Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Gunday

March 19
19590.




































































nine, Disease
mreaten China
Millions Face Death

HONG KONG, March 18.

y'¢ developing famine is affecting millions of
in eleven provinces south of the Great Wal
's coming in from foreign and Chinese sources
y that disease is fast spreading among the peasants
resistarce is lowered through starvation,

, —- *' A relief

——

mission now back
: ‘ Hongkong from Anwhei Province
e ; Circulated a state.nen: Sayiie Luin

famine and disease were aft

53 out of the 63 counties ana t!

, province,

| The mission predicted th
position would deteriorate rap-
idly and millions would die i;

y }
relief was not immediatel, pre

: PARIS, March 18. vided.

|. Balay, French Minister The Anwhei mission said
yy tas been appointec | untold thousands of people ha
sh representative on the Uni- | been living in desperate condi

j tions since last summer’s/ os
ruined crops, destroyed
washed away stored
and drowned livestock.

ng Commission for Lib-
‘ ‘announced here to-day.
‘ile Clarac, Inspector-General
“Jomatic Posts, has been ap-

houses |
foodstuff
|

|

'

vq French Minister in Bag-| Because Yangtse and Huai r'y
: Lamarle, French) rT dykes were broken in man
; in Havana, succeeds | Places, large areas remained sub |



merged during the autumn, whi!
| receding waters elsewhere jeft +}
soil covered with a blanket «
mud and sand.

“¢. Edmund Peti De Beau-
» French Consul-General in
~ has been appointeo |}
‘der in Havana, Franco's De |
: Director of Technical
ts at the French For-
succeeds him in th.
rs post. Georges Cassin,
yf the French Embassy
, is appointed French
tin Tirana, Rayons D. P
‘mas has been appointed
Affaires at the Frenc®

in Rangoon. Jean Roy i
French Consul Genera’

Disaster followed in thc

ter when heavy snow crush

and destroyed flimsy huts ;

built by peasants from what
ever materials the flood wat:
left behind.

Other sources said that mil
tary upheaval and economic cha
bad aczentuated their effect
The re was drought and pestilence
in many provinces.
| The Communists announced lasi
| night that they are moving hu

me

—Reuter. »



quantities of grain into the
5 fected areas.
Hard Or No Communist appeal for aid

| from abroad has so far been pub
licised, but Chinese in Hengkon
believe the presence of the

Be Traitors

’ Anhwei Mission here indicat
a SAYS ADAMS their readiness to accept helo
| —Reuter.

Aivoeate Correspondent)
LOF-SPAIN, March 18.
Adams, Barbados La-
who passed through
morning on his way
to attend vae 1.L.0.
Conference told mea
port that if W.I. polivical
d not work hard now
‘of federation they
itors to voe best interest
ibbean. He added: “I
y best to hasten tha
; ‘4 federation throughout

explained vaat although



7 Days In
Shark Waters |

PEARL. HARBOUR, Mar. 18
The United States Navy~ repaii
ship “Comstock” late last night
picked up 26 American sailors}
who had spent seven days on life
rafts in the shark infested water: |
of the Pacific Ocean.



, The men were off the smal
3 ee agree — Americao Navy tender “Elder” |
ene + 2 i which caught fire in mid-oceai |
: ton Commi tee, he) after an engine room explosior
a to reserve the right to| 4) March 10
h nee ris PA sage ee The “Comstock” radioed that
is tll a oe ise apart from bad sunburn, the;
adoption t is — were none the worse for thei!|
\ Asa ge ani.| experience. |
1 Lice me jo forsake unani The rescued men said _ that

to agree with things

_I think” fund: ally | three officers and eleven men hac |
s said. eamantaily remained aboard the “Elder’ t

es however that a| fight the fire.
compromise can be They themselves had been or- }

dered to abandon the ship becaus¢
the captain feared that munitions
aboard would explode and blow
the little craft to pieces.

A radio station later quoted re-
ports from \he Piedmont that all 14

at after the discussions
do his best to hasten the
}of Federation.

—(By Cable)







os men who remained aboard th¢
. May Have “Elder” were safe and unhurt,”
‘ —Reuter. |
One Heart
dos Advocate Correspondent) f 99
RT-OF-SPAIN, March 18 ‘Independence
psy performed on the
this morning lea yg? * :
limen here to velicve|, SLL Radioactive

had a single heart

ém. Peter Lamb, Gov-| WASHINGTON, March 18.
thologist who did th: The former aircraft carrier
is reported continu Independence is still radioactive

Ogical tests of th

! ‘ § more than three and a half years
sot the twins, which migh

after it was drenched by wate!





mi eries which migh‘| thrown up by an atom bomk
ete medicine world, blast during the experiments at
8 believed that the twins| Bikini. ;
had a twin heart and! The Navy announced that}

a single liver. The|machinery from the ship will be
medical men are] used at the Naval Air missile test

Seat “interest ‘in centre at Point Pucu, California

—Reuter.

the
tests—(By Cable} |



7
. @
En-Lai Accuses U.S.
’ a ee ° ’ ype
| Imperialistic Policy |
LONDON, March 18. |
® Communist Foreign Minister Chou En-Lai, to- |
ir. Dean Acheson's San Francisco speech on)
ian policy in Asia, an attempt “to dope some people |
: the experience of America’s aggressive policy

‘ene 8 © a Peking despatch of the New China Al
Ey inLondon.

‘German Mark

ts Nose-Dive



4! In a statement, replying to *he
policy speech made by the Amer-
ican Secretary of State on March
15, Mr. Chou En-Lai charged that
America acquired the Philippines

and many strategic ote
BERLIN, Ma islands 50 years ago, obtained;
of the Ment ee control of Japan and South

Korea after” world war II and)
was “also attempting to control |
China, Indonesia, Vietnam Thai-;
land, Burma and India.”

hwnd On the open mar
West! pen mar-
ort nD to-day as ru-

t a new '
pending in

y . |
of East Germans an

“The whole world knows that)
the United States Government, |
fn its attempt to annex China
has supported Chiang Kai Shek
in. waging large scale civil war,
denying the Chinese people any

they yaiting to dispose o
‘feared might soon be
‘ outs cy formed

© West Berlin

booths to by

early
ex

- uy west mark:
: ‘ag, tli-time low rate. of}freedom or any rights, x w-) sa
» Vi . for one west | portunity to live in independence
tae? 8 rate was 7.70 nd peace.” Ch En Lai decis
ink 4, oman Deutsch
denia 3” issued ate- Puppets
oat than any forn yf The United Stat
orm was pending irjploying similar methods

any

—~-Reuter @ On Page ll

|
1



| Blohn

jing here









I
from cl

ose

Gorn Dock
Demolished

HAMBURG, March 18.
Strong police forces and many
police radio cars patrolled Ham-



burg's dock area this afternoon
as the first explosion Cemolishing
part of a iant graving dock
built for war purposes, shook
the city More than 2,000 people
stood the treets nearby tc
watch the demolition carried ou
by British army engineers
Police headquarters have an-

nounced that they were determin





ed to prevent any interference
with the demolition work anc

erse any demonstrators. Ham
urg authorities had held that
lemolition of part of the dock
night have been preventec
i ving a protest note from
Chancellor Konrad Adenauer tc
British High Commissioner Gen-
eral Sir Brian Robertson asking
him to delay the action. Aden-

vuer had said the blasting woulc
endanger the harbour installations
and that the dock necessary
for the German ship building in-
dustry.

The dock known as Elbe 17 is
state owned but is operated by
the biggest German shipping firm
and Voss

|

was



—Reuter.

Russia Help
Red Chinese

HONG KONG, March 18,
A Chinese businessman arriv
trom Shanghai claimed}
o-day that uniformed Soviet
troops were helping Chinese
Communists to man anti-aircraft
defences at two at least of Shang-
hai’s four airports, These airports
have recently been under constant)
Nationalist attack. The statement |
could not be definitely confirmed,
but an official foreign source said |
something similar had been re-
perted elsewhere, Another Chinese
also just arrived, said about 2,000

Russian “advisers and experts”
had arrived in Shanghai for air-
port duties. Earlier reports saial
many houses near the

Huanjao {
airport had been requisitioned for
Russians. The bu8iness man said
the anti-aircraft guns, captured
German pieces, were manned by!
Russians the Chinese had not}
known how to handle them. |

—Reuter, |

Expelled Prelate |
Leaves Prague |

PRAGUE, Mar. 13.
Monsignore Ottavio De Liva,|
the last diplomatic representative
of the Holy See remaining inj
Czechoslovakia, left by |
air to-day for Rome
The Czechoslovak Foreign Min-
istry, which said he carried o;
subversive activities on Marcn /6
ordered him expelled within three |
days.
It is believed that before leav
ing he paid a last visit to Arch-
bishop Josef Beran, who has not

Prague

Sunda

BELGIAN PRIME MIN



| Col

Ui |





IRAY LON, inside right for Empire, climaxes a good forward movement with a low hard shot
range at the Carlton goal
The ball, however, struck the left upright and rebounded into play



I

“



Federal Set-Up
Will Be Costly

Says City Druggist

FEW Barbadians have yet reac the Report of the Stand |

ing Closer Association Committee on the Federation of the
West !ndies published in book form last week or even -wher
it appeared in instalments in the pages of the Barbados

Advocate

W.1. Air Lines
In Parliament

London—In a House otf
Commons debate on civil
aviation in the Colonies
(March 7), Mr. Geoffrey

Cooper (Labour) asked Mr.
John Dugdale, new Minister
of State for Colonial Affairs,
if he would look into air
transport facilities in the
West Indies,

“We know”, he said, “that
some islands are not, served
at all adequately either by
sea or by air transport. We
cannot hope to get adequate
development of the Colonies
unless transport facilities are
really adequate to do the
task with which they are
concerned,

“Representations were
made ‘‘o me over the last 18
months by more than one
merchant who had interests

in the West Indies. It was
represented to me that it
was extremely difficult to

develop both ways between
the West Indies and this
country without adequate air
services. In fact, “Mr Cooper
went on, iv was pointed out
that letters even by air mail
sometimes took as much as
15, 18 and 20 days to reach
this country, sometimes even
longer.

“It is obvious”, he con-
Anued, “that if a firm in this
country is quoting for a con-
tract for some work in the
West Indies and finds that
communications take so long
to reach the country, they
may well lose the oppor-
tunity of submitting their
tender, because of the delay
in comparison with the time
taken for letters to reach the
United States. Therefore the
development taking place in
the Caribbean area through
the Colonial Development
Corporation, and it seems to
mie the Colonial Corporation
itself, is not really helped by
the inadequate air services
extended to that part of our
Colonial territory. —B.U.P.

Indochinese Ordered

af

The Advocate interviewed
cross section of the communit
| yesterday. A druggist did not se
how the dream of Federatio:

| gone,

4



|

|
|
|

| To Shoot Down U.S. Planes

PARIS, Mar. 18.

The Vietminh (Indo-Chinese) |
; Command in southern Indo-China
| has ordered its troops to fire or: |
; any American aircraft flying ove:

left his Palace here since Mia-| the — terpitor: Domnaaiaet i

January. De Liva_ was Beran’: ‘Agence cee oe ane

only link with the Vatican. from Co adhe res:
Monsignore, De Liva, who Ww —Reuter.



in Prague 16 months disclosec
before leaving that he had pr«
tested formally last week to th
Czechoslovak Government against
press attacks against him
Heads of*the western diploma
tic missions in Prague were a
the airport to see De‘Liva off. |
—Reuter.



Doctors For |
Atom Victims |

NEW YORK, Mar. 18



could become a reality before the

next twenty years when most o

the enthusiasts will be “dead anc
”

He said that few people with
whom he had discussed the matter
realised the tremendous cost that
the setting up of the Federal
structure envisaged in the report
would entail.

The Federal Constitution,
*ederal Judiciary and the running
of the Federal Services would cost
a tremendous amount of money
The contributions of the Constitu-
ent Territories. would also- create

| some meastife of difficulty and the
| choosing of the seat of the FrJera'

capital would always be open to
much critidjsm,

A Civil servant thought that i
was not sufficiently known that

| "he Federal Government would not

implify the existing Legislative
set-ups in the constituent Terr
tories but would be entirely addi
tional.

He felt that some of the colonies
with their topheavy methods for

| government should have taken the

opportunity to effect some moditi-
eation of the respective systems.

Mr. Victor Unasé a member of
the St. Michael’s Vestry said that
while not committing himself o
the principle of federation as out-
lined in the report, from the firs‘
reading of the report it appeare:
to him that the idea of the Gov-
ernor General of the area selecting
senators from each of the colonies
for the Senate, might bring about
a great deal of dissatisfaction.

@ on page 16



Sports Window

SIX football matches will be ,
played during the week at Ken-
sington Oval and Queen's Park.

The fixtures are;—

MONDAY, MAROH 2,

Everton vs Harrison College,
Division 1, at Kensington Ova)
Referee Mr, Paul Wilkin. Lines
men Mr. O. 8S. Coppin and Mr
I. Byer.

TUESDA®, MARCH

Harrison College vs Y.M.P
Division 2, at Queen's Park. |
feree Mr. F. Edward

WEDNESDAY, MAR‘

Empire vs Notre-Dame, â„¢
2, at Queen's Park. Referee, Mr
lL Byer

THURSDAY, MARCH 23,

Pickwick-Rovers Spartan, Di-
vision 1, Kens Oval, Referee
Mr. O. 8S. Cope! °

Linesmen I Byer and Mr.

Paul Wilkin
FRIDAY, MARCH 24.
Spartan vs Everton, Divieicn
at Queen's Park. Referee Mr
Amary .
SATURDAY, MAROH 25.
Pickwick-Rovers vs Fanpire, Di-

cB

vision 1, at Kensington Oval. Re-
feree, Mr. L. 8, Linesmen,
Mr. E. Amory and Mr. F,
Edwards.





Is The Senator Indiscreet?

NEW YORK, March 18.
Legislation to deport Charlie
Chaplain and others is planned
in the United States Congress by
Senator William Langer, a Norte
Dakota Republican,
York Daily News”

the

day.
The “News” said Senator Lan-
| ger hoped to introduce the legis-

“New
reported to-

| lation as an amendment to a Bill

New York Health officials havi | by Senator Edwin Johnson (Col-

launched a plan to

any future atomic d'saster

“The medical problems assovia- |

with an atomic ex
like New York are
comprehensik

ted
a city
beyond





Johnson’s Bill, the

Ingrid Bergman

}

|
‘ “News” | Senator Johnson as “one of th:
n in} said, was directed specifically at| most
most | actresses
officials | Rita Hayworth, for their interna-

ard

i
said;

| tional romances which he
after effects of the vlast,| flouted civilisation’s moral code
eat and the iation al The New York “Daily News
ior { all| to-day quoted Senator Langer
t aying: “I checked with the
St New : migration Department to see
ell Chaplain and other foreigners of









s like who have lived here f



‘

30 to 40 years but refuse to tak«

out United States citizenshi;
could also be barred from th:
country.

“Finding that they cannot un-
der our present laws, I decidec
to take legal steps to get rid of
them.”

In Washington, Senator Sheri
dan Downey, (Democrat Cali-
fornia) said that film people pro-

| vide “far more examples of good
prepave the | orado, Democrat), to require fed-| conduct than bad.”

States. 30,000 doctors to deal witt | eral licensing of films, actors and |

| producers.

He described the proposal b

extreme proposals I hav

| ever encountered”.

Downey said he did not con

done the actions of “certuir
jmmembers of the iadusitry whc
have violated our accepted code :

of behaviour”. But, he added, for

every individual who offends

there are thousands who live

decently and wholesomely”’
—Reuter.

| *o-night,

the

Aduncate
STER RESIGNS





Year 55.



Further Strikes Threatened

alate Salk |
Carry On

Says Isaacs

LONDON, March 18,
Mr. George Isaacs, Minister of
Labour in Mr, Clement Attlee’s
majority of five Government said
“We are going to carry
n as a Government for a good
ne yet.”
eeaking at a meeting in south
London, Isaacs said: “Do not be-

ieve the suggestions that there
11 be another elecJon in two or
hree months time. If the Tories

| (Conservatives) want us to go, let

hem get us out. The majority of
he people put us in power, and
ve mean to govern, “The Govern-
nent is going to do the right thing
‘cr Britain, whether they are un-

»»ular things or not.”

Isaacs added “The Labour Gov-
‘rnment is not running away. We
ure carrying on.”—Reuter.

Idolatry
In Russia

BELGRADE, March 18,
Propaganda chief Milovan Djilas
1 senior member of the Yugoslav
Politburo listed to an audience o
25,000 students to-night the sin:
of the Kremlin in Belgrade eyes

He told an election meeting
here was too much idolatry of!
Soviet leaders in Russia as was

the case under the old monarchies
The sins of Moscow, he saic
included economic exploitation
smaller Socialist States—dividin:
the world into spheres of influenc
-suppressing the initiative of th
He said a privileged caste o
| masses,
} ureaucrats had arisen in Moscow
| nd transformed the State into
ower above the people
This, the Minister said, was t!
| visis of socialism.”—Reuter.

Saciniitete
Meet In U.K.

HASTINGS, March 18
Social Democratic leaders fron
all over Europe met here toda)
for a two day session in an at-





tempt to solve important polic: | migrants to Argentina now onl)

differences among the non-Com

munist Left Wing. The birce

problems confronting the dele

gates of the Committee of th:
International Socialist Or ganisa-
tion (Comisco) were the Differ-
ences about the future of the
Saar particularly between the
German and French Parties and
the failure of the Italian 3¢
Democrats io unite a single party
When the delegates assemble

today under the Chairmanship «
the British Labour Party Secre-
tery, Morgan Phillips, they deal
with routine business. They wer
expected this afternoon to discus
the two main subjects which wi!’
~robably take up most of the
remainder of the conference
—Reuter.

Serap The White
Elephant

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica

Party politics are again playine
vart in the fate of the Gas Works
which is completely outmoded
and. has for some years past been
costing the taxpayer £25,000 t-
keep it on. Government wants thr
Sas Works scrapped— its a white
slephant, but the Corporation
Council wants to keep it on for
* provides work for scores and
they are mostly all members of
the T.U.C., the Labour Union from
which P.N.P. derives its strength





Trygve Lie Appoints
An Art Board

LAKE SUCCESS, Mar, 18
United Nations Secretary-Gei.
eral Trygve Lie has appointe:
an Art Board of four membei
to pass judgment on the paintin
furniture, interior decorating ar
exterior landscaping of the ne

United Nations headquarters.
They are Mr. Wallace Harrso:
chief architect, M. Jacques Cal.
of France, Senor Miguel Covar
rubias, of Mexico, and Mr. How

ard Robertson, Britain.

—Reuter.

CRUDE OIL PRICE

WILL DROP
MEXICO CITY, March 18,
The Mexican Government be-
lieves the world price of crude oj
will continue to drop this year



tor General of “Petroleos Mexi-
canos” the Government oil mon
opoly, said in a speech here
Production is still exceeding de-
mand, he said. adding that Mexicc
hoped to produce 300,000 barrels
daily by the end of 1950.—Reuter.

GALES DELAY
ITALIAN LINER

NEW YORK, March 18,



to-day delayed incoming
f

rom Europe.

'

BRUSSELS, March 18.
AFTER A TWO-HOUR MEETING of the
Belgian Catholic-Liberal Cabinet this morning,
Premier Eyskens left for the Royal Palace to hand
in his Government’s resignation to Regent Prince
Charles.

An official communique issued after the Cabinet
meeting said: “The Government failing to reach an
agreement on summoning a joint session of both
Houses of Parliament to vote the repeal of the
Regency Law and this point not being included in
Government programme, the Prime Minister has
decided to hand in the resignation of his Govern
ment to the Prince Regent.’’

4| Emerging from the Cabinet
: meeting, Albert Devez2, Literal
Acheson P? lans Defence Minister and Vice-Pre--

mier said, “Now
that the responsible
pledged to form a new Govern-
ment will find a formula, which
I hope with all my heart, will be
a national formula.”

Deveze added that the resigna-
tion of the government did not

one must hope
statesman

New Move

WASHINGTON, Mar. 18.
Mr. Dean Acheson, Unitec
States Secretary of State, was re-

ported to-day to be planning : Re ay \ t
move next week to enlist con-} meen “an irreparable rift between
gressional svpport for a new the men who have cooperated in
ere . : the outgoing coalition,”

1ited Staies policy in the Far a ' - F
—" lel ; This is a solution of reciprocal
ts ; fairness between the parties in the

r. Aches as rated that mig? ,
tl ae ae - = . “ Ais former Government” he added.
1 inited states may : saa)
giv i . * and *

to give limited Peonomic anc Party Differences
military aid to southeast Asiar °
countries who wish to join The outgoing Cabinet had nine
volunteer programme aimed ai] Catholic (Christian Social Party)
halting the Far Eastern expan-| members and eight Liberals. It
sion of Communism. was formed on August 10 #Bst

Mr. Acheson has given no in-{ year after 45 days of political
cication that the administration] crisis caused by party differences
is planning any military assist-} Over the possible return of King

Leopold.
The Socialist Party, opposed
the King’s return, refused to join

ence for the Chinese Nationalis

Coy to
Covernment

The administration already ha :
bout $100,000,000 which coul eee Catholics in a
e used in launching a Far Eas a gener diectteh: ats Jere
| alka nae ait: Aut Sols gave the. Catholics an overall
ie smile 2° ge wh gle Sa Y | majority in the Senate—Upper
tina aid funds voted last yea’} trouse—pbut they were two votes
by Congress . short of a majority in the Chamber
A Bill is now pendine befor: | of Deputies,
the Senate Foreign Relation Catholics and Liberals—partners
Committee to extend for anothe in the Government—disagreed on

~ear alter June 30, President Tr 1 solution to the nation’s five year



|man’s right to svend these funds | old “Royal question,” personally
The Bill orovides for ft eir us | suggested by the provisionally
‘nm the “China area” which yp’ exiled king.
umably could include = south Yesterday, a wave of 24 hours
ast Asia —Reuter “Stop Leopold warning strikes”

|

|

'

|

)

Senator Antonio Bermudez, Direc- |



Gales lashing the Atlantic Ocean}
ships |

In general, ships on the Atlantic}

were delayed from 24 to 48 hours.

Among the delayed

i Italian liner Conte Biancamano, |
‘from Naples o1) its first postwar
voyage. —Reuter,

stiatend tees MEO erat ow

hips is the)

broke out throughout the Walloon
(French-Speaking) provinces in
southern Belgium. About 250,000
workers downed tools as a protest
against any attempt to bring King
Leopold back to the throne.

To-day there was a general re—
‘urn to work, although some work-
‘vs who did not take part in
yesterday’s stoppage staged isolat-
‘d strikes to-day.

Walk-Outs



Japs May Go To
Argentina

TOKYO, March 18.
Plans for sending Japanes
await Argentine Government ap
proval, the Kyodo News Agence)
reported here today, Japane:

aationals in Argenvina have form- |. In Ghent, there were partial
d a Committee for this, One of it valle outs among wor kers in a
officials will fly to Japan to selee |NUmber of textile factories and
; , . mechanical construction plants,
migrants as soon as Governmen

and ¢ ckers,

approval has been given. Fun ind among dockers
In Antwerp, pamphlets were

for the first year of the migration

being circulated this morning by

lan have already pee found Belgian Transport Workers Union
and land for settling Japane urging dockers to down tools for
‘armers will shortly be surveyes | 94 hours on Monday.

—Reuter.

The strike is also spreading to
| Brussels, where workers of large

KING GEORGE ILL | industrial plant are staging a 24

hour strike on Monday.
7 a © i os > mis t
LONDON, March, 18 The strikes were unofficial, but
King George VI is confined

; were tacitly supported by the
i A Socialist-dominated General Fed
his room at Buckingham Palace} eration of Labour—Belgium’s
with a slight chill. Sir John Wei
the Royal physician visited the

,| largest trade union,
Palace to-day,—Reuter.



Earlier this week, the Union

@ On page 11.
























K-W-Vv

CORONATION WINE





MAKE A

Enjoy the fine
characteristics of WY tending
that are popular in leading Clubs and
Hotels in the United Kingdem, Canada
New Zealand, Sweden and other coun-
tries—and save the difference in costs
between foreign and Empire Wines by
reason of lower import duties,
TABLE WINES

K.W.V. Sauvignon Blanc, K. wy
Riesling Cape Dry White, Selected,

SHERRIES

K.W.V. “ey No. 1—Very Old extra

ry

Jouker Capero—Medium-Dry
” Kimberley Ciub—Pale oe
SPARKLING WINES

K.W.V. Sparkling Franschbock
-White
Sparking Roodcherg—Red

and the famous South African Li ueur
K.W.V. VAN DER HUM

”









| PLANTATIONS Livia

eee
— OOS

Fl

tice
with ::

PAGE TWO



ROYAL worrnines

LAST SHOW TODAY AT 8.30
Republic Double
WILLIAM MARSHALL

t anaes

ACTION

EMPIRE
NO SHOW
Monday and Wednesday, 9.15 p.m.

Sree ata

EDGAR BARRIER

5 Ml

sh Be ss

|
ROXY |
NO SHOW TODAY
Last Show Monday, 7.20 p.m. |
Republic Double
STEPHANIE BACHEI.OR
“SECRETS OF SCOTLAND YARD”
“CHEYENNE WILDCAT” |
s” 2 WauMnte 2 |

Wild Bill Elliott as Red Ryder and Bobhy Blake
as Little Beaver

OLYMPIC

NO SHOW TODAY
MONDAY and WEDNESDAY 9.00 P.M

gee AS
_ JOH

:
f

THINKING

Or
HOUSE
REPAIR ?

so, our—

BUILDING &

Ss at your service.

S give y¢

Vild



“MURDER IN THE MUSIC HALL”

Bill’ Elliott in

“WAGON WHEELS WESTWAR:
Linda Sterling

THRILLS





t Tougher.
ever Ob

THE FIGHTING
KEN) HCRIAE

|
BRECONSTRUCTION > NEW
BUILDING :

ON!

i quotations.



Tipe

i ie

VERA RALS7

as Red Ryde

“te Gecrg >
. , SUSPEI

|,
y. Lew Ia

|

|

i



TODAY

GENE TIERNEY
RICHARD CONTE
JOSE FERRER
CHARLES BICKFORD

METOPORIE 3 LETS 0M



ZA Ye,

F-8 ll .

=




time





WE HAVE



HAIR BROOMS
STRAW BROOMS
YARD BROOMS
BANNISTER BRUSHES
SCRUB BRUSHES
BOTTLE BRUSHES
CARPET BRUSHES
TOILET BRUSHES
and HOLDERS

SELECT EARLY
FROM

THE CORNER STORE

panied

soretary,

noor

:





{
{

if

ii

) \
i

2 { H)

{ t

CTING DEPARTMENT \|
| Sh)

WI

Hi

}

41 )))

M1)

Ry

1



the
Savage,
Lambert,

IS Excellency
and Mrs.
by Mr.

St. Andrew

During the






MORGAN

will be open

TO-NIGHT

the Club Morgan
Orchestra and
Peter Lacy

at the Piano

for continuous
Entertainment.

Last 2 Show

Governor
accom- IL
Private
attended a Scout Raliy
yesterday after-
evening, they

to the Official dinner at the



ORD BALDWIN,
the Leeward Islands pro-

poses to visit Montserrat

the 3rd April and after a stay of

eighteen days there, will return to

Antigua on the 21st April

Governor of

vatched the football match be- ; :
en Empire and Carlton at Ken- At Stanmore | odge
on Oval From there, they MARGARET 1



Wi eS :



Montre

a Ss 7 » BRAY frorn al,
Mariné Hotel, held ih honour of Will. 4pend: the nekt two months
visiting Anterican Admirals at “tanitiore Lodge.” the ham«
a Generey bt Mr. and Mrs, K.'D. G, Frost
= in wiack Rock. She arrived from
ror About Two Months Canatia yesterday by T.C.A. and
i her visit is principaliy for her
TAR. WINSTON WARD, Man- joo yy
M ager of the Paradise Beach aah
|Club, left for New York yester- Visitirg Her Son
lay via Antigua by BWA. and RS, PATRICIA GCDFREY 2
e will be away for about tWo Vit nuntdadian, wvho is spending
rae time in Venezuela arrived on



Friday afternocn from Ven:
via Trinidad to visit her son v
is at the Lodge School. She wi
be here over the weekend.

i

Intransit

M* t. A, WEATHERLY who
+ arrived from Bermuda ear-
ly yesterday morning by T.C.A.,
was able to go into Bridgetown
and telephone his friend Mr. John
Hammond out at Porters and re-
turn to Seawell in time to catch
B.W.1.A’s morning flight to An-
tigua, where he will be stavine
with Mr. and Mrs. Ogden P. Starr
in St. Johns.

_.hy Visitors from Toronto
ANY people from ‘foronto are
visiung Barbados. Several
arrived yesterday by T.C.A. and
a iew that returned were Mr. and
Mrs. H. W. Larkin, and Mr. and
Mrs. Irving Wilson who were all
staying at the Windsor, and inci-
dentally have already made re-
servations there for next year.
Also returning yesterday were
Mr. and Mrs, Alex Paterson who
live in Montreal and were at the
Marine Hotel for three weeks

Best In the Island

A FTER two weeks
the Crane Hotel,

holiday at
Mr. and

Mrs. Mansfield Horner, who live g

in Hartford, Connecticut, returned
home via Canada yesterday by
T.C.A. He is President of United
Aircraft in Hartford. Mrs. Horner
thinks that the Crane Beach is
the best in the island,

Today at 5 & 8.30 p.m

CASABLANCA

at 5 & 8.30 p.m
Lauren BACALL

MON
Charles

& TUES.
BOYER,

Confidential Agent

A warner Bros

8404 FOR RESERVATION

DIAL



AMTATIC CLD

TONIGHT (SUNDAY), TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY at 8.30

CROSBY—ANN
HUME

BING

in Paramount’s

I w Ann and Bing sing



Please note: Shows instead of



GLOBE

u're in Love with D ae
sitg other wonderful hits inculding ‘‘When Irish E'yes Are Smiling

“Ye

“TOP O' THE MORNING’, |

Tuesday and Thursday wili be Tuesday

}
1
/
end Wednesay by arrangement with the Electric Company i lcome

Picture







; “ft
CUNEMA (Members Only! i
BLYTH—BARRY FITZGERALD ii

CRONYN

Sormone”’ and hear

THEATRE



TONITE 8.30 — FOREIGN TALENT ON PARADE
(1) The Hot Shots (Trinidad’s No, 1 Orchestra)
(2) Madam Tiam Fook (Chinese Dancer) ”
(3) Syd Vanderlyde (i.G’s Ace Comedian)



At9 am. TO-DAY L&

MONDAY

CORPORAL STUBBL
Crooning: “BI

“ry





KEEP YOUR

HOME AS
CLEAN AS
A WHISTLE!

R
“3
oO
M
S

CAL TALENT AUDITION

John GARFIELD in “FORCE OF EVIL”



SPECIAL (GUEST STAR:
‘FIELD, U.S. Marines

JE MOON”
IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE”









SUNDAY

{with the
| mission,

|
|

ADVOCATE

—







¢:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR as he arrived at the Empire
Theatre on Friday night to see the Musical Revue “High Tyme”.
He is seen being escorted in by Mr. C. B. Dowding, Publicity

Manager for the show.

Flies the Inland Routes
M* and Mrs. John Fisher re-~
turned by T.C.A. yester-
day after an enjoyable two weeks
at the Hotel Royal. Mr. Fisher is
pilot with T.C.A, but never
comes this way. When he is fly-
ing he flies the inland routes of
7.C.a 2
Happy Memories
AJ. and Mrs. A. Melnotte
a Hill, who have been holi-
daying in Barbados since January
returned to Antigua yesterday by
B.W.1.A., where Maj. Hill, is Supt.

of Police. They carried with them
some “Bajan” Flying Fish and
happy memories of a. wonderful

vacation,
Enroute to Grenada
M* HARVEY SMITH, a
tired Post Office
Engineer,

ls enroute
discussions

for
i

Leeward Group concerning







ternal communications He ar-
rived yesterday by the Golfito,
and while he is in Barbados will
be a guest at the Hastings Hotel
Fie was accompanied by his wife.

To Be Married Shortly

MONG the passengers arriv-
A ing on the Golfito yester-
day was Miss Lynette Plant, a

Londoner, who is intransit to An-
tigua where she will shortly be-
| the bride of Mr. Npville
Berridge, Registrar of that Island.
| Canadian K.C. Here
| R. IRVING S. FAIRDY, K.C,,
'M arrived yesterday by T.C.A.
Ito spend three weeks at the Colony
}Club, St nes; in Canada he is
Toronto Transport Com





SEA VIEW
HOUSE

)
\
(
{
HASTINGS, BARBADOS )
{
(

)) EXCELLENT CUISINE
FULLY STOCKED BAR }
RATES: $5.00 per Day &
upwards
(Inclusive) |

{



firs. W. S. He WELL





Crane Hotel

Easter Saturday
8th April

8
Evening Dress
optional
e
MUSIC by Arnold
Meanwell and his
Little Meanies
e

§ Admission ... $1.00

Light refreshments
included









| THE BARBADOS
} CO-OPERATIVE
| COTTON FACTORY Lt





CALLING

wre fully
Fish Hooks, Fishing Lines. $)

Seine, Mullet and Herring



Twines Brass Swivels,

Rowlocks, Mesh Wire

Wire

j
d. | Galvanised
1

Cleat Hooks

Lacing

Pulleys



res
Regional
to Grenada
with the Govern-
ment of that island as well as the
in-

;}with Mr. W. F. Bryden.

|Canada on the Lady Rodney.



}

AEE
FISHERMEN ©
4 |

Land your
i

Catch safely 4

)
i
stocked with i)

Worse Than Pulling Teeth
% HIS is worse than puiling

teeth,” said Mr. Hugh Gage
as he entered the Terminal Build-
ing at Seawell yesverday morning.

‘What is worse than that?”
Carib asked him.
“Well,” he said, “We are re-

turning to New York, and we feel
as if we are leaving home and
going away, rather than returning
home!”

Mr. Gage, who was accompanied
by his wife and eleven year old
son Hugh have been in Barbados
since 28th January staying at the
Paradise Beach Club.

Young Hugh had a_ problem
himself. He asked his mother if
he could borrow sixpence so that
he could telepnone his “girl
friend,” and tell her
he left before he could see her!

This is their third visit to Bar-
bados and they e coming again
next year

Denmark’s Washington

Ambassador
Sere KAUFFMANN, Den-
mark’s Washington Amias-
sador is in Barbados for one week
Staying at “Heron Beach,” the
Ronald Tree’s home in St. James,

He arrived yesterday morning by
DAC ii

Barbados Holiday
R. H. H. GARDINER, Presi-

dent of Masco Electric Co.,
Ltd., in Toronto, with his daugh-

ter Mrs. W. Pape and his grand-
son David arrived yesterday by
T.C.A. for a Barbados holiday

and they will be staying at the
Marine Hotel.

Was At Seawell
RS. GEORGE H. WELD, was
at Seawell yesterday morn-
ng, 40 meet her husband who ar-
‘ived from Toronto via T.C.A.,
iccompanied by two friends also
rom Toronto, Mr. and Mrs. J. L.
hree weeks at the Marine Hotel.

Engaged
"THE engagement was an-

nounced last night between
Mr. Lloyd Clarke, son of the late

Mr. J. W. Clarke formerly head-
naster of St. Leonard’s Boys
school and Mrs. Clarke of Bank
fall, and Miss Gloria Ramsay
laughter of Mr. G. A, Ramsay,
\gricultural Instructor, St. Peter

nd Mrs, Ramsay.

From San Tome
M* and Mrs. Jack B. Foster
L arrived on Friday afternoon
y B.W.LA. from Venezuela via
Crinidad and they are guests at the
‘aradise Beach Club. Mr. Foster
Ss with the Constructura Mundial
n San Tome, Venezuela and he
eturns there on Sunday,

Their two young’ daughters
enelope and Mary Elizabeth,
vere with them, and after Mrs.

Foster has put them to school here
ind had a short holiday she will
ye returning to Venezuela.

For the Week-end

M* A. E. NORCROSS, Man-
ager of West Indies Royal
Securities Corporation with head-
quarters in Montreal who arrived
in Barbados about two and half
months ago on the Lady Nelson,
left on Friday afternoon by
B.W.1.A. to spend the weekend
He will
be returning to spend another
month here before he leaves for
He
is a-guest at the Marine Hotel.







NN

good-bye, as

SUNDAY, my;



Antiguan Exhibition
N Thursday evening there was
an exhibition at the St.
John’s Methodist Church in An-
tigua of handwork by girls of the
“Point Club” of which Mrs. Doro-
thy Smith wife of Rev. C. TT.
Smith is President. Thisyclub was
originally started two and a half
years ago for the benefit of de-
linquents but other girls who had
nothing to do in the evening found
their way to the club to learn
some sort of fancy work. Over
two hundred girls have passed
through the club and the excellent
display this year was contributed
by over a hundred, girls. The
club’s secretary is iss Helen
Shervington and other helpers are
Miss Henry, Miss Farara, Miss
Heatly and the Misses V and R.
Carmichael.

The exhibition was visited by
Lord Baldwin accompanied by his
A.D.C. Major Denis Vav)zhn.

Dislikes Flying
TYR. L. R..WYNTER who has

been holidaying in the
U.S.A., Canada, and Jamaica
during the past five Thonthe has
returned to Antigua but will not
be taking up his duties until next
month. Dr. Barnes well known
chiropodist of Hamilton, Ontario,
accompanied Dr. Wynter and is
visiting Antigua for the first time.
Dr. Barnes is Mrs, Wynter’s step-

father. Mrs. Wynter dislikes fly-
ing and is expected by boat
shortly.

Guest Of Honour

MS EVELYN CHALLENOR
one of the 20 girls selected
to go'to the U.K. as Auxiliary
workers in the hospitals, was
Suest of honour at a party by
members and friends of the Si.
Lucy Church Girls Club on Thars-
day at the Church House.

Miss Challenor was given many
presents which included a_ suit-
case. She leaves on Tuesday for
the U.K.

LT. and MRS.
Marrie¢ Yesterday

: HE hundred and fifty guests

who were at the reception
at “Medmenham” Pine Hill, saw
Miss Elizabeth Joy Shearn, elder
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H, F.
Shearn of “Letchworth,” Garri-
son, married to Lt, Michael John
Blackman, R.N., elder son of Mr.
and Mrs. Blackman of London,
England, shortly after 4.30 o’clock
yesterday afternoon at St. Mat-
thias Church.

The Church was decorated in
white and the ceremony, which
was fully choral, was performed
»y Bishop Bentley and thg Rev.
Griffiths. The Bride’s dress was
an ivory satin gown, exquisitely
embroidered with seed pearls on
the sheer yoke, with a softly
draped bustle from which flowed
a long circular train. Her flowing
veil of Brussels lace was held in
place by a tiara of orange blos-
soms. She carried a bouquet of
white orchids.

The Bridesmaids were Miss
Jean Bovell, Miss Suzanne Shearn
and Miss Wendy Inniss. They
wore four pastel shades of geor-
gette, green, blue, yellow and
mauve in their wide full skirts.
Each one had a bodice of one of
these colours, and wreaths of
matching flowers were in their
hair, and they carried fans also
made and decorated in. the four
shades of their skirts.

The Bestman was Mr. Mickey
Challenor and ushers were. Dr.
Kenneth Nicholls, Mr. Clifford In-
niss, Mr. Pat Roach, and Mr. David
Badley.

After the reception the happy
couple left to spend their honey-
moon at the Crane House Club.

Coloured Flowers

RS. MORAY ANDERSON,

wife of a retired Broker of
Toronto, is spending a holiday in
Barbados, at Cacrabank. She
came down on a Freight ship, anc,
although they had a terribly
rough time, she still thinks it was
worth it, because, “Barbados is so
beautiful,” she says; she can’t get
used to the worderful colours of
the flowers.

in Khaki

The ‘SAGAMORE §

EVANS & WHITRIBLDS

The English AERTEX SPORTS g4ff

in White Only

The “BUSHMAN” Shirt




































ARCH ig, iy

For C
A ®vine ee &W
ras yesterday moraine ;
ana Were WV +
Mr. Roe cart and Mi oe
bados to take w

Colonia}
Welfare as a eto

years,

Prior to comi
in the general heres
of the office of the
for the Cotonies g :
Captain in the British ’
Saw service in Ne
Egypt and Palestine,

After Seven

FTER g 3
A holiday in Engine
Parris of Black Bess, St

turned yesterday mo

“Golfito”, :
First Visit

P**inc their first yi;

« bados are Mp ‘eau
Abrahams of Weston 4% Oy
England, They arrive a
sho Oliday j

S.A. and are rai
Ocean View Hotel, ving at

Mr. Abrahams is ap
Abrahams and Co, La so ge |
turers of silver ware.”

Vicar of Se, Albans

EV. L. v.G ;
R Curate of gnORce .
dral, returned from Eng
terday morning on ae ¢
after residing there for
months as Assistant cmt
Benedicts, Ardwick,

He has Now come to ri
appointment ‘ake yp
Albans, os Weer at

Barbadian Return;

R. A. M. WILKIE

student of Harrison ¢
returned yesterday
Goifito from England, His
in 1944 and joined the

demobilisation in. 194%, je ig

course in Public A,
Oxford University aaa





a

— cane

































































siti

BLACKMAN

To Study Ministry

k. C. JOHNS of Hertford

England arrived here yes
day morning on the “Golfite’!
study Minist#y and will enter
rington College.

Spent Three Weeks
R. O. Soverall, Civil §
attached to the Lands
Surveys Department of Trith
returned home yesterday evtil
by B.W.LA, after spending
weeks’ holiday, He was ati
panied by Mr, Frank Bars)
former student of Queen's
College. They were both sajage
at Leaton-on-Sea, The Str a
Returns from Long Lag.
ETURNING from long
in England was Mr. C4] |

Lawson who arrived yesterdayl
the Golfite accompanied by &
Lawson,

Mr. Lawson resumes his r
stantive position ,
Cable and Wireless (W.1.
Barbados,

Intransit

ISS JEANETTED
daughter of the late D
ward Deane and Mrs. D
John and a grand-daughter â„¢
Peter Patterson, was inWal
the “Golfito” y fi
from England where she had:
a holiday.
She is now on her '
St. Vincent where she ;
ried on Hea: at St. G
Cathedral to Mr. |
an Englishman resident in BAP

colony. + sister of |






















Miss Deane is
Cyril Barnard. aa
° « §
‘®& NOTHER intransit pase
on the “Golfito” from &
yesterday was Mrs. Elma
a widow who went on 04
where she will be Tesi’
her brother Mr. A. E. Moor’
master-general of that coi
th Mi. and .
wit . an ‘oe
their residence in the’Gé

SMART |
SHIRTS
from AMERICA! §

|







in Plain Shades —

sta



$3)



















: £ A. Nyren the Ame
ps with Rear-Adm! (
; ond Maj.-Gen. P. W. €

pivision, who arrived y¢

Honour of U.S. Visitors
























































; four hundred guests
a ere invited to the COCK-
F at the urine riove:
Pogo given by the Am@pcan
: Consul Mr. A Nyren,
j the visit of Rear
Seid Wright U.S. Navy, and
Gen. P. W. Clarkson U.S.

fae, G. 3rd Iniantry Divis-
z who arrived yesterday morn-
“jpg-on the U.S. Amphibious Task
“worce Flagship “Taconic.” During
y, which was from 6 to 8
n there was music by Percy
n’g orchestra in the ballroom
AT of the Hotel where the party was
held.
Tenth Anniversary
and Mrs. Ogden P. Starr
celebrated their tenth wed~-
anniversary with a large
Spamber of guesls “Cocktails
Thursday in Antigua. Mr. and
Wie Starr are both very well
there for their many ac~
since their arrival three
sin connection with the

Lo

f Project. Mr. Starr is
ising agent for Mill Reef
s Lid. and Mrs, Starr
attractive gift shop in the
“nic as the “Saga Shop”

al

1o ¢

Mofers tourists

res With Churchill

ey
(OBL COWARD, who has just
returned to ingiand ‘roi i
id in Jamaica, share h
Churchill his hobby of |
A picture by this
pwn playwright-producer-actor,
me with others by enthusiastic
$, is on view at the
Ideal Home Exhibition
hf opened
F Its title is
Jamaica”
ly, has just
ondon
Colonial”,
nents. Its principal characte!
if-made Yorkshire n ho
Governor of a

aint-

well-

Wally

n London Ast
[The Junctio
Cow
announced his
producti

tarri

|
f

For these Ward
| To Get Items
|

Town Talk l

hi bees: Bemac

gen Eucryl Tooth Powder |
|
|

Silvy }

pGynomin Tabict

Plark’s Blood

| Serubbs n

pMacassar Oil (R

| Mothaks

PClinitest Urine

Analysis Sets

Potters Asthma R
Cte.

I Sep at.
KEITH ARCHER

DRUG STOR!

Ay



FS

,

Est



i
i
|

EN Ro AB oa



COCKTAIL PARTY last night
ican Consul (left)
iral Gerald Wright
arkson,









1orning by the “Taconie”.

On

M

I
rived

pan
Mi



a sim

‘eave and have spent sometime |
in Trinidad where they attend

Six Months’ Leave

ISS Sheila Mittelhozer, Civil!
f Medical
partment, British Guiana, ar-/|
r Wednesday by
in honour 3B-W.1A. from Trinidad for six

Servant of the

here on

Admiral Weeks’ holiday. She was accom-
ied by her sister, Miss Claire
Mittelhozer who is also a Civil
Servant of the Lands and Mines
Department. She will be here for

ilar period.

They are both on six seianaass |

the Carnival.

RRIVING here recently from

for
two weeks’ holiday was Mrs. Ger- | daughter.

trude

First Time

Trinidad by B.W.LA.

Spencer,

at pe Marine Hotel,
ind Mrs. Nyren (right)
U.S. Navy, in white uni-
. Army C.G. 8rd Infantry

ed |

At the Cinema:

Bing In

| JRELAND, lend of the “little
people’, land of song an

laughter, of superstition and dire
predictions, of emerald lakes and
misty marshes, and home of the
famous Blarney Stone — to all
this, add Bing Crosby. Ann Blyth,
Barry Fitzgerald and Hume
Cronyn and you have the recipe
for “Top Of The Morning” pre-
sented by the Aquatic Clud
Cinema this week. Bing ai

Barry have long been associat

as a song and fun team, and in
“Top Of The Morning” the com-
bination is a happy one with
songs and laughs for everyone.

_ The story is light and amus-
ing and concerns the theft of the
Blarney Stone, thus fulfilling an
old prophecy that the stone would
one day be stosen and that dire
consequences would result. Joe
Mulqueen (Bing Crosby), an
American insurance investigator
is sent to Ireland by his firm with
which the stone is insured
for half a million dollars, His
timely arrival, combined with the
fact that he poses as an artist~
and not a very good one—casts
/ Suspicion on him, and after
spending a short time in the civ'c
jail, he runs into further difficul-
ties with the local police Ser-
geant Briany McNaughton (Barry
Fitzgerald) when he develops
| move than a passing interest in
| Conn (Ann Blyth) the sergeant’s
Sinister events com-





owner of The Lit-| menee to happen, as predicted

tle Barn Restaurant. She says it’s by the leeal wise woman Biddy
her first visit and she is enjoying| O’Devlin (BRileen Crowe), includ-

holiday. She is

Crystal Waters, Worthing.

ONGRATULATIONS
Harold DaC. Straker, who
Was a successful candidate for the
Licentiate Examination which was
recently held here under Dr. W. H.
Pan ee VO,

A

Harris,

for the

Mr.
Teache
Parish

A

Me

Messrs
don makers of soap has arrived

in Barbados to arrange with suited to his requirements.
Messrs. Bradshaw and Co., the 3 ;

newly appointed agent for the While in England, he visited
establishment of a permanent Works of manufacturers from

Oap agency and perhaps a soap
factory
is happy to be here and expresses
‘elight to be back in the West
after an absence of fifteen

his
Indies
years.

He

nas
pa

at the



EA








Start



!
iis
!

Soid

1g one

Congrats

M.A.,
» Royal Schools of Music.
Straker is
r of: “St.

Church.

fter Fifteen Years

WALTER DAVID HALL,

the Flying Salesman

Harry Green Ltd.,

in this island. Mr.

is

Hotel Royal.



SE THE STRAIN!

Relief starts in 30 seconds

ma attacks come unexpectedly — forestall them by

small Ephazone tablet!
-conds.

stion in the bronchial tubes.
g becomes easier.

nothing to inject.

(Seer

writes

Ephazone is unsurpassed.

by all registered chemists,

an Assistant
Lawrence Boys’
School, and Organist of St. Philip’s

of
Lon-

Hall

Jamaican born but has
been residing in the U.K. for the
t fifteen years. He is a guest

ASTHMA

Here’s an easy, effective way to

On reaching the stomach, Ephazone’s
ral healing agents are released to dissolve germ-laden

cause of your discomfort — coughing ceases,
he treatment today! There is nothing to inhale, |,

Por the rapid relief of
,| Asthma, Bronchitis and Bronchial Catarrh,

» Tf any difficulty, write to; A. S, BRYDEN & SONS LTD.,
P.O. BOX 403, BRIDGETOWN.

staying at



Back From Course
In England

M* D.. W. SAYERS, M.B.E.,
Superintendent of the work-
shop of the Highways and Trans-
port and engineer in charge of
Government craft, returned from
England yesterday morning on the
“Golfito”,

Mr. Sayers left here six months
ago on a Bursary Scliolarship
which was sponsored under the
auspices of the British Council.
This scholarship was for the pur-
pose of studying engineering at the
Birmingham Transport Corpora-
tion, but he was later transferred
to the Public Works Department,
Birmingham, an organisation more

to Mr.

whom equipment in Barbados was
purchased and collected valuable
information in connection with
Technical Education for the Bar-
bados Evening Institute.

He also attended many football
games and made special mention
of the courtesy extended to him |
by Sir Stanley Rous, Secretary of
oe Association in Eng-
land,











Relief starts in

Ephazone clears



By G. B.







FOR HEAL TH

CO¢ PER 1/2 LB. TIN.





ete



SUNDAY



Ireland

|
}
;
j
|
|
ing the murder of a cousin ot
Constable Hughie Devine (Hum«
Cronyn). A trap is set by Mul
queen, with the help of Bidd)
to catch the murderer, who turns |
out to be also the Blarney Stone
thief. The stone is finally recov-
ered by Sergeant McNaughton,
and there is a happy ending fo:
everyone, except the |
The film is full of music and
Bing Crosby sings several old
irisn folk songs that are charm-

ing, including “As _ Beautiful
Kitty” which is delightful, and
ef course, the old fayourite

“Believe Me if All Those Endear-
ing You Charms”. The new
tunes felide the tithe song,
which is as bright as its name
implies and “You're In Love With
Semeone”. “Ah, ‘Tis Sweet To
Think”, another old Irish air is
interpolated between two chor-
uses of this last song, which is
sung with Ann Blyth, and th:
result is a very delightful duet
Ann Blyth has a lovely voice
with a pure clear quality, and it
is te be hoped that we will hav:
the pleasure of hearing her man)
times more. She is a talented
young actress, and she plays the
role of Conn with a great deai
of Irish charm. I should think
though, that she could do mcre

serious roles just as well—an

probably better. Bing Crosby's
singing and acting are| as always,
appealing and natural, and I}

enjoyed especially “As Beautiful
Kitty” ‘in which he accompanies

himself on a melodeon. Barry |
Fitzgerald, one of the screen’s
best known and most popular





character comedians, is exeellent| gdouble variety in pots, so that A
in a role that is made to order| when. bearing at Christmas time cross
for him, and Hume Cronyn, as}they can be brought into the L. Seige of Shia, sine 18 easily
his assistant, plays well a part! house where they make lovely| 5. A sugar, stlok perhaps. (4)
at is entirely differe . smi iniaiatahin siiiednnts 7. A skin blemish... (4)
that is entirely different from | and seasonable decoration. Sub thie ie tiblecuahen. ia)
any I have ever seen him do! Some gardeners have already | 11: Accustom. (5) |
before. The acting is good} cyt back their King of Flowers, | 12 To Ted it spun, (4)
. > fil } sht | > ‘| 13, Beguile, (6)
throughout the film, but I thought | put it is not too late if you cut] 15) If you do you will laugh to scorn. |
that in places, the action was a/ jt back in April. After cutting 16. Believi the mi
. ‘tae . ave hee ee . . : . . Belleving in the millennium, (¥)
little slow and could have beer back, give a generous applica-| 3: Mythology pices i n W m. 1)
speeded up. However, events] tion of manure, water well and earth and Hades, (6)
may not move so fast in Ireland Keep well watered during the a Pine 28 thls agrt of carriage. (4) |
as they do elsewhere, so perhaps | fowering period. Treated in this | 94° Nothing you want. (4) |
the director was right in his | way the flower heads will be} 25. To be facetious may be amusing. |
tempo. larger and more profuse and if (5) f |
Ie * ad re own |
To complete the programme, | the withered flower heads are} 9 yo son see me Se wena}
there arc Pathe and _ British pour off the oars period will island. (4 eae
Se ta . é sonsiderably longer 3. Baffle. (5) 4, All that’s green. (4)
Movietone news reels , | last consi¢ : 5 : 5. Orude as it tay 8
This re. s . . “an 5. Cr as ib may appear, it cg
This lovely shrub, which | be reniediads 15) ppe an
kc RR Ra hal 6. a ones player's trap, (3) ,
, . mk » . 7. It’s the least that can be done ‘
CRYPTOQUOTE—Here's how to work it: fs oe , a
ye? > . Ripe even for a fairy. (4)
AXYDLBAAXR | 9 You may hang on it in the four
is BON GFELLOW | a open Dg bere, ( )
: se . That's the idea, isn’t it? (5)

One letter simply stands for another In this example A is used 14. This is so sudden I’ (6) |
for the three L's. X for the two Os, ete Single letters, ape 15, Pass out round and about nine
trophies. the length and formation of the words are all hint 4 1% aus a gg ree expression. (4)

" | 18. Fai s Vintan 4 t
Each day the code letters are different has been galled Noel. (1) who
4 . Bring that tuba back. (4)
A Cryptogram Quotation 41, Story without an alternative. (3)
TPC: 3@ ITTPXYU KT CEY 1, ‘Sketch: @ Nip, 9 Tear dO. Oars |
, AW > ) IT" r , ch: 6. Nip . ax; 10, Oslo: i
SY JAY POs Tee . Died; 12. Bet; 15. Mats: 14° Axe: Jo. |
é | : Ash; 18, Barm; 21, Hoick; 23, Bre; 24
MIHY SIX—MYTYRJ | Imply; 26 Noel; 27, Since; 28. Gas
| 28,,. SaveE onl is Lest a Exit
} se TAT 1 we oT TT 5, Toes; 4, Code oax; 7, lex: #
Cryptoquote: SUCCESS ENCOURAGES THESE; Pot; 11, Dosh) 12, Baim; ” 25, Beane:
THEY CAN BECAUSE THEY BELIEVE THEY CAN—VIRGII | 28 ak ane ee tor ae:
—

now getting WELGAR §

\T, made near London,

£ NABISCO SHREDDED WHEAT,

at Niagara Falls, U.S.A
Welgar

for

and

They're the same original, whole-



ea ek Ph es i oe ee

ADVOCATE

nell

“-

ee
Magtts



nk

meee

“Run and get the hammock.

dear, they're growing fast.”
London Express Service.

(ardening Hints
Kor Amateurs

PLANNING AHEAD

To keep a garden gay with the
maximum amount of flowers, a
good deal of planning ahead i
necessary. Before one Season's
flowers are over, plants and beds
must be in preparation for the
next lot if a good flowering ro-
tation is to be kept up

It may seem ridiculous to be
thinking, in March of December's
flowers, yet that is what you must
do if you want your Double Poin-
settia to be lovely at Christmas
time. March is the month it
should be cut back. (Single va-
riety in August). Cut it back to

| within three feet of the ground,

and manure and water generous-
ly. Any piece of Poinsettia will
grow, and it’s quite a good plan to
plant a number of pieces of the







HREDDED
England, in

- It’s ‘tops’
Nabisco are

fruit, jam,



tbe grown sihgly, in clumps, or
as a hedge, is a quick grower. It
is propagated by seed, cutting or
root division. The colours vary
|} from all the shades of pink to
mauve, and purest white.

} In keeping up the brightness of
your garden a eertain number of
birannuals are a great help in

| bridging the gap between the
annuals. There are the various
Pentas which can be cut back to
come and bear again at almost
any time. These can be had in
varying shades of mauve, in Red

and pure white. There are the
little bright single Balsams, sc
attractive on Rockerys and ir

Ferneries. And there are of course
all the flowering shrubs, trees and
| vines to help. Make a note o/
the flowering time of the various
plants and stock your garden so
that there is always at least one
flowering spot, be it tree, vine,
|shrub or plant, to beautify it.

In March we have all the an-
;nuals, These should be in ful
jflower now. The Bougainvillea,
lespecially the lovely Helen Mac-
‘lean, are at their best. The pink
and white Coralitas (not th:
double pink or Xmas white) arc
in flower, and the Frangipan
have dropped their leaves and
are sending out their bunches of
gay sweet smelling blooms, All
these at one time, what could be





loviler?
CROSSWORD
!

a]
Felts ie tallbealeed al
IP
rr | i]
leis





NABISCO?

|
—they’re the same, original,
100% Shredded Wheat cereal

wheat breakfast cereal, appetizing, nourish-
ing, and full of goodness and energy.
Welgar Shredded Wheat makes a wonderful
breakfast treat with milk and sugar, but for a
change, you will find it just as delicious with

yrup, cheese, or as a savoury.





PAGE. THREE

er een at ene



|





4

3 places Test the Perfection

of your Make-up
Even in close-ups, Dorothy Gray exquisite rouge and fine
powder blend imperceptibly into your skin. You will
particularly appreciate this flattering effect around your eyes.
Qn your nostrils, Dorothy Gray never cakes, but clings smooth
and feathery—for hours. And Dorothy Gray lipstick! . . .
creamy, lasting, faultless in any climate. Buy these important
Dorothy Gray cosmetics to enhance your looks today :
Derethy Gray Lipstick in twelve flattering shades . .
silkily lustrous.
Dorothy Gray Rouge in cream torm, m twelve shades to match
lipstick colours . . . natural-looking and flattering.
Dorothy Gray Portrait Powder in ten lovely shades, each

perfectly blended to match and flatter your natural skin tones.

Dorty Gray <1

LONDON, PARIS AND NEW YORK
. Pee

. smooth,





Obtainable only from
COLLINS LIMITED, Bridgetown,



APPOINTMENT, PURVEYORS OF SOAP
TO H.M. THE KING

BY



.». created to keep you

cool and clegant all through the day

YARDLEY 6%,27//LAVENDER

and the ‘luxury soap of the world’

YARDLEY RBROND STREET LONDON

MODERN

OFFERS

BIG REDUCTIONS
IN

33 OLD







EVENING

DRESSES
AFTERNOON

and

DAYTIME
DRESSES

BUY NOW

4 AND SAVE

75 EVENING DRESSES

They are beautiful Dresses to clear at 20% Discount

LADIES’ DRESSES

BETTER QUALITY
BEMBERGS & ART SILKS
SIZES FROM 38—44
REGULAR 324.00 REDUCED TO

EVENING BAGS
BROWN, NAVY, BLACK—each

Modern Dress Shoppe

BROAD STREET.

($12.00

\(i—.—_—







PAGE FOUR

oo





FTHE 1950 Football season opened at Kensington yesterday afternoon
before a large crowd estimated at four thousand who paid to see
the game in which Empire defeated Carlton by the odd goal in three.
His Excellency the Governor and Mrs. Savage witnessed the game
from the sidelines. The football was extremely interesting at times
but the finishing efforts of the front-line men of both teams left much
to be desired. ‘

It was the first game of the season and although there were many
instances of clever midfield play yet the forwards on both sides
kicked wide of the goal even when favourably positioned in their
opponents’ penalty area.






SURPRISED
was surprised at first when Empire began to dictate the pace of
the game, bearing in mind that Carlton, last season, were runners-

oe

Se ae

! up in the First Division and defeated Spartan, the champions, on both
a occasions on which they met last.

i But after the first ten minutes one saw a resolute attack being
he maintained by the “Blues” although they were kicking against the
3) i wind in the first half.

ky The Empire halves worked well and it seems as if the combina-
iL { tion of Wilson, Symmonds and Charles Alleyne will constitute a
*) formidable defence in the middle this season,

it Robinson led his line with some of his old cleverness recaptured
Hi but I was particularly impressed with McCollin formerly, an Everton
forward but now turning out at right wing for Empire.

LACKED DASH

ARLTON team lacked their wonted dash. Cozier was much too

slow at centre forward and never seemed to have got accustomed
to the pace of the pitch. On several occasions he was favourably posi-
tioned but hesitated long enough to be robbed by the Empire defenders.

Both Williams and Warren were weak in the defence and kicked
the ball into touch far too often, Warren must curb his inclination
towards robust play at full-back or he will cost his team many pen-
alties this season.

Reynold Hutchinson worked hard at inside right but when he
went to outside left he had found the position at which he could give
the most hetp to his team.

Marshall is perhaps the most big-hearted trier in First Division
football today. He is small of build but this is no handicap to him.
He is tireless in tne defence and a correspondingly capable force in
any attacking plan. He was easily the outstanding player on the
Carlton team yesterday afternoon.

*
ES

~~



W.L. TABLE TENNIS TOURNAMENT
FTE Barbados Table Tennis Association has received an invitation
from the Table Tennis Association of Jamaica to take part in
West Indian championships to be held there next month.

The invitation contained proposals for sending two players or
alternately a single player. The financial aspect of the tour is more o1
less domestic and with that we are not immediately concerned, but on
the other hand all true sportsmen will hope that this scheme ma-
terialises and if there is a public appeal by the local Association for
financial aid it should meet with considerable support

STOUTE MAY GO

The Barbados Table Tennis Association are considering sending
one player—Louis Stoute—who captained the Barbados Table Tennis
team to British Guiana last year and who holds victories over the
former Trinidad champion Ralph Gomes.

The experience gained from these tours and the added benefit of
getting to know our West Indian neighbours are two considerations
that make such tours of a high value in the estimation of those sports-
men whose vision is able to reach beyond the narrow boundaries of
Barbados

TWO ATHLETIC & CYCLE MEETS

HE Amateur Athletic Association of Barbados have planned their

local Meeting for April 10 and their two-day Intercolonial Cycle
and Athletic Meet takes place on April 29 and June 1.

These Meets are in my opinion well timed since the local Meet-
ing will provide the scope for the local athletes and cyclists to gauge
their respective abilities before the Trinidad and British Guianese
invitees arrive here for the Intercolonial Meet.

The Amateur Athletic Association have been forced to create an
Intermediate “B” class for cyclists. They have found that some
cyclists have improved beyond the “B” class standard but are not yet
good enough for classification in the “A” class, hence the formation
of an. Intermediate “B” class.

NOVICES TOURNAMENT WAS GOOD

HE staging of a “Novices” tournament by the Barbados Amateur

Boxing Association was a refreshing novelty and is an experi-
ment around which the Association might well build something of
a more elaborate nature in the future.

It is obvious that through the efforts chiefly of Major A. R. Foster,
Commander Beard, Mr. Louis Lynch and Mr. C. D. Ramsay, Ama-
teur Boxing is fast gaining popularity with the sporting public of
Barbados. I would like to see the Association sponsor an Inter-
School Boxing tournament and the revival of the Inter-troop Scout
tournament all sponsored by the Barbados Amateur Boxing Associa-
tion,

”

COACH NEEDED
UT I shall never get tired of appealing to the Association to engage
the services of a recogriised professional boxer in order to train
the youths first in the elementary principles of attack and defence
The longer they postpone this step, the harder it will be to wean

the older boys from faults which they must of necessity develop at
first if they begin boxing without the expert assistance of a coach.
“ry

B.F.F.A. ELECT OFFICERS

THE Annual General meeting of the Barbados Friendly Football
Association was held on Thursday night last at the Reeds United Club,
Baxters Road. The following officers were elected for the year 1950-
51 :—C, E. Jemmott (President); J. M. Hewitt (Vice President); C. B.
Scott (Hony. Secretary); C. E, Reece (Assistant Secretary); J. Archer
(Hony. Treasurer); C. Estwick and J. Archer (Trustees).

The season is due to commence on Wednesday, March 22, and

Harcliffe and St. Matthews Old Boys’ Association will meet in the
opening fixture.
TAILPIECE

ERE is a tailender that should be of some interest to some of out

local fans who has had some experience of bowling :-

jowlers watching a game in the Woolley Cup competition at
Fitzroy Park, Highgates, home of the North London Bowling Club,
between G. R. Attkins and H. P. Sharp saw an astonishing sight

When Attkins was making a gentle delivery for a draw, his
wood split completely in two on the green, For the first time, experi-
enced bowlers were able to examine the interior of a composition

iCAR OWNERS...

Get Better Protection - Longer
Life for Your Car’s Engine!

NEW

Mobiloil

@ Makes Engines Cilea-
ner,





@ Prevents Unnecessary
Wear.





eo
Da Cat Reales
i re Ble

@ improves Car Perfor-
mance.



@ Reduces Gas and Oil Consumption.

Enjoy the increased power of @
smoother-running engine.
Get New Mobiloil.

New Mobiloil help keep your en-
gine free of deposiis that cause
waste fuel and oil. Don't risk

Change to New Mobiloil,



SS LA



RGEST - SELLING MOTOR OIL

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD





a TTY fT weenie re en Serene

SUNDAY

ADVOCA



1950 Football Season Opens

Governor Sees Empire
Defeat Carlton 2—1

HIS Excellency the Governor and Mrs. Savage were
among the large number of spectators who were at Kens-
ington yesterday evening to witness the opening game of
the B.A.F.A. Competition between Empire and Carlton.

In a keenly contested game, they saw the Bank Hall
team notch two second half goals to win from their oppon-
ents who got their lone goal during the first half hour.
aan eee Both teams missed many oppor-



Ss. C. Griffiths Thinks

W.I. Team Formidable

(From Our London Correspondent)
LONDON, March 15.

S. C. GRIFFITHS, Sussex and England wicket-keeper,
who normally bats No. 10 or 11 for his county but who





Queen’s College
Beat St. Winifred’s
At Cricket

QUEEN’S COLLEGE won a
two-to-one innings victory ovcyr
ihe St. Winifred eleven when
their cricket match enued yes-
terday evening on the Queen’s
College grounds. Clay Atwell, the
Queen’s batting backbone, con-
tributed 13 out of College’s 55.
wv. Winifred scored 31 and 21 in
their two respective innings.

Anne Hoad, St. Winifred’s cap-
tain, scored a chanceless 19 to
push her side against strong odds,
but the devastating swings of
Clay Atwell who captured seven
and four wickets in the respec-
tive fnnings, defied the boldest
bid for runs on St. Winifred’s part,
part.

D. Hunte who claimed three of
the College wickets for her team,
was the most outstanding bowler..

Swift on the field and accu-
rate in the shy in, K. Lashley of
St. Winifred showed herself to
be a good field. M, Wood was the
best in the fielding department for
Queen’s College.

A born stylist, Rislin Hutson
displayed a variety of well-
judged strokes. Her smooth and
easy way of playing balls which
seemed sure stump knockers gave
rise to much wonderment

For a Girls’ interschool cricket
match, the evening was packed
full of thrills for the many vis-
itors To see the bowlers, not
quite With that smooth run of
the normal bowler, and occasion-
ally péltiig the ball with much
vim, was a source of continual
laughter to all.

Savannah Club

Tennis

Yesterday’s Results
LADIES’ SINGLES
Miss D. Wood beat Miss I. Len-
agan 6—2, 6—2,
MEN’S SINGLES
F. D. Barnes beat W. Crichlow
6—3, 1—6, 6—1.
LADIES’ DOUBLES
Mrs. G. D, Bynoe and Miss D.
Austin lost to Mrs. A. A. Gibbons
and Miss Ena Bowen 4—6, 6—4,
3—6.
Monday’s Fixtures

MEN’S SINGLES
D. Worme vs. S. P. Edghill
P. McG. Patterson vs J. W.
Davey.
LADIES’ DOUBLES
Mrs, R. S. Bancroft and Miss D.
Wood vs. Mrs, D. Worme and Miss
E. Worme.,
MEN’S DOUBLES
C. R, Packer and C, B, Sisnett vs.
C. A. Patterson and R. S. Ban-
croft.
H. L. Smith and I. J. Niblock vs.
C. deL. Inniss and W. Crichlow.
MIXED DOUBLES
Miss M. Ramsay and D. Lawless
vs. Miss A. Lenagan and G. H.
Manning.

Barbados Table
Tennis Association

INTER-CLUB DIVISION I
TEAMS, ATE TIME
MAROH
Y.M.C.A, I vs Carlton on Monday
th at 7.30 p.m

Everton I vs Abbey Marines on Mon-

fay 20th at 8.15 p.m,

Y.M.C.A. II vs Shamrock on Wedrfes-

day 22nd at 4.30 p.m.

Everton Ii vs Waldrof on Wednesday
22nd. at 530 pm.

‘ oarne vs Brooklyn Thursday 23rd. at
30 p.m
YM.P.C. vs Cathedral on Thursday

23rd at 5.30 p.m,

Carlton vs Everton on Friday .24th, at

4.30 p.m.

Abbey Marines vs Shamrock on Fri-

day 2th. at 5.30 p.m.

Y.M.C.A, Il vs Waldrof on Saturday

25th. at 600 p.m.

Brooklyn vs Everton Il on Saturday

25th. at 7.00 p.m
Y.M.C.A,. I vs

25th at 7.30 pm.
Barna vs Y.M.P.C. on Saturday 25th

at 8.00 p.m.

Teams shall be 3 a-side and the 3 games
played are best of 3 sets.

“Cathedral on Saturday

Me



tunities of scoring especially the

Black Rock team. Empire were

awarded two penalties, but were

only able to make use of one.
First Goal

McCollin formerly of Everton
turned out for Empire at outside
right and scored the first goal for
his team, while Drayton scored the
other as the result of a penalty.
Carlton got their lone goal when
the ball rebounded into the nets
from Cozier their centre forward
while Smith the Empire custodian
was attempting to clear.

The game started promptly at
five o’clock with Empire defending
the goal from the pavilion end.
They soon got into their stride and
for the first fifteen minutes at-
tacked their opponents goal, but
King between the uprights for
Carlton proved equal to the task.

On one occasion, Robinson at
centre forward sent in a good one
but King was well in position and
saved. Later Harper on the left
wing got possession but kicked
over.

It was not long after this that

Carlton, in a good forward move- }

ment swept down the field but
Hall at outside left after receiving
from Lucas kicked out.

The Carlton forwards again got
possession and took the ball well
within their opponents area. It
was during this period that goal-
keeper Smith came out to clear
and the ball striking Cozier the
Carlton centre forward re-
bounded into the nets to give the
Black Rock team the first goal.

Empire now fought hard for the
equaliser and almost found them-
selves two down when Carlton
again attacked but Andrews on
the right wing kicked feebly, and
Smith had no difficulty in saving.

In spite of many efforts by both
teams to score the interval was
taken with the score 1—0 in fav-
our of Carlton.

Second Haif

On resumption Empire made a
change in their line up, Robinson
at centre forward interchanging
with Symmonds at centre half.

Carlton were however the first
to attack and carried the ball well
up the field, but goalkeeper Smith
came out and cleared. Play was
immediately transferred to the
Carlton goal area and Symmonds
who was in possession kicked wide
of the goal.

Empire who had the better half
of this period, began to press and
soon equalised when Symmonds
after receiving from one of his
halves, passed neatly to McCollin
on the right wing who beat King
with a powerful low shot from
close range.

Fired with this success, the
Empire forwards again pressed
and in a good forward movement,
Drayton beat King with another
good shot but the referee had
blown for a foul against the Black
Rock team. He put the ball on
the spot and Drayton who took the
penalty, made no mistake.

The Black Rock team made
some good efforts to equafise, but
Smith in goal seemed to be al-
ways in the right position. Empire
now took over and practically had
things their own way, Harper on
the left wing sent in a good one
after receiving from Drayton, but
King deflected the ball over the
bar. Nothing happened from the
resultant corner kick.

It was only a matter of minutes
aiter that Empire was given their
second penalty as a result of foul
play by one of the Carlton defence.
Drayton took the kick, but this
time he sent the ball wide of the
goal.

Carlton on the other hand made
a last minute effort to draw level
when they bore down on their op-
ponents, but Hall kicked wide.
The final blast of the whistle found
Empire winners by the odd goal
in three.

The referee was Mr. Chirdale.

The teams were as follows :

Empire: Smith; Bynoe, Grant;
Wilson, Symmonds, Alleyne; Mc
Collin, Drayton, Robinson, Taylor,
Harper.

Carlton: . King; Warren, Wil-
liams; F. Hutchinson, Clairmonte,
Marshall; Andrews, R. Hutchin-
son, Cozier, Lucas, Hall.

Made by C. & j. Clark Led. (Wholesale only), street, somerset, Englana @
BOCAL ASENTS: ALEC RUSSELL & CO., BARBADOS

vpened the innings for the M.C.C, in the Second Test Match
against the West Indies in Trinidad in 1948 and scored a



century, has given his views on the prospects of the team

to visit England this summer,

‘ a pinay

Will England
Be Led By A

Professional?

By



PETER DITTON
LONDON
selection of Leslie Ames,
former Kent and England wic-
ket eper, as an England Test
Selector is undoubtedly one of

The



the most democratic moves the
MCC have ever made. It is the
first time in the history of Eng-
lish cricket that a professional

}

has been given full powers in the
election of an England Test
team. It also poses an interesting
question—“Does this mean that
he MCC are paving the way for
a professional captain to lead
England against other countries?”

Cricket experts are divided in
their views. They agree that the
time is ripe to have a profession-
al cricketer on the Test selection
Committee but they are not pre-
pared to agree that the way is
being paved for Len Hutton or
Denis Compton to lead England
against the West Indies this sum-
mer,

In any case they feel that Eng-
land is not so much in need of
a professional captain this sum-
mer as for the tour of Australia
which follows immediately after.

This is no slur on West Indian
cricket. There are perhaps three
or four amateurs playing to-day
who are worthy of a place in an
England team on ability alone.
When matches are played in this
country these men can usually af-
ford the time to fulfil their se-
lection. But it is a different pro-
position altogether when it comes
to making the trip to Australia.
That requires a five or six month
absence from business and few
amateurs to-day are in a financial
position to be able to afford such
a long tour.

For that reason alone it seems
unlikely that England will have
a professional captain for fhe
whole series against the West In-
dies this. summer. But I know
there are many who would like
to see Compton or Hutton given
control of the England team for
the final match of the series in
to gain experience for the
visit to Australia

order



Donaldson Snooker Champ

BLACKPOOL, March 18,

Walter Donaldson of Scotland
to-night won the world profes—
ional snooker championship, when

he beat the holder, Fred Davis of
England by 51 frames to 46 here.
Davis won the title from Donald-
on in 1948, and returned it against
him last year.—Reuter.



wee | Gillette

» fe

sharpest

In an article in the current edi-
tion of the West India Commitvee
Circular, Griffiths, who was Assis-
tant Manager on the 1948 vour,
enough to visit the West Indies
with the M.C.C. side had been
waiting the news of the selecvion
of the team with particular and
personal interest. :

He adds “Since the West Indies
received the M.C.C. in 1948, they
themselves have voured India, and
here, one has no doubt, some repu-
tations made during the M.C.C.
visit were found to be too hastily
—or, perhaps, too easily—ac-
quired, and the result has been
what would appear vo us, with our
slightly out-of-date knowledge,
one or two curious omissions from
the selected side.” :

Strong Batting

Griffiths agrees that Goddard
will have a batting side of im-
mense strengvn, particularly on a
hard fast wicket. He mentions
Worrell and Weekes, both of
whom “might well bid fair to be-
come great players.”

He says Stollmeyer and Gomez,
both of whom bat more in the
“English” manner may find them-
selves more able vo cope with the
ball when it is turning and he
expects Walcott to make plenty of
runs this summer.

He recalls one shot in par-
ticular which Walcott played
against the M.C.C, Cranston was
the bowler and Walcott, playing
back, hit a none too short de-
livery straight back over the
bowler’s head and into the stand
for six. “A majestic stroke in-
deed” says Griffiths.

The strength of the bowling, he
thinks, rests with Jones and John-
son, both of whom are fast by
present day English standards.
But Johnson, who is 38, will have
to be carefully nursed.

Useful

Pierre, who bowls “prodigious
medium-paced in-swingers vo a
packed leg-side field” will be use-
ful to keep the runs down but
Griffiths does not consider that ha
will worry the best of English
batsmen.

Leg-spinner Williams who bowl-
ed a remarkably fine length with-
ouv much success on a “heart
breaker” at Barbados could not at
that time be compared with Fer-
guson who seemed ideally suited
to conditions in England.

Griffiths hopes thay Valentine
will prove as useful to Goddard as
Mankad of India, Mann of South
Africa and Burtt of New Zealand,
have been in England since the
war.

“As always on tour much will
depend upon the captain,” he
adds. “Goddard is a fine all-
rounder—batving soundly and left-
handed, bowling right - handed
rather better than the average
at medium pace, and always
fielding magnificently who
brings a delightful and unbound-~
ed enthusiasm vo all he does on
the cricket field. He is a deter-
mined man with a real under-
standing of his country men and
one cannot imagine he will fail to
bring out the bes? in his players.”

In conclusion Griffiths says that
given fine weather the West Indi-
ans will be hard to beat, “even in
the maich which lasts five days.”

On the weather-affected wickets
he expects them to have their bad
moments but he vhinks they will
be able to adapt themselves.

“One thing is certain—they pre-
sent a more formidable combina-
tion to be disposed of vwice in a
match than any of their prede-
cessors; they will, too, play cricket
in a manner which will appeal in
its wholeheartedness to vhe spec-
tators over here.”

S.A. FACING DEFEAT
JOHANNESBURG, Mar. 18.
The Australians scored 227 in

their first innings in reply to the

South African Eleven’s total of
49 here to-day and had taken five
of their opponents second innings
wickets for 48 when bad light
stopped play for the day’
—Reuter.



edge in the world!

Gedd Gr Limite

ant











































































SUNDAY, MARCH jg 1859
ee nance
aS



I SHALL begin to-day by correctin i ;
column about September Song. 5 Reg Rens.
wins, one im A class and one in
because he only won one race and that was
he won very impressively from Pepper Wine,

My mistake only proves what can happen w
with the performance of a certain horse in a

I said he had Scored cane

B. This is of course entirely yf
” =
the A class Sprint wig

hen one ig go j
Particular re ta q

having seen

€ of six ingle
that stage he onde
ver the be

excludes thought of any other. Consequently
Song burning up the track and leading by fiv.
B class five and a half I was so sure that at
be beaten that up to now I have not got o
Slainte sprung by beating him. This is my 9
made such a glaring error. I sincerely apologise to aol fee to
ticket which drew him for any anxiety I caused them, —
surprise of this kind is even more effective than the pa aD Sure
me. lainte gay,
SIX FOR UNION PARK 5

In my notes on Sunday before last I made mention ;
that Fred Payne had given me an explanation of what hai Of the fat
on Brown Girl in the Guineas. I also®said that the copened thin
was too lengthy to fit into my notes at that time. However Story
as there is space to-day and so many peculiar interpre! » inasmuch
been placed on what happened I shall repeat the stony a haye

First of all I must say that Fred did not volunteer oom
After the races I went to him myself and asked him if he :
to say anything about Brown Girl’s running as [| was nl are
disappointed about the indifferent performance which otis *
readily agreed and here is his story : somewhere just acta Re
furlong gate Brown Girl gave the first sign of bearing pth:
immediately tapped her on the shoulder with the whip and anit te
sure on the bit to get her to come back to the rails, Inatesaal
sponding to these efforts she went further towards the oui
and at this stage Fred decided it was useless to try tugging mals
at her and he let her have her head to see if it would make ieee
comfortable and so induce her back to the rails, Unfortuna ~e
also failed and Brown Girl, so intent on getting away from ma
rails, continued round the last turn into the home stretch ina
widening circle. It was then useless to try and get her back on
field who had by this time passed her with lengths to spare, *
ended the interview by agreeing with me that but for this velnie
he thought Brown Girl might have won the Guineas, S
that she was too fat and had therefore tired easi
immediately. ial Pooh-pooel

Now that is Fred Payne’s story which I believe I have reports
as correctly as my memory serves me. To the horseman if sounds
very plausible. But to the ordinary spectator who was
the rails between the three and the two furlong his actions may hey
looked baffling. Consequently when the whispering campaign start.
ed some of these people were the first to say that they saw the fily!
running wide and that Payne did nothing to stop her, At one stage
of the race this was in fact true, for the reason as stated above, By
these “know-alls” did not know what was going on in Payne's mind
nor have they stopped to consider the split-second decision which the
unfortunate jockey was called upon to make at such a crucial stage
of the race. Therefore they should not go about making
statements because they are not qualified to judge for the simple
reason that they might not know which end of a horse one pulls ati
turn it one way or the other.

Lastly I must remind readers that two Sundays ago I also wrote
that Brown Girl was the only one who could tell us why she ran wide
but for the fact that she is a dumb animal. But horses have other
ways of speaking. On the third day of the meeting I was told that
Brown Girl was not racing because she was found to be suffering
from sore shins. I have known many other similar cases most nit-
able of which was St. Moritz who behaved in almost the exact man
ner,

I learn that not only Joint Command and Postscript will be going:
to Union Park for Easter but also Beacon Bright, Beaufils, Vixen tht!
Miss Friendship. Brahmin’s Choice who is owned in Trinidad’bit
made her debut to racing up here will also be going over for the.
meeting. The meeting has received a much larger entry than was
first expected although the A class races are not very well patronised,

Beacon Bright will head our contingent and will al8o be the
only horse classified A or A2 at the meeting. I see that The Gauntlé,
Lady Pink and Ice Boy have been picked out as his chief opponenit
but the one I have my eye on is Fitches Green. This Irish filly of Mh
George de Nobriga’s ran a very good race in Port of Spain lat
January and gave me the impression that she, was then coming into
her own. I should expect that at Union she will be more acclime
tised and will therefore do better. \

Another point worthy of note about the Union meeting is thatthe
three-year-olds Fair Profit, Wavecrest, Princess Rassiyya. The Eagle
and Leap On are all due to make their first appearance for the seas
Fair Profit has to race in the D and E class races because he is a Jamil:
can bred imported after the date of the new rule which bars cred
from that colony from being placed any lower than E2. He will there
fore find himself in a similar position to his compatriot Brown Rockt
when the latter raced at Union in 1948. The opposition is not
but even so I am not enamoured with Fair Profit’s chances H
them, Maybe he will do better than I expect but in any case We
shall be able to see him going over a mile. ‘s

With regard to the others I am most anxious to see what Wave
crest is going to do. He has not raced since August last year at ,
and meanwhile his contemporaries have been in the ig, Be
1 like him the best of all the three-year«olds I saw in
I look forward to seeing him show up well at Union, Ano’
ite of mine is Princess Rassiyyra. This big grey filly from J =|
a good looker who will go far but up to now I am not sure WI
she will be better at sprinting or over longer distances. Leap
also a game gelding who showed some promise at C a
whether he is winner or not he can be counted on to tum =
fighting performances. The Eagle has received a great deal of
ing from Trinidad racing public and in particular Mr. Dick }
who last August at Arima went into near estasies about this colt. q
cannot say I remember paying much attention to him although
raced at Christmas, but then I understand he was not expec

do much because of some setback he had while in training.
also come into his own at Union.





. Brylcreem yy =
smastly in position throughout the most hair ruffling day
little Brylcreem each morning is a grand insurance against |
its
first

Hair’. “Sportsmen use Brylcreem because it controls
perfectly during vigorous exercise
valuable tonic effects keep the scalp
class condition. Look after the health
hair—look out for Brylcreem, the
hair dressing.

BRYLCREEM
is the perfect Hair Dressing

% GRVLFOAM— The Cream Shampoo in a Tube 1S NOW AY ;

psf



Ree



.



| SUNDAY. MAREH 19, 1950

naa

Council

Pottery



BECAUSE a majority of members were of
the
Factory at Lancaster

that the expansion of

voting was as on the mo-
tion for concurrence:—

) Hon’bles A. G. Gittens;
&Â¥. C. Gale; P. F
aera D. L. Pile—(5).
) Hon’bles R. Challenor;
G. Massiah; G. B. Evelyn;
M. Hanschell; J. D. Chand-
jar; Dr. ¢C. H. St. John.—(6).






















Resolution was first dis-
4 at a previous meeting of
> and was arp ag tng
because members wante dis-
report of a Committee
had been appointed by the

t to investigate the
to establish a success-
clay working industry in

Se Dee ae aa

ent intended to expand

theindustry on lines suggested by
Brannam Report and in the
int of advice received regarding
possibilities of the

commercial
very industry.

A Report
ft will be recalled that Mr,
was employed under a
Development and Wel.
Scheme to report on a pro-
clay working industry in
. His report, which was
gid in the House of Assembly and

ve Council stated that
“aw materials and other condi-

Peas errr kt Fase BBA A















ver or can be provided for
the Beeatecture of the following
He —
" Y Building bricks
m Hollow blocks
ed Roofing tiles

Floor tiles
ted Flower pots, terra cotta ware,
nds field drain pipes

Domestic pottery
7 Insulating bricks.”
ave Wr. Brannam drew attention to
m- § the Various possibilities of financ-
ly pottery

gave an estimate of the capital
of a factory capable of pro-
ci the minimum economic
i Committee appointed by His
y the Governor-in-Exec-
Committee to consider the
cial prospects of establish-
a clayworking industry advis-
t it was unlikely that private
capital would be attracted to in-
yestment in the clayworking in-
dustry and that if a clayworking

} was to be started it must
on the Government for
Not Likely

While it is accepted, on present
idence, that the financing of a
working factory is not likely
remunerative and, therefore,
ely to attract private capital,
18 nevertheless considered that
tWould be unwise to abandon all
fe of the economic development
ithe industry.
he Committee on the assump-
that “Government clearly
ftands that there are very
derable risks in undertaking
ince this Clayworking Indus-
Wy has suggested that the indus-
id not be developed on
full scale envisaged in M>.
's report estimated to
$144,000, but by way of a
expansion of the present
the estimated cost of which
be of the order of $70,000.
the latter figure $24,000 rep-
the cost of the services of
expert for three years,
$14,400 for working capital
contingencies) .
Committee further propos-
that the undertaking should be
Mi by a small Board and this
Is acceptable to Govern-

Hon'ble Acting Colonial
when debate on the res-
m was continued Tuesday
Pie in favour of the scheme in
Mght of further advice that
able to obtain as re-
the commercial possibilities
‘ industry.
5 : Optimistic
lettbte «, B. Evelyn was of the

that where the further op-
advice that the Hon’ble
Colonial Secretary was
’ne'to obtain was concerned, it
os found that persons
ey Were in favour of a seheme
a ays very optimistic about
ad enue that would be obtain-
etom such a scheme.
meme on the advice of the
meee that had been appoint-
) Government he did not
one could be optimistic.
Very glad that the Council
Heed on the last occasion to
‘poning of the Resolution
could study the report
ittee.

aie manufacture of

EBRae Fee




































\ Bew-StebeueuS RRS? ARERIRTSSE TERR RSTeaeSS ee TTS Se





§70,000Resolution

Not Economical

project. a Resolution for $70,000 which sum w
a be capital for such an expansion was rejected
tive Council at its Jast meeting. ’

Rejects

i the Opinion
Government Experimental
would not be an eco) omica]
yas intended
py the
The question was whether the
advice received by the Acting
Colonial Secretary was better
than that of the committee.

Hon’ble F. C. Hutson said he
regretted that the advice that the
Acting Colonial Secretary had got

had not been available to the
committee. He admitted that in
the early days of its existence—
if it went through—the industry
would have to carry a heavy over-
head expenditure, but he was
Was sure that it would pull

through

To Relieve Unemployment

They should remember that the
scheme was intended. io relieve
unemployment, and he felt that it
would have a better chance of
success than _ any emigration
scheme that they had embarked on

So fal

If the scheme went through,
pottery makers out of work, but
they would not try to put existing
would concentrate

r on trying to
produce different articles. He
hoped _ that hon'ble members

would vote for the Resolution and
give the industry a chance, He
felt that it was’ well worth trying.

There was no further debate,
and the question that the Resolu-
tion be concurred in was put to
the vote with the result already
mentioned



Judge JWB Chenery
















the Staff



ON BROAD

Guide Notes

Peceutive Comimitdee
Meeting



i re vas a Meeting « the
Commitiec yn Satur-

March at

Pax H

10.30 a.m
Annual Meeting of the Local

.

rtjon

42 3+
The Annual Meeting of the Lo-
cal Association will be held at Pax
Hill on Wednesday, 22nd March at
5 p.m
ws From St. Pholi
Enrolment
On Monday, 6th March Mrs
J. A, Broomes, District Commi
sioner, visited St. Martin’s Girl



School to enrol 12 recruits, 8 fri
18th ‘St. Martin’s) and 4
32nd, an open Company of
Miss Marjorie Blackman i
Guider. Sir Thomas and L:





Southorn, Mr. Woolf, parents and

friends of the Guides, members of
and ‘the school children

















3 S were present Afier the Enroi-
i D YelcKE ment Mrs. Broomes appealed to
0 1S¢ uss the parents and guardians to co-
Bh ty operate with the Guiders to helr
Closer Association Report « train the Guides to be. good
citizens
ON TUESDAY 2lst inst at Lady Southorn, who has done
p.m Mi Justice Chener vill Guiding in many parts of the Ex
continue his lectures on Britis pire and whe very keen sup-
Constitutions. He will lead a dis- potter of the Organis#tion, in-
cussion on the Recommendations spected the Companies and re-
of the Closer Assoc om- marked on th martness. She
mittee which were li cindly consented to speak to the
week. Guides i her words of encour
La iesda eve Mr. ageme: remembered
Chenery pok on ar pres¢
Constitution, comparing h The ¢ Gi Sot
British Parliamentar ystem, H uests eo nging we
described the composition and Vanat — eg ee
functions of the Ameri Cor rougt ; enjoyable Meetins
gress and the Supreme Court. T! ae ee
POWERS Of (Le: ERSRG Ent) wenrengs Thursday, $th March
discussed. 7 On Thursd 9th March, H.R.H
Mr. Chener 3 lecture ire giver Prince 1 through
at “W kefield, ind the general pi anezer ing
public are invited ton College of a
ie 1 front of th nd th
Boys’ Sv.n0o decoratec
P. 4 QO B 1 with arches and flags by the
ui rn one Scouts of the Boys’ Sch« ana at
Keith Davidson. of Fairfield 4 p.m. the street lined with

Land was put on a bond for three

months in the sum of £1 when
he was found guilty of throwing
stones across Chamberlain Briage
by His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
yesterday.

Elwell Maynard an island con-
stable said on March he was
walking across the Chamberlain
Bridge when he saw Davidsot
threw a large tone acros the
bridge. Apparently he was throw-
ing the stone at a man

He ran after him and arrested

him



“Lady Nelson”
Coming Wednesday

The “Lady Nelson” will call at
Barbados from British Guiana vie
Trinidad, Grenada and St. Vii-
cent on Wednesday morning

From Barbados the Lady
Nelson” will sail for St. John,
New Brunswick, via., the Britis!
Northern Islands Messrs Gar-
diner Austin & Co., Ltd., are loca

agents



Molasses Company |

Gets New Tanker |

(Advocate Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, March 15. |

A NEW tanker, “Athelglen
arrived last week-end for the!
Pure Cane Molasses Company ri
replace th Molarell.” The 482
|
|



ton tanker left Birkenhead Eng-
land on February 5 and reachea
Trinidad on March 6 where she
was manned by a Guianese
crew, for the last leg of her voy~|
age. When fully loaded the draft)
will be about 11 feet, operating)
in -West Indian waters. C.N.S. |



school children, Scouts of the 88th
Troop and Guides of 19th Com-
pany As the Princes car ap-
proached Miss I. Taitt, Captain ot
the Guides, called the Company to
attention and Guide Ha 2 el
Broomes stepped forward and pre-



sented a bouquet of flowers to the
Princess on behalf of the Com-
pany. The childre: hen broke
into wild cheers.
Book Stall

The Book Stall for the Girl
Guides’ Fair on 3rd June is ur-
sently in need of Books and maga-
ines to give away. Get in touch
vith Miss Nora Burton, St. Mich-
ael’s Girls’ School (Phone 3116)

who will call and collect ther



25 YEARS AGO

(Barbados Advocate, March 19
1925)
Arrival of U.S. Submarin
oy Yr’
For the first ytime it the
history. of Barbados the US
Submarine with a gross tonnag




2,200 tons arrived in port yester-

day under the command
Lieutenant S. Picking, with
crew of 87 men. She irrive

about 5 p.m. and after a short stay

will sail for St. Thomas.



TOILET

e ® LINDEN BLOSSOM @ e

‘ IMPERIAL LEATHER



If vour hair
is coming out
remember

that -

DOES GROW HA

Silvikrin Hai

Foo Fron
la Na a Od

Silvikrin (Laboratories Lt



STREET YESTERDAY
crossed where they





Silvikrin ~

SUND TY ; \wvac ATE
Brothers
Award Two
Scholarships









The Topic
of







_ ORGANISATION,. the!
Brothers of the Svars, | I t
|
two two-véar schol- | as bs ee
ps midrer nose parents |
t tener cumstane :|
t « e Scnool an 1e
Ss I el’s ris’
e boys’ school goes to }

4ilab ¢&
Earl Hamblin



Newton of Moun

Pieasant Land, St. Phili> and the
one at tl ‘ sirls’ scl 00 , i
Gill of Haggatt Hal |
&. vaele
ey VAN O—102, ‘ i

L. E. Smivh of St. Joseph atid }
ariven by Louis Ain {ft

pedestrians walked and same adaress, was dam



cared, t became involved in an accident
on Clifton Hall Road, St. J it |
e bout 3.00 p.m. on Friday |

900 ivoid Alsu involved was © the yr | On Friday we saw “High 1ayme"

. es ‘4. | We sat on the Jeft wing
rry J—119, owned by Newcasti | And as the Governor entered

Plantation, St. John and driven by | Captain Raison, played ‘The Kine”.
Lionel Griffin of Venture This}. P
was also damaged. es a





Pavement

it was dazzling splendour
You should have seen the play



























ove ‘ : SS juantity of! Then Joe 1 e
WITHIN an hotr—11 am, to HE LOSS of abit bg ME oats mp ova, og,
noon at ne int on Broad articles valued $9.00 reeyrâ„¢ eR Te is E
‘ ; sorted to the Police pert) without much he i
Street rda 90 : } Ww ut much hesitation
é « vy, 900 ped estrians Bowen of White Hil ven | Eric Gates and his fine gang
Ke long the road instead of rage ses ‘ \ll joined in the opening chorus
: Fi stated that the arvicles \ | the show wank WHEE a Meri
ae eer moved from his reside | .
Che Police, in an all out effort to Wednesday. Well Joe then whispered softly
ease traffic vongestion, has N ACCIDENT occurre: te} Said, Lou it must be fun
‘ - big old man to ma
placarded the slogan; “Walk On / corners of Map dito eet ane tedaentones
the Pavement” ou many places Cutting Road abou } cs
along the Stree g rades ' s he j Twas then we felt romantic
4 , the Street, but all grades ot Friday between ( ry, aid some the old “megs”
people ignore the appeal. lorry M 1007, owned y | eighteen-ninety people,
Broad Street, as is usually the Thorpe of Britton’s Hill and n \ { blush at those young girls’ legs
ease on Saturdays, carried its by Charles Rowe of Haggatt !1 1 was 2 tyme” dancing
isual hurly-burly of shoppers. and a bicycle owned and , joys you uissed a treat
Most of those who used the by Garrett Beckles East P ty wie e dresse
i “+ y rho adies looked too sweet
pavement yesterday seemed more ~': Philip
© be doing so from the wish to be Beckles was wounded is | ase Has Dee tae Jeane
. ; 5 forehea The fro for \nd these head grow
ie sun’s fierce rays, than peor ; ty Phe iene eas We heandvaf lexisatore
from that of complying with the WHC! oF the cycle were Ye ind saying “No
; ee a HE FRONT fork ani :
raffic regulations " ; Ne iga
anovhe reve were eat "
\ few pedestrians used the : : , yurse tl vute
; 43 : aged in an accident on Cr e think it gave two free trip
anes, the other move to relieve Street. at.. about 1) OF ' jear friend “Archie Cuke
the traffic congestion, but the pryiqay
reate? lumber crossed on any ¢ ou should've heard “Brow wa
. " Simply sWeet as buttered toa
the road The accider ting on the tourist
car X 2,’ owner i ne ywn on our “Gold Coast
_ yf Worthins ‘hrist ¢ I
o re ‘ ed and said to Robert
‘ ‘ driven by Clarence Dy 1 ake venture
Scout Notes: ell’s Cross Road. The ( all Barbad
) ; }
Ye li e Hill , 1
ignalling 09's | )
S 1 ae
tock ou
y oye TWO LORRIES wer ae
Competition & ccident ! ce hear ings like lingeric
: le pe ec top
annec oe
sft the staging of thr a : a : | v-and-then’’ electric
taging of t Peter ! iver Jarrell: } ed Robert to stumble
competition a Scantiet f } ng girl friend one nixt
I ni istricts where ind N } 4
. 1 4 y : High Tyme’ was a great
cul will be held in «x Electric (¢ é en | was a “high-tyme" spree
) Inter-troop by Charles Duket: ( irch V And \ now that all the profit



those people

1 each District wil!



lohr «
ce - YEAR-OLD Gline] That is why we
w Yearwoc



the 1eet ir ri tition for the f Chapman's Street | ! pite of und pence
re Sco He rte ; | ‘ v like ir game cock
u mead ters a accident ) ‘ the Park fence



n
bout_3.45 p.m,

innounced later

Scouters Meet At H.Q.



“He





Friday- evening last the Gene Hospital and dischargt 1 Ts ake figh Tyme er
Group Scouters of South Western Also involved wa 1 motor R
District met at Scout Head- owned | Dear’s Garage mae
quarters when they discussed a driven by J. P. Parilli of
programme of activities during Hastings Hotel sponsored by
the months of April and May. ORK ON THE New Pla 5:
Among other things the D.C Theatre ituated ppos J & R BAKERIES
paanned to visit each Troop in the Empire tre PY
the District during the remainder Street progressing rapidly makers of
of this month and next month The side walls are nc up to rc
plans for an inter-troop Signalling level and the roof will be erect my .
Competition in preparation for the this week The enclosing wal ENRICHED BREAD
inal competition for the Geoffre along Jordan Lane
Williams’ Flag were discussed cally completed Th and the blenders of
The variou entertainment a wide ivement betweer
and activities take place dut~ | Theatre nd the oadwa\ a & R RUM
ing St. George Week were al a}
ciscussed, and plans for the tag-}
ing of a District Scouting Day
24th May beginning at 8.30 a {

|
James Street Group Concert)

On Thursday 20th April the 4 |
Barbados (James Street) Group}
will be staging Concert at tl
Y.M.C.A. in aid of Group funds]
for their Overse Camp
August.

A first-class programme |
been arranged for your ente!
tainment, so make note of tl
place and date, and sive the
effort your wholehearted support

Scouts Own and Investiture

Today at 4.30 p.m., there will}
be Scouts Own and Investitu
of Rovers at the Speightstow»
Boys’ School. All Scouters, Rovers
und Scouts are cordially invited
to attend.



children’s
lass of Andrews Liver

have our



gularity, gi

ANDREWS
LIVER SAL

Ki67|



bling Andrews keeps young

tummies fr from upsets, and

like
of this non-habir-

the

Beene
SOAPS

BLUE HYACINTH ©

youngsters merry
: Seem

forming laxative.

COOLS - REFRESHES « INVIGORATES













Write Direct or Airmail > fatherly Advice—Free

A KEY POSIT!
Y POSIT

2























Start training for it NOW!

There is still room at the top jor the fully qualified

man who is litted for the job. YOU can be that
man—successtul, prosperous, with your future

FIRST CHOOSE
YOUR CAREER

ACCOUNTANCY
AVIATION







pes ints assured—by studying at home in your spare time,
: BOOK-KEEPinG guided by the personal tuition of The Bennett
! College Distance k diff

CARPEATRY onveg ance makes no erence,

CHEMISTRY

CIVIL SERVICE
COMMERCIAL ART
GRAUGHTSMAKSHIP
ENGINEERING

. ERG. DEFT
+ MUR. ERG
JOURHALISM
sANGUAEES

WE WILL HELP YOU TO
ACHIEVE YOUR AMBITION

Get your feet on the ladder of success TO-DAY.
Write to The Bennett College and lear how
thousands o} people just like you have reached

MATHEMATICS the top with the right guidance. A well-paid §/
MATRICULATION job can be yours—stert this pleasant spare-time

Minine study NOW
DEPT. 188

ee Phe |
Bennett College!




Direct Ma
RABIG (Sheri Wave erect fail to
SECRETARYSHIP
SRORTHANS (Pitman «
TELEVISION
WIRELESS

WORKS MANAGERS
' cour
are not
vwertte

Wp
Vy i

the

QUANTITY SURVEYING
tee sete: | SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND

oF)
advice





| MARCH 19 — NO. 111)











you want to play bal]
you cant be so'slim / '
uve got to build up rai
> with plenty of KLIM |

(







says ELSIE the BORDEN cow

KLIM“~“<-MILK

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER



Practically all the world loves Maidenette...it says sucl jovely (tings about youn
and average figures. Lifts, holds, molds to perfection. And Maidenotte tty
... half fabric, half lace, it's one of the loveliest brassieres ever under shee
blouses ! Choose it in white or tearose. Choose rayon sat 1 lace, cot

broadcloth and lace, or nylon taffeta and

There is a Maiden Foun for Every Type of Figure!

marc

“~
e





Light up—and smile




Dim lighting is bad-~for your eyes, for your nerves,
for your general well-being. Light up then, and smile
with Osram, the bright, cheerful lamp.

WONDERFUL
We

THE CITY GARAGE CO.
BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

REPRESENTING THE GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. LTD., OF ENGLAND











i
i

Gin mh
Wiki: ‘
mh (D)

Dani












+ ah

Mm
NUTELLA TAU
i) Ln Ll



de ] )
y yee HNP
ff) “my Bi I Hy

mlb TH







Crease-resisting-and washable!

Made of high quality Tootal guaranteed fabric,
in dozens of rich colours and good designs. And

they stay good, for every tie is wasbable—lining
and tie are fitted so that with ordinary washing y
they will not twist or pull out of shape.
'
°
Another good point! Every tie is marked
“Tebilized” for tested crease-resistance,



j Wn iy

WH UAL
if)








Seda ai aa

in







14





PAGE SIX



WARDS his enemy in the

aesert war Rommel’s attitude
was one of friendly, if sometimes
suspicious, hostility.

Lake all Germans, he resented
at first our employment of inqgan
divisions agains) Huropeans, until
he encountered the 4th Indian
Livigon and found them as wel)

*, disciplined and “correct” as any.

He could not resist a mild sneer,
for. propaganda purposes, at the
“coloured English” who accom-
panied the South Africans, though
ne knew well vnat they were non-
combatants.

Promising Amateurs’
The Australians he considered
, but it was the sort of

ro
roughness which amused him. He
rai them highly as individual

ng men, but thought tney
were inclined to get out of hand

South Africans he thought good
but too raw. For the New Zea-
landers he had a great admiration.
They were, he maintained, the
finest troops on our side.

The British he respected—as
promising amateurs. He even
went so far as vo admit that, for
small, independent operations, re-
quiring great personal initiative,
such as those of the Long Range

rt Group and the S.A.S.
(Special Air Service), they were
better than the Germans. é

British regular formations
were, he thought, stubborn anc
brave in defence but insuffici-
ently trained.

He made an exception of the
7th Armoured Division, particu-
larly of the two Rifle Battalions
of the Support Group, the 1!th
Hussars and the artillery.

Nevertheless he thought that in
tank actions our ermoured units,
and even single tanks, were far
too much inclined to go bald-
headed into the attack.

His criticism that we
armour in penny packets and
thus invited its destruction in
detail has been echoed by British
military critics. _ ;

‘Too Slow

The British system of command
he thought too slow, involved
and clogged with paper.

1 cannot’ discover that
expressed any opinion about any
inuividual British general except
General Wavell, whose desert
campaign against the Italians
would, he declared, always b¢
studied as a supreme example of
bold planning and daring execu
tion with small resources.

Chivalry
It was quickly discovered by
the British that the Afrika
Korps proposed to fight accord-
ing to the rules, For this the

used

he
























whole credit, was given to
Rommel. viel
“Thank God, we had no s.s.
divisions in the desert” said
General : Bayerlein, his chief of
staf, “or Heaven knows what











The BOOK that has set all Barbados talking...











SUNDAY ADVOCATE SU NDAY, MARCH - a
i " a aT 7. aa ;
was a dispute about vhe fare, and ———— oo
two carahinieri detained him. |
Later, as he was being taken -
to Germany he contrived to dive |
through a window while the train
was running.
He was wounded, but on Marci j
22, 1945, he escaped again, and DA NGEROUS GA ’
by April 15 he was home in A uck- fa x KE}

Komimnel

The British Prisoner

Rommel Admired
By DESMOND YOUNG

cuted.”

The order was signed “Adolf
Hitler” and was, therefore, “top
level”.

At Nuremberg

On June 18, 1946, General
Siegfried Westphal was ques
tioned about it at Nuremberg:—

Question: “You were on the
African front. How was the war
conducted there?

Answer: “I can answer in a
sentence: It wes conducted a
chivalrous and _irreproa ble
manner.”

Question: “Who was mul
chief?

Answer: “Marshal Rommel.”

Question: “Did he ever order
or sanction violation of the rules
of war?”

Answer: “Never”

Question: “Do you know the
order issued by Hitler on Octo
ber 18, 1942?”

Answer: “Yes’’.

Question: “How did Marshal

Romme! behave on rece pt of this
order?”

Answer: “Marshal Rommel and
I read it standing beside our
truck. I then immediately pro

posed that we should not publish
it. We burnt it at once, where we
stood.”

‘The Nephew’

General Westphal was then
questioned aboit the strange
case of “the nephew of Field-
Marshal Alexander”.

Question: “Could you
briefly run through the cese
of the commando action in
which the nephew of Field
Marshal Alexander took
part?”

Answer: “In the autumn
of 1942, a close relation of
Field—Marshal Alexander was
taken prisoner behind the
German lines. He was wear-
ing an Afrika Korps cap and
was armed with a German pistol
He had thus put himself
outside the rules of war.

“Marshal Rommel gave the

BURCKHARDT




BRIGADIER

CLIFTON
a ’

would have happened; it would
have been a very different sort
of war.”

The Afrika Korps did not beat
the fir

up prisoners. After st

rough pounce, it treated them

with almost old-world courtesy
So Kind

In the May 1942 battle, I met

an Army Film Unit photographer,

a Scot, who had managed to
escape after an hour or two in
enemy hands

“What like of people are these
bluidy Germans, sir?” he asked
“A German officer, an office:
Ah’m tellin’ ye, actually took ma
camera off me an’ wouldna giv:
it back Never

' mind,” he
added. “Ah hae his receipt for
it.”

So he had, on the back of an
envelope with name, rank, and
date He proposed to look for
the oberleutnant after the war

When | was captured the young
German who searched me politely

handed back a gold cigarette-
case.

He apologised for taking my
field-glasses, but explained that
these were military equipment
whereas the cigarette-case was
private.

Hitler’s famous or infamous
order of October 18, 1942. was at

least unequivocal: —

“From now on,” said para
3 “all enemies on so-called
Commando missions in Eu-
rope or Africa challenged by
German troops, even if they
are to all appearances sol-—
diers in uniform or ‘demoli
tion troops, whether armed
or unarmed, in battle or in
flight, are to be slaughtered

to the last man. Even if
these individuals, when found
should apparently be pre

pared to give themselves up
no pardon is to be granted to

them on principle

“This order does _ not
apply,” said para 5, “to the
treatment of any enemy
soldiers who, in the course
of normal hostilities are
captured in open battle or
give themselves up.”

“ I will hold responsibk
under Military La idle
the final I ray
taliilny t ‘
orac
office
lected their uly } iInstry
ting tl t I al i th
oracr
ara¢ it



|



GENERAL BAYERLEIN, Chief
of Staff of the Afrika Korps,

several times by
ing

‘Rommel said, ‘Well, that i
reasonable and could happen in
a night battle, but. ’ He then
went on to describe how a .Ger-
wounded officer had been

people in pass

man
thrown into a burning truck
For Sport?
“After some discussion he
asked, ‘Why are you New Zea
landers fighting? This is a

European war. Are you here fo:
the sport?’

“Realising that he really meant
this, I held up my hands with
the fingers closed and said, ‘The
British Commonwealth fights
together. If you attack England

ROMMEL questions his prisoner, Brigadier Clifton. Major
earatroop leader, later captured by the British, acts as

order that he should be you attack New Zealand and

treated like any other prs Australia too,

oner, The Marshal thought “Rommel wished me luck, and

that he did not understand off he went,

what might have been the “Six days later I escaped, but

consequences of his conduct.” was recaptured by three young

What Rommel actually said officers hunting gazelle
when someone proposed that the “The marshal deigned to see
prisoner should be shot, as he me again, and once more opened
could ligitimately have been, the conyersation with strong
was “What, shoot General comments on our “gangster
Alexander’s nephew! You damned mevnods, occasioned this time by
fool, do you want to make a &@ Flying Fortress high-level
present of another couple of bombing attack on a hospital ship
divis'ons to the British Army leaving Tobruk

In fact, the prisoner was no He said, ‘I do not blame you
relation of Field-Marshal (then for attempting to escape, it is your

Alexander

Captured

Perhaps the best anecdote on
Rommels’ treatment of prison-
ers is that by Brigadier G. H.
Clifton, D.S.O., M.C; a captured

General)

New Zealand brigade com-
mander. Here it is:—

“I drove out into No-Mai’s-
land’ to tidy up someone else’s

night battle.

“It was before first light an
a most confusing situation. As
the result we drove up to the
wrong people and went
‘into the bag’

“Later an Intelligence
told me Rommel was here

“Rommel proceeded to har
angue me about the ‘gangster’
methods of the New Zealanders

Officer

“It appeared that we had
bayoneted the German wounded
in the night battle behind

Matruh and he was very annoyed
about it
“He said if we wanted to fight

rough, so could they, and that
any further action of this sort
would be answered by immediate
reprisal

“As the nearest New Zealander

vailable for such reprisals, it



became a rather personal matter
to me :

“I was however, able
explain that our first wave
through in the dark, caught
Germa! by surprise Some of

th
the

duty, and I would have done vhe
same.”

“Appreciating his increasing
waistline and tight boots and
breeches, [ replied: ‘I ama quite

sure you would try, sir, bu: I do
net think you could have walked
as far as I did” (More than 100
miles in less than five days on one
can of water.)

“Rommel came back very quick-
ly with, ‘No, I would have had
more sénse and borr,seed a motor
eax.’ Trick vo him. “So would [
but with only 20 seconds start
there was not much time, though
we had a suitable vehidle marked
down,

“He then added that I was a
nuisance, and thay any further
att ,* at a break would finish
by. my being shot while escaping

“However, he deeided to get
rid of me by plane next morning
direct to Rome

“Germans are literally minded,
in addition vo having a tragic lack
of humour. Rommel impressed me
as an outstanding exception, and
that impression grew stronger.

“When he met our troops either
as prisoners or wounded, he greet-

ed them as one soldier meeting
ovhers and very fairly.”

He Wrote...
@ After Rommel’s death there

was found among his
private papers this note he
had written on Brigadier
Ciiftona:—

A night aitack on the
t the Br

tic}
ritish



L0th

Buarekhardt,

interpreter.

ternational law committed by
New Zealand troops.

“Clifton showed the most
absolute cervainty of victory,
which was understandable
now that our attack had been
beaten back.

“He was an old Africa
veteran. He impressed us as
a very brave man and very
likeable. He insisted on be-
coming a prisoner of the Ger-

mans and not being sen’ to
Italy.
‘Vanished’
“T tried to carry out his

wish, and, evading general in-
structions, handed him over
to a German depot in Mersa
Matruh. However, the com-
mandant later ordered him vo
be handed over to the Italians.

But on the evening before
he was due to be handed to
the Italians, Clifvon asked to
go to the lavatory, where he
got out of the window and
vanished without trace.

“All troops were at once
warned by wireless. A few
days later some of my officers
were hunting gazelle when
they suddenly saw a weary
foot-traveller coming across
the desert, carrying what
seemed to be a water-bottle in
his hand. Closer observation
revealed him the much-
soughy-after Clifton,

“He was at once arrested
and brought in to us again. I
expressed to him my recogni-
tion of his courage; for not
“very man would contemplate

as

uch a trek through the
desert. He looked very ex-
hausived, which was not sur-
prising

“To stop any

more attempts to
scape I had him
: sent at once to
ass Ttaly.

“Later I heard
hat he _ disap-
yeared from the
talian prison
amp in the dis-
guise of a Hitler
Jugend leader,
with shorts and
vadge of rank,
and in this uni-
form crossed
over the frontier
nto Switzerland”

Got Away

Rommeis in-
| formation was
i ncorrect. Clifton
vas sent to
campo P.G, 2s
in Italy, where I
vas a prisoner,

He at once
evolved a _ plan
or escape. He
diowered himsel¢
nut of a second-
orey window at
light into a patch
of shadow ac-
ually on a sen-
try’s beat. Then
ie slid across the
yard

wire fence.

German Milan.
he
for Como from the North Svation
ind arrived there before
missed at the morning roll-call.
To

hoping to cross over the moun-
tains into Switzerland.
This was his undoing. There

on his
stomach and got
under the barbed

F] He reached
Ponte D’Olio, and who feel that even

took the train, to ditions may be worth preserving
l _ Crossing if, when wars are over, we still
Milan in a tram, have to live together in the same
got a train world.

being

save time he hired a carriage,

point with Rommel.

He was indignant when he heard
the Navy was pulling them into
Malta for examination, furious
when it was reported that they
had been avtacked by the R.A.F.
at sea.

Drafting a strong note of protest,
he was somewhat shaken to learn
that an Italian general, frightened
of flying, had taken a passage in
a hospival-ship as a stretcher-case
and had been removed, unwound-
ed, at Malta.

His final disillusionment came
at a conference before El Alamein.
Pommel was complaining about
being halted for lack of petrol.
Three tankers had been spnk in
two days.

The Italian chief of staff re-
assured him, Other means had
already been adopted, Petrol was

land, New Zealand.
How Can /?
@ Hosp.tal-ships were a sore





Are you nervous and fidgety during the
day, ready to snap anyone’s head off at
the slightest provocation ?

LIVING ON YOUR NERVES Is 4. |

Nervous exhaustion coupled with low.

















ered vitality may well be the cause,

THIOPHOS

SBSBS ESSER VES - SES BESEES

being sent over in the double- TH AN EASILY. MiLas (
bottoms of hospital-ships ! ; SuICPHOS pRovieS fe
Rommet turned on him. “How SUES, PROGRESSIVE erin ickl
can I protest against British in- iu CASES OF WEAKME Quickly restores nervous exhaustion.
terference with hospival-ships NERVOUSNESS AND LOSS i
when you do things like that?” PHOS 1S UNEQUALED FO! eps =
he demanded. ; ee oss OF TONE IN THE | peps you up,—you feel better, eat better, ,
Tribute PunctioNs, ano) suleruss :
@ To sum up the spirit. of the wo ne sleep betier, and you will soon be laugh. (
desert war, I quote General : ‘
von Ravenstein, who com- ing at what irritat
manded a Panzer division. 6 ed you before,
“When I reached Cairo,” he (
said, “I was received very
courteously. Then I was vaken to ;
see General Auchinleck himself. YOU’ (
“He shook hands with me and OU WILL GET TH
said: “I know you well by name. E BEST ouT OF
You and your division have
fought with chivalry. I wish to

treat you as well as possible.’
“I heard that General Campbell

had been awarded the Victoria
Cross. I obtained permission to
write to him, and I still have a
copy of my letter.”
The letter read:—
“Dear Major - General
Campbell,

“IT have read in the paper
that you have been my brave
adversary in the tank battle
of Sidi-Rezegh.

“It was my Division which
has fought in these hot days
with the 7th Armoured Divis-
ion, for whom I have the
greatest admiration. Your 7th
Support Group of Royal
Artillery too has made the
fighving very hard for us and
I remember all the many
irons that flew near the aero-
drome around our ears.

“The German comrades
congratulate you with warm
heart for your award of the
Victoria Cross.

“During the
enemy, but with
spect.

war

high

your
re-

“Von Ravenstein”
“Jock” Campbell was _ killed
soon afterwards I do not sup-
pose he ever received the letter.
If he had, I think he would have
appreciated it.

Two Ways

@ There are two opinions

on the question of chivalry in

war. General Eisenhower holds
the other

“When Von Arnim was
brought through Algiers on his
way to captivity.” he has writ-
ten, “some members of my staff
felt that_ I should observe the
custom of bygone days and allow
him to call on me.

“The tradition that all profes-
sional soldiers are comrades-in-
arms has, in tattered form, per-
sisted to this day. ...

“For me, World War II. was
far too personal a thing to enter-
tain such feelings. ... ”

General Eisenhower is a wise
man, with whom no one would
willingly disagree.

Nevertheless, there are some

, (World copywright)
(NEXT WEEK)
Rommel sees Hitler: Strange talk
of a ‘two-mile blast’ weapon: His
first suspicions of the Fuehrer
London Express Service,
London Express Service

THE CAB@For New Efficiency

R r
soomy, modern design * Full “3-seater”—ad

aa ar
seat * Built-in concealed mounting steps * Sound-insulated
doors fitted with locks
windows

corner

aemisting

aqows

ECKSTEIN BROS.

Radio * Air conditioning
and back panel
* Sliding

.Provision for :

In
Hinged ventilating pane
rear window.

AUST

tattered tva-

Dust and draught proof * Rea
: Built-








































ano
+ MOMDOM, ENGLANO
eronotrowsn, wane QUIN

LIFE WHEN YOU TAKE

THIOPHOS |

ON SALE AT’ ALL GOOD DRUG STORES

STOKES & BYNOE—AGeNTS













J

MONEY COES FURTHER...

A fine car that saves money all the way—that’s the



BSSSESSeSE 25 5 -SSES6 Sa =ESESLSZEERSK





Prefect! You get smart body styling, roomy comfort for four



and big luggage space. Smooth riding on the roughest roads



and there’s ample ground clearance too! Its eager, precision



built 10 h.p. Ford engine saves petrol and oil, service charges




are at low prices.

@BSBSSRSSEBSESZRSELSS



THE AUSTIN 2 and 5
TON TRUCK FOR 1950



The Austin ‘Loadstar’ is a “driver-comfort
truck.

chassis that has all the great
and stamina you expect from an
is an outstanding new cab —
designed to give drivers the best working
conditions they’ve ever had. It will help
them to do their job more efficiently by
cutting down fatigue, And that will step
up operating schedules — and reduce Tune
ning costs,

On a
strength
AUSTIN








o ¥
justable driving

THE CHASSIS

in. heating and ~. 6 cylinder o.h.v. engine. 4 speed gearbox.
sulation of roof Fully floating rear axle with quickly T
( for door win- movable diff. assembly. Lockheed tw

leading-shoe brakes (5 ton, servo assisted).
I N — you can depend on it!

a Distributors. on Street.

May

5 YC a RN es ty








hie

RT of the British
Standing Sart, Ame:
ny Committee recen pub-
' represents the work of
ntatives of the British ter-
ries in the Caribbean in an
‘4p unify politically territories
ated by great distances, by
> in history, tradition,
ms, and races.
»Committee was appointed as
wilt of a Conference of the
’ Association of the
+ West Indian Colonies held
yo Bay, Jamaica, in Sep-
wor 1947. The Conference at

» Bay recommended the,
gup of the Committee whose
subject of this article.
y of reference of the
“mliie - were to consider and
«recommendations in relation













assimilation of: —
The fiscal, Customs, and
- tariff policy of the Brit-
B ish territories in the
p area.
2. legislation of such
The unification of the cur-
/ of such territories.
The unification, so far as
~ may be practicable, of the
_ public services of such ter-
_ yitories.
The form of a federal con-
stitution and federal judi-
The means of financing the
ie of all federal ser-

Currency
Th respect Customs and the
tion of ees there have
gen set up Commissions under the

mmanship of Mr. J. McLagan
Sir Maurice ee respec-

and in ec of currency
; is at work a preparatory
mmittee dealing with the Kast-
Group, fesulting from the
cy ¢ ence held in Bar-
in ‘under the auspices
{Sir John Meepherson.
To these matters’ therefore the
tommittee has only adverted in
and the report of this
mittee should be read in con-
n with the reports on Cus-
y, and Unification of

































snnemiahiiha neil

eet aed ie aa

respect of the assimilation of*
gis! on of the Caribbean
fories, the Committee recom-
that uniormity in such
§ as Commerciai Law is-de-
as tending to facilitate the
action of business on a re-
al scale. To effect that end it
rested that under Federation
and other economic matters
d be within the Legislative
tency of the Federation,
_ be able to ensure
_ Independence
bulk of the Committee’s re-
is devoted to the inter-related
of drafting a Federal Consti-
and a Federal, Judiciary,
suggesting the s of fin-
operation * Federal
The Com ee begin
port with the | imate as-
n that the main purpose of
is to secure “a real poli-
independence for the British
Nes of the region within
fre mework of the British
onwealth.” ‘They proceed to
¢comments on the prerequi-
Teal independence which
ndable alike for their
lom as their realistic ap-
th towards the economy of the
“Tt is now a truism to say








7.

'a

—



MARCH 19, 1950

By
that political independence is un-
real unless it is based on financial
stability which in turn must rest
on a ‘solid foundation of economi
productivity,” "

White admitting that over the
region as a whole public expendi-
ture is at the present time covered
by public revenue, the Committee
express their doubt that the pres-
ent condition of affairs is likely to
‘continue and in this, of course
their doubts are borne out by the
crisis which the sugar industry
laces in the unhappy negotiations
with the Imperial Government,

Eeonomic Stability

The Committee come to the
clusion that only Federation af-
fords .@ reasonable prospect of
achieving economic stability, for
they reject the view that economi c
stability can ever be ¢ hieved uns
der the present system of a large
number of separate political units
The Committee feel that Federa-
tion will givé to this ‘region the
voice of unity»and power which
in the past has been’so sadly lack-
ing. It is theit view that while
Federation will hot of itself solve
the troubles of the région that it
might prové the means of so do-
ing. Federation, they say, “will
not absolve the region from the
necessity for physical and mental
and moral effort—it may if suc-
cessful, help that effort to issue in
greater ,roductivity, more secur-
ity, and higher standards of liy-
ing, taan can the same effort ex-
ercised within the present pulitical
framewor!:.”

the con-









In framing their suggested con-
stitution the Committee have had
to bear in mind that a number o:
the Units have been Welehtde
grants in aid from the Imperial
Treasury for several years past
and will, in ail probability, require
such assistance for several years
to come. ji

Vital Interests

They have had to bear in mind
the vital interests of the United
Kingdom in respect of defence and
foreign affairs, and so to draft the
constitution that these diverse in-
verests should be safeguarded, The
Committee has recommended that
Trinidad be the seat of the Fed
The






eral Government,
will probably resent this
tion but it is likely that it will
meet with the general approval of
the other Units. In drafting th:
constitution the Committee ave,
in compliance with the decision
reached at Montego Bay, provided
that all powers not expressly given

to the Federal Government should

vest in the Units. This should help,
particularly in the early years, to
allay the suspicions and mistrust
of the more insular-minded.

Two fields of legislation are sug-
gested — the Exclusive List in
which only the Federal Legislature
ean operate and the Concurrent
List, in which both the Federal
Legislature and the territorial
legislatures may function. In
latter where there is a conflict be-
tween Federal and territorial leg-
islation then the Federal legisla-
tion is to prevail.

Foreign Affairs

The Exclusive List deals mainly
with defence, foreign affairs, Ex-
change control and matters per-
taining to the Federal Government,
The Concurrent List covers a wide
field and includes company and

—— ee

criminal law, trade unions, trade
and commerce with territories out-
Side the Federation and between
the Units. It does not inglude
Agriculture, Housing, or the Social
Services,

A Governor-General and a bi-
cameral Legislature has been sug-
gested. The Governor-General
would be the representative of the
Crown and would have to assent
to all Bills passed by the Legisla-
ture; but there shall be a special
category of Bills which would be
reserved for the signification of
His Majesty's pleasure.

This category of Bills relates
mainly to defence, foreign affairs
and Bills which in the opinion of
the Governor-General gravely im-
peril the fina al stability of the
Federation. His other powers may
be more conveniently dealt with
in the discussion of other parts of
the Committee’s suggestions.

Legislature
_ It is recommended that the Leg-
isiature consist of a House of As-
sembly and a Senate. Members of
the House of Assembly should be
elected on Adult Suffrage, there
should be quingennial elections




or income qualification for mem-



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Review of the Report of the British Caribbean

Standing Closer Association Committee
i.

able» aspect of the evolution of
democratic government in this
région as in other countries which
have essayed to tread tlie path
of parliamentary institutions.

In turning to deal with the for-
mation of a policy making body
the Committee has recommended
that a Council of State Ls ferscd
consisting of 14 members. Of incse,
7 members of the House of Assem-
bly are to be appointed by the
Governor-General on the recom-
mendation of the Prime Minister
and 6 are to be appointed by the
Governor-General in his own dis-
cretion. Of these six, not more
than 3 may be Federal officials and
» may be members of either
branch of the Legislature.

Officials

_ Criticism of the use of officials
im the Councu of State will be
widespread and vociferous. On the
other hand the provisions suggest-
ed would result in the Prime Min-
ister together with those members
nominated by himself constituting
a majority.

The Governor-General’s power
of veto, the reservation of Bills for
the signification ofsHis Majesty's
pleasure, the influence of grants in
aid from the Imperial Treasury

n Council should have power to

and there should be no property Fa the provision that His Majesty

bership. Allocation of seats should

egislate for the Federation in re-

be roughly—but only roughly—ong’spect of defence, foreign affairs,
the basis of population and thes the securing and maintaining of

total number of seats should be
fifty.

The Committee after careful
consideration suggest that the
Senate should be nominated by the
Governor-General and that the
allocation of seats should repre-
sent the principle that the purpose
of a second chamber in a federa-
tion is to reflect the view that it is
a Union of co-equal members.
Thus each Unit should have an
equal representation. It is sug-
gested that the powers of the Sen-
ate should be limited to those of
a revisionary and delaying nature.

In respect of Money Bills the
powers of the Senate should be
yet more limited, for a Money Bill
should become law when it has
received the assent of the Gov-

ernor-General even though it has
not obtained. the concurrence of
the Senate. Those who may re-
ret this limitation because of the
fear that the House of Assembly

iy spend recklessly may be re-

inded that any Bill which grave-

perils the financial stability
f the Federation is to be reserved
ification of His Ma-
sure,

Senators
question as to the nomina-



"
Ine

fen of Senators will undoubtedly
provide such diseussion particu-
larly in view of the fact that the

American Constitution provides for
bicameral Legislature, both
chambers, of which are elected.
The provision will however com-
mend itself to all those who be-
lieve that an ability to obtain the
favour of the electorate is not the
only criterion by which one’s use-
fulness to the State is to be judged.
The Prime Minister, the Com-
mittee recommends, should be
elected by the House of Assembly
from amongst its members and it
is clearly envisaged that party
politics will dominate the Federal
Legislature not long after the in-
auguration of Federation. How-
ever much this is to be deplored, it
is probable that it is an inescap-

the financial stability of the Fed-
eration, and for securing and
maintaining public safety and
order and supplies, and the power
of His Majesty to disallow any
law assented to by the Governor-
General which appears to His Ma-
jesty’s Government in the United
Kingdom to alter to the injury of
the stockholder any Federal Gov-
ernment stock which has been in-
cluded in the List kept by the
Treasury of the United Kingdom;
or to involve a departure in the
contract in respect of any such
stock—These will individually and
collectively constitute the most
serious checks on the real inde-
pendence of the Federation.
Unbalanced Economy

It appears. however, that such
checks are inescapable as Jong as
the region exists with an unbal-
anced economy which is subject to
the stray winds of world trade.
However much West Indians may
resent the restrictions thus im-
posed, it seems likely that without
similar safeguards the Imperial
Government would be willing to
give the Federation that support
without which it would be imprac-
ticable. West Indians have too
long lived in the harsh world of
economic reality not to appreciate
the harsh facts of life.

The Committee has devoted a
portion of their report to the con-
stitution of a Federal Judicature
Which they suggest should‘ consist
of a Chief Justice and not less than
three other Judges. They recom-
mend that the Federal Supreme
Court should have an original and
appellate jurisdiction. In respect
of the original jurisdiction that
is suggested by the Committee is
very limited but in their appellate
jurisdiction it is proposed that,
inter alia, they should replace the
exisiting West Indian Court of
Appeal. It would undoubtedly fall
io the lot of the Federal Supreme
Court to decide matters arising un-
der the Constitution or involving
its interpretation.



ts ALWAYS a special occasion ..

when you're we2iing one of Tootal’s lovely fabrics, designed for frocks that flatter and
stimulate and keep ‘you looking your very best. There’s a Tootal fabric for every occa-
sion, and for every zaood. Colourful gay and wonderfully adaptable, you'll find them

equally successful for tailored ‘chic’,
they’ll see you through a

and for the softer, more informal ‘afternoon’ styles
wedding, or a pienie on the beach,

Tootal fabrics are-as hardwearing as they are beautiful. You'll find that they launde:
perfectly, are friendly to sunshine, and will last for years.

And all are covered by this famous Tootal guarantee :—

« should dissatisfaction arise through any defect whatsoever in the material,
Tootals will replace it or refund the price and pay the cost incurred in making-

”

up.

OOTAL

The word ‘Tootal’ and other brand names

TOBRALCO

the wonderful crisp cotton
print, designed to take repeated
washing and years of wear
without losing its freshness and
charm, It has an unusually
wide range of lovely plain col-
ours and delightful prints in-
cluding designs specially creat-
ed for children and for gay,
stimulating beach-wear. The
ideal hot-weather fabric—easy
to wash—hard to wear out—
always looking its best.

ROBIA

an exquisite, flower-fresh fabric
df gossamer texture, so
and delicate yet so surp

a a. Robis is ideal for dainty
blouses, fuil-skirted evening
dresses, children’s party frocks,
or any ‘special’ occasion. It
launders perfectly and is mark-
ed “Tebilized” for tested crease-
resistance. Made in many love-
ly shades, plain or with designs

in-woven,

LYSTAV

a beautiful spun rayon, highly
adaptable and of great popu-
larity, Marked “Tebilized” for
tested crease-resistance, Lystay
has a § linen-like sur-
face, and tailors beautifully. It
also a soft draping
quality, ideal for the semi-
formal ‘afternoon’ frock. Made
in a wide variety of rich, glow-
ing, prints and lovely De
n shades. Lystav launders
Ms and is wonderfully
serviceable afid long lasting

LOMBIA

the rayon with the streamline
drape, distinctive in texture
and so very versatile. Woven
in many wonderfully deep clear
colours — plain, stripes and
checks. Not too heavy and
very adaptable, Lombia is ideal
a‘ike for draped styles and
severer tailored lines, Hard-

ane bo ge yrs —
was! su and is mark-
ed “Telalized”™ for tested

crease-resistance.

GUARANTE

FABRICS

mentioned are Registered Trade Marks.



Lord Listowel

On Federation

The Only Type That Would
Work Satisfactorily

LORD LISTOWEL—until re-

cently Minister of State

Colonial Affairs.
oreoninpeeenpnienenennisiinallenitesenaidibasiiasansienianais,

The Committee’s proposals in re-
Spect of the Federal Judicature are
less comprehensive than their sug-
gestions relating to the Federal
Legislature and Executive, but this
is understandable in view of the
great differences in the constitu-
Mon and operation df the differ-
ent courts of.the various Units. It
is Impossible to offer any criticism
of the general principles laid down
for the probability of extensive
modification and amplifieation is
recognised,

The Committee has been at great
pains to ensure that the Federal
Publie Service should be kept out
side the turmoil of Federal poli-
tics and gone to the extent
of recommending that the estab-
lishment of a Public Service Com-
mission should be an integral part
of the Constitution. The members
of the Committee are much to be

for



commended on adopting _ this
statesmanlike view. It would in-
deed be ragic day for these West
Indiar mds if at the inception
of the experiment of Federation
the “Spoils System” should »
attached to the Federal Public
Service

Great Task

In dealing thus far with the re-
commendations of the Committee
it seems clear that the members
of the Committee have approached
their great task in a spirit that
augurs well for the future. They
have approached the problems of
the region with a confidence that
has remained undimmed by their
obvious realisation of the difficul-
ties and pitfalls that will attend the
peoples on their-way towards the
appointed goal. Their suggestions,
on the whole, reflect a moderation
and sense of balance which are
both welcome and opportune as
public men prepare to act upon a
wider stage.

In another article the means
with which it is proposed to endow
the Federal Government will be
examined and the chances of suc-
cess will be weighed in the sum
total of the recommendations.

&.0



(From Our wr Correspondent)
LONDON.
< THE .ederal set-up suggested in
the Standing Closer Asscciation
Committee’s Report is ‘the only
type of federation that would have
a chance of working satisfactorily
and surviving in the peculiar cir-
cumstances of the british West
Indies,” writes Lord Listowel in
an article in the magazine “New
Statesman” this week.

It is a “ioose” federation, he
says, with a weak centre limited
to a minimum of tunciions, which
would naturally include foreign
ina Commonweaitn relations, ex-
ternal communications, and over-
seas trade. The territorial gov-
ernments would continue io
manage their own internal affairs.
They would be asked to surrender
nothing but executive powers
they could not carry out equally
vatisractorily themselves, and the
Cegree of financial authority neec-
ed to pay for the federal a-
ministration.”

Lord Listowel emphasised that
it was essential to avoid the sub-
ordination of the smaller terri-
tories to the larger populations of
Jamaica and Trinidad. This would
be secured by the existence of a
Second Chamber, in which each
territory had equal representation,

Praise

He praises the proposed federal
constitution for the attention it
pays to the machinery of govern-
ment, and for its deliberate dis-
regard of matters of abstract right
or fundamental law. “By concen-
trating upon the minimum requir
ments of a federal system of gov
ernment” he says “its authors hav

given their finished article :
flexible and unfinished quality
which will enable it to grow

gradually in response to changing
political and social conditions’

The former Minister f State
tor Colo..at Affairs shares the
Reports assumption that politica

independence in the Caribbean is
impracticable for the separat
territories so long as it is pursue:
in isolation from their neighbours
“Economic — viability onl)
possible for the region as a whole
and for each territory as a mem
ber of a regional association.”

is

Lord Listowel says finally that
Britain must do everything it can
to support the economic develop-
ment of the Caribbean territories.

ithout economic stability there
is little prospect of suecessft!
representative institutions, either
in the colonies themselves or at
the federal centres‘‘Let us. not
forget,’”’ he warns, “that the whole

political future of the British
territory West Indies and their
long-term relationship with the

rest of the Commonwealth, wil’
be determined by the commercial
poliey of a Government (Home)
hat we elect.”







MD

“Ne

* Hazeline Snow’ does so much for
your skin, Women the world over
trust it as they do no other beauty
cream, So magically cooling at all
seasons, 80 good for treating little
blemishes, never greasy, * Hazeline
Snow’ should be your daily choice.

“HAZELINE SNOW

TRADE MARK

al A BURROUGHS
——— LLL LL

—and somet

Cow & Gate Baby

delightful
tender skip
is just wha
during ¢
tentime
encou

Lightly

{
and refined,

ee ew

( ,
Pal

ert



u Uy ae
Lae pet



Agents J.



vaneadan
NS ce ia
ve aor daa |
ST ie
ture
Coe

ihe beauly cream. « :
that is a ‘irealment?<




and dirt. . . guards againsteun,





softens and perfmned the:



.. + gives a perfect * madb-



‘HAZELINE SNOW? 3S

foundation for powder jy.5../ 0)
a












protects the skin from dust.»

<8 eeee,

”

cools the skin immediately’*'f
it is applied . . . so refreshing " “
is \

skin, prevents that shiny’ lodk’”
ay Cott)

cleanses thoroughly, gently-+.

Arun of is

ht



eae eon

oral

. i = Roe
= B. rogaterns

WELLCOME & CO, PRODUCT.

very comforting, The new_.
Powder is a delicate and.
for Baby’s+>

cooling, soothing influence’

aration — ideal



iby needs after the bath of!

ofthe day, It brings cans
om from irritation — and
nd, refreshing, sleep, :
imed, slightly béfated, pure



$$$ $F

renee

EGATE. = %
( â„¢ 7 2
cwde TS

Leslie &

FOR COMFORT AND CONTENTMENT

BHRS 25889



” Oe ae
ena ape ce Oy
PACE SEVER.
(enhance so
FOR A SMOOTH, €OOL 1) Yen shite n onl

GS OAstsse



ee ees

=

A Ag ee NC el a

Cae Ue



re a een

——





Es OS





os

PAGE EIGHT





ADVOGATE

Publishec by Th. Advocate Co, Ltd., 34, Brosd St., Bridgetow?

Sunday, March 19, 1950



No Confidence

THE speech delivered by Mr. Ernest
Deighton Mottley, the Senior Member for
the City at Wednesday’s mecting of the
House of Assembly, is one deserving of the
closest consideration. The facts quoted by
Mr. Mottley are such as to perturb the
minds of all West Indians irrespective of
their place in party camps.

The endless round of conferences whose
decisions remain a secret or whose recom-
mendations are pigeon-holed have already
been adversely criticised in these columns.

The Control Board was instituted during
the war as a wartime measure. Recently
it was announced that the office of Con-
troller of Supplies has been made a pen-
sionable post in the Civil Service. Today
five years after the end of hostilities con-
trol restrictions hamper the operations of
businessmen and plague the life of the
ordinary citizen more than ever during
the war.

The West Indies find themselves in an in-
vidious situation. The Currency policy
carried out by the Control Board ap-
parently is not a policy having for its goal
the interests of Barbados or the West
Indies. It appears to be a policy designed
only to secure the interests of the British
people. West Indian trade with Canada has
been brought to a standstill and the West
Indian islands must then accept a dollar
dole. No consideration is taken of the dol-
lars saved for Britain, no concessions are
made to peoples who must sell on terms
fixed by the buyer and buy at terms fixed
by the seller.

But the most shocking disclosure made
by the Senior Member for the City was
when he said, “Recently we all heard that
as a result of devaluation, the rate of
steamer freight from England to the West
Indies was being increased to cover the
extra cost. Not a word was said however,
about the fact that the homeward freight
to England was being reduced by 8/9 per
ton. This has only leaked out lately.”

Is the inference drawn by Mr. Mottley
the correct one? Is it that the Ministry of
Food put pressure to reduce the freight
rate thereby the cost of sugar to the con-
sumer, and at the same time invited the
steamship companies to recoup themselves
by adding the amount to the cost of out-
ward freight to the B.W.L., thus increasing
the already high price paid for English
manufactured goods?

Or is there some other explanation? If
there is, the sooner it is given the better it
will be for the honour of the British Gov-
ernment and the continued existence of
goodwill between the West Indian peoples
and the Imperial Government.

Strong criticism was also made by Mr.
Mottley of the manner in which confer-
ences of officials are held whose decisions
appear to ignore entirely the best interests
of the West Indies. “One wonders”, was Mr.
Mottley’s comment “if our officials are paid
by the British Treasury to protect the
United Kingdom's interests, or by the Bar-
bados Treasury to look after ours.”

It would be better if Mr. Mottley’s criti-
cisms were unfounded. That however is not
the case. Mr. Mottley’s outcry was that of
every responsible and thinking West In-
dian. This is not the agitation of irrespons-
ible men, Businessmen, economists, and
politicians are all sorely troubled by the
manner in which West Indian interests
have been and are being sacrificed.

These islands stand upon the threshold
of a Federal Union. In the proposed con-
stitution it is suggested that the Imperial
Government should have overriding powers
in respect of Exchange Controls and the
maintenance of the financial stability of the
Federation.

West Indians may well stop and ponder
the significance of those suggestions. Does
it mean that the “British Caribbean Fed-

— - ~ s

OUR READERS SAY,
OUR READERS SAY:

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,-—-The Boy Scouts Associa-
tion is a most valuable organisa-
tion in this island; but for many

years its work has been hampered should be

Speeches

To The Editor, The Advocate, a :
SIR,—It is regrettable that it you will agree they are still more

eration” should, like the scattered islands
at present, exist only for the purpose of
providing markets in which U.K. manu-
facturers can name their price and which
can produce cheap food for Britain ?

Mr. Mottley is to be congratulated on his
courageous speech. The Barbados Gov-
ernment should lose no time in making
strong representations to His Majesty’s
Government and drawing to their attention
the growing dissatisfaction with the pre-
sent policy.

Who Should Pay?

EARLIER this month Barbados had the
honour of a visit from Her Royal Highness
Princess Alice and .se Rt. Hon. The Earl
of Athlone after the Princess had com-
pleted her installation as Chancellor of the
University College of the West Indies in
Jamaica. It was a visit to which the people
of this isiand had looked forward and of
which they showed their full appreciation.
It proved to them that the ties between
the Throne and the Colonial Empire are as
strong as ever and that the Royal Family
are at least aware of our existence and
our desire to maintain our allegiance to
the Empire.

The celebrations in Barbados in honour
of this Royal visit were of a standard hefit-
ting the occasion but they had been brought
about without any special provisicn being
mede by the Government by way of cn-
tertainment expenses.

His Excellency the Governor and Mrs.
Savage as was their duty threw open
Government House to the Royal couple.
In the course of the entertainments several
hundred guests were invited to meet the
Royal visitors in a continuous round of
social functions. The entertainment was
lavish and the expense great. But up to
the present, it must be borne by the pocket
of the Governor, the one member of the
Civil Establishment whose salary is the
same as it was fifty years ago. And the
present Governor does not boast of being
a rich man.

It would not be in keeping with the
dignity of a Governor, who is after all, the
King’s Representative, to complain over
the expenditure incurred in the entertain-
ment of members of the Royal Family but
inasmuch as the visit of Her Royal High-
ness and the Earl was not merely a social
call on the Governor and Mrs. Savage, but
in answer to the desire of the people of
this island, it should be clear that all
expenses incurred with the Royal visit
should be borne by the Public Treasury.

This suggestion is not without precedent.
On the occasion of the visit of the Duke of
Windsor as Prince of Wales and the three
Princesses and the Earl of Athlone in
March 1934 the Legislature of this colony
voted specific sums to defray the cost of
entertainment. It also true that on
occasions in the past when units of the
Royal Navy visited these shores large sums
were voted for entertainment of the
Officers and men. If there was any justi-
fication then, there is more now when the
greatest service which can be rendered to
the Empire is to keep it together.

The members of the Royal Family who
visit various parts of that Empire, such as
the King and Queen and the Princesses
visiting South Africa, Princess Alice and
the Ear] of Athlone visiting the West Indies
and the proposed visit of the Duke of
Gloucester to Nairobi this month and that
of His Majesty to Australia, do so as am-
bassadors of Empire. Their presence
among the peoples of the Commonwealth
shows that there is need to strengthen
those bonds which have made the Empire
great and which can keep her great.

is

The representatives of the people have shown
in the past that they can be magnanimous; their
appreciation of the fitness of things would pre-
vent them from withholding evidence of that
magnanimity on this occasion; and so it is the
duty of the Executive to sond down to the Leg-
islature a resolution for such sums as inight be
agreed on as reasonable expenditure incurred
during the Royal visit.

There have been occasions when sums for
causes less public by nature and less beneficial
to the community have been voted without
division. In this case there is not likely to be
any dissentient voice to the measure.



tention to my personal experience
with the Electric Supply Corpora-
don on rates for my house I think

startling.





by nov having its own head- %"% oo de we ape hy protest’
quarters. agains Way in which excisions >,
, on speeches are made by em- , 12 June, 1949, I purchased a

Thanks to the generosity of the
Government and many kind
friends, it has at last acquired its
own building which has been
erected on the Bay Lands, and the
work should now give creditable
results

After mature consideration, the
Executive Committee of the Asso-
ciavion have prepared a careful
budget of its annual costs, and
although making every effort to
economise, these still amount to
$2,400 to run the Associavion.

We now make an appeal to the





public to help us maintain this
most useful organisation by sub-
scribing half of the required
amount annually.
H. A. CUKE,
President
W. H. CARTER,
Island Commissione!
H CHANDLER
Honorary Treasurer
G. I. CUFFLEY
Honorary Secrevary
The Scouts Association



Branch),
dquarters,
3eckles Road,

St. Michael.







ployees of a reputable journal.
If, for reasons of space or time,
it be deemed expedient to con-
dense, then care should be taken
to ensure that what is allowed to
remain of the original, at least
makes sense. Precis writing re-
quires skill, and an appreciative
feeling of focal issues; and it is
not unreasonable to expect a re-
cognition of the simple facy that
the Honour Roll of a school, with
its historic and traditional impli-
cations, is a most important in-
gredien’ of any headmaster’s
speech on Speech Day.
Why was this omitted?
W. A. FARMER
The Lodge School,
St. John
March 17, 1950.
Electricity
To The Editor, The Adv
SIR,—TI have been reading
vreat interest the comps
electricity rates in our !
ing colonies, Trinidad ;:
Guiana, with those in f
1 Barbad These



house in Marine Gardens which
was fully wired for electricity, and
which was supplied to the former
owner at the rete of 5 cents per
unit—6 cents with the 20% sur-
charge. When I, the new owner,
applied to the Electric Supply Cor-
poration for service, which en-
tailed mo new wiring or other
change, I was informed that I
would have to pay for the same
service 18 cents per unit — 21%
cents, with 21% surcharge.

I know several people who have
already, or are now building,
houses and they, too, are being
charged this discriminatory rate.
it surprises me that these new
builders have not yet told their
plighv.



Has the Electric Supply Cor-
ration the right to do this? I
rstand that any form of dis-
ination in rates charged ta
consumers of the same class is
expressly forbidden by the Acts
inder which the company oper=
{

D, E. HENDERSON

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Cummings.



‘| hope you're not going to put
ME in one of your drawings !”



A 2 a

Sitting On The Fence

OT long ago I foresaw a dis-

tant future in which all mem-
bers of Parliament, including the
Cabinet, would be dogs.

The interest dogs are already
taking in politics was apparent in
South Norfolk, where a doggie be-
longing to the wife of Christopher
Mayhew, the Socialist candidate,

bit one of his staunchest sup- Clea

porters.
. *

Interviewed, the dog said: —

“Among other things, I must
have swellowed a lot of propa-
ganda, because I always thought
Conservatives were well dressed
and Socialists wore caps and
mufflers, or ought to.

“This fellow was so well dressed
I thought he was a Conservative.

ee ARN

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

One more crack out of you
Wilber/orce Mt., and tomorrow
Mornings oapers are gomg to
carry a story about a lonely
87 vear-Ovn spinster beating up

a defenceless youth.”



So I bit him. I can only offer my
apologies.”

Loves’s Old Sweet
Song

When the sheer misery of
existence becomes intolerable
and one is feeling rather Rus-
sian, it is heartening to read
about a man who has been
beating his wife every eve-
ning for 18 years.

UST a clout at twilight,

When the lights are low,
In the flickering shadows

A softly thudding blow;
Though the day be weary

And the evening drear.

I shall get at twilight

Just the same thick ear,

Just the sa-a-ame thi-i-i-ick

e-e-e-ar.

Flat-irons for
Beauty

“The » wrinkled
faces of elderly women are



Just So

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Surely the appropriate
solution to the “High Tyme” leg
controversy is :— “Honi Soit Qui
Mal Y Pense’’?

T. WALKER PATON.

Pavilion Lodge, .

Hastings,

March 17, 1950.

Air Mails
To The Editor, The Advoédfé,
SIR,—In your issue of to-day,
Carib writes under the caption
“An Advantage” that mail from
England by T.C.A. is getti
here quicker than it used to. Al
air mails from England are des-
patched to Barbados by B.O.A.C.
via Jamaica and onwards by
B.W.I.A.
H. N. ARMSTRONG,
Colonial Postmaster.
March 15, 1950.

No Quicker

To The Editor, The Advocate,

Sm—In your newspaper of 15th
inst. under “Carib Calling” with
the heading “An Advantage”, it
is stated that Mail from England
by TC A _ gets here much quick-
er than it used to.

We would call your attention to
the fact that all Air Mails from





weary of

“How do you reconcile. Mr

mings, your cartoon of last week with
u expressed to me
about the Socialist Party, this time,

the sentiments

three years ago?”



“But I can’t understand why

you're not a complete nervous

wreck at the — of six weeks
or it.”

By Nathaniel
Gubbins

now being ironed out with a
flat-iron.”—A beauty article,
* > *

OTHER, make the iron hot.
Auntie’s face has sagged a lot.
rly, it’s our painful duty
To restore our auntie’s beauty.
Hurry, Alice, hurry, Mabel,
Strap her on the kitchen table.
Do not heed her frantic shout.
Wrinkles must be ironed out.
Careful, Gertrude, don’t be rough.
Stop when auntie’s had enough,

* * %

Steady Mary, steady Jane,

Must you burn her nose again?

Alice, Mabel, are you dreaming?

Can't you hear your auntie
screaming?

Take that iron off her face.

That is not its resting-place.

When It's Colder
and Colder

A SCIENTIST (they’re all over
4A the place) thinks the weather
in Britain will get colder and cold-
er. Yet another thinks women will
one day be 10ft. high with barrel
chests and enormous appetites.

This will make the bigger wo-
men of the future look much
worse. A new ice age will grow
hair on their barrel chests,

Their massive jaws will become
purple with frost bite, and their
terrible appetites will be satisfied
only with raw meat and whale
blubber.

* * *

As we alsu believe that steam
heating is unhealthy, we shall get
colder and colder as the weather
gets worse and worse.

It is bad enough to foresee a
future full of purple-faced women
ten feet high.

But if we are also going to have
icebergs all round the coast, polar
bears in the back garden, and
giant women roaming the frozen
wastes munching blubber sand-
wiches, then roll on the next war,
come what may.

Isn*t Nature
Wonderful?

l T Cannot now be very lon;
Before the birds burst into
song

And folks become hysterikil



Today’s Thought

Fame is what you have taken
Character is what you give
When to this truth you waken
Then you begin to live.
BAYARD TAYLOR
(Improvisations) .

— ate





Help to Maintain the Boy Scouts Association

England are despatched to Barba-
dos by BO AC. and B.W.1.A.,,
which our Colonial Postmaster has
confirmed.
J. PERCY TAYLOR,

Branch Manager.

British West Indian Airways Ltd.
Boxi

ing

SIR, — I am in receipt of the
following communication from the
Trinidad Boxing Board of Controi.

The Secretary of the Board of
Control wrives: “We have in Trini-
dad a Boxing Board of Control
which is the Supreme Authority
in Boxing both Amateur and Pro-
fessional here. As such, no pro-
fessional boxer could leave these
shores to fight abroad as an ama-
teur, more so with the Amaveur
Boxing Association, Each amateur
boxer was given a duplicate of
his amateur certificate duly signed
by the Secretary of the Trinidad
and Tobago Amateur Boxing
Association.

“I beg to state for the informa-
tion of all concerned that: Ken-
neth Wallace, our welterweight,



ance of good faith.



politics, rveiaxes
at a social littie evening ..

, BTC, ETC, py
Cum- ;
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD., Successors ty |
Stafeeman and Nation” C. S. PITCHER & CO, LTp |
Phones : 4672, 4487 p
—— =





SUNDAY, MARCH 19, igs,

a Se



— ee





select from this
wide range '



bg COAL STOVES—Nos. 6, 7 and 4
OIL VES COA
PRESSURE COOKERS L rots
SAUCEPANS—Iron, Enamel and Aluminum
DOUBLE BOILERS

NEGRO POTS—2, 3, and 4 gallon
DANISH POTS—1, 2, and 3 gallon

FRY PANS—11” and 12” and FRENCH
COFFEE MILLS—Nos, 2 and 3

MEAT MINCERS—Nos. 1, 2, and 3
TINNED: AND ALUMINUM KITCHEN WARE
BOX IRONS

FRIERS








to
&
/
; +
Y
fe
p
|

@
®

“Oh—COMMERCIAL art!”
London Express Service



YEAR OLD
COCKADE
FINE RUM

YEARS |
OLD
AND ITS GOOD

RUM TO THE
LAST MIENUTE

About the blooming daffodil.
The crocuses will soon be out,
Then up will go a mighty shout
From the lower and the upper ten
And clerks and tired business men:
“The spring has come! How too
divine!
Let’s walk beside the Serpentine.”
With the first green, tender slots
Come little mass production soots;
For every wild flower in the grass
There is some gaudy, vulgar ass,
His jacket tightened at the waist,
Attired in appalling taste. .
Why does Nature in the spring
Adorn and colour everything?
With these exceptions, you and me,
Who dress ourselves atrociously,

$1.60 a bot.

at
STANSFELD.
SCOTT
Co., Lid.



&

<>

RT ee en eee ee



Pe a



Sao

in

When bathing in her coronet?”

«>
seven titled grandmothers liv-
JUST RECEIVED. *}
AUSE a moment, tiny tot, .
Vo wl Shue lo Liushing Nainy,
Woes site eat and arnk Wke uss BIRKM y RE CANVAS }
f
Does she take them out at mght?
Remember every grandmammah
Or just a blowsy baroness. f
* * fe
4

OnHallowedGround
“There are no fewer than — ——— =
ing in one square mile of Lon-
don.’ —Gossip- writer.
oa

Before you tread this hal- 1
lowed spot, +.
4 wait lo see @ Litied granny.
Ur Gin th Wikspers Liungerous,
ls she very, very old?
Are her faise teeth made of gold?
Are her whiskers grey or white? ONE PIECE BIRKMYRE t
Does she get her ringlets wet :
bp probably . dowagah, G RE E N CA N VAS ;
Or possibly a marchioness, :

° .
Child, your curiosity G2 11s. wide
About our aristocracy,
Though natural and understude
Is very, very, very rude, ‘ ‘
A dowager or marchioness AT e PER YARD. b

Is often human... more or less.
—L.E.S.

SECURE YOUR REQUIREMENTS NOW
FROM

DACOSTA & CO., LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT.

FOR THOSE

“Wont de 2 silly



LY dn styised Seite

ELABORATE Be. ‘\
PARTY aS. 4

is 18 years old and has been at-
tending the Vicvoria Institute. He
has only been boxing eight months,
He has only had four public fights,

LETTERS whtich are signed with a nom-de-plume, but un-
accompanied by the customary bona fides, will be ignored.
Many such reach the Editor’s desk each week, and readers
are again reminded of the necessity for the writer's name to
be known to the Editor, net for publication, but as an assur-

having lost two and won two. His
fifth. public fight was against
Geoffrey Perkins of Barbados, He
belongs to the Serene Gym, where
he gevs his training from Mr. J. M.
Douglass, manager-trainer of both
West Indian crowned champions
Gentle Daniel and Boswell St.
Louis. Kenneth Wallace has never
fought professionally and has no
intention of doing so in the near
future, as he is not up to profes-
sional svandard. I might mention
that Kenneth Wallace was rated
as our No. 2 Amateur Welter-
weight, our first being E, Mason
of the Serene Gym.”

I may mention that I am in

possession of Kenneth Wallace's
amaveur certificate of registration

L. A. LYNCH,

Hon, Sec., B.A.B.A
Modern High School,
St. Michael.



Goddard's sal

GOLD
BRAID

Rum

IS
THE
ALL-PURPOSE
LIQUOR.

COCKTAILS —

HIGH BALL

PLANTERS’
PUNCH

The Finest
RUM is

GODDARD'S

GOLD BRAID



ener ee a oe

















































































Garden itself had a
ime new decor by Oliver
~The great occasion had
of aristocratic dignity
nch visitors to England
seem to recognise more
jy than we can see it our-

ng that ali the right
. were said. granting that this

r tial visit repre-
* Cnty founded on
ground than the visit of
in 1989, it must
ly stated that M. and
» Auriol have not brought
eople of Britain and the
wie of France a fraction of a
eye nearer together in
; ty to a common
i oe ederttanding. Though
me can be seen across twenty
pf sea the distance between
» countries is far greater
_petween two nations of the
th, thousands of
" across the world.
h our military and diplo-
sailiances mean the formation
lly joint armies there is
‘hat sense of common fortune
‘made the’ Anzac force of the
‘World War, uniting Australia
iNew Zealand.

A Tense Week

Auriols, too, came _ to
in a tense political week.
i the Government falling —
ys and with a new election
offing; with the backwash
amazing case of Dr. Fuchs,
meting against tense politics
jhigh human interest, what
‘the worthy, witty, Socialist
dent of France and his elegant
io to gain themselves news-
prominence? The pro-
ms were indeed grand; the
ty of Works’s crimson ban-
brightened London squares,
did its early-Spring

on

thet

le the King and Queen en-
Mr. Bevin, in tne
Uilice, was hard at work
for some reality in the
Cordiale. France, since
» has had a number oi
policy. She has wanteu
her lost international
dragged in the dirt by
France, too, has been
concernea with the future
Over tive years
been some acute differ-
h French policy,
y distrustful of any politi-
word, and American policy,
ready to see a change of
im the welcoming smile oi
d people. In these
over the export of Ger-.
coal, over the political
fe of the new Germany,
he control of German heavy
¥— Britain has been
and peacemaker, (some-
puzzled and un-
een Paris and
Recent news from
might indeeq encourage
ach to say a bitter “I told

in

et),

; Not Co-operating
trusted Germans are not
Maing in the control ot
usiry; these understanding
ate kicking up as much
dust as they dare at the
Programme of dis-
eir war industries.
a thas been to bring
eétd Britain, in view, much
ni Now Bevin and
, the French Foreign
=f, Would a to persuade
, the U.S. Secre-
State to come over to
wea have another talk
: ong He does not
ned come; indeed
Signs of distressed re-
erican policy
my put through before he
4 fo join this Confer-
the idea of Western Ger-
8 valuable bastion against
m being considered
is just being perceived
sives Germany great
concessions
and then selling
Status to the
— and that might
A bitter result of
would be a new
in 1939 between
y and Com-

aT

r

‘They An H-Bomb ?

ashington, by courtesy
at Americ n Press Agency,

EASTE

EGGS

‘nd enjoyed by all
the kiddies

Yours carly from

GHT’S
| pt STORES

s

)

What Does Auriol’s

(By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS)

HE BRIEF VISIT of President Auriol of
. with his wife, a neighbourly call at Buckin
+ of toa strict and packed timetable with
The last event of the visit—a ballet at Covent Garde.
nuinely retrieved some of the lost glitter and charm ol
ton life of a almost forgotten pre-war,

are ‘quite delicious

en nn
Ste

.

1950

LONDON.

France pay-
gham Palace
real cordial-

comes a “story” more improbable
than any ever dreamt. And yet.
Why not? Here it is. Mr. ta
Dimmick, sales manager of Apache
Powder Co., (does it sell iace
powder to apaches? Or does i
make a little powder to turn us
into apaches? | know not), an
nounces that an “ultra stream-
lined flying saucer” was wreckex
on a Mexican hillside last week
The pilot of the machine he
describes as a man twenty three
inches tall. He died and his body
has béen embalmed for purpose:
of Scientific research. Mr, Dim
mick maintains that Mexica:
officials believe the aviator has
arrived from another planet. This
of course, puts the Hydrogen bomb
in the shade. According to re-
ports over the last two years
from almost every country of the
globe, these flying saucers havc
been seen repeatedly. This form
of recOfinaisance has unpleasan
possibilities. But we should bov
to this great American news
agency and congratulate it on the
most daring “spoof” of the age
Who is trying to make whom be-
Tieve what?

M.P.s Are Being Brutally
Treated

Recently the two major
political parties insisteg thai uc
their MPs. sick or tired, ove,
worked or disgruntled, shouid bc
in the Palace of Westminister oi.
the stroke of ten — evei.
ambulances were to be used s
long as the move to vote did no
put a Member’s life in dangei
Next week this will happen agai
twice. The strain on the politfta
system of conducting Govern
ment without compromise, with :
slender majortty, will surely grow
intense. A week ago it seeme.
Conservatives might agree t
wait, let the Government have :
length of political rope, and hop¢
it would hang itself. Now M:
Churchill and his party seem kee:
to push the Government over :
cliff as soon as possible. Con-
Stitutional questions are bein;
pushed to the forefront by the
close division of political powei
between the two big parties. One
way out, which Mr. Churchil
suggested, is to remodel the votins
system in such a way that the
Liberals get a number of M.P’s in
the House of Commons in propor-
tion to the vote they receive a‘
elections. This would bring their
number from nine up to forty or
fifty. Naturally, then, the Social-
ist Government would be out-
voted, and could not rule, unless
it confined itself to measures ac-
ceptable to Liberals. Mr, Church-
ill’s scheme, which is attractive,
naturally, to Liberals, has the
other feature that it would be a
great gain to Conservatives! It
is true that Conservatives could
never be very Tory, any more
Mr. Churchill’s suggestion is be-
ing interpreted as indication that
he believes Tories can never rule
the country, for long, alone. This
takes into account the facts of
life in the post-war Britain—the
rise of the prestige of the Trade,
Unions, and solid support of in-}
dustrial England for Socialism.

The Crime Wave. Up And
Down

83

The same figures can be used
to prove both sides of most argu-
ments. You might say crime in
Britain was diminishing; but then
surely it is increasing. Both are

right. The total of crimes re-
ported, and of convictions of
criminals is falling. My own

guess is that the drying up of
easy money to be earned by “wide
boys” in fairly simple little
rackets has lowered the general
crime figures. But it has also
made crime harder to succeed at,
and driven criminals to organize
themselves in gangs and use
violence. So the number of
atrocious attacks, usually on
women, is rising. Crime is be-
coming gangster-run. I expect | it
is natural that judges and police
should immediately suggest that
flogging, with the cat, which was
abolished two years ago should
be re-introduced. Personally I
doubt whether this will happen.
No Government will want to take
a step that is retrograde _and
would put Britain in, the position
of being the one and only civil-
ised, non-Communist country en-
shrining physical violence in its
penal code.

?
ee

with genuine

R




we
BS



\

nsec me

SS Ae

————_

assembly



BECAUSE I dared to love and
accept the love of a white woman
our punishment is to be exiled for
the next five years from my coun-
try, Bechuanaland, which is the
size of France.

The great majority of my people,
IT am assured, are horrified by the
British Government's action.

They and I regard it as a
betrayal of the trust that Bechu-
analand has reposed in Britain
for more than half a century since
King Khama, my grandfather,
came to England to ask Queen
Victoria to take our people under
her protection when they were
threatened by the Transvaal Boers

Tshekedi’s Action

IT was my misfortune to ba
deprived of parental care before
I was ten,

My upbringing became the
responsibility of Tshekedi, son of
King Khama by his fourth marri-
age. I have always regarded him
as an uncle,

;

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

RUTH and

Hy Seretse Khama
A Statement to the British People



Most of the speakers at the invitation was a trap to lure
second assembly considered I had Ruth and me out of Bechuana-
been wrong in not consulting the land, and that we might not be
tribe before marrying. They did allowed to return.
not, however, consider that this
omission should deprive me of my 4SSurances that we were not

position as chief-designate.
Shouts of Approval

IT was agreed that I should
return to Britain to finish my law
studies and then return in a few
months’ time to attend the third

assembly,

that third meeting went on for
five days. I called upon all those
who favoured Tshekedi to stand
up and 43 stood up. I then called
upon all those who would accept

me as chief and my wife.

The meeting rose to its feet with

shouts of “Pula! Pula! Pula!’
This word, meaning “Rain,”
the Bechuana way of expressi
strong approval of anything.

is R
NS seemed to justify our suspicions

A fortnight sater I received the

congratulations of Sir



SERETSE

Tshekedi has been the bitterest
pponuent to my marriage. He said
t the beginning: “I do not want

white blood in the Khama family.”
He did everything he could, first
oO prevent my marriage, and then,
when that failed, he tried to bring
about separation.

I have heard stories, for the
truth of which I am unable to
vouch, that after Ruth Williams
accepted my proposal Tshekedi had
hopes that she would, for a finan-
‘ial consideration, break off the
engagement,

But I married
character.

@ woman of

At Oxtord

THIS story begins when my
uncle decided I would be better
fitted for my future responsibil-
ities as tribal chieftain if I com-
pleted my education in Britain.

I had two happy years at Oxford
University. Afterwards I went to
London to study law.

I stayed with other Colonial
students at a hostel, and there
at a gathering I was introduced to
the girl who is now my wife. |
did not meet her for the first time
at a West End dance hall, as had
been reported.

Ruth’s parents were not at first
happy at the association, but their
opposition passed.

Ruth has been described as
typist, but, in fact, she held
position of trust at Lloyd's.

I wrote to my uncle seekin
his consent to the marriage. H«
immediately cabled back objectiny
to my marrying Ruth or any other
woman,

Ruth and I discussed his objec -
tion, but resolved to face the
future together. We were married
at Kensington Register Office ou
September 29, 1948.

4-day Assembly

SHORTLY afterwards I went
home to see my uncle. He im-
mediately called a kgotla, a tribal
at which we discuss
tribal affairs in the open air.

Two other assemblies were held
to complete the discussions. The
first, held at Serowe, our capital,
went on for four days.

My uncle made his objections
clear, and the majority of my
tribesmen—women being exclud-
ed from kgotlas—opposed my
marriage on the ground that it
had been arranged without tribal
consent.

It was also agreed at that first
meeting that I had been wrong in
marrying a white woman, I re-
minded my people that King
Khama had not sought consent in
at least two of his four marriages.
And that Tshekedi had not obtain-
ed consent to his marriage.

I also claimed that there was
nothing in tribal law forbidding
me marrying a white woman.

Many younger members of the
tribe were sympathetic to me.
But they had been silenced by my
uncle ruling that nobody under 40
should be allowed to address the
kgotta.

a



m

—

a

Ss

wenave SKIMMED
POWDERED MILK

SELLING AT 43c. per lb.
ESCHALOT

also DRY

Roebuck Street,



PERKINS & CO., LTD.

i,
U 66663 CCCGO0SCOG8SSS0G909

and RUTH

Baring, the High Commissioner.
cir Evelyn said he expected vo
receive confirmation of my recog-
nition as chief from London in
about three weeks

He added that he expected to
receive protests from South Africa,
but that the matter was a domestic
one that did not concern the
Union,

Findings Secret

MY uncle's next move was to
press for a judicial inquiry, Yt
became evident that pressure in
other quarters was also being
brought to bear against rae.

The inquiry went into the
question of whether the assembly
that appointed me chief had been

properly constituted and whether ent by Tshekedi.

I was a fit and proper person to
be chief.

Mr. Ellenberger, the Govern-
ment representative, in his evi-
dence, said the tribe had a histery
of squabbles,

He also said that, as the South
African Government had banned
me from its territory, it would be
difficult for me to keep in consul-
tation with the Resident Com-
missioner at Mafeking.

The inquiry was conducted
fairly, but its findings have been
kept secret. This handicapped my
lawyers when they presented my
case to the Governmert during
the past weeks

A Warm Welcome

RUTH came out to Bechuana-
land before tie inquiry, Official
objections prevented ner being
welcomed at the Francistown air
port, but there was no inistaking
the warmth of the tribe's welcome
when we drove into Serowe

Ridiculous stories have been
spread that she would hav= to live
in a mud hut’ and perform all
sorts of menial tasks such as
carrying water.

Our home, in fact, is an attrac-
tive bungalow, and we ave for-
tunate in having five servants.

Water has always been a di!ti-
cult problem in my country, but
a piped supply to the bungalow is
being arranged.

Our home is comfortabiy fur-
nished. We have the radio and a
car,

My wife, like most whit
women, will probably do her
shopping by mail order witn shops
in Johannesburg. That is, if we
are ever allowed to live again m
my native land.

She quickly settled down hap-
pily, making many friends both

among the tribe and the white
families. The wives of some
Government officials have been
aloof.

Tribe Feared Trap

WHILE we awaited the open-
ing of the judicial inquiry, the
British Government representa-
proval when I carried out numer-
ous duties as tribal chief.

Then came word from _ Sir
Evelyn Baring that I had been
invited to discuss matters with
the Secretary for Commonwealth
Relations, in London.

When I consulted the tribe about
this there was a feeling that the

Dial 2072 & 4502

POSSE OEOSOPSOSOOSBONS

«
4



Evelyn







We received numerous official

shanghaied, but all requests for
a written undertaking that we
should be allowed to return were
turned down.

Mr. Fraenkel, my legal adviser,
was given an emphatic assurance
by Mr. Clarke, the Imperial
Secretary, that there could be no
question of my being barred from
Bechuanaland in view of my
birth there. But he would not
give me this in writing.

When a tribal delegation made
the same request it was also re-
jected. We decided that Ruth
should remain at home.

The marked disappointment at
uth's non-appearance in London

of Government intentions,
Our Fate Settled

BEFORE our talks had gone
far I formed the impression that
the Government had — already
reached a decision and _ that
nothing we said would make
much difference,

I was asked to consider relin-
quishing permanently all claims
te the chieftainship. This was not
acceptable to me

I suggested that I should be
given a trial period of office as
chief.

It was the Government argu-
ment that my return to Bechuana-
land would provoke disturbances.
My answer was that the Govern-
ment could easily depose me if
that happened.

Mr, Patrick Gordon-Warker, the
new Secretary of the Common-
wealth Relations Office, said that
one of the reasons I had not been
confirmed as chief was that they
wished to make tribal administra-
tion more democratic by allowing
more people to have a say in

€ the running of the country.

%

; aayeree ro reforms could be
introduce uring my probation-
ership as chief.

Mr. Fraenkel said that he was
authorised by the other seven
Bechuanaland tribes to say they
supported me. He produced a
petition organised by one of them.

When I arrived for the last of
these discussions Mr. Gordon- |
Walker read to me a document !
settling our fate Banishment
from my homeland for five years

|
|

|

was the sentence meted out to
myself and my wife. |
‘ |

We at once reminded Mr. |

Patrick Gordon-Walker that I am |
concerned in an important law-
suit involving the inheritance left |
by King Khama and held at pres- |

It is essential that I return to
Bechuanaland forthe preparation
of my case, which comes up in
April. This matter is now being
considered.

Cable from Wife

MY wife has cabled me telling
of the distress the Government's
decision has caused. She is ex-
pecting our first-born in June,
Where is our child to be born?

I shall not obey the Govern-
ment’s edict until we have ex-
hausted every lawful means of
combating it.

The Government denies that
racial prejudice influenced the
decision. It denies that considera-
tions for the “colour bar” policies
of the Government of South
Africa brought about my banish-
ment, '

But world opinion seems to
agree that I have been the victim
of both,

I think the disturbances that
the British Government pretends
to fear might arise from my re-
turn to Bechuanaland will be
nothing compared with the unrest
that may spread through the
British Colonial Empire as the
result of its clumsy handling of
this affair.

Freedom for a man to marry
the woman of his choice and the
democratic right of people to
choose their own form of govern-
ment are the principles at stake.

WORLD COPYRIGHT



' London Express Service.

lowest price.

20 BROAD ST;

$oCCCCG4





problem which arises, is to de }
Ithe best method of conveyir
water to the surface, mak.n |

available



LOOPS S SDSS ODO FOG POOF PDO I DPOF OOO SIFT TE? ‘

Sy

The beautiful jewelry at your Jewellers will please.
Always something new and attractive, and at the very

® GOLD and SILVER JEWELRY
@® COSTUME JEWELRY
@ BUTTERFLYWING JEWELRY

Y. DE LIMA & CO., LTD:
Your Jeweilers

LPLLPLESOEPIOSIOO OOO

PAGE NINE









“I am a proud consumer of... .

GOAT CHOW

The cows begin their young ones on .

CALF STARTENA

)L tainable from H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd.

10 8S eBekesesesewereenee
SBaBpeaBPjX oa BeBuvkebase %

| |
Trail In |
| Barbuda —



Forty miles north of Antigua lies
the coral island of Barbuda, part
of the Presidency of Antigua.

Known as a Sportsman's Para-
dise it is unknown by almost
everyone else is the West Indies



But four Federal, Government
officers paid their first 1950 routine }
visit to Barbuda on March 4. The
party comprised of Dr. C. N.
Griffin, Senior Federal Medical
Officer, Mr. John Knox, Federa
Engineer, Mr. Jim Wilson, Ass’st
ant Federal Engineer and Mr
Clifford Palmer, Federal Directo:
of Education.

}
1
They left Antigua by sloo; |
around 3.30 a.m. on 4th Marci
and arrived at Barbuda’s neares
point to Antigua known as thé
river, within six hours. It is a
this spot that engineers have been
onsidering the possibility of con-
structing a pier which wouk
tacilitate a neafer anchorage for
nter-island boats. In the vicinit
there is an old Martello Tower |







The area is exposed and not : | HEALTH

suitable anchorage during rough | . aes
veather but normally it woul OF TH t 7K
onsiderably shorten the voyage ; :

between the two islands an | A fowl’s worst «

rethods of transportation to Cov another fowl

rington Village which is som

three and a half miles away mig bird is infected
then be improved. The offici:
vere conveyed to the villas
wagon and stayed five days th
house of the warden Mr, Clement}
Gomez.



worms. The only way &





vent the infection spreading }
through the flock is to mix
“Phenovis’ of
Phenothiazine into the mash
once a month.

-PHENOVIS”
BRAND PHENOTHIAZINE
An EC... Product.

ON SALE AT ALL DRUG STORES.
Messrs AS. BRYDEN & SONS (820s) LTD.—Agents.

<2

brand

Having disembarked the Govy-
ernment Officers the sloop con
inued her journey, finally arrivin
ix hours later at the customar
vharf which is in a_ sheltere
lagoon a great distance away, thu
howing the time and tanc¢
vhich might be saved if the pro
osed new landing is built



di





The primary object of the
ng engineers was to look t
Barbuda’s water supply systen
which in some ways is said to
more adequate than that
Antigua. There are a number
wells, some salt, and some suita
for human consumption, an





to the populace,
possibly extending it for irri
tion purposes on this island w!
is most susceptible to
droughts.

i\YOU MUST

|
ing|
: SEE THESE SPECIAL LINES!

prolonge

Interesting experiments e} SIMPLY AMAZING
now being carried out in Barbud VALUES!
with onions, tobacco and gree: : ante
vegetables. The, show great} e
|

promise, and irrigation is neces
sary if this island is to show exten
sive development Already this
year they have exported over thre
hundred bags of large sized pea-
nuts to Antigua, but thepg will have

SRINKLE
GEORGETTE

{

to cultivate this item mueh more in White, Black, Peach,
ee if a market js to be Blue, Green and Pink
sought.

: $1.88 yd.

Mr. Palmer’s visit was center¢ ®
on Barbuda’s school curriculun
and seeing the result of having ; ~
Government teacher econde SATIN BACK
from Antigua to that island intial
Anglican school “Holy Trinity” REPE

With the use of the Agricultural in Cerise, FPmerald
Department's projector, Mr and Turquoise
Palmer arranged three open ai ese

Yo) SLG6I

shows and Barbudans were affor
ed the opportunity of seeing sou 9
films of most recent news reel ,
documentary films from the Britis! SR ARKSKIN
Council, and films on. musi
dancing, comics, and agriculture White only
From all accounts these show $1.70 and $1.89 yd.
were enthusiastically received |
the inhabitants. e

It is hoped that Antiguan Gov
ernment Officers will now foll
up with visits to Barbuda a
would appear that Federal officer
more frequently avail themselves
of such opportunities.

HARRISONS

BROAD STREET

{ aoe











\ White Linen Guest Towels

Size 15 x 24 inches Each —

Size 15 x 22 inches Each

Hemmed Cotton Glass
Cloths



20 x 30 each_

—

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO,, LID.

10, 1l, 12 & 13 Broad Street



















LIGHT & POWER

TROUBLE FREE

INSTAL - -

“LISTE R’
ALTERNATOR SETS

1.75 K.W. DIESEL DRIVEN ALTERNATORS



: — ‘ ' oe
. 5 K.W. ” ” ”
. 10.5 K.W. ‘a * es
7) 16 K.W. Po ” ”
si 22 K.W. ” ” ”
| All complete with Switchboards and Automatic Voltage
x i Regulators.
% COMPLETE RANGE OF SPARE PARTS IN STOCK!
Anply -
4
y , y
8 TE BARBADOS FOUNDRY Led.
PHONE 4644 %!.» white Park Rosé “t Dial 4546
$$656056666604. Sanne mene 5 SSSA AO RSENS







MONEE RS oS esd

%
:
i
®
i »
t
“e
t
th
}





have
ine

PAGE TEN

Recentsarticles in these columnsz





MADAME

undeérlinea the popularity of *

local*school of Dancing and

the serviee which it provides toy, cal overtures and interludes.
ine : bY ml \

the youth! of our community. ' When Madame Bromova was

As has previously been noted 2 asked about her work, and het
we havee-seen from time to time training and experiences, she
signs of the progress which has&seemed more ready to talk about
been achieved by the school, and \Barbados and her pupils here. On
Madame Bromova and — ear te subjects she was almost
dents and pupils will give further} ;
ence of ‘ heir arOwens at a full, only to meet any of her pupils
t the Empire Thea-''and their parents to realise the

seals rect ; : a
tre on the afternoon and evening; aamiration and warm affection
of March 23. His Excellency the} which they feel for her.

Governor and Mrs, Savage have} On the subject of her own
) ted to the display|_ experiences it seems that Madame
siven under their patron-4Bromova came to take dancing as
na their Excellencies will be#a career almost’ by chance. The

}

being
age, :
present, with a small party off
guests, at the evening perform-;
ance.



$45,9596O6666" . -
OFF FOF

°
‘

OF

SPS SISSY

-

6S OCOHOS

“

SOOO SPO SOT TF

ORCC OO SOOO

PLL FI OF

la a ee

4 4 £,56606000'"
£59865 8S SO 8S OOOO 691%

~
GOO?

DF
KF

FRESH STOCKS CONSTANTLY ARRIVING






jeadmistress of St. Paul’s (Girl









n that on 1
yined one of the



ay iil provide the mi

STE ies



MOLLY RADCLIFFE w! hortly be ¢ ig f n Ei

7 +
f BROMOVA =

By A Correspondent





































lyrical in her praises, and one has

chool in London, where she was
Captain Raison and the) lucated, had singled her out as
Police Band (by kind permissionjg) future Physical Training anc
of Col. Michelin) with Miss La rames Mistr
com 1.RLAM., and Mrs, Benfield 1¢ object of tr

and it was wit
ining for that pro

shovi she

SUNDAY ADVOCATE









tian She was.also a member been a professor of the scholars of
a ane yany of which Madame the R.A.D,' since then. Besides
ag ballet mistress, and contributing periodically to the
series of perform- “Daneing Times“ she became a
vce ia London in aid of Sir member of the Education Com-
ea @toli’e War Seal Founda- mittee of the R.A.). in 1944, and
; helped to compile the Academy’s
“Ballet in Education — Children’s
Syllabus”. In 1936 and again in
1948 she toured Great Britain
teaching and demonstrating the
R.A.D. syllabus; and during the
last three years she has been on
the teaching staff of the R.A.D.
Teachers’ Training Course.

Latterly also and with Arnold
Haskell (the well known writer
on the ballet she has given Lec-
ture demonstrations all over Bri-
tain, including visits to the Uni-
versities of Bristol, Nottingham
and London.

With two such teachers there is
no reason to doubt the future
; prosperity and success of our
local ballet school. Madame Bro-
mova herself is shortly due to
leave for England for a well earn-
ed vacation. To say that she will
be missed would be a gross mus-
3 \ understatement but at least we

“. can be grateful to her fer all her

} efforts and for leaving the school
in such capable hands. Bon Voy-
age and a happy holiday—

Madame Bromova—our warmest |
MADAME BROMOVA—Going wishes and thanks go with you.









Oswald Stoll’s

icer were being increasingly
é ipon, and it was shortly
after the London run of “Valen-
ine’ ended that she founded a
school of Ballet in London, which
continued right up to 1939 when
i she decided io retire.

Anxiety

For the purpose of this account,
the years of World War II are not
important. Apart from interest-
ing herself in the development of
i ballet in) America, during 1944
when she was in Washington D.C.,
it was not until she came to Bar-
bados, early in 1945, that Madame
Bromova had any thought or in-
tention of resuming her activities
as a feacher. The fact that she
did so was largely due to the sug-
gestion and insistence of Howard
Hayden our former Director of
Education. She has persisted be-
causé she has found the effort
appreciated and the achievements

‘elt worth while.

Her main anxiety now is to en-.
sure that the work will be carriec
on. With this in view, and to
ensure the continuity of the school
and the maintenance of its stand-
ards and traditions, Madame Bro : Air ee
mova has at last been able tcp,! ~~ ae homes for

, * ™ s “ iti 7} $ aac sablead war veterans. ;
MOLLY RADCLIFFE—Coming. see Oe seed wed tally Molly Radeliffe’s real teaching
Physical Training Academies. It qualified teacher from Britain ’ career See in are ore ee
as there that she displayed egThe latter’s professional name is, Was Assis! ant e! i ~ hea
atural talent and love for danc-fMolly Radcliffe, and she is ex- ‘arsavina in her London. School.

ing, and within a comparatively#ipected to arrive here with herg| In i ie a Cathedral
short time found herself on the®small family about the end ofm/by the Royal Acagem &

arst sylle A LARGE and appreciative
ching stz F the e i i 4to conduct the first syllabus ex- | ||. :
Then iosna ante Peon A aily Radcliffe, like Madamefaminations ever held are eee de eres ie |
paid one of her rare visits to Lon-\{Bromova net was wea LEE ee im Balen ine Savage listened on Monday after—
1 Needless to say Anna Bro-trained in the Russian tradition, S eee oe ay ntiee attiay is
in those few weeks, dicftin fact one of her masters wastqing in 1936, with tht Coe a CV. °. gy va th en
se but live at Covent Gar-@Serge Morosoff of the pe ay - Theatre Li haus ones Recital in the Cathedral og
den and other theatres, and dreamt!Russian Ballet, a master and part- Yorks [heatre, oncom. a 4 " vas “4 ane % ‘orm
all night about the ballet. Mor &ner of Madame Bromova herself.« From 1936, Molly ee has wien “ane o ave” seed il,
sractically however, she also man-tqIncidentally, Molly Radcliffe came4 concentrated on teaching and an - d was given, above all,
pri aus 5 ‘ a-§ 6 Madame Bromova as a very! examination work, as well as With exquisite taste and restraint,


































Fei







Dr. Harris’s Organ
Recital At The







aged to secure an audition with‘ ; sachs] dl ceed

Michael! Mordkin, then Anne:?young dancer for lessons and pro- best advantage as a musical
> 73'e ar ar s , es 24 iz . > 7

aoe ore yg BS ah z4Â¥ instrument, and not as a jugger-
> Ww weeks CE e a 1iembde oO

root lich
Killed in

Pain and Itching

Stopped in
7 Minutes |



4p


















Do your feet itch so badly that they
nearly drive you crazy? Does the skin
on your feet crack and peel? Are there
blisters between your toes and on the
‘our feet? Do these bilsters
run and cause more blisters
to form? Do your feet get so sore at
times that they actually bleed? If you
suffer from these foot troubles,
should realize that the real cause is a
germ or fungus and that
get rid of your trouble until you kill the
erms or parasites responsible for the

Kills the Cause

Ordinary ointments and Naquids can
not do much good because they do not
fight or kill the underlying cause of
your tronble, Fortunately it at Inst is
possible to overcome these foot troubles
and also even the most stubborn ring-
worm infection with the doctor’s pre-
scription Nixoderm—based on the pre-
scription of a famous English skin spe-
cialist and now im
chemists. Nixoderm
anteed to end your foot trouble, and
has these 3 definite actions: 1. It kills
the germs, parasites, and fungus re-

clear, and sm











Get Nixoderm

morning. In 4
have killed add

| fungus responsii
and you can see Be
skin rapidly is i









smooth, and heal
just 3 days long
results are com)
at the end of t i,
not completely rid h UF Tee
ing, peeling, bee +
derm will cost not
antee all you havi
derm to the test f
not completely ga‘
merely return the
your money will be *
from your chemist todays
guarantee protects you,










orted by leading
positively guar-



e ballet of a Compans
Viichael Mordkin later took

North America. This tour last
ed over two years, and the ball
visited over 100 towns in tl
United States, Mexico and Canad:

Madame Bromova joined t
Theodore Kosloff Ballet : 1 prin-
cipal dancer, subsequently joinin
the Imperial Russia Ballet und
the maestro Cecchetti and
great manager and _ impresari
Serge Diaghilev Those were the
days of Karsavina, Lopokové
Nijinsky — names which will b
known to all ballet fans.
Disappointment

Then came < eat disappoint
ment. The Imperial Ballet due f
a tour in South America
Madame Bromova was una
persuade her parents to let h
Rejoining the Theocore K
Company she was soon off ¢
tour of Europe but World War I
intervened and with a em
nant of the company she
to get back safely to Ey i ‘
nothing worse than the lost «
most of her personal belongin;
and all hertage dresses and othe
effects.

The small remnant of this Ballet
formed the nucleus of another
Company, sponsored by Sir Os-
vald Stoll, one of the chief thea-











= .tre owners i London, and a series

‘of ballets were produced during
the war. At that period also
,Madame Bromova produced anc

fyappeared as the principal dancer
pjin the ballet of a musical operetta

called “Valentine” at the St. James
Theatre in London ;but she found
that her services as a teacher and





COSMETIC BAGS and FINE POWDER PUFFS
CIGARETTE TUBES PIPES VACUO FLASKS
DARLEY’S CONDITION POWDER for Horses

CALL in at:--

reo

COSMOPOLITAN PHARMACY

Day Phones 2041 — 4441 as NIGHT 81-41




44 BHOOGS6O" BEEGt ..
LPP FEF SEEPS EFF SSO SSSG

PROTECT

HOME

WAY!



THIS

investment by using

ATLAS “A’
Wood Preservative

Obtainable from
‘ >A niup > .
tHE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
‘ f Ltd., | ‘

Br ge ae

vu:

ote

PSPS

oe

SOOOCOOOL

|
On her return to tee

over, ave iiauled on Goodyear



SERGE MOROSOFF AND ANNA BROMOVA in “Hungarian
Rhapsody,” at the Coliseum Theatre, London.



i
writing and lecturing and she has thus showing the organ to the }
(




naut capable of over-riding all
sense of musical feeling and
dignity.

Dr. Harris was a pupil of that
great teacher and musical giant
Sir Walter Parratt, whom, even-
tually, he succeedéd at Windsor.
Listening to the recital on Mon-
day I was irresistably reminded
of that great master’s impeccable
neatness and delicacy of execu-
tion

it was a happy thought to fol
low the G major Preiude witi
the ‘Jig’ Fugue, a jolly wor,
evidently composed by Bach
when he had his ‘wig off’,

It is difficult to single out an;
cone item above others, but tne
‘Larghetto’ of Mozart, and a
delicate little fancy ‘Toccatina
for the Flutes’ by Pietro Yx
(played, incidentally, entirely on
the Chancel Organ) were a sheer
joy to listen to.

Spec'al mention must be madi
of Dr, Harris’s extremely effective
registrations which were indeea,
a model of what such should be
The two new stops, the Zauver-
flote—given by Mrs. Hahnemann
Bayley — and the Nazard were
used for the first time at a reci-
tal, and full use was made of
them by the performer.

Dr. Warris was delighted to
find so excellent an instrument
in Barbados, thougi he had
already been shown the Spec’fi-
cation in London, and he ex
pressed the hope that he would,
one day, be able to give another
recital—a hope that it is certain
that all who heard him on this
occasion will share.



Check these four Distinctive Fe
Also Available from Steck:





1. It's
Thorough

more

+

2. Its kinder

to Carpets











@ FLOOR POLISHES



+



AGENTS.



G. B.












Leadership in Lubrication

VACUUM CLEANERS
& FLOOR POLISHERS ©

atures of the Model Ray

4d. It's

Conv





Also Available from Stock:

@® BARREL TYPE CLEANER
® “VACTRIC” HAND DUSTER

P. MUSSON. SON & CO, LTD)



giant tires thai on any other make!

Por maximum mileage and winimum








specially desi:ned to meet your needs.
They are ext:.-tough —last longest —
have greater b/owout resistance. See
your Goodyexr dealer now for the
world’s fines! giant tires,

cost-per-mile, these famous Goodyear
work tires are unequaled. Whatever
the road—whatever the }oad—you are
certain to find a Goodyear giant tire

HI-MILER ALL. WEATHER



ry 66,667
txt, OCP IGCOOOSS

PEPSPLES ESS?

tt

66% 4%

PCOS

4.4 fteptsttet,

GOGO

bb tot
PLS






Other super-stamina Goodyear
work tires are: Hard Rock Lug

-Road Lug — Studded Sure-
Grip — Hi-Miler Xtra Tred





HI-AILER RIB

PNs

tm anamne|
ee Seman





RIOIIOOOIOKK

Trans-atlantic

Between September 1941 and February 1946 British Overseas

Airways Corporation made 2,000 crossings of the North

Atlantic, most difficult trans-ocean air-route in the world.

This regular two-way service has been maintained in all
, Weathers and has carried some 21,000 passengers safely to

their destination. The resource and pioneering spirit of the
* men who made this trans-atlantic ferry service a reality are
, Matched by the skill and ingenuity of the chemists and
lubrication engineers who produced AeroShell which
y B.O.A.C. trane-atlantic aircraft use exclusively for aircraft
engine lubrication om this route.

























hou Eni Lai
pySes U.S.

a From Page 1.
Ee puppet Bao Dai, Syng-
n Quirino in un-
sae onal independ-

nts of the Demo-
chlic of co of
i the Philippines.
» = rid them-
: can Aid, things
x for Chiaa, _
independent.

— cag panes for the
hole world, es-

ye people of the col-
. been selected or
sted as objects of ag~
‘American imperial-

s of the fae ee
attled the Asian

0 on must
tered with by such,
sts, as Ache-
y on the other side
ocean.” —Reuter

a fi

























12ns

Page 1.

its plans for a
strike will not

tion, unless the
ithout the consent

on is holding an emer-
National Congress to-mor-
4; National Congress of the

‘Party—Belgium’s second
shes also been called for
he Socialists are opposed
‘King’s return.
‘Flemish provinces, where
n generally favours
es return, King Leopold
â„¢ per cent of the votes.
nia, where the population
lly opposed to the King,
of the votes cast were in

yr—Reuter.













Salt From
Prune

Correspo:
BONDON (By Mail)
Island, one of the Gren-
roup, is to receive £2,500
t of the salt
rthere and of its next-
hbour, Canouan island.
y will come as an in-~
loan to the colony of
pent from Colonial Devel-

















































funds.

fincent-imports salt -

present, and as the fish-
y is being expanded a

mater local supply of salt

opment of the Prune
industry is intended to
necesary salt. It will
ned from evaporating sea
large shallow pans.

dard Goes Up

Advocate Correspondent)

KINGSTON (By Méfi).

in the standard of the
local Examinations,
Teinstitution of vhe
mvice Entrance Examina-
ih'a proviso that holders
tal certificate as well as
j ing the Higher
pCetlificate would be eli-
the service, has been
by the Board of Edu-



Medas a long-term plan,

serve to make employ -
vil Service possible
Students who have
4 secondary schoo!

mind me—I’m
oy Rag on local

You Take

Suffering NOW
your Head ACHES
— your Spirits are
; w NERVE
» i you are
=PLESS, restiess
, you must
- Vite without








‘AST-VITE







B nay, MARCH 19, 1950
T ,



nee

Cocoa Producers
Will Get Rise

(Parbados Advocate Correspondent)
KINGSTON
Producers of coffee and cocoa
are, according to reports in cir-
culation about to get an increase (Barbados Ady
in prices. In the case of coffee KINGSTON.
which is now selling at roughly | The Rt.

Jamaiea
Enthroned

oeate Correspondent).
Jamaica, (By Mail).
Rev. Basil Montague

300% below world prices, the Dale, M.A., was
x \ py 4.44., Was enthroned us Lord
growers are expected to get Bishop of Jamaica in the ancient

about double the 614d. per Ib. they Cathedral at s
a ontting pearl while there will terday
also a substantial inerease in after his arrival from E

5 ‘ his a ) nglan

a tte Phe world with his wife ana son =
i e Canadian market is His Excellency the G overn

io : “ ) or

Tt ane shillings for 100 Sir John Huggins G.CMG. was

my overnment is still paying at the service which was also at-

4 ae” Gas = yer tended by dignitaries of the
. n ys the Church, inister: 3

coffee at this price on behalf of pituthameaedieee. ot state “and

the British Ministry of F ne

: a h is. i is
the contract is to last for another en lace” creeper ae ee

two years—who in turn sells it :
to Canada at sky prices, keeping sibility aha Of the vast respon-
sibility which rested on him and

the profits.
e profits asked their prayers and help in
the days to come. Stressing the
continuity of the purpose of the
Church, he called upon all men
of God, and all who ought to be
men of God, to rise up and serve
the King of Kings.

panish Town yes-
afternoon a few hours



e . »

Comic Study

(Barbados Advocate Correspon”’

KINGSTON.
Government has set up a Com-
mittee to study the importat‘on
of comics into the island, as a
result of a resolution proposed



W.I. And British

by the Hen Douglas Judah and ’ e e
accepted by the old Legislative Indus rT’ ha

Council. Mr. H. H. Houghton, u woe Fe -
Director of Education is the (From Our Own Correspondent)
Chairman.

LONDON (By Mail)
Once again Barbados will not
be represented in the West Indies
section of the British Industries
Fair which is to be held simul-
taneously this year at Olympia,
London, and Castle Bromwich, in
the Mislands, from May 8th to
(Barbados Advocate Correspondent) 19th. For the first time since the
: KINGSTON. war however, there will be ex-
Jamaica’ biggest market — the hibits from St. Vincent; and Bri-
Coronation Market in J6:stern tish Guiana will be represented
Kingston—is to be closed down for the first time since 1947.
after a month’s notice to allow The Commonwealth section at
the reconstruction work, which Earls Court in which the B.W.I.
is absolutely necessary, to be exhibits will be housed will oc-
carried out. The enormous cupy 7,000 square feet. Of this
quantity of country produce area 999 feet have been allotted
which is sold at this market will to British West Indian colonies .
be distributed to the four other This allocation comprises 749 feet
markets in the Corporate Area. which will be arranged by the

ae India Committee on behalf
, of the islands, and 250 square feet
Calver Wants

12 More Women



Close Down
Jamaica Market



in which the Colonial Develop-
ment Corporation will stage an
exhibition on behal* of British
Guiana. :
(Barbados Advocate Correspondent) The Trinidad and Tobago stand
KINGSTON. will measure 250 square feet
Police Commissioner Calver Jamaica will have also ‘the same
announced yesterday that as soon area and the Windward Islands
as the Government’s approval Will have 137 square feet. A
for the addition of twelve more Slightly smaller area of 112 square
policewomen to vhe Jamaica Con- feet will be taken over by the
stabulary is received, the selec- West Indian Sea Island Cotton
tion will be made from candi- Association.
dates already on the waiting list The British Guiana exhibit will
having satisfied the examiners, feature forest products, bauxite,
So far there are three policewomen sugar and rum.
in the island. One Coropral and Final exhibits for the othe
two constables, all of whom are stalls have not yet been arranged
doing very good work.





Cube Costs
£34,000

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON (By Mail)
“Mr. Cube” may have cost his

Trade Disputes Mr.

Board Set Up

(Barbados Advacate Correspondent)
KINGSTON.
Government has set up a Board

to inquire inte trade a sputes. inventors somewhere arouna
The Hon. H. V. Alexander, £34,000 up to last October wnen
C.B.E., Privy Councillor and the financial year ended, The full
Solicitor is the Chairman. The report of Tate & Lyle’s accounts

other members being the Hon,
F. V. Grosett, Custos of Port-
land, who is also a solicitor and
Mr. Rudolf Burke, President of
the Jamaica Agricultural Society.
The Board has been set up
under the Trade Disputes (Arbi-
tration and Enquiry Law) and
the terms of reference are: “To
inquire into the present position The accounts reveal that the
in regard to representational total assets of the company havc
disputes between Trade Unions expanded by £1,649,196 vo £23,-
and to make representations for 791,845. Current assets total £12,-
the provision of machinery for; 659,997 against liabilities of £58,-
the settlement of such disputes.") 436,328, leaving net surplus as-
f sets at £4,223,669.
4 The trading profit of the grou;
b

published this week show that ad-
vertising expenditure rose from
£13,380 in 1948 to £47,217 in
1949, As last year’s expenditure
included the company’s anti-na-
tionalisation campagn, it seems
reasonable to assume, therefore,
that the rise in costs is due fo tne
activities of Mr. Cube,



amounted to £4,381,976, a decreas~
of £243,171 compared with the
previous year, At 54s 6d the 15s.
ordinary units yield nearly 5 per
18 per cent dividend

Milk Up One Penny
In B.G. )

racent on an
4 basis,







(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Mar, 15, Development in Jamaica i:
Government has approved Olffshown on the balance sheet to
an increase in the retail price ofjjhave amounted to £34,301, com
milk from 8 cents per pint tO4pared with £853,817 in 1948. The
10 cents per pint affec-ifhigher amount in the previous
tive from Thursday, March 16.fyear was due to the constructio
This higher price is intended, injfof the Monymusk sugar factory

particular, to off-set increasingy|completed last summer.
costs of production, in the case The effect of the “hiving off”
of farmers feeding their cows orfflast year of the company’s asset:
balanced rations containing im-"Jinto Tate & Lyle Investments an
ported and other feeding stuffs @Silvertown Services has not been
the prices of which have risen int reflected in the balance sheet ana
consequence of devaluation off profit and loss account. The re
sterling and other factors. onstruction was carried through
—C.N.S. Ssince the date of the report.

QUICK RELIEF
FROM ——~
HEADACHES
NEURALGIA
NERVE PAINS
RHEUMATIC PAINS
SLEEPLESSNESS











inspi
From Paris

Evening in





A
f\





as



Bishop. Of * Aiding Safe |
' Navigation |

, Barbados



with LIPSTICK

the newest, smartest, make-up shades which inspire

from five flattering tones, delicate rose red to

oT ROUGE ©
___% BOURTSIS <

Also Evening in Paris Porfum

Cold Cream — Vanishing

\ Hriiiantine Cream

: ‘
Be certain vou get Irving § V2 —
Yeast-Vi :

uname Ne ; LS

‘ eg NEN rnp ger teen

i ki a a 7 ai i a a



SUNDAY ADVOCATE







orem

Advocate Correspondent

GEORGELOWN ( By’ Mail)

A FOUR-PILE beacon with
red and white steel structure, has |
been established at the enirance |
to the Waini River, northwestern |
point of British Guiana border- |
ing Venezuela, 5 miles Nortti|
(True) off the Waini Point ai|
Latitude 8 33’ N., Longitude 59!
54° W., and in 9 feet of water. |

The establishment of the Waini |
Beacon is part of a Plan of the}
Transport and Harbours Depart- |
ment to light the entire seaboard
of the Colony from the Waini to|
the Corentyne.

\

1. It gives a brighter
sh'nein halfthetime. \
2. Its waxes keep the
leather soft and
supple.

3. It puts back the
original colour into
the leather,

The Waini Beacon is visible | fa
114 miles away and. gives a| The a Shoe Polish
white flash every 12 seconds. | ,
The height of the light is 38} Nine colours available : KIWI BLACK, DARK

feet above High Water Spring |
Tides, and mariners are warned |

TAN, MID TAN, TAN, BROWN, OX BLOOD



to Keep not less than quarter & MAHOGANY —with BLUE & TRANSPARENT
mile to the eastward of this! pir inutors especially for Ladies’ Shoes.
Sacer, ween approaching the THE GENERAL AGENCY CO. (BARBADOS) LTD., P.O. BOX 27, BRIDGETOWN
é iver, )
At the mouth of the Pom-

eroon River the Department has
placed a red conical Buoy whieh |
exhibits a white light, flashing |
every 7 seconds. This buoy is|
situate off the mouth of the!
Pomeroon in Latitude 7 394 N.,
and Longitude 58 45° W.



e.
In Keeping
In keeping with the Depart-|
ment’s safe navigation pro- |
gramme, four new Fairway buoys
have been imported and wis]
shortly be established outside the ,

entrance to the Essequibo, Dem- |

erara and Berbice Rivers. These
néw buoys will be seen from a}
farther distance than the buoys |

Phensie !

When you feel stiff with pain and
every movement makes you want

presently in use. One of the buoys |
will be kept in reserve to meet|
any emergency. For the present |
it is not decided to place one at}
the entrance to the

Corentyne |
- traffic here does not warrant | to cry out--remember Phensic!
it. . ;

Two Leading Marks will also| Phensic will quickly ease and
be placed at the entrance to the} soothe the agony, lift pain-caused
Berbice River to enable ships, | firtinn winapienet tiie amar
particularly bauxite vessels, to} atigue, remove the weariness.

leave and enter in safety at the}
highest tides which generally oc- |
cur in the early hours of the!
morning,

The Department also contem-j;
plates the early establishment of
a Radio Beacon at the Light Ves- |
sel at the entrance to Port George- |
town or at the Lighthouse ashore. |
This will enable ships entering |
the Port to get wireless bearings. |

When the programme is com- }
pleted British Guiana’s entire
seaboard will be lighted and the]
standard of efficiency in navi-
gating ships will be equal to}
that existing in most first-class
countries,

In addition to lighting the sea-
board it is ‘planned to lay down
leading marks at strategic points
along the Essequibo River which
will ensure , greater safety for
vessels using the river, especial-

}
|

Phensic neither harms the heart
nor upsets the stomach. Be pre-
pared for sudden pain—keep a
supply of Phensic handy,





ic
for quick, speedy relief

FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO,
NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, INFLUENZA, COLDS & CHILLS





-- LOVELY==
Luscious

* EASTER
EGGS”

ly oceangoing ships transporting
timber overseas.



New York Sends
Flood Relief:

(Prrbados Advocate Correspondent) i
GEOVTETOWN (By Mail).
A CHEQUE for $100.00 )
Currency) has been received by |}
the League of Colcured Peoples |}
from the British Guiana Emer- x
gency Flood Relief Committee of |)

(U.S. }))
)
\
New York of which Dr. E. H |{}

In var1ous s12ZéeS... .
Bruyning is Secretary. The
cheque has been handed over te
the Mayor’s Central Flood Re-

lief Fund. enjoy it .



Soil Survey Ends:

We also have a large Selection of CONFECTIONERY,
CHOCOLATES in Fancy Gift Boxes

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN (By Mail).

Mr. C. F. CHARTER, Chief
Soil _ Chemist of the Department |
of Agriculture, Gold Coast, v

FANCY
vho
has been looking into the suite |
)

BISCUITS ....in Small & Large Tins.
Ete., Ete.



ability of soils and climate of the |
Potaro River District
Colony on Tuesday. During
stay here he took soil sample

from various parts of the dis-
vriet but the data collected is still
under consideration.

These items are ideal for that EASTER PICNIC, or

— WEEKEND.

the |

his | - . ae

Obtainable at



1 . ‘

Treasury Bills a

(Barbados Advocate Correspon«
KINGSTON
Government is inviting sub-|
scription to another issue of |
Treasury Bills to be made on }
|
|

BOOKER'S eos) DRUG STORES LTD.

April 1. Bills will be sold to the (ALPHA PHARMACY)
public at £99.

three months later

Broad Street and Hastings
12. 6. redeemabl

}
Give the Kiddies a real treat this EASTER, they will
t

at £100. |



@ ov
i—

=every hour





of the day (



SHADES
red by PARIS!

fashion centré of the world

When everyone else is hot and bothered you will
fascinate by your freshness — if you do this. After your
bath or bathe, shower yourself all over with Cashmere

come

Paris Lipstick and Rouge. Choose

Bouquet Taleum Powder. Its magie touch will turn your

skin to silk : clothe you in a cool, protecting film. that
glamorous purple red . . . in Lipstick that goes on keeps you daintily fresh all day | Its deli orfi
anil, thins Oh enduringly | aad ie Rouge thet seeps you daintuly fresh all day ong. 8 delicate perfume
blends beautifully to accent the smoothness of will add new and subtle charm to your whole personality.
skin and powder. Both are magic beauty aids For Cashmere Bouquet is the Taleum Powder with the
ivy the master hand of Boarjois. fragravce men love.

alarws

‘|| Cashmere Bouquet
LIPSTICK I

ALS en

4 — Pereder



POWDER





|
|





pa




within your reach always

|





PAGE ELEVEN

Tee

VAL

Alka-Seltzer brings pleasant relief

Alka-Seltzer gives you the quick
relief you want PLUS the alka-

lizer you need when overeating

causes excess gastric acidity. Drop
one or two tablets in a glass of
water —
down. It’s reliable First Aid. Pleas-
ant-tasting. Not a laxative: Alka-
Seltzer makes you feel fine fast.

Alka-

MILES

Gift Sizo....
Goya Handbag Phial 1/9

Go yY

Qistr







A

butors: |. M. B

Yes,

watch it fizz, then drink it

LABORATORIES '

ms
A

XX

h fragrance of an expensive perfume is within easy

ow Goya puts his perfumes into tiny handbag

m, voluptuous No. 5;

mood; romantic

ay-going

1; sparkling, open-air Goya Heather.

vos 2.8.1

INO STREET

sgt







‘soaping” your hair with even finest

liquid or cream shampoos hides its natural
lustre with dulling soap film.

Halo

contains no soap or sticky oils

nothing to dull your hair’s natural lustre, With

mering highlights.

very first shampoo, Halo brings out shim-
Its fragrance lather rinses

away quickly in any kind of water —needs no

alter~

rinse, For|hair that’s lustrous, use Halo.

AMERICAS B/6CEST SELLING SHAMPOO

Tubes of
12 & 30 tablets.

296 Fe

| iv LUXURY
PERFUME



Great Expectations

bitter-sweet









eltze

U.S.A







* LONDON + wW.:
Meyers & Co, Ltd. P.O, Bow 171 Bridgetown



“ Soaping ” dulls hair —

HALO jloripes t/







In America, Halo outsells all other shampoos. The reason ? American
vomen have proved only Halo gives hair such natural radiance.

HALO reveals the hidden beauty of your hair



98"
28"

26"





—"
——

ONCE AGAIN
THEY ARE HERE

DUNLOP

x 14"
x 1}"

x 1}" Racing Tyres

+

Cream Roadster Tyres

Pink Roadster Tyres

ECKSTEIN BROS.

DIAL 4269

BAY STREET





PAGE TWELVE



reasonable that where suitable
houses are not readily procurable
the Government should relieve its
officers of the anxiety of finding
accommodation for themselves
end should provide quarvers; but
cfficers may properly be expected

HE publication of this
Report by the Commis-
sion on the Unification of
the Public Services in the
British Caribbean Area,

continues here to-day. Jt to pay rent for such yuarters and
has been published daily jyej; salaries should be fixed on
since its release, a week ago, ‘his assumption.”

and will be continued until No Business
completed, It no business of ours t

recommend the adoption of’ this
urrangement in cases where ic
does not already obtain, but | it
is our concern to emphasize the



The Report reads ;—
We have already pointed out that
such diversity places no obstacle







inte way of transterabilsty, ointmade by the Secretary
fication, and»we do not‘for a.mo- ~ te that a housing shortage do®
ment doubt that the coureé ‘of °°t absolve a Goverriment from
rigdom les in acceptance of di- seeing that its officers are pro

erly housed. Where th's is not

versity rather than in any attemp! *

“ity ) y at or ee » effecte oe
to force diverse elements into e fer or aatese or Gurernthes
srocruste ed 0: iformity. : r Ree tee
procrustean bed of uni : igainst the payment of rent, w
















Unification of



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Ct

(i) If Government accommoda-
tion becomes available, the offi
er may at any time be directe
to occupy it, and if he decline:
to occupy it, the allowance i
respect of his rented accommo
dation should be stopped

(ii) The seale of accommoda-
tion occupied and its rent shoud
be approved by the Government

(iii) If the officer sub-lets part
of his accommodation or ‘other-
wise gives permanent accommc -
dat-on to persons other than his
wife, children, dependents,
servants, a reduction of two-fift’
of the rent should be assumed
On claiming the full allowance
the officer should certify that none
he accommodation is sub-ict
regularly occupied otherwis:
ban by himself and his fam 1

Following the lines of thes
provisions, we do not consider the‘

ant





ol




















0) NE p OSE of this famous remedy

After Meals

If you suffer from In-
digestion with its pain,



discomfort, flatulence,
nausea and heartburn
~let one dose of
MACLEAN BRAND
STOMACH POWDER

ou rehel

But







tonic

7 HROUGHOUT the world, for
many years, PHOSFERINE has
been regarded as an indispensable tonic
for the weak and ailing, the convalescent
and the ruh-down, PHOSFERINE
hastens the rerurn to full health and
strength. It revives the appetite, restores
“| _ vitality, replaces lost confidence. If you
i are feeling nervy or out-of-sorts make
%| up your mind to try PHOSFERINE
) You'll be feeling better in
= Y no time!

PHOSEERIN
ewWwue & GG ihe
THE

iONIGS

scion,

& 4 &

Ora VF

‘sie





is everyone’s | to Beduce

» suc int 2 leu ltic Soha
creat mi ee ae rte « recommend ‘that the additional it should be difficult for the Gov
to examine the.other more im- °°? above 10 per cent of an ofi- crnments concerned to safeguard
portant conditions of service SCT ® salary involved in eeee themselves against an officers «
housing, vacation leave, p ge an ut furnished house s ould De travagance or collusi( nh wit!
pensions, and the retiring e, borne by Government Where a landlord, or his taking unfair
indeed, the only obstacle in the {Urnished accommodation is en- advantage of the concession
way of uniformity lies in gaged, the cost to be borne | Whatever may be the difficulties,
possible unwillingness on thi Government should be the differ- we regard acceptance of our re-
of some Governments t cnee between the actuel rent a commendation in this matter as
the additional expenditure w' a9 per cen o the al s ee bs ing a sine qua non of the uni
acceptance of our proposals wot Where an officer ta eee ce - fieation of services.
involve. While any depar SERGE") ath. 8 hotel or ns The detail of the rules govern-
frorn uniformity in the corfdit « house,” the Government shoul ing vacation leave and the mini-
of service we have mentic determine what proportion of the mnm period which an officer has
would pro tanto impede freed charge paid should be allocat to serve before he may be granted
of transfer ‘between one” cole to rent. It is clear, of course, t vacation leave varies from colony
and another, we do not sugge certain safeguards will be nec¢ to colony, but the following state-
that unification should be hel ary in this matter, and we 1 ment indicates the broad effect of
until all the Governments ha mend that they should be the main provisions in this re-
ome into line on all these m follows: — pect:—
ters. There is, however, 0 eas
problem for wh.ch a common sol CLASS OF OFFICER Vacation leave Minimun
tion musi’ be found before ur leave earned accumulative length of
fication can be regarded a ’ es ip to
practical proposition, and that Barbados
the problem of enabling office) Officer re , 6 months 2 year
transferred from one colony laos ius
another to obtain living acc British Gui :
modatien on reasonable tern OMmce a fi iths 2 year
Houses t os .
Thréughout the West In ilies pee
t} provision of official quar I 3 yes
or an- allowance in lieu of (
ters i§ “the exception rath ee et .
rule. ‘T ate iritish Honduras days p 180 day » ve
cultic ( 6 mor
ri hou eee ree oes Serer ae he te pa
m
onies Jaron .
house 1 o , : : “ 1% month 6 month ! year
1 per ann
nouses
pron Y not exceeding £325 | 4 weel 16 v
aS 1 7 w €
the efficacy weal
prohibitively high but house al
renting a1 nobtainable, In P idles
of-Spain and in Georgetoy a Isla © Domin Suneiid
mp) ‘ re informe eave 108
from the question of week da day
d, vacant he
are ne be found. In Kingst 48 cal- les '
houses can be found but onl endar days peri
a rent beyond an officer's me per ann :
We have had evidence tl :
of the most senior officials of . iieiobeiies
Government of Jamaica ha i lad Voba Vacation
live in a hotel for some two ye 1s Gide oes 180 da Aon teaiete
before he vas pl ‘d with ane an }
cial quarters, because no sulta at
private house could be had at
rent bearing a fair re ion ¢ pe oe
to his not inconsiderable ila Yindwakd feiand pling Dominica) ' n
It is clear to us tt +
circumstances in fi ——__—_——
vice ‘ be ated ve the ve ul mulated up to. eight
f f n, o el r We have no doubt that
or t earn one re favourable rate at which
he ‘ i I 1 ke e leave earned in British Guiana
ot ‘ h may be nd British Honduras is justified
mum ¢ climatic conditions. We there-
. { of for wre do not recommend that it
i I hould be reduced to that obtain
7 ; er ay ing in the majority of the colonies
aor eS ce, in British Guiana and Britis! There are a number of minor
V the quest ot Honduras, howeve the 1 re differences in the provision
" en stated in paragrap! fficers earn leave at the adopted by the several colonies
(: f Colonial No 197 ir rate of two months a year, but For example, the leave rules in
f ng terms: “The pract hile in British Guiana tl le force in the Leeward Islands and
I iding free quarters to cert n be a nulated up to the in Dominica are peculiai It is
cl € of officers should be ti dinar maximun namel i not easy to gauge their exact
continued where it exists. It : n British Honduras it can effect, though we are informed by

Ai the first sign of a cough,
sneeze or sniffle, rub chest,
back and throat with doul'e-
action Thermogene Medicaied
Rub. This penetrative, vapour-
ising ointment will give speedy
relief from Head Colds, Catia:
Bronchial Congestion, Couglis
and Rheumalic Pains, and
check them: at the start. You
Medicaied
Rub is a real blessing!

say Thermogene







HMere’s an

Opportunity

your

Costs Considerably and at the
Maintain

same time

Efficiency

ruAT IS WHAT YOU OBTAIN FROM A

BEDFORD/SCAMMELL
TRACTORITRAILER

! Bedford

Witt l 1 sed
y

OURTESY











yfficers who have become adept in

the intricacies of the calculations
volved that the provisions are
slightiy more favourable than
those which ordinarily obtain.
1in, in some colonies leave is



‘i on years of service while in
it is based on months of
service; and in some cases the
rate of leave earned is expressed
in days of leave, in other weeks
and in others, months

f ve. There are also discrep-
anciés in the general rule to the
effect that an officer who has
earned his maximum amount of
leave but has been refused leave
earn additional leave until he
tad the leave for which he
d. We do not consider
» disparities are such as










that tes
to place any real obstacles in the
way of free transferability of
officers in’ unified services, and
on that account we have not
thought it necessary to tormu-
late standard conditions of ser-
vice in this respect.

We are, however, concerned to
see that an officer on transfer is

enabled to carry forward such
leave as he may have earned,
since it would not be equitable
that such an _ officer should
lose what leave is stana-
ing to his credit and should

have to start earning leave afres»
from the date of his transfer. We
therefore recommend that all the
colonies of the region should
agree to place to the credit of
officers who are transferred to
their service by the Public Service
Commission the amount of vaca-
tion leave which stands to their
credit at the time of their transfer.
This facility is generally allowed
as a matter of grace. In the in-
terest of a unified service, and in
conformity with paragraphs 95—
100 of Colonial Regulations, we
recommend that it should be uni-
versally accepted. Further, we
recommend that, for the purpose
if calculating the minimum length
f tour which the officer should
erve in the colony of his new
ippointment, the period which he

has already served in his former
lon hould be ‘trken into
count
Passages

We now turn to the subject of
passages in respect of an officer’s
first appointment, his transfer, and
1is vacation leave.

As regards passages on an offi
er’s first appointment or transfe!

linary Colonial practice is a
follows:

(i) an officer on first appoint-
ment to Government
service receives the reas-
onable travelling expens-
es of himself, his wife,
and not more than two
children; and
an officer on transfer re-
ceives the allowance pre-
scribed in Colonial Regu-
lations 95 to 100, namely,
a free passage for him-
self (by cheapest route)
and up to a total of four
passages besides his own
for his wife and children.

These arrangements are gencr-
ally followed in the Caribbean
vegion. We recommend that they
should be adopted in all cases. In
the category of officers on transfer
we should, of course, include the
serving officer’ who takes up hi
first appointment in a unified
service on transfer.

Related to the matter of passages
on transfer is the question of the
transport of vhe officer's effects,
Colonial Regulation 98 prescribes
that an officer who is transferred
from one colony to another shall
be granted a reasonable allowance
for the transport of his heavy bag-
gage (i.e., ordinary household ef-
fects ovher than furniture). In the







let that
COLD \
Jiake hold

wee



Highest

UNIT

€ $5,950. 00



GARAGI

White Park Roa

ublic Services Report |



majority of the colonies in the
Caribbean region, each case is de-
cided on its merits, and we think
that this method of approach is
more satisfactory than any arti-
ficial limitation based on weight
of effects or the cost of their trans-
port. We recommend, therefore,
tha’ the practice prescribed by
Regulation 98 should be adopted in
all cases.

We do not believe that these
recommendations can reason~
ably give rise to dispute. It is
in the matter of leave passage>
that we find more room for ar-
gument. It stands to reason that
officers in colonies which grant
leave passages would be reluc-
tant to accept transfer to col-
onies which do not do so. More -
over we are convinced that the
transferability of officers within
the region will be gravely im-
peded unless, under some un:
form rule, officers serving aw.y
from the colony of their ori:
are enabled to visit their homes
on leave from time to time. I!
this facility is not granted to
them, the smooth working of
unified services organised on «
regional basis will be jeopar-
dised.

Bur, as will be seen from the
statement given below, the present
practice in respect of leave pas-





sages varies widely and ranges
from that, of British Honduras,
where a “senior officer” and his

wife may avail themselves of free
passages vo the United Kingdom
ind back, to the opposite extreme
in several colonies where no assis

tance towards leave passages is
granted.
Provisions
Subject to the satisfaciion of

various conditions, the main pro-
visions adopted in this matter by
each colony are briefly as foliows:

Barbados: No leave passage
concessions are granted.

British Guiana: An officer in
receipt of a salary exceeding
$1,200 (£250) is eligibie for a
return passage te the United King-
dom at a cost not exceeding $672
(£140) once in two years,

British Honduras: An officer of
or above the grade of Firsv Clas:
Clerk (£363—- £452) and his wife
are eligible for return passages to
the United Kingdom once in two
years.

Jamaica: An expatriate officer is

eligible for a return passage to the
United Kingdom once in vhree
years. A local officer who has

com eted six years’ service and
who is in receipt of a salary of
£600 ($2,880) or more is eligible
for a return passage to the United
Kingdom once in every six years

Leeward Islanas: No leave pas-
sage concessions are granted.

Trinidad & Tobago: Senior
officers recruited from overseas
and local officers married to wives
who were not domiciled in the
colony at’ the time of marriage
are eligible for up to three return
edult passages to the home of the
officer or that of his wife as Jhe
case may be, afver a tour of two
and a half years. Local officers
other than the above are entitled
to return passage for themselves
only to the United Kingdom afte:
a vour of two and 4 half years, but
have the option of postponing
overseas vacation leave until the
end of a four-year tour, when they
are eligible for free family pas-
sages, at the rate of three adulv’
fares, to a country of the officers’
choice or to the United Kingdom.
provided the toval passage cost
does not exceed the cost of three
return adult fares to the United
Kingdom and the duravion of his
absence from the colony is not less
than 50% of the accumulated
leave, subject to a minimum of







a
“Headache’s gone...

I took GENASPRIN’”’
==

three months excluding passage
time,
windward Islands: No leave)

passage concessions are grantec.

Excepi in Jamaica and Trinidad
and Tobago, which have recently
drawn the distinction indicated |
between expatriates and non-ex-
patriates, the arrangements de-
scribed above make no distinction
between the officer of local origin
end the officer whose country
cf origin is elsewhere. To
our way of thinking, som
distinction should be drawn
ketween ine two classes of
officers, While the main purpose of
leave is recuperative, wica a view
to subsequent efficient service, tha
expairiaie takes leave partly to
this purpose and partly in order
to revisit the country of his cr:gin,

) visit his parents maybe, and 19
re-establish his old contacts and
friendships. We believe tha. leave
passage arrangements should take
account of this difference.

We wish to make it clear that
we are not concerned with thé
pcsicion only of expatriates from
the United Kingdom. We are
sneerned with expatriates in the
broader sense of a term coverins
officers of a Caribbean service who
are not serving in the colony or
country of their origin. It is ow
belief vnat, for example, an officer
from Barbados transferred for}
sevice in Jamaica is in no differ-|
ent position from that, say, of an
Englishman sent to serve in Trini-
dad, in respect of his need to»re-
turn to his birthplace now anda
‘nen,

As regards the officer serving in
his own colony, it has been repre-
sented to us that in certain of th
colonies, for example, British Gui-
ana and British Honduras, there
is no place within vhe colony
where an officer can have an en-
jioyable holiday away from the}
scene of his work. We consider
that there is justification for this
view, and that we should make a
recommeridation assisting officers
vo take a holiday away from their’ |
own colonies.

Local Descent

The point has aiso been put to
us that officers of local descent
should be given the opportunity ol
visiung the United Kingdom from
‘ime to time. In our view, it i¥|
desirable that such officers should,
be enabled to travel and so widen }










their experience. It is also de-};
sirable that they should see tor!
themselves the land which has;

hithervo had a guiding influence |
on their destinies, and that the|
unity of the Comomnwealth
should be maintained and
strengthened by vnis means. With
this proposition we believe that}
there can be no quarrel, The hesi-
tation we feel is not as read
the principle but as regards vne
extent of its application,

We have endeavoured to rei
~ecommendations -which take
count of these several points <
which fairly cover vhe_ varied
needs both of the expatriate «nd!
the non-expatriate officer. Our :e-
commendations are as follows

(i) An officer shall be entitled to
return. passages for himself and
his wife vo his country of origin |

ch
c= |
nd |

at the end of each tour of duty, | §




provided that the cost of thes;
passages does not exceed the cost
of revurn passages to the United
Kingdom. If his country of origin |
is a colony in the Caribbean region
other than that in which he is
serving, he may, in lieu of this |
concession, receive a return pas- |
sage to the United Kingdom for |



himself only. At vhe end of ever;
other tour of duty, he may, if he |
so elects, receive return passages |
for himself and his wife to the}
United Kincdom.

(To be continued).







No other shampoo gives you the
same magical LANOLIN-blend lather .. .

for beautiful, lustrous hair.

Tonight he can see new sheen in your hair,
FEEL its caressable softness. Yes, tonight. . .
if you use Lustre-Creme Shampoo today !
Only Lustre-Creme has this magical blend of
secret ingredients plus gentle lanolin, So
rich-lathering in hardest water. Leaves hair
ragrantly clean, shining, and so manageable,
Now on sale everywhere in the handsome blue and white jar,

{OT A SOAP! NOT A LIQUID! BUT A WONDERFUL NEW
DISCOVERY WITH LANOLIN FOR SOFT LUSTROUS G

100%
QUALITY

COLGATE-PALMOLIVE-PEET LTo

GASOLINE

100% BRITISH



Look for the Red White
& Blue Pump Globe |



*Ginasprin'—the safe brand of aspirin
— quickly checks Headaches, Tooth-
ache, Nerve and Rheumatic Pains, Colds
and "Flu. Also quickly helps to break a
fever. At any time of strain or pain,
‘Genasprin’ sees you through !

Sold by all Chemists, Druggists, ete.

The word ‘Genasprin’ is the registered trade mark of Genatosan Ltd., Loughborough, Er



gland,



















THE CITY GARAGE TRADING
BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

REPRESENTING THE GENERAL ELEC

















SUNDAY, MARCH us

t
Ty Lustre-Cremet

CREAM
“Anon al











3

VALUE

4

MANUFACTURED IN TRINIDAD BY TRINIDAD LEASEHOLDS LTD,

AGENTS:—

’ DA COSTA & CO., LTD
JAMES A. LYNCH & CO., LTD.

i

G.E.C. Li va
are well designed S
install. They will
time and effort,
relied upon tos
efficient
G.B.C, accesson
need, from mala
lampholder.

co, LID.

TRIC CO. LTD.» or EN 2





.

«NpAY, MARCH 19, 1950
sue et



Aarne SUNDAY ADVOCATE

ty Ben BY



CARL ANDERSON





tenn qnbene bac Weild riches reenel




- a

pili cil
= z j
aie to TOV PTHAT | a
‘ yw ic a ae

a

if PDOES |
iv)









MY GOODNess | (HET
WE NEED Just |p “~~

ABOUT EVERYTHING | NOW_ HOW ARE »)
"Wey Otay IN THE STORE | | WE GOING TO ~ 4
Him) -[ Gens TODAY , GET ALLTHIS } @82%
per“) HOME ? x BAA
ran 1} ae Pnsal x \
: tid ofS \.§
ae) 2A) As \
py i iD» \ Wa)
Yipes 7 ie weg

-
fh






—_ aL



wt)

; A N NON 7 ° e ®
" te [PUT ME DOWN BLAST
, You !You'LL PA



- « The
Meta + Aw
RA MN PH 4.25

a f { bf fag
| fo} 24

i

/
ff 4
) 1/4 9%
on &



Reicichle ef dine GReal £ i











JPLACE YHAT SHOULD
\ SE INTERESTING!
A

















MY FRIEND IS A
NICE COOLINGSâ„¢






ER ie
Ses

BY FRANK STRIKER

\\yO0"] | HEADING FOR CAMB TONTO DOESNT!
“| | SUSPECT TREACHERY FROM SANDY,

| |? I'LL OUTSMART THIS REDSKINIF I

3 (CAN SNEAK AWAY HIS KNIFE.

| & Sx

2














ee





OH-on!! MAGGIE’S }

SINGIN’ TEACHER!
ONE-TWO - THREE -
FOUR- FIVE -SIx-

ie

~—



re a
1! Vil] - TEN~ Now |
| I oan PSE. |
TTER:!
yy :
¢'\ *
(Wr
° 4
fe)
Carn



BY GOLLY-
DAUGHTER
MAY BE

RIGHT= LL.
Th TH'

RY IT TH
NEXT TIME/





SEVEN - EIGHT-
NINE --






-








D
Pamiie)) PARDON WE...HAVE YOU ) .

SEEN A SLIM, DAPPER






BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

Y{CANYOU MAKE A)] [A LOVE POTION? AH YES IMM [WEL No COMMENTS Wi
MIXTURE THAT | HAVE A SPECIAL REALLY, 88 GENERAL. ye

WILLMAKE ONE RECIPE “CACKLE- Seem NOTHIN

PERSON FALLIN LOVE. Zila RISE HAS,

WITH ANOTHER ? Bite

=
























|
|
|
|



SS

)
|
}





CASTROL

WORLD'S FIRST FOUR

)
Here's the Answer to Your Cane Haulage Problems

PAGE THIRTEEN

ee



SCORES AGAIN

Relentless itching—caused by germs undes
the skin, speedily develops into irritating
pimples and open sores unless checked.
Thousands of skin suffereis have proved
that there is nothing more sure in results

than D.D.D. Prescription. This famous
liquid healer does penetrate the tortured
skin tissues, attack the festering germs and
drive out the infection. Whatever form of
! skin trouble is giving you pain and distress
' | ~—- ECZEMA, PSORIASIS, BOILS,
|#| ERUPTIONS, PRICKLY HEAT,
MALARIA SORES or RINGWORM



just a few applications of wonderful
D.D.D. Prescription will give instant
relief. Persevere, and me good results
will be lasting! D,D.D. Prescription is
obtainable from chemists and stores
everywhere.



THE
Distributors :
F.B.Armstrong Ltd., Bridgetowr

DE HAVILLAND COMET D D BD
pPRESCRIPTIONS

ENGINED JET
LONDON/ROME|

LINER
LONDON

ESTABLISHED
USING

CASTROL

THERE IS A GRADE OF CASTROL For
EVERY MOTOR.

RECORD



For - - -
THREAD CUTTING
| WELDING
BATTERY CHARGING
th METAL TURNING
| MOTOR REPAIRS
|

See —

GURDON BOLDEN
BARBADOS GARAGE,

130, Roebuck St. : Dial 3671



MARKHAM CANE CARTS |

LOW COST —— LOW MAINTENANCE i

CHEAPER TO OPERATE i

EASY HAULING IN WET WEATHER







® }
i 4/5 Von Carts with i a $1.250.00 each |
! * Carte ‘and Tiacters $41.150.00 each |
1 Ex Stock
|
| \ \ x TN - ‘ ‘ »»
| ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LTD.
| TWEEDSIDE ROAD, — _ ST. MICHAEL DIAL 4629









REPRESENTING THE GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. LTD., OF ENGLAND





THE

For clear
reception

... the world over

|
Specially made and

tested for tropical
all-wave reception
— this receiver is

a joy to listen to
and own.

Ask for a leaflet

or a demonstration.



FEC.

6-volt Radio

Ye Also in 2-colour plastic and for AC/DC mains.




gruelling
conditions.





THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD.
BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS




== Distributors :~ Dears Garage Lte
: 127 Roebuck Street, Bridgetown










[Ser ge

ag



{
f
:
i
:
a
|
i
a

3
Se
i
a
hs



PAGE FOURTEEN



‘CLASSIFIED ADS.
















































































SUNDAY ADVOCATE

ees

PUELIC SALES






































Released From









> »
as atic TION REAL ESTATE Prison Term
Finfold Street, wood!
: UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER | pouse. reception room, 3 bedrooms. MICHIGAN CITY, Ind.,
DIED FOR RENT tchen, shower bath toilet, water, elec- March 18.
5 On Thursday 23rd by order of Mr | tricity, enclosed yard, Barbados Real d D of the
s Walter Boyce we will sell the furniture | Estate Agenay, Phone 2536. Foymer' Grand Dragon
GRANT —Yertensay 3 a tak: at thet Home” Satipes, weit in- | 19.3.50-—1n Klu Klux Kian, peprenee, has
Wera, er Mrs, VIOLE cludes ip-’ a pri nt a r ‘ - or eas‘
GRANT. The funeral wiil Jeave ey HOUSES Arm and rris Cal ‘ers, Chet: COVE SPRING HOUSF. Si. Jam=, won ge year ==. ine agi
jate residence, Church Street, at 4.6 1 ss fonier, ioest ‘Tables, Weayme. Settee | Two storey hhaues: 4. bedrooms, veran. from life imprison .
r'c’cek this afternoon for the Westbury | a Staats over Sanitary Laundry Depot.; ali in ny, Gong m 9 x 9, drhs, all convenienges, servonts’ querters murder cenviction, Stephenson,
Cemetery, Friends and members of No bot “ Be rng Apply Senita Foun. | Rotled k, Oar ers, G' gerage, own bething cove, overlooking who was once so powerful that
17 Club, G.T,U. are asked to atten ‘o., Country Road. 16.3.50--0n | Ware Dinner and ‘tea Ware, Pyrex Dishes | ser. 1% acrzs land. \ccai be rented iri- i law” be
{° “Vernen Grant (husband), Christina Pictures, Rush Chairs, ers and Set- | furnished) Barbados Real Estate Agency he boasted “I am the law ES
Srvinger (mother), Muriel Banfle’c| | OFFICE—Marhill St. next to W. B.| tee, Brass Ware, Electric Fan, Simmens | Phone 2336. 19.3.50—In came dligible for parole when
(sister), James and Cmay Sprinve srevooregs & Co. For further particu-| Single Bedsteads Vono Spri: A Deep | a ail H Spchricker com-
(brothers), Phyllis and Joan Ban-| lars apply W. B. Hutchinson & Co.!Sieep Beds, Iron Heastecde. lhogany LAND—1,637 square feet of land a Governor Henry spc ,
field | (neices}, Colin rs 14.3.50—t.f.n. Buren, Cedar Press, Wi Re-| punlow Lane, off Bay Street. Apply muted his prison sentence bs as
(nephews) 3. erator order,|G. L. W. CLAR ., Soli 6 i ;
(APARTMENT: Unfurnished Groxnd- | Larder, ichen fables," Burrer Oil SX Y CUAREE & CO. detichars - amngunt of Hime Ne Has serv
yt, near iown an ub. | Stove, uble Doors, 2 Jalousies an 3
THANKS ‘No Pets, no Chi'dren). For further par-| 2 pairs %4 Jalousie Doors SS items. | “GOTTAGE—Somerset, Cottage, Upper The 56-year old prisoner’s sen
ticulars Dial 3696. Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms Branker | Belmont Rd, standing on 4836 cq? at, | tence followed a week end drink-
is abe at 26.2.50—t,f.n.| ‘Trotman & Co., Auctioneers. 2 Bedroom: open Gallery, Drawing! ing party resulting in a murder
The undersisaed gratefully — return A anes he 19.3.50—2n. | Room, Kitchennette Modern Conveni- | ; he hes
thanks to all who attended the funeral,| FOR RENT from May 8h for siy ~~ ] enees, fruit trees enclosed. Priced within conviction, but throughout he has
sent wreaths, oF in any, other way $x: months furnished house near Yaght Club ESTATE Feach' of most buyers for details, phone | insisted that he was a political
pressed sympathy fin the ‘orray s only. pply Barbados 4523, o- 2 ; ‘
oceasioned by the dgath of rns, ae Agency, Phone 2336 as Sear des lites ee Ee praoner
band LEONA . , s 3.50—In VALUABLE Propert reasona i
Roach (widow). ha Soy - Business as a meera in the| price. situated in = rae a He contended that Miss Ober-
-- ; ae FOP. PENT: Furnished Cottage &. | City with ts and Good-| Avnoia Lowe, Brittons Hill, S*. Miehae’| holtzer, his alleged murder vic-
James coast near sea, further Hie} will. Condi’ very Attrac- 19.3.50—In | 4; isoned herself on the
IN MEMORIAM “res from Barbados Real _, tive and No invoived or : tim, po - ; :
| Phone 2336. 9.3.80—-In| Book oan oe ene eer ‘ __. | week-end trip preceding her
OVING MEMNRY of my ‘o> | TE BOWFR, Garrison. y| Tea BP oi S AT F death
IN 1 NG me ny TE Bi k, arrison. dor . "
raaeng SReeT B ead ty] obese. O8 bet mea Lees ee i9.9.50-n| FOR SALE AND REMOVAL —Reuter, |
NARD who fell asleep in £us | rivhee per month, ease of 2), ——————— TT J
10th Mareh 1947 eae monthiv tenancy, g Dixon & Bladon, | KARLVILLE, Upper Spooner’s Hill e jones yg ay Be
He wes kind, thougitful end loving | Ppal Estate Agents” Auctioneers, Plan- | Two storey house, part stone, part wood. |store which is one storey in hei nt
And how J miss him, no ome bu | {ations Building, Phone 4640 3 3 pecreeee Dak bo kitchen, | "The property offered for Sale a te
Jesus knows, 19.3.50—1n | water, é' enclosed yard. Barba- | . ‘ iy , al
He ‘loved him best. s cceesiipeeninaaaniosibesainapssrceaemnee | 660 WO AS AEE, WEE. lacute Goulet the building sna o'r PROFESSIONAL NOTICE
It feels to me as if it's today : CARLTON, St. James, Modern 3 bei- f 19.3.50—In. imbers, windows plates. floors and roof-
He will never be forgotten by hi} -e-m residence in beautiful surround: ime to the said building but not th DR. FERREIRA of “Chiroville’” Upper
dear beloved wife Mrs, Masel Mavnerd | ings, hot and cold water, auxiliers | ROSLYN, sth Avenue Belleville, wood | stern wall which forms the western Esplanade) by Chiropractic
19.3.60-—-In | jery lighting plant. DIXON & BLADON,| house, foom. morning | Oo of the two storied pert of Me Ray St. (uear iv
5 aaa eas Mies tations Building, Phone —. te room, om * oe bath | puilding method corrects diseases of eyes, ears,
In loving memory ©; 19.3.50—1r | toilet, electricity, water. pply Barba- “ . a
mother LILIAN JOHNSON, who fe x = si aneipneietiadh SEE ‘ | Phone 2336. in tea in rae ta ecg TT nose, throat, lungs. stomach, kidneys and
asleep on March 20th 1949. .| “NEW HAVEN", Crane Coast fully fur- 19-9.50—Ir |," tne 34th March lower organs. Dial 2881.
Dear is the grave in which she is lai’) »1-ne4, 3 bedrooms, 3 servants’ rooms For full particulars of the propert
De are the memories has antl new | ible garage lighting plan, wales LADO hc POUT DD ors icrms of conditions ot Se
fade | mill, Superb bathing beach. 2 6 “LI
cnet iy the hope that seain we sha:'| November, December. —————S GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LIMITED |
meet 19.3.50—t.f.r H, D. BROWNE, RED MOVIN
Kreeling together at Jesus feet. LOST D OWN. |
Ever to be remembered by — _| “PARAWAY” St. Philip Coast. Pully 16.3.50—Tn i
Ivy Bayley (daugiia). Mave opie ‘umished, 3 bedrooms, 3 servants rooms,! LOST—One ye of t npewrieen con iia eedkigehiettediitiee
ison), Norman m: e | eerperk, lighting plant, water mill. | coloured paper, from on's y along Ww ill offer for sal bli .
dad), Tdalio Padmore (neice, Trinidad) | + osning peach. From May let. Dial] the direction of Broad Street to the Bus petition on Peidty the Alot Gar. TT Mah
(Trinidad Papers please Oe an cy | M478 8.50—t.f.n] Stand. Pinder will be suitably rewarded | j950, at 2 p.m. at our office Jemes Street. ]
19.3.5 oo | by returning same to the Advertising | tie’ Messuage Dwelling house and shop )
FLAT, fully furnished flat at St | Department of Barbados Advocate. situate at Street, Bridgetown
; ry of my | L®wrence Gap, Phone #434 19.8.50—In. | wajoining The if Chureh standing on |
In loving and EE nie ae WAITHE 19.3.50—1- 2156% square feet of land
dear husband JOSE 5 ee This property which is built of stone
Gpacksnih) Wc, pessey Sway the | Ov ACO ROB—St. James. Private beach} PUBLIC NOTICES |< ee a shop to the front and i| WON'T WORRY YOURSELF ABOUT
20th of March 1947 4 Sait * beérooms, 2 reception rooms, 2 garages 4 wetiiee gonasting of five rooms to th MOVIN
Thvee years have passed since that sd} p., jor furnished from 28th Mapeh for 6 aaa | back. aga US Son WORRIES Zo
day & id onths. Apply Herbert H. iNiams, trici and Government wate’ | o
The one we loved was called away, Pinfold Street, Dial 2673. 19.3.50—In. | “225 easily earned by obtaining orders = ur apply on the premise | Personal Supervision Assured
Tho dark my path and sad my lot, =_ for private Christmas Cards fror |to the tenant an: day. Phone 3309
Let me be still and murmur not. For further particulars apply to:— | BARBADOS FURNITURE REMOVER
All that now make it hard to say, WANTE vour friends. No previous experience HUTCHINGON a BANFIELD,
Thy wit be a aid necessary, Write today for beautiful free SEiAHte’ Finer Biveet 8. CODRINGTON,
w Treas caaee eee ter Tye rues Semple Book to Britain's largest and 7 17.3.50—8 | Britton’s X Rd. 19.3.50—t.t.n.
yith Thy sweet s ‘0 ess, | Se ; ratssi rar
My God to Thee I leave the res a fwemost Publishers; highest com on
Thy will be done 4ELP ee ae a re,
The WAITHE’S family Martindale's Rd — enes, ams -» Dept. ictoria
ere \0'3'50-1n,| STENOGRAPHER: Experienced sten-| Works, Preston, England.” GOVERNMENT NOTICES.
ographer for work in Solicitors office -- EE, TTS SS
- ~ Ho 10 to 4 Apply in pers” ‘o HARRISON COLLEGE SPO!
por Hours 10 to RTS ‘1
reeu ALR Senet at a ee ENTRANCE TO HARRISON COLLEGE YEAR 1950—51.
rae aA Teli aaa —— | The finals of the Sports will be held A limited number of vacancies will oceur in September, 1950 in
ASSISTANT STOREKERPER: Appli-| his year on Wednesday, 2nd March. E : + ai
SS cations for the above post should be | and one March, | starting | the Preparatory Department and in the Main School. Applications for
lf arded \{ , ivi oder ; -m, Excellency the Gov- i
AUTOMOTIVE See eee eng eteence’| ernot and Mrs. Savage have kindly con-| entry must be made to the Headmaster by Parents/Guardians on a
nd \ ry sented to be present on t Friday, iti i j a Bi i ifi r
CAR Prefect Ford 196 model in! Up ARPA 9% Phonan and to present trophies Seal after Waiting List Form, accompanied by . et aa Sevens =
excellent condition, Apply: United Motoi | -- ls 4 p.m., and parents of boys, Old Har-| tefore 31st May. Unsuccessful applications made for previous years do
Comps 85 Roebuck Street, Dial 2741 | EXPERIENCED STENO-TYPIST. Also risonians, and friends of the School are : ‘ . i bmi N li
16.3.50—4 dy for Insurance Department’ wit! cordially invited on both days not hold good. New applications for 1950 must be submitted. No appli-
- —--— - ae owledge of typir Apply by lette Jepartment 0 ucation, - j “ i a
ONE 199 BEDFORD VAN—Done £09 i M Sonee sooha rie "y imitea| 13th Mareh, 1950 " | cation can normally be accepted for a boy who will be under 8 years 6
Seren VERS Taare. sonora, DIRE) 18 3.50—3n 15.3.50-2n | months in September 1950. Parents/Guardians will be notified of the
=f - = Pe aie dates and time of the Entrance Examination by a notice in the Press
CARGMilliman 10 TP 198? Mode’ In| ATHLETIC SPORTS
4 Sas ncaa ea jek Later; and by letter.
T ‘ | MIS OUS The ANNUAL ATHLETIC SPORTS i
a parame cie ceca MEETING of the COMBERMERE Department of Education,
aes cay: be HOUSE or FLAT—Small Furnishea| SCHOOL will take place this year 13th March, 1950. 19.3.50—3n
Recent! 3 | tduse ‘ar Mat monthly basis. Con-| 0D Thursday, March 23rd, starting at
€ hile venient to Bridgetown. State Rental and ee 30 een eee ane See 7 ou ——
1 o Box G.G 5 ohare : joys, fr tl c 1 : : :
ee Locality to Dox G.. c/o Advetele Ad tain aie Caeey te, oa Shoe Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
297 sa jidan | Ste east ' ae swept. Pi Old Boys’ Race will be | ment) Order, 1950, No. 10 which will be published in the Official
8.3.50—3r ‘YOUNG AD G P| ‘ B .m,
nisl ait ledaaait seaiven tholitinn “niciceiieee ontete 19.3.50—3n. | Gazette of Monday, 20th March, 1950.
ARS—( Austin 10, (1) Vauxhall| has ability in needling (willing to sleep . is : axi i i
EAS Sig lh REE i AME EMER SY NOTICE sod te ee eta
I 1 BSA Motor Cycle 3% HP. | ee Pp p 8 :
‘ ; ra a Lye ome ahi idaieeia Le a —————
i a hand voila abe all burehanelia, -BORUNION os Maneueren ; PARISH OF 8T. JAMES
} rurchase hs ste a ‘- ’ ced \in Hotel or Club in Seneaee ab Ee Tenders wil} received by the under- WHOLESALE
eed D'Arcy A. Scott, Auetionees.,oy Tnglish Lody, highly experienced. signed up to Monday 20th March 1950 for ARTICLE PRICE RETAIL PRICE

Magazine Lane. 18.3.50—4n | Reply to W. A. S. c/o Advocate.

17.3,50—3n

cA Artiqs gn

1946 Model excellent











































































1. Conveyance of Paupers,
2. Burial of Paupers.
Forms of tender may be obtained from







(not more than)



(not more than)







ednditio throughout. Always owner One LIQUOR LICENSE See Harole |‘he Parcchial ‘Treasumer's | Office
Hiiven. Own levine Tad, Belge tnvatne ic aeatte ‘rays P. H. TARILTON, A
aren. Owner | ne ing | lalen rice | Proverbs & Co,, Limited, High Sirest Clerk, Board of Guardians MACKEREL—Pickled .. |$47.55 per brl. of
19.3.50--1n ea a So ee St James. 200 Ibs,
4 le. per is
. = Gane 089, 1 Wiss | « LO BUY: House, Bungalow or Building 11, 9: idontin SUGAR:—
‘ Pe 5 Be : a a 937, 1 Willy Site, SEA-SIDE, astings, Worthing
an Car, 2 Hill yedan’ Cars, 1] ct Lawrence." Box #4, ¢ Vorthing 0 i b d Clerk ’ U . (a) Plantation White ‘ 9c. per lb.
é c J 08e . \ sanigine ‘e 3 4
; d jeoph's | Vuleapiaine | 16.3.50—41 ardados S Union (b) Clear Straws which
¢ 19. 3.50 CROQUET SET in good condition ener includes Searles Spe-
; -. [Phone 3973 18,1. 50—3n AGENDA: cial and similar types |$7.75 per 100 Ibs. 8c. per lb
r wh-| INVALID WHEEL CHAIR in gooc] The Annual General Meeting of the (¢) Grocery Yellow Crys-
oA | tion, Phone 4146 18.3.59—3n Clerks’ Union will be held at Spe. tal a ¥ $6.95 per 100 lbs. 7¥ce. per lb.
os WANTED TO BUY. Small Businass [Y.M.C.A. Hall, (d) Dark Crystal and
a= a kcntoae=o write ful particulars X.¥.Z., c/e§ 1. Minutes
FLECTRICAL | Adveecate’ Co 17.3.50—2r J 2. To receive the Report of the Ex- Muscovado $6.50 per 100 Ibs. Te. per Ib.
eer cr tee eaves rn seen — ecutive Committee, for 1949—50.
‘. : teak es URGENTLY, to complete a pair, one} 3. To receive and adopt the financia’
eto Simmons Coil Spring 3 ft. wide. If statement for the ne ending 28th |
: a sor cossary, willing to exchange for same Febru 1950, which may be seen
as on ed new spring of anv other type avail- on application to the General Secre- ART ONE ORDER
0—1n. | able locally Tel. 3738. Mrs. H. W. Ince tary
rine aeAMTN aia Shea | 19.3.50-—3n. § 4. Election of Officers, members of the
Fad KOA _i107190 un'ta AP fe coneae Committee, a Trustee and By
SR tS A 0 SSS aca eR an Auditor .
: 040098 SASK e944 ‘ . 5. To consider notices of motions and Lieut.-Col. J. Connell, O.B.E., E.D.,
Satos. pans ee For Sale=Contd nadine qe laielbaa Commanding,
18.3. 50-—3: 6. Any other business The Barbados Regi
me ; ment,
: a SSE ES | N.B. ‘Notice of motions and/or
eo aed questions to be considered at the An- Issue No. 11 17 Mar. ’50
LIVESTOCK | ALY AMIRS IASMNTS my 2t and 271 Gilet Meester net fee Mian eaves
, auge Gft., Bins. t q # ecretary not le: than sev a J
PIIPPIES Stal?’ tees pale ae | seo a4 steel plates Ae were Core before the. date fixed ar mee 4 eas LATORY
ceded? ke: ten aes” Wetbiaan if ond 3/8 in various sixes. Enquire J ™eeUng. ‘eae ‘he Commandi > has i i
un Phone Mrs m Wilkinse Auto Wyre Company, Srateians Say e CHRISTIE ‘sMirTH, 2 . ding Officer has received the following message
sia i at 1.3.50-—-t f.» General Secretary om H.E. the Governor:
oeeeeerneenee: .3.50—4n “ asi " orn
MECHANICAL _GALANISED PIPE cn tae “ae ue ‘ I desire to place on record my appreciation of the splendid
su i Tale ect ive n entral Foundry Lté., Broad pcrformance o é ‘ a
SEGGANGGUTwET sup to wa, in| Breet end Pier Heed tc. Broa NOTICE n the part of the Officers and Other Ranks under
: a OUTIERS up te Mins CAPar Anaian BUC Cen ET imines ab your cOmmand on the occasion of the arrival of H.R.A.
~ = on a sta men | Ebaki, and Red, 84e aah. ‘des GEORGE WARBEU Lon GRAHAM Princess Alice and the Earl of Athlone. The Guard of Honour
and spare parts. Then | Store,’ Lucas Street 3 Deceased. mounted by the Barbados Regi i
DULG. Misr. ‘tein "SO" had en 2. pts Sele eat Glee Oo ies ais tim «—< =
; ri ain se —— ying any debt or claim against ne fine reputati i ¥
tmertes, Get them at HARR'SON S SHIRTS Mens’ Silk Shirts ea gape, Estate of George Washington} » par 2 putation of the Regiment,
- 3.00 each in Grey, Fawn and White, Stan- Graham, late of Barbarees Hosd, Saint | “* 3 ADE—PAY
naomapeereapemensynicep way Store, Laicas Street f Michael, Master Mariner, who died at There will be a Pay
WISCELLANEOUS si i in F224 08 ,OF about the 2nd “day of Decem- a Pay Parade at 1700 hours on Thursday 23
50--In ber 1949, are hereby required to send Mar, *50, for all those who have qualified for pay. Th r
aby's Paamnbulater ; THOSE RECORDS YOU WANTED. Cae ten ta See caah Tatas. no further pars dont ye a
pponhy;: Rerembulator, in good egndition They're here and they're keen [the a Enders cues, See Howell Grahpm 5 Teh hace parades during the month of March. The next parade
' 7 ~ Tamunde ene se ge the deceased, in care of Messrs Years will be held on 5 Apr. ’50,
TES ot every descrintion ey Meakin Doss: vocals by An-f wood & Boyce, 14 James Street, Bridge-| 2. S iG ) ;
( ; oa xe ci ine ae. | Sisters, Mills aaah 8 tc ie town, Weltors, on ot Lae tite 5 aero a ener
c s Early books, Maps, Auto-| - ig ee i a See day of May , after which date I shall he Dr. Delamere Rev > Ch vill ,
¢ ., at Gorringes Antique Shop., PIANO: Hanschel Piano Cabinet | ee Wo Gistribute Wie assets af the 1600 hours Friday ¢ ong Berane Cie Eek
é g Royal Yacht Club bie ce Gromd in excellent condition, enquire arene having” veer — arene SS Sree 0s Sa.
§ i n at lee re . F . 5 oO suc! j j S, ‘ + :
at ‘Palosades,’ Lakes Folly, Prone $86. claims of which g Whie. dae bees “bad , 7 Major Simpson Challenge Cup will be shot for by Warrant
Ric Perenotes ut aioe eae aint the ae, bn a nee pA RRL Officers and Serjeants at 1600 hours on Monday 20 Mer. ’50.
2. Pri DOCH: One Platinum set Diamond J trib ‘ ; a The Maj i i
all Grocers and Dru Prooc , uted, to any person of whose debt or © ajor St. Hill Challen wi ; i?
17.38.40. ; rooch, Wm D. Richards & Son, Mcfclaim we shall not then have had notice. = Cup Hh Pe Sot: for hy, maciss




Gregor Street

CANE JUICE. Eight (8) cents

PICTURES;
Obtainabie from C, Arthur . 2.

ment of reproductions of Italian Masters.





























JAPTHBNWARE MIXING ROWLS ver

Watkins & Co . aes anil _ STAMPS at Mayfair Gift Shop. From
eet, Oppo Jar Oc. a Packet up—See en FIFTY (50) CASH, 6d. CON- attend at 2045 h
i sian $6) SOLATION, PARI- , we ’ =
.. on a wat WIRE--Galvanised Mesh Wire Me in, | STA bw BEP and POR oe
i $ te bah ont is oe + % Se Hele will be paid on and from MON- THE BARBADOS REGIMENT

19.3.50--1n.

LIPTON’S TEA










19.3.50--1n
—_—
magnificent assort-





16.3.50—t.f.n



OTE
Fresh supply now in






And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their in-
debtedness without delay.

Dated this 18th day of March 1950, 4. ANNUAL CAMP



Payment Of Prizes

NAY, 20th MARCH, 1950, between
12.00 and 3.00 pm. daily, SAT-
DAYS excepted.

24TH FEBRUARY, 1950
LEAVE—PRIVILEGE

men and lst Class shots in this year’s A.M.C. below the rank
of Serjeant, at 1600 hours on Tuesday 21 Mar. 50.

“Wallsbrook”, River Road.| Pit'an, Raphael ete. Price very .
2382 1 $.i4n) we” : y reagon- CECIL HOWELL GRAHAM, ‘ }
“ = | ee ee e.seemie eee eatin of the Wil of The Annual Camp will be ! eld from 2—11 Jun. 50. All volun-
DANTE. sina? Shak Pants M1 om seithasinhsteevlisiepenbintsietnignslesaiabintshieadis ; 50-—4n
ANTS encMtone’ Khaki pants a — neton Gra’ a ased. teers who are able to attend ai d have not handed jn their names
: Stanwas » Lurene Bit LLER BRUSHES: Ladies Mair | ————————_____. Ae : i
mee ed rushes (Bristlecombs!. Dental Plate oe should #0 90 98 abel yessib! 7
“ALOTHING: Mome tenes eft adios | Douanee-Fiesh Brushes, Manicure ger LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE 5. COMMISSIONS—GRANT OF
Worm Clothin c sel ay , ta,
Worm othing including Rain Coat, so) Thoth Brushes, Ladies cnd Gents Comb | THE Clarke of His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to grant commis-
_Dial_ 202 S0—Sn ' S'sir Brushes, Wall Brushes, Toilet | Parris a Joven for permissior. sions to the following in the B: Regi
ANO. One Rickman Plane in mond! pevaee “Qiuminum | Brushes, Uwilty | to seal it Ldauars, &: ae Se Bi roadie pent with ‘eRest foom
dition, Dial 206. 10.3-80-2n\ Fummttute Bellsh and’ Deluxe Wome | area af'Guike At st''as.| the 20th February, 1950:
- . Brust : neon ; Peter
mn AACE oe large Diamerd at Co. Td ’ fiddle Sivek.’ Bint 3382. : To: ~ - yea _ ee t is * -
ign Hetie
u¢ owner is leaving the Island Beet ss "CL pbece. 6. ORDERLY veins DO x Ee
cooliw Wry Dy Richards & Sons. Me. | “CATH TUBS—Four Bngilsn Bath Tube . o R AND OF DERLY SA FOR WEEK
Greror Street 18.3,80—2n | Sear $190. Lees 10% for cach sale | N.B.—This wit So ened: ENDING 27 MAR, '50
aware ae praee | A. Bares & Co., Ltd. 12.39.80 t.f-n, # g penging Court to be at Orderly Officer Lieut. S, E. L. Johnson
+ Tinoenlare, 6 Power in leother case MTA fe s r i y . ** . . . e s
Wa D Rienards & Son, Me ene 8 | MENSA for STOVER Watkine & Co. | the 28m day of March 1980 at 1) o'clock Orderly Serjeant .. 212 L/S Haynes, G. L.
; 80—$0 | James Street. 18.3. 50—2r A. W. HARPER, Next for duty
- TE _- .
_ EVERITR ASRESTORS SHFFTS (>| “ROUND MOSQUITO NET HOOPS can | 19.9.00-In0 Seale DIK OP Ormerty OMe. ae Es S. Geee
: aon’ Sven Mt. x Sf. |e had again, they are. stronger 7 Orderly Serjeant 233 L/
: OF Binet monde ond | Soca aa the “otate aimee, "ape as 3 L/S A. L. O, Blackman
JB. Tay d Smoet | 207 and 26° diameter. Phone sz M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major
jc Rene | "3 Barbados Turf Cl S.O.LF. & Adjutant,
Shite wetie| “eee arbados Tur ee eee
Mee, | wenont ANISE PIPES & FITINGS, Size Th
Roebuck St. Ope | wa. Dineh, 1s. 1h, # Ble. 8. &e 4 inet o Barhedcs Ragiment.
18 F~eutre: Auto Tyre Co., Trofalgar St NOTICE .

The monthly Mess Meeting of the Officers’ Mess ‘will be held
on Saturday 25 Mar. '50 at 2015 hrs, Honorary Members may

PART IX ORDERS

SERIAL NO. 4
SHEET 1 & ONLY

Captain J, Redhead, No, 1 Coy., Granted 3 months P/Leave with
A. No. 1 Coy., Granted 4 months P/Leave

M. L. D,. SKEWES-COX, Major,

S.O.L.P. é& Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment

hands e your er and if vou are
ian ing this most delicious and econ-
s — se amiarcmred GM (oe alee Te one We HORSES and SERIALS will be ermissi z
f all irop in i let us . wi permission to leave the o ; 4 .
\ DVERTISE 1 amp) witl any | paid on and fram MONDAY, 27th 216 C F ieahane 4 colony wel, & Maw. "ER,
, SE Hon to. Duy svitedt-awente. | MARCH, 1930, between the hours oe a pg ode

5 | 1 SS0 sn. | as above, SATURDAYS excepted. w.e.f. 24 Mar. ’50

im the : ; | RAISINS & CURRANTS—We can sup- G. A, LEWIS

A D\ OCA | E i &. Tudor St. Cl 19.3.80—tn. | 17.3.50.—$n. (

Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Mary M. Lewis.
Sch. W. L. Bunicia Aux. Seh. Cachalot.

In Carlisle Bay

Transport Carpellotti, Sch. Sea sect
ARRIVALS
Schooner Alexandrina R., 30 tons, Capt
Smith, from St. Lucia; Consignee: ©. .

IN PORT: Sch. Lochinvar S., Sch









































M.V. Blue Star, Seh. E. M. Tannis, Seh. Johnson, Esq. ‘

Adina Mac, Seh. Zita Wonita, Sch. Cyril S.8. Golfito, 4,505, Capt Sapeworih :

&, Smith; Sch. Wonderful Counsellor, from Southampton, signees: Wilkin- SS

Sch. Anita Il., Sch. Timothy A, H. Van- son & Haynes,

sluytman, Sch. Frances W. Smith, Sch MAPLE 7 rs

Freedom Fleary, Sch, Turtle Dove, Sch DEPARTURES >

Emeline, M.V. T. B. Radar, Sch e ,

Providence Mark, Sch. Cyclorama 0. Schooner W. L. bunicia, 38 tons, Capt Ovpusi N0ge

Seh. Laudalpha. Joseph, for Dominica. vsite Has ng

Schooner Phillis Mark, 58 tons, Catt Tel.—3oe lan

M.V. Lady Joy, U.S. High Speed McWith, for Trinidad. “aed '

Transport Kleinsmith, U.S High Speed S.S. Lioyd Crest, 4,911 tons, Capt | 8

Transport Burdo, U.S. High Speed Barwell, for St. Lucia. ‘

AFTER THE
A Sound Invesen
Phe SUNR
S37 MOTOR ¢yp

~

From JAMAICA: Mrs, Myring-Hewitt,
Mv. Philip Myring-Hewitt, Mr. Da Costa
Mosley Golburn, Mr. William Brown,
Bishop Wilson, Mrs, Mary Wilson, Maste:
Michael Wilson, Miss Felicity Wilson
Miss Judith Montagu.

DEPARTURES—By B.W.1.A.A.

For TRINIDAD: Mr. ‘ord Richards,
Mr. Cecil DeCaires, Mr, Denis Atkinson,
Mrs. Christine Von Hagen, Mr. Walter
Hoyte, Mr. Bglon Burrowes, Miss Sylvie (
Foster, Mrs. Ameilia Rice, Mr. Sidney,
Ratcliffe, Mrs. Olive Ratcliffe, Ve. lig®
Mr. Vodel, Mr. Ranmville Cray, Mus:
Florence Selik, Mrs. Mary Gabe, Miss
Rvelyn Gabe, Mr, Samuel Gabe, Mr
Frederick Mendes, Master
Mendes, Mrs. Gloria Mendes. _.-

For ANTIGUA: Mrs. Alice Gage, Mr
Hugh Gage Sr., Master Hugh Gage Jr.,
Mrs. L. Hill, Major Adrian Hill, Mrs.
Ermie Farmer, Mr, Winston Ward, Mr.
Thomas Wetherly, Mr. M. Horner, Mrs.
L. Horner.

For ST. KITTS: Mr, Gerald Jordan.

For La GUAIRA: Mr. Slade Reedy,
Miss Barbara Lee, Mrs. Jessiaa Lee, Miss
Dorothy Lee, Mr. Jose Rodriguez, Mrs
Linsa Rodriguez, Mrs. Marie Muller, Mr.
Ernest Muller, Master Orlanda Riebman,
Mrs. Gerda Riebman, Miss Rita Cranay,

Mr. Sam Fales, Mrs.
Master Clyde Webber, Mr. Hugh Webber,
Mr. Jack ‘Trigg, Mrs. Molly Trigg,

Master Mark Trigg.

DEPARTURES By T.C.A.

For TORONTO: Harrison Black, Lillian
Black, George Case, Katherine Case,
Bruce Hopkins, Marjorie Hopkins, John
Jory, Jahn Macara, Frederick McLeod,
Belle Morgan, Elgin Lander, Dorothy
Lander, Herbert Schell, Coralie Schell,
Irving Wilson, Dora Wilson, John Fisher,
Rominne Fisher, Monica Skeete.

For BERMUDA: Wilbert Howard, A
Olive Howard, Geosge Sherwood, Rober’
Gillean, Hliarry Larkin, Violet Larkin,
Alex Patterson, Anna Patterson.

For TRINIDAD: Kathryn Irwin, Dorothy
Ridout, Homer McKenzie, Jean McKenzie,
Charles Wilson, Marjorie Wilson.

ARRIVALS By B.W.L.A.L.
From TRINIDAD: Marjorie Chan,
Joaquin Fabaldon, Virginia Fabaladon,
Pawin Taylor, Ormond Howard, Anita
Jessamy, James O'Neill, Mary O'Neili,
Fitzroy Jackman, Edna Wason, Colin
Wason, Sydney Steele, Hubert Steele.
Alan Steele, May Bonyun, M. Shadéch,
Charles Philip, Owen Ottley, Patricia
Godfrey, Lawrence Green, George
Stewart, Victor Gill, Mary Gill, Sylvia
Balgobin, Moussa Naaqus, Jack Foster,
Mary Foster, Penelope Foster, Mary E.
Foster, Alan Gedsal, Robert Steware,

From ANTIGUA: Harold Beggs, Edna
Cruse.

From ST, KITTS: Mr. Douglas Frost,
Mr. G. Bartlett, Mrs. G. Bartlett.

For ©
BRASSWARy:







The Sugar Manufacturers’ Association
(of Jamaica) Limited





invite applications for two posts in their Research Department for | |
duties connected with the breeding, selection, and field testing of |
sugar canes, with special reference to resistance to virus and other
diseases as well as to other normally desirable characters.

FOR SAL

HOUSE §PONS
BUILDING |
Cash or Easy Ter

From 10c, per $q,

ELECTRIC, BUS and
SERVICES AYAI
—at—

1, ICH WioR ROAD,
TON, St. a4
2. rane, o
Turning, St.

3, ‘THE PINE CROSS
Michael. te
4. WELCHES, no
GARDEN & KINGSI(
RACE through from ¢

(a) Botanist, salary £1,000 rising to £1,500 per annum
(b) Agronomist, £ 600—£1,000 per annum.

Applicants should possess a research degree or equivalent quali-
fication of a recognised University or other similar institution, and
have had experience in plant breeding and selection work.



The Botanist will also be expected to advise on plant pathology.

The initial period of service will be three years under contract,
with prospect of permanent engagement. The selected candidates
will be provided with free passages to Jamaica, B.W.I., and required
to assume duty not later than Ist November, 1950, A local allowance
in lieu of quarters’ is provided and leave with passages paid after
three year service periods. There is a contributory pension scheme,
Further particulars may be obtained from the Director of Research,
Sugar Research Department, Mandeville, Jamaica, B.W.I., to whom





applications, with full personal particulars and three references, Hill to Kingston Road, St Mi
should be addressed, 5. THE GARDEN f
19.3.50—4n Christ Church,
Apply : ERNEST D, MO
Office, Coleridge Street
SHIPPING NOTICES | »~ :

—$—$——





——$S———

ASTHMA MUCUS

Loosened First Day



REAL ESTAT

The irv. DAERWOOD wil!
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lueja, St. Vincent, Grenada.
Aruba, sailing Wednesday 22nd |

March, Don't let coughing, sneezing, chok-

The M.*. CARIBBE® will ac- ing attacks of Bronchitis or Asthma f
cept Cago and Passengers for ruln your sleep and another + | J
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, | day or Dight without * 1
St, Kitts-Nevis. Sailing Friday D. . This great medic is not a
ih Match LAUDALPHA ||| thrush the blood” thus reaching. the AND

ea us n ie
rhe Ll A jungs’and bronchial tubes. The first

will accept Cargo and Passengers

for St. Lucia, sailing Tuesday 2ist nature immedi-

dose starts helpin
ately 3 ways; 1. Helps loosen and re-

HOPPE, , move ere: strangling Ue 2, anus B
promotes freer breathing and sounder,
BWd, Tene MON Ce,” | more refreshing sleep. 3. Helps allevi- , M.
Consignees. ate ‘oughing, wheezing, sneezing (JOHN ’
TEL 4047 , | Quick satisfaction or money bac} 2 5
w | guaranteed, Get MENDACO ‘ro “CARLDIEM” — St.

well-known 2 storey stom
fronting onto a sand

good ;
Tela has to offer.
M0 |



chemist today.



Canadian National Steamship:

bedrooms, Oy
dahs

try ete. ,
Two self bo



Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails “ ON
SOUTHBOUND Monire: Haliiax Boston Barbados Barbados DIX JARLO
pear Silver ane
CANAD stone and }
CHALLENGER on 10th Moar _—: 20th Mar. 20th Mar
Y — 25th Mar. 27th Mar. 5th Apr. 6th Ap:
YY iN = 12th Apr, 18th Apr. 23rd Apr 24th Apr
Y ROU) Y 12th May lth M 17th May 26th Me: 27th Ma)
LADY NELSON 3ist May 3rd June Sth - 14th June 1$th Jun
RODNEY 30th May) = rd July Sth July 4th July 16th July
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
NORTHBOUND Barbados Barbados Boston St. John Halifax Montreal
LADY NELSON 22 Mar. 22nd Mar ist Apr 2nd A) . — ee
LADY RODNEY 7th Avr 1th Avr 28th Apr = 2th Apr. 3rd Ma
LADY NELSON 6th May 8th May 17th May —— 18th Mar. 2vau
LADY RODNEY 8th June l0th Ju. 19th June — 2ist Jun. 24th Jun
LADY NELSON zith June 28 3) 8th July — 10th July 13th July
LADY RODNEY @th Jui Wth Jur th Aug —— 9th Aug, 12tn Aug



N.B.—Subject to change without notice, All vessels fitted with cold storage cham-
bers. Passenger Fares and freight rates on application to :—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.,

VISITORS TO OUR ISLAND

WHY HAVE BAGGAGE WORRY ?

You can leave your Baggage with us for despatch by our
regular service. You can be assured of its satel .
Remember !

WE GIVE PERSONALIZED SERVICE

SMITH'S SHIPPING SERVICE

MOVERS — PACKERS — & FREIGHT FORWARDERS

)

Alexander House, |
James Street,
Phone — 7

Bridgetown.



DRINK

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

(With the Distinctive Flavour)
And enjoy Rum at its Best.

Remember—SIP IT — TO ENJOY IT



: BLENDERS :
John D. Taylor & Sons Lid.

Grocery &
Provision 3740 Grocery 4335

= —S—=—==——=—=———— oO

PR ——S oe











gUNDAY, MARCH 19, 1930
ST
: The Banal Side of Elgar's Music

faking About Music..

By

































































Neville Cardus










iG the last week or tw of England the fin
chided by inst symphe Kipli
peen chidex< : sen Baa Kip wit
eis for what they deseribe Barrack-rc ballads, Puck i
4 % terms my “belittling” Pooks Hill, an¢ Jungie Ss} s.
shaikovsky. ae glove any ye. Prophetic sombr>
Bemawey.of course, nev . Bow and boom of fate Th
ia Tenaikovsky in thes > Neeessional can be heard in tix
or anywhere. Ww movement of Elgar’s second





ly a month or sympneny,
in fact, only .

since I wrote a prote
























inst the “superior” view _Both of there great b
: imevsky, and Teminde.) MM&2 cropoed
de brows that his genius 4) Into
the pity and torme sare Sic,
ad. el-house terror of th a ae possible to
etio’ Symphony to the 1981 fic a oe vith cliche
tiu! and happy balict rausi Res eee See
“ world. the beiie you. are 5
objection to the T: omething, whoa realiy you
iS wogye is that it is only exploiting the same
ting, and usuaily profer cormuts h phi
gond-best of his output melody over and ov
B flat ms, os ie era | loonie Ry ciferent and rising
i erenade, for ex- !evels yf iick=*- - gia chromatic nr i
aa artist is insulted wards












‘io Jacking taste of Saint iS,
of ‘selection. Ther @ are
‘Difficult Task obsessions; Wolf's a
* of the most interesting fares'at the end of a song—wht
»40r a music-lover is °% indeed knows yet, in large num-
nt out the best from the bers, the best of Hug Wolf
ot best in a genius’s produ —the Geh’ Geliebter, or Ke:
“And the task gets stiffer du das Land, rather than
yf brisk to coy colloquial

we come to finer orders




ing — as we mount Of thos soubrette” trivialiti:
eto the minor to the So familiar at any Wolf recital
. ters. in London.
qa letter to his wife, Busoni The student analysing the best
Bane of the best minds ever and the second best in m
wn to music—said that in a ill enjoy himself adding t
year he had iecarned, list of reach-me-down trick



other things, to recognis
id from second-rate Beethoven
sways,” added Busoni, “very
iit’; for Beethoven seidom
ded to sloppy thinking and

the trade, resorted to b;
a very few composers to
the tottering intellect. Few
haven't needed such crutch

Needed Crutches













But distance lend encl ‘
_ Not Always Sublime ment; the older t lush
td : the Dvious seem ti
Min the finale of the Ninin /7C ‘¢S8 obvious seem
Z 5 ties. Time changes ul
: mphony, he introduces that ; ie i >
ft banal march-tu into “‘quaintness.
iéte was a reaSon for it; Beetho- M there are moments when oven
Bwarhers extending the ran ozart comes before us in quos-

tionable



‘ $y, spit guise, and you can
‘ie A esadlgat bepaedla sure th it Bach hath his platitude:
a? the “millions,” not less ponderous or empty th
Miss of ordinary mankina, ‘ose of Martin. Tupper |
fomiliar or vulgar tine London Express Service
Eyed as a symbol in a generally
ne whole.
employed banality to

game expressive end, but not

%y

ys with the same sublime
ification.
| Mahler at least knew

he was doing when he wes
fal or sentimental; some com-
are commonplace and vul!l-
f (at times) because they can-
help it, and perhaps because
afe so very much alive and

c

ft, for instance, Pomp and
tumstance marches on the one
(“damn good tunes” he
called them), Gerontius
other,

_ Elgar and Kipling

Lh ve never read of anywhere,
mG ny attention drawn to,
n affinity between Elgar
: ; in each was the
sort of contradiction or
Elgar with his military
ies, fairy music in The
md of Youth, the waving flag

it

pling



“So your wife said it was
old-fashioned !”
London Express Se:tice,

_ CHURCH SERVICE

DO!

S

Y.M.CA. WEEKLY SPRIGHTSTOWN. 11 «.m

St. John. 7 p.m. Rev. La enc
FELLOWSHIP St. LUCY CHURCHES. a.1 Re
; and friends including ladies Griffin 4
unde of the Weekly Fellowship The Evening Service

me Place at Headquarters,

this afternoon commen. 22mes Street and Bethel Churche



1 ak". will be conducted by Chaplai
V ; CE. Biles of the Chureh fy, > _ Javv
we Guian. tan kindly from the U.S. Navy.
: ive the add: 5. i. ; tre oar
et THE NEW TESTAMENT
MI FOR WEEK ENDING CHURC * GOD
A MARCH, 150 Ont, MICHAEL
1th 4.45 p.m. ‘Weekly .Fellow- i
Soe’ Cc. 2B. Biles, 7 p.m. Bank Hall, Rev. M
24:00 p.m, Lawn Ten: Tohn. 7 p.m. Eckstein Village, Bider
en Practice, 4.30 fy Walkes.
ommittee Meetine ; ‘ 7
mM, Scout Practice, 7.30 p.m. to a s *3 sO relist A
mn Table Tennis Tournament. ‘at p.m as Beeps “a War ae lis j
A 4.30 to 6.30 p.m. Members ip rome, fOr Annual | arves to vi
t leeting; Football Practice., the general publie is invited
BEUD th Ward Room la ty, iL a.m Greens, Elder R, 1. Walk:
4 Crosby m led by The ST. THOMAS
Bridge Field, Rev. J. B. Wi

ST. ANDREW
Shorey’s Village, Rev. J









8.15 p.m. S.PO.A »
a Hall; His ,.2 ?â„¢
the x Will be presid- ‘“*
TS are invited. lM:
a 400 pm. Lewn Ww Gas
Variterx

Class, Basket Rall Practice
Tournament, 4.30

Fines te ANGLICAN
> Board of Directors, 7.20 p.m. St. PAUL'S 7.30 a.m. Holy Con
nion, 9.1% a.m. Litany in Processic

Solemn Mai and Sermon.

Subject: “The Churchman’s budge
p.m. Sunday School, 3.30 p.m
dren's Service, 7 p.m. Evensong and





6 2rd 4.00 to 6.00 p.m. Foot-
aoe 5.00 p.m. Scout Practice,
Sm eval Hall loaned to r
te en for Annual Meeting.



3 cr




























Programmes




‘ 4.00 to 6.00 p.m. Tabic Sermon. Preacher: The Very Rev. 7
hent, Gym Class, 8.15 p m Dean Safin ous nik
i ag ST. MARY'S: 7.30 a.m. Matins
w led by Mr. O. S. Liteny, 8.a.m, Mass, 9 a.m. Pr ex
: Sung Mass and Sermon, 3.30 p.r u
; ae ede ee ‘Table day School, 4 p.m. Children's Vespe
" va, 6,; to 9.: : Stan Sasciahie Mantas
Tennis Tourniment, “mee Sole a ae Ti 8 Vicar
melt. Social for Members ana P'toession, Preacher: The Vica 7
lady friends or Members and “gp LEONARDS: 8 a.m. Choral I
; charist, 9 a.m. Choral Buch:
Sermon, 11 a.m. Matins and %&
%.15 p.m. Sunday School, 4 p.m Ch
ie Service, 7 p.m. Evensong and Ser- |
a.m.°-and 7 m
ee. WEEK DAYS
. T. Barker, Mondax, Tuesday: Saturday Ho
1 C mmuhion after Matins at 7.30 a.m
1 Lam. Mr. A Wednesday Matins and Litany 7.30 a.m
i. Weekes ae Holy Communion 8 a.m., Evensong and
Pm, Mr. Culpep- Sermon 7.30 p.m
«7 Dm. Mr. Arth Thursday: Holy Communion 5 a.m
IE: 3.30 | aS Mating 7.30 a.m
n aoe. bet ation Friday; Holy Communion 6 Vt
Pp. Reid ‘wit the Evening Prayer 5 p.m
Governme t ,
day night Mech wos, THE SALVATION ARMY
Subject w “God's
a MM "Gee BRIDGETOWN oe
Davis, recent graduate 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com





enric!
n Training College, will
er at the Advent Avenug

pany MOeunE. 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
Preacher: Major M. Stnith
Rall, on Sunday night

WELLINGTON STREET







. 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com

Â¥ METHODIST any Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting

i STREET . ’ Preacher: Major T Gibbs
“und * lM a.m. Rev. Law- OIST&NS ak
F 11 a.m, Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
pony Meeting, 7 p.m. Salwation Mecting

Lieutenant Gunthorr
FOUR ROADS
Heliness Meeting, 3 p.1

Preacher:



11 a.m


















â„¢m Rev panv Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Mee
7 D.m. Mr. F_ Moore Preacher: Lieutenant Hinds
30 am Mr. J. A PIE CO R )
. Mr. J. B. Haynes 11 a.m. Holiness Meet Br
‘™. Rev. Edwin L. pony Meeting, 7 p.m, Sal n Meeting





Preacher: Mator Hollingsy
DIAMOND CORNFR
Holivess Mee 3

y Meeting. 7 p.m

ervice we shall bid
ed ta three of our
“te leaving tor England



Sa Y
Moore







a Crosh Preecher: Lieutenant
i. Tees CARLTON
a.m. Mr. F. Moore aim. Holirees Meeting. ; pm Ce
. Commissiong Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meets
: 9a.m. Rev A Treecher: Lieutenant Reid so ee
. Miss L, Peskett COlTONEL Wm. P a c . T a
lam. Rev. VA ‘ Se ram
m. Mr. R, Linton ‘ oi
1 a.m. Mr. G_ Harri ‘ ;
. a » the 23rd a Corgmissionins :

Meld in the Bethel Churc







| |
BRITISH WEST INDIAN



| West Indies Half Hour

“Mondays 7.15 p.n

A Speech by Princess Elizabeth)

On Wednesday next, 22nd inst \
1 speech by H.R.H. Princess Eliz- |
ibeth will be broadcast by the}
BBC. The programme will be on}
ne air at 5.15 p.m. on Wednes-/
lay |

this colu









a series

t ol
planned for t

Talss

hour on M

West indian Poetry

replace ? ib-|
ca ae In the second half of ‘Carib-
Mic abee haa pe be Geshe bean Voices’ at 7.15 p.m. on
8! aa Sie the G.O\S, The tatks Sunday, 19th a selection of poe-
— rather questions and an- try. from all over the Caribbean
swers — are on the subject « it iv " hn
e : q will be given. The poets are John|
Adult Education as seen by H. Hakton Eileen Cooper, K. G.}
V. Wiseman, now of Leeds Cnml- Hall, Fleurette Bowers of Jamai-
versity, who was Education ca, W. S. Arthur of Barbados,
sci in Dominica from 1943 jp.’



Raymond Barrow of British Hon-
duras and E. Mc G. Keans of St.
, Vincent. The first part is a short
story by Jack Gordon ef British
Guiana.

t

to 1947 who tells of his experi-
ehees in angwer to questions put
to him by John Figueroa of Ja-
naica who is now Lecturer in
glish -at London University s |
instite Educati The series |
besan on the 6th March and No. |

the series pe
next, 20th inst.
programme is

Class’









heard

Tr
entitled |
on re-|
cordings of an adult class actual- |
ly in session, and it will endeav- |
an action
been
x1

will



and is based

ir to give
what h

theory

picture

liscussed in







st two broad

}





rhe membe r
Speak for them
about themselves. Mr. Wiseman
is the tutor and John Figueroa
tnterrogates. In the final pro-}
ime an outside critic, S. G.|
Raybould, Director of the Extra- |
Mural Department of Leeds Uni-

f the cl
selves and

perhas

}
will |
|
|
|
|











versity, will be brought in | THE FINAL Touch
provide, with the previous two |
participants, a discussion forum |} TO YOUR MAKE-UP ;
to ddssect the material point
raised in the first three pro- | 4 ” 4

| eee Fi

nah manicured with

grammes, You can tune in to the]
Series at 7.15 p.m. on Mondays on










|

megacycles, 31.32 metres or | C U TEX |

‘ negacycles, 25.53 metres. |
he rmer began usually gives |

better reception than the latter |

"| Magic-wear CUTEX, so

but it does not come on the
until the start of the West Indi easy to apply i

t as ‘ y— gives
1alf-hours while the other on | PP?) §

from 6.00 p.m, beauty to your fingertips.





|

British Industries Fair | i

Ever since the last British} This incredibly long-

Industries Fair in 1949, William | wearing polish resists 1}
Holt has been tourit Britain | f - |

and giving his impressions of | chipping and peeling. |
{

industry in his weekly talks. Now /|





that preparations for the British

Industries Fair of 1950 are well Stays perfect longer —
advanced, Mr. Holt will be de- i

voting four of his talks to CUTEX’s clear, non-
preview’ of the Fair. The first rye }

Of theas will be benaAdest te. bis fading shades never seem
current series ‘On the Job" in to lose their

coming week, that is, at 9.15

on Tuesday, 21st inst.

brilliance lustre.

ee

B.B.C. Radio

aotr «x

World's most popular
nail polish.



AT YOUR SERVICE





Asn . é IN CLEANING, DYEING,
a ae ee Bet LAUNDERING 'AND HAT

The News, News seaiers

Analysis, 7:15:a.m. Ni the Opera, | DRESSING

4.â„¢m,

From the Bi


















reel, |
The
Py

30 p.m
News, 2
itain, 2

p.m

8.16 a.m

Programme Parade, 8.15 a.m Anthology
» 8.30 a.m. Donald Peers, 9 am.

« Down, 12 noon ews, 12.10

News Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Carroll]
calls the tune, 1 p.m. People and places |
ound London, 1.15 p.m
|





{
Radio New |
Ray’s a Laugh, 2 p.m
10 p.m, Home News from
Mar e, ?

Bay Street. Opp. Comberme re St
19.3 .50—4n
| KEEP THIS DATE
15 pam, Muse Marsrone, Poon OPEN
3.30 7
cela JSUNE Sth
(
(
(
(
)
Just Received
FRESH STOCKS OF THE
FPOTIOWING:
HORLICKS MALTED MILK 8 sizes



Henry Hall's Guest Night,




















p.m. Under the Greenwood Tre
The News, 4.10 p.m. Inter
p.m. Monia Liter Q 1.30 p.m.]} r
Sina kone a8 reas LOYAL BROTHERS OF
) p.m. Variety Bandbe } p.m. Pro ie
me Parade, 6.15 p.t Fix the
oly he RI THE STARS
p.m. The New 10 p.n * *
Ne nalysis rr Chribt ’
\ 45 The Discip o
copie. 8 p.m, Radio ec ANNUAL
Montmartre Players 30 p.m
Service, 9 p.m. The News, 9.10 |
Ho ws from Britai 9.15 ¥
People and places t 2 }
don, 9.30 p.m. Tip top Tunes, 10 p.m
I do Forum, 10.30 ¢ I }
Laugh, 11 p.m. The New AT

QUEEN'S PARK

MONDAY MAROH 10, v949










News, —————S
d sis a.m. Sh%
7 | ee
7.4 , Generally °
k the Editorials,



OF

e Parade, 8.1













n. Close Down ?
2.10 News Amals is
mme Parade, 12,18 p.m ~
Grand Hotel,, 1 pum »
1.15 pm Ratlio Ne 3s
Have a go, 2 p.m. Th °
Home News from B |@ GERMICIDAL SOAP 1% (Neko
Sports Review, 2.30 4) CUTICURA SOAP
3 pm, From the 1? ts OINTMENT
The News, 4 @ CREAM OF. WHEAT
» 4 : g ALLEN BURY’S MALTED For
Ss 2. 8
4 Q PA OL COMPOUND
ordec er- | N BABY POWDER
ne ¢ mig J SON BABY LOTION

New

CREAM







SOP ALOE OI OI?



Eduration, 451) ie +» SOAP
D.t you, 8 p.m Radio | %
Newsr World end Euro-
pe Ice Hockey Championship: 8.30 x °
p.m. London light congert orchestra, 9 Xx aid
sieseavtwten ees 8 @ CARMTON BROWNE
fro Britain, 9.15 p.m. Se c Re- | & 4
view, 9.90 p.m. Recital, 10 p The) %
Riddle of the Sands, 10.20 p.m. Three's | % Wholesale & Retai)
Comprn 10.45 Bem. Ce cawea ° + x
ll p The 3 Druggist
s
9 Mc, WRUW 11.73 Mc, WRI x|¢ 136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813 :
%

SSCP CCEECOECE BEE COBG OSES









AIRWAYS LIMITED

several changes in schedule which he e





ling changes in times of arrivals.

DUE ito
effective Saturday, ist April, 1950, all porcon |-
ing reservations on or after that date ar lly
* requested to communicate with our Office, _.ow
} 2
Broad Street, (Phones : 4585 and 2789) for inform-
\
Ki

]
and {
}



6

PSOPPSOSD





SUNDAY ADVOCATE





—_—










TRIUMPH FOR TRIUMPH!!!

The new Thunderbird... 650 c.c.!]
O.H.V. fast, powerful; luxury in
travel to Triumph standards: the
best in the World... here soon.

A. BARNES & CO. LTD.

is your Home iooking Shabby ?

Why not give it a coat of Paint inside and outside ?

We have an excellent Stock of - - -

Ready Mixed Paints

- - - in Various Shades
+

N.B. HOWELL

Dial 3306 Lumber and Hardware, Bay Street.



Now Opening :—

CRICKET BATS AND CRICKET SETS
FOR BOYS

FLOWERED GLASS
FOR DOORS

AT



LOOK OUT!!

INSPECTOR BOB FABIAN

WILL BE COMING YOUR WAY
IN THE

EVENING ADVOCATE

TO-MORROW







ala a te FOF PPE LPL >
s
‘
‘
‘
*

ee ee

AO

present the week’s specialty—

TROPIC GOLD LAYER CAKE

sprinkled with juicy coconut and «4 layer of golden pineapple
It’s a

CAKE-

thals
sure lo

Please



Try ‘heir specialties and be convineed of their superiority ir

the baked goods they serve.

pote

WILLIAM FOGARTY LED.

INC. IN B.G.
e

Leading Centre for . . .
Exclusive English Suitings

HARRIS & SPORTS
TWEEDS,

GABERDINE, SERGES
& DOESKINS

Please call and see us, when it will
be our privilege to see that you are
fully satiefied which is much .. ,

And become one of our
REGULAR CUSTOMERS
which ig more

“THE HOUSE OF FOGARTY”

combines Tailoring Craftsmanship
with High-Grade Clothing
AT KEENEST PRICES















PCA PLELEALSS LE?
PPLE LL VCL SPELL EEA EPR A ACLESL PROPS > «



PAGE FIFTEEN

Ses SS
& —— {

WIT the beauty spot of the island \
EDGE WATER HOTEL
BATHSHUEBA

This newly erected modern hotel is situated in the
most picturesque part of the island.

TELEPHONE 93zis rQOR RESERVATIONS
f.-oms with or without private bath etc. We specialise
,







er









in Fish and Lobster Luncheons. — Well Stocked Bar




LES LLL LLL FD CELSO ELG IO Oe

LINOLEUM CARPETS
Sizes: 9 ft. by 7% ft. and 10% ft. by 9 ft.
Also
LINOLEUM IN ROLLS 6f1. wide

All very reasonable in Price.

L. bE Lid,

10 & 1) Roebuck Street

BRESSSSSAGSSONGSSSSOGS4 6 SE LOOEBBCOLEA BSCS
OO EEL EOE GLE SECO EEE CC SPE CPA LAPS PA AAE?!





&stablisheo

locorpurated
186)

1926

LODGES FOOSE:

PGCE



EN
x

; :

{

8

de ine eae aks eat

Lig Thermometers ; «gical Dressings and

i S Pulse Glasses Piasters

) Bandages

\ Drinking Tubes Scissors

{ Hot Water Bottles Bed Pans

Ice Caps Trusses %
\} ==" OUR PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT IS SECOND TO %
\ NONE IN BARBADOS. Send Us your next Prescription >
{\ ’ %
COLLINS’ DRUG STORES 3
i SOM Lee eee + 3

4

“
,



LLLLLLLLLPPLLPKL APPEAL ALLA

Ps ee =











Mere ers taered aoe






=

BOOKS ON OUR SUGAR CANE

MODERN MILLING OF SUGAR CANE
by Francis Maxwell
SPECTS OF SUGAR CANE PRODUCT _ |}
by Francis Maxwell {t
THE PRINCIPLES OF SUGAR CANE
MANUFACTURE
CANE SUGAR

ECONOMIC

by J. G. Davies

AND ITS MANUFACTURE

by H. C. PRINSEN GEERLIGS, Ph.D.

MACHINERY AND ITS EQUIPMENT OF THE
SUGAR CANE FACTORY by L. A. Tromp

°e

G Oo .

DIAL 3301

’s the Perfect Time, and you wiii always
have it with you-—IF:

YOU BUY A
ROLEX WATCH! |

COME IN AND SEE THE WORLD FAMOUS

ROLEX OYSTER

Sold exclusively the World over hy leading Jewellers.

LOUIS = L.

Bolton Lane



BAYLEY,

Sole Representative in Barbados.



TO O“§F“ONR PLANTER AND
TRADER FRIENDS







You can now obtain an

INSURANCE OF MONEY POLICY

WITH THE

ROYAL INSURANCE CO., LTD.

which will afford you cover against loss of
money whilst in transit between your premises
and the Bank (or other destination), or vice
versa; and also whilsi in: locked safes.



x We shall be pleased to give you full
‘ particulars and advice.
’ DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—acents

s
‘.
x
s
>
&

>

FRPOES Fe



SPSS

POOP PPPS

sy
<, , +4 DOA Ott Ft tt be .
LOS oA POON OF IAI OEEEM A gl AF ot 0 oa a GG TET. COCA 0 gt Fv 0a oF»



















LALA LLP PE OLIVE PPO EE

Make Your

Home Look

Attractive
with
CONGOLEUM

We can supply you witli
Various Sizes in Attractive Pailerns
g480: 3

FIBRE and KUBBER MATS







Pay us a visit before purchasing elsewhere

The Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd.

(The House for Bargai*s)
Nos. 33 & 52 Swan Street. $3 Piuone 2109 or 4406
LLLP CFCS SSF EFFEC FOOD.





{







Ni
f
i

SS See

i

4
4
7
i



‘I
*
mi

eds -aeae



a

‘%
‘
{
5
i

t
{
i
|
|
Ly
}
}
:
j
s
*
|
|
{

=e nes



PAGI








MARINE CPL.



SIXTEEN



whetittorss s of



*y of apver

JUST HELPING CLEM TO CARRY ON

“* Copyright. By arr

Sa ee a

|

STUBBLEFIELD of one of the visiting U.S. |

Warships who thrilled listeners at the Globe Theatre on Friday

night.

37 Boats
Sailed
Yesterday

was witnessed







in weer the
ne f and when tne
F ‘ f R.B.Y.C
W é € ci t Cilut
h bo ap-
: be ailing beside each
ite” rounded the
Nor k rst al kept its lead
eve at tarted. Tha
I th-about
ve ¢ ind wind. Nine
i irted in the ‘B’ Class, ten
in the ‘( il in the Intermediate
he ‘D’ Class. In
e ‘Dp e Nod did not start
we Burke's ‘“Kesolute,” skip-
red by Hammond Burke, came
t in the ‘B’ Class. Second posi-
went to Mr J D. Chandler's
Kay 1 close behind in
thir place wa John Toppin
M ief
in e Intermediate Calyps
a Gem II” dropped out after
the lap, Honours in vhis race
were rried ff »y Johnnie
I Coronetta Georgie
} Gnat” came econd and
is Donald Stoute In
vader
Gerald Nichclas’ ran off witb
the ‘C” Class beating Milton
Tucker’s “Astra which came
second. Third was Colin’ Bel-
lamy Magwin.”
The “D” Class race was won

They’ Ih Do It Every



Wrex HOSPITALIZED FOR WATER |
ON THE SOCK j=
WOLFY HAD NURSES WHO'D 4 CLOCK

He sang “I’m In The Mood For Love” and “Again”.

| ther

angement with Daily Herald,



SUNDAY



e

rent must not be brought Toa —

in such condilions as These there can be no excuse
for indul ging in factious or fractious opposition. We have no
doing anything, of the kind" Q°POS/TION LEADERS

(Homrse aes er)

Arsenal And Chelsea -
Draw Thrilling Game

LONDON, March

Fighting back grimly against a

2—0 deficit, Arsenal drew 2—2,
with Chelsea before a_ 68,000

crowd in the first semi-final of the | ®
Football Association Cup at Toten-

han
day

f
)

Chelsea, unable to play two!
their first team forwards be-
of injuries, réceived a fur-
handicap just after the in-
terval, when their inside left
Hugh Billington suffered a leg in-
ul forced to limp along

ause



ue 2 for the rest of the

ime Playing more calmly than
AX enal at the start, Chelsea had
their English International cenvre-
forward Roy Bentley. A few sec-
nds before the interval Cox re-
luced a lead with a goal direct
rom a corner. Arsenal put every-

thing they had into vhe attack and
Leslie Compton headed the equa

jliser from his brother, Dennis’
orner kick
Manchester United and Liver
pool were both beaten at home
Blackpool scored a great 2—1 win
over United and Wolverhampto»
Wanderers. Manchester United

remain top of the table.
Second Division leaders Toten-_

ham Hotspur crashed to their
| fourth defeat of the season at
| Barnsley, and Sheffield United,
lsecond in the table, could only
draw at home to Leicester. Notts
County, with a draw at Walsall,

Federal Set-Up |
Will Be Costly |

@ From Page i

As this official—whom he pre-
sumed would be from the Unitea
Kingdom—would be stationed ir
Trinidad, he would have

no per-
sonal knowledge of, or person
al contact with, the personal-

ties in the various islands, anc
ie would not be in a position tc
elect th

he most qualified people

That being the case, he woulc
have to get this information fron
ohers—in the colonie and thi
vould be @xposing the < truc-
ion of the Senate )
ritucism

If that is the rrect (

n 1 have placed on the 1atter

id Mr, Chase, “I do not think it
would be in the best inter« oO.

the federal body that it should be

Several othe

peopie in public
life told the “Advocate” that they
have not yet had the time to reac
the report
Corkie Roberts Rainbird’

Second was Geofirey Johnson's
Imy and third Raymond Mut
phy’s “Van Thorndyke

Results were:

B' Class 1, Resolute, 2. Okapi
3. Mischief.

Intermediate l Cornetta 2
Guat. 3. Invader

©. Giese: 3 Rogue 2. Astra
3. Magwin

D’ Class: 1. Rainbird. 2. Imp
3. Van Thorndyke

The Fifth Regatta of the
R.B.Y.C., will be sailed on Sat
urday, March 25.

7 ume trvinone 6 toe

Prev a AN EYE
hE HAD
BIT

semen ad

od

EO

SSS

| home
| retained



Rovers, with
against Wrexham
their leadership in th-
Third Division Southern and
Northern Divisions respectively.

SCOTTISH LEAGUE DIVISION B:
Airdrionians 3, Saint Johnstone 0 —
Athletic 2, Dunfermline Athletic 3
Broath 1, Albion Rovers 3. Ayr United
2, Morton 2. Cowdenbeath 6, Stenhour
muir 1. Dimberton 1, Forfar Athletic |
Hamilton Academicals 1, Kilmarmock 0
F A. Cups Semi Final, Chelsea 2,
Arsenal 2

SCOTTISH LEAGUE DIVISION A:
Aberdeen 2, Queen of the South 0. Clyde
1, Raith Rovers 1. East Fife 1, Dundee ‘
Falkirk 1, Sibernian 2. Heats 5, St, Mir
ren 2. Rangers 2, Motherwell 0. Sair
Mirren 0, Celtic 1. Third Lanark 2, Par
trick Thistle?

FIRST DIVISION: Birmingham City !
Manchester City 0. Bolton Wanderers

Charlton Athletic 0. Burnley 1, Hudde
| feld Town 0. Derby County 2, Fulham !
L iverpool 0, Wolverhampton Wanderer
Blackpool 2
Sunderland |

Doncaster
victory

and

| Manchester United 1,
Everton 0

| si »ke City 1,



The Weather |



TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.06 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m.

4 (First Quarter) March

6.30 p.m.
3.58 a.m.,, 4.16

nightie:

High Water:
p.m.

YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington): Nil.

Total for Month to Yesterday

Temperature (Min,) 70.5
deg. F.

Wind Direction (9 a.m.)
(il a.m.) E.

Wind Velocity 10 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.064
(11 a.m.) 30.063.

E,



_By y Jimmy 3 Hatlo



CPERATION LAID HiM LOW= |
BEAUTIFUL NURSES...
IOW COULD HE KNOW?







al

18 \

Hotspurs Ground, London, to- | £

EVERY SUNDAY NIGHT



om Hotspur 0

smouth 1. West Bromwich
astle United 1
=COND DIVISION:

Albion 1,

Barnsley 2, Toten-
Coventry City 1, Black-
umn Rovers 1 Grimsby Town 4,
radford 0. Leeds United 3, Hull City 0
iton ‘Town 0, Cardiff City O. Preston
th End 0, Plymouth Argyle 0. Queens
Rangers 3, Chesterfield 2. Sheffield
nited 2, Leicester City 2. Southampton
Brentford 3. Swansea Town 1, Shef-
d Wednesday 2 United 4,






2. West Ham

iry 0

‘IRD DIVISION NORTHERN. Br-
y 0, Crewe Alexandra 2

Darlington 1, Carlisle United

Doncaster Rovers 2, Wrexham 0. Gat-
i Accrington Stanley 0. Halifax

idtord
Chester 0,
vers 0

SERVED

From 7 to 10 0’clock

We





Top Scorers

——_—_—











COLD DANISH
BUFFET SUPPER

Make.

SU





». MAFF

ADVOCATE

ce LLL LLL

Dramatic Wins
Lincolnshire |
Handicap |

LINCOLN, March 18
Dramatic, owned
Saunders won
iuncoinshire the first big hand. -
cap of the English fiat racing |
season here this afternoon. Gor-|
don Richards, the champion}
jockey, brought Dramat ce
to an easy three lengths victor)
over last year’s winner, Mr
c. ¥. C. W. Gordon’s Fair |
Judgement with Mr. A. Barnevt’s
Pal Joy two lengths away third

there were forty runners.
Dramatic which was 33 to one,
when the*entries were known was}

coit. by

M Lucky”

The
the



backed down to start a_ seconc,
favourite at seven to one. Dra-
matic, drawn number 37, made



the most of his favourable draw
and striking the front a quarter-
mile from home ran on to wil
unchallenged .

This was Gordon R chard’s
second success in the Lincoln-
shire. He won ten years ago on
Quarter Maitre, who was ther
favourite. Fair Judgement mad
a gallant attempt to emulat:
the feat by winning the race
two years in succession. Hr
came late on the scene + but
eculd not make any impression
on the Dramatic. Fair Judge-
ment another well backed horse
started at 100 to six while Pal
Joy was a 40 to one outsider’

Dramatic brougnt off one
sae biggest gambles in the 101
years history of the race. Tre
coup is reported ag_having been
planned five months ago and ir
the meantime thousands of
pounds had gone on the five year
old trained by George Todd at
Manton, Berkshire. Dramatic, by
Fair Trial out of Titinic, sufferec
from rheumatoid arthritis in his
hind legs last year and was prac-

of









tically paralysed all over.
fitted

Town 0, Lincoln City 1 Hartleypools

United 1, Mansfield Town 3. New

Brighton 0, Rotherham United 3. Roch-

dale 2, Barrow 1 Southport 1, Yor
City 1 Stockport County 1, Oldham
Athletie 3.

THIRD DIVISION SOUTHERN: Alder-

shot 0, Crystal Palace 0. Brighton =n
Hove 2, Port Vale 1. Bristol City
Ipswich Town 2. Millwall 1, Souther
United 2. Newport County 1, Exeter
City 2. Northampton Town 2, Reeniir
0. Norwich City 4, Leyton

Town 1, Bristol Rovers 0. Torquay Uni-
ted 3, Bournemouth 1 Wale 3,
County 3 EUTE

ave

Orient 0

Nottingham Forest 0, Watford 1. Swindon
gate.
}
'

O





ITS

THAT FIT

YOUR FIGURE
AT
PRICES
TO

SUIT

YOUR POCKET
SEE US FIRST f

EI & Co., Ltd.

in

=—

Tailoring







SS

ll OOo

ots

dy
)

} X-—1097

Wi

accident

y

n

| F

FIREWOOD CHARCOAL

*f

si





|

}
)

'

}
'
)











a



Car Damaged
In Accident

part of the
slightly damagea
became involved in an
with the lorry P—2»
esterday evening on Strean
toad, Christ Church about 4.4
clock. ‘ne lorry was being driv-
1 by Thelston Barnevt of St
atrick. The car is owned and
as none driven by Mr. Pulve
i St. Lawrence.

THE rear car
was

hen it

ARRIVE HERE

Arriving at Bridgetown yester- |
day
“Alexandrina
1 ey

31-ton schooner
R’ which sales
om St. Lucia with firewood ana
narcoal for this port:

The “Alexandrina R” is
gned to Mr. D. L. Johnson.

was the

DANCE

Sanbury Resolute Sports
Club

at

THE DRILL HALL, ” GARRISON

©a SATURDAY Night April 1, 1980
susic by Mr. A. Meanwell’s ©

Refreshments on Sale

ADMISSION



N.P.C. A. ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING

Tuesday, 21st March, at 8.30
. at the .

Y.M.C.A. HALL

H.E. The Governor, Patron
of the Society, has gracious:y
consented to preside,

The General Public is invit-
ed to join our memters in
attendance.

“We speak for those who can-
not speak for themselves.”















SFP FEES SSF SSS DDD

|



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
OF THE WEST INDIES

eXTRA-MURAL
DEPARTMENT

A LECTURE

on the Report of the

West Indian Federation
by

Judge J. W. B. CHENERY,
B.A.,

at the British Council Rooms,
Wakefield, on Tuesday,
March 21st, at 8.15 p.m.













Always keep ..

SACROOL

IN THE HOME!!



{ffi FAMOUS REMEDY
for SPRAINS & RHEUMA-

TIC PAINS.
ACTS LIKE MAGIC
On Sale at

ALL DRUG STORES.

KNIGHTS LTD.











Here's a Treat for the

EASTER. season

We have opened a smail
Quantity in WHITE

SHARKSKIN

Its Superb Quality and soft
to touch Finish



is simply







Irresistible. °





Come at your
Centre—

THANI Bros,

Dial 3466

Shopping

Pr. Wm. Hy. St.
and 6, 42 & 53 Swan St.



con~ |

f

;

sion (fe!



} New Fashion Plastic



} In Black, White, etc. from $3.95, $4 Handbag, aa :
For CHILDREN at 21,92 aa an 5495 .

i} LADIES’ HATS Y FELT 0

i IATS IN FELT AND STRAW ;

Y Latest Styles and Colours 7

Also for CHILDREN i

READY-MADE DRESSES, BLOU SES, sx :
} SLACKS AND SUN surrs 8

)) At The... P
,

; i 8

| EPRRGREDU AY mae 5 Step
aiteia eo » ad < . 2 |

dane an ; Ss

| —= ah
] .
}

Witite [ggg

HHES SSeS

4

Emb-oidered wy; :

” With oes) He

——

scenes. ie le a

hild - 5 935 245 a A

yeers : 4
Each igi G47

BIBS |

Bates Ae

WV





CAVE SHEPHERD & Co, in|

13 BROAD STREET

1, 12 &



y
PPSSSSSSSSS SOO 99999

We have received new stocks of

RED HAND HARD Gli
PERMANENT GREEN Pi

This P posse
and spre ading
reliable



ses outstanding cipeate
power and a thoroughly
permanency of colour,

Standing Closer Association 1 gin. tins » SIULSB
Committee 1% gin. tins Ks 5.87 :
. on. 14 gin. tins 3.00 3



The Sign of
Quality

,
|g
4

!
1
|

2

\

Special Grey Ung in
1 gin. tins 3 ‘

WILKINSON & HAYNES (0, UD

Agents,

5

*Phene 4456
. SEGA OAS 6600906

$y SSPRSSSOS PPS PPSFSOSS SSS

Food Tips

FOR THE

Housewives!!
CANADIAN EGGS
SALAMI SAUSAGES

Tins LOBSTER PASTE
PEA FLOUR
EGG PLUMS,
PLUMS, DAMSON
VICTORIA PLUMS



”

GOLDEN
PLUMS,

—

ALLEYNE

ARTHUR
DRY ESCHALOT & CO., LTD.
me High Street

am "

Pkgs.

”

SHELL

FOODYEAST
CATELLI EGG

(1-lb.)
NOODLES

ALMONDS





444,
SSSOSSOCIOIOOO 7
——— SS

GOOGSOSS

HIGH
| CLASS |

WOOLLENS —

WORSITEDS —
CASHIMERES





ms
O
aw

LANE

\

i~



Full Text

PAGE 1

BELGIAN PRIME MINISTER RESIGNS Sunil.i; Utarr fa i;> 1950. ^un^au ^toworte IX (I.1TH Year ... famine, Disease Threaten China Millions Face Death BONG KONG, Mrch IS. _HU;.\>devclopins famine is iiffpcling millions ol C people in eleven provinros sniilh of Ihe OnM W-il %  Htrcconiinu in In.-i 'ureign and Chhwae nan „j,3iv ihal disease is fast spri-nrling among Ihe pensanK J^r^isl (.• is lowered llirnuvh scurvulion. A riln-1 mission now h rb Make Ministerial :es %  BOd MISKISC wei >4 out ..I tK The mivion predicted il, %  luld deteriorate rap nlliioiH w.mld .it. || not Immrdlal I ^fc*rtpmenutiv Albert Lamarle. Knurl U Havana, succeed* i t Edmund Peti Dc Beau-i French Consul-General in m. hss l ^" R m Havana Fran Director of Technical; KJIT— at the French For| Changes £5, HAKIS Ma.rh 18. ''• I RJ,,. Preni ' ', . been appointee untold :i. —.ii [or l..i ** %  |: > Ml %  .MMUIIOSI ) I mined crops. dr rune Inipertor-Gener.il waebed away stored to .Sc'posu. has been apI and drowned liveitock. SLch Minuter in HugBecause Yangtse and Huai v %  • or dykes were broken In man places, large areas nraall luring ihe autumn, tvhil -ii ovend with a I mud and sand. Further Strikes Threatened Oft*, succeed* htm in th an Mi. Georges EL*? f 'he French Embassy ZKDW is appointed Front I Tirana. Rayons D. P has been appointed D-Aflaires at the Frene \\a Rangoon. St an Roy i French Coni fadui. —Renter. !-OI-SPAIN i. H 18. %  asut) Adams, Harbados LaIttder who passed through Ins way agggfWl to attend %  utlt. old inn airport thai if W.I political I did not work hard now it cause of fedei jttaitoo io ft/t boat interwt Cant:--n He added: "I Hi mj best to hasten (ho jf. of federation throughout Swr explained &at although did not agree with I reeorr.mendation of the IteBCtktIon Comi Tve the right to It* or against those lie it wrong in principle when %  an come* before the LcgisTfcr adoption. it UJ milk f(r me to fo" aenHj to agree with things % %  • %  -I • think tin dameuutll) said. .^..M UWW however thai : %  % %  *M .it afti; %  ill do his best to hi m of Federation. —(Bv ( ifeta)) lor* Hani Or Be Traitors S4VS ADAMS Disaster followed in I •i' when m crushc, -t roved ftlms\ omit by peasants fro ever materials the Ooo left nehind. Other sources ind economic rhs %  %  There was drought and pestilence TheG 'I night that they are nw Ufa of grain into the si areas. I for aid "' %  •art has so far UeJaad, i.ut Chhv i %  • Anhwei Mission here tl —Renter Wn 0 May Have Hd One Heart to"aaaBMi |f^|^PAIN Mstop>v performed on th* %  at twin.this morning lea P*ctJ men n,„ t„ believe ibe :,. n %  Bthfrr.. Potts ib. (.ovPJpWhologisi who did th"•ported conlinu %  Mocti If.?* 1 *L ttcovMiea which mlgh t %  bllltved that the twins V*** **d %  twin heart and !" a single liver Th< wp medical C P* M >nt< %  %  wl test ,rtv ( lb 4et 7 Days In Shark V^ aters PEARL HARBOUR. .Mar. IB uted States Nay recall ship "Comstock" late last nigh, picked up 28 All %  who had spent seven days on 1 ft rafts In the shark infested water, of the Pacific Ocean. The men were off tl tender "Elder" which caught tire in niid-ocea. %  i 10. The (/f>msln.r, 'apart from had sunburn, the. were none th) mM eX|M i lence. The leacued men said thai three officers and elevei. remained aboard the "Elder' t light the lire The. thenuelraa had been or[p beeauM .11 feared that munition: aboard would explode and blow the tittle i men who abotxd OH .' %  • and unhurt." —Keater. Bmptr frnm cl %  The ball. rKrwaver, atiuck tha laft upright and (jerman Dock Demolished HA %  ii 18. ind man> %  Hi graving dock %  %  blood ii: %  nounced 11 i'd to pn %  tratora. Ham LMM that might have lKen prcventc. %  ;uie from i Konrad Adenauer tc %  :ier ClenBrian Robartai Ion Adenjuer had Lfng woulc 'leceaaary taraan >hip building m%  The dock known aa Elbe 17 is .ied but is OPOI the biggent Qarman shipping Arm —ReNter. good forward movement %  i Labour V^ ill Carry On Says Isaacs LONDON. March 18. •aaa, Minister o( Mr Clement AttleeV %  'o-night. "Wp are going to rarry nmanl for a good .it %  rncctlni London, Isaacs said: "Do not beicvtihe suggestions that there I two 01 hire months time If : %  %  Consenatives) want ug hem get us out. The m h" people put us in powgi igtd n rhc Qovara i ant is Komg to do the right thing i v Britain, whether thaj an on : not." %  not nmnlng ; i v |ng on "—Healer. "Inde/iemh'nco" Still Radioactive WASHINGTON. March IB. The former IndViH IHlrmr Ull after it was drenchel by watei blast during the experiments ll Bikini TinNavy announced thai i... Nasal Air missile test Point Pucu, —Heater iB? W En-Lai Accuses U.S. Of Imperialistic Policy laf^L^ LONDON. March 1H ^'?J e Communist Foreign Minister Chou En-Lai, tog >aM Mr. Dean Acheson's Sun Fran< r^n policy in Asia, an attempt "to doj.. rjfjyJl h d the experience 'n London Ku88ia Help Red Chinese HOMO KONti. Uarefa 18. 1 to-day ti Soviet Chine* Communists to man anti-aircraft hai's four airport attack. The statement! could not ! %  ilnmitely %  %  '... (brain sou Mjinclhing similar had been rei : %  %  % %  I ">ut 2.000 I Shanghai for alr%  airport haw j*n.is man said %  had not haadli thern. —R#iil#r. •''•riiiuii Mark * Nose-Dive E I "J'"I the Kav. Oerma Jai that L^^s Pending R" Germ !" .„ ? tai^f ' dUpM siT. !" red mieht soon %  Ba' J^"" ,1 might soon lx CiSE**!!* 'ormed eerls 1 gs* •" %  rnarki 3* buy west mark for %  rai ( >nt lu ejvT^*. <" ne we. JJ^aj s rate in Deutschr jSteform'-S t Wr 1 T 1n a '" —Renter. In a sutement. leplying to Hie policy speech made by the Amei ican Secretarv of State on Marc". itou En-Lai charged that -ulippiniand many strategic Paclrii islands 50 years ago. obtalneo ,f Japan and South Korea after world war II and was "also attempting to control lOtMata, Vietnam Thailand. Burma and India." %  The whole world knows thai the United States Oovi In its attempt to annex China has supported Chiang In waging large scale denying the Chlnaa* people an> freedom or any rights, any opportunity to live in independence %  Poppet* imilar methou g, Oa rage II Expelled Prelate Leaves Prague PRAGUE. Ur. 13 Monsignore Ottavio I | %  I u i Rota Baa -s-kia, left I .> for Rome. %  %  isiry. which -aid he carried .. a activities on [tn expelled within ihr.-e It is believed that brfi Bora. %  Do lava an R with the VatV %  i..inDO I. v.. <||SC10M>< .ivlng that he had pre 'esied formally last an • C/echoalovak Oovi press attacks against hi .f'the western diploma lie miaaions in Pragu< lie Lira off. —Reeter. Federal Set-Up Will Be Costly Says City Druggist FEW HarbadiaT.s have >ct rcai' the RepOII %  nmittee on U* a ol th< ublighed in book form Iggl en whci in instalments in thl %  %  'Hi unit %  i rnoat o the enthusiasts will bo gone" that few paoajoi orW whom hi? ha: discussed i I I :ig up of the Federal jstnicUnW.!. Ur Uiiea In Parliaineiil London—In a Ho. Common* debate on CTVU %  (March 7). |f| <",.-,, tTre> Cooper (Lakiour) asked Mr. John Dugdalc. run* Ministej of Situ if he would look n ironsi-i n the 'lira. %  We know", he said, "that at all ndequ.it. by air transport. We cannot hope to get au> toiooki unless transport facilities are ulequale to do the : :ied. I lagt 18 months by n %  .ii the West IwUBB. It U I that ii I f the Kremlin In He told ..n election meetm, too much Idolatry %  Soviet leaa • i— aa wa< aider thr old m i no of Moscow, he saio included ii %  He said a pi I masses, ureaucrats had arteon m Moscov %  peoplo Thla, the J im."—ReuUr. would entail %  Vderal Judiciary and the nmnlng of the Federal S< a tremendous amount The contributions of the Constituent Territories %  some measifT of ittfllculty and the choosing of the seat of thi / capital would always he open to much CII'I | A Civil servant thought thai I was not sufficiently known that heFedei. vould noi the exi.iling I.' tones but would be entirely add! tional. He felt that some of thi with their lopheavy methods for government should have taken the opportune. ie modnication ol Mr. Victor i nas. an* Vestry said that while not committing l •he principle %  f federation as outlined in the report, from the Unto him that the idea of the Governor (" %  eneral of the area selecting senators from each of the colonie> (or the Senate, might hung about %  great deal of dissatisfaction. • UR page lb Sports Window NX fo.rth-11 inalchaa wIU hr PMyad dun-ng ilw •* art Kan%  innori Ovt>) and Quawn > Piarii. T*i lUtura. *.— MONVAV, MASMM "• nverton .. lUnUon I>iiu,-. I. a KrnaingkM, Ovl Indochintu Ordered To Shoot Down U.S. Planes PARIS, Mar. II. The Vietminh (Indo-Chinese! Command in southern Indo-Chin* ied its troops to Are or ir.e territory, according to ai Agence Prance Preaae report from Saigon to-day B o a K> B kagtM CopjHIl St i i I -I. • -lit. N II iL.ii gg>i, ollafa, v v at r Dlvlakm t. < u>umr* Put.. • tnw Mr r Ertword wtamraoar. MA. % %  Empli* va Noli*-Dam>• 1. at Qsieane Pkrk Kafcrrf. Mr I BfO> "Ml RaBAV, HAII H -i l > i.a*.<'k-IU>vt> NparUn. iniiHoit I. Katwlnglo t Oval Hrton atf "> ^ romtr. UiMMman %i> l H>rt *,+ Mr Paul With.i. %  ajim i II i Noanao n r*m.. I>i. al ^iaro Pmr* Palrm a 'All aii*l MMU H | 111 kwlCfe.Rmrt. >. laaatrr. 0>MalMi 1. al Keiauiwum (nai laraa. Mr 1. Th^ Mr Kf*afcUaU>rt i >. ThMIUM. L*l ter. L Is The Senator Indiscreet? Doctors For \lom Victims NEW YORK. Mar. 18 rk Health ofnciaU havi launched a plan to pi • State* 30.000 doctors to t.ie atomic d sailor. its a*f %  iai • %  stated %  the heat •aateo a—Renter. NEW YORK. March 18. Legislauon to depon Charlie cnaplain and others is plannw. In the United States rmigraat i; Senator Wlitiaiii Laatger, JJakoU Republican, the "Ne* York Dally Newsreported today. The News" said Senator Langer hoped to Introduce the legWjauon as an amendment to a Bill by Smator Kdwln Johnson (Colorado. Democrat), to require federal beaming of films, actors and predDoon Jolinaon's BID. the New-' said, was directed sneciflcalh mi act re sst s Ingrid Bergman ai d [ Rita Hay worth, for their interro.'ional rotnancac which he saiJ. flouted civilisation's moral code. TTe New York "Dail to-day quoted Senator Langer a*j i rhecked with the Immigration Department to see i'l Chaplain and other forhi like who have lived here for .10 to 40 years but refuse to tak< out United Statea could also be barred from th' ountry. "Finding that they cannot un der our present laws, I decide, to take legal steps to get rid %  i •hem." In Washington, Senator Bh> l dan Downey, (Democrat Callfornia) said that film people provide "far more examples of good conduct than bod." He deacribed the proposal b Senator Johnson as "one of thmost extreme proposals I hav ever encountered" Downey said he did not con .one the actions of of the ..uiualry wht have violated our arcO) of be.iaviour" But, he added, for . %  there are thousands who "livt l> and wholesomely'' —Reul'i BRUSSELS, March 18. ^FTER A TWO HOUR MEETING of the Belgian Catholic Liberal Cabinet this morning, Premier Eyskens left for the Royal Palace to hanci in Iiis Government's resignation to Rogsnt Prir.co Charles An official communique issued after the Cabinet meeting said: "The Government failing to reach an agreement on summoning a joint session of both Houses of Parliament to vote the repeal of the Regency Law and this point not being included in Government programme, the Prime Minister has decided to hand in the resignation of his Govern ment to the Prince Regent Socialists Meet In U.K. HASTINGS, March 18 Social Democratic leaders fret) all over Europe met here u i 1 %  >robablv take up m.--t remainder of thi —Renter. Wheson Plans New Move WASHINGTON Mar. 18. Mr Do S.aies Secrei.it > ol St.it ported to-day to be planning >t week to enlist congressional support for %  new • %  l | ..st Aslai ountrtoi iio programme h lltfall Ibt Communism. Mi Ai beeon has glw ihitstraUoi i planning uty rnlUtai %  • i o\ The sdminlstratlon already ha iMI.OOO.OOO which COtlli 'i launching a Far Fa*' < rograr %  as left over frm • last vea utress. A BUI Relation "ommittec to axt oar .Het Juno 80 'oan's rifht to snenri Us* The Bill lr %  rnabty could lot lu Is %  \-,., —Reaier Japs May Go To Argentina Plans for sending Jageanai migranU to Argentina now ool await Aic. menl ap proval, the Kyi-do Nam leported here today .nationals in Argentina hi %  %  otltciala will il> to Japs migrants as SON approval has be* tor the in ilan have aLreadj %  md land for atV .armers will shoi —Keul-r Scrap The wall* Ele|)hant r.irtnnlna. Afl.n.liCraTnpnndntl • KINGSTON. Jamaica i D it la the fate of the < i •vhlch is comptei<-U sad hag lor soms rears past been %  osting the taXDO ^is Werks scrapped iU a white t-ut the < OourtCll want" to keei t'n -cores and %  which PN.P. derives it KING GEORGE ILL lM King Ucorge VI is COB his room at PAwklnghan with a slight dull Sir the Royal pgej %  I%  % %  ni> Kruter from the rneeting. Alien I %  N iw one must that the responsible pledged to form %  n ment will tmd a formula, which 1 hope with all my heart. \ cd that the resigna• the government did not tween operated in the outgoing coalition This i* a soluUon of reciprocal in the i I'.irU DifTerenceThe outsnlng %  • n and elghi Uberala. it was formed on Augu I I .fter 43 .lays %  I King ",'s return re! I V.ii.'.oll A general Jim* tie Catholics an majority in the SenateI House—but tha of DapofeV i alholics :H;M %  Old "Royal que ett on," personally %  nally Yesterda> %  wave f 24 "Stop Leopold warning t>roke OUt throughout the Walloon (Speaking) ptovince-. in l'..|giuiu Ms < %  (i. i ral Trygve Lie has appointe an Art Board of foui lo pass Judgment on the paini< utniture, interne rleiorating at mtertar landscaping of the w .oiled Nations headqol They are Mr. Waliai i I "iie,t, M. Ja> i of France, Senor Miguel Covai rubles, of Mexico, and Mi II. %  rd Robertson, Britain —Reatrr CRUDE OIL PRICE WILL DROP MKXICO CITY. March IS, Th* Mexican Govern me,, t beneves the world price of nanwill continue to drop U Senator Antonio Bermu % % %  ral of "Petroleos Mexleanoa*' the Government "poly, said in a, speech here Production ia still exceeding demand, he said adding In hoped to produce 300.o daily by the end of 1 SO — I GALES DELAY ITAUAN LINER NEW YOHK, March 1H. c;ales lashing the Altai to-day delayed incoming ships from Europe In general, skips on 'he Mlantic were delayed from 24 to Among the del.. Italian III from Naples or iU first %  aeear. Br>t> K*W*'V COROMKTIO/. WMS ... g^-^ww f PAARL 1 1 OLD BROWN 1 f SHERRY i aV^lgggy—jJ Ma %  %  in KJ KI % SB Ol sV.V. .i,; t.'" '"" %  "" %  "" i %  % %  *iii 2""**" "' K.W.V. (.linn tvlNCK IUI „. D.„I„ ,„ i„ di „, lleUtaUifc. i,„„ u K..,.I. ... s '" •"-I'l'.l s, M .,„„ ,„ U|1 "'(1 -4... II,. Jldririur in ,.sl. ''"""'"" I 'mi Wtaea I.. "'" •' l lm|>rl dnllr. I Md.I l\|\., K.W.V. MmvinMii Blsi... K \\ \ Klrslin, <-, Dry MMM nil.uj ''IIKKKIKs K.W.V. Shim Ne. 1-Vrr, Ilia ,s„. Dr. J ." k r r !'a"—Medium II,, hunh.rlr. Club— |>,| r •I'liKIIM, HIM. K.W.V. Sparkling 1 r.ns. I.IHH k Hhlle Searklng RoodchrrrIi. ,1 ind ihr (......us sunn, \l,,,..,, l., QU ur Is" V H\ l„K IIIM



PAGE 1

^nvM ABCH 1, 1950 Chou En Lai Reuses L.S. Cocoa Producers Will Get Rise SUNDAY \l)V PAGE ELEVEN ,faie I „,-*! 3.0 D.i. Syng 1 •**- %  Advocate OnvMn,, ., KINGS Product !" o. coffee and coco, < ording to reports culaUon .bout to ct an increase Bishop Of Aiding Safe Jamaica F Navigation Enthroned ol the Dcmo0 t Vietnam, ot 300'-, baton growers are " A ., ...mfcnl. GEOKGKi'on.. —-reate •.,..„. ,,„„„ ._____ A r"OL R-PH,E beacon In the case of codec KINGSTON. Jamaica. (By Mail) rM and wh,: selling at roughly The Rt Rev Basil Montague bMn " bl world prices, the Dale. MA. was enthroned .is Lord ,0 ,he Waini River. Don pected to get Bishop ot Jamaica in the ancient >*>>'" British Guiana i yes"* Venezuela. S ~ hours 'True) off the Waini P r his arrival from England Latitude 8 3JN.. 1-oniii8* W., and in 9 lect ol water ellency ihe Governor Th establishment ol sir John Muggins G.CMG was "e ac n is part of a Plan of the it the ..ervice which was also atTransport and Harbours Deparlended ty dljnH .„, ment lo light the entire seaboard „0 for Clu.ia. ana cocoa Despite high world wl -^bKonwIndep-^etVL prices ahe Canadian ma:; F.^wful lesson for the lhm hundred shillings for 100 s, If ST-hole worlc. ,„,., Government 1, sUll payi" f Li th people ot the col,„,. Jamaica producer €'. "oer ?i, %  C^e bn selected or 100 lbs. Government buy, Ke {S^,, %as objects of ascoffee at this price on behalf of Cnu cn ministers of state and * ,he Colony from the Waini to 'JTXmerlcan imperialtn( BrlUsh MIniitrv of Food pr f "" ,he Corentyne. the contract Is to last for another ,K Ulshl, P ln hi' sermon told Th e Walnl Beacon is visible %  JM of Ihe Asian peo, wo years—who in turn sells it r e eongrcgation that he "1 miles away and gives a ".anted by the Asian In Canada at sky prices, keeping "TJf,, ra nscious of the vast responwhite flash every 12 seconds 3 *5,^MTitlon ( unless the^ |£m without the consent yjca is holding nn cmerSul Congress to-moriViuonal Congress ot Ihe U pirtr-Bel Slum's second U^ also been called for l^i Socialists are opposed {Oil's return. %  LFVinish provinces, where rtiwi generally favours "iT-.j.. !" V iim T i.,, L7l return, Kul Leopold Coronation Market In ^-stern iUh Guiana Trill hn mm "S per cent of the voles. Kingston—is to be closed down for the first time since I94T presently in use. One of the l.in.>_"- where the population after a month's notice to allow The Commonwealth section at wil1 ^ kepl in rese rve to meet nib opposed to the King, the reconstruction work, which Earls Court in which the 11 W 1 ''"' necessary, to be exhibits will be housed will oeiX ls not decided to place The enormous cupy 7,000 square feet. Of thi. lne entrance to the l\ cf the votes cast were in „-Holer. r %  .'tUed by 1 riel, and must Dsprriallsts. as Ache%  =on Ihe other side KB* ocean.' -Heater Minister Resigns HH profttH Comic Study iteihadM Advocat* Com-**KINGSTON iient has set up a Commillce to study the Importat on of comics into the island, as a result of %  resolution proposed by the Hen Douglas Judah and cepted by the old Legislative mncil Mr. H. H. Houghton. Director of Education is the Chairman. ~ !" oc- iv^pun .•ability which rested on him and Th o height of the light is 38 asked their prayers and help in '"' above High Water S| the days to come. Stressing the Tides, and mariners arc warned continuity of the purpose of the to keep not less than quarter Church, he called upon all men nule to the eastward ..: of Cod, and all who ought lo be Beacon when approarhin the men of CM. %  „ „,. „p : ,„d serve w "im Maw, the King of Kings. W.L And British Industries Fair At the mouth of the Pomcroon River the Department has placed a red conical Buo\ whlc exhibits a white light. Hashinit •Wry 7 seconds. This buov ll situate off the mouth of the i Pomeroon In Latitude 7 391 N. and Longitude 58 45' W. Close Down Jamaica Market BkrtMdOO AdVOCMf COfTripWlflB,! I KINGSTON. Jamaica' biggest market — the In LONDON (B. Once again Barbados will not be represented in the West Indies 4 the British Industries ment FMr which is to be held simultaneously this year at Olympia. London, and Castle Bromwich. in UN Mislands, from May 8th to IWh. For the first time since the war however, there will be exIn Keeping With the Dopai t. %  ..;.. %  %  keeping i safe gramme, four new Fairway buoys have been imported and wii. shortly be established outside the entrance to the Esscquibo. Denierara iind Berbice RlVI hibits from St. Vincentl and BrigS. ''"T, wUI K ^ iT ? m '' tub n.... n ...ni i L ".-., farther distant* th.m the buoy.Salt From Prune %  DMlyteij carried out. '.ity of country produce area 999 feet 'have been al'lotleil as '"hie here does not v. which is sold at this market will to British West Indian colonies %  '• be distnbuted lo the tour other This allocation comprises 749 feet Two leading Marks will also market! in the Corporate Area which will be arranged by the be placed at the entrance West India Committee on behalf Berbice River to enable ships, of the islands, and 250 square feel particularly bauxite vessels, lo ln which Ihe Colonial Developleave and enter in sal, t ment Corporation will stage on highest tides which gen, exhibition on behal' of British eur in the early hours of the Ouiana. morning. The Trinidad and Tobago stand The Department alfo will measure 250 square feet plates the early establishment of Police Commissioner Calver Jamaica will have also the same a Radio Beacon at the I.Kl ...a announced yeaterday thai as soon UJMd Ihe Windward Islands se l at ihe entrance to IVi I SL S* 'rj v cn,me nl "PProval will have 137 square feet. A town or at the Ughthouse ashore. for the addition of twelve m-,re slightly smaller area of 112 square This wl|] enable ship .from Colonial Devel??i^?,-;^'. n *^ 1 U5f.i ,n Sf5"_? !" S!i. w, ,i.!?_ ^ k f._ ve r '. to --l Calver Wants 12 More Women taubadoa Advocate Carrwparxietu i KIN'.. Mr Own Cpona>n' 0NDON (By Mail) ..Ulind, one of the CrenGnup, is to receive £2.500 efwlopment M tinsail Here and of Ko£bour, Canouan island %  n will come as an inEL^^^.^'rw,*?' Po"Mwmen lo -tie Jamaica Confeet w.U be taken over by* Ih. mm from Colonial Devels ia b ulary is received, the selecWest Indian Sea Island %  *; „ "on will 1* made from canriiAssociation. nmt imports salt jnu datea already on the waiting list The British Guiana exhibit will b^nt.anda.ihehshhavl 5allsfled lh examiners r ealuro forcsl products, bauxite. ^T^t Wjis bemg expanded n ^ fflr hm h ^^^ SUR ar and rum eU n ^" rt of •JS^H %  local supply -f salt B the isUnd Q ne Coropral and Final exhibits for the ofhri JJ' n ? h t £" wlU **, S two constables, all of whom an stalls have not yet been arrant 'hat exiting in most Ant-clan| doing very good work. Cotton when the programme i plcted Brit! ontin-' seaboard will be lighted %  liwlopment of the Prune ndiHtry is intended to tenecKary salt It will from evaporating sea a Jrge shallow pans. idard Goes Up Trade Disputes Board Set Up Mr. Cube Costs £34,000 :i\r o-n-i-i-.i. r.-i HSCSTON (By Mall). I a the standard of the Local Examinations, i Barbados Advocate CormpondMtl. KINGSTON. Government has set up a Hoard i Inquire %  ni'' trade The Hen. 11. v Alexander, %  n !" Our own CtaiBBeBKtanl LONDON (B. I "Mr Cube'' may have MM btl somewhere arounu ., l: 34.000 up lo last Uctoliei * i'. BE Priv > r Councillor and UM liiiannal year enoca. lne lull fcblntrance KximiiuT So lrt,or lh Chairman. The report ..1 Tate 4. Ljle's account. r.nrnv^"h, h ler. lh m < !" 1 " l %  **•"* kxaauni uJ' Hi.her a nd wh is also a solicitor and £13J80 in 1848 to £47,21. „. 53S52 would be ell Mr Rudolf Burke, Pm As last year's expenditur tountries. In addition to Hgh*f"| board it is planned to leading marks at strategic points along the Esaequibo EUvtr wnleta wlTI ensure enattn gaiety for \-essels using the river ly oceangoing ships transporting timber overseas. New York Sends Flood Relief: >-ur,;.dc AdVoCJtW C%ii-T(iaM.dnl< i „ KTOWN (B| A CHEQUE for $10000 I 11 y) has been received by the League of Coai uraocatc would Uc CH•<. T • i. %  T J a i— --^IM IXNIKUC 01 v-oi' t'onalisation caiiipa.gu, it ,. n H .... "" H " r "' U "Oder Ihe Trade Disputes (Art %  %  ... assume, the.elo,.. N !" Yor h oTwhich rl' 1 M ., ,„„._,„_ „,„„ '"""I, and Enquiry Uw) and that the rise in costs is due to In. 2 !" L rk ,."' !" h "', %S Hua long-term plan. JlKTve lo make employ fc Civil Service pouibl %  eho the terms of reference are: "To ftCttviUM ol Mr. cut*. ioqidn into the present position The accounts reveal that th. ,,_ ln regard to representational total assets of the company hav TrT disputes between Trade Unions exu-nded by JC l.Mv.lwi ;j £o,and to make representations for 791.841. Current assets tou.1 £1^,:he provision of machinery for, 658.997 against liabilities of £o8.the settlement of such disputes.".; •*3b'.32. leaving net surplus flsets at f4.223,689. The trading profit of I i '<> 14.381,976. a decrease "171 compared with th pnvtom year. At 54s 6d the 15s. Milk Up One PeiLUFfl eTm*, In B.G. %  Drdlnuj units yield nearly 5 per has been looking into Uv Boot] on u IB per cent dividend ability of soils an balanced rations containing iminto Tate & L>le Investments an ported and other feeding Itufllilnlvflrtown Services has not been feripUon Ihe prices of which have risen it ^reflected in the balance sheei |Utnn of devaluation ofjtproftt and loss account. Tin uterTTng and other factors. ^.onstruction was carried through —C.N.S. Ration the date of the report. Kmyning Is Secretary. The cheque has been handed over ir I ihe Mayor's Central Flood Ke[ lief Fund. Soil Survey Ends: 'Dawtadoa Advoc*U COTTMapuurfi-ut %  GEOHGETOWN (By Mail). C. F. CHARTER. Chief I Soil Chemist of the Deport of Agriculture, Gold Coast, who Treasury Bilk IVlrtlaWlOAdVOCI.tr VtWTfV—' KINGSTI >'. Govenunont is inviting sub-1 Mther issue ol BlUi %  April 1 Hills Will bl sold to ththree months later :<\ [10Q I. Itfi*ml>'i|hti ihnr^hjlfthtnmi 1 %  kttp th* leither 10ft and tuppla. i it puti back out remember Pfagaticl l*hcnsic will quickly case and MKXhc the agony, hit pain-caused fatigue, remove ihe ganj lhensie neither harms the heart nor upsets the stomach. Be prepared for nddofl pain keep a supply ol Phensic handy. Alka-Seltzer MI1IS laiORAtOIIIS. INC ItMHAttl INO USA f$ ^i^ LUXURY PERFUME Phensi f %  FROM HEADtCKES. RHEUMATIC PAINS. LUMBAGO %  NERVE PAINS. NEURALGIA. INFIUENIA. COLDS & CHILLS < LiSViOtS "EASTER EGGS'' in various sizes... %  within your reach always '' incc ot an rxpemive perfume 11 within easy r>u perfumes into tiny handbag phiali. Warm, voluptuous No. 5 ; Oreat Expectation! %  g'y-going mood; romantic bitter-sweet %  Darkling, open-air Goya I leither. Gift Siio lit.I Goya Handbag Phtal I 9 T33NtwaONOSTKfir -LONDON %  *. %  ...... a c in. r.o. >.. 171 >< "Soaping" dulls hair — 0 %  HAIO ffajfat/ Give the KiiUij.-s .1 nal Inal ihiI;\STI;K. IIMJ will Maj*y il . BJM have %  laifa s-lr< ti ,l ( n\l I < i MIM;KY. CHOLOI.ATHS in Kaiio l.ill II.. M. FAN! \ II1SI MI'S 111 Small ft Lam Tin-. I It lit.. Ttwae ilrins arc ul.-al li.r ili.n BASTED PICNIC M WEEKEND. _ Ohl.iin.,1.1.. al BOOKER'S lln.ail Slr.-ol and HMtiagl (ALPHA I'llAUM M \ ORllli STORES LTD. %  pin/ 1 nn hni Mi nm 9mm latnU or emn loanpaoa hUn In naiurji limrc with dulllnit Map nlm. %  rwihiawda1nw liair'a ntuunl hano, Mrtt '" nntinnpoo, HaJofarnaieaH il mernj IkVrffchti I. Inw lati.., '" Jk ,kl > Inani kiml of water— or. ' %  '"'" rWln* ihaf, liniruu., uw KaJo OirorDrvlij lnAm,,Ha,HaUmdMlUatUlH,r,h*mp e m> Iht .;/•,,*, mi uiih LIPSTICK Ml Mil s inspired by PABIS! Krow Partnk*M "nnV ol* tbr durkl