Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Friday
Mareh
1950.



17







Fu



| Russian

Invasion

Says Churchill

STON CHURCHILL warned P

it was at once grave

“a against posible
her sate lites.















| insti
Mr. Churchill ref CANBERRA, March, 1 ena
ferr a ; le te. Wert ihe re » is ba will dema
school of thought in santariea ak | ies Mir Ms ; a a es ee nat “Weteoue temas it me thet
“The Princess Wi ill pak Western Europe to be inde- | Affairs, toni ht tole the eine the Chambers will resume their
oon the only line | Representatives the vw St OF work within the rigorously re-;
» re the Soviet advance could isiiér Tavis ne well be spected framework of the consti-,
Tell The King ee was the English Channel |making defence ait Te ve a3 | tutional as
é : z plans s *
Advocate Correspondent) “T mn eae “failacious he said to conc Before M. Jacques Pirenne, the .
ETOWN, B.G., March 16.) Goo; pcr Hig ad this view has been trate on Russia as the only po King’s Prine ipal Secretary, had
Alice joined the hun- Seanereenatens by the United ble aggressor in the P aa: ay. read more than a few introductory
; ‘ € ourselve: 2 hs . = ? = 8, i}
wice school girls choir atlors ognec elves and all the pow-+ Southeast Asia words, journalists tore copies of
A S concerned with the Brussel f i he declaration from his hand.
7 ' nment House Garden Party Treaty and the Atlantic Pact” he Dr. Evatt said that a Regic ‘| Cables and chairs were overthrown
a Inesday night in singing said. INNISS, the Lodge School sprinter scores a win in the 220 yards flat race to beat Streetly, Division 1 ae Pact for the Pacific ; na mad rush from the room,
. “ees a health to His Majesty”| The wartime Prime Minister champion at Lodge School yesterday, Inniss also took honours in the 100- sprint, — __ |siderabh ‘ Asia would be of « | After reading the King’s state-
E wards told the children said the active aid of Western| ———--—- bicelles mat crass value }ment M. Pirenne said: “The King
i a tell the King how/Germany was essential to the de+ -y : ne . — participation wes| will not go back to Belgium until
| ou sang”. fensive plans of the Atlanti F S t C G ; 4 HE, NN, | essentia n any Such pac | Parliament gives him aiiiton,
by e ( than 300 attended the | nations. oy | eretse an O 4 | omen: Ol Tacie,. Pa “It is up to Parliament to decide
: ay held in a blaze of colour) ‘We are unable to offer any as: | T NG Veyi0n “would: ‘be | whether or not the King shall re- ;
/ #. The Princess, Ear! of |Surance to the Germans that they Back Home SO VIE S FOR SIVCERE, ‘Fr oud t Nolisuubeh Geae EERE oad
th and party were seated |'â„¢8y not be overrun by the Soviet cd I Nendly reli With be Eecliament o conssanss, and
tree planted here or a satellite invasion” he warned. 1 were essentia but there }t rey wi make t e decision by
y che pa by Peinetes Marie “Germany is at present dis- LONDON, March 16. cial PERA TON WIT H U.S | iiel: DEO change in the status | which the King will abide. “It is
-—*s Slee wap alidusly armed and unable to give any |,, CO™monwealth Secretary Pat- jot Duteh New Guinea withou!|now for the Prime Minister to do KING LEOPOLD f
i ine Hikes veka but military forces to assist in the de- rick Gordon-Walker announced in e full consent of Australia| this. I do not know when this will
fected nice! dae Ce dea aoe of her eastern frontier, a dat Ce panos to- ay tet BERKELEY, California, March 16 }Which recognised without quali ~ Eyvsk the Belgian Pri Houses separately mu est ap-
Ol ng Pe . 1e mighty mass of the Rus- 7overnmen lad agree to AM ~ : , , a MT Daan oy i ien sovereignty of thx M. Byskens, the Belgian ime/prove the ing ri in
station which plunged the} sian armies and their satellites lie Seretse Khama, C hief-designate of Ads eae SECRETARY OF STAT E Dean Aches |} Netherlands in that area Minister, said to Reuter.” Our | session
in darkness for 20 minutes. like a fearful cloud upon the ‘Ger- [the Bamangwato tribe, returning oday called on the leaders of the Soviet Union to co-oper: Renter nission here is completed. fia | as
—(By Cable) man people and the Allies cannot |PY. 2 to Lobatsi, Bechuanaland| Sincerely with the United States in finding solutions We shall all be returned Leo} ‘ ed'sto«
e » them any direct protection” ee Go: re lawsuit | present world problems and so bring peace and secur Brussels-~probably tonight. I da a cht by the Exe
ms r. Churchill said Peay ober iad also agreed | . the world. | —- 7 ’ sd 1 not know when Parliament will] cutive of the Be Socialist
e Lindstrom Wants He continued ‘We have no [to pa us air passage } he world Packakling 2 P ; or e C er vote, uggested in King Leo Party C cond
5 en guarantee to give except to en- |°"C if legal expenses in- | later atin "CG sea ian pok statement. This is som ronges heir
gage j rar which after wrecl urre, his visit to L onde | nawonal O-operation 01 the ~ y scidud | ; .
Ingrid’s Daughter et eee Preciell a ersaidne tad] Sheep In Baby's | ¥erie,ceonemic development, i | eads British thin ‘aan | e return
5 ) ean ¢ ili- told K K Acheso aid is : al one to J 8. } the } Or
a) . pets . ution, would ) doubt end ulti- }°? * od M Pirenne said the Kin; ‘ tt
, LES, March 16, : Sta i d pea ut ot ah :
EE Seegmac's former hus-|™ately in the defeat the So-.| wite Clothin price.” The United Sts 4 Mis sion In U raed ye. Seen oe 9 ore = | set u e oughout the
rs . wij? | Vets, Dut it might begin by Com- ],,.... yp} Ruth } 4 om ¢ iia haa : | lents of the two amber cou . to
ays Dr. Oe dit tua 77 munist enslavement of Western | Willi ther around | § | Union ; a BO cat ee a Sc viet | Franz Van Cauwelart, of the}, a ae ‘ bea
cross s . the t Sn aaa ‘ ts 2 J , bi 10 t ense ¢ ry I " PI : |
him and demand that “ermany, and not only of West i ; Taras LONDON, March, 16. rousing false hopes whic h woul ta LONDON, March 1 Lower House and M. Robert Gillon } Executive ! -
h alle tern t s st ind his / Jottinghe icems: een. ope oulc of th oyal Ait ‘ » Senate » presence of | i
‘a eer-old daughter, Pia, ern Gern any, ' Bae bs ane tee A Nottingham policeman be dashed by new failures, he said. | yo... f the Royal Ait of the Senate, in the presence o! } tio: ( e cial
esata gral Minas If the Germans are to have no |"0¥ © protector-|| who saw a man with a pram HN: Ane onuenlix: ‘Abtarrinad Te idey y become ir-ithe Prime Minister at “Le Re-| Part la
| Thi apenait in va ~|guaranteed defence, nor be al- ale . uanalanc ould be} | at dawn stopped him to have | support all deal dhenté. © * oe : revived British Joint posoir,”’ the King’s lakeside villa The Sociali
‘ : day b Dr. Lin ais la a. lowed to make a general contribu- soe mss the Gov- || a look at the baby and found || ful settlement and to sist dering Washingt at Pregny, near Geneva. ting in permaner $
day Becht 4 toraee Saat 5 Ition to the framework of defence, |@°™™ ‘i g regard » his it was the carcase of a sheep gression.” ‘ er Emanuel Shinwe Brussels headquarters
% ormer Jnite sep st. console’ theamaniues conduct and the inter of g 2g a i eee ' 7? 7 : re
superior court Judge, ae ime Goiien ith tated cht order and good ‘aioverbinest ee | eee ined e 10 eet in the frankest outline he had today eee Announcement ne abe nee ye ee ee
he Swedish film star took le- | ¢p.\ tl ee hae ihite a0ugn" territory, he added 3 | mee , Reuter. yet given of the fundamental dif- ‘he today: bia ikon base 7 Ay: b ed for Parliame: ession
st. 4 Sith al 1ey have no military ex- es LO | ferences between East and West. ad been revived King Leopold’s announcemer called to vote on the repeal of e
: action through her attorney penses to bear —Reuter. penalty meter ogee rr wal the importance they attac followed three days f gent ‘ | ‘
‘Bie yesterday demanding from| «7 say without hesitation that Mr. Acheson named seven fields in to our represent tion in W hit a tat 2 th. tk . Belgi n cee tae ally Bote * f
. . say é which the Kremlin could permi! : . \ 1 in Washing | consultations with re gan} gency. Normally, bot), houses o '
an accounting Oo! |the effective defence of European itai W i 5 i ton. ills . meet T
i i 2) ‘ vr : " ; the rational and peaceful develop- wa political leaders at the villa, Parliament should meet on Tues-
10 ety of Ps vith, thi hes: frontiers cannot be achieved if Constantine To Bri a ill Spend ment of thei: guem ind that of yard Pedder, a 50 year old Scot Prince Badouin, Leopold’s 19-|day. The regeney legislation is
i a, now wi e doc-/the German contribution is ex- rT} 000 th: a nd ; , ; Deputy Supreme Commander, ! ie’ at Anadis ih ie ° s ’
. . e West. There were: . |; year-old son, was believed to be] certain to be repealed
Com: “ de 000. : “4 ; ied ag, f ‘ a
Ne etd Mie Hee ite estos, eae ack wale cole Meet Griffiths “21, On (1) The inability of the Western Altec a1 ees, in Borope Ander attending the talks. He! will] ‘The - Catholics, the country's
BEE conortunity ee eee aia, he a mop rest wi , ke Allies and Russia to define ill take ah ‘ isenhower. He succeed to the Throne if his|strongest Party and the only
Me facts before the California as tig“ ou dase ¢ we mys ON SERETSE AFFAIR rmed Ferees peace terms for the coun- Si} ie ce Tigg satel coe Recah : ; father abdicates. party wholly in support of the J
F . Be 8. tries defeated in the last : \ wa a raider” Nac (BRarlier today, Cabinet circles] King’s return, holds ¢ oral
as O64 tls oy Spe y : | Mi day, Ca King’s return, holds an overall
, (Barbados Advocate Correspondent) LONDON, March 16. war. nrivalled qualifications for thi:|in Brussels said the King» had{ majority. in the Senate—the Bel
—Reuter. LONDON, March 16. | Defence Minister Emanuel Shin “The Soviet leader ask which involved do-operation | | “tO ne ‘f eb | fe: tr :
; " a a . 5 es saders joined ‘ * , | decided to return to the Chron e} gian Upper House. In the Cham-
o The future of the British Colo~| well, opening a debate on defence in tf le : hotness ith French and American col s are :
> : . \ , é defenc in the pledge at Teheran |," " we Ta : : |after his five years in srovistonal} ber of Deputies—the Lower Hou
1 Tw A k Re Close Rumanian nial policy will be discussed to-| in the House of Commons to-day that they looked forward | *“48Ues ¢ highest level exile. They claimed ' that the they are two votes short
0 AS emove ° S +, | morrow afternoon when a delega-| said substantial progress was be- with confidence to the day}, ‘‘S . St tate ae EAE 1) lls wlth the King in Switzerland | majority
Information VEE Vinee | Hon from sexetes noeree 2 Set ing made in military planning) to when all Peoples of the ‘ ome ie : ge See vs aimed to “planning the consti- it is now clear that the
Film Censorship Conmtnaishan . 25 me = jeer translate the concept of integra- world may. live free lives |) tative tha di © kron:,| tution of a new government to be] receive an adequate support of
cee Constantine meets the Colonial] ted defence of the North Atlan- untouched: by tyranny and ifesentative on the standing group | ae Pie a dn ine | oeeitet ckements ani he |
WASHINGTON, March 16 Says Britain Secretary, Mr. James Griffiths. tic area into practical measures according to their varying }°! ret Nor ba ae Milit t thon ae ing his return to the aan eee a
’ € . tuys . > going fece|'s py at a Ms a e on ee Mi shinwell se 1rone, ‘
Hollywood studios have LONDON, March 16. i. ep ally, syre sein? ee red intended to deter any potential desire and their own con- ymitt r, Shinwe - al Pai ata cialis glial ttl Renter.
fuled the United States Supreme Britain took a further step to-| CUSS Seretse’s affair,” Constantine ) aggressor. } ne: eae ere Stee | Belgium's General F atior
BF court to declare censorship of" day in developing its recent pol- oom a ih bi aes Mr. Gor-| “He would shortly meet his col- We can accept treaties ERR ee Labour said today its oe , ——__——
‘lms cee don-Walker has offered a compro~] Jeggues > N,- Atle . A of peace which would give C ye ry | Stage a. series of nationwicdk
unconstitutional. United | icy of reprisals against I Euro- ery ane a bee eagues of the } th Atlantic De ‘ f a : \ | ‘ ‘
es ts Corporation and the Hal | , diplomatic missions in Lon-| "VS*: rim vitat ao ass mes n=! fence Committee at the Hague to @ On page 3 tober tson C-in-€ eo Sag i “Ming go into} $ Day Ss 7 0 Lez ave
loach Studios Incoi sated. have | I * “e v ‘ terested in is seeking assurances review all this work, he said —_— jaction only if the ing returt | y
ae! Ss porated have | don in cases where the aie 1€ fe ue Ate Tiyan nege a s ’ said, ge ’ . |
Wpedled against the Memphis sritish diplomats in eastern ee “" ae apes a are! Shinwell was speaking on a S on Viddle hast {the country without consen RAGUE
pemesse) censorship of the film | ;ope have been interrupted {"S varantt oe ee eee tha | Government motion asking the} © tassen \ ants T op : : Parliament. Czechosl:
- Cu a as bz - = . : . t stantne to > thar i I se ake ‘ »fence | Before Leopold car etur! as ‘ported tp
| which w 1S banned be | The British Foreign Office an-| time being the “Fighting Commit- dieu € to take note of a de fenec > Land Forees | I fore opold can retur i | wa repor wn
Jt hegro children were includ- | ),ounced that the Government had . would. . ena 2 avi Vhite Paper issued last week eve | Pe eace Talks he Throne a joint sessi j giver Monsignor 0 )
@ Min the cast with white -children. + al anded the closing of the Ru od iG oon ate acl ot Oe This showed that Britain intends LONDO Mat } both Houses of Parliament m Secretary of t |
| sing “Ss inst vhe original Gov- : ‘- JONDON, March lt E : i
j 4 eynesee Supreme Court} jjonian. Information Service it ernment’s decision imposing a five to spend £780,000,000 Op her! ST, LOUIS, Missouri March 16 fhe foreign Office and the War| Pe held, and vote to repeal the) tiatura k n° ° : ‘
“no M sos coma stating || London, following the recent RU-| year exile on Seretse. armed forces next year £21,000,-| A leading Republica: Haro tice announced that His Maj« | legislation. passed in 1945, wile ' ron" : ree Ed
lained Eee renin ‘the manian Gecision te eee ee inl nn ot, course:_it is up to Serctse) ee oy aa 4 to “get ans |Stassen wants a “top level pea the King has approved the ap-| established the Regency, Bot “Reuter,
i . gee med He! the British information service in|] now to say yes or no to Mr. Gor~| POWET 1S to be reduced to 685,! conference’ with or ithout |pointment of General Sit :
{ % sontract with the film | Bucharest. | don-Walker’s compromise.” by April, 1951—about 100,000] Russia. He said in a speech het Robertso ligh Comr
‘the Mi mic Johnson, President of The demand was contained in} Congstanti d : i: “T } ist | less than a year ago, and more} “suyeh nd ' ; “ n, High Commi st
0 : 4% seared d 1e ma as © onsta ne addec lave just oe ae Ce : 7 : $ conterency mi lave rermany\ ymmander
~ ae he Gooed tne note presented to the Rumanian] jeft } talking over with his pee y cn pn Os; OSE AD! eng leaders of both political arti niet ; Vii t Lapd Forces to} i
Sibreme Court decis iq | Government by Walter Roberts) jawyer exactly what the new offer | 7*S5¢@ren. —Reuter. of this country participating, ana icceed rera]l Sir John ‘| ‘
a> out” film Pi soi vou British Minister in aT st.| means. He will make his reply to ‘its complete proceedings take rocker in Jun i
‘dilute the constitutional | Britain closed down the Informa-| the Government to-morrow.” down and released to the orld General Robertson will be suc M 1a i
it of free express thout | Hen Service on March 3, 24 hours —(By Cable.) Fi ce ‘- ib I and be held in neutral territor eeded by Sir Ivone Kirkpatric eet 4
estroying it" we said after the Rumanian Government terce ripa such as Helsinki, Stockholm or|the Permanent Under | a retar;
ES —Reuter. had demanded it. ‘ YY ¢ ° . Vietnam. Sta id that Pre nm chores of tha..Cilenan skctons
—Reuter. 3 Scientists War In Australia. |saent truman should also “gather {2 Chatge of the German. x - :
ereund him Republican ex-Pres- a + abi tos { s $
4 H BRISBANE, March 16. |igent Herbert Hoover and Gens} ,ccmt! Crocker is to B ob k avian
66 9 Return ome Australian police are being des-leral. Dwicht ‘an poet ; i waa Adjutant - General to the forces |)
ft F Sniaiictic | patched to Edward River, smal!|men woulda help to “strengthen | 2, 5¢Ptembe! | t
rom | outpost on the Cape York Pen-|th - tobertson has been the Seni
‘ e hand of America work : . 8) : ‘ Ea}
: i : insula of Northern Australia, to| affairs.’ British Official in Germany since} i} Superintendent Bob Fabian, of } fs
ning Show—A Grand Success — aaiibliaiiicacin 1:0 (he stralia, to| affairs,” he saic it L many since )
q } 4 , Me mbat a fierce tribal war there. _R we November 1947 when he succeed-} scotland Yard, has written ee
8 | Smiling and fit three of the It was announced they will fly in @ ‘Reuter. ed Marshal of the Air Force Sir| fj) real-life detective story of the cen uf
HIGH TYME, Eric Gates’ Musical Revue, which opened | British scientists rescued by the} to the nearest base to the battle Sholto Douglas Military Gov-|
last night at the Em ire Theatre, is a colourful show pack-| relief ship “John Biscoe last! ground. From there they will Po e Holds Secret |e: , Before that he wa tury. |
umpire 7 | month after years in the Antare-| have a three-day coastal trek PP o Ue 7 Chief-of-Staff in Germany and|§,
With good music, fun and dancing. | tie arrived at a London Airport to-, News of the war came from a Y * Deputy Military Governor | Fabian un) yective atl the
Costumes and stage settings were lavish*sand the crow d! day, They returned to England] transmitter at the Church of Eng- Consistory - —Reuter, |@) a Sesh :
of over seven hundred went away very satisfied with what) in the British Overseas Airways]land Mission Station on Thursday a | al thrills he has packed into 28 years
Y saw and heard. oo a ee xleam’ im Island, 295 miles north of Edward a ree March 16. p ‘ , k | of top-flight police work. He will
Ca Raison leading the Police | ontevideo e three sre | River. —Reuter. ope Pius XII met 15 Cardinal: ~ 1 W cers | te » secre ases ich {5
i oe ae joa me a openin | Mark Randall, 21-year-o rs oid in secret Consistory today to ap- aris Steel orKker i eae i a a case whieh i
an as , -rnar ¥: “ove ' * . | is reco as Britain's yj
: mI ; shortly after 8.30 p.m.;| radio operator, Bernard tone prove the canonisation of five Qn " iH i
Malayan Bandits uber parted and the show| house, 23, Meteorologist, 2nd Didn't Want Girls |2¢¥ S22. The Consistory — ai Return To Work | most brilliant sleuth. af
; W habe on | Harold David Jones, 32, aircrait which no new Cardinals were PARIS: March 16. |!
. was 0 =; Whe >
s, ound 8 Britons Show. girls dressed in_ black] mechanic. _ INDIANA, March, 16 |Mominated —- lasted an hour, I Eight thousand Paris stee)} Here are some of the cases he
4 | strapless evening gowns and white —Reuter, are at Mishawaka, Indiana.| Was followed by a Consistory a | workers returned to work, to- eis dencvile: ¥
Hy, SINGAPORE, March 16. | muffs glided onto the stage, fol-| are looking for the mother of} which the approval of the Car-| jay aecentuating the bach , r {
7 an Bandits shot and| lowed by the “High Steppers’ | D. #: | two-day-old twin girls who left|dinals for the canonisations was|to work” medi after a three i}
1 unded Smother ‘eight Britonsl then the’ principals, all singin Petrol Goes Up | the babies in hospital saying she;amnounced. The Saints will be | weeks strike wave. } H h D ie
t. When they ambushed film| “There's no Business like Show) ; ‘didn’t want girls’’ and walked|canonised this year by the Pope A spokesman for the employ |@! ow the Dog Dopers Work a
| to take shots of iroops) Business”, “Rhapsody in Blac: 3d Per Gallon j off without even agreeing to name|in St, Peters in a series of} ors Federation said that 52,00¢/—) y
Cro Fil R. Stark, leader of the| and White” as it “0 pay aa them as wee beginning immediately | still on strike in the Paris area | fj) ; :
. Im unit touri ng the Fat well put over and the crowd no’ . | —Reuter. after “aster —Renter represented 13 per cent of thr | Th it ie
tt | : . : ’ | ; a}
) eet injured, while| ded supcoved x - ae ‘rn in S, Africa ' total,as compared with 15 per| p i Case of The Fake ; ‘
- and one of the sol-, the applause ha subsided, ana) se sei f ' | cent yesterday } oliceman 4
By, Xorts wer -' settle k into their seats to CAPETOWN, March 16. | > e ; . i
3 when they ar ee pte 20a ree aig oats of the show * eee, cee ee | Fi eee e@ ing t se | Hf
Utside Ky | slans for peares rationing, Finance | ’ ia i ?
| lala Lumpur. A} There were three small sketches |) ese | : | ;
Britis " eaiatet ; : Minister N. Havenga said ev | Ui : ' s | The Trail f Bur ; j id
ser OMieer “and four other | event a ne, Sat eae ai sone hal rge Foli mnesty Court Martial 3 F or] sae of Cat Bu alr w
. | cal numbers, and tho as | ° e nearest real-lit ay
i ‘ ath ; a ‘ “ ote reai-iite aw
—Reuter. good acting by Miles Skewes-Co 7 4 i } 4
lend. G : i petro) w ne 3d. a ATHENS, March 16. « Viussourt Grounding jf BP
: Greta Bancroft in the first But petro} would be | r country, he replied “No. The : j 4
land Ed saa Cook, Miles Skewes-| galion dearer, he said. Since Mr Professor Alexander Svolos said Greek people in the majority voted . i 7 : 8) | approach to Raffles), | ie
V d Cox and Pauline Dowding in the] Eric, Louw, Economic Affairs to-day ne Le ae Sociale for aecacaben, expressing a de- G rns ieee 16 | z
an { » ‘ > of these} Minist nes ra 1ing | Party 4 wou. emand in| sire for the adopti f seneral ourt Martials were! .
second, the dialogue of these} Minister, iou i tion “| w the adoption of democ ratic aa a a 7 : | i
enberg In i sketches was rather weak. In thel gcheme last September it ha: beer ne new Parliament a general po-} methods and not for violence.” ordered to-day for the Command- The Chase to. Gretna 2
Bu lfnal sketch the English North| several times deferre: {r jlitical amnesty and the suppres-| Svolos added: “The Socialists in ing Officer, the Operations Officer | G it
enos Aires | Country accents of Greta Bancroft| tiayenga told Parliament today a of the “reformatory” camp at Parliament will fight for Syndi- |®°¢ the Navigator of the United) §} reen. :
jand Betty Arne were convincing. that the increased petr price lakroneos. Communists and sus- ealist freedom and equality of States Navy's giant battleship |
BUENOS AIRES. Mar : and their chatter witty with good sonia: ake cat a Ot y¢|Pects sent to this camp had been] citizens before the law, for the | “Missouri” because it groundec (fi SE
General Hoyt §. SRAECH 16 acting . 1 “940, 000. _Beuter. | subjec aaah violence to extort “re | best use of Marshall aid to Greece, | n Chesapeake Bay on January 17.] | Ba
Sommander. in-C beta ve The Song and Dance Number by | re “Sabie § | pentance > alleged and will fignt against economic} The “Missouri” is the biggest) . h & a
a Air For; nef of the United) pric Gates and Peggy Packer in| PAPAL “APPOINTMENT SVolos, i party holds about | 2nd financial oligarchy.” warship afloat, ft in the ™
Prideo in t ay _— fr¢ vhich Eric sings, “It Only Hap- : of 110 seats in the new Parliament, “Maintaining faithfully her —Reuter. } §
tour ot course of a goo bens When I Dance With You” ] : TAT FICAN CITY March 16, : left by air for London to-day for | pPesent friendship and links (with _——- — i | ;
= be te cuth America, He| was gracefully performed, ar | Pope Pius AH has ete jthe meeting of Commsco (Com-|the West), Greece must. establish ‘ x
ist Buest of the Argentit 2 some idea of the versatilit \ hbishop Georges De jonghe _ ol | mittee of the International Social- | < and. develop peaceful relations | OFF TO RIO ‘ae
at * yma ¢ this young Fnglish stage acto i Ha Be a & . _- = Organisation) Hastings this | w ith any other country” he said Pc es PARIS, March 16 if
wil! \ Packe thr het ' ne week-end : ! ; The only conditions is that all | #banese Poreifm Minister Tak- ane
ar al ‘ ke f i u isked if ti eHeEVE the Com-/should respect ti i grity | eft Orl Airport Pari 4
™ eI 1 ti | re — ula again rise n arm independence of Greece yi for Ri ie Janeir ‘g i
—Reuter. @ On page 3 —Reuter. ,cither from abroad or within the \ —Reuter. inte,



LONDON, March 16

arliament to-day that

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Aggressor









rice:

he ee Cents

Year 55.



MUST DECIDE

GENEVA, March 16.

[| XILED KING LEOPOLD stated to-day that the Belgian

Parliament must decide whether he should return to

the throne on the basis of Sunday’s Referendum, which

gave him 57.6 of the votes. If Parliament—in which the

Catholics, whe supported him full), are just short of an

absolute majority — decided against his return, he was
ready to retire, the 49-year-old King stated.

“If on the other hand, the Par-

liamentary Assembly, enlightened

| by the consultation, returns my

prerogatives to me, the principle of:
Parliamentary majority, on which”

|
fy

—Kvatt


































































ecwreeras Sn



4
a
y
i
i
}
ai



z

PAGE TWO



H. E. THE GOVERNOR .
Is EXCELLENUY the Govern-

or has extended his
distinguished patronage to the
Barbados Amateur Football

Association. He will attend the
opéhing First Division fixture at
Kensington to-morrow afternoon
betweefi Carlton and Empire.

Until Sunday

IR ‘THOMAS and Lady
S Southorn, Mr. Harold Woolf,
Lady Southorn’s brother accom-
panied Hon. John Stow, Admin-
istrator of St. Lucia to St. Lucié
yesterday travelling by B.W.LA
They will be his guests until they
return to Barbados on Sunday.
The Southorn’s and. Mr. Woolf
have .béén holidaying here for
some time now and are guests
at Sam Lord’s.

Staying With the ‘Trees’
ORD. ASHCOMBE, Chairman
of Holland Hannen = and
Cubitts, Building and Civil
Engineering firm working with
the Colonial Development Cor-

poration on the reconstruction of

Castries arrived yesterday from
St. Lucia, to spend a few days
with. his. good friends Mr. and
Mrs. Ronald Tree at their home
Heron Beach, St. James, where

Mrs. Anthony Eden is also staying
He has been in St. Lucia for twe
weeks on an inspection visit a
will be returning to St. Lucia
before going back to England

Holidaying With Her

Family
RS. LOLA Mc. BRIDE and her
daughter Clara Barinda, ar-

rived on Wecnesday afternoon by
B.W.1A. to spen \oliday with
her family Mr. Mrs. C. D
Rogers of ‘Homestead’, Fontabelle

Mrs. Me. Bride lives in Trentor
Tennessee, where her husband

in business, she has not bee
to Parbados fot

years.
Married on Wednesday
ISS DIANA HUGGINS, eldest

daughter of Sir John Hug-
gins, Governor of Jamaica was

and
and

three and a

* married on Wednesday afternoon

Andrew Parish Church to
Kinney, solici-

at St.
Donald Bruce Mc

tor of Nassau, Bahamas, Bishop
Dale, the new Bishop of Jamaica
officiated Governo! Huggins,
gave away the bride and_ the
wedding was witnessed by hun-
areas while thousands crammed
the -immediate vicinity of the
Chureh.. Six hundred _ invited
guests attended the reception

which was held at “Kings House”.

The couple will shortly proceed
to the Bahamas where they will
reside,



ce A

Lucky Fellow

R. MAURICE MICHAEL of

A. Michael and Sons in St.
John’s, Antigua, certainly had a
lucky holiday in Barbados, On
the first day’s races he won the
first prize in the two shilling field
sweep in one of the races. He
was here for ten days staying
with Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Jordan
of Clifton Terrace, Bay Street, and
he begged ‘Carib’ to thank the
many friends he made during his
short stay here for the wonderful
time that they gave him.

Delegates Return

ELEGATES who returned

vesterday after the Devalua-
tion Talks held here were Mr
John Mordecai, Traze Acministra-
tor of Jamaica, Mr. D. C
Ferguson, Commissioner of Com-
merce and Industries in Jamaica,
Mr. J. B. Clegg. Secrctary
Economie Affairs in Jamaicy ‘and
Hon E. D Hone, Colonial
Secretary of British Honduras and

Mr.. A. Emmanuel. Heri of the
Economic (Gener) Department

of the Colonial Office

On B.C, Work
R. H. RISELY TUCKER of
the British Council lef
yesterday by B.W.1LA. on his first
visit to Antigua where he will be
staying at ‘Happy Acres.’ He is
on British Council work and be-

fore returning to Barbados on
Monday, he will visit St. Kitts
and Nevis.

For Few Days
RS. WILFRED FRANCO, and

her young son Brian are
here for five days and will be
staying with Mr. and Mrs. K.

Girling at High Winds, Rockley.
They arrived yesterday by
B.W.1A.

ne tes



LORD ASHCOMBE
On Business Visit

M* AND MRS. W. CRAN left
for Trinidad by

B.W.LA.
Tuesday. Mr. Cran

on
is Managing
Director, stationed in Montreal of
Broadcast Relay Services (Over-
seas) Limited.

Mr. K. T. Murray, Regional Di-
secvor of Broadcast Relay Services
also left for Trinidad on Tuesday.

Island Hopping
“ROM NEW YORK to Trinidad

on the Luxury Liner
“Uruguay” came Mr. and Mrs.
Edward Stephani who live in
Chicago. Yesterday they came
over by B.W.LA. to Barbados to
spend five days at the Crane
Hotel, before they continue their

‘island hopping’ return journey to
Miami Mr Stephani is a
Chevrolet dealer.



BY THE WAY.....



] T is not every day that 170

large hales are found dead
in a heap on the co between
Vic i and Tasmania Experts
sa he died of mass hys-
teria, the disease that attacks
wealthy ladies when the quack
“specialists” refuse to recommend
a ten months’ holiday in Madeira

The Basque Explorer Churiz-
quetamendi discovered that
whales, for all their thick skin

and phlegmatic appearance, are
extremely sensitive. One day when
he was whistling the air of one of
his native dances of the Soule

the Sept Sauts—a whale began to

laugh and cry in a strange way
Hysterics followed. Hysteria may
also be the explanation of the
Japanese boy aged four who
paints eight or nine pictures every
day. 1 neither know nor care

Starch Your Hat With Snibbo

, ’
So near and yet so safari
HE rejected suitor, in the old
days, was always supposed

to go to the other side of the world
to hunt big game—which was, at
any rate, more romantic than
smothering his grief on a local

golf course. But any such move,
romantic or unromantic, was fore-
stalled the other day by the girl
who “said she would marry him
if he would rid the house of mice.”
Keating, the famous small game
hunter, would probably have wel-
comed this as an alternative to the
perils of Africa

Maison Tirlitontaine

PJCHERE has appeared in a fash-

ionable West End street a
shop which sells choice fruits, and
rare and even unheard-of vege-
tables, to the kind of customer for
whom robbery loses half its ugli-
ness when it is perpetrated in cost-
ly surroundings. The shop has

that air of Juxury blended with
execrable taste which makes the
wealthy feel at home, and proud

to be swindled without any sordid
details. Over the shopfront is the
simple legend Maison Tirliton-
taine. and in the window one
basket of peaches and one of straw-
berries. The fruit is so symme-
trical and so perfect in appearance
that it might be imitation fruit.
Within the shop all is glittering
chromium, and so clean and hy-

a ON Ae

Carb Calling

}
Eminent Barrister

R. R. S. CRUICKSHANK, an |

eminent Barrister and Mer- |
chant Banker from England, whe |
hag been spending a holiday as a |
guest at “Cacrabank,” left yester-
day by B.W.1A. for Tobago £6 |
spend a few days at “Speyside” |
before returning to England.

On Short Visit
R. AND MRS. RICHARD M
PRATT, who are from New
York City were visiting Mr. and
Mrs. Lawrence Green, Americans
who now live in Trinidad.
Yesterday Mr. and Mrs. Pratt
accompanied by Mrs, Green ar-
rived by B.W.LA. from Trinidad
to spend a few days at the Has-
ings Hovel
Mr. Green is due to join his wife
here today.

From Barcelona
N AMERICAN, from Tulsa,
Oaklahoma, Mr, T. J. Green,
now works in Barcelona, Vene-
zuela and yesterday he arrived via
TrinideA by B.W.1.A., to spend one
week at the Paradise Beach Club.

Advertise!

“T F we had only heard some-

thing about Barbados before
we planned our West Indian holi-
Gay we would have come here
direct and spent our entire vaca-
‘fon here.” So said Mr. and Mrs.
Leonce Levesque who live in Rob-
erval, Province af Quebec.

They hope to return next year
nd bring some friends with them.
They left yesterday for Trinidad
hy B.W.1.A., and will be there for
three days when they connect
with T.C.A. on their return trip
to Canada.

They had high praise for the
Manager of the Marine Hotel, Mr.
Iverson and for the Hotel itself
where they spent six very happy
days. :

B.W.1.A. Staff News

RS. PEGGY ABERCROMBY,

one of B.W.1.A.’s Steward-
ses is in Barbados for a few
’ holiday. She arrived vester-
day by B.W.TA,

Carib heard news of another
B.W.1.A. Stewardess yesterday, it
Was that Dorothy benane.d has
become engaged vo Claude Gordon
Smith, a B.W.1A. pilot.

From Durban, South Africa

RS. BERYL WADE and Miss

Margaret Edwards, who came
ull the way from Durban, South
Africa to visit Miss Edwards
relations in Antigua, and besides
soing to Trinidad for Carnival,
took time to spend a_ few
days in Barbados staying at the
Windsor Hotel. Yesterday thev
left for St. Kitts by B.W.I.A, on
‘heir return journey home

Looking Up Old W.I.





Friends
| HEAR that Dominican-born
Mr. Alan Lartigue, who has

pent most of his lite in Canada,
has recently gone over to Europe
to buy goods for his firm. He is
staying at London’s’ exclusive
Mayfair Hotel and in a few days’
time is going over vo Paris. While
he is in England, Mr. Lartigue is
taking the opportunity to look up

some of his old West Indian
friends.
From Toronto
RS. W. M. TEMPLE of

Toronto is in Barbados on
holiday and is a guest ai “Cacra-
bank.” This is her first visit to

the island, and her only regret is |

that she has not been here before

She is the widow of Mr. W. M
Temple who was President of the
Ash Temple Company, the well-
known English-Canadian firm
manwacvurers of all dental
gery equipment

sur-





By Beachcomber

gienic that the customer almost
expects to be laid instantly on onc
of the slabs and operated on. In
place of an assistant he looks for
a white-coated surgeon in rubber
gloves and a mask. Instead of
which he sees three beautiful girls.
And something makes me think
that if you entered the barbarous-
ly furnished office on the first floor
you would find our old friend,
Captain Foulenough, up to his
tricks again.
Dr. Rhubarb’s Corner

C. L. writes: To jollify things a
bit at home my fiance pretended
that he thought my mother’s nose
was bleeding, and put our front-
door key down her back. She be-
gan to cry out and throw herself
about, and the piano-tuner wio
lives next door came in and said
these modern dances made him
sick, and tried to waltz with her,

Bert, my fiance, was slapping his }

legs and howling with laughter,
when my dad walked in and or-
dered Bert out of the house. How
can I explain?

Dr. Rhubarb says: Say that Bert
did it to test your parents’ love
for him.



Sse" Quaelity Shoes for Your Children!



OPPER
CHILDRENS TRU-FORM SHOES

BLACK PA
4s to 6s
$4.12

TENT 3 WHITE BUCK
7e to 10s lls to ls
$8.23 $6.05
TAN LACE
7s to 10s lls to ls
$4.52 $5.29

A. New Shipment of - - -

JOHN WHITE MFNS & YOUTH SHOES

Fil Prices Advertised are B

NEW GOODS

-W.1, Dollars

BEAUTIFUL PRINTED CREPES $1.93 and $1.96

we



- - + Just Arrived !



EVANS and
WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

——_—--—



pana
a

in*her trousseau the M

. j w







THE NEW MARCHIONESS OF MILFORD HAVEN now back in
brought these hats with her honeymoon trousseau. Left : black fe
spray and scattered with rhinestones. Right : head-hugging ha
decked with a thistle spray.

Women Outnumber Men In United States
But Husband-Seekers Need Not Worry

(By FREDERICK COOK) a long period of immigration,
New York (By Mail) was over 2,700,000. By 1940, the
America’s 1950 census, which| sexes had reached almost exact
begins on April Fool’s Day, is} balance. Halfway between the
going to be a women’s census.| 1940 census and the 1950, the
Population experts are already} balance shifted. In 1945, accord-
agreed that it will be the first|ing to the samplings, there were
ever to reveal a preponderance] 99,6 males for every, 100 females.
of women in this country. They ee
suspect that it may show as many
as 1,000,000 more women than
men, yy
Questions of “special interest
to women” are going to be puf at}
every fifth thouse throughout the;
country. These will include a
detailed inquiry about housing,
covering everything from the age
of the television set to the effic-







©ROSSWORD



ae
| ee feral ||

iency of the kitchen drains. | ig a
Included will be the type of ol mT |
house structure, the heating

Pe babi | bl
method employed, how much rent} ,
is paid, or how much is still to be} re hd Pry | dd

met on the mortgage.



Census officials said to-day} | F’] | | | | [ot |
that scientific samplings have} ‘
ad reves hat a heavy} roe
already revealed aah @ so ,./ @ A Plant, small enougn tor a
preponderance of women will be( flower pot. may become a big
shown in the official count. Until A gne. Be ba alata naomi
ns oe 20 aia
1930, men maintained a margin| 19 Grumpet without @ perm. (3)
»ver women in the United States | 11. You might lose this berry. (4)
12 Just for » change let Reg be 4

of 102 fo 106 for every 100 women. }

bird (5)
In 1912 the excess of men, after

Tugs give them
15 Border upon. (4)
Where corn nas gone bad you'll
ususlly find one. (6)

(4)

Electrical Engineer



3 Outflow.
It’s mix

guest at the Paradise Beach Club. | 24 ed UD in a pose. (3)



AXYDLBAAXR
® is LONGFELLOW



of |

DIAL 4220’

One letter simply stands for another. In this example A is used
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters, apos-
trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints.
Each day the code letters are different.

A Cryptogram Quotation
BXOORBB RDOYXQWLURB HARBR;
HARV OWD SROWXBR HARV SRCJRUR

| HARV OWD—UJIQLIC.

= ~_~, Cryptoquote: A FERVENT AND DILIGENT MAN
_ IS PREPARED FOR ALL THINGS—THOMAS KEMPIS.







SATURDAY NIGHT March 18th
PERCY GREEN & HIS ORCHESTRA
Dancing from 9 to all hours—$1.00

We are generating our own electricity, so there would be light
















‘ALLING
ALL

FISHERMEN
‘

Land your

Catch sately

# We are fully stocked with
Fish Hooks, Fishing Lines.



Seine, Mullet and Herving



Twines, Brass Swivels,

THE BARBADOS
CO-OPERATIVE

Rowlocks, Mesh Wire,

Lacing Wire, Cleat Hooks,





%

rchioness brought these honeymoon hats









London with the Marquess, has
ather helmet with looping feather
t in Bermuda-pink shantung straw

ace
| Two main reasons are given
for the switch: The heavy decline
of immigration (predominantly
men) and the higher death rate
among men. ;
The population experts believe

that the decline in the ratio 0i
men will go on. But they adc

that this need not alarm a girl

in search of a husband because

it will be limited mainly to the
There are still more

men than women in the “marry-

older men.

ing- oups’—15 to 34.
ee ee —LES.



Chicks Taken Over
AYR, Canada,

Farm-wife Mrs. J. W. Maur
had 700 chickens for dinner the
were day-ol,
which were put on the
kitchen floor when their
broke down. Six hun-

other day. They
chicks
warm
incubator
gry men in the
to gotoa restaurant
meals.

meals.—(CP)

for thei

Riddle

At what age are most women

happy?

Why does a youth cease to grow

up when he starts a beard?
“UMOP, FULMOIS st OU BSNVIIET a@asuy

Ww Aves Jaaou Aoud esneoog te MAsUy

ROWAL Worthings






TO-NIGHT & SUNDAY NIGHT

|
| at 8.30 p.m





19. A piece for storing honey (4)
21 aes to hard inelastic terms | Republic Smashing Double
|
R. AND MRS. NIGEL SEALE | 22 a a thing ts true to aature. . William MARSHALL, ares
. ne ' xa RALSTON
I of Forest Reserve, T.L.L.. 25 Bird veneratea py the ancient ; Vera Re
nave been here on vacation as|,, Egyptians. (4) \ in
guests at “Cacrabank.” Mr, Seale 6 eh 7 tegen tcad URDER IN THE MUSIC BAI)
is an Electrical Engineer with | 27. For one %° dogmatic 1 might : RPA pee rag
r.L.L., and was born in Barbados eugaest well-placed dog-bite
(7 Gow j WILD BILL
; ‘ ‘ ELLIOT AS RED RYDER
Comings And Goings lL. Suitable kind of seat for + in
ON. E. P. ARROWSMITH, 2 CS gee oy ad “WAGON WHEELS WESTWARD”
; re vebeis rode w out of joint this
Administrator of Dominica should be put Be ee seats “ | ia ea
left for Antigua yesterday by| 4 Birds. (5) | Linda STERLING,
B.W.LA 4 Sort of thing that sacchus George J. LEWI>
STANT “TT enjoyed. (4)
HON. H. A. CUKE, O.B.E.,} 0 A yacht can sali on this ano
M.L.C., returned from Trinidad never touch the sea. (3) EMPIRE
on Tuesday by B.W,LA. % Colour. (6) 7. Let it stay (4)
tho jg} & May Sound ungrammatical out TO-DAY at 5 and 8.30 p.m.
Mr. JOHN MATSON, who is 1 5 ; SATURDAY G6 6S Dm
attached to the American Embassy 18 tvs & change from arid. (4) ? are eee
in Mexico, and has been here} jg Tone tanasiites. (5) : HIGH TYME nae
over the week-end on a visit, left] 20 This lady did nothing to found Come and see ee eR Musica}
on Wednesday afternoon for) 9, ees. (6) did: was
Trinidad by B.W.I.A. He was a| 2 8

ROXY
SATURDAY & MONDAY
at 7.30 p.m

Republic Double
Edgar B’4nRRIER
Stephanie BACFF'
‘SECRETS OF SCOTLAND YAR
and
‘CHEYENNE WILDCAT’
ith
ws RED RYDER
BLAKE as
BEAVER

OLYMPIC |

; SAT., MON., & WED.

Ww
Via Bill Elliott
| and Bobby
| LITTLE
|

at 9 p.m



Republic Pictures Present

John WAYNE—Vera RALSTON

‘THE FIGHTING. KENTUCKIA
Oliver HARDY~ Philip DORN

—_——



—s

TOO

(
| THESE
SAWS
PLANES—Jack,
RULES
BRACES
COPING SAWS
TABLE VICES
>
| THE C
1 |





Maus family had

Why should carpenters believe
| there is no such thing as glass?

a

OIL STONES, ETC., ETC.

Sarena — Soo: ———
SSSR ee SS SF

FRIDAY, m
oie

oa





Children’s Corner

Pills)



ARCH 1)
ARCH 1). 1954
























_ Rupert and some of his friends
have had a jolly evening
some fireworks in his garden,
mere ~ goes out to tidy up
pu urnt out pieces into a
sack, While he is busy the gate
coe and Willie the Miouse comes
in

.



Count Up

Out Kansas way there’s a story
about a farmer who when he
wanted to know how many hogs
he had, always counted the legs
and then divided by four.

We heard that later he tried! (@4M0u) © oaey g pe
the same system on a neighbour’s b What word of three letters
farm where there were beef-|?° loetes with two
cattle, sheep and turkeys. There|SP0Ken with one letter?
were more sheep than turkeys.| oy, osre «, sm othe Bak a
Sheep and turkeys together had oe ee AL tay
aeads and feet totalling 100. The} H a
beef-cattle were only one-third) ‘ett many ot each did &
of the number of the others com-! pager 5 Tarn have?”
bined. | jaaq swt asa ea a

What two |
bet have nothing fe tea i

















For all white shoes-~—4

White shoes, to pass muster
in company, must be spot.
less, immaculate. Use PR
Propert’s White Renovato
; ? akin Beet eed!
or Propert’s Shuwhite. No fiesta
surer way of making sure Ree

that white shoes are white!

SS
PROPERTS

SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR
In Cartons with Sponge











Two Shows Daily :—Matinee 5 p.m. Evening 83 |

“FODAY AND CONTINUING
Humphrey Ingrid
BOGART BERGMAN

CASABLANCA

Presented by WARNER BROS,
WITH A HOST OF FAVOURITES

DIAL 8404 FOR RESERVATION















a ee wee Ee wwe oe Mahe! sae




| AQUATIC CLUB CUNEMA Wenbes oH |
TONIGHT (Friday), SUNDAY, TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY #488 §

Bing CROSBY—Ann BLYTH—Barry FITZGERALD—Hume vy
In Paramount's np

“TOP O' THE MORNING’ }

Hear Ann and Bing sing ‘You're In Love With Someone” and heit
Bing sing other wonderful hits including ::When Irish Bye Aw
Smiling”!
PLEASE NOTE :—Shows instead of Tuesday and Thursday
will be Tuesday and Wednesday by arrangement with the
Electric Company, .















SUN. TIAM







SUN. TIAM
rook Globe Theatre FOOK
sian cdadae Maat a
TONITE at 8.20 — ALL STAR TALENT NITE
BIAS: 4

THE HOT SHOTS (T'dad’s No! Orchesta)

PRICES : Stalls 24¢., Circle 40c., Balcony 54c, Box Oe
22nd 4



Starting Saturday 18th, Monday 20th and Wednesday
JOHN GARFIELD in:

FORCE OF EVIL




LS! TOOLS:

MR. CARPENTER

ARF AMONG OUR NEW STOCK |

HAMMERS
Smoothing, Block and Rabbit

SPIRIT LEVELS

BREAST DRILLS

PLANE IRONS.

SCREW DRIVERS

SELECT YOURS EARLY

ORNER STORE






























































FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 1950

AK. Manufacturers

xploit Colonies
—Mottley

WEDNESDAY’S MEETING of the House of

y, Mr. E. D. Mottley (E) led the criticism of the
Government's attitude towards the West Indies as
s the current sugar price discussion,
‘Assembly was dealing withte——— ——___
(i, Controls, Subsidies, aicin Ss
1950—51 Colonial Es-} TACs being confined to ofticiais °
4 Mr, Mottley said: i that they dare nov admit any
ate ut officials, as they cannot let!

te jiate the remarks

tonourable senior member'| 2"Yone else’ know what is going}
going

oi on. They know that they would

relative to subsidisa- Br:
feel that our low standard | (/€" With strong opposition when
cy try to put over something

t such a very high cosv :
p I “due to the treat-| Which they should not. if non-



at



yi



meted out to us by the! a admitted.
ited Kingdom. St remembered thay
seeing how badly our| from the time the average official

Delega gation was vreated, it| Was little more than a boy, he has
je necessary to. review the situa- 7 Colgmned into him that whav

as it is quite clear that the| ‘ ‘a olopial Office says is the iaw
“felonies are still considered mere-| 2%@ must be carried out without
as ucers of cheap raw| @Â¥estion. If he shows any inde-
rials for exploitavion by U.K. Penrenre of opinion on such ma:-
wrers and for providing | ‘€Ts he will never ges any pro-

| motion.



{
a

‘know that many English,
in the country as well as}
1 ticians and statesmen
the United Kingdom disliked
Indians using the word ex-
tion, but I would say hera
4nd now that the only way to stop
“we word being used is to stop

ord

Own People

If the West Indies remonstrat
about some of these decisions.
they will be told that vhey have
been e by our own people.
Nothing can be farther from the
truth. The outlook of the official
on such inatyers js totally different
from that of the man in public
life or the trained businessman,

If there was not a lot which !
they wanted to keep hidden from
vhe public, there would not be all
this secrecy about these meetings,
and the pretense that West Indi- ;
ans are making the decisions |
which are in fact being imposed |
from London and easily accepted |
by our officials without the know- |
ledge or approval of the masses
of people in the R.W.I. of their
truly elected representatives.

Let us examine some of the
Sort of decisions which have
been made. Canada, which has
always had very close trading
relations with the B.W.L, and
buys a large part of our produce,
is being gradually eliminated as
@ supplier, and being reduced
and eventually entirely removed.
The West Indies are be-
ing treated, as regards Canada
exactly as if they were so
distant colony,

iting us.
ae Very Cheap
The UK. bought our sugar ar
cheap prices for 7
during the war and since,
hile it was in short supply, and
| would have fetched six or eight
times the price we accepted in
-yiew 0 war. Now it is coming
supply, they are ready vo
the colonies overboard. The
the English consumer and
turer is of paramount im-



Our people, with their
dard of living, must, if
‘be pushed lower down,
ust be kept clearly in mind
ugar has been a most im-
nt dollar earner and, equally
tant, what was consumed in
was a dollar saver, Not
f this has ever been men~
from the Unived Kingdom.
p never been told anything
the amount of dollars the
“Sugar Industry has either
d or saved. The U.K. Gov-
nent is now ready. to use
to buy cheap sugar from

vere ere



and what sugar could be] While the U. K,, is allowed to Oe enna |
in the pritish West Indies. buy apples, bacon and numbers Gedy auutal ni
je same time, they are deny~|of similar products from Canada,

g us dollars for many essentiall we are prevented from buying

which they themselves arq|these commodities which are
ing in the dollar area, such as| specialties {rom Ganada. ’ ard

pes, onions, bacon, hams,
breakfast cereals and in
ny cases, pickled meats.
_ The British Government con-
‘sider it quite in order to pay
their own Beet Sugar Industry
more than 50°/, over what they
the B.W.I., and on several
¢ s, including this year,
, paying a higher price for
; Gr at than they are pay-
mg us in the B.W.I.
; 4s more than obvious that
a completely different
lon, of, what. is good and
y or the British working
compated, tor the colonial,
icularly n° our primary
luc in free supply.
hoes Or Not
Was made quite dlear not

which cannot be obtained from |
elsewhere, either as well or is |
cheap. Our cost of living is ba-}
ing forced up thereby. |

Rice |

Is it that the working man in|
Barbados should
breadfruit, Sweet potato and the
ike? Is he not entitled to some
of the things to which the English
working man is entitled?
high time that we let it be known
that however much
power and freedom are given to
us and we are kept strangulated
economically, our peoples cannot
advance.
It is not only with respect to
our Canadian trade that we are
long ago when Mr. Rees jYreceiving a raw deal. There are
f Under Secretary of }many other instances. Recently
fe the Colonies said it was |we all heard that as a result of

er of indifferuuce whether {the devaluation, the rate

re,



lS

of

'0ld people in the West Indies |steamer freight from England to eee 2 ere * I
Ss or lived in propeg|the West Indies was being in. |Patticular considera

ses, so jong as the working |creased to cover the extra costs.
ree got food cheaply. |Not a word was said however,
Gi that is not the feeling |about the fact that the home-
every Englishman. It must |ward freight to England on suga-
been gratifying to all vrue {was being reduced by 8/9 per toi. |
Indians to hear that when) his has only leaked out latel-.
fesults of the British General} This is a very rotten deal, anid
ons were declared, Mr, Will- | jit js quite clear that the Ministr,
Was kicked out. Just as we of Food must have put on pres-
seing very badly treated over |sure to reduce the freight ra.c
‘ the same thing is happen~ | and thereby the cost of sugar to
many other directions which | the British consumer, and at the
So obvious to most people. same time told the steamship
Government makes companies to recoup themselv:
sat pretense that they are | py adding the amount to the
colonies much |cost of outward freight to the
B. W. I., thus increasing the cost





» aSon most important
questions, they are im-
wishes withouv
our opinion and we are
m told what decisions have
e. i A Shame?

suring the war years, they |
they held conferences.
in some commercial ad-

the freight on sugar. This is

they are paying for our sugar.

Is this not a shame? Can any-
one say that a nation who as trus-
as they ne their brains |tees for. a people is acting fair
P them out, although the| when, this is done? Is it not
chew ne never allowed to|therefore obvious to honourable
When decisions were taken. members that the affairs of the

they have abandoned the | colonies should be the concern



even | another way of reducing the price | «y

Co-o

pe

and ours,

me: good faith

tinuation of

AS recommended
have only rice, | Indian Governors’ Conference held
in Barbados in November, 1949, a
Conference of officials from the
|British Caribbean territories was
It is|held in Barbados from 7th March
14th March to
political |@conomic problems of the region
in the light of the revaluation of
sterling in September, 1949,

The Conference reviewed the }
field of economic problems in the
British Caribbean
developed since the revaluation
of sterling against the background
not only of special conditions in }
the region but also of economic
trends in the sterling area and in

\ to

and the
| dustries.

ration

With U.S.

@ From page 1



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Wages For Workers







sone to this pledge and (HE manual workers of Queen’s Park are to get their,
tc the terests fe On .} bt ca a . ~ e
to the interes Ss of all in- ichtful wage of $1.44 a day from this week instead of the!
(2) The Soviet leaders coula; 5!:30 they have been getting since March last year. This
withdraw their military and was a decision made by the Vestry of St. Michael at yester-
police force from the satel- day's meeting, when Mr. E. D. Mottley drew to members’
e countries i p : i . . j
from ig gg al eames attention that through a clerical error, these workers had
that force to keep te beatae! been getting $1.30 a day when all the other manual workers
persons and regimes which| @Mployed by the Vestry were paid $1.44,
a, Were not democratic. 1s ogy ; pst a
(3) They could drop their poli- the Gt : nt ; TECAER 1G ga
# .. of obbiaad ,| the Queon’s Park -wersers “che
United Reed oad ae money owed to them since March “HIGH
instead “act as if they be- | /#St year as the result of the error, .
lieve the United Nations is | Mr. Victor Chase supported Mr, 99
- an himself has recent. | A Bo at ME: Se
Â¥ called it, a serious instru- = , nat
ment for the maintenance| . The Vestry agreed to get their From Page
of international peace and | Solicitor's advice on a_ letier e A
security, | Written them by the Lord Bishop|French Scene or Paris Interlude
(4) The Russian leaders could! @Sking for the Title Deeds and| with

join the United States in
seeking realistic and effec-
arrangements
atomic

tive
control

of

The
using the

In an

(6)

countries were treated in
manner conforming to the} field.
accepted codes of diplomacy |
—with decency and respect.
In general the Russian lead- |
ers could refrain from sys-
distorting

their own people the picture |

of the outside world, par-

ticularly the United States,
“These are some of the things
|we feel the Soviet
'do, which
tional

(7

tematically

and

Mr.

and the cost of living, \ n¢
the maintenance of fiscal stability
development of new in-

hopes.

would

could
vorldwide Com-
munist apparatus to attempt
to overthrow by subversive
means established Govern. |
ments with which it stood| from Messrs,
outward
friendship and respect.
The Soviet
could co-ope
official repr

for

state

leaders} bought a portion of land at Triend-
rate to see that | Ship, and that he understood that number was the “Picture Frame of

the
weapons
and the limitation of arma-
ments in general.

Kremlin stop

of | Co., Solicitors for Mr. M. L. Har- brought the house down.”

its typical sidewalk Cafe,
tables on the sidewalk, waiters in-
viting customers in; the two
“come hither” girls the two fast
young men, the Can-Can dancers
the aerobat, the nurse and baby,
and the rich Baroness, and final-
ly Eric Gates and Pauline Fitz-
gerald as the Sailor and his girl
friend highlight the act with »
dance. The songs in this number
heard a letter read|/are catchy and bright, and Eric
G. L .W. Clarke &|Gates ‘India rubber like figure’

| Conveyanee of the Deanery, over
which the Vestry are the cus-
todians.

Members also decided that apart
from getting the Solicitor's advice,
they should not allow the papers
io leave the Vestry buildings. The
3ishop could come down to the

| Vestry buildings and examine the
} papers,
The Vestry

| Tison, stating that the latter had Perhaps the most pieturesqu
é e sque

esentatives of all| the Vestry was interested in ac- the Past” scene with Denise Sis-

No one

leaders could
would permit the ra-}
peaceful development
of the co-existence of their system
Acheson added.
The United States was ready, as
it had been and always would be,
for genuine effort
settlements, he said.
ever, that I must warn you not to
raise your
has lived through these postwar
years can be sanguine about reach-
ing agreements in which reliance
can be placed and which will be
+; observed by the Soviet leaders in
He @eclared that he
|could see no evidence that the So-
change

to find peace
“T fear, how-

progress of the

convinced
they could not profit from a con-
these tensions,

them

that

—Reuter.

Revaluation
Reports

at

as

consider

they

the

the

have

|problems of changes in the direc-
tion of imports and exports, ex-
|port incentives, the measurement |
and control of changes in prices



Problems

age trends,

The Conference recognized that

could not

ences,

be

it had

Profes

Mr. E
Mr, F

British Guiana:

i i i ne Spencer, Economic
of ‘having anyone butlof the United Nations Organis2- wicisher,
at these confprences which |tion? 1 know they are some] British Honduras

iN many ways more important
L ever, ; a

‘ London Conference
Londo

people in this country who secret-
ly tried to make out that I am
anti-British, but I would like it
» they had a Confer=!to be known that I am as. loyal









ei om “| trator. Si
‘ y aacummoned alas any other British subject arc | Leeward Islands: The Honourable P,P
i i Jonald, o1on.a Secrets

: Bass ‘es . art essentially DEP, West appar Minidad: The Honourable A R
was vo be done|y fee] that justice should not only | _Jrisos inancial Secretary. Mr. A. dA

rations to future dollar appear to be done, but should be | Shenfield, Economic Adviser; Mr L

ce is eee was done Spence, Controller of Customs

‘sing ‘ — ain. ape One wonders if our officials are eyiudwaras: His Honour E, P. Arrow-

Single unofficial was allowed
rucipate. No report of vhis
ce has ever been issued,
XCe| ‘- a few officials, no
th WI. has ever been
ny inkling of what was
imposed upon us.
no representative of tha| ©
in the colony whevher in or
th. overnment can honestiy
tis our fate in this matter.
ut last November another

paid by the British Treasury to
t the U. K., interests, or by
Barbados Treasury to lovix
after ours.
It is high time all this non-
sense be stopped and we make an
to see that local people have
I share in detergining our
economic cy and we must no
ea aoe and let the Col-
onial Office ably peers ae
ene of t and Welfare dictate i
Barboder probasis ‘tor to us without our knowing even
among them=|what is happening and fooling
should spend the| ourselves that we are receiving
unt of dollars that the| greater power to govern our~
London had decided | selves.
to the B.W.I. ain, this should find out the W. I.
lan’ *S, 100% official, not tion with regards to dollar n
r business advised | earning and dollar saving our visi-
No report of this'ple as well as invisible dollar ex-
ever been issued, such as Tourist Trade and
ar yeuly, finding out by| put up a fight for a proper amount
all the ‘disastrous things of dollars to preserve a decent
standard of living and _ protect
vitally important Canadian
We have been sitting
down like a lot of dummies hav-
ing it put across us.for too long.
= will be voting a wie a
vy heart, feeling surc
ery if _ v. K. gave us better
treatment, food could be bought
cheaper and the money could be
used to improve many of the}
other eens, social geokiqnns
tside are badly in need < ’
vonnaat ag To tell the United Nations
superior that all js well with the colonics
ese confer~'is far from the truth.

0

matters arising
Everyone must agree

is being ha
e
which are avail-

ec et CL
aecersanenqnentann tte

Oo.

Jamaica:
Economic
Commissioner of Commerce
Mordecai, Trade Admini

~—

|

|

tries; Mr. J.

as Secretary ©

ste

Affairs;
oO.

—_— = ee &
SSS

‘LIGHT & POWER.

TROUBLE FREE |

INSTAL - -

Developmeat

Mr

J

sor C
and

A. Emanuel,
Petrie:
A Bishop;

Col
Adviser;
Controller of Supplies.

The

D

smith, Administrator, Dominica; His H
our J. M. Stow, Administrator, St Luc
His Honour W. F 5.





though the revaluation of sterling
viewed in
from other major economic influ- |
thrown into relief
some of the region’s most difficult
economic problems and the Con-
ference recommended to Govern-
ors that these should be reviewed
of our goods so that our people | from time to time on a regional
are paying for the reduction ir | pasis,
The Conference Report is being
bmitted to the Governors of the
region, 3
The members of the Conference
were as follows:
Chairman:
Colonial
Organization,
Colonial Office:
of the Economic (General) Department of
the Colonial Office
Barbadys:
Secretary;
Controller of Supplies

G

Acting

oO
Mr

onel

Honourabl

E. D. Hone, Colonial Secretary;
Mr. J. B. Clegg, Secretary fo
Mr.

Ferguson
and Indu



a

to}

who

their

West |

isolation

Beasley,
Welfare

Head

Financia!

“and |day, a

. | coal



nett, Eileen Thorne, Madeline
a Gloria Warren, Bettie Press

He asked the Vestry to give him | 224 Edward Cook and “The Pink
their decision on the matter, since Powder Puff”, Betty Wilkes. The
would-be purchasers were asking adies in their old fashioned hoop
| about the land. skirts of the Victorian era sitting

The Vestry decided to refer the |!MSide a huge picture frame, sang
matter to the Playing Fields Com- such lovely songs as “Somewhere
mittee who will discuss it with | beyond the Stars”, “Lovely to
| Miss Arne, Social Welfare Officer. Look At’ » and others; each girl in

There will soon be a steel break- | Ur. singing one of these songs.
fast shed in Queen’s Park for use Finally stepping out of the frame |
during the Annual Exhibition, | th¢y paraded in their very beauti- }
Some time ago, the’ Agricultural ful costumes. :
Society approached the Vestry on ,rhen ere wis: Sip ane
the matter and were given ‘per- Number Which had doth the!
mission by the Vestry to get ahead | bright and cheerful songs such xs!
with it. There was an alternative | Dixie, Swanee, as well as Stephen
proposal by the Arts and Craft | Fosters’ Old Kentucky Home and
Society that instead of the steel | the American Negro Spiritual Old

quiring the land for a

playing

shed, they (the Arts and Crafts |Man River among others. These
| Society) should be allowed to erect | SO4gs were well sung each in
a floor on the top of the former | their own style by Erie Gates,

Kenneth Tucker and Edward Coo’:
with chorus by the entire cast:

}coach house which is aback of the
| Queen’s Park building. This up-
}per floor would serve for exhibi-
}tion purposes and could be used
by the Arts and Craft Society
| throughout the year.

Florence Daysh who does a
local “Mary waiting for the Bus’
act complete with baskets, torn



apron anda piece of butterless
The Vestry decided not to] bread, tells in rhyme (in much
hange their decision, and they | the same style as the popular Joe

will therefore allow the Agricui- | @ 2d Robert column which appear;

tural Society to erect the steel | weekly in the Advocate,) he:

shed, material for which has al- | views on local affairs. It is witty,
ready arrived from the U.K, clever and most effectively per-|
;, Also discussed yesterday was a|formed by Mrs. Daysh.

letter from the Director of Educa- Eric Gates then did a very!
lion relative to a proposed change | snappy number with the choru

jin the methed of awarding and | girls, telling them “A Secret"

paying for
} Secondary

Vestry Scholarships to

Though it is a very short number, |
Schools. Members de-

it is very sweet.



rided to have the Clerk write a The finale once again included
letter to the Director telling him|the entire cast, and the many
| that if he submitted draft reguia~j} curtain calls which the crowd
tions to the Vestry they would | called for makes “HIGH TYME”

‘onsider them.

The Vestry also dealt with two
j letters from the Department of
Highways and Transport. The first
] was relative to Government grant
for repairs to Tenantry Roads on
which it is proposed to start work,
ind forwarding a list of the pro-
posed programme as well as that
; completed in 1948.

The second asked the Vestry to
submit a list of such Tenantry
| Roads as they consider should be
| given priority in 1950-51. It also
;commented on the programme
completed in 1949-50.

rise and shine, and a triumph for
Eric Gates and his hard working
and talented cast.



415 Sign |
Petition

Four hundred and fifteen citi-
zens have now signed the Petition
to His Excellency the Governor
appealing for a better standard of
lservice from the Barbados Electric
Supply Corporation.









The Vestry decided to refer!” On Wednesday 332 had signed |
| both letters to the Guardians | petitions at the Advertising De-
with whom Mr. E. D. Mottley|partment of the Barbados Advo-
will be associated. cate but yesterday this number
The Vestry received a letter|had risen to 384
|from the Parochial Treasurer of} Seventeen were signed at Messrs
|; Christ Church asking them to|C, F. Harrison and fourteen at|

) Messrs, Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. {
|

|of Vestrymen to discuss ways and]

| send representatives to a meetin

means of collecting the revenue;
which Vestries will by the;
abolition of Occupancy Tax. ¢ m= |
i
|

loss

; venor of the meetings will be Mr. |

A. M. Jones, a member of the ARRIVES
Vestry of Christ Church

, St. Michael’s Vestry decided |

{that such a meeting would)

serve no useful purpose, since

|after the abolition of Occupancy

Tax, there were only two ways]
'in which Vestries could célle |
|revenue—Trade Tax or Owner- |}
|ship Tax.

| The Vestry awarded the tender
for milk for the Almshouse for |
the current year to Mr. C W.|
Springer. The tender for fresh |
meat was awarded to D. V. Scott
and that for bread to Messrs.
Johnson & Redman.

The four-engined Comey set up
a new London-Rome record. The
former record was neld by a
Hawker “Fury” fighter which last
May made the nop in just over
two hours and 30 minutes, accord-
ing to local aerodrome records.
| The Comet was piloted by ex-
{Group Captain John “Cats-Eyes”
/Cunningham, former night fighter
| pilot.

Serre | Air Marshal Sir Alan Coryton
Gas Rationing |

controller of the Ministry of Sup-
| In Sydney

|
|
| SYDNEY, March, 16.
| Sydney's one and a half million
|people went on gas rationing to- |
strike Maitland Field |
j having stopped production of the |
usgi to produce it. Ths
| strikers are “safety men,” wh«

at
al

om

i h. Feo. }are resisting a penalty, impose
St. Vincent; Mr = Police wink to didé
nomie and Financial Adviser ’ on them for haltit g ork Q on
Mr. B. E, Rolfe of the Colonial Devel- | ouss grievances. 3
si rg vat rected
opment and eee gar zeae acts r.



To Mothers
who cannot
feed their babie

can digest it without trouble. The



Vestry Decides On ©



eS
Ca

The Tenets
Of Christian
Science
By Earle E. Simms

HOW td “build a Christly life
of freedom, health, happiness, and
usefulness” through
the religious Tents o

ience was the subject of a talk b

by Earl E. Simms, C S., of Austin
Texas, last night.



European
Frent
Imperative

@ From page |!

have a policy, and the House o
to know what is our policy.
“It is painful to witness

the

; resent indecision by which re-
ractice of}? ays ge > ~ |
Christain eee of France and Great |

ritain with Germany is hindered |
y belated dismantling of a few |

*}remaining factories and still more |

A member of the Board of Lec-| belated trials of aged German |

tureship of The
The First Church

: ot Christ, Scien-
tist,

Science Church, Garrison Hill.

From a lifetime experience the

Mother Church,} Generals.

in Boston, Massachusetts, the Communist fifth column. in
Mr. Simms spoke in the Christian Western Germany and assists the

“All this plays into the hands of

reviving of Nazis.
He said he did not quarrel with }
the Navy estimates, but rather |

lecturer drew actual instances of}W@S sorry to sec no increases in

healing and
ot
ristian Science after a
physical difficulty had
sponded to treatment by
nent physician.
experience, Mr. Simms. said:
. “During the sleepless, fear-fi2lec
nights which camé, it was necas-

severe
not

regeneration for him-] fleet
.and others. He was healed in} 1950-51.

reserve strength during |

“There is no surface fleet poten- |

re-jtially hostile to us in the world
a prom-| to-day, therefore, the aircraft car-
Describing this{rier with appropriate naval pros

tection must increasingly replace
the battleships of former times.
“What we have to face in the

sary to hold closely to God's ever- {next few years is the Germanised

presence and all-power. ‘{he
Christian Science practitioner t

Soviet U-boat.”
“An entirely new type of U-boat

whom I had turned for treatmeni|had been developed which could

faithfully stood by me.
and comfort were found in the
understanding that my true self
hood was ever in the secret pact
of the Most High, abiding unde.
the shadow of the Almighty, Sx
We are assured in the ninety-’ rs
Psalm.

“The healing took two years
It was completed in Christian Sci-
ence. During this period I wa:
able to be about my business al-
most as usual. Indeed it was a
wonderful regenerative experi-
ence. As the healing progressed
many false traits of character, such
as social drinking, the smoking
habit, the use of profanity, and
an ungovernable temper fell a-
Way.

The quality of importunacy
commended by Christ Jesus, tig-

ured prominently in another heal-J°i

it, as did Esau for a megs of poi~}]

ing that resulted in mental surgery
through application of Christian
Science, A friend of the lecturer
was obliged to interrupt a trip
from New- York to Florida on ac-
count of sudden pain. When his
condition became known in the
hotel, persons there tried to per-
suade him to enter a hospital for
an operation.

“Being a Christian Scientist,’
Mr. Simms continued, “he had
no intention of relying on aught
but God for his healing. He said:
‘Amid intense suffering, I affirmed
that, in reality, I was in the se-
cret place of the Most High abid-
ing under the shadow of the Al
mighty. Then suddenly this angel
thought came to me; ‘Why, my
God-given birthright is freedom
and dominion! I demand it right
now! I refuse to be satisfied with
anything short of my divine heri-
tage ”








“He said he fell asleep impor-
tunately demanding-his rich leg-
acy of perfection and liberty. Sev-
era] hours later he awoke to find
that a clear case of mental.surgery
had taken place. This man refused
to be denied his spiritual birth-
right! Just: recently he told me
he has been free from that condi-
tion ever since.

“Remember, your
spiritual perfection

birthright is
Do not barter













|
\
|
|
!
'
|
|
'
'

Refuge |{Manoeuvre below the surface at.

upwards of 20 knots and could |
make, passages of thousands
miles without appearing
surface” he said,

“The main emphasis
naval effort at the present time
should be to create the largest
numbers of light fleet aircraft car- |
riers and auxiliary carriers which |
are capable of carrying the nece:
sary modern type of aircraft,”

Mr. Churchill said Britain
and France must stand together, |
primarily united in Europe. Unit-
ed, they would be strong enous!
to extend their hands to Germany
As long as the Allies could not |
give them any direct protection
German villages and cities
homes might be overrun by “thi
Eastern deluge.’

Mr. Churchill added

Germans who have be
prominent in resisting Comr
ism, or are working for a
ciliation with the west
cracies, would px
feit.”

After declaring
a policy on Germany, Mr. Churc!
ill said: “To remain as we art
for a long period of ti
tainly not the best way
ing the measureless
third world wan

on

of

our

that

No do

reco!
aemo
ay ihe nal

n

there must

of preve
horror
Reuter.



RELIEVES CONSTIPATION

To feei bright, clear ¢
and energy ou mM
ood digestion, re
ndlan Root Pills »
© often needs. This
me ts
dient away i
' system right and regula



yed—-always
ust have cle

!
!
|
{
OLD FAVOURITE MEDICINE
I
|
|









ne t
better you feel tomorrow

tage, but insist upon realizing this}1 |
|

rich inheritance here and now!”
Mr. Simms also related how

Mary Baker Eddy, Discoverer aad

Founder of Christian Scienc

found healing in the inspired};

RMORSES

“aoe PIL

LS

pages of the Bible. Hopelessly ili 4

according to the attending phy- |

sician, she called for her Bib'eyt TRUSTED REMEDY +
and read the narrative in Mat-/)_ dak GGie. I
thew’'s Gospel where Jesus healed}!

the man sick of the palsy. She, t 50 years

too, experienced healing



AIRLINER

IN ROME —

ROME, March 16.

BRITAIN’S HAVILLAND COMET, the world’s first
all-jet airliner, landed here today after flying from Hatfield
near London, in two hours five minutes,

ply was on board.

Police, on foot and in jeeps,
fought to clear the tarmac in front
of the airport buildings of crowds
who had flocked out from Rome io
see the plane.

Cunningham, greeted by roars
of cheers as he step out of the



plane said he tim the flight at
two hours two minutes. “It was
an excellent flight”, he added, ‘but
we had a head wind.”

—Reuter




s
@

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PAGE FOUR



Published by Thu Advocate

ee =
es Friday, 17th March, 1950



— Emigration

THE question of emigration has for the
last five or six years given rise to much
controversy in this island. It means much
to Barbados with her redundant popula-
tion’ and limited fields of employment.
During the five year period after 1944
when the first emigrants under contract
were sent to the United States of America
the returns of the Savings Department of
the Labour Office showed that approxim-
‘ately three million dollars had been sent
back. In this same period it was not
readily realised that the private returns of
workers from Curacao amounted to almost
the same. In addition, large sums of money
and gifts are sent back annually by former
Barbadians now living in the United
States. The result can be seen in the lives
of many of those who now own small prop-
erties and businesses.

In the past there was free and heavy
emigration to Panama, Cuba and the
United States. This helped the island to
find jobs and to bolster its economy.
During the years of the war there was
emigration to the United States and the
United Kingdom and this too had its bene-

ficial effect in relieving unemployment here.
Within recent days however the notices

published in the Press show that there is a
reverse process and although still in small
numbers, the emigrants who have gone
out, are now coming back to a land with an
overflowing labour market. Week by week
there are returns from Bermuda, Curacao,
and smaller numbers from other places but
they nevertheless add to the glut in the
labour market.

The reason for the reduction in the
United States market is not far to seek.
Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have
become politically conscious of their ties
with the United States and their claims
have had to be recognised. In some in-
stances the clashes between Puerto Rican
and West Indian claims have been made
political issues in the United States.

In the Caribbean area there are several
countries like British Guiana, Dutch
Guiana, French Guiana and British Hon-
duras which are definitely underdeveloped
and under populated. Whether it is done
by the Colonial Development Corporation,
by private enterprise or by the British and
West Indian Governments according to
the terms of the EVANS Report, the time
has come when the problem of emigration
must be tackled in a statesmanlike and
imaginative manner in order to relieve the
population pressure on Barbados and some
of the smaller islands.

Barbados still has 65,000 acres of arable
land producing a sugar crop of about
150,000 tons to support 200,000 people. It is
a problem which would tax the inability of
any government; but it is not facing that
probjem to say that the outlook for emigra-
tion is not bright. To accept the defeatist
attitude is to fail before any attempt is
made to find a solution to a problem which
must be solved.

There are still Barbadians willing to
work and work hard at home or abroad;
and places must be found for them while
they are young and adventurous, if we are
to maintain that level which has been
rezched by the hardihood and ambition of
these who have shown the way in former
years Those were the individuals who
took their future in their own hands and
made gcod. Many of them are still scat-
tered cver the world making their living
and ore became a President of Liberia.

What is needed is an imaginative drive
at development in the Caribbean area as
an alternative to the restrictions placed on
emigration by deliberate political action
and by the increasing difficulties of trans-

rtation. There is British Guiana, British

onduras and other places where expendi-
ture can be made on the scale of the East
African ground nut scheme in order to
settle the people of this island who really
want to work. And it would be far more

valuable to the true riches of the Common-
wealth than the problematical nuts.







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for freedom.

After
sessions, honourdble members
te twelve hours wrangling
Tuesday on vne matter of
Colonial Estimates for 1950-51.
Eight heads of expenditure were
passed, many views were express-
ed and several tempers
strained. Also strained, as usual,
were the hearing organs of the
unhappy Press, parvicularly in the
early stages.

There was much debate on the

vitally important matter of Edu-
cation, Head XX, for which close
to $695,000 was finally passed.
That there are numerous fauliy
with the present educational sys-
tem is apparent to all, but the
most vragic feature is the lack of
accommodation in the existin

schools and the lack of additiona
schools. Mr. Adams bluntly stated
that he would like to see every
child in school even if the school
accommodation was under bread-
fruit trees or tents! Messrs. Fos-
ter, Mottley and Branker quoted
incidents of children being unable
to atiend schools purely through
the absence of adequate space, and
deplored such incidents as head-
masters failing prospective stu-
dents in their entrance examina-
tions when the true reason was
that there was no room for them.
“The powers of headmasters,”
thundered Mr. Mottley, “are too
widé. We have likened them to
God.” Under vhe present regula-
tions a headmaster may decide
whether or not a child of nine or
ten years is worthy of further edu-
cation or not!—A truly unfortu-
nate state of affairs. There have
been thousands of cases, in all
parts cf the globe, where a boy
might have been something of a
dolt at that age—only to emerge
in later years as a firs’ class
scholar. Deny him vhe right of
education and his chances of re-
maining a dolt are considerable.

Mr. Crawford stated that thou-
sands of children in this island,
around the age of ten, are illiter-
ate. Mr. Crawford, I am presum-
ing, must have sound grounds for
this statement, and if this is the

ease it is a shocking future we
face Mr. Keith Walcott, and
others, veiced vhe opinion that
preparatory schools, much along

the English system, might answer
the problem of preparing children
for higher grades, providing such
preparatory schools be staffed with



two compafatively brief
of
the House of Assembly had close
last
the

were

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Teachers’ Conversation

By Lee Wade

specialists, but of all the sugges-

‘sons and proposed solutions offer-

ed, the vital need for neers

action was a point on which all
members were agreed. Some de-
finite educational scheme, con-
structed to suit the condivions and
background of the West Indies, is
the most serious problem the pre-
sent Government faces—for on its
satisfactory solution depends the
welfare of the coming generation
in Barbados. Mr. Adams assured
the House that he intends vo give
the matter his strict attention in
vae months to come. and in this
connection he appealed for the
fullest co-operation from members.
The public in general will trust
that he gets it—for a great deal
of co-operation, in fac’ the co-
operation of every loyal citizen in
the Colony, is going to be needed
te remedy the existing chaotic
confusion. A physics laboratory at
Lodge School — but no physics
masier — children turned away
from schools—lack, as Mr. Craw-
ford and others mentioned, of
proper transportation for school
children—resulting in them arriv-
ing home at cight or nine o’clock
at night. What sori’ of conditions
are these if not chaotic? Mr.
Adams mentioned a Select Com-
mittee to delve and probe for a

cure. Such a commivtee will have

to be quite unlike far too many
other committees of which we

have heard in that it will have

to produce action — pov merely
pigeon-hole documents until all

are buried in the dust of forget-
fulness and public apathy.
Garner voiced his opinions on the
faults of the educational system in
a vwenty-minute speech of impas-
sionate power and bitter fury. He
deplored the fact that absolutely

Mr.

nothing of Negro history or cul-

ture, the deeds of past Negroes of
fame, was Vaught to students at

the elementary schools, “from

which”, he cried, “95.per cent. of

students, on leaying, should return
and learn the three ‘R’s’!”’ “And,”

he declared, “some teachers can~
not begin a conversation without
asking for
“And such systems,” he continued,
“that may be good in England may last war have not yet had their

increases in salary.”

not suit the West indies, or us.
Without education we are next

only vo the sheep, the goats and solidly as in works of stone.
psec eens

the pigs.” It is only too true that
education as it works in one land
might not be practical in another,
and it is equally vrue that chil-
dren should be instructed in the
cultural background of their land
and race, for only from such can
be installed pride of race —- any
race. “Te&ch youth,” concluded
Mr. Garner, “to have pride in him-
self, Don’t hope alone in a foreign
race. We can go forward side by
side, yes, but on equal terms.

Couldn’t Hear

The day would not have been
compleve without the usual little
squabble — this time between
Trade Union secretary F. Walcott
and Mr. Mottley. Mr. Walcott
accused Mr. Mottley of straying
from vhe point (the estimate) and
wasting precious time. Mr. Mottley
hotly denied that he was wasting
precious time. For two or three
moments the two jumped up and
down and shouved at each other
both ending by counter accusing
the other of ignoring the ruling of
the Chairman. In all the confusion
I never did discover what Mr
Smith’s ruling was, for above the
din I couldn’t hear a word he said.
Quite a few litile arguments go
on outside in the halls, too, a’
times. On one occasion, when Mr.
Crawford was speaking, a loud
scream from the exterior of the
chamber had this scribe, who has
a kind and peace loving heart,
thoroughly alarmed. No furvher
cries followed, however, and no
arrests were made.

Heroes And The Heart

I would like to close with one
comment on Mr. Garner’s wish
that he may see the statue of a
black man next to tha’ of Lord
Nelson, in Trafalgar Square. I
feel sure, from the few occasions
on which I have spoken with Mr.
Garner, that he will understand
my meaning. Statues, it is true,
are usually erected vo the memory
of heroes, or famous figures of
politics or war. No statue to a
Negro yet stands in Trafalgar
Square—but the names of many
are inscribed on the Memorial
which does, Those names rank
equal with any statue—and rank
in honour with any memorial
They, too, were heroes. They
from these parts who fell in the

inscribed — but remem-
the heart as

names
brance remains in



The Spies Among Us

By Bernard Newman

HE treachery of Dr. Fuchs has
cost Britain hundreds of
millions of pounds. That is to say,
the Russians have gained as much,
since they have been able to
short-circuit vital and expensive
experiments.

What price are we prepared to
pay to see that there is no second
Dr. Fuchs? I say “we,” because
the nation’s conscience, as well as
the national exchequer, is involv-
ed.

The menace must be faced with
completely new weapons. Many
people will not like some of the
ideas I suggest: I do not pretend
to like them myself.

More Men

—_ easiest escape from the
reproaches of our own con-

sciences is to pile all the blame on
our security departments, M.I.5«
and the Special Branch of Scot-
land Yard. This is absurd, and
wild talk of “purges” will provoke
many a chuckle in Moscow.

The truth is that we are very
short of first-class Intelligence
officers. Too often a period on an

Intelligence staff is regarded as an
unwelcome break in a_ military
career—perhaps as a fill-in duty
for an unfit officer,

Our counter-espionage staff has
been grossly under-staff since vic-
tory in 1945, when too many
people in high quarters seemed to
think that its days of useful
service were over.

It has been admitted that Dr.
Fuchs was not even “vetted” by
the usual agencies, but by Minis-
try of Supply security police. Yet
such an obvious case must have
been referred to someone in high
quarters for decision. Whoever
he was, he carries a heavy respon-
sibility.

Are we prepared in future to
use the security methods favoured
in other countries? In Russia
the M.V.D. uses about half a mil-
lion agents. The concierge of
your block of flats, the postman,
the scavenger, the man working at
the next bench—all sorts of people
are pressed into service. The hid-
den microphone is translated from
fiction into fact.

Once I endured a Russian in-
terrogation—and it was indeed an
ordeal. I was not tortured or
drugged, but relays of officials
questioned me for hours on end
for several days. Such pressure
makes it extremely difficult to
refuse a confession in exchange





VEN the American F.B.I. uses
methods which it does not
pretend are pretty. Its “loyalty
check” on people in responsible
positions makes ours seem trifling
in comparison.

A man is trailed for days and
weeks; his friends, his acquaint-
ances—all are closely questioned
about him. Agents are free to
listen to his telephane conversa-

tions, or investigate his corre-
spondence. ;
Unpleasant? Very. The Ameri

cans think so, too, but the Fuchs
case has reinforced their belief in
the need for methods comparable
with those of the adversary.

First, the effectiveness of M.1.5
and the Special Branch must be
strengthened.

They will need reinforcements
of first-class men—who must be
adequately paid. The average
Special Branch man gets little
morc chan a policeman’s pay. The
lowest ranks in M.1.5 are better off
with an Army major’s pay as
minimum.

More Training
A NEW type of counter-spy is
needed. It does not follow
that a man who was a success in
catching German spies in wartime
will necessarily be successful in
catching British spies—in Britain

in peacetime,

The Communist mind is a
special study, and in its incon-
sistencies and perverted logic

must be well understood.

The ordinary policeman is sel-
dom of great use in such a cam-
paign. In one recent routine check
on technicians in responsible posi-
tions, suspects were trailed by
large men who gave themselves
away in a few hours.

We do not need an enormous
organisation—not even approach-
ing American standards, much less
Russian, But the men must be
given additional powers.

More Helpers

O far, I imagine, there will be
little dissension. But an
enlarged security force, however
good, will need large numbers of
volunteer assistants,

After Dunkirk there was a real
risk in Southern England of a
German occupation. Considerable
numbers of men and women were
carefully selected for Intdligence
work. They included town clerks,
bus conductors, waitresses.

If the Germans came, these peo-
ple were to remain at their posts,
and act as our spies, The training





was necessarily brief, but would
have served.

« suggest the enrolment of a
Security Guard along the same
lines—but not from the zealous
enthusiasts who would promptly
offer their services: these people
would provoke spy panic.

Other defensive measures are
needed. People should be infil-
trated into suspect political organ-
isations, just as the Communists
do it in reverse.

More Equality

USSIA has in London at least

five times as many diplomatic

representatives as we have in
Moscow.

ALL diplomatic arrangements
and privileges should be com-
pletely reciprocal. If Britons may
not move freely in Ruritania, then
Ruritanians should be restricted
in Britain—or the men of both
nations should be withdrawn, This
is not childish; it is common sense.

Nor should we halt at defensive
measures, The Russians have a
powerfyl Fifth Column in Western
Europe. I tell you that we have
an even more powerful Fifth
Column in Eustern Europe.

Our many Polish, Czech, and
Hungarian friends, and the several
anti-government moveinents in
the Soviet Union itself, could be

used, not for espionage, but to
publicise the true intentions of the
West.

More Vigour

E have friends in those
places. Remember Peene-
munde? The map which enabled
us successfully to bomb the rocket
research centre was given to
Britain by two Polish forced la-
bourers employed by the Ger-~
mans, |

These men were scavengers in
the factory; the map showed even
the tiniest details of the workshops
they swept around each night. |

The report of the Canadian spy- |
case in 1945 was a warning of the
Fuchs episode, but the import of
copies of the report was deliber-
ately restricted. Why?

Take another example of this
absurb fear of “offending Russia’’:
when Gouzenko walked out of the
Soviet Embassy in Ottawa with
his brief-case of deadly and in-
criminating papers, the first reac-
tion of the Canadian Government |
was that he and they should be

|
|
|

| unification is, in our view, more clearly established

| scale of a capitation fee for cases treated as part of



Unification Of Public
Services Report—cona

TO CONSIDER how the grades of a vearvice for
unification could be applied the commissioned ranks
of the Police of a large colony—Jamaica, and a smali
colony, British Honduras are chosen:—.

Jamaica:

GRADE Basic Salary
Commissioner of Police...... £ 1,300
Deputy Commissioner of Police 950
Superintendent ............. 700
Senior Asst. Superintendent . . 625
Assistant Superintendent .. £425-25-525

British Honduras:
Superintendent of Police... £849-30-968
Assistant Superintendent .. £566-27-673

Now if the grading in Jamaica can be taken as
affording a sound basis—and we have no reason to
think otherwise since they have recently been exam-
ined and revised—the task is to place the posts of
Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent in
British Honduras into two of the Jamaican grades.
[n order’ to do this, it would be necessary to deter-
mine the basis of allocation. Quite clearly the exist-
ing salary scales would not serve the purpose. Those
scales are determined on a colony basis, and scales
so determined too often represent not the appropri-
ate remuneration for the duties of the post in
juestion but the limit which the colony can afford.
fhe only other possible basis of allocation would be
i comparative evaluation of the duties and respons-
-bilities attaching to the several grades in the two
colonies. Looking at the matter from this point of
view, there appears no doubt that, since in both
colonies the grade of Assistant Superintendent is
the lowest commissioned grade, part of the duties
of the Assistant Superintendents in British Hon-
duras must be the same as those of the Assistant
Superintendent in Jamaica. Inasmuch, however, as
the former officers have only one grade of officer
above them, whereas the latter have four, it appears
equally clear that a greater measure of responsibil-
ity must fall on the former than on the latter, But
balancing these two factors neither can we nor,
we venture to assert, can anyone else reach an
informed conclusion whether it would be appropri-
ate to place the British Hondyras Assistant Super-
intendents in the Jamaican Superintendent or Senior
Assistant Superintendent grade. The same diffi-
culties would arise in any attempt to place the
British Honduras Superintendent in one of the
Jamaican grades.

: UNIFORMITY

But if uniformity of grading presents great diffi-
culties in the case of such a service as the police, it
is demonstrably impossible in a number of other
services, owing to the heterogeneity in tneir organi-
zation and scope in the several territories. Had such
homogeneous territories as the Leeward Islands and
Windward Islands alone been the subject of our
investigation, we conceive that no great difficulty

would have been experienced in formulating uni-*

form gradings and common scales of salary. But
under our terms of reference we have to consider
unification in relation to all the British Caribbean
territories. The heterogeneity to which we have
referred is a natural reflection of the wide vari-
ations in the population and financial resources of
the various colonies. At one end of the scale there is
Jamaica with a population of 1,300,000 and a revenue
of £9,500,000; in the middle of the scale there is
British Guiana with a populaton of 37,500 and a
revenue of £3,800,000; and at the lowest end of the
scale the smallest islands such as the Virgin Islands
with a population of 6,500. and a revenue of some
£50,000. The smaller territories neither need nor
can support an administration of the same size as
that of the larger and wealthier territories. Even
where the smaller territories woula wish «o extend
their field of administration, the achievement of
their ambitions is limited by financial necessities.

DIFFERENCES

The consequent differences in scope and organi-
zation of the various administrations are, of course,
greater in some departments than in cthers. An
extreme example of difference is found in the or-
ganization of the financial administration, in res-
pect of which we have the following variations. In
some administrations were are separate posts of
Financial Secretary and Accountant-General; in
others, the duties of a Financial Secretary and an
Accountant-General are combined in the post of

Colonial Treasurer; in the smallest administrations, |

the post of Colonial Treasurer has attached to it a
host of other offices; thus in St. Vincent, the Colonial
Treasurer is also Income Tax Commissioner, Chief
of Excise, Registrar of Shipping, Chief Tax Officer
under the Land and House Tax Ordinance,
Escheator-General, and Receiver of Wrecks. Again,
in Trinidad, customs and excise fall alone to one
department, while in Jamaica the Department of
the Collector-General is responsible not only for
customs and excise but for a substantial part of
inland revenue as well. In some of the postal ad-
ministrations, the Postmaster-General is responsible
for telephones; in others he is not so responsible,
The functions normally falling to a Public Works
Department are, in one colony, split up among five
independent departments. Examples of differences
in the scope and organization of the various depart-
ments could be multiplied, and we are satisfied that
over a wide range of the administration they are
such as to defy any attempt to propound a system
of uniform gradings of posts.

In the preceding paragraphs we have endeavoured
to show the impracticability of a system of uniform
gradings for scheduled posts in unified services. In
the following paragraphs we examine the question
whether if, in spite of our failure to find a solution
the problem of uniform gradings could in fact be
solved it would be possible to attach to them com-
mon basic scales, We begin by examining the possi-

| bilities in relation to a particular service and pros

ceed to consider the matter on a wider basis,

: MEDICAL SERVICES
There is 110 service in regard to which the case for

than the medical service where common basic
Salaries are more impossible. In the case of some
posts, the salary is based on the assumption that the
hoider is not permitted to indulge in private prac-
tice; in others, we find a salary scale and a right to
private practice; in others, the position is stil)
further complicated by the addition to the Salary

the officer’s official duties, as well as a right to
private practice. So long as such variations exist,



sent back, not seized!
Fear and apathy can be
greater menace than Dr. Fuchs.
E.S.

|
|
. \

—— ma

common basic salaries are, of course, impossible, an
the heroic remedy of abolishing private practice =
fixing salaries on the basis of full-time service to

Government is ruled out by two considerations,
(To be continued)



It Is No Bed Of Roses That Scholars Lie In

To The Editor, The Advocate,

in advance, (4) owing to the cli-

is prevented from so doing owing

or parents afver their heavy spend-

grateful thanks the donations re-

Messrs: Singer Sewing Machine Co.,






















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SIR, — The financial provisions
which have been offered by the
lavest Act to present and probably
prospective Barbados Scholars can
only be described as wholly in-
adequate.

t of all, we find that steam-
shj ges to England have sky-
rocketed so high that the sum of
£50 “allocated for this purpose
falis far below par of the present
rates.

This in itself creates quite mâ„¢
impasse, as the unfortunate schoi-
ars must start looking for more
money to aid his ~.meagre sum
offered by the Government, if he
wishes vo complete his passage
fare. So from this, we can infer
that before he can even think of
what he is going to study in Eng-
land, he must first of all know
how he is going to get there

When at long last he reaches
England he finds (1) that owing
to the valuatior { the £, the
cost of living ha
somewhat, (2)
and caution mo
must’ be
hé intends to pursue a 1 course
an extra sum of £183 i npul

sory, and above all, must be pai

ae

the
the



ney

paid in

mate, a great deal of clothing and
other incidentals are obligatory
and must be boughy locally, if any
financial saving is to be effected
and (5) some parents are unable
to cope with this overwhelming
budget in spite of some sacrifices.

And there we find that a Bar-
bados Scholar's portion is no bed
of roses, for unless he is in a posi-
‘ion to meet the heavy expendi-
ture which is neoessary, especially
certain sums for whica the Gov-
exmnment has made absolutely no
allocation, he is no where in ob-
taining his goal.
_ This subject is of paramount
importance and should be given
due recognition by those in au-
thori’y, for how can these scholats
exist on the limited government
grants ?

I always thought that Barbados
Scholars were given

pursuing vhatever

choice





to the prodigious amount of which i

Government has made no alloca-
tion, even if vhey decided toe pay
half or more which would bo
better than nothing, the unfor-
tunate student finds himself in a
dilemma as he is being literally
told vhat he can’t study law.

The hardships of these parents
are indeed a perplexing problem,
and it also has a tendency to dis-
courage the students when they
realise that promises made by vhe
Government are as easily broken
as they are made, especially when
the parents have done all in their
power to further the education of
their children,

Besides having an effect on
present scholars, it will also hava
an even greater effect on future
scholars, they are probably
wondering how much heavy ex-
penditure their parents‘ will have
t through and what a livtla
he I t will offer
n he Govern-
money to
given for
itrary it would prove to
be quite a boon in alleviating any
tha’ may

iby any parent

as

» go








ave more

they have already

al SK tur
l miiture

ng.
By virtue of their success, the
scholars have already done their
bit, and vhe authorities shouid not
hesitate in relieving the situation.
Many a noble cause has been
fought and won in these columns,
and I have every reason to believa
that I have not writven in vain,
as it must be by now, painfully
obvious to one and all that Gov-
ernment allocations to Barbados
Scholars are woefully inadequate,
and m nina uae they produce
some tan, e effort in re izi
this stark fact, —™
R.C,

Canadian Club

To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—The Women’s Canadian
Club would like to express tgeir
sincere thanks to all those who
assisted with the Valenvine’s
dance held at the Marine Hotel on

February 11, particularly those
who donated flowers, loaned
games, made Valentines and in
other ways helped The Club

would also like to thank the Bar-

bados Advocate for very wener-
ously advertising free of cost
the Club acknowledge



ceived during the year, as follows:

Messrs: Da Costa & C’, Ltd , $15 00;
Evelyn, Roach & Co., Litd., $5 00; T. R.
Evans $5.00; William Fogarty Ltd., $15.00;
Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd , $10.00; T
Herbert Ltd., $10.00; C. F. Harrison &
Co., Ltd., $15.00; H. Jason Jones & Co.,
Ltd,, $10.00; Johnson's Stationery $5.00:
Knights Ltd. (City Pharmacy) $10.00:
Modern Dress Shoppe $10.00; Manning &
Co., Ltd., $15.00; Martin Doorly & Co.,
Ltd., $10.00; S, P. Musson, Son & Co.
Ltd. $10.00: Plantations Ltd. $15.00: C. Ss.
Pitcher & Co., $5.00; J. B. Leslie & Co.,:
$10.00; Hull & Son $10.00; T. Sydney
Kinch Ltd., $10.00; Bruce Weatherhead
Ltd., $5.00; Y. De Lima & Co., Ltd., $5.00;
Stansfeld, Scott & Co., Ltd., $10.00; Ince
& Co., Ltd,, $10.00; Cosmopolitan Pharm-
acy $5.00; C. B. Rice & Co., $5.00; R. M.
Jones & Co., Ltd., $5.00; British Ameri-
can Tobacco %o., Ltd., $10.00; Mr, Charles
McKenzie $5.0); Messrs. Jas. A. Lynch &
Co., Ltd., $100; Gittens, Croney & Co.,

$10.00; A. Barnes & Co., Ltd., $7.50
Alleyne, Arthur & Sons., Ltd. $10.00:
A S Bryden & Sons, Ltd $10 00:

Bookers Drug Stores Ltd.. $5.00; Barbados

Foundry Ltd., $10.00; City Garage

$5.00; Cole's Printery $3.00; Hinines
Hotel Ltd., $5.00; Hanscheli, Larsen &
Co., Ltd., $10.00; Bata Shoe Store $5 00
Eckstein Brothers $10.00; Bradshaw &
Ce $5 00 Occ View Hot $10.0

@ LETTERS which are signed with a nom-de-p]
-plumie, b
accompanied by the customary bona fides, will be Rest
Many such reach the Editor's desk each week, and readers |

are again reminded of the

to be known to the Editor,

assurance of good faith.

$10.00; J. N. Goddard & Sons, Ltd., $20.00;
T. Geddes Grant Ltd,, $15.00; Barbados
Telephone Co., Ltd., $12.00; Robert Thom
Ltd., $10.00; Wilkinson & Haynes Co.,
Ltd., $5.00; Cave, Shepherd & Co., $15.00;
Central Foundry Ltd., $10.00; Barbados
Cotton Factory Ltd., $10.00; B'dos Electric
Supply Corp., Ltd., $10.00; J. N. Harri-
oe Co., Ltd., $10.00 Private Donations

1.00,
The dance realised $2,276.08, of
which $1,415.00 has been donated
to various local charities, and the
baiance will be distributed at
Christmas.
_ The winners of the prize draw-
ing which took place at the dance
are as follows: Mr. F. D. Barnes.
Lexham, Garrison, — Basket of
Flowers. Professor Beasley, Pine
Hill—One Gallon of Rum.
Again with sincere thanks vo
you and everyone who assisted ir.
making this function a success,
LEE NIBLOCK,

Hon. Secretary,





WHILE YOU DRINK
EMPIRE COFFEE

_ The Cheapest ia Town
rder

J&R BAKERY

SPECIALS

“Clevelands,”
Britton’s Cross Road.

a

necessity for the writer's name |
not for publication, but as an |











HIS EXCELLENCY T

FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 1956



HE GOVERNOR, the Lord

Bishop, and the Headmaster of the Lodge School each








in his speech the spi



poy”, counselled the boys
“iy these words: “It is the extra
‘+ made whether in school, or
Lagi playing field, or in life
ij attracts success,” and he
on to emphasise the necessity
od work and concentration.
“| do congratulate you Mr.

farmer and your staff on the
ic and other meres

but above all on one

Thee Thich does not attract
ae or prizes, but, in fact, is

: greatest reward a Headmaster
= earn. I refer to the general
ytmosphere as reflected in the
loyalty of the students, their gen-

, behaviour and appearance
and their alertness,” the Governor





2

g

ac} felt this atmosphere very
strongly on two occasions last

































First, when with Her
| Highness Princess Alice, we
through the ranks of the

and secondly, when the
tatives of the school visit-
ed Government House. Although
representatives at Govern-
House modestly stood in the
ranks, it was not their height
dress, Which attracted my at-
ten but their whole bearing, I
s they were from vhe Lodge
" gehool, and I felt very proud of
the Lodge School, and of Barba-

drove

e.. Governor then emphasised
‘the essential need for a spiritual
tion in the lives of all

Headmaster’s Report
THE Headmaster in his address
pointed out that it was necessary
we should have a spiritual back-
gound in our lives, and said that
we should look to the church to
pa supply this spiritual background.
"He was delivering his repori
#M of the school’s activities for the
; ear,
i Peaving welcomed the Gov-
emor to the School for the first
‘time he said: The School now
‘qumbers 267 pupils—an increase
of 30 boys—on the number given
/at his last Speech Day by the
jing Headmaster, who, tha
| School will be delighted to know,
{has risen above the rank of
Schoolmaster, and] is now busily
engaged in spreading the cause
of Education in Kenya, A bril-
jiant Classic, who could at al
moment’s notice turn the most
qrosaic English passage into)
“melodioys Latin Verse, Mr. |
fvans is undoubtedly a linguistic |
atist; speaking metaphorically;
mee give him the building, and
he could ornate and embellish it,
but what he found most irksome
was the long drawn-out effart of
constructing the edifice. He is
the third of a brilliant se-
‘quence: O. deC. Enmtage,
ee memory is loved and
fevered throughout the West
Indies for his all round greatness;
the Rev. H. B. Gooding, for his
learning and piety; and Mr. T. L.
| fvans for his scholarship ~ and
generosity. For the past 50 years
thd more the School has been
lead, and in its policy directed,
by 3 exceptional men; each of
whom, so it seemed to me, en-
feavoured to give the School a
definite lead in that particular
sphere of academics in which his
own interests and aptitude lay.
Needs oi School

For myself, I am reminded of
the question of the passer-by—
lere, my good man, are you

q this great mastiff?” “Me!
| stacious no, I am not Jeading
> Iam carefully watching
where he wants to go and am
taking him there.” In scholastic
Patlance, I shall endeavour cor-
"etly to interpret the needs of
School, and to ‘assess accu-
tately in what direction or di-;
rections the particular talent of
our School, as it unfolds itseli
inclines, and to supply these
heeds. A$ matters stand now, the
School shows a definite bias to-
| Wards Science and English; ana
tis fortunate that the School
at present two very
fompetent men in charge of its
mtific studies—Mr. Hodgson
ad Mr, Gooding—Mr. Hodgson
Sur Chemist, holds a First Class
of Manchester, and Mr.
ming, Our Biologist, is a Gold
mallist of McGill. In addition,
© Governing Body has just ex-
d the Science Department
ing a Physics Laboratory,
# So all that the School now
“sur, ' complete its Science
no is a first rate Physicist.
, he a ag School can offer
Pus the most up-to-date
oom teaching in the West

Time Presses, there remains
Much to say, and we cannot



























E MES. SAVAGE,
Pion. Dougall finished the 10



ritual side of education, at the

e School oer Day yesterday afternoon,
The Governor, calling himself a, go into each department of study

with the same detail, and I mere-
ly mention, en passant, that the
Sixth Form Classics Seotion is of-
fering both English and Classics
for the Oxford & Cambridge High-
er Certificate this year, and the re-
sponsibility for this extra English
teaching rests upon Mr. Newsam,
a member of our already depleted
Classical Staff.

A Headache

_In these days, the mere men-
tion of Staff is quite a head-ache
for the Heads of Schools: indeed
«my senior colleague, the Head-
master of Harrison College, has
had two such head-aches, I am
suffering my first with the de-
parture of Mr. Walker, a spec-
dalist with a first in Mathematics.
In the main, however, the ola
brigade stands firm; and Mr.
Crichlow—or more familiarly
*Crich’—is still the Staff's refer-
ence on all debatable points.
Last Term, Mr, Cooper, who haa
endeared himself both to the boys
and staff, left us to return to
England; and in September this
year we shall be losing Mr. Mas-
siah. “Young Wilfred Massiah,
you may remember, gaining nis
Oxford & Cambridge Higher
Certificate in July 1948: in Sep-
tember 1949 he joined the Stat?
of his old School, and I am hap-
py to say that he will be going
up to Oxford in September 1950
to qualify as a Schoolmaster
In the September Term of 1949,
Mr. Michael Timpson, an Hon-
ours Graduate and MA., of St
John’s College Oxford, with »
Diploma in Education ‘to boot
joined the School. By introduc-
ing his pupils to the art of pic-
torial representation, he has
vividly brought to life again the
stirring events of the Renaissance
Period: and you will find, staged
by him, in the upper storey,
Physics Laboratory a little ex-
hibition of graphic art, the
of juniors whom he
TI am sure you will be pleased to
see what your boys are now at-
tempting in this field. To many
boys, especially those to whom
abstract reasoning is difficult and
its rewards elusive, pictorial re-
presentation gives not only
sense of greater realism, but af-
fords an outlet for expression.
and so brings relief from a feel-
ing of inadequacy and frustration
Further relief, too, in this sphere
has been ours for the asking, and
we owe a debt of gratitude to the
following gentlemen of the Brit-
ish Council:—to Mr. Tucker, for
a most interesting lantern slide
display: to Mr. Harrison ‘or the
very kind interest he has taken
in the introduction of Art Class-
es; to Mr. Dons, for his lead in
musical appreciation; and to Mr.
Aubrey-Smith who, as you may
know, has been seconded to the
University College of the West
Indies by the University of Cam-
bridge, for his interesting valk on
Education. —

a

Heartiest Congratulations

And now I make mention of
Cricket and John Goddard, to
whom I extend our heartiest con-
gratulations on his appointmeni
as Captain of the West Indies
Team to tour England this year.
John possesses a wonderful spirit
of optimism, which defies defeav,
an invincible optimism, which
can change probable defeat into a
glorious victory. Is it not re-
markable that Barbados should
provide 6 members ouv of 16, and
more remarkable still that 5 of
these hai] from our leading Schools
—2 from Harrison College, Wal-
cott and Williams; 1 from Com-
bermere, Worrell; and 2 from tha
Lodge, Marshall and Goddard?

My friends, the growth of Edu-

cation proceeds apace, every
branch of it is progressively
spreading out. Physics, for ex-
ample, uppermost now in our

minds because of its own spectac-
ular advance in recent years, has
become much more abstract, and
our Schools need specialist staf.—
more of them if we are to hold
our own in scholarship in a mod-
ern world, and if we are to carry
worthily the torch of learning
which is ours by right of ovr
tradition. Deny us this need, and
we may have to write Ichabod
over our portals; but grant us
these in full measure, and we
march from strength to strength.
We would therefore counsel all
who are truly interested in Edu-
cation—our Governing Bodies, our
leaders in Politics, our Economic
Adviser, our Executive Council—
te consider the special needs of
our Academic Schools in the mat-
ter of staff. We need experts in



wife of H.E. presents a prize to Dougali, Division Til

0-yard sprint in 121/10 secs

work | Latin, more often the request is
has taught.) more general, Languages: I hope

SEXTRA SCHOOL EFFORT Uttered
| ATTRACTS SUCCESS

Says Governor At Lodge
School Speech Day



—————$——

| Clamouring loudly for these needs
| Science, Mathematics,

| English and Modern Lang
| we do not

Classics,
uages, in
‘ feel that we are being
selfish—Education is now open to|
| all—all our sons and daughters!
Stand to benefit from this teaching.
Expert Higher Certificate teaching
requires skill and acumen cf a)
er high order, and it must not
be forgotten that in our Sixth
| Form, boys are really doing first,
and, im some cases, second year
University work. We do not indeed |
mean to enter into the arena of

politics nor the sphere of eco-|
nomics, when we say that we
recognise that we are 200,000

souls dependent on a single indus- |
try, and that there are definite
limiting factors to our resources;
but such is our confidence in our
statesmen and our public citizens,
that we persistently cherish the
belief that this problem of ade-|
quately staffing our leading schools
will not be found insoluble.
School Matters

I have digressed somewhat, and
to get back to the proper domain
of School matters:—what, a parent
may ask, is the broad distinction|
between School Certificate and/
Higher Certificate requirements, |
Briefly, a candidate for the Schools}
is required to have a fairly sound!
general knowledge of a variety of |
subjects. 5 is the minimum num-
ber, and our boys offer 7, from
Latin and Greek, French, English, |
Maths, Botany, Chemistry, Biology
and Scripture. For the Higher
Certificate, the candidate is re-
quired to narrow down his choice
of subjects to one, or maybe iwe
at the most, and to pursue his
particular line of study to an ad-
vanced level. For example, School
Certificate Mathematics entails |
only a knowledge of Arithmetic
Elementary Algrebra, Geometry
and a little Trigonometry; whereas {
the Mathematics for the Higher



|

|

Certificate includes advanced |}
work in 8 branches — namely, |
Algebra, Trigonometry, The Dif-
ferential and Integral Calcu-
lus, Statics, Dynamics, Pure and
Analytical Geometry. Speciali-
Sation of this intensive nature
exists in all the other subjects

and, this gives me the opportunity
to point out that specialisation be- ;
gins with the Higher Certificate in
the Sixth Form. Too cften do we
have to cope with the request that
a boy may be allowed to give up

|



that parents will forgive me for}
saying that such requests do not |
fit in with the curriculum of this
School, and that it is very neces-
sary to veto them, both on the}
ground of practical application to
the working arrangements of this |
School, as well as from an ideal-)
istic point of view; for there would |
be a grave danger to academic!
education in this Island if we
allowed it to assume, in the forma-
tive years, a too specialised or
technical aspect.

Our Youth
Our youth is far too prone to
consider only the utilitarian side,
and to neglect the aesthetic in



| presented

{had sent

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| A Forged
Cheque For $210



Assize Sentence Postponed

AFTER 45 MINUTES’ DELIBERATION a petit Jury

j

the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday found Ernest Adol-
phus Murrell of Bank Hall guilty of endeavouring to obtain
$210.00 from Barclays Bank, Ltd. by virtue of a forged
cheque, knowing it to be forged.

Sentence was postponed.

Murrell appeared on alterna-
tive counts of uttering a forged
document and endeavouring to
obtain money by virtue of
forged instrument.

His Honour Mr. G. L. Taylor,
Acting Chief Justice, presidea
and Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C.,
Solicitor General, prosecuted on
behalf of the Crown,

Police

First witness for the Prosecu-
tion was Sgt. B. King of the
Police who said that on November
16 last year, Sgt. Bourne had
made a statement to him and had
handed him a cheque—12-Ac

76733, purporting to be signed
by Mr. Beaubrun, then Comp-
troller of Supplies. The cheque

had beem issued for $210.00. Sgt
King exhibited to the jury the
counterfoil of the same cneque
as well as the book from which
the cheque had been taken,

Sgt. Bourne had also handea
him six keys op a ring and a
separate key

The Bank

Harold de C. Parris, a cashie.
Ot barciays Bank told vhe Cou.
that on Novemper 2, 1949, tne
accused came to the Bank anu
him a cheque. Tne
cheque in Court was the same,
and it was in favour of Chester-

|neld Herbert for $210.00.

It purported to have been
siguea by uvit. beaubrua, sala
Parris, He aid not recogmze

tne Signature, and he had relerreu
it tO WvlisS Meath, an Accountaie.

Miss Meath revurned him te
cneque and maae a stalement to |
hum.

He called the accused anu
asked him it he wanted casa 101
il, and tne accused said ne ala.

He also asked the accused who
him, and tne accuseu
acpiled wal IMP, beaucorun had
sent him. He did not casn wwe
cneque, but returned it 0 Mus»
Heath,

He was called to the Manager's
otice about nve or ten munutes
later, There he saw the aerena-
ant. The Manager showed him
(Parris) the cheque .and askeu
him if that was the same one tna:
the accused had presented to him.
He said yes,

To the accused Parris said that
he had made no attempt to waik

Out of the bank or run out. He
had said “Beaubrun.” He migh’
nave said “i. C. Beaubrun.”

He did not look at the numbers
on the cheque, but he recogniseu

it from the manner in which the
words “two hundred and ten’
were written.

Sgt. King recalled said he was

present in the Magistrate’s Court

; + 3 ; yhen Mr. Beaubrun had given
education. Indeed, it is becoming | W” brur
increasingiy necessary to remind | ¢Vidence. The Court had calles
our children that culture is as im- |92 Mr. Beaubrun to write on a

portant as acumen, and that while
Mathematics and the Sciences are
first-rate tools for carving a liv-
ing out of life, it is from the study
of languages that we derive our
more humanising influences, our
liberality of thought and breadth
of outlook, our traditions. We}
know that many of our youth re-j;
fer to the Ancient Languages of
Greece and Rome as dead lan-j}
guages; why study a dead lan-
guage, they say: to mention only |
one of the most, obvious reasons, |
it is because our own English is
}partially built upon Latin and)
| Greek; and, paradoxical as it may |
| seem, a thorough and adequate ,
knowledge of English can only be!
obtained via Latin and Greek. I
should like to venture into details,
but need I remind you how inter-
esting is the history of some of our
every-day words; time, however, |
does not allow of this, and
merely pronounce the generalisa-
tion that parents should encourage
their boys to do their best with
their languages. It will help their
spelling by the process of associa~
tion, it will make their reading the
more entertaining, it will help the
phrasing of their written English,
it will teach them—as nothing else
can—the structure of their own
language, and—most important of
all—it is very necessary in life
that our youngsters be encouraged
to do the things they don’t parti-
cularly like, and to grapple with,
rather than to evade, the things
they find difficult; for life is full |
of difficulties. a

It has not been easy to say this,
but on the other hand it is more
difficult to be altogether silent on
a matter which so intimately af-
fects the lives and happiness of
our own children, and of other
people’s children in our charge.

Thanks

The Lord Bishop moved the vote
of thanks. He thought the audi-
ence would agree with him, he
said, that His Excellency having
decided to call himself a “new
boy”, had acquitted himself re- |
markably well, and he hoped it
would not be the last Speech Day
he would attend at the Lodge
School. ¥

Referring to what he said were
two things arising out of the Head-
master’s speech, the Bishop said
that first of all what he would ask
parents to bear in mind particular-
ly, was that the whole trend of the
educational world was chaoging so
rapidly that unless they were pre-
pared to keep pace with it the
boys and girls in the island were
goirig to suffer considerably.

Not very long ago the legisla-
ture had made provision for the
awarding of four Barbados Schol- |

i



arships. That was not simply
to give two or three more scholar-

two or three more
@ On page 7.

| What’sOn Today |

Court of Grand Sessions at
10.00 a.m.

Athletic Sports, St. Michael's
Girls’ School at 2.45 p.m.

Mobile Cinema, Spa Planta-
tion yard, St. Joseph at
7.30 p.m.

ships to

|

piece of paper the words “‘Chester-

field Herbert, two hundred ana

‘ten dollars”, and to sign his name

under the amount.
had kept the paper.

Miss P. Heath Clerk, gave evi-
dence corroborating that given by
Parris, and said in reply to the
accused that she was certain that
she did had a conversation with
him in the bank.

Percy S. Kirby, Aqcountant at
the bank said that the cheque
had been brought to him by Miss
Heath for reference. He haa
looked at it and discovered tha
the signature was not Mr. Beau-

The Cour

brun’s. He telephoned Mr
Beauprun, and_ retained the
cheque. While waiting for Mr
Beaubrun to come to the bank

he engaged the accused in conver-
sation, He had asked him if he

was Chesterfield Herbert, and he}

Said no, that he had been sent
by someone else. Before Mr.
Beaubrun arrived, he had taken
the accused into the Manager’s
Office. When Mr. Beaubrun ar-
rived, he said that the cheque
had not been drawn by him.

To Murrell: I asked you if you
were Chesterfield Herbert. I
may have asked you if you came
to cash the cheque for yourself
You did tell.me that you were
not cashing the cheque for your-
self. The conversation between
you and I may have lasted for
about three minutes. You did
not run out of the bank.

The Manager

Mr. R. B. MacKenzie, Manager
of Barclays Bank, said that on
November 2 he was in his office
at the Bank. The Accountant,
Mr. Kirby, came in to him and
brought a cheque. He went to the
counter and interviewed Murrell.
He asked Murrell if he was
Chesterfield .Herbert and he said
“no”. He then said that
name was Adoly: us Payne.

He









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a | Road who had asked him to cash

his,

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then asked Murrell who was
Herbert and Murreil said that
Herbert was a grocer in paxter’s

the cheque.

He asked Murrell where he
worked and he said at Rogers
Grocery in Baxter’s Road. He
asked Murrell to come into his
office and asked one of the
messengers to show him in.

Mr. Beaubrun arrived shortly
after and Murrell was still in his
otfice. He asked Mr, Beaubrun
if he had signed the cheque anu
he said that he did not.

He next phoned Col. Michelin
and asked him to send over a
policeman. Later two detectives
arrived. He told Sgt. Bourne,
one of the detectives, that he
wanted him to make investiga-
ions. Mr. Beaubrun stated that
Murrell was his messenger and
asked Murrell for a cheque that
he had given him to deliver to
Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfiela
and he made no reply.

Sgt. Bourne then accused an.

cauuoned him. He = searcne.
wiurreil’s pocket and found tnc
counterfoil and keys. Murrei.
was then taken away by tne
caetectives.

He said_all that Mr. Beaubrun
had said and done was in the
presence of Murrell, |

To Murrell; Betore the Police
Magistrate I mentioned Chester- |
field but did not remember the
second name Herbert I also did!
not remember the name of the;
srocery and vne Police Magistrate
uid not allow me to refer to my
notes on the back of the cheque.
{ made these notes in your pres-
ence before Mr, Beaubrun ar-
rived.

Keys

Sgt. Cecil Bourne of the C.I.D.,;
last witness for the Prosecution
said that on November 2 he was
sent to Barclay’s Bank. When he
got there he saw Murrell, Mr.
Seaubrun and the Manager, Mr.
Mac Kenzie.

The Manager



showed him a
cheque and told him that Murrell
had brought it to the Bank. He
took the cheque and showed it to
Murrell. He told him that he
had been accused of uttering a
forged cheque with intent to de-

fraud. He searched Murrell and
found a counterfoil, two

the keys he found one which
could unlock Mr. _ Beaubrun’s

desk. Another single key was
claimed by the office and he gave
it to one of the clerks.

To Murrell:
key to Mr.
your
presence

I did not try the
Beaubrun’s desk in
presence, I tried it in the
of P.C. Babb and Mr
Beaubrun on the following
morning. I made extensive en-
quiries and checked the whole of
Baxter’s Road and Tudor Street
for Chesterfield Herbert's Grocery
but did not find it.

Murrell
Beaubrun’s

next asked that Mr.
evidence be read to
the Court. In this evidence Mr
Beaubrun told how he kepv his
cheque Book in. the right hanx
lraw of nis desk. On November
his attention was drawn to

single
keys and a bunch of keys. Among

‘raw being left open. On _ the
following day he was called t
Barclays Bank where he identi-
the Cheque

Sed and

Book,

cheque

The Defence

In defence Murrell stated that
m November 1 Mr. Beaubrun
isked him to go into the market
ind buy some slips for his goat
He told him that he was not going
because it was a practice of hi:
to send him for fish and meat etc
and he was not going for slips.

He said that Mr. Beaubrun said
“you are not going for slips now
but when you go up there you
are going to work for nothing.”

He next told how Mr. Beau-
brun gave him the cheque with
the counterfoil and everything
He said that after drawing the
money he intended taking back
the money to Mr, Beaubrun,

To Mr. Reece; I did not tell the
Manager of the Bank that
name was Adolphus Payne.

Murrell next addressed the jury
He submitted that the whole case
against him was a_ conspiracy |
between Sgt. Bourrte, the Manag- |
er of the Bank’and Mr. Beaubrun

He told the jury “Let justice
be done though the Heavens
should fall,” and that they woulé
not be doing justice if they found
him guilty.

The Acting Chief Justice later
summed up and the Jury returned
their verdict,

The Court then adjourned until
10.00 a.m. today.

my





mula





Tissues strengthened

*Sanatogen’

en a

“SANATOGEN? 52"
J.B. ss a 4 FOOD

restores health,
The word ‘Sanatogen’ i

youth and vitality |

a registered trade mark

an Ltd., Loughborough, England





Sugar Stored
In Bonds At
Speighistown

S of the Leeward parisnes 0:
the island is being stored in bonas
at Shermans and Speigntstown

actorie

daily.
Kvery year, ships call
Speightstown for sugar to be

Shipped to U.K. Sugar ships have
called at Bridgetown already
year but none has called at
Speightstown.

Sugar shippers of Speightstown
told the “Advocate” that they cia
not know when the first ship will
call,

HE ANNUAL meeting of the



Belleplaine Sports and Social
Club took place on Wednescay
at 8 p.m. at the Alleyne School.

Mr. L. E. R. Gill was elected
patron of the Club. Other offices
filed were as follows:— Rev.!
G. C. M. Woodroffe, President, Mr.|
K. G. Douglin, Vice Presiaent, |
Mr. J. E. Graham, Secretary,
Mr. I. Bourne, Treasurer, Mr. w.|
Jordan, Mr. C. Hewitt and Mr.|
C. W. Springer, members of the
committee.

Mr. H. Springer is skipper of
the cricket team and Mr. Mc!
Donald Smith, Vice Skipper
Skipper of the football is Mr. Mc!
Donald Smith and Mr. C
is Vice Skipper.

OUNTED POLICE can stil!

be seen patrolling Broad
Street trying to prevent conges
tion on the streets,

Yesterday they (police) were
busy as many housewives were
in town trying to get bargains

from the various stores that
holding sales.

are

HEN THE FINALS the
Bagatelle Tournament vas

played at the Police games room,
Coleridge Street PC Eacie
Phillips who was the table tenni

champion last month defeated
band cadet Grant after keen
contest. In the semi-finals P.(

Cadogan lost to Cadet Grant an
cadet Dodson to Phillips. Thi
is the first time that P.C. Phil
has won the finals Baga
telle tournament
EN JIM BEST and Lotti
Smith both of My 1
Hill appeared before His Worshi)
Mr. H. A. Talma
inflicting bodily harm
Walcott on November 14, ‘
were each fined.
to pay 40/- and
days and Smith 30/- and
costs in 14 days. They were)
given an alternative of one mont
imprisonment
TILLIAM HARRIS a. sai
of the SS Lloyd Cre
reported that he was robbed of hi
wallet which was valued ;
and contained $52.00
Wednesday.
ECILIA GOODMAN of
Hall St Johr told th
police that a goat valued at $25.
was stolen from the pen in he
yard between March 11 and 12

In the

yesterday

on Perce

Best was orders

3/-

costs
h
ol

10

on

$25.1

in cash

Foste



FIRE OF unknown
broke out at Lower Estat
Plantation yesterday about
am. and 24 acres of ripe cane
were burnt This fire
a field at Belle Plantat
burnt 17 acres hich
nroperty of Hon'ble G
Lascelles
Another cane fire ke
Pine Plantation on Tuc

102 holes of canes we I int



Sentence Postponed

Reuben Green pleaded
at the Court of Gr ;
yesterday to a chars rf ali
ne travelling watch valued $50
one leather wallet valued $2, on
black safety

ane me Lor

razor vaiued $1.80
ind cash amounting to $22, total
‘mount $75.80, property i Re
1. E. Griffiths, from

welling
house on November 9. His He

Our postponed sentence

YEARS AGO

(BARBADOS ADVOCATE,
March 17, 1925)



or
me

STANLEY BENN AT CAMP

During the past week tne cai p
f Stanley Benn, the m« eriou
contender for championship |
ours was visited by a great
ber of local spurting genie
They were entertained by
and his sparring partners
reparation for the grim fight t
e staged next Monday at th:
Olympic Theatre wivn

Smili

erent
noone

White

White Cotton Pique Voile_. RM

Cotton Voile 77 & R(he
Rayon Spun _.._.. $1.00

Rayon Satin... Oe

White

White

White

All 36 inches wide.



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID.

12 & 18 Broad Street

10, il,





|
|
Hewitt}
|

Cotton Leno Voile___ Yije

Sex





PAGE FIVE



Will Meet In Antigua

Advocate Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, March 16,
\ meeting of administrators
commissioners of the four
eward presidencies will be held
Antigua on .March 28 when
itters of cornmon interest to the

Le



His Honour Charlesworth hg3,
Commissioner of Montserrat w
act as Administrator in Antigua
during the absence of 0. St. J.
Wayne—who is on five months’
leave in the U.K. During his leave
Mr. Wayne will partake in discus-

ur presidencies are to be dis-jsions of the Colonial Office’s req

cussed end the meeting is likely to
last for several days.

|



|
:

\|| SIMPLY AMAZING
VALUES!

3
» Bw

Ree P ) eB





SRINKLE
GEORGETTE

in White, Black
Blue, Green

1)
I Peach,
and Pink

$1.88 yd.

rN

REPE

in

s
Emerald

and Turquoise
SL.6L
8

| SHARKSKIN

White
$L.70 and $1.89 yd.

HARRISONS

BROAD STREE?

Cerise,

|
|
a
| SATIN BACK
yd.

only

|
|

|
|
}







2 our No. 1 Show Case.







ly

BBS RBEBBEE ESA.
|S PSS eBeeeeeaeeaaaeaee
it

eee nee nn went

| SPECIFY

—“EVERITE’

ASBESTOS - CEMENT
CORRUGATED SHEETS

AND

“TURNALL’

| ASBESTOS







vised ten-year plan for Antigua.
—(By Cable.) -

“Iam a proud consumer of....

GOAT CHOW

The cows begin their young oneson.. .
CALF STARTENA
)btainable from H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd.

mae eermaages
a @



——



YOU MUST

SEE THESE SPECIAL LINES!
f é ,

















4

;

















de FRIDAY, MApe |
BARE S ADVOCATE sa i ek > MARCH
PAGE SIX sn MMI iil celal . = ee
sucker rer ee = |
HENRY




























Te diet I

!

FOR GOOD




; Town
, Silver -
it } oa Poliyy
ry |
4 : Clark’s Blood aye
fee | \ [ Sul ; Mi
hi | S E R I . an Maubbs Ammonia

Macassar 0;
Mothaks Oil (Red g ate



SHADES—
VALUE- —

| USE

“STAG”

BRAND

READY MIXED :

PAINTS

AN I. C. 1. PRODUCT.
-

A.S. BRYDEN & SONS vos) LTD.

AGENTS.



|
|
|
(
DRUG STORE
| Phone saleridge St.

ate POO S oe

BY WALT DISNEY

| (SHAMROCK LANDY ROW

THAT MEANS Ww {. TH

IRELAND | PTREASURE 1S
PH" @BAP LUCK!

ng

.

,

>








LOOK! THERE'S
ETHING ON THE
sae BACK!















rr
|A_BAG FULL OF )
JELLY SRANG FF







Ot
PS ; > 6666006 FOC SO SOCOD
OP PPD OOPS SPP PPPS OS SS SSFP SPP SPF O SEPP PSI LAL ADPL AP PPD





K. @. CANNON ..... - The Biddle of the Red Domine QS





a ee



HAVE A PEEK! IF YOU
















TRY THE WINDOW, STIRRUPS.) WHAT WE NGEO IS \| STA/KE ME, THERE JS! | J a ~
oun ALY! THEAs's ores 'e HOVER PLANE NOT A PLANE, BUT LEAVE YOUR ARMFUL / Fhe “eae
WICKL AING! Sam BUT NOTHING'S || A D/NGHY -RIGHT OF BLONDE. WE j Sau na
SOMEONE COMI! Cu “ COULD MAKE !T!. A YRS 4 kid ; bi
Se fon may mean Kidney trouble
We NA a; = yy
; ~
=’ & 2 f



A function of the kidneys is to eliminate
harmful impurities from the system. If the
kidneys grow sluggish, these impurities
in particular excess acid- accumulate and
settle, and become a cause of pain and
suffering in joints and muscles.

The way to tackle the root of the trouble
is to help the kidneys. “They should be
toned up with De Witt’s Pills — the medicine
made specially for this purpose. De Witt’s
Pills have a soothing, cleansing and
antiseptic action on the kidneys that f
brings them back to perform their
natural function properly.

Ye Witt’s Pills are a very well-tried







a,
Es
Kea

“My teeth really
ARE whiter— _

Â¥
thanks to the Irium b
a












rc . remedy. They are sold all over the world om
BY FRANK STRIKER in Pepsodent / . | and we have many letters from sufferers are made specily fe
aT RG aprree Tre | telling of relief gained, after years of BACKACHE

HERIFF, 1 CANIT STAY WITH YOU! ) suffering after taking De Witt’s Pills,
” ] They act on the kidneys quickly. Why JOINT PAINS
not uy them for your trouble? Go to RHEUMATIC




You'll be really excited when you see the sparkling new smile that
Pepsodent gives you. For Pepsodent is the only toothpaste that









your chemist and obtain a supply to-day. LUMBAGO
contains [rium — and there’s no more effective teeth cleaning sub- eth SCIATICA
stance than Irium known to dental science! It’s the Irium in } Se pre
. i - 2 ij j ing
Pepsodent that removes the dulling film from your teeth, leaving | OUR GUARANTEE

them whiter than ever before.

THE TOOTHPASTE
WITH IRIUM

KX

X%-PD 7-151-50 PEPSODENT LTD., LONDON, ENGLAND

and the i ent
all conform to rigid
standards of purity,

2a
ds Nase cure) iF Tolel i








-_—_———

QUAKER OATS Zeahiecr

vild TALLER, HUSKIER children!



IT WONDER WHAT
GGS 9 WORTH- | |

AF |






RIP KIRBY

wy tb |) / 4NO Next magame 77> Sw 1 1)

: ( XASKAS LatesT 22° JARgp iL)
CREATICN:, MOOBLEO & uy \e- eB Ih,

SY MISS HONEY / I’ AB

BY ALEX RAYMOND










KITTY MY SLIPPERY FRIEND y OF COURSE RIP,
MR. MORAY HAS JUST SLIPPED) 'SN’T MY KAREN
OUT... DON'T KNOW WHY... THE LOVELIEST
PLEASE BEA GOOD GIRL) OF THEM arcs |
WHILE I LEAVE You FOR EXCEPT Your
A FEW MINUTES.... BEAUTIFUL HONEY
Conia, NO DOUBT..|

THE CHILDREN! ©

+




ABOUT RIP
KIRBY!




BIGGER
FOOD VALUE

, monne it Rt BBALONG
NATURE'S WONDER FOOD |

oeennenententeeneneeal ee —— 3
Quaker Oats is Nature's Wonder Food... no other whole grain

cereal supplies more nourishment for growing youngsters!

This tasty, nutritious breakfast food is a real bargain in nour-

f ishment. Children thrive on Quaker Oats; it’s rich in the

> e

essential food elements growing youngsters must have to
become tall, strong and energetic.

, ENID BLYTON
Quaker Oats hel by N

s develop—and maintain— ;
ibe dole Gin TR op—and maintain—pep and stamina

hat makes it an ideal breakfast for the whole





















- ‘ family. tt 4
ae , THE VOICE OF A STRANGER
THE ' Today . . . buy Delicious, Nourishi . * .
JHE __PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES “hs Pies SN Saree it Gare day! me arte Ones tor bigger —by Emyr Humphreys
SSS TARI,DOVOU LT Mone THAN | [iF COULD ONIY PAGE TROT i i teens
THING WRONG WITH ¥ en LOVE HIM) EVER.DAD.HES | JORDERING HIM TO Lovie oN MORE REASONS THAN EVER TO BUY QUAKER OATS FOUR STUAR? PQATRAIS ;
(01) THAT 6000 FOOD CAEN THOUGH, Sis EVERY | |HMMs-IVEAN IDEA =-ife crany. MORE ’
t INSHINE WON'T < U KNOW HE ae BUT SOS LOVE<< Tom ehow : : MINERALS ............ for strong bones and teeth alin Hugh Does Williamson
ao BEEN a 3 Pa vit | i MORE Proteins... to: growth; solid flesh ond muscle ,
SO WORRIED! Sy a DE: er
ers =f \ ee 71 |” MORE cansowronans..-.. ‘iwasenenee PEARS CYCLOPAEDIA 3
Te 6 IK 44 ah) © MORE virnmans (8; ond 82). .20rn food into “‘hody-tuel““ WHITAKERS ALMANACK
| Aeek a = | Tomorrow for Breakfast! + *
if : Quaker Oats ‘Cook it, witha, : i ADVOCATE CTATIONEN
S| | for 272 minutes, That's all, \ | J '
L deen | { fe



cece



eee

I en tartare rarer iterate tanita tie aii ie ital ee tae










































MARCH 17, 1950

==

1,50
1.20}

1¢

3

v

|
|
|



is MEMORIAM

'G MEMORY o!
re cotR BUTCHER who fell
ch 17, 1947.
“off the edge of grief,
é turns back every leaf.

. Clair Butcher. *17.3.50—1n
G MEMORY of our dear
a WHITE —
hi 17th March 1} ¥
iis ther so gentle and kind
memories you've left

and nights you've bore your

i

i care but all in vain,
Aineelt knew what was best
“you home with him to rest

’ shine upon her

\aving sons:—

k Garfield White; Rodney,
goat and he, Anthony and. Sy:

ain dren).
gqn, (Grandehil 17.3.50—In

ALK



=
OMO

Anglia in very good
2592.
16.3.50—Sn

ah 198 Ford
AB Me al

Prefect Ford 1948 model in
. Apply: United Motor

condition.
: Roebuck Street. Dial 2741
" 16.3.50—4n
UXH SALOON (WYVERN
‘approximately 20,000. $1,500.(i
Garage. Dial 461¢.

15.3.50—3



BEDFORD VAN—Done 800
- driven. Broadway Dress
17.3.50

RIFUGAL PUMP, com
h.p. Cobra Engine—
1% inch Hose delivery
ly K. L. Chandler, 2427.
16.3.50—2:
Treadle Sewing
, LIKE NEW—$14
Trafalgar Street, Dis
17.3.50—1>

0 OUTFITS up to No. 10
; mtation set are now avail-
. F. Harrison & Co. as wel
sets and spare parts. Then
2 also the famous HORN”

electric train sets and many
Get them at ee ISON'S
17.3.50—2:

Half bred Lamrador Ma
Tom Wilkinso |
17.3.50—3n e.0.¢

LLANEOUS
ul PIPES & FITINGS, Size
es 1%, 1%, 2; 2%, 3, & 4 inen
e Tyre Co., Trafalgar St
) 2 16.3.50—t. f.n
TA






























O — Onions being scarce
Eschalots which we offer 48 cents
» Harold Proverbs & Co., Ltd.
a 11.3,50—6n.
few No. 7 Caledonia Coal
, necessity ee your home
y priced. pply:
,& Sons Ltd., Roebuc
15.3.50—3n
at Mayfair Gift Shop. From
‘et up—See these today.
15.3.50—6n

sae SERS: Ladieg a
ombs), Denta e
Brushes, Manicure Brushes
h Complexion Brushes,
Ladies and Gents Combe
Wall Brushes, Toilet
Brushes, Utility
Brushes, Dry Mops,









1]

Fo English Bath Tubs
Less 10% for cash sale
Co., Ltd. 12.3.50t.f.n

SHEETS in 24 and 2¢

ott. ins. 8ft. and 9ft. lengths
pRild steel plates 1/16, 1/8 ‘4.
9/8 in various sixes. Enquire

lyre Company, Trafalgar Street.
1,3,50—t.f.n

MOSQUITO NET HOOPS can
a are stronger Bi
square ones, size 28”
id 36’ diameter. Phone 8322
17.3%.50—3n




om

. Rich concentrated vita



f
ene Contains B2. Price 74c. Ib
from all Grocers and Druv
17.3 50.



INDO

& DOORS, (12) Frenc}
conn (%) Double Sash- Win-
Front door and Case

Windows, (2) Jalousie door:
(3) Bedroom-doors and Cases.
“ ae Peel built of Pitch
Phy aoa2 » I. Weatherhead, Max

i
Pa

17.3.50—4r
bs
: Gerberas, Purple. Grounr
Caracas Daisys. Phone 209
17.3.59—9

ON'S TEA: Fresh supply now /
mine Of your grocer, and if you are
a ae tan? ar

us
free Sample withrv
buy.. John F, Hutson Lim
17.3.50—3

_ WANTED

————

PHER: Experienced Sten-
oe oe office
z Pp. in person ‘oO
& Co., 151 & 152 Roebuck:
16,3,50—t.f.n

2 OVERSEER—For Cleland Plan-
Sy . Salary $105.00 per
* 11.3.50—6n.

to

SELLANEOUS

" LICENSE. See Harold
mt & Co., Limited, High Street
17.3.60—3

BEER BO:
Quantity—Pay %e each
Wer to Musson’s Warehouse
16,3.

bse, gO", Bungalow or Buildin
. £

SIDE, Hastings, Worthing ©
Box 44, c/o Advocair

16.3.50—4n

meageNTLEWOMAN of inde-
. leaving Canada owing
ulties desirous post as

Panion or companion. Ap-|
cliffe, Canadian Bank|
Chemainus, Vancouver |
14.3.50—5n. j
’

ow







TO?

. ®3 Manageress or assistant
Ms fi, Chip in Garbados or Jamaica |
® r highly experienced
WA's. c/o Advocate |

17.3.50—3n

RD
70 BUY, Small Busines
5% Petticulars X.Y.Z., /o|





[CLASSIFIED ADS. | xx

Week Sun
$1.90 1.20 |
|
02 03

42 f


















FOR RENT







i 15.3.50—3n | Frances W. Smith, Sch. Freedom Fleary

He ICE—Marhill St. next to w

me ane & Co. For further particu-
pply W. B. Hutchinson & Co
14.3.50—t.f.n.

furnished with
at Indramer, Worthing
13.1 506

o



FLATS futly
erator and linen
Yel 8364



le and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.,
se that they can now communicate
the following ships through their
4 Coast Station:—

FARAWAY”, St

furnished, Garages. "ae ant oi
‘athing beach. From March
per month. Phone 4476.

nebo
NEWHAVEN”

S.S. Blue Master, S.S. Delvalle, SS
Libertad, S.S.° Sunrell, S.S. Torrance
Hills, S.S. Seabreeze, S.S. Sunvailey, S.S.
Sullys Hill, S.S. Julian, SS. Agnete,
S.S. Gascogne, S.S. Auricula, S.S. Waal,
S.S. Balantia, S.S. Vinni, S.s. Theodoxus,
S.S. Siwanoy, SS. Orwell, S.S. Williams-
burg, S.S. Tapti, S.S. Johilla, S.S Alcoa
Pilgrim, S.S. Atlantic Shipper, S.S. At-
Jantic Mariner, S.S. Ptros, S.S. Kankee
Pioneer, S.S. Mormactern, S§.S. Abbedijk
S.S. Pacific Liberty, S.S. Stuyvesant, ss.

‘une, Now °
vata eee dae

BRIGHTWOOD—On-Sea. St.



Gap. Fully furnished, From Aanyence
m April ist.
ny io Mrs. Weatherhead Rikenben”
ng 15.3.50—2n
i a Cork

STOREROOM in Molls Alley, sui
+ Suitable
oe for the housing of small

Dial 4322, Niagara Factory,

Spry Street, 17.3.50—5n

T ’

PORE SALES ARRIVALS By B.W.TA.L.
@ Fem TRINIDAD: Kathryn Simms,
Earl Simms, Sheila Mittelnolzer, Giadys
‘ttelhoizer, Livingston Parris, Quinn
Robertson, H. O Bb. Whoding, Beatrice
Eden, Violet Hinds, la Me Bride,
erinda Me Bride, Seymour Hope, Mary
Seale, Frank Horne, Leonard Le B ny
Joseph Daniel, Harold Vogel, Jane
hani, Edward Stephani, Brian Fire )
Yolanda _ Franco, Frank Bush,









AUCTION

FRIDAY 17th at 2 P.m, Courtesy r
age, White Park, Austin 10 H P. Sedat
Car damaged in accident. Terms Cash.

R. ARCHER McKENZIE,
Auctioneer.
12.3,50—4n

|



Step

Ico
John
Payne, Margaret Stanley, Margaret Aber-

cromby, Virginia Green, Alice Pratt,
U Richard Pratt, Rafael Torres, Matild
NDER THE IVORY HAMMER Torwen, Georss Ward, ‘Thomas rcen.

BY_ instructions received I will sell Iva Green, -

on Friday March 17th at 2 p.m. a re
Messrs MeEnearney Garage (1) Model From ST. LUCIA: Minnie Wells, Arthur
B-Ford Truck. Good Tyres. Damaged | Plews, Margaret Plews, Roland Ashcombe,
Terms Cash. Aidan Filoissac, James Boyce, Haratio
VINCENT GRIFFITH, Weasdijk.
Auctioneer

12.3.50—3n,



UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER

Tuesday 28th Mrs. ANDRES

O'DONNELL'S SALE at “Villa| LONDON,
Una”, Hastings.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

(By Mail)

present restrict oil exploration in
Peru will be removed by the new



N TOUCH WITH BARRADOS COAST STATION





Petroleum Law For Peru |

)sion period of 6 years would be}
Many of the obstacles that at| granted and the Government roy “|
alty only 3 per cent.

Auctioneers Pm
1.3.5 draft petroleum law liberalising
17.3.50.—1n. : : |
the terms on which concessions
are granted, stated the current

REAL ESTATE edition of “Petroleum Press Ser-

HOUSE: Modern Bungalow, freehola | Vice”, London's
4,836 sq. ft. Fruit trees, lovely garden,| journal.
plenty of space for Chickens, Turkey











Pigs, ete. Gas laid on, Apply: “Somer- - is law ; rati
set” Belmont Road ahha Under this law, oil exploration
he mo’ will be allowed in any part of
DWELLING HOUSE with 3 roods 31] the country and an unlimited
perches of land attached at “Briar Hall”,| acreage permitted to any one

Christ Church. The dwelling house con-
tains open verandah, drawing and din-
ing rooms, two bedrooms and usual con-
veniences. There is also a Lime Kiln in
good working order on the premises.
The above property will be set up for
sale at our Office, James Street, on

operator. The only proviso is
that the operating company must
surrender 50 per cent of the land
When the development stage is
entered.

Friday 17th March, 1950, at 1.30 p.m j
Inspection on application on the pre- Operators will be granted terms
mises. in accordance with the type of

YEARWOOD & BOYCE, region they will be working in

The object will be to offer the
most attractive conditions in the
most difficult terrain. For in-
stance, in the “coastal” area the
concession périod for exploration
would be 4 years and the Gov-
ernment royalty to be paid 12
per cent; whereas in the “Oriente”
or more difficult areas, a conces-

citors.
5.3.50—9n



DWELLING HOUSE—The two storied
dwelling house called “AMBURY” with
1 acre 4 perches of land attached there-
to, situate at Upper Collymore Rock,
St. Michael. The house contains draw-
ing and dining rooms, one bedroom and
conveniences on the ground floor, and
three bedrooms, toilet and bath on first
floor, Government water and Electric
ity installed. For inspection dial 3297

The above property will be set up for
sale at our Office, James Street, on Fri-
day 17th March, at 2 p.m.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,







Publie Notices=Contd







Solicitors re
5.3.51 $n
NOTICE
FOR SALE AND REMOVAL PARISH OF ST. JAMES

Tenders will be received by the under-
igned up to Monday 20th March 1950 for

1 Conveyance of Paupers,

2 Burial of Paupers.

Forms of tender may be obtained from
the Parochial Treasurer's Office

P. H. TARILTON,
Clerk, Board of Guardians,
St James

That part of the building known as
‘Jones & Swan, Lower Broad Strec
Store’ which is one storey in height.

The property offered for Sale and re-
moval consists of the North, West and
South wall of the building and also al!
timbers, windows plates, floors and roof-
ing to the said building but not th
eustemn wall which forms the western
wall of the two storied part of the
building. r

Tenders in writing will be received
by the Secretary of the undersigned
to the 24th March.

17.3.50-——3n



OFFICIAL NOTICE













authoritative oil | :
| foreign
their shipments.

Schooner Owners’ Association.

President Brand, S.S. Esso Syracuse, S.S.
Loch Avon, S.S. Giriuly, S.S. Dartmouth,

Columbia Star, S.S. Penrisyivania Sun,
S.S. Esso Hartford,
Katy,
Dolores# S.S. Empire Cowdray,
Tresus, S.S. Mangarella,
S.S. Cottica, SS. Mormac Dawn.

Cl
Miss Videt White, Miss Ruby Woo.
Leurie Scott,
Daphne Thorne, Mx. John Jenkins
Hoyte, Mr. Joseph Emerson, Mr, Lio.
Levesque,

Lady Bella Southorn, Mr. Harold Woolf

BARBADOS

|

ADVOCATE







Headmaster
Reports

4OUSES
‘dewtas : From page 5.
| 1 Marhall Streed, Agr, "Sundry Depot In Carlisle Ba covet il ast
ery Cc s Yy Laun- ads : sae:
a Co Cami OTe coe pirates: kta altered in the aan tte ee
MANHATTAN, pore ofered in the island, into line
le’ ~ . : Sen, Pu shed N . S ri io
Mage Christ Church, From ist A 1 oe PORT: Sch. Lachnivar S., Seh. Sch. Hazel Scott, Sch. Turtle Dove, Sch with modern educational trends.
10re 3309 teint ee ee Wonts ro Mery * Lewis, Emeline, M.V. T. B. Radar, Sch They had the four principal
meainrneneneniineninneateeteenieiie nS et = W . a, Aux. Sch. Cachalot, Laudal; ~» Sch. yliss 3 , se re i ;
HAZLEWOOD Bishop's Court Hill, coo? “ Vv : Blue Star, Sch. BE. M. Tamnis, Sch Proven snark oT sou Classics, Mathematics,
S meeaete house, to rent furnished for E Smith Sch: Wor ae ae ‘ eee ee eee
nonths from April ist. fot =i » Sch. Wonderful Counsellor ARRIVALS So great was the pressure of
moderate rent, : tremely |Sch. Adalina, Sch. Anita IL. ‘ yclorama 71 te i y ard Y¥e-
Telephone nm to careful tenants, [Timothy A. H, Vansluytman, on cu Ga ae Teptdnd: hoeke ue sacay that the stand

quired in all these fields was very
much higher than it was twenty
or thirty years ago. Whereas in
those days it was comparatively
easy for anyone passing the Matri-
culation Examination to gain en-

S.S. Argentina, S.S. Stiklestad, S.S. | ession of nothing less than a h- |
Gulfpeak, S.S. Fageriell, S.S. Luciano ~ : >
Manara, M/S Patuca, SS. Adula, s,s, |&% Certificate today made one eli- |
Esso Worcester, S.S. Gibbes Lykes, S S |gible to gain admission. J
pl Runner, S.S. Armadale, M/S |
ribbe, S.S. San Veronico, S.S. Cana-
dian Challenger, S.S. Benoil, S.S. Thirlby,| , There is a greater and greater
SS. S. Paula, S.S. Aire, S.S. Queen | demand for more specialised train-
Adelaide, S.S. Falcon, S.S. Salcaas, S.S

S.S._ Glosinia, M/S

S.S. Atlantic Traveller,

3.S
$.S. Donstan,

other things, there was the ten-
dency to revert to the easy method i
of calculation, namely, to say that
a school had so many boys and
girls and therefore it needed a staff
of so many, allowing a teacher for
so many children. But it was not
so easy as that, what they wanted |
today was a staff especially in the
first grade schools, in relation to
the facilities which the school
offered or indeed should offer to
“Mr |the pupils attending that school.

DEPARTURES By B.W.I.A.L
For TRINIDAD: Mrs. Marie Dear, M
arence Belmar, Mrs, Claudra Pinder





Mrs.



Louise Scott



Mrs. Leona Levesque, \
O. B. Wooding, K.C
For ST. LUCIA: Sir Thomas Southo

Specialists
He was sorry that in the last
allocation of specialist teachers

Mr. Shanks Moffatt, Hoo John Stow | ;},- omirns int
Mr A. MecLeod-Smith, Mrs Ann |“ lat very important bene
McLeod-Smith. seemed to have been overlooked

For ANTIGUE: Mr. Maurice Michse! | or not to have received the

ele a Tucker, Mr. Edward Arrow attention it deserved.

For ST. KITTS: Miss Margaret He did not want to see anyone
a as Pen cg Hace. sabe of the first grade schools of the
ite. Aacon. Smmibel, Me. John. Clare island trying to work a cirricu-
Mr, Donald Ferguson, Mr. Evelyn Hone.! lum which was unbalanced.

| Proper balance must be pre-
served.
The Headmaster very rightly,

id endorsed by His Excellency
drew attention to the need for
a spiritual foundation to all thei
ducational work.
| will like to stress this
| point”, said the Bishop, “we live

To encourage production for|in a very delightful place far
export, the law provides that oil| from the maddening crowd anc

| shipped abroad shall be virtually| it 1s very ony overlook th
|exempt from taxes. Exporters! fact that in the world today
| will also be allowed to keep the| there is an intense battle fcr

the possession not merely of the



For full puree of “ propert;
and terms of conditions o: le anniv ¢ i.
“ TED.| BARBADOS
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. (NE, |IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF APPEAL |
; Secretary | s Equitable Jurisdiction) |
16.3.50—7n EWAN I IS BLACKETT of th
3s ) United States of America, acting
herein by Attomey ALTHE
HERODIAS BLACKETT Plaintiff

7 C WOTICES VENISHA SKEETE . Defendan
Pr Re IN puremance of an Order in th
Court in the above action made on th
13th day of March 1950, I give notice ‘
all peysons having any estate, right or
interest in or any lien or incu

affecting all that certain piece or parcel
of land (formerly part of th lands ot
The Whim Plantation) situate in the
parish of Saint Peter and Island afore-
said containing by admeasurement two
roods or thereabouts abutting and bound
ing on lands formerly of Joseph Walke



“225 easily earned by obtaining orders
for private Christmas Cards from

vour friends. No previous experienc:
necessary, Write today for beautiful free
Sample Book to Britain's largest and
fmemost Publishers; highest commission,
marvellous money making opportunity

Icnes, Williams & Co., Dept. 10 Victoria /jut now or late of the Estate of Jac:
Works, Preston, England. Ramsay deceased on lands now or late
——<——$—— —— jof the Estate of Charles Welch deceas |

on lands of the Estate of Fdwar:
Harris deceased and on the public 1X
or however else the same may

bound to bring before me an accow
their said claims with their wit

ocuments and vouchers, to be

We will offer for sale to public com-
petition on Friday the 3lst day of March
1950, at 2 p.m. at our office James Street.
The Messuage Dwelling house and shop
situate at Tudor Street, Bridgetown

djoining The Egolf sae standing ON }»y me on any Tuesday, or Frida
‘56% square feet of lan ; een the hours of 12 (noo

This property which is built of stone} oclock in the afternoon, at the OMic
somprises a shop to the front and 1. the Clerk of the Assistant ¢

esidance consisting of five rooms to Appenl at the Court House Brid



back. before the 3lst day of May 1950
Electricity and Government wate |inot such claims may be ranked
For inspection apply on the premise: }ing to the nature and priority thereof
to the tenant any day. respectively; otherwise such persons will
For further particulars apply to:-— be precluded from the benefit of th«

HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD,
Solicitors, James gree

said Decree, and be deprived of all claim
on or agminst the said property
Claimants are also notified that they
must attend the said Court on Wednes-
day the 3ist day of May. 1950, at 1
o'clock a.m. when their said claims w!
be ranked.
Halls V: e, St. James, for permission wane my hand this 13th day
tal illage, St. . oro

) sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at aj I. V. GILKES,

Ag. Clerk of the Assistant Court

tard and shingle shop with shedroof
of Appeal
Signed SYDNEY WILLIAMS.

attached, situate at Holders Hill, St.
OFFICIAL SALE
Applicant | py

James.
Dated this 14th day of March, 1950
To 8. H. NURSE, Esq
ill be con ‘Pie ASSiSTAN COURT OF APPEAL
_--This application w: "TiN TH 8 Tt COU Fr 4
sidered an Licensing Court to be hel¢ (Equitable Jurisdiction)

|

LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE

The application



Police Magistrate, Dist, ““E"—Holetown

District “E"—Holetown |FWAN DENNIS BLACKETT of
a ha he 28th day of March 1950, United States of America, acting
at 11 o'clock, a.m. herein by Attorney ALTHE
S, H, NURSE, HERODIAS BLACKETT ..._ Plaintiff
Police Magistrate, Dist. “E"—Holetowr VENISHA SKEETE Defen

17.3.50—)

Barbados Turf Club
Payment Of Prizes

FIFTY (50) CASH, 6d. CON-
SOLATION, PARI-MUTUEL, 2/-

NOTICE is hereby given that by virtuc
of an Order of the Adsistant Court «
Appeal dated the 13th day of March 1950
there will be set up far sale to the hir:
bidder at the Office of the Clerk of tt
Assistant Court of Appeal at the C
House, Bridgetown. between the | 01
of 12 (noon) and 2 o'clock in the aft
neon on Friday the 2nd day of June 1950

All that certain piece or parce! of lan



Plantation) situate In the parish of §
Peter and Island

aforesaid containing y h
y mdmeasurement two roods or there-| will be paid. Subsistence allowance will be paid at the rate of $3.60



Petroleum Press Service,
when adopted by the
junta now in power, and by the
Government next July, the new
law cannot be expected to pro-
duce any striking rise in produc-| valuable service to the school, was
tion for several years to come.”

with the Argentine Government



exchange proceeds of

mind of man but of the soul. This

| battle is becoming more and
Legislation on these lines has! more intense and it can only be
long been overdue. The older| won by an ever-increasing num-
Peruvian fields are being ex-| ber of people who hold the
hausted and there has been little; unshakable conviction abouv tha
search for new oilfields in re-| human purpose of life and the
cent years. On the other hand,| place of the human being in it.
internal demand has_ doubled} z
during the last 10 years, reach- Chapel ;
ing 7 million barrels, with the} ‘I shall fog veer ee poprtes
result that export fell by 3.2) if a school like this which has
million barrels, or nearly 30 per some eighty resident boarders ir
cent. | it, had a chapel, and I hope on
| day it will. Those who owe s
Since the internal demand is} much to the school in the pas
likely to increase an intensive! and who have taken up their
search for new oilfields 1S Ur-\ places in the various walks of
gently needed. “But” says the] jife can render=no ‘better servic«

“even | to

He the school than in bringing
military |

about the erection of a chapel’.

The Bishop then expressed re-
|gret that the Rector of thr
parish who, had rendered ver)

|resigning at the end of July, Some
; one to fill his place was one of!
| the things he would have to loo}
after, he said and he wished t
|assure them that he wouk
; endeavour to get someone whx





MEAT TALKS

LONDON, March 16

Mr. E. J. Joint, British Com-! would have a real interest in th
mercial Attache in Buenos Air« School.
left here by air to-day for South; They were very thankful to
America to open new meat talks His Excéllency for his presence

{and hoped that he would be with

—Reuter. ‘them on future occasions.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORT
Persons due back pay for the period 1st April, 1948, to 21st Jung



| 1949, should personally submit their claims to the Office, Department
of Highways and Transport, on or before Friday, 28th April, 1950.

17.3.50,.—2n.



FORM I
THE LAND ACQUISITION ACT, 1949

(Notice required by Section 5)



THE acquisition, for public purposes, of the following parcel of

land containing 7,710 square feet more or less situate at Payne’s Bay
in the parish of St. James in th
|Schedule hereto and more particularly shown and delineated on a
plan of survey signed by Mr. Frank L. Gibbons, Sworn Surveyor,
and dated 26th November 1948 and filed in the office of the Colonial
Engineer having been decided on by the Governor with the approval
of both Houses of the Legislature of the [sland of Barbados by reso-
tution of the Houses of the Legislature, it is hereby declared in pur-
suance of Section 5 of the Land Acquisition Act, 1949, that the said
lands have been acquired for the following purposes: as a site on
which fishing boats can be hauled up and on which shelters may be
erected.

Island of Barbados described in the

THE SCHEDULE
A parcel of land at Paynes Bay in the parish of St, James con-

taining 7,710 square feet Bounding on the north on lands of B. H.

;Moore and others, on the East on the Public Road running from
| Holetown to Bridgetown, on the South on other lands of B. H. Moore

}and others, and on the West on the Sea.

| Island of Barbados.

|

}
|

Dated this 10th day of March, 1950, at Government House in the

A. W. L. SAVAGE,
Governor.
16.3.50,—I1n.



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
DOMINICA, B.W.L.
APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Agricultural Assistant

| (Agricultural Education) in the Department of Agriculture, Dominica,

Windward Islands. Applicants should hold a degree or diploma, and

| have some experience in teaching agriculture and related sciences.

formerly part of the lands of The Whim |

Salary scale $1,680 x $96 — $2,400 per annum. If a car is re-

| quired to be kept, allowances in accordance with local regulations

STAND SWEEP and FORECAST eae abutting and bounding on lands |

ill be paid on and from MON-
DAY, 20th MARCH, 1950, between
12.00 and 3.00 p.m. daily, SAT-|
URDAYS excepted.

formerly of Joseph Walker but
latm of the Estate of Jaco

sed on lands now or
state of Charles Welch
aun of the Estate of Fdiu

Rama‘






veceased and on the pul ad oT
HORSES and SERIALS will be he waver a Oe om ney, pps re
, oF wr) ary yO" en oO by °%
paid on and from MONDAY, 27th ee We his tee cat hic’ ttn aoe onan



MARCH, 1950. between the HOU | cnc Fr

as above, SATURDAYS excepted. | how

G. A. LEWIS
Secretary Ag. Clerk

betweer



17 ae 17.3.50.—3n. i

now or

Harris



late of the | <_< - :
deceased on| pupils in accordance with an approved course of studies,

also be

| per day when away from Headquarters.

The Officer will be responsible for the training of ‘agricultural

alled upon to organise refresher courses for the Jumor Staff

|of the Agricultural Department.

et

Applicants should write to the Superintendent of Agriculture,

Botanic Gardens, Roseau, Dominica, enclosing details of qualifications |
and experience, and two recent

testimonials.
L. L. DE VERTEUIL,
Superintendent of Agricuiture.
16.3.50.—3n.



wrance to a University, the |
8

vision for these things in relation ;
to making financial privision oa









PAGE SEVEN



Lodge School| SAIPPING NOTICES Stop Pyorrliea
C

anadian National Steamships | n 24 Hours

Bleeding Cums, Loose Teeth and Sore



Trench Mouth or a bad disease whi

|
Mouth mean that you have ?yorrhe:
}

sooner or later will make your teeth fall
out and may cause Rheumatism and Heart
Trouble. Stop this disease now with the

new discovery Amosan. Stops bleedin
gums in 24 hours, ends sor: mouth a

Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails
SOUTHBOUND Montres? Haiifax Bosten Barbados Barbado:
CANADIAN
— 10th Mar nae 20th Mar =. 20th - Mo» |
LADY RODNEY oo 25th Mar 27th Mar. Sth Apr Sth Ap
LADY NELSON ---- 12th Apr 13th Apr. 23rd Apr 24th Ap
LADY RODNEY 12th Mey = Sth May 1th May 26th Mo 27th Mu
LADY NELSON Sist y ra June Sth J 4th June 15th Ju
u RODNEY 30th May 3rd July Sth July Mth July 15th
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
NQRTHEBOUND Barbados Barbades Boston St.John Halifax Montres
LADY NELSON 2ist Mar. 22nd Mar. Ist Apr.2nd Appr. — —
LADY RODNEY 17th Apr 19th Apr. 28th Apr. —— wth Apr. 3rd Ma)
LADY NELSON 6th May 8th May 17th May —— 8th Mar. 22nd M
LADY RODNEY 8th June 10th Ju.. 19h June —— 2ist Jun. 24th Jun
LADY NELSON 27th June 2%h Ju 8th July — 10th July 13th Jub
LADY RODNEY 27th Ju 39th Ju’ 7th Aug — 9th Aug. 12th Aug

SEE

N.B.—Subject to change without notice. A!) vessels fitted with cold storage cham-

}

|

Meet BOB FABIAN












Passenger and freight rates on application to :—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD. — Agents.

ing in the island for which we! =——————————————_- ——_
must have the requisite number of ‘

S.s. |teachers,” said the Bishop. When}
it came to making financial pro- |





CIE. GLE., TRANSATLANTIQUE

tightens teeth. Iron clad guarantee.
Amosan must make your mouth well and
save your teeth or money back on return
of empty rackage. Get Amosan from your

Amosan

‘| For Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth
See penea naan SST,

chemist today.
The guarantee

The Schooner “Timothy A. H.
Vansluytman"” will accept Cargo
and Passengers for Demerara,
sailing Saturday, 18th March.

The Schooner “Lochinvar 5S”
will accept Cargo and Passengers
for Grenada, sailing Saturday, 18th
March. re

The M.V. “Daerwood”~ will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Vineent, St. Lucia, Grenada,
Aruba, date of sailing will be

given.

The Schooner “Wonderful Gow
scllor” will accept Cario
Passengers for St. Lucia, .<:.
Saturday 18th March

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Consignees.



FRENCH LINE
Sailing to Trinidad — Sailing to

Â¥ ; Plymouth
“GASCOGNE Rees ‘ March 14th March 21st
“MISR Beene eee cae April 4th
“GASCOGNE honk April 19th April 26th
“MISR settee eee tees May 9th May 13th
GASCOGN deen ia May 24th May 3ist

For further particulars apply to :—

R. M. JONES & CO, LTD.- Agents.



of Scotland Yard
in the Evening Advocate

BRITISH WEST INDIAN
AIRWAYS LIMITED

NOTICE



DUE to several changes in schedule which become
effective Saturday, ist April, 1950, all persons hold-
ing reservations on or after that date are kindly
requested to communicate with our Office, Lower
Broad Street, (Phones : 4585 and 2789) for inform-
ation regarding changes in times of arrivals, and

departures, ete.

ORLPLEPEPEPEE APPLE,
$1y
7 $1 %
YLLIAM FOGARTY LID. &8
x % x
%
INC. IN B.G. %
‘,
. §
’ Leading Centre for ... .
; Exclusive English Suitings
5
$ HARRIS & SPORTS
Â¥
TWEEDS,
‘ %
: GABERDINE, SERGES :
$
$ & DOESKINS :
‘,
% Please. call and see us, when it will x
% be our privilege to see that you are x
; fully saticfied which is much . . %
%
% And become one of our.... %
8 REGULAR CUSTOMERS %
3 which is mgre. y
¢ “THE HOUSE OF FOGARTY”
8 combines Tailoring Craftsmanship
% with High-Grade Clothing
8 AT KEENEST PRICES
$

He may | ¥





LOE

BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LTD.

——————————
HAVE YOU SEEN: |




FOR





THE LATEST GAS COOKERS?

3B out of 4:7:

were sold the same day of
arrival this week.
THE LAST ONE
is an all Enamel WHITE Gas
Cooker with Modernistic Chrome
Legs, 3 Boiling Burmers and 1 Grill
Burner,

net call and see it to-day.?








Why









What have You to Offer

FOR SALE OR RENT?

Acreage, Building Sites
or Houses
*Phone or write the
BARBADOS
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
Office : Hastings Hotel Ltd.
Telephone 2336
17.3.50--2n

GENUINE
WEST INDIAN
HANDCRAFTS |

See The |
Dominica
Handcrafts
Company

Bridge & Trafalgar Streets

ORIENTAL GOODS!

For CURIOS, JEWELLERY
BRASSWARE, TEAKWOOD
SANDAL, IVORY, ETC.

: 0 6 VMs 8
KASHMERE“*

THANI BROS.
Pr. Wm. Hy. Street

OOD

Is your

DINING ROOM

FURNISHE

+A lovely
‘Table

Mahogany Dining

- A modern Mahogany and Cedir
Sideboard,

A smart China Cabinet

- A set of stylish Dining Chairs
caned or upholstered ?

All these and more you can get

FROM HERE TO-DAY

renewed at

New o

Money Saving’ Prices

SLEEVES SEE SSEOOESOS GSES

4,

e 5

LS. WILSON

~
Dial 4069 ¥

OOS

4,4,

Trafalgar St. -:-











FLASH!

LADIES,
JUST OPENED

MBROIDERED

LACE

From Austria
(A very small quantity)
Its Superb Quality and
Dainty Embroidery is
simply enchanting and
indeed irresistable
In White only
36” wide $2.95 per yd.
Also Beautiful
EMBROIDERED EDGES

BROS.
St.





THAM

Pr. Wm. Hy.
6, 42 & 53 Swan Street

















Sele al

INR RRR EELS,

See ate

Meee eee



a





FRIDAY
PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATI 2a sl dilehcbilionneneiindilnmcaguemtine ta

Zoe a, Now Manager ,

LONDON, March 15
Freddie Mills, former World
British, Buropeay and Empiré
Lighi-Heavy weight Champion, has
been ‘granted a Manager's licence



Results Of B.T.C. |
6d. CONSOLATION |











ee)

Q

per
pam
Q
ms












































































































































ing M i 1950 aoa one ee erat Vy
by the British Boxing Board cf
Spring eeling % Centrol.—-Reuter. b
7 Prize Series Series Series hae ae Amt | B.B.C. RAL C. RADIO V
v “p" — an” “" ver 1 FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1950 %
+ “a Tket Ne. Tket No. T’ket No. T'ket. No. I'ket. No | am. T e News 3 16 am Hie a iy
ati ST oe --425.« «A758: 4402=«S«s«983BB)O «7? ~=—« $140.00] gt, 7-18 aun Thinn on. ghess| ue ;
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+ 7 962 9781 WwW, OOF ude, 8_1f London Light Concert
es cee: ee aoe ne pe SP ay SS p
i Ose ss 04a 8029 6294 2105 2858 2132 69.4 I The News, 12.10 p.m. News Analysis. | >
OE ek 5k 1738 © 3903S «5462 «= 7962 ~=—-2598 50.90} “i "pm. ‘Programme Parade, 1.1 aa
6th ; 1578 3453 4019 4621 4189 39.00) “ba : » Continues, 1.15 p.m. Radio News- |
weteeh ods unt el, 30 Ss hon Ss .
aes 5676 «1161 += 3814S 2124 = 8402 20.90)! p.m. ‘The News, 2.10 p.m. Home New Le \0rlds be
) fem Britain, 2.15 n. Sports Review
8th ......-... 3819 id ie po os : , 2 30 p a ae Keniner, 3 2 Tee oa
, B 2 97 20. 06 hera Ireland, 4 . The News, 4.1 ecg.
a ee eae a ous 2298 9952 879% ri) 00| The Daily Service. 4 8 p m Night s uits in an .
SS saris eee 2 9902 ; ou.0 \t the Opera, 5 Carroll Calls +}
1th 6773 | ««G786-—=—s—«7661~=«s«G22—Ss« BD 20..00| Tune, 5.18 p.m. Programme Parade, 5.: veriety of coloan,
12th .........- 6840 5687 4940 7728 3833 10.00 sm. Interlude, 6 p.m. New Recor’ oe
MN Saestues 1028 3537 7754 2299 0780 10.00! Fg matey pee ms ace from 34 {9 44, be E
5 5 We ndla jary, 7.45 ‘ Dance 5
SOS me 9868 6 964552550985 5541 re a Viele, 6 pm. Radio Newerel, 6.15 Ba “=
PEC Scot rchestra, § m he
TR a eam 2885 3339 3394 1373 0464 : BEC Scottish | Ore hestra. A Sg ah ,
POR Shae es 0708 1808 8033 9193 6483 10,00 Britain, 9.15 p.m. The Debate: Continues, |
ess 9798 0286 3450 4838 1291 10,0 | = 20: Bisco liuagt ae pple iP"
18th 1486 0299 «©9534-4473 7362 10. O¢ ae ‘ weuzine. i048 p.m. World Affairs, |
Chie eX ais . “i : | 1} p.m. The News. i
BA casae sh 7407 1940 6604 0259 3791 10.006 i: ea ag age Pe:
a FOUR DIVISION CHAMPIONS of Lodge School pose for the Advocate’s” cameraman. (Left | 66669656904 |
BOR is sige eves 3014 8247 1596 4908 1418 10.00 to right) A. J. K. Streetly (Div. I), C. M. Redman (Div. II), J. E. Wedderbrun (Div. IV), and A. G. | eoer POOOIOOOFOS a
RE rte 9126 6185 2609 3847 4916 10.00) “Humphrey (Div. V). Saas ae 8
4 ut g EVENT No, 10. HALF MILE, DIV. 1
Sind .... ., 1488 ©7694 «=—««O791Ss«058B «1558 10.06 (Ree: 2 mins. 6 2/5 sees., L. Critchlow % DANCE % %
28rd ... 8819 7396 8040 ©4899 = 0145 10. 00 St ; tl Cl IT Ch mp st’ Redman, 2nd King, 2rd Murray |\¥ %
SOON a danns : 3576 2482 5925 6003 9999 10. Of ] ee ass . a ‘" = sacrnany, a , King, " - , 8 at ¥ AVE SHEPHERD
Re ins ae 1074 4119 9805 3535 0903 10.0 t a ss S h I S orts : a Sr ee i RELAY | 1% : * cit esha ¥% &
26th 0803 «= 7303-=Ss«9535 «1184 = 1804 10.00 A odge cnoo Pp Fe Laborde, 2nd School, 3rd Emgtare | THE BARB: ap an il, 12. @ 18 Baan ul
* Be VE 3255 7365 mI RA) 3 set is CLUB . 10, 11, 12 ,
SPOR ios + ore. mee ee mgs: hoy =“ at DURING a period of keenly contested athletic sports | * mt “Ne, 1 ATER Ouse ents : % —_
ME acs ses ; 8388 3653 3013 6985 6334 10. Of at the Lodge School yesterday, A.J. K. Streetly. the EF Emp-| 1st _Emptage, and Laborde, 20 ool | $ (Local & Visiting Members % \
sie’ 9075 5 7 EVENT No. 13. OLD BOYS’ i
Ee ccaees 6573 2075 wae pos a ‘e lage House rupper emerged champion of Division I. I. t Fileetm, Farmer, Massiah . alt Only) % ats
| eres ‘es 0110 5989 9341 55 6625 10,00) Pall and shageg it was hi Ist. Inniss, 2nd. Rodriguez, 3rd. Pi-! EVENY Ne. M4 GH SCHOOL GIRLS’ | soe . ca, | StOSuossosesesesose +; ae
ema =f vigour and pers os ce oe , eer No ame YARDS, DIV. 1 Miss D cane 1% SATURDAY, MARCH 18TI is ; FOSSStg8
$750.00! for this 1948 Division II cham-} Res: 10 7/i0 th secs. G. J. Evelyn | < 9 P.M QI Y
fe 'pion, the ~ Cla 1 honours. 7) neuen ea P. he ¥ | it %| % LINOLE U Mi CARPETS
; Streetly piloted his House,} 23 Goddard. (Time 11 3/10 secs). |@ Music by ARNOLD MEAN- $/ 2
Government Tax $200.00 on each Series. | Emptage, in a masterful way t EVENT No. 3. 100 Y ARDS, DIV. a | Savannah Club Tennis | g WEL L and "his ORCHES- % | * Sizes: 9 ft. by 1% {t, and WY, ;
| win the Sports Shield | _ (Ree: 11% sees, N. de § 1928 | Tournament | & a by. the. Bae e ft :
Prize Series “J" Series K Series “L" Series “M" Amt | It was an ideal evening and a Petert 138 | XM +} oie Also J 5
Ticket No. Ticket No. Ticket No. ‘Ticket No. tha taal a een cords be nts ~ sa YESTERDAY’S RESULT: | sceuabal caress > ‘“ 4
Ist 6909 1595 7578 447 $140.00) ) of ever, ere broken | eee No 4. 190 YARDS, DIV M D ee te M. Blader| x 3 % LINOLEUM IN ener ae
onc 308: 3517 5188 100.00‘ Possessing a powerful stride,}. RESP notin, eee ; ae Meas eer ae issi m 27+ 312 v
2nd ; 8641 30 5 e617 p . are Bd oo eo | oolst} 2nd Jorda ie ates 1% Admission to Ballroom 2, C1 All very reasonable ‘ E
8rd 5556 3463 7228 6529 80.90} C. M. Redman carri t Ti ee Saieetirar's “ER Ne 1g
ore é sceee oe : y ; Bs ' | 100 vards and 220 yards spr ints ” YARDS. DIV. U C , = nn & beat A I Jemmott | 56, (OBO CO OOO OOOO OGLE % cone ae
4th iawn 4873 1418 7034 2624 60 | land the half mile from his { ; 241/10 secs BD H. Mo 4 S$. Nicholls beat*H, L. Smith 6-2 | e. | 8 Muabllan i HERDER .
eo 6517 9374 3918 5158 $0'.00| closdat rivals it convincing stil ket aes Sa a4 ee a we aa f (ey BABY LOVES 186° , i i
‘ a : : 5 aye 1 ss Crichlow _ beat i ! cine:
6th 3303 1334 8510 9201 20, OF Inniss, Division 1, took the] “EVENT No. 6 aX ARDS, DIV, 1 ?, 6—2 é ica ! 10
he 5 920 3B 2450 20.00| sprinting honours when he won] ,,, ,.,.\Mec 22 pi E \. Benjamin lost to H. L. Toppi ee ee & 11 Roebuck Street
ith . 8553 9200 4659 245( i 4.40) yards distances. | =, nie and Street ; 2, 2-6 Talcnm Powder, It is 2B2$59S55659086055¢
8th ... mist 4081 eoee 3518 me Ny tit 1 00 eae v in win fnished Pe EVENT No.7. 190 1 ARDS. DIV 1 G. Mamming beat J. L. St.Hil SL Seana fee $660 Tr oreE ON an
Epa iar 6246 0413 4726 20.00] in 10$ seconds as against the| ..J8 Humphrey, and 1 ce statins hake 46d Wabbes hattateacaage | (to eeenntnpenese 9 re
10th wee 9549 8656 6776 901 20.00) previot record of 10 10 se¢-|” EVENT No. 8 220 Y ARDS DIV. if! : a eee) are ad Make hit bath- S 7
“ . 4 ond a . cao al 1 riniie Rec: 27 : ro-t Y’S FIXTURES in ait 4 ; F 9
1ith . 7026 23: 9258 7398 20.00} onds, t at Inniss had no ser iou Sets : Gut_B I ADU s SINGL ES SFR pice terery x E P :
on an ‘ 10.09, CPponen to urge him < to}, ‘ 1 ~ 1/10 . . Gibbons \ D aieghtanr tale ‘ . ©
12th ... 1635 1086 4791 4916 A record aking | MEN'S siNGuES vith Cutiours % q
13th . 5766 221 } 1582 1408 Mf ; dea “tuciils 4 | EVENT No. 9 HALF MILE. 01y ing A Niel Soap. * present the week’s specialty— 4 4
14th . 7933 i769 6665 3196 1D or e q Pog a ‘7 . Mi MIXE D Dor BLES . Ms
15th 6515 7668 3030 0319 Redn Dot uga itl, J E. Wedder- | ‘ . ; all and J ria amen - % We ROPIC GOLD
16th 1317 5 2573 vif 00) burn a t. G. Humphr re- — e LAYER ¢C
ii 17th aide 8580 7163 O198 ) spectivel | $ ;
‘ +e) >| 2685 4148 6017 One of the th the | s Sprinkled with juicy coconut and a la
yey 8th 0081 =" Beat net : Gd ee ee , % Its a yer of golden
Hi) 6780 97 9456 vei : vl ‘ ‘| :
3280 07 ITS 1 d I 4 ie} j .
6248 4125 5949 6409 c to } 4
} “i + *.
8390 OTE 7996 288 : nw taxed el) | x .
683 1 bOGD 8246 OBTE nee aeat i | ‘
¢ em
5726 1595 5479 18 0.1 ° ‘
9400 3 ; 1915 26 f te | % tals \ ‘
‘
7408 ao2i 0948 ;
é eh nea a teal ee m Sure lo
2046 6606 3329 , COUG By %
28th ... 9528 1157 , % flease
29th . 3480 4431 d TBE f Gi Ww Iso the 4 % 5s
30th .. ri 5355 5589 6706 7241 OE ar meas a ( ‘OLD DANISH LOZ ERG =S 1%
rac {i ec! 1uUrance i ‘ &
) Stride ¢ he ick 1 te i y
" $751 eem ¢ For coughs, colds & sore throats | &
| ' 1 ” ~ rhe Old Boy: e pl P R mew : id i ry their specialties and be convinced of their
Government Tax $200.00 on each Seri lg , | U I EB (ate the baked goods they serve.
| Be ete gee a
Prize Series “N" Series O Se vic Pp’ Serie a Amt , t I ) 6640604 OOOO OOOO ~ ‘
Ticket No. Ticket No Ticket No. Tieket No i f SERVED Rak ae ie aces PESTS? tt MS
¢ : >. i t * SSSSSESISSOO C8850"
3146 67 2930 8263 $140.00] boys w onsoled, 1 “STOMACH? 39990 399599599 SOOO EY ree
i44 ) 1908 ( + 00 t e@) tions .
} 1 the e v, .
| , % We have received new stocks of
149 1996 6016 108 ‘ i ot an eve ” r . ~ 7K Take soothing iy ee
an sani 7 G 1%
at 1G 45uc 143 50. OF ; 19 - '
ve ee 1 4ou9 aos 60. ae ‘ EVERY SU ND: LY NI HT PEPTO-BISMOL 8
ee Bis a — a ase RAD HAND HARD
t 9 : print i From 7 to 40 Pepto-Bismol is gen- i
fue ’ | tle. it spreads a sooth- | % ig
bu 9269 2211 798 6904 : é ‘ ing, protective coating 4
os Oe 948 « 1 V A Fay i W \ on irritated stom ib q
9th 4526 4246 3625 ay ie cal tts and intestinal walls.
ema aol . LOOK seco and tr i pla 1
4437 4766 4706 4548 ” iy inthe Old Rode’ recht! 1. Helps calm and quie! the upset
lith 2196 636 7485 3616 20 Miss D Hz : ny | | + Beene fermentation and forme- a This Paint possesses outstanding:
12} 4946 OgoEe 9269 127 0 High Sehool Girls 100 yard wid e- s and spreading power and a
13th 2305 2798 2566 4895 | sprint, doing the ce in 13} 3. Helos sweeten ond sete the stomach (=>) 3 reliable permanency of colour,
14t 9285 3323 2615 3160 1 Oe en wigle nie tal oaiiis | Pepto- Bismol | % 1 gin, ting |... )\s¢0nee -
15th 9305 3063 5128 1063 Ou} EVENT No 1. 100 YARDS. DIV. 1 | ok FOR Upsk> $1 STOMAGH be / . ote
6u 8229 0259 6566 0076 : 10 1/0 sees. 1 oe % Vy gin, ting ....:.505 eek a
16ut 8225 255 f i | 194 ‘ i
17th 3433 1016 4118 6145 0.06] VENTIN R Yoo gin, tape ‘
18th 0129 5398 5354 1341 woo, fo. " E] UNG E | The. St ; dies @ u
19th 9778 1775 0500 6517 10..0¢] % Wa: «lig te a
| yp l 1% Quality L gin, tims .....seeeeee)
20th 8409 6863 5478 6705 10.06 The Weather FOR CUR : .
2ist 4676 1249 1445 6288 10.00} | o- a
erat aaa : : a aed TO-DAY } is
roe 2902 3738 2461 2181 10.00) 7 Sun Rises: 6.07 a.m. I
23rd 1326 885qQ 0864 5298 10. 00] Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m RELIEVES PAIN g WILKINSON & HAYNES 60, Ul
24th : 1613 8133 1620 3814 10.00} Moon (New) March 18 | FIGHTS INFECTION R
25 eh san ~ 20% 784 } | Lighting: 6.30 p.m. | %
25th 6378 7699 gs 63 10.0 & i
* a cia " om 7 . : High Water: 3.30 a.m., 3.20 | 4 wie
26th 6734 1186 0239 0219 10. 0% pm ‘ ‘Phone 4456 5
- ne a we “3 e ‘ Ss
27th 7781 1066 7546 2846 10. 0 YESTERDAY ‘ e ial
28th 3266 4313 9567 5811 10.0 Rainfall (Codrington) nil = VOGPGS9SL6%599 99 GOCOUSSGS oe
29th 8045 1053 9456 2433 10,00)% “MRL aaet, =. ee —e ~.
30th 9765 6346 3046 2334 10 00) Temperature (Max.) 84.0 °F ii
- ‘Temperature (Min.) 73.5 °F r »
$750.0¢| | Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E. Bb e Make eeee E
(3 pm, E.
i Wind Velocity: 1 iles per
Government Tax $200.00 on each Series ‘hour. en |
BOVELL & SKEETE Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.014, :
Per E. E. BOURNE (3 Pom.) 29.937 C i A a





‘They'll Do It Eve: y Time

FOR ONL’ <
Ss (ae
WHEN His | SET COMPREHENSIVE
INSURANCE \_ "Your END off
MAN TRIED
FRIEND My

TO SELL HiM naa
THIS IS THE LAST

A BETTER
LIABILITY STRAW! TRYING To |
POLICY sss CHISEL ANOTHER
BUCKS! TLL
GIVE MY BUSINESS
TO EBODY

By Jimmy Hatlo
































THAT FIT




But As oF
YESTERDAY
WHEN HE HAD
A WRECK
HE'S BEEN
VERY ANXIOUS
TO DO
BUSINESS:+»

OLD PAL! I'VE
BEEN LOOKING ALL
OVER FOR YOU HEY-
CAN T STILL TAKE THAT
POLICYEWE CAN DATE iT |
AS OF LAST WEEK, CAN'T }
WE,PAL? La@OT A Uf)
SL'GHT BUMPON Fry
U, MY FENDER... all if

WOOLLENS —
WORSTEDS —

YOUR FIGURE







AT






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PRI¢ p ES Vital food-elements in its compo-

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‘ o ou soon feel more
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{
le Bynin Amara is an invaluable tonic
!
j
i

TO

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od sure benefit from Bynin Ama |
After consalancance. }

when run-down or jaded
s U I 7 there is no finer tonic.

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ee ie st ‘~___ Bew apd, Port of Spaix, Trinidad $2 ee iecialchates naam

Le Ee eR ere == —

{







Full Text

PAGE 1

I'AC.I II\KH All'i\ii\. Results Of B.T.C. 6d. CONSOLATION Spring Meeting 1950 T kM N I .l v. Ml t t>i. v. tuzs 9311 2nd 2274 78'3 5121 84Q1 1 IW Ki It 7131 9622 | 8029 6294 210 r 2858 ;-3:< 3903 5462 7902 1 UN 3453 4019 4621 5676 1161 3814 2124 8402 3319 IIM 5029 0393 9th MM 0481. 1249 2300 iOlb 79511 %  t 2298 lllh 6773 7661 0622 MM 12Ui MM 4940 772H 3813 nth 1028 3537 7754 2299 0780 !4th tm „ II 5255 1 5541 15lh MM 3339 3194 1373 0464 10.00 161h MM 1808 8033 9193 6483 I7lh 11798 43.H. I81I1 1438 inn, 1941. MM 0259 ."Oil. MM 8247 1590 MM 1418 : %  %  9128 61S5 2Jnd MM %  1558 23rd Ml) 8040 MM 0145 24th 3578 2482 5925 .1 Wb 1074 4111 ?Ui MM 1184 1804 27th 5408 4154 28th 8388 3013 . 29th 565.1 0087 Nth 0110 5981' •134 i 1855 MM Champion Now Manager J22L T ***SIIT.^ i.-. u|. ; .Hd A. O. mm* ,,„. .,1. ,.„ %  Streetly Class I Champ \t Lodge School Spoils %  ISC I'll .. 2.vd RudrUniw. 3rd T QOTCI 1 House. I %  t';l evening and %  %  %  I I %  I %  11 ; % %  HUH ha I %  %  If N1 Ma iov \n* nit ii t lot Kerfi-. It. H Coddart T EVKM1 *• tm 1 Mil"l>l* Ii: %  v 1 v < s. %  V4KD1 1 I I S I . %  lot IriniW. 2nd S1 %  •' and Kin %  IM \11 iurnnoie uur 1 1 mm I Mil 1: 11 \ %  %  riN, v, 11 IIIII Savannah Club Tennis Tournament B8TI U) UTS ftl 1 1 VIMl -Is (IN. -IN,.I %  I %  I .1 %  B.B.C. RADIO %  %  Choice 1 p 1 30 p 11. %  1 Praanmn** mmmm Treat Uu> Third Prod' \ MOraU. i P" 1 • %  aa* %  >'.'.-.',',',',',',',0','-*.'**.'-*.'-'-'DANCE %  Ladies' Bath ing Suit, -.!. CAVI SHEPHERD & 6uJ '" %  :t II K:tin ..^ : A 13 B::OAD -I'Ukl : I \lllni.sM.n la llBllr—l c ~~" ,V8ABY LOVES "" "— II M MJ Ll.-VOI.il >| . m llolLS All ver y reasonable in Price. l.litKJitiiUliJ. MM • %  P -de.. ]( %  ... v \ aWl. f \. V... h* b.lb — **IO.,l, J ma' %  '-' %  '-' %  %  %  • % % % % % %  % % % %  .:;:::.;. 10 4 11 Kbuc Slnm % % % % %  %  %  % % % %  % %  's^,* ^-HM1M3 ZEPHIRINS I specialty— j TROPIC GOLD LAYER CAKE ..,,,., oi j^nj COUGH LOZENGES For cow': "throats /b/eaje 1 '[ their -upfrwflB thc bal ftspto Bismol FOR t/pSty STOMACH UNGUfNTIIflr' FOR BURNS MUfVIS *A.M MOMOTIS HIAUHQ V. KEI)lli.M)IIARI)(ill)S PERMANENT dllliEN PAD .. ,. ..! colour 1 tin. Im, IIUI '-, lln .inn •* ', tin. IIIII ** I (,n. I4>rr*i; I Kin. tin, *" N08WICM 4^^f2r> WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, %  I' lr i4;.li AMUIBA ifouikjfujt ^* IjTUn Arrnfimui mvJuiiulioniwWca Winfi r a m w at* Vkai feed-Umanu In (u comoo tkJon tofn •Kktn ton up ih tntlr* ph>i.e' Tew WOP teal more i •nargctic uai women of til (tj dc :> b—a W t (rcm Bjnin An A(|r coavalMCfLKCfl WIMMI rMM-dowi. tkan a ao Itaar teak. \ol RPOCSKET see us Fsr S.MAFFEI&Co.Ltd Top Scorixs m Tailoring HIGH CLASS WOOLLENS WORSTEDS CASHMERES FOR MEN AND WOMtN AT C. B. RICE & Co. OF BOLTON LANE ^



PAGE 1

7T F r i il ii y M-irli 17 l5. teba&oB locate ive l'rnl< lenr .1 .^. KING LEOPOLD READY TO RETIRE BELGIUM PARLIAMENT European Front ImperativeAgainst Russian Invasion Says Churchill l.t)\lM (\ \| ,., I, ir -TWBTONtlll K<% % %  1-1u.„,,,,l l-,,li.„,,,„, „..,,;,;''„,„ Hn>alHT Bravo „nd impernliv, lo r,„,„ ,„„„ i, Europe •(••insl pnoinle turlher invasion bj Ruuia ,i..l htr nKllltes. The Princess Will Tell The King ttaM-0 Advo< I ..-pnndent. GEORGETOWN, B.G., March 16. Protest* Alice : '" I lhe huna-c-^ce school girls choir Qgnnunrni Hou lo Wednesday night In -Here's a health to His M Hd afterwards told the 1 dull tell the King how dutifully you sang'' Hore thari 30 i led the %  Ht; held in n %  !an il colour iti light. The Earl of Albtaie nnn tJflr a mango tree |>lanti any years ago by PrinceIMN. The party r slightly %  Acted when the lights Iiflowing technical troubles at the jtvv station which plunged the r i" darkness tor 20 mil — i BY Cable) Lindatrom Wants IngritVs Daughter L08 AN tafrid Bergman's torn %  bud. Dr. Peter Undsti o A) a cross complaint to MWttt him ami demand that Mr 11-year-old daughti •tallowed to remain in %  B-day. This .tHlsy by Dl _^hse Pacht, Unit'.'" %  Ret superior %  miri .li %  %  ^fte Swedish film star took leal action through her attoniey in yesterday demanding from at. LiDdstroiii :. community property arm Issttdv of Pla. now, with *r. Commenting on Miss Bergaaa'i iiut Pacht said. %  M the opportunit; w facts before Uw i Bans". —Reuter. Two Vsk Remove Film Censorship WASH r.' T*o Hell ntad the i ni Supreme wi to di hip oi %  * unconstitutional. United %  rtaU Corpora tioi in* Stud lot E il-il ... iies>. %  ., Tansy" which •jut negn, anew the Memphis action I P • ,i had IJpUllK. I Pit lo contra* %  *, F -'" P*0Uon Picture Aam g*** wit) hoped the *J tM: I would I *P* out" film uum-orship. "You JP jUtatl 'iTiitional •J* of rrc i npn on without •eatuaily destn .i: —Reulei Mr. CbureWl) referred to a school \1 thought in America that %  rope to be indcnd iK-heve.) the only i,„i. whero the Soviet edvai bo held was the Engliah Channel and tbl "I am glad this view has been States, ourselves and all the powen concerned with the Brusseii Pact" he I'rime Minister Mid the 1 to the de%  •lie Soviet sion" he warned. at present disd unable to give any %  "The mlgfatj Q %  Mi Chi We have no %  %  %  1 ontrihu%  the thought have no military exIwar. Italian that the efleeth I • %  %  loee nut real with we mgst • On pace : Close Rumanian liiiornialioii Service Says Britain took I rthet optni %  %  %  . %  i | the Bu Il ... || %  A . -i Robert inform.. Rumanian Gen %  : anded it. %  the 230 took honours in thr I SeretseCanGo Back Home LONDON, March 16. ".wciiith Secret rick Oordon-Walm-i uu %  ...... senate of I %  : ... i • i, Drdea —Reuter, Cansitmtine To MM! Griffiths ON SERETSE AFFAIR • BaibMo> meant! %  The future othe Brill i %  %  lonstaniu %  %  %  MI Oor%  been." hat! for tha Fighting (Vunmltl %  %  %  Mr. Gor%  -Mth In* %  %  —(By Cable ) Sheep In Main's Clothing IN, March. 10. A Nottingham policeman .'. a man wit). iii Mm to have .ni-.no fnunn illegally slaughtered. The % % % % %  < %  r :o. %  ?*n "HIGH TV ME Opening Show — A Grand Success HKiH TYME, Eru *t night ai Hi. Empire Theatn is a colourful show pach•o with good mi nd dancing. ofovor seven hundred v.. i.'. twa ed with what ^* —^.^—^—.^ i s 30 p m.; a, putted und the shov Malayan Bandits tound 8 Britons SINGAPORE. Mi, ^y Bunun ^J*d anoth. i when Uu lo Uke shol i gowns and white %  %  %  I o Business i Buwntea". "Rhapsody in Blaci> ,'i Scientists Return Home From Antarctic LONl>< %  %  n oath .tiler years in the AntarrEiikilai... %  %  III %  Harold David Jot —Reuter Britain Will Spend Armed Forces LONDON. March 16 Minister Enianii.l Shi i%  i tiitul progress was m%  in military planning lo in spl the North Atlantic area into praa intended to d'< 1 He would shortly mi i leaguee of the N -th At i thai work, I %  Shinwflt was spear.. Government motion asking tin lake note %  >( Whit.Paoet it %  i; 780.oon.uuu rmad lot i i %  \CHESON CALLS ON SOVIETS FOR SINCERE CO-OPERA TION WITH U.S. BERKELEY, CaUl LERICAN SECRETARY OF STATE %  Itsvdtn ol thi hltmi . On page T 1 Kussia Is Not Only Possible* Aggressor — Ewtft %  PaclBc \ negb the Pacific %  lU I'arliciiwlii.n v 1 lit thai ho staiu .i ffltbOU %  %  I' %  —Reut*r MUST DECIDE GENKVV March 16. 17X11.Ml) KIN(. LEOPOLD Mated to-day that the Belgian Parliament nui>l Jet IUV whether lie ihMsU reiiirii to the throne on the basis til Sunday lleU irmiiim. which li %  mm ;7.ii of the votes. If Parliament—in which the Catholic, who supported him lull', afftj m-t ihati %  baolute luiijority — decided agiii.ist his return, lie w:s re uli lo retire, the 19-year-old Kins I tied "II ai the othar hand, th.I laatcobiy, alighb i b) the conaultaUoa, leiurn* ioy me. tha principle oft. Ity, "O which he regime is based, will demaiidt %  it and i ; the Chambers will leaume Unirl work wnhin the rigorously re-> %  Baton H JacqssM Pirenm. Ipal Swretary, had %  introdu %  u i re ooolai patched U Edward Bivt outpost on the Cape insula of Northern Australia, to MM n> in .rest base to the battle pmBM Fr-.m their %  i 'h' war i .. %  %  land Mission Stett* Island, 295 mile* north —Ht-ulri •Z** lo Uut * shot.%  Misaa". "itnapsoay %  * %  R. Sktrk. ls... unit tou •Ightly Injure ..pproval to or.. ipplause had subsu. k into their seats to blbey ran int. B of tha how !* % %  • % %  Kualii .ie were three small %  're hurt. —Reuter %  .k. In the %  ta Bancrol: Number b) Packer Ir %  iwns ssasaa 1 Dance With You' row. Vvndenberg In Buenos Aires O2SIS A,RES baa af Petrol Goes Up 3d Per Gallon in S. Africa %  %  ..... today %  %  l Reaser. I. APPOINTMENT Didn't Want Girl* INDIANA. M : I are looking fm I 'didn't want girl It evan ugieting to name —Reuter. %  down niui %  %  %  %  pral D%  I %  : | . —Heater. Pope Holds Secret Gonsistory VATICAN err %  new Cardinals wen was follow) %  ai iviars In %  %  beginnu.t: h after faster —Reater. Greek Leftwing Will Urge Political Amnesty Veberimm G-in-C Middle BOBt Land forces %  si % %  %  %  < %  %  ne was —Retilrt M Belgian Pliny W lirulir.' Ou I oinpleted. M leturned 1 i.. tonight 1 neni will I. Thia u sun; m on] ..iseUi. he Kini %  i, nseni to to* Pra. two Chaiulfi sil tauwelart, of tl l.twei House and M Kon. Muustei at 1st l>< %  > %  Kins'', lakeside Vill I H i innouncetnvnt King Leopolds ami... •lays ol urgent Ufa the Belgian Prsnoi BadsVuin, Leopold's ULiavad to be tin talks. He will n.uaic d hu .fl t llfli : King ii-.i return to the Ptro i %  r i i %  thai the talks With • %  • i u*n to the %  Belgium I I-.buui said today its plans t< %  tag* i general strike* m u action only it the Km. the country wi!' Parliament > %  a bald, asd ease i passed in MM MM. | %  i i %  tailed to %  %  Th.I per House h %  I %  %  Reuter. 3 Days To Leave Paris Sled Workers hVturn To Work PAR!! ind Paris stee %  %  iftei A saakearnan %  ni of th. td with 15 pei %  -Re H U-r VATICAN C NS. Mai eh 18 ud %  .nd the suppression ol the refoimatoi Makroneo* Communi*' pacts senhad been to violence to extort "re iloged. >hoae party holds about 10 scats in the new Parliament, •o-day for assssaa €t iae International Soeialaa Ots>r u utmni at Hatting* this On page 3 i i any. country, ApieSBing a neBvolos added Parliament will fight ealist freedam and iualKy of eitlsens before the lave, for the beat use of Marsi ntnt against nnd (inanci.il oligar. •ssainlaining faithfullv I*T present friendship ..rrd I hi >-.IMI mabliah aid dav.-i "The on —Reater. Court Martial li For Missouri Grounding h 16. ordered to-day for the Commandand the Navigat States Navy's giant battleship %  %  • jke Bay on J IS the bigge-t —Reler. OFF TO RIO p .., —Renter. Meet Uoh I' abian i i uu%  uu "iii i. Uva n th. i of lop-hultl : ten tan %  oeeeti al lllMII meal brl llanl death. llei^ at th. How the Dog Dopers Work The Case of The Fake Policeman The Trail ol Cal Burglar No. 1, (me nearest real lite approach lo Raffles). The Chase to Grelna Green in tin-EVENING ADVOCATE J



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TT YKlll.WM.ABC II 17. l5|i BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE •JSXTRA SCHOOL EFFORT Uttered A Forged Su # arSion (/ W1H Meet ln Antigua ATTRACT*? CWTS^STncici r>U J7 moiA In Bontls.it '--^, Cheque For $210 \Speighistown ATTRACTS SUCCESS Says Governor At Lodge School Speech Day % % %  MaUiemalli r-nlin and Modern Lanju... Wf do nol reel thai we urf l*in HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR ih„ I „^ 7i .""J-BducaUon u now op *4, am '"n^ht/r 0, ,' h !i ^S ScKSl ^^ed ,n his speech the spiritual side of education, at the Expm !" *r CertlflcaS i^lge School Speech Day yesterday ahernoon. "" : ' •El ad KUM .-., 1/I i. ,l; PKIIIll I I li 'wJ of ihc Lam I.irch If. the four :'.^ when Assize Sentence Posti>onern I re'er to the general 2,-nbe* reflected in the Stot the students, their genii behaviour and appearance 2 their ilertness," the Governor -I felt this atmosphere very _-n.lv on two occasions last E* First, when with Her Hail Highness Princess Alice, we -re through the ranks of the giiooi, and secondly, when the -onaentattves of the school visitJbovenunent House. Although ^r representatives at Govern'taaX House modestly stood in the ttk rsnta. it was not their height rf dress, which attracted my atMtion but their whole bearing. 1 i~w thfv were from Me Lodge Sftool. and I felt very proud of it Lodge School, and of BarbaThe Governor then emphasised At essential need for a spiritual feuidition in the lives of all pfoplf. Headmaster s Report THE Headmaster in his address panted out tnat it was necessary iv should have a spiritual background %  our lives, and said that T should look to the church to apply this spiritual background. He was delivering his repor* of the school's activities for the put year. Having welcomed the GovCWr to the School for the lirst ..id: The School now 287 pupils—an InCftMl boys—on the number given last Speech Day by the log Headmaster, who, tha 100I will be delighted to know. has risen above the rank of go into each department of study with ihe same detail, and I merely mention. passant, that the %  .... I~-.III,, Sixth Form Clas.us Section „ „f•"i *c Oxford & Cambridsc Hi.h. %  Certificate This year, am lh„ ... to Ihis year, ana the rePonstbility lor Ihis extra English UmltHn (actors lo our resources; Wry hi|h order, and It, mi/i not bo torsollen thai In form. boi. mean to enter int.. the arena ol pout,,, nor the .phei. QOUet, "lion m U] ihat w* recognise thai we are 200.000 but such is our confidence in our stalcsnicn and our public citizens. we perMslenlly cherish the that Classical staff. A Headache In these days, the mere mention of. Sun Is quite a head-ache for tnc Heaas of Schools; indeed %  ny senior colleague, Uie Heaomaster of Harrison College, has UM two such head-aches. 1 am .uttering raj iir with ihe departure ot Mr. Walker, a specin^'he'mal '"I* '" -'*•'""' %  1^' &hoorcitleat, %  main, however, the belief thai this problem of adequately stalling our leading schools will not be found Insoluble. School Matters I have digressed somewhat, and to get back to the proper domain 't School matters:—what, a parent may ask. is the broad distinction brigade I* rich tow ol. stands firm; and Mr. -or more familiarly Cnch—is s-nii u,e Staff's reference on all debatable points Last Term. Mr. Cooper, who hao endeared lumself both to the bovs and staff, left us to return to England; and in September this year we shall be losing Mr. Mat•dab. Young Wilfred Uaaeleh. you may remember, gaining his Oxford & Cambridge Higher Certificate in July 1M8: in September 1949 he joined the staff of his old School, and I vy to say that ho will be going up to Oxford in September i5u to qualify as a. Schoolmaster in ihe September Term of 1MB, Mr. Michael Timpson. an Honours Graduate and MA., of St Johns College Oxford, with .. Diploma in Education to boot joined the School. By introducing his pupils to the art of tutorial representation, he ha.ividly brought to life again the stirring events of the Ran Period: and you will find, stageby him, in the upper slore>. I'ln-ics Laborateg] a little exhibition of graph] ( tj of endeavouring to obtain $210.00 from Barclays Bank Ltd. by virtue of a forged cheque, Knowing it to be forced. 'ported. Murrell appeared on alter bad Murreii who ana Uv< counts of uttering a iorm-d Herbert and Murrell said tna. utH-ument forbart was a grocer in uaxter "Wam in. %  ,--. .ol ., Koad who had asked him to csn forged instrument ihe cheque HI Hoawur Mi ; I. Taylor, He asked Acting Chief Juatlce, presiden worked and Higher I'ertiflcate requirements and Mr W W Iteece. KC Solicitor General, prosecuted on behalf of the Crown Police First witness for the Prosecution was Sgt. H. King of the PoUea who said that on Nownibci 18 last year. Sgt. Bourne hmi made a statement to him and had handed Mm V6733. purporting to be signeo b> Mr. Beaubrun, then Comp: Supplies. The heque tor J2I0.OO. sgt Klni exhibited to the jury the counterfoil of the sain. saying that such request* do not lit in with the curriculum of this School, and that it is verv necesjuniors whom he has taught.) more general. Languages J am sure you will be pleased to that parents sa what your boys are now atSttelnuiter. andl 1. now Dually j EpT^JjU? ,521 7" T"' anted In spreading the %  %  2JJ* !" ? those to whom wlortiouissstscsss&s w f s i t h \ b r k fr r w h is required to have a f.-.rlv sound" 10 cheque " d bc n ukcn general knowledge nf a variety of b 1 "ourne had also handei. subjects. 6 Is the minimum numhim sl ke v ou "" and I bar, and our boys offer 7, from M 'l )a rate key Latui and Greek. French. FJIRII-!, The B,ink Maths. Botany. Chemist!>. Biologv Harold do C. Pams, a cashie: and Bcripture For the rliabti ink torn .he coui ceruacate, the candldata is remat on Novwnoer t, UM, tn< quired to narrL.. X hc BHIIK of nibjoi at the most, and to pursue his paiti.ul.ir line l I evei. For eunipla, Schix.i CerUfieata UathemaUi only ,i knowledge of Artthmel Klementary Algrebra. Georv. and a little Trigonometi. I tha Mathematics for the HlgJ Certificate includes advanced work in 8 branches namelv. Trigonometry. The Differential and Integral CalcuI Analytical Geometry, Bpaclalithis uiteiiMve nature In all the other Ribjecti .. %  Ktvaa ma the opportunity I n^ ^., (l to point .! gins with the High..i ae Rev II. B Gooding. for his %  ftrning and piety: and Mr. T. 1. IraM for his scholarship and awrosity. For the past 50 years ad more the School has been sad. and in it; policy directed. • ; donal nun; each of •ham. so it seemed to me, enwouretl %  School a nt in that particular ahere of academics in which hi •rti intoresis and aptitude lay .Needs ui Schuol For myself, I am reminded ol I* question of the passer-by— '•ding this great mastiff?" "Me %  *dous no, I am not leading %  ; I am carefully watching %  fcre he wants to go and am "nag him then." In scholastic parlance, I shall endeavour cor*Uy to i. needs of %  • School, and to assets accun or dii. as n unfolds itseli J"din, and to supply thOM **• As matters stand now, the opl shows a definite bias to*n Science and Dlgll fortunate that the School at present two varj it men in cbarp studies—Mr. Hodgson Mr. GoodingMr. Hodgson Chemist, holds a Kir of Manchester, UI I B Gold ill In addition tavernm K Body has . WfTKUv.. ihoratory. JJ,"0 all that the School now %  >o complete its 8 P" %  "rat rate PI 1 "its, the School can offer TPJJPil* the most up-to-date rT** leaching in the West %  •"" Time presaaa. anv presented aim . cnaquo, *i cheque in Court was inc same. ana it was ui iavour oJ ( boater' .i.UO. It purported to have been iiguco uj .ui. tcauuiu... nlQ not recoflniaa UM Mgiuaure, aim no naa uiviu,. nun U,K CQOQUO JIMI maue a lie* nun. <>d the accused am. ltd ne -uci He also askea tne accuaad wn mm, .i!..i i it accuaeu %  .... --ii. uaati %  sent nun. lie uid DM CSUUI ...^ cooqua, Du %  He was called to Lha a aoout ava oi ten muuuiva forgive me for' ialer • %  ll11 '" %  lll i'ani The Daanacer ihoan iParriaj the cheque and aske-him if that was tha aauM one sary to veuj ihem. both on the the accused had presented to him. ground of practical application to Ha aaid ye*. the working arrangements of this! T() tba accused Pains said thai School, as well as from an idealhe had made no attest istic point of view; for there would out of the bank or run out, He be a grave danger to academii Beaubrun." He HUKII: education in this Island if we nave aaid "I. C. Beaubrun allowed it to assume, in the formaB diu nut look at the numbers tive years, a too specialised or on the cheque, but he i 'echnical aspect. Our Youth Our youth is far too prone to consider only th>utilitarian ide, AiiKn tht words -Ifcu imiidred I were written. Sgt. King retailed said he wa* and to neglect th*aesthetic in Pfesent in the Magislr... education. Tndeed. it is becoming %  wncn Mr Beaubrun had given increasingly necessary to remind %  VJdaiKa. The Court hi our children that culture la u ira' Hi Ucaubrun to am portant as acumen, and that while Psaca of papal U* Mathematics and the Sciences are i held Herbert, two hu lirst-rale tools for carving a livten dollars", and to sign his tianM Ing out of Ufa. It la from the atudy under the amount. The Court of languages that wa derive our had kept the l I more humanising Irjfluatkeaa, our uisa P. Heath Clerk gave eviier'to'S'SenfSS?-'', ad Rome u dead Ianf he ^, h-d " aad lanhln .' '" *** ^" h i] to mention only Hercy S. Kirby, Aacountanl at one of the most obvii • %  lid that the cheque M much there and u ramahii I cannot invincible optimLsm. which can rhange probable defeat Into a glorious victory Is it not remarfcabla that Barbados should provide 6 memb-.*ls OUT Of Hi. and more remarkable still that 5 of |j from our leading Schools —J from Harrison College. Walcott and WiUIagna; 1 from Comliermcre. Worrell; IaOdge. Marshall and God lb of Education proceeds ajatt i i ranch i if it is prograaaively spreading out. Physics, for exipparmoit now minds because of its own apavtacular advance in 11 become much n OUT Schools need specialist atafl more of them if we are to hold our own In In a modem world, and if wa are to carr> worthily the tOTCh of which u own bj right of owr tradition! Deny m tha we tna> la Ichauod thcaa in full in' aaun march from strength lo strength. We would therefore i who are truly interested in Education—our Governing Bodies, our i Politics, our Economic Adviser, our Executive Council— to consider the special needs of our Academic Schools in the mattag cf rlafl. We need experts in knowledge of English can only be via Latin and Greek. I should like to venture in' but need I remind you how interesting is the history of some uf out every-day words, time, however, does not allow of ti. renounce the t;< paranta should i ihiii boja to do Ibaai bad with their languages. It will spelling by the process of associatiun. it will make Uuir reading the more entertaining, it will help the phrasing of their written English. It will teach them—as nothing else can the 'neir own language, andmost important of all—it la very necessary in life that our youngsters be encouraged lo do the things they don't partiii,hilly like, nnd to grapple with, 'he things tw> And dl of difficulties. It has m but On the othei hand it i more difficult to le altogcthe: lives and happiness of %  %  people's children in our charge. Thanks The Lord BUt h Op moved the vote of thanks. He thought the audience would agree with him. he I : %  decided to call himself a "new boy", had acquitted himself remarkably A ell. and he hoped it would not be the last Si" he would attend at the I-odge School ing to what he two things arising out of the HeadI speech, the Bishw that first of all what he would ask | parents to beai uular, :hat the whole trend of the %  paired to keep pace with it the ^nd were going to suffer consider. Not verv long ago the legislature had made provision for the awarding of four Barbados Scholarships. That was not simply to give two or three more scholarships to two or three more OB p**t 7. mini's. He telephoncu Mr Beaubrun. and retained lha white waiting for Mr Beaubrun :> 'nine to the bank %  . %  .: him if he was Oat :..l he said no. that he had beti Beaubiun arrived, he %  I'd Into the A %  a said that the cheque had not been drawn l.y hnn To Murrell: I asked von if you %  may have asked you If you came to cash the cheque for yourself You did tell me that you were not cashing the cheque for yourself. The conversation lietween and I may have la life is fidl | ab out three minutes no* run <>u: 4 th> The Manager Mr it it MacKenzle. Manager November 2 he was in his aflsBt at the Bank. The Accountant. M> Kirhy, came in to him and brought a cheque. He went to the counter and interviewed Murrell. He asked Murrell if he was Chesterfield Heilx-rt and he said "no" Me then aid that hfci Murrell where he he said at Roger.* Grocery in Baxters Itoaa. Hx askea Murrell to come into hu. orttce ana asked one of tin messengers to show him in. auorun arrived shonly after and Murrell was still in hi* wince. He asked Mr. Beaubrun if ho had signed the cheque am. he said that he did not. Ha next phoned Col. Michchn and asked him to seim meg %  policeman. Later two detectives arrived. He told Sgt Bourne, one of the detectives, that he wanted him to make ions. Mr. Beaubrun stated that Murrell was his messenger ami asked Murrell lor a e>M he had given him to deliver to Messrs Hutchinson St Banilelo and he made no reply. bgl, Bourne then accused am. cauuoned him. He searcnev i>ocKet and found tn. counterfoil and keys. MWNi was theu taken away by tm ueiectives. ul thai Mr Beaubrun had saju and done was in the present* of Murrell. To Murrell: Betore the Police levery yeau. Speign;-. a called al year but none ba apatghtat Sugar aaJnpi told the "Advocate' l not know when the fli call T^HE ANNI'AL BtOI -i. Ballepsalaa -. Club took pla at 8 pm at Mr. L I patron of the Club. Other filled were as followe: Q ( M Woodrorte. Pr K. G. Douglin, Vice Preai Mr. J. hi. l( Mr i Bourn* Jordan, Mr C Hewit c w. Bprtngei commr.' Mr. H. Sprmger the cricket team Donald Smith, Vie Skipper of the footba IJonald Smith ami Mr c H i^ Vice Skipper li/fOl-NTED POUOI %  i"A be aeen patrolling Street trying to prcveni tion ii the Btraau Yeetordaj busy as many houaee in town trying to gci %  from the varioua tore .holding sales. VVfHFN Hit IINAI N V :.. i layed -t the Police Coleridge m Commissioner of Montserra' act aa Administrator in Antigua •luring the absence ot O Wayne—who uniha' %  cave II partake in ri sions of the Colonial OlTlce vised ten-year plan for AnUgufl —(By 1-iMe.) .V.V.V.V.V.V.V.VA 1 in A proud (onsumer of ... GOAT CHOW The cows begin their >oung ones on . CALF STARTENA Ihl linaMe from II. JASON JONES & Ca., Ltd. YOU SEE THESE MUST SPECIAL LINES! Magistrate I mentioned Chester-j Phillips who tenn— nela but did not remember the champion laal *econtt name Herbert 1 also dm I band cadet Grant ..i'i rerneuiber tne name of tta Ml ma Police Magistrate Old not allow ma to reiei *.o OBJ note* on the back^of the cheque. I made these notes in your praeenc-e before Mr. Beaubrun arrivad Ke> s D .1 Bourne of the c I 1). !he I*rosecution s-id that uii NVI • i lent to Barclay's Hank. When M got there he saw Mm ager, Mr. Mac Kcrule Bd him a cheque and told him mat Murrell had brought it to the Bank He took the crsaojue and bowed I Murrell. He told bin that he had been accused of uttering a forged cheque with intent to defraud He searched Mu found a counterfoil, two ilnajsa keys and a bunch of keys. Among tail (ataad one wUeh could unlock Mr. BeaubrunV desk. Another single key wai claimed by the office and ba gave it to one of the clerks. To Murrell: 1 did not try the ke> to Mr. Beaubrun %  your presence. I tried it In Ihe presence of P.C Babb and Mi Beaubrun on the following morning. I made extensive en* id checked tha whole of Baxter's Road and Tudor Street for Chesterfield Herbert but did not find it. Murrell next asked that Mr Beaubrun'!! evidence be read to the Court. In this evkb Beaubrun told how hi cheque Book in the light hat* raw of hla deek. On Novembei his attention was drawn to the 'raw being left open. On 1h< following day he was called t Barclays Bank where he identi %  ed the cheque and Cheque Book. The Defence In defence Murrell staled that 0 Noveenber 1 Mr. Beaubrun lsked him to no Into the OMCtDtt Hid buy some slips for his goat lie told him that ho was not gun.;. because 11 m iui Bah and and BO was no! going lor slips. ii Beaubrun sai>' "you are not going for slips no* bul whan you go up l are going to work for nothing He ne\l told how Mr Baatl brun gave him the era art i/erythbai He said that after drawing the money bai intended taking back the money to Mr. Beaubrun. To Mr. Heece: I did not tell the Manager of the Bank tnai mj name was Adolphus Payne. Hurra!) next addreaaed He submitted that the whole case against him was a Bgt Bourite. the Mauag lU-aubrun He told lha jury I>*t justio 1m done though the Heavenshould fall," and that they vouR not be doing justice if they found him guilty. The Acting Chief Justice later summed up and the Jury returned %  heir verdict. The Court then adjourned until appear., Cadogan lost | %  me that P.C has won the Bnal \VTIItN MM Ills, VV smith Hill Mr. H inflicting bodllj Walcott waraaai %  tifeb HO coats In 14 da] b Impriaonrnenl W HIIWl IMKKIs Of the SS %  walkd whh n v. day. C MIl.IA OOODM \N Hall st John %  %  yard between March A FIRS' Ol Jbroke oui at L oi %  %  I %  I %  i il %  %  Another SIMPLi \N? \ZiNO VAIl JRINKLE GEORGETTE In While. Black Man < %  M M • SATIN BACK CREPE I i i-> I mi r.ilil %  Mill.' -.11.61 yd. SHARKSKIN Wlill, ilAIIIIISOiVS BROAD Si name was Adoli • us Payne. He 10.00 a.m. today. Sentence Portponed jt the COM l one leathii black safei ind cash ai mount S7&.80. pro] Hla Hon-:, VKAKS \(,0 llVKBAIilis Minn v II Hareh II, i^:. ••i IMLBTI in S\ \I tcr Dunn*: %  ber of I.I. ... %  i tnd his %  %  •rtparaUon for :i e staged Olympic Th. at i SPECIFY "EVERITE ASBESTOS CEMENT CORRUGATED SHEETS AND "TURMLL ASBESTOS WOOD 1 V/////////JL F. preonU • priu lo rv.us.. %  POO. DOUCAII OnUbcd Ihc 100-varrt i*rlnl in !2 1/10 leci. \\ liul>Un I ..(lav < outi w Grand BBMIIIK 1 II.M urn. AlklMIr S|wl>. M Mi.hArl Olrk HckMl U 1 U .m. M.-I.ilf ii-., SH Pl.nU UM >>rd, HI. Jatrk 'I I M ra. "'in. "THAT hoMtaa fl, n| 1K1I -our. loo BHk, 'not up lo K jn> loofK n woly mean, thai JOU' bam lakini 10^ much .Mil ol tourxir. Vou, boOr it than o4 i-o manual iuA|UauM| looda phoapbofiM aad proiaua. -KA.V\TOIaK.\ a To put yog nfhl. you iMMd lanaloaanN.... IOOK laud m "•• '• VI bodybiildNa, (oodi pkoapkoco. aad piouui in Ihair Kiwi lorn. ao UUl ll ( .i< aahU, ,b0ad i~o yotr >u Day by day (tonoi., n> K.. aad .mill, Ho. iluoo^, ,^, >Mt ^J. your atmiih and aair-conddciKC ... Ran OB a counc of 'Sanaloarn' today. "d> ~d IUI aad J,. u ..i. MKII HIM. fOOU I".-J ^—' ri-slufrs In-allh, tuulh and yilaln, White Cotton Leno Voile.. White Cotton Pique Voile $!)(' White Cotton Voile 77<" & 8()(' White Rayon Spun $ 1,00 Whit.Rayon Satin J)0f All 36 IKUI w,d*. i... No 1 how Cnw. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10, 11. 12 & 13 Broad Street





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PACK FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE WADOsd AogjHTE I Van* In v%' Conversation Friday. 17th March. 1950 Emigration THE question of emigration has for 1he last five or six years given rise to much controversy in this island. It means much to Barbados with her redundant population and limited fields of employment. During the five year period after 1944 when the first emigrants under contract were sent to the United States of America the returns of the Savings Department of the Labour Office showed that approximately three million dollars had been sent back. In this same period it was not readily realised that the private returns of workers from Curacao amounted to almost the same. In addition, large sums of money and gifts are sent back annually by former Barbadians now living in the United States. The result can be seen in the lives of many of those who now own small properties and businesses. In the past there was free and heavy emigration to Panama, Cuba and the United States. This helped the island to find jobs and to bolster its economy. During the years of the war there was emigration to the United Slates and the United Kingdom and this too had its beneficial effect in relieving unemployment here Within recent days however the notices published in the Press show that there is a reverse process and although still in small numbers, the emigrants who have gone out, are now coming back to a land with an overflowing labour market. Week by week there are returns from Bermuda, Curacao, and smaller numbers from other places but they nevertheless add to the glut in the labour market. The reason for the reduction in the United States market is not far to seek. Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have become politically conscious of their ties with the United States and their claims have had to be recognised In some instances the clashes between Puerto Rican and West Indian claims have been made political issues in the United Stf In the Caribbean area there ere %  evaraJ countries like British Cuiana. Dutch Guiana. French Guiana and British Honduras which are definitely underdeveloped and under populated. Whether it is done by the Colonial Development Corporation, by private enterprise or by the British and West Indian Governmca Infl to 9 the terms of the EVANS Report, the turn.has come when the problem of emigration must be tackled li inlike and imaginative mum < rin e the popui.i" ome ui the naaUet .ilandp, Barbados still ha land producing %  sugar crop oi .ibnut 150,000 tons to rapport 200,000 people It hi a problem which would tax the Inability o( any government; but it is not facing that problem to say thai the outlook lor emigration is not bright. To accept the daft attitude is to fail before any attempt is made to find a solution to a problem which must be solved. There are still Barbadians willing to work and work hard at I road; and places must be found tor them while they are young and adventurous, if we are to maintain that level which has been H d by (he hardihood and ambition of those who have shown the way in i' years Those were the individuals wn< took their future in their own bandl and made y,cod. Many of them are still scattered ever the world making their livm %  mili-i bacamea President of Lil What is needed is an imaginative drive at development in the Caribbean area as an alternative to the reatricUonl placed on emigration by deliberate political action and by the increasing difficulty K -nation. There is British Guiana, British Dnduras and other plac< enditure can be made on the scale of the leal African ground nut scheme In order to settle the people of this island who really want to work. And it would be far more valuable to the true riches of the Commonwealth than the problematical nuts. • pafatively brief rJlnf last Tuesday on rtie matter of the ll I .. %  < %  Wadr but of all the suggesand p roposed solutions offerand several tempera were' tlon was a point on u-ffi.v all mberi were agreed. Some denational scheme, conzssrzsr p • n,cu,ar,, ,n ,he %?£2r^*Z£t'%?!£ ... much deb,'. %  tfl*—*.* ".. * %  %  ? ....... ... .._..... ...I...—.......I .... "he matter his .strict attention in with the present educational |I. > A .... 1cm ta nrmsmnt In -ill hut he "" "• %  >"'" to com*, and In lh'1 !" IJSJi. li,l.ko connection he appealed (or the '",7, 'th'^exm,-^ <>"'< co-opera.ion from member, schools and Iho lack o( additional "•• public in general will trust schools Mr Adams bluntly stated •" %  I h "•;."-' %  "" "' that he would like lo see every "' co-operation, in (act the cochild In school even If the school "Deration of every loyal citizen in accommodation was under bread'he Colony. >f < W be needed fruit trees or tents' Messrs. To %  "*. * f x, *" f hao "f ter. Motlley and Branker quoted confusion A phyHalite"tory al an of children bein unable Lode* S* 00 ~ bu no end Khooll purely through masiM chl drcn turned away the absence of adequate Jp.ee. and '•<•-, schooiV-lack. "JfeOW"deplored such incidents as head'ord and others mentioned of master, falling prospective stuiroper transportation for sch"ol their entrance cxaminachildren—resu ting In them arrlvtloni when ,hc true reason was ing home at eight or rune o clock that there was no room for them. % %  nightWhat or. of condition. %  The powen of headman ''e if not chaotic. Mr. Ml Mottley, ,,.. mentioned a Select ComWe have likened them to mittee to delve and probe for a God '• Under tha present regulacure. Such a committee will have lions a headmaster may decide lo be quite unlike far too many I 1 child of nine or other committees of which nhv of further cduhave heard in that it will have or not-A truly unfortuto produce action — JIOL merely ..te of affairs. There havo pigeon-hole documents until all been thousands of cases, in all are buried in the dust of forjetI the globe, where %  boy fulness and public apathy. Mr. might have bean KRiethlluj of a Garner voiced his opinions on the. dolt at that age— only to emerge faults of the educational system in In later years as a flue class a .wcnty-minute speech of impasholar. Den] him .he right of tiionate power und bitter fury. He ll chances of redeplored the fact that absolutely mauling a dolt are considerable, nothing of Negro history or culMr Crawford -tatcd that thouture, the deeds of art Negroes of sands of children In this island, fame, was eauvfhl to students at around the an of ten are illitcrthe elementary schools, -'from ate Mr Crawford, 1 am preaumWhich he cried, ••9a per cent, of i..unds for students, on leaving, shou d return ind if this is the and learn the three 'Its' "And. .1 ihocklnfl future wo he declared, "some teachers canfar. Mr Keith Walcott, and not begin a conversation without Ini a that .skmg for increases in salary, mvparatorv schools, much along "And such systems.'he continued. ..cr "that may be good in England may the problem of preparing children not suit the Wet .n.lies, or us. Idlng such Without education we are next Khooll lie stalled with only ro the sheep, the goats and the pigs." It is only ton true that education as it works in one land might not be practical in another. and It la equally .'rue that children should be instructed in the cultural background of their land for only from I be installed pride of race — any race "Teach youth." concluded Mr. Garner, "to have pride in himself. Don't hope alone in a foreign race. We can go forward side by but on equal terms' Couldn't Hear The day would not have been complex without the usual little squabble — thus time between Trade Union secretary F Walcott and Mr. Mot'ley Mr. Walcott accused Mr. Motlley of straying from Che point (the estimate) and wasting precious time. Mr Mottle. holly denied that he was wastlm, precious time. For two or three moments the two jumped up and down and shou.ed at each other both ending by counter accusing the other of ignoring the ruling of the Chairman. In all the confusioi I r.cver did discover what Mr Smiths ruling was. for above the. din I couldn't hear a word he said Quite a few little arguments go on outside in the halls, too. a times. On one occasion, when Mr. Crawford was speaking, a loud scream from the exterior of the chamber had this scribe, who has a kind and peace loving heart, thoroughly alarmed. No fur.hei cries followed, however, and no arrests were made. Heroes And The Heart I would like to close with one comment on Mr. Gamer's wish that he may see the statue of a black man next to thai* of Lord Nelson, in Trafalgar Square. I feel sure, from the few occasions on which I have spoken with Mr Garner, that he will understand my meaning. Statues, it is true are usually erected ro the mrnrnn of heroes, or famous figures of polities or war No statue to I Negro yet stands in Trafalgar Square—but the names of many are inscribed on the Memorial which does. Those names rank equal with any statue—and rank in honour with any memorial They. too. were heroes. The. from these parts who fell in the last war have not yet had their names inscribed — but remembrance remains in the heart a> solidly as in works of stone. Tin S|iivs Among Is >>v,mnii i F.B.I, uses was necessarily brief, but would cost Britain hundreds oi Cj methods which i: ._. That U to say, pretend are pretty Its "loyalty ••"" *• ? !" 2 m 1 £ 1 ' gained as much, shock" on people In responsible SwurttyGuard along^the _same Miice ill .,„ %  Ota* questioned Other defensive rneasures are because about him. Agents are free to needed. People should be mlllU ,. to hi. telephone conversal SSf a tS^*J^SiS!S: the national taw h aXjuT, ll mvolvtions, or investigate his ed. spondence. T .,ce must be faced with Unpleasant? Very. The Ameri complete!) kfany cans think so. too. but the Fuchs people will nul like some of the ease has reinforced their_teUeMn n vssl/i has |n London ol i cas lly II. i nartl "M1K tiea.hciv ,.f Dr. Fuchs has r?VEN the Amei ic oi H/ methods which it does not have served. :.... pretend are pretty Its "loyalty • %  "* %  ** %  Russians have gained as much, i-hcck" on people In responsible f* !" "'/,, a ;,. """ """.h""",.^,; ,ave been able to positions makes ours seem trilling luies—but not from the zealous •t-nremt vital and expeulv. in comparison. enthusiasts who would promptly P .ments A run U trailed lo. days and offer their services: these people correisations, just as the Communists do it in reverse. !H*rKtiMulil? Ill nui lint' suiiie <*. *( %  : 'd II- i wynw.w • %  •. v^-.-. __ I suggest: I do not pretend Ou^r^fw njjhe^jwjirjile ^ iv I yselX. effectiveness of M.I.5 representatives as we have in ..ranch must be Moscow. ALL diplomatic arrangement-. T .. ill naad reinforcements and privileges should be comol Krtt-ctaM men—who must be pletely reciprocal. If Britons mu> adequately paid. The average not move freely in Kuntania, then .ii Branch nan gets little Ruritaniani should be restricted %  i.iii a policeman's pay. The in Britain—or the men of both i. >IIMI Me'll lame on I niiicaiion Of Public Services Report£849-30-968 £568-27-673 ,.ii.i i.ilk ol "purgaa* 1 will provoki auekla in M< I are very military career—perhaps as a fill-in duly for an unfit officer. %  i been grossly uiuk>r-stafl since vie%  %  pi into in nigh qu ll Iti days of useful fi 11 has bam admitted that Dr. i • M-tted" by HI M.l.5 are better off nations should be withdrawn. This with an Army major' 1 pa> as is not childish, it is common sense. minimum. Nor should we halt at defensive # measures. The Russians have a .Murf I rUilllHlt powariW Filth Column in Western A NEW type of counter-spy is Europe. I tell you that we have needed. It does not follow "\ e ven mor e Powerful Fifth that a man who was a success in ^A^man^Kh ffl and catching German spies in wartime ^^^Jiffi^ Will necessarily be successful in ^tl-fov*!!!*^ mov^uents in i iiehing British spies—in Britain lne soviet Union itself, could be in peacetime. US ed. not for espionage, but to The Communist mind Is a publicise the true intentions of the special study, and in its inconWest .HrVitfour W E have Pi friends in those laces. Remember Peencnde? The map which enabled ami perverted logic must be well understood. The ordinary policeman is sellom of great use in such a cam;<>lice. Yet palm. In one recent routine check .._ in obvious case must have on technicians in responsible'PO*ius succcssfuUy to bomb the rocket I to s>meonc in high tions, suspects were trailed by research centre was given to quarters for decision. Whoever large men who gave themselves Britain bv two Polish forced lahc was, t t .nonaway in a few hours. bourers employed, by the (it; gftrfUty. We do not need an mormous mam. organisation—not even approachThese men were scavengers in Are we prepared In future to mg American standards, much less tne factory the map showed ewn .enirity methods favoured Russian. But the men must be lne (, n iest details of the workshops in other count ues" In Russia given additional powers, the MV.D. uses about bait . mil\|„ r II, In, is I i ncierge ol .siwsr nriiirrn your block of flats, the postman, CO far, I imagine, there will be the seav.. orking at fcJ little dissension. But .11 sorts of people enlarged security force, however ately restricted. Why .,n praatad Inl Phi Udgood, will need Urge numbers of Take another example of this dm mi. anslatad from volunteer assistants. absurb fear of "offending Russia": Action into fact. Dunkirk there was a real when Oouzenko walked out of the Once I endured a Russian inrisk in Southern England of a Soviet Embassy in Ottawa with tenogalion—and it was indeed nn German occupation. Considerable his brief-case of deadly and inordeal. 1 Wl numbers of men and women weie criminating papers, the'lir'.' drugged, but ralayi of ottcUll carefully selected tui Intdjhgence uon of the Canadian Government questioned me lor hours on end work. They included town cleiW-. m that he and thev should be for several days. Such pressure bus conductors, waitresses.. tmt back, not seized!' makes it cxtietmU dlfftcuM to If the Germans came, these peoFear and apathy can be refuse a conf—aton In exchange ule were to remain at their posts, greater menace than'l>r. Fuchs. for freedom. and act as our spies. The training —L ES they swept around each night. The report of the Canadian spycase in 1M5 was a warning of the Fuchs episode, but the import of copies of the report was deliberCont'd TO CONSIDER how the grades of a .vrvice for unification could be applied the commissioned ranks of the Police of a large colony—Jamaica, and •olony. Brtttsti 'ir — is mail's: GRADE Basic SaUr? Commissioner of Police £ 1,300 Deputy Commissioner of Police 950 Superintendent 700 Senior Asst. Superintendent 625 Assistant Superintendent .. £425-25-525 British Honduras: Superintendent of Police. .. Assistant Superintendent .. Now if the grading in Jamaica can be taken as affording a sound basis—and we have no reason to -hink otherwkN itnca they hava recently been examined and revised— the task is to place the posts of Superintendent taill Superintendent in Bntfata Honduras into two of the Jamaican grades. to do this, it would be necessary to determine the basis of allocation. Quite clearly the exist.ng salary a ca lai would not serve the purpose. Those I.determined on a colony basis, and scales *> determined too often represent not the appropnite remuneration for the duties of the post in inc. turn but the limit which the colony can ..iford. fha only other possible basis of allocation would be comparative evaluation of the duties and responsbihties attaching to the several grades in the two .olonies. Looking at the matter from this point of view, there appears no doubt that, since in both colonies the grade of Assistant Superintendent is the lowest commissioned grade, part of the duties Of the Assistant Superintendents in British Honduras must be the same a; those of Ihc Assistant Superintendent in Jamaica. Inasmuch. DOW the former officers have only one grade of officer above them, whereas the latter have four, it appears equally clear that a greater measure of responsibility must fall on the former than on the latter. But balancing these two factors neither can we nor. we venture to assert, can anyone else reach an Informed conclusion whether it would be appropriate to place the British Honduras Assistant Superintendents in the Jamaican Superintendent or Senior Assistant Superintendent grade. The same difficulties would arise in any attempt to place the British Honduras Superintendent in one of the Jamaican grades. UNIFORMITY But if uniformity of grading presents great diffln the case of such a service as the police, it ib deni'.nstnibly impossible in a number of other Owing to the> heterogeneity in QMO organ.cation and scope in the several territories. Had such MOUS territories as the Leeward Islands and i. Islands alone been the subject of our 'ion. we conceive that no great difficulty would have been experienced in formulating unifarm gradings and common scales of salary. But j under our terms of reference we have to consider uniiication in relation to all the British Caribbean territories. The heterogeneity to which we have referred is a natural reflection of the wide variations in the population and financial resources of OUO colonies. At one end of the scale theie is Jamaica with a population of 1,300.000 and a revenue of £9.500.000; in the middle of the scale there is British Guiana with a populaton of 37.500 and a revenue of £3.800,000; and at the lowest end of tha scale the smallest islands such as the Virgin Islands population of 6.500 and a revenue of some £50,000. The smaller territories neither need nor can support an administration of the sann :hat of the larger and wealthier territories Even where the smaller territories woula wish io extend •heir Held of administration, the achievement uf %  heir imbitions is limited by financial necessities. DIFFERENCES "iiscquont differences in scope and organization of the various administrations are. of course. In some departments than in others. An extreme exaniplf of difference is found in the organization of the financial administration, in respect of which we have the following variations. In i iMim.vtrations inert are separate posts of! Financial Secretary and Accountant-General; in! others, the duties of a Financial Secretary and an Aceountant-General are combined in the post of, Colonial Treasurer; in the smallest administrations, I the post of Colonial Treasurer has attached to it a • %  lost of ofhai oillos*; thus in St. Vincent, the Colonial : • r is also Income Tax Commissioner, Chief' itrar of Shipping, Chief Tax Officer under the Land and House Tax Ordinance, G*M1 il. and Receiver of Wrecks. Again, m Trinidad, customs and excise fail alone to one department, while in Jamaica the Department of the Collector-General is responsible not only fci customs and excise but for a substantial part of Inland P alL In some of the postal administrations, the Postmaster-General is responsible for telephones, in others he is not so responsible. The functions normally falling to a Public Works Department are. in one colony, split up among five independent departments. Examples of differences In the scope and organization of the various departments could be multiplied, and we are satisfied that over a wide range of the administration they are I such as to defy any attempt to propound a system of uniform gradings of posts. In the preceding paragraphs we have endeavoured to show the impracticability of a system of uniform for scheduled posts in unified services. In the following paragraphs we examine tne question whether :f, in spite of our failure to tlnd a solution, the problem of uniform grading^ could in fact be' solved it would bo possible to atmch to them common basic scales. We begin by examining the possiMUtfei in relation to a particular service and proceed to consider the matter on a wider basis. MEDICAL SERVICES There is ;.o .service in regard to which the case for 11 >. In our view, more clearly established than the meokal service where common basic, salaries are moro impossible. In the case of some posts, the salary is based on the assumption that the! holder is not permitted to indulge in private prac" Bad a salary scale and a right to private practice; In others, the position is still further complicated by the addition to the salary '.tiion fee for cases treated as part of the officer's official duties, as well as a right to practtoa. So long as such variations exist common basic salaries are, of course, impossible, and the heroic remedy of abolishing private practice and ilxing salaries on the basis of full-time service to Government is ruled out by two considerations. MONK or GLASS BLANr Ms* Usually 26c. Now ^£ NC TinTRINIDAD MABMAI in. Usually 36c. % a£ McEWANS RED LABEL BEER KITCHEN NEEDS: seiecf Irom this wide range WOOD AND COAL STOVES-Nos. |; M OIL STOVES (OAI m, PRESSURE COOKERS AL ""* SAUCEPANS—Iron. Enamel and Aluminum DOUBLE BOILERS Ura NEGRO POTS—2. 3. and 4 gallon DANISH POTS—I. 2. and 3 gallon FRY PANS-11" and 12" and FRENCH FRIERS COFFEE MILLS— Nos. 2 and 3 !" MEAT MINCERS—Nos. I. 2. and 3 TINNED AND ALUMINUM KITCHEN w.oc BOX IRONS ETC., ETC m WILKINSON & HAY.NES CO., LTD., SUCCWB, C. S. PITCHER & CO., LTD, "Phones : 4672. 4487 STOCK UP EARLY! RED KIDNEY BEANS—per lb CORNMEAL—per lb TABLE BUTTER—5-lb. Una i SOUTH AFRICAN GRAPES per lin. MACKEREL „ MAXAM BEEF SAUSAGES CRUSHED PINEAPPLE SWIFTS MUTTON & PEAS SWIFTS BEEF d VEGETABLES DANISH CHICKEN BROTH BOYARDU SPAGHETTI DINNER DUTCH APPLESAUCE S I % ASM I l Mllll & CO.. ITI. JUST RECEIVED &f BIRKMYRE CANVAS ONE PIECE BIRKMYRE GREEN CANVAS 72 ins. wide &f SECURE YOUR REQUIREMENTS N0 FROM DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT. •IB BKAMEILS SAY. UMsSfutm H Is No li. .1 Of HUM-* Thai Scholars Lie In To Tht Editor, The Advocait, SIR. The financial provision* v/hldi have been offered by iho latvtt Act to pratent and probably praapactive Barbadot Scholars can t-nly be described as wholly laudeuuatc first o.* all. we nnd Ihftl ship passages lo England have sk> rocketed so high that the sum of £30 allocated for tliis falls far below par of .he present This in lUclf rrcates quite .n .mpasae. a* ihc unfortunate scholars must start looking for moro noncj to aid his meagre sum offered b> tlic Government, if ha %  rt> complete his passage (are. So frw that before )< tic U going to stud> in England, he must first how he is going to gel When at long las; he reach— England he I owtttf t, attend caution n musT I (3) If n advance. | mate, a great deal of clothing and other incidentals an obligatory ... %  financial MVIOJ and (5) SJIV.C parents art unable to cope with this overwhelming budget in sp.v i A d that a BarM bed .. position to meet the heavy expenditure whu h i v.nmcnt has made lAaotut. allocation, he i DO where In obUlnini Ins goal. Thi' f paramount impoi: ula u,> given In aucholari %  I el .rbadon %  I %  id from so doing owing to the prodigious amount of which no allocahalf or more which would bo .n nothing, the unfor; tall in .. .; literally %  The hardship.-* problem. •>•> %  to dis%  "i hen they Government are as eaU broken Lath when %  11 in their further the education of their call 1 IB effect on %  penditu.. to go ta^rousjfc and r. • %  • *a* aaere money lo or parents af.er their heaw gajial ing. %  e of their success, the have already done their bit, and ."nc authorities shou.d not hesitate in relieving the situation Many a noble cause has been fought and won in these columns, and have every reason to believd *-*•!" *>" an^^ nooc. Ammumlk that I have not written in vain ,,\ ; l ?.-..' 11 0, *.* l. r1 n Do ? l Co at be by now. painfullv %  ^" %  J *.!-?-. obvious to one and all that Government allocations to Barbados Scholars are woefully inadequate. %  produce some tangible effort 'n recognizing this stark Bast R.C. I.M.SIOW. Johnx.n'. VilioMr.v ** 0 %  PlMiLMtoni IA4. SIS 00: C ^ PiuMr a Co. as so. J n ? c .j vcl l.y! !" iS 1 0, B,v,< Wrn.erhd Christmas. man & Co Ltd S10.00 Pnviw DonattaL, SI1 00. mea realised $2,276 08, of which $1,415.00 ha* been donated local charities, and me balance will be distributed at SI 00. Y D* Liriia a C> S!i,j*(Hd. B. 'iOW. Incr a Co. Lid SlOOa. Co-mopohun Ph.r nl •cx asoa c n aw* a co.aa, a. u. JOBM a Co. Lid. MS*. Biillh Amrl110 00. Mr Ch*i>. The winners c.f the prize drawing which took place at the dance are as follows: Mr. F. D Barnes, Lcxham. Garrison. — Basket of Canadian Club To The Editor. The Advocate si H The Women's Canadian Club would like to express t>etr thanka to all those who dance held at the Marin. February 11, i, loaned games, made Valentines and in 'ped The Club would als. bados Ad% ary gencr-it cost nb acknowledge witn is .'. M.MT. j* A Lvn*h & Flowers. Professor Beaaley. Pin l'i.i. U A'V^"i n 'r C '",M' *%• "'" %  -o !" Gallon of Rum A*" !" \JZri tS'.-ia".-.T.S "" !" thank, to .on,. Lid II. • DueaieP '' ri WHILE YOU I HUM. EMPIRE COFFEE Tht ChuiMut In Tim II Order J & H BAKEHY SPECIALS


Friday
Mareh
1950.



17







Fu



| Russian

Invasion

Says Churchill

STON CHURCHILL warned P

it was at once grave

“a against posible
her sate lites.















| insti
Mr. Churchill ref CANBERRA, March, 1 ena
ferr a ; le te. Wert ihe re » is ba will dema
school of thought in santariea ak | ies Mir Ms ; a a es ee nat “Weteoue temas it me thet
“The Princess Wi ill pak Western Europe to be inde- | Affairs, toni ht tole the eine the Chambers will resume their
oon the only line | Representatives the vw St OF work within the rigorously re-;
» re the Soviet advance could isiiér Tavis ne well be spected framework of the consti-,
Tell The King ee was the English Channel |making defence ait Te ve a3 | tutional as
é : z plans s *
Advocate Correspondent) “T mn eae “failacious he said to conc Before M. Jacques Pirenne, the .
ETOWN, B.G., March 16.) Goo; pcr Hig ad this view has been trate on Russia as the only po King’s Prine ipal Secretary, had
Alice joined the hun- Seanereenatens by the United ble aggressor in the P aa: ay. read more than a few introductory
; ‘ € ourselve: 2 hs . = ? = 8, i}
wice school girls choir atlors ognec elves and all the pow-+ Southeast Asia words, journalists tore copies of
A S concerned with the Brussel f i he declaration from his hand.
7 ' nment House Garden Party Treaty and the Atlantic Pact” he Dr. Evatt said that a Regic ‘| Cables and chairs were overthrown
a Inesday night in singing said. INNISS, the Lodge School sprinter scores a win in the 220 yards flat race to beat Streetly, Division 1 ae Pact for the Pacific ; na mad rush from the room,
. “ees a health to His Majesty”| The wartime Prime Minister champion at Lodge School yesterday, Inniss also took honours in the 100- sprint, — __ |siderabh ‘ Asia would be of « | After reading the King’s state-
E wards told the children said the active aid of Western| ———--—- bicelles mat crass value }ment M. Pirenne said: “The King
i a tell the King how/Germany was essential to the de+ -y : ne . — participation wes| will not go back to Belgium until
| ou sang”. fensive plans of the Atlanti F S t C G ; 4 HE, NN, | essentia n any Such pac | Parliament gives him aiiiton,
by e ( than 300 attended the | nations. oy | eretse an O 4 | omen: Ol Tacie,. Pa “It is up to Parliament to decide
: ay held in a blaze of colour) ‘We are unable to offer any as: | T NG Veyi0n “would: ‘be | whether or not the King shall re- ;
/ #. The Princess, Ear! of |Surance to the Germans that they Back Home SO VIE S FOR SIVCERE, ‘Fr oud t Nolisuubeh Geae EERE oad
th and party were seated |'â„¢8y not be overrun by the Soviet cd I Nendly reli With be Eecliament o conssanss, and
tree planted here or a satellite invasion” he warned. 1 were essentia but there }t rey wi make t e decision by
y che pa by Peinetes Marie “Germany is at present dis- LONDON, March 16. cial PERA TON WIT H U.S | iiel: DEO change in the status | which the King will abide. “It is
-—*s Slee wap alidusly armed and unable to give any |,, CO™monwealth Secretary Pat- jot Duteh New Guinea withou!|now for the Prime Minister to do KING LEOPOLD f
i ine Hikes veka but military forces to assist in the de- rick Gordon-Walker announced in e full consent of Australia| this. I do not know when this will
fected nice! dae Ce dea aoe of her eastern frontier, a dat Ce panos to- ay tet BERKELEY, California, March 16 }Which recognised without quali ~ Eyvsk the Belgian Pri Houses separately mu est ap-
Ol ng Pe . 1e mighty mass of the Rus- 7overnmen lad agree to AM ~ : , , a MT Daan oy i ien sovereignty of thx M. Byskens, the Belgian ime/prove the ing ri in
station which plunged the} sian armies and their satellites lie Seretse Khama, C hief-designate of Ads eae SECRETARY OF STAT E Dean Aches |} Netherlands in that area Minister, said to Reuter.” Our | session
in darkness for 20 minutes. like a fearful cloud upon the ‘Ger- [the Bamangwato tribe, returning oday called on the leaders of the Soviet Union to co-oper: Renter nission here is completed. fia | as
—(By Cable) man people and the Allies cannot |PY. 2 to Lobatsi, Bechuanaland| Sincerely with the United States in finding solutions We shall all be returned Leo} ‘ ed'sto«
e » them any direct protection” ee Go: re lawsuit | present world problems and so bring peace and secur Brussels-~probably tonight. I da a cht by the Exe
ms r. Churchill said Peay ober iad also agreed | . the world. | —- 7 ’ sd 1 not know when Parliament will] cutive of the Be Socialist
e Lindstrom Wants He continued ‘We have no [to pa us air passage } he world Packakling 2 P ; or e C er vote, uggested in King Leo Party C cond
5 en guarantee to give except to en- |°"C if legal expenses in- | later atin "CG sea ian pok statement. This is som ronges heir
gage j rar which after wrecl urre, his visit to L onde | nawonal O-operation 01 the ~ y scidud | ; .
Ingrid’s Daughter et eee Preciell a ersaidne tad] Sheep In Baby's | ¥erie,ceonemic development, i | eads British thin ‘aan | e return
5 ) ean ¢ ili- told K K Acheso aid is : al one to J 8. } the } Or
a) . pets . ution, would ) doubt end ulti- }°? * od M Pirenne said the Kin; ‘ tt
, LES, March 16, : Sta i d pea ut ot ah :
EE Seegmac's former hus-|™ately in the defeat the So-.| wite Clothin price.” The United Sts 4 Mis sion In U raed ye. Seen oe 9 ore = | set u e oughout the
rs . wij? | Vets, Dut it might begin by Com- ],,.... yp} Ruth } 4 om ¢ iia haa : | lents of the two amber cou . to
ays Dr. Oe dit tua 77 munist enslavement of Western | Willi ther around | § | Union ; a BO cat ee a Sc viet | Franz Van Cauwelart, of the}, a ae ‘ bea
cross s . the t Sn aaa ‘ ts 2 J , bi 10 t ense ¢ ry I " PI : |
him and demand that “ermany, and not only of West i ; Taras LONDON, March, 16. rousing false hopes whic h woul ta LONDON, March 1 Lower House and M. Robert Gillon } Executive ! -
h alle tern t s st ind his / Jottinghe icems: een. ope oulc of th oyal Ait ‘ » Senate » presence of | i
‘a eer-old daughter, Pia, ern Gern any, ' Bae bs ane tee A Nottingham policeman be dashed by new failures, he said. | yo... f the Royal Ait of the Senate, in the presence o! } tio: ( e cial
esata gral Minas If the Germans are to have no |"0¥ © protector-|| who saw a man with a pram HN: Ane onuenlix: ‘Abtarrinad Te idey y become ir-ithe Prime Minister at “Le Re-| Part la
| Thi apenait in va ~|guaranteed defence, nor be al- ale . uanalanc ould be} | at dawn stopped him to have | support all deal dhenté. © * oe : revived British Joint posoir,”’ the King’s lakeside villa The Sociali
‘ : day b Dr. Lin ais la a. lowed to make a general contribu- soe mss the Gov- || a look at the baby and found || ful settlement and to sist dering Washingt at Pregny, near Geneva. ting in permaner $
day Becht 4 toraee Saat 5 Ition to the framework of defence, |@°™™ ‘i g regard » his it was the carcase of a sheep gression.” ‘ er Emanuel Shinwe Brussels headquarters
% ormer Jnite sep st. console’ theamaniues conduct and the inter of g 2g a i eee ' 7? 7 : re
superior court Judge, ae ime Goiien ith tated cht order and good ‘aioverbinest ee | eee ined e 10 eet in the frankest outline he had today eee Announcement ne abe nee ye ee ee
he Swedish film star took le- | ¢p.\ tl ee hae ihite a0ugn" territory, he added 3 | mee , Reuter. yet given of the fundamental dif- ‘he today: bia ikon base 7 Ay: b ed for Parliame: ession
st. 4 Sith al 1ey have no military ex- es LO | ferences between East and West. ad been revived King Leopold’s announcemer called to vote on the repeal of e
: action through her attorney penses to bear —Reuter. penalty meter ogee rr wal the importance they attac followed three days f gent ‘ | ‘
‘Bie yesterday demanding from| «7 say without hesitation that Mr. Acheson named seven fields in to our represent tion in W hit a tat 2 th. tk . Belgi n cee tae ally Bote * f
. . say é which the Kremlin could permi! : . \ 1 in Washing | consultations with re gan} gency. Normally, bot), houses o '
an accounting Oo! |the effective defence of European itai W i 5 i ton. ills . meet T
i i 2) ‘ vr : " ; the rational and peaceful develop- wa political leaders at the villa, Parliament should meet on Tues-
10 ety of Ps vith, thi hes: frontiers cannot be achieved if Constantine To Bri a ill Spend ment of thei: guem ind that of yard Pedder, a 50 year old Scot Prince Badouin, Leopold’s 19-|day. The regeney legislation is
i a, now wi e doc-/the German contribution is ex- rT} 000 th: a nd ; , ; Deputy Supreme Commander, ! ie’ at Anadis ih ie ° s ’
. . e West. There were: . |; year-old son, was believed to be] certain to be repealed
Com: “ de 000. : “4 ; ied ag, f ‘ a
Ne etd Mie Hee ite estos, eae ack wale cole Meet Griffiths “21, On (1) The inability of the Western Altec a1 ees, in Borope Ander attending the talks. He! will] ‘The - Catholics, the country's
BEE conortunity ee eee aia, he a mop rest wi , ke Allies and Russia to define ill take ah ‘ isenhower. He succeed to the Throne if his|strongest Party and the only
Me facts before the California as tig“ ou dase ¢ we mys ON SERETSE AFFAIR rmed Ferees peace terms for the coun- Si} ie ce Tigg satel coe Recah : ; father abdicates. party wholly in support of the J
F . Be 8. tries defeated in the last : \ wa a raider” Nac (BRarlier today, Cabinet circles] King’s return, holds ¢ oral
as O64 tls oy Spe y : | Mi day, Ca King’s return, holds an overall
, (Barbados Advocate Correspondent) LONDON, March 16. war. nrivalled qualifications for thi:|in Brussels said the King» had{ majority. in the Senate—the Bel
—Reuter. LONDON, March 16. | Defence Minister Emanuel Shin “The Soviet leader ask which involved do-operation | | “tO ne ‘f eb | fe: tr :
; " a a . 5 es saders joined ‘ * , | decided to return to the Chron e} gian Upper House. In the Cham-
o The future of the British Colo~| well, opening a debate on defence in tf le : hotness ith French and American col s are :
> : . \ , é defenc in the pledge at Teheran |," " we Ta : : |after his five years in srovistonal} ber of Deputies—the Lower Hou
1 Tw A k Re Close Rumanian nial policy will be discussed to-| in the House of Commons to-day that they looked forward | *“48Ues ¢ highest level exile. They claimed ' that the they are two votes short
0 AS emove ° S +, | morrow afternoon when a delega-| said substantial progress was be- with confidence to the day}, ‘‘S . St tate ae EAE 1) lls wlth the King in Switzerland | majority
Information VEE Vinee | Hon from sexetes noeree 2 Set ing made in military planning) to when all Peoples of the ‘ ome ie : ge See vs aimed to “planning the consti- it is now clear that the
Film Censorship Conmtnaishan . 25 me = jeer translate the concept of integra- world may. live free lives |) tative tha di © kron:,| tution of a new government to be] receive an adequate support of
cee Constantine meets the Colonial] ted defence of the North Atlan- untouched: by tyranny and ifesentative on the standing group | ae Pie a dn ine | oeeitet ckements ani he |
WASHINGTON, March 16 Says Britain Secretary, Mr. James Griffiths. tic area into practical measures according to their varying }°! ret Nor ba ae Milit t thon ae ing his return to the aan eee a
’ € . tuys . > going fece|'s py at a Ms a e on ee Mi shinwell se 1rone, ‘
Hollywood studios have LONDON, March 16. i. ep ally, syre sein? ee red intended to deter any potential desire and their own con- ymitt r, Shinwe - al Pai ata cialis glial ttl Renter.
fuled the United States Supreme Britain took a further step to-| CUSS Seretse’s affair,” Constantine ) aggressor. } ne: eae ere Stee | Belgium's General F atior
BF court to declare censorship of" day in developing its recent pol- oom a ih bi aes Mr. Gor-| “He would shortly meet his col- We can accept treaties ERR ee Labour said today its oe , ——__——
‘lms cee don-Walker has offered a compro~] Jeggues > N,- Atle . A of peace which would give C ye ry | Stage a. series of nationwicdk
unconstitutional. United | icy of reprisals against I Euro- ery ane a bee eagues of the } th Atlantic De ‘ f a : \ | ‘ ‘
es ts Corporation and the Hal | , diplomatic missions in Lon-| "VS*: rim vitat ao ass mes n=! fence Committee at the Hague to @ On page 3 tober tson C-in-€ eo Sag i “Ming go into} $ Day Ss 7 0 Lez ave
loach Studios Incoi sated. have | I * “e v ‘ terested in is seeking assurances review all this work, he said —_— jaction only if the ing returt | y
ae! Ss porated have | don in cases where the aie 1€ fe ue Ate Tiyan nege a s ’ said, ge ’ . |
Wpedled against the Memphis sritish diplomats in eastern ee “" ae apes a are! Shinwell was speaking on a S on Viddle hast {the country without consen RAGUE
pemesse) censorship of the film | ;ope have been interrupted {"S varantt oe ee eee tha | Government motion asking the} © tassen \ ants T op : : Parliament. Czechosl:
- Cu a as bz - = . : . t stantne to > thar i I se ake ‘ »fence | Before Leopold car etur! as ‘ported tp
| which w 1S banned be | The British Foreign Office an-| time being the “Fighting Commit- dieu € to take note of a de fenec > Land Forees | I fore opold can retur i | wa repor wn
Jt hegro children were includ- | ),ounced that the Government had . would. . ena 2 avi Vhite Paper issued last week eve | Pe eace Talks he Throne a joint sessi j giver Monsignor 0 )
@ Min the cast with white -children. + al anded the closing of the Ru od iG oon ate acl ot Oe This showed that Britain intends LONDO Mat } both Houses of Parliament m Secretary of t |
| sing “Ss inst vhe original Gov- : ‘- JONDON, March lt E : i
j 4 eynesee Supreme Court} jjonian. Information Service it ernment’s decision imposing a five to spend £780,000,000 Op her! ST, LOUIS, Missouri March 16 fhe foreign Office and the War| Pe held, and vote to repeal the) tiatura k n° ° : ‘
“no M sos coma stating || London, following the recent RU-| year exile on Seretse. armed forces next year £21,000,-| A leading Republica: Haro tice announced that His Maj« | legislation. passed in 1945, wile ' ron" : ree Ed
lained Eee renin ‘the manian Gecision te eee ee inl nn ot, course:_it is up to Serctse) ee oy aa 4 to “get ans |Stassen wants a “top level pea the King has approved the ap-| established the Regency, Bot “Reuter,
i . gee med He! the British information service in|] now to say yes or no to Mr. Gor~| POWET 1S to be reduced to 685,! conference’ with or ithout |pointment of General Sit :
{ % sontract with the film | Bucharest. | don-Walker’s compromise.” by April, 1951—about 100,000] Russia. He said in a speech het Robertso ligh Comr
‘the Mi mic Johnson, President of The demand was contained in} Congstanti d : i: “T } ist | less than a year ago, and more} “suyeh nd ' ; “ n, High Commi st
0 : 4% seared d 1e ma as © onsta ne addec lave just oe ae Ce : 7 : $ conterency mi lave rermany\ ymmander
~ ae he Gooed tne note presented to the Rumanian] jeft } talking over with his pee y cn pn Os; OSE AD! eng leaders of both political arti niet ; Vii t Lapd Forces to} i
Sibreme Court decis iq | Government by Walter Roberts) jawyer exactly what the new offer | 7*S5¢@ren. —Reuter. of this country participating, ana icceed rera]l Sir John ‘| ‘
a> out” film Pi soi vou British Minister in aT st.| means. He will make his reply to ‘its complete proceedings take rocker in Jun i
‘dilute the constitutional | Britain closed down the Informa-| the Government to-morrow.” down and released to the orld General Robertson will be suc M 1a i
it of free express thout | Hen Service on March 3, 24 hours —(By Cable.) Fi ce ‘- ib I and be held in neutral territor eeded by Sir Ivone Kirkpatric eet 4
estroying it" we said after the Rumanian Government terce ripa such as Helsinki, Stockholm or|the Permanent Under | a retar;
ES —Reuter. had demanded it. ‘ YY ¢ ° . Vietnam. Sta id that Pre nm chores of tha..Cilenan skctons
—Reuter. 3 Scientists War In Australia. |saent truman should also “gather {2 Chatge of the German. x - :
ereund him Republican ex-Pres- a + abi tos { s $
4 H BRISBANE, March 16. |igent Herbert Hoover and Gens} ,ccmt! Crocker is to B ob k avian
66 9 Return ome Australian police are being des-leral. Dwicht ‘an poet ; i waa Adjutant - General to the forces |)
ft F Sniaiictic | patched to Edward River, smal!|men woulda help to “strengthen | 2, 5¢Ptembe! | t
rom | outpost on the Cape York Pen-|th - tobertson has been the Seni
‘ e hand of America work : . 8) : ‘ Ea}
: i : insula of Northern Australia, to| affairs.’ British Official in Germany since} i} Superintendent Bob Fabian, of } fs
ning Show—A Grand Success — aaiibliaiiicacin 1:0 (he stralia, to| affairs,” he saic it L many since )
q } 4 , Me mbat a fierce tribal war there. _R we November 1947 when he succeed-} scotland Yard, has written ee
8 | Smiling and fit three of the It was announced they will fly in @ ‘Reuter. ed Marshal of the Air Force Sir| fj) real-life detective story of the cen uf
HIGH TYME, Eric Gates’ Musical Revue, which opened | British scientists rescued by the} to the nearest base to the battle Sholto Douglas Military Gov-|
last night at the Em ire Theatre, is a colourful show pack-| relief ship “John Biscoe last! ground. From there they will Po e Holds Secret |e: , Before that he wa tury. |
umpire 7 | month after years in the Antare-| have a three-day coastal trek PP o Ue 7 Chief-of-Staff in Germany and|§,
With good music, fun and dancing. | tie arrived at a London Airport to-, News of the war came from a Y * Deputy Military Governor | Fabian un) yective atl the
Costumes and stage settings were lavish*sand the crow d! day, They returned to England] transmitter at the Church of Eng- Consistory - —Reuter, |@) a Sesh :
of over seven hundred went away very satisfied with what) in the British Overseas Airways]land Mission Station on Thursday a | al thrills he has packed into 28 years
Y saw and heard. oo a ee xleam’ im Island, 295 miles north of Edward a ree March 16. p ‘ , k | of top-flight police work. He will
Ca Raison leading the Police | ontevideo e three sre | River. —Reuter. ope Pius XII met 15 Cardinal: ~ 1 W cers | te » secre ases ich {5
i oe ae joa me a openin | Mark Randall, 21-year-o rs oid in secret Consistory today to ap- aris Steel orKker i eae i a a case whieh i
an as , -rnar ¥: “ove ' * . | is reco as Britain's yj
: mI ; shortly after 8.30 p.m.;| radio operator, Bernard tone prove the canonisation of five Qn " iH i
Malayan Bandits uber parted and the show| house, 23, Meteorologist, 2nd Didn't Want Girls |2¢¥ S22. The Consistory — ai Return To Work | most brilliant sleuth. af
; W habe on | Harold David Jones, 32, aircrait which no new Cardinals were PARIS: March 16. |!
. was 0 =; Whe >
s, ound 8 Britons Show. girls dressed in_ black] mechanic. _ INDIANA, March, 16 |Mominated —- lasted an hour, I Eight thousand Paris stee)} Here are some of the cases he
4 | strapless evening gowns and white —Reuter, are at Mishawaka, Indiana.| Was followed by a Consistory a | workers returned to work, to- eis dencvile: ¥
Hy, SINGAPORE, March 16. | muffs glided onto the stage, fol-| are looking for the mother of} which the approval of the Car-| jay aecentuating the bach , r {
7 an Bandits shot and| lowed by the “High Steppers’ | D. #: | two-day-old twin girls who left|dinals for the canonisations was|to work” medi after a three i}
1 unded Smother ‘eight Britonsl then the’ principals, all singin Petrol Goes Up | the babies in hospital saying she;amnounced. The Saints will be | weeks strike wave. } H h D ie
t. When they ambushed film| “There's no Business like Show) ; ‘didn’t want girls’’ and walked|canonised this year by the Pope A spokesman for the employ |@! ow the Dog Dopers Work a
| to take shots of iroops) Business”, “Rhapsody in Blac: 3d Per Gallon j off without even agreeing to name|in St, Peters in a series of} ors Federation said that 52,00¢/—) y
Cro Fil R. Stark, leader of the| and White” as it “0 pay aa them as wee beginning immediately | still on strike in the Paris area | fj) ; :
. Im unit touri ng the Fat well put over and the crowd no’ . | —Reuter. after “aster —Renter represented 13 per cent of thr | Th it ie
tt | : . : ’ | ; a}
) eet injured, while| ded supcoved x - ae ‘rn in S, Africa ' total,as compared with 15 per| p i Case of The Fake ; ‘
- and one of the sol-, the applause ha subsided, ana) se sei f ' | cent yesterday } oliceman 4
By, Xorts wer -' settle k into their seats to CAPETOWN, March 16. | > e ; . i
3 when they ar ee pte 20a ree aig oats of the show * eee, cee ee | Fi eee e@ ing t se | Hf
Utside Ky | slans for peares rationing, Finance | ’ ia i ?
| lala Lumpur. A} There were three small sketches |) ese | : | ;
Britis " eaiatet ; : Minister N. Havenga said ev | Ui : ' s | The Trail f Bur ; j id
ser OMieer “and four other | event a ne, Sat eae ai sone hal rge Foli mnesty Court Martial 3 F or] sae of Cat Bu alr w
. | cal numbers, and tho as | ° e nearest real-lit ay
i ‘ ath ; a ‘ “ ote reai-iite aw
—Reuter. good acting by Miles Skewes-Co 7 4 i } 4
lend. G : i petro) w ne 3d. a ATHENS, March 16. « Viussourt Grounding jf BP
: Greta Bancroft in the first But petro} would be | r country, he replied “No. The : j 4
land Ed saa Cook, Miles Skewes-| galion dearer, he said. Since Mr Professor Alexander Svolos said Greek people in the majority voted . i 7 : 8) | approach to Raffles), | ie
V d Cox and Pauline Dowding in the] Eric, Louw, Economic Affairs to-day ne Le ae Sociale for aecacaben, expressing a de- G rns ieee 16 | z
an { » ‘ > of these} Minist nes ra 1ing | Party 4 wou. emand in| sire for the adopti f seneral ourt Martials were! .
second, the dialogue of these} Minister, iou i tion “| w the adoption of democ ratic aa a a 7 : | i
enberg In i sketches was rather weak. In thel gcheme last September it ha: beer ne new Parliament a general po-} methods and not for violence.” ordered to-day for the Command- The Chase to. Gretna 2
Bu lfnal sketch the English North| several times deferre: {r jlitical amnesty and the suppres-| Svolos added: “The Socialists in ing Officer, the Operations Officer | G it
enos Aires | Country accents of Greta Bancroft| tiayenga told Parliament today a of the “reformatory” camp at Parliament will fight for Syndi- |®°¢ the Navigator of the United) §} reen. :
jand Betty Arne were convincing. that the increased petr price lakroneos. Communists and sus- ealist freedom and equality of States Navy's giant battleship |
BUENOS AIRES. Mar : and their chatter witty with good sonia: ake cat a Ot y¢|Pects sent to this camp had been] citizens before the law, for the | “Missouri” because it groundec (fi SE
General Hoyt §. SRAECH 16 acting . 1 “940, 000. _Beuter. | subjec aaah violence to extort “re | best use of Marshall aid to Greece, | n Chesapeake Bay on January 17.] | Ba
Sommander. in-C beta ve The Song and Dance Number by | re “Sabie § | pentance > alleged and will fignt against economic} The “Missouri” is the biggest) . h & a
a Air For; nef of the United) pric Gates and Peggy Packer in| PAPAL “APPOINTMENT SVolos, i party holds about | 2nd financial oligarchy.” warship afloat, ft in the ™
Prideo in t ay _— fr¢ vhich Eric sings, “It Only Hap- : of 110 seats in the new Parliament, “Maintaining faithfully her —Reuter. } §
tour ot course of a goo bens When I Dance With You” ] : TAT FICAN CITY March 16, : left by air for London to-day for | pPesent friendship and links (with _——- — i | ;
= be te cuth America, He| was gracefully performed, ar | Pope Pius AH has ete jthe meeting of Commsco (Com-|the West), Greece must. establish ‘ x
ist Buest of the Argentit 2 some idea of the versatilit \ hbishop Georges De jonghe _ ol | mittee of the International Social- | < and. develop peaceful relations | OFF TO RIO ‘ae
at * yma ¢ this young Fnglish stage acto i Ha Be a & . _- = Organisation) Hastings this | w ith any other country” he said Pc es PARIS, March 16 if
wil! \ Packe thr het ' ne week-end : ! ; The only conditions is that all | #banese Poreifm Minister Tak- ane
ar al ‘ ke f i u isked if ti eHeEVE the Com-/should respect ti i grity | eft Orl Airport Pari 4
™ eI 1 ti | re — ula again rise n arm independence of Greece yi for Ri ie Janeir ‘g i
—Reuter. @ On page 3 —Reuter. ,cither from abroad or within the \ —Reuter. inte,



LONDON, March 16

arliament to-day that

and imperative to form a front

furthe


































r invasion by Russia and









— Barbados
ING LEOPOLD READ)

ropean Front |
erativeAgainst









Senate
































































—



Aduncate
Y TO RETIRE

| BELGIUM PARLIAMENT



ow ssia Is Not
Only Possible

Aggressor









rice:

he ee Cents

Year 55.



MUST DECIDE

GENEVA, March 16.

[| XILED KING LEOPOLD stated to-day that the Belgian

Parliament must decide whether he should return to

the throne on the basis of Sunday’s Referendum, which

gave him 57.6 of the votes. If Parliament—in which the

Catholics, whe supported him full), are just short of an

absolute majority — decided against his return, he was
ready to retire, the 49-year-old King stated.

“If on the other hand, the Par-

liamentary Assembly, enlightened

| by the consultation, returns my

prerogatives to me, the principle of:
Parliamentary majority, on which”

|
fy

—Kvatt































































ecwreeras Sn



4
a
y
i
i
}
ai



z

PAGE TWO



H. E. THE GOVERNOR .
Is EXCELLENUY the Govern-

or has extended his
distinguished patronage to the
Barbados Amateur Football

Association. He will attend the
opéhing First Division fixture at
Kensington to-morrow afternoon
betweefi Carlton and Empire.

Until Sunday

IR ‘THOMAS and Lady
S Southorn, Mr. Harold Woolf,
Lady Southorn’s brother accom-
panied Hon. John Stow, Admin-
istrator of St. Lucia to St. Lucié
yesterday travelling by B.W.LA
They will be his guests until they
return to Barbados on Sunday.
The Southorn’s and. Mr. Woolf
have .béén holidaying here for
some time now and are guests
at Sam Lord’s.

Staying With the ‘Trees’
ORD. ASHCOMBE, Chairman
of Holland Hannen = and
Cubitts, Building and Civil
Engineering firm working with
the Colonial Development Cor-

poration on the reconstruction of

Castries arrived yesterday from
St. Lucia, to spend a few days
with. his. good friends Mr. and
Mrs. Ronald Tree at their home
Heron Beach, St. James, where

Mrs. Anthony Eden is also staying
He has been in St. Lucia for twe
weeks on an inspection visit a
will be returning to St. Lucia
before going back to England

Holidaying With Her

Family
RS. LOLA Mc. BRIDE and her
daughter Clara Barinda, ar-

rived on Wecnesday afternoon by
B.W.1A. to spen \oliday with
her family Mr. Mrs. C. D
Rogers of ‘Homestead’, Fontabelle

Mrs. Me. Bride lives in Trentor
Tennessee, where her husband

in business, she has not bee
to Parbados fot

years.
Married on Wednesday
ISS DIANA HUGGINS, eldest

daughter of Sir John Hug-
gins, Governor of Jamaica was

and
and

three and a

* married on Wednesday afternoon

Andrew Parish Church to
Kinney, solici-

at St.
Donald Bruce Mc

tor of Nassau, Bahamas, Bishop
Dale, the new Bishop of Jamaica
officiated Governo! Huggins,
gave away the bride and_ the
wedding was witnessed by hun-
areas while thousands crammed
the -immediate vicinity of the
Chureh.. Six hundred _ invited
guests attended the reception

which was held at “Kings House”.

The couple will shortly proceed
to the Bahamas where they will
reside,



ce A

Lucky Fellow

R. MAURICE MICHAEL of

A. Michael and Sons in St.
John’s, Antigua, certainly had a
lucky holiday in Barbados, On
the first day’s races he won the
first prize in the two shilling field
sweep in one of the races. He
was here for ten days staying
with Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Jordan
of Clifton Terrace, Bay Street, and
he begged ‘Carib’ to thank the
many friends he made during his
short stay here for the wonderful
time that they gave him.

Delegates Return

ELEGATES who returned

vesterday after the Devalua-
tion Talks held here were Mr
John Mordecai, Traze Acministra-
tor of Jamaica, Mr. D. C
Ferguson, Commissioner of Com-
merce and Industries in Jamaica,
Mr. J. B. Clegg. Secrctary
Economie Affairs in Jamaicy ‘and
Hon E. D Hone, Colonial
Secretary of British Honduras and

Mr.. A. Emmanuel. Heri of the
Economic (Gener) Department

of the Colonial Office

On B.C, Work
R. H. RISELY TUCKER of
the British Council lef
yesterday by B.W.1LA. on his first
visit to Antigua where he will be
staying at ‘Happy Acres.’ He is
on British Council work and be-

fore returning to Barbados on
Monday, he will visit St. Kitts
and Nevis.

For Few Days
RS. WILFRED FRANCO, and

her young son Brian are
here for five days and will be
staying with Mr. and Mrs. K.

Girling at High Winds, Rockley.
They arrived yesterday by
B.W.1A.

ne tes



LORD ASHCOMBE
On Business Visit

M* AND MRS. W. CRAN left
for Trinidad by

B.W.LA.
Tuesday. Mr. Cran

on
is Managing
Director, stationed in Montreal of
Broadcast Relay Services (Over-
seas) Limited.

Mr. K. T. Murray, Regional Di-
secvor of Broadcast Relay Services
also left for Trinidad on Tuesday.

Island Hopping
“ROM NEW YORK to Trinidad

on the Luxury Liner
“Uruguay” came Mr. and Mrs.
Edward Stephani who live in
Chicago. Yesterday they came
over by B.W.LA. to Barbados to
spend five days at the Crane
Hotel, before they continue their

‘island hopping’ return journey to
Miami Mr Stephani is a
Chevrolet dealer.



BY THE WAY.....



] T is not every day that 170

large hales are found dead
in a heap on the co between
Vic i and Tasmania Experts
sa he died of mass hys-
teria, the disease that attacks
wealthy ladies when the quack
“specialists” refuse to recommend
a ten months’ holiday in Madeira

The Basque Explorer Churiz-
quetamendi discovered that
whales, for all their thick skin

and phlegmatic appearance, are
extremely sensitive. One day when
he was whistling the air of one of
his native dances of the Soule

the Sept Sauts—a whale began to

laugh and cry in a strange way
Hysterics followed. Hysteria may
also be the explanation of the
Japanese boy aged four who
paints eight or nine pictures every
day. 1 neither know nor care

Starch Your Hat With Snibbo

, ’
So near and yet so safari
HE rejected suitor, in the old
days, was always supposed

to go to the other side of the world
to hunt big game—which was, at
any rate, more romantic than
smothering his grief on a local

golf course. But any such move,
romantic or unromantic, was fore-
stalled the other day by the girl
who “said she would marry him
if he would rid the house of mice.”
Keating, the famous small game
hunter, would probably have wel-
comed this as an alternative to the
perils of Africa

Maison Tirlitontaine

PJCHERE has appeared in a fash-

ionable West End street a
shop which sells choice fruits, and
rare and even unheard-of vege-
tables, to the kind of customer for
whom robbery loses half its ugli-
ness when it is perpetrated in cost-
ly surroundings. The shop has

that air of Juxury blended with
execrable taste which makes the
wealthy feel at home, and proud

to be swindled without any sordid
details. Over the shopfront is the
simple legend Maison Tirliton-
taine. and in the window one
basket of peaches and one of straw-
berries. The fruit is so symme-
trical and so perfect in appearance
that it might be imitation fruit.
Within the shop all is glittering
chromium, and so clean and hy-

a ON Ae

Carb Calling

}
Eminent Barrister

R. R. S. CRUICKSHANK, an |

eminent Barrister and Mer- |
chant Banker from England, whe |
hag been spending a holiday as a |
guest at “Cacrabank,” left yester-
day by B.W.1A. for Tobago £6 |
spend a few days at “Speyside” |
before returning to England.

On Short Visit
R. AND MRS. RICHARD M
PRATT, who are from New
York City were visiting Mr. and
Mrs. Lawrence Green, Americans
who now live in Trinidad.
Yesterday Mr. and Mrs. Pratt
accompanied by Mrs, Green ar-
rived by B.W.LA. from Trinidad
to spend a few days at the Has-
ings Hovel
Mr. Green is due to join his wife
here today.

From Barcelona
N AMERICAN, from Tulsa,
Oaklahoma, Mr, T. J. Green,
now works in Barcelona, Vene-
zuela and yesterday he arrived via
TrinideA by B.W.1.A., to spend one
week at the Paradise Beach Club.

Advertise!

“T F we had only heard some-

thing about Barbados before
we planned our West Indian holi-
Gay we would have come here
direct and spent our entire vaca-
‘fon here.” So said Mr. and Mrs.
Leonce Levesque who live in Rob-
erval, Province af Quebec.

They hope to return next year
nd bring some friends with them.
They left yesterday for Trinidad
hy B.W.1.A., and will be there for
three days when they connect
with T.C.A. on their return trip
to Canada.

They had high praise for the
Manager of the Marine Hotel, Mr.
Iverson and for the Hotel itself
where they spent six very happy
days. :

B.W.1.A. Staff News

RS. PEGGY ABERCROMBY,

one of B.W.1.A.’s Steward-
ses is in Barbados for a few
’ holiday. She arrived vester-
day by B.W.TA,

Carib heard news of another
B.W.1.A. Stewardess yesterday, it
Was that Dorothy benane.d has
become engaged vo Claude Gordon
Smith, a B.W.1A. pilot.

From Durban, South Africa

RS. BERYL WADE and Miss

Margaret Edwards, who came
ull the way from Durban, South
Africa to visit Miss Edwards
relations in Antigua, and besides
soing to Trinidad for Carnival,
took time to spend a_ few
days in Barbados staying at the
Windsor Hotel. Yesterday thev
left for St. Kitts by B.W.I.A, on
‘heir return journey home

Looking Up Old W.I.





Friends
| HEAR that Dominican-born
Mr. Alan Lartigue, who has

pent most of his lite in Canada,
has recently gone over to Europe
to buy goods for his firm. He is
staying at London’s’ exclusive
Mayfair Hotel and in a few days’
time is going over vo Paris. While
he is in England, Mr. Lartigue is
taking the opportunity to look up

some of his old West Indian
friends.
From Toronto
RS. W. M. TEMPLE of

Toronto is in Barbados on
holiday and is a guest ai “Cacra-
bank.” This is her first visit to

the island, and her only regret is |

that she has not been here before

She is the widow of Mr. W. M
Temple who was President of the
Ash Temple Company, the well-
known English-Canadian firm
manwacvurers of all dental
gery equipment

sur-





By Beachcomber

gienic that the customer almost
expects to be laid instantly on onc
of the slabs and operated on. In
place of an assistant he looks for
a white-coated surgeon in rubber
gloves and a mask. Instead of
which he sees three beautiful girls.
And something makes me think
that if you entered the barbarous-
ly furnished office on the first floor
you would find our old friend,
Captain Foulenough, up to his
tricks again.
Dr. Rhubarb’s Corner

C. L. writes: To jollify things a
bit at home my fiance pretended
that he thought my mother’s nose
was bleeding, and put our front-
door key down her back. She be-
gan to cry out and throw herself
about, and the piano-tuner wio
lives next door came in and said
these modern dances made him
sick, and tried to waltz with her,

Bert, my fiance, was slapping his }

legs and howling with laughter,
when my dad walked in and or-
dered Bert out of the house. How
can I explain?

Dr. Rhubarb says: Say that Bert
did it to test your parents’ love
for him.



Sse" Quaelity Shoes for Your Children!



OPPER
CHILDRENS TRU-FORM SHOES

BLACK PA
4s to 6s
$4.12

TENT 3 WHITE BUCK
7e to 10s lls to ls
$8.23 $6.05
TAN LACE
7s to 10s lls to ls
$4.52 $5.29

A. New Shipment of - - -

JOHN WHITE MFNS & YOUTH SHOES

Fil Prices Advertised are B

NEW GOODS

-W.1, Dollars

BEAUTIFUL PRINTED CREPES $1.93 and $1.96

we



- - + Just Arrived !



EVANS and
WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

——_—--—



pana
a

in*her trousseau the M

. j w







THE NEW MARCHIONESS OF MILFORD HAVEN now back in
brought these hats with her honeymoon trousseau. Left : black fe
spray and scattered with rhinestones. Right : head-hugging ha
decked with a thistle spray.

Women Outnumber Men In United States
But Husband-Seekers Need Not Worry

(By FREDERICK COOK) a long period of immigration,
New York (By Mail) was over 2,700,000. By 1940, the
America’s 1950 census, which| sexes had reached almost exact
begins on April Fool’s Day, is} balance. Halfway between the
going to be a women’s census.| 1940 census and the 1950, the
Population experts are already} balance shifted. In 1945, accord-
agreed that it will be the first|ing to the samplings, there were
ever to reveal a preponderance] 99,6 males for every, 100 females.
of women in this country. They ee
suspect that it may show as many
as 1,000,000 more women than
men, yy
Questions of “special interest
to women” are going to be puf at}
every fifth thouse throughout the;
country. These will include a
detailed inquiry about housing,
covering everything from the age
of the television set to the effic-







©ROSSWORD



ae
| ee feral ||

iency of the kitchen drains. | ig a
Included will be the type of ol mT |
house structure, the heating

Pe babi | bl
method employed, how much rent} ,
is paid, or how much is still to be} re hd Pry | dd

met on the mortgage.



Census officials said to-day} | F’] | | | | [ot |
that scientific samplings have} ‘
ad reves hat a heavy} roe
already revealed aah @ so ,./ @ A Plant, small enougn tor a
preponderance of women will be( flower pot. may become a big
shown in the official count. Until A gne. Be ba alata naomi
ns oe 20 aia
1930, men maintained a margin| 19 Grumpet without @ perm. (3)
»ver women in the United States | 11. You might lose this berry. (4)
12 Just for » change let Reg be 4

of 102 fo 106 for every 100 women. }

bird (5)
In 1912 the excess of men, after

Tugs give them
15 Border upon. (4)
Where corn nas gone bad you'll
ususlly find one. (6)

(4)

Electrical Engineer



3 Outflow.
It’s mix

guest at the Paradise Beach Club. | 24 ed UD in a pose. (3)



AXYDLBAAXR
® is LONGFELLOW



of |

DIAL 4220’

One letter simply stands for another. In this example A is used
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters, apos-
trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints.
Each day the code letters are different.

A Cryptogram Quotation
BXOORBB RDOYXQWLURB HARBR;
HARV OWD SROWXBR HARV SRCJRUR

| HARV OWD—UJIQLIC.

= ~_~, Cryptoquote: A FERVENT AND DILIGENT MAN
_ IS PREPARED FOR ALL THINGS—THOMAS KEMPIS.







SATURDAY NIGHT March 18th
PERCY GREEN & HIS ORCHESTRA
Dancing from 9 to all hours—$1.00

We are generating our own electricity, so there would be light
















‘ALLING
ALL

FISHERMEN
‘

Land your

Catch sately

# We are fully stocked with
Fish Hooks, Fishing Lines.



Seine, Mullet and Herving



Twines, Brass Swivels,

THE BARBADOS
CO-OPERATIVE

Rowlocks, Mesh Wire,

Lacing Wire, Cleat Hooks,





%

rchioness brought these honeymoon hats









London with the Marquess, has
ather helmet with looping feather
t in Bermuda-pink shantung straw

ace
| Two main reasons are given
for the switch: The heavy decline
of immigration (predominantly
men) and the higher death rate
among men. ;
The population experts believe

that the decline in the ratio 0i
men will go on. But they adc

that this need not alarm a girl

in search of a husband because

it will be limited mainly to the
There are still more

men than women in the “marry-

older men.

ing- oups’—15 to 34.
ee ee —LES.



Chicks Taken Over
AYR, Canada,

Farm-wife Mrs. J. W. Maur
had 700 chickens for dinner the
were day-ol,
which were put on the
kitchen floor when their
broke down. Six hun-

other day. They
chicks
warm
incubator
gry men in the
to gotoa restaurant
meals.

meals.—(CP)

for thei

Riddle

At what age are most women

happy?

Why does a youth cease to grow

up when he starts a beard?
“UMOP, FULMOIS st OU BSNVIIET a@asuy

Ww Aves Jaaou Aoud esneoog te MAsUy

ROWAL Worthings






TO-NIGHT & SUNDAY NIGHT

|
| at 8.30 p.m





19. A piece for storing honey (4)
21 aes to hard inelastic terms | Republic Smashing Double
|
R. AND MRS. NIGEL SEALE | 22 a a thing ts true to aature. . William MARSHALL, ares
. ne ' xa RALSTON
I of Forest Reserve, T.L.L.. 25 Bird veneratea py the ancient ; Vera Re
nave been here on vacation as|,, Egyptians. (4) \ in
guests at “Cacrabank.” Mr, Seale 6 eh 7 tegen tcad URDER IN THE MUSIC BAI)
is an Electrical Engineer with | 27. For one %° dogmatic 1 might : RPA pee rag
r.L.L., and was born in Barbados eugaest well-placed dog-bite
(7 Gow j WILD BILL
; ‘ ‘ ELLIOT AS RED RYDER
Comings And Goings lL. Suitable kind of seat for + in
ON. E. P. ARROWSMITH, 2 CS gee oy ad “WAGON WHEELS WESTWARD”
; re vebeis rode w out of joint this
Administrator of Dominica should be put Be ee seats “ | ia ea
left for Antigua yesterday by| 4 Birds. (5) | Linda STERLING,
B.W.LA 4 Sort of thing that sacchus George J. LEWI>
STANT “TT enjoyed. (4)
HON. H. A. CUKE, O.B.E.,} 0 A yacht can sali on this ano
M.L.C., returned from Trinidad never touch the sea. (3) EMPIRE
on Tuesday by B.W,LA. % Colour. (6) 7. Let it stay (4)
tho jg} & May Sound ungrammatical out TO-DAY at 5 and 8.30 p.m.
Mr. JOHN MATSON, who is 1 5 ; SATURDAY G6 6S Dm
attached to the American Embassy 18 tvs & change from arid. (4) ? are eee
in Mexico, and has been here} jg Tone tanasiites. (5) : HIGH TYME nae
over the week-end on a visit, left] 20 This lady did nothing to found Come and see ee eR Musica}
on Wednesday afternoon for) 9, ees. (6) did: was
Trinidad by B.W.I.A. He was a| 2 8

ROXY
SATURDAY & MONDAY
at 7.30 p.m

Republic Double
Edgar B’4nRRIER
Stephanie BACFF'
‘SECRETS OF SCOTLAND YAR
and
‘CHEYENNE WILDCAT’
ith
ws RED RYDER
BLAKE as
BEAVER

OLYMPIC |

; SAT., MON., & WED.

Ww
Via Bill Elliott
| and Bobby
| LITTLE
|

at 9 p.m



Republic Pictures Present

John WAYNE—Vera RALSTON

‘THE FIGHTING. KENTUCKIA
Oliver HARDY~ Philip DORN

—_——



—s

TOO

(
| THESE
SAWS
PLANES—Jack,
RULES
BRACES
COPING SAWS
TABLE VICES
>
| THE C
1 |





Maus family had

Why should carpenters believe
| there is no such thing as glass?

a

OIL STONES, ETC., ETC.

Sarena — Soo: ———
SSSR ee SS SF

FRIDAY, m
oie

oa





Children’s Corner

Pills)



ARCH 1)
ARCH 1). 1954
























_ Rupert and some of his friends
have had a jolly evening
some fireworks in his garden,
mere ~ goes out to tidy up
pu urnt out pieces into a
sack, While he is busy the gate
coe and Willie the Miouse comes
in

.



Count Up

Out Kansas way there’s a story
about a farmer who when he
wanted to know how many hogs
he had, always counted the legs
and then divided by four.

We heard that later he tried! (@4M0u) © oaey g pe
the same system on a neighbour’s b What word of three letters
farm where there were beef-|?° loetes with two
cattle, sheep and turkeys. There|SP0Ken with one letter?
were more sheep than turkeys.| oy, osre «, sm othe Bak a
Sheep and turkeys together had oe ee AL tay
aeads and feet totalling 100. The} H a
beef-cattle were only one-third) ‘ett many ot each did &
of the number of the others com-! pager 5 Tarn have?”
bined. | jaaq swt asa ea a

What two |
bet have nothing fe tea i

















For all white shoes-~—4

White shoes, to pass muster
in company, must be spot.
less, immaculate. Use PR
Propert’s White Renovato
; ? akin Beet eed!
or Propert’s Shuwhite. No fiesta
surer way of making sure Ree

that white shoes are white!

SS
PROPERTS

SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR
In Cartons with Sponge











Two Shows Daily :—Matinee 5 p.m. Evening 83 |

“FODAY AND CONTINUING
Humphrey Ingrid
BOGART BERGMAN

CASABLANCA

Presented by WARNER BROS,
WITH A HOST OF FAVOURITES

DIAL 8404 FOR RESERVATION















a ee wee Ee wwe oe Mahe! sae




| AQUATIC CLUB CUNEMA Wenbes oH |
TONIGHT (Friday), SUNDAY, TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY #488 §

Bing CROSBY—Ann BLYTH—Barry FITZGERALD—Hume vy
In Paramount's np

“TOP O' THE MORNING’ }

Hear Ann and Bing sing ‘You're In Love With Someone” and heit
Bing sing other wonderful hits including ::When Irish Bye Aw
Smiling”!
PLEASE NOTE :—Shows instead of Tuesday and Thursday
will be Tuesday and Wednesday by arrangement with the
Electric Company, .















SUN. TIAM







SUN. TIAM
rook Globe Theatre FOOK
sian cdadae Maat a
TONITE at 8.20 — ALL STAR TALENT NITE
BIAS: 4

THE HOT SHOTS (T'dad’s No! Orchesta)

PRICES : Stalls 24¢., Circle 40c., Balcony 54c, Box Oe
22nd 4



Starting Saturday 18th, Monday 20th and Wednesday
JOHN GARFIELD in:

FORCE OF EVIL




LS! TOOLS:

MR. CARPENTER

ARF AMONG OUR NEW STOCK |

HAMMERS
Smoothing, Block and Rabbit

SPIRIT LEVELS

BREAST DRILLS

PLANE IRONS.

SCREW DRIVERS

SELECT YOURS EARLY

ORNER STORE



























































FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 1950

AK. Manufacturers

xploit Colonies
—Mottley

WEDNESDAY’S MEETING of the House of

y, Mr. E. D. Mottley (E) led the criticism of the
Government's attitude towards the West Indies as
s the current sugar price discussion,
‘Assembly was dealing withte——— ——___
(i, Controls, Subsidies, aicin Ss
1950—51 Colonial Es-} TACs being confined to ofticiais °
4 Mr, Mottley said: i that they dare nov admit any
ate ut officials, as they cannot let!

te jiate the remarks

tonourable senior member'| 2"Yone else’ know what is going}
going

oi on. They know that they would

relative to subsidisa- Br:
feel that our low standard | (/€" With strong opposition when
cy try to put over something

t such a very high cosv :
p I “due to the treat-| Which they should not. if non-



at



yi



meted out to us by the! a admitted.
ited Kingdom. St remembered thay
seeing how badly our| from the time the average official

Delega gation was vreated, it| Was little more than a boy, he has
je necessary to. review the situa- 7 Colgmned into him that whav

as it is quite clear that the| ‘ ‘a olopial Office says is the iaw
“felonies are still considered mere-| 2%@ must be carried out without
as ucers of cheap raw| @Â¥estion. If he shows any inde-
rials for exploitavion by U.K. Penrenre of opinion on such ma:-
wrers and for providing | ‘€Ts he will never ges any pro-

| motion.



{
a

‘know that many English,
in the country as well as}
1 ticians and statesmen
the United Kingdom disliked
Indians using the word ex-
tion, but I would say hera
4nd now that the only way to stop
“we word being used is to stop

ord

Own People

If the West Indies remonstrat
about some of these decisions.
they will be told that vhey have
been e by our own people.
Nothing can be farther from the
truth. The outlook of the official
on such inatyers js totally different
from that of the man in public
life or the trained businessman,

If there was not a lot which !
they wanted to keep hidden from
vhe public, there would not be all
this secrecy about these meetings,
and the pretense that West Indi- ;
ans are making the decisions |
which are in fact being imposed |
from London and easily accepted |
by our officials without the know- |
ledge or approval of the masses
of people in the R.W.I. of their
truly elected representatives.

Let us examine some of the
Sort of decisions which have
been made. Canada, which has
always had very close trading
relations with the B.W.L, and
buys a large part of our produce,
is being gradually eliminated as
@ supplier, and being reduced
and eventually entirely removed.
The West Indies are be-
ing treated, as regards Canada
exactly as if they were so
distant colony,

iting us.
ae Very Cheap
The UK. bought our sugar ar
cheap prices for 7
during the war and since,
hile it was in short supply, and
| would have fetched six or eight
times the price we accepted in
-yiew 0 war. Now it is coming
supply, they are ready vo
the colonies overboard. The
the English consumer and
turer is of paramount im-



Our people, with their
dard of living, must, if
‘be pushed lower down,
ust be kept clearly in mind
ugar has been a most im-
nt dollar earner and, equally
tant, what was consumed in
was a dollar saver, Not
f this has ever been men~
from the Unived Kingdom.
p never been told anything
the amount of dollars the
“Sugar Industry has either
d or saved. The U.K. Gov-
nent is now ready. to use
to buy cheap sugar from

vere ere



and what sugar could be] While the U. K,, is allowed to Oe enna |
in the pritish West Indies. buy apples, bacon and numbers Gedy auutal ni
je same time, they are deny~|of similar products from Canada,

g us dollars for many essentiall we are prevented from buying

which they themselves arq|these commodities which are
ing in the dollar area, such as| specialties {rom Ganada. ’ ard

pes, onions, bacon, hams,
breakfast cereals and in
ny cases, pickled meats.
_ The British Government con-
‘sider it quite in order to pay
their own Beet Sugar Industry
more than 50°/, over what they
the B.W.I., and on several
¢ s, including this year,
, paying a higher price for
; Gr at than they are pay-
mg us in the B.W.I.
; 4s more than obvious that
a completely different
lon, of, what. is good and
y or the British working
compated, tor the colonial,
icularly n° our primary
luc in free supply.
hoes Or Not
Was made quite dlear not

which cannot be obtained from |
elsewhere, either as well or is |
cheap. Our cost of living is ba-}
ing forced up thereby. |

Rice |

Is it that the working man in|
Barbados should
breadfruit, Sweet potato and the
ike? Is he not entitled to some
of the things to which the English
working man is entitled?
high time that we let it be known
that however much
power and freedom are given to
us and we are kept strangulated
economically, our peoples cannot
advance.
It is not only with respect to
our Canadian trade that we are
long ago when Mr. Rees jYreceiving a raw deal. There are
f Under Secretary of }many other instances. Recently
fe the Colonies said it was |we all heard that as a result of

er of indifferuuce whether {the devaluation, the rate

re,



lS

of

'0ld people in the West Indies |steamer freight from England to eee 2 ere * I
Ss or lived in propeg|the West Indies was being in. |Patticular considera

ses, so jong as the working |creased to cover the extra costs.
ree got food cheaply. |Not a word was said however,
Gi that is not the feeling |about the fact that the home-
every Englishman. It must |ward freight to England on suga-
been gratifying to all vrue {was being reduced by 8/9 per toi. |
Indians to hear that when) his has only leaked out latel-.
fesults of the British General} This is a very rotten deal, anid
ons were declared, Mr, Will- | jit js quite clear that the Ministr,
Was kicked out. Just as we of Food must have put on pres-
seing very badly treated over |sure to reduce the freight ra.c
‘ the same thing is happen~ | and thereby the cost of sugar to
many other directions which | the British consumer, and at the
So obvious to most people. same time told the steamship
Government makes companies to recoup themselv:
sat pretense that they are | py adding the amount to the
colonies much |cost of outward freight to the
B. W. I., thus increasing the cost





» aSon most important
questions, they are im-
wishes withouv
our opinion and we are
m told what decisions have
e. i A Shame?

suring the war years, they |
they held conferences.
in some commercial ad-

the freight on sugar. This is

they are paying for our sugar.

Is this not a shame? Can any-
one say that a nation who as trus-
as they ne their brains |tees for. a people is acting fair
P them out, although the| when, this is done? Is it not
chew ne never allowed to|therefore obvious to honourable
When decisions were taken. members that the affairs of the

they have abandoned the | colonies should be the concern



even | another way of reducing the price | «y

Co-o

pe

and ours,

me: good faith

tinuation of

AS recommended
have only rice, | Indian Governors’ Conference held
in Barbados in November, 1949, a
Conference of officials from the
|British Caribbean territories was
It is|held in Barbados from 7th March
14th March to
political |@conomic problems of the region
in the light of the revaluation of
sterling in September, 1949,

The Conference reviewed the }
field of economic problems in the
British Caribbean
developed since the revaluation
of sterling against the background
not only of special conditions in }
the region but also of economic
trends in the sterling area and in

\ to

and the
| dustries.

ration

With U.S.

@ From page 1



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Wages For Workers







sone to this pledge and (HE manual workers of Queen’s Park are to get their,
tc the terests fe On .} bt ca a . ~ e
to the interes Ss of all in- ichtful wage of $1.44 a day from this week instead of the!
(2) The Soviet leaders coula; 5!:30 they have been getting since March last year. This
withdraw their military and was a decision made by the Vestry of St. Michael at yester-
police force from the satel- day's meeting, when Mr. E. D. Mottley drew to members’
e countries i p : i . . j
from ig gg al eames attention that through a clerical error, these workers had
that force to keep te beatae! been getting $1.30 a day when all the other manual workers
persons and regimes which| @Mployed by the Vestry were paid $1.44,
a, Were not democratic. 1s ogy ; pst a
(3) They could drop their poli- the Gt : nt ; TECAER 1G ga
# .. of obbiaad ,| the Queon’s Park -wersers “che
United Reed oad ae money owed to them since March “HIGH
instead “act as if they be- | /#St year as the result of the error, .
lieve the United Nations is | Mr. Victor Chase supported Mr, 99
- an himself has recent. | A Bo at ME: Se
Â¥ called it, a serious instru- = , nat
ment for the maintenance| . The Vestry agreed to get their From Page
of international peace and | Solicitor's advice on a_ letier e A
security, | Written them by the Lord Bishop|French Scene or Paris Interlude
(4) The Russian leaders could! @Sking for the Title Deeds and| with

join the United States in
seeking realistic and effec-
arrangements
atomic

tive
control

of

The
using the

In an

(6)

countries were treated in
manner conforming to the} field.
accepted codes of diplomacy |
—with decency and respect.
In general the Russian lead- |
ers could refrain from sys-
distorting

their own people the picture |

of the outside world, par-

ticularly the United States,
“These are some of the things
|we feel the Soviet
'do, which
tional

(7

tematically

and

Mr.

and the cost of living, \ n¢
the maintenance of fiscal stability
development of new in-

hopes.

would

could
vorldwide Com-
munist apparatus to attempt
to overthrow by subversive
means established Govern. |
ments with which it stood| from Messrs,
outward
friendship and respect.
The Soviet
could co-ope
official repr

for

state

leaders} bought a portion of land at Triend-
rate to see that | Ship, and that he understood that number was the “Picture Frame of

the
weapons
and the limitation of arma-
ments in general.

Kremlin stop

of | Co., Solicitors for Mr. M. L. Har- brought the house down.”

its typical sidewalk Cafe,
tables on the sidewalk, waiters in-
viting customers in; the two
“come hither” girls the two fast
young men, the Can-Can dancers
the aerobat, the nurse and baby,
and the rich Baroness, and final-
ly Eric Gates and Pauline Fitz-
gerald as the Sailor and his girl
friend highlight the act with »
dance. The songs in this number
heard a letter read|/are catchy and bright, and Eric
G. L .W. Clarke &|Gates ‘India rubber like figure’

| Conveyanee of the Deanery, over
which the Vestry are the cus-
todians.

Members also decided that apart
from getting the Solicitor's advice,
they should not allow the papers
io leave the Vestry buildings. The
3ishop could come down to the

| Vestry buildings and examine the
} papers,
The Vestry

| Tison, stating that the latter had Perhaps the most pieturesqu
é e sque

esentatives of all| the Vestry was interested in ac- the Past” scene with Denise Sis-

No one

leaders could
would permit the ra-}
peaceful development
of the co-existence of their system
Acheson added.
The United States was ready, as
it had been and always would be,
for genuine effort
settlements, he said.
ever, that I must warn you not to
raise your
has lived through these postwar
years can be sanguine about reach-
ing agreements in which reliance
can be placed and which will be
+; observed by the Soviet leaders in
He @eclared that he
|could see no evidence that the So-
change

to find peace
“T fear, how-

progress of the

convinced
they could not profit from a con-
these tensions,

them

that

—Reuter.

Revaluation
Reports

at

as

consider

they

the

the

have

|problems of changes in the direc-
tion of imports and exports, ex-
|port incentives, the measurement |
and control of changes in prices



Problems

age trends,

The Conference recognized that

could not

ences,

be

it had

Profes

Mr. E
Mr, F

British Guiana:

i i i ne Spencer, Economic
of ‘having anyone butlof the United Nations Organis2- wicisher,
at these confprences which |tion? 1 know they are some] British Honduras

iN many ways more important
L ever, ; a

‘ London Conference
Londo

people in this country who secret-
ly tried to make out that I am
anti-British, but I would like it
» they had a Confer=!to be known that I am as. loyal









ei om “| trator. Si
‘ y aacummoned alas any other British subject arc | Leeward Islands: The Honourable P,P
i i Jonald, o1on.a Secrets

: Bass ‘es . art essentially DEP, West appar Minidad: The Honourable A R
was vo be done|y fee] that justice should not only | _Jrisos inancial Secretary. Mr. A. dA

rations to future dollar appear to be done, but should be | Shenfield, Economic Adviser; Mr L

ce is eee was done Spence, Controller of Customs

‘sing ‘ — ain. ape One wonders if our officials are eyiudwaras: His Honour E, P. Arrow-

Single unofficial was allowed
rucipate. No report of vhis
ce has ever been issued,
XCe| ‘- a few officials, no
th WI. has ever been
ny inkling of what was
imposed upon us.
no representative of tha| ©
in the colony whevher in or
th. overnment can honestiy
tis our fate in this matter.
ut last November another

paid by the British Treasury to
t the U. K., interests, or by
Barbados Treasury to lovix
after ours.
It is high time all this non-
sense be stopped and we make an
to see that local people have
I share in detergining our
economic cy and we must no
ea aoe and let the Col-
onial Office ably peers ae
ene of t and Welfare dictate i
Barboder probasis ‘tor to us without our knowing even
among them=|what is happening and fooling
should spend the| ourselves that we are receiving
unt of dollars that the| greater power to govern our~
London had decided | selves.
to the B.W.I. ain, this should find out the W. I.
lan’ *S, 100% official, not tion with regards to dollar n
r business advised | earning and dollar saving our visi-
No report of this'ple as well as invisible dollar ex-
ever been issued, such as Tourist Trade and
ar yeuly, finding out by| put up a fight for a proper amount
all the ‘disastrous things of dollars to preserve a decent
standard of living and _ protect
vitally important Canadian
We have been sitting
down like a lot of dummies hav-
ing it put across us.for too long.
= will be voting a wie a
vy heart, feeling surc
ery if _ v. K. gave us better
treatment, food could be bought
cheaper and the money could be
used to improve many of the}
other eens, social geokiqnns
tside are badly in need < ’
vonnaat ag To tell the United Nations
superior that all js well with the colonics
ese confer~'is far from the truth.

0

matters arising
Everyone must agree

is being ha
e
which are avail-

ec et CL
aecersanenqnentann tte

Oo.

Jamaica:
Economic
Commissioner of Commerce
Mordecai, Trade Admini

~—

|

|

tries; Mr. J.

as Secretary ©

ste

Affairs;
oO.

—_— = ee &
SSS

‘LIGHT & POWER.

TROUBLE FREE |

INSTAL - -

Developmeat

Mr

J

sor C
and

A. Emanuel,
Petrie:
A Bishop;

Col
Adviser;
Controller of Supplies.

The

D

smith, Administrator, Dominica; His H
our J. M. Stow, Administrator, St Luc
His Honour W. F 5.





though the revaluation of sterling
viewed in
from other major economic influ- |
thrown into relief
some of the region’s most difficult
economic problems and the Con-
ference recommended to Govern-
ors that these should be reviewed
of our goods so that our people | from time to time on a regional
are paying for the reduction ir | pasis,
The Conference Report is being
bmitted to the Governors of the
region, 3
The members of the Conference
were as follows:
Chairman:
Colonial
Organization,
Colonial Office:
of the Economic (General) Department of
the Colonial Office
Barbadys:
Secretary;
Controller of Supplies

G

Acting

oO
Mr

onel

Honourabl

E. D. Hone, Colonial Secretary;
Mr. J. B. Clegg, Secretary fo
Mr.

Ferguson
and Indu



a

to}

who

their

West |

isolation

Beasley,
Welfare

Head

Financia!

“and |day, a

. | coal



nett, Eileen Thorne, Madeline
a Gloria Warren, Bettie Press

He asked the Vestry to give him | 224 Edward Cook and “The Pink
their decision on the matter, since Powder Puff”, Betty Wilkes. The
would-be purchasers were asking adies in their old fashioned hoop
| about the land. skirts of the Victorian era sitting

The Vestry decided to refer the |!MSide a huge picture frame, sang
matter to the Playing Fields Com- such lovely songs as “Somewhere
mittee who will discuss it with | beyond the Stars”, “Lovely to
| Miss Arne, Social Welfare Officer. Look At’ » and others; each girl in

There will soon be a steel break- | Ur. singing one of these songs.
fast shed in Queen’s Park for use Finally stepping out of the frame |
during the Annual Exhibition, | th¢y paraded in their very beauti- }
Some time ago, the’ Agricultural ful costumes. :
Society approached the Vestry on ,rhen ere wis: Sip ane
the matter and were given ‘per- Number Which had doth the!
mission by the Vestry to get ahead | bright and cheerful songs such xs!
with it. There was an alternative | Dixie, Swanee, as well as Stephen
proposal by the Arts and Craft | Fosters’ Old Kentucky Home and
Society that instead of the steel | the American Negro Spiritual Old

quiring the land for a

playing

shed, they (the Arts and Crafts |Man River among others. These
| Society) should be allowed to erect | SO4gs were well sung each in
a floor on the top of the former | their own style by Erie Gates,

Kenneth Tucker and Edward Coo’:
with chorus by the entire cast:

}coach house which is aback of the
| Queen’s Park building. This up-
}per floor would serve for exhibi-
}tion purposes and could be used
by the Arts and Craft Society
| throughout the year.

Florence Daysh who does a
local “Mary waiting for the Bus’
act complete with baskets, torn



apron anda piece of butterless
The Vestry decided not to] bread, tells in rhyme (in much
hange their decision, and they | the same style as the popular Joe

will therefore allow the Agricui- | @ 2d Robert column which appear;

tural Society to erect the steel | weekly in the Advocate,) he:

shed, material for which has al- | views on local affairs. It is witty,
ready arrived from the U.K, clever and most effectively per-|
;, Also discussed yesterday was a|formed by Mrs. Daysh.

letter from the Director of Educa- Eric Gates then did a very!
lion relative to a proposed change | snappy number with the choru

jin the methed of awarding and | girls, telling them “A Secret"

paying for
} Secondary

Vestry Scholarships to

Though it is a very short number, |
Schools. Members de-

it is very sweet.



rided to have the Clerk write a The finale once again included
letter to the Director telling him|the entire cast, and the many
| that if he submitted draft reguia~j} curtain calls which the crowd
tions to the Vestry they would | called for makes “HIGH TYME”

‘onsider them.

The Vestry also dealt with two
j letters from the Department of
Highways and Transport. The first
] was relative to Government grant
for repairs to Tenantry Roads on
which it is proposed to start work,
ind forwarding a list of the pro-
posed programme as well as that
; completed in 1948.

The second asked the Vestry to
submit a list of such Tenantry
| Roads as they consider should be
| given priority in 1950-51. It also
;commented on the programme
completed in 1949-50.

rise and shine, and a triumph for
Eric Gates and his hard working
and talented cast.



415 Sign |
Petition

Four hundred and fifteen citi-
zens have now signed the Petition
to His Excellency the Governor
appealing for a better standard of
lservice from the Barbados Electric
Supply Corporation.









The Vestry decided to refer!” On Wednesday 332 had signed |
| both letters to the Guardians | petitions at the Advertising De-
with whom Mr. E. D. Mottley|partment of the Barbados Advo-
will be associated. cate but yesterday this number
The Vestry received a letter|had risen to 384
|from the Parochial Treasurer of} Seventeen were signed at Messrs
|; Christ Church asking them to|C, F. Harrison and fourteen at|

) Messrs, Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. {
|

|of Vestrymen to discuss ways and]

| send representatives to a meetin

means of collecting the revenue;
which Vestries will by the;
abolition of Occupancy Tax. ¢ m= |
i
|

loss

; venor of the meetings will be Mr. |

A. M. Jones, a member of the ARRIVES
Vestry of Christ Church

, St. Michael’s Vestry decided |

{that such a meeting would)

serve no useful purpose, since

|after the abolition of Occupancy

Tax, there were only two ways]
'in which Vestries could célle |
|revenue—Trade Tax or Owner- |}
|ship Tax.

| The Vestry awarded the tender
for milk for the Almshouse for |
the current year to Mr. C W.|
Springer. The tender for fresh |
meat was awarded to D. V. Scott
and that for bread to Messrs.
Johnson & Redman.

The four-engined Comey set up
a new London-Rome record. The
former record was neld by a
Hawker “Fury” fighter which last
May made the nop in just over
two hours and 30 minutes, accord-
ing to local aerodrome records.
| The Comet was piloted by ex-
{Group Captain John “Cats-Eyes”
/Cunningham, former night fighter
| pilot.

Serre | Air Marshal Sir Alan Coryton
Gas Rationing |

controller of the Ministry of Sup-
| In Sydney

|
|
| SYDNEY, March, 16.
| Sydney's one and a half million
|people went on gas rationing to- |
strike Maitland Field |
j having stopped production of the |
usgi to produce it. Ths
| strikers are “safety men,” wh«

at
al

om

i h. Feo. }are resisting a penalty, impose
St. Vincent; Mr = Police wink to didé
nomie and Financial Adviser ’ on them for haltit g ork Q on
Mr. B. E, Rolfe of the Colonial Devel- | ouss grievances. 3
si rg vat rected
opment and eee gar zeae acts r.



To Mothers
who cannot
feed their babie

can digest it without trouble. The



Vestry Decides On ©



eS
Ca

The Tenets
Of Christian
Science
By Earle E. Simms

HOW td “build a Christly life
of freedom, health, happiness, and
usefulness” through
the religious Tents o

ience was the subject of a talk b

by Earl E. Simms, C S., of Austin
Texas, last night.



European
Frent
Imperative

@ From page |!

have a policy, and the House o
to know what is our policy.
“It is painful to witness

the

; resent indecision by which re-
ractice of}? ays ge > ~ |
Christain eee of France and Great |

ritain with Germany is hindered |
y belated dismantling of a few |

*}remaining factories and still more |

A member of the Board of Lec-| belated trials of aged German |

tureship of The
The First Church

: ot Christ, Scien-
tist,

Science Church, Garrison Hill.

From a lifetime experience the

Mother Church,} Generals.

in Boston, Massachusetts, the Communist fifth column. in
Mr. Simms spoke in the Christian Western Germany and assists the

“All this plays into the hands of

reviving of Nazis.
He said he did not quarrel with }
the Navy estimates, but rather |

lecturer drew actual instances of}W@S sorry to sec no increases in

healing and
ot
ristian Science after a
physical difficulty had
sponded to treatment by
nent physician.
experience, Mr. Simms. said:
. “During the sleepless, fear-fi2lec
nights which camé, it was necas-

severe
not

regeneration for him-] fleet
.and others. He was healed in} 1950-51.

reserve strength during |

“There is no surface fleet poten- |

re-jtially hostile to us in the world
a prom-| to-day, therefore, the aircraft car-
Describing this{rier with appropriate naval pros

tection must increasingly replace
the battleships of former times.
“What we have to face in the

sary to hold closely to God's ever- {next few years is the Germanised

presence and all-power. ‘{he
Christian Science practitioner t

Soviet U-boat.”
“An entirely new type of U-boat

whom I had turned for treatmeni|had been developed which could

faithfully stood by me.
and comfort were found in the
understanding that my true self
hood was ever in the secret pact
of the Most High, abiding unde.
the shadow of the Almighty, Sx
We are assured in the ninety-’ rs
Psalm.

“The healing took two years
It was completed in Christian Sci-
ence. During this period I wa:
able to be about my business al-
most as usual. Indeed it was a
wonderful regenerative experi-
ence. As the healing progressed
many false traits of character, such
as social drinking, the smoking
habit, the use of profanity, and
an ungovernable temper fell a-
Way.

The quality of importunacy
commended by Christ Jesus, tig-

ured prominently in another heal-J°i

it, as did Esau for a megs of poi~}]

ing that resulted in mental surgery
through application of Christian
Science, A friend of the lecturer
was obliged to interrupt a trip
from New- York to Florida on ac-
count of sudden pain. When his
condition became known in the
hotel, persons there tried to per-
suade him to enter a hospital for
an operation.

“Being a Christian Scientist,’
Mr. Simms continued, “he had
no intention of relying on aught
but God for his healing. He said:
‘Amid intense suffering, I affirmed
that, in reality, I was in the se-
cret place of the Most High abid-
ing under the shadow of the Al
mighty. Then suddenly this angel
thought came to me; ‘Why, my
God-given birthright is freedom
and dominion! I demand it right
now! I refuse to be satisfied with
anything short of my divine heri-
tage ”








“He said he fell asleep impor-
tunately demanding-his rich leg-
acy of perfection and liberty. Sev-
era] hours later he awoke to find
that a clear case of mental.surgery
had taken place. This man refused
to be denied his spiritual birth-
right! Just: recently he told me
he has been free from that condi-
tion ever since.

“Remember, your
spiritual perfection

birthright is
Do not barter













|
\
|
|
!
'
|
|
'
'

Refuge |{Manoeuvre below the surface at.

upwards of 20 knots and could |
make, passages of thousands
miles without appearing
surface” he said,

“The main emphasis
naval effort at the present time
should be to create the largest
numbers of light fleet aircraft car- |
riers and auxiliary carriers which |
are capable of carrying the nece:
sary modern type of aircraft,”

Mr. Churchill said Britain
and France must stand together, |
primarily united in Europe. Unit-
ed, they would be strong enous!
to extend their hands to Germany
As long as the Allies could not |
give them any direct protection
German villages and cities
homes might be overrun by “thi
Eastern deluge.’

Mr. Churchill added

Germans who have be
prominent in resisting Comr
ism, or are working for a
ciliation with the west
cracies, would px
feit.”

After declaring
a policy on Germany, Mr. Churc!
ill said: “To remain as we art
for a long period of ti
tainly not the best way
ing the measureless
third world wan

on

of

our

that

No do

reco!
aemo
ay ihe nal

n

there must

of preve
horror
Reuter.



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OLD FAVOURITE MEDICINE
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ne t
better you feel tomorrow

tage, but insist upon realizing this}1 |
|

rich inheritance here and now!”
Mr. Simms also related how

Mary Baker Eddy, Discoverer aad

Founder of Christian Scienc

found healing in the inspired};

RMORSES

“aoe PIL

LS

pages of the Bible. Hopelessly ili 4

according to the attending phy- |

sician, she called for her Bib'eyt TRUSTED REMEDY +
and read the narrative in Mat-/)_ dak GGie. I
thew’'s Gospel where Jesus healed}!

the man sick of the palsy. She, t 50 years

too, experienced healing



AIRLINER

IN ROME —

ROME, March 16.

BRITAIN’S HAVILLAND COMET, the world’s first
all-jet airliner, landed here today after flying from Hatfield
near London, in two hours five minutes,

ply was on board.

Police, on foot and in jeeps,
fought to clear the tarmac in front
of the airport buildings of crowds
who had flocked out from Rome io
see the plane.

Cunningham, greeted by roars
of cheers as he step out of the



plane said he tim the flight at
two hours two minutes. “It was
an excellent flight”, he added, ‘but
we had a head wind.”

—Reuter




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PAGE FOUR



Published by Thu Advocate

ee =
es Friday, 17th March, 1950



— Emigration

THE question of emigration has for the
last five or six years given rise to much
controversy in this island. It means much
to Barbados with her redundant popula-
tion’ and limited fields of employment.
During the five year period after 1944
when the first emigrants under contract
were sent to the United States of America
the returns of the Savings Department of
the Labour Office showed that approxim-
‘ately three million dollars had been sent
back. In this same period it was not
readily realised that the private returns of
workers from Curacao amounted to almost
the same. In addition, large sums of money
and gifts are sent back annually by former
Barbadians now living in the United
States. The result can be seen in the lives
of many of those who now own small prop-
erties and businesses.

In the past there was free and heavy
emigration to Panama, Cuba and the
United States. This helped the island to
find jobs and to bolster its economy.
During the years of the war there was
emigration to the United States and the
United Kingdom and this too had its bene-

ficial effect in relieving unemployment here.
Within recent days however the notices

published in the Press show that there is a
reverse process and although still in small
numbers, the emigrants who have gone
out, are now coming back to a land with an
overflowing labour market. Week by week
there are returns from Bermuda, Curacao,
and smaller numbers from other places but
they nevertheless add to the glut in the
labour market.

The reason for the reduction in the
United States market is not far to seek.
Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have
become politically conscious of their ties
with the United States and their claims
have had to be recognised. In some in-
stances the clashes between Puerto Rican
and West Indian claims have been made
political issues in the United States.

In the Caribbean area there are several
countries like British Guiana, Dutch
Guiana, French Guiana and British Hon-
duras which are definitely underdeveloped
and under populated. Whether it is done
by the Colonial Development Corporation,
by private enterprise or by the British and
West Indian Governments according to
the terms of the EVANS Report, the time
has come when the problem of emigration
must be tackled in a statesmanlike and
imaginative manner in order to relieve the
population pressure on Barbados and some
of the smaller islands.

Barbados still has 65,000 acres of arable
land producing a sugar crop of about
150,000 tons to support 200,000 people. It is
a problem which would tax the inability of
any government; but it is not facing that
probjem to say that the outlook for emigra-
tion is not bright. To accept the defeatist
attitude is to fail before any attempt is
made to find a solution to a problem which
must be solved.

There are still Barbadians willing to
work and work hard at home or abroad;
and places must be found for them while
they are young and adventurous, if we are
to maintain that level which has been
rezched by the hardihood and ambition of
these who have shown the way in former
years Those were the individuals who
took their future in their own hands and
made gcod. Many of them are still scat-
tered cver the world making their living
and ore became a President of Liberia.

What is needed is an imaginative drive
at development in the Caribbean area as
an alternative to the restrictions placed on
emigration by deliberate political action
and by the increasing difficulties of trans-

rtation. There is British Guiana, British

onduras and other places where expendi-
ture can be made on the scale of the East
African ground nut scheme in order to
settle the people of this island who really
want to work. And it would be far more

valuable to the true riches of the Common-
wealth than the problematical nuts.







@UR READERS SAY:



Cu, Ltd., 34, Broad St., Bridgetows







—eiieesnilioocenitiaa SS,
a

|

for freedom.

After
sessions, honourdble members
te twelve hours wrangling
Tuesday on vne matter of
Colonial Estimates for 1950-51.
Eight heads of expenditure were
passed, many views were express-
ed and several tempers
strained. Also strained, as usual,
were the hearing organs of the
unhappy Press, parvicularly in the
early stages.

There was much debate on the

vitally important matter of Edu-
cation, Head XX, for which close
to $695,000 was finally passed.
That there are numerous fauliy
with the present educational sys-
tem is apparent to all, but the
most vragic feature is the lack of
accommodation in the existin

schools and the lack of additiona
schools. Mr. Adams bluntly stated
that he would like to see every
child in school even if the school
accommodation was under bread-
fruit trees or tents! Messrs. Fos-
ter, Mottley and Branker quoted
incidents of children being unable
to atiend schools purely through
the absence of adequate space, and
deplored such incidents as head-
masters failing prospective stu-
dents in their entrance examina-
tions when the true reason was
that there was no room for them.
“The powers of headmasters,”
thundered Mr. Mottley, “are too
widé. We have likened them to
God.” Under vhe present regula-
tions a headmaster may decide
whether or not a child of nine or
ten years is worthy of further edu-
cation or not!—A truly unfortu-
nate state of affairs. There have
been thousands of cases, in all
parts cf the globe, where a boy
might have been something of a
dolt at that age—only to emerge
in later years as a firs’ class
scholar. Deny him vhe right of
education and his chances of re-
maining a dolt are considerable.

Mr. Crawford stated that thou-
sands of children in this island,
around the age of ten, are illiter-
ate. Mr. Crawford, I am presum-
ing, must have sound grounds for
this statement, and if this is the

ease it is a shocking future we
face Mr. Keith Walcott, and
others, veiced vhe opinion that
preparatory schools, much along

the English system, might answer
the problem of preparing children
for higher grades, providing such
preparatory schools be staffed with



two compafatively brief
of
the House of Assembly had close
last
the

were

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Teachers’ Conversation

By Lee Wade

specialists, but of all the sugges-

‘sons and proposed solutions offer-

ed, the vital need for neers

action was a point on which all
members were agreed. Some de-
finite educational scheme, con-
structed to suit the condivions and
background of the West Indies, is
the most serious problem the pre-
sent Government faces—for on its
satisfactory solution depends the
welfare of the coming generation
in Barbados. Mr. Adams assured
the House that he intends vo give
the matter his strict attention in
vae months to come. and in this
connection he appealed for the
fullest co-operation from members.
The public in general will trust
that he gets it—for a great deal
of co-operation, in fac’ the co-
operation of every loyal citizen in
the Colony, is going to be needed
te remedy the existing chaotic
confusion. A physics laboratory at
Lodge School — but no physics
masier — children turned away
from schools—lack, as Mr. Craw-
ford and others mentioned, of
proper transportation for school
children—resulting in them arriv-
ing home at cight or nine o’clock
at night. What sori’ of conditions
are these if not chaotic? Mr.
Adams mentioned a Select Com-
mittee to delve and probe for a

cure. Such a commivtee will have

to be quite unlike far too many
other committees of which we

have heard in that it will have

to produce action — pov merely
pigeon-hole documents until all

are buried in the dust of forget-
fulness and public apathy.
Garner voiced his opinions on the
faults of the educational system in
a vwenty-minute speech of impas-
sionate power and bitter fury. He
deplored the fact that absolutely

Mr.

nothing of Negro history or cul-

ture, the deeds of past Negroes of
fame, was Vaught to students at

the elementary schools, “from

which”, he cried, “95.per cent. of

students, on leaying, should return
and learn the three ‘R’s’!”’ “And,”

he declared, “some teachers can~
not begin a conversation without
asking for
“And such systems,” he continued,
“that may be good in England may last war have not yet had their

increases in salary.”

not suit the West indies, or us.
Without education we are next

only vo the sheep, the goats and solidly as in works of stone.
psec eens

the pigs.” It is only too true that
education as it works in one land
might not be practical in another,
and it is equally vrue that chil-
dren should be instructed in the
cultural background of their land
and race, for only from such can
be installed pride of race —- any
race. “Te&ch youth,” concluded
Mr. Garner, “to have pride in him-
self, Don’t hope alone in a foreign
race. We can go forward side by
side, yes, but on equal terms.

Couldn’t Hear

The day would not have been
compleve without the usual little
squabble — this time between
Trade Union secretary F. Walcott
and Mr. Mottley. Mr. Walcott
accused Mr. Mottley of straying
from vhe point (the estimate) and
wasting precious time. Mr. Mottley
hotly denied that he was wasting
precious time. For two or three
moments the two jumped up and
down and shouved at each other
both ending by counter accusing
the other of ignoring the ruling of
the Chairman. In all the confusion
I never did discover what Mr
Smith’s ruling was, for above the
din I couldn’t hear a word he said.
Quite a few litile arguments go
on outside in the halls, too, a’
times. On one occasion, when Mr.
Crawford was speaking, a loud
scream from the exterior of the
chamber had this scribe, who has
a kind and peace loving heart,
thoroughly alarmed. No furvher
cries followed, however, and no
arrests were made.

Heroes And The Heart

I would like to close with one
comment on Mr. Garner’s wish
that he may see the statue of a
black man next to tha’ of Lord
Nelson, in Trafalgar Square. I
feel sure, from the few occasions
on which I have spoken with Mr.
Garner, that he will understand
my meaning. Statues, it is true,
are usually erected vo the memory
of heroes, or famous figures of
politics or war. No statue to a
Negro yet stands in Trafalgar
Square—but the names of many
are inscribed on the Memorial
which does, Those names rank
equal with any statue—and rank
in honour with any memorial
They, too, were heroes. They
from these parts who fell in the

inscribed — but remem-
the heart as

names
brance remains in



The Spies Among Us

By Bernard Newman

HE treachery of Dr. Fuchs has
cost Britain hundreds of
millions of pounds. That is to say,
the Russians have gained as much,
since they have been able to
short-circuit vital and expensive
experiments.

What price are we prepared to
pay to see that there is no second
Dr. Fuchs? I say “we,” because
the nation’s conscience, as well as
the national exchequer, is involv-
ed.

The menace must be faced with
completely new weapons. Many
people will not like some of the
ideas I suggest: I do not pretend
to like them myself.

More Men

—_ easiest escape from the
reproaches of our own con-

sciences is to pile all the blame on
our security departments, M.I.5«
and the Special Branch of Scot-
land Yard. This is absurd, and
wild talk of “purges” will provoke
many a chuckle in Moscow.

The truth is that we are very
short of first-class Intelligence
officers. Too often a period on an

Intelligence staff is regarded as an
unwelcome break in a_ military
career—perhaps as a fill-in duty
for an unfit officer,

Our counter-espionage staff has
been grossly under-staff since vic-
tory in 1945, when too many
people in high quarters seemed to
think that its days of useful
service were over.

It has been admitted that Dr.
Fuchs was not even “vetted” by
the usual agencies, but by Minis-
try of Supply security police. Yet
such an obvious case must have
been referred to someone in high
quarters for decision. Whoever
he was, he carries a heavy respon-
sibility.

Are we prepared in future to
use the security methods favoured
in other countries? In Russia
the M.V.D. uses about half a mil-
lion agents. The concierge of
your block of flats, the postman,
the scavenger, the man working at
the next bench—all sorts of people
are pressed into service. The hid-
den microphone is translated from
fiction into fact.

Once I endured a Russian in-
terrogation—and it was indeed an
ordeal. I was not tortured or
drugged, but relays of officials
questioned me for hours on end
for several days. Such pressure
makes it extremely difficult to
refuse a confession in exchange





VEN the American F.B.I. uses
methods which it does not
pretend are pretty. Its “loyalty
check” on people in responsible
positions makes ours seem trifling
in comparison.

A man is trailed for days and
weeks; his friends, his acquaint-
ances—all are closely questioned
about him. Agents are free to
listen to his telephane conversa-

tions, or investigate his corre-
spondence. ;
Unpleasant? Very. The Ameri

cans think so, too, but the Fuchs
case has reinforced their belief in
the need for methods comparable
with those of the adversary.

First, the effectiveness of M.1.5
and the Special Branch must be
strengthened.

They will need reinforcements
of first-class men—who must be
adequately paid. The average
Special Branch man gets little
morc chan a policeman’s pay. The
lowest ranks in M.1.5 are better off
with an Army major’s pay as
minimum.

More Training
A NEW type of counter-spy is
needed. It does not follow
that a man who was a success in
catching German spies in wartime
will necessarily be successful in
catching British spies—in Britain

in peacetime,

The Communist mind is a
special study, and in its incon-
sistencies and perverted logic

must be well understood.

The ordinary policeman is sel-
dom of great use in such a cam-
paign. In one recent routine check
on technicians in responsible posi-
tions, suspects were trailed by
large men who gave themselves
away in a few hours.

We do not need an enormous
organisation—not even approach-
ing American standards, much less
Russian, But the men must be
given additional powers.

More Helpers

O far, I imagine, there will be
little dissension. But an
enlarged security force, however
good, will need large numbers of
volunteer assistants,

After Dunkirk there was a real
risk in Southern England of a
German occupation. Considerable
numbers of men and women were
carefully selected for Intdligence
work. They included town clerks,
bus conductors, waitresses.

If the Germans came, these peo-
ple were to remain at their posts,
and act as our spies, The training





was necessarily brief, but would
have served.

« suggest the enrolment of a
Security Guard along the same
lines—but not from the zealous
enthusiasts who would promptly
offer their services: these people
would provoke spy panic.

Other defensive measures are
needed. People should be infil-
trated into suspect political organ-
isations, just as the Communists
do it in reverse.

More Equality

USSIA has in London at least

five times as many diplomatic

representatives as we have in
Moscow.

ALL diplomatic arrangements
and privileges should be com-
pletely reciprocal. If Britons may
not move freely in Ruritania, then
Ruritanians should be restricted
in Britain—or the men of both
nations should be withdrawn, This
is not childish; it is common sense.

Nor should we halt at defensive
measures, The Russians have a
powerfyl Fifth Column in Western
Europe. I tell you that we have
an even more powerful Fifth
Column in Eustern Europe.

Our many Polish, Czech, and
Hungarian friends, and the several
anti-government moveinents in
the Soviet Union itself, could be

used, not for espionage, but to
publicise the true intentions of the
West.

More Vigour

E have friends in those
places. Remember Peene-
munde? The map which enabled
us successfully to bomb the rocket
research centre was given to
Britain by two Polish forced la-
bourers employed by the Ger-~
mans, |

These men were scavengers in
the factory; the map showed even
the tiniest details of the workshops
they swept around each night. |

The report of the Canadian spy- |
case in 1945 was a warning of the
Fuchs episode, but the import of
copies of the report was deliber-
ately restricted. Why?

Take another example of this
absurb fear of “offending Russia’’:
when Gouzenko walked out of the
Soviet Embassy in Ottawa with
his brief-case of deadly and in-
criminating papers, the first reac-
tion of the Canadian Government |
was that he and they should be

|
|
|

| unification is, in our view, more clearly established

| scale of a capitation fee for cases treated as part of



Unification Of Public
Services Report—cona

TO CONSIDER how the grades of a vearvice for
unification could be applied the commissioned ranks
of the Police of a large colony—Jamaica, and a smali
colony, British Honduras are chosen:—.

Jamaica:

GRADE Basic Salary
Commissioner of Police...... £ 1,300
Deputy Commissioner of Police 950
Superintendent ............. 700
Senior Asst. Superintendent . . 625
Assistant Superintendent .. £425-25-525

British Honduras:
Superintendent of Police... £849-30-968
Assistant Superintendent .. £566-27-673

Now if the grading in Jamaica can be taken as
affording a sound basis—and we have no reason to
think otherwise since they have recently been exam-
ined and revised—the task is to place the posts of
Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent in
British Honduras into two of the Jamaican grades.
[n order’ to do this, it would be necessary to deter-
mine the basis of allocation. Quite clearly the exist-
ing salary scales would not serve the purpose. Those
scales are determined on a colony basis, and scales
so determined too often represent not the appropri-
ate remuneration for the duties of the post in
juestion but the limit which the colony can afford.
fhe only other possible basis of allocation would be
i comparative evaluation of the duties and respons-
-bilities attaching to the several grades in the two
colonies. Looking at the matter from this point of
view, there appears no doubt that, since in both
colonies the grade of Assistant Superintendent is
the lowest commissioned grade, part of the duties
of the Assistant Superintendents in British Hon-
duras must be the same as those of the Assistant
Superintendent in Jamaica. Inasmuch, however, as
the former officers have only one grade of officer
above them, whereas the latter have four, it appears
equally clear that a greater measure of responsibil-
ity must fall on the former than on the latter, But
balancing these two factors neither can we nor,
we venture to assert, can anyone else reach an
informed conclusion whether it would be appropri-
ate to place the British Hondyras Assistant Super-
intendents in the Jamaican Superintendent or Senior
Assistant Superintendent grade. The same diffi-
culties would arise in any attempt to place the
British Honduras Superintendent in one of the
Jamaican grades.

: UNIFORMITY

But if uniformity of grading presents great diffi-
culties in the case of such a service as the police, it
is demonstrably impossible in a number of other
services, owing to the heterogeneity in tneir organi-
zation and scope in the several territories. Had such
homogeneous territories as the Leeward Islands and
Windward Islands alone been the subject of our
investigation, we conceive that no great difficulty

would have been experienced in formulating uni-*

form gradings and common scales of salary. But
under our terms of reference we have to consider
unification in relation to all the British Caribbean
territories. The heterogeneity to which we have
referred is a natural reflection of the wide vari-
ations in the population and financial resources of
the various colonies. At one end of the scale there is
Jamaica with a population of 1,300,000 and a revenue
of £9,500,000; in the middle of the scale there is
British Guiana with a populaton of 37,500 and a
revenue of £3,800,000; and at the lowest end of the
scale the smallest islands such as the Virgin Islands
with a population of 6,500. and a revenue of some
£50,000. The smaller territories neither need nor
can support an administration of the same size as
that of the larger and wealthier territories. Even
where the smaller territories woula wish «o extend
their field of administration, the achievement of
their ambitions is limited by financial necessities.

DIFFERENCES

The consequent differences in scope and organi-
zation of the various administrations are, of course,
greater in some departments than in cthers. An
extreme example of difference is found in the or-
ganization of the financial administration, in res-
pect of which we have the following variations. In
some administrations were are separate posts of
Financial Secretary and Accountant-General; in
others, the duties of a Financial Secretary and an
Accountant-General are combined in the post of

Colonial Treasurer; in the smallest administrations, |

the post of Colonial Treasurer has attached to it a
host of other offices; thus in St. Vincent, the Colonial
Treasurer is also Income Tax Commissioner, Chief
of Excise, Registrar of Shipping, Chief Tax Officer
under the Land and House Tax Ordinance,
Escheator-General, and Receiver of Wrecks. Again,
in Trinidad, customs and excise fall alone to one
department, while in Jamaica the Department of
the Collector-General is responsible not only for
customs and excise but for a substantial part of
inland revenue as well. In some of the postal ad-
ministrations, the Postmaster-General is responsible
for telephones; in others he is not so responsible,
The functions normally falling to a Public Works
Department are, in one colony, split up among five
independent departments. Examples of differences
in the scope and organization of the various depart-
ments could be multiplied, and we are satisfied that
over a wide range of the administration they are
such as to defy any attempt to propound a system
of uniform gradings of posts.

In the preceding paragraphs we have endeavoured
to show the impracticability of a system of uniform
gradings for scheduled posts in unified services. In
the following paragraphs we examine the question
whether if, in spite of our failure to find a solution
the problem of uniform gradings could in fact be
solved it would be possible to attach to them com-
mon basic scales, We begin by examining the possi-

| bilities in relation to a particular service and pros

ceed to consider the matter on a wider basis,

: MEDICAL SERVICES
There is 110 service in regard to which the case for

than the medical service where common basic
Salaries are more impossible. In the case of some
posts, the salary is based on the assumption that the
hoider is not permitted to indulge in private prac-
tice; in others, we find a salary scale and a right to
private practice; in others, the position is stil)
further complicated by the addition to the Salary

the officer’s official duties, as well as a right to
private practice. So long as such variations exist,



sent back, not seized!
Fear and apathy can be
greater menace than Dr. Fuchs.
E.S.

|
|
. \

—— ma

common basic salaries are, of course, impossible, an
the heroic remedy of abolishing private practice =
fixing salaries on the basis of full-time service to

Government is ruled out by two considerations,
(To be continued)



It Is No Bed Of Roses That Scholars Lie In

To The Editor, The Advocate,

in advance, (4) owing to the cli-

is prevented from so doing owing

or parents afver their heavy spend-

grateful thanks the donations re-

Messrs: Singer Sewing Machine Co.,






















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JUST RECEIVED:

+

BIRKMYRE CANV

ONE PIECE BIRKMY3E

GREEN CANVAS

72 ins. wide

AT $5.16 PER “a

a

(i

ap Re
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SECURE. YOUR REQUIREMENTS Nol
FROM

=e ve coe se os Sse = 2 oe

DA COSTA & CO, LT)

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT.

ws ea aS

ont

SIR, — The financial provisions
which have been offered by the
lavest Act to present and probably
prospective Barbados Scholars can
only be described as wholly in-
adequate.

t of all, we find that steam-
shj ges to England have sky-
rocketed so high that the sum of
£50 “allocated for this purpose
falis far below par of the present
rates.

This in itself creates quite mâ„¢
impasse, as the unfortunate schoi-
ars must start looking for more
money to aid his ~.meagre sum
offered by the Government, if he
wishes vo complete his passage
fare. So from this, we can infer
that before he can even think of
what he is going to study in Eng-
land, he must first of all know
how he is going to get there

When at long last he reaches
England he finds (1) that owing
to the valuatior { the £, the
cost of living ha
somewhat, (2)
and caution mo
must’ be
hé intends to pursue a 1 course
an extra sum of £183 i npul

sory, and above all, must be pai

ae

the
the



ney

paid in

mate, a great deal of clothing and
other incidentals are obligatory
and must be boughy locally, if any
financial saving is to be effected
and (5) some parents are unable
to cope with this overwhelming
budget in spite of some sacrifices.

And there we find that a Bar-
bados Scholar's portion is no bed
of roses, for unless he is in a posi-
‘ion to meet the heavy expendi-
ture which is neoessary, especially
certain sums for whica the Gov-
exmnment has made absolutely no
allocation, he is no where in ob-
taining his goal.
_ This subject is of paramount
importance and should be given
due recognition by those in au-
thori’y, for how can these scholats
exist on the limited government
grants ?

I always thought that Barbados
Scholars were given

pursuing vhatever

choice





to the prodigious amount of which i

Government has made no alloca-
tion, even if vhey decided toe pay
half or more which would bo
better than nothing, the unfor-
tunate student finds himself in a
dilemma as he is being literally
told vhat he can’t study law.

The hardships of these parents
are indeed a perplexing problem,
and it also has a tendency to dis-
courage the students when they
realise that promises made by vhe
Government are as easily broken
as they are made, especially when
the parents have done all in their
power to further the education of
their children,

Besides having an effect on
present scholars, it will also hava
an even greater effect on future
scholars, they are probably
wondering how much heavy ex-
penditure their parents‘ will have
t through and what a livtla
he I t will offer
n he Govern-
money to
given for
itrary it would prove to
be quite a boon in alleviating any
tha’ may

iby any parent

as

» go








ave more

they have already

al SK tur
l miiture

ng.
By virtue of their success, the
scholars have already done their
bit, and vhe authorities shouid not
hesitate in relieving the situation.
Many a noble cause has been
fought and won in these columns,
and I have every reason to believa
that I have not writven in vain,
as it must be by now, painfully
obvious to one and all that Gov-
ernment allocations to Barbados
Scholars are woefully inadequate,
and m nina uae they produce
some tan, e effort in re izi
this stark fact, —™
R.C,

Canadian Club

To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—The Women’s Canadian
Club would like to express tgeir
sincere thanks to all those who
assisted with the Valenvine’s
dance held at the Marine Hotel on

February 11, particularly those
who donated flowers, loaned
games, made Valentines and in
other ways helped The Club

would also like to thank the Bar-

bados Advocate for very wener-
ously advertising free of cost
the Club acknowledge



ceived during the year, as follows:

Messrs: Da Costa & C’, Ltd , $15 00;
Evelyn, Roach & Co., Litd., $5 00; T. R.
Evans $5.00; William Fogarty Ltd., $15.00;
Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd , $10.00; T
Herbert Ltd., $10.00; C. F. Harrison &
Co., Ltd., $15.00; H. Jason Jones & Co.,
Ltd,, $10.00; Johnson's Stationery $5.00:
Knights Ltd. (City Pharmacy) $10.00:
Modern Dress Shoppe $10.00; Manning &
Co., Ltd., $15.00; Martin Doorly & Co.,
Ltd., $10.00; S, P. Musson, Son & Co.
Ltd. $10.00: Plantations Ltd. $15.00: C. Ss.
Pitcher & Co., $5.00; J. B. Leslie & Co.,:
$10.00; Hull & Son $10.00; T. Sydney
Kinch Ltd., $10.00; Bruce Weatherhead
Ltd., $5.00; Y. De Lima & Co., Ltd., $5.00;
Stansfeld, Scott & Co., Ltd., $10.00; Ince
& Co., Ltd,, $10.00; Cosmopolitan Pharm-
acy $5.00; C. B. Rice & Co., $5.00; R. M.
Jones & Co., Ltd., $5.00; British Ameri-
can Tobacco %o., Ltd., $10.00; Mr, Charles
McKenzie $5.0); Messrs. Jas. A. Lynch &
Co., Ltd., $100; Gittens, Croney & Co.,

$10.00; A. Barnes & Co., Ltd., $7.50
Alleyne, Arthur & Sons., Ltd. $10.00:
A S Bryden & Sons, Ltd $10 00:

Bookers Drug Stores Ltd.. $5.00; Barbados

Foundry Ltd., $10.00; City Garage

$5.00; Cole's Printery $3.00; Hinines
Hotel Ltd., $5.00; Hanscheli, Larsen &
Co., Ltd., $10.00; Bata Shoe Store $5 00
Eckstein Brothers $10.00; Bradshaw &
Ce $5 00 Occ View Hot $10.0

@ LETTERS which are signed with a nom-de-p]
-plumie, b
accompanied by the customary bona fides, will be Rest
Many such reach the Editor's desk each week, and readers |

are again reminded of the

to be known to the Editor,

assurance of good faith.

$10.00; J. N. Goddard & Sons, Ltd., $20.00;
T. Geddes Grant Ltd,, $15.00; Barbados
Telephone Co., Ltd., $12.00; Robert Thom
Ltd., $10.00; Wilkinson & Haynes Co.,
Ltd., $5.00; Cave, Shepherd & Co., $15.00;
Central Foundry Ltd., $10.00; Barbados
Cotton Factory Ltd., $10.00; B'dos Electric
Supply Corp., Ltd., $10.00; J. N. Harri-
oe Co., Ltd., $10.00 Private Donations

1.00,
The dance realised $2,276.08, of
which $1,415.00 has been donated
to various local charities, and the
baiance will be distributed at
Christmas.
_ The winners of the prize draw-
ing which took place at the dance
are as follows: Mr. F. D. Barnes.
Lexham, Garrison, — Basket of
Flowers. Professor Beasley, Pine
Hill—One Gallon of Rum.
Again with sincere thanks vo
you and everyone who assisted ir.
making this function a success,
LEE NIBLOCK,

Hon. Secretary,





WHILE YOU DRINK
EMPIRE COFFEE

_ The Cheapest ia Town
rder

J&R BAKERY

SPECIALS

“Clevelands,”
Britton’s Cross Road.

a

necessity for the writer's name |
not for publication, but as an |








HIS EXCELLENCY T

FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 1956



HE GOVERNOR, the Lord

Bishop, and the Headmaster of the Lodge School each








in his speech the spi



poy”, counselled the boys
“iy these words: “It is the extra
‘+ made whether in school, or
Lagi playing field, or in life
ij attracts success,” and he
on to emphasise the necessity
od work and concentration.
“| do congratulate you Mr.

farmer and your staff on the
ic and other meres

but above all on one

Thee Thich does not attract
ae or prizes, but, in fact, is

: greatest reward a Headmaster
= earn. I refer to the general
ytmosphere as reflected in the
loyalty of the students, their gen-

, behaviour and appearance
and their alertness,” the Governor





2

g

ac} felt this atmosphere very
strongly on two occasions last

































First, when with Her
| Highness Princess Alice, we
through the ranks of the

and secondly, when the
tatives of the school visit-
ed Government House. Although
representatives at Govern-
House modestly stood in the
ranks, it was not their height
dress, Which attracted my at-
ten but their whole bearing, I
s they were from vhe Lodge
" gehool, and I felt very proud of
the Lodge School, and of Barba-

drove

e.. Governor then emphasised
‘the essential need for a spiritual
tion in the lives of all

Headmaster’s Report
THE Headmaster in his address
pointed out that it was necessary
we should have a spiritual back-
gound in our lives, and said that
we should look to the church to
pa supply this spiritual background.
"He was delivering his repori
#M of the school’s activities for the
; ear,
i Peaving welcomed the Gov-
emor to the School for the first
‘time he said: The School now
‘qumbers 267 pupils—an increase
of 30 boys—on the number given
/at his last Speech Day by the
jing Headmaster, who, tha
| School will be delighted to know,
{has risen above the rank of
Schoolmaster, and] is now busily
engaged in spreading the cause
of Education in Kenya, A bril-
jiant Classic, who could at al
moment’s notice turn the most
qrosaic English passage into)
“melodioys Latin Verse, Mr. |
fvans is undoubtedly a linguistic |
atist; speaking metaphorically;
mee give him the building, and
he could ornate and embellish it,
but what he found most irksome
was the long drawn-out effart of
constructing the edifice. He is
the third of a brilliant se-
‘quence: O. deC. Enmtage,
ee memory is loved and
fevered throughout the West
Indies for his all round greatness;
the Rev. H. B. Gooding, for his
learning and piety; and Mr. T. L.
| fvans for his scholarship ~ and
generosity. For the past 50 years
thd more the School has been
lead, and in its policy directed,
by 3 exceptional men; each of
whom, so it seemed to me, en-
feavoured to give the School a
definite lead in that particular
sphere of academics in which his
own interests and aptitude lay.
Needs oi School

For myself, I am reminded of
the question of the passer-by—
lere, my good man, are you

q this great mastiff?” “Me!
| stacious no, I am not Jeading
> Iam carefully watching
where he wants to go and am
taking him there.” In scholastic
Patlance, I shall endeavour cor-
"etly to interpret the needs of
School, and to ‘assess accu-
tately in what direction or di-;
rections the particular talent of
our School, as it unfolds itseli
inclines, and to supply these
heeds. A$ matters stand now, the
School shows a definite bias to-
| Wards Science and English; ana
tis fortunate that the School
at present two very
fompetent men in charge of its
mtific studies—Mr. Hodgson
ad Mr, Gooding—Mr. Hodgson
Sur Chemist, holds a First Class
of Manchester, and Mr.
ming, Our Biologist, is a Gold
mallist of McGill. In addition,
© Governing Body has just ex-
d the Science Department
ing a Physics Laboratory,
# So all that the School now
“sur, ' complete its Science
no is a first rate Physicist.
, he a ag School can offer
Pus the most up-to-date
oom teaching in the West

Time Presses, there remains
Much to say, and we cannot



























E MES. SAVAGE,
Pion. Dougall finished the 10



ritual side of education, at the

e School oer Day yesterday afternoon,
The Governor, calling himself a, go into each department of study

with the same detail, and I mere-
ly mention, en passant, that the
Sixth Form Classics Seotion is of-
fering both English and Classics
for the Oxford & Cambridge High-
er Certificate this year, and the re-
sponsibility for this extra English
teaching rests upon Mr. Newsam,
a member of our already depleted
Classical Staff.

A Headache

_In these days, the mere men-
tion of Staff is quite a head-ache
for the Heads of Schools: indeed
«my senior colleague, the Head-
master of Harrison College, has
had two such head-aches, I am
suffering my first with the de-
parture of Mr. Walker, a spec-
dalist with a first in Mathematics.
In the main, however, the ola
brigade stands firm; and Mr.
Crichlow—or more familiarly
*Crich’—is still the Staff's refer-
ence on all debatable points.
Last Term, Mr, Cooper, who haa
endeared himself both to the boys
and staff, left us to return to
England; and in September this
year we shall be losing Mr. Mas-
siah. “Young Wilfred Massiah,
you may remember, gaining nis
Oxford & Cambridge Higher
Certificate in July 1948: in Sep-
tember 1949 he joined the Stat?
of his old School, and I am hap-
py to say that he will be going
up to Oxford in September 1950
to qualify as a Schoolmaster
In the September Term of 1949,
Mr. Michael Timpson, an Hon-
ours Graduate and MA., of St
John’s College Oxford, with »
Diploma in Education ‘to boot
joined the School. By introduc-
ing his pupils to the art of pic-
torial representation, he has
vividly brought to life again the
stirring events of the Renaissance
Period: and you will find, staged
by him, in the upper storey,
Physics Laboratory a little ex-
hibition of graphic art, the
of juniors whom he
TI am sure you will be pleased to
see what your boys are now at-
tempting in this field. To many
boys, especially those to whom
abstract reasoning is difficult and
its rewards elusive, pictorial re-
presentation gives not only
sense of greater realism, but af-
fords an outlet for expression.
and so brings relief from a feel-
ing of inadequacy and frustration
Further relief, too, in this sphere
has been ours for the asking, and
we owe a debt of gratitude to the
following gentlemen of the Brit-
ish Council:—to Mr. Tucker, for
a most interesting lantern slide
display: to Mr. Harrison ‘or the
very kind interest he has taken
in the introduction of Art Class-
es; to Mr. Dons, for his lead in
musical appreciation; and to Mr.
Aubrey-Smith who, as you may
know, has been seconded to the
University College of the West
Indies by the University of Cam-
bridge, for his interesting valk on
Education. —

a

Heartiest Congratulations

And now I make mention of
Cricket and John Goddard, to
whom I extend our heartiest con-
gratulations on his appointmeni
as Captain of the West Indies
Team to tour England this year.
John possesses a wonderful spirit
of optimism, which defies defeav,
an invincible optimism, which
can change probable defeat into a
glorious victory. Is it not re-
markable that Barbados should
provide 6 members ouv of 16, and
more remarkable still that 5 of
these hai] from our leading Schools
—2 from Harrison College, Wal-
cott and Williams; 1 from Com-
bermere, Worrell; and 2 from tha
Lodge, Marshall and Goddard?

My friends, the growth of Edu-

cation proceeds apace, every
branch of it is progressively
spreading out. Physics, for ex-
ample, uppermost now in our

minds because of its own spectac-
ular advance in recent years, has
become much more abstract, and
our Schools need specialist staf.—
more of them if we are to hold
our own in scholarship in a mod-
ern world, and if we are to carry
worthily the torch of learning
which is ours by right of ovr
tradition. Deny us this need, and
we may have to write Ichabod
over our portals; but grant us
these in full measure, and we
march from strength to strength.
We would therefore counsel all
who are truly interested in Edu-
cation—our Governing Bodies, our
leaders in Politics, our Economic
Adviser, our Executive Council—
te consider the special needs of
our Academic Schools in the mat-
ter of staff. We need experts in



wife of H.E. presents a prize to Dougali, Division Til

0-yard sprint in 121/10 secs

work | Latin, more often the request is
has taught.) more general, Languages: I hope

SEXTRA SCHOOL EFFORT Uttered
| ATTRACTS SUCCESS

Says Governor At Lodge
School Speech Day



—————$——

| Clamouring loudly for these needs
| Science, Mathematics,

| English and Modern Lang
| we do not

Classics,
uages, in
‘ feel that we are being
selfish—Education is now open to|
| all—all our sons and daughters!
Stand to benefit from this teaching.
Expert Higher Certificate teaching
requires skill and acumen cf a)
er high order, and it must not
be forgotten that in our Sixth
| Form, boys are really doing first,
and, im some cases, second year
University work. We do not indeed |
mean to enter into the arena of

politics nor the sphere of eco-|
nomics, when we say that we
recognise that we are 200,000

souls dependent on a single indus- |
try, and that there are definite
limiting factors to our resources;
but such is our confidence in our
statesmen and our public citizens,
that we persistently cherish the
belief that this problem of ade-|
quately staffing our leading schools
will not be found insoluble.
School Matters

I have digressed somewhat, and
to get back to the proper domain
of School matters:—what, a parent
may ask, is the broad distinction|
between School Certificate and/
Higher Certificate requirements, |
Briefly, a candidate for the Schools}
is required to have a fairly sound!
general knowledge of a variety of |
subjects. 5 is the minimum num-
ber, and our boys offer 7, from
Latin and Greek, French, English, |
Maths, Botany, Chemistry, Biology
and Scripture. For the Higher
Certificate, the candidate is re-
quired to narrow down his choice
of subjects to one, or maybe iwe
at the most, and to pursue his
particular line of study to an ad-
vanced level. For example, School
Certificate Mathematics entails |
only a knowledge of Arithmetic
Elementary Algrebra, Geometry
and a little Trigonometry; whereas {
the Mathematics for the Higher



|

|

Certificate includes advanced |}
work in 8 branches — namely, |
Algebra, Trigonometry, The Dif-
ferential and Integral Calcu-
lus, Statics, Dynamics, Pure and
Analytical Geometry. Speciali-
Sation of this intensive nature
exists in all the other subjects

and, this gives me the opportunity
to point out that specialisation be- ;
gins with the Higher Certificate in
the Sixth Form. Too cften do we
have to cope with the request that
a boy may be allowed to give up

|



that parents will forgive me for}
saying that such requests do not |
fit in with the curriculum of this
School, and that it is very neces-
sary to veto them, both on the}
ground of practical application to
the working arrangements of this |
School, as well as from an ideal-)
istic point of view; for there would |
be a grave danger to academic!
education in this Island if we
allowed it to assume, in the forma-
tive years, a too specialised or
technical aspect.

Our Youth
Our youth is far too prone to
consider only the utilitarian side,
and to neglect the aesthetic in



| presented

{had sent

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| A Forged
Cheque For $210



Assize Sentence Postponed

AFTER 45 MINUTES’ DELIBERATION a petit Jury

j

the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday found Ernest Adol-
phus Murrell of Bank Hall guilty of endeavouring to obtain
$210.00 from Barclays Bank, Ltd. by virtue of a forged
cheque, knowing it to be forged.

Sentence was postponed.

Murrell appeared on alterna-
tive counts of uttering a forged
document and endeavouring to
obtain money by virtue of
forged instrument.

His Honour Mr. G. L. Taylor,
Acting Chief Justice, presidea
and Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C.,
Solicitor General, prosecuted on
behalf of the Crown,

Police

First witness for the Prosecu-
tion was Sgt. B. King of the
Police who said that on November
16 last year, Sgt. Bourne had
made a statement to him and had
handed him a cheque—12-Ac

76733, purporting to be signed
by Mr. Beaubrun, then Comp-
troller of Supplies. The cheque

had beem issued for $210.00. Sgt
King exhibited to the jury the
counterfoil of the same cneque
as well as the book from which
the cheque had been taken,

Sgt. Bourne had also handea
him six keys op a ring and a
separate key

The Bank

Harold de C. Parris, a cashie.
Ot barciays Bank told vhe Cou.
that on Novemper 2, 1949, tne
accused came to the Bank anu
him a cheque. Tne
cheque in Court was the same,
and it was in favour of Chester-

|neld Herbert for $210.00.

It purported to have been
siguea by uvit. beaubrua, sala
Parris, He aid not recogmze

tne Signature, and he had relerreu
it tO WvlisS Meath, an Accountaie.

Miss Meath revurned him te
cneque and maae a stalement to |
hum.

He called the accused anu
asked him it he wanted casa 101
il, and tne accused said ne ala.

He also asked the accused who
him, and tne accuseu
acpiled wal IMP, beaucorun had
sent him. He did not casn wwe
cneque, but returned it 0 Mus»
Heath,

He was called to the Manager's
otice about nve or ten munutes
later, There he saw the aerena-
ant. The Manager showed him
(Parris) the cheque .and askeu
him if that was the same one tna:
the accused had presented to him.
He said yes,

To the accused Parris said that
he had made no attempt to waik

Out of the bank or run out. He
had said “Beaubrun.” He migh’
nave said “i. C. Beaubrun.”

He did not look at the numbers
on the cheque, but he recogniseu

it from the manner in which the
words “two hundred and ten’
were written.

Sgt. King recalled said he was

present in the Magistrate’s Court

; + 3 ; yhen Mr. Beaubrun had given
education. Indeed, it is becoming | W” brur
increasingiy necessary to remind | ¢Vidence. The Court had calles
our children that culture is as im- |92 Mr. Beaubrun to write on a

portant as acumen, and that while
Mathematics and the Sciences are
first-rate tools for carving a liv-
ing out of life, it is from the study
of languages that we derive our
more humanising influences, our
liberality of thought and breadth
of outlook, our traditions. We}
know that many of our youth re-j;
fer to the Ancient Languages of
Greece and Rome as dead lan-j}
guages; why study a dead lan-
guage, they say: to mention only |
one of the most, obvious reasons, |
it is because our own English is
}partially built upon Latin and)
| Greek; and, paradoxical as it may |
| seem, a thorough and adequate ,
knowledge of English can only be!
obtained via Latin and Greek. I
should like to venture into details,
but need I remind you how inter-
esting is the history of some of our
every-day words; time, however, |
does not allow of this, and
merely pronounce the generalisa-
tion that parents should encourage
their boys to do their best with
their languages. It will help their
spelling by the process of associa~
tion, it will make their reading the
more entertaining, it will help the
phrasing of their written English,
it will teach them—as nothing else
can—the structure of their own
language, and—most important of
all—it is very necessary in life
that our youngsters be encouraged
to do the things they don’t parti-
cularly like, and to grapple with,
rather than to evade, the things
they find difficult; for life is full |
of difficulties. a

It has not been easy to say this,
but on the other hand it is more
difficult to be altogether silent on
a matter which so intimately af-
fects the lives and happiness of
our own children, and of other
people’s children in our charge.

Thanks

The Lord Bishop moved the vote
of thanks. He thought the audi-
ence would agree with him, he
said, that His Excellency having
decided to call himself a “new
boy”, had acquitted himself re- |
markably well, and he hoped it
would not be the last Speech Day
he would attend at the Lodge
School. ¥

Referring to what he said were
two things arising out of the Head-
master’s speech, the Bishop said
that first of all what he would ask
parents to bear in mind particular-
ly, was that the whole trend of the
educational world was chaoging so
rapidly that unless they were pre-
pared to keep pace with it the
boys and girls in the island were
goirig to suffer considerably.

Not very long ago the legisla-
ture had made provision for the
awarding of four Barbados Schol- |

i



arships. That was not simply
to give two or three more scholar-

two or three more
@ On page 7.

| What’sOn Today |

Court of Grand Sessions at
10.00 a.m.

Athletic Sports, St. Michael's
Girls’ School at 2.45 p.m.

Mobile Cinema, Spa Planta-
tion yard, St. Joseph at
7.30 p.m.

ships to

|

piece of paper the words “‘Chester-

field Herbert, two hundred ana

‘ten dollars”, and to sign his name

under the amount.
had kept the paper.

Miss P. Heath Clerk, gave evi-
dence corroborating that given by
Parris, and said in reply to the
accused that she was certain that
she did had a conversation with
him in the bank.

Percy S. Kirby, Aqcountant at
the bank said that the cheque
had been brought to him by Miss
Heath for reference. He haa
looked at it and discovered tha
the signature was not Mr. Beau-

The Cour

brun’s. He telephoned Mr
Beauprun, and_ retained the
cheque. While waiting for Mr
Beaubrun to come to the bank

he engaged the accused in conver-
sation, He had asked him if he

was Chesterfield Herbert, and he}

Said no, that he had been sent
by someone else. Before Mr.
Beaubrun arrived, he had taken
the accused into the Manager’s
Office. When Mr. Beaubrun ar-
rived, he said that the cheque
had not been drawn by him.

To Murrell: I asked you if you
were Chesterfield Herbert. I
may have asked you if you came
to cash the cheque for yourself
You did tell.me that you were
not cashing the cheque for your-
self. The conversation between
you and I may have lasted for
about three minutes. You did
not run out of the bank.

The Manager

Mr. R. B. MacKenzie, Manager
of Barclays Bank, said that on
November 2 he was in his office
at the Bank. The Accountant,
Mr. Kirby, came in to him and
brought a cheque. He went to the
counter and interviewed Murrell.
He asked Murrell if he was
Chesterfield .Herbert and he said
“no”. He then said that
name was Adoly: us Payne.

He









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then asked Murrell who was
Herbert and Murreil said that
Herbert was a grocer in paxter’s

the cheque.

He asked Murrell where he
worked and he said at Rogers
Grocery in Baxter’s Road. He
asked Murrell to come into his
office and asked one of the
messengers to show him in.

Mr. Beaubrun arrived shortly
after and Murrell was still in his
otfice. He asked Mr, Beaubrun
if he had signed the cheque anu
he said that he did not.

He next phoned Col. Michelin
and asked him to send over a
policeman. Later two detectives
arrived. He told Sgt. Bourne,
one of the detectives, that he
wanted him to make investiga-
ions. Mr. Beaubrun stated that
Murrell was his messenger and
asked Murrell for a cheque that
he had given him to deliver to
Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfiela
and he made no reply.

Sgt. Bourne then accused an.

cauuoned him. He = searcne.
wiurreil’s pocket and found tnc
counterfoil and keys. Murrei.
was then taken away by tne
caetectives.

He said_all that Mr. Beaubrun
had said and done was in the
presence of Murrell, |

To Murrell; Betore the Police
Magistrate I mentioned Chester- |
field but did not remember the
second name Herbert I also did!
not remember the name of the;
srocery and vne Police Magistrate
uid not allow me to refer to my
notes on the back of the cheque.
{ made these notes in your pres-
ence before Mr, Beaubrun ar-
rived.

Keys

Sgt. Cecil Bourne of the C.I.D.,;
last witness for the Prosecution
said that on November 2 he was
sent to Barclay’s Bank. When he
got there he saw Murrell, Mr.
Seaubrun and the Manager, Mr.
Mac Kenzie.

The Manager



showed him a
cheque and told him that Murrell
had brought it to the Bank. He
took the cheque and showed it to
Murrell. He told him that he
had been accused of uttering a
forged cheque with intent to de-

fraud. He searched Murrell and
found a counterfoil, two

the keys he found one which
could unlock Mr. _ Beaubrun’s

desk. Another single key was
claimed by the office and he gave
it to one of the clerks.

To Murrell:
key to Mr.
your
presence

I did not try the
Beaubrun’s desk in
presence, I tried it in the
of P.C. Babb and Mr
Beaubrun on the following
morning. I made extensive en-
quiries and checked the whole of
Baxter’s Road and Tudor Street
for Chesterfield Herbert's Grocery
but did not find it.

Murrell
Beaubrun’s

next asked that Mr.
evidence be read to
the Court. In this evidence Mr
Beaubrun told how he kepv his
cheque Book in. the right hanx
lraw of nis desk. On November
his attention was drawn to

single
keys and a bunch of keys. Among

‘raw being left open. On _ the
following day he was called t
Barclays Bank where he identi-
the Cheque

Sed and

Book,

cheque

The Defence

In defence Murrell stated that
m November 1 Mr. Beaubrun
isked him to go into the market
ind buy some slips for his goat
He told him that he was not going
because it was a practice of hi:
to send him for fish and meat etc
and he was not going for slips.

He said that Mr. Beaubrun said
“you are not going for slips now
but when you go up there you
are going to work for nothing.”

He next told how Mr. Beau-
brun gave him the cheque with
the counterfoil and everything
He said that after drawing the
money he intended taking back
the money to Mr, Beaubrun,

To Mr. Reece; I did not tell the
Manager of the Bank that
name was Adolphus Payne.

Murrell next addressed the jury
He submitted that the whole case
against him was a_ conspiracy |
between Sgt. Bourrte, the Manag- |
er of the Bank’and Mr. Beaubrun

He told the jury “Let justice
be done though the Heavens
should fall,” and that they woulé
not be doing justice if they found
him guilty.

The Acting Chief Justice later
summed up and the Jury returned
their verdict,

The Court then adjourned until
10.00 a.m. today.

my





mula





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Sugar Stored
In Bonds At
Speighistown

S of the Leeward parisnes 0:
the island is being stored in bonas
at Shermans and Speigntstown

actorie

daily.
Kvery year, ships call
Speightstown for sugar to be

Shipped to U.K. Sugar ships have
called at Bridgetown already
year but none has called at
Speightstown.

Sugar shippers of Speightstown
told the “Advocate” that they cia
not know when the first ship will
call,

HE ANNUAL meeting of the



Belleplaine Sports and Social
Club took place on Wednescay
at 8 p.m. at the Alleyne School.

Mr. L. E. R. Gill was elected
patron of the Club. Other offices
filed were as follows:— Rev.!
G. C. M. Woodroffe, President, Mr.|
K. G. Douglin, Vice Presiaent, |
Mr. J. E. Graham, Secretary,
Mr. I. Bourne, Treasurer, Mr. w.|
Jordan, Mr. C. Hewitt and Mr.|
C. W. Springer, members of the
committee.

Mr. H. Springer is skipper of
the cricket team and Mr. Mc!
Donald Smith, Vice Skipper
Skipper of the football is Mr. Mc!
Donald Smith and Mr. C
is Vice Skipper.

OUNTED POLICE can stil!

be seen patrolling Broad
Street trying to prevent conges
tion on the streets,

Yesterday they (police) were
busy as many housewives were
in town trying to get bargains

from the various stores that
holding sales.

are

HEN THE FINALS the
Bagatelle Tournament vas

played at the Police games room,
Coleridge Street PC Eacie
Phillips who was the table tenni

champion last month defeated
band cadet Grant after keen
contest. In the semi-finals P.(

Cadogan lost to Cadet Grant an
cadet Dodson to Phillips. Thi
is the first time that P.C. Phil
has won the finals Baga
telle tournament
EN JIM BEST and Lotti
Smith both of My 1
Hill appeared before His Worshi)
Mr. H. A. Talma
inflicting bodily harm
Walcott on November 14, ‘
were each fined.
to pay 40/- and
days and Smith 30/- and
costs in 14 days. They were)
given an alternative of one mont
imprisonment
TILLIAM HARRIS a. sai
of the SS Lloyd Cre
reported that he was robbed of hi
wallet which was valued ;
and contained $52.00
Wednesday.
ECILIA GOODMAN of
Hall St Johr told th
police that a goat valued at $25.
was stolen from the pen in he
yard between March 11 and 12

In the

yesterday

on Perce

Best was orders

3/-

costs
h
ol

10

on

$25.1

in cash

Foste



FIRE OF unknown
broke out at Lower Estat
Plantation yesterday about
am. and 24 acres of ripe cane
were burnt This fire
a field at Belle Plantat
burnt 17 acres hich
nroperty of Hon'ble G
Lascelles
Another cane fire ke
Pine Plantation on Tuc

102 holes of canes we I int



Sentence Postponed

Reuben Green pleaded
at the Court of Gr ;
yesterday to a chars rf ali
ne travelling watch valued $50
one leather wallet valued $2, on
black safety

ane me Lor

razor vaiued $1.80
ind cash amounting to $22, total
‘mount $75.80, property i Re
1. E. Griffiths, from

welling
house on November 9. His He

Our postponed sentence

YEARS AGO

(BARBADOS ADVOCATE,
March 17, 1925)



or
me

STANLEY BENN AT CAMP

During the past week tne cai p
f Stanley Benn, the m« eriou
contender for championship |
ours was visited by a great
ber of local spurting genie
They were entertained by
and his sparring partners
reparation for the grim fight t
e staged next Monday at th:
Olympic Theatre wivn

Smili

erent
noone

White

White Cotton Pique Voile_. RM

Cotton Voile 77 & R(he
Rayon Spun _.._.. $1.00

Rayon Satin... Oe

White

White

White

All 36 inches wide.



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID.

12 & 18 Broad Street

10, il,





|
|
Hewitt}
|

Cotton Leno Voile___ Yije

Sex





PAGE FIVE



Will Meet In Antigua

Advocate Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, March 16,
\ meeting of administrators
commissioners of the four
eward presidencies will be held
Antigua on .March 28 when
itters of cornmon interest to the

Le



His Honour Charlesworth hg3,
Commissioner of Montserrat w
act as Administrator in Antigua
during the absence of 0. St. J.
Wayne—who is on five months’
leave in the U.K. During his leave
Mr. Wayne will partake in discus-

ur presidencies are to be dis-jsions of the Colonial Office’s req

cussed end the meeting is likely to
last for several days.

|



|
:

\|| SIMPLY AMAZING
VALUES!

3
» Bw

Ree P ) eB





SRINKLE
GEORGETTE

in White, Black
Blue, Green

1)
I Peach,
and Pink

$1.88 yd.

rN

REPE

in

s
Emerald

and Turquoise
SL.6L
8

| SHARKSKIN

White
$L.70 and $1.89 yd.

HARRISONS

BROAD STREE?

Cerise,

|
|
a
| SATIN BACK
yd.

only

|
|

|
|
}







2 our No. 1 Show Case.







ly

BBS RBEBBEE ESA.
|S PSS eBeeeeeaeeaaaeaee
it

eee nee nn went

| SPECIFY

—“EVERITE’

ASBESTOS - CEMENT
CORRUGATED SHEETS

AND

“TURNALL’

| ASBESTOS







vised ten-year plan for Antigua.
—(By Cable.) -

“Iam a proud consumer of....

GOAT CHOW

The cows begin their young oneson.. .
CALF STARTENA
)btainable from H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd.

mae eermaages
a @



——



YOU MUST

SEE THESE SPECIAL LINES!
f é ,

















4

;














de FRIDAY, MApe |
BARE S ADVOCATE sa i ek > MARCH
PAGE SIX sn MMI iil celal . = ee
sucker rer ee = |
HENRY




























Te diet I

!

FOR GOOD




; Town
, Silver -
it } oa Poliyy
ry |
4 : Clark’s Blood aye
fee | \ [ Sul ; Mi
hi | S E R I . an Maubbs Ammonia

Macassar 0;
Mothaks Oil (Red g ate



SHADES—
VALUE- —

| USE

“STAG”

BRAND

READY MIXED :

PAINTS

AN I. C. 1. PRODUCT.
-

A.S. BRYDEN & SONS vos) LTD.

AGENTS.



|
|
|
(
DRUG STORE
| Phone saleridge St.

ate POO S oe

BY WALT DISNEY

| (SHAMROCK LANDY ROW

THAT MEANS Ww {. TH

IRELAND | PTREASURE 1S
PH" @BAP LUCK!

ng

.

,

>








LOOK! THERE'S
ETHING ON THE
sae BACK!















rr
|A_BAG FULL OF )
JELLY SRANG FF







Ot
PS ; > 6666006 FOC SO SOCOD
OP PPD OOPS SPP PPPS OS SS SSFP SPP SPF O SEPP PSI LAL ADPL AP PPD





K. @. CANNON ..... - The Biddle of the Red Domine QS





a ee



HAVE A PEEK! IF YOU
















TRY THE WINDOW, STIRRUPS.) WHAT WE NGEO IS \| STA/KE ME, THERE JS! | J a ~
oun ALY! THEAs's ores 'e HOVER PLANE NOT A PLANE, BUT LEAVE YOUR ARMFUL / Fhe “eae
WICKL AING! Sam BUT NOTHING'S || A D/NGHY -RIGHT OF BLONDE. WE j Sau na
SOMEONE COMI! Cu “ COULD MAKE !T!. A YRS 4 kid ; bi
Se fon may mean Kidney trouble
We NA a; = yy
; ~
=’ & 2 f



A function of the kidneys is to eliminate
harmful impurities from the system. If the
kidneys grow sluggish, these impurities
in particular excess acid- accumulate and
settle, and become a cause of pain and
suffering in joints and muscles.

The way to tackle the root of the trouble
is to help the kidneys. “They should be
toned up with De Witt’s Pills — the medicine
made specially for this purpose. De Witt’s
Pills have a soothing, cleansing and
antiseptic action on the kidneys that f
brings them back to perform their
natural function properly.

Ye Witt’s Pills are a very well-tried







a,
Es
Kea

“My teeth really
ARE whiter— _

Â¥
thanks to the Irium b
a












rc . remedy. They are sold all over the world om
BY FRANK STRIKER in Pepsodent / . | and we have many letters from sufferers are made specily fe
aT RG aprree Tre | telling of relief gained, after years of BACKACHE

HERIFF, 1 CANIT STAY WITH YOU! ) suffering after taking De Witt’s Pills,
” ] They act on the kidneys quickly. Why JOINT PAINS
not uy them for your trouble? Go to RHEUMATIC




You'll be really excited when you see the sparkling new smile that
Pepsodent gives you. For Pepsodent is the only toothpaste that









your chemist and obtain a supply to-day. LUMBAGO
contains [rium — and there’s no more effective teeth cleaning sub- eth SCIATICA
stance than Irium known to dental science! It’s the Irium in } Se pre
. i - 2 ij j ing
Pepsodent that removes the dulling film from your teeth, leaving | OUR GUARANTEE

them whiter than ever before.

THE TOOTHPASTE
WITH IRIUM

KX

X%-PD 7-151-50 PEPSODENT LTD., LONDON, ENGLAND

and the i ent
all conform to rigid
standards of purity,

2a
ds Nase cure) iF Tolel i








-_—_———

QUAKER OATS Zeahiecr

vild TALLER, HUSKIER children!



IT WONDER WHAT
GGS 9 WORTH- | |

AF |






RIP KIRBY

wy tb |) / 4NO Next magame 77> Sw 1 1)

: ( XASKAS LatesT 22° JARgp iL)
CREATICN:, MOOBLEO & uy \e- eB Ih,

SY MISS HONEY / I’ AB

BY ALEX RAYMOND










KITTY MY SLIPPERY FRIEND y OF COURSE RIP,
MR. MORAY HAS JUST SLIPPED) 'SN’T MY KAREN
OUT... DON'T KNOW WHY... THE LOVELIEST
PLEASE BEA GOOD GIRL) OF THEM arcs |
WHILE I LEAVE You FOR EXCEPT Your
A FEW MINUTES.... BEAUTIFUL HONEY
Conia, NO DOUBT..|

THE CHILDREN! ©

+




ABOUT RIP
KIRBY!




BIGGER
FOOD VALUE

, monne it Rt BBALONG
NATURE'S WONDER FOOD |

oeennenententeeneneeal ee —— 3
Quaker Oats is Nature's Wonder Food... no other whole grain

cereal supplies more nourishment for growing youngsters!

This tasty, nutritious breakfast food is a real bargain in nour-

f ishment. Children thrive on Quaker Oats; it’s rich in the

> e

essential food elements growing youngsters must have to
become tall, strong and energetic.

, ENID BLYTON
Quaker Oats hel by N

s develop—and maintain— ;
ibe dole Gin TR op—and maintain—pep and stamina

hat makes it an ideal breakfast for the whole





















- ‘ family. tt 4
ae , THE VOICE OF A STRANGER
THE ' Today . . . buy Delicious, Nourishi . * .
JHE __PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES “hs Pies SN Saree it Gare day! me arte Ones tor bigger —by Emyr Humphreys
SSS TARI,DOVOU LT Mone THAN | [iF COULD ONIY PAGE TROT i i teens
THING WRONG WITH ¥ en LOVE HIM) EVER.DAD.HES | JORDERING HIM TO Lovie oN MORE REASONS THAN EVER TO BUY QUAKER OATS FOUR STUAR? PQATRAIS ;
(01) THAT 6000 FOOD CAEN THOUGH, Sis EVERY | |HMMs-IVEAN IDEA =-ife crany. MORE ’
t INSHINE WON'T < U KNOW HE ae BUT SOS LOVE<< Tom ehow : : MINERALS ............ for strong bones and teeth alin Hugh Does Williamson
ao BEEN a 3 Pa vit | i MORE Proteins... to: growth; solid flesh ond muscle ,
SO WORRIED! Sy a DE: er
ers =f \ ee 71 |” MORE cansowronans..-.. ‘iwasenenee PEARS CYCLOPAEDIA 3
Te 6 IK 44 ah) © MORE virnmans (8; ond 82). .20rn food into “‘hody-tuel““ WHITAKERS ALMANACK
| Aeek a = | Tomorrow for Breakfast! + *
if : Quaker Oats ‘Cook it, witha, : i ADVOCATE CTATIONEN
S| | for 272 minutes, That's all, \ | J '
L deen | { fe



cece



eee

I en tartare rarer iterate tanita tie aii ie ital ee tae







































MARCH 17, 1950

==

1,50
1.20}

1¢

3

v

|
|
|



is MEMORIAM

'G MEMORY o!
re cotR BUTCHER who fell
ch 17, 1947.
“off the edge of grief,
é turns back every leaf.

. Clair Butcher. *17.3.50—1n
G MEMORY of our dear
a WHITE —
hi 17th March 1} ¥
iis ther so gentle and kind
memories you've left

and nights you've bore your

i

i care but all in vain,
Aineelt knew what was best
“you home with him to rest

’ shine upon her

\aving sons:—

k Garfield White; Rodney,
goat and he, Anthony and. Sy:

ain dren).
gqn, (Grandehil 17.3.50—In

ALK



=
OMO

Anglia in very good
2592.
16.3.50—Sn

ah 198 Ford
AB Me al

Prefect Ford 1948 model in
. Apply: United Motor

condition.
: Roebuck Street. Dial 2741
" 16.3.50—4n
UXH SALOON (WYVERN
‘approximately 20,000. $1,500.(i
Garage. Dial 461¢.

15.3.50—3



BEDFORD VAN—Done 800
- driven. Broadway Dress
17.3.50

RIFUGAL PUMP, com
h.p. Cobra Engine—
1% inch Hose delivery
ly K. L. Chandler, 2427.
16.3.50—2:
Treadle Sewing
, LIKE NEW—$14
Trafalgar Street, Dis
17.3.50—1>

0 OUTFITS up to No. 10
; mtation set are now avail-
. F. Harrison & Co. as wel
sets and spare parts. Then
2 also the famous HORN”

electric train sets and many
Get them at ee ISON'S
17.3.50—2:

Half bred Lamrador Ma
Tom Wilkinso |
17.3.50—3n e.0.¢

LLANEOUS
ul PIPES & FITINGS, Size
es 1%, 1%, 2; 2%, 3, & 4 inen
e Tyre Co., Trafalgar St
) 2 16.3.50—t. f.n
TA






























O — Onions being scarce
Eschalots which we offer 48 cents
» Harold Proverbs & Co., Ltd.
a 11.3,50—6n.
few No. 7 Caledonia Coal
, necessity ee your home
y priced. pply:
,& Sons Ltd., Roebuc
15.3.50—3n
at Mayfair Gift Shop. From
‘et up—See these today.
15.3.50—6n

sae SERS: Ladieg a
ombs), Denta e
Brushes, Manicure Brushes
h Complexion Brushes,
Ladies and Gents Combe
Wall Brushes, Toilet
Brushes, Utility
Brushes, Dry Mops,









1]

Fo English Bath Tubs
Less 10% for cash sale
Co., Ltd. 12.3.50t.f.n

SHEETS in 24 and 2¢

ott. ins. 8ft. and 9ft. lengths
pRild steel plates 1/16, 1/8 ‘4.
9/8 in various sixes. Enquire

lyre Company, Trafalgar Street.
1,3,50—t.f.n

MOSQUITO NET HOOPS can
a are stronger Bi
square ones, size 28”
id 36’ diameter. Phone 8322
17.3%.50—3n




om

. Rich concentrated vita



f
ene Contains B2. Price 74c. Ib
from all Grocers and Druv
17.3 50.



INDO

& DOORS, (12) Frenc}
conn (%) Double Sash- Win-
Front door and Case

Windows, (2) Jalousie door:
(3) Bedroom-doors and Cases.
“ ae Peel built of Pitch
Phy aoa2 » I. Weatherhead, Max

i
Pa

17.3.50—4r
bs
: Gerberas, Purple. Grounr
Caracas Daisys. Phone 209
17.3.59—9

ON'S TEA: Fresh supply now /
mine Of your grocer, and if you are
a ae tan? ar

us
free Sample withrv
buy.. John F, Hutson Lim
17.3.50—3

_ WANTED

————

PHER: Experienced Sten-
oe oe office
z Pp. in person ‘oO
& Co., 151 & 152 Roebuck:
16,3,50—t.f.n

2 OVERSEER—For Cleland Plan-
Sy . Salary $105.00 per
* 11.3.50—6n.

to

SELLANEOUS

" LICENSE. See Harold
mt & Co., Limited, High Street
17.3.60—3

BEER BO:
Quantity—Pay %e each
Wer to Musson’s Warehouse
16,3.

bse, gO", Bungalow or Buildin
. £

SIDE, Hastings, Worthing ©
Box 44, c/o Advocair

16.3.50—4n

meageNTLEWOMAN of inde-
. leaving Canada owing
ulties desirous post as

Panion or companion. Ap-|
cliffe, Canadian Bank|
Chemainus, Vancouver |
14.3.50—5n. j
’

ow







TO?

. ®3 Manageress or assistant
Ms fi, Chip in Garbados or Jamaica |
® r highly experienced
WA's. c/o Advocate |

17.3.50—3n

RD
70 BUY, Small Busines
5% Petticulars X.Y.Z., /o|





[CLASSIFIED ADS. | xx

Week Sun
$1.90 1.20 |
|
02 03

42 f


















FOR RENT







i 15.3.50—3n | Frances W. Smith, Sch. Freedom Fleary

He ICE—Marhill St. next to w

me ane & Co. For further particu-
pply W. B. Hutchinson & Co
14.3.50—t.f.n.

furnished with
at Indramer, Worthing
13.1 506

o



FLATS futly
erator and linen
Yel 8364



le and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.,
se that they can now communicate
the following ships through their
4 Coast Station:—

FARAWAY”, St

furnished, Garages. "ae ant oi
‘athing beach. From March
per month. Phone 4476.

nebo
NEWHAVEN”

S.S. Blue Master, S.S. Delvalle, SS
Libertad, S.S.° Sunrell, S.S. Torrance
Hills, S.S. Seabreeze, S.S. Sunvailey, S.S.
Sullys Hill, S.S. Julian, SS. Agnete,
S.S. Gascogne, S.S. Auricula, S.S. Waal,
S.S. Balantia, S.S. Vinni, S.s. Theodoxus,
S.S. Siwanoy, SS. Orwell, S.S. Williams-
burg, S.S. Tapti, S.S. Johilla, S.S Alcoa
Pilgrim, S.S. Atlantic Shipper, S.S. At-
Jantic Mariner, S.S. Ptros, S.S. Kankee
Pioneer, S.S. Mormactern, S§.S. Abbedijk
S.S. Pacific Liberty, S.S. Stuyvesant, ss.

‘une, Now °
vata eee dae

BRIGHTWOOD—On-Sea. St.



Gap. Fully furnished, From Aanyence
m April ist.
ny io Mrs. Weatherhead Rikenben”
ng 15.3.50—2n
i a Cork

STOREROOM in Molls Alley, sui
+ Suitable
oe for the housing of small

Dial 4322, Niagara Factory,

Spry Street, 17.3.50—5n

T ’

PORE SALES ARRIVALS By B.W.TA.L.
@ Fem TRINIDAD: Kathryn Simms,
Earl Simms, Sheila Mittelnolzer, Giadys
‘ttelhoizer, Livingston Parris, Quinn
Robertson, H. O Bb. Whoding, Beatrice
Eden, Violet Hinds, la Me Bride,
erinda Me Bride, Seymour Hope, Mary
Seale, Frank Horne, Leonard Le B ny
Joseph Daniel, Harold Vogel, Jane
hani, Edward Stephani, Brian Fire )
Yolanda _ Franco, Frank Bush,









AUCTION

FRIDAY 17th at 2 P.m, Courtesy r
age, White Park, Austin 10 H P. Sedat
Car damaged in accident. Terms Cash.

R. ARCHER McKENZIE,
Auctioneer.
12.3,50—4n

|



Step

Ico
John
Payne, Margaret Stanley, Margaret Aber-

cromby, Virginia Green, Alice Pratt,
U Richard Pratt, Rafael Torres, Matild
NDER THE IVORY HAMMER Torwen, Georss Ward, ‘Thomas rcen.

BY_ instructions received I will sell Iva Green, -

on Friday March 17th at 2 p.m. a re
Messrs MeEnearney Garage (1) Model From ST. LUCIA: Minnie Wells, Arthur
B-Ford Truck. Good Tyres. Damaged | Plews, Margaret Plews, Roland Ashcombe,
Terms Cash. Aidan Filoissac, James Boyce, Haratio
VINCENT GRIFFITH, Weasdijk.
Auctioneer

12.3.50—3n,



UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER

Tuesday 28th Mrs. ANDRES

O'DONNELL'S SALE at “Villa| LONDON,
Una”, Hastings.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

(By Mail)

present restrict oil exploration in
Peru will be removed by the new



N TOUCH WITH BARRADOS COAST STATION





Petroleum Law For Peru |

)sion period of 6 years would be}
Many of the obstacles that at| granted and the Government roy “|
alty only 3 per cent.

Auctioneers Pm
1.3.5 draft petroleum law liberalising
17.3.50.—1n. : : |
the terms on which concessions
are granted, stated the current

REAL ESTATE edition of “Petroleum Press Ser-

HOUSE: Modern Bungalow, freehola | Vice”, London's
4,836 sq. ft. Fruit trees, lovely garden,| journal.
plenty of space for Chickens, Turkey











Pigs, ete. Gas laid on, Apply: “Somer- - is law ; rati
set” Belmont Road ahha Under this law, oil exploration
he mo’ will be allowed in any part of
DWELLING HOUSE with 3 roods 31] the country and an unlimited
perches of land attached at “Briar Hall”,| acreage permitted to any one

Christ Church. The dwelling house con-
tains open verandah, drawing and din-
ing rooms, two bedrooms and usual con-
veniences. There is also a Lime Kiln in
good working order on the premises.
The above property will be set up for
sale at our Office, James Street, on

operator. The only proviso is
that the operating company must
surrender 50 per cent of the land
When the development stage is
entered.

Friday 17th March, 1950, at 1.30 p.m j
Inspection on application on the pre- Operators will be granted terms
mises. in accordance with the type of

YEARWOOD & BOYCE, region they will be working in

The object will be to offer the
most attractive conditions in the
most difficult terrain. For in-
stance, in the “coastal” area the
concession périod for exploration
would be 4 years and the Gov-
ernment royalty to be paid 12
per cent; whereas in the “Oriente”
or more difficult areas, a conces-

citors.
5.3.50—9n



DWELLING HOUSE—The two storied
dwelling house called “AMBURY” with
1 acre 4 perches of land attached there-
to, situate at Upper Collymore Rock,
St. Michael. The house contains draw-
ing and dining rooms, one bedroom and
conveniences on the ground floor, and
three bedrooms, toilet and bath on first
floor, Government water and Electric
ity installed. For inspection dial 3297

The above property will be set up for
sale at our Office, James Street, on Fri-
day 17th March, at 2 p.m.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,







Publie Notices=Contd







Solicitors re
5.3.51 $n
NOTICE
FOR SALE AND REMOVAL PARISH OF ST. JAMES

Tenders will be received by the under-
igned up to Monday 20th March 1950 for

1 Conveyance of Paupers,

2 Burial of Paupers.

Forms of tender may be obtained from
the Parochial Treasurer's Office

P. H. TARILTON,
Clerk, Board of Guardians,
St James

That part of the building known as
‘Jones & Swan, Lower Broad Strec
Store’ which is one storey in height.

The property offered for Sale and re-
moval consists of the North, West and
South wall of the building and also al!
timbers, windows plates, floors and roof-
ing to the said building but not th
eustemn wall which forms the western
wall of the two storied part of the
building. r

Tenders in writing will be received
by the Secretary of the undersigned
to the 24th March.

17.3.50-——3n



OFFICIAL NOTICE













authoritative oil | :
| foreign
their shipments.

Schooner Owners’ Association.

President Brand, S.S. Esso Syracuse, S.S.
Loch Avon, S.S. Giriuly, S.S. Dartmouth,

Columbia Star, S.S. Penrisyivania Sun,
S.S. Esso Hartford,
Katy,
Dolores# S.S. Empire Cowdray,
Tresus, S.S. Mangarella,
S.S. Cottica, SS. Mormac Dawn.

Cl
Miss Videt White, Miss Ruby Woo.
Leurie Scott,
Daphne Thorne, Mx. John Jenkins
Hoyte, Mr. Joseph Emerson, Mr, Lio.
Levesque,

Lady Bella Southorn, Mr. Harold Woolf

BARBADOS

|

ADVOCATE







Headmaster
Reports

4OUSES
‘dewtas : From page 5.
| 1 Marhall Streed, Agr, "Sundry Depot In Carlisle Ba covet il ast
ery Cc s Yy Laun- ads : sae:
a Co Cami OTe coe pirates: kta altered in the aan tte ee
MANHATTAN, pore ofered in the island, into line
le’ ~ . : Sen, Pu shed N . S ri io
Mage Christ Church, From ist A 1 oe PORT: Sch. Lachnivar S., Seh. Sch. Hazel Scott, Sch. Turtle Dove, Sch with modern educational trends.
10re 3309 teint ee ee Wonts ro Mery * Lewis, Emeline, M.V. T. B. Radar, Sch They had the four principal
meainrneneneniineninneateeteenieiie nS et = W . a, Aux. Sch. Cachalot, Laudal; ~» Sch. yliss 3 , se re i ;
HAZLEWOOD Bishop's Court Hill, coo? “ Vv : Blue Star, Sch. BE. M. Tamnis, Sch Proven snark oT sou Classics, Mathematics,
S meeaete house, to rent furnished for E Smith Sch: Wor ae ae ‘ eee ee eee
nonths from April ist. fot =i » Sch. Wonderful Counsellor ARRIVALS So great was the pressure of
moderate rent, : tremely |Sch. Adalina, Sch. Anita IL. ‘ yclorama 71 te i y ard Y¥e-
Telephone nm to careful tenants, [Timothy A. H, Vansluytman, on cu Ga ae Teptdnd: hoeke ue sacay that the stand

quired in all these fields was very
much higher than it was twenty
or thirty years ago. Whereas in
those days it was comparatively
easy for anyone passing the Matri-
culation Examination to gain en-

S.S. Argentina, S.S. Stiklestad, S.S. | ession of nothing less than a h- |
Gulfpeak, S.S. Fageriell, S.S. Luciano ~ : >
Manara, M/S Patuca, SS. Adula, s,s, |&% Certificate today made one eli- |
Esso Worcester, S.S. Gibbes Lykes, S S |gible to gain admission. J
pl Runner, S.S. Armadale, M/S |
ribbe, S.S. San Veronico, S.S. Cana-
dian Challenger, S.S. Benoil, S.S. Thirlby,| , There is a greater and greater
SS. S. Paula, S.S. Aire, S.S. Queen | demand for more specialised train-
Adelaide, S.S. Falcon, S.S. Salcaas, S.S

S.S._ Glosinia, M/S

S.S. Atlantic Traveller,

3.S
$.S. Donstan,

other things, there was the ten-
dency to revert to the easy method i
of calculation, namely, to say that
a school had so many boys and
girls and therefore it needed a staff
of so many, allowing a teacher for
so many children. But it was not
so easy as that, what they wanted |
today was a staff especially in the
first grade schools, in relation to
the facilities which the school
offered or indeed should offer to
“Mr |the pupils attending that school.

DEPARTURES By B.W.I.A.L
For TRINIDAD: Mrs. Marie Dear, M
arence Belmar, Mrs, Claudra Pinder





Mrs.



Louise Scott



Mrs. Leona Levesque, \
O. B. Wooding, K.C
For ST. LUCIA: Sir Thomas Southo

Specialists
He was sorry that in the last
allocation of specialist teachers

Mr. Shanks Moffatt, Hoo John Stow | ;},- omirns int
Mr A. MecLeod-Smith, Mrs Ann |“ lat very important bene
McLeod-Smith. seemed to have been overlooked

For ANTIGUE: Mr. Maurice Michse! | or not to have received the

ele a Tucker, Mr. Edward Arrow attention it deserved.

For ST. KITTS: Miss Margaret He did not want to see anyone
a as Pen cg Hace. sabe of the first grade schools of the
ite. Aacon. Smmibel, Me. John. Clare island trying to work a cirricu-
Mr, Donald Ferguson, Mr. Evelyn Hone.! lum which was unbalanced.

| Proper balance must be pre-
served.
The Headmaster very rightly,

id endorsed by His Excellency
drew attention to the need for
a spiritual foundation to all thei
ducational work.
| will like to stress this
| point”, said the Bishop, “we live

To encourage production for|in a very delightful place far
export, the law provides that oil| from the maddening crowd anc

| shipped abroad shall be virtually| it 1s very ony overlook th
|exempt from taxes. Exporters! fact that in the world today
| will also be allowed to keep the| there is an intense battle fcr

the possession not merely of the



For full puree of “ propert;
and terms of conditions o: le anniv ¢ i.
“ TED.| BARBADOS
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. (NE, |IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF APPEAL |
; Secretary | s Equitable Jurisdiction) |
16.3.50—7n EWAN I IS BLACKETT of th
3s ) United States of America, acting
herein by Attomey ALTHE
HERODIAS BLACKETT Plaintiff

7 C WOTICES VENISHA SKEETE . Defendan
Pr Re IN puremance of an Order in th
Court in the above action made on th
13th day of March 1950, I give notice ‘
all peysons having any estate, right or
interest in or any lien or incu

affecting all that certain piece or parcel
of land (formerly part of th lands ot
The Whim Plantation) situate in the
parish of Saint Peter and Island afore-
said containing by admeasurement two
roods or thereabouts abutting and bound
ing on lands formerly of Joseph Walke



“225 easily earned by obtaining orders
for private Christmas Cards from

vour friends. No previous experienc:
necessary, Write today for beautiful free
Sample Book to Britain's largest and
fmemost Publishers; highest commission,
marvellous money making opportunity

Icnes, Williams & Co., Dept. 10 Victoria /jut now or late of the Estate of Jac:
Works, Preston, England. Ramsay deceased on lands now or late
——<——$—— —— jof the Estate of Charles Welch deceas |

on lands of the Estate of Fdwar:
Harris deceased and on the public 1X
or however else the same may

bound to bring before me an accow
their said claims with their wit

ocuments and vouchers, to be

We will offer for sale to public com-
petition on Friday the 3lst day of March
1950, at 2 p.m. at our office James Street.
The Messuage Dwelling house and shop
situate at Tudor Street, Bridgetown

djoining The Egolf sae standing ON }»y me on any Tuesday, or Frida
‘56% square feet of lan ; een the hours of 12 (noo

This property which is built of stone} oclock in the afternoon, at the OMic
somprises a shop to the front and 1. the Clerk of the Assistant ¢

esidance consisting of five rooms to Appenl at the Court House Brid



back. before the 3lst day of May 1950
Electricity and Government wate |inot such claims may be ranked
For inspection apply on the premise: }ing to the nature and priority thereof
to the tenant any day. respectively; otherwise such persons will
For further particulars apply to:-— be precluded from the benefit of th«

HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD,
Solicitors, James gree

said Decree, and be deprived of all claim
on or agminst the said property
Claimants are also notified that they
must attend the said Court on Wednes-
day the 3ist day of May. 1950, at 1
o'clock a.m. when their said claims w!
be ranked.
Halls V: e, St. James, for permission wane my hand this 13th day
tal illage, St. . oro

) sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at aj I. V. GILKES,

Ag. Clerk of the Assistant Court

tard and shingle shop with shedroof
of Appeal
Signed SYDNEY WILLIAMS.

attached, situate at Holders Hill, St.
OFFICIAL SALE
Applicant | py

James.
Dated this 14th day of March, 1950
To 8. H. NURSE, Esq
ill be con ‘Pie ASSiSTAN COURT OF APPEAL
_--This application w: "TiN TH 8 Tt COU Fr 4
sidered an Licensing Court to be hel¢ (Equitable Jurisdiction)

|

LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE

The application



Police Magistrate, Dist, ““E"—Holetown

District “E"—Holetown |FWAN DENNIS BLACKETT of
a ha he 28th day of March 1950, United States of America, acting
at 11 o'clock, a.m. herein by Attorney ALTHE
S, H, NURSE, HERODIAS BLACKETT ..._ Plaintiff
Police Magistrate, Dist. “E"—Holetowr VENISHA SKEETE Defen

17.3.50—)

Barbados Turf Club
Payment Of Prizes

FIFTY (50) CASH, 6d. CON-
SOLATION, PARI-MUTUEL, 2/-

NOTICE is hereby given that by virtuc
of an Order of the Adsistant Court «
Appeal dated the 13th day of March 1950
there will be set up far sale to the hir:
bidder at the Office of the Clerk of tt
Assistant Court of Appeal at the C
House, Bridgetown. between the | 01
of 12 (noon) and 2 o'clock in the aft
neon on Friday the 2nd day of June 1950

All that certain piece or parce! of lan



Plantation) situate In the parish of §
Peter and Island

aforesaid containing y h
y mdmeasurement two roods or there-| will be paid. Subsistence allowance will be paid at the rate of $3.60



Petroleum Press Service,
when adopted by the
junta now in power, and by the
Government next July, the new
law cannot be expected to pro-
duce any striking rise in produc-| valuable service to the school, was
tion for several years to come.”

with the Argentine Government



exchange proceeds of

mind of man but of the soul. This

| battle is becoming more and
Legislation on these lines has! more intense and it can only be
long been overdue. The older| won by an ever-increasing num-
Peruvian fields are being ex-| ber of people who hold the
hausted and there has been little; unshakable conviction abouv tha
search for new oilfields in re-| human purpose of life and the
cent years. On the other hand,| place of the human being in it.
internal demand has_ doubled} z
during the last 10 years, reach- Chapel ;
ing 7 million barrels, with the} ‘I shall fog veer ee poprtes
result that export fell by 3.2) if a school like this which has
million barrels, or nearly 30 per some eighty resident boarders ir
cent. | it, had a chapel, and I hope on
| day it will. Those who owe s
Since the internal demand is} much to the school in the pas
likely to increase an intensive! and who have taken up their
search for new oilfields 1S Ur-\ places in the various walks of
gently needed. “But” says the] jife can render=no ‘better servic«

“even | to

He the school than in bringing
military |

about the erection of a chapel’.

The Bishop then expressed re-
|gret that the Rector of thr
parish who, had rendered ver)

|resigning at the end of July, Some
; one to fill his place was one of!
| the things he would have to loo}
after, he said and he wished t
|assure them that he wouk
; endeavour to get someone whx





MEAT TALKS

LONDON, March 16

Mr. E. J. Joint, British Com-! would have a real interest in th
mercial Attache in Buenos Air« School.
left here by air to-day for South; They were very thankful to
America to open new meat talks His Excéllency for his presence

{and hoped that he would be with

—Reuter. ‘them on future occasions.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORT
Persons due back pay for the period 1st April, 1948, to 21st Jung



| 1949, should personally submit their claims to the Office, Department
of Highways and Transport, on or before Friday, 28th April, 1950.

17.3.50,.—2n.



FORM I
THE LAND ACQUISITION ACT, 1949

(Notice required by Section 5)



THE acquisition, for public purposes, of the following parcel of

land containing 7,710 square feet more or less situate at Payne’s Bay
in the parish of St. James in th
|Schedule hereto and more particularly shown and delineated on a
plan of survey signed by Mr. Frank L. Gibbons, Sworn Surveyor,
and dated 26th November 1948 and filed in the office of the Colonial
Engineer having been decided on by the Governor with the approval
of both Houses of the Legislature of the [sland of Barbados by reso-
tution of the Houses of the Legislature, it is hereby declared in pur-
suance of Section 5 of the Land Acquisition Act, 1949, that the said
lands have been acquired for the following purposes: as a site on
which fishing boats can be hauled up and on which shelters may be
erected.

Island of Barbados described in the

THE SCHEDULE
A parcel of land at Paynes Bay in the parish of St, James con-

taining 7,710 square feet Bounding on the north on lands of B. H.

;Moore and others, on the East on the Public Road running from
| Holetown to Bridgetown, on the South on other lands of B. H. Moore

}and others, and on the West on the Sea.

| Island of Barbados.

|

}
|

Dated this 10th day of March, 1950, at Government House in the

A. W. L. SAVAGE,
Governor.
16.3.50,—I1n.



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
DOMINICA, B.W.L.
APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Agricultural Assistant

| (Agricultural Education) in the Department of Agriculture, Dominica,

Windward Islands. Applicants should hold a degree or diploma, and

| have some experience in teaching agriculture and related sciences.

formerly part of the lands of The Whim |

Salary scale $1,680 x $96 — $2,400 per annum. If a car is re-

| quired to be kept, allowances in accordance with local regulations

STAND SWEEP and FORECAST eae abutting and bounding on lands |

ill be paid on and from MON-
DAY, 20th MARCH, 1950, between
12.00 and 3.00 p.m. daily, SAT-|
URDAYS excepted.

formerly of Joseph Walker but
latm of the Estate of Jaco

sed on lands now or
state of Charles Welch
aun of the Estate of Fdiu

Rama‘






veceased and on the pul ad oT
HORSES and SERIALS will be he waver a Oe om ney, pps re
, oF wr) ary yO" en oO by °%
paid on and from MONDAY, 27th ee We his tee cat hic’ ttn aoe onan



MARCH, 1950. between the HOU | cnc Fr

as above, SATURDAYS excepted. | how

G. A. LEWIS
Secretary Ag. Clerk

betweer



17 ae 17.3.50.—3n. i

now or

Harris



late of the | <_< - :
deceased on| pupils in accordance with an approved course of studies,

also be

| per day when away from Headquarters.

The Officer will be responsible for the training of ‘agricultural

alled upon to organise refresher courses for the Jumor Staff

|of the Agricultural Department.

et

Applicants should write to the Superintendent of Agriculture,

Botanic Gardens, Roseau, Dominica, enclosing details of qualifications |
and experience, and two recent

testimonials.
L. L. DE VERTEUIL,
Superintendent of Agricuiture.
16.3.50.—3n.



wrance to a University, the |
8

vision for these things in relation ;
to making financial privision oa









PAGE SEVEN



Lodge School| SAIPPING NOTICES Stop Pyorrliea
C

anadian National Steamships | n 24 Hours

Bleeding Cums, Loose Teeth and Sore



Trench Mouth or a bad disease whi

|
Mouth mean that you have ?yorrhe:
}

sooner or later will make your teeth fall
out and may cause Rheumatism and Heart
Trouble. Stop this disease now with the

new discovery Amosan. Stops bleedin
gums in 24 hours, ends sor: mouth a

Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails
SOUTHBOUND Montres? Haiifax Bosten Barbados Barbado:
CANADIAN
— 10th Mar nae 20th Mar =. 20th - Mo» |
LADY RODNEY oo 25th Mar 27th Mar. Sth Apr Sth Ap
LADY NELSON ---- 12th Apr 13th Apr. 23rd Apr 24th Ap
LADY RODNEY 12th Mey = Sth May 1th May 26th Mo 27th Mu
LADY NELSON Sist y ra June Sth J 4th June 15th Ju
u RODNEY 30th May 3rd July Sth July Mth July 15th
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
NQRTHEBOUND Barbados Barbades Boston St.John Halifax Montres
LADY NELSON 2ist Mar. 22nd Mar. Ist Apr.2nd Appr. — —
LADY RODNEY 17th Apr 19th Apr. 28th Apr. —— wth Apr. 3rd Ma)
LADY NELSON 6th May 8th May 17th May —— 8th Mar. 22nd M
LADY RODNEY 8th June 10th Ju.. 19h June —— 2ist Jun. 24th Jun
LADY NELSON 27th June 2%h Ju 8th July — 10th July 13th Jub
LADY RODNEY 27th Ju 39th Ju’ 7th Aug — 9th Aug. 12th Aug

SEE

N.B.—Subject to change without notice. A!) vessels fitted with cold storage cham-

}

|

Meet BOB FABIAN












Passenger and freight rates on application to :—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD. — Agents.

ing in the island for which we! =——————————————_- ——_
must have the requisite number of ‘

S.s. |teachers,” said the Bishop. When}
it came to making financial pro- |





CIE. GLE., TRANSATLANTIQUE

tightens teeth. Iron clad guarantee.
Amosan must make your mouth well and
save your teeth or money back on return
of empty rackage. Get Amosan from your

Amosan

‘| For Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth
See penea naan SST,

chemist today.
The guarantee

The Schooner “Timothy A. H.
Vansluytman"” will accept Cargo
and Passengers for Demerara,
sailing Saturday, 18th March.

The Schooner “Lochinvar 5S”
will accept Cargo and Passengers
for Grenada, sailing Saturday, 18th
March. re

The M.V. “Daerwood”~ will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Vineent, St. Lucia, Grenada,
Aruba, date of sailing will be

given.

The Schooner “Wonderful Gow
scllor” will accept Cario
Passengers for St. Lucia, .<:.
Saturday 18th March

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Consignees.



FRENCH LINE
Sailing to Trinidad — Sailing to

Â¥ ; Plymouth
“GASCOGNE Rees ‘ March 14th March 21st
“MISR Beene eee cae April 4th
“GASCOGNE honk April 19th April 26th
“MISR settee eee tees May 9th May 13th
GASCOGN deen ia May 24th May 3ist

For further particulars apply to :—

R. M. JONES & CO, LTD.- Agents.



of Scotland Yard
in the Evening Advocate

BRITISH WEST INDIAN
AIRWAYS LIMITED

NOTICE



DUE to several changes in schedule which become
effective Saturday, ist April, 1950, all persons hold-
ing reservations on or after that date are kindly
requested to communicate with our Office, Lower
Broad Street, (Phones : 4585 and 2789) for inform-
ation regarding changes in times of arrivals, and

departures, ete.

ORLPLEPEPEPEE APPLE,
$1y
7 $1 %
YLLIAM FOGARTY LID. &8
x % x
%
INC. IN B.G. %
‘,
. §
’ Leading Centre for ... .
; Exclusive English Suitings
5
$ HARRIS & SPORTS
Â¥
TWEEDS,
‘ %
: GABERDINE, SERGES :
$
$ & DOESKINS :
‘,
% Please. call and see us, when it will x
% be our privilege to see that you are x
; fully saticfied which is much . . %
%
% And become one of our.... %
8 REGULAR CUSTOMERS %
3 which is mgre. y
¢ “THE HOUSE OF FOGARTY”
8 combines Tailoring Craftsmanship
% with High-Grade Clothing
8 AT KEENEST PRICES
$

He may | ¥





LOE

BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LTD.

——————————
HAVE YOU SEEN: |




FOR





THE LATEST GAS COOKERS?

3B out of 4:7:

were sold the same day of
arrival this week.
THE LAST ONE
is an all Enamel WHITE Gas
Cooker with Modernistic Chrome
Legs, 3 Boiling Burmers and 1 Grill
Burner,

net call and see it to-day.?








Why









What have You to Offer

FOR SALE OR RENT?

Acreage, Building Sites
or Houses
*Phone or write the
BARBADOS
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
Office : Hastings Hotel Ltd.
Telephone 2336
17.3.50--2n

GENUINE
WEST INDIAN
HANDCRAFTS |

See The |
Dominica
Handcrafts
Company

Bridge & Trafalgar Streets

ORIENTAL GOODS!

For CURIOS, JEWELLERY
BRASSWARE, TEAKWOOD
SANDAL, IVORY, ETC.

: 0 6 VMs 8
KASHMERE“*

THANI BROS.
Pr. Wm. Hy. Street

OOD

Is your

DINING ROOM

FURNISHE

+A lovely
‘Table

Mahogany Dining

- A modern Mahogany and Cedir
Sideboard,

A smart China Cabinet

- A set of stylish Dining Chairs
caned or upholstered ?

All these and more you can get

FROM HERE TO-DAY

renewed at

New o

Money Saving’ Prices

SLEEVES SEE SSEOOESOS GSES

4,

e 5

LS. WILSON

~
Dial 4069 ¥

OOS

4,4,

Trafalgar St. -:-











FLASH!

LADIES,
JUST OPENED

MBROIDERED

LACE

From Austria
(A very small quantity)
Its Superb Quality and
Dainty Embroidery is
simply enchanting and
indeed irresistable
In White only
36” wide $2.95 per yd.
Also Beautiful
EMBROIDERED EDGES

BROS.
St.





THAM

Pr. Wm. Hy.
6, 42 & 53 Swan Street

















Sele al

INR RRR EELS,

See ate

Meee eee



a


FRIDAY
PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATI 2a sl dilehcbilionneneiindilnmcaguemtine ta

Zoe a, Now Manager ,

LONDON, March 15
Freddie Mills, former World
British, Buropeay and Empiré
Lighi-Heavy weight Champion, has
been ‘granted a Manager's licence



Results Of B.T.C. |
6d. CONSOLATION |











ee)

Q

per
pam
Q
ms












































































































































ing M i 1950 aoa one ee erat Vy
by the British Boxing Board cf
Spring eeling % Centrol.—-Reuter. b
7 Prize Series Series Series hae ae Amt | B.B.C. RAL C. RADIO V
v “p" — an” “" ver 1 FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1950 %
+ “a Tket Ne. Tket No. T’ket No. T'ket. No. I'ket. No | am. T e News 3 16 am Hie a iy
ati ST oe --425.« «A758: 4402=«S«s«983BB)O «7? ~=—« $140.00] gt, 7-18 aun Thinn on. ghess| ue ;
ay 7 a i | mme; 7.50 a Intertude, 8 a |
i es. ae ie te we en 63.60 ER ys aN T
+ 7 962 9781 WwW, OOF ude, 8_1f London Light Concert
es cee: ee aoe ne pe SP ay SS p
i Ose ss 04a 8029 6294 2105 2858 2132 69.4 I The News, 12.10 p.m. News Analysis. | >
OE ek 5k 1738 © 3903S «5462 «= 7962 ~=—-2598 50.90} “i "pm. ‘Programme Parade, 1.1 aa
6th ; 1578 3453 4019 4621 4189 39.00) “ba : » Continues, 1.15 p.m. Radio News- |
weteeh ods unt el, 30 Ss hon Ss .
aes 5676 «1161 += 3814S 2124 = 8402 20.90)! p.m. ‘The News, 2.10 p.m. Home New Le \0rlds be
) fem Britain, 2.15 n. Sports Review
8th ......-... 3819 id ie po os : , 2 30 p a ae Keniner, 3 2 Tee oa
, B 2 97 20. 06 hera Ireland, 4 . The News, 4.1 ecg.
a ee eae a ous 2298 9952 879% ri) 00| The Daily Service. 4 8 p m Night s uits in an .
SS saris eee 2 9902 ; ou.0 \t the Opera, 5 Carroll Calls +}
1th 6773 | ««G786-—=—s—«7661~=«s«G22—Ss« BD 20..00| Tune, 5.18 p.m. Programme Parade, 5.: veriety of coloan,
12th .........- 6840 5687 4940 7728 3833 10.00 sm. Interlude, 6 p.m. New Recor’ oe
MN Saestues 1028 3537 7754 2299 0780 10.00! Fg matey pee ms ace from 34 {9 44, be E
5 5 We ndla jary, 7.45 ‘ Dance 5
SOS me 9868 6 964552550985 5541 re a Viele, 6 pm. Radio Newerel, 6.15 Ba “=
PEC Scot rchestra, § m he
TR a eam 2885 3339 3394 1373 0464 : BEC Scottish | Ore hestra. A Sg ah ,
POR Shae es 0708 1808 8033 9193 6483 10,00 Britain, 9.15 p.m. The Debate: Continues, |
ess 9798 0286 3450 4838 1291 10,0 | = 20: Bisco liuagt ae pple iP"
18th 1486 0299 «©9534-4473 7362 10. O¢ ae ‘ weuzine. i048 p.m. World Affairs, |
Chie eX ais . “i : | 1} p.m. The News. i
BA casae sh 7407 1940 6604 0259 3791 10.006 i: ea ag age Pe:
a FOUR DIVISION CHAMPIONS of Lodge School pose for the Advocate’s” cameraman. (Left | 66669656904 |
BOR is sige eves 3014 8247 1596 4908 1418 10.00 to right) A. J. K. Streetly (Div. I), C. M. Redman (Div. II), J. E. Wedderbrun (Div. IV), and A. G. | eoer POOOIOOOFOS a
RE rte 9126 6185 2609 3847 4916 10.00) “Humphrey (Div. V). Saas ae 8
4 ut g EVENT No, 10. HALF MILE, DIV. 1
Sind .... ., 1488 ©7694 «=—««O791Ss«058B «1558 10.06 (Ree: 2 mins. 6 2/5 sees., L. Critchlow % DANCE % %
28rd ... 8819 7396 8040 ©4899 = 0145 10. 00 St ; tl Cl IT Ch mp st’ Redman, 2nd King, 2rd Murray |\¥ %
SOON a danns : 3576 2482 5925 6003 9999 10. Of ] ee ass . a ‘" = sacrnany, a , King, " - , 8 at ¥ AVE SHEPHERD
Re ins ae 1074 4119 9805 3535 0903 10.0 t a ss S h I S orts : a Sr ee i RELAY | 1% : * cit esha ¥% &
26th 0803 «= 7303-=Ss«9535 «1184 = 1804 10.00 A odge cnoo Pp Fe Laborde, 2nd School, 3rd Emgtare | THE BARB: ap an il, 12. @ 18 Baan ul
* Be VE 3255 7365 mI RA) 3 set is CLUB . 10, 11, 12 ,
SPOR ios + ore. mee ee mgs: hoy =“ at DURING a period of keenly contested athletic sports | * mt “Ne, 1 ATER Ouse ents : % —_
ME acs ses ; 8388 3653 3013 6985 6334 10. Of at the Lodge School yesterday, A.J. K. Streetly. the EF Emp-| 1st _Emptage, and Laborde, 20 ool | $ (Local & Visiting Members % \
sie’ 9075 5 7 EVENT No. 13. OLD BOYS’ i
Ee ccaees 6573 2075 wae pos a ‘e lage House rupper emerged champion of Division I. I. t Fileetm, Farmer, Massiah . alt Only) % ats
| eres ‘es 0110 5989 9341 55 6625 10,00) Pall and shageg it was hi Ist. Inniss, 2nd. Rodriguez, 3rd. Pi-! EVENY Ne. M4 GH SCHOOL GIRLS’ | soe . ca, | StOSuossosesesesose +; ae
ema =f vigour and pers os ce oe , eer No ame YARDS, DIV. 1 Miss D cane 1% SATURDAY, MARCH 18TI is ; FOSSStg8
$750.00! for this 1948 Division II cham-} Res: 10 7/i0 th secs. G. J. Evelyn | < 9 P.M QI Y
fe 'pion, the ~ Cla 1 honours. 7) neuen ea P. he ¥ | it %| % LINOLE U Mi CARPETS
; Streetly piloted his House,} 23 Goddard. (Time 11 3/10 secs). |@ Music by ARNOLD MEAN- $/ 2
Government Tax $200.00 on each Series. | Emptage, in a masterful way t EVENT No. 3. 100 Y ARDS, DIV. a | Savannah Club Tennis | g WEL L and "his ORCHES- % | * Sizes: 9 ft. by 1% {t, and WY, ;
| win the Sports Shield | _ (Ree: 11% sees, N. de § 1928 | Tournament | & a by. the. Bae e ft :
Prize Series “J" Series K Series “L" Series “M" Amt | It was an ideal evening and a Petert 138 | XM +} oie Also J 5
Ticket No. Ticket No. Ticket No. ‘Ticket No. tha taal a een cords be nts ~ sa YESTERDAY’S RESULT: | sceuabal caress > ‘“ 4
Ist 6909 1595 7578 447 $140.00) ) of ever, ere broken | eee No 4. 190 YARDS, DIV M D ee te M. Blader| x 3 % LINOLEUM IN ener ae
onc 308: 3517 5188 100.00‘ Possessing a powerful stride,}. RESP notin, eee ; ae Meas eer ae issi m 27+ 312 v
2nd ; 8641 30 5 e617 p . are Bd oo eo | oolst} 2nd Jorda ie ates 1% Admission to Ballroom 2, C1 All very reasonable ‘ E
8rd 5556 3463 7228 6529 80.90} C. M. Redman carri t Ti ee Saieetirar's “ER Ne 1g
ore é sceee oe : y ; Bs ' | 100 vards and 220 yards spr ints ” YARDS. DIV. U C , = nn & beat A I Jemmott | 56, (OBO CO OOO OOOO OGLE % cone ae
4th iawn 4873 1418 7034 2624 60 | land the half mile from his { ; 241/10 secs BD H. Mo 4 S$. Nicholls beat*H, L. Smith 6-2 | e. | 8 Muabllan i HERDER .
eo 6517 9374 3918 5158 $0'.00| closdat rivals it convincing stil ket aes Sa a4 ee a we aa f (ey BABY LOVES 186° , i i
‘ a : : 5 aye 1 ss Crichlow _ beat i ! cine:
6th 3303 1334 8510 9201 20, OF Inniss, Division 1, took the] “EVENT No. 6 aX ARDS, DIV, 1 ?, 6—2 é ica ! 10
he 5 920 3B 2450 20.00| sprinting honours when he won] ,,, ,.,.\Mec 22 pi E \. Benjamin lost to H. L. Toppi ee ee & 11 Roebuck Street
ith . 8553 9200 4659 245( i 4.40) yards distances. | =, nie and Street ; 2, 2-6 Talcnm Powder, It is 2B2$59S55659086055¢
8th ... mist 4081 eoee 3518 me Ny tit 1 00 eae v in win fnished Pe EVENT No.7. 190 1 ARDS. DIV 1 G. Mamming beat J. L. St.Hil SL Seana fee $660 Tr oreE ON an
Epa iar 6246 0413 4726 20.00] in 10$ seconds as against the| ..J8 Humphrey, and 1 ce statins hake 46d Wabbes hattateacaage | (to eeenntnpenese 9 re
10th wee 9549 8656 6776 901 20.00) previot record of 10 10 se¢-|” EVENT No. 8 220 Y ARDS DIV. if! : a eee) are ad Make hit bath- S 7
“ . 4 ond a . cao al 1 riniie Rec: 27 : ro-t Y’S FIXTURES in ait 4 ; F 9
1ith . 7026 23: 9258 7398 20.00} onds, t at Inniss had no ser iou Sets : Gut_B I ADU s SINGL ES SFR pice terery x E P :
on an ‘ 10.09, CPponen to urge him < to}, ‘ 1 ~ 1/10 . . Gibbons \ D aieghtanr tale ‘ . ©
12th ... 1635 1086 4791 4916 A record aking | MEN'S siNGuES vith Cutiours % q
13th . 5766 221 } 1582 1408 Mf ; dea “tuciils 4 | EVENT No. 9 HALF MILE. 01y ing A Niel Soap. * present the week’s specialty— 4 4
14th . 7933 i769 6665 3196 1D or e q Pog a ‘7 . Mi MIXE D Dor BLES . Ms
15th 6515 7668 3030 0319 Redn Dot uga itl, J E. Wedder- | ‘ . ; all and J ria amen - % We ROPIC GOLD
16th 1317 5 2573 vif 00) burn a t. G. Humphr re- — e LAYER ¢C
ii 17th aide 8580 7163 O198 ) spectivel | $ ;
‘ +e) >| 2685 4148 6017 One of the th the | s Sprinkled with juicy coconut and a la
yey 8th 0081 =" Beat net : Gd ee ee , % Its a yer of golden
Hi) 6780 97 9456 vei : vl ‘ ‘| :
3280 07 ITS 1 d I 4 ie} j .
6248 4125 5949 6409 c to } 4
} “i + *.
8390 OTE 7996 288 : nw taxed el) | x .
683 1 bOGD 8246 OBTE nee aeat i | ‘
¢ em
5726 1595 5479 18 0.1 ° ‘
9400 3 ; 1915 26 f te | % tals \ ‘
‘
7408 ao2i 0948 ;
é eh nea a teal ee m Sure lo
2046 6606 3329 , COUG By %
28th ... 9528 1157 , % flease
29th . 3480 4431 d TBE f Gi Ww Iso the 4 % 5s
30th .. ri 5355 5589 6706 7241 OE ar meas a ( ‘OLD DANISH LOZ ERG =S 1%
rac {i ec! 1uUrance i ‘ &
) Stride ¢ he ick 1 te i y
" $751 eem ¢ For coughs, colds & sore throats | &
| ' 1 ” ~ rhe Old Boy: e pl P R mew : id i ry their specialties and be convinced of their
Government Tax $200.00 on each Seri lg , | U I EB (ate the baked goods they serve.
| Be ete gee a
Prize Series “N" Series O Se vic Pp’ Serie a Amt , t I ) 6640604 OOOO OOOO ~ ‘
Ticket No. Ticket No Ticket No. Tieket No i f SERVED Rak ae ie aces PESTS? tt MS
¢ : >. i t * SSSSSESISSOO C8850"
3146 67 2930 8263 $140.00] boys w onsoled, 1 “STOMACH? 39990 399599599 SOOO EY ree
i44 ) 1908 ( + 00 t e@) tions .
} 1 the e v, .
| , % We have received new stocks of
149 1996 6016 108 ‘ i ot an eve ” r . ~ 7K Take soothing iy ee
an sani 7 G 1%
at 1G 45uc 143 50. OF ; 19 - '
ve ee 1 4ou9 aos 60. ae ‘ EVERY SU ND: LY NI HT PEPTO-BISMOL 8
ee Bis a — a ase RAD HAND HARD
t 9 : print i From 7 to 40 Pepto-Bismol is gen- i
fue ’ | tle. it spreads a sooth- | % ig
bu 9269 2211 798 6904 : é ‘ ing, protective coating 4
os Oe 948 « 1 V A Fay i W \ on irritated stom ib q
9th 4526 4246 3625 ay ie cal tts and intestinal walls.
ema aol . LOOK seco and tr i pla 1
4437 4766 4706 4548 ” iy inthe Old Rode’ recht! 1. Helps calm and quie! the upset
lith 2196 636 7485 3616 20 Miss D Hz : ny | | + Beene fermentation and forme- a This Paint possesses outstanding:
12} 4946 OgoEe 9269 127 0 High Sehool Girls 100 yard wid e- s and spreading power and a
13th 2305 2798 2566 4895 | sprint, doing the ce in 13} 3. Helos sweeten ond sete the stomach (=>) 3 reliable permanency of colour,
14t 9285 3323 2615 3160 1 Oe en wigle nie tal oaiiis | Pepto- Bismol | % 1 gin, ting |... )\s¢0nee -
15th 9305 3063 5128 1063 Ou} EVENT No 1. 100 YARDS. DIV. 1 | ok FOR Upsk> $1 STOMAGH be / . ote
6u 8229 0259 6566 0076 : 10 1/0 sees. 1 oe % Vy gin, ting ....:.505 eek a
16ut 8225 255 f i | 194 ‘ i
17th 3433 1016 4118 6145 0.06] VENTIN R Yoo gin, tape ‘
18th 0129 5398 5354 1341 woo, fo. " E] UNG E | The. St ; dies @ u
19th 9778 1775 0500 6517 10..0¢] % Wa: «lig te a
| yp l 1% Quality L gin, tims .....seeeeee)
20th 8409 6863 5478 6705 10.06 The Weather FOR CUR : .
2ist 4676 1249 1445 6288 10.00} | o- a
erat aaa : : a aed TO-DAY } is
roe 2902 3738 2461 2181 10.00) 7 Sun Rises: 6.07 a.m. I
23rd 1326 885qQ 0864 5298 10. 00] Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m RELIEVES PAIN g WILKINSON & HAYNES 60, Ul
24th : 1613 8133 1620 3814 10.00} Moon (New) March 18 | FIGHTS INFECTION R
25 eh san ~ 20% 784 } | Lighting: 6.30 p.m. | %
25th 6378 7699 gs 63 10.0 & i
* a cia " om 7 . : High Water: 3.30 a.m., 3.20 | 4 wie
26th 6734 1186 0239 0219 10. 0% pm ‘ ‘Phone 4456 5
- ne a we “3 e ‘ Ss
27th 7781 1066 7546 2846 10. 0 YESTERDAY ‘ e ial
28th 3266 4313 9567 5811 10.0 Rainfall (Codrington) nil = VOGPGS9SL6%599 99 GOCOUSSGS oe
29th 8045 1053 9456 2433 10,00)% “MRL aaet, =. ee —e ~.
30th 9765 6346 3046 2334 10 00) Temperature (Max.) 84.0 °F ii
- ‘Temperature (Min.) 73.5 °F r »
$750.0¢| | Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E. Bb e Make eeee E
(3 pm, E.
i Wind Velocity: 1 iles per
Government Tax $200.00 on each Series ‘hour. en |
BOVELL & SKEETE Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.014, :
Per E. E. BOURNE (3 Pom.) 29.937 C i A a





‘They'll Do It Eve: y Time

FOR ONL’ <
Ss (ae
WHEN His | SET COMPREHENSIVE
INSURANCE \_ "Your END off
MAN TRIED
FRIEND My

TO SELL HiM naa
THIS IS THE LAST

A BETTER
LIABILITY STRAW! TRYING To |
POLICY sss CHISEL ANOTHER
BUCKS! TLL
GIVE MY BUSINESS
TO EBODY

By Jimmy Hatlo
































THAT FIT




But As oF
YESTERDAY
WHEN HE HAD
A WRECK
HE'S BEEN
VERY ANXIOUS
TO DO
BUSINESS:+»

OLD PAL! I'VE
BEEN LOOKING ALL
OVER FOR YOU HEY-
CAN T STILL TAKE THAT
POLICYEWE CAN DATE iT |
AS OF LAST WEEK, CAN'T }
WE,PAL? La@OT A Uf)
SL'GHT BUMPON Fry
U, MY FENDER... all if

WOOLLENS —
WORSTEDS —

YOUR FIGURE







AT






which brings renewed vitality.

PRI¢ p ES Vital food-elements in its compo-

sition tone up the entire physica!
‘ o ou soon feel more
* and energetic.





{
le Bynin Amara is an invaluable tonic
!
j
i

TO

. Sten. end women ot ol ages derive |
od sure benefit from Bynin Ama |
After consalancance. }

when run-down or jaded
s U I 7 there is no finer tonic.

gvour POCKET

SEE US FIRST



proouct

-C.5. MAFFEL& Co.,Ltd. |} * ee ? BOLTON LANE
=e oe in Tailoring |= eee ies ak Py lL :
ee ie st ‘~___ Bew apd, Port of Spaix, Trinidad $2 ee iecialchates naam

Le Ee eR ere == —

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PAGE 1

n4 ,, MA RCH IMM. CLASSIFIED ADS. Ii A (HADUS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN • on IU:\T omrc-Huhui a „„, ,„ „. IN MEMORIAM %  aasiBBSAinSfcs: •JS^ml m~i you !" ln .JfS. ml "MM. >" %  '" u "' """ (•* CMV but all In vain, S G SB*" =•" wlu "*• "•" KfifSim* wniw i*iw.f H* S-M AnUlow .nd SVIait T&J*V • W-tl n "FUr;nTwooi> o,,.s. . i 1 ". !" !" to Mil. Aim. .unrti. lor Bond or lor U houoTu? of Hii.ll fl'HLII UW I't.TIOT* Si Ml Ford Anariia in "I MM ford IMI modal MconfliU"' Apply: lhWJd_Mt %  TyAl^HALL SAUXiN 'WYVKKN iHTMnnwi^y *.<*'> *I.N*I.. (SWaga Dial -..:• gg} IN BHWORD VAN—Don* sol "asaa dnvnt BCOJII %  *%  > %  Diem NjCAL r CTKTKirUGAI. PCMP ... B m lip. Cobra Engine EH in-lHB0T Treadle s*wn i Mlt mod*!. LIKE NEW-114 rnn. Tr*iaig> • 17.3 5:irt Thei Ihe IxnouR electric train arta Mid mom Oat them ..i ICAUHLSON 17 3 40 i> HOCK WTOS If.lf bind l.-invndor M. rtm Mtl Tom Wl'km IT 3.SO— 3n *fl ttTASUB PIPM PITINGS. 81** l me*, n,. ui. >: ii,. J, & 4 Inci %  Asto Tyre Co.. Trafalgar Si It 3 SO—II n Oniom being ararrr taVaalota which we offer %  cent' ptNDd lUiold Piovetta ft Co.. Lid 11.3.50-n A tew No. 1 Catedonla rv... i BaaaMty for you _—/ priced Apply: John p I* Sna Ltd.. Roebuck Site* 15 3 W 3n I at MaylaJr run Shop Fro-. %  "aBltat B** the** today 1S 3 5001 |W* IUU-SHF.S: Ladle* llalr [ %  . Denial PlatiWMfe Brualirs. Manicure Tli'i-lt.^ftten OnniPxlon Bruahem *. L.. II 1 SOt f I * YXAXT. RK^h !" .>."nlraWd vl• %  tOktalm IkL IMor T*c Ih nom all Grocer • and Dnt17 3 V> •* %  aaea. (41 Double SaahWin % %  ^f* "> rrrat door and CaWiiJl a*'n-door and Ca*e. .31 HHErTS In 14 and V %  I Sim (| and t. lenjth. %  ••1 platM 1 1(1. 1.1 '. a-? 1 ^ • %  rtoui alxri Enquire %  in* Company. Trafalgar Slieet. 1 3 30—t ( 11 WDnoiQurro NET II.KTPS 71, % %  etUn. thcr ace etronCrr r. %  •JK the K uare oa> > % %  • * diameter Phone 8333 17 3. 50-3t; %  tail **or.t | J* 1 Oerberu, Pun.le C..u%  %  '*' % %  DaUye. Phi>. IT 3 ^ •jj-STtA Pr^ t -.„ fl*5'Ml moat rWJif^,,, ^^ ^^ I,! !" ii*e sampH %  > %  ? %  6w Jnhi-. r II "* In Solicitor! office panpf 0 1C 1 .'%  f 1 iTT 1 *^ Cleland Plan!?LUNE "• • Co Umlud. Hih Stro. 11 3 BO\fur"&*?. STr* 1 J^inB* Worthing < %  rlo 44, c %  „ Advoca It 3 J0-* nUDAV !7lh U 1 p.m. Courtly Qr i %  ark, Autiin io H or damaged In accident. Term. C**h R. ARCHER M, .. AucUoneer. 13.3 SO—4n In 4 jirlulr Bar V:*..^ Cjch --* iad-Lph.. tea PhyltN Mark. Sch win\£^.* ^J5 ?.. u TtMU PTn.Mwue Sen Zila Wonitj. Scl-. I f. smith. Sch Wonderful Coana. \RMVALs •*. Amu H. Sc* Srhoor*r cXIaTi. Tl M. n* rSZEZm \J1L ^.* n ' u m *'. ^<>' Cap* Oliv>arre. from Tmtdad, Ager** rrance. W. Smith. 9rh_ Freedom fi*,ry Schomar Owner-AM IN TOUCH WITH BARPADOS COAST STATION %  adkwaj Ltd, now com man caw ,h '*• vugh thr "•^Ti ^ ^ Torranc. *! ,I,U s Aanete L— f'S""!SS ,> "" 11 S S William.*Uaatk shipprr | | \. [antic Man-, %  AbbrdUk, SS Pacific l-uertv. ss Ttlimwl. S*. I Euo Syracuie. 5 S Loch Avon. BM. G Daitmouth. SS Araenlina. SS Stikleatad, SS Gulfpeak. SB. ra. Manaia. M S Patuca, S.S. Adula. SS. Eaao Worcoater. S.S Glbbr. : Alcoa Runner. 55 Armadalr. M S %  -lien Challenger. S.S llen.nl. S S Thulbt RS S Paula. SS Ai.e. ..,... %  -^ .... Columbia Star. SS lVnnaiivanta Sun. SS Eaao Hanford. SS Gloainia. MS Rgl U Atlantic Traveller. SS DoloreaA S S. Empire Cuawliajr, ss Treeua. S.S Maw— n S S Come*. SS Mormac Dawn. ^UUa^ UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER BY inatrucUona received I -ill •*.. %  ii Friday March 17th at 3 p m Mo r MxEneam*> Garage <1 MoJe. n.Ford Truck. Good Tyrea. Dom"gfNl Tarma Chjah VINCBNT GRIFFITH. i IV M .By ft W 1 V I IT-J, Ouin floherlwn. H. O. Iv WioOing. B^lr-e torn. Violet Hind*. T* Mc Brld.-. erinda Mc Bride, Sr>inour Hope. Mar) Seaat. Frank Home. Leonard Le Bajcu. loaaph i'-in... iur.-..t Voaal Jane su haul. Edward Saaphani. Brian Franco Voianda Franco. Frank Bu.*, Joh%  Brai Rtanary. Maiwaret Abar-ronvbv. Virginia Greet.. Alt.. Pratt, Rlehart Pratt. Rafael TonTorrea. Geomo Want. Irtomue Green, In Qpaaat I tUt, Arthur i %  v Roland Aahcombe. .. -. Iloi'tlo wwaadjjk, 1111-41111 Ks IT, ft\.W | 4 I For 1TUN1DAD: M Clarerva Brlniar. Mr* CinuOra I'hMlcr %  IXiphne Thou* M> ).— HDyta, Mr Jaa^ai U-KI %  %  amamaaat. Mr M.a Mofl it Mr A. Mrl^ocl-Snuth. V^r ANT7GVE Mi %  Smith For ST. KJTTB | MM M^a-garet Rarrl Waae For JAMAICA: ,Mr John Montreal Mr. Aaron Emaaiuwl, Mr Mr Donaild rguai<.. UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER PetroleUlll LUW VOT PtTU ANDRES ODONNELL'S SM.l Una", Hastings. BKWKI K 1 Kill MAN & CO. \u< Uoneer* 17.3.50,--In. REAL ESTATE HOUSE: Modem Bung*:.. 1.B3S aq ft Prult trai plenty of *pare for Chtchn Pigi. ety? Gaa laid on. Ap(.. *t", Balmont Road MO HOUSE with 3 rooda 31 perchea of land all... I Chiin Church The dwelling houie contalna open vvnuHUh. drjwing and dinIne rooma. two bedroonia and usual conThan n j|.*u a Lime Kiln In %  >ixi working otdrt on the premitra. The above property will he 'el up for idle at our Office. Jume* Friday I7ih March. 1M0. at 1.30 p.tn Imipecllon on application on the prvaja| VFABWOOD ft BOYCE, Sollcllora. S 3 so-tn nwFt i tsc; imr-i dwelling houae called AMBl'RY with I acre 4 pcrchca of land attached thereto, attual* at Upper Collymore Rock. St. Michael The houar conlalna drawing and dining rooma. one bedroom ana ronvenlenrri on the ground floor, and 'hree bedroom", toilet and halh on flrat I'oor f.ovrrnmrnt water ind Electric Ity ln.Ul)ed For ln building Mrnbei-h. windowa plaiea. floors and roofing: to (he aald building but not th r. ( tem wall which forma Ilk wall of the two alerted part of the building Tender* In writing Will by ihe Secretary of the uiwieratgnrd to the 34th March For full partRjUlara of the propirr , %  ba %  "%  search for new Eently needed. "But" Petroleum Press Son.. when adopted by the muttarj ninta now in power, and bj lb. Government next July, the nav law cann-' 1 to produce any striking risi tion for several yean to come." NOTICE F uusa or ai IA*UI Trrtder* will be received b> the under-. %  M-. ... %  jun '. .. % %  -. %  i ance of Pamper-. > Foniui of %  he rWortiW Trewmarrs I*. H TAWLTON, Clerk, Board of Guaa-diani. SI ] %  3 50—*. Ml III M \OTMTi "C2S •mod by obUinlng orderf for prlata Chrlatmaa Carda from rgaji frienda. No prevloui eiperlencnecraaary. Writ* today for beautiful free Sample Book to Britain'a largest and cinoat PubiUhera; highest eommlaalon. iiarvalloua money making ovpvrtunll) "iiei, WlUlama at Co.. Depl Vk-tor.Work.. %  — •--'—• patjyagi <.c. F L, '.'BH %  IBM. B t 2 p m. at awr af aiJM %  "z'l Tlte Meaauage Pw*a *ag "P ***^**?" djolning The EaVlf Church Ml. *ju-tc (eel Of Un-l .-,> WhMh la fcU •OaagaraHi a ahop Io tha I. |IU-SJU I conaiatlng I>1 fi-e : %  back F.lorairily nnd Goiwrni % %  ror inapectlon apply on ihe prenuw* he lenanl any da; i.. furihar" partlaular. apr'J.to Sollcllora, Jaroea **•*'•,. LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE The application -f S>dne> ^ u *.'" ' .alia Village. St James i %  P*" 1 "" tell RpUlW. Mall l*nw %  g* art) and ahingle a?P.."-' th ^f*^ .lached, altuata at l%0*d>r Hill. St J *T££<1 fgdf 1*1" t ol March. ItaO JLi"JTuT^ aws*raar&5a**" ' C '"*• S H KUIM. Polk, uwuinw. Due • r. OFFICIAL NOTICE IN III! l>.Mt\T(Olllnl M'pi \l it* Jurisdiction. F.WAN DttMS nLATKETT of '.tap of Arneru i-. AUoanry Al.THE HEROD1AS BI^CKJ-TT VEN1SHA SKFJ7TF. Dstfendan i punauatc* of an Order In th Court in the above action ntada on th. lib day of March 1040. I guw naXJcr ill peaaona having any estate, right 0 niercat in or any lien ai .fleeting, all that italn piece or parcel if land I formerly ;-.iof th Uands ot n Whim Planiatloni %  Ituat* In the Salnl Peter and 11land aforeaald contatnlna; by admeaaurement two roodi or ihereadMula abutilng and bound UiMla formerly of Ju v c* late of the F-.1-. Ramaay deceased on land* now or lati I* lialatt "f nui'ir. Weh ( %  deci m land* of the Estate ol 1 I larrla daoaaatd and on th< p r however elae th* aatnr e nngf bafUw me %  I claim* with their a ma on any 'Tuesday, or Fnd-a ran lite hours of • : the Oftk A %  %  rlautu may be r. ntharwlftc emt. .lid br depin.-' or agaurvat the aMd n.w>ert> Clalinanui are also notlHe-i .i;.t attend ihe aald Court on WrdiiM.y the Slat day of May. Itto. .i i clock am when their ai.i r ranked Given under my hand tbli 13th day %  Match I flan i v cnxr-a. Ceik nf ihe p( Appf-il MEAT TALKS ON, March 16 Ur B mercial Attache in Bui I > %  air lOHlay I America to open new i with the —Reutn. Lodge School Headmaster Reports • Frosa pan g boys and girls, but it wu to bring the scholarship facilities ofTered in ihe island, into line with modern educational trends. They had the four principal groups. Classics, Mathematics. Modern Studies and Science and so great was the pressure of life today that the standard required in nil these fields was vary |har than it was twenty ears ago. Whereas in those days it was comparatively ea;y for anyone passing the Matn: ".animation to gain cn.ranc to I Tniversity. the possatting less than a Hightie today made one eligible to gam admission. There is a greater and greater demand for more specialised training In ihe island for which we must have the requisite number of teachers." said the Bishop. When it came to making financial provision for these things in relation Io making financial privision for other things, there was the tendenev la revert to the easy method \ .\ition, namely, to sty that ol had so many bOtfl i fore it needed I tarai has for so many children. But it was not so easy ai Dial, what they wanted tally in the illation to the falUUaa which the school indeed should offer to the pupils attending that school. Specialists : that in the last allocation of -penalist teacher* important poin*. D overlooked I i. .-ived UW %  i mi i grade schools rfc a i Irrieu unbalanced. • ; adniaatar very nghtlj. .: |ed b) He. K\i i • i :i t.> the need fot Foundation io -ill theii ork. like to ita %  iBaaakop, ue hv. .... %  %  % %  ok th ild lodabattle f*i %  it ,,i the IOU] Trdi LetotniiiK i t i -ui only ias/ai -increasing numwbo hold th. ibou,' thai human purpoaa ->f life and tin ,,i betof in it I lupel k Ii happii i ... tins arhach bai ivsident boarders ir mi 1 hope onThose who 0W1 %i the school in Uh %  .ken up then in the various walks a ;rier no better servie* in the ichOol than in bringiiu Of a chapel" lli^hup Ihen expressed reEteeter of th. who, had rendered • he school, was : nf July. Some %  fill his place was one o* ll-.e things he would have to loot ho said and he wished t< them that he wuul> %  sumeone wli' I interest in th • .. i-y thankful to His BstccHencj for his iireaenc* ..t he would 1H\vill .'.'ions. SHIPPING NOTICES Stop Pyorrhea Cunadian National Steamships III 24 H 0 U \ S niFadlfi* naaaaa IPM> Tih and See-UlTkiOlSt CANADIAN CHALLENGE) 1AUY RODNEY LADY NBSON i-DNEV %  l ADY RODNEY NOJtTBBOCND I>.DY mrj LADY RODNEY IADY M 1ADY RODNEY laVDY NELSON IADY RODNEY 13th M | 31 May Sail* SalLBoaum Darbadoa Sail" IMMI llh Mar 33th Mar 13th Apr Ira Jun. 3rd Jul> nth Mar 13th A> ITih M Mb July 30th Mai Mh Aria**; pr iair. lath June 14th Jut. 30th Hi •th u :f AI 37th Ma 1M. ,'i 15th Jyi Rleedlng I'uma, Looae Terlh and Sore Mouih mean lhat yon have P^orrhea. Ir.mh Mouth or a bad dlaeaae which %  ooner er later will make our teeth fan n\i\ aid rn..( i-auas llhruu itiain and Heart irouble Mop tali dlaeaar now -nh tha ^'•ili iv i"iun Slop! 1.1, -ding !"' %  In It hours, ends anr^ mouth aal *-HI> muit inafee your mouih wall sad •ave tour tnalh or i-ion-odaj. I Amour Anti'oaaUi I^J!! %  ^ % % %  ""^^ %  w*^*" !" |.i..ii-in rau r*r Pjarrhaa—Tra-eai Ma-ifc tut Mar rand Mar let Apr 3nd Appe ITh Am in A. 3tin Ap. BHh Apr 3rd Ma tth Ma. Mh May 17th May — iath Mar %  th June 10th .'. IWh June —— SU> Jun 34tn ,'ur 3Tth JuneBRh ,u Ith July 1 0th July 13th Jui 17th Ju ISth 31 :th Aug tth Aug Ittn Am N %  ,.—Subject to change without notice. veagaga. fitted with cold %  torag* charoban. Pi eee na er Faraa and fietaht 'ties on tppBcaUon to :— GAUDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD. AfenU. OB. liiLE.. III V\V\I I \\ I Mil I FRENCH LINE Sallini to TrtaUaled "GASCOGNE'' MISH "GASCOGNE" Misir 'QASCOQHtr April ISth May 8th May Mth Smilins to riTBwaui March 21st April 4th April -ftith May 13th May 31st Th* Schooner Timothy A H VaiuduyUnaMi" will accept Cargo and Passenger* for ln-mas*.-. ulllrsc Saaturday. lath March The Schooner "Lochlnvwr S" sill accept Cargo and Passenger* fII VI VOIHIS L*"J*-tWOIs#YN i % %  • leaving Canada oaring !" .T. u,tl4 a "ri P0 ai "Sfyfan or rompanion Ap•adcline. Canadian Bank % % %  "aliiua, Vancouver 14.3. 3n iaT r highly swparwnced "As TT-PT Small Biutnesa |"ew *tisaiigf x Y 7. > 17 330—3r Barbados Turf Club Payment Of Prizes FII-n 150] CASH, M. CONSTAND SWEEP and roHE : ,'! S T will b* paid on anA rom MON DAY. 20th MARCH. I50 l*'" ; 1200 and 3.00 p.m. daily. bAl j URDAVS fxctpttd. IS and SERIA' %  paid on and from MONDA I MARCH. 1950. between U.0 hount ai above. SATURDAYS G A Bail aim n.l.50.—Jn. DBPABTMENT ol HIGHWAYB AMI IKANSI'ORT Persons due l MS, to 11S JuDflj 1949, should pers ... >. partment i.f llifhways and Trai.i-i : ..l,.y, 28lh April. 1950. 17.3.50.—2n. OFFICIAL SALE | BM2XXJ i\ rar. ASSUTANT coi ai 01 hrw\ 'FaiulUtble JurlaJictioni EWAN DTKNI9 BLACKIT I'nlled State* of AJTUTK by Attomey HEKOniAS BIACKETT faa.nnfl V BVlEH A SKaaTTE NOTaCfC ii heeaby given lh..„ nn Orter of Ihe Aaslata Apeeal dated the 13*h day of March lftM Uvsre will be net up for aale aw mmm m howwvar elae that egaae *imuitd and If not Uanr aaag in* art pre pert y will be act up for aale on ever-, Friday "the aa J t Dated thle 13U> *V I V ciLtuai AsT Clark of the AjBtatant Court FORM II THE LAN!) ACQUISITION ACT, 1949 (Notice required by Section 5) purposes, of the following parcel of land containing 7,710 aqu I or less situate at Payne's Bay Schedule btl .( both House*, of the LegltlatUP ol the Island of Barbados by reaoiution nf the Houseof 1 declared in pursuance of Section 5 of the LdUld Acquisition Act, 1MB, that the said lands have been acquired (or U* toUowing purposes: as a site on which fishing boats can I H which shelters may be t-rtxted. r i .: A parcel of land at Payne* Hay in the parish of St. James containing 7,710 sou. OB lands of B. II. %  ue Public Road running from i.er lands of B H. Moore and others, and on the West Dated this 10th day of March, 1950. at Government House In the Island of Barbados. A. W. L SAVAGE. Governor. ifc.3.50. —In. DEPARTMEN1 01 .U.KICULTURE IMIMINH \. H.W.I. APPLICATIONS are invited for the poet nf Agricultural Assistant (Agricultural Education) in the Department of Agriculture, Dominica, Windward Islands. Applicants should hold a degree or diploma, and have some expei ln| ;inculture and related sciences. Salary scale Si.630 I S06 S2.400 per annum. If a ear is required to be kept, allowance* la accordance with local regulaUons will be paid. Subsistence allowance will .*' paid at the rate of S3.60 per day when away from Headquarters. The Officer will IKre.|>on*ible fnr ihe training of agricultural pupils In accordance with an approved course of studies. He may upon to organ! nurses for the Junior btaif Applicanta should '.eiwient of Agriculture. Botanic Gardens, Roseau, D u.g details of quaUflcatioas and experience, and two recent testimonials. '. EHTEUIL, Superintendent of AgriciUture. 16>.a<. BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED \iiiici: DUE to several chansjrs In schedule which become afbetiva Saturday, 1st April. 1950. all persons holding rescrvjlion.s mi or alto that date are kindly requesii-d lo c.immunicnte with our Ofttoa Lower Broad Stiret. (I'hunes : 45B5 and ^789) lot animation regardinK changes in times of arrivals, and departures, etc. KIR SALE OR RENT? Acreage. Building site, or Houses 'Phone BAKltUms Itl M IMAII U.l \( \ Office : llaatinga Hotel Ltd. Telephone -'336 4.ISIIISI l.l ISIII.S II Wilt H VI iS See The lldlllllllCJ llandcrafh I < Illp4JI Bridge A Trafalgar Streets, ORIIMAI. (iOODS! For cumios. it m u i ti IIKAKSHAKI: IIAKWIMII) NAMIAI, ITOBT, in< . Vlall . K A s ii M i: %  I THAN! HKOS IT mav II,. Mr.rl yiLLiAM FOGARH LTD. | INC. IN B.C. Laading Centtv for . i aataatva i.nstisi. suiitng, HARRIS & SPORTS TWEEDS, GABERDINE, SERGES & DOESKINS Please call and see us, when it will be our privilege to see th:it you are fully Mtfafled which is much Aim RIO. I rlERS which is i "THE HOUSE OE EOUARTY I romblnrs Tailoring rjllsiiiaii'.hip with High (irade f lutlung • *.T MI.M-I PRICKS •ss.'s.'.*.'.-.'.:*.'.•.•.'.•.'%  '' %  .'..'.".--'-'.•.'-',-.'.-.','.-,-.'.',",'. 1 ,$ I :: ^ Is your IHMMi ROOM FURNISHED | i TBBTII -,.an Maihjagkiii ai %  All these and nions you caaa get Money Savins Prices BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD. LS. WILSON L rr.r.li.r SI. i iui nib:. J '.'.V//.V.V NEWS FLASH! I.AIIIKS. .iesT OI'K.M:!) EMBROIDERED LACE From Austria (A very small quantity) Its Superb Quality and Dainty Embroidery is simply enchanting and indeed irresistable In While only 3" wide 82.95 per yd. Also Beautiful KMBKOIIII KM) DOSS III AM BROS. Pr. Wm. Hy. St. 16, 42 & S3 Swan Street



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fglDAV. MARCH 17. 1950 BAKBAD08 AUVOCATE L.K. Manufacturer-, Exploit Colonies — Mottley PAGE AT WEDNESDAY'S MEETING of th. II,,,,,, s ^ m „U. Mr. E. D MoUUy ,E, led h £+£?$ ,1 ^,1,1, Government allitud.inward, in, w,.., i., d :, .. regards the turrcnl sugar urire discussion. ne Asnibly was dealing with* — ^^^^B]. Controls. Subsidies, I TV the l50-'> Colonial K>K conllned lo £ and Mi MolUe} said u ""'f'l' re no; admit any "ffil 1 appreciate the remarks !" „ !" c '" s they cannot let /ZTnonourabl nlo. member "WW else kn ow wh „ „ %  J-iive to subsldisa.' <• %  They know that it. ;" n """"S Upper,:: reUtlvc-to subrtdisa.' "J_ They know ,hal Uli | reel that our Ion i "IU| >lron B opposition when umcipally due lo th Ir,-.,lJp. meted oul lo us by the rated Kingdom After seeing how badly our &nr Delegation *•*' created, it ^Tfcejsary to review :l Iliat the 'dome* .:" ' ,l mereproducer, ol cheep raw which they Chould n,,^ !" ;'.olBclals were .idmitud it must be remembered tha,.me the avcra J^nS was little more than a bov. he has ssisr -trials f, .IK P^ndenre ol opinion Laaatatturri und foi urovidin '*' hc will raver %  Ep fOOd I know lhal many Kngli.ii jfcjal< in .he pounti %  us well us Mpjth politicianand statesmen a tat United Kingdom disliked fpK Indians using the word ex(Utatton. hut I would say hero 2 no* hal ,n,, OI,1 >' wa >' l0 sl P at word being used is to stop (OlOlUUt. us. Very Cheap UK U.K. bought our sugar ar %  motbwi Own Pfttelc ,,"„ ,hc emonstnt. own made by our own people from th* on such matvers-irto^KdiSn' from that ol the _„,an ,„ p ub u c w .,7. -—- "t uur own neouU' 1L U '...-., The """" "' 'he official '"eorth,, r ,u neo "tZi. ces ''•' %  ;:'i, hi, 10 row the coloiiu overboard. The jjtt to ihv English consumer and %  afauiacturer is of paramount imiorunce Our people, with their lav standard of living, must, if Lascar) be pushed lower down. Ifuiw,! be B ; rij in mind :ai( sugar nost imnUnt dollar tamer and. equally spartam. what was consumed in %  M U\K was a dollar saver. Not i Mid of this has ever heen mentned froi 'Hi t i.vd Kingdom Ithsvenewi • %  i lold any thin* ibout the amount of dollars the' B.WI Sugar Industry has either MnMd or saved The U.K. Govaament is now ready lo use Uim tc buy cheap sugar from Cabs-and mat ugar could be* nan in the British West Indies. %  time. the> ai i H io dollars (01 many i vttdes which they themselves arq laying in thr doll inaxs, onions. baoWi, hams. MB, breakfast cereals and in tany cases, pickled meats The Briti-li %  j Ike B.W.I Aiui un several avuioiu. inrludini thi* year. BP paying a higher price for aillar ,ugnr than Mi. ire paya* us ia the B.W.I. re than obvious that | i 1 i completely different F Mon nf what is Rood and r tor the Br.itish working to the ooicnial ^Jpto when' <-ur primary %  gkKti are in free supply. 9kom Or \ol was made quite dear not ilie public. hlcti i: from 'here would not be all am the pretense that W< w """"IB the With U.S. • I rom M ,r 1 and refrain > ""' : n power 1 ly called ol inh %  nd ihe limitallnn or arm: A estry Decides On Wages For Workers M UMir id of the' ce March last i made by uht Mi C D. Mottlev drew to m %  iencal error, these work) SI .30 a day when all the other manual work*] i Bid >1 44 %  %  %  which it stood %  I lit. i. O. I w %  %  *tr> during the war and since. In short supply, and mud have fetched six or eight tnts the price we accepted in nnr of the war Now it is coming _. %  i .jofull supply, ihey are ready m being %  v-i board. The hv T,,, m ,'' l:n by our ottdala wntiout the %  of people in the Rw.l. or ttvh elected epmenuri Let u* examtag Mmw of thr *' or decisioru. which have teCB madr (a,uda. uh.cl, kM alwajs uidver, close tradimt rrlalion* with lh e B.W I .uwt %  (Ti In %  %  f lh< mi, pap. %  which r Uonal lopmenl %  i %  : i" iind pcacr buya a large parl of our produce Ml not to ia being gradually eliminated u a supplier, and heinc reduced IhrougJ uiu i-\i-nlu*ll\ nuireh removeri : The BrtUali Heal Indie* ^re h, e ran ing treated, a* reganU C'aaiada, -va< ti> a uf disUnt colony While the U K., WC ire S ^ aW e225.Sl fr0m . bu >'^.tinuatlon of these tens,. Kiul.i | the s..|vlel : which cannot be obtaii %  cheap. Our cox ol llvl Kice %  I %  "' mckliu man in Barbados should have only rice breodtruit. sweel potato and URevalualion Reports %  i IM things to which the English British Cat working man is entitled? it is i held In Barbadoi nigh turnthat we let it be knowc i *> Hth Maivh to cons, however much %  %  us and we are kei •oonomically, oar iK?opics cannot It is not only with ;. our CanadKin trade that B long ago when Mr. Hees | receiving a raw deal. Tr.ere Paams. Under Secretary of jrnany other instai |tor tne Colonie;aid 11 wa we all heard that wr of indirTexvue whelhei the devaluation. the rate .-.i.v^wiii 'MUMiti '"e uivuiuauon. UH' •U people in the West Indie> aleamer freight from England lo sftoe^ ..i lived in propeij the West Indies was being inIbg workin i Br.gland gut (ood cheaply reasd to cower the i \ir., cos-. Not .t wottl v.., WZ£? 1 : "' '^hng|abo\it the"7acT"tl -i-nan '• —.-. i %  *.-._.. I k> t-i,, ";,".'. ",. t"" 81 1*"""! freight to Ei 1 %  been m-anr.vmg to all .Vue This I. gWt Indianto hear that when Jesuits cf the British General kins were dec lared, Mr. Willwas kicked out. Just Itefctg very badly treated over IJ. Ihe same thing is hupueniBimany other directions which I" so obvious to most people. English Government makes "it pretense that th. the colonies a much measure of self Governbut m fan. .1ns ifar from •niih, ..s on most important -, Questions, the; %  T"* Uu -i tin u.' even %  *"* Ui on; opinion and we are I. : what declsi %  J^ r5. they %  rnen Ihej held coi i. %  OBde some commercial adn.to UM aadji „,„brains J*P fnarn our. although the %  ters were never allowed to J; re taken. ibandoned the %  jse or having anyone hut h^• t, %  w which %  m-m .,.,,, more important ily leaked out late) This '• D veri rotten deal, and it is quite dear that th. of Pood must have put aure to re ay the cost i %  %  Maine lime told the (.'. to th. cost of i [ht to the It W l thus Increasing the cost of our goods so that our people are paying for the reduction ir the freight on sugar. This •another way of reducing they are paying for on \ Mianuone say that a nation w: tees for a people is acting fa ; when, this is done? I %  members that the arTan colonies should be ttu N %  tlon? I know, they people in tins I ly tried to make out thai I anti-British, but I would lil to be known that I am as loyal am essentLtliy pro W. I f l ,M Conference %  J* August, the) had a I %  ta Una,,,, ,,„ j Mmm t^SC!^"fflcialsto atteod m ,,_.,„.,, ,„., .., IttTli. JSLWa .* ** done I feel that %  ratk-, ^S* f ulurc doUar lappear tn tx hould b aJS"' !" conference was ^ n the liyi sterling in The Col Bald % %  *... %  %  i %  trends in the sterling an It gave parUculai problems ol tlon of Irni %  %  the maintet %  Probiemi %  though tin :iflu. %  %  I %  I from timbasis. Utr ttu %  for milk for the Altnsh< .. %  Mr c tier, since about the %  Ixhibitlon. iven "i %  Jternative nd Craft and crafts tck ol the ihn.ughi not to nd they %  %  :. lias al%  I' K. %  %  %  %  %  %  i 1H8. %  I both lattl I %  %  %  aaod repi' %  which V< Tax. ConThe Tenets Of Christian Science II, t:„rhK Simm, HOW to build a t'hnsllv I.r. of treefloin. health, hap, through ,. 'he religious TMI T1. ',' "f Au in Texaj. last mght A member ol the Board ol Ixctu"*ip ol DM M.,ti„-r Church, tue Firal t luinh ,.( Chi i' c,' n Bo on MaasacluuclLs. Air suun ..poke m Uu %  OMM i I urch, From a liletin, lecturer drew actual In hea.ing ., %  :,! r(tlieraUa rot I ::thriatiai, vr ,,,., IWllt pin %  nd all-B Ihnstiai. whom I had turned loi faithfully stood bv mc Rel un and .omlorl were round in th, ..ling that mv hoo,l wa. ever In the -,. Of the MOM Hit: I "I the Almighu s, -ureu in Ihe ninelvn Psalm •HIGH TYME" • from Fase 1 French Scene or Pans Interlude typical sidewalk Cafe, the sidewalk, waiters inviting customers :n; the two !an dancers the aerobal ind baby. %  ance. Trie songs In this nui.ib. i are catch lit rubbr i %  the house down." Per hap* the most platMWanjM. number wa ihe 'IViui. Ki..me if I jetl saaaan Thome. Madeline rte Warren, Bi'ttic Prca %  o tad PI. I'II k ''i^f. Betty Wilkes The "The healing look two heir old fa a htan ad hoop it waa completed Ihe Victorian era sitting i I"H*' During ; n s pe r ,od I war fture frame, sang | "bio to be about m\ bu Baa BoowwIhBre ""^ sl uaual indeed it was ,. l-eyond the Stars", lively to I wonderful legenerativc Untk At", and others: each girl in '> ence. As the healing | Bg t.i, r ai these songs man < i ping out of the fr.ii irinkiug, ih, they paraded in :heir \ei> 1-MIII habit, the use of pro) 'ul cost 11 Then there was the !h\ Number which had Jjoth ihe' „.. bright and cheerful song> Blcl ""' i,ji,l > i..T. as well as Sloplu , • l '" " '>ed by ChTUl J Fosters' Old Kskntuclo Hosaa • i mtual O! i Wan KIM n 'ii,,.. a0 %  Tla by Eric Gate 'Ad KdwardCoo. I lamh who does a i':i baskets, tor aoe ff butterlesi Mn much %  %  II is wULy. Bi llvei) pei II] •i varj %  nappy number with U Ung them A Thuiigh ii ., va) ahori number -weet. The tlnale OSkOa igam nuliit:.,. N I .el. .,11(1 If %  urtain rails which Uk OBlted for makes -HIGH TYME' 1 rise and shine, and i triumph foi Enr Gates and hi* hard working and talented cast. ured PTomlnantla :ng that n through application ol \ friend ,>f t! ged to intern ; from New York to 1 | pain When hi condition became known m the hotel, pen made Mm to ante. %  Being .i Christian <\> atmpu con %  %  m his healing He ia I i i %  %  migl thougti %  %  anything shoit of my o-tag, European Front Imperative • Fram par I %  I l %  %  %  %  rials of aaeu the Comn. oluma In %  fleet raw ngth IM0-S1 The i. tially hostile : %  %  I If. With .;;i 0) lection musi %  Soviet 1' 'An %  manoeuvre below th< I passages of :i. "The man; %  %  Mi Chur" I %  %  uuea bi I prominent %  %  Fly to US Sign I'i'lition lalei %  acy of perfection and Ul i erai DOUTS latei that a clear case ol mantel aui i • i had taken place Thla DOI I>pintuul birlhnghl' ,lusl recently h* M %  %  %  %  %  %  %  haaMng In U i ling to the aiiei j sician. she called foi it rean I laaadat Messri ihew's Gospej A-here J> ,'•"%  She, I 17 1 p %  to Ii. the Harh.ido I %  %  cate but is number had risen to 304 %  teei C V Han on and I %  %  OlO MVOUIIIII MIUI.IM •tttllVtk CONIIII-AIIUN %  %  DR MORSE5 "m PILLS via PAN AMERICAN CLIPPERPAA knthrna IgBBBJ ,i %  | |d v ." Vuik IJU.72 ... • I|M fcl en VVg i.irn. • MIAMI %  i 1)1 :;, mid Trip ll.W I ( urifi'i > EUROPE tut Double • Decked Clipper Service between New York and tronsollontic point, Ove-nighl accom modalion inNew Yc on through dighli to Europe of no odditionol COM. FUf PAA. ih* b.i wuj m the world to travel onywhere in the world. For further information and oniull youissen trove %  nd IllHIll "•%  %  %  %  I IWllKtl ". -uti %  and that for hi t Redman. %  n lUah rsmsf%  Deter. rSS '"' s "if 1 aJS!? unofl fc'-l was allowed 1^'opate Ne, report ol bis ff^jw* has ever been issued. f*pt for a few oflicials. no i n 'he B.W I ha i ever been %  >' inkling tead aaai? 1, -' of thq %  w-ernmciit can I *our fate in this : our officials are paid b) protect the r K. Intere to lc ; after ours. It is high time all sense be ste, e make an fTort to see that local plarge than ui.esli\ 'economic policy and ni ., ( c ;. ( longer sit down and let the ColB*" last November another on** 1 Ofllce ably assisted ^'Wce of Supply Officers was velopment and Welfare dictate it U Barbados, probably for to us without our knowing even w plan out -mwhat Is happening and fooling %  rselves that we are receivlm; L*"* 0 111 f dollar> that the I creater power to govern our-."*** ,n London had decided i salves. g J" the n W I Again, thU We should And out the W. I TJ^ was 100% official, not' position with regards to dollar n I adntu' 1 ''" lC earning and dollar saving our visiP renr* k" No ^ClK " f ^^'ble as well as Invisible dollar cxlaTV-. ** cvcr bco i^uedrxirts. such as Tourist Trade and BBfcJre i Oniy finding out by *~ S^*".the disastrous things ?"* Plannea for uttL, B**^nt time t -——• MM ihere ia ^•renee beiiu heU in BarCT 1 an * matters ariaiag U^JEveryone must agree 52 *1U1I> affeeUng everr aiT^Beuif n u. BH |. ^x %  mT-g** flBd ? Again no e a^J? !" • allowed to par*2T' L_ %  *• %  be4n "**' %  kkTL.^"* whifh are avail, %  Use He.t ladies ouuida ^J rtrele. wlileli | veatare H > are iaJUte^. HU .i.. %  kj *hy r r* all these conferGas Rationing In Sydney %  %  FIRST JET A1RMSER ARRIVES IN ROME HOME, Match lb BRITAIN'S HAVILLAN D COMBT, tbi all-ji-l animei. landed bjBCt toda) fsftM "yui. in two hottra &va naio i ply was on board. Polite, mi tool and foudhl to eteai the tarmac in from port buiiiinni'inked out (BBfl sac the plane. Cunningham, greeted by Hairs il he steppeu i :i.ed the lllgtit .1 two hours two minutes it ; ihuht-. he we hail I head wind." —Reuter HoRLo AIRWAYS passmcias • MA., cuerta tiii V PAA Ua Co. 14 i new Lond Roau ; %  %  i ghter which last %  iteB, ..ci-ording to local aei •>• piloted by ex(iioup Captain John "I mi, former nifhi lighter Air Marshal Sir Alan put up a tight for a proper amount of dollars to preserve standard of living and protect OUT vitally important Canadian fade. We' hava bee. down like a lo*. of dummies having It put across us for too long I will lie i Un| I with a heavy heart. ... that il the V K gav. treatment, food could be bougri cheaper and the money oauM *< used to impro** other p" IBOIIIBII i which an 1 '*T a \.". form. T, that all is well with the coloniw.^ is far from 'he truth. LIGHT & POWER TROUBLE FREE INSTAL "LISTER" ALTERNATOR SETS New Fashion Plastic Handbag* III. a Hlul.. .1. i n i .,, I UNI HAT8 l.l IND Ti \\\ l.-l. .1 l.m~ \ts., Ill Hit i|\[il in;I i.l ul -I -Kit; I -. -I \t h-. INU I \ -IIICHIOAIIU A. .SIII.SS MIUH. 1 75 K.W. 1 K.W. K \t W.I K.W. it U-*. ?! EM. %  MMI t roKs lUhboarci. and Vuumallr ValUiKanhiMn. COilK. OF SPARE PARTS IN STOCK \ ppl I UK HXHIt MHtS FOI XIWY i.ul. WhIU Park Road Mai MM To Mothers who cannot feed their babies Don'l worry !Oa'tmilk can b< prepared fcoihai ihr yajnfesl hab>' can.liacst il without Irnublc. Ihe .1JJ111..11 .'i K...>nw.n\ 'Patent' Itarley pcwoaU the nnlk I Tiiuni; hVp ium.chs. making II .nuivc organs 10 do their work thoroughly whilst getting them ready to digest heat ler Isxxlt later ihUfe-That'swh. ..: mothers alwjys use Robuuon's S ROBINSON'S PATENT BARLEY WILLIAM RMiARTY LTD. Inr. B. (i. 1 1 -MR Announcing the arrival 1950 PRESOLD REFRIGERATORS Ml i eaojUMSIla See the N. HI IhaM — Uat STI.I I. IK WT, wiili ., %  I



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PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FBIDAV.MUtt-j, „ QcUiih Cn&ny i*Hi trouss.au rh. Mrchionss brough* thtse honeymoon hats Lucky Fellow Eminent Barrister M" M S CRITICKSHANK. in T R MAURICE MICHAEL of 1TX tm||wm Blirr|ster Md Mer Ucfaaal and Sons in St chan Banktr from England, wh John'5. Antigua, certainly had a j,a* been spending a holiday as a lucky holiday in Barbados On BUtst al -cacrcbank." left yeslerT day's races he won the day by B.W.I A. for Tot-ago t %  fif tWO shilling field days at "Speystdf' the races. H 1 -re for len days slaying Mr, and Mrs. Cecil Jordan of Clifton Terrace. Bay Street, and ho begced 'Carib' to thank the many friends he made during his before returning to England. On Short Visit M R. AND MRS. RICHARD M PRATT, who are from Naw York City were visiting Mr and %  • iy LwH fOf the wonderful Mrs. Lawrence Green. Americans ho now live In Trinidad Yesterday Mr. and Mrs Prat' accompanied by Mrs. Green arD -.LEGATES who returned med by BWIA from Trinidad lay alter the Devalua'<> T^rd a few days at the HasGreen is due to loin his wHo John Mordecai, Tra e Ac.m'nli.trjtor of Jamaica. Mr. D C. time that thvy gave him Di |< H I Return fcELEC.ATES who returned lay ancr the DevaluaH E TIU iiOVFRNOP Fcnmson, Commissioner of C'mmerce and Industrial in Jamaica. Mr. J. B. ClcgR. Economic Affairs In Jan Cr lonial 11 %  Aasociatlon. He will attend " On B.C. Work oatniitf rlrst Division nature a. HISEI.Y TUCKER of Ktn.in.ton to-morrow a crnoo., j^| n ^^ M between Carlton and Empire From Barcelona A N AMERICAN, from Tulsa. Oaklahoma. Mr, T. J. Green, now works in Barcelona. Venezuela and yesterday he arrived via TrinldX-i bv B.W.I.A to spend one of the „ l 0 | c al tne p, ra< ii, t Beach Club .-:'. Until Sunday THOMAS and Advertise! I F we had only heard something about Barbados before we planned our West Indian holioay we would have come hero lay by BWIA. on his first direct and spent our entire vacavisit to Antigua where he will Do i on here." So said Mr. and Mrs. I adv staying at "Happy Acres He Is Leonce_Levesque who live in RobS L. Southorn. Mr Harold Wootf, ,„'„"' rc "i urn i ns t D Barbadoi on Thev hope to return next year LaJy Southorn's brother accornd M • | % %  ml bring some friends with them and Nevis Th v ''" y""rmoon Iroussea spray and scattered with rhlnearones. Ri*ht : drrkr | with x thistle spray. hJ'k in London with the Marquess. ha Left : black feather helmet with looping feathel head-hugging hat In Bermuda-pink shantung straw Women Outnumber Men In United Stales But Ihnhuiul Si-vkvr* fcaal W Uorry staving Glrlinn at High Winds, Rockley. T rived yesterday by H W.I A. panted Hon John Stow. tatrjtor of St. Lucia to SI Luci vattcrday travelling by B.W.I.A rh. v will be his guest* until they return to Barbados on Sunday The Southorn's and Mr. Wool' have been holidaying here for some time now and are guests at Sam Lord's. SUyinf With the "Treet" L ORD A of Holland H %  s. Builointt %  the C'Dl'.Jinil Deval poratlon on U | arrived yasterday from si Uicla, to spand with his good frl< Ronald Tree .. i Beach. St J Mrs. Anthony Eden is also H< h %  will before going back to England. Holidaying With Her Family M RS. LOLA Mc. BR1D1 dauiclt' At moon by BW I A to her fJU %  Mc Bride liv. I %  xbadoi for Ihn years. Married on Wednesday M lb.-> DIANA H uaughter ol Sir John Hug•mor ol Jama* I married on Wednesday aftff rew Parish Church to j~ \i{ ,' Tuesday. ill, Bahamas i Island Hopping Dale, thf new Bishop of Jamaica officiated Governor Huggms. E"HOM NEW YORK to 1 gave away the bride and UM | Lixuxy Lmcr wedding was witnessed by nunind MrsI : BWphanl who I %  ChhafO • Vj -h7'h' as "n 0 rb^e.rhere~be(ur;. Churoh. Six hundred >*aos to She is the widow u( Mr W M "' %  %  TWnpla who was Praoldent of tho %  11 was held at i Company, UH> well1 hnuwn English-CtrLHtis.!! linn ol %  %  •• Bahamas where thi il itephanl is a man^acAirera of all dental -m reside. Cbon SQUlpment nd for the Hotel itself whers they spent six very happv fiiiys B.W.I.A. Staff New. M RS PEGGY ABERCROMBY I B.W.I.A.'s Stewardll In Barbados for a few tlktay She arrived yeatin*hy BWIA. Carib heurd news of another \ Stewardess ve^tcrday. it was that Dorotny tsenane.a has . %  engaged \X> Claude Gordon I A pilot. From Durban, South Africa M RS. BERYL WADE and HlH %  ,11 lbs way from Durban. South %  us in Antigua, and besides to Trinidad fnr Carnival. took lime to spend it. Barbados staying at lb* Windsor Hotel Yesterday thev li-ft tot St Kilts by B.W.I.A. on i 'urn journey home LookingUp Old W.I. Friends LORD aSHOOatBI i m.Ait u ...t DggntnleaB-sMcn On Buiiiii'ss Visit un Dunnes* YHII ^ m o( ^ nu m CuMU Kone over to Europe •'! a on U) Luy Kuoa j t or n is linn, lie %  euesuay. tug at London's exclusive ... lair Hotel and in a few .uj Broodeast Ratal s.i\Ices (Over„ mt ,, gul ]s uver „ ^^^ wtlllc he is in England. Mr. Lartigue i Mr K T Murray. Regional Dl, aklng he opportunity to look up infill ulc-ist Relay JarvlcM Mmt 0 ( hls 0l(1 Wral | nt iuiii [i lends. From Toronto II TEMPLE of .Toronto Is in Barbados on holiday and is a guest l lank" This is het Ant the island, and her on]. M" (By I KID) Kl' h COOK) New York (B> Mail. America's 1950 census, which begins on April Fool's Day. is going to be a women's census. Population experts are already agreed that it will be the first ever to reveal a preponderance ot women in this country. They suspect that it may show as many as 1,000,000 more women than men. Questions of "special inti-rest to women" are going to be put at every fifth +iouse throughout the These will include a detailed Inquiry about housing, covering everything from the age of the television set to the efficiency of the kitchen drains, Included will be the type of house structure. the heating method employed, how much rent is paid, or how much is still to be met on the mortgage. Census officials said to-day •hat scientific samplings have revealed that a preponderance of women will te( dtown in the official count. Until 1930. men maintained a margin over women in the United States of 102 to 106 for every 100 women. In 1912 the excess of men, after a long period of immigration, was over 2.7OO.0OO. By l^JJ. thsexes had reached almost exact balance. Halfway between the 1940 census and the 1950. the balance shifted. In 1945, according to the samplings, there were 99.6 males for every 100 fem ale? CROSSWORD Rupert and some of • his friends tavc had a jolly evening letting o& jome fireworks in his garden. Next moraipg he goes out IO tidy up and put the burnt out pieces into a tack. While he is busy the gate opens and Willie the Mouse cocoes in to help him. When all is gathered they set ott (p %  sfc nother rubbish. I Two main reasons are given 1 for the switch: The heavy declint of immigration (predominantly men) anJI U You mignt lose Ibis iwr> 141 12 Just tor • chsoM let >M8 be • Dirt tSi 14 rugs Hive mem 1*1 is Border upon. I4i 16 Wbere corn naa gone DBO TOUII uauauy nnd one ifl) 19 A p.ace for atonna noney i4l Found Ui Hard tnelMUc Mrma for thei Mlirks I ;.k. it #Wr AYR, Canada. Farm-wife Mrs. J. " had 700 chickens for dinner tht other day. They were day-ol chicks which wer.put on tm warm kitchen iloor when that. incubator broke down. Six hungry men In the Maus family had to go to ;i n'st.iui.int CB _^^ llicldle At wh.it ;ieie are most wome-i happy' 1 Why does %  youth cease to grow up when he starts a beard Why sh.-uhi carpenters bohevo there is DO such thing as gloss. "H ii>**S''Y Out Kansas way there's a story about a farmer who when he wanted tu know how many hog ; ; he had, always counted :he legl and then divided by four. We heard thai Later lie tstad he same system on a nemhUnir's farm where there were beelcattle. sheep and turkeys. There were more sheep than turkeys. Sheep and turkeys together had Itasdl and feet tutalling 100. The: „ oeef-cattle were only one-third! t0 man y each f the number of the others com-' r ", 'nbour farmer haw? Alphabet Conundrums What two letters of u. „-, bet have nothir beheeeblff be spelled with two S* spoken with one letterr J*' tmnR a true to nature a auco J0( '43 Bird onratea o tbe eocieui tBjpuane |4) in rbu l* a =e>r ooputaf ort y uses. 14) 'fl for one -" doginatic 1 mlgtu Busiest well-placed dos-ote nan L Ouiunie mnd ol acat roi 1 countryman ifl) i. Pot an elbow out ol joint in:* %  aouki oe put uaderoestD. >5i i Blrta i3i 4 Sort of tning uat ttaccQu* enjoyed. 141 s A yacht can sail 00 tr.it ana never toucb the tea. Ol Colour, is) 7. Let it atay I4I sound mi grammatical out 8) Jb 17 Measure. ._. 18 More measuree. (A) SO This lady did no'.tnns 10 touno Cartaage. (4) U lfa for *ser on edge n> 21 Outflow. (3) 34 ira mixed up m a pose. (S) TV BY THE WAY Ity Beachcomber I T 1'lay that 70 golf course Hut II that the 1 ustomer almost 1 eta to he lai.i instantly on 01.1 in a ,..-. as ilabs ud opsratod *>n. in of an assistant he looks for Of mass hvnl[ he would rid the %  irfSOO in rubber small game gloves and a mask Instead of • three beautiful *iii IN to the And something makes rne think %  that %  and ( ling the air ol %  %  that if >ou entered the barbarously luiiashed ollice on the tlrst tin*., IfoissM I irlilntuiiH> HW would find our old friend. T roul OOUfh, Up to his UU \ S aB *-e .vil shop which sells choice fruits, and l r Khubarb l.ornvr inhoarrj of Mani L Drrttas. To juiii/u things a > %  ( customer for bit at home my fiance prct.'nil.d uglifhat he thouoht my mother^ nose r iR /iJ'_. I ui" ModHiy. and put our front. %  s door key doun her back. She bethat air of .luxu: ah yan Io cry out and throic h.-nr'l execrable taste which makes the about, and the piano-tuner uo wealthy i'. ,r door came in and said rdAd hWss Hiodcrn dances made him details. Over the shopf: k, and tried to utalt: with her. afalsoa TirlironBert, my fiance, uaa slappina In* tame ami n, the WlndOW one leys and hoU'Iini/ tl'tth lauyhtcr. T ld basket of peaches and one of strawicheti my dad walked in and ordays. was always supposed berries The fruit is %  symmedttrtd Bert out 0/ the house. How to go to the othci side of the u01 Id tricul and so perfect in appearance can I explain? to hunt big 1 • is, at that it might be imitation fruit Dr. Rhubarb says: Say that Bert any rate, mow romantic than v, feop all is glittering "hi it to test your parents' love %  mothering his giu-f on a local chromium in and byfor him also : Japanese i>y aged 'our who dav Krch Vour Hat With Snibbo. &v nvtir ami yrt *afnri ^HI raji rtad lultor, la the old A as always supposed CRYPTOQl'OTK—Here's how to work it: %  XTDLIAaXI • IsLONU FELLOW One letter simply stands for another. Inihis example A is used for the three L*s. X for the two Oi. etc. Single letters, apos(rophies. the length and formation of the words ate all hints. Each day the code letters are different. A Cryptogram QuointIon BXOORBB RDOYXQWURB II A R V HARV OWD SROWXBR HARV H A R B R; SRCJ R UR OWD-UJQLJC Ouplaajastsi \ FERVENT AND DILIGENT MAN IS PREPARED FOR ALL ,'HINCS—THOMA.S KEUPIS %f**& X fcfOX £V£GY STlOPP£R. CHILDRENS TRU-FORM SHOES MARINE HOTEL DANCE KATI HUAY Ml.II I >lar,h 111.I. PERCY GREEN & HIS ORCHESTRA Dancing from 9 to all hours-$1.00 H'e art generating our own drdrkil), so there would be light SLACK PATENT 4to 65 7r 10 IOJ WHITE BUCK Hi to la $6.05 £•12 SJ.2S TAN LACE 7> to 10a 1U to la $.52 S5.2S nay Quality Shoaa lor Y our Childian I -^gj A Naw Sfalomant ol JOHN WHITE MENS & YOUTH SHOES lual Arrived I Ail Pricaa Adraruaad ore B.W.I. Dollora NEW GOODS! BEAUTIFUL PRINTED CREPES $1.93 and Sl.N EVANS and WHITFIELDS DIAL 4606 DIAL 4220 HOa Al. Worthings ~iti-rit<>s Ltoublc w \t. M Mill — with — Oor|* J LEW I I MIMIII ilh. II TVME HU.W SATURDAY Si MONDAY ii C, i ui si .1 i i \su i \h Ml W \M UII.IM \l with Ml M 1CKD HYDBR %  r,I>v 1U_\KK ai LITTt^. llHAVKll For ali while shovsWhite shoes, to pa muster in company, must he spotless, immaculate. Use H^ Prnpcrt's White Rcnovato Sa%P or Propcrt's Shuwhite. No surer wuy of making sure that white shoes are white! I ROPERTS SULWHITE & it'll ITE RENOVATOR in Ctiiiitns with 5CM| P L A Z A Two Shows Daily :—Matinee 5 p.m. Event* lit TODAY AND CONTINUING Humphrey liisntl Paul IJOGART BERGMAN HENREE CASABLANCA ri.-.in.il b> v\ lllM.lt BaUS. WITH A HOST OK KAVOUR1TES / DHL 8401 K KSUVHKIW 7 %<•! Al l( < I.I It n\K>i.\ U0* TONIOItT iFriiUvi. SUNDA*i Blitd CROHBY AIUI BL.Y1 I'sramouiiH "TOP O' THE MORNING', Hoar Ann %  nd Bine •in* "You'rw In Lowe With Somaww • %  *J Bin* sine olliw woinasrfui hits lncrudlns[ WMn Insk %  I PLBAAC W>TX —allows trutratd of TurwUy and Thundsi will b. TiMMisty atkd WMntaOM by rrncmnt wl* U* Elcclrlc ConiiaattV. TOOLS! TOOLS MR. CARPENTER THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY Ltd. i u.mi. ALL FISHERME.X • Land your iulch smfflff a are lully stocked with Ml Hooki. t ..inn. Lines Seine. Mullet and Herrin, |[| rlne>. ami SlveU. tonlaclu. Milk Wire. Larlna Wire. CleU Hooks. Galvantaea Pal lei. THESE ARE AMONG OUR NEW STOCK SAWS HAMMERS PLANES—Jack. Smoothing. Block and Rabbi! KLI.KS SPIKIT LEVELS UKACES BREAST DRILLS COPING SAWS PLANE IRONS TABLE VICES SCREW DRIVERS OIL STONES. ETC., ETC. r?> SELECT YOURS EARLY THE CORNER STORE



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PACK SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE HF\RV BY CARL ANDERSON SI MICKEY MOIKF BY WALT DISNEY FR1D . M-VRt,, 1) FOR GOOD SERVICESHADESVALUEVSE -STAG" READY MIXED PAINTS AN I. C. I. PRODUCT. &f A.S. BRYDEN & SONS wm> LTD. AGENTS. %  atunS : Molhalt, '""He I uam s IS Daw J -.tsi? „ Sana.^ Gunr, j! INCE&C0..1K •; "1*1nit. *un • -.-.-.•.•.•....,.,....., v "My teeth really ARE whiterthanks to the Irium in Pepsodent!" You II be really cxciled when you sec [he sparkling new smile lhat Pcpsodcnl gives you. For Pcpsodcnl is Ihe only toothpaste lhal contains Irium —and there's no more effective teeth cleaning substance than Irium known to dental science '. It's the Irium in Pepsodent that removes the dul'ing tilm from your teeth, leaving _—^ ihcin whiter than ever before. THE TOOTHPASTE WITH IRIUM JOINT AND MUSCLE PAINS may mean kidney trouble A function 01 the kidneys is to eliminate harmful impurities from the system. If the kidney.-. : -iuw sluggibli, these impurities in paitmiiar CJCC*M acid accumulate and settle, and become a cause of pain and suffering 111 joints and muscles. The way to tackle the root .1 the trouble it to help the kidneys. They should be toned up with De Witt's PiUs the medicine made specially for this purpose. Dc Witt's Pills have a soothing, cleansing and antiseptic action on the kidneys that brings tnem back to perform then natural (unction properly. Pe Witt's Pills ate a very well-tried remedy. They are sold all over the world and we have many Inters from -nhVirn telling of relief gained, altti years of suffering after taking DP Witt's Pills. They act on the kidneys quickly. Whv not try them for your trout)]"? Go to your chemist and obtain a supply to-day. DeWitt sPUb m-nstttfttttrtv BACKACHE JOINT PAINS RHEUMATIC Mill LUMBAGO SCIATICA OUR GUARANTEE >• %  Witt's Pius an made under stnc% lygiemc toodiboas I and the ingredients I ail conform to rigal j ,_.iuaids of pantj./ K-VO 7-ISI-M iSNT [TO., LONDON, BNOIWD DE WITTS PILLS j for Kidney and Bladder TrojU QUAKER OATS %wJM build TAUIR, HUSKIER children! A SPECIAL BOOK ON v.hcilegrsii. inn yourigiiert' I Quaker Oan i Nature's Wonder I ,„ „l sere.,1 lupplMI more nourithtntnl lor growing voung This us,, n„,,„„„„hr.akfa,, f, M „| U ,*,„, hjgijn"?* !" ;;: .shine,,, CfcUdna >h,„ c „n Quaker <>,„; i, *,„„ j„ ^ b-l."e, aU ^,r.T a"'I "'" W ""' >"•""<""' — " '" b.cume ran, st.tmg and encrgcuc. #<>*£ REASONS THAN EVER TO SUY QUAKER OATS &&>"**** l- !" ,U,^ 1 4111/WOfilNS h. W ^* :M lmt^i,mimmk 4m/ CAIIOHTDIATIS for ear,,, mi .Mat* 4fiS£ VITAMINS (I, mi I,, hx. Utfe-HW* \ Tomorrow (or Irowktattl • o* water. Add lalt. . 'dd I cup of % %  irring, N ""lei. Thal'i a||. ^ FOR THE CHILDREN! &f RUBBALOM TALES by KNI1) iil.YTON Tilt: VQICC OF A STRANGER —by Emyr Hum, FOUR STUART PORTRAITS -by Hugh Boa .V-tlli**** CYCLOPAEDIA WHITAKERS ALMANACK &f ADVOCATE STATIONER'