Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
2a Friday
Mareh 40

19590.





















ay 0
TT idad

d capital
“a a aten Caribbean

aa 586,700; 206,410

























































Results At |
A Glance

SECOND DAY















































om 7,236 acres. vy ‘ Menetieance?
$37,927,519. nore ae BY oo Fir NINTH RACE
* $37 417,052. ¢ ut He ¥.. eS September Song, (O'Nei
aad : Lf te Chae ora ss, Pepper Wine, (Crossley j
es 105 (89,644 ee ee ENR ES Lady Pink. (A. Gonzal
: 0 ' iS EN’ ACI
et}, : ee “ ? cD Watercress, (O'Neil) |
Create Pharos Il, (Holder
g44 gals. . 9999 _ itor Colleton, (Crossley) |
rf £99,245 gals. $2,222. ibs ELEVENTH RACH
a aa ¢ Joint Comme folder
ws; 9,009,644 lbs., eae Miss Priendahiy,. (Yoon |
, TWELFTH RACE
: 25, te, (Payne
+ 18,696 tons, $2,925 (Payne)
. Lady, (Yvonet
: $844,446. NTH RACI |
i 802,423,910 ie iOtoaalés
Ic Yve T |
| Maytime, (P. Fletehe
FOURTEENTH RACH
32,395,539 | 1 Lady Belle, (Thirke
1,304,029. Di eit 1 {yy
goods: PIPTEENTH RACH
Bullet, (O'Ne
| .
setroleum $15,048.- | timer ne
ie_petto! ENTH RACE |
syailways carried 8,675,- | Gun Bite, (Cross |
ng 458,189 tons of goods Bi ;
Â¥ 10,308,098 tons of |
se entering Port of _———— ee ate
Pa i 2,065,074 was | st
ig 14 PRISONERS |
r 5,059 aircraft at ‘ |
Pinging 34,028 pas- KILLED IN FIRE
anor NEW MEXICO, March
rf Fourteen Armed Force
CHILL WILL VISIT jers died and two he
TRINIDAD ritically jured hen
understood, that Mr. a tempor pris
Churchill will be ing andia Secret. Weay
in Trinidad on rear here last night |
s 14th and may visit , Five other peopl ver
sdos, Up to the present Fs - me by smoke |
yer, there has been no as ae Brin Bey why Sandia base is a part
tion from official td ‘ x Armed Forees Secre Weapr |
Ye Sharew rs mourn i (project. The atomic boml
, Paty 42 , embled there.—~Reuter |
|
asec acta ae gible ermine, MUS eas Ne oto ck
: | : ie
1948 or 1948/49 | iS |
| | ;
(Revised Estimates) Heed : 7 ‘ A A
k
| | ° oe! y rT ©
NN a ensaaeatinetennen * a
@) ey ee ere 9 Services Ripe For Union
Grant in |
Total True Aid of Customs | % (c) Net Postal UNIFICATION of the Public Services in the British Car
Revenue Admin- Receipts of (a) Receipts | bean Areas involves no constitutional changes. It leave
Vebaciscehinaeeâ„¢ the Governments of the several colonies tree to pur:

Sparacenpey re : : a er nae Pot their individual policies, and derogates from their pow:
$ 8,822,00 be 95 o. eT ’

— oe : ye vial ? ae only in so far as such functions as fall to them in rega
A; ered oh > 528,098 : 3 to recruitment to and promotions and transfers in unified |
$ 20,349,118] $800,000°] $ 7,255,000 36% $ 354,152 | | services are taken out of the hands of the individual G |
£ 4,239,399] £ 166,666] £ 1,511,449 £ 73,782 bail | e@rnments and transferred eh regional authority.

’

» os +0 a a ‘ Having made this clear Sir,
+. SelB $ 127,798 $ 837,650 37% $. 36,290 : Maur’ er iiciines and the other sig-} that it is an Indifferent sul |
$ 2,740,009 $ 153,358) ¢ 1,005,080 $ 43,528 | natories of the Report of the Com-| tor the latter.”
£ 572,902 £ 31,949) » 909,412 £ 9,047 mission on the Unification of the Co-operation

i : | Public Services in the British ‘But it must not be supp |
$ 43,413,245 — $17,184,000 38% _ | Caribbean area 1948—49 conclude:} that because we are alivi |
£ 9,044,426 nase £ 3,580,000 — j “A unified service is, at best, no| UmPerfections of any systen

j 50% more than a half-way ube ‘pe. | WNification which falls stiorts
$ 174,586 si $ 86,904 $ 75,970 tween separate services for each *deration, Mp ue eee so
x $6,873 ve £ 18,105 £ 15,827 | > mee m | territory and a federal service, and| Pie of Uniti ap 7 ae be
23% PRINCESS ALICE we should be lacking in candour if} S08: On the contrar,
‘ $ 215,424 ae $ 50,400 $ 108,403 | as she leaves the Races | we ‘failed to express ‘our opinion will and ready co-operi (
Is, £ 44,880 ee £ 10,500 £ 22,584 4 part of the Governme ) (
_ seinen Db scccsaiintiitbonents - en oes | SOV territories we be
& Ree ea BRITISH CARIBBEAN AREA ate been BrOp
only re a I a ubst
mPENDEN- $ 43,803,255 aa $17,421,304 40% $ 184,373 ees solide but & whe mh
is £ 9,125,678 tie £ 3,608,605 £ 38,411 SUMMARY advantages which flow {1
sipinpsiclietanieaaniicietieesiideial es — a . neilisiaiiliaee eae adoption of a wider basis « e- |
s $ 1,404,876 _— $ 624,000 44% $ 30,733 } cruitment and promotion thi I
£ 292,682 ene £ 130,000 £ 6,403 (a) | (b) (c) bey | (e) present obtains might well e}
| the way for the extensio { (
$ 1,578,700 $ 505,000 32% $ 45,113 Total True | Grants in Aid Customs % (c) | Net Postal | federal principle. We have postu
; Q¢ f . 55 ‘ ' w z “ad (
: £ 928,695 *y & 105,208 . Revenue of Adminis- Receipts of (a) Receipts sprains ii tae sé ian ve ki : =
$ 396,789 $ 168,000 $ 108,000 27% $ 26,713 tration if our proposals are examined

? erent re bi ai 5 —_——\|--- | peer penretari a a a parochial spirit ; th jeal
v 82,665 & 35,000 £ 22,500 £ ad tacos on ‘Gan me aint 1
‘ 9.96 $ 18,240 10% $ 138,679 1937 $ 37,011,010) § 730,750 $17,655,487 48% $ 844,622 | the existing privileges and powers|.
+: haa 1 : : : : 7,707,294 52,2 3,678,146 : 177,821 ‘| of individual colonies, unification ||
- iat ; 3.800 £ 28,891 £ 7,707, £ 152,240 £ 3,678,146 £ 177,32 | of individual colomies, unifica | \

we % 37,453 — £ : 2 will become an impossibility
' 92 oF ¢ @ 9n 7K oe » ons The re Ss sig i y Si i
a, 8 OAT, $10,120,000 25% || $ 280,146 1988 = ..| | $ 40,025,704 y ooioi9 | $igai,s7o | 46% | $ 540375. |, The report is signed by Siri}
£ 9,131,608 se £ 2,108,333 | £ 47,946 £ 8,338,284 | 5 40,629 £ 3,863,636 £ 113,137 | Campbell, S, A. Stone, J. KE. C.|'\i
mi * ‘Farlane, D L Matheson, J.| {i
ICA 5. 845,055 $336,000 40% || $ 85,850 0% aacomenes | * ee s aeeaee Me or a tae ee
$ » 845,055 7“ $i 08, rat 17.985 1939 $ 41,056,694 $ 686,995 $18,684,235 46% $ 222,924 O’Connor, W, A. Date and H. P.|}}
£ 176,053 ae £ 70,000 | & 089 s 8,553,728 J: eee Feo tinh ak £ 46,593 Goodwyn (Secretary).
\ 3 f ny £ 148,124 £ 3,892,559 | f A note of reservation is made} {\\
mA 6] $ 2,413,136 ies $ 794,250 38% || $ 15,166 See : ; by Mr P, F. Campbell.
£ 302,737 _ £ 190,669 £ 3,160 1946 . $101,930,050 $1,125,912 $33,192,625 33% $1,281,325 | Throughout their deliberations | \
£ 902, 7% * | £ 21,235,429 £ 234,565 £ 6,998,468 £ 266,944 | the Commission kept in mind the | \\\
Weia $ 1,100,410 ae $ 480,000 44% $ 91,888 ‘5 objective of “staffing the public} }})
hs Nal ie > | £ 19,1437 | . 5 An “ ° wala wate asl es | services with persons of local|
; 5 ape an . ; w A967 ne ation ts ? oe $4020 00R 38% $/955,606 | descent to the fullest extent that
MINCENT .. $ 1.218.929 Sa $ 370,000 30% $ 61,013)" : | £ 24,800,126 £ 20,000 £ 9,423,646 £ 190,104 | compatible with the effi dent co I
fi a hae oe 7.083 £ 12,7115 8.4 | . duct of the services and we believe | }\\
£ 288,944 ee . #1948 | $128,693,641 $1,121,358 $41,552,074 32% $1,321,168 that acceptance of our recomme!
™ a - Seooergreenenren® : 7 Co "'ne agi SS ea | F ig artengbor ations will enable the Secretary o! | {{{
1 $128 603 641 $1,121,358| $41,552,074 aa aat (revised £ 26,811,183 £ 233,615 £ 8,635,857 | £ 275,231 | Seas es oe teen Hi
£ 26,811,183 £ 233,615 || £ 8,635,857 ; estimates) extent with the need to transfé ry
ors , eo eee >| officers serving outside the, region | \\\
RA > 3 Ut
ition by H.M.G. towards cost of subsidization, ion iae ee ee @ on page i
" = —E —_—_— \\
i
ay IF our Hor ses Repeat )
|



= BAHAMAS
|

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\ NIGARAGUA,



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Mee, Bia ., kc,



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— iho”

By
————

7
Ege Ss
CARIQ@BEAN SEA

, nor is Brit ish Guiana).

NGO

a

WEST INDIES









First Day Wins

B.T.C. Spring Meet Enters |
| Upon Second Day
| |

| JON. J. D. CHANDLER'S “Watercress”, Mr. L. J. Wong's! |

“Silver Bullet”, Mr. A. P. Cox’s “Lady Belle” and Mr. ,
I, 0, C, Perkins’ “Slainte”, yesterday repeated their first day |
| wins as the Barbados Turf Club Spring Meet entered upon
the Second Day. }

Slight showers yesterday did not materially affect the

track, They however tended to make it a little slower. |
| The Stands were filled almost to-capacity but again the |
|





crowd on the grounds was comparatively small. )
The Field Stand Prizes that{eighteen pounds \
| Teached the four hundred dollar The Forecast paid their. highe
} mark six times on Saturday, were; dividend of the day on this race—|
| Slightly better yesterday. The high- | $109.80. ay
jevt prize paid, for the day was Huon. J, D, Chandler’s brown
$518 to the holder of ticket 2792] gelding Guh Site out ‘of O.T.C|}
j that drew Silk Piant in the half-; Sunrise stepped out of hi rin} (
pred creole Handicap for G-2] the final race of the day, the B \\)
nimals only. Five times, ir ade ead Turf Club Har p to}}))
tion to this instance, the prize; snatch first place from M1 ( (
passed the $400 mark fi ’s hea ck
Outstanding feature of the day’s| ing Blue Streak i
a fine effort in whi ‘ O'Ne
vi 1 ok Perkin Slainte n 1 Sa
ruldered 43 1 the Garrison }
handicap an 1 from the aged | wh« t ingle winne
War Lord to whom he conceded @ On Page 10

Adunca
NIDAD IS PROPOSED FEDERAL CAPITAL

,

{)




re

a,
“FIVE CENTS

riee:

Wear 335.



Elected House:

Nominated Senate
Recommended For

B.C. Federation

“THE BRITISH CARIBBEAN FEDERATION”

with a seat of Government in Trinidad is
recommended in The British Caribbean Standing
Closer Association Committee 1948-49 Report, pub-
lished today.

Recurrent cost of the Federation in its early years is
estimated to be of the order of £180,000 per year. It is
recommended that the legislative power of the Federation
hould be vested in a Federal Legislature consisting of a
Governor General (representing His Majesty the King) a
Senate and a House of Assembly.



ae

SS Sia cata ie Sa ceeale





+! Fifty seats in the House of As-
" >..° sembly are proposed to be aHot-
What The Prineess | tea as follows:
ae PORNO ks Gs es .
: Nay British Guiana ....... 5
\ ill Do lo day | British Honduras .... 2
: | Jamaica 16
it 9 um. a representative | Antigua : ae
party of children and teach | St. Kitts ; eye ea
ers from all public schools } Montserrat es
aud the =omajor private Crinidad alte 9
schools will assemble at Gov | | Grenada 2
ernment House to Greet St. Vincent 9
H.R The Police Band will || St Paihia 2
attend. Dominica 7» 2
ML.RH. will visit the Chil Thé House of Assembly would
dren's Goodwill League at | be wholly elected on a basis of
11.55 am, The Royal Party | Universal adulv suffrage and the
Will see the babies in the |] c., would consist of 23 sena-
Creche and will then watch | tor ippointed by the Governor
the school children having reneral in his discretion.
their meals, Senators would be appoint.
At 3.55 p.m, the Royal ed in respect of each Unit, except
Party will leave Government Montserrat One Senator would
House for H.M.LS, “Glasgow be ppointed from Montserrat,
after their three-day visit. The House of Assembly would
\ Guard of Honour, pro be empowered to elect its own
vided by the Barbados Police | Sp er whether or not from its
Force, will be present on the wn membership and also a De-
Wharf at 4 pum. | puty Speaker and Chairman of
( mitvec hould however
ee | be i member of the Assembly
2 Membe of the Federal Assembly
. +} ie 1: (Seveyesthaie' che >
Congratulations | \" ‘bs Pes a
e following is the text } or 10 Years
‘ge which was received fro | rst Senators would be ap-
ecretary of State for the] ‘ { +a Bi as een
lah Si ed for term of ten years.
“I congratulate the Stand- | P) i ene Ving pee Tt he
ing Closer Association Com Sega yee aie Sat nen
: jpenate in the case of Bills other
mittee most warmly upor \than money Bills w suld have ;
their report published to-day. labia it a iets f t fe +} iy = tie
this exposition of the politi- oe : ee oe ee
cal and economic issues in- :
volved in federation as affect { Waving regard to the ines-

ing both the West Indian
territories themselves and
their place in a larger world
must give the West Indian
people a heartening confidence
in the statesmanship of their
representatives.

‘ commend the repori t«
West Indian Legislatures for
erious examination and dis
cussion, The Committee
proposals will not, we may be

ure, prove exactly to the
taste of all Modern histor)
shows that initial demands
made upon units joining in a
federation have rarely been
easily conceded, however
compelling the urge to unite
may have been. Yet I feel

sure the peoples of West In

capable responsibilities of His
Majesty’s Government aris-
ig out of problems of de-
fence, international relations
aud ultimate financial stabill-
ty of the Federation in its
external relationships, it has
been thought necessary to pro-
vide that in certain carefully
delined circumstances related
to the foregoing, His Majesty
in Council should have cer-
tain overriding powers of leg-

islation§ suflicient to enable
those respensibilities to be
discharged .

These powers relate to de-
fence, the regulation of the

relations between the Federa-
tion and foreign countries, se-
curing and maintaining fiman-

dies territories will be follow cial stability and in certain
ing the example of their emergencies, securing and
representatives in the Com maintaining public order and
mittee, and show the same supplies and services.

@ on page 5

adel. ..........he exchange

|

subtract. from the other
]

Line charges

@ on page 6





when you travel by
Trans Canada Air Lines to

U.S.A., Canada or Eng-
land. For full information
consult your T.C.A.: general
Agent:

GARDINER AUSTIN & C0., LTD.

Phone 4518

McGregor Street







ig

pa

at

Spee: ganee



Â¥
7

i

pit

®

pl ia a a ai Sey oer crag nese



Bos









FRIDAY, MARCH 10

PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE

irene re en en ne I eA ene et

—
Sponsored By C.D. & W. A Matter Of Rorows i. ‘Chutter Bra

® ® ISS ELISE MURRAY who has ie 2ECTOR of British Blo
4 been in England on a six stock Agency = lel and al Accessory shops on Fifth Ave-

teen months’ course on Infant Ed- Veterinary Surgeon is Mr Gerald} nue reveal the velvet touch Wide

ueation, which was sponsored by Mc. Elligott, who has been here| crushed belts of past tel velveteen,

Development and Welfare re- for three days staying at the | black velvet ribbon fancy neck-

‘s| 1 Peter Pan collar-and-

turned yesterday via Trinidad by Marine Hotel. One of the buyers) ‘aces, and

1959











AQUATIC CLUB CIN EMA, (Members cu

SATURDAY, MONDAY, WEDNESDAY NIGHT
. J

=N and JANE WYMAN yf

j
‘
g








5

in “KISS IN THE DARK»

VICTOR MOORE-—-WAYNE MORRIS—






















































B.W.LA for this Agency, he is on his way | cuff sets in flower colours on dark, with BRODER
AST night Government House She travelled from England on to Panama Peru via Jamaica shee r wool dresses a i CRAWFORD IY
was most attractive; he Elders and Fyffes liner the He will then go J Farley ee ae ae, Sallie apes 4 Warner Bros. Picture

illuminated for the evening re- Matina,’ as far as Trinidad Kentucky and Virgir oa we a braid a nyl n nak Se
céption which began punctually I England she attended the turning E Fair tt has - a ae - at fumae a ome ; : SS SSS See,
at 9.30 o'clock With a mebile . Educatior Sally” wil short eit tai k for ‘a very low style —
generator and the Governme! he ity and e ly as a Cons rse. Mr folded acre to act as a modesty > rs , : "" 54
Heuse emergency lighting plant onden hris Newr t Indian} vect in exvreme styles Mer cas any ith cis ELECTRIC
in operation, the grounds were ‘ Agent as at Seawell to see him Latest pigskin gloves have : Showing To-night at 82 '
partially floodlit and picked out oaaatt fi nica wit dl yw set in at the wrist mow at 4 aia
in coloured fairy lights : RS. BILL FORBES, returne R.A.F. Association so that the wearer can see her B R Ou Hi K, it (ONE NIGHT oy

It was a clear and starry night watch keneath ONLY)

yesterday from visiting her ~QuUADRON LEADER Da ac Tal r
mother in St. Lucia, and is here S ; H : has been —LES. | J O N A THAN
yntil Saturday when she will fly | .inted Overseas iaiso. -

intea Sa eal

or baeniedl via TCA. Her hus- oes bg Royal ‘iis Benes Girls Neek a A SAT. “MASSACRE RIVER

band is an Engineer with Association in London
and Wireless in Bermuda, and Members of the R.AF-A., an By C. V. R. THOMPSON. DIAL 8404 FOR RESERVATION

Mr. A. G. L. Douglas, Divisional ...p ar. personnel wishing to} NEW YORK (By Mail).

Manager of Cable and Wireless «3: the Association are invitelto| Feminists are bombarding Con- f i, z :
West Indies, just returned from |... ‘ with Mr. Henderson | gress to legislate for full equality B |

nicate

If one corner of the grounds a
tell tree with spreariing branches
and thick foliage’ was floodlit,
while in the far corner of the
lawn a flamboyant tree was bor-
dered with red lights and in the
ceniure background blue lights were
strung along a covered waik

















Ladies in their long flowing ev« Puerto Ri ; oe ( nu |
ning gowns and gentlemen, mostly lis Puerto Rican tour, and MIs. 4+ ston, Marine Gardens.) for their sex ne aime iaaaiet cs "it
wearing tails and shell jacke,: Douglas were at Seawell to meet 4y, tings They want all these things OPENING | TONITE 8.45 & on SUNDAY 1a
some with medals on their lapels, her. Would Love To | abolished :— a TUESDAY i4th — ¢ United Artists rn
were all presented to the Roya! Sead ou ov ; A Massachusetts law forbidding A True- ‘to- L ‘ite DRAMA. sea
couple. Heacquarters in Me STANLEY F. MATTOCKS| women to carry anything weigh- — —_————-~ “=
_ Atter the presentation, the Pol- Amsterdam of Vincent-Elliott Agencies, | ing more than 751b: ey
pe Bend highlighted the evening t R. OSCAR VANLEER of the Pert-of-Spain, is here with his} A Minnesota law which says | ehhh
: dier® Pareae. ~ vw. Se Vanleer Concern arrived wife and small daughter s} sending | they cannot clean moving machin- kes evs 9°"
¢ dier” 2 : Fs avias © | te se
i Then pad ie sweat ints ai yesterday from Trinidad by holiday at Carrabank Hotel. | ery; . | ta c a 9g
: : il avy Went sAle action, B.W.LA. With headquarters in They are from England , andj) A Pennsylvania law by which t 5108
as nine sailors from the H.M.S |Amsterdam he is stationed in would love to come and live in| they cannot read or test meters: | e*?

A Wisconsin law which ordains

“Glasgow” did the Sailor's Hor:
that women golf caddies are not}

Pipe with much grace and pertect



America and is here on business Barbados.



when ccor ied by the Ship’ s oe allowed; |
» accompanied by the Ship rp RINCESS AI % Tes , ied | A Washington law which in-}
Band a detachment of Marin H.R.H, PRINCES LICE I He the Earl of Athlone were in} ug “4 on ee : Fecun -i
gave an Exhibition of precisio: the Grand Stand of the Bart rurf Club yesterday for about ten | ® upert and he Caravan ‘a ben eS er eee '

: ;



A New York law which forces |
waitresses to stop work at 10 p.m



drill, finalising with the beating of ! ites and sa\
the Retreat. The reception end



















































































































with the playing of the National Picture 10 r I D. Chandler, Princess Alice,
Anthem and the withdrawal of Hon. J. D. Chandl 1.L,.( t tt. Hon. the Earl of Athlone |
the Royal Party, Standing behind in the ‘ ! I re Mr. Maurice Skinner, M1 cCROSSW ORD
+s H, A. Edwards, Hi lt t rnor Mr. Savage, Mr. A. S. | fet — |
Visit To The Races sunbitee pence g ree Ne
HORTLY after 3 p.m. yester-
day afternoon, The Royal Glitter B , ab. J ( the e Barbado A keen turfite, |
Party could be seen driving slow- drive through H he has been here for five weeks,
ly around the Savannah tore R. L. Hut \ I friends, the Akows, also left |
When they reached the Savan- |, B ere Trinidad yesterday but they
nah Club the cars drove onto the sj, rned by the Lady Nelson, thus . |
ene Soe were joined ey an After 47 Years ( ling them to be at the Second Rupert takes a quick look around angry men are telling Roderigo that |
guard of nine mounted da Race .
irs Thee stances heat of ea a Mrs Cx at : the cabin and sees that there is no 0. stranger has come on ot eft the |
the :- ad Gers orn Oh M", . on om [his was his third visit to Bar- other door, ‘*We can’t get back ship and the pirate COPIA 1B POAT: |
ne Grand Stand, Princess Alic« A ‘ 3 he was here tor five wealks ee ing back at them, They still
Mr. Savage and Mr. Lambert in yeste ia mornin he “Lad any Whee fie 4RAt, ere through the skylight,"" he mutters haven't seen us!" breathes Rupert, |
the first car and the Earl of Nelson” fwom Boston Acco aa ask sdow Crisket Matches anxiously. ‘* We must go the same ‘but we've no time to lose.”’ Slip- |
Selene, Mrs. Savage and Maj. panying them were M M ? ee, aa ey F way as Roderigo.” Cautiously he ping silently to the stern of the |
ewes-Cox in the second car Reece ad Miss Gracie Reece, si ‘ Sai limbs the companionway and peeps at, he puts Beppo on the cable,
They were met by Hon. J. D. f Mr. Reece. They expe Business Visit along the deck. All the crew are and the little monkey, scared of so | Auris
Chandler, M LC, and Mr. A. &. tc he here for about two rR J NUNES, Managing gathered near the aangway. where nuch shouting. scampers ashore } i ad vatapie { low ) Da
4 tu )
Bryden, After the playing of the }, nd the e st | Hirectow “Bh Mbeuaie: NOPA (ae ee — - ————____
Was, Ge Saves Tove eats Enmore Hotel Fogarty Ltd, and Mr, H. K. Har- CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it: | ¥ Yeast nas neen reapnnsinie for GRAND OPENING SATUR DAY 11th 8.30 pam al
em, the Roya arty mace 1 R : Saeed 5 * . } t then One. tor
pe : \ Barbadian, Mr. Reece risor Director of the same firm AXYDLBAAZAR | rit t rLose
their wa 1e Gove s Box , ee eae | pies ; ,
Oteee eas, "5 oe tk ox. paying his first vi ( rrived yesterday from Trinidad is LONGFELLOQW | : : aid ROW AL (Worthings)
c : Tr rst arbados j 47 years while | ) B.W.LA. on a «hort business lett | ' ; " mawere ; ; ae
Tur Nut , > ¢ ; aa N“ > 0 let simply stands for a ier In this exam} ) WARE pA. ft
ys , sea } yeal Mr, Jack Egan and they are ar ; i ; . ong 1 . P re ;
glancing through the Race Book P ; ‘ t " ; r gap ary trophies, the length and formation of the wor ar j }.a 4 resin worth a it ey > f 4 aE i }
aa thay waited for the Twelfth I he pai 15 . 5M et i at the Enmore Hotel Ba od one ; e Pe é ‘* he words are all hints ) Pamous physi ; : j ELLA Bye HELEN
Race \ hn employee ¢ y V vy . : ’ ‘ a sCTeH Fre y lu ‘ ery
They sat in three rows, in the ° ‘ the five and ten cent First Time \ Cryptogram Quotation ue Yonrs | nape) 19), a Lewy a AAIN
front row were left to right, Mrs. *'°" al ece rR spine nepyw ZT) ee ee |\4 On the Lee e tp got Noe i AY
J.D, Chandler, Princess ‘Alice, 120" " Rae: Sees eee Y ET VUAVUKTILTE ¥RT TISFY tw one th : Y mi
Hon. J. D. Chandle M.L..< ind nt : : : ae fo: Senne ‘ ; ; oe ,
the Earl of Athlone in the on } | Ly ancouve!r or one year R tL} \ t 4
ond oe . Mr pt ini ( ire! , t re urned peetercay by ; | 73 rt ' $a
Mr. H, A. Edwards, His Excellency Mexico and Mr. hicl a peta RR ag a S Ty peaa Nes lL MEN WORRY THEM- =
, : , : . ’ rR ’ , ‘ is Mr. Charlie Peterkin s ’ | Down
the Governor Mr. Savage, M: ident of Boston Mi ; Lt t
A. S. Bryden, and Mrs. Savage is no tua l ’ Vy Rob eae oe
In the third row were Maj tration = ey . . K La ~
Skewes-Cox, Mr. W. Lambert and On Routine Visit Seven el eoae ee WES Ne
Mr. T. N. Peirce : : , time that Mrs. Peterkin had DwWHOT Ww T i. of a .
The Twelfth Race was won by M R, A. R. Perguso oa Sh sranddaughter Mr SI ECIAL A I TRACTION 1 t tonacco Released thru United Artists
Mr. 1. 0. C. Perkin’s Slainte, and + eee See ls ‘een ware: Sire 1 Tre Peet n tu )
i the § arty diately fucturers Life Assurance ¢ e also there method “at ‘calculation py R
/ ent, Pariaat a ee with headquarters in| , = husband accompanied her AT , gymborn " ‘ iM PIRE TH EAT EO
from the crowded Stands and ntransit passenger on the “I =m Antigua, he will be there - AT Renee. SAS: GRR, CORT: ORM: A) TO-DAY AT 2.30 AND 9.15 P.M,
Savannah, and Princes Alice Nelson” from Canada | oy a een ne wel rears 2 8 nstrument (4 ) Eagle Lion Pictures Presents .
bowed graciously in return Guiana yesterday morni he Lady Rodney. tg Thee grounds AF gate, (40. oF VICTOR McLAGLEN—JON HALL— Tig
: ‘i , A een See | “ | '@ You only get 2 tew ar this || in “SOUTH OF PAGO PAGO”
The Nightengale Children’s [ndies, Mr. Ferguso: We Hope C [ U 8 M O & A N file (4) : with —_—
Ling vi t on [te ' Olulion vu! ¥ i¢ AceOss f ‘E 3 Rf NA WIN Et A P
Home ; 3 , M« AND MRS. TASS TAWIL, }, oly Wie ab tuavarday wie 4 OLYMPICE BI aaa ae KHART—DO
R.H. PRINCESS ALICI ' = British ( : ' rived vesterday from fO-MORROW NIGHT | Evot , ‘% $ iced 3 = RAS
the Rt. Hon. the Earl of uarte I i by B.W.LA. with the TO-MC NIGHT Poor 1 Gawk 35 Dinug :
g me Via Pue iowa :
Athlone visited the Nightengale Pominican Republic, Ha that their horse “Blue er on at eu ROXY THEATRE f{
Children’s | ie terday morn : ou io better t t +e ‘i , . ~ ~ td Below 4
ene ter ae Recs ind Cub woul. Ge Datew teae. 9 Trinidad Orchestra THE HOT SHOTS b TO-NIGHT AT 7.30 P.M.
> eave ¢ ry ! KCL Saturday hey returned y "
ee Bee Betniaee - diior Was Here In 1936 ind, ater the fret Gay! : ————E— a ROY ROGER PRICGER—LYNNE ROB
NTs Savage ri j : rv » ‘ t atu w VLGG -
Eituate Mactabar: , Mr wy B .( | will be here until oune| for your Entertainment = “YES OF TEXAS”
: : ? , ests at the Ocean View|
bert and Maj. Skewes-Cox ’ I 100 V ‘ 1 i ang ,
hao aida want bor he Pian < ale : . j Mir. Joe Tawil, his brother DIAL 4000 for Reservations. . i “MADONNA OF THE DESERT’ I
eg Pts ie e Teleph ( irs Tawil were at the air-| ae . Beby seveeinde with CROFT
Churehwarden of & Michael nt ( H ot nen Gutieura Soap. It combines LYNNE ROBERTS—DONALD BARRY—ROY BAN
Vestry, Mr. H. A. Tudor, and erday nis With T.L.L emollient and medicinal } aS Action Packed Double ws
members of the St. Michael's Nelson” for about t ’ aoe ie ee hones aa 3 | i:
Vestry, Hon. V. C. Gale, MLA ind this time he I R. DICK DAVIES, son of Mr ealthy and EL
and Mr. Fred Medd urd, M.C.P., a ife who is pa M ind Mrs. H. Davies of| jee fom blemishes cE } OLY MP PIC ¥ HEATR
well as Miss Arne and the Matro: re i Marine Gardens, yesterday re-} 1 ‘oF 4 + . y palin ms | TO-NIGHT AT 9.00 P.M.
of the Home “Mis: Grace Bryan é Vi H d to Trinidad where he is on | EMPI RE HE ATRE Ny Darryl F. Zanuck Presents .
On their way through the | oy Refinery Staff of Trinidad | A 4 . "Th OLIVIA de HAVILLAND--MARK ents 190 fl
poe gi ls o mitories which wer¢ Visiting Great Grandson el cide _He ee heen here on | n “THE SNAKE PITT”
In 1 #upstlal’s of the build r 2S Jar . \ weeks annua eave th r
Princess Alice remarked to the Mi Pi , \nother Barbadian who is with | ; HOLM—GI ae LANGAN—HELEN cRAlG :
} Earl, “This is stupendously clean wh fg .— L.L. in Point a Pierre arrived { es ee nn SDFEB
: , the La ) ; ; Ss
Before they left they were en- | ; io a a on the me plane which Dick
s 4 tertained to recitations by Romeo © 0g? — : _ left on. He was Mr. Harold Davis |
Johnson, and Muriel Elliot and W)' {er reliably vary . ind he is here to spend three |
then all the children joined in ‘?’ L\ MA N et with his parents Mr. and |
| singing Mine Own Country ee havik Ml M. M. Davis of St. John's |
‘ pani Before coming to Barbados
: On The Way : Ww wever, he spent one week in
{ N their way to Codrington ” ingtora, Gre la ind one week in St.|
{ College and St. John’s Church Until Sunday Lucia yt
} yesterday the Royal Party passed R, DON HUNTER I el s Sank |
| ine Podee Shoal Achoct boy: ae. a ‘ Intransit From Martinique ei
lined both sides of the road near B.W.I. anc i I LUE eyes, blonde hair and|§@) cp
' Society Factory and cheered them 4rrived = ye I W.LA handsome 1s Pepsi-Cola’s yo
as they passed. They also drove and will be representative Mr WwW L. Bashford, |
through Codrington High Schoo) staying at the O We j, Who arrived from St, Lucia yes- &
where Princess Alice was prest Keen Turfite oe by B.W.1.A, intransit from {
ed with a bouquet D*" CLEMI Martinique : ‘éo
. taka tV v4 ri Ui Es) True to his word, he was a 1€
Lunched With Sir Edward |, oP D.S., who h ee! uest R aces yest rday and if all went
i of 4 I Mi Isa \ t well he must have been at the
| .R.H. PRINCESS ALICE and toned oh mes e- Club Morgan last night
eto the Re ios the Ez , surned t t He is due to leave for Trinidad
j n he irl = of 1 by B.W.LA ( to-day, intre insit to Venezuela, and
aoc Athlone lunched yesterday with hi: t the airport A then rn to his headquar- T DAY
, Sir Edward Cunard at his home sorry for himself { } avi “t ) te : i Ml xico 0 City. are

FRIDAY 0th MARCH

| . Good Alone CROWN GINGER BEER (iood for a Shandy | 8.30 a.m, — 12.00
ii

1.30 p.m, -— 3.30 p.m.































ii HANDBAGS favo! BEE ERM |
+ 4 ARRIVED |
| : | Choose a HERCULES BICYCLE | as
for your Easter Needs | | ck MAAR Cocae 6 Menta THESE ARE AMONG OUR NEW STO
We can offer - - - ¢ SAWS HAMMERS
Choose Now: | | Pinseal & Patent Finishes in i GENTS, LADIES and the POPULAR PLANES—Jack, Smoothing, Block and Rabbit
|| Black, White, Tan & Wine. i SPORTS MODEL ae arent LENIN
Ca 3 09 ¢ Al t Also - - - BRACES BREAST DRILLS
* ' $ ' 9 $6. Shades \ Cycle Lights, COPING SAWS PLANE IRONS,
} Locks, f TICES : , ERS
1 ’ ‘DEE ss nile ities o i TABLE VICES SCREW DRIV
et NE W Si 4 NX “he DESIGNS $1.01 i} Polishi.g Cloths, OIL STONES, ETC., ETC.
j |} Oil Cans, and a
‘Under-the-Dollar” Dress Values now displayed in the Windows i Lubricating Oil. t> SELECT YOURS EARLY
1)

AT
)) THE BARBADOS

’ ) mw 1 q DIAI CO-OPERATIVE
VANS & HVTELELDS CONTON FAC
4220 TORY LIMITED

a
(Ow FHEH—O~nN’p~P~RX~-2-2-—-—-————— Eee
I

oe





MARCH 10,

P pRDAY,

1950





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

LE









JABOUR PAR’FY WINS FIRST BATTLE

















et

; : 9

| Saragat’s
| Expulsion
| ROME, March 9.
s newly constituted cen-

iglist. party, the Unitary
a ask the COMISCO
setionl Socialist Move-
) conference at Hastings,
tend, later this month to ex-

ian Rightwing Social
SD, led by former

Unitary Socialist commu-
qnnouncing the demand
{iii not give reasons.
4 for Saragat’s ex-
| ‘i HE COMISCO is held
MMnresent the Unitary Socialist
of view that they only are

entatives of true Social-
jn Italy, since Sarigat has,
reyes, “betrayed Socialist
ines” by his collaboration
the Christian Democrat Gov-

i.
ment. ra ——@ This first searching test of the

ty Premier, Gieuppe Saragat. |

| Commons Reject

The Challenge

LONDON, March 9.

gaiTAIN’S new Labour Government tonight won its first |

of Commons battle by defeating a Conservative mo-
no confidence with a majority of 14, it

“hs House of Commons rejected an opposition challenge
| nationalisation by 310 votes to 296,

Liberals who have nine seats voted against the Gov-

small Labour majority brought
| the largest muster of members to
| register the biggest vote since full
| parliamentary records began 120

with members squatting all round |
the Speaker’s dais and jammed
| elbow vo elbow below the bar at
| the opposite end of the chamber.
| The Government front bench |
was so crowded that Ministers |
‘vere sitting in each other's laps,

Mr. Winston Churchill, who
threw down the gauntlet for the
Conservatives within days of the
‘ew Parliament taking life, ar-
rived in evening dress. |

Just before the vote Prime|
Minister Clement Attlee said it
was “unprecedented” for the |
Opposition to put down amend-

>

| years ago. departments is mot =-ecommended.
Packed into the House by Party | With regard to ssalzaxries the Com- |

| Whips, the near complete mobili- | â„¢!SS100 write: |

} sation of voting strength came It is not a ques aon of salaries

insufficient to attract to
the public serwic
highest qualificat@ens. tt is a

question of the sSalaries being

insufficient to attract persons
with the minimusre qualifications
required.

Since some Gover: ments are
poor to increase ssalzaries “we can
way in whieh this circle
can be broken umles= some means
can be found of gi â„¢~ ing financial
| assistance from Inag>e€rial funds to
enable the poorer c@e>lonies to aa
adequate salaries’”” :
Commissiom recommends



Throne—a vote of thanks to the|
King for his speech on opening of
Partinment, |

He thought the Conservatives’ |
action at vhis time “shows utter |
irresponsibility |

The King’s speech—in which the |
















































tS Pain Nenni, head of the ex-

mw felt Socialists has already

hia expelled from COMISCO

swiving himself with the Com-
~Reuter,

1} Expelled
tom Union

LONDON, March 9.
London dockers, who help-
itganise some of London’s
war dock strikes, have
led by the Transport
eneral Workers Union,
gother men concerned in tha
ve been barred from
fee in the Union for the
ars. These concessions{
f taken by the Union's
on the recommendations
cia disciplinary inquiry
activitiés of the eight men

the strike over Canadian |
Blast summer, which para-!
ai shipping in the port of
. The men are accused of |
in a manner liable to be
fo the Union’s interests,
ipating in the unofficial |
Portworkers Committee, |
Weing associated with the
unofficial newspaper,
s’ News.—Reuter.

5

|
}





nding Closer
lwociation Did

Advocate Corresponde
ORT-OF-SPAIN, March 9
tiitorial comment in Trini-
ithe report of the Standing
Association is that the
Structure recommended on
le is a sound one and
be accepted by the various
mires concerned

Ninidad Guardian in its
slates that the Commit- |
Mexcellent job that points
port as one to avoid
extremes while pro-
Workable basis for attain-
Multimate dominion status.
express urprise
wre at Trinidad being
® the federal capital.

|
—By Cable.



Poreek Parties

a

im Coalition

ATHENS, March 9.
Theo

Greek G
ders of the centre Par-
” until they get the
B of last Sunday's elec-
wre planning the next

Mt last’ night by three
au ral, Democra-
and Republican Pro-
hat they had joined
form a Coalition Gov-

Move Would oust ex-Pre-
Mantin Tsaldaris’ Pop-
fern? Were leading tho
sy Votes, according to
lal cen Conciusi:

election are not ex-
Mit Saturday

iS said to-day it wouk
fo wait until the nes
assembles, ar Pal

= are vlearly c} efore
he oe oe befor

—Revtei

Shot Blind
Brother

YLVANIA

Moshe
PYanian }
ler ee ween Chars
Be Nis bros), ee
1 fen t ~~ . :
Mos}
J Be her

iY hy
Y OY

es

i

aan

J0-Ve

‘
Bthe ney

Corp, aa.

73 Stay



}speaker, questioned the Opposi- |

\vhe Government Whip because ‘it
lis in the national interest that the
tokis, Prime Minister | Government should not be brought
overnment, to-day |to a sudden and snap vove.

| consequences if their vote tonight
|defeated the Government. Bowen

‘ment followed an an- |

contained no mention of the na- |
tionalisavion of the iron and steel |

industry | grade,

L ; | Specially

Law To Nationalise | officers,

A public Service Commission

| comprising

jother members is 2~
salaries of remembers and

staff of the CommissS#on and other

are estimated to be of
| the order of £25 OO@ a year

The law to nationalise steel was
passed by the last Parliament,
though it does not operave before
October,

Mr, Churchill’s amendment “re-
gretted” that the steel indusiry
should be left in a state of sus-
pense¢

The Liberals brought more
drama to v‘he crisis by announcing
they would vote with the Conser-
vatives against the Government.

Every possible member was ral-
lied for the vote. Many were svill
wearing morning dress from cere-
monies this morning connected
with French President Vincent
Auriol’s state visit to Brivain

Deputy Prime Minister Herbert |

the King for his speech opening

Parliament, took the form of “re-| at
| gretting” that the future of the
j steel industry was not mentioned



in vhe King’s speech which out-
lined the Government’ pro-
gramme

Opening the debate, Oliver Lyt- |

tleton, a Conservative former Min-|a four day

ister, emphasised that vhe amend- | railways
| ment was put down to secure a| normal,
promise from the Government } duced

Beeellent Job | that if would nov make the vest-

ing date earlier than nine months
after the next election or some
equivalent dave

Government Warned

Lyttleton warned the Governs-
ment not to underrate the forees
which would come to vne oman
tion’s aid. (The nine Liberal mem-
bers were expected to vote against
the Government.)

The Minister of Supply, George |
Strauss, taunved the Conservatives
with being under the misappre-
hension that they had won the
election, He said the Government
would nov’ abandon a measure
which it believéd essential to
maintain full employment and
prosperity.

Evan Bowen, the first Liberal





tion’s motives in putung forward
their amendment, but said, in
view of the Liberals’ strong oppo-
sition to nationalising steel, they
musi support it, a

Labour laughter greeted his}
statement that the Liberals had
given notice of their decision to



When a Labour member asked
if the Liberals would take the

replied amid loud laughver from
the Government benches: “If they

|did, the responsibility would cer-

tainly not be with the Liberal
Party, The Government can de-
feat this amendment very easily

| without a division by, postponing
|indefinitély nationalisation of
| steel.” Rarlior he had said it would

have been better if the Opposi-
vion's amendment had not been

put down.
Pr'me Miaister Attlee took the |
view that ary defeat
Royal speech would mean ;
ent's resigngtion and!

vl tion—even if the re-|
ult were again a stalemate.

otential voding strength of the,

Pariies today was Government

314, Opposition 263, and Liberals |

9, But neither Lavour nor Con-|

itives could be sure of 100 per |

ven in vhis criti¢a

cent
1 "

he vhirlwind activity
among both main partes

per hal
n ‘Hor »







French President
ren

t at a gala banque ‘







idering “pairing arrangl
{ te tne ysten-
1 vould

eancel out withou

Reuter

| Cost of

| expenses

Govt. Take- Over
Power FP fants
IN STRIKE CRISIS

Government ower right seizing}

was suppliec® every where

rounced

cstimated
of

interference

nationalised sas industry | COUNCIL TO BE CLOSED

the next few days.

eased
street
strike.

collected in some ci istricts.



U.S. Feerces

NEW YOR EE, March 9.
Sixteen thousazad American|
troops landed by sS«=< and air on)
vhe
i big combime« OW Puerte Rico by United States |
Armed Forces. i
The attacking fosâ„¢< es, supported
by more than 150 maval vessels |
and hundreds of ple=zmnes, found the,
assault against a he==-vily entrench-
ed “enemy” Yough ging, the New
York Times reporte- ours went to the ci«=fenders.
Observers judgec’ that had the
“war” been real, t-Ere entire air-
borne battalion ~wkmdich landed on
the island might haewwe been wiped
newpaper aid, —Reuter.



Unificeation

ts Halfway

Howe se

@ from paz. | |

in Unifiecs West Indian}

_, The following sex~rices are con- |
sidered ripe for wri fi cation:— |

ADMINISTRAT EON, AGRI- |
CULTURE, CIVII. AVIATION, |
FORESTS, LEC AL AND |
JUDICIAL, oat ob dee Sia
POLICE, POSTAE__ PRISONS, |
Unification of all t Ihe posts in the]





too



e methods of e©@xetry into the
menis to the Address to the} administrative class

Promotion t<\ the lowest
cdministrative @rae of cadet of experi<=nced clerical
officers who hawe shown them-
selves capable of Ce >ing admini:-
trative work.

Direct appPpintment of
Government declares its pro-| Olficers of high aecmeB®emic attain-!
gramme for the coming session—| ment and suitable jy >ersonality to
the cadet grade.

Promotion t<\ the cadet
after suitable training. of
selected w<>ung clerical!

a Chairrr xan and two

@ See paf =~ 1



PARIS, Mik arch 9.



}
|

upplies =adequate for

—Reuter,



\
|

of Viecpuses yesterday

Will F¢xe Al
Planes Over
Hong #song

HONG KONG, Mar
Tne Hong FKoorag Government
, issued A wWwremz ning ns
unauthorised aircz- the colony woulci Eee liable

that

The auvhorities zaid the
issueaq on it =tructior
British Gover nt
of recent air incurs

territor

said aircraft? ailing
t aer : t
is Ante ; :
satisfactorily wv crmald be
é > be iT t
p «
y
is < re

Congratulations

@ from page 1

enlightenment and under-
standing of each other's de-
sires and anxieties,

The decisions which are
taken upon the recommenda-
tions in this report will be of
immense significance for the
future of the British territor
ies concerned. I know the
recommendations will be
eagerly studied and their im-
plications examined both in
Legislatures and by the pub--
lic, not only with the serious-
ness which their importance
warrants, but in the ardent
hope of seeing in them the
means whereby the people of
the West Indies can make
their voice more effective in
the outside world. I shall
await with eagerness the
opinions of the various Legis-
latures on the report and at
this stage I confine myself to
repeating the assurances which
Mr. Creech Jones stated clear-
ly at Montego Bay that H.M.
Government of the United
Kingdom do not look at anti-
cipated federation in the Brit-
ish West Indies as a means of
avoiding its responsibilities or
as in any way retarding the
development of self Govern-
ment in individual territories.

I realise that consideration
of the Committee's proposals
is not a matter which can be
hurried. Nevertheless I hope
Legisiatures will be able to
give their attention to this
matter with all reasonable
despatch. Meanwhiie the re-
port of the Commission on the
unification of the public ser-
vices and the report of the
Customs Union Commission
which will shortly be avail-
able will provide the oppor-
tunity for studying other
means whereby the territories
can associate themselves in
common action for their mu-
tual benefit. His Majesty's
Government have not wished
to prejudge or influence de-
cisions in these various mat-
ters which must now be taken
by representatives of West
Indian people. But they will
at all times be ready to help
in any step which may after
examination appear feasible
in furtherance of the aims
which were accepted at the
Montego Bay Conference in
1947.

King George
To Be

Morrison had made it = that | at powet taticrns, and the] i ay > ”
the movion before the House in; “requisitioning” of key men
the names of Winston Churchill} averted National ~pm~wer stoppage Invited To f aris
and other Conservative leaders| today, though man» of the 100,- LONDON, March 9
was “an issue of confidence”, La- | 000 and electri<-ity workers The London Evening News said |
bour quarters believed the Gov- | came on strike to-day that King George VI and
ernment would get home by aj Electricity requwuiz-~ement were|Queen Elizabeth will receive a
majority in the vove which was | met per cent throughout |formal invitation from President
due akout 10 o'clock. France midday, the Ministry | Auriol to make a State visit to
The Conservative amendment to | of Incustry and Commerce | Paris, following the Royal visit to
the address, a vote of thanks to; announced. Australia.

The invitation will be delivered

reduced presstare |ijn a few months time, the paper’s
Governmer®t said neariy | diplomatic: correspondent stated.
requisitioned workers re- An official spokesman at the
for duty» Legal action; Elysees Palace, the President's |
being taken =a gainst those} residence, said today he could not
not. } contirm a British Press report that
Parisians, still ha2adicapped by | the British King and Queer
bus and underground! would be formally invited to visit!
strike, forrmrad electricity! Paris in the Autum!
but gas E>ressure re-| He said: “Decision between

Governments have to be taken re-
| garding Royal visits. No such de-







Temporary electricity power] >. : ; ; faite
. i S10 as bee ken so far as I
occurred in time Lille and] S* nh AS: GON , .
KNnCW
; al k Ceementh tea | A French Foreign Ministry
: Pasite al e France ‘i ource said they had no confirm-
€ < e > © >
= : } atior the report. ‘It
that gas cawrd electricity} ts i of rhb ers era ag
> cut off for ene hear jn} ROT Ser tO —
sach an invitation, but nothing
=~ will be known in Paris il he
Jational Eilee> tricity Board .
Ni 3 a ae 40 pe e a | comes back Reuter,
y jemand, z2erd said the
“peak” had = passed BUDAPEST BRITISH

BUDAPEST, March 9

The Paris transp« little. but many Paris withdrawal of two leading official
cleaners were now on|0f the British Legation here, and
Garbage r<=mained un-| the closing of the Budapest branch

the British C

cil



—Reuter

FIRING ORDERS

WATENSTEDT, Salzgitter



March 9
. ‘ e German police headquarters here
Prae Fise today said that British vroc
orders to fire on German demon-
&trators here, if there further |
OFF PUERT@M RICO rioting.
—Reuter,



Presents MUSIC of

ORCHESTRA “THE

Featuring Joe Grasso

Globe Theatre T’da

Russia would have no real chance

of power and determinavion to use
that power if necessary, Austra-

| Percy Spender, declared today

In his first foreign policy state-
jiment to ew Conservative- |
ominated Parliament, Mr. Spen- |

Swimmer Breaks Record

Joe Verder, American Olympic



GLOBE

LEARIE CONSTANTINE has :
Seretse Khama. This afternoon the former West Indian
Test Cricketer from Trinidad

“Seretse Khama Fighting

Auriol Visits
French
Hospital

IN ENGLAND

LONDON, March 9
The French President, Vincent

}Auriol, to-day left the French
{hospital in Shaftesbury Avenue
| with tears in his eyes saying, “I
jam profoundly moved and very|*”
| touched .”’

He put his hand to his ear, a|

| gesture of his which has become -*
| familiar to Londoners

With Madame Auriol, who was |

wearing a pale pearl grey cos-
jtume, the President drove from
Buckingham Palace to the hospita?
| for his first visit on the last day

his State visit to the capital
—Reuter,



Approach To

Russia Must Be
Based On Power
~SPENDER |

CANBERRA, Wiarch §
Any new approach to Soviet

uccess unless based on a policy

External Affairs Minister,







aid the Democracies must
uccept the fact that any policy of
j} appeasement vowards the Soviet
| Union was complete ineffective
na ever angerous |
The leaders of Communist Ru
regarded appeasement or any}
sign of fear as weakness They
"espected power, and the deter
mination to exercise power, should| {:
that prove necessary
The major responsibility for the}
world struggle, thai had developed
since the war, lay in Soviet for-|
eign policy, Mr. Spender declared. |
—Reuter. la



NEW JERSEY, March 9 |



swimmer, equalled the world re-
cord for the 00 yard breast
stroke at the Trenton Times swim-
ing meeumns |
Verder covered the distance in
9.4 secs. t qual the official
orld record held by inother 1
ésmerican, Keity Carter arter set] South
p the mari 194 it Lauyetve |
~Reuter.

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Constantine Will Fight
For Seretse’s Return

From Our London Correspondent
LONDON, March 9. |

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PAGE FOUR





'o4 saGaR

t Published by Tho Advocate Co. Ltd., 34, Broad St, Bridgetows
Friday, March 10, 1950

Federation

THE Report of the British Caribbean
Standing Closer Association Committee
(1948-49) is published to-day. It is a Re-
port which should be studied most care-
fully by every West Indian for if its
recommendations are implemented the
stream of West Indian life and thought
x will be radically altered,

Those who read the Report will do well
to bear in mind that the Committee was
not set up to advise on the desirability of
Federation—that was decided at Montego
Bay in 1947—but to advise on those matters
contained in Resolution 6 of the Montego
Bay Conference, The two most important
matters are the form of a federal constitu-
tion and federal judiciary and the means of
financing the operation of all federal ser-
vices.

The Committee has, however, given some con-
sideration to benefits which might accrue from
Federation. The Committee begins with the as-
sumption that the “underlying purpose of our
task is to seek the shortest path towards a real
political independence for the British peoples of
the region within the framework of the British
Commonwealth,” They record their recognition of
the paramount importance of economic stability
and express their belief that the region will not
achieve economic stability while it consists of a
large number of quite separate political units. The
Committee continues “We may place on record
our considered and emphatic view that Federation
and only Federation, affords a reasonable pros-
pect of achieving economic stability and through
it that political independence which is our con-
stant object.”

The reasons which prompt the Committee to
this conclusion are not, however, clear and the
Committee indeed add that Federation as such
will not solve the probleme of the region, but will
en the conditions in which they can be dealt
with. ‘

The Committee recommend that the seat of the
Federation which should be termed the “British
Caribbean Federation” should be in Trinidad. The
Federal Constitution envisaged by the Committee
is one in which the Units of the Federation will
retain all powers not expressly vested in the Fed-
eral Government—this recommendation is in con-
formity with the first resolution of the Montego
Bay Conference.

It is recommended that there should be a
Governor-General with powers clearly defined
and limited. The Legislature should be a bicam-
eral body consisting of a House of Assembly and
a Senate. The former to be elected on Adult
suffrage and the latter to be nominated by the
Governor-General,

The Prime Minister should be elected by the
House of Assembly from amongst the members of
that body, and together with the Council of State
should be responsible for the policy of the Gov-
ernment. '

The Draft Constitution also makes provision
for a Council of State which would perform the
duties of the British Cabinet. The members of the
Council would be nominated partly by the Prime
Minister and partly by the Governor-General,
but the nominees of the Prime Minister should
be a majority of the Council.

The relation between the Senate and the House
of Assembly is regulated. The Senate should
have merely a revigionary and delaying power.
In respect of Money Bills the powers of the
i Senate should be even more limited and Money
| Bills may become law when assented to by the
; Governor-General without the concurrence of
the Senate. In respect of all other Bills the
Senate should have the power of delay for twelve
months.

The allocation of seats in the House of Assem-
bly should be in ,roportion to population but
recognising the difficulties attendant upon the
great variation in population in the different
Units, the Committee has recommended an allo-
cation which in their words “cannot be reduced
to a mathematical formula.” Jamaica would get
16 seats, Trinidad 9, B.G. 6, Barbados 4 and the
other islands 2 each except for Montserrat which
would get one seat,

In the Senate each unit should have two seats



te



aan



24 Se Otte STP

% except Montserrat which should have one. This
} arrangement would reflect the Federal principle
t Since a Second Chamber is to reflect the position
of the territories as equal partners. Montserrat
f should in the opinion of the Committee be treated
i differently because of its very small population.
' The Committee makes recommendations in re-
} spect to the setting up of a Federal Judiciary
and Publie Service Commission. The problem
i of Imperial financial help igs also faced and the

‘ manner in which such help be apportioned and
5 regulated receives the attention of the Com-
i mittee.
The Committee recommends that the Federal
Government be financed by the collection of
Customs Duties but that seventy-five per cent
of the duties collected in each island should be
: returned to the island of collection,
t The Committee gives the optimistic estimate
‘ of annual Federal expenditure for the first five
years at £180,000. That sum does not allow for

i initial capital outlay nor does it appear to in-

° clude an estimate of the lease of Federal buildings

‘ It will undoubtedly be on the question of finance
i} that the question of Federation will be decided

If any general criticiym of the Committee’s
report be well founded as distinct from disagree-
ment with particular details of the suggestions,
it would appear to lie here

The estimate of expenditure will undoubted)
; prove to be very conservative and there are
i many who will look askance at the big salaries for

Federal officials. There are many too who will
view with disfavour the recommendation that
some Federal Officials should have their valaries
written into the Constitution.
“a But on the whole the Committee have done a
very commendable task, They have faced the
difficulties realistically, and in recording their
approval of the goal of Federation they have
affirmed their faith in the peopies of this region.
Federation itself will be far from the end of all
our troubles—the Committee expresses the be-
lief that it will prove the means of overcoming
our troubles, It is to be hoped that they are
right.,

o>

2 ag pee NA Me



Our Readers Say:

Compulsory Education
To the Editor, The Advocate—

Sm,—It was refreshing to find that some mention
had been made in the House during the discussion
of the Estimates of Compulsory Education, It is a
long time since we have heard the members of the
Labour Party make any statement on it. When
they were not in the Government they held it out
as a hardy annual against the other government
that they had refused to introduce a system of com-
pulsory education.

Current events show that it is really needed.
Not in the sense that there must be merely a com-
pulsory learning of the three R’s but it is time that
this community realise that there should be some
discipline of the mind in one form or another

Pet

Soke hares el dBee



Some days ago a few small boys gathered in
Cheapside near the entrance of the Market, their
usual habitat, and sang some of the most vulgar
: songs ever heard in Bridgetown. An idea of the
m¢ f the ng can be gauged when some fisher-
‘ hearing called upon them t«
reatt d ll the Police
i r€ hen they should have ail
been in ol because the eldest was about nine
years old
‘ This entire community shows a lack of discipline
and it is not confined to any particular bracket of
society If this is true then it is best to start with
the oung
CITIZEN

ee

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



TheFederalStructure

Chapter [—S.C.A.C. Report

We start from the assumption
that the main underlying purpose
of our task is to seek the shortest
path towards a real political in-
dependence for the British peoples
of the region, within the frame-
work of the British Common-
wealth—what is meant in fact by
“Dominion Status”. We assume
further that we have been charged
with this task because there is
general agreement that this object
cannot be attained without some
form of federal association be-
tween the territories concerned,
but that with Federation its at-
tainment becomes practicable.
We are aware that in some circles
there is a demand for full inde-
pendence, or for self-government,
either in advance of or simultane-
ously with Federation, on the
basis of existing political units.
While we reaffirm the view ex-
pressed at the Montego Bay Con-
ference that the political develop-
ment of the units must be pursued
as an aim in itself, we are satis-
fied that the sheer force of cir-
cumstances of the modern world
makes independence on a_ unit
basis a mirage. Independence or
self-government as a Federation
is however a practical possibility,
and we have framed our proposals
with this specific objective in view.

This categorical statement re-
quires elaboration, We do not
imply any reflection on the poli-
tical capacity, or the public spirit,
of the peoples of the territories as
they stand to-day. If we did, we
should not be justified in putting
forward a scheme for a larger
political unit, which, together with
the existing territorial politica)
structures, cannot fail to make
even greater demands on the poli-
tical resources of the region than
are made to-day. Our reasons for
this view lie in the fields of eco-
nomics, public finance and admin-
istration, but particularly econom-
ics, the basis of all the rest.

Financial Stability

It is nuw a truism to say that
political independence is unreal
unless it is based on financial
stability which, in turn, must resi
on a solid foundation of economic
productivity—i.e., on an adequate
“national income”. It is true that
| there are many states in the world

which are legally sovereign

and independent: but it can be
asserted that of these only those
which can pay their way can
really be said to enjoy full inde-
pendence. From this point of view
it does not matter what form is
taken by outside financial support.
Grants from United Kingdom
public funds are familiar to this
region, ‘whether in the form ot
grant-aid with its concomitant oi
Treasury control of estimates,
or of grants under the Coloniai
Development and Welfare Aci
Which do not involve Treasury
control of estimates. Other
states, though nominally _ inde-
pendent, have been assisted in
other ways, eg., by private banks
or firms, and their history shows
that their real, though not perhaps
their apparent, independence, is
no less curbed by this form of
assistance than it is by the overt
and acknowledged receipt of
assistance as from one Govern-
ment to another.

The way to real political inde-
pendence is, in short, through eco-
nomic stability and solvency. By
this we do not mean economic
self-sufficiency. Whatever may be
done to produce in this region a
wider range of the goods con-
sumed here — and in our view
much can and should be done—
it would be foolish to shut our
eyes to the fact that the West
Indies and the mainland territor-
ies live by world trade. If eco-
nomic stability and financial sol-
vency are the necessary founda-
tions for political independence,
any proposals far attaining the
latter must be judged,
other things, by the extent
which they promote the
From this point of view,
questions arise, @.g.:
West Indies economically
and solvent now ?*(b) Can they
become so on the existing politi-
cal basis, i.e, the basis of a com-
paratively large number of separ-
ate political units? (c) If not, can
Federation lead to stability and
solvency, either immediately or
in the long run? These questions
demand answers, and upon,
those answers will depend in large
measure the nature of the propos-
als which we shall make

to

former,

Equanimity

Taking the first of these ques-
tions, it is the case that, over the
region as a whole, broadly speak-
ing, public revenues cover public
‘expenditures at the present time
If that were a permanent condi-
tion the future could be regarded
with some equanimity: it might
even be argued that there was
little needed for adding a further






























































among

various
(a) Are the
stable

ards; but they are large in relation
to revenues and, what is more im-
portant for present purposes, they
could not easily or quickly be re-

duced substantially

if revenues

suddenly shrank.

High Prices
The temporarily healthy state of

the public finances is in fact attri-
butable to other factors than any

basic
capacity of the region.

the taxable
These fac-

increase in

tors include, first the comparative-
ly high prices till lately prevailing
for the exports of the region, and
to such other sources of overseas
income as wartime expenditures
by His Majesty’s Government and
the United States Government.

These
higher
region

incomes are reflected in
direct taxability in the
itself, and indirectly in

larger imports which, at present
high prices, mean large ad valo-

rem customs revenues.

It is obvi-

ous that any importast recession

1

n the value of the region's exports

could have a profound and harm-
ful effect alike on the private in-
comes and the public finances of
the region as a whole.

Signs are

not wanting in the world at large
that commodity prices may be on

he turn: this is a matter of the

utmost significance for this region,
even although there seerns no pre-
sent reason to expect a disastrous

slump.
portant

Should there be an im-
recession, the conse-

quences for the economy of the
region would be serious, unless
steps were taken to mitigate them
by means of special arrangements

|
|
|

|

| large

| that

with His Majesty’s Governmnet.

To recognise the realities of the

present economic status of the
region is not an admission of pes-
simism. On the contrary, we feel
that the time has come for a firm
and courageous approach te the

problems which undoubtedly exist.
We are conscious that, unsuspect-
ed discoveries apart, this is not to
be reckoned among the richly en-
dowed areas of the world. We
1evertheless feel sure that in an
age which has seen such substan-
tial advances in the natural
sciences, and where further ad-
vances, particularly in biology, and
its applications to agriculture,
nay be confidently expected,
means can be and are being found
which cay, provide a reasonable
standard of living to all those in
this region who are prepared to
earn it This result will not come
about easily, and we recognise
that the not-too-abundant re-
sources of the region will require
to be freely fertilised with brains,
skill and hard work. This can un-
doubtedly be done, provided al-
ways that the political and admin-
istrative arrangements of the
region are such as_ to enable
modern knowledge to be particu-
larly and confidently applied
where it is most needed, and to
ensure that value is received for
value created,

Economic Weaknesses

The next question is to consider
whether there are possibilities that
the economic weaknesses of the
region can be remedied within the
existing political framework—i.e.
on a “territorial” rather than a
“regional” basis. In other words,
ean the existing units, or any of
them, hope to achieve a sufficient
degree of economic stability to
enable them to attain a real and
permanent independence of out-
side aid and so the possibility of
real as distinct from formal poli-
tical independence ? Having re-
gard to their natural limitations,
the answer for many of the in-
dividual territories must be in the
negative. Some of the units, par-
ticularly the smaller ones, have
no evident prospect, as units, of
moving very far from the margin
of subsistence in public finance;
and, while that is so, genuine in-
dependence must remain unreal-
ised and its pursuit, an occupation
doomed to failure and frustration.
No one unit is large enough, or
rich enough, to be able to main-
tain by itself the range of scien-
tists and others to whom, as we
have suggested above, the region
must look for a real improvement
in its productivity and economic
Stability. Further, all experience
shows that on the basis of inde-
pendent units, the joint action in
external economic and_ related
matters, which daily becomes
more and more important, is ren-
dered infinitely slow and difficult
and consequently much less effec-
tive than it should be. There is
much more to be said on this topic,
but we do not consider it neces-
sary to labour it, since we believe
that it is perhaps one of the few
on which there is fairly general
unanimity, We are satisfied the
region will not achieve economic
stability while it congists of a
number of quite separate
political units, and consequently
the hopes of such units of

| achieving real political independ-

political superstructure in the}
form of a Federal constitution.
But on closer examination the
picture is not so reassuring. In

the first place, several territories
are at present in receipt of grant-
aid and are likely to continue
to require it. Some others may at
any time come to require it
Secondly, there is scarcely a terri-
tory, even among the largest,
whose finances do not give some
cause for concern, aid which
might not, as a result of some by
no means unprecedented misfor-
tune or disaster, be brought to in-
solvenc;. Thirdly, there is a basic
instability about even the present
apparently satisfactory state of
the public finances. Revenues are
very substantially greater thar
they were before the war; but
these increases are not, unfortun-
ately, due to any real increase in
the basic productivity of the
region, in relation to numbers
There is in fact evidence that in
this region—as indeed elsewhere
in the world — basic productivity
|

has suffered a temporary decline
This is a serious matter, since
basic productivity is the founda-
tion upon which economic stabil-
ity, solvency, and hence real poli-
tical independence, must be built

Revenues may be described as
| “elastic *, or sensitively responsive
to change in a number of factors
Expenditure on the other hand is
less s For reasons into which
jwe need not enter, recent years
j}have witnessed a substantial in-
crease in public commitments in
the field of social and allied sex
| vices. These provisions are by no
mean excessive in relation t
need or by any modern stand

| prospect

ence, as such, are slight.

This said, we may place on re-
cord our considered and emphatic
view that Federation and only
Federation, affords a reasonable
of achieving economic
stability and through it that poli-

| tical independence which is our

constant object. We have chosen
these words with care. We do not
claim that Federation will immed-
iately and automatically solve the
economic and fiseal problems of

Ithe region, or that it cannot fail.

We do claim that it will put in
the hands of men responsible to
the region as a whole, powers and
opportunities, particularly in re-
spect to the place of the region in
world trade, which do not exist at
present, and which these men ac-
cording to their abilities and in-
clinations can use for the better-
ment of the region. Federation as
such will not solve our problems,
but will provide the conditions in
which they can be dealt with.

Cease To Exist

We desire i to emphasise
this point. ere is in some
quarters a disposition to imagine
that immediately a Federation is
establighed cefttain difficulties
will cease to exist. Conversely,
thers appear to hold that, be-
cause the establishment of a Fed-
eration will of itself only mean
another legislature and adminis-



tration, and consequent expens
in addition to those already ex-
isting (which is true so far as

it goes)it will not help the region
Both views are false, because
problems are never solved
natically by new constitutions

al





only by the efforts of men to whom |

titutions 1
tution may

ive a

this region than it was in 1787 -o
North America or even a meeting
of the British Parliament before
the advent of railways. More im-

propriate powers and responsibili- |
ties which did not exist before.
These two apparently contradic-
tory views are thus closely akin,
in that they rest on the fallacy
that results are or should be
achieved by adjustments of poli-
tical and administrative ma-
chinery, instead of by the efforts
of men who may be helped or hin-
dered by the machinery but who
cannot thereby be absolved from
effort. Federation will not ab-
solve the region from the necessity
for physical and mental and
moral effort—it may, if success-
ful, help that effort to issue in
greater productivity, more se-
curity and higher standards of
living, than can the same effort
exercised within the present po-
litical framework.

Briefly, the services that Fed-
erciion can render, and whicn
can be adequately rendered in
no other way, can be summarised
as prompt, effective action in the
economic field on behalf of the
region as a whole. There is a
clamant fecessity for some single
agency which can speak and act
with authority, full knowledge,
and at short notice, for the re-
gion in a wide field of activities,
of which trade negotiations are
only the mcet prominent example.
This necessitates an agency which |
can act in its own right, and not
by delegation from other agencies!
and subject to their confirmation.
This in turn requires a fully rep-
resentative deliberative organisa-
tion from which to derive the
necessary authority—that is to
say, a legislature in which the
directly elected representatives of
the people of the region have a
preponderant voice.
































Restatement

We are conscious that much 2
the foregoing is a restatement of
what is already accepted, and that,
strictly speaking, it is not incum:
bent upon us to argue the pros
and cons of Federation. But we
have in our deliberations had an
unusual opportunity of discussing
the matter in much greater de-
tail than was possible at the
Montego Bay Conference, or in
the discussions in the various
legislatures of the recommenda-
tions of that Conference; and we
feel that there is advantage in
setting out at length some of the
basic considerations which have
largely guided us in our more de-
tailed recommendations In sum-
mary, we believe that the attain-
ment of independence within the
British Commonwealth is the
legitimate political objective ot
the region. Since a state has a
real as distinct from a purely
formal independence only to the
extent of its independence of ex-
ternal financial assistance, it is
clear that the economic stability
of the region must be improved
as rapidly as possible. It is our
considered judgment that this
can only be done by settin up a
federal government and ent istins
to it important powers <¢ d re-
sponsibilities particularly, hough
not exclusively, in the economic
field. The remainder of this Part
of our Report consists of the ap-
plication of these principles to 4
Federal Constitution within the
framework of which the siates-
men of the region will have the
}epportunity of leading their peo-
ple towards their goal.

|

Government Functions

As in our deliberations, so we
feel that in our report it is ap-
propriate to deal at ‘an early stage
with the functions which a Fed-
eral Government should perform,
and its relations with territorial]
|Governments. We start with the

mandate of Montego Bay that a

Federal Constitution should follow
the pattern of that of the Com-
monwealth of Australia, in that
the Federal Government should
have only such powers as_ are
specifically made over to it, and
that all others the “residua)
powers” should remain where
they are, with the territorial Gov-
ernments. It is not therefore opev
to us to proceed on any other
basis but we wish to record that
our discussions have amply con-
firmed to us the wisdom of that
mandate, Geography alone sug
gests the wisdom of not attempt-
ing too close or all-bracing a Fed-
eration for this widely scattered
region. But we feel that the
geographical factor is apt to be
overstressed, and that it will be-
come progressively less impor-
tance as communications improve
and become less costly. Even now
it is far less troublesome and
time-consuming to assemble a
fully representative gathering in



portant reasons, at this stage, for
adhering to the Australian pattera
and to a relatively limited list of
“Federal” functions, are the social
and economic diversity of the re-
gion, and the strength of local po-
litical and other traditions. It is
only the unwary outsider who w ill
venture to dogmatise about Bar-
bados on the basis of an acquain-
tance with Jamaica, or about Brit-
ish Honduras on the strength of a
visit to St. Kitts or to British
Guiana. Moreover these local
traditions are not lightly to be
cast aside. They form a valuable
bond among the
hold to them, and in many re-
spects uniformity is not an un-
qualified good. The region has not
resources that
we can afford unnecessarily to
weaken traditions which hold
people together in local pride and
self-respect. One is by no means
the worse West Indian for being
a good Vincentian

One point perhups mer:ts clari-
fication and emphasis, as it some-
times appears that there is doubt
and misgiving about it Under
Federation, except in respect of
the powers which are explicitly
assigned to it, the Federal Gov-
ernment is in no sense ‘over” the
territorial Governments and their
actions are not subject to Federal

The territories

peoples who

so many human

sanction or review
will keep all their powers except
in so far as they specifically sur-
render them. Conversely, the Fed

eral Government, in the exercise
of the Federal powers conferred
upon it, is not obliged to seek the
i @ on page 6

| Public Services

{aspect of the closer association of the British West





FRIDAY, M



ARCH 10, ity

| Unification Of

} D:

SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

v .

war

TO-DAY'S ¢
at the Cor

AUSTRALIAN F
Usually 68











RUIT
NOW

CREAM OF wu
WH
Usually 51 Now 43°

_—_—_———

McEWANS RED



THE UNIFICATION of the public services is one nea

indian colonies. The history of the question of
closer union is set out at length in Chapter XVIII
of the West India Royal Commission Report (Cmd.
6607), and move briefly in the opening paragraphs
of the Report of the Montego Bay Conference (Cmd.









7291). The former report contained certain re- LABE
commendations in regard to the unification of local Usually 26 Now? BEER
services but the locus classicus on the subject is 5 1 \

the Secretary of State’s draft despatch of May,
1946, which was printed at the end of the latter
report. The despatch is an integral part of our
terms of reference and we shall have frequent
occasion to refer to it. We have therefore repro-

ns

We have EVERYTHING |

ee ee









{
duced it in full in Appendix I. {
The essence of unification is the substitution of
the region for the colony as the unit for the recruit- FOR YOUR GARDEN ;
ment, promotion. and posting of the staff of the HOSE 54’ d 3%" ;
— services. From the point of view of the s an 4
overnments, the more obvious of the advantages
of e - an arrangement are that the range of selec- HOSE NOZZLES & SPRAYERS f
tion for both first appointments and promotions is
widened, that the qualifications for sppotennent to HOSE COUPLINGS & MENDERS
the various grades can he standardized, and that “” n :
the efficiency of the service is improved ——— HOSE CLAMPS 12” & %4” ;
the greater scope offered for the employment o ” SAN oot
civil servants on the type of work best suited to a BIB COCKS '2” & %4" with Union
their respective talents. The civil servants them-
selves enjoy corresponding advantages. phen GARDEN FORKS & TROWELS ‘
possibilities are afforded for the advancement of de- Y
serving officers, more opportunities or eae ex- ROSE TREE PRUNERS
perience are opened up for many, and a ave a
better prospect of congenial work. It is a ener SECATEURS t
corollary of unification that entrants tc a unifie
service after its institution will have to prea an TREE PRUNERS
bility to serve anywhere in the region, but this C :
should prove no deterrent to an officer who is GARDEN POTS from 4c. to 80¢. % ii
anxious to make his way in the service. ., D ¢
Before we come to consider which = in tay VEGETABLE GARDEN MANURE #
services in the Caribbean area lend themselves to ON & HAYNES CoO. 0
unification, and to which posts in those services WILKINS 1 » LTD., Successors i q
unification should be applied, there is one subsidi- i
ary matter to be disposed of. te S. P TCHER & Coy LTD, :
SCHEDULED POSTS Phones: 4472, 4687, a
There are throughout the various colonies of the ai
Caribbean area a certain number of scheduled posts dq
in the Colonial Unified Services, and it would be a
inconsistent with the clear statement of principle al

enunciated in paragraph 8 of the Secretary of State’s
draft despatch for us to make any recommendations
which would have the effect of limiting his discre-
tion to transfer the holders of such posts to colonies
outside the region or to transfer to such posts offi-
cers serving elsewhere, It has therefore to be re-
cognised that in some of those services which we
recommend for unification there will be certain
posts which are unified posts in a general as well
as in a regional sense. At the same time, we have
throughout our deliberations kept in mind the ob-
jective of staffing the public services with persons
of local descent to the fullest extent that is com-
patible with the efficient conduct of the services,
and we believe that acceptance of our recommenda-
tions will enable the Secretary of State to dispense
to an increasing extent with the need to transfer
officers serving outside the region to posts in Unified
West Indian Services.

We pass now to consideration of the criteria
which we should apply in deciding whether to re-
commend any particular service for unification. It
may be convenient at this point to refer to the pres-
ent procedure governing appointments to offices in
the government service in the colonies, which is
set out in Regulations 20-33 of Colonial Regulations.

DIVIDED
In these reguiations, public offices are divided

into three classes: Class I includes all offices in
Colonial Unified Services; Class II includes all other

. &
STANSFELD SCOTT & CO. LTD.
offices with initial emoluments of not less than Z

£600 a year; and Class III intludes all other offices | <== :

with initial emoluments of less than £600 a year.
a $ , £ fn
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CSFALI® ws
is
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DANISH ICE CREAM WAFERS per pkg. ...........

DANISH CHEESE WAFERS per pk«:,
DANISH VIENNA SAUSAGES per
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TN 6.6 eevee
RED SALMON 1 !fb tin onan
RED SALMON |, fb tin
SWEET MIXED PICKLES per bot. ........
MAYPOLE LEMON CHEESE per bot. ......
HOLBROOKS WORCESTER SAUCE per bot.
MORTONS PEARL BARLEY 1 ib tin ........
SMEDLEYS MIXED VEGETABLES per tin .
SMEDLEYS GARDEN PEAS per tin ......
CADBURYS BOURNVILLE COCOA 14 fb tin.
SWIFTS LUNCHEON BEEF per tin ...........,
NORWEGIAN SARDINES per iin







a

The Secretary of State reserves to himself the right
to select candidates for all vacancies in Classes I
and II, though in reporting vacancies in these
classes Governors may recommend candidates to fill
then. _ Governors may themselves fill all vacancies
occurring in Class III, subject to any special direc-
tions which may have been given by the Secretary
of State. In paragraph 7 of his draft despatch, the
Secretary of State says that he appreciates “that
Colonial Governments would probably be reluctant
to surrender their powers of selection and posting
to a regional authority.” In the light of this con-

SS CoeSse yy eee ee

Who need a Good Helmet
for all Weather.

Lo ek ee

>
2

in
sideration, we have confined our recommedations Ne
for unification to those services in respect of which pa
the advantages to be derived from unification, from !
the points of view both of the efficiency of the ser- p
vice and the opportunities for advancement of offi- ee ;
cers of ability, cannot be gainsaid even by those iz
who, on principle, are opposed to the transfer of ”
powers which is inherent in unification.

In order that any service should be regarded as T
appropriate for unification it is, in our opinion,
en = four conditions should be satisfied. .
n the first place, the service should be one which T
exists in ngst, if not all, of the colonies. This ARE ONCE AGAIN :
point calls for no argument, since the unification of i

a service on a regional basis presupposes that the
service is region-wide. Secondly, the service should
be one the officers in which normally look to ad-
vancement in that service and in no other.

ELABORATION

This point calls for some elaboration. In the
course of our investigations, we came across cer-
tain departments the officers in which are eligible
for promotion either in their own Gepartment or in
another department the work of which is of an
analogous character. Thus in some colonies there
is a measure of interchangeability between such de-
partments as Audit, Accountant-General, and In-
land Revenue. Where such conditions obtain, uni-
fication would not be desirable, Supposing, for ex-
ample, that the audit services were to be unified,
it would be unreasonable to expect the Public Ser-
vice Commission to look beyond officers serving in
audit departments when promotions in the audit
service were under consideration. Any advantages
that might accrue from unification would, therefore,
be more than offset by the withdrawal of opportuni-
ties for inter-departmental transfers within the
colony. Thirdly, the service should be one in whicb
the qualifications for entry and advancement are,
broadly speaking, of an equivalent standard. In
order to make the transfer of an officer from one
colony to another acceptable to the receiving col-
ony, it is essential that, in so far as posts calling
for professional or technical qualifications are con-
cerned, the officer transferred should, apart from
any question of merit or seniority, possess qualifi-
cations not inferior to those looked for in the re-
ceiving colony. Fourthly, the service should be one
which offers opportunities for advancement from
one grade to another. In adopting this criterion,
we have had regard to the fact that, as we see it,
transfers from one colony to another will usually
take place on promotion from one grade to another,
though we envisage lateral transfers which carry
with them increased emoluments. This is not, we
think, an unreasonable assumption, since the ex-
penses in setting up house in a new colony are
such as to make it unlikely that the Publ® Service
Commission would order a transfer unless there
were some countervailing financial advantages.

NOW RIPE

In the light of the considerations referred to in
the preceding paragraphs, we consider that the fol-
lowing services are now ripe for unification: — Ad-
ministration, Agriculture, Civil Aviation, Forests
Legal and Judicic’. Medical, Police, Postal, and
Prisons In recom. ending these services for unifi-
cation we are not suggesting the unification of all
the posts in the departments which administer them.
The Secretary of State recognises, in paragraph 10
of his draft despatch, that the subordinate clerical
posts can at present best be organised on the ex-
isting colony basis, and that the unification of the

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police service should not extend below the com- '
missioned ranks. The same considerations apply } .
jin the case of the other services Apart from ‘he } ke
fact that there would be no advantage in recruit- | *h
iment in the lower ranks on a regional basis, it | oe
} would be manifestly unreaso © put lowly-paid | 7
officers to the expenss g in a col- th
ony ot than that i n so far te
| therefore, as we recommend the unification of cer- | a
jtain services, our recommendations are limited to | Re
the recruitment and promot » the posts set out | am
in the schedule given in x I Throughout | try
yur rep th posts ated “scheduled | Me
post \ a





gwAY, MARCH 10, 1950

a

TT

| Bridgetown Parking Case Appeal

RIDGELOWN WAS 2 deserted
city after midday
Most of the Stores closed
ecause of the Races and
eekly half-holiday and
people, who did not
dq the and a small
er of personnel from the
Ss “Glasgow” could be seen
“‘rolling around the town. '
n after 3 o'clock, bus loac
pus load could be seen going
the direction of the Garrison
shortly after two o’clock a
iden shower fell but this only
ied for about three quarters of
an hour, after this dark clouds
overhang the City.
puring Wednesday and up tc
g o'clock yesterday morning scat-
tered showers fell throughout the
jsland, but the total rainfal’
recorded was only 61 parts.

FGINNING TONIGHT at 9.1:
B o'clock in their regular Friday
eyening programme over the loca
proadcas. the British Council wil

nt a new feature under the
tile “The Voice of Poetry.”

This will consist of readings oi
well known poems by those twc
distinguished figures of the Eng-
ish stage—Edith Evans and Johr







alf-day b
° their W

a few 3
» Racing,

jelgud. .
oon incidental and _ interlud
| music will be taken from the
works of Frederick Delius.

ip RIGHT rear ,and fron
“I fenders of a motor car and th:
rer fender of a bicycle wer
damaged and a cart extensivel;
damaged when an accident oc
at Hothersal Turning a
“gout 6.30 p.m. on Tuesday.
Margaret Brewster, who was ¢
nger on the cart, was injured
_ The accident involved the moto)
0-79, owned and driven b:
derick Wood of St. Bernard
ge, St. Joseph, a_ bicyelr
d and ridden by Vincen’
Manning of Browne’s Village, St
orge, and a donkgy drawn car‘
owned and driven by Oliver Wooxr
Jackmans, St. Michael.

"aN ACCIDENT occurred o1
Hindsbury Road at abou
900 p.m. on Monday between ;
motor lorry owned by C. Springer
of Hindsbury Road and the moto:
car M-430, owned and driven b)
Wilfred Cordeau of School Gap
Hindsbury Road.

The right front and rear door:
of the Car were extensivels
damaged. Six rails from_ thr
tlisade of the house of Kentural
Mayers, situated near the scene
of the accident, were damaged.

NOTHER ACCIDENT occurre:
on Sargeants Village Roa
‘at about 7.00 a.m. on Wednesda:
between the motor lorry X-379
ned by Newton Plantation anc
ftiven by Gladstone Butcher o/
Oldsbury, St. Philip, and a var
gwned by the Barbados Telephone
, and driven by Leon King of
Sargeants Village.

The right fenders of the van and
tight front fender of the lorry
were damaged.

A BICYCLE beionging to Hen-
derson Springer of Pounders
Gap, Westbury Road was damagec
i an accident on Whites Alley.
Mar James Street, at about 2.55
pm. on Wednesday.

_ Also involved was a mule drawn
“am, owned and driven by
Alphonso Payne of Third Avenue
Bush Hall,

WO BICYCLES were damaged

in an accident at tne corner
of Culloden Road and Collymore
Rock on Tuesday.

The accident occurred at about
130 am. between one eycle
ned and ridden by Walter
Haynes of Licorish Village, My\
lords Hill, and another cycle
owned by McDonald Ward of SF.
Joseph and ridden by McDonald
mech of Mason Hall Street.
Haynes was treated at the General
Hospital for injuries and dis-
charged,






























LEFT side of a van be-
longing to Messrs. J. N. God-
datd and Sons was slightly
damaged after it became involved
Man accident with a push cart
wned by Messrs. Plantation Ltd.,
#4 manned by Percival Gooding
al Sixth Avenue, New Orleans.
This accident occurred on Milk
kQ at about 2.15 p.m. on
Wednesday, The van was driven
Arthur Harte of Worthings,
Christ Church.

N ACCIDENT occurred on
Welches Road, St. Michael
HM about 5.00 p.m. on Wednesday
; en a bicycle owned and
by Adolphus Greene 0’
ker Hall, St. Lucy, and <









































strian Adelphia Constant of
field Road, St. Michael.
tant’s left arm was slightly

‘
FIRE of unknown origin
broke out at Lowthers Plan-
mh at about 9.05 p.m. on Tues-
nd destroyed 11 acres of first
pe canes, The canes were
qd and are the property of
#. Watson of the same Planta-

E

4 WEDNESDAY at about 9.45
ge a fire of unknown origin
ten Sut at Small Ridge Planta-
ri Christ Church and destroyed

= acres of first crop ripe canes
ylth were insured. They are

Property of G. S. Evelyn.



Cornmeal Arrives
Arriving with 1,670 bags of

mes th

: r 159-ton Dutch steamship

“which sailed from Trini-

â„¢..

This Shipment of cornmeal which
Signed to Mr

» Ltd., was yesverday un-

and removed to bonds from

it will be distributed to

ther cargo from

of celcure



*r, silk goods,

crates

a ae of oranges

.. “Upplies of cotton goods,
» Shoes and hand bags
wat Local agents are
, Musson, Son & Cx



â„¢meal for Barbados yesterday |

K. R. Hunte|

Retrial Ordered In

THE WEST IND
appeal in both cases which
recent sitting here.

our the Acting Chiet Judge
The first case was that in which
Clifford Skinner appeal against
the findings of a Common Pleas
vury awarding damages to Arden
dag ae as the result of an
we : ri ;
boi’ cigahey €n cars driven by
Second case was the appeal «
Sergeant G.c. Springer of the aan
bados Police Force against the de-
cision of the Court of Error which
Court dismissed an appeal filea
by Springer against a decision of
the Assistant Court of Appeal
which court had confirmed a de-
cision of a Police Magistrate, dis-
missing a case brought by Springer
against Doorly unaer the bridge-
town Parking Regulations, 1949.
The West Inaian Court of
Appeal has ordered retrial of the
Skinner-Cuke case, There was no
vruer as to costs. The Springer-
Doorly case is to be sent back to
the Police Magistrate to be heard
and determined according to law.
In this case also, there was no
order as to costs.

The Court
The West Indian Court of
Appeal was composed of His

Chief Justice of Trinidad (Presi.
sent), Sir Newnham A. Worley,
Chief Justice of British Guiana
and Sir Clement Malone, Chiet
Justice of the Windward and
Leeward Islands.

The Judgment of the President
in the Springer-Doorly appeal
was read by His Honour Mr, Tay-
lor. Those of the other two Judges
was read by Mr. G. C. Williams,
Acting Deputy Registrar,

Legal appearances before the
West Indian Court of Appeal were
in the Skinner-Cuke case, Mr.
W. W. Reece K.C., associated with
Mr. J. E. T. Brancker for the
appellant, instructed by Messrs.
Carrington and Sealy, while Mr.
D. H. L. Ward instructed by
Messrs. Hutchinson and Banfield
appeared for the respondent.

In the Springer-Doorly matter
Mr, John Whyatt K.C., Attorney
General, associated with Mr. W. W.
Reece K.C., Solicitor General and
Miss M. E. Bourne, Acting Legal
Draughtsman represented the ap-
vellant instructed by Mr. G. B.
Evelyn, King’s Solicitor.

The Respondent was represented
hy Mr. E. K. Walcott K.C., asso-
ciated with Mr. J. S. B. Dear and
instructed by Messrs. Yearwood
and Boyce,

Judgment

The Judgment of the President
follows:—

This is an appeal from the de-
cision of the Court of Error hold-
ing that certain regulations made
under section 7 of the Motor
Vehicles and Road Traffic Act,
1937, were, on the date when the
respondent is alleged to have
committed an offence under them,
no longer in force by reason of
the fact that the requirements of
the section had not been fully
compiled with. The requirements
are contained in sub-section (2)
of the section which for con-
venience I shall refer to hereafter
as the Barbados provisions and
are in the following terms:

“All such regulations shali
forthwith be reported by the
Director to the Governor for his
approval and sanction, and shall
as soon as possible thereafter
be submitted for the approval
of both Houses of the Legisla~
ture and if not approved shall
cease to be regulations from
the date of their disapproval,
but the non- approval shall not
affect anything done or suffered
under the regulations between
their coming into force and
their rejection by the Legisla-
ture.”

The regulations were made by
the Director on the 12th February,
1948, and received the approval
and sanction of the Governor on
the 10th April, 1948. The com-
plaint alleged an offence commit-
ted on the 7th June, 1948, but on
that date the regulations had not
been submitted for approval ot
the legislature although it is said
that some thirteen sittings of the
House of , Assembly had taken
place since the date of the Gov-
ernor's approval and sanction,

The question at issue has been
discussed in the Parliament of the
TInitead Kingdom and by text-
hook authors but there is no clear
authoritative decision upon it.
And, although a great variety of
textual expression has been em-
vloyed in the enactments of the
TInited Kingdom which are de-
signed to afford Parliament an
early opportunity of approving oF
repudiating subordinate legisla-
tion, none has been found in
similar terms to that which we
now have to construe. The near-
est perhaps is exhibited in the
case of Bailey vs. Williamson
(1873) 8 Q.B.118, which for con-
venience I shall refer to here-

| after as the British provisions, and
| these are in the following terms:—

| “Any rule made in pursuance

of the first schedule to this Act
| shall be forthwith laid before
| both Houses of Parliament, if
| Parliament be sitting, or if not,
| then within three weeks after
| the beginning of the then next
| ensuing session of Parliament;

and if any such rulés shall be
| disapproved of by either House
| of Parliament within one month
after the same shall have been
so laid before Parliament, such
rules, or such parts thereof as

eer
WHAT'S ON TO-DAY

Police Band at Government
House at 9.00 a.m.

Court of Grand Sessions at
10.00 a.m.

Meeting, House of Assembly
at 5.00 p.m,

Mobile Cinema, Westmore-
land Plantation Yard, St.
James at 7.30 p.m.

nl

Judgments of
were read in the High Court yesterday

Allowed By W.L. Court

Skinner-Cuke Case

IAN COURT OF APPEAL has allowed the

came up before them at their

the Court in both cases
t morning, His Hon-
Mr. G. L. Taylor, presiding.

shall be disapproved of, shall
not be enforced.”

in that case the court was askea
t aeclare the reguiauons invalia
because they had not been laid
vetore Parliament within the
specified time, It was argued, as
it has been argued before us, tnat
the requirement was mandatory,
and disobedience of it renderea
the regulations nugatory, The
Court held that the requirement
was directory only, and not man-
datory, and declined to nullify the
regulations. It appears to me that,
although the British provisions
which received judicial interpreta-
tion in that case differed in
Several material respects from the
Barbados provisions which we are
now required to construe, the
differences are even more favour-
able to a similar conclusion. Since
the meaning and intention of the
legislature is to be derived from
the text of its enactments, it is

important to examine the ex-
pressions used in the Barbados
provisions, to observe the varia-

tions from the text of the British
provisions which have already re-
ceived judicial interpretation, and
to consider whether those va
tions supply a guide as to the man-
datory or directory character of
the Barbados provisions. The
first and most notable variation
is that in the Barbados provisions
the regulations when made by the
Director are required to be ap-
proved and sanctioned by the Gov-
ernor before submission for the
approval of the legislature. The
subsequent requirement that the
regulations are to cease if disap-
proved by the legislature makes
it clear that they are to be re-
garded as in full force and effect
prior to such disapproval. It is
not so clear as to when they are
deemed to have come into opera-
tion. The Intervretation Ordin-
ances of most Colonies provide
that regulations commence on the
date of publication in the Gazette.
but no such provision existed in
the Barbados Interpretation Act at
the material time. It appears to
me that the intention here was
that the regulations should come
into operation as soon as te
“overnor gave his sanction to
them, and not when the Director
made them or when thev were
published in the Gazette. For the
purposes of the present issue the
point to note is that the legisla-
ture has provided intermediate
machinery for checking the reeu-
lations. I am disposed to infer
from this that, so far as concern-
ed the operation of the regula-
tions and their suitability, the
legislature was content to entrust
this to the scrutiny of the Gov-
ernor and his advisers, and in
further providing for its own sub-
sequent approval it intended to
give expression to its constitu-
tional position as the sovereign
authority in all legislative matters



Another Variation

Another notable variation in the
Barbados, as compared with the
British provisions is the require-
ment that the regulations shall be
submitted to the legislature for
approval. There seems to be no
room for doubt that this involves
a resolution of approval to make
the regulations effective there-
after. It has been submitted on
behalf of the respondent that
such a resolution must, according
to the practice of the Barba-
dos legislature, be moved by a
member in charge of Government
business in the House, and that
this is the final step which Gov-
ernment must take to give per-
manence to the existence of the
regulations as a statutory mea-
sure. If that step is not taken
within the time prescribed then,
it is argued, the regulations be-
come automatically revoked as
from that date. This require-
ment, it is said, constitutes and
exhibits the mandatory character
of the provision. There is much
force in this contention, and it
deserves close consideration, al-
though it was not on this ground
that the Court of Error decided
in favour of the respondent. The
British provisions require no act
of the executive to give perman-
ence to the regulations other than
the act of laying them before the
legislature within the preseribed
time. The Barbados provisions
require the executive to move :
resolution of approval. If that was
not done, did the legislature in-
tend revocation, or had it some
othe, purpose in requiring it to
be done? In determining what
that purpose was it is relevant to
enquire first whether any public
mischief is to be apprehended if,
through inadvertence or other-
wise, the executive fails to take
action in time, and next whether,
if revocation were to follow such
failure, the date of revocation can
be precisely ascertained. In re-
gard to the first question I am
impressed by the wideness of the
administrative field which is to
be covered by the regulations
made under this section as enunci-
ated in sub-section (1). Can it
be that the legislature intended
to destroy the administrative
machinery under the Act which
itself had set up merely because

some member of the House
had delayed to move a_ reso-
lution at the first meeting

of the Assembly? It appears to
me that if any other loss injuri-
ous purpose than this is decerni-
ble in the provision it should be

preferred. In regard to the sec-
ond question counsel for the
respondent was asked on what

date in his submission the regu-
lations became revoked. His first
answer was, “On the 20th April,
1948”, on which date there was a
meeting of the House of Assembly,
which was the meeting
ubsequent to of the
On

second
approval
regulations by the Governor
being asked why on the
of the first meeting he agreed
that this would be the move logi-
cal date. It is manifest that there
is cause for uncertainty as to

hen it will be pos

date

not

late V

eT

the |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

practicable to move a
session,

of being able to

ments is another

lay in conforming with the re-
yuirements of this’ provigion. I
have already indicated what I

think that purpose to be.
think, it was to give

tion.

of controlling

ment side do not
punctual

lapse
performance of

to all civilized legislatures, and
such extreme measures as manda-
mus are quite unnecessary for
that purpose. It was this suppos-
ed absence of power to compel

obedience to the provisions which |

seems to have moved the Court
of Error to the decision which it
reached, but I feel sure that
neither of the two Houses of leg-
islature in Barbados need have
cause to apprehend that such re-
quirements as these now under
review could ever be ignored with
impunity. The constitutional
means of preventing this are in
their own hands, and these are
ample and sufficient for the pur-
pose. For these reasons I con-
sider that the requirements now
under construction is directory
and not mandatory, and, that the
present appeal should be allowed.
The case should be remitted to
the magistrate to hear and deter-
mine according to law. The orders
of the Assistant Court of Appeal
and of the Court of Error should
be set aside. Since the issue on
this appeal it of public importance
there should be no order as to
costs.
27th February, 1950.
(Sgd.) C. FURNESS-SMITH,
Chief Justice of Trinidad and
Tobago,
(President) .

BAFA Meets Today

When Will Football

Season Start?

The opeming date of the 1950
Football Season will be decided
upon this afternoon when the
Council of the Barbados Amateur
Football Association meets.

The Annual General Meeting of
the B.A.F.A. will take place this
afternoon at 4.30 at the Y.M.C.A
Headquarters when the financial
statements and the Secretary Re-





port for the 1949 Season will be
received.
Immediately after this, the

Council of the B.A.F.A. will meet
to elect its sub-committees anc
to decide the opening date for the
1950 Football Season,

“Glasgow” Defeat
College 6—1
A team from the H.M.S

Glasgow inflicted a six-one defeat
on Harrison College in a Footbal

Match at the College Ground
yesterday evening.
ward scored four goals for his

Walker, the Navy’s centre-for-
team, One from the centre-for
ward position and the others while
he’ was at right wing. The re
mainfng two goals for the Navy
were scored by Hobson, their insidy
left. The lone goal for Colleg«
was scored by their centre-for-
ward, Hope.



Commonwealth Play
Last Match Today

BOMBAY, March §

George Duckworth, former Lan-
cashire and England wicketkeeper,
will be behind vhe stumps when
the Commonwealth cricket team
end their tour of India, Pakistan
and Ceylon with a_ three-day
match against the Governor’s XI
svarting here tomorrow.

The touring team, which is be-
ing managed by Duckworth, ar-
rived here today from Colombo
for tomorrow’s match which has
been organised by the. Indian
Cricket Board of Control in aid of
provincial charities.

Teams for the twelve-a-side
mach have been chosen as fol-
lows:

Commonwealth: Duckworth, G.

Pope, D. Fitzmaurice, H, Lambert,
W. Alley, F. Worrell, J. Holt, W
Place, R. Smith, G, Tribe, C
Dawkes and F. Freer

Governor's XI; Raja Maharaj
Singh, the Governor, C K, Nayu-
du, D, B. Deodbhar, S. Mustagq Ali,
C. S. Nayudu, R. Medi, S. W. So-
roni, A. Singh, D. G. Phadkar,
P. R, Umrigar, M. R. Bhide, and
V. L. Manjrekar.—Reuter,

20/- For Wounding

Grace Griffith of Fairfield Road,
Black Rock, was fined 20s. in
one month or one month's impris-
onment by His Worship Mr. E, A.
McLeod yesterday.

She was found guilty of wound-
ing Eunice Ifill on September 26

Assize Diary



FRIDAY
No. 13° Rex. vs. Cecil
Bryan
No. 21 Rex vs. Ronald
Sellman





a @
a
ow @

ible or}

‘



ee

resolution
during the course of a legislative
The practical importance
ascertain with
certainty and precision the period
of operation of legislative enact-
consideration
which leads me to look for some
other purpose than revocation as
a consequence of inadvertent de-

If, as I
statutory
expression to the sovereignty of
the legislature in respect of these
regulations that purpose would be
readily achieved by the process of
question, debate and if necessary
censure on the floor of the Assem-
bly, and without recourse to the
public mischief which may attend
premature and automatic revoca-
Such constitutional methods
its own business
(including the business of seeing
that its members on the Govern-
in the
their
duties to the House) are common

| B.W.LA
| Trinida

eee ee nn ee ne ee ee

“Tam a proud consumer of... .

GOAT CHOW

The cows begin their young ones on

CALF STARTENA

)btainable from H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd.

e . se a
a aoe”; ee ee ee ee ee *



Cabbages, Tomatoes

In Good Supply

eon kitchen gardens.

searcity a short while ago

vhe “Advocate”
more is to be
banana sold when ripe.

B.W.1I.A. Board
Meets In Trinidad

yesterday



Mr. J. W Booth, Deputy Chair-
tish Overseas Airways
) of
» IS expected to arrive in
d today accompanied by
- G. Granville, General
Traffic,

man of Bri

Corporation and a Director

Mr,
Manager, Sales and

‘C. Messrs. Booth and Gran-

| Ville left London on the 20th Feb-

ruary in a B.O.A.C. Argonaut
{which has been making a tour
of B.O.A.C.’s South America
routes,

Commander A.D.S. Mur-

tay, Managing Director of

B.W.LA., will meet them in

Caracas on the 9th March and ac-

rare them to Trinidad on the
h.

The Hon. H. A, Cuke, O.B.E,,
the Barbados member of the
B.W.I.A, Directorate, will arrive
from Barbados on Saturday, 11th
March. :

During their Stay in Trinidad
Booth and Mr. Granville will
1ave_ an opportunity of visiting
B.W.LA.’s new workshops at
Piarco and new offices av Airways
House iy Port-of-Spain. ,

A Directors’ Meeting under the
Chairmanship of Sir Errol dos
Santos will take place on Mon-
day, and the following Directors
will be present; —

Mr. J. W. Booth, The

Hon. Alan Storey, D.F.C.,

H. O. B. Wooding, K.C..
The Hon. H. A. Cuke,
O.B.E., Lt.-Cdr. A. D. S.
Murray.

The Chairman and Directors of
B.W.LA, will give a cocktail party
in honour of the guests at the
Country Club on Saturday, 11th,
and the Chairman will give a
lunch at the Union Club on Mon-
day, the 13th.

A Busy Day

To-day looks like being a busy
day for B.W.1.A. Besides the above,
the first of the three new Vickers
Vikings which were ordered re-
cently is expected to arrive. This
Viking left London on the 6tt
instant and is being flown across
the South Atlantic by Captain
W. A. Cash, and Captain P. Kel-
shall as Co-Pilot.

On the morning of the 14th Mr.
Booth and Mr, Granville, accom-
panied by the Managing Director,
will leave for Jamaica’ on
B.W.1LA.’s 391 service which flies
via Caracas and Curacao.

On the same day another Vick-
ers Viking will be making a good-
will and proving flight on one of
B.W.1.A.’s new routes which were

recently authorised by the Civil
Aeronautics Board of the United
States. On board this aireratt

will be B.W.I.A, and Government

officials, and calls will be made
at San Juan (Puerto Rico) and
Ciudad Trujillo (Dominican R2-

public) on the way to Miami. On
the return journey the airerait
Will‘probably fly by way of Kings-
ton and Port-au-Prince (Haiti),
and is due in Trinidad on the 19th
Commander Murray will probap-
ly join the aircraft at Kingston
on the return journey.
Mr Booth and Mr.
will leave Jamaica on
day, the 15th March, and wil!
return to England by way of
Nassau and the United States.
The Short Sealand amphibiar
“R.M.A, St. Vincent” recom-
menced trials and proving flights
on 8th March,

‘Lady Nelson”
Brings Flour

SEVEN hundred and fifty bag:
of Grade “E” flour were lancec
for Barbados from Halifax yes-
terday. This supply arrived by the
“Lady Nelson” which sailed into
Carlisle Bay at daybreak.

Granville
Wednes-



Neck bones, sausage binder
eggs, margarine wraps, machiner)
and bread pans were the othe
items arriving by this vesse:

from Halifax. From Boston an
the British Northern Islands came
advertising material, rubber belt-
ing, empty barrels, puncheon:
and hogsheads, two horses, plate

glass, tomatoes, eschalot anc
fresh fruit.

After taking passengers fol
ports on its voyage South, the

“Lady Nelson” left port las
night about 9 o'clock for St. Vin-
cent. Messrs Gardiner Austin &
Co., Ltd., are agents.

25 YEARS AGO
(“Barbados as” ong Mareh 10

925.
THE DISCOVERY OF INFANT,
DEAD BODY.

On Sunday morning the deac
body of a newly born babe wat
found on Long Bay Beach, St.
Philip. It was removed to the
mortuary at St. Philif’s Alms
house where an inquest was be-
gun and adjourned by Mr. H. S$
Thorne, Coroner of Distric’ C, anc
a jury. Dr. L. S. Tappin per-
formed the autopsy.



Local farmers are concentrating
They find a
| ready market for their products.
| ©abbages and tomatoes are to be
had in fair quantivies at 30 cents
| per pound. During the whole week
{the market sellers and those about
the alleys were getting quick sales
| to eager housewives who are mak~
ing much of the flow after vhe







ship» Mr. E. A. McLeod with|
stealing one bundle of shingles |
valued at $4.00, and the property |
of T. Geddes Grant, Ltd., on |
March 9 |
He was remanded unti! March |
16 and bail was offered in the |
sum of £20 i
eee Seances, : es






























arriving
morning by the “Custodian.”
brought
portland cemenv, pharmaceuticals,
motor cars, machinery, ovaltine,
barley water, tea, cocoa, nescafe
herrings, virol, pickles, cornflour
Vinegar and confectionery
rt agents are Messrs. DaCosta & Co
Cucumbers and seasoning are Ltd

‘wo of the month’s addition to the
sreens supply. There is a dearth
in green bananas. One seller told
that
gained from thea

The

A fine of £2°and 2s
paid in 14 days or one month’s im- |
prisonment
woman called Kathleen of Dean’: |
Village yesterday when she ap-
peared before His Worship
. A. Talma. ‘

She was found guilty of inflict- |
ing bodily
Cadogan on August 26.



stom London

“Custodian” also



£2 Fine For
Bodily Harm

was imposed on

harm on



Charged With

Theft: Remanded

Lionel Gibson, a
chaffeur, of Kew Road, was yes- |
terday charged before His Wor





CAVE

‘Custodian’ Brought
Whiskey, Wine

Whisky, beer, stout, gin and wine
were part of a shipment of cargo
yesterday

Local

costs to be

al
Mr

Madeline

21-year-old |



bee

PAGE FIVE’







When or expensive

REMEMBER

ORANGE & GRAPEFRUIT MARMALADES
sad

is scarce

butter

I nics since tt ne ee ot ats

GUAVA. JELMIMB 0 oe a: OP

PEANUT BUTTER 96 & 60

ee

SHEPHERD & CO. LID.

12 & 13 Broad Street



C. F. Harrison & Co.. (Bdos.) Ltd.

Have pleasure in

‘ ‘
SOLE
‘ 4 4

HUMBER CYCLES

For 70 years “HUMBER” Cycles have maintained their
Reputation for QUALITY and SERVICE and have been
ahead of all other makes in DESIGN, MATERIAL and

fi- i

The Accumulated Experience Gained by Generations of
Expert Cycle Craftsmen is Reflected in the Fine Models
Now Being Produced and so Highly is the “HUMBER”

Esteemed that it

gPROUDLY AND
“HUMBER”

THE ARISTOCRAT OF ALL CYCLES.

e Have Just

GENTS’ GREEN MODELS
(22 and 24 Inch FRAMES)

Complete with 3 Speed Gear, Lighting Set, Pump, Bell,
Tool Bag & Tools, Cycle Lock, Yellow Duster, Lubricating

The World's

Heady For The Road

Wwe =Fuil Range of Other Sizes and Models





Harrisons



ape AG
4 a 4

Announcing that they have been appointed

DISTRIBUTORS

OF THE WORLD FAMOUS

WORKMANSHIP.

is Privileged and Honoured to Carry the
ROYAL WARRANT.

By Appointment

: 4 Bicyele Manuf terera
to /1M. the King J

Humber Limited





JUSTLY THE MANUFACTURERS OF
CYCLES CLAIM THAT THEIRS IS

Received ...

Oil, Etc.



Vinest Cycle Fatly Equipped and

ONLY $77.49

Expected Shortly





FoR HHUMBERS



a tao teak ia a

ee ee eee





ea











Be She n>
page

ahaa

OR ci Et:





Oe siti , a,
cs IS NES a ee GE





PAGE SIX







BARBADOS ADVOCATE





FRIDAY, MARCH 10, ig P

Report Of Standing Closer Association Committee |

i “* @ from page 4
approval or confirmation of ter-
riteftial Governments,

“"—"" Two Classes

We Y€commend the adopiion of
aicthey Teature of the Australian
(and some other) Federal con-
stitdtidns, in that we suggest tha:
thé Subjects on which Federation
may legislate should be divides
info tivo classes — those on which
only the. Federation may legislate
(the “exclusive” list), and those
on which both the Federat'on and
the’ Constituent territories may
légisiaté; but where Federal law
will“ Yitomatically prevail (the
“concurrent” list). The former will
be short, and include only those
subjéefs' on which, under Federa-
tion, there can be no room for a
variation, and which are e¢ssential
to the existence of the Federation
as such,

The details of the lists whic
we propose are to be found in
paragraphs 6 and 7 of the Con-
solidated Recommendations (Ap-
pendix-.5). The lists are largely
self explanatory, and few detail
ed comments are requ'réd. It wil!
be seen that the main emphasi:
js ‘on external relations, of all
kinds; and matters connected
therewith-<¢.¢. the power to nego-
tiate trade agreements, ete., car-
ries with it the power to imple-
ment such agreements, We pro-
pose ulso that the Federat’on
should be empowered to deal with
communications( of all kinds) be-
tween the territories as well as
externally, but that it should be
concerned with purely internal
communications matters only in
so far as federal commitments in
respect of external or inter-terrj-
torial. communications make this
neerssary

It is perhaps more necess ary 95
comment on certain omissions, It
will "He seen that very im-
portant! have been exclud-
ed frem both lists, such as agri-
culfi¥e, “education, housing. and
the’ thaltntenance of public orde
The omment is that these
subjects have not excluded
simply iff order to leave some im-
port furictions to the territorial
sovernments, but because in our
view Jtts the ost efficient course
to Ga so, Taking first public order,
the -weight the ex}
othe, Federation
retaining the
and. order
polices force "
than .a,.“‘Federal”
in Great Britain
tary» state, fore ire
organised on and not a
central basis, the central
Government ¢ nake ts i
aid aud’) th and other 1
exercises food deul of influence
an pe This makes
promptit e jr tl i for the
close adaptation of polb
tion. tw cal {
in th region by fa
part or the ork of
is eéneerned with
ment of purely te
and ‘regulations, and it is conse-
quentls appronriat that they
shoult? be under local. control,
This dbes not mean that the Fed-
eral Governinent, could) not in the
coufse of time play a part in the
improvement
tion and
United Kingdom Horne
assist as regards training
these hing which
done. without suming control ot
the police forces, the responsi-
bility. for day to day main-
tenance order

Education and Agriculture

Similarly, education and agri-
culture-are both matter which
are -uppropriately left to local
rather then central responsibility,
since acricultural and educational
policies..require to be extremely
carefully adapted to local needs
and*eonditions if they are to be
successfull, It is for this reason

some
topi¢

first
Mrst ¢

beer



of erience

s on the side of
maintenance of law
the control of
a “state” rather
ect Even
hi t

an¢





a county

althoug}

for

and ae
Moreover,
the greate
police forces
the enforce-
ritorial law

of police organisa-

methods does th
Office—o
But

can ue

elk

aire

or

ol public





that'tiy many countries important
functions relating to education in
particular are delegated to quite
smal] local organs of government.

In relation to agriculture the ex-
periense-of Great Britain during
the war is instructive It was
essentiad-to get the last ounce of
production with the minimum of

expenditure of effort, manpowe!
and other resources. The broad
lines of policy had to be centrally
determined; but as a sheer mat-
ter of efficiency the detailed
application of policy to par-
ticulhy afeas, farms and = even
fields was delegated to County
Agricultural Committees. In our
view, ie responsibility for the
actual HHeation of agricultural
policy, fov the instruction of farm-
ers and the introduction artd, as
necessary, the enforcement of new
methods, conservation measures
etc., cannot properly be divorced
from territorial governments
Here again the Federal Govern-
ment niyay, without assuming
ultimate responsibility, play a

most lsefui part in the ean
of research, the collection an
dissemination of information and
the provision of specialist advice.

The above discussion leads to
a point of some general impor-
tance, which is that the activities
and value Federation need
not be, and normally are not,
limited to those fields in which
it can legislate and has, or_ can
assume, executive authority. As
fn agriculture, or police matters,
so in respect of education, market-

of a

ing, industrial and sejentifie
matters, social services and many
others. the Federation can ren-

der very Valuable advisory ser-
vices to-individuals and to terri

torial Governments. In this re-
spect it would be able to take
over the advisory functio:
hitherto discharged by the De-
velopment and Welfare Organi-
zation in Barbados, ar el
and add to them with all the
additional Sveight which attach-
meut Federal Government
coul t { £11 Such func
tion however require to
be ten.d Fe ral Consti
tution, sane t nv

the exer

powers hei

create ,.and té the neces-
sar fittes k
erat cou t

vi roa eri vovernment
the
tions “to Pirious Commonweall)
or irtern tt) ' )
the Cormnonwealth Agricultural
Bure x, which would be a
tir nistr onvenience
toa e!

it is hardly necessary to add
that the liste of functions given
in the Consolidated Recommenda-
tions are not to be regarded as
final. Experience will show in
vhat respects they may usefully

Le modifiec. We understand that
the usual trend is for functions
aradually to be’ added to the

Fereral Government, as the region
“grows together’ and it becomes
dear that additfonal functions
ean with advantage be entrusted
‘o the Federation. Apart from any
formal review, however, we con-
sider that the Constitution shoul:
provide for the assumption by the
Federation of additibnal func-
tions at any time, provided always
that both the Federal Legislature
and the territorial legislature or
legi-latures concerned agree. To
take a purely illustrative exam-
ple, it might be that one or two
ef the smaller territories wishes
the Feder*' Government to as-
cume control of soil erosion
versures. In that case, if the
Fe ‘eral Government felt able to
o so, the corrésponding power
could be madé over to the Fed-
erotion in respect of those terri-
tories but of no others. We have

wdinely made provision for
this contingency in item (xxxviii)
‘f paragraph 7 of the Consoli-
deted Recommendations.

inverual brinance

we have aireaay wucned on
ihancial matters in olmer con-
2 vernal tManciai structure of we
seueration snould pe devisea.

4S accepted as axiomatic that
aly Federal Government mus:
have its own direct sources wi
imance, ie, that it must not ae-
peod on contribuulons voted by
ine constituent territories fn.
would piace it in a position sub-
vluinale to we Governments of
those territories (in that funas
could be withheld), which would
make effective Federal govern-
ment impossible. Moreover it 1s
essential for the purpose of rais~

ing loans that the Federation
snould be able to do so on the
security of assets (revenues)

which it raises itself and which
are under its sole control.

it is further accepted that the
appropriate single source of Fed-
eral revenue should be the pro-
duct of the Customs. This is the
more appropriate in that the es-
ublishment of a Customs Union,
involving a Free Trade area, uni-
form tariffs, and a single customs

idministration, are the founda-
tion of a federal structure, par-
ticularly of one of whieh the
ehief functions will include re-
sponsibility for economie ard
commercial matters

The customs revenues of the
urea, comprising some 80° of the
total revenues, will for many
years greatly exceed the require-

nents of the Federal Government.
Moreover, the responsibilities of
the territorial Governments will
continue to be very considerable,
and their position would be im-
possible unless a yery substantial
vart of the customs revenues were
returned to them after collection
by a Federal customs administra-
tion. This problem is common to
most Federations, and methods of
dealing with it vary trom one
case to another, and from time
to time, as the relative responsi-
bilities of the Federal and terri-
torial Governments change and
develop. No single arrangement
ean be deemed to be permanent,
and the structure of federal finan-
ces must be subject to review
at intervals. But for an initial
period of 5 years we propose that
it be provided that, subject to
our recommendations regarding
postal revenue in paragraph 36
below, not less than 75% of the
customs revenues collected by the
Federation in respect of each
territory (net of the cost of col-
lection—i.e. of the maintenance
of the Customs Administration
itself) should be returned to the
territory from which it has been
derived. These grants, or, more
properly, refunds, should be auto-
matic and without condition or
implication’ of control on the part
of the Federal Government, any
more than other revenues directly
collected by the territorial Gov-
ernments themselves, They would
not require to be voted by the
Federal Legislature, which would
have disposed only of the
portion not exceeding 25%
served for it.

Postal Services

A further source of Federal
revenue which gives rise to special
problems, is that arising from the
federalisation of postal services.
Taking the region as a whole,
postal revenues and expenditure
approximately balance. But the
position varies from territory to
territory. In some of the larger
territories, postal services operate
at a loss and their deficits are a
charge on general revenues. In
some of the smaller territories and
dependencies, on the other hand,
the proceeds of stamp sales, large-
ly to philatelists, constitute an
important if somewhat hazardous
source of revenue. Merely to fed-
eralise postal services, without
making allowance for this fact,
would place these territories in
eonsiderable difficulties. We re-
commend therefore, that as from
the date on which the Federation
takes over postal administration
nd becomes entitled to revenpes
therefrom, there be paid to each
of such territories as make appli-
cation accordingly an annual sum
equivalent to their average annua)
1et receipts from stamp sales over
the preceding five years. The pro-
posed grants in lieu of postal pro-

pro-
re-

its, should, like those in lieu of
customs revenues, be automat
nd without any implication of
nancial control on the part of the
Yederal Government
Special attention is also re-
iired connection tt n
It will be open to the Federal Gov
ernment to raise loans for federal
purpose and Unit Government
ll continue equire loans
t a the
ge of their n responsibili

uld be free to float loans

> region as a whole. The

tion is different as regards ex-
which means in pr

ans raised « he Lo



that it can offer more substantial
credit, based on the customs
revenues of the region as a whole.
than can any single Unit Govern-
ment; and the Federal Govern-
ment can therefore hope to obtain
more favourable terms than car
individual territories. Moreover,
it will be in a position to issuc
larger, and consequently gore at-
tractive, loans. There’ is thus
every reason to provide that ali
external borrowing, whether for
Federal purposes or on behalf of
Unit_Governments, should be b
the Federal Government. By this
means also it is possible to avoid
cumbering the market with a mul-
tiplicity of small loans, and to
obtain for the Unit Governments
better terms than they could
obtain for themselves.
Strongly Advocate

This procedure, which we
strongly advocate, undoubtedly
means that the Federal Govern-
ment would exercise over the ex-
ternal loan policy of the territories
a much greater influence than it
will over their general finances,
since the Federal Government
could not be expected automati-
cally to Sponsor and take the re-
sponsibility for loans of the sounds
ness of which it was not con-

re-issue to such Governments and
to be supplemented as required
from Federal funds; that provis-
ion be made for financial agree-
ments between the Federation and
Unit Governments; and that Fed-
eral finances and financial rela-
tions with Unit Governments
should be subject to review after
five years.
Cardinal Importance

We now come to a topic of car-
dinal importance; one which has
involved us in prolonged discus-
sion, and which will certainly en-
gage the greatest attention in the
region. Our conclusions have to
some extent been adumbrated in
Chapter I of this Part. As there
indicated, the “ to day relations
of the region with His Majesty’s
Government are governed and de-
termined preponderantly by econ-
omics and finance. \

Until the economic situation of
the region materially improves, so
long will His Majesty’s Govern-
ment, in fact, though perhaps not
in law, have to stand behind the
region and be ready to render fin-
ancial assistance when required.
So long as His Majesty’s Govern-
ment is in the position of ultimate
guarantor it follows inescapably
that His Majesty’s Government

vineed. This is however a reason-* Will expect to exercise control in

able price to be paid for arrange-
ments designed to secure for the
region as a whole loans on the
best and least onerous terms, and
it does not in our view constitute
a a to which constitutional
objection can be taken.

We must now consider the
special problem of grant-aid. Sev-
eral territories are in receipt of
grants in afd of the ordinary cost
of administration. This position
will not be changed by the mere
act of Federation. In a fully inde-
pendent, financially self-support-
ing Federation, these charges
would fall to be met from Federal
funds. But, as we have shown in
Chapter 1 of this Part, the finan-
cial resources of the region are
not such as to enable them to sup-
port any serious deficits. It is
therefore necessary that, until that
time comes, special arrangements
should be made for the continu-
ance of grant-aid from United
Kingdom funds.

We consider, however that to
continue the system of direct
grants in aid from His Majesty’s
Government in the United King-
dom to the individual Unit Gov-
ernments concerned would seri-
ously inhibit the development of

financial responsibility and self-
reliance in the region. Since in
due course the territories must

look to the Federation, and not to
His Majesty’s Government, for
financial assistance when required,
the Federal Government must
learn to administer such assist-
ance, and the sooner a beginning
is made the better. We therefore
recommend that the principles
proposed at the St. Kitts Confer-
ence on a Windward-Leewards
Federation should apply to the
larger union, namely, that His
Majesty’s Government should
make to the Federal Government,
for a period of say ten years, an
annual grant equivalent to the
average amount actually issued by
way of grant-aid over the five
years preceding the establishment
of Federation. This grant would
be reserved solely for use as
srant-aid to Unit Governments to
enable them to meet essential
commitments, any balances being
kept in a special reserve fund for
this purpose.
A Corollary

A corollary would be that,
should the requirements of grant-
aid at any time exceed the amount
of this United Kingdom grant, and
of accumulated reserves, the ex-
cess would be sought in the first
instance from Federal revenues.
Under this arrangement, territor-
jes in need of grant-aid would
apply not to His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment but to the Federal Gov-
ernment, and such controls as
might be imposed in respect of
grant-aids would be imposed by
the Federal Government and not
by His Majesty’s Government. It
remains only to add that, should
the Federal revenues themselves
be insufficient to meet any excess
of grant-aid over the consolidated
annual grant from His Majesty's
Government, or be otherwise in-
sufficient to meet essential Federal
expenditure, the Federal Govern-
ment would itself have to apply
to His Majesty's Government for
assistance as do territorial Gov-
ernments at the present time.

It is evident that many matters
f financial detail will arise as be-
tween the Federation and Unit
Governments, and it is inappro-
priate to provide in detail in the
Constitution how these matters
should be regulated. We recom-
mend, however, that the Federal
Government should follow the
practice af negotiating financial
agreements with Unit Govern-
ments, covering all aspects of their
financial relationships, the first
such agreements to cover a period
of five years; and, further, that at
the end of that time there should
be an independent enquiry into
the whole question of the finances
of the Federation including finan-
cial relationships between the
Federation and the Units, By this
means any reasonable apprehen-
sions on the part of the Units
Should be allayed and, moreover,
there would be made available a
most invaluable indication of the
extent to which the region has
proceeded on the road to econo-
mic and financial stability.

To summarise the argument and
proposals in this Chapter, we en-
dorse the principle that the Fed-
eration should have its own source
of revenue in its sole control; that
this should in the first instance
consist of Customs revenues; that
not less than 75% of the net re-
ceipts from Customs revenues
should be returned automatically
to the territories in proportion to
the Units of final consumption of
the goods on whieh the import du-
ties were levied: that, as soon ag





the Federal Government assumes
control of postal services and r>-
venues, grants in lieu of postal
profits should for a period of five
years be made to those te :
which apply for them: th r€
Unit Governments should | free
to float loans within the region

Loar shoul be

Federal Goy

fl





ernment, whet! i its ow be

half or on behalf of Unit Gover
ments; that for an initial period
His Majesty's Government should
ike to the Federal Government
an annual grant in lieu of grant-
aid 1 Unit Governments. th
t to be employed solely for



some form over general economic
and financial policy. While that is
the case, the region cannot claim
to have attained full political in-
dependence. It is of the first im-
portance that the peoples of the
region shquld realize that, if they
are to be free to control their des-
tiny without, political supervision
on the part of His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment, they must be prepared
to conduct their economic and fin-
ancial affairs in such a way as to
reduce to a minimum the necess-
ity for applying to His Majesty’s
Government for financial aid.

While His Majesty’s Govern-
ment by virtue of its historical re-
lationship with the component
parts of the Commonwealth must
inevitably be regarded as ultimate
guarantor, it would be fatal to the
development of a proper sense of
responsibility for the Federation to
regard itself, or to permit itself to
be regarded, as being in a position
of daily reliance on His Majesty’s
Government in its financial and
economic affairs. In these cireum-
stances it is essential that the Fed-
eration must be afforded in fact as
well as in theory the fullest pos-
sigle measure of freedom in the
initiation and administration of its
financial and economic affairs.

While it is conceded that the
relationship between His Majes-
ty’s Government and the Federa-
tion must be influenced, more so
in the early stages, by the grants
in aid received by certain Uuits
through the Federal Governngent,
we are firmly convinced that a
viable federation—one acceptable
to the peoples of the region==pre-
supposes the power to ®xercise
their own initiative in financial
and economic matters. It is of
particular importance that if and
when controls are found to be un-
avoidable, such controls should be
so designed as to avoid making-the
economic interest of the region in
any way subservient to any ex=
ternal interests, Prevailing opin-
ion in the region appears to be
that the Federal constitution must
be so designed as to provide the
fullest possible stimulation of na-~
tive self-reliance in these matters
if there is to be federation in sub-
stance, and not in shadow. There
would be, we are convinced, the
strongest objection to any other
principle than that recommended
here.

Loans And Grants

The relationship of the Federa-
tion to His Majesty’s Government
in the latter's capacity as the
source of grant in aid pending the
attainment of a greater economic
stability in the region, is not to be
confused with that relationship
which arises in the case of loans.
Here again the development of a
true sense of responsibility indi-
cates the desirabilgy of the Fed-
eration resorting, when it must
and as far as possible to loans as
distinct from grants in aid. In
such cases the Federation must be
permitted to bargain for such loans
to b> made on the most favourab’.e
terms and subject only to such
control and regulation as is yor-
mally consistent with the pos}tion
of borrower and lender. In mo cir-
cumstances must the probable ne-
cessity for applications fo agsist-
ance in the form of loans be pre-
dicated on the basis of His Ma-
jesty’s Government having a gen-
eral and indeterminate contro!
over the «diay to day financial and
economic affairs of the region.

At this point we feel bound to
comment on a class of sugge:.ior
which has already been made in
public discussion, and which may
recur, It springs from (ne belief
that any degree of political in-
dependence presupposes complete
financial stability, and takes the
form that in order to start off the
Federation it would be necesvary
for His Majesty’s Government to
make a grant of very large pro-
portions—many millions of pounds
have been mentioned—to a new
Federal Government. The super-
ficial attractions of such a pro-
posal are evident. A very large
grant might serve to guarantee the
solvency of the region for a period
long enough to give it time so to
develop its own resources as to be
able to continue in volvency there-
after, We do not however recom-
mend any such scheme, for what
appears to us the overriding reas-
on that the availability of such a
grant would no. breed that spirit
of self-reliance and that deter-
mination to stand on our own feet
economically and financially which
are essential if we are to attain full
political independence. It is we
think a matter of human nature
generally, and not of Wet Indian
human nature only, that a grant
for which the Federation was not
accountable would not in fact be
spent to the best advantage, and
there would be a serious risk, if
hot a virtual certainty, that when
it was exhausted the region woul



find itself not with strengthened
productive and economic resources
but with heavily inereared e+
curring commitments, and sx €
further from. and not nearer
real ependence, W

clude the possit lit of a
assistance by way t capital g }
for epecific plrposes e.g. the :
setting up new Federal sdmir
trative headquarters, and c



over We assume the continuance of

the eligibility of the regior Oi
assistance under the Coloria
Development and Welfare A

But, subject to assistance of that
kind, we consider that the real
independence of the region will
only be won by its own efforts,
and founded upon resources there-
by built up. a

To sum up the argument of tiis
Chapter, the position of His
Majesty’s Government as ultimate
and formal guarantor is recog-

niged; that in relation to grant- representatives will, in short, re-

aid certain controls are inevitable;
that in relation to loans safeguards
may be imposed; that, neverthe-
less, there must be no direct and
general control of the economic
and financial affairs of the Feder-
ation. ’
Legislative Process

Under democratic procedure, the
legislative process consists in the
main of the adoption of bills by
deliberative assemblies, which be-
come law on receiving the assent
of the Head of the State. Accord-
ing to the practice of the British
Commonwealth this means assent
given by, or on behalf of, His
Majesty the King. Strictly speai-
ing, therefore, the term “Legisla-
ture” comprises the Head of vne
State, or, for our purposes, the
Crown as Well as the deliberative
part of the vtructure. We shall
however consider elsewhere in
greater detail the functions of the
Head of the State as head of the
Executive. Here we are concerned
only with his part in the making
of laws and more particularly with
the constitution and powers of
the deliberative part of the Leg-
ivlature; and for convenience in
this connection we shall use the
term “Legislature” to mean that

art .
r be am with the assumption,
which we need not debate, mt
the nderant voice in ie
Legidlaterd should be that of per-
rons elected by the people on
as wide a franchise as possible.
No other view is now possible, no
ether arrangement would win the
support of the peoples and legis-
latures of the territories, and no
other course would, we believe,
be to the satisfaction of His
Majesty’s Government. On_ this
point we believe that the policy of
Fis Majesty’s Government is above
party, and we see no risk of any

change. :
We proceed then to consider
various consequential questions

first; should the popular repre-
sontatives be directly elected by
tne peoples of the region or be
r2pregentatives selected by terri-
tovial legislatures? Secondly, what
should be the franchise for direct
vlection? Thirdly, should the Leg-
islature consist of one Chamber or
two? Fourthly, should the Levis-
lature include a _ non-elective
clement and, if so, where should
this element be placed? Other im-
portant questions remain to be
discussed, but we feel that the
-bove ghould be disposed of first.

First, whether the representa-
tives should be directly elected or
chosen by territorial legislatures.
We raise this point, not because
to our minds there is any difficulty
about it, but in order to make our
position quite clear. We have no
doubt whatsoever but that the
principle of direct election should
be followed. The world is not
without experience of other pro-
cedures, and it is safe to say that
an assembly consisting of the
nominees of other legislatures
cannot but remain subordinate to
those legislatures, which strikes
at the root of the federal principle.
Such representatives cannot but
be mere delegates, bound by man-
dates from their own legislatures
and under the necessity of seeking
instructions on all points of major
importance, and inhibited from ac-
quiring and acting upon a region-
«| sense which transcends the out-
look of any individual territory.
I! js not too much to say that a
Federation based on this principle
would be no Fedesation, but a
Confederation, or loose association
of states, hardly capable of devel-
oping a truly regional outlook, or
© prompt or consistent action.
l’istory shows many examples of
Confederation, hardly
wich has proved stable—either
they have fallen under the dom-
ir ation of the strongest member
and become in effect a unitary
site, or they have led forward to
1) ‘e Federation, or they have dis-
in'cgrated altogether. We regard it

a: essential therefore, that the
ular representatives in the
Lecislature should be _ directly

elected by the peoples of the
reyjpion,

Franchise
ccondly, franchise. Here again
w have no difficulty nor doubt.
¥ » consider that elections should
te by universal, adult suffrage. In
s( me quarters, we know, objections
are raised, but we consider that
they spring from unjustified fears
int from a fundamental lack of
‘aith in the political judgment of
ih peoples of the region. These
@orbts would, if carried to their
‘eg cal conclusion, inhibit the un-
le ‘aking of Federation, or any
ne tical advance at all. We do not
‘o\vtend that perfect wisdom re-
‘ides in the peoples of this (or
n other) region, nor that much
move political and general educa-
tie. is not desirable, nor that the
be ilnt-box cannot at times lead to
wre 4g conclusions. We do contend
how ever, that in the circumstances
of .1is region and this time, to the
ext nt that the elective principle
is mployed, it should be thorough-
%¢ 1g, and this can only mean the
ad» tion of univergal, adult suff-
ram,
To this we would only add onc
qualification, not as a matter of
prin ciple but as a matter of prac-
tical convenience. To arrange
elections on a basis of universal
id) dt suffrage require: legislation,
the. preparation oi" voters’ rolls, and
otaer administrative arrangements
Which cannot be done in a day
ind which can haraly precede the
anstitution of Federation. We re-
commend, therefore, that the first
elections under Federxtion sould
be held, so far as concerns fran-
hise, in accordance with the laws
revailing the tim@® in each
erritory, it being an injunction to
the Federation in. the Constitution
tself to provide tty legislation and
t wise for the immediate in-
troduction of universal adult 1

at







ige
We d® not propose at this po
to diseaiss in detail the question

f the numbers to be elected
how hose numbers hould
divide#i between the vitrious te:
tories. That sep.irat
with which we deal at length

ars graph 63 below. It is neces

nor



i a

ary

one of

- practice afford us a variety of ex-

t by
» ond Chamber

1 system at any rate to have

i riti is and
wever here to state that in our period, although criticism i
sare the numbers and their distri- proposals for change are seldom

. m .- e 3
bution should be related to popu- lacking for long. We have there Trinidad ls

i i tri best course is

lation—not mechanically or strict- fore felt that the

ly "(that, as we shall show later, to ¢ solely stg tg
is impracticable), but so that, ment would be in t - aoa ake 0 :
generally speaking, the larger pop- ests of this region, ee eae )
ulation groups shall have more each of the three ment , Fe deral -
_ The Executive
side in a Council

















elected representatives at any rate in its own setting,

numerous’
than the smaller. The elected stood the test of time.

Elective ek

resent the region as a whole, and We obviously rule out a -
os a single entity, thus reflecting tary Senate. The choice is only
one side of the federative principle. between the elective and nomina-

The representation in the Consti- tive principles. The prominent ex- tuvi of
tution oR the units as such—in ample of the United States, as a Cones avisoty to 4
order to reflect the other side of well as of other feder 8) tive and ap

ae tion
the federative principle—requires compels attention to the adop'

separate treatment as will be of the elective principle for the

shown, ydeccnnns ra “ae for zr ened bs

i Assembly. ere are, "

We aes een of certain important considerations,

some general and some of particu-
- eae eae we lar relevance to this region, which

. The Constitution a
; ent us from regarding the for a Council of State of A
oer ay eee bt With fatter as a foregone conclusion. ar oak $ _—
vist of one C or. r aca In the first place, as we have al- aan a Binning of each peo.
the exception of rep h ore Teady stated, we regard it as axio- ment the House
this problem gave us perhaps more ‘atic that the dominant element would elect one of 4
concern, and aroused more ite in the Legislature should be elec- tyhom the Governor General
cussion, than wie ea - ohm ad tive—that is to say, the House of : f State wipraint the Op
point with which we have fad Assembly. We shall later indicate th the style .
'o deal—as indeed its importance : detail how this position of Prime Minister. th Dot

wae ar oe we ep: = be ts anaet eg. in relation to Governor Genera}
a definite predisposition in favour

ing of expenditures, and seven other members ny
of a single none oe th caphetien of the Executive. aes nominated by 4
by the Caribbean detetand to-have For prisent purposes, it suffices to iniater 7
Fase ese ea rsa ccoretavy state the general principle. Tf that By this means 2 group ot ey
been favoured by the Secreray is so, it is important that there within the Couneil of 4

of State. The advantages o oe & It shall be no obscuration of this pid majority, will owe
Chamber are —r Coon vould dominance—ie, that one, and o ai on through the Prime ying
would be eo ag y a and a one, part of the Legislature shall Fee e. ve of the majority of
eee ee eee ee ohamber be able to speak with the partied e ‘deral. Asem 5 «ae
WY tye tena ee tent with la. weight and authority w oh overnor Genera):
would appear ss c ds We felt derive from popular election. empowered to tb 16
current political trends. idex why now the Senate were also * be s er ge of wh
obliged, however, = — sed elected by popular vote, and t! 4 fen three should be
practically no Gispense with 2 should be a divergence of view be- e remainder members
thought fit to ther elective, tween the Assembly and the rr Lewd ature,

bern me ggg Seer ene vGespitg ate, each could claim equally < roadly the
nominated or heredi ie ne it spoke with popular sane oe of State will constitute the’s
considerations of cost an ae Moreover it would be difficult, in forming instrument in the
We did not oe ourse oe such a situation, to place the Sen- tution. ms
bound to accept the se ate, as we shall propose, in a The establishment of a
simply because others had cut position of definite constitutional Service Commission,

80 atid we were quite eeipoeate Subordination to tHe sees: tc vhe Governor

for sufficient reasons, to a eee since the primacy accorded to commended. An indi An
that this region should break wit one, on grounds of popular elec- part of the Constitution
precedent, however well estab- tion, could hardly be denied to Federal Supreme Court conde.
erhataeie might be the situation Ge ee ey ae tee ee i

; ed. Nor do we consider it than three Judges,
in unitary states, one important as thet the two Houses

factor applicable to a Federal sjould be constitutionally equal,
Constitution soon presented itself, on the ground that they derive spective powers of the 4
It is of the essence of a Federation their authority from the same and the Senate, and to sig
that there shall be a balance, ,,5ular source. It is important providing that the
throughout its organisation, be- «1,44 the two Houses of a bicam- je nominated and not
tween unity and diversity; that the cral legislature should have some- Other and more
territories, merged for some pur- \ hat different functions and POW- reasons for ad the
poses, should retain their identities ers if they are not to be * ee tive principle for a
for others. Now a ne eee duplication of each other. ; I nape in thie region ae oa ral .
populations, would adequstely re. nqt@, eae Proper part 10, is true that in the oune
eet ane. Foaeratun ea single a way saeoanaee place the existence of Federation, ;
Salk but it would not reflect the a tier er Be pattern, and Of a career in Federal politics a
fact that the cons.ituent territories there should be no doubt, on any ditional to that in term
enter upon Federation as equals. ground which is the dominant politics, may well ina
Moreover, it is not apparent hew hartner, For these reasons, which numbers of experienced p
this could be done while retaining we believe to be of general appli- But that time has yet to
the unicameral principle, To pro- sation, we have come to the con- and for the present ang for th
vide that territorial legislatures ¢jysion that, in, recagnition of its first years of Fed ’
should select members to represent g\hordinate though nonetheless been and will be the general 1
their point of view, additional to jmportant role in the legislature, of political advance that the
poe eee elected, anes xe. the Senate shoul be nominated piy of experienced public meni
introduce e “confederative” and not elected. likely to
principle, the objections to which Before we proceed ee aie the a ae emphasize that
we. have already Stated in para- eyssion of, more particular ao, speak of experience and not
graph 49 of this Chapter. We re- ons for this view, two possi le “ability, as to which we have:
ject the, idea oe seniels ee vomments on the general ne qualms, We think it wise,
mince the expedient ‘et mixing 1°, Tuell be, dealt Wit ore, soo desig te Olle
nominated and elected members in ‘t May be asked, ee & Senate tion that we do not ex
a single legislative body is not 2Pé of the functions of the Sener, this form of publle serv
viewed with favour and is on the ‘® ‘@ reflect the constituent units 4 might not otherwise be: a
' as equals, it cannot be composed apie, We do not hold that

whole on the way out. Whatever sf
may be the reasons for adhering of members elected by the variouS gich as can

it where it already exists, we -Crritorial legislatures, thu also gjection are fitted to makea is
A be reason for introducing it preserving the elective principle j,+i¥. contribution to the
into an entirely new Constitution. in all branches of the Federal with those who hold
We were led therefore to the Legislature. As to the latter point, ajoo¢ from polities for
conclusion vhat, as in other Feder- we have already indicated that 0N 6. snobbish reasons we
ations, there is no option but to general grounds we feel that the sympathy; but. there are
set up a separate Second Chamber House of Assembly should be the men of good and v.
if only that these may be ade- sole expression of the elective ence, not by any means ¢

in Great Britain the

ter and other members
Cabinev are appointed 4
advise His Ma the Ki






















































































wey

Ais Be

=

a

quately reflecte? and represented principle. We have also in othet one Slass of society, who are hei:
the equality of the constituent connections (see paragraph 49) pack by feelings of n
Other Reasons sistent with true Federation, any their contribution uninvited,
That there are other, and good, system whereby the Federal leg- Secondary Place
chief one, as the experience of it derives its authority, from g¢rom the fact that, under our pi
other countries, including many ferritorial legislatures, Provision posals, the Senate will d
shows, is that there is an abiding reflection of the equality of the jeg: : 0
: ee 1 legislative process. Its power!
need in any legislature, however units and we shall put forward selation 10 Ananane
cess. This does not imply any : Faded
1 . election of Senators by territorial wers will be révisionaty
lack of faith in an elective as- legislatures is not one of them. pe only, and in the.
stituted on some other principle. E : r
Discussion of this point is often, ore serious. In rejecting the ment, the views of the Howe
we consider, needlessly clouded by ¢lective principle for the Senate, Assembly will prevail. Thed
tutions the Chamber deemed orig- to reject a_principle embodied in from among its ranks.
inative is elective, whereas the the constffutfon of the United fore unlikely that an
n 1 politician
nominated (as in Canada) or her- appealed to history, and undoubt- seek election to the Senate
editary (as in Great Britain). This edly the conspicuous precedent of
f : is not to the House of
easily work both ways—legislation lightly to be set aside, Nor do we
introduced in the “second” Cham- cet it aside lightly, ’ . these circumeainan
5 : an
revised during its subsequent pas~ * States, for example, be
sage through he first. Any single But we make the following ob- Senate would run the ‘
capable at times of hasty decisions; United States constitution, in this To summarise our
and constitutional history clearly as in many other respects, is now far, we omn
further scrutiny and review. We stitutions in the world and, while of two Chambers, a |
dislike and eschew such terms as the fact that it has remained in this Assembly, w
their connotations of superiori’y commands respect, it does date the dominant partner in
and the reverse, The proper dis- from a period since when constitu- lature, and a '
“originative” and “revisionary”, as_, A con n gre
indicating the normal functions of ae emuch expetience has been _ We must now of the resp
. i ¥
legislature although, ag we have V©™ture, with great respect, to sug- Chambers, the numbers
suggested above, we would not $¢st that experience has shown sentatives from each in
or second chamber for the first ‘ion is at times liable to just those the mode of
consideration of a proposal, when ‘ifficulties which we earlier sug- the respective
vy
cumstances of the case make it element in the Constitution can the Head of the *
expedient to do so, claim to enjoy a popular mandate, cess of leg! the Hot (AY
entire legislature should be elec- the House of Representatives and sembly, we had of .
tive, or whether any other prin- the Senate, but also the Chief Cevising as the same
That Means for our purposes claim, and there i adequately reflects the. Te
| ; aim, here je in fact no clear quat ’
whether there should be a nomin- supremacy of one branch of the DOpulation of the
dicated that in a bicameral legis- a : overweight a a 1”
lature the “originative” and dom. quently, political struggles in that —a in relation to r
henceforth call the House of As- ©f the nature of a battle of equals, obvious that to allot seats Sf
sembly—should be directly elect- @!! able with equal apparent in accordance ne
that it should include members Voice of the people. We cannot tory, Jamaica, halt of the
chosen by any other method, but believe that the adoption of membership, and
pointment by territorial legisla- for deadlock and delay, and mav of that one territory,
tures. It is therefore necessary to tend to give rise to intricate operation of only one o&
bers of the second or revisionary nq a way o ce bly. We fe ti
: a : : ’ ¥ out of the impasses so the Assembly p
cnamber—which we suggest be created, particularly in a region that in practice
sinted 2 istory a ; 9 i
pointe Here history and current perience of the United States in the repent
amples—in Great Britain, a main- °°4!ing with such difficulties, For 'e'ritor:
ol
the United States an elective Sen- S@¢ the popular mandate clearly sider it more pro
1 emer
Each of these three Pe branch of the Legislature. and cut aeross terrilot
democratic states appears to be one only, and that that branch Nevertheless, even to b¢
e On Page *

units. considered and rejected, as incon- genuine diffidence from
reasons we are fully satisfied. The jislative structure or any purt ol A further consideration
mature in political experience, has, it is true, to be made for the have ‘a secondary place in
constituted, for a revisionary pro- proposals to this end. But the ly limited, In other |
bl. - ;
sem ly as compared with one con The other possible comment is resort, in the event of
,
the fact that under many Consti- we have taken it upon ourselves Minister will never is
Chamber deemed revisionary is States, We have from time to time and ambitious y
chance of
process however can and does as the United States Senate att be ane
i ft greatly from those of the Ua
ber may often be advantageously One Of The Oldest
chamber, however constituted, is ®@rvations. In the first place, the coming a very
demonstrates the necessity for one of the oldest important con- Federal Legislature
“Upper” and “Lower” House, with respect unchanged undoubtedly of universal adult suffrage?
tinction is to our mind as between tional ideas have greatly developed wholly of no
the two chambers of a bicameral gained. As a matter of practice, we detail the size 4
rule out the use of the revision ‘hat the United States constitu- qualifications,
of fhe
the state of business and the cir- gested will arise if more than one Chambers and
We next consider whether the In the United States, not only Taking first :
ciple should be included as well. Executive himself, can make this Of seats which
ated element. We have already in- Legislature over another. Con >. tories, is not too large
inant chamber—which we may COUntry appear to us often to be mo take the last
ed; and we have rejected the idea justice to claim to speak with the would involve gi
whether by nomination, or by ap» Such system must at times make possibility that the ne |
consider on what basis the mem- political subterfuges in order to tepresentatives, could
sty lec e Senate— bs ‘ae ne it i
yled the Senate—should be ap which has not had the long ex- teal, in that it pate of any ®
t be oak
. ‘ te
} d invariably ,
hereditary House of Lords, in Purposes we would prefer to Cote ae a sine nierk.
Â¥ d> bable
ate, in Canada a nominated Sec- 8%d indubitably concentrated in divisions wil “ame
the
sufficiently satisfied with its own’ should be constitutionally domin- of such a possibility is

, e left it ant. This we propose to ensure
n being for some considerable in detail in déaling with the re-



sy, MARCH 10, 1950

a er gO
| Report Of Standing Closer Association Committee :

@ From Page 6 the Head of the State in hi









ty +s i S capa- authority being the Gover of terest. The 7 . ; ; i , ; ; - , : . ini . ,

city as representatiy : y & the Governor of terest. The ultimate control of Minister himself, then their prim- should have an overriding tion 76 of the Commonwealth remaining the responsibility of
; agreed therefore that Majesty the King trocact His the Leeward Islands. We had Government by the electorate is, ary loyalty is not to him but to power to legislate (vide of Australia Constitution con- unit Governments might, wheeled
i 200 its, while rightly re- asvsame that he will receine’ We the advantage of discussion with according to British practice and the Assembly. This system can Chapter 5, paragraph 76). stitutes a useful precedent not, be unified, as may be decide
e ge representation structions in the sense a ‘n- observers from these territories, Xperience, best preserved by the lead, and has in some constitu- This is necessary to ensu for consideration:— in each case. The establishment
es one should not do-so commendation of th: - the re- in the course of which we learned “Vice of ensuring that the Legis- tions led, to a most undesirable to His Majesty in Council “16. The Parliament may % Federation does not automatic-
f p be Srportion to their popu- Royal Commission (Cma. —— that the Turks and Caicos Islands ‘ture in effect chooses, and can lack of effective unanimity in the the power to make his legis- make laws conferring original ally bring about the unification of
oer jn a diminishing pro- p. 449, para. 56 (a), relating tg “Te Not only. content with, but change by withholding support Executive, which of all things im- lative function effective. jurisdiction on the High Court S@rvices, nor need ‘t affect the

appointments to Executive wey to anxious to retain, their present {70â„¢, a preponderant element in pedes efficient government. It is (b) Certain other functions




















’ pus 1 € . , in any matter — those awho ectly
other end of the ils. N- association with i the Executive itself. In Great still open to a Minister, should he which are listed in Note A i - en an n ‘
ate — “to the conclusion We recommend that would be satisfied array a Britain, the Executive is His find himself at variance with his at tne end of the Consoli- Ci) a under ae. Con- by the Federal Gov E
- “minimum number of shali-be appointed for one sented in a Federation through of tne is es Minister wae Seine fan ie page oon tine - interpretation; Cat federal” = > sain be
9s from each po ; fei a -_- Of the King’s Ministers, who de- poin ew to the Assembly. A dix 5. Th ii , idera’ beneficial. a
raid a ares aibtne to ad an — eligi a at a hepa ee ae ae executive authority Should it there find sufficient — pe ma of these Sees (i) —~. mone tie ee pee —_ = jal, as we
Snes tor aitiry tens or re- , it would from His Majesty as Head of thé the Assembly is i ‘ ised i 4) ee ee tia i dies.
poviso that W ae Than eae = intment; but that the first b€ acceptable to arrange for direct State and not from the Legislature. virtually to compel soe daemon, Pry sy tata (til) of Admiralty and mari- Publie Service
i? er should be one. Pedieat’ co uttpainted under the administrative attachment to the But the Legislature can and changes in the policy or composi- General are discussed else- time jurisdiction; We have pointed out above that
et difficulty was. ex- appointed in Sane teu i ‘ion, ieee —— ee Soll arn = ed > ee terval oe caste tas, eee oe abeieninine sinanoe aie er to appoint, promot
est diffi! Se years, tion, ie, © Governor-Gen- Policy of the Government parth subject-matter claimed power to appoint, promote, dis-
Metion for the inter- We recotmmerid that the Const. Stal, should in respect of the Virtue of its power to pass State Council deelt with; in other cance under the laws of ier Sibling and equlate the beep
ritories; and in fixing tution should provide th onsti- British Virgin Islands take the °F refuse bills to carry out Six seats remain to be filled in the context of the Consoli- ent States.” the public service should with
Wye found it necessary to Senate shall elect its own pren® Plaee of the Governor of the that policy, and particularly @ State Council of fourteen. It dated Recommendations Within the field of original the Governor-General. 18 tat 5
r ount not numbers dent and Vice-Pr ident Presi- Leeward Islands in regard to all DY its power to vote or withhold may be that in its initial stage makes detailed explanation jurisdiction as described in ia pun ee
: oe EN galecp einer eli a meiees ot from matters with which the latter at peg bog ws use of & is ey 7 have _ = at this point unnecessary. graph 4 above, the Federal legis. — ncelebemateL by. be
, bu. -oductivity, fin- We . relies : ers, the ature can elemen' e Council tate. ould’ Vernon: a
I ay oa a athe at sana "peoalve tips ae Tomseoes the Brien. Virgin “Telands oe ensure that the policy and prac- But we consider that in the Fed- Federal Public Service Gecnek of Si cegeeancan amisted | in the” disaineas. Of | ihe
sta time recognising that and other emoluments ae the — anxious that some member of the tice of the Government is under efal constitution a stage has been powers over the public service,

: ees nd its Own: gen ; reachedl : There is . ; of Australia Constitution) have best isions
spfeatures might change from bers of the House of Assembly Senate should be charged with the however errself senate," aaa be given ns the view that officials we recommend, a reserve or dis: power to male laws — may be taken. on’ =

nay s tha cua eee S : : . may be taken on service, matters
MEE Tocation of seats {cc Presiicnts. ipove); and that Guty of looking after British responsibility for more than the must properly be regarded as the cTetionary power which does nat (i) defining the jurisdiction (which are. often exe
sed a ee ie enna oe arsy envs salary should be Virgin Islands interests, and that nature and composition of the servants ¢f the Executive, and not fall within the above categories— of any federal court complex and technical) but also in
epee Gathematical formu- setae ere per annum to- these should be the responsibility Government. This does not mean members of it. An official ele- namely in respect of the federal other than the Federal order that members of the service,
jeated omg opulation figures, aoe with a duty allowance of Of some secretary in the Federal that the Legislature may not ques- ment should be included only in public service. Its inclusion among Supreme Court; and the public, may be
? it epee that: the allo- ite’n hyd annum, As in the case Administration; that the British tion and discuss the detailed acts So far as it may be required to the reserve powers constitutes (ii) defining the extent to that such decisions are taken in
mot holly satisfactory, but soaaiaia ae We do not pro- Virgin Islands should be able to Of Government. Such question- assist the Council in the discharge simply a convenient way of adapt- which the jurisdiction of the light of disinterested advice.
B vate the result of much a oa © actual figures should look to the Federal Government ings constitute a large proportion of its responsibilities, and not on ing to the constitutional cireum- any federal court shall For these reasons, we cordially
my reht, and anxious de- a ee hey anns Constitution, for outside technical assistance as of the work of the Parliament of any assumption that’ official con- stances of the region the well- be exclusive of that SUpport the recommendation of
ce cx Ethet frorn tiie i at they should be left for they to-day look to the Leeward “teat Britain, and Governments trol of policy is required. An established and extremely imrort- which belongs to or is the Holmes Commission that there
pwe rae the framers of ‘© Federal legislation. Islands Federal Government; that ‘ Practice show themselves most example of the kind of assistance ant British practice of keeping the vested in the courts of Should be established for this re-

Federal constitutions, not Respective Powers the British Virgin Islands should sensitive to the views of the Leg- required is that of a Law Officer. day-to-day management of the the units: gion a Public Service Commission;





f Seen. ae : islature in such matters in view We do not however consider it affairs of the public servi ii i and we have in the Consolidated
of ne 4 i ag We now come to the important aoe & be served by the of their dependence on the Leg- to be necessary to specify which becoming a maha of Samia cane (iit) Vesting ‘any court 8 Recommendations, set out in de-

d eda ets as follows : AweStion of the respective powers : me Court of the Windward jsiature for their continued exist- Officials should be appointed to troversy, By this we do not mean unit with federal juris- tail our pr oposals as to the form
allocation is as f “S* of the Assembly and the Senate pes Leeward Islands or by any ence. In brief, the Legislature the Council of State, and in our that the Legislature shall have no sap ection. in which provision should be
pais 6 in relation to legislation. The nor- Ot#€? Court which may be created can throw out’ the Government, view it will suffice to provide only say in the size organisation, emolu- Notwithstanding our recom- made in a federal constitution. A
pGuiana 2 mal practice is that all legislation t© Serve that region; and that the whereupon another emerges which . that not more than three officials ments ete,, of the public service— endation that the existing Presi- Public Service Commission, desir-

h Honduras 1g Shall require the assent of both Present arrangements should con- can count upon the support of the shall be appointed. it will in fact have complete gen- “encies of the Leeward Islands able in respect of unification, is in

Chambers before submission to the tinue as regards the circulation Legislature or, if that proves im- PES Ay
Head of the State, But to ensure Of U.S. currency in the British possible, fresh elecflons can be _,“ corollary of such limitation
the primacy of the House of As- Virgin Islands. We gathered from held at any time to obtain a clear Of Official representation on the fnoe has shown that it is essential the Federation as separate units, _We recommend, further, that
sembly, and in accordance with the Cayman Islands observers that expression of the views of the — of State is that, unless the in the interests of efficient admin- We recommend that it would be Under federation the Public Ser-
current British constitutional prac- the legislative body of that De- ©lectorate on current major issues. al tater er assume certain istration that the individual civil advisable to keep in existence the Vice Commission should be set up
tiee, we consider that the constitu- pendency were unanimousiy of We consider that, for the pres- SI jonaibiliti See eee ae should not be subject to Supreme Court of the Windward ®t 4 very early date, in order that
tion should provide the opinion that Federation would’ ®t Purposes of this region, the on ot ble an, ——_ and almost Girect political influence, and that and Leeward Islands, or to create otk may begin at once on the
(a) that Money Bills (that is, only be acceptable if arrange- ©*@cutive power should reside in Pportable burden will fall his work should not be the subject- some similar Court to serve as a 8bStruse and technical matters

; i = Upon officials in the Council since 43 1 =
ortly, Bills ' aye me a Fay Primsnannee they would be required to ex. Matter of political controversy, Supreme Court for those terri- eee ee yt eos
only clauses dealing with Islands to be directly represented eral as Head of the Executive and Plain the departmental views on [Corrupt and efficient service is tories. federal responsibility. Wh
taxation or the expenditure in the Federal Legislature. Taking appointed by him, just as in Great Tange of topics wider than it is CMY Possible when the civil ser- We recommend that the salaries service is federalised, abated
of public money) may only the last point first, while we have Britain the Prime Minister ang ‘easonable for one or two men Vice Knows that loyal and honest of the Chief Justice and other problems of some delicacy and
fen Feet _ be House of every sympathy with the point other members of the Cabinet are !0 be able to master in addition Tall het be b melltea by gf today Judges" of the Federal Supreme difficulty will speedily arise. The
ds the qualifications of the Government, 40” Of of view expressed, we felt bound appointed by and advise His © their substantive duties. It Wi eat Of fomanised by the 60v- Court should be of the order of problem will not be difficult in
ards qual yovernment; to conclude that the provisions Majesty the King. Such appoint- Would in our view be more con- ¢mment of tomorrow, It is essen- £3,500 per annum for the Chief

eral control of all these through its Colony, and the Colonies of the our view essential under feder-

eyends power of the purse—but experi- Windward Islands should enter ation.

Nr



























shortly, Bills containing ments were made for the Cayman

| wenn







we inc at first to (b) that the Senate’s powers in . : sonant with the develo tial to keep the civil service out of , relation to new entrants, who will

new that, as he GOES as relation to Money Bills ieee thane te nantes x a by 6 Se eee responsible government Tae politics, and politics out of the Pig Al) det linn et od ont Sites tilored te cee jhe
prrnchise, SO in this case should be very strictly lim- hi . ; : . beolut ete bers of the Cabinet group were to °iVil service. For these reasons we : : — lidi : ’ .
miveations for the first election ited. in ee So eee th ata staal’ f te atasame allotted the responsibility for 8%e proposing elsewhere in this the age of retirement for Judges cluding particularly the liability +4
ai be those obtaining at that (c) that the certification that a of the Federal Legislature should than in actual, a&t His Majesty e. haadline. in the Council of Report the establishment of a (including the Chief Justice) to be posted anywhere in the re~ yi
f the units, leavin Nir dae il (in Be, allotted to the Turks and appoints the Ministers who form si issi -e- Should either be higher than for 8ion: but special provision will 4
neach of t rca: hekaadh Bill is a Money Bill (in Cai Island h 5 the British Cabinet otherwise than SUCh departmental matters as Public Service Commission, re- h : ic Tequire to be made for officers al- ‘|
Federal Legislature itselt accordance with a definition ~@!C0S fsiands, the Cayman in accordance with well defined Might be expedient from time to SPonsible to the Governor-General, ther members of the public f

Seqently to enact uniform to be included in the Con- Islands, or the British Virgin should be Teady in services to be federalised.

nee >» thi i i i » Servi t least
Rees rei ie ; } constitutional 6 He . time. They would by this means to advise him on questions of entry, Service or a 3 . annot eq be m8
on on this point. We lates stitution) shall be a matter Islands. After careful considera- meal Te ee eee es also be the batter able to put Promotions and discipline, and that capable of extension in suitable omupcee in aeetiaet wits of }
sd_a proposal that in re- for the Speaker of the House tion of the position, we have come Federal constitution which re- forward in the Legislature the certain limits be placed on the cas@s, so as to attract to those ie

service, and certain options must ie
be available to them, The prob- ut
lem is ee 2 = ee in =

. case of the unification of a service
The Public Service (cf, paragraph 36 of the Holmes
in relation to this Report). It is not within our com-
matter is much simplified by the Petence to recommend in detail

wot the first and any subse- of Assembly, after consult- to the conclusion that the best quires to be embodied*in a writ- Policies with the framing of which matter of legislation affecting the appointments outstanding senior
4 s, a candidate en- ation with a Law Officer; interest of the dependencies would ten document, we propose that they had already been associated public service. It may be pointed practitioners.
r election in any — (dq) that in the case of Bills be served if the Turks and Caicos the inode of choice of the mem- ‘—a duty which would otherwise out that this provision corresponds
ul should ipso - vo ey other than Money Bills, the Islands, and the Cayman Islands pers of the Council of State should ‘end to be too greatly concentrated to the practice of Great Britain

Bio stand in any other, On Senate shall have a delaying like the British Virgin Islands pe clearly set forth in the Con- 0m the Prime Minister. We there- although there, in the absence of a Our task

. oes oe oe? power of twelve months were to be transferred to stitution itself, and that it should fore provide in our detailed re- written constitution, formal pro-









: act al , only. the administrative responsibility provide for a majority of mem- commendations, for the develop- vision to this effect is not to be ilabili what form the conditions of trans- ;
of ere Sy ol in _, Except as otherwise provided, it of the Gioveenar-Clenpral, in which bers who depend os their author- ment of a Ministerial system, found. Unification aan ne ee fer should take, and this can best et |
tet n the Con. Should be permissible for any case we have no doubt that suit- ity on the will of the House of without recommending _ rigidly The Judicature under the Chairmanship of Sir be dealt with by a Public Service aid
self for the qualifiea. measure, whether private or Gov- able administrative provision could Assembly as the elective and pre- Precisely how this should come ’ Maurice Holmes. F On .. Commission, +h
eo, ns of ¢rnmentally-sponsored, to be in- be made in respect of the points Ponderant branch of the Legisla- about. We recommend, as an indispens- r eo or the pur We wish to make it clear that F FH
Sand ye 4 iy iy troduced for the first time in either raised by the observer from fhe ture. There remain three seats to be able part of a federal constitution, poses of this Part of Our OWN we do not regard the federal and igi
Ss: an ras ev licceed- Chamber as convenience may dic- British Virgin Islands, and for any Council of State filled. These we consider should a Federal Supreme Court consist- ee eo hotar vom, Par the remaining local services as
Mi, Our detailed pro- tate. Gur detailed proposals are set other similar matters. We put To discharge this function, we » left to the discretion of the ing of a Chief Justice and not less acne: to Chapter V_ of the peing in any way watertight com-
Mothis end are to be found Ut in Appendix 5, paragraphs 36 ji. recommendation forward, Tecommend, therefore, that the Governor-General. subject to the than three other judges. The de- Holmes Report, regarding the partments, and we anticipate there

d ; . ; : ie
‘ { ¢ Yds Gants proviso that his choice should be tails of our proposals as to mode Public Service Commission, and will be no bar to transfer between
feeling that despite their existing Geen ae a Nie ad restricted to the members of one of appointment, tenure and other Chapter VI, which discusses from them, when it is in the interests

aphs 21, 22 and 23 of the to 39.
i expression of views the legislative members, composed as follows. OF Other Chamber of the Legisla- matters are set out in the Consoli- the point of view of the Holmes of the public service and of the

i Fecommendations Assent to Bilis
5). . Briefly, and in The last stage in the legis‘ative

i , ; = body of the Cayman Islands may . ture. We consider that there is dated Recommendations (Appen- i i
mywith our sroncsel, then ereecee _ We uranine, = omens Gia to revise Theis opinien, Ghes a ae of nee aa good reason for retaining at this dix 5) paragraphs he ppe ae i ee of pk i e La 7
u Bay. S50. ae ee i ae en oaks Peaeiens 9 they have had an opportunity of should elect one of their number Stage provision for an unofficial It will be observed that the de- Owing to the sibility of mis- other reasons we foresee that the
Musider that qualifications aitierweied: constitutionally appro- Studying the matter afresh in the whom the Governor-General must eee tere ooo pa ao rencoumandatens ure... understanding in the matter, we Public Service oe in
ist of British citizen- priate for such assent. This wil] Ught of this Report as a whole, thereupon appoint to the Council » Pp e lat, as we complete in several respects. The wish to point out the clear dis- addition to serving the n of
en i piel, gy and that the people of the Turks of State with the style and powers &Ve proposed, the majority there- constitution and operation of a tinction between “federalifation” the federal public service, may
mge and residence qualifica~ be the duty of the Head of the ° & Didets. teleedn-tany -saediovin ca Eten ae ey = oe in reflects the will of the majority system of courts, particularly simi’ scnin tion.” A fed lieed usefully also be available, in the
aly; and that property or State, in accordance with common 8n@ te ' Se ee "are a the Gh a Ge: on h lq in the House of Assembly. In the where a federal system, is to be poe ; hag 2 7 re h Mae ae a {Manner proposed by the Holmes
eo ae ee ne ane My omit te oe oS eed ae et esa naeoiee aah ction, ene hace early stages of a new Federation, superimposed on “a number of ee i ledevel guoweneomat whe Commission, to assist Unit Gov-
House of Assembly should Scared tt caaee thar "to with. informed by the observer from bers of the Legislature, nominated there will be an urgent need for existing systems, is a highly duties of which Conciet nh mime ernments regarding non-federal-

the continuity of experience, and cornplicated and technical subject istering federal functions, A ised services. By this means we

owered to elect its OWN hold assent from any Bill, but that the Turks and»Caicos Islands that by the Prime Minister. By this this will be facilitated by provid-


























































; : i ithi iri f f existi i servi -t that a salutor ifying in-. rf
whether or not from its jn respect only of defined categor- this would not accord with the Means, a group of eight within the ing that in the Council of State san De care maaan ae h isting unified service, on the other hand, po ill be ry uae no 11%
, : ; 2 : i Council of fourteen, a clear ma- ware systems, We have had neither the js a service the members of fluence wi exer’ ough '
; bership, an alsO @ jes of Bills he should have discre- wishes of the people of these ¢ ear A aie their position there may be an element which is tinje nor the equipment to mak@ which are employed b different the region and throughout all Bay ah
mepeaker and Chairman of tion to reserve such Bills for the Islands; and we recommend that tpeesinhe the Prime Minister, to "0t liable to change in accordance such a study. Although, therefore, Governments, but wheh consti- Services, which cannot fail to be igi
; ae who | Sous, Newer signification of His Majesty’s if, after further consideration, they the will of the majority of the with political developments in the we feel thac our recommendations tutes a single service for career of general benefit by enhancing Hy
ine r of the Assembly. pleasure (see Consolidated Recom- adhere to their desire to retain Federal Assembly. The Governor- House of Assembly (which may in embody the main principles which purposes, the officers concerned the attractiveness of the public ay
Meonsider that members of â„¢endations, Appendix 5, para- their present relationship with General should be empowered to the ae be ag fre- it is desirable to follow in setting being liable to transfer from one Service and making it easier to apc
y should be graph 40). Jamaica, then their wishes should appoint up to six other members, gue . . is. Rene Se od — up a system of federal courts, we administration to another, and the Place officers in the posts for te
to the fact Having regard to the inescapable be acceded to. We have not of whom not more then three eee e be e etna om jal realise that when the actual draft- terms of service of which have to Which they are best suited. ; ne
equire thei” yesponsibilities of His Majesty’s thought it necessary to write into should be officials, and the re- ee road = ae can Dring be ago ing of the federal constitution is a greater or lesser extent been Title And Seat of Capital ik
their homes and Government arising out of prob- our Consolidated Recommenda- mainder members of the Legisla- ae ° ath pa he oem ort Ee reached the detailed provisions of made uniform throughout the re- | We recommend that the name *
avoeations for perhaps jems of defenge, international tions detailed provisions to give ture: but should he so appoint less ° fe e ait a 4 ole , itr te Y our recommendations may require gion. Only those services will be of the Federation should be “The a
ai periods of time, and. yejations and ultimate fimancias effect to our recommendations in than six, the Prime Minister pe Ras ~ “i panning nd modification and amplification, “federalised” whose functions are British Caribbean Federation”, iad
Morder that lack of means gtability of the Federation in its this matter, but our proposals as should have the right to nominate ° whe wh As on passes, anc’ Subject to this our proposals are taken over by the Federal Gov- and that the seat of government of vy
metbe a bar to this kind of (ternal relationynips, it has been a whole should be read as assum- for appointment “ — = ay aaa cee. toe Ge as follow:— ernment and whose members are the Federation should be in Trini- +a
mervice, In our view, the 4, ~egss rovide that, j that the Turks and Caicos sons (being members of the ; At as ree a .. employed by the Federal Gov- dad. il
fpauld be of the order of ie eatin pastas “defined cir- Shake: and the Cayman Islands Legislature) as may be ee of State . ae aa poor tees iy ana ca teenies ha ernment, Other services, these (To be continued) ae
. and th tL members cumstances related to the fore- would cease to be dependencies of to 5 0G, he, eee SS — extent of nominees of the Prime planation or justification. As to im
gel husiness of 80ing, His Majesty in Councth Jamaica. If they are not, certain eed forther that all Minister — in terms, indeed, it heag (iii) we think that the oi
Mation, and subsistence at SHouwld have certain re minor consequential amendments bers of the Council of State, Would be constitutionally open to pederal Supreme Court should be . e
1 ye ; powers of legislation sufficient to may be required which it is not ; Pri Minister, him to appoint in this way all f ll Units t
of £3 per night spent ? able those responsibilities to be Metall: We. need including the ‘ime MAES bl laaen rramiors an appellate court for a nits 7. an er ,
mom home on the business Aiecherdek These powers are de- ae oa @sch wane should hold office aun the ves . and that appeals to the Privy a .
ati The Speaker “ischarged. ar s ad e ; ‘ . ‘ +o ‘
eeretion ' ve eee fined in paragraph 42 of the Con- 4... wna in no way affect the Sie aan ae Wane ct the Functions Of Council | one Ppt ge lene hag Ae uitted Will Fight
he is a men surren- eee agen, to eae question of congeituetaags develop~ ordinary United Kingdom conven- “a bd ype pele Me eae of the Federal Supreme Court
§ member’ - pendix o) and : F ithi encies to tj i ircumstances : : i .
Brith @ Duty nce of the regulation of the ap oo ign which, as to the rest of the region, in which the Prime Minister fecle tpeaking, they are, to advise the (though this th aie pe MANCHESTER, New Hampshire, @ from page 3
The De akon tween the Federation and forei hs ; 4 n to resign. We pre- Governor-General on the dis- without prejudi s March 9.
year Bre Seplty Apeeeee countries, securing and maintain- 7 eis s eration Moteg a ee ene the ions charge of all the functions vested petition the Privy Council for Dr. Hermann Sander was ac- #'eas and northwards to Central
tion in addition to his ing financial stability and, in cer- Bay * , native that the Constitution '” him, except in so far as he is special leave to appeal direct). It quitted here tonight after trial for Africa.
BSA member. These ficures tain emergencies, securing and , should itself contain a rigid rule Specifically directed or empower- this recommendation were ac- the “merey killing” of a woman , At the moment South African
Member, These figures ; Th E. t :
ot be fixed in the Consti-. maintaining public order and sup- e Lxecttive requiring the Prime Minister's -d under the Constitution to act cepted the appellate side of the cancer patient. Europeans are roughly divided be-
Dut left ; i recommenda- plies and services. titutional resignation on the defeat of the or be an in his ath discretion, or Federal Supreme Court would The Prosecutor, in his closing tween Afrikaan speaking ——-
Wthe Federal Government to We do not recommend that any The common constitutiona’ covernment on any or every mo- /M accordance with advice ten- replace the existing West Indian address, did not press for the ®ists—people of Dutch origin—
; ’ vel t power of disallowance be reserved division of the state is into three tion which the mover chose to “ered by some other body or Court of Appeal. From exactly death penalty, and English speaking Smuts sup-
Ming to the Senate, we found to His Majesty once a measure parts, the Legislature, the Execu- ove as a vote of no confidence. individual, Normally such advice what courts in the Units, and Defence lawyer Wyman ap- porters.
‘questi : lion I he assent of the tive, and the Judiciary correspond- Whatever special conditions might will be authoritative, ie, the — h ditlens axneals :
m of the distribu-. has received the ass' c : ‘ ak- atever spi ief E { sill be obliged to Under what conditions, appeals peared on the verge of years as Political ideration in Seret-
: ; 4 “ ne the ing to the three functions of ma d a. + n the taking Chief Executive will be obliged to y . olitical consideration in Ser
Of seats presented little dif- Governor-General except in, is ing laws, carrying them out, and " prio . = 's possi. act in accordance with the advice should lie to the Federal Supreme he asked the jury to send Sander se’s case is|that his establishment
rg rere of Whe functions single instance of certain a interpreting and enforcing them. ble that ‘it might vaaenoast cele of the Council and not otherwise. Court, and the extent to which back to his family and community. as Chief might lead many English
: namber in a federal affecting Federal Govern There are in actual fact many judgment or manoeuvre. in other In certain specified instances, he this will entail modification of ex- “The soul had left the body of speaking South Africans to trans~,

¢ had aaa We ae stock which 7 _on Rinedow overlaps, but the division is useful. |ecisjatures, it sometimes happens ™ay however be requijed to seek isting arrangements in the Units Mrs. Rorroto before his ‘irrational’ fer their allegiance to Dr. Malan
Vet a caus! ment desires the Uni ,

One of the overlaps lies in the fact that the Government is defeated the advice of the Council but not for the hearing of appeals by Unit act in injecting air into her veins” and give encouragement to his



















me: Population differences Py y is 7 ri- ‘ : i i i t " ;
fle i Treasury to list as trustee secur! { H of the Executive is ssary necessarily to follow it. We shall courts, are technical questions of he cried.—Reuter. extremists. It might be argued
SS et the other House. ties in the United Kingdom. This pv aS part of the Legis- pet ae og Thy nmap revert at a later stage to the im- some complexity and we feel that that Seretse is being sacrificed in
’ there pie aie ah ~ cant provision is one which is mene’ lature in that his assent is re- should resign. The normal course patent eueeene he i a this Committee is not equipped to Senate: | Snenniaeeeianl order to better ag he ome
Aetritory ke two Senators tated by Treasury regulations pe quired before a measure becomes of eyents would be that a Prime ones eg o — e eatin deal adequately with them. L k Wi peoples - the tec’ - rn
Bln order to wuard against exchange for the advantages to be },., phe extent to which he acts Minister, on being satisfied that oan te ole nature, i ia! ia hats ii uckman ins against the long arms of ut
ble absences, we decided gained by having the stock SO i, his own discretion, or accord- he no longer had sufficient sup- ~ nay ae Mike enenil (a) The eral Supreme Cour m “ Africa, It has See Saaeity oes ts
mend that the number listed. c ing to advice and if the latter port in the House to enable him t Stat y ee the ewe should have original jurisdic- Fencing At C.A.G6. ted that conditions for ans
tWo, subject only to the We make no recommendations ~ccérdinggto whose advice, is the to carry _out his policy, would formin, e inst oe ae 4s to tion in a comparatively small within the Union could hardly be
fh that no a: os for any special procedure for cON- main subject-matter of political teyder his resi, ation, 7“, the tity co Tt is here thet proposals list of subjects. We suggest GUATEMALA, March 9. worse.
phe represented more stitutional emendment. That iS and constitutional history and de- acce pence oie ich , pond fee! Coverite ditign ‘an tenn for consideration the Psi Lawrence Luckman of Curacao But it is argued that the duty’
man it has‘ members of. to say, the Constitution, which velopment. would proceed to make a lated and decided upon. Here visions of section 75 of the won first place in the individual of the British Government is to
of Assembl we anticipate will be embodied in Governor-General OF ea be noted that we do not Government bills are approved, Commonwealth - Po ae sabre fencing at the Central Amer- hold back the tide of South Afri--
Qualificat; an Order in Council, moat a Recommended fs recommend that each and every and here in particular estimates of a which re as a Kennee hare with six victories can racialism from sweepint
bs ications amendable by His Oe cr {, as to the See mas member of the “Cabinet” group revere and comendiners are oa ee age ‘Sean Geek Piles a Sige throng be nee peatesaes -
OP Gualificatic: sds Sahiareids, SOOUEIGATS We recomm - nomenclature, we recummenc ' Should be elected by the Assem- 5 ered. overnment legislation i ae ae Eales E coloni erthe:
Bt the Conctitas oo that it be provided that no amend- the Head of the Executive should bly, but only the Prime Minister. can only be introduced by sanction ( i) arising under any treaty; won vhe individual service rifle Rhodesia.
Bethe to be clathin san ment diminishing the proportionate pe “styled “Governor-General” 77: Crission is deliberate. We of the Council of State, It is in fact (ii) affecting consuls or omer — ae ee —_ a Appeasement of South Africa by’
Bilon to the Senate, person. representation of any Unit in snd that he should be appointed | oiieve that our proposal effects impossible to exaggerate the im- representatives of ether — pea the Rag eye banishing arnee and his Englis '
Whe British sujcets, the: either Chamber of the Federal hy the Sovereign. In general . "necessary concentration of au- portance of the Council in the . countries; ade win ew, Se the ane EK
Mud since attaining the Legislature, or the number of terms, the powers conferred of thority in the hands of the Prime Constitution; and on prepessle (iii) in which the Comme Pi But it though’ mee 98 aoe A
Bl vears, have resicied in ihe representatives of a Unit in the the Federation will be exercised Minister, By this means, the Tegarding ma nee of esta Salty wealth, or a person suing ” », eae behin an Ihe
Sr not less than 5 years in House of Assembly, or increasing, by the Governor-General as Te- prime Minister owes his position ment have n most carefully or being sued on behalf generally weldome
at vipa oncaichet! ed Seis » or otherwise altering presentative of the Crown, and all 4, the Assembly; other State devised to ensure that it shall at of the Commonwealth, is decision—By Cable.
tir the if . Tae a Unit, should have acts of the Federation will be done Coyncillors appointed on his one and the same time fully reflect a party; Commits Lover's {
eo nat ily ~ ae a majority of the jm his name. nomination owe their position to the will of the elected part of the (iv) Between States, or be- a ‘ 4
siting. SS a ting in any Unit con- We next consider the nature of the Prime Minister. It is of course legislature, and also be capable of tween residents of differ- S . id Five Invited To
_ omimarecs electors Voune such an amend- the Government—that is to say, possible that the Prime Minister integrated and responsible action. ent States, or between a uicide
i y prop- cerned approve Ss the agency through which the may make choices which do not The most important points, in our State and a resident of ;
on for ment. : J ti pewers of the State, formerlygand commend themselves to the opinion, are to concentrate in the aficther State. TOKYO, March 9, Play Golf
ar Special Consideration ion constitutionally concentrated in Assembly. If so, the remedy lies Prime Minister responsibility to (v) in which a writ of Man- _ Dr. Toshio Othurki, Japanese in-
We gave special coneprenene’ the Governor-General, are actual- at hand in the power of the the Federal Assembly, and to damus or prohibition or ventor of the “balloon bombs,” AUGUSTA, Georgia. Mar, 8.
to the problems of the Turks anc ly exercised. At this point we Assembly to withdraw its support assure for himself and his nom- an injunction is sought which Pacific winds carried to Three South American ‘profes-
Caicos Islands, the Cayman ¢ oui like to emphasize the prac- from him; and experience ws inees an effective majority in the a re of the Oregon State, has almost certainly sionals Roberto De Vicenzo and
Islands and the British Virgin ica) importance of the distinction that Prime Ministers in fact pay Council. —_— — committed a “lover’s suicide” with Antoni Cerda ( ) and
An is The two former terTi- phetween Government and Legisla- close attention in such matters to | We now come to the question of th ae shall h his secrevary, Police said to-day. Paecaull Viola are
ries are at present dependencies tyre. It is the duty of the Govern- the views of the Legislature as the discretionary powers of the ie gh Court nm ave They said that Dr. Othuki— five leading
cae wn with powers of legis- ment to govern, and the actual shown to them. This procedure Governor-General in relation to original jurisdiction. claimed by many to be a genuis— who have been invited to in
n delegated to them by responsibility for its specific exe- is in our view essential to ensure executive action. These discre- (b) The Federal Legisfature left his wife and two children on the Masters Tournament, here
Dg nd subject to the cutive action cannot be shared the effective joint and collective tionary powers, we recommend, should be able to confer ad- March 1, and eloped with the sec- from —_ +>
ae y tad aa jurisdiction with any other agency, e.g. the responsibility of the Cabinet should be limited to; ditional original jurisdiction retary to a popular hotel 40 miles The two are Norman Von
Stee wo British Virgin Legislature, except at the risk of grown. Where members owe their (a) The subjects in respect of on the Federal Supreme Court from Tokyo. All indications were Nida, Australian professional and ie
Taree aligning Leeward confusion and delay and conse- position to direct,election by the which we recommend that in respect of specified matters. vhat the two had taken theit Henri De Lamaze, prominent pat
i a un 2 ma Tae



Ts ST seoaaion the legislative quent prejudice to the public in- Assembly and not to the Prime His Majesty in Council Again, the provisions of Sec- lives, the Police added.—Reuter. French amateur.—Router.
lands Federat ’

Islan¢

















PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ee



BY CARL" ANDERSON

|. Feeea Gan





‘a>

MICKEY MOUSE —
ike ame WR
YOU'VE BROKEN UP ONE oF te ey

BIGGEST CRIMINAL RINGS IN THE
WORLD! Jae



WELL, EEGA, NOW THAT We'vE
FINISHED THIS CASE, How CO YOu
FEEL ABOLT BEINGS IN THE

DETECTIVE BUSINESS 7?








(i
ys

ey het
NN (



BY CHIC YOUNG




$$$ .
i Es [feat 2 |
i fa. Oe see tee net
$ OH, BOY, A NIGHT OFF-- o t LL FIX MYSEL!
i: PIM AS FREE ASA BIRD! MI DONT “ai A SANDWICH +
§) TO DO WHAT I WANT! | KNOW WHAT L MA AND GOTO BED 3
‘ CH, PEACHY! | |TO DO wiTH Jat AND READ <
: MYSELF éU,

ASK





FOR THE BEST |

AND ENJOY

y

sl
i

of excess acids and 4
| fresh blood flows toerenn ine thay

Then you feel better—look en
better and you are ready ty a
joy. Insist on the genui Dest
Pills in the blue package yj * Klay
bands. Only /~ at all drug

S.2 85 Us A SSBB BeBe

——————
/
a
—
oe (¢
& ag
Be
u Es
o>
Ee
=

/ INZ Spaghety A
\ Tomato

Vegetable Sox
Oxtail Soup,
+ Strawberrigg j TR
Pears, De

SS
neers

Os fs &

47Bses

S38 o-

fae

el ° q

Pineapple,
Pineapple fully
Guavag, " .
Fruit silag!

—_

a

INCE & Co., ‘te .

DIAL 2236 = RosUEK gf











THE LONE RANGER

ed padi iain — |
T WASN'T GOING TO, HURT YOU. I JUST!
WANTED TO PROVE THAT I COULD
HANDLE GUNS. I'M ON THE

OUTLAW TRAIL AN! T WANT t
TO TEAM UP!



- i, eu ce. oe . oS i? oe ee
YOU'RE FUL!.} | | HOLD STILL, SANDY, I'LL SEE)! x +
OF TRICK } | IF YOU HAVE ANY ~— ENT.

RE WEAPONS! )









“every hour

of the day

Phe Riddte of the fed Domine GY


















































7 : '
When everyone else is hot and bothered you will
YES, MR .PROFILE .. VES .MR.PROFILE. QUICKLY, PLEASE’ SD DID YOU NOTICE THAT DAGGER fascinate by your freshness — if you do this. After your
VES..THEY'RE BOTH TAKEN BRING MISS WHISPER INTO OF HIS, K.0.? JUST LIKE THE ONE b : ,
CARE OF... NO,MR PROFILE THE CLUB. . YES, SHE MUST IN THE BODY AT OUR FLAT | ath or bathe, shower yourself all over with Cashmere
NO MESS, 1 ASSURE VOU.. REST. SHEISIN AVERY 4 RECKON OLD PROFILE’S BEAUTY Bouquet Taleum Powder. Its magic touch will turn your
YOU ARE AT THE HOUSEBOAT CLUB? DEEP SLEEP. . VERY DEEP! :
aoua MISS WHISPER 1s WELL eaRi 72 > ee go IS ONLY SKIN DEEP ! ~— re 4 skin to silk: clothe you in a cool, protecting film that
. YEG, MR. PROFILE , GOOD NIGHT. Y = V ty keeps you daintily fresh all day long. Its delicate perfume
NOW @eaaxt onal af, will add new and subtle charm to your whole personality.
. SLIP ~ aND wy PS For Cashmere Bouquet is the Taleum Powder with the
-%
FINGER SUPS fragrance men love,
|
3 THEN WE‘(L ,
Wf ohne tunt ar Cashmere Bouquet
TALCUM POWDER
| ° COLGATE-PALMOLIVE-PEET co.
| es ene eessesenencessensenesenstnnnesenseeumns
ibis hae rm alin aa
| |'\VE POSTED THE BUTLER |
i | AT THE FRONT COOR AND
| "LL WATCH THE FIRE
| ESCAPE -THIS I6 ONE TIME
—~ I'LL FOOL JIGGS - w
4
mt
5 om aT
: ‘ se, Inc, Wenkd es i. a s
7
RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND
“4 E c SE! I'VE | | VERY WELL, LOuise...8uT (ft CONT GARE | [ guT CHITTERTC
= ve NED A | YOU REALLY SHOULD LEAVE | WHAT OTHER |
; i 5 | |PRICELESS JEWELRY IN THE | WOMEN GO! |
} VAULT AND HAVE IMITATIONS /WQBODY COULO| /
|MADE FOR ACTUAL WEAR! / /AAKE AN | Two wonderful remedies —
F OTHER WOMEN / IPAITATION OF .
f oo! COE CHITTERTON Zubes Cough Mixture and
{ ; | “ ' EVERALDS!
: } “ ‘es Ms | Zubes Cough Lozenges.
: 2 "| \ ' )
q f \S f They are new here but
’ i] _
Mh I\ # well-proven elsewhere.
fi he. |
. [ j \ _ |
‘4 ‘> Zubes Cough Mixture is excellent
! . d ¢ - for soothing coughs speedily, and
é ls , 7 | } \ comforting a congested chest.
i \ ' J \ Ideal for family use —children
, \ in i love this pleasant-tast ng syru
~a \ \ oc sod yrup
. Nal , coven? «sore 1H Zubes Cough Mixture should
NY 569
nOOrine © sortt® be in every home
:
‘ f -
‘ BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES '
| .o. ANG Here are the
= PEPEH Vee me
lozenges —_
a
ie
i] i bes Cough Lozenges make

of hoarseness and
e, irritating, little



vs. In handy pocket-sized
. eady be
ey
v to yo mouth at
\ .
\
\
| ;00D Wemrete " é
e > C B > s AND $7 ORES
ements fe
cme,”



aaa
5
§
' gases





| WILLIAM FOGARTY 1),

Inc. B. G.





Announcing the arrival

of pe

| 1950 PRESTCOW §
REFRIGERATORS

4.44 ci. capacity Be





K{ See the New Features in these—
1 : i
i ALL STEEL BODY, SEALD UNIT, a
i

with a 5-year Guaranice

i

‘ an
i Let Us demonstrate these to You. :
} ae
eee FFE SS ‘
1 Ba Bs

A

| an
"



mj
—
—
~
=
—
oS
~~
os .
a

+

Oe

Me
~
0
TALES §&
by ENID BLYTON
THE VOICE OF A STRANGER
by Emyr Humphrey
FOUR STUART’ PORTRAITS
-by Hugh Ross Williamson
' ~ 4
jj PEARS CYCLOPAEDIA {
4 i .
‘| WHITAKERS ALMANACK i
; _.
j « i
| F i? NER! i
ADVOCATE STALIONON Es
iS A i

=

_

. | em re te eR RR



pripAy. Mz ARC H i0, 1950

| CLASSIFIED ADS. ”) PUREE BLic Nori ES |

tae oe oan

a





































































































































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE










LE

Netherlands @:! | Coal Study































































































































9= casily . ‘ | [ d F E d
E25 cnaily earned by obtaining orders) “HR ustry Expands WASHINGTON, March &.
your friends a ; ecessary. Writ Yo previous experience : eae Congress to authorise a nine man
: ara accessary, Write today for beautiful fre. : LONDON (By Mail) commission to study long range
‘ $1.00. 1.20 ample Book to Brita ean ,; Nineteen forty-nine was a 1 ind € ae
’ St Publishers;. highest comm oo® year for the Netheriands Coal industry problems.
i } ‘SONS money making opporiun fe i trade. The ountr y's total ou Teeter with identical letters
j Williams & Co., Dept. 10 Victor: a ¢ ys to 4 }to Vice-President Alban Barkley
Z i 5 Preston, England.’ “=| —~emand was well above expecta-jand House Speaker Sam Raybury!
: am wie $ ae a en Sp increase. ene Texas), Mr. Truman In Carlisle Bay
TICE \ ntensive searc OY O44 igs}sent to the Capitol a proposed * ay
rr ' , - : *
, oa ‘. haan lads further encouraging resuis,/Bill to create the Commission
} rom April RBADOS GENE TAT ca oe we . var _
4 F Weatheritnd, | SEALED TENDER ye wosritay there has been great progress in{which would report within one Marion Belle welts, Sch ngs a
= Hospital up to 12 ares irelinery construction. Everything, | year. Sch. W. L. Eunicia. Sch. Phyliss Ma
a 3.3.50 . 4 e’cleck iy . : . . ¥ ere
P ALES } 14th Mareh, 19%: n fact, points to the continuea In his letter, President ruman | Seh. Anita H., Sch. Gardewa W., do:
Bm auc § bk FARAWAY" i ses ih the nee cee : war he, creniaens Truman (ee ee Aue’ tar” tele ars
7 ee ae 1 | urkARAWAY™, St. Phitip cost, fully| 1 Ses git the following Line xpansion of the industry this}said the end of the strike “has in| Bie Star, Sch” Lady Neste MY
- NO REAL rnisn . athe + tro ¢ lee ms ‘ : : a
jae weer7ox 4 | athing beach. “From “Mivant ,Rooms.| 1950:— ‘ rar, no way diminished the need for |Molly N. Jones, Sch United Pilgrim
i re pet agate line er month Phone 4476. eee |) FRESH BREAD The — subsoil of the Nether-|@ long range study of the coal pi z= M. bag Sch. patna Ma:
— 6.1.50—t.t.n ALCOHOL lanas has probably been more|iMdustry with a view to finding | 5>:, 4t4 Wonita Laudalpha, Sch
: ae 1.20 ' “1.8 F COFFINS, ana nian x3 y Cyril E. Smith. Sek. Wonderful Coun-
4 mu charge u4 1.2 NEWHAVEN" Crane Coast, {fully | and HORSE forthe: Bea 4 on i thoroughly explored for oil than = et ee oieet. — a hes aye
i Re ae tines) fur Garages, Servant Room. sdesd at the Westbury Crmeren {that of any other country in |Solutions of its problems from the
pu | Superb bathing bi D 4) PU RE FRES: 7” Vin stand t f th hi ABRIVALS
. i & beach. February, Mareh H MILK }Rurope. The s h for thich | 5%? point of the miners, the] «< cu ff
‘ a | Nowavelton: Pecembe ry. Mare Forms for the respective tenders wi) | pot OR®, search for oil which | serators. and ab. IL, the Naw [regen CUSTODIAN, 3,684 tons net, Capt orrers
4 LIC oe ee 08 2.16) ” Phone 4476. Aes ne Ans ‘pplied on application to the Pi began in 1935, was greatly in- op: e fo above all, the Na Therpeen, from Dominica: Agents; Da \ { / -
Or Nee 1.20 © 1.50 og ee “al nk Seah Hospital anc {tensified during the war when | “Mal interest, nenten me eae Meenas. AN IeDRer NN ;
SE". Erdist Hi 5 Sic} +} aS > enterisine e le la = : hic 3 _ . aa ie : ne ae \ aP
Be Oca ono!) | Ca NAR AR ARG, ci, | Sete at es | Molin. as omuple. “hit neater et Syme Mand cS, Hom Btmueg aes Gm
ae ents For further particulars. « Nanicles f cidentally, saved many Duten son, Son & Co., Ltd Ws Wilson. Prom Pa
vo 4 vee I urnished 1 » x ean '
CARRINGTON & SEALY the eat quality ind’ hea be act scientists and workers from being | ; oe ARDY petaon, 4,055 toas net. Cc Peterkin Wiens : tineban 0h
‘papi I N & SEAT moroval cf te ay t to the! deported to German e Capi ch, from St. |ucta, Agent OM ' R. Husbands, My
pon Laces tre howe decision: shai fa Superintendent | CRO lorati Germany). Z NEW CARS FOR Gardiner Austin & Co., Lid tenes, Mr. F. A. Nicholls. From Dor
ieee a a A aa 8.°3.50—5r | thereto in regard Ploration is now continuing ss DEPARTURES Mr. §. P whill and Mr. I =
|S PEACON VILLA | Persons tendering must submit at the}° 2, 2, large scale. Nederlandse EMPLOYEES Vacht LRANDER, SI (ons net, Capt. Wiltshire :
OTIVE nd Black Rock Rosis, fer a | Saint indering letters from two other | Atdolie — Maatschappij owned |
ticulars 1 ‘ er; Persons nown to Jy i : ;
ar rom Bi Ay Beowon.. | peemiie~ teole sia by Bataafsche Petroleum SPRINGFIELD, Ohio, March 9 IN TOUCH WITH BARFADOS COAST STATION | Service
» Terraplune Sedan 7 t.f£.n | bouna as sureties f Mij. (Royal I 1-She ) f it strialist, M : . ae
ee good. condition CORAL SANDS. w | the contract. -°* ‘Be fulfilment of : Pratehs Shell Group) | : A Detroit industrialist, Mr. Dal- Cadi 1 Wireless (West S.s , 3s Pp
en and in : oe 4 SANDS: Worthing (1) one| ‘7 of contract and Standard Oil Company (New 1as, Sinslow, was presenting 100 oi able and Wireless est Indies) Ltd 1 S, Alcoa Polaris, S.S Prospector |
fies or 2737 8.3.2 furnished Flat with Silver and Li It act and = fu r par- | Je . his e loy i - idvise that they can now communicate $.S_ I S,. Eros, S.S. Mitra, S.S
; or further particulars Dial @134 Ane’ | al the Gecoms’ obtained on application |UETSEY), iS responsible for these Mis employees with a new motor] vith the following ships through thei: W 3. Alcoa Runner, §.S. Mer. |
Morris 8 h.p. 1948 model ashley 98:2 80-tt | eberel Hospital. operations. Two oilfields have Sar each to-day because “happy J arbados Coast Station ; € 5. Goldmouth, 8.8, Theodoxus
driven and imi cceceiee Ww soormas been discovered—the Schoone-|€™Ployees do a better job thar} ss inge Marsk. SS. Apache C Rar een ae ae ee aa |
Uy furntsr ecretary. |). a ‘ ‘ H 3 , ar a tg s ’ e Ss pache Canyon, ort Amierst arion oran, SS
Mis ODonnel 50 sn. | erator Bod linen ‘ot ‘ndtamat Ww Refrig- 3.50-2n, }beek and Ruhler Twist. Both are} those who are merely indifferenv.” J 3.8. Nidarhoim, S'S. Tactician. SS Lide Ladv Rod ey, SS. Sun Rell, SS. Nor
- “| Dial 8364, ° R. pineeerecnusemenensteseidaak it teeny situated near the Germ: P oh —Reuter. chile, S.S. Coptic, $8. Matina, S.S nandiet, Aviekaree, M.V. Tiarbara
13. beh 50—t.f.n. S a e German front-| fauretania, S.S. Bughii, S.S. N S.S. Pont Audemer, 8.8. Gus .
Fas Minor .. e ; 1949 | —— PINE HILL ne NOTICE The first, which started com-! ———_ a Franada, S.S. Balla, SS. Sagona. SS Specialist. Hage vo ’ eee
miles, Like new. Morris 8) BARBADOS GEN mercial production shortly after| tity of Derby, S.S. Portugal, S.S. Loide Hawk, S.S. Evanthia, 8: Ss
| oP lel, 7,800 miles. Excellent | “CORAL c ROFT”, m ‘ iENERAL HOSPITAL a’ production shortly after} . i ah Sarag 3S. Yos MSS ik Seki tue .
98 Wet y-6 100% Sedan, Onis | tlone. Houseman gqiuadiern. 2. be SEALED TENDERS will be received at|‘®@@ war, was working 90 pro-|!” 1953, when the proposed ex- f *#tasuay, S.S! Yostis Lemos, §.S. Bulk- Southern Counties between
cies. eee anona, Fort | furnished or unfurnished. Phone e itl Mp to 1s o clook bp ao wells up to November 1949 —— - = ee nave beer
ee "3 ad 9.3,50--3 : ‘ORMS oe the . ,| completed. Work has also begut
4,3.50—8n i UNIFORMS ) ; | The second was discovered in May | . eg
| ee eee, FOR MALE A i j ‘efi 4 i
CHURCHILL” Maxwell Conct AND PORTERS for a perioi} 1949: 7 producing wells have} 2 @ new oil refinery in Rotter: SAN JUAN
» (1) 1943 dual géar| bed r d i ee year fr r 5 , : 7 | dé ‘ali io. Tavos
TaUCK—OF I a y ae ee ean 8 furnished. Available from] Tend me i esabel April. 1950. , been completed so far in this| dam for the California-Texas Pe- |
cd 1 15t 1 ill kt
Truck in ¢ I h, on three months or longer | e supplied on ap-| . }troleum (Co any SALTEX D
ie Auto Tyre Company, Trafalgar leane Apply Ralph A. Beard, Hardwoo i thal a a ae Secretary, General Hos- field. ! ith ee (¢ BX) 5 ST THOMAS
i] 4 9/3/50-—tfn Alley Phone 4683 , rdwooc pital, and tenders will t be z + wi a sched t
eet. - " | ed except they are on fcaiio burs lian’ tae Oil producti has in vs i} 980 “ a omy ¢ } ‘
Misi Sitios, one of the bee 10.3.50— the Hospital sit p ecvion has made rapic |8 ,000 tons in 1958. It is due te Fine,
| Persons tende strides in recent years. It is now, Start operatin early this year Ipw
till going strong. Alway: | ———————_—_——— ring must submit at the|”. 3 & early Ss yes Pw -ALS ; . ; ma ie: :
meee a ood hs Sanat sales a vane of tendering letters from two other | (i.e. for 1949) 620.000 tons. com-| (=== cep) RIV ALS by B.W.LA.L t ee penis chao Jean Cayia, Robert | we
Wi or: ; rondit | | Persons known ¢ epee 620, S, : i ; Piquenard, Robert Logier |
Piece eee Aopis:, Strouse) PP UTRILEG QAR | Re “Rene fo posscos' property, ex| pared with 496,000 tons in 1948 | RE thenid [poure4p poner. | st. J
mage, James : 22.2.5 ——S=——— bound as sureties for the fulfilment of |29Gd 213,000 tons in 1947. The} SULTS andn +e taplene poate. phaleolm ai Br Bruce-Clayton, Mrs. Theln °
wy 7 the nt t. eco . . Angela ucie-Smith izabeth Camacho, Miss Ross » Camach
eee 2 UE. 1987, Model. | Aric TION } Further particulars may be obtaine: | Present figure covers about 30! are what count in dep i Hush Laciet Gartela trem Jamarca 0
| rn te Leone | from the Secretary, General Hospital. | Per cent of Dutch domestic re-! are what count in Ad- | riorie Williams, Walter Bonyan Mr. Gerald McElliott ST. LUCIA bh feucls
| esy Ga s yrith be FRIDAY 10th at 1 pn see W. GOODM; 2 R Payne, Ala an Payne, Donald
sxepied up to 4 p.m. Friday 1 HALL MAIN p.m. UPPER BANK | 3O0ODMAN | quirements. RACING oyn. | be a a s: DEPARTURES t ; 4
iD a ; : ROAD, NEW ee Nr x ¢, Hanna Meh é mS by BW.ILAL
1990. Jas. A. Lync! sony | SHINGLE HOUSE nin o- re | The refining capacity of the} tans carina Doyto | fniss, Elesa Mum ay, Molly Tawi Cor TRINIDAD PORT OF SPAIN
—— | immediate possession. CASH ON [| | Country—concentrated at Pernis,| |] with racing it's a camnble valhe | wil, Frank Bena Vante, Seok. zeae Mew ene Riad eae, Boe | f
eter 7 1947 | OF HAMMER NOTICE | near Rott _ but with cooking, you Vamhe | pherwooc sear Vanieli au s, Mrs eleina Eastmond, Mr. Agste ‘i?
— Vauxhall 14 WiDs R.. ARCHER McKENZIE 1 otterdam—has__ also ex-! : ’ , araj Medvejey Joseph Medvejer es, Mstr. Raymond Hamblin Mis: |
iitio Opel Kadett, 39 model McKENZIE, lei Gn ake SeeaAn panded. The Royal Dutch-Shell| me 8 fOrPS, | fery, Harold Harriso), Jose Nunes. Carroll Hamblin, Mr, Milton Hambi : in . ; i
meer PF 10.3,50—3n 8.3.50-3 | Will be received by the! plant, which refined 2,600,000 tons | WINNER raiwg- | PEachrane, Dorothy M« Fachrane, Mrs. Louise Collymore, = Mr. Chay The Clipper CV-240 is my
ie Seibel leant TAT ha, up to Friday 5 Pri ca os ’ S| then }Janki, Kenivn Samuei, Bertrand Hewitt, Gilbert Marean vir W
1931 Ford V-8. Excellent cor | 3 ev 1 envelopes i of crude oil in 1948 is expected to} When you buy a Gas Cooker s | P Kedar Rickhi, Marion L. O'neai, Bradshaw, Miss O’Tool | acknowledged to be the f
; Reasonable price. 1935 Chevraicr| UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER | ‘ r the conveying of 's and; have an output of 3,400,000 tons | fughtin For St. LUCIA | : : ‘
1. . Neds of the Dead 1) } convey 4 ; ) :
Reson. Secs 7 ar. | or ’ { . most advanced type airplan
Ret de Lid. Toleplione aoo4, | wON Tuesday 14th by order of Mrs, | {0 paupers from any part of the parish « i kt LUCIA Mra. Rorthy Moffatt, Mate. Anare | yp plane
— 10.3.50 —3n W. R. N. Wynne we will sell her House |‘? the Almshouse or any institution ir e eee, Baral vim Rati ora, ot. Meee ene aN | of its kind. Its extra large
liad appointments both Antique and Moder the parish of St. Michael and vice a awrence, Azig Abraham, Har Shapley, Mr. Lionel Pau | :
at “Chelwood” Two Mile th in. | Versa. (2) For t upplying o fins t i i
9 RE cludes— Very ae ee m 7 “ Tor nd the conve ing of th ey r id ae aes UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES € one e ae - aes Pastuce windows, wide aisles
aT | Be ter Table (seat 8 with Brass Tipe institution or f ny part of the eer d its 40 li
en Site utlers Tray, Pedestal Sidebos Se parish of either of the hureh vards A vacanc »xists . Senior scturer or hee f a and its roomy, recline-to-
BPRMTOURE— Morris Suite, (4) | Ing. arngreen ecertal Sideboard, Serv. | Parish, of lther of the Church yards] ancy exists for a Senior Lecturer or Lecturer in Pharma- | y
SS tt tae A nenae oe. Upright chairs, hertele Pedestals; An-| the dead only in coffins supplied by the cology. The salary scale for a Senior Lecturer is £1,100 x £50 to your-comfort seats, assure j
tam’ Hardwood Alley wae ee and Sewing Tables, Bergere |Parish. The Board shall retain the| £1,500 per annum or for a Lecturer £700 x £50 to £1,100 per
10.3.50—an, | “"y Orris Chairs, Bookshelf, uphois, |"#ht of sending a person to or from ; . : a : : ‘ Passengers the utmost ir i
| note, eee tn! all in old Mahogany: U Hospital of the institution who in their] ®22um with an efficiency bar at £900. The point of entry into the —— —— at
4irs, Envelope Card ; yinic is suitable to s rave ) “ale i > ~ 7 A dk ale bs 1" —
STOCK teins, Inthe muelone Card Table, pcos pinion ts uit able to e wevel; and de scale will be determined by qualifications and experience. The per- ~ comfort and luxury in flight.
| colours, Besse ann, toe ef 2 very | lowest or no tender son appointed will be responsible, under the Professor of Phy siology. ‘
ppc st . é i é es' Ss; ol Trenc , . fay . e *
qP-2 Pure bred: Algatien| Fup: |(Ghing Tea and Coffee Beivne oienee W. SMALL, for the instruction of students working for medical degrees of the ms ; hit
4 now weaned. Apply to Noe | ond Fish se ee Service, Dinne Ms & 8 B providing this most mod-
Miser, Moncrieffe Plantation, 8b] Stee. diver Tee, © ihe. uit Ser Board of Poor ardians, | University of London and generally tor the development of Pharma- 5 Y 9 ; i
a i ce, las, Sweet Q/5 » :
y eiaad 8.3.50-——sn, | Dishes, Bowls and ete. Pewter Mugs 9/3/50—4n.| cology in the University College. Child allowance is paid and super- Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose ern, fast, dependobie Clipper A
J a | Shef: Pit. Entre Dish, Plated ware in eee ee annuation is under arrangements similar 7 ; Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
intra Dishes, Sopone’ Woke ate oTic i é S under arrangements similar to F.S.S.U. Unfurnished “ . Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease on this route, PAA is con-
LANEOUS |lery and Glass Ware. Twin Bedsteads PARISH a A E accommodation is available at a rate no. exceeding 10% of salary. my 1 SCberarian ine that will sooner or tater cause your teeth :
Vono Springs, Vanity Table with Trivlet nas SAINT MICHAEI Applicat ; 9 : . 5 ¢ / / NUM a to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism tributi to th d a ‘
ERA-One (1) Argoflex seflex| Mirrors and Glass Top, Cheval gla : : BS Bervous, firms and compar’ ations pplications (12 copies), giving full particulars of qualifications and Consignees and ean Ue mnoann stops gum uting to the advancement 7
2 Arg > a — Tig ne ein oe nas having Accounts against the Parish of} : ee ee : + : ‘ rleedin e first day, ends sore mouth j
one Gnome Enlarger for above. Lepenrea ieee Old Linen Saint Michael are requested to vend in| ‘€ names of three referees, should be received on or before 3ist Tel. 4047 and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad of the rapidly growing tourist 4
uae > Colonnade Stores. — ‘gn| tresses, Cedar Chest. Larder, Enarh wet their Vouchers (duly made ut in Du-) March, 1950 by the Secretary, Senate Committee on Higher Education SOUS cil Cee Re aT ORE: ‘ j {
7.3.50—6n | presses, C . Ls , ei ieate) to the respective Departments | - ; “ rer g a save yo eeth oF i te ‘
; (pari ee ee apeh Erne, Florence ot later than Wednesday, March 15,{in the Colonies, University of London, Senate House, W.C.1, from | Se Ga Rieke teen eee ane area in the islands between |
ISTOLS—Papermatic ‘ 3 are “re ouse efrig 1950 ; : age e mosan fr y is . ‘
MOLS—Papermatic pistols are here| erator in Perfect order Bleie e me y an ; whom further particulars may be obtained. a . *today. ‘The muars Puerto Rico and Trinidad AP Lil tol
e pistol that uses no caps yet FRED ay gua au,
1 ?s f } F Iron &c. Kitchen utensils, Gaiden T Ch J; ASHBY, UCWI/28 50 osan antee protect
plenty of noise. Get them at] ,'°" : ene ools Shurehwarden’s Clerk, 28/2/50. 10.3.50—1 , apemes
9 2 Lawn Mower, Wheel-barrow, Fow! Ru ; . f +O n.
's Toy Dept., where you will!” s Dart ow: Parish of St. Michael a
fed the Doggy torch that lights up and other items. Sale 11.30 o'clock 3.3.50—Tn rn Por P orrhea-—T: ch M th
s his te rable} Terms Cash. | SS SESS SSS a ¥ ow
you press his tail and the adorable (Kn ee SI a" , F full inf
ae phoebe BRANKER TROTMAN. : : or full information and
Auctioneers Barb Yo j ‘
Bos Two lovely songs from thy 10.3.50—2n, ados Youth Movement BROADWAY NOVELIIES OF n ms eee
Riso. alone’ can be obtained | Serre rartsesessenppsenenscennieeeer . ti ;
Harrison's Music Dent; Staats AS A GOING CONCERN (1) Large boven nee ot the Barbados Youth : \ wana ian a ona ea i travel agent or i
. ey ‘ 4 a s hear and sincere ei
this hous and the title song Be ) Storey Stone Building with Shop an greetings to the Earl and sattit nan uee INTEREST } iis
you alone” sung by Caruso Bakery 4, coeenarles, Liquor and Liquor |\who arrived in Barb as tan, Se — ee eee | i
9 2% 50— acensed ancy goods scales nd . % . " y o
9.3.50—-2n | ete Glens” cases Ae ke aoe (age. , Rev i , BRUCE-CLARKE NYLON STOCKINGS in New Shades ......... $1.86 per pr. (} Sails - ail A Sails |
MEL WIRE ROPE—Approximately| ther items. All selling in one lot the! Rey. “J, Be GRAND ~pounde! LACE all over 36 in. wide in White, Beige, Black at $1.77 per pr. SOUTHBOUND Monire Hats, Bost Barbados Barbado
Ibs second hand flexible steel wire prone gy Ay ‘a acre of land wt ” Ditector é 1d oy a } Also Trimming Lace teeees ... from 8e, to 18e. per yd \ ; fe ' ne me ;
. : $ rl a tenantry situated at Clapha ~— . ‘ 4plain { > 7 7 " x
: Mabie a Lt 4 appr ‘aoa: Land and Flay Staf Rd_ ; 1ext to Big h- MRS. OLGA BROWNE, { } ADIES’ BELTS in ~ large Assortment of colours {N 3 27 M N
a s td. Dial 4405 |gates Govt. Water and Lirht Ins is , , Secretar } KITCHEN TOWELS good size... oc... ccc cee escacees 47¢ ae EE SON weaitiet Nhe ution wth ates
9/3/50—2n Apply on premises to Jose F The Barbados Youth Mov “n o CANADIAN
E fae acne W330 | chattencrn We aaah, BR a PAN AMERICAN .
eee aaa, nt er or oee| 10.¢ rrr es : 26th Ma 27th Mar ith Apr 3 ¥)
Cy | BROADWAY DRESS SHOP LADY Rmaon moe He, ee, ae ae RLD AIRWAYS
¥ Store, Lucas St 10.3.050 in | Ci il 4 » a A ° LADY RODNEY whiny 18t} ith Ma 26th Ma 27th Ma Ai f
REAL_ESTATE IVIL Service Association LADY NELSON a 4th June 151
eh Very fine quality | HOUSE: Modern Bungalow eehc j = <= <= LADY RODNEY ar t I4th July Sth Ju *T.M. Reg., PAA
tls, yd. Stanway Store, Lucas) 4,836 sq. ft. Fruit trees, lovely garde: DIVISION SERIES’ ;
10.3.50—In. | plenty of space for Chickens, Turke THE Annual General Meeting of Divi- A } A A
Te Ri eha eee fiton Aol m2, C A ill be hele Wed Array Sails Arrive Arrive Arrives Arrives
5, ete aas a . 4 y > t i085 N ‘ ) neid or “ar 3 T « lel t
S- Khaki Pants of finest qual-| set’, Beimont Road. Pet. 2, 50 Siete March at 4.80. p : NORTHBOUND = Barbados Barbas Bo St. John Halifax Montre
Stanway Store, Lucas St roliec strate’s C District SON ‘ Mar. 22nd M Apr ind Apor ie
10,3. 5¢ | DWELLING HOUSE with Agend: PARY NeLAON ah eee ae” ee a ee eee eo HP,
» } perches of land attached at “Briar Ha , RIN win “Ape if iS t i 29th pr at iM t
AMPA X. The latest in feminine * ‘ . eo. ont LADY NELSON 6th May 8th } lith May 18th Mar Denn ;
“es ©) Christ Chureh. The dwelling house con LADY RODNEY 8th June 10th J wth June 21 Ju 2 n
» safe, sure, comfortable, easy Cor e€ I . : : 24th Jur +)
fe. Fresh supplies just vaealuna tains open verandah, drawing and din- LADY NELSON 2th June 2%h . th July 10th July 18th Ju
W426, From all Dr oe a Drs ing rooms, two bedrooms and usual con + An the Shi LADY RODNEY 2th J 29th ith Aug Oth Aug 12th Aus
4 mn me ae veniences. There is also a Lime Kiln i ? CSS eee “ tte
= 10.3.50 2n | good working order on the et c | BR is _ ae os (Registered in Trinidad) weit
BESSORIES— For Motor and Truck The above property will be set up for ci re ne 4 Bho N.B.—Subject to change without notice vessels fitted with cold storage cham | Lower Bread Street, Bridgetown, [
‘R

® Stop Leak. Re 5 : } sale at our Office, James Stveat,
Billa Fon ait Kits, Chamoi| Friday 17th Match, 1950, at 1.30 p.m
Mirrors, Wiper Blades, Yellows Ispection on application on the pre-
S. Reiman & Taylor’s Garage Ltd., Mises YEARWOOD & BOYCE \
25 3 Df & 4 {
si a 10.9 ma: sl Solicitors it REMOVAL
VANISE SHEETS in 24 and 26 - 1)
. Of. Bins. 8ft. and 9ft. lengths |
mild steel plates 1/16, 1/8 “ DWELLING HOUSE—The two storied | NOTICE
| ad 3/8 in various sixes Enquire | dwelling house called “AMBURY” with |
Tyre Company, Trafal Street 1 acre 4 perches of land attached there-
1,3.50—t.f.n to, situate at Upper Collymore Rock,
| St. Michael. The house contains draw- patrons and the General Public
ing and dining rooms, one bedroom and , } that I have removed by Barber's

}
‘
PERSONAL conveniences on the ground floor, Salon from McGregor Street







THIS serves to nform

three bedrooms, toilet and bath on first} Cheapside, opposite the Public
floor Government water and Electric Market, where I will continue ta











| "i
ity installed For inspection dial 3297 \{ give satisfactory service to all

Mublic are herehv < ; si The above property will be set up for i{ concerned
credit Patan ny ene ageine sale at our Office, James Street, of Fri- i oa Fe

lard, (nee Gopaigan} . Pras day 17th March, at 2 p.m }) TOM JONES,

pe G an) as de — . al il

myself responsible for her or YeARWOUS BOYCE, Barber

ele contracting any debt or Solicitors. a
@ my name unless by a writte 5.3,50-—-9n — SSS
Sime by me

GRAFTON Aw GODDARD ; Tame
“epeatti White GOVERNMENT NOTICES.

10,3, 50.

Public are hereby warned against The British Caribbean Standing Closer Association Committee |
fedit to my wife Euralee I

ted (nee Waithe) as I do not hold | 1948-49 Report is available at the Colonial Secretary's Office at a cost |



Teponsible for her or nyor fs 3 , 10.3.5
r ) anyon of s p y=tv . s opy. Bal |
tracting any debt of deh in | Of Seventy-two cents per cop) 10.3.50. |
unless by a written orde —— |

me

ELTON *ABEWOOD: POLICE NOTICE
2n DEPARTURE OF H.R.H. PRINCESS ALICE



Christ Church
10,3. 50.

iki FRIDAY, 10TH MARCH, 1950




|
}
‘ «& FOUND 1. Between the hours of 4.45 p.m. and 5.15 p.m., no vehicle |
or person shall be allowed to pass through, stop or remain in Cavans |
Lane, Pierhead Lane or the Pierhead.

LOST 2. No driver shall allow his vehicle to be on or pass across any
mf AKE TICKET BOOKS—sSeries| Of the following roads between 4.45 p.m. and 5.15 p.m
ae "<5 oa y Gano—49 Pine Hill, Belmont Road, Constitution Road, St. Michael's |
Tig” Q320—29 “AA. 0520—29 Row, Trafalgar Street, Trafalgar Square and the Chamber- |
Rum to R. , Write Chane lain Bridge. i
9.3.50—2n Made under Rule 22 of the Bridgetown & Speightstown (Traffic) |
3 TAKE TICKETS— Series X.| (Amendment) Regulations 1943. i
, hte, wn ae return same ‘to (Sgd) R. T. MITCHELIN, |
tt | onan Commissioner of Police.



Police Headquarters,

WANTED Bridgetown,

===



Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend |

SBiocRa PER & TYPIST - | ment) Order, 1950, No. 9 which will be published in the Official

for

Bites snot’. Apply in person| Gazette of Thursday, 9th March, 1950. iW

. Pplication and referenc '
LTD ire 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling }

, eer 2 °
ie 3.3.50-t.f.0 | prices of “Oil—Kerosene” and “Gasolene” are as follows: —

WANTED



Macher ¢
t fitls Grenada. “Applic I ARTICLE PRICE RETAIL PRICE
ae, » address- (not more than) | (not more than)





per gallon 32e. per gallon









s
©

iit
WHOLESALE ,



bers. Passenger Fares and fren ites on application to Barbados. Phones: 4585 & 2789 \

€
Need bottle-fed GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.













=>.
—









babies be CIE. GLE, TRANSATLANTIQUE B 0 0 K 5 as
cry-babies ? FRENCH LINE a





Sailing to Trinidad Sailing to ‘
Piymouth hdd.
: “GASCOGNE” ..... Merch 14th March 21st dates toa
: : : — eaRerceey ‘ April 4th
Certainly not ! Baby's cry “GASCOGNE” ...,. ; April 19th April 26th

usually means pain — the pain of indigestion, aS IA Feta Mey 9th May 13th
“GASCOGNE” ....... May 24th May 31st

Cow’s milk by itself you see, is apt to form a clot in
baby’s stomach. That’s why wise nurses and mothers add For further particulars arply to :—

|
Robinon’s ‘Patent’ Barley. This fasnos cereal osbls RM, JONES & <0, LID.-Agents _| | GREAT

INTEREST
CYCLISTS

milk and prepares their digestive organs to deal with
Booker T. Washington

more solid foods later on, Try Robinson's ‘Patent’ Basle:
+ ~—By Basil Mathews









and see how he thrives,

ROBINSON'S

‘PATENT BARLEY

= Ce
Stn oth RP Ty s

nn ae



White Fang

wna : ONCE AGAIN —By Jack London
*THEY ARE HERE Four Stuart Portraits

LIGHT & POWER —By Hugh Ross"

TROUBLE FREE ) Williamson

au DUNLOP |i

< I S 7 E R” X - By James Joyce {f)
ALTERNATOR SETS . Hi] 28" x 1/2" Cream Roadster Tyres ellie Sn ea

Caribbean





1.75 K.W. \!RSE!. DRIVEN ALTERNATORS —By A. W. A th $

kM i y A. W. Acwor
aS : \|| 26" x 1/4" Racing Tyres
10.5 KW. . a Now on Sale at:
16 KW. ” ” ” *
22 ~—CO«.W.. i ” “ r

All complete with Switchboards .nd Automatic Voltage ADVOC ATE
Regulators. EC
cognate wikis ah eee: ald on we KSTEIN BROS.

TEE BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lid. | DIAL 4269 — BAY STREET STATIONERY

White Park Road 2 Dial 4546



~
7 ee















. nA FRIDAY
PAGE TEX BARBADOS ADVOCATE















































































































































——— - oe ry i a) a
cisanieiaiaanonnlin - $$$ ee Te } 3 f $3) : <
-——— — nie osition but Thirkell still |! who was still lea 3. Swiss ure ‘
= TT TTT OE: - — é ot he fore and the Roll kept the lead
EP “ bd ‘ p the home stretch ir as reached her ‘ pte
acing hesulls a eae cae a | ena al rans | sae
Racing Kesults oe gE vi an cnet Se age ea | eran, Me
7 ; te. : ¢ a2 as he é gain pulled away down t! Holder) and Blue Stee @
. ’ ; if Miss Friendship tretch making a strong ' P wnat Blue wee
& + ~ “11+ >; ‘ar yllet 1 - . =
, 4 RRISON SA NNAH HURSDAY, MARCH 9, 1950 on . nae ictory but Silver Bulle elding | to ;
1T GARt AVA i, 7 wheat, Wile 7 CWELFTH RACE nicely to the urgir of jockey | ay,
: WEA t , ~ . O'Neil “sed jead t : s
, : . - : : or—$1,05¢ _ : 2 - Neil forged aheaa I
i jih Race DALKEITH rAKI Cla % and Lower—S$1,050 Garrison Handicap leader and snatch the race by
i ($30 is Furilengs neck, It was O’Neil’s t ; " The ? punched. by ‘s
‘ J O'Ne oy: *t eee Slainte | she day, Swiss Roll as ‘secol retch and then the dag
) | \ I r r © Up) SnMatenea this race ngth in front of River Sprite ig home stretch batt,
Crossley War Lord (Lattimer) in the ES | oe nae sta
n i ) Jockey} Gonzalez ‘ ige of one of the Meet’s . ee ‘yy 1 +. ee
Bee . 1 i > 7 $i 12, $1.10 hrilling events. The fel SIXTEENTH RACE . a ste IM @ brilliant jes
FORECA one of seven contestants, eight B.T.C. Handicap | e me infaion oe
si Y a Lord (125 Ibs., Lat- i ig been scratche ‘urf ‘ ¥ Cropped
ae ; ALSO RAN a | ossley eave Tbe Caner} The day’s racing ended w A place 3 lene bel
Bet, START: Gx FINI ( 1 length, 144 lengths | veight. As the race began War | ‘hrilling win by Gunsite o\ ' en
‘ WINNER 4 ‘ > ( | Lord assumed the lead followed
te ; TRAINER: M i | by Tiberian Lady (Yvonet) and |\o—————_. > ——
| Iannis —— penitent ee Infusion (Holder).
a) 10th Rac« BRIDGETOWN HANDICAP—Class F and Lower—$650 | At the five-furlong pole, Infu- |
‘ $95) 5’ Furlones | sion posed a chalienge. The field |
———__—_—___—__-—— | swept past the Drill Hall, and War
1 JATERCRI oO J ). har dler. Jockey O'Neil | Lord was “still leading and going
2. PHAROS I 9 ir. M. E. I Bourne Jockey Holder strong. They hit the home
f 3. COLLETON n. J. D. Chandler. . | stretch, and then it was that;
i Jockey Crossley Slainte made the successful bid
TIME 1( l Win: $2.62. Place: $1.66, $6.50 that brought him home a head in
FORECA‘ : ; ; | front of War Lord. The latter ° La *
ALSO RAN ' Gir ib \. Gonzalez); Mountbatten | was second half a length ahead of Season Lb 2QAQ AGEL ope
(106 7 lbs., Yvone | Tiberian Lady. |
Seater. 3 Cro FINISH: Close. Head, 1 length. | ady
STAR’ irl . - pTAN’ 4 » ploee Ania ‘_Rre. -— " ve 7 saettaan 2 ° ems sé
4 WINNER: pate LAN bf ? ou “he--Condiment SILK PLANT and Mopsy in a close finish (Half-Bred Creole Handicap) THIRTEENTH RACE and we Ar wall stocked with
% TR .INER He J. D. Chandle ‘ 5
Ce aa | . | Brown Girl soon took over in the Half-Bred Creole Handicap | ‘
: lith Race: CHELSEA HAND?! CAP—Class F and Lower 865 } éé penn 7 29 coder miantiaied. Approaching the KNEE PADS—per pair ............... 2.16
Mk ($185, $95) 7) Furiongs | bi) 1, / : 'L |clock Pharos II joined up, but Chindit was scratched and the is q
A saat ‘ a i J 4 7 | down the home stretch Watercress ,; remaining field of four faced the am te } 7
1, TANGO 117 bos ir, V. BE, Cox. Jockey Thirkell /INS NINTH R A ( ‘h: lurged by O’Neil moved rapidly | Starter with Brahmin’s Choice ANKLE SUPPORTS—per pair ........ S19? 7
2, JOINT COMMAND 119 Ib ir. C, Barnard, Jockey Holder | L l l . L Aad jaway from the field. Hustled ty | carrying 13 lbs. overweight. “ 1
3, MISS FRIENDSHIP a ‘ Holder Pharos If who was mov-|. Brahmin’s Choice got the last SHORTS in White only with
10% o i ir. F. E. C, Bethell. Jockey ¥ von @ from page 1 were off to a good start with Iden- | ing up meanwhile soon engaged in | jump but caught up with the field SH : 4
TIME . ARI-MUT' Win: 8.08, Paeces O180, Seay urday rode two more winners yes- | tify (Holde1 “up) “slightly in the | @ strenuous tussle with the leader. | Soon after ithe five furlong pole Elastic Waist—paiv ;
FORECAS1 4.0 : saw % te rd nd’ 16 key Tt in sell who | lead September “Sor “3 quickly |O’Neil however kept Watercress | was passed. Silk Plant was now ubastic isa , Were. 6 ae
ne); Foxglove (107 lbs. Cross), 1. le ev in ve } the firi challenged and drew level but ap- | to the front for her to emerge the | in the lead closely followed by |
roae one V ner or ne | ‘ 5 € ; was : } we “eats AaroOs o 58 , 2 ye ’s Choice wy ." y ry > sia
INISH | - 1% length.| day of the meet scored two more|proaching the third furlong pole | victor by a head. Pharos II got Mops; with Brahmin s Choice in REFEREE WHISTLES—each .. ,
FINISI Close. neck » length Bi data he dropped back to second place isecond place money in beating|the third position and Maytime
farionette in aa 2 a Es ae : f lat nie + ot} ir xe . se
R Marionett fhe starting was not up t Reaching the clock the horses | Colleton by a length TOR aee . ee ange of FOOTBALL PUMPS Lh
Slice ee — | good standard yesterday and cer-; bunched, but on the run down the | ELEVENTH RACE aha ve antes ns , Bs oT ‘Silk ALL Wir (o/s ore ae 5
Toth Race: GARRISON HAND CAP—Class B and Lower $850 | tainly could not compare with wZstretch for home, O'Neil urged | roe on Plant oe ae me the lend Lea thie an 1h \ |
- f : i. Carta tandard reached in the pa september Song again to the fore. | . om Rete kN ds oe nl PUMP ADAPTERS—each ............
$245, $1 74 Furlongs Z ‘ , tah t The colt pulled away steadily fron Chelsea Handicap horses entered the straight run for
| meetings and even on ne 4 away slte : > ay Tey . ages
— : — Perkir j xy Payne The 1 art itself w the field and though stubbornly | 3 the first ce over 7 home Mopsy (Yvonet up) Seam : i: ibe eck
1. SLAINTE } b Grins, YOURE! on ; ; carat a shallenged _ by Pepper Win , ay vane Serta eae ame into the picture to be a seri- FOOTBALL LACES—each ..........,
9 WwW I C:1 restrail. Jockey Lattimer ‘ re were yme ver Cr ie eae ee tt eit hic l for the da‘ Four hi rse contender for the premier po- | t
9 IBEI I Chase. Jockey Yvonet ishes eee swe as Leelee | were scratched, leaving a field of | sition. Silk Plant who was ridden ; ss : |
TIME: | W $5.50. Place: $1.96, $4.00 The Police Band was in hy ny Bonn’ i) = ees gah an ; six with Miss Friendship (Yvonet! by Crossley responded _ nicely FOOTBALLS complete with BLADDERS ,
he gain de ‘aptain R eadyeach the Judge an vin the race iv P FBRoe . + . ; .
92 " - a bs i 3 I a 3 he h length ahead. Pepper Wine took a Ni ae es FI . Be . Pp however, to the urgings of his Ss J sae ek: ghia > On f
‘S : lie a rg Fee en ate al 4 Kecond place by a length and 7 t Ibs. Over-| jockey, and reached the Judge a Size 5, each $5.85; $6.50 & $7.00, a
le ) Flieuxce ( Mi lh Pt, hir- cater oO alton ae r ‘ ae ci 7 att in front of Ladd Pink i re pecti el) i caluhe 4 }head in front. Mopsy took second | -.
O'Neil Corfu 07 i Ibs.,| pre gare _ ( . r Was : The fie as: of $0 a aed tart | place ten lengths away from May- | NES
Eighth Army March by oatd TNT ACE nd bunched as they passed the | time é
ISH Driving,’ Head, % length Nibelungen”—Entracte by Wa TENTH RACE ds for the first time with Tan- a | i
Linda er “Ciribirin” by Bucalo to t . igo (Thirkell ) light in tl OU -EN h 1 1 nN 1 1 i
I ; ae as r a a i a Bridgetown Handicap |§ irkell uj} zh I 1 | FOURTEENTH RACE CAVE CHEPHERD & (‘() Li) f
NEI alypso orbeau and the NW | lead E : \ ) d \ 4 4k Me ’ i
“t 1A NDICAP—C lass G2 Only $550 Murrell Three of the eight entrants; On reaching the Hastin Castle Grant Handicap | ' '3
Lsth FR 1TALF-BRED wrt . ; , ti mip were scratched and five started |stretch it wa ull Fango with 9 ° : mh
ar ses aa | KF ie It : With Mountbatten and Pharos II| Vixen second folio i by M Vixen and Sun Fire’ were 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET
ive n Ss -arrying 7 Ibs. and 1 lb. respe | t ip a Joint Command | scratched leaving five to contest
K. C. Hawkir LY eae? eA coe 2 : |with Foxglove bringing up the this event. It yas another last
: vely overweight ith z I , thi ent. was an
Jockey Crossley SECOND DAY “1 The horses were off after some | rear. minute win, this time by Lady SS —
SMA ‘Geist. NINTH RACE jelay, Colleton getting off several After the field had passed the} Belle (Thirkell). As the race got! MPO O Por POPPA IP EAL ALAA IAG LEIS VDDDDDT STOTT
o ; } K. C. Hawkin NINT ACE Te atthe talk ae * ins, there was some exchange of | off, Bro Girl overweighted 11] + j '
e . — . engths behind the others 1 ff, Brown Girl overweightec 1
Jockey P Fletcher x be Pharos II was in front for a|places a Joint Commander (Hol-| lbs. Dulcibella (Yvonet up) got} % SPEAKING OF ENRICHED BREAD ? :
sd ni Win $5.42. Place: $1.18, $1.10 Dalkeith Stakes Ihort while but Watercress and up) made a bid for the pre-| the better of the jump and led the |. ;
FORE { é Four of the entrants were Sted ield to the beginning of the home 1 / E a
4 AS : Reynolds) scratched and the remaining five | = tretch. By this time Dulcibella ; % i ‘
STA ISH : lose, head, 10 length eer ee ieee nase te pe ee ) had Sweeper to the right of her{y ; \ ’
WINN { Plant—-H,B. Mare ] ‘ ind Lady Belle to the left of her.) % Swan and Roebuck Streets ;
i } i ee a eae Results OF 2/- | The Lady didn’t stay there. She} % Recognized Quality Bakers offer... . ‘
1 ‘ TE GRANT I ry .p : or $750 passed the judge a half length] 7 ry ’ AVA 7 t
4th Ra CASTLI AN i DiC Al ; Class D and Lower $75 “% head of Duicibella. The Sweeper | % ENRICHED BL T TER BREAD ,
: @91 i10) 5\ Purlongs 4 1e i¢ kL weep vas third, two lengths behind * 3 ,
* am | % “em ca
i ) \. P. Cox. Jockey Thirkell SIRT ERPN’? 2 hy ¥
Me I Fee tae Tosies eit FIFTEENTH RACE >
en 4 May ' y Second Day Cats 3 $
eR} : Db. Chandler | Spring Handicap %
if Jockey Crossley NINTH RACE | *
if r rl W 9.70. Place $2.22, $1.62 cree Ttoket \mour Two horses were scratched ii | *
FORI ¢ : Second 0087 o hi race. The remaining eight |
} I ne); Brown Girl (100 +. 11 Third 1350 62 & tarted with Ability and Souther | %
Fourth 0462 ; . << ooarrving © 1 a. .
ig eae! sist 3 bs Tena g Ween Fifth oan 1 Cross carrying 11 and 8 lbs., re 1%
y START PINS : 1085¢ 2 ACNE, « > $5.00 ‘each to holders of Tickets N | & pectively overnight. 1%
j Wi i ( ( Lady Mary 1820, 1822, 0066, 0068, 1349, 1251, 0461, 6 NI H | Swiss Role was soon in the lead | $
1 a rR NE P. Cox tg Ea Se mie a TENTH RACE | | ae 7“ eae ice aoe x
, f } > SPPRIA » ‘ ‘ py $750 Prize Vieket Amount | Ime im lis position, ollowed | &
ut | i5th Race PRI G HANDI( AP Class C and Lowe 75 if bok pice closely by Sun Queen and Silver *
hal $215, $110) — 9 Furlongs "ih Sh BUFFET St JPPER Bullet in the second and third] %
| : . .
: w ‘ N 47 | | positions respectively. The horses | &
ER ft t QO it i J. Wons Boh Ke ie is peat 5 | | strung out around the bend, but 1%
2 Wi I yu ' : I Be Pe ait a ras et | 2173, 2 san fone Mila aaa teen | passing the five furlong pole Silver | %
3. RIVE! PRITI 1 \I V u. ©, Bethe, Jorh ee . : | Bullet moved up from third posi- !
1 | Wi e) 19 ) . 29 & d | . 1% ‘9 is ens D : Poe
TIMI I-MUTUEL: Wit 12, Place: $1.32, $4.14, ELEVENTH RACE | SERVED tion to challenge strongly Swiss|% Watch this space every Sunday for the week’s Specialties
$12 Pr Vieket A % Beginning SUNDAY, March 12
entre is S69 4 ise icke mount ¥
I ° a 4 \S" sie bvciadtcah adnter C100 +0 the a : ie $454 ( | 999999999999 999999 SDE POSSI O PS LOES a6
an “ oe a sar ? Ibs.. Thirkell); Southern Cross | Thire 0616 ‘aa EVERY Sl INDAY NIGHT OSS 9OPS PIG VOS O99 GOP 9 F9FI999OSS
. 7 4 I rt $251 64 4 i
( Holde Fiftl 00)
' 6 « Neck 1 length ;
TART: Good FINISH: Driving, Neck, 1 lengt : ba : : 4 A new economical decoration
WINNER: 6-yr.-old gr-m. Alishah—Confidence Trick $5.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos | From 7 to 10 o'clock LOOK FOR !
he ' + 22 2 154 1547, 0615, 06 50 >
TRAINER: Mr. H. E. Hart. ’ f 7 \
a Se in sinsinninmernineinenne iil di or WALLS an EILINGS
ea i6th Race: BARBADOS TURF CLUB HANDICAP—Class A and] p,,,, rH a n d CEIL
; iH Lower $950 ($275, $140) 9 Furlongs ale vide bog NEW t
f 4 : ” 280 1
: rt o771 40 ' }
j 1, GUN SITE 121 lbs. Mrs. J. D. Chandler Fourtt Sh 0
+ : Jockey Crossley, | Fitt! 1204
; s rT 1} f . Mi Molly Tawil. Jockey Payne ; bp | 4
- } ‘ : ‘ 157
; 4 BEACO IGHT 33 lbs Vir. K. D. Edwards. Jockey Lattimer | g5 00 « to holders of ke No C :
tae TT ; : MUTURL: Win: $3.52. Place: $1.38, $1.46. | one 53, 1855, 0770, 0772, 1189, 119 . vovers in one coat
} FORE 00 THIRTEENTH RACE : ‘ ‘ )
1" ( \LSO RAN: 1 2 Ibs., Holder) bie Prin Picket denis Supplied in Powder form in many otiractive colout }
; 4 START ( 1 FINISH Close, neck, 3 length t 19 $51 :
r ’ oo Y 293 4 7
te bas a WINNER: 6-y1 O.'T.C.—-Sunrise | Third 146 WHITE, CREAM, BLUE, SUNSHINE, GREEN, BUFF.
+ | rRAINE! ( J », Chandley sea h 73
teh sesh capil ts | $5 00 ea ot Tickets N oo : : :
ees | TY W tt 93, 1575, 1 19, 3411, 2877, 237 Made ready for use by- mixing 24 pints water with 5 lbs.
: »
’ a , ' ; ") rer 4
f B.B.C. Programine 1 wea FOURTEENTH RACK powder.
‘ TO-DAY | Prize Ticket Amoun A
fl ® t t 0198 $41 :
Mf Sun Rises: 6.15 a.m Se 0378 137 ;
Been) At : Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m | Third 0413 118 5 lb. packages at 90c, per package
pe ; Bs , Moon (Last Quarter) March ' i387 a
ae k t i0 $5 0 4 to holde : 3 ts N a
pre | i i Lighting: 6.30 p.m 17, 0199, 0377, 0379, 0412, 0414, 0994, 099
ey oes : 7 High W sien get um., 9.50 WILKINSON \ HAYNES (0 1)
Close Dov ( : i + Sak 3 ot FIFTEENTH RACE r fi
Ne A p.m Prize Vieket Amour « 9
I € 4 t 0618 $445 4
YESTERDAY | i 449 Phone 4456 Rh Hardware Deph
Rainfall (Codrington) .23 ins
—— «* — Spee 9 > eee 6BCCCSSH
day: .61 ins : —————— ee ——————
Femperature (Max.) 82.0° Ff Fis om |
1 remperature (Min.) 76.0° FE y a t ice Tickets N
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E., %, 0870, 0872, 1 1860, 0226, ¢
by N., (3 p.m.) BE. SIXTEENTH RACE
Wind Velocity: 16 miles per 1 17 $491
. hour Th

Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.001;

SALE

+

\ Dance usic: | (3 p.m.) 29.928 >





CLASS

WOOLLENS —
| WORSTEDS —



; | SUITS

280
| a 140
D i.4 “Y754. 2364, 2: "2599,
' - ny yn wah
They'll Do It Every Time ieee’ ceahiine By Jimmy Hatlo | |! THAT FIT ene Sate, SaORORER
| ‘The: of ot eo . —$1.15 a Yd.
cant ———_— Lovely Tolies GINGHAMS
49c. a Yd.
Fancy Checked TAFFETAS
$1.35 a Yd.
JERSEY SILKS Ass’t Col’s
9le. a Yd.
GOLD BELTS —37c. & 76c.

Toms) kam ae
a YOUR FIGURE

(Quit 20H, NO, OBLIVIA“Y BvERYBoDY's “ZN My DAY A GIRL 7 YOU,ME AND
{ YOU CAN'T STOP NOW «/ POSITIVELY RAVING Y PLAYED PIANNER AN’ | THE PIANO PLAYER
| T'S ONLY 12 O'CLOCK )| ABOUT YOUR PLAYING, HER MAN TURNED THE) ARE THE ONLY , y





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THE EVENING'S JUST » MY DEAR! COME ON, \ PAGES: HER GUY JANES HE'S MISSED)






BEGUN::WHY YOURE // GIVE US A NICE, ) IS JUST TURNING DANCING WITH ALL |

$1.00.
@SPUN SILKS, Plain & Ptd.

79c, up. N
WOOLLENS IN GREATEST MEN AND WOME

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} i = PARTY s+» NOW *+5 eS _—BSie, up, §
Peo af ae — Hh FANCY BEDTICK 56” CAS
i | | vi) / i | $1.14 a Yd.
atk y I || MKHAKI DRILLS—5s, 92, 98c
peat. eH v \ GREY FLANNEL—$2.14 a
Hi ig id
) ' Gts. & Ladies’ VESTS—2 for FOR
7 |
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PRICES
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yeni a oa be oie ‘aie THAN BROS. ( 2 B. RIC e i

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TEs aan ae ee | Top Scorers in Tailoring
WINNIPEG , MAN. CANADA - ~

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Full Text

PAGE 1

HABCU HI IKU BARBADOS Unix \ n PACT, illlil I LABOUR PART* Commons Reject The Challenge WINS FIRST BATTLE LONDON, March 9. Laur a new Labour Government tonight WOE EJ Commons bailie by defeating a C EJM confidence with a majority or 14. CROU" "l Commons rejected an opposition challfe 11 u iionalisalioti by :i]0 voles to 296. Bjjjberals who have nine seals voted against the Gov! %  %  •' Saragat's Expulsion Demanded ROME. March !' TLUA party, thi nal later this month lo cxC"juiun Rlghlwin in. it tartar* Socialist ommuuniounciiit Ihr #prr reaM* la* Mianli frm COMIS< i I ^ nfw thai ihoj only arc ^MHOUIIM'of liv r'"' _J*" U hit m WEN*"' 1*1' ~ tprtlfti from i i |kf iimsclf i" 1 ""' cnmi-Mlrr. Unificcmtiotn Is Ha if way HotM&e died Jfrom Union Expt LONDON. H irj. Ink. %  HBH ba mo Transporl Bad Work< i ncemed in the; |pe been barns in the Union for the These I I dlSCipir Wvltifs of lh< %  IN jummer. which parapiupptni in the port of L The men W This lirst searching t. RMII uibour majority brought the largest mutter of memhers to Inn fun uail.amentai> records l>eean 120 v*ars ago. Packed Into .tie House by Party Whip... the near compleb won of .. Mm trenfUi came luattlni -'ll iound -lbow ,v> elbow below the bar at the opposite end of the chamber. nt bench rowded that I ii Innsron Churchill, who m the anintlet for the '<" I'.irliament taking life, arrived ID %  -. Jusl before die vote Minister Clement Attlec Wai "unprecedented" for the Oppositlor to put down amendto thu Tlirotifti on opening of ft tboufhi (be conservative-' aeUon al %  utter The Kinc'.speech—In which the novenuneni I the naLaw To Nationalise %  -teei was though i don not opera* before %  LnduMrjr should be li brought more %  i i runent . |. lied for the vote Many a rum cere-1 IhU morning connected | with French Pn britfaln Deputy Prime Minister Herbert tfofrnon had made K cl< :" fore the H< i i • from iAr i The following sei Mdcrrd npo foi unit Lcelion*— ...n I iV.l^ ,SrRA r T0 ^AC,RI[RE. CIVIL .AVIATION PpyCE. POSTA1 rjniflcath Jif I 1 1 : wiih ii u. mission ii iIH.I 4 aa a a a m i„„,.| aeaart i l>emE muflii-iit ID .itir.i. i w, ihr public irn lliaaaaa nun „i the hiahesl iiualilic.it %  .m, || ,, question of tlirinsufficient to .iilij.i prnon. iih tlir minimuiM qualifli Mtena r ea aJ gw. %  *oe po woo in whi can be bi... %  .., %  rna ,. :. %  . rom IraapM Prime |nabie the poorer loa* aid it, adequate aalarii The Commission reiomnu'ini• I .-*ti> into ,|„. aonnlrunrativc Proenoti< n T . ihc lowesl t. r;<. I• .ibove tnnl who have aBhe ipaJade f i c >|n| admtnb*tratlva L Dirrrr ;.>( .. .,, ba %  moat and ujtut.u( >-rsonallty to the cadet xrad*. 3. Promotion t < Krade, after •uit;i I .l- %  ponallj fiertf.) v-*-. Iinff clerical Dfla w r g, A put" %  i Commiion a chairman and two uther memliers la %  -i miated to lx> of the order -if BSS ftOk • Beat pmar*4 Govt. TTJITTT Over POHIT I* lairls IN STRIKE CRISIS IS. v I ; ,. of the p> %  the names Of Winston Churehil %  be "" or ' boui i)uartan boliavad the Oovivould get honi' in the voiP which was a toe Union's Intaraetai Hoc in the unofficial ftrtwi rker Committee %  M BneaeU'd with the al new : *—Rriitrr. Ming Closer bociation Did Excellent Job %  Ma Uvuoiir Conn wr-op-si'M-. palanil % %  i report %  %  rturr rtconu due ilnui lit oVWk The Conservative amendmnit to %  luuks to opening % %  ii'. took the form of "rethat the future %  nt*| proOpen 11 %  ' ister. emphiisisrd that Au iwn to secure a proralM from the Govarnmant %  • IM month* eouivalanl Govarnnwiil Wanwd ongmtulatiom • trom wrr 1 nilulitriinirMl nid under >Undlni ol each olhcr* drilraa aad -"rrtltat Pai daadMaai oralali .irr %  akin upon ihr rrrommfndallaiifl in thi* roport H iininriisr riatnMeaJi [M n ^1 tlu BfHMl IrniUu tea courerned. 1 know ihr rrruro mm dial ions will br eattfflj otadled .uni iheir impU atleaaa x.mined both in i-i-iiiurrs .nd b ihr pub%  Ik. nol ..UK nh ihr ..nous new whirh ihnr impurUnrr w*rranu. tun bj uaa aidtaart hope of Beaaaa %  Ihrm Ihr %  aaaaa ielaarab| ihr pmpir af ihr Hril ladUoa MM m.ikr thrir raoao aaare a0 Ihre la the ouUidr world. I -n.ili Await with %  aiirwaa the opnlataa ni the ratfaaai l*aW'Jlurrs mi the rri'orl >nd ;l tht* suir I loiitnir aaraalf la rrpratiiiK thr .iK-.ur.in. rv> In. Ii Mr. Creech JaoMa ilaled i wai ty Al MaaUaaia KJ> that B.M. (•iivernmrnl .>( tin I mii-il Kimdum do not look .it inti iiulrd icdrr.iiii.ii in lb. Itrit l*h Wrfti Indir. u .i in..in. ,.i ..w.idini; it, iiiapuaalMMilia ac a* in *iu WBJ reUrdinc thr devrlopmrni ol wtH <;buli may alter 'lamination .ippr.tr Ir.i.ibtr in liirihrr.in(r ol the .itnis which weir u-eplrd al ihr '•Ion lego Ila> I'onlrrriier in 1917. Vuriol Visits Frenrli Hospital IN ENGLAND LONDON The French Pn French %  %  ear, i> %  \ no was %  %  %  j for hi : — Renter %  Electrieit> requli met 98 pr cent througboul France at !" i the Hholatn of Int njiriiMiunnti ;>jIio<\ 1 %  all requiaiUon o d ported for dfutj I was wiio dl %  11xi rtan i >• a four da i underground rtrike, foim.; riactrlcit] normal, . %  ; %  ment ID m fcacwo-.i.: i M hUeu ftaardhm jajfaj ... ,. %  %  d won tho the Government ., II.IM me which it at Trlni mm tederal capital -By Cabte: foe* Parties to Coalition ii to-day ^' a m g? Piaw J*oieni laUowed an an%  "at night in tin.. gJia-Ubcr-.. ( % %  Wind Repui%  %  full I MI tno I. lie and (Ippotlii %  %  %  ,,1-jrt it. Labour latajMl i rail had %  acauat it is In tlu n :h *t :w %  nt should not be DrOU|n1 .ulen and snap '• When a Labour memo) I If the 1 %  .lefeuted the Oovai mid loud laugh If they .. lainly not ba with the Labcrai Part% The Government can deuneadmenl n without :i division by postponing |j nationalisation of nut ev-l'i. *!•! %  larilCT he had tald it would Twldaii^' P tppoal..^ ere ,..„,„ ml had -it '-' .. %  %  hUi >* 2? ?r.* V ...mid moan %  lemate. %  ,,rm..en' !.,l>eralK i %  %  The Striki • > %  > < .. i >-"i., t *.l electiicit> %  Ihree. tj Boat %  %  | "peak.*" lnterf*am i %  The I*, i Irike had onsed I little. I.vit many Pan sin.-t cleaners wr*i' nO on rtrike. Onrbngo > %  —Reuter. King George To lie Invited lo PUrt* Tile LOEHJ I \eiuiifc Nt*. %  %  %  The Invitation will in ;i few menu i\n %  itdant*a ould lc foniiHily Invited bo the A lie %  A Franco Poraigi be ri %  aj will be ki Urulrr. ipproooh To Ruseia Must lie Based On Power -SPENDER %  n .i policj %  | !•• rev Spl I I ii Span%  %  1 %  i %  %  -Renter ( onstatiluiv \$ ill Fipght For Serelso's Rvlurn Fran Our Laacwn orroapooclaail ch 9. behalf of Veal Indian ';< idcni ni Una Fighting Committei mniittoc %  .incl Colonial organisationa lor riphts for 'his tintnonwealth AJ %  on to tht 114 is to ba %  lee of TinI l l %  i %  %  %  i %  i H %  1 i %  i I 1 %  %  i %  \ %  "Sorry I can't see you!" V /Don't let thh * A i ^lhappen to you Deo'f W wry — Be safe using Amolm. • DOM NEGLECT LITTLE BUMS THI THINO TO USI IS UNGUENTINE da what teoHil JNCUtNnNl %  • atuivt *IN • MOHI itaticiioN • MOMOU NiailMO FREE YOURSELF from the BONDS OF CONSTIPATION I whenyw< check OrySca/p Swi mmcr Breaks Record %  %  %  cord foi %  %  %  Iteirtei %  %  %  %  %  %  ir row MAia M hagd-t nid full of loose dandriilt irr you huv \".,trliii< H Scalp by iiippltn •• I ural iCiilp oils LOOM %  V" MUI C rlai I >>r other dtyta| Vatcln.t. i today. Vaseline' HAIR TONIC, uaia IT MOII MIN roaa OtMII HAIR (ON1C i,V///V.'./'/'/'.'/. • i I\III >i caavaia Silrs: <> fl hv 7'. II. nid 10> a fl. liy ft ] All! inoiiiM IN iimis All \ery reusunuhlr i BUDAPEST BRITISH COUNCIL TO BE CLOSED BUDAPX81 IPinKar %  %  Krulri U.S. F€*rces Practise OFF PUERTO RICO Tliousaa-^ct %  I Ol VIOM dunnu big coml %  Aimed F The atucking 'by mora than 150 naval and hundred--" of plaaiartee, foul aaaault aaainad %  > ra< .*! BBaoini N York Tlane* report*'. %  idera. Obt>ervera judaX*>


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frill"? Harrh HI 1950. Barfraiws Itowcate Prirf: FIVE CENTS Ver 5 5. [RINIDAD IS PROPOSED FEDERAL CAPITAL ffinidad _—.n oropw"! rtipllal •gfan.w. % %  '" gjn.1 !*_." I37.927.M9. Jg£V:l.iii5 (89.844 |S" : ; %  |L..-ii> %  BBkatl: J84J mKZ ffwu' 0mrl •' : KTorlruli'"" %  oaTi %  • ^ : " (* UKH/U w/u v/s/r WN/04D %  g pBilriM.ii.il 11..I Mr MM fhur.dill ' 'II I" Ml "' Trinlda.1 on | Hlli jml in" v.sil I'p tn Hie present lli-i %  II ftion from ni.i ii. Results At 1 Glance SECOND DAY MMH I. \. I %  %  %  %  I >< | UMIMII i; \, i %  %  I HI* II I Mil KM MM Mill MM H M l %  I It II I M I l< -.< %  %  -l\i. • %  14 PRISONERS KILLED IN FIRE Ililll.l IS4S or 1948/49 (Revised Battmato) Cam friH SANA EH HONBWI Hi lab IICA& PBNL'LN B L'T.S IBB8AT USDS KDAD %  1 %  on, StALS Tata] True Revenue t H.U22.IIOO %  I 13,413,149 1 M S 13,803,255 £ 9,125,078 > 1,404,87)1 £ 292,082 £ 328.890 I £ 37,453 %  S 845.055 S 2.413,130 S l.luu.llu I £ 2J3.H1 %  ; 2ii M3 'i r. £ 2U.U1I.1U3 111) Grant In Admin. %  $ 1.13,358 $ ItiU.UOll i £ 233,813 (c) Custom' Receipts E 1,511,449 837,850 $ 1,01)5,11811 $17,184,000 £ i.fiUO.IMIIJ 86,0(11 00,400 10,500 I .i.nun.iHii S 024,001' £ 130,000 J 505,000 £ 105,208 $ 108,000 £ 22,iou $ 18,240 £ 3,800 | 2,108,333 S 336,000 £ 70,000 £ 190, ,.10,1100 lOQfOM $ 370.000 £ 77,i 341,552,074 £ 8,635.857 in ~44%~ 10% 23 38% Reoeu.1 :i 13,814 £ 73.782 S 36.190 $ 43.528 I 0114. S 75,07(1 £ 15,827 $ 108,403 £ 22,584 UNIFICATION IS HALFWAY HOUSE 9 Services Ripe For Union bi'on Area ii conatitutional ch dividual policli onlj n u'li function. i nitmenl to and promotion .. i Elected House: Nominated Senate Recommended For B.C. Federation |"HE BRITISH CARIBBEAN FEDERATION" with a seat of Government in Trinidad is recommended in The British Caribbean Standing Closer Association Committee 1948-49 Report, published today. ition in Iti eai ly vearj %  I c itio.uoo per year, n Ii %  .war HI the Pederatloii Lature consisting of a Majesty the K. mbly. -— y • louae of Aa. . to be iiiini%  4 W hut The Princess \\ ill l). To-dw parts ill I II Ii lllrvi lit.iln .Urn ,11,1 ItflU Ii ill pi.l.li. -. li.n.iIN II.ill 1 0 HI Itl.llM* ll, II.it.II. tin PoUee Bend irUI %  lllllll. Il.li.lt tVtll MM! Hi, arena lUnii Lejtaee ii i, tin loyal Part) mi! -i .ii llir will linn wait ii Ike -IKKII Inldnn II.IV.MI: linn mi .U. II II pin. Mir K..1.1I Part] mil Ii iir (.iittoiiimiK lliii., let it M 8 Oraalox Hi i Hun llni-tilji i i.it V Qaald nl llinioiii. in o inlet lit llir llarluilu*. i'oli.. i on %  will be preeenl he , i> in nalorlej •iTViirin (hi "A inn' %  n candoui Letted .ii aapratj our opuui 184,373 38,411 30,733 6,403 45,113 9,409 26,713 5,365 138.679 28,891 $ 230,140 | ...no S £ I C I £ $ £ BKITISII C VltlUIltA.N rUeaM SUMMARY 85,850 17,885 15,166 3,160 8IJHMIA '.9,1437? 61,01311'i 12,71ll %  - ^—-Wl9< (1,321,168 f 275,231 .... aaaaaM (a) (bl CO 1) |e) Total True Qua 011,010 £ of Aitiioi.oCUMI %  aa % (C) o( (•) Net Postiii Ratalsti 1937 S 730,750 £ 152,240 $17,655,487 E 3,678,146 tt 1 .ii..,.:. 1 177,321 1938 P. M £ 8,338,284 %  IJ6.694 £ 8,553,728 1 291,010 s id 1 143,124 ,1,579 £ 3,863,636 $18,U4,235 £ 3.892,559 $ 540,375 £ 113,137 I 46,593 1346 3101.1 £ 21,235,429 $1,12..' L 234,565 • $1,281,325 £ 266,944 1947 £ 24,800,126 i 96,000 £ 211.'HI M^'SBJioa 1 H.123,646 .'!' %  NMM £ 199,104 1948 $128,693,641 £ 26,811,183 a, % $1,121,358 E IM %  2,074 £ 8,635,857 $1,321,168 £ 275,231 Co-Qfnntton %  %  %  II %  crultmcni %  \\i luvinoaaUItM IKMUMII "ll illllll %  %  %  %  Caini-i^ll. J. Iv i le, I) I. Mi %  %  l A no!-%  %  %  objective D4 tafflnj I %  %  auct of the %  • uu pftfr 3 I ongraiukrtiona late f< .tlulali ill. s( a ,,,i t %  %  ! %  --. c Bin iinit.i' ratet iraraili iiMi perl iiuMi.iird u> ii,> eattlM ui UM puiiti H-. Ml in ifeel in,],,., 0 KI Ivea ..M.i lli.ir Blue iu larerr orl.( WeM iiuibi. mi HI i iniliewinemlili hell %  III I'V i • niiiiii'iiii ihi ii i"i i i. n.vi insji MM ,.. I ll. Mllllllld. r prope ee l ore, IHIIM i \,„ iiv in ihr 1 I U ui ill Mmlrni hlelOl vhs Hi id %  MI mills iii.iii i i have rarrls been %  ttHi it* ii, ii"\M'M MIIMI, ill. nr.i to null. nui %  bee* v. i i reel III. 111. ,1.4.1111s ,,| l\,sl 111 .Ins l.tril.in.^ i, ,11 Ii. inline Mil | \,IIM|ll. .1 tin II 1 in lath i-s in in i i.i.i iniii.i'. nil -him the s.inir ) on par,. : %  British Honduras Hi B 31 2 SI 1. .i would IM* Wholl ul the %  • i b> '.ini; i %  %  ... %  would %  i i froni Its rmaui of %  I Of III \rais %  — %  nl. The* %  II.4.IH. M";.iil to BBC .nwixMisibihUi s „. uu QoveaWaaaMi **Unis mil ui DawUSasal <>f tierenee .Btei luttoasj retoa^aeM prohs4 1 1.uu %  .M-i rail] %  iiiisi ,n. esj ratesMI II' His V...Jt".t> U I'llll. l| -ll.tUlll hjl | mt < ..i Isfslllli. It IK Ii. .1 ,1.1. i ipsewiMUttos to be Id.-... mi\i.r> rrlJltU, iirreuce, UM ,...i i | ,,. t w essi MBO 11 derail..ti .. .mnliirs. sc%  1 1 unan%  inliii mil ui .rUIn 1 MI it s.., limn, ..mi M-UMMI.. BVfetlr .ml. urn uin.lirs ;ll ,i srrvirn # mi pace < ailtl _the exchange Four Horses Repeal First Day Wins B.T.C. Spring Meet Enter* Upon Second Day LION. J l ( H AMII.KK S Wi.ur.i.^s Mr. I. J 11 "Silver liullri". Mr. A. P. Cox'i l.d> li.ll. tnd Mi I. < I. ('. IVtknis' "ShiilHc v..s|(.rdii> r.|ir,ilril lli.u tus( il,.> A m^ ,.s (he Hjirli.nlus Tin I I lull Spi in\1rrl riltrifii tlBOB taM Nimnil DH| Slj^hl slinurrs vi-sierdn\ ilnt mil miflcrially ;im*. i I Iu irack. The> ItnVMVW ii-mlfil to m.ikr ii | lil)li> alowei Dhi Btavsii wan IttwJ ibaosl to'capach] but iftJn ilntroHil mi US [IQWrini \\;i.



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PACE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOC \TF "M>AY, MxRrii Hl-NRY BY CARL* ANDERSON s < MICKEY MOUSE <££' BY WALT DISNEY BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG CU BO* A NMT OFFft TO DO '.'.MAT I WANT' K-V—^ OH. PEAC JV' j\: %  ILL FIX MYSELF A SANDWICH ANO GO 10 BED AND THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER r w5GCIN3 TO ^ar IOU. uusi WAITED TO PROVE THT I OAD %  OUTiAW TRAIL AN' XVlANf lp6W| 1DTT..' it. o. < \.v\o\ .*%\( VE!> TMiV'Hf lOTM TAKtN %  ( OS NO. MR PnOP.lt ^ NOMiSb.l AS&U*[ VOO.. %  ""m WUHIOAT CAU1* OOOOt Mflfr mwi* n, M u..MIIUT. Ht.MH.WOm GOOONKMeT %  %  HitMIe ih. ||,.<| Oom.n hO VOU KQTlcI THAT OAliotH IP MK.KO ?JUST LKI THI JNI N TM( BOOV AT out HOT I II-.KON OLD PftOPIlf S flt %  ONIV SHIN OCIPf -^ BRINGING UP FATHER 1 BY GEORGE MC.MANUS ai5Geee'aLLIVB ADSTEO THE eUTieR AT TME PPCNT COOP ANO H —, III COCL J u EEK' .. %  • RIP KIRBY %  E I M***.t %  %  "Oj W*v MC\, J .PAW — = %  t-Sfi vCWBHV i\ T~E 1 rtOMfeJ UO 1 VHJLT AKO *i*V* iW.TAT.Xfi JAtOSOC. *WM =•>< / MA.i~^TOs BY ALEX RAYMOND %  THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES %  .;t.'.5 DRINK AND ENJOY R-t-l%  • • b-to'"*)-ii JTJ*^ AM REfEIVFB .... ASK FOR THE BEST McEWANS. i * knS POSTS -every hour of the day Whin tvaryoae ita i hot tad bo red mi mil uaatnate) hy your flw htw If you do thfe, Afttt your B M Titornn Powder, [< M tun you Hkin to xilk : otOttM you HI m i|, al k|.VO.l.l.,llltlh ll.-l, (II ,|„y |0B| .lIlllllO lH !"' ham I.. fwUty. 1 roar vita u.u fraifrtuu-y IUVII lovti. Cashmere Bouquet TALCUM POWDER COLGATE*LNOClV|.pf iT C0 [ INCE& CoJ Announcing the arrival of 1950 PRESOLD j REFRIGERATORS 4.44 c.f. r;i)i BM HM N*<' PMturc liese — ALL STEEL noi.V il D I Ml. with %  .V\..ii GII Let l v demomtrale Ihose I i You. iave just arrived! This is the mixture Two wonderful remediesZubes Cough Mimure and Zubts Cough lozenges. Thy are new here but well proven elsewhere. Zobts Coufh Mixture iiexcellent lor WOUi.Bj t,,„, Vl ,_ 'ti'l i conceited dMM, 'o, l.mil, ,„ c C h,| dr ,„ l*Vt thit pl.Jtlnt t „| ^ f ^, p Zub.lCcu|hM..i • home A SPECIAL BOOK and here are thg azenges of 'd.udHi and %  0 roui mouih :'.f*i! oi MMZMMI FOB THE CHILDREN! &f RUBBALON TALES I by ENID BLYTON I Bmyr Hum] _bj : "** CYCLOPAEDIA WHITAKEB CK %  i coop iK£isr;


PAGE 1

T" %  ail AKCH CLASSIFIED ADS. ,, ; W .T^" BARBADOS ADVOCATE >'w.r HIKE .•/OR mv r ins ortw. for private Chiutrtw I! %  ^fl*t> Hook to Bni enrj mahi NeUwrkoda Oa Industry Expands I I'hn .WAV" | QWMI %  ' Pk r Mm Cin Coam. i u iu la. Servant Room. 'h Febr... "•cmbrr. KC w „,, 8 1 M ;,!. !UU cAmmoi NOTICE I F.RS %  man BXZAB i"i with Rf|„ a %  idnawr, ITmlMn i3.i.se~tf,i %  %  I'lNi; CROfT-. mil. unfumiahM %  %  CHUl fum n>. on Ibi %  MB %  BBBBBBBMBJI Ml.i*. 'he bo-i ". in fr -1 %  M fW APP<> %  jgnMStmi. a 8 H.I* 41 %  %  %  >-" % %  K %  i c %  10 3 50-Jn NOTICE >i (BAD ,., m | u M -iir .i _•* Bin qujgg VfbKfcVll H i !' 1841 Sbettm Arr> %  1 At'CTIp y i %  -iwap. %  %  i-oii. itMcriag am MbatM .i ih< h rUl Irtlr-i. (.vn. iv.., ,(., "" %  • %  < M888M IM. | '_'!"" ihtu ,..„„ %  ... ,. ,„„„,, lid (HI ilir falulmml of %  %  I tout Oil t %  Uwrt hu Own great undress In I The subsoil lanu* has probabl> bai thcroughly explored lor oil man thai of any other country In : • search foi began In i93ft, was pn %  -kers irom being %  Exploration U now continuing rge scale \v %  %  and SuuKtll i'rcsentinjf 11K> oi %  . 10b thai Botl urc "' ' ' Coal Study WASHING: President Truman • Congress to utK commission to study long range coal Indus;: tQ Wc-lYe*ioent Alban Harklev I Mavbu. (Democrat Tex..sent to • Bi • %  1 In his mimshed the need for a long rangt %  and puQll I from the %  Undpoinl ol ihe miner*, the •we all. the N;i.'i-rest. —Renter NOW.. Iii Carl*le K NEW CAM FOR EMPLOYEES il IEL1). Ohio. March 8 .. %  MM ronl%  %  1MB %  %  l M. '• 1949: 7 prodi this — Kerjier DM propootd ex haj ..iso uvgui in Rotter„.. led output o on production has m ->000 tons in 1053. It \s due it %  '' pertl nj .... um rw .949) 620.000 tons, a Lb 1"U,000 tons in 194b and 213.000 tons in 1B4T. The ruriher parUcular* my h* obuinv % %  %  • % %  .. %  i %  S S i0--3n NOTICE urn \IBMiTURE \iv: %  _j~m ToM V-il I r.J. %  1 i id TeieplMMif ao( : %  i |.M at lUlpn A llnrfl* \\,e%  ,, A MUM nssrtaua BCELUNE0US %  DM m lus Un MUs. 9JM-.-n to %  (. %  4X-ti.,l r Ilrpt %  8 3 SO—In %  0 I udt lo otdM UNDER THE SILVER HAMMFR W. ft. N. %  Il Ch.irf. Book-'. Divan Ooud iioli: Chiir. %  %  %  %  %  %  %  ; Knire D:.i It" *£* OUM w ,,r T IJiiili-i TabU Cl*r %  Iron Si 1 nid nihi-r HCTIL. Sale Tmna Ca*h. IIHANKEIf Ti: %  II : AS CJOINO COM EB! rv Stone BulMli AeMSMnaa uiiKhli. OlM %  %  %  %  REAL ESTATE %  %  10 1 50 %  %  %  %  I Mm "* "' "-TON ftAjrjn H LOST %  $ *440-oa. v 6saa-Sl !&-*> *A (*ao- L to R • WhllU*. Chaw_ 8 3 90-£> %  I ... 4.838 *q ft FVOI' plenty at -pact tor Chtcrii-r. Oil laid on. M | %  .r„i aiiackMl •< 1 tnlm opt' IWO bnlimxii* ..m %  i %  %  Ufa Friday ITlh March. 18U. at 1 30 p m %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  natii th< %  %  I %  UAU %  per cent of Dutch domestic rei the %  .fcntraled at PMIlla, Rotterdam—has also ex! I)utch-Shell| %  J plant, which rellned 2.600,000 tons Ml xpected to ;t,400,000 tons RESULTS RACING Of 1-Wi.inn WINNER : %  >la.MMi ILvi.r WMM t* W L tunlcia. Vh BfiyUSB •.UiulaUtV II. Au v. Oachaiol M LMi votlf. AM *€-h I'nMd Mi Adlna M i ii Womia *<-h 'audaiph*. Vi. wlior. Me* Adautia. II M S OUaagw UUMVaUal %  S Ct'STODIAN. 3.M4 ton. nM, Cast Thorn p*on. from Horn I met. Airnx t'o.1* ft Co Lid CM Wran.l. % %  off. *rom Trinidad A|>n>< *• \( MI. * % %  ft Co.. Ud : %  %  ipt rtiucii fioni Hi Jinn A HXPAHTCHIS cht tKANDrrt 31 MM %  i %  %  %  %  %  IN TOUCH WITH IIAKI'UHPS CO\ST STATION %  >dvia thai the) can %  UTbadi' %  %  %  Moral %  I lillB.SH %  NOTICC PABIM MI RAIH1 MH il *i: haimg Account* .uyun*t thi thr \ooch* (duly nuulr .'.'"i C* mo j Clark. %  Barbados Youth Movement o[ I %  %  **d B*v. 1. IllUt :-< I AKKf 11 ORAMT' %  %  Mo ItlM YEARWOOD i :. lefltan 5.3.JO W DWBLUNO HOtra '!".. %  %  %  %  ihrrr hadrnnm<. loilrl and hath im lirii Noor Oov< Ity InaUlIad For Impecllon dial 3381 %  Hi* nt ow UfAor. I day 17th Mnrrh. aj KID ft BOYCC. (iiil Sen icr \s\iiriiiliiiii i %  %  %  REMOVAL NOTICE r.. %  %  %  give -ami io all UOVEHXME.Vr NOTICES. %  1948-49 Id of seventy-two cgpt POLICE MM H i. DEPARTURE OF HRH PRINCESS ALICE FRIDAY. 10TH MARCH. 1950 :ween the hours of 4 45 p.m. and 5.15 pj HI Cavans %  ihead Lane or the Pli I 2 No driver shall allow his \ chicle to bt n or pass across any %  iowing roads between I 45 p.m. and 5.15 p.m.: — MM Hill. Belmont Road. Constitution Road, St Michael's Row, Trafalgar Street, Trafalgar Square and the Chamberlain Bridge. Made under Rule 22 of the Bridgetown & SpetgM (Amendment) Regulations 1943. %  Bridgetown, 10.3.50. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES %  \ 150 to 11.500 per annum oi i I £M to 11,100 p annum with u .: %  ctle will .... nu pfa> %  1 ind wneraUj U i pn ,,ii Child tUowi i I'SM 1 0% Ol -IHIV i Full partlcvJ u • i % % %  nould be received on or liefore 31st %  biuMttoi -iu ui Guidon. Sen-t. HOLMW.C I. from whom fui '30. 10.3 MIn MIIOtDWil XO\lllllS oi IS I I Ml M N W .u\ STOCKINGS In New Shade* M.gg per P r. 1 U ..II .vrr Hi hi wldr in Ahite. Beigr. Blirk j| 51.77 per pr. \l-.. irimini.K Lgee ir mi Re. lo IHr. per >d. • \lllt.S' Hills in .1 Li,. \.-.,iiinriil nl mlou". M i ( III N IOWI LH i ,/, 47IHIOAIIUAV JMIISS SHOP. Need bottle-fed babies be cry-babies ? Ccrumly run | Dl <4mpain (hepuoofindsf 'Tll>-ou*ce.i*api to lormsijonn "'l *IM: nu'kc>4ni(m..tl Robin*..,' %  PMctu Bnriej rhlsfMDi boiifc-i. milk and pitn|| v*ii %  i snd IM now be lb ROBINSON'S PATENT BARLEY ^uLumll 1\ M I \ 1 t orn vi. h i %  IHM nii}:> > ,r. %  Mrrdlna ihr It.i .1., ,„i. M>I Il uaranlrr Amaaan mu.l paahi nOHIh *•!! .ind ••>• >oui r. nionay PMI M ntWl Ol mpit |— k **. Oat Amaaan Irom your cha Astsosan £?• r P r *rrk—Trk N..ifc Cuuudiau Natiuaal Steamahipi KOITHnni HB H UADV Nl i m ,'A.NAOIAN IIIAIJ KNOI l( LADY Hi %  nth Mar LADY Mi '..ADY IU/I1NIV l-M>Y Nl i t-AHY IIUUM I 50th M 1 An NOBLTBinOt NO llnil M %  LADY Nt i III :-AI)Y HODNtY %  %  ADY KKUfO.N sih *; May LADY RODNEY I.APY NFJ i !th JitIv i^DV BODNXY Itin i 7*ih J, Au, S I GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. Agentg. PAA offers CUPPFR CV-240 Service between SAN JUAN ST. THOMAS SY. CR0IX ST. JOHNS ST. LUCIA PORT OF SPAIN The Clippe. CV.?40 l| acknowledged to be the mott odvoncrd type ocplane ol in kind. In extra large picture windowi. vidr uillcs ond iH 40 roomy, recline-ioyOi>r-comlori lean, ativre paiiengei*, ihe uimoit li comforl and luxury in (light By providing this moM incdero.lou.dependobie Clipper on this route. PAA It con'nbutino, to ihe odvancement o( the ropidlyqrowinq lour ivf oreo in the inland* bei-.. %  • Puerto Rico and Trmidau. For lull informolion ond 'eietvaiionv consult your t'ovel agent or PAN AMERICAN WOKLO AIRWAYS PAA iKeslslcrr-d in Trinidad) I "iv.i r.i.td -.Urr-I HndKrtowi Harb^dim. I'hunrs: 4585 A '7R COt, CiLE.. III.V\S.\II.A\II<>I>: FREN.'H US£ DONE" 'MISR" %  ;NE" Balllei It MaMM K M %  .'.Ill N.lllllH lu l'l>muulli Manh 21st Afrinl 4tli May I3lh May Jlst Por furlhcr parti. .: to:— B. M. JONES & Q.. LTD.-Agents. Attention is drawn •Amendment! Order, IM the Official 1950. 2. Under this Order the n tall elling %  re as follows: — '"il -K-i nscni "*i.i %  *' -olene *sii,^' __^ • gUShT'Wh March. 1950. WHOLESALE PRICE ore than) PRICE 3 ?,U i i LIGHT & POWER TROUBLE FREE "LISTER" ALTERNATOR SETS 115 11 H '•.! %  Iir.lVES AI.TF.RNATOR8 J K K.W. l.J B.W. U K.W. tt K.W. Ail rompl.lr Mith sw il< hbojrj. nd Aul.mmlk V.IU<. Krtula^rB. IPLKTE RANGE Or SPARE PARTS IN STOCK Apply THE HXMtMMSS tOIMtHi 1.1,1. Hhltf P.rk Road Dial li !CV€LISTS ONCE AGAIN |THEY ARE HERE DUNLOP 28" x l 1 2 Creiuii Roadster Txr.s 26" x l'/" Huiiii" Tvres ECKSTEIN BROS. DIAL 426 BAY STREET .'GREAT INTEREST Booki-r T. W.i.lnn Inn —By Basil Mnthewi WkUt Kunu --B> Jack I Four Sluari Hnrirails —By HUKII : WUllai Ulyascs By James Joyce Treasure in Ihe Caribbean —By A. W. Acworth Now on Sale al: ADVOCATE STATIONERY ;==—-.


2a Friday
Mareh 40

19590.





















ay 0
TT idad

d capital
“a a aten Caribbean

aa 586,700; 206,410

























































Results At |
A Glance

SECOND DAY















































om 7,236 acres. vy ‘ Menetieance?
$37,927,519. nore ae BY oo Fir NINTH RACE
* $37 417,052. ¢ ut He ¥.. eS September Song, (O'Nei
aad : Lf te Chae ora ss, Pepper Wine, (Crossley j
es 105 (89,644 ee ee ENR ES Lady Pink. (A. Gonzal
: 0 ' iS EN’ ACI
et}, : ee “ ? cD Watercress, (O'Neil) |
Create Pharos Il, (Holder
g44 gals. . 9999 _ itor Colleton, (Crossley) |
rf £99,245 gals. $2,222. ibs ELEVENTH RACH
a aa ¢ Joint Comme folder
ws; 9,009,644 lbs., eae Miss Priendahiy,. (Yoon |
, TWELFTH RACE
: 25, te, (Payne
+ 18,696 tons, $2,925 (Payne)
. Lady, (Yvonet
: $844,446. NTH RACI |
i 802,423,910 ie iOtoaalés
Ic Yve T |
| Maytime, (P. Fletehe
FOURTEENTH RACH
32,395,539 | 1 Lady Belle, (Thirke
1,304,029. Di eit 1 {yy
goods: PIPTEENTH RACH
Bullet, (O'Ne
| .
setroleum $15,048.- | timer ne
ie_petto! ENTH RACE |
syailways carried 8,675,- | Gun Bite, (Cross |
ng 458,189 tons of goods Bi ;
Â¥ 10,308,098 tons of |
se entering Port of _———— ee ate
Pa i 2,065,074 was | st
ig 14 PRISONERS |
r 5,059 aircraft at ‘ |
Pinging 34,028 pas- KILLED IN FIRE
anor NEW MEXICO, March
rf Fourteen Armed Force
CHILL WILL VISIT jers died and two he
TRINIDAD ritically jured hen
understood, that Mr. a tempor pris
Churchill will be ing andia Secret. Weay
in Trinidad on rear here last night |
s 14th and may visit , Five other peopl ver
sdos, Up to the present Fs - me by smoke |
yer, there has been no as ae Brin Bey why Sandia base is a part
tion from official td ‘ x Armed Forees Secre Weapr |
Ye Sharew rs mourn i (project. The atomic boml
, Paty 42 , embled there.—~Reuter |
|
asec acta ae gible ermine, MUS eas Ne oto ck
: | : ie
1948 or 1948/49 | iS |
| | ;
(Revised Estimates) Heed : 7 ‘ A A
k
| | ° oe! y rT ©
NN a ensaaeatinetennen * a
@) ey ee ere 9 Services Ripe For Union
Grant in |
Total True Aid of Customs | % (c) Net Postal UNIFICATION of the Public Services in the British Car
Revenue Admin- Receipts of (a) Receipts | bean Areas involves no constitutional changes. It leave
Vebaciscehinaeeâ„¢ the Governments of the several colonies tree to pur:

Sparacenpey re : : a er nae Pot their individual policies, and derogates from their pow:
$ 8,822,00 be 95 o. eT ’

— oe : ye vial ? ae only in so far as such functions as fall to them in rega
A; ered oh > 528,098 : 3 to recruitment to and promotions and transfers in unified |
$ 20,349,118] $800,000°] $ 7,255,000 36% $ 354,152 | | services are taken out of the hands of the individual G |
£ 4,239,399] £ 166,666] £ 1,511,449 £ 73,782 bail | e@rnments and transferred eh regional authority.

’

» os +0 a a ‘ Having made this clear Sir,
+. SelB $ 127,798 $ 837,650 37% $. 36,290 : Maur’ er iiciines and the other sig-} that it is an Indifferent sul |
$ 2,740,009 $ 153,358) ¢ 1,005,080 $ 43,528 | natories of the Report of the Com-| tor the latter.”
£ 572,902 £ 31,949) » 909,412 £ 9,047 mission on the Unification of the Co-operation

i : | Public Services in the British ‘But it must not be supp |
$ 43,413,245 — $17,184,000 38% _ | Caribbean area 1948—49 conclude:} that because we are alivi |
£ 9,044,426 nase £ 3,580,000 — j “A unified service is, at best, no| UmPerfections of any systen

j 50% more than a half-way ube ‘pe. | WNification which falls stiorts
$ 174,586 si $ 86,904 $ 75,970 tween separate services for each *deration, Mp ue eee so
x $6,873 ve £ 18,105 £ 15,827 | > mee m | territory and a federal service, and| Pie of Uniti ap 7 ae be
23% PRINCESS ALICE we should be lacking in candour if} S08: On the contrar,
‘ $ 215,424 ae $ 50,400 $ 108,403 | as she leaves the Races | we ‘failed to express ‘our opinion will and ready co-operi (
Is, £ 44,880 ee £ 10,500 £ 22,584 4 part of the Governme ) (
_ seinen Db scccsaiintiitbonents - en oes | SOV territories we be
& Ree ea BRITISH CARIBBEAN AREA ate been BrOp
only re a I a ubst
mPENDEN- $ 43,803,255 aa $17,421,304 40% $ 184,373 ees solide but & whe mh
is £ 9,125,678 tie £ 3,608,605 £ 38,411 SUMMARY advantages which flow {1
sipinpsiclietanieaaniicietieesiideial es — a . neilisiaiiliaee eae adoption of a wider basis « e- |
s $ 1,404,876 _— $ 624,000 44% $ 30,733 } cruitment and promotion thi I
£ 292,682 ene £ 130,000 £ 6,403 (a) | (b) (c) bey | (e) present obtains might well e}
| the way for the extensio { (
$ 1,578,700 $ 505,000 32% $ 45,113 Total True | Grants in Aid Customs % (c) | Net Postal | federal principle. We have postu
; Q¢ f . 55 ‘ ' w z “ad (
: £ 928,695 *y & 105,208 . Revenue of Adminis- Receipts of (a) Receipts sprains ii tae sé ian ve ki : =
$ 396,789 $ 168,000 $ 108,000 27% $ 26,713 tration if our proposals are examined

? erent re bi ai 5 —_——\|--- | peer penretari a a a parochial spirit ; th jeal
v 82,665 & 35,000 £ 22,500 £ ad tacos on ‘Gan me aint 1
‘ 9.96 $ 18,240 10% $ 138,679 1937 $ 37,011,010) § 730,750 $17,655,487 48% $ 844,622 | the existing privileges and powers|.
+: haa 1 : : : : 7,707,294 52,2 3,678,146 : 177,821 ‘| of individual colonies, unification ||
- iat ; 3.800 £ 28,891 £ 7,707, £ 152,240 £ 3,678,146 £ 177,32 | of individual colomies, unifica | \

we % 37,453 — £ : 2 will become an impossibility
' 92 oF ¢ @ 9n 7K oe » ons The re Ss sig i y Si i
a, 8 OAT, $10,120,000 25% || $ 280,146 1988 = ..| | $ 40,025,704 y ooioi9 | $igai,s7o | 46% | $ 540375. |, The report is signed by Siri}
£ 9,131,608 se £ 2,108,333 | £ 47,946 £ 8,338,284 | 5 40,629 £ 3,863,636 £ 113,137 | Campbell, S, A. Stone, J. KE. C.|'\i
mi * ‘Farlane, D L Matheson, J.| {i
ICA 5. 845,055 $336,000 40% || $ 85,850 0% aacomenes | * ee s aeeaee Me or a tae ee
$ » 845,055 7“ $i 08, rat 17.985 1939 $ 41,056,694 $ 686,995 $18,684,235 46% $ 222,924 O’Connor, W, A. Date and H. P.|}}
£ 176,053 ae £ 70,000 | & 089 s 8,553,728 J: eee Feo tinh ak £ 46,593 Goodwyn (Secretary).
\ 3 f ny £ 148,124 £ 3,892,559 | f A note of reservation is made} {\\
mA 6] $ 2,413,136 ies $ 794,250 38% || $ 15,166 See : ; by Mr P, F. Campbell.
£ 302,737 _ £ 190,669 £ 3,160 1946 . $101,930,050 $1,125,912 $33,192,625 33% $1,281,325 | Throughout their deliberations | \
£ 902, 7% * | £ 21,235,429 £ 234,565 £ 6,998,468 £ 266,944 | the Commission kept in mind the | \\\
Weia $ 1,100,410 ae $ 480,000 44% $ 91,888 ‘5 objective of “staffing the public} }})
hs Nal ie > | £ 19,1437 | . 5 An “ ° wala wate asl es | services with persons of local|
; 5 ape an . ; w A967 ne ation ts ? oe $4020 00R 38% $/955,606 | descent to the fullest extent that
MINCENT .. $ 1.218.929 Sa $ 370,000 30% $ 61,013)" : | £ 24,800,126 £ 20,000 £ 9,423,646 £ 190,104 | compatible with the effi dent co I
fi a hae oe 7.083 £ 12,7115 8.4 | . duct of the services and we believe | }\\
£ 288,944 ee . #1948 | $128,693,641 $1,121,358 $41,552,074 32% $1,321,168 that acceptance of our recomme!
™ a - Seooergreenenren® : 7 Co "'ne agi SS ea | F ig artengbor ations will enable the Secretary o! | {{{
1 $128 603 641 $1,121,358| $41,552,074 aa aat (revised £ 26,811,183 £ 233,615 £ 8,635,857 | £ 275,231 | Seas es oe teen Hi
£ 26,811,183 £ 233,615 || £ 8,635,857 ; estimates) extent with the need to transfé ry
ors , eo eee >| officers serving outside the, region | \\\
RA > 3 Ut
ition by H.M.G. towards cost of subsidization, ion iae ee ee @ on page i
" = —E —_—_— \\
i
ay IF our Hor ses Repeat )
|



= BAHAMAS
|

{JAMAic, Ge








\ NIGARAGUA,



YQ f
| eh
Mee, Bia ., kc,



, | ey ‘
— iho”

By
————

7
Ege Ss
CARIQ@BEAN SEA

, nor is Brit ish Guiana).

NGO

a

WEST INDIES









First Day Wins

B.T.C. Spring Meet Enters |
| Upon Second Day
| |

| JON. J. D. CHANDLER'S “Watercress”, Mr. L. J. Wong's! |

“Silver Bullet”, Mr. A. P. Cox’s “Lady Belle” and Mr. ,
I, 0, C, Perkins’ “Slainte”, yesterday repeated their first day |
| wins as the Barbados Turf Club Spring Meet entered upon
the Second Day. }

Slight showers yesterday did not materially affect the

track, They however tended to make it a little slower. |
| The Stands were filled almost to-capacity but again the |
|





crowd on the grounds was comparatively small. )
The Field Stand Prizes that{eighteen pounds \
| Teached the four hundred dollar The Forecast paid their. highe
} mark six times on Saturday, were; dividend of the day on this race—|
| Slightly better yesterday. The high- | $109.80. ay
jevt prize paid, for the day was Huon. J, D, Chandler’s brown
$518 to the holder of ticket 2792] gelding Guh Site out ‘of O.T.C|}
j that drew Silk Piant in the half-; Sunrise stepped out of hi rin} (
pred creole Handicap for G-2] the final race of the day, the B \\)
nimals only. Five times, ir ade ead Turf Club Har p to}}))
tion to this instance, the prize; snatch first place from M1 ( (
passed the $400 mark fi ’s hea ck
Outstanding feature of the day’s| ing Blue Streak i
a fine effort in whi ‘ O'Ne
vi 1 ok Perkin Slainte n 1 Sa
ruldered 43 1 the Garrison }
handicap an 1 from the aged | wh« t ingle winne
War Lord to whom he conceded @ On Page 10

Adunca
NIDAD IS PROPOSED FEDERAL CAPITAL

,

{)




re

a,
“FIVE CENTS

riee:

Wear 335.



Elected House:

Nominated Senate
Recommended For

B.C. Federation

“THE BRITISH CARIBBEAN FEDERATION”

with a seat of Government in Trinidad is
recommended in The British Caribbean Standing
Closer Association Committee 1948-49 Report, pub-
lished today.

Recurrent cost of the Federation in its early years is
estimated to be of the order of £180,000 per year. It is
recommended that the legislative power of the Federation
hould be vested in a Federal Legislature consisting of a
Governor General (representing His Majesty the King) a
Senate and a House of Assembly.



ae

SS Sia cata ie Sa ceeale





+! Fifty seats in the House of As-
" >..° sembly are proposed to be aHot-
What The Prineess | tea as follows:
ae PORNO ks Gs es .
: Nay British Guiana ....... 5
\ ill Do lo day | British Honduras .... 2
: | Jamaica 16
it 9 um. a representative | Antigua : ae
party of children and teach | St. Kitts ; eye ea
ers from all public schools } Montserrat es
aud the =omajor private Crinidad alte 9
schools will assemble at Gov | | Grenada 2
ernment House to Greet St. Vincent 9
H.R The Police Band will || St Paihia 2
attend. Dominica 7» 2
ML.RH. will visit the Chil Thé House of Assembly would
dren's Goodwill League at | be wholly elected on a basis of
11.55 am, The Royal Party | Universal adulv suffrage and the
Will see the babies in the |] c., would consist of 23 sena-
Creche and will then watch | tor ippointed by the Governor
the school children having reneral in his discretion.
their meals, Senators would be appoint.
At 3.55 p.m, the Royal ed in respect of each Unit, except
Party will leave Government Montserrat One Senator would
House for H.M.LS, “Glasgow be ppointed from Montserrat,
after their three-day visit. The House of Assembly would
\ Guard of Honour, pro be empowered to elect its own
vided by the Barbados Police | Sp er whether or not from its
Force, will be present on the wn membership and also a De-
Wharf at 4 pum. | puty Speaker and Chairman of
( mitvec hould however
ee | be i member of the Assembly
2 Membe of the Federal Assembly
. +} ie 1: (Seveyesthaie' che >
Congratulations | \" ‘bs Pes a
e following is the text } or 10 Years
‘ge which was received fro | rst Senators would be ap-
ecretary of State for the] ‘ { +a Bi as een
lah Si ed for term of ten years.
“I congratulate the Stand- | P) i ene Ving pee Tt he
ing Closer Association Com Sega yee aie Sat nen
: jpenate in the case of Bills other
mittee most warmly upor \than money Bills w suld have ;
their report published to-day. labia it a iets f t fe +} iy = tie
this exposition of the politi- oe : ee oe ee
cal and economic issues in- :
volved in federation as affect { Waving regard to the ines-

ing both the West Indian
territories themselves and
their place in a larger world
must give the West Indian
people a heartening confidence
in the statesmanship of their
representatives.

‘ commend the repori t«
West Indian Legislatures for
erious examination and dis
cussion, The Committee
proposals will not, we may be

ure, prove exactly to the
taste of all Modern histor)
shows that initial demands
made upon units joining in a
federation have rarely been
easily conceded, however
compelling the urge to unite
may have been. Yet I feel

sure the peoples of West In

capable responsibilities of His
Majesty’s Government aris-
ig out of problems of de-
fence, international relations
aud ultimate financial stabill-
ty of the Federation in its
external relationships, it has
been thought necessary to pro-
vide that in certain carefully
delined circumstances related
to the foregoing, His Majesty
in Council should have cer-
tain overriding powers of leg-

islation§ suflicient to enable
those respensibilities to be
discharged .

These powers relate to de-
fence, the regulation of the

relations between the Federa-
tion and foreign countries, se-
curing and maintaining fiman-

dies territories will be follow cial stability and in certain
ing the example of their emergencies, securing and
representatives in the Com maintaining public order and
mittee, and show the same supplies and services.

@ on page 5

adel. ..........he exchange

|

subtract. from the other
]

Line charges

@ on page 6





when you travel by
Trans Canada Air Lines to

U.S.A., Canada or Eng-
land. For full information
consult your T.C.A.: general
Agent:

GARDINER AUSTIN & C0., LTD.

Phone 4518

McGregor Street







ig

pa

at

Spee: ganee



Â¥
7

i

pit

®

pl ia a a ai Sey oer crag nese



Bos






FRIDAY, MARCH 10

PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE

irene re en en ne I eA ene et

—
Sponsored By C.D. & W. A Matter Of Rorows i. ‘Chutter Bra

® ® ISS ELISE MURRAY who has ie 2ECTOR of British Blo
4 been in England on a six stock Agency = lel and al Accessory shops on Fifth Ave-

teen months’ course on Infant Ed- Veterinary Surgeon is Mr Gerald} nue reveal the velvet touch Wide

ueation, which was sponsored by Mc. Elligott, who has been here| crushed belts of past tel velveteen,

Development and Welfare re- for three days staying at the | black velvet ribbon fancy neck-

‘s| 1 Peter Pan collar-and-

turned yesterday via Trinidad by Marine Hotel. One of the buyers) ‘aces, and

1959











AQUATIC CLUB CIN EMA, (Members cu

SATURDAY, MONDAY, WEDNESDAY NIGHT
. J

=N and JANE WYMAN yf

j
‘
g








5

in “KISS IN THE DARK»

VICTOR MOORE-—-WAYNE MORRIS—






















































B.W.LA for this Agency, he is on his way | cuff sets in flower colours on dark, with BRODER
AST night Government House She travelled from England on to Panama Peru via Jamaica shee r wool dresses a i CRAWFORD IY
was most attractive; he Elders and Fyffes liner the He will then go J Farley ee ae ae, Sallie apes 4 Warner Bros. Picture

illuminated for the evening re- Matina,’ as far as Trinidad Kentucky and Virgir oa we a braid a nyl n nak Se
céption which began punctually I England she attended the turning E Fair tt has - a ae - at fumae a ome ; : SS SSS See,
at 9.30 o'clock With a mebile . Educatior Sally” wil short eit tai k for ‘a very low style —
generator and the Governme! he ity and e ly as a Cons rse. Mr folded acre to act as a modesty > rs , : "" 54
Heuse emergency lighting plant onden hris Newr t Indian} vect in exvreme styles Mer cas any ith cis ELECTRIC
in operation, the grounds were ‘ Agent as at Seawell to see him Latest pigskin gloves have : Showing To-night at 82 '
partially floodlit and picked out oaaatt fi nica wit dl yw set in at the wrist mow at 4 aia
in coloured fairy lights : RS. BILL FORBES, returne R.A.F. Association so that the wearer can see her B R Ou Hi K, it (ONE NIGHT oy

It was a clear and starry night watch keneath ONLY)

yesterday from visiting her ~QuUADRON LEADER Da ac Tal r
mother in St. Lucia, and is here S ; H : has been —LES. | J O N A THAN
yntil Saturday when she will fly | .inted Overseas iaiso. -

intea Sa eal

or baeniedl via TCA. Her hus- oes bg Royal ‘iis Benes Girls Neek a A SAT. “MASSACRE RIVER

band is an Engineer with Association in London
and Wireless in Bermuda, and Members of the R.AF-A., an By C. V. R. THOMPSON. DIAL 8404 FOR RESERVATION

Mr. A. G. L. Douglas, Divisional ...p ar. personnel wishing to} NEW YORK (By Mail).

Manager of Cable and Wireless «3: the Association are invitelto| Feminists are bombarding Con- f i, z :
West Indies, just returned from |... ‘ with Mr. Henderson | gress to legislate for full equality B |

nicate

If one corner of the grounds a
tell tree with spreariing branches
and thick foliage’ was floodlit,
while in the far corner of the
lawn a flamboyant tree was bor-
dered with red lights and in the
ceniure background blue lights were
strung along a covered waik

















Ladies in their long flowing ev« Puerto Ri ; oe ( nu |
ning gowns and gentlemen, mostly lis Puerto Rican tour, and MIs. 4+ ston, Marine Gardens.) for their sex ne aime iaaaiet cs "it
wearing tails and shell jacke,: Douglas were at Seawell to meet 4y, tings They want all these things OPENING | TONITE 8.45 & on SUNDAY 1a
some with medals on their lapels, her. Would Love To | abolished :— a TUESDAY i4th — ¢ United Artists rn
were all presented to the Roya! Sead ou ov ; A Massachusetts law forbidding A True- ‘to- L ‘ite DRAMA. sea
couple. Heacquarters in Me STANLEY F. MATTOCKS| women to carry anything weigh- — —_————-~ “=
_ Atter the presentation, the Pol- Amsterdam of Vincent-Elliott Agencies, | ing more than 751b: ey
pe Bend highlighted the evening t R. OSCAR VANLEER of the Pert-of-Spain, is here with his} A Minnesota law which says | ehhh
: dier® Pareae. ~ vw. Se Vanleer Concern arrived wife and small daughter s} sending | they cannot clean moving machin- kes evs 9°"
¢ dier” 2 : Fs avias © | te se
i Then pad ie sweat ints ai yesterday from Trinidad by holiday at Carrabank Hotel. | ery; . | ta c a 9g
: : il avy Went sAle action, B.W.LA. With headquarters in They are from England , andj) A Pennsylvania law by which t 5108
as nine sailors from the H.M.S |Amsterdam he is stationed in would love to come and live in| they cannot read or test meters: | e*?

A Wisconsin law which ordains

“Glasgow” did the Sailor's Hor:
that women golf caddies are not}

Pipe with much grace and pertect



America and is here on business Barbados.



when ccor ied by the Ship’ s oe allowed; |
» accompanied by the Ship rp RINCESS AI % Tes , ied | A Washington law which in-}
Band a detachment of Marin H.R.H, PRINCES LICE I He the Earl of Athlone were in} ug “4 on ee : Fecun -i
gave an Exhibition of precisio: the Grand Stand of the Bart rurf Club yesterday for about ten | ® upert and he Caravan ‘a ben eS er eee '

: ;



A New York law which forces |
waitresses to stop work at 10 p.m



drill, finalising with the beating of ! ites and sa\
the Retreat. The reception end



















































































































with the playing of the National Picture 10 r I D. Chandler, Princess Alice,
Anthem and the withdrawal of Hon. J. D. Chandl 1.L,.( t tt. Hon. the Earl of Athlone |
the Royal Party, Standing behind in the ‘ ! I re Mr. Maurice Skinner, M1 cCROSSW ORD
+s H, A. Edwards, Hi lt t rnor Mr. Savage, Mr. A. S. | fet — |
Visit To The Races sunbitee pence g ree Ne
HORTLY after 3 p.m. yester-
day afternoon, The Royal Glitter B , ab. J ( the e Barbado A keen turfite, |
Party could be seen driving slow- drive through H he has been here for five weeks,
ly around the Savannah tore R. L. Hut \ I friends, the Akows, also left |
When they reached the Savan- |, B ere Trinidad yesterday but they
nah Club the cars drove onto the sj, rned by the Lady Nelson, thus . |
ene Soe were joined ey an After 47 Years ( ling them to be at the Second Rupert takes a quick look around angry men are telling Roderigo that |
guard of nine mounted da Race .
irs Thee stances heat of ea a Mrs Cx at : the cabin and sees that there is no 0. stranger has come on ot eft the |
the :- ad Gers orn Oh M", . on om [his was his third visit to Bar- other door, ‘*We can’t get back ship and the pirate COPIA 1B POAT: |
ne Grand Stand, Princess Alic« A ‘ 3 he was here tor five wealks ee ing back at them, They still
Mr. Savage and Mr. Lambert in yeste ia mornin he “Lad any Whee fie 4RAt, ere through the skylight,"" he mutters haven't seen us!" breathes Rupert, |
the first car and the Earl of Nelson” fwom Boston Acco aa ask sdow Crisket Matches anxiously. ‘* We must go the same ‘but we've no time to lose.”’ Slip- |
Selene, Mrs. Savage and Maj. panying them were M M ? ee, aa ey F way as Roderigo.” Cautiously he ping silently to the stern of the |
ewes-Cox in the second car Reece ad Miss Gracie Reece, si ‘ Sai limbs the companionway and peeps at, he puts Beppo on the cable,
They were met by Hon. J. D. f Mr. Reece. They expe Business Visit along the deck. All the crew are and the little monkey, scared of so | Auris
Chandler, M LC, and Mr. A. &. tc he here for about two rR J NUNES, Managing gathered near the aangway. where nuch shouting. scampers ashore } i ad vatapie { low ) Da
4 tu )
Bryden, After the playing of the }, nd the e st | Hirectow “Bh Mbeuaie: NOPA (ae ee — - ————____
Was, Ge Saves Tove eats Enmore Hotel Fogarty Ltd, and Mr, H. K. Har- CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it: | ¥ Yeast nas neen reapnnsinie for GRAND OPENING SATUR DAY 11th 8.30 pam al
em, the Roya arty mace 1 R : Saeed 5 * . } t then One. tor
pe : \ Barbadian, Mr. Reece risor Director of the same firm AXYDLBAAZAR | rit t rLose
their wa 1e Gove s Box , ee eae | pies ; ,
Oteee eas, "5 oe tk ox. paying his first vi ( rrived yesterday from Trinidad is LONGFELLOQW | : : aid ROW AL (Worthings)
c : Tr rst arbados j 47 years while | ) B.W.LA. on a «hort business lett | ' ; " mawere ; ; ae
Tur Nut , > ¢ ; aa N“ > 0 let simply stands for a ier In this exam} ) WARE pA. ft
ys , sea } yeal Mr, Jack Egan and they are ar ; i ; . ong 1 . P re ;
glancing through the Race Book P ; ‘ t " ; r gap ary trophies, the length and formation of the wor ar j }.a 4 resin worth a it ey > f 4 aE i }
aa thay waited for the Twelfth I he pai 15 . 5M et i at the Enmore Hotel Ba od one ; e Pe é ‘* he words are all hints ) Pamous physi ; : j ELLA Bye HELEN
Race \ hn employee ¢ y V vy . : ’ ‘ a sCTeH Fre y lu ‘ ery
They sat in three rows, in the ° ‘ the five and ten cent First Time \ Cryptogram Quotation ue Yonrs | nape) 19), a Lewy a AAIN
front row were left to right, Mrs. *'°" al ece rR spine nepyw ZT) ee ee |\4 On the Lee e tp got Noe i AY
J.D, Chandler, Princess ‘Alice, 120" " Rae: Sees eee Y ET VUAVUKTILTE ¥RT TISFY tw one th : Y mi
Hon. J. D. Chandle M.L..< ind nt : : : ae fo: Senne ‘ ; ; oe ,
the Earl of Athlone in the on } | Ly ancouve!r or one year R tL} \ t 4
ond oe . Mr pt ini ( ire! , t re urned peetercay by ; | 73 rt ' $a
Mr. H, A. Edwards, His Excellency Mexico and Mr. hicl a peta RR ag a S Ty peaa Nes lL MEN WORRY THEM- =
, : , : . ’ rR ’ , ‘ is Mr. Charlie Peterkin s ’ | Down
the Governor Mr. Savage, M: ident of Boston Mi ; Lt t
A. S. Bryden, and Mrs. Savage is no tua l ’ Vy Rob eae oe
In the third row were Maj tration = ey . . K La ~
Skewes-Cox, Mr. W. Lambert and On Routine Visit Seven el eoae ee WES Ne
Mr. T. N. Peirce : : , time that Mrs. Peterkin had DwWHOT Ww T i. of a .
The Twelfth Race was won by M R, A. R. Perguso oa Sh sranddaughter Mr SI ECIAL A I TRACTION 1 t tonacco Released thru United Artists
Mr. 1. 0. C. Perkin’s Slainte, and + eee See ls ‘een ware: Sire 1 Tre Peet n tu )
i the § arty diately fucturers Life Assurance ¢ e also there method “at ‘calculation py R
/ ent, Pariaat a ee with headquarters in| , = husband accompanied her AT , gymborn " ‘ iM PIRE TH EAT EO
from the crowded Stands and ntransit passenger on the “I =m Antigua, he will be there - AT Renee. SAS: GRR, CORT: ORM: A) TO-DAY AT 2.30 AND 9.15 P.M,
Savannah, and Princes Alice Nelson” from Canada | oy a een ne wel rears 2 8 nstrument (4 ) Eagle Lion Pictures Presents .
bowed graciously in return Guiana yesterday morni he Lady Rodney. tg Thee grounds AF gate, (40. oF VICTOR McLAGLEN—JON HALL— Tig
: ‘i , A een See | “ | '@ You only get 2 tew ar this || in “SOUTH OF PAGO PAGO”
The Nightengale Children’s [ndies, Mr. Ferguso: We Hope C [ U 8 M O & A N file (4) : with —_—
Ling vi t on [te ' Olulion vu! ¥ i¢ AceOss f ‘E 3 Rf NA WIN Et A P
Home ; 3 , M« AND MRS. TASS TAWIL, }, oly Wie ab tuavarday wie 4 OLYMPICE BI aaa ae KHART—DO
R.H. PRINCESS ALICI ' = British ( : ' rived vesterday from fO-MORROW NIGHT | Evot , ‘% $ iced 3 = RAS
the Rt. Hon. the Earl of uarte I i by B.W.LA. with the TO-MC NIGHT Poor 1 Gawk 35 Dinug :
g me Via Pue iowa :
Athlone visited the Nightengale Pominican Republic, Ha that their horse “Blue er on at eu ROXY THEATRE f{
Children’s | ie terday morn : ou io better t t +e ‘i , . ~ ~ td Below 4
ene ter ae Recs ind Cub woul. Ge Datew teae. 9 Trinidad Orchestra THE HOT SHOTS b TO-NIGHT AT 7.30 P.M.
> eave ¢ ry ! KCL Saturday hey returned y "
ee Bee Betniaee - diior Was Here In 1936 ind, ater the fret Gay! : ————E— a ROY ROGER PRICGER—LYNNE ROB
NTs Savage ri j : rv » ‘ t atu w VLGG -
Eituate Mactabar: , Mr wy B .( | will be here until oune| for your Entertainment = “YES OF TEXAS”
: : ? , ests at the Ocean View|
bert and Maj. Skewes-Cox ’ I 100 V ‘ 1 i ang ,
hao aida want bor he Pian < ale : . j Mir. Joe Tawil, his brother DIAL 4000 for Reservations. . i “MADONNA OF THE DESERT’ I
eg Pts ie e Teleph ( irs Tawil were at the air-| ae . Beby seveeinde with CROFT
Churehwarden of & Michael nt ( H ot nen Gutieura Soap. It combines LYNNE ROBERTS—DONALD BARRY—ROY BAN
Vestry, Mr. H. A. Tudor, and erday nis With T.L.L emollient and medicinal } aS Action Packed Double ws
members of the St. Michael's Nelson” for about t ’ aoe ie ee hones aa 3 | i:
Vestry, Hon. V. C. Gale, MLA ind this time he I R. DICK DAVIES, son of Mr ealthy and EL
and Mr. Fred Medd urd, M.C.P., a ife who is pa M ind Mrs. H. Davies of| jee fom blemishes cE } OLY MP PIC ¥ HEATR
well as Miss Arne and the Matro: re i Marine Gardens, yesterday re-} 1 ‘oF 4 + . y palin ms | TO-NIGHT AT 9.00 P.M.
of the Home “Mis: Grace Bryan é Vi H d to Trinidad where he is on | EMPI RE HE ATRE Ny Darryl F. Zanuck Presents .
On their way through the | oy Refinery Staff of Trinidad | A 4 . "Th OLIVIA de HAVILLAND--MARK ents 190 fl
poe gi ls o mitories which wer¢ Visiting Great Grandson el cide _He ee heen here on | n “THE SNAKE PITT”
In 1 #upstlal’s of the build r 2S Jar . \ weeks annua eave th r
Princess Alice remarked to the Mi Pi , \nother Barbadian who is with | ; HOLM—GI ae LANGAN—HELEN cRAlG :
} Earl, “This is stupendously clean wh fg .— L.L. in Point a Pierre arrived { es ee nn SDFEB
: , the La ) ; ; Ss
Before they left they were en- | ; io a a on the me plane which Dick
s 4 tertained to recitations by Romeo © 0g? — : _ left on. He was Mr. Harold Davis |
Johnson, and Muriel Elliot and W)' {er reliably vary . ind he is here to spend three |
then all the children joined in ‘?’ L\ MA N et with his parents Mr. and |
| singing Mine Own Country ee havik Ml M. M. Davis of St. John's |
‘ pani Before coming to Barbados
: On The Way : Ww wever, he spent one week in
{ N their way to Codrington ” ingtora, Gre la ind one week in St.|
{ College and St. John’s Church Until Sunday Lucia yt
} yesterday the Royal Party passed R, DON HUNTER I el s Sank |
| ine Podee Shoal Achoct boy: ae. a ‘ Intransit From Martinique ei
lined both sides of the road near B.W.I. anc i I LUE eyes, blonde hair and|§@) cp
' Society Factory and cheered them 4rrived = ye I W.LA handsome 1s Pepsi-Cola’s yo
as they passed. They also drove and will be representative Mr WwW L. Bashford, |
through Codrington High Schoo) staying at the O We j, Who arrived from St, Lucia yes- &
where Princess Alice was prest Keen Turfite oe by B.W.1.A, intransit from {
ed with a bouquet D*" CLEMI Martinique : ‘éo
. taka tV v4 ri Ui Es) True to his word, he was a 1€
Lunched With Sir Edward |, oP D.S., who h ee! uest R aces yest rday and if all went
i of 4 I Mi Isa \ t well he must have been at the
| .R.H. PRINCESS ALICE and toned oh mes e- Club Morgan last night
eto the Re ios the Ez , surned t t He is due to leave for Trinidad
j n he irl = of 1 by B.W.LA ( to-day, intre insit to Venezuela, and
aoc Athlone lunched yesterday with hi: t the airport A then rn to his headquar- T DAY
, Sir Edward Cunard at his home sorry for himself { } avi “t ) te : i Ml xico 0 City. are

FRIDAY 0th MARCH

| . Good Alone CROWN GINGER BEER (iood for a Shandy | 8.30 a.m, — 12.00
ii

1.30 p.m, -— 3.30 p.m.































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+ 4 ARRIVED |
| : | Choose a HERCULES BICYCLE | as
for your Easter Needs | | ck MAAR Cocae 6 Menta THESE ARE AMONG OUR NEW STO
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Choose Now: | | Pinseal & Patent Finishes in i GENTS, LADIES and the POPULAR PLANES—Jack, Smoothing, Block and Rabbit
|| Black, White, Tan & Wine. i SPORTS MODEL ae arent LENIN
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* ' $ ' 9 $6. Shades \ Cycle Lights, COPING SAWS PLANE IRONS,
} Locks, f TICES : , ERS
1 ’ ‘DEE ss nile ities o i TABLE VICES SCREW DRIV
et NE W Si 4 NX “he DESIGNS $1.01 i} Polishi.g Cloths, OIL STONES, ETC., ETC.
j |} Oil Cans, and a
‘Under-the-Dollar” Dress Values now displayed in the Windows i Lubricating Oil. t> SELECT YOURS EARLY
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I

oe


MARCH 10,

P pRDAY,

1950





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

LE









JABOUR PAR’FY WINS FIRST BATTLE

















et

; : 9

| Saragat’s
| Expulsion
| ROME, March 9.
s newly constituted cen-

iglist. party, the Unitary
a ask the COMISCO
setionl Socialist Move-
) conference at Hastings,
tend, later this month to ex-

ian Rightwing Social
SD, led by former

Unitary Socialist commu-
qnnouncing the demand
{iii not give reasons.
4 for Saragat’s ex-
| ‘i HE COMISCO is held
MMnresent the Unitary Socialist
of view that they only are

entatives of true Social-
jn Italy, since Sarigat has,
reyes, “betrayed Socialist
ines” by his collaboration
the Christian Democrat Gov-

i.
ment. ra ——@ This first searching test of the

ty Premier, Gieuppe Saragat. |

| Commons Reject

The Challenge

LONDON, March 9.

gaiTAIN’S new Labour Government tonight won its first |

of Commons battle by defeating a Conservative mo-
no confidence with a majority of 14, it

“hs House of Commons rejected an opposition challenge
| nationalisation by 310 votes to 296,

Liberals who have nine seats voted against the Gov-

small Labour majority brought
| the largest muster of members to
| register the biggest vote since full
| parliamentary records began 120

with members squatting all round |
the Speaker’s dais and jammed
| elbow vo elbow below the bar at
| the opposite end of the chamber.
| The Government front bench |
was so crowded that Ministers |
‘vere sitting in each other's laps,

Mr. Winston Churchill, who
threw down the gauntlet for the
Conservatives within days of the
‘ew Parliament taking life, ar-
rived in evening dress. |

Just before the vote Prime|
Minister Clement Attlee said it
was “unprecedented” for the |
Opposition to put down amend-

>

| years ago. departments is mot =-ecommended.
Packed into the House by Party | With regard to ssalzaxries the Com- |

| Whips, the near complete mobili- | â„¢!SS100 write: |

} sation of voting strength came It is not a ques aon of salaries

insufficient to attract to
the public serwic
highest qualificat@ens. tt is a

question of the sSalaries being

insufficient to attract persons
with the minimusre qualifications
required.

Since some Gover: ments are
poor to increase ssalzaries “we can
way in whieh this circle
can be broken umles= some means
can be found of gi â„¢~ ing financial
| assistance from Inag>e€rial funds to
enable the poorer c@e>lonies to aa
adequate salaries’”” :
Commissiom recommends



Throne—a vote of thanks to the|
King for his speech on opening of
Partinment, |

He thought the Conservatives’ |
action at vhis time “shows utter |
irresponsibility |

The King’s speech—in which the |
















































tS Pain Nenni, head of the ex-

mw felt Socialists has already

hia expelled from COMISCO

swiving himself with the Com-
~Reuter,

1} Expelled
tom Union

LONDON, March 9.
London dockers, who help-
itganise some of London’s
war dock strikes, have
led by the Transport
eneral Workers Union,
gother men concerned in tha
ve been barred from
fee in the Union for the
ars. These concessions{
f taken by the Union's
on the recommendations
cia disciplinary inquiry
activitiés of the eight men

the strike over Canadian |
Blast summer, which para-!
ai shipping in the port of
. The men are accused of |
in a manner liable to be
fo the Union’s interests,
ipating in the unofficial |
Portworkers Committee, |
Weing associated with the
unofficial newspaper,
s’ News.—Reuter.

5

|
}





nding Closer
lwociation Did

Advocate Corresponde
ORT-OF-SPAIN, March 9
tiitorial comment in Trini-
ithe report of the Standing
Association is that the
Structure recommended on
le is a sound one and
be accepted by the various
mires concerned

Ninidad Guardian in its
slates that the Commit- |
Mexcellent job that points
port as one to avoid
extremes while pro-
Workable basis for attain-
Multimate dominion status.
express urprise
wre at Trinidad being
® the federal capital.

|
—By Cable.



Poreek Parties

a

im Coalition

ATHENS, March 9.
Theo

Greek G
ders of the centre Par-
” until they get the
B of last Sunday's elec-
wre planning the next

Mt last’ night by three
au ral, Democra-
and Republican Pro-
hat they had joined
form a Coalition Gov-

Move Would oust ex-Pre-
Mantin Tsaldaris’ Pop-
fern? Were leading tho
sy Votes, according to
lal cen Conciusi:

election are not ex-
Mit Saturday

iS said to-day it wouk
fo wait until the nes
assembles, ar Pal

= are vlearly c} efore
he oe oe befor

—Revtei

Shot Blind
Brother

YLVANIA

Moshe
PYanian }
ler ee ween Chars
Be Nis bros), ee
1 fen t ~~ . :
Mos}
J Be her

iY hy
Y OY

es

i

aan

J0-Ve

‘
Bthe ney

Corp, aa.

73 Stay



}speaker, questioned the Opposi- |

\vhe Government Whip because ‘it
lis in the national interest that the
tokis, Prime Minister | Government should not be brought
overnment, to-day |to a sudden and snap vove.

| consequences if their vote tonight
|defeated the Government. Bowen

‘ment followed an an- |

contained no mention of the na- |
tionalisavion of the iron and steel |

industry | grade,

L ; | Specially

Law To Nationalise | officers,

A public Service Commission

| comprising

jother members is 2~
salaries of remembers and

staff of the CommissS#on and other

are estimated to be of
| the order of £25 OO@ a year

The law to nationalise steel was
passed by the last Parliament,
though it does not operave before
October,

Mr, Churchill’s amendment “re-
gretted” that the steel indusiry
should be left in a state of sus-
pense¢

The Liberals brought more
drama to v‘he crisis by announcing
they would vote with the Conser-
vatives against the Government.

Every possible member was ral-
lied for the vote. Many were svill
wearing morning dress from cere-
monies this morning connected
with French President Vincent
Auriol’s state visit to Brivain

Deputy Prime Minister Herbert |

the King for his speech opening

Parliament, took the form of “re-| at
| gretting” that the future of the
j steel industry was not mentioned



in vhe King’s speech which out-
lined the Government’ pro-
gramme

Opening the debate, Oliver Lyt- |

tleton, a Conservative former Min-|a four day

ister, emphasised that vhe amend- | railways
| ment was put down to secure a| normal,
promise from the Government } duced

Beeellent Job | that if would nov make the vest-

ing date earlier than nine months
after the next election or some
equivalent dave

Government Warned

Lyttleton warned the Governs-
ment not to underrate the forees
which would come to vne oman
tion’s aid. (The nine Liberal mem-
bers were expected to vote against
the Government.)

The Minister of Supply, George |
Strauss, taunved the Conservatives
with being under the misappre-
hension that they had won the
election, He said the Government
would nov’ abandon a measure
which it believéd essential to
maintain full employment and
prosperity.

Evan Bowen, the first Liberal





tion’s motives in putung forward
their amendment, but said, in
view of the Liberals’ strong oppo-
sition to nationalising steel, they
musi support it, a

Labour laughter greeted his}
statement that the Liberals had
given notice of their decision to



When a Labour member asked
if the Liberals would take the

replied amid loud laughver from
the Government benches: “If they

|did, the responsibility would cer-

tainly not be with the Liberal
Party, The Government can de-
feat this amendment very easily

| without a division by, postponing
|indefinitély nationalisation of
| steel.” Rarlior he had said it would

have been better if the Opposi-
vion's amendment had not been

put down.
Pr'me Miaister Attlee took the |
view that ary defeat
Royal speech would mean ;
ent's resigngtion and!

vl tion—even if the re-|
ult were again a stalemate.

otential voding strength of the,

Pariies today was Government

314, Opposition 263, and Liberals |

9, But neither Lavour nor Con-|

itives could be sure of 100 per |

ven in vhis criti¢a

cent
1 "

he vhirlwind activity
among both main partes

per hal
n ‘Hor »







French President
ren

t at a gala banque ‘







idering “pairing arrangl
{ te tne ysten-
1 vould

eancel out withou

Reuter

| Cost of

| expenses

Govt. Take- Over
Power FP fants
IN STRIKE CRISIS

Government ower right seizing}

was suppliec® every where

rounced

cstimated
of

interference

nationalised sas industry | COUNCIL TO BE CLOSED

the next few days.

eased
street
strike.

collected in some ci istricts.



U.S. Feerces

NEW YOR EE, March 9.
Sixteen thousazad American|
troops landed by sS«=< and air on)
vhe
i big combime« OW Puerte Rico by United States |
Armed Forces. i
The attacking fosâ„¢< es, supported
by more than 150 maval vessels |
and hundreds of ple=zmnes, found the,
assault against a he==-vily entrench-
ed “enemy” Yough ging, the New
York Times reporte- ours went to the ci«=fenders.
Observers judgec’ that had the
“war” been real, t-Ere entire air-
borne battalion ~wkmdich landed on
the island might haewwe been wiped
newpaper aid, —Reuter.



Unificeation

ts Halfway

Howe se

@ from paz. | |

in Unifiecs West Indian}

_, The following sex~rices are con- |
sidered ripe for wri fi cation:— |

ADMINISTRAT EON, AGRI- |
CULTURE, CIVII. AVIATION, |
FORESTS, LEC AL AND |
JUDICIAL, oat ob dee Sia
POLICE, POSTAE__ PRISONS, |
Unification of all t Ihe posts in the]





too



e methods of e©@xetry into the
menis to the Address to the} administrative class

Promotion t<\ the lowest
cdministrative @rae of cadet of experi<=nced clerical
officers who hawe shown them-
selves capable of Ce >ing admini:-
trative work.

Direct appPpintment of
Government declares its pro-| Olficers of high aecmeB®emic attain-!
gramme for the coming session—| ment and suitable jy >ersonality to
the cadet grade.

Promotion t<\ the cadet
after suitable training. of
selected w<>ung clerical!

a Chairrr xan and two

@ See paf =~ 1



PARIS, Mik arch 9.



}
|

upplies =adequate for

—Reuter,



\
|

of Viecpuses yesterday

Will F¢xe Al
Planes Over
Hong #song

HONG KONG, Mar
Tne Hong FKoorag Government
, issued A wWwremz ning ns
unauthorised aircz- the colony woulci Eee liable

that

The auvhorities zaid the
issueaq on it =tructior
British Gover nt
of recent air incurs

territor

said aircraft? ailing
t aer : t
is Ante ; :
satisfactorily wv crmald be
é > be iT t
p «
y
is < re

Congratulations

@ from page 1

enlightenment and under-
standing of each other's de-
sires and anxieties,

The decisions which are
taken upon the recommenda-
tions in this report will be of
immense significance for the
future of the British territor
ies concerned. I know the
recommendations will be
eagerly studied and their im-
plications examined both in
Legislatures and by the pub--
lic, not only with the serious-
ness which their importance
warrants, but in the ardent
hope of seeing in them the
means whereby the people of
the West Indies can make
their voice more effective in
the outside world. I shall
await with eagerness the
opinions of the various Legis-
latures on the report and at
this stage I confine myself to
repeating the assurances which
Mr. Creech Jones stated clear-
ly at Montego Bay that H.M.
Government of the United
Kingdom do not look at anti-
cipated federation in the Brit-
ish West Indies as a means of
avoiding its responsibilities or
as in any way retarding the
development of self Govern-
ment in individual territories.

I realise that consideration
of the Committee's proposals
is not a matter which can be
hurried. Nevertheless I hope
Legisiatures will be able to
give their attention to this
matter with all reasonable
despatch. Meanwhiie the re-
port of the Commission on the
unification of the public ser-
vices and the report of the
Customs Union Commission
which will shortly be avail-
able will provide the oppor-
tunity for studying other
means whereby the territories
can associate themselves in
common action for their mu-
tual benefit. His Majesty's
Government have not wished
to prejudge or influence de-
cisions in these various mat-
ters which must now be taken
by representatives of West
Indian people. But they will
at all times be ready to help
in any step which may after
examination appear feasible
in furtherance of the aims
which were accepted at the
Montego Bay Conference in
1947.

King George
To Be

Morrison had made it = that | at powet taticrns, and the] i ay > ”
the movion before the House in; “requisitioning” of key men
the names of Winston Churchill} averted National ~pm~wer stoppage Invited To f aris
and other Conservative leaders| today, though man» of the 100,- LONDON, March 9
was “an issue of confidence”, La- | 000 and electri<-ity workers The London Evening News said |
bour quarters believed the Gov- | came on strike to-day that King George VI and
ernment would get home by aj Electricity requwuiz-~ement were|Queen Elizabeth will receive a
majority in the vove which was | met per cent throughout |formal invitation from President
due akout 10 o'clock. France midday, the Ministry | Auriol to make a State visit to
The Conservative amendment to | of Incustry and Commerce | Paris, following the Royal visit to
the address, a vote of thanks to; announced. Australia.

The invitation will be delivered

reduced presstare |ijn a few months time, the paper’s
Governmer®t said neariy | diplomatic: correspondent stated.
requisitioned workers re- An official spokesman at the
for duty» Legal action; Elysees Palace, the President's |
being taken =a gainst those} residence, said today he could not
not. } contirm a British Press report that
Parisians, still ha2adicapped by | the British King and Queer
bus and underground! would be formally invited to visit!
strike, forrmrad electricity! Paris in the Autum!
but gas E>ressure re-| He said: “Decision between

Governments have to be taken re-
| garding Royal visits. No such de-







Temporary electricity power] >. : ; ; faite
. i S10 as bee ken so far as I
occurred in time Lille and] S* nh AS: GON , .
KNnCW
; al k Ceementh tea | A French Foreign Ministry
: Pasite al e France ‘i ource said they had no confirm-
€ < e > © >
= : } atior the report. ‘It
that gas cawrd electricity} ts i of rhb ers era ag
> cut off for ene hear jn} ROT Ser tO —
sach an invitation, but nothing
=~ will be known in Paris il he
Jational Eilee> tricity Board .
Ni 3 a ae 40 pe e a | comes back Reuter,
y jemand, z2erd said the
“peak” had = passed BUDAPEST BRITISH

BUDAPEST, March 9

The Paris transp« little. but many Paris withdrawal of two leading official
cleaners were now on|0f the British Legation here, and
Garbage r<=mained un-| the closing of the Budapest branch

the British C

cil



—Reuter

FIRING ORDERS

WATENSTEDT, Salzgitter



March 9
. ‘ e German police headquarters here
Prae Fise today said that British vroc
orders to fire on German demon-
&trators here, if there further |
OFF PUERT@M RICO rioting.
—Reuter,



Presents MUSIC of

ORCHESTRA “THE

Featuring Joe Grasso

Globe Theatre T’da

Russia would have no real chance

of power and determinavion to use
that power if necessary, Austra-

| Percy Spender, declared today

In his first foreign policy state-
jiment to ew Conservative- |
ominated Parliament, Mr. Spen- |

Swimmer Breaks Record

Joe Verder, American Olympic



GLOBE

LEARIE CONSTANTINE has :
Seretse Khama. This afternoon the former West Indian
Test Cricketer from Trinidad

“Seretse Khama Fighting

Auriol Visits
French
Hospital

IN ENGLAND

LONDON, March 9
The French President, Vincent

}Auriol, to-day left the French
{hospital in Shaftesbury Avenue
| with tears in his eyes saying, “I
jam profoundly moved and very|*”
| touched .”’

He put his hand to his ear, a|

| gesture of his which has become -*
| familiar to Londoners

With Madame Auriol, who was |

wearing a pale pearl grey cos-
jtume, the President drove from
Buckingham Palace to the hospita?
| for his first visit on the last day

his State visit to the capital
—Reuter,



Approach To

Russia Must Be
Based On Power
~SPENDER |

CANBERRA, Wiarch §
Any new approach to Soviet

uccess unless based on a policy

External Affairs Minister,







aid the Democracies must
uccept the fact that any policy of
j} appeasement vowards the Soviet
| Union was complete ineffective
na ever angerous |
The leaders of Communist Ru
regarded appeasement or any}
sign of fear as weakness They
"espected power, and the deter
mination to exercise power, should| {:
that prove necessary
The major responsibility for the}
world struggle, thai had developed
since the war, lay in Soviet for-|
eign policy, Mr. Spender declared. |
—Reuter. la



NEW JERSEY, March 9 |



swimmer, equalled the world re-
cord for the 00 yard breast
stroke at the Trenton Times swim-
ing meeumns |
Verder covered the distance in
9.4 secs. t qual the official
orld record held by inother 1
ésmerican, Keity Carter arter set] South
p the mari 194 it Lauyetve |
~Reuter.

IT’S A TREAT O

presenting

ANDRES

(Celebrated Argentine

and

Genoueva

in
2 HOURS OF GLORIOUS
at the
GLOBE THEATRE
on
WEDNESDAY, MARCH

Orch. Seats $1.00; Circle 2
Reservations made DAILY

Heavenly Kind featuring TRINIDAD’S NO
HOT SHOTS” on SATURDAY March
Amerjean Saxaphonist) Rod Clavary

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the latest Calypsoes.

PRICES: 20 — 36 — 48 — 60.

Cee ee





Constantine Will Fight
For Seretse’s Return

From Our London Correspondent
LONDON, March 9. |

behalf of =

| Don’t be sorry —

President of | Be safe using Amolin. «

Committee |




was elected
Committee”.
chosen at a meeting in London of delegates of the 25 African
and Colonial organisations will fight for rights for this un- j
fortunate chieftain from Bechuanaland who has become a
storm centre of this raging Commonwealth controversy.

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PAGE FOUR





'o4 saGaR

t Published by Tho Advocate Co. Ltd., 34, Broad St, Bridgetows
Friday, March 10, 1950

Federation

THE Report of the British Caribbean
Standing Closer Association Committee
(1948-49) is published to-day. It is a Re-
port which should be studied most care-
fully by every West Indian for if its
recommendations are implemented the
stream of West Indian life and thought
x will be radically altered,

Those who read the Report will do well
to bear in mind that the Committee was
not set up to advise on the desirability of
Federation—that was decided at Montego
Bay in 1947—but to advise on those matters
contained in Resolution 6 of the Montego
Bay Conference, The two most important
matters are the form of a federal constitu-
tion and federal judiciary and the means of
financing the operation of all federal ser-
vices.

The Committee has, however, given some con-
sideration to benefits which might accrue from
Federation. The Committee begins with the as-
sumption that the “underlying purpose of our
task is to seek the shortest path towards a real
political independence for the British peoples of
the region within the framework of the British
Commonwealth,” They record their recognition of
the paramount importance of economic stability
and express their belief that the region will not
achieve economic stability while it consists of a
large number of quite separate political units. The
Committee continues “We may place on record
our considered and emphatic view that Federation
and only Federation, affords a reasonable pros-
pect of achieving economic stability and through
it that political independence which is our con-
stant object.”

The reasons which prompt the Committee to
this conclusion are not, however, clear and the
Committee indeed add that Federation as such
will not solve the probleme of the region, but will
en the conditions in which they can be dealt
with. ‘

The Committee recommend that the seat of the
Federation which should be termed the “British
Caribbean Federation” should be in Trinidad. The
Federal Constitution envisaged by the Committee
is one in which the Units of the Federation will
retain all powers not expressly vested in the Fed-
eral Government—this recommendation is in con-
formity with the first resolution of the Montego
Bay Conference.

It is recommended that there should be a
Governor-General with powers clearly defined
and limited. The Legislature should be a bicam-
eral body consisting of a House of Assembly and
a Senate. The former to be elected on Adult
suffrage and the latter to be nominated by the
Governor-General,

The Prime Minister should be elected by the
House of Assembly from amongst the members of
that body, and together with the Council of State
should be responsible for the policy of the Gov-
ernment. '

The Draft Constitution also makes provision
for a Council of State which would perform the
duties of the British Cabinet. The members of the
Council would be nominated partly by the Prime
Minister and partly by the Governor-General,
but the nominees of the Prime Minister should
be a majority of the Council.

The relation between the Senate and the House
of Assembly is regulated. The Senate should
have merely a revigionary and delaying power.
In respect of Money Bills the powers of the
i Senate should be even more limited and Money
| Bills may become law when assented to by the
; Governor-General without the concurrence of
the Senate. In respect of all other Bills the
Senate should have the power of delay for twelve
months.

The allocation of seats in the House of Assem-
bly should be in ,roportion to population but
recognising the difficulties attendant upon the
great variation in population in the different
Units, the Committee has recommended an allo-
cation which in their words “cannot be reduced
to a mathematical formula.” Jamaica would get
16 seats, Trinidad 9, B.G. 6, Barbados 4 and the
other islands 2 each except for Montserrat which
would get one seat,

In the Senate each unit should have two seats



te



aan



24 Se Otte STP

% except Montserrat which should have one. This
} arrangement would reflect the Federal principle
t Since a Second Chamber is to reflect the position
of the territories as equal partners. Montserrat
f should in the opinion of the Committee be treated
i differently because of its very small population.
' The Committee makes recommendations in re-
} spect to the setting up of a Federal Judiciary
and Publie Service Commission. The problem
i of Imperial financial help igs also faced and the

‘ manner in which such help be apportioned and
5 regulated receives the attention of the Com-
i mittee.
The Committee recommends that the Federal
Government be financed by the collection of
Customs Duties but that seventy-five per cent
of the duties collected in each island should be
: returned to the island of collection,
t The Committee gives the optimistic estimate
‘ of annual Federal expenditure for the first five
years at £180,000. That sum does not allow for

i initial capital outlay nor does it appear to in-

° clude an estimate of the lease of Federal buildings

‘ It will undoubtedly be on the question of finance
i} that the question of Federation will be decided

If any general criticiym of the Committee’s
report be well founded as distinct from disagree-
ment with particular details of the suggestions,
it would appear to lie here

The estimate of expenditure will undoubted)
; prove to be very conservative and there are
i many who will look askance at the big salaries for

Federal officials. There are many too who will
view with disfavour the recommendation that
some Federal Officials should have their valaries
written into the Constitution.
“a But on the whole the Committee have done a
very commendable task, They have faced the
difficulties realistically, and in recording their
approval of the goal of Federation they have
affirmed their faith in the peopies of this region.
Federation itself will be far from the end of all
our troubles—the Committee expresses the be-
lief that it will prove the means of overcoming
our troubles, It is to be hoped that they are
right.,

o>

2 ag pee NA Me



Our Readers Say:

Compulsory Education
To the Editor, The Advocate—

Sm,—It was refreshing to find that some mention
had been made in the House during the discussion
of the Estimates of Compulsory Education, It is a
long time since we have heard the members of the
Labour Party make any statement on it. When
they were not in the Government they held it out
as a hardy annual against the other government
that they had refused to introduce a system of com-
pulsory education.

Current events show that it is really needed.
Not in the sense that there must be merely a com-
pulsory learning of the three R’s but it is time that
this community realise that there should be some
discipline of the mind in one form or another

Pet

Soke hares el dBee



Some days ago a few small boys gathered in
Cheapside near the entrance of the Market, their
usual habitat, and sang some of the most vulgar
: songs ever heard in Bridgetown. An idea of the
m¢ f the ng can be gauged when some fisher-
‘ hearing called upon them t«
reatt d ll the Police
i r€ hen they should have ail
been in ol because the eldest was about nine
years old
‘ This entire community shows a lack of discipline
and it is not confined to any particular bracket of
society If this is true then it is best to start with
the oung
CITIZEN

ee

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



TheFederalStructure

Chapter [—S.C.A.C. Report

We start from the assumption
that the main underlying purpose
of our task is to seek the shortest
path towards a real political in-
dependence for the British peoples
of the region, within the frame-
work of the British Common-
wealth—what is meant in fact by
“Dominion Status”. We assume
further that we have been charged
with this task because there is
general agreement that this object
cannot be attained without some
form of federal association be-
tween the territories concerned,
but that with Federation its at-
tainment becomes practicable.
We are aware that in some circles
there is a demand for full inde-
pendence, or for self-government,
either in advance of or simultane-
ously with Federation, on the
basis of existing political units.
While we reaffirm the view ex-
pressed at the Montego Bay Con-
ference that the political develop-
ment of the units must be pursued
as an aim in itself, we are satis-
fied that the sheer force of cir-
cumstances of the modern world
makes independence on a_ unit
basis a mirage. Independence or
self-government as a Federation
is however a practical possibility,
and we have framed our proposals
with this specific objective in view.

This categorical statement re-
quires elaboration, We do not
imply any reflection on the poli-
tical capacity, or the public spirit,
of the peoples of the territories as
they stand to-day. If we did, we
should not be justified in putting
forward a scheme for a larger
political unit, which, together with
the existing territorial politica)
structures, cannot fail to make
even greater demands on the poli-
tical resources of the region than
are made to-day. Our reasons for
this view lie in the fields of eco-
nomics, public finance and admin-
istration, but particularly econom-
ics, the basis of all the rest.

Financial Stability

It is nuw a truism to say that
political independence is unreal
unless it is based on financial
stability which, in turn, must resi
on a solid foundation of economic
productivity—i.e., on an adequate
“national income”. It is true that
| there are many states in the world

which are legally sovereign

and independent: but it can be
asserted that of these only those
which can pay their way can
really be said to enjoy full inde-
pendence. From this point of view
it does not matter what form is
taken by outside financial support.
Grants from United Kingdom
public funds are familiar to this
region, ‘whether in the form ot
grant-aid with its concomitant oi
Treasury control of estimates,
or of grants under the Coloniai
Development and Welfare Aci
Which do not involve Treasury
control of estimates. Other
states, though nominally _ inde-
pendent, have been assisted in
other ways, eg., by private banks
or firms, and their history shows
that their real, though not perhaps
their apparent, independence, is
no less curbed by this form of
assistance than it is by the overt
and acknowledged receipt of
assistance as from one Govern-
ment to another.

The way to real political inde-
pendence is, in short, through eco-
nomic stability and solvency. By
this we do not mean economic
self-sufficiency. Whatever may be
done to produce in this region a
wider range of the goods con-
sumed here — and in our view
much can and should be done—
it would be foolish to shut our
eyes to the fact that the West
Indies and the mainland territor-
ies live by world trade. If eco-
nomic stability and financial sol-
vency are the necessary founda-
tions for political independence,
any proposals far attaining the
latter must be judged,
other things, by the extent
which they promote the
From this point of view,
questions arise, @.g.:
West Indies economically
and solvent now ?*(b) Can they
become so on the existing politi-
cal basis, i.e, the basis of a com-
paratively large number of separ-
ate political units? (c) If not, can
Federation lead to stability and
solvency, either immediately or
in the long run? These questions
demand answers, and upon,
those answers will depend in large
measure the nature of the propos-
als which we shall make

to

former,

Equanimity

Taking the first of these ques-
tions, it is the case that, over the
region as a whole, broadly speak-
ing, public revenues cover public
‘expenditures at the present time
If that were a permanent condi-
tion the future could be regarded
with some equanimity: it might
even be argued that there was
little needed for adding a further






























































among

various
(a) Are the
stable

ards; but they are large in relation
to revenues and, what is more im-
portant for present purposes, they
could not easily or quickly be re-

duced substantially

if revenues

suddenly shrank.

High Prices
The temporarily healthy state of

the public finances is in fact attri-
butable to other factors than any

basic
capacity of the region.

the taxable
These fac-

increase in

tors include, first the comparative-
ly high prices till lately prevailing
for the exports of the region, and
to such other sources of overseas
income as wartime expenditures
by His Majesty’s Government and
the United States Government.

These
higher
region

incomes are reflected in
direct taxability in the
itself, and indirectly in

larger imports which, at present
high prices, mean large ad valo-

rem customs revenues.

It is obvi-

ous that any importast recession

1

n the value of the region's exports

could have a profound and harm-
ful effect alike on the private in-
comes and the public finances of
the region as a whole.

Signs are

not wanting in the world at large
that commodity prices may be on

he turn: this is a matter of the

utmost significance for this region,
even although there seerns no pre-
sent reason to expect a disastrous

slump.
portant

Should there be an im-
recession, the conse-

quences for the economy of the
region would be serious, unless
steps were taken to mitigate them
by means of special arrangements

|
|
|

|

| large

| that

with His Majesty’s Governmnet.

To recognise the realities of the

present economic status of the
region is not an admission of pes-
simism. On the contrary, we feel
that the time has come for a firm
and courageous approach te the

problems which undoubtedly exist.
We are conscious that, unsuspect-
ed discoveries apart, this is not to
be reckoned among the richly en-
dowed areas of the world. We
1evertheless feel sure that in an
age which has seen such substan-
tial advances in the natural
sciences, and where further ad-
vances, particularly in biology, and
its applications to agriculture,
nay be confidently expected,
means can be and are being found
which cay, provide a reasonable
standard of living to all those in
this region who are prepared to
earn it This result will not come
about easily, and we recognise
that the not-too-abundant re-
sources of the region will require
to be freely fertilised with brains,
skill and hard work. This can un-
doubtedly be done, provided al-
ways that the political and admin-
istrative arrangements of the
region are such as_ to enable
modern knowledge to be particu-
larly and confidently applied
where it is most needed, and to
ensure that value is received for
value created,

Economic Weaknesses

The next question is to consider
whether there are possibilities that
the economic weaknesses of the
region can be remedied within the
existing political framework—i.e.
on a “territorial” rather than a
“regional” basis. In other words,
ean the existing units, or any of
them, hope to achieve a sufficient
degree of economic stability to
enable them to attain a real and
permanent independence of out-
side aid and so the possibility of
real as distinct from formal poli-
tical independence ? Having re-
gard to their natural limitations,
the answer for many of the in-
dividual territories must be in the
negative. Some of the units, par-
ticularly the smaller ones, have
no evident prospect, as units, of
moving very far from the margin
of subsistence in public finance;
and, while that is so, genuine in-
dependence must remain unreal-
ised and its pursuit, an occupation
doomed to failure and frustration.
No one unit is large enough, or
rich enough, to be able to main-
tain by itself the range of scien-
tists and others to whom, as we
have suggested above, the region
must look for a real improvement
in its productivity and economic
Stability. Further, all experience
shows that on the basis of inde-
pendent units, the joint action in
external economic and_ related
matters, which daily becomes
more and more important, is ren-
dered infinitely slow and difficult
and consequently much less effec-
tive than it should be. There is
much more to be said on this topic,
but we do not consider it neces-
sary to labour it, since we believe
that it is perhaps one of the few
on which there is fairly general
unanimity, We are satisfied the
region will not achieve economic
stability while it congists of a
number of quite separate
political units, and consequently
the hopes of such units of

| achieving real political independ-

political superstructure in the}
form of a Federal constitution.
But on closer examination the
picture is not so reassuring. In

the first place, several territories
are at present in receipt of grant-
aid and are likely to continue
to require it. Some others may at
any time come to require it
Secondly, there is scarcely a terri-
tory, even among the largest,
whose finances do not give some
cause for concern, aid which
might not, as a result of some by
no means unprecedented misfor-
tune or disaster, be brought to in-
solvenc;. Thirdly, there is a basic
instability about even the present
apparently satisfactory state of
the public finances. Revenues are
very substantially greater thar
they were before the war; but
these increases are not, unfortun-
ately, due to any real increase in
the basic productivity of the
region, in relation to numbers
There is in fact evidence that in
this region—as indeed elsewhere
in the world — basic productivity
|

has suffered a temporary decline
This is a serious matter, since
basic productivity is the founda-
tion upon which economic stabil-
ity, solvency, and hence real poli-
tical independence, must be built

Revenues may be described as
| “elastic *, or sensitively responsive
to change in a number of factors
Expenditure on the other hand is
less s For reasons into which
jwe need not enter, recent years
j}have witnessed a substantial in-
crease in public commitments in
the field of social and allied sex
| vices. These provisions are by no
mean excessive in relation t
need or by any modern stand

| prospect

ence, as such, are slight.

This said, we may place on re-
cord our considered and emphatic
view that Federation and only
Federation, affords a reasonable
of achieving economic
stability and through it that poli-

| tical independence which is our

constant object. We have chosen
these words with care. We do not
claim that Federation will immed-
iately and automatically solve the
economic and fiseal problems of

Ithe region, or that it cannot fail.

We do claim that it will put in
the hands of men responsible to
the region as a whole, powers and
opportunities, particularly in re-
spect to the place of the region in
world trade, which do not exist at
present, and which these men ac-
cording to their abilities and in-
clinations can use for the better-
ment of the region. Federation as
such will not solve our problems,
but will provide the conditions in
which they can be dealt with.

Cease To Exist

We desire i to emphasise
this point. ere is in some
quarters a disposition to imagine
that immediately a Federation is
establighed cefttain difficulties
will cease to exist. Conversely,
thers appear to hold that, be-
cause the establishment of a Fed-
eration will of itself only mean
another legislature and adminis-



tration, and consequent expens
in addition to those already ex-
isting (which is true so far as

it goes)it will not help the region
Both views are false, because
problems are never solved
natically by new constitutions

al





only by the efforts of men to whom |

titutions 1
tution may

ive a

this region than it was in 1787 -o
North America or even a meeting
of the British Parliament before
the advent of railways. More im-

propriate powers and responsibili- |
ties which did not exist before.
These two apparently contradic-
tory views are thus closely akin,
in that they rest on the fallacy
that results are or should be
achieved by adjustments of poli-
tical and administrative ma-
chinery, instead of by the efforts
of men who may be helped or hin-
dered by the machinery but who
cannot thereby be absolved from
effort. Federation will not ab-
solve the region from the necessity
for physical and mental and
moral effort—it may, if success-
ful, help that effort to issue in
greater productivity, more se-
curity and higher standards of
living, than can the same effort
exercised within the present po-
litical framework.

Briefly, the services that Fed-
erciion can render, and whicn
can be adequately rendered in
no other way, can be summarised
as prompt, effective action in the
economic field on behalf of the
region as a whole. There is a
clamant fecessity for some single
agency which can speak and act
with authority, full knowledge,
and at short notice, for the re-
gion in a wide field of activities,
of which trade negotiations are
only the mcet prominent example.
This necessitates an agency which |
can act in its own right, and not
by delegation from other agencies!
and subject to their confirmation.
This in turn requires a fully rep-
resentative deliberative organisa-
tion from which to derive the
necessary authority—that is to
say, a legislature in which the
directly elected representatives of
the people of the region have a
preponderant voice.
































Restatement

We are conscious that much 2
the foregoing is a restatement of
what is already accepted, and that,
strictly speaking, it is not incum:
bent upon us to argue the pros
and cons of Federation. But we
have in our deliberations had an
unusual opportunity of discussing
the matter in much greater de-
tail than was possible at the
Montego Bay Conference, or in
the discussions in the various
legislatures of the recommenda-
tions of that Conference; and we
feel that there is advantage in
setting out at length some of the
basic considerations which have
largely guided us in our more de-
tailed recommendations In sum-
mary, we believe that the attain-
ment of independence within the
British Commonwealth is the
legitimate political objective ot
the region. Since a state has a
real as distinct from a purely
formal independence only to the
extent of its independence of ex-
ternal financial assistance, it is
clear that the economic stability
of the region must be improved
as rapidly as possible. It is our
considered judgment that this
can only be done by settin up a
federal government and ent istins
to it important powers <¢ d re-
sponsibilities particularly, hough
not exclusively, in the economic
field. The remainder of this Part
of our Report consists of the ap-
plication of these principles to 4
Federal Constitution within the
framework of which the siates-
men of the region will have the
}epportunity of leading their peo-
ple towards their goal.

|

Government Functions

As in our deliberations, so we
feel that in our report it is ap-
propriate to deal at ‘an early stage
with the functions which a Fed-
eral Government should perform,
and its relations with territorial]
|Governments. We start with the

mandate of Montego Bay that a

Federal Constitution should follow
the pattern of that of the Com-
monwealth of Australia, in that
the Federal Government should
have only such powers as_ are
specifically made over to it, and
that all others the “residua)
powers” should remain where
they are, with the territorial Gov-
ernments. It is not therefore opev
to us to proceed on any other
basis but we wish to record that
our discussions have amply con-
firmed to us the wisdom of that
mandate, Geography alone sug
gests the wisdom of not attempt-
ing too close or all-bracing a Fed-
eration for this widely scattered
region. But we feel that the
geographical factor is apt to be
overstressed, and that it will be-
come progressively less impor-
tance as communications improve
and become less costly. Even now
it is far less troublesome and
time-consuming to assemble a
fully representative gathering in



portant reasons, at this stage, for
adhering to the Australian pattera
and to a relatively limited list of
“Federal” functions, are the social
and economic diversity of the re-
gion, and the strength of local po-
litical and other traditions. It is
only the unwary outsider who w ill
venture to dogmatise about Bar-
bados on the basis of an acquain-
tance with Jamaica, or about Brit-
ish Honduras on the strength of a
visit to St. Kitts or to British
Guiana. Moreover these local
traditions are not lightly to be
cast aside. They form a valuable
bond among the
hold to them, and in many re-
spects uniformity is not an un-
qualified good. The region has not
resources that
we can afford unnecessarily to
weaken traditions which hold
people together in local pride and
self-respect. One is by no means
the worse West Indian for being
a good Vincentian

One point perhups mer:ts clari-
fication and emphasis, as it some-
times appears that there is doubt
and misgiving about it Under
Federation, except in respect of
the powers which are explicitly
assigned to it, the Federal Gov-
ernment is in no sense ‘over” the
territorial Governments and their
actions are not subject to Federal

The territories

peoples who

so many human

sanction or review
will keep all their powers except
in so far as they specifically sur-
render them. Conversely, the Fed

eral Government, in the exercise
of the Federal powers conferred
upon it, is not obliged to seek the
i @ on page 6

| Public Services

{aspect of the closer association of the British West





FRIDAY, M



ARCH 10, ity

| Unification Of

} D:

SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

v .

war

TO-DAY'S ¢
at the Cor

AUSTRALIAN F
Usually 68











RUIT
NOW

CREAM OF wu
WH
Usually 51 Now 43°

_—_—_———

McEWANS RED



THE UNIFICATION of the public services is one nea

indian colonies. The history of the question of
closer union is set out at length in Chapter XVIII
of the West India Royal Commission Report (Cmd.
6607), and move briefly in the opening paragraphs
of the Report of the Montego Bay Conference (Cmd.









7291). The former report contained certain re- LABE
commendations in regard to the unification of local Usually 26 Now? BEER
services but the locus classicus on the subject is 5 1 \

the Secretary of State’s draft despatch of May,
1946, which was printed at the end of the latter
report. The despatch is an integral part of our
terms of reference and we shall have frequent
occasion to refer to it. We have therefore repro-

ns

We have EVERYTHING |

ee ee









{
duced it in full in Appendix I. {
The essence of unification is the substitution of
the region for the colony as the unit for the recruit- FOR YOUR GARDEN ;
ment, promotion. and posting of the staff of the HOSE 54’ d 3%" ;
— services. From the point of view of the s an 4
overnments, the more obvious of the advantages
of e - an arrangement are that the range of selec- HOSE NOZZLES & SPRAYERS f
tion for both first appointments and promotions is
widened, that the qualifications for sppotennent to HOSE COUPLINGS & MENDERS
the various grades can he standardized, and that “” n :
the efficiency of the service is improved ——— HOSE CLAMPS 12” & %4” ;
the greater scope offered for the employment o ” SAN oot
civil servants on the type of work best suited to a BIB COCKS '2” & %4" with Union
their respective talents. The civil servants them-
selves enjoy corresponding advantages. phen GARDEN FORKS & TROWELS ‘
possibilities are afforded for the advancement of de- Y
serving officers, more opportunities or eae ex- ROSE TREE PRUNERS
perience are opened up for many, and a ave a
better prospect of congenial work. It is a ener SECATEURS t
corollary of unification that entrants tc a unifie
service after its institution will have to prea an TREE PRUNERS
bility to serve anywhere in the region, but this C :
should prove no deterrent to an officer who is GARDEN POTS from 4c. to 80¢. % ii
anxious to make his way in the service. ., D ¢
Before we come to consider which = in tay VEGETABLE GARDEN MANURE #
services in the Caribbean area lend themselves to ON & HAYNES CoO. 0
unification, and to which posts in those services WILKINS 1 » LTD., Successors i q
unification should be applied, there is one subsidi- i
ary matter to be disposed of. te S. P TCHER & Coy LTD, :
SCHEDULED POSTS Phones: 4472, 4687, a
There are throughout the various colonies of the ai
Caribbean area a certain number of scheduled posts dq
in the Colonial Unified Services, and it would be a
inconsistent with the clear statement of principle al

enunciated in paragraph 8 of the Secretary of State’s
draft despatch for us to make any recommendations
which would have the effect of limiting his discre-
tion to transfer the holders of such posts to colonies
outside the region or to transfer to such posts offi-
cers serving elsewhere, It has therefore to be re-
cognised that in some of those services which we
recommend for unification there will be certain
posts which are unified posts in a general as well
as in a regional sense. At the same time, we have
throughout our deliberations kept in mind the ob-
jective of staffing the public services with persons
of local descent to the fullest extent that is com-
patible with the efficient conduct of the services,
and we believe that acceptance of our recommenda-
tions will enable the Secretary of State to dispense
to an increasing extent with the need to transfer
officers serving outside the region to posts in Unified
West Indian Services.

We pass now to consideration of the criteria
which we should apply in deciding whether to re-
commend any particular service for unification. It
may be convenient at this point to refer to the pres-
ent procedure governing appointments to offices in
the government service in the colonies, which is
set out in Regulations 20-33 of Colonial Regulations.

DIVIDED
In these reguiations, public offices are divided

into three classes: Class I includes all offices in
Colonial Unified Services; Class II includes all other

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MAYPOLE LEMON CHEESE per bot. ......
HOLBROOKS WORCESTER SAUCE per bot.
MORTONS PEARL BARLEY 1 ib tin ........
SMEDLEYS MIXED VEGETABLES per tin .
SMEDLEYS GARDEN PEAS per tin ......
CADBURYS BOURNVILLE COCOA 14 fb tin.
SWIFTS LUNCHEON BEEF per tin ...........,
NORWEGIAN SARDINES per iin







a

The Secretary of State reserves to himself the right
to select candidates for all vacancies in Classes I
and II, though in reporting vacancies in these
classes Governors may recommend candidates to fill
then. _ Governors may themselves fill all vacancies
occurring in Class III, subject to any special direc-
tions which may have been given by the Secretary
of State. In paragraph 7 of his draft despatch, the
Secretary of State says that he appreciates “that
Colonial Governments would probably be reluctant
to surrender their powers of selection and posting
to a regional authority.” In the light of this con-

SS CoeSse yy eee ee

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Lo ek ee

>
2

in
sideration, we have confined our recommedations Ne
for unification to those services in respect of which pa
the advantages to be derived from unification, from !
the points of view both of the efficiency of the ser- p
vice and the opportunities for advancement of offi- ee ;
cers of ability, cannot be gainsaid even by those iz
who, on principle, are opposed to the transfer of ”
powers which is inherent in unification.

In order that any service should be regarded as T
appropriate for unification it is, in our opinion,
en = four conditions should be satisfied. .
n the first place, the service should be one which T
exists in ngst, if not all, of the colonies. This ARE ONCE AGAIN :
point calls for no argument, since the unification of i

a service on a regional basis presupposes that the
service is region-wide. Secondly, the service should
be one the officers in which normally look to ad-
vancement in that service and in no other.

ELABORATION

This point calls for some elaboration. In the
course of our investigations, we came across cer-
tain departments the officers in which are eligible
for promotion either in their own Gepartment or in
another department the work of which is of an
analogous character. Thus in some colonies there
is a measure of interchangeability between such de-
partments as Audit, Accountant-General, and In-
land Revenue. Where such conditions obtain, uni-
fication would not be desirable, Supposing, for ex-
ample, that the audit services were to be unified,
it would be unreasonable to expect the Public Ser-
vice Commission to look beyond officers serving in
audit departments when promotions in the audit
service were under consideration. Any advantages
that might accrue from unification would, therefore,
be more than offset by the withdrawal of opportuni-
ties for inter-departmental transfers within the
colony. Thirdly, the service should be one in whicb
the qualifications for entry and advancement are,
broadly speaking, of an equivalent standard. In
order to make the transfer of an officer from one
colony to another acceptable to the receiving col-
ony, it is essential that, in so far as posts calling
for professional or technical qualifications are con-
cerned, the officer transferred should, apart from
any question of merit or seniority, possess qualifi-
cations not inferior to those looked for in the re-
ceiving colony. Fourthly, the service should be one
which offers opportunities for advancement from
one grade to another. In adopting this criterion,
we have had regard to the fact that, as we see it,
transfers from one colony to another will usually
take place on promotion from one grade to another,
though we envisage lateral transfers which carry
with them increased emoluments. This is not, we
think, an unreasonable assumption, since the ex-
penses in setting up house in a new colony are
such as to make it unlikely that the Publ® Service
Commission would order a transfer unless there
were some countervailing financial advantages.

NOW RIPE

In the light of the considerations referred to in
the preceding paragraphs, we consider that the fol-
lowing services are now ripe for unification: — Ad-
ministration, Agriculture, Civil Aviation, Forests
Legal and Judicic’. Medical, Police, Postal, and
Prisons In recom. ending these services for unifi-
cation we are not suggesting the unification of all
the posts in the departments which administer them.
The Secretary of State recognises, in paragraph 10
of his draft despatch, that the subordinate clerical
posts can at present best be organised on the ex-
isting colony basis, and that the unification of the

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police service should not extend below the com- '
missioned ranks. The same considerations apply } .
jin the case of the other services Apart from ‘he } ke
fact that there would be no advantage in recruit- | *h
iment in the lower ranks on a regional basis, it | oe
} would be manifestly unreaso © put lowly-paid | 7
officers to the expenss g in a col- th
ony ot than that i n so far te
| therefore, as we recommend the unification of cer- | a
jtain services, our recommendations are limited to | Re
the recruitment and promot » the posts set out | am
in the schedule given in x I Throughout | try
yur rep th posts ated “scheduled | Me
post \ a


gwAY, MARCH 10, 1950

a

TT

| Bridgetown Parking Case Appeal

RIDGELOWN WAS 2 deserted
city after midday
Most of the Stores closed
ecause of the Races and
eekly half-holiday and
people, who did not
dq the and a small
er of personnel from the
Ss “Glasgow” could be seen
“‘rolling around the town. '
n after 3 o'clock, bus loac
pus load could be seen going
the direction of the Garrison
shortly after two o’clock a
iden shower fell but this only
ied for about three quarters of
an hour, after this dark clouds
overhang the City.
puring Wednesday and up tc
g o'clock yesterday morning scat-
tered showers fell throughout the
jsland, but the total rainfal’
recorded was only 61 parts.

FGINNING TONIGHT at 9.1:
B o'clock in their regular Friday
eyening programme over the loca
proadcas. the British Council wil

nt a new feature under the
tile “The Voice of Poetry.”

This will consist of readings oi
well known poems by those twc
distinguished figures of the Eng-
ish stage—Edith Evans and Johr







alf-day b
° their W

a few 3
» Racing,

jelgud. .
oon incidental and _ interlud
| music will be taken from the
works of Frederick Delius.

ip RIGHT rear ,and fron
“I fenders of a motor car and th:
rer fender of a bicycle wer
damaged and a cart extensivel;
damaged when an accident oc
at Hothersal Turning a
“gout 6.30 p.m. on Tuesday.
Margaret Brewster, who was ¢
nger on the cart, was injured
_ The accident involved the moto)
0-79, owned and driven b:
derick Wood of St. Bernard
ge, St. Joseph, a_ bicyelr
d and ridden by Vincen’
Manning of Browne’s Village, St
orge, and a donkgy drawn car‘
owned and driven by Oliver Wooxr
Jackmans, St. Michael.

"aN ACCIDENT occurred o1
Hindsbury Road at abou
900 p.m. on Monday between ;
motor lorry owned by C. Springer
of Hindsbury Road and the moto:
car M-430, owned and driven b)
Wilfred Cordeau of School Gap
Hindsbury Road.

The right front and rear door:
of the Car were extensivels
damaged. Six rails from_ thr
tlisade of the house of Kentural
Mayers, situated near the scene
of the accident, were damaged.

NOTHER ACCIDENT occurre:
on Sargeants Village Roa
‘at about 7.00 a.m. on Wednesda:
between the motor lorry X-379
ned by Newton Plantation anc
ftiven by Gladstone Butcher o/
Oldsbury, St. Philip, and a var
gwned by the Barbados Telephone
, and driven by Leon King of
Sargeants Village.

The right fenders of the van and
tight front fender of the lorry
were damaged.

A BICYCLE beionging to Hen-
derson Springer of Pounders
Gap, Westbury Road was damagec
i an accident on Whites Alley.
Mar James Street, at about 2.55
pm. on Wednesday.

_ Also involved was a mule drawn
“am, owned and driven by
Alphonso Payne of Third Avenue
Bush Hall,

WO BICYCLES were damaged

in an accident at tne corner
of Culloden Road and Collymore
Rock on Tuesday.

The accident occurred at about
130 am. between one eycle
ned and ridden by Walter
Haynes of Licorish Village, My\
lords Hill, and another cycle
owned by McDonald Ward of SF.
Joseph and ridden by McDonald
mech of Mason Hall Street.
Haynes was treated at the General
Hospital for injuries and dis-
charged,






























LEFT side of a van be-
longing to Messrs. J. N. God-
datd and Sons was slightly
damaged after it became involved
Man accident with a push cart
wned by Messrs. Plantation Ltd.,
#4 manned by Percival Gooding
al Sixth Avenue, New Orleans.
This accident occurred on Milk
kQ at about 2.15 p.m. on
Wednesday, The van was driven
Arthur Harte of Worthings,
Christ Church.

N ACCIDENT occurred on
Welches Road, St. Michael
HM about 5.00 p.m. on Wednesday
; en a bicycle owned and
by Adolphus Greene 0’
ker Hall, St. Lucy, and <









































strian Adelphia Constant of
field Road, St. Michael.
tant’s left arm was slightly

‘
FIRE of unknown origin
broke out at Lowthers Plan-
mh at about 9.05 p.m. on Tues-
nd destroyed 11 acres of first
pe canes, The canes were
qd and are the property of
#. Watson of the same Planta-

E

4 WEDNESDAY at about 9.45
ge a fire of unknown origin
ten Sut at Small Ridge Planta-
ri Christ Church and destroyed

= acres of first crop ripe canes
ylth were insured. They are

Property of G. S. Evelyn.



Cornmeal Arrives
Arriving with 1,670 bags of

mes th

: r 159-ton Dutch steamship

“which sailed from Trini-

â„¢..

This Shipment of cornmeal which
Signed to Mr

» Ltd., was yesverday un-

and removed to bonds from

it will be distributed to

ther cargo from

of celcure



*r, silk goods,

crates

a ae of oranges

.. “Upplies of cotton goods,
» Shoes and hand bags
wat Local agents are
, Musson, Son & Cx



â„¢meal for Barbados yesterday |

K. R. Hunte|

Retrial Ordered In

THE WEST IND
appeal in both cases which
recent sitting here.

our the Acting Chiet Judge
The first case was that in which
Clifford Skinner appeal against
the findings of a Common Pleas
vury awarding damages to Arden
dag ae as the result of an
we : ri ;
boi’ cigahey €n cars driven by
Second case was the appeal «
Sergeant G.c. Springer of the aan
bados Police Force against the de-
cision of the Court of Error which
Court dismissed an appeal filea
by Springer against a decision of
the Assistant Court of Appeal
which court had confirmed a de-
cision of a Police Magistrate, dis-
missing a case brought by Springer
against Doorly unaer the bridge-
town Parking Regulations, 1949.
The West Inaian Court of
Appeal has ordered retrial of the
Skinner-Cuke case, There was no
vruer as to costs. The Springer-
Doorly case is to be sent back to
the Police Magistrate to be heard
and determined according to law.
In this case also, there was no
order as to costs.

The Court
The West Indian Court of
Appeal was composed of His

Chief Justice of Trinidad (Presi.
sent), Sir Newnham A. Worley,
Chief Justice of British Guiana
and Sir Clement Malone, Chiet
Justice of the Windward and
Leeward Islands.

The Judgment of the President
in the Springer-Doorly appeal
was read by His Honour Mr, Tay-
lor. Those of the other two Judges
was read by Mr. G. C. Williams,
Acting Deputy Registrar,

Legal appearances before the
West Indian Court of Appeal were
in the Skinner-Cuke case, Mr.
W. W. Reece K.C., associated with
Mr. J. E. T. Brancker for the
appellant, instructed by Messrs.
Carrington and Sealy, while Mr.
D. H. L. Ward instructed by
Messrs. Hutchinson and Banfield
appeared for the respondent.

In the Springer-Doorly matter
Mr, John Whyatt K.C., Attorney
General, associated with Mr. W. W.
Reece K.C., Solicitor General and
Miss M. E. Bourne, Acting Legal
Draughtsman represented the ap-
vellant instructed by Mr. G. B.
Evelyn, King’s Solicitor.

The Respondent was represented
hy Mr. E. K. Walcott K.C., asso-
ciated with Mr. J. S. B. Dear and
instructed by Messrs. Yearwood
and Boyce,

Judgment

The Judgment of the President
follows:—

This is an appeal from the de-
cision of the Court of Error hold-
ing that certain regulations made
under section 7 of the Motor
Vehicles and Road Traffic Act,
1937, were, on the date when the
respondent is alleged to have
committed an offence under them,
no longer in force by reason of
the fact that the requirements of
the section had not been fully
compiled with. The requirements
are contained in sub-section (2)
of the section which for con-
venience I shall refer to hereafter
as the Barbados provisions and
are in the following terms:

“All such regulations shali
forthwith be reported by the
Director to the Governor for his
approval and sanction, and shall
as soon as possible thereafter
be submitted for the approval
of both Houses of the Legisla~
ture and if not approved shall
cease to be regulations from
the date of their disapproval,
but the non- approval shall not
affect anything done or suffered
under the regulations between
their coming into force and
their rejection by the Legisla-
ture.”

The regulations were made by
the Director on the 12th February,
1948, and received the approval
and sanction of the Governor on
the 10th April, 1948. The com-
plaint alleged an offence commit-
ted on the 7th June, 1948, but on
that date the regulations had not
been submitted for approval ot
the legislature although it is said
that some thirteen sittings of the
House of , Assembly had taken
place since the date of the Gov-
ernor's approval and sanction,

The question at issue has been
discussed in the Parliament of the
TInitead Kingdom and by text-
hook authors but there is no clear
authoritative decision upon it.
And, although a great variety of
textual expression has been em-
vloyed in the enactments of the
TInited Kingdom which are de-
signed to afford Parliament an
early opportunity of approving oF
repudiating subordinate legisla-
tion, none has been found in
similar terms to that which we
now have to construe. The near-
est perhaps is exhibited in the
case of Bailey vs. Williamson
(1873) 8 Q.B.118, which for con-
venience I shall refer to here-

| after as the British provisions, and
| these are in the following terms:—

| “Any rule made in pursuance

of the first schedule to this Act
| shall be forthwith laid before
| both Houses of Parliament, if
| Parliament be sitting, or if not,
| then within three weeks after
| the beginning of the then next
| ensuing session of Parliament;

and if any such rulés shall be
| disapproved of by either House
| of Parliament within one month
after the same shall have been
so laid before Parliament, such
rules, or such parts thereof as

eer
WHAT'S ON TO-DAY

Police Band at Government
House at 9.00 a.m.

Court of Grand Sessions at
10.00 a.m.

Meeting, House of Assembly
at 5.00 p.m,

Mobile Cinema, Westmore-
land Plantation Yard, St.
James at 7.30 p.m.

nl

Judgments of
were read in the High Court yesterday

Allowed By W.L. Court

Skinner-Cuke Case

IAN COURT OF APPEAL has allowed the

came up before them at their

the Court in both cases
t morning, His Hon-
Mr. G. L. Taylor, presiding.

shall be disapproved of, shall
not be enforced.”

in that case the court was askea
t aeclare the reguiauons invalia
because they had not been laid
vetore Parliament within the
specified time, It was argued, as
it has been argued before us, tnat
the requirement was mandatory,
and disobedience of it renderea
the regulations nugatory, The
Court held that the requirement
was directory only, and not man-
datory, and declined to nullify the
regulations. It appears to me that,
although the British provisions
which received judicial interpreta-
tion in that case differed in
Several material respects from the
Barbados provisions which we are
now required to construe, the
differences are even more favour-
able to a similar conclusion. Since
the meaning and intention of the
legislature is to be derived from
the text of its enactments, it is

important to examine the ex-
pressions used in the Barbados
provisions, to observe the varia-

tions from the text of the British
provisions which have already re-
ceived judicial interpretation, and
to consider whether those va
tions supply a guide as to the man-
datory or directory character of
the Barbados provisions. The
first and most notable variation
is that in the Barbados provisions
the regulations when made by the
Director are required to be ap-
proved and sanctioned by the Gov-
ernor before submission for the
approval of the legislature. The
subsequent requirement that the
regulations are to cease if disap-
proved by the legislature makes
it clear that they are to be re-
garded as in full force and effect
prior to such disapproval. It is
not so clear as to when they are
deemed to have come into opera-
tion. The Intervretation Ordin-
ances of most Colonies provide
that regulations commence on the
date of publication in the Gazette.
but no such provision existed in
the Barbados Interpretation Act at
the material time. It appears to
me that the intention here was
that the regulations should come
into operation as soon as te
“overnor gave his sanction to
them, and not when the Director
made them or when thev were
published in the Gazette. For the
purposes of the present issue the
point to note is that the legisla-
ture has provided intermediate
machinery for checking the reeu-
lations. I am disposed to infer
from this that, so far as concern-
ed the operation of the regula-
tions and their suitability, the
legislature was content to entrust
this to the scrutiny of the Gov-
ernor and his advisers, and in
further providing for its own sub-
sequent approval it intended to
give expression to its constitu-
tional position as the sovereign
authority in all legislative matters



Another Variation

Another notable variation in the
Barbados, as compared with the
British provisions is the require-
ment that the regulations shall be
submitted to the legislature for
approval. There seems to be no
room for doubt that this involves
a resolution of approval to make
the regulations effective there-
after. It has been submitted on
behalf of the respondent that
such a resolution must, according
to the practice of the Barba-
dos legislature, be moved by a
member in charge of Government
business in the House, and that
this is the final step which Gov-
ernment must take to give per-
manence to the existence of the
regulations as a statutory mea-
sure. If that step is not taken
within the time prescribed then,
it is argued, the regulations be-
come automatically revoked as
from that date. This require-
ment, it is said, constitutes and
exhibits the mandatory character
of the provision. There is much
force in this contention, and it
deserves close consideration, al-
though it was not on this ground
that the Court of Error decided
in favour of the respondent. The
British provisions require no act
of the executive to give perman-
ence to the regulations other than
the act of laying them before the
legislature within the preseribed
time. The Barbados provisions
require the executive to move :
resolution of approval. If that was
not done, did the legislature in-
tend revocation, or had it some
othe, purpose in requiring it to
be done? In determining what
that purpose was it is relevant to
enquire first whether any public
mischief is to be apprehended if,
through inadvertence or other-
wise, the executive fails to take
action in time, and next whether,
if revocation were to follow such
failure, the date of revocation can
be precisely ascertained. In re-
gard to the first question I am
impressed by the wideness of the
administrative field which is to
be covered by the regulations
made under this section as enunci-
ated in sub-section (1). Can it
be that the legislature intended
to destroy the administrative
machinery under the Act which
itself had set up merely because

some member of the House
had delayed to move a_ reso-
lution at the first meeting

of the Assembly? It appears to
me that if any other loss injuri-
ous purpose than this is decerni-
ble in the provision it should be

preferred. In regard to the sec-
ond question counsel for the
respondent was asked on what

date in his submission the regu-
lations became revoked. His first
answer was, “On the 20th April,
1948”, on which date there was a
meeting of the House of Assembly,
which was the meeting
ubsequent to of the
On

second
approval
regulations by the Governor
being asked why on the
of the first meeting he agreed
that this would be the move logi-
cal date. It is manifest that there
is cause for uncertainty as to

hen it will be pos

date

not

late V

eT

the |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

practicable to move a
session,

of being able to

ments is another

lay in conforming with the re-
yuirements of this’ provigion. I
have already indicated what I

think that purpose to be.
think, it was to give

tion.

of controlling

ment side do not
punctual

lapse
performance of

to all civilized legislatures, and
such extreme measures as manda-
mus are quite unnecessary for
that purpose. It was this suppos-
ed absence of power to compel

obedience to the provisions which |

seems to have moved the Court
of Error to the decision which it
reached, but I feel sure that
neither of the two Houses of leg-
islature in Barbados need have
cause to apprehend that such re-
quirements as these now under
review could ever be ignored with
impunity. The constitutional
means of preventing this are in
their own hands, and these are
ample and sufficient for the pur-
pose. For these reasons I con-
sider that the requirements now
under construction is directory
and not mandatory, and, that the
present appeal should be allowed.
The case should be remitted to
the magistrate to hear and deter-
mine according to law. The orders
of the Assistant Court of Appeal
and of the Court of Error should
be set aside. Since the issue on
this appeal it of public importance
there should be no order as to
costs.
27th February, 1950.
(Sgd.) C. FURNESS-SMITH,
Chief Justice of Trinidad and
Tobago,
(President) .

BAFA Meets Today

When Will Football

Season Start?

The opeming date of the 1950
Football Season will be decided
upon this afternoon when the
Council of the Barbados Amateur
Football Association meets.

The Annual General Meeting of
the B.A.F.A. will take place this
afternoon at 4.30 at the Y.M.C.A
Headquarters when the financial
statements and the Secretary Re-





port for the 1949 Season will be
received.
Immediately after this, the

Council of the B.A.F.A. will meet
to elect its sub-committees anc
to decide the opening date for the
1950 Football Season,

“Glasgow” Defeat
College 6—1
A team from the H.M.S

Glasgow inflicted a six-one defeat
on Harrison College in a Footbal

Match at the College Ground
yesterday evening.
ward scored four goals for his

Walker, the Navy’s centre-for-
team, One from the centre-for
ward position and the others while
he’ was at right wing. The re
mainfng two goals for the Navy
were scored by Hobson, their insidy
left. The lone goal for Colleg«
was scored by their centre-for-
ward, Hope.



Commonwealth Play
Last Match Today

BOMBAY, March §

George Duckworth, former Lan-
cashire and England wicketkeeper,
will be behind vhe stumps when
the Commonwealth cricket team
end their tour of India, Pakistan
and Ceylon with a_ three-day
match against the Governor’s XI
svarting here tomorrow.

The touring team, which is be-
ing managed by Duckworth, ar-
rived here today from Colombo
for tomorrow’s match which has
been organised by the. Indian
Cricket Board of Control in aid of
provincial charities.

Teams for the twelve-a-side
mach have been chosen as fol-
lows:

Commonwealth: Duckworth, G.

Pope, D. Fitzmaurice, H, Lambert,
W. Alley, F. Worrell, J. Holt, W
Place, R. Smith, G, Tribe, C
Dawkes and F. Freer

Governor's XI; Raja Maharaj
Singh, the Governor, C K, Nayu-
du, D, B. Deodbhar, S. Mustagq Ali,
C. S. Nayudu, R. Medi, S. W. So-
roni, A. Singh, D. G. Phadkar,
P. R, Umrigar, M. R. Bhide, and
V. L. Manjrekar.—Reuter,

20/- For Wounding

Grace Griffith of Fairfield Road,
Black Rock, was fined 20s. in
one month or one month's impris-
onment by His Worship Mr. E, A.
McLeod yesterday.

She was found guilty of wound-
ing Eunice Ifill on September 26

Assize Diary



FRIDAY
No. 13° Rex. vs. Cecil
Bryan
No. 21 Rex vs. Ronald
Sellman





a @
a
ow @

ible or}

‘



ee

resolution
during the course of a legislative
The practical importance
ascertain with
certainty and precision the period
of operation of legislative enact-
consideration
which leads me to look for some
other purpose than revocation as
a consequence of inadvertent de-

If, as I
statutory
expression to the sovereignty of
the legislature in respect of these
regulations that purpose would be
readily achieved by the process of
question, debate and if necessary
censure on the floor of the Assem-
bly, and without recourse to the
public mischief which may attend
premature and automatic revoca-
Such constitutional methods
its own business
(including the business of seeing
that its members on the Govern-
in the
their
duties to the House) are common

| B.W.LA
| Trinida

eee ee nn ee ne ee ee

“Tam a proud consumer of... .

GOAT CHOW

The cows begin their young ones on

CALF STARTENA

)btainable from H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd.

e . se a
a aoe”; ee ee ee ee ee *



Cabbages, Tomatoes

In Good Supply

eon kitchen gardens.

searcity a short while ago

vhe “Advocate”
more is to be
banana sold when ripe.

B.W.1I.A. Board
Meets In Trinidad

yesterday



Mr. J. W Booth, Deputy Chair-
tish Overseas Airways
) of
» IS expected to arrive in
d today accompanied by
- G. Granville, General
Traffic,

man of Bri

Corporation and a Director

Mr,
Manager, Sales and

‘C. Messrs. Booth and Gran-

| Ville left London on the 20th Feb-

ruary in a B.O.A.C. Argonaut
{which has been making a tour
of B.O.A.C.’s South America
routes,

Commander A.D.S. Mur-

tay, Managing Director of

B.W.LA., will meet them in

Caracas on the 9th March and ac-

rare them to Trinidad on the
h.

The Hon. H. A, Cuke, O.B.E,,
the Barbados member of the
B.W.I.A, Directorate, will arrive
from Barbados on Saturday, 11th
March. :

During their Stay in Trinidad
Booth and Mr. Granville will
1ave_ an opportunity of visiting
B.W.LA.’s new workshops at
Piarco and new offices av Airways
House iy Port-of-Spain. ,

A Directors’ Meeting under the
Chairmanship of Sir Errol dos
Santos will take place on Mon-
day, and the following Directors
will be present; —

Mr. J. W. Booth, The

Hon. Alan Storey, D.F.C.,

H. O. B. Wooding, K.C..
The Hon. H. A. Cuke,
O.B.E., Lt.-Cdr. A. D. S.
Murray.

The Chairman and Directors of
B.W.LA, will give a cocktail party
in honour of the guests at the
Country Club on Saturday, 11th,
and the Chairman will give a
lunch at the Union Club on Mon-
day, the 13th.

A Busy Day

To-day looks like being a busy
day for B.W.1.A. Besides the above,
the first of the three new Vickers
Vikings which were ordered re-
cently is expected to arrive. This
Viking left London on the 6tt
instant and is being flown across
the South Atlantic by Captain
W. A. Cash, and Captain P. Kel-
shall as Co-Pilot.

On the morning of the 14th Mr.
Booth and Mr, Granville, accom-
panied by the Managing Director,
will leave for Jamaica’ on
B.W.1LA.’s 391 service which flies
via Caracas and Curacao.

On the same day another Vick-
ers Viking will be making a good-
will and proving flight on one of
B.W.1.A.’s new routes which were

recently authorised by the Civil
Aeronautics Board of the United
States. On board this aireratt

will be B.W.I.A, and Government

officials, and calls will be made
at San Juan (Puerto Rico) and
Ciudad Trujillo (Dominican R2-

public) on the way to Miami. On
the return journey the airerait
Will‘probably fly by way of Kings-
ton and Port-au-Prince (Haiti),
and is due in Trinidad on the 19th
Commander Murray will probap-
ly join the aircraft at Kingston
on the return journey.
Mr Booth and Mr.
will leave Jamaica on
day, the 15th March, and wil!
return to England by way of
Nassau and the United States.
The Short Sealand amphibiar
“R.M.A, St. Vincent” recom-
menced trials and proving flights
on 8th March,

‘Lady Nelson”
Brings Flour

SEVEN hundred and fifty bag:
of Grade “E” flour were lancec
for Barbados from Halifax yes-
terday. This supply arrived by the
“Lady Nelson” which sailed into
Carlisle Bay at daybreak.

Granville
Wednes-



Neck bones, sausage binder
eggs, margarine wraps, machiner)
and bread pans were the othe
items arriving by this vesse:

from Halifax. From Boston an
the British Northern Islands came
advertising material, rubber belt-
ing, empty barrels, puncheon:
and hogsheads, two horses, plate

glass, tomatoes, eschalot anc
fresh fruit.

After taking passengers fol
ports on its voyage South, the

“Lady Nelson” left port las
night about 9 o'clock for St. Vin-
cent. Messrs Gardiner Austin &
Co., Ltd., are agents.

25 YEARS AGO
(“Barbados as” ong Mareh 10

925.
THE DISCOVERY OF INFANT,
DEAD BODY.

On Sunday morning the deac
body of a newly born babe wat
found on Long Bay Beach, St.
Philip. It was removed to the
mortuary at St. Philif’s Alms
house where an inquest was be-
gun and adjourned by Mr. H. S$
Thorne, Coroner of Distric’ C, anc
a jury. Dr. L. S. Tappin per-
formed the autopsy.



Local farmers are concentrating
They find a
| ready market for their products.
| ©abbages and tomatoes are to be
had in fair quantivies at 30 cents
| per pound. During the whole week
{the market sellers and those about
the alleys were getting quick sales
| to eager housewives who are mak~
ing much of the flow after vhe







ship» Mr. E. A. McLeod with|
stealing one bundle of shingles |
valued at $4.00, and the property |
of T. Geddes Grant, Ltd., on |
March 9 |
He was remanded unti! March |
16 and bail was offered in the |
sum of £20 i
eee Seances, : es






























arriving
morning by the “Custodian.”
brought
portland cemenv, pharmaceuticals,
motor cars, machinery, ovaltine,
barley water, tea, cocoa, nescafe
herrings, virol, pickles, cornflour
Vinegar and confectionery
rt agents are Messrs. DaCosta & Co
Cucumbers and seasoning are Ltd

‘wo of the month’s addition to the
sreens supply. There is a dearth
in green bananas. One seller told
that
gained from thea

The

A fine of £2°and 2s
paid in 14 days or one month’s im- |
prisonment
woman called Kathleen of Dean’: |
Village yesterday when she ap-
peared before His Worship
. A. Talma. ‘

She was found guilty of inflict- |
ing bodily
Cadogan on August 26.



stom London

“Custodian” also



£2 Fine For
Bodily Harm

was imposed on

harm on



Charged With

Theft: Remanded

Lionel Gibson, a
chaffeur, of Kew Road, was yes- |
terday charged before His Wor





CAVE

‘Custodian’ Brought
Whiskey, Wine

Whisky, beer, stout, gin and wine
were part of a shipment of cargo
yesterday

Local

costs to be

al
Mr

Madeline

21-year-old |



bee

PAGE FIVE’







When or expensive

REMEMBER

ORANGE & GRAPEFRUIT MARMALADES
sad

is scarce

butter

I nics since tt ne ee ot ats

GUAVA. JELMIMB 0 oe a: OP

PEANUT BUTTER 96 & 60

ee

SHEPHERD & CO. LID.

12 & 13 Broad Street



C. F. Harrison & Co.. (Bdos.) Ltd.

Have pleasure in

‘ ‘
SOLE
‘ 4 4

HUMBER CYCLES

For 70 years “HUMBER” Cycles have maintained their
Reputation for QUALITY and SERVICE and have been
ahead of all other makes in DESIGN, MATERIAL and

fi- i

The Accumulated Experience Gained by Generations of
Expert Cycle Craftsmen is Reflected in the Fine Models
Now Being Produced and so Highly is the “HUMBER”

Esteemed that it

gPROUDLY AND
“HUMBER”

THE ARISTOCRAT OF ALL CYCLES.

e Have Just

GENTS’ GREEN MODELS
(22 and 24 Inch FRAMES)

Complete with 3 Speed Gear, Lighting Set, Pump, Bell,
Tool Bag & Tools, Cycle Lock, Yellow Duster, Lubricating

The World's

Heady For The Road

Wwe =Fuil Range of Other Sizes and Models





Harrisons



ape AG
4 a 4

Announcing that they have been appointed

DISTRIBUTORS

OF THE WORLD FAMOUS

WORKMANSHIP.

is Privileged and Honoured to Carry the
ROYAL WARRANT.

By Appointment

: 4 Bicyele Manuf terera
to /1M. the King J

Humber Limited





JUSTLY THE MANUFACTURERS OF
CYCLES CLAIM THAT THEIRS IS

Received ...

Oil, Etc.



Vinest Cycle Fatly Equipped and

ONLY $77.49

Expected Shortly





FoR HHUMBERS



a tao teak ia a

ee ee eee





ea








Be She n>
page

ahaa

OR ci Et:





Oe siti , a,
cs IS NES a ee GE





PAGE SIX







BARBADOS ADVOCATE





FRIDAY, MARCH 10, ig P

Report Of Standing Closer Association Committee |

i “* @ from page 4
approval or confirmation of ter-
riteftial Governments,

“"—"" Two Classes

We Y€commend the adopiion of
aicthey Teature of the Australian
(and some other) Federal con-
stitdtidns, in that we suggest tha:
thé Subjects on which Federation
may legislate should be divides
info tivo classes — those on which
only the. Federation may legislate
(the “exclusive” list), and those
on which both the Federat'on and
the’ Constituent territories may
légisiaté; but where Federal law
will“ Yitomatically prevail (the
“concurrent” list). The former will
be short, and include only those
subjéefs' on which, under Federa-
tion, there can be no room for a
variation, and which are e¢ssential
to the existence of the Federation
as such,

The details of the lists whic
we propose are to be found in
paragraphs 6 and 7 of the Con-
solidated Recommendations (Ap-
pendix-.5). The lists are largely
self explanatory, and few detail
ed comments are requ'réd. It wil!
be seen that the main emphasi:
js ‘on external relations, of all
kinds; and matters connected
therewith-<¢.¢. the power to nego-
tiate trade agreements, ete., car-
ries with it the power to imple-
ment such agreements, We pro-
pose ulso that the Federat’on
should be empowered to deal with
communications( of all kinds) be-
tween the territories as well as
externally, but that it should be
concerned with purely internal
communications matters only in
so far as federal commitments in
respect of external or inter-terrj-
torial. communications make this
neerssary

It is perhaps more necess ary 95
comment on certain omissions, It
will "He seen that very im-
portant! have been exclud-
ed frem both lists, such as agri-
culfi¥e, “education, housing. and
the’ thaltntenance of public orde
The omment is that these
subjects have not excluded
simply iff order to leave some im-
port furictions to the territorial
sovernments, but because in our
view Jtts the ost efficient course
to Ga so, Taking first public order,
the -weight the ex}
othe, Federation
retaining the
and. order
polices force "
than .a,.“‘Federal”
in Great Britain
tary» state, fore ire
organised on and not a
central basis, the central
Government ¢ nake ts i
aid aud’) th and other 1
exercises food deul of influence
an pe This makes
promptit e jr tl i for the
close adaptation of polb
tion. tw cal {
in th region by fa
part or the ork of
is eéneerned with
ment of purely te
and ‘regulations, and it is conse-
quentls appronriat that they
shoult? be under local. control,
This dbes not mean that the Fed-
eral Governinent, could) not in the
coufse of time play a part in the
improvement
tion and
United Kingdom Horne
assist as regards training
these hing which
done. without suming control ot
the police forces, the responsi-
bility. for day to day main-
tenance order

Education and Agriculture

Similarly, education and agri-
culture-are both matter which
are -uppropriately left to local
rather then central responsibility,
since acricultural and educational
policies..require to be extremely
carefully adapted to local needs
and*eonditions if they are to be
successfull, It is for this reason

some
topi¢

first
Mrst ¢

beer



of erience

s on the side of
maintenance of law
the control of
a “state” rather
ect Even
hi t

an¢





a county

althoug}

for

and ae
Moreover,
the greate
police forces
the enforce-
ritorial law

of police organisa-

methods does th
Office—o
But

can ue

elk

aire

or

ol public





that'tiy many countries important
functions relating to education in
particular are delegated to quite
smal] local organs of government.

In relation to agriculture the ex-
periense-of Great Britain during
the war is instructive It was
essentiad-to get the last ounce of
production with the minimum of

expenditure of effort, manpowe!
and other resources. The broad
lines of policy had to be centrally
determined; but as a sheer mat-
ter of efficiency the detailed
application of policy to par-
ticulhy afeas, farms and = even
fields was delegated to County
Agricultural Committees. In our
view, ie responsibility for the
actual HHeation of agricultural
policy, fov the instruction of farm-
ers and the introduction artd, as
necessary, the enforcement of new
methods, conservation measures
etc., cannot properly be divorced
from territorial governments
Here again the Federal Govern-
ment niyay, without assuming
ultimate responsibility, play a

most lsefui part in the ean
of research, the collection an
dissemination of information and
the provision of specialist advice.

The above discussion leads to
a point of some general impor-
tance, which is that the activities
and value Federation need
not be, and normally are not,
limited to those fields in which
it can legislate and has, or_ can
assume, executive authority. As
fn agriculture, or police matters,
so in respect of education, market-

of a

ing, industrial and sejentifie
matters, social services and many
others. the Federation can ren-

der very Valuable advisory ser-
vices to-individuals and to terri

torial Governments. In this re-
spect it would be able to take
over the advisory functio:
hitherto discharged by the De-
velopment and Welfare Organi-
zation in Barbados, ar el
and add to them with all the
additional Sveight which attach-
meut Federal Government
coul t { £11 Such func
tion however require to
be ten.d Fe ral Consti
tution, sane t nv

the exer

powers hei

create ,.and té the neces-
sar fittes k
erat cou t

vi roa eri vovernment
the
tions “to Pirious Commonweall)
or irtern tt) ' )
the Cormnonwealth Agricultural
Bure x, which would be a
tir nistr onvenience
toa e!

it is hardly necessary to add
that the liste of functions given
in the Consolidated Recommenda-
tions are not to be regarded as
final. Experience will show in
vhat respects they may usefully

Le modifiec. We understand that
the usual trend is for functions
aradually to be’ added to the

Fereral Government, as the region
“grows together’ and it becomes
dear that additfonal functions
ean with advantage be entrusted
‘o the Federation. Apart from any
formal review, however, we con-
sider that the Constitution shoul:
provide for the assumption by the
Federation of additibnal func-
tions at any time, provided always
that both the Federal Legislature
and the territorial legislature or
legi-latures concerned agree. To
take a purely illustrative exam-
ple, it might be that one or two
ef the smaller territories wishes
the Feder*' Government to as-
cume control of soil erosion
versures. In that case, if the
Fe ‘eral Government felt able to
o so, the corrésponding power
could be madé over to the Fed-
erotion in respect of those terri-
tories but of no others. We have

wdinely made provision for
this contingency in item (xxxviii)
‘f paragraph 7 of the Consoli-
deted Recommendations.

inverual brinance

we have aireaay wucned on
ihancial matters in olmer con-
2 vernal tManciai structure of we
seueration snould pe devisea.

4S accepted as axiomatic that
aly Federal Government mus:
have its own direct sources wi
imance, ie, that it must not ae-
peod on contribuulons voted by
ine constituent territories fn.
would piace it in a position sub-
vluinale to we Governments of
those territories (in that funas
could be withheld), which would
make effective Federal govern-
ment impossible. Moreover it 1s
essential for the purpose of rais~

ing loans that the Federation
snould be able to do so on the
security of assets (revenues)

which it raises itself and which
are under its sole control.

it is further accepted that the
appropriate single source of Fed-
eral revenue should be the pro-
duct of the Customs. This is the
more appropriate in that the es-
ublishment of a Customs Union,
involving a Free Trade area, uni-
form tariffs, and a single customs

idministration, are the founda-
tion of a federal structure, par-
ticularly of one of whieh the
ehief functions will include re-
sponsibility for economie ard
commercial matters

The customs revenues of the
urea, comprising some 80° of the
total revenues, will for many
years greatly exceed the require-

nents of the Federal Government.
Moreover, the responsibilities of
the territorial Governments will
continue to be very considerable,
and their position would be im-
possible unless a yery substantial
vart of the customs revenues were
returned to them after collection
by a Federal customs administra-
tion. This problem is common to
most Federations, and methods of
dealing with it vary trom one
case to another, and from time
to time, as the relative responsi-
bilities of the Federal and terri-
torial Governments change and
develop. No single arrangement
ean be deemed to be permanent,
and the structure of federal finan-
ces must be subject to review
at intervals. But for an initial
period of 5 years we propose that
it be provided that, subject to
our recommendations regarding
postal revenue in paragraph 36
below, not less than 75% of the
customs revenues collected by the
Federation in respect of each
territory (net of the cost of col-
lection—i.e. of the maintenance
of the Customs Administration
itself) should be returned to the
territory from which it has been
derived. These grants, or, more
properly, refunds, should be auto-
matic and without condition or
implication’ of control on the part
of the Federal Government, any
more than other revenues directly
collected by the territorial Gov-
ernments themselves, They would
not require to be voted by the
Federal Legislature, which would
have disposed only of the
portion not exceeding 25%
served for it.

Postal Services

A further source of Federal
revenue which gives rise to special
problems, is that arising from the
federalisation of postal services.
Taking the region as a whole,
postal revenues and expenditure
approximately balance. But the
position varies from territory to
territory. In some of the larger
territories, postal services operate
at a loss and their deficits are a
charge on general revenues. In
some of the smaller territories and
dependencies, on the other hand,
the proceeds of stamp sales, large-
ly to philatelists, constitute an
important if somewhat hazardous
source of revenue. Merely to fed-
eralise postal services, without
making allowance for this fact,
would place these territories in
eonsiderable difficulties. We re-
commend therefore, that as from
the date on which the Federation
takes over postal administration
nd becomes entitled to revenpes
therefrom, there be paid to each
of such territories as make appli-
cation accordingly an annual sum
equivalent to their average annua)
1et receipts from stamp sales over
the preceding five years. The pro-
posed grants in lieu of postal pro-

pro-
re-

its, should, like those in lieu of
customs revenues, be automat
nd without any implication of
nancial control on the part of the
Yederal Government
Special attention is also re-
iired connection tt n
It will be open to the Federal Gov
ernment to raise loans for federal
purpose and Unit Government
ll continue equire loans
t a the
ge of their n responsibili

uld be free to float loans

> region as a whole. The

tion is different as regards ex-
which means in pr

ans raised « he Lo



that it can offer more substantial
credit, based on the customs
revenues of the region as a whole.
than can any single Unit Govern-
ment; and the Federal Govern-
ment can therefore hope to obtain
more favourable terms than car
individual territories. Moreover,
it will be in a position to issuc
larger, and consequently gore at-
tractive, loans. There’ is thus
every reason to provide that ali
external borrowing, whether for
Federal purposes or on behalf of
Unit_Governments, should be b
the Federal Government. By this
means also it is possible to avoid
cumbering the market with a mul-
tiplicity of small loans, and to
obtain for the Unit Governments
better terms than they could
obtain for themselves.
Strongly Advocate

This procedure, which we
strongly advocate, undoubtedly
means that the Federal Govern-
ment would exercise over the ex-
ternal loan policy of the territories
a much greater influence than it
will over their general finances,
since the Federal Government
could not be expected automati-
cally to Sponsor and take the re-
sponsibility for loans of the sounds
ness of which it was not con-

re-issue to such Governments and
to be supplemented as required
from Federal funds; that provis-
ion be made for financial agree-
ments between the Federation and
Unit Governments; and that Fed-
eral finances and financial rela-
tions with Unit Governments
should be subject to review after
five years.
Cardinal Importance

We now come to a topic of car-
dinal importance; one which has
involved us in prolonged discus-
sion, and which will certainly en-
gage the greatest attention in the
region. Our conclusions have to
some extent been adumbrated in
Chapter I of this Part. As there
indicated, the “ to day relations
of the region with His Majesty’s
Government are governed and de-
termined preponderantly by econ-
omics and finance. \

Until the economic situation of
the region materially improves, so
long will His Majesty’s Govern-
ment, in fact, though perhaps not
in law, have to stand behind the
region and be ready to render fin-
ancial assistance when required.
So long as His Majesty’s Govern-
ment is in the position of ultimate
guarantor it follows inescapably
that His Majesty’s Government

vineed. This is however a reason-* Will expect to exercise control in

able price to be paid for arrange-
ments designed to secure for the
region as a whole loans on the
best and least onerous terms, and
it does not in our view constitute
a a to which constitutional
objection can be taken.

We must now consider the
special problem of grant-aid. Sev-
eral territories are in receipt of
grants in afd of the ordinary cost
of administration. This position
will not be changed by the mere
act of Federation. In a fully inde-
pendent, financially self-support-
ing Federation, these charges
would fall to be met from Federal
funds. But, as we have shown in
Chapter 1 of this Part, the finan-
cial resources of the region are
not such as to enable them to sup-
port any serious deficits. It is
therefore necessary that, until that
time comes, special arrangements
should be made for the continu-
ance of grant-aid from United
Kingdom funds.

We consider, however that to
continue the system of direct
grants in aid from His Majesty’s
Government in the United King-
dom to the individual Unit Gov-
ernments concerned would seri-
ously inhibit the development of

financial responsibility and self-
reliance in the region. Since in
due course the territories must

look to the Federation, and not to
His Majesty’s Government, for
financial assistance when required,
the Federal Government must
learn to administer such assist-
ance, and the sooner a beginning
is made the better. We therefore
recommend that the principles
proposed at the St. Kitts Confer-
ence on a Windward-Leewards
Federation should apply to the
larger union, namely, that His
Majesty’s Government should
make to the Federal Government,
for a period of say ten years, an
annual grant equivalent to the
average amount actually issued by
way of grant-aid over the five
years preceding the establishment
of Federation. This grant would
be reserved solely for use as
srant-aid to Unit Governments to
enable them to meet essential
commitments, any balances being
kept in a special reserve fund for
this purpose.
A Corollary

A corollary would be that,
should the requirements of grant-
aid at any time exceed the amount
of this United Kingdom grant, and
of accumulated reserves, the ex-
cess would be sought in the first
instance from Federal revenues.
Under this arrangement, territor-
jes in need of grant-aid would
apply not to His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment but to the Federal Gov-
ernment, and such controls as
might be imposed in respect of
grant-aids would be imposed by
the Federal Government and not
by His Majesty’s Government. It
remains only to add that, should
the Federal revenues themselves
be insufficient to meet any excess
of grant-aid over the consolidated
annual grant from His Majesty's
Government, or be otherwise in-
sufficient to meet essential Federal
expenditure, the Federal Govern-
ment would itself have to apply
to His Majesty's Government for
assistance as do territorial Gov-
ernments at the present time.

It is evident that many matters
f financial detail will arise as be-
tween the Federation and Unit
Governments, and it is inappro-
priate to provide in detail in the
Constitution how these matters
should be regulated. We recom-
mend, however, that the Federal
Government should follow the
practice af negotiating financial
agreements with Unit Govern-
ments, covering all aspects of their
financial relationships, the first
such agreements to cover a period
of five years; and, further, that at
the end of that time there should
be an independent enquiry into
the whole question of the finances
of the Federation including finan-
cial relationships between the
Federation and the Units, By this
means any reasonable apprehen-
sions on the part of the Units
Should be allayed and, moreover,
there would be made available a
most invaluable indication of the
extent to which the region has
proceeded on the road to econo-
mic and financial stability.

To summarise the argument and
proposals in this Chapter, we en-
dorse the principle that the Fed-
eration should have its own source
of revenue in its sole control; that
this should in the first instance
consist of Customs revenues; that
not less than 75% of the net re-
ceipts from Customs revenues
should be returned automatically
to the territories in proportion to
the Units of final consumption of
the goods on whieh the import du-
ties were levied: that, as soon ag





the Federal Government assumes
control of postal services and r>-
venues, grants in lieu of postal
profits should for a period of five
years be made to those te :
which apply for them: th r€
Unit Governments should | free
to float loans within the region

Loar shoul be

Federal Goy

fl





ernment, whet! i its ow be

half or on behalf of Unit Gover
ments; that for an initial period
His Majesty's Government should
ike to the Federal Government
an annual grant in lieu of grant-
aid 1 Unit Governments. th
t to be employed solely for



some form over general economic
and financial policy. While that is
the case, the region cannot claim
to have attained full political in-
dependence. It is of the first im-
portance that the peoples of the
region shquld realize that, if they
are to be free to control their des-
tiny without, political supervision
on the part of His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment, they must be prepared
to conduct their economic and fin-
ancial affairs in such a way as to
reduce to a minimum the necess-
ity for applying to His Majesty’s
Government for financial aid.

While His Majesty’s Govern-
ment by virtue of its historical re-
lationship with the component
parts of the Commonwealth must
inevitably be regarded as ultimate
guarantor, it would be fatal to the
development of a proper sense of
responsibility for the Federation to
regard itself, or to permit itself to
be regarded, as being in a position
of daily reliance on His Majesty’s
Government in its financial and
economic affairs. In these cireum-
stances it is essential that the Fed-
eration must be afforded in fact as
well as in theory the fullest pos-
sigle measure of freedom in the
initiation and administration of its
financial and economic affairs.

While it is conceded that the
relationship between His Majes-
ty’s Government and the Federa-
tion must be influenced, more so
in the early stages, by the grants
in aid received by certain Uuits
through the Federal Governngent,
we are firmly convinced that a
viable federation—one acceptable
to the peoples of the region==pre-
supposes the power to ®xercise
their own initiative in financial
and economic matters. It is of
particular importance that if and
when controls are found to be un-
avoidable, such controls should be
so designed as to avoid making-the
economic interest of the region in
any way subservient to any ex=
ternal interests, Prevailing opin-
ion in the region appears to be
that the Federal constitution must
be so designed as to provide the
fullest possible stimulation of na-~
tive self-reliance in these matters
if there is to be federation in sub-
stance, and not in shadow. There
would be, we are convinced, the
strongest objection to any other
principle than that recommended
here.

Loans And Grants

The relationship of the Federa-
tion to His Majesty’s Government
in the latter's capacity as the
source of grant in aid pending the
attainment of a greater economic
stability in the region, is not to be
confused with that relationship
which arises in the case of loans.
Here again the development of a
true sense of responsibility indi-
cates the desirabilgy of the Fed-
eration resorting, when it must
and as far as possible to loans as
distinct from grants in aid. In
such cases the Federation must be
permitted to bargain for such loans
to b> made on the most favourab’.e
terms and subject only to such
control and regulation as is yor-
mally consistent with the pos}tion
of borrower and lender. In mo cir-
cumstances must the probable ne-
cessity for applications fo agsist-
ance in the form of loans be pre-
dicated on the basis of His Ma-
jesty’s Government having a gen-
eral and indeterminate contro!
over the «diay to day financial and
economic affairs of the region.

At this point we feel bound to
comment on a class of sugge:.ior
which has already been made in
public discussion, and which may
recur, It springs from (ne belief
that any degree of political in-
dependence presupposes complete
financial stability, and takes the
form that in order to start off the
Federation it would be necesvary
for His Majesty’s Government to
make a grant of very large pro-
portions—many millions of pounds
have been mentioned—to a new
Federal Government. The super-
ficial attractions of such a pro-
posal are evident. A very large
grant might serve to guarantee the
solvency of the region for a period
long enough to give it time so to
develop its own resources as to be
able to continue in volvency there-
after, We do not however recom-
mend any such scheme, for what
appears to us the overriding reas-
on that the availability of such a
grant would no. breed that spirit
of self-reliance and that deter-
mination to stand on our own feet
economically and financially which
are essential if we are to attain full
political independence. It is we
think a matter of human nature
generally, and not of Wet Indian
human nature only, that a grant
for which the Federation was not
accountable would not in fact be
spent to the best advantage, and
there would be a serious risk, if
hot a virtual certainty, that when
it was exhausted the region woul



find itself not with strengthened
productive and economic resources
but with heavily inereared e+
curring commitments, and sx €
further from. and not nearer
real ependence, W

clude the possit lit of a
assistance by way t capital g }
for epecific plrposes e.g. the :
setting up new Federal sdmir
trative headquarters, and c



over We assume the continuance of

the eligibility of the regior Oi
assistance under the Coloria
Development and Welfare A

But, subject to assistance of that
kind, we consider that the real
independence of the region will
only be won by its own efforts,
and founded upon resources there-
by built up. a

To sum up the argument of tiis
Chapter, the position of His
Majesty’s Government as ultimate
and formal guarantor is recog-

niged; that in relation to grant- representatives will, in short, re-

aid certain controls are inevitable;
that in relation to loans safeguards
may be imposed; that, neverthe-
less, there must be no direct and
general control of the economic
and financial affairs of the Feder-
ation. ’
Legislative Process

Under democratic procedure, the
legislative process consists in the
main of the adoption of bills by
deliberative assemblies, which be-
come law on receiving the assent
of the Head of the State. Accord-
ing to the practice of the British
Commonwealth this means assent
given by, or on behalf of, His
Majesty the King. Strictly speai-
ing, therefore, the term “Legisla-
ture” comprises the Head of vne
State, or, for our purposes, the
Crown as Well as the deliberative
part of the vtructure. We shall
however consider elsewhere in
greater detail the functions of the
Head of the State as head of the
Executive. Here we are concerned
only with his part in the making
of laws and more particularly with
the constitution and powers of
the deliberative part of the Leg-
ivlature; and for convenience in
this connection we shall use the
term “Legislature” to mean that

art .
r be am with the assumption,
which we need not debate, mt
the nderant voice in ie
Legidlaterd should be that of per-
rons elected by the people on
as wide a franchise as possible.
No other view is now possible, no
ether arrangement would win the
support of the peoples and legis-
latures of the territories, and no
other course would, we believe,
be to the satisfaction of His
Majesty’s Government. On_ this
point we believe that the policy of
Fis Majesty’s Government is above
party, and we see no risk of any

change. :
We proceed then to consider
various consequential questions

first; should the popular repre-
sontatives be directly elected by
tne peoples of the region or be
r2pregentatives selected by terri-
tovial legislatures? Secondly, what
should be the franchise for direct
vlection? Thirdly, should the Leg-
islature consist of one Chamber or
two? Fourthly, should the Levis-
lature include a _ non-elective
clement and, if so, where should
this element be placed? Other im-
portant questions remain to be
discussed, but we feel that the
-bove ghould be disposed of first.

First, whether the representa-
tives should be directly elected or
chosen by territorial legislatures.
We raise this point, not because
to our minds there is any difficulty
about it, but in order to make our
position quite clear. We have no
doubt whatsoever but that the
principle of direct election should
be followed. The world is not
without experience of other pro-
cedures, and it is safe to say that
an assembly consisting of the
nominees of other legislatures
cannot but remain subordinate to
those legislatures, which strikes
at the root of the federal principle.
Such representatives cannot but
be mere delegates, bound by man-
dates from their own legislatures
and under the necessity of seeking
instructions on all points of major
importance, and inhibited from ac-
quiring and acting upon a region-
«| sense which transcends the out-
look of any individual territory.
I! js not too much to say that a
Federation based on this principle
would be no Fedesation, but a
Confederation, or loose association
of states, hardly capable of devel-
oping a truly regional outlook, or
© prompt or consistent action.
l’istory shows many examples of
Confederation, hardly
wich has proved stable—either
they have fallen under the dom-
ir ation of the strongest member
and become in effect a unitary
site, or they have led forward to
1) ‘e Federation, or they have dis-
in'cgrated altogether. We regard it

a: essential therefore, that the
ular representatives in the
Lecislature should be _ directly

elected by the peoples of the
reyjpion,

Franchise
ccondly, franchise. Here again
w have no difficulty nor doubt.
¥ » consider that elections should
te by universal, adult suffrage. In
s( me quarters, we know, objections
are raised, but we consider that
they spring from unjustified fears
int from a fundamental lack of
‘aith in the political judgment of
ih peoples of the region. These
@orbts would, if carried to their
‘eg cal conclusion, inhibit the un-
le ‘aking of Federation, or any
ne tical advance at all. We do not
‘o\vtend that perfect wisdom re-
‘ides in the peoples of this (or
n other) region, nor that much
move political and general educa-
tie. is not desirable, nor that the
be ilnt-box cannot at times lead to
wre 4g conclusions. We do contend
how ever, that in the circumstances
of .1is region and this time, to the
ext nt that the elective principle
is mployed, it should be thorough-
%¢ 1g, and this can only mean the
ad» tion of univergal, adult suff-
ram,
To this we would only add onc
qualification, not as a matter of
prin ciple but as a matter of prac-
tical convenience. To arrange
elections on a basis of universal
id) dt suffrage require: legislation,
the. preparation oi" voters’ rolls, and
otaer administrative arrangements
Which cannot be done in a day
ind which can haraly precede the
anstitution of Federation. We re-
commend, therefore, that the first
elections under Federxtion sould
be held, so far as concerns fran-
hise, in accordance with the laws
revailing the tim@® in each
erritory, it being an injunction to
the Federation in. the Constitution
tself to provide tty legislation and
t wise for the immediate in-
troduction of universal adult 1

at







ige
We d® not propose at this po
to diseaiss in detail the question

f the numbers to be elected
how hose numbers hould
divide#i between the vitrious te:
tories. That sep.irat
with which we deal at length

ars graph 63 below. It is neces

nor



i a

ary

one of

- practice afford us a variety of ex-

t by
» ond Chamber

1 system at any rate to have

i riti is and
wever here to state that in our period, although criticism i
sare the numbers and their distri- proposals for change are seldom

. m .- e 3
bution should be related to popu- lacking for long. We have there Trinidad ls

i i tri best course is

lation—not mechanically or strict- fore felt that the

ly "(that, as we shall show later, to ¢ solely stg tg
is impracticable), but so that, ment would be in t - aoa ake 0 :
generally speaking, the larger pop- ests of this region, ee eae )
ulation groups shall have more each of the three ment , Fe deral -
_ The Executive
side in a Council

















elected representatives at any rate in its own setting,

numerous’
than the smaller. The elected stood the test of time.

Elective ek

resent the region as a whole, and We obviously rule out a -
os a single entity, thus reflecting tary Senate. The choice is only
one side of the federative principle. between the elective and nomina-

The representation in the Consti- tive principles. The prominent ex- tuvi of
tution oR the units as such—in ample of the United States, as a Cones avisoty to 4
order to reflect the other side of well as of other feder 8) tive and ap

ae tion
the federative principle—requires compels attention to the adop'

separate treatment as will be of the elective principle for the

shown, ydeccnnns ra “ae for zr ened bs

i Assembly. ere are, "

We aes een of certain important considerations,

some general and some of particu-
- eae eae we lar relevance to this region, which

. The Constitution a
; ent us from regarding the for a Council of State of A
oer ay eee bt With fatter as a foregone conclusion. ar oak $ _—
vist of one C or. r aca In the first place, as we have al- aan a Binning of each peo.
the exception of rep h ore Teady stated, we regard it as axio- ment the House
this problem gave us perhaps more ‘atic that the dominant element would elect one of 4
concern, and aroused more ite in the Legislature should be elec- tyhom the Governor General
cussion, than wie ea - ohm ad tive—that is to say, the House of : f State wipraint the Op
point with which we have fad Assembly. We shall later indicate th the style .
'o deal—as indeed its importance : detail how this position of Prime Minister. th Dot

wae ar oe we ep: = be ts anaet eg. in relation to Governor Genera}
a definite predisposition in favour

ing of expenditures, and seven other members ny
of a single none oe th caphetien of the Executive. aes nominated by 4
by the Caribbean detetand to-have For prisent purposes, it suffices to iniater 7
Fase ese ea rsa ccoretavy state the general principle. Tf that By this means 2 group ot ey
been favoured by the Secreray is so, it is important that there within the Couneil of 4

of State. The advantages o oe & It shall be no obscuration of this pid majority, will owe
Chamber are —r Coon vould dominance—ie, that one, and o ai on through the Prime ying
would be eo ag y a and a one, part of the Legislature shall Fee e. ve of the majority of
eee ee eee ee ohamber be able to speak with the partied e ‘deral. Asem 5 «ae
WY tye tena ee tent with la. weight and authority w oh overnor Genera):
would appear ss c ds We felt derive from popular election. empowered to tb 16
current political trends. idex why now the Senate were also * be s er ge of wh
obliged, however, = — sed elected by popular vote, and t! 4 fen three should be
practically no Gispense with 2 should be a divergence of view be- e remainder members
thought fit to ther elective, tween the Assembly and the rr Lewd ature,

bern me ggg Seer ene vGespitg ate, each could claim equally < roadly the
nominated or heredi ie ne it spoke with popular sane oe of State will constitute the’s
considerations of cost an ae Moreover it would be difficult, in forming instrument in the
We did not oe ourse oe such a situation, to place the Sen- tution. ms
bound to accept the se ate, as we shall propose, in a The establishment of a
simply because others had cut position of definite constitutional Service Commission,

80 atid we were quite eeipoeate Subordination to tHe sees: tc vhe Governor

for sufficient reasons, to a eee since the primacy accorded to commended. An indi An
that this region should break wit one, on grounds of popular elec- part of the Constitution
precedent, however well estab- tion, could hardly be denied to Federal Supreme Court conde.
erhataeie might be the situation Ge ee ey ae tee ee i

; ed. Nor do we consider it than three Judges,
in unitary states, one important as thet the two Houses

factor applicable to a Federal sjould be constitutionally equal,
Constitution soon presented itself, on the ground that they derive spective powers of the 4
It is of the essence of a Federation their authority from the same and the Senate, and to sig
that there shall be a balance, ,,5ular source. It is important providing that the
throughout its organisation, be- «1,44 the two Houses of a bicam- je nominated and not
tween unity and diversity; that the cral legislature should have some- Other and more
territories, merged for some pur- \ hat different functions and POW- reasons for ad the
poses, should retain their identities ers if they are not to be * ee tive principle for a
for others. Now a ne eee duplication of each other. ; I nape in thie region ae oa ral .
populations, would adequstely re. nqt@, eae Proper part 10, is true that in the oune
eet ane. Foaeratun ea single a way saeoanaee place the existence of Federation, ;
Salk but it would not reflect the a tier er Be pattern, and Of a career in Federal politics a
fact that the cons.ituent territories there should be no doubt, on any ditional to that in term
enter upon Federation as equals. ground which is the dominant politics, may well ina
Moreover, it is not apparent hew hartner, For these reasons, which numbers of experienced p
this could be done while retaining we believe to be of general appli- But that time has yet to
the unicameral principle, To pro- sation, we have come to the con- and for the present ang for th
vide that territorial legislatures ¢jysion that, in, recagnition of its first years of Fed ’
should select members to represent g\hordinate though nonetheless been and will be the general 1
their point of view, additional to jmportant role in the legislature, of political advance that the
poe eee elected, anes xe. the Senate shoul be nominated piy of experienced public meni
introduce e “confederative” and not elected. likely to
principle, the objections to which Before we proceed ee aie the a ae emphasize that
we. have already Stated in para- eyssion of, more particular ao, speak of experience and not
graph 49 of this Chapter. We re- ons for this view, two possi le “ability, as to which we have:
ject the, idea oe seniels ee vomments on the general ne qualms, We think it wise,
mince the expedient ‘et mixing 1°, Tuell be, dealt Wit ore, soo desig te Olle
nominated and elected members in ‘t May be asked, ee & Senate tion that we do not ex
a single legislative body is not 2Pé of the functions of the Sener, this form of publle serv
viewed with favour and is on the ‘® ‘@ reflect the constituent units 4 might not otherwise be: a
' as equals, it cannot be composed apie, We do not hold that

whole on the way out. Whatever sf
may be the reasons for adhering of members elected by the variouS gich as can

it where it already exists, we -Crritorial legislatures, thu also gjection are fitted to makea is
A be reason for introducing it preserving the elective principle j,+i¥. contribution to the
into an entirely new Constitution. in all branches of the Federal with those who hold
We were led therefore to the Legislature. As to the latter point, ajoo¢ from polities for
conclusion vhat, as in other Feder- we have already indicated that 0N 6. snobbish reasons we
ations, there is no option but to general grounds we feel that the sympathy; but. there are
set up a separate Second Chamber House of Assembly should be the men of good and v.
if only that these may be ade- sole expression of the elective ence, not by any means ¢

in Great Britain the

ter and other members
Cabinev are appointed 4
advise His Ma the Ki






















































































wey

Ais Be

=

a

quately reflecte? and represented principle. We have also in othet one Slass of society, who are hei:
the equality of the constituent connections (see paragraph 49) pack by feelings of n
Other Reasons sistent with true Federation, any their contribution uninvited,
That there are other, and good, system whereby the Federal leg- Secondary Place
chief one, as the experience of it derives its authority, from g¢rom the fact that, under our pi
other countries, including many ferritorial legislatures, Provision posals, the Senate will d
shows, is that there is an abiding reflection of the equality of the jeg: : 0
: ee 1 legislative process. Its power!
need in any legislature, however units and we shall put forward selation 10 Ananane
cess. This does not imply any : Faded
1 . election of Senators by territorial wers will be révisionaty
lack of faith in an elective as- legislatures is not one of them. pe only, and in the.
stituted on some other principle. E : r
Discussion of this point is often, ore serious. In rejecting the ment, the views of the Howe
we consider, needlessly clouded by ¢lective principle for the Senate, Assembly will prevail. Thed
tutions the Chamber deemed orig- to reject a_principle embodied in from among its ranks.
inative is elective, whereas the the constffutfon of the United fore unlikely that an
n 1 politician
nominated (as in Canada) or her- appealed to history, and undoubt- seek election to the Senate
editary (as in Great Britain). This edly the conspicuous precedent of
f : is not to the House of
easily work both ways—legislation lightly to be set aside, Nor do we
introduced in the “second” Cham- cet it aside lightly, ’ . these circumeainan
5 : an
revised during its subsequent pas~ * States, for example, be
sage through he first. Any single But we make the following ob- Senate would run the ‘
capable at times of hasty decisions; United States constitution, in this To summarise our
and constitutional history clearly as in many other respects, is now far, we omn
further scrutiny and review. We stitutions in the world and, while of two Chambers, a |
dislike and eschew such terms as the fact that it has remained in this Assembly, w
their connotations of superiori’y commands respect, it does date the dominant partner in
and the reverse, The proper dis- from a period since when constitu- lature, and a '
“originative” and “revisionary”, as_, A con n gre
indicating the normal functions of ae emuch expetience has been _ We must now of the resp
. i ¥
legislature although, ag we have V©™ture, with great respect, to sug- Chambers, the numbers
suggested above, we would not $¢st that experience has shown sentatives from each in
or second chamber for the first ‘ion is at times liable to just those the mode of
consideration of a proposal, when ‘ifficulties which we earlier sug- the respective
vy
cumstances of the case make it element in the Constitution can the Head of the *
expedient to do so, claim to enjoy a popular mandate, cess of leg! the Hot (AY
entire legislature should be elec- the House of Representatives and sembly, we had of .
tive, or whether any other prin- the Senate, but also the Chief Cevising as the same
That Means for our purposes claim, and there i adequately reflects the. Te
| ; aim, here je in fact no clear quat ’
whether there should be a nomin- supremacy of one branch of the DOpulation of the
dicated that in a bicameral legis- a : overweight a a 1”
lature the “originative” and dom. quently, political struggles in that —a in relation to r
henceforth call the House of As- ©f the nature of a battle of equals, obvious that to allot seats Sf
sembly—should be directly elect- @!! able with equal apparent in accordance ne
that it should include members Voice of the people. We cannot tory, Jamaica, halt of the
chosen by any other method, but believe that the adoption of membership, and
pointment by territorial legisla- for deadlock and delay, and mav of that one territory,
tures. It is therefore necessary to tend to give rise to intricate operation of only one o&
bers of the second or revisionary nq a way o ce bly. We fe ti
: a : : ’ ¥ out of the impasses so the Assembly p
cnamber—which we suggest be created, particularly in a region that in practice
sinted 2 istory a ; 9 i
pointe Here history and current perience of the United States in the repent
amples—in Great Britain, a main- °°4!ing with such difficulties, For 'e'ritor:
ol
the United States an elective Sen- S@¢ the popular mandate clearly sider it more pro
1 emer
Each of these three Pe branch of the Legislature. and cut aeross terrilot
democratic states appears to be one only, and that that branch Nevertheless, even to b¢
e On Page *

units. considered and rejected, as incon- genuine diffidence from
reasons we are fully satisfied. The jislative structure or any purt ol A further consideration
mature in political experience, has, it is true, to be made for the have ‘a secondary place in
constituted, for a revisionary pro- proposals to this end. But the ly limited, In other |
bl. - ;
sem ly as compared with one con The other possible comment is resort, in the event of
,
the fact that under many Consti- we have taken it upon ourselves Minister will never is
Chamber deemed revisionary is States, We have from time to time and ambitious y
chance of
process however can and does as the United States Senate att be ane
i ft greatly from those of the Ua
ber may often be advantageously One Of The Oldest
chamber, however constituted, is ®@rvations. In the first place, the coming a very
demonstrates the necessity for one of the oldest important con- Federal Legislature
“Upper” and “Lower” House, with respect unchanged undoubtedly of universal adult suffrage?
tinction is to our mind as between tional ideas have greatly developed wholly of no
the two chambers of a bicameral gained. As a matter of practice, we detail the size 4
rule out the use of the revision ‘hat the United States constitu- qualifications,
of fhe
the state of business and the cir- gested will arise if more than one Chambers and
We next consider whether the In the United States, not only Taking first :
ciple should be included as well. Executive himself, can make this Of seats which
ated element. We have already in- Legislature over another. Con >. tories, is not too large
inant chamber—which we may COUntry appear to us often to be mo take the last
ed; and we have rejected the idea justice to claim to speak with the would involve gi
whether by nomination, or by ap» Such system must at times make possibility that the ne |
consider on what basis the mem- political subterfuges in order to tepresentatives, could
sty lec e Senate— bs ‘ae ne it i
yled the Senate—should be ap which has not had the long ex- teal, in that it pate of any ®
t be oak
. ‘ te
} d invariably ,
hereditary House of Lords, in Purposes we would prefer to Cote ae a sine nierk.
Â¥ d> bable
ate, in Canada a nominated Sec- 8%d indubitably concentrated in divisions wil “ame
the
sufficiently satisfied with its own’ should be constitutionally domin- of such a possibility is

, e left it ant. This we propose to ensure
n being for some considerable in detail in déaling with the re-
sy, MARCH 10, 1950

a er gO
| Report Of Standing Closer Association Committee :

@ From Page 6 the Head of the State in hi









ty +s i S capa- authority being the Gover of terest. The 7 . ; ; i , ; ; - , : . ini . ,

city as representatiy : y & the Governor of terest. The ultimate control of Minister himself, then their prim- should have an overriding tion 76 of the Commonwealth remaining the responsibility of
; agreed therefore that Majesty the King trocact His the Leeward Islands. We had Government by the electorate is, ary loyalty is not to him but to power to legislate (vide of Australia Constitution con- unit Governments might, wheeled
i 200 its, while rightly re- asvsame that he will receine’ We the advantage of discussion with according to British practice and the Assembly. This system can Chapter 5, paragraph 76). stitutes a useful precedent not, be unified, as may be decide
e ge representation structions in the sense a ‘n- observers from these territories, Xperience, best preserved by the lead, and has in some constitu- This is necessary to ensu for consideration:— in each case. The establishment
es one should not do-so commendation of th: - the re- in the course of which we learned “Vice of ensuring that the Legis- tions led, to a most undesirable to His Majesty in Council “16. The Parliament may % Federation does not automatic-
f p be Srportion to their popu- Royal Commission (Cma. —— that the Turks and Caicos Islands ‘ture in effect chooses, and can lack of effective unanimity in the the power to make his legis- make laws conferring original ally bring about the unification of
oer jn a diminishing pro- p. 449, para. 56 (a), relating tg “Te Not only. content with, but change by withholding support Executive, which of all things im- lative function effective. jurisdiction on the High Court S@rvices, nor need ‘t affect the

appointments to Executive wey to anxious to retain, their present {70â„¢, a preponderant element in pedes efficient government. It is (b) Certain other functions




















’ pus 1 € . , in any matter — those awho ectly
other end of the ils. N- association with i the Executive itself. In Great still open to a Minister, should he which are listed in Note A i - en an n ‘
ate — “to the conclusion We recommend that would be satisfied array a Britain, the Executive is His find himself at variance with his at tne end of the Consoli- Ci) a under ae. Con- by the Federal Gov E
- “minimum number of shali-be appointed for one sented in a Federation through of tne is es Minister wae Seine fan ie page oon tine - interpretation; Cat federal” = > sain be
9s from each po ; fei a -_- Of the King’s Ministers, who de- poin ew to the Assembly. A dix 5. Th ii , idera’ beneficial. a
raid a ares aibtne to ad an — eligi a at a hepa ee ae ae executive authority Should it there find sufficient — pe ma of these Sees (i) —~. mone tie ee pee —_ = jal, as we
Snes tor aitiry tens or re- , it would from His Majesty as Head of thé the Assembly is i ‘ ised i 4) ee ee tia i dies.
poviso that W ae Than eae = intment; but that the first b€ acceptable to arrange for direct State and not from the Legislature. virtually to compel soe daemon, Pry sy tata (til) of Admiralty and mari- Publie Service
i? er should be one. Pedieat’ co uttpainted under the administrative attachment to the But the Legislature can and changes in the policy or composi- General are discussed else- time jurisdiction; We have pointed out above that
et difficulty was. ex- appointed in Sane teu i ‘ion, ieee —— ee Soll arn = ed > ee terval oe caste tas, eee oe abeieninine sinanoe aie er to appoint, promot
est diffi! Se years, tion, ie, © Governor-Gen- Policy of the Government parth subject-matter claimed power to appoint, promote, dis-
Metion for the inter- We recotmmerid that the Const. Stal, should in respect of the Virtue of its power to pass State Council deelt with; in other cance under the laws of ier Sibling and equlate the beep
ritories; and in fixing tution should provide th onsti- British Virgin Islands take the °F refuse bills to carry out Six seats remain to be filled in the context of the Consoli- ent States.” the public service should with
Wye found it necessary to Senate shall elect its own pren® Plaee of the Governor of the that policy, and particularly @ State Council of fourteen. It dated Recommendations Within the field of original the Governor-General. 18 tat 5
r ount not numbers dent and Vice-Pr ident Presi- Leeward Islands in regard to all DY its power to vote or withhold may be that in its initial stage makes detailed explanation jurisdiction as described in ia pun ee
: oe EN galecp einer eli a meiees ot from matters with which the latter at peg bog ws use of & is ey 7 have _ = at this point unnecessary. graph 4 above, the Federal legis. — ncelebemateL by. be
, bu. -oductivity, fin- We . relies : ers, the ature can elemen' e Council tate. ould’ Vernon: a
I ay oa a athe at sana "peoalve tips ae Tomseoes the Brien. Virgin “Telands oe ensure that the policy and prac- But we consider that in the Fed- Federal Public Service Gecnek of Si cegeeancan amisted | in the” disaineas. Of | ihe
sta time recognising that and other emoluments ae the — anxious that some member of the tice of the Government is under efal constitution a stage has been powers over the public service,

: ees nd its Own: gen ; reachedl : There is . ; of Australia Constitution) have best isions
spfeatures might change from bers of the House of Assembly Senate should be charged with the however errself senate," aaa be given ns the view that officials we recommend, a reserve or dis: power to male laws — may be taken. on’ =

nay s tha cua eee S : : . may be taken on service, matters
MEE Tocation of seats {cc Presiicnts. ipove); and that Guty of looking after British responsibility for more than the must properly be regarded as the cTetionary power which does nat (i) defining the jurisdiction (which are. often exe
sed a ee ie enna oe arsy envs salary should be Virgin Islands interests, and that nature and composition of the servants ¢f the Executive, and not fall within the above categories— of any federal court complex and technical) but also in
epee Gathematical formu- setae ere per annum to- these should be the responsibility Government. This does not mean members of it. An official ele- namely in respect of the federal other than the Federal order that members of the service,
jeated omg opulation figures, aoe with a duty allowance of Of some secretary in the Federal that the Legislature may not ques- ment should be included only in public service. Its inclusion among Supreme Court; and the public, may be
? it epee that: the allo- ite’n hyd annum, As in the case Administration; that the British tion and discuss the detailed acts So far as it may be required to the reserve powers constitutes (ii) defining the extent to that such decisions are taken in
mot holly satisfactory, but soaaiaia ae We do not pro- Virgin Islands should be able to Of Government. Such question- assist the Council in the discharge simply a convenient way of adapt- which the jurisdiction of the light of disinterested advice.
B vate the result of much a oa © actual figures should look to the Federal Government ings constitute a large proportion of its responsibilities, and not on ing to the constitutional cireum- any federal court shall For these reasons, we cordially
my reht, and anxious de- a ee hey anns Constitution, for outside technical assistance as of the work of the Parliament of any assumption that’ official con- stances of the region the well- be exclusive of that SUpport the recommendation of
ce cx Ethet frorn tiie i at they should be left for they to-day look to the Leeward “teat Britain, and Governments trol of policy is required. An established and extremely imrort- which belongs to or is the Holmes Commission that there
pwe rae the framers of ‘© Federal legislation. Islands Federal Government; that ‘ Practice show themselves most example of the kind of assistance ant British practice of keeping the vested in the courts of Should be established for this re-

Federal constitutions, not Respective Powers the British Virgin Islands should sensitive to the views of the Leg- required is that of a Law Officer. day-to-day management of the the units: gion a Public Service Commission;





f Seen. ae : islature in such matters in view We do not however consider it affairs of the public servi ii i and we have in the Consolidated
of ne 4 i ag We now come to the important aoe & be served by the of their dependence on the Leg- to be necessary to specify which becoming a maha of Samia cane (iit) Vesting ‘any court 8 Recommendations, set out in de-

d eda ets as follows : AweStion of the respective powers : me Court of the Windward jsiature for their continued exist- Officials should be appointed to troversy, By this we do not mean unit with federal juris- tail our pr oposals as to the form
allocation is as f “S* of the Assembly and the Senate pes Leeward Islands or by any ence. In brief, the Legislature the Council of State, and in our that the Legislature shall have no sap ection. in which provision should be
pais 6 in relation to legislation. The nor- Ot#€? Court which may be created can throw out’ the Government, view it will suffice to provide only say in the size organisation, emolu- Notwithstanding our recom- made in a federal constitution. A
pGuiana 2 mal practice is that all legislation t© Serve that region; and that the whereupon another emerges which . that not more than three officials ments ete,, of the public service— endation that the existing Presi- Public Service Commission, desir-

h Honduras 1g Shall require the assent of both Present arrangements should con- can count upon the support of the shall be appointed. it will in fact have complete gen- “encies of the Leeward Islands able in respect of unification, is in

Chambers before submission to the tinue as regards the circulation Legislature or, if that proves im- PES Ay
Head of the State, But to ensure Of U.S. currency in the British possible, fresh elecflons can be _,“ corollary of such limitation
the primacy of the House of As- Virgin Islands. We gathered from held at any time to obtain a clear Of Official representation on the fnoe has shown that it is essential the Federation as separate units, _We recommend, further, that
sembly, and in accordance with the Cayman Islands observers that expression of the views of the — of State is that, unless the in the interests of efficient admin- We recommend that it would be Under federation the Public Ser-
current British constitutional prac- the legislative body of that De- ©lectorate on current major issues. al tater er assume certain istration that the individual civil advisable to keep in existence the Vice Commission should be set up
tiee, we consider that the constitu- pendency were unanimousiy of We consider that, for the pres- SI jonaibiliti See eee ae should not be subject to Supreme Court of the Windward ®t 4 very early date, in order that
tion should provide the opinion that Federation would’ ®t Purposes of this region, the on ot ble an, ——_ and almost Girect political influence, and that and Leeward Islands, or to create otk may begin at once on the
(a) that Money Bills (that is, only be acceptable if arrange- ©*@cutive power should reside in Pportable burden will fall his work should not be the subject- some similar Court to serve as a 8bStruse and technical matters

; i = Upon officials in the Council since 43 1 =
ortly, Bills ' aye me a Fay Primsnannee they would be required to ex. Matter of political controversy, Supreme Court for those terri- eee ee yt eos
only clauses dealing with Islands to be directly represented eral as Head of the Executive and Plain the departmental views on [Corrupt and efficient service is tories. federal responsibility. Wh
taxation or the expenditure in the Federal Legislature. Taking appointed by him, just as in Great Tange of topics wider than it is CMY Possible when the civil ser- We recommend that the salaries service is federalised, abated
of public money) may only the last point first, while we have Britain the Prime Minister ang ‘easonable for one or two men Vice Knows that loyal and honest of the Chief Justice and other problems of some delicacy and
fen Feet _ be House of every sympathy with the point other members of the Cabinet are !0 be able to master in addition Tall het be b melltea by gf today Judges" of the Federal Supreme difficulty will speedily arise. The
ds the qualifications of the Government, 40” Of of view expressed, we felt bound appointed by and advise His © their substantive duties. It Wi eat Of fomanised by the 60v- Court should be of the order of problem will not be difficult in
ards qual yovernment; to conclude that the provisions Majesty the King. Such appoint- Would in our view be more con- ¢mment of tomorrow, It is essen- £3,500 per annum for the Chief

eral control of all these through its Colony, and the Colonies of the our view essential under feder-

eyends power of the purse—but experi- Windward Islands should enter ation.

Nr



























shortly, Bills containing ments were made for the Cayman

| wenn







we inc at first to (b) that the Senate’s powers in . : sonant with the develo tial to keep the civil service out of , relation to new entrants, who will

new that, as he GOES as relation to Money Bills ieee thane te nantes x a by 6 Se eee responsible government Tae politics, and politics out of the Pig Al) det linn et od ont Sites tilored te cee jhe
prrnchise, SO in this case should be very strictly lim- hi . ; : . beolut ete bers of the Cabinet group were to °iVil service. For these reasons we : : — lidi : ’ .
miveations for the first election ited. in ee So eee th ata staal’ f te atasame allotted the responsibility for 8%e proposing elsewhere in this the age of retirement for Judges cluding particularly the liability +4
ai be those obtaining at that (c) that the certification that a of the Federal Legislature should than in actual, a&t His Majesty e. haadline. in the Council of Report the establishment of a (including the Chief Justice) to be posted anywhere in the re~ yi
f the units, leavin Nir dae il (in Be, allotted to the Turks and appoints the Ministers who form si issi -e- Should either be higher than for 8ion: but special provision will 4
neach of t rca: hekaadh Bill is a Money Bill (in Cai Island h 5 the British Cabinet otherwise than SUCh departmental matters as Public Service Commission, re- h : ic Tequire to be made for officers al- ‘|
Federal Legislature itselt accordance with a definition ~@!C0S fsiands, the Cayman in accordance with well defined Might be expedient from time to SPonsible to the Governor-General, ther members of the public f

Seqently to enact uniform to be included in the Con- Islands, or the British Virgin should be Teady in services to be federalised.

nee >» thi i i i » Servi t least
Rees rei ie ; } constitutional 6 He . time. They would by this means to advise him on questions of entry, Service or a 3 . annot eq be m8
on on this point. We lates stitution) shall be a matter Islands. After careful considera- meal Te ee eee es also be the batter able to put Promotions and discipline, and that capable of extension in suitable omupcee in aeetiaet wits of }
sd_a proposal that in re- for the Speaker of the House tion of the position, we have come Federal constitution which re- forward in the Legislature the certain limits be placed on the cas@s, so as to attract to those ie

service, and certain options must ie
be available to them, The prob- ut
lem is ee 2 = ee in =

. case of the unification of a service
The Public Service (cf, paragraph 36 of the Holmes
in relation to this Report). It is not within our com-
matter is much simplified by the Petence to recommend in detail

wot the first and any subse- of Assembly, after consult- to the conclusion that the best quires to be embodied*in a writ- Policies with the framing of which matter of legislation affecting the appointments outstanding senior
4 s, a candidate en- ation with a Law Officer; interest of the dependencies would ten document, we propose that they had already been associated public service. It may be pointed practitioners.
r election in any — (dq) that in the case of Bills be served if the Turks and Caicos the inode of choice of the mem- ‘—a duty which would otherwise out that this provision corresponds
ul should ipso - vo ey other than Money Bills, the Islands, and the Cayman Islands pers of the Council of State should ‘end to be too greatly concentrated to the practice of Great Britain

Bio stand in any other, On Senate shall have a delaying like the British Virgin Islands pe clearly set forth in the Con- 0m the Prime Minister. We there- although there, in the absence of a Our task

. oes oe oe? power of twelve months were to be transferred to stitution itself, and that it should fore provide in our detailed re- written constitution, formal pro-









: act al , only. the administrative responsibility provide for a majority of mem- commendations, for the develop- vision to this effect is not to be ilabili what form the conditions of trans- ;
of ere Sy ol in _, Except as otherwise provided, it of the Gioveenar-Clenpral, in which bers who depend os their author- ment of a Ministerial system, found. Unification aan ne ee fer should take, and this can best et |
tet n the Con. Should be permissible for any case we have no doubt that suit- ity on the will of the House of without recommending _ rigidly The Judicature under the Chairmanship of Sir be dealt with by a Public Service aid
self for the qualifiea. measure, whether private or Gov- able administrative provision could Assembly as the elective and pre- Precisely how this should come ’ Maurice Holmes. F On .. Commission, +h
eo, ns of ¢rnmentally-sponsored, to be in- be made in respect of the points Ponderant branch of the Legisla- about. We recommend, as an indispens- r eo or the pur We wish to make it clear that F FH
Sand ye 4 iy iy troduced for the first time in either raised by the observer from fhe ture. There remain three seats to be able part of a federal constitution, poses of this Part of Our OWN we do not regard the federal and igi
Ss: an ras ev licceed- Chamber as convenience may dic- British Virgin Islands, and for any Council of State filled. These we consider should a Federal Supreme Court consist- ee eo hotar vom, Par the remaining local services as
Mi, Our detailed pro- tate. Gur detailed proposals are set other similar matters. We put To discharge this function, we » left to the discretion of the ing of a Chief Justice and not less acne: to Chapter V_ of the peing in any way watertight com-
Mothis end are to be found Ut in Appendix 5, paragraphs 36 ji. recommendation forward, Tecommend, therefore, that the Governor-General. subject to the than three other judges. The de- Holmes Report, regarding the partments, and we anticipate there

d ; . ; : ie
‘ { ¢ Yds Gants proviso that his choice should be tails of our proposals as to mode Public Service Commission, and will be no bar to transfer between
feeling that despite their existing Geen ae a Nie ad restricted to the members of one of appointment, tenure and other Chapter VI, which discusses from them, when it is in the interests

aphs 21, 22 and 23 of the to 39.
i expression of views the legislative members, composed as follows. OF Other Chamber of the Legisla- matters are set out in the Consoli- the point of view of the Holmes of the public service and of the

i Fecommendations Assent to Bilis
5). . Briefly, and in The last stage in the legis‘ative

i , ; = body of the Cayman Islands may . ture. We consider that there is dated Recommendations (Appen- i i
mywith our sroncsel, then ereecee _ We uranine, = omens Gia to revise Theis opinien, Ghes a ae of nee aa good reason for retaining at this dix 5) paragraphs he ppe ae i ee of pk i e La 7
u Bay. S50. ae ee i ae en oaks Peaeiens 9 they have had an opportunity of should elect one of their number Stage provision for an unofficial It will be observed that the de- Owing to the sibility of mis- other reasons we foresee that the
Musider that qualifications aitierweied: constitutionally appro- Studying the matter afresh in the whom the Governor-General must eee tere ooo pa ao rencoumandatens ure... understanding in the matter, we Public Service oe in
ist of British citizen- priate for such assent. This wil] Ught of this Report as a whole, thereupon appoint to the Council » Pp e lat, as we complete in several respects. The wish to point out the clear dis- addition to serving the n of
en i piel, gy and that the people of the Turks of State with the style and powers &Ve proposed, the majority there- constitution and operation of a tinction between “federalifation” the federal public service, may
mge and residence qualifica~ be the duty of the Head of the ° & Didets. teleedn-tany -saediovin ca Eten ae ey = oe in reflects the will of the majority system of courts, particularly simi’ scnin tion.” A fed lieed usefully also be available, in the
aly; and that property or State, in accordance with common 8n@ te ' Se ee "are a the Gh a Ge: on h lq in the House of Assembly. In the where a federal system, is to be poe ; hag 2 7 re h Mae ae a {Manner proposed by the Holmes
eo ae ee ne ane My omit te oe oS eed ae et esa naeoiee aah ction, ene hace early stages of a new Federation, superimposed on “a number of ee i ledevel guoweneomat whe Commission, to assist Unit Gov-
House of Assembly should Scared tt caaee thar "to with. informed by the observer from bers of the Legislature, nominated there will be an urgent need for existing systems, is a highly duties of which Conciet nh mime ernments regarding non-federal-

the continuity of experience, and cornplicated and technical subject istering federal functions, A ised services. By this means we

owered to elect its OWN hold assent from any Bill, but that the Turks and»Caicos Islands that by the Prime Minister. By this this will be facilitated by provid-


























































; : i ithi iri f f existi i servi -t that a salutor ifying in-. rf
whether or not from its jn respect only of defined categor- this would not accord with the Means, a group of eight within the ing that in the Council of State san De care maaan ae h isting unified service, on the other hand, po ill be ry uae no 11%
, : ; 2 : i Council of fourteen, a clear ma- ware systems, We have had neither the js a service the members of fluence wi exer’ ough '
; bership, an alsO @ jes of Bills he should have discre- wishes of the people of these ¢ ear A aie their position there may be an element which is tinje nor the equipment to mak@ which are employed b different the region and throughout all Bay ah
mepeaker and Chairman of tion to reserve such Bills for the Islands; and we recommend that tpeesinhe the Prime Minister, to "0t liable to change in accordance such a study. Although, therefore, Governments, but wheh consti- Services, which cannot fail to be igi
; ae who | Sous, Newer signification of His Majesty’s if, after further consideration, they the will of the majority of the with political developments in the we feel thac our recommendations tutes a single service for career of general benefit by enhancing Hy
ine r of the Assembly. pleasure (see Consolidated Recom- adhere to their desire to retain Federal Assembly. The Governor- House of Assembly (which may in embody the main principles which purposes, the officers concerned the attractiveness of the public ay
Meonsider that members of â„¢endations, Appendix 5, para- their present relationship with General should be empowered to the ae be ag fre- it is desirable to follow in setting being liable to transfer from one Service and making it easier to apc
y should be graph 40). Jamaica, then their wishes should appoint up to six other members, gue . . is. Rene Se od — up a system of federal courts, we administration to another, and the Place officers in the posts for te
to the fact Having regard to the inescapable be acceded to. We have not of whom not more then three eee e be e etna om jal realise that when the actual draft- terms of service of which have to Which they are best suited. ; ne
equire thei” yesponsibilities of His Majesty’s thought it necessary to write into should be officials, and the re- ee road = ae can Dring be ago ing of the federal constitution is a greater or lesser extent been Title And Seat of Capital ik
their homes and Government arising out of prob- our Consolidated Recommenda- mainder members of the Legisla- ae ° ath pa he oem ort Ee reached the detailed provisions of made uniform throughout the re- | We recommend that the name *
avoeations for perhaps jems of defenge, international tions detailed provisions to give ture: but should he so appoint less ° fe e ait a 4 ole , itr te Y our recommendations may require gion. Only those services will be of the Federation should be “The a
ai periods of time, and. yejations and ultimate fimancias effect to our recommendations in than six, the Prime Minister pe Ras ~ “i panning nd modification and amplification, “federalised” whose functions are British Caribbean Federation”, iad
Morder that lack of means gtability of the Federation in its this matter, but our proposals as should have the right to nominate ° whe wh As on passes, anc’ Subject to this our proposals are taken over by the Federal Gov- and that the seat of government of vy
metbe a bar to this kind of (ternal relationynips, it has been a whole should be read as assum- for appointment “ — = ay aaa cee. toe Ge as follow:— ernment and whose members are the Federation should be in Trini- +a
mervice, In our view, the 4, ~egss rovide that, j that the Turks and Caicos sons (being members of the ; At as ree a .. employed by the Federal Gov- dad. il
fpauld be of the order of ie eatin pastas “defined cir- Shake: and the Cayman Islands Legislature) as may be ee of State . ae aa poor tees iy ana ca teenies ha ernment, Other services, these (To be continued) ae
. and th tL members cumstances related to the fore- would cease to be dependencies of to 5 0G, he, eee SS — extent of nominees of the Prime planation or justification. As to im
gel husiness of 80ing, His Majesty in Councth Jamaica. If they are not, certain eed forther that all Minister — in terms, indeed, it heag (iii) we think that the oi
Mation, and subsistence at SHouwld have certain re minor consequential amendments bers of the Council of State, Would be constitutionally open to pederal Supreme Court should be . e
1 ye ; powers of legislation sufficient to may be required which it is not ; Pri Minister, him to appoint in this way all f ll Units t
of £3 per night spent ? able those responsibilities to be Metall: We. need including the ‘ime MAES bl laaen rramiors an appellate court for a nits 7. an er ,
mom home on the business Aiecherdek These powers are de- ae oa @sch wane should hold office aun the ves . and that appeals to the Privy a .
ati The Speaker “ischarged. ar s ad e ; ‘ . ‘ +o ‘
eeretion ' ve eee fined in paragraph 42 of the Con- 4... wna in no way affect the Sie aan ae Wane ct the Functions Of Council | one Ppt ge lene hag Ae uitted Will Fight
he is a men surren- eee agen, to eae question of congeituetaags develop~ ordinary United Kingdom conven- “a bd ype pele Me eae of the Federal Supreme Court
§ member’ - pendix o) and : F ithi encies to tj i ircumstances : : i .
Brith @ Duty nce of the regulation of the ap oo ign which, as to the rest of the region, in which the Prime Minister fecle tpeaking, they are, to advise the (though this th aie pe MANCHESTER, New Hampshire, @ from page 3
The De akon tween the Federation and forei hs ; 4 n to resign. We pre- Governor-General on the dis- without prejudi s March 9.
year Bre Seplty Apeeeee countries, securing and maintain- 7 eis s eration Moteg a ee ene the ions charge of all the functions vested petition the Privy Council for Dr. Hermann Sander was ac- #'eas and northwards to Central
tion in addition to his ing financial stability and, in cer- Bay * , native that the Constitution '” him, except in so far as he is special leave to appeal direct). It quitted here tonight after trial for Africa.
BSA member. These ficures tain emergencies, securing and , should itself contain a rigid rule Specifically directed or empower- this recommendation were ac- the “merey killing” of a woman , At the moment South African
Member, These figures ; Th E. t :
ot be fixed in the Consti-. maintaining public order and sup- e Lxecttive requiring the Prime Minister's -d under the Constitution to act cepted the appellate side of the cancer patient. Europeans are roughly divided be-
Dut left ; i recommenda- plies and services. titutional resignation on the defeat of the or be an in his ath discretion, or Federal Supreme Court would The Prosecutor, in his closing tween Afrikaan speaking ——-
Wthe Federal Government to We do not recommend that any The common constitutiona’ covernment on any or every mo- /M accordance with advice ten- replace the existing West Indian address, did not press for the ®ists—people of Dutch origin—
; ’ vel t power of disallowance be reserved division of the state is into three tion which the mover chose to “ered by some other body or Court of Appeal. From exactly death penalty, and English speaking Smuts sup-
Ming to the Senate, we found to His Majesty once a measure parts, the Legislature, the Execu- ove as a vote of no confidence. individual, Normally such advice what courts in the Units, and Defence lawyer Wyman ap- porters.
‘questi : lion I he assent of the tive, and the Judiciary correspond- Whatever special conditions might will be authoritative, ie, the — h ditlens axneals :
m of the distribu-. has received the ass' c : ‘ ak- atever spi ief E { sill be obliged to Under what conditions, appeals peared on the verge of years as Political ideration in Seret-
: ; 4 “ ne the ing to the three functions of ma d a. + n the taking Chief Executive will be obliged to y . olitical consideration in Ser
Of seats presented little dif- Governor-General except in, is ing laws, carrying them out, and " prio . = 's possi. act in accordance with the advice should lie to the Federal Supreme he asked the jury to send Sander se’s case is|that his establishment
rg rere of Whe functions single instance of certain a interpreting and enforcing them. ble that ‘it might vaaenoast cele of the Council and not otherwise. Court, and the extent to which back to his family and community. as Chief might lead many English
: namber in a federal affecting Federal Govern There are in actual fact many judgment or manoeuvre. in other In certain specified instances, he this will entail modification of ex- “The soul had left the body of speaking South Africans to trans~,

¢ had aaa We ae stock which 7 _on Rinedow overlaps, but the division is useful. |ecisjatures, it sometimes happens ™ay however be requijed to seek isting arrangements in the Units Mrs. Rorroto before his ‘irrational’ fer their allegiance to Dr. Malan
Vet a caus! ment desires the Uni ,

One of the overlaps lies in the fact that the Government is defeated the advice of the Council but not for the hearing of appeals by Unit act in injecting air into her veins” and give encouragement to his



















me: Population differences Py y is 7 ri- ‘ : i i i t " ;
fle i Treasury to list as trustee secur! { H of the Executive is ssary necessarily to follow it. We shall courts, are technical questions of he cried.—Reuter. extremists. It might be argued
SS et the other House. ties in the United Kingdom. This pv aS part of the Legis- pet ae og Thy nmap revert at a later stage to the im- some complexity and we feel that that Seretse is being sacrificed in
’ there pie aie ah ~ cant provision is one which is mene’ lature in that his assent is re- should resign. The normal course patent eueeene he i a this Committee is not equipped to Senate: | Snenniaeeeianl order to better ag he ome
Aetritory ke two Senators tated by Treasury regulations pe quired before a measure becomes of eyents would be that a Prime ones eg o — e eatin deal adequately with them. L k Wi peoples - the tec’ - rn
Bln order to wuard against exchange for the advantages to be },., phe extent to which he acts Minister, on being satisfied that oan te ole nature, i ia! ia hats ii uckman ins against the long arms of ut
ble absences, we decided gained by having the stock SO i, his own discretion, or accord- he no longer had sufficient sup- ~ nay ae Mike enenil (a) The eral Supreme Cour m “ Africa, It has See Saaeity oes ts
mend that the number listed. c ing to advice and if the latter port in the House to enable him t Stat y ee the ewe should have original jurisdic- Fencing At C.A.G6. ted that conditions for ans
tWo, subject only to the We make no recommendations ~ccérdinggto whose advice, is the to carry _out his policy, would formin, e inst oe ae 4s to tion in a comparatively small within the Union could hardly be
fh that no a: os for any special procedure for cON- main subject-matter of political teyder his resi, ation, 7“, the tity co Tt is here thet proposals list of subjects. We suggest GUATEMALA, March 9. worse.
phe represented more stitutional emendment. That iS and constitutional history and de- acce pence oie ich , pond fee! Coverite ditign ‘an tenn for consideration the Psi Lawrence Luckman of Curacao But it is argued that the duty’
man it has‘ members of. to say, the Constitution, which velopment. would proceed to make a lated and decided upon. Here visions of section 75 of the won first place in the individual of the British Government is to
of Assembl we anticipate will be embodied in Governor-General OF ea be noted that we do not Government bills are approved, Commonwealth - Po ae sabre fencing at the Central Amer- hold back the tide of South Afri--
Qualificat; an Order in Council, moat a Recommended fs recommend that each and every and here in particular estimates of a which re as a Kennee hare with six victories can racialism from sweepint
bs ications amendable by His Oe cr {, as to the See mas member of the “Cabinet” group revere and comendiners are oa ee age ‘Sean Geek Piles a Sige throng be nee peatesaes -
OP Gualificatic: sds Sahiareids, SOOUEIGATS We recomm - nomenclature, we recummenc ' Should be elected by the Assem- 5 ered. overnment legislation i ae ae Eales E coloni erthe:
Bt the Conctitas oo that it be provided that no amend- the Head of the Executive should bly, but only the Prime Minister. can only be introduced by sanction ( i) arising under any treaty; won vhe individual service rifle Rhodesia.
Bethe to be clathin san ment diminishing the proportionate pe “styled “Governor-General” 77: Crission is deliberate. We of the Council of State, It is in fact (ii) affecting consuls or omer — ae ee —_ a Appeasement of South Africa by’
Bilon to the Senate, person. representation of any Unit in snd that he should be appointed | oiieve that our proposal effects impossible to exaggerate the im- representatives of ether — pea the Rag eye banishing arnee and his Englis '
Whe British sujcets, the: either Chamber of the Federal hy the Sovereign. In general . "necessary concentration of au- portance of the Council in the . countries; ade win ew, Se the ane EK
Mud since attaining the Legislature, or the number of terms, the powers conferred of thority in the hands of the Prime Constitution; and on prepessle (iii) in which the Comme Pi But it though’ mee 98 aoe A
Bl vears, have resicied in ihe representatives of a Unit in the the Federation will be exercised Minister, By this means, the Tegarding ma nee of esta Salty wealth, or a person suing ” », eae behin an Ihe
Sr not less than 5 years in House of Assembly, or increasing, by the Governor-General as Te- prime Minister owes his position ment have n most carefully or being sued on behalf generally weldome
at vipa oncaichet! ed Seis » or otherwise altering presentative of the Crown, and all 4, the Assembly; other State devised to ensure that it shall at of the Commonwealth, is decision—By Cable.
tir the if . Tae a Unit, should have acts of the Federation will be done Coyncillors appointed on his one and the same time fully reflect a party; Commits Lover's {
eo nat ily ~ ae a majority of the jm his name. nomination owe their position to the will of the elected part of the (iv) Between States, or be- a ‘ 4
siting. SS a ting in any Unit con- We next consider the nature of the Prime Minister. It is of course legislature, and also be capable of tween residents of differ- S . id Five Invited To
_ omimarecs electors Voune such an amend- the Government—that is to say, possible that the Prime Minister integrated and responsible action. ent States, or between a uicide
i y prop- cerned approve Ss the agency through which the may make choices which do not The most important points, in our State and a resident of ;
on for ment. : J ti pewers of the State, formerlygand commend themselves to the opinion, are to concentrate in the aficther State. TOKYO, March 9, Play Golf
ar Special Consideration ion constitutionally concentrated in Assembly. If so, the remedy lies Prime Minister responsibility to (v) in which a writ of Man- _ Dr. Toshio Othurki, Japanese in-
We gave special coneprenene’ the Governor-General, are actual- at hand in the power of the the Federal Assembly, and to damus or prohibition or ventor of the “balloon bombs,” AUGUSTA, Georgia. Mar, 8.
to the problems of the Turks anc ly exercised. At this point we Assembly to withdraw its support assure for himself and his nom- an injunction is sought which Pacific winds carried to Three South American ‘profes-
Caicos Islands, the Cayman ¢ oui like to emphasize the prac- from him; and experience ws inees an effective majority in the a re of the Oregon State, has almost certainly sionals Roberto De Vicenzo and
Islands and the British Virgin ica) importance of the distinction that Prime Ministers in fact pay Council. —_— — committed a “lover’s suicide” with Antoni Cerda ( ) and
An is The two former terTi- phetween Government and Legisla- close attention in such matters to | We now come to the question of th ae shall h his secrevary, Police said to-day. Paecaull Viola are
ries are at present dependencies tyre. It is the duty of the Govern- the views of the Legislature as the discretionary powers of the ie gh Court nm ave They said that Dr. Othuki— five leading
cae wn with powers of legis- ment to govern, and the actual shown to them. This procedure Governor-General in relation to original jurisdiction. claimed by many to be a genuis— who have been invited to in
n delegated to them by responsibility for its specific exe- is in our view essential to ensure executive action. These discre- (b) The Federal Legisfature left his wife and two children on the Masters Tournament, here
Dg nd subject to the cutive action cannot be shared the effective joint and collective tionary powers, we recommend, should be able to confer ad- March 1, and eloped with the sec- from —_ +>
ae y tad aa jurisdiction with any other agency, e.g. the responsibility of the Cabinet should be limited to; ditional original jurisdiction retary to a popular hotel 40 miles The two are Norman Von
Stee wo British Virgin Legislature, except at the risk of grown. Where members owe their (a) The subjects in respect of on the Federal Supreme Court from Tokyo. All indications were Nida, Australian professional and ie
Taree aligning Leeward confusion and delay and conse- position to direct,election by the which we recommend that in respect of specified matters. vhat the two had taken theit Henri De Lamaze, prominent pat
i a un 2 ma Tae



Ts ST seoaaion the legislative quent prejudice to the public in- Assembly and not to the Prime His Majesty in Council Again, the provisions of Sec- lives, the Police added.—Reuter. French amateur.—Router.
lands Federat ’

Islan¢














PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ee



BY CARL" ANDERSON

|. Feeea Gan





‘a>

MICKEY MOUSE —
ike ame WR
YOU'VE BROKEN UP ONE oF te ey

BIGGEST CRIMINAL RINGS IN THE
WORLD! Jae



WELL, EEGA, NOW THAT We'vE
FINISHED THIS CASE, How CO YOu
FEEL ABOLT BEINGS IN THE

DETECTIVE BUSINESS 7?








(i
ys

ey het
NN (



BY CHIC YOUNG




$$$ .
i Es [feat 2 |
i fa. Oe see tee net
$ OH, BOY, A NIGHT OFF-- o t LL FIX MYSEL!
i: PIM AS FREE ASA BIRD! MI DONT “ai A SANDWICH +
§) TO DO WHAT I WANT! | KNOW WHAT L MA AND GOTO BED 3
‘ CH, PEACHY! | |TO DO wiTH Jat AND READ <
: MYSELF éU,

ASK





FOR THE BEST |

AND ENJOY

y

sl
i

of excess acids and 4
| fresh blood flows toerenn ine thay

Then you feel better—look en
better and you are ready ty a
joy. Insist on the genui Dest
Pills in the blue package yj * Klay
bands. Only /~ at all drug

S.2 85 Us A SSBB BeBe

——————
/
a
—
oe (¢
& ag
Be
u Es
o>
Ee
=

/ INZ Spaghety A
\ Tomato

Vegetable Sox
Oxtail Soup,
+ Strawberrigg j TR
Pears, De

SS
neers

Os fs &

47Bses

S38 o-

fae

el ° q

Pineapple,
Pineapple fully
Guavag, " .
Fruit silag!

—_

a

INCE & Co., ‘te .

DIAL 2236 = RosUEK gf











THE LONE RANGER

ed padi iain — |
T WASN'T GOING TO, HURT YOU. I JUST!
WANTED TO PROVE THAT I COULD
HANDLE GUNS. I'M ON THE

OUTLAW TRAIL AN! T WANT t
TO TEAM UP!



- i, eu ce. oe . oS i? oe ee
YOU'RE FUL!.} | | HOLD STILL, SANDY, I'LL SEE)! x +
OF TRICK } | IF YOU HAVE ANY ~— ENT.

RE WEAPONS! )









“every hour

of the day

Phe Riddte of the fed Domine GY


















































7 : '
When everyone else is hot and bothered you will
YES, MR .PROFILE .. VES .MR.PROFILE. QUICKLY, PLEASE’ SD DID YOU NOTICE THAT DAGGER fascinate by your freshness — if you do this. After your
VES..THEY'RE BOTH TAKEN BRING MISS WHISPER INTO OF HIS, K.0.? JUST LIKE THE ONE b : ,
CARE OF... NO,MR PROFILE THE CLUB. . YES, SHE MUST IN THE BODY AT OUR FLAT | ath or bathe, shower yourself all over with Cashmere
NO MESS, 1 ASSURE VOU.. REST. SHEISIN AVERY 4 RECKON OLD PROFILE’S BEAUTY Bouquet Taleum Powder. Its magic touch will turn your
YOU ARE AT THE HOUSEBOAT CLUB? DEEP SLEEP. . VERY DEEP! :
aoua MISS WHISPER 1s WELL eaRi 72 > ee go IS ONLY SKIN DEEP ! ~— re 4 skin to silk: clothe you in a cool, protecting film that
. YEG, MR. PROFILE , GOOD NIGHT. Y = V ty keeps you daintily fresh all day long. Its delicate perfume
NOW @eaaxt onal af, will add new and subtle charm to your whole personality.
. SLIP ~ aND wy PS For Cashmere Bouquet is the Taleum Powder with the
-%
FINGER SUPS fragrance men love,
|
3 THEN WE‘(L ,
Wf ohne tunt ar Cashmere Bouquet
TALCUM POWDER
| ° COLGATE-PALMOLIVE-PEET co.
| es ene eessesenencessensenesenstnnnesenseeumns
ibis hae rm alin aa
| |'\VE POSTED THE BUTLER |
i | AT THE FRONT COOR AND
| "LL WATCH THE FIRE
| ESCAPE -THIS I6 ONE TIME
—~ I'LL FOOL JIGGS - w
4
mt
5 om aT
: ‘ se, Inc, Wenkd es i. a s
7
RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND
“4 E c SE! I'VE | | VERY WELL, LOuise...8uT (ft CONT GARE | [ guT CHITTERTC
= ve NED A | YOU REALLY SHOULD LEAVE | WHAT OTHER |
; i 5 | |PRICELESS JEWELRY IN THE | WOMEN GO! |
} VAULT AND HAVE IMITATIONS /WQBODY COULO| /
|MADE FOR ACTUAL WEAR! / /AAKE AN | Two wonderful remedies —
F OTHER WOMEN / IPAITATION OF .
f oo! COE CHITTERTON Zubes Cough Mixture and
{ ; | “ ' EVERALDS!
: } “ ‘es Ms | Zubes Cough Lozenges.
: 2 "| \ ' )
q f \S f They are new here but
’ i] _
Mh I\ # well-proven elsewhere.
fi he. |
. [ j \ _ |
‘4 ‘> Zubes Cough Mixture is excellent
! . d ¢ - for soothing coughs speedily, and
é ls , 7 | } \ comforting a congested chest.
i \ ' J \ Ideal for family use —children
, \ in i love this pleasant-tast ng syru
~a \ \ oc sod yrup
. Nal , coven? «sore 1H Zubes Cough Mixture should
NY 569
nOOrine © sortt® be in every home
:
‘ f -
‘ BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES '
| .o. ANG Here are the
= PEPEH Vee me
lozenges —_
a
ie
i] i bes Cough Lozenges make

of hoarseness and
e, irritating, little



vs. In handy pocket-sized
. eady be
ey
v to yo mouth at
\ .
\
\
| ;00D Wemrete " é
e > C B > s AND $7 ORES
ements fe
cme,”



aaa
5
§
' gases





| WILLIAM FOGARTY 1),

Inc. B. G.





Announcing the arrival

of pe

| 1950 PRESTCOW §
REFRIGERATORS

4.44 ci. capacity Be





K{ See the New Features in these—
1 : i
i ALL STEEL BODY, SEALD UNIT, a
i

with a 5-year Guaranice

i

‘ an
i Let Us demonstrate these to You. :
} ae
eee FFE SS ‘
1 Ba Bs

A

| an
"



mj
—
—
~
=
—
oS
~~
os .
a

+

Oe

Me
~
0
TALES §&
by ENID BLYTON
THE VOICE OF A STRANGER
by Emyr Humphrey
FOUR STUART’ PORTRAITS
-by Hugh Ross Williamson
' ~ 4
jj PEARS CYCLOPAEDIA {
4 i .
‘| WHITAKERS ALMANACK i
; _.
j « i
| F i? NER! i
ADVOCATE STALIONON Es
iS A i

=

_

. | em re te eR RR
pripAy. Mz ARC H i0, 1950

| CLASSIFIED ADS. ”) PUREE BLic Nori ES |

tae oe oan

a





































































































































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE










LE

Netherlands @:! | Coal Study































































































































9= casily . ‘ | [ d F E d
E25 cnaily earned by obtaining orders) “HR ustry Expands WASHINGTON, March &.
your friends a ; ecessary. Writ Yo previous experience : eae Congress to authorise a nine man
: ara accessary, Write today for beautiful fre. : LONDON (By Mail) commission to study long range
‘ $1.00. 1.20 ample Book to Brita ean ,; Nineteen forty-nine was a 1 ind € ae
’ St Publishers;. highest comm oo® year for the Netheriands Coal industry problems.
i } ‘SONS money making opporiun fe i trade. The ountr y's total ou Teeter with identical letters
j Williams & Co., Dept. 10 Victor: a ¢ ys to 4 }to Vice-President Alban Barkley
Z i 5 Preston, England.’ “=| —~emand was well above expecta-jand House Speaker Sam Raybury!
: am wie $ ae a en Sp increase. ene Texas), Mr. Truman In Carlisle Bay
TICE \ ntensive searc OY O44 igs}sent to the Capitol a proposed * ay
rr ' , - : *
, oa ‘. haan lads further encouraging resuis,/Bill to create the Commission
} rom April RBADOS GENE TAT ca oe we . var _
4 F Weatheritnd, | SEALED TENDER ye wosritay there has been great progress in{which would report within one Marion Belle welts, Sch ngs a
= Hospital up to 12 ares irelinery construction. Everything, | year. Sch. W. L. Eunicia. Sch. Phyliss Ma
a 3.3.50 . 4 e’cleck iy . : . . ¥ ere
P ALES } 14th Mareh, 19%: n fact, points to the continuea In his letter, President ruman | Seh. Anita H., Sch. Gardewa W., do:
Bm auc § bk FARAWAY" i ses ih the nee cee : war he, creniaens Truman (ee ee Aue’ tar” tele ars
7 ee ae 1 | urkARAWAY™, St. Phitip cost, fully| 1 Ses git the following Line xpansion of the industry this}said the end of the strike “has in| Bie Star, Sch” Lady Neste MY
- NO REAL rnisn . athe + tro ¢ lee ms ‘ : : a
jae weer7ox 4 | athing beach. “From “Mivant ,Rooms.| 1950:— ‘ rar, no way diminished the need for |Molly N. Jones, Sch United Pilgrim
i re pet agate line er month Phone 4476. eee |) FRESH BREAD The — subsoil of the Nether-|@ long range study of the coal pi z= M. bag Sch. patna Ma:
— 6.1.50—t.t.n ALCOHOL lanas has probably been more|iMdustry with a view to finding | 5>:, 4t4 Wonita Laudalpha, Sch
: ae 1.20 ' “1.8 F COFFINS, ana nian x3 y Cyril E. Smith. Sek. Wonderful Coun-
4 mu charge u4 1.2 NEWHAVEN" Crane Coast, {fully | and HORSE forthe: Bea 4 on i thoroughly explored for oil than = et ee oieet. — a hes aye
i Re ae tines) fur Garages, Servant Room. sdesd at the Westbury Crmeren {that of any other country in |Solutions of its problems from the
pu | Superb bathing bi D 4) PU RE FRES: 7” Vin stand t f th hi ABRIVALS
. i & beach. February, Mareh H MILK }Rurope. The s h for thich | 5%? point of the miners, the] «< cu ff
‘ a | Nowavelton: Pecembe ry. Mare Forms for the respective tenders wi) | pot OR®, search for oil which | serators. and ab. IL, the Naw [regen CUSTODIAN, 3,684 tons net, Capt orrers
4 LIC oe ee 08 2.16) ” Phone 4476. Aes ne Ans ‘pplied on application to the Pi began in 1935, was greatly in- op: e fo above all, the Na Therpeen, from Dominica: Agents; Da \ { / -
Or Nee 1.20 © 1.50 og ee “al nk Seah Hospital anc {tensified during the war when | “Mal interest, nenten me eae Meenas. AN IeDRer NN ;
SE". Erdist Hi 5 Sic} +} aS > enterisine e le la = : hic 3 _ . aa ie : ne ae \ aP
Be Oca ono!) | Ca NAR AR ARG, ci, | Sete at es | Molin. as omuple. “hit neater et Syme Mand cS, Hom Btmueg aes Gm
ae ents For further particulars. « Nanicles f cidentally, saved many Duten son, Son & Co., Ltd Ws Wilson. Prom Pa
vo 4 vee I urnished 1 » x ean '
CARRINGTON & SEALY the eat quality ind’ hea be act scientists and workers from being | ; oe ARDY petaon, 4,055 toas net. Cc Peterkin Wiens : tineban 0h
‘papi I N & SEAT moroval cf te ay t to the! deported to German e Capi ch, from St. |ucta, Agent OM ' R. Husbands, My
pon Laces tre howe decision: shai fa Superintendent | CRO lorati Germany). Z NEW CARS FOR Gardiner Austin & Co., Lid tenes, Mr. F. A. Nicholls. From Dor
ieee a a A aa 8.°3.50—5r | thereto in regard Ploration is now continuing ss DEPARTURES Mr. §. P whill and Mr. I =
|S PEACON VILLA | Persons tendering must submit at the}° 2, 2, large scale. Nederlandse EMPLOYEES Vacht LRANDER, SI (ons net, Capt. Wiltshire :
OTIVE nd Black Rock Rosis, fer a | Saint indering letters from two other | Atdolie — Maatschappij owned |
ticulars 1 ‘ er; Persons nown to Jy i : ;
ar rom Bi Ay Beowon.. | peemiie~ teole sia by Bataafsche Petroleum SPRINGFIELD, Ohio, March 9 IN TOUCH WITH BARFADOS COAST STATION | Service
» Terraplune Sedan 7 t.f£.n | bouna as sureties f Mij. (Royal I 1-She ) f it strialist, M : . ae
ee good. condition CORAL SANDS. w | the contract. -°* ‘Be fulfilment of : Pratehs Shell Group) | : A Detroit industrialist, Mr. Dal- Cadi 1 Wireless (West S.s , 3s Pp
en and in : oe 4 SANDS: Worthing (1) one| ‘7 of contract and Standard Oil Company (New 1as, Sinslow, was presenting 100 oi able and Wireless est Indies) Ltd 1 S, Alcoa Polaris, S.S Prospector |
fies or 2737 8.3.2 furnished Flat with Silver and Li It act and = fu r par- | Je . his e loy i - idvise that they can now communicate $.S_ I S,. Eros, S.S. Mitra, S.S
; or further particulars Dial @134 Ane’ | al the Gecoms’ obtained on application |UETSEY), iS responsible for these Mis employees with a new motor] vith the following ships through thei: W 3. Alcoa Runner, §.S. Mer. |
Morris 8 h.p. 1948 model ashley 98:2 80-tt | eberel Hospital. operations. Two oilfields have Sar each to-day because “happy J arbados Coast Station ; € 5. Goldmouth, 8.8, Theodoxus
driven and imi cceceiee Ww soormas been discovered—the Schoone-|€™Ployees do a better job thar} ss inge Marsk. SS. Apache C Rar een ae ae ee aa |
Uy furntsr ecretary. |). a ‘ ‘ H 3 , ar a tg s ’ e Ss pache Canyon, ort Amierst arion oran, SS
Mis ODonnel 50 sn. | erator Bod linen ‘ot ‘ndtamat Ww Refrig- 3.50-2n, }beek and Ruhler Twist. Both are} those who are merely indifferenv.” J 3.8. Nidarhoim, S'S. Tactician. SS Lide Ladv Rod ey, SS. Sun Rell, SS. Nor
- “| Dial 8364, ° R. pineeerecnusemenensteseidaak it teeny situated near the Germ: P oh —Reuter. chile, S.S. Coptic, $8. Matina, S.S nandiet, Aviekaree, M.V. Tiarbara
13. beh 50—t.f.n. S a e German front-| fauretania, S.S. Bughii, S.S. N S.S. Pont Audemer, 8.8. Gus .
Fas Minor .. e ; 1949 | —— PINE HILL ne NOTICE The first, which started com-! ———_ a Franada, S.S. Balla, SS. Sagona. SS Specialist. Hage vo ’ eee
miles, Like new. Morris 8) BARBADOS GEN mercial production shortly after| tity of Derby, S.S. Portugal, S.S. Loide Hawk, S.S. Evanthia, 8: Ss
| oP lel, 7,800 miles. Excellent | “CORAL c ROFT”, m ‘ iENERAL HOSPITAL a’ production shortly after} . i ah Sarag 3S. Yos MSS ik Seki tue .
98 Wet y-6 100% Sedan, Onis | tlone. Houseman gqiuadiern. 2. be SEALED TENDERS will be received at|‘®@@ war, was working 90 pro-|!” 1953, when the proposed ex- f *#tasuay, S.S! Yostis Lemos, §.S. Bulk- Southern Counties between
cies. eee anona, Fort | furnished or unfurnished. Phone e itl Mp to 1s o clook bp ao wells up to November 1949 —— - = ee nave beer
ee "3 ad 9.3,50--3 : ‘ORMS oe the . ,| completed. Work has also begut
4,3.50—8n i UNIFORMS ) ; | The second was discovered in May | . eg
| ee eee, FOR MALE A i j ‘efi 4 i
CHURCHILL” Maxwell Conct AND PORTERS for a perioi} 1949: 7 producing wells have} 2 @ new oil refinery in Rotter: SAN JUAN
» (1) 1943 dual géar| bed r d i ee year fr r 5 , : 7 | dé ‘ali io. Tavos
TaUCK—OF I a y ae ee ean 8 furnished. Available from] Tend me i esabel April. 1950. , been completed so far in this| dam for the California-Texas Pe- |
cd 1 15t 1 ill kt
Truck in ¢ I h, on three months or longer | e supplied on ap-| . }troleum (Co any SALTEX D
ie Auto Tyre Company, Trafalgar leane Apply Ralph A. Beard, Hardwoo i thal a a ae Secretary, General Hos- field. ! ith ee (¢ BX) 5 ST THOMAS
i] 4 9/3/50-—tfn Alley Phone 4683 , rdwooc pital, and tenders will t be z + wi a sched t
eet. - " | ed except they are on fcaiio burs lian’ tae Oil producti has in vs i} 980 “ a omy ¢ } ‘
Misi Sitios, one of the bee 10.3.50— the Hospital sit p ecvion has made rapic |8 ,000 tons in 1958. It is due te Fine,
| Persons tende strides in recent years. It is now, Start operatin early this year Ipw
till going strong. Alway: | ———————_—_——— ring must submit at the|”. 3 & early Ss yes Pw -ALS ; . ; ma ie: :
meee a ood hs Sanat sales a vane of tendering letters from two other | (i.e. for 1949) 620.000 tons. com-| (=== cep) RIV ALS by B.W.LA.L t ee penis chao Jean Cayia, Robert | we
Wi or: ; rondit | | Persons known ¢ epee 620, S, : i ; Piquenard, Robert Logier |
Piece eee Aopis:, Strouse) PP UTRILEG QAR | Re “Rene fo posscos' property, ex| pared with 496,000 tons in 1948 | RE thenid [poure4p poner. | st. J
mage, James : 22.2.5 ——S=——— bound as sureties for the fulfilment of |29Gd 213,000 tons in 1947. The} SULTS andn +e taplene poate. phaleolm ai Br Bruce-Clayton, Mrs. Theln °
wy 7 the nt t. eco . . Angela ucie-Smith izabeth Camacho, Miss Ross » Camach
eee 2 UE. 1987, Model. | Aric TION } Further particulars may be obtaine: | Present figure covers about 30! are what count in dep i Hush Laciet Gartela trem Jamarca 0
| rn te Leone | from the Secretary, General Hospital. | Per cent of Dutch domestic re-! are what count in Ad- | riorie Williams, Walter Bonyan Mr. Gerald McElliott ST. LUCIA bh feucls
| esy Ga s yrith be FRIDAY 10th at 1 pn see W. GOODM; 2 R Payne, Ala an Payne, Donald
sxepied up to 4 p.m. Friday 1 HALL MAIN p.m. UPPER BANK | 3O0ODMAN | quirements. RACING oyn. | be a a s: DEPARTURES t ; 4
iD a ; : ROAD, NEW ee Nr x ¢, Hanna Meh é mS by BW.ILAL
1990. Jas. A. Lync! sony | SHINGLE HOUSE nin o- re | The refining capacity of the} tans carina Doyto | fniss, Elesa Mum ay, Molly Tawi Cor TRINIDAD PORT OF SPAIN
—— | immediate possession. CASH ON [| | Country—concentrated at Pernis,| |] with racing it's a camnble valhe | wil, Frank Bena Vante, Seok. zeae Mew ene Riad eae, Boe | f
eter 7 1947 | OF HAMMER NOTICE | near Rott _ but with cooking, you Vamhe | pherwooc sear Vanieli au s, Mrs eleina Eastmond, Mr. Agste ‘i?
— Vauxhall 14 WiDs R.. ARCHER McKENZIE 1 otterdam—has__ also ex-! : ’ , araj Medvejey Joseph Medvejer es, Mstr. Raymond Hamblin Mis: |
iitio Opel Kadett, 39 model McKENZIE, lei Gn ake SeeaAn panded. The Royal Dutch-Shell| me 8 fOrPS, | fery, Harold Harriso), Jose Nunes. Carroll Hamblin, Mr, Milton Hambi : in . ; i
meer PF 10.3,50—3n 8.3.50-3 | Will be received by the! plant, which refined 2,600,000 tons | WINNER raiwg- | PEachrane, Dorothy M« Fachrane, Mrs. Louise Collymore, = Mr. Chay The Clipper CV-240 is my
ie Seibel leant TAT ha, up to Friday 5 Pri ca os ’ S| then }Janki, Kenivn Samuei, Bertrand Hewitt, Gilbert Marean vir W
1931 Ford V-8. Excellent cor | 3 ev 1 envelopes i of crude oil in 1948 is expected to} When you buy a Gas Cooker s | P Kedar Rickhi, Marion L. O'neai, Bradshaw, Miss O’Tool | acknowledged to be the f
; Reasonable price. 1935 Chevraicr| UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER | ‘ r the conveying of 's and; have an output of 3,400,000 tons | fughtin For St. LUCIA | : : ‘
1. . Neds of the Dead 1) } convey 4 ; ) :
Reson. Secs 7 ar. | or ’ { . most advanced type airplan
Ret de Lid. Toleplione aoo4, | wON Tuesday 14th by order of Mrs, | {0 paupers from any part of the parish « i kt LUCIA Mra. Rorthy Moffatt, Mate. Anare | yp plane
— 10.3.50 —3n W. R. N. Wynne we will sell her House |‘? the Almshouse or any institution ir e eee, Baral vim Rati ora, ot. Meee ene aN | of its kind. Its extra large
liad appointments both Antique and Moder the parish of St. Michael and vice a awrence, Azig Abraham, Har Shapley, Mr. Lionel Pau | :
at “Chelwood” Two Mile th in. | Versa. (2) For t upplying o fins t i i
9 RE cludes— Very ae ee m 7 “ Tor nd the conve ing of th ey r id ae aes UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES € one e ae - aes Pastuce windows, wide aisles
aT | Be ter Table (seat 8 with Brass Tipe institution or f ny part of the eer d its 40 li
en Site utlers Tray, Pedestal Sidebos Se parish of either of the hureh vards A vacanc »xists . Senior scturer or hee f a and its roomy, recline-to-
BPRMTOURE— Morris Suite, (4) | Ing. arngreen ecertal Sideboard, Serv. | Parish, of lther of the Church yards] ancy exists for a Senior Lecturer or Lecturer in Pharma- | y
SS tt tae A nenae oe. Upright chairs, hertele Pedestals; An-| the dead only in coffins supplied by the cology. The salary scale for a Senior Lecturer is £1,100 x £50 to your-comfort seats, assure j
tam’ Hardwood Alley wae ee and Sewing Tables, Bergere |Parish. The Board shall retain the| £1,500 per annum or for a Lecturer £700 x £50 to £1,100 per
10.3.50—an, | “"y Orris Chairs, Bookshelf, uphois, |"#ht of sending a person to or from ; . : a : : ‘ Passengers the utmost ir i
| note, eee tn! all in old Mahogany: U Hospital of the institution who in their] ®22um with an efficiency bar at £900. The point of entry into the —— —— at
4irs, Envelope Card ; yinic is suitable to s rave ) “ale i > ~ 7 A dk ale bs 1" —
STOCK teins, Inthe muelone Card Table, pcos pinion ts uit able to e wevel; and de scale will be determined by qualifications and experience. The per- ~ comfort and luxury in flight.
| colours, Besse ann, toe ef 2 very | lowest or no tender son appointed will be responsible, under the Professor of Phy siology. ‘
ppc st . é i é es' Ss; ol Trenc , . fay . e *
qP-2 Pure bred: Algatien| Fup: |(Ghing Tea and Coffee Beivne oienee W. SMALL, for the instruction of students working for medical degrees of the ms ; hit
4 now weaned. Apply to Noe | ond Fish se ee Service, Dinne Ms & 8 B providing this most mod-
Miser, Moncrieffe Plantation, 8b] Stee. diver Tee, © ihe. uit Ser Board of Poor ardians, | University of London and generally tor the development of Pharma- 5 Y 9 ; i
a i ce, las, Sweet Q/5 » :
y eiaad 8.3.50-——sn, | Dishes, Bowls and ete. Pewter Mugs 9/3/50—4n.| cology in the University College. Child allowance is paid and super- Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose ern, fast, dependobie Clipper A
J a | Shef: Pit. Entre Dish, Plated ware in eee ee annuation is under arrangements similar 7 ; Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
intra Dishes, Sopone’ Woke ate oTic i é S under arrangements similar to F.S.S.U. Unfurnished “ . Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease on this route, PAA is con-
LANEOUS |lery and Glass Ware. Twin Bedsteads PARISH a A E accommodation is available at a rate no. exceeding 10% of salary. my 1 SCberarian ine that will sooner or tater cause your teeth :
Vono Springs, Vanity Table with Trivlet nas SAINT MICHAEI Applicat ; 9 : . 5 ¢ / / NUM a to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism tributi to th d a ‘
ERA-One (1) Argoflex seflex| Mirrors and Glass Top, Cheval gla : : BS Bervous, firms and compar’ ations pplications (12 copies), giving full particulars of qualifications and Consignees and ean Ue mnoann stops gum uting to the advancement 7
2 Arg > a — Tig ne ein oe nas having Accounts against the Parish of} : ee ee : + : ‘ rleedin e first day, ends sore mouth j
one Gnome Enlarger for above. Lepenrea ieee Old Linen Saint Michael are requested to vend in| ‘€ names of three referees, should be received on or before 3ist Tel. 4047 and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad of the rapidly growing tourist 4
uae > Colonnade Stores. — ‘gn| tresses, Cedar Chest. Larder, Enarh wet their Vouchers (duly made ut in Du-) March, 1950 by the Secretary, Senate Committee on Higher Education SOUS cil Cee Re aT ORE: ‘ j {
7.3.50—6n | presses, C . Ls , ei ieate) to the respective Departments | - ; “ rer g a save yo eeth oF i te ‘
; (pari ee ee apeh Erne, Florence ot later than Wednesday, March 15,{in the Colonies, University of London, Senate House, W.C.1, from | Se Ga Rieke teen eee ane area in the islands between |
ISTOLS—Papermatic ‘ 3 are “re ouse efrig 1950 ; : age e mosan fr y is . ‘
MOLS—Papermatic pistols are here| erator in Perfect order Bleie e me y an ; whom further particulars may be obtained. a . *today. ‘The muars Puerto Rico and Trinidad AP Lil tol
e pistol that uses no caps yet FRED ay gua au,
1 ?s f } F Iron &c. Kitchen utensils, Gaiden T Ch J; ASHBY, UCWI/28 50 osan antee protect
plenty of noise. Get them at] ,'°" : ene ools Shurehwarden’s Clerk, 28/2/50. 10.3.50—1 , apemes
9 2 Lawn Mower, Wheel-barrow, Fow! Ru ; . f +O n.
's Toy Dept., where you will!” s Dart ow: Parish of St. Michael a
fed the Doggy torch that lights up and other items. Sale 11.30 o'clock 3.3.50—Tn rn Por P orrhea-—T: ch M th
s his te rable} Terms Cash. | SS SESS SSS a ¥ ow
you press his tail and the adorable (Kn ee SI a" , F full inf
ae phoebe BRANKER TROTMAN. : : or full information and
Auctioneers Barb Yo j ‘
Bos Two lovely songs from thy 10.3.50—2n, ados Youth Movement BROADWAY NOVELIIES OF n ms eee
Riso. alone’ can be obtained | Serre rartsesessenppsenenscennieeeer . ti ;
Harrison's Music Dent; Staats AS A GOING CONCERN (1) Large boven nee ot the Barbados Youth : \ wana ian a ona ea i travel agent or i
. ey ‘ 4 a s hear and sincere ei
this hous and the title song Be ) Storey Stone Building with Shop an greetings to the Earl and sattit nan uee INTEREST } iis
you alone” sung by Caruso Bakery 4, coeenarles, Liquor and Liquor |\who arrived in Barb as tan, Se — ee eee | i
9 2% 50— acensed ancy goods scales nd . % . " y o
9.3.50—-2n | ete Glens” cases Ae ke aoe (age. , Rev i , BRUCE-CLARKE NYLON STOCKINGS in New Shades ......... $1.86 per pr. (} Sails - ail A Sails |
MEL WIRE ROPE—Approximately| ther items. All selling in one lot the! Rey. “J, Be GRAND ~pounde! LACE all over 36 in. wide in White, Beige, Black at $1.77 per pr. SOUTHBOUND Monire Hats, Bost Barbados Barbado
Ibs second hand flexible steel wire prone gy Ay ‘a acre of land wt ” Ditector é 1d oy a } Also Trimming Lace teeees ... from 8e, to 18e. per yd \ ; fe ' ne me ;
. : $ rl a tenantry situated at Clapha ~— . ‘ 4plain { > 7 7 " x
: Mabie a Lt 4 appr ‘aoa: Land and Flay Staf Rd_ ; 1ext to Big h- MRS. OLGA BROWNE, { } ADIES’ BELTS in ~ large Assortment of colours {N 3 27 M N
a s td. Dial 4405 |gates Govt. Water and Lirht Ins is , , Secretar } KITCHEN TOWELS good size... oc... ccc cee escacees 47¢ ae EE SON weaitiet Nhe ution wth ates
9/3/50—2n Apply on premises to Jose F The Barbados Youth Mov “n o CANADIAN
E fae acne W330 | chattencrn We aaah, BR a PAN AMERICAN .
eee aaa, nt er or oee| 10.¢ rrr es : 26th Ma 27th Mar ith Apr 3 ¥)
Cy | BROADWAY DRESS SHOP LADY Rmaon moe He, ee, ae ae RLD AIRWAYS
¥ Store, Lucas St 10.3.050 in | Ci il 4 » a A ° LADY RODNEY whiny 18t} ith Ma 26th Ma 27th Ma Ai f
REAL_ESTATE IVIL Service Association LADY NELSON a 4th June 151
eh Very fine quality | HOUSE: Modern Bungalow eehc j = <= <= LADY RODNEY ar t I4th July Sth Ju *T.M. Reg., PAA
tls, yd. Stanway Store, Lucas) 4,836 sq. ft. Fruit trees, lovely garde: DIVISION SERIES’ ;
10.3.50—In. | plenty of space for Chickens, Turke THE Annual General Meeting of Divi- A } A A
Te Ri eha eee fiton Aol m2, C A ill be hele Wed Array Sails Arrive Arrive Arrives Arrives
5, ete aas a . 4 y > t i085 N ‘ ) neid or “ar 3 T « lel t
S- Khaki Pants of finest qual-| set’, Beimont Road. Pet. 2, 50 Siete March at 4.80. p : NORTHBOUND = Barbados Barbas Bo St. John Halifax Montre
Stanway Store, Lucas St roliec strate’s C District SON ‘ Mar. 22nd M Apr ind Apor ie
10,3. 5¢ | DWELLING HOUSE with Agend: PARY NeLAON ah eee ae” ee a ee eee eo HP,
» } perches of land attached at “Briar Ha , RIN win “Ape if iS t i 29th pr at iM t
AMPA X. The latest in feminine * ‘ . eo. ont LADY NELSON 6th May 8th } lith May 18th Mar Denn ;
“es ©) Christ Chureh. The dwelling house con LADY RODNEY 8th June 10th J wth June 21 Ju 2 n
» safe, sure, comfortable, easy Cor e€ I . : : 24th Jur +)
fe. Fresh supplies just vaealuna tains open verandah, drawing and din- LADY NELSON 2th June 2%h . th July 10th July 18th Ju
W426, From all Dr oe a Drs ing rooms, two bedrooms and usual con + An the Shi LADY RODNEY 2th J 29th ith Aug Oth Aug 12th Aus
4 mn me ae veniences. There is also a Lime Kiln i ? CSS eee “ tte
= 10.3.50 2n | good working order on the et c | BR is _ ae os (Registered in Trinidad) weit
BESSORIES— For Motor and Truck The above property will be set up for ci re ne 4 Bho N.B.—Subject to change without notice vessels fitted with cold storage cham | Lower Bread Street, Bridgetown, [
‘R

® Stop Leak. Re 5 : } sale at our Office, James Stveat,
Billa Fon ait Kits, Chamoi| Friday 17th Match, 1950, at 1.30 p.m
Mirrors, Wiper Blades, Yellows Ispection on application on the pre-
S. Reiman & Taylor’s Garage Ltd., Mises YEARWOOD & BOYCE \
25 3 Df & 4 {
si a 10.9 ma: sl Solicitors it REMOVAL
VANISE SHEETS in 24 and 26 - 1)
. Of. Bins. 8ft. and 9ft. lengths |
mild steel plates 1/16, 1/8 “ DWELLING HOUSE—The two storied | NOTICE
| ad 3/8 in various sixes Enquire | dwelling house called “AMBURY” with |
Tyre Company, Trafal Street 1 acre 4 perches of land attached there-
1,3.50—t.f.n to, situate at Upper Collymore Rock,
| St. Michael. The house contains draw- patrons and the General Public
ing and dining rooms, one bedroom and , } that I have removed by Barber's

}
‘
PERSONAL conveniences on the ground floor, Salon from McGregor Street







THIS serves to nform

three bedrooms, toilet and bath on first} Cheapside, opposite the Public
floor Government water and Electric Market, where I will continue ta











| "i
ity installed For inspection dial 3297 \{ give satisfactory service to all

Mublic are herehv < ; si The above property will be set up for i{ concerned
credit Patan ny ene ageine sale at our Office, James Street, of Fri- i oa Fe

lard, (nee Gopaigan} . Pras day 17th March, at 2 p.m }) TOM JONES,

pe G an) as de — . al il

myself responsible for her or YeARWOUS BOYCE, Barber

ele contracting any debt or Solicitors. a
@ my name unless by a writte 5.3,50-—-9n — SSS
Sime by me

GRAFTON Aw GODDARD ; Tame
“epeatti White GOVERNMENT NOTICES.

10,3, 50.

Public are hereby warned against The British Caribbean Standing Closer Association Committee |
fedit to my wife Euralee I

ted (nee Waithe) as I do not hold | 1948-49 Report is available at the Colonial Secretary's Office at a cost |



Teponsible for her or nyor fs 3 , 10.3.5
r ) anyon of s p y=tv . s opy. Bal |
tracting any debt of deh in | Of Seventy-two cents per cop) 10.3.50. |
unless by a written orde —— |

me

ELTON *ABEWOOD: POLICE NOTICE
2n DEPARTURE OF H.R.H. PRINCESS ALICE



Christ Church
10,3. 50.

iki FRIDAY, 10TH MARCH, 1950




|
}
‘ «& FOUND 1. Between the hours of 4.45 p.m. and 5.15 p.m., no vehicle |
or person shall be allowed to pass through, stop or remain in Cavans |
Lane, Pierhead Lane or the Pierhead.

LOST 2. No driver shall allow his vehicle to be on or pass across any
mf AKE TICKET BOOKS—sSeries| Of the following roads between 4.45 p.m. and 5.15 p.m
ae "<5 oa y Gano—49 Pine Hill, Belmont Road, Constitution Road, St. Michael's |
Tig” Q320—29 “AA. 0520—29 Row, Trafalgar Street, Trafalgar Square and the Chamber- |
Rum to R. , Write Chane lain Bridge. i
9.3.50—2n Made under Rule 22 of the Bridgetown & Speightstown (Traffic) |
3 TAKE TICKETS— Series X.| (Amendment) Regulations 1943. i
, hte, wn ae return same ‘to (Sgd) R. T. MITCHELIN, |
tt | onan Commissioner of Police.



Police Headquarters,

WANTED Bridgetown,

===



Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend |

SBiocRa PER & TYPIST - | ment) Order, 1950, No. 9 which will be published in the Official

for

Bites snot’. Apply in person| Gazette of Thursday, 9th March, 1950. iW

. Pplication and referenc '
LTD ire 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling }

, eer 2 °
ie 3.3.50-t.f.0 | prices of “Oil—Kerosene” and “Gasolene” are as follows: —

WANTED



Macher ¢
t fitls Grenada. “Applic I ARTICLE PRICE RETAIL PRICE
ae, » address- (not more than) | (not more than)





per gallon 32e. per gallon









s
©

iit
WHOLESALE ,



bers. Passenger Fares and fren ites on application to Barbados. Phones: 4585 & 2789 \

€
Need bottle-fed GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.













=>.
—









babies be CIE. GLE, TRANSATLANTIQUE B 0 0 K 5 as
cry-babies ? FRENCH LINE a





Sailing to Trinidad Sailing to ‘
Piymouth hdd.
: “GASCOGNE” ..... Merch 14th March 21st dates toa
: : : — eaRerceey ‘ April 4th
Certainly not ! Baby's cry “GASCOGNE” ...,. ; April 19th April 26th

usually means pain — the pain of indigestion, aS IA Feta Mey 9th May 13th
“GASCOGNE” ....... May 24th May 31st

Cow’s milk by itself you see, is apt to form a clot in
baby’s stomach. That’s why wise nurses and mothers add For further particulars arply to :—

|
Robinon’s ‘Patent’ Barley. This fasnos cereal osbls RM, JONES & <0, LID.-Agents _| | GREAT

INTEREST
CYCLISTS

milk and prepares their digestive organs to deal with
Booker T. Washington

more solid foods later on, Try Robinson's ‘Patent’ Basle:
+ ~—By Basil Mathews









and see how he thrives,

ROBINSON'S

‘PATENT BARLEY

= Ce
Stn oth RP Ty s

nn ae



White Fang

wna : ONCE AGAIN —By Jack London
*THEY ARE HERE Four Stuart Portraits

LIGHT & POWER —By Hugh Ross"

TROUBLE FREE ) Williamson

au DUNLOP |i

< I S 7 E R” X - By James Joyce {f)
ALTERNATOR SETS . Hi] 28" x 1/2" Cream Roadster Tyres ellie Sn ea

Caribbean





1.75 K.W. \!RSE!. DRIVEN ALTERNATORS —By A. W. A th $

kM i y A. W. Acwor
aS : \|| 26" x 1/4" Racing Tyres
10.5 KW. . a Now on Sale at:
16 KW. ” ” ” *
22 ~—CO«.W.. i ” “ r

All complete with Switchboards .nd Automatic Voltage ADVOC ATE
Regulators. EC
cognate wikis ah eee: ald on we KSTEIN BROS.

TEE BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lid. | DIAL 4269 — BAY STREET STATIONERY

White Park Road 2 Dial 4546



~
7 ee












. nA FRIDAY
PAGE TEX BARBADOS ADVOCATE















































































































































——— - oe ry i a) a
cisanieiaiaanonnlin - $$$ ee Te } 3 f $3) : <
-——— — nie osition but Thirkell still |! who was still lea 3. Swiss ure ‘
= TT TTT OE: - — é ot he fore and the Roll kept the lead
EP “ bd ‘ p the home stretch ir as reached her ‘ pte
acing hesulls a eae cae a | ena al rans | sae
Racing Kesults oe gE vi an cnet Se age ea | eran, Me
7 ; te. : ¢ a2 as he é gain pulled away down t! Holder) and Blue Stee @
. ’ ; if Miss Friendship tretch making a strong ' P wnat Blue wee
& + ~ “11+ >; ‘ar yllet 1 - . =
, 4 RRISON SA NNAH HURSDAY, MARCH 9, 1950 on . nae ictory but Silver Bulle elding | to ;
1T GARt AVA i, 7 wheat, Wile 7 CWELFTH RACE nicely to the urgir of jockey | ay,
: WEA t , ~ . O'Neil “sed jead t : s
, : . - : : or—$1,05¢ _ : 2 - Neil forged aheaa I
i jih Race DALKEITH rAKI Cla % and Lower—S$1,050 Garrison Handicap leader and snatch the race by
i ($30 is Furilengs neck, It was O’Neil’s t ; " The ? punched. by ‘s
‘ J O'Ne oy: *t eee Slainte | she day, Swiss Roll as ‘secol retch and then the dag
) | \ I r r © Up) SnMatenea this race ngth in front of River Sprite ig home stretch batt,
Crossley War Lord (Lattimer) in the ES | oe nae sta
n i ) Jockey} Gonzalez ‘ ige of one of the Meet’s . ee ‘yy 1 +. ee
Bee . 1 i > 7 $i 12, $1.10 hrilling events. The fel SIXTEENTH RACE . a ste IM @ brilliant jes
FORECA one of seven contestants, eight B.T.C. Handicap | e me infaion oe
si Y a Lord (125 Ibs., Lat- i ig been scratche ‘urf ‘ ¥ Cropped
ae ; ALSO RAN a | ossley eave Tbe Caner} The day’s racing ended w A place 3 lene bel
Bet, START: Gx FINI ( 1 length, 144 lengths | veight. As the race began War | ‘hrilling win by Gunsite o\ ' en
‘ WINNER 4 ‘ > ( | Lord assumed the lead followed
te ; TRAINER: M i | by Tiberian Lady (Yvonet) and |\o—————_. > ——
| Iannis —— penitent ee Infusion (Holder).
a) 10th Rac« BRIDGETOWN HANDICAP—Class F and Lower—$650 | At the five-furlong pole, Infu- |
‘ $95) 5’ Furlones | sion posed a chalienge. The field |
———__—_—___—__-—— | swept past the Drill Hall, and War
1 JATERCRI oO J ). har dler. Jockey O'Neil | Lord was “still leading and going
2. PHAROS I 9 ir. M. E. I Bourne Jockey Holder strong. They hit the home
f 3. COLLETON n. J. D. Chandler. . | stretch, and then it was that;
i Jockey Crossley Slainte made the successful bid
TIME 1( l Win: $2.62. Place: $1.66, $6.50 that brought him home a head in
FORECA‘ : ; ; | front of War Lord. The latter ° La *
ALSO RAN ' Gir ib \. Gonzalez); Mountbatten | was second half a length ahead of Season Lb 2QAQ AGEL ope
(106 7 lbs., Yvone | Tiberian Lady. |
Seater. 3 Cro FINISH: Close. Head, 1 length. | ady
STAR’ irl . - pTAN’ 4 » ploee Ania ‘_Rre. -— " ve 7 saettaan 2 ° ems sé
4 WINNER: pate LAN bf ? ou “he--Condiment SILK PLANT and Mopsy in a close finish (Half-Bred Creole Handicap) THIRTEENTH RACE and we Ar wall stocked with
% TR .INER He J. D. Chandle ‘ 5
Ce aa | . | Brown Girl soon took over in the Half-Bred Creole Handicap | ‘
: lith Race: CHELSEA HAND?! CAP—Class F and Lower 865 } éé penn 7 29 coder miantiaied. Approaching the KNEE PADS—per pair ............... 2.16
Mk ($185, $95) 7) Furiongs | bi) 1, / : 'L |clock Pharos II joined up, but Chindit was scratched and the is q
A saat ‘ a i J 4 7 | down the home stretch Watercress ,; remaining field of four faced the am te } 7
1, TANGO 117 bos ir, V. BE, Cox. Jockey Thirkell /INS NINTH R A ( ‘h: lurged by O’Neil moved rapidly | Starter with Brahmin’s Choice ANKLE SUPPORTS—per pair ........ S19? 7
2, JOINT COMMAND 119 Ib ir. C, Barnard, Jockey Holder | L l l . L Aad jaway from the field. Hustled ty | carrying 13 lbs. overweight. “ 1
3, MISS FRIENDSHIP a ‘ Holder Pharos If who was mov-|. Brahmin’s Choice got the last SHORTS in White only with
10% o i ir. F. E. C, Bethell. Jockey ¥ von @ from page 1 were off to a good start with Iden- | ing up meanwhile soon engaged in | jump but caught up with the field SH : 4
TIME . ARI-MUT' Win: 8.08, Paeces O180, Seay urday rode two more winners yes- | tify (Holde1 “up) “slightly in the | @ strenuous tussle with the leader. | Soon after ithe five furlong pole Elastic Waist—paiv ;
FORECAS1 4.0 : saw % te rd nd’ 16 key Tt in sell who | lead September “Sor “3 quickly |O’Neil however kept Watercress | was passed. Silk Plant was now ubastic isa , Were. 6 ae
ne); Foxglove (107 lbs. Cross), 1. le ev in ve } the firi challenged and drew level but ap- | to the front for her to emerge the | in the lead closely followed by |
roae one V ner or ne | ‘ 5 € ; was : } we “eats AaroOs o 58 , 2 ye ’s Choice wy ." y ry > sia
INISH | - 1% length.| day of the meet scored two more|proaching the third furlong pole | victor by a head. Pharos II got Mops; with Brahmin s Choice in REFEREE WHISTLES—each .. ,
FINISI Close. neck » length Bi data he dropped back to second place isecond place money in beating|the third position and Maytime
farionette in aa 2 a Es ae : f lat nie + ot} ir xe . se
R Marionett fhe starting was not up t Reaching the clock the horses | Colleton by a length TOR aee . ee ange of FOOTBALL PUMPS Lh
Slice ee — | good standard yesterday and cer-; bunched, but on the run down the | ELEVENTH RACE aha ve antes ns , Bs oT ‘Silk ALL Wir (o/s ore ae 5
Toth Race: GARRISON HAND CAP—Class B and Lower $850 | tainly could not compare with wZstretch for home, O'Neil urged | roe on Plant oe ae me the lend Lea thie an 1h \ |
- f : i. Carta tandard reached in the pa september Song again to the fore. | . om Rete kN ds oe nl PUMP ADAPTERS—each ............
$245, $1 74 Furlongs Z ‘ , tah t The colt pulled away steadily fron Chelsea Handicap horses entered the straight run for
| meetings and even on ne 4 away slte : > ay Tey . ages
— : — Perkir j xy Payne The 1 art itself w the field and though stubbornly | 3 the first ce over 7 home Mopsy (Yvonet up) Seam : i: ibe eck
1. SLAINTE } b Grins, YOURE! on ; ; carat a shallenged _ by Pepper Win , ay vane Serta eae ame into the picture to be a seri- FOOTBALL LACES—each ..........,
9 WwW I C:1 restrail. Jockey Lattimer ‘ re were yme ver Cr ie eae ee tt eit hic l for the da‘ Four hi rse contender for the premier po- | t
9 IBEI I Chase. Jockey Yvonet ishes eee swe as Leelee | were scratched, leaving a field of | sition. Silk Plant who was ridden ; ss : |
TIME: | W $5.50. Place: $1.96, $4.00 The Police Band was in hy ny Bonn’ i) = ees gah an ; six with Miss Friendship (Yvonet! by Crossley responded _ nicely FOOTBALLS complete with BLADDERS ,
he gain de ‘aptain R eadyeach the Judge an vin the race iv P FBRoe . + . ; .
92 " - a bs i 3 I a 3 he h length ahead. Pepper Wine took a Ni ae es FI . Be . Pp however, to the urgings of his Ss J sae ek: ghia > On f
‘S : lie a rg Fee en ate al 4 Kecond place by a length and 7 t Ibs. Over-| jockey, and reached the Judge a Size 5, each $5.85; $6.50 & $7.00, a
le ) Flieuxce ( Mi lh Pt, hir- cater oO alton ae r ‘ ae ci 7 att in front of Ladd Pink i re pecti el) i caluhe 4 }head in front. Mopsy took second | -.
O'Neil Corfu 07 i Ibs.,| pre gare _ ( . r Was : The fie as: of $0 a aed tart | place ten lengths away from May- | NES
Eighth Army March by oatd TNT ACE nd bunched as they passed the | time é
ISH Driving,’ Head, % length Nibelungen”—Entracte by Wa TENTH RACE ds for the first time with Tan- a | i
Linda er “Ciribirin” by Bucalo to t . igo (Thirkell ) light in tl OU -EN h 1 1 nN 1 1 i
I ; ae as r a a i a Bridgetown Handicap |§ irkell uj} zh I 1 | FOURTEENTH RACE CAVE CHEPHERD & (‘() Li) f
NEI alypso orbeau and the NW | lead E : \ ) d \ 4 4k Me ’ i
“t 1A NDICAP—C lass G2 Only $550 Murrell Three of the eight entrants; On reaching the Hastin Castle Grant Handicap | ' '3
Lsth FR 1TALF-BRED wrt . ; , ti mip were scratched and five started |stretch it wa ull Fango with 9 ° : mh
ar ses aa | KF ie It : With Mountbatten and Pharos II| Vixen second folio i by M Vixen and Sun Fire’ were 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET
ive n Ss -arrying 7 Ibs. and 1 lb. respe | t ip a Joint Command | scratched leaving five to contest
K. C. Hawkir LY eae? eA coe 2 : |with Foxglove bringing up the this event. It yas another last
: vely overweight ith z I , thi ent. was an
Jockey Crossley SECOND DAY “1 The horses were off after some | rear. minute win, this time by Lady SS —
SMA ‘Geist. NINTH RACE jelay, Colleton getting off several After the field had passed the} Belle (Thirkell). As the race got! MPO O Por POPPA IP EAL ALAA IAG LEIS VDDDDDT STOTT
o ; } K. C. Hawkin NINT ACE Te atthe talk ae * ins, there was some exchange of | off, Bro Girl overweighted 11] + j '
e . — . engths behind the others 1 ff, Brown Girl overweightec 1
Jockey P Fletcher x be Pharos II was in front for a|places a Joint Commander (Hol-| lbs. Dulcibella (Yvonet up) got} % SPEAKING OF ENRICHED BREAD ? :
sd ni Win $5.42. Place: $1.18, $1.10 Dalkeith Stakes Ihort while but Watercress and up) made a bid for the pre-| the better of the jump and led the |. ;
FORE { é Four of the entrants were Sted ield to the beginning of the home 1 / E a
4 AS : Reynolds) scratched and the remaining five | = tretch. By this time Dulcibella ; % i ‘
STA ISH : lose, head, 10 length eer ee ieee nase te pe ee ) had Sweeper to the right of her{y ; \ ’
WINN { Plant—-H,B. Mare ] ‘ ind Lady Belle to the left of her.) % Swan and Roebuck Streets ;
i } i ee a eae Results OF 2/- | The Lady didn’t stay there. She} % Recognized Quality Bakers offer... . ‘
1 ‘ TE GRANT I ry .p : or $750 passed the judge a half length] 7 ry ’ AVA 7 t
4th Ra CASTLI AN i DiC Al ; Class D and Lower $75 “% head of Duicibella. The Sweeper | % ENRICHED BL T TER BREAD ,
: @91 i10) 5\ Purlongs 4 1e i¢ kL weep vas third, two lengths behind * 3 ,
* am | % “em ca
i ) \. P. Cox. Jockey Thirkell SIRT ERPN’? 2 hy ¥
Me I Fee tae Tosies eit FIFTEENTH RACE >
en 4 May ' y Second Day Cats 3 $
eR} : Db. Chandler | Spring Handicap %
if Jockey Crossley NINTH RACE | *
if r rl W 9.70. Place $2.22, $1.62 cree Ttoket \mour Two horses were scratched ii | *
FORI ¢ : Second 0087 o hi race. The remaining eight |
} I ne); Brown Girl (100 +. 11 Third 1350 62 & tarted with Ability and Souther | %
Fourth 0462 ; . << ooarrving © 1 a. .
ig eae! sist 3 bs Tena g Ween Fifth oan 1 Cross carrying 11 and 8 lbs., re 1%
y START PINS : 1085¢ 2 ACNE, « > $5.00 ‘each to holders of Tickets N | & pectively overnight. 1%
j Wi i ( ( Lady Mary 1820, 1822, 0066, 0068, 1349, 1251, 0461, 6 NI H | Swiss Role was soon in the lead | $
1 a rR NE P. Cox tg Ea Se mie a TENTH RACE | | ae 7“ eae ice aoe x
, f } > SPPRIA » ‘ ‘ py $750 Prize Vieket Amount | Ime im lis position, ollowed | &
ut | i5th Race PRI G HANDI( AP Class C and Lowe 75 if bok pice closely by Sun Queen and Silver *
hal $215, $110) — 9 Furlongs "ih Sh BUFFET St JPPER Bullet in the second and third] %
| : . .
: w ‘ N 47 | | positions respectively. The horses | &
ER ft t QO it i J. Wons Boh Ke ie is peat 5 | | strung out around the bend, but 1%
2 Wi I yu ' : I Be Pe ait a ras et | 2173, 2 san fone Mila aaa teen | passing the five furlong pole Silver | %
3. RIVE! PRITI 1 \I V u. ©, Bethe, Jorh ee . : | Bullet moved up from third posi- !
1 | Wi e) 19 ) . 29 & d | . 1% ‘9 is ens D : Poe
TIMI I-MUTUEL: Wit 12, Place: $1.32, $4.14, ELEVENTH RACE | SERVED tion to challenge strongly Swiss|% Watch this space every Sunday for the week’s Specialties
$12 Pr Vieket A % Beginning SUNDAY, March 12
entre is S69 4 ise icke mount ¥
I ° a 4 \S" sie bvciadtcah adnter C100 +0 the a : ie $454 ( | 999999999999 999999 SDE POSSI O PS LOES a6
an “ oe a sar ? Ibs.. Thirkell); Southern Cross | Thire 0616 ‘aa EVERY Sl INDAY NIGHT OSS 9OPS PIG VOS O99 GOP 9 F9FI999OSS
. 7 4 I rt $251 64 4 i
( Holde Fiftl 00)
' 6 « Neck 1 length ;
TART: Good FINISH: Driving, Neck, 1 lengt : ba : : 4 A new economical decoration
WINNER: 6-yr.-old gr-m. Alishah—Confidence Trick $5.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos | From 7 to 10 o'clock LOOK FOR !
he ' + 22 2 154 1547, 0615, 06 50 >
TRAINER: Mr. H. E. Hart. ’ f 7 \
a Se in sinsinninmernineinenne iil di or WALLS an EILINGS
ea i6th Race: BARBADOS TURF CLUB HANDICAP—Class A and] p,,,, rH a n d CEIL
; iH Lower $950 ($275, $140) 9 Furlongs ale vide bog NEW t
f 4 : ” 280 1
: rt o771 40 ' }
j 1, GUN SITE 121 lbs. Mrs. J. D. Chandler Fourtt Sh 0
+ : Jockey Crossley, | Fitt! 1204
; s rT 1} f . Mi Molly Tawil. Jockey Payne ; bp | 4
- } ‘ : ‘ 157
; 4 BEACO IGHT 33 lbs Vir. K. D. Edwards. Jockey Lattimer | g5 00 « to holders of ke No C :
tae TT ; : MUTURL: Win: $3.52. Place: $1.38, $1.46. | one 53, 1855, 0770, 0772, 1189, 119 . vovers in one coat
} FORE 00 THIRTEENTH RACE : ‘ ‘ )
1" ( \LSO RAN: 1 2 Ibs., Holder) bie Prin Picket denis Supplied in Powder form in many otiractive colout }
; 4 START ( 1 FINISH Close, neck, 3 length t 19 $51 :
r ’ oo Y 293 4 7
te bas a WINNER: 6-y1 O.'T.C.—-Sunrise | Third 146 WHITE, CREAM, BLUE, SUNSHINE, GREEN, BUFF.
+ | rRAINE! ( J », Chandley sea h 73
teh sesh capil ts | $5 00 ea ot Tickets N oo : : :
ees | TY W tt 93, 1575, 1 19, 3411, 2877, 237 Made ready for use by- mixing 24 pints water with 5 lbs.
: »
’ a , ' ; ") rer 4
f B.B.C. Programine 1 wea FOURTEENTH RACK powder.
‘ TO-DAY | Prize Ticket Amoun A
fl ® t t 0198 $41 :
Mf Sun Rises: 6.15 a.m Se 0378 137 ;
Been) At : Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m | Third 0413 118 5 lb. packages at 90c, per package
pe ; Bs , Moon (Last Quarter) March ' i387 a
ae k t i0 $5 0 4 to holde : 3 ts N a
pre | i i Lighting: 6.30 p.m 17, 0199, 0377, 0379, 0412, 0414, 0994, 099
ey oes : 7 High W sien get um., 9.50 WILKINSON \ HAYNES (0 1)
Close Dov ( : i + Sak 3 ot FIFTEENTH RACE r fi
Ne A p.m Prize Vieket Amour « 9
I € 4 t 0618 $445 4
YESTERDAY | i 449 Phone 4456 Rh Hardware Deph
Rainfall (Codrington) .23 ins
—— «* — Spee 9 > eee 6BCCCSSH
day: .61 ins : —————— ee ——————
Femperature (Max.) 82.0° Ff Fis om |
1 remperature (Min.) 76.0° FE y a t ice Tickets N
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E., %, 0870, 0872, 1 1860, 0226, ¢
by N., (3 p.m.) BE. SIXTEENTH RACE
Wind Velocity: 16 miles per 1 17 $491
. hour Th

Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.001;

SALE

+

\ Dance usic: | (3 p.m.) 29.928 >





CLASS

WOOLLENS —
| WORSTEDS —



; | SUITS

280
| a 140
D i.4 “Y754. 2364, 2: "2599,
' - ny yn wah
They'll Do It Every Time ieee’ ceahiine By Jimmy Hatlo | |! THAT FIT ene Sate, SaORORER
| ‘The: of ot eo . —$1.15 a Yd.
cant ———_— Lovely Tolies GINGHAMS
49c. a Yd.
Fancy Checked TAFFETAS
$1.35 a Yd.
JERSEY SILKS Ass’t Col’s
9le. a Yd.
GOLD BELTS —37c. & 76c.

Toms) kam ae
a YOUR FIGURE

(Quit 20H, NO, OBLIVIA“Y BvERYBoDY's “ZN My DAY A GIRL 7 YOU,ME AND
{ YOU CAN'T STOP NOW «/ POSITIVELY RAVING Y PLAYED PIANNER AN’ | THE PIANO PLAYER
| T'S ONLY 12 O'CLOCK )| ABOUT YOUR PLAYING, HER MAN TURNED THE) ARE THE ONLY , y





|

THE EVENING'S JUST » MY DEAR! COME ON, \ PAGES: HER GUY JANES HE'S MISSED)






BEGUN::WHY YOURE // GIVE US A NICE, ) IS JUST TURNING DANCING WITH ALL |

$1.00.
@SPUN SILKS, Plain & Ptd.

79c, up. N
WOOLLENS IN GREATEST MEN AND WOME

TO

(
j yy (
. “ THE LIFE OF THE }) | DREAMY WALTZ SHER HAIR GRAY*+ Al \ HAIRBRUSHES, Las, & Gts
} i = PARTY s+» NOW *+5 eS _—BSie, up, §
Peo af ae — Hh FANCY BEDTICK 56” CAS
i | | vi) / i | $1.14 a Yd.
atk y I || MKHAKI DRILLS—5s, 92, 98c
peat. eH v \ GREY FLANNEL—$2.14 a
Hi ig id
) ' Gts. & Ladies’ VESTS—2 for FOR
7 |
(



|
|
{
PRICES
|



a SUIT [Psa S
; f ‘ D
. YOUR POCKET . ‘E & Co. |
yeni a oa be oie ‘aie THAN BROS. ( 2 B. RIC e i

YA

MONK ‘TO THE HUR
GURDY GALS ::-

Pr. Wm. Hy. St.

aeons. 1a P. C.S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd.
TEs aan ae ee | Top Scorers in Tailoring
WINNIPEG , MAN. CANADA - ~

6, 42 & 53 Swan Street BOLTON LANE )












PAGE 1

PAOI M\ BARBUiOs AUVOCATE FRIDAY. M ABCH i Report Of Standing Closer Association Committee • iratn p.tr opprov-i or r mfli n i nenb I Mr CWMM %  %  (th^ it), and those on which, both th* Padt n Ihe' Const! Il* [i rn:or.< | wtl. prevail (thr "concurrent'' list). The former erlll thoae nth. under 1 %  non. there cmn be no roam for a tion, and which ;irr esSD ration %  wel Tl %  % %  *. ill of thr : %  we propo* par. penrt.%  % %  %  %  pose %  H ihOtfld in ftl %  %  %  tMTlKW that it can offer more substantial re-issue to ucn Governments and hl the i % %  rn credit, baaed on thr be supplemer.from Federal funds than can m be made for flnanrial agree. menu between th. therefor* hop. Unit (.overnment*. and that Fedmore favourable tpimv than car eral finances end flnaa* %  it will be m d portion to issue larger, and consequently More atI t"an< Then-' ^on t-. provide that all borrowing whether foi on behal* •.'. involved bouI*i l. of tergarded u* i \t' %  : anco wll %  I tradually to b. %  %  and II become1 hs. nal function\ ernmenta should be eubjei i five years. Cardinal Importance We now come to a topic of cardinal importance, one %  n prolonged discushich will certainly enMeral purpose: V Ion Apart from any Unit Governments formal review, h the Metal O.-vernment B, thu cage the greatest attention m the *ldtr thai the Constitution she i.ossible to avoid region Our conclusions have to %  the assumption by th. %  >.rnbenng the market with a mulsome extent been adumbrated in • mrtiplicily of small loans, and to Chapter I of this Part As there obtain for the fnii Government; indicated, the day to day relations bettei trrnu than they could of the region with His Majesty'* %  wvea. Government are governed and deStrongly tdvm-ali ter mined preponderantly by ecopThis procedure, which <*,<• omka and nuance. strongly advocate. undoubted!-. Until the cconomi. ..ituation of means that the Federal Governthe region materially improve-!, so inent would exercise over the exlon will His Majesty'l QovaCnternal loan policy of the territories inent. in fact, though perhaps not a much greater influence than it '" l* w have to stand behind the will over their general finances, region a nti ,-niler fln%  Ince the Federal Government anclal assistance when requirea could not be expected automntiS lon 8 aB H Majesty ally to sponsor and take the remcnl %  in lhe position of ultimate %  %  unrl ness of which It was not eon vineevl This i* > able pnee to be paid for arrange menta designed to secure for Ihe li • ; rovlded alwny gUlatur %  itura o i ae T' %  • %  <; % %  11 might be tl %  he smaller territories I %  v era. Govern" • the eorrespondinp the Fedr"ion In ri M %  len • if no We Ifeflee % %  Ml %  YXXVlU) %  erosion %  power f paraRraph T of Ilk %  % %  %  tnienuu i nance %  now uw i axiomaw %  ' r'eun. guarantor it follows inescapably that Hll vernment control in some form over general nd financial policy While that %  %  %  ill own aired %  %  %  %  i %  i %  %  %  U %  M i %  %  . li II LtM I. • M Met %  wiiiih || | r ;ole control . lurti %  %  %  close so:. %  %  %  %  1 %  %  %  %  %  • %  ..! % %  %  %  I I %  I %  %  %  i prfa MIX %  %  %  %  IbUlUei ot %  and then position would bfl \.r %  tntlal way of grant-aid ove iart '( the custom* ravai r*gion as a whole loans on the lt,e case, the region cannot claim best and least onerous terms, and to have attained full political [tilt docs not m our view conetln lice. It la of the a point to which constitutional POftanct that the peoples of the objection can be taken. i-gion .should realize that We must now consider the are IO be free to control their desspecial problem of grant-aid. Scvlin y without,political supervision eral territories are in receipt of n ,h P ar ' His Majesty's Gov'*! of the ordinary cost crnment, they must be prepared of administration This position l0 conduct their economic and flnWlll not be changed by the more "ncial affairs in such a way as to Act Of Fedpui'ion h; ( fullj intfaradUC* 10 I minimum the necesspendent, financially self-support'<) lOf applying to His Majesty's vernment for financial aid would fall to be met from Federal While His Majesty's Goven.ruiKB But as we have shown in ,r, cnt by virtue of its hi Chaptai of thai Part the Inan' 'tionshlp with the component %  I resources of thiregion arc i *""" r l h* Commonwealth must InevUabl) be regarded as ultimate guarantor, it would be fatal to the Of a proper H lanbUltv for the Feder.r. ItaaM, or to permit itself to e regarded, as being in a DM rattanta on His s\.> ivarnmant m its financial and heae circurr,' %  niial that the Fedi lad In fact as lit fullest posIn too of itf %  Wol* ihat the aetwaai Govenunaol and tl.. BJ to enable them to sup %  serious da*V %  aeaamrj that, until that tune comes, special arrangements should be made for the ance of grant-aid from L'mtei Kmg. BR>nt re firmly convinced timi a %  • %  %  Hera It I 4 I and ind to be untrokli ..!.id (>,. Id making-the %  he i.'tiinn in inj way %  uhaarvlant to aay exni %  aval lug optn ... | %  %  %  .,. i | enable tham > bnlai i %  ... "" "' l "'"' %  11 rraniement A ftnan%  %  tlshmani Ion In the region appvars to be f Federation. This grant wouJ I I kM dedJEntd as to prot i Uon of na%  to be rederatli stance, and not in shadow There 1 rtould DO, inccd. the %  %  to any othai than That reci lund for %  ubject II purpose A Corollan \ i liar] would be tiiat. iremcnt.s of grantht>t I exceed the amount %  J "^ United Kingdom Of accumulated reserves, the exould be aouanl i %  Bui foi an I'II, m Federal revenues i< %  ., %  n.e.1 of grant-al %  eniment but to the Federal Governmant, nrdghl inunpoaad m n tl Government %  the t*i*,.,i revenue! themealvta %  %  %  tad bj the l tei Dal ice in the Legislature should be that of perl lecn-d by the people on wide a franchise as possible. BkH v:. ther arrangement would it of the peoples and legis| *ories. and no • course would, we %  %  to the satisfa. v's Gcvenunant On this I icy of t iest>" Government i.s above of any iiDnge. Wa proceed then to c B efiuential qua should the popular roprehattrt • oples of the roglon or i** ternI Secondly, what • action? Thirdly, ihould tin itura consist of one Chamber or rourl %  %  .here should •d? Other im%  %  i cussed, but wa feel tl e ehoul %  • boold actly elected or a by territorial legisl iise this point, not b" to our minds there is any difficulty it. but in order to make our iiion quito clear We U %  whatsoever but that tho 1 nciple of direct election should I*followed. The woilH v iliout experience of other pro* %  an assembly consi.-:Unata oi other legi .. %  %  .. | root of the federal principle i representatives cannot but I re delegates, bound b) %  from their own iecisiatur-s BdMar the necessity of seeking In iructions on all points of major Vtanoa, and inhibited from acquiring and acting upon a region"nse which tr8Ti!X?ends the out: .-. not too much to aay that ;i %  I but a < 'i federal it-;. %  I -tory show %  kptea of bardl;. 01 w uch has proved stable either i %  In IL under the doin%  %  •ccome in aft or that) have %  federation, or Ibl lies) i Mi..' (ore, that the lar in the b • on. Knmihi-i . % %  %  univeraaJ, adull lUKrtars, we know, objections iistxi. birl we i n -der that pit n'k of %  i i political )udgnv tb %  peoples of the | %  nrouli inhibit the un... % %  %  %  ,1 advance al all, We do not end toad perfect in tin pooph < %  ::.' much ; i.In i ,i %  not deslmble. nor tl ..\ %  \., thai BCUVe principle ior General S^fg members "" ,r '<>>, At the beeinninj of vould elect one of ui vhom '>. c. n .— r^* 'ho Governor SLS that is to say. the House of therefore appoint to ttaInute, l n-4 ..'...l„l -I,,,. nom1nK T hv ', J7J9 Bbcaii L^lxmi t onlress. prls e n purposes, il suffices to Mun.t,., %  "fc *L u M '2 um L 0 !" e Ue the Btneral principle. If that By tin, mrBm __ .J wnicn we nave naa £^„£w. We sh iu later indicate of State wTtnTi;i'Vyi,'!IL 0 * eeured. e.g. in relation to (governor O ig of expenditures, and seven other members of n? otltton of the Executive, islature. nominated bv-Jr. i predisposition U tavour t J -ingle Chamber, as advocated aribbei le. The advan'.anes of a single '1 ??•'''-'C;„„ !" .l nn „f ihl< f Stale. The advantages of a singl Chamber are indent apparent It would be less costly, there woul be less nelay wholly elective *sing "os means a —~— %  % %  "hi" he Counell offj-l? hall be no obscuration of this clear majority, will ow> n^y' iominance—i.e. that one. and only sition through the PT1/MV re shall to the. w,H of the nSi** of the Legislature i -i-*'j-..i— % .- ^ne. part oi ine i-cgi*ia(uic WHU %  mv ui oi me maiftrt* -77 n legation .and a ^ ak wiIh lhp partlcU Fode ral Assembly ""^ ** n^'iS I" weight and authority which The Governor Geoeral-u.,. •al^rend W fcl, dP v from W 1 tte £, 0 ?il Pm f> wcrpd ,P *W****l m ir.nay we ait h Sentite were also to be other members of whiJi* :Sii o r' er otb o er S talr & *&*** ^3 ***•# xh r s an ,hr< ^SbtTsa* ? , 1 :-L_.^.... '! should be;i divergence of view_ bethe remainder memSTTi? £S r?tVhJJir wCmSL twn the Assembly and the Sen Second Chamber, whether etectjvo, (> H t ( ou)d dalm dually that unaied or hereditary, despita ; iinWn A Uh po^iar sanction. nf than Chief Justice snu^TJ Ihree Judges. Ilroadly spealung the COM „ .ipoke with popular sanction, of State will constiruu th,^ ions of cost and delay. Morcovor lt woutd i)C dlfflcult. in forming instrument IMRTS We did not coMttJej m aaWeo uih ,. li;ili)1|]> te p!at e the Sentution. !" ,n • bound to accept the pr.nc,... ,. ));i| propoer in a The establishment of, -. "' ,lon position of definite constitutional Service Commit l^JS ..were HU.Uprepare,,, j „ t Astrmb i y u ;tl( Governor flenS?! ant reasons to advocate lhp iniafV acror ded to the enmrnended An l3JLl£ tnat this ra tion shou ld break w.th !" on grounds of popular eierirl f lhe ConrthulSSBS precedent, however well eatatb, |((|| roll f d narrUy ^ d enied to P. ae.1 i S 'H^'. t c. i ... thi other if it were also to be Whatever might be the situation lw lpfl Nordo %  < %  faa. <>"e irable uvt HM two Houaay titutionally equal Constitution soon presented itself. h trouaii that lb %  cof a Federation (hir au thority from the same thai there shall be a balance, ^ouia,sour-e It is important throughout its organisation, be, Ih( ,. A1 Houses ol •ween unity and diversity; that the '" ,' Wlil ^ Xutl >houUi |merged for some purj dlrT e r ent functions and pow.ild retain their ..u-ntii.i i , h ,. v ,,,. rir) lo | )e a mere mgle chamber duplication of each other, with number* propoMioi d C( p JV lts propcr pail m v . populations, V/OUM adequatolj i present the FadaraUon n ;i ngl ..' unit but it would not reflect the n he constitutional pattern, and 0l a career in Feaersl poilbag> fact that the i lould ^ no doubt, on any ditionul to that in :mt* enter upon Federation as equals. a round which is the dominant politics, may well intrant %  For these reasons, which numbers of experiences,„ eve to be of general nppliBut that time has yet te eation, wa haaa coma to the eonS> itlOU of itS suixirdin.it.though tlOnethelOBI role In the legislature, should be nominated and not etUl lad< ve proceed to tne du> I more particular reashtl view, two possibloininents on the general princile may usefully be dealt with •t may be asked, first >ne ; s to reflect the constituent units .moot be composed fll ... rriiorial legislatures, thu also Section are fltUal la as*! .overs of the Aassab .oiu tne Senate, and tarifsaaab providing that the Steak) gait be nominated ana not eienet OUier and more ptraakt reasons for adopting tot mas* If each ve n,u| P le 'or a Faatru Seat ,. proper part r w e lon ar 'oUm t eich should ^'ruc thai m the count of-iaed place £* t'x.stence of FederiH*, Moreover, it is not apparent how this could the unicameraJ vide that territorial legislatures %  %  'hen point %  cited, would reIntroduce the "eonfedentiv. principle 1 the objections to which we have already stated in paragraph 49 of this Chaptu. We refeet the. idea of adding nornbuted to the elective i i-xpetuert t\ mixing and elected mem heir in a single legislative body il not viewed with favou .. %  ..i it where and for the present u4 :* u of Federation, twa at nd will be the raw** of political advance that tsea ply of experlenMd puUgnsti likely to lie considerably Ami the need. We emphasuc thit* FI experience and MIS' ability, as to which w* halts We think It i, tbar fore, so to >K.i %  iiii,ii!ioi1 nliiTk . r o might not otherwise Mr* We do not hold uw as as can succeulullj %  Bt no reason for introdiicing it preserving the elective prlrn into an entirely new Constitution We were led therefore to the conclusion mat. as in other Federations, there is no option but t< in all branchei of th Legislature, A.-. e have already indicated that on aasMtal grounds we leel that thset up a separate Second Chamber House of Assembly should be th* if only that these may be ade 1 ind reprflaaotacl the equality of the constituent units Oilier Ki.i.nn, ire other, and good. reasons we are fully satisfied. The laxative itructur Chief one. .is the experience of other countries, including many 1 Mute experience, an abiding need m an) legislature, however constituted, for a revisionary proeeaa. This does not imply an\ lack of faith in an elective as-embly as compared with one con stituled on some other principle Discussion of this point Is often principle. We have also In Othel connections (see paragri< glared and rait %  U %  latent with true Federation, an) %  ,.. rail letany p^rt oi it derives it> .minority, from ,'rue. lo be in.. DV reflection of the equality of the I : proposals to this end. But the election Ive contribution to the rtpa With those who hold I %  I oof from politics for ftc-ats or snobbish reasons wt turn a thy; but there are i : -uixl and valuibh eoa> expression of the elective ence. not by any meaia one Ja.s.s of society, who an 1st back by feelings of tssdM; genuine lifli'ence from Ml their contribution unaivited Secondary Hast A further consioerauoa oswa from the tact that, under t^a* ir Senate will dsftM Kondery plaw %  • igislative process. 1U poasall relation to finance will be i ly limited. In other raise* • f Senators by territorial ,„,, W|I | & revukcarj legislatures is not one of them The other possible continent ll ( more eerious. In rejecting the we consider, needlessly clouded by •l***lve principle for the Sgreailv "fro"m~those"o( the Os* One Of The Oldest States, for example, an daj But we make the following obSenate would run the risk *£ rvationa. In the first place, the coming a very second-rate %  ti. In this To summarise our arfuffl** "ther res|>ects, is now for. we recornmend t*** oldest important conFederal Legislature dwa** nia* hile of two Chambers, a Ho* remained in this Assembly, wholly electfdcai ' C V. %  %  . "• %  1 \\ which „ %  i au of the %  .1 if we are to think a n I in nature t %  %  %  To this VI %  1 come, i '< dons on .i be : suffrage 1 i~> iprepai..'. %  huh cannot be undoubtedly of universal adult (unYaas. %  LnTiths^TTLL %  %  '-— %  *? .y iN spect, it does uato lhe dominant partner is theiaF :".:,£S.* f r "J5!" *-*.. hlur.. *m .-f-* ,„d -revlrtonVir' a. "*"? """ r *"">' "vlop.M wholly nf nominated •* %  :.!.• has been We mull now conn*'"JJ lhe tan laiinO. Aa a mailer of practice, wo Hetall Ihr sire of 0 ny-j ure altnopgh. aiv wc have ve,u ure, WIUl grMt racptct, to Milchiinilx-rii. Ihe numbrnj*^ lsl that experience has shown lentativei from each W*v^ rule out the uae of lhe rrviuonarv "'' ,l lhe United Stales conilituqualification*, their f—**^ hMnh* for th, at limat liable lo !usl lhoe the mode of selection ol ^J 'hich we earlier sun,nr Teipeclive puw** ?*j^f Chamber, and flnallf m *~i r :ho Head of the SUW ""' .. ss of Ipgi.lalion. M Tnk.n Urn ihe nsJ-JK blv. we had peal "3i, • ie, but alio lhe chief ''"' '•'"" '**" %  %  hllDMif. Mil l.um. and lhe-" %  .11 fai coniin. 1 :.|,iul. when 'H:llcullli • of biiiincss anil the cirne.ted will arne if moi cumlloncei ol the caie make il elemenl .11 lh> conititutlon .an exponent to do to. • %  .,.., a popul., •. Ihe United Slates. i which 1'iiiuUon o 1 NdtW e m . hr ,„ entire legislature should be elec'hi other prin ciplc should be included as well Thai means for oui thert should i,. •noil elen., .', ,.lreod\ in. %  eral legit. 'mure ih. n d dean. manl chamber, which we mai henceforth rail ihe Hi.,, nould lie dire. I %  .vitem of 1 il which it U 1 -idcnuntelv reflecU premacy of one U ...pulation of lhe ^fsjjc %  ,, %  %  •.'" .'~2a K*. I ol the nature 01 I able w.ih .., .1 It should include members vole* of the people 'A ;.... K\ ; n> ; ?' h, mMh d. b '-' •*"" *> %  ben of the sec.. "' cal '">"'" %  VMM. lierefore nece%  last ooiri"^! 10 allot tl"S ivinl %  2 ihuiP"i "SB To tak. obvious thai to allot 1 in accordance wm %  .vould involve i^.'Z^ ramaica. half of "J g oemban ia MM mm' iwtibilitt lhal the reje of ihat one lemtors. %  operation of only * £ %  > %  •live.. ^""^JSS Or\el. 1 i houid"b?ap* "" !" : ; ' rlf •:' a V7ilwr : -. v ".2?i[ *S a single hJJJJ ^ A %  more pro""^ urren: %  ^riular maud:.eoiMidarabje in del Each of these three sUles appears to be n being for some 0. f''



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FACE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY MARCH Comb Calling L AST nijtfii Oovatnmenl was most ilhimJnatt.1 ft cafjUon which began pui 10 o'clock W • ;or and the < %  House MMf* nU.it in opa i m coloured fairy lights It wu a clear and its) III one coitic-r oi me frOU i.U tree with spreading braj and thick whikin the far 11 lawn a flamboyant Hi ilat cul % %  -I ri cepuc baekflround l liv Ifhi strut.i. along Ladles in their long flowi.., i.lng gowns and gentlemen I mortng laili and shell romp with medals on thru vere all |r. t %  couple Aftm %  I lea timid highlighted th< I.Ji'li.ni.l' . %  dier'' Parum Then the Nat | to as nine k.utlo^^ from the H Glasgow" did the S ripe with much trao Timing. Then, accompanied by ihi llnnd | del,. %  %  %  drill, finalising arltli In* (he h* „ he L, iutl m wd 1,w ,n n business Barbados the Karl of Athlon %  bout ten %  %  ol Athlon*. trie* 81 %  %  •Rupert and the Caravan—41 dirts Seek Kreedom By C V R THOMPSON. 1 YORK (By \. Feminists an bombs I for .heir sex. They want al these til Bbollahad:— A Massachusetts law forbli iu carry anything •/< i. 7516: A Ml they cannot clean moving machm%  \ Pennsylvania law by which they cannot read or A Wisconsin la* which that women golf caddis* are not A Washington law which Inthai .dl I 1 "" 11 poric%  i i en IM nl f.'i ftvt weeks. Afler 47 Years the U S.A but they Nolaon. thus %  %  %  %  [he British ,Iinnli I V \fiua ma* their v. Turf Club |ol All. ., i;lan. log througl tlx an the> waUi i wdfth RBM They aat In front i J. I) Chandlt i. Prl Bon %  %  %  i (! row -"•! Mr M rtc aft. K. A Idwardi, H I 'he Oi A. S I.Hih; In the IWn Skew. Mr 'I 'll,. '! ... lf| Mr, I I I ike Royal i . %  thi\ rowdi Hot %  %  %  k Bgan and the: irom Savani..j be/wtd l'i %  l< On Routine Visit R A P I i I %  i Business Visit It. J M maging %  i i %  I ind Mi. H K Hari th* • erda from II W 1 A -, Hotel fc Rupcii ukc* quick look arauoo the cabin and eei lh*t ihere is no other doot. "Wt can't get back through the skylinlit." he muttcn jnniouilv" We mutt go the ami M> .^ Kodtnto." Caunouily h elimbi thr .omp^nion* iv *nd peepilong the deck. AH (he ct*w iff %  nui ih' eni*av. wher. mar* awn an tcil...t, rtoaenec. itiil no stranger has come on or let, the *h:p end (he pirate cepian is roarinic back M them. They snll liiven't leeii as I breaihs Rupett. "but *e've no tune 10 lose." Slipping silently to the ktftn ol the boat, tie puts Beppo on 'he cable, iile monkey, scared ot n muob shounng. witnne' i>hore M' 1 First Time MI PITCKKIN In i %  %  and then i %  M ..iiied her ...ii be there I < RiTTOQrOTE—Here's ho to v.ork it: \ \ \ DLB \ A X R ht LONOI i I I Q U in this example A is u*e< for I Single Idlers, apoeIrophiaa. the lenj of the words are all hints l < %  \ t r Rtatram Qaotatloai YKT TJTFY %  ' THEMWas Here In The Nightenfale Children's Home H B H PR1NI i i • Night Childri i log aecoraj %  Urs Private ft ratai Hi W i %  i thi ,; Mi ii A • M i c arall a. Mir, \ Earl. %  i i ii UM chlldi %  %  We Hope M 11 1936 %  M of Visiting Great Grandson %  %  On The Wav O wn me way N their i i o j \ I l>y Ihe I > %  Ken Tun i Lunched With 8b hdw„r.l H"" 1 UM Hi H I Sii I TABS TAWIL, I f B.Wii %  I j returned %  l until Sun%  %  gl the aii With T.L.L. lICK DAV1E8. I i I )avics Iv la oh n a %  who ii. with I i %  Dick %  Mr. and %  v. John's, %  I Intrunsit From Martinique %  B.W.I.A %  1 night SI'ICIAL VTTR ACTION — AT — MORGAN TO MOUKOW NIGHT Orcheslni THE HOT SHOTS i w.nr hiilerliiinmciii OlAI moil for lu'M-n.iion-. Mil*.< II. 8 biMtiad in i i *iai> i n • t TTEATTHY li Gwd Alone CROWN lilM.I II r.li.li ii.'inl fur a Shamlv II \\lilt for your NEWLY ARRIVED Easier Needs Choose No. Pirisea/ 6 Patent Finiihes in Black. While. Tan € Wine. $3.09 to $6.41 NEW SPITES S.Wes BLACK a WHITE DESIGNS •l. i:>iiim im:\nu \ &v \^ S ^ BOX OFFICE OPENS TODAY FIIIIKW lOih >I\HII 8.JU a.m. — 12.IHI LSI |>-in. — 111 BJB. Bst>> rtveb I dcliglittuUftiun-liKe lather of I CutKuri Soap It combines ; emollient ami nirdiciosl properuei -hi^.i keep his teo-W ikin bealihy ami Iftte from Blemishes, esquwt e 1 y tolt end velvety. futicura V/ SOAP llll Mill II).I).11 .1 l.JI IMl P.U PM. presi t'N .... FIIANCB ram I in PAOO I'llMI OLYMPICEBI KIIAIIT-DOl'OUS IIIIMURIIXF. roMf.HT AT IM PM. Bepakllc Daakta „„ !" :.VNNt ROBOHS i ii (H ll\land -MADOKN l HI lltl DSSWT ; ;V R0VBA.1CM li, 1.1I..I, ITHE ATM OLYMI'K ro-Niom vi I.M P.M. Karr.l I /...".! %  K '"V ,,. imCBS ,,i n nil SNAKE PITT will f ELES I I —OLEN .2SS i I.. TOOLS! TOOLS! MR. CARPENTER POPULAR Under the-Dollai Dress Values now displayed in the Windows AT EVANS & HITFIELD 11 DIAL 4606 k 4220 Choose a HERCULES BICYCLE and MAKE Cycling a Pleaiure We can uffvr • GENTS, LADIES and the SPORTS MODEL Also Cycle I iiiluLockk, PolUhLg llolhs. Oil Cant, and Lubricating Oil. THE HAKBAIHI* rxMwaaasrfi < HI IU\ l u TOBY LIMITED THESE ARE AMONG OUR NEW STOCK IMH II VMMEKS l'i UiaS Mtk, Siiiimihiim. Blink und Kubbil KLXES SPIKIT I EVEU BRACES BREAST DRILLS COTOK SAMS I'I.AM. raowfl TABLE VII Is stKIM DRIVERS Oil. SHIM s IK | U iy SELECT YOURS EARLY THE CORNER STORE



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r\(.i B VRB \lis \n\ui M I reiDAI WARCfl Racing Results %  ,l ,AI lVANNAII.ThrKSDAT.il Mi" II 9. MM 1 i •• %  tlM* i %  u %  • i ,li \T • I" I I urli.n.i iml lower—50 Bourne. Jockey Holder I TON j : N, M 50. %  lllh Ree : CHELSEA HASH f I I..I "" -'"" i miean Thirkcll II TWELFTH KM I Garrison Handicap I sn K ri \\r 'SEPTEMBER SO\G" WINS X/.XTII RACE %  %  %  .,,N II \N W t I." K ...ul lower SH.MI i ; i ulMff %  : %  : ibi • from Mice 1 %  %  with Men%  i 'hc third fur lung pole %  %  I .'. %  ,1 \\|iH W I I." *• I) I l %  rlangl %  I 1 ; $1 10 1 %  i MI ISM D i ami I BriMd %  .iKell %  %  %  %  %  %  i %  i 1 Nilx-lm I l | Events SECOND DAY NINTH RACE I)..Ik.nil SI,I!.I> Poui • >i the antrai lining iivi Results Of 2/Fivltl Sweep Second Day the fore %  %  ti %  %  II VI II IC VI I B Id eloirn Handicap I %  rely ovei %  %  I Sung the up. but | lei .'. %  %  %  O'Neii however kepi W %  l l i.vi NTH RA< I. Chelsea Handicap %  %  i Miss I %  : up the The ilel.t %  %  ••.•Kan War tha lead followed .iv i Yvonell and Infusion (Holder). Al the rive-furlong pole, Infu%  %  %  The liHH I the Di Hall A strong. They hit the home stretch, and then it was that %  light him home a head In [''it.,!%  hall .i length ahead of an I-ady THIRTEENTH RACE Half-Brad Creole Handicap Chlndlt ma acratched I :icld of foui .. %  %  U .'. eight Brahmin'! Choice got jump but caught lip wit' ive furlong pole was passed' Silk Plant aril now i ad closely toll the third position and Maytune i tinning g .lose fourth. Ttaere ivai some exchange of places ncanng the clock but Sdk • nil in the lead. As the ghl run for ipj again picture to be a seri%  [Ilk I'lant whu n by Crossley re. %  each* %  FOURTEENTH RACE (aslie Grant Handicap and Sun Fminute wl by Lady Ki>ll who i %  stretch making i %  % %  o'Ncii forgi %  %  SIXTEENTH RAJ B.T.C Handkap ihrtlllng win by Gun-it* %  ">"*k ^ -' %  | still betwei %  ' 'hf % %  i % %  : %  %  place 3 !, Sstcucn it Q/M aqrriA # and ws'av. cJiod with KNEE PADS par pair ANKLE 81 PPOBTS—per pair SHORTS in White enlj will. HaMi. VV.list —pai REFEREE Wllisii BS—each FOOTBALL I'l Mi's PUMP AD iPTERSM ^ FOOTBALL LAt ES—eat li FOOTB 11complete with Bl, .DDBRfl each |!>.85 i U. $ui $UI (Wl SHEPHERD & <(>.. LTD. in. ii it a 13 BBOAD sntn After Uli •.•.--•.-.-.-.-.• 1 lei i lliii. I.I inn 1 lenftl DI i iw i uii i"" n %  till 'i %  Hurl. i length BAKBAIMI riml ''I" HAND1C \T -IM l375. $IU" I ,8 " I B.B.C. Progran YOU CAS T S'OP NOA %  •, ITS os.Y .zo'CuOC<-' f I Iba, DulclbeUi (Yvonet up. got ind led the Bald to tin' beginning of i Dulctbella nt of her %  il( length %  i FIFTEENTH RACE Spring Handicap SPEAKING OF ENRICHED BREAD ZEPHIRINS IIRtAD \ • r %  I.lit..i wll i )ing 1 1 and It night r the flrsl lime HI followed 3ui Quaen and SUvei Flu I let ll strung uui around the i %  .. %  %  p (ron third poalLOOK FOR I.I n\> -.in ii". i % %  i. Hun rtrti i' 11 l' in M i l.a-l lln.nl' i M 19 i II "..in • i li in VEKTKRDA1 in .?3 Im. I M.inlli I., li -I. i il .. II ,iiI %  mi.i i .Um 'I . I. MM" i .nil. I>IMI i '"" %  I IV Hill Hill I ll.lll I'l 4 III I I Ii. N || l I Wind \< im in ii mill !•• liniir II I" i" ..m i i ilpi H.M1 [They'll Do li I M'i-y Time uCANTSTaPNOW", POS1T1VE.VPAVN6 v a4VE3 %  join VOURPL-I'MJ THE EVE^ SS S .-JST S wv DEAR! 0-E OH 9E6u'. THi uPE OF THE ^ PARTV--E US A MCE. 39EAMV WALTZ NOW"NEW LINES! AT OUR HARVEST SALE EORGITO -II.IS IINOHAMS ked TAIRTAS IKIISKV SILKS A'l CoTi lie. 3Tc. 4 Tdc 11 MRBRUSHIS, Ld>. 0 c'.l. up H Wi ^ BEDT1CK 56" II.H KIUKI DRILLS QR1V FLANND 11.00. no • Ptd 'ItATEST VAR1BTV 'HITS THAN! BROS. Pr. Wm. Hy. St. 42 & 53 Sw.n Street rt new economical decoration W VLLS CEILINGS SISCOLIN DISTEMPER Covers in ono coat Supplied in Powder form in many o'tractive colon* WHITE, CREAM, BLUE, SUNSHINE, GREEN, WFTMade ready for use by mixing 2; pints water witb 5 H powder. 5 lb. packages at 90c. per package | WILKINSON k HAYNtS CO.. LTD. J Phone 4456 Hardwcw Dn* HIGH CLASS WOOLLENS WORSTEDS CASHMERES FOR MEN AND WOMEN AT C. B. KICK & Co. OF BOLTON LANE V



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PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE FM * V. MARC,, HAHBADOS^iAmtK^rE r. 1 .T^r^-—f—_ -i PtibUflbad by IK, AdnnH C LM., S* Broad It, %  r iiaiWwi Friday. March 10. 1950 Federation THK Report of the British Caribbean Standing Closer Association Committee (1948-49) is published to-day. It is a Report which should be studied mast carefully by everv West Indian for if Its recommendations are implemented the stream of West Indian life and thought will be radically altered. Those who read the Report will do well to bear in mind that the Committee was not set up to advise on the desirability of Federation—that was decided at Montego Bay in 1947—but to advise on those matters contained in Resolution 6 of the Monte^n Bay Conference. The two most important matters are the form of a federal constitution and federal judiciary and the means of financing the operation of all federal services. The Committee ha", however, given some consideraUon to benefit* which might •ccrue from Federation. The Committee begins with the asMirr.plmn that the "underlvmtc purpoiv* of our task i* to seek the shortest path towards a real political independence for the British peoplee of the region within the framework of the British Commonwealth." They record their recognition of amount Importance of economic stabilin and express their belief that the region will not achiev. i lability while it consists of a large number of quite separate political units The Committee continues "We may place on record our eon mphatlc view that Federation %  'Xwiable prospec! of eentevtnfl economic stability and through It that political independence which is our connect." The reasons which prompt the Committee to thia conclusion are not. however, dear end the Committee indeed add that Federation as such w .11 not solve the problem!of the region, but will provide the conditions in which they can be dealt %  rtt The Committee recommend that the scat of tin Federation which should be termed the "British % %  %  should be in Trinidad. The Federal Constitution envisaged by the Committee ie one In arnica the Units of the Federation will retain all pou i t,.,l n i n0 Federal Government—tht recommendation is in conformity with the first resolution of the Montego It If • there should be a i .earlv defined The legislature should be a bicameral body consisting of a Hoi Bt. The former to Ielected on Adult .-MfTrage and the latter to be Dominated i.. the to vimor-Gencral. The Prime Minister should be elected by th i urn amongst the members of that body, and together with the Council of State should be n*ix"iblc for the policy of the Government. The Draft ConitltuUon also makes provision for a Council of Stale which would perform the dunes | Tin in. mben of the 1 would be nominated partly i MlnMer an I parti %  [the< ouncll. Thr n HOUM of Assembly is regulated. The Senate should rU0IM and delaying power ]n respect of Money Mills the powers of the %  van more Unwed and Mom hen assented to | Ithout the %  Biped Of all other BULF the : twelve UK l ": rr. population bm attendant in itlon in the oilt. i. i i i noad an alloIn their word .I.in..ii<.. would get %  lu. 4 and the an it which would get one seat. I tin bouid have two seats .rm-h ihould have one Thia %  fled the Federal 11 to reflect the position of the territories as distinct I II,. ni with particular details ..f the sugg. %  %  en %  n man) too raaw with d recommandai %  wrttfc I .'iistiiutioii But on the unittea have i ,|S I hey have faced the ally, and In reconttna their I : faith in the peoplea Fedci. (of all our tn (preaoea the belief that it \u!l pi. %  hoijed that U i Our Reudvra Say: t umpuhorv t efaM ttfnM To the Editor, The AM 8a rt WM rat eatinj t. i mention '. .ussion %  %  Id it out [her government "fused to intiod i cduiatioli. %  oti show that it is really needed L) a comig of the three Rs but it is time that -Kould be sonic %  thered in i:. their I vulg.i.%  %  %  I' are a.l TheFederal Structure Chapter I—S.C.A.C. Reporl We start from the assumption that the main underlying purpose of our task is to seek the shortest path towards a real political ino^pendence f<>i the British peoples of the region, within i work of the British Commonwealth—what is meant in fact by "Dominion Status". We assume further that we have been charged with this task because there is general agreement that this object cannot be attained without some form of federal association between the territories concerned, but that with Federation its attainment becomes pi We are aware that in some circles there is a demand for full Independence, or for self-government. either in advance of or simultaneously with Fedeiation, on the basis of existing political units. While we reaffirm the view expressed at the Montego Bay Conference that the political development of the units mult be pursued as an aim in itself, welled that the sheer force of circumstances of the modern world makes independence on a unit basis a mirage Indcpen self-government as a Federation is however a practical possibility. and we have framed our with this specific objective In view This categorical statement requires elaboration. We do not imply any reflection on the poll tical capacity, or the public spirit of the peoples of the ten It they stand to-day. If we did. Wf should not be justified in putting forward a scheme for %  larfej political unit, which, together with the existing territorial political structures, cannot fail to make even greater demands on the political resources of the region than are made to-day. Our reasons for this view i %  Ida of economics, public finance and administration. but particular!. ICE, the basis of all the 11 financial Stability %  poUtteal independence unless it is based on stability which, in turn, must res; on a solid foundation of economic productivity—I.e., 00 U "national Income it Ii true thai i there are many states in the world to-day which are legally and independent: bit it can be %  aiarted that of men only those vfaicn can pay their way can really IKgaid to enjoy lull independence. From this DOil it does not matti taken by outside financial support Grants from United Kingdom public funds an familiar to this I tthej in tin grunt-aid with it< concomitant ol Treasury control of eetlmatee, or of grants under the Colonla. Development and Welfare Act Invol i on, t r o 1 tates. though noinin.iiiv independent, have l OttsM WOya, Of. by private banks or farina, and then h^toiy ghoWl that their leal, though n %  ndenci let form ol the overt nowledged reo %  merit to m The wa I Lb ;d bide. r %  III short, througl o nomic stabillt) %  rI solvei B th m do not mean %  : may be dona t" prodia i In Ui afidei range ol the good turned hare and In our via* ranch can and i hi aid 11 u would be toohafa to eyes to the fact that the Veal indies and the mainland territories live ba world tradt n aconomic stu vency are the naceaaai | lions for politu i ..it. proposal* t.attaining the latter must be judged, among other thlnga, by the extent t" which the) promote tin I 5 rest Indlea aconornically stable and solvent no* bacon* ling political basis, i.e. the basis i parativel ate pohtu ii ii"! can il .ui' and llatab 04 in the long run %  niwai >. and u p o n those anew i end in large propoaeli which we shall n i KqllHiiiinil> Taking the Brat ol lions, it u ina an that, vei the mg, public revenues ci l expenditure! .it the pre II that were a | turn the future could t" inirmtj) a nughi ards; but they are large ID relation to revenues and. what is mare important for present purposes, they could not easily or quickly be reduced substantially if revenues suddenly shrank. High Price* The temporarily healthy state of the public finances is in fact attributable to other factors than any basic increase in vhe taxable capacity of the region. These factors include, first the comparatively high prices till lately prevailing for the exports of the region, and to such other sources of overseas %  wartime expenditures by His Majesty's Government nnd the United States Government. nines are reflected in highet direct taxability in the region itself, and indirectly in larffM imports which, at present high prices, mean large ad valorem customs revenues. It is obviJUS that any important recession •i the Value of the region's exports could have a profound and harmful effect alike on the private ini the public finances of the region as a whole. Signs are ng in the world at large that commodity prices may be on this is a matter of the ..mrtcance for this region, even although there seems no present reason to expect a disastrous slump. Should there be an important recession, the consequences for the economy of the region would be serious, unless Steps were taken to mitigate them by means of special arrangements with His Majesty's Governmnet. To recognise the realities of the i '.nomic status of the regkm is not an admission of pessimism. On the contrary, we feel that the time has come for a firm and courageous approach 1* the oblcms which undoubtedly exist. nscious that, unsuspected discoveries apart, this is not to be reckoned among the richly enireaa of the world. We levertheless feel sure that in an ge which h;is seen such substantial advances in the natural sciences, and where further adaxticulaTiy in biology! and b] .implications to agriculture, nay be confidently expected. means can be and are being found which can. provide a reasonable itandard of living to all those in n who ue prepared to earn it This result will not come about easily, and we recognise not-too-abundant resources of the region will require v fertilised with brafns, skill and hard work. This can unvided alne poUtfa el and adminof the region .ire such as to enable modern knowledge to be particularly and confidently applied Where it ll moat needed, and to ensure thai value Ii received foi fcco nun lie Weakness* !" .i queaiion hi b whether there are possibilities that the economic weakness. n IHremedied within the existing political framework i.e 00 .. "territorial" rather than a basis. In other words. can the existing units, or any of them, hope to achieve a sufficient economic it in to attain i it independence of outside aid and so the possibility of i hint from formal political nniepciiiieik. Having renrd hi then Datura! limitations, the inawar far raany of the individual territories must be in the Bon I of the units particularly i' Hies, have no evident proepect, •> unit*, of moving vnrj far from the margin of subsistence in public ananca; .uid, while that is so, gen I must remain unrealised and its pursuit, an > doomed to failure end truatratlon No one unit is largo enough, o rich enough, to be able tain by It %  of scientists and otheri to whom, as wi have suggested above, the region must look tm ;i real improvement I %  tabUity. Kuiiiu of independent units, the Mint action in external i nd related becomes on and re important, is renv and difficult ch teas, effective than it should be much more 10 i kn it ne ce a Of the few on whw h there i (ah %  unanimity. We are sal stability while ll congtata of a tmbai ol quiu tti.it the h OpM Of such unit* of even be aigi.ttt thai little nee rlher ence. as such, are slight K ltlcal supnrat the m Of • %  Feitei.il constitutioli lauon the picture is not so reassuring In the itisi pianii leveral ti it nraaai of grant This said, we may place on record our considered and emphatic >. hi atlnn and onta H leasonable %  %  Ad through it that pol paasloraN wfiatll u our to require It. Borne others mai al MMhmt objacl We have chosen Seeondi>. than Ii acara toij. even among the largest, whose linances do not | cauae tot might not, as a n unprecedented misforbc inought to inTlUrab there is a basic mstjbilit> about even the present the public lin.tn. I verj lubetai tter lhar %  L, ".' region, in relation to numbers e that in this region > u in the world I has suffered a temporaltion upon which i %  less so For reasons in ,btantial inWi claim lhat Federation will immed. solve the .did rtscal problems of :. oi that it cannot fall laim that it will put in the hands of men responsible to the region u a uhole. powers and irtlculart) In rathe place ot the region in world trade, which do B h these men according t ai and inclinations can'use for the betterment of the region Fed* such will but will pi which they can be deal; iwth Cessgg To r.xlst We desire ^r m i %  Elaspoaftton I thai Irnrrw eetablfgtin \ I \ist. Conversely pnaar to hold I tl goesiit will not help i 1 because %  propnate j laponsibUI tics which did not exist before These two apparently contradictory views are thu< elO* that they rc^t on the fallacy lhat results are or should be achieved by adjustments of political and jidrmnistiLi'. chinery, instead of by the effort.' of men who may be helped or hindered by the machinery but w!io mnot thereby be absolved from effort. Federation will not ablolve the region from the necessity for physical and mental ai d moral effort—it may. if successful, help that effort to issue in greater productivity, curity and higher standards Ol living, than can the same effort exercised within the present political framework. Briefly, the services that Federcion can render, and wbien be adequately rendered in no other way, :an be summarised as prompt, effective action in th" economic field on behalf of the region i n % %  < la, There is .i l&mant rtecessity for some single agency which can speak and a.*t with authority, full knowledge, and at short notice, for the region in a wide ticid of of which trade negotiations are inly the mest prominent example. This necessitates an agency which can act in its own right, and nnt by delegation from other agencies and subject to their conflrmatm.i. This in turn requires a fully representative deliberative organisation from which to derive the necessary auth. say. a legislature in which Hw directly elected representatives ol the people of the region have a preponderant voice. Restatement We are conscious that much -f the foregoing is a restatement of .icady accepted, and tha*. strictly sneaking, it la no; Incnnv bent upon us to argue the pros and cons | %  > But have in our deliberations had an unusual opportunity of d the matter in much grt tail than was possible at UV Montego Ba> Conference, or in the discussions in the varlou' legislatures of the recommendations of that Conference; and we feel that there is ad... setting out at length some of the basic considerations which have largely guided us in our more detailed recommendations In sumbelieve that | merit of nutcpeiuienee within "ie British Commonwealth is thi legitimate political obj< the region 9 itate hai •> real as distinct from a purely formal U> I ly to the extent of Its Independence of external financial aasastance, it m eaaar that the of the region must be unproved as rapidly ai possible, ll is out considered iiidgment that UUl can only be done by lettin up I lederal eovernrnent and enl istin to It in %  ti responsibihties particularly, nough not exclusively, in the i I Meld The lei'i.uiuier of this Part of our Iteport consists of the ap t these principles to Federal Constitution within the tramcwoik of which the Bfatai men of the ie*;ioii will oppoituniiy of kaadlng pi Ciovernmenl Functions As in our osfltberati %  :n our ronoai it li ap propruite to deal at an l with tha functions wl I era! Qovernnaant ihould parform and its relations with territorial Wi UU-t with the mandate ot Montego Bay that Federal Conatttutlon should follow item of that of tt of Auatraii ,: QovefBa] I have only such powers made ovm that ail others the reeldual should ran aitfa the lerriti It is not thareJ proceed 00 BI basu but we wish to record lhat our discussions have an fu nml to us the wisdom of that %  %  .i .;,> or all-bracing a Fedtnii aicMj region But we foal that the aaogxaphlea] factor is apt to be overstressed, and that it will beimportance as communication and become less costly Kven i '\s it is far less tl rurning to ea* fullj repraaantatlve Mthering in %  ... m I7t1 i North Ana I meeting %  %  of railways. More important reasons, at this stage, for the AuatraUan pattern and to a rel.itively limited lift ol runctiona, are and economic diversity of the legion, and the strength of local poUUcal and other trad::; only the imw.uy OUtaldWr who will venture to dogm.ttise about Barfan I b Jamaica, or about British Honduras on the HrD KitU or theea local lightly cast aside They form a valuable bond among the DM man; %  ,((.lllllt> is .,HI The reg human rvsoi we can people together In local pride and self-respect. One If bj I a good Vlnoantian One point perhp 0 i flcation and emphasis, as It some times appears that there and misgiving about It I i %  actions ere i a Taw Winbrn i powers enreaa In so far a* they sp*ciftcaU> eurUnification Of Public Services THR UNIFICATION of the public sCTVlOl aspect of the closer association of the British West j Indian colonies. The history of the question of closer union is set out at length in Chapter XVIII i of the West India Royal Commission Report (Cmd., 6607), and mon Ing paragraphs of the Report of nference (Cmd. 7291i The former t tain rec \ DIVIDED In these regulations, public offlcea are divided into three class,Clam I includes all offices in Colonial Unified Servicee: Claaa II includes all other .'.ii initial emolument! of not leaa th.m III includes all other offices : with initinl emoluments of less than O00 a year The Secretary of State reserves to himself the right to select candidates for all vacancies In Cla and II, though In reporting vacancies in these sscs Q> |tM to fill • ra ma* themselves fill all vacancies occurring In Clan Mi, subject to any special directions which may nave been given by the Secretary of State In paragraph 7 of his draft despatch, the s;ate says that he appreciates "that Colonial Governments would probablv be reluctant to surrender tt* Uoo and posting to a regional authority.' 1 In the light of this coned our rvcommedations for lulflcaUon to thoae eepect of which the advantages to be derived from unification, from the points of view both of the efficiency of the service and the opportunities foi ."Iv.mcement of offi%  bility. cannot be gainsaid even bv those oeed to the transfer of :s Inherent In unification In order that any service should be regarded as %  nnronrlate for unification it is. In our opinion that four condition! should be satisfied In the Hist place, the service should be one which nant, if not ;ill. of the colonies. This i' ut. .nice the unification of presupposes that the ocuy, the service should can in which normally look to ad0) in that service and in DO Othei ELABORATION This point calls for some elaboration. In the course of our Inveatigi one across cerrirtments the officers in which are eligible tor promotion either in their own department or in another department the work of which is of an analogous character. Thus in some coknie ure of intercha ruch denta as Audit, Accountant-General, and Insuch conditions obtail ficauon would not be dW ample, that the audit it WOUld aMe to expect the POP. iinission to La vfng in %  ll that might accrue from unification W0 be more than offset by the withdrawal of oppoaumtles for inter-departmental tranafen within 'he Thirdly, the service should be one in whlcb %  tent are %  uivalent standard. In mater of an officer from one colony to another acceptable to the receiving coisential that, in so far as post! calling flllional or technical qualification! are con.msferred should, apart from my question of merit or senioi ity, possess qualifito those looked for in the re* olony. Fourthly, the service should be one which otters opportunities for advancement from Ie to another In adopting this criterion. have had regard to the fact that, as we see it. from one colony to another will usually from one grade to another. k Ii carry \> uh them increased emoluments This is not. v think, an unreasonable assumption, since i new colony are to make it unlikely that the Publf 9 r unless there untervaiUng financial r.dvan* NOW RIPE In the light i r thai ihe foin — Ad%  L*** 1 %  ice, Postal, and Prisons In reconu. •awhng theea services for unlflcalion i njMUlLg the unification of all -minister then. la paragraph 10 of hi! drart despatch, that the subordinate poets can at present best be organised on I ind that the unl the com%  recruitoasis, it %  ly-paid eaaaan ofttatr tor. leawsaaBaaai the tar limited to md pcucr ; • to the p": D. V. SCOTT TO-DAYS SPF ACSTKAI.IAN CREAM OF WHEAT-J Usually II NOW 4 8 -" MeSWANS RED I'sually 2ft We havr IUIIMMIM FOR YOUR GARDEN HOSE %  '." and ', HOSE NOZZLES & SI'KAVlKs HOSE COUPLINGS & MENDERS HOSE CLAMPS V & V % BIB COCKS •-.' %  & '," wi.hl„i, in GARDEN FORKS & TROVTBU ROSE TREE PRUNERS SECATEURS TREE PRUNERS GARDEN POTS from 4c. to 80c. VEGETABLE GARDEN MAMRK WILKINSON & HAWKS CO.. LTD., Suc PU D*(r b



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I. fKH' lV MARCH III, 1950 Bridgetown Deserted Yesterday 1RII*' 1 )v If An" _lr midday yester" Stoi ?£jar because "' lnp "" l^a few people, who did not | ^, uic Hoc-inn. and ^bff "I personnel from the %  %  US '(JUSKOW" eould be seer F?^,. aroun,; in* town. p^fcjn after 3 o'clock, bus loat ^tHiS load could be seen goinj ^e direction of the Garrison shortly af,er two ' cloc h ^eo shower fell but Ibl Sel for about three quartern of -Thour. after tnis (lark clouds During Wednesday and up tr 1 o'clock yesterday morn.: J^J showers fell throughout tin -ad. but the total —opic,! was only 61 parts. ^OPMNO TOOTOBI Ij in thnr regular Fridaj the lora Itish Council wil datura under ilu Jie The Voice of Poetry." %  p. is will consist or readings ol „i; known poems by those ran tpmguished tlgures of the Bogjfe stage—Edith Evans and Johi Ot.lT-.' The incidental and inteaiud JKJIC will be laken from thi rts of Frederick Del Jus. r E RIGHT rear .and fron %  nders of a motor car and :h aar fender of a bicycle WW taMCed and a cart extensive! Staged when an accident oe Igand at Hothersal Turning a ate; 630 p.m. on T l< Margaret Brewster, who was s l^arnger on the cart, was Injured .-u!ve:| the motoi I and driven b Wood or St. Bernard 1. Joseph. and ridden by Vim-en ng of Browne*l Village, St %  jr. and a donkey drawn car fared and driven by Oliver Wooi Wjackmans. St Michael. Parking Case Appeal Allowed By W.I. Court HAKIt.ADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE Retrial Ordered In Skin VEriTZ !^ DIAN COURT 0F APPFAI 1 SLSS5LS Cabbages, Tomutoes In i rood Supply Local farmers are conccntr.it inn .nchen gardens. Tht) market for their products. %  mporttnee ascertain with ei ;sion the period m of legislative enaet- 'r quami.'.es at 30 cents "err ,irx* isfttit onfornuni with .he louiid Durinj Ihe whole mt talon I ""' market sellers and lhose about in* alt '" !" *A ,.l the ilou ndlcated think, M In III hal I •kail be dtupprovrd ,.t Hal be enforced. Clifford Skinner appeal ai ""• ""ding, „, ., Son "',"a! TcZTZ, ^ T ca M h eco Ur ,, .eedil ( ihe process of %  "*• tebete and tf necessary Me floor of the Assemithout recourse to the %  chief which n premature end %  utctnatti th constitutional methods business ,-ncludiriK the business or pasing *e"a oetonihe Qovem"' 1 ^ D u, JT menl wos mW"i do not lapse In the and disobedience oi n actual performance ..r their u nugatory. The duties to %  I re common II i-ivili/ed l| ;'"^ ""'.'•."." %  '• ineludtoi 'i I*J Mas i waj ihe appei oados Police tan. Court dismissed an appaal UCJ £ ASm a ^Cr, a o'r Appe"! SSLSS %  *.• %  rl while ago c u.umbers and seasoning ;*re • iiiuiilh'* addition to the owns supply There Is a dearth In areen bananas. One seller told M "AdTDcat*vesterdav that pore la to be sained from tho banana sold when ripe. B.W.LA. Board Weefs In Trinidad 'C'.iistotliaii' Brought Whiskey, Wine Whisky, be. r %  i.'ormng The Portland cement', pharmaor motoi Ltd Mr. J. w Booth. Deputv Chair£*"•' B=itlh Overseas An u, I whuh Murt had conilrme^i' ??^ di rectorj nt manwch < oendaB w IA il .S-^ DI,frtor "' (W T;m,dfd i; lc pecled l0 rnv '' ''' idad today accompanied by %  proVaBoni inch < %  moved the Court ^: !" ''ri" ; t SIS,;"' fi? fine Abr Bodily Harm A line r I paid in 14 ,lavs or one n Villane ,, %  ll. bu.hu Cadoitan on Aim Appeal has ordered relrlaT'oi tl'u*f ver "' material respecu Irom th. Skmner-Ciike case. There was no ^""""" prov.sions ..:.,. %  > %  - aa to costs The Sonnlera12 rc< "" rM : .oiistrue. the Doorly case Is to be ml bark u, ". •'"' PoU Kadnrata Z ,„ „ •" "> a almllar conclu... and determined according to law — me "" ln antl li> appraband Uul such re, '"^utes. c'ommaiuUv ADS Mmlliere In this urder as to costs. The Curt The west Indian Court Appaal i femur sir Cecil •tonM-Smiin, prow enti. sir Newnham A Work htcielon which it reached, but 1 feel neither islafUre in Barbados need have causf m undei lid ever be Ign Impunlt) The means ot end these are ample end I the pur>'Ne lett Uindon on Ihe Imii Fe..whi?„ "' BO A U< n^„ b f* n m kl "K %  tour BO.A.C.'s Smith Amen. Fmie;.' amM .i at Jackn i\ H-ndMiLiiy itnad at abou |H p.m. on Monday between motor lorry owni'd by C. Sprmuet rfHindsbury Road and the mot-r tar M-430. owned and driven b? ( %  bed Cordeau of School Gap %  BTsoury Road lit front end rear door ii cere extensively lniH! Six rails from th' %  lisade of the house of Keiiturn' lttTer-\ situated near 11 %  idem, arere damaged, A NOTHER ACCIDENT occurrc. on Sargeanti Village Roa lit about 7.00 a.m. on We htawi the motor lorry X 37!) bv RewtOtl Plantation ID by Gladstone Butcher o ', St. PhiUp. end a v;ii by the Barbados Teblphom driven bv I^on KIIIK (K its VlUage. The right fenders -if the tiftt front fendei "I ihe lorr> iw damaged. Ml vc i.i. nonging to Hen J der^on Springer of Pounder? CJ, Wwlbury Road was damage* B in accident on Whites Alley Mr Jimes Street, at al Ml on Wednesday. Alio involved was a mule drawn wt owned and driv< *hbonw Payne of Third pwum rCLES i at ine corner d after It became In %  accident with n put I'lanUtlon Ltd., i ii> I'ercival Goodinj! New Orleans. Thbac.i,, JM at about 2 IS \ %  ewiay. The van waa !" Church. i s tCCIDKNT occurn x ,. si Michael tie owned ani by Adolphui OreietM o Hall. St. Lucy, and %  38 "O the text id us enacti irnuortmit to exan. I reasons 1 con* tion* from the text ol the British v,,, *' r that thi i ta now ISIUIIS which i. ; '" '* directory tllon. end ;,lld not !" nd *h3ty 1 ;md that the •onsider wlu-thei I a d si r "cN !" :;,:^„;,,:'';';.. : .,.,.,., na l irln la. Tl„. orders toward Th„ Judnnant ot ma p-aidani in the Si.iin.-cr-Doon. .,,, was read by His Ion ,M,' 1 mportanca lor. Those'fthe'Z !" -o ..,';. rtwoJudv %  Artln'ifn.^.. 11 !,' S' Wllli I KM. S, JZ.„ "' 1': approval ot the legislature The (Sad.) C. FURNESS-SMTH. w „ ,Li!K 1 *? b ""' ""' Wswiuenl Trinidad and W r?;* ?Tl *'. I "" v ' l W '"' tagWklura m (Pre. w. w^ HeeeeKX. associaie,i „iih lt daai thai the, an lo be ilrancker 'u .^' ri ' n s,r,K IM l,v Jeemed to hnve I Messrs. Hutchinson and Banllrld tin,,. The total nnces nf most Colonies provide Appeared for the respondent. ,U„,,; L, : . BAFA HeettTodoy When Wdl Football Season Start? ReeceKr^SoUHt.^^ '..,,,,.? L!", ,"L rh '."'" „l,:mo. Anmicu, x, \. -" 5 ollcllor %  • %  -'llnrlndo, Tnterpretation Act lit Pooth.ll .\v,i a ii,, Miss M. B Bourn, ,i hr mnt „,„ lim .. !" -i!"!l Me';',"e';";' Mr""-" 1 ,, z T "' c i • P* '' *r. G. B. ft th iwulall :,„ .,, „„. Y M \ "•" h v "j. K """ "Peratlon as so,.:, ,,. M. S-'i ,' V '.. .. w ? lcn Kl %  "Ot when Ule %  lor the ItMD Season will In Ui Mi .1 s II Daai and made than or tvhen % % %  %  %  publlanad and Boycr. ourposes c,f %  %  II A t A ixilnt to note Is ii, lure hai provided intermediate :tl %  machlnarv for ebieldni the recnHISO Football Season, tations. I am dispose' ,o inter Judunienl The Judgment of Die : follows:— *2L\?,E courT'oXo^: 5=K ~ "Glasgow" Dvfoat College 6-1 %  lion 7 of the Motor Vehlclea and Road Trainc Act, I when the i: is aliened to have committed ->n offence under them, no longer in ton i the fact that the requirements ol • i not been fully compiled with. The ree. i are contained In tub eecUon (2) of the 1 %  all ran ompend with the as the BarbedrOe provfaioni and British pn %  %  requireare In the following terms ment thai Ihe rOfpllatloni shall be "All Mich reKulatioiu Shall forthwith he reported by the Dim tor to (he Governor for his d their suitability, th lesdalature was conten! this to the amitlnv ol %  l; frmn lh( ernor and Mi further providing for lb sequent approval it mtonde.1 to Match at the College live expreeatori lo %  i right win-. mainlng two goals for the Mavj edb lobeo theli instdi left, TI.. %  Mope D all II \noiher Variation Another notable variation in the ibmltted room for doubt rSSSSSS CeommoewealthPla, be '.uliiiuttn.j for the approval i^half .. if ihe respondent thai .ri beta IIOUHI-V ot the UKiaia.,,,(, K reaoluUor ture tnil it not approved shall t<> the practice "f Uh eeaw to be legaiaMiM ffaai leglsutare, be moved by a the date of their disapproval, member in charge of government but the nonappro\.tl shall not business In the House, and that affri-t u>thing done or suffered tins l| the Anal step ami under the re XU Ulioiu. between crnment must take to Rive pertheir (online into force and their rejection bv the Leisla lure •• ool taken The'regulations were made by *",hin the time prescribed then. -„ on the 12th February. ,s ar ued the regulations be, received the g •he 10th April. lMfl I plaint alleged an offencej-omnnt, lf lnc ()1 , Last Match Toda> HOMMAY. March t %  i mer LanCMBhlra and England > ii ''ill i" 1 b" the Comn tour of India. % %  match agaJ %  The touring team, win iiig managed by Dink n toda) front for tomon .vhioh has Indian much Crick< ted on the 7th June, IMS. but on ( nrci ,„ ;(,,. contention, and it provincial charities. that date the regulations had I lose consideration, idnutted for approval Ol though It was not on thl the legislature although H : the Court ol < a the date ence lot! other tl; aaoluuonol approval II thai II ,B-,.J.A .Jn..triJ.li IIIUIII It ....... %  tune Flir it Comimm.M JIIII %  \ ... . % %  In.' Oevemer's \i Singh, tin du i it Deodl I flu, R M .li. .s W SoAddphla Constant ot *"<'• although a great Road. St Michael I loft arm was slightly "*K of unknown origin htoke out at LowtiM t ahout 9.05 p.m. on TuesgJ destroyed 11 acre* of first ^ea, The c aines were ire the property ol Q s HU)\E8DAY at ah Are of unknown origin ^'out at Small Ridge Planta, JJ^. Christ Church insured. T' '-ornmeal Arrives %  (th 1 S70 bags of Barbados \esterda> n Dutch steamship ^ailed from Tnnial which K :istributed to authcritaUn ni) dene, did the legislature Inr n Singh i *nd. although a great variety (end revoc ation. <.r be vpression has been cmj|nei purpoMt 1L i nts of the ^ doacl In da U Clng lom which are afford Parliament ay public earlv npporlunity of approving oi mischief is to be •SQUdlating subordinatM otheriHiu none has been found in wi take mtZttmm .^.. 11E tn th.it which *-' icUon n lime, and next whetht nowhavrtoconsir^ The nearII n •" %  now haxe to comirue ine (1 est perhaps is ^^'^.J"^ be precisely ascertained In n of lalley vtnimunMi ,,Q.B„p. n. l/mrlgar, M R I V I. M.,ii,irkai Rruler. 2vFor \\ oiiinliilji lllfflth of Fan: %  ceea dins) i I oin eaaed by the wio> isions. ano ])c covcred h> these are in the followma termll(i]i rule rrudr in pursu*n* ,..i of the linrt schedule im Uil Ad ,„ That the legi-. shall be forthwith laid befor* ; ,, boih llouaes of Parliament. II machiner) under the A 1-^i-liament be sUUnc. or if ni ihen -ithin ihrre weeks iMtl %  approved M b e.tlirr I ou U ( Parliament wiUun one mn nould be fler the same | srlD meet thnu in l m'.^ Pa V lhf,ni ; ion, : '"' HOB H A Ouke, nil I ow,^" rU,dos nwotbei B.W.I.A. Uirectorate. uili arrive March. Dl S n J I Trinidad Mr. Booth and Mr. QranvtUe rrill haw an ctpportunlty t .t vitUlng % %  A new word rUrco and pen offices ... Alrv aya Port-of-Spain Krrol dus III take place on Monday, and the following Director) tll be presentMr J W Booth. The Hon. Alan Nlorry. l> i II. O. B. Woodina. Kl '. Ihe Hon. ||. \. rukr "HI li ( i r \. D v Murray. The Chairman and Din it w : A %  .: %  ,: in honour of the gut-' Country Club on Saturday, nth and the Chairman wil %  !3th. A Bnt] Da] To-day looks hke bell day for B.W.I.A. Besides %  i Vlctoen vUlnga which m rive This VTklng left London on the -HI od I s being down aoroi the South Atlantii by Captain n P Kelpiiot On ihe rnonuhg ol Ihe Mih Mi Mi QrnnvlUi ponied n> the Managing Direct<>.-, will leave for Jamaica <>n B W.LA.N 3!M service which flies ia Caracas and Curacao. On the | will be makir ill and proving Might I recent Aeronautics Hoard Ol the UnlteO : %  will ! %  !'. V. uHWi.il-. and mill will %  : | public) "ii the way to Miami Ot %  A fly b) way o( King) ConunanoV i proban'> join the %  Ircrafl al Kingston %  .i II |ournt) Mr Bo day. the 16th atarch, and wll return t> %  waj %  Nassau an it Sealand '•R.M.A. St. Vino %  %  Chained \\ iih Theft: Romauded Lionel chaifeur, of Keu ; terday chgn snip Mi K \ valued at $4.00 of T C. Maud (i %  DRINK CLAYTON'S KOLA TONIC •Lady y<>tson'* Brings Flour i ..-. t ii.iM* i; floui kvtre lan< i Bai badoa from Hi HI %  • %  "Lady Nelson'* which sailed into Carlisle May al dttyhreak. Neck hum's. MUeagt .gn. margarine wraps, machiner] %  from Halifax Prom ft the British NortlM %  | material, ml i freah h \ttei ports on ita VOJ "l^idy Nelson" left port \u> ght about 9 o'clock fOI St Vln. a Maasn Oscdlnei Lt.l are ... 25 YEARS AGO i Barhadoo Advoeate," M-i.n || I t& III! Ills, ,\ gftl oi |M \S | DBAS BOliv On Sunday morning K1> of )>abe wiu L M| H-; Bt Philip It was removed to tht i*niiip> Mam InniMBt was he•tr H I %  jury Dr L s r, : formed the autopsy. a aa .V.V.W %  _a_B_B_B. GOAT CHOW n hagbj their touni one* on CALF STARTENA IMalaaMafl 11 IAMM IIIMMI..I.U. .V.V.-.V.VB When buller is scarce or expensive REMEMBER ^V$% ORANGE & GRAPEFRUIT MARMALADES Hach = / GUAVA JELLIES •! PEANUT BUTTER & 9mfl CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11. 12 & 13 Broud Street I. . Il.aa i ison A in.. (Bdos.) Ltd. Have pleasuie m Announcing that they have been appointed SOII LOCAL IMMItllll IOIIS OF THE WORLD FAMOUS I III MIILIt 11 # %  //"s limst I iffltFully Ktf ipfftl ami, It. %  mil/ l-i,iI li,, ll,,„,I ONLY S77.49 Full Range of Other Sizea and Modela Expected Shortly Harrison's FOR III >HH IIS



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^r nuD-vy. BARBADOS ADVOCATE Report Of Standing Closer •<-in hi, „„ WHoll eo of Hi doing,"! eeSi ,n PACE SEVEN Association Committee From rag* savftsraaii ultimate control uf Minister hunsrll. UH Wc h.d Oownuntnl by the electorate i. ary loyalty is 110I ,„ h, m ,, u ,„ I5U? "^ "' <"uion with according to British practice and lhe Aasemblv. This system con :.om these territories, experience, best preserved by the lead, and his in w constitul h., k !" !Jf* ' "" ucn ta ?', vice ' """" ngt U Ultion. led. 10 i RUM undesirable ff—• ,al the lurks and Caicos Islands l" 21 ln effect chooses, and can lack of effective unanimity in the Commit ta< •MIDI to !" re no! """ content with, but '"intmcnf to Executiv. t-Z.J. -mxious to retain, their ucc.nl rhange from. Irom iJwfrii i withholdim support Executive, which of all taints imappoin-menuto Executive Colinanx "' us %  retain, their present IJ !" "V 1 PfPeW""' clement in pedes efficient government. It is %  toun association with jmue, and ?*, f""" 1 "'""' 'n Great atl!l open 10 .1 Minister, should he d 'hat Senators !" uld * tl=ned as to be recrcS"Si? '?.' E" 011 !" ls Hia find himself at variance with his W for terni 3 senlM "> Federation through J^gK! aSTwEHS ""l.""?* colle.,ues. to resi„ and put his ",„ "' ve veary at Jamaica. As to the British Vimn ,„ %  .s "' """"" %  who depo.nl of view to the Assemblv Bt* t„ islands, we Mlhered tha 2 22. „"".. 55"*^, •'""horlty should it there lind sufflcient sup)r-oeneral of the Federadoes exercise control over the Uon of the Cabinet grouD policy of the Government by virtue of its power to pus State Council or refuse bills to carry out Six seats remain to be filled in thai policy, and particularly State Council of fourteen li by its power to vote or withhold may be that in its initial stage %  %  %  %  with which the latter at lmanciai supplies. By the use of U ' necessary to have an official mmeod that Scnam !" p,wenl dealsThe observer from -!* 0 p ?^ tf ^" the Leg*****"-"* can clement in the Council of State tha s amo saline! the Brili5h VMB Islands was ,*" T Hl al ,! he poUcy and P rac Bu w ""wder that in the Fed%  un 1 Iil ^ 5 ,h,.m P T' ^xious that some member of -he lhe Governm, n t H under eral constitution a stage has been Hou ^nate should b^chTrg^with -he KJiSl "Tf? 1 **""*• Wi ^ Ut T"^ when P*on should %  ;; duty of lookuwlatter British r^Lr Ml i assumin ^rect *' tfven to the view that officials %  salary shm,l,i i Virgin Islands mler^ta^\h, res ,P n lbll 1 ,t >' f more than the must properly be regai, ESS? theS\h?M L ,1 \ a urr nnd > m Posi"on *>' ,,ZrJ:i; h f CMe Administration; that the British UOO hj detailed acts far as it may be required to not proTlffta Uaadi ihoiud be able to"' Government. Such questionassist the Council in the^dischWe Igurea should look to the Federal Government '00k to the uI n of ten y^ar. tion. i^ fid* Gover^o.^en 1 'ntnend that the Consti D"" 0 !^V 1 1 ln r**Pect of the "1 Provide :ha^t B ntilh V rgin Islands ^* * 1 elect 1U own Prt^ P laC 0f "* Governor of the Resident frmn Ueward IUnas in regard to all %  mbershiu matters with which the latter 'TiimitlonH .K,4 Efrom rwnnlun .-iioulti BAV an overriding power to legislate (vide Chapter 5. paragraph 78). This is necessary to ensure to His Maiesty in Council the power to make hi legislative function eS (b) Certain other function* which are listed in Note A at lue end t the Consolidated Recommend., t Appendix V The reason why certain of these tin should be exercised in the discretion of the GovcmorOWnl are discussed elsewhere in this report when the particular topics are dealt with; in other cases the context of the C dated Recommendations any matter I i) arising under this Constitution, or involving its interpretation; I U) ..rising under any laws maae by the Parliament; (in) of Admiralty and maritime jurisdiction. lation. ^P^vePower. 0 the important Supreme Court of the WiSwnrri ot me,r d *P*ndence on the Legto be necessarv to ipedfy which %  liewar^ i.?IS ? dward '^turc for their continued existofficials should lhC Senate 1? i eward Islands or by n to Hc^lation. The norotner Gourt which may be crealcri %  Islands Federal Government thai m P rac ce show themselves most the British Virgin Islands should *f, n ll v< \ to thc V,CW8 ot lhc Leontinue to be served bv the .it this point unnecessary. Federal Public Service There is out tespect in which we recommend a reneri i .-rcuonary power which does not fall within the above categoric* — respect of lhe federal public service. Us inclusion among the reserve powers constitute* simply a convenient way of adaptlog to the constitutional circumstances of the region lhe weli'Stablished and extremely import of its responsibilities, and not __ any assumption that oftki the Ix^ward Ureai Britain, and Governments trol of policy is required An example of the kind of assistant | r act ice of keeping the required Is that of a Law Officer. d0 il igement of tha in of the public service from mlng a matter of politi. exist"meals should t>e appointed to troversy By this we do n. I | tioU| present arrangements should concan count upon UM support of the shall b appointed e submission to tha ''P uv :is tr ards lh circulation Legislature or. if that proves im tion 76 of the COaBBMOWtaith remaining the responsibility of <>f Australia Constitution conunit Governments mght, or might stitutes a useful precedent not. be unified, as may be decided for consideration:— in ** c *> ca The establishment 76. The Parliament may of Federation doea not automaticmake laws conferring original ", b fi n aboul *** unification of jurisdiction on the High Court 'f !" 1 ?*" or "T* flect *• n !" v m.ti^r t rm and condition* of any bu. those who are directly employed by the Federal Government. The influence of Federation on "nonfederal" services may however be considerable and beneficial, as we shall point out later. Public Service Commission We have pointed out above that relating to the same tor the reasons there stated the subject-matter claimed power to appoint, promote, disunder the laws of differ• iplinc and regulate the work of Cast States the public service should real with Within the Held of original ,n Governor-General. If that is accepted, it is clear that there is a need for some means by which the Governor-General may be assisted in the discharge of his powers ovaV the public service, not only that the best decisions may be taken on service, matters ) defining the jurisdiction < which are often exceedingly oi any federal court complex and technical) but also in other than the Federal order that members of the service, supreme Court; and the public, may be satisfied tog 'he extent to that such decisions are taken in which the jurisdiction of the light of disinterested advice. i ral court shall l ""' these reasons, we cordially makes detailed explanation jurisdiction as described in para graph 4 above, the federal !r;i lature should (on thc model ol Section 77 of the Commonwealth Of Australia Constitution) have owcr ( nake laws — 4 that to or is But to ensure the British possible, fresh clecgjons can be A corollary oi Houn of'AsVirgin islands. We gathered from held at'any' ume'w'obtain a"cleaT ?.' Uncial" itpmuttoaoti UM SSK-? SSLF? and in accordance with thc Cayman Islands observers th:.t expression of the views of the ^^""'^ 'Slate is that, unless the tUtlonal prac' he constitu. %  %  111 'that ic Bills containing ments were made I %  %  u> be %  nurtisterlal .md administrative responsibihUes. .MI undue and almosl ', insupportable burden will fall m upon officials in the Counonly clause, deautofTwitt manVtVleTireeUv 'i i" lvI ^ r > ^e CiovernoV^en">; would ll* required Npc-ndituro in the Federal t^adauVuiri Takm. eral r 1 1K ; ' hv Kteeutive and P lain the departmental views on mav only he Uat ^fint lirX? S Jht5 -IP^nted by him. just as in Great a range < • than it is c In the House if !•.L *L i. Britain thc Prime Minister and "•M""** lot one or two men notion o T5L s >' m,K,,h >^ wllh ; he K P in j OtbSf memberof the C.bmct are g '^ I in addition "" motion of of view expressed, we felt bound .ppointed b> and advise His l \heir substant:. ,-„„„ to conclude that the provisions Majesty the King. Such appointwou ld in our view be more cone !" ,n n ? * tomorrow. It U lonev liilU f gardin re '' 1 o^ ments by thc Governor-General, sona t with the development of ''ajto^. %  retlvUr! |n ^^ R *P rt snould sUnd "> d would not bOWeVW DO In his responsible government if mem**}?*> and politics out of the V\ *.!!,^ arrt ,,5 3 _ 0O0 l *^ a nn u,n .. ,or ' l urse be able to ae.ep, or re %  ""•"* ,,m that no scats in either Chamlmabsolute discretion, anv mnn. bers of the Cabinet croun wenSenate' tion UOO that a Rill % %  .i %  to In the legislative body of that D< '" current major issuet. pendency were unanimously of w<1 etter ;.ble to put promotions and discipline. ..nd thai forward in the Legislature the eertain Urj policies with the framing of which matter of legislation aiTcctim; 'he they had already I wen associate vice. It ma> bi ctitioners duty which would otherwise out that this provision > | For these reasons %  ,ne erms ottered to them, propoai re in this thc nRp of retirement for Judges eluding particularly the liability Report the estabiishmeni (Ineludln hould either he higher he mibl Mould %  to those %  Is outatandini to be iMwte-i anywhere in thc region but special provision will BUlr.the "lands and the Cayman Islands bers of the Council of State should tend to be too ; rated to the praeUce ol Great Brlta hall have a delaying like the British Virgin Islands be clearly set forth m the Con rajetra months were to be transferred to stitution itself, and that it shouh on the Prime Miiuster. We .. should ore provide in our detailed rethe administrative responsibility provide for a majority of memcommendations, for the develop%  i it of thc Governor-General, in which bers who depend for their author[ "ent of ., Balnj for anj case we have no doubt that suit'ty on the will of the House of without recommending rigidly to or Govable administrative provision could Assembly as the elective and preprecisely how this should come %  i. to he inbe made in respect of the points ponderant brauch of the Leglala,,b ut " 1 raised bv the observer from tne ture. There remain three seats to be oca may dieUrlt ish Virgin Islands and for am Council of State led • Tht *: we consider should a Federal supreme Court : vopoaaU are set ul(ll r slnil|l(r mattor ; We 1Hll To uischarge this function, we ]? lctt • %  discretion of the tag of a Cllafi JlasttM and S. paragraphs 36 tms reconmendat on f o r w a r d recommend, therefore, that the Governor-General subject lo the than three other Jad d Constitution should pi .vide for n ur0Vls that his choice should be tails of our proposals as to mode although there, in the afaaanca itaon, formal provision to this effect is not to I .found. The Judicature We recommend, as an able part of a federal COQatltutlon to 39. \s ( -nt to Bins feeling that despite their i expression of views the legislative Council granting %  by ixith Chaml ldy TU %  Cwman Kl.nd, r,v !" ">be !" compost -vish to revise their opinion when t ir %  had an opportunity of should clect itW uf thl ir number audy.ng UM matter afresh in the ,,.„„„ „„. t ;„ V rrnoi -General musi l .ipon appoint to the Council %  f State "of fourteen rc tricteo to the members of one of appointment, tenure and othei as follows, or ulh 'i r L hiim ber of the Leglalamatters anset out in the Consoli each Pflrllalure ; W<1 """"aider that there is dated Recommendations (App.ii ment the House of Assembly Rood reason 'or retaining at this dix 5) paragraphs 77-B2 ith thc style and power) r.t -Prinn aUnJatar* In ad8iUon the Govcrnor-r.cneral should appoint seven others, being memI'lllJUIM.IVH-ll" Ilium, . ., will h< oi >s Report as a whole, Ol the Head of the i,ml ,hal ,h *' TO P 1 uf *• DMO -"'d Caicos Ulan amend %  : w "' %  : %  .-' i to withinformed by the observer from bers of the Legislature, nominated .1 hut that the Turks and Caicos Islands that by the Prime Minister. By this %  i categorthis would not accord with the means, a group of eight within th.Of the people ol i for the Island .commend tha : >n. the stage provision for an unofficial ted element in thc Council of State, provided thai, as we have proposed, the majoiity therein reflects the will nf the majoritj in the House of Assembly In QM I %  there will be an urgent need for the contim.,ty t.i experience, r Kuld be their desire to retain %  iationahlp with Jamaica, then their wishes should We have not I %  %  : thought It necessary -o write Into shou ,d ^ omcials. and the re „„, ^ ..lor membeis ot the Legisla""r* !" ;*; tied the detailed provisions ol made uniform throughout the re ture: but snould he so a] pcii >> AP MM mm.r U ..n n ... nuv MA U I M „.„.. n.i. • %  7 2 ... .. the Prime Minister ig regard to the I n es c apable be acceded to. light it neccs Ing out of pi. i ommenda r.al tions detailed provision %  : %  > i:%  i!iimendations In Uua matter, but our proposals as I be read as assumtiiought >.' <>at, ing that the Turks and Caicos 'fislands and the Cayman Islands the forewould ceaa) Jamaica. If t:rtalh nwiruUiig imn(1I ynS equential amendments „. n-uuired which it 10 j 08 necessary to detail irdly state that any such trans in paragraph U of the Con^^ {n nQ Council of fourteen, a i ferity, will owe theu* position, through the I'rime Minister, to the will of the majority of the i; sembh The Governorappoint up to six other members, of whom not more then three It will be observed that the detailed recocsUnesKUtKSU in complete in several PaSJ comtituiion and operation of Um Xuill u^,.,,, -ftdaralatatlon %  particutarlj ..,.. ( „nitlcalion A , %  naraj • -iipfiuiipoaed on a U a higbl, | (lmill rnviri %  ompltcaled and technical subject ,., 0III1( fpn „ n , Ull I time nor the aqulpoiant such a study Althouj:! >f Kene I of State which is tc change In -mi politi c al developments in the House of AssembU which nuU In %  irly frequent). It i< moreover desirable to associate with the formation of g special embody the main principles which pur|Kes. 'the officers p ng iH'inic liaU< %  %  %  realise thai when tha actual draft ten h have to ttcnt IK*C require to he made for officers ali feiierahsed. These officers cannot a-quitably be caaipelied to accept new terms of ;ind certain options must .ulable to them. The problem is similar to that arising in the case of the uniilcation of .. service .ragraph 36 of the Holmes relation to this Report). It is not within our comimplihcd !>\ the Pa*enea to recommend in detail what foun the conditions of transfer should take, and this can best be dealt with by a Public Service Commission. We wish to make it clear that not regard the federal and the remaining local services as being in any way watertight compartments, and we anticipate there will be no bar to transfer between them, when it is in the interests ol the public service and of the individuals concerned thnt -uch should take place. For this and other reasons we foresee that the Public Service Commission, In addition to serving the needs of thc federal public service, may usefully also be available, in the bo the Holmes i;overntiit'nt. "ihi l % %  MMIIISMI.II. to assist Unit OovI ...rdmg noii-fcderalHv this maaa, I that a salutoiy unifying in0 led throughout the legion and throughout all Ot fail to be 1 henrfit by enhancing The Public Service Our task in much availability ol tha Repof %  undar tha Up of Six Maurice H the purI our own Report, we mvite attention par..pier V of the HofCoaa Report, regard Public Service Comini chapter VI. which discusses from tha point Of tfttw of U> Commission the advantages of federation over uiiillcalion. Owing to the possibility of misunderstanding in the matter, we run to point out the clear disncw political and administrative '",„", rnendations rnu Sublect to this OUT proposals ar follow; — the attn the public service and making it easier to place officers in the posU for which they are beat suited. Title And Seat o( Capital We recommend that the name agraph 42 of the COD .ions (Ap %  ,' ,; %  •;: doici;,';.. w"" 1 • %  < "T^SSAX^Z oriUna,y VnUti K ntd "' ml within the Dependences to uon* rdaUiki to tht ettei "' 'Of 11 *" „.„, M .„j i„ vtnleun „ a ll^l „,„ ,„ r „i m a. ind, in cer,nng and I ..nd su|>%  i that any -Huuid tuva the rlhl to nominate "ructurc. (Ol uppniiitment sui-h other per-JpiTlonce > %  (aln ur propos. lMUl| members U the |J would enable th< OOVMI ,i.) as may be requM* Ibod undc to brii.g the membership o( thc "' tte to a ureater anil greater heads u) and III) rCqultl Council "I Slate up to fourteen ''f !" "' nominees ot the Prime plutaUon in. As ti We reci.mmend further that all M ""* ,e I ln .'". ms ndeed i head (III) * Ihlnk that thi ...ember, of lhe Council "I State, would he constitutionally open • : „ m d ,„ M should hold office d.. ""• d nul al)pwito 10 ,,. Ftinrlions Of Council Council Ihreui* Ol the Council of Stale. Hroadly Ol It'.BM CW advise the (though this would, of loutse, bo MANCHK.STHt diswithout prejuoi hi t.. harge of all the functions vested petition UM Onl) InoM Mr J the reiteration should be "The •to.lcriilise.r whose functions are British Caribbean Federation". taken on ,nd that lhe seat of government of ; 11 be in Triniud. ornnuH IhoM " Bay Resolution 2 applies forred this solution to the alter The Executive native that the Constitution should itself contain a rigid nil) llrinl the Prilitc III cnstitutiom.1 reslgiiatlon on the defeat of the %  oOHure parts, the IA : ..dual live, and the Judicial .ilhorltBlive. I three functions of mak^ dcvls ,. d ,„ „ OV e rn h c taking hlcf baeuUya lain laws ing law.i. carrying them ou .... ,1 ., always posi lie advice. .tin. and enfoi. hl r prM e„, a ,„ a p of thc Council and noi il rw,..„i n„v„r.ii nctual fact many „,„„__,„. *. m _7 v _. ... n him. except in so far as he is special leave to appeal direct). It peclBcalh i nendalion I under the ConstituUon to act ple<1 the appellate sii. a decide in hi. own discretion, or ,. in accordance with advice ten some Dr. Sander Acquitted Hampshi M.iteh B. Hermann Sander was Constantine Will Fight i trial (oi Airl • from page 3 areas al ol a aroniar. iidgrnant 1,111 leaislatur' he overlaps lies in the faet ,,,„, k „ %  n that his assent in the ' %  K i.ecessi%  Htka no lecommcndations pecial procedure for conj^ain .subject-matter of political t. 0 der his resignation, ipedfled inst ig West Indian naTJKU. under what con should lie to the I Court, and the I T.tail moditlcation of ex< I tdUlnC The Proaecutor, res* for the • aaltv, lawyei Wvman H uf years as Al the Curopeana mm South African roughly divided bein his closing 22 Afrik.au a peaking NaUo... Dlletrej nannfx nr lliile^tet nnein %  lists—people of Dutch origin— %  nd F,nnlnh speaking Smuts supPOUtieaJ consideration in Seret%  odment. Thnt imtional history and deh waloptnant, 111 be embodied in Governor-General m Council, should he I.e. ..ininended First, as > D-.vrrnmcnt Is :,,Wlvr nf ,h '' COUlfceJJ hut not %  uithnut any naesaaao "' % % % %  "> '" f,,ll A n e that thc Oovernment '-vert at a later stagei to the Imihowld resign The normal course portai ,_ired before a meajure becomes 0 f events would he that a Prim, nonary po law. The extent to which he ,,iied that General, theil oatctre, deOniUon ID his own discretion, i , lu longer had sufficient supand I imitations. ing to advice and if the latter port in the House to enable him Hroadly speaking, the Council tcdrdinayto whose advice, is the to carry out his policy, would tate constitutes the policyi the forming instrument in th* .'iition. It is here that proposals ution are forniuand decided upon Mere It will be noted that we do not Government billt are recommend that each .. here n particular eaumatea of revenue and expenditure are con acceptance ol which the would proceed to make a Istlng arrangements in the Unit* *,\ ri for the hearing of appeals by courts, are technical (,ucstic>* %  %  this Committee is not equipped lo %  %  ,u..t-i-. with II I a) The 1^ should have original Jurisdiction in a coinparati. %  I Lad uf subjects. We suggest for consideration the p MM is that his establishment ms family and community. M chief might lead many English me OU] had lelt the body of speaking South Africans to trans. • nis 'irrational' njectlng an % % %  — hruler I.in kniiiii W in> rVming At C.A.G. — ..—, — io we ut-i <-i -• .,.-,_,.„.,. n # tK,, "r|,inpt" KTOUD revenue and expenditure are con,mend however nuInewlaauewertcummcnd:hu ._nerr.be r of ^ *• !" ^ /£££ sidered. Government legislation M amendtne Hoad of the Executive should h ou l(Ul th ,^ mc Minift er tan only b. I sanction if the proportionate ^ s|yled -Governor-General T /' amiBil ;. deUberate We "I the Council of Sutt. It is in fact I %  gnd thai he should be appoint) | ftamber oi the Federal (, v .,, | n general %  .umber of terms, the powers conferred on Unit ii increasing, by the ml as reAU. and all GUATEMALA, March 9. Lawrence Luekmai. ( Curacao -isions of section 7J of the won n „ t plllce ln lhe lndividlu Commonwealth of Australia sabre fencing al the Central AmerConstitution. which reads as lean Game. I follows;— and no defeats "75. In all matters — Jose Nosari Epinos of Mi ng under any treaty, won the individual service rlftd Rhodesia fer their allegiance to Dr. Malai and give ancpuragaBnant I -ts. It might be argued that Seretse is being sacriln i i iid the Bantu uf the Protectorates against the long arms of South Africa. It has been readily admitted thai (or Africans within the Union could hardly be Hut it is argued that the duty of the British Government ls to hold back the tide of South African racialism from %  weeping through UM British protectorate-. and colonies such as Northern Unit should have ,.<-is of die Federatioi name any Unit contich an amendi i.id....in.ii .:ks will be done 'imission is deliberate. we "< *' %  ^WU.K-H m ^w-. .. is n. i.i Id be appointN ljeheve lhal our pro posal effects impoasibJe to exaggerate the ima neceaaarv of auportance of the Council in the inds of the Prime Cou By this means, the regarding its mode of establishPnme Minister owes his position ment have been most carefully the Assemblv; other State devised to ensure that it shall at Councillors appointed on his one and the same time full> .nation owe their position to lhe will of the elected part of the We next consider thc nature of lhe prime Minister. It is of course legislature, and also be capable of the Government—that is to say, possible that the Prime Minister integrated and responsible action. thc agency through which the may make choices which do not The most important point p< wers of the State, formerlj^and commend themselves to the opinion, are to concentrate in the constitutionally concentrated In Assembly If so. the remedy lies Prime Minister responsibility to d the Governor-General, are actual; ,t hand in the ihs the Federal Ascembly, and to xercised. Al this point we Assembly to withdraw its support cssure for himself and his nom( ii) affecting consuls or othel Hi a mark of 958 for the representatives of ether three positions. The Mexican fivecountries; (Hi) In which the Commonwealth, or a person or being sued on behalf of the Commonwealth, is party; (iv) Between States, or between residents of different States, or between a State and a resident of anolher State. ( v) in which a writ of Manwon the tean i total of 4.643. — Realer Commits Lover's Suicide Appeasement of South Africa by ng Seretse and his English wife may be the wrong course. But it Is thought here that these I reasons behind the Go\ernments generally unwelcome decision. —By Cable. Five Invited To Play Golf ivm should like to emphasize the pracfrom him; and experience shows inees an effective majority in lhe ,. importance of the distinction that Prime Minister, in tact pay Com. ,. ..fen Government and I.eeisla, |oae attention in such matter, to We nov come to the question of ;cn! dependencies ture j, ,, the duly of the Goven.Legislature a. the discretionary powers of the rs of lecisment lo govern, and the actual Anna. This procedure Oovcrnor-Geneial in relation to :hem by responsibility for its specific exe.. m our virw ..ssential tn ensure nxecutlve action. These diaere... a*.'. l '* ahared the an md collective tionary power., wo recommend, responsibility of the Cabinet should be limited to: l, virgin Legislature, except at th. Where members owe their (a) The subjects in reaped of .-ew.rd confusion and delay and conseposition lo direct, election by the which we recommend that iuent prejudice to the public inAssembly and not to the Prime His Majesty in Council AUGUSTA. Georgia. Mar. 8 Three South American profev TOKYO. March 9 Dr. Toshio Othurki. Japanese indamm or prohibition ..r !" &* *£ ,' h "balloon bombs.'' %  n Injunction I. sought S* lch S? 0 10 win ? u '• %  ned to against an officer of the re " *••• %  h " almoat oartalnly .tonal. Roberto De Vlcemo and C^minnweallh committed a "lover', .uicide" with Antoni Cerda (ArgenUnal and the Hlrt.To.Trt Salt h.v. hU >**"•'> % %  Police said to-day Paecaull Viola (Uruguay) are oILn.1 '. .P.^J" They ld lhat Dr Othuklamong fl.e leading foreign golfer. orllinal Jurisdiction. claimed by many lo be a geiiuiwho have been Invited to play in Ibi The federal LegUTature |, (t „„ lf , nd w ht MMU r Tournament hero should be able to confer adMarch I, and eloped will on April —I. dltlonal original Jurisdiction rotary to a popular hotel 40 mile. The other two are Wonnan Von Federal Supreme Court from Tokyo. All Indication, wore Sida. Australian professional and in respect ot specified matters, that the two had taken their Henri De Lamaze. prominent Again, thc provisions of Seclive., the Police added— Beater. French amateur— I