Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Friday be Price:
Q February 17

1950.

Five Cents

Year 55.







gf ee | ane oR: Loeal Batsmen
P vernor JOHNNIE LUCAS misses one from Rollox and is
’ a i / nearly out when Wicketkeeper seh whipped off : eS | Score 2A6 for 5
: | the bails. The other slayer with arms outstretched is se . sy e °
e I stall 2 =e Robert cao , ee 3 Gaskin And Trim
n e€ |

Bowl Well
‘As Chancellor of W.I. University

| §
z (By 0. S. COPPIN)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Feb. 16,



Bis International pace bowler John Trim and Interna-
j tional medium fast Berkeley Gaskin to-day played the

spar installation ceremony of Princess Alice as Chance

* of the University College of the West Indies this af
|




llor
ter-
will

































down to 246 runs for the loss of five wickets as the Second

British Guiana—Barbados Test opened at Kensington Oval

yesterday.

Having won the toss Skipper Camacho sent Barbados
in to bat on a true wicket but one which gave the bowlers
some assistance due to a considerable amount of moisture
which it contained in the early hours of play.

Trim who developed consider- 17. The Barbados score was now
able pace during the course of the ; 62/2. x
match, bowled with unerring a ; Lucas who joined Marshall at
curacy during the day capturing | this Stage commenced his innings
the wickets of fellow Internation- | with free strokes at once, an im-
als Everton Weekes and Clyde | provement on his first innings
Walcott and also that of C, display

major part in pinning the tall scoring Barbados batsmen
was colourful and impressive in its solemnity and

own in history.
je University of which the foundation stones of the admin-
tive and medical buildings were laid this afternoon by

Chancellor and her husband will set the pastoral lands
h surrounded the mountains six miles from Kingston,

To-day’s ceremonies were car-

b kk ried out in the presence of five
averpDroo Colonial Governors, Jamaica,
; Barbados, British Guiana, Lee-

. ward Islands, Catholic Archbisho
ATS Support of Trinidad, Bishops of t r



he Angli-

“Roogles” Williams. His figures} Gaskin who had been trundling

can Church, Principal of the for the day were 22—6—50—3. faithfully and persistently from
Our London Correspondent) Caribbean Islands and America,
Bg London Feb. 16, the Chancellor of McGill Univer-

Gaskin was also accurate and | the pavilion end was

| rewarded
untiring, He sent down 28 overs | with Marshall’s wicket. A well
claiming two wickets for 52 runs lighted one cut back from the leg

Again Everton Weekes stole the } saw Marshall give an easy return
honours in the Barbados batting | cate Gaskin off his own bowl
top scoring with a polished 82 in

@ Beaverbrook has at least|sity, the Vice-Chancellors of Bir-
supporter for his Empire mingham, St. Andrew’s, London
" which he set forth Universities, American Univer-
” yesterday. | sities, West Indian Legislators,
38-year-old| Mayors, and 1,500 invited resi-
i















132 mihutes while Roy Marshall Marshall had defended soundly
. , i -y |dents of Jamaica re senting played another sound defensive | for one hour and fifty _ minutes
Be bie ph er i the culture of the ina innings at number one to score 48 | scoring 48 runs half of which came
‘or apham, i . Sté . acne
‘cons’ nts “I welcome the| ,,,__ . ’ Sea ae
ae arniie Lobbyists,” The proceedings started at 2.50

in 110 minutes. by way boundaries. Barbados

% e ne pe RO el } e Charlie Taylor and Roy Maér- | had now lost three wickets for 90
Stalin Must Come To Russians Don’t shall who put on 98 for the first | run

wicket in the first Test again open Gaskin who had now

: when e . tian dias dinde
Bel it can be the economic as Governor Huggins escorted

a
‘motional salvation of our|*® Princess from the waiting France Says

a room to join the e any é
And I am sure it will pe J Sept at

rained im-
4.30 when the National Anthe

e
, ” m S
d in the Dominions. iste ave oe : = nikal ec Ce yuneil
Siterd Beaverbrook has was played. Five minutes later, e
















e ry ed the Barbados innings yest measurable confidence bowled to
| W e \ ‘ t W ‘ day Trim opened from the | Weekes next n in, with a ring
ashington 7 Door Open an ar | vilion end this time and at on of five fleldsmen around ‘the inter-

Sha hi smapai¢n. Prom a fanfare by the Jamaica Military | ’ “ | IT orn up an improved pace Dalios il record holder Wes
finued his ce ; ,| Band announced the entry of the ; R ht i | that of the first Test roweve as unflurried by these
displayed oe 2S yore principals. The academic proces- as ig SAYS PRESIDENT TRUMAN SAYS POLLI | He kept both batsmen on the | elaborate preca itions geitat at
of the Daily Express he has} sion, including under-graduate ' : defensive and made some of his | scorit ind placed the ‘ba
me the advantages we seek! members of the College, dressed THE HAGUE, Feb. 16. WASHINGTON, Feb. 16, British Communier Iecner iar. | Seliveries swing in from the of t clever Witte ee ee
poestow on the inhabitants of |j, scarlet gowns were followed The International Court of Jus- President Truman was closely questioned at his Press Sritish Communist leader Har-|very late. Gaskin w ho bowled | cley« istwork
ica and on those, who live in acturers. librariane ™ a Th ; 7 Ys . : ' 7 ese : ‘ oe ry Pollitt said in a pre-election | from the sereen end was equally ;
a by lecturers, librarians, members | tice met here today to decide Vag oh : ; L .
fa are just as important to) of the Senate College, and visit- whether the use of the veto in the Conference to-day about the possibility of a new \pproach| broadeast to-night that his party | steady He bowled his opening _ Century Completed
Lobby as full employment ing representatives of other Uni- Security Council is legal when to Marshal Stalin to end the “coldgvar |favours negotiations for ears 4- | overs without a slip on the oft side} he _ centun y was ‘ So
high wages here at home. versities. applied ‘to applications for mem- He gave a firm “No comment to a question about oe mo ae t me 7 + ne W —— a — 4 leg trap of after o tne _ — fe ie on
_— é ‘ < : ‘ a ‘1D i otates, France, Mina, It WO leg Silps, Short square leg ar oO WeOKE Who é
(By Cable) we as bership to the United Nations, and] Winston Churchill’s proposal in a campaign speech at| nd Bae sity onlion : : batting attractively for a long
| whether the General Assembly Edinburgh that “another talk” with Marshal Stalin might | The Russians lost seven mil Taylor edged an outswi: time aitempted to drive out at one
the Soci tee rejected by help to end the cold war. |} people in the last wat No, i high through slips buv there from Gaskin that we igain ee
1e Security Council, ‘ : ; To Sob. 4 » ail d ; sae eos back nicely from the le 1 skiec
’ Asked if he would stili*be glad to see Stalin in Wash ie be Russias. wlio. want wa a ade i ened later Gash beck nicely: fi leg “ ee
Ty > atemenis are s 4 A , . it he pahiec stricken Ame i rought ollo 1 to field © ball i t
Written statements were sub ington, Truman replied that the door was open to the head te Se uM kala. hi ne but:there was no one there Pairau-
mitted today by eight Govern- ee ; gee ; nuitonaires,” Pollitt said. Russi: | second slip ee
ments including the United States of any state who wished to come to Washington ad pat forward a watertight Taylor who was patiently p deau just failing there after
Egypt Venezuela, Russia, the The President repeated his frequently expressed or the abolition of the aton:|ing himself in hooked an inswit running in fron A pelea pa
z > ’ ’ . } f ; ay t . if ay » Ty " o -eCkKeS Was her oo and he 1g
Ukraine, Byelo-Russia, andj sistence that any further meeting with Stalin should take ; bomb, ee oe ar teece ‘7 Sean tae oe iad Caen rr Suk thle tees tee thelieabel sent
Czechoslovakia. place in Washington. When correspondents agi ! ea ei = used GATS ai oaduce eae Square leg boundar: x ah 199, mlanten
The only oral statement today tried to make the President com-j} °M€'BY Was us Ps :
was by M. Georges Cllae of

; % hi The Clock Lucas went back into his shell
ment in general terms on anot! “pala ee Winston Churchill 1 Behind The Clock of the First Test and he got into
France, who said the French 2 ° approach to Russia the Presiden delet thet aoe aa The scoring was behind Sioiedtenaniiing.edimuis testes tice on
; Government felt the reecommenda- e | said that, United States Ambas- at ! as clock as the batsmen took

| tion of the Security Council is in-





























































































| vared to ake ¢ ) g roach) ada nie ne. Wheel Lor. | 02 nates.

" 7 2 waa R paawave all-over the world were ee aes Seat in the bak sy ia por ae be meee ' Weekes atoned for his fauity
ican oade TT i ] P bli h j all ready to diseuss any questio or Prime Minister Attlee by the | PM@ying we thad eaen th 2 troke with a late cut next over
can elect a new member. ] ubus | With any state that wanted ormer war leader,” whose Ful pee gee re “ord te aE off Gaskin that left the fieldsmen

The Security Council, he con- | enter into discussions, ton speech in 1946*set-the bal Saced ways on’ the aleriand ill standing while the. ball. car«
cluded, had perfect right not to M | The door had always be rolling for war against vhe Sovie. | “4S¢ ‘ ms a eened away to the boundary. With
recommend acceptance of a new emoirs ' open, the President added. Th Mle - ” ; Ne age wae ties al this stroke he completed his in-
member. If it did not, the General United States had never walk« We can get food, ray material, 19" bringing “hikgeelt of [ civedual halt century in 75 min.

| Assembly could do nothing. The ROME, Feb. 16, | out of a meeting and never+u imber and other goods from the | cree ena in place of G Een wane COLODRANGC OER. “Vent
public séssion was then closed and Sicilian bandiv qhief Salvatora| its veto power in the Unit et Union, the peoples’ democ- | £$! 5 o eae naster] eep to the square leg
~ ; Z nif Sg Sa ; sa a aaa yt | Marshall welcomed m : : aa fear: xi off the
; the President announced that the} Giuliano plans to publish his! Nations, cies and China without any po dover dbive for tote vir bounda 0 ur ru ff tt
| advisory opinion of the Court memoirs in the United States} Truman said he did not | litical svrings or payments in dol | ver he: brought Gaski: next ; ‘i
| would be given later. shortly, according to press re-| the time had come. to 1 ts,” he baid ¢ Trim at the pavilion © The score at ea wa J 3/ 5,
| It is understood that this opinion) ports purporting to come from his! passible special mission to Russis —Reuter unis Seine esl. aiptice Wee kes being 64 not out and Lueas
vill be made public at the end mountain hideout. | He made th comment \ for Gaskin 3 not ou .
of March or the beginning of The memoirs—7,000 pages deal- | correspondents read to in This brought almost imm Weekes Out
April. ( ing with his exploits since he first} quotation from an exclusive \- 6 Kall d In |} suecess for Tavlor Vas Weeke and Lucas « res
—Reuter killed a policeman in 1943-—havel terview whic h he _ gave to th ) 1 e fortable .to him ad ion boosted the score gq
nee seer out of Italy | — a rr sistts " . | through the slip just out 6 ng me nee come Rae
uly Giuliano’s permission for| a this he said that if I y I af Rollox, the lone slip, bu nue 1e Weekes-Lucas part-
j ° ; the first instalment of the diary] American election campaign i uXp OSLON balls later Taylor hit ou iy rship ving already put on ah
trike to go to press is required accord-} not been in progress in 1948 h aaa sasy Catch to Pairaudeat even 100 in 95 minute With the
, | mod i: ; ee Bye Jiketion.. Vinnal p an easy catch to Paira Bed Te sa ‘ne’ Han
9 ing to the reports would have sent Justice it i : aria Taylor had sen at the core at 214 Trim with the new
| Le 7 * : | ar sé. and ay b MICHIGAN, Feb 16 cover aylor had been a 1
I F | Giuliano fled, leaving behind) to talk with Stalin and ma; \n explosion ripped apart wicket for 33 minutes and ball made one swing in Ms pop
| > ages f his iary. Since then,! that would be the thing to d n KX S10) : . Pace i ‘ y : s ‘otal was| Sharply and Weekes who rac
pages of his diary. } ; bifttdine ¢ 5 tis »} scored 13. The Barbado: ta as |
n rance journalists who have gained; sometime, on a ae iepdaty kiitos then 18—1 ‘shaped for a scoring stroke put
\ 2 access to his closely-guarded | There were angry exchanges] ‘ hemical 4 ompany a illing| A double change that brou up an easy return to Trim. Weekes

PARIS, ‘Feb. i “kingdom” have reported that he/ between the correspondents a) Ue ene Soa we poms j} on medium fast bowler Thoma was at the wicket for 1382 minutes

All workers in the Ford Fac- had been writing hard, preparing‘ Truman over his exclusive int A Dow Company official said the screen end for Trim ana 5! to score 82 in well timed strokes
tory at Poissy, near Paris, total- other data.-—Reuter. ! view with the New York 7 r hat six to eight more workers! left.arm Rollox at the pavili all around the wicket, He hit nine
ling about 6.000 went on “unlim- When ~ correspondent: how¢ vere injured in the shattering for Gaskin saw no chang: ¢ urs in his innings. i Weekes

, jited” strike to-day. Their decis- ————___— | their discontent that the Pre last | slow rave of scoring alti fourth wicket partnership with
ion, taken after a meeting in | dent had made important state- The explosion blasted the roof,| Walcott and Mershall:< | Lucas put on.a valuable 124;
HP . _— ance eT, the’ courtyard of the factory - ¥ } ments of policy to th ind one wall of a building | M 7 1 I ; vith | ee | ( B. Willian who partnered
i. PRINCES, SE, C 288 2, W yas yesterday : i : ie ents : 7 ke z ; | boundary Ww slegant 3 Hams who pa
Ralled as Ghancelion ie ee ot sr ea oY he eee which turns out 100 cars a day d vrecu | correspondent of one newspaper Dow Company officials said they; irives and once Marshall | th but he nl urvived two balls
: verer rr ae ° ~" Twas in protest against the dis- ? instead of to the White Hous lid not yet know the cause of neatly through the slips for four. | from Trim he eut at the third ball,
Ce missal notice to 180 workers fol- In A nton Press correspondents collectively he explosion Reuter The first fifty came -after n|a fast -outswinger that: took the
lowing the “go slow” demonstra- E the President replied with some | hour and seven minutes of play | edge and Rollox at. second slip
Ty . ‘ tion yesterday. ; heat that the President was } and when the luncheon interval} held a smart cateh to dismiss him
ue Police lé . . 2 : HONGKONG, Feb. 16 free agent s » . | was taken the pre-lunch play of | for “a duck.”
Guard \\) ante oviet They also claimed immediate] geyen Nationalist secret agents! y,. President also turned | Korean I resident 1S minutes had vielded 6{.'ru Pata ompleted his. individual
, ° if grant of a bonus of 3,000 Francs.| were executed at Canton yes-| down efforts by correspondents | mn Roy Marshall was 30 not out and| half century in three hours and
ze k Unconscious ; Saint Nazaire om oe no | terday, a pro-Communist Chin- to obtain his endorsement for | In lokyo Walcott 17 not out twelve minutes after S long
ep 1c Aa slow rae ae ae ete newspaper here. reported to- such world government _ pro- ine a Walcott Oui ojourn in the forties. = oe
oading by troops yesterday ay. 0sals as the “Atlantic Union’ TOK , Fe 16 Tr ash ame on first after | included but two fou er this
IN BELIZE war material from the. ee < This is believed to be the first tin now being discussed by| Syngman Rhee, President ot Ph ica y ined Watcott | Lucas brightened up and attacked
Pe mos Advocate co In W. Africa ship “Empire Marshal, “ a a mass execution carried out by Congress committees as a mean:|/former ly American-occupied wicket with his second ball \ | the bowling. He was missed at 63
ese ee . dockers had refused to handle.} ip, Communists since the Peking of removing the threat of hydr--} Southern Korea, arrived in Tokyo} fust inswinger well up.to the bats- | when he cut at one from Camacho
*MIZE, Feb, 16. - 3 Government was set up. *n bomb warfar —Reuter, ‘ cs re ay vi 1 man eritian Tale irive but | wide of the wicket and Christiani
AD ‘C : ‘or "el acaues Chastell: n- s gen bomb warfare today for a three day visit tc an enticed Walcott to drive it
, Was quiet all day gg Scene _M. Jacques oe), Most other, prisoners have & pee ae alata airs a = ae si het thal eee ake the | failed to hold a simple catch at
n the _ queht's clashes the Nationalist Sromtalinn Shen me gg or Sau tatbnaciots oes to] merely been submitted to courses . | ‘to reach a common understand-j centre and leg stumps j Bully , '
efiel on raed rae ple’s Party “admitted in court here strike tiie Tn a broad-j}of Communist doctrine, pr PAINTER FOUND DEAD }ing with Japan in the face of A single run had been added to } m: we of way, toons = Sut a 4
en orum = Chair- ews: F “1Ke x ; . .|tive of the nature of their | > ‘ " i * | the seore but Walcott had not vet/ 6/5 Lucas being 65 not out anc
actar . é é lanned to],, > sai e two-hou ‘ . growing Communist expansion. re Sco! \ F ,
en a” cove eeiblish's “West Afr on Soviet | C28! ge aftieen” called by the| offence. The seven executed LA PAZ, Boliy%, Feo. 16 |” President Syngman Rhee flew] increased his pre-lunch score of Atkinson 12 not out
ese Should ‘not sing Republic”. including the Gold | tik nist led “C.C-T.” for purs+| Yesterday were described us Cecilia Guzman de Rojas, 50-| 14 Tokyo in the personal plane of |
S America when | *6pubiic”, Com nunis “C.C.T. members of an “Overseas Youth yéar-old Bolivian painier, was! * ; MeArthut
ice arriv. ' Coast. ly political motives. rae ae z 3 General Douglas rthu }
then attives and in- He is on trial here with twelva|~ ! —Reuter, | Organisation”, who had been found dead yesterday under mys- Sapreme Allied Comihander ir
Oy 2. that under the other meiibers of the party on a found guilty of “violating the}terious circumstanees on the iden. Hak abtuite or vention -t/.S. i
? t he ca t speak vers . oe 4 : ; r socia ” : oom a Paz : Saja b¢ 1 squi ,
the Gover; ; aro aon charge of inciting a riot by “posi- revolutionary social order. - highway between La Paz and ( al gave the presidential party a 21
People by iment, tive action” —Reuter. {acoto, a La Paz suburb.—(C.P.) gift’ salute..Weanae '
esieged the house i , : . é oii . ,
e@ Speaker fie : Nkrumah also admitted that he .
B Sticks and boule Wi? | nad declared a “sit at home| Prince Bernhard |
With police who 8 enti sirike, non-co-operation and a 1 WIL [ GET - WASHINGTON, Feb. 16.

Gear the streets with tear | boycott < Briton” Cae ae Decorated ‘Churehill Prepares Hugh Stewart, Oil Director in the Department of the In-
8, ’ r month.—Reuter. ‘ é 7 , 7 7 ; ; Tlnj
PMOWd dispersed RIO DE JANEIRO, Feb. 16 INA terior, said to-day he was hopeful that current Anglo-Unitesd
ne? hry ple when the Prince Bernhard of the Nether- No EF B oad t States oil talks here would result in a “mutual understanc-

n Smith, ; © Leader Hon . . | iands, who arrived here on holi- or r cas ing” on oil policies
“Ppeare or the é day las i ay y on n ‘ppe | ce ; ri » a Can
appealed to them 4 Hedler s Acquitta a idet {'nrieo Dutra the Grand NEW YORK, Feb. 16. The report added that oat | LONDON, Feb. 16 He was oottyiog ies a Con-
’ residen regi ible information” in Eastern Eu- | . ; 4 ; : gressional Sub-Committee on
: sion at] The New York Times said to- ,si L ae . ’ shill’s vate Sec-
mo also the sole polic Condemned Ss Hocienai's ceteones eent in} day that before the new Russian- _— quate me naeneethot | renee ees report m4 Petroleum Pik fee ‘ete
“overnment House w ; ‘Ne Dri Bernhard! Chinese 30-year treaty was signed|Mao an nis Foreign ster | iti Leeder © had r te Back Stewart said the talks fol $
1 ro F the Rio Hills, Prince Bernhai 3 . 7 En-le sho headed the |that thé Opposition Britain's oposed restricvions on
UWconscious 9 CFU *b, 16. f ; ; ae sday, munist leader|]Chou En-Lai, who heac ritain's proposec ‘
om a Sane TI Seteta taken «G ate received Brazil's —— om Tho lertRing reported to | Chinese Delegation in the Moscow Pp se St. li i t United States oil imports to the
Bt doing See oe elie today protested] tion, the Grand Order of the have agreed to give Soviet-nom-| negotiations, had gained import. | Mr, 7 oe — oF nally To Normal sterling area, wouid likely be con-
* tne age < a a) S y san : areal 5 Ss * " asr0’ vain!
hight the audience ‘at the {against the acquittal by a\Germen | Southern Cross. Reuter {inated advisers key positions is ant bargaining points from the reat nie Sets Sie tox ‘ tinted into ne xt ae ee
Consumers’ Co-one... | cour ‘he former Bundesta,' ae ina's Army, secret police an ussians. j prep : oie . “The real effect of the §
Ping Drigumers’ Co-opera- | court of _vhe ieee a ! re ot Party It said that during the early | morrow night, He is in the best TRIESTE, Feb. 16 action is not yet) well: understood,
Chai € meeting ignored | deputy, ee re wt tard The report contained in a Paris stages of the talks, which lasted |of health,” the eee, i Cridetd. snuiiivessias: “ite .| nor is there any finality about it”
Save Tequest to sing The Landtag resident, i re a f , 's|two months, Russia demanded full| Throughout the nigh re rieste’s mit i x ‘apap hs
the ; i eic nalinks > . ispatch from the newspaper's , Alt > o to-day af
e ny King and quietly | Stang, was applauded when a Communist: csc C. S. Sulderzer, | control of seven Yellow Sea ports | were rumours that Churchill had} oe aoe tis on wali “Tam hopeful that.ollt’o® these
Mt, 260 WE by othe | said Hedler’s behaviour in court , 4 a. 6 ted to|—-Dairen, Port Arthur, Chinwang-| been taken ill and Conservative| a r Stiri 7 rae discussions will come some real
a es . ‘ Hitler when he ° . said Mao was also repor airen, ‘ Pang- | -a e inun-| shopkeepers and “middlemen” in scuss
Ms ren. reminded him of Hit ey CC th Police re & i reluctantly to supply |tao, Hiaichow, Chefoo, Wihaiwi ! Party Headquarters wer t . |} understanding on the part of the
Teported | 2 , i 192 ne verdict had as have agreed reluctantly PP’ 4 la +] all ympathy with 30,000 industrial ; : han
; py .Reuter’s | was tried. in 1924. The verdict 4 0 1 labourers}and Tsingtao |dated with telephone calls. ’ ke | British and Ametiean Companies
: ry at the angry | amazed the German people, ~ NICE, Feb. 16 aa Sepeeg oe oe aa | —Reuter, | workers who have been on strike |! id’ Government representatives
eelors y at tn aie * 4 ; a D. 16 rom China to Siberia on a con- . of . : ted | fince February 2 for cost of liv-|2 : . +
w ant to sing | said . ; . Z aei ened icils ¢ Satellite sources had repartec since rua “ “ h we can move forward
a Ame vhen Prin- i ‘Within minutes of, Hedler’s ac- J Communists apy an ght at basis under 'sectét codicils to that the obstinacy of Mao and ing «llowances., a ‘a at pbasible damage to
ee min * ttn dine, re tonigt > treaty. = , : cal ate i he waited th t i Bs .
May | Shere next | quittal yesterday, thé Social Dem- peace ee a ‘adie wo te treaty }Chou had forced the Kremlin to | REDENTIALS The industrial workers ha our common good and future
Med .., WiSpersed to-day | o¢ratic leader, Kurt Senne | oF than ‘ ae menscer: Oe suffering A “sizable proportion” of is |modify these demands. PRESENTS Cc +] announced they will on strik security
fant 3 ; ; : “dis. » hospit and é ‘ “un Reales tne ‘ é } t . >» meet t det
Oot police with] idemned the decision as : di 7 . oe < cneunities themselves. | contingent was yanderstood to have Chinese delegates were unde PARIS. Feb. 16 | ing ill employers meet te + 3 He added that there was some
gusting ey nad | six minor Cé ot ‘ sas ndjleft China already, it added. jstood cn the eve of» the treaty ; A te. the new! mand. Small industrialists ave l nonce among oil. producers in
f ‘ ‘ ’s|The police used tear ga nd } le! ) , } ' . ; Hector A. Madero, the new . : .
fe strator ere | found tex i a ose ae , big age the 1,500} The correspondent said that! conclusion, to have expressed dis- Denes Ar bassador to France.| 287e¢ed to pay them 56-lire a th i States that the British
“s peech could not be ; Auer aon ig wie te de n-|specific indications had reached | satisfaction with what they inte ee es ted: h redential ost of living bonu a estrictio ild result in. im-
} archer : Te iv io . Pari that ecret odicils to the! prete R ; fort te > en : roy ‘Re subli e or 60 € | rhe ere af il produced by
; ' Sets at new tre ne eer 4BNCG re- } fringe RT is - = 7 were ers re - it ted State companies abroad.
; a ssieeacieeal | presentative f the tw sovern-' the re inus peat \uriol ioe —~Reuter. | ~( Reuter.)
H t ee R ‘ ments er
« ‘ Reuter.) ' police jeep.—Reuter.




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PAGE TWO



“Caib Calling

OUSANDS turned out to History of Barbados !
witness- the second Colony R. C. GLINDON REED. Di-
match between British Guiana rector of Education will pre-
and Barbados which opened yeS- side over the fifth lecture in the
terday at Kensington. Both the series on the History of Parbados
George. Challenor and the Ken- given by Mr. H. A. Vaughan, at
eee pies oe eenacalealy the British Council Heady iarters
dressed and the Gents looking i. this evening at 8.15
very. -smart themselves. The &
George Challenor Stand was
erowned with the B.G. colours, a
green flag with the B.G. crest.
done in i in the centre, flap-
‘in



That Slip of Paper

T IS now getting to the stage
e strong breeze. where everyone is walking

Besides cricket however as is around with a littie slip of paper
always the case when such large folded neatly in their wallets or in
crowds gather together there were their pockets with sixteen names
spots of humour during the day’s written on it.
play. Meet anyone and start a con-
The Biscuit Man was once more versation, sooner or later. your
heard and very seldom seen. He hand will stray into your wallet
had a new fanfare yesterday for out comes the bit of paper, and
any bowler who had a four hit off both of you will probably simul-
him. A little “ditty” which has taneously say—“Have you picked
been chanted..by many West In- your side for England yet?”

when*thte bowling is parti- Pe) “s
cula »—“Bowler come
from Sugar Hill,” blown with Overheard
great ‘his trumpet
we as , j HIS story was overheard in the
eg Square yesterday as two old
Will Live Here ladies surveyed Trafalgar Square
_E. Ae JAMIN, former- with its many new Traffic signs.
ly a director of Pegasus One said, “But Mary, why they

got all dese rock stones lying in
tne Square so?” The other replied,
he has come. to live and has “It mus’ be on account of the
brought along his wife. They are housing shortage, may be they
at present staying at the Marine going start building houses *pun
Hotel. top dem!”

Mr, Benjamin was last here in ay
1947—48. when he spent three : as
months 6n business. Their daugh- First Visit
ter Gillian who is now at Bad- R. GERALD BLANCHARD,
mington, a—-girls’ public school Manager of the grocery de-
near Bristol, expects to join them partment of Peter and Co., Cas-

Textiles Ltd: London, England, is
now back in Barbados. This time

sometime in September. tries, St. Lucia, arrived here re-

eee > cently by B.W.LA. on his first visit

. . to the island and is staying at the
Leaving Today Cosmopolitan Guest House.

ETURNING to Trinidad to- He told Carib that he is very
day is Mr. Oliver Thompson, much impressed with the island
Transport Contractor, of Trinidad, and is enjoying his holiday.
who is staying at the Hotel Royal. «> «>
He arrived here earlier in the
week ‘by the B.W.I.A. as Man-
ger of the emateur boxers, who
took part in the tournament
which ended at the Modern High Secty., of Pitcher, Connell and Co.,

School on Wednesday .
Mr. Thompson is also a mem- left saci Wednesday by B.W.LA. for
: ‘- three weeks’ holiday in Trinidad.
ber of the Amateur Boxing As~ g) i he stevia’ ait. Ne
jation of Trinidad. cin eae ree Va vas
soc: daughter Mrs. Donald Allcroft who
ne lives in Point-a-Pierre. Her hus-
band is with T.L.L. there,

«> «>»

For Three Weeks
RS. WARREN, wife of Mr.
Sydney Warren, Manager

Attended Cricket
R. RUPERT CROWE, Archi-
tect and Builder of Trini-
dad, left earlier in the week by
B.W.IvA, for Grenada after a
short holiday. While here he at-
tended Dart of the cricket games
at Kensington He was staying
at Indramer Guest House, Wor-
thing.



Married in Boston
R. ahd Mrs. George Jost, who
were married in Boston on
Feb. 12th, arrived here un Tuesday
by B.W.1.A. and are spending their
honeymoon at the Crane Hotel.
They expect to be in Barbados for
two weeks. Mr. Jost is Travelling

& “2 Representative of Messrs, Can-
a ; adian Industries Ltd.
Winding Up Holiday <> P
ISS -DOREEN RODRIGUES,
M Civil Servant of Georgetown, To Bathsheba For Two
British Giflaffi, is now in Barba- Months

dos ‘winding -up her six months’

holiday, the majority oa R. AND MRS. E. P. MASSON,
spent 'in-SteDucia. She arrive accompanied by their daugh-
on Sunday by-B.W.1.A. and will ter Betty arrived on Wednesday

be here uhtfl the end of the month »y BWIA. for a couple of
as a guest of Mr. and Mrs. T. months’ holiday. They will be
A. Wason of Deacon’s Road. staying at “High Winds”, Bath-
«» «> — Dr. Masson is Medical
: be upt., of the Mental Hospital in
Paid Short Visit Trinidad, ,
R. ALPHONSO DE LIMA, «> “2

Director. of Y. De Lima and
Cc Ltd,,..jewellers of Trinidad
and Barbados, returned to Trini-
dad by B.W.LA. on Wednesday
after a short visit to the island.

Comings and Goings

M* and Mrs. Owen Boyce and
two children have arrived

He was staying at the Hastings in Barbados to spend a short holi reer Se ee
Hotel. day. Mr. Boyce is Manager of
“s < Canning & Co, Ltd, San Fernando SAT. 18th
Branch ‘
Uncanny ae tee ccs ae ADAM'S LOBE
XPERTS at the London Zoo Mr. Charles Peirce of James A. RIB

have been puzzled by twe Lyrch & Co. Ltd., left yesterday

frogs which have been sent to the by B.W.I.A, on a short visit to
Zoo as a gift from Mrs. J. E. Antigua,

Risdon of Plantation Diamond, *

British Guiana. They have been so

unable to identify the species Mr. Robert M. Jones of R. M.
“They are plainly tree-frogs,’ Jones & Co., Ltd., and Mrs. Jones

left yesterday by B.W.LA., to
Rpm el je get ag ger spend a holiday in Cuidad, Tru-
behi them, one can clearly see a Seal. their daughter Mrs,
the bones and digestive organs— ~ ;
it’S quite uncanny.” The frogs are
feeding on small sand flies. They
cam jump 2{t at a bound. Perhaps Mc & Co.

Enearney Lta.,

to enlighten the Zoo authorities. B.W.1.A., for Trinidad.



Madame Bromova

(By a Special Correspondent)

The beginning of 1945 is quite
a way back. World War II was in
its closing stages, and we had yet
to experience the release and
joy of giving vent t» pent up
emotions which found universai
and spontaneous expression in
the celebrations of V.E. and VJ.
days. But this is not a War
story—far from it. 1945 means
very little to us all now, but may—
be it will attain significance as
marking the birth of a new en-
terprise in this our small island
community.

The fact is that in 1945, an
increasing bustle of activity and
a new excitement could be oo-
served in and about the Aquatic
Club on Saturday mornings and,
on occasions, during week days,
in the neighbournood of certain
of our institutions which are nor-
mally devoted to the: initiation
of the young idea into the myste-
ries of the three R’s.

As the weeks and months pass-
ed the contagion spread, and soon
it appeared that a new element
was creeping into the life of the
community, particularlyson those
festive occasions with which our
calendar of public events is 80
liberally sprinkled, when all con-
cerned are bent on en nment
and the sponsors of charitable
appeals reap the harvest of dol-
lars which means so much, not
only to the sponsors, but also to
those who in age, sickness or
other adversity are less well
endowed than others with the
necessities of life.

Thus in 1946 was gathered the
first fruits of this new growth,
the occasion being a garden
party in Government House
grounds, where, in the presence ot
His Excellency the Governor and,
his lady, some 600 guests were
charmed and entertained in a
truly rustic setting to the strains
of sweet music, provided by the
rejuvenated Police Band, under
its then new conductor.

Early 1947 produced the second

bumper crop from this steadily
a



THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Takes A Bow

























FOUR of Madame Bromova’s pupils in a Mexican Dance which was
performed in one of her past shows which have been so successful.

thriving plant. The scene en this
occasion was the Empire Theatre,
once more restored to the use for
which it was originally intended.
The Royal Box filled again witn
its rightful occupants and distin-
guished *guests from a visiting
ship of H.M, Navy, and an audi-
ence where white tie and _ tails
and exquisite gowns with the
eee paraphernalia of fem-
inine charm and ut redom-
inated. Yes, that wie a 188 letter
occasion,

ment of a proper and recog-
nised syllabus of training
in the dance and the ballet

art. ,
(b) “The first fruits etc.” are
the many delightful per-
formances with which
Madame Bromova and her
talented pupils and students
have delighted not only
their audiences, but have
also richly supplemented
the funds of many of our
island charities, and
“The bumper crop” is the
recital which is to be given
at the Empire Theatre on

This tender plant, which has ce)

been so skilfully nursed and

n , continues to grow and
TT spread. From time to time since — ere ae
POCKET CARTOON 1947, blossoms have appeared,
and many of us have savoured Thus has been born an -enter-

Mr. Charles MacKenzie, of Chas.
n J and
Mfs. Risdon would be good enough Mrs. MacKenzie, left yesterday by

hy OSBERT LANCASTER

and enjoyed their fragrance and
beauty. Now it can be said that
the plant has passed its adoles-
cence and reached the first stage
of a full maturity. This year, in

| fact, very soon, we may expect
to see a bumper crop reaped, and
the fruit will be there for all who
wish to take a share.

And now to translate all this
into practical realities. It is all
quite simple.

(a) 1945 — is the year when
Madame Anna Bromova (a
former member of _ the
Imperial Russian ballet--
but a Scotswoman arrived
in Barbados and laid the
foundation for the esvablish-



is



“So 1 looked her straight m
the eye and said: ‘Trudi
isn’t it rather extraordinary
that the main fuse should just
happen to blow out exactly
‘wo minutes before Mr,
Churchill was on the air?

eR RR eA ET

LAZM VYHZ GR

CROSSWORD »

. Cryptoquote:

OPEN



(9)
the

; heart.

1. The sign of a contrite heart.

i. you may, ony eae P
ance of 80) .

10, Turn ou wouldn't take on the

red. (5)
11. Praise in return, (4)
12. As you see this word is across,

7)
14. It 1# naturally palmed, (4) .
17. When cars smash you get this
aki Sompang. (3)
19, ny. bs
20. What the Boarlet Pimperne!
said after “1 will.” (5)
21 Almost alike as two peas, (7) ‘ rr :
23. Talk at large, (3) “Jokes”’—By Freeman
94. Dashing sort of wave but not &

THEATRE

EVERY

TONITE at 8.30 LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
8 NEW STARS—PICK YOUR WINNERS

Plus:

A MUSICAL C. B. (Count) BROWNE EVENING

and his FULL ORCHESTRA

PROGRAMME :

(2) “A Dreamer’s Holiday’—Slow Fox Trot

prise, which in addition to being
a boon from the entertainment
oint of view, is performing a
valuable service in the communi-
ty, especially in the field of the
mental, physical and _ cultural
development of ever growing
numbers of the younger genera-
tion

But this Is not the whole
story. At present it is a private
enterprise. What of to-morrow’
Where will it lead? In another
article, which will appear short-
ly, we will consider the goal
towards which further progress
might well be directed, and how
that goal may be achieved.

CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it:
AXYDLBAAXR
LONGFELLOW

One. letter simply stands for another
for the three L's, X for the two O’s, ete. Single letters apos>
trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints.
Each day the code letters are different

In this example A is used

A Cryptogram Quotation

RENGRIGZX EVV

GNR OAEQT GR QZTYHZX—OYQMZGVVZzZ.

WHAT: A STUPID THING
OLD MAN LEARNING AN ALPHABE .s



!—MONTAIGNE.

Reetires vw

nAinota



KIDDIES
CARNIVAL

NITE



The Theme Song—‘“I’m feeling sentimental over you”

(1) “Let’s Start” (it’s Jump)—Composed & arr. by C. Browne

with Thompson at the Mike

“T can’t give you anything but love.”

permanent one. (7) (4) irvan Cadogan—(on tenor Sax.)+
Down
w Look For Men |» jy2xitvorues
. The tur . 5) Charmer—* > fi vi armer”
y ; % is far fies CB) ar ee (5) Charmer—‘“In the field with the farmer”.
LONDON, (By Mail) be the feature of the dinner here. (3) ad a, (6) Johnson’s Rag—‘Freddie goes to town on alto Sax
Spring fashions will not be © jacket. & pele aise. aw 7) The Irresistabl ar
sailieins mmanapoly this year s ieee ae raky. (6) (7 re Irresistable Milton Quartette
British tailors are preparing a Squared shoulders and exag-| ® formes a which you an (8) Freddie Goddard—Alto Sax—‘Stardust” ¢

new look fér males but without gerated drape are definitely out

the leg and shoulder revealing Men’s spring fashions will be “a
“sensations” featured in the Paris la naturelle” and allow men to
and London collections for women. drop the impression that they

British fashion expert
Taylor indicated that the fashion- muscle-building gadgets.
able gentleman of 1950 will have

John are posing for advertisements for

Taylor calls all this the Ed-

. (4)

.| 9. A word that everybody 1s be-
inning to allow. (3)

18, You'll find a pear in plunder. (6)

15. A large number left the angler
out of range. (5)



narrow to wr
9)

clothes.
to be noticed when

off the surface. (3)
——e

18. A long,
of one’s
22. One point






a waist — despite the fact that wardian look—a return to grand- eo” -_”
their wives and sweethearts are pa’s hey-day — with fancy and goiution esterday’s puztic.—Actoss.
beginning to lose theirs again in coloured waistcoats. 5 Tine, § Binae & talince: % Boe
the 1920 look. “But,” warned Taylor, “you | 17 Rears: 19. id; 21. Nio, 22. Emu: EXTRA:
‘ ; : , 3° Pore: 25° Rumble: 26 Proper, 27.

Trousers. will be narrower, won't see it walking down the | ant, Down: & Ol; 5. tnured; 4 Geese:
jackets skirted at the hips, and street yet—it is coming gradual- | 3. Hu; 6, Tevere rump 14 eet TICKETS ON
the American “shawl” collar will ly.”—(LN.S.) fe. sours ie Siren: ad. wule; 24 Oya PRICES :



Everything
to SUIT you

Sir !
TROPICALS

FOUR INTO ONE
6.72—6.83—6.88—7 08

ali at 6.235

\
\
For a limited time only!

RVANS & WHITPIELDS

Dial 4606 Dial 4220
BROAD ST.








|
x
Sole Selling Agent for Ry
MEN'S AVENUE SHOES |'|%
$14.40 per Pair x






1M
a
16. | race among the heaths. (5) *

AND

We Offer

66666665605



20;

PARTITIONS ®

ALUMINIUM CORRUGATED SHEETS
Lengths 6 ft., to 10 ft., width 2 ft.

KARLIT INSULATING WALL BOARD
Lengths: 6 ft. to 10 ft; Width: 4 ft.

KARLIT HARDBOARD
Lengths: 6 ft., to 8 ft., width 4 ft.

GALVANIZED B.R.C.
Lengths: 8 ft., and 9 ft., width 2 ft., 24 gauge.

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LIMITED.

DIAL 2039

(Extensive range playing)

(9) “The Bells of St. Mary (By special request)

(10) Dennis Peters (Guitar) —“It’s been a long long time”.
(11) Alfred Prescott (on trumpet)—“Harlem Heat”

(12) “Samba Street—Composed & Arranged by Basie

(18) “Diesel Engine Lady Shaw’—Calypso by special request

“Chinese Children calling me daddy”

SALE TONITE
36; 48; 60.



EXPANDED METAL

$$$SS$S66*4 <
\ SOSsS PPP VV Se ee yr ere eee FSO OOOO OSS OOS SCSOSS

SUN. 19th
°



| January
Mayfair.
gant ghost,

Fashion.

Fas

rivals Paris,

aga

an

Bloused at the back; 3,

seennioeeninseeinsaetiar eee | Starring
Monte HALE, Adrian BOOTH
Guide To
Housewives | OLYMPIC

completely as
although the c
the accessories are not.

The Accessories

Briefly—the new accessories are
r hats worn on one

big, flat sailo c
§ one-sided caps trim-

side, or tiny,
med with long feathers.
leather belts
string, and pate’
shoes. Chiffon se
the waist. White
shantung, and tie-
orate breast pockets.

Anyone with
fill in the ghost’
these details.
jacket lines; 7

The Ghost Walk:

By Anne Edwards

EVERY year around the end of
a ghost walks through
She’s an extremely ele-
dressed six months
ahead of style, and she haunts the
salons of our Top Ten dress-de-
signers.

For the ghost is the New Spring
And the New Spring
Fashion is a dreadful secret which | ankles, and buttoned or bowed at
no one reveals to anyone until the
buyers (American for preference)
have had their pick—lest manu-
facturers have the clothes copied
cheaply before the exclusive orig-
inals are in the shop.

We saw the opening of London’s
the week that
the week of two
shows per day—one for each of
our best ten designers.

hion Week,

Robb and I saw the ghost walk
has drawn her as
he is allowed. For,
Jothes are secret—

in. Robb

For

d short,

Today’s Prices



as narrow as a shoe-
nt-leather court
arves tied round
blouses in linen,
silk, with elab-

nd sight can
s clothes a
daytime—three
Tailored, fitted,
about hip-length; 7;

seco!



0 f
;



Bleeding Gums,

| Te eth mean tht oe
| Trench Mouth or verhap,
that will sooner or later

and Heart ‘Trouble cause
bleeding the firg
and quickly ti
guarantee. Am

Again

§
=
£
°
Cc
5
mn
3
a
g

ets, caught in round the hip with
| one button.
| All the skirts are tight, plain,
land straight, with one flap pleat
| at the back. |
For evening—three skirt lines:
/1, Short frock, with handkerchief
points, usually in tulle; 2, Long
skirt with a double tier—in lace;
|}3, Tightly swathed from waist to

money back on
age. Get Amosan fro

Amosan






—







whe back—in brocade.

—TnE
BIGGEST

—LESS.
















ROWVAL Worthings

Opening To-Night at 8.30 p.m.
M.G.M.’s Master Piece
Lassie IN
“HILLS OF HOME”
with

Eimond GWENN, Tom DRAKE
Donald CRISP, Janet LEIGH
Drama, Action, Thrills, Romance.

It's The Best Week-End show.

at ROYAL

Saturday Night at 8.30 p.m.

“THE COLLEGE HERALDS”
CARIBBEAN TRAINING COL-
LEGE MALE OCTENITE in a Pro-
gramme of Spirituals and popular
Songs Assisted by SEDRIC PHIL-
LIPS with Miss VERNA REID at
the piano.

it

Patent-



ROXY

To-morrow Night & Mon.
7.30 p.m.

at

Republic Action Packed Double
Lynne ROBERTS, Donald BARRY
Warren DOUGLAS

in :
“LIGHTNING IN THE FOREST”

“CALIFORNIA FIREBRAND”

Box jack-



To-Morrow Night at 9 p.m.

20th. C-FOX Presents:
Tyrone POWER, Gene TIERNEY



For Pyorrhea—trency,














M

have Pel ay
Cause _
ble. Amosar,

it day tony








~


























COCcOA— an io
Essence ....-- 38c. per lb. fon oF FURe

TEA— Monday Night at 9 p.m.
Loose . 7T4c. per Ib. “SAVAGE STALLION”

ean? with

OIL— : Peggy COMMINGS
Bdible........... 24c. per pint Charles COBURN

LARD—











Wednesday Night at 9 p.m.
“GUADALCANAL D1ARY”
William BENDIX, Preston FOSTER

(Velvo Kris) 5lc. per lb.
Locally Manu-
factured .... 44c. per lb.





\
ij



if
Sys oy sO PTT T SPOTS TOTO SD TTT OTTO TTP PEO PPP PPE EEO.
é ROOFS mz








SS
|









FRIDAY & SUNDAY 8.30 p.m.

PARAMOUNT presents - - -
ALAN LADD as

“THE GREAT GATSBY ”

With a host of Favourites

DIAL 8404 FOR RESERVATION











Marion Ma f
Rand Sha
William Net
HOWARD Kings

nduced














AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT (FRIDAY), SUNDAY, TUESDAY & THURSDAY
NIGHT at 8.30
UNIVERSAL presents - - -

DEANNA DURBIN — DICK HAYMES — VINCENT PRICE
in “UP IN CENTRAL PARK”

.
TO-DAY 230 PM, t
and the Magnificent Music of SIGMUND ROMBERG %

Continuing





EMPIRE, TH

INDIA’S PRIME
JAWAHAREL }

IN f

“ASIA’S NEW |

(A MARCH OF
SU

Enjoy yourself and assist a Deserving Cause

2 HOURS OF FUN & FASHION

At the

GLOBE

: on TUESDAY Feb. 21st.
in a GORGEOUS CABARET & MANNEQUIN SHOW
Beautiful Models in 5th Avenue Outfits
— in aid of —
The ST. THOMAS’ & ST. PHILIP’S WELFARE CLINICS
Reservations made according to a PLAN arrangement.
PRICES :—Orchestra & Circle $1.00; Balcony 72c. & 48c.
TICKETS Sold DAILY 9 a.m. — 4 p.m.















The wiring division of our Electrical Service Department has
been recently re-organized, and-is now in a better position
than before to undertake all kinds of Electrical House, Fa¢-
tory and Commercial Wiring and Installations, ete.

Your patronage is solicited and all orders attended to

promptly. All work fully guaranteed.

MANNING & Co., Ltd

Electric Service Department.









ets

120,000 |
Bigamous
_ Britons

LONDON, (By Mail) |
js booming in Britain. |
‘acations have proved that |
marriages are more}
ean in Britain than any other |
ean country. It is estimated
“sre are 20,000 undiscovered |

eee

a3



mous

ory.
ae wil not make any
to uncover these illicit mar-
< and it is only when some |
mes suspicious and!
over the records that a
marriage is discovered.
ences against these mar- |
discovered, according |
jmates, are between 20 |
to 1. It is believed that |
bigamy case which |
re the courts, there are |
90 which remain ‘undis- |
























































set House, Britain’s
where all details of
irths and deaths, are
automatic check is
match details of current
with those which have

$

Discovery

LONDON, (By Mail)

A discovery worth $25,000 has!
been made by a London whole-
sale stamp dealer.

While sorting through his stock
| of the Universal Postal Union 75th
anniversary issues for the Aden
Dependency of Shihr and Mu-!'
kalla, O. W. Lempert, of War-|
dour-street, found a sheet with-|
out the normal surcharge of “y}
rupee.”

Only one sheet of many thous-
ands sold had missed the printing

cl an for the Registrar
eral’s Office, said :
The system is not intended to
bigamies.”
mi so thousands of illegal
fees will remain unrevealed.
will look at the records
they become suspicious,
experts stated that even |
a ascovered, there still
ouiside chance it will never
%p court, for the difficulties of
bigamy to the satisfactior
judge are many.
Action At Last
at long last something is

; ae machine. Normally the sheet
done by sora eee er to would be worth under $14 but
check .on ‘ this error made the sheet into

ris being discussed by ex-
as of the- Registrar General’s
partment.

a rarity,
Stanley Gibbons, the philatelic

nvisag establishment | @ealer, estimated the sheet was
CS Se dex ‘of the coun-| Worth $25,000 — each stamp
+ 12,000,000 families. Each | Valued at $420. It is possible}
fly would be listed as a unit—| that one stamp will be offered}
mother, and children as | to the King, who like his father

mive, and cross-indexed so | 1S a keen collector.
ould be easy to find out} The Aden and Dependencies

fappened to them for ever

ty

sets were printed in East African
currency of shillings and cents, |
because it was intended that they
should adopt that currency by|
the time that the stamps went]
on sale on Oct. 10, 1949, |

As a result of technical trouble, |
the old currency of rupees and
annas, based on the Indian rate

admit that the index |
pot. bring to light immedi-
‘ of existing bigamous |
es, but as time went on
y would become much more
tilt to practice.

ties prove that four men

woman commits bigamy. of exchange, was retained, The
“sexes are am ae ~ stamps, already printed, were
between 2 and <9, and | surcharged with rupee or anna}
ely to commit it after 60. | values. |
n between the ages of 17 Stamp collectors are already |}

are, six times more likely
it, however, than men
he age. And what hap-
the guilty party is
iit to court?



hunting for the Aden and Depen-
dencies sets, because they were!
withdrawn without notice 10!
days before the scheduled time. |
Stocks in the hands of dealers |
are believed to be very low. |

The price rose from 49 cents|
for each of the three sets to $2.45 |

he!

h.amazing thing,” said
H probation officer, “that
N goes into the dock |

With bigamy, it is usually | ©2¢h in mind condition, with al
fous wife—theoretically | Proportionately higher price for|
fed party—who stands by | Used. Most of the used stamps|
Blicly announces forgive- |@â„¢anate from Aden Town, as
md whether he goes to | Postal communications with the|
or not, remains loyal. | States are extremely bad-

Plegal wife? Usually she —(LN.S)



thing but contempt for the
Diet 9?

@my in Britain is an indict-
ferme carrying a maximum
y of seven years imprison-

t—(LN.S.)

Indo-China Policy
Is The Test Case

BANGKOK, Feb. 16.

Expressions of the United States |
and other western powers’ re-|
Sponsibilities stemming from their |
moral support of Indo-China’s
newly independent states was the |
major southeast Asia political |
issue before the Conference of the
United States Asian envoys which |
ended here tonight. |

It was reliably learned, after |
the Conference, that the envoys |
took particular note of the Siam- |
ese Premier’s failure to gain ma- |
iority support for his proposal to |
the Cabinet that Siam should fol- |
‘ow the western powers lead in
recognising the Governments of
Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos. It
is known with certainty that the
conference accepted that. Siam’s
harontic expression of what is un-
ferstood to be a general mood of
disillusionment spreesing over
South East Asia, was a reminder
‘hat remaining western prestige
| vas likely to stand or fall on the

nergence of a_ positive policy
in the Indo-China test case.

An informed diplomatic source
said that the question of respons-
ibility, erystalised into the simple
proposition of whether or not the
United States would defend with
)®rmed forces the Asian regimes
| coomed to Communist liquidation
if left to their own devices, was
the “dominant thought emerging
} from all but the most hypotheti-
}eal of the discussions”.—Reuter,














Owns 7 Palaces
But Is Not Rich

LONDON, (By Mail).

The 26-year-old Maharajah of
Jodhpur, leaving for India, asked
reporters not to describe him as
one of the wealthiest men in the
world.

“The family owns six or seven
palaces and a few smaller resid-
ences,” he said, “but they are more
of a liability than an asset now-
| adays.”” :

State revenue of Jodhpur is
| $4,200 a year. Now it has acceded
to the Dominioh of India, revenues
are no longer drawn by the
Maharajah who is, however, en-
titled to a State pension not ex-

ceeding $210,000 a year, in addi-
tion to the income from his per-

HAIR is hard-to-manage
Hofloose dandruff, chances
YOu have Dry Scalp
une’ Hair Tonic checks Dry











by supplementing the nat-
P €alp oils. Loose dandruff
and your hair stays

fad well-groomed all d

ay.

Maes : a
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Ht contains no alcoliol

drying ingredients. T:
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—(LN.S.)







WELCOMES CHURCHILL'S

f Vasey

ore LONDON, Feb. 15
mie Liberal Party jeader, Clement
Davies in welcoming Winston
Churchill’s proposal for an ap.
proach to Stalin, today said that
thought the Government could







Reuter.



SNow if you send thar sl

| magazines are the “Cinderellas of

sonal fortune. |

SUGGESTION

} ore. |
ntact ali Commonwealth F re- |
ier their attitude vhile
‘ in touch with: President

Y Mons Tt an
MEN TObAY TH Ther think the free coun-
OTHER Kai tonic , tries of Europe would be anxious
dente to join he told reporters.-




eee



Oil Enquiry

NEW YORK, Feb. i6.

The United States Government
has subpoenaed records from two
leading oil companies for an in-
vestigation of “international petre-
Jeum cartel activities” mainly in
the Middle East, according to offi-
cials of the companies concerned,

Socony Vacuum Oil, and Stand-
ard Oil Company (New Jersey)
Officials said that memoranda from
the Federal Trade Commission
came with the subpoenas.

These said the Gommission had}
“instituled an investigation of
agreements entered into by Ameri-
can petroleum companies among)
themselves and with petroleum
companies of other nations and
the relation of such agreements to
the domestic trade in, and prac- |
tices of, the American petroleum ;
industry”. |

Spokesman for the oil compan-!
ies denied that the firms had been |
involved in cartel activities.

Officials of the two oil compan-
ies, who understood that the Gulf}
Oil Corporation of Pittsburgh was |
included in the inquiry said the;
records sought had already been |
made public, many of them before |
various Congressional hearings.

Among records sought by the
F.T.C. were those of the Iraq|
Petroleum Agreement and the |
pact by Jersey Standard andj{
Socony for the purchase of Anglo- |
Iranian Oil Company crude oil.

Middle East oil has been much
in the news, lately, various Ameri- |
can producers criticising imports |
at a time when domestic oil pro- |
duction was being curtailed. |

—Reuter.

Fish Slaps
Parish Mags ©

|

LONDON, (By Mail)
A charge that Britain’s parish



Christian literature” has been |
|levelled by author J. Blair-Fish.
| And backed by the Church}

Assembly, he has started a drive

|for brighter editions. \

What is needed, said Fish, is}
more virile writing. |
“It is better for a church}
magazine to risk being vulgar than)

to be dull and innocuous.” a)
In his book “Better Parish}
Magazines,” published by the}

Church’s own press, Fish slaps |
Britain’s 11,000 church parish|
periodicals as the “dreariest publi-
cations of today.”

The first move
Blair the replacement
parson by a lay editor. |

The vicar, said Blair, is apt to|
be either too erudite or given too;
much to the use of parsonic jargon. |
“Few of the magazines appeal|
the serious reader or are in-
stimulating to anyone
writes.

Critical

The Book is severely critical
of the humbler sort of religious
literature. It employs, according
to Blair, an irritating style ot
writing marked by “excessive
Churchiness.” One great essential
of the parish magazine is that it
should contain real news.

“If an editor cannot find news
for his magazine he had better
give up editing and consult a
psychoanalyst. If Church news
chiefly consists in recording the
names of those who ‘do the altar
flowers’ or take up collections,
the magazine will appear dull and
actually fatuous to others. ’

The book contains many
allusions to clerical editors:

“The style of many clergymen
is anything but felicitous. The
parson is apt to be either too

suggested by!
of the|
!

is

to
tellectually
else,” Blair

erudite for his readers or too
much given to the use of a
‘parson’s jargon’ that puts people
off.”

“Some vicars’ letters are so full
of meat, or savoured with salt
that no parishioner would like to
see them omitted. The majority
seem to be resigned, complaining,
or simply dull.”

The Bishop of London, Dr.
Wand, in strongly recommending
the book, said:

“It is quite possible that many
clergy will challenge the author’s

preference for SOURCES, as
against parsonic phraseology.
7 , —(LN.S.)



May Plead For
Don Juan

MADRID, Feb. 16

| Qbservers here suggested to-
jnight that to-day’s journey to
Rome by Gil Robles, former



Spanish Catholic Leader, was to
| plead the cause of Don Juan,
|claimant to the Spanish Throne,
to the Vatican.

| Robles, political adviser to Don
| Juan, passed through here to-day

by air from Estoril Portugal.
where he in voluntary exile
His trip was linked with the ex-

pected visit to Rome by Don Juan
jand his wife the end of the
| month.—Reuter.

at

ogan in to the Express and wim ten guineas, it

ee




For Carnival

RIO DE JANEIRO, Feb. 16.

Rio is feverishly preparing itself
to turn into a garish wonderland
of noise, light
ation for the carnival which begins
at midday next Saturday.

Ever since New Year’s eve, the
sound of the steady beat of drums
has been rolling down the hill-
sides every night in the sh: nty
towns or “Favellas”, the negro
quarters high up on Rio’s hills,
carnival clubs and samba schools
have been rehearsing for the im-

pending three days and three
nights of mass gaiety. |
Illuminated arches already

spread the capital’s main streets
and monster canvas clowns, and
columbines look down from the
sides of skyscrapers.

In Praca Onze, one of Rio’s main
squares, a replica of a hill complete
with shanty town has been built,
while open air dance floors, band
stands and 40 feet high revolving
towers have been erected in diff-
erent parts of the city. Thirty feet
high pillars flank the great thor-
oughfare, Avenida Rio Branco. |
Illuminated fountains are playing |
an important part which will lend



to the splendour of the night |
Carnival here means more than
Christmas, New Year’s eve and

Easter together. Although it starts
officially on the Sunday before Ash}
Wednesday, people turn up to work
on Saturday morning already
wearing their fancy As
midday strikes, the streets are
transformed with gaily dressed
crowds streaming out of offices
and shops. Business closes down,
The carnival is on

By nightfall Rio is ablaze
light and the crowds have taken
over, Traffic comes to a standstill,
Trams, the only form of transport,
disappear under the mass of col-

dress.

THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

"ll just about pay your fine.”

From Human Skins

with | de



ourful passengers swarming even





25,000 U.S. Govt. Wants | Rio Prepares | R.C. Journalists

Meet In Rome

ROME, Feb. 16,

About 350 Catholic journalists | =â„¢pire. Moreover a specialist in,

from 16 countries will meet to-day

the Catholic Press.

Presided over by Guiseppe Della | comes along.
Torre, President of the Interna- | much chance in the backwoods «f
tional Union of the Catholic Press,| Africa as if he were in London,

they will discuss the theme: “The
Catholic Press in the service of
truth, justice and peace.”

Countries represented are Aus- |

tria, Belgium, China, Egypt, Italy,
France, Germany, Spain, Venezue-
la, Uruguay, Holland, The United
States, New Zealand, Malta Canada,

On the last day of the Congress,
next Monday, the journalists will
visit St. Peters Basillica. An
audience which Pope Pius Twelve
was to have granted to them for
Monday was cancelled because of

his illness. It is hoped, however, |

that he may be well enough to
receive them at the week-end.
—Reuter.



Lampshades Made
















and fantastic decor-| in the great Chancellery Palace, maintain contacts with the top
on Rome’s Capitol Hill for the | ranks of his science in Britain
) third annual 4 day Congress of! and know that he will not be over-

|
|
|






| Colonial
| Se

LONDON, (By Mail)

A scheme under which eventual-
jly some 400 research workers

will be available to work in tne
Colonies has now started and, says
the Colonial Office, anyone in the
Empire who has the right qualiti-
| cations—and they are of a very
high standard—can join in.

With £2,250,006 a year to spend
}on research, the Colonial Office
has tackled the problem podgd by
the fact that in the past brilliant
young research workers have been
reluctant to go out to the Colonies
for a year or two because they
would have lost opportunities of
advancemegi at home, as well as
such things as pension rights and
steady advances in pay.

‘|. The new Colonial Research
Service, dating from January 31,
this year, but with retrospective
— to the beginning of 1949,
creates a service with salary,
terms of service and standaras
comparable to anything in the
| Unitea Kingdom and, for instance,
gives the worker the opportunity
| of earning a continuous pension
: whether he spends all or only part
{of his career in the Colonial





for example, soil research, will

| looked when a

He

top-flight
will have

job

as

under the eyes of the selectors
themselves.
389 Schemes

“Above all we want the young
people to come forward, the
| brilliant “young men,” says a
Colonial Office official. “We want
the people who are prepared to
|put in two or three years’ hard
| work in the colonies themselves.
At the moment there are about
380 research schemes under way |
and so far we have made ten!
senior appointments, about 59}
subsidiary appointments, and wii
| probably appoint about 400 work- |
ers of all kinds during the full)
run of the plan.” |

The work of the
Universities in. Africa,
Indies and the Far
integrated with the service and|
any Colonial workers who fulfil |

the necessary technical qualifica- |



Colonial |
the Wes!
East will be

i tions stand a chance of appoint- |

} ment,
MUNICH, Feb. 16. | Dr. C. F.. Hickling, Fisherie
Isle Knoch, wife of the Buchen- | Research Officer, for instance, is|
wald Nazi Concentration Camp | Planning to find a omnes 20
Commander, is to be mentally for a Malayan Chinese with
examined, London science degree Hickling

She is to be tried in April by
a German court for alleged mur-
r of German camp inmates
Her defence maintains she was
not fully responsible for heF ac-
tions. She was said to have had

lampshades made of her victims

on to the roofs. Fares are rarely | S*ins. —Reuter.

collected and conductors some-
times leave their trams to join in
the fun.

Carnival is the time for a general
easing of everyday restrictions.
One rule, however, is firmly im- |
posed. No spirits may be sold. At
earnival balls you can only buy |
beer or champagne.—Reuter.





Britain Asked |
To Protect Man
In Trinidad |

MONTEVIDEO, (By Mail.)

The American Society for the}
Defence of Democracy has asked;
the British Foreign Minister, Mr.}
Ernest Bevin, not to comply with|
a Venezuelan Government request}
to extradite a Venezuelan exiled}
politico now residing in Port-of-}
Spain, Trinidad,

In a letter sent to Mr. Bevin,}
the Society said that Vincente]
Gamboa, wanted by the Venezue-|
lan Military Junta, would be de-
| prived of his human rights if he
were turned over to the Venez-|
uelan authorities,

“We trust that the historical
British respect for human liber-|
ties will not permit the Violation |
of this elemental right of asylum,”



the note said. —B.U-P



Octopus Attack

|
|
ALGIERS, Feb. 16
A young man fishing nied
water here with a harpoon was
avlacked by an octopus which
he surprised in a hole in a rock.
Held by its tentacles, he suc-
eeded in reaching the beach}
where his friends killed it. |
—Reuter. |

LADIES’)
COATS

en
Sport or Evening Wear

IN



Stripes, Plaids and
Solid Colours

$28.50 each

MODERN DRESS

SHOPPE
Broad St.

Bridgetown \



| sent to blow
| have formed in the Danube caus-

regions
sent to the areas.—Reuter,



Danube Floods
Large Areas

SOFIA, Feb. 16.
troops have been
up barriers which

Bulgarian

| ing the river to flood large areas
| of country.

Following a Cabinet meeting

threatened
are being

all along the

and supplies



10 Killed In
Natal Fracas

DUNDEE, Natal, Feb. 16.
Ten Africans were killed and
nine others seriously wounded in
a fight early today between two
factions of the Mcunu Tribe in
the Dundee Natal District.
Firearms and assegis were used

by beth sides.

The trouble was believed to
have started over a dispute about
maize lands, Police were sent to
the scene of the fighting.

—(Reuier.)



Pope Much Better

VATICAN CITY, Feb. 16.
Pope Pius. XII, who was ill with
influenza for the past two days,
was to-day reported much better

with a temperature well Below
normal. \
On the doctor’s order, “how-

ever, he will keep to his room,
coming up only for a short period
of the day, at least until the end
of the week.—Reuter.

here, observation posts have been |
\ set



BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY

| million are in the Far East, mostly

|

|

is the expert on fish farming—a

science that has been practised

for about 4,000 years in China,

being handed on from father to

son.
Hickling explains that out
avout 14% million acres of

farms throughout the world,

of
fish
14]

in China. Now a fisheries Research
Institute is being set up at Penang!
in Malaya, covering 300 acres of |
which 120 acres will be devoted
to ponds in which every kind of
fish farming can be practised, Ir |
particular the scientists want “c

know more about fish grow’ng ir

rice fields during the flooding

They want to find out what effect

the fish have on the rice, and the
rice on the fish.’

“There are,” says Hick'ing,
“enormous possibilities for fish
farming in Africa and the West
Indies.” —(B.U.P.)

Death Holds





_ Up Traffic

SYDNEY, Feb. 16.
Traffic in the heart of Sydney
was disorganised for half an hour
today when a signalman collapsed
and died in a traffic control tower
at the junction of Elizabeth Street
and Liverpool Street.

Ambulance men had to radio
for police help to get his body
from the tower, down a narrow
iron ladder.

—Reutcr.



Wolves Deterred
By Foul Smell

OSLO, Feb. 16.

Norwegian Lapps have fcund
a new way of stopping wcives
attacking the herds of reindeer
which they graze on the Ior-
wegian-Finnish countries.

The Lapps smear the reindeer
with a foul-smelling paste. The
wolves hate the smell so n uch
that they keep away.

fe —Reuter







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oi. Thursday






















. a

A Nation Will Have A Go.

America Plans the Biggest —
Q) and A of all time

By Frederick Cook

NEW YORK.

BRIGHT and early on April Fool’s Day, 4
150,000 specially trained men and women COLONNADE STORES
will start ringing doorbells all over America, : %
To startled householders, farmers and head§ | 2. ——————— saieinaeciiia
of businesses they will put questions like:
“How old are you?”; “How many in the fam-
ily?”; “How much do you make a year?”;
been in this job?”;



=

A PAGE FOUR THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

BARBADOS db AVOGTE The Western Tradition

fae Se SS Ges
Few broadcast discussions have 1s the present day “barbarian”?
Published by Thu Advocate Co. Ltd., 34, Broad St., Bridgetown roused so much interest as a ser- Hy Gilbert Murray Modern Western civilisation is in
a ies of Talks on the Western or essence Hellenic, thpugh Jew-
Friday, February 17th, 1950 |

European Tradition, given in the ish civilisation added monotheism
European Programme of the Brit- and some moral cleansing; Rome
Guage [ing 00h and now lsh a saat‘ abe vader tht
Hondur am Warning a book, “The Western Tradition,” strength. oi takes poe.
FROM every corner of the West Indies and by the Castle Press, 50, Old Growth Of Toleration
from every source of thought it has been
pointed out to the British Government that
a stable economy means more to the three
million peoples who inhabit this part of the

Brompton Road, London, S.W. 7 Toletetion was a slow-growing
Empire than all the constitutional amend-

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY yp
——=> iy











McEWANS RED LABEL BEER—per ‘bottle

| GOLDEN BEAN IcING suGaR’ “™* -- 6

Bottles HEINZ PLAIN OLIVES

One of Britain’s foremost
classical scholars, and author
of a number of books on in-
ternational politics. He has
been, since 1928, President
of the International Commit-
tee of Intellectual Co-opera-
tion, In 1941 Professor Mur-
ray was awarded one of
Britain’s highest honours,
the Order of Merit.









at seven shillings and sixpence net. plant. But ;

There is a preface by Lord Lay- merely in ieee oP aanion
ion, a Liberal peer, on the prac- of noxious Keresy, because you
tical issue now, and an epilogue cannot kill it, but much more, at
by Arnold Toynbee, the well- least among enlightened people.
known historian, on the possibili- as a recognition of the fact that
ties of a hundred or more years no one sect has the monopoly of





We have just received’
CONGOLEUM ~

in various colours and patterns, excellent for

. hence. There are 18 distinguished but in sci eternal “How long have you
; at ut in science and phil truth. Each may learn x 7
ments forced on us from Whitehall, Th contributors — Liberal, Socialist, art, letters, music, aay, . something from the ore. “Are you an Indian, Japanese, Negro, Chin-

Catholic, Protestant, agnostic,
scientific and literary, illustrating
vividly the “diversity in unity”
which most of them find to be
characteristic of our civilisation.

Two matters seem clear beyond
dispute, Our greatest duty is to
save civilisation where it is in
peril, and restore it where it is
already wrecked. And secondly,
the way to restore it is by union,
in whatever form may prove
practicable. The hope of a really
world-wide union has, for the
present, disastrously failed; but
the nations of the Western Tradi-
tion, forming what used to be
called “Christendom”, are visibly
uniting more closely.

What is it that has wrecked
Western civilised society and made
the tyrannies and miseries of Eu-
rope a byword in other continents?
Obviously war, war on a vaster
scale than ever before and the
more atrocious because it was vir-
tually a civil war between groups
belonging to the same community,
a highly industrialised community
with capacities for destruction far
exceeding its natural powers of
recovery. Apart from economic
ruin the long world war has left
behind it too moral consequences;
first, the passion for power or
victory at all costs, and consequent
thereon a general disregard of all
aims and qualities not conducing
to power and victory, which com-
prise, as a matter of fact, nearly
all the higher values of human
life. This it is which tends to
wreck civilisation.

Freedom And Rule Of Law

But what is this Western Civili-
sation that we are trying to save
or restore? It certainly was a
wonderful thing. It held before
1914 a position of undisputed su-
premacy in the world, not only in
wealth and power and technology,

this is so is now being conclusively proved
by the attitude of the people of British
Honduras.

Ten months ago the people of British
Honduras passed a resolution of loyalty
and pledged to maintain their allegiance
to the British Crown when Guatemala
repeated her unsupported claim to sov-
ereignty in that ¢blony. The claimant was
invited by the British Government to sub-
mit her claim to the Court of International
Justice at the Hague. Even if the ruling of
such a court had gone against the objection
of Great Britain it is clear that the loyalty
and affection of the people of British Hon-
duras emphasised by the recognition of the
right of self determination would have
' greatly influenced any future action.
bt That loyalty and affection have now been
strained to the utmost and to-day the same
people who stood up against the intruder
et ten months ago are now up in arms against
HS British economic policy. It is not that they
are unmindful of the debt they owe to
Great Britain; it is not that they desire any
t secession from the British Crown, but they
z now feel that they have been penalised and
eae their economy upset by the trade and fin-
; ancial policy of the Socialist Government.
? British Honduras suffered in the past

from that inattention by succeeding Gov-

ernments in London in the same way that
\ the Leeward Islands suffered. These were
‘ characterised by no less an outstanding
Colonial Administrator than Sir Alan
Burns as the “slums of Empire.” Now Brit-
ish Honduras has been spoken of by Mr.
Richard Greenough as one of the most dis-
graceful spots in British Colonial adminis-

government and moral authority.
It was liberal. It permitted no ‘the Western Tradition” are chief-
famines, no pestilences, no violent }Â¥ impressed by the ready wel-
persecutions, no organised brig- CMe given by Europe to the mod-
andage, such as were often in- @â„¢ scientific and rationalist
eradicable elsewhere. movement. Almost all scientific
What was the secret of this sig- ®dvance in the modern world has
nal success? A combination, say been due to Europe itself or to the
most of the contributors to this extension of Europe beyond the
book, of Freedom and the Rule of Seas. And the plain positive ideal
Law. It is at root a Hellenic tradi- Of “the greatest happiness of the
tion; a habit, as Professor E. L. greatest number”, witgout aristo-
Woodward puts it, of “being never cratic or dogmatic “strings,” has
indifferent to the problems of gov- been more accepted in the
ernment.” The ancient Greek Western tradition than elsewhere.
writers, historians, philosophers It is in the scientific “respect for
and even poets, are always dis- fact,” in the constant increase of
cussing such problems and give in knowledge, and particularly in
general the.same answers. The the comparatively new explora-
first need is the rule of Law. tions of human psychology and
In the half-oriental empire of sociology, that these writers place
the Seleucidae, for instance, the their chief hopes for the future.
Cities were Greek, the hinterland It is on these lines, they think,
was Asiatic, In the cities an ac- that Western civilisation has risen
cused person had a public trial most distinctively above “bar-
recording to a public law, pub- barism”.
licly known; he had the right to Doubtless, the whole book is
defend himself or to engage coun- open to Mr. Tonybee’s criticism
sel; his punishment, if convicted, that, however much the individ-
was limited by law. In the “bar- ual writers may differ, it is all
barian” districts he could be “What the West thinks of the
seized without trial, and punished West”, not the judgement of dis-
in any way that might please the interested outsiders. The writers
governor. In Hellas all were are all Westerners; more than
equal in the eyes of the law, and that, they are all British. What,
the law itself was made by a he asks, would a Chinese or In-
process of argument and discus- dian observer say of us? Or even
sion, It was not merely a law of an observer from France or Ger-
obedienze to a king or priest. Jus- many? The point is true as far as
tice and even truth, in the eyes of it goes, but we may well answer
the philosophers, was a thing to that, in the first place, we Euro-
be reached, or at least to be ap- peans do understand our ways and
proached, by searching and dis- standards more intimately than
cussion. Difference of opinion was any outsider is likely to do, and
not merely, within large limits, this book is only a British contri-
tolerated but was actually wel- bution to what we hope will be a
comed as a help to finding the best symposium of Western opinion.
answer. After all, the great problem of
Is it not all the same spirit healing our wounded civilisation
which modern Western civilisa- is our own problem. No one can
tion regularly maintains as against solve it but ourselves.

ese, Filipino—or other?”

Anyone who feels overwhelmed by temp-
tation to tell the questioner to mind his own
business had better restrain it, for refusal
to answer fully all questions in America’s |
every—10—years census carries with it 60
days in jail and a fine of about £170.

‘The census is the biggest fact-finding job
in Ly It will cost the taxpayer at least

Ss
















and breakfast room floors or for concrete

om

—also —

CONGOLEUM SQUARE

3x3 yards and 3x24 yards

£ 25,000,
“ ANSWERS FILL 100 VOLUMES

Statisticians of the Census Bureau will
have a full-time job for three years classi-
fying and analysing the information gath-
ered, with the aid of an “electronic brain”
equipped with 10,000 tubes. :

When it is all over, America’s officials will ‘
know more about their country than any WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD., s

Government have ever known since Eng-
C. S. PITCHER & CO,

land completed the Domesday Book.
Phones : 4472, 4687,






























More than 40,000,000 families, 60,000,000
farmers and 3,000,000 businesses and indus-
tries will be checked. In addition to the
questions about age, sex, race, education, job,
income, health, and so forth which the wage-
earner will have to answer, land workers
will be queried about their crops, irrigation,
prices, acreage and related matters.

Businessmen will_have to fill in compli-
cated forms giving full details of production,
employment, sales, prices, wages, costs and
markets.

In all, it is estimated that more than
6,000,000,000 facts will be at the Govern-
ments’ disposal when it is all over, filling
about 100 volumes or 150,000 pages of small

rint.
THE DEAD MUST NOT TELL

The enumerators face no easy job. They
will visit Park Avenue penthouses and mis-
erable slums in New Orleans, jails and nud-
ist camps, isolated lighthouses and lumber
camps in the Far North, ships in harbour
and seamen’s hostels and bars.

If the experience of past years is repeated,
they will be violently assaulted, kicked
downstairs, shot at, chased by dogs, dodged
for days at a time, and often have to call for

a eee
or this, they will earn four cents





FINE FOOD

order at

CONDENSED MILK
Per Case $11.04

‘The Berlin

Kremlin’








Danish Boneless TINNED HAMS—2\4lb. each .
Danish Boneless TINNED HAMS—34lb. each .......,
Danish Boneless TINNED HAMS—4%4]b.—12lb., per Ib,

se tneee








Sai. me ra PABLUM—small pkg. ...9.+.+-+sseeseenees tele
The reports of several investigating bod- By William Hamsher (3%d.) for each name. With luck, speed and PABLUM large pkg... sts ig
ve: Ee —W4lb. DKg. ... 04.0 00caeee
ies have shown that British Honduras BERLIN. a compound, the Kremlin of ” agility they may make as much as £17 a|% DivcappLE JAM—ABlb. tins...
A NEW brick wall runs be- Berlin, many”—and reputed to be the| week—if everybody is at home the first time |% SevILLB ORANGE MARMALADE—4b, tins ..

deserves special attention. Sparsely popu- man Moscow most trusts of all

lated and without adequate agricultural
production to support the smallest measure
of industrialisation the country has been
unable to support their population at any
standard in keeping with modern demands.
: The Evans Report left no doubt that the
‘ie time has come when apart from any gen-
eral reorientation of policy in the Colonial
Empire the British Government needed to
‘ pay special attention to the needs of British
hi Honduras.

It was singularly unfortunate that the
over-all policy of the present Socialist Gov-
ernment was not sufficiently flexible to
admit of any relaxation of the rule as far
as British Honduras was concerned. It is
even now more unfortunate that no heed
was paid to the pleadings of the people of
that colony for some relief from the distress
of devaluation.

There is no rule without its exception
and there is no healthy government with
an over-all power which cannot deal with
the case of each country on its particular
merits having due regard to the peculiar
conditions prevailing.

What is more than unfortunate in the
present instance is that there are other col-






















side the little River Panke where
it sparkles and eddies through a
wooded park on the north-east
border of Soviet Berlin. The wall
is half a mile long and twice as
high as a man,

Both sides are strongly patrolled
day and night. The German
Black Guards, who move silently
among the trees, wear smart
black uniforms with _ silver-
coloured shoulder flashes. They
have new belts of bright brown
leather, and each man carries a
revolver on his right hip.

If, ignoring the revolvers and
the rest, you scaled the wall, you
would find nothing more grisly
than a well-kept lawn, an enor-
mous black car on a path beside
it and, pacing on the grass, a
lonely old man, thick white hair
showing beneath a Homburg hat,
his bulk swaddled in a heavy grey
top coat

Royal Domain

The little, lone pacer is the
Moscow-trained Communist Wil-
helm Pieck. His new biography
proudly records that he is a close
friend of Stalin, his co-disciple in
Marxism, and now, at 74, the
Kremlin’s choice for the presi-
dency of the East German “Peo-
ple’s Democratic” Government,

If protection from the Russians
is not needed, can it be that he is
to be protected from jealous Ger-
mans?

For besides the presidency
Comrade Pieck also inherited a

Here are the homes of the men
who, with Pieck, made up the
Communist Government of this
“People’s Democracy,” and, like
Pieck, all who live in the com-
pound are as carefully guarded as
if they were lunatics or lepers.

Most Germans would envy
them their villas, even if they
are only of the outer suburban
family type that could be put up
for, say, £800 in the days when
that sort of thing was allowed.

Rank Tells

Among the “protected person-
nel” of the compound there is
not much calling on neighbours.

If ever President Pieck leaves
his royal hunting lodge and his
well-kept lawn to drop in on the
Otto Grotewohls for instance, he
could not fail to contrast his own
spacious home with the lack of
space provided for his Prime
Minister,

But there is no evidence that
President Pieck has ever gone
visiting in the Premier’s street—
the Friedrich Wilhelmstrasse, one
of the narrowest in the whole
compound.

The presidentail car
uses the front gate. If he drove
out of the side entrance, it is said,
there would be only one Black
Guard to salute him.

The truth is that in this com-
pound
has abolished rank, it is
rank—up or down the Commun-
ist ladder—which tells.

always Nuschke made her his

this Government.

Frau Lotte is known for her
swift eye for food bargains in the
special shop for high-ups where
Germans and Russians still meet
and where every shopper must
show a special admission card
before being allowed to buy.

Other Government fraus avoid
being seen in this store for high-
ups and foreign diplomats from
the East. Among the shy ones is
young Frau Profe¥sor Gertrud
Kastner, wife of Economics Pro-
fessor Hermann Kastner, the so-
called Liberal, who is another
Deputy Premier.

Visitors

Frau Kastner is never among
the personal shoppers. But she
well knows the attractions of the
cafe attached to the store, She
visits it frequently for coffee and
cream cakes, She acquired the
habit when she was Kasther’s
secretary and took coffee with
the first Frau Kastner,

Another shy Frau Minister is
Frau Nuschke, She was 21 when
57-year-old Deputy Premier

f
bride, ~—

The question of a motor car
went to Ministerial level the
other day. This was after the
Russians refused a Western dip-

of a Government which lomat permission to drive his
still Own car back East to his post of

duty.

In past years
something of a strain on the honesty of some
enumerators. One was.caught boosting his
pay by visiting a neighbouring cemetery,
copying names from tombstones and writ-
ing in imaginary data.
enumerator must pass a political
e census is an outstanding example
of America’s political — system. All
appointments rest with t
and nomination of census staff is considered
the juiciest plum with which to reward loyal
party workers after the appointment of
me

TH
















onies in the West Indies suffering now
from feelings of disappointment and frus-
tration resultant from the mishandling of
the sugar problem by the Ministry of Food.
The virus might spread and although there
might not be the same reckless abandon of
all civilities it is likely that British rule in

“Tell him we will give him a



royal domain—this Panke park
of many trees and many mansions
where once the
proudly pranced on hunting days.

There was no wall then, Neither
was there in the park a palisade
to which the wall gives place
for a half mile. It is a palisade of
green-painted, dee p-planted
planks which curves past a few

Hohenzollerns

Shopping jygecedence presents
its problems in the compound,
The keenest shopper is Frau
Lotte Kuehn-Ulbricht, who runs
the household of bearded Deputy
Premier Walter Ulbricht, the
“modern Lenin of Eastern Ger-

visa to take his car across the
Soviet zone,” said Foreign Min-
ister Georg Dertinger, but the
Westerner refused to be led into
negotiating with an unelected
Government whose legal exist-
ence the Western Powers deny.

But Western recognition—just
that—remains the chief hope of
the East zone “People’s Demo-

the piecework system proved

e party in power,

VANITY TRICK

Question-askers are trained in a number
of tricks to enable them to get at the truth.
They are told, for example, that if they sus-
pect that a woman is the type who will not
give her exact age if asked outright, they
should not ask her at all.

Instead, in the midst of other questions,
they should say innocently : “Let’s see—you
will be about 43 years old?”—always adding
five or 10 years to their real guess. Nine
times out of ten, the indignant woman will
blurt out the truth.

Enumerators all take an oath of secrecy
and accuracy.—LES.

Hitler Ordered The Vatican To Be Raided



MUNICH, Feb. 16.

WHEN Italy surrendered in 1943, Hitler
ordered the Vatican to be raided, Herr Ru- |
dolf Rahn, last Nazi Ambassador to Italy told
a Denazification Tribunal here to-day.

He said that the order was not carried out
only because he flew to Berlin, and talked
the Nazi leaders out of the idea a Reuter re-
port stated.

STANSFELD,

55598693539 56.












WEST OF ENGLAN

s9henl
g

DOE SKINS

Made Exclusively
by

HUNT & WINTER

in the POPULAR COLOURS

FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE VISITOR
FROM THE :

M.V. STELLA POLARIS
OUR DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT Wis
REMAIN OPEN UNTIL 3.30 PM. ON
SATURDAY 18TH



DACOSTA & CO.. Lil

What's on Today

Intercolonial Cricket at Ken-
sington, 11.30 a.m,

Court of Ordinary, 11 a.m.

Police Magistrates’ Court 10
a.m.

Hitler in issuing the order called the “Vati- |,
can a nesting place for Allied spies.” Herr |
Rahn said that he met Hitler, Goering, Rib- |
bentrop, and other leaders in Berlin. Hitler |
had once launched a diatribe against the |!

Pope and demanded that his order should be

the West Indies will draw upon itself the
odium which it has attracted in other parts
of the Empire.

There is still time to heal the breach and
it was never beyond the capacity of British
statesmen to rise to the occasion.

stately trees then suddenly angles
away from the park to seal off a
whole row of streets—such as
Bismarck-alley, Kronprinz- ave-
nue, and Siegfried-lane.

Among these reminders of
Prussian glory the wall and pali-
sade came together to enclose

cratic” Cabinet insid -
lin of Berlin. mecca

‘Until this hope matures, they
will stay in their compound with
the protective Black Guards as a
tangible symbol of their own fear
of facing a free electorate.





OUR READERS



To the Editor, The Advocate—

Sir,—May I beg the courtesy of
your columns to express a word of
thanks to all those kind people
who have so generously offered
their hospitality to all members of
the Ship’s Company during H.M.S.
Devonshire’s visit to “Little
England.”

I should like to be able to thank
individually those who have en-
tertained us in their homes or
clubs; those who have organized
our cricket, tennis, football and
the like and those who have given
up much of their time for our
benefit. This I cannot do but I do
want to say there is no one in the
Devonshire who has not appreci-
aied to the fullest degree the wel-



SAY:

The * Devonshire” Says Thanks To «Little England”

Records Will Be Smashed

To the Editor, The Advocate—
_SIR,—On the eve of the selec-
ton of the West Indies team to
tour England this summer I am
being continually approachcd by
many cricket lovers like myself
who ask me such questions as
“What do you think our chances
will be” and “How do you com-
pare the expected 1950 team
with that of 1939?” In the cir-
Qumstances I shall during the
course of this letter reply to
them in brief with a “who's
who” of a few of my certainties
and so justify all reasons for my
arguments

First I would like to make
this buld assurance to all crick-



e

a grim determination to eclipse
all the glories of all previous
touring teams to send West
Indian cricket sky-rocketing.

The team under the captaincy
of John Goddard will be able to
deliver the goods. Frank Worrell
has on more than two occasions
demonstrated to the world that
he is a batsman of the highest
class, that his batting perform-
ances could be favourably com-
pared with any of those of the
now fnimortal Victor Tr::mper
and could only be over-shadow-
ed by some of the great Don
Bradman’s.

In Everton Weekes the West
Indies can boast of another of



LES. carried out.



as the greatest all-rounder of the
nineteenth century, for it has
been my good fortune to see him
perform in all four departments
of the game and this has been
my conclusion.

As a batsman Walcott belon
to the calibre of England’s Bill
Edrich, Australia’s Syd Barnes,
India’s Hazare and South Afri-
ca’s Dudley Nourse.

As wicket-keeper, his present
form would have been Z aan
serious contender for Bertie Old-
fields. As an outfielder Percy
Chapman at his best could not
have been better, and as a bowl-
er with little more concentration
could take as many wickets for

cricket world with some phenom-
enal feats, and will bring cricket
writers from all parts of, the world
to report on his genius, and the
gods of cricket shall acclaim his

greatness.
ARCHIBALD . PERCH.
Oistin Town,
Christ Church.

Married v Single

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I again write on behalf
of single girls, and there is every
reason why married women
should not have first place, or be
selected before single women and
they (the married women) should
be broad-minded enough to know
that figure and face mus: change

come you have given us and the
generosity displayed to us.





We leave the island with many = the annals of cricket did George Headley has left off ana Medical books speak of this, and
: viticet —. any part of the is moving ahead with rapid And to conclude I must men- “3% sensible person can sce the
regrets but we shall always look © icket globe with the possible strides. Not even Len Hutton’s ton here that Roy Marshall difference, Can a flower
forward to returnit gain when &xception of Australia with such a 364 which he made at Kenning- Comes on my list of certainties look like one blooming in
we can rt that of friend- Plethora of cricket talent as that ton Oval, against the Austra- I do not now propose to en garden?
: liness wl o freely to Whiten Is to-day evident in the jians in 1938, and which remains iâ„¢ any particular detail as to his Barbados has g r
the Navy |t inhabitants of Seubr Caribt I sey that be- a world record is safe from him. cricket ability but I shall say cauien aiela® Gk Ber share bf
arbados cause | am convinced that dur- that oe a ae au s, :
+ — ing this 1950 tour record after And now to Clyde Walcott, food water’ Ga ae be a gamn<:ous % sheir miat-
G. H. STOKES (Captain), Tecord will go smashing to the and I do not want to be judged He will even go further jn the ~— ao = stay é
iw ound for this invasion team by any « readers as trying game than Roach himself uid ¢ of a ding E ; ubhy, ge
Royal Navy will be leaving these shores with ‘o emphasize when I declare him He is destined to star's the vf spending Hubby’s money, and



et enthusiasts that never before He

has taken



the world’s greatest
over

batsmen. the West Indies

as Mauri t
from where ever took for England. ee ee ee

getting employment

be given to single young women,
thereby leaving the Barbados girl
to suffer,

BARBADOS GIRL.

Against Walking
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I am quite willing to give
the new bus stand a fair trial, but



Order Now

e¢ 6.4

These are Enjoyable

Vienna Sausages



I am jtqtally against expecting |

passengers to walk through traffic
laden paths after paying bus fare.

As regards walking bei
healthy exercise, as odveeed’ by
some of — writers, it is sheer
nonsense to compare walkin,
health and at leisure to Selhaae
in a city of congestion. Bridge-
town as a business centre should
be reached without difficulty, as
time is limited for many who work
or visit same, and then with the
present price of shoes and cloth-

ing, how can we afford extra wear |









and tear?

It is all well for the idle rich
who have tin n abundance
of clothing, also cars to take then
over the bridge, and elsewhere in
the city, for cocktails. Poor people
are the tail end and are not con-
sidered, it seems

POOR TRAVELLER.

Frankfurter Sausages
Wace ”
Palethorpes ”








Table Thrillers

Dutch Rolled Oats in tins
Macoroni in Packages

” & Cheese in tins
Spaghetti in Packages
Spaghetti & Cheese in tins
Cream of Wheat
Grape Nuts

J. & R. BREAD

Drinks that are Best
GOLD BRAID
RUM
TOP NOTCH
RUM
CROWN DRINKS

| GODD

|
|
Bologna Sausage

Large Apples

ARDS

































































































tem
i orking Wel l

(S
Te ting more accustomed

Janes and signs in
are . Yesterday was
that this system has
tion and a few

ow asked.
aT. er ae

‘police, told the “Ad-

— that One Way
System allows for more
me stream of traffic, which
ae the flow.
sid that the motoring pub-
sid 4 to decide into what

ic they want to go
into that stream. By
would te in the
to turn off wiién’

do so. :
a plenty of space in
, uare for vehicles to
abreast,” said the
ssjgner .

a 4 that the recently form-
Som in Trafalgar Square: is
much better now that the
Ke are getting to know where
“is direct them to go.

his system is being tried out
Hmprovements will be made
, to time until the best

ar Sq)
‘th




the?
a they

fe

om irrived at,” he said.

ng the Session of the House
“mbly on Tuesday the,chains,
+» for many years have pre-
‘ed vehicles from using the
“round the Public Buildings,
put out.

: n asked about this the Com-
said that it was only
iment, but if the noise of
disturbs the House of As-
» the chains will be put

oe

oo shelters are now being
% at the Probyn Street Bus
inus. The Commissioner said

are being erected to
et those waiting for buses
sun and rain.

"TON CUMMINS of Mount
“Brevitor Road, St. Peter,
ed for an injured hand
he fell from the platform
notor lorry E. 29 on Wednes-
The lorry was being driven
ng Mile and a Quarter Road by
Herbert of Mile and Quar-

7

f ABOUT 8.10 a.m. on
Tuesday an accident occur-
All Saints’ Road between
lorry E.12, owned by St.
Plantation, and driven
Scantlebury of More
band a bicycle ridden by El-
Holder of Four Hill.
der fell from the bicycle and
ty injured on his knee.

LOSS of 49 holes of yams
‘yalued $7 was reported by
Farmer of Mount Planta-
“St. George. He stated that
were removed from the
sof the same plantation on
They are the property of
tates of Harewood.

DRIVE SHAFT and front
fender of motor van M.832
re damaged about 9.00 a.m
esday when the van ran
road at Derricks, St.
gs. It isthe property of E. C.

r

4
e and was driven
e Weekes of Wavell
Black Rock.

understood that the edga
Toad gave way and the van
into a two fogt trench. It
mounted an embank-
itand eventually struck a tele-

pole.

WEDNESDAY at about 7.20
Pm. a fire of unknown
broke out at Spring Hall
lation, St. Lucy, and des-
d 5j acres of first crop ripe

canes, which are the pro-
of Spring Hall Ltd., were

ACE CONSTABLES were
busy yesterday preparing to
building at the Central
which houses the Police

games room and library are
‘situated in this building and

fe than one occasion the
Cinema has given a show

interior was recently re-
. The games room is now
d with two table-tennis
§ and two snooker tables.
Constables can also
h playing dominoes.

@ who are not interested in
fan relax with a book and
the Radio Distribution

BOYS of the Horse Hil)
Troop held a camp fire
y night last on a small
behind St. Joseph Girls’
@t Horse Hill.
Ohe time it was thought that
lid have ruined the pre-
shortly before 6.00
‘Mie clouds cleared up
will be invested at
mM. today at the St. Jos-
School. It is understood
10 will be issued to

boys,

WHO formerly
d the Rock Crusher at
St. Joseph, are now
the workers told
MÂ¥ocate that they are out of
Every year just before the
in full swing.
0 St. Joseph Factories
Made much improve-
ing the past few months
€xpected that the crop
a Very soon,
- EADLEY and
_ Haynes were slightly
on Wednesday morning,
ay 7 o'slock, when they
ibd icycle while travelling
u _ Hill, St. Joseph,
, — Tiding with Haynes

St UITS ARE very scarce
+ eet but a pleasing
_ at the potato crop is
ony of improvement. On
Blackmans opened a
and many holes
Wednesday house-
owever seen going

more potatoes. It i
at th .

Per hole. Yams are
My 22 plentiful,

id i R around February

0

es

t is



cf
4

-










Sl¢ On
=,”

nidad fire flies can be
year,



and pedestrians

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1950

Traffic

JUDGMENT RESERVED
IN CUKE-SKINNER CASE |

THE sitting of the W
began here Monday
judgment was reser

est Indian Court of Appeal which
st yeorcay adjourned sine die, and |
; ’ ved in the first appeal heard, th
Clifford Skinner (Defendant-Appellant) and Ateen” St
Clair, Cuke (Plaintiff-Respondent). °
ounsel in this case completed their submissions last |
Tuesday, but returned to Court yesterday morning to|
answer questions relative to the insurance of parties to



}pu

ey are selling| and work on the phosphate ‘. 4

seen| have read steamship Goi

the action.
Potato Yiel
Not Good

_The Director of Agriculture in
his monthly notes writes that the
harvesting of sweet potatoes was
continued during January burt
yields, especially in the lower





altitudes, have not been very good. |

Reaping of the main yam crop is
expected to begin next month
Vegetables, including tomatoes,
cabbages and carrots, were in fair
supply in the markets, Owing to
the frequent showers which

occurred during the month, peas-|

ants were able to do much more
planting than usfial for this time
of the year.

The young planted canes have
responded well to the January
rains. Suitable weather conditions
enabled supplying and, in some
cases, late planting to be done.

Cotton picking was continued.
Yields: on peasant plots, particu-
larly in the St. Lucy area. are
below expectations.

Some good yields of groundnuts
have been reported in St.
and Christ Church.
appear satisfied with
obtained from the recently
duced variety Virginia Bunch; it

The appeal is one against a ver-
dict of a Common Pleas Jury

, Which awarded Cuke £1,500 gen-
, eral damages and £4. 3. 7. spetial
| damages at the end of an action

brought by Cuke after a collision
aoe om = and ees.
un e ap) were that
the Jury were misdirected in the
Acting Chief Judge’s summing up,
that the verdict was against the
| Weight of the evidence and that
| the damages were excessive.
| The President of the Court, Sir
Cecil Furness-Smith, Kt, Chief
| J ustice of Trinidad, yesterday
| asked whether it was a fact that
Compulsory Insurance was not
enforced in Barbados,

“That is so, Your Honour,”
replied Mr. J. E. T. Brancker,
Junior Counsel for Skinner.

Mr. D. H. L. Ward, Counsel for
| Cuke said in answer to the Presi-
dent that when the Jury heard
that the defendant was insured,

| they might have thought that he

was insured against all risks—

| third party and otherwise. As,far

as he knew, nothing was said



| during the trial which might have
| lead the jury to understand that
| the plaintiff was insured in a sim-
| ilar manner.

Philip
Peasants! Court that he had not been pre- ee ee
yields| sent during the’ trial in the Court | »er in inviting her to be Chancel-
intro-| of Common Pleas, but his solici- {lor stating that she was the first

|tor had instructed him that Mr.

Mr. Brancker then told the

is proposed to extend its cultiva-| Ward’s statements on the matter

tion during the 1950—51 crop.

Breadfruit, bananas and coco
nuts were in good supply in the
markets during January. Limes
were also available.

Pests, Diseases

; The main pests reported attack-
ing peasants’ crops during the
month were the white butterfly
and bacterial black yot in cabbage,
and scale insects on fruit trees
Control measures are being adva-
cated .

The Peasant Agricultural In-
structors visited 444 peasant hold-

ings and 8 school gardens in
January; 41 mango trees were
top-worked

The Colonial Development and

Welfare scheme for assisting in- |

dividual peasants to install irri-
gation units continued satisfac-
torily. Twelve peasant propri-
etors were assisted with pipe
and/or tanks and/or irrigation
units.

Apart from weeding and other
routine cultural operations, ap-
propriave seasonal activities,

young plant canes, were carried
out at all Stations.

The total number of livestock
at
of January, including young stock
born during the month, was 126.
Seven hundred and_ sixty-two
gallons of milk were produced.
Sixteen head of stock were sold
to peasants for rearing and seven
sold to the butcher.

Stud services paid for at the
Stations were as follows:—bulls
120. bucks 51, rams 32, boars 63,
making a total of 266 for the

month,
Botanical
The arrows of all crosses made
at Groves during the breed-

ing season have now ripened and
have been sown at Codrington.
Potting has been started, and by
the end of the month about 7,000
seedlings had been put out in the
cisterns.

Supplies for all trials planted
during November 1949 were cut
and put in early in January. It
was found that a large number of
the supplies were not needed, as
the original plants had germinated
well since the counts were made.
Germination on the whole has
been quite satisfactory, and with
the excellent weather in January,
it is expected that there will be
few blank spaces when the trials
are reaped.

The crop season was started on
the 23rd January, when a start

in- |
cluding supplying and the appli- |
cation of muriate of potash to the |

the six Stations at the end!

| of insurance were accurate.

“If I may add _ this,” Mr.
Brancker said, “I will say that
when a jury has an intimation that
a party is insured, there seems to
be a tendency to hit the insurance
company.”

Judgment was then reserved.



6 Months For
n .
Stealing
} COLVIN KING of Dash Road,
was sentenced to six months’ im-
| prisonment with hard labour by
| His Worship Mr. A. J. H, Han-
schell on Wednesday when he was
found guilty of stealing £1 1s. 8d.

| whe property of Glorga Goodridge
on January 16.

Put On Bond For

Misbehaviour

Dessa Deane and Elvie Evans,
both of Alleyne’s Lane, were put
on a bond when they appeared
before His Worship Mr. E. A
McLeod yesterday.

They were found guilty of mis-
behaving ‘themselves on Alleyne’s
Lane on August 24. They were
bound over for one month in the
sum of £1.





15s. In 14 Days

A fine of 15s. and 2s. costs to be
paid in 14 days or in default one
month’s imprisonment was im-
posed on Mark Mayers yesterday
by His Worship Mr. H. A, Talma.

He was found guilty of inflict-
ing bodily harm on Charles Pil-
grim on January 11.

re Boats Lost

| Last Month

IN his notes for the month of
January the Director of Agricul-
ture said that the sum of $444.25
was repaid on loans, bringing the
total amount repaid to date to
$42,078.57. Interest collected for
the same period amounted to $2.86,
making a total of %492.90
interest collected to date.

A sum of $97.00 was issued for



the month in loans to fishermen,!than mere formality and

Princess Alice
Installed

© from page 1

The Principal, Dr. T. W. J.
Taylor,

y lo: accompanied by Vice-
Principal Mr. Sherlock, and the
Registrar, Mr. Hugh Springer

brought up the rear.

he Principal announcei the
rpose of the assembly; then the
Registrar read relative pa

}from the Royal Charter, granted

by His Majesty the King. Then

both retired returning shortl
~~ . sho
| with the Chancellor-Elect ie

jed by two under-graduates.



\





The
Chancellor at the request of the

Principal recited the Oath of
Office. Then she was robed and
took her seat amid a fanfare,
announcing her entry upon the
office.

Addresses were then presented
from 14 Universities in Great
Britain, Ireland, and the British
Empire. Addresses were present-
ed to the Vice-Chancellor of the
University of St. Andrew’s and
Chancellor of London.

Gratitude

The Princess then read the
following message from the King,

“On your installation as
Chancellor of the University
College of the West Indies, I ask
you to convey my best wishes to
its members, and to all those
associated with its work. I am
very glad to be associated with the
College as its visitor, and hope
that it may ever prosper in its
high purpose for the advancement
of true learning.”

Signed GEORGE R.

The Princess then made a
lengthy address, expressing grati-
tude for the signal honour done

woman Chancellor
University.

She assured the gathering that
wherever she was, it would al-
ways be her constant pleasure to
watch over their interests. That
day’s ceremony, fittingly set seal
to the recognition upon the new
University College of the West
Indies, for which three great
Universities in the Old Country
had been mainly instrumental for
its being.

St. Andrew’s and Birmingham
had been midwives at its birth,
while London had been parent,
without whom she ventured to say
all heroic efforts on the part of
the first two Universities wouid
have availed nothing.

After setting out what it was
hoped that the University would
accomplish, the Princess said that
it was a deplorable fact that the
current of religious faith was far
weaker today than in the last
century with all its materialism.

She believed that the Univer-

of any

sity’s first business was, as trustee} Kensington.

of human learning, transmitting
to the next generation a_philo-
sophy, founded on the past, but
refashioned and perhaps enriched
by present day experience. But
that was by no means its only
responsibility. It had another task
of almost equal importance which
some people might say was of
greater importance.

It had to educate young men and
women to make them into good

citizens. In that task, it has to} tthe Rocks to-

combine humanism and technique,
and by humanism, she meant the
study of man in all his relations
as a thinker and a social and
moral being.

She concluded: “Keep your
wonder at great and noble things
like sunlight and thunder, the
rain, the stars, the wind, the sea,
the growth of trees, the return of
harvest, the greatness of heroes.
Keep your hearts hungry for new
knowledge; keep your power of
indignation, and keep your hatred
of a lie.” The Earl of Athlone also
addressed the gathering.

Principal Speaks

Dr. Taylor said that the Mem-
bers of the University College
desired him to express their deep
appreciation for the honour which

H.R.H. Princess Alice had placed |

on them in taking up so high an
office as Chancellor.

That day was a great day for
them, but it was not for
only. It was a great day for all
those people who were working

ating the University College.

them |





'
'



|
|

}

|

}and the Ballet Music from the

|
|
|



THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE
}

|
|



Give °E,
A Chance

THERE is an utmosphere of
Suspense which keeps the crowd
of cricket enthusiasts upon their
feet as they listen at the many
radios. By the silence that is
evident when some heated point
‘S to who is the best bowler or
batsman is not being discussed.
; the closeness with
which they follow the every word
ot the commentator.

A crowd began to straggle
around the wharf radio just about
11.15, o'clock yesterday, some
smoking cigarettes to while away
the time until the coin would be
tossed. A few took up their posi-
tions from where the local Big
Ben could be seen, and then to a
second they were there to hear
7 British Guiana had won the

one is told

“Yes, give ‘em a chance. Le’
them decide,” one burly chap said

somewhat stolidly as he puffed | th

away at an inch of cigar.

No one else voiced an opinion
then, but a few minutes later an-

cher chap a bit lanky, who seem- | ain

ed as though he was contemplat-
ing arguing with his cigar friend.
said, as though he meant it to be
general, but got it to hold a touch
of pointedness at Mr. Cigar, “Be!
Yo’ one out before they score 25”

His cigar friend refrained from

replying at first, but then made a
scoffing gesture of his hand as
who would say “Oh!, what de
you know,”
_ A short while afterwards, dur-
ing one of those breathless
silences, the commentator said
“and he is out.” The tall lanky
chap who had made the chal-
lenge jumped up in the air and
exclaimed “Why yo’ didn’t bet
me?"

Everybody stood gaping at his
seeming sagacity and, he made
conceited by his good guess, pre-
dicted another wicket would fall
within another 25 runs.

All then held in loud tones
that they knew Taylor would be

the first to be dismissed and as*

runs steadily increased and the
sun became hot a few tried to

edged against the wall to be
shaded.

When 49 were scored the com-
menfator sail “That was a
tricky one and—” Our lanky
friend jumped up but on this

occasion he was not so accurate
or lucky. The commentator even-
tually went on to say “and he
played it down the wicket.”

By lunch a big crowd had gath-
ered and were paying that alert
attention to the radio which show-
ed them to be enjoying them-
selves almost as much as those
who were watching cricket at



Band Concert
At Hastings
Rocks

THE special feature of the band
night will be the
conducting of the various pieces,
together with the choice of pro-
gramme, by the N.C.Os of the
band. Included on the programme
are three items specially requested
by Canadian Music Lovers at
present holidaying on the island.
Elgar’s Pomp and Circumstance
March No. 4; The Melodies of
Sullivan from his Comic Operas,

opera Faust.

PROGRAMME

MARCH—Pomp and Circumstance
—Elgar.
Sir Edward Elgar, born in 1857,
composed a music setting for
Cardinal Newman’s Poem “The
Dream of Gerontius” in 1900
for which the honour of a
knighthood was conferred upon
him. He was awarded the
“Order of Merit” in 1911 and
was appointed “Master of the
King’s Music” in 1924.
Conductor:—Cpl. B. Morris.

in | together for the purpose of cre- OVERTURE—Morning, Noon and

Night—Franz Suppe.

The installation was much more | Conducted by Band-Sgt. Archer.

one in

was made with the First Year | making a total of $83,115.16 issued|which they as members of the |

Seedling Trials. By the end of
the month, the Short Season Trial
and about two-thirds of the Long
Season Trial had been cut. Forty-
three seedlings were selected from
the Short Season Trial, and to
date 172 from the Long Season
Trial, making a total of 215 alto-
gether. :
Entomological

Preparations for the liberation
of parasites for the control of
saccharalis are proceeding nor-
mally.

Field examinations of
plant cane show very little dam-

p. were

to date.

University fully felt to be the tra-

A meeting of the Fisheries Ad-| ition of the ancient Universities.

visory Committee was held during
the month, at which matters con-
cerning loans to fishermen and
sanitary accommodation at beaches
were discussed.

Experimental work at sea with
the “Investigator” continued
during the month and 17 trips
made.
spent in research on the flying

!
\



fish fishery nd the others on the |

young | large pelagic deep sea fishery.

Unfavourable weather was ex-

age or egg deposition by D. sae-| perienced throughout the month

charalis at present.

Laboratory stocks of Lixophaga
are being maintained and a few
surplus flies out at Codring-
ton, One r ery of Lixophaga
was made at Codrington during
routine work.

During January, 17,650 pupal
parasites of the cabbage group de-
foliators were bred in the labora-
tory and the majority were liber-
ated in the field. So far, a total
of 54,740 of these parasites have
been laboratory-reared. Field
collected material has so

eausing the disablement of many
boats at sea. Three boats were
lost during the month, of which
one was smashed on the beach;
the other two have not been seen
or heard of since putting out to
sea about the middle of the month,
and must be presumed lost with
their crews.

Catches of fish were heavier
during this month on the west

coast but somewhat lighter on!

the east coast, and at Bathsheba,| which
far been| heavy wind and seas kept the;them by becoming their officer.

She had been installed in the
presence of high officials of the

Caribbean and their presence to- |

gether showed it was a great deal
to the people of the British Colo-
nies. It marked a step forward in
realizing the need for a deeper
feeling for the things of the intel-
lect and the spirit to be spread

Of these, 12 were| throughout the countries.

She had taken up the duties of
the chief officer of the joint un-
dertaking in which all those coun-
tries were playing their part. The
installation that day was the first
step to the fulfilment of their wish
and prayer.

Wide Sympathy

They felt that whatever diffi-
culties might be confronting them
in their task of building up the
College, they had the sympathy

j

|
|

|

}



and the support of all the Uni-!

versities of the world.

That day was also a great day
for them for many personal reas-
ons. He had already expressed
his appreciation of the honour
she had conferred upon

used at once for laboratory pur-| boats on the beach for almost the; When he thought of the day when

poses and no recoveries of these
parasites have been recorded.
Introduced Predators
A field recovery of the intro-
duced predator of Cottony Cush-
ion Scale was mayle, showing that
several years after its introduc-
tion it is maintaining itself as a
control agent. Azya trinitatus
was recovered from a new local-
ity. .
Chemical
The mechanical analysis of six
black coral soils was completed.
The new ‘Spekker’ was tried
out for the first time on the analy-
sis of phosphate and potash solu-
tions. The new technique of mani-
pulation has now been controlled

tent of Barbados soils will
commenced.







Ifite and
not Gascogne.

entire month.



Pleasure Yacht
Off To Tobago

PLEASURE Yacht Serva La Bari

From Tobago, this vessel is ex-

Indian Islands.



Firewood, Charcoal



|
i
|
}

THE 30-ton schooner Alexan-





March resi f ’ . 5
fe able to . sidents of St.) « ito’ ‘Gasco ne drina R. arrived yesterday from
a € to see small lights olrito ~ ‘ f
ound at night. At eis IT WAS inadvertently statec St Lucia ngi a cargo of
ie 7, 20'S were traced and| in yesterday’s issue that steam~/ firewood and ci

Und out + . ae . oe arrive This schooner made the trip in

Bre gj.. Ut that they came] ship Gascogne is due to arriy A Sen , :
Rina i to-day. The paragraph should|46 hours which was good sailing

Ifor a vessel of that size
D. L

Mr. Johnson is ayent

(63 tons) under Captain Schlect

pected to pay visits to other West

|



left the island yesterday for
Tobagp after spending 17 days}
here.

|
|
|

Arrived Yesterday |

;

he had sat under her chairman-
ship in an academic matter in
London, he remembered her deep
human sympathy and the under-
standing of academic ideas and he
knew that that sympathy would
be exercised on their behalf then
and they were indeed fortunate to
have her as their leader.

For that reason, her installation
then was an event of the greatest
importance.

=





SELECTION—Gems from Sulli-
van’s Operas—Godfrey.
Including:—Mikado; _Tolanthe;
Pirates of Penzance; Patience;
and The Gondoliers.
Conductor:—Band Cpl. Eastmond.
RHAPSODY—Slavonic No. 2
Friedeman.
Conductor:—Cpl. W. Best.
VALSE—Venus on Earth—Lincke.
Conductor:—Band Sgt. Archer.

BALLET MUSIC—From the Opera

Faust—Gounod.
Conductor:—Cpl. B. Morris,
CORNET SOLO — The Willow
Song—Coleridge Taylor.
From the Incidental Music to
Shakespeare’s Othello.
Soloist: —Boy Farnum.



?
Stop Poultry
Thie
eves

_. LONDON (By Mail).
Britain’s farmers will try to
beat poultry thieves by giving
every bird a registration number
~—indelibly tatoced on one wing.

The scheme has been drawn up
A National Farmers’ Union
and approved in principle by the
Ministries of Food and Agricul-
ture and the Home Office.

The N.F.U. has sent details to
all county branches and hopes
that all farmers will join the
scheme.

A bird will carry its registration
— even after it has been

For a fee of $5 poultry farmers
will be issued with a registration
number and equipment to stamp
the number on their birds.

One N.F.U. official declared:

“Tt is believed that the scheme

will go a long way towards recov-
ering stolen birds and catching
e thieves.”
Poultry thefts, particularly be-
fore the Christmas season, have
been soaring even higher in Brit-
in recent years.—L N.S.

Britain
Going Dry

LONDON, (By Mail)

Britain is fast going “dry” with-
out the formality of an 18th
amendment.

Either from choice or necessity
the beer-dfinking Briton is cut-
ting his consumption so drastical-
ly that many saloon owners are
facing bankruptcy.

Sales for January were expect-
ed to be the lowest since the
Trade began keeping national
books.

Revealing this to-day, Albert
Dyer, chairman of the London
Licensed Victuallers’ Central Pro-
tection Society, said:

“The commodities we sell are
getting out of reach of the public
and if these conditions continue
hundreds of licensees will be put
out of business.

“Last year beer sales dropped
by 72 million gallons below the
1948 total. Tax on each 36-
gallon barrel yields $28 so
Chancellor of the Exchequer Sir
Stafford Cripps will be $56,000,000
down on his $781,200,000 estimate
of revenue from the beer tax.”

The annual meeting of the
licensees, to be held mid-February
will urge a call for a cut of 4
cents in the 10-cents a pint tax
at present imposed by the Ex-



chequer.

The Society’s vice-chairman
Cornelius Collins, mine host at
the Upton Manor Arms, on

London’s East Side, declared trade
had reached a new low.

“Things are desperately bad,”
he said. “Prices are so high that a
man dare not go into a saloon be-
cause he is frightened he will have
to stand a big round.

“Before the war beer was
averaging about four cents a pint,
now it is 14. A decent nip of
Scotch was 7 cents, now it costs
anything up to 35 cents.”

Chairman Dyers said that the
limit had been reached. “I have to
discourage friends gathering in
large groups because the people
themselves now dislike vaem,. It
costs too much to treat all round.

“There was a time when men
would ask for whiskey as a matter
of course. Now they hardly dare
mention the word.

beer—what then?” —LN.S.

9 = °
Can’t Get Rid
Of His House
LONDON (By Mail).

Lord Rothschild, 29 - year - old
head of the famous banking fam-
ily, has a moated Elizabethan
mansion, which he can neither sell

i nor give away.
This perfect example of Brit-
}ain’s handsome _ architecture—
tensive grounds near Bury St.
Edmund's, Suffolk County.

“T have offered the hall to prac-
tically every organization you
could mention,’ Lord Rothschild
said. “I also contacted local au-
thorities with view to letting
them have it as a gift.”

“I bought the house just before
the war. Now it is standing
empty and deteriorating. It would
make an excellent sanatorium or
hospital—in fact it was used as a
hospital during the war, Since
then it has been used as an agri-
cultural training centre.”

Lord and Lady Rothschild live
at Merton Hall, Cambridge, where
he spends much of his time in
| scientific research,

“Rushbrooke is too big and dif-



Conductor:—Cpl. Eastmond ficult to run as a home,” said Lord

MUSICAL COMEDY .— Bitter
Suite—Noel Coward.
Conductor:—Cpl, W. Best

MEDLEY—Current Hit Songs and | Schild bou

Dances—Murrell.
Director of Music:
Capt. C. E. Raison, A.R.C.M.
GOD SAVE THE KING.

“Stella Polaris”
Comes Saturday

LUXURY passenger liner “Stella
Polaris” will make its second trip
to Barbados for the 1950 tourist
season on Saturday.

This vessel opened this year’s
tourist season when it arrived here
on Thursday, January 19.

Over 100 passengers are ex-
pected to come by thes vessel.
Messrs. Robert Thom ‘itd. are
local agents.





PIGEON CHOW
GOAT CHOW

two of Purinds best
and obtainable from
H. JASON JONES & Co.,Ltd.—tower troad st.

Rothschild, “‘but it would be ideal
for an institution of some kind.”

It was reported that Lord Roth-
t the hall for $84,000
from Lady Islington, who had car-
ried out considerable interior
modernization.

There is a possibility that the
National Trust may eventually
have a hand in its disposal. ‘i

—LN.S.

in Satin and Lace,
Peach only in sizes 32
34 and 36 Each

“But when they stop asking for |

| Rushbrooke Hall—is built in ex- |

|



|



It's Satin and Lace!

DAINTY BRASSIERS

ROLL-ON , ELASTIC PANTIE GIRDLE

with detachable inner seat. Genuine Value @

CAVE SHEPHERD & co. LTD.

$$

PAGE FIVE

Teams Selected [Be Wise ....
For Fifth Test

: MADRAS, Feb. 16.

The fifth, final and what may
prove the deciding unofficial Test
between India and the Common-
wealth team opens tomorrow on
the Chepauk sporting wicket here. |

The Commonwealth won the
first Test at Delhi and India won
the thrid at Calcutta. The second
(Bombay) and 4th (Cawnpore)
were drawn.

_India are including in their
side a new ‘cap’ in Joshi, a wicket-
keeper who scored a eentury for
Central Province Governor's
XI against the Commonwealth
side last month. Almost every
one of the 20,000 seats have al-
ready been sold. The Chepauk
pitch is known for giving bat and
ball an equal chance, and it is
worth mentioning that all five
Tests played there (two. official
and three unofficial) since 1934
have produced a definite decision.

The teams will be:

Irdia:—V. S. Hazare (captain),
C. E. Nayudu, Mustaq Ali, D.
Phadkar, H. Adhikari, V. S. Man-
kad. G. Kishenchand, P. Umrigar.
N. Chowdhury, R. S. Modi and



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PAGE SIX THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

- i



HENRY _BY CARL ANDERSON
r anes eee " - on

Wy

cope, W989, King Pestores Spediste, Yc, World thes roverved

ON GUR BUSTING UP THE
CRIME SYNDICATE! LET'S Gol

CF Boers
ow 25,

Wisk, Disa, Previn ime XY qa
wid Rights Roser val Coad mY +
=~ 5

“uy







}1T'S REALLY WHAT KIND || MRS_DITHERS WAS TELLING
\YOUR_ WIFE'S \ Coe, MAN YAN ARE SLONDIE JHOW YOU MADE
| HER FIRE THE COOK BECAUSE

THERE'S NO EXCUSE
gE T / i] | FAULT --- SHE |
piel pT | ICALLED_uP eee BEN! NO | 1 | YOU WERE AFRAID TO DO IT
| BLONDIE OU ip - net YOIROEL 4 peel













ee { USTE AGAIN, BUMSTEAD 1

iy TO BE EARLY
TOMORROW



\MORNING AND ‘prasad Sy,

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t a? SD | + JIT DELAYED MY
Per: yo) | 1m | BREAKFAST
ee i 4 J nicks v4






beeen Leen

THE LONE RANGER

YOU SLUGGED ME ANO STOLE THAT "THE MAN WHO HIRED ME TO DELIVER

PACKAGE BEFORE I COULD THE PACKAGE WARNEO ME “THAT YOU

DELIVER IT! a TWO WOULD TRY TO STEAL IT. Lae
WHO SAYS WE

|\q SLUGGED You? =















COME) HAL, YO%
AND 4” AND VARNEY
; TARTRO THE}
rae tRouate. | fi

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| FOUND POCKETING IT.







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1
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IM -AVING A STREAK DADDy-!'VE spent] || | 1 SAW THAT BIG ROLL OF | | WELL-T STAYED HOV
OF BAD LUCK AT DINTY'S My ALLOWANCE 1} | BILLS YOU JUST PULLED | | TONIGHT - BUT ITDIDN
i, CARD GAMES - EVERY ALREADY - CAN OUT = HAND IT OVER - I'M {| o j= MY LUCK- —~/
a TIME I PLAY I GO BROKE- YOU HELP Me GOING TO DO A LITTLE — said
¢ MAYBE IF I STAY HOME LT? — SHOPPING TOM RROW
§ | TONIGHT I'LL. HAVE A oe seets eee
' \ CHANGE OF LUCK ye |
y co, sobetliuina
ft r
»
t



BY ALEX RAYMOND

IT'S NOT JOE GOWOY OUGHTA BS IN JAIL! IT's!
YOU PEOPLE...ALL OF YOu! BECAUSE YOU'RE |
\ A BUNS 4 OF MEAN, NASTY OLO
GOSSIPS! I HATE YOU ANO IT
LOVE MISS MITCHELL! SHE'S
THE FINEST TEACHER IN THE
WORLD AN’ THE BEST FRIEND

7
2
v

2
az
o
~<




po

ay [oat you RAN AINAY. ++.
GOWOY ANDO THE TEACHER

*







ee |





HOME SO LATE AT NIGHT,

THE TOWN STARTED
TALKING... THAT'S WHY
OY HIT

3
6
é
ah
‘
:
e
i














1







‘AH, YOUR HIGHNESS! | HEARD pf HUMPH #
HOW YOU HID IN THE CLOSET f LAUGH

IN YOUR UNDERWEAR WHILE YOU
wut (LE MY MEN sie = or
FOR YOU. =









PRINCE TYPORE, HERES ) HMM ONE YOU SHOULD MEET) MESOME BAD
KALI, THE LEADER OF OF, ~~ sa TIMES?

THIS — eo \"





KALI. YOU AND.
YOUR THUG EES
ARE FINISHED!

ALU MIND TELLING
ME HOW, FOR
FUTURE REFERENCE?












AS THE CON "ONQUERED THUGGEES ARE LED OFF
THEIR SECRET 1SLAND =T0 FACE JUDGMENT



















=:

BY GEORGE MC. MANUS
BESS =
































of diguestin ail

Nutritive value
the feud. oe

It enriches the
Vv nervous Psa:

Sverwork, if

condition, =

Give this proved

tonic a trial and
Y enjoy the full
Joy of living,



This Tan Plain Front Oxford
is now on Sale at the leading
stores. See them for yourself.

made by

JOHN WHITE

means made just right


























Allen and Leal,
Obtainable from all Cad ‘









‘/
“Verprrgiiailill





HAT hopeless feeling that you're too weak,

‘not up to it’ any longer simply means that
you've been taking too much out of yourself,
Your body is short of two essential strengthening
foods—phosphorus and protein.

Tissues strengthened

To put you right, you need a course of
‘Sanatogen’ Nerve Tonic Food. ‘Sanatogen’
combines these two great body-building foods—
| phosphorus and protein—in their organic form.
Mi} so that they are quickly absorbed into your
system. Day by day glorious new health, youth
and vitality flow through your whole bod

your strength and self-confidence come back ! |
Start on a course of ‘Sanatogen’ today.
































DELICIOUS
BREAKFAST!
Boil 2 cups of
water. Add salt.
When boiling,
add 1 cup of
Quaker Oats.
Cook it, stir-
ring, for 2%
minutes, That's
all.






































On sale at good chemists and druggists

SSANATOGEN? 2"

restores health, youth and vitality
The word ‘Sanatogen’ is a registered trade mark © n Lid., Loughborough, England
SSN Ane ERR

MORE MiNERALS............
MORE PROTEINS............

MORE CARBOHYDORATES......

MORE VITAMINS (B, &B2)..




63D







oo arenes:











FEF" | FOSS SSSSSSSSSOSSSSSSSSS SSI O SSS FFAS

HROADWAY DRESS SHOP. LINOLEUM CARPETS
will be closed on THURSDAY 16TH half-day and open Sizes: 9 ft. by 71% ft. and 1014 ft.by 9 ft 7
SATURDAY until 4 p.m. in order to facilitate shopping for t r A) :

the passengers and crew of
LINOLEUM IN ROLLS 6f,
M. V. STELLA POLARIS All very reasonable in Price,

HROADWAY DRESS SHOP. maincs «=| HERBERT Ld,

1860





ro,





&














10 & 11 Roebuck Street









= =





The book that has set the world talking

On

~ HUMMEL





A swashbuckling general who insygred many a story, some
ficticious some true, to be told about him while the fighting
in World War II was still at it’s height.

Hollywood once tried to portray the character of this Ger-
man General on the screen but they missed badly.

Here, at last, is the truth behind one of the freatest drama

ever to come out of the second World Wai
What he thought of his men and his Italian allies !
What he thought of his foes; the men of the Empire !

How he was eventually murdered by Hitler’s Gestapo !



Beginning in the Su Sunday Adv Advocate, Feb. vate, Feb. (9










ay, FEBRUA











a —

>.







Rae
4, 1950 @.

- —— ae









A ten ee
ot

TLASSIFIED ADS. |.

a> eee ee

' SALES

ET

AUCTION
Se

















THE BARBADOS
WANTED

—EoEeeeeeeee
HELP







; s By Put [eee
Fr F ny. our office A CHAUFFEUR for Mrs. F. Hutson,
} T E OR RENT . the 24th | “Wendover”, Brittons Hill, please apply
Week Sun. q P.m. 5180) 0m premises: reference required
$1.00 1.3 ct ae 16.2.50—an
. 5 ta + Stre =.
| HOUSES t he ree a pte vie A JUNIOR CLERK for our office and
“NEWE Aim € . pao we M.C.A,| spare parts department. Cole & Co.,
02 : cumtoe gee ra Coast, fully | o ttel Dwellin “a koe - ee
"i ineilie tities 8, Servant Rooms | Open Verandah aire ses contains |
Superb bathing bea c crandah, drawing a. ol r ISTANT 3
| June November: pee a ra Som, one bedroom, Kite) » downstarre | (with pie! ) eee tere a }
} month. Phone 4476. er; $6 00 per ree bedroom’ upstairs, and emant aie w + ence Apply by letter to |
= i . $.1.50—t.f.n tru trees in the yard. Water is| View Guest “House” seers ee |
; : Mipparoraeee | installed. Inspect ide “eamenicemeel | . |
furnished, “Ceres Philip coast, fully, the premises Foo” litioee caeemtene, 14.2.50—Sn. |
Bathing ° ervant Rooms, | ®PPly to Haynes & Grifth. 'e . a ne
Se ok em are S| "Badal tas Sieh, hele | SAN Goce Sean wh a
a . erie Z 12.2.50—fn, | efficient experienved person. Apply:
r ins BOING we is | Woodyare, Pine Hill,
5 agate line 3UNGALOW—With all Modem a n 10.2.90-—in.
wd per 5 < 1.20 1.% retin such as Government gene ; REAL ESTATE |
Fe ness tf and a THe 1 egSBECIOUS, Bedrooms | me | MISCELLANEOUS
ya agate ines) Main Road. Near Deasona pare" | st. MN. BISHOP'S CC wRT,' PAYING GUESTS” Two Couples, or 4
wm Me resonable. Apply eacons Rd. Rent fee chael, standing on 25,175 square} single people. Delightfully cool rooms
DAYS? OM Whites Alley. City, “0% S- Bourne. | feet on se eae | Running water, 10 minutes walk to
ea. y. con rawi and! City or Clubs, monthly
. 15. 2.50-—7n oa rooms with covered wabadinak Rates. eo ere
sd | KRISHANA" and usual offices, two bedrooms with Mrs. BENNETT,
Ind. Apply T. Ma ‘ontabelle, Lancs | running water, one with dressing room | Woodside Gardens.
DIED Swan Strest. raj. Hindu Store, 5} | attached, Toliet and Bath upstairs. Tw¢ | 12,2.50—t.f.n.
on Sone ; 9.2.50—t.f.n servants rooms with toilet and bath. |
: ea AP? yashroom and ow st
Be leave her la residence, | » ne "Apartinent, neetuenished Ground- | in the yard, workshop and garaj >
ne Government Hill at 4.3 Je . near town and Ciub Inspecti OTICE
the Adventist Chureh, Gov t. Grevuanees * Fhildren). For further B. Bantiiter Bases 7 "ei "
fam thence cg pr eat a. ial 3696. lberen The above will be set up to public! WANTED — Shares in Barbados Co-
' . Friends 2 50—3n | Competition at the office of the under- | operative Bank Limited. Prospective



Heal: , Bertina Lewis (T'dad)
en); muhy, Beryl, Lottie,
} great grand children.

'§ please copy
— 17.2.50,







































THANKS

in any

wreaths or

Family

17,2.50—1n

MEMORIAM

beloved
departed
1944
thou de-

¢ memory of our
BRATHWAITE who
bd 1 LATS
jm the 16th February
meg have passed since

ig ‘deal at thou did’st set,
eee of thy love and kind
fill our minds

Brathwaite (son) Mrs
(sister) Miss Frances
(Aunt), Mrs. Oy Inniss and

oe 17.2.50—1n
memory of ow dear beloved
father and grandfather CLE-
(OND who departed this
17th 1947

of sadness still come
tears do often flow
today, has brought before us:

: ories of three years ago
wears away the edge of grief,

sory turns back every leaf
Eastmond (wife: Mr Matella

o'er u





Ottie Blades, Mrs
‘Gollop (children): Mr Ivan
Mr. Leslie Eastmond, Miss
mond, Miss Ewis Gollop

17.2.50—1n

*

os

FOR SALE

i
0

Price $300.00, Standard 10 four
im, Tyres, (2) good and (3) new, new
my, engine good. Upholstery re-
attention. Phone 3817
t












12 tn
Vauxhall (Wyvern) 12 H.P. 4
MM, Only done 5,500 miles. Apply
7%. Hutchinson, Phone 2978
14.2,50--4n
Hillman 10 Convertible. 5 goo
Engine Sound Ring 91-06
i 17.2.50—2n
fC CHANGERS — A fresh
received A.C.D.C. 100-130
mM) Volts 25--60 cycles.
lio Emporium.
od 16.2.50—4n
W Second Hand 10 Valve

BAC. in perfect working order
) Dr Chas Pay: Dentist
Row, St. M. 4














DCI



— Wire Hair Fox Terrie
newly imported stock
Culars. Apply X.Y.Z C/o
Co. 14.2.50-—4n
RKEYS weighing between 10 and
price. Apply Mrs. E

blot, Chelsea Road
16.2. 50. in

L
i LES CARRIER CYCLES—A\lso |
Gents and Ladies Sports Auto

far St. Dial 2696.
7.2.50—t.f
G MACHINE, Barrett Electric
Messrs T. Geddes Grant Ltd
Under 3 years old $200 or
Dial 476. A. Barnes & Co

16,.2,50—t.f.n











RELLANEOUS

Fresh Shipment PABLUM
8 ots Pkts 6hc., if ozs Pkis
ainable from your Grocers and
Pabena also stocked 50c |

16,2 ,50-—3n
NEWS—At the Mayfair Gift |
tle Club. First day rovers
Mplete set Coronation Stamps,
ms. Old U.S.A. Stamns, ete
16.2.50—12n

PQUALITY KHAKI 72c
Royal Store.



& 84c

3.2,50—14n

Royal
l4n

'S & and 96 cents

3.2.50

& MEN’S SHOES from $3.96
, 3.2.50—14n |



ged beg through this

return thanks to those who
i way
with us in our recent be-

| hours of 12 (noon) and 3 o'clock in the

} otherwise such persons will be preclud-
ped

{10 o’clock a.m, when their said claim
}

FLATS full
erator and lin
Dial 8364

y furnished with Refrig-
en at Indramer, Worthing,
13.1.50—t.f.n.

K SEA-GAZE — On—the—sea Maxwell
coant, fully furnished including Refri-
sera or and Telephone for March, June
July, 16 September to December. For
further information dial 2250
17.2.50-
FLAT — At “Hiam” Kensington
a s n New
Road Front Room, Vernndah twe bed.
rooms with running water, Kitchenette.
toilet, bath also Garage. Phony “62 F
17.2.5 -2n

ee
PERSONAL

*

—_—.

eS
THE public are hereby warned

giving credit to my

GAN

2n











against
wife EDNA CADO-

(nee Chase) as I do not l.c'd my-

f influence for all that was self responsible for her or anyone else
and noble lingers on contracting any debt or debts in my
strive to approach the|{ name unless by a written order signed







by me

| Signed SYDNEY CODOGAN,

| Wear Gap.
Britton 1 1
| 17.2. 50—in
== -
PUBLIC NOTICES
_



NOTICE

Tenders will be received py the un-
‘signed up to February 20th 1950 for
in to the Highway Commissioners of
Parish of St. James for £2,500.0.0
it a Rate of Interest not exceeding 4%



SSNS
* © OR easily earned by obtaining orders

for private Christmas Cards from
vour friends No previous experience
necessary, Write today for beautiful free
Semple Book to Britain's largest and

m



ellous money making opportunity.
Jcnes, Williams & Co., Dept. 10 Victoria
Works, Preston, England.”



OFFICIAL NOTICE

APPEAL
(Equitable Jurisdiction )

CHARLES EDWIN ASH Plaintiff,
REGINA JUSTINA AGUSTA MARSHALL
Defendant

In pursuance of an Order in this
Court in the above action made on th
12th day of December 1949, I give notice



to all persons having any estate, right
or interest in or any lien or incum
brance affecting

All that certain piece or parcel o
land situate at Airy Hill in the parishes
of Saint Thomas and Saint Joseph in
this Island containing by admeasure
ment three roods eight perches be the

same more or less (inclusive of a certain |
area in the Public Road forming on
of the boundaries thereof) butting anc

Marshall, on lands now or late of S. N





on any Tuesday, or Friday between the
afternoon, at the Office of the Clerk of
the Assistant Court of Appeal at the
Court House Bridgetown, before the 22nd
day of February 1950, in order that such
claims May be ranked according to th
nature and priority thereof respectively

from the benefit of the said Decree
and be deprived of all claim on or
against the said property.

Claimants are also notified that the
must attend the said Court on Wednes-
day the 22nd day of February 1950, at

| will be ranked,
Given under my hand this 12th day o
December 1949.
I. V. GILKES
Ag. Clerk of the Assistant Court of
| Appeal.
16,12.49—3n



OFFICIAL SALE

BARBADOS,

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF

foremost Publishers; highest commission,

si

Turary 1950

ta
at

Re

un

Fe



|
}



bounding on lands now or late of S. J |

Murphy, on lands now late of J |
Knight, and on the public road whic
was formerly a Road-in-common or |
however else the same may buti |
bound,

to bring before me an account of thei
said claims with witnesses, dc:
and vouchers, to be examined by me|



APPEAL



from $3,25

3.2.50—Jdr |
a |

VE BOYS SHIRTS

iS & BOYs PYJAMAS




















}
for |

Play. Royal Store, Phone |
3,2.50—14n |

SPORT & DRESS S 's |
SSS SHIRTS

& Retail. Royal Store.

= 8.2.50—14n

AND C
Auto ‘Tyre

BATTERIFS—15 &
Co. Trafalgar St
7.2.50—t.f.n

y A Nourishing Food beverage
‘ Obtainable at Knight's
15.2.50---3n





; INHALANT—We have just
fresh Suply of Vapex Inhalant

Infuenza, Catarrh and Has
Obtainadie at Knights Ltd
15,2.50






If 2.50



sizes 3—5 @
& Whit-
value
10.2.50

Gn
ee English Tropical, sever
, Shades @ $6.95 ” * Th

Ewans
ae special



}
cash



eins wD to $3.7

February only





apie aiiiaeeaertat cea
ki Pants yn
» order, 5 Ds i ule &





Store |
17.2.50—1n. }



(Equitable Jurisdiction )

CHARLES EDWIN DASH Plaintiff.
REGINA JUSTINA AGUSTA MARSHALL
Defendant
Notice is hereby given that by virtue
of an Order of the Assistant Court of
Appeal dated the 12th day of December
1949 there will be set up for sale to the
highest bidder at the Office of the
Clerk of the Assistant Court of Appea)
at the Court House, Bridgetown, be-
tween the hours of 12 (noon) and %
o'clock in the afternoon on Friday the

24th day of February 1950
All that certain piece or parcel of
land situate at Airy Hill in the parishes
of Saint Thomas and Saint Joseph in this
Island containing by admeasurement
three reods eight perches be the sam
more or less (inclusive of a certain area
in the Public Road forming one of the
boundaries thereof) butting and bound-
ing on lands now or late of S. J. Mar-
shall, on lands now or late of S. H
n 24), on lands now or late of J. W



[Ny

. | Knight, and on the public road which

rh FLY-WAND—Rid| was formerly a Road-in-common o

les by han Atomite”| however else the same may butt and
and, the magic chemica!| bound.

>» Pkt. Obtainable and if not then sold the said property

will be set up for sale on every succeed-
ing Friday between the same hours until
the same is sold for a sum not less thai
£208. 6. 8.

Dated this 12th day of December 1%9

I. V. GILKES

Ag. Clerk of the Assistant Court «

Kppeal,

16.12.49—3n,



Cutlery etc. Four Bedrooms









—<—<—<—<—<$—<—<————





oo ant

NOTICE |

DR. CHAS. PAYNE |

Dentist \

(Opposite Cathedral) } |

Has resumed Practice. (i

=)

a 5

A Few More.... i

of the

|

{
!

| | FOR SALE
| “CARLDIEM,”—St. Lawrence

“CARLDIEM”, St. Lawrence. Fully furnished.
Situated on the St

s excellent sea bathing

bathing beach,

fields St.
premises Gardep, St. James.

land,
Teddy MeKinstry)
Christ Church.

BOYCE, Solicitors.

| dwelling

be
dining
second
offices
| ground
Excellent site for business
For further



AUCTION
























sned on Friday the 17th day of Feb-
at 2 p.m

CARRINGTON & SEALY.
LUCAS STREET.



1.2.50—9n.

COVE SPRING HOUSE — A mode~
Pungalow, four bedrooms, two hatha:
electricity, fate

ae the sea, own private
2 acres of land Vepe-
ble Garden, 8 miles from Bridgetown
Garden, St. James. Enquiry Sandy-

Peter. Phone 91-50 or at the



20.1.00—15n.
BUILDING SITE 29,216 square feet of
(adjoining the residence of Mr
at Rocklev New Road.
Apply YEARWOOD &

11.2.50—7n

———..,

HIGHGATE HOUSE, St Michael —
Large Stone House on excellent | site
overlooking harbour. At present *con-
verted into flats. Can be bought with
146,000 sq. ft. lend or smaller area
Por further information phone 4230.
Wilkinson & Haynes Co. Ltd

15.2,50—6n.

ALL that three storied stone
house situate in St
Bridgetown, (adjoining

wall
Michaels

Ww, the pre-

mises occupied by The Pornn Bay Rum
Company)

standing on 4,512 square feet
lanJ. The dwelling house contains 3
»oms Gn the top floor, drawing and
rooms and 3 bedrooms on the
floor; kitchen and usual out
and several other rooms on the
floor

particulars apply to the

dersigned

The above will be set up for sale by
Publie Competition at our office in Lucas
Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the 24th

bruary 1950 at 2 p.m





| and to be repaid by Annual instalments CARRINGTON & SEALY
of £250.0.0 with interest (Loan by Solicitors
Legislature) . ‘ 14.2,50—10n
| Signed EE Renee, ee eames
| P. H. TARILTON, BUILDING SITES — At Highgate, st
Clerk, Highway Commissioners, St. Michael. Minimum size 10,000 sq ft
James. There are excellent private roads with
11.2.30—3n water and electric supply already in-
V—— | stalled. For further information phone
4230. Wilkinson & Haynes Co. Ltd
NOTICE 15.2. 50—6n
| x PARISH OF ST. JOHN.
Attention is drawn to all owners ot |
«ogs that they should be licensed during LOST
| the month of February, in accordance
with the Dog License Act DOG—Fox Terrier answering to thc |
| R. S. FRASER. name of Prince, with name on collar
Parochial Treasurer, | Finder return to “Allworth’”, Cheapside. |
St. John. 17.2.50—2n. |
11,2.50—€n

eo



SALE



1948 FORD PREFECT CAR

at MacEnearny’s Garage
}
2.30 pam. TO-DAY
WE are instructed by the

Insurance Company to sell
the above vehicle which has
been damaged in an acci-
dent. Mileage only 11,000.
Car driven away under own
power after accident, Oppor-
tunity to acquire a modern,
repairable Car. |

Cash on fall of Hammer,

AUCTIONEERS

DIAON & BLADON







POPULAR

Cannon Gas Hotplates

- with
> 3 BOILING BURNERS

sellers please apply to R. S. Nicholls &
| Co: 151/2 Roebuck St: Ring 3925.
17.2.50—In.

TRINIDAD BONDS |

$3,360 3% due 1973/83 @







$864 3% ,, 1955/59 @ 97%
$9,600 3% 1974/84 @ 98
£1,000 4% ,, 1963/73,@ 107

Net, plus accrued interest; pay-
ment and delivery in Trinidad.

| TRINIDAD SHARES

300 Alstons Limited Ordinary

@ $6.75
300 Angostura Bitters Ord’y
@ $21.00

Net, local funds, plus stamp

duty.

AUSTRALIA BONDS

Highest premium paid for 344%
and 5% Dollar Bonds.

BARBADOS SHARES

A new list issued Tuesday, free cn
application to: —

A.M. WEBB

Dial 3188 —_ Hours 9—3
155 Roebuck St.
(Over Peoples Pharmacy)

14,2.50—5n



ADVOCATE

ee nem mete ma cen ea



In Carlisle Kay

IN PORT: Sch. Adalina, Sch. Mar:
M. Lewis, Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe, Si

Uucille M, Smith, Sch. Frances W. Smith
Sch. Emeline Sch. D'Ortac, Yacht Mar-
patcha, Sch. Gita M., Sch. Emanuel C
Gordon, Yacht Leender, Sch. Manuata
M.V. Twillingate, Sch. Wonderful Coun
sellor, Sch. Molly N. Jones, Sch. Zita
Wonita, Sch. Belaueen, Sch. Burma D..

M.V. T. B. Radar
ARRIVALS
Schooner Alexandrinu R., 30 tons net,
Capt. Smith, from St. Laicia; Agent: D.
L.. Johnson Esq
DEPARTURES
Yacht Serva La Bari, 63 tons net,
Capt. Schlect, for Tobago

IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION

Cable & Wireless (West Indies) Lid
advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships
Barbados Coast Station;:—

S-S. Joseph Lykes, Mauretania,
Etoranger, Prinsbernhard, Chemawa.
Atla, Ticgun, Delsud, Hertfjord, Luciano,
Presidentbrand Tresus, Sevane, Ariston,
Petter, Mercator, Gascogne, Brajara,

Dageid, Alcoa Pegasus, Marialetizia,
Lugano, Prospect, Simon enson M/s
Mercator, Marmac Lark, Craftsman,

Fsso Richmond, Golfito, Veenenbureh





\

ay od at
DEPARTURES—By B.W.LA.L.

For Trinidad: Mrs. Belle Morgan, Miss
Elizabeh McRae, Mr, Douglas Wall, Mr.
Charles MacKenzie, Mrs. Ella Mae Ken-
zie, Mr. Julian Pierre, Mr. Josef Adamira,
Mr. Malcolm Riley, Mr. Graham Riley.
Mr, Ernest Peterkin, Mr, Michael Ram-
din, Mr. Richard Budd, Miss Eleanor
Nurse, Mrs. Agnes Nurse,

For St. Lucia: Mrs. Marie Scotland,
Mrs. Louise Osbourne, Mr. Percy Good-

ing, Mr. Lawrence Charlton, Mr. John
Marchpenny.
For Jamaica: Mr, Peter Lacy, Mr.




John Hale, Mrs.



ulcie Hale.



Communist China and Russia
Trade Agreement Soon

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 16.
A Peking broadcast heard here
said that a trade agreement be-

tween Communist China and
fRussia will soon follow the
‘treaty of alliance and mutual

assistance just concluded,

Pr. Wm. Henry St. Dial 3466
Hollywood Fashion 6 Swan St.

FREE! FREE! With every Purchase of $1.00 and
over FREE GIFTS GIVEN AWAY.

COME

ALL!

Queen Adelaide, Esso Denhang, Nuc
veandalucia, Triton, Constantis, Brazil

M/V Rosario, Barbara, Alcoa Cavalier
Esso Balboa, Weyeager, Westernsun
Robinwentle, Sanbarbarn, Argentina,

Cevina, Esso Avila, Manistee, Stafford,
Sanpoula, Aire, Lady Rodney, Chemawa
Mormacdove, Laristan, Randibrovg,
Quilmes,, Arakaka, . Santlisec
Alcoa Ranger, Sokna, Enid, Paik, Esite
Cherrywood, California, Sanvulfrano
Sundial, Thirlby, Acoa Pennant, Cazador
Gerona, and Rand Tachra.

pe




eee

For Antigua:. Mr. John O’Brien, Mrs.
Isabel O’Brien, Mr, Charles Peirce, Mr.
Richard Venable, Mrs. Amy Venable.
For St. Kitts: Mr, Viadimir Fesar.
Fer Ciudad Trujillo, D.R.; Mrs, Maud
Jones, Mr. Robert Jones

ARRIVALS—By B.W.1LA.L,
From Trinidad: Jessica Barthelmess,

Richard Barthelmess, Angela Boyce,
Jeanne Boyce, Lt. Chariton, Sybil Butt,
Maicolm Butt, Mrs. Nichols, Rebecca



Laughlin, John Williamson, Gladys Wil-
liamson, Betty Johnson, Page Johnson,
Mortimer Seabury, Frida Seabury, Owen
Boyce Marcia Boyce

It quoted the Communist new



PAGE SEVEN

| SHIPPING NOTICES

The Sch. “ENTERPRISE S” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for











So ait Trinidad, Sailing

y 17th February 1950.

The Sch. “ADALINA"” wil: ADVERTISE .. «
we Cargo and Passengers for

St Jucia. Sailing Friday 17th.

Februw-y 1950 : in the

The M.V. “DAERWOOD” wi!

accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba. Sailing Sunday 19th
Pebruary 1950

The Sch. “MARY M. LEWIS”
will accept Cargo and Passengers
for Demerara Sailing Thursday
16th February 1950

The Sch. “EMELINE” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Demerara. Sailing Saturday 18th
February 1950,
SCHOONER OWNERS’

ASSOCIATION (INC)
Consignee. Tel. No. 4047.

Canadian National Steamship

EVENING
ADVOCATE

Published every Monday
with an increasing circula--
tion every week. |







Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails
SOUTHBOUND Montreal Halifax Bosion Barbados BarBados
LADY RODNEY —_— 8th Feb Wh Feb 19th Feb 20th Feb.
LADY NELSON — 2th Feb 27th Feb Sh Mar 9th Mar
CANADIAN
CHALLENGER -— 10th Mar —_—- 20th Mar 20th Mar
LADY RODNEY -_—— 25th Mar 27th Mar Sth Apr 6th Apr.
LADY NELSON soe 12th Apr 13th Apr 23rd Apr 24th Apr
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LADY NELSON Sist May 3rd June Sth . 14th June 15th Jnn
LADY RODNEY 30th May ard July Sth July Mth July 15th” July
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arfives Arrives
NORTHBOUND Barbados Barbados Boston St. John Halifax Montreal
LADY RODNEY 4th Mar. Sth Mar. 15th Mar 16th Mar. oe
LADY NELSON 2ist Mar. 22nd Mar. ist Apr. 2nd Apr. ——
LADY RODNEY 17th Ape 19th Apr. 28th Aor. ——= 929th Ar 3rd May
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LADY RODNEY 27th Ju 29th July 7th Aug - Mh Aug 12th Aug



N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vessels ritted with cold storage cham-
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GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD. — Agents.





CIE. GLE., TRANSATLANTIQUE
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Sailing to Trinidad










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PAGE LIGHT



THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Barbados Score 246 For 5 Wickets

TRIM, GASKIN BOWL
STEADILY ALL DAY

Barbados” opening batsmen Roy
Marshall and A. M. Taylor went to
the wicket at 11.40 a.m. and fast
bowler Trim opened the attack
ftém the Pavilion End to Taylor
Taylor opened the score with a
single to leg off the fourth ball
and Marshall played out the over.

Gaskin came on from the Screen
End to Taylor and bowled to a
leg-field. The batsman attempted
to block the last ball of the over
on the off side but the ball edged
to slips where there was no ficitis-
man and he collected 3 runs. He
was nearly caught off the seconi
ball in Trim’s next over when
Persaud at fine leg just failed to
get his hand to the ball. The bow!-
er sent down the first maiden for
the day. Gaskin bowled the sec-
ond to Roy Marshal! in his next
over.





JOHN TRIM
i
he mark t be
# vb pers
t the over
next over Was a mai
iall Gaskin ntin
Screen End to Taylor, t
} taking a single oj
ball of the over. G
v still wling to a packed les
field.

In Trim’s next over Tayk
the third delivery past silly mi
on for a brace ar t t
remainder of the

The ore as
Skipper Car 1 e «
the Scree it { ¢



Hi



hrough shi ut Ro

get hi hand | th

batsman got 2 runs. H rv
was not for long however, fo
Gaskin’s last ball he hit high
cover to give Pairaudeau an ¢
catch. He had scored. 13 rur
cluding one boundar ne
been at the wicket f 33 1
The total was now 18 i
partnered Marshal He

his account t

wide of mid-or ft
immediately came

Camacho. M iall
two singles i !

Gaskin sent dc i
Marshall and in Trim’s nex
Walcott drove his first deliy

ee ein

powerfully

to the long of!

ary. The first 25 runs took 4

minutes.
Thomas who was playing for the
first time in the series came on

from the Screen End with the score

at 37, and 3
off the over,
cutting the last

The

runs were
Walcott
ball

scored

beautifully

Do It Eve



later took a



square

for 2. Gaskin was kept on at the
Pavilion End and -sent down an-
other maiden to Marshall. His
figures were now 9 overs, 2
maidens, 12 runs, 1 wicket.

The bowling at this stage wag
very steady and the fielding good,

but the batsmen were playing |
with confidence.
Rollox came on from the

Pavilion End with the score at
46 and. got the ball to break
sharply from the leg ‘side causing
the batsmen some tineasiness. The

over was a maiden t~ Marshall.

In Thomas’ next. over Marshall
drove the last bal! nic“ly to the
mid-on boundary to send up 50
in 67 minutes.

Gibbs was brought on at the
Screen End with the score at 55
and the batsmen scored 5 runs
off the over.

Rollox bowled the last over be-
fore lunch and Marshall made 4
single.

The interval was taken with the
score at 61 for 1, Marshall being
not out 30 and Walcott 17. There
was only 1 extra. The innings had
now lasted 75 minutes.

On resumption, Trim bowied
from the screen end to Marshall
who cover drove for a single but
the next found Walcott’s stumps
as the batsman attempted to drive
one that was well up and missed.
He was at the wicket for 43 min-
utes and had seored 17 runs in-
cluding two boundaries.

Johnny Lucas joined Marshall
and the batsman got a single as
the result of a bye while Marshall
placed the fifth neatly througt

the slips for a boundary

Rolleox bowled
jon end
single

from the pavil-
over yielded a
Lucas. Lucas
irim neatly to
while Mer-

and hi
to mid-off Dy
one from

y for a single

k an easy single wide of
and Luca gianced 1
race
replaced Rollox at the
pavilion end and Marshall cuf
through the slips for a four and

single to mid-off. Trim
ent down a maiden to Marshall
nd Gaskin did likewise to Luca



Weekes back drove one from
Camacho i the boundary and
cover drove the next to the bound-
ary. He ‘then on drove for a
couple to make his score 29. The
total was now 133 with Lucas 20

Rollox’s next over yielded a
single, a hard on drive by
while Camacho sent
maiden te@ Lucas

Weekes took an easy single
iong-off off Rollox and latex
off drove Camacho for a couple
ond then cover drove to the
boundary. He also got a single

Lucas,

down a

with a crisp square cut.

Facing Rellox Weekes took the
only single of the over with a
cover drive.

Trim Bowls Again

Witi. the score at 143 Trim was
brought back from the screen end
vice Camacho. He bowled to
Weekes who took a single past
gully off the second. Lucas played
out the remainder.

Weekes pulled one from Rollox
to the’ on boundary then back

drove the next powerfully but
Rollox stopped what looked a
certain four. Trim’s next over

was a maiden to Lucas.

Gaskin bowled from the screen
end to Weekes who skied one to
cover but no one got under it, the
batsmen eventually ran two; and
150 went up after 177 minutes.
Weekes turned the next neatly to
fine leg for a brace and later
Lucas placed one from Trim
through the slips for a couple.

Weekes square cut Gaskin to the
boundary to get his 50 including
six boundaries in 73 minutes and
then swept the next to the square
leg boundary.

Persaud had his first spell for
the day from the screen end and
his over yielded 11 including a
pull to the on boundary by Weekes
off a full toss, Rollox now bowled
from the screen end to Liuicas who
glanced the fifth for a brace.

Weekes back drove one from
Persaud for a single, Lucas covet
drove for a couple and then took
a sharp single to extra cover. The
tea interval was now taken with
the total at 181 for three. Weekes
was 64, Lucas 33 and Extras 6.

On resumption Thomas bowled
to Lucas from the Pavilion End
and sént down a maiden to the

batsman.










POCKET CARTOOK

by OSBERT LANCASTE>



“ Attention, please / |

has @ amail woutel
retern it at once to
tizhempien im Bor 17.

Lady

single off the second ball aa
Lucas playéd out the over. This
batsman was now somewhat sub-
dued and his scoring at this stage
was slow.

The score was taken to 214
when Trim got Weekes to return
with his score at 82. He had been
at the wicket for 132 minutes and
his score included 9 fours. The
partnership had yielded 124 runs.

C. B. Williams came in and
after playing the next delivery
the bowler’s third edged to slips
where Rollox caught brilliantly.
Five Barbadian wickets were
now down for 214- Atkinson was
the next man in and played the
last ball making the over a
maiden in which two of the mosi
valuable wickets had fallen. He
had now secured his third wicket
for 43 runs.

Both Gaskin and Trim
sent down a maiden each.

In Trim’s next over Atkinson
turned the fourth ball to leg for
4 to open his score.

Camacho bowled in place of
Trim with the score at 221. and
in this over Lucas reached his
50 which he took 193 minutes





then















a ne a Che. ” Rollox bowled from the other to make. He was 63 when he was
Persau j squ ire leg off Te ape end and each batsman got 4 given a life, cutting one well
Lucas beautifull) bah oa no Single off the over They repeat- outside the off stump from
nex ingle. Mars vail a - ed this in Thomas next. Camacho in his next over into
her single this time to : ns These bowlers were kept on the hands of Christiani at gully,
i ; ee : * ‘elded scart for a few more overs and the 190 Who failed to take the vateh.
vaskin's next over yielded IWO vant up by a drive to mid off off Stumps were drawn soon afte:
ingle fe alot itt ams Rollox by Weekes for a single with the total at 246 for 5, Lucas
ve oe tote lt ro * day, This partnership had now yield- being not out 65 and Atkinson
ven his second spell for the is ed 100 in 95 minutes. The 200 not out 12 with 9 extras. The
a oat ar r "baay singi® mark was soon reached and had innings so far have lasted 285
hn OK al asy sing eS
ft the second and then been made in 214 minutes. minutes
off off the second and then Trim who sent down 2:
ved t the remainde : . overs for the day including 6
Marshall turned the first from maidens, stole the ,bowling hon-
: a " aes . : a
yaskin t jaare leg for a bra ; ours in taking 3 wickets for 50
nake his score 48 : i Ls: tot runs, Gaskin took the remainin;
7 i yed out ae ae 2 for 52. He bowled 28 overs of
er, Gibl nt down a maid- which 9 were maidens.
to | i Following are the scores:—
: all ; BARBADOS—I5 Innings
Roy sarshail Out A. M, Taylor.c Pairaydeau b Gaskin 13
British Guiana got their third R. E, Marshall c & b Gaskir 48
C. L, Waleott b Trim 17
ICKE th the core at 90 when J. H. Lucas not out 65
Roy Marshall returned the first C B. Williams ec Rollox b Trim 0
ball of Gaskin’s next over and E. D. Wenmes' ay trun *
ia : a E. Atkinson not out 12
the bowler made no mistake. He Extras w. 5; nb, 3; b. 1
is at the wicket for 110 minutes 7
for 48 which included 6 boundaries Total or S: wate,) band
Veekes the incASming betsman Fall of wickets 1 for 18, 2 for 62, 3
urvived an appeal for catch for 9, 4 for 214, 5 for 214
behind the wicket off the next oo oe R Ww
; j z
ther layed out the remain- J. Trim 22 6 50 3
as B. McG. Gaskin 23° (Oo 2 2
Gaskin who had been bowling . aint aa. eee 9
extremely well had the fine analy- A. B. Rollox 17 1 36 0
of 140. 5M. 22R. 2W G. Gibbs 5 2 13 0
: G. Persaud 2 0 15 )
Git bowled a maiden to Lu ie i oa
le Weekes broke hi du ET
th a cut past point for a singh £. WEEKES B B Cc R di
he only run of the over ; re adio
We Seinen nals ih a tingle lrim bowled the new ball
. from the Sereen End with the
i >» leg off Gibbs and Luca < £ >
ane a a. sve for another, Weeke core at 204 and three singles in enue
took ’ “sit f le wide of Rollox at ‘®! scored, two going to Weekes FRIDAY February 17, 1950
mi An ‘\ gind later Laces cover Gaskin came on from the Pa- ajay oa — ie mn. New
drove, getting a boundary as a re- vilion End to Weekes and bowled things: 7.30 am. From the thi rd Pro
sult of a misfield by Christiani to a packed leg field, sending down ee 7 = . *, are 8 a.m
i a ms ant : " 1 the iterials: 8.10 ¢ P
Lucas turned one from Gaskin ® " aiden , vramme Parade: 8.15 a.m. Londen Light
to fine leg for a brace to send up In Trim's next over Lucas Concert Orchestra: 9 a.m. The New
100 after 124 sainutes’. play and Steere’ ‘Ais second ball through 9:13 @-m. Home News from Britai
i 2 iutes ay % » y , 915 a.m lose Down: 12 no The
then took an easy single to mid- the slips for 4 and played out the News; 12.10 p.m. News Analysis: 12.15
an ovey p.m. Programme Parade: 12.18 pm
Rollox took over from Gibbs at Still using the leg trap Gaskin, 7 stoners Choice. Tp Atk
the screen end with the score bowled to Weekes who took al phony on Strinw 7 2 a N
102, He bowled to Lucas who turt |? ” p.m. Home Now : from Briteir n: 21%
1 ‘
ed the third neatly to fine leg fo. Dupre (Orfan) 2.52 p.m "intedude 2
three while Weekes on drove the sal â„¢ pm. Commonwealth Journey - 3.45. p.m
; . : » W » | ight Music: 4 p.m, The News: 4.15
last for a single. i he eather pom. The daily service: 4.18 p.m. Nights
Weekes took a single to mid : : it the Opera: 5 p.m. Kay on the Keys
on off the second from Gaskin! TO-DAY . 15 p - Frogreavane Parade: 5.30 p.m
. am; Tor he n x sm §.4 t
and later on drove one from Rol-{{ Sun Rises: 6.20 a.m. Intertide: - 6 a Se eae Pa
lox to the boundary, then got aj Sun Sets: 6.09 p.m p.m. Anthology 1: 7 p.m. The News
‘ouple through the slips and an} Moon (First Quarter) Febru- West teches ee eaves: 7.18 pan
couple ig. e § Ss é © ary 24 West Indian Diary 7.45 p.m. Dance
easy single to cover Music: 8 pom. Radio Newsreel: 8.15

the over yielded four singles

Rollox was now brought on from |
the pavilion end and he bowled to
an easy single to

Lucas who took

Gaskin’s next over yielded
single, an off drive by Weekes |
Skipper Camacho took over

from Rollox at the screen end and

Lighting: 6.530 p.m.
High Water:
p.m.
i YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) .45 ins
Total for Month to Yester-
day: 1,08 ins.
‘Temperature (Max.) 82.5 °F.
‘Temperature (Min.) 71.0 °F

4.32 am, 4.07

mid on and later Weekes cove Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
irove for a single (3 p.m.) E. by N

Weekes pushed Camacho to} Wind Velocity: 15 miles per
cover for an easy single off the hour,
first while Lucas played out the}| Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29,990,

remainder Rollox’s next

yielded a single.

over

Time

* aaghoed Gene athe -

(3 p.m.) 29.916,

By Jimmy Hatlo

j



@ (TWO TO SHOW ON FLAMINGO Y I'D UKE TO SEE HIM PUT T \HIS WIFE PAID US FOUR DOLLARS
IN THE THIRD-"TWO ACROSS } TWO BUCKS ON ACCOUNT. JLAST SPRING WHILE HE WAS IN
HOW MANY MONTHS DO THE HOSPITAL:--I GUESS HE

| He BOARD ON SPLINTERS
BA IN THE FIFTH“AND LISTEN,
NICK:sI GOT A HOT TIP

ON THIS ONE-FIVE ON THE

SCHNOZ“RUBBERLEGS ~=

a

IN THE EIGHTH: >»

fea tt
Bag
2 —



HEY OWE EUS Now ?

ca Saks t

“TOUGHER FOR

“oe Oe
b>;
Lo
mK

HIS WIFE LOST —
HER JOB THE =
QTHER ~r,






COULDN'T GET TOA BOOKIE:: |

7 aman

Ke)" HEAR THINGS Va. a
/ ARE GETTING ‘ail’ HORSE-PLAYERS

PY Ole BROKE— AND
=H] SO DOVHE PEOPLE |
WHO LET ‘EM PUT |

eco THE ARM-.
se

HIMs.



co ANA
oe ee ~~"
THANK TO
ANO NYMOUS
=o 7

O,LeLINOS





p.m. BBC Northern Orchestra: 9 p.m
The News: 9.10 p.m. Home News from
Britain; 9.15 p.m. Political Speech

My. Winston Churchill (Con.): 9.45 p.m
Light Music, 10 p.m. Export Jig-Sav
{0.30 pm. Music Magazine: 10.45 p.m
World Affairs: 11 p.m. The News

SS





TIME TO
ORDER
VvOUR
SUITS
FOR

THE
CRICKET

TOURNAMENT
CALL IN
EARLY AND
BE SURE

OF A
PERFECT FIT.

pP.C.S

SS
:

Tee Scorer3










S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd.



















FRIDAY,

EN

FEBRUARY
FOR SALE







Sportswriters os Argentines
Select To Swim 660 Miles

BUENOS AIRES, Feb. 16.
W.1. Team

Five Argentine swimmers today
approached the halfway mark in
their 660-mile swim down the

MR. STREBOR ROBERTS, Syorss| Parana River with containers of

Paitor of the Jainaica Gleaner. Mr. H hpl. of

M* Thurne, Sports Paitor of the Trini. | earth from. Yapeyu, birt place

Croker, sports-] Jose De Sanmartin, the.centenary

Guiana Daily Saute .

Chrreilcie and Mr:_O. S. Coppin, Sports | Of whose deatn Argentina cele

Fditor of the Barbades Advocate, yes- ru this year.

terday named the sixteen players who officer, Sanmar-

they think should reoresent the Wes A high ranking Fr: the

Traits {hn the 1989 tour to England, These | tin fought against ance in

are as follows: Spanish army, and afterwards

iat - ig MR THORNE'S} ieq a South American army



ee ceeeeel

arn

|
|
|



TEAM TEAM 7
GODDARD GODDARD across the Andes in 1817 to defeat

Spanish rule in Chile.—Reuter.





PINE HOUSE, standing on 2} acres

drawing room, dining room, 4 bedrooms, bg
kitchen with buttery and pantry. Large verandahs on
sides. Three servants’ rooms, bath and toilet, large
telephone and water. Inspection by appointment only,

ticulars from . .
BARBADOS REAL ESTATE AGENCY,
HASTINGS HOTEL.

3, tWO miles from ¢.
















Telephone 2336.

Announcement








ins C. F. HARRISON'S WOOD-WORKING Dep;

PIERRE or KING WALCOTT ENTI . MENT will now undertake Cutting, gin
McW ATT. or TISH or TRIM UNGU Thicknessing, Planing, and shaping to eusiop

GUILL m

specifications. For information and QUOtatigne
apply to the Manager, Mr. Hassell (tej, 16,
* Hours 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. (except 11 a.m, to 12 noap)

gue

EfJoouterron ¢ ‘bins oD
Ladies’ high lass

WALKING SHOES

In red & white, brown



“Longfield” |
Picks His 16 — POHTS INFECTION

Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Feb. 16.
Forecasting a possible 16 West

Indies cricketers for England the}
Gleaner sport columnist Jack/
‘Longfield” Anderson emphasised |
the necessity that a specialist)
wicketkeeper be included as it!
was obvious that Waleott, accept- |
ed number one and Christiani a}
likely understudy on their Indian |
form, no longer relish the job in)
view of the fact that they did not}
wicketkeep in their colonies’ first |
match at Bridgetown last week. |
He advised that West Indies
cricket cannot afford to experiment
with wicketkeepers as we have!
been doing’ since the death of}
Cyril Christiani and the retirement
of Ivan Barrow, and should pick
the right man for the right place.

In this t he saw a place*

either for Alfie Binns or Simpson
Guillen and his opinion, accord-
ing to reports is that the former
is the best man for the job.

Discussing composition of the

attack, he warned selectors not to

persist with the original intention

of sending three fast bowlers if the |
third is not up to standard. Using |
the case of Tyrell Johnson in 1939;
as a comparison, he argued that}
so far neither.Trim, King nor Ken-{
tish revealed the required class!
and it is better to send two good

men, Johnson and Jones, instead of |







on! this cough

My throat is sore with this cough, cough,
cough, all the time...

& white,

blue &

white and pure white.

Also Silver Birch shoes of the same

at old




class. You are advised to buy

prices because prices in England have

gone up again.

CaveSHEPHERD &Co,

10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD §



three with one dud. Commenting What a difference!
cn the general composition, in rf Ae ectiahdthied
his opinion Valentine revealed ZuSses eased my cough and soothe

sufficient class for the important my throat in no time!

position of slow lefthand bowler,
which is essential on the English
tour, and suggested that if the
selectors are satisfied that George
Headley, who has been offered an
attractive coXfract with Bacup to
take the place of Everton Weekes
in the Laneashire League, is fit he }
should be selected because

shot > s vause his |
undeniable experience and all-}
round ability is invaluable to what |
is the West Indies most important, 4 f 2 § NG E






















SOSSSSSSISIO PLLA PSSSF

We offer new stocks of ....

FERROCRETE RAPID-HARDENING CE

tour in history. |
He finally suggested the follow-
ing 16: Goddard, Headley, Weekes

Worrell, Walcott, Stollmeyer he makers of the nemo Bbc Cough Mixture mo Sr Seems
Gomez, Rae, Johnson, Jones, }

Christiani, Ferguson, Binns, C Per Leet. ah at ue PORTLAND CEMENT

B. Williams, Valentine, R. Mar-;|$*" "7" """"* PODS PODS ISOE & in 94 tb. bags

shall.—(By Cable).

‘PORTLAND CEMENT

in 400 1b. drums

WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT

in 375 Ib. drums

RED & KHAKI COLORCRETE CE

in 375 Ib, & 112 lb. drums

IRON carne? METAL

, , 2%, 3!" mesh

GALVANIZED EXPANDED METAL



__._ Y.M.B.C.
s ex ANNUAL
oa CARNIVAL
” DANCE

SELECTION OF CARNIVAL
QUEEN

Prizes for:—

Headley Will Play
For Bacup C.C.

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent

GEORGE HEADLEY, Jamaica
and West Indies batting ace and
former Lancashire League player
has accepted and signed a con-
tract to play for Bacup Club in




POLLO LPELEPPPPPEEEPP PPE EEE PEELE.



the Lancashire League in Eng- MOST ORIGINAL (Ladies) Ae PUN

land. yeorge Headley will be (Gents) 14", 34”, 1” mesh

taking the place of Internationa! PRETTIEST ‘COSTUMES va

record breaker Everton Weekes, adies) WILKINSON & HAYNES (0.
who has just finished a season PRETTIEST COSTUMES

with Bacup and will be going to (Gents)

MOST ORIGINAL BAND Phone 4267.

PRETTIEST BAND Etc. Ete.

Saturday, 18th Feb,

9 pm,
ADMISSION — $1.00 %

Music—
C. B. Browne's Orchestra,

Indies

England with the West
Cricket Team.—(By Cable)



SOSOOCSOCSOS

eS











Tins HEINZ Spaghetti im
Tomato Sauce
(with Cheese

Baked Beans.

Salad Cream.
Mayonaise.

Sandwich
Spread

HAVE

CLOTHES

Vegetable Soun

Oxtail Soup.
Strawberries,
Pears.

BY

Pineapple.
Pineapple Juice.
Guavas

Fruit Salad,

C. B. RICE &
OF

BOLTON LANE

in Tailoring







Full Text

PAGE 1

-rr 0>\\FKBKl AKY 17. 1U5*—_^ m !Bi againsl these mar%  Mfers, are between 20 believed that I m* which ^ %  Lre the courts, there arc %  L 20 which remain undi.sJt*nt House. %  njildmc where all detail! ot ear* Wi' r •VciiKwnian for the R KSofflce. said : Cpitfm is not intended To IE Srtv will look id the ^%g*they become suspicious. %  .vered, there still Ksstside chain, %  il will never Bf ourt. for tin" difficulties ol ^IJUW nan > Action Al Last Lit Ions last something Is 'M done by the authoril II chock on this crime. ,js being discussed by exthe Regi; ipriwges the establishment colossal index ol the counTBJIOO.OOO familie lwould be listed as a unit— LSJJSBW and ch id eross-indi asy to find out ^BiMd to them for ever ihe index rum to light immedi| Digamous Igtf, but LU i would become much more lies prove that lour men ( %  woman commits bigamy. %  DM are more I between ::: Hktlytti conn KBB between % %  ol 17 ^ %  HL,** times more likely f^^HfL ssmever, than men Bwir Ann whal [Ullty party is I to CCUl"" I' Vc.r. THKEG No* •< :•* send ihal slogan in lo the Express auj wm ten ifluneus, it'll /lut about pay >aur fin c.s. Govt. Wants Rio Prepares R. C. Joumulisis CKI Cpprfiy For Carnival Mas. h low BW YORK, Ftb. .8. rh United Statsi Governsnssyt I Rio ur TANS*! on — %  • if has subpoenaed records trom ,wc ; m„ lg '„ Bto turn into ., jLErZ Wujatkuof "mum.ua mauil> in ation (or toe cam. Ever since New $25,000 Discovery LONDON. iBy Mail, rerth $25,000 has I London wholeWhile wirimg through his stock of the Liuversal Postal Union 75th %  for the Aden Dependency ol shihr kalla. O. W Lempert, ol Wuriseaf, .vithoui the normal suich.,: Only one sheet of many ihous' h x. d """^ ""' Prtnttm ""'*tiiuicd an investigation uf have been ntMntaTf' :M Uh 1 "' Normally the heel ..gu-eim-nis entered Into by Amcttpending three davf inrfihS. HO under $14 but. can pstnlSUSl eumpanio SSQOUg nights of mass rtns ,-rror made the she*'! into thSSDSSlves Mi i w ith petroleum Illuminated of other nations and spread the capital' Oibuons, ihe philatelic ralatlon of aud to and monst. i timatod the sheet % %  I tk trad* Is, UK) ..ratcolumbines look down from the S25.000 — each stamp Uces of. the American petroleum sides of skyscrapers valued at $420. It is possible "'* In Pr;;ca Owe, one of fl uiat one stamp will be often . %  of ,i hill complete to me King, who like his father' &* denied .. %  %  i collector itel activities. while open air dan The Aden and Dependencies! Officials uf the two oil comp..:. ,-i 40 feet high i printed In Bait African ^ wn0 uodorsiood that the Gulf! towers have been erected ind cents 0l1 Corporation of Pittsburgh was I erem paitl of the ntv. Thirty feet becauaa it was intended that they' ""^""ed *" tluinaulry and thai high pillars flanl ihould adopt that currency uj ^^wds sought had already been [ oughXare, Avenida Rfo Brnnco. faor— aamer ieuin cartel acW the Middle East, according to officials Of !.'. Socony Vacuum Oil. aid Oil Compan;. [New Joaaag I ni that memorai the Federal Trade Commission Kith the subpoenas. %  "InfltUuted an investigation sound of the steady beai has been rollii 1K down woes evenmght in ti towns of KavelL.s yuarters higli up on Ri carnival clubs and sum! ROME. Feb. 1C. About 350 Catholic Journalists from it, countries will meet to-day in the great Chancellcr\ Palace DO Rome's Capitol Hill for the third annual 4 day Congress of the Catholic Press by Guiseppe I). 11a Torre. President of the Inter fahon of the Catholic Press. •hey will iiiseuas the theme: "Thei under Uie eyes uf the gToaravB sn-azing thim "that %  he dock %  Iheoreticallv ^^^ft*rty— w ho stands by I Hplehannounce; forgiveBBd whether lie goes to Bpnot remains loval. 1 ifeT Usually she Ppamg but contempt for the ^^in Britain is an mdictM wholes better, tlpfee/sforfer. IriwyMcheck adopt that __. ihe time that the stamps went OB Oct. 10. 1949. As a result of technical trouble the old currency of rupees and -ed on the Indian rate Dad. The printed, were surcharged with rupee or anna collectors are already hunting for the Alien and Depen%  withdrawn without notice 10 days before the icheduled time Stocks in fhe hands of dealers are believed to b.' very low The price rose Iron; for each ol ls to $2.45 each in mind condition, with a proportionately higher I t Of the Use : emanate from Aden Town, as postal communications, with the ninety bad —(I.Vsi lc, many of than in-iorei Illuminated founts various Congressional hearings. an import. by the 1 to the splendour of ihe night. Coogre Among lecunls sought F.T.C. were those of the Iraq Petroleum Agreement and the pact by Jersey Standard and Socony to) of AIIHIO%  LI Compau> crude oil Middle East oil has been much In the news, lately, various American prod IK at a time whafl dOCDastlc oil production was being curtailed, —Rculer Fish Slaps Parish Mags Indo-China Policy b The Test Case BANGKOK. Feb. Ifi. CaxBdvi v i %  Easter together Althougl oitlcially on the Sunday In-fore -\sh Wednesday, people turn I %  nay mornim. wearing tin || midday sir '.lansformcd with Bails crowds streaming out Business doai The carnival is on. By nighuali Rio li iblaxe wtttl light and the crowds t... ;' : : %  Trams, the only form of trai under the mass of col* ourful pasaangatt on to the roofs l collected and conductors sometimes leave their trams lo join in the fun. Carnival a general easing of evsrydi One rule, how S T' LONDON. 03j A %  fiarge lhat britam's parish %  .eiellas Of literature" has been by author J. Blan-K And backed by ihe Church pose d No ipfe Assembly, he has started a drive carnival balls you can onlv buy beer or champagne —Keuler What Bid Fh>S, is more virile writing "It iv setter for a church Depressions of the Unlf > nsk being vulgar than and other western po .. .„. ^w ,,„d Innoeu sponsibilities stemming from their, m h.s book "Better Parish moral support of Indo-Chti ,., b y the tbe*draart "nded here tonight. cations of today. fte Conleienee. that the en^ SJ Defence Of Democracy i. •f. am npry withl ".erudite or .,„ Governmi : ould rotm %  Britain Vskcd To Protfft Mail hi Trinidad MONTEVIDEO, (Bj The Am* rioan 9 Press hi the service truth, justice and peace." Countries represented are Aus-' %  m. China. Rg] I d la. Uruguay. Holland. The United States. New Zealand, Malta nd Canada. \ew Deal For Colonial Science LONDON. (By Mali) A scheme under whu-h svSSstajjally some 400 reseaich workers will be available to w.. Colonies has now started and, say the Colonial Ofl.ce. anyone in the ire who has the right qualirtI nujh standard—can join in. With £2J50,OOC a >ear to spend n research, the Colouial Office ttkled the problem i>oe u: in :v next Mondav. the journalists v ill; %  work ,n ,he eolonies Uv 31 Peters BssdlUca. An At the moment than arc abou audience which Pope Pius Twelve I 38 research schemes under way have granted to them or' and so far we have road, Monday was cancelled because of' senior appointmenls. about 5)j bis illt.. tjd, DOwevsr, -.ubsidlary appoiuiiuei • lhat he may be well enough lo i probably appoint about 400 work receive, them al the week-end. t ids during the —Heater. run The work of the Co j UmversiUcs In Af: j _, I Indies ami the Fai Kast will be) LailllFSliaciCS \Iadt* Intssjrstad aitl any Colonial workers who fulfil the necessary technical qua.. l stand a chance of appointI Dr. C F. Hicklln "Thanks to the Irium in PepsodentYcs. you can see the difference in your m\i\c w lien > 00 uie Ptpsodem. the toothp.me that contains Irium. For the I 'Icctnc tecul clensui sobauncc than Irium knoa IleOaaM NCKIKC and Irium ii exclusive lo Rernodeni | Gentl) it removes toe harnil.il him that hides .the brilliance of your smile, lMVin| your teeth sparkling white. ^. —^. ^Miaiing wnuc. -^r From Human Skins TOOTHPASTE WITH IRIUM -•• MUNICH. Feb. 1 Isle Knoch. wife of the Buchenwald Nazi Concentration ( sn p Commander, is to be examined. U) be tried m April by i court for alleged murder of German camp inmates Her defence maintains she was not ful'y responsible for her %  < was said to have h.-.d lampshades made of he skins. —Renter. Daniibt* LargiFloods Areas SOFIA. Feb. It! Bulgarian troops have been sent to blow up bam< have formed in the Danube causing the nver to Hood lwge sraaa Of country. Following a Cabitu It hare, observation posts have been •at ail along the legions ITS bail % •tent to lite areas 10 Killed In Natal Fracas Research Officer, foi planning to find a resean I for a Malayan Chinese London %A is ihe expert jij lish !. science lhat has been practised for about 4,000 years in China. being handed on from father to Htekunf explains thai farms throughout the world. 11 million are In the Far East, mostly in China. N Institute is being gat up at Penajog in Malaya, covering 300 acres of | which 120 acre* will he ito ponds in which every kind of fish fsrming can partlculai I know more about fish 11 I during the flooding t lo find OHl whal ellect the fish have on the r* i rtcs oti ihe fish." "There are." says 'enaAMUj possibllltlei for f&sti laiming in Africa and thr W.-sl iB.f.P.) KIDNEY: TROUBLE i pou nments of latnam, Cambodia aim I ptad that Siam's <ijig over reminder n prestige lo stand or fail on bag Uvs poUojj %  ii the Indo-Ch ns tesl Mid thai the question of responsor not the United Slates would u. [< "inled forces (he Asian regimes to Communist liquidation their own dei the "dominant thought i bom ail i %  il cf ihe Kralrr. NiH/ut hard-to-inana*.%  **M J.iudr. it .ii.iii.. have Dr P^'HaaT....! >*l i|>pkmenting the nat_*l|> li. Uxw P"n.anu your ^* H I ii TICS with %  r .•Whv, %  Owns 7 Palaces Hut Is \ot Rich LON iatt). id Maharajah of Jodhpur. leaving for India, asked not to describe him as l m Of the wealthiest men in the "The family owns six or seven iler residI said, "but they are more .ntv than an asset nowStale revenue of Jodhpur is $4,200 a year. Now it has acceded to the Dominion of India, revenues longer drawn by the Maharajah who is, however, entilled to a Stale pension not exceeding $210,000 a year, in addition In the income from his per—ti \ > %  i or are taUsctuaU. rthnulatUM to anyone i iles. Critical •eveiely critical of the Humbler sort ot religious %  %  !o itlatr. sn writing marked by "excessive i ss." One great of the parish msgsilne li that II should contain real QOSI U an editor cannot for his magazine he had better i>diting and II Church new., %  %  flowers' or take up collections, %  iDe will appeal dull arm actually fatuous to OUh The book contains many allusions to clerical adl icigymen is anything but ftUdtOU parson is apt to be cither too erudite for his readers or too much given to the use of a •parson's jargon' thai puts people off" "Some vicars* letters arc so lull of meat, or savoured that no parishioner would like to The majority seem to be resigned, complaining, or simply dull The Bishop of London. Dr Wand, in strongly recommending the book, said: it Is quite possible that many clergy will challenge the author's for Journal against parsonic phraseology DUNDEE. Natal. Feb. 16. Ten Africans were killed and Spain. Tril b wounded In In a letter sent to Mr. Bevin.' a ^ el> today between two the SooiSfi "' £• Mc nu T nbC "' he Dundee Natal District. Ian Military Junta! would be deIghts if he were turn. hlssatfnil British respect for human liberties will nopermit tba of this elemental right ol • %  • said —B.t I' i' and auugis wen ised by bath sides. The trouble was believed to sd ova* a dispute about metis lands. Police were sent to the fighting. — (Kru.cr. i Octopus Attack ALGIERS Fi A youug man fishing underaitacked by an octOJN) 1 Held by its tsntSelCS, be %  uceeeded in reaching las where his friends killed it. —lit iili r Pane Much Better VATICAN CITY, Feb 16 i who was ill with for the past two clays, was to-da;. b l>etUi Wlttl I temperature n doctor's order. "Tlowever, he will keep to his room. coming up only for a short period of the dsy. at leasi until the end %  l k —neuter Death Hold* Up Traffic SYDNEY. Feb. 16. In the heart of BydtSS) %  i %  and died in a trai %  Ambulance men had to radio for police help 0 from the lower, iron laaV Ke.li -. Wolves Dttrrrcd By Foul Smell OSLO, Feb 16 Norwssnan L*app* ha. I DOW way of stoppmg Wl IvSS attacking the herds of rein, leer whkh they grace on the Horwegian-Finnish countries. The Ipps smear Ihe ratoaVSM with a foul-smelling paste. The wolves hate the smell so n uch that they keep away. -Itnb< WELCOMES CHURCHILL'S' SUGGESTION May Plead For Don Juan %  0tJair., OCA *"H.M, ro MADRID. Feb. 16 Observers here suggested toLONDON. Feb 15 nitnI lr ,at to-day's Journey to Liberal Party eadcr, Clement Rome by Gil Robles. former Daviea '•'" %  'Spanish Catholic Lcade: Chtrchiirs proposal for an applead the cause of Don Juan. In, today said that, claimant to the Spanish Throne. he thought the Govcnm i the Vatican. contact all Common* ealth PreKobtss, political adviser lo Don ugh here to-dav h with Prssid. rs he is ui vc would be anxious pected visit to Borne by Don Juai %  id reporters.— and his wife I month. "' at the end uf the LADIES COATS FOR Spwl or hniiHi; Hear IN Stripes, Plaid, and Solid Colour. S28 5 0 each MODERN DRESS SHOPPE Broad Si. Bridgetown BACKACHE JOINT PAINS RHEUMATIC PAINS LUMBAGO SCIATICA Here s a medicine specially made for it! If yousaspect that UW• s "sooicUu-.g 1 wits row kitinryi it .. il thy nc-d s 'Oftuc iiwdicine. %  .,:. M iicuuwuc pus, .uuiOafco. SKI-US-. biiMlder I'ord ii with scalding and buimrlf;. n ibleiUrtswIirnihekidilryBRrow IcP l *b and fail to %  —'foam Uieif cultural OSS from . can rratotr these vital ,an to normal acUvity ai iiiany otheia > taking De Wilt s Pills. hSTS a cl*aning, sooUung and •fleet on ihe kidii. y aadyea will • •/ fei I Hi,.Q


PAGE 1

FAUI. I T8B BABBADU> ADVOCATE FRIDAY FEBRUARY Barbados Score 246 For 5 Wickets SP"*^*" 8 Weekes back drove or..' MMBM| ^ M ^ C*v \\ \ I 7Y?ZM, 6 \SklS /?0H2, ^^^1 fU. Team STEADUA ALL DA) %  from the f'avil, I single to let orf HIP %  %  End to Taylor and bo* leg field. The batsir.an allcr-.p'o:, to block the last ball of on Uie off side but tho I i here there Mi man and he collected ." was neerly cauffM off •' %  Trim's ne*t i Per*Aii long-off off Rollox and late. The bowling at thl* slagt tt nff drovp Camjcho ior ^pi, very rteaay and the fielding good. |() hrn ( ovrr drriw to o,, but the batsmen m T Hjirv „ a|to ^ a ,,„,.,. ^,lhconnder.ee. W)lh fr1 ^ Mrf fu J'u !" P ^. m L,.K n ,KJ 2L J ''" in *"" W ~ k look ,hc ITvilion Eno wiln Ihe score al .,.; %  .. „. ... _,,,, _..., a < and sol the bell I" or..* ""> """ "' ,h ""' w h sharply from Ihe lei aide causinj >" %  1r,v TrSSoTST^lL %  <* %  "•' *•*" In Thomas' next over Marshall Wlu lh „,,, „ l43 trim an drove the last bal. nicrlj to ihe brou([nt UKr lrom .„, -creen -. m >d-on boundary to s-nd up M .,„ Cam cn „ „, fowled .. in c, minutes Weekes who look a .mile pas! Screen^EnTw.rtfe 1 .S/i/S ^ "?£"£? ^ "'^ ofrth?oveT Umfn ^ ^ Weetes^^'u'erone ,rom Rollox Rollox bowled the Uit over I s > ,hr on 1 l " fore lunch and Marshall m.de a trove the next powerfully but •-ingle. Rollox stopped what looked a The interval was taken with tha certain fmr I %  %  score at 61 for I, Marshall hc:ng was a m-lden to Lucas. n.ii out 30 and Walcott IT ThenGaskin bowled from the screen ww only 1 extra The innings had end to Weekes who skied one to cover but no one got under it. the On resumption. Trim bow.ed batsmen eventually ran two; and •creen end to Marshall 150 went up after 177 minute* who cover drov> for J sinclr but Weekes turned the next neatly to found Walcotf M leg for a brace and later as the batsman attempted to drive Lucas placed one from Trim one that was well up and mi^ d IhroUfA the slips for a couple. He was at the wicket foi U Weekes square rut Gaskin to the uts and had scored 1? runs inboundary to get his 50 including cluuing two boundariao. rilt boundaries in .3 minutes and Johnnv Lucas joined Marsl .11 'hen swept the next to the square and the batsman *ot a single J leg boundary the result of a bye while M irsh .11 ^^ had his first spell for placed the Dftl %  wrrcn fnd the slip* for a b !u ,. ,,v ''f IS JiSl ion end and :.is over yielded single to mid-ofl turned one from i run i ''red no %  through tl i %  tour and to mid-off Trim AUmtton. piaaM l if nwtnr hu mm-.a a ssno-l agp c^iriat hry p icn ar rrtmri u at oneu P.OI 17 13. cHRxariA-Ni c a WTUJAMS sToixantroi TWWTRArL \l?s jnttynos OQMKt RAX VAUBCTtNi: WALCOTT ROT VtAMWAl 1 ntnn <* KKTWH <* KtNr: MB CWMIIT1AM GOOOAJU5 RAX *TO(JJSXTTP i.wmM Kg In lkigUr>d Thj-e THORNr %  TV AM r.ntiOARr. wixw* w Vrfzentin* 1 Tto Swlai 666 UN BUENOS AIRES. Fee 16. .ers tod..y approached the halfway mark in their SCO-mile swim down Us* Parana rUvar with containers ..f earth from Yapeyu. birthplace >( Jow De Sanmartin. the-centenary of whose deatn Argentina ceU-nrated this year. A high ranking officer. Sanmartin fought against France in the Spanish army, and afterwarls ted a South American army acrou the Andes In 1817 to lefeat Spamih rule in Chile —Reuter. cmrf IISTTANI sra coi-eix • TRAM noDDAiao MARS.1I M i Tsassrr&AiL off Ided 11 including boundary by Weekes full toss Rollox now Ixiwleri single off the second ball a .o Lucas played out the over Tha batsman was now somewhat subdued and his scoring at this static was slow. eon was taken to 214 when Trim Kt Weekes to retu.n with Ml sconat B2 He had been .it the wicket ior 132 minutes ami his score included 9 fours. Tinflip had yielded 124 runC U Williams came in and %  •'. deliver.. the bowler's third edged t<> -li; where !tiiox caught M Five Barbadian wickets were now flown lor 214 Atkinson was the next man in and i last ball making the over 3UL WALCOTT .THROn-lANI TRXflrrRAIL FTROf*ON VAlXNTTNE HVW I or KIN' (.OSflBZ M< WATT nr fiflUXN ROT MARS.-' U %  STOLLMXTTR CHRagTUMI oafi JUHNCkON VA1XNTWR R1CKASBD8 RAJS C 1 1 WA*-OOTT KING or KEN Tlf* r TRIM Longfield" Picks His 16 got oil the mark by a single to played out th. Taylor, tin %  fourth 1 was still bowlinf to a ; nW. • mlrl I| on for a brae remaind. i The Skipper t %  %  %  %  %  %  l Wtlef (I Guskin did lil ! wide •;( Tnm and tovrr arove the ritfle Imi to tha %  %  Ided two %  %  r the day. %  %  t and nVit %  r a bm-e the tot 11 ,.< K. j .i ..shmi Out %  : %  I 10 musuM for4Swhli i '.lie n %  Iron, the K-reen end to Luca, who !" "*<\ m h "* '"'' ** %  Klaneed the tilth tor a brace. valuable wicket, had lallen. Ha me Iron had now secured his third wick, Peraaud for a single. Lucaj covet ,r „* !" r*\ _. drove tor a con i n > <"'" 1 rjown :, mann-ii each. • iken with In Trims next over Atkin.. •he mini at 181 (or throe Week.M It ball to le( loi l.uru it and Extras 6. to open his score. Thomas bowled Camacho bowled In place nl to Lucas from the Pavilion End Trim with the score al 22\ .. and sent dour. 10 'he in this over Lucas reached his batman. ^ which he took 193 mlnuti"Ilollox bowled from the other to make Ho was 63 when he was end and each batsman got a • %  ..!<: cutting one well abtfla oil th r They repeatt.ulside the ofl slVmp from •S" 1 ... .1,1. ,„ Tl edlhls in Thomas next. nacho in Ins next over into These bowlers were kept I ChrijUaiil at gullv. more overs and Ihc 190 who fail.-d to take the catch. drawn soon attc Weekaa for a single ;•! 246 for 3. Luca This partnership had now yieldbeing not out ed 100 in is minutes The 200 not nut 12 with 9 extras Th. mark was noB reached and had Innings so far have lasted 28." Ida in 214 minutes. mim Trim who for tho Btnns or Simpson %  %  %  %  i %  %  %  nd up %  %  RolV %  %  1U2. 1U b. wli Ihree | -uigle. mi ami %  .* brought CM %  %  Lucas rho U ..i. I Wi k. Weekes pushed I from the 8creen Bad with the score .over for an easy single off the ami 3 rum ins, while Ul lit the ... cuttuig the leal ball %  paq 'W^ Id 1 ^B; ^^^ the ica r.i*iM>.-ii !%  %  H. ll K 1: b 1 Twai F*ll ..( ., for . 4 t..t IM. ". for II* IMiWIINT. ANALVg I Trim 1SSS -.1. rs s s I IT I | I" I ttUki B.B.C. Radio Pro^ramiiit' • i IDAl I'Mfiarj It. ii Tha. .N. i\ Trnk ,. %  I %  Screen Bnd with the %  .TH anil three singles red, U %  Uhfdown l i Tl Lucas l'.anrhnson and Jones, instead of .vith one dud. Commenting I i n the general composition, in on Valentini' revealeu suHVient class for the important pcaition of slow lefthand bowler. which is essential on the English lour, ami suggested that if the t.ried that George who has been offered an t-oHttracl with Bacup to t;.k• %  selected because hi* : %  • and allround ability is inva!u.v is the West Indies most importanl tour In history. He finallv suggested the followl W rret. WoktW Stollmeyei i Jones. i Ferguson. Binns. C, 1'.. WilUan !t Mar} %  cable) i $.|| m i rin I he \\ eatber TO-l\ Sua Rises: ik'i* a.m KM lets .. N p III Mo, (Ural Qharteri Phbra ary 24 l.uUluu %M p.m Mich Mater 4 37 4m. Itl p.m. i MIK1IW nalnfsll ( odrlmton) i.< m> loUl H.r Month In \rv|rr iU>: I.UK ii -%. i rmperjlure (MM I I Irmperalure (Mln I 71 • I' \md INreetlen l so.1 I (3 pmi E h. \ \.runn>v li*.i %  w*i I so p m A T*l' .• H %  SI i> m lnl.tl.iJi %  Hecwliej Will IMay For Bacup C.C. Nl. %  Olr K. 11 t> m Procrawiamv Panttr i JO p II ml PiMajnanuiir S SO |> in liM*tt(fc t .„ %  j^ n.. %  N I T o m TW Htws: MS Pain i...tt> N Wtllal-i OTThaMtn 1 l> m llrn.r \. a t I 10 i> m Cxpod J | i Worlrt A flair,.. 1, p rq Tl. MX .ale ClM I 'MUlUOnil' E lil u: BY Jamaic. #i | Indtos b;ittin,; ace and lomter Lancashire Leaue playci has accepted and signed a contract to play for Bacup Club in ...hire LaajpM in Bngland. George Hcadley dng the place of Internationa' who has just finished a season with Barup and will be going tu England with I lu i'able) Tluyll l).i h lun Time 0 TO SeOV O. RAMIN60 IN THE THiRD-TWO ACROSS i THE BOARD ON SPUMTBKS i.N THE FIFTH-AMD LISTEN NCK-I GOT A HOT TIP IDUKETOSEEwUPJT \W FE l%P JS K2u9POO>S | TWO8uOACCO0NT-.Ji.A5TSP?iN6 A*fi-E -I VVSIN MOf MAK.Y MONTHS DO S.~nE rOSPfTAL—I S~5S5 HE --Es CWEUSNOW? S{ -rAPTr\iS -*E SET T .S5 T0U<5HER R3R > I By Jimmy Hack) VP->-T SET TO A fSOOKiE• HORSE--.A>Eie5] OEBROK-E-ANC" SO X> iUE PEOPLE rVMOLeT EM PUT JT0N-..S ARV8 3" SZ -= 30RRw A£0 T-As. A 10 • TOM RXAMVXT CALL LX LAHLV AXB HL SI ML OF A PLHLL1 I MR P.C.S.MAFFEl&Co M L td. Top Scortxtn Tewloring Mm HOI st sUnding on 2 prises drawing room, dining room. 4 l>edii.. kitchen with buttery and pantr .in-lae*, f*, sides. Three servants' rooms, bath and toilet, large §m telephone and water. Inspection tq ftpptlni licular? from . BARBADOS KEAI. JMW, \(,|\ (v HASTINGS H( Trlephnne 2336. ftpto-Bismol fOU to cibiLtea specifications. For information and quoga apply to the Manager, Mr Hours 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. (except "^ omtw* coughI What a n ( do' Mf throat i tore -ith this couf ft. cough, cojfh. si' (he time %  %  Whi lubes'9^ M Whit difff'tW**' ,.>ufh and loothed m th-on IM no time' COUGH LOZENGES H)OOLL£RTON£(|J|LSONUO Ladies' hih class WALKING SHOES In red & white, brow lue a white and pun Wbtto. Also Silver Birch shoe-, i class. You ui ;i(iviw(i to 'MI, nt old prices becnu-' gone up CAVESHEPHERD&CO, 10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD S &'**,',:•,','.•.'.::: Y.M.P.C. ANNUAL CARNIVAL DANCE SELECTION Of CARNIVAL QUEEN ...r;— MOST ORICINAL (Ladles) PRETTIEST COSTUMES'" (Lacteal I'KETTIEST COSTUMES (CcnU) MOST ORIGINAL BAND PRETTIEST BAND K Satiniay. 18(1 Feb. 9 pm ADMISSION J 1.00 X H> oflrr new slorks of .... ^ FERROCRETE RAPID-HARDENING CEMOfl n. in ii.. % %  § PORTLAND CEMENT •; in 11 PORTLAND CEMENT in III" lh iliuins WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT III 37f> lh. llril'n^ RED & KHAKI COLORCRETE CEWIff in 178 ih. .s ii.' lb. ii >IRON EXPANDED METAL I 1 ; int-.h GALVANIZED EXPANDED METAL 1 i". '. I IIK-li WILKINSON & HAYNES Ci 15 ...... . %  .: %  : % % % % % % % % % %  JUST RECEIVED Tln< HEINZ Spahoi m Tomato Sauce (wish Chaaso Baked Beans. Salad Cream Mayoaalar/. Sanu.. Spread Bon Vocelable So-in Onlail Soup Slrawbemes. Pineapple. Pineapple Jui. a Fruit Salad INCE & Co.. Ltd. 'JIM 2234 tOaUCK ST P| THOSE WHO DEMAND THE BEST HAVE THEIR CLOTHES TAILORED BY C. B. RICE & O OF BOLTON LANE



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PACE TWO THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE IHIUAt. IIBRL'AKV 1?.1^T QaJuJ} &*&*"} Madame Bromova Takes A Bow LANDS witness ihe i*cond turned out i" Hiitor) of Barbados Colony WR C, Gl.lNUON BEKI match between British Guiann JV1 rector of Education will prand Barbados which opened %  > '**,^ e over h e fifth lecture in :hc terday ;U Kensington. Both the & Tlts 0 n the History of Barbados GeorRo Chnllenor and the Ken„ (ven i,v Mr. il A. Vaughan. at smgton Stands presented a colourtbe British Council Has* • ful picture Ladies immaculately al u/akeflchl ihis evening at 8 IS dressed and the Gents looking very mart themselves. The George Challenor Staiid was otowned with the B.G. colours, a green flag with the B.G. crest done in gold in the centre, flapping in the strong breeze. Besides cricket however as is always the case when such large crowd* gather together there were their pockets w %  pots of humour during the day's written on it The Biscuit Man was once more heard and very seldom seen. He had a new fanfare yesterday for any bowler who had a four hit on him. A little "ditty" which has been chanted by many West Indians, when the howling is particularly 'sweet'.—"Bowie'come from "Sugar Hill," blown with great gusto on his trumpet,, o'clock. That Slip of Piper I T IS now getting to Uie stage where everyone is walking around with a little slip of paper folded neatly in their wall Ki th sixteen names Meet anyone and start a conversation, sooner or later your hand will stray into your wallet out comes the bit of paper, and both of you will probably MIH.I1uy—"Have you picked iifor England yet?" Overheard Will Live Here M R E. A. BENJAMIN, formerly a director of Pegaju* Textiles Ltd. London, England, is now back tn Barbados. This time he has come to live and has brought along his wife. They are at present staying at the Marine Hotel. Mr. Benjamin was last here in 1947—48 when he spent three months on business. Their daughter Gillian who is now at Badmington, a girls' public school near Bristol, expects to join them Hjne m September. • Leaving Today l ETURN1NG to Trinidad toT l TV was overheard ;n the Square yesterday as two old ladles surveyed Trafalgar Square with its many new Traffic signs One said, "But Mary, why tin:, got all dese rock stones lying 11. tne Square so*" The other replied, 'it mm' be on account of the housing shortage, may be they going start building houses *pun top dem!" > Firat Viait M R. GERALD BLANCHARD, Manager of 'the grocery department of Peter and Co., Castries, St. Lucia, arrived here recently by B.W.I.A on his first visit to the island and is staying at the Cosmopolitan Gaest House. He told Carib that he is very xv d*v iv Mr. Oliver Thompson, much impressed with the island Transport Contractor, of Trinidad, and is enjoying his holiday. who is Staying at the Hotel Royal litarrived hi re earlier in me week by the B W I A as Manger of the amateur boxers, who took part in the tournament For Three Weeks WHS WAHREN. wife of Sydney Warren, Mr. atastjaaai which ended at the Modern High s ^ %y of Pltcncr connell and Co.. School on Wednesday. wtt on Wednesday by B.WIA. for Mr Thompson is also a mem^^ weeK:s holiday in Trinidad ber Of the Amateur Boxing AsSnc wi|I ^ ilay i ng with her (By a Special Cerreependeat) The beginning of 1945 is quite a way back. World War II was in Its closing stages, and we h to experience the release and joy of giving %-ent t. pent up emotions which found universal and spontaneous expression in Ihe celebrations of V.E. and VJ. days. But this is not a War staff? far from it. 1945 means very little to us all now, but maybe it will attain significance as marking the birth of a new enterprise in this our small island community. The fact is ti.at in 1945, an increasing bustle of activity and a new excitement could be ooscrved in and about the Aquat'e Club on Saturday mornings and, on occasions, during week days, in the neigh hour nooo of certain of our institutions which are no-mally devoted to the Initiation of the young idea into the mysteries of the three R's. As the weeks and months passed the contagion spread, and soon it appeared that a new element was creeping into the life of the community, particularly-on those festive occasions with which our calendar of public events Is so liberallv sprinkled, when all concerned are bent on entertainment and the sponsors of charitable appeals reap the harvest of dollars which means so much, no' only to the sponsors, but also those who in age. sickness %  other adversity are less well thriving plant. The scene on this endowed than others with mc occas j on was ^ Empire Theatre. necessities of life once more restored to the use (or Thus in 1948 was gathered t.ic which it was originally intended, first fruits of this new growth. The Royal Box filled again witn the occasion being a garden n* rightful occupants and distinparty in Government House guished •guests from a visiting grounds, where, in the presence ot ship of Hif. Navy, and an audiHis Excellency the Governor and ,. nce where white tie and ta The Ghost Walks Again II > Anne EVERY year around the end of IMIH .irils ets, caught in round the uarv a ahost walks through' one button. ... -iT._ A n the skirts are tight, plain, je Bromova's pupils in a Mexican Dance which was performed in one of her past shows which have been so successful. his lady, some ftOO guests were charmed and entertained in a truly rustic setting to the slroi-is of sweet music, provided by |M rejuvenated Police Band, under its then new conductor. Early 1947 produced the second bumper crop from this steadily sociation of Trinidad. Attended Cricket M R RUPERT CROWE. Archi,md Builder of Trinidad, left earlier in the week by B.W.I.A. for Grenada after a short holiday. While here he atdaughter Mrs. Donald Allcrofl who lives in Point--Pierre. Ilei husband is with T 1.1. there. Married in Boston R. ahd Mrs. George Ji>** were rnarned Ifl Boston on Feb. 12th. arrived here on Tuesd. M"' tended n/rt of the cricket game* h B w A am) arf> spcIHllni [ their ,-ton He was staying honeymoon at the Crane Hotel. at Indramci thing. Cut-it House, WorThey expect to be in Barbados for two weeks. Mr. Jost i* Travelling Representative of Messrs. Canadian Industries Ltd. POCKET CARTOON hv OSBFRT LANCASTFR Two Winding Up Holiday M lbte DOHEKN KODKIGL'ES, Civil Bervai \ of Georgetown, BrhUb Gutaffi. is now in Barbados winthint-uo hei '-ix months' holibV. the saajoiiis of which she Kpent tofltraWcTa. She arrived Sunday by-B.W.I.A. and will ler p^tty arrived on Wednesday be here tmtTJ the end of the month by uwiA for a couple of To Bathsheba Fo Months D R AND MRS E. P. MASSON, accompanied by their daugh%  r : %  i> Mr. and Mrs T. aeon's Road Paid Short Viait P* ALPHONSO DE LIMA, Dm,tor of Y. De Lima and Trinidad B-.iU.dc*. n-turned to TrimWednesday after | -liort visit to the island He was months' holiday. They will be staying at "High Winds'. Hathsheba. Dr. Masson is Medical Supt of the Mental Hospital rHfitdad "0 / looked her Hratght M etc eye and said. Trudi uni II rather Mtru^rdinari/ that fie main luse should tut happen to Now out exactly IUO minute* belore M Churchill mil on fne air? and exquisite gowns with the attendant paraphernalia of femnine charm and beauty predominated. Yes, that was a red letter occasion. ment of a proper and recognised syllabus of training in the dance and the ballet art. f (b) "The first fruits eh an the many delightful performances with which Madame Bromova and her talented pupil* and students have delighted not only their audiences, but have also richly supplemrr.u,! the funds of many of our island charities, and (c) "The bumper crop" is th recital which is to be given at the Empire Theatre n Thursday. March 23rd 1950. Mayfair. She's an extremely elegant ghost, dressed si* ahead of style. ;ind she haunts the salons of our Top Ten dress-designers. For the ghost is the New Spring Fashion. And the New Sprn.u Fashion is a dreadful secret which no one reveals to anyone until the buyers (American for preference) have had their pick—lest manufacturers have the clothes copied cheaply before the exclusive originals are In the shop. We saw the opening of London's Fashion Week, the week that rivals Paris, the week of two shows per day—one for each <>f best ten designers. Robb and I saw tne gl again Robb has drawn her as completely as he is allowed. For, although the clothes are secret the accessories are not. The Accessories Briefly—the new accessories are big, flat sailor hats worn on one side, or tiny, one-sided caps trimmed with long feathers. Pa"^* leather belts as narrow as a shoestring, and patent-leather court shoes Chiffon scarves tied round tne^aist. White blouses In linen, shantung, and tie-silk, with elabate breast pockets. Anyone with second sight can 11 m the ghost's clothes from ihese details 6 For da^^ree jacket lines; 1. Tai rL "** and short, about WP-1MIJ. ; Bloused at the back; 3, Box jacK and straight, with one flap pleat at the back. For evening—three skirt lines: Short frock, with handkerchief points, usually " tulle; 2. Long skirl with u double tier—in lace; 3 Tightlv swathed from waist to ankles, and buttoned or bowed at the back—in brocade IIOVAI. Worthing* OpwUnc To-Nlaht .t 8 30 p i M G M M*fW P* L-..W a* "HUJ'S Or NOME*' Elmond GWSWN. Tot-. DRAKE DaaaUd ctusiv J:."'-> U-toii Dram*. An""". Thrill*. Ronwnc*. ll'S 1>.-B**l We#k-End lww. %  •"••. Sot* H, || %  .r.i.l., ,i, A*9 moulh wall .„„ „ !" M .tfjll Anaosan ^:^s Cominfi and Coinft M", Uncanny E XPERTS at the I-ondon Zoo have been puzzled by tw frogs which have been sent to the Zoo as a gift from Mrs J K Riadon of Plantation Diamond. British Guiana. They have heei. unable to identify the species Tliey are plainly tree-frogs,' says Mr J. W. Lester, the curator, "but when viewed with the light behind them, one can clearly set the bones and digestive organs— it's quite uncanny" Tu fi fee-Wig on small sand files. They eaa Jump 21t at a bound Perhaps Mi* Risdon would be good enough to enlighten the Zoo authorities. and Mrs. Owen Boyce and wo children have arrivec Hg| in Barbados to spend a short holi %  Canning A Co, Ltd, Ban Branch. Mr Charta. Lynch & Co. b) II w 1 A Antigua Pttrce ii %  Ltd lell Mi Rob ii M J0 %  t 1 !( M %  i Lid and Mi %  fonts left yesterda, 03 H W.I.A.. to Apend a holiday in CuMad, TruEarl HoinsntJ Mr Charles MarKeii'r Ltd.. and Mrs. MacKen/it B.W.I.A.. for Tril This tender plant, which has been so skilfully nursed and nurtured, continues to grow and spread. Prom time to time sJnca 1947, blossoms have appeared. and many of us have savoured Thus has been born an enterand enjoyed their fragrance and pmet which ii, addition to being beauty. Now it can be said that a boon irom the entertainment the plant has passed its adolespo^t 0 f view, is performing a cence and reached the first stage valuable service in the communiof a full maturity. This year. In lV| especially m the Held of the fact, very soon, we may expect mental, physical and cultural to see a bumper crop reaped, and development of ever growing the fruit will be there for all who num bers of the younger generawish to take a share, ^ on And now to translate all t!n into practical realities. It is all But this is not tne whole quite simple. story. At present it is a private i a) 1945 — is the year when enterprise. What of to-morrow* Madame Anna Bromova fa Where will it lead? In another former member of the article, which will appear shortImperial Russian ballet-ly. we will consider the goal but a Scotswoman arrived towards whuh further progress in Barbados and laid the might well be directed, and how foundation for the establishthat goal may be achieved. CRYPTOQUOTE— Hire* hM M work it: AWDLBAAXR Is LON 0 F E i. Ii o w Oi tatter simply stands for another in this example A la used for the three L's. X for the two O . etc. Single letters, aposthe length and formation of the words arc all hutts. Each lay the code letters are different A Cryptogram Quotation LAZM VYHZ GR Guide To Housewives Today* Prices COCOA— Essence 3 8e. per lb. TEA— Loose 14c. per lb. OIL— Edible 24c. per pint LARD— (Velvo Krisl 51c. per lb. Locally Manufactured ... 44c. per lb. NR OAEQT GR RENCRICZX E1>V Q Z T Y H Z X-O VOIIZO'V V Z r.vpluquotr; WHAT A STl'PID THING IS AN OLD MAN l.KAI'.NINU AN ALPHABET!—MONTAJ For Men be the lacket feature of the dinner b, %  . .. ..... New Look ON, (B> Mail) Spring fashions will not be a monopoly this year tailors are preparing a new look for males but without iterated drape are deftniw A DM leg and shoulder revealing Men's spring fashions will be "a "sensations" featured in the Paris la naturelle" ami allow i and London collections for women drop the impression thai tlM| Hntish (Mhion expert John are posing f->r advertisements for Taylor badkatod that the fashionmuscle-building g.nt. able gentleman of 1B50 will have Taylor calls all this It* a waist — despite the fact that wardian look—a return to grandiheir srlvas and swccliiearls are pa's hey-day — with fancy and beginning to lose theirs again In coloured waistcoats the 1M0 look "But." warned Taylor. you Trousers will be narrower, won't see it walking down the jackets skirted at the hips, and street >ei it is coming gradualthe American "shawl" collar will ly — (I.N.S.I to SUIT you Sir! TROPICALS FOUR INTO ONE 6.72-6 83-6 88-7 08 -II as 0.2.1 For a limited time only! I wiiminiis t ins sign of a oonirlta Mart \ M u mar say Booaby* w t" chance of solving uu. tl K 10 Turn >'ou wouldn't • u inc rad ill it Fralss tn return. Hi ii. ATou tea ibis wort U scros.. it it 1 naturally palmed. (* • n Wh*o can imuti ron €l " dutortsd scar, lit it ^.•af?fci)i.-uld "twr t will." (Bl n. Aimoat siwa •„V" v*—,7 % %  1 I.K it U>rs. %  > •; rMaitini lort of •* out not • Driuisaaat one(?) tHD 1 A awf-contrsdlctory tawraan. i i7i 3. Tba turn oi the lido. Hi a, Tliu Jar fll . H ius> E !..[•. Id) S. Brinf Gun IKAIU OPEN l:^EH^ tna sun to OaLaa Bt'lDt Nmnartlfcl U QOt UflueDOtd %  Melsaer aid.. Ill pSimi to i* nfttnsr r'^By. IBI I : ;r, alormona. it. a A word Wat ?ryr>ody u I mnlus to allow. (Si ou-u find a D^. in Piund„ li A Utfft number leu in* an out of rsnjj. IS> K „,_ id 1 r*ce ainorii tn# nt^in* la A iou. narrow piec u t(t oiie% ciolbas. •' '• rONBI *> .io UH-AL TALENT ON PARADE B NEW STARS—PICK YOUR WINNERS Plus A MI'SK.U. C. B (Count) BROWNE EVEM\(. and hl II I I ORCHESTRA PROGRAMME : The Thome Song—"I'm feelmit sentimental over you". (1) "Let's Stan" <(t' Jump)—Composed & arr. bv C. Browne (2) "A Dieamer's Holiday"—Slow Pox Trot with Thompson at the Mike (3) "Jokes"—By Freeman (4i livan Cadogan—(on tenor Sax.)-— "I can't give you anything but love." (5( Charmer—"In the Held with the farmer". (> Johnson's Rag—"Freddie goes to town on alto Sax (7) The lrresistable Milton Quartette (81 Freddie Goddard—Alto Sax—"Stardusl"• i.inge playing) U Hell* ot S! Ifal) (By s|H-iiiil icHiuest) (10) Dennis Peters (Guitar)—"It's been a long long tune". (11) Alfred Prescott (on trumpet)—"Harlem Heat" (12) "Samba Street—Composed It Arranged by Basie I ady Shaw"—Calypso by special EXTRA : "Chinese Children calling me daddy" IH KI IS ii". \l I I UNITE I—Il 2: J; **: For ROOFS AXU PARTiTMOAS We ( HI i ALUMINIUM t mini t. Ml I) SHEETS Lengths 6 ft., to 18 ft., widlh 2 ft. KARL1T 1NSII.ATINO HALL BOARD Lengths: 6 It to III It. Width: 4 It. K Mil II HARDBOARD Lengths. C It., to 8 It., width 4 It. GALVANIZED B.R.C rXI'ANDED METAL Lengths: 8 It., and It., width 2 it., 24 gauge. • BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LIMITED. DIAL 10W



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yr Friday |ffcrr 17 |S5. B.G. BOWLERSTilN^RBADO^DOWN 5 Governors, 1,500 gee Princess Alice Installed As Chancellor of W.I. University JOHNNIE l.l'i AS mian OH Hun BoUm aaJ ii nearly „ m |„.„ iriaketlMBper KeWt1 whipped off the bail*. The other player with amis otttNntoasl la Robert rin-istiani. IplE installation KINGSTON. Jamaica. Fob II ceremony of Princess Alice „s rh',..V 11 ^::::";;;ri: • %  %  %  2 -^5 %  Wvrrsity of which the foundation s.one* of ,l,e admin Unlive ami medical hmldings wenlaid (his aflerim.,., I... *. Chance -.nd her hushand will se, ... r " "^ a**" !" -I .. .ins six ,„i|,. s from K Tnls lo „ r .„ 1 i" dl > '' s '""•monies were corColon'i.1 "V-""' U """'W of live colonial Governors. Jamaica British tiuianaTK£ •ftflMk Arclibi^ "I rim,1.1,1 Bishops of Ihe Anlican Church. Principal „ f ,„„ Caribbean Island, and America St. C ,h an v" 0r ^' McC ' u " !" %  ttjr, Hie Vicc-rhanccllors of Birnonuham St. Andrews. London Uim.-iMhos. American UmvcrJj W • Indian LcsWo". vltad resist Jamaica, ranreaantlnf Beaver I nook Bets Support ff,.don ('(MTV-pondrnli London Fob. Iti. B l Beaver hr.. .it le.i i |i ( %  his Empire ^^^Hv, which ^^ %  flaily Express . are lo %  rt L bb> a> Hill employment H al home. —(By Cihlrj dents "''' CUltUW Of DM island. nraltlnai started at CM %  fen Governor Huggii.* escorted %  • Prfneeei from tb room to join the companv at 4.30 when the National Anthem was played. Five minutes later a fanfare bj :. %  Jamaica Military Band announced the cntrv of the prfncipsjj Thi sion. includimunder-graduatc members of the College, dressed followed by lecturers, librarians, members of the Senate College, and vislt1 '"'.'" >ther Universities. • on pace 5 Local Batsmen Score 246 for 5 Gaskin And Trim Bowl Well (By O. S. COPHN) B ,nl rn <"'nal pace hauler John Trim and International medium fast llcrkclcv Gaafcta lo-day played ihe TZ££2*l "'"?'"* ,."? u ", sror "" i " %  %  Kaaaaa Hri! h V l r "" S n" r u"i' l *S s '" '"'' ,vick " •'" "" *•"< yesterdav P "" d K ns n K 0v ' Having won the loss SUntai Camaaho MIII Barbados >•< in bat on ., trua wicket but ona which save the boi son., „„. 0 ,.„,. which .i contained in the earl; .-i av .hi-,"' ore was now ISS 'T,!r Marshall at i His inniiio •U ESS !" Week"' I"," Staf 2 !VS"", Gaskin France Says Sec. Council Was Right THE HAGUE. Feb. 16. The International Court uf Jushere today to decide whether the use of the veto in the Security Council is legal when applied to applications for membership to the United Nation-,, and whether the General Asscmnlv cun admit applicants rclcrtcd by UM Security Council. statement! %  m:ttd today by eight Governments including the Untied States, Egypt. Venezuela. Russia, the Ukraine. Byelo-Russia. a n .1 Chechoslovakia The only oral statement today WU by M Oeorges Cllae of Danes. WHO MM the Frenct: Qovernmenl felt the ii-commendotion ol the Security Council is lnh <• (Wore the can elect a new member. The Security Council, he coneluded, had i>et(ect right not to i acceptance of .1 new member, ir it did not, uv Assembly could do nothing The public session was then closed and the President announced that the idvisory opinion uf the Court ran It li understood that thl will he made public al or the btgt] April. —Reuler Stalin Must Come To Washington: Door Open TRUMAN SAYS PRESIDENT iHissianshoifi Want War SAYS POLUTT WABHINOT" President Truman %  i.uNiioN. Feb. 10 iiuinlst leader ll..i Conference to-day about the poeubUit] il ,,. lo Marahal Stalin to end the Jdjiai 1 "" 1 u,,t h 'He i;ave a lirm "\i fcrSlNCESSALlck-c % %  % %  Chaneellni i Atbio Collage %  I Indies. Ml Police Guard frl "K LiKonsc ions IN BELIZE Chj %  I1EI.1ZK F.l,. IB. 111.. L^^* should i?_ Aoierii.., • whcn EJ*;, Von„e"' .'It; 1 Police who al LT-" 1 *!' LMdai Hon y il on th.^^••ed to :M, police *!"> meeti,,,, ,„£„..,, oai the angrv % ., Wanted Soviet Republic In W. Africa \. Gold Coast. Feb. 16. '>i Kwame Nkiumah. head ol ConvenUon People's Party, admitted in court beta today that he had planned lo establish a West Afr, Rapahlic", including the Gold Coast. He is or. idaJ ban whto twalan other members of the parly on a : ncitniK a riot by "posittva .n Uofl" %  h also admitted that he had declared a "sit at home" ffrike, T ion-co-operation and %  tit British noods last month. — Renter. %  el. Hcdlrr> \c(|iiill;it Condemned FliANKFCHT Feb. 16protrsted ut acquittal by itOermsn court of (he former B deputy. Wolfgram II< The Landtag P StaiiR. wi said Hedler behaviour in court 11 eidict had •maeed A\? German people, he -. 1^,1 nemocratu l condemned the d %  ndal". The owing to conflicting evidence. The ere today unanimoun In the condemning of iaaaar.) 6.000 Strike In France PARIS. FI All worken In the Ford Facu "> ..' P % %  '.HIS. total* unlim' %  Ion, taken after a meeting HI factory, which turns out 100 cars a day was m protest again M missal notice to 180 in lowing the "wo slow" tarday. iso claimed immediate %  rant %  <( i bonus of 3,000 Francs. Saint Na/;ure uockers decided to "go slow" to-day following the unloading by troop war matenal from the British ihki K i. which dockers had refused to handle. M. Jacques Chaslcllain. MmItler of Transport, to-day appealed to French railwayn.cn not lo stnke In lattrruw In cast he >aid that the two*houi Mnke had been called by the Communist led "CUT." for pur-— ly political motive—Rruler. ; ;;ivo Wintton ChurehtU'a proposal in a ( eech Edinburgh thai "another talk' with Marshal Stalin rniuht help lo end the cold WU, Asked if he would still be ington. Truman replied that the door wa ri of any state who wished to connto W The Pru.sidfiH repeated hll [fequei sistencc that any turther meet in *• wltl place in Washinclon. Twndenti ag.i n %  t ried 10 make lh< i %  lO Russia Uv %  aaders al %  enter Into koor had always been "pen. the Presldei United Statea had ROME. Feb. in. nut of a meet dhicf Solvalomi its Gluliano plans to publish la the United States; Tl i shortly, according to pr ports purporting .. mountain hideout. ihe memoir! ..IHKI pag, ,,,,,, mg with his expli killed a poUceman in %  nuggled out o( Italy Only Glulian the tir-t instalment ol %  itig to the reports Giuliano tied, Iaavi0t| Bandit Chief W ill Publish Memoirs ita laagat, Ion campaign ha %  would ha. to talk with Stalin pages oi his diary. Sin bat would tx journalists who have gained son %  %  ^'kingdom" have reported thai beJ batweeri • riling hard, preparinx^ Truman ovet his exelu-i. %  When to tn< %  %  oUei tiv. I) heat that the Pn i'lesldent also turned down atforti b to obtain his endorse posals as the Atlantic Union' plan iwa %  ing the threat Renter Prinee Bernhard Deeoraled RIO DE JANEIRO, Feb 16 Prince Bernhard of the Netheraodtj who arrived here on holiday last night, today bestowed on Dutra the Grand Cross of the Order of the Lion at the President's summer i •he Rio Hills, i received Brazil's highest decoration, the Grand Order of the Southern Cross. —RruWr Communists Clash With Police Communists marching to a "peace meeting'' here ton.ght clashed wti ending ."wo of them to hospital and six minor casualtlfe themselves. The notice used tear gas Mid truncheons as some of the 1.500 to invade nonCommunist newspaper frfnees. tear gas. Turned a 7 Executed In Canton HONGKOM.. h.< | Seven NaUonalist secret agents were executed terday. a pro-Commuiu %  l" i !i. ie|iurted loday. This is believed to be the lirsi carried out ><> the Communists Government was set up. Mo*t other prisoners hevc merely been submitted to courses of Communist doctrine, imapa Uve of the nature of their offence. The seven execulcl yevterday were described a* members of an "Overseas Youth Organisation". who had been found guilty of "violating th.> revolutionary social m — Reuler %  ihe Unit I .a. RUHI Tn. Hi. No. not l he RuiaUru who % % %  %  %  PtkUltl %  %  %  %  imoiUM-i-maml that he *uaau r r Hnsne Minister Attlesormei %  vhnse Ful i m 1X46 si' I from tiv lion, the pee** It any pa USl StYtngfl or I —Reulei was also accurate i tmng. He sent down 28 oven with Marshall's wicket A well ysszsz ,, s niinute. •nun,. >| „„mbe, .me lo score 18 scorn* run. hall of which came 6 Killed In Explosion MICHIGAN. I Ai w apart .. ling liov layi LrJUina %  Man, '. eight iiKH> ' blast n'asted the rool %  aMaoC, npany ofheials said thev lid not yel know ?h< Rruler PAINTER FOUND DBAD LA PA/ It lit*/ I kojas. 50ydar-old Bolivian pautasr, wai found dead yesterday undei i terious i i on the suP rci highway between l-a Pai I.a Par tubuii 1' Korean I'residenl In Tok\o TOKYO, Kro | Synganan ithec. i^cstdeni ol %  Korea, arrive today for a three d*n Us said that hr bad eon < to reach a common unilnltandng win Japan in Una .trowing Communi't caqMaasan rtipnan Ithee new la Tokyo In Ihe personal plain ol (ieneral Douglas McArthui Allied Commander il lit) mil Chart* shall who put on wt tot wicket in the tiii.ubados mini May r.m opened froi this time and at H thai t>t the An I wing ia hom ti„ n in who bawla irom th craan .is iquaii* a led his openivK -i the wiaket but hud .1 ivK trap oi %  i -i am U slip log himself m hook %  Behind i ha I lech %  clock as Ihe batsmen %  ithough thr %  playing in amount of lurn thai %  %  %  %  • The btoughl all rortabla lo ruai lit Ol Hollo,. % %  • %  Taylor had %  %  wickei for 33 ralnuia scored 13. Ti B— 1 A douhlt %  mum last IKIWI. i %  reap and for Trim j left arn iaaUn -aw no oh %  %  through UH lip The ni %  %  %  %  Ro] Marahatl % %  • %  Walcettt Onl %  resumption rlalmed fad inswlngei well up U %  %  i leg stumps. %  not yt\ %  i ring the mter. these ball Centurj t {tUted pleted %  had been %  long '..Il .all runnlni d point. laving unuiaw. aully %  %  I 1 min^ith n ire leg %  i I Weekea (Hit %  %  %  i 2U %  ... %  i had Ira put upaneai) return to Trim Weekes a 82 in well tuned Ml %  KB bll nine i us. Weekes' < ii % %  tiered MI hall, %  1 p* iha %  slip %  I (gun the [iresidential partv Reater long %  i macho %  I I I oil! SOVIETS WILL GET TOP JOBS IN CHINA led thai "responsible Information'' in Eastern E mpean quarters had indicated U at Mao and his Foreifci. Chou En-Lai, who headed the "legation in the Moscow negotiations had gained Important bargaining points from the maariam %  • %  stages of the talks, which las:< two months. Rusaia demanded full Throughout Unin lull Prepares For BroiatJeusI IX)NDON. Feb. It. Churchill's Private Se -day denied a rapI thai the Ovpoiiiion Leader had twen taktn ill. Mr. Churchill is at horn. Chart well, where be is busil> preparing his broadcast for lomorrow night He i% in the besi the nigh: there NEW YORK. | The (VruYork Times said today that before i %  Chinese 30-year treaty was signed oa Tuesday. Communist leader Mho Tee-Tung was reported to have agreed to give Soviet-nominated advisers key posj'ions in China's Army, secret police and Commun.st PWtj The report, contained in a Paris dispatch from the newspaper'* correspondent C S. Sulderzer. said Mao was also reported to have ..greed reluctantly to aupi large force of manual labo.. %  from China to Siberia on a contract basts under secret eodidls to i Satelht.: wun-es had reported the traaar. (Chou had forced thr KrA "sisable proportion'' of thia [modif%these demands, contingent was .understood to I neat delegates were underleft China already, it added. (stood I'AHifi. reo. 16 A. Madero. specific lnt tt c ^ ^_^. r ff^ |'*** %  ***(*'* •• *hsst Ambassader to France Paris that secret -teams la %  alareaad a* w iwaia n aaaarl 'tented his credential' " beeBaaapeg hpa^lMaav • %  C*tmmm .. sident of the rtepublic, presentauves i menu. iours that Churchill h.. I -Dairan, lort A _been taken 111 and Conservatne :ao. Hiaichou Chofoo, wlhaiwl Part) Headquarters were Inundated with talaphom PRESENTS CREDENTIAL'. XNGLO-U.S. TALKS WILL SOLVE OIL PROBLEM WASlilNCJTON. PS tewai t. O Direct) ..id to-day he was 11 current Angto-Unittl i t in a 'mutual unostrstan< %  oil policiea. before a Cannal Sub-Corn mitte.> d the talks roll... n.ports to ah" Itkel) be conI BritWi %  I well understood. n> finality about It". %  i lul that out o| these Trieste Back To Normal to normal to-d i 4-houi rtrilci i • %  hopkeeiieis and *Snlddlen.eu" vmpatrn with M,< rancaa. Announced they agreed to pay them 5t>ers asked for mi hr. i are holdiin. indi M i wtll ome some real irt of the oinpanies %  an aaeve forward .• ian.a|e to future nrnpanlei abroad —(Eeatar.)





PAGE 1

^r FRIOAV. FEBRrAHY 17, HM Sew Traffic System forking Well Till! BARBADOS ADVOCATE %  no ,._ and pedestrians aaaa^lKlanes and M ftS * <"" V*"" J— %  JnW and very tew ^ow asked. a*>j i T Mirhclln. Coi i^Jerday ,ha. One W Rii allows lor more E* W 50Min of traffic, which t" die flow tT-l tint the motoring pab^ %  id to decide Into what %  SSmfflcthey want to go IfLaf th' would be In the %  L>sluon to turn of! K-Bt tO do SO. K plenty of space in Square for vehicles to ^> abreast.'' said the that the recently form[alfar Squareis rjdi better now that the telling to know whert .'direct them to go. mtem is being tried out tents will be made to time until the best laJTaitived at." e said, title Session ol the House B> on Tuesday the, £?!'.''">' .'<* have preS vehicles from using the fiTUund the Public rluildlnga, JJM. put out. ._asked about this the Com<-~.* yud th.it u w.is only ISmiwn'. but if the noise of -ts the House of Aslain* will be put m-IS iff* foe..er arc now being be Probyn Street Bus ^ %  HM Bie Commissioner said ^^tom srr being created to tt these waiting for buses ^.HB and rain. %  ION Cl'MMINS of Mount Brevilor Road. St. Peter, •mied (or an injured hand w be fell rom tne platform % %  or lornE. 29 on Wednes(The lorry was being driven bMfieand a Qunrter Road by %  Herbert of Mile and Quar ABOUT 8.1U a.m. on Tuesday an accident uccur: All Saints' Road between -_,, : fc ]-, owned by St. pViw Plantation, and driven %  Bpril Scantlcbmy of More find a bicycle ridden by El.f Holder of Four Hill getter fell from the bicycle and %  Utoly injured on his knee. LOSS of 49 holes of yams valued $7 was reported by Ifc, Farmer of Mourn Plania%  .Si George He stated that Ijtni were removee a tendency to hit the insurance Judgment was then reserved. PAGE FIVE Princess Alice Give 9 Em Installed A Chance 6 Months For St eating COLVIN KING of Dash Road. was sentenced to six m Dl With hard labour by A .1 H. Han%  %  found guilty ol stealing £1 is. ud me property of Glorji Goodridge on January 16. Put On Bond For Misbehaviour DMno and lh both uf Alk\iu''s Unit, were put on a bond wha a Usaa bum His Worship Mr. E. A "lay. I 11 (uuncl guilty of misbehaving .hems... LaUM on Augujt 'M They were bound over for one munth la ttM sum of £ 1. PPmts Tiom and library are Tatait*. B tins building and ne occasion tho %  i Cinema has given a show m iatericr was recently reThe games room Is now with two table-tennis, %  id two snooker tables. I ullr CuuiblM can also J* playing dominoes. P who are not interested In Tan relax with a book and | the Radio Distribution 0V8 of the Horse Hill afl" Tr'i'P held a camp fire •tW night last on a small ^teh.nd St Josei ,-< %  Horse Hill, •"time it was thought thnt J"I have ruuud the pre%  Jbllt shortly before 8.00 %  e cloud, cleared up %  boys will be invested at |f. today at tho St JosI i ^HJ**wlll be issued to ^llllKs WHO llMli L !" ". tne Rock Crusher at WSj}'St. Joseph, are now B? ot the workers told %  jWe that they are out of F "y year just before the K? Ih in full swing. '"" Joseph Factories IT^ 1 ** 1 much improve%  J"T"^ "* Past tew months tj^LV^ected that the crop %  1 t. ,WT "en_ %  J"*"!" and IK : wnc slightly %  Jf( B 80 "esday morning, t !" ".-lock, .Is Rl'tatv.le while • I? !" "! Hill. St. Jo^ph. CJ" riding with Haynes %  "'" %  UrsAM very scarce Kg, t r" 1 *Ph but a pleasing ^^** the potato crop Is \i "nprovement. On Blackmans opened a %  • %  a nd many holes Wednesday househowever seen going ^J",, !" ", potatoes. It la KT* t they are selling RE-* 1 "olo. Yam. an? J %  around February S.^" rMldents of St. CJ^.! %  •" the " Sies can be I Potato Yields Not Good The Director ot Agriculture In his monthly oot Mites that th" harvesting of sweet potatoes was continued during January buryields, especially m the lower ah.tudes. have not been very good Reaping of the main yam crop U expected to beam next month Vegetables, including tomatoes, cabbages and carrots. .; supply in the markets. Owing 'o the frequent showers wh oh occurred during the month, peasants were able to do much more planting than usfial for of the year. The young planted canes have responded well to the Januaryrains. Suitable weather conditions enabled supplying and. in some rases, late planting to be done. Cotton picking was continue.. Yields on peasant plots, particu-l larly in the St. Lucy area, *n\ below expectations. Some good yields of groundnuts j have been reported in St. Philip, and Christ Church. Peasants' appear satisfied with vieid'^btamed from the recently introduced variety Virginia Bunch; it is proposed to extend its eultiTatiou during the 1950—51 crop. Breadfruit, bananas and coco nuts were in good supply in the murkets during January. Limes i m ;ilso available. Pests, Diseases The main pests reported attacking peasants' crops during the month were the white butterfl. and bacterial black j-ot in cabbage' and scale insects on fruit trees Control measures are being advo; cated. TinPtaaanj Asrlcultural Instructors visited 444 peasant holdings and 8 school Hardens In January; 41 mango trees were top-worked Tb Colonial l>evi'Ui Welfare scheme for at dividual peasant gatlon units continued satisfacturily Twelve )>easaiaan lOWn it rcKlrington. Potting has boon Btarted, and by the end of the month all seedlings had been put out In the BtafBRM Buppliei foi all triail planted during November 1949 were cut and put in early in January. It was found that a latge number of the supplies were not needed, as the original plants had germinated well since the counts were made. Germination on the whole has been quite satisfactory, and with the excellent weather ii. it is expected that then few blank spaces when the Mali are reaped. The crop season was started on the 23rd January, when a start was made with tbe First Year Seedling Trials. By tbt the month, the Short Season Trial and about two-thirds of the Long Season Trial had been cut. Fortythree seedlings were selected from the Short Season Trial, and to date 172 from the Long Season Trial, making a total of 215 altogether. Entomological Preparations for the liberation of parasites for the control of n-, saceharaita are proceeding normally. Field examinations of young plant cane show very little damage or egg deposition tij . aaartiara.** at present. Laboratory Mocks Of Llxopham are being maint;< surulus flies yut out at Codrington One recWrery of Llxoahaga was made at Codnngt.m OUlwl routine work. During January, 17,650 pupal parasites of the cabbage group defoliators were bred in the laboratory and the majority were liberated in the Held. So far, a total of 54.740 of these parasites have been laboratory-reared. Field collected material has so far been used at once for laboratory purposes and no recoveries of these parasites have been recorded. Introduced P is, fH A flfild me i nlro duced predator of Cottony Cushion Scale was male. showing that several years after its introducmaintuining itself u ia control agent. Asya IrlnKaia* was recovered from a new localChemical The mechanical analysis of six al soils was completed The MV Si>ekk.i' was tried out for the first time on the analysis of phosphate and potash solutions. The new technique of mani j pulation has now been controlled and wort, on the phosp. tent of Barbados soils will DC commenced, THE 30-ton schoor.er Alexao'GoUito' Not 'Gacogne 6rinA R. cargo of • wood and charcoal. ship Gaaeaene is due to arrive i This schooner made tl to-day The paragraph should 4$ hours which was good sailing have read steamship GeMHo and i for a vessel of that sis*, no: Cassagna Mr. D. L Johnson is b nt. 158. In 14 Days 4 15s. and 2s. costs to bo paid in 14 days 01 in default one month 1 impi iMiiuneiit was Imposed on Mi.ik Mayers yesterday I found guilty of toflktIng bodily harm on Chti grim on January 11 .'J Bouts Lost Last Month IN his notes for the month of lie Director of Agncul"1 $444.25 1 mging the total amount repaid to date U $42,078.57. Interest col'ected for iio $2.86, making a total of i 4 $97.00 was issued for* the month making a total ^r $83,115.16 issued %  nmittea VH in the month, at wbicfa luatters con-I cerning lo^ns u, lishennen and; sanitary accommodation at beaches, I sea with tigator" continued during the month and 17 trips were made. Of these. 12 wen 1 spent in research 00 the tly.ni: tlsh fishery nd the others on the large pcianic dntp Unfavoui penenced throughout the month the disablement of many boats at sea. Three boats were lost during; the month, of which one was smashed on the beach; the other two have not been seen or heard of since putting out to sea about the middle of the month, and must bo presumed lost with their crews. Catches of fish were heavier during this month on the west coast but somewhat lighter on l)ege| desired him to express the; appreciation for the honour II.It.II. Princess Alice had placed on them in taking up so high an office as Chancellor. That day was a great day for .'. it was not for them only. It was a those people win together I ating the University College. The installation was much rftOM than mere formality and one in which they as members nf the University fully felt to be th dition of the ancient Univoi She had been installed In the high officials of the Caribbean and their praeeo 1 Kdher showed it was a great 1 to the people of the British Colo' It marked a step fort*. Lng the need for a d< feeling for the things of the intelind the spirit to be spread throughout th< She had taken up the dul %  nj undertaking in which all those coun• (slaving then step to the fulfilment of their wish and pr.i Wide Sympathy They felt that whatever difficulties might be confronting them .,sk of building up the College, they had the sympathy %  nd the support of all the Uni-.vorld. That day was also a great day for them for many personal reasons. He had already expressed his appreciation of the honour which she had conferred upon them by becoming their officer When he thought of the he had sat under her chairmanship in an academic London, he remembered her deep %  mpathy and U %  % %  %  •neir behalf then and they were indeed fa have her as their leader. For that reason, her installation then was an event of the greatest importance. THERE is an atmosphere of suspense which keeps the crowd I enthusiasts upon their ten at the many Bl the silence that is evident when some heated poini w to who is the best bowler or bctsman is not being discussed one u told the closenesa wish %  vnich they follow the ex. 01 the commentator. A crowd began to straggle ground the wharf radio just about 11 15 o'clock yesterday, some smoking cigarettes to while aw*J th *time until the coin would bo ,08 **dA few took up their positions from where the local Big Ben could be seen, and then to 11 Mcond they were there to hear hat British Guiana had won •Juices. I a chance. Le' them decide." one burly chap said somewhat stolidly as he puffed away at an inch of cigar. No one else voiced an opinion %  hen, but a few minutes later an*.Jier chap a bit lanky, who seem-1 ed as though he was contemplating arguing with his cigar friend, .said, as though he meant it to be general, but got it to hold %  touch of pointedness at Mr. Cigar. "Be> ^o' one nut before they score 25" tils cigar friend refrained from replying at first, but then made a scoffing gesture of his hand as who would say Oh!, what dc you know." A short while after wards, durlUf *"" "' tnosc *whle*s auenccs, the commentator aaid "and he is out.' The tall lankv chap who had made the challenge jumped up in the air ami exclaimeo Whj TO 1 didn't hot me?'* Everybody stood gaping at lus fceming sagacity and, he made conceited by tUJ KO od guess, predicted another wicket would fall within another 25 runs. All then held in loud tone* that they knew Taylor would be the Qrst to be dismissed and as runs steadily increased and the sun became hot a few triM to edged against the wall to be shaded. When 49 were scored th# commentator saiii 'That was a tricky oM and — 1 Our lank:friend jumped up but 00 this occasion he wss not so aceuren or lucky. The eommentatoi eventually went on to say "and hf down the w* By lunch a big crowd had gathered and were paying that alert attention to the radio which showed them to be enjoying themselves almost as much as those who were watching ciukct :,t Kensington Band Concert At Hastings Rocks THE special feature of the band M. the Hocks to-night 9 conducUng of the various pieces. together with the choice of programme, by the N.C.Os of the band. Included on ihe programme are three items specially rwauaateg by Canadian Music L present holidaying on it %  m|> and ('IF. March No 4; The Melodies of Sullivan from his Comic Operas, and the Baliet Music from the opera Faust. PROGRAMME 11AHCH Pomp .nut l iicumslaiice —Elgar. Sir Edward Elgar. born in 1857. composed a music setting for Cardinal Newman's Poem The Dream of Gerontius" in 1900 for which the honour of a knighthood wag conlec re d upon him. He was awarded the •Order of Merit" in 1011 and was appointed "Master of the King's Music" in 1924. Conductor:--Cpl. 11. Morris. oVF.RTUKK—Morning. Noon and NightFran Conducted by Band-Sgt. Archer. SELECTIONGem* from Sullira*V| Operas fii.lfn. Including Mil 1 Ol IVn.'.iint and The Gondoliers. Conductor:—Band Cpl. Eastmond RHAPSODY—Slavonic No. 2Friedcman. Conductor:—Cpl. W Best Venus on Earth—Lincke Conductor Band Sut Arehei HALI.ET MUSIC—From the Oper* Faust—Gounod Conductor—Cpl. B. Morris CORNET SOLO — The Willow Song—Coleridge Tnylor From the Incidental Shakespeare* Othello. Soloist:—Boy Farnum Condi. Bastmond MUSICAL COMEDY — Bittot Noel Coward. Conductor:—Cpl. W. Best MEDLEY—Current Hit Songs and Dances—MuiM-1) Director of Music: Capt. C E Raison. A It < M (.oil -W I ill! KIM. "Stella Polaris" Coini'S Saturday LUXURY passenger In Polaris'" will make its second trip to Barbados for the 1950 tourist an Saturday. tourist season when 11 aj on Thursday, January IB. Over 10O passengers are ex* pected to come by thi, vessel. Messrs. Robert Thorn 'Ud are local agents. Stop Poultry Thieves LONDON (I!> Britain s farmers srlu beat poultry n... "35 rL', d *'"on number —tniMiDly talooM on i rue scheme has been drawn up by the National Farmer,' Unlor, ana approved in principle bv the Ministries ot Food and Aarlcul. ture and the Home Office The N.F.U. has sent details to all county branches and hopes that all farmers will Join Ihe scheme. A bird will carry its registration number even after it has been lolled. For a fee of $5 poultry farmers will be issued with a registration number and equipment to stamp the number on their birds. One N.F.U. official declared: "It is believed that the scheme will go a long wai towards recovering stolen birds and latching the lh:.-\. Poultry thefts, particularly before the Christmas season, have been soaring even higher in Britain in recent years—1..V.S. Britain Going Dry LONDON'. (Bj Britain is fast S oinu ; out the formality ol an 18th umendment. Either from choice or necessity the beer-drinking Briton ting his consumption so drastically that many saloon in facing bankruptcy. Sales for January weir I spa, ;<\1 to be the . Trade bey boatst. lag this to-day, Albert Dyer, chairman of tlu Licensed Victuallers" Central Protection Society, said: "The commodities w sell are getting out of reach of the public and If these conditions continue hundreds of lieout of business. Last year beer sales drop p ed by 72 million gallons l*elow the 1M8 total. Tax DO gallon barrel yields $28 so Chancellor of UV Stafford Cripps iil bo S56.oo0.00ii down on his $781,200,000 estimate of revenue from the bat The .intnul licen s ee s to be held mid will urge a call cents in the 10-rents %  pint t.i\ at present Imposed by the Exchequer. The Society's vlci Cornelius Collins, mine host at ihe Upinn Manor Arms, on London's East Side, declared trade Mad reached a new la \v Things re ieepentely bad." nih thai %  man dare not no into n cause he is frightened he will have to stand a big round. "Before the war beer w-i* %  vatagjtai about foul cents a pint, now it is ;4. ,\ decent nip i Scotch was 7 cents, now anything up I Chairman Dyers said ih.it the limit had been i< discourage friends gathering in large groups bei thrmsi'lve-. now dislike Aem. It costs too much b %  would ask for amlskOy as a matter Now the> hai mention the word. "Hut when they stop asking for l then'" — l.N.N. Can't Gut Rid Of His House LONDON (By Mall). %  head of the famous banking family, has a monlp-t EU %  nor give away. This perlct example of Britain's handsonn go Hall—11 built in cxItuiv St Kdnuind's, Suffolk County. OBSSffad the hull to jiinc! ttcally ovei could mention.'* Lord '' %  aid "i akao cool letting | them have it as "1 bought the house just before the war. Now it is standing | empty and dotaffi make an excellent sanatorium or hospital—in fact it was used as a hospital during the IV*I BtBpe then it has been used as an agricultural training Lord and ichud live :it Merton Hall, Cnmbndge. where much "I bis time in ; he research. "llushbrooke is too big ilcult to run as a home." said Lord Kothschild, "but it woul tor an institution of son It was reported that I-ord Rothschild bought the hall for $84,000 from Lady Islington, who had carintnior There is a possibility that the National Trust may < have a hand in its disposal. —I.V*v Teams Selected For Fifth Test MADRAS, Feb. 16. The fifth, ilnal and what may decidlnt unofficial Test between India and the Oosagarej%  iiii opens ton thechtpauk sporting wicket here, mmonwealth won the test Test at Delhi and India won the thrld at Calcutta. The second (Bombay) and 4th (Cawnpore) were drawn. India are including in their %  cap' in Joehi. a wicket' lio scored a century for Ctntral Province Governor'.; XI .igainst the Commonwealth side last month. Almost everv one of the 20.000 seats have already been sold. The Chepauk pitch is known for giving bat and ball an equal chance, and it is irorta mentioning that all five Tos' played there [two iiflliilel unofficial) since 19S4 have produced a dafbklh aana will be. I> rfla:_v S Haxare (capuin). C B. N'ayudu. Mustaq Al., D. Ph.dkar. H. Adhlkari. \ ; Kishenchand. P (Imrlgar N Chowdhur>-. R. S. Modi and P r .icshi i:th man it QaekBe Wise.... Advertise... OLa> FAVOUftlTf MfDICINK I naxiivn COMSTIPATION I rotaMbnajki. rtr*rrM %  /••nrol r p I a*4 MMSIT' jiTlf li| %  r-iwii. UB IM .ifMlai MfHUM inurr | li-ni. r*mn ..„, iai|>aVllM. N-n1Mb %  u rn ann JH>I m* mm ii iiiMi nm "-MORSES /^/^ PILLS noor rormocfallli:— \ %  tn (captain). South .. Freer (Victoria); r Worrell. (Wtsst Indln): J. Holt (Waal, Indtca); Bill Alley. (N Southi %  orjo Tribe. 1 %  Ion wtsst Norman Oldnclri. < Nnrlhants) R Smith, i Ei • I I'ibyshire); H. Lann ( iVi.torlal — Renter. TtUlTfO BIMIDT SOS OVIt 50 nJt I COM5IOCK 5 WORM PIlLtIS j iMd. l.y ih. nt.r. ot Da HaasA I l t .i.ia.b ... %  ocUHoraduU BROAD ST. HARRISONS JO.\EV SEWING MACHINES (HAND MODEL) I \rrpiiunall\ v lu "iierote. They run smoothly and make a perfect lock-stitch on all materials from the finest silk to the heaviest drill IH'Y .% -JeWWaT IT WIU. (ilVi: TOO A I.1KK-TIMK Of TROUBLErSBB si:itvicE CASH PRICE-ONLY $69.15 llllti: l'l IK IIASi: TITMM1 AKHANGED ELECTRIC MOTORS wilh which % %  banal aaataUasI model can easily be converted into an Electrically driven machine $46.56 each HARRISONS ^tr^' "lllkM' rot evetu occasion on Sale at tne teadina StoteS Firewood. Charcoal tamed Yeaterdaj PIGEON CHOW GOAT CHOW two of Purinds best and obtainable from H. JASON JONES & Co.-Ltd-io->ofs> w It'sSaiin and Lace! DAINTY BRASSIERS in Satin and l.*> r. I'rarh onl> in iso. it 34 and 3. Each $148 ROLL-ON ELASTIC PANTIE GIRDLE with dt-Uthalilr Innrr sral. Oenaine Value # CAVE SHEPHERD & co. LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street



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PAC.l THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE mi D.W. FK BBtAM u y< mWMitiM % Gfe This Tan Plain Front Oxford K now on Sale at the leading stores. See them for yourself. JOHN WHITE means made just right 'V.rwork. MI. M T" > (onk i trial IM •^ •n|oy tt | u | lor of ll.li,,. 4 it * PHOOUCT' THAT hopetcM fedin ih*l you 'N I *'nol up W il" *n> longer Mmpl> MUt l1u( you've been faking too much out til > our til Your body i> *hoil ot (HO owntul itfcngihciuiit food* --pha.phoiu JDJ protein. Tissue* strength—#d To put vnu rfcjpt. >ou need 4 course of 'Sarulofcn' Ncr^e tcttt I '"*l Sjniiofen' thec i-o greai body-building 1O.HJ pho%pnorut and pioiem in lh#ir oryaiuk t'orm. #o Ihji il.. .toothed MM you system. Day by day gloriou* nev> he-ilih. youth nod \iubiy Ho* ihrou*n your whole bod• your •.treniflh Md *cl.-inhdeiKr COM buck! Sun oo a coun* oi Sjiuionea iod*y. OH iitlt ul jfvo'f i haimmlm t'ul i/rumi"'* 'SAXATOtiKV restores health. n>ulh UIHI >i)alit> HIIOAIIUAY MEM MM*. will be closed on THURSDAY 16TH half-day and open SATURDAY until 4 p.m. in order to facilitate shopping for the passengers and crew of M. V. STELLA POLARIS %  IIIOAIIUAY IMIISS SHOP. QUAKER OUR a big nourishment jywjj LOOK AT ALL QUAKER 041. IN iivilwN 1.1 KM %  VaMMU Mote "OIIIM* M0U£ CARIOHTOIATU ... MOW VITAMINS 1,11, % %  %  %  %  %  .'.-.v.:::-.;::;-,::-/ .%  .-.•..//- I l.\OI II l tAHPETS Silts: II il by T/ 2 ft and I0>4 ft by S It A'. I IMII II il l.\ HULLS 6(1. * All very reasonable in Price. r*ur.|ipr,,<, loon 1. tlfcii-ittil Liu. taoMafl ID & 11 IloebufK Street The book that has set the world talking RDMMEL A swashbuckling general who insured many a story, MM 'cticious some true, to be told about hirn whii.UM BghttDg III World War II was still at it's heiglit. Hollywood once tried to pnrv.iy lb* chaiactci I I man General on the HrtCB but they missed badly. Here, at last, is the truth l,c!. I ever to come out of the second World Wai What he thought of his men an,. Ihes I What he thought of his foes; the men of the Empire How he was eventually murdered by Hitler's Gestapo Beginning in the Sunday Advocate, Feb.19th a



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00 \l__ Y FEBAJ'AMV I! %  . CLASSIFIED ADS. p,Bl •*] ^^r THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE %  AUCTION ••'OR HIM HOUSES -.l.s, —--—. iTld*-. ^ ~ — %  WrMher with two : If %  ?* and on* 113 SO—en HELr mm to, Mn T? d ?T* r "Brtl*en HIIL pie*.n> apply on mnwi iWrnnrr ITCUIM 1* 1 On t CLCRK for our office and %  par* mm Omnnwfil CM* Co, %  %  IS 1 AW AWBTANT HOUmOKPOl '* %  iP1l Apply by !*Mer to Mr. W p MOWTU. f-roprirtr**.. Sea M*w GuM HQUM SHIPPING NOTICES III 4 arliatlr Kn L %  Mrs. "•"'> %  •" % %  " a*~". Ig "T. o %  ,,rf, i.M-i L ant,. THANKS tin* I .—,—. beg ihro.mli I Jf.'SErthank. %  fejf'^h. or .n any way P*** FMn '" ITl.SS-ln W MEMORIAM [^ nemorv of ..ur beamed RTTV %  |V IM4 IUM* -Q* . (tf e '.it ,VJII>..I:I ItM I "" %  ..Ho*r Hlwp 1 2 -Tn SERVANT (.-.eral Servant will, food IIIPWUUM Of coking C.nM Mf For u"ii*r>*d peraen Apply: tt—dvar* Pin* mil rT Mar.,. SSSftoST I W.S.H k IT 2 M 3o gEAL ESTATE " application to ur I n Bannliter nial-MTl I CARRINGTON SIALY LITAS STRFCT. I 1 2.50-tn i MISCELLANEOUS %  UESTS-TNro Couple*, or 4 jlniW people Deii£htfuny cool room* KunnJng ..Iff Iff minute* walkto < I'V or Club*. special monthly or weekly Mra BETOBTT. Wood aide GardenIS.S 9 ti n AIJ-Hlwr Ktnlon New rjf_. .T? !" Ra ~ i 'v "itiwi rimnlng water K MM, bath ..bo Ganaga, Ptwn. ~*j ITiyi In NOTICE WAXTTO Owr*. op*rativ* Bank Una •rllrr. plm,^. ppj, M CO: HI 1 RoMtitk SI n> nirbodo* C\rd Proaprrtlt** K S Nwholl> %  MJ *" IT 9 .in IN POBT M A*Ouv. M !,.. Srn Mvlon Bfi.. lAKUIe M Smith. 9rh Frn,. Srh IhMino 9rh D'OrUc WM M ,. P"*M, srh OIU M 9ph bnamirl C Kordon. Yacht l*min. Bpti M \ Twillin->rt,. fteh WoncMr.il (V,n **lk. *-h Molly N Jon*.. -h .' #oniu. *h ivioi-^n. srh Dumta U H V T B IUd*r AKin'AU Sonoo n or Alrndnru It SO IOIM I r*p( smith, from SI li*a. Afmi I. Johnann bq NMimM Yacht Sorva I ttart S3 tons %  (Vpt SrhMi. for Tob*> IN TOUCH WITH BARB ADOS COAST STATION CabW 4 Whoh-i ,Wt India.. Ud !?" r ,h ""^' %  now oommunn-m. wiu iho rolMrtnf wd-B UvOU**i their S N Jo**ph Uykw. MaurriMU,. ? r *^ r t^ln-Mrnhord. t-nw. All*, TVcun. IM>HI. Ilortliord. I ueMn. Pr-.tdentbrond Tt^aw. Srv.ne. Art.t.-, Prtl-r Merc.tor. (Mnr BMMTA, n^ew AW. PM>^. MMtoMSo, '- %  • l>ort. Mmon rnom M > Uorwt-r M.nr IJA t^ RMUnond. Oolfllo. VrrnwibiirKt* r*n AdoUldo, 1MB DMihoni, MM .aondalucU. TVIton. ConafauiU*. RrMII H \ Ko^jto, lurhan. Alma CkWIo M n*lbo*. Wryon-. Wntmuun ahnbarbona, Arffmun* t-itn*. K—. Avlta. Mont*:** swflord l^nitouU. Atrr. I*dy Rod**?. Chomow. Moom-cdow*. Untu Rondlbrovi Quilm*... Anlufco, aVodono. HM>IIIMO ""nW^r. smtno. Kntd. IMk. Eut. < h*rr>-ood. QOlSamio. Son\i,iirn# SuiMtui. TTurlby. A*oa IMuv. r %  •**', ol Krt*f. •mo %  LThftmo"" ' Oiti* Bladi m ^ Irtiildr*'! 1 Mr HTM" I Ml--.! %  ll H|J< \OI!1 I s NOTICE %  ill b* rorclved by the unV to r*bruar>30-n iw i of I, A' lJ ho "WhwM CommUalonwa of irw Pariah of st J,.^. (l>r fj.soo n n M Interem not .•K-eodJna 4-, • %  [ ia ,','L^*'. r p,W b Annual irjtalmn.iv u.,S2^,' *"" ""—• "-"> Riflnarl !" .., p H TARII.TDN -hiiy OonunMion*rSi Jam**. 11 J TO 3n MMgATT "tif-ii: -• -.-, %  far mm. i.n th* lop floor, .i dihma: rnom, ..nd 3 bedroom, o.. m, tS 0 0 "" %  %  i ...HI OUl %  troilnd rioor Exrcllrni .it* for biialncaa For further partictiWa apply to the Hi Mr*bBMd o."??? U? 0 *'* W,U "• • "P ' 1* b CARIUKtlTnx A SCAL.Y Sollcilom 14 1 SO lOn FR *lr NOTICE mvE ^EmtvO** 00. Standard 10 : RTjre.. : ML topne food Upholttery BpjOM. Phone HIT* naall 'Wyvem 12 II l> L Pandone a,K" n I. MHtlr.Mti Phono ITS 14 M 4i. I BUnawi ID Oonv Itapn. Bound IT I W -.f. line CRANI -____YaBA •: n <' UPBW r..;-„,„„. I Sarond Hand ii porfert uorl i Ut Oka P I Inr, 91 M 4 I Wir.. II Apply X V /. Co u ? MI n 1 <-' I %  Road %  %  WUB CAlUlira CYCLEd-AI-n Tniilfar st. Dial KM, T 3 S0--i.f %  Eimrlt I IM 4414 10 I %  ttLUNtOLS %  • I |'\I:I-II or ST JOHN << la drawn to % %  i thai they should h* lle*nd dHlisa %  f Frbnuarv. In *cordanr* with th* Dog Urenao Act %  %  FRA89DR. Pnmchial Ti. .Si Jniin 11 1 SO—(n P tf earned by obUlninjl orderr for private ChrUtma* Cardx Imm vt.ur frlendu No prevloui experim< %  nrceery. Write today for b) iek to Rrilain. : ''•lemon Publkhera; hlfheit commlaJon. marvellous money maklns opport.tnit> ,. | .. W'orka. Preaton. Encland." lH'n.IMNG SITES Al Hlithral*. %  %  ...' H I0.0OB aq. ft That* are excellent private roada' with mlted f\n further inform il TRINIDAD BONDS j S3.3B0 3% duo 1B73,M S T* 64 3r „ 19S5/5B if 97, S9.600 3% ., 197.84 98 £1.1100 f r 1963/73 9 107 Not, plus accrued interest; payment and delivery In Trinidad. TRINIDAD SHARES 300 Alstons Limiled Ordinary ,. Sf> 75 300 Angostura Bitten Ord'v %  S> $21.00 Net. local funds, plus stamp duty. AUSTRALIA BONDS Highest premium paid for 3V4T 1 and 5% Dollar Bonds. BARBADOS SHARES A new list issued Tuesday, frrv on application to: — ^AJwLHatUL "*** Tn "BfTDtPrUSt: nrenada and Trinidad Soilm< rrtday lTih FrbruoniMf The SH, "ADAiJKA" wil. • rto and P^eawgen for r*nruae-r IbM Th* U V --OADIWOOD' wl' ...cept Carvo and Paaaanetn fn< St Lurid. St Yin**T4. Grenada !>a Sailinc Sunday IWth Piabeuary 1M) Iota MARY M IXwlS" iU aore-pt Cargo and Paiaengen M I>*rion*ra Soiling Thuraday irth hbur, i*4o The Sen. WIIJNT win nreept Cargo and Puimtai for iTemerara Salting Sattirdoy lath February lt*> II W l SCIKX>NCR iiiKUS' ASSX-L\Tli>N (DfC COnatgnee TVI No 4041 ADVKRTISE . %  Ike EVENING ADVOCATE rabllafaed everr Monflaj with an Increaaliur rlrriil.UOD eery week. Canadian National Steamships • Ot TRBOl'.NR IADV RODNEY 1-AOY NEU*>N i AMAOIAai CHAlXCNOnt LADY KODNXY l_\DY NHMIN LAUY KIDNEY l_\t>Y NB3AIIN I ADY RODNITf ITII. M. \ .H-t M... aath M- 10th M.w aftti M.r IJlh Apr IMh May M ;..-„• 3rd Jul. HBJ M-r 3tth Mar loth Mar Mr. Aur -4ih Ai. ITth May 14th .l,,„r IJth inn 14th Jul. liin .'ul> A. M. WEBB Dial 3188 — llokin 9—3 155 Roebuck St. (Over Peoples I'harmarr) 14.2.50—5n DgPARTI .-) B.W.LA.L. Far TriaMad Mr. Hrlle Morgan. Mia* Ell/abeh NKRar. Mr l)..ugl*. Wal. Mr Cha.l*. MarK*nik. Mr. Ella Mac Ket, %  . Mr Julian Pierre. Mr. Joeel Adamlra. Mr. Malcolm Rilev. Mt Oiaham Rik<. Mr Erneit Prlerkln. Mr. Mirharl 1U"^ din. Mr Richard Budd. MM El*an,.r Nurw. Mr. Agn*a Nurae r*r St Laela Mri Marie Scotland. Mra. Louise Oabourne. Mi Perry Clouding. Mr. Lawrence Charlton. Mr John Mai. Ii|-..i> l"*r laaaalra Mr IVier Lory, Mr. John line Mt. Dnicir Hale. -"••gal'e4 M4 l i ^|Wa *,..,„. Mr liabcl Ollrien. Mi Charlc. i Klchard Venablr. Mr. Amv Venable t.r it, Kill. Mt Vladimir Feoar far lladad IialllU 11 R Mra. Maud Jonea. Mr Robert Jonea ARRIVALS—Sly n.w.l.A.L. Iram Trlaldad J*.ica naithelmea.. Richard Harthelmeaa. Anawla Rovce. Joanne fftoycr. I.I Charltem. Sybil Rutt. Malcolm Hull. Mr. Ntchola, Kabecca lauahlln. John Will.am.on. GUd>. Wil liamaon. Betty Johnaon. Page Johnaon. Mortinwr Seaena-.'. rnda S*aWnar> <> %  *(. Boy re Marcla Boyre Communist China and Russia Trade Agreement Soon SAN FRANCISCO. Feb. 16. It quoted Uw t.unnumist new A Psjaaalafl broadcast heard here China "Nevvs Aurncy" as say inn said that a trade agreement lxthat ;i tnotl .iitreement was now tween Communist China and taking shape in talks in Moscow IRuatiiu will soon follow UM H tWl wUI soon be gt§l '.jnce find mutual assistance just concluded. —Reuter. NORrRROINn IADV RODNEY i .Any NTl-SON l-VDY RODNEY LAJIY NEJJR1N 1A11Y RODNEY 1_\I)Y NCI .SON LADY RODNEY 4h Mar Mh Mar isn Mar itth Mar Mat M.r Itnd Mar IM Apr 2nd Apr ITth Apr llh Apr 3Sth Aor 3tth *• ath Ma> Rth May ITth May ISth Ma gh June 10th Jim IMh June 21 at Jut. JTih Juno rath Ju ath Julv 10th Ju nth Ju Itth Jul' Tth AUg i sir. J,... 13th Aim GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD. AgenU. I'lE. ULE.. I IIA>SAI I AM MM I FRENCH U.Vf ilASCOClNE" MISIt •QASCOGNP' aisR '•fiSl'txlNE" Salllni la Trinidad April 19th May 9th Ma) .'It! salllni to IMjmwIk April Jlh : fuilher particulars k|| R M. JONES & CO., LTD.-Agents. LOST I Trier aggfl lairw of Prince, will. IU>I LAIjrv KHAKI :> A, Mc %  oMl Store. 3 J SO14n OFFICIAL NOTICE APPEAL lie Juiiadlcilon i %  KIX.INA JIJSTINA AOUSTA Dggaodgg In purauanro of an Order In tint COUli in the aoov* action made on Ih : l>ercmber lft40. I give notice • .i.n having any < i K incuin All that certain %  > •imaa and Haint Jnarpn in thi% [aland canlaining by ad m oa au rt inonl three rooda eight prrchrIw UM r leaa Unclualvc of a certain grgg In the Public Itoad form.ng on .iLirle. thereof! bulling an. land* now or lab i Itinda now or I.' %  Murphy, on Knight, .ma on the public road whic' .v a Koad-ln-ii i %  ,mi ..f thai it. WtUl Wilneaae-. u. . n any Tuesday, or Friday between UM •oura of la inoonl and 3 o'clock in tin ilemocai. al the Office of the Clerk ol he AaUatant Court uf Appeal at the Jouit Houie RridgttuHii. iHlore the 22ii0 .lay of Feoruary 1940, In order thai auch na may be ranked gfwortf %  %  r.^pectlvcly ithorwiie aucb peraona will b* pi<*iud< %  friMit the benent of the aald Decree nd bo deprived of all claM ki.Mi.n th* aaM property. Claimant* are alao notified thai they r.uat attend the aald Court on Wedneaa..y the 12nd day of February 1M0. al •'clock u n. wtMjn their aald claim. u ill be ranked. .i-i my hand tlil* 12th day o IMS I V GI1JCXS of the AaiM..n( CMai "I Appeal. if ii 4 in \M iio\ 8AUE lf.4K FORD PKEFECT CAR ai MacKneariiy's Garage leM P.m. lO DAY Wl an Irurtnifftsg] hy the %  I. e ComDany to sell UM above vtihitlc wluth tlM been damaged la an accident. Mileage only 11.000. %  iv under own power after aicideiil. Opportunity in iii'iimv a modern, raptairabU Cw. ( >sli on fall ol Hammer. IMVUM' III tIMIN I.OOII ism HARVEST SALE BEGINS TO-DAY AT THANI BROS. Pr. Wm. Henry St. Dial 3466 Hollywood Fashion 6 Swan St. Society Store 53 Swan St. Gandhi „ 42 Swan St. NOTICE nit. CIIAS I Has resumed Praeliee. FREE! FREE! With every Purchase of $1.00 and over FREE CUTS OVMN AWAY. COME ALL! COME ONE! I am f in llni|il;iliv • WSiS SHOES Irom 13 W. Z! I -' W Mn ^BOYS I'YJAMAS from U 3.2 SO— I4r l~BOYS fol %  * Rnyal M 11U 14n %  Royal | a.**Ty-, Co T T 1 SQ-t I.n JWJAI-V-VT W# ,Wa '"'' %  %  OFFICIAL SALE DAl'llAlhlS IN THE ASSISTANT i in III OF APPEAL '. ...-. %  Mraal %  hereby glvrn tn.it b) elftM of an Order of the Aaaialant Court of Apiaejl dated the I2U. day o IMS there wlU L ict up for aale to the hlghaat bidder at UM Oflta* of the Caht ol th* AaaMUnt Court f Appeal at the Court House, m iwn. between the hour* of 12 inooni and r, clock In lb* afternoon on Friday thi Mth day of Pebruary IStO All that certain piece or parrel of land Mtuat.. "I Saint Thoniaa and -Salni Joaeph In thla Ihioa rooda eight perchea b* the aanu ".or* or leaa uncluslv* of a certain area in the Public Road forming one of In* ii'iiindariea thrreufi bulling and boundland, now or late of S J Mai %  > > 3 BOrLIN< OaaVN Bt >MI not -*.l and *ae ixtrn. Bay n AN Sl LADIES DEPARTMENT Good t,tiiilil\ COTTON VESTS 2 for SI .00 ib .;. ut II i !" '^— i Mam A Whit %  P*ral value 10 I SO On S-siai*^* jr. n,, %  K % %  d ah Th r 1 rrt "*ry ool. fjvana 10 2 80 gp .... land* now KniBht, and <-n the public road v. hid Ul formerly a Road-ln-con the tame may bull and ouund. and if not then aold Hie aald property %  vUl be iet up for aale on every aucceedint FViday between the aame houra until the aame la aold for a aum not lea. thai *;. a a. %  !Ith nay of IM ember Its* I. V. GILXaR Ag Clerk ol the Aaalrtant Court %  LsgegaJ. lt-1240 3n. Cheers (or the Players and CHAIRS FOR YOU! tapular ftlahoaaiu at • 8.V..WI t.u t romtor. SHBC-IAI. ISto doubU.Mnaaalk Plaa Hakasau -i Oaw . .,. ;, %  i lf*Hrr I SPUN SII.K In various shades SSt. Up FUJI CALICO CAMBKKS Ur Up i OTTON PANTIES NiItihbcd Ones Only 17c. each SILK llldii VIM in all shades 75c. a vd. I I M III II PURSF.S From 20c. Up It. 11 i .....II %  In.,,if. SILK 1'ANTIIS 75c each l III PI lie ( MINI Nit.. 8Mb i 11.35 a yd. PLASTIC COMBS mmio.NS. PINS I'KKFI'MF.S. SOAPS elc All r.nW fhenn JhKSKV MIPS S2.44 each N. Gown $2.88 each ( IIIJKF.0 TAFKTAS $1.35 a yd. Ladiea Good gualily HANMKKRCHIKKS 13c. Up II llsl V PYJAMAS • %  ; Mi a pr. STKIPKII JKKSKV Itnhelievably Prelty 54" $1.50 a yd. IIM.I.S, LACKS. SKIVING i Mill VDs NKKDLKS, KNITTING WIM1L Ml i HI liu. MI Prices PLASTK ami GOUl BKLTS From 22c. Up PLAIN RBSSi Sir. a yd. HATS. HAT VVIKK. HAT PINS. IlllAll! and Hundred's ol olher Haberdashery Lines—Cheap PLASTIC IIIMITIKS 15c. rm II PRINTS v.,i t.,„„i Qnalitj i,i, up sun KINGS 14K. I la HAIII I s • 75c. Up PUMPS $1,118 I'p GENTS DEPARTMENT GRKV FI.ANNKI. 54" Wide $1.98 u yd. SHIRTS In Dozens ol Snlcs From $1.08 Up L.S. WILSON I OK SALE CARLDIEM,'-St. Lawrence %  Mil.HICM", St. Lawrence. Full>• furnnhed. Linen and jr Bedrooms. Situated on the St Lawrence Beach wli ..ellenl sea bathinl This home can ... %  %  , CREAM Fl.ANMI 54" Wide $5.28 a yd. SII.K SPORT SHIRTS Cream and others 1.2 Up TROPICALS 54" Wide $1.(8 a yd. Good Qtatlll) \ I.STS 2 lor $1.00 KHAKI DRILLS 58. 92. 98 and $1.03 a yd. SOCKS In Many Qualities 32c. Up. PIN STKIPKII TWEED 58" Wide $5.98 a yd. PLASTIC BKLTS From 49c. Up WHITE IIKILI.N 59, 98c. HANDKERCHIEFS From 18c. Up In While and Coloured II VIII lit! NKS SI.14 each PV.1AM IS BJM I |, l.oM'l. Shmli's -inn g ill Pajadf' Brands HOUSEHOLD -__— BED TICK PLASTIC TABLE DAMASK TABLE TOWELS MI.ANKETS PLASTIC In Very Laval] FLANM I.KTTE 1 OVERS COVERS Lanfe Baa In 2 Si/. %  HANOBBS Quality 42c In 2 Size. $2.98 each For Balh $1.92 Up Ui each 54" Wi.l, All W„„l $1.12 I'll Lace One. $1.08 each 82c. each -in Up i ntiiiiin FLAN Ml 75c. a vd. BOYS AND GIRLS BOYS CAPS With Crct 34c. BOYS SOCKS For School 18c. a pair A Genuine Btiv BO."M STS 33c. Ill (,IKI.S TOO 33c. Up ANKLE s"l Ks \ pr. Upwards SPORT SHIRTS COc. I'|i TIES. HK BELTS Etc All Cheap SCHOOL HATS M IIIKII UNIFORM (LOTH All Reilli.,,1



PAGE 1

PAGE FOUR THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. FF.RR1 PMblUtxd b> TheAdTOMM CO. USM. tSfoed St.. I Friday."February 17th. I50 TIW Wtv^i^rn I ratltlioii llo.iili.rai. Warning FBOMeverj coma of the WtIndies and from every source of thought it has been pointed out to the British Government that a stable economy means more to the three million peoples who inhabit this part of the Empire than all the constitutional amendments forced on us from Whitehall. That this is so is now being conclusively proved by the attitude of the people 6f British Honduras. Ten months ago the people of British Honduras passed a resolution of loyalty and pledged to maintain their allegiance to the British Crown when Guatemala repeated her unsupported claim to sovereignty in that cWony. The claimant was invited by the British Government to submit her claim to the Court of International Justice at the Hague. Even if the ruling of such a court had gone against the objection of Great Britain it is clear that the loyalty and affection of the people of British Honduras emphasised by the recognition of the right of self determination would have greatlv influenced any future action. That loyally and affection have now been strained to the utmost and to-day the same people who stood up against the intruder ten months ago are now up in arms against British economic policy. It is not that they arc unmindflil of the debt they owe to Great Britain; it is not that they desire any secession from the British Crown, but they now feel that they have been penalised and their economy upset by the trade and financial policy of the Socialist Government. ttfh Honduras suffered in the past from that inattention by succeeding Governments in London in the same way that the Leeward Islands suffered. These were char., outstanding Colonial Administrator than Sir Alan Burns as the "slums of Empire." Now British Honduras has been spoken of by Mr. Richard Greenough as one of the most disgraceful spots in British Colonial administration. Tinreports of several investigating bodies have shown that British Honduras deserves special attention. Sparsely populated and without adequate agricultural production to support the smallest measure of industrialisation the country has been unable to support their population at any standard in I h modern demands. The Evans Hcporl left no doubt that the „„„ hen apart from any general reorientation of policy in the Colonial Brililh Government needed to jMCial attention to the needs of British Honduras. It was siiij'.ulaily unfortunate that the i • SoclalW Gov..-lently flexible to admit of any relaxation ..f the rule as far trttiih llondu: l It is even DOW more unfortunate that i ., "I Hi. people of that colony for some relief tram the distress of devalua There is no rule without its BXCtpUoP and ;' I w h an over-all powi :l 1 acal w ,n (he 1 >i uvular „„.,,, the ptouliai oonttttoDi prevail What ;. more than unfortunate In Iha present instance ll that there are other iol••,,• West Indies suffenn: (ran disappointment and frustration resultant from the mishandling of ugar problem by the Ministry of Food. The I and although there might not be the same reckless abandon of a ll ,.. nkely that British rule In the West Indies will draw upon itself the odium wlurli U has attracted in other parts of li There is still time to heal the breach and it was never beyond the capacity ol British statesmen to use to the occasion. Few broadcast discuss.. roused so much interest as a scries of Talks on the Western or European Traditinii. ghn European Programme of the British Broadcasting Corporation during 1949. and now published as a hook. "The Western Tradition." by the Castle Press, 50, Old Ilromplon Road. London, S W. 7 at seven shillini; There is a preface by Lord Lay1011, a Liberal peer, on the practical Issue now, and an epilogue by Arnold Toynbec. the welllorlan. on the possibilities of a hundred or more yean hence. There are 18 distinguished but contributors — Liberal, Socialist It. i.illM-rf Murrav One of Britaln'i foremost ttassical scholars, end author of a number of books on Inrrriuxionaf politics. He ha* been, since 192$. President uf thr International Commit1 • 'cllectual Co~operalicn. In 1941 Professor Murray was awarded one of Britain's highest honour*, (he Oder of Merit. the preae.it day "barbarian"? | Modern Western civilisation is in its essence Hellenic, though Jewish civilisation added monotheism and some moral cleansing; Rome added r>*r grand edi'kee of Law, and the Nordic invaders their strength and fighting power. Growth Of Toleration Toleration was a slow-growing plant. But it came; and that not merely in the form of toleration of noxious heresy, because you cannot kill it. but much more, at least among enlightened people, as a recognition of the /act that no one sec* has the monopoly of eternal truth. Each may learn —. .n science and philosophy, in iirt, letters, music, history. In good %  omctnlns; from the others Catholic. Protestant. ngnosti<\ government and moral authority. scientific nnd literary, illustrating: it was liberal. It permitted no vividly the "diversity In unity" famines, no pestilences, no violent hich most of them find U) !" %  ii of our civilisation. Two matters seem clear beyond dispute. Our greatest duty is to save civilisation where i: is n. peril, and restore it where it is iilreadv wrecked. And secondly, the way to restore It is by union. persecutions, no organised brigandage, such as were often ineradicable elsewhere. What was the secret of this signal success'' A combination, say %  of the contributors to this Several of the contributors to "the Western Tradition" are chiefly impressed by the ready welcome given by Europe to the modern scientific and rationalist movement. Almost all scientific advance in the modern world has been due to Europe itself or to the extension of Europe beyond the I-aw in whatever form may prove tior; practicable. The hope of a really world-wide union hns. for Iha [present, disastrously failed; but the nations of the Western Tradi'tion, forming what used to be called "Christendom", are visibly uniting more closely. What is it that has wrecked Western civilised society and made the tyrannies and miseries of Europe a byword in other co roiwn u Obviously war, war on a vaster scale than ever before and the more atrocious because it was virtually a civil war between groups belonging to the same community, a highly industrialised community It is at root a Hellenic tradihabit, as Professor E L. book, of Freedom and the Rule of •• And the plain positive ideal of "the greatest happiness of the greatest number", without aristocratic or dogmatic "Strings," has been more frankly accepted in the Western tradition than elsewhere. It Is in the scientific "respect for fact," in the constant increase of knowledge, and partteularlj Woodward puts it, of "being never indifferent to the problems of government The Hnclent Greek writers, historians, philosophers and even poets, arc always discusslng such problems and give in general the same answers. The the comparatively new explorallrst need is the rule of Law. ns of human psychology and In the half-oriental empire of sociology, that these writers place the Seleucldae. for instance, the their chief hopes for the future. Cities were Greek, the hinterland It is on these lines, they think. was Asiatie In the cities an acthat Western civilisation has risen .used person hod a public trial most distinctively above barii-cording to a public law, pubbarism". wn; he had the right to Doubtless, the whole book is defend himself or to engage counopen to Mr. Tonybee's criticism Mi; his punishment, if convicted, that, however much the Individwith capacities for destruction far wa limited bv law. In the "bar"' writers may differ, it is all barian" districts he could be "What the West thinks of the seized without trial, and punished West", not the judgement of disruln the long world war bas left ( n any way ln at might please the interested outsiders. The writers behind it too moral consequences; governor. In Hellas all were are all Westerners; more t xceeding its natural powers of recovery. Apart from economic tlrst, the passion for power or equal in the eyes of the law. and victory at all costs, and consequent tne law itself m made by a thereon a general disregard of all process of argument and discusaims and qualities not conducing slon j t was not merely a law of to power and victor.*, which comobedience to a king or priest. Juspr.se. as a matter of fact, nearly .| Ci > ana even truth, in the eyes of all the higher values of human lne philosophers, was a thing to life. This it is which tends to oe reached, or at least to be apwreck clvilisation._ _ m proached. by searching and disFreedom And Rule Of Law Hut crhat is this Western Civilisation that we are trying to save or restore? It certainly was a wonderful thing. It held before 1914 a position of undisputed su|n the world, not only in wealth and power and technology, t-ussion. Difference of opinion was not merely, within large limits, tolerafed but was actually welcomed as a help to finding the best answer. Is it not all the same spirit that, they are all British. What, he asks, would a" Chinese or Indian observer say of us? Or even an observer from France or Germany? The point is true as far as it goes, but we may well answer that, in the first place, we Europeans do understand our ways and standards more intimately than any outsider is likely to do. and this book is only a British contribution to what we hope will be a symposium of Western opinion. After all, the great problem of healing our wounded civilisation which modern Western civiusais our own problem. No one can tion regularly maintains as against solve it but ourselves. I ii sill* I lit' lEVMiii lirciiiliii' Ifv William llumsher BERLIN, NEW brick Kc where :iirough a wooded park on Hie north-east a compound, the Kremlin of many*'—and reputed to be the Berlin, man Moscow most trusts of all Here are the homes of the men this Government, who. with Pieck, made up the Frau Lotte is known for her nunlft Government of this swift eye for food bargains in the i Pi I %  pie's Democracy." and, like special shop for high-ups where is half a mile long and twice as 1'ieck, all who live in the comGermans and Russians still meet high as a man. pound are as carefully guarded as and where every shopper musi Both sides arc strongly patrolle.i if they were lunatics or lepers, show a special admission card day and night. The" (..citu.ui Most Germans would envy before being allowed to buy. black Guards, wko move silently them their villas, even if they Other Government fraus avoid among the trees, wear smart are only of the outer suburban being seen in this store for high black uniforms wilh silverfamily type that could be put up U ps and foreign diplomats from oloured shoulder flashes. They for, say, £800 in the days when the East. Among the shy one* is h..\or Gertrud leather, and each man earrll I Rank Tells Kastner. wife of Economics Prorevolver on his right hip. Among the protected personfessor Hermann Kastner. the soil. Ignoring the revolvers and nc i" 0 f the compound there is called Liberal, who "is another the rest, you scaled the wall, you no t much calling on neighbours. Deputy Premier, would find nothing more grisly u ever President Pieck leaves than a well-kepi lawn, m •WnThis royal hunting lodge and his mous black car on a path beside W1 .|l-kept lawn to drop in on the Frau Kastner is never among I geiDfl M th' grass, a otto Grotewohls for instance, he "" personal shoppers. But she man, thk k whitehair ,. ou i d nol fai i ^ contrast his own wel1 knows the attractions of the showing beneath .. Homburg hat, spil ,.|ous home with the lack of cafe attached to the store. She hu bulk swaddled in n heavy grey ,pur,, provided for his Prime visits u frequently for coffee anu UHL II takes. She acquired the Visitors top OMl cream Royal Domain Etui there hi no tvMMWI that '>*hit when she was Kastner _. ,,.. | | ., pioek has ever gone secretary and took coffee with lloaeow-l i l t Wl1 wsiting in the Premier's street— the ilrsl >rau Kastner. bain. Pieck His an biography the Frietin-h Wilhelinstrasse, one Another shy Frau Minister is proudly records that he is a close of the narrowest in the whole £ !" u Nuschkc. She was 21 when pie ... compound -year-old Deputy Premiei 74. the The presUientaU car always "uschke made her his fourth lie front gale. If he drove hride. ,„ (-., t German "PaOout of the side entrance, it is said. The question of a motor i men! than would be only one Black went to Ministerial level the If protection from the Russtana Guard to taluta him other day. This was after the l is The truth i* that in this comRussians refused a Western dipUUd of a Government which Jomat permission to drive his minJ 7 bas abolished rank, it is still own car back East to his post ol For besides the P OF down the Communduty. Comrade Pieck also inherited a 1st ladder—which tells 'Tell him wc will give him a royal domain-this Panke park Shopping ai*** dence presents visa to take his car across the mani mansions Its problems in the compound, boviet zone.' said Foreign Minwhere once the Hohenzollems The keenest shopper is Frau Jster Ceorg Dertinger. but the proudly Dfanced on hunting days Lotte Kuehn-rihneht. who runs Westerner refused to be led into Ther" was no wall then. NeiTl ).nld of bearded Deputy negotiating with an unelccted was there in the park a palisade Premier Walter Ulbricht. the Government whose legal exist|0 hnh the wall gives place • n nHem I^nin of Ka*'ern C.erence the Western Powers deny half mile. It is a palisade of —~~" %  "" %  "^~^~""—^~—" But Western recognition—Just A Nation Will Have A Go America Plans Hie Biggest ll and A of all lime II. Frrderirk CwHS NEW YORK, i BRIGHT and early on April Fool's Day, 1W.000 specially trained men and women will start ringing doorbells all over America To startled householders, farmers and heads ol businesses they will put questions like: "How old are you?"; "How many in the family?"; "How much do you mane a year? ; "How long have you been in this Job. ; | "Are you an Indian, Japanese, Negro, Chin-1 ese, Filipino—or other?" Anyone who feels overwhelmed by temptation to tell the questioner to mind his own j business had better restrain it, for refusal to answer fully all questions in Americas every—10—years census carries with it SO days in jail and a fine of about £ 170. j The census is the biggest fact-linding job I in history. It will cost the taxpayer at least £25,000,000. ANSWERS FILL 100 VOLUMES Statisticians of the Census Bureau will have a full-time job for three years classi| tying and analysing the information gath[ ered, with the aid of an "electronic brain j equipped with 10,000 tubes. Wnen it is all over. America's officials will I know more about their country than any Government have ever known since England completed the Domesday Book. More than 40,000,000 families, 60,000,000 farmers and 3,000.000 businesses and industries will be checked. In addition to the questions about age, sex, race, education, Job, income, health, and so forth which the wageearner will have to answer, land workers will be queried about their crops, irrigation, pi ices, acreage and related matters. Businessmen will.have to fill in complicated forms givingTull details of production, employment, sales, prices, wages, costs and markets. In all, it is estimated that more than 6,000,000,000 facts will be at the Governments' disposal when it is all over, filling about 1110 volumes or 150,000 pages of small print. THE DEAD MUST NOT TELL The enumerators face no easy job. They will visit Park Avenue penthouses and miserable slums in New Orleans, jails and nudist camps, isolated lighthouses and lumber camps in the Far North, ships in harbour and seamen's hostels and bars. If the experience of past years is repeated, thev will be violently assaulted, kicked downstairs, shot at, chased by dogs, dodged for days at a time, and often have to call for j a police guard. For all this, they will earn four cents (3VW.) for each name. With luck, speed and agility they may make as much as £ 17 a week—if everybody is at home the first time they call. In past years the piecework system proved something of a strain on the honesty of_some enumerators. One was .caught boosting his pay by visiting a neighbouring cemetery, copying names from tombstones and writing in imaginary data. Every enumerator must pass a political test. The census is an outstanding example of America's political spoils system. All appointments rest with the party in power, and nomination of census staff is considered the juiciest plum with which to reward loyal party workers after the appointment of postmasterships. THE VANITY TRICK Question-askers are trained in a number of tricks to enable them to get at the truth. They are told, for example, that if they suspect that a woman is the type who will not give her exact age if asked outright, they should not ask her at all. Instead, in the midst of other questions, they should say innocently : "Let's see—you will be about 43 years old?"—always adding five or 10 years "to their real guess. Nine times out of ten. the indignant woman will blurt out the truth. Enumerators all take an oath of secrecy and accuracv.—LES. ,/*"£? At.,/. For T0 D "mil McEWANS RED LABEL BEER— prTlu J GOLDEN BEAN ICING SUGAR Bottles HEINZ PLAIN OLIVES 3J 54 4lb. each Danish Boneless TINNED HAMS—:('ilb. each Danish Boneless TINNED HAMS—4"lb.—121b.. par lb. PABLUM--small pkg I'ABI.UM large pkn BLUE CROSS TEA—Viilb. pkg PINEAPPLE JAM—81b. tins SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE—81b. Una SCOTT & CO.. LTD. STANSFELD. for L — green-painted, dee p-p 1 a n t e " Say Thank* To "Little England •• Tu HM Editor. Tdc Advocate your columns to cxprcae a word of thanks to all those kind ; who i raiuly offered their hospitality to all members of irln| H M s ftUre'i visit to "Uttle England." BUM like to l dually those i clubs, those who have oi | our i %  football and I -now* who have ftven up much of their time for our beneflt. This I cannot do but I do want to say there is no one In the not apprecfLtftTM the welcome n us and the lo us. !:: n--ny re(r: for*. We ('..: Barbados. C. !I Hi-inrih 14/// !!• %  Smu*ln il .. Iha eve u( i tion of the Waal tour Rnglai being" continually apfTOW | . i who ask me such qi. do you think our 11 will u.'" ud ii 19M) team uiih that of 1BS6' In U ices I shall dun: course ol IbJ theni in brief with a "who's f ;i few of my etsi and so Justify all reasons for my arguments. make Id assurance to all r.iisiiists that : in the annals of l tht %  globa with the possible %  %  In the bean 1 say t) ing this 1950 tour recoi i I will go smashing %  n team bo leaviruj those shorn with a grim iltlaiiiiliigllim to i all the glories of all pi i i touring teams to send Indian cricket sky-rocketing. The team I of John Qoddard deliver tho food*. Frank Worrell has on more than two ooea djQinoaatratod to tho world that he is a batsman of the highest class, that his batting perform' vouranqr compared with any of those of the InlinoiUil V'ictoi T and could only be over -shadow of the great Dot Bradman's. Ihfl We | can boast of another of (he world's greatest batsmen. He has tal rasa where (ft off ani i Hi rapid lii Mutton's 364 which he n Australians in 1938. and which remains i* Judged latest all-rounder of tho %  ti century, for it has been my good fortune to see htm pet form in all four departments of the game and this has bee", my conclusion. As a batsman Walcott belongs |0 ih, ..illbre of England's Bill Ediuh. Australia's Syd Barne*. India's Haure and South Africa's Dudley Nourse. Kot-keeper, his present form would have been a most serious contender for Bertie Oldftelds. As an outfielder Percy Chapman at his best could not have been better, and as a bowler with little more concentration could take as many wickets .'or the West Indies as Ma ever took for England And to conclude I must mention here that Roy Marshall comes on my list of • %  I do not now propose to enttr in any particular detail as to hla cricket ability but I shall uv that in him the West Indies hav? found another Clifford Roach He will even §o further in the game than Roach himsV! j.d go. He U desUned to star*'e the cricket world with some phenomenal feats, and will bring cricket writers from all parts of. the world to report on his genius, and the Cods of cricket shall acclaim hal grcatnooa, ARCHIBALD PERCH. Oistln Town, Christ Church Married r Single To ihr Editor. The -4dt>ocare— SIR.I again write OB belli If of single girls, and there If reason why married women should not have first plac. or be %  elected before single women and they (the married women) should be broad-minded enough to know that figure and face mus. change after marriage and childbirth. Medical books speak of Mato, and tiny sensible person can see *he difference. Can a flow. look like one blooming in the garden? Barbados has got her share of beauUful girls, and UM be mor* glarf-ious if kl ried sisters would stay at home a.id take care of Hub! of spending Hubby's money, and getting employment that should oe given to single young women, thereby leaving the Barbados girl to suffer. BARBADOS GIRL, .\ftuin*! Ualking SIR.—I am quite willing to give the new bus stand a fair trial, but I am tqtall\ .,. p oa oo ng er i to walk through traffic laden paths after paying bus fare. As regards walking being a healthy exercise, as advocated bv some of your writers, it is sheer nona e pje to compare walking for health and at h in a city of congestion. Bridgetown as a business ctotn be reached without difficulty, as time Is limited for many who work or visit same, and then with the present price of shoes and clothing, how can we afford extra wear and tear' It is aB who have Ume and an abundance , also cars to t over the bridge, and elsewhere in --r people are the tail end and are not considered. It seems. POOR TRAVELLER. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT Ike* w*4 nui *• iiFueiTtn For Ik* ^"^ JM.V.V£ Theae are Enjoyable HoloalU SallkMr \ irnna SailaMC* i i.mUluil.i >..us.. :,an I'.ttllllOT |l.— „ Table Thrilleri n.ii, h Rolled Oate In Una Y Mortal in Parkaar. A Cherac In Una Spaahrtti In Parkair* "•pachrUI it i hi-rMIn till!, ('ream of Wheat (•rape Nub. I I R. BREAD Drinks that are Beit MM i> mi MIP Kl M mi' \,ii< ll %  CM 1 Rim\ IIKIM.-. GODD


Friday be Price:
Q February 17

1950.

Five Cents

Year 55.







gf ee | ane oR: Loeal Batsmen
P vernor JOHNNIE LUCAS misses one from Rollox and is
’ a i / nearly out when Wicketkeeper seh whipped off : eS | Score 2A6 for 5
: | the bails. The other slayer with arms outstretched is se . sy e °
e I stall 2 =e Robert cao , ee 3 Gaskin And Trim
n e€ |

Bowl Well
‘As Chancellor of W.I. University

| §
z (By 0. S. COPPIN)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Feb. 16,



Bis International pace bowler John Trim and Interna-
j tional medium fast Berkeley Gaskin to-day played the

spar installation ceremony of Princess Alice as Chance

* of the University College of the West Indies this af
|




llor
ter-
will

































down to 246 runs for the loss of five wickets as the Second

British Guiana—Barbados Test opened at Kensington Oval

yesterday.

Having won the toss Skipper Camacho sent Barbados
in to bat on a true wicket but one which gave the bowlers
some assistance due to a considerable amount of moisture
which it contained in the early hours of play.

Trim who developed consider- 17. The Barbados score was now
able pace during the course of the ; 62/2. x
match, bowled with unerring a ; Lucas who joined Marshall at
curacy during the day capturing | this Stage commenced his innings
the wickets of fellow Internation- | with free strokes at once, an im-
als Everton Weekes and Clyde | provement on his first innings
Walcott and also that of C, display

major part in pinning the tall scoring Barbados batsmen
was colourful and impressive in its solemnity and

own in history.
je University of which the foundation stones of the admin-
tive and medical buildings were laid this afternoon by

Chancellor and her husband will set the pastoral lands
h surrounded the mountains six miles from Kingston,

To-day’s ceremonies were car-

b kk ried out in the presence of five
averpDroo Colonial Governors, Jamaica,
; Barbados, British Guiana, Lee-

. ward Islands, Catholic Archbisho
ATS Support of Trinidad, Bishops of t r



he Angli-

“Roogles” Williams. His figures} Gaskin who had been trundling

can Church, Principal of the for the day were 22—6—50—3. faithfully and persistently from
Our London Correspondent) Caribbean Islands and America,
Bg London Feb. 16, the Chancellor of McGill Univer-

Gaskin was also accurate and | the pavilion end was

| rewarded
untiring, He sent down 28 overs | with Marshall’s wicket. A well
claiming two wickets for 52 runs lighted one cut back from the leg

Again Everton Weekes stole the } saw Marshall give an easy return
honours in the Barbados batting | cate Gaskin off his own bowl
top scoring with a polished 82 in

@ Beaverbrook has at least|sity, the Vice-Chancellors of Bir-
supporter for his Empire mingham, St. Andrew’s, London
" which he set forth Universities, American Univer-
” yesterday. | sities, West Indian Legislators,
38-year-old| Mayors, and 1,500 invited resi-
i















132 mihutes while Roy Marshall Marshall had defended soundly
. , i -y |dents of Jamaica re senting played another sound defensive | for one hour and fifty _ minutes
Be bie ph er i the culture of the ina innings at number one to score 48 | scoring 48 runs half of which came
‘or apham, i . Sté . acne
‘cons’ nts “I welcome the| ,,,__ . ’ Sea ae
ae arniie Lobbyists,” The proceedings started at 2.50

in 110 minutes. by way boundaries. Barbados

% e ne pe RO el } e Charlie Taylor and Roy Maér- | had now lost three wickets for 90
Stalin Must Come To Russians Don’t shall who put on 98 for the first | run

wicket in the first Test again open Gaskin who had now

: when e . tian dias dinde
Bel it can be the economic as Governor Huggins escorted

a
‘motional salvation of our|*® Princess from the waiting France Says

a room to join the e any é
And I am sure it will pe J Sept at

rained im-
4.30 when the National Anthe

e
, ” m S
d in the Dominions. iste ave oe : = nikal ec Ce yuneil
Siterd Beaverbrook has was played. Five minutes later, e
















e ry ed the Barbados innings yest measurable confidence bowled to
| W e \ ‘ t W ‘ day Trim opened from the | Weekes next n in, with a ring
ashington 7 Door Open an ar | vilion end this time and at on of five fleldsmen around ‘the inter-

Sha hi smapai¢n. Prom a fanfare by the Jamaica Military | ’ “ | IT orn up an improved pace Dalios il record holder Wes
finued his ce ; ,| Band announced the entry of the ; R ht i | that of the first Test roweve as unflurried by these
displayed oe 2S yore principals. The academic proces- as ig SAYS PRESIDENT TRUMAN SAYS POLLI | He kept both batsmen on the | elaborate preca itions geitat at
of the Daily Express he has} sion, including under-graduate ' : defensive and made some of his | scorit ind placed the ‘ba
me the advantages we seek! members of the College, dressed THE HAGUE, Feb. 16. WASHINGTON, Feb. 16, British Communier Iecner iar. | Seliveries swing in from the of t clever Witte ee ee
poestow on the inhabitants of |j, scarlet gowns were followed The International Court of Jus- President Truman was closely questioned at his Press Sritish Communist leader Har-|very late. Gaskin w ho bowled | cley« istwork
ica and on those, who live in acturers. librariane ™ a Th ; 7 Ys . : ' 7 ese : ‘ oe ry Pollitt said in a pre-election | from the sereen end was equally ;
a by lecturers, librarians, members | tice met here today to decide Vag oh : ; L .
fa are just as important to) of the Senate College, and visit- whether the use of the veto in the Conference to-day about the possibility of a new \pproach| broadeast to-night that his party | steady He bowled his opening _ Century Completed
Lobby as full employment ing representatives of other Uni- Security Council is legal when to Marshal Stalin to end the “coldgvar |favours negotiations for ears 4- | overs without a slip on the oft side} he _ centun y was ‘ So
high wages here at home. versities. applied ‘to applications for mem- He gave a firm “No comment to a question about oe mo ae t me 7 + ne W —— a — 4 leg trap of after o tne _ — fe ie on
_— é ‘ < : ‘ a ‘1D i otates, France, Mina, It WO leg Silps, Short square leg ar oO WeOKE Who é
(By Cable) we as bership to the United Nations, and] Winston Churchill’s proposal in a campaign speech at| nd Bae sity onlion : : batting attractively for a long
| whether the General Assembly Edinburgh that “another talk” with Marshal Stalin might | The Russians lost seven mil Taylor edged an outswi: time aitempted to drive out at one
the Soci tee rejected by help to end the cold war. |} people in the last wat No, i high through slips buv there from Gaskin that we igain ee
1e Security Council, ‘ : ; To Sob. 4 » ail d ; sae eos back nicely from the le 1 skiec
’ Asked if he would stili*be glad to see Stalin in Wash ie be Russias. wlio. want wa a ade i ened later Gash beck nicely: fi leg “ ee
Ty > atemenis are s 4 A , . it he pahiec stricken Ame i rought ollo 1 to field © ball i t
Written statements were sub ington, Truman replied that the door was open to the head te Se uM kala. hi ne but:there was no one there Pairau-
mitted today by eight Govern- ee ; gee ; nuitonaires,” Pollitt said. Russi: | second slip ee
ments including the United States of any state who wished to come to Washington ad pat forward a watertight Taylor who was patiently p deau just failing there after
Egypt Venezuela, Russia, the The President repeated his frequently expressed or the abolition of the aton:|ing himself in hooked an inswit running in fron A pelea pa
z > ’ ’ . } f ; ay t . if ay » Ty " o -eCkKeS Was her oo and he 1g
Ukraine, Byelo-Russia, andj sistence that any further meeting with Stalin should take ; bomb, ee oe ar teece ‘7 Sean tae oe iad Caen rr Suk thle tees tee thelieabel sent
Czechoslovakia. place in Washington. When correspondents agi ! ea ei = used GATS ai oaduce eae Square leg boundar: x ah 199, mlanten
The only oral statement today tried to make the President com-j} °M€'BY Was us Ps :
was by M. Georges Cllae of

; % hi The Clock Lucas went back into his shell
ment in general terms on anot! “pala ee Winston Churchill 1 Behind The Clock of the First Test and he got into
France, who said the French 2 ° approach to Russia the Presiden delet thet aoe aa The scoring was behind Sioiedtenaniiing.edimuis testes tice on
; Government felt the reecommenda- e | said that, United States Ambas- at ! as clock as the batsmen took

| tion of the Security Council is in-





























































































| vared to ake ¢ ) g roach) ada nie ne. Wheel Lor. | 02 nates.

" 7 2 waa R paawave all-over the world were ee aes Seat in the bak sy ia por ae be meee ' Weekes atoned for his fauity
ican oade TT i ] P bli h j all ready to diseuss any questio or Prime Minister Attlee by the | PM@ying we thad eaen th 2 troke with a late cut next over
can elect a new member. ] ubus | With any state that wanted ormer war leader,” whose Ful pee gee re “ord te aE off Gaskin that left the fieldsmen

The Security Council, he con- | enter into discussions, ton speech in 1946*set-the bal Saced ways on’ the aleriand ill standing while the. ball. car«
cluded, had perfect right not to M | The door had always be rolling for war against vhe Sovie. | “4S¢ ‘ ms a eened away to the boundary. With
recommend acceptance of a new emoirs ' open, the President added. Th Mle - ” ; Ne age wae ties al this stroke he completed his in-
member. If it did not, the General United States had never walk« We can get food, ray material, 19" bringing “hikgeelt of [ civedual halt century in 75 min.

| Assembly could do nothing. The ROME, Feb. 16, | out of a meeting and never+u imber and other goods from the | cree ena in place of G Een wane COLODRANGC OER. “Vent
public séssion was then closed and Sicilian bandiv qhief Salvatora| its veto power in the Unit et Union, the peoples’ democ- | £$! 5 o eae naster] eep to the square leg
~ ; Z nif Sg Sa ; sa a aaa yt | Marshall welcomed m : : aa fear: xi off the
; the President announced that the} Giuliano plans to publish his! Nations, cies and China without any po dover dbive for tote vir bounda 0 ur ru ff tt
| advisory opinion of the Court memoirs in the United States} Truman said he did not | litical svrings or payments in dol | ver he: brought Gaski: next ; ‘i
| would be given later. shortly, according to press re-| the time had come. to 1 ts,” he baid ¢ Trim at the pavilion © The score at ea wa J 3/ 5,
| It is understood that this opinion) ports purporting to come from his! passible special mission to Russis —Reuter unis Seine esl. aiptice Wee kes being 64 not out and Lueas
vill be made public at the end mountain hideout. | He made th comment \ for Gaskin 3 not ou .
of March or the beginning of The memoirs—7,000 pages deal- | correspondents read to in This brought almost imm Weekes Out
April. ( ing with his exploits since he first} quotation from an exclusive \- 6 Kall d In |} suecess for Tavlor Vas Weeke and Lucas « res
—Reuter killed a policeman in 1943-—havel terview whic h he _ gave to th ) 1 e fortable .to him ad ion boosted the score gq
nee seer out of Italy | — a rr sistts " . | through the slip just out 6 ng me nee come Rae
uly Giuliano’s permission for| a this he said that if I y I af Rollox, the lone slip, bu nue 1e Weekes-Lucas part-
j ° ; the first instalment of the diary] American election campaign i uXp OSLON balls later Taylor hit ou iy rship ving already put on ah
trike to go to press is required accord-} not been in progress in 1948 h aaa sasy Catch to Pairaudeat even 100 in 95 minute With the
, | mod i: ; ee Bye Jiketion.. Vinnal p an easy catch to Paira Bed Te sa ‘ne’ Han
9 ing to the reports would have sent Justice it i : aria Taylor had sen at the core at 214 Trim with the new
| Le 7 * : | ar sé. and ay b MICHIGAN, Feb 16 cover aylor had been a 1
I F | Giuliano fled, leaving behind) to talk with Stalin and ma; \n explosion ripped apart wicket for 33 minutes and ball made one swing in Ms pop
| > ages f his iary. Since then,! that would be the thing to d n KX S10) : . Pace i ‘ y : s ‘otal was| Sharply and Weekes who rac
pages of his diary. } ; bifttdine ¢ 5 tis »} scored 13. The Barbado: ta as |
n rance journalists who have gained; sometime, on a ae iepdaty kiitos then 18—1 ‘shaped for a scoring stroke put
\ 2 access to his closely-guarded | There were angry exchanges] ‘ hemical 4 ompany a illing| A double change that brou up an easy return to Trim. Weekes

PARIS, ‘Feb. i “kingdom” have reported that he/ between the correspondents a) Ue ene Soa we poms j} on medium fast bowler Thoma was at the wicket for 1382 minutes

All workers in the Ford Fac- had been writing hard, preparing‘ Truman over his exclusive int A Dow Company official said the screen end for Trim ana 5! to score 82 in well timed strokes
tory at Poissy, near Paris, total- other data.-—Reuter. ! view with the New York 7 r hat six to eight more workers! left.arm Rollox at the pavili all around the wicket, He hit nine
ling about 6.000 went on “unlim- When ~ correspondent: how¢ vere injured in the shattering for Gaskin saw no chang: ¢ urs in his innings. i Weekes

, jited” strike to-day. Their decis- ————___— | their discontent that the Pre last | slow rave of scoring alti fourth wicket partnership with
ion, taken after a meeting in | dent had made important state- The explosion blasted the roof,| Walcott and Mershall:< | Lucas put on.a valuable 124;
HP . _— ance eT, the’ courtyard of the factory - ¥ } ments of policy to th ind one wall of a building | M 7 1 I ; vith | ee | ( B. Willian who partnered
i. PRINCES, SE, C 288 2, W yas yesterday : i : ie ents : 7 ke z ; | boundary Ww slegant 3 Hams who pa
Ralled as Ghancelion ie ee ot sr ea oY he eee which turns out 100 cars a day d vrecu | correspondent of one newspaper Dow Company officials said they; irives and once Marshall | th but he nl urvived two balls
: verer rr ae ° ~" Twas in protest against the dis- ? instead of to the White Hous lid not yet know the cause of neatly through the slips for four. | from Trim he eut at the third ball,
Ce missal notice to 180 workers fol- In A nton Press correspondents collectively he explosion Reuter The first fifty came -after n|a fast -outswinger that: took the
lowing the “go slow” demonstra- E the President replied with some | hour and seven minutes of play | edge and Rollox at. second slip
Ty . ‘ tion yesterday. ; heat that the President was } and when the luncheon interval} held a smart cateh to dismiss him
ue Police lé . . 2 : HONGKONG, Feb. 16 free agent s » . | was taken the pre-lunch play of | for “a duck.”
Guard \\) ante oviet They also claimed immediate] geyen Nationalist secret agents! y,. President also turned | Korean I resident 1S minutes had vielded 6{.'ru Pata ompleted his. individual
, ° if grant of a bonus of 3,000 Francs.| were executed at Canton yes-| down efforts by correspondents | mn Roy Marshall was 30 not out and| half century in three hours and
ze k Unconscious ; Saint Nazaire om oe no | terday, a pro-Communist Chin- to obtain his endorsement for | In lokyo Walcott 17 not out twelve minutes after S long
ep 1c Aa slow rae ae ae ete newspaper here. reported to- such world government _ pro- ine a Walcott Oui ojourn in the forties. = oe
oading by troops yesterday ay. 0sals as the “Atlantic Union’ TOK , Fe 16 Tr ash ame on first after | included but two fou er this
IN BELIZE war material from the. ee < This is believed to be the first tin now being discussed by| Syngman Rhee, President ot Ph ica y ined Watcott | Lucas brightened up and attacked
Pe mos Advocate co In W. Africa ship “Empire Marshal, “ a a mass execution carried out by Congress committees as a mean:|/former ly American-occupied wicket with his second ball \ | the bowling. He was missed at 63
ese ee . dockers had refused to handle.} ip, Communists since the Peking of removing the threat of hydr--} Southern Korea, arrived in Tokyo} fust inswinger well up.to the bats- | when he cut at one from Camacho
*MIZE, Feb, 16. - 3 Government was set up. *n bomb warfar —Reuter, ‘ cs re ay vi 1 man eritian Tale irive but | wide of the wicket and Christiani
AD ‘C : ‘or "el acaues Chastell: n- s gen bomb warfare today for a three day visit tc an enticed Walcott to drive it
, Was quiet all day gg Scene _M. Jacques oe), Most other, prisoners have & pee ae alata airs a = ae si het thal eee ake the | failed to hold a simple catch at
n the _ queht's clashes the Nationalist Sromtalinn Shen me gg or Sau tatbnaciots oes to] merely been submitted to courses . | ‘to reach a common understand-j centre and leg stumps j Bully , '
efiel on raed rae ple’s Party “admitted in court here strike tiie Tn a broad-j}of Communist doctrine, pr PAINTER FOUND DEAD }ing with Japan in the face of A single run had been added to } m: we of way, toons = Sut a 4
en orum = Chair- ews: F “1Ke x ; . .|tive of the nature of their | > ‘ " i * | the seore but Walcott had not vet/ 6/5 Lucas being 65 not out anc
actar . é é lanned to],, > sai e two-hou ‘ . growing Communist expansion. re Sco! \ F ,
en a” cove eeiblish's “West Afr on Soviet | C28! ge aftieen” called by the| offence. The seven executed LA PAZ, Boliy%, Feo. 16 |” President Syngman Rhee flew] increased his pre-lunch score of Atkinson 12 not out
ese Should ‘not sing Republic”. including the Gold | tik nist led “C.C-T.” for purs+| Yesterday were described us Cecilia Guzman de Rojas, 50-| 14 Tokyo in the personal plane of |
S America when | *6pubiic”, Com nunis “C.C.T. members of an “Overseas Youth yéar-old Bolivian painier, was! * ; MeArthut
ice arriv. ' Coast. ly political motives. rae ae z 3 General Douglas rthu }
then attives and in- He is on trial here with twelva|~ ! —Reuter, | Organisation”, who had been found dead yesterday under mys- Sapreme Allied Comihander ir
Oy 2. that under the other meiibers of the party on a found guilty of “violating the}terious circumstanees on the iden. Hak abtuite or vention -t/.S. i
? t he ca t speak vers . oe 4 : ; r socia ” : oom a Paz : Saja b¢ 1 squi ,
the Gover; ; aro aon charge of inciting a riot by “posi- revolutionary social order. - highway between La Paz and ( al gave the presidential party a 21
People by iment, tive action” —Reuter. {acoto, a La Paz suburb.—(C.P.) gift’ salute..Weanae '
esieged the house i , : . é oii . ,
e@ Speaker fie : Nkrumah also admitted that he .
B Sticks and boule Wi? | nad declared a “sit at home| Prince Bernhard |
With police who 8 enti sirike, non-co-operation and a 1 WIL [ GET - WASHINGTON, Feb. 16.

Gear the streets with tear | boycott < Briton” Cae ae Decorated ‘Churehill Prepares Hugh Stewart, Oil Director in the Department of the In-
8, ’ r month.—Reuter. ‘ é 7 , 7 7 ; ; Tlnj
PMOWd dispersed RIO DE JANEIRO, Feb. 16 INA terior, said to-day he was hopeful that current Anglo-Unitesd
ne? hry ple when the Prince Bernhard of the Nether- No EF B oad t States oil talks here would result in a “mutual understanc-

n Smith, ; © Leader Hon . . | iands, who arrived here on holi- or r cas ing” on oil policies
“Ppeare or the é day las i ay y on n ‘ppe | ce ; ri » a Can
appealed to them 4 Hedler s Acquitta a idet {'nrieo Dutra the Grand NEW YORK, Feb. 16. The report added that oat | LONDON, Feb. 16 He was oottyiog ies a Con-
’ residen regi ible information” in Eastern Eu- | . ; 4 ; : gressional Sub-Committee on
: sion at] The New York Times said to- ,si L ae . ’ shill’s vate Sec-
mo also the sole polic Condemned Ss Hocienai's ceteones eent in} day that before the new Russian- _— quate me naeneethot | renee ees report m4 Petroleum Pik fee ‘ete
“overnment House w ; ‘Ne Dri Bernhard! Chinese 30-year treaty was signed|Mao an nis Foreign ster | iti Leeder © had r te Back Stewart said the talks fol $
1 ro F the Rio Hills, Prince Bernhai 3 . 7 En-le sho headed the |that thé Opposition Britain's oposed restricvions on
UWconscious 9 CFU *b, 16. f ; ; ae sday, munist leader|]Chou En-Lai, who heac ritain's proposec ‘
om a Sane TI Seteta taken «G ate received Brazil's —— om Tho lertRing reported to | Chinese Delegation in the Moscow Pp se St. li i t United States oil imports to the
Bt doing See oe elie today protested] tion, the Grand Order of the have agreed to give Soviet-nom-| negotiations, had gained import. | Mr, 7 oe — oF nally To Normal sterling area, wouid likely be con-
* tne age < a a) S y san : areal 5 Ss * " asr0’ vain!
hight the audience ‘at the {against the acquittal by a\Germen | Southern Cross. Reuter {inated advisers key positions is ant bargaining points from the reat nie Sets Sie tox ‘ tinted into ne xt ae ee
Consumers’ Co-one... | cour ‘he former Bundesta,' ae ina's Army, secret police an ussians. j prep : oie . “The real effect of the §
Ping Drigumers’ Co-opera- | court of _vhe ieee a ! re ot Party It said that during the early | morrow night, He is in the best TRIESTE, Feb. 16 action is not yet) well: understood,
Chai € meeting ignored | deputy, ee re wt tard The report contained in a Paris stages of the talks, which lasted |of health,” the eee, i Cridetd. snuiiivessias: “ite .| nor is there any finality about it”
Save Tequest to sing The Landtag resident, i re a f , 's|two months, Russia demanded full| Throughout the nigh re rieste’s mit i x ‘apap hs
the ; i eic nalinks > . ispatch from the newspaper's , Alt > o to-day af
e ny King and quietly | Stang, was applauded when a Communist: csc C. S. Sulderzer, | control of seven Yellow Sea ports | were rumours that Churchill had} oe aoe tis on wali “Tam hopeful that.ollt’o® these
Mt, 260 WE by othe | said Hedler’s behaviour in court , 4 a. 6 ted to|—-Dairen, Port Arthur, Chinwang-| been taken ill and Conservative| a r Stiri 7 rae discussions will come some real
a es . ‘ Hitler when he ° . said Mao was also repor airen, ‘ Pang- | -a e inun-| shopkeepers and “middlemen” in scuss
Ms ren. reminded him of Hit ey CC th Police re & i reluctantly to supply |tao, Hiaichow, Chefoo, Wihaiwi ! Party Headquarters wer t . |} understanding on the part of the
Teported | 2 , i 192 ne verdict had as have agreed reluctantly PP’ 4 la +] all ympathy with 30,000 industrial ; : han
; py .Reuter’s | was tried. in 1924. The verdict 4 0 1 labourers}and Tsingtao |dated with telephone calls. ’ ke | British and Ametiean Companies
: ry at the angry | amazed the German people, ~ NICE, Feb. 16 aa Sepeeg oe oe aa | —Reuter, | workers who have been on strike |! id’ Government representatives
eelors y at tn aie * 4 ; a D. 16 rom China to Siberia on a con- . of . : ted | fince February 2 for cost of liv-|2 : . +
w ant to sing | said . ; . Z aei ened icils ¢ Satellite sources had repartec since rua “ “ h we can move forward
a Ame vhen Prin- i ‘Within minutes of, Hedler’s ac- J Communists apy an ght at basis under 'sectét codicils to that the obstinacy of Mao and ing «llowances., a ‘a at pbasible damage to
ee min * ttn dine, re tonigt > treaty. = , : cal ate i he waited th t i Bs .
May | Shere next | quittal yesterday, thé Social Dem- peace ee a ‘adie wo te treaty }Chou had forced the Kremlin to | REDENTIALS The industrial workers ha our common good and future
Med .., WiSpersed to-day | o¢ratic leader, Kurt Senne | oF than ‘ ae menscer: Oe suffering A “sizable proportion” of is |modify these demands. PRESENTS Cc +] announced they will on strik security
fant 3 ; ; : “dis. » hospit and é ‘ “un Reales tne ‘ é } t . >» meet t det
Oot police with] idemned the decision as : di 7 . oe < cneunities themselves. | contingent was yanderstood to have Chinese delegates were unde PARIS. Feb. 16 | ing ill employers meet te + 3 He added that there was some
gusting ey nad | six minor Cé ot ‘ sas ndjleft China already, it added. jstood cn the eve of» the treaty ; A te. the new! mand. Small industrialists ave l nonce among oil. producers in
f ‘ ‘ ’s|The police used tear ga nd } le! ) , } ' . ; Hector A. Madero, the new . : .
fe strator ere | found tex i a ose ae , big age the 1,500} The correspondent said that! conclusion, to have expressed dis- Denes Ar bassador to France.| 287e¢ed to pay them 56-lire a th i States that the British
“s peech could not be ; Auer aon ig wie te de n-|specific indications had reached | satisfaction with what they inte ee es ted: h redential ost of living bonu a estrictio ild result in. im-
} archer : Te iv io . Pari that ecret odicils to the! prete R ; fort te > en : roy ‘Re subli e or 60 € | rhe ere af il produced by
; ' Sets at new tre ne eer 4BNCG re- } fringe RT is - = 7 were ers re - it ted State companies abroad.
; a ssieeacieeal | presentative f the tw sovern-' the re inus peat \uriol ioe —~Reuter. | ~( Reuter.)
H t ee R ‘ ments er
« ‘ Reuter.) ' police jeep.—Reuter.




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-—

PAGE TWO



“Caib Calling

OUSANDS turned out to History of Barbados !
witness- the second Colony R. C. GLINDON REED. Di-
match between British Guiana rector of Education will pre-
and Barbados which opened yeS- side over the fifth lecture in the
terday at Kensington. Both the series on the History of Parbados
George. Challenor and the Ken- given by Mr. H. A. Vaughan, at
eee pies oe eenacalealy the British Council Heady iarters
dressed and the Gents looking i. this evening at 8.15
very. -smart themselves. The &
George Challenor Stand was
erowned with the B.G. colours, a
green flag with the B.G. crest.
done in i in the centre, flap-
‘in



That Slip of Paper

T IS now getting to the stage
e strong breeze. where everyone is walking

Besides cricket however as is around with a littie slip of paper
always the case when such large folded neatly in their wallets or in
crowds gather together there were their pockets with sixteen names
spots of humour during the day’s written on it.
play. Meet anyone and start a con-
The Biscuit Man was once more versation, sooner or later. your
heard and very seldom seen. He hand will stray into your wallet
had a new fanfare yesterday for out comes the bit of paper, and
any bowler who had a four hit off both of you will probably simul-
him. A little “ditty” which has taneously say—“Have you picked
been chanted..by many West In- your side for England yet?”

when*thte bowling is parti- Pe) “s
cula »—“Bowler come
from Sugar Hill,” blown with Overheard
great ‘his trumpet
we as , j HIS story was overheard in the
eg Square yesterday as two old
Will Live Here ladies surveyed Trafalgar Square
_E. Ae JAMIN, former- with its many new Traffic signs.
ly a director of Pegasus One said, “But Mary, why they

got all dese rock stones lying in
tne Square so?” The other replied,
he has come. to live and has “It mus’ be on account of the
brought along his wife. They are housing shortage, may be they
at present staying at the Marine going start building houses *pun
Hotel. top dem!”

Mr, Benjamin was last here in ay
1947—48. when he spent three : as
months 6n business. Their daugh- First Visit
ter Gillian who is now at Bad- R. GERALD BLANCHARD,
mington, a—-girls’ public school Manager of the grocery de-
near Bristol, expects to join them partment of Peter and Co., Cas-

Textiles Ltd: London, England, is
now back in Barbados. This time

sometime in September. tries, St. Lucia, arrived here re-

eee > cently by B.W.LA. on his first visit

. . to the island and is staying at the
Leaving Today Cosmopolitan Guest House.

ETURNING to Trinidad to- He told Carib that he is very
day is Mr. Oliver Thompson, much impressed with the island
Transport Contractor, of Trinidad, and is enjoying his holiday.
who is staying at the Hotel Royal. «> «>
He arrived here earlier in the
week ‘by the B.W.I.A. as Man-
ger of the emateur boxers, who
took part in the tournament
which ended at the Modern High Secty., of Pitcher, Connell and Co.,

School on Wednesday .
Mr. Thompson is also a mem- left saci Wednesday by B.W.LA. for
: ‘- three weeks’ holiday in Trinidad.
ber of the Amateur Boxing As~ g) i he stevia’ ait. Ne
jation of Trinidad. cin eae ree Va vas
soc: daughter Mrs. Donald Allcroft who
ne lives in Point-a-Pierre. Her hus-
band is with T.L.L. there,

«> «>»

For Three Weeks
RS. WARREN, wife of Mr.
Sydney Warren, Manager

Attended Cricket
R. RUPERT CROWE, Archi-
tect and Builder of Trini-
dad, left earlier in the week by
B.W.IvA, for Grenada after a
short holiday. While here he at-
tended Dart of the cricket games
at Kensington He was staying
at Indramer Guest House, Wor-
thing.



Married in Boston
R. ahd Mrs. George Jost, who
were married in Boston on
Feb. 12th, arrived here un Tuesday
by B.W.1.A. and are spending their
honeymoon at the Crane Hotel.
They expect to be in Barbados for
two weeks. Mr. Jost is Travelling

& “2 Representative of Messrs, Can-
a ; adian Industries Ltd.
Winding Up Holiday <> P
ISS -DOREEN RODRIGUES,
M Civil Servant of Georgetown, To Bathsheba For Two
British Giflaffi, is now in Barba- Months

dos ‘winding -up her six months’

holiday, the majority oa R. AND MRS. E. P. MASSON,
spent 'in-SteDucia. She arrive accompanied by their daugh-
on Sunday by-B.W.1.A. and will ter Betty arrived on Wednesday

be here uhtfl the end of the month »y BWIA. for a couple of
as a guest of Mr. and Mrs. T. months’ holiday. They will be
A. Wason of Deacon’s Road. staying at “High Winds”, Bath-
«» «> — Dr. Masson is Medical
: be upt., of the Mental Hospital in
Paid Short Visit Trinidad, ,
R. ALPHONSO DE LIMA, «> “2

Director. of Y. De Lima and
Cc Ltd,,..jewellers of Trinidad
and Barbados, returned to Trini-
dad by B.W.LA. on Wednesday
after a short visit to the island.

Comings and Goings

M* and Mrs. Owen Boyce and
two children have arrived

He was staying at the Hastings in Barbados to spend a short holi reer Se ee
Hotel. day. Mr. Boyce is Manager of
“s < Canning & Co, Ltd, San Fernando SAT. 18th
Branch ‘
Uncanny ae tee ccs ae ADAM'S LOBE
XPERTS at the London Zoo Mr. Charles Peirce of James A. RIB

have been puzzled by twe Lyrch & Co. Ltd., left yesterday

frogs which have been sent to the by B.W.I.A, on a short visit to
Zoo as a gift from Mrs. J. E. Antigua,

Risdon of Plantation Diamond, *

British Guiana. They have been so

unable to identify the species Mr. Robert M. Jones of R. M.
“They are plainly tree-frogs,’ Jones & Co., Ltd., and Mrs. Jones

left yesterday by B.W.LA., to
Rpm el je get ag ger spend a holiday in Cuidad, Tru-
behi them, one can clearly see a Seal. their daughter Mrs,
the bones and digestive organs— ~ ;
it’S quite uncanny.” The frogs are
feeding on small sand flies. They
cam jump 2{t at a bound. Perhaps Mc & Co.

Enearney Lta.,

to enlighten the Zoo authorities. B.W.1.A., for Trinidad.



Madame Bromova

(By a Special Correspondent)

The beginning of 1945 is quite
a way back. World War II was in
its closing stages, and we had yet
to experience the release and
joy of giving vent t» pent up
emotions which found universai
and spontaneous expression in
the celebrations of V.E. and VJ.
days. But this is not a War
story—far from it. 1945 means
very little to us all now, but may—
be it will attain significance as
marking the birth of a new en-
terprise in this our small island
community.

The fact is that in 1945, an
increasing bustle of activity and
a new excitement could be oo-
served in and about the Aquatic
Club on Saturday mornings and,
on occasions, during week days,
in the neighbournood of certain
of our institutions which are nor-
mally devoted to the: initiation
of the young idea into the myste-
ries of the three R’s.

As the weeks and months pass-
ed the contagion spread, and soon
it appeared that a new element
was creeping into the life of the
community, particularlyson those
festive occasions with which our
calendar of public events is 80
liberally sprinkled, when all con-
cerned are bent on en nment
and the sponsors of charitable
appeals reap the harvest of dol-
lars which means so much, not
only to the sponsors, but also to
those who in age, sickness or
other adversity are less well
endowed than others with the
necessities of life.

Thus in 1946 was gathered the
first fruits of this new growth,
the occasion being a garden
party in Government House
grounds, where, in the presence ot
His Excellency the Governor and,
his lady, some 600 guests were
charmed and entertained in a
truly rustic setting to the strains
of sweet music, provided by the
rejuvenated Police Band, under
its then new conductor.

Early 1947 produced the second

bumper crop from this steadily
a



THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Takes A Bow

























FOUR of Madame Bromova’s pupils in a Mexican Dance which was
performed in one of her past shows which have been so successful.

thriving plant. The scene en this
occasion was the Empire Theatre,
once more restored to the use for
which it was originally intended.
The Royal Box filled again witn
its rightful occupants and distin-
guished *guests from a visiting
ship of H.M, Navy, and an audi-
ence where white tie and _ tails
and exquisite gowns with the
eee paraphernalia of fem-
inine charm and ut redom-
inated. Yes, that wie a 188 letter
occasion,

ment of a proper and recog-
nised syllabus of training
in the dance and the ballet

art. ,
(b) “The first fruits etc.” are
the many delightful per-
formances with which
Madame Bromova and her
talented pupils and students
have delighted not only
their audiences, but have
also richly supplemented
the funds of many of our
island charities, and
“The bumper crop” is the
recital which is to be given
at the Empire Theatre on

This tender plant, which has ce)

been so skilfully nursed and

n , continues to grow and
TT spread. From time to time since — ere ae
POCKET CARTOON 1947, blossoms have appeared,
and many of us have savoured Thus has been born an -enter-

Mr. Charles MacKenzie, of Chas.
n J and
Mfs. Risdon would be good enough Mrs. MacKenzie, left yesterday by

hy OSBERT LANCASTER

and enjoyed their fragrance and
beauty. Now it can be said that
the plant has passed its adoles-
cence and reached the first stage
of a full maturity. This year, in

| fact, very soon, we may expect
to see a bumper crop reaped, and
the fruit will be there for all who
wish to take a share.

And now to translate all this
into practical realities. It is all
quite simple.

(a) 1945 — is the year when
Madame Anna Bromova (a
former member of _ the
Imperial Russian ballet--
but a Scotswoman arrived
in Barbados and laid the
foundation for the esvablish-



is



“So 1 looked her straight m
the eye and said: ‘Trudi
isn’t it rather extraordinary
that the main fuse should just
happen to blow out exactly
‘wo minutes before Mr,
Churchill was on the air?

eR RR eA ET

LAZM VYHZ GR

CROSSWORD »

. Cryptoquote:

OPEN



(9)
the

; heart.

1. The sign of a contrite heart.

i. you may, ony eae P
ance of 80) .

10, Turn ou wouldn't take on the

red. (5)
11. Praise in return, (4)
12. As you see this word is across,

7)
14. It 1# naturally palmed, (4) .
17. When cars smash you get this
aki Sompang. (3)
19, ny. bs
20. What the Boarlet Pimperne!
said after “1 will.” (5)
21 Almost alike as two peas, (7) ‘ rr :
23. Talk at large, (3) “Jokes”’—By Freeman
94. Dashing sort of wave but not &

THEATRE

EVERY

TONITE at 8.30 LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
8 NEW STARS—PICK YOUR WINNERS

Plus:

A MUSICAL C. B. (Count) BROWNE EVENING

and his FULL ORCHESTRA

PROGRAMME :

(2) “A Dreamer’s Holiday’—Slow Fox Trot

prise, which in addition to being
a boon from the entertainment
oint of view, is performing a
valuable service in the communi-
ty, especially in the field of the
mental, physical and _ cultural
development of ever growing
numbers of the younger genera-
tion

But this Is not the whole
story. At present it is a private
enterprise. What of to-morrow’
Where will it lead? In another
article, which will appear short-
ly, we will consider the goal
towards which further progress
might well be directed, and how
that goal may be achieved.

CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it:
AXYDLBAAXR
LONGFELLOW

One. letter simply stands for another
for the three L's, X for the two O’s, ete. Single letters apos>
trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints.
Each day the code letters are different

In this example A is used

A Cryptogram Quotation

RENGRIGZX EVV

GNR OAEQT GR QZTYHZX—OYQMZGVVZzZ.

WHAT: A STUPID THING
OLD MAN LEARNING AN ALPHABE .s



!—MONTAIGNE.

Reetires vw

nAinota



KIDDIES
CARNIVAL

NITE



The Theme Song—‘“I’m feeling sentimental over you”

(1) “Let’s Start” (it’s Jump)—Composed & arr. by C. Browne

with Thompson at the Mike

“T can’t give you anything but love.”

permanent one. (7) (4) irvan Cadogan—(on tenor Sax.)+
Down
w Look For Men |» jy2xitvorues
. The tur . 5) Charmer—* > fi vi armer”
y ; % is far fies CB) ar ee (5) Charmer—‘“In the field with the farmer”.
LONDON, (By Mail) be the feature of the dinner here. (3) ad a, (6) Johnson’s Rag—‘Freddie goes to town on alto Sax
Spring fashions will not be © jacket. & pele aise. aw 7) The Irresistabl ar
sailieins mmanapoly this year s ieee ae raky. (6) (7 re Irresistable Milton Quartette
British tailors are preparing a Squared shoulders and exag-| ® formes a which you an (8) Freddie Goddard—Alto Sax—‘Stardust” ¢

new look fér males but without gerated drape are definitely out

the leg and shoulder revealing Men’s spring fashions will be “a
“sensations” featured in the Paris la naturelle” and allow men to
and London collections for women. drop the impression that they

British fashion expert
Taylor indicated that the fashion- muscle-building gadgets.
able gentleman of 1950 will have

John are posing for advertisements for

Taylor calls all this the Ed-

. (4)

.| 9. A word that everybody 1s be-
inning to allow. (3)

18, You'll find a pear in plunder. (6)

15. A large number left the angler
out of range. (5)



narrow to wr
9)

clothes.
to be noticed when

off the surface. (3)
——e

18. A long,
of one’s
22. One point






a waist — despite the fact that wardian look—a return to grand- eo” -_”
their wives and sweethearts are pa’s hey-day — with fancy and goiution esterday’s puztic.—Actoss.
beginning to lose theirs again in coloured waistcoats. 5 Tine, § Binae & talince: % Boe
the 1920 look. “But,” warned Taylor, “you | 17 Rears: 19. id; 21. Nio, 22. Emu: EXTRA:
‘ ; : , 3° Pore: 25° Rumble: 26 Proper, 27.

Trousers. will be narrower, won't see it walking down the | ant, Down: & Ol; 5. tnured; 4 Geese:
jackets skirted at the hips, and street yet—it is coming gradual- | 3. Hu; 6, Tevere rump 14 eet TICKETS ON
the American “shawl” collar will ly.”—(LN.S.) fe. sours ie Siren: ad. wule; 24 Oya PRICES :



Everything
to SUIT you

Sir !
TROPICALS

FOUR INTO ONE
6.72—6.83—6.88—7 08

ali at 6.235

\
\
For a limited time only!

RVANS & WHITPIELDS

Dial 4606 Dial 4220
BROAD ST.








|
x
Sole Selling Agent for Ry
MEN'S AVENUE SHOES |'|%
$14.40 per Pair x






1M
a
16. | race among the heaths. (5) *

AND

We Offer

66666665605



20;

PARTITIONS ®

ALUMINIUM CORRUGATED SHEETS
Lengths 6 ft., to 10 ft., width 2 ft.

KARLIT INSULATING WALL BOARD
Lengths: 6 ft. to 10 ft; Width: 4 ft.

KARLIT HARDBOARD
Lengths: 6 ft., to 8 ft., width 4 ft.

GALVANIZED B.R.C.
Lengths: 8 ft., and 9 ft., width 2 ft., 24 gauge.

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LIMITED.

DIAL 2039

(Extensive range playing)

(9) “The Bells of St. Mary (By special request)

(10) Dennis Peters (Guitar) —“It’s been a long long time”.
(11) Alfred Prescott (on trumpet)—“Harlem Heat”

(12) “Samba Street—Composed & Arranged by Basie

(18) “Diesel Engine Lady Shaw’—Calypso by special request

“Chinese Children calling me daddy”

SALE TONITE
36; 48; 60.



EXPANDED METAL

$$$SS$S66*4 <
\ SOSsS PPP VV Se ee yr ere eee FSO OOOO OSS OOS SCSOSS

SUN. 19th
°



| January
Mayfair.
gant ghost,

Fashion.

Fas

rivals Paris,

aga

an

Bloused at the back; 3,

seennioeeninseeinsaetiar eee | Starring
Monte HALE, Adrian BOOTH
Guide To
Housewives | OLYMPIC

completely as
although the c
the accessories are not.

The Accessories

Briefly—the new accessories are
r hats worn on one

big, flat sailo c
§ one-sided caps trim-

side, or tiny,
med with long feathers.
leather belts
string, and pate’
shoes. Chiffon se
the waist. White
shantung, and tie-
orate breast pockets.

Anyone with
fill in the ghost’
these details.
jacket lines; 7

The Ghost Walk:

By Anne Edwards

EVERY year around the end of
a ghost walks through
She’s an extremely ele-
dressed six months
ahead of style, and she haunts the
salons of our Top Ten dress-de-
signers.

For the ghost is the New Spring
And the New Spring
Fashion is a dreadful secret which | ankles, and buttoned or bowed at
no one reveals to anyone until the
buyers (American for preference)
have had their pick—lest manu-
facturers have the clothes copied
cheaply before the exclusive orig-
inals are in the shop.

We saw the opening of London’s
the week that
the week of two
shows per day—one for each of
our best ten designers.

hion Week,

Robb and I saw the ghost walk
has drawn her as
he is allowed. For,
Jothes are secret—

in. Robb

For

d short,

Today’s Prices



as narrow as a shoe-
nt-leather court
arves tied round
blouses in linen,
silk, with elab-

nd sight can
s clothes a
daytime—three
Tailored, fitted,
about hip-length; 7;

seco!



0 f
;



Bleeding Gums,

| Te eth mean tht oe
| Trench Mouth or verhap,
that will sooner or later

and Heart ‘Trouble cause
bleeding the firg
and quickly ti
guarantee. Am

Again

§
=
£
°
Cc
5
mn
3
a
g

ets, caught in round the hip with
| one button.
| All the skirts are tight, plain,
land straight, with one flap pleat
| at the back. |
For evening—three skirt lines:
/1, Short frock, with handkerchief
points, usually in tulle; 2, Long
skirt with a double tier—in lace;
|}3, Tightly swathed from waist to

money back on
age. Get Amosan fro

Amosan






—







whe back—in brocade.

—TnE
BIGGEST

—LESS.
















ROWVAL Worthings

Opening To-Night at 8.30 p.m.
M.G.M.’s Master Piece
Lassie IN
“HILLS OF HOME”
with

Eimond GWENN, Tom DRAKE
Donald CRISP, Janet LEIGH
Drama, Action, Thrills, Romance.

It's The Best Week-End show.

at ROYAL

Saturday Night at 8.30 p.m.

“THE COLLEGE HERALDS”
CARIBBEAN TRAINING COL-
LEGE MALE OCTENITE in a Pro-
gramme of Spirituals and popular
Songs Assisted by SEDRIC PHIL-
LIPS with Miss VERNA REID at
the piano.

it

Patent-



ROXY

To-morrow Night & Mon.
7.30 p.m.

at

Republic Action Packed Double
Lynne ROBERTS, Donald BARRY
Warren DOUGLAS

in :
“LIGHTNING IN THE FOREST”

“CALIFORNIA FIREBRAND”

Box jack-



To-Morrow Night at 9 p.m.

20th. C-FOX Presents:
Tyrone POWER, Gene TIERNEY



For Pyorrhea—trency,














M

have Pel ay
Cause _
ble. Amosar,

it day tony








~


























COCcOA— an io
Essence ....-- 38c. per lb. fon oF FURe

TEA— Monday Night at 9 p.m.
Loose . 7T4c. per Ib. “SAVAGE STALLION”

ean? with

OIL— : Peggy COMMINGS
Bdible........... 24c. per pint Charles COBURN

LARD—











Wednesday Night at 9 p.m.
“GUADALCANAL D1ARY”
William BENDIX, Preston FOSTER

(Velvo Kris) 5lc. per lb.
Locally Manu-
factured .... 44c. per lb.





\
ij



if
Sys oy sO PTT T SPOTS TOTO SD TTT OTTO TTP PEO PPP PPE EEO.
é ROOFS mz








SS
|









FRIDAY & SUNDAY 8.30 p.m.

PARAMOUNT presents - - -
ALAN LADD as

“THE GREAT GATSBY ”

With a host of Favourites

DIAL 8404 FOR RESERVATION











Marion Ma f
Rand Sha
William Net
HOWARD Kings

nduced














AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT (FRIDAY), SUNDAY, TUESDAY & THURSDAY
NIGHT at 8.30
UNIVERSAL presents - - -

DEANNA DURBIN — DICK HAYMES — VINCENT PRICE
in “UP IN CENTRAL PARK”

.
TO-DAY 230 PM, t
and the Magnificent Music of SIGMUND ROMBERG %

Continuing





EMPIRE, TH

INDIA’S PRIME
JAWAHAREL }

IN f

“ASIA’S NEW |

(A MARCH OF
SU

Enjoy yourself and assist a Deserving Cause

2 HOURS OF FUN & FASHION

At the

GLOBE

: on TUESDAY Feb. 21st.
in a GORGEOUS CABARET & MANNEQUIN SHOW
Beautiful Models in 5th Avenue Outfits
— in aid of —
The ST. THOMAS’ & ST. PHILIP’S WELFARE CLINICS
Reservations made according to a PLAN arrangement.
PRICES :—Orchestra & Circle $1.00; Balcony 72c. & 48c.
TICKETS Sold DAILY 9 a.m. — 4 p.m.















The wiring division of our Electrical Service Department has
been recently re-organized, and-is now in a better position
than before to undertake all kinds of Electrical House, Fa¢-
tory and Commercial Wiring and Installations, ete.

Your patronage is solicited and all orders attended to

promptly. All work fully guaranteed.

MANNING & Co., Ltd

Electric Service Department.






ets

120,000 |
Bigamous
_ Britons

LONDON, (By Mail) |
js booming in Britain. |
‘acations have proved that |
marriages are more}
ean in Britain than any other |
ean country. It is estimated
“sre are 20,000 undiscovered |

eee

a3



mous

ory.
ae wil not make any
to uncover these illicit mar-
< and it is only when some |
mes suspicious and!
over the records that a
marriage is discovered.
ences against these mar- |
discovered, according |
jmates, are between 20 |
to 1. It is believed that |
bigamy case which |
re the courts, there are |
90 which remain ‘undis- |
























































set House, Britain’s
where all details of
irths and deaths, are
automatic check is
match details of current
with those which have

$

Discovery

LONDON, (By Mail)

A discovery worth $25,000 has!
been made by a London whole-
sale stamp dealer.

While sorting through his stock
| of the Universal Postal Union 75th
anniversary issues for the Aden
Dependency of Shihr and Mu-!'
kalla, O. W. Lempert, of War-|
dour-street, found a sheet with-|
out the normal surcharge of “y}
rupee.”

Only one sheet of many thous-
ands sold had missed the printing

cl an for the Registrar
eral’s Office, said :
The system is not intended to
bigamies.”
mi so thousands of illegal
fees will remain unrevealed.
will look at the records
they become suspicious,
experts stated that even |
a ascovered, there still
ouiside chance it will never
%p court, for the difficulties of
bigamy to the satisfactior
judge are many.
Action At Last
at long last something is

; ae machine. Normally the sheet
done by sora eee er to would be worth under $14 but
check .on ‘ this error made the sheet into

ris being discussed by ex-
as of the- Registrar General’s
partment.

a rarity,
Stanley Gibbons, the philatelic

nvisag establishment | @ealer, estimated the sheet was
CS Se dex ‘of the coun-| Worth $25,000 — each stamp
+ 12,000,000 families. Each | Valued at $420. It is possible}
fly would be listed as a unit—| that one stamp will be offered}
mother, and children as | to the King, who like his father

mive, and cross-indexed so | 1S a keen collector.
ould be easy to find out} The Aden and Dependencies

fappened to them for ever

ty

sets were printed in East African
currency of shillings and cents, |
because it was intended that they
should adopt that currency by|
the time that the stamps went]
on sale on Oct. 10, 1949, |

As a result of technical trouble, |
the old currency of rupees and
annas, based on the Indian rate

admit that the index |
pot. bring to light immedi-
‘ of existing bigamous |
es, but as time went on
y would become much more
tilt to practice.

ties prove that four men

woman commits bigamy. of exchange, was retained, The
“sexes are am ae ~ stamps, already printed, were
between 2 and <9, and | surcharged with rupee or anna}
ely to commit it after 60. | values. |
n between the ages of 17 Stamp collectors are already |}

are, six times more likely
it, however, than men
he age. And what hap-
the guilty party is
iit to court?



hunting for the Aden and Depen-
dencies sets, because they were!
withdrawn without notice 10!
days before the scheduled time. |
Stocks in the hands of dealers |
are believed to be very low. |

The price rose from 49 cents|
for each of the three sets to $2.45 |

he!

h.amazing thing,” said
H probation officer, “that
N goes into the dock |

With bigamy, it is usually | ©2¢h in mind condition, with al
fous wife—theoretically | Proportionately higher price for|
fed party—who stands by | Used. Most of the used stamps|
Blicly announces forgive- |@â„¢anate from Aden Town, as
md whether he goes to | Postal communications with the|
or not, remains loyal. | States are extremely bad-

Plegal wife? Usually she —(LN.S)



thing but contempt for the
Diet 9?

@my in Britain is an indict-
ferme carrying a maximum
y of seven years imprison-

t—(LN.S.)

Indo-China Policy
Is The Test Case

BANGKOK, Feb. 16.

Expressions of the United States |
and other western powers’ re-|
Sponsibilities stemming from their |
moral support of Indo-China’s
newly independent states was the |
major southeast Asia political |
issue before the Conference of the
United States Asian envoys which |
ended here tonight. |

It was reliably learned, after |
the Conference, that the envoys |
took particular note of the Siam- |
ese Premier’s failure to gain ma- |
iority support for his proposal to |
the Cabinet that Siam should fol- |
‘ow the western powers lead in
recognising the Governments of
Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos. It
is known with certainty that the
conference accepted that. Siam’s
harontic expression of what is un-
ferstood to be a general mood of
disillusionment spreesing over
South East Asia, was a reminder
‘hat remaining western prestige
| vas likely to stand or fall on the

nergence of a_ positive policy
in the Indo-China test case.

An informed diplomatic source
said that the question of respons-
ibility, erystalised into the simple
proposition of whether or not the
United States would defend with
)®rmed forces the Asian regimes
| coomed to Communist liquidation
if left to their own devices, was
the “dominant thought emerging
} from all but the most hypotheti-
}eal of the discussions”.—Reuter,














Owns 7 Palaces
But Is Not Rich

LONDON, (By Mail).

The 26-year-old Maharajah of
Jodhpur, leaving for India, asked
reporters not to describe him as
one of the wealthiest men in the
world.

“The family owns six or seven
palaces and a few smaller resid-
ences,” he said, “but they are more
of a liability than an asset now-
| adays.”” :

State revenue of Jodhpur is
| $4,200 a year. Now it has acceded
to the Dominioh of India, revenues
are no longer drawn by the
Maharajah who is, however, en-
titled to a State pension not ex-

ceeding $210,000 a year, in addi-
tion to the income from his per-

HAIR is hard-to-manage
Hofloose dandruff, chances
YOu have Dry Scalp
une’ Hair Tonic checks Dry











by supplementing the nat-
P €alp oils. Loose dandruff
and your hair stays

fad well-groomed all d

ay.

Maes : a
Hair Tonic works with
Ht contains no alcoliol

drying ingredients. T:
ae
ne’ Hair Tonic




—(LN.S.)







WELCOMES CHURCHILL'S

f Vasey

ore LONDON, Feb. 15
mie Liberal Party jeader, Clement
Davies in welcoming Winston
Churchill’s proposal for an ap.
proach to Stalin, today said that
thought the Government could







Reuter.



SNow if you send thar sl

| magazines are the “Cinderellas of

sonal fortune. |

SUGGESTION

} ore. |
ntact ali Commonwealth F re- |
ier their attitude vhile
‘ in touch with: President

Y Mons Tt an
MEN TObAY TH Ther think the free coun-
OTHER Kai tonic , tries of Europe would be anxious
dente to join he told reporters.-




eee



Oil Enquiry

NEW YORK, Feb. i6.

The United States Government
has subpoenaed records from two
leading oil companies for an in-
vestigation of “international petre-
Jeum cartel activities” mainly in
the Middle East, according to offi-
cials of the companies concerned,

Socony Vacuum Oil, and Stand-
ard Oil Company (New Jersey)
Officials said that memoranda from
the Federal Trade Commission
came with the subpoenas.

These said the Gommission had}
“instituled an investigation of
agreements entered into by Ameri-
can petroleum companies among)
themselves and with petroleum
companies of other nations and
the relation of such agreements to
the domestic trade in, and prac- |
tices of, the American petroleum ;
industry”. |

Spokesman for the oil compan-!
ies denied that the firms had been |
involved in cartel activities.

Officials of the two oil compan-
ies, who understood that the Gulf}
Oil Corporation of Pittsburgh was |
included in the inquiry said the;
records sought had already been |
made public, many of them before |
various Congressional hearings.

Among records sought by the
F.T.C. were those of the Iraq|
Petroleum Agreement and the |
pact by Jersey Standard andj{
Socony for the purchase of Anglo- |
Iranian Oil Company crude oil.

Middle East oil has been much
in the news, lately, various Ameri- |
can producers criticising imports |
at a time when domestic oil pro- |
duction was being curtailed. |

—Reuter.

Fish Slaps
Parish Mags ©

|

LONDON, (By Mail)
A charge that Britain’s parish



Christian literature” has been |
|levelled by author J. Blair-Fish.
| And backed by the Church}

Assembly, he has started a drive

|for brighter editions. \

What is needed, said Fish, is}
more virile writing. |
“It is better for a church}
magazine to risk being vulgar than)

to be dull and innocuous.” a)
In his book “Better Parish}
Magazines,” published by the}

Church’s own press, Fish slaps |
Britain’s 11,000 church parish|
periodicals as the “dreariest publi-
cations of today.”

The first move
Blair the replacement
parson by a lay editor. |

The vicar, said Blair, is apt to|
be either too erudite or given too;
much to the use of parsonic jargon. |
“Few of the magazines appeal|
the serious reader or are in-
stimulating to anyone
writes.

Critical

The Book is severely critical
of the humbler sort of religious
literature. It employs, according
to Blair, an irritating style ot
writing marked by “excessive
Churchiness.” One great essential
of the parish magazine is that it
should contain real news.

“If an editor cannot find news
for his magazine he had better
give up editing and consult a
psychoanalyst. If Church news
chiefly consists in recording the
names of those who ‘do the altar
flowers’ or take up collections,
the magazine will appear dull and
actually fatuous to others. ’

The book contains many
allusions to clerical editors:

“The style of many clergymen
is anything but felicitous. The
parson is apt to be either too

suggested by!
of the|
!

is

to
tellectually
else,” Blair

erudite for his readers or too
much given to the use of a
‘parson’s jargon’ that puts people
off.”

“Some vicars’ letters are so full
of meat, or savoured with salt
that no parishioner would like to
see them omitted. The majority
seem to be resigned, complaining,
or simply dull.”

The Bishop of London, Dr.
Wand, in strongly recommending
the book, said:

“It is quite possible that many
clergy will challenge the author’s

preference for SOURCES, as
against parsonic phraseology.
7 , —(LN.S.)



May Plead For
Don Juan

MADRID, Feb. 16

| Qbservers here suggested to-
jnight that to-day’s journey to
Rome by Gil Robles, former



Spanish Catholic Leader, was to
| plead the cause of Don Juan,
|claimant to the Spanish Throne,
to the Vatican.

| Robles, political adviser to Don
| Juan, passed through here to-day

by air from Estoril Portugal.
where he in voluntary exile
His trip was linked with the ex-

pected visit to Rome by Don Juan
jand his wife the end of the
| month.—Reuter.

at

ogan in to the Express and wim ten guineas, it

ee




For Carnival

RIO DE JANEIRO, Feb. 16.

Rio is feverishly preparing itself
to turn into a garish wonderland
of noise, light
ation for the carnival which begins
at midday next Saturday.

Ever since New Year’s eve, the
sound of the steady beat of drums
has been rolling down the hill-
sides every night in the sh: nty
towns or “Favellas”, the negro
quarters high up on Rio’s hills,
carnival clubs and samba schools
have been rehearsing for the im-

pending three days and three
nights of mass gaiety. |
Illuminated arches already

spread the capital’s main streets
and monster canvas clowns, and
columbines look down from the
sides of skyscrapers.

In Praca Onze, one of Rio’s main
squares, a replica of a hill complete
with shanty town has been built,
while open air dance floors, band
stands and 40 feet high revolving
towers have been erected in diff-
erent parts of the city. Thirty feet
high pillars flank the great thor-
oughfare, Avenida Rio Branco. |
Illuminated fountains are playing |
an important part which will lend



to the splendour of the night |
Carnival here means more than
Christmas, New Year’s eve and

Easter together. Although it starts
officially on the Sunday before Ash}
Wednesday, people turn up to work
on Saturday morning already
wearing their fancy As
midday strikes, the streets are
transformed with gaily dressed
crowds streaming out of offices
and shops. Business closes down,
The carnival is on

By nightfall Rio is ablaze
light and the crowds have taken
over, Traffic comes to a standstill,
Trams, the only form of transport,
disappear under the mass of col-

dress.

THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

"ll just about pay your fine.”

From Human Skins

with | de



ourful passengers swarming even





25,000 U.S. Govt. Wants | Rio Prepares | R.C. Journalists

Meet In Rome

ROME, Feb. 16,

About 350 Catholic journalists | =â„¢pire. Moreover a specialist in,

from 16 countries will meet to-day

the Catholic Press.

Presided over by Guiseppe Della | comes along.
Torre, President of the Interna- | much chance in the backwoods «f
tional Union of the Catholic Press,| Africa as if he were in London,

they will discuss the theme: “The
Catholic Press in the service of
truth, justice and peace.”

Countries represented are Aus- |

tria, Belgium, China, Egypt, Italy,
France, Germany, Spain, Venezue-
la, Uruguay, Holland, The United
States, New Zealand, Malta Canada,

On the last day of the Congress,
next Monday, the journalists will
visit St. Peters Basillica. An
audience which Pope Pius Twelve
was to have granted to them for
Monday was cancelled because of

his illness. It is hoped, however, |

that he may be well enough to
receive them at the week-end.
—Reuter.



Lampshades Made
















and fantastic decor-| in the great Chancellery Palace, maintain contacts with the top
on Rome’s Capitol Hill for the | ranks of his science in Britain
) third annual 4 day Congress of! and know that he will not be over-

|
|
|






| Colonial
| Se

LONDON, (By Mail)

A scheme under which eventual-
jly some 400 research workers

will be available to work in tne
Colonies has now started and, says
the Colonial Office, anyone in the
Empire who has the right qualiti-
| cations—and they are of a very
high standard—can join in.

With £2,250,006 a year to spend
}on research, the Colonial Office
has tackled the problem podgd by
the fact that in the past brilliant
young research workers have been
reluctant to go out to the Colonies
for a year or two because they
would have lost opportunities of
advancemegi at home, as well as
such things as pension rights and
steady advances in pay.

‘|. The new Colonial Research
Service, dating from January 31,
this year, but with retrospective
— to the beginning of 1949,
creates a service with salary,
terms of service and standaras
comparable to anything in the
| Unitea Kingdom and, for instance,
gives the worker the opportunity
| of earning a continuous pension
: whether he spends all or only part
{of his career in the Colonial





for example, soil research, will

| looked when a

He

top-flight
will have

job

as

under the eyes of the selectors
themselves.
389 Schemes

“Above all we want the young
people to come forward, the
| brilliant “young men,” says a
Colonial Office official. “We want
the people who are prepared to
|put in two or three years’ hard
| work in the colonies themselves.
At the moment there are about
380 research schemes under way |
and so far we have made ten!
senior appointments, about 59}
subsidiary appointments, and wii
| probably appoint about 400 work- |
ers of all kinds during the full)
run of the plan.” |

The work of the
Universities in. Africa,
Indies and the Far
integrated with the service and|
any Colonial workers who fulfil |

the necessary technical qualifica- |



Colonial |
the Wes!
East will be

i tions stand a chance of appoint- |

} ment,
MUNICH, Feb. 16. | Dr. C. F.. Hickling, Fisherie
Isle Knoch, wife of the Buchen- | Research Officer, for instance, is|
wald Nazi Concentration Camp | Planning to find a omnes 20
Commander, is to be mentally for a Malayan Chinese with
examined, London science degree Hickling

She is to be tried in April by
a German court for alleged mur-
r of German camp inmates
Her defence maintains she was
not fully responsible for heF ac-
tions. She was said to have had

lampshades made of her victims

on to the roofs. Fares are rarely | S*ins. —Reuter.

collected and conductors some-
times leave their trams to join in
the fun.

Carnival is the time for a general
easing of everyday restrictions.
One rule, however, is firmly im- |
posed. No spirits may be sold. At
earnival balls you can only buy |
beer or champagne.—Reuter.





Britain Asked |
To Protect Man
In Trinidad |

MONTEVIDEO, (By Mail.)

The American Society for the}
Defence of Democracy has asked;
the British Foreign Minister, Mr.}
Ernest Bevin, not to comply with|
a Venezuelan Government request}
to extradite a Venezuelan exiled}
politico now residing in Port-of-}
Spain, Trinidad,

In a letter sent to Mr. Bevin,}
the Society said that Vincente]
Gamboa, wanted by the Venezue-|
lan Military Junta, would be de-
| prived of his human rights if he
were turned over to the Venez-|
uelan authorities,

“We trust that the historical
British respect for human liber-|
ties will not permit the Violation |
of this elemental right of asylum,”



the note said. —B.U-P



Octopus Attack

|
|
ALGIERS, Feb. 16
A young man fishing nied
water here with a harpoon was
avlacked by an octopus which
he surprised in a hole in a rock.
Held by its tentacles, he suc-
eeded in reaching the beach}
where his friends killed it. |
—Reuter. |

LADIES’)
COATS

en
Sport or Evening Wear

IN



Stripes, Plaids and
Solid Colours

$28.50 each

MODERN DRESS

SHOPPE
Broad St.

Bridgetown \



| sent to blow
| have formed in the Danube caus-

regions
sent to the areas.—Reuter,



Danube Floods
Large Areas

SOFIA, Feb. 16.
troops have been
up barriers which

Bulgarian

| ing the river to flood large areas
| of country.

Following a Cabinet meeting

threatened
are being

all along the

and supplies



10 Killed In
Natal Fracas

DUNDEE, Natal, Feb. 16.
Ten Africans were killed and
nine others seriously wounded in
a fight early today between two
factions of the Mcunu Tribe in
the Dundee Natal District.
Firearms and assegis were used

by beth sides.

The trouble was believed to
have started over a dispute about
maize lands, Police were sent to
the scene of the fighting.

—(Reuier.)



Pope Much Better

VATICAN CITY, Feb. 16.
Pope Pius. XII, who was ill with
influenza for the past two days,
was to-day reported much better

with a temperature well Below
normal. \
On the doctor’s order, “how-

ever, he will keep to his room,
coming up only for a short period
of the day, at least until the end
of the week.—Reuter.

here, observation posts have been |
\ set



BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY

| million are in the Far East, mostly

|

|

is the expert on fish farming—a

science that has been practised

for about 4,000 years in China,

being handed on from father to

son.
Hickling explains that out
avout 14% million acres of

farms throughout the world,

of
fish
14]

in China. Now a fisheries Research
Institute is being set up at Penang!
in Malaya, covering 300 acres of |
which 120 acres will be devoted
to ponds in which every kind of
fish farming can be practised, Ir |
particular the scientists want “c

know more about fish grow’ng ir

rice fields during the flooding

They want to find out what effect

the fish have on the rice, and the
rice on the fish.’

“There are,” says Hick'ing,
“enormous possibilities for fish
farming in Africa and the West
Indies.” —(B.U.P.)

Death Holds





_ Up Traffic

SYDNEY, Feb. 16.
Traffic in the heart of Sydney
was disorganised for half an hour
today when a signalman collapsed
and died in a traffic control tower
at the junction of Elizabeth Street
and Liverpool Street.

Ambulance men had to radio
for police help to get his body
from the tower, down a narrow
iron ladder.

—Reutcr.



Wolves Deterred
By Foul Smell

OSLO, Feb. 16.

Norwegian Lapps have fcund
a new way of stopping wcives
attacking the herds of reindeer
which they graze on the Ior-
wegian-Finnish countries.

The Lapps smear the reindeer
with a foul-smelling paste. The
wolves hate the smell so n uch
that they keep away.

fe —Reuter







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. a

A Nation Will Have A Go.

America Plans the Biggest —
Q) and A of all time

By Frederick Cook

NEW YORK.

BRIGHT and early on April Fool’s Day, 4
150,000 specially trained men and women COLONNADE STORES
will start ringing doorbells all over America, : %
To startled householders, farmers and head§ | 2. ——————— saieinaeciiia
of businesses they will put questions like:
“How old are you?”; “How many in the fam-
ily?”; “How much do you make a year?”;
been in this job?”;



=

A PAGE FOUR THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

BARBADOS db AVOGTE The Western Tradition

fae Se SS Ges
Few broadcast discussions have 1s the present day “barbarian”?
Published by Thu Advocate Co. Ltd., 34, Broad St., Bridgetown roused so much interest as a ser- Hy Gilbert Murray Modern Western civilisation is in
a ies of Talks on the Western or essence Hellenic, thpugh Jew-
Friday, February 17th, 1950 |

European Tradition, given in the ish civilisation added monotheism
European Programme of the Brit- and some moral cleansing; Rome
Guage [ing 00h and now lsh a saat‘ abe vader tht
Hondur am Warning a book, “The Western Tradition,” strength. oi takes poe.
FROM every corner of the West Indies and by the Castle Press, 50, Old Growth Of Toleration
from every source of thought it has been
pointed out to the British Government that
a stable economy means more to the three
million peoples who inhabit this part of the

Brompton Road, London, S.W. 7 Toletetion was a slow-growing
Empire than all the constitutional amend-

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY yp
——=> iy











McEWANS RED LABEL BEER—per ‘bottle

| GOLDEN BEAN IcING suGaR’ “™* -- 6

Bottles HEINZ PLAIN OLIVES

One of Britain’s foremost
classical scholars, and author
of a number of books on in-
ternational politics. He has
been, since 1928, President
of the International Commit-
tee of Intellectual Co-opera-
tion, In 1941 Professor Mur-
ray was awarded one of
Britain’s highest honours,
the Order of Merit.









at seven shillings and sixpence net. plant. But ;

There is a preface by Lord Lay- merely in ieee oP aanion
ion, a Liberal peer, on the prac- of noxious Keresy, because you
tical issue now, and an epilogue cannot kill it, but much more, at
by Arnold Toynbee, the well- least among enlightened people.
known historian, on the possibili- as a recognition of the fact that
ties of a hundred or more years no one sect has the monopoly of





We have just received’
CONGOLEUM ~

in various colours and patterns, excellent for

. hence. There are 18 distinguished but in sci eternal “How long have you
; at ut in science and phil truth. Each may learn x 7
ments forced on us from Whitehall, Th contributors — Liberal, Socialist, art, letters, music, aay, . something from the ore. “Are you an Indian, Japanese, Negro, Chin-

Catholic, Protestant, agnostic,
scientific and literary, illustrating
vividly the “diversity in unity”
which most of them find to be
characteristic of our civilisation.

Two matters seem clear beyond
dispute, Our greatest duty is to
save civilisation where it is in
peril, and restore it where it is
already wrecked. And secondly,
the way to restore it is by union,
in whatever form may prove
practicable. The hope of a really
world-wide union has, for the
present, disastrously failed; but
the nations of the Western Tradi-
tion, forming what used to be
called “Christendom”, are visibly
uniting more closely.

What is it that has wrecked
Western civilised society and made
the tyrannies and miseries of Eu-
rope a byword in other continents?
Obviously war, war on a vaster
scale than ever before and the
more atrocious because it was vir-
tually a civil war between groups
belonging to the same community,
a highly industrialised community
with capacities for destruction far
exceeding its natural powers of
recovery. Apart from economic
ruin the long world war has left
behind it too moral consequences;
first, the passion for power or
victory at all costs, and consequent
thereon a general disregard of all
aims and qualities not conducing
to power and victory, which com-
prise, as a matter of fact, nearly
all the higher values of human
life. This it is which tends to
wreck civilisation.

Freedom And Rule Of Law

But what is this Western Civili-
sation that we are trying to save
or restore? It certainly was a
wonderful thing. It held before
1914 a position of undisputed su-
premacy in the world, not only in
wealth and power and technology,

this is so is now being conclusively proved
by the attitude of the people of British
Honduras.

Ten months ago the people of British
Honduras passed a resolution of loyalty
and pledged to maintain their allegiance
to the British Crown when Guatemala
repeated her unsupported claim to sov-
ereignty in that ¢blony. The claimant was
invited by the British Government to sub-
mit her claim to the Court of International
Justice at the Hague. Even if the ruling of
such a court had gone against the objection
of Great Britain it is clear that the loyalty
and affection of the people of British Hon-
duras emphasised by the recognition of the
right of self determination would have
' greatly influenced any future action.
bt That loyalty and affection have now been
strained to the utmost and to-day the same
people who stood up against the intruder
et ten months ago are now up in arms against
HS British economic policy. It is not that they
are unmindful of the debt they owe to
Great Britain; it is not that they desire any
t secession from the British Crown, but they
z now feel that they have been penalised and
eae their economy upset by the trade and fin-
; ancial policy of the Socialist Government.
? British Honduras suffered in the past

from that inattention by succeeding Gov-

ernments in London in the same way that
\ the Leeward Islands suffered. These were
‘ characterised by no less an outstanding
Colonial Administrator than Sir Alan
Burns as the “slums of Empire.” Now Brit-
ish Honduras has been spoken of by Mr.
Richard Greenough as one of the most dis-
graceful spots in British Colonial adminis-

government and moral authority.
It was liberal. It permitted no ‘the Western Tradition” are chief-
famines, no pestilences, no violent }Â¥ impressed by the ready wel-
persecutions, no organised brig- CMe given by Europe to the mod-
andage, such as were often in- @â„¢ scientific and rationalist
eradicable elsewhere. movement. Almost all scientific
What was the secret of this sig- ®dvance in the modern world has
nal success? A combination, say been due to Europe itself or to the
most of the contributors to this extension of Europe beyond the
book, of Freedom and the Rule of Seas. And the plain positive ideal
Law. It is at root a Hellenic tradi- Of “the greatest happiness of the
tion; a habit, as Professor E. L. greatest number”, witgout aristo-
Woodward puts it, of “being never cratic or dogmatic “strings,” has
indifferent to the problems of gov- been more accepted in the
ernment.” The ancient Greek Western tradition than elsewhere.
writers, historians, philosophers It is in the scientific “respect for
and even poets, are always dis- fact,” in the constant increase of
cussing such problems and give in knowledge, and particularly in
general the.same answers. The the comparatively new explora-
first need is the rule of Law. tions of human psychology and
In the half-oriental empire of sociology, that these writers place
the Seleucidae, for instance, the their chief hopes for the future.
Cities were Greek, the hinterland It is on these lines, they think,
was Asiatic, In the cities an ac- that Western civilisation has risen
cused person had a public trial most distinctively above “bar-
recording to a public law, pub- barism”.
licly known; he had the right to Doubtless, the whole book is
defend himself or to engage coun- open to Mr. Tonybee’s criticism
sel; his punishment, if convicted, that, however much the individ-
was limited by law. In the “bar- ual writers may differ, it is all
barian” districts he could be “What the West thinks of the
seized without trial, and punished West”, not the judgement of dis-
in any way that might please the interested outsiders. The writers
governor. In Hellas all were are all Westerners; more than
equal in the eyes of the law, and that, they are all British. What,
the law itself was made by a he asks, would a Chinese or In-
process of argument and discus- dian observer say of us? Or even
sion, It was not merely a law of an observer from France or Ger-
obedienze to a king or priest. Jus- many? The point is true as far as
tice and even truth, in the eyes of it goes, but we may well answer
the philosophers, was a thing to that, in the first place, we Euro-
be reached, or at least to be ap- peans do understand our ways and
proached, by searching and dis- standards more intimately than
cussion. Difference of opinion was any outsider is likely to do, and
not merely, within large limits, this book is only a British contri-
tolerated but was actually wel- bution to what we hope will be a
comed as a help to finding the best symposium of Western opinion.
answer. After all, the great problem of
Is it not all the same spirit healing our wounded civilisation
which modern Western civilisa- is our own problem. No one can
tion regularly maintains as against solve it but ourselves.

ese, Filipino—or other?”

Anyone who feels overwhelmed by temp-
tation to tell the questioner to mind his own
business had better restrain it, for refusal
to answer fully all questions in America’s |
every—10—years census carries with it 60
days in jail and a fine of about £170.

‘The census is the biggest fact-finding job
in Ly It will cost the taxpayer at least

Ss
















and breakfast room floors or for concrete

om

—also —

CONGOLEUM SQUARE

3x3 yards and 3x24 yards

£ 25,000,
“ ANSWERS FILL 100 VOLUMES

Statisticians of the Census Bureau will
have a full-time job for three years classi-
fying and analysing the information gath-
ered, with the aid of an “electronic brain”
equipped with 10,000 tubes. :

When it is all over, America’s officials will ‘
know more about their country than any WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD., s

Government have ever known since Eng-
C. S. PITCHER & CO,

land completed the Domesday Book.
Phones : 4472, 4687,






























More than 40,000,000 families, 60,000,000
farmers and 3,000,000 businesses and indus-
tries will be checked. In addition to the
questions about age, sex, race, education, job,
income, health, and so forth which the wage-
earner will have to answer, land workers
will be queried about their crops, irrigation,
prices, acreage and related matters.

Businessmen will_have to fill in compli-
cated forms giving full details of production,
employment, sales, prices, wages, costs and
markets.

In all, it is estimated that more than
6,000,000,000 facts will be at the Govern-
ments’ disposal when it is all over, filling
about 100 volumes or 150,000 pages of small

rint.
THE DEAD MUST NOT TELL

The enumerators face no easy job. They
will visit Park Avenue penthouses and mis-
erable slums in New Orleans, jails and nud-
ist camps, isolated lighthouses and lumber
camps in the Far North, ships in harbour
and seamen’s hostels and bars.

If the experience of past years is repeated,
they will be violently assaulted, kicked
downstairs, shot at, chased by dogs, dodged
for days at a time, and often have to call for

a eee
or this, they will earn four cents





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lated and without adequate agricultural
production to support the smallest measure
of industrialisation the country has been
unable to support their population at any
standard in keeping with modern demands.
: The Evans Report left no doubt that the
‘ie time has come when apart from any gen-
eral reorientation of policy in the Colonial
Empire the British Government needed to
‘ pay special attention to the needs of British
hi Honduras.

It was singularly unfortunate that the
over-all policy of the present Socialist Gov-
ernment was not sufficiently flexible to
admit of any relaxation of the rule as far
as British Honduras was concerned. It is
even now more unfortunate that no heed
was paid to the pleadings of the people of
that colony for some relief from the distress
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There is no rule without its exception
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side the little River Panke where
it sparkles and eddies through a
wooded park on the north-east
border of Soviet Berlin. The wall
is half a mile long and twice as
high as a man,

Both sides are strongly patrolled
day and night. The German
Black Guards, who move silently
among the trees, wear smart
black uniforms with _ silver-
coloured shoulder flashes. They
have new belts of bright brown
leather, and each man carries a
revolver on his right hip.

If, ignoring the revolvers and
the rest, you scaled the wall, you
would find nothing more grisly
than a well-kept lawn, an enor-
mous black car on a path beside
it and, pacing on the grass, a
lonely old man, thick white hair
showing beneath a Homburg hat,
his bulk swaddled in a heavy grey
top coat

Royal Domain

The little, lone pacer is the
Moscow-trained Communist Wil-
helm Pieck. His new biography
proudly records that he is a close
friend of Stalin, his co-disciple in
Marxism, and now, at 74, the
Kremlin’s choice for the presi-
dency of the East German “Peo-
ple’s Democratic” Government,

If protection from the Russians
is not needed, can it be that he is
to be protected from jealous Ger-
mans?

For besides the presidency
Comrade Pieck also inherited a

Here are the homes of the men
who, with Pieck, made up the
Communist Government of this
“People’s Democracy,” and, like
Pieck, all who live in the com-
pound are as carefully guarded as
if they were lunatics or lepers.

Most Germans would envy
them their villas, even if they
are only of the outer suburban
family type that could be put up
for, say, £800 in the days when
that sort of thing was allowed.

Rank Tells

Among the “protected person-
nel” of the compound there is
not much calling on neighbours.

If ever President Pieck leaves
his royal hunting lodge and his
well-kept lawn to drop in on the
Otto Grotewohls for instance, he
could not fail to contrast his own
spacious home with the lack of
space provided for his Prime
Minister,

But there is no evidence that
President Pieck has ever gone
visiting in the Premier’s street—
the Friedrich Wilhelmstrasse, one
of the narrowest in the whole
compound.

The presidentail car
uses the front gate. If he drove
out of the side entrance, it is said,
there would be only one Black
Guard to salute him.

The truth is that in this com-
pound
has abolished rank, it is
rank—up or down the Commun-
ist ladder—which tells.

always Nuschke made her his

this Government.

Frau Lotte is known for her
swift eye for food bargains in the
special shop for high-ups where
Germans and Russians still meet
and where every shopper must
show a special admission card
before being allowed to buy.

Other Government fraus avoid
being seen in this store for high-
ups and foreign diplomats from
the East. Among the shy ones is
young Frau Profe¥sor Gertrud
Kastner, wife of Economics Pro-
fessor Hermann Kastner, the so-
called Liberal, who is another
Deputy Premier.

Visitors

Frau Kastner is never among
the personal shoppers. But she
well knows the attractions of the
cafe attached to the store, She
visits it frequently for coffee and
cream cakes, She acquired the
habit when she was Kasther’s
secretary and took coffee with
the first Frau Kastner,

Another shy Frau Minister is
Frau Nuschke, She was 21 when
57-year-old Deputy Premier

f
bride, ~—

The question of a motor car
went to Ministerial level the
other day. This was after the
Russians refused a Western dip-

of a Government which lomat permission to drive his
still Own car back East to his post of

duty.

In past years
something of a strain on the honesty of some
enumerators. One was.caught boosting his
pay by visiting a neighbouring cemetery,
copying names from tombstones and writ-
ing in imaginary data.
enumerator must pass a political
e census is an outstanding example
of America’s political — system. All
appointments rest with t
and nomination of census staff is considered
the juiciest plum with which to reward loyal
party workers after the appointment of
me

TH
















onies in the West Indies suffering now
from feelings of disappointment and frus-
tration resultant from the mishandling of
the sugar problem by the Ministry of Food.
The virus might spread and although there
might not be the same reckless abandon of
all civilities it is likely that British rule in

“Tell him we will give him a



royal domain—this Panke park
of many trees and many mansions
where once the
proudly pranced on hunting days.

There was no wall then, Neither
was there in the park a palisade
to which the wall gives place
for a half mile. It is a palisade of
green-painted, dee p-planted
planks which curves past a few

Hohenzollerns

Shopping jygecedence presents
its problems in the compound,
The keenest shopper is Frau
Lotte Kuehn-Ulbricht, who runs
the household of bearded Deputy
Premier Walter Ulbricht, the
“modern Lenin of Eastern Ger-

visa to take his car across the
Soviet zone,” said Foreign Min-
ister Georg Dertinger, but the
Westerner refused to be led into
negotiating with an unelected
Government whose legal exist-
ence the Western Powers deny.

But Western recognition—just
that—remains the chief hope of
the East zone “People’s Demo-

the piecework system proved

e party in power,

VANITY TRICK

Question-askers are trained in a number
of tricks to enable them to get at the truth.
They are told, for example, that if they sus-
pect that a woman is the type who will not
give her exact age if asked outright, they
should not ask her at all.

Instead, in the midst of other questions,
they should say innocently : “Let’s see—you
will be about 43 years old?”—always adding
five or 10 years to their real guess. Nine
times out of ten, the indignant woman will
blurt out the truth.

Enumerators all take an oath of secrecy
and accuracy.—LES.

Hitler Ordered The Vatican To Be Raided



MUNICH, Feb. 16.

WHEN Italy surrendered in 1943, Hitler
ordered the Vatican to be raided, Herr Ru- |
dolf Rahn, last Nazi Ambassador to Italy told
a Denazification Tribunal here to-day.

He said that the order was not carried out
only because he flew to Berlin, and talked
the Nazi leaders out of the idea a Reuter re-
port stated.

STANSFELD,

55598693539 56.












WEST OF ENGLAN

s9henl
g

DOE SKINS

Made Exclusively
by

HUNT & WINTER

in the POPULAR COLOURS

FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE VISITOR
FROM THE :

M.V. STELLA POLARIS
OUR DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT Wis
REMAIN OPEN UNTIL 3.30 PM. ON
SATURDAY 18TH



DACOSTA & CO.. Lil

What's on Today

Intercolonial Cricket at Ken-
sington, 11.30 a.m,

Court of Ordinary, 11 a.m.

Police Magistrates’ Court 10
a.m.

Hitler in issuing the order called the “Vati- |,
can a nesting place for Allied spies.” Herr |
Rahn said that he met Hitler, Goering, Rib- |
bentrop, and other leaders in Berlin. Hitler |
had once launched a diatribe against the |!

Pope and demanded that his order should be

the West Indies will draw upon itself the
odium which it has attracted in other parts
of the Empire.

There is still time to heal the breach and
it was never beyond the capacity of British
statesmen to rise to the occasion.

stately trees then suddenly angles
away from the park to seal off a
whole row of streets—such as
Bismarck-alley, Kronprinz- ave-
nue, and Siegfried-lane.

Among these reminders of
Prussian glory the wall and pali-
sade came together to enclose

cratic” Cabinet insid -
lin of Berlin. mecca

‘Until this hope matures, they
will stay in their compound with
the protective Black Guards as a
tangible symbol of their own fear
of facing a free electorate.





OUR READERS



To the Editor, The Advocate—

Sir,—May I beg the courtesy of
your columns to express a word of
thanks to all those kind people
who have so generously offered
their hospitality to all members of
the Ship’s Company during H.M.S.
Devonshire’s visit to “Little
England.”

I should like to be able to thank
individually those who have en-
tertained us in their homes or
clubs; those who have organized
our cricket, tennis, football and
the like and those who have given
up much of their time for our
benefit. This I cannot do but I do
want to say there is no one in the
Devonshire who has not appreci-
aied to the fullest degree the wel-



SAY:

The * Devonshire” Says Thanks To «Little England”

Records Will Be Smashed

To the Editor, The Advocate—
_SIR,—On the eve of the selec-
ton of the West Indies team to
tour England this summer I am
being continually approachcd by
many cricket lovers like myself
who ask me such questions as
“What do you think our chances
will be” and “How do you com-
pare the expected 1950 team
with that of 1939?” In the cir-
Qumstances I shall during the
course of this letter reply to
them in brief with a “who's
who” of a few of my certainties
and so justify all reasons for my
arguments

First I would like to make
this buld assurance to all crick-



e

a grim determination to eclipse
all the glories of all previous
touring teams to send West
Indian cricket sky-rocketing.

The team under the captaincy
of John Goddard will be able to
deliver the goods. Frank Worrell
has on more than two occasions
demonstrated to the world that
he is a batsman of the highest
class, that his batting perform-
ances could be favourably com-
pared with any of those of the
now fnimortal Victor Tr::mper
and could only be over-shadow-
ed by some of the great Don
Bradman’s.

In Everton Weekes the West
Indies can boast of another of



LES. carried out.



as the greatest all-rounder of the
nineteenth century, for it has
been my good fortune to see him
perform in all four departments
of the game and this has been
my conclusion.

As a batsman Walcott belon
to the calibre of England’s Bill
Edrich, Australia’s Syd Barnes,
India’s Hazare and South Afri-
ca’s Dudley Nourse.

As wicket-keeper, his present
form would have been Z aan
serious contender for Bertie Old-
fields. As an outfielder Percy
Chapman at his best could not
have been better, and as a bowl-
er with little more concentration
could take as many wickets for

cricket world with some phenom-
enal feats, and will bring cricket
writers from all parts of, the world
to report on his genius, and the
gods of cricket shall acclaim his

greatness.
ARCHIBALD . PERCH.
Oistin Town,
Christ Church.

Married v Single

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I again write on behalf
of single girls, and there is every
reason why married women
should not have first place, or be
selected before single women and
they (the married women) should
be broad-minded enough to know
that figure and face mus: change

come you have given us and the
generosity displayed to us.





We leave the island with many = the annals of cricket did George Headley has left off ana Medical books speak of this, and
: viticet —. any part of the is moving ahead with rapid And to conclude I must men- “3% sensible person can sce the
regrets but we shall always look © icket globe with the possible strides. Not even Len Hutton’s ton here that Roy Marshall difference, Can a flower
forward to returnit gain when &xception of Australia with such a 364 which he made at Kenning- Comes on my list of certainties look like one blooming in
we can rt that of friend- Plethora of cricket talent as that ton Oval, against the Austra- I do not now propose to en garden?
: liness wl o freely to Whiten Is to-day evident in the jians in 1938, and which remains iâ„¢ any particular detail as to his Barbados has g r
the Navy |t inhabitants of Seubr Caribt I sey that be- a world record is safe from him. cricket ability but I shall say cauien aiela® Gk Ber share bf
arbados cause | am convinced that dur- that oe a ae au s, :
+ — ing this 1950 tour record after And now to Clyde Walcott, food water’ Ga ae be a gamn<:ous % sheir miat-
G. H. STOKES (Captain), Tecord will go smashing to the and I do not want to be judged He will even go further jn the ~— ao = stay é
iw ound for this invasion team by any « readers as trying game than Roach himself uid ¢ of a ding E ; ubhy, ge
Royal Navy will be leaving these shores with ‘o emphasize when I declare him He is destined to star's the vf spending Hubby’s money, and



et enthusiasts that never before He

has taken



the world’s greatest
over

batsmen. the West Indies

as Mauri t
from where ever took for England. ee ee ee

getting employment

be given to single young women,
thereby leaving the Barbados girl
to suffer,

BARBADOS GIRL.

Against Walking
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I am quite willing to give
the new bus stand a fair trial, but



Order Now

e¢ 6.4

These are Enjoyable

Vienna Sausages



I am jtqtally against expecting |

passengers to walk through traffic
laden paths after paying bus fare.

As regards walking bei
healthy exercise, as odveeed’ by
some of — writers, it is sheer
nonsense to compare walkin,
health and at leisure to Selhaae
in a city of congestion. Bridge-
town as a business centre should
be reached without difficulty, as
time is limited for many who work
or visit same, and then with the
present price of shoes and cloth-

ing, how can we afford extra wear |









and tear?

It is all well for the idle rich
who have tin n abundance
of clothing, also cars to take then
over the bridge, and elsewhere in
the city, for cocktails. Poor people
are the tail end and are not con-
sidered, it seems

POOR TRAVELLER.

Frankfurter Sausages
Wace ”
Palethorpes ”








Table Thrillers

Dutch Rolled Oats in tins
Macoroni in Packages

” & Cheese in tins
Spaghetti in Packages
Spaghetti & Cheese in tins
Cream of Wheat
Grape Nuts

J. & R. BREAD

Drinks that are Best
GOLD BRAID
RUM
TOP NOTCH
RUM
CROWN DRINKS

| GODD

|
|
Bologna Sausage

Large Apples

ARDS






























































































tem
i orking Wel l

(S
Te ting more accustomed

Janes and signs in
are . Yesterday was
that this system has
tion and a few

ow asked.
aT. er ae

‘police, told the “Ad-

— that One Way
System allows for more
me stream of traffic, which
ae the flow.
sid that the motoring pub-
sid 4 to decide into what

ic they want to go
into that stream. By
would te in the
to turn off wiién’

do so. :
a plenty of space in
, uare for vehicles to
abreast,” said the
ssjgner .

a 4 that the recently form-
Som in Trafalgar Square: is
much better now that the
Ke are getting to know where
“is direct them to go.

his system is being tried out
Hmprovements will be made
, to time until the best

ar Sq)
‘th




the?
a they

fe

om irrived at,” he said.

ng the Session of the House
“mbly on Tuesday the,chains,
+» for many years have pre-
‘ed vehicles from using the
“round the Public Buildings,
put out.

: n asked about this the Com-
said that it was only
iment, but if the noise of
disturbs the House of As-
» the chains will be put

oe

oo shelters are now being
% at the Probyn Street Bus
inus. The Commissioner said

are being erected to
et those waiting for buses
sun and rain.

"TON CUMMINS of Mount
“Brevitor Road, St. Peter,
ed for an injured hand
he fell from the platform
notor lorry E. 29 on Wednes-
The lorry was being driven
ng Mile and a Quarter Road by
Herbert of Mile and Quar-

7

f ABOUT 8.10 a.m. on
Tuesday an accident occur-
All Saints’ Road between
lorry E.12, owned by St.
Plantation, and driven
Scantlebury of More
band a bicycle ridden by El-
Holder of Four Hill.
der fell from the bicycle and
ty injured on his knee.

LOSS of 49 holes of yams
‘yalued $7 was reported by
Farmer of Mount Planta-
“St. George. He stated that
were removed from the
sof the same plantation on
They are the property of
tates of Harewood.

DRIVE SHAFT and front
fender of motor van M.832
re damaged about 9.00 a.m
esday when the van ran
road at Derricks, St.
gs. It isthe property of E. C.

r

4
e and was driven
e Weekes of Wavell
Black Rock.

understood that the edga
Toad gave way and the van
into a two fogt trench. It
mounted an embank-
itand eventually struck a tele-

pole.

WEDNESDAY at about 7.20
Pm. a fire of unknown
broke out at Spring Hall
lation, St. Lucy, and des-
d 5j acres of first crop ripe

canes, which are the pro-
of Spring Hall Ltd., were

ACE CONSTABLES were
busy yesterday preparing to
building at the Central
which houses the Police

games room and library are
‘situated in this building and

fe than one occasion the
Cinema has given a show

interior was recently re-
. The games room is now
d with two table-tennis
§ and two snooker tables.
Constables can also
h playing dominoes.

@ who are not interested in
fan relax with a book and
the Radio Distribution

BOYS of the Horse Hil)
Troop held a camp fire
y night last on a small
behind St. Joseph Girls’
@t Horse Hill.
Ohe time it was thought that
lid have ruined the pre-
shortly before 6.00
‘Mie clouds cleared up
will be invested at
mM. today at the St. Jos-
School. It is understood
10 will be issued to

boys,

WHO formerly
d the Rock Crusher at
St. Joseph, are now
the workers told
MÂ¥ocate that they are out of
Every year just before the
in full swing.
0 St. Joseph Factories
Made much improve-
ing the past few months
€xpected that the crop
a Very soon,
- EADLEY and
_ Haynes were slightly
on Wednesday morning,
ay 7 o'slock, when they
ibd icycle while travelling
u _ Hill, St. Joseph,
, — Tiding with Haynes

St UITS ARE very scarce
+ eet but a pleasing
_ at the potato crop is
ony of improvement. On
Blackmans opened a
and many holes
Wednesday house-
owever seen going

more potatoes. It i
at th .

Per hole. Yams are
My 22 plentiful,

id i R around February

0

es

t is



cf
4

-










Sl¢ On
=,”

nidad fire flies can be
year,



and pedestrians

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1950

Traffic

JUDGMENT RESERVED
IN CUKE-SKINNER CASE |

THE sitting of the W
began here Monday
judgment was reser

est Indian Court of Appeal which
st yeorcay adjourned sine die, and |
; ’ ved in the first appeal heard, th
Clifford Skinner (Defendant-Appellant) and Ateen” St
Clair, Cuke (Plaintiff-Respondent). °
ounsel in this case completed their submissions last |
Tuesday, but returned to Court yesterday morning to|
answer questions relative to the insurance of parties to



}pu

ey are selling| and work on the phosphate ‘. 4

seen| have read steamship Goi

the action.
Potato Yiel
Not Good

_The Director of Agriculture in
his monthly notes writes that the
harvesting of sweet potatoes was
continued during January burt
yields, especially in the lower





altitudes, have not been very good. |

Reaping of the main yam crop is
expected to begin next month
Vegetables, including tomatoes,
cabbages and carrots, were in fair
supply in the markets, Owing to
the frequent showers which

occurred during the month, peas-|

ants were able to do much more
planting than usfial for this time
of the year.

The young planted canes have
responded well to the January
rains. Suitable weather conditions
enabled supplying and, in some
cases, late planting to be done.

Cotton picking was continued.
Yields: on peasant plots, particu-
larly in the St. Lucy area. are
below expectations.

Some good yields of groundnuts
have been reported in St.
and Christ Church.
appear satisfied with
obtained from the recently
duced variety Virginia Bunch; it

The appeal is one against a ver-
dict of a Common Pleas Jury

, Which awarded Cuke £1,500 gen-
, eral damages and £4. 3. 7. spetial
| damages at the end of an action

brought by Cuke after a collision
aoe om = and ees.
un e ap) were that
the Jury were misdirected in the
Acting Chief Judge’s summing up,
that the verdict was against the
| Weight of the evidence and that
| the damages were excessive.
| The President of the Court, Sir
Cecil Furness-Smith, Kt, Chief
| J ustice of Trinidad, yesterday
| asked whether it was a fact that
Compulsory Insurance was not
enforced in Barbados,

“That is so, Your Honour,”
replied Mr. J. E. T. Brancker,
Junior Counsel for Skinner.

Mr. D. H. L. Ward, Counsel for
| Cuke said in answer to the Presi-
dent that when the Jury heard
that the defendant was insured,

| they might have thought that he

was insured against all risks—

| third party and otherwise. As,far

as he knew, nothing was said



| during the trial which might have
| lead the jury to understand that
| the plaintiff was insured in a sim-
| ilar manner.

Philip
Peasants! Court that he had not been pre- ee ee
yields| sent during the’ trial in the Court | »er in inviting her to be Chancel-
intro-| of Common Pleas, but his solici- {lor stating that she was the first

|tor had instructed him that Mr.

Mr. Brancker then told the

is proposed to extend its cultiva-| Ward’s statements on the matter

tion during the 1950—51 crop.

Breadfruit, bananas and coco
nuts were in good supply in the
markets during January. Limes
were also available.

Pests, Diseases

; The main pests reported attack-
ing peasants’ crops during the
month were the white butterfly
and bacterial black yot in cabbage,
and scale insects on fruit trees
Control measures are being adva-
cated .

The Peasant Agricultural In-
structors visited 444 peasant hold-

ings and 8 school gardens in
January; 41 mango trees were
top-worked

The Colonial Development and

Welfare scheme for assisting in- |

dividual peasants to install irri-
gation units continued satisfac-
torily. Twelve peasant propri-
etors were assisted with pipe
and/or tanks and/or irrigation
units.

Apart from weeding and other
routine cultural operations, ap-
propriave seasonal activities,

young plant canes, were carried
out at all Stations.

The total number of livestock
at
of January, including young stock
born during the month, was 126.
Seven hundred and_ sixty-two
gallons of milk were produced.
Sixteen head of stock were sold
to peasants for rearing and seven
sold to the butcher.

Stud services paid for at the
Stations were as follows:—bulls
120. bucks 51, rams 32, boars 63,
making a total of 266 for the

month,
Botanical
The arrows of all crosses made
at Groves during the breed-

ing season have now ripened and
have been sown at Codrington.
Potting has been started, and by
the end of the month about 7,000
seedlings had been put out in the
cisterns.

Supplies for all trials planted
during November 1949 were cut
and put in early in January. It
was found that a large number of
the supplies were not needed, as
the original plants had germinated
well since the counts were made.
Germination on the whole has
been quite satisfactory, and with
the excellent weather in January,
it is expected that there will be
few blank spaces when the trials
are reaped.

The crop season was started on
the 23rd January, when a start

in- |
cluding supplying and the appli- |
cation of muriate of potash to the |

the six Stations at the end!

| of insurance were accurate.

“If I may add _ this,” Mr.
Brancker said, “I will say that
when a jury has an intimation that
a party is insured, there seems to
be a tendency to hit the insurance
company.”

Judgment was then reserved.



6 Months For
n .
Stealing
} COLVIN KING of Dash Road,
was sentenced to six months’ im-
| prisonment with hard labour by
| His Worship Mr. A. J. H, Han-
schell on Wednesday when he was
found guilty of stealing £1 1s. 8d.

| whe property of Glorga Goodridge
on January 16.

Put On Bond For

Misbehaviour

Dessa Deane and Elvie Evans,
both of Alleyne’s Lane, were put
on a bond when they appeared
before His Worship Mr. E. A
McLeod yesterday.

They were found guilty of mis-
behaving ‘themselves on Alleyne’s
Lane on August 24. They were
bound over for one month in the
sum of £1.





15s. In 14 Days

A fine of 15s. and 2s. costs to be
paid in 14 days or in default one
month’s imprisonment was im-
posed on Mark Mayers yesterday
by His Worship Mr. H. A, Talma.

He was found guilty of inflict-
ing bodily harm on Charles Pil-
grim on January 11.

re Boats Lost

| Last Month

IN his notes for the month of
January the Director of Agricul-
ture said that the sum of $444.25
was repaid on loans, bringing the
total amount repaid to date to
$42,078.57. Interest collected for
the same period amounted to $2.86,
making a total of %492.90
interest collected to date.

A sum of $97.00 was issued for



the month in loans to fishermen,!than mere formality and

Princess Alice
Installed

© from page 1

The Principal, Dr. T. W. J.
Taylor,

y lo: accompanied by Vice-
Principal Mr. Sherlock, and the
Registrar, Mr. Hugh Springer

brought up the rear.

he Principal announcei the
rpose of the assembly; then the
Registrar read relative pa

}from the Royal Charter, granted

by His Majesty the King. Then

both retired returning shortl
~~ . sho
| with the Chancellor-Elect ie

jed by two under-graduates.



\





The
Chancellor at the request of the

Principal recited the Oath of
Office. Then she was robed and
took her seat amid a fanfare,
announcing her entry upon the
office.

Addresses were then presented
from 14 Universities in Great
Britain, Ireland, and the British
Empire. Addresses were present-
ed to the Vice-Chancellor of the
University of St. Andrew’s and
Chancellor of London.

Gratitude

The Princess then read the
following message from the King,

“On your installation as
Chancellor of the University
College of the West Indies, I ask
you to convey my best wishes to
its members, and to all those
associated with its work. I am
very glad to be associated with the
College as its visitor, and hope
that it may ever prosper in its
high purpose for the advancement
of true learning.”

Signed GEORGE R.

The Princess then made a
lengthy address, expressing grati-
tude for the signal honour done

woman Chancellor
University.

She assured the gathering that
wherever she was, it would al-
ways be her constant pleasure to
watch over their interests. That
day’s ceremony, fittingly set seal
to the recognition upon the new
University College of the West
Indies, for which three great
Universities in the Old Country
had been mainly instrumental for
its being.

St. Andrew’s and Birmingham
had been midwives at its birth,
while London had been parent,
without whom she ventured to say
all heroic efforts on the part of
the first two Universities wouid
have availed nothing.

After setting out what it was
hoped that the University would
accomplish, the Princess said that
it was a deplorable fact that the
current of religious faith was far
weaker today than in the last
century with all its materialism.

She believed that the Univer-

of any

sity’s first business was, as trustee} Kensington.

of human learning, transmitting
to the next generation a_philo-
sophy, founded on the past, but
refashioned and perhaps enriched
by present day experience. But
that was by no means its only
responsibility. It had another task
of almost equal importance which
some people might say was of
greater importance.

It had to educate young men and
women to make them into good

citizens. In that task, it has to} tthe Rocks to-

combine humanism and technique,
and by humanism, she meant the
study of man in all his relations
as a thinker and a social and
moral being.

She concluded: “Keep your
wonder at great and noble things
like sunlight and thunder, the
rain, the stars, the wind, the sea,
the growth of trees, the return of
harvest, the greatness of heroes.
Keep your hearts hungry for new
knowledge; keep your power of
indignation, and keep your hatred
of a lie.” The Earl of Athlone also
addressed the gathering.

Principal Speaks

Dr. Taylor said that the Mem-
bers of the University College
desired him to express their deep
appreciation for the honour which

H.R.H. Princess Alice had placed |

on them in taking up so high an
office as Chancellor.

That day was a great day for
them, but it was not for
only. It was a great day for all
those people who were working

ating the University College.

them |





'
'



|
|

}

|

}and the Ballet Music from the

|
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|



THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE
}

|
|



Give °E,
A Chance

THERE is an utmosphere of
Suspense which keeps the crowd
of cricket enthusiasts upon their
feet as they listen at the many
radios. By the silence that is
evident when some heated point
‘S to who is the best bowler or
batsman is not being discussed.
; the closeness with
which they follow the every word
ot the commentator.

A crowd began to straggle
around the wharf radio just about
11.15, o'clock yesterday, some
smoking cigarettes to while away
the time until the coin would be
tossed. A few took up their posi-
tions from where the local Big
Ben could be seen, and then to a
second they were there to hear
7 British Guiana had won the

one is told

“Yes, give ‘em a chance. Le’
them decide,” one burly chap said

somewhat stolidly as he puffed | th

away at an inch of cigar.

No one else voiced an opinion
then, but a few minutes later an-

cher chap a bit lanky, who seem- | ain

ed as though he was contemplat-
ing arguing with his cigar friend.
said, as though he meant it to be
general, but got it to hold a touch
of pointedness at Mr. Cigar, “Be!
Yo’ one out before they score 25”

His cigar friend refrained from

replying at first, but then made a
scoffing gesture of his hand as
who would say “Oh!, what de
you know,”
_ A short while afterwards, dur-
ing one of those breathless
silences, the commentator said
“and he is out.” The tall lanky
chap who had made the chal-
lenge jumped up in the air and
exclaimed “Why yo’ didn’t bet
me?"

Everybody stood gaping at his
seeming sagacity and, he made
conceited by his good guess, pre-
dicted another wicket would fall
within another 25 runs.

All then held in loud tones
that they knew Taylor would be

the first to be dismissed and as*

runs steadily increased and the
sun became hot a few tried to

edged against the wall to be
shaded.

When 49 were scored the com-
menfator sail “That was a
tricky one and—” Our lanky
friend jumped up but on this

occasion he was not so accurate
or lucky. The commentator even-
tually went on to say “and he
played it down the wicket.”

By lunch a big crowd had gath-
ered and were paying that alert
attention to the radio which show-
ed them to be enjoying them-
selves almost as much as those
who were watching cricket at



Band Concert
At Hastings
Rocks

THE special feature of the band
night will be the
conducting of the various pieces,
together with the choice of pro-
gramme, by the N.C.Os of the
band. Included on the programme
are three items specially requested
by Canadian Music Lovers at
present holidaying on the island.
Elgar’s Pomp and Circumstance
March No. 4; The Melodies of
Sullivan from his Comic Operas,

opera Faust.

PROGRAMME

MARCH—Pomp and Circumstance
—Elgar.
Sir Edward Elgar, born in 1857,
composed a music setting for
Cardinal Newman’s Poem “The
Dream of Gerontius” in 1900
for which the honour of a
knighthood was conferred upon
him. He was awarded the
“Order of Merit” in 1911 and
was appointed “Master of the
King’s Music” in 1924.
Conductor:—Cpl. B. Morris.

in | together for the purpose of cre- OVERTURE—Morning, Noon and

Night—Franz Suppe.

The installation was much more | Conducted by Band-Sgt. Archer.

one in

was made with the First Year | making a total of $83,115.16 issued|which they as members of the |

Seedling Trials. By the end of
the month, the Short Season Trial
and about two-thirds of the Long
Season Trial had been cut. Forty-
three seedlings were selected from
the Short Season Trial, and to
date 172 from the Long Season
Trial, making a total of 215 alto-
gether. :
Entomological

Preparations for the liberation
of parasites for the control of
saccharalis are proceeding nor-
mally.

Field examinations of
plant cane show very little dam-

p. were

to date.

University fully felt to be the tra-

A meeting of the Fisheries Ad-| ition of the ancient Universities.

visory Committee was held during
the month, at which matters con-
cerning loans to fishermen and
sanitary accommodation at beaches
were discussed.

Experimental work at sea with
the “Investigator” continued
during the month and 17 trips
made.
spent in research on the flying

!
\



fish fishery nd the others on the |

young | large pelagic deep sea fishery.

Unfavourable weather was ex-

age or egg deposition by D. sae-| perienced throughout the month

charalis at present.

Laboratory stocks of Lixophaga
are being maintained and a few
surplus flies out at Codring-
ton, One r ery of Lixophaga
was made at Codrington during
routine work.

During January, 17,650 pupal
parasites of the cabbage group de-
foliators were bred in the labora-
tory and the majority were liber-
ated in the field. So far, a total
of 54,740 of these parasites have
been laboratory-reared. Field
collected material has so

eausing the disablement of many
boats at sea. Three boats were
lost during the month, of which
one was smashed on the beach;
the other two have not been seen
or heard of since putting out to
sea about the middle of the month,
and must be presumed lost with
their crews.

Catches of fish were heavier
during this month on the west

coast but somewhat lighter on!

the east coast, and at Bathsheba,| which
far been| heavy wind and seas kept the;them by becoming their officer.

She had been installed in the
presence of high officials of the

Caribbean and their presence to- |

gether showed it was a great deal
to the people of the British Colo-
nies. It marked a step forward in
realizing the need for a deeper
feeling for the things of the intel-
lect and the spirit to be spread

Of these, 12 were| throughout the countries.

She had taken up the duties of
the chief officer of the joint un-
dertaking in which all those coun-
tries were playing their part. The
installation that day was the first
step to the fulfilment of their wish
and prayer.

Wide Sympathy

They felt that whatever diffi-
culties might be confronting them
in their task of building up the
College, they had the sympathy

j

|
|

|

}



and the support of all the Uni-!

versities of the world.

That day was also a great day
for them for many personal reas-
ons. He had already expressed
his appreciation of the honour
she had conferred upon

used at once for laboratory pur-| boats on the beach for almost the; When he thought of the day when

poses and no recoveries of these
parasites have been recorded.
Introduced Predators
A field recovery of the intro-
duced predator of Cottony Cush-
ion Scale was mayle, showing that
several years after its introduc-
tion it is maintaining itself as a
control agent. Azya trinitatus
was recovered from a new local-
ity. .
Chemical
The mechanical analysis of six
black coral soils was completed.
The new ‘Spekker’ was tried
out for the first time on the analy-
sis of phosphate and potash solu-
tions. The new technique of mani-
pulation has now been controlled

tent of Barbados soils will
commenced.







Ifite and
not Gascogne.

entire month.



Pleasure Yacht
Off To Tobago

PLEASURE Yacht Serva La Bari

From Tobago, this vessel is ex-

Indian Islands.



Firewood, Charcoal



|
i
|
}

THE 30-ton schooner Alexan-





March resi f ’ . 5
fe able to . sidents of St.) « ito’ ‘Gasco ne drina R. arrived yesterday from
a € to see small lights olrito ~ ‘ f
ound at night. At eis IT WAS inadvertently statec St Lucia ngi a cargo of
ie 7, 20'S were traced and| in yesterday’s issue that steam~/ firewood and ci

Und out + . ae . oe arrive This schooner made the trip in

Bre gj.. Ut that they came] ship Gascogne is due to arriy A Sen , :
Rina i to-day. The paragraph should|46 hours which was good sailing

Ifor a vessel of that size
D. L

Mr. Johnson is ayent

(63 tons) under Captain Schlect

pected to pay visits to other West

|



left the island yesterday for
Tobagp after spending 17 days}
here.

|
|
|

Arrived Yesterday |

;

he had sat under her chairman-
ship in an academic matter in
London, he remembered her deep
human sympathy and the under-
standing of academic ideas and he
knew that that sympathy would
be exercised on their behalf then
and they were indeed fortunate to
have her as their leader.

For that reason, her installation
then was an event of the greatest
importance.

=





SELECTION—Gems from Sulli-
van’s Operas—Godfrey.
Including:—Mikado; _Tolanthe;
Pirates of Penzance; Patience;
and The Gondoliers.
Conductor:—Band Cpl. Eastmond.
RHAPSODY—Slavonic No. 2
Friedeman.
Conductor:—Cpl. W. Best.
VALSE—Venus on Earth—Lincke.
Conductor:—Band Sgt. Archer.

BALLET MUSIC—From the Opera

Faust—Gounod.
Conductor:—Cpl. B. Morris,
CORNET SOLO — The Willow
Song—Coleridge Taylor.
From the Incidental Music to
Shakespeare’s Othello.
Soloist: —Boy Farnum.



?
Stop Poultry
Thie
eves

_. LONDON (By Mail).
Britain’s farmers will try to
beat poultry thieves by giving
every bird a registration number
~—indelibly tatoced on one wing.

The scheme has been drawn up
A National Farmers’ Union
and approved in principle by the
Ministries of Food and Agricul-
ture and the Home Office.

The N.F.U. has sent details to
all county branches and hopes
that all farmers will join the
scheme.

A bird will carry its registration
— even after it has been

For a fee of $5 poultry farmers
will be issued with a registration
number and equipment to stamp
the number on their birds.

One N.F.U. official declared:

“Tt is believed that the scheme

will go a long way towards recov-
ering stolen birds and catching
e thieves.”
Poultry thefts, particularly be-
fore the Christmas season, have
been soaring even higher in Brit-
in recent years.—L N.S.

Britain
Going Dry

LONDON, (By Mail)

Britain is fast going “dry” with-
out the formality of an 18th
amendment.

Either from choice or necessity
the beer-dfinking Briton is cut-
ting his consumption so drastical-
ly that many saloon owners are
facing bankruptcy.

Sales for January were expect-
ed to be the lowest since the
Trade began keeping national
books.

Revealing this to-day, Albert
Dyer, chairman of the London
Licensed Victuallers’ Central Pro-
tection Society, said:

“The commodities we sell are
getting out of reach of the public
and if these conditions continue
hundreds of licensees will be put
out of business.

“Last year beer sales dropped
by 72 million gallons below the
1948 total. Tax on each 36-
gallon barrel yields $28 so
Chancellor of the Exchequer Sir
Stafford Cripps will be $56,000,000
down on his $781,200,000 estimate
of revenue from the beer tax.”

The annual meeting of the
licensees, to be held mid-February
will urge a call for a cut of 4
cents in the 10-cents a pint tax
at present imposed by the Ex-



chequer.

The Society’s vice-chairman
Cornelius Collins, mine host at
the Upton Manor Arms, on

London’s East Side, declared trade
had reached a new low.

“Things are desperately bad,”
he said. “Prices are so high that a
man dare not go into a saloon be-
cause he is frightened he will have
to stand a big round.

“Before the war beer was
averaging about four cents a pint,
now it is 14. A decent nip of
Scotch was 7 cents, now it costs
anything up to 35 cents.”

Chairman Dyers said that the
limit had been reached. “I have to
discourage friends gathering in
large groups because the people
themselves now dislike vaem,. It
costs too much to treat all round.

“There was a time when men
would ask for whiskey as a matter
of course. Now they hardly dare
mention the word.

beer—what then?” —LN.S.

9 = °
Can’t Get Rid
Of His House
LONDON (By Mail).

Lord Rothschild, 29 - year - old
head of the famous banking fam-
ily, has a moated Elizabethan
mansion, which he can neither sell

i nor give away.
This perfect example of Brit-
}ain’s handsome _ architecture—
tensive grounds near Bury St.
Edmund's, Suffolk County.

“T have offered the hall to prac-
tically every organization you
could mention,’ Lord Rothschild
said. “I also contacted local au-
thorities with view to letting
them have it as a gift.”

“I bought the house just before
the war. Now it is standing
empty and deteriorating. It would
make an excellent sanatorium or
hospital—in fact it was used as a
hospital during the war, Since
then it has been used as an agri-
cultural training centre.”

Lord and Lady Rothschild live
at Merton Hall, Cambridge, where
he spends much of his time in
| scientific research,

“Rushbrooke is too big and dif-



Conductor:—Cpl. Eastmond ficult to run as a home,” said Lord

MUSICAL COMEDY .— Bitter
Suite—Noel Coward.
Conductor:—Cpl, W. Best

MEDLEY—Current Hit Songs and | Schild bou

Dances—Murrell.
Director of Music:
Capt. C. E. Raison, A.R.C.M.
GOD SAVE THE KING.

“Stella Polaris”
Comes Saturday

LUXURY passenger liner “Stella
Polaris” will make its second trip
to Barbados for the 1950 tourist
season on Saturday.

This vessel opened this year’s
tourist season when it arrived here
on Thursday, January 19.

Over 100 passengers are ex-
pected to come by thes vessel.
Messrs. Robert Thom ‘itd. are
local agents.





PIGEON CHOW
GOAT CHOW

two of Purinds best
and obtainable from
H. JASON JONES & Co.,Ltd.—tower troad st.

Rothschild, “‘but it would be ideal
for an institution of some kind.”

It was reported that Lord Roth-
t the hall for $84,000
from Lady Islington, who had car-
ried out considerable interior
modernization.

There is a possibility that the
National Trust may eventually
have a hand in its disposal. ‘i

—LN.S.

in Satin and Lace,
Peach only in sizes 32
34 and 36 Each

“But when they stop asking for |

| Rushbrooke Hall—is built in ex- |

|



|



It's Satin and Lace!

DAINTY BRASSIERS

ROLL-ON , ELASTIC PANTIE GIRDLE

with detachable inner seat. Genuine Value @

CAVE SHEPHERD & co. LTD.

$$

PAGE FIVE

Teams Selected [Be Wise ....
For Fifth Test

: MADRAS, Feb. 16.

The fifth, final and what may
prove the deciding unofficial Test
between India and the Common-
wealth team opens tomorrow on
the Chepauk sporting wicket here. |

The Commonwealth won the
first Test at Delhi and India won
the thrid at Calcutta. The second
(Bombay) and 4th (Cawnpore)
were drawn.

_India are including in their
side a new ‘cap’ in Joshi, a wicket-
keeper who scored a eentury for
Central Province Governor's
XI against the Commonwealth
side last month. Almost every
one of the 20,000 seats have al-
ready been sold. The Chepauk
pitch is known for giving bat and
ball an equal chance, and it is
worth mentioning that all five
Tests played there (two. official
and three unofficial) since 1934
have produced a definite decision.

The teams will be:

Irdia:—V. S. Hazare (captain),
C. E. Nayudu, Mustaq Ali, D.
Phadkar, H. Adhikari, V. S. Man-
kad. G. Kishenchand, P. Umrigar.
N. Chowdhury, R. S. Modi and



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PAGE SIX THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

- i



HENRY _BY CARL ANDERSON
r anes eee " - on

Wy

cope, W989, King Pestores Spediste, Yc, World thes roverved

ON GUR BUSTING UP THE
CRIME SYNDICATE! LET'S Gol

CF Boers
ow 25,

Wisk, Disa, Previn ime XY qa
wid Rights Roser val Coad mY +
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}1T'S REALLY WHAT KIND || MRS_DITHERS WAS TELLING
\YOUR_ WIFE'S \ Coe, MAN YAN ARE SLONDIE JHOW YOU MADE
| HER FIRE THE COOK BECAUSE

THERE'S NO EXCUSE
gE T / i] | FAULT --- SHE |
piel pT | ICALLED_uP eee BEN! NO | 1 | YOU WERE AFRAID TO DO IT
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ee { USTE AGAIN, BUMSTEAD 1

iy TO BE EARLY
TOMORROW



\MORNING AND ‘prasad Sy,

FS i

t a? SD | + JIT DELAYED MY
Per: yo) | 1m | BREAKFAST
ee i 4 J nicks v4






beeen Leen

THE LONE RANGER

YOU SLUGGED ME ANO STOLE THAT "THE MAN WHO HIRED ME TO DELIVER

PACKAGE BEFORE I COULD THE PACKAGE WARNEO ME “THAT YOU

DELIVER IT! a TWO WOULD TRY TO STEAL IT. Lae
WHO SAYS WE

|\q SLUGGED You? =















COME) HAL, YO%
AND 4” AND VARNEY
; TARTRO THE}
rae tRouate. | fi

f
EP a








r, WOULD THIS BE IT ?
IT OION'T LOOK AS IE IT
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| FOUND POCKETING IT.







VALUABLE IN IT = fF
EXCEPT - A RED
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MY HAND-BaG! \ f
; THERE WAS NOTHING ~~~










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endiaginan eae nanan pore ee te
1
—s —_—____——, || ———_—_——_ || dcwlicimn
IM -AVING A STREAK DADDy-!'VE spent] || | 1 SAW THAT BIG ROLL OF | | WELL-T STAYED HOV
OF BAD LUCK AT DINTY'S My ALLOWANCE 1} | BILLS YOU JUST PULLED | | TONIGHT - BUT ITDIDN
i, CARD GAMES - EVERY ALREADY - CAN OUT = HAND IT OVER - I'M {| o j= MY LUCK- —~/
a TIME I PLAY I GO BROKE- YOU HELP Me GOING TO DO A LITTLE — said
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§ | TONIGHT I'LL. HAVE A oe seets eee
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»
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BY ALEX RAYMOND

IT'S NOT JOE GOWOY OUGHTA BS IN JAIL! IT's!
YOU PEOPLE...ALL OF YOu! BECAUSE YOU'RE |
\ A BUNS 4 OF MEAN, NASTY OLO
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LOVE MISS MITCHELL! SHE'S
THE FINEST TEACHER IN THE
WORLD AN’ THE BEST FRIEND

7
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GOWOY ANDO THE TEACHER

*







ee |





HOME SO LATE AT NIGHT,

THE TOWN STARTED
TALKING... THAT'S WHY
OY HIT

3
6
é
ah
‘
:
e
i














1







‘AH, YOUR HIGHNESS! | HEARD pf HUMPH #
HOW YOU HID IN THE CLOSET f LAUGH

IN YOUR UNDERWEAR WHILE YOU
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FOR YOU. =









PRINCE TYPORE, HERES ) HMM ONE YOU SHOULD MEET) MESOME BAD
KALI, THE LEADER OF OF, ~~ sa TIMES?

THIS — eo \"





KALI. YOU AND.
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ALU MIND TELLING
ME HOW, FOR
FUTURE REFERENCE?












AS THE CON "ONQUERED THUGGEES ARE LED OFF
THEIR SECRET 1SLAND =T0 FACE JUDGMENT



















=:

BY GEORGE MC. MANUS
BESS =
































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= =





The book that has set the world talking

On

~ HUMMEL





A swashbuckling general who insygred many a story, some
ficticious some true, to be told about him while the fighting
in World War II was still at it’s height.

Hollywood once tried to portray the character of this Ger-
man General on the screen but they missed badly.

Here, at last, is the truth behind one of the freatest drama

ever to come out of the second World Wai
What he thought of his men and his Italian allies !
What he thought of his foes; the men of the Empire !

How he was eventually murdered by Hitler’s Gestapo !



Beginning in the Su Sunday Adv Advocate, Feb. vate, Feb. (9







ay, FEBRUA











a —

>.







Rae
4, 1950 @.

- —— ae









A ten ee
ot

TLASSIFIED ADS. |.

a> eee ee

' SALES

ET

AUCTION
Se

















THE BARBADOS
WANTED

—EoEeeeeeeee
HELP







; s By Put [eee
Fr F ny. our office A CHAUFFEUR for Mrs. F. Hutson,
} T E OR RENT . the 24th | “Wendover”, Brittons Hill, please apply
Week Sun. q P.m. 5180) 0m premises: reference required
$1.00 1.3 ct ae 16.2.50—an
. 5 ta + Stre =.
| HOUSES t he ree a pte vie A JUNIOR CLERK for our office and
“NEWE Aim € . pao we M.C.A,| spare parts department. Cole & Co.,
02 : cumtoe gee ra Coast, fully | o ttel Dwellin “a koe - ee
"i ineilie tities 8, Servant Rooms | Open Verandah aire ses contains |
Superb bathing bea c crandah, drawing a. ol r ISTANT 3
| June November: pee a ra Som, one bedroom, Kite) » downstarre | (with pie! ) eee tere a }
} month. Phone 4476. er; $6 00 per ree bedroom’ upstairs, and emant aie w + ence Apply by letter to |
= i . $.1.50—t.f.n tru trees in the yard. Water is| View Guest “House” seers ee |
; : Mipparoraeee | installed. Inspect ide “eamenicemeel | . |
furnished, “Ceres Philip coast, fully, the premises Foo” litioee caeemtene, 14.2.50—Sn. |
Bathing ° ervant Rooms, | ®PPly to Haynes & Grifth. 'e . a ne
Se ok em are S| "Badal tas Sieh, hele | SAN Goce Sean wh a
a . erie Z 12.2.50—fn, | efficient experienved person. Apply:
r ins BOING we is | Woodyare, Pine Hill,
5 agate line 3UNGALOW—With all Modem a n 10.2.90-—in.
wd per 5 < 1.20 1.% retin such as Government gene ; REAL ESTATE |
Fe ness tf and a THe 1 egSBECIOUS, Bedrooms | me | MISCELLANEOUS
ya agate ines) Main Road. Near Deasona pare" | st. MN. BISHOP'S CC wRT,' PAYING GUESTS” Two Couples, or 4
wm Me resonable. Apply eacons Rd. Rent fee chael, standing on 25,175 square} single people. Delightfully cool rooms
DAYS? OM Whites Alley. City, “0% S- Bourne. | feet on se eae | Running water, 10 minutes walk to
ea. y. con rawi and! City or Clubs, monthly
. 15. 2.50-—7n oa rooms with covered wabadinak Rates. eo ere
sd | KRISHANA" and usual offices, two bedrooms with Mrs. BENNETT,
Ind. Apply T. Ma ‘ontabelle, Lancs | running water, one with dressing room | Woodside Gardens.
DIED Swan Strest. raj. Hindu Store, 5} | attached, Toliet and Bath upstairs. Tw¢ | 12,2.50—t.f.n.
on Sone ; 9.2.50—t.f.n servants rooms with toilet and bath. |
: ea AP? yashroom and ow st
Be leave her la residence, | » ne "Apartinent, neetuenished Ground- | in the yard, workshop and garaj >
ne Government Hill at 4.3 Je . near town and Ciub Inspecti OTICE
the Adventist Chureh, Gov t. Grevuanees * Fhildren). For further B. Bantiiter Bases 7 "ei "
fam thence cg pr eat a. ial 3696. lberen The above will be set up to public! WANTED — Shares in Barbados Co-
' . Friends 2 50—3n | Competition at the office of the under- | operative Bank Limited. Prospective



Heal: , Bertina Lewis (T'dad)
en); muhy, Beryl, Lottie,
} great grand children.

'§ please copy
— 17.2.50,







































THANKS

in any

wreaths or

Family

17,2.50—1n

MEMORIAM

beloved
departed
1944
thou de-

¢ memory of our
BRATHWAITE who
bd 1 LATS
jm the 16th February
meg have passed since

ig ‘deal at thou did’st set,
eee of thy love and kind
fill our minds

Brathwaite (son) Mrs
(sister) Miss Frances
(Aunt), Mrs. Oy Inniss and

oe 17.2.50—1n
memory of ow dear beloved
father and grandfather CLE-
(OND who departed this
17th 1947

of sadness still come
tears do often flow
today, has brought before us:

: ories of three years ago
wears away the edge of grief,

sory turns back every leaf
Eastmond (wife: Mr Matella

o'er u





Ottie Blades, Mrs
‘Gollop (children): Mr Ivan
Mr. Leslie Eastmond, Miss
mond, Miss Ewis Gollop

17.2.50—1n

*

os

FOR SALE

i
0

Price $300.00, Standard 10 four
im, Tyres, (2) good and (3) new, new
my, engine good. Upholstery re-
attention. Phone 3817
t












12 tn
Vauxhall (Wyvern) 12 H.P. 4
MM, Only done 5,500 miles. Apply
7%. Hutchinson, Phone 2978
14.2,50--4n
Hillman 10 Convertible. 5 goo
Engine Sound Ring 91-06
i 17.2.50—2n
fC CHANGERS — A fresh
received A.C.D.C. 100-130
mM) Volts 25--60 cycles.
lio Emporium.
od 16.2.50—4n
W Second Hand 10 Valve

BAC. in perfect working order
) Dr Chas Pay: Dentist
Row, St. M. 4














DCI



— Wire Hair Fox Terrie
newly imported stock
Culars. Apply X.Y.Z C/o
Co. 14.2.50-—4n
RKEYS weighing between 10 and
price. Apply Mrs. E

blot, Chelsea Road
16.2. 50. in

L
i LES CARRIER CYCLES—A\lso |
Gents and Ladies Sports Auto

far St. Dial 2696.
7.2.50—t.f
G MACHINE, Barrett Electric
Messrs T. Geddes Grant Ltd
Under 3 years old $200 or
Dial 476. A. Barnes & Co

16,.2,50—t.f.n











RELLANEOUS

Fresh Shipment PABLUM
8 ots Pkts 6hc., if ozs Pkis
ainable from your Grocers and
Pabena also stocked 50c |

16,2 ,50-—3n
NEWS—At the Mayfair Gift |
tle Club. First day rovers
Mplete set Coronation Stamps,
ms. Old U.S.A. Stamns, ete
16.2.50—12n

PQUALITY KHAKI 72c
Royal Store.



& 84c

3.2,50—14n

Royal
l4n

'S & and 96 cents

3.2.50

& MEN’S SHOES from $3.96
, 3.2.50—14n |



ged beg through this

return thanks to those who
i way
with us in our recent be-

| hours of 12 (noon) and 3 o'clock in the

} otherwise such persons will be preclud-
ped

{10 o’clock a.m, when their said claim
}

FLATS full
erator and lin
Dial 8364

y furnished with Refrig-
en at Indramer, Worthing,
13.1.50—t.f.n.

K SEA-GAZE — On—the—sea Maxwell
coant, fully furnished including Refri-
sera or and Telephone for March, June
July, 16 September to December. For
further information dial 2250
17.2.50-
FLAT — At “Hiam” Kensington
a s n New
Road Front Room, Vernndah twe bed.
rooms with running water, Kitchenette.
toilet, bath also Garage. Phony “62 F
17.2.5 -2n

ee
PERSONAL

*

—_—.

eS
THE public are hereby warned

giving credit to my

GAN

2n











against
wife EDNA CADO-

(nee Chase) as I do not l.c'd my-

f influence for all that was self responsible for her or anyone else
and noble lingers on contracting any debt or debts in my
strive to approach the|{ name unless by a written order signed







by me

| Signed SYDNEY CODOGAN,

| Wear Gap.
Britton 1 1
| 17.2. 50—in
== -
PUBLIC NOTICES
_



NOTICE

Tenders will be received py the un-
‘signed up to February 20th 1950 for
in to the Highway Commissioners of
Parish of St. James for £2,500.0.0
it a Rate of Interest not exceeding 4%



SSNS
* © OR easily earned by obtaining orders

for private Christmas Cards from
vour friends No previous experience
necessary, Write today for beautiful free
Semple Book to Britain's largest and

m



ellous money making opportunity.
Jcnes, Williams & Co., Dept. 10 Victoria
Works, Preston, England.”



OFFICIAL NOTICE

APPEAL
(Equitable Jurisdiction )

CHARLES EDWIN ASH Plaintiff,
REGINA JUSTINA AGUSTA MARSHALL
Defendant

In pursuance of an Order in this
Court in the above action made on th
12th day of December 1949, I give notice



to all persons having any estate, right
or interest in or any lien or incum
brance affecting

All that certain piece or parcel o
land situate at Airy Hill in the parishes
of Saint Thomas and Saint Joseph in
this Island containing by admeasure
ment three roods eight perches be the

same more or less (inclusive of a certain |
area in the Public Road forming on
of the boundaries thereof) butting anc

Marshall, on lands now or late of S. N





on any Tuesday, or Friday between the
afternoon, at the Office of the Clerk of
the Assistant Court of Appeal at the
Court House Bridgetown, before the 22nd
day of February 1950, in order that such
claims May be ranked according to th
nature and priority thereof respectively

from the benefit of the said Decree
and be deprived of all claim on or
against the said property.

Claimants are also notified that the
must attend the said Court on Wednes-
day the 22nd day of February 1950, at

| will be ranked,
Given under my hand this 12th day o
December 1949.
I. V. GILKES
Ag. Clerk of the Assistant Court of
| Appeal.
16,12.49—3n



OFFICIAL SALE

BARBADOS,

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF

foremost Publishers; highest commission,

si

Turary 1950

ta
at

Re

un

Fe



|
}



bounding on lands now or late of S. J |

Murphy, on lands now late of J |
Knight, and on the public road whic
was formerly a Road-in-common or |
however else the same may buti |
bound,

to bring before me an account of thei
said claims with witnesses, dc:
and vouchers, to be examined by me|



APPEAL



from $3,25

3.2.50—Jdr |
a |

VE BOYS SHIRTS

iS & BOYs PYJAMAS




















}
for |

Play. Royal Store, Phone |
3,2.50—14n |

SPORT & DRESS S 's |
SSS SHIRTS

& Retail. Royal Store.

= 8.2.50—14n

AND C
Auto ‘Tyre

BATTERIFS—15 &
Co. Trafalgar St
7.2.50—t.f.n

y A Nourishing Food beverage
‘ Obtainable at Knight's
15.2.50---3n





; INHALANT—We have just
fresh Suply of Vapex Inhalant

Infuenza, Catarrh and Has
Obtainadie at Knights Ltd
15,2.50






If 2.50



sizes 3—5 @
& Whit-
value
10.2.50

Gn
ee English Tropical, sever
, Shades @ $6.95 ” * Th

Ewans
ae special



}
cash



eins wD to $3.7

February only





apie aiiiaeeaertat cea
ki Pants yn
» order, 5 Ds i ule &





Store |
17.2.50—1n. }



(Equitable Jurisdiction )

CHARLES EDWIN DASH Plaintiff.
REGINA JUSTINA AGUSTA MARSHALL
Defendant
Notice is hereby given that by virtue
of an Order of the Assistant Court of
Appeal dated the 12th day of December
1949 there will be set up for sale to the
highest bidder at the Office of the
Clerk of the Assistant Court of Appea)
at the Court House, Bridgetown, be-
tween the hours of 12 (noon) and %
o'clock in the afternoon on Friday the

24th day of February 1950
All that certain piece or parcel of
land situate at Airy Hill in the parishes
of Saint Thomas and Saint Joseph in this
Island containing by admeasurement
three reods eight perches be the sam
more or less (inclusive of a certain area
in the Public Road forming one of the
boundaries thereof) butting and bound-
ing on lands now or late of S. J. Mar-
shall, on lands now or late of S. H
n 24), on lands now or late of J. W



[Ny

. | Knight, and on the public road which

rh FLY-WAND—Rid| was formerly a Road-in-common o

les by han Atomite”| however else the same may butt and
and, the magic chemica!| bound.

>» Pkt. Obtainable and if not then sold the said property

will be set up for sale on every succeed-
ing Friday between the same hours until
the same is sold for a sum not less thai
£208. 6. 8.

Dated this 12th day of December 1%9

I. V. GILKES

Ag. Clerk of the Assistant Court «

Kppeal,

16.12.49—3n,



Cutlery etc. Four Bedrooms









—<—<—<—<—<$—<—<————





oo ant

NOTICE |

DR. CHAS. PAYNE |

Dentist \

(Opposite Cathedral) } |

Has resumed Practice. (i

=)

a 5

A Few More.... i

of the

|

{
!

| | FOR SALE
| “CARLDIEM,”—St. Lawrence

“CARLDIEM”, St. Lawrence. Fully furnished.
Situated on the St

s excellent sea bathing

bathing beach,

fields St.
premises Gardep, St. James.

land,
Teddy MeKinstry)
Christ Church.

BOYCE, Solicitors.

| dwelling

be
dining
second
offices
| ground
Excellent site for business
For further



AUCTION
























sned on Friday the 17th day of Feb-
at 2 p.m

CARRINGTON & SEALY.
LUCAS STREET.



1.2.50—9n.

COVE SPRING HOUSE — A mode~
Pungalow, four bedrooms, two hatha:
electricity, fate

ae the sea, own private
2 acres of land Vepe-
ble Garden, 8 miles from Bridgetown
Garden, St. James. Enquiry Sandy-

Peter. Phone 91-50 or at the



20.1.00—15n.
BUILDING SITE 29,216 square feet of
(adjoining the residence of Mr
at Rocklev New Road.
Apply YEARWOOD &

11.2.50—7n

———..,

HIGHGATE HOUSE, St Michael —
Large Stone House on excellent | site
overlooking harbour. At present *con-
verted into flats. Can be bought with
146,000 sq. ft. lend or smaller area
Por further information phone 4230.
Wilkinson & Haynes Co. Ltd

15.2,50—6n.

ALL that three storied stone
house situate in St
Bridgetown, (adjoining

wall
Michaels

Ww, the pre-

mises occupied by The Pornn Bay Rum
Company)

standing on 4,512 square feet
lanJ. The dwelling house contains 3
»oms Gn the top floor, drawing and
rooms and 3 bedrooms on the
floor; kitchen and usual out
and several other rooms on the
floor

particulars apply to the

dersigned

The above will be set up for sale by
Publie Competition at our office in Lucas
Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the 24th

bruary 1950 at 2 p.m





| and to be repaid by Annual instalments CARRINGTON & SEALY
of £250.0.0 with interest (Loan by Solicitors
Legislature) . ‘ 14.2,50—10n
| Signed EE Renee, ee eames
| P. H. TARILTON, BUILDING SITES — At Highgate, st
Clerk, Highway Commissioners, St. Michael. Minimum size 10,000 sq ft
James. There are excellent private roads with
11.2.30—3n water and electric supply already in-
V—— | stalled. For further information phone
4230. Wilkinson & Haynes Co. Ltd
NOTICE 15.2. 50—6n
| x PARISH OF ST. JOHN.
Attention is drawn to all owners ot |
«ogs that they should be licensed during LOST
| the month of February, in accordance
with the Dog License Act DOG—Fox Terrier answering to thc |
| R. S. FRASER. name of Prince, with name on collar
Parochial Treasurer, | Finder return to “Allworth’”, Cheapside. |
St. John. 17.2.50—2n. |
11,2.50—€n

eo



SALE



1948 FORD PREFECT CAR

at MacEnearny’s Garage
}
2.30 pam. TO-DAY
WE are instructed by the

Insurance Company to sell
the above vehicle which has
been damaged in an acci-
dent. Mileage only 11,000.
Car driven away under own
power after accident, Oppor-
tunity to acquire a modern,
repairable Car. |

Cash on fall of Hammer,

AUCTIONEERS

DIAON & BLADON







POPULAR

Cannon Gas Hotplates

- with
> 3 BOILING BURNERS

sellers please apply to R. S. Nicholls &
| Co: 151/2 Roebuck St: Ring 3925.
17.2.50—In.

TRINIDAD BONDS |

$3,360 3% due 1973/83 @







$864 3% ,, 1955/59 @ 97%
$9,600 3% 1974/84 @ 98
£1,000 4% ,, 1963/73,@ 107

Net, plus accrued interest; pay-
ment and delivery in Trinidad.

| TRINIDAD SHARES

300 Alstons Limited Ordinary

@ $6.75
300 Angostura Bitters Ord’y
@ $21.00

Net, local funds, plus stamp

duty.

AUSTRALIA BONDS

Highest premium paid for 344%
and 5% Dollar Bonds.

BARBADOS SHARES

A new list issued Tuesday, free cn
application to: —

A.M. WEBB

Dial 3188 —_ Hours 9—3
155 Roebuck St.
(Over Peoples Pharmacy)

14,2.50—5n



ADVOCATE

ee nem mete ma cen ea



In Carlisle Kay

IN PORT: Sch. Adalina, Sch. Mar:
M. Lewis, Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe, Si

Uucille M, Smith, Sch. Frances W. Smith
Sch. Emeline Sch. D'Ortac, Yacht Mar-
patcha, Sch. Gita M., Sch. Emanuel C
Gordon, Yacht Leender, Sch. Manuata
M.V. Twillingate, Sch. Wonderful Coun
sellor, Sch. Molly N. Jones, Sch. Zita
Wonita, Sch. Belaueen, Sch. Burma D..

M.V. T. B. Radar
ARRIVALS
Schooner Alexandrinu R., 30 tons net,
Capt. Smith, from St. Laicia; Agent: D.
L.. Johnson Esq
DEPARTURES
Yacht Serva La Bari, 63 tons net,
Capt. Schlect, for Tobago

IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION

Cable & Wireless (West Indies) Lid
advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships
Barbados Coast Station;:—

S-S. Joseph Lykes, Mauretania,
Etoranger, Prinsbernhard, Chemawa.
Atla, Ticgun, Delsud, Hertfjord, Luciano,
Presidentbrand Tresus, Sevane, Ariston,
Petter, Mercator, Gascogne, Brajara,

Dageid, Alcoa Pegasus, Marialetizia,
Lugano, Prospect, Simon enson M/s
Mercator, Marmac Lark, Craftsman,

Fsso Richmond, Golfito, Veenenbureh





\

ay od at
DEPARTURES—By B.W.LA.L.

For Trinidad: Mrs. Belle Morgan, Miss
Elizabeh McRae, Mr, Douglas Wall, Mr.
Charles MacKenzie, Mrs. Ella Mae Ken-
zie, Mr. Julian Pierre, Mr. Josef Adamira,
Mr. Malcolm Riley, Mr. Graham Riley.
Mr, Ernest Peterkin, Mr, Michael Ram-
din, Mr. Richard Budd, Miss Eleanor
Nurse, Mrs. Agnes Nurse,

For St. Lucia: Mrs. Marie Scotland,
Mrs. Louise Osbourne, Mr. Percy Good-

ing, Mr. Lawrence Charlton, Mr. John
Marchpenny.
For Jamaica: Mr, Peter Lacy, Mr.




John Hale, Mrs.



ulcie Hale.



Communist China and Russia
Trade Agreement Soon

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 16.
A Peking broadcast heard here
said that a trade agreement be-

tween Communist China and
fRussia will soon follow the
‘treaty of alliance and mutual

assistance just concluded,

Pr. Wm. Henry St. Dial 3466
Hollywood Fashion 6 Swan St.

FREE! FREE! With every Purchase of $1.00 and
over FREE GIFTS GIVEN AWAY.

COME

ALL!

Queen Adelaide, Esso Denhang, Nuc
veandalucia, Triton, Constantis, Brazil

M/V Rosario, Barbara, Alcoa Cavalier
Esso Balboa, Weyeager, Westernsun
Robinwentle, Sanbarbarn, Argentina,

Cevina, Esso Avila, Manistee, Stafford,
Sanpoula, Aire, Lady Rodney, Chemawa
Mormacdove, Laristan, Randibrovg,
Quilmes,, Arakaka, . Santlisec
Alcoa Ranger, Sokna, Enid, Paik, Esite
Cherrywood, California, Sanvulfrano
Sundial, Thirlby, Acoa Pennant, Cazador
Gerona, and Rand Tachra.

pe




eee

For Antigua:. Mr. John O’Brien, Mrs.
Isabel O’Brien, Mr, Charles Peirce, Mr.
Richard Venable, Mrs. Amy Venable.
For St. Kitts: Mr, Viadimir Fesar.
Fer Ciudad Trujillo, D.R.; Mrs, Maud
Jones, Mr. Robert Jones

ARRIVALS—By B.W.1LA.L,
From Trinidad: Jessica Barthelmess,

Richard Barthelmess, Angela Boyce,
Jeanne Boyce, Lt. Chariton, Sybil Butt,
Maicolm Butt, Mrs. Nichols, Rebecca



Laughlin, John Williamson, Gladys Wil-
liamson, Betty Johnson, Page Johnson,
Mortimer Seabury, Frida Seabury, Owen
Boyce Marcia Boyce

It quoted the Communist new



PAGE SEVEN

| SHIPPING NOTICES

The Sch. “ENTERPRISE S” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for











So ait Trinidad, Sailing

y 17th February 1950.

The Sch. “ADALINA"” wil: ADVERTISE .. «
we Cargo and Passengers for

St Jucia. Sailing Friday 17th.

Februw-y 1950 : in the

The M.V. “DAERWOOD” wi!

accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba. Sailing Sunday 19th
Pebruary 1950

The Sch. “MARY M. LEWIS”
will accept Cargo and Passengers
for Demerara Sailing Thursday
16th February 1950

The Sch. “EMELINE” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Demerara. Sailing Saturday 18th
February 1950,
SCHOONER OWNERS’

ASSOCIATION (INC)
Consignee. Tel. No. 4047.

Canadian National Steamship

EVENING
ADVOCATE

Published every Monday
with an increasing circula--
tion every week. |







Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails
SOUTHBOUND Montreal Halifax Bosion Barbados BarBados
LADY RODNEY —_— 8th Feb Wh Feb 19th Feb 20th Feb.
LADY NELSON — 2th Feb 27th Feb Sh Mar 9th Mar
CANADIAN
CHALLENGER -— 10th Mar —_—- 20th Mar 20th Mar
LADY RODNEY -_—— 25th Mar 27th Mar Sth Apr 6th Apr.
LADY NELSON soe 12th Apr 13th Apr 23rd Apr 24th Apr
LADY RUDNEY 12th May 15th May 17th May 26th Mea 27th »-May
LADY NELSON Sist May 3rd June Sth . 14th June 15th Jnn
LADY RODNEY 30th May ard July Sth July Mth July 15th” July
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arfives Arrives
NORTHBOUND Barbados Barbados Boston St. John Halifax Montreal
LADY RODNEY 4th Mar. Sth Mar. 15th Mar 16th Mar. oe
LADY NELSON 2ist Mar. 22nd Mar. ist Apr. 2nd Apr. ——
LADY RODNEY 17th Ape 19th Apr. 28th Aor. ——= 929th Ar 3rd May
LADY NELSON 6th May 8th Mayl7th May ve 18th Ma’ 22nd
LADY RODNEY Sth June 10th Jun 19th June ——- ist Jun 24tneJune
LADY NELSON 27th June2%h Ju» 8th July 10th Jul 13th July
LADY RODNEY 27th Ju 29th July 7th Aug - Mh Aug 12th Aug



N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vessels ritted with cold storage cham-
bers. Passenger Fares and freight rates on application to :—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD. — Agents.





CIE. GLE., TRANSATLANTIQUE
FRENCH LINE

Sailing to Trinidad










Sailing to



China “News Agency” as saying
that a trade agreement was now}
taking shape in talks in Moscow
“and will soon be signed,”

—Reuter.

HARVEST oALE

BEGINS TO-DAY

at ‘THANI BROS.

Society Store
Gandhi

“o

Plymouth
“GASCOGNE” March 14th March’ 21st
VRE cy Sins Wigs in Ala April 4th
“GASCOGNE” ....... April 19th April 26th
“la ISR” ap! May 9th May 138th








“@ASCOGNE" 3/75) May 24th
For further particulars apply to :—

R. M. sONES & CO,, LTD.- Agents.

May 3ist




53 Swan St.
42 Swan St.

COME ONE!







Good Quality



3)» 1 GRILL BURNER & PAN {i
3h» GREEN ENAMEL FINISH

why not call and see them } |
(

at your Gas Showroom, Bay Street
DO

and

CHAIRS =|

FOR YOU!

Popular Mahogany

and Birch |
caned

and upholstered Chairs
Seveval Styles
Tub Arm

and style



COTTON VESTS | Nice
2 for $1.00
SPUN SILK
In various shades in
88e. Up



FUJI CALICO
CAMBRICS
39¢e. Up



with or

$4.50
ing chairs low and standard |
height sitting comfort {
SPECIAL Two double ih!
strength Pine Mahoganised Office
Chairs, $5.00 each One Iron
frame Swivel body full size Office
Chair Only $10.00 }

.
WILSON

Dial 4060

8

ve

L.

Trafalgar

Rocking
and Stationary caned and uphol-
stered Chairs
Morris Streamlined and level-
lined Mahogany and Birch Chairs
without Cushions from
Rush apright, corner and rock-
Street



Linen and
Lawrence

This house can

( Be h where there
i ment Nn)
price to give the € ¢ i)
»)
' i \\
M K. HUNTE i t 357 i
ui]
} pate ttt tt ett NN
— SSS S= |



54” Wide
$1.98 a yd.

SHIRTS
In Dozens of Styles
From $1.08 Up





PLASTIC TABLE
COVERS
In 2 Sizes
$1.12 Up





BOYS SOCKS

BOYS CAPS For School 33c. Up
With Crest 18e. a pair GIRLS TOO
36. A Genuine Buy 33c. Up



COTTON PANTIES
Only 47c. each



SILK BROCADE



LEATHER
From 20c. Up

FLANNEL [CREAM FLANNEL
54” Wide
$5.28 a yd.

SILK SPORT



Cream and others

DAMASK TABLE
COVERS
$2.98 each

Lace Ones $1.08 each

Ribbed Ones Quality

all shades
75e. a yd.

PURSES



SHIRTS VESTS,

$1.92 Up

For Bath
82c. each

Real Good





PLASTIC COMBS
RIBBONS, PINS
PERFUMES,
SOAPS etc.

All Going Chean

TROPICALS
54” Wide
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PAGE LIGHT



THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Barbados Score 246 For 5 Wickets

TRIM, GASKIN BOWL
STEADILY ALL DAY

Barbados” opening batsmen Roy
Marshall and A. M. Taylor went to
the wicket at 11.40 a.m. and fast
bowler Trim opened the attack
ftém the Pavilion End to Taylor
Taylor opened the score with a
single to leg off the fourth ball
and Marshall played out the over.

Gaskin came on from the Screen
End to Taylor and bowled to a
leg-field. The batsman attempted
to block the last ball of the over
on the off side but the ball edged
to slips where there was no ficitis-
man and he collected 3 runs. He
was nearly caught off the seconi
ball in Trim’s next over when
Persaud at fine leg just failed to
get his hand to the ball. The bow!-
er sent down the first maiden for
the day. Gaskin bowled the sec-
ond to Roy Marshal! in his next
over.





JOHN TRIM
i
he mark t be
# vb pers
t the over
next over Was a mai
iall Gaskin ntin
Screen End to Taylor, t
} taking a single oj
ball of the over. G
v still wling to a packed les
field.

In Trim’s next over Tayk
the third delivery past silly mi
on for a brace ar t t
remainder of the

The ore as
Skipper Car 1 e «
the Scree it { ¢



Hi



hrough shi ut Ro

get hi hand | th

batsman got 2 runs. H rv
was not for long however, fo
Gaskin’s last ball he hit high
cover to give Pairaudeau an ¢
catch. He had scored. 13 rur
cluding one boundar ne
been at the wicket f 33 1
The total was now 18 i
partnered Marshal He

his account t

wide of mid-or ft
immediately came

Camacho. M iall
two singles i !

Gaskin sent dc i
Marshall and in Trim’s nex
Walcott drove his first deliy

ee ein

powerfully

to the long of!

ary. The first 25 runs took 4

minutes.
Thomas who was playing for the
first time in the series came on

from the Screen End with the score

at 37, and 3
off the over,
cutting the last

The

runs were
Walcott
ball

scored

beautifully

Do It Eve



later took a



square

for 2. Gaskin was kept on at the
Pavilion End and -sent down an-
other maiden to Marshall. His
figures were now 9 overs, 2
maidens, 12 runs, 1 wicket.

The bowling at this stage wag
very steady and the fielding good,

but the batsmen were playing |
with confidence.
Rollox came on from the

Pavilion End with the score at
46 and. got the ball to break
sharply from the leg ‘side causing
the batsmen some tineasiness. The

over was a maiden t~ Marshall.

In Thomas’ next. over Marshall
drove the last bal! nic“ly to the
mid-on boundary to send up 50
in 67 minutes.

Gibbs was brought on at the
Screen End with the score at 55
and the batsmen scored 5 runs
off the over.

Rollox bowled the last over be-
fore lunch and Marshall made 4
single.

The interval was taken with the
score at 61 for 1, Marshall being
not out 30 and Walcott 17. There
was only 1 extra. The innings had
now lasted 75 minutes.

On resumption, Trim bowied
from the screen end to Marshall
who cover drove for a single but
the next found Walcott’s stumps
as the batsman attempted to drive
one that was well up and missed.
He was at the wicket for 43 min-
utes and had seored 17 runs in-
cluding two boundaries.

Johnny Lucas joined Marshall
and the batsman got a single as
the result of a bye while Marshall
placed the fifth neatly througt

the slips for a boundary

Rolleox bowled
jon end
single

from the pavil-
over yielded a
Lucas. Lucas
irim neatly to
while Mer-

and hi
to mid-off Dy
one from

y for a single

k an easy single wide of
and Luca gianced 1
race
replaced Rollox at the
pavilion end and Marshall cuf
through the slips for a four and

single to mid-off. Trim
ent down a maiden to Marshall
nd Gaskin did likewise to Luca



Weekes back drove one from
Camacho i the boundary and
cover drove the next to the bound-
ary. He ‘then on drove for a
couple to make his score 29. The
total was now 133 with Lucas 20

Rollox’s next over yielded a
single, a hard on drive by
while Camacho sent
maiden te@ Lucas

Weekes took an easy single
iong-off off Rollox and latex
off drove Camacho for a couple
ond then cover drove to the
boundary. He also got a single

Lucas,

down a

with a crisp square cut.

Facing Rellox Weekes took the
only single of the over with a
cover drive.

Trim Bowls Again

Witi. the score at 143 Trim was
brought back from the screen end
vice Camacho. He bowled to
Weekes who took a single past
gully off the second. Lucas played
out the remainder.

Weekes pulled one from Rollox
to the’ on boundary then back

drove the next powerfully but
Rollox stopped what looked a
certain four. Trim’s next over

was a maiden to Lucas.

Gaskin bowled from the screen
end to Weekes who skied one to
cover but no one got under it, the
batsmen eventually ran two; and
150 went up after 177 minutes.
Weekes turned the next neatly to
fine leg for a brace and later
Lucas placed one from Trim
through the slips for a couple.

Weekes square cut Gaskin to the
boundary to get his 50 including
six boundaries in 73 minutes and
then swept the next to the square
leg boundary.

Persaud had his first spell for
the day from the screen end and
his over yielded 11 including a
pull to the on boundary by Weekes
off a full toss, Rollox now bowled
from the screen end to Liuicas who
glanced the fifth for a brace.

Weekes back drove one from
Persaud for a single, Lucas covet
drove for a couple and then took
a sharp single to extra cover. The
tea interval was now taken with
the total at 181 for three. Weekes
was 64, Lucas 33 and Extras 6.

On resumption Thomas bowled
to Lucas from the Pavilion End
and sént down a maiden to the

batsman.










POCKET CARTOOK

by OSBERT LANCASTE>



“ Attention, please / |

has @ amail woutel
retern it at once to
tizhempien im Bor 17.

Lady

single off the second ball aa
Lucas playéd out the over. This
batsman was now somewhat sub-
dued and his scoring at this stage
was slow.

The score was taken to 214
when Trim got Weekes to return
with his score at 82. He had been
at the wicket for 132 minutes and
his score included 9 fours. The
partnership had yielded 124 runs.

C. B. Williams came in and
after playing the next delivery
the bowler’s third edged to slips
where Rollox caught brilliantly.
Five Barbadian wickets were
now down for 214- Atkinson was
the next man in and played the
last ball making the over a
maiden in which two of the mosi
valuable wickets had fallen. He
had now secured his third wicket
for 43 runs.

Both Gaskin and Trim
sent down a maiden each.

In Trim’s next over Atkinson
turned the fourth ball to leg for
4 to open his score.

Camacho bowled in place of
Trim with the score at 221. and
in this over Lucas reached his
50 which he took 193 minutes





then















a ne a Che. ” Rollox bowled from the other to make. He was 63 when he was
Persau j squ ire leg off Te ape end and each batsman got 4 given a life, cutting one well
Lucas beautifull) bah oa no Single off the over They repeat- outside the off stump from
nex ingle. Mars vail a - ed this in Thomas next. Camacho in his next over into
her single this time to : ns These bowlers were kept on the hands of Christiani at gully,
i ; ee : * ‘elded scart for a few more overs and the 190 Who failed to take the vateh.
vaskin's next over yielded IWO vant up by a drive to mid off off Stumps were drawn soon afte:
ingle fe alot itt ams Rollox by Weekes for a single with the total at 246 for 5, Lucas
ve oe tote lt ro * day, This partnership had now yield- being not out 65 and Atkinson
ven his second spell for the is ed 100 in 95 minutes. The 200 not out 12 with 9 extras. The
a oat ar r "baay singi® mark was soon reached and had innings so far have lasted 285
hn OK al asy sing eS
ft the second and then been made in 214 minutes. minutes
off off the second and then Trim who sent down 2:
ved t the remainde : . overs for the day including 6
Marshall turned the first from maidens, stole the ,bowling hon-
: a " aes . : a
yaskin t jaare leg for a bra ; ours in taking 3 wickets for 50
nake his score 48 : i Ls: tot runs, Gaskin took the remainin;
7 i yed out ae ae 2 for 52. He bowled 28 overs of
er, Gibl nt down a maid- which 9 were maidens.
to | i Following are the scores:—
: all ; BARBADOS—I5 Innings
Roy sarshail Out A. M, Taylor.c Pairaydeau b Gaskin 13
British Guiana got their third R. E, Marshall c & b Gaskir 48
C. L, Waleott b Trim 17
ICKE th the core at 90 when J. H. Lucas not out 65
Roy Marshall returned the first C B. Williams ec Rollox b Trim 0
ball of Gaskin’s next over and E. D. Wenmes' ay trun *
ia : a E. Atkinson not out 12
the bowler made no mistake. He Extras w. 5; nb, 3; b. 1
is at the wicket for 110 minutes 7
for 48 which included 6 boundaries Total or S: wate,) band
Veekes the incASming betsman Fall of wickets 1 for 18, 2 for 62, 3
urvived an appeal for catch for 9, 4 for 214, 5 for 214
behind the wicket off the next oo oe R Ww
; j z
ther layed out the remain- J. Trim 22 6 50 3
as B. McG. Gaskin 23° (Oo 2 2
Gaskin who had been bowling . aint aa. eee 9
extremely well had the fine analy- A. B. Rollox 17 1 36 0
of 140. 5M. 22R. 2W G. Gibbs 5 2 13 0
: G. Persaud 2 0 15 )
Git bowled a maiden to Lu ie i oa
le Weekes broke hi du ET
th a cut past point for a singh £. WEEKES B B Cc R di
he only run of the over ; re adio
We Seinen nals ih a tingle lrim bowled the new ball
. from the Sereen End with the
i >» leg off Gibbs and Luca < £ >
ane a a. sve for another, Weeke core at 204 and three singles in enue
took ’ “sit f le wide of Rollox at ‘®! scored, two going to Weekes FRIDAY February 17, 1950
mi An ‘\ gind later Laces cover Gaskin came on from the Pa- ajay oa — ie mn. New
drove, getting a boundary as a re- vilion End to Weekes and bowled things: 7.30 am. From the thi rd Pro
sult of a misfield by Christiani to a packed leg field, sending down ee 7 = . *, are 8 a.m
i a ms ant : " 1 the iterials: 8.10 ¢ P
Lucas turned one from Gaskin ® " aiden , vramme Parade: 8.15 a.m. Londen Light
to fine leg for a brace to send up In Trim's next over Lucas Concert Orchestra: 9 a.m. The New
100 after 124 sainutes’. play and Steere’ ‘Ais second ball through 9:13 @-m. Home News from Britai
i 2 iutes ay % » y , 915 a.m lose Down: 12 no The
then took an easy single to mid- the slips for 4 and played out the News; 12.10 p.m. News Analysis: 12.15
an ovey p.m. Programme Parade: 12.18 pm
Rollox took over from Gibbs at Still using the leg trap Gaskin, 7 stoners Choice. Tp Atk
the screen end with the score bowled to Weekes who took al phony on Strinw 7 2 a N
102, He bowled to Lucas who turt |? ” p.m. Home Now : from Briteir n: 21%
1 ‘
ed the third neatly to fine leg fo. Dupre (Orfan) 2.52 p.m "intedude 2
three while Weekes on drove the sal â„¢ pm. Commonwealth Journey - 3.45. p.m
; . : » W » | ight Music: 4 p.m, The News: 4.15
last for a single. i he eather pom. The daily service: 4.18 p.m. Nights
Weekes took a single to mid : : it the Opera: 5 p.m. Kay on the Keys
on off the second from Gaskin! TO-DAY . 15 p - Frogreavane Parade: 5.30 p.m
. am; Tor he n x sm §.4 t
and later on drove one from Rol-{{ Sun Rises: 6.20 a.m. Intertide: - 6 a Se eae Pa
lox to the boundary, then got aj Sun Sets: 6.09 p.m p.m. Anthology 1: 7 p.m. The News
‘ouple through the slips and an} Moon (First Quarter) Febru- West teches ee eaves: 7.18 pan
couple ig. e § Ss é © ary 24 West Indian Diary 7.45 p.m. Dance
easy single to cover Music: 8 pom. Radio Newsreel: 8.15

the over yielded four singles

Rollox was now brought on from |
the pavilion end and he bowled to
an easy single to

Lucas who took

Gaskin’s next over yielded
single, an off drive by Weekes |
Skipper Camacho took over

from Rollox at the screen end and

Lighting: 6.530 p.m.
High Water:
p.m.
i YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) .45 ins
Total for Month to Yester-
day: 1,08 ins.
‘Temperature (Max.) 82.5 °F.
‘Temperature (Min.) 71.0 °F

4.32 am, 4.07

mid on and later Weekes cove Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
irove for a single (3 p.m.) E. by N

Weekes pushed Camacho to} Wind Velocity: 15 miles per
cover for an easy single off the hour,
first while Lucas played out the}| Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29,990,

remainder Rollox’s next

yielded a single.

over

Time

* aaghoed Gene athe -

(3 p.m.) 29.916,

By Jimmy Hatlo

j



@ (TWO TO SHOW ON FLAMINGO Y I'D UKE TO SEE HIM PUT T \HIS WIFE PAID US FOUR DOLLARS
IN THE THIRD-"TWO ACROSS } TWO BUCKS ON ACCOUNT. JLAST SPRING WHILE HE WAS IN
HOW MANY MONTHS DO THE HOSPITAL:--I GUESS HE

| He BOARD ON SPLINTERS
BA IN THE FIFTH“AND LISTEN,
NICK:sI GOT A HOT TIP

ON THIS ONE-FIVE ON THE

SCHNOZ“RUBBERLEGS ~=

a

IN THE EIGHTH: >»

fea tt
Bag
2 —



HEY OWE EUS Now ?

ca Saks t

“TOUGHER FOR

“oe Oe
b>;
Lo
mK

HIS WIFE LOST —
HER JOB THE =
QTHER ~r,






COULDN'T GET TOA BOOKIE:: |

7 aman

Ke)" HEAR THINGS Va. a
/ ARE GETTING ‘ail’ HORSE-PLAYERS

PY Ole BROKE— AND
=H] SO DOVHE PEOPLE |
WHO LET ‘EM PUT |

eco THE ARM-.
se

HIMs.



co ANA
oe ee ~~"
THANK TO
ANO NYMOUS
=o 7

O,LeLINOS





p.m. BBC Northern Orchestra: 9 p.m
The News: 9.10 p.m. Home News from
Britain; 9.15 p.m. Political Speech

My. Winston Churchill (Con.): 9.45 p.m
Light Music, 10 p.m. Export Jig-Sav
{0.30 pm. Music Magazine: 10.45 p.m
World Affairs: 11 p.m. The News

SS





TIME TO
ORDER
VvOUR
SUITS
FOR

THE
CRICKET

TOURNAMENT
CALL IN
EARLY AND
BE SURE

OF A
PERFECT FIT.

pP.C.S

SS
:

Tee Scorer3










S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd.



















FRIDAY,

EN

FEBRUARY
FOR SALE







Sportswriters os Argentines
Select To Swim 660 Miles

BUENOS AIRES, Feb. 16.
W.1. Team

Five Argentine swimmers today
approached the halfway mark in
their 660-mile swim down the

MR. STREBOR ROBERTS, Syorss| Parana River with containers of

Paitor of the Jainaica Gleaner. Mr. H hpl. of

M* Thurne, Sports Paitor of the Trini. | earth from. Yapeyu, birt place

Croker, sports-] Jose De Sanmartin, the.centenary

Guiana Daily Saute .

Chrreilcie and Mr:_O. S. Coppin, Sports | Of whose deatn Argentina cele

Fditor of the Barbades Advocate, yes- ru this year.

terday named the sixteen players who officer, Sanmar-

they think should reoresent the Wes A high ranking Fr: the

Traits {hn the 1989 tour to England, These | tin fought against ance in

are as follows: Spanish army, and afterwards

iat - ig MR THORNE'S} ieq a South American army



ee ceeeeel

arn

|
|
|



TEAM TEAM 7
GODDARD GODDARD across the Andes in 1817 to defeat

Spanish rule in Chile.—Reuter.





PINE HOUSE, standing on 2} acres

drawing room, dining room, 4 bedrooms, bg
kitchen with buttery and pantry. Large verandahs on
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telephone and water. Inspection by appointment only,

ticulars from . .
BARBADOS REAL ESTATE AGENCY,
HASTINGS HOTEL.

3, tWO miles from ¢.
















Telephone 2336.

Announcement








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PIERRE or KING WALCOTT ENTI . MENT will now undertake Cutting, gin
McW ATT. or TISH or TRIM UNGU Thicknessing, Planing, and shaping to eusiop

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Ladies’ high lass

WALKING SHOES

In red & white, brown



“Longfield” |
Picks His 16 — POHTS INFECTION

Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Feb. 16.
Forecasting a possible 16 West

Indies cricketers for England the}
Gleaner sport columnist Jack/
‘Longfield” Anderson emphasised |
the necessity that a specialist)
wicketkeeper be included as it!
was obvious that Waleott, accept- |
ed number one and Christiani a}
likely understudy on their Indian |
form, no longer relish the job in)
view of the fact that they did not}
wicketkeep in their colonies’ first |
match at Bridgetown last week. |
He advised that West Indies
cricket cannot afford to experiment
with wicketkeepers as we have!
been doing’ since the death of}
Cyril Christiani and the retirement
of Ivan Barrow, and should pick
the right man for the right place.

In this t he saw a place*

either for Alfie Binns or Simpson
Guillen and his opinion, accord-
ing to reports is that the former
is the best man for the job.

Discussing composition of the

attack, he warned selectors not to

persist with the original intention

of sending three fast bowlers if the |
third is not up to standard. Using |
the case of Tyrell Johnson in 1939;
as a comparison, he argued that}
so far neither.Trim, King nor Ken-{
tish revealed the required class!
and it is better to send two good

men, Johnson and Jones, instead of |







on! this cough

My throat is sore with this cough, cough,
cough, all the time...

& white,

blue &

white and pure white.

Also Silver Birch shoes of the same

at old




class. You are advised to buy

prices because prices in England have

gone up again.

CaveSHEPHERD &Co,

10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD §



three with one dud. Commenting What a difference!
cn the general composition, in rf Ae ectiahdthied
his opinion Valentine revealed ZuSses eased my cough and soothe

sufficient class for the important my throat in no time!

position of slow lefthand bowler,
which is essential on the English
tour, and suggested that if the
selectors are satisfied that George
Headley, who has been offered an
attractive coXfract with Bacup to
take the place of Everton Weekes
in the Laneashire League, is fit he }
should be selected because

shot > s vause his |
undeniable experience and all-}
round ability is invaluable to what |
is the West Indies most important, 4 f 2 § NG E






















SOSSSSSSISIO PLLA PSSSF

We offer new stocks of ....

FERROCRETE RAPID-HARDENING CE

tour in history. |
He finally suggested the follow-
ing 16: Goddard, Headley, Weekes

Worrell, Walcott, Stollmeyer he makers of the nemo Bbc Cough Mixture mo Sr Seems
Gomez, Rae, Johnson, Jones, }

Christiani, Ferguson, Binns, C Per Leet. ah at ue PORTLAND CEMENT

B. Williams, Valentine, R. Mar-;|$*" "7" """"* PODS PODS ISOE & in 94 tb. bags

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__._ Y.M.B.C.
s ex ANNUAL
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SELECTION OF CARNIVAL
QUEEN

Prizes for:—

Headley Will Play
For Bacup C.C.

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent

GEORGE HEADLEY, Jamaica
and West Indies batting ace and
former Lancashire League player
has accepted and signed a con-
tract to play for Bacup Club in




POLLO LPELEPPPPPEEEPP PPE EEE PEELE.



the Lancashire League in Eng- MOST ORIGINAL (Ladies) Ae PUN

land. yeorge Headley will be (Gents) 14", 34”, 1” mesh

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record breaker Everton Weekes, adies) WILKINSON & HAYNES (0.
who has just finished a season PRETTIEST COSTUMES

with Bacup and will be going to (Gents)

MOST ORIGINAL BAND Phone 4267.

PRETTIEST BAND Etc. Ete.

Saturday, 18th Feb,

9 pm,
ADMISSION — $1.00 %

Music—
C. B. Browne's Orchestra,

Indies

England with the West
Cricket Team.—(By Cable)



SOSOOCSOCSOS

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