Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
Tharsday

February

19350.

te Ct a


















































yy

| = LONDON, (By Mail).
iting in the “Daily Mail’
fer visiting British Honduras
chard Greenough says:
“ is no doubt but
Honduras is an

West Indies.

nistration intermingled
hall niggardliness.

"ppt out of it.

» Until a few years ago there
“were no attempts at agricultural
development, road building, capi-
“hough important, afforestdtion of
enuded forests.

tedly, something is being
. With Government and pri-
ite farms up-country, plus sensi-
@ productive plans by the Colo-~
lal Development Corporation in
le for the extension of exist-
“img crops and the cultivation of
“new ones—such as papaine pow-
‘der, which is already being used
“in New York for the tenderising of
meat—it seems the Colony is be-
‘ing reshaped into a paying pro-
_ position.
4 —B.U.P.



_ Barbados
Drop One For
2nd Test

Barbados Selectors, Messrs.
“Kidney, T. N. Peirce and
O'C. Gittens with Barbados
ain John Goddard co-opted,
lerday made a single change
he f€am that represented
mtdados in the First Test against
mitish Guiana when they selected
We team for the Second Test.

VEL. G. Hoad, Jnr., Pickwick’s
Slow tight arm spin bowler has
en selected in place of Norman
pMashall who injured his ankle
le fielding in the First Test.
p the team is as follows:—J. D.
Goddard (Capt.), E. D. Weekes,
CL Walcott, C’ B. Williams, F.
mg G. Wood, A. M. Taylor, R.
) J. H. Lucas, EB. Atkin-



4
yeisman W. A. Farmer.

_ Wining more than

dship,
Rhee two

Pand Soviet Forej

greements:

Min WASHINGTON, Feb, 15,
: reat Under-Secretary of
; nab Dean Ruk told Senators
op nat America was “prepared
» Outstanding issues with
Soviet Union and to leave all
doors open for an ex-
of views,”

%

Hsueh a discussion must not

r a powers sitting

‘ and disposing “of the
Anterests of other Govern-

- or Peoples behind their
he Said.—Reuter.

4 ee
M“strian Treaty
falks Postponed

LONDON. Feb, 15
‘ood four Foreign Ministers

py esotiating th iz
Treaty jeder e Austrian

; a atch }.
4 mays Meeting
. : © deadloc
ng, the

eepu



ended in
first
ind devoted most
trying to shift
the responsibility
ack of progres

State Treat

fh ‘eir time

in

—Reuter



that
acutely
d colony, one of the most
1 black spots I’ve seen
Colonial Administration

’ “Apart from the dollar’s deval-
tion, there has been crass mal-
with
In the
the Colony has always been
‘un exelusively for what could be|

improvements, or even simple, |
}

jo Je Germany

EL. G. Hoad Jnr. Emergency
I

16

| ORD BEAVERBROOK has not
ee ing from the West Indies bef

morning in a signed article in the
sites all and everyone to “join the Em
invites all

Russia and Communist China tod

a;
K. In a two hour |
since January |

Wes rehearsed any
*reument dq many;

BEAVERBROOK STARTS |)>
JHE ‘EMPIRE LOBBYISTS’,
: Champions £6 A Week Pay Packet “

(From Our London Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb. 15.
waited long after return.
ore entering the political

| pire lobby and join

- wy, eae new political organisation.
| called into being overnight, is
pledged to promote here and now
the unity of the Empire by
demanding of Parliamentary
candidates firm pledges to carry
forward the necessary legislation
in the next Parliament.

When the candidates answer
these pledges the “Empire Lobby-
ists” are asked to send an urgent
message immediately to Lorc
Beaverbrook ‘at his Fleet Street
office.

This is one side of Lord Beaver-
brook’s activity during the elec-
toral campaign. Another aspect is
a campaign for a £6 weekly pay
packet which opened with Beaver-
brook’s policy statement coincid-
ing with the Conservative Con—
ference last autumn,

_ The ‘Daily Express’ gives prom-

inence to news that “three more
candidates—all Tory—came out

last night for the £6 a week pay
| packet, A Socialist criticised it”.
—By Cable.



Big Puerto Rico
Sugar Export

WASHINGTON (By Mail).

Paul Harrison of the U.S, Com-
modity Credit Corp., has agreed
to buy 220,000 tons of Puerto
Rican sugar at 4,60 cents a pound
for sale to toreign countries re-
ceiving U.S. economic assistance.

All is expected to go to Western

Germany. The E.C.A. has author-
ised the Spending by Western
Germany of 21,260,000 dollars for

Puerto Rican sugar provided it
could be made available at a low
enough price.

Latest estimates of the Puerto
Rican 1950 crop is 1,250,000 tons,
Puerto Rico has a U.S. quota of
910,000 tons, a local consumption
quota of 105,000 tons and expects
to sell an additional 35,000 tons to
the U.S. to make good deficits in
beet sugar production. About
90,000 tons of the 1949 were unsold
It is. expected that with its foreign
market quota of 220,000 tons,
Puerto Rico will sell about 1,270,-
000 tons of sugar, carrying over
about 70,000 tons into 1951.

The industry will be receiving
2,640,000 dollars less than if all
the sugar had been sold at thet
U.S. price, but it is pointed out
that storage costs to carry it as|
surplus for a year would be at
least 2,500,000 dollars. Growers|
will absorb 960,000 dollars of the
loss, millers 880,000 dollars and
workers 800,000 dollars. The new
Sale will however, mean that
3,500,000 man-days labour will be
put in that would have otherwise
been impossible.

It is planned to lift 668,000 tons
in March, 77,000 tons in April and
77,000 tons in May. The sugar will
be weighed and bagged in Puerto
Rico.



—B.U.?.



Russia And China Sign
30 Year Treaty

MOSCOW, Feb. 15.
ay signed a 30-year treaty

. a quarter of the world’s population in

two months of negotiations in Moscow by China’s new
#ader Mao Tse-Tung, his Foreign Minister, Chou En-Lai,
gn Minister, Andrei Vyshinsky signed the

(1) Russia will give China a
long term credit equivalent to
$300,000,000 (U.S.) for Soviet
industrial and rail equipment
This will be repayable from
December 1954.

(2) The Manchurian railway
will be returned to Chinesc
eontrol, Soviet troops will leave
the Port Arthur naval base in
Manchuria, and Russia will give
up her interests in the Port of
Dalny (Dairen).

These conditions will become
effective after a peace treaty has
been concluded with Japan—or at
the latest, by 1952.

They will seek a peace treaty
with Japan “in conjunction with
their allies during the Second
World War.” }
Russia will hand over to China,
without compensation Japanese
enterprises in Manchuria acquired
by Soviet interests.

(3) The main treaty — the
other two were separate agree-
ments—abrogates the 1945 Sino-
Soviet Agreement, signed with
Generalissimo Chiang Kai Shek.
The new agreement confirms
the full sovereignty of outer Mon-
golia. Russia and China agree “to
prevent the resurgence of Imperi-
alism and aggression of Japan, or
of any other power.”

If either party is attacked by
Japan or powers allied with her,

| and finds itself in a state of war,
adjourned, |

the other will immediately give
military aid with all the means
at its dis 1,

Marshal Josef Stalin sat at the
head of the table at a farewe!l
banquet given here tonight for
Mao Tse-Tung and his party after
the signing

It was expected that Mao and}
his treaty negotiators would leave
Moscow shortly, “
sé veral irea { the Ss viet U nion
efor Peking.

— (Reuter

before returning to

“Daily Express” he

but tour through }2

Riot Act
Read In B.H.

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

BELIZE,’ Feb. 15.

At a late meeting of the Execu-
tive Council last night, Governor
Ronald’ Garvey signed the Bill
enforcing the regulation illegaliz-
ing public assemblies without
permission from the Police Super-
intendent.

Police Chief, Story, said today
he considered the Riot Act already
read and said further that he
had replenished his forces with a
stock of tear gas bombs and
granted the church and _ schools
exemption. Violators of the regu-
lation are liable to a fine not ex-
ceeding $500.00 or imprisonment

) ley Adams, M.C.P., Mr.
| B.W.LA, for Jamaica,
| Princess Alice,
| Indies.

to attend
as Chancellor of
W. W. Reece, M.C.P., goodbye.

| Excellency the
craft with Mr. Percy Taylor, Br





not exceeding 12 months or both.
Story said this is a move against
incidents like yesterday’s, when
angry people assaulted City Coun-
cillor M. B. L. Wilson and forced
him to march home under the }
American flag, because Wilson |
had voted the key to the city and
an address to Princess Alice and|
the Earl of Athlone, due to arrive
in Belize on 23. The
regulations only apply to Belize. |
(By Cable)









Belize Police

Use Tear Gas

|
(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

BELIZE, Feb. 15.
Police used tear gas bombs
to-night to clear the streets after |

| the first meeting, held under to- |

day’s Emergency Act, was broken |
up when the crowd stoned a|
speaker who criticised America
and advised the people that they |
should not sing “God bless |
America”, |

Several arrests and one minor |
casualty were reported.

—(By Cable)

B. G. Flood
Victims Get
Condensed Milk

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 15.

The merchant community of
Bermuda are sending, as a gift, by
the ‘Lady Rodney’ 88 cases of
assorted canned foodstuff for flood
sufferers, according to a cable
received from Bermuda’s Gov-
ernor .

A cable was also received Sepa |
Dr. Miranda, Prime Minister of
Surinam, informing of the decision
of the Surinam Government i
send 510 cases of condensed milk
“as a, gift of the population of
Surinam to their neighbours in
distress.”

Both cables assured the B.G.
Governor of deepest sympathy of
the populations of Bermuda and
Surinam. Hon. C. T. Parkinson,
Governor-Deputy, have cabled
replies expressing appreciation for
these acts of generous sympathy.

From Surinam arrived, today
Edgar Wijngaarde, Vice-Chairman
of Paramaribo Chamber of Com-}
merce, with a etter of recom- P
rnendation from Prime Minister
Miranda. Wijngaarde represents
a group of Surinam citizens who
are desirous of extending special
aid to flood sufferers in this neigh-
bouring colony.

He will be taken around, firstly
by Flood Commissioner, M. B.
Laing, and will es wie a report to

‘aramaribo on Friday.
ee (By Cable)

Dead Child Had
2 Heads, 3 Hands

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 15.

The Director of Medical Ser-
vices disclosed today that a twen-
ight years old mother gave
birth on Monday to a full-term





ty-



|male child with two heads fully
formed and three hands. The
lfreak was born dead and the/
ther died shortly after The
from the waist|

(By Cable) |

Installation
Broadcast
To-night

THE ceremony of the in-
stallation of H.R.H. Princess
Alice, as Vice-Chancellor of
the University College
the West Indies, takes place
to-day, and will be broad-
cast from Jamaica by station

VRR62 on 13,505 kes. at
2100 G.M.T. (9 p.m. local
time).



No Stunts
From Bevin

LONDON, Feb. 15.
Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin

;Said today that in his job as For-
eign Minister he was going to play
|no stunts of any kind,

but was
going straight on with steady and
thorough methods of negotiation.

“T am going to continue talking
with and building up agreements
between those who will agree,
keeping my eye on the necessities
of others, and doing what I think
is right at the moment.”

He was addressing his constitu-
ents at East Woolwidh.—Reuter.



Ask $4,518,000
For “The Skyscraper’

WASHINGTON, Feb. 15.

The United States Army has
asked for $4,518,000 to continue
tests of the top secret anti-aircraft
gun, “the Skysweeper”, which it
is said could hit planes of super-
sonic speed either by night or day,
it was disclosed here today.

The yange and firing speed of
the Skysweeper, a 75mm. weapon,
were not disclosed in the report
made public before the Military
Appropriations Sub-committee of
the House of Representatives, but
its primary features were said to
be radar-directed fire control and
proximity - fused ammunition. —
Reuter.

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

WwW. W.
| Douglas Smith, were among the p

bados Legislature at the installation.



Twelve Europeans and seven South Africans are
seriously wounded in an outbreak of rioting, arson, and
widespread looting in three Johannesburg suburbs.
Africans yesterday started the |

and Mrs. Savage, Mr. Grant

Reece, M.C.P., and
assengers who left yesterday by
the installation ceremony of H.R.H,
the University College of the West

Mr.

The ceremony takes place to-day.
Picture on left shows Mr. J. H.

Wilkinson, M.C.P. bidding Mr
Reece is representing the Bar-
Picture on right shows His

Mr.

Governor and Mrs. Savage, walking out to the air-

anch Manager of B.W.1LA.,

while i

the background Mr. Aubrey Douglas Smith and Mr. Grantley Adan
| are seen busily chatting ag they made their way slowly to the ‘plane
eer

19 WOUNDED IN RIOT
IN JOHANNESBURG

JOHANNESBURG, Feb. 1:

in hospits

outbreak in the suburbs of New-
clare, setting Indian shops afit
and building petrol drum barri-
cades along the main roads, from
behind which they stoned polic«
and fire brigades rushing to the
scene, All traffic through
clare, Sophia Town and the west-
ern native townships was stoned,
and Europeans retaliated outsié
the borders of the African resi-

tial areas by stoning Afriaan
cars and a bus

Police opened fire in clearing
the barricades, and later covered
the firemen by sten-gun volleys
over the heads of rioting Africans,

who tried to cut the water hoses. |

They ran through a rain of stones
and scattered gunfire in New-
clare, where yesterday they
rounded up 250 people for disor-
ders in which one Indian woman
was hit by a bullet. It all be
when police arrested one man {0
failing to carry an identity
When the police had finally dis-
persed, the looters and barricac¢

Aubrey ,

L} information

New- |

card. |

fighters, the streets were littered |

with stones and glass,
Strong patrols covered the
tire riot area.—Reuter,

n



Death Sentence For
Arsenic Poisoning

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
| GRENADA, Feb. 15
Sentence of death was impos:
| On 67-year-old Veronica Alexan-
| der by Mr. Justice Cools-Lartigu«
yesteraay evening for sending
John Thompson (60), an arseni
impregnated mango by an 8-yeat
old boy during October last.
This is the first of 24 cases o
the Calendar for the February
or Cable.
4



Hope For Fortune

ROME, Feb. 15

Hopeful Italians are searchin,
deep in the dusty archives of r«
cord offices to see if they
claim to a fortune

The Italian Foreign Offide ha:
announced that an American
John Musto, who died in San Die-
go, California, on September 17
1948, has left a “huge inheritance’
to relatives presumed living ir
Italy. —Reuter.

Can ia)



Snow Storms Sweep U.S.
16 Dead: Many Homeless

CHICAGO, Feb. 15.

Floods and storms dealt destruc-
tive blows across wide areas of
the United States to-day, Mid-
February snow and ice storms
were blamed for at least 16
deaths. Property
ato mount-
ed into millions
of dollars.

Thous ands
were made
homeless as ris-
ing rivers spilled

Read the

into lowland Monday in the Evening The snow car-
homes in Louis- pet over some
jana and Mis- Midwest U. S.
sour. Other| Advocate. areas measured
thousands were More than 20
threatened with ae inches

evacuation i n To-day light
Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Ten- snow fell iri the upper and middle
nessee. Mississippi Valley, Michigan and

Many rivers fed with heavy over New England. Rain fell along | without

fainfall for the last several days
surged to flood stage, sorne inch-
ing toward high marks in last
month’s damaging overflows.

The U.S. Weather Bureau
that leet and now storn
which swept the Middle
West and Eastern St

ates
tates

SHAC

acros

was



“Illuminating Dots...”



diminishing. It left a blanket of
snow throughout the northern
States and abundant rainfall from

the Gulf to the North Atlantic
States. ;
Many g¢ommunities remained

isolated from
outside telephone
communicati on,
Prees, Telephone
and power lines
snapped under
weight of heavy
snow and sleet.

case of the
{



the Atlantic coast
Carolina northward.
no severe cold spots

New York counted 11
Gead. in accidents attributed t
the Four death
Pennsylvania and one |

in Tilinois.—Can Press

South
were |

from
There

person

were re-

ported in

|

|




a

;

8 Killed In

FALLS, Mon., Feb

GREAT
Wied it

15

| nen were killed
escaped when a Ur



Force B.29 Superfortress eras

shortly afte: taking off from
| Air Force base her«

The big four engined plar
Which had been earching fo:

missing B.36 bomber off the co

of British Columbia, plummet«
to the prairie about 3 miles soy

; west of the base

| It blazed up soon atter

} One side ofa road, an Air Fy

officer said.—Reut+r



Duke’s Grandson

|
‘| Drowned Trying

| Co Save His Brother
| OXFORDSHIRE

A six

et
year+old descendant
he Duke of Wel ington, Rot
, Clyde, was Growned in trying
rescue his eight-year-old brott
Jeremy from a lake with a stick
it was disclosed here today. Thi
two boys, grandsons of the sever
Duke of Wellington, were play
the |

near a lake

near

vilenael



r ne I Jeremy manager
Reuter.

Attlee Doesn't
Rule Out

LINCOLN, Feb. 1
British Prime
Attlee, commer
Winston
avom
in
Nations.
there vould e@ al
another

Phe
Clement

Vlinis
itr 1e1¢
Churchill
proposal, sai
the hands i

ig three
this matter
United
Whether

ise in

is

the

Making
a matter

1 do
voicn
Churehill
moment,
Nations.
It is all a very difficult subject
and I cannot make any further

approa
consideration
the

been made

for

mot rule gut upgge
has
the

the

e but at
it with

presen

rests United

pronouncement on it, until I have }
the |

talked the matter
Foreign Secretary.”

over with

—Reuter,



Acheson May Resign





Plane Crash





BANGKOK, Feb, 15
The American Secretary of
State, Dean Acheson, is likely to|
resign within six or eight weeks, |

sources close to American diplo- ,

mets meeting here said today
The diplomats were today con-

cluding their three-day conference

on the situation Southeast
Asia.

The source said that Dr, Philip
Jessup, President Truman’s roving
Ambassador, was expected to suc-
ceed Mr. Acheson

The reported possibility that he
might sueceed Dean Acheson fol-
lewed closely on reports from
Washington that the United States
had decided its strategia interest
in the Far East, an area in which
Dr. Jessup has shown interest
Reuter.

in



Russian Hold-up

BERLIN, Feb. 15.

The Berlin-Frankfurt American
military train was held up by the
Russians at the Zonal border for
more than two hours last night,
an American spokesman announe-
ed here.

The Russians held the train on
the claim that two passengers, Mr
George Hoffman and Miss V
Walker, delegates of the Interna-

tional Committee of the Red
Cross, travelling on Swiss pass-

ports, were on the military train
proper documentation,
the American spokesman stated.
It was established by Berlin
U.S. Army headquarters that thei:
apers were

!

|
|
i
}
|

in order, and the| reliably informed that he

train we llowed to proceed. to]

F 1 t clock to-da
ite eing held up for two and
larter hours.-—Reuter,

} Which he finds utterly abhorrent./

Price:

Five Cents

Year 553.

‘If Tories

Churchill Tells

(From Our London Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb. 15.
WIN STON CHURCHILL, Leader of the Conser-
vative Party, told me in a letter “there’s no
cause for alarm’’ in colonial food producing coun-
tries over the future of buik-buying if the Conser-

vatives are returned at the General Election on
February 23.



Churchill was replying to a
letter I had sent him asking for
clarification of the Conservatives’
policy on bulk buying,

Rumours that the Conservatives
would end this method of food
purchasing were causing serious
concern in the Empire and Com-«
monwealth countries I pointed
out,

I quoted a Member of the Aus-
tralian Export Control Board who
had warned Victorian dried fruit

Tories Not Opposed
To A Long-Term
Sugar Contract

Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 15.
Mr, L, D. Gammans, who may
2e next Colonial Secretary if the
Conservatives












k

are returned tof}, 1 neh AR a dul ;
office, said tonight he couldn't mervetives ware tune bo
remember the time when there} *“"Y* : . we power

bulk buying would cease, mean-
ing that Australia would have to
sell

had been so much discontent in
the Colonial Empire.

“The West Indies are on the at a lower price against com-
point of almost open rebellion,’} P&#Uon. : J ,
he added Churchill replied “we believe

Mr. Gammans addressing his the time has come to restore the
constituents in Hornsey, London, business of food purchase to ex-
said: “I want Britain to be the} Pemienced traders in food and to
centre of a great Colonial Empire,|®!@ cirect Government buying,

If Labour are returned to office but we intend to honour contracts

that cannot be”. which have already been made by
He said the Colombo Confer-| the Government

ence had been a great opportunity We recognise longterm con-

to strengthen Empire unity but] tact ay be a valuable means

Bevin’s decision to recognise Com-} fr offering producers in the

munist China before the confer- | =â„¢pire and Commonwealth coun-

nee had made a fiasco of the] t’ies guaranteed markets and we
whole affair. are ready to use such means.
“We believe even in such cases
“We (Conservatives) are} it will still be desirable to use the {
pledged if we return to office to] channels of private trade, while
hold a great imperial conference | Government confines itself to the
; tS soon as possible,” he added. proper function of ensuring stabil-
Asked how the Conservative | ity By Cable
Party intended to reduce taxatior



nd at the same time keep and
npreve social services and pen-
ions Mr, Gammans said it would

Meet! But

be done by cutting down need-

less spending. “Look at the mil- y

lions that have gone down th Meet In U.S.A.

drain over bulk buying,” he said, abies vay 3
Afterwards he explained t: WASHINGTON, Feb, 15.





your correspondent that the Con-] . Dean’ Acheson, U.S. Secretary ee
ervatives weren’t opposed to the State, said today that any. “Big
West Indian demands for a lone | Tree” meeting between Marshal
term contract and to negotiate ; Stalin, the American President
price for sugar. “That’s not bulk! &9@ the British Premier would

buying,” he said.—By Cable. have to be in the United States,
: ' Three other conditions, which

“ must be agreed to, are:
; ; a3 ss (1) : wee take ~— within
1e framework and in ac-
U wN. Flag Goes cordance with the princi-
‘ ples of the United Nations
. Charter

Up In Asmara (2) It should not be confined to
the United States and the
ASMARA, Feb. 15. Soviet Union, if the inter-
Judge Erling Quale, Chairman ests of other countries are

iffected

(3) It shall not be conducted

under duress,

Mr. Dean Acheson will have an
Opportunity at his Press Confer-
ence today to comment on Mr.
Winston Churchill’s suggestion for
such a meeting to end the east-
west cold war, On the other hand,
he may refuse to do so beeause of
the election issues in Britain.

Last week, he ruled out for the
present the possibility of a “nego-
tiated peace.”

of the United Nations Commission
for Eritrea, today raised the flag
of the United Nations over the
former palace of the Governor of
Asmara and now headquarters of
the Commission.

He called on all to work for the
good of Eritrea, and said that
‘tranquillity. was necessary to carry
out the Commission’s work. The
Commission has been sent to Eri-
trea to “ascertain more fully the
wishes and the best means of pro-
noting the welfare of the inhabi-«

tants of Eritrea,” he said.—Reuter. —Reuter.

RUSSIANS SUFFERING
FROM FEAR COMPLEX

—Truman



NEW YORK, Feb. 15.
Truman does not believe that any Russian promise given
in talks like those proposed by Churchill last night would
be kept.
This was shown in an exclusive interview the President has
given to one of America’s influential papers, the New Yorl
Times,

The President told Arthur Truman said that he remembe:
| Krock, the paper's Washington] ed with what goodwill towards
correspondent, that he “has noj the Russian people and their

hope the. Russians will keep any! rulers he
agreement, which it would be good
poliey
seek,”

The interview is regarded here
48 more significant, because it “But I found that all Stalin
was given before Churchill's cali; wanted to talk about was cessa-
last night for talks between Stalin,| tion of lend-lease hence, the
Truman and the man who becomes, atmosphere was unfavourable to
British Prime Minister. | what T had in mind,”

The President believes that the| The President said that to
real trouble with the Russians abousn lend-Llease at the time was
that-they are still suffering fromf a mistake, but he was “new” t
a complex of fear and inferiority | the Presidency. He felt there wa:
where we are concerned,” nothing else he could do, but sign.

He had no staff and no cabinet
of his own then, but now he had
both.

went to Potsdam.
There he planned to offer heip
for the United States to} for reconstruction of Russia, a
; well as of the rest of the wor «
; on a very large scale.

s

No Hope
“The agreement the Russian:
made at Yalta was the only one

they ever kept out of nearly U.S. Surpluses

forty,” the President said.

When the USSR blocked East-
West trade after the. Potsdan
agreement, he “began to lose the
last vestige of hope that what
scemed so good a peace prospect
ot San Francisco had survived”.

The President said that, further
Walter Bedell Smith, the Ameri
can Ambassador, reported from
Moscow that the. Russians wer¢
“carefully keeping from the
people, all the facts about the wai
assistance we had given them, ard
what our proposals have been fo
joint construction of the -vorld.”

Krock said the Preside:t i
huss
have 16,000,000 in con-en-

amps”. Krock adds, “bi

way of the Police Sti

ion

tne

Krock reported Truman as say~
ing that the globe showed vast
areas inhabited by hundreds of
millions ef people, whe wanted to
improve their lot, and this could
be done with American surpluses,
and with a moderate amount of
American assistance,

When that was done, the chief
threat of International Com-
munism would pass. This was the
primary objective of his policy.

Krock described the President
as “sitting in the White House”
in the age of Atomic Energy and
in the shadow of the Hydrogen
detonant, “with undiminished con-
fidence in the triumph of human-
ity’s better nature, and the pro-
ress of his own efforts to achieve

| abiding peace.”
—Reuter

j



wt)

ee

1

| Our Correspondent ;



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PAGE TWO

TS |











THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

anib Calling

IS EX€ELLENCY the Gov-

ernor and Mrs. Savage, Mr.
Grantley Adams, M.C.P., Mr. W.
W. Reece, K.C., M.C.P., and Mr.
Aubrey Douglas-Smith, Resident
Tutor in Barbados for the Uni-
versity College of the W.I., were
among the passengers who left by
B.W.1.A’s special flight yesterday
morning for Jamaica. They will
be present for the installation of
HLR.H. Princess Alice, The Coun-
tess of Athlone as Chancellor of
the University College of the West
Indies.

Other passengers intransit by
the same flight for the installation
were the Rev. F. Ryan, from Trin-
idad and Mr. Claude Wight, from
British Guiana.

«> «>
Sixteen Years Ago
ER ROYAL HIGHNESS

PRINCESS ALICE, who is
due to attive in Barbedos on
March 7th on H.M.S. “Glasgow
was last-in Barbados approxim-
ately sixteen years ago.

it was on March Ist, 1934 that
she arrived here by the Canadian
Pacific Liner “Duchess of, Rich-
mond.” Sir Mark Young, then Mr.
M. A; Young, C.M.G., was Gov-
ernor.of Barbados. Other Royal
visitors on this occasion were H.H.
Princess Helena Victoria, and
H.H. Princess Marie Louise. A
large crowd gathered to welcome
them, and The “Barbados Advo-
cate Weekly” of Saturday March
3rd 1934 has this to say about the
arrival of the Royal visitors.

“Pynctually at 9 o'clock, His
Excellency the Governor, accom~
panied by his Private Secretary
left the Chamberlain Bridge in the
Water Boat “Ida” to meet the
Royal visitors.

Lined up across Trafalgar
Square was a Guard of Honour of
Volunteers and Police under Capt.
F. B.-Armstrong, while a party of
Scouts fell in under Rev. A. E
Armstrong, Assistant Island Com-
missioner, and a party of Girl

Guides under Miss Daisy Year-
wood, Commissioner.
Shortly after ten o'clock, the

“Ida” with the Union Jack floating

at her stern entered the inner
basin--end—a rousing cheer was
sent up.

In response Their Royal High-
nesses waved their kerchiefs and
the lusty cheering was continued
until the party had landed.”

The Een of Athlone, accom-
panied her on this trip and they
left Barbados on March 3rd 1934
by the “Elders and Fyffes Liner
“Ariguant’;

«> «>

In Hencur OF

HE BARBADOS PRESS

CLUB will be giving a Dance
on Saturday 18th Feb., in honour
of the visiting British Guiana
Cricket Team. Arnold Meanwell

and his Meanies will be supplying
the music and all the new dance
tunes are on the programme.
Rhumbas, Sambas, Fox-Trots and
Calypso Session. Nothing is being
spared to make this a night of
nights, not only for the B.G. crick-
eters. but for everyone who
attends.



“ Makes
had elections more often,
doesn't it'”

you wish we



London Express Service heal
From Venezuela
R. CARLOS ECHEVERRIA,

‘ distributor in Caracas for
Yardley and Co., Ltd. and Alfred
Dunhill Ltd. of London, is now in
Barbados for about ten days’ holi-
day. He arrived on Sunday by
B.W.I.A. accompanied by his wife
and children and they are staying
at the Hastings Hotel.

«>» «>

Intransit

NTRANSIT passengers for An-
tigua yesterday by B.W.LA.
were Mr. John Parker, Managing
Director off Pure Cane Molasses,
and Mr. Joseph Forsyth, Asst.
Manager of the Shipping Dept. of
the United Molasses Company.
They were in Barbados last week
on a short business visit.

«>» «,

Indian Cadets Entertained
HANI BROS. and Mr. T. Ma-
raj held a cocktail party at
“Athlone”, Fontabelle in honour
of the Indian Cadets from H.M.S.
“Devonshire” on Tuesday evening.
Also present were Mr. Ganesh
Persaud, British Guiana cricketer,
Mr. Lalchand, dry goods merchant
from St. Kitts and Mrs. Lalechand
who are at present holidaying in

the island.
«»

First in 20 Years
M* J. P.. MARTIAL, Comp-

troller of Income Tax, Cas-
tries, St. Lucia, was a recent
arrival by B.W.1.A. for a holiday
and is staying at the Cosmopolitan
Guest House.

«>



A member of the St. Lucia
Cricket Club, Mr, Martial cap-
tained the St. Lucia team which
visited Grenada in 1947 during
the Cork Cup Cricket Tourna-

ment He represented St. Lucia
against Spartan last year and was
in Barbados about 20 years ago
as a school boy member of the St.
Lucia team which was returning
from the Cork Cup Tournament
held in Grenada.

While here they played against
the Pickwick Cricket Club, but
rain interfered with the game.

Mr. Martial attended the first
cricket game at Kensington and
hopes to see as much as possible
of the second game before return-
ing home on Sunday.

One thing that impressed him
was the love the Barbadian has
for his country, not only at home,
but in whatever country he hap-
pened to be.

WORLD'S tallest show girls are there at New York’s Copacabana.
They must be 6 feet or over, and the management claims that, as

well as being the biggest they are the best looking.—Express.



Everything

to SUIT you

Sir !

TROPICALS

FOUR INTO ONE

6.72—6.83—6.88--7.08
all at 6.2 a

For a limited time only!

WHITPIELDS

Dial 4220

EVANS. &
Dial 4606

BROAD ST.

ote

“oe ae

\




~
oa

ee

For Carnival in Trinidad
ISS ELIZABETH MAC CAR-
THY O’LEARY and Miss
Michaelene_ Glowacki left yester-
day by B.W.1.A. to spend a short
holiday in Tobago. They will
then be going to Trinidad for
Carnival. They are guests at the
Marine Hotel and they will be
away a little over one week.

<> <>
Undertook Enquiry
R. T. J. HALLINAN, C.BE.,
formerly Director of Medical
Seryices, Jamaica, returned home
yesterday evening by B.W.LA. via
Trinidad after undertaking an en-
quiry into the administration and
—" of the General Hos-
pital.

Dr. Hallinan was accompanied
by his wife and they were staying

at the Hotel Royal.

a «»
Spent Three Weeks
ISS JOAN CHIMMING, typ-
4 ist of the Trinidad Match
Factory, returned to Trinidad on
Tuesday by B.W.1.A. after d-
ing about three weeks’ holiday.
She was staying at ‘“Leaton-on-
Sea”, The Stream.
«> “>
Second Visit
R. AND MRS. E. FRENCH
and their two children were
arrivals from Venezuela on Sun-
day by B.W.I.A. for about three
weeks’ holiday and are staying at
the Hastings Hotel.

Formerly a Major in the British
Army, Mr. French served in the
Far East for fifteen years. He re-
tired in 1946 and joined the Shell
Group in England and went out to
Venezuela the same year.

This is his second visit to Bar-
bados, the first being about 20
years ago when he spent a short
holiday here. He told Carib that
Barbados is an ideal place for a
holiday and he had always wanted
to return, but this was the first
opportunity he had got.

<>? «>
Welcome News

ARIB is pleased to learn that

the Cabaret Show- and Man-
nequin Parade, which was such a
success at the Drill Hall on Satur-
day February 4th is now being re-
peated at the Globe Theatre on
Tuesday Feb. 21st.

There are to be added numbers
to this programme, which is in
aid of the St. Philip Baby Welfare
Centre and the St. Thomas Child
Nutrition Clinic, and what with
these extra attractions the show
should be a bumper success,

A plan of the seats can be seen
and booked daily between 9 a.m.
and 4 p.m. at the Globe.

ao «<2
U.K. Director Leaves

M® VICTOR ERCOLANI,

Managing Director and
Chairman of Cabinet Industries
Ltd., London, returned home via
Trinidad by B.W.1.A. yesterday
after spending about four weeks’
holiday here. He was accompan-
ied by his wife, Dr. Ercolani and
they were staying at the Windsor
Hotel.

«a» «>»
Adieu!

HE H.M:S. “Devonshire” left

Barbados last night for Trini-
dad. For almost everyone of
them it has been a most enjoyable
stay. There were quite a few
Cadets at the Aquatic Club yester-
day afternoon and they all said
how sorry they were to have to
leave, and by the looks of the
many young ladies who were also
down there, it would appear that
it was not only the Cadets who
felt that “Parting is such sweet
sorrow.”

«>» «>
Comings and Goings
ON. H. A. CUKE, OBE.,
M.L.C!, and Mrs. Cuke and

Hon. G. D. Pile, M.L.C., returned
from Trinidad by B.W.I.A. on
Tuesday.

* + *

Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Triming-
ham, returned to Trinidad yester-
day by B.W.LA.

* on” *

Mr. Colin Williams of Black-
mans St. Joseph, also left for
Trinidad by B.W.1.A. yesterday.

Cs + *

Mrs. E. Archer, Managress of
Hotel Windsor, left for Trinidad
on Tuesday by B.W.LA.

* a *

Mr. Tony MacAndrew, Man-
ager of J. B. Leslie’s Insurance
Dept. in British Guiana is here on
a short business trip. He arrived
yesterday by B.W.1.A. from Trini-
dad and expects to return on
Tuesday to British Guiana.

* *

Dr. Steve Bennett, Veterinary
Surgeon, arrived yesterday by
B.W.1.A, on ae one day’s visit.

* ae *

Mrs. M. B. Watson, left yester-
B.W.1LA, to spend three
weeks’ holidays with her family in

day by

Trinidad,
* os .

Miss Marguerite Rollock,

Bryan’s family in Maraval.
will be in Trinidad for Carnival

Mr, Bryan is Senior Clerk in the

Post Office,









Sole Selling Agent for

MEN'S AVENUE SHOES

$14.40 per Pair



ac-
companied by Mr. and Mrs. Wal-
ter Bryan, also left yesterday to
spend a short holiday with Mrs.
They

Americans

‘Seek King’s:
Shirt Style

AMERICAN business men are
bidding for deliveries of a new
sports style shirt which the King
has helped to design. One buyer
is flying to Britain to see the
shirt-maker — Mr. Jack Izod — to
find out how soon the shirt can
be mass-produced and exported
to the U.S. at £5-7s.6d. each.

Mr. Izod is 80. At his Thames-
side home yesterday he said: “It
will be the biggest export of the
year in men’s wear. The Ameri-
cans will be ordering in
thousands.”

Details of the shirt are secret.
Even staff at Mr. Izod’s London
showrooms ~in Hancver-square
are not allowed to see copies.
The first shirt to the King’s
specifications is locked in the
showroom safe- It is made of
knitted wool and silk and is
known as the “pullover shirt.”
A factory in Hawick, Scotland,
made it after special alterations
to the textile frames. 4

Said Izod: “The King ordered
his shirts last November. It was
to serve a double-purpose—allow
complete freedom of movement
and ensure maximum warmth.
He wanted the shirts for shoot-

Mr. Izod will only say that it
is similar in design to the dozi—a

knitted shirt he invented for
tennis players and golfers 30
years ago.

London Express Service.

Guide To

Housewives



Today’s Prices

MACKEREL:
Pickled—24c. per lb.
Canned—36c. per Ib.
PILCHARDS:
Canned—33c. per 1-1I6 tin
SALMON—Tinned:
(a) Red—77c. per 1-16 tin
4lc. per }-Ib ,,
(b) Chum 48c, per 1-16 ,,
26c. per 4-1b ,,
(c) Pink—56c. per 1-1b ,,
30c. per }-Ib ,
Pickled—30c., per Ib.



cCROSSW

ORD
3



Across
1, Pusm ahead while the this
ood. (5)
o. Before going up, remember that
it has its dangerous descents. (4)
8. This ple is sweet. (5)
0. Here’s love ir Yorkshire. (8)
1. Hard rock of igneous origin. (5)
2. Kind
4
2
7
9

1

1

1 (4)

14. Now this will be hard to find (4)

15. The female of some species. (3)

17. Brings up one way. (5)

19. Peculiar finding it im good
dresses. (3)

21, Sort of measure you may get at
a pinch, (3)

22 Copy the bird when its late. (3)

23. Rope for a smali hole. (4)

25. Disorder. (6)

26. See that your answer's correct

(6)
Fy around this tor the ‘arder
(3)

DowD
Boiling without Crosby. (3)
3 Being ruined one must get used
to the change. (6)

4. Symbolic of silliness. (5)

5 Take the measure of the vel
rope. (3)

6 Where the vet ran to” (6)

7. Close even for a miser. (4)

8 He is in the wrong. (7)

9 M@ke Peri next to teing un-
skilled. (8)

ls Even in solo there are thirteen
ike this one. (5)
14 it may be a help to pic:
or possibly a hindrance )
i6 Scent that ts almost odd nelong
ing to us. (5)
is The lady has risen to attract
20 Regulation. 14)
4 May start an ovation (3)
Soiution of vesterdavs vu c Across
,



(6)

Spokesman 7
fi. 12, Envy:
». Pus








some
Down:
Matrix, ¢

WATCH FOR....
- HiGh





am concerned Paris can keep it.

If their designers imagine that
this ugly line will please the
world, as the New Look did in
1947, they are going to be disap-

Balmain showed these 15} ins.



KISMET, THE RA



HELSEA artists consider Kis-
met Shahani (pictured here)
one of the most beautiful models
they have seen. She is 20, was
born in India of an English mother
and an Indian father. They
brought her to England when she
was two. She now shares a flat
with a girl friend at Hove.

Kismet began posing at 17,
used to work at Brighton and vari-
ous London art schools for 5s. an
hour. A month ago she came to
Chelsea in search of more lucra-
tive work.

By the time portrait painter
A. E. Egerton Cooper had done
three heads of Kismet news of
her beauty began to get around.
Then James Proudfoot painted

Paris Can



Shapeless Look

SO the flapper look has come
back. Well, don’t say I didn’t
warm you.

The flattened shapeless silhou-
ette of the 1920’s is being pushed
by almost every leading Paris
fashion house. And so far as I

pointed.

I suggest that English women
will ignore it.

At the finish of Dior’s 24 hours’
dress show his overheated,
overcrowded, over-perfumed
salon in the Avenue Montaigne,
champagne flowed as the audi-
ence screamed their appreciation,
kissing and embracing Dior and
congratulating him on another
wonderful collection.

in

. “we
Straight Skirts
AND of all the hideous 1920
clothes I have seen Dior’s were

certainly the most wearable.

Day dresses are sleeveless, with
low U-shaped or rounded neck-
line. They have straight bodices
pulled in with a belt.

Skirts are straight and tight or
sometimes with pleatings from
the hipline.

At Jean Dresses’ midnight show
we saw day dresses with long
trailing chiffon scarves.

from the floor. His evening

dresses are one inch shorter.
There are lots of buttons on

day dresses. Dior showed dresses

buttoned along each _ shoulder Roy AL Worthings
and down each side, Another oe ;
designer showed dresses which OPENING FRIDAY AT 8.30 p.m.
can be worn sleeveless or with NO SHOW TO-DAY
the sleeves buttoned on. Baie
The sash returns for day and LASSIE£ in
evening wear. “HILLS OF HOME”
Orange Popular ial
THE short evening dress 1s 5 cadens 0 nach iee
more popular than ever. It is Edmond GWENN—Tom AKE,
made now in the straight, sleeve- Donald CRISP—Janet LEIGH
less 1920 style, fringed with jet i
or crystal beads. Drama, Action, Thrills, Romance
Suits have long rounded revers | | It’s the best week-end Show
buttoned below the waistline
(more 1920 influence here), with SATURDAY NIGHT 8.30
straight tight skirts.

Most popular colour is orange,

TYME”
&

17th MARCH.




| EMPIRE = 16th
|

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Lengths 6 ft., to 10 ft., width 2 ft.










AEE

GE

During the

her in the nude.
22 sittings his studio was visited
by many artists.

T. C. Dugdale, R.A., says: “She | proudly, “She can make an Irish |

almost made me break my rule
never to paint any woman but a
fair-skinned one.”
‘My Best Model’

Sculptor Barney Seale com-
ments: “T have never seen a
mare exquisite combination of
beauty in face and figure.”

And Proudfoot calls her
best model he has ever had.

Kismet has an urchin crop of
blue-black hair. Her eyes are
such a dark brown as to be almost
black.

“Burnt sienna”,
calls it.—L.E.S.

Keep The

the

Proudfoot

so difficult to wear. It is shown

with grey, with black, and with

white.

Some hats I saw looked as if they
were made from wood. They
were shaped like the roof of a
house, and one imagined they
had been knocked up by a car-
penter rather than created by
a Paris milliner.

Bangles Back

BUNCHES of radishes were
used as buttonholes. Two de-
signers showed black satin pan-
taloons peeping beneath full lace
skirts.

Bangles are back. They are
worn high up the arm above the
elbow, and you will wear them
with strings of beads again.

The beads are twisted several
times around your throat, then
knotted hanging to the waist.

nl e

Large Ear-rings

EAR-RINGS are large and
dangling to the shoulder, and
you top all this with a long cig-
arette holder and with shoes with
long pointed toes and the old
shape Louis heel.

The mannequins
and beautiful, and they need to
be to wear these unbecoming
clothes. The ordinary woman at
home of medium height with
wide hips would look as if she
was wearing a fancy dress cos-
|} tume if she walked out in this
1920 Look.

—L.E.S.

===








were young



While Sailor Sam
ing the horse Rupert remembers the
crumpled bit of paper in his pocket,
and now he opens it out and ex-
plains how Beppo had led. him ‘to
the place where he found it. Sam

fooks at it carelessly. Then he
stares more alertly. “* This is very
queer. very queer indeed,"’ he



A Singin’ |
Hinny

People who have heard or sung
the old Northumbrian folk song
“Billy Boy” will remember that
Billy, having announced his in-
tention of getting married, is sub-
jected by his mother to a merci-
less cross examination as to his
bride’s matrimonial qualifications.
When mamma asks, “Can she
make an Irish Stew?” Billy replies

Stew and a Singin’ Hinny too.”
But how many of the people who
sing the song with a fine appre-
ciation of its rousing tune but
secant regard for the words know
what a Singin’ Hinny is? Margar-
et Sheppard Fidler set any en-
quiring minds at rest in a recent
B.B.C. broadcast when she told
listeners not only what a Singin’
Hinny is but also how to make
one. It is a sort of large girdle
cake, which can be made with the
minimum of effort and is cooked
on a large flat girdle or the hot
plate of an electric cooker without
using the oven. It is made with
flour, fat, a good helping of dried
fruit and a trifle of salt and when
cook it is split open, spread liber-
ally with butter and served hot.
But why Singin’ Hinny? Because
this delectable cake makes a pro-
testing “singing” noise as it sits
grilling on the girdle.

Wits Tester

FOR a deceptive trick, take a
handful of matches or tooth-
picks, place ten ona table, remove
six and leave none. Use any
method you like, so long as no
matches are broken or crossed.
‘eT ‘Buryjou 20 ‘QO 9y}
vey TIM NOs pue ‘sayojeur xIs IO ‘,.M,,
Due .2,, 94} SAOUTIAY = .,°0M3,, RIOM 9a}
ads 0] SOYO}wUL 94} OFueIIY :YOMSNV





UNIVERSAL presents - - -
DEANNA DURBIN — DICK

im

1



Gene

RIDERS OF THE





——



THE FACTS THEN ARE—





at ROYAL
“The College Heralds”

CARIBBEAN TRAINING COL-
LEGE MALE OCTETTE in
Prdgramme of Spirituals
Popular Songs assisted by Sedric
Phillips with Miss Verna Reid at





and

LAST SHOW TO-NIGHT AT 9.15

Columbia Pictures Presents... .

‘Anna Lucasta’

I
)
)
\ Starring
}
BISHOP—John IRELAND-
|

Paulette GODDARD— William
Oscar HOMOLKA





ROXY

LAST SHOW TO-NIGHT AT 7.30

United Artists Double

The VICIOUS CIRCLE

and

The Dead Don't Dream



William BOYD as

Hopelong Cassidy



OLYMPIC

y
Conrad NAGEL—Fritz KORTNER
| LAST SHOW TO-NIGHT AT

9 o'clock

ml Inst. Columbia Serial

BATMAN and ROBIN





—_#o_o~oeo—==eRmnmPP-V_|[—_——DJT#xTFHOOOOeeeeeeas”'"

the Piano.
——$<_$—$—$—$—$————————————— 1)
EMPIRE |)




The

from 9 a.m.—4 p.m.



We have in Stock...



SHINGLES
CEMENT

|
| ‘

~~



ne

and the













































se hy

Caravan ~22

ee,

mutters, ‘* This isn’ Written
English, It's low Spani

on earth is it doing h ms Wha
since | saw. this Anat Ws

can't understand much of 3% :

frowns as he tries to

meaning. Then as he ea 4

very end of the message §
sees him give @ violent an

j est
a «nen
& a*

eo

Tio |
Fa ue
|
eee

“7
Directed by
rj

Ns

HOWARD HAWKS

Opening FRIDAY, 177 , .
2.30 Matinee

at the
Empire neatte

ba

Extra!, Extra!

India’s Prime Minister Jy
haral Nehru in --. ‘



AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Menkes |

FRIDAY, SUNDAY, TUESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT at 8,

“OUP IN CENTRAL PARK
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quuRSDAY.

—

Cyechs Overrule
Church

Appointment

PRAGUE, Feb. 15










by

nn



has installed a Roman The annual

priest of its choice as Australian Burea
‘ng administrator” of the perimental Stations»
“of Banska, in Central refers

jal Slovak news agency that

















oy n Catholic priest
peste vet (42), son of an
ural labourer, = aon
F jshopric, where the
Ee oe skrebik died .on
wary 8. ,
me news agency said Dean
whet had aeusaced Dean Dr
“3 Briedon, who “without the
the State, was appoint-
a] Vicar of the diocese
n informed of the atti-
‘the State Church office,
”

¢

ding to the news agency,
ster of Banska on January
t consulting the State
Chureh Affairs, elected
4ion as Capital Vicar.

Slo branch of the State
for Church Affairs repeat~-
d the Chapter against
dings, and repeatedly
» were to be consulted by
in accordance with
wisions of the new Church
it was stated.

Cl

—Reuter.



ed the nomination by js jn

.

FEBRUARY 16, 1950



Australian

Sugar

me Czechoslovak State Office Progress

Geclesiastical Affairs, annulling
ee een Catnede SYDNEY, (By Mail)

report of the
u of Sugar Ex-
for 1948—49
_ to long delays in the in-
ation of equipment and shows
while field and mill labour
iproving, ‘the supply is still
not comparable with pre-war
years,

The report showed, however,
that the 6,000,000 ton cane pro-
duction record of 1939 was broken
by the season’s 6,433,556 ton
output. Sugar production of
910,049 tons was 338,000 tons
higher than that for the previous
Season—an increase of 59%,
although harvested acreage,
while still 7,153 acres short of the
1940 record, only rose by 17%

stall

iyo.
Average cane and sugar yield

per acre also rose to new heights
of 24.88 and 3.52 tons respective-
ly, beating the 1939 records of 23.14
and 3.4 tons, while yields in. the
Lower Burdekin district, Queens-
land, responsible for 14 per cent
of the total Australian crop, rose
to as high as 34.08 tons of cane
and 5.14 tons of Sugar per acre.
The report adds that this was
only one-year cane and could
justifiably be considered with the
world’s best.

Sucrose content of the cane
was also higher than for the
previous two seasons, but could



little blue crocuses, don't you

Election News



“Lilienthal
p timis tie

NEW YORK, Feb. 15.













,

world.”

& Lilienthal also unequivo-
































icy on the Hy

— Reuter.



Bie Ill With

“Influenza

PVATICAN CITY, Feb, 15.

Pius XII, who has been
since yesterday with influ-
fiad today partially lost his
) A speech which he was
we made tomorrow to Catho-
malists holding an Interna-
Conference here will be
in writing. The Pope’s
$said the Pope was suf-
P inflammation of the
#, but there was “‘no cause
i

Pope's condition was re=
@this morning to be slightly
with a temperature just
Normal. Vatican officials
he Pope’s enforced rest may
the pains in his left
wich have been recently
him to limp.—Reuter.



i Tow Burnt
Ship From

Venezuela
10 BREMEN

BREMEN, Feb. 14,

b m ocean going tug
has left here for Puerto
Venezuela to pick up
to Bremen the burnt out
Plykary. The Bombay
d by the Bremen shipping
which bought the

wkary is expected to be
Service again after ex~

in a dockyard here.
PBombay is expected to com-
trip in about four
uter

es

Fire Siren;

| iidings Burn

MISSOTUT, Feb, 13.
Sifen iroze at Mond
wun, and half a block

mes in the m

P ain business
t burnt out while a tele-
tor called each mem-

Volunteer fire ig
r,
. '

Mies
COATS

FOR
Wt Evening Wear

BB ire

a
ia
.

ade




PMOERN DRESS
SHOPPE
St.

Bridgetown





David E. Lilienthal, whose
on as Chairman of the

States Atomic Energy
jon becomes _ effective
y said that he did not “share
p predictions about the end

New York Times reported
n Washington today that Mr.
made this conment after
ell visit to the White

endorsed President Truman’s
rogen Bomb and
Energy in general, The



}

not compare with 1939, when one
ton of sugar was extracted from
6.77 tons of cane.

The report assertéd that the

higher cane output was due to the
introduction of three new types

the old-established species.
—B.U.P.

Widespread
Demand For
World Sugar

LONDON, (By Mail).

Czarnikow’s latest sugar re-
view, after reporting that the
Ministry of Food and Common-
wealth producers are now work-
ing on the basis of 1950 sugar
price of £30-10s. a ton cif. U.K.,
describes a widespread demand
for world sugar and a livening of
the market,

Ireland has bought 30,000 tons
of Cuban raws, Switzerland,
France, Holland, Belgium and
Greece are other customers, and
it is rumoured Cubans have also
been placed to the UK,

The strong possibility that cur-
rent Indian production may be
short of satisfying home demands
suggests she may have to import.
Sterling sugar will be difficult for
her to get and she faces a cur-
rency problem if she wants
Cuban sugar.

(Though Czarnikow’s do not
mention this point, it would ap-
pear that if Indian produé@tion
continued to lag in future years,
here would be a good market
for the unguaranteed Australian
surplus),

A very discouraging view is
taken of the future prospects of
Formosan sugar, yields are poor
and the political situation diffi-
cult.

The surprise reappearance of
Puerto Rican sugar on the world
market failed to shake it—another
reflection of the strong demand.

Canada’s sugar crop for 1949,
says the Canada and Dominion
Sugar Company, has been the
largest in history at 100,361 long
tons.

Prague’s sugar news estimatcs
European beet sugar production
for 1950, (excluding Russian) at
6,859,133 metric tons raw value—
over 30,000 tons below last year.

On the basis of a total output
of 4; million (Spanish) tons, the
Cuban crop has now been allo-
cated as follows:

World quota 925,000 tons
Special Reserve 1,000,000 tons
USA and retained 2.600,000 tons
Loeal consumption 225.000 tons
B.U.P.



Human Rights
Court Urged

THE HAGUE, Feb, 14.

The establishment of a Human
tights Court at the peace palace
here to handle all problems aris-
ing from the alleged violation of
personal and national freedom
vas urged to-day by Professor H.
Bruggman, Chairman of the Eu-
ropean Federalist Movement deal-
ing with the reserve shown by
Britain on European Unity, Pro-
fessor Bruggman said that Hol-
dand’s role is an important one
of being a link between such hes-
itants as Britain and Scandinavia
and the more enthusiastic coun-
tries like Belgium, France Ger-
many and Italy.

An official spokesman said that
another official had mentioned
to the Foreign News Agency re-
porter earlier to-day that he had
read in the newspapers. three
}months ago of the arrest of a man
in Hanover, who was alleged to
have wanted to kill the President.
| The man, this official had said,
|turned out to be a lunatic, and
was now in an asylum.

The official said that he men-
, tioned the reported case in sup-
'port of West German Chancellor,
/Dr. Konrad Adenaeur’s proposal
‘for a Bonn Police Force to pro-



| tect the Government and Parlia-

ment

—Reuter.



ASK DELAY
SPY TRIAL

WASHINGTON, Feb. 14.
Representations have been
to Hungary to delay the
Robert Vogeler, Execu-
the International Tele-
and Telegrai i
ho is due to face espionage

harges in Budapest next Friday

j —~(Reuter.)

which have supplanted some of



From Britain

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

LONDON, (By Mail)

Our election is not warming up.

With only ten days until the pol

experienced election agents are

fearing that the proportion of
voters coming to make their mark
on Thursday 23 will be the low-
est in this country. That is the
best consolation Conservatives
can find at the moment. For the
tude of opinion seems to be run-
ning steadily against Mr.
Churchill’s valiant campaigning.
But it is Labour that depends on
“getting out the poll”—the phrase
used for getting as many as pos-
sible to vote.

The weather does not help the
politicians to persuade people to
come Out at night to their meet-
ings. Most of Britain is now
under.a deep dank cloud—a ter-
rible contrast to electioneering
days in the Summer of 1945. Lord
Beaverbrook has arrived in this
damp England from the Sun {f
the West Indies. One newspaper
—aot one of his own—reports
that he is already expressing dis-
approval of the nice peaceful
election we have been enjoying.
But one of his own newspapers,
“The Evening Standard,” nas de-
clared that the “phoney election”
is now over and the gloves are
off. According to this paper,
though, it is Winston Churchill
who has wakened up the sleepy
combatants, And there is some
truth in that. The hard smacks at
Socialist electioneering — mainly
at promises that take no account
of the perilous trade position of
Britain—have come from Winston
himself, Anthony Eden has
made the greatest Conservative
success, in the “persuasive” line,
with a radio speech a week ago.
Labour speakers are still trying
to refute him. Eden, incidentally,
gave a comparitively large seg-
ment of his radio time to Foreign,
Commonwealth and Colonial
questions. He gave the impression
that if Conservatives win the
election he would like to return
to that spacious room overlooking
the Horse Guards and St. James’s
Park where a Foreign Secretary
makes his decisions. Though this
is his personal inclination, no
doubt, Eden is picked for the
place as Leader of the House of
Commons and Lord President >f
the Council the place Morrison
now holds at Attlee’s right hand.
Listening to Anthony Eden it was
noteworthy that Conservatives
have now adopted the technique
Labour used in Opposition—in
the past. He tried to explain
economics and government as a
difficult science—rather than
rely on catchwords and slogans.
This time, it is Labour that is
playing the electoral game with
slogans

On Plymouth Hoe

The brightést fight of the elec-
tion, a little spot of fire in the
damp world, is the election fight
between Michael Foot, the Labour
champion, and Randolph
Churchill Winston’s adventurous
son, in Plymouth. The Labour
member, Michael, an acid Foot,
won in 1945 by just over two
thousand votes—a small margin.
These two principal contestants
are both journalists and wits.
Randolph Churchill, taking over
the battle from Leslie Hore-Beli-
sha, (of yellow beacon fame), calls
himself a “Conservative Liberal
—Hore-Belisha was a Liberal by
origin. Michael Foot, now one of
the Labour Left Wing, is also «
Liberal by origin, in another
sense. He was brought up in a
famous Liberal tamily. His
father. Isaac Foot, sits like a
prooding Nestor, watching the
tate of his sons—two Liberals
and the Labour Foot, all fighting
this election in the West Country

Winston has sailed ‘— to
Plymouth in support of his son,
who advertised the meeting with
the unfilial phrase, “Come out on
Thursday and give the old war-
horse a cheer.” Churchill, (the
elder), gave his audience a fine
show; and Nye Bevan came down
just afterwards to give the Labour
Foot a leg up. This is one of the
seats into which the two main
parties are throwing everythin:
they have got. And Liberals are
intervening in the middle. Their
candidate, Mr. Cann, has been
many things in his day. He
learned platform speaking as 4%



- . 7 ¢
Conservative speaker and for
rile W : I lk wer t Sir
hut ai 2
Oswald Mosley bu u for
month eighteen yeal



Mr. Cam Michael Foot marric
recently the brilliant, yound ar
independent film producer iil

Craigie, who made a_ serious
minded tale of Plymouth and how

it should be replanned — called *aucer-shaped object appear from
‘The Way we Live.” The film the southeast with a yellow band
was propaganda he tou, ay. round it”

S propaganda for town plan In Buenos Aires it was reported
chance Nazi bombs had offered &t a large object, brilliantly a
to build a finer Plymouth. But oP and pink at the edges, flew. :

’ . - over Rosario this
morning shortly after midnight.

It was seen by hundreds of per
sons. who claimed that it lit u
the part of the city wherever 1°
passed as if it were daytime. Simi
crombie’s. I doubt whether you lar objects recently have been re-~
have seen Mrs. Michael Foot’s ported seen in Chile. -Reuter.

ning, and Plymouth, and — the

most of Plymouth still lives in an
uncomfortablé way—in the pres
fabricated bungalows of Labour's
plan not the “spacious living
terraces of Sir Patrick Aber-

films overseas — but they were
admired here. Michael, though,
is relying less on this indirect
Support, and his wife’s charm,
than on_ trenchant speeches,
violent denunciations and his

father told me a story of a man
on his death-bed. The parson

asked him if he was prepared to Catholic Press Meet

renounce the Devil and all his
works, The dying man replied
‘situated as I am I do not think 1

am in a position to make an enemy Tepresenting 16 nations will mee
of anybody’ ”. That, Foot im- here tomorrow for the third An-

can ' . Set nual
plies, is the position the Tories aoe hpe *
are in now — they need all the Press—Reuter.

friends they can find.
Irreverent Revelations

A Conservative new Spaper
columnist has it from a junior
minister, speaking privately on
the steps of the Labour citadel,
that this Labour Minister would
like four men of other parties
returned at this election. The
four are an old group. The Con-
servative is Quintin Hogg, the
present Oxford Member—lI expect
him to be returned, his opponent
is Lady Pakenham, the wife of

the Labour Lord Pakenham. This
Labour Minister also thought
W. J. Brown,, the Independent
member for Rugby, would be a
nice opponent to see back in the
House. (Brown has only a fair
chance—as the Tories have put x
up a man against him. Odd this %
—since he is one of the best anti- %
Socialist shots in the locker). K
Then the Labour Minister, (speak- ¢

ing, no doubt, behind his hand,
on the steps of the building Bevin
built), added two others to his x
non-party choices. Konni Zillia- |
cus, the Labour rebel, expelled ¥
for his Communist sympathies, ]%
and now anathema to Com- |X
munists for his Tito sympathies, | &
was mentioned in the same bre ath |
as Harry Pollitt, the Communist }%
leader. Reports from Gateshead | 2
indicate “Zilly” will probably | %
hold his seat — but I doubt | 9

4,

PROD

whether Harry Pollitt, or any|* o C oOo

other Communist will be there
to put Soviet questions in the next |
House of Commons. This total |
obliteration of the Communist |
party is remarkable—in 1950. It
makes the British “C.P.” the
weakest of Moscow’s brood
operating in Western Europe.

Which Labour Junior Minister
was it?

,

|

1

|

|

|

|

|

|

In Darkest Kensington
I went round a constituency in

West London, held by a Labour}

member, with the editor-in-chief |

of a group of Swiss magazines. |

The afternoon was gloomy and|

rainy. With the Labour membs« r|
and his “agent” we took stock of |
the residential areas, and the|
tenement areas, and all the “in
between”. Two remarks were
illuminating. After the Labour
stalwarts had admitted almost |
unanimous support in the ten- |
ements, 20% support in the|
residential areas and 50-50 sup-
port in the rows of small terraced
houses, the Swiss editor remarked
“It is a class war, isn’t it? What-
ever is said officially?” And the |
Labour Agent’s remark pointed |
out the two problems of a British
politician—getting out the voters
and being sure of the women. He!
said, “T would like to be an agent |
in Switzerland where the women |
cannot vote, and the men have to|

vote compulsorily!” ;*

Five Years Jail |
For Starting Fire
BORDEAUX, Feb. 14

Twenty-three year old Mat e|
Georgette Tibult has been sen-|

tenced he to five years hard}
labour for tarting one of the
res that ravaged ne
Crronae egi it
4 ave be
re i . «
owner of farm

— (Reuter. |

THE BARBADOS



'

ADVOCATE





Se ok ten







“hlying Saucers”

Seen Over Jutland

: COPENHAGEN, Feb. 14.

Two “flying saucers” over Jut-
land were reported today by the
Conservative newspaper “Ber-
lingske Tidensde”

The paper quoted a responsible
elderly couple for seeing “a



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KLIM*:MiLK

NEUMUNSTER, Feb. 16,
A German
former German
Bundestag Deputy, Wolfgang Hea- |
ler, on charges of having deliver- |
anti-semitic

great

Before announcing the verdict, |
the Judge, Herr Otto Paulick, said

separately with a charge against |



Bernhard In Rio

RIO DE JANEIRO, Feb. 15,

( : Prince Bernhard of The Nether
acid wit. “Before long the Toriey lands

will be calling themselves Con- West
servative-Liberal-Socialists My —Reuter.

Von Koneringen, on leave of the



prosecution
investigations
Hedler was alleged to have said |
that Knoeringen worked during |
World War II as a Major in the}
British Seeret Service, and spied
against Germany.



member of the Right Wing German
Party, the smallest

Adenauer’s
coalition, was alleged to have said
Schleswig-Holstein,
last November, that opinion may

ROME, Feb. in Chancellor

Conference of the

right to poison Jews by gas, There
other means
During the



rid of them.
trial, Hedler and several friends
and party colleagues gave evidence
that he had thought of a Jewish
mass emigration to a Jewish State,
which was to be set up

Jamaica Governor

Banns Meeting

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Feb, 1!

The Governor of Jamaica to-
night banned a public meeting and
processions here following a strike
of Kingston hotel workers, whic!
began yesterday,—Reuter.

that he thought of







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BARBADOS

eer SSS ES fone e
Published by Thu Advocate Co. Lid., 34, Broad St., Bridgetows

~

PAGE FOUR
ADVOGXTE



naan cetera
Thursday, February 16, 1950

rn a ID
University College
THE installation to-day of H.R.H. Prin-

cess Alice, Countess of Athlone, as Chan-
cellor of the University College of the West
Indies is an important occasion. The cere-
mony among the emerging buildings on
a site ringed by the Blue Mountains of
Jamaica will be a picturesque and colour-
ful rite in a land which is full of colour. Its
importance is symbolic, the formal recogni-
tion of a fact. The University College is
in being; seventy under-graduates, eight of
whom are from Barbados, are in residence
and working for degrees, and the growing
staff of Professors and lecturers, constant-
ly recruited by new appointments, is at

work in teaching and research. The im-

pressive assemblage of buildings — Great

Hall, Senate House, Teaching Hospital,

science schools and five halls of residence

—setting their wide demesne of pleasant

grounds and playing-fields, will be largely

completed by the end of 1952.

The University is the freest and most
flexible of all academies of learning. No
Government controls or plans it. It owns
no higher authority than itself. The associa-
tion of scholars and teachers themselves
decide the statutes which they obey.
Older Universities are sometimes accused
of becoming hide-bound by their own tra-
dition, but there are few human societies
in which thought and the expression of
opinion has been so free,

The history of Universities is usually
traced to the Middle Ages, and Bologna,
Paris, Padua, and Oxford, with some dis-
pute ag to their relative priority of the
oldest Universities of the world. Perhaps
the origins of the Institutions are still
earlier. Athens itself where Socrates and
the Sophists sat among their listeners, and
Plato wandered with his in the grove of
Academus, has the quality of a University
city. The great concentration of learning
which began at Alexandria in the third
century B.C. was already of a more special-
ised kind.

The West Indian University College be-
longs to the people of these islands, with
those of British Guiana and British Hon-
duras, and is not administered by a Gov-
ernment Department. Here black and
white East Indians and Chinese, are al-
ready living and working sidé by side.
Of its staff, many are West Indians born.
Many are distinguished scholars from
Great Britain or other parts of the Com-
monwealth. Nor has any great University
closed its doors to foreign scholars. Know-
ledge knows no boundaries.

The foundation had its opponents among
gloomy prophets who declared that the
West Indian University would never win
respect for its degrees as against those of
older foundations. This objection is already
answered. The students sit for the exter-
nal degrees of London University, whose
standing is everywhere recognised and
famous. The West Indian graduates will
rank with those of any University in the
world. With this standard set, the future
will see the West Indian University con-
fidently granting its own degrees.

There can be no doubt of the special con-
tribution which the new Institution should
be able to make to human knowledge. A
great new opportunity has opened for re-
search in tropical medicine, Meanwhile
the interesting suggestion is often heard
among the general public that Civil Ser-
vants and officials from England might well
receive a part of their training here. Above
all perhaps, the new University should con-
stitute a unique field for research in social
studies.

The emergence of a West Indian Culture
is even discussed. The University will
probably be its chief centre and clearing-
house. Of West Indian culture, it has been
wisely said that if the emphasis is always
placed on the culture, a West Indian quality
will come of itself. All great cultures have
drawn on the vast stores of the interna-
tional past. When Hitler tried to make Ger-
man culture nationalistic, he degraded its
art and made its biology ludicrous and
despised. With application and research,
West Indian culture will enrich the inter-
national store.

|
|

THE



Ive Just Paid My Witch Doctor ..

With Bernard Wicksteed In Darkest Afriea
Despatch No. 2...

THE LOITA HILLS, Kenya.

I DON’T know what the ac-
countants will say when they see
my expenses for this trip, but »ne
of the items will be: “To buying
acow... £5.”

It wasn’t a very good cow, but
I needed it to pay my witch doc-
tor’s bill. Q

He’s rather a superior witch
doctor (or laibon, as they’re called
in these parts), and he’s the rector
of a witch doctor’s medical school
in the Masai native reserve.

I happened to say to somebody
in Nairobi that I’d like to meet a
real medicine man, and he said
there was a whole faculty of them
8,000 feet up in the hills
at Loita.

So here we are above
the clouds in a lost world
that might have come out
of Rider Haggard.

To reach it you drive
for more than a hundred
miles over the dusty
plains lying immediately
south of the equator.
Then you climb into the
&y up a series of brick-
ted gorges that are the
home of baboons and
leopards.

Suddenly you come out
at the top and spread be-
fore you are the rolling
green downs of England.
You might be in Susser
or Wiltshire. '

A dozen varieties of
little flowers grow in the
turf like buttercups,
daisies, and harebells,
and the hills are dotted
with bushes that look
something like blackthorn or may.

In these so-English surround-
ings it’s odd to find that the ani-
mals grazing by the track are
antelopes, zebras, and gnus.

*
Bone Rattling

About 40 hereditary witch doc-
tors live in this African Shangri-
La, but not all of them are in
practice. Successful witch doc-
toring depends so much on psy-
chology and a knowledge of hu-
man nature that you are not al-
lowed to rattle the bones or take
fees till you reach middle age.
Until then you have the status of
an undergraduate or a witch doc-
tor’s heir apparent.
The faculty at Loita was founded
about a hundred years ago by a
witch doctor who came down from
heaven and was found sitting on
top of a hill. He was so small that
the Masai herdsmen thought he
was a child and took him home.

Imagine their surprise when
they got him back and found that
he wasn’t a youngster at all but a
teeny weeny witch doctor.

fie married several of the local
girls, and all his male descend-
ants have been witch doctors ever
since. '

.
My Rheumatism
A dozen of them dressed in the
best bedside manner in Army
blankets were waiting for us un-
der a tree when our lorry bumped
to a stop. Besides blankets they
wore sanda!s made of motor tyres,

—_——

Political Newsfront

The art of the barrow: boy con-
sists in display. If he is selling
apples, for example, the large,
rosy ones will be at the front and
on top of the pile. But when he
serves you he takes apples from
the back of the mound And
these, very often, are not so good,

This art has been adopted by
the politicians. The rosy apples
of promise are in the Short
Manifestos. The less good ones
are tucked away in the longer
Party Programmes. The worst
are never displayed at all, and
are mentioned only in private.

Consider, for example, the
Short Manifesto of the Socialist
Party—the document called Let
Us Win Through Together. Here
the emphasis is on such things
as full employment and fair
shares. Well, we all want full
employment, and a love of fair
shares is native to us as a people.

In this document the Socialist
Party appears disarmingly as a
party carrying further the
Liberal tradition, It appears as
a reformist, not a revolutionary,



party
But if you study the Socialist
Party programme, the _ longer

document called Labour Believes
in Britain, you will get a very
different impression, Under the
powers for which the party asks
in this document, there is liter-
ally nothing that a new Socialist
Government could not do, and
nothing that it could not claim
was within the scope of the
‘mandate.’

Study with especial care para-
graph 6 on page 12 of Labour
Believes in Britain. In _ this



OUR READERS SAY:



Keep Your Eye On

To the Editor, The Advocate

your eye on the ball.

and instead of carrying little
black bags they stowed their
equipment in holes pierce d

through their ears.

There’s no bush telegraph to
Loita, but a bus runs once a week
and word had been brought ahead
by the driver that Bwana Beaver-
brook, friend of Bwana Churchill,
was sending up a reporter and a
cow,

In the Masai medical profession
they don’t ask for fees in advance.
It’s a case of “No cure, no cow,”
so we left ours to graze and gath-
ered round in a circle.



Muickstced and foiond
The Health Scheme

The situation was explained to
the panel something as follows:

“Your fame as medicine men
has spread to Britain, and this
man here, Bwana Bwernard
Bwicksteed, having failed to get
his rheumatism cured under the
White Man’s National Health
Scheme, has come to you with
this magnificent cow to ask for
your advice.”

The old boys didn’t believe a
word of it. They weren’t sure
what we were getting at, but you
could see at once they knew it
was some kind of gag.

Without even bothering to con-

fer with the others, the dean, or
head of the faculty, gave this re-
ply: “We can cure rheumatism
among our own people, but we
have never tried our methods on
a white man.
“If the Bwena-with-the-stinking-
pipe has sufficient faith to live
with us for a few weeks we might
help him, Otherwise our advice
to him is to go to the Nairobi Gov-
ernment Hospital.” .

The District Officer who had
brought me up*to Loita said they
were being cagey because they
thought we were trying to break
down their code.

“One of their sidelines is giv-
ing charms to cattle-thieves,” he
said, “If once we knew what those
charms were we'd know that any





paragraph it is proposed that a
new Socialist Government should
have three powers.

No Ethusiasm

The first is power to take over
any industry which is “In-
efficient.” Who is to say whether
an industry is inefficient or not?
Why, the Government which
wants to take it over. This is
an extremely convenient
arrangement, for the Govern-
ment anyway.

The second is power to start
up State enterprises in com-
petition with existing private
industry. What private industry?
Any private industry: No limits
are laid down for the exercise of
this power,

The third is power to buy up
concerns which are willing to

sell out. Up till now I have not
noticed any enthusiasm on the
part of private enterprises to

sell out or be bought out. Indeea,
quite a number of them have
been protesting at the top of
their voices at any such idea.

But this may not continue. If
I headed a Government with
power to start up any enterprise
I chose in competition with
private industry and could back
my enterprise with all the re-
sources of the State, I think I
could make a whole lot of enter-
prises willing to be bought out—
if only to save at least something
from the wreck.

These three powers
enable a Socialist Government
to do pretty well anything it
liked anywhere in industry. But
just in case anything should slip

would

By W. J. Brown MP
Socialist Barrow Boys

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

man found carrying them was out
on a cattle raid.”

when asked about the organisation
side of thetr profession. They have

and charge according to the pa-
tient’s means. :

en réally poor pay nothing at
a






AT the height of the Palestine troubles, |
The panel were less reticent |Hollywood planned the film Sword in the |

Desert. It was completed last summer.
the sliding scale system of fees{ This film misrepresents
Palestine and grossly libels the conduct and | 2 t==————

character of the British soldiers who did their pe

They don’t specialise. Every duty at that time. It shows them treating

witch doctor is a G.P., but it is
quite normal to catl in a second
opinion. They are middlemen be-
tween the Creator and the patient,
they say, and in difficult cases one
middleman isn’t enough.

Each patient has his
own registered medi-
cal man, just as we
have now, but he’s at Jib-
erty to change to an-
other if the first doc-
tor gives him permission.

If he swops without

getting
equivalent of filling in the
right forms—he’s liable to
find himself bewitched.
Cases of unprofessional
conduct are punished by
the MGM.C. (Masai
General Medical Council)
but they wouldn’t tell us
what conduct they con-
sidered unprofessional.
It certainly isn’t
drunkenness because get-
ting tiddly om beer made
from honey is often a

prelude to
diagnosis.

And it isn’t getting
familiar with your

female patients. It is

more likely that you’d be

owe unprofessional if you
n't.

Surgery

Your true medicine man won't
touch surgery. That’s a mere
artisan’s job. Even a white man
can be a surgeon. Indeed, these
days the witch doctors send sur-
gical cases to the European hos-
pital without much question.

In the old days, though, the
Masai surgeons would amputate
a limb, or remove a fractured rib
and put one from a sheep in its
place.

melted sheep’s fat, and they
sewed up the wounds with sinews
from the back of an ox. Until
the * wounds were healed the
patient lived on nothing but roast
beef.

This was all very interesting,
but it wasn’t the top secret stuff
I wanted.
Bwana Beaverbrook’s cow, now
grazing peacefully in the back-

give that.

I had the cow brought nearer
and asked what they did when
they needed rain. “Why,” said

the dean, “we do the same as
you. We pray for it.”

Go on, give him the cow,
Barney.

—London Express Service.
cexiapsipainicenieninenpesassicnenterniniie

up, there is another paragraph;
paragraph 7 on page 13.

This
“monopoly” industries. They
might not be willing to sell, and

to compete with them might be!
So this paragraph
industries,!to take place on private cinema premises, |

uneconomic.
proposes, for such
outright nationalisation.

The four powers taken
together, constitute a blank
cheque for Socialism. The field
of possible action is unrestricted.

The Socialist Party is not a
social reform party concerned
with social security and national-
ising only a few essential but
badly run-down industries. It
is a revolutionary party. Its
declared aim is the complete
Socialist State.

Ends And Means

Up till now the public line
adopted by Mr- Morrison has
been that it was up to those who
wanted nationalisation to prove
their case on the facts of the
industry concerned. It is now

will have nothing to do with the
decision.

The decision is already taken| are

on all cases, The decision is for

full Socialism. Extremist

They do not differ on the goal.
And if we don’t want the end

had better deprive them of the
means.

Beware the Barrow Boys!
(World Copyright mere?
—L.E.S.



13.1.50. It

amused me, and to tell


























civilians harshly and shooting up helpless
civilians and illegal immigrants. The critic
of the “New York Times,” Mr. Bosley Crow-
ther, rebuked the producer, Robert Buckner
of Universal-International, for portraying the
British as “stiff-necked cads.”

And.the climax of the film comes when the

underground Jewish army blow up a British
camp while the soldiers are singing carols
this—the Masai Jon Christmas Eve.

This is a film calculated to bring “a little
holiday in the heart” of the notorious Mr.
Hecht.

And it would certainly arouse the anger
and resentment of any British audience be-
fore whom it was screened.

Last week, Sword in the Desert was shown
for the first time in Britain at a Regent Street
cinema. Riot broke out among a section of
a difficult }the audience. Mr. Victor Mischon, Chairman
of the L.C.C. Public Control Committee, says
‘that this disturbance was created by “Fas-
cist elements of organised hooliganisâ„¢.

What happened then?
the Permanent Secretary of tre Home Office,
Sir Frank Newsam, sent urgently for the
Clerk of the Council and told him that they
had information that “there might be serious
outbreaks at the next performance.
was a possibility of grave risk of loss of life
and the police could not be responsible for
safeguarding the audience.”

In these circumstances the L.C.C. ordered
the withdrawal of the film, and it was not
Their principal disinfectant was|shown again.
for Universal International in London, later
stated that the film will not be shown any- |
where else in London. \3

So the hooligans have their way, they have |
banned the showing of Sword in the Desert |
Even the promise of | throughout the London area.
Absolutely irrespective of their views on
ground, wouldn't induce them to} this film as such, the public should take note
that this ban represents a great victory for
dark and totalitarian forces.

A group of men set themselves up against |
the peace; by violence, riot and disorder
they sought to impose their censorship over |
a legal performance which every citizen in |
the country was entitled to see and to 1a]
approve or criticise, enjoy or loathe for him- ||ly “4 si
self; and, incredibly, by one single manifes- | Been
tation of violence they have won.

This is totalitarianism in its vilest aspect,
and it has been allowed, without even a show |
paragraph deals with|of resistance, to flaunt itself and triumph in |

On the next day

There

Mr. Ben Henrey, spokesman

|

_ LE LE,



-

The Astounding Case Of,
The Banned Film

By Charles Ray

British policy in |





our very midst.

If conduct of this character is to be allowed |

there is no reason why any group, Fascist, |
Communist, Atheist, Religious, or any organi- |
sation holding any conviction should not |
adopt the same tactics to suppress what they |

detest.

There is no reason why they should not |
burn books, rush platforms, beat up news- |
paper sellers, or club down speakers. |

In the case of this film the public had |
available the supreme weapon of expressing |
their justifiable repugnance: they could have
stayed away.

No film company could afford to keep on

{a film in an empty West End cinema, poor
returns from the box-office would hit them
plain that the facts or the merits) Where it hurt.
Let there be no mistake. Wherever there
forces plotting for the overthrow of our
and] liberties wherever there are groups dreaming
moderate may differ on the pace.|of the establishment here of systems we
fought to keep from our shores, there is jubi-
on which both are agreed we) lation now, and much scheming as to how,
from the ground gained in Regent Street,
they may make further, bolder and more im-
pudent advances towards their evil ends.

The Ball Is The Cardinal Rule Of Cricket



SIR,—May I just make a short
comment on our cricket? Years ago
I remember we thought little of
our bowling, yet we noticed that
when we failed, it was our batting
which was at fault. This depart~
ment seems strong nowadays,
though it would be better to have
consistent scoring rather than owe
our seore to two batsmen. The un-
easy thought occurs—what would
happen if even one of these spark-
ling batsmen tailed? But it is
fielding I want to talk about. A
bowler once said “Give me a first
class fielding, and I'll get along
with second class bowling.” Have
you ever noticed what hearty
applause a nice quick bit of field-
ing evokes? Now our men stop the
bail but they do not gather it

cleanly. If you notice you will
see that eighty percent of the
balls stopped are allowed to fall on

erara boy

the grou! rt Der

are



E. C. JACKMAN,
Plea For Mullins
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—It is time that the Barba-
dos cricket selectors realise that
they are making a mistake to
cricket not only in Barbados but
also in the West Indies and the
world by the non-selection of Carl
Mullins to represent Barbados
against British Guiana.

Did not Trinidad allow Lance
Pierre to show his goods instead
of Jones in the second Trinidad-
Jamaica match? Is it too late to
select Mullins in preference to
Atkinson? I think not. Atkinson is
a good plodder, a good trier, but
Mullins is a natural fast bowler

Barbados selectors, will you be
so kind as to allow the West In-
dies selectors to see our other
fast bowler (King being one) in
action against the B.G. tear

L. De PEIZA-BARKER
Unity Lodge,
Mt. Stavdfast
St. James
The Story Goes
The Editer, The Advo
I I read an ar

correspondent






the truth, I thoroughly enjoyed his
little joke. It read thus: “It seems
to me that Mr. Gibson is right in
his opinion that pedestrians
should walk on the right side of
the road to face on-coming trafiic.

“Walking on the left side, peo-
ple so often step out towards the
middle of
avoid obstructions or thoughtlessly
—whilst in conversation and a
silent on-coming car almost on
them, even one step to the right
might be fatal.

“Walking on the right side of the
road this would not, happen for
they could see all on-coming
traffic.” It was signed A, E. Belle,
Windy Ridge, Paynes Bay.”

Now if we divide his article inte
four parts, it will be seen that the
first is based on an article by
Mr. Gibson, who stated that the
late Col. Dickens was a great ad-
minist nd he had a
ip, which if

ompel
ht

rator etc. et







the road—perhaps to *

then Col. Dickens is no exception
to the rule and from one mistake
ean follow many.

The second: If a pedestrian steps
out towards the middle of the road
to avoid an obstructon: that needs
no argument, seeing it is obviously
necessary.

Third: Pedestrians
the road thoughtlessly whilst in
conversation, and this will con-
tinue even if one could walk in
the atmosphere.

Fourth: It does not matter
which side one walks, he must
cross on-coming traffic, whether
real or imaginary.

The above facts having been
proved, Mr. Belle’s opinion can
be safely discarded.

will cross

We should all keep to the left
because it has become secondary
nature; e.g., if a motorist were
driving in a ‘bus and the beil
rang, he would unconsciously push
his right foot in the action of
applying the brakes, although at
the time he was not the actual
driver of the "bus, if one were
shelling peas and had to throw the
husks in the bin and the peas in
the bowl alternatively, before the
operation is finished he eventually

throws the peas in the bin and
vice versa.

If pedestrians were compelled
to walk on the right side of the
road, it would put an additional
mental strain on the motorist, as
he would have to think continu-
ally, I am walking or I am driving
as the case may be, and some
good day his train of thoughts
will collide, and having found
himself under an on-coming vehi-
cle, he would then be a victim of
the very circumstances which the
gods tried to help: so the story
goes.

(MRS.) ARTHUR CONLIFFE.
Bush Hall,
St. Michael.

Joy Ride

bi Editor, The Advocate

“O Music! Sphere-descended

maid

Friend of Pleasure, Wisdom’s
aid!

Goddess, why, to
denied

As I listened to the now fan
College Heralds at a recent rex
the above mentioned
was wafted into my
such was the

Why

ta}
lat,

station





mind, tor

captivating effect

|

—L.E.S.

these Heralds held on the entire
audience,

The youngsters deserve the
highest praise for they sang with
the verve of professionals, as with
gusto they simply excelled in the
various intricate parts, as they
gave us many excerpts from their
repertoire of songs.

_ Their conformity of timing and
singing was the epitome of antici-
pation, and it was particularly
noticeable that they ga'ned just
as much pleasure from their sing-
ing, as did the appreciative audi-
ence.

They have certainly



lessly, team work. the nucleus of |
success, has been «ainiy instru-|
mental in helping these buys to|
realise the fruition of their noble

efforts,

Accompanied by a taleuted pian-
ist, they certainly took us for a
joy ride a la musique, over many}
treasured isles of song ?

We thank them for their rare

» and aiso offer tiiem congrat
ulations on their past success
glories in the musical world

RICHARD CLANKKE
Stratford,
Black Ro

future

cK

made a
phenomenal rise since their in- |} FROZEN CANADIAN SAL-
auguration two years and, doubt- | MON





















TAURSDAY, FEBRUARY

—

: 7



McEWANS RED LABEL BEER—per bottle
GOLDEN BEAN ICING suUGaR
Bottles HEINZ PLAIN OLIVES



' COLONNADE sTOngs

NOTICE



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ournament at noon on the following days i
~_
THURSDAY, 16TH FEBRUARY
MONDAY, 20TH FEBRUARY
TUESDAY, 21ST FEBRUARY

*

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD,, Sue

C. S. PITCHER & CO,

Phones: 4472, 4687, 4413, 4251,






we offer
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order at

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FOR
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REMAINING OPEN ON SATURDAY, 1
FEB, UNTIL 3.30 P.M,

FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE VISIO®
FROM THE M.V. “STELLA PO)

PLEASE ARRANGE YOUR 5b
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MILK FED TURKEYS
MILK FED CHICKENS
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*

| quasDs¥, FEBRUARY 16, 1950

New Traffic| WT C.. |
Â¥ Vew frajjic Pk -
: Fecheme Is I. Court Of Appeal | Elee

| .
1 Not Finat Is Still Considering

Tis Si She Springer-Doorly Case |

onial Secretary told
the

THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Seamen Pledged
To Observe
Discipline

er eenng





tricity

| Trinidad | 4 piggieutt Order
Cuts

Sugar Talks

A Meeting of the Directors of
British West Indies Sugar Asso-
ciation (Inc.) was held at the
Treasury Building, Port-of-Spain
on Monday, 13th February, com-
menecing at 9 a.m.

A BANANA VENDOR yesterday
told an “Advocate” representative
that though she had been fined
| 40 shillfags already for selling the
fruit above the Schedule price.
she found it extremely difficult to
} obey the order.

;

'
|
THE power cuts imposed by
the Barbados Electric Company; The Seamen's Division of the
Wil] be soon at an end because; Caribbean Workers’ Union last
Some of the new parts for the| night passed a Resolution pledg-
engines have arrived and are! ing tnemselves to uphold the












, | being installed. traditi ; ; o ; :
Acting Colo _ . | e adition of the Barbadian sea-| The following were presen!:— She claims she buys it at the
D the “Advocate yesterday . The Springer-Doorly case 9 cupied : i wane has been announced a fort- men and to observe the necessary igua— Hon. A Moody Stuart same price, and that being so, she
ae lal cat West Toa Yd ese Jecupied the attention of the| Might ago, the new crank shaft discipline for the harmonious| {RB MC. (Director): Hon. J. C | could make no profit if she carried
_—_ vate has been drawn 1 t d th ian Court of Appeal again yesterday, Counsel com-| ®%4 bed plate for the new engine working of ships. | Barbades—Hon. Gb L. Pile, OB. | Out the instruction of the Order
ge Government Architect} © ro their arguments, and the Court announced that they | Sundes are S'S. Craftsman on| It was decided that a letter tAdviner) NO” HA. Cuke, 0.8 E | She reasoned that some provisior,
py ing Officer, but the} Will deal with a further point at 9.30 am. today. "| the manufacturing setts _from| would be forwarded to Mr. D. G.| should be made to make those

eae : > British Guiana—R. y
This is the Jue manufacturing firm arrived Leacock (Jnr.) telling him their (Director) : a. < Foulless-Senite










sector of Highways and es this > ‘ast appeal for the local sitting of the Court on| over. the week-end. They have| agreement, In the Resolution ee ta Mt. ‘Mbewood to anil apeiny soll okie tama
ae idea that it, would Poli me and it is one filed by, Sgt. Springer of the — © work: and it is hoped] was stated that the seamen re-| ‘feta: D. J B Bivia Orn B., | Price, In that case, she said, there
E Plce had, decid bring this into ae orce asking the Court to set aside and reverse an a estat ey will be work-| gretted any disobedience that (Director): A. C. Evelyn, Malcolm Smith’ | Would instantly be a noticeable
be impossi Victoria Bridge has er made by the Court of Error confirming aidecision of e oie Orily after they have| might have taken place and ae tek 5c aging citreniocs reduction in the number of cases
force Ut ed the Assistant Court of Appeal. : four w oe in three or/ unanimously pledged themselves} Trinidad) Hon OP E. Robinson, | Where the law is broken.
4 peen enlarged. Springer had brought a case)fact that : . ee time, that such would not occur again-| (Chairman), (Director): Comda. CS
Bi traffic | 28ainst Mrs. M. Doorly ; copies were yet to be! ip, : The Resolution was passed| Pyi2¢: Bric Johnson, W. B. Pyeit,
> under the full scheme, ; corly under the{laid before Parliament, and ther machinery which was ex- (Advisers) .
wring Trafalgar Square from = a Parking Regulations | plaining why such copies Mire pected to arrive by air has been| as°",® letter had been read from} Mr. Keith McCowan, Secretary
Street would not be allowed a 248, and a Police Magistrate | not so laid before the inst sent by steamship and is expected Mr. Leacock who regretted cer-| and Mr. C. G. M. Skeete, Asst. Ak
| jp swing right over the Chamber- | “Smissed the case. The Assistant | came into operation, Tument | to arrive in Ba tain circumstances had prevented

rbados on the SS. Secretary of B.W.I. Sugar Asso-

ppeal confirmed








: e whole way round through
- Bridge Street.
qi the full scheme was in-
“troduced therefore, the amount
~ o{souh-bound traffic over Cham-
" perlain Pridge was likely to be
Bi very
i been very noticeable, said
q : Ming Colonial Secretary,
shat motorists here have not yet
aught on fully to the idea of one-
way traffic and do not make full
De ot the right hand side of the

mA
A the corner of Pine and Cul-
joien Roads at about 7.45 a.m.
| Monday between motor car
“M647, owned and driven by Wil-
Ashby, of Dalkeith, and a
“hiovele owned and ridden by Gor-
“gon Clarke of Lodge Road, Christ
"Church. The cyclist was slightly




- @

ACCIDENT occurred at











HEAD LAMP of a bicycle
was damaged when an acci-

;
e
-— a
--

































































Mor tay.
me accident

Co, and driven by Duncan Evelyn
‘¢ Mount Standfast, St. James,
and a bicycle owned by Darnley

— Babb of the same a

pm. on Monday.
fith of Kellman’s Land, Black
; was involved in a collision
with motor bus M-730, owned by
‘the Yonkers Bus Co., and driven
Raymond Springer of Sharon,
)St. Thomas.

“A FIRE of unknown origin
broke out at Durant’s Plan-
Christ Church, at about
100 a.m..on Sunday and destroyed
Mj acres of first crop ripe canes,
' The canes are the property of
‘Mr. H. G. Ward and were insured.

& LOSS of two pine joists
4 was reported by John Hunte
of Halls Road. The joists are
‘Valued $1.44. He stated that they
‘were taken from his yard on
Tuesday.

WANGELENE SOBERS of

/ Villa Road, Brittons Hill, re-
‘jorted that her house was broken
_ iidentered between 7.00 p.m. and
1000 p.m. on Tuesday and cutlery
“ind other articles to the value of
‘$3.44 were stolen.

| BLAH PHILLIPS of Thorpes
+ Cottage, St. George: reported
a quantity of cabbage and
he, valued $8.40, was pulled
from her land and thrown on
“Me ground. The incident occurred
| Over the week-end,

MVE ACRES of second crop ripe
* canes were destroyed when a
Me occurred at about 2.00 p.m, at
‘Harrow Plantation, St. Philip. The
fates belong to Mr. D. S. Payne
Mthe same Plantation and were

N ACCIDENT occurred on St.
Barnabas Road at about 11.45
on Tuesday between motor
Mitty M-678, owned and driven
W Joseph Griffith of Bank Hall
a, and another lorry, M-1557,
ned by the Pine Plantation,
ddriven by Cedric Manning of
Helens, St. George.

The platform of M-1557 was

a
i

| NOTHER ACCIDENT occur-
ted on White Park Road on

at about 7.30 p.m. be-
Motor car M-2249, owned
Durant of Bush Hall and
een by Leroy Worrell of Hol- |
iS Road, and a bicycle owned
tidden by Seymour Douglas,
ot Holligans Road.

_bustace Simmons, who was on
Me Lar ur the bicycle, was wound-
head and also slightly
“on his right elbow and

Was taken to the General
sa, Where he was treated

ged. The frame of the
i teas the left front
- ead lamp of the car
damaged, ,

‘i

———

M0/- In 14 Days

A

fine of 40/- and 2/- costs
Posed on Oswald Boyce of|
wes Land yesterday by His|
i> Mr. H. A. Talma,
mas found guilty of driving
tor bus M-757 on the Upper
without having in _ his
2 an appropriate driving

|

- |

Offence was committed on
Alter 6 and he was given an}

* Hativ e of serving one
tbe ‘mprisonment, The fine
F paid in 14 days,

ly. In Seven Days

arent Tryhayne of Bagatelle, |
ts ;, S Was fined 10/- nad 1/-
; M defor} Paid in seven days or
ee Moric, undergo seven days’
’ hip Mr yesterday by His
Was fo; H. A. Taima

~ ound guilty of causing
" car T-52 to stop
Pek, “rea other
ie one, passengers
F was committed on

maiber 25

t

1





t

tri on a



=a
-

than for

Bridge, but would have to go c

involved motor|M.
‘bas M-272, owned by the General | man.

The van, M-2079, owned by|British Guiana, and Sir Cleme

| Allen spoke 0

| sort
provided that a copy of a statu- |

the

Repeating that the Court had

Philosopher on February 28th.

him from attending the meeting.

ciation (Inc.) were in attendance

magistrate’s decision, the task of blazin i The changes j
: ; ; g a pioneer trail, _CMhanges in the cuts have ; 3 ah

ae cae 6 spate is whether Mr. Whyatt said that in the light — F hanptituted to accommodate Mr. Le The Later 4 Po oy n-
time of the Sietene Valid at the of the authorities that he had Bell machines at Hanson and the arte — 's letter read: I of the Delegation aera wpe
alleged offence, they having bee | Siete tte trail was clearly fie Pumping Station. Because am Prepared to give assistance to| pi the Deleg percnaistine of the
signed by the "Governor, tt ow ie te nible. For the reasons that | °f the crop season, sugar factories Afte ‘thei alana ee H. A. Cuke, Mr. G. M gg ewe
up to that time laid before oot | the o8d_siven, he submitted that | 2%¢ in need of greater quantities 5 ey ne wile: Weare. Soe ee M. Kirkwood
Legislature for th efore the © appeal should succeed. ot water and so there can be no] Steen which would not carry out a ake a aoe irkwood,
approval. e latter’s|_ In reply to the Court Mr. | reduction of the power to the| ° discipline necessary uring egotiations in Lon-

Never Approved

It was brought
that the regulation
approved by the
They were revoked b
set of regulations whi
the same fate at the
third set.
approved by the Legislatur

Mr, John Whyatt” ‘i
ner General, w.

e Informant-Appellant
the point tha t

hat it w
had been in operation.
| As the case began yesterday
(Mr. Whyatt was associated with

occurred on Hastings Road, |Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor |
near Harts Gap, at about 6.35 a.m. General.

( Mr. Reece left
island yesterday for Jamaica,
his place was taken by

E. Bourne, Legal

the
and
Miss
Draughts-
Counsel for the

Respondent, Mrs. Doorly are Mr
E. K. Walcott, K.C., associated

| Hope of Dayrells and ridden by|with Mr. J. S. B. Dear and in-
d- | structed by Messrs. Yearwood &

Boyce.
The Court is comprised of Their

Chief Justice of Trinidad
Sir Newnham A,
Worley, Kt., Chief Justice of

nt

Daniel’s Bakery, Roebuck | Malone, Kt., O.B.E., Chief Justice
and driven by Thoral,of the Windward

and Leeward
Islands.

Mr. Whyatt was making his first
address when the Court adjourn-
ed on Tuesday evening.

Sanctions

Discussed

As Mr. Whyatt resumed his
address to the Court yesterday he
returned to the questions of
sanctions, and to a discussion of
whether sanctions were relevant
to a consideration of the provis-
ions which were being examined.
Citing a passage from the 8th
Edition of Russell, Volume JI,
Page 561, Mr, Whyatt said that
the principle was that where a
public officer was guilty of a mis-
behaviour in office by neglecting
a duty imposed upon him by com-
mon law or by statute, he com-

mitted a misdemeanour and was}
liable to indictment unless there |

was another remedy substituted
by statute.

If the particular statute meant
that it was a matter of public
convenience that those regulations
should be laid before the Legis-
lature, then the person who was
responsible for so laying them, if
he treated the duty with con-
tempt, would be guilty of a com-
mon law misdemeanour,
there was no statutory penalty
provided for.

Discussing whether or not
sanctions of any kind were neces-
sary when construing a_ provis-
ional statute as directory, Mr.
Whyatt said that in the case then
before the Court of Appeal, the
Courts below had so far said that
it might cause a great inconvent-
ence if they were to declare that
those traffic regulations were null
and void because they were not
laid before the Legislature, but
that they would still say they
were null and void because other-
wise they could not enforce the

duty which was imposed on the

public officer.
Another
z e * y
Submission

What in his submission the
Court below should have said was
that since to declare the regula-
tions null and void would work
an intolerable inconvenience to
those who had no control over the
person responsible for laying
them, they would not import the
sanction of nullification of the
regulations.

It seemed th
had argued thus: | ‘
are provisions which impose a
duty on a public officer, there
must be sanctions. Here are such
provisions, and therefore there
must be sanctions. The ease
premise should be: Where t ae
are such provisions, it is no
necessary or relevant one be Ae
the other to consider whether

sanctions.
en. Whyatt then recalled that
when he was reading on phon
Bee ft some suggestions
for overcoming the difficulties
arising from the use of vee
phrases like “as soon as poss a.
That difficulty was ne he _

y Instrume \

ge ae of United Kingdom

Legislation.

Wide Act

That Act which covered every
of subordinate legislation

e Courts below
Where there

tory instrument was required to
be laid before each House of Par-
liament after being made, before
the instrument came into opera-
But if it was found essen-

tial that the instrument should
come into operation before the
copy could be laid, it « ould
brought into operation, provide
that nd essential,

that if was
notification should
the Lord Chancellor
Speaker of the House ;
mons, drawing attention to



the

out yesterday | ence,
S were never
Legislature.
y a second
i suffered
hands of a
This third set were |

yatt, K.C., Attor- |
ho is appearing for
made
i t the fact that the
regulations were revoked showed
t as considered that they

Defendant- |



provision as to when such statu-
tory enactments came into exist-
they . should take
common law of England as a
Buide. He cited a principle taken
from a case appearing in 1918-1
King’s Bench Division to the
| effect that subordinate regulation
came into operation when it be-
came known to the public and
not when it was lying on the desk
}of the departmental officer who
made it.

If they assumed, however, that
j they came into operation when
| they were made, that date was
February 12, 1948. If they took
the day when the Governor sanc-
, tioned them, that was April 10.
If they took the date when they
became known to the public—
that is when they were published
in the Official Gazette, that was
|April 12. But whichever date
they took, it was a day certain.

For Defendant

| Mr. Walcott opening his address
| recalled that Mr. Whyatt had
;Stated that the facts of the case



AHE REAR END of a van was| Honours Sir Cecil Furness-Smith.| V® Pot in dispute. He recalled
' damaged in an accident on|Kt.,
White Park Road at about 4.50! (President);

,too that he had drawn to the
attention of the Court that the
|charge on which Doorly had been
j‘ried was dated June 7, and the
| appeal as would appear from the
record also mentioned that date,
whereas in truth and in fact the
evidence showed that the date
was July 7.

He was well aware that there
; vere cases in which the time did
; not necessarily entitle the person
}accused to an aequittal, but on
jthe other hand Their Honours
were in the position of being ask-
ed to send back a case to the
magistrate and to direct that
Doorly be convicted on the said
information, and that the costs of
the appeal be awarded to the
informant.

There was in this colony, pecu-
liarly enough, the right to dismiss
without prejudice.

Here Sir Newnham of Britisn
|Guiana said that he had intended
to ask the Attorney General if
that Court could send the matter
back—assuming that they accepted
his view—with an order or direc-
tion to convict, It appeared from
the Record, that in the trial be-
}fore the Magistrate, at the close

effect that there was no case io

of the defence as to the facts of the
case had never been heard.

; It seemed to him that the most
that the Court could do would be
'to send it back to the magistrate



since! With a direction on the point of

law, that was assuming that They
jaccepted the view of the Attorney
|General on the point of law.

The Court would not be pre-
pared to go into the question of
the evidence unless the defence
was prepared to admit that the
offence had been committed if the
regulations had been valid at the
time.

Is Date Material?

Mr. Walcott said he took it then
that if the case was sent back it
would be sent back on the ground
that the Court held that it was
immaterial whether the date was
June 7 or July 7.

Sir Newnham: Merely whether
the submission of Jaw made in the

rial was correct,

a Walcott said that in that
case it would not be in order for
the appellant to ask the Court to
send it back with a direction to
convict the defendant-respondent
on the information. Another point





would also arise: Neither the
Assistant Court vl Appeal
with its view that the
delay in laying the regula-
tions was 19 meetings, nor the
Chief Justice with his seven
meetings would be correct. The

‘true figure would be 13 meetings.

Mr. Walcott’s next point was
whether the action of all three—
the Director, the Governor and the
Lewislature—was needed before
the regulations could be deemed to
be in force. The Court would
notice, he said, that tne Magistrate
iso held, and both the Assistant
Court of Appeal, and the Court of
Error had held that the Governor 8
approval of the regulations would
make them valid.

Not Upheld

The submission of Counsel had
not been upheld in the Court
below, and he had raised the
question only because it was not
in the interest of a client under
any circumstances to give up any
point which was either uncertain,
or would be in the client's favour.

Mr. Walcott continuing said that
the learned Attorney General had
dealt with the failure to lay regu-
lations. He (Mr. Waleott) woutd
draw to the attention of the Court
that it was not a question of ~
i







ing regulations anymore than
}was a question of a ae
|resolution being sufficient to
| validate them. _ see :
| it s a question of their being

for
If

to the Legislature
of both Chamber

ne





tion of ar

on page 7

Whyatt submitted that when as
was the case here there was no

the

Belle Pumpin,

The
Company hopes
short time the e!
be working full
there will be n
cuts in the supply

g& Station.
that within

ult and

Dos Santos Is

B. W.1. A.

Chairman





The Hon. Alan Storey D. F. ¢

Manager of the Electric
ngines will all

that |
Oo necessity for |

4 |to engage any more Barbadian
seamen,

write them and inform them of
|the formation of the Caribbean
give another tria] toelocal seamen
enrolled by this union, It must
clearly be understood, however,
that if the Royal Netherlands
Steamship Campany engage to
employ Barbadian seamen again,
the men concerned will have to
behave in an orderly and discip-
linary manner on board.

nw. : I will not suggest that they
poet og announce that Sir| should submit to unfair treat-
ote os antos has assumed the ment, which I hope will not arise,
oe rmanship of that Company, | but they must be prepared to
a oe esiding at a Board Meet- | carry out the orders of the captain
Sern opened at Jamaica and ship officers and if they con-
a F sider any orde
BwWiAe Directors of the should still or ction attics
-LA., are: the s i
Air Commodore Whitney W see — eet
Straight, C.B.E., M.C,, D.F.C. | U

If the Union members clearly
understand this, I will write the



(Trinidad), H. O. B. Wooding,| Royal Net
. To > & , y herlands Steamshi
K.C., (Trinidad), G. G. R. Sharp, | Company i P
’ + P, | Company edi
O.B.E., (Jamaica), The Hon. Age Boag pcre ys

H. A. Cuke, O.B.E., (Barbados)
oe A.D.S. Murray (Manag
ing). a

New Vicar Of
St. Alban’s

The Appointments’ Board me
on February 14th and on_ the
nomination of the Revd. A. W



Johnson, Rector of St. James, the
Board appointed the Rev. Lloyd
Vernon George, Assistant Curate
of St. Benedict's, Manchester, to

be Vicar of St. Silas with St
Alban, in succession to the Rev

W. D. M. Woode. The new Vica
was formerly Assistant Curate a
St. Michael’s Cathedral.



Highest Rainfall
In January

THE rainfall for the month of

January was above the average

| In the majority of districts there
an
of the evidence for the prosecu~| which rain fell. The heaviest falls
jtion the defence had submitted in occurred on the 5th, 18th and 31st.

were approximately 20 days

The average total rainfall for

janswer. Therefore, the evidence! the Island for the month was 5.79
1.23
the
average for January for the past

inches, as compared with
inches for January 1949.,

one hundred years was 3.37 inches.
7 Not 17

THE

stated,



THE ¥89R3% TIMES

SURVEY OF THE COLONIES

A SEPARATE
‘PUBLISHED 1

WITH THE AIM of spreading an

affairs of the British Colonies as widely as possible, in
February The Times is publishing a separate 16-page

illustrated supplement dealing
aspects of the subject—financi

and social. Articles by authoritative writers are devoted to :

THE COLONIES AND

RECRUITS FOR THE

THE UNITED NATIONS TRUSTEESHIP COUNCIL
’ SERETSE KHAMA

THE MARRIAGE OF

THE ECONOMIC Sit
SPORT iN Al

WEST

date of the Revaluation
Conference to be held in Barba-
dos is the 7th of March and not
the 17th of March as previously

THE DOLLAR CRISIS
COLONIAL SOURCES OF RAW MATERIALS

The meeting was presided over
by Mr. J. W. Hewitt, Chairman.
Mr. Mottley offered an excuse
for Mr. Leacock. Mr, France,
Secretary, read the letter,



Oranges, Bananas
Again Plentiful

ORANGES and bananas are
again plentiful about the City,
Male vendors of the oranges with
their push carts and the women
,| With their trays vie with each
,|Other in the advertising of their
r| Wares, They fetch from three to
t|six cents each according to the
size and buyers are easily
attracted.

Bananas on the other hand, the
majority of which are of the smal!
variety and which the Schedule
Order has fixed at three for ;
penny are still being sold at one
cent each.

t





140,000 Tons
| Sugar In 1950
|

BARBADOS will produce
140,000 tons of suga: this crop,
according to the estimate of the
Department of Agriculture,

U.S. Workers Save
$3.024,985.08

-
THE savings of workers from
this colony in the United States to

January 31, 1950, amount to
$3,024,985.08, a release from the
Savings Branch of the Labour

Department has disclosed

aad

SUPPLEMENT
N FEBRUARY

up-to-date knowledge of the

with many important current
al, economic, administrative,

COLONIAL SERVICE

FROM YOUR LOC

E.C.A,

to any

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eR





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- ee

eee

CHOW

obtainable from

UATION IN MALTA iy,
FEEDING AFRICA’S RISING POPULATION
RICAN LIFE
AFRICAN ART
AL NEWSAGENT — |
or direct from the Publisher, The Times

aboard ship, the Royal Nether-
lands Steamship Company told
us that they were not prepared

I am prepared, however, to

| Workers’ Union and ask them to

don with the representatives of
the Ministry of Food, the Colonial
Office, the Treasury and the
Board of Trade which commenced
in November last and ended in
January this year, I: was agreed
that the offer to the British Wes.
Indies was totally inadequate, and
that the Delegates adopted the |
right course when they decided |
to ask for an adjournment for:
the purpose of consulting the |
| B.W. Governments.

The Meeting also appointed the
same delegates to represent B.W_I.
Sugar Association (Inc.) at the
Regional Conference to be held
in Grenada next week. The dele- |
gates will seek the advice of the |
Conference as to the best course |
to be pursued, and the immediate- |
ly proximate steps which should |
be taken, }
_The Meeting was marked by the |

highest possible degree of |
unanimity and resolution, and |
terminated with votes of thanks |
to the Delegates to the U.K. for|
their services and to the Chairman |
the Hon. H. E. Robinson, fo:

'

presiding over the Meeting.

>

~~



3 Years Ago

(BARBADOS ADVOCATE, FEB.
RUARY 16, 1925)

At

1.40 p.m. on Saturday,
the North American and West |
Indian Squadron consisting of

H.M.S, Calcutta, 4,180 tons, 5 guns, |
bearing the flag of His Excellency |
Vice-Admiral Sir James Fergus-|
son, M.C.M.G., C.B., H.M.S, Cape- |
town, 4,190 tons, 5 guns, H.M.S

Constance, 3,750 guns, |

tons, 4
H.M.S. Curlew, 4,190 tons, 5 gun
and H.M.C.S. Patriot, 1,000 ton |

Lt. H. E. Reid, R.C.N., arrived on
a visit to this port for a week.

The “Calcutta” came from
Grenada, the “Capetown” from St.
Lucia, the “Constance” from St
Vincent, the “Curlew” from
Martinique and the “Patriot” from
Trinidad.

At 3.00 p.m. Vice-Admiral Sir
James Fergusson landed in an
official manner and was received
by a Guard of Honor of Police
under Lt. Col. M. D. Harrel O.B.E.,
Inspector General of Police, at the

Baggage Warehouse. He ws
attended by his personal staff and!
after inspecting the Guard, he

proceeded to Government House.
Shortly after His Exceliency the
Governor, Sir Charles O’Rrien
K.C.M.G., returned the compliment
by visiting the “Calcutta.”

There will be several celebra-
fions in honor of the fleet, for
the successful performance of
which the Legislature voted the
sum of £200.

a





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T HEARD HIS WIFE WALKED OUT ON | THAT'S | . Ld i LO ke
| LEFT HIM- HE DOESN'T f° YOU LAST WEEK - | | RIGHT- | | DOWN ( é
= LOOK TK 1D HAF PY 5 : oy WOE Bi anes Ji } } "
+ ABOLIT - + I % sii ‘a
: a | The book that has set the world talking
as SEN GE _ BY ALEX RAYMOND | ) (] | \) | | \) | | | \
7 NEMS VALERIE GTONS | | JUST A MINUTE 5 C PY nc « AD 1 OBES SY
_ f aN’ I'M & PUPIL AT MISS FAINn’s| yt vS
YOUNG \ SCHOOL AN’ THE OTHER DAY I | | é
LADY, WHAT'S )_ GOT THE WHEPS Because T | |
YOUR NAMB® J | WAS SO LONESOME AN’ IT /| |
OBC 'CED TO RUN aAviAy
> A swashbuckling general who inspgred many a story, some
fieticious some true, to be told about hira while the fighting 4
in World War II was still at it’s height. a
Hollywood once tried to portray the character of this Ger- i



man General on the screen but they missed badly.





Here, at last, is the truth behind one of the greatest dramas
_FALK & RAY MOORES ever to come out of wh eed World War.
3 THE, se ARE TMs PORE ] Wisse What he thought of his men and his Italian allies !
He | | grocee on BOOKKEEPER 5 rom | , ve |
he ste ER OR BC What he thought of his foes; the men of the Empire !
> Le] ie ; How he was eventually murdered by Hitler’s Gestapo !
ey ph | ’
sf 1

Beginning in the Sunday Advocate, Feb {9th





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F pass, seerremeectesnereetieerene
CLASSIFIED ADS.















































































a

























THE

















BARBADOS ADVOCATE



WI. Court
Of Appeal







SE a ee

|“Gascogne” Arrives

PAGE SEVEN

:
900 Drums Colas |#e Wise. - - _
--- ADVERTISE

es





On Friday Evening

ON Friday evening next Messrs

Arrived Yesterday .



































































| Elders and Fyffes’ pass r li }
@ from page 5 os passenger liner OVER 900 : as | TRINIDAD BONDS
‘ “Gascogne™ is expecte ot drums of colas|
! 3 ted to call ivy ;
S ing a resoluti : ;,. | arrived in th S y ay
HOUSES ing a resolution for the purpose of] here from South while on its l Secu ‘Trinidad. The ts eat $3,360 3% due 1973/83 @. 97%
“LA VI hs, einen ak lwonrds sar tbe regulations. The| Voyage to Southampton England | Wonita” brou; e 0d-ton “Zita! $864 3% ,, 1955/59 @ 9734
a from March Ist. Paynes ug Ir Cc li I B } er “disapproval” or “non- The “Gascogne” will take laa . — 450 drums of $9,600 3% ,, 1974/84 @ 98
St, James. Apply on premises artiste may oe used in the section} passengers from here for England, | «p nee ity and the 59-ton} £1,000 4%. 5, 1963/73 @ 107
wee 15.2.50—2n: IN PORT: Sch. Agalina «« F ant that the.Governor had to| Messrs. Wilkinson and Havuesrt 500 drums. Net, plus accrued interest; .pay-
BUNGALOW With all Modem equim | Lucinvis Sch. Marion Belle Wolie, Sar OT Ta ene 118 tons net, Capt.| Put UP the regulations by means| Co. Ltd. are agents. . aynes) Other cargo of the “Zita|}ment and delivery in Trinidad.
me equip- facile M ey i . : % ms net, Cap’ 56a luti "» ” . ,
Electric ths Government Water and | Sch ding Scho ines W.. Smith Gone aioe od sae et ee vonieadlt uae A 5 a Steamsnh: ‘Lad ee ee See TRINIDAD SHARES
if ght. Spacious Bedrooms | patcha, Sch. Git, ) ar- Owners’ ation. a yal, ¢ a @ House « eamship “ Rodney” is| oil i rhi
ad a Third if necessary. At 0 Gita M., Sch.’ Emanuel ©. Sch. BURMA Ty. '59 ¢ Ass ’ tig oto and cylinders of gas, while
Main Road. Near iextont Goodland Gordon, Yacht Leander, Sch M. mt ie ons net, Capt embly only had the right to] expected on Saturda It is | th. “ 7?
; 3. Rent|M.V ; * Mahuata, King, trom Trinidad; Agents: Schooner} 4... , y. Is te; that of the “Burma D” was ane 4
Whites nites Apply Lecn S. Bourne. seilor, ‘Son nieate, Sch Wonderful Coun- Owners’ Association. disapprove or to approve, arrive from Halifax via Boston] printed matter and cartons. of | °°? Alstons Limited oe 75
vy. City. « ARRIVALS ah dua . and sail the following day for St. | bitters. ‘ £
15.2.50—T™n.} Dutch S.s. MANY DEPARTURES lr i . 3 t '
'RRISHANA LL Wilmint from. ‘Trinesae ae — Capt M.V. LADY JOY, 46 tons mi, Capt Two Distinctions Vincent, Grenada, Trinidad and 00 Angostura Bitters '- x a
id RANA? nara Ontabelle, Lands | Musson, Son te ented: Agents: 'S. P. Parsorta for St. Laicia; Agents: D. I British Guiana. Agents of this} Schooner “Belqueen” — 44 tons Wak: - Ices 7
Swan Street. ae oo. 2 | peatiaztTA WONTTA, 69 tons net, Cant. S'S. MANTO, 159 tans net, Capt. Wil-| 4 There were two distinctions. The | Vessel are Messrs. Gardiner Austin} "et — called from St. Vincent uate. Sis unds, . plus Sarap
APARTMENT — Untu Schooner Owners” Asercanti, Agents: mint, for. St. Vincent; Agents; S. P aa was as was the case in Eng-| and Co., Ltd. | etaoing copra, arrowroot and a :
aes Associ. q Musson, ie 5 a ~
feor Apartment, near tows aa ee mings UEEN, 44 tons net, Capt, H-M.S. DEVONSHIRE 10,000 _ tons, aoe ae the only act was the pump, | The 116-ton motor vessel AUSTRALIA BONDS
(No. Pets, no Chitarers an, Ce. » from St. Vincent, Agents: Schooner Cust. ‘Stokes, for thinidad | the sauaying, such legislation on | “T. B. Radar” came from St. Lucia
10.2.50—3n Commons, . “t See acaba Soldiers Ate Mi with fresh fruit, cocoanuts, fire~| Highest premium paid for’ 8% %
FLATS fully A Tam| _'N TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION | might pray and thet gh member eve | ahas tee ee pipes agony
y furnished with Refrig. ay wed. ese four vessels are con- .
erator and lini Gab) r ar i
se a en at Indramer, Worthing, ee é Wireless (West Indies) Ltd. Ulin, Mosli, Vanostade, Mani sth, Pikes oe Bar bados tne Governor had Eight J KYO, Feb. 15. Signed to the Schooner Owners’ BARBADOS SHARES
18:1.50—t-£.n. | with the following thie” (ommunicate bernhard, Loide Bmasil, Luciano, tagano,| 2¢ positive duty of submitting apanese ex-soldiers, who | Association .
i KILDARE"—Redford Avenue. weil | B®fbados Coast Stations > “Bee Teena nts Gaxton, _ Philosopher, | them for approval, and not merely | £0Und out four years late that the A new list issued Tuesday, free.cn
maunished bungalow to be let for 6] gg il stantis, Golfito, MAT Folk ceemonens lay them and leave it to scme| Wa had ended, have arrived back| Also calling at Barbados yester- | application to: —
“ chub Serene valk from Yacht | cogne, Mba nt Afhelstane, Gas- Sterlapolaris, Fulgor, Neuva Andahwia,|PTivate member to move for their|i® @ Japan that they had never day was Dutch motor vessel ri
sea S| on ew nae ea” te| ence Sse lei GOR, Mma hui as armament or aeapprove pect to co aguan'* "| SH2_ was ute mot A.M. WEBB~
veniences, garage, garden, N, “| Kountouriotis, America, Nieuw Amster. odve pn . y, Mormac-} The next point was that th e men had lived deep in the ”
‘elock this evening for . No children, 7 odve, Ferncourt, Alcoa 5 dia! k as tha e}. : !
pai Conetery. Friends are| To be seen by appointment only. ‘Tele. | 2% Alcoa Corsair, Hatsvse, ©. G. Ti gna’ 'se eee Pegasus, Sundial. learned Attorney General had |J¥agles of New Guinea on 4 diet} This vessel brought a few| Dial 3188 = — Hours..9-~3
tg and Family, Laura 16.2.50—In asked what was.the legal effect of | f Potatoes and field mice.—Reuter| packages containing’ gener s1| 155 Roebuck’ St. =
Hinds ef See6NR} eee = subordinate legislation made and n andi i (Over Peoples Pharmacy)
ate nerchandise along with wire P i
Uae PUBLIC N ¥ ra in due form but not laid netting, agricultural implements 14.2.56-—S0
by re aegis ; 7 i i ; oer .
| oTIcEs tine nts enpay pets | talons eesessnon Gite | 4, toe arecmeart loan 3
e as is rea ably able oO vali r. It i
THANKS ———————_—_—_ having regard to the circumstances, | Walcott put it as April 13. th ‘qt left Carlisle Bay yesterday A Few More.... ~~. {
49% easily earned by obtaining orden He would li ; - , oe tye first | evening for St. Vincent. Messrs. ~~
jgned beg to thank all for private Christmas Cards from ARRIVA: e would like to put. it thys: |meeting of the House after the S. P. Musson, Son and Co. Ltd of the 0
oY ¢ a : ’ > > \ ‘ " eiads
‘any way expressed Uns. | Your friends. No previous experience | From TRINIDAD by B.W.LA.L, Jocelyn McClean, Mrs. Myro Wooding,| Whether a Court would construe} regulations had been signed by } are the local agents. ‘ oe
with us in our recent berea necessary, Write today for beautiful free Stephen Bennett, John Mac Andrew a ar ae eed ae ) an act In such a way as to make the Governor. | : ( (i Ho | les
2 . Citta ty, Mai fo ames nt, } . setta Mayers, Miss arlia ry oC 7 Fup i i a at Mae o $ i
siisin Medias wate ho Britain's largest and Manary:. Tieton Vere Mamon, Eugens’ Michaelons” Glowoen Maier Tecoene, parliamentary control effective or a oc observed that “as soon Quite a few schooners, all of anon was tplat
D Brathwaite. siocaacsl camera ene commission, | Peggy ire en John Kenny, Ramdava, Mrs. Auvril Yee, Mr. Claude | rites it respect of subor- maetine: yo on Mes the first} which are expected to leave port BO with — =
" —In. | m ng opportunity. | Watkins, Ww Watkin, eekle, Nora Yee, Mr. Lauriston Lewis, Mr. Norman} dinate legislation, e secon meeting ithi ' . %— 3 BOILING BURNERS
Works, prime & Co., Dept. 10 Victoria | Geoffrey Herkicts Het’ 7%” Morin, Bushell,’ Mrs. Clarissa Greene, Mrs | Mr, Walcott next dealt with the | after they were signed within the next two days, were #}-> 1 GRILL BURNER & PAN
Works, Preston, a.” Isabelle Cuke, Ect Hon. H. A. Cuke, Louise Bryan, Mr. Walter Bryan, Mi ate > : K! Mr. Walcott i“ | loading cargo yesterday, “> GREEN ENAMEL FINISH
N MEMORIAM George Pile wather Crimberg, Hon! Elizabeth McCarthy-O'Leary, Mrs. Claire} POINt as te the meaning of the ar, cott said that for the! Items loaded included lard mr : i
ay i ES . Pounder, Richard Pen Bennett, Gladys Watson, Mrs. Ivy Warren, Mr. White-| words “as soon as possible,” say- | PUrpose of his submission, if they | sta adh j ard, ny) WBY Hot call and see. thenr~.
eg memory of our dear husban NO? ICE Girbert,” z ‘cunder, Marouetate head, Mr. Colin Williams, Mrs. Elizabeth! ; hat his lear “i had failed to lay the r iF s | Margarine, sugar, bales of bags eee Ses Showroom, Bay Sirect
SCHOLLS 5 rge Jost. Kerr, bars. Wines nae ing that his learned friend had say the regulations |... baw : : SaaS
put leaving memories PARISH OF ST. JOHN For TRINIDAD by B.W.LA.L, Forde, sae George Gone, nate ini oe construed them as “as soon as | 4S $00n as possible after they were | asst anne. Walle: Lia, ae ta
take away Attention is drawn to ‘all owners of | Mrs. Cynthia Trim Coxe, Mix. Victor Sellier, Mr. Victor| practicable under the circum-, “ined, they had failed in the per- | ©™Pty colas drums and two motor =
‘will linger «ous that they should be licensed Trimming rmmingham, Mr. John Ercolani,, Mrs, Etheline Manning, Mrs. | et-neoc . ‘9g , LoOrmance of their duty ij | Cars, '
that : 4 during mingham, Mr. Chie : stanees. He (Mr. Walcott) was eir duty if the pro-
" this earth we stay ne month of February, in accordance | Mr. G _ 2 arence Prescott, Daisy Moore, Miss Gladys Marshall, Mr oS ’ visi . ¢ wom
on Ruby,! with the ; c h oulbourne Phillips, Mrs i y trae | Submitting ‘ isions were mandatory, ° *
i uPicholls (wife) Pearl, y Dog License Act. D'Arcy, Mr. Henry Davee Js; Rosita G. Donovan, Mrs. Donovan, Mr. Walter} Submitting that it need not be After th The i rofessional Notie
gro! Emerson, Lucie, een Parc ASER. Low, Mrs Aurelia Freiaawe = sons Fe ee Stated as so many days, as long repli ge age iy General had |. ; oon a - taken for St \ l
ell, Naomi (c nm). > Treasurer, | roy Gill, Mrs. Pearl Gi Mie mares, ae AICA.... as it was easily ascertainabl pled’ briefly, the Court adjourn- | Vincent, Grenada, St. Lucia, Trini-
16.2.50—1n. to : ; Mrs. Pearl Gill, Mr. Omar Ali, as as easily ascertainable, ate : Se ees , |
: i1's.50--en, Bees’ tate ee oe Eduardo Azanza, HB, Mr. A. W. L. Savage, Mrs The words were “as soon as|&@ until to-day, dad, British Guiana,
memory of or oe te eae | Alphonso DeLima, Mr eee tetas Sraith, Me pt ee Bere x Beer anne EES Wen Se Sacer seeelnceiee ett i + 8 2 ee: ae
CH, who depar s NOTICE ; Mrs. Agnes Hallinan, Mr. Thomas Hair spu‘®;,M@-_Walter Reece, K.C., M.C.P | mitting that “thereafter” couid Tee ee naan.
+ ne 7 ey oer as ass Mrs. Peta Stocker, Mr. Grantley / : een ad e a | ice f pS
od 1948 ce sindinien Gtk to orwtinss: nan, Mr. Wharton, Mr. Bennett, Mrs. M.c.P. ocker, Mr. Grantley Adams, only man after the approval of GOVERNMENT NOTICE |} the office of’ Dr. C. Me
tobe with Jesus | tiie undaaaee ae ae be feceived by a ae i gy was the re Conney, will be closed from
to meet her the takes or i post of a Care- ; trom which the time must be
e : and Gro : ; ene
Welch Decnley Welch, | the playing fields at Bellegiaans et a MAIL NOTICE Pil ° re y | judged. His learned friend in con- Feby, 16th to Feby. 20th.
Welch (sons). cations will be received up to ‘aigotas U Zriuns Will See | struing the words to mean “as DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ; oa
ao nn = algae are x oon tae BRITISH GUIANA by the A Il ‘ TT [moon as practicable under the cir- i . : on account of illness.
. A. SKINNER, Sth. Y M. LEWIS will be closed 0 stances” was citi >y pplications are invited fr j
Vestry Clerk, St. A: at the General Roe: a : ost e cumstances” was citing commer-| , See are: ed from teachers and other. suitably quali- Dr, C y
— Marcin Revistered and Ordinary at | P s Tomb \cial cases which were not on all! /€d persons for the following vacancies: 7 vitae aan
at_ 12.15 p.m. on the 16th February ° ° fours with the present case as far aa ak
SALE NOTICE 1060. Pere This Spring las the tianhdnes oe that phrase waa i Peter's Girls’ School |
Tenders will be received by th ————————— | concerned . F's Sirls Schoo 999999999974 79S9999
y te un. | ——————_—————— CU: Bs I ~ a aia | PRPDPSS LS 9 FOSS O OOOO
’ ee Py a February 20th 1950 for VATICAN CITY, Feb, i5. If the argument of the learned = Bernard 8 Girls’ School 1x
Mi 3,800| the Parish of toes iE enone PERSONAL The new under ground Basiliva,| Attorney General was correct, it St. Augustine S Girls’ School I's N ny
One 1949 Morris Minor, 3, rs a es for £2,500.0.0 built under St. Peter’s Churer aS ee : Ebenezer Girls’ School is 1 OTICE
new. Oné 1948 Morris, 8 Rate of Interest not exceeding 4° s Churen}would mean that although they St. Mark’s Girls’ & ®
im miles, Excellent condition. | and to be repaid by Annual instalments | =—=—=—==——=—————__. | round the tomb of the Apostie}had put in an act that legislation ot Ate Girls’ School x 5
‘ let. Going cheap. of Biee.0:0 with” interest (Loan by| 7», | will be opened to pilgrims for the| made by a subordinate authority St. Andrew’s Girls’ School % %
ROYAL GARAGE Ltd. Phone a . iving public are hereby warned against | first time this spring. the Vatic: a ; c St. Patrick’s Girls’ School, . : %
. 14.2.50—3n Signed giving credit to my wife Coral Bascom e this spring, the Vatican} must be submitted for the approv x Due to, Tourist Boat %
Aga rage a ee % H. TARILTON, ae Sai as I do not hold myseif | @Nounced today. jal of the House, it need never be 2, The minimum qualification for e try to i i Sao ring ¢
Shall (Woyvern) is HP. * Highway Commissioners, St. Sone aae or anyone else con-| Work began 10 years ago to en-|submitted, and yet such legisla-|is the Cambridge School Certificate or entry to the teaching service | g arriving SATURDAY ¥
e 5, m: . 3 \s a any or debts in my name a 7 : Rating ae s ‘ ” ate, | ‘
‘ et Phone 2978. 11,2,30—3n, | Wless by a written order signed by me. large the crypts under Saint|tion would be good law despite i 1% Feb. 18th, we will be 4
14,2. 50-41) | ceeeeeeeeeesinttrere Signed SAMUEL BASCOM, Peter’s to build a burial chopel for| any question of misdemeanour, 3. Applications must be submitted hes “j i. : x
The Mount, Pope Pius, ae ri which may be obtained from the ee ~ peotiets form, § closing on THURSDAY,
3 : i r iduca a s . ;
Barbados Youth Movement St» George During excavations, traces had Positive Resolution reach the Director of Education not later th: ~scvadher pat hould i% Feb. 16th, ‘
r 15.2 50 i i : in 10 ater than Saturday, 25th |
fui 1937~1949 been found of the tomb of Saint February, 1950, ty Ny x
i Wire Hdtr Fox Terrie: SS | Peter himself. As wo ‘k proceede Mr. Wale assing ¥ ‘DW |
° 18°-Yeus OM: (iss7aba) . As work proceeded,| Mr. Walcott passing on the ; ; s R.H. EDWARDS, LTD: 3
Eftom newly imported stock. y1 0 Gouant 7 nO). it was decided to develop thel positive and ie soluti 4. Any teacher who applies for a vacancy . $ 9, Ltd. 9
. Apply X.Y.Z. C/o quarters — Tudor Bridge, St PUBLIC SALES as ded to develop thej positive and negative resolutions school Ss " s @ vacancy on the staff of another | $ " 3
Ci 14.2.50—4n. Michael. s made by the excavators during|said that the difference between }* must inform her present Chairman of Managers : ¥ awe
; ~~ A World-Wi ; ; owe ave $ g | é I an eae, ts ae é anagers and the . ¥
——— iends ane ees as copa fo sii covering a large extent of the|the local positive resolution and eae of her application for such a transfer, OCC BE BEDS
PLB. BWM. EM. BCD, REAL E ancient basilica built by the|the English affirmative resolution ebruary, 1950, 16.2,50—2n | % OSS S SSO SOCIO,
— ’ aoe E gem ae rant: be. STATE Emperor Constantine over St. was that whereas the English re- \ x “4 Bs x
between anc a i a sec ————— 2 ¥ ¢ ‘ 4 ad . : cal a . ‘
pe mes Apply: Mrs. E aay nt because we fourht for the BUILDING SITE 29,216 square feet of Peter’s tomb during the. f arth Soeyane a alicaie tee oy 3 GIBBS . x
Bait, Chelsea Road, uplift and improvement of the poor,| land, (adjoining the ‘residence of Mr. | century. Before the basilica is cecent to the invalidity, the local 1% » %
. 16.2. 50—3n Petes tte _Reatedied. and unwanted aay eee? at Rockley New Road,| opened to the public, it is ex-| affirmative resolution created a 1% PROVISION, GROCERY AND x
a s rbados. § reme yo r . . r » © 2) i * J ‘T e ri
- Activities Include” Religious Sal Gen. | BOYCE, Solicits Terie en pected that Pope Pius XII will senaetien ‘Demencent to the contin- see 3 — OR STORE offers you Vahic >
eral Knowledge, Unity and Culture — | -———————— . announce the full archaeologica ene valiaity, The Sch. « - o_ NTREAL, AUSTRALIA new | 9 "your money. y
“CARRIER CYCLES—Al oo T. BRUCE-o CLARKE * Found oeeliing fs three Storied stone wall| and religious value of the finds,|, The learned Attorney General accept Carpe ey ee Ce LINE x Beacon Sausage x
5 oo Te jouse s st. 1 ar Z ihe a assengers for whe siusages wn:
iad tndion Sports P44 & President. oumee"| Row. Bridgetown, mtadtonice Fnegpcee made by the excavators during had ae that there _were only Fra et Trinidad. Sailing __{MLA.N.Z.) LINE) S ¥ enna Sausages Bt >
St. Dial 2696. Rev, J. B. GRANT, L.Th. Director. | mises occupied by The Bornn Bay Rum | their ten years’ work.—Reuter, | ‘WO days to get rid of a statutory The Sen sbruary 1950 MS, “PORT PIRIE” is scheduled to] $ [otted Meat ... pas
71.2.50—t.f Mrs. OLGA BROWNE (Cen. Sec). Compxny) standing on 4,512 square feet nlp ptipenras Sita ltigeegeapaie sb enactment—by another statute re- aceept Cargo a eka wilt jf sail from Sydney January Mth — x Gibrted Bees aw™ 9
; The Barbados Youth Movement. in The ee house contains 2 Re | Voking it, or if the enactment in St. Lucia Sailing "yeaa ik oe at Trinidad about February % Laings C. WwW. Scru ee s 3
, Barrett Electric .50—In edi is on the top floor, drawing and . | ite Seale lite ‘el a tae ay 17th . ainda. t.) i eee 3
fet? Geddes Grant Lid Going rooms and 3 bedrooms on the CLAIMS CURE FOR its th exumeoned Sena waa hp as »0D tote See TE ena x Len fe men mE! x
Under 3 years old $200 o7 second floor; kitchen and usual out ; imited duration. au © regula- accept Cargo ; er soeae vl rom rt Pirie January 7th, Burnie] % jfolbr skate Set &
Dial 476, A, Barnes & Co PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE offices and several other rooms on the TUBERCULAR | tions which the Court werg con- St Luca, St. Vincent eee, 20 January 20th, Beauty Point "January| $% Whole Tomeice amie 3
16.2.50—4.f.n (Ge Fekeic Simaline “ack, 16k ig ie ee sidering were delegated legisla- phd Aruba, Sailing Sunday 19th February Ist, Brisbane Foss Syane* | §% Tomato Ketchup 2 ian &
(1904—6) § 30) For further particulars apply to the MENINGITIS ttion, which in truth and in fact The Gein i | riving at Trinidad about 10th Maren. pe oe Oe & ibe. 70g. 15 %
oN TUESDAY the 7th day of March Moe reeed, 4 id not become statutory enact- will acaept Cane a: LEWIS" These vessels have ample space fo: % Chole. ron ae Sleriy 9)
950, at the hour of 2 «clock in the e above will be set up for sale by i ments until they satished c for: Tramnenas? and Passengers Chilled, Hard Frozen and General Cargo ® cr ae amoked | Herrings 0
TIC CHANGERS — A fres! Men eae Pe sold at my office to the ee Sheet at our office in Lueas PARIS,, Feb. 1d.. | p . ts: a the stelaiess to aeontiake 16th aebeunres roonlling Thursday Cargo accepted on Through Bills of S Pilchense ere Bt acths 18 x
Rit Volts 35-00 ‘cycles. | Ne aporaised value.’ “S| February 1950 at 2 pm,‘ | Doctors from 16 countries mcet- | {he approval of both Honees ot AL acts Cave a RANE” win [1] for British Guiana, Barbados, Wired |S SPE Peas cs. tae pe
0 Vo 5 cycles. | "! nised vi , ah 2 p. , SS n aoe F | 4 app é s accept Cargo and Pas aatdh . dow et : ' a ind warc Black Eyes vie
° Bporii rt Sink Sots. Blene, of Tard contain: CARRINGION ,&, SeaLY .. ing here announced today that the| the Legislature. It was a tempor- [|| Buseruat™ Saif, Zevemaers or || sna ‘Leeward inane S chat a Batliy at ‘sikea’ ees
16.2.50—4n. | (P Pete ne aa Biilig. wort ona Ic. ba ee drug streptomycin, properly used,| ary statutory enactment. until it February 1950, , FURNESS pereeruars apply;— X , TONEY.
hounding on lands of the estate of J ——_______© | could cure tubercular meningitis, | peceived that approval, B-W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’ Agents: Triniad@” UTD: % Products. DIAL. 3115 $
ous Challener, on lands of Melvin Alleyne.| “BURNHAM” BISHOP'S COURT,| hitherto incurable, Gonklenee TARION. (INC) B DA COSTA & Co. LTD | DELIVERY BY VAN oR,cycLE %
on lands of Bayley’s Plantations, on | St. Michael, standing on 25,175 square Streptomycin was discovered in| We t submission by M Wal ‘ No, 4047 Agents: Barbados. — % >
GIRDER 28 x 12” x 5”. |'"nds of the estate of ©. Sargeant | feet of land. the United States in 1945. Tuber- | rags “th a th Le i ie OPAL SSSGSOOGEEGON
0 ‘Lt (dec'd), and on a road eight feet wide The house contains drawin and ears re eer ~} coll was at where e Legisia- ,
F ne 14's anne pading to the Rybiie pore at wen House | dining rooms with covered caida! cular meningitis killed its every! tue delegated its law making
em | ‘OKether with the old wall Dwelling House | and usual offices, two bedrooms. with victi: efore the z was used.! power as rdi ity ¥
KHAKI 72c. & Se | ‘lwidings, &c., apprateryl as. follows:— | running water, one with dressing room me, ete : anaes % " He wael 9 2 subordinate authority
St ‘ he whale property appraised to FTV¥ | attached, T 2 Doctors using it now report that} but retained the right to review °
‘ore, UUNDEED: A Fiery snvrny | attached, oilet and Bath upstairs. Two bi r > . ey iis } : 2 z ra Lae
3.2.50—14n DOLLARS AND RIPTY cmarrs ear soy | Sefvants rooms with toilet and bath, etween 20 and 60 per cent of | suc 1 subordinate legislation, the SURE
Attached fr vee Theovhilus Marshal! | washroom and workshop and garage| sufferers are saved. | provisions, in his submission were Gg.
4 and 96 WAS. ote lop math, towers watleention, wer aN cs a sa The four-day Paris Conference | mandatory. HAL,
vet N.B.—-25% Deposit to be paid on day| + "BR Rannister. Daa °° ™*|of the United Nations Interna-| Here Sir Newnham asked if de- CANADIAN sEkVIOR COME
MEN'S SHOES from $3.96 | °! TR CRGs HB. ROCHFORD, The above will be set. up to public tional Children Emergency Fund,|claring the regulations invalid SOUTHBOUND : Eb
7 3,2.50—14n * Atta, Provost Marshal. ae ok ie omens 6b. the ee just ended, called for uniform! would not work a = incon- Name of ship Salls Arrives
t BO PYJAMAS from $3,25 | Prevost Marshal's Office, . on Friday the ay of Feb-' methods of reporting results in} venience to the public, when it a Halifax i
eae 2s Bs rurary 1950 at 2 p.m | : . ol e .! oy § 8. “ALCOA PEGASUS” > 5 February. 17th
3.2.50—Jar | Feb. 14, 1980. Sinan CARRINGTON & SRALY. {al hospital using streptomycin. | was considered that the provisions §.S. “ALCOA POLARIS” iy > Febru 20th Sharon fed ee 10 OUR
Tyger gen LUCAS STREET. | Professor Cesare Cochi, of the/ 9°! other sub-paragraphs of the Sailing every two weeks,
Bi play. Royal Store. Phone} LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE 1.2.50—9n. | University of Florence, has cured| cies, ees apace hae NEW YORK SERVICE
‘ 3.2.50—14n cis SERS VIMGAT Rockin tae ee ae r cent of children treated! daily life of the wayfarer. In tha
The application of Athelstan Bruce of| BLUE VISTA—! Rockley ar Golf per cent of ¢ e ated) © rs ha : ; Sails Arrives
SPORT & DRESS SHIRTS | Maxwell Road, peeles Chute ae ot Ci) New Coral block residence with | with streptomycin, the best result} Se - oe, or ee 88, “wvidica pe jew et a Hor pnaee
‘Sine " license No. 201 of 1950, gran unobstructed views over links and . . } mine at whatever interpretation oe, 4 ebruary . arch Sth.
@& Retail. Royal Te. 14n in respect af a two storey wall and Lounge, dining rant, % bedrooms with 7 the drug discovery they put on sub-section y would Cc, J. “THULIN” February, 3rd. February 11th,
tas il wooden building at Oistins, Christ Church | built-in wardrobes, tiled bathroom ALS Mee | es - é 1 : * >
within District “B” for permission to] kitchen, double garage, servants’ quar- osed many new problems for ipply to all those regulations, and NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
AND CAR BATTERIFS—15 & P t E
. Auto Tyre -RIFS—15 8&1 remove the said license to a board and] ters, Terraced rock’ parden. lawn. doctors. Little was known of the| ®°t only the particular regulations Sails Arrives
Con Tr egear (St | shingled shop. with shedroof attached at| tropiral shrubs and plants. DIXON @ | doctors. Little was known of the with which they were dealing Now. Secene eens
7.2.50—t.f-n | Welches, near Oistins, Christ Church. | BLADON, Real E-tate Agents, Avetion. | rhythm of the flow of spinal fluid| ir. Wal “sand teak S.S. “ALCOA ROAMER” January 2th. February 7th.
NEWS—At ine Girt | within District “B" and to use the aia cers and Surveyors, Plantations Blde.| to the brain, basis of the strept-| ula sorte ee. — * ey 8.8. “ALCOA RUNNER” February 8th. February 20ta,
+ snea “ e 50— : coul
Club. First d overs! ee ae 7 eee tee Finone 4840 16.2.50—In | omycin cure, whereas blood ¢i>-| oS ia Continena its armadens
Set Coronation Siamps,/m, ~ Ww. RUDDER, Eaq., i THE MALL—(Nr. Waterfer Fetate) | culation has been studied for cen- Si . Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Canadian Service.
Old U.S.A. Stamps, etc. Police Magistrate, Dist “2. St. Michael. Wateant old world oe turi | he said that they could be made ROBERT THOM L/TD.—New York and Gulf Service. TO-MORROW =
16.2.50—12n (Sgd.) ATHELSTAN BRUCB, perty standing in approx. 2 acres of ares .| Valid overnight. The only time
BEER Ho . s F Applicant. pleasant and quite private grounds It was announced that another they would be questioned was ( }
bark land's finest brew. © 1» This application will be con-| flanked by sugar cane 2 recention. 3} conference of experts to. study all’ inn. camanne wan. oc} 5
k I d d
ig thrist quenching drink t to Wa hala) ¢ ee I ie when someone was charged under TEN IL SET
dealer or bar tna “day, | Sidened at the Licensing Cour’ , | bedrooms, large verar’oh. couble ©} forms of tuberculosis treatrnent }ipem :
™ bar man to-da *}on Monday, the 27th dav of February | stabling, servants’ quarters, courtyard ill be held in C hagen. later them. wv
m OA, | 19°, at 11 o'clock a.m. at Police Courts | ete. This property is offered at a very } Ww ill e he in Copenhagen late Sir Cecil ; I do not see how you AD 4 y
5.2.50— DO a lites reasonable figure making it on attroceive | this year— Reuter. an bring them into force unless Complete Large & Small ae
7 Presi Shipment PABLUM Hollen, Magauete, Dien SK. |Meat alec | they are out into writing—pub- The 17th Feb.
Br sre: 18 cas Pict 16.2.50—1n | & Surveyors, Plantations Building, Phone | T Pilot Killed lished in the Official Gazette. i 1950
pein Your Grocers and 4640. 16.2:50—In est Pilot Kile Mr. Walcott replied that the ROBERTS & CO. Dia! 3301. . i
8213 | regulations appeared in the Ga- = 2 ae 2 : ALE PRICES Cul
. , os pp . So SS Sa
“CHAMPION” As Plane Explodes |#tc ster tei were signea ty SS









& FOUND
LOST

SAKE TICKET BOOK—Series
, Advi Finder please return
» Advig. Dept. Reward offer-
% 14.2.50—8n.

Fighting or Loving he was the Cham-
pion,

You cannot afford to miss the best
fight-game picture to come to the screen
in years,

Tough and pomnpalling, this Ms
keep you on the e of your ¢ %
See Kirk DOUG in Ring Lardner’s
“CHAMPION” co-starring Marilyn MAX-
WELL, Arthur KENNEDY with Paul
STEWART, Ruth ROMAN, Lola AlL-
BRIGHT.

Showing at ROXY THEATRE

pO 10.2.50—4n

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to Backache”

—SAYS GRANDMA

Backache is a misery that strikes many
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ou would really appreciate how much
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to relieve backache!

That's because this time-proven Dr.
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HOUSEKEEPER —

TANT
Apply by letter to

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ide Gardens
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AUCTION SALE

1948 FORD PREFECT CAR
at MacEnearny’s Garage

2.30 p.m. on Friday 17th

WE are instructed by the
Insurance Company to sell
the above vehicle which has
been damaged in an acci-
dent. Mileage only 11,000.
Car driven away under own
power after accident. Oppor-
tunity to acquire a modern,
repairable Car.

Cash on fall of Hammer.

AUCTIONEERS

DIXON & BLADON

NOTICE
DR. CHAS. PAYNE
Dentist
(Opposite Cathedral)
Has resumed Practice.
(





—=—

BRICKHILL, Buckinghamshire,
Feb, 15.
A tailless experimental jet
fighter plane, known as the Flying
Wing, exploded in mid-air when
on a high speed test trial here
today.+
| The plane was one of two
| experimental machines owned by
| the Ministry of Supply. The body
of a Royal Air Force test pilot
was found in a nearby wood. The
plane was the same experimental
' type—-DH-108—as that in which
Geoffrey de Haviland, one of Byi-
tain’s leading test pilots, met his
cdicath.—Reuter,

Sunspot May Affect
Communications

LONDON, Feb. 15.

A sunspot which_is now visible
may knock radio communications
sideways immediately before and
after Britain’s General Election of
February 23, according to scien-
tists here.

An official at Hurstmonceux—







Britain’s foremost Solar Observa- | forcin

tory—said they had detected the

the Governor. He was. arguing
that in case there was any ques-
tion of invalidity, they could be
made valid overnight. They were
really taking away something
which belonged to the public.

After repeating his submission
that the provisions were mandat-
ory, Mr. Walcott dealt with the
point of prima facie evidence of
delay in the laying of the regula-
tions. His submission was that all
that would lie in the power of the
defendant would be to say that
the House sat 13 times and they
were not laid before the Legisla-
ture, @ithough they were in the
Gazette two days after the Gov-
ernor had signed them. The other
side could then call evidence in
rebuttal.

Luncheon

At this stage the luncheon ad-
journment was taken, and on re-
sumption Mr. Walcott dealt with
the question of sanctions. He said
that as he understood it, his
learned friend had argued that
the Assistant Court of Appeal had
uaported the idea of nullification
to have the effect of a sanction
g the Executive to comply
with the directions of the Legisla-

spot but did not know yet whether | ture.

iit was crowing in size.

j



He was submitting that that

DOWN Ir

KOR SALE soi

“CARLDIEM,"~—St. Lawrence

“CARLDIEM”, St. Lawrence. Fully furnished. Linen and
Cutlery ete, Four Bedrooms. Situated on the St. Lawrence
Beach where there is excellent sea bathing. This house can
be purchased at a price to give the buyer a good investment on
the purchase price, and it has possibilities of development, For
pgrticulars, Dial Miss K. HUNTR, Telephone 8357.





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i Other observers described it as | question was really not material s n

“the largest sunspot seen for ajat all. The Courts were merely % BOOKER’S (B'DOS) DRUG STO ES I '
considerable ffme”, and forecast| trying the issue as to whether LTD. % k e
radio communications would »-;some alleged offence was really > . ings HARMA

bably be affected on February 21,/ an offence Headquarters for Best RUM . Broad Street and Hs: (ALPHA F on

22 and 23.—Reuter. In reply t 2 + as :
wd . Famer 10, Sie, Const: a tn. wean SPRPLLRLELL LLCO CCE CELI LE LACES













PAGE EIGHT
H.T.C. Entries:

5 From



FOR the first time in nine years
Berbados races will receive a
sizable entry of horses from
Trinidad to race at the Spring
meeting due to start on March
4th viext. Entries for the meeting
closed at the offices of the Bar-
bacos Turf Club yesterday after-
noon and a recorc number, for a
Spring meeting. of 54 horses were
entered for the iwenty three
taces.

Among the entries from Trini-
dad will be the famous Jamaica
creole Blue Streak who will be
the first A class horse ever sent
from Jamaica to the South Carib-
bean to race in Barbados. Blue
Streak is trained by Mr. Leo
Williams and will be accompanied
on the trip over by stable mates
Lady Pink and Swiss Roll.

Already the big Jamaican gel.-
fig has been made a favourite
for the feature Barbados ‘bur.
Club Stakes as most oi the ba:-
badian horses are either from
lower classes or expected to
in ho better form than they were
in Trinidad where blue Streak
has already beaten them. ‘The
non-entry of Storm’s Gift, who !
resting, and Pepper Wine, who ha
s been reserved for the A clas
bine sprint on the second day, mak?
Biue Streak even more of a
certainty for the big race. Never-
theless the racing public will be
able to see Pepper Wine matchin:,
strides with the Jamaican
Champion over the shorter dis-
tance of 542 furlongs

Ledy Pink and September Son;
% are also regarded as horses wit!

ve







Cie very good chances at the meetin
7 and are expected to give the !
Â¥ class horses in Barbados a roug!
Pte time. More so because the mai
4 opposition must come from newly
te imported fillies.
mee The Barbados Guineas, the firs
2 classic ever to be run at the
Spring meeting received an entry
of six, notable absentees being
Bowmanston who is entered i!
other races at the meeting at
iy the St. Vincent filly Bow Bell
i Entries were as follows
Race 1 — C and C2 Maidens—
th 5l44f— Musk, \ Cros
Hing Identify, Ability, Starry Night
ain Race 2 — F class, 5'f:—
mh Gavotte, Joint Command, Su
fire, Bowmanston, Mountbatte
Minuette, Postscript Foxglov
Facetious





Race 4 — A class, 9f:—Slainte
Tiberian Lady, Beacon Bright

Gun Site, Fliéuxce, Blue Streak
River Sprite, Infusion, Eliza-|
bethan

Race 5 — C class, 744f:—Silve!
Bullet, Sun Queen, Beaufils, Rive
Sprite. Swiss Roll, Ability, Starry
Night, Southern Cross, Musk.

Race 6 — G class, 542f:—Mopsy,!}
Tango, Miss Friendship, Maytime, |
Minuette, Brahmin’s Choice, Chin |

|



dit, April Flowers, Silk Plat
Vixen.

Race 7 — D class, 74of:—Bat-)
talion, Dulcibella, Sweeper, Po
script, Facetious, Lady Belle

Race 8 — B class. 54¢f:—Slainte,
Rebate, Corfu, Infusion, W
Lord, Tiberian Lady, Lady Pin}
September Song, Land Mark, |
Identify |

March 9th }

ify, Lady Pink, War Lord, Septem

ber Song, Blue Streak, Don
Arturo, Rebate, Infusion, Peppet
Wine.

Race 10 — F class 3.y.0., 54¢f:—
Watercress, Brown Girl, Mount
batten, Pharos II, Colleton, Bow
manston, Perseverance, Apollo

Race 11 — F elass 4.y.o. and
up, 744f:—Tango, Joint Commande,
Miss Friendship, Facetious, Post
script, Gavotte, Vixen, Minuette,

Sunfire, Foxglove.
Race 12 — B class, 7/.f:—Ident-

ify, Silver Bullet, War Lord,
Starry Night, Swiss Roll, Sun
Queen, Tiberian Lady, Infusion,
Fliéuxce, September Song, Lady
Pink, Musk, Corfu, Rebate
Race 13 — G2, 5'4f:—Silk
Plant, Chindit, Mopsy, Maytime,

Brahmin’s Choice
Race 14 — D class 54of:—Sun-

fire, Sweeper, Battalion, Dulci-
bella, Brown Girl, Lady Belle,
Vixen.

Race 15 — C class, 9f;—Musk,
Silver Bullet, Sun Queen, Swiss
Roll, Ability, River Sprite, Starry



Te OCCASION WA






rere ee

calm sea made ideal Water

Race 3 — Barbados Guineas |
7%4f:—Apollo, Br Girl, Col-|K
leton, Watercress Mountbatte
Perseverance, Pharos II

SECOND DAY ¥

Race 9 — A class, 544f:—Ident-







S ULTRA: SO
RUNELLA SPENT+PLENTY OF MOOLA
FOR ONE OUNCE OF SCENT:>-

Woust AMINUTE) |}0D0m
1) MORE, DEAR J
TLL BE



Trinidad

Among 54 Entered!

Jamaica’s Blue Streak to Race in B’dos

THIRD DAY

March 11th

Race 17 — B class, 9f:—Slainte,
Infusion, Tiberian Lady, Fiieuxce,
September Song, Musk, Corfu,
Rebate, Starry Night, Swiss Roll,
River Sprite.

Rice 18 — G class, 74f:—April
Flowers, Vixen, Minuette, bdilk
Plant, Mopsy, Tango, Miss Friend-
ship, Chindit.

Race 19 — D class, 9f:—Bat-
talion, Sweeper, Postscript, Dui-
cibella, Lady belle.

Race 20 — C class, 5'4f:—
Southern Cross, Swiss Roll, Musk,
Starry Night, River Sprite, Sun
Queen, Silver Bullet, Dulcibella,
Icentity, Beaufils, Ability.

Race 21 — F class 3.y.0., 74ef:—
Colleton, Perseverance, Pharos II,
Mountbatten, Brown Girl, Apollo,
Bowmanston, Watercress.

Race 22 — F class, 4.y.o. and
ap, 9f:—Tango, Miss Friendship,
Vixen, Joint Command, Gavotte,
Facetious, Sunfire, Foxglove, Post-
script.

Race 23 — A class, 7'4f:—Re-
bate, Infusion, Silver Bullet,
September Song, Blue Streak,
Identify, Pepper Wine, Lady Pink,
Elizabethan, Gun Site, River
Sprite, Slainte, Beaufils,
Arturo, Béacon Bright.



Navy Team
Swamped 8-Nil
IN RETURN MATCH

A SUNNY and

Polo
shortly

afternoon

conditions yesterday as

after 5 p.m., a Water Polo Team
from H.M.S. Devonshire lined up
to play a return match against a
local side.

However, despite valiant efforts







ym the Navy's part they were
»verwhelmingly defeated eight nil.
This was chiefly due to the quick
pa by he local lads, who
wel ill in good trim from their
recent tour to Trinidad
F< the homesters Delbert
é r, who is developing quite
idable back hand _ shot,
cored twice with this type of
hot. It was Peter Patterson, how-
ever skipper of the side who

ypened the scoring, and he went on
yet another. Geoffrey Foster
n the wing also scored two and
Ince and Boo Patterson

lo net

ennet}

ored one eacl

The teams were

H.M.S. Devonshire: Marine
Tucker, Mr. Saunders, Leading
Sig. Murphy, Yeoman
(Capt,), Band Cpl.

E. R. A. Roche and Cadet Simpson.

Barbados G. Foster, Dd.
Bannister, Fs Patterson, G.
MacClean, K. Ince, B. Patterson

and P. Foster.



Belleville
Resulis

Ladies’. Singles — Final
Miss D. Wood beat Mrs. S. Con-
i1ell 6—4, 6—2

Men’s Singles—Semi Final
E. P. Taylor beat D E. Worme
4, 6—2

Ladies’ Double

Mrs. D. Worme and
Branch beat Misses D
Lamming 6-——1, 6—0

MATCH 16TH MARCH:

Men’s Singles—Semi-Final

Dr. C. Manning vs. R. S. Nicholls

Mi L,
D

and

MENNA WINS ON
POINTS

sight rounds bere last night.

Pacheco 155 pounds.—Reuter.

Can See E.G.

AUCKLAND, Feb. 15

units feature film of the



F





TWMOp} TT —

i

READY.. CAN TAKE YOUR JOB AND
AROMA OF. \(PUFF-PUFF)HEY! CLOSE
16 BUCKS | |EL steNcHOS, | THAT WINDOW! WANT

2 FOR 154, 23 ME TQ CATCH



Don |

Williams | petition in th é
Guthrie, | spreads of sail once ran riot. The

Tennis wind the Brittania used to carry
a

WHITE PLAINS, New York,
Feb. 15
Freddie Menna, of Brooklyn,,\

beat Chico Pacheco of Brazil on a
split decision points verdict over |

Menna scaled 152) pounds and

The New Zealand National Film
Empire

DUT HER EAU'DE CAMELIA WAS
SMOTHERED,
UNFLOWERED

THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

BALANCING the boat calls for acrobatic





The Fastest Yachts

In The

Water

By lan Gale

LONDON (By Mail).

AFTER fifty years of experi-
ment Australia has produced the
most spectacular open sailboat in
the world to-day—the Eighteen
Footer. A boat of seven feet
beam and only 24 inches depth,
it earries what is literally a cloud
of sail. The sail area, which is
nearly 2,000 square feet, is fantas-
tic for so small and shallow an

“lopen boat, and yet the Eighteen

Footer is best in a wind of 32 to
36 miles an hour. And, believe it
or not, Mr. Ripley, these craft
have been known to leap clear of

the water in a sudden burst of
speed
The origin of the Eighteen

Footer, which had no prototype in
any other country, is a matter of
controversy, Some contend that
it was developed from the fast
“buteher boats” which Sydney
providores sent out to meet in-
coming ships, ut Peter Cowie, a
veteran who built one of the ear-
liest Highteen Footers 50 years
ago, declares that it originated in
a shallow-draft skiff or pleasure
boat common in Sydney early in
the last century. When the own-
ers got tired of rowing about the
harbour, he says, they fitted fins
and a Bermuda type sail and
went sailing instead.

Since the only _ restrictions
placed on the boats for racing
purposes relate to the hull, com-
the setting of fantastic

sail area of the modern Eighteen
Footers is nothing to what the
“old timers” sometimes earried in
their efforts to outspeed their
competitors. Instead of a mast of
26 ft. which is now the standard,
the old Minnawatta once carried
a mast of 52 ft. and in a light

s much as 2,826 sq. ft. of sail!
Since the sky was the limit, all
kinds of extra sails were tried
out, They set “aeroplane spin-
nakers”, with holes to spill the
wind. and some carried “water-
sails”, set below the boom to catch
ithe last drop of wind, but neither
| of these sails proved successful
and were eventually scrapped.
But they retained the “ringtail”
which is an adaptation of the stud-
sails sometimes set by square
riggers, and giving six or seven
feet extra width to the mainsail

More Streamlined
The modern Eighteen Footer,
which thousands of fans flock to

watch racing in Sydney Harbour
every week, dates from eleven
years ago. The new boats are

much more streamlined than the
ld Eighteen Footers, Where the



The Weather

TO-DAY
| Suy Rises: 6.20 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.09 p.m.
Moon (New) February 16.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 4.05 a.m, 2.46

m.
YESTERDAY

|

|

Rainfall (Codringion): Nil.

Total for Month to Yester-

day: .63 in.

Temperature (Max.) 82.5° F
Temperature (Min.) 72.0° F.
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) FE,








Games is expecte € > J

Night, Southern Cross, Identify, ious Hew iment rlegnte (3 p.m.) E. by N

Beaufils. time. The Alm act 7.500 feet Wind Velocity: 16 miles per
Race 16 — A class, 9f:—Blue} wili take about half an hour to hour. De ath

Streak, Infusion, Gun Site, Eliza-}run. It will be released simul- Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.9945

ethan, September Song, Beacon | taneously in the main New Zea- (3 p.m.) 29.925.

Bright. BEG and cities on March 3.—Reuter.

ES eT ange ae ery — care EY
- ’ = re :
Pheyll Do It Every Time sscinoe ae tn By Jimmy Hadlo |

—— OOOO = = = —— = ——— = === —=

BY GAR! OVERPOWERED
BY HUBBY'S CIGAR!








SO I LOOKED HIM RIGHT IN
THE EYE (PUFF) AND I SAYS >
TO HIM (PUFF-PUFF) YOU |







MY DEATH ¥



; aw












































older boats pushed their way
through the water, the new ones
plane over the top. The new
conditions yesterday, as_ shortly
boats are much lighter too, since
they are fitted with hollow masts
and spars and carry sails of fine-
ly woven Japara and Egyptian
silk instead of the old duck and
eanvas. The sail plan has been
agtered so that the mainsail is
not so large as the ones the veter-
ans carried, but the over-all
spread of sail is on an average
greater.

The center-plates of the new
boats are deeper and narrower
than those of their predecessors
and three mainsails and four jibs
are carried for varying winds.
The spinnaker is fixed to a 30 ft.
pole and has an area of 694 sq. ft.
When the wind is blowing at 32
miles an hour the Eighteen Footer
is reefed down and carries a bare
1,400 sq. ft. of sail. Winds over
36 miles an hour do not show the
yachts to advantage, since they
ship too much water.

The speed at which the
Eigh‘een Footers really travel has
always caused argument, because
its spectacular action makes it ap-
pear to be moving faster than it
really is. Some spectators are
willing to bet even money that
some of the faster boats can do
20 miles an hour, but of course,
this is not so. Big, fast clipper
ships of the Cutty Sark period
only did 18 knots in good condi-
tions, so to credit small craft of
this or any other type is foolish.
Peter Cowie comes to the rescue |
again with figures which he has
compiled over many years.
cording to him
Eighteen Footer travels is about
ten smiles an hour. This figure
mezy not sound terrific, but along-
side a fast moving ferry boat or

a very geod showing indeed.
Six Man Crew

While the older boats used to
earry 12, 14 and even 18 hands,
so that when they leaned out-
board they had to hang out in
double rows, the crew of to-day’s

reduced to six.

only about 550 lb., with only a
112 lb. fin to steady it under 1,400
ft. of sail in a 36 miles an hour
wind is pretty vigorous work. The
crew, a well trained team,
handling sails and balancing the
boat against gusts and shifts of
wind, to keep her running true
and upright against the sea. This
calls for considerable acrobatic
agility, hardihood and endurance
on tNe part of the crew, but re-
pays them with plenty of thrills.

With its beautifully streamlined
hull of polished cedar planking,
phosphor bronze and stainless
steel equipment, the Eighteen
Footer is an expensive craft. Be-
fore the war, a fully fitted boat
could be set in the water for
£335, but now the same job costs
about £450. But this does not
mean that the sport is limited to
the wealthy. Far from it. The
cost of the boat is usually split up
between the crew, and also boat
owners race for bonuses to recoup
their outlay. it is recorded that

will be glad to hear that there is
a good chance of the Australian



. | and handlers
motor yacht, the little boats make | Referee Foster who disqualified

racing Eighteen \Footer has been }

Working a boat which weighs |

|



agility, hardihood and endurance.



Trinidad Scores
Four Wins In

.

Boxing Tourney

TRINIDAD scored two more
wins last night at the Intercolonial
Amateur boxing tournament be-
ween Trinidad and Barbados
ended at the grounds of the
Modern High School, Roebuck
Street last evening.

Barbados again scored a lone
win last night and the total score
at the end of the tournament was
Trinidad four wins and Barbados
two wins.

Highlight of last might’s card
was a brilliant first round K.O..

by Hollis Wilson (118 lbs) of
Trinidad over Victor Lovell
(118° lbs) of Barbados. Wilson

climaxed some spirited exchanges
in the closing stages of the first
round, with a short sharp right
cross that landed flush on Lovell’s
chin forcing him to take the full
count.

In the second match between
Aloysious Marcano (129 lbs) cf
Trinidad and Gilbert Goodman
(129 lbs) of Barbados, \#xing
fans saw a courageous but out-
classed Goodman fight a dour
battle against a too cocksure
opponent who was bent on scoring
a K.O., victory. Mareano landed
some heavy blows but Goodman
boxing cleverly scored more
regularly to gain the edge by
sheer tenacity.

The final bout between George
Best (180 lbs) of Barbados and
Wilfred Rodney (192 lbs) of Trini-
dad ended in the first round with a
victory to Rodney by disqualifica-
iion. George Best who in spite of
his twelve pound disadvantage in
weight and also considerable in-
feriority in reach carried the fight

Ac-jto his man and floored him for
the fastest an}

a count but in his impetuosity
struck him a comparatively light
blow as he was on his knees.
Objection by Rodney’s seconds
was upheld by

Best and awarded the fight to
Rodney according to the rules of
Amateur Boxing.





in one season a boat raked in
£450 in this way.
Yachtsmen all over the world j<

London Express Service,



Eighteen Footer becoming an in-
ternational class yacht, as the Star
is to-day. Boats of this unique
type are now being built in New
Zealand, England and the United
States, and a yachtsman from In-
dia has taken the plans back with
him to introduce it in the East.
Also, five hundred copies of book-
lets containing the plans have
been sent to yacht clubs all over
the world, and enthusiasts in Aus-
tralia are confident that once these
jubs have realised the nature of
i this beautif*1 craft, world contests
Iwill only be a matter of time.



CHILDREN

DO PUT
ON

WEIGHT

WHEN THEY
ARE FED

DAILY
| ON

J&R

ENRICHED











‘DE

H.M.S. “DEVONSHIRE” de-
feated a Combined Team from
Y.M.P.C.” and Carlton two - love
when they met at football yester-
day on Y.M.P.C. grounds.

Both teams seemed to be short
of form. This could be judged
by the inaccuracy in passing the
ball to each other and the loss of
many oprortunities to score.

The Devonshire team combined
better than tke homesters and
when called on to defend, did so
successfully.

Y.M.P.C.-Carlton got the kick+
off and for the first five minutes
of play, were kept on the defen-
sive by the Devonshire. In the
meantime two corners were con-
ceded to the visitors who failed
to score from either.

Later, a melee in the homesters’
goal area almost gave the Devon~
shire their first goal, but it was
cleverly saved by Archer in goal.

The homesters at one time bore
down on the Devenshire’s goal
area and what looked like a cer-
tain goal was saved through a
struggle put up by the visitors’
goalie and backs. :

Play had only been going on
for 20 minutes when the Devon-
shire team got their first goal.

Bradshaw at inside left passed
neatly to Moore ‘at centre forward
who sent the ball to the left of
Archer in goal.

hhaif-time found the score. at
1—0 in favour of the Devonshire.
Both teams had opportunities to
score other goals during the first
half, but just failed to take them.

On resumption, the visitors
started the attack again. The
ball was carried down to the
homesters’ goal and a shot was
taken by Moore, centre forward,
with the goalie cut of position.
Dash, one. of the backs, was



TWO IRISH 2-YEAR-OLDS
PURCHASED

THE Anglo-Irish Agency have
purchased two of the best Irish
}2 year olds of 1949 for exper:
abroad. These are FIRST VIEW,
Ch.F. (1947) by PANORAMA —
FIRST TELEGRAM, and COUP
D’ECLAT, Ch.C. (1947) by Mr.
JINKS—COUP DE MaAITRE.
FIRST VIEW strictly on forn
was the champion 2 year old
filly in Ireland last year. She
| won two of the season’s bigges!
juvenile events, the National
Produce Stakes and the Anglesey
Stakes, and two other races in
a total of six starts. She defeatec
PRINCE OF BLENHEIM by 5
lengths and this colt beat FIRST
VIEW’S best rival RED ANITA,
subsequently. COUP D’ECLAT
won 3 races in six starts, wind-
ing up with a win in Manches-
ter’s Bettisfield Stakes.





B.B.C. Radio
Programme

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1950

Books to Read, 8.45 a.m. Theat

* a.m. The News, 9.10 Home News from
Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close Down, 12 noon

The News, 12.10 p.m. News Analysis
12.15 p.m.
ation Post, 1.15 p.m. Radio Newsrcel
130 Take it from Here, 2
News, 2.10 p.m.

o.m

Philip Green and his Concert Orchestra

} p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 8.15 p.m. Pro-
5.30 p.m, Generally
5.45 p.m. Tom Jongs Trio,
7

The News, 7.10 p.m. News Analy-

gramme Parade,
Speaking,
} p.m. from the
>m
sis, 7.15 p.m. We See Britain, 7.46 p.m
Verchant Navy Newsletter, 8 p.m

8.45 p.m

Third Programme,

Radio Newsreel,

wealth Journey, 9 p.m. The News, 9.10
“ome News from Britain, 9.45 Political

3peech—My. Clement Davies (Lib. )

7.35 p.m. Ray Martin, 10 p.m. Meet the
“ommonwealth, 10.30 p.m. Sandy Mac
10.45
The

Pherson at the Theatre Oran,
p.m. Special Dispatch,

“AFRESH

1l p.m,



Here she

give that
vitality.



VONSHIRE’ DEFEATS
COMBINED TEAM

7.10 am, News ¥

New Records, 1 p.m. Observ-

Home News from
Britain, 2.15 p.m. Sports Review, 2.30
Radio Theatre, 4 p.m. The News,
4.10 p.m. The Daily Service, 4.15 p.m.

Happiness—Cow & Gate, the most famous of all
Infants’ Foods. And what a relief! For there is
everything that Baby needs in a tin of Cow & Gate
to build firm flesh, strong bones, sound teeth, and t0

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SDAY. FEBRUARY !
Fly to j
in

luckily there to kick it out.

With not many minutes left for |
play, the Devonshire took the
score to 2—0. Turner at inside
right nicely received a pass from
the right wing and drawing goalie
Archer out, he easily placed the
ball into the nets.

Y.M.P.C.-Cariton fought hard
to retrieve their loss, but every
attempt they made was thwarted
by the Devonshire’s strong
defence. ~

At end of play, the score re-
mained 2—0 in favour of the
visitors.

The teams were; —

Devonshire—Thomas, Thomas,
Pugh, Turner, Nevett, Farmery,
Garrett, Rees, Moore, Bradshaw,



| Trine

EPRUARY



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WEST.
AIR

BRITISH WEST p 5
‘Registered in Tau

Lower Broad Street, oe
Phones 4585 & ye



a.

Y.M.P.C. - Carlton — Archer,
Dash, Straker, Bourne, Andrews,
Lewis, Porter, Hazell, Gomes,

Hutchinson, F., Marshall, E. W.
Referee—Parnell.

——<———————_—_——_—_—

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Full Text

PAGE 1

THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FOUR THCTSDAY, FFBRI ABY BARBADOS^ AflVME p.„_.—t %  *-1 ruMMted tijr Tlv. Advmu Co I _W.. M. *OK. St. BrWJWtowi TluirsHiiv. rYhruarv It, I !* %  '• I've Jnwf Paid My Wilrh IKu-ior .. Wilh Bernard Wirk^leed In ark-s Africa l>< s|t.i(< l> .\. 2 . 1 mxi-sil? Colletfe THE installation lo- 8.000 feet up In the hills at Lolta. So hen iin a lost world that might have come out of Rider H..|tgard. To reach it you drive for more than a hundred miles m-er the d u 8 t y plain* lying Immediately south • %  Then fou climb loto fcy up a series of brick•ed gorges that home of baboons and laqnardi Suddenly you come out at the top and spread before vou are the rolling green downs of England. I You might be in Sussex ,r Wiltshire I A dozen MI. little flowers grow in the turf like buttercups, daisies, and harebell:-. and the hills ..re dotted frith bushes that look something like blackthorn or may. In these so-English turroundngs it's odd to tlnd that the animals grazing by the track are antelopes, zebras, and gnus. Iitmjnf and piemd Each patient has his own registered medical man. Just as we have now. but he's at liberty to change to another if the first doctor gives him permission If he swops without getting this—the Masai equivalent of filling in the right forms—he's liable to And himself bewitched Cases of unprofessional ronduct are punished by the MGM.C. (Masai General Medical Council) but they wouldn't tell us what conduct they considered unprofessional. It certainly lsnl drunkenness because getting tiddly on beer made from honey is often a prelude to a difficult diagnosis. And it isn't getting familiar with your female patient*It is more likely that you'd be TIlC l-l'ullh Scheme considered unprofessional if you didn't. The situation was explained 1*0 the panel something as follows: Sin * r* "Your fame as medicine men hai spread tu Britain, and this Your true medicine man wont „„ man here. Ilwana Bwernard touch surgery. That's a mere About 40 hradltn witch dotBwlckslee d. having failed to get artisan's job. Even a white man r his rheumatism cured under the can be a surgeon. Indeed, these White Man's National Health days the witch doctors send surScheme. has come to you with gical cases to the European hosh question. Hon. llullliiiU tors live in thi La, but not .ill Of uMn MY frgaful witch doci.pends so much on psy, „„gni.H-.-i,t cow to ask tor pltal without m Knowledge oi huVM|r nd J| M ;. man nature that you arc m M1() l( (V ^Idnl belle** n In the old days, though, the lowed to rattle the bones or take W(i) (f lt Thrv w(11I1 i an Masai surgeons would amputate fees till you reach middle age ^ U( Vlll sjemilg at, but you a limb, or remove a fracture! rib Until then you have the status ot ',,, _, .,, ,„„.,, lh ,. v kn c W |. an d put one from a sheep in its an undergraduate or a witch I ,. k|| |( „, „,„ p ] ar e. ir apparenl. ,,.-.. ,The faculty at Loita was founded W1 „„, .,„ | ...hcring to conTheir principal disinfectant was about a hundred years ago by a lcr wilh lh0 a .hers, the dean, or melted aheeps fat. and they I witchdoctor who cam* down (rom h ,.. 1(l „. a* faculty, gave this resewed up the wounds wim sinews heaven and was found sitting on | .. We can cure rheumaUsm 'rom the back of an ox. until top of a hill. He was so small that an our own pep,., but we the • wounds were healed the the Masai herdsmen thought he hav( nevl r m .,, „ ur methods on patient lived on nothing but roast was a child and took him horna wnltc mnn beet. .„„.,,„„ Imagine theii ,.„. Hwena-wilh-the-stinkingThis was all very interesting. they got him bock and found that has ^indent faith to live but It wasn't the top secret stult he waant a y. for a t*W W*ak* W* might 1 wanted. Even the promise of Mich doctor, h.-li him Otherwise our advice Bwona Beaverbrook s cow, now lit married local ,,j linn is to go to the Nairobi Govgrazing peacefully in the backand ..II his male dStcand...nment Hospital.'' • ground, wouldnl induce them to give that. The District Officer who had brotllhl ""' P-to Ita said they I had the cow brought nearer wra ling cagey because they and aaked what they did wnen thought ws were trying to break they needed rain. hy, said rJoWn th*U 'he dean, 'we do the same as Une if their sidelines is givyou. We pray lor il. Ins charms to cattle-thieves," he Co on, piur him me con, said, "It once we knew what those Bameu. je wed know that any —London Eipresa Seretee. i ,-eii srltch aoi %  since. Mj Hli. nin.llisi.i best I" ' ln Army blankets wars wslUng for us under a irewhen our lorry bumped to a stop. Besides blankets they were sanda s made of n I'oli.in.l \r.fro n My W. J'*• %  %  %  SM-ialisl Harrow Boys Tiu arl of the barrow boy con;..,i.,i..i,h it li proposed that a up, th.-re is another paragraph, sists in If he is aaUll •ol should paragraph 7 on page 13. apple., Z m ba three powers rosy ones will be at the front and ,.,, top "i ttM pl %  But arhtn b I takes apples from %  !M. i" I-V. ^ •*** -~ —%  _,-_ Hnh %  •—i .. :—i—•— ...ki-b — >'!.._ IUIIIIIMIIIIII> So this paTiigriip'i deals with monopoly" mtiustrie.s. They 1\ l.lhllsiilSIII might not be willing to sell, and The lir>t is power tu Uke over to competo wilh them might be i,,,k t.t tic n;u.iiul And anv LrahiStn which If 'inuneconomic. So this paragraph! Who I, to say whether proposes, for such industries.I tu lake place on private cinema prcnusr. The Astounding Case Of The Banned Film By < hurlr* Hay AT the height of the Palestine troubles, Hollywood planned the tilm Sword in the Desert. It was completed last summer. This film misrepresents British policy in Palestine and grossly libels the conduct and character of the British soldiers who did their duty at that time. It shows them treating civilians harshly and shooting up helpless civilians and illegal immigrants. The critic of the "New York Times," Mr. Bosley Crow-, ther, rebuked the producer, Robert Buckner of Universal-International, for portraying the British as "stiff-necked cads." And the climax of the film comes when the underground Jewish army blow up a British camp while the soldiers are singing carols on Christmas Eve. This is a film calculated to bring "a little holiday in the heart" of the notorious Mr. Hecht. And it would certainly arouse the anger and resentment of any British audience before whom it was screened. Last week, Sword in the Desert was shown for the first time in Britain at a Regent Street -inema. Riot broke out among a section of the audience. Mr. Victor Mischon. Chairman >f the L.C.C. Public Control Committee, says hat this disturbance was created by "Fas-ist elements of organised hooligani"n. What happened then? On the next day the Permanent Secretary of the Home Office, | Sir Frank Newsam. sent urgently for the Clerk of the Council and told him that they had information that "there might be serious outbreaks at the next performance. There was a possibility of grave risk of loss of life and the police could not be responsible for safeguarding the audience.'' In these circumstances the L.C.C. ordered the withdrawal of the lilm. and it was not shown again. Mr. Ben Henrey, spokesman for Universal International in London, later stated that the film will not be shown anywhere else in London. So the hooligans have their way, they have banned the showing of Sword in the Desert throughout the London area. Absolutely irrespective of their views on this lilm as such, the public should lake note that this ban represents a great victory for [ dark and totalitarian forces. A group of men set themselves up again*! the peace; by violence, riot and disorder j they sought to impose their censorship over I a legal performance which every citizen in the country was entitled to see and to approve or criticise, enjoy or loathe for him•elf; and, incredibly, by one single manifestation of violence they have won. This is totalitarianism in its vilest %  and it has been allowed, without even a show tance, to flaunt itself and triumph in our very midst. If conduct of this character is to be allowed For TO-DAT lost, Liviai |^ McEWANS BED LABEL BEER—pr bottle W U,r V %  i —Per cam %  %  N ICING SUGAR "l Bottles HE.'NZ PLAIN OLIVES (OlOVVtUI. VlOlltv Ntim Our LUMBER YARD and HARDWARp n !" MENTS will be closed for the IntercoS 01 *!:! Tournament at 12 noon on the following 2 &i *. THURSDAY, 16TH FEBRUARY MONDAY, 20TH FEBRUARY TUESDAY. 21ST FEBRUARY WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LTD., SucceaC. S. PITCHER & CO., LTD Phones : 4472, 4687, 4413, 4251. .*, ',,'.'.•,'. '. '*'.'.'.**:*S f r t '*' f ',',',* r r -s t ;+ e t TO-DAY FMXE mm m urilfr al one. COXDEXSED .Ml/.* fVw #'.' SILO I Danish Boneless TINNED HAMS— 2^1b. each Danish Boneless TINNED MAMS 341b. each TINNED HAMS—4 a lb.—121b. perlo 3 PABLUM imall pku PABLUM large pk BLUE C'ltOSS TEA—v,lb. pkg I'INKAI'1'1 K JAM Hll> lllls SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE -Sib. tins STANSFELD. SCOTT & CO., LTD. This arl has been adopted I.HKHUI or noi? u,f poUUcJana. Tba n Own naomx which ..f promtM an m Uu Bh*it *• %  <"<> ul K over. This is The lass good ones an -\tmm-l> convenient ri |r arrangement, let Party Programmes. TtM %  rorsl an MVtc displayed .11 ,A\ and The second le powec to start art nu'iui. tt up si.ii. MtaiprttM In eomConsldn tea tUUon with exletlDfl prlvgM ilfctfto "I IM S.KI.IIISI indltatn Wn.it private industry'.' ml called i \n* uatrj No limits Ul Win Through TeejatlMi Men an laJd thiwn for the exercise of | !. . as fun employment aad ua ThJ third is power to buy up phatM. W.-il. era nil w.mt full conetrns which are willing to I .ir sell out Un till now I have not shares is native to us as a people noticed any enthusiasm on the In Ibis enterprises to : inIIOUKIII mil. Indeeii part} outright nationalisation. The four power together, constitute %  heque for Socialism taken blan k the Govern,he 'i llc ,or * llsm Th f. '!^ 1 ol ix)ssible action is unrestricted The Socialist Party is not a turm party concerned with social security nnd nationally a few essential but badly run-down industries, lt is a revolutionary party. Its declared aim is the complete Socialist State I IMU Allll M.aus Up Ull now the public line adopted by Mr Morrison hits been that it was up to those wl rurtha "< them have WiitlU ., l nationalisation to It appears as been protesting at the top of lncir case on lne f ac u of tba ;i roformlat, not ; %  rwoluttonary, tbotr voioaa at uny su*h party lil1 ""^ m *'v n l ,,),l, i ,uu But if | UM Socialist I in ided i Oovsnuasnt with i> ar t y (l rt up u*3 anMrpctea document called Uboui n.h.-ves I chose In ccenpotttlon with ... .JI mi .i li tustry and could back enterprise with all the rewhlcb UM partj %  I UM Btot* I think 1 in this document, there is liter could IMlM %  •rhOU Mt Ol etUerlUng to l>e bought out t COUld not do, M MW < MeMt nothing thai it could tol ctalm frotn UM amck i,r ttM These three powers would Boctalut Qovei %  ttg in ii anything II grapn e at Labour liked imywheie in industry But Believe* in Bntain In UUl |U*t In case anything should slip uuiuitrv concerned. It is now plain that the tacts ui t. nothing to do with the dat cift o n The decision Is already taken on all cases. The decision is for BjaJbm Extremist and moderate may differ on the pace not differ on the goal And if we don't want the end both are agreed we bad) better deprive |hat BgWfjrt the Harrow Boys! (World Copyright Heaervedl — L.S.S. thenis no reason why any K ruU P' L Communist. Athi-isl. Keli^ipus. or any organisation holding any conviction should not adopt the same tactics to suppress what they detest. There is no reason why they should not burn books, rush platforms, beat up newspaper sellers, or club down speakers. In the case of this lilm the public had available the supreme weapon of expressing their justifiable repugnance: they could have stayed away. No lilm company could afford to keep on a tilm in an empty West End cinema, poor returns from the box-office would hit them where it hurt. Let there be no mistake. Wherever there are forces plotting for the overthrow of our liberties wherever there are groups dreaminn of the establishment here of systems wi fought to keep from our shores, there is Jubilation now. and much scheming as to how, from the ground gamed in Regent Street. Ouy may make further, bolder and motf pudent advances towards their evil ends. -L.K.S. NOTICE OUR DRY GOODS DEPARIH WILL BE CLOSED On THURSDAY 1M. Ol II FOR WEEKLY HALF HOUDU AND REMAINING OPEN ON SATURDAY, M FEB. UNTIL 3.30 P.M. FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE VKTO* FROM THE MV. "STELLA POLAtt PLEASE ARRANGE YOUR ACCORDINGLY. .,! .:!' %  ; %  oi ii 111 % in iis SAYi Keep lour Ej On The Hall l The Cardinal Itule Off Cricket l rttjor, The Ad your %  > %  Oil II %  I c JACK 11 ago SIR,—II li UrnaUul the Barba,i Ickcl i .ml. in Barbadus bul I' 1 •>"'" "P "' '" as "^ alao „, ii„. Wen ladle i .ad—pcrtapa lo %  rarld by thf non-wlfriior, ,.f Carl avoid obalmrtlon. or th. Mulliru to represent Ihea Col Makata i. aa aacaeUca throws A* oea in the bin and IIMM Heralds hd.i on th. Ihe Irutll. I Ihoi .. I %  i ule and from one mistake ri !" iwrae. audjene*. IilllejokiII n can follow many. If pedeatriani were tompelled The youn rlabl in The second: If a pedeslrian steps to walk on the nht aide of tho hihe his ODtolUa thai |-.i. ...rd, the middle of the road road it would put: an .dditional tini. :..|ru.ton: that needs mental strain on the molorUI. as gusto DO argument, i-.-cuu It al obviouslv he would have I,, think ... on Ii e lefl tvda inn-egsuy. ">• • m ••*!* or 1 am driving gave us many excerpts frocr Iheir as the case may be, and some repi-rlotr.or songs. nil cross good day his tram of thoughts Thenconform.' whilst in will collide, and having found singing was ; will vonhimself under an on-coming vchipation. and it was par! Third: Pod. the road thoughllesslv conversation. and this easy thought occurs— wl ,,,,.! u r .,.i, .' on-coming car almost on tmue e.en mdTa.low Lame I "• ""tSL^T linn bal g t want to talk about. A •t llrst class i • -long with jurond class bowling ball i asl of m aa Oba> i II gamW-Keep the very circumitanccs which the as much pleasure from the.. Fourth: It does not matter gods tried to help so the story Ing. as did the ap| iv his goods instead ,n, r ; m ihe second TrinidadJamaica match? b tt t %  l think not. Atl ildcr. a goo<( I Mulling is a natural UUM I Barbados aeleclmartll irou bt N,„, [] \'. i.oult. all keep to the left To The Editor. Th* Adrocar* so kind as to allow tl> | t^e seen that the because it hai become secomis '" to see our .., tf a motorist which side one walks, he must goes. I he cross on-coming traffic, whether (MRS.) ARTHUR CONLIFr*E. real or imaginary. H..U .ii! see all on-coming The above facts having been si. Mn It was signed A E B BcaUVl upumm can iiidgo. Paynes Day." be salt J uv /(iilr fast bow .K1|, %  imes ih, Starj • '. The Adi'ocaK stated that th* driving in a "bus and the bell was a graat adrang, he would unconsciously push had a hi* tight foot in the applying the brakea, although at he was not the actual EanWMM ulatiuns on th. .:r,g peas and had to throw the College Heralds at a recent recital, future glorir That give:i husks in the I tas in thj "O Music' Sphere-dosccnded maid Friend of I'lcsurc. Wisdom's aid* Whv. Goddess. %  rtU, to us denici ire mentioned quout an expert make a mis'tak. '' the bowl aiteraal ihe was wal* correspo: deration is flnlshe^l f such was tho captivating effect Black Rock 'ingaadience. They ha%e C*ni phenomenal rij. auguration two years an lessly. team wot*: tba nucleus, ol MMSaa, ||g*| IKIM ...in,' ni.lriimental in help.i,: realise the fruition ol Uv effort*. Asocompa Joy ride a la mu treasured isles of song. nk them *or I treat, ami jln) offrr them conijratRICHAP ENJOY IIIKSE DINNER SPECIALS! felaHliej Wr-l. Mli.K FED Tl'RKEYS MILK FEU CHICKENS VEAL CHOPS LAMB CHOI'S FROZEN CANADIAN SALMON COD FILLETS MACKF.11K.1. IleasDr.salt*. SANDEMAN S SHERRY MOCK I'RCNIER BRANDY GOLD BRAID RUM CROWN DRINKS I* OUAVAS *• POTATOiClABfB BH FBS • %  ** %  (DaJ! ,aaj LARGE JJ LARGE T



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. ie He d room. Rent ••SSoncaa H ,„ ! % %  i ,."KRISHANA" *. Apply T Maraj FonUb*n. Ijiv Hindu Star*. || • 3 at—t f „ DIED .__-,, mo <^ru. AR. Slek 1W avetiing ,or BW U I SGSRWS For furthtr 10 J SO—3n nil yr 1 "" "*~r. wtin.. u 1 B-un THANKS l gtfS— ,.„_, H MEMORIAM .. _ !" y ol " *' I*** !" %  fenfe l "'£Sr£"l-.nr. &rl. Bfi- %  %  _ JSSeTW-S'' %  "> ""•" '""' JO-ln tfarden N. WIN Ii rt-*n*. study %  eats, m M MM bg %  i-n.v %  ,-; i ni'iH.ir writ i s " * ••> ~ !" i b. obuini.^ „.u„. t* pHv.t, Chrlitm., CsM. from ~~rT Win, udsr (or i„ uutul Sample noo> lp Bruin-. |„-_, ... L' !" '^, rU '""""" i """-' """>• %  " 7 !" wm,"""? ""'""• "HP""""!*-. NOTICE ... '* %  %  O' IT. JOHN Attention is 4t awn 0 ,, ._..„. .. :. %  -.' %  '„' %  -„...,.;.;,'';„;:; % %  nonu M ivbr..-.^ ... ... ^hZITA WONITA. • ton. nat. Can* %  T 11 HADAK. lUlU*-H-uel 1 fraii. si Lucia. Afl*r,t .v \ :i Trinidad; ASr< Owner." AaocUOon. *. fnam 5* Vin it. Agenta Servo, | DRPAITI Us IY JOY. Pfc 'or 91 Uta; A*M.t. T> 1 Ji-hnm. Eaa) S 8 MAKID. IM tan. nM. Opt Wit ""• %  S* Vincent. Agerita: S P Muen. Son ft Co L^ H u Devowmmr lo.oao M MM, (or Trinidad IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION wE*!. 5! *1"~'!VP.M,. „,„„. p„„. %  • %  Kwppei. loriPJTinvpal. BK!.. •a A*l. AII..-UUP, tj_E-"> ",. M/T KWk. SlnKuvr %  ••L8ST %  II I V I jlraltrp,. •ccordAiicr FebruT, in I UMIW Act It S IHASTIl l**rochl4U Troamrar, 81. John ILI n ... Fffll HALE 39ft, (he r., PWICAL In HACKIM:. ftru41 Electric 1-.. omai. UmMr id saoo <) Met A BM If. %  BUu.lO.JS Ifli'MlM LGxcclleni HO cw>poln (-->".u: entap flOTAL GAKAGE Ud Phoni TupJull i"-n" 1" 'I '" MttttMrv Ptlifli I %  ""'' %  %  Wire Hair Fox Turtle Bp %  %  ELWH. APP x v z. c-o %  *liiti*l I*ICO Ajtplv NOTICE C. A. NOTICE TrndfT. win h* NM(M by ih. ., Jwnw (oi I. A 0*" P ; rir""wt? !" r ,. Jootlvn MeCiMn. M MM ManrM<-itp lln Ur II %  %  cr. *ulaiin-ln. : ^./. Cbiirl 0/ Ippcal • lf*i wr .^ uons. The put up ihe regulations I o> • positive reaohil Ml the House :l to approve. 7'ufo Distinctions There ftupxxi.:. RoU O "nanovkn.' Up Dpnpvpn Jopn rAmn. \ln M L rpKy Mr apuibpu,,,^ pK.iT.^L'^r Pl ^ co "n niri Ada A un n M. % %  V All. Tor JAUAICA. It B %  .Vnlt M. MAIL NOTICE lin "' on lh '• PH"iM*iy, nnd to h repaid bv 4...1.1 (~Zivl Il.latnrc>. JUTTM. Sarbaaog Youth Movement 1937-1949 "ii %  MO BUS CrVRHTEH CYCIJW-Al_10tWi .nd l-ioi— S,-*i. A,.!< Bfc TVIJI^M St D'nl KM. 7 2 :*> i f OTWiCiL %  ATC CHANGrJLS V W-1M '. IIMt* Er.|wriujii 1ft ? SO—in CrUJTY K %  •. Htv.l Store. i*0ys I'VJAMAS from U "* 3 3 SO -J4. gnyi BO. % %  Mr. it..i 3 3.50—Mi. 0BT (V DMEM SHIHT *B*il Roy,) ^ 7 m-iiii %  ATOrAH BATTTRIFA IS f, mm i., T I M %  A World-Wide and raoo(Al>d |M> i T** ""'• ..nwnt be2iw M world-wide and rer-^n[-e" Movrtnml i %  MMMM f utlnrtunute necleded and -.%  *cUvlllo incliKlo Reli mi :"' Knoli. ono [....i ii.-in R>v. U BRUCE—CLAKKE Pound-ir l MMW Rev J R TRANT. I, T MrOl-GA RR(>>.! The nnrbBdkn V. IB 1 JO—In PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE Trie I1-..V.W Mjinhal'-. Art 1KH II I 30> 'IN TUESDAY UM %  hour o( 2 '*• iTlc-u> thi -nrhmt bidder fur •he apnrnl-'.: ind ronlain%  %  "Hn"-r—1 on i Midi of MeJvIn A(le>Tw on Und* of B*yiev 1>I UN elte of f> RMnkrw, .1 mi .1 road Mfl %  i -I to fP" ANO pin%  itiaehed from Jama %  paid n-\ dJ^ '-I.Mv if n Rooir*p.o A-1* Pmvo" nw.vo-1 Mi>rhr* Ofnce. 1950. 1ft? W Bn IM:IWOI>AL IkVMll I hold M for her or %  mot, Mrtta* .n>deln or debt, SWiod. SAMUEL BASC The Mount. St Geantr 15 2 50 IM III u SALBS REAL ESTATE ia si !" SJ „ „„, C ,^ „, ...^APPIV VEARWOOD A *'.'?/ Ul t thj * "orled .Ion.wall •Ml M bOUM LttMU m M M| ,„,.!, . flrldcetown, fodJoinhiLb* occupied by The Bor tandlnf on 4.81] !" OTn •" ">• "Op floor. (! %  dlnlrur room, and 3 bedjy..-Btond floor; Mtch> omeoa and %  eveml other rootna on I ha Cround floor. Kxrcltoii .ite for bualnoM ^ !^!l CT P "^" 1 *" *PP' o the Pilgrims W #7/ See Apostle's Tomb This Spring VA'i . The new built under St | round UM tomb ol tin will bo optoDd :•> pgrlim loi the iiiit tune this iprillg, tbi %  . i %  %  During n %  beta found of the tomb . . %  made by the ui ancient b Kmperor I Peter's tomb dill century. Bdoi opened to th.pu ptcwd that Pop* -• >. KH : announce the full arch nnd religious V*iu -f I made by the ov their ten yean.' ti wat as was the ease in Kn;rand where UM onhf ad was the act 0 ( laying sueh legislation m he labl Lfoutl rf commons, and then a membn t it be disallowed. I the positive duty of vubmltUn | tnem lor approval, and not merelv lay them *mi U %  for their annulment or disApp:. that the '• • rnaa Gam lure In as short a %  ka to put it ti^s: %  %  suborwith UM %  ... ... %  %  nd had iValcott) Bd not be iny days, as long %  %  must l %  ii.i in consoon as pi i fit inn commernol on .II %  %  mrase wat il "f the learned %  %  0 would OM % %  !. ugh they • legislation I (or the approvII need never be %  uch lcgislai.t-copit-"" Arrives On Friday Evening Uden nd The 'aseo||ne" will l.lk. Knslan,! 900 Drums Coke Arrived Yesterda] nP.II 1__— RPIM . . ii IHIIM: from Trinidad. The 69-K: irousht <50 %  vjdity ano • "Burma D" 900 drums. To n W RttnDF.R. Eq \!.^i.lr„li-. T)..l "H i TAN nnrcE. '. I) ThiaoDtKntion will be con%  I.'cmi-liin Co4iH lo b held f Pebrunrr • lock it m at Pa B' c w RunnfatPoia, .en y • i ..--. i thi : -' FTidjiy the 14th will be tet up for Mlc by I'patlUon at our ofl %  r*bruar>' 1MO at I p i Aiufi\i,n.\* a, SV.MV SoUcitor. 14 3 SO 1 CLAIMS CURE FOR TUBERCULAR MENINGITIS "RnfMIAMIIISHiipS COURT • landing on 2S.ITS aquare feet of land The i dlnlnr %  nnd u-ii taloi PARIfl i. %  %  could curt i rnydn wai di :%  %  tuiar meningitis killed victim before the drug Doctors using II TIM ton: *he United .'. pubtk Uonal Qiildran En •ear-1 just eud,. drawing and %  •red vrrmmah %  %  ln-lit-iiin with runmnc w.ir. IMHIIII room attached. Tmiel anr| n.ih upii.lri. Two •ervanit i t and waihioom and workahou and gataie Ln the II to Mr. If B. nanr.Utrr. Dlal-3412. comt-rtltWn at UM %  I %  %  %  1 ti i %  1 Hra. Tmi.. !•/. ..... *• It! ~ -.V hi THE MAT.L. I. Mi..'. %  -ilenuH.nt and Hi lanked hv -ue* •te***ioin. %  %  %  reiMHWli!. 1 >' %  Ae**t. a•aurvi •., ,i A FOI' .Ml LOST r der pleaw return •Jant. !< %  14 1 503n offeied for re%  fl Kanuig lat 3 3 50-1 f n *.\T:I "CHA HPION* I'tchting or Laving h waa the Chainpi on Vou cannot afford lo mUa the boat fiki.i-if-.me plctur* to coma to the acrawn wUI s-rkhh fwUGUAS"In" Ring I-rdner. I II \Mllll\ thur KENNEDY with Pau r, Ruth ROMAN, LoU Showing at ROXY THgATKX rilday. Me (l, :.. io i so4a nootKK letter to '"• ''" %  i" %  • %  tiv... O: I* 2 50-Sn Pass *IE0JS "Say Goodbye %  o Backache" -SAYS GRANDMA Bachaclw la a iwatry that an H lad, Ont..' . .)... day aflrr day. i That'* becatne thia time-proven Pr. | %  1 Airnox SALE 1948 1 iii.Ii I'RHHI t \i; ini)'a Garage 2.30 p.m. on Friday 17th WE are itiatiuvted by the Insurance Company to seU the above vehicle which has been damagiu EC only 11,000. powei I 'ppori.iodern. repairable Car. Cash an fall of Haaamer. %  M I k UIXONtVUI 1UOS I ided. He said that the drug doctors. Little ^ %  to the brain, basis of tl ornycin cun filiation h.i It was announced Dial %  Keuler. IVst Pilot lUHed As Plane Explodes HKICKHILL. BuuII %  %  %  %  today • %  was found in an. %  plane was 11 %  %  tain's leetdii Iteulrt. NOTICE DR. CHAS P -OprHOJ rei Suupol Ma\ aifed Coiiiiiiunit alitm~ N : A sunspot win. : may knock radio eonun %  ins General i. rebruary 23. aco ti : %  ban An oftit Britain's foremo*: spot but rltd not lu %  "the lar:i I iflactad on T*IM-|MI J T\ I 22 and 23.-Eeuler. Positive Rt'solu lion ti| on the fl '..M)lutior.-, i. 11 i %  between i Union ajid 11 ''Ii Kir %  %  i n :itn>ii pretty, the local hit ion created a %  adenl to U %  Attorney General in gel nd of a statutory another statute re%  rmt was of Hut the regula%  idei ing were delegate %  'i In truth .11. %  luh %  %  ..i Uncut until it Mr. Wal... %  •rdlneite authority evlei %  Newnham aiaa clarinf ihc regulationa invalid would not %  and lhal the pha tif the In thai %  %  Ihcy put on sub-section 2 would I regulations, and with which thev were dealing. Ignad that they .. .. i he said that they could be made tinned was %  i how rou %  to i itmg—published in the Official <> %  that thi %  He was arguing i lined to the ; | his submission ory, Mr with the i %  lie in the power erf the %  be Legisla* the GovThe other side could then rebuttal. Luncheon • %  'ken, and on reicalt with He said that as he understood It his -id argued that tha Assistant Court 'if A imported Ihe effect of %  MBWS_ hat that it really not material era merely rrang th* issue as to whether aa aa^ sT aagael offence waa really to the Court as to what i.OVi:il.\>||\| \OIHI; DBPABTM m lo Tourist Boat :'. '' j SATURDAY 18th, we on THURS mil. not Liter than Sal 1950. ntuat Inform i another ft II EDWARDS Ii h.;.'rnT,! SHIPPING NOTICES :^::xcrcc^; lilHBSBTBJB %  • for lath MONTREAL. AUHTKAUA XK* /.KA1.ANU LINE LIMITMi M \*. A., LlNKi "PORT I1RIE" I. ..(, Jai.uai, ||| Ttintdad about I. PAKI" i. ,ched..led to aal) iHMrjl 10th. Reauly Co mi Jan M a ly a rabruary 1Mb % %  .ntrn. -_ fi-iiniary lit. Driat>_ %  I TrliUdad u_._ %  -ela hav ample ii.ir f, imlCarg.. .h nnii -i '.ulana. liartMMlt. 1 lalanda a wrn.v X COTLTD A#*ni I Agam %  ; Barbadoa. 9nc. %  o. IN nut M. Msaaa .r uia B %  • A1UOA PEUABL'S B.S. "ALCOA POL.> M evtiy tw 4 ANADIAN l Ifl %  %  February itjili Bfatgaj \. .... lUilxde* fi'lir.i.,1. :, Mart* ,i.i M v. Tin i, -i avid Sail. \ OBI • sM %.Orleaaai %  ft amaty mk Ann'i IH.ni.,> full. i.-..idi.-.n Service %  STENCIL SETS Complete Large & Small ROBERTS Dia! 3301. I OK SMI CARLDIEM.'-Sl. Lawrence < AHI.II1I I furnished. 1 OaOarj tuaM on Ihe St Ijwrencc llc ' 1 M balhlna This house can aased ^it .1 pi nd It BU |>OS::.! Pirticulars. Dial Miss K. HUNT*. Telephone SJ57. Si in: CO //; HARVEST SALE TO-MORROW MHMOAW The 17th Feb. 1950. HUM IS till ill a*> > *! VISI r THANIS Pl. Wm. Hr St Di.il 3406. n >i I Itumba.v Store. sprighMljnr t.andhl store. 42 Suan Kl We Offer . IVanul Butter-1-lb. Jars Jack straw*—per rhg. I'riiiii. in I Ir.IVetroot In Tins t'arroU In I ins f gkfSsM A M.-.. -inn. bj MM Cbeeae A Ssghrttl In Una Aprtctvta in Tina Tomato Ketchup In Bota. Csveaae per Ih. ILUOII Sli,„l prr lb. SNAIT ,V SA.MMA •'*'**•••'*'*','*•*'**,* LTD. in SMI atraf DO YOU SUFFER From %  OA lMa S HAZOR RASH. PIMPLES? -..ill Kiuplion, Then OET Yourself a Bottle of RECTOR'S ALCO SULPH LOTION Obtainable ur Mim fisfll Dlllli STORES LTD. Braad Klreel and Ua-.^surs (ALPHA I'llAKM.M t I 5



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PAGI: TWO THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE TTHWUBWf^ UJ'W lt QcUub Ctdtinq H IS EXCELLENCY the Governor and Mrs. Snvage. Mr. Gr-intlev Adams. MOP, Mr W W. Keecc. K C M OP, and Mr. Aubrey Dotiglas-Smllh. Resident Tutor in Barbadjs /or the University Collet* of the W I araonc the passengers who left by P.W.US special flight yesterday morning tot Jamaica. Th, be present for the installation of HIE Princess Alice. The Countess of Alhlone as Chancellor of the University Collene of the West Indies. Other passengers intransit by the same flight for the installation were the Rev F Ryan, from Trinidad and Mr Claude Wight, from British Guiana. Sixteen Year. Ago HICI For Carnival in Trinidad M ISS ELIZABETH MAC CARTIIY O'LEARY and Miss Michaelcne Glowacki left yesterday by B.W.I.A. to spend a shorl holiday in Tobago. They will then be "going to Trinidad for Carnival. They are guests at the Marine Hotel and they will be aw.iy a little over one week. Undertook Enquiry D R. T. J. HALLINAN. C.B.K.. formerly Director of Medical Services, Jamaica, returned home yesterday evening by B.W.I A. via Trinidad after undertaking an enquiry Into the administration and organisation of the General Hospital. Dr. Hallinan was accompanied by his wife and they were staying at the Hotel Royal. ROYAL ii PRINCESS ALICE, who is Spent Three Weeks M ISS JOAN CHIMMING. typist of the Trinidad Match From Venezuela M R. CARLOS ECHEVERRIA. UIIOI m Caracas for due to arrive in Barbrdos on Yardley ana CoLtd and Alfred _. March 7th on H.M.S. "Glasgow" Dunhill Ltd. of London, Is now in Factory, returned to Trinidad on was last in Barbados approximBarbados for about ten days noliTuesday by B.W.I.A. after spendatelv sixteen years ago. day. He arrive*! on Sunday by ,„, ,bout three weeks' holiday. It was on March 1st. 1934 that B.W.I.A. accompanied by his wife She was staying at "Leston-onshe arrived here by the Canadian an d children and they are staying Sea". The Stream. Pacific Liner "Duchess of. RichJt i the Hastings Hotel. 0 ^ % mend." Sir Mark Young, then Mr „ ., Second Vitit e* !" o T&do? dthVr" Royal lntran.it V^ AND MRS. E.FRENCH visitors on this occasion were H H a and their two children were Princess Helena Victoria, and TNTRANSIT passengers for Anarrivals from Venezuela on SunHH Princess Mane Louise. A 1 ngua vesterday by B.W.I.A. day by B.W.I.A. for about three large crowd gathered to welcome wcrc Mr. John Parker, Managing W M| "' holiday and are staying at them, and The "Barbados AdvoDll ector of Pure Cane Molasses, '"t""'!?**,'??!'!,; ,„ ,„. Hr ,,,. h cate Weekly" of Saturday March „„ d Mr JoI „ Forsy.h. Asst r r " n 1 / i"**? r j5JH B "VS 3rd 1934 has this to say about the Umam Of the Shipping Dept. of A !" >; !" ',F !" <* ""Yf 1 i" £' arrival of the Royal visitors nc lnl ,„, M „i assM Company. l'L?£ X .'fl. !" '?" G 2^J%3l .., Th.v won. in Rarhadns last week ,lre ln I848 ana Jomed the Shell •Punctually at 9 o'clock, His They were £"J££ d lMl •" Group in England and went out to Excellrncv the Governor, accom"" """' Business visit. Venezuela the same year. named by his Private Secretary A' \ i ... This is his second visit to Barleft the Chamberlain Bridge in the Indian Cadet! entertained bados, the first being about 20 Water Boat "Ida" to meet the rr-.f|AN"I BROS, and* Mr. T. Mayears ago when he spent a shorl Royal visitors. X raj held a cocktail party at holiday here. He told Carib thai Tv...l.r "Athlone", Fontabelle in honour Barbados Is an ideal place for a Lined up *"" ro J!!!-?;*". of the Indian Cadets from H.M.S. holiday and he had always wanted Square was a Guard of Honour or .. Dcvonsh|re ., on Tucsda y evening, to return, but this was the first Volunteers and Polite under capr A1 __ 1 „_ n-—h nn^rfuniiv h* hH ant Americans Seek King's Shirt Style AMERICAN business men are bidding for deliveries of %  new sport* style shin which th-* Ki-.g has helpec" to design One buyer :s flying to Brita-n to fee the shirt-maker — Mr. Jack Izod — to find out how soon the shirt can be mass-produced and exported to the U.S. at £5 7s.6d. each. Mr. Izod Is 80. At his Thamesside home yesterday he said: "It will be the biggest export of the year in men's wear. The Americans will be ordering In thousands." Details of the shirt are secret. Even staff at Mr. Izod's London showrooms in Hanc .'T-square are not allowed* to see copies. The first shirt to the King's specifications is locked in the showroom safe It is made of knitted wool and silk and Is known as the "pullover shirt." A factory in Hawick. Scotland, made it after special alterations to the textile frames. y Said Izod: "The King ordered his shirts last November. It was to serve a double-purpose—allow complete freedom of movement and ensure maximum warmtn. He wanted the shirts for shooting Mr. Izod will only say that it is similar In design to the dozlknitted shirt he invented for tennis players and golfers 30 years ago. London Express Service. K.SMET. THE RACE OF CHELSEA Rupert and the Caravan^ F. B. Armstrong, while a party of Sconts fell in under Rev. A. t Armstrong. Assistant Island Commissioner, and a jjarty of Girl Guides under Miss Daisy Yearwood. Commissioner. after len o'clock, the "Ida" with the Union Jark (loaling at her stern entered the inner bairni an*-* rousing cheer was sent up. Also present were Mr. Ganesh opportunity he had got. Persaud. British Guiana cricketer. Mr. Lalchand, dry goods merchant from St. Kitts and Mrs. Lalchand prasMst holidaying in the island. First in 20 Year* M R. J. P. MARTIAL. CompWelcome New*. C ARIB is pleased to learn that the Cabaret Showand Mannequin Parade, which was such a success at the Drill Hall on Saturday February 4th is now being repeated at the Globe Theatre on troller of Income Tax. CasTuesday Feb. 21st. I recent There are to be added numbers arrival by B.W.I.A. for a holiday to this programme, which is tn and is staying at the Cosmopolitan aid of the St. Philip Baby Welfare House. Centre and the St. Thomas Child A member of the St. Lucia Nutrition Clinic, and what with Cricket ( pthese extra attractions the show tained the St. I Inch .should be a bumper success. r-nada in 1947 during A plan of the seats can be seen the Cork I I Tournaand booked daily between If am ment. %  J St. Lucia and 4 p.m. at the Globe. Spartan last year and was s in Barbados about 20 years ago U.K. Director Leaves as a school boy member of the St. mR VICTOR ERCOLANI. im which was returning |y| ManaaTino nirwtnr and '.orn the Cork Cup Tournament gL£X"S?fM*!F&u^& T*HE BARBADOS PRESS 1.,-Id in Grenada. „. Ltd., London, relumed home via 1 CLUB v .11 b.-giving • Dance ^WhUehere thev played against £5^*3 by B.W.I A. yesterday cnSaMri' I in honour tr>< I'irkv. n-k, c "' c l ' L '" b kul after spending about four weeks of the visiting Ilritish Guiana rain interfered with the game holiday here. He ,-.. r y„ T.m Arnold Mtanwell Mr. Martial attended the nrst __., h / h[ „,,,. r In response Their Royal Highnesses waved their kerchiefs and the lusty-cheering was continued until the parly had landed. The Bart of Athlone. accompanied her on this trip and they left Barbados on March 3rd 1SS4 by the "Elders and Fyflcs Liner "Anguanr:. In He M niOf Guide To Housewives Today't Prices MACKEREL: Pickled—24c. per lb. Canned—36c. per lb. PILCIIAKOS: Canned—33c. per 1-lb tin SALMON—Tinned: (a) Red—77c. per 1-lb tin 41c. per 1-lb ., (b) Chum 48c. per 1-lb ., 2c. per 1-m (c) Pink—56c. per 1-lb .. 30c. per 1-lb „ Pickled—30c, per lb. Whik Sailor Sjm h.s been letch. ing Ihe horn Rupert rementbm the crufnp'.rj b.l ol pjp" ." ni pocket, ind now he opens it oul and explain, how Beppo h.d kd him to the pl.ee where he found it. S.m look, JI it eareBtattv, Then he Man. more alertly. Thi. .._ very Queerv etv qucel indeed." he English, on cut., thu \ can i wwj meaning. Then tt *\J* vfrv rnd ol :he mtm %  • h,m Kivt %  vwk* _, f". f nd niadiT^J uatT^ C HELSEA artiits consider Kismet Shahani (pictured here) one of the most beautiful models they have seen. She is 20. wa~ born in India of .in English mother and .in Indian father. They brought her to England when Ihf was two. She now shares a tint with a %  Sri friend at Hove Kismet began posing at 17. used to work at Brighton and various London art schools for 5s. an hour. A month ago she came to Chelsea in search of more lucrative work. By the time portrait painter A. E. Egerton Cooper had done three heads of Kismet news of her beauty began to get around. Then James Proudfoot painted calls it.—L.E.S. her in the nude. During the 22 sittings his studio was visited bv many artists. T. C. Dugdalc, R.A.. says: "She almost made me break my rule never to paint any woman but a fair-skinned one." -My Best Model' Sculptor Barney Scale comments: "I have never seen JI mflre exquisite oombinaUuii ol beauty in face and ilgure." And Proudfoot calls her the best model he has ever had. Kismet has an urchin crop Of blue-black hair. Her eyes are such a dark brown as to be almost black Burnt sienna". Proudfoot Paris Can Keep The CSS A Singin' Hinny People who have heard or sung the old Northumbrian folk song "Billy Boy" will remember that Billy, having announced his intention of getting married, is subjected by his mother to a merci. less cross examination as to his hride's matrimonial qualifications. I When mamma asks. "Can she %  k* an Irish Stew?" Billy replies proudly, "She can make an Irisn Stew and a Singin' Hinny too." But how many of the people who %  dug the song with a fine appreciation of its rousing tune but scant regard for the words know what a Singin' Hinny is? Margaret Sheppord Fidler set any enI quiring minds at rest in a recent B.B.C. broadcast when she told listeners not only what a Singin' Hinny is but also how to make oust, It is a sort of large girdle cake, which can be made with the minimum of effort and is cooked on a large flat girdle or the hot plate of an electric cooker without using the oven. It is made with Hour. fat. a good helping of dried fruit and a trifle of salt and when cook it is split open, spread liberally with butter and served hot. But why Singin' Hinny? Because this delectable cake makes a protesting "singing" noise as It sits -Trilling on the girdle. CROSSWORD accumpan.j led by" his wife. Dr. Ercolani and and hU Meanles wm o* supplying c '**\t* !" _ l ^^ yS^JBe hey were staying st the Windsor HI USE r-aaasi • %  %  Cricket Team. Arnold MsanwsU the music and all the new dance hopes to see as tunes are on the prormme of the second game before returnRhumbs-i Sambas. Fox-Trots and ins home on Sunday. Calvpso Session. Nothing is being One thing that 'inpre*sed him •oared to make this a night of was the love the Barbadian has niuhisi not only for the B.G. crickfor his country, not only at home. tiers but for everyone who but in whatever country he hap•ttends Hotel. "Adieu!" T HE H.M.S. "Devonshire" left Barbados last night for Trinidad. For almost everyone of ihem it has been a most enjoyabl stay. There were quite a few Cadets at the Aquatic Club yesterday afternoon and they all said how sorry they were to have to leave, and by the looks of Uta many young ladies who were also down ihi'ie. it would appear that it was not only the Cadets who fall thai "Parting is such sweet sorrow." Comings and Goings H UN H. A. CUKE, O.B.E.. M.L.C., and Mrs. Cuke and Hon. G. D. Pile. ML.C, returned mdad by B.W.I.A. on 1 .l-'li.lV. • • • Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Trimingi.iii., returned to Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I.A. • Mr. Colin Williams of BlackJoseph, also left for lv HW.IA. yesterday. • • • Mrs. E. Archer, Managress of Hotel Windsor, left for Trinidad OQ Tiu-sday by B.W.I.A. SO the flapper look has come back. Well, don't say I didn't warm you. The flattened shapeless silhouette of the 1920's is being pushed by almost every lead.: fashion house. And so far as I am concerned Paris can keep it. If their designers imagine that this ugly line will please the world, as the New Look did in 1M7. they are going to be disappoaDtad I suggest that English women will ignore it. At the finish of Dior's 21 hours' aress show in his overheated, overcrowded, over-perfumed sa'on in the Avenue Hontaign*. champagne flowed as the audience screamed their appreciation. WORLD'S tallest show girls are there at New They must be 6 feet or ovi that, as well as being the biggest they are the best looking — Express Mr Tony MacAndrew. Man%  gaff of J, n I-eslie's Insurance Dept. in British Guiana is here on a short business trip. He arrived by II W.I.A. from Trinidad and expects to nstun OB Tuaatta to British Guiana • • &f Dr. Steve Bennett. Veterinary ii. arrived yesterday by B.W.1 A. on a one day's visit. • • • Mrs. M. B. Watson, left B.W.I.A. to spend three r*hs' holidays with her family m i. mtdad • • • Miss Marguerite HoUock, accompanied by Mr. and Mi iff hsl Mi van. also left yesterday to spe.id a short holiday with Mrs. Bryan's family in Maraval. They will be in Trinidad for Carnival Mr. Bryan is Senior Clerk in the I'ost Ofl.ce. i. Pusn an#M whet IDs tnia 4 good. ,i> > Batoro suing up. remember mat ll has n> osngeioj* (IMCIDU I*I a lou pie u twMl (5) 10 Here's lovt lr Yorishlrt. lilt ;, Hj.d rock ol igneous origin, is) 1. Kind li 14 Now tnia w.u t,e nro to nno i > 15 Inr lemate ol eom* ipeclm Ui 17 Brings up one way ill is. Peculiar finding it in cooo dreasea fit Sort of meanuit rou ma* get at a pinch I ii Copi the trtrd wnen It* late l*l ii Rope for a small Dole. i4> j:>. Dtisoider ifi> a (je* thai Tour anawer'a onrrect i6> 21 Pry around tnia lor to* .arar: | Uawa 2 Boning eithoxtt c-oinj ui i Being ruined ose rnuat set u*m lo too chang?. a Where the el tan to (Ol T ClOH tven lor a miM.~. 4) t. He .t In lha wroQf. (?) MSKC Perl neat to #in| und IBI 11 rveii in oitneit an hiita un* -I'u 5t 1* I', mar M • Oeip to p or nOsWlttii a hindrance u* i i i .a rtwi ladv riaa nsto f> it ft llottuialloi) i*i --.art an ovation I n i !i.-n I %  . \ %  I ftB 1* so diflicult to wear. It is shown with grey, with black, and with white. Some hats I saic looked as if then iide from Ufood. They uiere shaped like the roof of a house, and one imagined they had been knocked up by a car%  ather ihan cri'oted by a Paris mil'iiicr. IIV.III-I. s Karls BUNCHES of ra used as buttonholes. Two designers showed black satin panlaioons peeping beneath full lao skirts, Bung'es are back. They ur wo' n high up the arm above th elbow, and you will wear them with .tnngs of beads again The beads ore twisted several ^i^Sn""0 ^ ^sj^i.v^ jsi>wonderful collection. U UH I SI r FOR ,i deceptive trick, take a handful of matches or toothpicks, place ten on a table, rcmo *ix and leave none Use any method you like, so long as no matches are broken or crossed. AII "Stinnou JO 'o am %  *afil up* noX pua -WMJUTUI xw JO •,.,. w ..!., in BAoui)( u'askiH IUOW out Wlf oi aW|3linii ai|i *3infjJV U3MB.SJV OpeniiiB FRIDAY, 1^BJ 2.30 MaiiiH. at the Empire Theatre Extral, Extra! India's Prime Ministerial haral Nehru in %  "ASIA'S NEW VORT knotted hanging to the waist. I .ii'U* lir-rimjH EAR-R1N*GS arc large and dangling to the shoulder, and you top all this with a long cigarette holder and with shoes with long pointed toes and the old %v WIIITFIELDS P L A Z A FRIDAY & SUNDAY 8.30 p.m. PARAMOUNT presents ALAN LADD as "THE GREAT GATSlit With a host of Favourites L/ put MM Kl ilSHHtiQil / •.--'.'.'.V.-.-.W.'-V For ROOFS AXD PABTMTMOJVS Dial 4606 Dial 122" BROAD ST. Sole S.llini; Audit (or MEN'S AVENUE SHOES $14.40 P" "•" We Oftet ALUMINIUM CORRUGATED SHEETS Lengths 6 It., to 10 It., width 2 ft. k Mil II INSULATING WALL BOARD Lengths: t (I. to 10 ft; Width: 4 ft k Mil IT IIARDBOARD Lengths: 6 ft., to 8 ft., width 4 ft. GALVANIZED B.R.C. EXPANDED METAL Lengths: 8 ft., and 9 ft., width 2 ft., 24 gauge. a BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LIMITED. DIAL MM SATURDAY NIGHT S 30 at ROYAL "The College Heialdi' CARIBBEAN TRALNLNQ CXM.IXGE MA1X OCTfrTTE In %  lYOtfr-iiune o* Spiriluala and I>opulatr Sons' rhtllipa the Piano. I uatatcd by Sadru EMPIItK L.AST SHOW TO-SIGHT AT 9 li Columbia Piclurw Ptvaenta . "A II II %  I .i. -sit PauWtt* OODOARLV William BISHOP-John UUOAXD— Oaw HOUOUCA HERE'S A POSER? Do you believe in FACTS or FIGURE? THE FACTS THEN ARE— The Grandest CABARET & FASHION PARADE will be held at The GLOBE On TUESDAY, 21ST FEBRUARY at l*> THE FIGURES ARE—You lust sit tight and see JM • j brother. You'll see the best llgures this side ot is" !" "In Aid o/ The ST. THOMAS 4 ST. PHILIP BabK Welfare Climes. DEFINITE RESERVATIONS made daily ' d* from 11 a.m.—4 p.m. /'rices: Orchestra 1 House SI .00, Balcony 'fc%  now LAST SHO'* TV, S'lCHT AT 7 The VICIOUS CIRCLE atumd KAGBLr Frtu KOStTNKR The Dead Don't Dream Wmum BO YD aa HopakMig Caaaidjr •LVMPIC LAST SHOW TO-NIGHT AT u Celtoabaa Banal BATMAN and ROBIN ROOF needs repairs, take Ihis ti do it ^ We have in Stock AllVMINIl M SHEETS-fift. 1" ^ ^ EVIK1TE SHEETS—Sft. "ft s " GALVANIZED SHEETS-ft. 8' 1 """ SHINGLES CEMENT ALIMINUM GUTTERING QA1 \ Wl/lll I.ITTEKING COPPER OUTIIIDN *' .::::•.::: %  %  .:: %  %  %  %  %  .::: %  .: %  %  .; %  %  .: %  %  %  %  %  % % %  % % %  %  %  % % % % 


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..r, THl" 1 -" ilKl iRY IS. 195U Australian Sugar Progress 1 e annual reoort %  bureau ol 8 |£ ST* !" Baft?? s= 0,,!., Overrule Church V,,(Miiitni-fii ORAGLE. rVb. 15. XjiStical Affair. onovJUn* "SZw UV Rom-" THE BARBAOt) ADVOCATE PAGK THRIX *4si*oi R' rxcni-!. dBral labour.-r. ..s "CuraCj yBisbopnr. whirr th. £J Dr. Skrabik died ol *C W | f*s ajency said " Ud replaced Oei -upph With pli-Wji Deal Di rhe ,ep„ rl show !" bAOTMr th, the 6.000.000 ion cane pro. ductton record ol 1939 was broken by the seasons M33.556 ton output. Sugw prou, :i3tt.mjo tons lor tin increase of 59.t K^^who-'withou, the n ' h 9 lh "" w KTtbe Stat.-. waa .ippointh '" h<-r "tan that 1. <^^nl Vicar of the dlocc~!>reason—on incre 1*n .ntorm.-d ,.l the alUalthough harvested acreage J* J^, State Church omce. <"l< 'ons ol sugar per acre. kYfSpwr m aeeordanee with !" r0 P" adds that thl Ml Church :ilv "H-JWM cane and could justifiably be considered with the —euter. worlds best. Sucrose content of the cane was also higher than for the %  ous two seasons, but could not compare with 1939. when one ton (,f .ugar was extracted from 6.77 tons of cane. The report asserted that the higher cane output was due to the introduction of three new types th lerti. other members ol ou. Housewives blue crocuses, don'l prorKic BjA It •• Lilifiitluil Optimistic 7JEW YORK. Election News From Britain League a.. oWoeetitiB *<• Poll9 booth. -,ih you th.nl a laige red goremwn i, M lb *ri-oc.al? •• %  %  akprvsi Sam fclkwiK. Lilimthal. whose S^i/SLSSS^!' sonw "' Chairman „f the lhc ', 11. %  %  'i Berhe made ^ %  Jktes Atomic %  B1LSJ1' %  |^ said that tic did noi Fpudiclions about the end t-wtd. I I reported [f>mnpm toda. Thai Mr. ggHi^u.>*-Thi.>••:, % % %  enl after Wt nsit to TIC White it also tinequivo rdroj-pn Efc i in funeral. Tito —Keutrr. Widespread Demand For World Sugar agents are tearing that the proporUo. voters coining to make their mark on Thursday M will be the lowIUS cuuntry. Thai LONDON, (Bj agar rcBlew, after reporting that the Ministry „f Food and CommonaIII ll".l i""'' "I £30 10s. a ton c.i.f. U.K., T "' "'"am is now fmv III Wllll ., widenreed demand ""* i.k cloud— ter• fAe %  —JJ -m-• rlnla* %  sitilri.el t.. -il„>.i....„...^.... Influenza '"• ,7'"' experience .tSSL.""SLiSI ".I'i iJ* 1 *" The w... was piopaganda for I "iind lining, and Plymouth. N icpcnS on i I, Ime Slml getting ou. to, used ior gettu,, a. many ., h„l„ ,, '" llm "'' 1 h '"' MKlla.l. though, iclp tlu ,s relying lMS „,, and his vwf,. 1 Jew Speech tD vi>te. The m r noi/woi'khg on I'IC buj| ,,f I9Q0 pi nn i. If UK.. low violenl (Jenunelations 38 ; .oX,. 1 VATIC.VN 1 Plus XII. whtj UfKe y#^tcnij\ with influI A I 1 Inwas I oidmi' nn IntemaMII !)•• %  ^^^^Bhe Pope I ban. biflamoiMiofi >>i tka I %  :rcet. Summer u[ 1SH5. Lou Ireland has bought 30,000 t.ms 1 i cav, r brook has arrivad In th ol Cub %  •.-. %  .-. Cram On bun France, HoQajld, Belgium llianlly i-' -AI lUoario thl. horUj .ifter aiidnight f hundn % %  : it lit u hcrrver -been .eKeHtor. Beriihurd In Rio Prince Bernhai or of thr arrived hi %  d I Pope'* eoo IMH nomn tmn .1 lemperature iusrt laormal %  •Popev rn %  MKTI have fc : Keuler. My father • — _— %  ii Ui death-bed TJj. . .. .iskM him if h, t.atllolKIVl'Ss Mfiol works. The dj "ituate.1 a | of ihinl. | %  T!i.d. Foot %  %  >.,:" %  : ne gio^ ,, ;re ;; u : m X V T,;'' a :"-SKSEJ jurua S SirSh-s^saateiSS: continued to lac In tul .".uoniir ing — munil) „,,,, „„. Lataw ••;;--' like rear ,i,e„ ol ,,„er g££ „. The .;,.. The CO,,Iher customers. LUMOUfld Cubans havt i to the i'K. rong poaafbtlltj rent Indian proxluction may IM••tisfyinst home demand U alreatd} expressing dis.i ui enjoying. Hut one ot bit own newe nai Thx: Bveolng .,'. the "phoney i ll now over ana the gloves arc off. According to this paper, wants though, it ,•> Winston Churchill HOME. Feb. If. %  ben tomorrow for the third An* 1 Keulrr. A very 'li^couragmg Jamaica Governor liaim.s MiM'ling The Governor ol Jamaica toihiir meetme and %  .. II,.:,,,,, | I 'll %  t'liUWIlIK •! Tou Rurnl wt Ship From Iteezuela TO BREMEN b 16. I Ommm lod'ay %  %  l i kkMN of having ut ed a tiatioriali^t antt-eemlUc the Judge. Ilcrr Otto I". | the Com* ltd to deal separate!' i wl.tng Bavarian Soetahel leader, Hen The Court ivquestcd ntlmii its %  i %  thiit Knoerinnen HOIK. World Wiir 11 M BrltM. S* I li'imii'v ". %  at Btnleldi %  %  right to poison Jews by gas. There may have been othwr means of getting rid nt them During ihe i B) friend i DUeeguea % %  < th:it he had thcurht o# a JJewlsb nuBM cmlgntlon to i Jewish State, which waa to be-aM uji his remark In that he tt* Mejer.) Qtm a <. pee, %  Feb. 14. J pick up %  tne burnt out The litwtbuH p b, the : %  OH** which bought the NWkn-,, u ^xpwted to be • wrvlce again alter exP"fcir m a dockyard here. fWaimexiHvi. tat. Ip "' ,„lt 1-atHturn. Bdan. m Puerto R market failed to shake itanotlii r """ l " 'us radio :.;.,. o t. :.„... n|mb-| (oi M| .. . ( reflection of the strong demand -"nunonwealth and Colomal ri|cc ^ Canada's sugnr crop (or IM l,m House. (Brown has onlv -. f-„r • and Domini. ] ^erv-t.ves wn the i: hance-a 8 the T> at 100.361 lor,g 'hat sp.K.01* mom .nrer ookm Horse Guards and bt James s Soc||||jft ^,. ays Th,. Canada 1 history tons. PragU*i sugar new;: boot sugar productlo 1 ior I9S0. (exdudlng Russian) ::t 6.859.133 %  value>"0 tons below last yea: 1 oreign Secretary Th , '; ,. i> lus paVMUl iiuliiiatioii. no uoubt. Kii> for the House ol " %  'al output Commons and Lord President -f Council the plan Cuban crop has now been allonow hohis It Attlee's right hand, 'olio World 1 USA and retained %  iFire Siren; %  Mings Bum louiir, 1 and uair blnek • %  meniBJE 'D£ R ^ N DRESS SHOPPE I Bn, Human Rights Court Urged THE HAGUE, I ml oJ %  • Human %  uig from the alle %  %  .1 man of the Eu%  ing with . hown biy ': ,ity. ProU iRgman aid %  Itanta as Rntam and Si %  ttuHtaVtic couuMM lik. Bcigiutii. Krance Oer.-cesman said th-t ol [ r *oot."now Di. no doubt, %  built), abided twi, others to his Konnl /Illinois, the Cabou lor bis Conuw. and now %  me btvatn 11s Harry Pollitt, the Communist leader. Reports from Gnteshead explain indlcate .. Zl | Iv wllI nrohnKi.. and government u a hoId hu ^ rely on catchwords and slogans otnfp Comnmnisl W|]| This time I te Labour that is to Sov j e( quCiIlons playing the electoral game w.th H:i ifflcial iuid to the i L tftocy n>aer to-day that he had read In tne newspapers throe months ago of the arrest of I man in Hanover, who was alleged to cil to kill the President. Thman, this official had said, gl to be a lunatic, and ns now in an asylum. Id that he menslogans On Pl> mouth Hoe Tim brightest Ogbt .., tion, a little -pot of lire in the uamp woirti, is tne ei*. a) Foot, the Labvui aiaiiipion, and Randolph chunhill Mnston'a advanturoua NOII. ui Plymouth i acid Fool, won in 1945 by just over two West London, neld by a Labour thousand votes—a small margin, member, with the edit. These two principal contestant"' %  group of Swiss magazines. are both journalists and Witt Tnp afternoon was gloomy and Ranuolph Churchill, taking ovei rainy with the Labo.. the battle from Leslie Hore-Belland his "agent" we loot sha. (of yellow beacon lame), calls thc residential areas, and UN himself a "Conservative Liberal"' tenement areas, and all tin m -Hore-Belisha was a Liberal bv iK-tween". Two remarks ware ruinating. After the Labour I almost unanimous support in the tern ements. 20T. support in the residential areas and 50-50 support in the rows of small terraced housea, the Swiss editor remarked "It la a class war. isn't It* Wh.nthe Labour Left Wing. Is also a Liberal by origin, in another sense. He was brought up in a famous Liberal tamlly Hat lather. Isaac Foot, sits like x prooding Nestor, wat< rate of his sons—two Liberal* ana the Labour Foot, all fighting "ver is sold officially"*" And the this election In the West Countrv Labour Agent's remark pointcii Winston has sailed down to 'i' the two problem 1 Uoned the reported case in supPlymouth In auano '• ^SSrS^S SS "* ?" & Dorl of West German Chancclloi. who advertised the meeting with md being aura of the women. He aid. *T would like to he an agent r Swit7erland where tu -annot vote, and the men have t" >v///,-.v.W,v/,w ,; '. ,-,','.'. For QUICK DEPENDABLE PRESCRIPTION SERVICE TRY L'S FIRST We compound only the Best Dnug In ictectlon by out Douhk Chacktag COLLINS LIMITED. 28. Broad Street. ^RINSO washeA R— Adenaeur's propoaul the untilial phrase, "Come out on Thursday and give the ol aaaattl and ParlW— Reater. ASK DELAY SPY TRIAL WASHINGTON. Feb. 14. are been delay the Robert Vogeli 1 •he International Telephone and Telegram company, %  marges' tn Budapest ne* —(Realer I hone a cheer" Churchill, g for >our babv. KLIM a, aa purv and Qournbing— utd a tpeciai proctss rask it inoi* digestible. I11 w tomiDiM, 100. MMI ous only what you need ai s nsne. \*U K1.IM kass i i perict*>-wherever >ou art—wwOomi re Irinffaiimi' K1IM MIIK FIRST IN PREFIRCNCC THE WOULD OVIR leaded DIESEL ENGINES ALL STATIONARY 6 MARINE DUTIES I ngineWaring thaaa InterII.IIIHIIJIK i.mioiifl names are daiox -pi. o.li.l -. ,, IM itarmujheajtia.wwUoa huul and tea. Tbete 1% M ,nt> Mid tyiw tor every ,l nl% Thfs are supplied 111 a rraav eaueat range ol pwweri from l| to 1,440 B.H.iV (fiNTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. DISTRIBUTORS SAVE ON PETROL II—-f t'oMr I /"• %  Uvcmrbunin—I M' •/. supply GASKETS /w ihf lolloirimm :— \\ MIS—All M4rL 111 I.|KI>— Trucks ltl]/KU—I k... 1( ii.^ rOBO—Modal "A" roKU—va ui M n Mil I.MANII ll V MATCHLK8K—]| h.B. 3, %  "v UAI-'HSortlL— Kadritf 12 h.i> MOHHIS—I h.„ It K,p. and PACKAID— CrL, I Crl. SIMjEK—9 h.p. STANDAILD—> h.„ 1* h> asd Ith.*. IT IIKHAREII—Can sad friKk. VAUXHAlJ^-lt k-. It k->. and 14 h.. WHLWUI-t %  . I* k. ECKSTEIN BROS. DIAL 4269 — BAY STREET



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r h % %  ridj frbruiiP' Iff 19J0. JMaaos Mweate^ Prirc: Flv Cent) Year 55. THE WEST INDIESNEED NOTWORRY fl£4 VERBROOK STARTS THE EMPIRE LOBBYISTS' Champions £6 A Week Pay Packet (From Our London Correspondent) ORD BEAVEBBBOOK hus „o, J£EFE£ S& £ tan I " % %  T,ia inornms in a Mgned article in Ihe Daily Kxures. i rW lo "join the Empire loM] „n,l Ufa, _2f nc wpllUcal on.,, ..wSL'!" 0 beln "nii|ht, u plediN o promote her,, ana no. the unity 0l no E %  Twain fh" !" Pled,! '" *U arc a8 ked to send an urgenmessage immediately to i^,. ^avcrbmok at hi. Fleet street This is one side of Lord Beaverbrook s activity during the electoral campaign. Another aspect is a campaign for a £6 weekly pav packet which opened with Beaverbrook I policy sutement coinciding with the Conservative Conference last autumn invites all and ev. U,t oncf^ Honduras: *W. Indies Black Spot" ffrium I after vi %  jcfun %  Hwre UNDON. (By Mail). ;n the "Daily Mail" ng British Honduras, eenough i no doubt but tint gntjth Honduras is an acutely F^Eaaed colony, one of the most japaccfn! black spots I've seen Tariush Colonial Adminl itheWes: : %  Apart from the dollar's deval| Th e 'Daily Express' gives promj sjbcn. therr has been crass mal ^^^^Hfjon Intermingled itttthjll niggardliness In the pat the Colony has always been m txrlusively for what could bo [ftttt of it. btll a few years ago %  30 attempts at agricultural dapmerii. road building, capiBBprovernents, or even atfnpl •aajh important, afforesultion ol t* denuded foresU. ^Heatedly, something is being daw With Government and priHtt farms up-country, plus aensi%  Tpfoduitivi-plan: the ColoMi Development Corporattoi BriUe tor the ion ol exis*i^dpi and the cultivation of %  such as papaine power, vhich is already being used ialfew York for the tendensing of nat—it seems the Colony is beiaf reshaped Into a paying projawa, -B.V.V. Barbados Drop One For 2nd Test Ijh* Kidney. T N Pcirce and (ICC. Gitt.-n> with Barbados Cpttin John Goddard co-opted, Wrda> :nade a single change H* leam tha %  %  %  dos in the First Teal against %  %  em for the Second Test. Jnr., Pickwick's %  m lav tin anvaVaVf ed ln P |; "-"-' "( Norman wall h ,i in | IJS ankle "a* nelding in the First Teat %  •ft**' 11 -;—J. D•fW/tapt. I, i, .. BfeDtt, C B W .. 0d, A. M. Taylor. R. H. Lucas, E. Atkiri*ad Jnr Emergency Farmer. Bonce to news that "thrre more candidates—all Tory—came out last night for the £6 a week pav packet. A Socialist criticised It" —By Cable. Big Puerto Rico Sugar Export To German\ WASHINGTON (B, UH1). J f.V Horrison of 'he U.S. Commodity credit Cor,,., has agreed to buy 220,000 tons of p£?to Rican sugar at 4.60 cents a pound !f saIc : % %  IDUM receiving us. ecoi All is expected to go Germany. The E.C.A. has authorwed the spena!! Germany of 21.260.000 dollars for **uerto Riean sugar pi could be made available at a to* enough price. Latest t [ha putfto mean 1950 crop is 1.250.000 ton.^If !" Rico has %  U S <>l ot 910.000 tons, ,. local consumption 1 %  W ill an additional 35,000 tons to the U.S. lo make good dent-it* in beet sugar production. About 90,000 tons of tin It Is expected that with its foreign market quota of 220,000 tons, Puerto Rico will sell about 1,270,D00 ton about 70,000 tons into 1951. The industry will In 2.640.000 dollars less than if all Ihe sugar had been sold 11 UM U.S. price, but it is pointe 3,500,000 r .1 will bl put in thai woul been nni>ossible. it 1planned to lift 668.000 lorn In March. 77,000 tons in 77,000 tons in May. The sugar wi'.l i and liaggen Rico. -B.f.i'. 'If Tories Win' Churchill Tells Our Correspondent (Pnia Our l.,,ndon m ILIMI.-IU) l^UftOUM. i\ u. uv W'lMSTON CHUBCHILL. Leader of the Couser vative Party, told me in a letter "there's no cause for alarm" in colonial food producing coun tries over the future of bulk buying if the Conservatives are returned at the General Election on February 23. lories Not Opposed To A Long-Form Sugar Contract Ba i--h.. \.: 'M • amapaaatai HIS EXCELLENCY THE C.OVEIINo:; ey Adams. M.C.P.. Mr W II W I A for jMn.ict ,o ..tlcnd the in Riot Act RvaH In R H Mil lift til O./T' rnaiN -. The ceremony takes place t..%  Bar...*.. ..u urr. Po .a..,, | W W. Reive M L 1". gOOdbyft^Ml R. BELIZE. Feb. 15. %  %  live Council last night. Ronald Garvey signe-i anfordng the reg ing public aascmblics without permission from the Police Superintendent. hiof, Storj'. *aid toda> he considered the Riot A, read and said further that he had replenished his forces with a stock of tear gas bomb* and granted the church and schools exemption Violators of the regulation are liable to a tine not exceeding $500.00 or imprisonment "ing 12 months or both. Story said this is a move against incldanti like yesterday's, when ah*;ry people assaulted City Counnllor If, B. L. Wilson and forceu him to march home under the' flag, because Wilson! the key to tin an address to Princess Alice and the Karl of Athlone. due to arriv* In Belize on Fabruary 2S. Th> regulations only apply to Belize (By Cable) badosLeg.sUtu.e-M ',7,7,^:,. !', ,i I. ,: i aylu Branch Hiniga wn ii c „ Mr. Aubraj Dougi..> 9 %  % % % %  U thev m;i,1t ", : Belize Police ;|Use Tear Gas Russia And China Sign 30 Year Treaty at "" %  MOSCOW. Feb. If.. I Communist China to >re than a quarter of the WorloVfl populaln.ii iii two months of negotiations in IA itGOV r Mao Tse-Tung, his Forei Qiou Bn-Lai ^OVKI Foreign Mlniatar Andrei Vythin ff^nx-nts. m glvi China %  long term credit equivalent to S300.000.o00 (U.S.) for Soviet industrial and rail equipment ill be repayable from December 1854. (2) The Manchurian railway will be rotiu:. control, Soviet troops \M!1 iaavi the Port Arthur naval base la Manchuria, and Russia will givi up her interests in the Port of Dalny (Dalren). effective after a peace treaty has I luded with Japan—or a: the latest, by 152 They wlU seek a paaj with Japan "in conjunction w.ti their allies during the Second World War." Russia will hand over to China, without compensation Japanese enterprises in Manchuria acojulnad %  t interests. (31 The main treaty — the other two were separate agreements—abrogates the 1M5 Sino\greement. signed with Generalissimo Chiang Kai Shek. The new agreement confirmthe full sovereignty of a jolia. Russia and China agree be resurgence of Imperialism and aggression of Japan, or Of any other power" JDOv Feb. 15. if either party is attacked b; foreign -" or fiOV(tn aU ied with her. aun g the ( j ind itielf ln g sjUti loday adjourned, the other wUI limnedi tai | aid with all the means at its disposal. Marshal Josef Stalin sat at trw head of the table at a farewell banquet given here tonight for Tung and his : nlng. It was expect. his treaty negotiators would leave several areas of returning to Peking. — (Eeas>r.; I.S. Prepared To Discuss *'th Russia ON, Feb. 15, [•'"<: %  U n dtr SUtn Den Ruk loli 10, •w.;', ^T", Ul ""n and to k a or, ,„„.,, Io a^" usl nul '•rrX' "'}*' %  ""fa • taJL J .'"' ""Wing "ol llw Govor..* OWBlrs behind Ihnr • Uid.-Rrulrr. A <"lrian Treaty folks Postponed i. thTn !" ' !" hour i January i "-hearaod man, 1 dtvoltd moil 5&: ll.il„d.. Adr, t >ir'p,nd(nl, /.E, Fb. 15. Police II^HJ i.ar gas bomb to-night lo ,U^ir the street* nftft '"Mint held under to. LONDON,!. I Art, WH 1,1... ^ %  ...•l:,i; Kn up when the crowd '^ 'hut la e, he was golns lo play • **.*. — *"<•> %  " %  • sln C,nl hta""" 11 •>tmnl on with ...* !" • i thorouiih melho'i M the main n %  and lire I I Ing to th. i ugh Naw%  em native townships was stoned, and Euro] Ihe borders of Uw Afi. dantial ar*a>by atoning Afnew:. irs ami rlaarlng the barricades, and lain the firemen by stcu-gn: over the lieads of rioting Afncan.v, who tried to eul U They ran through a lain of itoni i and scattered gunitre %  in" %  • '< %  ip 250 people for disotders in vrrueh one Indian was hit by I bullet I: when poUi I | • :ilily card, i police had An persed the fighter*, the •-ir.H-t-, were Uttered • ,;Uss, Strong tire riot area.—Realer. Installation Broadcast To-night THE ceremony of the mstallaUon of H.K.H IMncess Alice, as Vice-Chancellor of the University College ol the West Indies, takes place :o-day, and will be broadcast from Jamaica by station VRR62 on 13.505 kcs. at 2100 G.M.T. (9 p.m local Ume). No Stunts From Bevin urests and one minoi "I an. going t.> COntlDUl T ulkirm casualty were reported. — (By Table! B. G. Flood Victims Gel Condensed Milk ilUrbado. leWaM I .iff.pwujuil 1 GEORGETOWN, Feb. 15. Th> merchant communitj %  .( Bermuda are sending, as a gift, by the Lady Rodney' 88 cases of assorted canned foodstuff for flood sufferers, according to a cable from Bermudas Governor A cable was also received (mo I)r Miranda, Prime Ml .Surinam. iiuVrming of Uk Surinam Government U send 510 cases of condensed mill; f of the iiopulatipn < 1 Surinam to their neighbordistress." Both oabli ajBMTld the fl G. Cnwernor of deepest sympath> of the populations of Bermuda and Surinam. Hon. C. T. P Qovi i iK'i-Deputy, hu\ %  • pressing appn •A generous sympathy. lavaaan arrived, today Edgar Wijngaarde. Vice-Chairman of Pnramnribo Chamber %  %  Micndiition from Prime Minister Miranda. Wijngaarde represents a group of Surinam citizens who : -us of extending special .i-cl to flood sufferers in this neighbouring colony. He will be taken around. nrstl> bj Flood Commiasioner. M. B Lalnf, and will return a report to I (By Cable) uilh and building up agreement. betwnen those who will agree, %  id doing rhal I Is right at the moment %  (Irlreailna his constltu' East Woolwidh Reuter. H Killed In Piano Crash BOO, Fet, 15 .mug fei fl ihe eo weal ,>f the base. RetM-f Duki"Graadson Drowned Trying fo Save His Brother AHIW Ruk Do* -ii*| Oul Vsk $4,:>18, I %  %  %  I turtrn i I tary." —Realer. K Feb. 15. ana, who man I olonial Secretary If the turned io i tonlftari be couldn't nen their aoh dunoaaant la rnplre i:es are on the POUt Of ;iliuost open lebellio; a added aaatag his consUtuents In Hornscy, London, to be the u Empire. ihat cam. o Conferpnortunlt) %  i (ore '>l>e confeienee had made iflalr, Ife [i lonaarvattvea) are are return to office U real It %  added, how the Conservative l ... Q aid it woo i v ttii town aoMong. H Look at uw n %  i imik buying. %  < -pondent that the Conservative! weren't opposed to the .ui demands for a Ion ror sugar. "That's not n< i Churchill area replying to a letter | nad •". Italy Heuter Snow Storms Sweep U.S. 16 Dead: Many Homeless CHICAGO, Feb. 15 oiminisning. Ii li n I manltet of flooda and storma dealt daatrucu, throuh.,ut the northern live blow, acroat wide area, of stalct and abundant rainfall freoi the United Stain to-day. Midthe Gulf to the North Alli.nti tebruary mow and ice alorma Stale*, were blamed for at least 18 Many v'lnimunlflea dealha. Property imlaled f r .. m damage mount— IHIIMII. J,." mll on eomm. of dollar.. o TV„ SI Thou, and s !" "" %  %  • "I Uw „, u were made .napped under llliiiiiiii..i,iu: IKit. -pilled hoVe. 0 ^^ Mond ' in thp %  , Midweat U. S. aourl. Other Ad\ocate. „ 0 Mjr(v %  nan M wth _____^___^_ -_^^^___ evacuation i n ** To-day light Illinois, Indiana. Ohio and Tensnow fell in the ui -Tjse*. Mississippi %  Many rivers fed with he, rainfall for the last several days the At)%  urged to flood Mage, some InchCarotin, nartii*. • ing toward high marks In las: r.o ever* eai 8 wnfi month's damaging overflows. that a sleet and MV hlch swept across West and Eastern States was In I I .JN. Flag Goes I |> In Asmara Judge BrUng i f the United IN t late United Notion Asmara and now hraun ii i rninission. He called on all to work for th" good of Eritrea, and tfcwai necessais lit the OnimissjonV work The Commission has been MO irea to "ascertain more full, the I ooting to* I Mid Kruter West I Hut Heel In U.S.A. %  %  ng between Mi would the UI %  %  iii 1 toad to %  13i It shall not tai %  Preae Confer%  hand, Britain. i out for the tutted pi —Beater. Acheron Maj Kesigii i %  %  on ihe Asia. Ambassador, was rxpni< l Washington that U %  li Reader RUSSIANS SHEERING FROM FEAR COMPLEX — Truman 15. LM given in talks hko I ( | by ChurehUI la jy*" iDfluaaUaJ |-. what goodwill towaio '' %  i told Arthu%  %  dent, that h. keep an/ > 11 would be gooci I he., foi th*United %  •ign iflcant, tuaalan people and %  t to Potsdam. %  %  Uao paaj %  i %  : Bg fcale. liut I fou:i LO talk about . —...., >i,ii i I,,11 %  %  d the man wh< Russian Hold-u/t The Berlln-Frankf ui i military tiain was held %  hours last night. '. 'uMi if ..it p ihaaoMfi announa The RuMiant held the train on 'he claim that two pas;-. loffman and Miss V Walker, delegates of th> tional Coi the lte.l Cross, tr., iotaanattitaUuu, desman stated. Army headiuarter that then ted II persons papa" aaan i and the •vas BJlawsd %  leaths i vania i rid up Par taaa assd a naa qunr grater. %  %  %  real trouble arftl that they are still suffering from .1 ami Inferlorlt) No IIII|HThe agreement the Russiam Valta was th. thi Pn kaan % %  last vestige of hope U %  >*med so good a peaci San FrarH'laco had Mi --id that, further Walter Bedell Smith, ti can Ambassadoi keeping ': %  %  joint construction of th Krock said tl reliably Inf. u-na havf Ifl.Oon < %  %  '"" m wtaeti he finds utterh what I had in n aaanf i \ %  • .'-< ..I the tn | %  %  %  bath. 1 v M saygaobe sliowerIrada of no wanted to Ihii could and with ; i moder-ii. aaautanoa, When that was done, the of International Communism WOul ; .(S the Krock described ti at "sitting in %  tth undbvMfataad roni of huaaan %  %  great of his o


Tharsday

February

19350.

te Ct a


















































yy

| = LONDON, (By Mail).
iting in the “Daily Mail’
fer visiting British Honduras
chard Greenough says:
“ is no doubt but
Honduras is an

West Indies.

nistration intermingled
hall niggardliness.

"ppt out of it.

» Until a few years ago there
“were no attempts at agricultural
development, road building, capi-
“hough important, afforestdtion of
enuded forests.

tedly, something is being
. With Government and pri-
ite farms up-country, plus sensi-
@ productive plans by the Colo-~
lal Development Corporation in
le for the extension of exist-
“img crops and the cultivation of
“new ones—such as papaine pow-
‘der, which is already being used
“in New York for the tenderising of
meat—it seems the Colony is be-
‘ing reshaped into a paying pro-
_ position.
4 —B.U.P.



_ Barbados
Drop One For
2nd Test

Barbados Selectors, Messrs.
“Kidney, T. N. Peirce and
O'C. Gittens with Barbados
ain John Goddard co-opted,
lerday made a single change
he f€am that represented
mtdados in the First Test against
mitish Guiana when they selected
We team for the Second Test.

VEL. G. Hoad, Jnr., Pickwick’s
Slow tight arm spin bowler has
en selected in place of Norman
pMashall who injured his ankle
le fielding in the First Test.
p the team is as follows:—J. D.
Goddard (Capt.), E. D. Weekes,
CL Walcott, C’ B. Williams, F.
mg G. Wood, A. M. Taylor, R.
) J. H. Lucas, EB. Atkin-



4
yeisman W. A. Farmer.

_ Wining more than

dship,
Rhee two

Pand Soviet Forej

greements:

Min WASHINGTON, Feb, 15,
: reat Under-Secretary of
; nab Dean Ruk told Senators
op nat America was “prepared
» Outstanding issues with
Soviet Union and to leave all
doors open for an ex-
of views,”

%

Hsueh a discussion must not

r a powers sitting

‘ and disposing “of the
Anterests of other Govern-

- or Peoples behind their
he Said.—Reuter.

4 ee
M“strian Treaty
falks Postponed

LONDON. Feb, 15
‘ood four Foreign Ministers

py esotiating th iz
Treaty jeder e Austrian

; a atch }.
4 mays Meeting
. : © deadloc
ng, the

eepu



ended in
first
ind devoted most
trying to shift
the responsibility
ack of progres

State Treat

fh ‘eir time

in

—Reuter



that
acutely
d colony, one of the most
1 black spots I’ve seen
Colonial Administration

’ “Apart from the dollar’s deval-
tion, there has been crass mal-
with
In the
the Colony has always been
‘un exelusively for what could be|

improvements, or even simple, |
}

jo Je Germany

EL. G. Hoad Jnr. Emergency
I

16

| ORD BEAVERBROOK has not
ee ing from the West Indies bef

morning in a signed article in the
sites all and everyone to “join the Em
invites all

Russia and Communist China tod

a;
K. In a two hour |
since January |

Wes rehearsed any
*reument dq many;

BEAVERBROOK STARTS |)>
JHE ‘EMPIRE LOBBYISTS’,
: Champions £6 A Week Pay Packet “

(From Our London Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb. 15.
waited long after return.
ore entering the political

| pire lobby and join

- wy, eae new political organisation.
| called into being overnight, is
pledged to promote here and now
the unity of the Empire by
demanding of Parliamentary
candidates firm pledges to carry
forward the necessary legislation
in the next Parliament.

When the candidates answer
these pledges the “Empire Lobby-
ists” are asked to send an urgent
message immediately to Lorc
Beaverbrook ‘at his Fleet Street
office.

This is one side of Lord Beaver-
brook’s activity during the elec-
toral campaign. Another aspect is
a campaign for a £6 weekly pay
packet which opened with Beaver-
brook’s policy statement coincid-
ing with the Conservative Con—
ference last autumn,

_ The ‘Daily Express’ gives prom-

inence to news that “three more
candidates—all Tory—came out

last night for the £6 a week pay
| packet, A Socialist criticised it”.
—By Cable.



Big Puerto Rico
Sugar Export

WASHINGTON (By Mail).

Paul Harrison of the U.S, Com-
modity Credit Corp., has agreed
to buy 220,000 tons of Puerto
Rican sugar at 4,60 cents a pound
for sale to toreign countries re-
ceiving U.S. economic assistance.

All is expected to go to Western

Germany. The E.C.A. has author-
ised the Spending by Western
Germany of 21,260,000 dollars for

Puerto Rican sugar provided it
could be made available at a low
enough price.

Latest estimates of the Puerto
Rican 1950 crop is 1,250,000 tons,
Puerto Rico has a U.S. quota of
910,000 tons, a local consumption
quota of 105,000 tons and expects
to sell an additional 35,000 tons to
the U.S. to make good deficits in
beet sugar production. About
90,000 tons of the 1949 were unsold
It is. expected that with its foreign
market quota of 220,000 tons,
Puerto Rico will sell about 1,270,-
000 tons of sugar, carrying over
about 70,000 tons into 1951.

The industry will be receiving
2,640,000 dollars less than if all
the sugar had been sold at thet
U.S. price, but it is pointed out
that storage costs to carry it as|
surplus for a year would be at
least 2,500,000 dollars. Growers|
will absorb 960,000 dollars of the
loss, millers 880,000 dollars and
workers 800,000 dollars. The new
Sale will however, mean that
3,500,000 man-days labour will be
put in that would have otherwise
been impossible.

It is planned to lift 668,000 tons
in March, 77,000 tons in April and
77,000 tons in May. The sugar will
be weighed and bagged in Puerto
Rico.



—B.U.?.



Russia And China Sign
30 Year Treaty

MOSCOW, Feb. 15.
ay signed a 30-year treaty

. a quarter of the world’s population in

two months of negotiations in Moscow by China’s new
#ader Mao Tse-Tung, his Foreign Minister, Chou En-Lai,
gn Minister, Andrei Vyshinsky signed the

(1) Russia will give China a
long term credit equivalent to
$300,000,000 (U.S.) for Soviet
industrial and rail equipment
This will be repayable from
December 1954.

(2) The Manchurian railway
will be returned to Chinesc
eontrol, Soviet troops will leave
the Port Arthur naval base in
Manchuria, and Russia will give
up her interests in the Port of
Dalny (Dairen).

These conditions will become
effective after a peace treaty has
been concluded with Japan—or at
the latest, by 1952.

They will seek a peace treaty
with Japan “in conjunction with
their allies during the Second
World War.” }
Russia will hand over to China,
without compensation Japanese
enterprises in Manchuria acquired
by Soviet interests.

(3) The main treaty — the
other two were separate agree-
ments—abrogates the 1945 Sino-
Soviet Agreement, signed with
Generalissimo Chiang Kai Shek.
The new agreement confirms
the full sovereignty of outer Mon-
golia. Russia and China agree “to
prevent the resurgence of Imperi-
alism and aggression of Japan, or
of any other power.”

If either party is attacked by
Japan or powers allied with her,

| and finds itself in a state of war,
adjourned, |

the other will immediately give
military aid with all the means
at its dis 1,

Marshal Josef Stalin sat at the
head of the table at a farewe!l
banquet given here tonight for
Mao Tse-Tung and his party after
the signing

It was expected that Mao and}
his treaty negotiators would leave
Moscow shortly, “
sé veral irea { the Ss viet U nion
efor Peking.

— (Reuter

before returning to

“Daily Express” he

but tour through }2

Riot Act
Read In B.H.

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

BELIZE,’ Feb. 15.

At a late meeting of the Execu-
tive Council last night, Governor
Ronald’ Garvey signed the Bill
enforcing the regulation illegaliz-
ing public assemblies without
permission from the Police Super-
intendent.

Police Chief, Story, said today
he considered the Riot Act already
read and said further that he
had replenished his forces with a
stock of tear gas bombs and
granted the church and _ schools
exemption. Violators of the regu-
lation are liable to a fine not ex-
ceeding $500.00 or imprisonment

) ley Adams, M.C.P., Mr.
| B.W.LA, for Jamaica,
| Princess Alice,
| Indies.

to attend
as Chancellor of
W. W. Reece, M.C.P., goodbye.

| Excellency the
craft with Mr. Percy Taylor, Br





not exceeding 12 months or both.
Story said this is a move against
incidents like yesterday’s, when
angry people assaulted City Coun-
cillor M. B. L. Wilson and forced
him to march home under the }
American flag, because Wilson |
had voted the key to the city and
an address to Princess Alice and|
the Earl of Athlone, due to arrive
in Belize on 23. The
regulations only apply to Belize. |
(By Cable)









Belize Police

Use Tear Gas

|
(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

BELIZE, Feb. 15.
Police used tear gas bombs
to-night to clear the streets after |

| the first meeting, held under to- |

day’s Emergency Act, was broken |
up when the crowd stoned a|
speaker who criticised America
and advised the people that they |
should not sing “God bless |
America”, |

Several arrests and one minor |
casualty were reported.

—(By Cable)

B. G. Flood
Victims Get
Condensed Milk

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 15.

The merchant community of
Bermuda are sending, as a gift, by
the ‘Lady Rodney’ 88 cases of
assorted canned foodstuff for flood
sufferers, according to a cable
received from Bermuda’s Gov-
ernor .

A cable was also received Sepa |
Dr. Miranda, Prime Minister of
Surinam, informing of the decision
of the Surinam Government i
send 510 cases of condensed milk
“as a, gift of the population of
Surinam to their neighbours in
distress.”

Both cables assured the B.G.
Governor of deepest sympathy of
the populations of Bermuda and
Surinam. Hon. C. T. Parkinson,
Governor-Deputy, have cabled
replies expressing appreciation for
these acts of generous sympathy.

From Surinam arrived, today
Edgar Wijngaarde, Vice-Chairman
of Paramaribo Chamber of Com-}
merce, with a etter of recom- P
rnendation from Prime Minister
Miranda. Wijngaarde represents
a group of Surinam citizens who
are desirous of extending special
aid to flood sufferers in this neigh-
bouring colony.

He will be taken around, firstly
by Flood Commissioner, M. B.
Laing, and will es wie a report to

‘aramaribo on Friday.
ee (By Cable)

Dead Child Had
2 Heads, 3 Hands

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 15.

The Director of Medical Ser-
vices disclosed today that a twen-
ight years old mother gave
birth on Monday to a full-term





ty-



|male child with two heads fully
formed and three hands. The
lfreak was born dead and the/
ther died shortly after The
from the waist|

(By Cable) |

Installation
Broadcast
To-night

THE ceremony of the in-
stallation of H.R.H. Princess
Alice, as Vice-Chancellor of
the University College
the West Indies, takes place
to-day, and will be broad-
cast from Jamaica by station

VRR62 on 13,505 kes. at
2100 G.M.T. (9 p.m. local
time).



No Stunts
From Bevin

LONDON, Feb. 15.
Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin

;Said today that in his job as For-
eign Minister he was going to play
|no stunts of any kind,

but was
going straight on with steady and
thorough methods of negotiation.

“T am going to continue talking
with and building up agreements
between those who will agree,
keeping my eye on the necessities
of others, and doing what I think
is right at the moment.”

He was addressing his constitu-
ents at East Woolwidh.—Reuter.



Ask $4,518,000
For “The Skyscraper’

WASHINGTON, Feb. 15.

The United States Army has
asked for $4,518,000 to continue
tests of the top secret anti-aircraft
gun, “the Skysweeper”, which it
is said could hit planes of super-
sonic speed either by night or day,
it was disclosed here today.

The yange and firing speed of
the Skysweeper, a 75mm. weapon,
were not disclosed in the report
made public before the Military
Appropriations Sub-committee of
the House of Representatives, but
its primary features were said to
be radar-directed fire control and
proximity - fused ammunition. —
Reuter.

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

WwW. W.
| Douglas Smith, were among the p

bados Legislature at the installation.



Twelve Europeans and seven South Africans are
seriously wounded in an outbreak of rioting, arson, and
widespread looting in three Johannesburg suburbs.
Africans yesterday started the |

and Mrs. Savage, Mr. Grant

Reece, M.C.P., and
assengers who left yesterday by
the installation ceremony of H.R.H,
the University College of the West

Mr.

The ceremony takes place to-day.
Picture on left shows Mr. J. H.

Wilkinson, M.C.P. bidding Mr
Reece is representing the Bar-
Picture on right shows His

Mr.

Governor and Mrs. Savage, walking out to the air-

anch Manager of B.W.1LA.,

while i

the background Mr. Aubrey Douglas Smith and Mr. Grantley Adan
| are seen busily chatting ag they made their way slowly to the ‘plane
eer

19 WOUNDED IN RIOT
IN JOHANNESBURG

JOHANNESBURG, Feb. 1:

in hospits

outbreak in the suburbs of New-
clare, setting Indian shops afit
and building petrol drum barri-
cades along the main roads, from
behind which they stoned polic«
and fire brigades rushing to the
scene, All traffic through
clare, Sophia Town and the west-
ern native townships was stoned,
and Europeans retaliated outsié
the borders of the African resi-

tial areas by stoning Afriaan
cars and a bus

Police opened fire in clearing
the barricades, and later covered
the firemen by sten-gun volleys
over the heads of rioting Africans,

who tried to cut the water hoses. |

They ran through a rain of stones
and scattered gunfire in New-
clare, where yesterday they
rounded up 250 people for disor-
ders in which one Indian woman
was hit by a bullet. It all be
when police arrested one man {0
failing to carry an identity
When the police had finally dis-
persed, the looters and barricac¢

Aubrey ,

L} information

New- |

card. |

fighters, the streets were littered |

with stones and glass,
Strong patrols covered the
tire riot area.—Reuter,

n



Death Sentence For
Arsenic Poisoning

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
| GRENADA, Feb. 15
Sentence of death was impos:
| On 67-year-old Veronica Alexan-
| der by Mr. Justice Cools-Lartigu«
yesteraay evening for sending
John Thompson (60), an arseni
impregnated mango by an 8-yeat
old boy during October last.
This is the first of 24 cases o
the Calendar for the February
or Cable.
4



Hope For Fortune

ROME, Feb. 15

Hopeful Italians are searchin,
deep in the dusty archives of r«
cord offices to see if they
claim to a fortune

The Italian Foreign Offide ha:
announced that an American
John Musto, who died in San Die-
go, California, on September 17
1948, has left a “huge inheritance’
to relatives presumed living ir
Italy. —Reuter.

Can ia)



Snow Storms Sweep U.S.
16 Dead: Many Homeless

CHICAGO, Feb. 15.

Floods and storms dealt destruc-
tive blows across wide areas of
the United States to-day, Mid-
February snow and ice storms
were blamed for at least 16
deaths. Property
ato mount-
ed into millions
of dollars.

Thous ands
were made
homeless as ris-
ing rivers spilled

Read the

into lowland Monday in the Evening The snow car-
homes in Louis- pet over some
jana and Mis- Midwest U. S.
sour. Other| Advocate. areas measured
thousands were More than 20
threatened with ae inches

evacuation i n To-day light
Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Ten- snow fell iri the upper and middle
nessee. Mississippi Valley, Michigan and

Many rivers fed with heavy over New England. Rain fell along | without

fainfall for the last several days
surged to flood stage, sorne inch-
ing toward high marks in last
month’s damaging overflows.

The U.S. Weather Bureau
that leet and now storn
which swept the Middle
West and Eastern St

ates
tates

SHAC

acros

was



“Illuminating Dots...”



diminishing. It left a blanket of
snow throughout the northern
States and abundant rainfall from

the Gulf to the North Atlantic
States. ;
Many g¢ommunities remained

isolated from
outside telephone
communicati on,
Prees, Telephone
and power lines
snapped under
weight of heavy
snow and sleet.

case of the
{



the Atlantic coast
Carolina northward.
no severe cold spots

New York counted 11
Gead. in accidents attributed t
the Four death
Pennsylvania and one |

in Tilinois.—Can Press

South
were |

from
There

person

were re-

ported in

|

|




a

;

8 Killed In

FALLS, Mon., Feb

GREAT
Wied it

15

| nen were killed
escaped when a Ur



Force B.29 Superfortress eras

shortly afte: taking off from
| Air Force base her«

The big four engined plar
Which had been earching fo:

missing B.36 bomber off the co

of British Columbia, plummet«
to the prairie about 3 miles soy

; west of the base

| It blazed up soon atter

} One side ofa road, an Air Fy

officer said.—Reut+r



Duke’s Grandson

|
‘| Drowned Trying

| Co Save His Brother
| OXFORDSHIRE

A six

et
year+old descendant
he Duke of Wel ington, Rot
, Clyde, was Growned in trying
rescue his eight-year-old brott
Jeremy from a lake with a stick
it was disclosed here today. Thi
two boys, grandsons of the sever
Duke of Wellington, were play
the |

near a lake

near

vilenael



r ne I Jeremy manager
Reuter.

Attlee Doesn't
Rule Out

LINCOLN, Feb. 1
British Prime
Attlee, commer
Winston
avom
in
Nations.
there vould e@ al
another

Phe
Clement

Vlinis
itr 1e1¢
Churchill
proposal, sai
the hands i

ig three
this matter
United
Whether

ise in

is

the

Making
a matter

1 do
voicn
Churehill
moment,
Nations.
It is all a very difficult subject
and I cannot make any further

approa
consideration
the

been made

for

mot rule gut upgge
has
the

the

e but at
it with

presen

rests United

pronouncement on it, until I have }
the |

talked the matter
Foreign Secretary.”

over with

—Reuter,



Acheson May Resign





Plane Crash





BANGKOK, Feb, 15
The American Secretary of
State, Dean Acheson, is likely to|
resign within six or eight weeks, |

sources close to American diplo- ,

mets meeting here said today
The diplomats were today con-

cluding their three-day conference

on the situation Southeast
Asia.

The source said that Dr, Philip
Jessup, President Truman’s roving
Ambassador, was expected to suc-
ceed Mr. Acheson

The reported possibility that he
might sueceed Dean Acheson fol-
lewed closely on reports from
Washington that the United States
had decided its strategia interest
in the Far East, an area in which
Dr. Jessup has shown interest
Reuter.

in



Russian Hold-up

BERLIN, Feb. 15.

The Berlin-Frankfurt American
military train was held up by the
Russians at the Zonal border for
more than two hours last night,
an American spokesman announe-
ed here.

The Russians held the train on
the claim that two passengers, Mr
George Hoffman and Miss V
Walker, delegates of the Interna-

tional Committee of the Red
Cross, travelling on Swiss pass-

ports, were on the military train
proper documentation,
the American spokesman stated.
It was established by Berlin
U.S. Army headquarters that thei:
apers were

!

|
|
i
}
|

in order, and the| reliably informed that he

train we llowed to proceed. to]

F 1 t clock to-da
ite eing held up for two and
larter hours.-—Reuter,

} Which he finds utterly abhorrent./

Price:

Five Cents

Year 553.

‘If Tories

Churchill Tells

(From Our London Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb. 15.
WIN STON CHURCHILL, Leader of the Conser-
vative Party, told me in a letter “there’s no
cause for alarm’’ in colonial food producing coun-
tries over the future of buik-buying if the Conser-

vatives are returned at the General Election on
February 23.



Churchill was replying to a
letter I had sent him asking for
clarification of the Conservatives’
policy on bulk buying,

Rumours that the Conservatives
would end this method of food
purchasing were causing serious
concern in the Empire and Com-«
monwealth countries I pointed
out,

I quoted a Member of the Aus-
tralian Export Control Board who
had warned Victorian dried fruit

Tories Not Opposed
To A Long-Term
Sugar Contract

Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 15.
Mr, L, D. Gammans, who may
2e next Colonial Secretary if the
Conservatives












k

are returned tof}, 1 neh AR a dul ;
office, said tonight he couldn't mervetives ware tune bo
remember the time when there} *“"Y* : . we power

bulk buying would cease, mean-
ing that Australia would have to
sell

had been so much discontent in
the Colonial Empire.

“The West Indies are on the at a lower price against com-
point of almost open rebellion,’} P&#Uon. : J ,
he added Churchill replied “we believe

Mr. Gammans addressing his the time has come to restore the
constituents in Hornsey, London, business of food purchase to ex-
said: “I want Britain to be the} Pemienced traders in food and to
centre of a great Colonial Empire,|®!@ cirect Government buying,

If Labour are returned to office but we intend to honour contracts

that cannot be”. which have already been made by
He said the Colombo Confer-| the Government

ence had been a great opportunity We recognise longterm con-

to strengthen Empire unity but] tact ay be a valuable means

Bevin’s decision to recognise Com-} fr offering producers in the

munist China before the confer- | =â„¢pire and Commonwealth coun-

nee had made a fiasco of the] t’ies guaranteed markets and we
whole affair. are ready to use such means.
“We believe even in such cases
“We (Conservatives) are} it will still be desirable to use the {
pledged if we return to office to] channels of private trade, while
hold a great imperial conference | Government confines itself to the
; tS soon as possible,” he added. proper function of ensuring stabil-
Asked how the Conservative | ity By Cable
Party intended to reduce taxatior



nd at the same time keep and
npreve social services and pen-
ions Mr, Gammans said it would

Meet! But

be done by cutting down need-

less spending. “Look at the mil- y

lions that have gone down th Meet In U.S.A.

drain over bulk buying,” he said, abies vay 3
Afterwards he explained t: WASHINGTON, Feb, 15.





your correspondent that the Con-] . Dean’ Acheson, U.S. Secretary ee
ervatives weren’t opposed to the State, said today that any. “Big
West Indian demands for a lone | Tree” meeting between Marshal
term contract and to negotiate ; Stalin, the American President
price for sugar. “That’s not bulk! &9@ the British Premier would

buying,” he said.—By Cable. have to be in the United States,
: ' Three other conditions, which

“ must be agreed to, are:
; ; a3 ss (1) : wee take ~— within
1e framework and in ac-
U wN. Flag Goes cordance with the princi-
‘ ples of the United Nations
. Charter

Up In Asmara (2) It should not be confined to
the United States and the
ASMARA, Feb. 15. Soviet Union, if the inter-
Judge Erling Quale, Chairman ests of other countries are

iffected

(3) It shall not be conducted

under duress,

Mr. Dean Acheson will have an
Opportunity at his Press Confer-
ence today to comment on Mr.
Winston Churchill’s suggestion for
such a meeting to end the east-
west cold war, On the other hand,
he may refuse to do so beeause of
the election issues in Britain.

Last week, he ruled out for the
present the possibility of a “nego-
tiated peace.”

of the United Nations Commission
for Eritrea, today raised the flag
of the United Nations over the
former palace of the Governor of
Asmara and now headquarters of
the Commission.

He called on all to work for the
good of Eritrea, and said that
‘tranquillity. was necessary to carry
out the Commission’s work. The
Commission has been sent to Eri-
trea to “ascertain more fully the
wishes and the best means of pro-
noting the welfare of the inhabi-«

tants of Eritrea,” he said.—Reuter. —Reuter.

RUSSIANS SUFFERING
FROM FEAR COMPLEX

—Truman



NEW YORK, Feb. 15.
Truman does not believe that any Russian promise given
in talks like those proposed by Churchill last night would
be kept.
This was shown in an exclusive interview the President has
given to one of America’s influential papers, the New Yorl
Times,

The President told Arthur Truman said that he remembe:
| Krock, the paper's Washington] ed with what goodwill towards
correspondent, that he “has noj the Russian people and their

hope the. Russians will keep any! rulers he
agreement, which it would be good
poliey
seek,”

The interview is regarded here
48 more significant, because it “But I found that all Stalin
was given before Churchill's cali; wanted to talk about was cessa-
last night for talks between Stalin,| tion of lend-lease hence, the
Truman and the man who becomes, atmosphere was unfavourable to
British Prime Minister. | what T had in mind,”

The President believes that the| The President said that to
real trouble with the Russians abousn lend-Llease at the time was
that-they are still suffering fromf a mistake, but he was “new” t
a complex of fear and inferiority | the Presidency. He felt there wa:
where we are concerned,” nothing else he could do, but sign.

He had no staff and no cabinet
of his own then, but now he had
both.

went to Potsdam.
There he planned to offer heip
for the United States to} for reconstruction of Russia, a
; well as of the rest of the wor «
; on a very large scale.

s

No Hope
“The agreement the Russian:
made at Yalta was the only one

they ever kept out of nearly U.S. Surpluses

forty,” the President said.

When the USSR blocked East-
West trade after the. Potsdan
agreement, he “began to lose the
last vestige of hope that what
scemed so good a peace prospect
ot San Francisco had survived”.

The President said that, further
Walter Bedell Smith, the Ameri
can Ambassador, reported from
Moscow that the. Russians wer¢
“carefully keeping from the
people, all the facts about the wai
assistance we had given them, ard
what our proposals have been fo
joint construction of the -vorld.”

Krock said the Preside:t i
huss
have 16,000,000 in con-en-

amps”. Krock adds, “bi

way of the Police Sti

ion

tne

Krock reported Truman as say~
ing that the globe showed vast
areas inhabited by hundreds of
millions ef people, whe wanted to
improve their lot, and this could
be done with American surpluses,
and with a moderate amount of
American assistance,

When that was done, the chief
threat of International Com-
munism would pass. This was the
primary objective of his policy.

Krock described the President
as “sitting in the White House”
in the age of Atomic Energy and
in the shadow of the Hydrogen
detonant, “with undiminished con-
fidence in the triumph of human-
ity’s better nature, and the pro-
ress of his own efforts to achieve

| abiding peace.”
—Reuter

j



wt)

ee

1

| Our Correspondent ;



ee

Gi

Soo

oor

j

{

Pe ee eee



poe

ee

on

PSE PO

Se Te ets ae ae
tes) ree

So ee So wa eens eat

eo

r



a


















PAGE TWO

TS |











THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

anib Calling

IS EX€ELLENCY the Gov-

ernor and Mrs. Savage, Mr.
Grantley Adams, M.C.P., Mr. W.
W. Reece, K.C., M.C.P., and Mr.
Aubrey Douglas-Smith, Resident
Tutor in Barbados for the Uni-
versity College of the W.I., were
among the passengers who left by
B.W.1.A’s special flight yesterday
morning for Jamaica. They will
be present for the installation of
HLR.H. Princess Alice, The Coun-
tess of Athlone as Chancellor of
the University College of the West
Indies.

Other passengers intransit by
the same flight for the installation
were the Rev. F. Ryan, from Trin-
idad and Mr. Claude Wight, from
British Guiana.

«> «>
Sixteen Years Ago
ER ROYAL HIGHNESS

PRINCESS ALICE, who is
due to attive in Barbedos on
March 7th on H.M.S. “Glasgow
was last-in Barbados approxim-
ately sixteen years ago.

it was on March Ist, 1934 that
she arrived here by the Canadian
Pacific Liner “Duchess of, Rich-
mond.” Sir Mark Young, then Mr.
M. A; Young, C.M.G., was Gov-
ernor.of Barbados. Other Royal
visitors on this occasion were H.H.
Princess Helena Victoria, and
H.H. Princess Marie Louise. A
large crowd gathered to welcome
them, and The “Barbados Advo-
cate Weekly” of Saturday March
3rd 1934 has this to say about the
arrival of the Royal visitors.

“Pynctually at 9 o'clock, His
Excellency the Governor, accom~
panied by his Private Secretary
left the Chamberlain Bridge in the
Water Boat “Ida” to meet the
Royal visitors.

Lined up across Trafalgar
Square was a Guard of Honour of
Volunteers and Police under Capt.
F. B.-Armstrong, while a party of
Scouts fell in under Rev. A. E
Armstrong, Assistant Island Com-
missioner, and a party of Girl

Guides under Miss Daisy Year-
wood, Commissioner.
Shortly after ten o'clock, the

“Ida” with the Union Jack floating

at her stern entered the inner
basin--end—a rousing cheer was
sent up.

In response Their Royal High-
nesses waved their kerchiefs and
the lusty cheering was continued
until the party had landed.”

The Een of Athlone, accom-
panied her on this trip and they
left Barbados on March 3rd 1934
by the “Elders and Fyffes Liner
“Ariguant’;

«> «>

In Hencur OF

HE BARBADOS PRESS

CLUB will be giving a Dance
on Saturday 18th Feb., in honour
of the visiting British Guiana
Cricket Team. Arnold Meanwell

and his Meanies will be supplying
the music and all the new dance
tunes are on the programme.
Rhumbas, Sambas, Fox-Trots and
Calypso Session. Nothing is being
spared to make this a night of
nights, not only for the B.G. crick-
eters. but for everyone who
attends.



“ Makes
had elections more often,
doesn't it'”

you wish we



London Express Service heal
From Venezuela
R. CARLOS ECHEVERRIA,

‘ distributor in Caracas for
Yardley and Co., Ltd. and Alfred
Dunhill Ltd. of London, is now in
Barbados for about ten days’ holi-
day. He arrived on Sunday by
B.W.I.A. accompanied by his wife
and children and they are staying
at the Hastings Hotel.

«>» «>

Intransit

NTRANSIT passengers for An-
tigua yesterday by B.W.LA.
were Mr. John Parker, Managing
Director off Pure Cane Molasses,
and Mr. Joseph Forsyth, Asst.
Manager of the Shipping Dept. of
the United Molasses Company.
They were in Barbados last week
on a short business visit.

«>» «,

Indian Cadets Entertained
HANI BROS. and Mr. T. Ma-
raj held a cocktail party at
“Athlone”, Fontabelle in honour
of the Indian Cadets from H.M.S.
“Devonshire” on Tuesday evening.
Also present were Mr. Ganesh
Persaud, British Guiana cricketer,
Mr. Lalchand, dry goods merchant
from St. Kitts and Mrs. Lalechand
who are at present holidaying in

the island.
«»

First in 20 Years
M* J. P.. MARTIAL, Comp-

troller of Income Tax, Cas-
tries, St. Lucia, was a recent
arrival by B.W.1.A. for a holiday
and is staying at the Cosmopolitan
Guest House.

«>



A member of the St. Lucia
Cricket Club, Mr, Martial cap-
tained the St. Lucia team which
visited Grenada in 1947 during
the Cork Cup Cricket Tourna-

ment He represented St. Lucia
against Spartan last year and was
in Barbados about 20 years ago
as a school boy member of the St.
Lucia team which was returning
from the Cork Cup Tournament
held in Grenada.

While here they played against
the Pickwick Cricket Club, but
rain interfered with the game.

Mr. Martial attended the first
cricket game at Kensington and
hopes to see as much as possible
of the second game before return-
ing home on Sunday.

One thing that impressed him
was the love the Barbadian has
for his country, not only at home,
but in whatever country he hap-
pened to be.

WORLD'S tallest show girls are there at New York’s Copacabana.
They must be 6 feet or over, and the management claims that, as

well as being the biggest they are the best looking.—Express.



Everything

to SUIT you

Sir !

TROPICALS

FOUR INTO ONE

6.72—6.83—6.88--7.08
all at 6.2 a

For a limited time only!

WHITPIELDS

Dial 4220

EVANS. &
Dial 4606

BROAD ST.

ote

“oe ae

\




~
oa

ee

For Carnival in Trinidad
ISS ELIZABETH MAC CAR-
THY O’LEARY and Miss
Michaelene_ Glowacki left yester-
day by B.W.1.A. to spend a short
holiday in Tobago. They will
then be going to Trinidad for
Carnival. They are guests at the
Marine Hotel and they will be
away a little over one week.

<> <>
Undertook Enquiry
R. T. J. HALLINAN, C.BE.,
formerly Director of Medical
Seryices, Jamaica, returned home
yesterday evening by B.W.LA. via
Trinidad after undertaking an en-
quiry into the administration and
—" of the General Hos-
pital.

Dr. Hallinan was accompanied
by his wife and they were staying

at the Hotel Royal.

a «»
Spent Three Weeks
ISS JOAN CHIMMING, typ-
4 ist of the Trinidad Match
Factory, returned to Trinidad on
Tuesday by B.W.1.A. after d-
ing about three weeks’ holiday.
She was staying at ‘“Leaton-on-
Sea”, The Stream.
«> “>
Second Visit
R. AND MRS. E. FRENCH
and their two children were
arrivals from Venezuela on Sun-
day by B.W.I.A. for about three
weeks’ holiday and are staying at
the Hastings Hotel.

Formerly a Major in the British
Army, Mr. French served in the
Far East for fifteen years. He re-
tired in 1946 and joined the Shell
Group in England and went out to
Venezuela the same year.

This is his second visit to Bar-
bados, the first being about 20
years ago when he spent a short
holiday here. He told Carib that
Barbados is an ideal place for a
holiday and he had always wanted
to return, but this was the first
opportunity he had got.

<>? «>
Welcome News

ARIB is pleased to learn that

the Cabaret Show- and Man-
nequin Parade, which was such a
success at the Drill Hall on Satur-
day February 4th is now being re-
peated at the Globe Theatre on
Tuesday Feb. 21st.

There are to be added numbers
to this programme, which is in
aid of the St. Philip Baby Welfare
Centre and the St. Thomas Child
Nutrition Clinic, and what with
these extra attractions the show
should be a bumper success,

A plan of the seats can be seen
and booked daily between 9 a.m.
and 4 p.m. at the Globe.

ao «<2
U.K. Director Leaves

M® VICTOR ERCOLANI,

Managing Director and
Chairman of Cabinet Industries
Ltd., London, returned home via
Trinidad by B.W.1.A. yesterday
after spending about four weeks’
holiday here. He was accompan-
ied by his wife, Dr. Ercolani and
they were staying at the Windsor
Hotel.

«a» «>»
Adieu!

HE H.M:S. “Devonshire” left

Barbados last night for Trini-
dad. For almost everyone of
them it has been a most enjoyable
stay. There were quite a few
Cadets at the Aquatic Club yester-
day afternoon and they all said
how sorry they were to have to
leave, and by the looks of the
many young ladies who were also
down there, it would appear that
it was not only the Cadets who
felt that “Parting is such sweet
sorrow.”

«>» «>
Comings and Goings
ON. H. A. CUKE, OBE.,
M.L.C!, and Mrs. Cuke and

Hon. G. D. Pile, M.L.C., returned
from Trinidad by B.W.I.A. on
Tuesday.

* + *

Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Triming-
ham, returned to Trinidad yester-
day by B.W.LA.

* on” *

Mr. Colin Williams of Black-
mans St. Joseph, also left for
Trinidad by B.W.1.A. yesterday.

Cs + *

Mrs. E. Archer, Managress of
Hotel Windsor, left for Trinidad
on Tuesday by B.W.LA.

* a *

Mr. Tony MacAndrew, Man-
ager of J. B. Leslie’s Insurance
Dept. in British Guiana is here on
a short business trip. He arrived
yesterday by B.W.1.A. from Trini-
dad and expects to return on
Tuesday to British Guiana.

* *

Dr. Steve Bennett, Veterinary
Surgeon, arrived yesterday by
B.W.1.A, on ae one day’s visit.

* ae *

Mrs. M. B. Watson, left yester-
B.W.1LA, to spend three
weeks’ holidays with her family in

day by

Trinidad,
* os .

Miss Marguerite Rollock,

Bryan’s family in Maraval.
will be in Trinidad for Carnival

Mr, Bryan is Senior Clerk in the

Post Office,









Sole Selling Agent for

MEN'S AVENUE SHOES

$14.40 per Pair



ac-
companied by Mr. and Mrs. Wal-
ter Bryan, also left yesterday to
spend a short holiday with Mrs.
They

Americans

‘Seek King’s:
Shirt Style

AMERICAN business men are
bidding for deliveries of a new
sports style shirt which the King
has helped to design. One buyer
is flying to Britain to see the
shirt-maker — Mr. Jack Izod — to
find out how soon the shirt can
be mass-produced and exported
to the U.S. at £5-7s.6d. each.

Mr. Izod is 80. At his Thames-
side home yesterday he said: “It
will be the biggest export of the
year in men’s wear. The Ameri-
cans will be ordering in
thousands.”

Details of the shirt are secret.
Even staff at Mr. Izod’s London
showrooms ~in Hancver-square
are not allowed to see copies.
The first shirt to the King’s
specifications is locked in the
showroom safe- It is made of
knitted wool and silk and is
known as the “pullover shirt.”
A factory in Hawick, Scotland,
made it after special alterations
to the textile frames. 4

Said Izod: “The King ordered
his shirts last November. It was
to serve a double-purpose—allow
complete freedom of movement
and ensure maximum warmth.
He wanted the shirts for shoot-

Mr. Izod will only say that it
is similar in design to the dozi—a

knitted shirt he invented for
tennis players and golfers 30
years ago.

London Express Service.

Guide To

Housewives



Today’s Prices

MACKEREL:
Pickled—24c. per lb.
Canned—36c. per Ib.
PILCHARDS:
Canned—33c. per 1-1I6 tin
SALMON—Tinned:
(a) Red—77c. per 1-16 tin
4lc. per }-Ib ,,
(b) Chum 48c, per 1-16 ,,
26c. per 4-1b ,,
(c) Pink—56c. per 1-1b ,,
30c. per }-Ib ,
Pickled—30c., per Ib.



cCROSSW

ORD
3



Across
1, Pusm ahead while the this
ood. (5)
o. Before going up, remember that
it has its dangerous descents. (4)
8. This ple is sweet. (5)
0. Here’s love ir Yorkshire. (8)
1. Hard rock of igneous origin. (5)
2. Kind
4
2
7
9

1

1

1 (4)

14. Now this will be hard to find (4)

15. The female of some species. (3)

17. Brings up one way. (5)

19. Peculiar finding it im good
dresses. (3)

21, Sort of measure you may get at
a pinch, (3)

22 Copy the bird when its late. (3)

23. Rope for a smali hole. (4)

25. Disorder. (6)

26. See that your answer's correct

(6)
Fy around this tor the ‘arder
(3)

DowD
Boiling without Crosby. (3)
3 Being ruined one must get used
to the change. (6)

4. Symbolic of silliness. (5)

5 Take the measure of the vel
rope. (3)

6 Where the vet ran to” (6)

7. Close even for a miser. (4)

8 He is in the wrong. (7)

9 M@ke Peri next to teing un-
skilled. (8)

ls Even in solo there are thirteen
ike this one. (5)
14 it may be a help to pic:
or possibly a hindrance )
i6 Scent that ts almost odd nelong
ing to us. (5)
is The lady has risen to attract
20 Regulation. 14)
4 May start an ovation (3)
Soiution of vesterdavs vu c Across
,



(6)

Spokesman 7
fi. 12, Envy:
». Pus








some
Down:
Matrix, ¢

WATCH FOR....
- HiGh





am concerned Paris can keep it.

If their designers imagine that
this ugly line will please the
world, as the New Look did in
1947, they are going to be disap-

Balmain showed these 15} ins.



KISMET, THE RA



HELSEA artists consider Kis-
met Shahani (pictured here)
one of the most beautiful models
they have seen. She is 20, was
born in India of an English mother
and an Indian father. They
brought her to England when she
was two. She now shares a flat
with a girl friend at Hove.

Kismet began posing at 17,
used to work at Brighton and vari-
ous London art schools for 5s. an
hour. A month ago she came to
Chelsea in search of more lucra-
tive work.

By the time portrait painter
A. E. Egerton Cooper had done
three heads of Kismet news of
her beauty began to get around.
Then James Proudfoot painted

Paris Can



Shapeless Look

SO the flapper look has come
back. Well, don’t say I didn’t
warm you.

The flattened shapeless silhou-
ette of the 1920’s is being pushed
by almost every leading Paris
fashion house. And so far as I

pointed.

I suggest that English women
will ignore it.

At the finish of Dior’s 24 hours’
dress show his overheated,
overcrowded, over-perfumed
salon in the Avenue Montaigne,
champagne flowed as the audi-
ence screamed their appreciation,
kissing and embracing Dior and
congratulating him on another
wonderful collection.

in

. “we
Straight Skirts
AND of all the hideous 1920
clothes I have seen Dior’s were

certainly the most wearable.

Day dresses are sleeveless, with
low U-shaped or rounded neck-
line. They have straight bodices
pulled in with a belt.

Skirts are straight and tight or
sometimes with pleatings from
the hipline.

At Jean Dresses’ midnight show
we saw day dresses with long
trailing chiffon scarves.

from the floor. His evening

dresses are one inch shorter.
There are lots of buttons on

day dresses. Dior showed dresses

buttoned along each _ shoulder Roy AL Worthings
and down each side, Another oe ;
designer showed dresses which OPENING FRIDAY AT 8.30 p.m.
can be worn sleeveless or with NO SHOW TO-DAY
the sleeves buttoned on. Baie
The sash returns for day and LASSIE£ in
evening wear. “HILLS OF HOME”
Orange Popular ial
THE short evening dress 1s 5 cadens 0 nach iee
more popular than ever. It is Edmond GWENN—Tom AKE,
made now in the straight, sleeve- Donald CRISP—Janet LEIGH
less 1920 style, fringed with jet i
or crystal beads. Drama, Action, Thrills, Romance
Suits have long rounded revers | | It’s the best week-end Show
buttoned below the waistline
(more 1920 influence here), with SATURDAY NIGHT 8.30
straight tight skirts.

Most popular colour is orange,

TYME”
&

17th MARCH.




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AEE

GE

During the

her in the nude.
22 sittings his studio was visited
by many artists.

T. C. Dugdale, R.A., says: “She | proudly, “She can make an Irish |

almost made me break my rule
never to paint any woman but a
fair-skinned one.”
‘My Best Model’

Sculptor Barney Seale com-
ments: “T have never seen a
mare exquisite combination of
beauty in face and figure.”

And Proudfoot calls her
best model he has ever had.

Kismet has an urchin crop of
blue-black hair. Her eyes are
such a dark brown as to be almost
black.

“Burnt sienna”,
calls it.—L.E.S.

Keep The

the

Proudfoot

so difficult to wear. It is shown

with grey, with black, and with

white.

Some hats I saw looked as if they
were made from wood. They
were shaped like the roof of a
house, and one imagined they
had been knocked up by a car-
penter rather than created by
a Paris milliner.

Bangles Back

BUNCHES of radishes were
used as buttonholes. Two de-
signers showed black satin pan-
taloons peeping beneath full lace
skirts.

Bangles are back. They are
worn high up the arm above the
elbow, and you will wear them
with strings of beads again.

The beads are twisted several
times around your throat, then
knotted hanging to the waist.

nl e

Large Ear-rings

EAR-RINGS are large and
dangling to the shoulder, and
you top all this with a long cig-
arette holder and with shoes with
long pointed toes and the old
shape Louis heel.

The mannequins
and beautiful, and they need to
be to wear these unbecoming
clothes. The ordinary woman at
home of medium height with
wide hips would look as if she
was wearing a fancy dress cos-
|} tume if she walked out in this
1920 Look.

—L.E.S.

===








were young



While Sailor Sam
ing the horse Rupert remembers the
crumpled bit of paper in his pocket,
and now he opens it out and ex-
plains how Beppo had led. him ‘to
the place where he found it. Sam

fooks at it carelessly. Then he
stares more alertly. “* This is very
queer. very queer indeed,"’ he



A Singin’ |
Hinny

People who have heard or sung
the old Northumbrian folk song
“Billy Boy” will remember that
Billy, having announced his in-
tention of getting married, is sub-
jected by his mother to a merci-
less cross examination as to his
bride’s matrimonial qualifications.
When mamma asks, “Can she
make an Irish Stew?” Billy replies

Stew and a Singin’ Hinny too.”
But how many of the people who
sing the song with a fine appre-
ciation of its rousing tune but
secant regard for the words know
what a Singin’ Hinny is? Margar-
et Sheppard Fidler set any en-
quiring minds at rest in a recent
B.B.C. broadcast when she told
listeners not only what a Singin’
Hinny is but also how to make
one. It is a sort of large girdle
cake, which can be made with the
minimum of effort and is cooked
on a large flat girdle or the hot
plate of an electric cooker without
using the oven. It is made with
flour, fat, a good helping of dried
fruit and a trifle of salt and when
cook it is split open, spread liber-
ally with butter and served hot.
But why Singin’ Hinny? Because
this delectable cake makes a pro-
testing “singing” noise as it sits
grilling on the girdle.

Wits Tester

FOR a deceptive trick, take a
handful of matches or tooth-
picks, place ten ona table, remove
six and leave none. Use any
method you like, so long as no
matches are broken or crossed.
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CARIBBEAN TRAINING COL-
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Prdgramme of Spirituals
Popular Songs assisted by Sedric
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I
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Paulette GODDARD— William
Oscar HOMOLKA





ROXY

LAST SHOW TO-NIGHT AT 7.30

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The VICIOUS CIRCLE

and

The Dead Don't Dream



William BOYD as

Hopelong Cassidy



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BATMAN and ROBIN





—_#o_o~oeo—==eRmnmPP-V_|[—_——DJT#xTFHOOOOeeeeeeas”'"

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ne

and the













































se hy

Caravan ~22

ee,

mutters, ‘* This isn’ Written
English, It's low Spani

on earth is it doing h ms Wha
since | saw. this Anat Ws

can't understand much of 3% :

frowns as he tries to

meaning. Then as he ea 4

very end of the message §
sees him give @ violent an

j est
a «nen
& a*

eo

Tio |
Fa ue
|
eee

“7
Directed by
rj

Ns

HOWARD HAWKS

Opening FRIDAY, 177 , .
2.30 Matinee

at the
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Extra!, Extra!

India’s Prime Minister Jy
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TONITE 8.45 P.M. (ONLY)

AND
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It’s the Globe’s 1st DOUBLE



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Do you believe in FACTS or FIGURES

The Grandest
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will be held at 4

GLOBE

On TUESDAY, 21ST FEBRUARY at 8.30

THE FIGURES ARE—You just sit tight and see this
brother, You'll see the best figures this

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"a

side of heaven.



nit, sit, oft 1
gft, oft. 10
sft. 10ft.






rf
quuRSDAY.

—

Cyechs Overrule
Church

Appointment

PRAGUE, Feb. 15










by

nn



has installed a Roman The annual

priest of its choice as Australian Burea
‘ng administrator” of the perimental Stations»
“of Banska, in Central refers

jal Slovak news agency that

















oy n Catholic priest
peste vet (42), son of an
ural labourer, = aon
F jshopric, where the
Ee oe skrebik died .on
wary 8. ,
me news agency said Dean
whet had aeusaced Dean Dr
“3 Briedon, who “without the
the State, was appoint-
a] Vicar of the diocese
n informed of the atti-
‘the State Church office,
”

¢

ding to the news agency,
ster of Banska on January
t consulting the State
Chureh Affairs, elected
4ion as Capital Vicar.

Slo branch of the State
for Church Affairs repeat~-
d the Chapter against
dings, and repeatedly
» were to be consulted by
in accordance with
wisions of the new Church
it was stated.

Cl

—Reuter.



ed the nomination by js jn

.

FEBRUARY 16, 1950



Australian

Sugar

me Czechoslovak State Office Progress

Geclesiastical Affairs, annulling
ee een Catnede SYDNEY, (By Mail)

report of the
u of Sugar Ex-
for 1948—49
_ to long delays in the in-
ation of equipment and shows
while field and mill labour
iproving, ‘the supply is still
not comparable with pre-war
years,

The report showed, however,
that the 6,000,000 ton cane pro-
duction record of 1939 was broken
by the season’s 6,433,556 ton
output. Sugar production of
910,049 tons was 338,000 tons
higher than that for the previous
Season—an increase of 59%,
although harvested acreage,
while still 7,153 acres short of the
1940 record, only rose by 17%

stall

iyo.
Average cane and sugar yield

per acre also rose to new heights
of 24.88 and 3.52 tons respective-
ly, beating the 1939 records of 23.14
and 3.4 tons, while yields in. the
Lower Burdekin district, Queens-
land, responsible for 14 per cent
of the total Australian crop, rose
to as high as 34.08 tons of cane
and 5.14 tons of Sugar per acre.
The report adds that this was
only one-year cane and could
justifiably be considered with the
world’s best.

Sucrose content of the cane
was also higher than for the
previous two seasons, but could



little blue crocuses, don't you

Election News



“Lilienthal
p timis tie

NEW YORK, Feb. 15.













,

world.”

& Lilienthal also unequivo-
































icy on the Hy

— Reuter.



Bie Ill With

“Influenza

PVATICAN CITY, Feb, 15.

Pius XII, who has been
since yesterday with influ-
fiad today partially lost his
) A speech which he was
we made tomorrow to Catho-
malists holding an Interna-
Conference here will be
in writing. The Pope’s
$said the Pope was suf-
P inflammation of the
#, but there was “‘no cause
i

Pope's condition was re=
@this morning to be slightly
with a temperature just
Normal. Vatican officials
he Pope’s enforced rest may
the pains in his left
wich have been recently
him to limp.—Reuter.



i Tow Burnt
Ship From

Venezuela
10 BREMEN

BREMEN, Feb. 14,

b m ocean going tug
has left here for Puerto
Venezuela to pick up
to Bremen the burnt out
Plykary. The Bombay
d by the Bremen shipping
which bought the

wkary is expected to be
Service again after ex~

in a dockyard here.
PBombay is expected to com-
trip in about four
uter

es

Fire Siren;

| iidings Burn

MISSOTUT, Feb, 13.
Sifen iroze at Mond
wun, and half a block

mes in the m

P ain business
t burnt out while a tele-
tor called each mem-

Volunteer fire ig
r,
. '

Mies
COATS

FOR
Wt Evening Wear

BB ire

a
ia
.

ade




PMOERN DRESS
SHOPPE
St.

Bridgetown





David E. Lilienthal, whose
on as Chairman of the

States Atomic Energy
jon becomes _ effective
y said that he did not “share
p predictions about the end

New York Times reported
n Washington today that Mr.
made this conment after
ell visit to the White

endorsed President Truman’s
rogen Bomb and
Energy in general, The



}

not compare with 1939, when one
ton of sugar was extracted from
6.77 tons of cane.

The report assertéd that the

higher cane output was due to the
introduction of three new types

the old-established species.
—B.U.P.

Widespread
Demand For
World Sugar

LONDON, (By Mail).

Czarnikow’s latest sugar re-
view, after reporting that the
Ministry of Food and Common-
wealth producers are now work-
ing on the basis of 1950 sugar
price of £30-10s. a ton cif. U.K.,
describes a widespread demand
for world sugar and a livening of
the market,

Ireland has bought 30,000 tons
of Cuban raws, Switzerland,
France, Holland, Belgium and
Greece are other customers, and
it is rumoured Cubans have also
been placed to the UK,

The strong possibility that cur-
rent Indian production may be
short of satisfying home demands
suggests she may have to import.
Sterling sugar will be difficult for
her to get and she faces a cur-
rency problem if she wants
Cuban sugar.

(Though Czarnikow’s do not
mention this point, it would ap-
pear that if Indian produé@tion
continued to lag in future years,
here would be a good market
for the unguaranteed Australian
surplus),

A very discouraging view is
taken of the future prospects of
Formosan sugar, yields are poor
and the political situation diffi-
cult.

The surprise reappearance of
Puerto Rican sugar on the world
market failed to shake it—another
reflection of the strong demand.

Canada’s sugar crop for 1949,
says the Canada and Dominion
Sugar Company, has been the
largest in history at 100,361 long
tons.

Prague’s sugar news estimatcs
European beet sugar production
for 1950, (excluding Russian) at
6,859,133 metric tons raw value—
over 30,000 tons below last year.

On the basis of a total output
of 4; million (Spanish) tons, the
Cuban crop has now been allo-
cated as follows:

World quota 925,000 tons
Special Reserve 1,000,000 tons
USA and retained 2.600,000 tons
Loeal consumption 225.000 tons
B.U.P.



Human Rights
Court Urged

THE HAGUE, Feb, 14.

The establishment of a Human
tights Court at the peace palace
here to handle all problems aris-
ing from the alleged violation of
personal and national freedom
vas urged to-day by Professor H.
Bruggman, Chairman of the Eu-
ropean Federalist Movement deal-
ing with the reserve shown by
Britain on European Unity, Pro-
fessor Bruggman said that Hol-
dand’s role is an important one
of being a link between such hes-
itants as Britain and Scandinavia
and the more enthusiastic coun-
tries like Belgium, France Ger-
many and Italy.

An official spokesman said that
another official had mentioned
to the Foreign News Agency re-
porter earlier to-day that he had
read in the newspapers. three
}months ago of the arrest of a man
in Hanover, who was alleged to
have wanted to kill the President.
| The man, this official had said,
|turned out to be a lunatic, and
was now in an asylum.

The official said that he men-
, tioned the reported case in sup-
'port of West German Chancellor,
/Dr. Konrad Adenaeur’s proposal
‘for a Bonn Police Force to pro-



| tect the Government and Parlia-

ment

—Reuter.



ASK DELAY
SPY TRIAL

WASHINGTON, Feb. 14.
Representations have been
to Hungary to delay the
Robert Vogeler, Execu-
the International Tele-
and Telegrai i
ho is due to face espionage

harges in Budapest next Friday

j —~(Reuter.)

which have supplanted some of



From Britain

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

LONDON, (By Mail)

Our election is not warming up.

With only ten days until the pol

experienced election agents are

fearing that the proportion of
voters coming to make their mark
on Thursday 23 will be the low-
est in this country. That is the
best consolation Conservatives
can find at the moment. For the
tude of opinion seems to be run-
ning steadily against Mr.
Churchill’s valiant campaigning.
But it is Labour that depends on
“getting out the poll”—the phrase
used for getting as many as pos-
sible to vote.

The weather does not help the
politicians to persuade people to
come Out at night to their meet-
ings. Most of Britain is now
under.a deep dank cloud—a ter-
rible contrast to electioneering
days in the Summer of 1945. Lord
Beaverbrook has arrived in this
damp England from the Sun {f
the West Indies. One newspaper
—aot one of his own—reports
that he is already expressing dis-
approval of the nice peaceful
election we have been enjoying.
But one of his own newspapers,
“The Evening Standard,” nas de-
clared that the “phoney election”
is now over and the gloves are
off. According to this paper,
though, it is Winston Churchill
who has wakened up the sleepy
combatants, And there is some
truth in that. The hard smacks at
Socialist electioneering — mainly
at promises that take no account
of the perilous trade position of
Britain—have come from Winston
himself, Anthony Eden has
made the greatest Conservative
success, in the “persuasive” line,
with a radio speech a week ago.
Labour speakers are still trying
to refute him. Eden, incidentally,
gave a comparitively large seg-
ment of his radio time to Foreign,
Commonwealth and Colonial
questions. He gave the impression
that if Conservatives win the
election he would like to return
to that spacious room overlooking
the Horse Guards and St. James’s
Park where a Foreign Secretary
makes his decisions. Though this
is his personal inclination, no
doubt, Eden is picked for the
place as Leader of the House of
Commons and Lord President >f
the Council the place Morrison
now holds at Attlee’s right hand.
Listening to Anthony Eden it was
noteworthy that Conservatives
have now adopted the technique
Labour used in Opposition—in
the past. He tried to explain
economics and government as a
difficult science—rather than
rely on catchwords and slogans.
This time, it is Labour that is
playing the electoral game with
slogans

On Plymouth Hoe

The brightést fight of the elec-
tion, a little spot of fire in the
damp world, is the election fight
between Michael Foot, the Labour
champion, and Randolph
Churchill Winston’s adventurous
son, in Plymouth. The Labour
member, Michael, an acid Foot,
won in 1945 by just over two
thousand votes—a small margin.
These two principal contestants
are both journalists and wits.
Randolph Churchill, taking over
the battle from Leslie Hore-Beli-
sha, (of yellow beacon fame), calls
himself a “Conservative Liberal
—Hore-Belisha was a Liberal by
origin. Michael Foot, now one of
the Labour Left Wing, is also «
Liberal by origin, in another
sense. He was brought up in a
famous Liberal tamily. His
father. Isaac Foot, sits like a
prooding Nestor, watching the
tate of his sons—two Liberals
and the Labour Foot, all fighting
this election in the West Country

Winston has sailed ‘— to
Plymouth in support of his son,
who advertised the meeting with
the unfilial phrase, “Come out on
Thursday and give the old war-
horse a cheer.” Churchill, (the
elder), gave his audience a fine
show; and Nye Bevan came down
just afterwards to give the Labour
Foot a leg up. This is one of the
seats into which the two main
parties are throwing everythin:
they have got. And Liberals are
intervening in the middle. Their
candidate, Mr. Cann, has been
many things in his day. He
learned platform speaking as 4%



- . 7 ¢
Conservative speaker and for
rile W : I lk wer t Sir
hut ai 2
Oswald Mosley bu u for
month eighteen yeal



Mr. Cam Michael Foot marric
recently the brilliant, yound ar
independent film producer iil

Craigie, who made a_ serious
minded tale of Plymouth and how

it should be replanned — called *aucer-shaped object appear from
‘The Way we Live.” The film the southeast with a yellow band
was propaganda he tou, ay. round it”

S propaganda for town plan In Buenos Aires it was reported
chance Nazi bombs had offered &t a large object, brilliantly a
to build a finer Plymouth. But oP and pink at the edges, flew. :

’ . - over Rosario this
morning shortly after midnight.

It was seen by hundreds of per
sons. who claimed that it lit u
the part of the city wherever 1°
passed as if it were daytime. Simi
crombie’s. I doubt whether you lar objects recently have been re-~
have seen Mrs. Michael Foot’s ported seen in Chile. -Reuter.

ning, and Plymouth, and — the

most of Plymouth still lives in an
uncomfortablé way—in the pres
fabricated bungalows of Labour's
plan not the “spacious living
terraces of Sir Patrick Aber-

films overseas — but they were
admired here. Michael, though,
is relying less on this indirect
Support, and his wife’s charm,
than on_ trenchant speeches,
violent denunciations and his

father told me a story of a man
on his death-bed. The parson

asked him if he was prepared to Catholic Press Meet

renounce the Devil and all his
works, The dying man replied
‘situated as I am I do not think 1

am in a position to make an enemy Tepresenting 16 nations will mee
of anybody’ ”. That, Foot im- here tomorrow for the third An-

can ' . Set nual
plies, is the position the Tories aoe hpe *
are in now — they need all the Press—Reuter.

friends they can find.
Irreverent Revelations

A Conservative new Spaper
columnist has it from a junior
minister, speaking privately on
the steps of the Labour citadel,
that this Labour Minister would
like four men of other parties
returned at this election. The
four are an old group. The Con-
servative is Quintin Hogg, the
present Oxford Member—lI expect
him to be returned, his opponent
is Lady Pakenham, the wife of

the Labour Lord Pakenham. This
Labour Minister also thought
W. J. Brown,, the Independent
member for Rugby, would be a
nice opponent to see back in the
House. (Brown has only a fair
chance—as the Tories have put x
up a man against him. Odd this %
—since he is one of the best anti- %
Socialist shots in the locker). K
Then the Labour Minister, (speak- ¢

ing, no doubt, behind his hand,
on the steps of the building Bevin
built), added two others to his x
non-party choices. Konni Zillia- |
cus, the Labour rebel, expelled ¥
for his Communist sympathies, ]%
and now anathema to Com- |X
munists for his Tito sympathies, | &
was mentioned in the same bre ath |
as Harry Pollitt, the Communist }%
leader. Reports from Gateshead | 2
indicate “Zilly” will probably | %
hold his seat — but I doubt | 9

4,

PROD

whether Harry Pollitt, or any|* o C oOo

other Communist will be there
to put Soviet questions in the next |
House of Commons. This total |
obliteration of the Communist |
party is remarkable—in 1950. It
makes the British “C.P.” the
weakest of Moscow’s brood
operating in Western Europe.

Which Labour Junior Minister
was it?

,

|

1

|

|

|

|

|

|

In Darkest Kensington
I went round a constituency in

West London, held by a Labour}

member, with the editor-in-chief |

of a group of Swiss magazines. |

The afternoon was gloomy and|

rainy. With the Labour membs« r|
and his “agent” we took stock of |
the residential areas, and the|
tenement areas, and all the “in
between”. Two remarks were
illuminating. After the Labour
stalwarts had admitted almost |
unanimous support in the ten- |
ements, 20% support in the|
residential areas and 50-50 sup-
port in the rows of small terraced
houses, the Swiss editor remarked
“It is a class war, isn’t it? What-
ever is said officially?” And the |
Labour Agent’s remark pointed |
out the two problems of a British
politician—getting out the voters
and being sure of the women. He!
said, “T would like to be an agent |
in Switzerland where the women |
cannot vote, and the men have to|

vote compulsorily!” ;*

Five Years Jail |
For Starting Fire
BORDEAUX, Feb. 14

Twenty-three year old Mat e|
Georgette Tibult has been sen-|

tenced he to five years hard}
labour for tarting one of the
res that ravaged ne
Crronae egi it
4 ave be
re i . «
owner of farm

— (Reuter. |

THE BARBADOS



'

ADVOCATE





Se ok ten







“hlying Saucers”

Seen Over Jutland

: COPENHAGEN, Feb. 14.

Two “flying saucers” over Jut-
land were reported today by the
Conservative newspaper “Ber-
lingske Tidensde”

The paper quoted a responsible
elderly couple for seeing “a



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A German
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great

Before announcing the verdict, |
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separately with a charge against |



Bernhard In Rio

RIO DE JANEIRO, Feb. 15,

( : Prince Bernhard of The Nether
acid wit. “Before long the Toriey lands

will be calling themselves Con- West
servative-Liberal-Socialists My —Reuter.

Von Koneringen, on leave of the



prosecution
investigations
Hedler was alleged to have said |
that Knoeringen worked during |
World War II as a Major in the}
British Seeret Service, and spied
against Germany.



member of the Right Wing German
Party, the smallest

Adenauer’s
coalition, was alleged to have said
Schleswig-Holstein,
last November, that opinion may

ROME, Feb. in Chancellor

Conference of the

right to poison Jews by gas, There
other means
During the



rid of them.
trial, Hedler and several friends
and party colleagues gave evidence
that he had thought of a Jewish
mass emigration to a Jewish State,
which was to be set up

Jamaica Governor

Banns Meeting

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Feb, 1!

The Governor of Jamaica to-
night banned a public meeting and
processions here following a strike
of Kingston hotel workers, whic!
began yesterday,—Reuter.

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BARBADOS

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Published by Thu Advocate Co. Lid., 34, Broad St., Bridgetows

~

PAGE FOUR
ADVOGXTE



naan cetera
Thursday, February 16, 1950

rn a ID
University College
THE installation to-day of H.R.H. Prin-

cess Alice, Countess of Athlone, as Chan-
cellor of the University College of the West
Indies is an important occasion. The cere-
mony among the emerging buildings on
a site ringed by the Blue Mountains of
Jamaica will be a picturesque and colour-
ful rite in a land which is full of colour. Its
importance is symbolic, the formal recogni-
tion of a fact. The University College is
in being; seventy under-graduates, eight of
whom are from Barbados, are in residence
and working for degrees, and the growing
staff of Professors and lecturers, constant-
ly recruited by new appointments, is at

work in teaching and research. The im-

pressive assemblage of buildings — Great

Hall, Senate House, Teaching Hospital,

science schools and five halls of residence

—setting their wide demesne of pleasant

grounds and playing-fields, will be largely

completed by the end of 1952.

The University is the freest and most
flexible of all academies of learning. No
Government controls or plans it. It owns
no higher authority than itself. The associa-
tion of scholars and teachers themselves
decide the statutes which they obey.
Older Universities are sometimes accused
of becoming hide-bound by their own tra-
dition, but there are few human societies
in which thought and the expression of
opinion has been so free,

The history of Universities is usually
traced to the Middle Ages, and Bologna,
Paris, Padua, and Oxford, with some dis-
pute ag to their relative priority of the
oldest Universities of the world. Perhaps
the origins of the Institutions are still
earlier. Athens itself where Socrates and
the Sophists sat among their listeners, and
Plato wandered with his in the grove of
Academus, has the quality of a University
city. The great concentration of learning
which began at Alexandria in the third
century B.C. was already of a more special-
ised kind.

The West Indian University College be-
longs to the people of these islands, with
those of British Guiana and British Hon-
duras, and is not administered by a Gov-
ernment Department. Here black and
white East Indians and Chinese, are al-
ready living and working sidé by side.
Of its staff, many are West Indians born.
Many are distinguished scholars from
Great Britain or other parts of the Com-
monwealth. Nor has any great University
closed its doors to foreign scholars. Know-
ledge knows no boundaries.

The foundation had its opponents among
gloomy prophets who declared that the
West Indian University would never win
respect for its degrees as against those of
older foundations. This objection is already
answered. The students sit for the exter-
nal degrees of London University, whose
standing is everywhere recognised and
famous. The West Indian graduates will
rank with those of any University in the
world. With this standard set, the future
will see the West Indian University con-
fidently granting its own degrees.

There can be no doubt of the special con-
tribution which the new Institution should
be able to make to human knowledge. A
great new opportunity has opened for re-
search in tropical medicine, Meanwhile
the interesting suggestion is often heard
among the general public that Civil Ser-
vants and officials from England might well
receive a part of their training here. Above
all perhaps, the new University should con-
stitute a unique field for research in social
studies.

The emergence of a West Indian Culture
is even discussed. The University will
probably be its chief centre and clearing-
house. Of West Indian culture, it has been
wisely said that if the emphasis is always
placed on the culture, a West Indian quality
will come of itself. All great cultures have
drawn on the vast stores of the interna-
tional past. When Hitler tried to make Ger-
man culture nationalistic, he degraded its
art and made its biology ludicrous and
despised. With application and research,
West Indian culture will enrich the inter-
national store.

|
|

THE



Ive Just Paid My Witch Doctor ..

With Bernard Wicksteed In Darkest Afriea
Despatch No. 2...

THE LOITA HILLS, Kenya.

I DON’T know what the ac-
countants will say when they see
my expenses for this trip, but »ne
of the items will be: “To buying
acow... £5.”

It wasn’t a very good cow, but
I needed it to pay my witch doc-
tor’s bill. Q

He’s rather a superior witch
doctor (or laibon, as they’re called
in these parts), and he’s the rector
of a witch doctor’s medical school
in the Masai native reserve.

I happened to say to somebody
in Nairobi that I’d like to meet a
real medicine man, and he said
there was a whole faculty of them
8,000 feet up in the hills
at Loita.

So here we are above
the clouds in a lost world
that might have come out
of Rider Haggard.

To reach it you drive
for more than a hundred
miles over the dusty
plains lying immediately
south of the equator.
Then you climb into the
&y up a series of brick-
ted gorges that are the
home of baboons and
leopards.

Suddenly you come out
at the top and spread be-
fore you are the rolling
green downs of England.
You might be in Susser
or Wiltshire. '

A dozen varieties of
little flowers grow in the
turf like buttercups,
daisies, and harebells,
and the hills are dotted
with bushes that look
something like blackthorn or may.

In these so-English surround-
ings it’s odd to find that the ani-
mals grazing by the track are
antelopes, zebras, and gnus.

*
Bone Rattling

About 40 hereditary witch doc-
tors live in this African Shangri-
La, but not all of them are in
practice. Successful witch doc-
toring depends so much on psy-
chology and a knowledge of hu-
man nature that you are not al-
lowed to rattle the bones or take
fees till you reach middle age.
Until then you have the status of
an undergraduate or a witch doc-
tor’s heir apparent.
The faculty at Loita was founded
about a hundred years ago by a
witch doctor who came down from
heaven and was found sitting on
top of a hill. He was so small that
the Masai herdsmen thought he
was a child and took him home.

Imagine their surprise when
they got him back and found that
he wasn’t a youngster at all but a
teeny weeny witch doctor.

fie married several of the local
girls, and all his male descend-
ants have been witch doctors ever
since. '

.
My Rheumatism
A dozen of them dressed in the
best bedside manner in Army
blankets were waiting for us un-
der a tree when our lorry bumped
to a stop. Besides blankets they
wore sanda!s made of motor tyres,

—_——

Political Newsfront

The art of the barrow: boy con-
sists in display. If he is selling
apples, for example, the large,
rosy ones will be at the front and
on top of the pile. But when he
serves you he takes apples from
the back of the mound And
these, very often, are not so good,

This art has been adopted by
the politicians. The rosy apples
of promise are in the Short
Manifestos. The less good ones
are tucked away in the longer
Party Programmes. The worst
are never displayed at all, and
are mentioned only in private.

Consider, for example, the
Short Manifesto of the Socialist
Party—the document called Let
Us Win Through Together. Here
the emphasis is on such things
as full employment and fair
shares. Well, we all want full
employment, and a love of fair
shares is native to us as a people.

In this document the Socialist
Party appears disarmingly as a
party carrying further the
Liberal tradition, It appears as
a reformist, not a revolutionary,



party
But if you study the Socialist
Party programme, the _ longer

document called Labour Believes
in Britain, you will get a very
different impression, Under the
powers for which the party asks
in this document, there is liter-
ally nothing that a new Socialist
Government could not do, and
nothing that it could not claim
was within the scope of the
‘mandate.’

Study with especial care para-
graph 6 on page 12 of Labour
Believes in Britain. In _ this



OUR READERS SAY:



Keep Your Eye On

To the Editor, The Advocate

your eye on the ball.

and instead of carrying little
black bags they stowed their
equipment in holes pierce d

through their ears.

There’s no bush telegraph to
Loita, but a bus runs once a week
and word had been brought ahead
by the driver that Bwana Beaver-
brook, friend of Bwana Churchill,
was sending up a reporter and a
cow,

In the Masai medical profession
they don’t ask for fees in advance.
It’s a case of “No cure, no cow,”
so we left ours to graze and gath-
ered round in a circle.



Muickstced and foiond
The Health Scheme

The situation was explained to
the panel something as follows:

“Your fame as medicine men
has spread to Britain, and this
man here, Bwana Bwernard
Bwicksteed, having failed to get
his rheumatism cured under the
White Man’s National Health
Scheme, has come to you with
this magnificent cow to ask for
your advice.”

The old boys didn’t believe a
word of it. They weren’t sure
what we were getting at, but you
could see at once they knew it
was some kind of gag.

Without even bothering to con-

fer with the others, the dean, or
head of the faculty, gave this re-
ply: “We can cure rheumatism
among our own people, but we
have never tried our methods on
a white man.
“If the Bwena-with-the-stinking-
pipe has sufficient faith to live
with us for a few weeks we might
help him, Otherwise our advice
to him is to go to the Nairobi Gov-
ernment Hospital.” .

The District Officer who had
brought me up*to Loita said they
were being cagey because they
thought we were trying to break
down their code.

“One of their sidelines is giv-
ing charms to cattle-thieves,” he
said, “If once we knew what those
charms were we'd know that any





paragraph it is proposed that a
new Socialist Government should
have three powers.

No Ethusiasm

The first is power to take over
any industry which is “In-
efficient.” Who is to say whether
an industry is inefficient or not?
Why, the Government which
wants to take it over. This is
an extremely convenient
arrangement, for the Govern-
ment anyway.

The second is power to start
up State enterprises in com-
petition with existing private
industry. What private industry?
Any private industry: No limits
are laid down for the exercise of
this power,

The third is power to buy up
concerns which are willing to

sell out. Up till now I have not
noticed any enthusiasm on the
part of private enterprises to

sell out or be bought out. Indeea,
quite a number of them have
been protesting at the top of
their voices at any such idea.

But this may not continue. If
I headed a Government with
power to start up any enterprise
I chose in competition with
private industry and could back
my enterprise with all the re-
sources of the State, I think I
could make a whole lot of enter-
prises willing to be bought out—
if only to save at least something
from the wreck.

These three powers
enable a Socialist Government
to do pretty well anything it
liked anywhere in industry. But
just in case anything should slip

would

By W. J. Brown MP
Socialist Barrow Boys

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

man found carrying them was out
on a cattle raid.”

when asked about the organisation
side of thetr profession. They have

and charge according to the pa-
tient’s means. :

en réally poor pay nothing at
a






AT the height of the Palestine troubles, |
The panel were less reticent |Hollywood planned the film Sword in the |

Desert. It was completed last summer.
the sliding scale system of fees{ This film misrepresents
Palestine and grossly libels the conduct and | 2 t==————

character of the British soldiers who did their pe

They don’t specialise. Every duty at that time. It shows them treating

witch doctor is a G.P., but it is
quite normal to catl in a second
opinion. They are middlemen be-
tween the Creator and the patient,
they say, and in difficult cases one
middleman isn’t enough.

Each patient has his
own registered medi-
cal man, just as we
have now, but he’s at Jib-
erty to change to an-
other if the first doc-
tor gives him permission.

If he swops without

getting
equivalent of filling in the
right forms—he’s liable to
find himself bewitched.
Cases of unprofessional
conduct are punished by
the MGM.C. (Masai
General Medical Council)
but they wouldn’t tell us
what conduct they con-
sidered unprofessional.
It certainly isn’t
drunkenness because get-
ting tiddly om beer made
from honey is often a

prelude to
diagnosis.

And it isn’t getting
familiar with your

female patients. It is

more likely that you’d be

owe unprofessional if you
n't.

Surgery

Your true medicine man won't
touch surgery. That’s a mere
artisan’s job. Even a white man
can be a surgeon. Indeed, these
days the witch doctors send sur-
gical cases to the European hos-
pital without much question.

In the old days, though, the
Masai surgeons would amputate
a limb, or remove a fractured rib
and put one from a sheep in its
place.

melted sheep’s fat, and they
sewed up the wounds with sinews
from the back of an ox. Until
the * wounds were healed the
patient lived on nothing but roast
beef.

This was all very interesting,
but it wasn’t the top secret stuff
I wanted.
Bwana Beaverbrook’s cow, now
grazing peacefully in the back-

give that.

I had the cow brought nearer
and asked what they did when
they needed rain. “Why,” said

the dean, “we do the same as
you. We pray for it.”

Go on, give him the cow,
Barney.

—London Express Service.
cexiapsipainicenieninenpesassicnenterniniie

up, there is another paragraph;
paragraph 7 on page 13.

This
“monopoly” industries. They
might not be willing to sell, and

to compete with them might be!
So this paragraph
industries,!to take place on private cinema premises, |

uneconomic.
proposes, for such
outright nationalisation.

The four powers taken
together, constitute a blank
cheque for Socialism. The field
of possible action is unrestricted.

The Socialist Party is not a
social reform party concerned
with social security and national-
ising only a few essential but
badly run-down industries. It
is a revolutionary party. Its
declared aim is the complete
Socialist State.

Ends And Means

Up till now the public line
adopted by Mr- Morrison has
been that it was up to those who
wanted nationalisation to prove
their case on the facts of the
industry concerned. It is now

will have nothing to do with the
decision.

The decision is already taken| are

on all cases, The decision is for

full Socialism. Extremist

They do not differ on the goal.
And if we don’t want the end

had better deprive them of the
means.

Beware the Barrow Boys!
(World Copyright mere?
—L.E.S.



13.1.50. It

amused me, and to tell


























civilians harshly and shooting up helpless
civilians and illegal immigrants. The critic
of the “New York Times,” Mr. Bosley Crow-
ther, rebuked the producer, Robert Buckner
of Universal-International, for portraying the
British as “stiff-necked cads.”

And.the climax of the film comes when the

underground Jewish army blow up a British
camp while the soldiers are singing carols
this—the Masai Jon Christmas Eve.

This is a film calculated to bring “a little
holiday in the heart” of the notorious Mr.
Hecht.

And it would certainly arouse the anger
and resentment of any British audience be-
fore whom it was screened.

Last week, Sword in the Desert was shown
for the first time in Britain at a Regent Street
cinema. Riot broke out among a section of
a difficult }the audience. Mr. Victor Mischon, Chairman
of the L.C.C. Public Control Committee, says
‘that this disturbance was created by “Fas-
cist elements of organised hooliganisâ„¢.

What happened then?
the Permanent Secretary of tre Home Office,
Sir Frank Newsam, sent urgently for the
Clerk of the Council and told him that they
had information that “there might be serious
outbreaks at the next performance.
was a possibility of grave risk of loss of life
and the police could not be responsible for
safeguarding the audience.”

In these circumstances the L.C.C. ordered
the withdrawal of the film, and it was not
Their principal disinfectant was|shown again.
for Universal International in London, later
stated that the film will not be shown any- |
where else in London. \3

So the hooligans have their way, they have |
banned the showing of Sword in the Desert |
Even the promise of | throughout the London area.
Absolutely irrespective of their views on
ground, wouldn't induce them to} this film as such, the public should take note
that this ban represents a great victory for
dark and totalitarian forces.

A group of men set themselves up against |
the peace; by violence, riot and disorder
they sought to impose their censorship over |
a legal performance which every citizen in |
the country was entitled to see and to 1a]
approve or criticise, enjoy or loathe for him- ||ly “4 si
self; and, incredibly, by one single manifes- | Been
tation of violence they have won.

This is totalitarianism in its vilest aspect,
and it has been allowed, without even a show |
paragraph deals with|of resistance, to flaunt itself and triumph in |

On the next day

There

Mr. Ben Henrey, spokesman

|

_ LE LE,



-

The Astounding Case Of,
The Banned Film

By Charles Ray

British policy in |





our very midst.

If conduct of this character is to be allowed |

there is no reason why any group, Fascist, |
Communist, Atheist, Religious, or any organi- |
sation holding any conviction should not |
adopt the same tactics to suppress what they |

detest.

There is no reason why they should not |
burn books, rush platforms, beat up news- |
paper sellers, or club down speakers. |

In the case of this film the public had |
available the supreme weapon of expressing |
their justifiable repugnance: they could have
stayed away.

No film company could afford to keep on

{a film in an empty West End cinema, poor
returns from the box-office would hit them
plain that the facts or the merits) Where it hurt.
Let there be no mistake. Wherever there
forces plotting for the overthrow of our
and] liberties wherever there are groups dreaming
moderate may differ on the pace.|of the establishment here of systems we
fought to keep from our shores, there is jubi-
on which both are agreed we) lation now, and much scheming as to how,
from the ground gained in Regent Street,
they may make further, bolder and more im-
pudent advances towards their evil ends.

The Ball Is The Cardinal Rule Of Cricket



SIR,—May I just make a short
comment on our cricket? Years ago
I remember we thought little of
our bowling, yet we noticed that
when we failed, it was our batting
which was at fault. This depart~
ment seems strong nowadays,
though it would be better to have
consistent scoring rather than owe
our seore to two batsmen. The un-
easy thought occurs—what would
happen if even one of these spark-
ling batsmen tailed? But it is
fielding I want to talk about. A
bowler once said “Give me a first
class fielding, and I'll get along
with second class bowling.” Have
you ever noticed what hearty
applause a nice quick bit of field-
ing evokes? Now our men stop the
bail but they do not gather it

cleanly. If you notice you will
see that eighty percent of the
balls stopped are allowed to fall on

erara boy

the grou! rt Der

are



E. C. JACKMAN,
Plea For Mullins
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—It is time that the Barba-
dos cricket selectors realise that
they are making a mistake to
cricket not only in Barbados but
also in the West Indies and the
world by the non-selection of Carl
Mullins to represent Barbados
against British Guiana.

Did not Trinidad allow Lance
Pierre to show his goods instead
of Jones in the second Trinidad-
Jamaica match? Is it too late to
select Mullins in preference to
Atkinson? I think not. Atkinson is
a good plodder, a good trier, but
Mullins is a natural fast bowler

Barbados selectors, will you be
so kind as to allow the West In-
dies selectors to see our other
fast bowler (King being one) in
action against the B.G. tear

L. De PEIZA-BARKER
Unity Lodge,
Mt. Stavdfast
St. James
The Story Goes
The Editer, The Advo
I I read an ar

correspondent






the truth, I thoroughly enjoyed his
little joke. It read thus: “It seems
to me that Mr. Gibson is right in
his opinion that pedestrians
should walk on the right side of
the road to face on-coming trafiic.

“Walking on the left side, peo-
ple so often step out towards the
middle of
avoid obstructions or thoughtlessly
—whilst in conversation and a
silent on-coming car almost on
them, even one step to the right
might be fatal.

“Walking on the right side of the
road this would not, happen for
they could see all on-coming
traffic.” It was signed A, E. Belle,
Windy Ridge, Paynes Bay.”

Now if we divide his article inte
four parts, it will be seen that the
first is based on an article by
Mr. Gibson, who stated that the
late Col. Dickens was a great ad-
minist nd he had a
ip, which if

ompel
ht

rator etc. et







the road—perhaps to *

then Col. Dickens is no exception
to the rule and from one mistake
ean follow many.

The second: If a pedestrian steps
out towards the middle of the road
to avoid an obstructon: that needs
no argument, seeing it is obviously
necessary.

Third: Pedestrians
the road thoughtlessly whilst in
conversation, and this will con-
tinue even if one could walk in
the atmosphere.

Fourth: It does not matter
which side one walks, he must
cross on-coming traffic, whether
real or imaginary.

The above facts having been
proved, Mr. Belle’s opinion can
be safely discarded.

will cross

We should all keep to the left
because it has become secondary
nature; e.g., if a motorist were
driving in a ‘bus and the beil
rang, he would unconsciously push
his right foot in the action of
applying the brakes, although at
the time he was not the actual
driver of the "bus, if one were
shelling peas and had to throw the
husks in the bin and the peas in
the bowl alternatively, before the
operation is finished he eventually

throws the peas in the bin and
vice versa.

If pedestrians were compelled
to walk on the right side of the
road, it would put an additional
mental strain on the motorist, as
he would have to think continu-
ally, I am walking or I am driving
as the case may be, and some
good day his train of thoughts
will collide, and having found
himself under an on-coming vehi-
cle, he would then be a victim of
the very circumstances which the
gods tried to help: so the story
goes.

(MRS.) ARTHUR CONLIFFE.
Bush Hall,
St. Michael.

Joy Ride

bi Editor, The Advocate

“O Music! Sphere-descended

maid

Friend of Pleasure, Wisdom’s
aid!

Goddess, why, to
denied

As I listened to the now fan
College Heralds at a recent rex
the above mentioned
was wafted into my
such was the

Why

ta}
lat,

station





mind, tor

captivating effect

|

—L.E.S.

these Heralds held on the entire
audience,

The youngsters deserve the
highest praise for they sang with
the verve of professionals, as with
gusto they simply excelled in the
various intricate parts, as they
gave us many excerpts from their
repertoire of songs.

_ Their conformity of timing and
singing was the epitome of antici-
pation, and it was particularly
noticeable that they ga'ned just
as much pleasure from their sing-
ing, as did the appreciative audi-
ence.

They have certainly



lessly, team work. the nucleus of |
success, has been «ainiy instru-|
mental in helping these buys to|
realise the fruition of their noble

efforts,

Accompanied by a taleuted pian-
ist, they certainly took us for a
joy ride a la musique, over many}
treasured isles of song ?

We thank them for their rare

» and aiso offer tiiem congrat
ulations on their past success
glories in the musical world

RICHARD CLANKKE
Stratford,
Black Ro

future

cK

made a
phenomenal rise since their in- |} FROZEN CANADIAN SAL-
auguration two years and, doubt- | MON





















TAURSDAY, FEBRUARY

—

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~_
THURSDAY, 16TH FEBRUARY
MONDAY, 20TH FEBRUARY
TUESDAY, 21ST FEBRUARY

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*

| quasDs¥, FEBRUARY 16, 1950

New Traffic| WT C.. |
Â¥ Vew frajjic Pk -
: Fecheme Is I. Court Of Appeal | Elee

| .
1 Not Finat Is Still Considering

Tis Si She Springer-Doorly Case |

onial Secretary told
the

THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Seamen Pledged
To Observe
Discipline

er eenng





tricity

| Trinidad | 4 piggieutt Order
Cuts

Sugar Talks

A Meeting of the Directors of
British West Indies Sugar Asso-
ciation (Inc.) was held at the
Treasury Building, Port-of-Spain
on Monday, 13th February, com-
menecing at 9 a.m.

A BANANA VENDOR yesterday
told an “Advocate” representative
that though she had been fined
| 40 shillfags already for selling the
fruit above the Schedule price.
she found it extremely difficult to
} obey the order.

;

'
|
THE power cuts imposed by
the Barbados Electric Company; The Seamen's Division of the
Wil] be soon at an end because; Caribbean Workers’ Union last
Some of the new parts for the| night passed a Resolution pledg-
engines have arrived and are! ing tnemselves to uphold the












, | being installed. traditi ; ; o ; :
Acting Colo _ . | e adition of the Barbadian sea-| The following were presen!:— She claims she buys it at the
D the “Advocate yesterday . The Springer-Doorly case 9 cupied : i wane has been announced a fort- men and to observe the necessary igua— Hon. A Moody Stuart same price, and that being so, she
ae lal cat West Toa Yd ese Jecupied the attention of the| Might ago, the new crank shaft discipline for the harmonious| {RB MC. (Director): Hon. J. C | could make no profit if she carried
_—_ vate has been drawn 1 t d th ian Court of Appeal again yesterday, Counsel com-| ®%4 bed plate for the new engine working of ships. | Barbades—Hon. Gb L. Pile, OB. | Out the instruction of the Order
ge Government Architect} © ro their arguments, and the Court announced that they | Sundes are S'S. Craftsman on| It was decided that a letter tAdviner) NO” HA. Cuke, 0.8 E | She reasoned that some provisior,
py ing Officer, but the} Will deal with a further point at 9.30 am. today. "| the manufacturing setts _from| would be forwarded to Mr. D. G.| should be made to make those

eae : > British Guiana—R. y
This is the Jue manufacturing firm arrived Leacock (Jnr.) telling him their (Director) : a. < Foulless-Senite










sector of Highways and es this > ‘ast appeal for the local sitting of the Court on| over. the week-end. They have| agreement, In the Resolution ee ta Mt. ‘Mbewood to anil apeiny soll okie tama
ae idea that it, would Poli me and it is one filed by, Sgt. Springer of the — © work: and it is hoped] was stated that the seamen re-| ‘feta: D. J B Bivia Orn B., | Price, In that case, she said, there
E Plce had, decid bring this into ae orce asking the Court to set aside and reverse an a estat ey will be work-| gretted any disobedience that (Director): A. C. Evelyn, Malcolm Smith’ | Would instantly be a noticeable
be impossi Victoria Bridge has er made by the Court of Error confirming aidecision of e oie Orily after they have| might have taken place and ae tek 5c aging citreniocs reduction in the number of cases
force Ut ed the Assistant Court of Appeal. : four w oe in three or/ unanimously pledged themselves} Trinidad) Hon OP E. Robinson, | Where the law is broken.
4 peen enlarged. Springer had brought a case)fact that : . ee time, that such would not occur again-| (Chairman), (Director): Comda. CS
Bi traffic | 28ainst Mrs. M. Doorly ; copies were yet to be! ip, : The Resolution was passed| Pyi2¢: Bric Johnson, W. B. Pyeit,
> under the full scheme, ; corly under the{laid before Parliament, and ther machinery which was ex- (Advisers) .
wring Trafalgar Square from = a Parking Regulations | plaining why such copies Mire pected to arrive by air has been| as°",® letter had been read from} Mr. Keith McCowan, Secretary
Street would not be allowed a 248, and a Police Magistrate | not so laid before the inst sent by steamship and is expected Mr. Leacock who regretted cer-| and Mr. C. G. M. Skeete, Asst. Ak
| jp swing right over the Chamber- | “Smissed the case. The Assistant | came into operation, Tument | to arrive in Ba tain circumstances had prevented

rbados on the SS. Secretary of B.W.I. Sugar Asso-

ppeal confirmed








: e whole way round through
- Bridge Street.
qi the full scheme was in-
“troduced therefore, the amount
~ o{souh-bound traffic over Cham-
" perlain Pridge was likely to be
Bi very
i been very noticeable, said
q : Ming Colonial Secretary,
shat motorists here have not yet
aught on fully to the idea of one-
way traffic and do not make full
De ot the right hand side of the

mA
A the corner of Pine and Cul-
joien Roads at about 7.45 a.m.
| Monday between motor car
“M647, owned and driven by Wil-
Ashby, of Dalkeith, and a
“hiovele owned and ridden by Gor-
“gon Clarke of Lodge Road, Christ
"Church. The cyclist was slightly




- @

ACCIDENT occurred at











HEAD LAMP of a bicycle
was damaged when an acci-

;
e
-— a
--

































































Mor tay.
me accident

Co, and driven by Duncan Evelyn
‘¢ Mount Standfast, St. James,
and a bicycle owned by Darnley

— Babb of the same a

pm. on Monday.
fith of Kellman’s Land, Black
; was involved in a collision
with motor bus M-730, owned by
‘the Yonkers Bus Co., and driven
Raymond Springer of Sharon,
)St. Thomas.

“A FIRE of unknown origin
broke out at Durant’s Plan-
Christ Church, at about
100 a.m..on Sunday and destroyed
Mj acres of first crop ripe canes,
' The canes are the property of
‘Mr. H. G. Ward and were insured.

& LOSS of two pine joists
4 was reported by John Hunte
of Halls Road. The joists are
‘Valued $1.44. He stated that they
‘were taken from his yard on
Tuesday.

WANGELENE SOBERS of

/ Villa Road, Brittons Hill, re-
‘jorted that her house was broken
_ iidentered between 7.00 p.m. and
1000 p.m. on Tuesday and cutlery
“ind other articles to the value of
‘$3.44 were stolen.

| BLAH PHILLIPS of Thorpes
+ Cottage, St. George: reported
a quantity of cabbage and
he, valued $8.40, was pulled
from her land and thrown on
“Me ground. The incident occurred
| Over the week-end,

MVE ACRES of second crop ripe
* canes were destroyed when a
Me occurred at about 2.00 p.m, at
‘Harrow Plantation, St. Philip. The
fates belong to Mr. D. S. Payne
Mthe same Plantation and were

N ACCIDENT occurred on St.
Barnabas Road at about 11.45
on Tuesday between motor
Mitty M-678, owned and driven
W Joseph Griffith of Bank Hall
a, and another lorry, M-1557,
ned by the Pine Plantation,
ddriven by Cedric Manning of
Helens, St. George.

The platform of M-1557 was

a
i

| NOTHER ACCIDENT occur-
ted on White Park Road on

at about 7.30 p.m. be-
Motor car M-2249, owned
Durant of Bush Hall and
een by Leroy Worrell of Hol- |
iS Road, and a bicycle owned
tidden by Seymour Douglas,
ot Holligans Road.

_bustace Simmons, who was on
Me Lar ur the bicycle, was wound-
head and also slightly
“on his right elbow and

Was taken to the General
sa, Where he was treated

ged. The frame of the
i teas the left front
- ead lamp of the car
damaged, ,

‘i

———

M0/- In 14 Days

A

fine of 40/- and 2/- costs
Posed on Oswald Boyce of|
wes Land yesterday by His|
i> Mr. H. A. Talma,
mas found guilty of driving
tor bus M-757 on the Upper
without having in _ his
2 an appropriate driving

|

- |

Offence was committed on
Alter 6 and he was given an}

* Hativ e of serving one
tbe ‘mprisonment, The fine
F paid in 14 days,

ly. In Seven Days

arent Tryhayne of Bagatelle, |
ts ;, S Was fined 10/- nad 1/-
; M defor} Paid in seven days or
ee Moric, undergo seven days’
’ hip Mr yesterday by His
Was fo; H. A. Taima

~ ound guilty of causing
" car T-52 to stop
Pek, “rea other
ie one, passengers
F was committed on

maiber 25

t

1





t

tri on a



=a
-

than for

Bridge, but would have to go c

involved motor|M.
‘bas M-272, owned by the General | man.

The van, M-2079, owned by|British Guiana, and Sir Cleme

| Allen spoke 0

| sort
provided that a copy of a statu- |

the

Repeating that the Court had

Philosopher on February 28th.

him from attending the meeting.

ciation (Inc.) were in attendance

magistrate’s decision, the task of blazin i The changes j
: ; ; g a pioneer trail, _CMhanges in the cuts have ; 3 ah

ae cae 6 spate is whether Mr. Whyatt said that in the light — F hanptituted to accommodate Mr. Le The Later 4 Po oy n-
time of the Sietene Valid at the of the authorities that he had Bell machines at Hanson and the arte — 's letter read: I of the Delegation aera wpe
alleged offence, they having bee | Siete tte trail was clearly fie Pumping Station. Because am Prepared to give assistance to| pi the Deleg percnaistine of the
signed by the "Governor, tt ow ie te nible. For the reasons that | °f the crop season, sugar factories Afte ‘thei alana ee H. A. Cuke, Mr. G. M gg ewe
up to that time laid before oot | the o8d_siven, he submitted that | 2%¢ in need of greater quantities 5 ey ne wile: Weare. Soe ee M. Kirkwood
Legislature for th efore the © appeal should succeed. ot water and so there can be no] Steen which would not carry out a ake a aoe irkwood,
approval. e latter’s|_ In reply to the Court Mr. | reduction of the power to the| ° discipline necessary uring egotiations in Lon-

Never Approved

It was brought
that the regulation
approved by the
They were revoked b
set of regulations whi
the same fate at the
third set.
approved by the Legislatur

Mr, John Whyatt” ‘i
ner General, w.

e Informant-Appellant
the point tha t

hat it w
had been in operation.
| As the case began yesterday
(Mr. Whyatt was associated with

occurred on Hastings Road, |Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor |
near Harts Gap, at about 6.35 a.m. General.

( Mr. Reece left
island yesterday for Jamaica,
his place was taken by

E. Bourne, Legal

the
and
Miss
Draughts-
Counsel for the

Respondent, Mrs. Doorly are Mr
E. K. Walcott, K.C., associated

| Hope of Dayrells and ridden by|with Mr. J. S. B. Dear and in-
d- | structed by Messrs. Yearwood &

Boyce.
The Court is comprised of Their

Chief Justice of Trinidad
Sir Newnham A,
Worley, Kt., Chief Justice of

nt

Daniel’s Bakery, Roebuck | Malone, Kt., O.B.E., Chief Justice
and driven by Thoral,of the Windward

and Leeward
Islands.

Mr. Whyatt was making his first
address when the Court adjourn-
ed on Tuesday evening.

Sanctions

Discussed

As Mr. Whyatt resumed his
address to the Court yesterday he
returned to the questions of
sanctions, and to a discussion of
whether sanctions were relevant
to a consideration of the provis-
ions which were being examined.
Citing a passage from the 8th
Edition of Russell, Volume JI,
Page 561, Mr, Whyatt said that
the principle was that where a
public officer was guilty of a mis-
behaviour in office by neglecting
a duty imposed upon him by com-
mon law or by statute, he com-

mitted a misdemeanour and was}
liable to indictment unless there |

was another remedy substituted
by statute.

If the particular statute meant
that it was a matter of public
convenience that those regulations
should be laid before the Legis-
lature, then the person who was
responsible for so laying them, if
he treated the duty with con-
tempt, would be guilty of a com-
mon law misdemeanour,
there was no statutory penalty
provided for.

Discussing whether or not
sanctions of any kind were neces-
sary when construing a_ provis-
ional statute as directory, Mr.
Whyatt said that in the case then
before the Court of Appeal, the
Courts below had so far said that
it might cause a great inconvent-
ence if they were to declare that
those traffic regulations were null
and void because they were not
laid before the Legislature, but
that they would still say they
were null and void because other-
wise they could not enforce the

duty which was imposed on the

public officer.
Another
z e * y
Submission

What in his submission the
Court below should have said was
that since to declare the regula-
tions null and void would work
an intolerable inconvenience to
those who had no control over the
person responsible for laying
them, they would not import the
sanction of nullification of the
regulations.

It seemed th
had argued thus: | ‘
are provisions which impose a
duty on a public officer, there
must be sanctions. Here are such
provisions, and therefore there
must be sanctions. The ease
premise should be: Where t ae
are such provisions, it is no
necessary or relevant one be Ae
the other to consider whether

sanctions.
en. Whyatt then recalled that
when he was reading on phon
Bee ft some suggestions
for overcoming the difficulties
arising from the use of vee
phrases like “as soon as poss a.
That difficulty was ne he _

y Instrume \

ge ae of United Kingdom

Legislation.

Wide Act

That Act which covered every
of subordinate legislation

e Courts below
Where there

tory instrument was required to
be laid before each House of Par-
liament after being made, before
the instrument came into opera-
But if it was found essen-

tial that the instrument should
come into operation before the
copy could be laid, it « ould
brought into operation, provide
that nd essential,

that if was
notification should
the Lord Chancellor
Speaker of the House ;
mons, drawing attention to



the

out yesterday | ence,
S were never
Legislature.
y a second
i suffered
hands of a
This third set were |

yatt, K.C., Attor- |
ho is appearing for
made
i t the fact that the
regulations were revoked showed
t as considered that they

Defendant- |



provision as to when such statu-
tory enactments came into exist-
they . should take
common law of England as a
Buide. He cited a principle taken
from a case appearing in 1918-1
King’s Bench Division to the
| effect that subordinate regulation
came into operation when it be-
came known to the public and
not when it was lying on the desk
}of the departmental officer who
made it.

If they assumed, however, that
j they came into operation when
| they were made, that date was
February 12, 1948. If they took
the day when the Governor sanc-
, tioned them, that was April 10.
If they took the date when they
became known to the public—
that is when they were published
in the Official Gazette, that was
|April 12. But whichever date
they took, it was a day certain.

For Defendant

| Mr. Walcott opening his address
| recalled that Mr. Whyatt had
;Stated that the facts of the case



AHE REAR END of a van was| Honours Sir Cecil Furness-Smith.| V® Pot in dispute. He recalled
' damaged in an accident on|Kt.,
White Park Road at about 4.50! (President);

,too that he had drawn to the
attention of the Court that the
|charge on which Doorly had been
j‘ried was dated June 7, and the
| appeal as would appear from the
record also mentioned that date,
whereas in truth and in fact the
evidence showed that the date
was July 7.

He was well aware that there
; vere cases in which the time did
; not necessarily entitle the person
}accused to an aequittal, but on
jthe other hand Their Honours
were in the position of being ask-
ed to send back a case to the
magistrate and to direct that
Doorly be convicted on the said
information, and that the costs of
the appeal be awarded to the
informant.

There was in this colony, pecu-
liarly enough, the right to dismiss
without prejudice.

Here Sir Newnham of Britisn
|Guiana said that he had intended
to ask the Attorney General if
that Court could send the matter
back—assuming that they accepted
his view—with an order or direc-
tion to convict, It appeared from
the Record, that in the trial be-
}fore the Magistrate, at the close

effect that there was no case io

of the defence as to the facts of the
case had never been heard.

; It seemed to him that the most
that the Court could do would be
'to send it back to the magistrate



since! With a direction on the point of

law, that was assuming that They
jaccepted the view of the Attorney
|General on the point of law.

The Court would not be pre-
pared to go into the question of
the evidence unless the defence
was prepared to admit that the
offence had been committed if the
regulations had been valid at the
time.

Is Date Material?

Mr. Walcott said he took it then
that if the case was sent back it
would be sent back on the ground
that the Court held that it was
immaterial whether the date was
June 7 or July 7.

Sir Newnham: Merely whether
the submission of Jaw made in the

rial was correct,

a Walcott said that in that
case it would not be in order for
the appellant to ask the Court to
send it back with a direction to
convict the defendant-respondent
on the information. Another point





would also arise: Neither the
Assistant Court vl Appeal
with its view that the
delay in laying the regula-
tions was 19 meetings, nor the
Chief Justice with his seven
meetings would be correct. The

‘true figure would be 13 meetings.

Mr. Walcott’s next point was
whether the action of all three—
the Director, the Governor and the
Lewislature—was needed before
the regulations could be deemed to
be in force. The Court would
notice, he said, that tne Magistrate
iso held, and both the Assistant
Court of Appeal, and the Court of
Error had held that the Governor 8
approval of the regulations would
make them valid.

Not Upheld

The submission of Counsel had
not been upheld in the Court
below, and he had raised the
question only because it was not
in the interest of a client under
any circumstances to give up any
point which was either uncertain,
or would be in the client's favour.

Mr. Walcott continuing said that
the learned Attorney General had
dealt with the failure to lay regu-
lations. He (Mr. Waleott) woutd
draw to the attention of the Court
that it was not a question of ~
i







ing regulations anymore than
}was a question of a ae
|resolution being sufficient to
| validate them. _ see :
| it s a question of their being

for
If

to the Legislature
of both Chamber

ne





tion of ar

on page 7

Whyatt submitted that when as
was the case here there was no

the

Belle Pumpin,

The
Company hopes
short time the e!
be working full
there will be n
cuts in the supply

g& Station.
that within

ult and

Dos Santos Is

B. W.1. A.

Chairman





The Hon. Alan Storey D. F. ¢

Manager of the Electric
ngines will all

that |
Oo necessity for |

4 |to engage any more Barbadian
seamen,

write them and inform them of
|the formation of the Caribbean
give another tria] toelocal seamen
enrolled by this union, It must
clearly be understood, however,
that if the Royal Netherlands
Steamship Campany engage to
employ Barbadian seamen again,
the men concerned will have to
behave in an orderly and discip-
linary manner on board.

nw. : I will not suggest that they
poet og announce that Sir| should submit to unfair treat-
ote os antos has assumed the ment, which I hope will not arise,
oe rmanship of that Company, | but they must be prepared to
a oe esiding at a Board Meet- | carry out the orders of the captain
Sern opened at Jamaica and ship officers and if they con-
a F sider any orde
BwWiAe Directors of the should still or ction attics
-LA., are: the s i
Air Commodore Whitney W see — eet
Straight, C.B.E., M.C,, D.F.C. | U

If the Union members clearly
understand this, I will write the



(Trinidad), H. O. B. Wooding,| Royal Net
. To > & , y herlands Steamshi
K.C., (Trinidad), G. G. R. Sharp, | Company i P
’ + P, | Company edi
O.B.E., (Jamaica), The Hon. Age Boag pcre ys

H. A. Cuke, O.B.E., (Barbados)
oe A.D.S. Murray (Manag
ing). a

New Vicar Of
St. Alban’s

The Appointments’ Board me
on February 14th and on_ the
nomination of the Revd. A. W



Johnson, Rector of St. James, the
Board appointed the Rev. Lloyd
Vernon George, Assistant Curate
of St. Benedict's, Manchester, to

be Vicar of St. Silas with St
Alban, in succession to the Rev

W. D. M. Woode. The new Vica
was formerly Assistant Curate a
St. Michael’s Cathedral.



Highest Rainfall
In January

THE rainfall for the month of

January was above the average

| In the majority of districts there
an
of the evidence for the prosecu~| which rain fell. The heaviest falls
jtion the defence had submitted in occurred on the 5th, 18th and 31st.

were approximately 20 days

The average total rainfall for

janswer. Therefore, the evidence! the Island for the month was 5.79
1.23
the
average for January for the past

inches, as compared with
inches for January 1949.,

one hundred years was 3.37 inches.
7 Not 17

THE

stated,



THE ¥89R3% TIMES

SURVEY OF THE COLONIES

A SEPARATE
‘PUBLISHED 1

WITH THE AIM of spreading an

affairs of the British Colonies as widely as possible, in
February The Times is publishing a separate 16-page

illustrated supplement dealing
aspects of the subject—financi

and social. Articles by authoritative writers are devoted to :

THE COLONIES AND

RECRUITS FOR THE

THE UNITED NATIONS TRUSTEESHIP COUNCIL
’ SERETSE KHAMA

THE MARRIAGE OF

THE ECONOMIC Sit
SPORT iN Al

WEST

date of the Revaluation
Conference to be held in Barba-
dos is the 7th of March and not
the 17th of March as previously

THE DOLLAR CRISIS
COLONIAL SOURCES OF RAW MATERIALS

The meeting was presided over
by Mr. J. W. Hewitt, Chairman.
Mr. Mottley offered an excuse
for Mr. Leacock. Mr, France,
Secretary, read the letter,



Oranges, Bananas
Again Plentiful

ORANGES and bananas are
again plentiful about the City,
Male vendors of the oranges with
their push carts and the women
,| With their trays vie with each
,|Other in the advertising of their
r| Wares, They fetch from three to
t|six cents each according to the
size and buyers are easily
attracted.

Bananas on the other hand, the
majority of which are of the smal!
variety and which the Schedule
Order has fixed at three for ;
penny are still being sold at one
cent each.

t





140,000 Tons
| Sugar In 1950
|

BARBADOS will produce
140,000 tons of suga: this crop,
according to the estimate of the
Department of Agriculture,

U.S. Workers Save
$3.024,985.08

-
THE savings of workers from
this colony in the United States to

January 31, 1950, amount to
$3,024,985.08, a release from the
Savings Branch of the Labour

Department has disclosed

aad

SUPPLEMENT
N FEBRUARY

up-to-date knowledge of the

with many important current
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obtainable from

UATION IN MALTA iy,
FEEDING AFRICA’S RISING POPULATION
RICAN LIFE
AFRICAN ART
AL NEWSAGENT — |
or direct from the Publisher, The Times

aboard ship, the Royal Nether-
lands Steamship Company told
us that they were not prepared

I am prepared, however, to

| Workers’ Union and ask them to

don with the representatives of
the Ministry of Food, the Colonial
Office, the Treasury and the
Board of Trade which commenced
in November last and ended in
January this year, I: was agreed
that the offer to the British Wes.
Indies was totally inadequate, and
that the Delegates adopted the |
right course when they decided |
to ask for an adjournment for:
the purpose of consulting the |
| B.W. Governments.

The Meeting also appointed the
same delegates to represent B.W_I.
Sugar Association (Inc.) at the
Regional Conference to be held
in Grenada next week. The dele- |
gates will seek the advice of the |
Conference as to the best course |
to be pursued, and the immediate- |
ly proximate steps which should |
be taken, }
_The Meeting was marked by the |

highest possible degree of |
unanimity and resolution, and |
terminated with votes of thanks |
to the Delegates to the U.K. for|
their services and to the Chairman |
the Hon. H. E. Robinson, fo:

'

presiding over the Meeting.

>

~~



3 Years Ago

(BARBADOS ADVOCATE, FEB.
RUARY 16, 1925)

At

1.40 p.m. on Saturday,
the North American and West |
Indian Squadron consisting of

H.M.S, Calcutta, 4,180 tons, 5 guns, |
bearing the flag of His Excellency |
Vice-Admiral Sir James Fergus-|
son, M.C.M.G., C.B., H.M.S, Cape- |
town, 4,190 tons, 5 guns, H.M.S

Constance, 3,750 guns, |

tons, 4
H.M.S. Curlew, 4,190 tons, 5 gun
and H.M.C.S. Patriot, 1,000 ton |

Lt. H. E. Reid, R.C.N., arrived on
a visit to this port for a week.

The “Calcutta” came from
Grenada, the “Capetown” from St.
Lucia, the “Constance” from St
Vincent, the “Curlew” from
Martinique and the “Patriot” from
Trinidad.

At 3.00 p.m. Vice-Admiral Sir
James Fergusson landed in an
official manner and was received
by a Guard of Honor of Police
under Lt. Col. M. D. Harrel O.B.E.,
Inspector General of Police, at the

Baggage Warehouse. He ws
attended by his personal staff and!
after inspecting the Guard, he

proceeded to Government House.
Shortly after His Exceliency the
Governor, Sir Charles O’Rrien
K.C.M.G., returned the compliment
by visiting the “Calcutta.”

There will be several celebra-
fions in honor of the fleet, for
the successful performance of
which the Legislature voted the
sum of £200.

a





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' Pa THURSDAY, FEBRUARY
: PAGE SIX THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE consents pianists RY i gh



















bs GOSSS999999066,

%

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# |
% ADVERTISE IN |
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; | “<
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“BABYS. DIGEST
swith A a
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BY WALT DISNEY a
) CPMAYBE HE'S RIGHT! COME ON: 1 we CANT S y
5 el lat ACK LS , Z
COME (ON: SUT oe) BECAUSE WE'RE one THAT GANG LL i
LETS SET OUTOF RUNNING AWAY 5 SINGLEVANDED! ||
HERE AND Save pp DDe e_ INSTEAD OF TRYING ( een
OuR NECKS! — ghee OA UP THE PF ihe oe
saat CRIME RING! : Sits
cena, ’ IT IS ONLY PLACED ON GOODS OF FIRST QUALITY.
a - ia
' Always ask for :

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If baby is to a
should, the bi xs t
perfectly suited to them Me!
fant’s digestive p
Careful checking and labon.

tory control throughos,
every stage of manufcus fe





—— wear

STRONG PEPPERMINT
LOZENGES



oo Se hE

BY CHIC YOUNG
TTT rit MTL













































































































































ii THY TATA ATR rm thin Hh | ensure that Allen
a OE ae A FI are adjusted to pro
3 a ' NOW I'LL HAVE TO FIND ~"

NO_ DEAR, IT'S | THE INK BOTTLE? | [SOMETHING ‘WRONG AROUND ji = — compl
Cs IN THE DESK OF YOU, DEAR, |? HERE, SOT CAN GET RID a! assimilation right from bin
fe WHERE YOU WHERE IT 21 | OF THIS GUILTY FEELING J : 4
; Sele el Wl eie r ~ A.S. BRYDEN & SONS (Bidos) LTD :
Â¥ N THE HOUSE Y We .

y
BROADWAY DRESS SHOP
will be closed on THURSDAY 16TH half-day and open
i SATURDAY until 4 p.m. in order to facilitate shopping for

: ( the passengers and crew ol og
; so i M. V. STELLA POLARIS â„¢

Aes | 4

4 \ : ,
me a p . } HROADWAY DRESS | f
i TOILET SOAPS HR RO ESS SHOP,’
h ' ’ IMPERIAL LEATHER @ LINDEN BLOSSOM@e BLUE HYACINTH © \ :
Nt acsineoencnipelagshtie-dieai aa tiated Aion Maile seteabanslibesineeesidiiaagictin-sele FRA SS SE
i} |
( ‘| In Time for the New Year!
. n il ar!
| | Without a shadow of doubt

° DESK DIARIES; PLATIGNUM PENS; PENCIL SETS; CRAW

FORD’S ASSORTED SWEET BISCUITS; GENTS T
i oe ee ew eo ew 6Whe Ridsile of the Bed Bomine, Sa PURSES and WALLETS; LADIES’ PURSES |
| ' iT 4 SILLY — WHO WAG HE At O AVE Tis Bi gox 43 RE ntl NS) i y > 3
[PF Bee ee canst | ere tener eceeand niece, centan® MEME teen ory Ses a, } COSMOPOLITAN PHARMACY
i i” ne oe Oe . md anes oes NAMED — ae “ § ° Day Phones: 2041 — 4442 3 NIGHT i

1° 3t T2\ HERE, ANYWAY 4 1 | ofe By THE 4 . ee g a oa ill
ple ae SRS

eel : Ny ra 6’ , ‘ "
ae LATEST ARRIVALS —
' * 0) For MEN: Working Boots and Shoes; Dress Shoes, - 4
For LADIES: Californians, Fancy Shoes, Sporties. a
For CHILDREN: Shoes for Boys and Girls, and ms

: a

me SBanFaBo 2

BRITISH CO,, ll

he | SPECIAL: Floor, Furniture, Linoleums, Car

' i BY GEORGE MC.MANUS | Wax-Polish ...........5+++: in

BRINGING UP FATHER y pil : “% - ™ l ~~ a a
‘of " | | | a —
| Ds ge ied |
THERE'S HUGO FIRST- T HEAR youR wire | oe t DOK SO |=) THAT : iad ’
T HEARD HIS WIFE WALKED OUT ON | THAT'S | . Ld i LO ke
| LEFT HIM- HE DOESN'T f° YOU LAST WEEK - | | RIGHT- | | DOWN ( é
= LOOK TK 1D HAF PY 5 : oy WOE Bi anes Ji } } "
+ ABOLIT - + I % sii ‘a
: a | The book that has set the world talking
as SEN GE _ BY ALEX RAYMOND | ) (] | \) | | \) | | | \
7 NEMS VALERIE GTONS | | JUST A MINUTE 5 C PY nc « AD 1 OBES SY
_ f aN’ I'M & PUPIL AT MISS FAINn’s| yt vS
YOUNG \ SCHOOL AN’ THE OTHER DAY I | | é
LADY, WHAT'S )_ GOT THE WHEPS Because T | |
YOUR NAMB® J | WAS SO LONESOME AN’ IT /| |
OBC 'CED TO RUN aAviAy
> A swashbuckling general who inspgred many a story, some
fieticious some true, to be told about hira while the fighting 4
in World War II was still at it’s height. a
Hollywood once tried to portray the character of this Ger- i



man General on the screen but they missed badly.





Here, at last, is the truth behind one of the greatest dramas
_FALK & RAY MOORES ever to come out of wh eed World War.
3 THE, se ARE TMs PORE ] Wisse What he thought of his men and his Italian allies !
He | | grocee on BOOKKEEPER 5 rom | , ve |
he ste ER OR BC What he thought of his foes; the men of the Empire !
> Le] ie ; How he was eventually murdered by Hitler’s Gestapo !
ey ph | ’
sf 1

Beginning in the Sunday Advocate, Feb {9th





|
|
oe -]





(

DA
















F pass, seerremeectesnereetieerene
CLASSIFIED ADS.















































































a

























THE

















BARBADOS ADVOCATE



WI. Court
Of Appeal







SE a ee

|“Gascogne” Arrives

PAGE SEVEN

:
900 Drums Colas |#e Wise. - - _
--- ADVERTISE

es





On Friday Evening

ON Friday evening next Messrs

Arrived Yesterday .



































































| Elders and Fyffes’ pass r li }
@ from page 5 os passenger liner OVER 900 : as | TRINIDAD BONDS
‘ “Gascogne™ is expecte ot drums of colas|
! 3 ted to call ivy ;
S ing a resoluti : ;,. | arrived in th S y ay
HOUSES ing a resolution for the purpose of] here from South while on its l Secu ‘Trinidad. The ts eat $3,360 3% due 1973/83 @. 97%
“LA VI hs, einen ak lwonrds sar tbe regulations. The| Voyage to Southampton England | Wonita” brou; e 0d-ton “Zita! $864 3% ,, 1955/59 @ 9734
a from March Ist. Paynes ug Ir Cc li I B } er “disapproval” or “non- The “Gascogne” will take laa . — 450 drums of $9,600 3% ,, 1974/84 @ 98
St, James. Apply on premises artiste may oe used in the section} passengers from here for England, | «p nee ity and the 59-ton} £1,000 4%. 5, 1963/73 @ 107
wee 15.2.50—2n: IN PORT: Sch. Agalina «« F ant that the.Governor had to| Messrs. Wilkinson and Havuesrt 500 drums. Net, plus accrued interest; .pay-
BUNGALOW With all Modem equim | Lucinvis Sch. Marion Belle Wolie, Sar OT Ta ene 118 tons net, Capt.| Put UP the regulations by means| Co. Ltd. are agents. . aynes) Other cargo of the “Zita|}ment and delivery in Trinidad.
me equip- facile M ey i . : % ms net, Cap’ 56a luti "» ” . ,
Electric ths Government Water and | Sch ding Scho ines W.. Smith Gone aioe od sae et ee vonieadlt uae A 5 a Steamsnh: ‘Lad ee ee See TRINIDAD SHARES
if ght. Spacious Bedrooms | patcha, Sch. Git, ) ar- Owners’ ation. a yal, ¢ a @ House « eamship “ Rodney” is| oil i rhi
ad a Third if necessary. At 0 Gita M., Sch.’ Emanuel ©. Sch. BURMA Ty. '59 ¢ Ass ’ tig oto and cylinders of gas, while
Main Road. Near iextont Goodland Gordon, Yacht Leander, Sch M. mt ie ons net, Capt embly only had the right to] expected on Saturda It is | th. “ 7?
; 3. Rent|M.V ; * Mahuata, King, trom Trinidad; Agents: Schooner} 4... , y. Is te; that of the “Burma D” was ane 4
Whites nites Apply Lecn S. Bourne. seilor, ‘Son nieate, Sch Wonderful Coun- Owners’ Association. disapprove or to approve, arrive from Halifax via Boston] printed matter and cartons. of | °°? Alstons Limited oe 75
vy. City. « ARRIVALS ah dua . and sail the following day for St. | bitters. ‘ £
15.2.50—T™n.} Dutch S.s. MANY DEPARTURES lr i . 3 t '
'RRISHANA LL Wilmint from. ‘Trinesae ae — Capt M.V. LADY JOY, 46 tons mi, Capt Two Distinctions Vincent, Grenada, Trinidad and 00 Angostura Bitters '- x a
id RANA? nara Ontabelle, Lands | Musson, Son te ented: Agents: 'S. P. Parsorta for St. Laicia; Agents: D. I British Guiana. Agents of this} Schooner “Belqueen” — 44 tons Wak: - Ices 7
Swan Street. ae oo. 2 | peatiaztTA WONTTA, 69 tons net, Cant. S'S. MANTO, 159 tans net, Capt. Wil-| 4 There were two distinctions. The | Vessel are Messrs. Gardiner Austin} "et — called from St. Vincent uate. Sis unds, . plus Sarap
APARTMENT — Untu Schooner Owners” Asercanti, Agents: mint, for. St. Vincent; Agents; S. P aa was as was the case in Eng-| and Co., Ltd. | etaoing copra, arrowroot and a :
aes Associ. q Musson, ie 5 a ~
feor Apartment, near tows aa ee mings UEEN, 44 tons net, Capt, H-M.S. DEVONSHIRE 10,000 _ tons, aoe ae the only act was the pump, | The 116-ton motor vessel AUSTRALIA BONDS
(No. Pets, no Chitarers an, Ce. » from St. Vincent, Agents: Schooner Cust. ‘Stokes, for thinidad | the sauaying, such legislation on | “T. B. Radar” came from St. Lucia
10.2.50—3n Commons, . “t See acaba Soldiers Ate Mi with fresh fruit, cocoanuts, fire~| Highest premium paid for’ 8% %
FLATS fully A Tam| _'N TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION | might pray and thet gh member eve | ahas tee ee pipes agony
y furnished with Refrig. ay wed. ese four vessels are con- .
erator and lini Gab) r ar i
se a en at Indramer, Worthing, ee é Wireless (West Indies) Ltd. Ulin, Mosli, Vanostade, Mani sth, Pikes oe Bar bados tne Governor had Eight J KYO, Feb. 15. Signed to the Schooner Owners’ BARBADOS SHARES
18:1.50—t-£.n. | with the following thie” (ommunicate bernhard, Loide Bmasil, Luciano, tagano,| 2¢ positive duty of submitting apanese ex-soldiers, who | Association .
i KILDARE"—Redford Avenue. weil | B®fbados Coast Stations > “Bee Teena nts Gaxton, _ Philosopher, | them for approval, and not merely | £0Und out four years late that the A new list issued Tuesday, free.cn
maunished bungalow to be let for 6] gg il stantis, Golfito, MAT Folk ceemonens lay them and leave it to scme| Wa had ended, have arrived back| Also calling at Barbados yester- | application to: —
“ chub Serene valk from Yacht | cogne, Mba nt Afhelstane, Gas- Sterlapolaris, Fulgor, Neuva Andahwia,|PTivate member to move for their|i® @ Japan that they had never day was Dutch motor vessel ri
sea S| on ew nae ea” te| ence Sse lei GOR, Mma hui as armament or aeapprove pect to co aguan'* "| SH2_ was ute mot A.M. WEBB~
veniences, garage, garden, N, “| Kountouriotis, America, Nieuw Amster. odve pn . y, Mormac-} The next point was that th e men had lived deep in the ”
‘elock this evening for . No children, 7 odve, Ferncourt, Alcoa 5 dia! k as tha e}. : !
pai Conetery. Friends are| To be seen by appointment only. ‘Tele. | 2% Alcoa Corsair, Hatsvse, ©. G. Ti gna’ 'se eee Pegasus, Sundial. learned Attorney General had |J¥agles of New Guinea on 4 diet} This vessel brought a few| Dial 3188 = — Hours..9-~3
tg and Family, Laura 16.2.50—In asked what was.the legal effect of | f Potatoes and field mice.—Reuter| packages containing’ gener s1| 155 Roebuck’ St. =
Hinds ef See6NR} eee = subordinate legislation made and n andi i (Over Peoples Pharmacy)
ate nerchandise along with wire P i
Uae PUBLIC N ¥ ra in due form but not laid netting, agricultural implements 14.2.56-—S0
by re aegis ; 7 i i ; oer .
| oTIcEs tine nts enpay pets | talons eesessnon Gite | 4, toe arecmeart loan 3
e as is rea ably able oO vali r. It i
THANKS ———————_—_—_ having regard to the circumstances, | Walcott put it as April 13. th ‘qt left Carlisle Bay yesterday A Few More.... ~~. {
49% easily earned by obtaining orden He would li ; - , oe tye first | evening for St. Vincent. Messrs. ~~
jgned beg to thank all for private Christmas Cards from ARRIVA: e would like to put. it thys: |meeting of the House after the S. P. Musson, Son and Co. Ltd of the 0
oY ¢ a : ’ > > \ ‘ " eiads
‘any way expressed Uns. | Your friends. No previous experience | From TRINIDAD by B.W.LA.L, Jocelyn McClean, Mrs. Myro Wooding,| Whether a Court would construe} regulations had been signed by } are the local agents. ‘ oe
with us in our recent berea necessary, Write today for beautiful free Stephen Bennett, John Mac Andrew a ar ae eed ae ) an act In such a way as to make the Governor. | : ( (i Ho | les
2 . Citta ty, Mai fo ames nt, } . setta Mayers, Miss arlia ry oC 7 Fup i i a at Mae o $ i
siisin Medias wate ho Britain's largest and Manary:. Tieton Vere Mamon, Eugens’ Michaelons” Glowoen Maier Tecoene, parliamentary control effective or a oc observed that “as soon Quite a few schooners, all of anon was tplat
D Brathwaite. siocaacsl camera ene commission, | Peggy ire en John Kenny, Ramdava, Mrs. Auvril Yee, Mr. Claude | rites it respect of subor- maetine: yo on Mes the first} which are expected to leave port BO with — =
" —In. | m ng opportunity. | Watkins, Ww Watkin, eekle, Nora Yee, Mr. Lauriston Lewis, Mr. Norman} dinate legislation, e secon meeting ithi ' . %— 3 BOILING BURNERS
Works, prime & Co., Dept. 10 Victoria | Geoffrey Herkicts Het’ 7%” Morin, Bushell,’ Mrs. Clarissa Greene, Mrs | Mr, Walcott next dealt with the | after they were signed within the next two days, were #}-> 1 GRILL BURNER & PAN
Works, Preston, a.” Isabelle Cuke, Ect Hon. H. A. Cuke, Louise Bryan, Mr. Walter Bryan, Mi ate > : K! Mr. Walcott i“ | loading cargo yesterday, “> GREEN ENAMEL FINISH
N MEMORIAM George Pile wather Crimberg, Hon! Elizabeth McCarthy-O'Leary, Mrs. Claire} POINt as te the meaning of the ar, cott said that for the! Items loaded included lard mr : i
ay i ES . Pounder, Richard Pen Bennett, Gladys Watson, Mrs. Ivy Warren, Mr. White-| words “as soon as possible,” say- | PUrpose of his submission, if they | sta adh j ard, ny) WBY Hot call and see. thenr~.
eg memory of our dear husban NO? ICE Girbert,” z ‘cunder, Marouetate head, Mr. Colin Williams, Mrs. Elizabeth! ; hat his lear “i had failed to lay the r iF s | Margarine, sugar, bales of bags eee Ses Showroom, Bay Sirect
SCHOLLS 5 rge Jost. Kerr, bars. Wines nae ing that his learned friend had say the regulations |... baw : : SaaS
put leaving memories PARISH OF ST. JOHN For TRINIDAD by B.W.LA.L, Forde, sae George Gone, nate ini oe construed them as “as soon as | 4S $00n as possible after they were | asst anne. Walle: Lia, ae ta
take away Attention is drawn to ‘all owners of | Mrs. Cynthia Trim Coxe, Mix. Victor Sellier, Mr. Victor| practicable under the circum-, “ined, they had failed in the per- | ©™Pty colas drums and two motor =
‘will linger «ous that they should be licensed Trimming rmmingham, Mr. John Ercolani,, Mrs, Etheline Manning, Mrs. | et-neoc . ‘9g , LoOrmance of their duty ij | Cars, '
that : 4 during mingham, Mr. Chie : stanees. He (Mr. Walcott) was eir duty if the pro-
" this earth we stay ne month of February, in accordance | Mr. G _ 2 arence Prescott, Daisy Moore, Miss Gladys Marshall, Mr oS ’ visi . ¢ wom
on Ruby,! with the ; c h oulbourne Phillips, Mrs i y trae | Submitting ‘ isions were mandatory, ° *
i uPicholls (wife) Pearl, y Dog License Act. D'Arcy, Mr. Henry Davee Js; Rosita G. Donovan, Mrs. Donovan, Mr. Walter} Submitting that it need not be After th The i rofessional Notie
gro! Emerson, Lucie, een Parc ASER. Low, Mrs Aurelia Freiaawe = sons Fe ee Stated as so many days, as long repli ge age iy General had |. ; oon a - taken for St \ l
ell, Naomi (c nm). > Treasurer, | roy Gill, Mrs. Pearl Gi Mie mares, ae AICA.... as it was easily ascertainabl pled’ briefly, the Court adjourn- | Vincent, Grenada, St. Lucia, Trini-
16.2.50—1n. to : ; Mrs. Pearl Gill, Mr. Omar Ali, as as easily ascertainable, ate : Se ees , |
: i1's.50--en, Bees’ tate ee oe Eduardo Azanza, HB, Mr. A. W. L. Savage, Mrs The words were “as soon as|&@ until to-day, dad, British Guiana,
memory of or oe te eae | Alphonso DeLima, Mr eee tetas Sraith, Me pt ee Bere x Beer anne EES Wen Se Sacer seeelnceiee ett i + 8 2 ee: ae
CH, who depar s NOTICE ; Mrs. Agnes Hallinan, Mr. Thomas Hair spu‘®;,M@-_Walter Reece, K.C., M.C.P | mitting that “thereafter” couid Tee ee naan.
+ ne 7 ey oer as ass Mrs. Peta Stocker, Mr. Grantley / : een ad e a | ice f pS
od 1948 ce sindinien Gtk to orwtinss: nan, Mr. Wharton, Mr. Bennett, Mrs. M.c.P. ocker, Mr. Grantley Adams, only man after the approval of GOVERNMENT NOTICE |} the office of’ Dr. C. Me
tobe with Jesus | tiie undaaaee ae ae be feceived by a ae i gy was the re Conney, will be closed from
to meet her the takes or i post of a Care- ; trom which the time must be
e : and Gro : ; ene
Welch Decnley Welch, | the playing fields at Bellegiaans et a MAIL NOTICE Pil ° re y | judged. His learned friend in con- Feby, 16th to Feby. 20th.
Welch (sons). cations will be received up to ‘aigotas U Zriuns Will See | struing the words to mean “as DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ; oa
ao nn = algae are x oon tae BRITISH GUIANA by the A Il ‘ TT [moon as practicable under the cir- i . : on account of illness.
. A. SKINNER, Sth. Y M. LEWIS will be closed 0 stances” was citi >y pplications are invited fr j
Vestry Clerk, St. A: at the General Roe: a : ost e cumstances” was citing commer-| , See are: ed from teachers and other. suitably quali- Dr, C y
— Marcin Revistered and Ordinary at | P s Tomb \cial cases which were not on all! /€d persons for the following vacancies: 7 vitae aan
at_ 12.15 p.m. on the 16th February ° ° fours with the present case as far aa ak
SALE NOTICE 1060. Pere This Spring las the tianhdnes oe that phrase waa i Peter's Girls’ School |
Tenders will be received by th ————————— | concerned . F's Sirls Schoo 999999999974 79S9999
y te un. | ——————_—————— CU: Bs I ~ a aia | PRPDPSS LS 9 FOSS O OOOO
’ ee Py a February 20th 1950 for VATICAN CITY, Feb, i5. If the argument of the learned = Bernard 8 Girls’ School 1x
Mi 3,800| the Parish of toes iE enone PERSONAL The new under ground Basiliva,| Attorney General was correct, it St. Augustine S Girls’ School I's N ny
One 1949 Morris Minor, 3, rs a es for £2,500.0.0 built under St. Peter’s Churer aS ee : Ebenezer Girls’ School is 1 OTICE
new. Oné 1948 Morris, 8 Rate of Interest not exceeding 4° s Churen}would mean that although they St. Mark’s Girls’ & ®
im miles, Excellent condition. | and to be repaid by Annual instalments | =—=—=—==——=—————__. | round the tomb of the Apostie}had put in an act that legislation ot Ate Girls’ School x 5
‘ let. Going cheap. of Biee.0:0 with” interest (Loan by| 7», | will be opened to pilgrims for the| made by a subordinate authority St. Andrew’s Girls’ School % %
ROYAL GARAGE Ltd. Phone a . iving public are hereby warned against | first time this spring. the Vatic: a ; c St. Patrick’s Girls’ School, . : %
. 14.2.50—3n Signed giving credit to my wife Coral Bascom e this spring, the Vatican} must be submitted for the approv x Due to, Tourist Boat %
Aga rage a ee % H. TARILTON, ae Sai as I do not hold myseif | @Nounced today. jal of the House, it need never be 2, The minimum qualification for e try to i i Sao ring ¢
Shall (Woyvern) is HP. * Highway Commissioners, St. Sone aae or anyone else con-| Work began 10 years ago to en-|submitted, and yet such legisla-|is the Cambridge School Certificate or entry to the teaching service | g arriving SATURDAY ¥
e 5, m: . 3 \s a any or debts in my name a 7 : Rating ae s ‘ ” ate, | ‘
‘ et Phone 2978. 11,2,30—3n, | Wless by a written order signed by me. large the crypts under Saint|tion would be good law despite i 1% Feb. 18th, we will be 4
14,2. 50-41) | ceeeeeeeeeesinttrere Signed SAMUEL BASCOM, Peter’s to build a burial chopel for| any question of misdemeanour, 3. Applications must be submitted hes “j i. : x
The Mount, Pope Pius, ae ri which may be obtained from the ee ~ peotiets form, § closing on THURSDAY,
3 : i r iduca a s . ;
Barbados Youth Movement St» George During excavations, traces had Positive Resolution reach the Director of Education not later th: ~scvadher pat hould i% Feb. 16th, ‘
r 15.2 50 i i : in 10 ater than Saturday, 25th |
fui 1937~1949 been found of the tomb of Saint February, 1950, ty Ny x
i Wire Hdtr Fox Terrie: SS | Peter himself. As wo ‘k proceede Mr. Wale assing ¥ ‘DW |
° 18°-Yeus OM: (iss7aba) . As work proceeded,| Mr. Walcott passing on the ; ; s R.H. EDWARDS, LTD: 3
Eftom newly imported stock. y1 0 Gouant 7 nO). it was decided to develop thel positive and ie soluti 4. Any teacher who applies for a vacancy . $ 9, Ltd. 9
. Apply X.Y.Z. C/o quarters — Tudor Bridge, St PUBLIC SALES as ded to develop thej positive and negative resolutions school Ss " s @ vacancy on the staff of another | $ " 3
Ci 14.2.50—4n. Michael. s made by the excavators during|said that the difference between }* must inform her present Chairman of Managers : ¥ awe
; ~~ A World-Wi ; ; owe ave $ g | é I an eae, ts ae é anagers and the . ¥
——— iends ane ees as copa fo sii covering a large extent of the|the local positive resolution and eae of her application for such a transfer, OCC BE BEDS
PLB. BWM. EM. BCD, REAL E ancient basilica built by the|the English affirmative resolution ebruary, 1950, 16.2,50—2n | % OSS S SSO SOCIO,
— ’ aoe E gem ae rant: be. STATE Emperor Constantine over St. was that whereas the English re- \ x “4 Bs x
between anc a i a sec ————— 2 ¥ ¢ ‘ 4 ad . : cal a . ‘
pe mes Apply: Mrs. E aay nt because we fourht for the BUILDING SITE 29,216 square feet of Peter’s tomb during the. f arth Soeyane a alicaie tee oy 3 GIBBS . x
Bait, Chelsea Road, uplift and improvement of the poor,| land, (adjoining the ‘residence of Mr. | century. Before the basilica is cecent to the invalidity, the local 1% » %
. 16.2. 50—3n Petes tte _Reatedied. and unwanted aay eee? at Rockley New Road,| opened to the public, it is ex-| affirmative resolution created a 1% PROVISION, GROCERY AND x
a s rbados. § reme yo r . . r » © 2) i * J ‘T e ri
- Activities Include” Religious Sal Gen. | BOYCE, Solicits Terie en pected that Pope Pius XII will senaetien ‘Demencent to the contin- see 3 — OR STORE offers you Vahic >
eral Knowledge, Unity and Culture — | -———————— . announce the full archaeologica ene valiaity, The Sch. « - o_ NTREAL, AUSTRALIA new | 9 "your money. y
“CARRIER CYCLES—Al oo T. BRUCE-o CLARKE * Found oeeliing fs three Storied stone wall| and religious value of the finds,|, The learned Attorney General accept Carpe ey ee Ce LINE x Beacon Sausage x
5 oo Te jouse s st. 1 ar Z ihe a assengers for whe siusages wn:
iad tndion Sports P44 & President. oumee"| Row. Bridgetown, mtadtonice Fnegpcee made by the excavators during had ae that there _were only Fra et Trinidad. Sailing __{MLA.N.Z.) LINE) S ¥ enna Sausages Bt >
St. Dial 2696. Rev, J. B. GRANT, L.Th. Director. | mises occupied by The Bornn Bay Rum | their ten years’ work.—Reuter, | ‘WO days to get rid of a statutory The Sen sbruary 1950 MS, “PORT PIRIE” is scheduled to] $ [otted Meat ... pas
71.2.50—t.f Mrs. OLGA BROWNE (Cen. Sec). Compxny) standing on 4,512 square feet nlp ptipenras Sita ltigeegeapaie sb enactment—by another statute re- aceept Cargo a eka wilt jf sail from Sydney January Mth — x Gibrted Bees aw™ 9
; The Barbados Youth Movement. in The ee house contains 2 Re | Voking it, or if the enactment in St. Lucia Sailing "yeaa ik oe at Trinidad about February % Laings C. WwW. Scru ee s 3
, Barrett Electric .50—In edi is on the top floor, drawing and . | ite Seale lite ‘el a tae ay 17th . ainda. t.) i eee 3
fet? Geddes Grant Lid Going rooms and 3 bedrooms on the CLAIMS CURE FOR its th exumeoned Sena waa hp as »0D tote See TE ena x Len fe men mE! x
Under 3 years old $200 o7 second floor; kitchen and usual out ; imited duration. au © regula- accept Cargo ; er soeae vl rom rt Pirie January 7th, Burnie] % jfolbr skate Set &
Dial 476, A, Barnes & Co PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE offices and several other rooms on the TUBERCULAR | tions which the Court werg con- St Luca, St. Vincent eee, 20 January 20th, Beauty Point "January| $% Whole Tomeice amie 3
16.2.50—4.f.n (Ge Fekeic Simaline “ack, 16k ig ie ee sidering were delegated legisla- phd Aruba, Sailing Sunday 19th February Ist, Brisbane Foss Syane* | §% Tomato Ketchup 2 ian &
(1904—6) § 30) For further particulars apply to the MENINGITIS ttion, which in truth and in fact The Gein i | riving at Trinidad about 10th Maren. pe oe Oe & ibe. 70g. 15 %
oN TUESDAY the 7th day of March Moe reeed, 4 id not become statutory enact- will acaept Cane a: LEWIS" These vessels have ample space fo: % Chole. ron ae Sleriy 9)
950, at the hour of 2 «clock in the e above will be set up for sale by i ments until they satished c for: Tramnenas? and Passengers Chilled, Hard Frozen and General Cargo ® cr ae amoked | Herrings 0
TIC CHANGERS — A fres! Men eae Pe sold at my office to the ee Sheet at our office in Lueas PARIS,, Feb. 1d.. | p . ts: a the stelaiess to aeontiake 16th aebeunres roonlling Thursday Cargo accepted on Through Bills of S Pilchense ere Bt acths 18 x
Rit Volts 35-00 ‘cycles. | Ne aporaised value.’ “S| February 1950 at 2 pm,‘ | Doctors from 16 countries mcet- | {he approval of both Honees ot AL acts Cave a RANE” win [1] for British Guiana, Barbados, Wired |S SPE Peas cs. tae pe
0 Vo 5 cycles. | "! nised vi , ah 2 p. , SS n aoe F | 4 app é s accept Cargo and Pas aatdh . dow et : ' a ind warc Black Eyes vie
° Bporii rt Sink Sots. Blene, of Tard contain: CARRINGION ,&, SeaLY .. ing here announced today that the| the Legislature. It was a tempor- [|| Buseruat™ Saif, Zevemaers or || sna ‘Leeward inane S chat a Batliy at ‘sikea’ ees
16.2.50—4n. | (P Pete ne aa Biilig. wort ona Ic. ba ee drug streptomycin, properly used,| ary statutory enactment. until it February 1950, , FURNESS pereeruars apply;— X , TONEY.
hounding on lands of the estate of J ——_______© | could cure tubercular meningitis, | peceived that approval, B-W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’ Agents: Triniad@” UTD: % Products. DIAL. 3115 $
ous Challener, on lands of Melvin Alleyne.| “BURNHAM” BISHOP'S COURT,| hitherto incurable, Gonklenee TARION. (INC) B DA COSTA & Co. LTD | DELIVERY BY VAN oR,cycLE %
on lands of Bayley’s Plantations, on | St. Michael, standing on 25,175 square Streptomycin was discovered in| We t submission by M Wal ‘ No, 4047 Agents: Barbados. — % >
GIRDER 28 x 12” x 5”. |'"nds of the estate of ©. Sargeant | feet of land. the United States in 1945. Tuber- | rags “th a th Le i ie OPAL SSSGSOOGEEGON
0 ‘Lt (dec'd), and on a road eight feet wide The house contains drawin and ears re eer ~} coll was at where e Legisia- ,
F ne 14's anne pading to the Rybiie pore at wen House | dining rooms with covered caida! cular meningitis killed its every! tue delegated its law making
em | ‘OKether with the old wall Dwelling House | and usual offices, two bedrooms. with victi: efore the z was used.! power as rdi ity ¥
KHAKI 72c. & Se | ‘lwidings, &c., apprateryl as. follows:— | running water, one with dressing room me, ete : anaes % " He wael 9 2 subordinate authority
St ‘ he whale property appraised to FTV¥ | attached, T 2 Doctors using it now report that} but retained the right to review °
‘ore, UUNDEED: A Fiery snvrny | attached, oilet and Bath upstairs. Two bi r > . ey iis } : 2 z ra Lae
3.2.50—14n DOLLARS AND RIPTY cmarrs ear soy | Sefvants rooms with toilet and bath, etween 20 and 60 per cent of | suc 1 subordinate legislation, the SURE
Attached fr vee Theovhilus Marshal! | washroom and workshop and garage| sufferers are saved. | provisions, in his submission were Gg.
4 and 96 WAS. ote lop math, towers watleention, wer aN cs a sa The four-day Paris Conference | mandatory. HAL,
vet N.B.—-25% Deposit to be paid on day| + "BR Rannister. Daa °° ™*|of the United Nations Interna-| Here Sir Newnham asked if de- CANADIAN sEkVIOR COME
MEN'S SHOES from $3.96 | °! TR CRGs HB. ROCHFORD, The above will be set. up to public tional Children Emergency Fund,|claring the regulations invalid SOUTHBOUND : Eb
7 3,2.50—14n * Atta, Provost Marshal. ae ok ie omens 6b. the ee just ended, called for uniform! would not work a = incon- Name of ship Salls Arrives
t BO PYJAMAS from $3,25 | Prevost Marshal's Office, . on Friday the ay of Feb-' methods of reporting results in} venience to the public, when it a Halifax i
eae 2s Bs rurary 1950 at 2 p.m | : . ol e .! oy § 8. “ALCOA PEGASUS” > 5 February. 17th
3.2.50—Jar | Feb. 14, 1980. Sinan CARRINGTON & SRALY. {al hospital using streptomycin. | was considered that the provisions §.S. “ALCOA POLARIS” iy > Febru 20th Sharon fed ee 10 OUR
Tyger gen LUCAS STREET. | Professor Cesare Cochi, of the/ 9°! other sub-paragraphs of the Sailing every two weeks,
Bi play. Royal Store. Phone} LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE 1.2.50—9n. | University of Florence, has cured| cies, ees apace hae NEW YORK SERVICE
‘ 3.2.50—14n cis SERS VIMGAT Rockin tae ee ae r cent of children treated! daily life of the wayfarer. In tha
The application of Athelstan Bruce of| BLUE VISTA—! Rockley ar Golf per cent of ¢ e ated) © rs ha : ; Sails Arrives
SPORT & DRESS SHIRTS | Maxwell Road, peeles Chute ae ot Ci) New Coral block residence with | with streptomycin, the best result} Se - oe, or ee 88, “wvidica pe jew et a Hor pnaee
‘Sine " license No. 201 of 1950, gran unobstructed views over links and . . } mine at whatever interpretation oe, 4 ebruary . arch Sth.
@& Retail. Royal Te. 14n in respect af a two storey wall and Lounge, dining rant, % bedrooms with 7 the drug discovery they put on sub-section y would Cc, J. “THULIN” February, 3rd. February 11th,
tas il wooden building at Oistins, Christ Church | built-in wardrobes, tiled bathroom ALS Mee | es - é 1 : * >
within District “B” for permission to] kitchen, double garage, servants’ quar- osed many new problems for ipply to all those regulations, and NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
AND CAR BATTERIFS—15 & P t E
. Auto Tyre -RIFS—15 8&1 remove the said license to a board and] ters, Terraced rock’ parden. lawn. doctors. Little was known of the| ®°t only the particular regulations Sails Arrives
Con Tr egear (St | shingled shop. with shedroof attached at| tropiral shrubs and plants. DIXON @ | doctors. Little was known of the with which they were dealing Now. Secene eens
7.2.50—t.f-n | Welches, near Oistins, Christ Church. | BLADON, Real E-tate Agents, Avetion. | rhythm of the flow of spinal fluid| ir. Wal “sand teak S.S. “ALCOA ROAMER” January 2th. February 7th.
NEWS—At ine Girt | within District “B" and to use the aia cers and Surveyors, Plantations Blde.| to the brain, basis of the strept-| ula sorte ee. — * ey 8.8. “ALCOA RUNNER” February 8th. February 20ta,
+ snea “ e 50— : coul
Club. First d overs! ee ae 7 eee tee Finone 4840 16.2.50—In | omycin cure, whereas blood ¢i>-| oS ia Continena its armadens
Set Coronation Siamps,/m, ~ Ww. RUDDER, Eaq., i THE MALL—(Nr. Waterfer Fetate) | culation has been studied for cen- Si . Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Canadian Service.
Old U.S.A. Stamps, etc. Police Magistrate, Dist “2. St. Michael. Wateant old world oe turi | he said that they could be made ROBERT THOM L/TD.—New York and Gulf Service. TO-MORROW =
16.2.50—12n (Sgd.) ATHELSTAN BRUCB, perty standing in approx. 2 acres of ares .| Valid overnight. The only time
BEER Ho . s F Applicant. pleasant and quite private grounds It was announced that another they would be questioned was ( }
bark land's finest brew. © 1» This application will be con-| flanked by sugar cane 2 recention. 3} conference of experts to. study all’ inn. camanne wan. oc} 5
k I d d
ig thrist quenching drink t to Wa hala) ¢ ee I ie when someone was charged under TEN IL SET
dealer or bar tna “day, | Sidened at the Licensing Cour’ , | bedrooms, large verar’oh. couble ©} forms of tuberculosis treatrnent }ipem :
™ bar man to-da *}on Monday, the 27th dav of February | stabling, servants’ quarters, courtyard ill be held in C hagen. later them. wv
m OA, | 19°, at 11 o'clock a.m. at Police Courts | ete. This property is offered at a very } Ww ill e he in Copenhagen late Sir Cecil ; I do not see how you AD 4 y
5.2.50— DO a lites reasonable figure making it on attroceive | this year— Reuter. an bring them into force unless Complete Large & Small ae
7 Presi Shipment PABLUM Hollen, Magauete, Dien SK. |Meat alec | they are out into writing—pub- The 17th Feb.
Br sre: 18 cas Pict 16.2.50—1n | & Surveyors, Plantations Building, Phone | T Pilot Killed lished in the Official Gazette. i 1950
pein Your Grocers and 4640. 16.2:50—In est Pilot Kile Mr. Walcott replied that the ROBERTS & CO. Dia! 3301. . i
8213 | regulations appeared in the Ga- = 2 ae 2 : ALE PRICES Cul
. , os pp . So SS Sa
“CHAMPION” As Plane Explodes |#tc ster tei were signea ty SS









& FOUND
LOST

SAKE TICKET BOOK—Series
, Advi Finder please return
» Advig. Dept. Reward offer-
% 14.2.50—8n.

Fighting or Loving he was the Cham-
pion,

You cannot afford to miss the best
fight-game picture to come to the screen
in years,

Tough and pomnpalling, this Ms
keep you on the e of your ¢ %
See Kirk DOUG in Ring Lardner’s
“CHAMPION” co-starring Marilyn MAX-
WELL, Arthur KENNEDY with Paul
STEWART, Ruth ROMAN, Lola AlL-
BRIGHT.

Showing at ROXY THEATRE

pO 10.2.50—4n

“Say Goodbye
to Backache”

—SAYS GRANDMA

Backache is a misery that strikes many
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her neat little home, day after day,

ou would really appreciate how much
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That's because this time-proven Dr.
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Wad dae » Pine Hil)
i 14.2.50—3n.
HOUSEKEEPER —

TANT
Apply by letter to

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ide Gardens
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AUCTION SALE

1948 FORD PREFECT CAR
at MacEnearny’s Garage

2.30 p.m. on Friday 17th

WE are instructed by the
Insurance Company to sell
the above vehicle which has
been damaged in an acci-
dent. Mileage only 11,000.
Car driven away under own
power after accident. Oppor-
tunity to acquire a modern,
repairable Car.

Cash on fall of Hammer.

AUCTIONEERS

DIXON & BLADON

NOTICE
DR. CHAS. PAYNE
Dentist
(Opposite Cathedral)
Has resumed Practice.
(





—=—

BRICKHILL, Buckinghamshire,
Feb, 15.
A tailless experimental jet
fighter plane, known as the Flying
Wing, exploded in mid-air when
on a high speed test trial here
today.+
| The plane was one of two
| experimental machines owned by
| the Ministry of Supply. The body
of a Royal Air Force test pilot
was found in a nearby wood. The
plane was the same experimental
' type—-DH-108—as that in which
Geoffrey de Haviland, one of Byi-
tain’s leading test pilots, met his
cdicath.—Reuter,

Sunspot May Affect
Communications

LONDON, Feb. 15.

A sunspot which_is now visible
may knock radio communications
sideways immediately before and
after Britain’s General Election of
February 23, according to scien-
tists here.

An official at Hurstmonceux—







Britain’s foremost Solar Observa- | forcin

tory—said they had detected the

the Governor. He was. arguing
that in case there was any ques-
tion of invalidity, they could be
made valid overnight. They were
really taking away something
which belonged to the public.

After repeating his submission
that the provisions were mandat-
ory, Mr. Walcott dealt with the
point of prima facie evidence of
delay in the laying of the regula-
tions. His submission was that all
that would lie in the power of the
defendant would be to say that
the House sat 13 times and they
were not laid before the Legisla-
ture, @ithough they were in the
Gazette two days after the Gov-
ernor had signed them. The other
side could then call evidence in
rebuttal.

Luncheon

At this stage the luncheon ad-
journment was taken, and on re-
sumption Mr. Walcott dealt with
the question of sanctions. He said
that as he understood it, his
learned friend had argued that
the Assistant Court of Appeal had
uaported the idea of nullification
to have the effect of a sanction
g the Executive to comply
with the directions of the Legisla-

spot but did not know yet whether | ture.

iit was crowing in size.

j



He was submitting that that

DOWN Ir

KOR SALE soi

“CARLDIEM,"~—St. Lawrence

“CARLDIEM”, St. Lawrence. Fully furnished. Linen and
Cutlery ete, Four Bedrooms. Situated on the St. Lawrence
Beach where there is excellent sea bathing. This house can
be purchased at a price to give the buyer a good investment on
the purchase price, and it has possibilities of development, For
pgrticulars, Dial Miss K. HUNTR, Telephone 8357.





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i Other observers described it as | question was really not material s n

“the largest sunspot seen for ajat all. The Courts were merely % BOOKER’S (B'DOS) DRUG STO ES I '
considerable ffme”, and forecast| trying the issue as to whether LTD. % k e
radio communications would »-;some alleged offence was really > . ings HARMA

bably be affected on February 21,/ an offence Headquarters for Best RUM . Broad Street and Hs: (ALPHA F on

22 and 23.—Reuter. In reply t 2 + as :
wd . Famer 10, Sie, Const: a tn. wean SPRPLLRLELL LLCO CCE CELI LE LACES










PAGE EIGHT
H.T.C. Entries:

5 From



FOR the first time in nine years
Berbados races will receive a
sizable entry of horses from
Trinidad to race at the Spring
meeting due to start on March
4th viext. Entries for the meeting
closed at the offices of the Bar-
bacos Turf Club yesterday after-
noon and a recorc number, for a
Spring meeting. of 54 horses were
entered for the iwenty three
taces.

Among the entries from Trini-
dad will be the famous Jamaica
creole Blue Streak who will be
the first A class horse ever sent
from Jamaica to the South Carib-
bean to race in Barbados. Blue
Streak is trained by Mr. Leo
Williams and will be accompanied
on the trip over by stable mates
Lady Pink and Swiss Roll.

Already the big Jamaican gel.-
fig has been made a favourite
for the feature Barbados ‘bur.
Club Stakes as most oi the ba:-
badian horses are either from
lower classes or expected to
in ho better form than they were
in Trinidad where blue Streak
has already beaten them. ‘The
non-entry of Storm’s Gift, who !
resting, and Pepper Wine, who ha
s been reserved for the A clas
bine sprint on the second day, mak?
Biue Streak even more of a
certainty for the big race. Never-
theless the racing public will be
able to see Pepper Wine matchin:,
strides with the Jamaican
Champion over the shorter dis-
tance of 542 furlongs

Ledy Pink and September Son;
% are also regarded as horses wit!

ve







Cie very good chances at the meetin
7 and are expected to give the !
Â¥ class horses in Barbados a roug!
Pte time. More so because the mai
4 opposition must come from newly
te imported fillies.
mee The Barbados Guineas, the firs
2 classic ever to be run at the
Spring meeting received an entry
of six, notable absentees being
Bowmanston who is entered i!
other races at the meeting at
iy the St. Vincent filly Bow Bell
i Entries were as follows
Race 1 — C and C2 Maidens—
th 5l44f— Musk, \ Cros
Hing Identify, Ability, Starry Night
ain Race 2 — F class, 5'f:—
mh Gavotte, Joint Command, Su
fire, Bowmanston, Mountbatte
Minuette, Postscript Foxglov
Facetious





Race 4 — A class, 9f:—Slainte
Tiberian Lady, Beacon Bright

Gun Site, Fliéuxce, Blue Streak
River Sprite, Infusion, Eliza-|
bethan

Race 5 — C class, 744f:—Silve!
Bullet, Sun Queen, Beaufils, Rive
Sprite. Swiss Roll, Ability, Starry
Night, Southern Cross, Musk.

Race 6 — G class, 542f:—Mopsy,!}
Tango, Miss Friendship, Maytime, |
Minuette, Brahmin’s Choice, Chin |

|



dit, April Flowers, Silk Plat
Vixen.

Race 7 — D class, 74of:—Bat-)
talion, Dulcibella, Sweeper, Po
script, Facetious, Lady Belle

Race 8 — B class. 54¢f:—Slainte,
Rebate, Corfu, Infusion, W
Lord, Tiberian Lady, Lady Pin}
September Song, Land Mark, |
Identify |

March 9th }

ify, Lady Pink, War Lord, Septem

ber Song, Blue Streak, Don
Arturo, Rebate, Infusion, Peppet
Wine.

Race 10 — F class 3.y.0., 54¢f:—
Watercress, Brown Girl, Mount
batten, Pharos II, Colleton, Bow
manston, Perseverance, Apollo

Race 11 — F elass 4.y.o. and
up, 744f:—Tango, Joint Commande,
Miss Friendship, Facetious, Post
script, Gavotte, Vixen, Minuette,

Sunfire, Foxglove.
Race 12 — B class, 7/.f:—Ident-

ify, Silver Bullet, War Lord,
Starry Night, Swiss Roll, Sun
Queen, Tiberian Lady, Infusion,
Fliéuxce, September Song, Lady
Pink, Musk, Corfu, Rebate
Race 13 — G2, 5'4f:—Silk
Plant, Chindit, Mopsy, Maytime,

Brahmin’s Choice
Race 14 — D class 54of:—Sun-

fire, Sweeper, Battalion, Dulci-
bella, Brown Girl, Lady Belle,
Vixen.

Race 15 — C class, 9f;—Musk,
Silver Bullet, Sun Queen, Swiss
Roll, Ability, River Sprite, Starry



Te OCCASION WA






rere ee

calm sea made ideal Water

Race 3 — Barbados Guineas |
7%4f:—Apollo, Br Girl, Col-|K
leton, Watercress Mountbatte
Perseverance, Pharos II

SECOND DAY ¥

Race 9 — A class, 544f:—Ident-







S ULTRA: SO
RUNELLA SPENT+PLENTY OF MOOLA
FOR ONE OUNCE OF SCENT:>-

Woust AMINUTE) |}0D0m
1) MORE, DEAR J
TLL BE



Trinidad

Among 54 Entered!

Jamaica’s Blue Streak to Race in B’dos

THIRD DAY

March 11th

Race 17 — B class, 9f:—Slainte,
Infusion, Tiberian Lady, Fiieuxce,
September Song, Musk, Corfu,
Rebate, Starry Night, Swiss Roll,
River Sprite.

Rice 18 — G class, 74f:—April
Flowers, Vixen, Minuette, bdilk
Plant, Mopsy, Tango, Miss Friend-
ship, Chindit.

Race 19 — D class, 9f:—Bat-
talion, Sweeper, Postscript, Dui-
cibella, Lady belle.

Race 20 — C class, 5'4f:—
Southern Cross, Swiss Roll, Musk,
Starry Night, River Sprite, Sun
Queen, Silver Bullet, Dulcibella,
Icentity, Beaufils, Ability.

Race 21 — F class 3.y.0., 74ef:—
Colleton, Perseverance, Pharos II,
Mountbatten, Brown Girl, Apollo,
Bowmanston, Watercress.

Race 22 — F class, 4.y.o. and
ap, 9f:—Tango, Miss Friendship,
Vixen, Joint Command, Gavotte,
Facetious, Sunfire, Foxglove, Post-
script.

Race 23 — A class, 7'4f:—Re-
bate, Infusion, Silver Bullet,
September Song, Blue Streak,
Identify, Pepper Wine, Lady Pink,
Elizabethan, Gun Site, River
Sprite, Slainte, Beaufils,
Arturo, Béacon Bright.



Navy Team
Swamped 8-Nil
IN RETURN MATCH

A SUNNY and

Polo
shortly

afternoon

conditions yesterday as

after 5 p.m., a Water Polo Team
from H.M.S. Devonshire lined up
to play a return match against a
local side.

However, despite valiant efforts







ym the Navy's part they were
»verwhelmingly defeated eight nil.
This was chiefly due to the quick
pa by he local lads, who
wel ill in good trim from their
recent tour to Trinidad
F< the homesters Delbert
é r, who is developing quite
idable back hand _ shot,
cored twice with this type of
hot. It was Peter Patterson, how-
ever skipper of the side who

ypened the scoring, and he went on
yet another. Geoffrey Foster
n the wing also scored two and
Ince and Boo Patterson

lo net

ennet}

ored one eacl

The teams were

H.M.S. Devonshire: Marine
Tucker, Mr. Saunders, Leading
Sig. Murphy, Yeoman
(Capt,), Band Cpl.

E. R. A. Roche and Cadet Simpson.

Barbados G. Foster, Dd.
Bannister, Fs Patterson, G.
MacClean, K. Ince, B. Patterson

and P. Foster.



Belleville
Resulis

Ladies’. Singles — Final
Miss D. Wood beat Mrs. S. Con-
i1ell 6—4, 6—2

Men’s Singles—Semi Final
E. P. Taylor beat D E. Worme
4, 6—2

Ladies’ Double

Mrs. D. Worme and
Branch beat Misses D
Lamming 6-——1, 6—0

MATCH 16TH MARCH:

Men’s Singles—Semi-Final

Dr. C. Manning vs. R. S. Nicholls

Mi L,
D

and

MENNA WINS ON
POINTS

sight rounds bere last night.

Pacheco 155 pounds.—Reuter.

Can See E.G.

AUCKLAND, Feb. 15

units feature film of the



F





TWMOp} TT —

i

READY.. CAN TAKE YOUR JOB AND
AROMA OF. \(PUFF-PUFF)HEY! CLOSE
16 BUCKS | |EL steNcHOS, | THAT WINDOW! WANT

2 FOR 154, 23 ME TQ CATCH



Don |

Williams | petition in th é
Guthrie, | spreads of sail once ran riot. The

Tennis wind the Brittania used to carry
a

WHITE PLAINS, New York,
Feb. 15
Freddie Menna, of Brooklyn,,\

beat Chico Pacheco of Brazil on a
split decision points verdict over |

Menna scaled 152) pounds and

The New Zealand National Film
Empire

DUT HER EAU'DE CAMELIA WAS
SMOTHERED,
UNFLOWERED

THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

BALANCING the boat calls for acrobatic





The Fastest Yachts

In The

Water

By lan Gale

LONDON (By Mail).

AFTER fifty years of experi-
ment Australia has produced the
most spectacular open sailboat in
the world to-day—the Eighteen
Footer. A boat of seven feet
beam and only 24 inches depth,
it earries what is literally a cloud
of sail. The sail area, which is
nearly 2,000 square feet, is fantas-
tic for so small and shallow an

“lopen boat, and yet the Eighteen

Footer is best in a wind of 32 to
36 miles an hour. And, believe it
or not, Mr. Ripley, these craft
have been known to leap clear of

the water in a sudden burst of
speed
The origin of the Eighteen

Footer, which had no prototype in
any other country, is a matter of
controversy, Some contend that
it was developed from the fast
“buteher boats” which Sydney
providores sent out to meet in-
coming ships, ut Peter Cowie, a
veteran who built one of the ear-
liest Highteen Footers 50 years
ago, declares that it originated in
a shallow-draft skiff or pleasure
boat common in Sydney early in
the last century. When the own-
ers got tired of rowing about the
harbour, he says, they fitted fins
and a Bermuda type sail and
went sailing instead.

Since the only _ restrictions
placed on the boats for racing
purposes relate to the hull, com-
the setting of fantastic

sail area of the modern Eighteen
Footers is nothing to what the
“old timers” sometimes earried in
their efforts to outspeed their
competitors. Instead of a mast of
26 ft. which is now the standard,
the old Minnawatta once carried
a mast of 52 ft. and in a light

s much as 2,826 sq. ft. of sail!
Since the sky was the limit, all
kinds of extra sails were tried
out, They set “aeroplane spin-
nakers”, with holes to spill the
wind. and some carried “water-
sails”, set below the boom to catch
ithe last drop of wind, but neither
| of these sails proved successful
and were eventually scrapped.
But they retained the “ringtail”
which is an adaptation of the stud-
sails sometimes set by square
riggers, and giving six or seven
feet extra width to the mainsail

More Streamlined
The modern Eighteen Footer,
which thousands of fans flock to

watch racing in Sydney Harbour
every week, dates from eleven
years ago. The new boats are

much more streamlined than the
ld Eighteen Footers, Where the



The Weather

TO-DAY
| Suy Rises: 6.20 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.09 p.m.
Moon (New) February 16.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 4.05 a.m, 2.46

m.
YESTERDAY

|

|

Rainfall (Codringion): Nil.

Total for Month to Yester-

day: .63 in.

Temperature (Max.) 82.5° F
Temperature (Min.) 72.0° F.
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) FE,








Games is expecte € > J

Night, Southern Cross, Identify, ious Hew iment rlegnte (3 p.m.) E. by N

Beaufils. time. The Alm act 7.500 feet Wind Velocity: 16 miles per
Race 16 — A class, 9f:—Blue} wili take about half an hour to hour. De ath

Streak, Infusion, Gun Site, Eliza-}run. It will be released simul- Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.9945

ethan, September Song, Beacon | taneously in the main New Zea- (3 p.m.) 29.925.

Bright. BEG and cities on March 3.—Reuter.

ES eT ange ae ery — care EY
- ’ = re :
Pheyll Do It Every Time sscinoe ae tn By Jimmy Hadlo |

—— OOOO = = = —— = ——— = === —=

BY GAR! OVERPOWERED
BY HUBBY'S CIGAR!








SO I LOOKED HIM RIGHT IN
THE EYE (PUFF) AND I SAYS >
TO HIM (PUFF-PUFF) YOU |







MY DEATH ¥



; aw












































older boats pushed their way
through the water, the new ones
plane over the top. The new
conditions yesterday, as_ shortly
boats are much lighter too, since
they are fitted with hollow masts
and spars and carry sails of fine-
ly woven Japara and Egyptian
silk instead of the old duck and
eanvas. The sail plan has been
agtered so that the mainsail is
not so large as the ones the veter-
ans carried, but the over-all
spread of sail is on an average
greater.

The center-plates of the new
boats are deeper and narrower
than those of their predecessors
and three mainsails and four jibs
are carried for varying winds.
The spinnaker is fixed to a 30 ft.
pole and has an area of 694 sq. ft.
When the wind is blowing at 32
miles an hour the Eighteen Footer
is reefed down and carries a bare
1,400 sq. ft. of sail. Winds over
36 miles an hour do not show the
yachts to advantage, since they
ship too much water.

The speed at which the
Eigh‘een Footers really travel has
always caused argument, because
its spectacular action makes it ap-
pear to be moving faster than it
really is. Some spectators are
willing to bet even money that
some of the faster boats can do
20 miles an hour, but of course,
this is not so. Big, fast clipper
ships of the Cutty Sark period
only did 18 knots in good condi-
tions, so to credit small craft of
this or any other type is foolish.
Peter Cowie comes to the rescue |
again with figures which he has
compiled over many years.
cording to him
Eighteen Footer travels is about
ten smiles an hour. This figure
mezy not sound terrific, but along-
side a fast moving ferry boat or

a very geod showing indeed.
Six Man Crew

While the older boats used to
earry 12, 14 and even 18 hands,
so that when they leaned out-
board they had to hang out in
double rows, the crew of to-day’s

reduced to six.

only about 550 lb., with only a
112 lb. fin to steady it under 1,400
ft. of sail in a 36 miles an hour
wind is pretty vigorous work. The
crew, a well trained team,
handling sails and balancing the
boat against gusts and shifts of
wind, to keep her running true
and upright against the sea. This
calls for considerable acrobatic
agility, hardihood and endurance
on tNe part of the crew, but re-
pays them with plenty of thrills.

With its beautifully streamlined
hull of polished cedar planking,
phosphor bronze and stainless
steel equipment, the Eighteen
Footer is an expensive craft. Be-
fore the war, a fully fitted boat
could be set in the water for
£335, but now the same job costs
about £450. But this does not
mean that the sport is limited to
the wealthy. Far from it. The
cost of the boat is usually split up
between the crew, and also boat
owners race for bonuses to recoup
their outlay. it is recorded that

will be glad to hear that there is
a good chance of the Australian



. | and handlers
motor yacht, the little boats make | Referee Foster who disqualified

racing Eighteen \Footer has been }

Working a boat which weighs |

|



agility, hardihood and endurance.



Trinidad Scores
Four Wins In

.

Boxing Tourney

TRINIDAD scored two more
wins last night at the Intercolonial
Amateur boxing tournament be-
ween Trinidad and Barbados
ended at the grounds of the
Modern High School, Roebuck
Street last evening.

Barbados again scored a lone
win last night and the total score
at the end of the tournament was
Trinidad four wins and Barbados
two wins.

Highlight of last might’s card
was a brilliant first round K.O..

by Hollis Wilson (118 lbs) of
Trinidad over Victor Lovell
(118° lbs) of Barbados. Wilson

climaxed some spirited exchanges
in the closing stages of the first
round, with a short sharp right
cross that landed flush on Lovell’s
chin forcing him to take the full
count.

In the second match between
Aloysious Marcano (129 lbs) cf
Trinidad and Gilbert Goodman
(129 lbs) of Barbados, \#xing
fans saw a courageous but out-
classed Goodman fight a dour
battle against a too cocksure
opponent who was bent on scoring
a K.O., victory. Mareano landed
some heavy blows but Goodman
boxing cleverly scored more
regularly to gain the edge by
sheer tenacity.

The final bout between George
Best (180 lbs) of Barbados and
Wilfred Rodney (192 lbs) of Trini-
dad ended in the first round with a
victory to Rodney by disqualifica-
iion. George Best who in spite of
his twelve pound disadvantage in
weight and also considerable in-
feriority in reach carried the fight

Ac-jto his man and floored him for
the fastest an}

a count but in his impetuosity
struck him a comparatively light
blow as he was on his knees.
Objection by Rodney’s seconds
was upheld by

Best and awarded the fight to
Rodney according to the rules of
Amateur Boxing.





in one season a boat raked in
£450 in this way.
Yachtsmen all over the world j<

London Express Service,



Eighteen Footer becoming an in-
ternational class yacht, as the Star
is to-day. Boats of this unique
type are now being built in New
Zealand, England and the United
States, and a yachtsman from In-
dia has taken the plans back with
him to introduce it in the East.
Also, five hundred copies of book-
lets containing the plans have
been sent to yacht clubs all over
the world, and enthusiasts in Aus-
tralia are confident that once these
jubs have realised the nature of
i this beautif*1 craft, world contests
Iwill only be a matter of time.



CHILDREN

DO PUT
ON

WEIGHT

WHEN THEY
ARE FED

DAILY
| ON

J&R

ENRICHED











‘DE

H.M.S. “DEVONSHIRE” de-
feated a Combined Team from
Y.M.P.C.” and Carlton two - love
when they met at football yester-
day on Y.M.P.C. grounds.

Both teams seemed to be short
of form. This could be judged
by the inaccuracy in passing the
ball to each other and the loss of
many oprortunities to score.

The Devonshire team combined
better than tke homesters and
when called on to defend, did so
successfully.

Y.M.P.C.-Carlton got the kick+
off and for the first five minutes
of play, were kept on the defen-
sive by the Devonshire. In the
meantime two corners were con-
ceded to the visitors who failed
to score from either.

Later, a melee in the homesters’
goal area almost gave the Devon~
shire their first goal, but it was
cleverly saved by Archer in goal.

The homesters at one time bore
down on the Devenshire’s goal
area and what looked like a cer-
tain goal was saved through a
struggle put up by the visitors’
goalie and backs. :

Play had only been going on
for 20 minutes when the Devon-
shire team got their first goal.

Bradshaw at inside left passed
neatly to Moore ‘at centre forward
who sent the ball to the left of
Archer in goal.

hhaif-time found the score. at
1—0 in favour of the Devonshire.
Both teams had opportunities to
score other goals during the first
half, but just failed to take them.

On resumption, the visitors
started the attack again. The
ball was carried down to the
homesters’ goal and a shot was
taken by Moore, centre forward,
with the goalie cut of position.
Dash, one. of the backs, was



TWO IRISH 2-YEAR-OLDS
PURCHASED

THE Anglo-Irish Agency have
purchased two of the best Irish
}2 year olds of 1949 for exper:
abroad. These are FIRST VIEW,
Ch.F. (1947) by PANORAMA —
FIRST TELEGRAM, and COUP
D’ECLAT, Ch.C. (1947) by Mr.
JINKS—COUP DE MaAITRE.
FIRST VIEW strictly on forn
was the champion 2 year old
filly in Ireland last year. She
| won two of the season’s bigges!
juvenile events, the National
Produce Stakes and the Anglesey
Stakes, and two other races in
a total of six starts. She defeatec
PRINCE OF BLENHEIM by 5
lengths and this colt beat FIRST
VIEW’S best rival RED ANITA,
subsequently. COUP D’ECLAT
won 3 races in six starts, wind-
ing up with a win in Manches-
ter’s Bettisfield Stakes.





B.B.C. Radio
Programme

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1950

Books to Read, 8.45 a.m. Theat

* a.m. The News, 9.10 Home News from
Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close Down, 12 noon

The News, 12.10 p.m. News Analysis
12.15 p.m.
ation Post, 1.15 p.m. Radio Newsrcel
130 Take it from Here, 2
News, 2.10 p.m.

o.m

Philip Green and his Concert Orchestra

} p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 8.15 p.m. Pro-
5.30 p.m, Generally
5.45 p.m. Tom Jongs Trio,
7

The News, 7.10 p.m. News Analy-

gramme Parade,
Speaking,
} p.m. from the
>m
sis, 7.15 p.m. We See Britain, 7.46 p.m
Verchant Navy Newsletter, 8 p.m

8.45 p.m

Third Programme,

Radio Newsreel,

wealth Journey, 9 p.m. The News, 9.10
“ome News from Britain, 9.45 Political

3peech—My. Clement Davies (Lib. )

7.35 p.m. Ray Martin, 10 p.m. Meet the
“ommonwealth, 10.30 p.m. Sandy Mac
10.45
The

Pherson at the Theatre Oran,
p.m. Special Dispatch,

“AFRESH

1l p.m,



Here she

give that
vitality.



VONSHIRE’ DEFEATS
COMBINED TEAM

7.10 am, News ¥

New Records, 1 p.m. Observ-

Home News from
Britain, 2.15 p.m. Sports Review, 2.30
Radio Theatre, 4 p.m. The News,
4.10 p.m. The Daily Service, 4.15 p.m.

Happiness—Cow & Gate, the most famous of all
Infants’ Foods. And what a relief! For there is
everything that Baby needs in a tin of Cow & Gate
to build firm flesh, strong bones, sound teeth, and t0

cOM

i. an
Chey will be what you want them to be on Cow & Gale



























SDAY. FEBRUARY !
Fly to j
in

luckily there to kick it out.

With not many minutes left for |
play, the Devonshire took the
score to 2—0. Turner at inside
right nicely received a pass from
the right wing and drawing goalie
Archer out, he easily placed the
ball into the nets.

Y.M.P.C.-Cariton fought hard
to retrieve their loss, but every
attempt they made was thwarted
by the Devonshire’s strong
defence. ~

At end of play, the score re-
mained 2—0 in favour of the
visitors.

The teams were; —

Devonshire—Thomas, Thomas,
Pugh, Turner, Nevett, Farmery,
Garrett, Rees, Moore, Bradshaw,



| Trine

EPRUARY



BRIT}
WEST.
AIR

BRITISH WEST p 5
‘Registered in Tau

Lower Broad Street, oe
Phones 4585 & ye



a.

Y.M.P.C. - Carlton — Archer,
Dash, Straker, Bourne, Andrews,
Lewis, Porter, Hazell, Gomes,

Hutchinson, F., Marshall, E. W.
Referee—Parnell.

——<———————_—_——_—_—

Planters’
Umbrellas.

A Fresh Stock of

these
ea.

everlast-
ingly
rib

useful 16
umbrellas
with straight and
curved handles,
Will give

long service

you
in

rain or shine

ot $110 I
CaveSHEPHERD 8 Coll

11, 12 & 13, BROAD



We offer the following!








FOR ROOFS

EVERITE CORRUGATED
6 ft., 8 ft, & 10 ft, lengths

ALUMINIUM CORRUGATED —
6 ft, 7 ft, 8 ft. 9 ft, 10 ft len

FOR CEILINGS & PARTITION

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‘4
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& Phone 4267.

S WILKINSON & HAYNES Ot

YV36 6996966666 9S99S 98 SSESESIOGOSSS

ia

ARRIVAL OF SM

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cheerful smile of abounding health and
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LESLIE & Co, Lid




PAGE 1

PAilb. I i'.IIl THE BARBADOS AD\ o< VH wnsr. \v FEBElAJlt H.T.I I -. i< s: 5 From Trinidad Among 54 Entered Jamaica Blue Streak to Race in B 'dos VOI I'' year* Barbados races will receive %  stable enlrv at hones from Trinid-d to raw al \ho Spring %  I due to fctart on : ihimeeting do %  %  The Barb.d-: classic ever tn be Spring meeting re<* oi six. notable sAaanfcaai Bowmanston who Is entered In other : the St. Vincent Oil] km were as f Race 1 — C aa>d I Hal J'.IIdentify. Abel Race I — F claas. I bit Command How mansion. Mom. Race 3 — Barbaeot QfaW • .'. %  %  Raee — A class. Rft—8 Tiber.an Lady. Beacon I Mprtt be than. Raee 5 — C eJau. I! i liulU-t. Sun yusen. D —U fl l Man > Nigh' oss. Musk. Ra• — G eUss. !.— 1 Tango, Mu> > %  int. A; ril novrei Rare : — D cla ." %  aea iD dut. 5.' i in Lsjdy, Lad] Idem: SECOND DAY hi M ai Race 9 — \ i BhH nml Art!.: Rase 1 -FlW I Watercress. I %  i J( .. ii r SUM 4i... and UP. I %  .-l.tVe Ram It — H claa, T J:— Idanl iiuii.i Wm LUK. S'..ir> Night Swiss K lafuilon. | La.l> Pink. Musk. Corfu, i Race n Of, iHff>—4Wk Plant, Chindil. Mopsy. V t. llOICC Race 14 — D claa* Ifel Sweeper, Battalion, Dulcti Lady Bell.-. Race 15 — t OaSM M -Musk. Boll. Abiln Nigi'i u(\lS %  Ure IS — A rlaaa. ( Streak, Infusion. Q nethan. September Sotig. Beacon Bright • I V V TIIIKO OAY March 11th Rare 17 — B clast. 9f:—SlaiRte, : %  .. Septembti Bong, Musk, Corfu, Many Night, Bv KlVlT S, Ri-ee II — G caaas. 7'jf:— April k| info. Miss *rien;l. :iHit. K*ee 19 — D class. ati—Bat%  ipt. Dui. Raee 2$ — 0 class. 5'f:— Cross, Swiss Roll, Musk. Marry Night. Rh ^ueen. Silver Bullet, Duldballa, la, Ablttt) Baaa II i elan :i.v.. :'.f,'nlleton. !' %  Pharos II. arn Girl. Apollo. %  Raee 22 — F rUa. 4.y.e and sp. f:—Tango. Miss Friendship. ixen. Joint Command, Gavotte, Facetious, Sunlire. Foxglove. PostRsee 23 — A class. 7',f:—Rebate), Infusion. Silvn Bttlatl September Song, Blue Streak. Pappar Wtoa, Lady Pink. Elizabethan. Gun Stt< Rival Beauflls, Dor Aituro. Beacon Bright DEVONSHIRE' DEFEATS .COMBINED TEAM y.M.p.c HA I The Fastest Yachts In The Water II* Inn <-JII\aw Team Swamped 8-MI IN RETURN MATCH A SUNN made idesl W conditions, yesterday as shortly fter S p-i Polo Team %  return match local side. However, despite valiant efforts i the Navy s part '! : erwhelniingiy rirfented atght nil. the quick I trim Itom their %  Dclbert ping qui'e type of %  scoring, and i i %  big also •corad :nce i I Bo LONDON (By Mail) AFTER iifty years of expartlent Australia has produced the moot spectacular open sailboat In the world to-day :he Eighteen Footer. A boat of seven feet beam and only 24 inches depth. It carries what Is literally I cloud of sail The sail area, which is nearly 2,000 square feet, is fantastic for so small and shallow an open boat, and yet the Eighteen | bast in .i wind of 32 to 36 miles an hour. And, believe it or not. Mr Rlpley. than have been known to leap clear of in a sudden burst of •peed Devonshire E R A. Rocha and Cad* Barbados: G. F< %  i Belhville Tennis Results Laallaa' Bloglea — PIBMI ICll ft—4 %  Mriis Biaaitaa Kami I Inal K J 1 T. LaaUM 1 P—hli Itn D • I> I, 6—0 \1 \M II I6TU MAKI II ifaa'i Bissj U B< mi-l li :ii i>i ( Ma it ON MENNA WINS POINTS i %  kgbt rota M pouuda. Baajasff. The origin of tba Eighteen Footer, which had no prototype in any other country. !> .< manor of v Some contend that tt was developed from the fast "butcher boats" which Sydney providores sent out to coming ships, ">ut Peter Cowie, a vfter.n: who built one of the earliest Blgt.* 5 0 years ago. declares that it originated in a shallow-draft skiff or pleasure not) In Sydney early in the last century When the owners got tired of rowing about the harbour, he says, they fitted flm and a Bermuda type sail and iing instead. the s to score. The Devonshire team combined r-etter than the homesters and when called on to defend, did so successfully. YM PC -Carlton got the kickoff and for the first five minute--, "f play, were kept on the defensive by the Devonshire. In the meantime two comers were conceded to the visitors who failed to score from either. Later, a melee in the homesters' goal area almost gave the Devonshire their first goal, but it wa^ cleverly saved bv Archer in goal. The homesters at one time bore down on the Devonshire's Ron. area and what looked like a certain goal was saved through •> truggle put up by IT* I loalie and backs. Play had only been going on tor 20 minutes when the Devonshire team got their tirst goal Brarishaw at Inside left passed neatlv to lloore al contra forwara who sent the ball to the left of fcrehar in goal. half-time found the score at t—0 in favour of the Devonshire Both teams had opportunitiesi to score other goals during the first half, but just failed to take them. On resumption, the visitor-; started the attack again Thi ball was carried down to the homesters' goal and a shot was taken bv Moore, centre forward. with the goalie 'Ait of position. Dash, one of the backs, was nere to kick it nut. With not many minutes left for aaW r a took the % 0. Turner at inside right nicely received a pass from the right wing and drawing goalie Archer out. he | ball into the nets. Y M PC -Carl'im fought bar to retrieve their loss, but ever. attempt they made was by the Devonshire's strong At end of play, the score lemained 2—0 in favour of the visitors. The teams were; — Devonshire—Thomas. Thorn.is. Pugh. Turner, Nevett. Farmery. Garrett. Rees, Moore, Bradshaw. Box. Y.M.P.C. Carlton — Archer. Dash. Slraker, Bourne. Andrews. Lewis. Porter, llazell, Gomes. Hutchinson. P.. Marshall. E. W. Referee—Parnell Fly Carniy i Tin mirk KEPRUAIU h 7 m BRITISH WEST (No,*, AIRWAYS TWO IRISH 2-YEAR-OLDS PURCHASED peed at which ihr Eifch'een Footers really travel has always caused argument, because its spectacular action makes it appear to be moving faster than it really is Some spectators are willing to bet evrn money thai %  OBM i if the faster boats can do 20 miles an hour, but of course, this is not so. Big, fast clipper ships of the Catty Sark period II knots in good condition*, so to credit small atari at this or any other type is fooliah. A le comes to the rescue again with figures which he has THE Anglo-Irish Agon purchased two of the best Irish • vear olds of 1049 for exp"ri climaxed some spirited exchanges r-L-n The> e are TIRST VIEW la the cloning stages of the first ; F 1947) by PANORAMA round, with a short sharp ng.it ...pcj TELEGRAM, and COUP Unded Hush on LovcH'fc n'FCLAT Ch C (1SM7) by Mi chin forcing him to take the fu'l JI ^ KS _COUP DE MAITRE count. FIRST VIEW strictly In the % %  Ba n d match hetweeii c hamuioii %  Aioysious Marcano (129 lbs) cf I Trinidad and Gilbert Goodman of Barbados, bjfttoing fans aaw a courageous but outclassed Goodman light a dour bottle against a too cocksure u bent on scoring a K.O.. victory. Marcano landed some heavy blows but Goodman boxing cleverly scored more regularly to gain the edge by sheer ter Ma George Best (180 lbs) of Barbados and dncy (192 lbs) oi TriniM Aret round with a victory to Rodney by disqualincuUon. George Best woo in spite <;i %  pound disadvantage tn weight and also corn, '.I ferlority in lha fight compiled over many years. Aci te his man and tloored him for cordir.g to him the fastest an' B count but in his impetuosity Eighteen Footer travels is about struck bun a comparatively light ten miles an hour This figure blow as he was on bis knees. nwy not sound terrific, but alongObjection by Rodney ,s seconds side a fast moving ferry boat or ..,.,., *M upheld by motor yacht, the little boats make Keferee Foster who disqualified fon rear oU fllty in Ireland last year Sh< won two of the seasons bigges -vents. ttM Nationa. Produce Stakes and the Anglesey Stakes, and two other races in ,, total of six starts. She defeate PRINCE OF BLENHEIM by lengths and this colt beat FIRST VIEWS boat rival RED ANITA, subsequently COUP D'ECLAT won 3 races In six starts. Windbag up with a win in ter^s Bettisfleld Stakes Planters' Umbrellas A Fresh Stock of these useful 16 umbnllai straight and curved handles. Will give you rain or .shine $11.10 Each CAVESHEPHERD&CO, 10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET THI *D* ArteOytto, MS a.m. 7 m Muw Ma GnamU> Spwfci-s. a very good showing indeed. Six Man ( r.v. irdad the fight to I routing to the rules dun See RG ID; i*b l! %  lure dim oi u* %  d.iin New Zealand In a foitnigbt's i will take n hour to run It will be released simultaneously in the main New Zeah :i Kmlrr 'hile the older boats used to ear*} IS it and even IS hands, so that when they leaned outboard thay bud to hang out in double rows, the crew of to-day'* raekng i-'iuhteen .Footer has been %  Woiking a boat win. I. walgltt Otti) ibOttt 550 lb. with only u III lb. tin to steady it I m a 36 miles an hour I <* tnd is pretty vigorous work The crew, a well trained team. utag aalal and balancing the Bydnay Harnoui iboal against gusts and shifts of Weak, dates from eleven wind, to keep I'" running true and upright against the sea This %  alU for considerable uciobatic .igiUty, hardihood and endurance on the part of the eren payi them with With its beautifully stn hull of i>olislit'l cadai planking. phosphor brvnaa in stainless tvel e^uipiiieut. the Eighteen Itooiai Ll n expensive i war, a fully HI eoujd be set in the l £335, but now the same job costs about 1:450 But this does not mean that thi aport Is limited to The •olit up the craw, and also boat balf outta) r in one season a boat raked In n this way. I ht \N U n it i' %  ••'' >• %  >i„on i ^.•v^ i i •braari Ifl Llghtlngi 6 30 pin Hub Water: 4.05 am. J p.m. % I I a KI'AY Rainfall (Codrin;. mi; Nil ToUl for Month le Y'-tn day: .83 In I inprralurr (Max I T mperaturr iMln.) "• ' V. md IXrrrtien (I J in i IS p.m • r by N Wind Velocity; Hi Bsllai BM hour KaraaneUr <9 am) i.94: 13 p.m. I 21.BZ5. They'll Do 1 imc .THE OCCASION WAS ULTRASO FfR^\E„A 5PENJT-PUENTV0PM0OLA R3R ONE OJNCE Of SCENT. • • |imm : I itlo B-B.C. Radio PrograraiTi*' i AMY IS. 1M I 10 %  [<> ^t'^ %  Spurllixe Hw.' a m Th* N-m. 0 10 Horn. N*w IM HrlUln. 0.18 m Cto Dow". U >>>*>>• The Kwt. 1110 p.m Na Al* U IS p.m. roaw Hacurd*. 1 P m Obart-vMion PWI. 1 IS P m R**l" Nwrvl I 90 T*k* U (in H*. I in p m. Home N*' *">•" %  inl-.ir,. :ilp rn Sport. RavhW. m l*.a> T**r. 4 pm Th New. m U m The Daily BT"lra, 4 IS P m •hlllB Gf-wi ..i > iS D m Tbm Jc^nf. Trto. ... UwTliiiil I'TOSramnw. i in Thv Nt>a. 110pm Hi Hi 7 IS p.m We aer BnUm. 1 p m ^•niJiWnl Nw NewleU*r. • p m Itddio Kewsrael, . p in •y. 0 P %  Th. B BJ %  4.. mliiu-al raw 11* •• i M i> -u HW Mjitim, 10 p.m. Meei ilv. v^notton.lDv 10 M p m San* Mac ihe TfMMtre OnaWi. 10 U n m BpKliU DKprtch. II p m. The Nwi. w*.v.w,v//,w///,v,v,v.',v-,,. ,v,v. v/im If'a? //#*#• th<> i W /•*•• tiff MmiMk FOR ROOFS EVER1TE CORRIOATM) SHEETS j 8 ft, 8 it-. A 10 tt lemUn ALUMINIUM CORBUGATSD SHEBl| 6 ft. 7 It., s it.. :) it., 10 ft lenilat Z FOR CEILINGS & PARTITIONS ASBESTOS WOOD SHKElS 1 4 ft. x 4 it., i n. H. a n<*Q. li | INSl'I.ATINti V, In. thiik WALI.BDABD .il 14c. Ml. ft VNITEX HAItimtlARD Ui hi. thick il I6r. . ft All Termlt* rioofed. Phoiw 4^67. WILKINSON & HAYNIS ttj •& %  A FRESH ARRIVAL OF SMILB Liaivn livxn iir.M*. I.fcumiiiji an in%  i Atioul class yacht, as thi* Star ts !u-day. Boats ot this unique BOW bt'mg built In New " Vfctltty. re! Welcome once again Cow & Gate. COW & GATE MILK FOOD rte, ..// b, .Aai ,Km ,„< lU io 6. ox few



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PAGE SIX THE BABBADOS ADVOCATE TIILK.SL.AV. IfcBRLARY HENRY rM>. t 4? B Y CARL AN DERgON. MICKEY MOUSE COM! BY WALT DISNEY BLOND1E M &ki soae *-* BECAUSE wE'BE BL.NN1NC3 AWAV ._ iNSTSAP OF TRV.I 0 B8CAK. OP THC CIJiME t?lMC3! HE 5 RiflWT! .SfVl,— M BY CHIC YOUNG I 1 SUPPOSE \(cw. SOMEEOCWS )> NOBOOV -4 SPOKEN IT Y ( -JSES IT BUT J EMPTY | i MTME INK POTTLES KNEW IT.' V.MERE IT NO INK. M < \ BELONGS THE HOJSE NOW I'LL ••AVE TO =INO SOMETHING NPONG AROUND I rfEPE. SO I CAN GET PiO -VV4AT r CO.-NM ftLtv 6WT t CAM TO A MAS. I Mi WAS 6CA063 0*S tv THE 6K>HT. BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANUS CCGCHT LOOT TDONAPPy i—— ir<-• %  * tXNT H0OW5O %  CO* %  %  RIP KIRBY -.vl' V, = STC-.I -. %  -. / '.' SOT 1a *•= M.--W I I B-V.6S %  *• .§ ao LO*SOW W I I --5 %  -o-i' :*K OtD TO Rt>< .*** / V*mr. Tta_-JU*T A MINUTI THI ; •••MBwei BY ALEX %  it s -c >-.-o s*av RAYMOND 5* .A_en "HF PWANTOM .1 x BY L.EE FALK ft RAY MOORES .flft IHSBE ARE liME5~ "Nit AMEN I THNIT WOUlPBETOU A SCOCEB 0*6OC*EiH2 %  9Ni He member* this label! :'''"'' %  %  %  %  % %  % % % % % % % % % %  ",„, \ ADVERTISE IN | ADVOCATt I >: AND WATCK I RESULTS. in %  '"'> BNars mm IT IS ONLY PLACED ON GOODS OF FIRSTQUALITY •Always ask foe MORTON STRONG PEPPERMINT LOZENGES A.S. BR.DEN & SONS (B'dos) LTD. W baby it t0 thru.,. Jhould. the food n. u perfectly suited to th, f.nt'i digestive p^,^ Careful checking ma bkj. tory control threw,, every stage of —nh^ eraure th.t Allenburyi fa, re id justed to pronfc t, easy digestion ud ca^t aulmll.tlon rijhtfnwm FOODS / ii4>.\u \% muss MiWP. LNtPWtAL LKATUn • UNDEN Ui HLl t I1V,* IMIi* Without a shadow of doubt will be closed on THURSDAY IOTH half-day and gn SATURDAY unlil 4 p.m. In tfl hoppm(( w tnfn und en* <>> M. V. STELLA POLARIS niio.iim \v muss SHOP. In Time for the New Year! DESK DIAKIIS; PLATIGM'M PENS: PENCIL SETS; CU> FORD'S ASSORTED SWEET BISH ITS: GENTS TUI PUSSES and WALLETSi LADIES' PURSES COSMOPOLITAN PHARMACY D., Pone. : -Ml M4! NI01T * LATEST .IMHIV.US For MEN WorklM Boots and Shoe; Dm. Sh For LADIES: CaiifornkUM. Fan-* '-ho**. saorUei ._ ^. For ind GMa. I —. I — aa^i tfaeAM th*. oovdneto of 8u{ pSaS THE BRITISH SHOE CO., Lft SPECIAL: I'loor. Furniture. Linoleums. Cat Wax-Polish Ihe book that has set the world talking ROMMEL .hbucklinft general who insured many I story, some % %  us some true, to be told about him Wins in World War II was still at it's height. Hollywood once tried to portray the chat, C'rrman General on the screen but they mfcaMd hadly. Here, at last, is the truth beh.nd one o( Uv iam:is ever to come out ol the second World War. What he thought ol his men and his Italian allies What he thought ol his foes; the men of the Empnr How he was eventually murdered by HitUi Beginning in the Sunday Advocate, FebJ?th





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0 RSDAY IEBRLAR V lfi. 195,1 \ot Final Is Still Considering Springer-Doorlv Case III! IIAKBADOS ADVOCATE Electricity Cuts PAGE FIVE lh. Seamen Pledged To Observe DisdpHiie T rratalfar Square Vj, snal onr (or this area. irtiM Colonial Serrctary told g^KW" jreaterday. a, -aid that ** f"" ,f hemr ^ "„ tralllc I m m -ho Government PUlininU Offleer. but Iho ** or llnhsvays and Tran.sIM i the Commiasionei ol ff— had decided that it would %„£ble to brlnj dkli Into until Victoria Bridge ,|areed lm Ken *" raaer 'he full scheme, traffic \ JJM Trafalgar Square from EavnSOW would not be allowed {TIM right over lh e l Bridge, but would have to go Jr „|,„lf way round through Bndie Street. TlKfi the full scheme was iniforliiml !herefurt\ me amount J^uth-bound tralllc over Chambw to:n P-UIRC was likely to be U has been very noUceab Ag Acting Colonial S> .* motorists here have not yet aurti on fully to the u.ea of one-Wtrafflc and do not make full JJrf the right hand side of the A ACCIDENT occurred at ^1 the corner of Pine and CulhMn Roads at about 7.45 a.m. M Monday between motor car ufi; owned and driven by Wil*n Asnby. of Dalkeith. and a Hod* owned i>tid ridden by Gor^Sciarke.of Lodge Road, Christ Chm*. The cyclist was slightly I-,.;'' %  r t HKAlt LAMP of .i bicycle vas damaged when an accident occurred on Hastings Road, maHarts Gap, at about 6.35 a.m. Ha* ta) lb* accident involved motor VaM-272. owned by the General Cftaind driven by Duncan Evelyn 4 Mount Standfast. St. James, %  9 a bicycle owned by Darnlcy Hope of Dayrells and ridden by Kenneth Babb of the same od15 /pHt REAR EM) of B van was damaged in an accident on White Park Road at about 4.50 %  m. on Monday. The van. M-2079. owned by Keen. Daniel's Oakery, Roebuck and driven by Thoral will nlon, and n its imposed by ton!. „,"£" "" *' nd heeaiw Caribbea, * !" the new parts foe the night pas^d engines have arrled and being installed m.a*. hu b0 n "inounced a fonnight ago. h e new a„ k sh,,, and bed p!,u(or | he new arrived by the S.S Craftsman on The Seamen, Division of the Union last a Resolution pledg%  radition of the Barbadian sea men and to observe the necessary Trinidad Sugar Talks discipline for the harmonious I working of ships It was decided that a letter I elation (|| Trensury Building. Poi: on Monday. 13th y, uphold the| niencing at 9 a. m The following were preset! ':— '"' "'•', : Court !" .* %  "." J>k *• Court toaetaai of ?8 S 4 8 "",n/' ,rk ni1 ""gulanons ~i A ss„r !" a .!"_'.")' "sue is whether the reflations lUd at Inline, £ alleged olfenre. they having 1 signed by llie Governor, but no, ?2JZ .""" """' lald fttoS £c fact that copies were vet to be laid before Parliament, and explaining why such copies were £*Tl '•'<' ""ore the instrument " clearlv For ihe n themanX-,,?',?., ft*""? trom *<>uW oe forwarded to Mr. D. G. ive : agreement. I„ the R-aolulion 'hat h ,.',.•""',' '" %  "T' "" -"""' 'hat the seamen reini •.U.fawSStT i .f ork ""led an, disobedience that iou J3ST52? m hrM ; "*. mm r lv p d KI """•">•'. "•" lime. „„.,, would 1101 ocrxlr faln Other niachineiv u,h,^K — I The Resolution was 'er marhinerv which was ei-1 J Resolution was passed Peeled to arrive by air ha. been if"." lrt, r h,d "•"' "" om •mt by steamship and is expected EL LMrock wh o regretted cerPhilosopher on Februarv 21 The changes ,n the !" ts have lh* !" i n *. UWd ,0 "ecommodate nSi. J5 h ""* "' Hwen -nd the him from attending the meeting. The Letter Laacosieg ksMag n .., i. "' 'tan^oii ana me T %  •".. ..^. f k """P' 11 SUUon Because l* 1 '" 0 "^ to gave assistance to crop season, sugar factories mployment for fa mnrt 1,^ u j li .i^"iii tnai i — v.p NWWI. sugar factories -• %  •i!" .iincm .vi seamen. the !" ! V ''k^ n">milted that • lr e in need of greater quantities A '" T """ experience with two trie at)nt*A <.h>>tiM .n— J nt uT.t-._ > .. itunuiini ...h.^i, ,, „_* Never Approved -•-%  '•. %  •* .-uuiiii.ii ihe appeal Ibould succeed. In reply to the Court Mr, Emitted that when as W*M the cCM here there was no lory enactment ctDM %  "iild take the common law of England as a liuiae Mr cited %  principle taken a ease appearing in 1918-1 Bench UvWon to the i. Hurt .-ubordinate regulation eame into operation when it !*•OWfl to ihe public ;i nd not when n was lying on the desk of 'he departmental officer who made it. I (t, howcv.T. that %  Into operation when %  made, that 2. Ine necessary Ihi! S" brou hl ""I yesterday that the regulations wi approved by hl ,., third M. This third set were .pproved by ihe U-Risla.ure. Mr John Wh) ney General, who is appe.-„„, „„ the Informant-Appellant, made the point that the fact that the regulations were revoked showed that it was considered thut thev had been In operation. .. „,', he ca,le begsn Mr. W W. Reece, K.C, Solidtoi General. Mr. Reece left tha e nt-p,;;; -•• M. E. Bourne, Lagaj Draua] Counsel for Ihe Deft nilant' Itesixiiulent. Mrs. [Jootl E. K. Wnleott. K with Mr. J. S. B. Dein strutted by Messrs. Ycarwood & Boyce. Helle Pumping Slati, The Manager of the < ompany hopes that i short time ihe esUkM be working full 'here will be ni cuts in the supply Electrj II aU lilt and that necessity tor n M Aw> R L U Kik-.-.i KllU H li '"^s^oci A c &.!>,,. Mat L CJ !" O^ ^DOwto,, rand, c %  ale Jotuukx. w li ayan 1 Difficult Order A BANANA VENDOR yesterdav h she had I • I H Schedule prtee, the found it extremelv rtifflcult n order. She da. hat being so, she eould make no pr the instruction of the Order reasoned that some ; lid be made to make thos? nrom whom the small vendors buy %  U -n ., reasonable pnee. In that ca*c. she said, there would instantly be a noticeable In the number of eases broken t o( Kellmans L^nd. Black islands. the Official Gazelle, that was i r dine 'ney took, it WM For Defendant Mr. Walcott opening big %  rlrtiaag led Ihal Mr. Whyatt had The Court is comprised of Tl. *• '"'" "' ihe case Honours Sir Cecil Furif •' not m dispulc. He recalled Kt.. Chief %  '' %  -' I"' had drawn to the (President); Sir Newnhan A "'"""""' "' ""' Court that the Worlcy. Kt., Chi, I Justice ol H" Hoorly had been British Guiana, and Sll "" WM da 'ed June 7, and the Malone, Kt.. 11 K Cbii I Justice ,"PP" • would appear from the of the Windward and rd also mentioned that date. Dos Santos Is B. W. I. A. Chairman Cha, m; „, s „ „, ^ %  *Sn ,11 %  Board Baatopened at Jamaica H. O. B. Woo.li; Mr Whyatt hadK.C.. (Trinidad), G G. R. Sharp" 2 7* „ Mr j w Hewttt, Chairman Mottley offered an excuse Baata un. Mi Keith McCowan. Secretarv amMr C Q M Secretary of B.W.I Sugar Association (Inc.) were in attendaoc 1 The meeting unai iniouarj .'ndoraed and approved I 04 tinIV'egation. const: Hon H E. Robinson M. A. Cuke. Mr Q the Hon. R. i. M iiunng their negotiations in London with the represe the Ministry of Food, the Colonial Office, the Treasury Board ot Trade u | January this year. I. was agreed that the offer to the Brit indies was totally inadequate, and that ihe Delegates adopted the right course when K„ to ask for an adjournment foi 'ru_ purpose of con^ultin,; th. B. W..1 Govrrni'. The Meeting also ana MOM delegates to Sugar Association (Inc.i B | ,) u Regional Conference to ho tieln n Grenada need i gates will seok the aa to the i : lo be pursued, and the in Iy proximate steps which shout," be taken. tthlg was inai-, highest possible dsgrs* ,,( u n a nim i t y and ragolutl terminated with %  %  th* Hon H | presiding over thl irfTien your BACK ACHES... • BkK. u i„a k, Ur, kl4w Tl.baarriu.tt.bM.liikn. Wk the, ra tat el oca., aaa .* mi i! ." % %  ** %  *I *• iiaa TU. Ududa. h..a.rh.. I'IH...!,,. %  %  '!' net •• laat taaa eal' l.rfa. — MU.. T.>d. r l>h T ,_rt pnmri, d!.,• iar—a.l— IMa-. tUa>, Nk. D*t. Dim, WU aaaal, M * .... t.a.J bfai ol ricM. .da. mi wmm %  • Hwt aan, I -..U, .a ^ ,,,,^, 1, n~ >~ M U Urn WM .k !• mi rm m nm, I. im,. di m. laaat D r~~ IMa Km*, ra Ifc. Um aaitaa. -h ih. ,rf hmm. that 2 .1 >l2a| akeat. ,u EPHEDROL quickly relit wei COLES a nd CATARRH It .Icars tin* t.j.al ngg %  MM to remove KiaiBnai and th* OQ. oVatlocu ol head < osda astd catarrh. !!>., %  patafU n.i il appUcatii n I i ttl. li n n.ueU Letter thn sa|g, • %  in be carried conveniendv in pocket without fear of leakage. or drop] hggkdbiigj Maie *> Ml TD.. Liverpool. England Obuinablr frm all Drug Mggag : HNH.IUs in, A.ilM. niNIRHU TORS. effect that there was no case evidence to the facts of the %  been heard '. the most was another remedy substituted "" ""' cl ^ p by statute. If the particular itatuta meant that it a.. er of pubuV convenient' "Hulations should be laid before the Legislature, then the parSM %  • %  asat, valued $8.40. was pulled responsible for n laying thai Jlrwn her land and thrown on he treated the dutv with con'hat ihe Court could do would be (round. The incident occurred tempt, would be guiltv ..i moti las/ miademssnour, lino I there was no statutory penally law, that was assuming that a> E*TE ACU8 I second crop ripe i provided for. 'fanes were destroyed when a Discussing whether or not %  aoecuired at about 2.00 p.m. at: sanctions of an> kind were %  slow Plantation. St. Imilip. The s i( i v when construing a provis%  •> belong to Mr. D. S. Payne ional statute ai directory, Mr. %  tht same Plantation and were Whyatt said thai in the i *' Jlr before the Court of Appeal, the Courts l*low had so fnr said thai X s u I >"i Nl "l on St. | it might cause n graal Inconrard*•> Bamabas Road at about 11.45 ence if thtv wan u> do. 1 %  %  on Tuesday between motor ; those trafilc regulations a i any M-678. owneu and driven' and void because they were not fMaeph Griffith of Bank HalMaid before the Legislature, but %  as, nd anothei loiry, M-1557, that they would still say th. > %  by the Pme Plantation, i were null and vnic %  Bor.veu by Cedric Manning of! wise they could not enforce UM N#m Mrar Of St. Albans The Appointments' Board met iarj 14th and on Uv AW Johnson. Rector of St ; anted the Rev, Lloyd Assistant Curate ol st 81uu A than. In tlu Rev %  D M Wootk Tit, was forme/ly An St Michaels Cathedral, | for Mr Uacock. Mr. France, Secretary, read the letter. ffighest Kainful! In Junuurv Dfall (Of the tnnntn n| January was above ti in the majority M were approximately 20 days a\ which i.tin fell. The heaviest falls |o occurred on the Mh. 18th and Hal The avaraga total rainfall (or for the month wai S.79 inches, as compared with 1 It inches for January 1949.. the average for Januarj lor Iha '•%  %  t ,.-—•--" %  -* twin i" Wtplaiinrni of M-1557 was MOTHER ACCIDENT occur.V" duty which waa imposed on Ihe public officer. Another Submission P""> al aboul 7 30 p.m. bcVt 521.„, c r u '"l 2 ^-. '?,* %  %  '! What in hli %  ro> ; W ? rrel "' ""'thui once u !" n" 1 "tiZ: %  :.""' %  S !" n„:i IM work .HI inloleiablc Hi' .. person responsible tor layin %  anauea <>t nulllflration ot the JJ 1 "*" b> Seymour • %  Hcllijnns Road. af!**' bhnmons, who was on al -w' 1 "" %  l,H > l| e. was woundS" head and also slightly E" hu ht elbow and aka II teemed thai the Courts below a***, taken to Ihe General ( had "taued ^J" ? %  "*• where he . ir M ii are provnions which impose a KW %  fnVXSjTSSlduly'-. a pu, %  IE? ", weU • the letl tronl must be sanctions._ Here a Jh aW-yjd lamp o, ,„. c.rlp-.^ns.^ndjhe^ore g ,,r.mise should be: Where there are such provisions. It l not I to consider whether ancUons. Mi Whyatt -i '•• I f dh 1 %  I*.* tromC K A.. Court had observed *yIn 14 Days g2*l n Oswald Boy! %  ..1 g^ 0 1 l^nd yesterdav bv li T* 1 M It A Talma I the Court nao """" Pew? 5 -A"5i %  a. te.i thi Attorney on Iha point M .nit would not tha queatlon <>( %  offence had been commit*. %  lid at the time. Is Date Material? Mi Wall 41 .1,1 he to..k it then that if the case was sent back il would be ami bacl. on tl Court held ttial it WM Immaterial whether Iha date was liil> 7. %  trial wa> Mi v. • I HI thai %  I i Court to send it i %  Appeal Ihal UM delay In laying the regulations was 19 m. chief luatlea with his seven meetings would Mi W petal was .11 three— the Dtiactor, the Qovemor and the Lee'isiBture—was needed before the reguhibons could be deemed ,o be in f' ;I would notice, he s^id. that tne Magistrate so held, -nd bo'li the Assistant Court o. Cou,t -* 1 I held tnot the Governor r ,i the regulations would i valid. Not Upheld naving' in—hTsj %  > {^"Is'sooTa. "pca-hb/-. > appropr,., I'Toitnculty w M covered by the %  . eommitW on, *'*TviJ?'T !" Z Kin.dom En.m.e h V'4rvir. n one^" U TOprisonment. The fine [ PW in 14 days. *t h Seven Day* Wide Act "•li %  ..id 1 ^ %  aft r n „ M 1 day. or i"~ Blll Talma. "W yesterday by H A. h covered every sort of subordinate legislation ropy of a statuuas required to .is found cseen:.: should -fore the !"" n aaiBi,,, The submis>ion Of Counsel had n• point which wa* nthei uncertain. kant'i favour. Mr. Walcoti conUnuliU neral had deal! wi'. %  I negative :aem. It was a questi -,th Chambers If elS-Sd-h tne Lora wj, nuestlon < %  •"•" bro,.'. ^_T-4J to stop on a ln „ i( that was found essenUal. com,„„ted on s~^ of thi none, drc. '" '"' • a. paga 7 one hundred years was 3.37 inches. Oranges. Bananas Again Pltnlifiil ORANCES and bananas arc HaMiii plentiful about U attgasj with %  ..it. and ln> with the.. ibrStti • oihe, in thi advartlaUki ol then wares. The, (etch bora iix cents each according to the -ue and buyers are easily attracted Bananas on the other hand. Hal f which are ol the 1111..1 variety and which the Sched-de Order has fixed at three for .> • -till being sold .it am cent each. / 0,000 Sugar In Tons 1950 7 Not 17 TIIK data "i UM RV Conference to be held In Barbados is the 7th of March and net 'he 17th of March as %  stated. BARBADOS will pro due UA.0O0 n according to ihe i Department Agriculture. U.S. Workers Save NO ivhujl Ol wt.ikers from Una colony m tha Unltad II, 1B50. iiiiiount t. (nun ItM Branch of the Lauoui Department has disclosed iRAKHAIIOS \|)V(K \li i, H RI'AKY 1, UIS) At 1.40 p m. on Saturday, Ihe North American %  M M S Calcutta, 4.18U t. : bearing the flag ol His I Vice-Admiral Sli Jam< i. son. M.C.M.ti r i!. ii M il. 4.1N tons, 9 guns, ll.M.s Constance, | rag irlaw, 4,190 %  nd il M %  U H I n. %  R.i N The ,ii Lucia, the "Constance" from SI Vincent. the u and the Patriot" from Trinidad. At 3.00 pin VI Jamai Pmuaaen Uutdad la %  oActal n I %  %  %  Bnagaxe Warn %  %  procaadad V \ n Rar HiKM I K M < i returned the %  %  %  Uona in honor ol the Meet, foi %  'hlch Ihe LagtaL tun im of £200. THE TIMES SURVEY OF THE COLONIES A sr.PAKATE SUPPLEMENT IPVBLISHBD IN FEBRUARY wnii mi MM ..( tJMMdlDI an up-lo-dalc knowlcdpe of the .ill,1.1. ol the ltriii.li t ,'l.inic. .is wiJci> .is rnissiblc. in I .-hru.il> llu hint, ii pubUshlag %  senaraie 16-paite illiisiiiucd supplcmenl dc.ilinp with many important current aapadl of ihe subicsl linaiKi.il, MOBOnic adminisiijliu 1 ud siKi.ii. AftJcki b) nMbofiBsiive wrhan ait desoted to: llll (OKIMKS SMI :lll IMHIsH ( RIMS liililMSI SIIIKIIS III K\ SISMHIAI.S "limns nit mi (IIIIINIM siKsiii llll I "slllll rUIMM Ikl slU.sllll' i III MIL THK MMtBHI.I (II Mill IM BUM* %  III KIISIIMK sr I Mil IN IN mill II I MIM, SIKH > •• I.IMNI. • 1,1 ,|||,N M'llkl IN Ml. II S II I. Illsl U ...I \N SKI rROU KOI R LOt I/. W II sn idlir. ;.. 2."> ('ill Ago THIS CHAP LOOKS PLEASED WITH LIFE HE SMOKES "DOBIES" FOUR-SQUARE PIPE TOBACCO. Tea/ .Hid there s nothing (tetter to do il \\ ilh than SILVER STAR CONGOLEUM In Si|ii,,ir. nil x 'l MM li UM) TV. X I each $.7S; 9\9 each SI0.47, '' ''"' ' li •' %  M mil 'I s IL' each SI3.97. Its Ihe Winl-li II, wide SI.Hfi :i It wide Mai 27 inches wide 71c. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, II, 12 & 13 Broad St. "Trrr= r=-H #.V ?'Of* \LL inland Into 1950 W;\ Y... with Flying Colours PIGEON CHOW GOAT CHOW two of Purina s best and obtainable from H. JASON JONES & Co.,Ltd-u-.eads. w I U\/MJ/. N. B i on HSSIHI Ul*i llu //// be MSI i Ml t: arranged in th< o\ WHEKLS I. K.