTE:— The post of Radiologist was vacant during 1948—49.

%, (1) Hospital accommodation for the National Health Scheme in the
ingdom is developing on an estimated requirement of 800 beds for
BN) 000 0: population, with a staff of 30 doctors. In the Barbados General
ital 886 beds are provided for a population of 200,000. This includes a
nity ward of 19 beds (9 for mothers and 10 for infants) which should
rly be counted amongst the General Hospital accommodation, and
eludes about 12 permanently empty beds in the ophthalmie wards thus
reducing the beds available for all purposes to little more than 300.
wh (2) It is evident that, even on one-third of the standard of Great
Barbados is still far short of enough hospital accommodation for
population, even for, serious sick cases for which hospital accommo-
nis essential.
, This Hospital provides 41 beds for paying patients who pay a daily
Jor their accommodation and nursing in the Tercentenary Wards, Pay
“A” and “E””, and the Ophthalmic Pay Ward “D”. They also pay fees
ment to the Visiting Staff or to the Specialist Surgeon, and extra
at rates fixed by the Government for operations, the use of the oper-
theatre, X-Ray examinations, electrotheraphy and Laboratory examina-
For the non-paying public there are 120 surgical beds, 138 medical beds



and 12 beds for V.D. cases. Patients in these wards receive treat-
free of all charges for operations, special examinations, ete.

. The work of the Hospital wards, during the last ten years is shown
ithe following summary.

(sfep)
Avs ode19ay

















: 4 ,) Seemanaaae
| agges
& aseroae Atreq ARRARRASAR
| 5
| Ef TTL
7. az
ed ? cuommpy | SRSRSRSSS2
ceo oo NNO WH
spgq| SRERSSRRRR





AAVUOAAATARHS
(s&Bp) SEASSSSSSas
Avis a3ersay







. *
- agaaanaasa
2 osvreae ATTed
ws
* BE :
a “ —
. >
= | a suowsrupy | ARRRIISERS *
oT Seemann aman
il spgq | “Xe nnnnone
ET
UE mt O02 DH] MO IQ
(s&ep) Saessesane

Ae4s adeieay

asviaae Alred





Tercentenary B. & C.







SUMMARY for the last ten years of the Numbers of Ia-Patients in the Barbados Geueral Hospital.



ee sped |
1
% OOH
. ; wae) | Sasseassen
| s Aeqs o8es0ay
ot 410

5s | seguaass33
ol SQ | esezeav Aprea |
‘g <4 b Eee a

3S | —eneeen

> i : } wore ©
3 $ | smi | gageg3s2g2
is : ee
in ae
: | cpg | Sasaaaasae
si |

| | eons sl md 7
a
| * | 8959883888
'



ing children), 9 maternity beds (plus 10 cots for infants), 25 beds for



\REPORT OF HOSPITAL

|
|
|

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

27. (1) It will be observer) that the numbers of admissions have increased
by over 60% though the number of staff and hospital beds have been only slightly
increased during that period. This has been effected mainly by reducing the
average stay-in of patients in the public wards to the rather short period of 12.4
days to make room for urgent cases. This class of patient has not the facilities
for convalescence at home enjoyed by patients who use the paying wards.
Shortage of bed accommodation has also forced on the administration the custom
of putting two patients in one bed whenever this is practicable and beds are
required.

28. There is a waiting list for the public wards of over 500 patients needing
surgical operations. This list extends as far back as July 1949. The waiting
list for Pay Ward *‘ A’? (5/- daily charge) is 54 cases going back about one month
and the waiting list for the Tercentenary Wards (£1 daily charge) shows that
patients, except on rare occasions, can enter at their convenience usually booking
a week or fortnight in advance. Surgical operations are done as a routine 4 days
a week by Services A and B on alternate days, about 10 to 15 cases being dealt
with each day starting about 8 a.m. and ending between 6 and 10.80 pm. The
programme of operations is drafted by the House Surgeon of the Service operat-
ing who first selects the cases for his Service marked ‘‘Urgent’’, on the pubiic
ward waiting list, and then cases from the long outstanding cases to make up a
reasonably possible programme for the day. The list then goes to the Visiting
Staff of the Service who add their requirements of paying ward patients who
have been or are being admitted for operations. Should the programme be too
long some of the outstanding public ward patients may have to wait a little
‘onger. The position does therefore exist that patients of the poorer class with
shsabilities, not necessitating immediate or early operation, can obtain early
relief by electing to enter one of the paying wards, i.e. by paying fees for treat-
ment and operation which they cannot afford, and in some cases can only raise
by the sale of their possessions. This position has been created in the last ten
years by the lack of hospital accommodation to meet the public requirements,
and is a source of embarrassment to the Visiting Staff and the Specialist Surgeon.

29, The medical work of the Hospital is carried out almost entirely in the
public wards, very few medical cases being treated in the paying wards. Owing
to the shortage of beds the medical cases are all of a serious nature, many being
admitted in a hopeless condition. The deaths are consequently large in number.
‘The attendance ot doctors to these patients consists of six afternoon visits by
three members of the Visiting Staff to their alloted beds, some patients being
seen by them three days a week, other patients two days a week and others one
day each week. A House Surgeon is in general charge of all patients in the
medical wards in addition to many other duties. It is therefore possible, and
actually does occur, that days may arrive when patients in the medical wards
are not seen by a doctor at all. Examination of the case sheets of patients shows
that every effort is made by the overworked permanent staff to provide a reason-
able standard of treatment for these cases, but it can hardly be described as
adequute. It is certainly not the standard that should be maintained in a first
class hospital. The excellent facilities that exist in the Bacteriological Laboratory
Yor highly technical examinations and the finer points of diagnosis are not used
to the extent that they should be since the doctors have not the time to spend on
the detailed examination of cases that would require them, There is little call
for comment on the work of the V. D. Department which functions adequately,
beyond the fact that it.requires regular visits by one of the House Surgeyns in
addition to the Visiting Staff.

30. (a) The maternity ward of the Barbados General Hospital deals with
complicated or difficult cases of labour sent in by doctors or brought into hospital
in urgency, and is under the charge of a House Surgeon. The Maternity
Hospital maintained at Verona by the Government was apparently planned to
receive cases of labour for the purpose only of training midwives and not to
provide a Midwifery Hospital for general requirements of the public. It might
be reasonably argued that a knowledge of the treatment of complications of
labour is also of value in the training of midwives.

(b) Recommendation: I would recommend that consideration be given
to the enlargement of the Maternity Hospital to take all cases of labour and so
release the present burden on the General Hospital of dealing with these cases
amounting to over 300 a year.

31. (a) The Ophthalmic Hospital deals very completely with all the eye
work of the Hospital but its records show that its 24 beds are rarely more than
half occupied. From its position apart from the Hospital it requires a nursing
staff sufficient for its full number of beds.

(b) Recommendation: Under the present circumstances of ex-
treme shortage of accommodation it is recommended that arrangements be made
to use these vacant beds to relieve congestion in other wards, e.g., for all ear,
nose and throat cases or patients making uninterrupted recovery from simple
surgical operations,

Hospital Diets
32. These are ample and well prepared in Wnglish and American stand-
ards which are higher than that to which the majority of patients in the free
wards are accustomed, There would appear to be the possibility of savings
in the case of hospital diets now standing at £27,500 yearly and I recommend
that the present hospital diets be carefully examined and, if necessary, re-
vised to affect any possible economy while retaining the necessary standard

of nourishment.
Out-Patients

33. (1) The numbers of these dealt with in the last ten years are shown
in the following summary :

Summary

New patients No, of attendances





Year |—__—. rabid
General V. D. | Total | General V. D. | Total
193940 | 17,704 | 827 | 18531 | 33,216 | 17,577 | 50,793
1940—41 20,901 1,066 | 21,967 37,874 20,893 | 58,767
1941—42 20,054 1,138 | 21,187 37,208 | 22,766 | 59,974
1942-43 | 21,154 1,223 22,377 37,033 | 19,656 56,689
1943—44 22,500 1,324 23,824 39,109 | 22,961 62,070
1944—45 25,024 1,209 | 26,233 42,097 | 25.024 67,121
1945—46 28,934 1,181 30,115 46,559 16,242 | 2,791
1946—47 30,354 815 | 31,169 47,605 11,552 59,157
194748 | 27,766 163 28,529 40,373 9,837 50,210
1948—49 21,153 957 22,119 53,567 | 10,496 6#063
(2) These patients come from all parts of the Island, about 80%

coming from St. Michael and Christ Chureh, Most of the out-patients are
dealt with by the Out-Patient Medical Officers between the hours of 2 to 4
p.m., their session frequently being extended later than this.

34. An excellent feature of the work of the Out-patient Department is
the arrangement for diabetes patients to attend regularly to receive insulin
treatment. It would be of great benefit to the diabetic cases living in the
outer parishes if such facilities could be furnished by dispensaries in their
parishes, as many cannot afford the expense of regular journeys to Bridgetown
or the alternative expense of local treatment.

‘ Casualty Cases

35. Cases for dressings and other cases oceurring out of regular hours are
dealt with by the Casualty Officer on duty for the day who is one of the House
Surgeons performing this work in addition to his ward and other duties.

36. On the operating days the Casualty Officer relieves the House Surgeon
of the service at 3 p.m., and carries on giving anaesthetics for the remainder
of the operations which may keep him so employed up to sometimes after 10
p.m. During this period the nurse in charge of the casualty department
reports all cases by telephone to the Casualty Officer in the operating theatre
and receives his instructions from there. Should a case be or serious
it is sent up walking or brought by streteher to the door of the operating
theatre for the Casualty Officer to see it personally after which he issues
instructions and returns to his anaesthetics. Measures of emergency are car-
ried out by the casualty staff in a small room adjoining the Operating Theatre,
and in very great emergency the Casualty Officer is temporarily from
his anaesthetic duties while one of the Visiting Staff carries on in his place.
During the period when a Casualty Officer is engaged in giving anaesthetics
minor casualty cases are kept until he is free to attend to them or, if they
so wish, may be attended by the nurses. Occasionally a case gets tired of
waiting and leaves the hospital to obtain treatment outside.

37. An arrangement exists in theory that a second Casualty Officer should
be on call but with only 3 House Surgeons available and no Anaesthetist this
would result in practice that they would be almost permanently on duty or
call. At times it is necessary for the Medical Superintendent to treat casualty
cases to relieve the situation. There is no suitable place for detaining a case
under observation in the casualty department, e.g. the very comimon case of
a man brought in insensible, smelling strongly of drink, and with signs of
slight head injury, which might be a simple drunk or a fractured skull. Such
cases now have to remain on a couch in the casualty room while a nurse
is present on duty, or be transferred to an already overloaded ward where it
ean be under observation. The small nursing cadre does not permit of a
nurse being permanently on ducy in the casualty department and casualties
arriving at night are dealt with by a nurse from the near by medical ward.

VI. HOSPITAL FEES AND OTHER CHARGES.

38. A summary of the vost to the Hospital and of the fees charged dur-

ing the last ten years is given in the following table.



ee



PAGE SEVEN































NOTE.

a
‘quaned Paes BS
om Aq ved | ZERRRRERER we:
ot O} aBreyo | ge
® " EE Sxanaegonan #23
. 2 yeom sad | Svciggg dsaeed age
g ge [MeOH 49900) i ii icici ct i Wil i wi
® a g
2 p 3
4 B AQAA BBO YS omic
k& 4
quepfsar | Sages
: aBVreae AlTed SS8RS8S8288 Hee
6 | SaRaRRERRR |
4 7
a ile
me] lt)
5 iad quened PEeererenrreenr& 4 ae fs
e) a Wivivi giwiwiaiaiaid se
yo a is eis
8 os Hmm wtoakteag Fag,
ns . SésHeneaie gp
| 3 yam tod rl ae i ial 3° me
= a [lBdsoH 9900) Sora ae as ;
= at a ) 3
Bi Sees a
a *| wee |. Sketanea ss A
4 ia STS gaz
BRL
oO “speg INN INN HH Hw ane
Be
a6 nat
ST
Be a | oe
an qed = juayed Peer rere ee : ES ¢
»8 out Aq PRU | ai i wi wi wi wi i wi wi g see
5 oO | aq OF aBrIeYO a 3 oEe
) . . . . . a .
we 2 yom ed | Arse gies 3 ahs
Se (HESOH 9800] Bune ern 8 3g83
E> | § i ° » dpge
a4 8 ~avonree? QMRQCOAHOrA 3 its
Os ue Ue pts CODHAKMH RAH 2 ¢ hz
z5 & | o8Bz0av Aired ray eer § iiss
3 & 4508
o 8 a §.2e
oS -— ARAAASAASS : Le
ia yoo | 3%
g # | wd qn | S444seeeds ae
° ous Aq pred | seh. who od eh uel pa EE
. & | 1% OBIBUD | iw , asses
8 eo | CHANSWNHONG Z ais
° |
3 sa Youd KG grvaods j Hi
2 of ne YiddsiGeee : ey
~ = Be
5 < x B58
~ yupmer | idcaessceas ey
& | esesoae Ayreq a ae b 3 ad
is 1 a
e
: E ‘spa | Sitddaadaa : Ge as
s
a =
z

|
39. The present seale of Fees is fixed by the Barbados General Hospital

(Fees) Regulations, 1949, which came into foree on 1st June, 1949. In the

three next following paragraphs, comments are offered on the Schedules at-
tached to these Regulations.

First Schedule.

40. (1) The fees for maintenance are remarkably cheap for the aecom-
modation and service provided. The Government, loses on all classes of paying
patients as will be seen from the Table given in paragraph 38, which shows dur-
ing the year 1948—49 a loss of £5 per week per patient for all classes of “paying
patients’’ as compared with £5. 1. 0. per week for patients in the ‘‘Free’’
wards. All classes of the community are thus receiving equal assistance.

(2) The fees for visits by doctors to ‘‘medical patients’’ in the pay-
ing wards, are fairly reasonable.

Second Schedule.
_ 41. (1) The fees for operations are based on those current in the United
Kingdom where the incomes of all classes are far higher than those of corre-

_ sponding classes in Barbados.

(2) Recommendation. I recommend

(i) that all fees above $100 in this scale should be reduced for
patients in the Tercentenary wards and Ikye Ward “‘D”’ to
907% of the present scale, and for patients in Pay Ward,
“A’’, to 33 1/3 % of the present seale, ang

(ii) that all fees below $100 in this scale should be reduced to
66 2/3 % for the Tercentenary and Kye Ward ‘‘D”’ patients
and to 50% for Pay Ward ‘‘A’’ patients,

Third and Fourth Schedules,

42. (1) Comment and recommendation. These charges are far too high
and should be revised and reduced to figures that roughly represent the actual
vost to the Government of each examination. The list could also be greatly
simplified into more general classes of X-Ray examinations. Such cost would
be based on the total cost of running the X-Ray Department, i.e. salaries,
maintenance of apparatus, cost of films, ete.

(2) This recommendation may seem somewhat meticulous, but it is
made for the reason that the British Medical Association has banned all ad-
vertisements in its Journal for posts in Barbados on the complaint of a Radi-
ologist, recently resigned from the Barbados General Hospital, that, his
services were being used by the Government to its own profit, in that he
was given no part of the fees for X-Ray examinations and treatment received
from paying patients in Hospital or sent by outside doctors for examination.
The action of the British Medical Association regardless of its effect on 200,000
people of this Colony may seem deplorable, but it is better to avoid conflict
on a point of principle.

43, These recommendations for reduction of Fees are supported by. the
fact that many patients now find it impossible to pay them and the hospital
administration is frequently called upon by the Casualty Surgeon and mem-
bers of the Visiting Staff to sanction reduction of fees for paying patients

under their care,
Vil. DISCIPLINE. ”

44. I could find no evidence of indiseipline amongst the hospital st
who appeared to be as well conducted and respectful to authority as the staft
of any similar institution elsewhere. Their work generally is onerous and exact-
ing and the faults brought to my notice were of same of cases that occas-
ionally have to be dealt with in institution, oa Meas carelessness
frestion of minor. wales, minal peenlations of 200d ele, Seaelimen eacisne ta
themselyes, but not occurring so frequently as to reflect on the general
duct of the hospital staff. It would, however, strengthen the new tal
administration if any case recommended for dismi were dealt wi
quickly as possible. The old Hospital Board the power of imme-
diate dismissal and not infrequently used it, but under the existing machinery
of Government control, the dismissal of even the lowest

5

edging
employees requires the procedure of long inyestigation ending with the pds

consideration and sanction of the Governor’ who must be overburdened with

Sus

matters, which, owing to their complexity and magnitude, are obliged to be»

settled at this high level. One such recent casé in which dismissal was recom-
mended, carried-on, on account of one delay or another for about nine
and, during that time remained a point of embarrassment to the
administration.

45. I can find no substantiated case of rudeness of a nurse to
though one complaint was recently made of sharp replies of a nurse to a

too distressed to realise that the nurse has duties and responsibilities for’ a
number of other patients. ‘ ”
46.
which the persons who considered themselves to be of more or less importance
in the community had endeavoured to iediwenes members of the administra::
@ on page att

patient's relatives. This case was not sbstantiated, it is quite possible
that some may have occurred in the present conditions of medieal: .
_ staff and a large proportion of worked nurses under trait who have.
not yet learned to exercise the forbearance that is so necessary —
between nurses and patients and their anxious relatives are sometimes



|
|
,

a. maa mcmama an ama ie aaa earn aa aera
AREAL SRE SSE REGRESS Petes | SIPEG 2) RRS ree Ve PO ee NO IY ONL CORO TW! Ge Mae Re =! REREAD NOON ROS AONE GEER GOI IES OO) WNL VSN



~ \











ron ae WEDNESDAY, Mape .
PAGE EIGHT ; B ARB ADC S ADV OCATE < eee iain i ak ial i alain er ee ——_
BY CARL ANDERSON ‘
asians © you
Se Se oe Z\ ] wake wp i,



MICKEY MOUSE



_BY WALT DISNEY




afl
wan














\ CLINK 4
Fa
ae
ee a



K. @. CANNON ...... The Riddle of the Red



/ YOU, TOO, ARE A BUNGLER!
WHERE DID THEY GOP VOU
KNOW MOTA/NG! NOTHING
EXCEPT THAT YOU
MAY LOOK FOR A



a / YOU TAKE \
| IT, SIR, - IT

\. MAY BE..

PAUNCH - | SAY YOU ARE /
BLUNDERING FOOL TO HAVE LF |
CANNON TRICK YOU. AT THIS

\ VERY MOMENT HE WILL BE

SCOURING LONDON TO FIND

‘ a WHISPER -AH! |








_ Ea MA. PROFILE ?
a THE PHONE J BAD NEWS. 1 FEAR.
; cr WHISPER 15 GONE ~ |
: SNATCHED AWAY?4








YES! IT WAS CANNON.
OF COURSE, WE FOUGHT
\. "BUT HE HAD HORDES
_.OF MEN WITH HIM, ~







BY FRANK STRIKER

_ ae | IF YOU WANTED TC
~ BREAK AWAY FROWN

) TEAM VI WANT TO TEAM |
\, UP WITH A |
O? / BETTER MAN |
—-{ THAN YOU ARE!)





par.



BRINGING UP FATHER

[—
| ;
HUH
ELEVATOR
2 fill a r NO
BREAKFAST ? r YOUR OWN E
AKFAGT ~-I'M \h A AFRAID
} : NOT GETTIN’ WAKE UP
} \ UP YET! a
5

ie








7-—_--—-

RIP KIRBY

at eae LiKké
fi," “ FINGERS! LEA\
> ME HERE Ww A

' | COPPER YOU'VE
ry | KNOCKED COLD!

BY ALEX RAYMOND
VERY $0 RRY, MRS, Y





= \

2) OVE) Ob AR EE + A a —

THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES
VRE] fog Dip S0 wccnaaie? “AL LIEDLONG) WSR

/\ MeCoy

OR.\ HUSBAND SHELL) 7am
; EFOR ay { |
n *







early Morning
i can’t go back ia



CARE YOUR BUILDINGS!!
REPLACEMENTS COST £s

Corrosion costs you £ ? a year
‘ > | l ‘B: De you know the amount of
y Corrugated Iron imported inte
tropical countries every year ?
The figure is astonishingsy high, ang
|




Your Nerves a: ]
bad;




Then it js time ig












after allowing for new orks the
balance represents a heavy forfeit fos
jack of taking proper precautions.

Protection is easy with

LOGE

Anti-Corrosive Paint
for every INCH of metal.

FERROGENE is an _anti-corrosive

\ paint designed for the tropics. It clings
closely te the surface of metai-work, forming
a Camp-proof, air-proof skin which preserves |
|











tonic. Taken in dr
it quickly tones w 4
nerves and enables wit
to get a 00d nisl
rest. Try it and be g
vinced,

itslife~Imost indefinitely, In three attractive
shades «Red, Grev and Green.

Manufacturers; BURRELL’S PAINTS, Mitcham, Surrey
(Props.: R. J. HAMER & SONS (Paints)
Limited)

Also makers of - -
“PEDIGREE” Implement and Machinery
1

Ename

“PERFECTO” Oil Bound Washable
Water Paint

“AQUATITE” Waterproofing Composition



















|
|






ON SALE ar

Price 36+. per bo

All Good Drug



My Toni perm looked
natural from the start!”

says the Twin who gave herself



a Toni at home



f

so ° ' Y 4 5 ee
ee 86% ~~

2 me WHICH TWIN HAS THE ‘TONI -_ eee ere

and whith has the expensi rm?*

if <2 ~ \)

4“ tyl ya
-m . + ss /. 4 Fa
The wave that gives that Three Simple Steps ;
natural look no lovelicr fe | 1 Roll your hair up in Y. r e °
: ) | Toni curlers, Dab on > 7

rm at any price 5 WAAR) 2 Wy i yre t i
perm at any price Fives Crame‘diaien. a Our Dain’ s Merit
Soft, satura/-loo!) curl Poets | » If you like ask a _ '
deep, graceful \ i i








trend to help you with

last tor months and 1 the back ¢

OUR baby is entitled to have the best possible st

You'll say your Toni

lovely and lasts as lon a Tie a turban sround: (ee in life, for on this wil! grcot!y depend his future wt
ovely ¢ asts as long bude diis. eee ‘| \ Zz B ‘9 + i
expensive perm, And aisle chueyidiicn a being. . For this reason you wi!l kaow how importanti(g
ies alee eandiee Wverage. Pech aiem | is that your baby should be fed from the breast
? -- F vil ‘ nly Guoczi ley r
Toni waves any hair that wil Breast milk is the one perfect food tor babies. It is natunll
ee ee , . F constituted to suit their delicate digestions and to provide the nut
baby-fine hair. Average wa pre | 2) Caturate. eae curl tive elements required to ensure healthy ». owth and develop
ume is only 14 hours. } t ith ‘oni Neutralizer, ee :
¢Whink ; : | 4 then set in your Be guided by the experience of Nurses anJ others who testify
Which Twin has the Toni ? | write hair — style the value of ‘ Ovaltine’ to expectant mothers. Taken
Ella Wi oni is in — just after baby comes, delicious ‘ Ovaltine ', owing to its restorative
Joni Twin. ou want it! nutritive properties, stimulates lactation and thus helps to ensutth
ich ¢ , st-mi '
Important Saving ! roni Kit rich and ample supply of breast-milk.

. ” In addition, ‘Ovaltine’ supplies the form of concentrated a,
S143 balanced nourishment which does much to maintain the
strength and vitality during the nursing period.

Give yourself a natural-looking

e
a @ vaitine
My a wth 06 ate : . Dk
COVE sg ee Fnables / others lo breast Feed their
a Sold in airtight-tins by all Chemists and Stores. Po
ZENE SNL ILE NIL IIE NUE MWEN



A PRODU
ote

seeereresereseeeesoseoseses ,
Trade enquiri GED



i

















New Florida
5 WAYS SKIRTS

One and the same skirt you can wear in 5 different ways
1. with a blouse as an ordinary skirt,
2. with a blouse as a pinafor skirt.
3. sundress,
4. ordinary dress.
5. dancing dress,





“ PLORENG



Price $5.48

BROADWAY DRESS SHOP.











— ~~~

LIG

INSTAL - -

o_w~~»~oJ_~.~"“—=—["F CE

HT

TROUBLE FREE



We now have in stock

FLORENCE .
STOVES

AND

OVENS

8 BURNERS $7186 =
2 BURNERS $44





‘LISTE R"”
ALTERNATOR SETS

a Mey DIESEL DRIVEN ALTERNATORS
; ° % “




”





oe es :

All complete with Switchboards and A
Regulators.
COMPLETE RANGE OF SPARE PARTS
Apply -

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lid.

White Park Road



utomatic Voltage



IN STOCK



oe
CITY GARAGE TRADING (0. Hh







is Dial 4546
= = Se a
SSS aes 1




. ICH 25 ite E
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22, 1950 THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE rico



E




























































































































3
an ate ree! cso papshet cf . i
T ’ , Sa 8 +4
4 CLASSIFIED ADS. | PuBute vevices R r | ry Conducted y
) | eioninetinericsae epo ospital Enqui ‘
ee ee er = a
eee Pp ‘
i “£25 easily earngd by obtaining orders ;
DitD For R for private Christmas Cards fro 4
| EN Your friends No previous experies # 4
povcr—EDWARD ee! Bed * T | a ontes for beautiful free oe a triad i J
a wil Bank Hall at 9.00 am | 00 ee | pple Publisherss eee, Wareeet ane 3 ‘
: * an! ‘ Se ea ost Publishers; highest commissio::, : ; er ‘s tof ig 7 m om
> ening for the Westbury Ceme- | HOUSES | marvellous money ating dae ri @ from page 7 modera stancani's of treatment and this figure - ci me peg se es :
Barts Borce | tmother), ghceet Hy ee, DUNDEE, St. Lawtence Gap | Works, "Presmns, © 2. Dept. Ys tion of the Hospatal over matters of discipline, promotion and duties of hos: | to be arrive’ »t. An inercase of Se eee 7 ital be 65 iens oe
parce geginer), Elsie Sareea 333.80. | and the 1a. Suntenbe ane: anes ‘area or - pital employees. The interference was quite properly .disregarded uy the considerably «se the Nee ee provi ook a oe oo vadtetiga’ taal 4
TALE A Dial soe re Dundee, St rence, | 2 fficials eoneerned | that they can be used to the best advantage. erence § id
ANNE BUTCHER. | ‘ dee, St. Lawrence, | ATHLETIC SPORT. ficials eoncernec : : | SHSe tHe) ; : . ‘ ; i b
BCE er ttancion Road, Bent ret EET ig ANNUAL see ne mere 47. The allegation that nurses and subordinate staff were improperly /ed jn'this Repori will show that the daily average of patients in ae
fi, Funeral will leave her late| | MAZLEWOOD,” Bishops Count Hin | MEETING “a AT OMBERMERE conveying information about deaths of patients to undertakers was carefully | ont the year 1 13% less that the official bed aceommodation, despii
: Hal 4.30 p.m. for the West-| f furnished, Telephone, Refm or.) SCHOOL, will take pit ying pa ; ) i } ; A aaenie ane eal s
reaieremetery this evening. Garage and Garden, Available ist Ari, | 0. Thursday, acne Place this yeas investigated. One case only was found in which, after the most ¢areful in- | fact that the | ospital has frequently to turn away p acecomm
Gales Butcher Teuton (Son U.S.A.) | en Telephone $388, 21.3.50—2n | 12.30 vim. parents 1s vestigation, it could not be ascertained by what channel the undertakers had | some patients two in a bed at times.
un matcher (Grend-Deughier HoT ICE—Marhill St. next to W. B are cordially obtained the information. The nurses and porters of the hospital were warned | = . ‘
vreat-Grand) Tutehings, & oC me es ae es a : . ; . sii
Yvonne Butcher | 23.3.50—1n,| lars avply Wo B "ihe Particu-| sin at 3.00 pin. Olt Boys’ Race will be (to exercise the greatest care to prevent any leakage of information. : Site c ange o 7
14 n| 19.3.50—3n; 48. I was informed by a doctor in general practice in Bridgetown that | 55. On tho choiee of site the main faetors to be considered are:—
] rie * . ar eaneenseheensneeseewenanatinameeen P «4 ‘ A * * * . . if
ye meaatmaaas NLICE over Sanitary Laundry Depot ,; some of the undertakers of less repute were so enterprising in touting for (a) Convenience to the publie
IN MEMORIAM f erca. conn Raabely Senitary Lau NOTICE | their business that three agents had called at the house of one of his patients thy: Cet ‘08. conmthadian
> “ 6.3. 5¢ - >. > A ‘ ;
: eciedesai before his Jeath. The remedy for this state of affairs would appear to be in : : ; ; d
OR Oe SP eee ING! Rinden Ban shake aes . Sie: : | ») Maintenance of an adequate hospital service during the build-
IN loving ADNE HINDS who depart-| unfurnished ts mim Mede™n Bung SAMUEL HAMPDEN the hands of the community, i.e. not to deal with such firms. (¢) Mi ance an ade
< ‘ : t above Highuats ees | : :
ants fe on Mine! sad SE day} Popetrooms, dining or: Be NOTICE 1§ HERES GIVEN that a Vil. PERMANENT STAFF FOR THE GENERAL HOSPITAL. | ing period,
: one year Nee loved was galled away | | uing water “Dial ee Too, ru ae Se ane Sabt or claten ast fey General Remarks. ' Of the three suggested sites, Waterford, Bay Area and the present
cee Te ly but God love . the of Samue ampden : ic F ma, ies
as cog — ee ech obahidad as O8 | in this, Island, ape, wy, OF Bricuetows | 49. The work of the Hospital has long outgrown the old arrangements | Site of the Hosp'tal - : : a ae
: st. tN Sn ne Slo » Baker, who if this : . . J . + » .
Bo he took Ne eae ted by Millicent | Te Cue, Hill, fully furnished, | Island on the Sth day’ of September 19:8 | Under which it was carried out by a small body of permanent young doctors The present site is } mile from the omnibus reer or &
Be Mor Hinds, Parents. Celeste.) rroved tenant Reason ave Apoly, | tleulass of thant cinta an Be |(Housemen) under the direction of a Visiting Staff of private practitioners routes to Bridgetown and is most convenient to the Public. ;
4, vian, el. "4 " —_ _ ent. Apr ; on ~ & 1a uly a stec ‘ ‘ “ ; 7 . : : :
- and Cloner s) Raymond and Clara | 2°> King C/o Alleyne Arthur Soo te | UT ae hindersigned = GEORGE HENRY | who are all busy men with limited time that they ean spare for such work. No The Bay Area site 1 mile from the terminus is somewhat less
35:8.00-~-1n. | “Sanco poreicotes | MitllibeanGt Ease: Mena Gridgetorn os | SUch arrangement exists elsewhere for any but very small hospitals of limited convenient. : ; : :
; a Open gallery looking heat thee | or oP ay Meth April 1950, after whe'n | scope and it is a matter of surprise that it has existed for so long in Barbados, The Waterford site 2 miles from the terminus is definitely in-
ca SALE pe {oom dining room, three bed ‘sets of the deceased amon te partic, | and for congratulation to the civil practitioners of the Island for the devotion convenient.
} Pantry, hen, Serve b) * eihiane on : cast oe = ; .t z . . « : ° ‘
it FOR | ior Cooking, Electric Ligne ve ©, Tel ah aan on witee t thal then nave | ®2d public spirit with which they have kept it going, Although It might 80 New Construction or Re-Construction. Probable Cost.
bo Phone. | Dial Ms Kad notice and 1 will not be for | appear, it is not comparable with a big hospital in the United Kingdom with a | 56. (1) The cost of a construction of an entirely new hospital of 450 ._
. | yo mene | HE assets or any par he 3 72 bas * ‘ hs 3 . : . a
STONOTIVE | FROM MAY 8th for six months furnish distributed to tae yn Sear dant ; number of Visiting Staff. In such a hospital, the Visiting Staff are all Consult- beds on present day prices may be estimated at an actual figure of £1,500 a tt
a, new | Modern amenition CMP Adults only al Eek ail ‘paeerae aan eee i | ing Specialists, not engaged in general practice and the hospital has a large bed, i.e. £625,000, with subsequent extensions at the rate of £1,000 a bed. Op- = &
eae oe ents ter, model 1942, new | co on AGEon St. James Coast furnish | Mitate are requested to seitle ther i+ | permanent staff quite competent to carry on with all the general medical and | jin)\cm in low building estimates almost invaribaly results in sad disillu- i
ie 23,3.50—3n-| monthly of otheewlee, Peay “ated this 35th dag se popruary veo. | SURgieal work of the hospital and calling on ee are ae sialemtiniih: bs
au { Estate Agency Office Hastings Hotel La 3EORGE HENRY WILKIE, /for speci w a compelled the Hospital to : i k
ary etasah ck xe) | Tmphee Mae ual ie | Quelines Ancien aaeiaom ae Ricca mabe pape te ter go Rise tm for owlan and (2) The cost of re-constructon of the hospital upon its present site ¥
paase) Secerymouth, (1) Morris 8, (1) ee ae eee | of Samuel Haiipden, ener te h satire eal later a surgical specialist Now it becomes essential | for 420-450 beds should be possible for £350,000 by utilisation of some
ee aS Metee Te ai PET oa Ppaicnst: 1 ea . oa : oe : : ee sis , ; T
_-N.B.—These igen ipa et Pt BL SALES | | to provide a permanent staff efficient to cope with most of the general require- | of the existing buildings for their present or other uses. Under such a plan:
on the hire Arty A. Scott, Auctionee, | —— ATHLETIC SPORTS /ments of the Institution. The permanent staff of an 800-bed general hospital (a) The main Building, now used for medical wards would make
‘ F 3.5 Oo : ; om ‘ : : » : . . cs cer ad .
reer AUCTION THE Annual Athlete Sports Meeting | in the United Kingdom, is estimated at 30 full-time doctors. On this basis the an excellent Out-Patient and Casualty Department with its Hospital Adminis- f.
| — ‘ke place this seat un Phureey Sard | Barbados General Hospital, at present, should have 12 full-time doctors. tration Offices upstairs. i



| UNDER THE SiLvER HAMMER Fe ea eee ae hove ties se | Counting, however, upon continued assistance from the present organisation




















; : . (b) A very fine Operating Theatre Block could be made in the
the School and all Old Boy's are condi. | of the Visiting Staff, it may be possible to do with less.














































: ry 23 AaS . F 4
“FUPPIES ' Male | Thur apper storey of the present Tercentenary Ward Building, the lower storey of
— Half bred Labrador On Thursde by order of Mi ip invited te a dion emeinaey - ; PI » s S r B J ay
Puppies 98.00 each. Piya 80-38 anual Walter Boyce we will sell the furniture | Hf. a; Tula. aap aha, conmeaa 4 | Recommendations. which could well serve for the X-Ray Examination and Therapy Department.
3. a at “Summer att stings, h in- | distribute the rizes c fe 3° _ $ i ase , i i isi
cludes Round ‘Tip-Top Table. een ca, | Sistrtbute the prize 22.3.50—2n 00. Tt is therefore recommended that the permanent sta‘? be increased to (c) The Nurses Hostel could remain unchanged with provision
Veanler, Gammon: The? | = oom. | the following adie a lines : aia for future extension and better quarters for the resident permanent nurses.
}all in Maho . Congoleum 9 x ¢ Medical Superintenden s adiiaehe ‘
“TDDING MACHINE (1 aera | apie hs p De hn Oak. Bakker Gla WANTED 1 Specialist Sur n, , (d) The nm 3 il sia ea sia cake bial of the
ey eae : *| Ware Dinner and Tea Ware, Pyrex Dis 7 es REO) (d e new main wards couk on e >
Josta’s Hardware =| Pictures, Rush Chairs Mate ha cas 5 7 : “ he tat p ;
a Peer 21.3. 50- 3n. | >. takes Worse Bo ahi — SS 1 Specialist Physician, present Tereentenary Ward, in two storey blocks with foundations adequate
——_——_ | Sleep, Beds tenn eo, springs and I HELP 1 Specialist jachiogia, a for their conversion later to three storeys. The new wards should be for
a . ro CdS Lea > Viah % ’ : , w 1 7A F P g
ANEOUS Rureau, Cedar Press, Westinghouse Re- | “GoOK--A Good Cook. Apply to Mrs x Medical Officers (General duty). a 22—24 beds arranged in pairs with central ward offices for each pair and
_-MISCELLAN Pardes, kitchen *Feties, Serene: Gij | > Gittens, “The Bonyans’” Bay Sweet. | CGonerally two Medical Officers would work under the Specialist Surgeon, tw: lavatories and baths at the end of each ward. This would effect economy in
————— . sription. | a: ; . 9 Sure . —4n : ae + 9s $s : 7 : : : : : aan iiehama
ANTIQUES— of every peter nar, | stove: 2 Pouble Doors, is Jalousies and 2 Medical Officers under the Specialist Physician and three Medical Officers woul the use of nursing staff on night duty and provide a better service.
ewels, e ‘| 2 pairs *4 Jalousie S 8 othe 2m: = ; . > ee > i "
WEeeecisure Reriy books, Maps, Auto- | Scie 11.30 o'clock, emntnd, other items = be available for other general duties, such as anaesthetics, out-patient work e) The Pay Wards and Tercentenary Ward should be trans-
Watercolours i ‘Antique Shop, | Trotman & Co. ‘Aus : MISCELLANEOUS . ee : . iv. . . ; ( , j \ ; :
foots es ayal Yacht Club. NERO. Se: ARNON 19.3.50—2n, Nien CoUEET aes ae lat midwifery, V.D. Wards, relief for doctors called to give evidence in the courts, | ferped from the site of the main hospital and housed in new wards to be built
EIST RORE | + ntemeeeeticsere sree eennenstrrintions| gicet he 2 NCHS Puy Ear Oe late, aka, AAOp mite on a roster for night casualty duties. Preferably all the on the 3 aere site north of River Road. If these wards were housed in one



“GAS RANGE—Two Burner Gas Range; UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER ——) \ledical Officers should have previously held House Appointments in large building with different classes of accommodation, a better nursing service
as new Price $20.00 Phone BY instructions received I will sell

as {| hospitals elsewhere. The post of Specialist Anaesthetist might later be could be effected. This site would also serve for quarters to be erected for

- Spaigah a am 94.3,50—8n: | Pee ach att at Rea ae Cte sidered. additional staff.

SacteARighStringless Beans 14 cts| Demnged Trees herms Cash rd FOR SALE Suggested Salaries, (f) The present Eye Hospital and its Out-Patient Block and

per Ib. Carrots 16 cts. per Ib. Dial 3756 r Auctioneer BY 51. The present salaries of House Surgeons in Barbados are too low to Paying Wards could then be closed and its patients accommodated (i) in the

eee e Sherhere 7 3,00—2n SHI ED: HOUSE SPOTS obtain recruits in these days other than a few young Barbadian doctors who| new liospital Wards, (ii) in the newly cited Out-Patient and Casualty Depart-
return to use the Hospital as a short stepping-stone to private practice in the| ment. and (iii) in the new Paying Ward Block. The present Eye Hospital

entre
UND UITO NET HOOPS can c Sh R ! f eaten oe oe

te had again, “they are. stronger . al BUILDING SITES island, The salaries and conditions for these posts should offer equivalent| Buildings could be re-constructed and used for Staff Quarters,
neater than the square ones, size 28 LAND—1,637 square feet of land at













































































































































5 Wr and 26" diameter. Phone 8332. | Dunlow Lane, off Bay Street, Apply emoluments to those offered in similar posts in England and this might induce (g) There is ample room on the 11 acres for all the requirem nts
. 17-5.50—3n| G. L. W. CLARKE & CO., Solicitors Cash or Easy Terms a certain number of Barbadian doctors, who now prefer to remain in England, | of a 600 bed hospital. If a new paying patients block were constructed it
PURE CANE JUICE. Bight (8) cents} 22™mes Street. wees | to return to Barbados. The salaries of the proposed cadre should be :— should also include an operating theatre (for which all the equipment now
eee SRE on River Road, | pi PAYABLE WHOLESALE LIQUOR f Salary Fees Other | Galata) It would then be possible for paying patients to be operated upon at
hone 2382. uaneneeiies | Clay with Brrohaaing fuga wot ‘eae From 10c.;per.8q. toot up z emoluments | any time convenient to the Visiting Staff without conflict with the needs of the
; DOORS, (12) French| Will. Conditions of Sale very Attrac- ELECTRIC, BUS and WA'TER Bie ia o 10n-paying patients.
WINDOWS & DOORS, (12) French | tive and No Big Capital involved or Se hare j ' A, ; . ‘ A oak 7
Pant Chpen tis Fea doe aed Chas 200k ‘Debts. Dial Silt or 2113, Con PEANICES. ose Medical Superintendent .. ri £1,200 Nil Quarters and (3) Maintenance of hospital service during the building period would
. 1 ee “ i a aren Toe., 4 : . ‘e . . . . e a T< - , .
eee va hen: Se eer, Tudor Street, Near ‘Mason Hall. Street 1, PICKWICK ROAD, KENSING- passages be simple if an entirely new hospital were built on either of the W aterford or
“all these ere nowy wt of Pitch aang be eh TON, St. Michael. | Specialist Surgeon ie .. £1,000 x 100—1,300 Ilalf do. Bay-area sites, It would involve much difficulty during re-construction of the
a Weatherhead, Max-| " 3fOUSE,—One board and ingle gen teraemaeme, Savers | Specialist. Physician sa - do. Ilalf do. Hospital on its present site, but it is not impossible, The problem has already
‘, 5 » 200 x < BY 7 rc ad of uvning, St. Michael. . as . ) ieee ee a .
— 17,3.50—4n Pik & wens Situated shove Pins 3, THE PINE CROSS ROAD, St Specialist. Radiologist re ar do. Nil do. been studied by Mr. Leacock, the Specialist Surgeon, who when functioning as
> RVPRTE ASBESTORS SHEETS 6 to| Theatre, | Enterprise Ch. Ch. Apply "G! cetinth. xmoetaik Medical Officers .. . ok .. & 750 x 50—£1,000 Nil do. Medical Superintendent, drew up a scheme and plan for reconstruction showing
| itve tte ef pends and eee Senin GARDEN & KINGSTON” TER: || | This would increase the cost of the cadre, as at present maintained, by| that it was quite possible by following a careful programme of demolition and
) is. B. Taylor Ltd. Coleridge Street. | POST yN—eih Ave Belleville. woo | fill to Kingéien Road, Se Michael, approximately £5,000 per annum. , reconstruction to maintain hospital services. ‘These proposals are more apeeping
4100. 18.3,50—8n - : : ; awing, i i Oo Kingston Road, St. J ael, { rox Usty « ? . ” rl i ‘ 5 . i . a . Sd Goa ne ] for r sliminarv construction 0: .
SS ——_____—____——"- | house, Good condition. drawing, dining {jf 1" 19 neon et 62. The post of Medical Superintendent requires a man with some/ than his but by the use of the vacant 3-acre plot for preliminary eo
& |GALVANISE PIPES & FITINGS, Size) Oe toe ; St Re OTH | ve: ; : ital aad apable of exercising control over all} quarters and paying patients wards, thus releasing a large area of the Hospital
Bi %, 1 inch, 14, 1a, 25 242, 3, & 4 inch | “"CENWORTH — Pinfold, Street. Wood See Saar | experience Of hospital managemen ec for d liti AE teen late they become equally possible.
Prone ig? TIE SO So t.t.n | House, good condition, reception room| Apply : ERNE RTLE | classes of the hospital per ‘1. The respective salaries for these posts under | +0F Gemolition and ne f Ons ’
16.3.50—t.f.n | House, th ites tee Apply : ERNEST D, MORTLEY, classes of the hospital personnel. e pe P y 2
a ly now in| electricity, enclosed. yard, | Sane ceo eonee eons | the National Health Service in England is very much higher than those now ; X. MEDICAL eect cal
SEMI ct your groom amit you.are | , BARMYEDDE: — one part wood. {{| Dial 3927 Bridgetown | obtaining in Barbados. It is still doubtful if the salary now suggested would 57. Barbados possesses a Hospital but no sy ye of oe ae es
tat using this most delicious and econ- | 3 bedsoome, 3. ivi mi», kitchen, | - | chtain any but a young man awaiting opportunity of a better appointment, but| throughout the Island that in ene with the Hospital, would form an
f all tens, dr tn SAG 36 aS 7 lectricits ane '¢ yan a i . are i ¥ ° sieaiat nla, “lie apvice for 8 .
ad you cifeas’ sdnple. without .A0y WTS SPRING HOUSE T 3 ‘it might be attractive to some retired R.A.M.C. or I.M.S. officers on pe nsion, adequate medical rere for “e Doye ae oa: unde ‘ish control treat sick
Bampton to, buy Pe SiS need Beane SER — ho would prefer a life in the tropies to present conditions in the United 58. Dispensaries in Parochial Almshouses under parish control tree sick
John F. Hutson Limited—Agents. MS yndahs overlooking the W | \N Ho would prefer a ile m2 P Pp yg 1 aupers, and a system exists in the parishes under which poor persons may obtain
ae | eae 1 Barbados. Ra P| TOR % aa K Fees, paryAgenall pad cwn yon 2" 3 gt ht tinea hl rcs 4 ean in the Almshousé Dispensary by the Parochial Medical Officer at
a raat liculars from arbados oe ate) By } : ; 3 a rent cad ‘ se Dispens . } £
> BATH TUBS—Four English Bath Tubs 2 9 Office Hastings Hotel Lid | @| rd 484 touch with sneh retired service officers. - 4 : : 1 s I ws .
to clear $100. Less 10% eeeaieaeeesk 22.3.50—2n | a IX. HOSPITAL CONTROL. reduced charges on the recommendations of Inspector of Poor after enquiring
A, Barnes & Co., Ltd 50 t ————SSSSSSSS | Genesal into his cireumstances. Although this resembles the procedure for out-patients
s aa _ ‘GY Eg) | . c F ’ oa 2 z *
BE He Gin See ant bat. lenaths J | 4 wo Be : . was ; e General Hospital where patients pass an enquiry officer it is very different
Ble wild. ‘steel plates “1/16. 1/8 te | PERSONAL | BEAL BRPATE | 53. The present unsatisfactory conditions at the Hospital are not due to ia has the sahaate are even taliah onde the poor law which carries the un-
A rild steel lates 6, t 4s | ‘ { * .. B ¢ .
ty ~ ORG street. | DILON tse change. Tree tae old Baga as Management » gives ae ar See Sas deserved stigma of pauperism. That this is resented is shown by the compara:
i ‘huto Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street. . ps dale ian | / t ernment through its own executive officials. These conditions have been de- ciel large number of patients from country parishes who seek treatment at
| GHOSE RRCORDS YOU WANTED et ret (my ek el | ND | | Seloping through a numbor of years and the time has = 7 wert “= + » the Hospital Out-Patient Department. ‘he Parochial Medical Officers are not
; 1 : n| Callender) og J do. nes HOU ee 1h A spital i small to e ith the needs of the population while its wor 2 | TLMent. : veer ;
Tev're here and they're __ keen | Callender) as I yone else contract- | Hospital is too small to cope with the needs of the poy ) ; : nieol of the Chie! Macical(@iesr-theumh thelr diememeeeian aan
= by, bam Rowe vocals by An ine sme a oa doy me. QT | has co increased ip sinannt And eemplexity that 3 would, be impaniine 209. 8 ietibe nce cakcen th his beapectitn and although nee may saaetee his advice
gr Sites, Mins rn ee te co. |” * Staned EDMUND SRANGG Bi ADON |f | Board of lay business men, meeting once a month or even oftener, fully to/! rr sommendations they are not bound to follow his instructions in any duties
OTe ate —T es | understand and cope with it efficiently. It is quite certain that no business | #¢ he eis Thabe in thus little or mo co-operation between these doctors
C/T + mae | | (JOHN M. BLADON) | men willing to sit upon such a Board would agree to his own business being| that they perforin. There is thus little G Sas sdeat the clei Ga ie
Tag Saha lal tor y warned again * | fl ; b ‘mi ; f had the advan-| and the General Hospital, as is evidenced by the fact that very few cases can
1 Refreshing. | The public are hereby warned agai: | LAN terprise Road. (On | condueted by a similar body. The old Board of Management a, re : ee ae ee
BAilities af you Grocers or Drug- | giving credit to anyone ih my name wit ost Rae Canter harden: ‘ae ” > eee § f swift di swipline and a certain fluidity in powers} found on the Hospital's records of patients admitted for diseases such as tetanus,
* ct 3.50—2r a 4 tten order signed by me 1 J gt ' re tage of powers o entoree swi ae e@ & J. . or : a : eae coe : reliminar’ dose of curative
i a oe fe .Stirective building 4 : oor for the engagement of extra staff or other emergencies that the| 2mterie fever, and diphtheria who have received a pre V; Gone 08 cu
vad t rm of expenditure for the engageme e ee ae at] E
SrrEL CABINETS — Four Roneodex coun. Micha b ed. and | P state ' ; remedied or prophylactic serum, although the Government Medical Administration is pre
el Cabace Tacnclate ‘wits Tray ad St, Michael, "ty Alwake cool wile’? present hospital administration does not possess. These might be remedied — paved to provide such remedies free of charge to private practitioners, and like
Card, { *s Ltd aid ind swe r | ig ae = & ‘ . . 7 °
. oe 3 50—-3n BARBADOS CIVIL SERVICE leciriclty sale. | (1) By delegation of disciplinary Terie tad et to some issued circulars to Parochial Medical Otticers recommending their a patients
—=—==—— | | int further dow » line i : oerd an ots. N sthinery therefore exists under which a case treated free in the
BARBADOS “DIXON & BLADON”’ point further down the line, for instance to a Disciplinary and contacts. No machinery therefore exists under ¢
a ON 2) By POvisi i i ital can be ret d to his parish to reeeive free treatment to com-
ma | ASSOCIATI LEETON ON SEA--Near Oistins (2) Bs budget provision to meet contingencies. : General Hospital ean returned to his p } ’ Te LY
T NOTICE ion of Council members Suilt “Weak Oko ena Benet. | Measures to manage Hospital Accommodation. plete his recoyery, for example, cases of diabetes requiring regular insulin
" 5 a ua right onto a sandy beac * ; ‘ i a . re : 7 rs .
m THIS serves to inform my Polling for the election of five pale | 1 oy lient bathtt g fecilities | 54. There is no question that more hospital accommodation is necessary treatment for the rest of their life, or, cases discharged from hospital whieh need
ey Clets and the General Public to. seve om, the Council tor Trey of re, 59 wae. mon). vesandah and there can be little doubt that Barbados will never be able to provide this} obgeryation (uring their convalescence, or further treatment or occasional
/]] that I have opened my own Tail- 1950, will take place he iber, Public extending the entire frontage. 4 | and there can > : sas : f {l : § itates | j rneys to the Hospital
b Oring Fstablishment at home and the Legislative Counc ee asth April. |i} > cin ap. (3 with basins) ange | on the standard now adopted in richer communities. 600 Hospital beds for all] medical exa:sination that at present necessitates long journe ” e " bite
. a 34, i ss, on § ) . shaped loung ith cocktail | ' coe r : : , : 4 8
Ea intertake the making of 1950, between the hours of 10 am. 90 ber, klinhen, garage and, servants purposes would seem to be the limit possible for the Island to maintain for} that can ill- be afforded by them. An attempt has been made to remedy this
Teno cnsure satisfaction. to all. Sede ing Candidates have been|(§| quarters. Enquiries invited ition by the Act to establish a Department of Medical Services (1947) which
j p x ni “a Pen | ? ; : . at
nae ‘ ares nominated “DIXON & BLADON” a Th S M ct , A ‘ ti oe not ™ been promulenen a oe ere the oer oll ool rye
‘ ABR, Tailor Cutter Miss D. F a STATE TYPE HOUSI St. | . ssocia on owers 0 supervision an irection of and responsibili y for medica
formerly of C. B. RICE & Co.) Mr. F. H, BARKER Jegiigia. PRopertay’ Ya. comananding | e€ ugar anufa urers powe ; ie
7 i : & COUARK! : a ‘ f the Island, which he does not at present possess, but appears expressly
No. 76 Housing Scheme, Mr e CO EARKE See nee eae oe ae services 0. > i : , snl ?? ‘ ee
ine MB MOEWIs intel toaities In. this coke’ | (of Jamaica) Limited to differentiate (Section 4 (¢) ) between “‘public’’ and ‘‘ parochial’? Institutions
mar i tar we ow c.. SPRINGER idaho obese ee ee over the latter of which he is apparently given the powers only of visit and
a p . a to a modren heme without heavy | inspection. : 4 ee et ie
: Mies ML. ST tek clams areal land troy ie | The best solution would appear to be that the Government take
: Miss M. STUART sdrawn first class arable land may be as yr 59. he ‘ f e )
= "Tag g | Miss E. V. CARTER has with af first clase arable land may be | invite applications for two posts in their Research Department -“ over the maintenance of all Parochial Dispensaries and take the present Paro-
ale” ee io tie ental ee ens | duties connected with the breeding, selection, and field testing o ehial Medica! Officers in the country parishes into Government service as
| & FOUND building development which can | sugar canes, with special reference to resistance to virus and other Medical Officers at, roughly, their present pay and emoluments with the right
Lost be attracted here 4 diseases as well as to other normally desirable characters. to private practice. Their duties would be to maintain Government Dis-
i, _ ; “DIXON & BLADON a (a) Botanist, salary £1,000 rising to Biase yn annum pensaries, treat the sick in local Almshouses and to earry out public health
, . : LOST Series 2.0001 a en” Geotax tee | (b) Agronomist, _ &, @Or~ £1,000. par. annum. \ i measures under the direction of the Chief of the Government Medi-
in inules bh os gos hp A same to the Advo- Dayrelis Road.’ Spacious rece'gtly | Applicants should possess a research degree or rn _ oe eal Administration. It would cost the Government little extra and it would
ease ; varded. remodel Bor ee need Wiis , : \
Rakin has neari Tite “Advertising Dept. Rewarded, 4 lle I err So + : re Be yn or ered cones See ion, a 19 - - ia a sailed
aa nearly 60 million tinyseams | 010 vunts’ quarters, storerooms, gar- | nave had e e breeding and selection . ‘ : tan stania roviding an adequate medi senvied
me seers hide and case tee | ———————— cre, loride eek 0 anes in \ The Botanist will also be expected to advise on plant pathology. sateMiink > ss eines oe . nly tae nein - Sir John Maude on
eine Tingworm, Beotiasts, a ae ad extent my Srivogey asked. © | The initial period of service will be three years ow by-7 to mn ere Moet a ro recommends & consolidation of parishes inte
aS mples, Foot Itch and other G o reas ed for’ this desirable well buil a . The selected candidates Loe ro i . ‘ ,
oe teller we treatments give ony } BETTER to cook on j nate esira with prospect of oe ee ee B.W1, and required three districts of Loeal Government, whieh, if adopted, will throw the present
BeAuse, The Hew discovery, Nixa. ||{ BEST to own it — a ia ie x lated them 198 November, 1950. A local allowance Parochial Medical Serviees in the melting pot. If eg ie now taken over by
ote Mae tt a s a riddle ; 28 : > RSSURE Spt NO a r yerminent it Wi ve mueh discussion as to their future.
give von a soft. clear, attrac= IT'S not a . REAL ESTATE AGENTS, | in lieu of quarters is provided and leave with passages paid after the Governinent it will save ONCLUDING REMARKS. son
es skin in one week, or money | IT'S The Last Unsol 5 Auctioneers & Surveyors : nsion scheme a, C
on yturn gt empty package, Get ii white Enamelled Gas Cuoker d ce ea three year service pete There is . nates re 2 eee In conclusion | must express my appreciation of the kindness and cour-
ixoderm from your chemist an Showroom. Furth sarticulars may obtained ’ : e T
: : 5 Pee j ‘S BU Se yone througliout the en am par-
yore theres Why not call and have a look PLANE AE years Severe Sugar Researsh Department, Mandeville, deamtion, BALE 2 Spee tesy eg ets Bing Sg 7 ae ys ae ney pact in
9 se of skin ” it? ean Sree er t ieulars ai ences ticular’ { ) a ae C rae ting
Mla Tronbles trou. yo Da ee, oe secant); Medical Superintendent of the General Hospital, ior ts wae . angionece
“a eT eee Y 504 iry that necessitated such frequent calls from
: 1 ie a ven me throughout the enquiry tha
| , : ;
you GET many duties. '
i ss to my Secreta: jor A. De V.
EXTRALOW COST PTs MA, 90 RANE Cee one Chess an encpelopeotis ef tincwioags cat Batealiah Saemanniaaae ame
RATION | A Limited number of vacancies will occur in tember, 1950 in am avd tony areaten Paallithiod tad suaniee
OPE | the Preparatory Department and in the Main Sehool. Applications for oe ot ¥ Ansa takis V. Boiron fos the willing paleatittine as
eZ entry must be made to the Headmaster by Parents/Guardians ona stein Y t ei 7” % Bo a es doe ae ’ 3
eS Waiting List Form, accompanied by a Birth/Baptism Certificate, on or e nt manner °
before 31st May. Unsuccessful applications made for previous years do Tihéve the henieaeia be
not hold good. New applications for 1960 must be oe 7 —_ a
i¢ cation can normally be accepted for a boy who will be under 8 years s ? :
5 otified of the Your Excellency’s most obedient servant,
DEPENDABLE BATTERIES months in September 1950. Parents/Guardians will be no! 9 y TT eeAN,
FOR 61 YEARS! dates and time of the Entrance Examination by a notice in the Press ; AN
2 ( and by letter, The Barbados General Hospital,
me Department of Education, 14th February, 1960,
Sig EO,” aimnanmaaactta 19,3.50—Sn.
Distributors: CITY GARAGE CO., 13th March, 1950.




—

Pi AGE TE N








































E ngland Looking

TUESDAY, April the 4th
Sensational Welterweight





BARBADOS ADVOCATE









¢ ollege

Harrison





because



'B.B.C. Radio Programme



WEDNI SDAY

MARCH

ee,









1954

—.














































































300 Candle Power

British Make 99990966896¢

SSSOSGCSSS



COOSSS

00669909999990009

| tel aio NO MORE GREY
| > WEDNE ns BAECS ; Nes
| Defeats Y.M.F C. | 7a Fg AE | AFRICAN MIXTURE
j le The Pleasure of Poking About. 8
| : ABOUT 300 _ spectators iticun Won thee Weilterisls, &10. 000, Pro Colours the Hair instantly.
) or : ¢ Ts Queen’s Park yesterday saw | gramme Parade a 15 ass oe a i it is absolutely what Is professed of it :
OO a is ? >c | Wo 9 3 lose Down. 12 1
| Harrison College defeat Y aa oat The News 12.10 oan News Analysis A catia or hey SOLOUMNS
2 , il econd division footba 12.15 Music for Dancing p.m llable in andy sizes
iby Joe Thomas lgiecen 4s Gerald Barrs Speaking, Pe nian of “ Obtainable me
LONDON | During the first half. play was! â„¢ wsreel 1.30 p.m. The, Technique
g the f ail, pla) « p.m. The News. 2.10 p.m. Home , akes
THE British Football Association selection committee has not enterprising. A single goal was| News From Britain. 2.15 p.m. Sports Re BOOKER S (Barbados) the hair
¢ li I BK y 7 eno are oe ° 5 99 | College view. 2.30 p.m. British Concert Hall. 3.30 R E S LT soft and g
in artisie aay almost completed the task of naming the 22 players wh a y oa if found both|? Donald Peers. 4 p.m. The News DRUG STO Db. | Sota
> Pus ; { e second 1a oun bpotn I > ai Service. 4.15 pm |
s es will represent England in the ; orld Cup tournament at a oe a : oe aaa eras AP ge: 410 p m. The Dally nerves Be aS BROAD STREET, BRIDGETOWN 2 Sixes
2 sch. Alexandrina R., Sch Schooner ted Pilgr 7 ton . a bool July. ams 7 Music. 5.15 p.m. The Lord M 3 sate
Mutton Belle Wolfe, Sch Mary M Lewis set, Capt t, from St. Lucia tio de Janeiro next June and Ju J a SARE Pare them notched up a goal era ee she shiee oe Lane, BaOr 2 | Manufactured by E. FLOUTIER LTD., Stana ea aa Eng, de
Aux. Sch. Cachalot, Sch. E, M, Tannis, Agents : S« Wer meree foe There ST des tet ae a ; an As play was coming to a close | astery. 7 p.m. The News. 7.10 p.m. News | — mn ner 19
Sch. Adina Mac, Sch. Zita Wonita, Sch. 8.3. Gascogne, 2.681 tons net, Ca St ial tainties for the trip, and not more ht hard to score the] Analysis. 7.15 p.m. Books to Read. 7.30 | ——— as
Cyril mn Ficary, gene artis Dove Se. home h co. pe were ee i Savannah Club jthan a dozen real candidates for sonata ry wale often stopped | Pn Calls tt Masterpigems. 7:45 p.m, Cer- re .
Preedom ear Sch. Turtle ve, Sch one = Dee } , a ft . ee S \ ro calls the Tune > News- |
M.V. T. B. Radar, Sch. Provi- : IRES " So the remaining six places, by the College backs. reel. 815 pm. The Lord Mayor's
“Mark, Sch, Sea ante Se“v0oner france We we eith, 74 tons 1 ennis The spectators at Rio are almost} “phe evening’s first goal was| Thanksgiving Banquet. 8.45 pam. Inciden- |
Ie 28.8. Alcoa Pilgrim, Sch hilip yet Capt. Hassel, for British Guiana; YESTERDAY'S RESULYS sure to see some of the follovring taken by College about five #. ee ee tare Bene TENE,
co ABRIVALS ate ie eS Cones Orta aerteeene Mer’s Singties | Htttish ple yers In ROGERS ) q,| Minutes before half-time—when p.m Gerald Barry | Speaking 8.30 pin
pit 2. een ory Lucia; Agents ; Schoon ap’. Olivier or Trinidad; Agent Dr. C. G. Manning beat D. E Bert Williams (goalkeeper). He Gibbs, playing at inside lef nor « i oe es ee eee aed
er Owners’ Association. Tene biel tees hat: Can orine 4-6) 6-1) el, jhas been in grand form through- received a pass from Talma ct} SO cinta Commentary. Il pin. The | R
BE ODSE URS se crenadas Awents Prikent, for Mactinigué: Awente: Ht. M D. I. Lawless beat P. K. Roach |out the present season in inter-|jnside right and shot accurately. | News | YOU
oe by ge Weel ree "o & Co, Ltd 8—10, 8-—-6, 9—7. |national matches and for his club Without any further scoring, the |
gas Men’s Doubles Alf Ramsey (right back). He] whistle went off for first vw |
, , * ~ y Nec in tb eens ‘ is a str sure kicker wh ver Shortly after resumption,
J J 3 S COAST STATION P. McG. Patterson and G. H. |is a strong, sure kicker who nev s ; ry
IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS Manning beat O. M. Wilson and \s ets flustered. College took pe oe rs eis th Mr. L. Par | WARDROBE
fed ‘ ee Ste} oe ; ‘ > : 4 i i en al res > rom }
Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd ovig, Fosna, M/S Curate, ree J. H. C. Edghill 6—1, 6—1. | Laurie Scott (right back.) His Their second goa’ resu fa i : :
advise thas they can, now SEN hall. ceuariss San Vedtha, Geapeanasn, Oneroe TODAY'S FIXTURES experience against many foreign|a melee in Y.M.P.C., goal area. = Shoots Best |
Barballos Cont Batons eee anves H, Land, Hellinie Sky, Krios Men’s Singles clubs will be invaluable to the}the ball was ee ie “ ” Sat
: se ea ee Cape Junction, Uniguay, Alcoa Cavs lie . fa cae’ "ea British team; another strong] goalie got hold of it and lay « THERE was a practice on Satur | NOW
S.S. Geiruly, Durango, Thelidon u ane Se, ee, Ld nartt R S. Nicholls vs. G. H. Man- cited & the ground with it between his day at 200, 500, and 600 yards. |
Queen Adelaide, G. C. Brovig ae os ee Alooa’ Polaris,,) "ing ; | M a Conditions at 200 & 500 yards were
epnera, Cites, Regent titer aa’ -opne. NES De. ee Ladies’ Doubles Johnny Aston (left back). He Con e’s forwards gathered good but at 600 yards were difficult
Siancirilo, Lov a, Wave King, “ei Bea ‘pitreee (ode beeen Wredect 2, a PCS Mrs. J. | has proved himself quite the most ollege s aoe eo am nha thaws Nat cb betta > e
ciiell, “Petter, San Mateo, Argent! Cran’ “Eitactegatal, “Oleg Mrs. F. D, Barnes and Mrs. J. i around him. He tried to throw they que to changing light. The follow-
: “ena, Esso Reading, Rammhilé- Alcoa Ranger, Silversandal, Otco New { * ; The Misses Lenagan. |reliable left back in England, is aol 7 é Se ae
Golden Ocena, : : jet is Connell vs. The Misses Lenagz play while in his s are the eight best scores.
York, Bowrio, Martha Kleppe, PB ‘ known as “stone-wall” Aston’ by| ball back into pla ing are the eig arts ‘
(cuba, Chuertour, mouthen Cites Mixed Doubles ar lying position. The ball struck one HPS. 150/11 WHE areina
Niewe Arve, Cla ee tuatente |: Mré. .P, McC. Patterson and Cr a (wing-halt){of the forwards and rebounded) Mr. L. E. R. Parry 4 |
Dunedin EO June ne ‘ oe ie rkins ‘ ’ s iy ‘ ‘ i ee 3s ° or
Copra, Coconuts And Icotea, Wellandoc, Mormacsurf, Thoma |, S, Bancroft vs. Mrs. D. Perkins | | best wing half-back in the| toward the bars to be kicked back! Capt. C. R. E. Warner - Unique Position
Charcoal Arrive F, “Baker, Canadian Challeng ind Dr. A. C. Edwards. 8 out by one of the Y.M.P.C’s backs.] Mr. T. A. L. Roberts aa tt
= serday from ~ Miss E. Worme and J. 1. |game today. . It did not get far however aS} Mr. T. G. McKinstry 136 | t 1 ith
ARRIVING here eo a ae St. Hill vs. Mrs. D. E. Worme| Willie Watson (wing-half) the| tre forward Hewitt received} Capt. J. R. Jordan 135 | O supply wi
oa a ee at yen ren MAIL NOTICE and C. C, Worme. most constructive wing-half in| i+ at close range and easily scored Lt. C, E, Neblett 135 |
“United Pilgrim S.” with a cargo Mrs. G. D. Bynoe and C. de L. | England, is a grand ball player. Bourne, inside left for Y.M.P.C. Lt. Col. J. Connell 134 | THE FINEST
of 379 bags of copra, six bags r Mails for St. Vincent, Grenada, Arube | {nniss vs. Mrs. R. S. Bancroft and Billy Nicholson (wing-half), ¢ shot his team’s first goal to bring Mr. G. Pilgrim 134 |
coconuts, 266 bags of Ng Dartg ane’ by the MV lace hf Will be closet #1 Pp. McG. Patterson strong tackler, very enterprising |}46 score to 2—1. His low shot
resh fr the Geners ‘ “e as unde : y . ; ’ + SS AC ,
a smal] supply of fresh a” is con- 6 ater Aa REGISTERED MAIL a | Mixed Doubles (Handicap) | and enjoyable to watch. passed to the left of College’s | Sl ITS
The “United suger i ‘ ( as 30 p.m. on the 22nd March 1950 i Miss P. Wilson and A. M. Wil- Billy Wright (half-back), prob- goalie who was running out to Th W ather |
signed : to Messrs Schoor ee ae at 2 30 p.m. or ‘on vs. Miss D. Wood and Dr. | able captain of visiting team: ¢ oes the ball. e e.
Owners’ Association ene es 7 G. Manning very constructive player. End of play found the score TODAY MADE TO ORDER
\itate +k il fuera ” ‘Laurie Hughes (center-half), is ‘hanged
vemmmen TE unchangec |
St BS PITUTE” ant at beginning to establish himself as < Sun Rises: 6.06 a.m. | IN OUR TAILORING DEPT
SHIPPING NOTICES) aie Line ac ' a England’s first choice for center- Wi ° 3 De eals Sun 8 6.14 p.m. : .
| the next start in the We' “ |half; tall, strong minati is fe first Quarter) March
| racehorse trotter named “Substi- aes seneaaae act ating, i es ‘ e — (First Qu WE FIT You WITH EASE
“{ tute”. Waile —eing taken’ 0 | Stanley Matthews (wing for eter ighting: 6.30 p.m
—-—-— : ak iene broke away, Stanley Matthews (wing for- Lig ng: Do tee
‘We seers ——— me ac " saoeets a ae walked | ward); his skill would be of great , RIA. March 20 High Water: 5.18 a.m., 5.54 WE FIT TO PLEASE
cemennncat aia dashed for the beach ‘a -s | value at Rio; deceives his op- ALEXANDRIA, March 20. p.m. |
1" DABRW OOD ae straight into the sea. Three op ponent’. by his body swerving ahd Meraldo Weiss of Argentina YESTERDAY nA
aicerit aoe 5 fo later when it was overtaken ny brilliant foot-work I a reached _ the third round of sd Rainfall: (Codrington) .64 in. CAVE SHEPHERD & (0 Lid.
St, Lucia, St d Wis 1 fishing launch, it had cleared Wilt L a ; . iy Men's Singles in the Egyptian Total for month to yesterday: “9
Aruba wailing Wednesda 2 the Wellington heads, some pet anaae stylis ph Ser eat ence ‘owe be ag ri 1.61 ins. T i D
arch Fs » starting int, and was clever, stylis ayer a hips here by beating é c : 29° R
rh v. CARIBBER will ac from the starting poin hive i ; pionship: erature (Max.) 83.0° F. § °
tio Gogo va Passengers for GiyceRint | 4 PASTILLES « still swimming strongly. terrific shot in both feet. International Jacques Paton, eve tens (Min,) 72.0° F. | a orin ept. i
us ontserra pCa CURRA eee m bd : ;
ee ere Malling Frida} - i I very speedy stay ee ne, orward), |to-day. Weiss won 63, Other || int pireotion: (9 a:m.) E. :
24th March I H} Something New! ! {cence ane as who will need on er Gcetk shite dae by N. (3 p.m.) E., by N. ; aH
oner LAUDALPHA { "lal Aenats) STYLE {| careful watching the self-exiled Czech stars if ity: 15 miles | $A SSSSSesssessssss SSOSSS ;
recep Cargo and. Passenge' 1 ae a : Stan Mortensen (center for-|slav Drobney and ae Cer- aor 15 miles per | , SSSSseesssessossesenas
ling Tuese \( 1 . Yr 5 . | ;
| a \} SHOW & DANCE ey eke a Saas ro aoe Davin Sian ‘Sager, and Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.056; 1% ’ e
{ : old dash but very fe é é 7 < ‘ : . . 4 2 i Bol
B.W 3;CHOONER OWNERS Soothe your 1 AT DRILL HALL (Garri his power in te aca ee Australian International. (3 p.m.) 29.997, | % : os
ASSOCIATION (INC@.) { n FRIDAY MAY S5th., 1950 | 3 on RE ; Fa
re ac et aruaioe i Ther at 8.30 p.m ' 1 Jack Milburn (center forward), een : ) Bon
Pel, S047 irs AN (tte inluha PRODUCT IN AID OF CHRIST CHURCH }| 2 dashing forward who shoots - z | me fo
lel tale al al MADE IN ENGLAND BY: ALLEN 6 MANBURYS UB i BABY WELFARE LEAGUE {; with deadly accuracy when near ward), another newcomer to big- 1y
ae Tod. cietme Me ‘} goal : time football who is definitely 1% | Heute.
to help Babies in St. John - ~ 7 . |
Mires, Sin mons-Hpwell, a @ ud Eddie Bailey (inside forward),| above the average class player. | % ) bi
» H. ARRIS DIN LINE | Se ee ee re 18 a a eet oe *~ re a * ee 5 } !
presents her lovely models with | ball who will need careful watch- ; for Rio ~=wwi probably - | + Bato
i be watiful ces seein her ing when in possession of the ball. ! nounced at the end of this month 1 y 3 .
“el ME rae : | Redfern Froggatt (inside for- | —LN.S. | e
OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM its Gina arntea has Sh iat \\~= ms I | | DRINK CE Q
{ Owen Allder, M.C.P. Mr. W. W
Due ) Recce KC. MCLE. Me B. ¢ i } 1% - EREALS NOW abl)
Vessel. From Leaves Barbados } a ai tited tosis PCS | SPEA KING OF ENRICHED BREA D? AND ENJOY TO DAY’S PRICE,
or " tra in Atyendance | - S ,
3S NTIAN” Liverpool 8th Mar. 23rd Mar i 9 | . t
Ae S. “Gc ME DIAN” tonto. 14th Mar. $rd Mar. ADMISSION — $1.00 f it fics ——_ . ba ’ 0 \
ss TATE :SM AN” Glasgow 24th Mar. 7th Apt Dancing after Show | : : of water, watch Post Toasties Pabena is
SS “MEG NA London 25th Mar 10th Apr. J? ne . Swan and Roebuck Streets ” Ss Te a Welgar Shredded Wheat Cerevim ac
$.S. “OREGON STAR’ Liverpool 40m Mar. 1h Apr. 1) au, ee Rowe Optima Shsenbiinin inhibi Weelibiin allt Alka-Seltzer Quaker Corn Flakes poctabix (small & lange) in
HOMEWARD FOR UNITED KINGDOM. and help a worthy cause ks Puffed Wheat Ryvita Biscuits 5
| an } Dalton Cere: akes
Vessel. For Closes in Bucbades | SSS Sara) Tieiee Cream of Whee (aaa
S.S. “TEMPLE ARCH” London 25th Mat BOXING! BOXING! na
: om Nu! |
For further particulars apply to , MING! KEROSENE
ar THE ENRICHED ALLE
USTA & CO., LTE -Agents. RTHUR & CO
DA C ” YANKEE STADIUM ) , TILLEY LAMPS » LED,
ritton’s



Canadian National Steamship:









Sails Sails Sails Arr Sails
SOUTHBOUND Montrea Halifa Bosto Barbados Barbador |
CANADIAN
‘CHALLENGER 10th M rd. Mat rd. Mar
LADY RODNEY 25th Mar 27th Mar Sth Apr 6th Api
ADY NELSON 12th Apr 13th Apr j pi 24th Ap
LADY RUDNEY 12th May iSth N 11th May 26th N 27th Ma
LADY NELSON Sist May 3rd June h l4th June 15th J
LADY RODNEY 30th May 3rd Jul Sth July 4th Jul 15th Jul
rive Sails Arrives Arrive Arrives Arrives
NORTHBOUND Barbados Barbados Bo n St. John Halifax Montre
LADY NELSON 2 Mar 23rd. Mar. Ist Apr 2nd Appr
LADY RODNEY 17th Apr 19th Ay 28th Apr 2th Ap 1 oN
LADY NELSON 6th May 8th May 17th May 18th Mar
LADY RODNEY 8th June 10th Ju 19th June 2Zist Jur 24t Ju
LADY NELSON 27th June 2h J 8th July 10th Ju hat
LADY RODNEY 27th Ju. 2th Ju 7th Aug — 9th Aug. 1l2tn Aw
N.B.—-Subject to change without notice. A!) vessels fitted with cold storage ct
bers. Passenger Fares and freight rates on application to :—
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD. — Agents.
, — =|
‘ . ‘ . ~ ‘ ee _ , |
CIE. GLE., TRANSATLANTIQUE |
1
|
Sailing te Trinidad Sailing to i]
Plymouth |
| “GASCOUNE” March 14th March 21st
\\ “MISR” April 4th |
|

“GASCOGNE”
*“MISR”
*“GASCOGNE”

April 19th
May 9th
May 24th

April 26th
13th
sist

May
May

For further payticulars apply to

R. M.

FRENCH LINE |
|
|

JONES & CO., LTD.- Agents. |







They il Do Te Ev ery Time



Contest
KENNY SEAMAN

145 lbs,

va
KID HINDS 149 Ibs.
10 Rounds 10
last encounter these
fought to a thrill-

In their
two boys

ing draw. They sparkled the
ying embers of local fisti-
dying members of local fisti-
ana causing the crowd to
request a return,

In the last bout the

thoughts of fight fans wan-



ees CARRIES A BUMBERSHOOT BUT VYer in IN HIS CAR AT A GAS STATION HE

| WALKS UNJER THE AWNINGS, SHOVING

| me UMBRELL ve OUT INTO THE RAIN"
| FILL ‘ER UP
AND CHECK

ALL MY TIRPFES



THINKS A CANOPY |S SOMETHING HIS
WIFE SERVES AT COCKTAIL FARTIES ---

































it's mixed

with

MILK

}
———e BUTTER BREAD















dered back to the gladiators { PS —- ————————
f old. Busy Billy, Fearless
Freddie, Lionel Gibbs, Joe ee . A
Payne and all of the others. | Housek pers Benefit When
others 4 7
What will happen in this They Buy Krom Us.
encounter nobody knows, Mixed Peel Tins Cheeselets — Egg Noodles — Prepared
oo ee . os can be Mustard Tins Standard Yeast Mayonnaise Botts
r ea the Semi-final = Curry Powder—Toffee in Valise 7-lb. — Clozone—Lux Flakes
(6 Rounds 6) Flakettes Dispa Rinso Windowlene Palm Olive
AL MAULER (147 Ibs.) Soap.
vs
AL DAVIS (146 Ibs.) BUTLERS ALL MALT STOUT
Kid Ralph, who is to meet HIBBERTS GOLDEN LIGHT BEER
Fighting Bailey will meet
Joe Hall 4 Rounds Exhibi- Johm PD. Taylor «& Sons Ltd.
tion, ”
KID RALPH JOB HALL Grocery &
(163 Ibs) (165 Ibs) \\ Provision 3740 Grocery 4335
Sparkling Preliminary .
BELFIELD KID (126 Ibs) Ss = pa ee
va. ‘
KID SMILES (127 Ibs.) x
| Rounds 4 | We Make....
PRICES OF ADMISSION:
Ringside $1.50, Balcony $1.20,
Cage 84c.,, Bleachers 48c.
MARCUS BARROW, |
Promoter
SSS
ae Jimmy | Hatlo THAT FIT
YOUR FIGURE
}
| |
i |
en | || AT
A)

ee

———



Top Scorers



P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd.

SUIT

YOUR POCKET

SEE US FIRST

in Tailoring |

Lighting by Tilley Lamps
mea.s a Bright Light for
two evenings at one filling.










We have received new stocks of...

RED HAND HARD GLOSS
PERMANENT GREEN PAINT

This Paint possesses outstanding capacity
and spreading power and a th
reliable permanency of colour.

A. S. HUSBANDS,—Agent,

Babbs, St. Lucy.

BURN ORDINARY |S
|

ORIENTAL
Goons!!

CURIOS, JEWELLERY
BRASSWARE, TEAKWOOD
SANDAL, IVORY, ETC.















1 gin. tins . $11.56
KASHMERE 14 gin. tins 5.81
THANI BROS. 16 oft, te.) us cee 3.00
Pr. Wm. Hy. Street
The Sign of Special

Undercoating in
Dial 3466 — $9,

1 gin, tins

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, MfD.

Agents.

Quality 9.16











—=—



Always keep ..

SACROOL

IN THE HOME !!

"Phone 4456

ee









| SESRRRGTS AR | WOOLLENS — q
| ACTS LIKE MAGIC
| °* (LL DRUG STORES. WORSTEDS
| KNIGHTS LTD. CASHMERES
iy $9999999995959050055008
3 Just Received S POR
A LOVELY ‘
sssormenn jl] MEN «xo “WOMEN
EASTER BOGS r
; .. f CS maem
S ¢ CARLTON BROWNE. ¥ ae
. a :/ ania LANE
% 136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813 $ |
Yoooessoos SSSSS00SSN000" eee








PAGE 1

T" 9gBe*-* a ? I. 22 jMrc 1950. Barbate Vacate rice: VE CENTS Year .. 1,300 MILES IN 3 HOURS 29 MINS. SP4i4A" m£S A7VG |0PO£i> TO STA) Oil gut Send Prince Baudouin BRUSSELS, March 21. ri.llF.NKl SPAAK. Belgium's former Socialist Pre,,, L |0 oi([hl appealed U> KinR Leopold to send back his print* Baudouin, around whom all Belgians rails. knopen letter published in the Socia.ist Le Peuplc Jadviid the King to stay away and be content with 11 victory which, according to Spaak, the vt [i the question brouRht him. Lgfc who has led the anti-Leopold cam| JTJJien a frM hand by his party's fierce ami tLa, Max Buset. to negotiate with E _ m the national interest, it wai night. —• Spaak's free hand Imp! the Socialists havi standpoint ami would ling for the Unfa return fa only. Me %  ould thei a douin. Spaak la understood t< hi va tavoui %  fa nil el n the linn %  referendum but in i td it No (GovernntenI Vet Bllgium tonight la itll a Government. Careluker Premier Gas ton Bytkera has so far been unable to form an acunii to replace hii Cathol coalition, which resigned on Saturday. In talks between leanCatholic and Liberal Parties, a hardening of the Liberal Opposition to the return of King Leopold appears tonight to have mised plans for .he early formation of a new coalition Earlier. Prime Mln had forecast lion %  within houi four Patty Coalition |for Greece ATHENS. March 21. Greek Party leaders totaasaed the formation of [Coalition Government. 4 the Centre leaders. Venizelos. Nicholas md George Papandrou, patrol some 137 Assemtfer the Greek General fortnight ago. The II. Emanuel Tsou_ of a small group of fienessivei tie leaders were meetvwuiht. meral Napoleon Zerto enter the Centre tilh his seven-seat ConSX.Tne2 b Gov:| l — had tore stg ernng a new uv ,.,__ iiKtu Jet Plane Breaks Record: Controlled By Radar HORIV HI.I.UM.1) k-ESTBKOAl m leangevan all nailing la teg Tarawaal naBasag el a M %  til Workmen in MM n Ihr iol. win. li bl SSpeetesI le be imMirtl in irn v 1 he hrmimil tHdUtal lia.* had to Itr l-ni|t.rml \.M.(nl ml ,n,..miM; : inri outcome BMBfJftMn 1T dcill "iln in the Unatl M.uiacn'. miarlrrs whlrli hag hem hurriedly "t> rested into MffTWe to be formed to-day or i.-toater Egypt Moves On om muni sis CAIRO, March 21. i authorities said today believed their arrest of jmt Communisis yester.uck the hardest blow tpinst the underground Met movement in the ^ %  nested—some of them of the Central Cornier Efyptinn Communist %  brksdsd Hilei Schwartz. a* Rusuan origin. Imi in ad his wife. |k on two houses in the riddle class Cairo suburb | Polis. Puuce ity of Communist pro_aome of which, they said, %  BTeiy new type. the publications were M to Egyptian workers, %  Bio revolt against their i living conditions. The •be seised the Central (art accounts, showing the a* their funds to spread pan in Egypt and how has been spent. The I Ministry of the Interior It 1*47 to arrest Schwart r kDown as a professional agitator and propui disappeared for three Ja* yen, but turned up %  the eve of the Egvptian %  nrlv this year. —Renter. Meanwhile. Socialist members nf Parliament announced that they would lead "Stop parades In the indu south on Friday, when 3.000.000 trong one day "wai i I King's restoration. Then said ll n muld lead gUons through Liege. %  %  PrtDch-speaking, anti Leopold Wallonia. Reaffirming position to Leopold'! re the Socialist numuMra today gave 10.000 Belgiun franc* to the lighting fund of "Stop-Leopold" action committees", formed for tb) trnde imlittilttt and oil %  ist supporters. The tense labour situation eeavrl %  little today wht i \i 10.000 lliusscls "Stop U>opold" strikers return to work. The nowuifl Ik aat ol stoppages is causing a rain 00 \OSMaturTs, and some ihopkot %  old out their tinned stocks. Workers were today n Injf. and reconditioning the RovU Palace at Laekan, outside Brussels. Circles .lose '' tha Government said the Liberal call ioi paru discipline along the lines of tbO partv'.-i ofBetal : > King's return was regarded as I "delaying turtle" by the AntiLenixild faction witban the partj —Reuler. Finds £10,000 In Baekvard LBOURNB, March 21 Wcdderburii. not %  %  %  %  %  %  %  (Austral! u montha I over the oing uti in th.bach pnena, and rtreeti being torn up. The TOWl Com veil shafts m EWO miners' rights Lave been lodged Two residents. shaft* in their m the local Kroeer, Albert Smith, has found a 75 oi nugget in the malnstnynaterday farmer Buttn 70 ounce nuj %  ated to be wortl *• il.ooo (AustraU %  feet. The | are convinced that bl i %  %  of gold a fortum Lie Calls For 20 Year Programme Betwmn U.S. — Soviets WASHINGTON hfarcl United Nations StCTOUry-Ge % %  the United Etatei and I win peace". •' Hi ud West to use the U Sports Window ature %  mng. This will be U* %  having won the Third n MI the 1949 season. Bgttl nf their %  tfj v. Edward the refi HtlMM ^ I MO I MAI I issoi i \im\ Todays Rtten Harkllfli SI Mat%  lUntree: Mr. o. Graham. FOUR AMBUSHED AND KILLED SINGAPOHl rushed a mobile police patrol today on ;tn MtaM in Kedah. killint a Bi.: Sergeant and three Malay conld noundui: a special • onslable -Reuter. MTAIN WILL SPEND 223,000,000 ON R.A.F. LONDON, March 21. I U developini; advanced types t>f je! W>' en w P<** '"' *l I approaching that of sound—well over 600 miles an f-Air Minister. Arthur Henderson, told Parliament I Swap Kidneys IffWCO, March 21. %  "at Chicago Ho•• luccesslully *"•* • kidney from KJf, another. They C fc. onc ^y * P 0 *f to do itiniUr operaP w human beinga. and ["•or prolong the P rletims o( such din? cancer—Beater ^i These fighters. •t Got Some fl 700 Million |B& Dollars ^"JCTON. March 21 ^ % %  ^ American tourista -J!*** total o( nearly ^'n.tomiin travel last P""oflwnt to Canada, C* Indiea. and Cen^ %  The commerce de^^faa ot buiineu • !" Y this, and re" fcrope and the countries draw %  American travel American. BMBt %  "Canada and IS5._T*o The 1M9 total 121^ !" was about "•* than in 1M8. -Renter able to fly fit i extreme hdfhta, and urea will louou -in new lei lighter, the Venom, which Ri.jal All FWca sauadrons will be using next yem. All Britain's day lighter and ground attack squadrons oversea* are equipped with this 1<' except three sauadrons in the Far Bast, Henderson said. Henderson said that Britain has a jet night tighter in an adneed stage ol development with performance comparable to Habtars. All the let night ngbters, now being titled with up to datt radio ind radar aids, would also be able lo nght by day ,n weather that would ground day fighters. OaMai Missile Henderson said that air to • air" Luketvarm Res/ionm' CHEl. The Anglican Bishop lord, Dr. H that n move to U Communism" had %  liikeu.,1111 and patr.-i. sponse from the Church In his monthly Ist said Rome had conceded only .,'.ion of a limltf I I rhsra, la '' %  unless complete frankness ono %  rater. missile. out of N 0T RESIGNING ""a^Uig l^t,. Bogotn Ruins Disrupt Transport BOGOTA. March II UsuisuaU] I i s la Oolumbia have dlsrptltad and petrol has had to lrationcd in Bogota because nf floods hampering railways mti the capital. T: Call in western Colombia rut— Renter. BAK UR. SANDER CaMCllfl Will Strengthen Bond >Yiiii Rnasia LE, March 21. r, Vitc-l'ri'niier. m his llrsi stater, said today that Czechoslovak Koi,i,:i. Policy was based on intensifying :i;ihcning Czejonoalovak with Soviet Russia and 1 appointed Foreign to succeed Vladmier %  ParUaroantary Committee debat|B| m.Fureiun Ministry's hudget estimates for 1950. %  Intejrna%  .. atanalCylni of '•-mp of Capitalist reaction" .md the *^aunp <>f peace and progrets". Siroky said that within Czecho%  batwean thinew Socialist world ving remnants of Capitalism. Attempts were being made from abroad to give system*t issuance tt. u mb Slovakia's former capital and to organise espionage and sabotage. He said the Vatican and the High Church Hierarchy In Czechoslovakia were attempting to abuse the religious feelings of the people for the aims of Capitalist reaction. ly determined to I with our internal affairs useless" Siroky • %  %  < Krulff Spt-akuiK before tha National of Bnal Brith, a Jew%  ikcd the %  united Nations Pi gramme without delay" I do polMeal mlrBclos,' %  Mr Lie MM "It will take a Ion .eps to reduce the teiulons of the confUet nnd bring the great Powers together." "Equally I do not think the rhtW ran safely drlar taking the on this road of negotiation and conciliation" The. danger of an laatasflnUe intlnuatlon of the cold war in this ago of UM atom bomb, the hydrogen bomb and .>acterioU>K,too great". Mr til made It clear that his definition of n e gotiation did not mean "surrender or appeasement" by either side. "I mean negotiation %  i-lake by both sides" he said. "I have been encouraged by the ntI fflnnauofl iiiK tirest Powers — the United Union about 'he iinadNIHIaa i>f peaceful tween them and between the diffei. M and |xlltlcal aystenM tht The United N.. 1 founded upon that Iwl.I hope ol world peace depends upon its validity--neuter I'ulaml Rt'lt'ases Brilish Subjecl U. S. Sena I v Approve E.R.P. Fund WASHINGTON Idai Relations Ci nunlttee today unanimously the Atiini'i full S3.IOO.UOO.l>o< %  inme. The H. . e*entau\ i haa voted .•jsii from QC value in Amei u.u. i Buropeen Re< Senate-Houea dispute %  tinc hati i Committee Lgbt i The House Foreign Ar! %  %  %  ration bo the free people of Aata help to protect their The policy statement was ani>arV of the Foreign Ai i lull for the \2 months beginning rha Conunittet the and of work on tins meeutuK' Chaurman John Kan Conunittea contemplated onlj eonornie co-operntton, tw miliTJM Benatt .inn.. appjojvnd 1. An aim-n tjtn pean Payments Union 3. An miiendnient recju! E.C^.. whenever pre use counterpart hi Of Western F.urope. (counterpart funds are funds allocate,! by each ciHiiiir> equal assistance, t 4 An amendment K < %  A whereeei poaaible nunimise the bunitr ry proiiramme on the taxpnv. iing the t of dollar pt —Heater. 1 ^IFORDSHIRE, March 21 URITAIN'S De Havilland Comet—the world's first all jet passenger planeflew 1,300 miles to Copenhagen and back today in 3 hours and 29 minutes. The Do Havilland "Comet" was controlled on the first Ughl b) ;i radar laUl In I .,is followed by |,>: rndar for more than 100 miles at 30,000 | : s found no difnculty m controUirifl the last rrwving plant-. Normal time for the return air Truman Defends Aeheson WASHINGTON M., Repul %  i I State Do mining our national econocnj ai I loaing the peace in a ap WhetT) -.ud. "Apparently he has %  Russia %  Truna i Ai heeoi tie WUI h I Two Re| .n the House llOW int; Y.ilenl. i i ire. U %  %  %  Kentei Scelba Clamps 'Red Bell „ 21 Amid nioiiiiting U : ortbera uaduati eration of Labour was to-day deciding whether to stage %  new trial ni etrengtb afitb the Government. PoUce vete uking "preliminary security measures" to deal with any fresh clashe. workers and pol riie Confedeiatteu'i Ksveutive ConunlCtee was holding gency session to plan cuimti > %  linn to new GO orders for "suppression ol di W'oman Denies Charge bi Spy Trial PRAGI rtue* of the 16 den oalovak Sp> trial at Moiavi.i murdei .( .i lies Q Poll loolilasl Jauu-i'. tlie N< eported. All 16. who in. %  high treason and terrorist ,.-.ed. Antoro Husik. aUeged lo-d %  Vetejaka, at from behind, but Buatk admitted if tired several %  %  lured th< %  %  of damaging i one defen%  lag alarm among the popu* i .-"in | trip la about seven hours. Five ,n. the Comet—the "plane up a record Rome and back to under four hours. rbere Wai record for the l-ondon-Copenhagen flight f;ilit;un Cunningham also Hew the Comet to Home. He Is now De iol test pilot. The tamOUJ night lighter pilot. John ('immiighnut, took the Comet to the Danish capital In 1 hour and 42 minute! 'his morning. But his time from checkpoint lo nit, once he was In the M "nly one hour and 20 minutes cmds slowed him coming one hour 47 minutes from tiike-olT to landing. an Overse*is Airways CorD official, Sir Wiles Comas : thai by the end of next year, or early 1952, the Cornel enaf gpected to be on regular service Britain, through Cairo to and Calcutta, and might i talaaj la ;> seri nteh would link laondon with Australia In under 40 houi —Revter. Peru Files Counter-Charge THI HAGUI March II i rament Blad :,.iige in the : Justice hen teen in the i'i... Asylum case. submitted to the Court last Octot h. asarhun bian Kmbassy Vtctca Raul, %  Peru•rho wai chief of .* group, and who believed iincnt fused I by I*eru on . no legal n t.i refei tiie dispute to Tho rourt is nsked to state whether ompetenl to grant .inn whether POTU IS safe conduct to tha I so that he could lc ountry, Keuter. l*o\n' Iteeeives S|iuni&h Pretender AN CITY, March 21. Preti nder to the Throne, was received in ludtenea with the 1'ope In the VaUcan Palace. The ice lasted 20 minutes. Don llol> Year pilgrimage to Home. — (Renter.) ifwwt Britain's crime wave I Viscount Jowttt. the Lord ellor %  Britain* highest of Lords, "We have no|of violenee. of relntroduci Describing the present Last iv ot bed|wave eg -very grave" In some in Britain of assaults and gangster operations. Lord Godderd. The Lord Chief her judges have recently deplored their loss %  order flogging, whlc 1 they consider a deterrent to crime%  hed flogging. %  - opening %  debate on the present outbraak they hed still to see il long -i %  coupled with ft 4,700,000 Unemployed In The States WASHINGTON, March 21. A Government monomial todaj CXJII*AJ*O "creeping" unemployment throughout the United States. Unemployment figures last month reached a new postwar record of 4,700,000 and officials predicted It would reach the five million mark in early summer. A Department of Commerce spokesman said the grovth in population was outstripping job capacity. Tho unemployment trend at the moment was not a cause for any alarm, he s ai n Rsess r





PAGE 1

PAGE fOt'R BARBADOS ADVOCATE ^nxi-si.-. s „ AlitH ^ ^ BARBADOS &\vMmE The New Poorer On LLaucLL Sea And Air t ...~.~ A — %  %  %  —f — i NMhftai to Tfcj AAwM Co. lm. M. mremt H. IIMHtan Wednesday. March 22. 1950 Swift Action THE contents of the Report on the Barbados General Hospital by Major T. J. Hallinan have been made public. The Report contains little that has not been brought to the attention of Government before by members of the Hospital Staff through normal channels. And many of the defects and difficulties enumerated in the Report have been noted in previous report* on the Hospital. But because the report underlines what previous reports have noted that is no reason for its suffering the fate of Miller reports. The present report was undertaken as a result of intense criticism by politicians and members of the public. It is an answer to that criticism and its recommendations are a challenge to the Government to act and to remove grounds for future criticism. If the Barbados Government wants a first class hospital it has got to employ an adequate number of medical personnel. Dr. Hallinan recommends the employment of one medical superintendent, one specialist Surgeon, one specialist Physician, one Specialist Radiologist and seven medical officers for general duty as an increased permanent staff. At present there is no Specialist Physician and only two of the three House Surgeons provided by the Government i mates are working, while another is due to leave in May. To increase the permanent cadre would cost approximately £5,000 per annum. I* is worth digressing here to make a comparison with the cost per head per week ol patients in other countries' hospitals. In the United Kingdom this cost is £12, in Sweden £i;j, in tile United States 109 U.S. dollars. In Barbados the cost per patient per week is £7. The moral is that nothing can be got for nothing. It lias got to be paid for. Extracts frum Dr. Hallinan's report sound terrible enough to the lay reader. "Owing to the shortage of beds in the public wards the medical CUM are all of a Sttrioui nature, many being admitted In a hopeless Co nditio n. The deaths are 00010quently large in number." Or %  is a waiting List for the public wards of over 500 patients needing surgical operations. This hst extends as far back as July 1M9." Sentences like that* taken from llu-n context have a horrifying sound, and, in rxplain much of the concern and criticism which preceded the writing of the report. It is very difficult to sum up Dr. Halliiturns, but there i.s plenty od MOD i lUons In the repot i for inipi<\ u pital. And there li %  main current running through the report which seems to emphasize that without adequate stalling and without greater necessary delegation of authority, the Hospital cannot be run on the most etiieient liner The mipoi Kinl thing is for the Barbados Public to have CODfli m their own hospital, it cannot have that confidence If, tor example, day to day worsting of the Hospital li to be the subject of political InterJerem i mil a hospital, ur to run SO) organ. must be vcMi.i iu i. it.,in HKILM tartnioi a loose %  Hie man or woman dOeQ| Uujob Th.H.ilhn.ui WlWwre in niun> doctors who have previously pointed oul mo. I and difficulties which are now unfolded to the public gaze. It is up to the Government now to see that Dr, Halltnani MffBttkau and niviidatiuns an immi-ih.iWly discussed and sions Uikcn It b unfair to criticise individuals. Tindramta the (. Ikelj tu attract then here it is impossible to expect more from an understaffed hospital than it can provide AU the other recommendations hinge on ihis SeV starting and an administration wiUi powers to act and enforce .-.will discipline LY we have been reading ol tin I furmunces met, the jet ; .<• powered airliner We have heard of the trials of a gas turbine railway locomotive. Now the first Ras turbine car is being demons! rated. A new kind of engine is being used on land, at sea, and in th* air. It has already produe %  echnical revolution In the air. •nd we wonder whether therewill be similar revolutions on Irnd and at sea. To understand how all UMM new developments are possible we must first be dear about ;ibines" and "Jet propultliese arc Vwo completely different ideas. In a Jet aircraft they are brought UiEcther. but in gas turbint'-iiiivi'ii trains, ships or land vehicles the gas turbine p pie would be used without )< %  propulsion, which Is VOI • ful except at high speeds ol travel Jet 1 I'ropuNion JET propulsion is "motion Of %  I in a certain direction by Dg a Jet of fluid from it in the opposite direction." If you stood on ice and blew hard enough you would go backwards. This has not yet been done, but squids use a similar means for travelling under water. Jets avoid the use of a proi ."'. delightfully simple, but unfortunately they are inefficient at ordinary speeds of %  Hie effort being wasted in stirring up vhe air left behind. A turbine is an engine in which the main driving part rotates. In contrast to the piston engine, such as in our motor-cars, in which the main driving parts move to Md (TO I-OWEH is produced suit of compressing, hoe! Ulg a fluid When AM fluid Is have the steam turbn the fluid I | ,: %  : m have the gas turbine. D develop* %  Brit In DM I propulsion have boon planted in 150 BC by Hi... of who applied steam jets to drive an angliM In the COM of the gl recognisable as such was patent* d b) BI El II imian, John 1791. Hy Profrvwir O. A. S.iiimlrrs M.A: ll.Se. The name of Whittle is associated with both jet propulsion and the Ras turbine — and they are both old ideas What, then, was the great thing he did? The answer is that he brought rtie two together He said. "Let us use a gas turbine to produce a powerful jet of exhaust gases." His great achievement was that he did it. One of the defects of the je; engine is its extravagance on fuel. For many purposes this is than outweighed by it* extraordinary lightness, which enables more fuel to be carried. BW f<>r longer flights, especially at iower altitudes and speeds, the 'urbo-prop is better. The turbo-prop uses a gas turbine engine to drive a conventional propeller. Trrhnirnl Rare THE remarkable developments in alrcraf; since 1941 have not, of course, been confined to this In the early days of the war we informed the Americans of our progress, and in 1941 sent a Whittle engine to the U.S. Out of mat have grown in iv changes in %  Ircrafl design The Germans are out of the technical race, but tho Ilussians are not. and the FrettOn have made great progress since The war. The thrust of the jet in tho Btt 39, the first jet-propelled air. plane—buill by the Gloster Aircraft Company in 1941—was about' 8001b. Recently Rolls-Royce announced the thrust of one of theiu latest engines as 6,2501b The E28.-39 Hew at about 360 miles per hour. In 1946 the Meteor reached 016 miles per hour, arid .orlay the official record is 671 miles per hour. Inline Y?| UNDOUBTEDLY the gas turbine type of engine will be used on land and sea for many purposes. It is compact and light, needs liltle or no water and no boiler, and does not require a ei the petrol engine. So far iv is in Its infancy and but It Is potentially capable ol development to cincicncie-, level with the best) steam rurbine plant and better. In modern gas turbine engineering twe coun.hes have pioneered the way, our own and Switzerland While we in this country were developing the gas turbine for aircraft, .tie Swiss .were developing the gas turbine for industrial purpi ass Today tho Swiss have built more Industrial gas turbines, •for. themand other countries. *an any other nation. We are now very aotive here in the same field. The Metropolitan-Vickers Company is building a 15.000 kw. set fur the Stretford power station. C. A. Parsons, Ltd.. are building a 15.000 kw. as* for the Dunston station and a 10.000 kw. set foi the National Gas Turbine establishment. JOHN BROWN AND COMPANY arc building a 12,500 kw. set for the Dundee station. All these gas turbines ire oil burners. Because oil has to be imported, tfieir fuel bills may be a little discouraging. This is counterbalanced by other advantages, but if it burned a really cheap fuel the gas turbine overall economy would be sojnuch greater. For us here mere are only two such fuels—coal and peat A great effort is. therefore, being made to adapt the gas turbipe to burn these fuels. The economic impulse towards xhe coal-burning gas turbine for land use has no parallel for th" marine gas turbine. Will <>a I iirbim v lliftplarc Steam ? SHIPS have moved away from coal to oil, and the most economical marine engine is likely to be that which burns the lowest grades of oil. Whether, die gas turbine will ultimately displace the steam turbine and the diescl engine will not bo decided for.-' The first gas turbine to drive a bhlp Is British. In 1947. MGB2009 began trials with a MetropolitanVickers gas turbine adapted from one of that firm's aircraft engines. This vessel uses diescl engines for slow speeds and the turbine for high speeds, and has had a very successful debut. There has not yet been demonstrated, however, a marina gas turbine for long continuous, steads 1 running, such as the main power plant of an ordinary ship demands But tesis of this kind of englnf will not be long delayed. London txprm Serrlce IH:II.\AII UllhSIIII) in llurkeol Africa, where— Wives Can Be Bought On The i\ever-Never THE SCENE: A Village in Darkest Africa. The Time 1950 I'VE been Sitting in %  of i banana hut talking to an Aft i %  boul economic conditions lo the post-war world. He complain* I he had fatting I radio, UV i ; on the %  %  Hut most M ill : about the bJsjh cost of buying .1 [first married you could fBl quite a good wife in .my of the villages N 30 goats. I Now Ihey MM I %  faOCSUn I bo lucky lo pick up u utility I model for 80 goats, and xI.. boon nttcbii i5o. ited t a girl going hy "Look at that one. for %  I hod to i>av for hi i i i couldnM i'ii i i for nothing. Ninety goats and a cow," he his hinds In %  %  I lev-He didn't know Of OOUraO as bO explained he could have bought her tiin lor so many goats pn and I meats Lots of husbands did that. position as a chief it lite the ulna bought on the never-ne\ i hard as those you paid '<>r on the nail. They knew thai U In arrears with %  "cm i\(, WIVES I ASKED the chief U I i stop the rot by putting a ceil inn prie we'd done with fish and potatoes In England. He said that had been tried in some parts of East v but it didn't Fathers with unmarried African daughteri eere the same under the >kin as people with houses to let. The only result of uri.kr-ontrol was a rollicking black wife market. "I EorSjOt whether it fflj in Punch or the New Yorker.' the chief went on, fingering the rings In hii ears, "but one of the a joke about too many UK) (Of) wurit was i :iny, but it wasn't entirely true. in' plrniy at wives I 17, and I know where I 11 as many more as I want. d trouble is they're inflated ping steadily higher in up%  I triad i" picture an inflated ptog upwards in spirals, but him, who was evidently a student Of the radio speeches of Sir Stafford Grippe, went on talking. ralDS, for instance, a parent with a couple of dtSSSD sons and daughters, he said He ma. bought his own wivewhen prices wore lew, but when be con marry off his boys he finds there's market Wh.it can he do 1 In order to oivee for his own sons he's •M ai much as he can for his daughters. And so the prices go spiralling up. %  fell," 1 said, "wouldn't It Into scrap the whole system merry for love, as w. inuunt Idea hut it seems lo work" oh. dear. no. We couldn't do that," said the chief, adjusting histop-hat. "There are too many I -is. That would he a form of the capital levy Every man with an unmarried daughter would cry out that he was being robbed. WFAI.TH IN WIVES "THIS system of buying a wife is based, on an age-old economy, and isn't as crazy as you'd think. Wc don't have stocks and shares and banks as you do. Our a is our land, our female stock cows and nanny goats—and our women." the idea? Instead of putting another pound In the bank they put another cow in the field Instead of buying a savings certificate they take another wife. Beery family has so much land, so many head of stock and so many women. If they hand over a girl as a wife to another family they are giving up some of their capital, and they expect something back for her. If she is divorced and IS to her lamilv the purchase is returned, less a discount for each child. From the African point of view there was nothing much wronp the system until this awful business of the Inflated or rocketing brides going upwards in spirals. DEVALUED WsTI WHEN the cost of living goc? up in Europe you print more banknotes to pay for things. In Africa, when the cost of wives goes up, you have to h your goat and cow circulation. But cows, unlike ban-, have to i el and with brides at their present price uSere Is more stock than the land can support, and vast areas are becoming dust howls through overstocking. esnVi only one thine for it." said the African chief who the Times and listens to the n H C "and that is to devalue wives as vou've done the pound." —L.E.S. Miration Of Public Services Report (cuts-) THE reeert in this instalment makes reference to tht our ivcomniciidati'jns in respect of the holders of scheduled posts in unified sorvkes, who cnmpr.se most of the senior officers in the colonies, and to apply their own conditions to the rest would produce a situation which can only be described as farcical. The most likely conclunon is that tnese Governments will reject our recommendations on this matter and will adhere to the arrangements which are now in force. But it would have been quite idle for us to recommend the general adoption throughout the region of the speeuil arnumements which obtains in these colonies, since they would hnve been unacceptable to some of the other colonies on grounds of expense. Our recommendations on these and other matters relating to conditions of service should therefore be regarded as constituting the minimum provisions necessary to secure free transferability from one colony to another. In so far as any colony may have adopted more favourable conditions. W0 do not suggest any abatement of those conditions, though we recognise that any variations in conof service diminish pro tanto the possibilities of transfer. ENTRY STANDARD In his draft despatch of May, 1946, tho tan "f State contemplates the setting up of a regional executive authority to which would be delegated the powers of selection and posting of candidates to posts in unified services, subject to bii eporoval In cases where that is required under the CoumiaJ Keiiulations. Later, he elaborates the functions of such an authority by saying that it would set and maintain a common service and nominate the persons to be appointed, whether by recruitment or by promotion to vacant posts. He also points out that the difficulties inherent in the task of assessing claims to promotion are greatly i when the candidates concerned are serv(nn in different colonies, and goes on to say: "it is certainly not a task which the Secretary of State could successfully undertake at a distance in respect of purely local staff. It must be done the spot by an authority which Is not only in a to estimate the relative merits of candidates but to give effect to its conclusions." While we are in entire agreement with the Secretary of to the need for such an authority. It is. we venture to say, a great deal easier to postulate its creation than to formulate proposals for clothing it with the attributes which he prescribes. ords "on the spot" are no doubt used In a colloquial se ns e, but it is pertinent to point out that the colonies with which we are concerned Constitute fifteen different -pots, all separate! from one another by wattr. in some cases several hundred miles of it. It will bo appreciated, therefore, that 00 regional authority, however constituted and wherever situated, ran escape the disability which, M the Secretary at Suite Implicitly eg, must arise if Its headquarters are widely separated from the various colonies which COOM within its ambit. In the later paragraphs of this chapter, we make lUggestioni for minimising this disability, hut its i tnot be ignored. TITLE 1 We now have to consider the title of the reiglonal executive authority, its constitutional posi| tion. Its functions, and its composition. The functions referred to in paragraph 125 arc such as are usually discharged in other colonies, either directly or through the agency of promotion boards, by Public Service Commissions, and having regard to what we recommend functions, we consider this an appro'.nmenclature for the body referred to by the Secretary of Suite as a regional executive authority. „ As regards Its constitutional position, it is not for us to hazard a guess as to the constitutional form which the association of the British Caribbean colonies may take. Various possible alternatives are canvassed In "Closer Association British West Indian Colonies" (Cmd. 7120). but we are satisfied that a Public Service Comhowever constituted and however wide or narrow its functions, must either rest on some form of central Ofgen of i;overmnent, charged by the instrument which creates it with responsibility nig up and maintaining the Puhln Commission, or, alternatively, must be set up by rotary of State, its constitution and func:ai the remuneration of its members being Ined by him. Thounh we can lay no claim 00 constitutional issues, we car I no central organ of government short of .1 Government which could discharge the duties to which we have referred. T H* l.nun.rd D. V. SCOTT TO-DAYS SPEi-ii.iii, TINS TRINIDAD GRAVbn HKARTS .13 OVALTINE-I.ARGE 1 y \\. v TINS DUTCH SLICED B, VVs 1 .11 Wl II HEADERS VU i Pan ills Have A lliglii T Know About Their < liildren To The Editor, The Advocate. SIH. In fl %  ethnatsa the U Government adnuii some time be had not given education the attention it deserved. I do not gno* srhal Us complacent among us though!. %  most damaging ad:' I men of discerning and and be i. now to be good for the I educa. led with ii.. cases, with than now. deal our 1 time to know anything about lag, l do not to know what Record Cards really are Uut 1 hope here to enllghfa •nildi. :. d ca i „ (Q what they are (Parents who are or who A number lc.tr il not until | ret and eonttd begin ii on Vrin facts and opi ting to a pupil's school life T' pupil and ii posed that these Cards shall DO pupil leaves school < • •( %  tile grout euamuaato. I make no ..bserv.r.. rShgSSSl because among thr uriesseTa schoo: 'LaneseesllH i setting and marking i other papers; •0 that a pupil gctt-ng In) > B rcentUo Group i m no more than | In P G 3 in School U I:. shuil. such inform..: Id Altamwnrthloge for a comItildy and m. %  In that particular %  v.irrilnation paper is SOf Ith It. The %  it can men little 10 the Education Department who*I On the subject of ..rJs 1 can speak with more authority than any mem • her of the Education Department for, ss another medd drumming %  %  Teacher's considered opinion of the pupil more credence is grren the latter: though the way some of the local experts talk, one would think that itie results of these Tests were as Udisputablo and accurate as Holy Writ Put to those of us who do not think W good for our souls to accept tho lOOtl of local omcutis pushing their own special predn< we ilnd that the designers and skilled users of these Tests, DSSfl ill Cyril Burt and R. A. C. Oliver, repeatedly warn thai' unle*s these Tests are administered by carefully trained people and the most favourable condlilts obtained can bo very unui Below this is a socAon dealing with thi if of the pupil %  orded •factual, ae br' purely subjecssess In thht section th* teach-r m rev... the uupil is lazy or indu must Tenahers. even Head Teachers, es like other human beings and their nerves are seldom tranquil; and (b) according to Alien Hunt and IVruval Smith in "A Guide to IntclligeiK i Other Psychological Tasting, ten vary considerably in their definition of temperamental trails; e.g. different raters have probably vet] different idses assessing the trait "perseverance." But I snould be quite indifferent to all this information being recorded if it were not for one considerable fact These documents are secret and conAdcn;ial and no aa ant the teacher* concerned and the aAcen or Mir Kdu.ition Deaartaaant is allowed to *ec what 'facta are written on thia Card under the pupil ium. So parent may be minted the opportunity W see wfcutt the school U\|wjh M of his or her child This Is an alarming statement, but tl i rector of Education has rep. said this in gai who have for the mos.' p. %  %  %  !various reasiwis for 'n. uDesssra themselves on] lnand take no others. In the hope ol would be oleaginous with the De11 if it would secure them and -.till others, to whom the terms 'human right*' ...ocracy' really mean something h.ve been too flabberpSsSskd <>nd indignant to trust U'*mItr* lo null* .iiv immediate con i ni. nm— of Reprt—eium via m*y %  ihror KM ha* punlinciud thr DUodoT. W.n I SO n.iKh about Ihc :.. Uvoj, but I (uiulder that a paraal hai an Inalianabl* ilslu '.o all uriUen Inlotniatioii a whool hai 'about hi child and lhat tliht it m sun unpardonaDir. II i inlokiabk that n> a country protfaaedly dr:iu>:nuiy hold *tr, I and auty %  •.-"•(ud uu? >-oun ciuun al ihe ..at or thrraanar rarulr* i—iiim i ti. %  luvMiMnnit rti a nn ala. Ha aacuit t> Oil. action, tafcan vtMyo-l wann to tb pubUc. ri h* cmvlncU If the %  %  %  that En* 'ally d< Uuid haiT*d i KITCHES NEEDS! select from this ');', wide range WOOD AND COAL STOVES—N OT ft i-i. OIL STOVES COALKW. PHESSI'RE COOKERS SAUCEPANS—Iron. Enamel and Aluminum DOUBLE BOILERS NECHO POTS—2. 3. and 4 gallon DANISH POTS—I. 2. and 3 gallon FRY PANS—11" and 12" and FRENCH FBlroe COFFEE MILLS—Nos. 2 .md 3 !" MEAT MINCERS—Nos. 1. 2. and 3 TINNED AND ALUMINUM KITCHEN WARP BOX IRONS ETC, ETC pr WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD., Sutniw, C. S. PITCHER & CO., LTD. 'Phones : 1B72. 4487 EARLY EASTER SPECIALS! SELECT TIIBSE Mill PICNIC HAMS p-ik LIPTON'S TEA '.-lb pk. DALTON'S CEREAL FLAKES r* r CATELLI EGG NOODLES DOMINION VERMICELLI MUFFETS FOODYEAST "I SALAMI SAUSAGE TABLE BUTTER 5-lb. tins EASTPACK BEEF per tin CVPKAFV Reduced from 85c. STANSFELD. SCOTT & CO., LTD. GENTLEMEN! WHEN THINKING OF MENS' SUITINGS JUST THINK OF— DA COSTAS &f DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT. TUB FOWLS ARE LAYING THE BEST EASTER EGGS AT GODDARD*