Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Tuesday

vs" Barbadk
DOS DEFEAT


























/ Price:

Pive Cents





Year 35. aa



BH. C wd Rejects g sis —
Gov t Compromise "

Res,

7
=i
=
D
—
=
ep
—

By An Innings
And 110 Runs

rcs Williams Takes 7
4 Wickets For 66

BARBADOS yesterday defeated British Guiana

ee |

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent) ae
BELIZE, Feb, 13.
NOONDAY CROWD at a Battlefield meeting rejected
A the Gevernment’s proposal that “God Save the King”

not be sung when Princess Alice arrives on Febru-
23, if the people refrain from singing “God Bless
rica” during the visit.
America paren er ne) THE Crowd became

win -— - . furious on
, : , learning the City Council’s plan |
DT CHS | Of presenting by the city an
ff ; address of jo yalty. to. tne Se
“Princess.” City Councillo ¥; ae



by an innings and 110 runs with a day to spare _
UED O. L. B. Wilson, who supporte: in the first Test of the British Guiana-Barbados ©
the motion in the Council was Intercolonial series at Kensington Oval.

Dethtikash. win, 19; vant: handled by the crowa se Although the wicket was five days’ old yesterday, it

7 , has found the plea- cillor Gordon Leacock who aiso heat ebag EEE

; with which she learned of

supported the motion, and was re-
ported to have flogged

children for Singing “God
America”’, barely

showed no appreciable signs of wear and in spite of excel-
lent individual efforts especially by Robert Christiani (57)
and by Ganesh Persaud (76) who put on 120 for the third
wicket, British Guiana were dismissed for 2319

scientist husband week-end
kor scientist husband’s week-end

school
mington Island, mingled with ae

me distress.

escaped when



i | meeting broke up. =
tn housewife, Mrs, | Methodist principal, City Coun- :
|
|

hin
; Was a great source of worry to the Gui
| © Sprnners and many fooglies
|



i more. assistance and he
inese batsmen with his slow



in their
: second innings, still 110 runs behind their first innings
. — { . deficit of 429 runs,
, incidence Q yo | Chased by the crowd. <= i ‘ sos ae ~ — C. B. Williams yesterday ; : yuts z ‘ler P
Baty tha rathes uncon: The office windows of Monrad Ss : Bot gs es - SAN | the hor - ie Tie vidi eee ep se
Pr ratiie here of Fuchs have | Jetygen, O.B.E., who led the anti- Se eS es -
sade newspaper headlines in the|Guatemalan demonstration in 2 i ’ ~. EAS .
_ week has causecka good deal | March, 1947 were smashed with | so
; misapprehension. stones. George Price arrived Sie -
â„¢o-day Mrs. Fuchs told Reuter | s

from lunch while the



crowd
storming the home of Hon. H. W
Courtenay.

was no relationship what-
between her husband and
Doctor Klaus Fuchs who is
lawaiting trial here on charges of
disclosing atomic secrets to Soviet

| The Barbados fielding to-day “his
| With the exception of Weekes and ward to one from Lueas, missed
|} Walcott who were extremely and Wood w hipped off the bails
| good, was atill patchy and the Umpire Foster upholding an
|bowling as a whole not far re- appeal for stump, The score was
| moved from ordinary. Williams then 191 for the loss of three
| finished with the figures of 4 for

66 in nearly 21 overs while Frank

King with his pacers took 2 for
| 39 in twelve overs and Lucas with
| his slow off spinners 2 for 66 in

TRAFFIC. “io ad ae

Mr. Price persuaded the crowd
to march to Battlefield Square,
where he led them in singing
“God Bless America” He re-
peatedly advised the crowd that, if
last week, Mrs. Fuchs | they liked their country, they
nm me ot had never heard of | Must fight for their rights in the

Until the case of Klaus Fuchs |
ter Sia manner and follow the;

wicket
Two hundred went up soon
a alter this the double century was
@ spectacularly atross the ifter this the double century é















































hoisted 161 minutes of play.
| 18 overs Ten rur er Persaud who had
| British Guiana yesterday lost been battin wr 138 minutes was
eee of thelt teOCOre “BR 7 ss SS | their first wicket when only eight caught off Walcott by Weekes
ie. SKY The crowd dispersed peacefull if 7 ae, Mn re . : ‘runs had been added to their fieldin 1 the leg trap ane os
. . carrying the American flag, and ee a te ee 2 - : | overweek score of 3] for no scored 76 during his stay a the
. an Chief W ill shouting “Away with G. E. C Me vickets Gibbs who faced King vieke nd macht ten bani
° Goldson”.—(By Cable) SOME OF THE NEW TRAFFIC SIGNS and blocks which are in use i: lrafalgar Square trom the screen oe was. edfda- ies, With Christiani Persaud had
a saws ed l.b.w, to King hy J e Fos- put 120 for the thir
_— Ch = ; -y ter without any addition to hi in ‘ ist fruitful partnership
| da-b.W.I. Russia May, |..\; T iv We May Soon |: ofthe | .
F In London [ - R 3S [ ee . 7 i I I h ‘SOP | e a } Persaud who partnered Pairau Leslie Wigh fted one from ae
e Cana B. L USSU : ! 1c Ory Ss n e * ii |deau helped to put on 32 runs Roy Marshall high to long off for *
sSOUTHAMPTON, Feb. 13. 2 a J ;
stage here looked ¥
eet tonne when cinema Cruises e / ears

nen, press photographers

roa
i MON'TREAL, Feb. 13 Af d U. S A
S hrma Tay Atticus tribal The 18 and 21 day cruises oper-| tea —-

who is due to discuss in| @ted by Canadian National Steam-
3 Ss eC vu s Ss



Buy An | before Pairaudeau lost his wicket foul omplete his _ oer bi
F 7 for 48 runs, The n 107 minutes a
99 ly wulanese r ae decided im- i
J ur Guiane; - . ‘ H
In 1 945 —. Says Afttlee Atom Bom bs pees sod bakirnan rf . ? ‘ 5 ;

provement on



































































was impressive, his batting in the i
] N Ww 2 He took t wo fi x t innings 4
LONDON, Feb. 13 } PARIS. Feb. 13 } ; ; , he took M4
. . " r . ‘ f Ss, . ae aries {Y whe he (00:
Ships fr alifax assau ¢ /ASI GTON, Feb, 13. ‘ 7 ; cad Rates : € boundaries o wh ;
his claim to lead the Fehaton win iex to Nassau anc The . United rae toatl y Prime Minister Clement Attlee, at present electioneeri | , Amid alk the fuss over the] Waleott in his 223 minutes. to
“ a ssels ané mtates a tr. ‘ , i : 7 oe” ae "
fatos of Bechuanaland. dian Cruiser” and “Canadian Con- offered to examine “any pro- in the north on his 1,000 mile national tour today declare } American decision to manufac first over but in score 39. When
Blas been invited to London structor”, have proved popular,! posals” made in the Unitec “Victory is in the air as in 1945” ture the hydrogen bomb, the|attempting t o he had added -
laiks with Mr. Philip Noel- }* Secs. sidadcd Veg. Wa we ve kee i ASP ies Ak odes hes ‘ ay i Acc a : oe i ee: French stil] managed to keeplo po « « one of even to his seore Ei
“Minister for Samentdls ~ ogy bog : Faugeras hick j Nations for controlling Atomi The party chief strategist, Deputy Prime Minister Herbert their sense of humo1 L Sater: erase iiaiiie: ya atan i;
h Relations. | welll the can al tae, "aca it | ee. was made—a fortnight | Morrison, at Plymouth professed himself happy about the A Foreign Office spokesman, | off breaks he run out. His aes.
peinema and press men pad | March, are Spent between Halifax | after President Truman. ordered atmosphere” but warned supporters against over-confidence | hardly able to catch his breath wes b on pt brother Norman
| Teports that Seretse_ hac and Nassau and the return voyage | his scientists to build the Hydro- Summing up halfway through the campaign, he said there | after repeated phone calls from when only fue Wight put up an 4
transferred from a South : tardy 2nd : 2am} , Mr. Jot S Ny : ” | excited American reporters, finally | short of his ha easy catch off {
a . cabal lasts six days. Passengers Spend) gen Super Bomb—by Mr, John } was greater enthusiasm than in 1945”, Mees : s 0 éuatuby asy ; Ne
mM plane, which was held “P |one day in Nassau and from five | Hickerson, Assistant Secretary.-of 7 ain Ns | B8ve. this stock answer; ieerdPabeoieell Wil Williams near
ndria, to the Nairobi fy = | to:9i days at-Kingston;on the 18-} State fo; United Nations Affairs? y~ “The Tories aré badly in need “Never mind’ the hydrogesi airauc , cover point but Hi
which“atrived here ‘this | S® Says at-King; ; i I l Right now w re more;/been at the it d P t3 ans
| eC > s aa ok ietaiae | | > Cc rented, 20mMb- ig ow we ar ore i f droppec 1 are
: day trips. | of a stunt,” he commentec | | 0 on oe : A a
and Both vessels are passenger- It was in reply to Russia accu= | Laws ] Oo Attlee today experienced two] interested in oxygen balloons — . staan “No M an”’s ee
ESeretse was not on board, ;cargo ships, with accommodation | sations that Atomic Energy Talks | demonstrations against the Labou: The same day, a Paris new eee avid ‘hed ane pi Me mn Je
al | for 12 passengers.—B.U.P. had collapsed, because of the 7 | | policy, one in Greenock (Scot-| paper ran a front page cartoon vehi a ight refused a rae
5 ‘aaa , | Western attitude. vontro est land), where women Communists] showing two Frenchmen walkir hit ee run and Leslie ie |
F °] } But he said America would SOT with banners declared: “The| along a Paris boul: vard, deep in ieeaal the major Wight who had / it
ealth Scheme | cops > *9 | tinue to» support Atom Control | Atlantic Pact means war—stop it.’ | thought. One wa: saying, —~ sending ee One. are at
: “ « } I lecemeal I ace Plan, approved by the General ermany In his speech, made in support of| So, the atomic bomb is cx 5 thas then 50 in icket tried to AF
D.. Trinidad aM 2 Assembly until a’ better plan was Hector MeNeil, Minister of State | pletely outmoded 2 Reoypete sl 4 reg: in his : i
; Better | han None devised. be FRANKFURT, Feb, 13. for Foreign Affairs, Attlee attack Do you think they will put it nites thik’ ‘the groun but a Bo
RI-OF-SPAIN (By Mail), | onder Rene ioe ton|. ‘The: Adiied ulaiiness Security | ed | Conservative Chairman Lord| on sale with Sat Pet, OL the eee en becathe harp throw in
f for a. voluntary health TOKYO, x ? Teen oak Gade ted of | Board is drafting a new and cbm-| Woolin for showing “a completé surplus?”—(ILN.S.) quite comforta- ©. B WILLIAMS _by Roy Marshall
in Trinidad, providing; Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida say, Wilt "Clavie coal ‘that | Prehensive law, laying down the failure to grasp the essential con- nice ble ana the rate of scoring in- #’ve C. B, Williams. the chance
meument for members ot | told Rarliament today that Japan | State ‘eure ‘ment with Russia |Sbheres of operation for peace- |} ditions of the madern world : y id B apo creased, By the time that the first ‘!0 te 29h ny ey Oe ee
friendly societies paying| was in no position to refuse mili-| an a ms agree es A be- | time. industry in Western Ger- “IT-am not going to rn i ner ergnian century was reached they had got pire Fe ai ‘
Hinge . 2 ¢ ases > . y powel now would be , ’ - re petrol here or a bit mor« z : - es Norman Wi made some mea-
ings a year, was made | tary bases to the occupying poy ‘ t would lull the United | many. : bit more pe \ Ta in front of the clock one hundred : j ae : }
i Registrar ‘of the societies He said that a “piecemeal aot ae a ‘af seater , An Allied official said here to- tobacco there. We shall carry o Can Claim Baby being completed. in 91 minute: ure of atonement w hen he pulled
IPort-of-Spain, to the Trinidad | Peace” was better than no peace; States inte a false s |day that the law was still in its | to do the best for everybody witt re They kept up this pace and the an ofl ae. SoM va Marppall ie
‘0 mment, i jat all. The Government's view on| ity. | formative stage, but might _ first things first,” he said, | ROME, Feb. 1 third fifty came in an additional “cog comes’ 7 b Ul iat cook a
operand ilitary bases and a peace treaty . 4 » West- {ready in three or four weeks ; ; ‘id Bergman c: lais rhe es. Persi as lucky to leg boundary, the ball la aeng oO oa
m peibutors pe the scheme | 7s hah Bs target of attacks by Mr, Clayton man? 7 ~*~ bi ) eats it will S submitted to the Another demonstration this we 15 Ob F 7” f * es ~ eT ae oe ink the top of the Kensington Stand to at
ex get free treatment in any | !!é ena ee ern Powers would be willing to | 4 tre “ni B | time on behalf of 200. strikin a en A eg ave Ue .- ; register the first six of the match
' : | the Opposition parties. Yoshida| ‘ i greement ’ Allied High Commission in Bonn, as as her divorce from ‘ke 0d when he had «reg
colony's hospitals for most < pe recut Japan’s claim; keep such an ast Haat ween [" plumbers — was staged for th Molijereed hate 7“ ‘alist Lind tera aoe of Goddurd with his In spite of this the Guianese ‘a
Of illnesses and physical dis- to islands 800 kilometres south of never fully trust van if amem-| It is designed to replace the Prime Minister in Glasgow. Leaf strom is recognised in Sweden. ‘ore at 38 batsmen kept well in front. the
mr except drug addiction, raanbestun 5 Ae ey rnmost Senator Lydda Johnson, 2 yices | Allied Control Council Number } jets distributed among the public oe 3 ; ; ' , ‘ ; : saan oak r
Kyushu and the two sc uthernm« ber of the Senate Armed Services nn i the condi- | . 7 Gas Board was] “#S learned authoritatively today. | clock and 300 went up in 283 mir
oe and §6cases whe *€\islands of the Kurile group. Th¢ Committee, told journalists that | ‘43. which lays ie 2 d German | Said. the Scottish as -Boare - Rosselini’s lawyer, Signor Gin Phis pair settled down nicely tox With, 10 rim, ectdee to
ey psychiatric treatment 48'two Kurile islands are at present | Ru oy | st. eee ean ace ay a nearer a gagged by ee eee pout| Be: Sotis): expert on’ internationa ind bore an even share of the the score Gaskin, who went. in
led eget : . » Sovietc.__ ay VUSSLE van Cs oe ry on a four Powe ASS, Speaking to a crowd of abo 4 r ae v oe : » score was 158 ; int ’ } . ork
, |occupied by the Soviets.—Reuter. xg the United States in de- | 'NGustr; ~" ty . I i . aw and matrimonial probler scoring. When the score i ( bat it number ten as
Societies have a member- | aipeee in tse saliad sietinn Ter ee re 3,000 Attlee said a great task a told ‘Reuter’ that Miss Bergman!}oth batsmen. had reached 43 bowled by Boogles Williams for
fg t ates » ’ cal ‘rtake “ > ¢ versio ” : } lft, + 5 the 4
of 125,000. They plan to |} —Reuter. ar Gabeis henet Gedleréd int nara Satan te tar eterna can have the child registered Witn | Persaud completea tifty m. pe a 1 single and this was the begin- ;
i scheme in July and re-| Naples’ Dockers 4 report of.the Board’s .work. just ae re Ps ina the practical appli. | her name as aoe ent Ros- | crisp ae hg “ off re wane ning of the md: Jone gee j
acts wi > Govern-| + ‘$ oe , nt Se oe we ee Seana tee eae selini’s immediately the Swedisi | for a single e ha ‘ was last man in on su 3
feats with the Gover < published here We are not even j cation of the doctrine of the = a rie vg hy effect. | wicket for 99-minutes and had hit | vo balls from William. He hit ,
; ‘approved i ill he first | Ready To Work l Disturbance sure to-day that Sera brotherhood of man.” ick L uanak De Sotis said he did| six fours. Next over Christiani out at the second ball and put ,
: Het Will be t e. Oree | ? | Communa t is complete. “It is our job to see | eee re would be at |also completed his individual half up a dolly cateh to Roy Marshall ;
of its kind in the British amen ‘ ck tczaeenee Feb. 13 that the Germans do not engage Attlee’s vividly contrasted aspir-} not expect there would be any | also cc : setting into his wicket “P * warnoint nd he was dis- ;
Indiés, | NAPLES, Feb. 13, CALCUTTA, Feb. 1; 1-/in Atomic research, poison ga8| ant for Premiership, Winston} difficulty about the decree: }century by setting Mie from Wile, *t, Coverpoint a d re k .
i | Naples dockers today howled | Indian Air companies in Cal- ¥xyGns { the bacteriological | 4 chill, was to-day travellini acceptance in Sweden as the|and tickling a googli missed for a “duck ie | “itis it
|down a proposal that they should | outta were today sending a fleet held, ar 1 t in pects of the os : d to exhort Scottish| asons; for the divorce are valid |liams down to deep fine leg for Guiana innings had closed for 319
ty : mae ke arin 7 en $ ack field, and certain aspects : - northwarc B . on aSONS u “ ly wy » he w been batting 4 Yen d { * 295 minutes, Bi
POLICE DIRECTOR refuse to unload American arms, of ten-passenger aircraft to Dacka, fuel flow field, but the dividing voters at Edinburgh tomorrow also under Swedish law. | three. a h ee ieee ane. tad eee aoe — a fi
‘ 10 FACE TRIAL uaeen Leader Giuseppe Di vhetheg | Bast Bengal, Capital (Baliga) line between warlike and peace- Among the last day nomination Miss Bergman’s marriage tol for = f crudk six boundaries Firs! “T. st by in innings and 110 me |
: A who made the proposal walked | 5) evacuate refugees from that ful research {¢ hard-to define = rush were several ministers in-]} Rosselini is expected to take place and read mS ie caine oo " t Tes an lings
BAGHDAD, Feb. 13 out of the meeting after being | iy ; espeefally in the fields of radio cluding Aneurin Bevan, Minister} in Rome immediately the decree | But with seven sé ru i}
Khalid Director General of |Shouted down. 4 | Communal disturbances have active energy, chemistry and bac~ of Health and James Griffith | is recognised in Sweden. | meme ene 1;
Police, arrested in the week-| The. dockers then passed + |been reported in Dacka in the teriology.” General Hodges claim Minister. of National Insurance After the marriage the child, j i
i len resolution declaring that they | a ays. Yesterday two], however, that the Board's A number of surprise nominations} named Renato Roberto Giu te! e6 /
‘ Po fae 7 | were ready to unload “any kind | orien cision were sent to take pe calianns has proved quite sat~ in the elevesith nae also brought] (Giusto after Miss Bergman 8 O ysamy Ss 4 ype ie
the Government by ;of _ merchandise. sey rea refugees owing to disturbed |icfactory, and has Seon . new opponents for several Minis paneer) We 3° Soceared, eat : :
it was disclos ay j decided to send a referendum to fee at tan owes rport inite state of responsibility © a | mate | H
r closed to-day, jaecided to ta| conditions at the Dacka air] definite stz é ters. | + ahead | rie ® 99 im
found guilty. he m... > sen- |dockers in other ports of Italy 1a} Vo Neen ibis > alta sontinued > part of the German. ; Preparations were going ahead — S t "
death” ne aR e een a “their opinion. in Calcutta the situation continu meee , i led Four members of the Churchill today at the clinic where Mis octa ecuri ;
i le as —Reuter. to improve. —Reuter. Surveillance over industry he. family will be fighting for th Bergman is lying with her son for | a
ee at sented far greater ones ‘he Conservative case, Winston} i), baptism of little Roberto as : | . 4
LL . ; pe ; .
those in the scientific fi Churchill's son, Randolph, and his Roman Catholic j —In Africa
added. Lb itpiant ‘chaes TEwO sons-in-law, Duncan Sandys) “ny, ceremony is expected ¢!
ry" zeneral said, “Most Ger- feta ed Soadesi| (220 : ‘ 1
The ee a my reputable | ind Captain Christopher Soades | také place tomorrow afternoon. GENEVA, Feb. 14.
i strig s are i | : Ye ¢ 7 7 s ms
sine bree we laws laid dqwn} were all nominated today. in the clinic chapel. Cameramen After a 17-day probe in the British Cameroons in Africa a
— Reuter. | will be allowed to photograph th Inited N: s Trusteeship Council Yommission
for them.”’—Reuter i | baby for the first time during the four-man United Nations Trus eeshiy c nissi
| ceremony. —Reuter. has decided that polygamy is “a type of social security”,
ia - e : . ‘ Polygamy, the members of the
Thirteen Anti-Titoists _ Commigsen” said in thelr, reper
) |



ia 7; d “Assists issued today, would have to con-
Be rade Belg n Primate Vanguar tinue “until western civilisation,
Sei be | i shi through education, convinces the
n need In lg dD i R port Distressed Ship Africans that other ways are
he ision that} entes e, | ST. NAZAIRE. Feb. 13 better and preferable”.
RAD . 13. | aequitted with the prov A that | ST. NAZ B, Feb. 13, , 2
cos roe sn Neds court | they would have to do compulsory | BRUSSELS, Feb. 13. Britain s biggest a — “Plural marriage is partly a
The Belgra wd . orison sen-| labour for two years. ‘ |_ Cardinal Van Roey, the Belgian ‘Vanguard ) today too : in hie, | means of sustenance to the women
today passed aor aantet five} The Public Prosecutor in the Primate, to-day denied Belgian | he 4,512 _ French a as bp mvolved: ‘hende the practice that
tences on thirteen de vere found final address described the defend- Press reports according to which| ‘Bofla” whieh called for he p - a chief inherits ‘the wives of his
on studentte “ 2 gp ants as “hostile elements attempt- the Vatican had intervened in| storm tosséd seas oif the coast of |
Marshal ‘Titdy Ceeinason, ing to disturb the building of











; $ deceased predecessors”.
i ’s fi year y »g- | Spe last night, according to a}
Belgium’s five year Royai ques pain ta Saree a
r al anti-| Socialism in our country.” | Hom According to. the reports, | radio message from the warship | This report by the Commission
They founded an by 048 “Thanks however to the strength | published by La Nouvelle Gazette, | sicked up here on the Cameroons. is publaed
lav en ovi ia i 7 e ¢ ap nf Ne
Crown ab ie tein of Yugoslav | of the country, and confidence ofl a provincial anti-Leopold paper, | The 42,500 “Vanguard”, home-)four days after their announce
o_o | the people in the Government they! the Vatican, desirous pf avoiding ’
Nations.

' ; that the
oe . weorelae the | ment from Lake Success
| ia ae a, |i Nate tet eet) Mehetaneas Mire serse i | hudse tr wis" Spore
| Their defence was that they/ish and ‘hostile plan.” g | last remaining Catholic Monarchy, night in response to the “Boffa’s” | eroons chieftain had
lnerely wanted to organise a legal | All but one of the dcefence ii §
















: / ly happy
had urged the Belgian Primate to |"! e- S$ and, announced] that they were perfect "
Opposition Party | lawyers pleaded that the defend-| bring provisionally exiled King ee er = - and ‘would prefer no inhorteness.
} Main sentences were: Pavle| nis were not guilty of a crime | Leopold to reconsider the problem | that s . . ; The report recommende
B inje vic, an engineer, 20 years | against the State, but of failing.‘ objectively with his nobles ‘and | It. has been reported, that the| gradual evolution towards modern
| hat ar, Serovic, econ- | »iy for permission to form their ith an impassiofinte view. Ae- aA = th jamege. | Conditions ard self-government
| hard labour. Petar Serovic, n-| apply . | ; thé. same reports. Car- Boffa”, despite storm damag . . hi ‘iulinefiaie. callaat
ni} tud 18 yea Badpic | organisation legally. |cording io the same reports, ' j ae der ‘way fox|rather. than. #
y student, Ts, je novie’s lawyer accepted) dinai Van Roey had agreed to the ; was able to get under + he | changes int’ tiie Geeemanamene
Filipovic Lorand |} Jovano oo 8 lawy sia ji nd] Vatican request p | Bordeaux without aid " = the "saraicee the biggest a
and Petar Dimitrijevie, ij prosecu or S argument, , \ au a . ju t +4 thal} VY; nguard” or from the 500-ton % ; is said if
students, 15 years hard labour:| asked for leniency beeause ti The ¢ ardinal, in a letter , pa ena freighter “Bilma™. which | problem, . _ = ar ea
' ova Milor : i hE anger « > defendants is | leading selgian newspapé 1 E> . snals.| seemed to be e cre Qa i
tl ovane Milomer Lipojevic, | social flanger of the defendar a pe aha had also responded to her sign: see : : re /
D ; es er’ ae Dayne. pe “duty ti temas that the - Sing ware till, running high adequate basis of nena haw p
F , ‘ r the people were behin , rs ee founded”: |whew the: “Wanmeies’” teak the | sation among the broad m ay
hatene ig ' to ten! Marshal Tito’s Gove = ~ . rumour re entirely gate besia kent vessel in. tow.—Reuter. the population.—Reuter. {
t : ‘ were —Reuter.
PF } } : aud k re : : ar wo elendant .
a PERSAUD xecuting an elegant pull to the leg bour fs : :
team yesterday with a good display scoring





Leeann ae ae er meee





PAGE TWO



THE COLD DANISH BUFFET SUPPER which is served every Sunday evening in the Ballroom
of the Marine Hotel, is becoming increasingly popular with everyone not only among the guests but

also with many members

of the community.

Pictured is a group of the guests as they went

around the table helping themselves to the many varieties of specialties in food, being presented

in a most decorstive manner,
H*® Excellency the Governor

and Mrs. Savage, Mr. Grant-
ley Adams and Mr, W. W. Reece
are among those due to leave
Barbades on Wednesday morning
for Jamaica to attend the installa-
1 of H.R.H. Princess Alice, the
ess of Athlone as Chancellor





University College of the
West Indies.
«<> «>p
In Three Parts

7 E selection of recordings
which have been selected by
Mr, Q2'V. Chandler to be heard
the projramme Personal
nee Concert at the British
Wednesday at 8.15
1 be in three parts. The
divided into Over-
he Flying Dutchman by
Raymond by Thomas and
Schubert, and
and Valse
by

Beauty






i br
I by



€ econ contains the
ks of Arcangello Corelli,
ie Serenade
VSKY





»s, Gounod’s
iL Dei by
, “TH Walk
b ise ’
senia-





cin
ito us,” a
I val Wedding,
the’Choirs of Westminster
H. M. Chapels Royal
f the ? ic Apprecia-
ire invited to meet at
r prior the Personal
co Cc
«ap «»
Navy Love Us
— S week Nelson's Dockyard
Antigua has been tne

I n to officers and
f H.M.S. Glasgow. Steel
ls Gate” went off to
and entertained the
, officers had the thrill
to steel band music at
rator’s residence.
acclaimed “Top-

a altractl





of men of the
v ve expressed
y t Barbado





And Pleasure

BURROWES,
‘ | ; n }
ar Ltd., ot

Business
RA RI
svi



Appointment

M*. Arthur Kenneth Croston

has been appointed to the
Chair of English in the University
College of the West Indies. Mr.
Croston is a graduate of the
University of Liverpool, where he
obtained First Class Honours in
the School of English _Language
and Literature. He was later a
member of St. John’s College,
Cambridge, and obtained his First
Class with Distinction in Part II
of the Cambridge English Tripos.
During the war he served in the
Royal Artillery from 1940—45
and was a regimental officer dur-
ing the campaigns in France and
Germany. His publications deal
mainly with the Elizabethan and
Stuart periods. He was appointed
Lecturer in English Literature at
the University of Liverpool, 1948.

Had To Be Abandoned
HEAVY showers during the week,
caused the Antigua recreation
ground to be sodden, and a cricke,
match against a team from the
H.M.S. Glasgow had to be aban-
doned- The beating of the Re-
treat was done by marines from
H.M.S Glasgow on the Parham
Road opposite Government House
yesterday afternoon instead of on
the grounds.

«<>» «>
50 Below

IT was 50° below zero in Sas-
katoon, Saskatchewan when I left
on February 6, Mr. A. P. McDon-
ald told Carib shortly after he
arrived at Seawell yesterday
morning by T.C-A, from Montreal.
He was accompanied by his wife
and they will be here for a week’s
holiday as guests at the Hastings
Hotel.



Mr. McDonald is a Radio Opera-
cor employed with T.C.A, in das-
katoon.,

«<>» «>

After Six Months

R. C. Gordon Crawford,

Technical Manager of the
Central Foundry, returned from
Canada by T.C.A. _ yesterday
morning after spending an enjoy-
able six months’ holiday.

He said that there was a little
unemployment in Canada, but
other than that the place was as
busy as ever and producing lots of
trade. They had a very mild win-
ter in Toronto as against British
Columbia where it was very terri-
fic and most unusual for that
place.

His wife who went up with him
is staying over for another month
or two.



ceeeeceiietitiia taal aiains

«>» «<>
First Visit
AYING his first visit to the
West Indies is Mr. W. C.
Owens, retired General Manager
of Canadian National Railways.
He arrived here yesterday morn-
ing by T.C.A. for a week’s holi-
day and is staying at the Marine
Hotel.
Mr. Owens told Carib that he
ESTERDAY morning as Carib had heard a lot of Barbados and
was crossing the Chamber- was looking forward to a very
lain Bridge on his way to Bridge- pleasant stay on the island.

town, a friend stopped him and os “as

cae mee crear Ot coe, «Mee MM Bremen

ee 7 : : R. E. G. Hargreaves, Dental
Surgeon of Toronto also came



Mr. E. C. M. THEOBALDS
The new Assistant Director
of Education

Eastbound Traffic—Keep
Right !

Nelson's

statue you will have to
a quick decision!’

for a week’s holiday.
accompanied by his assistant Miss
Bridgetowners Marjorie Waters who is also a
adhered to the Professional Entertainer and they
signs on Broad are staying at the Hotel Royal.

Please Cross Here

LMOST all

yesterday
new pedestrian

Street which asked ‘Please cross Dr. Hargreaves said that they
’ But of course as always had a mild winter in Toronto,
there were a few who decided but in Montreal it was so cold

that seven power snow ploughs

they would cross where they
were brought into use to clean

pleased



the runways to allow the plane





in yesterday morning by T.C.A. |
He was|





The Story
That’s Always
In His Wallet

WHEN those

whom the gods
love die young

it’s usually sui-
cide. You read the story of the
young doctor William Alfred
Fitzherbert, who was found dead
in his bath. He was only 29.

At that age he was super-
intendent of a great hospital.
a very successful young man
Yet in a moment of despair he
plunged a fatal dose of morphia
into his arm.

The coroner said he had lost
faith in himself.

Inquests tell you only the cause
of death. It’s not the coroner's
business to say how it might have
been prevented. What happened
to Dr. Fitzherbert has happenet
to many young men. You read a'l
too frequently about brilliant
young men taking their lives.

Why, do you think?

Most likely, because success
without experience makes a
dangerous mixture.

The man who is a success at 30
has few, if any, failures behind
him; he would not be a success if
he hud, because at that age he
hasn’t had time to support
failures.

So when the first failure comes
he does not know how to support
it.

But the man who is a success
at 40 or 50 knows that a disap-
pointment or a setback is a tem-
porary affair. He knows that it
is 100 to 1 that time and his own
energies will overcome it. He
knows that because his own expe-
rience proves it.

It must have seemed to the
young Disraeli many times that
his career was at an end. He be-
came Prime Minister. No life
story of any famous man is with-
ovt oe chapter in which the
subject is in the depth of
despondency and despair.

If you took the trouble you
could draw a graph of any man’s
emotional life. The line would go
up and down; as he grows older
it would go up less and down less,
because experience would have
taught him not to put too much
value on the ups or downs.

nd the Caravan —27



puget words interest Sam, and
he s

istens intently, Then he
shakes his nead. “1 still can’t
imagine who the second man is,”

he says, “bur I've thought of a

plan, Those two must be search-

ing for somethin

away quickly. So I'm going w



THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Le SE A TE RE

Carib Calling

copra 7U3}o-AUOM? STAAET YI

in my shack, and
if they find it they'll want to get

ee ere nn me

[





j

,

Variations on an urchin
theme: Above, Miss Frances
Power, 17, holds the Challenge

cup fof her winning hatr-styte,
called “Spring Fashion.” Below
A. semi-Edwardian hair-do the

urchin effect swept to the top,
was worn by
Donavon. 5

rs Violet



n @xrprass “errice

Figure Fun

IF a boat can travel three miles
an hour against a current flow-
ing at the rate of two-and-a-half
miles an hour, how many miles
an hour can it travel with the
current in three and a half hours?
‘WEMSN'V

Guide To

Housewives
TODAY’S PRICES
BEEF—Corned
38c per 12 oz. tin
Salted (a) 42c. per Ib

(b) Boneless or
Flank
40c per Ib
FISH—Salted 18c. per Ib

Pe



ea Pr

.



With-




take charge of their horse

out it the caravan cannot work !°
Leaving Rupert in the shelter ot
the bushes, he walks stealthily
away and untethers the horse
Before long he its back again
**Here’s our tirs: bit of luck,”” he
smiles. ‘' Near the horse | found
a good strong bridle.”





GLOBE THEATRE
TONITE at 8.30 BOGART

“TOKYO JOE”



Wed., Feb. 15th at 8.30 p.m.

|

(1) JITTERBUG
(2) RHUMBA
(3) DRUMMERS

3-in-1 CONTEST

Music by
ARNOLD MEANWELL
























ee

Bergman's
Baby
Registered

ROME, Feb. 11. |

Ingrid Bergman’s week - old |
baby son was registered here to-|
day as the son of the Italian film }
producer, Roberto Rossellini, and
“a mother unknown”

This is the usual formula adopt-
ed by Italian law when the pater-
nity of a chile is claimed by
someone other than the mother’s
husband at the time of the child’s
birth.

The registration decision came
after a bitter argument between
the pair on whether Rossellini
should in fact claizn paternity oF
whether the boy should be regis~
tered as the child of Dr. and Mrs.

ee ee







Lindstrom (Ingrid Bergman).

Friends of Rosseliini said to-
day that Rossellini insisted on
claiming paternity officially for
fear he did lose the child in any
divorce settlement between Ingrid
Bergman and her husband, if it
were registered under the name
of Lindstrom.

No date has yet been announced
for the Bergman-Rossellin- wed-
ding, but friends believe it will
take place “quietly” at the City
Hall here within the next ten
days.—Reuter.



CROSSWORD



Across
2 anda 11 Down it can help
to lay expert dishes. (3, 5, 7
7 Love in a way that’s a bothe* to
the sapper. (5)
8. Sea girt land. (4)
12 ots a good course (9)
13. This, as you will realise is in

you













the U.S. (3)
15. Stages t. (3)
16. Thomas 1s e best known
ample of one. (7)
17 ng enou to intoxicate
+ A$)
18 S Plane floats. (3)
20 Where. you will find. lots rap
(7)
23 You'll have to to make that
stitch in time (3)
24 Twinges of conscience perhaps
(6) 25. Betrayer (9
Down
1. The ith gone in militars
fash > )
3 Not hard 1s in this store
(5)
4 Some verses include this lan
guage. (4)
5. May be solved in a roundabout
way. (6)
6. Intentions of old [haliand. (4)
9. You'll find it taste differently
)
}10. lanks’ ponies. (3)
}11. See 2 Across. (7)
114. Going this pace may be saler Dut
| not so quick. (6)
- 8 tarnished
r ty. (4)
21. The one groove you ha to get
| into. (3)
r Not fit for tee +









© 8.30 pom

ANOTHER WARNER BIG ACTION DOUB
i Le

“Oklahoma Kig:

and Richard TRAVIS in “ESCAPE from ORIME

Humphrey
BOGART in



Fri
DIAL

& Sun. Alan LADD as

8404 FOR RESERVATION






“THE GREAT GCarepy.








AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA tiene, op

WEDNESDAY NIG
at 8.30 HT at 8.39









PARAMOUNT presents
“THE PALEFACE~

Color by Technicolor
Starring BOB HOPE — JANE RUSSELL

NO SHOW TO-NIGHT
at ROYAL THEATRE

Wednesday at 8.30 p.m,
BENEDICT BOGEAUS /ceaa

presents

a eats i eee Oe oe









* JM PAYWE SOMNY TFT una
Hunted by Killers ...... Wanted by The Law

NO FUTURE but a bullet in his Back

SSSSSSSOSSOSSSSSSSSSSSSSSONHSS

ROXY THEATRE

TO-NIGHT at 7.30 p.m,

teens

55



Screen Plays Corp. presents

‘CHAMPION’

MARILYN MAXWELL - ARTHUR KENNEDY |

with PAUL STEWART * RUTH ROMAN + LOLA ALBRIGHT

Produced by STANLEY KRAMER
Associate Producer Robert Stillman - Directed by Mark Robson
Screenplay by Car) Foreman * Released thru United Artists














THE INCOMPARABLE

ATM/
BR OEn |

THE BOY WONDER \W




SHOWING

OLYMPIC

TUESDAY & THURSDAY FINAL INSTALMENT 1



A COLUMBIA




. = :
Men would do anything for Anta...

COLUMBIA PICTURES presents































- The other signs in Traialgar to take off. sid } kK
—% . Square were also the subject of “ss es SS f i‘ f
ae i mut h comment, and even at Played Golf Everyday i Hi f} ol / ; Rs
Ens’ ae cric ket yester ay in the Kensing- R. and Mrs. H. Hopson from | (= i ' ¢
Engineer Takes to stand, Carib heard several ] | { :
Fime Out people discussing them and the TC Regen ae year po fe
om @ - .« large tones ic have bee CA. en . 7 i ] :
; NAR. AND MRS. W. B. BOGGS a A gee = ae hoon spending two weeks’ holiday here. GRAND CABARET and (LETTE CODDARD .a
f ava Montreal = at aYINE the week-end , During their stay they serene 5 ta fl
5 t to the Pady "tera Miaens ats . small self-driven car, and travel- , ; am Bishop John Kreland- scar Homo a
L ong “motniog, ty We, BaRbadions, stop talking jean over the island “They dit} MANNEQUIN FASHION PARADE oe
: mts a anes On 7 re s metist be abdul something of major qule 0 bi tS a be AUADERICK CRAWFORD 3
ae ; ! tance c . “ s
} — importance time was spent at the Crone, the ee. te | ae Based won pay, ta
, f B employed with «> «» rest at the Hastings Hotel. They ee | picture!
eet , : content, derived from pure | ,
ere ‘ eel i will be in Bermuda for four days } si E 8 i
t ay ini ne On A Short Holiday before they return home. Mr B E THEATRE ee Oil and oranges, will ” Sea hamame Matern = Doesed ie PPAR Produced by PUP
4 Sharon Has A New Bell 1 spend two weeks at Four Hopson is with Flight Operations the resistance of the body =|
Bite CHARON Moravian Church will Winds, St. Peter, are Lt. Col. in T.C.A. andensurethatyour children growu MAGIC STONE” Story of pi P
Laie ee ee oon a a oak: ‘Hastings of Pr «. eon 5 ME en with sturdy limbs and strong teeth. | COME FARLY TO SEE “ OY ee
ih a, pe eee oer a Toronto, They arrived yesterday Comings and Goings | es |
oie tt Pee ge TY Mrs. Leon Maingot 7 > |
ge ce of the « yorn and : i ; a ME: and : on TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21ST, 1950
Peal ey ; a Col. Hastings is President of ; vere married in Trin- : ’ | . ‘ q .m. ;
aa be di Powerlite Devices Ltd., and is jqaq es arrived on Sun- By § a | Wednesday at 8.30 p ae
a co , ).., retired from the Canadian Army. avy by B.W.1.A. to spend their , SPECIAL REQUEST } ps”
bai this Church celet A. q They have two very good friends Oe ie in Barbados. _Mrs ’ a | THE “COLLEGE HERAL it
L i as ae ie poet "teen in Barbados, Mr and Mrs y Eric Maingot is the former Miss Doro- In aid of St. Philip’s Baby Welf Cent d | ate NM ee a “ FE OUT
} Mie ann e eomereaa Smythies, who live in St. Peter. thy De Vaux. St — Netritien Clinic entre an PVE On a nila | CARIBBEAN TRAINING COLLERE ne
a det to have some-tangible * nm «> ane " i P f Spirituals an
? eq to have some tangible » left on | + | in a rogramme 0 p ;
HY Wy Tet yal ap gall Rev. J. W. Birkby le n | Mamufachered and Guaranteed dy ‘ Scie i the
; fi 8 ee bi ate th , event ne For Three Weeks - gunday evening on the “Gascogne ORCHESTRA & HOUSE $1.00 4 | Alen & Heaburys Lid, Loadoo with Miss Verna Reid at
iy BE : ap Avera Yi e R. L. G. SMITH, Mining for England. Rev. Birkby is the | |
Me | lad.seen many years of Engineer of Timmins Cor- retired vicar of St. Bartholomew's BALCONY T2c. & 4 i ~]) | (i
\ hell hick lee Bae poration, Toronto, Canada is now Church. WA ad 8c. j is |
{ ; Cy Hell Which WIENS ¢ in Barbados on his first visit to «> «2 «8 ; ; a f }
¥ thout its hammer, will be the island. He came in yesterday Alsg leaving on the “Gascogne” Reservations Made Daily : JUST RECEIVED
, » |.on Sunday March 5, at morning by T.C.A., for three on Sunday for England was Mrs. }
1) f ] | service at 4 o'clock in weeks’ holiday and is staying at Marcella Peebles, wife of Major Ss
i, the afternoon the Hastings Hotel. Peebles. . | e
at! : ioctl LOPPSSSES POSES ESSE SS OSS IOP ISPS SSDS SASS PS SSE, |
4 ; I a6 }
ha WHI | CUSHIONED IN-SOLE GIVES EXTRA COMFORT | For ROOFS Fp anne, ONES.
4 i i | Lh (with Cheese
ef Brg 5 a A a
i Uz;k3 SIZES: 3 ? SIZES: 6 il AND os » Baked Beans,
BAG e iy | J) Bots Salad Cream “i
eho y ANVAS 1-97 3.36 Mayonaise. _ : : a
‘ C: S > PARTITIONS & ant
i} . = . 9 If your ROOF needs repairs, take this
i . A grand value for TENNIS, HOUSEHOLD and all S We Offer mpome : ° "7
me. ¥ Tw | 7 . : : to do it!
mer i L MP + Sporting occasions. $ ALUMINIUM CORRUGATED SHEETS ome Vegetable Soup 4



Oxtail Soup.
Strawberries.

Lengths 6 ft., to 10 ft., width 2 ft.

a



We have in Stock...

SFOS CFS

SCOOP EOSOP SOOO SESE









irr

RAMaT Ray grab oy WALL BOARD " 7. LUM ft. Tit ox m1
' : 6 ft. t ; Width: ALUMINIU} S—6ft. Tit. a
Due to TOURINE BOAT See our SPECIAL re Tr . eepreuee swans Cauaenae 7it. sit, oft, 108
oe ; KARLIT HARDBOARD " Pineapple Juice. ; : f sft, 108
ARRIVING SAT. NEXT, 9e— BVe KHAKI Lengths: 6 ft., to 8 ft., width 4 ft. m a ean SHEETS—4it.
» shal a wae ™ * x = ruit Salad NG
We. aball he Closing VALUES % GALVANIZED B.R.C. EXPANDED METAL CEMENT
Thursday next, Feb. 16, AL > Lengths: 8 ft., and 9 ft., width 2 ft., 24 gauge. acne ALUMINIUM GUTTERING
1 will 99 & 1.17 y . % | GALVANIZED GUTTERING
at 12 Noon and will re- ———————- sea 1X ai A) xU I
in OPEN SATURDAY ‘as i [S$ BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON $( INCE & Co. Ltd |) COREE
et a EVANS and , FACTORY LIMITED a i ee ae f
FEB, 18, UNTIL 4 P.l BROAD 1X DIAL 2039 a oo - 2 “« PLANTA’ NS I
WHITFIELDS STREET | SES esi. ee. SRE | stem ATIONS ua
PLL SPSS SSF ESL atte pln gpl pea om pcr me pian ss ————







ay, FEBRUARY 14,
quEsD:

Lawrence’s
| Autobiography

$400,000 A Copy

By TALBOT HOOD
CAMBRIDGE, England, (By Maii).




































































_ A Good
‘ 2 lly” Laugh

LONDON, (By Mail).
A Britain today is having a

' -by anyone willing to pay $400,000 for a single copy.

D until at least 1960 to learn t
personal story of the shy, blu

feats in the middle east
Stirred the world.

Fr known in the 1
years before his tragic t
told International N

“My _ brother’s

ican incredulity re-
the working of the Gov-
MF al National Health scheme
ee amusement was
an American story
hed in the current issue of
ich Medical journal “The
mer’ on how English

mal way until]
1960's.

“About a dozen copies we:

= ern and ‘offered for sale’
7 edly operate e;the fantastic rice

Aad r $400,000 each, Sa .
e in the United States are| d
; to learn how the Na-
‘Health Scheme or
alized Medicine” as they call

one to comply with America
copyright law.

“IT don’t expect anyone to bu:
at that price, but,

I'd be delighted if someone turn
ed up with $400,000

ie working, said the Practi-
ner article.

wloquent emissaries, adminis-
doctors or patients, care-
, have been telling
wom of the wonders of a welfare
ie” said the Journal.

Wn the other hand they have
wed of the iniquities and mer-
ary outlook of the British

The money would
come—I could use it,”

Lawrence, who
fessor of Classical Archaeology a
Cambridge University
1944, explained that as

i example of this kind of
saganda is the story of an
imerican doctor who called on a
ilish colleague and went with | tn
into his surgery and found
ucowd of seventyfive patients
\ ” said the Journal.

Hell’, said) the Briton, “TI
finish this lot. Hands
who have headache.
and get a prescription
the powders. Hands up} ;;
“hat have a cough. Come] ~
get a cough mixture. Hands| “Some of these men are
with bellyache. Here’s| dead, but 1 certainly won't
@” and so on until the/lish it in 1950. It is most unlilce-
pwas empty and the two}ly that I will do so until early in
to dinner. the 1960's.

ory would raise a laugh “Having read my brother’s auto-

lay ‘solely with him.

“I’m not in any hurry,” he told
ternational News Service. “My

men who served with him



now

fa

“I’ve decided it will be best to
wait until they’re all dead,”

Professor Lawrence declined to
discuss the contents of the “The
Mint” or to permit one of his two
printed copies to be seen. He said
the only other copy in Britain is
kept “out of sight” at the British
Museum, where it is “not avail-
able” ‘to the public.

@ incident.”
a —LNS.



India Police
est Communists

ST PUNJAB, Feb. 13.
e last night arrested
ple described as Commun-
fa clash in which shots
ixchanged. The arrested
med part of a proces-| The remaining copies, awaiting
ut 200 shouting slogans ; “sale”, are in storage in the United
br kK open the gaol; States, where they were printed,
q."down with the Nehru According to London literary

Another copy has been depos-
ited with the Library of Congress
in Washington, D.C.

. They were re- circles, one of the factors delay-
have attacked a Con-| ing general publication is the fear
F Office and g police} of libel suits by some of the per-
Fescorting them. sons Lawrence dealt with in
the attack three police|Gloves Off” manner.
Were injured. Tathis,! Heath would remove the danger
aiid tear gas were used

which Professor Lawrence appears

j willing to risk immediately only
if someone is curious enough to
pay $400,000 to find out what has
been said about him.

e the procession, upon
shots were fired at the
who opened fire in reply.
alties have been repor-

a far from the firing, —IN.S.







StS

S iy

nsf
~\



TAN LPG oi
| a

%

mre) |





A




and now 1 should like to say a teu
words about Mr Bevan's magnificent record in
rebuilding houses"



F incompetence

NM sqm

fo



me indiscreet and long-awaited autobiography of the late
ieerence of Arabia, “The Mint’’, can be read immediately

| Otherwise, the public must wait

eyed little Briton whose fantastic
once

good “belly” laugh over the] ferred to be » as he pre-

death)
ews Service:
‘ autobiography
will not be published in the tae

at least the ear!

about
ut that was onl;

quite frankly

- They would
have a copy with my compliments,
be most wel-

has been pro-

since
literary
executor of his brother, the decis-
ion on the general publication date

brother often told me he did not
want ‘The Mint’ available to the
public before 1950, at the earliest.

“He said that if it appeared too
soon it might offend some of the

and ‘the new headc uarters during thei
who might still be living to read | t ; ° -

pub-

fe.” concluded the article. | biography, I quite agree with his

he

O-











st

ly

>

it

y

n

College

SUNNINGDALE, BERKSHIRE,
ENG., (By Mail)

A forty-room, elaborately ap-
pointed mansion in Berkshire’s
'/“Millionaire’s Mile” to-day houses
Britain's first permanent Civil De-
fence staff college.

The new college, officially
opened by Home Secretary Chuter
Ede, was the former country seat
of the late Sir Hugo Cunliffe-
Owen, millionaire financier.

Even the tight-lipped Service
chiefs, inclucing admirals, gener-
als and R.A.F. officers, accus-
tomed to a certain amount of cere-
mony, were visibly astonished by
the magnificence and comfort of

1

‘our of inspection.

Described as Engiand’s perfect
country house, the mansion is
bounded on one side by the fam-
ous Ascot race track, mecca of
British horse racing, and on the
other by the Great Park of Wind-
sor and Sunningdale Park, coun-
try home-to-be of Princess Eliza-

freal laugh is that it is.opinion that some people might | beth.

mecited in America as a,not like it a bit because of the Slightly bewildered gold-braid-
t and the name of a|/frank manner in which it deals}ed Service chiefs wandered
‘nd respected American] with them. through the beautifully decorated
fis Ziven as having witness~ rooms while apologetic members

of the new staff explained that it
was a cheaper college, anyway,
than the Office of Works could
have built.

Selection of Suites

Prominent Americans who also
are expected to be visitors to the
college will have an unnerving
selection of suites to choose from.

The beds are ordinary Govern-
ment issue familiar to G.I.’s but
all are lined up in mock Spanish-
Moroccan rooms with Adam fire-
places, h

Those who sleep in the late Sir
Hugo’s royal blue bedroom will
probably prefer the pink-and-
green-haze bathroom, and those
who choose the pastel bedroom
may select the bathroom in helio-
trope crystal.

Some of the 40 staff members
defensively pointed out that the
mansion was accepted with 116
acres of parkland in payment of
death duties.

It was admirable for its Puts 9
pose, they declared, because it was |
in the vicinity of the Army and |
R.A.F. staff colleges.

The mansion was inherited by
Miss Marjorie Cunliffe-Owen
(Miss Marjorie Daw, the dancer
who was adopted by Sir Hugo)
and bought by the Government

st year. 1
“ “has been converted into a
staff college with a full roster of
experienced instructors. s

Its function will be to provide
courses for civil defence execu-
tives from all parts of Britain and
from the Commonwealth, along
the lines of courses run by the
Services’ staff college for officers.

The first of the four-week
courses already has started.
Among the 30 students are the
assistant defence secretary of Ma-
laya, the Chief of Police of Gib-
raltar, a chief constable, and civil
defence heads from all parts of
Britain.

They are working under the su-
pervision of the Commandant,
Major-General J. S. Lethbridge,
a former chief of staff to Field
Marshal Slim in Burma.

The course consists mostly of
lectures illustrated by models,
maps and panorama.

Forty Killed
By Tornadoes










J Napoleon
/ a Fo:



Slepid, f
law fog a Pidtly



ihe tones are a@ party ot
iiques, who only look backwards
to the past.”

>
Si

fhee's the

) kiss

© bu me
ry baby

n & $3 Ser





LONDON, Feb. 13.

Tornadoes which tore through
the States of Louisiana, Arkan-
sas and Texas during the week-
end killed at least 40 people and
did damage estimated at $1,000,-
Tees 200 people had to receive
| medical aid, many of them from
injuries. Most of those
trapped by roofs

serious
killed

which crashed in under the force
of the winds. More tornadoes

|

ast.

| have been forec adneuiee
|

Mussolini’s
_Kidnapper In Paris

PARIS, Feb. 13.
| Otto Skorzeny, chief of Hitler's
} personal bodyguard, who mid
| napped” Mussolini in 1943 when
a prisoner of the Badoglio regim<¢
|was in Paris over the week-end,
according to the Communist even-
jing paper Ce Soir today. a
The paper published a front
|page photograph of a man walk-
ing in the Champs _ Elysees and
alleged that it was Skorzeny.
Police said they_had no informa. j
: that Skorzeny was in France i
tated that Skorzeny

hing a pro-German

were










tion
Ce Soir
was now pubis A.
aper in the Argentine
newspaper ir ne Arge
. —Reuter.

THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

4
a, oe
CIVELEZAT IC

oN





Of Exchange

NASSAU, Bahamas, Feb. 13.

The Exchange Control
announced relaxation of exchange
control to allow that capital di-
rectly invested after January 1,
1950 by non-residents in projects
approved by the Bahamas Ex-
change Control may be repatriated
at any time to the extent of the
original investment.

Investment may be made in an
appropriate foreign currency,
sterling from an appropriate ac-
count, sterling eligible for remit-
tance to investors, or goods and
services from the country of the
investor. The same principle ap-
plies to subsequent investment as
well as to the initial sum invest-
ed.

The maxim followed by the
United States for the past five
years had been, in short, “security
through military power, whatever
the cost’.

“This mechanistic,
military psychological

technical-
att‘tude

has inevitable consequences”, (he
professor said.
“Every single act ot foreign

policy is governed exclusively by
one viewpoint.

“It has led to the establishment
f military around
vorld and the economic streng tn
ning of potential allies

“Internally”, he added, ‘it
‘uses concentration of tremend-
us financial power in the hands
of the military, the militarisation |
t youth, close supervision of ihe |
‘oyalty of citizens, and intimida- |

Dases



ion of people of independent ;
hinking”’ .

He said that the

ace between the

ind Soviet Russia, though origi-
ially supposed to be a preventative
measure, had “assumed a hysteri-
zal character’.

—Reuter,

Interzonal Trials
Begin

BERLIN, Feb. 13

Interzona] trade talks with a
view to lifting the western em-
bargo on imports of stee] to east-
ern Germany will start in Berlin |
tomorrow, Herr Kurt Leopold, |
representative of the West Ger- |
man Interzonal Trade Depart- |
ment in Berlin said today. |

Herr Leopold went to see Herr |
Josef Orlopp, East-German Inter- |
zonal Trade representative and
reported afterwards to the Allies
that he thought there was a basis |
for understanding. Herr Karl
Kaumann, head of the Frankfurt
Office for Interzona] Trade is ex-
pected in Berlin today to conduct
the negotiations for the west.

Western allied officials believe
that Eastern Germany will be
able to offer large quantities of
coal in exchange of goods under
the Frankfurt Agreement of last
October which at present is very
lop-sided, to the disadvantage of
the East.



—Reuter.



Memory For
Vickery

LONDON, Feb. 13,

Robert Vickery, driving a train
from Mendoza to the Andes,
rounded a bend in the track
and stared from his cabin at a
“coscade of water pouring down
the mountainside”,

What followed was like the
end of a movie. Here is the story
in Mr. Vickery’s words: “I just
opened the 110-ton engine flat
out, but even so the coaches were
Swamped with water. Then I saw
a slender bridge ahead spanning
a chasm”’,

“There was no time to stop. So
I carried on. And the bridge
groaned as the train passed over
it at 50 miles an hour.”

“When the last coach was safe-
ly across, I stopped and looked
back—to see the bridge, weak-
ened by the rains, break up and
fall into the torrent below.

The weight of the train had
supplied the finishing touch.

This was one of the memories
which Mr. Vickery recounted to-
day on his retirement after 38
years service as a London trans-
port bus mechanic,

Formerly a train driver on the
Buenos Aires and Pacific Railway
he got plenty of excitement and

never mounted the footplate
without a revolver on his hip

—Reuter

;

a
ine
| Friday with 9 men aboard.

armaments
United States

Millionaire | Relax Control

Boara | ‘



aN ti een ee

Communist Clash |
With Neo-Fascists |

ROME, Feb. 13.

Five people were injured whon| BERLIN, Feb, 13.

-ommunists broke up a processi-n| George Dertinger, Christian
of Neo-Fascists in Avezzano east Democrat Foreign Minister ot |
of Rome yesterday, seized their) Rastern Germany and moving |
flag and burned it in the City! spirit in the party’s self-purge |
Square. The Communists burst has taken over the foreign |
through a police cordon to seice| editorship of the Party paper |
the flag, while the/procession or-| Neue Zit, the West _ Ferman |

ganised by the Neo-Fascist Italiz

LU Agency oko eo Stee ie,
Social Movement (M.S.I.) was a aie i Sens ne |
marching to a mass rally in eee MCSE, nitherto gen |
local cinema. ’ eral and foreign editor of the |
paper, who has been officially |
Police arrestea four people. inj Sick for the last fortnight, has |

L
munists

a Spezia, Northern Italy, Con:-

been dismissed, the Agency said, |
invaded a Neo-Fasci +t

Owing to a shortage of newsprint |

meeting and stopped M.S.I. lead Neue Zit and the paper of the
Giorgio Almirante from speakiry Liberal Democratic Party, Der |
by singing the “Red Flag” eac) Morgen, are allowed by the East |
time he tried to address his fo’-| German authorities to appear as aj
lowers. |four page tabloid-size paper six |
Police finally dissolved thj| times weekly. The newspapers |
meeting to prevent a serious clasi\.| Controlled by the Communist- |
—Reuter dominated Socialist Unity Party |



however are printed on eight full-
Sized pages

SEARCH FOR MISSING | De,
the Western sector of Berlin told
PLANE |

Reuter this morning that he

Klein. who lives in |

had |

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas, | been dismissed from editorship
Feb. 18. | of the paper by “certain forces |

American naval planes took off! within the Christian Democratic |
here at dawn today in search ot Party Central Committee” because |

di

5,

NOVELIST DIES AT 75 |

LONDON, Feb. 13

Rafael Sabatini well-known
Italian born novelist, died in
Adelyoden, Switzerland, early

ned in



Gay, it Cal
was 75

_ Reuter, |

sappeared
flight over the

flying-boat missing since last they considered him “reactionary”, |

He confirmed that Foreign Minis- |

ter Dertinger himself had now

on a routin ‘| taken over the Foreign editorship |

Gulf of Mexico. | of the newspaper.
—Reuter.

The plane, a P.B.M.—5 Marine:
while

—Renter.

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PAGE THREE



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PAGE FOUR



aso

ADVOCATE

SS fosaSait

Published by The Advocate Co. td., 34, Broad St, Bridgetows



Tuesday, February 14, 1950





Weleome Fraific Rules

THE institution of new traffic regulations
in Trafalgar Square on Sunday is an at-
tempt by the Government to bring order
out of chaos. In some instances the new
regulations have been well received but
due to the natural objection to change there
is still room for closer co-operation by the
general public.

It is also true that some time must elapse
before the public can be educated into
appreciation of the merits and the reasons
for these regulations.

It has taken twenty years to get one way
traffic in Trafalgar Square and it is not to
be supposed that within one day pedes-
trians who have been accustomed to jay-
walking in any part of the City or the
motorists who has been accustomed to scare
pedestrians out of the way would accept
kindly a set of regulations which impose
new duties on him.

The regulations are not without their
flaws but it is necessary to adopt the trial
and error system before there can be any
approach to the satisfactory stage. And
the quicker the general public learn to
appreciate this and co-operate with the
Police and the Transport Authority the
better for everyone.

The object of the regulations is to bring
an easier fiow of traffic and to prevent the
unnecessary waste of time by motorist and
pedestrian alike. With the increase of
vehicular traffic in Bridgetown it was ob-
vious that if something was not done soon
there would be’a really chaotic state

The temporary signs which were erected
on Sunday warn drivers and pedestrians
on the approach to Trafalgar Square that
they are to follow the lines of traffic. From
Broad Street the line of traffic will keep
left until a point near the South Gate of



the Public Buildin where those going
over the Chamberlain Bridge swing right
while those for Rickett Street or Constitu-
tion Road will keep straight ahead. The
continuation of Rickett Street becomes
one-way and is open to ‘buses only from

the Wharf side. Trafalgar Styeet also be-
comes one-way with entry only from-the
Square so that traffic from Rickett Street



turns upwards and towards Constitution
before entering Bridge Street also one-way.
This brings the volume of traffic from the
Public Buildings, Rickett Street, Marhill

Street and Constitution Road into the one-
way line along Bridge Street. The road way
along the wharf is divided so that the
*buses from the Victoria Bridge drop their
passengers near the Cenotaph and return
to Probyn Street via the Victoria Bridge,
the main stream ke Nel-
son Statue keeping The
road between the Cenotaph and the Lamp
Post in the centre of the Square is also one-

ping towards the

this on the right.

way leading towards the Chamberlain
Bridge.
The new arrangements are welcome.

Pedestrians now know where traffic is go-
ing and a sense of self-preservation will
stop them from wandering across the street
and with the new signs “Cross Here Please”
erected in Broad Street and in Trafalgar
Square motorists will know where it is
possible that pedestrians might step from
the side walk on to the street.

The task of carrying out these regula-
tions is in the hands of the Police who must
be satisfied for some time to help educate
the travelling public into obeying the regu-
lations. The old lady who read the, sign
“Turn left’? and added “Right” displays
sense of humour but pedestrians who con-
tinue to walk in the road to avoid the ne-
cessity of crossing at required points are
breaking the spirit of the new regulations.

The time is not far distant when the
Nelson Statue will have to be removed to
the centre of the Square and traffic allowed
to enter the Public Buildings compound by
the South Gate only.

OUR READERS SAY:





ee

——

ssi ils MRM a a ciate

re em

DURING the past nine years,
considerable developments have
been taking place in the establish-
ment of free public library services
in the Eastern Caribbean, and the
Eastern Caribbean Regional Libra-
ry Scheme, as it is now known, has
played an important part in these
developments. This Scheme was
launched in 1941 under the auspi-
ces of the Carnegie Corporation
which has done so much for library
services throughout the world, and
$70,000. was granted to set up a
Regional Library service for the
astern Caribbean. The first four
years were mainly devoted to the
establishment of the Trinidad Cen-
tral Library, the original intention
being to use this as a centre for
rotating collections of books to the
other Colonies, but it was soon
realised that the narrow concep-
tion of a Regional Library service
would by itself be of little use, and
upon the expiry of the Carnegie
Grant in 1944 the British Council
therefore undertook to finance the
Scheme for a further period and to
develop and extend it as far as
possible. Dr. Helen Gordon.
Stewart, who was appointed in
1941 as Director of the Central
Library Scheme took over the
control of the extended scheme and
her retirement in 1948 marked
the end of seven years of untiring
work carried out under the most
Jifficult conditions; only those
of us who are following her fully
realise the labour involved in
launching a service of this kind
over so vast an area, and how
well the foundations have been
laid.

During these seven years,
apart from establishing the Trini-
dad Central Library Dr. Stewart
set up demonstrations of free
public library services in each of
the islands for which books and
equipment were supplied from
Regional Library funds, and her
retirement in June 1948 coincided



THE

The Eastern Caribbean

Regional Library Scheme
. By 8. W. Hockey, (Director)

time a well selected stock of books
freely available\to all who could
use them, and the “Regional”
books as they were called, brought
new life into the library services.
The next step was to persuade
the local Govertuments to finance
and maintain free library services,
as under the conditions of the
Carnegie Grant which were as-
sumed by the British Council, no
library can receive further help
from the Regional Scheme unless
some reasonable assurance of its
maintenance at a_ satisfactory
level from local funds can be
given. After many delays and
disappointments plans are at last
going forward and is hoped that
the second stage of development
will be completed during the next
few years. This will involve com-
plete reorganization of many of
the library services with the as-
sistance of Regional Library staff
and the incorporation of the
books used for the demonstrations
into the: main stocks of the local
libraries. Further supplies of
books from time to time will help
to bring the book stocks up to the
required level for the new services
which are being set up.

The Barbados Public Library
which celebrated its centenary
as a free public library service in
1947, and which under the live
direction of the present Librarian
is developing into one of the best
library services in the West Indies
has needed little of the practical
assistance outlined in the pre-
ceding paragraphs. Like every
other growing library however,
Barbados needs more books, and
a considerable addition to the
5,000 volumes approximately, al-
ready supplied from Regional
Library allocations will be forth-
coming in the near future. The
recent closure of the British
Council Library in Bridgetg@wn
has been in keeping with the pol-
icy of canalizing all library ser-
viees through the Regional organ-

with the first st€age of develop- ization, which operates within
ment. Thus, the people in many the framework of local Govern-
of the colonies saw for the first ments and initiates nothing which



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



cannot eventually be maintained
by the local administration.

One of the most important func-
tions of the Regional Library is
Staff training, and the classes
which were organized in the early
days to train staff in elementary
routines have now been widened
in scope and the examinations of }
the English Library Association
are taken at the end of the course
It is not generally realized that
the organization of a Library ser-
vice demands not only a wide
knowledge of books and the peo-
ple who use them but also a
definite technical training, and,
without ‘exception, the students
sent from Barbados have shown
a degree of ability and enthusi-
asm which augurs well for the
future of the library service
there.





The Regiona: Smeme, therefore,
is an attempt first to assist in the
establishment of an adequate
library service in each colony and
finally to leave as a going concern
a Regional organization in which
all will cooperate for their mutual
benefit. It is an attempt to do a
great. deal in a short time, but
with fhe advances in education
and the social and economic
changes now taking place in the
West Indies it should hardly be
necessary to emphasize the im-
portant part which a well run lib-
rary service can play in the life of
a community, and the need for ex-
ploiting to the full the resources
which are being made available.
At a recent meeting in Trinidad,
Sir Ronald Adam, speaking as the
President of the Library Associ-
ation, defined Adult Education as
the broadening of one’s horizon
which could be achieved by the
proper use of books and the re-
sources made available by public
libraries, and it is to the well es-
tablished library services in Bar-
bados and Trinidad that we shall
look for support in breaking down
the state of isolation which
exists in many of the Eastern
Caribbean Colonies.





Cold War Gets Warmer

PARIS (By Mail).
A period of increased tension ib
the cold war between Russia and

the West during the next six
months was foreseen to-day by
several leading western states-
men

High ranking American officials
abroad, as well as some European
political leaders, think that Soviet
pressure against the Western De-





mocracies is about to be intensi-
fied both in Europe and the Fat
East :

tis not beiievea that the Krem-~-
lin has any intention of dehber-
ately precipitating war ith tne
West in the foreseeable future.

The view still prevails among

Western statesmen and diplomats
that the Soviet leadership thinks
Russia is achieving tco much

without war to run the risks of
conflict
However, it is felt that Mos-

cow is going to turn the heat on
in the cold war.

Western statesmen see evidence
of this in Soviet recognition of the
Ho Chi Minh rebet regime in
French Indo-China, in the instruc-

, tions to French and ltalian Com-

munist parties to sr up new
trouble, and in the “baby block-
ade” tactics in Berlin.

. One leading Americhn official
in Europe who has reason to be
familiar with Soviet tactics told
this correspondent:

“There are definite signs that

| Russia is stepping up the cold war

pressure. The Soviets are starting
a new push against the doors of
the Western World all around the

| globe.

“They are looking for weak
points. If they find that the door
gives way, they will walk in.

eet aeilgmanemeemsseettRe A nT

Where they meet with stiff resis-
tance which might involve the
danger of a fighting show-down,
they will back away and try
somewhere else.”

The possibility is foreseen that
this anticipated intensification of
the cold war may atAimes and in
certain places reach a high pitch
which will appear to constitute a
serious threat to peace, But it is not
thought that Moscow will actually
go so far as to precipitate a situa-
tion which would result in a major
conflict with the Western Powers.

Stepping up of Soviet pressure
against the West may, in the opin-
ion of the Western statesmen, be
due to several factors

First of all, it is believed that
the Kremlin has been greatly en-
couraged by the Communist con-
quest of China, The Soviets want
to take full advantage of it in the

ify Kingsbury Smith

Far East before the United States
starts b}ilding up bastions against
the further spread of Communism
in the Pacific.

Hence, the move to support the
Indo-Chinese rebels which is ex-
pected to be followed by new ef-
forts to encourage revolutionary
movements in South East Asia.

Secondly, it is ecpnsidered high-
ly probable that the Soviet Gov-
ernment is deeply concerned about
America’s decision to proceed with
the manufacture of the hydrogen
bomb, not only from the military
point of view, but_also because of

Onee a

Always a Bishop

By JOHN CAMSELL
INS Staff Correspondent
LONDON, (By Mail).*

Church of England bishops who
in the future are found guilty of
“unbecoming conduct or of serious,
persistent, or continuous neglect
of duty”, may be told their bish-
opric is vacant. But they will re-
main bishops.

When the next session of the
Church Assembly opens on St.
Valentine Day, February 14, it
will have before it the Bishop’s
Retirement Measure.

For a year at Assembly meetings
the Measure has been discussed
and postponed. Now, it has been
amended to meet the criticisms.

The Measure will not make
provision for the unbecoming con-
duct of a bishop involving doc-
trine, ritual or ceremonies.

After a complaint is made it
will be referred by the Archbishop
to the Upper House of the Convo-
cation concerned. The Upper House
if it thinks fit, will in turn appoint
a Cémmission of Inquiry.

What's on Today

West Indian Court of Appeal
at 9.30 a.m.

Meeting, House of Assembly
at 12 noon.

Mobile Cinema, District “E”
Police Station at 7.30 p.m.

Boxing at Modern High
School at 8.30 p.m,



the psychological effect of this de-
velopment in the cold war.

Western officials pointed out
that this development restores
American Jeadership in the field
of atomic weapons despite Rus-
sia’s possession of the secret of
making the atomic. bomb. Thus,
the United States is considered
the far more powerful war poten-
tial nation and this tends to lessen
Soviet prestige in the great world
power politics struggle.

To off-set this loss of prestige,
the western statesmen. think the
Soviets will resort to bolder
moves in the cold war, adopting
a stiffer attitude towards the
Western Powers.—L.N.S,

Bishop

The report will be taken Lack to
the Upper House, which may form-
ally declare the complaint un-
founded, decide to take no further
action, pass censure on the bishop,
or request the archbishop to de-
clare the bishopric vacant.

“The measure will deal with
bishops who come before the civil
courts and also with those who
are getting too old to manage their
diocese,” a Church of England
spokesman explained.

“If a bishopric is declared
vacant it does not mean the bishop
concerned would not be granted

another, and he will certainly not
lose his title. Once a bishop always
a bishop.”—INS.





RECITAL

frewient

wgagnt?

“Thanks for carrying me
out, pal. Your fiddle’s v
cell 99!”



TT



































One Million Scots
Want Home Rule

In a remarkable demonstration which has
shaken England during the current General
Election campaign, more than a million Scots-
men have signed a petition demanding Home
Rule on domestic affairs by means of a Scot-
tish Parliament. The British Liberal Party
has endorsed the proposal, the Conservatives
have proposed a Royal Commission of Inquiry
and the Socialists have declined thus far to take
a stand, although in the past they have been
opposed, The Duke of Montrose, first to sign
the Covenant, tells in the following article,
written exclusively for International News
Service, why Scotsmen want Home Rule. He
calls the present British government system
out-mioded because of Social Welfare and
nationalization of industries. The Duke is a
member of His Majesty’s select Body Guard of
Royal Archers and hereditary sheriff of Dum-
bartonshire.

BUCHANAN CASTLE, GLASGOW,

Scotland, (By Mail),

The Covenant is the outcome of a very
general feeling of the Scottish people that
they have not been getting a fair deal in
recent years through Parliament as West-
minster. In Social Welfare, in domestic pol-
icy and many other things that affect their
daily lives this is of great importance.

It is patent to many of us that Scottish
people, being fully conversant with Scottish
conditions, could manage our national affairs
much more effectively and economically
than they are being managed from London
now.

We feel that Parliament at Westminster 1s
so crowded with Imperial and World Affairs,
it can not possibly find time to devote proper
attention to local matters. Hence, much of
our recent legislation has been *scamped
work, and very badly put together. The policy
of Nationalization has emphasized this pre-

dominantly.

drifting away from Scotland.

In business, in development of Empire Lands

the United Kingdom.

eral Legislature,
The Crown, The Constitution
National Defence, Customs, Foreign Policy
and Imperial Requirements.

tions as

England, Ulster,

of the United Kingdom as a whole.

they like to join in with the rest of us.

There is no intention whatever to “sep-
arate” or break up the existing Union be-
tween England and Scotland which has, on
the whole, proved beneficial to both Coun-
tries.

It is simply a ease of the present system
of government in Britain now being out-

Welfare legislation, and nationalization of
industries. The present system has answered

kind of expansion in legislative practice
took place. Grave congestion of parliamen-
tary business is a bad thing for any country.



Barbadian Aversion to Change Must Die The Death

To The Editor, The Advocate
SIR— I was a witness this is
morning to the praiseworthy in
attempt of those responsible for
dealing with the traffic problem
in the island. This attempt is
very long overdue and I si
cerely hope it will not be aban-
doned because of the fault-find
ing and grousing of a_ few
individuals who have been
accustomed for generations Ww
think only in terms of “Self”.

void of
the



(1) The

pay any

enough,

It is not likely that the attempt
need for
light of experience
suggestions are no doubt welcome
and will be given due considera-
tion. Hence 1 offer a few:-—

authority
heed
against a litthe walk on the part
of the bus travelling public. On
the whole Barbadians do not walk
It annoys me sorely to
witness as I do very frequently

amendment The Roebuck 5S

and

should not
to the cry out

Bridge.

(3) In the

tion

direction

It is impossible, to please the sorry spectacle of a spaced intervals.
everybody and any one in any hale hearty person taking the
walk of life who sets out to bus from Jemmott’s Lane to the tion
please everybody is only quali- bus stop in Trafalgar Square. worth trying ou

fying for a Lunatic Asylum.

L 1 South and there |
What should be borne in mind & person getting in the bus at St. Lawrence, Beckle ‘ will be n 4 re bread.” Wonter if : : | FROZEN”*CAN f
oe ; we anand ~bL . es Road) cross W! not a few to complain Barba ' : . xer if I could show | ADIAN SAL-
by ved proper Figg is the oo aa ea ee * Pris the Bridge and drop their passen- because of just a little inconveni- age toriats ret oer “ a boy who “do.” MON
es: ZO0C or ne greatest Beckie: ad. stop. ntes= were Rg -stoadaggt en 1 tygaes= ; : * * é ys ‘ a bh 7 ee ae 3
eaaber aa not satisfyin ; a fe w sence of laziness, bahaee the py Stand” th Featon ®t aA kat will aon et bs yy agpenmnoestiia ia avaliable in Das Deusak table cloths ri The eecor a
ee ae a sre ave ossession of iba ae : 1 Ol ) eet. m.i2 yn e genera island which so sorely Coa ; = a < Ss. e ural |
or even -man) who are aversé _— re «ong too much the same buses on their outward !™provement in a condition which buginess bee a ae pa reaction to that advertisement is | MACKEREL
to chang averse to a littl pet ' me pe - me _ ron ss run pass through the square and does cal for serious attention and ful reputation ah tea tak oe ast that in these days of meat! ;
sonal - siege : y , , . “es cs itt! Si » iy 1arm buf take up passengers who should be amelioration. Sa peasiteny alth, scenery shortage, a good substitute can be | fine Dwvinakse
and who wees wy a ar eee . B00 in queue awaiting them. I admit DISCIPLINE 5 a DEVONIAN found in digestible table cloths. :
thems¢ lves (2) I suggest that the buses it would take a small squad of Hotels P 7 - READER OF.ADVERTISEMENTS SANDEMAN’S SHERRY
W hatevel i¢ : hich ply to the north of the strong policemen teach the un- , — S | MOSSELLE HOCK
the Barbad d ould not cross it. Fon- nm nd® selfish Barbediam ‘Ao To The Bait inet oa ks seen ———__—__—— er
herself Black Rock bus { ai aon oe satan @ LETTERS which are signed with a nom-de-plunie, but un |} PRUNIER BRANDY
eRere an ( ‘ tions terest Ra ' r oars e he customary bona fides, will be ignored. ||} * [ELLE CURE
or 7 ne Se the ci i pigheaded. news ite on Hotel Accoi anny such reach the Editor's desk each week, and readers ||) GRAND. MARNIER
avel nore i evel Y be con- dation a ea are ag > m a S| iM
and ancil yp af idere ® con- dation I am surprised to hear that ain reminded of the necessity for the writer's name|}\} GOLD BRAID RUM
and anci p of Bre ered to the tourists cannot find accommoda- to be known to the Editor. not for publication, but CROWN DRINKS
ation t& I u VUistin stand e tion i ‘ : P a " UOn, Du i
n in this island, assurance of good taith. as an y

and vice vers

5a.

I have witnessed



would have to get to the bottom).

ville buses should park in Pal-
metto Square or Church Village.
This would relieve the bottle neck
over the too-hard worked Victoria

absence of Traffic
Lights which as we are aware work
automatically without considera-
for individuals, traffic cops
should be instructed to change the
of traffic at regularly

(4) This is the hardest sugges-
to implement but one well

ing buses from

await its

treet and Belle-

structions

that the avera
t. Let the incom-

(Oistins, i increased



TOE thoukd he Ghaok
sta shou e erected t
north of the Fountain as a cediee
from hot sun or light showers,
(5) Any person caught not com-
plying with any of the new in-
C including,
cluding, the “please cross here”
instruction should be arrested and
cautioned, if not prosecuted. In
addition Cops should do a little
patrol work and put a stop to
pedestrians using the sidewalk as
meeting places for gossiping.
Finally, it must be remembered

averse to change, except.a change
income,

covered
Residential

: beautiful St.
repeat in-

and good
able.

ge Barbadian is
available at

It is agreed that che Hotels,
clubs ‘te, in
around Bridgetowt.
capacity but how about other
good Hotels and clubs on the ments
Philip, Bathsheba
and St. James coasts which to my
personal knowledge have ample bados on
accommodation avail»

All these Hotels etc., are with-
in easy reach of Bridgetown and
generally have motor cars run-
ning into the city at least two or
three times a week at a nominal
charge or drive yourself cars are
reasor able rates.






Your Laugh

To The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—At a Party

and
are full to
were read
Newspaper: —

from your

April 19

arrives in

competing in
fastest plane.

speed



TS ET ee ee

po

We do not see why much Scottis!. business
should have to be centred in London. Once |§
the head office of a business goes South, the |
rest follows. Our national revenue returns
seems to indicate that Scotland’s wealth is

With the loss of business, our people are |
also losing the opportunity of employment,
and of obtaining promising positions. Many |
Glens are empty today when they should be |

full of happy and prosperous people. _|% WALLS OXFORD SAUSAGES |... 0), =
Ulster, Eire, Isle of Nan, and the Channel | § We ee eee :
Islands, all possess democratic legislative |§ Liatt CAREY BRRING BOWonE TCC ci
control in their domestic policy and oe Ce oes Re eh Lagat gc en ves per Ib,
All have made good, and are making good in- % at ewace Le oe oa ae t
creasingly; there has been no failure, and we | % BURR AS aoe WR oe, vc aa
. 5 ; ai : > DCI. Se CPPRED siccs ashes tunes pee
ask why should Scotland alone fail, when | % GRAND MARNIER LIQUEUR (0/0/0107. aa
she has within her self far greater industrial 3 GRAND MARNIER LIQUEUR ........... .. large
assets than any of these other States? 1%
We know the Scottish people have great | % STANSFELD, SCOTT & CcO.,
ability wherever responsibility is required. | sss PDO BLOSS SSS OO

|
|

in Government and Parliamentary Service, |

me can always find Scottish people at the | N €) - I C
top.

We say, therefore, that being afforded the |
opportunity to build up industrially and gov-
ern ourselves in domestic affairs, would pro- |
vide a tremendous moral uplift among our |
people, This, in turn, would have a wonder-

ful strengthening influence in the whole of WILL BE CLOSED E
fe Oe

Our ideal is self-government in all the
domestic affairs of Scotland, while retaining
the Parliament at Westminster as a Fed- |
to deal with such ques-

| FOR

In this Federal House representatives of
Scotland, Wales, Isle of
Man, and Channel Islands would all sit
together and work for the good government

Furthermore, we would leave the door
open for Representatives from Eire, should |


























TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

fi.

AYLMER’S PORK & BEANS.......
CATTELLI EGG NOODLES (Broad & Fine) 2
QUAKER OATS (I’ge pkts. with Chinaware) =



=—_

eee



TUESDAY, 21ST FEBRUARY
°

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD., s

C. S. PITCHER & CO, 1

Our LUMBER YARD and HAR 2
MENTS will be closed or the ae ARE D}
Tournament at 12 noon on the following lave.

THURSDAY, 16TH FEBRUARY _
MONDAY, 20TH FEBRUARY ag :
Phones : 4472, 4687, 4413, 495),

aoe

GODS SS SS SSS SESS



|
|

i



: KEILLERS DUNDEE CAKE

—_—— fee
OO |

OUR DRY GOODS DEPAR

On THURSDAY

OUR WEEKLY HALF §

AND ‘
REMAINING OPEN ON SATURDAY,
FEB, UNTIL 330 P.M

moded through the development of Social |

well for over 250 years, and it is time some |

the other |
afternoon the following Advertise- |

“Lady Rodney sails from Bar-|

FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE VIS
| FROM THE M.V. “STELLA PO
PLEASE ARRANGE YOUR SI
ACCORDINGLY.
al



Boston on April 20.” I think that}
the Agents should have previously |
notified the local public in particu-
lar and the world in general ot |
this fast ship that is capable of |
with the |

“Show me a boy who don’t love



ENJOY THESE DINNER SPECIALS! AT â„¢

Choice Meats

MILK FED TURKEYS
MILK FED CHICKENS
VEAL CHOPS

LAMB CHOPS






















DACOSTA & CO. |

—S wr
— nr

(“4 ¢@
\ ><" ==> fi)
ee oad




































































































‘ Questions
Asked:

y WILL ELL” an
‘ | “practice makes Ferfect
; some of the mottos employ

otorists passing throug
Square yesterday. ‘In

ec Janes and signs, whic
re seen in the Square for th



time yesterday mornin
a great amount of con

Looe Constables on duty wer
F ving answers to
ee tet questions.

PE One mo
new al) about Traffic Signs, wa

of the opinion that question
"were not necessary.

S He

‘vad tercolonial game.
gown River Road,
‘Victoria
i: On rea

over

the sign
Turn Right”.

i
rT

in big cities.

TOI
a

“fo
ai

“girection of Queen’s Park.

i

Road end.

Broad Street.
well, Christ

C Bovell of Chancery Lane,

fir Valley, was travelling
ig Gibbons Road, loaded with

understood that Clarke
on to one of the canes. The
proke and he fell.
WALL and wooden building,
40 x 60 x 18 feet, and valued
00 was completely gutted by a
of unknown origin which
out at Porey Spring, St.
mas at about
‘The house is the property of
DaCosta of the same
ress and is insured with Messrs.
arrington and Sealy for $3,360.

ODDS ESLALES Ltd. suffered
‘further loss when two fires
eeurred at Todds Plantation on

ton

; The first fire broke out at about
190 p.m. and destroyed an acre of
d ripe canes,
is fire extended to Ashbury
mation, St. George, and des-
toyed 323 holes of first crop ripe
belonging to Mr. R,
of the same Plantation.
second fire occurred at
ds 45 minutes later and burnt
holes of second crop ripe canes.
jall three ‘cases the damage was
ed by insurance.
N ACCIDENT occurred on
/Street atabout 12.10 p.m.
ay between a motor car
med by Messrs. Burton & Co.,
old Street and driven by Eric
of Roberts Tenantry, and
Mother car, M.1099, owned by Dr.
i, Massiah and driven by Rev.
W.D. Wood of St. Alban’s Vicar-
St. James,
tight rear fender of Dr.
iah’s car was damaged.

JE GRAHAM of Roaches,
St. George, fell from a bus
‘Md was injured at about 5.15 p.m.

He was taken to the
Hospital and detained,
Grab was a passenger on
Pmotor bus M.805, which was
welling behind the motor car
M.1242, owned by J. D.
is of Country Road, and
by Rufus Cordle of Deacons
was involved in an actident
Waterford Road with motor
1085, owned by the Police
voy and driven by P.C.

01

:

Frid

“It is understood that after the
Sad cccurred the bus stopped
y and Graham fell out.

ANOTHER ACCIDENT oc-
furred on Mount Gay Road,
Luey, at about 1115 a.m. on
may between motor car L.19—
Packard—owned and driven by
. Ward of Mount Gay,
otor lorry, M.1003, owned by
Ow of Dean’s Village
en by Allan Phillips of
mam, St. Lucy,
tight front fender and head
D of the car were damaged.
> Be Was done to the lorry.
emma SEEGNILLAR,
1 .x-Army Captain of On-
® Canada, was found dead in
“om at a seaside hotel at about



~*

bm. on Friday. His body
ved to Messrs. Burton &
ny Ss eral Parlour at

tt Villa Road was
Su yY a large stone,
Sputtly knocked it off its
+ and damaged the roof,
Dout | WW a.m. on Friday.
accident occurred when
#8 Phillips of Villa Road
i 8 Stones in the same
On Friday. The,, stone
the house of Fitz Clarke.

SENTATIVES of the
~
*“0wn as Jehovah's Wit-
tot assemble in conven-
pm February 17 to February
® the Steel Shed, Queen's

Delegate: from Grenada,
St. Vineent and Barba-
» P& attending,

pitare which culminates
Â¥ is a public lecture
py Light” at 8.00 p.m. on
_ ebruary 19, This lecture
i ven by R. Dp. Newton,
Brits ower Representative of
‘ P West Indies.
_ 9 “Mondelle,”
Baw XY Audley Downes
thsheba area, overturned









e
Gay last whil i
heba ay ie returning

a) Was Slightly injured
= al the fish were lost. , The
returning with a large

* overturned small
into the sea in an
ver some of the fish
wn was brought in-
4 rope was shot out
nce of the boat.

®sista



Answers Given

torist, who, as usual, haa
to many big cities ana

ecock-sure of himself ana

‘ollymore Rock on his
cette: Oval to watch
He came
the
Bridge and through the

ching the Nelson Statue
“East Bourne
He was a
worried but was still sure that
- come across such signs

ever turned right and
iment! going back in the
It was
y then that he decided to go
‘Yerough Crumpton Street and ap-
“proacl Kensington from the West-

3 reaching Kensington he was
Seat he could have motored

)UDOLPH CLARKE of Hope-
Church, was
ined at the General Hospital
the left rear wheel of a
or lorry ran over his right
at about 11.45 a.m. on Satur-

The accident occurred when the
“motor lorry X-793, owned by

ven by Phillip Callendar

midnight on!

qrsDAY. FEBRUARY 14, 1950
ee ge ee er eerie

Colleton Road C
Before WI Appeal Court

Did Trial Judge Misdirect Jury?

a

|
|
h
e
h
e
8

That the Trial Judg
and may hav
ming up was one of the
in the Cuke-Skinner ca
of Appeal now sitting h



Arden St. Clair Cuke was the
e| Plaintiff in an action which
5 brought against Clifford
after a collision on Collet
between the cars driven by both | >
parties _ respectively. The jury
‘ found in favour of Cuke and

awarded him dama
ner appealed
Court of Appeal.

General dama
£1,500 and spe
£4. 3. 7.

Date of the
vember 7,
jury was
1949 and j
with that verd
March 29, 1949

ges. Mr. Skin

s

accident was No.
1947,

dian Court of A;
dict of the Common P
be reversed and a verdi
his favour with costs ti
the Court below, an
judgment entered
altered accordingly,
The Judges
Jud
Cecil
Justice of Trinidad (Presi
Sir Newnham Arthur Worl
Chief Justice of British
and Sir Clement
O.B.E., Chief Justice
ward and Leeward Islands,
Skinner is represented by Mr.

dent)
ey Kt.

Malone Kt,

‘Ward, instructed by

Messrs
Hutchinson & Banfield.

W. W. Reece K.C., associated with
Mr. J. E, T. Brancker and jin-
structed by Messrs, Carrington &
Sealy, and Cuke by Mr. D. H. L..

idge in the Court of Com
e misdirected th

points on which is

Se with which the

ere began to deal y
—

on Road | ant distane

to the West Indian} the appellant is

ges awarded were | YOu are satisfied that both
cial damages were

Verdict of the
given on February 15,
udgment in accordance
ict was entered on

Skinner is moving the West In-
ppeal that the ver-
leas Jury
ct given in
here and in
d that the
on March 29 be

ges of the Court are Sir
Furness-Smith Kt., Chief

Guiana

of the Wind-

Hearing of the appeal continues

at 9.30 a.m. to-day.

The grounds of Appeal are that
the Learned Trial Judge erred and
may have misdirected the Jury
when he directed them that the

| defence was based upon the de-

fendant’s having seen the plaintiff
on the wrong side of the road, and
that the defendant went over to

his wrong side leaving the road

open to the plaintiff, and that if

the plaintiff had been keeping a
proper look-out he would have
seen what the driver had done
and taken the necessary course.
Misdirection is also claimed on
that part of the Judge’s summing
up to the jury when giving two
| other cases in which negligence is
| contemporaneous or nearly so, he
cited (1) People coming around

the curve on wrong side and leay- +:

ing it to go to their side, and (2)
A case in which although the
plaintiff is negligent, and the de-
fendant’s negligence is subse-
quent, yet the plaintiff's negli-
gence is the substantial cause of
the collision.

The appellant is also claiming
that the jury were misdirected
when the Trial Judge said to
them : “There was a long distance
and space according te Mr. Skin-
ner’s evidence when Skinner first
saw the Plaintiff’s car’, and im-
mediately continued: “If you are
satisfied that Skinner was not so
erowded by the other car as to
bring him within the agony of the
collision paragraph, or that the
last opportunity of avoiding acci-
dent was his, the plaintiff is en-
titled to damages”, therefore lead-
ing the jury to consider that the
distance between the cars when

If You're “Alieé



mon Pleas erred

he (the drivers of each car could first Tolled oats,
Skinner | See the other c¢.

e, and not the distance
etween the c
tiff
rect side,

The jury were
claiming, when
Judge told them: “If
a men
were negligent up to a certain
point, you will ask yourself which
; of them had th
of avoiding the collision.

The grounds of Appeal go on to
say that the Trial Judge ought to
have directed the jury
questions for them to
their verdict were: —

the Trial

answer by

The Right way?

A. Was the collision substantially
due to the negligence of both
parties or of the plaintiff or of the
defendant?

B. Having regard to the facts of

time when the defendant and/or
plaintiff could have become aware



moment of impact and the course
of both parties within that time,

ollision

€ jury in portions of his sum-
based the appeal:
Vest Indian Court
esterday morning. |

ars when the plain- | ¢X€reise books, cig
first started to pull to his cor- | Carpets. The

e last opportunity | th

that the to

of each other’s approach, and the | 8T®en

THE

VARIETY
OF CARGO
ARRIVES

A CARGO
} herrings,tinned
scanned ham, cauliflower,
1, cabbage, tomato
split peas,
and
‘yesterday
“Hersilia.”



liqueurs
by

arrived
Dutch

eae ° ‘
,oil in tins,

sprouts, electrica

ar Was the import-,°@Uipment, oil-gas stoves, nails,

;mouth organs, alarm clocks

from Amsterdam, Rotterdam anc

also misdirected, | Antwerp,

The “Hersilia”

Messrs. S. P. Musson, Son & Co

Ltd. It left this port
afternoon for Trinidad.

Other cargo arriving here over

e week was brought from U.K.
New York and Trinidad.

From Liverpool
Whisky, beer,
work,

firebricks, hay,

ship “Craftsman” from Liverpool

including smoked |
Vegetables, cheese, |
carrots, }
juice biscuits, |
cognac, apples, geneva
here
M.V.|

This vessel also brought olive
advertising material,

ar lighters and
cargo was brought

yesterday

stout cornflour
bacco, oats, cotton thread, steel-
and
machinery were brought by steam-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

‘Road Deaths
On Increase

In B.G.

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 10
accident rate of



|
|
|

Road

more
into

| years.

more
1



1
|

;

previous

year’s
$25,243.05.

figures



4

the
Colony is climbing each year as
vehicular traffic is brought
use. Last year’s total of
1,374 of which 20 were fatal shows
a big increase over two previous

Government has also collected
revenue through motor
vehicle licences and other fees
| attached to motoring than in 1948,

In 1949, $150,947.31 was collect-
ed as revenue. This exccpds —
iy

Of the 1,374 accidents which

districts,

,

crack-ups.
2 Fatalities in 1949

Last years 20 fatalities over-
shadow the figures of 10 in 1948
|when there were 1,136 accidents
)and seven in 1947 when there

is consigned to/ occurred last year, 1,107 were in
Georgetown and 357 in country
Eleven persons were
killed in the City and nine in the
country; three of the City fatal-
ities resulted from motor cycle

The “Philosopher” brought , were 755 accidents.
shirts, personal effects and a live} Seven hundred and twenty
horse consigned to Dr. Evelyn

from Trinidad.

New York’s cargo, brought by
the case, and in particular to the /St@2™Ship “C. G. Thulin", was

comprised of matzo and farel meal,
black kidney beans, split peas,
peas, crushed wheat,
medicines, lubricating oil, brake
fluid, household effects, tractor

(I) whether the plaintiff could parts and piece goods.

have avoided the collision, (2)
whether if the plaintiff was negli-
gent the defendant by exercise of
reasonable care could have
avoided the collision, (3) whether
the step taken by the defendant
in going to his wrong side of the
road was due to the negligence of
the plaintiff.

The third ground of appeal is
that the verdict of the jury was
against the weight of the evidence,
and the fourth ground is that even!
if the plaintiff was entitled to a
verdict, the amount of damages
was excessive.

As hearing of the appeal opened
yesterday morning,. Mr. Reece
made submission on the Grounds
of Appeal. He concluded at the
luncheon adjournment, and on
resumption Mr. Ward began to
make submissions on his case.

For the Plaintiff
Mr. Ward submitting that the
Trial Judge had put the case
clearly and properly to the jury,
said that as he understood the law,

as far as misdirection was con-
cerned, the Court would only
upset a judgment of the Court
below on the grounds ot mis-

direction if there was going to be}
a substantial miscarriage. of
justice.

In dealing with such a matter,
the Court should take into account
the summing up of the ‘rial
Judge as a whole, and not just
selected passages of that summing
up.



As he saw it, the only duty of
the judge was to expound so much
of the law as was relevant to the
issues before the jury. If that was
done, the question as to whether)

he had put other points o1
portions of the law relating to
negligence could not affect his
direction to the jury.

Mr. Ward began to cite case
law on the matter, and was 59
engaged when the Court

adjourfted until today.



You're Through

FORT NELSON, Canada.
(By Mail)
Life and death are the main

subjects taught in ) unique class- | boiled i ‘
; th British | atter being described as the most

room in this northern
Columbia outpost.

The classroom, for two and a} north.

half days in a two-week course,

consists of well-heated quarters. | against eating snow in its natural

After that it expands to the bush-
land surrounding the area and
pupils, with just enough food to
keep them uncomfortably hungry
for that length of time, are on
their own,

It’s the Royal Canadian Air
Force’s “Survival School,” one of
the world’s toughest, designed to
train fliers how to get along on
their own in the northland if they
are forced down.

The school has graduated more
than 200 officers, and the Air
Force intends to put all service
aircrew through the course twice
—once during the summer and
again during the winter. To speed
up the job, it plans to operate a
second school from Cambridge

| Bay, 175 miles inside the Arctic
circle on the southern edge of Vic-
toria Island.

Graduates generally complete
the course with uniforms sagging
noticeably about the middle. One
lost 16 pounds.

“If you’re still alive at the end
of 11 days,” said one graduate,
“You know you've passed the
course.”

However, since the course began
about a year ago there have been
no casualties.

Instructors are R.C.A.F.
officers with years of Arctic
experience, aided by Indians. The
Air Force doesn't expect the two-
week course to work miracles, but
goes after two main objects; re-
moving frou: ihe minds of its
personnel the long-standing fear
of the Arctic and making fliers
able to look after themselves
should they be forced down,

Survival trcicing at the Forst
Nelson school is : ased on a manual
which contains a wealth of advice
to those who find shermseives afoot
in the northland, .' retic authorities
say hundreds o; northern ex-
|plorers died in the past because
| they tried to fight a knock-down
|battle with the noth instead







and means of living off the;

country. ,
One recipe is for a stew of
mice and lousewort, the



tasty food plant found in the

Another piece of advice warns



state. This will cause dehydration
of the body instead of relieving
thirst, it cautions, and it explains,
that snow must be thawed first
in the hand, and can be eaten
when melted to a slush.—(C.P.)



Formosa To
Double Sugar

Production

TAIPEI, Formosa, (By Mail).

Formosan sugar production may
be doubled under a 3,000,000 dol- |
lar contract signed between the
Formosa Sugar Corporation and!
Johnston International, of Los)
Angeles, California, for the dril- |
ling of 125 irrigation walls under I
President Truman’s Four Point
Co-operation

Progra e, ,
The onomic

Administration has arranged that |

Greece will buy 30,000 tons of the

increased production, with dollars

provided under the Marshall |

Plan.—B.U.P.



Railway Sleeper
To Paper Bag

YOU may one day carry home|
groceries in a paper bag made
from discarded railway sleepers |
if current research in the U.S.A
proves commercially practical .

Although bags and wrapping
paper made from’ railway sleepers
are weaker than those from new
wood, it is possible that, further
study will find a way to strenghten
them Sleepers used in test so;
far were 22-years-old.

Paper from grass is also being

of| tested by the Southern Research |

Institute, Birmingham, Alabama |





| i york fo. them. | j

imaking it work for Ins te, sha Nf

| The manual covers northern | Dr wae Murray, re

avigat the nsititute, says 1e funct

geography, eme rgency nav igation ; ins g Bae, :

for aranead parties, mosquitoes and | of 1 research organisation

fli i oi Be re f he body, | To take i ts front door wha
es, gener a } : qf By seth

building shelters, hunting, travei.; the farmer has SE ae x e |

" . ance ask a — ; ~ s some-

natives, care of direarms, food and} back door, and try to make som

‘clothing under Arctic conditions,’ thing useful from it

?
|| H. JASON JO

Schooner “Gita M.” arrived
with 150 drums of gasolene, con-
signed to Messrs. Da Costa & Co;

td.

Steamships “Craftsman” and
Philosopher” are consigned to
Messrs. Da Costa & Co, Ltd., the
“C. G. Thulin’s” agents are Messrs.
Robert Thom Ltd. and the
Schooner Owners’ Association are
agents of Schooner “Gita M.”

Beat With
Stick: Fined

Norris Boyce of Jordan’s Lane
was fined 15/- to be paid in 14
days or in default 14 days’ im-
prisonment by His Worship Mr.
A. J. H. Hanschell yesterday.

“

He was found guilty of having, Commissio

unlawfully

567 in 1948 and 653 in 1947.

!using the
1.925 private cars; 899 hire cars

j and 512 motor cycles,

in Registration Fees; $2,8
fees for examining

$152.00 for
licences.—‘C.N.S.)



Large Seale Cocoa
‘Banana Cultivation
Planned For B.G.

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 10
Back from a 6-month stay in
the United Kingdom, during
which he wad discussions at the
Colonial Office, Director of Agri-
culture Mr. H. H. Croucher dis-
closed in an interview yesterday
plans for implementing the Evans
nm recommendations for





assaulting and beat-| growing crops on a large scale in

ing Annie Connor, ,also of Jor-|the Bartica Triangle area.

dan’s Lane, on January 25 with
a>stick.

Fined For Unlawful

Possession



A fine of 15/- to be paid in
14 days or in default undergo
14 days’ imprisonment was im-

posed on Dudley Alleyne, a 20-
year-old lighterman of Nelson
Street, yesterday by His Worship
Mr. H. A. Talma.

He was found guilty of having
had in his unlawfully possession,
a quantity of split peas which he
Was conveying on Trafalgar
Square on February 13.

Off Dock

The 72-ton Schooner “Emeline”
came off dock yesterday after
Spending five days undergoing
repairs.

This vessel will begin to load
cargo in preparation for its next
trip to British Guiana.

Made Disturbance
Fined 10/-

Sylvin Jones of Horse Hill, St.
Joseph, was fined 10/- to be paid
in 14 days or in default 14 days’
imprisonment when she appeared
before His Worship Mr. H. A.
Talma yesterday for making a
disturbance on Swan Street:







Camp Fire To-night

A Scout meeting was held last
night in the St. Joseph Vestry
Room on top of the St. Joseph
Dispensary. and it was decided
to hold a camp-fire to-night
(Tuesday) at 8.00 o’clock on the
grounds of the St- Joseph Rectory.

All Scouts and Scouters are

| asked to attend,

EPHE

quickly relieves

COLDS and
CATARRH

It clears the nasal pas

sages to remove stuffiness

and the distressing con
ditions of head colds and

catarrh. The patent nasal

application bottie is infinitely better than sp

or dropper, and can be

handbag or pocket without fear of leak

Made by CLAY & ABRAHA

A skilled soil surveyor (Mr.
Charter) is due this month for a
preliminary survey of the area,
Mr. Croucher said, and arrange-
ments are being made to send an
agricultural officer to set up a
station there.

Bananas Too
While cocoa was the priority
agricultural project of the Evans
Report, he said the growing of
)bananas was also under consider-
jation and he had stopped at Ja-
;maica for discussions on the
} banana project. The problem of
the froghopper pest which has
been spreading here for the past
eight months was also discussed
and Mr, Fenner, Trinidad entomo-
Jogist will be here shortly.

On the question of additional
staff, Mr. Croucher said a veterin-
ary surgeon was due shortly and
he hoped that his department
would also secure the services of
an entomologist by June,

He added that it was difficult
to get agricultural specialists that
cannot be provided by the West
Indies since the specialist officers
prefer to take up appointments in
Africa where there are better con-
ditions of service.—(C.N.S.)



B.G. To Send
Dentist To England

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 10.

The British Guiana Dental As-
sociation has been invited ana
has decided to send a representa-
tive to the annual meeting of the
British Dental Association which
will be held at Birmingham, Eng-
land, from July 10 to 14.

The British Guiana delegate
will take the »pportunity at the
same time to deal with matters of
vital interest to the Association
with the Medical Advisers to the
Colonial Office and the Colonial
Development and Welfare Organi-
sation.—(C.N.S.) .... ....

DROL

TRADE MARK

-



ray
yin
age.

M LTD., Liverpool, England

carried convenien’

Established 1813

Obtainable from all Drug

Stores:

KNIGHTS LTD., AGENTS & DISTRIBUTORS,



_———



>

PIGEON

_———



ll,

CHOW



GOAT CHOW

two of Purinds best

and o

NES & Co. ,Litd.—tower Broad St

btainable from

[

$9,723.00 in Drivers’ Licences and
bus conductors’

12 trade vehicles; 105 vans; 570
motor lorries; 88 buses; 6 hearses

Last year’s revenue was made
up as follows: $136,659.13 from
motor vehicle licences; $1,613.00
18° in
vehicles;

,



seven new vehicles were put on
the road last year, compared =

t
present there are 4,117 vehicles
roads of the Colony—




|
S|

C.0.L. Talk
In Marcela

As recommenacg at the West
Indian Governors’ Conference
held in Barbados in November |
1949, there wil] be held in Barba-|
dos on March 17th a conference|
of senior responsible officials, the
purpose of which will be to re-
view in detail the effects of the
revaluation of sterling on the
public finances and general econ-
omy of the region, and to con-
sider and recommend to Govern-
ments, in the light of that re-
view, what Governmental action,
whether conjoint or individual, is
called for. The revaluation con-
ference will be official, but it will
take into full consideration the
views in so far as they are avail-
able. of representative unofficial
organisations.



Cleanse the system from blocd
impurities ; many sufferers froin
rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago,
neuritis, pimples, boils, sores and
minor skin ailments, can derive great
benefit from this well-known medicine.















Im LIQUID or TABLET FORM




BROAD ST.

HARRISONS
JONES’

SEWING MACHINES |

a (HAND MODEL)

Exceptionally easy to operate. They run smoothly and
make a perfect lock-stitech on all materials from the
finest silk to the heaviest drill

BUY A “JONES”

IT WILL GIVE YOU A LIFE-TIME OF TROUBLE-
FREE SERVICE

CASH PRICE—ONLY $69.15

HIRE PURCHASE TERMS ARRANGED







Y.M.C.A. WORK
PRAISED

Capt. G. H. Stokes, Captain of
H.M.S. ‘Devonshire’ paid an offi-
cial visit to the Y.M.C.A. yester-
day, accompanied by the Chap-
lain of the Ship Chaplain D. A,
Watson, and he commented on
the good work which they are
doing and especially for the many
kindnesses extended to his men
during their stay in Barbados.

Sugar In
The City

There is a strong smell of sugar
around the City’s bond houses as
the 1950 crop gets in full swing:
Grinding is going ahead quickly



SS
reer ecnee cement atesnenaseesoe


























a
for those factories which have

begun their reaping. All other ELECTRIC MOTORS
factories are expected to be with which a hand operated model can





grinding by the end of the month.

Once again the streets around
the market are agog with the
beat of Coopers’ hammers as
these workers make ready for
the molasses supply.

easily be converted into an Electrically
driven machine $46.56 each

HARRISONS *














rdware Dert.
Dial 2364

25 YEARS AGO

(BARBADOS ADVOCATE, FEB-
RUARY 14, 1925)











Intercolonial Cricket Tournament,
Trinidad vs. Demerara

The sixteenth series of the In-
tercolonial Cricket Cup Tourna-
ment was commenced on 7th
instant at Queen’s Park Oval
when Trinidad met Demerara in
the opening game. The weather
was fine and the wicket as per-
fect as it possibly could be for
matting purposes,

The attendance was fair at the
Start but towards the end the
number in the stands and
grounds swelled preceptibly and a
good crowd witnessea the strug-
gle for Ssurpremacy, Mr. V. C.
Dias lost the toss to Mr. G. Dew-
hurst and Trinidad elected to bat,
The home team occupied the
crease for three hours and 22
minutes and were all out at 3.37
p.m. for 167 runs. The rate of
scoring was particularly slow for
the first two hours, The batting
was unenterprising although it
must be stated that the bowling
was always at a good length
much





A BEASTIFUL
TAST—TO-CLEAW









CONGOLEUM
























Too

safety play was probably
the cause of the lack of enter-
prise displayed. Towards the

end the rate of scoring was much
faster and the crowd showed
their appreciation by hearty ap-
plause . The outstanding feature
of the innings was the fine bowl-
ing of Chabrol and the keen
fielding of the visitors, particu-
larly C. Nascimento who gave a
fine exhibition behind the wick-
ets. Fernandes, Estwick, McLean
and Dare also gaineci applause
during the game for their beauti-
ful ground work, while the catch
by I. Henry ‘which dismissed
Wiles, was of the snap of order.







Will customers please note
-ssstelneshesindigigpinestiantalnsllte teeta is ei

Owing to the anticipated arrival of a tourist ship, this
Store will be open to business all day

on SATURDAY 18th EEBRUARY

but will be closed for the weekly Half Holiday at

12 NOON ON THURSDAY, 16TH FEBRUARY







CAVE SHEPHERD « co. Lp.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

.





HOLIDAYING IN U. K.?

Deliveries can be arranged in the U.K. for one of these popular - - -

VAUXHALL CARS

WYVERN~12 hp. 4 cy. —- VELOX 18 hp. 6 cy.





Full details will be gladly given on application to - « « -

ROBERT. THOM LTD.

Whitepark, (COURTESY GARAGE) Dial 4616



















eee oe. —— ee eee
PAGE SIx THE BARBADCS

HENRY

—









MOUSE

SACKEY Bets Sali
(24 2H iLL BE NEVER MIND! LET'S GET
a FINISHED GOING!




POKAY, MICKEY...
WE CAN PGET OUT

RIGHT AWAY !







|



+= i| fe
| —/- Rae | mm ete, ani Te
| Lot) 17S ONLY YOU, DxSWOOD! \/SoMETIMES I THINK YOU ))
| 7 YOU GAVE ME ae BE 7) | |\OO THESE THINGS JUST
\ FRIGHT--T W oe La TO ANNOY ME
TET CONSIDERATE») | | * .
y | VV L AG

| YY

IF YOU WANT

TROUBLE, YOU'VE

COME TO THE
RIGHT PLACE!

Y
I'M LOOKING
FOR VARNEY



| I DON'T WANT A ROOM. I JUST WANT
TO KNOW WHERE VARNEY AND HALL
ARE STAYING!














THATS O (
- — iad
MIGHT bE Naan
VALUABLE. >
Y

| a RED 00m NOt KS =|
Ono ! jf ~S i \
|

Se



‘on wit

RIP KIRBY

“OR ASGALILTIN

— A CITIZEN ANO
/- REFUGIN’ TO TELL WHY
THIS COURT SENTENCES

BY ALEX RAYMOND

“Come ON | [ANOTHER INTERFERIN’ JOH, NO, SIR! I’m TCO YOUNG”
Back Here, 4 z 1 @UPPOSE /TO BE A TEACHER

|










KIO! GRABER, YOU'RE GOING TO BUT I DO KNOW BVBRYTHING
TELL ME YOU'RE A
TBACHER AND YOu
KNOW ALL ABCUT

THE PHANTOM

: a | HAD TO FIND \ SSS Diana panitne
Sie ee es anal STRAT guriow) SSSk._ 11S ALL OVER?
NCE TYDORES MARINES MOP UP \ | ONTHE \D0Ls 5S sot sa me

: THUG GEES ~~ — ernment “\<¢ _ S/2 TS |
SS he } Se oy



LK & RAY MOORES
THERE YOu ARES ) rk YDORE

V CANT BELIEVE

peas REALLY S
==) aia





ADVOCATE

———
net el ol A
CT

hg

BISCUITS



ARE |
| BRITAIN’S BEST













ag

Climbing Steadily 4
in popularity.
in circulation! Ff

And it’s no wonder, for the “Evening Advocate” carries "a .
features whicr appeal te all classes of readers.

First of all, it gives your Monday’s news on Monday, as
well as all the happenings of the week-end. When there
is a long week-end it comes out on the first day after the
holiday, hence it is eagerly snapped up by readers who have
gone without a paper for some days.

There is humour in it with the articles
Gubbins in his Sitting on the Fence feature,
Humour by Touchstone.

by Nathaniel
West Indian

Short Stories for the quiet afternoon or evening hour.

Sir Patrick Hastings Case Book is of such absorbing
interest that copies of the “Evening Advocate” are being filed
away for future reference to those rousing stories.

Become a regular subscriber to-day of the

EVENING ADVOCATE



The book that has set the world talking

ROMMEL

A swashbuckling general who insjyred many a story, some if







ficticious some true, to be told about hirn while the fighting
in World War II was still at it’s height.

Ilollywood once tried to portray the character of this Ger-
man General on the screen but they missed badly,

Here, at last, is the truth behind one of the greatest dramas ail
ever to come out of the second World War. Sf

What he thought of his men and his Italian allies ! %
What he thought of his foes; the men of the Empire ! 4

How he was eventually murdered by Hitler’s Gestapo !

“a
“a





Beginning in the Sunday Advocate, Feb. 08

rr





-eseeeaaaseeenenserene

A eect eeeeneeteeeedneenenesnnsaranesmsenessesmasmeranaaeaeraaaeoeene





















] - )
China 8S Thin Red Veneer



.
a eae — | Ty ™~
FOR RE “| By Walter Fletcher, C. BL E.. M. P.
‘ LONDON (By Mail) i > itai
Ww. ae. ) ‘ in the case of Great Britain, or
| noses lea Bite FLETCHER, who head- non-recognition, as by the United
oe ae tenn $ wartime underground States, is in itself policy, but
f HELEN yt eal, Road. |] nent in China—the equiva- merely the means of implement-
: fe ch. ch Apply poe rl et. C. Hutchinson, | !€nt of America’s O.S.S.—declares ing policy,
| : ion. eae lye following articie that inter- A parallel case occurred in
: some ne make Chinese 1940 when America had an Am-
we KRISHAWA” — Fomubeliey” Look tuntsm “very vulnerable.” bassador at Vichy and Britain
“| Sean Apoly 7. Maraj. Hindu Store, 5 | Fletcher, now a member o , a %
Swan Street, 9.2.50—t.f.,. | liament received the ieenomsbieeneh ea eel ones
.2. of , Lec A e two nati F
~APAR ladies cieorton, Commander of the British Empire against the athena —
Poor Apartment, near town and Chuo for his wartime work, He outlines To talk v. ly ets i
(Mom et Me ig hldren) For further herewith a plan for utilizing ing Communion oe
1.2000 «1.5 10.2. ae Tek oe ~~ force” to wipe nothing and seanie aos eae
; ‘ : e thin red veneer c i insi :
US| Saas ae Ree ~ — over saaet ef Okt oa ws Communists to build inside lines
erator and Tinea ‘of ime wt Nedibane Vv m= to = Samiee territories and to
; 1, fn. nuniam i ina i ees
13.1.50—t.f.n. Communism in China is vulner- | sara mete a ae
Ser etiscification PURELM SAI ES te Oe cane “es aaah a sa:
ferent classifica ums The Common target of Britaih ism 4 ina i
reparate SS | and America in the Far East is to yuimersmmnsm in China is hes
én olsen Fe ain ta png hg vulnerable because its success has
“ 13 ¥ 15 certed policy to that end has thus je Bae ae mat for South and
i wes na, at any rate,
Flee |[UNDERTHE SILVER HAMMER |**,2ppeared. here eue real Security of tenure
oa ites Bh cleats > ie € best policy for Britain and
ao - 3 ommunist Governmen i i i
~ IN| MEMORIAM Furniture at Newtey ey Wil sell her eatin. ne tee i
a my of JACOB FRAN—| St; John, whieh ‘includes:— 7
n eparted. this life on 14th Unright, Rockers, “Geman! en GOVE N
ighit, , ani
ion tit ana arrow: | Sy Sie, Quumerand, Pant is en
is pre vom pain and care; Sideboard, Waggon, Rush Roche: _
= be with Jesus .. ard China, Plated Ware, Raspet Phone

to meet him there.



be remembered by
sis, (





, Gordon

for SALE

——————






good.
e 8174.
eee 12.2.50—3n.

’

Morris” Minor,

on One 1948 Mo
4 . Excellent condition
t let. Going cheap.
14, 2,59-—-3n,

nl (Wyvern) 12 H.P.

fe 0.
L

Wilhel-
, Wilhelmina oe
Henry anc
sons) others overseas.
( . 14.2.50—I1n.





$300.00, Standard 10 four
2) good and (3) new, new
Upholstery re-



800

OYAL GARAGE Ltd. Phone





4:

CULES CARRIER CYCLES—Also






















Trafalgar St« Dial 2696.
7.2.50—.f

EOUS

ot every description. Glass
Jewels, fine Silver,
early books, Map, Autographs

a

_ 1.9 49—s.w.n

KHAKI 72c. & 84c

Royal Store.





§ & and 96 cents.
3.2.50—141

8 & MEN’S SHOES



; 3.2.50—J4r



‘amd play. Royal Store Phone

ule & Retail. Royal Store.

AND CAR BATTERIES—15 &
t Auto Tyre Co. Trafalgar St
7.2.50—t.f.n

and
Dial
In

d Plymouth Rock
Rock 1/- each
14.2

HEL GIRDER 28/ x 12” x 5//,
OYAL GARAGE Ltd. Phone
14.2.50-—3n

50-

& FOUND

LOST

w-Reward offered for re-
of cut Steel Earring. Lost
Club and Crane. Phone
2.2,50—t.f.n











containing 35 m.m To
$10 Reward. For return
Cacrabank, Worthing

11.2.50—4n

E TICKET BOOK—Serjes
% 0629. Finder please return

Advtg, Dept. Reward offer-
14,2.50—Bn,

——————

DNAL









EL

are hereby warned against
to my wife Doreen Springer
qd) as I do not hold myself
Stor her or anyone contra
0 a2bts in my name unl
order signed by me.
SPRINGER,
Mt. All.
Andrew,
12.2.50—2n

WANTED





St.








SUESTS—Two Couples, or 4
opie. Delightfully cool rooms
Water, minutes walk to
Special monthiy or weekly

Mrs, BENNETT
Woodside Gardens,
12.2,.50—t.f.n

id east minimum
| Good wages. Apply
â„¢. Room 306 Planta-
14,2,50—In,

CAD — BUTLER—An experi-
St a: Butler. Apply to

. field’, Pine Hi
aud § eg jeld', Pine Hill

“re











Cc

14.2.50—3n,.

HOUSEKEEPER —
» Apply by letter to
l, Proprietress, Sea

14.2.50—5n

accun
requi
12,2. 50—3n.

la-

— With
musical,
jon with meals
or Yacht

Ted. Write ‘P’ C/o
Depot

‘14.2.50—2n
gi Le t
|
F later cause

Bleeding
y :
480 ca use Rheur

im Gums, Sore
* Amosan stor




and
rhea,










H Gents and Ladies Sports Auto

Water-

Gorringes Antique Shop. adjoin _

3.2,50—14n

Royal

from $3.96
3.2.50—14n

§ & BOYS PYJAMAS from $3.25

VE BOYS SHIRTS for

3.2.50—14n
SPORT & DRESS SHIRTS
%.2.50—l4n






|



—— Elec. Hot Plate and Tron; Victrola,

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers

By Public Competiti t
Norse ip ion at our office

chattel Dwelling Houses and a Stone
building used as a shop» thereon, situate
at Pinfold Street adjoining the Y M C.A
heedquarters, Bridgetown. The larger
o* the Chattel Dwelling Houses contains
Open Verandah, drawing room, dining
reom, one bedroom, kitchen downstairs,
one lange bedroom upstairs. and three
breadfruit trees in the yard, Water
installed. Inspection on application to
the premises. For further particulars
apnly to Haynes & Griffith, Solicitors
Dated this 7th day of February 1950.
12.2.50—6n.
—

done 5,500 miles. Apply
oan. Phone 2978. | REAL ESTATE
GiB 0O—O8 | a eeeacinlipthmneaels
“BURNHAM” BISHOP'S COURT,
St. Michael, standing on 25,175 square
feet of land.
ais The house contains drawing and
pigs — Wire Hair ree Toe dining rooms with covered verandah
from aNly ge z C/o} 8nd usual offices, two bedrooms with
gticulars. Apply * 14.2.50—4n, running water, one with dressing room

attached, Toilet and Bath upstairs. Two

servants rooms with toilet and bath,

washroom and workshoy and garage
application

in the yard.
Mr.
Dial-3472.

Inspection on
H. B. Bannister.

The above will be set up to public
competition at the office of the under-
signed on Friday the 17th day of Feb-
rurary 1950 at 2 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY.
LUCAS STREET.
1.2.50—9n.

to



__

BUILDING SITE 29,216 square feet of
‘and. (adioining the residence of Mr
Teddy McKinstry) at Rockley New Road
Christ Church. Apply YEARWOOD &
BOYCE, Solicitors. 11,2.50—Tr

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS
AND WATER ENGINEER, GRENADA

Applications are invited for the post of Assistant Superintendent
of Public Works and Water Engineer in Grenada. Duties of the
office include designing, planning and construction of buildings of
all kinds, water works, land drainage, sewerage and other sanitation
schemes, briages of all kinds, streets and highways, jetties, piers,
harbours, etc., as well as ability to undertake Land and Engineering
Surveying. Salary on the scale $2,880—$96—$3,360 per annum with
temporary cost of living allowance $240 per annum and travelling
allowance $960 per annum at present rates. Commencing salary
higher than minimum of the scale may be paid according to qualifica-
tions and experience of candidate,

2. Appointment -vould be on probation for one year and candi-
date selected would be required to pass medical examination. Free
passages to Grenada on appointment for candidate selected, wife and
children up to five persons in all.

3. Applications should be sent to Administrator of Grenada not
later than 20th February.
11,2.50—2n,



OKRA CLOSE SEASON
ORDER

In pursuance of Section (4) 3 of the Cotton Diseases Prevention
Act, 1928 (1928-7), the Governor-in-Executive has fixed the period
from the Ist of May to the 30th of June, inclusive, to be a Close
Season for Okras.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this elventh day
of February, one thousand nine hundred and fifty.

By Command,
E. L. WALCOTT,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
NOTE, Attention is drawn to sub-section (6) of Section 4 of the

Cotton Diseases Prevention Act, 1928 (1928-7) whereby special

exemption from the provisions of sub-section (3) of Section 4

may be granted by the Director of Agriculture with the consent



ALL that three storied stone
dwelling house situate in St. Michaels
Row. Bridgetown, (adjoining the pre-
mises occupied by The Pornn Bay Rum
Company) standing on 4,512 square feet
of land. The dwelling house contains 2
hefrooms on the top floor, drawing and

wall

dining rooms and 3 bedrooms on the
second floor: kitehen and usual. out
offices and several other rooms on the
greund floor

Freellent site far business

For further particulars apply io the
undersigned,

The above will be*set un for sale by
Public Comnetition at our office in Lier
Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the 24th
Februairy 1950 at 2 p.m

CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors
14.2.50—10n

PURI NOTICKS













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necessary. Write today for beautiful free
Semple Book to Britain's largest and
foremost Publishers; highest commission,
marvellous money making opportunity.
Jones, Williams & Co., Dept. 10 Victoria
Works, Preston, England.”





NOTICE

The road leading from Melvin's Hill
to Spa Plantation is dangerous to Vehi-
cular Traffic. Any one using this road
will be dorg so at their own risk.

By order
Highway Commissioner,
St. Joseph Parish.
11.2.50—3n



NOVICE

PARISH OF ST. JOHN.
Attention is drawn to all owners of
dogs that they should be licensed during
the month of February, in accordance
with the Dog License Act.
R. S. FRASER.
Parochial Treasurer,
St. John.
11. 2.50—€n



NOTICE

DR. PAYNE — Dentist — begs to no-
tify the Head Teachers of the Elemen-
tary Schools of St. Philip, Christ Church,
St. George and St. Michael of his ill-
ness. The Maternity Hogpital included.

They are requested to send all re-
quiring Treatincnt to Dr. Alleyne, Bush
Hall St. Michael by order of the Chief
Medical Officer. 14.2,50—3n.
_—_—————————

THL sARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB

NOTICE TO MEMBERS

NOTICE is hereby given that the Ball-
room will be closed to Members on
TUESDAY, February 14th, from 8 p.m.
for an Entertainment by the Royal and
Merchant Navy Welfare League,.for the
Men of H.M.S, “DEVONSHIRE”.

By order of the Committee,

H. P. SPENCER,
Secretary
14, 2.50—1n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of JOHN D. TAYLOK
& Sons Ltd. holders of Liqour License
No. 520 of 1950 granted to them in re-
spect of a board and shingle shop a!
St. Davids Village, Ch. Ch. for per-
mission to use said Liqour License at
board and shingle shop at corner of
forde Gap, Sargeants Village, Ch. Ch
within Dist. ‘A’.

Dated this 13th day of February 1950

To:—B. A. McLEOD, Bq. |

Police Magistrate Dist. ‘A’ '
EVANS PHILLIPS
cass es a licant.

N.B.—-This application will
dered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District ‘A’, on Thurs-
day the 23rd day of February ,1950 at
11 o'clock, a.m.

BE. A. sn os
Police Magistrate, GS.



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

REMOVAL
The application of LILIAN GILKES
of Endeavour, St. James the holder of
Ligour License No. 453 of 1950 granted
in respect of a board and shingle shop
with shedroof attached situate at Orange
Hill St. James to remove said License
to a board and shingle shop with shed
roof attached situate at Orange Hill,
St. James and to use it at such last
described premises.
Dated this 10th day of February 1950
To:—S. H. NURSE, Esq

Bret day. cuin “i ’ te ie.
, Mabtens the Tas fore mouth | Police Magistrate Dist Sse areme

wmesan Must + on clac Avplgrdt.
t N.i*.—This application will be consi-
dered 2 Licensing Court to be held
the 26ih Februmty 1950 at 13 o'clock |
Police Court, District ‘EB’ Hoele-
S. H. NURSE i
Trench Mouth | Police Magistrate, Dist. “B’ eae |





of the Board of Agriculture.

COTTON CLOSE SEASON
ORDER

In pursuance of Section 4 subsections (1) and (2) of the Cotton
Diseases Prevention Act, 1928 (1928-7), the Governor-in-Executive
Committee has fixed the period from the 1st of May to the 30th of
June 1950, inclusive, to be a Close Season for Cotton.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this eleventh day
of February, one thousand nine hundred and fifty.

By Command, }
E. L. WALCOTT,
Clerk, Executive Committee.



CUT THIS OUT





PARCEL POST (RATES) REGULATIONS, 1950

The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the pow- /
ers conferred on him by section 30 of the Post Office Act 1911 makes
the following Regulations :

1. These Regulations may be cited as the Parcel Post (Rates)
Regulations, 1950. |

2. Postage shall be payable in respect of parcels conveyed from |
the Island to the United Kingdom and Colonies and Foreign States |
at the rates set out in the Schedule to these Regulations.

3. Heads 13 to 15 of the Post Office Regulations, 1912 so far as |
they relate to parcel post rates are hereby revoked.

4. These Regulations shall come into operation on the Ist day
of March, 1950.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this 7th day of |
January, one thousand nine hundred and fifty. |

By Command,
E. L. WALCOTT,
Clerk, Executive Committee. |
SCHEDULE
Table Of Rates Of Postage
Postage rate on parcels of

weight not exceeding
3 Ibs. 7 Ibs. 11 Ibs, 22 Ibs,

Countries Remarks





Dh. Ba. ea
United Kingdom 54 88 120 1 80
Other places. via
United Kingdom )
Add the following
amounts to postage
from United ° King-
dom to destination 24 48 66 96
British West Indies
Bermuda and Brit- - ea
is i 24 73 |
ae 386 72 120 1 80 (Maximum weight 20 Ibs.) |
British Honduras 48 84 108 1 80
Dutch West Indies
and Dutch Guiana 48 84 1 08 1 68
U.S.A. including |
Canal Zone, Puerto
Rico and Virgin Le -

or par |

ee FE aco ‘i (Maximum weight 22 ibs..)





ad {OPP PDPDODDOVSPPOOPPE SOY,
%

| % |
| “GOD'S WAY OF

| SALVATION

| .

|

4,

66064
/§PSSSSSSISSSSSS9TOGSSTSS

MADE PLAIN”

+
Free Book from S. Roberts,
30, Central Avenue, Bengor,

a

AUCTION SALE



1948 FORD PREFECT CAR N, Ireland.

at MacEnearny’s Garage
; 2.30 p.m. on Friday 17th

WE are instructed by the
Insurance Company to sell
the above vehicle which has
been damaged in an acci-
dent. Mileage only 11,000.
Car driven away under our
power after accident. Oppor-
tunity to acquire a modern,
repairable Car.

Cash on fall of Hammer.

AUCTIONEERS

DIXON & BLADON

POSSESS

Oates
—=

DEVELOPING and |
PRINTING

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FILM, we*are sure that you !
will be more than Satisfied
with the Results,

COLLIN’S |)
PHOTOGRAPIC DEPT. |



COOOL,










;

}
)



THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE





|| Butter Shortage?





1S



the creution as an autonomous |
unit of the traditional Southwest
bloc in China—the Provinces of |
Kwangsi, Yunnan, Szechwan and /
part if not all of Kwantung. :

Northern and Southern China
jare tradit enemies, Mao |
Tze-Tung's Gover nment is suspect |
in South China as being just an- |
other successful War Lord in- |
vader from the North.

The advantage of a Southwest
bloc free from Comununist contre}
is that it would interpose itself
as a wedge between the Moscow
dominated Mao Government and
the other Far Eastern countries
to the south and west, not yet
Communized. |

Means other than force can be
employed and they always have
been the successful basis of
change in China.

Communism cannot use its two
main weapons in China—(1)
sealing the country off from the
outside world, and (2) terrorism,
— is by no means = in

na. ‘ ‘

It is really feasible in chine .
achieve a spectacular and posi«
tive victory by openly inflicting
for the first time a reverse on
Communism.

The thin red veneer placed over
most of China ty Mac has neither
popular support nor armed force
China—an area which has carried
out such movements before.

Such a policy would pay off in
a reduced prestige for Commun-
ism throughout the world, espe-
cially in the Far East,

It would be far more effective
than the so-called “containing”
policy, which really means sitting
and waiting for Communism to
consolidate without interference
and permitting it to attack and
penetrate wherever it likes.

“CHAMPION”

Fighting or Loving he was the Cham-











pion

You not afford to miss the best
fight picture to come to the screen
in ye




Tough and compelling, this one will
keep you on the edge of your chair

See Kirk DOUGLAS in Ring Lardner's
“CHAMPION” co-storring Marilyn MAX-















IN PORT: Sch. Mary E. Caroline, Sch “apt. Menage, from Antwerp; Agents:
Adalina, Sch. Mary M. Lewis. Sch. S P. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd. .
Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Lawille
Smith, Seh. Frances W. Smith, SS. C. G. Thulin, 1,317 tons net,

Emeline, Sch. Cyclorama, Sch

S.S. Philosopher,
from

Winstanley, Agents: Schooner Mary E, Caroline, 5 tons
Da Costa & Co., Ltd. net, Capt. Joseph, for Dominica; Agents:
SiS. Gascogne, 2.681 tons net, Cept. Schooner Owners’ Association.
Prigent, from Tyinidad; Agents: R. M. Schooner Zenith, 70 tons net, Capt.
Jones & Co,, Ltd, : Mulrain, for St Vincent; Agents:
. Schooner Owners’ Association.
s S. Craftsman, 4,000 tons net, Capt. ’
ig han ar Glasgow; Agents: DaCosta S83. C. W. Thulin, 1,317 tons net,
. , Cupt. Anderson, for Trinidad; Agents:
Schooner Gita M., 32 tons net, Capt. Robert Thom Ltd. sash
McLaren, from cd; Agents: S.S. Gascogne, 2,618 tons net,

Trinida
Schooner Owners’ Association.
Dutch M.V. Hersilia, 2,217 tons net,

Cable and Wireless (W.I.) Ltd advise
that they can now communicate with
the .following
bados

S$.S.Mormae Lark,

Prins Bernhard, Vinland, Mormae Gulf,
Orestes,

From Trinidad: Helen Proud. oot, Nev TRIN
: “Oot, Neville For TRINIDAD....
sue ieee Cyril Clarke = ” -
ubre: Ppin, Sy rt Davidson, Vernon Mr. Joseph Kellshall, Mstr Alan Year-
Pexander, Kenneth Wallack, Wilfred way, \ocePh Keushall, Mstr Ala :
Rodney, Aloysins Narearo, John Wilson, Kinieed, Saver Mao Peitnee, tite tent

scorge Cumberbatch,
Edith
French, William Martin,
Leon Maingot,
Berdan, Gladys Berdan,
terman, Roy Hessey,
don Pilgrim,
Heyes, Arthur Oldham,



In Carlisle Bay



Capt. Anderson, from St Oroix; Agents:
Robert Thom Ltd.

Schooner Lady Noeleen, 41 tons net,
Capt. Noel, for Dominica; Agents:
Schooner Owners’ Association.

ARRIVALS
4,972 tons net, Capt
Gren:

Capt.
Prigent, for Martinique, Agents:'R. M
Jones & Co., Ltd,

|
IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION

cada Cazador, Latirus, Steelore,
so Avil, Lriona, Constantis, Veragua,
Italia, Quirigua, Gascogne, razil, Bac-
haguero, Mosli, Irene, Argkaka, Repton.
orness, Petersburg, Teakwood, Helena,
AUartic Sun, Hidlejord, Siranda, America

ships through their Bar-
Station;—

Vinni, Metula,

Regnhildbrovig,

Swencesiao,
Quilmes, Empire Martaban. ii

Nuevaesnarta, Abu,

Neaera,



ARRIVALS By B.W.I.A.U DEPARTURES by B.W.1.A.L,

Kinkeed, Mrs, Kate Feldman, Miss Ruth
Feldman, Mr
Jeremiah, Dr
David

Ernest French.
French, John
Shelia Collvie

Dorethy Maingot, George

Cuthbert Marshall, M:
Gardon Cummins, Master
Miss
Brooks,
Hon. HH.
Mrs H,

French, Denise



Broc
aster Michael
Beale,
M.L.C.,

Medforu
Norman
O.B.E.,
Andrew

Daisy
Mr.

Cuke,

Mr





Christopher Mas-
Hugh Smar;
Robert Siegert,

A.

Gor- Cuke,

Ronald 4

Miss Jeanette Lewis, Mr







William B. m, > “ice St. Hil
ds Arthur KENNEDY with “Feull Apass Betton, Maru aedeen, Colin G. 2. ls Pils Miss Frenk Schuler
STEWART, Ruth ROMAN, Lola AL-| Bynoe : eencniaeh ta
F HT . —

e ry > Prem TRINIDA For GRENADA...,
Showing at ROXY THEATRE from a ” Miss Millicent Mayor, Miss Gertrude
rida) 10.2.50—-4n INTRANSIT TO KINGSTON Clynne, Miss Maria Clynne, Mr, Geof-
| leer Bain, Dy. Aage Thaysen, Rolph {°Y Semple, Mit. Adella Philip, Ne
Grant, Arthur Cooke, John Flemming Jemes Scot, Mrs. Marjorie Scott, My
TRINIDAD BONDS Monica Patchett, Una Mitchell * Rupert Crowe, Mr, Walter Hinkson,
From St. KITTS... For La GUAIRA
$2 9Fn <« « ‘a "7 3) Mr lalchand Ramchai!pni Mrs
$3,360 3% due 1973/88 @ 97% c ul Miss « . as .
oo i Kalawa . ‘ N OW aan iss “ilda Figuero, Mrs. Carmen Fig
$864 3% : 1955/59 @ 973% | cone Ramchandani, Mr. Everard veer
$9,600 3% ,, 1974/84 @ 98 | Mtrived by T.C.A, from BERMUDA
34 @ 7 From St. LUGIA,.... on 1th
£1,000 4% ” 1963/73 @ 107 z Mr. John Dunlop, Mr. Donald Leach,
Net, plus accrued interest; pay- Doreen Rodrigues, Bessie Waplington, Mr. Lionel Pile, Mr. Fred Burrows
ment and delivery in Trinidad.| Patricia Tucker, Col. Reginald Michelin, | 23 Passengers arriving from MON-
Sir Allan Collymore, Cecil Furness-Smith, TREAL on Ith.
D SHARES Sir Newnham Worley.
TRINID From GRENADA. Mr. Gordon Crawford, Mr. Edmund
Cleary, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Davey, Mr.
Als s Limited Ordinar, Clement Malone, Harry Pantin, Noei and Mrs. Desmond Fitzgerald, Dr. and
300 Alstons Lir . ) $6 15 Lambert, Audrey Lambert Mes, Elgin Hargreaves, Mr. and Mrs
, ¢ rf Milton Hastings, Mr. and Mrs, Donald
300 Angostura Bitters Ord’y From La GUAIRA, Maclachlan, Mr, Walter Owens, Mr.
@ $21.00 James Emberton, Barbara Emberton. Leonard Smith, Miss Marjorie Waters,
1 . . » « Carmen’ Michelena, A. C. M. Martin, Mrs. Vilda Woodroff, Mr, and Mrs.
Net, local funds, plus stamp Alfredo Martin, Arturo Ripanti, Lucia William Wyatt, Mr. and Mrs, Leward
duty. Fiorez, Maurice Jones, Alvin Stryker. Wykoff, Mr and Mrs. William Pogue
William Muigreve. Mr and Mra Alexander MeDonalé

AUSTRALIA BONDS

Highest premium paid for 3%%
and 5% Dollar Bonds.

BARBADOS SHARES

A new list issued Tuesday, free on
application to:

A. M. WEBB

Diai 3188 Hours 9—3

155 Roebuck St.
(Over Peoples Pharmacy)
14.2.50—5n



Fly to the
Carnival

Trinidad

(REBRUARY 8th—21st



|

BRITISH |
WEST INDIAN
AIRWAYS

BRITISH WEST INDIES AIRWAYS LTD,
(Registered in Trinidad)
Lower Broad Street, Bridgetown, B'dos.
Phones 4585 & 2789



A Bow More puta



of the (
POPULAR
1 |
Cannon Gas Hotplates ff
> BOILING BURNERS
%—> 1 GRILL BURNER & PAN

%->» GREEN ENAMEL

why call and see them
howroom, Bay Street

FINISH

not









Our CITY PHARMACY
Branch will close on
Thursday 16th inst. and
open on Saturday 18th.

KNIGHTS LTD.





WE CAN SUPPLY
PEANUT BUTTER at

72¢ per botile

°

Stuart & Sampson

LTD.

Headquarters for Sest RUM













a






















|
SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA NEW





ZEALAND LINE LIMITED
(MLA.N.Z.) LINE)

The M.V. “Caribbee” wil! ac- M.S. “PORT PIRIE” is scheduled to
cept Cargo and Passenger for sail from Sydney January 4th —
St. Kitts-Nevis, Antigua, Mont- arriving at Trinidad about February
serrat, Dominica ‘th,

|] M.S.“KAIPAKI” is scheduled to. sail
The M.V. “Daerwood"- will

from Port Pirie January 7th, Burnie
January 10th, Beauty Point January
/3th, Melbourne January 26th, Sydney

accept Cargo and Passengers so:
St. Luria, St. Vincent, Grenada,



Aruba. Date of sailing will be February 1st, Brisbane February 10th
given. ?rriving at Trinidad about 10th March
These vessels have ample space for
Chilled, Hard Frozen and General Cargo |
Case accepted Through meal of} |
‘a OWNEP: ~ading with transhipment at inidad | |
B.W ‘sia loeaanon ane _ for Pritish Guiana, Barbados, Windwara | |
and Leeward Islands. |
Tel. 4047. for further particulars apply:—

FURNESS WITHY & Co., LTD,
Agents: Trinidad.
DA COSTA & Co. LTD.,
Agents: Barbados.



PAGE SEVEN —

es ee,



































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CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND ai i ie
N f ails
rr oe Halifax Barbados —
8 8. “ALCOA PEGASUS” February 6th February 17th
S8.S. “ALCOA POLARIS” February 20th March 3rd
Sailing every two weeks,
NEW YORK SERVICE
Sails Arrives
New York Barbados
8.5.“ SF ye February 24th. March Oth
3 J. Ayia February 3rd. February lith.
NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
Sails Arrives
New Orleans wis manpnist
8.§ * SO/ Rk" January 25ty. “ebruary ne
s/s. WALEOA RUNNER” February 8th February 20th.
Apply: DACOSTA & CO,., LTD —Canadian Service,
ROBERT THOM LUTD.—New York and Gulf Service,



STENCIL SETS

Complete Large & Small

ROBERTS & CO. Dia! 3301.



BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LTD.






Agta
Da COSTA & Co., Ltd.
Phone 2122 Office a
Phone 2303 after hours ("> \
Broad Street. |

cz

BACKACHE
OF HEADACHE

oe

TAD Ol) 3 BL

Fi

NEWS FLASH!




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bag at

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Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466.

Society Store 53 Swan St.
Bombay House, Lucas St. .
Bombay Store, Speightstowr
Gandhi Store, 42 Swan St

















PAGE EIGHT





———

Pairaudeau, Persaud,
L. Wight Give Good Displays

Pairaudeau 17 and Gibbs 14
resumed for British Guiana with

thé score at 31 without loss. Clyde

Walcott opened the attack from
the Pavilion End to Pairaudeau
who glanced the fourth to the leg
boundary and cut the next to the
boundary.

King bowled from the screen
end and with his fifth delivery
had Gibbs l.b.w. without adding
anything to his overweek score.
His contribution of 14 included
two boundaries.

Ganesh Persaud joined Pairau-
deau and played the last bail.
Walcott’s next over yielded a
single, a cover drive by Pairau-

deau, while King’s yielded five
including a cover drive to the
boundary by Pairaudeau.
Pairaudeau turned one from
Walcott neatly to fine leg for

three, the only runs of the over,
King’s next over was a maiden.
Persaud took a single from
Walcott to long off and laie
Pairaudeau took a single to extra
cover to send up 50 in 54 minutes.
C. B. Williams replaced Kin;
the Screen End and Pairaudcau
made a single off the over
Walcott continued to. Pairau-
deau who played the fourth ball
to leg for 4 and on drove
last for another. The bats
made 3

runs off Williams’ n



in line

L, WIGHT



over and Luc: then repla
Walcott at the Pavilion Ex

the score t 62 he ove!

two. Persaud cover dr

liams for a single, Pairaudeau
drove for a similar amount
later Persaud pulled to sq

leg for another single

Pairaudeau Out

In Lucas’ next over Persa
took an easy single to square
but with the fourth delivery
Pairaudeau in attempting to pu!
an off turn to the on side mis

His

boundaries

and was bowled
48 including 7
for 72 minutes.

The total was now 71 and Chris-
tiani the incoming batsman v
quickly off the mark with a since
to square leg.

Williams’ next
Persaud pulled
received from Lucas to
for a couple
stroke from
getting a similar

innings ol!
lasted

over yielat
the econd
square le
repeated thc
next delivery

amount

ana
the

Christiani cover
for a single
drove for ¢

Williar
and later Persaud on
couple and then cov
drove for a single. Persaud edged
one from Lucas to the slip for a
single and Christiani took another
to extra cover. Williams’ next
over yielded single, a
drive by Christiani Ludas sent
down a maiden, his first.for the
day to Christiani

PerSaud collected two bounda-
ries, off Williams, a cut past point
and an on-drive. He then took
a single to mid-on and Christiani
cover drove to the boundary to
send up 100 in 91 minutes

Goddard Bowls

With the score at 105 Goddard
took over from Williams at tie
Screen End and sent down a
maiden to Persaud. Christiani
pulled the fourth, a short one
from Lucas to the on boundary
and then played out the remain-
der.

Persaud got a boundary through
the slips off the first from God-
dard’s next over and then played
out the remainder. Christiani on
drove one from Lucas to the
boundary and later off drove
for a single

Goddard’s next over yielded a
single a drive to extra cover by
Christiani. Lucas continued from
the Pavilion End. He bowled to
Christiani who off drove to the
boundary and then took a single
to mid-on,

drove

cover

The ‘ll Do It Every Time



Christiani took a single to cover
off Coddard and Persaud cut. wide
df gully to the boundary. The total
was now 129, Christiani 29 and
Persaud 34.

Roy Marshal] at this stage re-
placed Lucas from the Pavilion
End and his over yielded a couple,
each batsman collecting a single.

Goddard bowled a maiden to
Persaud and Marshall sent down
one to Christiani.

In Goddard’s next over which
was the last before lunch, Persaud
pulled the fourth to the on-boun-
dary. The score then read 139 for
two Christiani was 30, Persaud
39 and extras 8.

After Lunch

When play resumed Roy Mar-
shall bowled from the Pavilion
end and 7 runs were scored
Christiani sending one of the de-
liveries to the fine leg boundary
and adding two singles. Eric At-
kinson came on from the Screen
End and Christiani on drove the
tnird delivery nicely for 2. He
repeated the stroke off this
bowler’s next over for four. Mar-
shall continued from the other
end, the batsmen were now get-
ting well over the ball and scor-

ing somewhat freely. The 150
went up in 130 minutes. C. B. Wil-
liams who had sent down sx
overs before lunch from the

Screen End at a cost of 27 rus
was again given charge of the
leather at the same end with the
score at 164 Persaud made. a
single off the over and square cut
the fourth delivery of Marshali’s
next over beautifully for a single
to reach his 50 in 99 minutes. Ee
had now hit 6 fours. Soon after
in William’s next over Christiani
glanced the last ball to leg to

make his 50 in 73 minutes. His

score also included 6 fours.
Lucas relieved Marshall and

the over yielded 9 runs, Christi-

ani on-driving powerfully the
second delivery for 4 and Persaud
hooking the fourth for 4 after his
partner had added a single. Chris-

i lost his wicket in Lucas’ next
over, when in hitting out he miss-
ed bz ind was stumped by
wicket keeper Wood He had
cored 57 runs in good style and

t the wicket for 82 minutes

the 1



ing which he hit yurs. The
nership had yielded 120 runs.
Wight came out and opened
account with a four off the
first ball of C. B. Williams’ next
( The 200 was soon hoisted

had taken 161 minutes

re

King Bowls
King bowled the new ball from
the Sereen End to Wight who

ngled the last delivery.

Skipper Goddard made a dou-
ble change bringing on Walcott
from the Pavilion End to send
down a maiden to Wight

In King’s next over Persaud
glided the third ball nicely to leg
for 4 and singled the next. This
batsman was giving a fine dis-
play cutting, driving and gliding
gracefully. The end came how-
ever, when in Walcott’s next over
ae played a yoker the ball rising
and going into the safe hands of

Weekes ai short square leg He
had scored 76 runs including 10
fours and was at the wicket for
138 minutes. The score board
now read 210—4—76,

Camacho was the next men in

and after making four runs played
forward to a ball from King on
the leg side to give Lucas at silly
nid-on the easiest of catches.
The score was now 219 and
MeWatt partnered Wight. McWatt
delighted the crowd with some
fine hooks to the leg boundary.
Lucas and Atkinson were again
given a spell and Wight should
have been out when he returned
hard to Lucas waist high. Lucas
got his hand to the ball but could
hold it Wight was then 21
The 250 went up in 216 minutes
but when the score reached 255
C. B. Williams came on from the
Screen End and with his third
delivery, a leg turn, got Mc Watt
to miss as he swung at the ball
He was struck on the leg stump |
and was given out |l.b.w. His score
of 25 included 4 fours. He had
been at the wicket 37 minutes.

not

6 Wickets Down |

British Guiana had now lost 6

wickets and Rollox partnered
Wight. These remained until the
tea interval was taken having

taken the score to 270 runs, Wight
had contributed 34, Rollox 2 and
there were 10 extras.

C. B. Williams bowled the first
over after tea from the sereen end
to Wight. The batsman cover
drove the third but Goddard
fielded brilliantly. Wight however
took a single off the last. Facing
King from the pavilion end Wight
on drove the first and got four



THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE



British Guiana Beaten

SE Bae! = eres 2

»



G. PERSAUD

Roy Marshall replaced. King from
the pavilion end. He bowled to
Rollox who turned the first to fine
leg for three and later Wight
edged through the slips to the
boundary.

Wight cover drove one from
Williams for a single and later
Rollox returned a hard low one to
this bowler who made no mistake.
His contribution was 7.

Seven wickets were now down
for 288 and Norman Wight joined
his brother who was then 45, Roy
Marshall bowled to Leslie Wight
who lifted him to the on boundary.



B. PAIRAUDEAU

Norman Wight turned one from
Williams to fine leg for a coupie,
but was missed off the next when
Goddard at silly mid-off failed to
him in a good effort.

slie Wight lifted Marshall
overhead to the off boundary to
get his 50 in 107 minutes. He later
repeated the stroke for another
boundary to send up 300 after 283
minutes’ play.

Having a Go

The batsmen were now having
a go, and in attempting a single
off Williams after lifting the ball
to extra cover, Leslie Wight was
run out by Roy Marshall for 57
including eleven boundaries. His
innings lasted 112 minutes. Gaskin
filled the breach.

Marshall’ next over yielded
seven including a six by Norman
Wight the only one of the game





which struck the top of the
Kensington stand.
Gaskin after scoring a_ single

was bowled by Williams and Trim
the last man in cut the second
one he received from Williams
hard to Roy Marshall at point and
he brought off a low catch to bring
the innings to a close at 4.35 p.m.,
giving Barbados victory by en
innings and 110 runs. Norman
Wight carried his bat for 14 in-
cluding two boundaries

C, B. Williams, Barbados slow
leg break googly bowler carrie {
off the bowling honours with 4

for 66 in 20.4 overs; 2 of which
were maidens, while Frank King

got 2 for 39 in 12 overs, Lucas 2

The Weather

TODAY

Sun Rises: 6.20 a.m,

Sun Sets: 6.08 p.m.

Moon (New) February 16.

Lighting: 6.30 p.m.

High Water: 3.01 a.m., 2.01
p.m.
YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington) nil.

Total for month to yester-
day: .63 in.

Temperature (Max.) 83,5° F.

Yemperature (Min,) 70.0° F.

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.

(3 p.m.) E.

Wind Velocity: 11 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29,946'



(all run)’ He then played out the
remainder.

William's next over yielded two
singles. With the score at 276,









e.

HE DOESN'T DO ANY 3

(3 p.m.) 29,889.





By Jimmy Hatlo

Uff AND WHEN THEY












FOR ME? TELL ‘EM WORK HERE HE UUST Y DO CATCH HIM,
I’M NOT HERE ss NO GyPSUMS GOTA \Y USES THE UOINT AS JA HE TAPS US TO
FIND OUT WHO IT IS \ / culty CONSCIENCE. A HIDEAWAY" 777 Donec









TELL’EM YOURE NOT
SURE IF I LEFT YET»
GET THE AUMBER:s_
TELLEM ITLL A
CALL BACK’:

NT

4

AA

TENN

HE THINKS EVERY-
BODY WHO PHONES





\S A PROCESS





i Shy i 7
: Listenine To THE
OFFICE "GARNISHEE |
| 6US’ PLAY IT SAFE
J | THANX TO "CO-SIGNER’

INDIANAPOLIS, IND.

. Drayton

PARBADOS
BRITISH GUIANA

B. Patraudeau b J.

J. Trime R

for 66 and C. L. Walcott 1 for 52





| | CHILDREN

f
| WEIGHT

S. A. Seoi
275 For 7

AGAINST AUSTRALIA

JOHANNESBURG, Feb. 13.
Seuth Africa, with three wickets
in hand, need 41 runs to save the
foliow on egainst Australia in the
fcurth cricket Test here.
Enterprising batting by George
Fullerton, Hugh Tayfie'd and
Norman Mann enbled therm to
recover from 148 for six wickets
to 275 for 7 in reply to Australia’s
first innings total of 465. The
mateh ends tomorrow.
Fullerton defended for two and
a half hours, and remained un-
veaten with 45. He and Tayfield,
who hooked freely and drove
vigcerously, added 65 in 68 minutes
for the seventh wicket, and then
Fullerton and. Mann put on 62
in 73 minutes for an unfinished
eighth wicket stand. Both Fuller-
ton and Tayfield offered chances
when Saggers failed to stump them
off Ian Johnson’s bowling.
Earlier, South Africa had to
struggle for runs against a good
all-round attack after losing 3
wickets for 19 runs. In 105 min-
utes before lunch, they added
only 38 runs and lost four wickets.
Lindwall had a spell of two
wickets (Eric Rowan and Nourse)
for eleven runs, and later Miller
dismissed Denis Beggie, and Paul
Winslow, a new “cap”, in two
overs at a cost of only one run.
—Reuter.

Football This
Evening

A Football match will be play-
eH at the Garrison this evening
Between H.M.S. Devonshire and
an Island XI

The Island team ig as follows:—
Goal; King (Carlton) Backs:
Medford (Spartan) Chase (Army)
Halves: Haynes (Everton) Cad-
ogan (Spartan) Ishmael (Spar-
tan) Capt. Forwards: Chase
(Spartan) Johnson (Spartan)
(Empire) Lueas (Carl-
ton) Hutchinson (Carlton).

Players will wear white shirts,
and kick off is at 4.45 o’clock

“I want to send a food
parcel to England!”

London Express Service



Following are the seores:—

Ist INNINGS 686
ist INNINGS 257
BRITISH GUIANA tnd INNINGS
Lucas . 48



G Gibbs lbw King 1.
G. Persaud ¢ Weekes b Walcott 16
hk. Christiani stpd. (Wkpr) b Lucas 57
C. Camacho ¢ Lueas b King 4
J Wight run out ‘ 57
C. A. MeWatt lbw Williams 25
A. B. Rollox ¢ & b+ Williams 7
N. Wight not out 14
&. McG. Gaskin b Williams 1

Marshall b Williams 0
» 11 Lbs, 1 n.b 16

Fall of wieckets:—1—39, 2—71 191
4--210, 5—219, 6—255, 7—288, 8—308
9—319

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R w
F King 12 3 39 2

E. Atkinson . 3 1 20 0
C. Walcott , 12 1 52 1
Cc. B. Williams 20.4 2 66 4
J. H. Lucas 18 2 66 2
J. D. Godda 6 2 4 0
R. Marshall ll 1 46 0



By Innings

Experts Help

experts were helping India with



|
|
|

a ey
















India

TOKYO, Feb. 13.
Japan’s Trade Minister, Heitaro
Inagaki, told the Diet (Parlia-
ment) here today that Japanese
her five - year industrialisation

lan. :
. An Indian ee ae ares
with Japanese manufacturers an
technicians to find what heavy
machinery Japan could provide
for the plan and what machinery.
Japan could help India to buila
for herself. Head of the Indian
Mission, Mulherkar, told Reuter
of a plan for Japanese capital—
in the shape of heavy plant and
technical advice—to buy up to 49
per cent. of the shares in Indian
enterprises.—Reuter. :

U.S. And Russia
Could Destroy
Each Other

BALTIMORE, Feb. 13.

Some radio - active substance:
from the hydrogen bomb will las
“hundreds of thousands of years”,
making bombed cities uninhabi-
table, Mr. William I. Laurence
New York science writer, said in
a lecture here.

He said the bomb, “a physical
menstrosity”, was several million
times more powerful than an
acom bomb. The United States and
Russia could annihilate each other
in H-bomb warfare, he warned
his audience. '

“The sun is actually an enor- |
raeus hydrogen bomb,” he said, |
“and we will create on earth ‘a
miniature replica of the sun.”

Jap Silk
Come-Baeck

JAPAN, (By Mail).
Japan’s silk industry, badly hit
y world nylon development, is
making a come-back.

Masumi Hanaoka, director of the
‘atakura Industry Company, says
that silk production in Japan has
increased from 7,000 to 150,000







yy



Analysis,

Generally
Editorials, $3.10 a.m. Programme Par: de
: Souvenirs of Music, 9 a.m
Close Dewn, 12 (noon) The News, 12.10
p.m.
12.30 p.m. Tip Top

1.15 p.m.
John Buil's

Accordeon Interlude,
Tunes, i ;
ewsrel,
eased 2p m. The News, 2.10 p.m. Hcme
News from
R _30 p.m. Ring up the Curtein,
Seaetrt : > of Hearts, 4 pm. “he
News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily Service, 18
Tom Jones Trio, 5 p.m. Inc’
p.m. The Riddle of the Sands, 4.45 p.m
Parade, 5.30 p.m. Generall
by Carl Nielsen, 5.15 p.m. reomnercns
a
Organ, 6 p.m. British Concert
Hall, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m .
Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Westward Ho! 7.45
Letter from London; 8 p.m, Redio
8.15 p.m, Souvenirs of Music,
9 p.m. The News, 9.10 Oe Soa pfs ati
, 9.15 p.m. Political Spe cs
from Britain Pp oa Esc
The

Newsreel,

ere Sota 10 pem
Midland Light i ° i
les, 10.15 p.m. Light Music, 1€ 30
San Pavil Players, 10.45 p.m. Rer ort

m. Pavilion
Britain, 11 p.m. The News

Barbados Aquatic

H.MS.






bales in the past four years, and
exports, stopped during the war,

The cocoon industry is trying
to restore to mulberry fields, 250,-
000 acres shifted to food crops
during the war.

Experts have succeeded in se-
lecting a species of silk-worm,
producing a filament comparable
n tensile strength with nylon and
giving more raw silk from one
cocoon,

ARE
“NERVES” A SIGN
YOU'RE GROWING

OLD?

Often as a woman approaches
middle life, her nerves get bad, and
she accepts this as a sign of age.
But why let yourself becume edgy,
run-down—or so nervous you cry
without cause—at any time in life?

For nearly fifty years wise
women have been meeting this
situation happily — by getting
ame of rest, fresh air, wholesome
ood and by taking Dr. Chase’s
Nerve Food to build them up, For
the Vitamin Bi, iron and other
needed minerals in this time-tested
tonic help build up your vitality
and aid in toning up the entire
system—so you can face the future
with confidence.

Give Dr, Chase’s Nerve Food a
chance to help banish nervous
fears and doubts. It helps you rest
better, and feel better. The name
“Dr. Case” is vour assurance. 10







a)

ARRIVALS

SWIMMING RINGS and WINGS at

SPECIAL: Floor,

Wax-Polish

Furniture,

NEW
All RUBBER KNEE BOOTS
HOCKEY BOOTS, SHOE & SUEDE POLISHES
THE
BRITISH

co., LTD.
Car
coscvecces 360) Der tin

Linoleums,



DO PUT
ON

)) WHEN THEY
\)} ARE FED

DAILY
ON

J&R

ENRICHED

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reached the 80,000 bale mark in| \
1948. Already consumption is out-|¢
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B.B.C. Radio

Programme
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY I4, 1950
7 a.m. The News, 7.10 a.m. News;
7.15 am. BBC Northern
Ireand Light Orchestra, 7.45 a.m
Speaking, & a. From \he

News Analysis, 12.15

1 p.m. On the job,
30 p.m

Britain, 2.15 p.m

Sandy MacPherson

(Con)

Club

(Members Only)

Wednesday, February 15th

WATER POLO
5 p.m.

“DEVONSHIRE”
vs.

LOCAL TEAM

COCKTAIL DANCE
6 — 9 p.m.

Music by Sydney Niles and

his Orchestra

Free Admission to Ballroom
14.2.50.—2n.



»

» CARNIVAL
DANCE

SELECTION OF CARNIVAL

QUEEN

Prizes for:—
MOST ORIGINAL (Ladies)

(Gents)

PRETTIEST COSTUMES

(Ladies)

PRETTIEST COSTUMES

(Gents)

MOST ORIGINAL BAND
PRETTIEST BAND Etc. Etc.

Saturday, 18th Feb.
~ 9 p.m.
* ADMISSION — $1.00
Ya Music—
% C. B. Browne’s Orchestra.
‘

OSS SO FOES

SESS SPS DTEE

Intercolonial Amateur

BOXING

TRINIDAD vs. BARBADOS

at

MODERN HIGH SCHOOL

STADIUM

on

TUESDAY 1l4th &

WEDNESDAY, 15th FEB.

at 8.30 p.m,

Under the distinguished

Patronage of

HIS EXCELLENCY THE

GOVERNOR

5 Thrilling Bouts Each Night

e

PROGRAMME
Tuesday, 14th Feb. :
Keith Walters (Kid Sun-
shine vs. “Togo” Moore
(Sand-Fly Class).

Lisle Bagott (B’dos) vs.
Roy Singh Alexander
(T’dad) (Fly-Weight)

3. “Boy” Perkins (B’dos) v.

Kenneth Wallace (T’dad)
(Welter-weight)

Arthur Streetly (Lodge
School) v. Whitfield Ifill
(M.H.S.)

. Sam King (B’dos) v. Syl-

bert Davidson (T’dad)
(Light-weight)
Wednesday, 15th Feb. :

. Victor Lovell (B’dos) v.

Hollis Wilson

(T’dad)
(Bantam)

. Tony Foster v. Neville

Skeete (Welter-weight)

. Tony Barker y. Denzil

Vaughn (Light-weight)

. Gilbert Goodman (B’dos)

v. Aloysius Marcano (T.)
(Feather-weight)

. George Best, 184 Ibs. (B.)

v. Wilfred Rodney, 196
lbs. (T.)

Naval Personnel in Uniform
Half-Price. Seats booked at
Ralph
Alley. Phone 4683 or 8402.
Louis Lynch, Modern High
School, Roebuck St. Phone
2846.

Beard’s, Hardware

Refreshments & Bar avail-

able

Ring Side $1.50;

Ring Circle $1.00; Bleach-
ers 60c

300k Early

Guaranteed Electric Light-

Arrangements by the *
Courtesy of ESSO Servicen-

:

POSS O80 ee ee ‘







Sports

idental Music
y_ Speaking,

News




































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Full Text

PAGE 1

tets* ,V FEBRTARY 14. IRJI ST £ lleton Road Collision ,wers Given Bef ore WI Appeal Court Did Trial Judge Misdirect Jury? T:IF. n.\RRAnns APVIH IT1 Answers T D U UlLI. I'F-I.L -i i Q r*niotorifti passing through Lttifsr Square yesterday, i ne m*c I"** and s'*" 5 which xcn in the Sqiure (nr the tune yesteroa> morning a great amount or con*5i Constables on duty were JT&gsy giving answers to a St flow of questions. 3~ motorist, who. as usual, hau —-lied to many oig din ZZ all about Trafflc Sums, was 2 rock-wre of himself ana Srf the opinion that questions ie not necessary. H, leit Collymore Rock on his JJjo Kensington Oval to watch *7iBiercolooiai game. He came TL, River Road, over the JJJorw Bridge ami through the 'arching the Nelson Statue k, jaw Ihe sinn "East Uour.c --A Tum Right"'. He was Juried but was still sure that J, ud come across such signs Mtare in big cities. He however turned right and MI himself going back in the action of Queen's Park. It was 4, men that he decided to go ftqprh Crumpton Street and ap—jijrKensiniton from the WestWT Road endOn xwchin* Kensington he was pd that he could have motored ^n, Broad Street. R IDOLPH CLARKE of Hopeveil. Christ Church, was jdipeu jt the General Hospital ^ the left rear wheel of a a*or lorry ran over his right jpot at about 11.45 a.m. on SaturVARIETY Road Deaths C.O.L. Talks OF CARGO On Increase In March ARRIVES \n B.G. PACK FIVE LRGO includii: canned ham. caulltlo GEORGETOWN. Feb. 10 : rat, „, th. •-1 ***** PUIS f n " r CUkC "' ,S 8 W."* 1 Cfford Sk after a collision on Coll riV^J*'^^ he f { ^l .l_ nv "? of %  •* r could "il m tins dm rolled QMS, Government has also r revenue ollected through motor partial found by both respectively. The iu.y arises ss-^'X^ai -vafiraa saw. fiTSirte^fS ? !" ?! K_*!?f* " ?' >"• -EKDM r."": between | ""M lo pull to h reel snip. %  directed latanfi m jbe accident occurred when the %  lor lorry X-793. owned by jfloo C Bovell of Chancery Lane, gri dnven by Phillip Callendar d fMr Valley, was travelling iMg Gibbons Road, loaded with OH It is understood that Clarke %  %  to one of the canes. oar broke and he fell. \ WALL and wooden building, 41 x 60 x 18 feet, and valued HJOO was completely gutted by a lit o( unknown origin which lj.5j.-u, ,pcc,„, ^„ s !" ,.:,="w !" to their rid*, and (S A case in which although the plaintiff ts neglifi.'Til. and the defendant's negligence is subsequent, yet the plaintiff's negligence is the substantial cause of the collision. 1 furtiw I Thf 1 *' 5,> ls thc property of [lUton DaCosta of the same ittotss ann is insured with Messrs. [Caffinsion and Sealy for $3,36u\ EMAILS Ltd. suffered loss when two tires tavim at Todds Plantation on itanOiv The first are broke out at about l*p.m and destroyed an acre of |tj crop npe canes. Bat fire extended to Asbbury fetation, St. George, and destmc 323 holes of llrst crop ripe am belonging to Mr. R. H. Jbune ol the same Plantation, The second nre occurred at fclds *5 minutes later and burnt MaolM of second crop ripe canes. %  lil three cases the damage was bund by insurance. kS ACCIDENT occurred WnV'Street at about 12.10 p.m. • Fnday between a motor car % %  eJ by Messrs. Burton & Co., pWd Street and driven by Eric art of Roberts Tenantry, and %  HiWcar. M.I099. owned by Dr. B. M*s.v;ah and driven bv Rev I.D. Wood of St. Alban's Vlcar%  Tht nght rear fender of Dr. •ftth'* car was damaged. f MUX GRAHAM of Roaches, %  Wi George, fell from a bus %  ewas ;njured at about 5.15 p.m. %  Irmy. He was taken to the * !" Hapital and detained. %  H was a passenger on •rwor bus M.805, which was %  "Jfl-ng behind the motor car P* M1242, owned by J. D. Was of Country Road, and W bv Rufus Cordle of Deacons, JW. as involved in an accident %  Warlord Road with motor %  H1085. owned by the Police jyarmeiit and driven by P.C, %  LiMrish J[* understood that aftei the B occurred the bus stopped %  ">I> and Graham fell out. iSOTHER ACCIDENT oc"curred on Mount Gay Road, %  Jjcj. at about 11.15 a.m. on PJW bwween motor car L.I9— •fKiurd-owned and driven bv Ule Ward of Mount Gay. % % %  Wor lorrv. M.I003. owned by 2 1 Barrow of Dean's Village ELr""? by Allan Phillip, of HP" 1, St. Lucy. C'^J'ront fender and head V of the car were damaged. %  P* done to ihe lorry. M* "W \KI. .|.H,M|,l,.lll. w7 "•, Armv Caplain o( OnffM. wai (ound dead in l'\r Jl "cagide hotel at about t*,',. n l ^'das-. His body SJ !" *'to Messrs. Burton J, S*st^'"" r "' Parlour ' .\ H at Villa Road wa. 1ft*. \ %  large slone. ••M^IS^ dama l th.e roof. iS'tndent occurred when R. !" "f ' Villa Itoad *,"• %  .n the Mme sff- '"day The slooe " ot Kiiz Clarke *'>'*IIVh.s .: ,„, ni_ er Blbl nd Tract "lS|"--" Jc hovahs WitRS have directed thcjuTv iat UK .r them to their vtrdiet wore — TheUiyht Wmjl %  \ A.,due to thc negligence of both pUttM Ot of the plaintiff or of the lant? B. Having regard to the facts -if the case, and in particular to the time when the defendant and'or p.-iintifT could have become aware of each other's approach, and the Impact and the course ot both parties within that time, (I) whether the .Voided whether if the Mi -i carpets. The cargo was brought j previous wraoin, Rotterdam and I W5.243.05 01 the 1.374 accidofd whtek U KHUagntd to occurred last vear. 1.107 weie in s. I Uucaon, Son 4. Co, Q totn to w u and 357 in eountrv t-id. it icfi this |>ort yesterday districts. Eleven peraou were %  ranm for Trinidad lulled m the Cdty and nine in the other cargo arriving hero over t country; three of the City fataltlie week was brought from U.K.,. 'ties resulted from New York and Trinidad crack-upa. figures by motor cycle From Liverpool Whisky, beer, stout cornflour • -. tobacco, oats, cotton thread, steelI ^^. -'" Fatalities in 194 cany of the region, and to consider and recommend to Oovommenu. in the light of that review, what Governmental action. whether conjoint or individual, isi called for. The revaluation conference will be official, hut !t will full consideration H,c VttWl :n n lat M able of reprrsrntatlvi organisation-.. CLARKE'S "BLOOD MIXTURE" Cleanse the system from blocd impurities ; many sufferers from rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago, neuritis, p'mples. boils, sores and minor skin ailments, can derive great benefit from this well-known medicine. fa LIQUID or TABLET FOAM The appellant is also claiming that the jury were misdirected when the Trial Judge said to Ihem : "There was a long distance and space according tc Mr. Skinner's evidence when Skinner first saw the Plaintiff's car", and immediately continued : "If you are satisfied that Skinner WI crowded by the other car as to bring him within the agony of the collision paragraph, or that the last opportunity of avoid dent was his. the plaint titled to damages", therefore laadIng the jury to considei thai UN distance between the can when adjourfksd until today. negll gent the defendant by exercise ol tare could have avoided the collision. (3) whether the snip taken by the defendant ule of the %  the plamtitt. The third ground of appeal is that the verdict of the jurv wan against the weight of the e\ Men, a, and the fourth ground Is that evn il the plait T i TT W ts entitled to ;. verdict, the amount of damages BM ivi-. lug of the appeal opened yesterday morning. Mi Keecc made submission on the Grounds of Appeal. He concluded at the lunebeon adjournment, and on resumption Mr. Word began to make %  ubnunuoni on tab For the Plaintiff. Mr. Ward submitting that the Trial Judge had put the case i the jurv. said that as he understood the law, f.n' us misdirection < earned, the Court would only uufraent ol below mi the grounds ol nue: there u as Bj a substantial niiscarnage ol Unf with such a matte-. the Court should take inl .. %  DOt Jll-t selected passages of that up. As he saw it, the only duty ol the judge was to expound so much of the law as was relevant to the issues belore the jury. If that was done, the question as to whether he had put other i %  %  I the law ri affect his \ii Ward %  inn to die oaei law on UM ind was :.. % w li a the Court Irabclcka, hay. and SSSs ?' G T !;':" n ';r " % %  %  rr < .fiT ^s ~'-'Pns^"t inatro and farol meal, j usln. Ihe ro.6. ol U>e Colon}— black kidney beans, nil! pens. | i. M5 ^.v,,, c ,„. m „,„ g nn peas. crushed wheat. U trade vehicles; 10S van, %  570 jes. lubricating oil, brake, motor lorries: 88 buses: hearses Id effects, tractor j and 512 motor cvclea. Last vear's revenue was made up as follows $1S8.65.IJ from motor vehicle licences: SI.613.00 in Registration Fees; $2,800.18 in Tees for examining vehicles; JB.723.00 In Drivers' Licences and S152.00 lor bus conductors' hicnces—'C.N.S.) YM.CJL WORK PRAISED Capt G. H. Stokes. Captain of H.M.S 'Devonshlr.-' paid an offlal visit to the Y.MC.A. vestcrmedl fluid. •even in mi' whST tSre ?" %  > !" "0 !" by the Ch.pIhe plaintiff could ""* piece goods the collision. (2i .^ehooner Gita M • ..ITIVM pluintiir was negli"*"" J 50 If""" "' gasolene, coif sicned to Messrs. Da Costa & Co; Ltd. Steamships "Craftsman" and "Philosopher" are consigned l'i Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Ltd tin"C. G. Thulin's" agents are Messrs Robert Thorn Ltd.. and th Schooner Owners' Association agents ol Schooner "Gita M." m I Large Seal,' Cocoa Banaaa Cultivation Planned For B.G. GEORGETOWN. Feb. 10 Hack from a 6-monlh stav in the United Kingdom, during a. fined .5, to be paid to Mj S^Xti:^! days or in defau t 4 days' imculture Mr H £ Croucher Ssprisonment by H,s Worship *.|doaad In an inu^vu.^ve'terday plans for implementing the Evans a recommend at iona far growing crops on a large scale in the Banica Triangle area. A skilled soil surveyor (Mr. La due this month for a preliminary survey of the area, Mr. Croucher said, and arrangeI being made to send an agricultural ouVe. to set up a station tax Bunanas Too While cocoa was the prioritv led of the Evans Beat With Slick: Fined Norris Boyce of Jordan's Lane A. J. H. Hanschell yesterday found guilty of having unlawfully assaulting and beating Annie Connor, also of Jordan's Lane, on January 25 with ;i stick Watson, and he commented on the good work which thev arc doing and especially for kindnesses extended to his men during their stay in Barbados. Sugar In The City There is a stro*.g smell of sugar around the City's bond houses aa the 1950 crop gets in full swing Grinding is going ahead quickly for those factories iritlch have begun their reaping. All other factories are expected to be grinding by the end of the month Once again ththe market are agog with the beat of Coopers' hammers as these workers make n the inoaMMi mpplj HARRISONS BROAD ST. Fint'd For Unluwful Possession A ime of 15 to be paid in 14 days or In default undergo 14 days' imprisonment was nnStreet, yesterday bv His Worship Mr H. A Talma. If You're Alive You're Through l rV under considerlion and he had stopped at Jamaica foi msiussions on the He was found guilty of having banana proJect The problern 0| -he froghopper pest which has %  BUni here for the past eight months was also discussed and Mr. Fenner, Trinidad entomologist will be here shortly. On the question of additional taft Mi Croucfaai dm aortlj and he honed that his di would also aecure the an antornesogdat by June. ad that it an to get agricultural specialists that cannot IKprovided by the West Indies snue the specialist offlccn lake uji apDolnunents in Africa where there are la %  i-e.— (C.N.S.) had in his unlawfully possession, a quajitity of split peas which he was conveying on Trafalgar Square on February \:i Off Dock -ion Schooner "Emelme" came off dock yesterday after Spending live dayg uiKler^oin^ repairs. This veaaal nrtll begdn to load cargo in preparation for itnext trip to British Guiana. FORT NELSON. Canada. (By I DM main lubjectl taught In i unique classroom in thi.s nortnern Briuah Columbia outpost. The classroom, for two and a %  consists of well-heatet advice warns Unf snow in its natural si..te Tins will cause dehydration of the body instead ol reUevin | %  that now must be thawed first In the hand, and oan IHeaten when melted to l slush—(C.P.) Made Disturbunee Fined 10 7 Sylvm Jones of Horse Hill. St. Joaepb, was lined 10/to be paid in 14 days or in default 14 days' imprisonment when she appeared I before His Worship Mi H A I Talma yesterday for making %  disturbance on Swai. Formosa To Doubh Production Camp FireTo-nighl A Scout meeting was held last i.ight in the St. Joseph Vestry Room on top ol the St, Joseph Dispensary and to hold a camp-lire to-night (Tuesday) at 8.00 o'clock 00 the grounds of the St Joseph RactOCT. All Scouts and ftOUbMI an asked to > Sugar TAIPKV fosnoaa, (By Mail). Formosan sugar prcluclion may be doubled under a 3,000,000 dollar contract signed bFormosa Sugar Corporation and International, of Los I alifornia, for the drilling of 125 irrigation walls under President Truman's Four Point Programme. The Hconomic Co-operation Administration has arranged that Greece will buy 30.000 tons of the roductson, with dollars the Marshall Plan.—B.C.P. B.G. To Send Dentist To England GEORGETOWN, Feb. 10. The British Guiana t> socialion has been bVI %  tlve to the annual meeting of the British Dental Association which will be held at Birmingham, Engrom July 10 to 14. The British Guiana delegat* will tdke the opportunity at thr BM Ume to deal with matters ol vital interest to the Association with the Medical Advisers to the Colonial Office and the Colonial Development and Welfare Organisation. — li N few] mj^jwemble in convenP a lh ^ r u[ > 17 to FebrUarV "I*'""—! iiuci %  # niuiani I ii • nrk i£ s,Ml Shed. Queen's |Air Force doesn't expect the Iwo^Li^a 1 ^ 1 from Grenada, 'week course to work miracles, but ansnTh* ... "f.'" 1 and Borbagoes after t-vo main objects; re*he Mv |rwav, '"ending. I which culminates j public lecture h at 8.00 p.m. on %  sW 19. This lecture 1 W R D. Newton. Kepresentative of ' ... %  OAT "Mondelle." ** Audley Downes '•"t while returning moving froi .* ihe minds of its personnel tht long-standing fear of the Arctic and making nie.-s ,i.ok altar tl should they be florcod down. Survival ti.iing at the Forst Nelson school is ased on a manual which contains I wealth of advice to* those who find rcUc authorities say hundreds o aoffthi had in t) past they tried to fight t knock-down %  * slightly injured battle with the •aTL. ere ^oat. The lmaWn 8 >' work fo lhcni '"umtng with a large The manual cover, V overturned small **• %  oto the sea in r some of the (task. anea. grtv p*"^ , u i*' u brou >" ^2^_ re ?* w 'ho' ,ood *"'' TO ol the bo,, KV II. p. .. IntrrrolonUI MUM tournament, Trinidad n in in. i.,, The sixtt %  ,,| the |n. ,. Tournainrnt was enininenusl i>n Till insunt at QUMO'I Pirk oval Whan Trinidail MIM 1), Um opHUng name. Tl.. WHS innand ihe arickel al par(eet as It possibly could be fo malting purposes. The attendantatari but town. number in the tands and lib!) and a wooa i rowd aitni %  '>"" %  lost i i; n,u hurst and Trinidad alactad to bat The Jiume .team QOOtajaMl Ibjt crease for throhours ana 2J minutes and were all out al Ml p.m. for 167 runs Tin %  coring wa Iwo boun r i entering tlie end ihe rata of Koring %  taowad ibalr appraclaUon b) '. "I 'he inn. ing of CTlabn.l fielding of the visitor. rfaaetmanto who gave a '" "hi: %  ets. Fernandes, Esii, K McLean Jortng the gama Pa ibetr bHuti. "' """"' M* *llt b>I. Henry rhlch V-i.es. w a „ t ..,,. IO\KV SEWING MACHINES (HAND MODEL) Kvreptionally easy to operate. They run smoothly and make a perfect lock-stitch on all materials from thc finest silk to the heaviest drill HTY A -MOXES" IT WILL GIVK YOl! A LIFETIME OF TROUBLEFREE SERVICE CASH PRICE-ONLY $69.15 IMKI. ri iU ll \M TERMS ARRANGED ELECTRIC MOTORS with which a hand operated model can easily be converted into on Eleetrically driven machine $46.56 each HARRISONS Hardware Dc^t Dial 2364 I iC.III Fit IM1-T-CUal noOB GOVKKLNG | "SILVER STAR' CONGOLEUM Will customers please note Owin,: to thl .-mm,p.,1,,1 grrivgj ot a tourist ship, this store will be open to business all day •••• S.VIIHIMA la... 11 inn tit, hut will bt I'losed (Of Ihr weekly Halt Holiday at 12 NOON ON THURSDAY, 16TH FEBRUARY GAVE SHEPHERD & co. LTD. 10. II, 12 & 13 Broad Street PIGEON CHOW GOAT CHOW two of Purina's best and obtainable from H. JASON JONES & Co.,Ltd-u.i,^st .V-V.ViV.V.V.V.V. HOLMDAYMM MJV ML aV.? Deliveries can be arranged in the U.K. for one of these popular VAUXHALL CARS WYVERN-12 h.p. 4 cy. VELOX 18 h.p. 6 cy. Full details will be gladly ijiven on application to ROBERT I ROM LTD. Whilepark, MJMSB1 OMUaB) Dial Ml



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PAGE TWO THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE %  L.1SI || *. Carib Calling rOt COIJ) DANISH BUFFET SUPPER which li served every Sunday evening In the Ballroom Dl UM Marine Hotel, is beeoming increasingly popular with everyone not only among the guests but ,.h many member. of the community. Pictured is a group of the guetlii as they went around the table helping themselves to the many varieties of specialties in food, being presented in a mcist decorative manner. H KMlftsncs* an Had To Be Abandoned the Governor Appointment HfcAVY showers during ine week. m Mrs. Savage, Mr Omit\MR Arthur Kenneth Croston caused Uie Anugua recreation i-uns ana Mi ill bai been appointed to the ground to be sodden, and a cricKei those due to leave chair of English In the University match against a team from Use Barbados on Wednesday morning College of the West Indies. Mr. H.M.S. Guuuoto had to be aban..maica to attend the InstallaCroston it a graduate of the doned The beating of the Ke• H K II Princess Alice, the University of Liverpool, where he treat was done by marines from Uhlone as Chancellor obtained First Class Honours in H.M.S Ulasooui The Story That's Always In His Wallet WHEN those whom the sods love die young it's usually suicide. Yau read Uie story of the young doctor William Alfred Fitzhcrbcrt. who was found dead In his bath. He was only 29. At that age be war superintendent of a groat hospital, a very successful young man Yet in a moment of despair he plunged a fatal dose of morphia into his arm. The coroner said he had lost faith in himself. Inquests tell you only the cause of death. It's not the coroner'.; business to say how it migM have been prevented. What ha, to Dr. Fitzherbert has harpene 1 to many young men. You read a'l too frequently about brilliant young men taking their lives. Why. do you think? Most likely, because success without experience makes a dangerous Tilxture. The man who .s a success at 30 has few, if any. failures behind him; he would not be a success if he hud, because at that age he basgnl had time to support failures. So when the first failure comes he does not know how to support it. But the man who is a success t 40 or 50 knows that a disapcvp 1Q9 hf winning hm' iri/li called -Spn*0 Fnition Beloir the Farham liege of the the School of English .Language Koad opposite Government House ^inunem c r a setback is a temand Literature. He was later a yestcroay afternoon instead of on po^ry aflatr He knows that it member of St. John's College, uic grounds. is .00 to 1 that time and his own i "TL D"1* Cambridge, and obtained his First • energies will overcome it. He In lnree rarU class Uon in Part II 50 Below knows that because his own expeT ol re ca cdl n p ur the Cambridge English Tripos. 1T was 50 beiow zero m salrience proves it. have been selected by During the war he served in the xaloon( Saskatchewan when I left It must have seemed to the Mr O. V. Chandler to be heard Royal Artillery from HMO—45 on teDruar j3, Mr. A, P. McDonyoung Disraeli many times that on the projramme Personal and was a regimental officer dur^ w j d carib shortly after he his career was at an end. He bee Concert at the British | n g the campaigns in France and arrlve(1 al Seawell yesterday came Prime Minister. No life on Wednesday at 8.15 Gcr nil publications deal mormn g by T C A. from Montreal, story of any famous man is withjc in three part* The mainly with the Elizabethan and He waf accom paned by his wife out a chapter In which the first par. is divided into OverStuart periods. He was appointee Uid th wlll ^ nerc for a week's subject is in the depth hires—The Flying Dutchman by Lecturer in English Literature' ot hoUdav M guests at the Hastings Raymond by Thomas and the University of Liverpool. JMS. ,, olo| Bergman s Baby Registered ROME, Feb. 11 Ingrid Bergman's week old baby son was registered "re oday as the sol. of the Italian film producer. Robert" Rossellii.i. ..nd -a mother unknown" This is the usual formula adopted by rtallar. law when the paternity of a child is claimed by someone other than the mother J husband at the time of the child s birth. The rasjtti alts* a bitter argument between the pair on whether ntsHsflltll should in fact claim paternity or whether the boy should be registered as the child of Dr. and Mrs Lindstrom (Ingrid Bergman). Friends of Roeseliini said today that Roaellim insisted on claiming paternity officially for feahe did lose the child in any divorce settlement between Inerid Bergman and her husband, if it were registered under the name of Lindstrom. No date has yet been announced for the Bergman-Rossellin wedding, bul friends believe .' will take place "quietly" at the City Hall here within the next ten days.—Reuler. P L A Z A (One D#y CMlyi WED li>tlap B ANOTHER WARM* BIG ACTION DOCBU; "DLUhdiaKir 'FSCApt ttmn ( kitf* CAGNBV Hot, A. ar.d RlclMrd TRAVIS Alan ..ADD \l A I II fLIB < I \ I M \ [M embtf| WEDNESDAY NIGHT at 8.J. at 8.30 PARAMOUNT present* TMIE PALEFAart contu.r. Arcangcllo E i QnaJ part includes, Gounod's 11 Matt." • sh." sung by I %  >y I'Xpen dialies IS, 5. 1ia %  %  tbmVm s ootnsvo tile upper. (Si B ties t land I4I 12 Kou a good come li rtlU. as TOU will miow is in •.:ie DJJL <3l lb Stages unset. u< 16 si. Thomas is liio oet IAOWD rumpr o! one. ll • 11 Stroni enough to inwwicne Hitler. i3i in rnu plane riaata. iji 20 Wnere. vou will Ind. lots rap .1' 23 You'll nave to U> mane trial stitcti In Urn.Jl Twingoa, of conscience pernapa (fl, -lyer i' IIOLM) 1. Tht tnontn goDf :<. (Ssn:oii ii. ,i i Nothing h.-d u in tnu to.-ockyard in AnUgua has been tne i-.usoou*. Steel .L Ji Gat* wuiit ott to s t aff band music ..i ui.tsirator's residence. ^/ESTEHUAY morning as Carib had heard a lot of Barbados and 1*1 "1 -Top\ WM croifing hl chamvrw. SO*M PUITS Carp. prsaMU KIEK DOUGLAS in Ring lard nas's CHAMPION IMARILTM MAXWELL • ARTHUR KENNEDY |with PAU1. STtWART • BinH ROMAN • LOLA AURICHT "-oduc*dby STANLEY KRAMER IMS PTOJMST tobmi SSBBM • Dostwa by Htnk Rabat* So—ep! j T !r Cnl FOTMSCB %  RS(MSM ihn. UsIWd A West Indies is Mr. Owens, retired General Manager of Canadian National Railways H arrived here yesterday morning by T.C.A. for a week's holiday and Is slaying at the Marine Hotel. Mr. Owens told Carib that h ping imbcr ol man %  %  %  I %  %  %  n.-is looking forward to a very ri i*c on his way to Bridgepleasant stay on the island. town, a friend stopped him nnd fiuld, "Has your cai got a com. lor Alien you come to itatua you lull have to Had Mild Winter D R. E. G. Hargreaves, Dental Surgeon of Toronto also came in yesterday morning by T.C.A. loi .. spsjaVi holiday. He was ompanled by his assistant Miss Pleaie Cross Here RsssAssssal Ami PlsmatirrA1-MOST all Br.dgetowners Marjorie Waters who Is also Busineisrtnu r>wuijr ^ yesterday adhered to the Professional Entertainer and they B !" iK-destrian signs on Broad are sUying at the Hotel Royal l)r Hargreaves said that tlMy yi had a mild winter in Toronto • bi Montreal it was so cold power snow ploughs were brought into use to clean Og by TC.A. on u short %  *re staying tnjineer Tr.kcg -Time Out unporianci M h (he runwuys to allow the plane | TluoOktl signs in Trafalgar l0 take oft. ..Ko the subject of . .. Played Golf Everyday a. 411 and Mrs. H. Hopson front I to stand Carib heard s, y,, .1 jyi Monlrc ,, „„ y „,erday by people d 1 "-" 1 '" VIA en route to Canada after large ., ndl lwo we eks' hoUday here. | "> ,"..<.. ,h.ir slav they rented a Barbadlam lb During their stay they rented Mr I. to On A Short Holiday ,11 >ell-cirivcn cur, and travelle.l all over the Island. Tney dHi quite a bit of swlmmUig and played golf every day. Part of the time was spent at the CraneMhe rest at the Hastings Hotel They will be in Bermuda for four days before they return home Mr T ) spend two I UI Hopson is with Flight Operations It Col. in T.C.A. ,i.,i Mi, II. II Hastings ot .. 1 ... rhey arrived yesterday Commit and Uoings I A man and Mrs. l-eon Maingot i 1 Mailings Is Hresldent of Jyl who „,,. r e married In Trtnll.vi,es Ltd, and Is M,d on Saturday arrived nn Suncanadlan Army. j av hv B.W.I.A. t 't*" 11 „ vary good friends ,•"„„„,oon in Barbados Mn. rbados, Mr. and Mrs Eric vialngot is the former Miss uoro' i %  In PUl j hv ne Vaux. .... • M Rev J W Birkby left on For Three Weekt Sunday evening on the "Oaseogne I Men s.o'?!tl do a-TUwag i fcstHtml iifabtU-kiM mm sssan isssssj Bjgssssji. COME EARLY TO SEE l>M. WK* Ptaa-^i Si-**"* %  •MAIilC STONE" * %  W.d.ii-siLlv al s.:w p.m. THE "COLLEGE HERALD? 1ARIBBEAN TRAINING COLLEGE MALJ g in a Programme ol Spinluali and r "£" with Miss Vernu Rcid at the Pi* WHITE CANVAS PUMPS CUSHIONED INSOLE GIVES EXTRA COMFORT SIZES 3-5 SIZES 6-11 |.7 2 : ltt A (rand value lor TENNIS, HOUSEHOLD and all Sportinit occasions. Hue to TOURIST BOAT AJUUV1 \l NEXT. Ii.ll be Closing Tlmrsdas nevl. Feb. IS. .1 II Nuon and si ill re,I>I \ BATUBDAV I I II IS. UNTIL I I'M / / S,. our SPECIAL .7r—.8Jc KHAKI „ „ VALUES Miwr m 1.17 ,v.:::::::;:v For ROOFS AMD r \III 1 1 i a\s i: X \ X S —a .\mii II i its BROAD STREET He Oder ALUMINIUM CORRUGATED SHEETS 1 i ii..ihs 8 It., to 10 It., width 2 ft. Is Mil II INSULATING WALL BOARD Lengths: 6 ft. to III It; Width: 4 It KARLIT IIARDBOARD Lengths: l, ft., to g ft., width 4 It. GALVANIZED B.R.C. EXPANDED METAL Lengths: 8 ft., and t ft., width 2 It., 24 gauge. Tins HEINZ Sp Tea hetli to taM (wish Cheese Baked Beans. Salad Cream. M.!.vunalse. Sandwich Spread Vegetable So'ip Oxtail Soup. Strawberries Peart. Pineapple. Pineapple Juice. Guavas. Fruli Salad BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LIMITED DIAL MM HlltlllW ^/.V.V.-.V.V.-.W.W/'/.VV.-.V.V.V.-.'.,/. (1— INCE & Co.. Ltd. WAl MM ttoaucK vour ROOF needs repairs, take to do it this oW It*.* 1 We have in Stock . ALUMINIUM SHEETS—Oft. 7ft• •* %  EVERITE SHEETS—6ft. 7ftof Mt GALVANIZED SHEETS—Sft. "ft, t SIIINtiLKS CEMENT \1 1 MINIUM C.lTTf.KIM (\l \ \NIZED (.ITTERINt; COPPEI (.ITTKRI.NG i PL.WTATIONi** iniiTf



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I U.i -l\ Till BUtllUH S \i)\(H Ml TL'iaUJIV. rkBRI'ARv PEEK FREAN BISCUITS ARE BRITAIN'S BEST Climbing Steadily in popularity, in circulation! I Anil as no wonder, for the "Evening Advocate" carries features whir., appeal to all classes of EM h First of all. it gives your Monday'! nm on Monday, u well as all the happenings oi the week-end. Whan than r; a long week-end it comes out on the Oral day alter the holiday, hence it is eagerly snapped up by rtadari who haw r>one without a paper for some days. There is humour in it with the articles by Nathaniel Gubbins in his Sitting on the Fence feature. West Indian Humour by Touchstone. Short Stories for the quiet afternoon ui evening hour. Sir Patrick Hastings Case Book is of such absorbing interest that copies of the "Evening Advocate" HIP being filed away foi future reference to those rousing Become . reialar subscriber to-day of the EVENING ADVOCATE ROMMEL A swashbuckling general who insured many a story, some licticious some true, to be told about him while the fighting in World War II was still at it's height Hollywood once trid to portray the character oi tfaj man General on the screen but they missed badly. Here, at last, is the truth beh.nd on* of the cireator.t dramas ever to come out of the second World War. What he thought of his men and his Italian allies' What he thought of his lew; the men of the Empire I How he was eventually murdered by Hitler's OsUpo I Beginning in the Sunday Advocate, Feb. 19*



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CLASSIFIED ADS. la MOUSE? I Wali.UIO.s \i> \ I FO OEVT ymxA %  -M**ii •SSL"*"^'" inas Thin Red Veneer > Waller Hrl.-hrr. H. V... M. P. SSL* t "" %  22 I'd BriMtn-, mm,,,, „• ££J£ZZZ jon-recofr..United >SsS, r ~. ETSJ?* m ans "' im P"n>< !" i !" A "W.v T. Mara] Foertabelle. La,,. %  %  3 34Vt f LrttiSttLgvas M HIM 4SAI.F.K UNDERTHESILVER HAMMER ih by order % %  DMBBVUT %  nm we will sell t jhn. which include* W DlnlnaT T^tol,. Huah Ro.-k.ra. aia fHMt, note ; lallel rue occurred 22S?S ; 9, wh n America had .brr M p„ l'.'Sador ;.t v, c hv and Britain •roiioYol l^f c '8',zed <: """l Comnwidrr „, ,„,. Bri ,„ h Em !" 'o naliont pl.yrd both end., for ftu ,. ; -msl he middle perfectly hereu,,h 0 ,„„,, (nr SjaS ,„J ,alk vaguely about c out the thin red ncrer p| ac Jd S?'"f nd Permits the Chinese oner mow „/ China" b v thr ComSThT ."". l0 bulld "">* "no* munutt. IO lhc frontier terrltones and to Communism in China is vulner££."-i' """ ,ndla Sl1 ""Bum -<. able very vulnerable "rS"* and Possibly The Common target u( Britain r^ '""' : and America in the Fa. East ls t„ „ u 7£ mm ,7 m 1 s,n '" Chin '• very destroy Communism. No bin. conJ~" e "ecause its success has celled policy to that end has thus S,"" "?'<* ,hal 'or South and far appeared Southwest China, at any rate. Neither recosnition of the Chi... ""H" '? no "J security of Maura. recognition of the Chinese Communist Government ill', bM1 policv ,or %  "•"•"' '" America with the blunt payoff *£"*. %  One In" Horru. &**. EaceUem .-ondlllor. 5 carnal*, Own* cheap. %  "^ 1IISI.. JUKI LJ-HMII .Wyvem 1? II P CO5Y done fl.WO mile* Applj ffcailr— ">• >•. „ Ira Hair FVw Terrlc pk|y iiri|-.i'< ii : %  %  Ipply X Y / CWMICAL KOJS CARRIER CYCLESAlio (BfieriM Hal T.,.1 M %  AUlO [ft. Itatalfar SI. Dial 260a. laUkifaaw M"(*rm ca.h nRANKHt TROniAN A TO _^ Aucllonpfr* ., v -. I l' b p £omMlttoti .1 our offlr* ..1 Pinfold 81r* irflolnln,; t: %  ' thr Chnltcl DwHIltiti lt< rUaM coirwii. "r-.i Vcr^koih. drwin mom. nlnlns r^"m on* l.prtroorrt. Kitchen dnw-iilair* iwlmom up-Uln. .ird thtw ndfruit !• in the yard l vwm on appllcitlon £ "ir pmnlwi For furlh*-••arttoil.ir* %  J H :.'„r. A %  %  %  imm* (hiTth day ol Fbmrr.10 1* J SO-*. REAL ESTATE %  BISHOPS COURT. Mlftmcl. iiandlni on IS.1T5 .quare KiaWNEOUS w dMrrlptimt r.]m. tint Sllvrr. WnlarM>o. AulorriDh* .tia<> flk fc-1 The houtc rnnuim drawlni and d.nlnc room* with covered verandah nnd iiciini ofllce*. two bedrootni <-" %  runalna -niter, .t.e nh dre**.-.* nilsched. Toilet and Belh uprtalra. Two wr-nnta room-, with toilet and bMh, wa.h.oom nnd worfc.ho,. ur ,d unu In ihe MM "n -.onllraition H B Bannltter. nial-M The nhove will be *f up to public %  t the o/nrtof the under%  irned on PVIdav the 17th diir of Feonirary IHO nt ? CARRINGTON It, BatALY LVCAB RTRFPT %  OVERXMEIVT_ X OTICES. ASSISTANT* W'Mn^NDEMT OF P.TBUC WOKKS AND HATER ENGINEER. GRENADA of PuC Work/"';,;" 7, "V" B0 ' W,a "' Superintendent ..race mculv SfS '" GrCnada r all kmds, wale wnrkfiand H ? oonstruction of bull sehemes. brC< ol 5l k^ "T Se era,!e and ,h ''' h^bour^ec ; c llas l,' SrMS J and !"*" %  Jl "P" 1 "' a"S S 1*S a " Wanre ^"i-"2^TJ^^ hiBher h-,nTfn ^ J" l prMenl r lcs Commencing u^ dte 2 selt P ea 0 woTiM'V '' U d 'Z?" Pr0b " m 0r one %  ••" ld %  %  P^Berto^-rcn ""^ ' WM nWdic 1 !" ">'"ion. Free Sen 11,1 "" J1 ,0 n,m I '<" candidate selected, wfc ud cruiaren up to live persons m all. lat th a n^on ra, tJ! lS Sh0Ul ** "•* %  l0 Adm '"^lrator of Grenada not laier Than Join Ft-bi u 11.2.50—2n. MtN S %  ) % %  %  BOYH smiiTs n>i 3 I SO -Mr. SH.KTs •Si HM Ml LOST %  aW (V-arvrl oflrrrd for ,. W r,i stwi aWring. %  •! I-tM (lib ,.nd Cr-ne Phon-mm r*mn MTB %  %  .1. ,, ,...,.. > %  McKin^tryi ,1 RorVV v^ n,^^ Apply VRABWOOD A M 1 .10—lr AM. th-l 'Hrrr -Porl'il .to— i Mirrutrl* —. I'ritieetnHn. ladjolnlrui Ihe Ofei"-< occupied hv Th. nilirat on *.51 oquare feertwrlllnB hou-e pn'in. th* ton flo.dntwln* an-t •ilniiic rnoTi* n-d 1 te-rfmrnru. O" th %  •^ond florrkllrhrand tliuol nut il other roomen th Ur-d tunuulai* apply UH II i %  %  ..W I>| he -iet nn fow >. h. %  etiUon nt o,,.. %  Fi-l-rtiery 1*M :.' i.'AIIKINOTYW A SCALY Solicitor* 14 "> '0 '0i%  %  I 'III M MHHIA '_'."i v "••' n *'' o* obUlnina" orrt>r< for nrlva'e Chrlittnai C.irdt from rout friendNo rrrvlouno-ri-rii' 'Arite today for tn ebBl| Book to Britain', lirrr.t nnd '•teinon PublUhen; hicn--: %  tmn-elloui money making opportunity • VViliiiimi & Co Dept. 10 Victor" Work*. Prealon. Rig land OKRA CLOSE SEA80N ORDER Act Mp^laK^ T'''" iU 4> 3 action <3) of S may be wanted by ihe Dm JtUTfl .,,-.h tb> of the Board o( Agruulture. COTTON CLOSE SEASON ORDER In punuance ( .f Section 4 subsccUons (1) and (2) of tb Diseases Prevention Act. 1828 (1928-7). the Govcriiur-iu-I Committee has iixed the period from the 1st <>t May to the 30th of June 1950, inclusive, to be a Close Season for Cotton. Made by the Governui-m-Kxerulivr Comn md tune hundn iiv Conuivind, I I. WALCOTT. : .momous vinces of Kwancxi. Yunnan. Srechwan and tun*. %  Shi? %  of a Soutnwest oioc free from Communist conttel is ;hat it would interpose itself as a wedge between the Moscow runout -md countries lo the BM Conunu Moans other than force can be employed and they always have been the successful basis of change In I Communism cannot use its two >'hina— (I) sealing tOM : f r0 m the rid, and ^2) terrorism. which is b\ no means new in I l" nj| ible In china to achieve ;i spectacular and posi< tive virtor%by orx-nlv inflicting for ihe if! tlaTM reverse on 1 %  The 11 .in rod veneer placed over • Pixirl nor armed force I area which has carried -. Aould pay off in Communism ihr...! .,],(_ ,.,.,,.. ciali;. kn the Far East. It would be far more effective than the so-called ''containing'' BM sitting and waiting for Communism to consolidate without interference and pcrir le wherever it likes. PAGK In I .II Ii .Iiliar AO-ilui*. Sch aUrtoi IN PORT; Sch Mary E Croliii. *ch Mar, H Belh. Wo fe, Sch Ijiri"""" -Hhy A M Vnn.SUrpatcha ARUVAU '•jpher. 4.STS to,. S. IB SSr y i cr n, ,,d WMd : *"" 8S Qaaeeaaw 3JSL to,,. SSrkoTi2. nKtodi At / Ciawp.. AMM „*"* ou M a MM Mclatren. from Trinidad Aarnt. • Thulln. 1.31T t,m. ,!,*, Ihik-h M V rterMUa. t&t !• N-i-Wier Owner.' Aaaocuuon. St^oonar Mary E CaroUlM, H Ion. *ss?r .-.ho !"!" has laaS " Thiiin.. .an ton. nrt n'liW-.tt 1 *"" ""• c " \ \ Maeiinknie. AenU R M IN TOl!CII WITH MIBADOB COAST STATION 'S Itomw ij,k v.,.. P !" Ii,. ..,„ v., ...... .,.,..,.. a %  -mart... Abu AbMU < % %  .. Ulln aeaw i !" W tawiaa VenaBaa. ^Lau^4iL •CHAMPION" )tlhlln| ,.i IUVIIII he a the Chat" ptoa M aflord to mix the beet iciure to come to the nrrecn I.M one wV. %  %  loU AL\V rtltATRr. from 10 3 50—41 TRINIDAD BONDS (7 43.360 3*1, due 1973/83 (9 1955/SK 9 : :•. 4 81 j '.18 I r.iiud.Hi. TRINIDAD SHARES AUSTRALIA BONDS a paid for 3H^ Dollar Bonds. BARBADOS SHARES A. M. CUT mis oi l Dial .!! %  — Mi M ii. cr I'roplr: WEBB Mount — Z I'll II IIIJ( V VRBIVAI II, ,. I? 0 1 Trvudad Omn-awi. Jo.,. AlOMi I t nn O s> %  i Ale^^dc, K, <^Or. CUn.be. I Kdith French • %  l I'M ll IIE8 hy II H I A L. Ml win,!-,., %  %  III Rpw-rd . QUnk. Worthit,* 11 3 50—4^Vl IMRfv, %  .^ % %  a. CMrikhank. Wo J^^PJ a Finder p|, ^^ %  P M W D 'I'' ><< Finder 111 Oept It, HtUSO.WI. rr heeabj win ,.i .y., **** *'" Uoreei. "• %  • 1 -lo not hold mywlf n L'" '">""* .- 0 "• my lu me *"leM Ml. All. St Andrew. 13 3 50-20 WA.MKU NOTICE The road lendinf from Melon'* Hill i" Sp I'LanUUon I* daitavi ir Traffic Any one tuinc thU road so al Ihelr own MM. By order Hi.rhw.y Commlfaioner, Sl. Joaeph PeHih. ujja-as NOTICE Alt. fXKISH nl -r llUIN ration Ii drawn to all ... • ,ai taog MMUU I...., mi % %  irtna %  iMitith of Februarrv. m na-coidanc* h I'MDog Ia.rci.er Ait R 9 K,\siJf Parochial Treaiuier. St John. NOTICE I>ll PAYNE Dontlrt — bee> to rtorj the Heud Teacher, of the Elcmen 0l St Philip. Chflat Church. nd Sl Michael of hla (lira* *>• Maternity HoaplUl Included requented to "end all rei-rinn Treatin.'nl to Dr A %  riH-fl by order of the Chief Medical Officer. 14 2 v jri 1 WtSTs r^ %  .. E. Pt-HJ.rii. " OMeUI m, atrt lu. .. ii: so t *JU Good[wa-*.. Appt> L-. ii.a.so--in. HV % %  """ *"" 1 f~~' TiShSeld*. Plnp ha, 1 sod accunuiia Prke lequiKd IS 3 50in L £DY With oolh muDcal M ". with narai. i in .. UaaVkJMM \qi LTM I U %  NOTICE TO MUMIilaiS hereby dven that Ihe Ballroom will be cloud to Member* on TlrBBOAY. February lIUi. from 8pm for an EriUrUnnment by lite Royal and %  *-.re Laocue. lor ihc Uon ol R.at.a nEvosaanRr. By cader of UM Onrnrnlit'-e. H. P. Si-KNi ^•II 14.3.SO in LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE No hingle ahop at comer Of SarOeauiU Village. CiCh within rurf 'A' n-ted Uu 13th dory of February 1SO0 To T. A MrlXOD. Sea} Police MagUtrata Dlat 'A* EVANS PHIIJ.tPS for applicant applkiaSton will be contldered at a Ucen.au: Court to be held al Police Court. fXftrkct 'A', on ThuraOau the 33rd day of February, ISM at i am. E A MotaaOD. Police MegfcU-le. Diet PARCEL POST (RATES) REGULATIONS, 13U The Governor-in-Execullve Committee, in exercise of the powers conferred on him by suction 30 of the Post Office Act III the following Regulations : 1. These Hegulations may be cited as the Parcel Po> I Hegulations, 1950. 2. Postage shall be pav.ible In raapect of paiccr Dd to (he United Kingdom and Colonies and Foreign States at the rates set out in the Schedule to these Regulations. 3 Heads 13 to 15 of the Post Office Regulations, 1912 so far as they relate to parcel post rales are hereby revoked. 4. These H?;ulalions shall come into operation on ihe 1st day t, 1950. Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this Tth .lay ol one thousand nine hundred and fifty. By Command, E. L. WALCOTT, Clerk. SCHEDULE Tablr Of Rate* Of 1'w.Ugr Cou |. I Postage rate on parcels of Remarks nut exceeding lib*. lea. 11 la*. %  lb* $ c. Fly to the arnlva FEBRUARY 8th—2 hi United Kingdom Other pi I United Kingdom Add the following amouiils lo postage from Un 11 :.oin to destination briii.-.! West Indies Bermuda Ml h Guiana Canada Honduras .. Dutch West Indies and Dutch Guiana U.S.A. including Canal Zone, PlMrtO Rico and Virgin Islands of USA $c. 1 20 1 HO BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS %  .ill-li IHr INDIES Al kfl I tli %  Lowe* Broad SUeart. Bridactow i.. aV(Mi F'aonca, 40U a* 31SS A Fe M 48 7:' M 71 1 || 84 1 08 1 80 (Maximum weight 20 lbs.) 1 80 ( -111111111 lias llnlplalrs ut •% PA^ I i ? them 3 14c. a pound or put %  (Maximum arolfgnil ,at> !lh Loose %  IBlrae. J •Bleed r7 LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE acMot M I The applloMtoti of ULtAN GltJCER I "' ahdaan-our, St Jamea the holder of Lojour L.lcenae No 4U of IMS *-rai.t*d In reaooct of a board and *hin*-le ahop w"h -h*K>roof attaclted attuatc al Orwraf* 1 Hill St Jemee to irimve —id Ijcrner I to a board and ahtnilc atkH HlO al farad*. It'll. M Jan-ea and to uae II at auvli La* iirmlaae. I>*ted thit KSh day of Fefa TU ery ISt '1 NURfg*. a*a)_ Police UagUtniU Diet aT UlJAaN onr" APP-I • application will be cone* 'areranng Court • %  > be held **-r. -n Mou.j, Maarutrale. DUt. ** H*a*4own \IMION SAII: 1948 FORD PREFECT CAR at MarEiicarny's Garage 2.3t p.m. on Friday lTIb WE are instructed Insurance Company the above vehicle which has been damaged in an 1 1.000. %  lumly %  -dein. Cask o fall of \l i MOM I H HIXUSV III VIM. •CODS WAY OF SALVATION MADE PLAIN" Free Book from S. I 30, Central Avenue. Bangar. N. Ireland. • '.'.'.'.'.'SS.'.'.'.'.'.'SSSS.'.', NOTICE Uur CITY WiAHMACY Branch will close on Thursday 16th inst. and open on Saturday 18th. KNIGHTS LTD. ,'.-,',*-*.'.'-v---'-'DEVELOPING anil PRINTING \ Send us your next ROLL OF FILM, we ar> will i>. with the Results. COLLIiYS PHUltt,iPI< DEPI. Butter Shortage? W£ CAN SUPPLY rum BIIHER n lit per bottle &f Stuart & Sampson LTD. %  ea^uaneri far Seat RUM r jmmm • %  %  Pilarrm. .. AitaVe laahMi.. M Bynoe "• %  THIMiiiii 1 Ir.at ga KITItaik^and Ran.. % % % % %  ..LI. M*tr Alan Vaj%  tanhoil, Mi tiu Dai*y Medhm. .. %  ii n i. HO* HajHn, Mi rrwna -. %  ... M %  Qa HH i Is %  %  i %  '.i aju PMVO, Mr. I'-m -i LOOM nortn^Rodrtarup-. Boasta PwtrK|a Tucker. Ctal IV^ Sir Newiiiwun o l-reaa fchl v DA T ' A, fr S". aniriiM, I Caam rrooa i %  i.i \m v Alrmba Hi %  %  Uttaai allalpBin %  %  %  Mr (haiwena. Mr. %  \ir. vilda WiH.iroff, a| r and Mr* i %  V ....n. Mr Mad htra fcloKaaasar aSaDowaM SHIPPING NOTICES Tho M i %  The M V •'Devrwood' will II Liarin. %  Vruha. Date of Balling will be .MUNTREAU AUSTKALIA 1NKH /.IK A I.AND UNI LIMITED 'th 8.8. -AUTOA POLARIS" reOruary SrUi Sailing evaiy two weeaa. M.H llltk M %  Marvh 3rd gejaj Mew >.„k | .:|...|.%  '-nYSFJORt)" Febru%  0, i %  iy led. NEW oai.t AM aga\ii i Feiaruary lltfe. leteai New tlilr.a. luib.a.. January M4b. "ALCOA RUNNER" February Mh I'eltruary llh. 8.8. Join. ftnah DA COSTA a. CO I.TI> —Canadian TIIOM UT1 New York and Odll Service. Pon Americans a •wide System oHori ,, gieoteii choice o( rca Rome, enabling yov Over and vim mony ing places and ihfil route. And, o*Cf mooy ol PAA'i routes, ypeoal lo* fore* are now Aboard PAA'i loieit J motor Clippers the luxurious ne* d decked Clipper between Nev York and LondO''


PAGE 1

, v y. FKBRIAKV 14. You c "" R '"' 1 Lawrence's Autobiography $400,000 A Copy By TAI.BOT HOW) gland, (By Mull Th, md.sem.-t and UnHnM Uttobio^kphy .,, ;|, e Uie J,, wnCl of Arabia 1 he Mini' c,„ be rea H d mme di£ly me willin g 10 pay $ 400.000 f or a single A Good -Bellv" Laugh :\ Hil, I HIS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE until at inn IH0 1,, Personal story „f hc >hv Wu 22. 'T.? T "" S*" <-* ,.!^L .1 he midl "' stirred the world. Profraior >ier of Col Arnold Lawnncc <£S? hef h"" Wn '" "" "> ; A bT?35W u ls b 8n£ mjnn, un „, „ cas !" ~f. a2S&"LS *2" ''"'" UINHON. (By Mill). ui Bruin today is having a Jiend ">" la "* h ov """ Ji-i American incredulity rcS> the workine of the Govyitiil National Hcuith scheme -aft country %  —^ Er'"'' iiiusenieni was ? rt bv ,111 Aiiieti.-.m story ^SlM in the current issue of ^Ettr> Medical journal The %  Sour'' on how i: .1 .,„„ „ m r ,.„ for -,„ .uppowdly operate the, the fantastic price o( aho.i %  -"L ._ =.-.£2*5 •?* .* that V!3Jr * American Colt in the United States arc ^p, -o learn how the NaB Health Scheme — or ELuzM Mediciia they call JTwrkins. HI the Practi. -Boouenl emissaries, adminisnun, doctors or patients, enreUk jeleclH. have been telling ajno? :lie wonders of a welfare 'age* Mid U* Journal. •0a the other hand they have p^ of the iniquities and mer•jan; outlook of the British atnr•Ai> rxamplc of tins kind of Lppnda is the .story of an Jpmcar. doctor who tailed on a fttfcfa colleague and went with it, ato ".[• 111 %  nd round icwir 1 of leventvflve patients M. ai ; the Journal. -1W1V' said' the Briton. "I fag ar**r finish this lot. Hands %  USSf *ho have headache. Srrcon* and get a proscription ktosdirh nds up a* that tore a cough aid'. 1 eougl Hands 9 Hw with bellyache iparw -nd so mi until the Hits empty Kant to dinner Rfcstorv wnul.i i %  .1 laugh anaer-' eoi irticle %ftr m\ laugh is that it is ^^fated in America as %  pMr* anil Bid re*pe 'c American Mr ,r \i-' pW U*ir> I -INS done to comply copyright law Q \*, a ? nl "IPI? %  *" % %  to bu. ft h j" P".Jbut. q,n., ,:ink |, -Hinted if someone turii up with S400,ooo. The, would have a copy with m, .,. The money would be come—I could 1 %  Lawi.'iwe. India Police I Communists f 1AST PUNJAB. Feb. 13. 1MB be !" last nmht arrested Mil* desuilxd ,ii CommunV' clash .a which .'hols ^ttChBnKfM I':. I lormed p idaoout 200 > .. who has loen profenor of Classieal Arehaeolory at Cambria*,. OnlwrHtj 1944. explained thai as literary executor ol his brother, ihe decision on the general publii lay s.ilelv with him. "I'-n "''T in .in> hurry," lie Md %  Ice "My brother often told me 1 ".nit The Hint' avaiUI "re 1B50. at ti„ He Md that if 11 appeared too soon it miKht offend some of the men who served with him and who miKht still bo llvlru 11. %  %  m detid. but I certainly won't pubhsh It in IMo 1, is m ly that I will do %  biography, I quite Igraa vith bjl opinion that some pooplo nuitlit not hke it %  bit becau frank manner 111 which it dealf with them. Millionaire RelaxControl College 0f E xchange PVB Icddtd ^ will wait until they're .ill dead." leclined discuss the oontenti ol the "TnMint" or to pgBflll one ol his two %  Britain u kept "out of sighf ; ,t ihc British n hen •! Li able" to ihe public. Another iteii with the Llbrar) 'd Congreai in WashinRtfiu. D>C< The ren I %  .1 1 In ihe United UreaK open Ihe KOO! I States, whenKiev wcn< i B Nehru According to London DM ol 'he hctO in** general pubiit i i %  it libel Mil %  the per•UCL* HM7 PI hive attackiHl rtj - hem. Rk three police lad tear gaj pm* the procession, upon ]dts were (ired at the 11 reply. paauiltirs have been reporfrom the firini —Reulcr una now 1 ihoeni UU M I'I 1 TO if i iS^* ... BUNNINODALB, UEltKSHlRE. DIG (By Mail) A lorty-i-oom pointed mansion in iierkshnes "Millionaire's Mile" to-clav houses Britain's first panaaiMfrl Civil l>%  i.n* college. The new college. officially opened by Home Secretary Chuter 'he former COUI of the late Sir Hugo CunllffoOwen. millionaire tinancier. ad Service l.uf.ng admirals, generals and RAF officers, accusUlt of ceremotiv. wen toniahad by H cence and romtort of the new headquarter? during their Dapeeuon. Described a.s Engiands narnMl COUntr) houde, the mansion is hounded H the fam'lack, mecca ol British (in, :I ,| m lnt of Windrk, t'ciiin;.i. borne. bani, Sllghtl> bewildered nold-braiciad Service thief?, wandered through the beautifully decorated iogetic members Of ihe nr^ tail explained that it I eapei couegc than the Office t Wot have built. BaJ action oi SaUni Prominent Aircncaiis who llOO college will naVO an unnervin* li %  10 choose from. Ttie beds are ordinary Government Issue familiar to Q.I, nut .ill are lined up in mock Moroccan rooms with Adan finv Those who sleep in UV %  oyal blue bed) %  probabl] prater ihc pink-andgieen-ha/e batliiu.nn. ind tUOBB who choose the Pistol bedroom uSrootn In heii. lai. Some ol the -in Rail members defensively pointed nut that the .' anted with 116 in in payment of It was admirable for its purit, the vicinity Of Ihe A R.A.P The mansioa Miss Marjone Cunlitfe-Owen (Miss Mariorie Daw, the danur who was adopU'd by Sir Hugo) and bough! by the Government laal roar. It baa ; '' '"to a utaff college with a full roster ol experienced instructors. Its funotton will be to provide civil dcfeni %  lives from all parti <>t Britain and from the %  1th, along •he lines of courses run by the %  aga for officers. The iii st of the r um weak courses already has started. Among the 30 students in thf i fence secretary ot Mslaya, the Chief ..! Police of Gibraltar, a chief constable. defence heads from all an BrtUin. Thaj are wot king ua % %  Of the Commandant. hfajor-General J S. L a former chief of staff to Field Marshal Slim in Burma. The course consists mostly of models, maps and panorama. NASSAU. Bahamas. Feb. 13 fhc Enhance Control Board a nn oun ced exchange control to allow that capital directly Invested after January 1950 by non-residents in projects approved by the Ban;.change Control may be n b -u of Die Intent ant may be am urrenw. sterling from an appro*, Ithf eligible : %  tance to i: i lioods and %  piles to subaequeni Inveatntent as well as to ihe initial SU "d. The maxim npl %  year-! had fieen. U through military power 'he cost" eehanistlc, %  I %  %  point. ii has led to the aaaal '( militai j ound lh* %  %  ill/', lie .... us linuiicial pofl i >i the million of ihe oyalty o; ion oi ).. hinkiug" He said that the flie between tie %  i be a preventatlve etar" —Reter while theyprocesalon or'" %  '-Fascist IUII. to a mass rally in Invaded a N. rente fiom ipaakfa •he Red Flat;' cat Merren. „ : Ihe EMt %  taken over the lorcigi | editorship ( f u m tha West dermar Agencg ii i 1 A rapoi to t today. Dr aval and loreign paper, who has bet last fortnight %  IBBM / 1 Demoi it*. meetinc to piwent a serious deal —Re-.iln SEARCH FOR MISSING PLANE HI !• % % %  i. in naval planes took oil lawn today in search < i oard. The piBBM i ronun 1 %  a Ouu* of II —Rea*er %  four page -,,hl, aakly. The r controlled by the Oommunlst%  %  SH Klem | B told Raalar Ihi ml i from edit* %  Democratic Pirly Central Committee Iwcause armed that |\ %  %  vei the Fnirii-: Of the newspaper. —Renter f i i aa oaaj "M** I I ^p > ;.** h€i-., Forty KUled By Tornadoes LONDON. Feb. 13 Tornadoes which lore through of Louisiana. Arkansas and Texas during the weekend killed at least 40 people and did damage estimated at $1,000,000. Over 200 pvoplt had to receive medical aid. many of them Irom Most of those killed were trapped by roofs which era of the .. -omadoes %  i .vast. —Rcut" Mussolini's kidnapper In Paris PARIS. Feb. 13 Otto Skor/en>. chief i>odyguard. who "*ldnapped" Mussolini in 1*43 uhen a prisoner of the Bado*.< was in Paris over the according to the Commu: ing pai^ -'ay. The paper pui page photograph of a man walking in lh i'.sees and alleged th informs%  %  Interzonal Trials Begin BERLIN. Feb. 13 Interzoi view to lifting U bargo on in am Oernany win start In Berlin tomorrow, ffarr Kurt Leopold. man Intan la Department in Berlin said today. Heir Leopolo Josef Orlopp, East-Gcrniau Intergonal Trade rapraaaulallva reported afterwards to the Allies that he thought there was a basis for understate h ICau m a n n, head of the IraadEfOsi Office for Intcr/onai Trade is expected in Berlin today to conduct the negotiations for the west. Western allied officials believe that Eastern Germany will D* able to offer large qunl coal in exchange of goods under the Frankfurt Agreement of last October which ., %  lop-sided, to tne disadvantage of the East. —Reater Your Backache my be du. fo sluggish Kidney Action %  Eirary Ptcturt ttlha Storyithmg TIFB IS NOT so good when rou are troubled :li i^Jta,!.(btumatic paint, mfi. %  nnucles and loinu, lumbi lonunoo uxinarv ilanluVl' Jue to •luggih kidney acoon. why put up with pain and dinUort when you might get hopey relief by talung Doaa'i Rackuchc Kidney Pills. They itinmbtc -od .Ican-jr ikM A kidney, and so help tha* lo r,d "*. "2_t cucesi one add and oiber impuritin which ocherwi'Lnughl collect m the svitcsn and caue disima. DcianVpiUi have lielpcJ tbousan J* : 'Ci inem help you. HALF A CUNTURY of .., ,„ r^,^, "**•"•> •*• to m m d fuai, k,Jmy action, it iki foud rtconi of Dom> l\ „ ^j t.omtm of all agauuand rnommmd /*i> rtfin,n$ Memory For Vickery LONDON, i %  "ohert \ keg | m a rrom Mendoza to the Andes, rounded a bend In Ua and stared from his cabin at a •I water pom H mtainatdi What followed was like the end of a movie. Here is the stor • %  kerys wordI the no-ton a. out, but even so the co %  a slender bridge ahead spanning a chasm". There was no time to stop. So I earned on. And the brUgl groaned as the train passed over '> miles nn hour." "When the last coach was safely across, I stopped and looked back—to aaa the bridge, weakened by the rains, break upand fall into the torrent b The weight of the Irani had supplied the finishing touch. 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Tuesday

vs" Barbadk
DOS DEFEAT


























/ Price:

Pive Cents





Year 35. aa



BH. C wd Rejects g sis —
Gov t Compromise "

Res,

7
=i
=
D
—
=
ep
—

By An Innings
And 110 Runs

rcs Williams Takes 7
4 Wickets For 66

BARBADOS yesterday defeated British Guiana

ee |

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent) ae
BELIZE, Feb, 13.
NOONDAY CROWD at a Battlefield meeting rejected
A the Gevernment’s proposal that “God Save the King”

not be sung when Princess Alice arrives on Febru-
23, if the people refrain from singing “God Bless
rica” during the visit.
America paren er ne) THE Crowd became

win -— - . furious on
, : , learning the City Council’s plan |
DT CHS | Of presenting by the city an
ff ; address of jo yalty. to. tne Se
“Princess.” City Councillo ¥; ae



by an innings and 110 runs with a day to spare _
UED O. L. B. Wilson, who supporte: in the first Test of the British Guiana-Barbados ©
the motion in the Council was Intercolonial series at Kensington Oval.

Dethtikash. win, 19; vant: handled by the crowa se Although the wicket was five days’ old yesterday, it

7 , has found the plea- cillor Gordon Leacock who aiso heat ebag EEE

; with which she learned of

supported the motion, and was re-
ported to have flogged

children for Singing “God
America”’, barely

showed no appreciable signs of wear and in spite of excel-
lent individual efforts especially by Robert Christiani (57)
and by Ganesh Persaud (76) who put on 120 for the third
wicket, British Guiana were dismissed for 2319

scientist husband week-end
kor scientist husband’s week-end

school
mington Island, mingled with ae

me distress.

escaped when



i | meeting broke up. =
tn housewife, Mrs, | Methodist principal, City Coun- :
|
|

hin
; Was a great source of worry to the Gui
| © Sprnners and many fooglies
|



i more. assistance and he
inese batsmen with his slow



in their
: second innings, still 110 runs behind their first innings
. — { . deficit of 429 runs,
, incidence Q yo | Chased by the crowd. <= i ‘ sos ae ~ — C. B. Williams yesterday ; : yuts z ‘ler P
Baty tha rathes uncon: The office windows of Monrad Ss : Bot gs es - SAN | the hor - ie Tie vidi eee ep se
Pr ratiie here of Fuchs have | Jetygen, O.B.E., who led the anti- Se eS es -
sade newspaper headlines in the|Guatemalan demonstration in 2 i ’ ~. EAS .
_ week has causecka good deal | March, 1947 were smashed with | so
; misapprehension. stones. George Price arrived Sie -
â„¢o-day Mrs. Fuchs told Reuter | s

from lunch while the



crowd
storming the home of Hon. H. W
Courtenay.

was no relationship what-
between her husband and
Doctor Klaus Fuchs who is
lawaiting trial here on charges of
disclosing atomic secrets to Soviet

| The Barbados fielding to-day “his
| With the exception of Weekes and ward to one from Lueas, missed
|} Walcott who were extremely and Wood w hipped off the bails
| good, was atill patchy and the Umpire Foster upholding an
|bowling as a whole not far re- appeal for stump, The score was
| moved from ordinary. Williams then 191 for the loss of three
| finished with the figures of 4 for

66 in nearly 21 overs while Frank

King with his pacers took 2 for
| 39 in twelve overs and Lucas with
| his slow off spinners 2 for 66 in

TRAFFIC. “io ad ae

Mr. Price persuaded the crowd
to march to Battlefield Square,
where he led them in singing
“God Bless America” He re-
peatedly advised the crowd that, if
last week, Mrs. Fuchs | they liked their country, they
nm me ot had never heard of | Must fight for their rights in the

Until the case of Klaus Fuchs |
ter Sia manner and follow the;

wicket
Two hundred went up soon
a alter this the double century was
@ spectacularly atross the ifter this the double century é















































hoisted 161 minutes of play.
| 18 overs Ten rur er Persaud who had
| British Guiana yesterday lost been battin wr 138 minutes was
eee of thelt teOCOre “BR 7 ss SS | their first wicket when only eight caught off Walcott by Weekes
ie. SKY The crowd dispersed peacefull if 7 ae, Mn re . : ‘runs had been added to their fieldin 1 the leg trap ane os
. . carrying the American flag, and ee a te ee 2 - : | overweek score of 3] for no scored 76 during his stay a the
. an Chief W ill shouting “Away with G. E. C Me vickets Gibbs who faced King vieke nd macht ten bani
° Goldson”.—(By Cable) SOME OF THE NEW TRAFFIC SIGNS and blocks which are in use i: lrafalgar Square trom the screen oe was. edfda- ies, With Christiani Persaud had
a saws ed l.b.w, to King hy J e Fos- put 120 for the thir
_— Ch = ; -y ter without any addition to hi in ‘ ist fruitful partnership
| da-b.W.I. Russia May, |..\; T iv We May Soon |: ofthe | .
F In London [ - R 3S [ ee . 7 i I I h ‘SOP | e a } Persaud who partnered Pairau Leslie Wigh fted one from ae
e Cana B. L USSU : ! 1c Ory Ss n e * ii |deau helped to put on 32 runs Roy Marshall high to long off for *
sSOUTHAMPTON, Feb. 13. 2 a J ;
stage here looked ¥
eet tonne when cinema Cruises e / ears

nen, press photographers

roa
i MON'TREAL, Feb. 13 Af d U. S A
S hrma Tay Atticus tribal The 18 and 21 day cruises oper-| tea —-

who is due to discuss in| @ted by Canadian National Steam-
3 Ss eC vu s Ss



Buy An | before Pairaudeau lost his wicket foul omplete his _ oer bi
F 7 for 48 runs, The n 107 minutes a
99 ly wulanese r ae decided im- i
J ur Guiane; - . ‘ H
In 1 945 —. Says Afttlee Atom Bom bs pees sod bakirnan rf . ? ‘ 5 ;

provement on



































































was impressive, his batting in the i
] N Ww 2 He took t wo fi x t innings 4
LONDON, Feb. 13 } PARIS. Feb. 13 } ; ; , he took M4
. . " r . ‘ f Ss, . ae aries {Y whe he (00:
Ships fr alifax assau ¢ /ASI GTON, Feb, 13. ‘ 7 ; cad Rates : € boundaries o wh ;
his claim to lead the Fehaton win iex to Nassau anc The . United rae toatl y Prime Minister Clement Attlee, at present electioneeri | , Amid alk the fuss over the] Waleott in his 223 minutes. to
“ a ssels ané mtates a tr. ‘ , i : 7 oe” ae "
fatos of Bechuanaland. dian Cruiser” and “Canadian Con- offered to examine “any pro- in the north on his 1,000 mile national tour today declare } American decision to manufac first over but in score 39. When
Blas been invited to London structor”, have proved popular,! posals” made in the Unitec “Victory is in the air as in 1945” ture the hydrogen bomb, the|attempting t o he had added -
laiks with Mr. Philip Noel- }* Secs. sidadcd Veg. Wa we ve kee i ASP ies Ak odes hes ‘ ay i Acc a : oe i ee: French stil] managed to keeplo po « « one of even to his seore Ei
“Minister for Samentdls ~ ogy bog : Faugeras hick j Nations for controlling Atomi The party chief strategist, Deputy Prime Minister Herbert their sense of humo1 L Sater: erase iiaiiie: ya atan i;
h Relations. | welll the can al tae, "aca it | ee. was made—a fortnight | Morrison, at Plymouth professed himself happy about the A Foreign Office spokesman, | off breaks he run out. His aes.
peinema and press men pad | March, are Spent between Halifax | after President Truman. ordered atmosphere” but warned supporters against over-confidence | hardly able to catch his breath wes b on pt brother Norman
| Teports that Seretse_ hac and Nassau and the return voyage | his scientists to build the Hydro- Summing up halfway through the campaign, he said there | after repeated phone calls from when only fue Wight put up an 4
transferred from a South : tardy 2nd : 2am} , Mr. Jot S Ny : ” | excited American reporters, finally | short of his ha easy catch off {
a . cabal lasts six days. Passengers Spend) gen Super Bomb—by Mr, John } was greater enthusiasm than in 1945”, Mees : s 0 éuatuby asy ; Ne
mM plane, which was held “P |one day in Nassau and from five | Hickerson, Assistant Secretary.-of 7 ain Ns | B8ve. this stock answer; ieerdPabeoieell Wil Williams near
ndria, to the Nairobi fy = | to:9i days at-Kingston;on the 18-} State fo; United Nations Affairs? y~ “The Tories aré badly in need “Never mind’ the hydrogesi airauc , cover point but Hi
which“atrived here ‘this | S® Says at-King; ; i I l Right now w re more;/been at the it d P t3 ans
| eC > s aa ok ietaiae | | > Cc rented, 20mMb- ig ow we ar ore i f droppec 1 are
: day trips. | of a stunt,” he commentec | | 0 on oe : A a
and Both vessels are passenger- It was in reply to Russia accu= | Laws ] Oo Attlee today experienced two] interested in oxygen balloons — . staan “No M an”’s ee
ESeretse was not on board, ;cargo ships, with accommodation | sations that Atomic Energy Talks | demonstrations against the Labou: The same day, a Paris new eee avid ‘hed ane pi Me mn Je
al | for 12 passengers.—B.U.P. had collapsed, because of the 7 | | policy, one in Greenock (Scot-| paper ran a front page cartoon vehi a ight refused a rae
5 ‘aaa , | Western attitude. vontro est land), where women Communists] showing two Frenchmen walkir hit ee run and Leslie ie |
F °] } But he said America would SOT with banners declared: “The| along a Paris boul: vard, deep in ieeaal the major Wight who had / it
ealth Scheme | cops > *9 | tinue to» support Atom Control | Atlantic Pact means war—stop it.’ | thought. One wa: saying, —~ sending ee One. are at
: “ « } I lecemeal I ace Plan, approved by the General ermany In his speech, made in support of| So, the atomic bomb is cx 5 thas then 50 in icket tried to AF
D.. Trinidad aM 2 Assembly until a’ better plan was Hector MeNeil, Minister of State | pletely outmoded 2 Reoypete sl 4 reg: in his : i
; Better | han None devised. be FRANKFURT, Feb, 13. for Foreign Affairs, Attlee attack Do you think they will put it nites thik’ ‘the groun but a Bo
RI-OF-SPAIN (By Mail), | onder Rene ioe ton|. ‘The: Adiied ulaiiness Security | ed | Conservative Chairman Lord| on sale with Sat Pet, OL the eee en becathe harp throw in
f for a. voluntary health TOKYO, x ? Teen oak Gade ted of | Board is drafting a new and cbm-| Woolin for showing “a completé surplus?”—(ILN.S.) quite comforta- ©. B WILLIAMS _by Roy Marshall
in Trinidad, providing; Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida say, Wilt "Clavie coal ‘that | Prehensive law, laying down the failure to grasp the essential con- nice ble ana the rate of scoring in- #’ve C. B, Williams. the chance
meument for members ot | told Rarliament today that Japan | State ‘eure ‘ment with Russia |Sbheres of operation for peace- |} ditions of the madern world : y id B apo creased, By the time that the first ‘!0 te 29h ny ey Oe ee
friendly societies paying| was in no position to refuse mili-| an a ms agree es A be- | time. industry in Western Ger- “IT-am not going to rn i ner ergnian century was reached they had got pire Fe ai ‘
Hinge . 2 ¢ ases > . y powel now would be , ’ - re petrol here or a bit mor« z : - es Norman Wi made some mea-
ings a year, was made | tary bases to the occupying poy ‘ t would lull the United | many. : bit more pe \ Ta in front of the clock one hundred : j ae : }
i Registrar ‘of the societies He said that a “piecemeal aot ae a ‘af seater , An Allied official said here to- tobacco there. We shall carry o Can Claim Baby being completed. in 91 minute: ure of atonement w hen he pulled
IPort-of-Spain, to the Trinidad | Peace” was better than no peace; States inte a false s |day that the law was still in its | to do the best for everybody witt re They kept up this pace and the an ofl ae. SoM va Marppall ie
‘0 mment, i jat all. The Government's view on| ity. | formative stage, but might _ first things first,” he said, | ROME, Feb. 1 third fifty came in an additional “cog comes’ 7 b Ul iat cook a
operand ilitary bases and a peace treaty . 4 » West- {ready in three or four weeks ; ; ‘id Bergman c: lais rhe es. Persi as lucky to leg boundary, the ball la aeng oO oa
m peibutors pe the scheme | 7s hah Bs target of attacks by Mr, Clayton man? 7 ~*~ bi ) eats it will S submitted to the Another demonstration this we 15 Ob F 7” f * es ~ eT ae oe ink the top of the Kensington Stand to at
ex get free treatment in any | !!é ena ee ern Powers would be willing to | 4 tre “ni B | time on behalf of 200. strikin a en A eg ave Ue .- ; register the first six of the match
' : | the Opposition parties. Yoshida| ‘ i greement ’ Allied High Commission in Bonn, as as her divorce from ‘ke 0d when he had «reg
colony's hospitals for most < pe recut Japan’s claim; keep such an ast Haat ween [" plumbers — was staged for th Molijereed hate 7“ ‘alist Lind tera aoe of Goddurd with his In spite of this the Guianese ‘a
Of illnesses and physical dis- to islands 800 kilometres south of never fully trust van if amem-| It is designed to replace the Prime Minister in Glasgow. Leaf strom is recognised in Sweden. ‘ore at 38 batsmen kept well in front. the
mr except drug addiction, raanbestun 5 Ae ey rnmost Senator Lydda Johnson, 2 yices | Allied Control Council Number } jets distributed among the public oe 3 ; ; ' , ‘ ; : saan oak r
Kyushu and the two sc uthernm« ber of the Senate Armed Services nn i the condi- | . 7 Gas Board was] “#S learned authoritatively today. | clock and 300 went up in 283 mir
oe and §6cases whe *€\islands of the Kurile group. Th¢ Committee, told journalists that | ‘43. which lays ie 2 d German | Said. the Scottish as -Boare - Rosselini’s lawyer, Signor Gin Phis pair settled down nicely tox With, 10 rim, ectdee to
ey psychiatric treatment 48'two Kurile islands are at present | Ru oy | st. eee ean ace ay a nearer a gagged by ee eee pout| Be: Sotis): expert on’ internationa ind bore an even share of the the score Gaskin, who went. in
led eget : . » Sovietc.__ ay VUSSLE van Cs oe ry on a four Powe ASS, Speaking to a crowd of abo 4 r ae v oe : » score was 158 ; int ’ } . ork
, |occupied by the Soviets.—Reuter. xg the United States in de- | 'NGustr; ~" ty . I i . aw and matrimonial probler scoring. When the score i ( bat it number ten as
Societies have a member- | aipeee in tse saliad sietinn Ter ee re 3,000 Attlee said a great task a told ‘Reuter’ that Miss Bergman!}oth batsmen. had reached 43 bowled by Boogles Williams for
fg t ates » ’ cal ‘rtake “ > ¢ versio ” : } lft, + 5 the 4
of 125,000. They plan to |} —Reuter. ar Gabeis henet Gedleréd int nara Satan te tar eterna can have the child registered Witn | Persaud completea tifty m. pe a 1 single and this was the begin- ;
i scheme in July and re-| Naples’ Dockers 4 report of.the Board’s .work. just ae re Ps ina the practical appli. | her name as aoe ent Ros- | crisp ae hg “ off re wane ning of the md: Jone gee j
acts wi > Govern-| + ‘$ oe , nt Se oe we ee Seana tee eae selini’s immediately the Swedisi | for a single e ha ‘ was last man in on su 3
feats with the Gover < published here We are not even j cation of the doctrine of the = a rie vg hy effect. | wicket for 99-minutes and had hit | vo balls from William. He hit ,
; ‘approved i ill he first | Ready To Work l Disturbance sure to-day that Sera brotherhood of man.” ick L uanak De Sotis said he did| six fours. Next over Christiani out at the second ball and put ,
: Het Will be t e. Oree | ? | Communa t is complete. “It is our job to see | eee re would be at |also completed his individual half up a dolly cateh to Roy Marshall ;
of its kind in the British amen ‘ ck tczaeenee Feb. 13 that the Germans do not engage Attlee’s vividly contrasted aspir-} not expect there would be any | also cc : setting into his wicket “P * warnoint nd he was dis- ;
Indiés, | NAPLES, Feb. 13, CALCUTTA, Feb. 1; 1-/in Atomic research, poison ga8| ant for Premiership, Winston} difficulty about the decree: }century by setting Mie from Wile, *t, Coverpoint a d re k .
i | Naples dockers today howled | Indian Air companies in Cal- ¥xyGns { the bacteriological | 4 chill, was to-day travellini acceptance in Sweden as the|and tickling a googli missed for a “duck ie | “itis it
|down a proposal that they should | outta were today sending a fleet held, ar 1 t in pects of the os : d to exhort Scottish| asons; for the divorce are valid |liams down to deep fine leg for Guiana innings had closed for 319
ty : mae ke arin 7 en $ ack field, and certain aspects : - northwarc B . on aSONS u “ ly wy » he w been batting 4 Yen d { * 295 minutes, Bi
POLICE DIRECTOR refuse to unload American arms, of ten-passenger aircraft to Dacka, fuel flow field, but the dividing voters at Edinburgh tomorrow also under Swedish law. | three. a h ee ieee ane. tad eee aoe — a fi
‘ 10 FACE TRIAL uaeen Leader Giuseppe Di vhetheg | Bast Bengal, Capital (Baliga) line between warlike and peace- Among the last day nomination Miss Bergman’s marriage tol for = f crudk six boundaries Firs! “T. st by in innings and 110 me |
: A who made the proposal walked | 5) evacuate refugees from that ful research {¢ hard-to define = rush were several ministers in-]} Rosselini is expected to take place and read mS ie caine oo " t Tes an lings
BAGHDAD, Feb. 13 out of the meeting after being | iy ; espeefally in the fields of radio cluding Aneurin Bevan, Minister} in Rome immediately the decree | But with seven sé ru i}
Khalid Director General of |Shouted down. 4 | Communal disturbances have active energy, chemistry and bac~ of Health and James Griffith | is recognised in Sweden. | meme ene 1;
Police, arrested in the week-| The. dockers then passed + |been reported in Dacka in the teriology.” General Hodges claim Minister. of National Insurance After the marriage the child, j i
i len resolution declaring that they | a ays. Yesterday two], however, that the Board's A number of surprise nominations} named Renato Roberto Giu te! e6 /
‘ Po fae 7 | were ready to unload “any kind | orien cision were sent to take pe calianns has proved quite sat~ in the elevesith nae also brought] (Giusto after Miss Bergman 8 O ysamy Ss 4 ype ie
the Government by ;of _ merchandise. sey rea refugees owing to disturbed |icfactory, and has Seon . new opponents for several Minis paneer) We 3° Soceared, eat : :
it was disclos ay j decided to send a referendum to fee at tan owes rport inite state of responsibility © a | mate | H
r closed to-day, jaecided to ta| conditions at the Dacka air] definite stz é ters. | + ahead | rie ® 99 im
found guilty. he m... > sen- |dockers in other ports of Italy 1a} Vo Neen ibis > alta sontinued > part of the German. ; Preparations were going ahead — S t "
death” ne aR e een a “their opinion. in Calcutta the situation continu meee , i led Four members of the Churchill today at the clinic where Mis octa ecuri ;
i le as —Reuter. to improve. —Reuter. Surveillance over industry he. family will be fighting for th Bergman is lying with her son for | a
ee at sented far greater ones ‘he Conservative case, Winston} i), baptism of little Roberto as : | . 4
LL . ; pe ; .
those in the scientific fi Churchill's son, Randolph, and his Roman Catholic j —In Africa
added. Lb itpiant ‘chaes TEwO sons-in-law, Duncan Sandys) “ny, ceremony is expected ¢!
ry" zeneral said, “Most Ger- feta ed Soadesi| (220 : ‘ 1
The ee a my reputable | ind Captain Christopher Soades | také place tomorrow afternoon. GENEVA, Feb. 14.
i strig s are i | : Ye ¢ 7 7 s ms
sine bree we laws laid dqwn} were all nominated today. in the clinic chapel. Cameramen After a 17-day probe in the British Cameroons in Africa a
— Reuter. | will be allowed to photograph th Inited N: s Trusteeship Council Yommission
for them.”’—Reuter i | baby for the first time during the four-man United Nations Trus eeshiy c nissi
| ceremony. —Reuter. has decided that polygamy is “a type of social security”,
ia - e : . ‘ Polygamy, the members of the
Thirteen Anti-Titoists _ Commigsen” said in thelr, reper
) |



ia 7; d “Assists issued today, would have to con-
Be rade Belg n Primate Vanguar tinue “until western civilisation,
Sei be | i shi through education, convinces the
n need In lg dD i R port Distressed Ship Africans that other ways are
he ision that} entes e, | ST. NAZAIRE. Feb. 13 better and preferable”.
RAD . 13. | aequitted with the prov A that | ST. NAZ B, Feb. 13, , 2
cos roe sn Neds court | they would have to do compulsory | BRUSSELS, Feb. 13. Britain s biggest a — “Plural marriage is partly a
The Belgra wd . orison sen-| labour for two years. ‘ |_ Cardinal Van Roey, the Belgian ‘Vanguard ) today too : in hie, | means of sustenance to the women
today passed aor aantet five} The Public Prosecutor in the Primate, to-day denied Belgian | he 4,512 _ French a as bp mvolved: ‘hende the practice that
tences on thirteen de vere found final address described the defend- Press reports according to which| ‘Bofla” whieh called for he p - a chief inherits ‘the wives of his
on studentte “ 2 gp ants as “hostile elements attempt- the Vatican had intervened in| storm tosséd seas oif the coast of |
Marshal ‘Titdy Ceeinason, ing to disturb the building of











; $ deceased predecessors”.
i ’s fi year y »g- | Spe last night, according to a}
Belgium’s five year Royai ques pain ta Saree a
r al anti-| Socialism in our country.” | Hom According to. the reports, | radio message from the warship | This report by the Commission
They founded an by 048 “Thanks however to the strength | published by La Nouvelle Gazette, | sicked up here on the Cameroons. is publaed
lav en ovi ia i 7 e ¢ ap nf Ne
Crown ab ie tein of Yugoslav | of the country, and confidence ofl a provincial anti-Leopold paper, | The 42,500 “Vanguard”, home-)four days after their announce
o_o | the people in the Government they! the Vatican, desirous pf avoiding ’
Nations.

' ; that the
oe . weorelae the | ment from Lake Success
| ia ae a, |i Nate tet eet) Mehetaneas Mire serse i | hudse tr wis" Spore
| Their defence was that they/ish and ‘hostile plan.” g | last remaining Catholic Monarchy, night in response to the “Boffa’s” | eroons chieftain had
lnerely wanted to organise a legal | All but one of the dcefence ii §
















: / ly happy
had urged the Belgian Primate to |"! e- S$ and, announced] that they were perfect "
Opposition Party | lawyers pleaded that the defend-| bring provisionally exiled King ee er = - and ‘would prefer no inhorteness.
} Main sentences were: Pavle| nis were not guilty of a crime | Leopold to reconsider the problem | that s . . ; The report recommende
B inje vic, an engineer, 20 years | against the State, but of failing.‘ objectively with his nobles ‘and | It. has been reported, that the| gradual evolution towards modern
| hat ar, Serovic, econ- | »iy for permission to form their ith an impassiofinte view. Ae- aA = th jamege. | Conditions ard self-government
| hard labour. Petar Serovic, n-| apply . | ; thé. same reports. Car- Boffa”, despite storm damag . . hi ‘iulinefiaie. callaat
ni} tud 18 yea Badpic | organisation legally. |cording io the same reports, ' j ae der ‘way fox|rather. than. #
y student, Ts, je novie’s lawyer accepted) dinai Van Roey had agreed to the ; was able to get under + he | changes int’ tiie Geeemanamene
Filipovic Lorand |} Jovano oo 8 lawy sia ji nd] Vatican request p | Bordeaux without aid " = the "saraicee the biggest a
and Petar Dimitrijevie, ij prosecu or S argument, , \ au a . ju t +4 thal} VY; nguard” or from the 500-ton % ; is said if
students, 15 years hard labour:| asked for leniency beeause ti The ¢ ardinal, in a letter , pa ena freighter “Bilma™. which | problem, . _ = ar ea
' ova Milor : i hE anger « > defendants is | leading selgian newspapé 1 E> . snals.| seemed to be e cre Qa i
tl ovane Milomer Lipojevic, | social flanger of the defendar a pe aha had also responded to her sign: see : : re /
D ; es er’ ae Dayne. pe “duty ti temas that the - Sing ware till, running high adequate basis of nena haw p
F , ‘ r the people were behin , rs ee founded”: |whew the: “Wanmeies’” teak the | sation among the broad m ay
hatene ig ' to ten! Marshal Tito’s Gove = ~ . rumour re entirely gate besia kent vessel in. tow.—Reuter. the population.—Reuter. {
t : ‘ were —Reuter.
PF } } : aud k re : : ar wo elendant .
a PERSAUD xecuting an elegant pull to the leg bour fs : :
team yesterday with a good display scoring


Leeann ae ae er meee





PAGE TWO



THE COLD DANISH BUFFET SUPPER which is served every Sunday evening in the Ballroom
of the Marine Hotel, is becoming increasingly popular with everyone not only among the guests but

also with many members

of the community.

Pictured is a group of the guests as they went

around the table helping themselves to the many varieties of specialties in food, being presented

in a most decorstive manner,
H*® Excellency the Governor

and Mrs. Savage, Mr. Grant-
ley Adams and Mr, W. W. Reece
are among those due to leave
Barbades on Wednesday morning
for Jamaica to attend the installa-
1 of H.R.H. Princess Alice, the
ess of Athlone as Chancellor





University College of the
West Indies.
«<> «>p
In Three Parts

7 E selection of recordings
which have been selected by
Mr, Q2'V. Chandler to be heard
the projramme Personal
nee Concert at the British
Wednesday at 8.15
1 be in three parts. The
divided into Over-
he Flying Dutchman by
Raymond by Thomas and
Schubert, and
and Valse
by

Beauty






i br
I by



€ econ contains the
ks of Arcangello Corelli,
ie Serenade
VSKY





»s, Gounod’s
iL Dei by
, “TH Walk
b ise ’
senia-





cin
ito us,” a
I val Wedding,
the’Choirs of Westminster
H. M. Chapels Royal
f the ? ic Apprecia-
ire invited to meet at
r prior the Personal
co Cc
«ap «»
Navy Love Us
— S week Nelson's Dockyard
Antigua has been tne

I n to officers and
f H.M.S. Glasgow. Steel
ls Gate” went off to
and entertained the
, officers had the thrill
to steel band music at
rator’s residence.
acclaimed “Top-

a altractl





of men of the
v ve expressed
y t Barbado





And Pleasure

BURROWES,
‘ | ; n }
ar Ltd., ot

Business
RA RI
svi



Appointment

M*. Arthur Kenneth Croston

has been appointed to the
Chair of English in the University
College of the West Indies. Mr.
Croston is a graduate of the
University of Liverpool, where he
obtained First Class Honours in
the School of English _Language
and Literature. He was later a
member of St. John’s College,
Cambridge, and obtained his First
Class with Distinction in Part II
of the Cambridge English Tripos.
During the war he served in the
Royal Artillery from 1940—45
and was a regimental officer dur-
ing the campaigns in France and
Germany. His publications deal
mainly with the Elizabethan and
Stuart periods. He was appointed
Lecturer in English Literature at
the University of Liverpool, 1948.

Had To Be Abandoned
HEAVY showers during the week,
caused the Antigua recreation
ground to be sodden, and a cricke,
match against a team from the
H.M.S. Glasgow had to be aban-
doned- The beating of the Re-
treat was done by marines from
H.M.S Glasgow on the Parham
Road opposite Government House
yesterday afternoon instead of on
the grounds.

«<>» «>
50 Below

IT was 50° below zero in Sas-
katoon, Saskatchewan when I left
on February 6, Mr. A. P. McDon-
ald told Carib shortly after he
arrived at Seawell yesterday
morning by T.C-A, from Montreal.
He was accompanied by his wife
and they will be here for a week’s
holiday as guests at the Hastings
Hotel.



Mr. McDonald is a Radio Opera-
cor employed with T.C.A, in das-
katoon.,

«<>» «>

After Six Months

R. C. Gordon Crawford,

Technical Manager of the
Central Foundry, returned from
Canada by T.C.A. _ yesterday
morning after spending an enjoy-
able six months’ holiday.

He said that there was a little
unemployment in Canada, but
other than that the place was as
busy as ever and producing lots of
trade. They had a very mild win-
ter in Toronto as against British
Columbia where it was very terri-
fic and most unusual for that
place.

His wife who went up with him
is staying over for another month
or two.



ceeeeceiietitiia taal aiains

«>» «<>
First Visit
AYING his first visit to the
West Indies is Mr. W. C.
Owens, retired General Manager
of Canadian National Railways.
He arrived here yesterday morn-
ing by T.C.A. for a week’s holi-
day and is staying at the Marine
Hotel.
Mr. Owens told Carib that he
ESTERDAY morning as Carib had heard a lot of Barbados and
was crossing the Chamber- was looking forward to a very
lain Bridge on his way to Bridge- pleasant stay on the island.

town, a friend stopped him and os “as

cae mee crear Ot coe, «Mee MM Bremen

ee 7 : : R. E. G. Hargreaves, Dental
Surgeon of Toronto also came



Mr. E. C. M. THEOBALDS
The new Assistant Director
of Education

Eastbound Traffic—Keep
Right !

Nelson's

statue you will have to
a quick decision!’

for a week’s holiday.
accompanied by his assistant Miss
Bridgetowners Marjorie Waters who is also a
adhered to the Professional Entertainer and they
signs on Broad are staying at the Hotel Royal.

Please Cross Here

LMOST all

yesterday
new pedestrian

Street which asked ‘Please cross Dr. Hargreaves said that they
’ But of course as always had a mild winter in Toronto,
there were a few who decided but in Montreal it was so cold

that seven power snow ploughs

they would cross where they
were brought into use to clean

pleased



the runways to allow the plane





in yesterday morning by T.C.A. |
He was|





The Story
That’s Always
In His Wallet

WHEN those

whom the gods
love die young

it’s usually sui-
cide. You read the story of the
young doctor William Alfred
Fitzherbert, who was found dead
in his bath. He was only 29.

At that age he was super-
intendent of a great hospital.
a very successful young man
Yet in a moment of despair he
plunged a fatal dose of morphia
into his arm.

The coroner said he had lost
faith in himself.

Inquests tell you only the cause
of death. It’s not the coroner's
business to say how it might have
been prevented. What happened
to Dr. Fitzherbert has happenet
to many young men. You read a'l
too frequently about brilliant
young men taking their lives.

Why, do you think?

Most likely, because success
without experience makes a
dangerous mixture.

The man who is a success at 30
has few, if any, failures behind
him; he would not be a success if
he hud, because at that age he
hasn’t had time to support
failures.

So when the first failure comes
he does not know how to support
it.

But the man who is a success
at 40 or 50 knows that a disap-
pointment or a setback is a tem-
porary affair. He knows that it
is 100 to 1 that time and his own
energies will overcome it. He
knows that because his own expe-
rience proves it.

It must have seemed to the
young Disraeli many times that
his career was at an end. He be-
came Prime Minister. No life
story of any famous man is with-
ovt oe chapter in which the
subject is in the depth of
despondency and despair.

If you took the trouble you
could draw a graph of any man’s
emotional life. The line would go
up and down; as he grows older
it would go up less and down less,
because experience would have
taught him not to put too much
value on the ups or downs.

nd the Caravan —27



puget words interest Sam, and
he s

istens intently, Then he
shakes his nead. “1 still can’t
imagine who the second man is,”

he says, “bur I've thought of a

plan, Those two must be search-

ing for somethin

away quickly. So I'm going w



THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Le SE A TE RE

Carib Calling

copra 7U3}o-AUOM? STAAET YI

in my shack, and
if they find it they'll want to get

ee ere nn me

[





j

,

Variations on an urchin
theme: Above, Miss Frances
Power, 17, holds the Challenge

cup fof her winning hatr-styte,
called “Spring Fashion.” Below
A. semi-Edwardian hair-do the

urchin effect swept to the top,
was worn by
Donavon. 5

rs Violet



n @xrprass “errice

Figure Fun

IF a boat can travel three miles
an hour against a current flow-
ing at the rate of two-and-a-half
miles an hour, how many miles
an hour can it travel with the
current in three and a half hours?
‘WEMSN'V

Guide To

Housewives
TODAY’S PRICES
BEEF—Corned
38c per 12 oz. tin
Salted (a) 42c. per Ib

(b) Boneless or
Flank
40c per Ib
FISH—Salted 18c. per Ib

Pe



ea Pr

.



With-




take charge of their horse

out it the caravan cannot work !°
Leaving Rupert in the shelter ot
the bushes, he walks stealthily
away and untethers the horse
Before long he its back again
**Here’s our tirs: bit of luck,”” he
smiles. ‘' Near the horse | found
a good strong bridle.”





GLOBE THEATRE
TONITE at 8.30 BOGART

“TOKYO JOE”



Wed., Feb. 15th at 8.30 p.m.

|

(1) JITTERBUG
(2) RHUMBA
(3) DRUMMERS

3-in-1 CONTEST

Music by
ARNOLD MEANWELL
























ee

Bergman's
Baby
Registered

ROME, Feb. 11. |

Ingrid Bergman’s week - old |
baby son was registered here to-|
day as the son of the Italian film }
producer, Roberto Rossellini, and
“a mother unknown”

This is the usual formula adopt-
ed by Italian law when the pater-
nity of a chile is claimed by
someone other than the mother’s
husband at the time of the child’s
birth.

The registration decision came
after a bitter argument between
the pair on whether Rossellini
should in fact claizn paternity oF
whether the boy should be regis~
tered as the child of Dr. and Mrs.

ee ee







Lindstrom (Ingrid Bergman).

Friends of Rosseliini said to-
day that Rossellini insisted on
claiming paternity officially for
fear he did lose the child in any
divorce settlement between Ingrid
Bergman and her husband, if it
were registered under the name
of Lindstrom.

No date has yet been announced
for the Bergman-Rossellin- wed-
ding, but friends believe it will
take place “quietly” at the City
Hall here within the next ten
days.—Reuter.



CROSSWORD



Across
2 anda 11 Down it can help
to lay expert dishes. (3, 5, 7
7 Love in a way that’s a bothe* to
the sapper. (5)
8. Sea girt land. (4)
12 ots a good course (9)
13. This, as you will realise is in

you













the U.S. (3)
15. Stages t. (3)
16. Thomas 1s e best known
ample of one. (7)
17 ng enou to intoxicate
+ A$)
18 S Plane floats. (3)
20 Where. you will find. lots rap
(7)
23 You'll have to to make that
stitch in time (3)
24 Twinges of conscience perhaps
(6) 25. Betrayer (9
Down
1. The ith gone in militars
fash > )
3 Not hard 1s in this store
(5)
4 Some verses include this lan
guage. (4)
5. May be solved in a roundabout
way. (6)
6. Intentions of old [haliand. (4)
9. You'll find it taste differently
)
}10. lanks’ ponies. (3)
}11. See 2 Across. (7)
114. Going this pace may be saler Dut
| not so quick. (6)
- 8 tarnished
r ty. (4)
21. The one groove you ha to get
| into. (3)
r Not fit for tee +









© 8.30 pom

ANOTHER WARNER BIG ACTION DOUB
i Le

“Oklahoma Kig:

and Richard TRAVIS in “ESCAPE from ORIME

Humphrey
BOGART in



Fri
DIAL

& Sun. Alan LADD as

8404 FOR RESERVATION






“THE GREAT GCarepy.








AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA tiene, op

WEDNESDAY NIG
at 8.30 HT at 8.39









PARAMOUNT presents
“THE PALEFACE~

Color by Technicolor
Starring BOB HOPE — JANE RUSSELL

NO SHOW TO-NIGHT
at ROYAL THEATRE

Wednesday at 8.30 p.m,
BENEDICT BOGEAUS /ceaa

presents

a eats i eee Oe oe









* JM PAYWE SOMNY TFT una
Hunted by Killers ...... Wanted by The Law

NO FUTURE but a bullet in his Back

SSSSSSSOSSOSSSSSSSSSSSSSSONHSS

ROXY THEATRE

TO-NIGHT at 7.30 p.m,

teens

55



Screen Plays Corp. presents

‘CHAMPION’

MARILYN MAXWELL - ARTHUR KENNEDY |

with PAUL STEWART * RUTH ROMAN + LOLA ALBRIGHT

Produced by STANLEY KRAMER
Associate Producer Robert Stillman - Directed by Mark Robson
Screenplay by Car) Foreman * Released thru United Artists














THE INCOMPARABLE

ATM/
BR OEn |

THE BOY WONDER \W




SHOWING

OLYMPIC

TUESDAY & THURSDAY FINAL INSTALMENT 1



A COLUMBIA




. = :
Men would do anything for Anta...

COLUMBIA PICTURES presents































- The other signs in Traialgar to take off. sid } kK
—% . Square were also the subject of “ss es SS f i‘ f
ae i mut h comment, and even at Played Golf Everyday i Hi f} ol / ; Rs
Ens’ ae cric ket yester ay in the Kensing- R. and Mrs. H. Hopson from | (= i ' ¢
Engineer Takes to stand, Carib heard several ] | { :
Fime Out people discussing them and the TC Regen ae year po fe
om @ - .« large tones ic have bee CA. en . 7 i ] :
; NAR. AND MRS. W. B. BOGGS a A gee = ae hoon spending two weeks’ holiday here. GRAND CABARET and (LETTE CODDARD .a
f ava Montreal = at aYINE the week-end , During their stay they serene 5 ta fl
5 t to the Pady "tera Miaens ats . small self-driven car, and travel- , ; am Bishop John Kreland- scar Homo a
L ong “motniog, ty We, BaRbadions, stop talking jean over the island “They dit} MANNEQUIN FASHION PARADE oe
: mts a anes On 7 re s metist be abdul something of major qule 0 bi tS a be AUADERICK CRAWFORD 3
ae ; ! tance c . “ s
} — importance time was spent at the Crone, the ee. te | ae Based won pay, ta
, f B employed with «> «» rest at the Hastings Hotel. They ee | picture!
eet , : content, derived from pure | ,
ere ‘ eel i will be in Bermuda for four days } si E 8 i
t ay ini ne On A Short Holiday before they return home. Mr B E THEATRE ee Oil and oranges, will ” Sea hamame Matern = Doesed ie PPAR Produced by PUP
4 Sharon Has A New Bell 1 spend two weeks at Four Hopson is with Flight Operations the resistance of the body =|
Bite CHARON Moravian Church will Winds, St. Peter, are Lt. Col. in T.C.A. andensurethatyour children growu MAGIC STONE” Story of pi P
Laie ee ee oon a a oak: ‘Hastings of Pr «. eon 5 ME en with sturdy limbs and strong teeth. | COME FARLY TO SEE “ OY ee
ih a, pe eee oer a Toronto, They arrived yesterday Comings and Goings | es |
oie tt Pee ge TY Mrs. Leon Maingot 7 > |
ge ce of the « yorn and : i ; a ME: and : on TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21ST, 1950
Peal ey ; a Col. Hastings is President of ; vere married in Trin- : ’ | . ‘ q .m. ;
aa be di Powerlite Devices Ltd., and is jqaq es arrived on Sun- By § a | Wednesday at 8.30 p ae
a co , ).., retired from the Canadian Army. avy by B.W.1.A. to spend their , SPECIAL REQUEST } ps”
bai this Church celet A. q They have two very good friends Oe ie in Barbados. _Mrs ’ a | THE “COLLEGE HERAL it
L i as ae ie poet "teen in Barbados, Mr and Mrs y Eric Maingot is the former Miss Doro- In aid of St. Philip’s Baby Welf Cent d | ate NM ee a “ FE OUT
} Mie ann e eomereaa Smythies, who live in St. Peter. thy De Vaux. St — Netritien Clinic entre an PVE On a nila | CARIBBEAN TRAINING COLLERE ne
a det to have some-tangible * nm «> ane " i P f Spirituals an
? eq to have some tangible » left on | + | in a rogramme 0 p ;
HY Wy Tet yal ap gall Rev. J. W. Birkby le n | Mamufachered and Guaranteed dy ‘ Scie i the
; fi 8 ee bi ate th , event ne For Three Weeks - gunday evening on the “Gascogne ORCHESTRA & HOUSE $1.00 4 | Alen & Heaburys Lid, Loadoo with Miss Verna Reid at
iy BE : ap Avera Yi e R. L. G. SMITH, Mining for England. Rev. Birkby is the | |
Me | lad.seen many years of Engineer of Timmins Cor- retired vicar of St. Bartholomew's BALCONY T2c. & 4 i ~]) | (i
\ hell hick lee Bae poration, Toronto, Canada is now Church. WA ad 8c. j is |
{ ; Cy Hell Which WIENS ¢ in Barbados on his first visit to «> «2 «8 ; ; a f }
¥ thout its hammer, will be the island. He came in yesterday Alsg leaving on the “Gascogne” Reservations Made Daily : JUST RECEIVED
, » |.on Sunday March 5, at morning by T.C.A., for three on Sunday for England was Mrs. }
1) f ] | service at 4 o'clock in weeks’ holiday and is staying at Marcella Peebles, wife of Major Ss
i, the afternoon the Hastings Hotel. Peebles. . | e
at! : ioctl LOPPSSSES POSES ESSE SS OSS IOP ISPS SSDS SASS PS SSE, |
4 ; I a6 }
ha WHI | CUSHIONED IN-SOLE GIVES EXTRA COMFORT | For ROOFS Fp anne, ONES.
4 i i | Lh (with Cheese
ef Brg 5 a A a
i Uz;k3 SIZES: 3 ? SIZES: 6 il AND os » Baked Beans,
BAG e iy | J) Bots Salad Cream “i
eho y ANVAS 1-97 3.36 Mayonaise. _ : : a
‘ C: S > PARTITIONS & ant
i} . = . 9 If your ROOF needs repairs, take this
i . A grand value for TENNIS, HOUSEHOLD and all S We Offer mpome : ° "7
me. ¥ Tw | 7 . : : to do it!
mer i L MP + Sporting occasions. $ ALUMINIUM CORRUGATED SHEETS ome Vegetable Soup 4



Oxtail Soup.
Strawberries.

Lengths 6 ft., to 10 ft., width 2 ft.

a



We have in Stock...

SFOS CFS

SCOOP EOSOP SOOO SESE









irr

RAMaT Ray grab oy WALL BOARD " 7. LUM ft. Tit ox m1
' : 6 ft. t ; Width: ALUMINIU} S—6ft. Tit. a
Due to TOURINE BOAT See our SPECIAL re Tr . eepreuee swans Cauaenae 7it. sit, oft, 108
oe ; KARLIT HARDBOARD " Pineapple Juice. ; : f sft, 108
ARRIVING SAT. NEXT, 9e— BVe KHAKI Lengths: 6 ft., to 8 ft., width 4 ft. m a ean SHEETS—4it.
» shal a wae ™ * x = ruit Salad NG
We. aball he Closing VALUES % GALVANIZED B.R.C. EXPANDED METAL CEMENT
Thursday next, Feb. 16, AL > Lengths: 8 ft., and 9 ft., width 2 ft., 24 gauge. acne ALUMINIUM GUTTERING
1 will 99 & 1.17 y . % | GALVANIZED GUTTERING
at 12 Noon and will re- ———————- sea 1X ai A) xU I
in OPEN SATURDAY ‘as i [S$ BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON $( INCE & Co. Ltd |) COREE
et a EVANS and , FACTORY LIMITED a i ee ae f
FEB, 18, UNTIL 4 P.l BROAD 1X DIAL 2039 a oo - 2 “« PLANTA’ NS I
WHITFIELDS STREET | SES esi. ee. SRE | stem ATIONS ua
PLL SPSS SSF ESL atte pln gpl pea om pcr me pian ss ————




ay, FEBRUARY 14,
quEsD:

Lawrence’s
| Autobiography

$400,000 A Copy

By TALBOT HOOD
CAMBRIDGE, England, (By Maii).




































































_ A Good
‘ 2 lly” Laugh

LONDON, (By Mail).
A Britain today is having a

' -by anyone willing to pay $400,000 for a single copy.

D until at least 1960 to learn t
personal story of the shy, blu

feats in the middle east
Stirred the world.

Fr known in the 1
years before his tragic t
told International N

“My _ brother’s

ican incredulity re-
the working of the Gov-
MF al National Health scheme
ee amusement was
an American story
hed in the current issue of
ich Medical journal “The
mer’ on how English

mal way until]
1960's.

“About a dozen copies we:

= ern and ‘offered for sale’
7 edly operate e;the fantastic rice

Aad r $400,000 each, Sa .
e in the United States are| d
; to learn how the Na-
‘Health Scheme or
alized Medicine” as they call

one to comply with America
copyright law.

“IT don’t expect anyone to bu:
at that price, but,

I'd be delighted if someone turn
ed up with $400,000

ie working, said the Practi-
ner article.

wloquent emissaries, adminis-
doctors or patients, care-
, have been telling
wom of the wonders of a welfare
ie” said the Journal.

Wn the other hand they have
wed of the iniquities and mer-
ary outlook of the British

The money would
come—I could use it,”

Lawrence, who
fessor of Classical Archaeology a
Cambridge University
1944, explained that as

i example of this kind of
saganda is the story of an
imerican doctor who called on a
ilish colleague and went with | tn
into his surgery and found
ucowd of seventyfive patients
\ ” said the Journal.

Hell’, said) the Briton, “TI
finish this lot. Hands
who have headache.
and get a prescription
the powders. Hands up} ;;
“hat have a cough. Come] ~
get a cough mixture. Hands| “Some of these men are
with bellyache. Here’s| dead, but 1 certainly won't
@” and so on until the/lish it in 1950. It is most unlilce-
pwas empty and the two}ly that I will do so until early in
to dinner. the 1960's.

ory would raise a laugh “Having read my brother’s auto-

lay ‘solely with him.

“I’m not in any hurry,” he told
ternational News Service. “My

men who served with him



now

fa

“I’ve decided it will be best to
wait until they’re all dead,”

Professor Lawrence declined to
discuss the contents of the “The
Mint” or to permit one of his two
printed copies to be seen. He said
the only other copy in Britain is
kept “out of sight” at the British
Museum, where it is “not avail-
able” ‘to the public.

@ incident.”
a —LNS.



India Police
est Communists

ST PUNJAB, Feb. 13.
e last night arrested
ple described as Commun-
fa clash in which shots
ixchanged. The arrested
med part of a proces-| The remaining copies, awaiting
ut 200 shouting slogans ; “sale”, are in storage in the United
br kK open the gaol; States, where they were printed,
q."down with the Nehru According to London literary

Another copy has been depos-
ited with the Library of Congress
in Washington, D.C.

. They were re- circles, one of the factors delay-
have attacked a Con-| ing general publication is the fear
F Office and g police} of libel suits by some of the per-
Fescorting them. sons Lawrence dealt with in
the attack three police|Gloves Off” manner.
Were injured. Tathis,! Heath would remove the danger
aiid tear gas were used

which Professor Lawrence appears

j willing to risk immediately only
if someone is curious enough to
pay $400,000 to find out what has
been said about him.

e the procession, upon
shots were fired at the
who opened fire in reply.
alties have been repor-

a far from the firing, —IN.S.







StS

S iy

nsf
~\



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| a

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A




and now 1 should like to say a teu
words about Mr Bevan's magnificent record in
rebuilding houses"



F incompetence

NM sqm

fo



me indiscreet and long-awaited autobiography of the late
ieerence of Arabia, “The Mint’’, can be read immediately

| Otherwise, the public must wait

eyed little Briton whose fantastic
once

good “belly” laugh over the] ferred to be » as he pre-

death)
ews Service:
‘ autobiography
will not be published in the tae

at least the ear!

about
ut that was onl;

quite frankly

- They would
have a copy with my compliments,
be most wel-

has been pro-

since
literary
executor of his brother, the decis-
ion on the general publication date

brother often told me he did not
want ‘The Mint’ available to the
public before 1950, at the earliest.

“He said that if it appeared too
soon it might offend some of the

and ‘the new headc uarters during thei
who might still be living to read | t ; ° -

pub-

fe.” concluded the article. | biography, I quite agree with his

he

O-











st

ly

>

it

y

n

College

SUNNINGDALE, BERKSHIRE,
ENG., (By Mail)

A forty-room, elaborately ap-
pointed mansion in Berkshire’s
'/“Millionaire’s Mile” to-day houses
Britain's first permanent Civil De-
fence staff college.

The new college, officially
opened by Home Secretary Chuter
Ede, was the former country seat
of the late Sir Hugo Cunliffe-
Owen, millionaire financier.

Even the tight-lipped Service
chiefs, inclucing admirals, gener-
als and R.A.F. officers, accus-
tomed to a certain amount of cere-
mony, were visibly astonished by
the magnificence and comfort of

1

‘our of inspection.

Described as Engiand’s perfect
country house, the mansion is
bounded on one side by the fam-
ous Ascot race track, mecca of
British horse racing, and on the
other by the Great Park of Wind-
sor and Sunningdale Park, coun-
try home-to-be of Princess Eliza-

freal laugh is that it is.opinion that some people might | beth.

mecited in America as a,not like it a bit because of the Slightly bewildered gold-braid-
t and the name of a|/frank manner in which it deals}ed Service chiefs wandered
‘nd respected American] with them. through the beautifully decorated
fis Ziven as having witness~ rooms while apologetic members

of the new staff explained that it
was a cheaper college, anyway,
than the Office of Works could
have built.

Selection of Suites

Prominent Americans who also
are expected to be visitors to the
college will have an unnerving
selection of suites to choose from.

The beds are ordinary Govern-
ment issue familiar to G.I.’s but
all are lined up in mock Spanish-
Moroccan rooms with Adam fire-
places, h

Those who sleep in the late Sir
Hugo’s royal blue bedroom will
probably prefer the pink-and-
green-haze bathroom, and those
who choose the pastel bedroom
may select the bathroom in helio-
trope crystal.

Some of the 40 staff members
defensively pointed out that the
mansion was accepted with 116
acres of parkland in payment of
death duties.

It was admirable for its Puts 9
pose, they declared, because it was |
in the vicinity of the Army and |
R.A.F. staff colleges.

The mansion was inherited by
Miss Marjorie Cunliffe-Owen
(Miss Marjorie Daw, the dancer
who was adopted by Sir Hugo)
and bought by the Government

st year. 1
“ “has been converted into a
staff college with a full roster of
experienced instructors. s

Its function will be to provide
courses for civil defence execu-
tives from all parts of Britain and
from the Commonwealth, along
the lines of courses run by the
Services’ staff college for officers.

The first of the four-week
courses already has started.
Among the 30 students are the
assistant defence secretary of Ma-
laya, the Chief of Police of Gib-
raltar, a chief constable, and civil
defence heads from all parts of
Britain.

They are working under the su-
pervision of the Commandant,
Major-General J. S. Lethbridge,
a former chief of staff to Field
Marshal Slim in Burma.

The course consists mostly of
lectures illustrated by models,
maps and panorama.

Forty Killed
By Tornadoes










J Napoleon
/ a Fo:



Slepid, f
law fog a Pidtly



ihe tones are a@ party ot
iiques, who only look backwards
to the past.”

>
Si

fhee's the

) kiss

© bu me
ry baby

n & $3 Ser





LONDON, Feb. 13.

Tornadoes which tore through
the States of Louisiana, Arkan-
sas and Texas during the week-
end killed at least 40 people and
did damage estimated at $1,000,-
Tees 200 people had to receive
| medical aid, many of them from
injuries. Most of those
trapped by roofs

serious
killed

which crashed in under the force
of the winds. More tornadoes

|

ast.

| have been forec adneuiee
|

Mussolini’s
_Kidnapper In Paris

PARIS, Feb. 13.
| Otto Skorzeny, chief of Hitler's
} personal bodyguard, who mid
| napped” Mussolini in 1943 when
a prisoner of the Badoglio regim<¢
|was in Paris over the week-end,
according to the Communist even-
jing paper Ce Soir today. a
The paper published a front
|page photograph of a man walk-
ing in the Champs _ Elysees and
alleged that it was Skorzeny.
Police said they_had no informa. j
: that Skorzeny was in France i
tated that Skorzeny

hing a pro-German

were










tion
Ce Soir
was now pubis A.
aper in the Argentine
newspaper ir ne Arge
. —Reuter.

THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

4
a, oe
CIVELEZAT IC

oN





Of Exchange

NASSAU, Bahamas, Feb. 13.

The Exchange Control
announced relaxation of exchange
control to allow that capital di-
rectly invested after January 1,
1950 by non-residents in projects
approved by the Bahamas Ex-
change Control may be repatriated
at any time to the extent of the
original investment.

Investment may be made in an
appropriate foreign currency,
sterling from an appropriate ac-
count, sterling eligible for remit-
tance to investors, or goods and
services from the country of the
investor. The same principle ap-
plies to subsequent investment as
well as to the initial sum invest-
ed.

The maxim followed by the
United States for the past five
years had been, in short, “security
through military power, whatever
the cost’.

“This mechanistic,
military psychological

technical-
att‘tude

has inevitable consequences”, (he
professor said.
“Every single act ot foreign

policy is governed exclusively by
one viewpoint.

“It has led to the establishment
f military around
vorld and the economic streng tn
ning of potential allies

“Internally”, he added, ‘it
‘uses concentration of tremend-
us financial power in the hands
of the military, the militarisation |
t youth, close supervision of ihe |
‘oyalty of citizens, and intimida- |

Dases



ion of people of independent ;
hinking”’ .

He said that the

ace between the

ind Soviet Russia, though origi-
ially supposed to be a preventative
measure, had “assumed a hysteri-
zal character’.

—Reuter,

Interzonal Trials
Begin

BERLIN, Feb. 13

Interzona] trade talks with a
view to lifting the western em-
bargo on imports of stee] to east-
ern Germany will start in Berlin |
tomorrow, Herr Kurt Leopold, |
representative of the West Ger- |
man Interzonal Trade Depart- |
ment in Berlin said today. |

Herr Leopold went to see Herr |
Josef Orlopp, East-German Inter- |
zonal Trade representative and
reported afterwards to the Allies
that he thought there was a basis |
for understanding. Herr Karl
Kaumann, head of the Frankfurt
Office for Interzona] Trade is ex-
pected in Berlin today to conduct
the negotiations for the west.

Western allied officials believe
that Eastern Germany will be
able to offer large quantities of
coal in exchange of goods under
the Frankfurt Agreement of last
October which at present is very
lop-sided, to the disadvantage of
the East.



—Reuter.



Memory For
Vickery

LONDON, Feb. 13,

Robert Vickery, driving a train
from Mendoza to the Andes,
rounded a bend in the track
and stared from his cabin at a
“coscade of water pouring down
the mountainside”,

What followed was like the
end of a movie. Here is the story
in Mr. Vickery’s words: “I just
opened the 110-ton engine flat
out, but even so the coaches were
Swamped with water. Then I saw
a slender bridge ahead spanning
a chasm”’,

“There was no time to stop. So
I carried on. And the bridge
groaned as the train passed over
it at 50 miles an hour.”

“When the last coach was safe-
ly across, I stopped and looked
back—to see the bridge, weak-
ened by the rains, break up and
fall into the torrent below.

The weight of the train had
supplied the finishing touch.

This was one of the memories
which Mr. Vickery recounted to-
day on his retirement after 38
years service as a London trans-
port bus mechanic,

Formerly a train driver on the
Buenos Aires and Pacific Railway
he got plenty of excitement and

never mounted the footplate
without a revolver on his hip

—Reuter

;

a
ine
| Friday with 9 men aboard.

armaments
United States

Millionaire | Relax Control

Boara | ‘



aN ti een ee

Communist Clash |
With Neo-Fascists |

ROME, Feb. 13.

Five people were injured whon| BERLIN, Feb, 13.

-ommunists broke up a processi-n| George Dertinger, Christian
of Neo-Fascists in Avezzano east Democrat Foreign Minister ot |
of Rome yesterday, seized their) Rastern Germany and moving |
flag and burned it in the City! spirit in the party’s self-purge |
Square. The Communists burst has taken over the foreign |
through a police cordon to seice| editorship of the Party paper |
the flag, while the/procession or-| Neue Zit, the West _ Ferman |

ganised by the Neo-Fascist Italiz

LU Agency oko eo Stee ie,
Social Movement (M.S.I.) was a aie i Sens ne |
marching to a mass rally in eee MCSE, nitherto gen |
local cinema. ’ eral and foreign editor of the |
paper, who has been officially |
Police arrestea four people. inj Sick for the last fortnight, has |

L
munists

a Spezia, Northern Italy, Con:-

been dismissed, the Agency said, |
invaded a Neo-Fasci +t

Owing to a shortage of newsprint |

meeting and stopped M.S.I. lead Neue Zit and the paper of the
Giorgio Almirante from speakiry Liberal Democratic Party, Der |
by singing the “Red Flag” eac) Morgen, are allowed by the East |
time he tried to address his fo’-| German authorities to appear as aj
lowers. |four page tabloid-size paper six |
Police finally dissolved thj| times weekly. The newspapers |
meeting to prevent a serious clasi\.| Controlled by the Communist- |
—Reuter dominated Socialist Unity Party |



however are printed on eight full-
Sized pages

SEARCH FOR MISSING | De,
the Western sector of Berlin told
PLANE |

Reuter this morning that he

Klein. who lives in |

had |

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas, | been dismissed from editorship
Feb. 18. | of the paper by “certain forces |

American naval planes took off! within the Christian Democratic |
here at dawn today in search ot Party Central Committee” because |

di

5,

NOVELIST DIES AT 75 |

LONDON, Feb. 13

Rafael Sabatini well-known
Italian born novelist, died in
Adelyoden, Switzerland, early

ned in



Gay, it Cal
was 75

_ Reuter, |

sappeared
flight over the

flying-boat missing since last they considered him “reactionary”, |

He confirmed that Foreign Minis- |

ter Dertinger himself had now

on a routin ‘| taken over the Foreign editorship |

Gulf of Mexico. | of the newspaper.
—Reuter.

The plane, a P.B.M.—5 Marine:
while

—Renter.

Your Backache

may be due

to sluggish Kidney Action




[FE IS NOT so good when you

are troubled with backache,
rheumatic pains, stiff, aching
muscles and joints, lumbago or
common urinary disorders due to
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Y put up with pain and dis-
comfort when you might get happy
relief by taking Doan’s Backache

Kidney Pills. They stimulate and
cleanse sluggish kidneys and so help them to rid
the blood of excess uric acid and other impurities
which otherwise might collect in the system and
cause distress. Doan’s Pills have helped thousands ;
let them help you,

HALF A CENTURY of success in relieving
ailments due to inadequate kidney action, is the
proud record of Doan’s Pills. Grateful men and
women of all ages use and recommend this efficient
diuretic and urinary antiseptic to their Jriends
and neighbours,

° PS : °
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oe








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COLLINS LIMITED.

28, Broad Street.



WILTTAM FOGARTY LED.

INC. IN B.G.





Owing to the arrival of the - -

“STELLA POLARIS”

on SATURDAY 238th

OUR STORE WILL REMAIN OPEN UNTIL 4 P.M.





to Accommodate the Visitors



We will Close for our Weekly Half-Holiday




on Thursday







PAGE THREE



P< Cosson

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Carr's Biscuits are
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out

They are as good as
ever, and we hope
soon to be able to
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BARBADOS Sp





PAGE FOUR



aso

ADVOCATE

SS fosaSait

Published by The Advocate Co. td., 34, Broad St, Bridgetows



Tuesday, February 14, 1950





Weleome Fraific Rules

THE institution of new traffic regulations
in Trafalgar Square on Sunday is an at-
tempt by the Government to bring order
out of chaos. In some instances the new
regulations have been well received but
due to the natural objection to change there
is still room for closer co-operation by the
general public.

It is also true that some time must elapse
before the public can be educated into
appreciation of the merits and the reasons
for these regulations.

It has taken twenty years to get one way
traffic in Trafalgar Square and it is not to
be supposed that within one day pedes-
trians who have been accustomed to jay-
walking in any part of the City or the
motorists who has been accustomed to scare
pedestrians out of the way would accept
kindly a set of regulations which impose
new duties on him.

The regulations are not without their
flaws but it is necessary to adopt the trial
and error system before there can be any
approach to the satisfactory stage. And
the quicker the general public learn to
appreciate this and co-operate with the
Police and the Transport Authority the
better for everyone.

The object of the regulations is to bring
an easier fiow of traffic and to prevent the
unnecessary waste of time by motorist and
pedestrian alike. With the increase of
vehicular traffic in Bridgetown it was ob-
vious that if something was not done soon
there would be’a really chaotic state

The temporary signs which were erected
on Sunday warn drivers and pedestrians
on the approach to Trafalgar Square that
they are to follow the lines of traffic. From
Broad Street the line of traffic will keep
left until a point near the South Gate of



the Public Buildin where those going
over the Chamberlain Bridge swing right
while those for Rickett Street or Constitu-
tion Road will keep straight ahead. The
continuation of Rickett Street becomes
one-way and is open to ‘buses only from

the Wharf side. Trafalgar Styeet also be-
comes one-way with entry only from-the
Square so that traffic from Rickett Street



turns upwards and towards Constitution
before entering Bridge Street also one-way.
This brings the volume of traffic from the
Public Buildings, Rickett Street, Marhill

Street and Constitution Road into the one-
way line along Bridge Street. The road way
along the wharf is divided so that the
*buses from the Victoria Bridge drop their
passengers near the Cenotaph and return
to Probyn Street via the Victoria Bridge,
the main stream ke Nel-
son Statue keeping The
road between the Cenotaph and the Lamp
Post in the centre of the Square is also one-

ping towards the

this on the right.

way leading towards the Chamberlain
Bridge.
The new arrangements are welcome.

Pedestrians now know where traffic is go-
ing and a sense of self-preservation will
stop them from wandering across the street
and with the new signs “Cross Here Please”
erected in Broad Street and in Trafalgar
Square motorists will know where it is
possible that pedestrians might step from
the side walk on to the street.

The task of carrying out these regula-
tions is in the hands of the Police who must
be satisfied for some time to help educate
the travelling public into obeying the regu-
lations. The old lady who read the, sign
“Turn left’? and added “Right” displays
sense of humour but pedestrians who con-
tinue to walk in the road to avoid the ne-
cessity of crossing at required points are
breaking the spirit of the new regulations.

The time is not far distant when the
Nelson Statue will have to be removed to
the centre of the Square and traffic allowed
to enter the Public Buildings compound by
the South Gate only.

OUR READERS SAY:





ee

——

ssi ils MRM a a ciate

re em

DURING the past nine years,
considerable developments have
been taking place in the establish-
ment of free public library services
in the Eastern Caribbean, and the
Eastern Caribbean Regional Libra-
ry Scheme, as it is now known, has
played an important part in these
developments. This Scheme was
launched in 1941 under the auspi-
ces of the Carnegie Corporation
which has done so much for library
services throughout the world, and
$70,000. was granted to set up a
Regional Library service for the
astern Caribbean. The first four
years were mainly devoted to the
establishment of the Trinidad Cen-
tral Library, the original intention
being to use this as a centre for
rotating collections of books to the
other Colonies, but it was soon
realised that the narrow concep-
tion of a Regional Library service
would by itself be of little use, and
upon the expiry of the Carnegie
Grant in 1944 the British Council
therefore undertook to finance the
Scheme for a further period and to
develop and extend it as far as
possible. Dr. Helen Gordon.
Stewart, who was appointed in
1941 as Director of the Central
Library Scheme took over the
control of the extended scheme and
her retirement in 1948 marked
the end of seven years of untiring
work carried out under the most
Jifficult conditions; only those
of us who are following her fully
realise the labour involved in
launching a service of this kind
over so vast an area, and how
well the foundations have been
laid.

During these seven years,
apart from establishing the Trini-
dad Central Library Dr. Stewart
set up demonstrations of free
public library services in each of
the islands for which books and
equipment were supplied from
Regional Library funds, and her
retirement in June 1948 coincided



THE

The Eastern Caribbean

Regional Library Scheme
. By 8. W. Hockey, (Director)

time a well selected stock of books
freely available\to all who could
use them, and the “Regional”
books as they were called, brought
new life into the library services.
The next step was to persuade
the local Govertuments to finance
and maintain free library services,
as under the conditions of the
Carnegie Grant which were as-
sumed by the British Council, no
library can receive further help
from the Regional Scheme unless
some reasonable assurance of its
maintenance at a_ satisfactory
level from local funds can be
given. After many delays and
disappointments plans are at last
going forward and is hoped that
the second stage of development
will be completed during the next
few years. This will involve com-
plete reorganization of many of
the library services with the as-
sistance of Regional Library staff
and the incorporation of the
books used for the demonstrations
into the: main stocks of the local
libraries. Further supplies of
books from time to time will help
to bring the book stocks up to the
required level for the new services
which are being set up.

The Barbados Public Library
which celebrated its centenary
as a free public library service in
1947, and which under the live
direction of the present Librarian
is developing into one of the best
library services in the West Indies
has needed little of the practical
assistance outlined in the pre-
ceding paragraphs. Like every
other growing library however,
Barbados needs more books, and
a considerable addition to the
5,000 volumes approximately, al-
ready supplied from Regional
Library allocations will be forth-
coming in the near future. The
recent closure of the British
Council Library in Bridgetg@wn
has been in keeping with the pol-
icy of canalizing all library ser-
viees through the Regional organ-

with the first st€age of develop- ization, which operates within
ment. Thus, the people in many the framework of local Govern-
of the colonies saw for the first ments and initiates nothing which



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



cannot eventually be maintained
by the local administration.

One of the most important func-
tions of the Regional Library is
Staff training, and the classes
which were organized in the early
days to train staff in elementary
routines have now been widened
in scope and the examinations of }
the English Library Association
are taken at the end of the course
It is not generally realized that
the organization of a Library ser-
vice demands not only a wide
knowledge of books and the peo-
ple who use them but also a
definite technical training, and,
without ‘exception, the students
sent from Barbados have shown
a degree of ability and enthusi-
asm which augurs well for the
future of the library service
there.





The Regiona: Smeme, therefore,
is an attempt first to assist in the
establishment of an adequate
library service in each colony and
finally to leave as a going concern
a Regional organization in which
all will cooperate for their mutual
benefit. It is an attempt to do a
great. deal in a short time, but
with fhe advances in education
and the social and economic
changes now taking place in the
West Indies it should hardly be
necessary to emphasize the im-
portant part which a well run lib-
rary service can play in the life of
a community, and the need for ex-
ploiting to the full the resources
which are being made available.
At a recent meeting in Trinidad,
Sir Ronald Adam, speaking as the
President of the Library Associ-
ation, defined Adult Education as
the broadening of one’s horizon
which could be achieved by the
proper use of books and the re-
sources made available by public
libraries, and it is to the well es-
tablished library services in Bar-
bados and Trinidad that we shall
look for support in breaking down
the state of isolation which
exists in many of the Eastern
Caribbean Colonies.





Cold War Gets Warmer

PARIS (By Mail).
A period of increased tension ib
the cold war between Russia and

the West during the next six
months was foreseen to-day by
several leading western states-
men

High ranking American officials
abroad, as well as some European
political leaders, think that Soviet
pressure against the Western De-





mocracies is about to be intensi-
fied both in Europe and the Fat
East :

tis not beiievea that the Krem-~-
lin has any intention of dehber-
ately precipitating war ith tne
West in the foreseeable future.

The view still prevails among

Western statesmen and diplomats
that the Soviet leadership thinks
Russia is achieving tco much

without war to run the risks of
conflict
However, it is felt that Mos-

cow is going to turn the heat on
in the cold war.

Western statesmen see evidence
of this in Soviet recognition of the
Ho Chi Minh rebet regime in
French Indo-China, in the instruc-

, tions to French and ltalian Com-

munist parties to sr up new
trouble, and in the “baby block-
ade” tactics in Berlin.

. One leading Americhn official
in Europe who has reason to be
familiar with Soviet tactics told
this correspondent:

“There are definite signs that

| Russia is stepping up the cold war

pressure. The Soviets are starting
a new push against the doors of
the Western World all around the

| globe.

“They are looking for weak
points. If they find that the door
gives way, they will walk in.

eet aeilgmanemeemsseettRe A nT

Where they meet with stiff resis-
tance which might involve the
danger of a fighting show-down,
they will back away and try
somewhere else.”

The possibility is foreseen that
this anticipated intensification of
the cold war may atAimes and in
certain places reach a high pitch
which will appear to constitute a
serious threat to peace, But it is not
thought that Moscow will actually
go so far as to precipitate a situa-
tion which would result in a major
conflict with the Western Powers.

Stepping up of Soviet pressure
against the West may, in the opin-
ion of the Western statesmen, be
due to several factors

First of all, it is believed that
the Kremlin has been greatly en-
couraged by the Communist con-
quest of China, The Soviets want
to take full advantage of it in the

ify Kingsbury Smith

Far East before the United States
starts b}ilding up bastions against
the further spread of Communism
in the Pacific.

Hence, the move to support the
Indo-Chinese rebels which is ex-
pected to be followed by new ef-
forts to encourage revolutionary
movements in South East Asia.

Secondly, it is ecpnsidered high-
ly probable that the Soviet Gov-
ernment is deeply concerned about
America’s decision to proceed with
the manufacture of the hydrogen
bomb, not only from the military
point of view, but_also because of

Onee a

Always a Bishop

By JOHN CAMSELL
INS Staff Correspondent
LONDON, (By Mail).*

Church of England bishops who
in the future are found guilty of
“unbecoming conduct or of serious,
persistent, or continuous neglect
of duty”, may be told their bish-
opric is vacant. But they will re-
main bishops.

When the next session of the
Church Assembly opens on St.
Valentine Day, February 14, it
will have before it the Bishop’s
Retirement Measure.

For a year at Assembly meetings
the Measure has been discussed
and postponed. Now, it has been
amended to meet the criticisms.

The Measure will not make
provision for the unbecoming con-
duct of a bishop involving doc-
trine, ritual or ceremonies.

After a complaint is made it
will be referred by the Archbishop
to the Upper House of the Convo-
cation concerned. The Upper House
if it thinks fit, will in turn appoint
a Cémmission of Inquiry.

What's on Today

West Indian Court of Appeal
at 9.30 a.m.

Meeting, House of Assembly
at 12 noon.

Mobile Cinema, District “E”
Police Station at 7.30 p.m.

Boxing at Modern High
School at 8.30 p.m,



the psychological effect of this de-
velopment in the cold war.

Western officials pointed out
that this development restores
American Jeadership in the field
of atomic weapons despite Rus-
sia’s possession of the secret of
making the atomic. bomb. Thus,
the United States is considered
the far more powerful war poten-
tial nation and this tends to lessen
Soviet prestige in the great world
power politics struggle.

To off-set this loss of prestige,
the western statesmen. think the
Soviets will resort to bolder
moves in the cold war, adopting
a stiffer attitude towards the
Western Powers.—L.N.S,

Bishop

The report will be taken Lack to
the Upper House, which may form-
ally declare the complaint un-
founded, decide to take no further
action, pass censure on the bishop,
or request the archbishop to de-
clare the bishopric vacant.

“The measure will deal with
bishops who come before the civil
courts and also with those who
are getting too old to manage their
diocese,” a Church of England
spokesman explained.

“If a bishopric is declared
vacant it does not mean the bishop
concerned would not be granted

another, and he will certainly not
lose his title. Once a bishop always
a bishop.”—INS.





RECITAL

frewient

wgagnt?

“Thanks for carrying me
out, pal. Your fiddle’s v
cell 99!”



TT



































One Million Scots
Want Home Rule

In a remarkable demonstration which has
shaken England during the current General
Election campaign, more than a million Scots-
men have signed a petition demanding Home
Rule on domestic affairs by means of a Scot-
tish Parliament. The British Liberal Party
has endorsed the proposal, the Conservatives
have proposed a Royal Commission of Inquiry
and the Socialists have declined thus far to take
a stand, although in the past they have been
opposed, The Duke of Montrose, first to sign
the Covenant, tells in the following article,
written exclusively for International News
Service, why Scotsmen want Home Rule. He
calls the present British government system
out-mioded because of Social Welfare and
nationalization of industries. The Duke is a
member of His Majesty’s select Body Guard of
Royal Archers and hereditary sheriff of Dum-
bartonshire.

BUCHANAN CASTLE, GLASGOW,

Scotland, (By Mail),

The Covenant is the outcome of a very
general feeling of the Scottish people that
they have not been getting a fair deal in
recent years through Parliament as West-
minster. In Social Welfare, in domestic pol-
icy and many other things that affect their
daily lives this is of great importance.

It is patent to many of us that Scottish
people, being fully conversant with Scottish
conditions, could manage our national affairs
much more effectively and economically
than they are being managed from London
now.

We feel that Parliament at Westminster 1s
so crowded with Imperial and World Affairs,
it can not possibly find time to devote proper
attention to local matters. Hence, much of
our recent legislation has been *scamped
work, and very badly put together. The policy
of Nationalization has emphasized this pre-

dominantly.

drifting away from Scotland.

In business, in development of Empire Lands

the United Kingdom.

eral Legislature,
The Crown, The Constitution
National Defence, Customs, Foreign Policy
and Imperial Requirements.

tions as

England, Ulster,

of the United Kingdom as a whole.

they like to join in with the rest of us.

There is no intention whatever to “sep-
arate” or break up the existing Union be-
tween England and Scotland which has, on
the whole, proved beneficial to both Coun-
tries.

It is simply a ease of the present system
of government in Britain now being out-

Welfare legislation, and nationalization of
industries. The present system has answered

kind of expansion in legislative practice
took place. Grave congestion of parliamen-
tary business is a bad thing for any country.



Barbadian Aversion to Change Must Die The Death

To The Editor, The Advocate
SIR— I was a witness this is
morning to the praiseworthy in
attempt of those responsible for
dealing with the traffic problem
in the island. This attempt is
very long overdue and I si
cerely hope it will not be aban-
doned because of the fault-find
ing and grousing of a_ few
individuals who have been
accustomed for generations Ww
think only in terms of “Self”.

void of
the



(1) The

pay any

enough,

It is not likely that the attempt
need for
light of experience
suggestions are no doubt welcome
and will be given due considera-
tion. Hence 1 offer a few:-—

authority
heed
against a litthe walk on the part
of the bus travelling public. On
the whole Barbadians do not walk
It annoys me sorely to
witness as I do very frequently

amendment The Roebuck 5S

and

should not
to the cry out

Bridge.

(3) In the

tion

direction

It is impossible, to please the sorry spectacle of a spaced intervals.
everybody and any one in any hale hearty person taking the
walk of life who sets out to bus from Jemmott’s Lane to the tion
please everybody is only quali- bus stop in Trafalgar Square. worth trying ou

fying for a Lunatic Asylum.

L 1 South and there |
What should be borne in mind & person getting in the bus at St. Lawrence, Beckle ‘ will be n 4 re bread.” Wonter if : : | FROZEN”*CAN f
oe ; we anand ~bL . es Road) cross W! not a few to complain Barba ' : . xer if I could show | ADIAN SAL-
by ved proper Figg is the oo aa ea ee * Pris the Bridge and drop their passen- because of just a little inconveni- age toriats ret oer “ a boy who “do.” MON
es: ZO0C or ne greatest Beckie: ad. stop. ntes= were Rg -stoadaggt en 1 tygaes= ; : * * é ys ‘ a bh 7 ee ae 3
eaaber aa not satisfyin ; a fe w sence of laziness, bahaee the py Stand” th Featon ®t aA kat will aon et bs yy agpenmnoestiia ia avaliable in Das Deusak table cloths ri The eecor a
ee ae a sre ave ossession of iba ae : 1 Ol ) eet. m.i2 yn e genera island which so sorely Coa ; = a < Ss. e ural |
or even -man) who are aversé _— re «ong too much the same buses on their outward !™provement in a condition which buginess bee a ae pa reaction to that advertisement is | MACKEREL
to chang averse to a littl pet ' me pe - me _ ron ss run pass through the square and does cal for serious attention and ful reputation ah tea tak oe ast that in these days of meat! ;
sonal - siege : y , , . “es cs itt! Si » iy 1arm buf take up passengers who should be amelioration. Sa peasiteny alth, scenery shortage, a good substitute can be | fine Dwvinakse
and who wees wy a ar eee . B00 in queue awaiting them. I admit DISCIPLINE 5 a DEVONIAN found in digestible table cloths. :
thems¢ lves (2) I suggest that the buses it would take a small squad of Hotels P 7 - READER OF.ADVERTISEMENTS SANDEMAN’S SHERRY
W hatevel i¢ : hich ply to the north of the strong policemen teach the un- , — S | MOSSELLE HOCK
the Barbad d ould not cross it. Fon- nm nd® selfish Barbediam ‘Ao To The Bait inet oa ks seen ———__—__—— er
herself Black Rock bus { ai aon oe satan @ LETTERS which are signed with a nom-de-plunie, but un |} PRUNIER BRANDY
eRere an ( ‘ tions terest Ra ' r oars e he customary bona fides, will be ignored. ||} * [ELLE CURE
or 7 ne Se the ci i pigheaded. news ite on Hotel Accoi anny such reach the Editor's desk each week, and readers ||) GRAND. MARNIER
avel nore i evel Y be con- dation a ea are ag > m a S| iM
and ancil yp af idere ® con- dation I am surprised to hear that ain reminded of the necessity for the writer's name|}\} GOLD BRAID RUM
and anci p of Bre ered to the tourists cannot find accommoda- to be known to the Editor. not for publication, but CROWN DRINKS
ation t& I u VUistin stand e tion i ‘ : P a " UOn, Du i
n in this island, assurance of good taith. as an y

and vice vers

5a.

I have witnessed



would have to get to the bottom).

ville buses should park in Pal-
metto Square or Church Village.
This would relieve the bottle neck
over the too-hard worked Victoria

absence of Traffic
Lights which as we are aware work
automatically without considera-
for individuals, traffic cops
should be instructed to change the
of traffic at regularly

(4) This is the hardest sugges-
to implement but one well

ing buses from

await its

treet and Belle-

structions

that the avera
t. Let the incom-

(Oistins, i increased



TOE thoukd he Ghaok
sta shou e erected t
north of the Fountain as a cediee
from hot sun or light showers,
(5) Any person caught not com-
plying with any of the new in-
C including,
cluding, the “please cross here”
instruction should be arrested and
cautioned, if not prosecuted. In
addition Cops should do a little
patrol work and put a stop to
pedestrians using the sidewalk as
meeting places for gossiping.
Finally, it must be remembered

averse to change, except.a change
income,

covered
Residential

: beautiful St.
repeat in-

and good
able.

ge Barbadian is
available at

It is agreed that che Hotels,
clubs ‘te, in
around Bridgetowt.
capacity but how about other
good Hotels and clubs on the ments
Philip, Bathsheba
and St. James coasts which to my
personal knowledge have ample bados on
accommodation avail»

All these Hotels etc., are with-
in easy reach of Bridgetown and
generally have motor cars run-
ning into the city at least two or
three times a week at a nominal
charge or drive yourself cars are
reasor able rates.






Your Laugh

To The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—At a Party

and
are full to
were read
Newspaper: —

from your

April 19

arrives in

competing in
fastest plane.

speed



TS ET ee ee

po

We do not see why much Scottis!. business
should have to be centred in London. Once |§
the head office of a business goes South, the |
rest follows. Our national revenue returns
seems to indicate that Scotland’s wealth is

With the loss of business, our people are |
also losing the opportunity of employment,
and of obtaining promising positions. Many |
Glens are empty today when they should be |

full of happy and prosperous people. _|% WALLS OXFORD SAUSAGES |... 0), =
Ulster, Eire, Isle of Nan, and the Channel | § We ee eee :
Islands, all possess democratic legislative |§ Liatt CAREY BRRING BOWonE TCC ci
control in their domestic policy and oe Ce oes Re eh Lagat gc en ves per Ib,
All have made good, and are making good in- % at ewace Le oe oa ae t
creasingly; there has been no failure, and we | % BURR AS aoe WR oe, vc aa
. 5 ; ai : > DCI. Se CPPRED siccs ashes tunes pee
ask why should Scotland alone fail, when | % GRAND MARNIER LIQUEUR (0/0/0107. aa
she has within her self far greater industrial 3 GRAND MARNIER LIQUEUR ........... .. large
assets than any of these other States? 1%
We know the Scottish people have great | % STANSFELD, SCOTT & CcO.,
ability wherever responsibility is required. | sss PDO BLOSS SSS OO

|
|

in Government and Parliamentary Service, |

me can always find Scottish people at the | N €) - I C
top.

We say, therefore, that being afforded the |
opportunity to build up industrially and gov-
ern ourselves in domestic affairs, would pro- |
vide a tremendous moral uplift among our |
people, This, in turn, would have a wonder-

ful strengthening influence in the whole of WILL BE CLOSED E
fe Oe

Our ideal is self-government in all the
domestic affairs of Scotland, while retaining
the Parliament at Westminster as a Fed- |
to deal with such ques-

| FOR

In this Federal House representatives of
Scotland, Wales, Isle of
Man, and Channel Islands would all sit
together and work for the good government

Furthermore, we would leave the door
open for Representatives from Eire, should |


























TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

fi.

AYLMER’S PORK & BEANS.......
CATTELLI EGG NOODLES (Broad & Fine) 2
QUAKER OATS (I’ge pkts. with Chinaware) =



=—_

eee



TUESDAY, 21ST FEBRUARY
°

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD., s

C. S. PITCHER & CO, 1

Our LUMBER YARD and HAR 2
MENTS will be closed or the ae ARE D}
Tournament at 12 noon on the following lave.

THURSDAY, 16TH FEBRUARY _
MONDAY, 20TH FEBRUARY ag :
Phones : 4472, 4687, 4413, 495),

aoe

GODS SS SS SSS SESS



|
|

i



: KEILLERS DUNDEE CAKE

—_—— fee
OO |

OUR DRY GOODS DEPAR

On THURSDAY

OUR WEEKLY HALF §

AND ‘
REMAINING OPEN ON SATURDAY,
FEB, UNTIL 330 P.M

moded through the development of Social |

well for over 250 years, and it is time some |

the other |
afternoon the following Advertise- |

“Lady Rodney sails from Bar-|

FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE VIS
| FROM THE M.V. “STELLA PO
PLEASE ARRANGE YOUR SI
ACCORDINGLY.
al



Boston on April 20.” I think that}
the Agents should have previously |
notified the local public in particu-
lar and the world in general ot |
this fast ship that is capable of |
with the |

“Show me a boy who don’t love



ENJOY THESE DINNER SPECIALS! AT â„¢

Choice Meats

MILK FED TURKEYS
MILK FED CHICKENS
VEAL CHOPS

LAMB CHOPS






















DACOSTA & CO. |

—S wr
— nr

(“4 ¢@
\ ><" ==> fi)
ee oad

































































































‘ Questions
Asked:

y WILL ELL” an
‘ | “practice makes Ferfect
; some of the mottos employ

otorists passing throug
Square yesterday. ‘In

ec Janes and signs, whic
re seen in the Square for th



time yesterday mornin
a great amount of con

Looe Constables on duty wer
F ving answers to
ee tet questions.

PE One mo
new al) about Traffic Signs, wa

of the opinion that question
"were not necessary.

S He

‘vad tercolonial game.
gown River Road,
‘Victoria
i: On rea

over

the sign
Turn Right”.

i
rT

in big cities.

TOI
a

“fo
ai

“girection of Queen’s Park.

i

Road end.

Broad Street.
well, Christ

C Bovell of Chancery Lane,

fir Valley, was travelling
ig Gibbons Road, loaded with

understood that Clarke
on to one of the canes. The
proke and he fell.
WALL and wooden building,
40 x 60 x 18 feet, and valued
00 was completely gutted by a
of unknown origin which
out at Porey Spring, St.
mas at about
‘The house is the property of
DaCosta of the same
ress and is insured with Messrs.
arrington and Sealy for $3,360.

ODDS ESLALES Ltd. suffered
‘further loss when two fires
eeurred at Todds Plantation on

ton

; The first fire broke out at about
190 p.m. and destroyed an acre of
d ripe canes,
is fire extended to Ashbury
mation, St. George, and des-
toyed 323 holes of first crop ripe
belonging to Mr. R,
of the same Plantation.
second fire occurred at
ds 45 minutes later and burnt
holes of second crop ripe canes.
jall three ‘cases the damage was
ed by insurance.
N ACCIDENT occurred on
/Street atabout 12.10 p.m.
ay between a motor car
med by Messrs. Burton & Co.,
old Street and driven by Eric
of Roberts Tenantry, and
Mother car, M.1099, owned by Dr.
i, Massiah and driven by Rev.
W.D. Wood of St. Alban’s Vicar-
St. James,
tight rear fender of Dr.
iah’s car was damaged.

JE GRAHAM of Roaches,
St. George, fell from a bus
‘Md was injured at about 5.15 p.m.

He was taken to the
Hospital and detained,
Grab was a passenger on
Pmotor bus M.805, which was
welling behind the motor car
M.1242, owned by J. D.
is of Country Road, and
by Rufus Cordle of Deacons
was involved in an actident
Waterford Road with motor
1085, owned by the Police
voy and driven by P.C.

01

:

Frid

“It is understood that after the
Sad cccurred the bus stopped
y and Graham fell out.

ANOTHER ACCIDENT oc-
furred on Mount Gay Road,
Luey, at about 1115 a.m. on
may between motor car L.19—
Packard—owned and driven by
. Ward of Mount Gay,
otor lorry, M.1003, owned by
Ow of Dean’s Village
en by Allan Phillips of
mam, St. Lucy,
tight front fender and head
D of the car were damaged.
> Be Was done to the lorry.
emma SEEGNILLAR,
1 .x-Army Captain of On-
® Canada, was found dead in
“om at a seaside hotel at about



~*

bm. on Friday. His body
ved to Messrs. Burton &
ny Ss eral Parlour at

tt Villa Road was
Su yY a large stone,
Sputtly knocked it off its
+ and damaged the roof,
Dout | WW a.m. on Friday.
accident occurred when
#8 Phillips of Villa Road
i 8 Stones in the same
On Friday. The,, stone
the house of Fitz Clarke.

SENTATIVES of the
~

*“0wn as Jehovah's Wit-
tot assemble in conven-
pm February 17 to February
® the Steel Shed, Queen's

Delegate: from Grenada,
St. Vineent and Barba-
» P& attending,

pitare which culminates
Â¥ is a public lecture
py Light” at 8.00 p.m. on
_ ebruary 19, This lecture
i ven by R. Dp. Newton,
Brits ower Representative of
‘ P West Indies.
_ 9 “Mondelle,”
Baw XY Audley Downes
thsheba area, overturned









e
Gay last whil i
heba ay ie returning

a) Was Slightly injured
= al the fish were lost. , The
returning with a large

* overturned small
into the sea in an
ver some of the fish
wn was brought in-
4 rope was shot out
nce of the boat.

®sista



Answers Given

torist, who, as usual, haa
to many big cities ana

ecock-sure of himself ana

‘ollymore Rock on his
cette: Oval to watch
He came
the
Bridge and through the

ching the Nelson Statue
“East Bourne
He was a
worried but was still sure that
- come across such signs

ever turned right and
iment! going back in the
It was
y then that he decided to go
‘Yerough Crumpton Street and ap-
“proacl Kensington from the West-

3 reaching Kensington he was
Seat he could have motored

)UDOLPH CLARKE of Hope-
Church, was
ined at the General Hospital
the left rear wheel of a
or lorry ran over his right
at about 11.45 a.m. on Satur-

The accident occurred when the
“motor lorry X-793, owned by

ven by Phillip Callendar

midnight on!

qrsDAY. FEBRUARY 14, 1950
ee ge ee er eerie

Colleton Road C
Before WI Appeal Court

Did Trial Judge Misdirect Jury?

a

|
|
h
e
h
e
8

That the Trial Judg
and may hav
ming up was one of the
in the Cuke-Skinner ca
of Appeal now sitting h



Arden St. Clair Cuke was the
e| Plaintiff in an action which
5 brought against Clifford
after a collision on Collet
between the cars driven by both | >
parties _ respectively. The jury
‘ found in favour of Cuke and

awarded him dama
ner appealed
Court of Appeal.

General dama
£1,500 and spe
£4. 3. 7.

Date of the
vember 7,
jury was
1949 and j
with that verd
March 29, 1949

ges. Mr. Skin

s

accident was No.
1947,

dian Court of A;
dict of the Common P
be reversed and a verdi
his favour with costs ti
the Court below, an
judgment entered
altered accordingly,
The Judges
Jud
Cecil
Justice of Trinidad (Presi
Sir Newnham Arthur Worl
Chief Justice of British
and Sir Clement
O.B.E., Chief Justice
ward and Leeward Islands,
Skinner is represented by Mr.

dent)
ey Kt.

Malone Kt,

‘Ward, instructed by

Messrs
Hutchinson & Banfield.

W. W. Reece K.C., associated with
Mr. J. E, T. Brancker and jin-
structed by Messrs, Carrington &
Sealy, and Cuke by Mr. D. H. L..

idge in the Court of Com
e misdirected th

points on which is

Se with which the

ere began to deal y
—

on Road | ant distane

to the West Indian} the appellant is

ges awarded were | YOu are satisfied that both
cial damages were

Verdict of the
given on February 15,
udgment in accordance
ict was entered on

Skinner is moving the West In-
ppeal that the ver-
leas Jury
ct given in
here and in
d that the
on March 29 be

ges of the Court are Sir
Furness-Smith Kt., Chief

Guiana

of the Wind-

Hearing of the appeal continues

at 9.30 a.m. to-day.

The grounds of Appeal are that
the Learned Trial Judge erred and
may have misdirected the Jury
when he directed them that the

| defence was based upon the de-

fendant’s having seen the plaintiff
on the wrong side of the road, and
that the defendant went over to

his wrong side leaving the road

open to the plaintiff, and that if

the plaintiff had been keeping a
proper look-out he would have
seen what the driver had done
and taken the necessary course.
Misdirection is also claimed on
that part of the Judge’s summing
up to the jury when giving two
| other cases in which negligence is
| contemporaneous or nearly so, he
cited (1) People coming around

the curve on wrong side and leay- +:

ing it to go to their side, and (2)
A case in which although the
plaintiff is negligent, and the de-
fendant’s negligence is subse-
quent, yet the plaintiff's negli-
gence is the substantial cause of
the collision.

The appellant is also claiming
that the jury were misdirected
when the Trial Judge said to
them : “There was a long distance
and space according te Mr. Skin-
ner’s evidence when Skinner first
saw the Plaintiff’s car’, and im-
mediately continued: “If you are
satisfied that Skinner was not so
erowded by the other car as to
bring him within the agony of the
collision paragraph, or that the
last opportunity of avoiding acci-
dent was his, the plaintiff is en-
titled to damages”, therefore lead-
ing the jury to consider that the
distance between the cars when

If You're “Alieé



mon Pleas erred

he (the drivers of each car could first Tolled oats,
Skinner | See the other c¢.

e, and not the distance
etween the c
tiff
rect side,

The jury were
claiming, when
Judge told them: “If
a men
were negligent up to a certain
point, you will ask yourself which
; of them had th
of avoiding the collision.

The grounds of Appeal go on to
say that the Trial Judge ought to
have directed the jury
questions for them to
their verdict were: —

the Trial

answer by

The Right way?

A. Was the collision substantially
due to the negligence of both
parties or of the plaintiff or of the
defendant?

B. Having regard to the facts of

time when the defendant and/or
plaintiff could have become aware



moment of impact and the course
of both parties within that time,

ollision

€ jury in portions of his sum-
based the appeal:
Vest Indian Court
esterday morning. |

ars when the plain- | ¢X€reise books, cig
first started to pull to his cor- | Carpets. The

e last opportunity | th

that the to

of each other’s approach, and the | 8T®en

THE

VARIETY
OF CARGO
ARRIVES

A CARGO
} herrings,tinned
scanned ham, cauliflower,
1, cabbage, tomato
split peas,
and
‘yesterday
“Hersilia.”



liqueurs
by

arrived
Dutch

eae ° ‘
,oil in tins,

sprouts, electrica

ar Was the import-,°@Uipment, oil-gas stoves, nails,

;mouth organs, alarm clocks

from Amsterdam, Rotterdam anc

also misdirected, | Antwerp,

The “Hersilia”

Messrs. S. P. Musson, Son & Co

Ltd. It left this port
afternoon for Trinidad.

Other cargo arriving here over

e week was brought from U.K.
New York and Trinidad.

From Liverpool
Whisky, beer,
work,

firebricks, hay,

ship “Craftsman” from Liverpool

including smoked |
Vegetables, cheese, |
carrots, }
juice biscuits, |
cognac, apples, geneva
here
M.V.|

This vessel also brought olive
advertising material,

ar lighters and
cargo was brought

yesterday

stout cornflour
bacco, oats, cotton thread, steel-
and
machinery were brought by steam-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

‘Road Deaths
On Increase

In B.G.

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 10
accident rate of



|
|
|

Road

more
into

| years.

more
1



1
|

;

previous

year’s
$25,243.05.

figures



4

the
Colony is climbing each year as
vehicular traffic is brought
use. Last year’s total of
1,374 of which 20 were fatal shows
a big increase over two previous

Government has also collected
revenue through motor
vehicle licences and other fees
| attached to motoring than in 1948,

In 1949, $150,947.31 was collect-
ed as revenue. This exccpds —
iy

Of the 1,374 accidents which

districts,

,

crack-ups.
2 Fatalities in 1949

Last years 20 fatalities over-
shadow the figures of 10 in 1948
|when there were 1,136 accidents
)and seven in 1947 when there

is consigned to/ occurred last year, 1,107 were in
Georgetown and 357 in country
Eleven persons were
killed in the City and nine in the
country; three of the City fatal-
ities resulted from motor cycle

The “Philosopher” brought , were 755 accidents.
shirts, personal effects and a live} Seven hundred and twenty
horse consigned to Dr. Evelyn

from Trinidad.

New York’s cargo, brought by
the case, and in particular to the /St@2™Ship “C. G. Thulin", was

comprised of matzo and farel meal,
black kidney beans, split peas,
peas, crushed wheat,
medicines, lubricating oil, brake
fluid, household effects, tractor

(I) whether the plaintiff could parts and piece goods.

have avoided the collision, (2)
whether if the plaintiff was negli-
gent the defendant by exercise of
reasonable care could have
avoided the collision, (3) whether
the step taken by the defendant
in going to his wrong side of the
road was due to the negligence of
the plaintiff.

The third ground of appeal is
that the verdict of the jury was
against the weight of the evidence,
and the fourth ground is that even!
if the plaintiff was entitled to a
verdict, the amount of damages
was excessive.

As hearing of the appeal opened
yesterday morning,. Mr. Reece
made submission on the Grounds
of Appeal. He concluded at the
luncheon adjournment, and on
resumption Mr. Ward began to
make submissions on his case.

For the Plaintiff
Mr. Ward submitting that the
Trial Judge had put the case
clearly and properly to the jury,
said that as he understood the law,

as far as misdirection was con-
cerned, the Court would only
upset a judgment of the Court
below on the grounds ot mis-

direction if there was going to be}
a substantial miscarriage. of
justice.

In dealing with such a matter,
the Court should take into account
the summing up of the ‘rial
Judge as a whole, and not just
selected passages of that summing
up.



As he saw it, the only duty of
the judge was to expound so much
of the law as was relevant to the
issues before the jury. If that was
done, the question as to whether)

he had put other points o1
portions of the law relating to
negligence could not affect his
direction to the jury.

Mr. Ward began to cite case
law on the matter, and was 59
engaged when the Court

adjourfted until today.



You're Through

FORT NELSON, Canada.
(By Mail)
Life and death are the main

subjects taught in ) unique class- | boiled i ‘
; th British | atter being described as the most

room in this northern
Columbia outpost.

The classroom, for two and a} north.

half days in a two-week course,

consists of well-heated quarters. | against eating snow in its natural

After that it expands to the bush-
land surrounding the area and
pupils, with just enough food to
keep them uncomfortably hungry
for that length of time, are on
their own,

It’s the Royal Canadian Air
Force’s “Survival School,” one of
the world’s toughest, designed to
train fliers how to get along on
their own in the northland if they
are forced down.

The school has graduated more
than 200 officers, and the Air
Force intends to put all service
aircrew through the course twice
—once during the summer and
again during the winter. To speed
up the job, it plans to operate a
second school from Cambridge

| Bay, 175 miles inside the Arctic
circle on the southern edge of Vic-
toria Island.

Graduates generally complete
the course with uniforms sagging
noticeably about the middle. One
lost 16 pounds.

“If you’re still alive at the end
of 11 days,” said one graduate,
“You know you've passed the
course.”

However, since the course began
about a year ago there have been
no casualties.

Instructors are R.C.A.F.
officers with years of Arctic
experience, aided by Indians. The
Air Force doesn't expect the two-
week course to work miracles, but
goes after two main objects; re-
moving frou: ihe minds of its
personnel the long-standing fear
of the Arctic and making fliers
able to look after themselves
should they be forced down,

Survival trcicing at the Forst
Nelson school is : ased on a manual
which contains a wealth of advice
to those who find shermseives afoot
in the northland, .' retic authorities
say hundreds o; northern ex-
|plorers died in the past because
| they tried to fight a knock-down
|battle with the noth instead







and means of living off the;

country. ,
One recipe is for a stew of
mice and lousewort, the



tasty food plant found in the

Another piece of advice warns



state. This will cause dehydration
of the body instead of relieving
thirst, it cautions, and it explains,
that snow must be thawed first
in the hand, and can be eaten
when melted to a slush.—(C.P.)



Formosa To
Double Sugar

Production

TAIPEI, Formosa, (By Mail).

Formosan sugar production may
be doubled under a 3,000,000 dol- |
lar contract signed between the
Formosa Sugar Corporation and!
Johnston International, of Los)
Angeles, California, for the dril- |
ling of 125 irrigation walls under I
President Truman’s Four Point
Co-operation

Progra e, ,
The onomic

Administration has arranged that |

Greece will buy 30,000 tons of the

increased production, with dollars

provided under the Marshall |

Plan.—B.U.P.



Railway Sleeper
To Paper Bag

YOU may one day carry home|
groceries in a paper bag made
from discarded railway sleepers |
if current research in the U.S.A
proves commercially practical .

Although bags and wrapping
paper made from’ railway sleepers
are weaker than those from new
wood, it is possible that, further
study will find a way to strenghten
them Sleepers used in test so;
far were 22-years-old.

Paper from grass is also being

of| tested by the Southern Research |

Institute, Birmingham, Alabama |





| i york fo. them. | j

imaking it work for Ins te, sha Nf

| The manual covers northern | Dr wae Murray, re

avigat the nsititute, says 1e funct

geography, eme rgency nav igation ; ins g Bae, :

for aranead parties, mosquitoes and | of 1 research organisation

fli i oi Be re f he body, | To take i ts front door wha
es, gener a } : qf By seth

building shelters, hunting, travei.; the farmer has SE ae x e |

" . ance ask a — ; ~ s some-

natives, care of direarms, food and} back door, and try to make som

‘clothing under Arctic conditions,’ thing useful from it

?
|| H. JASON JO

Schooner “Gita M.” arrived
with 150 drums of gasolene, con-
signed to Messrs. Da Costa & Co;

td.

Steamships “Craftsman” and
Philosopher” are consigned to
Messrs. Da Costa & Co, Ltd., the
“C. G. Thulin’s” agents are Messrs.
Robert Thom Ltd. and the
Schooner Owners’ Association are
agents of Schooner “Gita M.”

Beat With
Stick: Fined

Norris Boyce of Jordan’s Lane
was fined 15/- to be paid in 14
days or in default 14 days’ im-
prisonment by His Worship Mr.
A. J. H. Hanschell yesterday.

“

He was found guilty of having, Commissio

unlawfully

567 in 1948 and 653 in 1947.

!using the
1.925 private cars; 899 hire cars

j and 512 motor cycles,

in Registration Fees; $2,8
fees for examining

$152.00 for
licences.—‘C.N.S.)



Large Seale Cocoa
‘Banana Cultivation
Planned For B.G.

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 10
Back from a 6-month stay in
the United Kingdom, during
which he wad discussions at the
Colonial Office, Director of Agri-
culture Mr. H. H. Croucher dis-
closed in an interview yesterday
plans for implementing the Evans
nm recommendations for





assaulting and beat-| growing crops on a large scale in

ing Annie Connor, ,also of Jor-|the Bartica Triangle area.

dan’s Lane, on January 25 with
a>stick.

Fined For Unlawful

Possession



A fine of 15/- to be paid in
14 days or in default undergo
14 days’ imprisonment was im-

posed on Dudley Alleyne, a 20-
year-old lighterman of Nelson
Street, yesterday by His Worship
Mr. H. A. Talma.

He was found guilty of having
had in his unlawfully possession,
a quantity of split peas which he
Was conveying on Trafalgar
Square on February 13.

Off Dock

The 72-ton Schooner “Emeline”
came off dock yesterday after
Spending five days undergoing
repairs.

This vessel will begin to load
cargo in preparation for its next
trip to British Guiana.

Made Disturbance
Fined 10/-

Sylvin Jones of Horse Hill, St.
Joseph, was fined 10/- to be paid
in 14 days or in default 14 days’
imprisonment when she appeared
before His Worship Mr. H. A.
Talma yesterday for making a
disturbance on Swan Street:







Camp Fire To-night

A Scout meeting was held last
night in the St. Joseph Vestry
Room on top of the St. Joseph
Dispensary. and it was decided
to hold a camp-fire to-night
(Tuesday) at 8.00 o’clock on the
grounds of the St- Joseph Rectory.

All Scouts and Scouters are

| asked to attend,

EPHE

quickly relieves

COLDS and
CATARRH

It clears the nasal pas

sages to remove stuffiness

and the distressing con
ditions of head colds and

catarrh. The patent nasal

application bottie is infinitely better than sp

or dropper, and can be

handbag or pocket without fear of leak

Made by CLAY & ABRAHA

A skilled soil surveyor (Mr.
Charter) is due this month for a
preliminary survey of the area,
Mr. Croucher said, and arrange-
ments are being made to send an
agricultural officer to set up a
station there.

Bananas Too
While cocoa was the priority
agricultural project of the Evans
Report, he said the growing of
)bananas was also under consider-
jation and he had stopped at Ja-
;maica for discussions on the
} banana project. The problem of
the froghopper pest which has
been spreading here for the past
eight months was also discussed
and Mr, Fenner, Trinidad entomo-
Jogist will be here shortly.

On the question of additional
staff, Mr. Croucher said a veterin-
ary surgeon was due shortly and
he hoped that his department
would also secure the services of
an entomologist by June,

He added that it was difficult
to get agricultural specialists that
cannot be provided by the West
Indies since the specialist officers
prefer to take up appointments in
Africa where there are better con-
ditions of service.—(C.N.S.)



B.G. To Send
Dentist To England

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 10.

The British Guiana Dental As-
sociation has been invited ana
has decided to send a representa-
tive to the annual meeting of the
British Dental Association which
will be held at Birmingham, Eng-
land, from July 10 to 14.

The British Guiana delegate
will take the »pportunity at the
same time to deal with matters of
vital interest to the Association
with the Medical Advisers to the
Colonial Office and the Colonial
Development and Welfare Organi-
sation.—(C.N.S.) .... ....

DROL

TRADE MARK

-



ray
yin
age.

M LTD., Liverpool, England

carried convenien’

Established 1813

Obtainable from all Drug

Stores:

KNIGHTS LTD., AGENTS & DISTRIBUTORS,



_———



>

PIGEON

_———



ll,

CHOW



GOAT CHOW

two of Purinds best

and o

NES & Co. ,Litd.—tower Broad St

btainable from

[

$9,723.00 in Drivers’ Licences and
bus conductors’

12 trade vehicles; 105 vans; 570
motor lorries; 88 buses; 6 hearses

Last year’s revenue was made
up as follows: $136,659.13 from
motor vehicle licences; $1,613.00
18° in
vehicles;

,



seven new vehicles were put on
the road last year, compared =

t
present there are 4,117 vehicles
roads of the Colony—




|
S|

C.0.L. Talk
In Marcela

As recommenacg at the West
Indian Governors’ Conference
held in Barbados in November |
1949, there wil] be held in Barba-|
dos on March 17th a conference|
of senior responsible officials, the
purpose of which will be to re-
view in detail the effects of the
revaluation of sterling on the
public finances and general econ-
omy of the region, and to con-
sider and recommend to Govern-
ments, in the light of that re-
view, what Governmental action,
whether conjoint or individual, is
called for. The revaluation con-
ference will be official, but it will
take into full consideration the
views in so far as they are avail-
able. of representative unofficial
organisations.



Cleanse the system from blocd
impurities ; many sufferers froin
rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago,
neuritis, pimples, boils, sores and
minor skin ailments, can derive great
benefit from this well-known medicine.















Im LIQUID or TABLET FORM




BROAD ST.

HARRISONS
JONES’

SEWING MACHINES |

a (HAND MODEL)

Exceptionally easy to operate. They run smoothly and
make a perfect lock-stitech on all materials from the
finest silk to the heaviest drill

BUY A “JONES”

IT WILL GIVE YOU A LIFE-TIME OF TROUBLE-
FREE SERVICE

CASH PRICE—ONLY $69.15

HIRE PURCHASE TERMS ARRANGED







Y.M.C.A. WORK
PRAISED

Capt. G. H. Stokes, Captain of
H.M.S. ‘Devonshire’ paid an offi-
cial visit to the Y.M.C.A. yester-
day, accompanied by the Chap-
lain of the Ship Chaplain D. A,
Watson, and he commented on
the good work which they are
doing and especially for the many
kindnesses extended to his men
during their stay in Barbados.

Sugar In
The City

There is a strong smell of sugar
around the City’s bond houses as
the 1950 crop gets in full swing:
Grinding is going ahead quickly



SS
reer ecnee cement atesnenaseesoe


























a
for those factories which have

begun their reaping. All other ELECTRIC MOTORS
factories are expected to be with which a hand operated model can





grinding by the end of the month.

Once again the streets around
the market are agog with the
beat of Coopers’ hammers as
these workers make ready for
the molasses supply.

easily be converted into an Electrically
driven machine $46.56 each

HARRISONS *














rdware Dert.
Dial 2364

25 YEARS AGO

(BARBADOS ADVOCATE, FEB-
RUARY 14, 1925)











Intercolonial Cricket Tournament,
Trinidad vs. Demerara

The sixteenth series of the In-
tercolonial Cricket Cup Tourna-
ment was commenced on 7th
instant at Queen’s Park Oval
when Trinidad met Demerara in
the opening game. The weather
was fine and the wicket as per-
fect as it possibly could be for
matting purposes,

The attendance was fair at the
Start but towards the end the
number in the stands and
grounds swelled preceptibly and a
good crowd witnessea the strug-
gle for Ssurpremacy, Mr. V. C.
Dias lost the toss to Mr. G. Dew-
hurst and Trinidad elected to bat,
The home team occupied the
crease for three hours and 22
minutes and were all out at 3.37
p.m. for 167 runs. The rate of
scoring was particularly slow for
the first two hours, The batting
was unenterprising although it
must be stated that the bowling
was always at a good length
much





A BEASTIFUL
TAST—TO-CLEAW









CONGOLEUM
























Too

safety play was probably
the cause of the lack of enter-
prise displayed. Towards the

end the rate of scoring was much
faster and the crowd showed
their appreciation by hearty ap-
plause . The outstanding feature
of the innings was the fine bowl-
ing of Chabrol and the keen
fielding of the visitors, particu-
larly C. Nascimento who gave a
fine exhibition behind the wick-
ets. Fernandes, Estwick, McLean
and Dare also gaineci applause
during the game for their beauti-
ful ground work, while the catch
by I. Henry ‘which dismissed
Wiles, was of the snap of order.







Will customers please note
-ssstelneshesindigigpinestiantalnsllte teeta is ei

Owing to the anticipated arrival of a tourist ship, this
Store will be open to business all day

on SATURDAY 18th EEBRUARY

but will be closed for the weekly Half Holiday at

12 NOON ON THURSDAY, 16TH FEBRUARY







CAVE SHEPHERD « co. Lp.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

.





HOLIDAYING IN U. K.?

Deliveries can be arranged in the U.K. for one of these popular - - -

VAUXHALL CARS

WYVERN~12 hp. 4 cy. —- VELOX 18 hp. 6 cy.





Full details will be gladly given on application to - « « -

ROBERT. THOM LTD.

Whitepark, (COURTESY GARAGE) Dial 4616
















eee oe. —— ee eee
PAGE SIx THE BARBADCS

HENRY

—









MOUSE

SACKEY Bets Sali
(24 2H iLL BE NEVER MIND! LET'S GET
a FINISHED GOING!




POKAY, MICKEY...
WE CAN PGET OUT

RIGHT AWAY !







|



+= i| fe
| —/- Rae | mm ete, ani Te
| Lot) 17S ONLY YOU, DxSWOOD! \/SoMETIMES I THINK YOU ))
| 7 YOU GAVE ME ae BE 7) | |\OO THESE THINGS JUST
\ FRIGHT--T W oe La TO ANNOY ME
TET CONSIDERATE») | | * .
y | VV L AG

| YY

IF YOU WANT

TROUBLE, YOU'VE

COME TO THE
RIGHT PLACE!

Y
I'M LOOKING
FOR VARNEY



| I DON'T WANT A ROOM. I JUST WANT
TO KNOW WHERE VARNEY AND HALL
ARE STAYING!














THATS O (
- — iad
MIGHT bE Naan
VALUABLE. >
Y

| a RED 00m NOt KS =|
Ono ! jf ~S i \
|

Se



‘on wit

RIP KIRBY

“OR ASGALILTIN

— A CITIZEN ANO
/- REFUGIN’ TO TELL WHY
THIS COURT SENTENCES

BY ALEX RAYMOND

“Come ON | [ANOTHER INTERFERIN’ JOH, NO, SIR! I’m TCO YOUNG”
Back Here, 4 z 1 @UPPOSE /TO BE A TEACHER

|










KIO! GRABER, YOU'RE GOING TO BUT I DO KNOW BVBRYTHING
TELL ME YOU'RE A
TBACHER AND YOu
KNOW ALL ABCUT

THE PHANTOM

: a | HAD TO FIND \ SSS Diana panitne
Sie ee es anal STRAT guriow) SSSk._ 11S ALL OVER?
NCE TYDORES MARINES MOP UP \ | ONTHE \D0Ls 5S sot sa me

: THUG GEES ~~ — ernment “\<¢ _ S/2 TS |
SS he } Se oy



LK & RAY MOORES
THERE YOu ARES ) rk YDORE

V CANT BELIEVE

peas REALLY S
==) aia





ADVOCATE

———
net el ol A
CT

hg

BISCUITS



ARE |
| BRITAIN’S BEST













ag

Climbing Steadily 4
in popularity.
in circulation! Ff

And it’s no wonder, for the “Evening Advocate” carries "a .
features whicr appeal te all classes of readers.

First of all, it gives your Monday’s news on Monday, as
well as all the happenings of the week-end. When there
is a long week-end it comes out on the first day after the
holiday, hence it is eagerly snapped up by readers who have
gone without a paper for some days.

There is humour in it with the articles
Gubbins in his Sitting on the Fence feature,
Humour by Touchstone.

by Nathaniel
West Indian

Short Stories for the quiet afternoon or evening hour.

Sir Patrick Hastings Case Book is of such absorbing
interest that copies of the “Evening Advocate” are being filed
away for future reference to those rousing stories.

Become a regular subscriber to-day of the

EVENING ADVOCATE



The book that has set the world talking

ROMMEL

A swashbuckling general who insjyred many a story, some if







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in World War II was still at it’s height.

Ilollywood once tried to portray the character of this Ger-
man General on the screen but they missed badly,

Here, at last, is the truth behind one of the greatest dramas ail
ever to come out of the second World War. Sf

What he thought of his men and his Italian allies ! %
What he thought of his foes; the men of the Empire ! 4

How he was eventually murdered by Hitler’s Gestapo !

“a
“a





Beginning in the Sunday Advocate, Feb. 08

rr





-eseeeaaaseeenenserene

A eect eeeeneeteeeedneenenesnnsaranesmsenessesmasmeranaaeaeraaaeoeene


















] - )
China 8S Thin Red Veneer



.
a eae — | Ty ™~
FOR RE “| By Walter Fletcher, C. BL E.. M. P.
‘ LONDON (By Mail) i > itai
Ww. ae. ) ‘ in the case of Great Britain, or
| noses lea Bite FLETCHER, who head- non-recognition, as by the United
oe ae tenn $ wartime underground States, is in itself policy, but
f HELEN yt eal, Road. |] nent in China—the equiva- merely the means of implement-
: fe ch. ch Apply poe rl et. C. Hutchinson, | !€nt of America’s O.S.S.—declares ing policy,
| : ion. eae lye following articie that inter- A parallel case occurred in
: some ne make Chinese 1940 when America had an Am-
we KRISHAWA” — Fomubeliey” Look tuntsm “very vulnerable.” bassador at Vichy and Britain
“| Sean Apoly 7. Maraj. Hindu Store, 5 | Fletcher, now a member o , a %
Swan Street, 9.2.50—t.f.,. | liament received the ieenomsbieeneh ea eel ones
.2. of , Lec A e two nati F
~APAR ladies cieorton, Commander of the British Empire against the athena —
Poor Apartment, near town and Chuo for his wartime work, He outlines To talk v. ly ets i
(Mom et Me ig hldren) For further herewith a plan for utilizing ing Communion oe
1.2000 «1.5 10.2. ae Tek oe ~~ force” to wipe nothing and seanie aos eae
; ‘ : e thin red veneer c i insi :
US| Saas ae Ree ~ — over saaet ef Okt oa ws Communists to build inside lines
erator and Tinea ‘of ime wt Nedibane Vv m= to = Samiee territories and to
; 1, fn. nuniam i ina i ees
13.1.50—t.f.n. Communism in China is vulner- | sara mete a ae
Ser etiscification PURELM SAI ES te Oe cane “es aaah a sa:
ferent classifica ums The Common target of Britaih ism 4 ina i
reparate SS | and America in the Far East is to yuimersmmnsm in China is hes
én olsen Fe ain ta png hg vulnerable because its success has
“ 13 ¥ 15 certed policy to that end has thus je Bae ae mat for South and
i wes na, at any rate,
Flee |[UNDERTHE SILVER HAMMER |**,2ppeared. here eue real Security of tenure
oa ites Bh cleats > ie € best policy for Britain and
ao - 3 ommunist Governmen i i i
~ IN| MEMORIAM Furniture at Newtey ey Wil sell her eatin. ne tee i
a my of JACOB FRAN—| St; John, whieh ‘includes:— 7
n eparted. this life on 14th Unright, Rockers, “Geman! en GOVE N
ighit, , ani
ion tit ana arrow: | Sy Sie, Quumerand, Pant is en
is pre vom pain and care; Sideboard, Waggon, Rush Roche: _
= be with Jesus .. ard China, Plated Ware, Raspet Phone

to meet him there.



be remembered by
sis, (





, Gordon

for SALE

——————






good.
e 8174.
eee 12.2.50—3n.

’

Morris” Minor,

on One 1948 Mo
4 . Excellent condition
t let. Going cheap.
14, 2,59-—-3n,

nl (Wyvern) 12 H.P.

fe 0.
L

Wilhel-
, Wilhelmina oe
Henry anc
sons) others overseas.
( . 14.2.50—I1n.





$300.00, Standard 10 four
2) good and (3) new, new
Upholstery re-



800

OYAL GARAGE Ltd. Phone





4:

CULES CARRIER CYCLES—Also






















Trafalgar St« Dial 2696.
7.2.50—.f

EOUS

ot every description. Glass
Jewels, fine Silver,
early books, Map, Autographs

a

_ 1.9 49—s.w.n

KHAKI 72c. & 84c

Royal Store.





§ & and 96 cents.
3.2.50—141

8 & MEN’S SHOES



; 3.2.50—J4r



‘amd play. Royal Store Phone

ule & Retail. Royal Store.

AND CAR BATTERIES—15 &
t Auto Tyre Co. Trafalgar St
7.2.50—t.f.n

and
Dial
In

d Plymouth Rock
Rock 1/- each
14.2

HEL GIRDER 28/ x 12” x 5//,
OYAL GARAGE Ltd. Phone
14.2.50-—3n

50-

& FOUND

LOST

w-Reward offered for re-
of cut Steel Earring. Lost
Club and Crane. Phone
2.2,50—t.f.n











containing 35 m.m To
$10 Reward. For return
Cacrabank, Worthing

11.2.50—4n

E TICKET BOOK—Serjes
% 0629. Finder please return

Advtg, Dept. Reward offer-
14,2.50—Bn,

——————

DNAL









EL

are hereby warned against
to my wife Doreen Springer
qd) as I do not hold myself
Stor her or anyone contra
0 a2bts in my name unl
order signed by me.
SPRINGER,
Mt. All.
Andrew,
12.2.50—2n

WANTED





St.








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opie. Delightfully cool rooms
Water, minutes walk to
Special monthiy or weekly

Mrs, BENNETT
Woodside Gardens,
12.2,.50—t.f.n

id east minimum
| Good wages. Apply
â„¢. Room 306 Planta-
14,2,50—In,

CAD — BUTLER—An experi-
St a: Butler. Apply to

. field’, Pine Hi
aud § eg jeld', Pine Hill

“re











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HOUSEKEEPER —
» Apply by letter to
l, Proprietress, Sea

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accun
requi
12,2. 50—3n.

la-

— With
musical,
jon with meals
or Yacht

Ted. Write ‘P’ C/o
Depot

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gi Le t
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480 ca use Rheur

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and
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H Gents and Ladies Sports Auto

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VE BOYS SHIRTS for

3.2.50—14n
SPORT & DRESS SHIRTS
%.2.50—l4n






|



—— Elec. Hot Plate and Tron; Victrola,

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers

By Public Competiti t
Norse ip ion at our office

chattel Dwelling Houses and a Stone
building used as a shop» thereon, situate
at Pinfold Street adjoining the Y M C.A
heedquarters, Bridgetown. The larger
o* the Chattel Dwelling Houses contains
Open Verandah, drawing room, dining
reom, one bedroom, kitchen downstairs,
one lange bedroom upstairs. and three
breadfruit trees in the yard, Water
installed. Inspection on application to
the premises. For further particulars
apnly to Haynes & Griffith, Solicitors
Dated this 7th day of February 1950.
12.2.50—6n.
—

done 5,500 miles. Apply
oan. Phone 2978. | REAL ESTATE
GiB 0O—O8 | a eeeacinlipthmneaels
“BURNHAM” BISHOP'S COURT,
St. Michael, standing on 25,175 square
feet of land.
ais The house contains drawing and
pigs — Wire Hair ree Toe dining rooms with covered verandah
from aNly ge z C/o} 8nd usual offices, two bedrooms with
gticulars. Apply * 14.2.50—4n, running water, one with dressing room

attached, Toilet and Bath upstairs. Two

servants rooms with toilet and bath,

washroom and workshoy and garage
application

in the yard.
Mr.
Dial-3472.

Inspection on
H. B. Bannister.

The above will be set up to public
competition at the office of the under-
signed on Friday the 17th day of Feb-
rurary 1950 at 2 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY.
LUCAS STREET.
1.2.50—9n.

to



__

BUILDING SITE 29,216 square feet of
‘and. (adioining the residence of Mr
Teddy McKinstry) at Rockley New Road
Christ Church. Apply YEARWOOD &
BOYCE, Solicitors. 11,2.50—Tr

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS
AND WATER ENGINEER, GRENADA

Applications are invited for the post of Assistant Superintendent
of Public Works and Water Engineer in Grenada. Duties of the
office include designing, planning and construction of buildings of
all kinds, water works, land drainage, sewerage and other sanitation
schemes, briages of all kinds, streets and highways, jetties, piers,
harbours, etc., as well as ability to undertake Land and Engineering
Surveying. Salary on the scale $2,880—$96—$3,360 per annum with
temporary cost of living allowance $240 per annum and travelling
allowance $960 per annum at present rates. Commencing salary
higher than minimum of the scale may be paid according to qualifica-
tions and experience of candidate,

2. Appointment -vould be on probation for one year and candi-
date selected would be required to pass medical examination. Free
passages to Grenada on appointment for candidate selected, wife and
children up to five persons in all.

3. Applications should be sent to Administrator of Grenada not
later than 20th February.
11,2.50—2n,



OKRA CLOSE SEASON
ORDER

In pursuance of Section (4) 3 of the Cotton Diseases Prevention
Act, 1928 (1928-7), the Governor-in-Executive has fixed the period
from the Ist of May to the 30th of June, inclusive, to be a Close
Season for Okras.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this elventh day
of February, one thousand nine hundred and fifty.

By Command,
E. L. WALCOTT,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
NOTE, Attention is drawn to sub-section (6) of Section 4 of the

Cotton Diseases Prevention Act, 1928 (1928-7) whereby special

exemption from the provisions of sub-section (3) of Section 4

may be granted by the Director of Agriculture with the consent



ALL that three storied stone
dwelling house situate in St. Michaels
Row. Bridgetown, (adjoining the pre-
mises occupied by The Pornn Bay Rum
Company) standing on 4,512 square feet
of land. The dwelling house contains 2
hefrooms on the top floor, drawing and

wall

dining rooms and 3 bedrooms on the
second floor: kitehen and usual. out
offices and several other rooms on the
greund floor

Freellent site far business

For further particulars apply io the
undersigned,

The above will be*set un for sale by
Public Comnetition at our office in Lier
Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the 24th
Februairy 1950 at 2 p.m

CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors
14.2.50—10n

PURI NOTICKS













“205 easily earned by obtaining orders

for private Christmas Cards from
vour friends. No previous exnerience
necessary. Write today for beautiful free
Semple Book to Britain's largest and
foremost Publishers; highest commission,
marvellous money making opportunity.
Jones, Williams & Co., Dept. 10 Victoria
Works, Preston, England.”





NOTICE

The road leading from Melvin's Hill
to Spa Plantation is dangerous to Vehi-
cular Traffic. Any one using this road
will be dorg so at their own risk.

By order
Highway Commissioner,
St. Joseph Parish.
11.2.50—3n



NOVICE

PARISH OF ST. JOHN.
Attention is drawn to all owners of
dogs that they should be licensed during
the month of February, in accordance
with the Dog License Act.
R. S. FRASER.
Parochial Treasurer,
St. John.
11. 2.50—€n



NOTICE

DR. PAYNE — Dentist — begs to no-
tify the Head Teachers of the Elemen-
tary Schools of St. Philip, Christ Church,
St. George and St. Michael of his ill-
ness. The Maternity Hogpital included.

They are requested to send all re-
quiring Treatincnt to Dr. Alleyne, Bush
Hall St. Michael by order of the Chief
Medical Officer. 14.2,50—3n.
_—_—————————

THL sARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB

NOTICE TO MEMBERS

NOTICE is hereby given that the Ball-
room will be closed to Members on
TUESDAY, February 14th, from 8 p.m.
for an Entertainment by the Royal and
Merchant Navy Welfare League,.for the
Men of H.M.S, “DEVONSHIRE”.

By order of the Committee,

H. P. SPENCER,
Secretary
14, 2.50—1n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of JOHN D. TAYLOK
& Sons Ltd. holders of Liqour License
No. 520 of 1950 granted to them in re-
spect of a board and shingle shop a!
St. Davids Village, Ch. Ch. for per-
mission to use said Liqour License at
board and shingle shop at corner of
forde Gap, Sargeants Village, Ch. Ch
within Dist. ‘A’.

Dated this 13th day of February 1950

To:—B. A. McLEOD, Bq. |

Police Magistrate Dist. ‘A’ '
EVANS PHILLIPS
cass es a licant.

N.B.—-This application will
dered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District ‘A’, on Thurs-
day the 23rd day of February ,1950 at
11 o'clock, a.m.

BE. A. sn os
Police Magistrate, GS.



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

REMOVAL
The application of LILIAN GILKES
of Endeavour, St. James the holder of
Ligour License No. 453 of 1950 granted
in respect of a board and shingle shop
with shedroof attached situate at Orange
Hill St. James to remove said License
to a board and shingle shop with shed
roof attached situate at Orange Hill,
St. James and to use it at such last
described premises.
Dated this 10th day of February 1950
To:—S. H. NURSE, Esq

Bret day. cuin “i ’ te ie.
, Mabtens the Tas fore mouth | Police Magistrate Dist Sse areme

wmesan Must + on clac Avplgrdt.
t N.i*.—This application will be consi-
dered 2 Licensing Court to be held
the 26ih Februmty 1950 at 13 o'clock |
Police Court, District ‘EB’ Hoele-
S. H. NURSE i
Trench Mouth | Police Magistrate, Dist. “B’ eae |





of the Board of Agriculture.

COTTON CLOSE SEASON
ORDER

In pursuance of Section 4 subsections (1) and (2) of the Cotton
Diseases Prevention Act, 1928 (1928-7), the Governor-in-Executive
Committee has fixed the period from the 1st of May to the 30th of
June 1950, inclusive, to be a Close Season for Cotton.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this eleventh day
of February, one thousand nine hundred and fifty.

By Command, }
E. L. WALCOTT,
Clerk, Executive Committee.



CUT THIS OUT





PARCEL POST (RATES) REGULATIONS, 1950

The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the pow- /
ers conferred on him by section 30 of the Post Office Act 1911 makes
the following Regulations :

1. These Regulations may be cited as the Parcel Post (Rates)
Regulations, 1950. |

2. Postage shall be payable in respect of parcels conveyed from |
the Island to the United Kingdom and Colonies and Foreign States |
at the rates set out in the Schedule to these Regulations.

3. Heads 13 to 15 of the Post Office Regulations, 1912 so far as |
they relate to parcel post rates are hereby revoked.

4. These Regulations shall come into operation on the Ist day
of March, 1950.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this 7th day of |
January, one thousand nine hundred and fifty. |

By Command,
E. L. WALCOTT,
Clerk, Executive Committee. |
SCHEDULE
Table Of Rates Of Postage
Postage rate on parcels of

weight not exceeding
3 Ibs. 7 Ibs. 11 Ibs, 22 Ibs,

Countries Remarks





Dh. Ba. ea
United Kingdom 54 88 120 1 80
Other places. via
United Kingdom )
Add the following
amounts to postage
from United ° King-
dom to destination 24 48 66 96
British West Indies
Bermuda and Brit- - ea
is i 24 73 |
ae 386 72 120 1 80 (Maximum weight 20 Ibs.) |
British Honduras 48 84 108 1 80
Dutch West Indies
and Dutch Guiana 48 84 1 08 1 68
U.S.A. including |
Canal Zone, Puerto
Rico and Virgin Le -

or par |

ee FE aco ‘i (Maximum weight 22 ibs..)





ad {OPP PDPDODDOVSPPOOPPE SOY,
%

| % |
| “GOD'S WAY OF

| SALVATION

| .

|

4,

66064
/§PSSSSSSISSSSSS9TOGSSTSS

MADE PLAIN”

+
Free Book from S. Roberts,
30, Central Avenue, Bengor,

a

AUCTION SALE



1948 FORD PREFECT CAR N, Ireland.

at MacEnearny’s Garage
; 2.30 p.m. on Friday 17th

WE are instructed by the
Insurance Company to sell
the above vehicle which has
been damaged in an acci-
dent. Mileage only 11,000.
Car driven away under our
power after accident. Oppor-
tunity to acquire a modern,
repairable Car.

Cash on fall of Hammer.

AUCTIONEERS

DIXON & BLADON

POSSESS

Oates
—=

DEVELOPING and |
PRINTING

Send us your next ROLL OF
FILM, we*are sure that you !
will be more than Satisfied
with the Results,

COLLIN’S |)
PHOTOGRAPIC DEPT. |



COOOL,










;

}
)



THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE





|| Butter Shortage?





1S



the creution as an autonomous |
unit of the traditional Southwest
bloc in China—the Provinces of |
Kwangsi, Yunnan, Szechwan and /
part if not all of Kwantung. :

Northern and Southern China
jare tradit enemies, Mao |
Tze-Tung's Gover nment is suspect |
in South China as being just an- |
other successful War Lord in- |
vader from the North.

The advantage of a Southwest
bloc free from Comununist contre}
is that it would interpose itself
as a wedge between the Moscow
dominated Mao Government and
the other Far Eastern countries
to the south and west, not yet
Communized. |

Means other than force can be
employed and they always have
been the successful basis of
change in China.

Communism cannot use its two
main weapons in China—(1)
sealing the country off from the
outside world, and (2) terrorism,
— is by no means = in

na. ‘ ‘

It is really feasible in chine .
achieve a spectacular and posi«
tive victory by openly inflicting
for the first time a reverse on
Communism.

The thin red veneer placed over
most of China ty Mac has neither
popular support nor armed force
China—an area which has carried
out such movements before.

Such a policy would pay off in
a reduced prestige for Commun-
ism throughout the world, espe-
cially in the Far East,

It would be far more effective
than the so-called “containing”
policy, which really means sitting
and waiting for Communism to
consolidate without interference
and permitting it to attack and
penetrate wherever it likes.

“CHAMPION”

Fighting or Loving he was the Cham-











pion

You not afford to miss the best
fight picture to come to the screen
in ye




Tough and compelling, this one will
keep you on the edge of your chair

See Kirk DOUGLAS in Ring Lardner's
“CHAMPION” co-storring Marilyn MAX-















IN PORT: Sch. Mary E. Caroline, Sch “apt. Menage, from Antwerp; Agents:
Adalina, Sch. Mary M. Lewis. Sch. S P. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd. .
Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Lawille
Smith, Seh. Frances W. Smith, SS. C. G. Thulin, 1,317 tons net,

Emeline, Sch. Cyclorama, Sch

S.S. Philosopher,
from

Winstanley, Agents: Schooner Mary E, Caroline, 5 tons
Da Costa & Co., Ltd. net, Capt. Joseph, for Dominica; Agents:
SiS. Gascogne, 2.681 tons net, Cept. Schooner Owners’ Association.
Prigent, from Tyinidad; Agents: R. M. Schooner Zenith, 70 tons net, Capt.
Jones & Co,, Ltd, : Mulrain, for St Vincent; Agents:
. Schooner Owners’ Association.
s S. Craftsman, 4,000 tons net, Capt. ’
ig han ar Glasgow; Agents: DaCosta S83. C. W. Thulin, 1,317 tons net,
. , Cupt. Anderson, for Trinidad; Agents:
Schooner Gita M., 32 tons net, Capt. Robert Thom Ltd. sash
McLaren, from cd; Agents: S.S. Gascogne, 2,618 tons net,

Trinida
Schooner Owners’ Association.
Dutch M.V. Hersilia, 2,217 tons net,

Cable and Wireless (W.I.) Ltd advise
that they can now communicate with
the .following
bados

S$.S.Mormae Lark,

Prins Bernhard, Vinland, Mormae Gulf,
Orestes,

From Trinidad: Helen Proud. oot, Nev TRIN
: “Oot, Neville For TRINIDAD....
sue ieee Cyril Clarke = ” -
ubre: Ppin, Sy rt Davidson, Vernon Mr. Joseph Kellshall, Mstr Alan Year-
Pexander, Kenneth Wallack, Wilfred way, \ocePh Keushall, Mstr Ala :
Rodney, Aloysins Narearo, John Wilson, Kinieed, Saver Mao Peitnee, tite tent

scorge Cumberbatch,
Edith
French, William Martin,
Leon Maingot,
Berdan, Gladys Berdan,
terman, Roy Hessey,
don Pilgrim,
Heyes, Arthur Oldham,



In Carlisle Bay



Capt. Anderson, from St Oroix; Agents:
Robert Thom Ltd.

Schooner Lady Noeleen, 41 tons net,
Capt. Noel, for Dominica; Agents:
Schooner Owners’ Association.

ARRIVALS
4,972 tons net, Capt
Gren:

Capt.
Prigent, for Martinique, Agents:'R. M
Jones & Co., Ltd,

|
IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION

cada Cazador, Latirus, Steelore,
so Avil, Lriona, Constantis, Veragua,
Italia, Quirigua, Gascogne, razil, Bac-
haguero, Mosli, Irene, Argkaka, Repton.
orness, Petersburg, Teakwood, Helena,
AUartic Sun, Hidlejord, Siranda, America

ships through their Bar-
Station;—

Vinni, Metula,

Regnhildbrovig,

Swencesiao,
Quilmes, Empire Martaban. ii

Nuevaesnarta, Abu,

Neaera,



ARRIVALS By B.W.I.A.U DEPARTURES by B.W.1.A.L,

Kinkeed, Mrs, Kate Feldman, Miss Ruth
Feldman, Mr
Jeremiah, Dr
David

Ernest French.
French, John
Shelia Collvie

Dorethy Maingot, George

Cuthbert Marshall, M:
Gardon Cummins, Master
Miss
Brooks,
Hon. HH.
Mrs H,

French, Denise



Broc
aster Michael
Beale,
M.L.C.,

Medforu
Norman
O.B.E.,
Andrew

Daisy
Mr.

Cuke,

Mr





Christopher Mas-
Hugh Smar;
Robert Siegert,

A.

Gor- Cuke,

Ronald 4

Miss Jeanette Lewis, Mr







William B. m, > “ice St. Hil
ds Arthur KENNEDY with “Feull Apass Betton, Maru aedeen, Colin G. 2. ls Pils Miss Frenk Schuler
STEWART, Ruth ROMAN, Lola AL-| Bynoe : eencniaeh ta
F HT . —

e ry > Prem TRINIDA For GRENADA...,
Showing at ROXY THEATRE from a ” Miss Millicent Mayor, Miss Gertrude
rida) 10.2.50—-4n INTRANSIT TO KINGSTON Clynne, Miss Maria Clynne, Mr, Geof-
| leer Bain, Dy. Aage Thaysen, Rolph {°Y Semple, Mit. Adella Philip, Ne
Grant, Arthur Cooke, John Flemming Jemes Scot, Mrs. Marjorie Scott, My
TRINIDAD BONDS Monica Patchett, Una Mitchell * Rupert Crowe, Mr, Walter Hinkson,
From St. KITTS... For La GUAIRA
$2 9Fn <« « ‘a "7 3) Mr lalchand Ramchai!pni Mrs
$3,360 3% due 1973/88 @ 97% c ul Miss « . as .
oo i Kalawa . ‘ N OW aan iss “ilda Figuero, Mrs. Carmen Fig
$864 3% : 1955/59 @ 973% | cone Ramchandani, Mr. Everard veer
$9,600 3% ,, 1974/84 @ 98 | Mtrived by T.C.A, from BERMUDA
34 @ 7 From St. LUGIA,.... on 1th
£1,000 4% ” 1963/73 @ 107 z Mr. John Dunlop, Mr. Donald Leach,
Net, plus accrued interest; pay- Doreen Rodrigues, Bessie Waplington, Mr. Lionel Pile, Mr. Fred Burrows
ment and delivery in Trinidad.| Patricia Tucker, Col. Reginald Michelin, | 23 Passengers arriving from MON-
Sir Allan Collymore, Cecil Furness-Smith, TREAL on Ith.
D SHARES Sir Newnham Worley.
TRINID From GRENADA. Mr. Gordon Crawford, Mr. Edmund
Cleary, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Davey, Mr.
Als s Limited Ordinar, Clement Malone, Harry Pantin, Noei and Mrs. Desmond Fitzgerald, Dr. and
300 Alstons Lir . ) $6 15 Lambert, Audrey Lambert Mes, Elgin Hargreaves, Mr. and Mrs
, ¢ rf Milton Hastings, Mr. and Mrs, Donald
300 Angostura Bitters Ord’y From La GUAIRA, Maclachlan, Mr, Walter Owens, Mr.
@ $21.00 James Emberton, Barbara Emberton. Leonard Smith, Miss Marjorie Waters,
1 . . » « Carmen’ Michelena, A. C. M. Martin, Mrs. Vilda Woodroff, Mr, and Mrs.
Net, local funds, plus stamp Alfredo Martin, Arturo Ripanti, Lucia William Wyatt, Mr. and Mrs, Leward
duty. Fiorez, Maurice Jones, Alvin Stryker. Wykoff, Mr and Mrs. William Pogue
William Muigreve. Mr and Mra Alexander MeDonalé

AUSTRALIA BONDS

Highest premium paid for 3%%
and 5% Dollar Bonds.

BARBADOS SHARES

A new list issued Tuesday, free on
application to:

A. M. WEBB

Diai 3188 Hours 9—3

155 Roebuck St.
(Over Peoples Pharmacy)
14.2.50—5n



Fly to the
Carnival

Trinidad

(REBRUARY 8th—21st



|

BRITISH |
WEST INDIAN
AIRWAYS

BRITISH WEST INDIES AIRWAYS LTD,
(Registered in Trinidad)
Lower Broad Street, Bridgetown, B'dos.
Phones 4585 & 2789



A Bow More puta



of the (
POPULAR
1 |
Cannon Gas Hotplates ff
> BOILING BURNERS
%—> 1 GRILL BURNER & PAN

%->» GREEN ENAMEL

why call and see them
howroom, Bay Street

FINISH

not









Our CITY PHARMACY
Branch will close on
Thursday 16th inst. and
open on Saturday 18th.

KNIGHTS LTD.





WE CAN SUPPLY
PEANUT BUTTER at

72¢ per botile

°

Stuart & Sampson

LTD.

Headquarters for Sest RUM













a






















|
SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA NEW





ZEALAND LINE LIMITED
(MLA.N.Z.) LINE)

The M.V. “Caribbee” wil! ac- M.S. “PORT PIRIE” is scheduled to
cept Cargo and Passenger for sail from Sydney January 4th —
St. Kitts-Nevis, Antigua, Mont- arriving at Trinidad about February
serrat, Dominica ‘th,

|] M.S.“KAIPAKI” is scheduled to. sail
The M.V. “Daerwood"- will

from Port Pirie January 7th, Burnie
January 10th, Beauty Point January
/3th, Melbourne January 26th, Sydney

accept Cargo and Passengers so:
St. Luria, St. Vincent, Grenada,



Aruba. Date of sailing will be February 1st, Brisbane February 10th
given. ?rriving at Trinidad about 10th March
These vessels have ample space for
Chilled, Hard Frozen and General Cargo |
Case accepted Through meal of} |
‘a OWNEP: ~ading with transhipment at inidad | |
B.W ‘sia loeaanon ane _ for Pritish Guiana, Barbados, Windwara | |
and Leeward Islands. |
Tel. 4047. for further particulars apply:—

FURNESS WITHY & Co., LTD,
Agents: Trinidad.
DA COSTA & Co. LTD.,
Agents: Barbados.



PAGE SEVEN —

es ee,



































Pan American's warid
wide System offers you thé
greatest choice of rovtes to
Rome, enabling you to éfop
over and visit many interest
ing places and shrines en
route. And, over many of
PAA's routes, special low |
fares are now in effect!

Aboard PAA’s lates
motor Clippers® --



including
the luxurious new double
decked Clipper
New York and London -- you

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are assured of the finest ser. |
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vice available anywhere
the utmost in comfort, speed,
dependability ...delicious |||
meals served aloft...attentive, |
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To make your Holy Yee
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by PAA -- the best way in 11]
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Make your plans now...conswit your |

travel agent or ask your PAA ticket

office for copy of new, interesting
Noly Year foider.



Hbcon ee





CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND ai i ie
N f ails
rr oe Halifax Barbados —
8 8. “ALCOA PEGASUS” February 6th February 17th
S8.S. “ALCOA POLARIS” February 20th March 3rd
Sailing every two weeks,
NEW YORK SERVICE
Sails Arrives
New York Barbados
8.5.“ SF ye February 24th. March Oth
3 J. Ayia February 3rd. February lith.
NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
Sails Arrives
New Orleans wis manpnist
8.§ * SO/ Rk" January 25ty. “ebruary ne
s/s. WALEOA RUNNER” February 8th February 20th.
Apply: DACOSTA & CO,., LTD —Canadian Service,
ROBERT THOM LUTD.—New York and Gulf Service,



STENCIL SETS

Complete Large & Small

ROBERTS & CO. Dia! 3301.



BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LTD.






Agta
Da COSTA & Co., Ltd.
Phone 2122 Office a
Phone 2303 after hours ("> \
Broad Street. |

cz

BACKACHE
OF HEADACHE

oe

TAD Ol) 3 BL

Fi

NEWS FLASH!




JUST OPENED

STRIPED
JERSEY

In all the loveliest shades
such as Blue, Grey, Pink,
Gold, Lime Green ete.

54” wide: $1.56 a Yd.

(Remember you need
very little for the dress

bag at

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466.

Society Store 53 Swan St.
Bombay House, Lucas St. .
Bombay Store, Speightstowr
Gandhi Store, 42 Swan St














PAGE EIGHT





———

Pairaudeau, Persaud,
L. Wight Give Good Displays

Pairaudeau 17 and Gibbs 14
resumed for British Guiana with

thé score at 31 without loss. Clyde

Walcott opened the attack from
the Pavilion End to Pairaudeau
who glanced the fourth to the leg
boundary and cut the next to the
boundary.

King bowled from the screen
end and with his fifth delivery
had Gibbs l.b.w. without adding
anything to his overweek score.
His contribution of 14 included
two boundaries.

Ganesh Persaud joined Pairau-
deau and played the last bail.
Walcott’s next over yielded a
single, a cover drive by Pairau-

deau, while King’s yielded five
including a cover drive to the
boundary by Pairaudeau.
Pairaudeau turned one from
Walcott neatly to fine leg for

three, the only runs of the over,
King’s next over was a maiden.
Persaud took a single from
Walcott to long off and laie
Pairaudeau took a single to extra
cover to send up 50 in 54 minutes.
C. B. Williams replaced Kin;
the Screen End and Pairaudcau
made a single off the over
Walcott continued to. Pairau-
deau who played the fourth ball
to leg for 4 and on drove
last for another. The bats
made 3

runs off Williams’ n



in line

L, WIGHT



over and Luc: then repla
Walcott at the Pavilion Ex

the score t 62 he ove!

two. Persaud cover dr

liams for a single, Pairaudeau
drove for a similar amount
later Persaud pulled to sq

leg for another single

Pairaudeau Out

In Lucas’ next over Persa
took an easy single to square
but with the fourth delivery
Pairaudeau in attempting to pu!
an off turn to the on side mis

His

boundaries

and was bowled
48 including 7
for 72 minutes.

The total was now 71 and Chris-
tiani the incoming batsman v
quickly off the mark with a since
to square leg.

Williams’ next
Persaud pulled
received from Lucas to
for a couple
stroke from
getting a similar

innings ol!
lasted

over yielat
the econd
square le
repeated thc
next delivery

amount

ana
the

Christiani cover
for a single
drove for ¢

Williar
and later Persaud on
couple and then cov
drove for a single. Persaud edged
one from Lucas to the slip for a
single and Christiani took another
to extra cover. Williams’ next
over yielded single, a
drive by Christiani Ludas sent
down a maiden, his first.for the
day to Christiani

PerSaud collected two bounda-
ries, off Williams, a cut past point
and an on-drive. He then took
a single to mid-on and Christiani
cover drove to the boundary to
send up 100 in 91 minutes

Goddard Bowls

With the score at 105 Goddard
took over from Williams at tie
Screen End and sent down a
maiden to Persaud. Christiani
pulled the fourth, a short one
from Lucas to the on boundary
and then played out the remain-
der.

Persaud got a boundary through
the slips off the first from God-
dard’s next over and then played
out the remainder. Christiani on
drove one from Lucas to the
boundary and later off drove
for a single

Goddard’s next over yielded a
single a drive to extra cover by
Christiani. Lucas continued from
the Pavilion End. He bowled to
Christiani who off drove to the
boundary and then took a single
to mid-on,

drove

cover

The ‘ll Do It Every Time



Christiani took a single to cover
off Coddard and Persaud cut. wide
df gully to the boundary. The total
was now 129, Christiani 29 and
Persaud 34.

Roy Marshal] at this stage re-
placed Lucas from the Pavilion
End and his over yielded a couple,
each batsman collecting a single.

Goddard bowled a maiden to
Persaud and Marshall sent down
one to Christiani.

In Goddard’s next over which
was the last before lunch, Persaud
pulled the fourth to the on-boun-
dary. The score then read 139 for
two Christiani was 30, Persaud
39 and extras 8.

After Lunch

When play resumed Roy Mar-
shall bowled from the Pavilion
end and 7 runs were scored
Christiani sending one of the de-
liveries to the fine leg boundary
and adding two singles. Eric At-
kinson came on from the Screen
End and Christiani on drove the
tnird delivery nicely for 2. He
repeated the stroke off this
bowler’s next over for four. Mar-
shall continued from the other
end, the batsmen were now get-
ting well over the ball and scor-

ing somewhat freely. The 150
went up in 130 minutes. C. B. Wil-
liams who had sent down sx
overs before lunch from the

Screen End at a cost of 27 rus
was again given charge of the
leather at the same end with the
score at 164 Persaud made. a
single off the over and square cut
the fourth delivery of Marshali’s
next over beautifully for a single
to reach his 50 in 99 minutes. Ee
had now hit 6 fours. Soon after
in William’s next over Christiani
glanced the last ball to leg to

make his 50 in 73 minutes. His

score also included 6 fours.
Lucas relieved Marshall and

the over yielded 9 runs, Christi-

ani on-driving powerfully the
second delivery for 4 and Persaud
hooking the fourth for 4 after his
partner had added a single. Chris-

i lost his wicket in Lucas’ next
over, when in hitting out he miss-
ed bz ind was stumped by
wicket keeper Wood He had
cored 57 runs in good style and

t the wicket for 82 minutes

the 1



ing which he hit yurs. The
nership had yielded 120 runs.
Wight came out and opened
account with a four off the
first ball of C. B. Williams’ next
( The 200 was soon hoisted

had taken 161 minutes

re

King Bowls
King bowled the new ball from
the Sereen End to Wight who

ngled the last delivery.

Skipper Goddard made a dou-
ble change bringing on Walcott
from the Pavilion End to send
down a maiden to Wight

In King’s next over Persaud
glided the third ball nicely to leg
for 4 and singled the next. This
batsman was giving a fine dis-
play cutting, driving and gliding
gracefully. The end came how-
ever, when in Walcott’s next over
ae played a yoker the ball rising
and going into the safe hands of

Weekes ai short square leg He
had scored 76 runs including 10
fours and was at the wicket for
138 minutes. The score board
now read 210—4—76,

Camacho was the next men in

and after making four runs played
forward to a ball from King on
the leg side to give Lucas at silly
nid-on the easiest of catches.
The score was now 219 and
MeWatt partnered Wight. McWatt
delighted the crowd with some
fine hooks to the leg boundary.
Lucas and Atkinson were again
given a spell and Wight should
have been out when he returned
hard to Lucas waist high. Lucas
got his hand to the ball but could
hold it Wight was then 21
The 250 went up in 216 minutes
but when the score reached 255
C. B. Williams came on from the
Screen End and with his third
delivery, a leg turn, got Mc Watt
to miss as he swung at the ball
He was struck on the leg stump |
and was given out |l.b.w. His score
of 25 included 4 fours. He had
been at the wicket 37 minutes.

not

6 Wickets Down |

British Guiana had now lost 6

wickets and Rollox partnered
Wight. These remained until the
tea interval was taken having

taken the score to 270 runs, Wight
had contributed 34, Rollox 2 and
there were 10 extras.

C. B. Williams bowled the first
over after tea from the sereen end
to Wight. The batsman cover
drove the third but Goddard
fielded brilliantly. Wight however
took a single off the last. Facing
King from the pavilion end Wight
on drove the first and got four



THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE



British Guiana Beaten

SE Bae! = eres 2

»



G. PERSAUD

Roy Marshall replaced. King from
the pavilion end. He bowled to
Rollox who turned the first to fine
leg for three and later Wight
edged through the slips to the
boundary.

Wight cover drove one from
Williams for a single and later
Rollox returned a hard low one to
this bowler who made no mistake.
His contribution was 7.

Seven wickets were now down
for 288 and Norman Wight joined
his brother who was then 45, Roy
Marshall bowled to Leslie Wight
who lifted him to the on boundary.



B. PAIRAUDEAU

Norman Wight turned one from
Williams to fine leg for a coupie,
but was missed off the next when
Goddard at silly mid-off failed to
him in a good effort.

slie Wight lifted Marshall
overhead to the off boundary to
get his 50 in 107 minutes. He later
repeated the stroke for another
boundary to send up 300 after 283
minutes’ play.

Having a Go

The batsmen were now having
a go, and in attempting a single
off Williams after lifting the ball
to extra cover, Leslie Wight was
run out by Roy Marshall for 57
including eleven boundaries. His
innings lasted 112 minutes. Gaskin
filled the breach.

Marshall’ next over yielded
seven including a six by Norman
Wight the only one of the game





which struck the top of the
Kensington stand.
Gaskin after scoring a_ single

was bowled by Williams and Trim
the last man in cut the second
one he received from Williams
hard to Roy Marshall at point and
he brought off a low catch to bring
the innings to a close at 4.35 p.m.,
giving Barbados victory by en
innings and 110 runs. Norman
Wight carried his bat for 14 in-
cluding two boundaries

C, B. Williams, Barbados slow
leg break googly bowler carrie {
off the bowling honours with 4

for 66 in 20.4 overs; 2 of which
were maidens, while Frank King

got 2 for 39 in 12 overs, Lucas 2

The Weather

TODAY

Sun Rises: 6.20 a.m,

Sun Sets: 6.08 p.m.

Moon (New) February 16.

Lighting: 6.30 p.m.

High Water: 3.01 a.m., 2.01
p.m.
YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington) nil.

Total for month to yester-
day: .63 in.

Temperature (Max.) 83,5° F.

Yemperature (Min,) 70.0° F.

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.

(3 p.m.) E.

Wind Velocity: 11 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29,946'



(all run)’ He then played out the
remainder.

William's next over yielded two
singles. With the score at 276,









e.

HE DOESN'T DO ANY 3

(3 p.m.) 29,889.





By Jimmy Hatlo

Uff AND WHEN THEY












FOR ME? TELL ‘EM WORK HERE HE UUST Y DO CATCH HIM,
I’M NOT HERE ss NO GyPSUMS GOTA \Y USES THE UOINT AS JA HE TAPS US TO
FIND OUT WHO IT IS \ / culty CONSCIENCE. A HIDEAWAY" 777 Donec









TELL’EM YOURE NOT
SURE IF I LEFT YET»
GET THE AUMBER:s_
TELLEM ITLL A
CALL BACK’:

NT

4

AA

TENN

HE THINKS EVERY-
BODY WHO PHONES





\S A PROCESS





i Shy i 7
: Listenine To THE
OFFICE "GARNISHEE |
| 6US’ PLAY IT SAFE
J | THANX TO "CO-SIGNER’

INDIANAPOLIS, IND.

. Drayton

PARBADOS
BRITISH GUIANA

B. Patraudeau b J.

J. Trime R

for 66 and C. L. Walcott 1 for 52





| | CHILDREN

f
| WEIGHT

S. A. Seoi
275 For 7

AGAINST AUSTRALIA

JOHANNESBURG, Feb. 13.
Seuth Africa, with three wickets
in hand, need 41 runs to save the
foliow on egainst Australia in the
fcurth cricket Test here.
Enterprising batting by George
Fullerton, Hugh Tayfie'd and
Norman Mann enbled therm to
recover from 148 for six wickets
to 275 for 7 in reply to Australia’s
first innings total of 465. The
mateh ends tomorrow.
Fullerton defended for two and
a half hours, and remained un-
veaten with 45. He and Tayfield,
who hooked freely and drove
vigcerously, added 65 in 68 minutes
for the seventh wicket, and then
Fullerton and. Mann put on 62
in 73 minutes for an unfinished
eighth wicket stand. Both Fuller-
ton and Tayfield offered chances
when Saggers failed to stump them
off Ian Johnson’s bowling.
Earlier, South Africa had to
struggle for runs against a good
all-round attack after losing 3
wickets for 19 runs. In 105 min-
utes before lunch, they added
only 38 runs and lost four wickets.
Lindwall had a spell of two
wickets (Eric Rowan and Nourse)
for eleven runs, and later Miller
dismissed Denis Beggie, and Paul
Winslow, a new “cap”, in two
overs at a cost of only one run.
—Reuter.

Football This
Evening

A Football match will be play-
eH at the Garrison this evening
Between H.M.S. Devonshire and
an Island XI

The Island team ig as follows:—
Goal; King (Carlton) Backs:
Medford (Spartan) Chase (Army)
Halves: Haynes (Everton) Cad-
ogan (Spartan) Ishmael (Spar-
tan) Capt. Forwards: Chase
(Spartan) Johnson (Spartan)
(Empire) Lueas (Carl-
ton) Hutchinson (Carlton).

Players will wear white shirts,
and kick off is at 4.45 o’clock

“I want to send a food
parcel to England!”

London Express Service



Following are the seores:—

Ist INNINGS 686
ist INNINGS 257
BRITISH GUIANA tnd INNINGS
Lucas . 48



G Gibbs lbw King 1.
G. Persaud ¢ Weekes b Walcott 16
hk. Christiani stpd. (Wkpr) b Lucas 57
C. Camacho ¢ Lueas b King 4
J Wight run out ‘ 57
C. A. MeWatt lbw Williams 25
A. B. Rollox ¢ & b+ Williams 7
N. Wight not out 14
&. McG. Gaskin b Williams 1

Marshall b Williams 0
» 11 Lbs, 1 n.b 16

Fall of wieckets:—1—39, 2—71 191
4--210, 5—219, 6—255, 7—288, 8—308
9—319

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R w
F King 12 3 39 2

E. Atkinson . 3 1 20 0
C. Walcott , 12 1 52 1
Cc. B. Williams 20.4 2 66 4
J. H. Lucas 18 2 66 2
J. D. Godda 6 2 4 0
R. Marshall ll 1 46 0



By Innings

Experts Help

experts were helping India with



|
|
|

a ey
















India

TOKYO, Feb. 13.
Japan’s Trade Minister, Heitaro
Inagaki, told the Diet (Parlia-
ment) here today that Japanese
her five - year industrialisation

lan. :
. An Indian ee ae ares
with Japanese manufacturers an
technicians to find what heavy
machinery Japan could provide
for the plan and what machinery.
Japan could help India to buila
for herself. Head of the Indian
Mission, Mulherkar, told Reuter
of a plan for Japanese capital—
in the shape of heavy plant and
technical advice—to buy up to 49
per cent. of the shares in Indian
enterprises.—Reuter. :

U.S. And Russia
Could Destroy
Each Other

BALTIMORE, Feb. 13.

Some radio - active substance:
from the hydrogen bomb will las
“hundreds of thousands of years”,
making bombed cities uninhabi-
table, Mr. William I. Laurence
New York science writer, said in
a lecture here.

He said the bomb, “a physical
menstrosity”, was several million
times more powerful than an
acom bomb. The United States and
Russia could annihilate each other
in H-bomb warfare, he warned
his audience. '

“The sun is actually an enor- |
raeus hydrogen bomb,” he said, |
“and we will create on earth ‘a
miniature replica of the sun.”

Jap Silk
Come-Baeck

JAPAN, (By Mail).
Japan’s silk industry, badly hit
y world nylon development, is
making a come-back.

Masumi Hanaoka, director of the
‘atakura Industry Company, says
that silk production in Japan has
increased from 7,000 to 150,000







yy



Analysis,

Generally
Editorials, $3.10 a.m. Programme Par: de
: Souvenirs of Music, 9 a.m
Close Dewn, 12 (noon) The News, 12.10
p.m.
12.30 p.m. Tip Top

1.15 p.m.
John Buil's

Accordeon Interlude,
Tunes, i ;
ewsrel,
eased 2p m. The News, 2.10 p.m. Hcme
News from
R _30 p.m. Ring up the Curtein,
Seaetrt : > of Hearts, 4 pm. “he
News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily Service, 18
Tom Jones Trio, 5 p.m. Inc’
p.m. The Riddle of the Sands, 4.45 p.m
Parade, 5.30 p.m. Generall
by Carl Nielsen, 5.15 p.m. reomnercns
a
Organ, 6 p.m. British Concert
Hall, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m .
Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Westward Ho! 7.45
Letter from London; 8 p.m, Redio
8.15 p.m, Souvenirs of Music,
9 p.m. The News, 9.10 Oe Soa pfs ati
, 9.15 p.m. Political Spe cs
from Britain Pp oa Esc
The

Newsreel,

ere Sota 10 pem
Midland Light i ° i
les, 10.15 p.m. Light Music, 1€ 30
San Pavil Players, 10.45 p.m. Rer ort

m. Pavilion
Britain, 11 p.m. The News

Barbados Aquatic

H.MS.






bales in the past four years, and
exports, stopped during the war,

The cocoon industry is trying
to restore to mulberry fields, 250,-
000 acres shifted to food crops
during the war.

Experts have succeeded in se-
lecting a species of silk-worm,
producing a filament comparable
n tensile strength with nylon and
giving more raw silk from one
cocoon,

ARE
“NERVES” A SIGN
YOU'RE GROWING

OLD?

Often as a woman approaches
middle life, her nerves get bad, and
she accepts this as a sign of age.
But why let yourself becume edgy,
run-down—or so nervous you cry
without cause—at any time in life?

For nearly fifty years wise
women have been meeting this
situation happily — by getting
ame of rest, fresh air, wholesome
ood and by taking Dr. Chase’s
Nerve Food to build them up, For
the Vitamin Bi, iron and other
needed minerals in this time-tested
tonic help build up your vitality
and aid in toning up the entire
system—so you can face the future
with confidence.

Give Dr, Chase’s Nerve Food a
chance to help banish nervous
fears and doubts. It helps you rest
better, and feel better. The name
“Dr. Case” is vour assurance. 10







a)

ARRIVALS

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B.B.C. Radio

Programme
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY I4, 1950
7 a.m. The News, 7.10 a.m. News;
7.15 am. BBC Northern
Ireand Light Orchestra, 7.45 a.m
Speaking, & a. From \he

News Analysis, 12.15

1 p.m. On the job,
30 p.m

Britain, 2.15 p.m

Sandy MacPherson

(Con)

Club

(Members Only)

Wednesday, February 15th

WATER POLO
5 p.m.

“DEVONSHIRE”
vs.

LOCAL TEAM

COCKTAIL DANCE
6 — 9 p.m.

Music by Sydney Niles and

his Orchestra

Free Admission to Ballroom
14.2.50.—2n.



»

» CARNIVAL
DANCE

SELECTION OF CARNIVAL

QUEEN

Prizes for:—
MOST ORIGINAL (Ladies)

(Gents)

PRETTIEST COSTUMES

(Ladies)

PRETTIEST COSTUMES

(Gents)

MOST ORIGINAL BAND
PRETTIEST BAND Etc. Etc.

Saturday, 18th Feb.
~ 9 p.m.
* ADMISSION — $1.00
Ya Music—
% C. B. Browne’s Orchestra.
‘

OSS SO FOES

SESS SPS DTEE

Intercolonial Amateur

BOXING

TRINIDAD vs. BARBADOS

at

MODERN HIGH SCHOOL

STADIUM

on

TUESDAY 1l4th &

WEDNESDAY, 15th FEB.

at 8.30 p.m,

Under the distinguished

Patronage of

HIS EXCELLENCY THE

GOVERNOR

5 Thrilling Bouts Each Night

e

PROGRAMME
Tuesday, 14th Feb. :
Keith Walters (Kid Sun-
shine vs. “Togo” Moore
(Sand-Fly Class).

Lisle Bagott (B’dos) vs.
Roy Singh Alexander
(T’dad) (Fly-Weight)

3. “Boy” Perkins (B’dos) v.

Kenneth Wallace (T’dad)
(Welter-weight)

Arthur Streetly (Lodge
School) v. Whitfield Ifill
(M.H.S.)

. Sam King (B’dos) v. Syl-

bert Davidson (T’dad)
(Light-weight)
Wednesday, 15th Feb. :

. Victor Lovell (B’dos) v.

Hollis Wilson

(T’dad)
(Bantam)

. Tony Foster v. Neville

Skeete (Welter-weight)

. Tony Barker y. Denzil

Vaughn (Light-weight)

. Gilbert Goodman (B’dos)

v. Aloysius Marcano (T.)
(Feather-weight)

. George Best, 184 Ibs. (B.)

v. Wilfred Rodney, 196
lbs. (T.)

Naval Personnel in Uniform
Half-Price. Seats booked at
Ralph
Alley. Phone 4683 or 8402.
Louis Lynch, Modern High
School, Roebuck St. Phone
2846.

Beard’s, Hardware

Refreshments & Bar avail-

able

Ring Side $1.50;

Ring Circle $1.00; Bleach-
ers 60c

300k Early

Guaranteed Electric Light-

Arrangements by the *
Courtesy of ESSO Servicen-

:

POSS O80 ee ee ‘







Sports

idental Music
y_ Speaking,

News




































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PAGE 1

PACE nr.HT THr B\RB ADOS ADVOC \TI •^m^f British Guiana Beaten By Innings Pairaudeau, Persaud. L. Wight Give Gw.nl Displays %  res u m ed %  <* gully to the b->un< Walcoii opened Ihe attack tarn. W now 129. C hri —I— I ilion End to Pairaudeau Persaud 34 who glanced trr fourth to the la Roc M ra o*H al Uui stasje rebound:irv a-. %  'he Pavilion bourni eouplc. I bowled from the wcrttn each batsman collecting a single end and with hi* Mill delivery Goddard bowled a maiden '.%  ,:bb* !hw without addHs Persaud and Marshall sent dovn one to His contribution o( 14 includ-d In Goddard's next ovei which two boundaries. w * the lat before wnch, I pulled the fourth u> UM on-bounGanesh Per^aiid joined Pain idary The wnre then road 139 lor deau and played the last bad. two Christian! WBI IWM over yielded m (to— Dwwn. It >•**> !" * **•**• u l0 um N*wi Aasdssss, llS_l>m. -orortfon bviiuda. 11 X p Turai. 1 9 m On *t Jo** %  > P (.t.o Se-g.1 1 JO t> m Mn BUl 2am., a p m The Maw., llflpm ttr m. .£•*, non. Britain. S •! p Srvte*. S p m Rlnc up %  !" rn Qur* ss * N.wt 4 10 p.m. Tha Daily Bwvk*. Tom Joe** Ttto. P m tncldarl.il MnWc p ro The lafcMla o< tha * %  ... P m Farad*S JO p m Garter*! IV Ipaak'.nii. M C-ai Ntrtaan. S IS p m Proran-mc Iti pm Sandy MarPnarww. -i 'fa Tha-ira Onjan. 6 p m Bnu.h ro'ri MU. 7 n "• Tha Nawg. T 10 p m H*sja :% p m Weaiwmrd Ho' T 9 p B l *"rr from London. 8 p.m Kadta el lllpm Sowvanir* <• Hi le. ... Tha New*. 110pm H from Britain. 11 P m Political pi -Dr Chark* HJS 'Oon< S 31 Midland iJSht OarhrsUa. )" P,'" BUJllMllr-, 10 is p m U*i •.*>.• p m Psvlllon Playart. 10.43 P m from Britain. 11 p m Thr N*v> • EXPECTANT MOTHEl) Mako baby atrong-so ha can hi an important future citizen Yoa seed mora A&D Viunuog uo to help eh. voor baby strong boaas snd a sturdy bodv J, C i help build you.owa Kanuna sod aoatgy. So mk, if loon's Emuliion regaltrly. Sat bow uudk bause you feel til duritsg apecitaey. i. ri PI-;\I i Roy Marshall replaced King (rooi ad. He bowled i'hrisliatii ending OfM od the dgRoDoil who turned the ttr-* i''i. livene* to the line leg boundiiry \ C g f or three and later WlgMt Persaud look a single from and adding two singles. Eric Atedged throul Wight cover drove OfM from Williams I ;md laljr Rollox returned a hard low one l this bowler who made no mistake. > button was 7. Seven wickets were now down for 288 and Norman Wight joined his brother who was then 45. Roy Marshall bowled to La uN WlgW who liftr.i : W.-ilrult in Ii | I au took a single to axtn -<>nd up 50 ir. C. B. W the Senmade I deau wh< fourth I to lag for 4 9 i. wK.iri %  %  drove : leg for gi Pairaiidfim Out In Lucas' took ai but v. Pairaudeau 72 mil kinson came on trom the Screen End and Christian! on drove the i %  !>' for 2. He %  i:e stroke oft this for four. Mar%  naill continued from the other %  i | >.eie now fag11 ting well over the ball and scori: ing somewhat freely I ip in ISO n.inute* C H Wl %  \'. down i x overs before lunch from t! c od at a cost of 27 nil I I eharge of ll e ina and ith t; e ifi4 Persaud made a mgle off the over and square cut Marshall s %  ... %  Unites. His %  a included 6 fours. Lucas %  . ni on-driving powei: nd Persaud •li fi>i 4 after his partner h.. |La Chns.'. he missunped by Wood li'.. %  • I %  : I technical advice—to buy up to 49 r*r cent, of the shares in Indian w enterprise s -Reuter. U.S. And Russia Could Destrm Each Other vith 45 He and T; wno hooked freely and drovi \igrrously. added 85 in for the seventh wicket, and then Fullerton and Mann put on 82 in 73 minutes for an in eighth wicket stand Both Pullerton >>ni\ TayfleM offered chances when Saggers failed to stump them off Inn Johnson's bowling. South Africa had to struggle for runs against a good ull-round attack after losing 3 BALTIMORE, Feb. 13 wickets for 10 runs. In 105 mmSorm* radio active suoatance utes before lunch, they added from the hydrogen bomb will lai only 38 runs and lost four wickets, hundreds of thousands of years Lindwal! had a spell of IW0 a**** 1 bombed cities umnhabiwickets (Eric Rowan and Nourse) labIe Mr William I. Laurence for eleven runs, and later Miller New York science writer, said In dismissed Denis Boggle, and Paul %  "ettinhere. ... He said the bomb, "a physical miiistrosity". was several million limes more powerful thnn Bfl ; ..r m bomb. The United States and COUld annihilate each othtv •bomb warfare, he warned his audience. "The sun is actually an enor: %  ion i! M s Devonafc n an Island XI The Island team is as foil-Goal: King (Carlton. Mod ford (Spartan) Chase Rarvae: LSaynaa (Evcrton) Cad(Spartan) Ishmael (Spartan) Capt. Forwurds: l 'Spartan) Johnson (Spartan i Jap Silk Come-Back JAPAN. cBy Mail). ;.k industry, badly fail %  -"-(en^J^jgjJ"**—* ton) Hutchinson (Carlton). Pli i white shirt*. and k^k off is nt 4.49 o'clock King Bowl* %  %  It I'.WItAI HI M n Wight turned one from • to line leg for a ca %  %  i-nff failed to i Sort .. Wight who ,s 50 in 107 rail I dourepeated the stroke bouudury to send up 300 after l'H3 %  .'. Kilt In King's next over Persaud to leg : batsman was giving liding off Williams .liter lifting the ball howto extra cover, Lealia wight was !faring a Go OUt bj R"V Marshall fol ^ tiani the incoming bat quick roceivr. %  trok.' %  %  %  Id Luoas sent first .for the day to '' %  •ie pU %  e ball rising Indudlnsj eleven buund.ii itM (Insafe hands of Innlngji lasted 112 minutaa l i %  %  inj 0 .! u at the wicki %  • t 1—78. .,top Of the the m nd %  1. BJ %  I Trim %  ... Wl %  can h to bring i IS pjn. I idoa vu tory by • n i 110 runs. N 1 Wii I i ,,1-n. I '14 in1 but COUld IIAN4 III IWIN. MKMl-ii ai'lASM tag l\si\i.-. li Pana mWau b J U^-u 4 K ."> Kirn: . • ai Ibw William. H n.,1... *, i, WiliiaMi"• Wighr not ..ill .... | 4 l>. II 11. I nb i iml Hanaoka. director of the lUra Industry Compoii'IK production in JapS lad from 7.U00 to 160.00 1 bales in the past four year; BOd durinE th d the 80,000 bale mark in 1948. Already consounptlon is outstripping production. COCOOn indu-stiy is trying ton to mulberry' nol<; : Lftad to food crops (luring the war. %  %  s,lk-worm. producing n ftbment comparable %  length w.th n> V • giving more raw silk fnim MM cocoon. ARE NERVES" A SIGN YOU'RE GROWING OLD? Often as a woman approaches .life, her nerves get bad,and %  C it Williams Barl witii 4 T..i.t 12. i ad 255 and an . i send up 100 in VI mia Goddanl Howls N End and n to Persaud pulleu from 1 and then BsayasJ out t • i.ims came on frgm tha wltb ins third %  leg turn, g<>' . He was M lag Mump and was given out l.b.w. His score ->f 25 included 4 tOUTI li. h. bean t the wicket 37 > I rank King got 2 for 39 in ll ,,VI tor Oft tuui C L W..U-.HI 1 < % % %  -^ 6 B ickels Down BrlUab Oul bad now lost and Hollox par i : HI tha %  Persaud got butad %  >• RoUi %  I and ire iu extras. %  %  boumi.: %  %  Guddaid'.v R Chris;.. %  bounti. -'cd two %  %  The Weather TODAY Baa Kihes; ti.'iO a.m. >un Sets; ii tin |i in Mon (Nan > i %  inn Lighting: > SO p.m High Water: 3.01 I p.m YESTERDAY lahrfl" it'odriiulon) nil. Total for month tu yesterday: .63 In. < ganatratagi iM.) 83.5 mix r iture iMin.) 7o.o r. Wind Direction t ami I 13 p.m. I E Wind TatoaHy: ll miles per hour. lUroinrlcr > a.m.) iH Hit. .; |. ii > ata. HOWUNG ANALYSIS % %  ; King Alkiiu-ai n wniiwu % %  aogy, -.%  dicrpts thi Hut why let yourself be. ^n—or <#> BOfVOU mtttOBCCBBH -atimy time in lite? I a marly fifty years wise bavi l>een meeting this MkSUioa kapptiy — by getting C raan air, wholesome od and by taking Dr. Chase's Nerve r-*i to basso them up. For uid other lainarah is iln> time-tested ionic In li timid up VOM :t-iliiv and aid in toning up the entire Lai %  thefuture %  i .iw %  • Narva Kwd J chance b I nervous (ears and doubt*. It helps you rest 3asss u IfEW \ititl\ vis All III IIIIKK KNBB BOOTS $4 95 HOCKEY BOOTS, SHOE & BUEDE POU8HE8 BWmSnMa ROtOS and WINGS al S1.J5 Thc yil Do It Every Time y Jimmy Hatlo Tuesday. Illb Feb. : Ki'ith Wtlttra (Kid Suiirogo 1 Hoon Hj Claaa). Itaott (B'dos) vs. I!..\ NniKh Alcx.mdei (T-diiili iFly-Wei(ht) "Boy" Perkins (B'dos) v. (Welter-weight) Ailhur Streetly (Lodge School) i Wh.tlleld Iflll Sam King (B'dos) v S.I .; Davidson (T'dad) \ iLlght-weiyfil) N ..!,.. .,... lSlk Fek.: J Victor Lovell (B'dos) v S Hollls Wilson (T'dad) 5 (Bantam) )<-.ster v. Neville Skeete (Welter-weight) Tony Barker v Denzil Vaughn (Light-weight) O.lbert Goodman (B'dos* v. Aloysius Marcano (T.) !ht> 5 Georne Best. 184 lbs. (B I \ Wilfred Hodnev, 1C lbs. (T.I Naval Personnel In Unlfon.i H.iU-l'iue. Seals booked at Beard's. Hal Phone 4fl1 or 840-1. High School. Roebuck St Phone Sat r.ents & Bar available Ring Side Jl 50: •I 00; Bleachers 60c Book GuaiHHaad Electric Lighting Arrangemenu by the ter. RECTOR'S ALCO SULPH L0TIC An effective and guaranteed cure mr the aboW Obtainable at mmkEK'S frwsl DRUG SljW Broad street and HaaUngl lALMi* P**" J ,/.-


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I B.H. Crowd Rejects Gov't Compromise (Barbados Advocate Correspondent) MONDAY CROWD a, a B.w2ffi^** a ,h, Oovrnmrn, •, proposal Dial "God Save il... it" %  ^Id „„, be sun, wh.„ Prince. Alice .rrit" onVebrfi w t tU >he people refrain Iron, sia I;. %  Klaus Furhs who is HjnV trial here on charges of %  patsf atomic secrets %  H"5 the case of Klaus Fuchs %  flat parrs I Fuchs S'Citabciow had never hi %  n-oratcr African Chief Will DisciiHs Claim | In London I SOLTHA\:i pg 13 Br laadli looked %  %  Aim >et loda. Inema pjmeien. press photon %  Hie Karma. Iho African tribal **' %  tan his (lam, ,o lead Iho %  kBfaatus o, Bcchuanaland %  raisUs' %  ,, London Wmb Wl I' NoelMinuter roi Common%  b Relations. tau-ntng uv, <,-,„. tol ntlna by the "rSr* ? '-yaity g %  •:. cfTT -^Councillor OIB. Wilson, who 'he motion „, Uie Council w•, severely handed by d W .i l,e ., n,e un brokf up. ItTcoun"" 0r 1 ..ho also uon, and was re. ported 0 ,,.„ iio^ed school %  two I chased b. storming the hon %  "lay. to march to BatUefleld So where Goo mess America" He rethalil they Ik slit tor then Proper maim, I The anc : shoutmii "Away with -iHi own By An Innings AndllORuns C. B. Williams Takes 4 Wickets For 66 BARBADOS yesterday defeated British Guiana i>, th a TS 18 and 110 n,ns with a ^ to spare V**.} !" ? ** ot the British Omana y Barbados BUSES 0NLY NO TURN RIGHT RIGHT TURN PLERSE CROSS = E rSisr TURN ick.. BrttW, GXL, V. 7 O, "!'" ""' "," l2 f r ,h ,hir 1 -• vfVi, .iry'-T,' r: ;' 9 ir .HER! I d bloeka KEEP PIGHT %  %  ." %  jr. Williams ,1 CanatLi-ll. W.I. Cruise* MONTREAL. Feb 13 Jamaica with the vessels "Canai.roved popuhu. DM L.i t\ea\. Four days of Ihe cruises, which will be made until th, South If"? Nassau and the return -x nays. Pi,. m five cargo ship, iti it., ,-. men had %  i wa not lo the n Ida %  i . me nanon *** %  ""' (at all. The Qovami gVJBwori i„ R" %  } '•' %  alany, hospitals lor most' ~fUlncsscs and physical dis!"" %  lalonda ol ,,,up. The two Kunl, occupied : ,:.,u. r. %  tana ta. II %  Wi/Cf DIRECTOR fO FACE TRIAL Egjd.li,,,,-,,, General of I lT,k. 0 ""hro ,,i i? ue Cfovernment by %  at**" Wealth Scheme |ftr Trinidad I mm ior., r %  ilfnenulv Russia May, Be 2 Yearn ihead U.S. •b. is. %  ny |.K.a tortnicbl %  "Piecemeal Peace* 1 Better Than None TOKV %  %  %  Ht' ^. . -.. %  %  %  i would %  %  tl %  %  arug (1 ewes w here itmtnt it. %  itt.ooo They plan \o 2Jnw m July and re%  :h. Govern. ^Kd. it wtll he Ihe lirsl ** (to kmo in the British 6 h Naples' Keu shouted dOWIL wore rMdj : ll.il> la —Master, %  .u %  it>. %  Jd inwilling lo i t two yi ohoftd >i %  —itt iii.i Communal Disturbance %  culta won t-ui Bon • ere sent lo take to improve -RruWr. Victor) Is In The Air As III 1945"— Says AW** %  i %  men) Attla %  .i u ii. IM5". %  of rtrtteglot, Deputy Pnmo Uinimtti H %  %  htmoeli "hara %  sit warned suppuru 11M5". %  %  %  %  in %  -slop it.' LtppOfl Ol %  od Coiuervutive Chain i ihoving "a i itui eon%  %  o proml t %  Wo sh tl |I i,in. am thu Laws To Control West Germany PRANKFURT, Feb. U. i i AM rVllli %  %  I 13, which %  Major General Jamei Hodges. I United St. %  %  %  that the Germans do i in Atomi. s of th* fuel liow del I. hut the ilividuirf lino botwi %  espea*ll> .lax< %  %  %  I h> English %  i: lo crowi '.'tin. .\tllee said a great task hft %  %  %  %  %  brut hi ihood tl nun." Churchill, was to-day rl Scotiisi. Among the last day non ruth won \ i f National %  A numlN'i %  : %  % %  %  III IK> llghln.. Conservative case. %  two sons%  l nominated today. —HeuUr We May Soon Buy in itont Bom Is pAiua i.. i Ami %  i ivdrogv:, %  1 %  DO you think %  %  I 'He Frank OOh 2 for -''** m (wait i iicaa with %  %  ; lor no %  '• Kin| on to %  %  %  I > was s was Ho had at the •oundar* ii wicket In^ri.l Bergman Can Claim ltul>\ Thirteen \nti-Titoists Sentenced In Belgrade %  % %  I %  1 %  %  %  • would be an) %  %  %  in llomr %  mate. Tig ahfao Rrrgman is lying with her son foi 1 %  will be H< tofraph thbaby for the tlrst lime during the young i opOsUstf %  i but in Ling to %  was b ,i\ two liwcl ol hii half been .11 (he wirkrt (Ml! in UU lhe i i M mlnuh aitaf tW quite %  n %  %  %  %  %  third tlft) %  %  %  no off Goddard wiih M %  %  %  with D I %  %  lid %  %  %  i'< >., mutes BBO a decided iraknnlnsji •. had t run .mi Rig Norman \S gut put off %  pod i n %  %  HI i %  %  I %  %  %  Wt Hf hit .1 put %  i i %  thr id 110 II .til IIWIv Polygamy Is -\ Type Of StK-ial Security" Iii Uri
n Party • LasjaJ *raproviiioi! rompul i eam y described U i %  i %  %  th*people In the ( %  to realise thx %  KisUle plan." All but one ol Iho %  ' %  I JOY an-* IMgian Primutm Denim Iteport Fob, 13 U-upan It*, to-day denied Br.gl.iri ". sidniE a redoubl;,ble .iitrredit for th* I had ured thr Helgun Ptln 14. '" .inoa a I %  .... ; I '-•rable". Vangnard M Aaaiata Diatr oo aaJ Sliij* .. --! r Hat, If, -. Ill tov. < help in %  The 42.AU0 igr. naanan. al %  %  i hence the %  eaaa that th<> I Cam* rroons chieftain had told that tl 'iapp. The re|>ort I rat hat 'idnion -aiid mi Mi 11 m ttsr aaBsliil team yesterday with a good display scoring 78 runs. il Tito's Gv\ j aa n on among the broad mass ol — %  *•* %  *• —Beater '-.triclwu vosaal .n tow.Renter, 'the populal





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PAGE n>i I LOOS IDVI TTESn.W. Fmm-ARY BARBADOS a^ADVO&TE fv, T %  nibiunm w n. um ca. us. K "• •Brtdii Turvdnv. Fcbmarj 11 TinEastern 4 ar ill bran %  iY;ioiial Library Srbrmr One Million Scots Want Home Rule % %  , II* V \V. Hockey. (Hirccloc) Welcome Irnirir Hulls THE Inatitul in Trafalgar Square on Sunday is an attempt by the Government to I out of chaos. In some instanc regulations have been v i but due to the natural objection to change there Is still room for closer co-operation I genera! public. It is also true that Hne time must. before the public can be educated into appreciation of the merits and the re, for these regulations. It has taken tWU traffic in Trafalgar Square ana it is net to be supposed that within one day pe trians who have been accustomed to jaywalking in any part of the City or the motorists who has been accustomed to scare pedestrians out of the way would accept kindly a let ol regulation! which In new duties on him. The regulation* are not without t.'ieir (laws but li '!>' U>e trial and error system b can be any approach to the And the quicker the general public learn to appreciate this and co-operate with the Police and the Tranaport Authority the better I. The object oi the regulataMU is to bring an eaaiei fd of ti "' U* unnecessary waste od tiro pedestrian alike. With thi vehicular traffic i %  there would be The temp I on Sunday '.nans on the ippi • %  llial they are tofol Broad Stn I left until a the Public BuiUi. the Chamrx %  •. I right nstitution Road will ki continuati, the V. i Square so that t bef. Pub:. way line.,: nd way a Ion. op their to IV the n son SI road bet l.amii Mrlain Bridge. The new ing and a sense uf sell n will stop them 11 and with the new I ad in Broad : Square motorists will I The task of carrying out these regulabe sa' the travelling public inl '•Turn left" and added I sense of humour but pi tlliue to w.ok h U I break n the Nelson Sta-.i. the centre 01 : and by the South Gal*,a .oil MlerWd stuck ol bo I 1,1 the establi.I IMdonal Libra T! a* "St" "'• %  l it is new known, has the local Governments to rinancc .lay. to train slafT In elementary important part In tin bar* now been III a, under the English Library Association ces of in, ulishCouncii.no are Uken at the end of the course which ha-.' ary can receive lurther help Jt is not generally real louiihout the world, ana Irom Ihe Regional Scheme unless the organization ot a Library seras granted to set up a some reasonable assurance ol ns vice demands not only a wide Regional Library service lor the maintenance at a satisfactory knowledge ol books and the pco%  anbbean. The first four Irvel from local funds can he pie w ho law ''>: I years were mainly devoted to the given. Alter many delays and definite t, mg. and. .nt ot tne Trinidad Cendisappointments plans ore at last without exception, ihe students j. ihe original intention going forward anil is hoped that sent frum Barbados have shown being to use this as a centre for the second stage of development a degree of ability and cnthusirotating ( i.ipleted during the next asm which augurs well for the .11 involve comfuture of Ihe library service roa concapplat* reorganization of many ot there. lion of a Regional Ul-: ., vices with the as-mama therefore ,ould by ..self be ,,.;., ThtvRegio. a %  *-' !" \£*JJ incorporation of the "an.Uemp first •"" %  £ %  he demonstralions cst.bl^mcnt ot a !^ u ^ UM into the main stocks of the local library service in e h couaiy an Srtemc orTfurthcr period and to libraries Fur..., ul finally to leave as a going concert, time to time will help = Regional organization in which hook slocks up to the all will cooperate fo: their mutual be {££?£" !e V,CM — '-'' %  "" --">'bu". 1041 as Director of the Central which arc Library Scheme took ovor th The ncmeand which Vr tctii' the end ol untiring ,P*' e * great deal in a short time, but Barbados Public Library with fhe advances In education celebrated Its centenary and the social and economic 1818 marked as a free public library service in changes now taking pi untiring 1M". and which under the live West Indies it should hardly be arricd out" under the most din ; resent lahranan ncccsarv to enwhaadze the lmE5£3 ^s^ouiiined' trsrts issmritJriSLg i h -2 cedu,T^aaTaph> Like every which are being made available a the^a,,r haT s SSHrs £3 w^ a considerable addition the r>esldt of Ihe Ubrary Assoetr,ri„ these seven years. 5.000 volumes approximately, alation. defined Adult Education as i which Goven %  .hint which Caribbean I which opcr.il. U framework of local Cold War Gets Warmer If t kiiia-lmr.' Smith If, KiHi^bnr* eamiii. S war"' 5 C A|r. '' %  "I ,. .. ..,_ Western ufllciaL pointed out : Z% !" that ihis developmenl | | .. ,..ns against Am elli 1]i .„,. Ik .l,i of Commune lU , u s bomb Thin, : 1 VieW | | „ .. : %  the UH %  eta will risoit lo boldet a war. adopting but also bec au e oi : %  % %  %  i' i N . iUtvv a llisli<|i Always a l-.s.io|r By JIIIIS I .VMM.1.1. is-, stall CHIMP leal Ihe Upi 1111,1 ""' %  :' In tin hilura HIP lound guilts M |* btiirap, nop to dc'''' -.v. i ,uvh-The measure will But the] will reblshopi coun Moo old to ma II I || ...lied I 1 it does not mean Ihi neeti I he "I" certai ,.t postponed. ingeonsnlca. . complaint <,e !" that cab pparHousi Ihoughl that Ml Will % %  preclplli all. it ibelli lo lake 'ull advantage of it in UM 1N\\ hul's on Today WOtt Indian < ami al Vp|M-ai at I a, ., m Me, Inn: Una-, ol \--< inlil,1 I | nuoll. •i i huani MstrM "aT PaHea >uii,m at I llosiiiK al Modern High s, l,„„l al g.:tl p.m. "THaakl Vour fiddle's If In a rmarkabl.demon* shaken En 0 Ulnd duri .i campaign. -corsai-e sipned a petition demanding Hon.e Rule on domestic affairs by means of a Seotlish /': -""'''' l P f"" hat '-BdoTsed the propoial. fhe Consercr hare proposed a Royal Commission of fnqulrp and Ihe Socialists hare decaned ih-it far to take a stand, alrliouoh in UM pajl ihci, hoc oppos.''"" % %  *"> '" ?*f n Why .Scolsmen uanl Home Rid,'. Hi ,,•01 Brilish yoeernmenl system e.,i-,,ioded because of Social Welfare and iuslrics. The Duke is a member of Hit Majesty's select Body Guard of Royal Archers and hereditary sheriff of Duni"K"HANAN CASTLK. GLASGOW. Scotland, (By Mail). The Covenant is the outcome of a very the Scottish people that : ive not been getting a fair deal in through Parliament as West: In Social Welfare, in domestic pot a j and many other things that aflecl then daily lives this is of great imports. It is patent to many of us that Scottish people, being fully conversant with Scottish inditions. could manage our national affairs rruch more effectively and economically than they are being managed from I n>w. We feel that Parliament al Westminster is | so crowded with Imperial and World Affairs, it can not possibly find time to devote proper attention to local matters. Hence, much of our recent legislation has been scamped ,nd very badly put together. The policy of Nationalization has emphasized this pre1 dnminantlv. ., not tee why much Scottis' business I have to be centred in London. Once ad office of a business goes South, the rest follows. Our national revenue returns seems to indicate that Scotland's wealth is drifting away from Scotland. With the loss of business, our pel | also losini; the opportunity of employment, and of obtaining p.omising positions. Many apt; today when they should be full of happy and prosperous people. Ulster, Eire, Isle of Nan. and the Channel Islands, all possess democratic lei. control in their domestic policy and affairs.; and are making good Inly; there has been no failu | aik whs should Scotland alone tall, when \ she baa within her sell far greater Industrial j. .an any of these ot] I lOW the Scottish | %  %  [ ,.,retpons %  .aired. In business, in devttV Empire Lands, in Government and Parl Service, always find Scottish people at the top. being ifloroji opportunity t build up industrially al • in -iirselves in doi I Id protremendoua moral uplift am, a This, in turn, would have a wondtrInfluence In the whole of the United Kingdom. Our ideal I %  riineiu in all the lira of Scotland, while retaining! the Parliament al era] Legislature, to deal with such ques-' -, -., Crowi I Constitution, il Defence, C Policy. Requirements. In this l-', i i iter, Seotl.m i Wales, hue of Od Channel Islands would all sit work for the good government of the I lam as a whole. Kin the! more, we would leave thl should thl J like tn join in with the rest of us. There is no intention what,. ir break up the existing Unl tween England and Scotland 9 the whole, proved beneficial to both Counlt is simply %  east of the present system of government in Britain now hen through the development of Social ( lation, and nationalization of ..,-,.! iswered well 1, 'Od it is tim, kind lUve practice took place, Grave congestion of parllamentan husme.ss is a bad thing tor any ci For TO-DAI lost filjvir4i|l LsualljMIMIKPOII a KANS '"JJ"' V, < VIII I.I.I tOO NOODLES (Broad A Fui„ U ~ HI VKIK DAT. il'ge pkla with rhlnawjrel ~ Hm! (UI.OWiUK VrOHEei NOTICE Our LUMBER YARD and HARDWAHP r !" MENTS will be closed for the InterVolol?rS Tournament at 12 noon on the following dj v "" THURSDAY, 16TH FEBRUARY MONDAY, 20TH FEBRUARY TUESDAY. 21ST FEBRUARY •a, WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LTD, Saees, C. S. PITCHER & CO., LTD. Phones : 4472. 4687, 4413, 4251. -.•.-,-.-.-.-.-.-,-.-.-.-.-,-.-.-.•. '--.-.'.-.-.-.-.-,-.-,-.-.-.-,.,..v7^~ FINE FOOD BUYS VOU SHOULD ORDER • S HINDER CAKE IVj-lb. axk WALLS OXFOKD SAUSAGES P til T WALLS PORK SAUSAGES „ LIPTONS COFFEE 14-H u 1 FOKT CARRY BAKING POWDER 1-ft "K COFFEE peri 1 HENNESSYS VS.O.P. BRANDY b o. II HOLLOWAYS DRY GIN VST rONIC WINE MAYPOLE LEMON CURD MARNIER UQUEUR small. GRAND MARNIER LIQUEUR l arge STANSFELD. SCOTT & CO.. '~%+S,K,^t&S *s+*S,'l*+* r ^,<.+sQ*t < *C O Q 0 0 000—OQI LTD. NOTICE OUR DRV HOODS DEPART^ WILL BE CLOSED On THURSDAY 16th FOR OUR WEEKLY HALF HOUDif AND ,-, REMAINING OPEN ON SATURDAY. IP FEB. UNTIL 3.30 P.M. FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE V'SI* FROM THE M.V. "STELLA pOLABB PLEASE ARRANGE YOUR ACCORDINGLY. SBORal DA COSTA & CO.. L.T& Ol II III AIM IIS SAY: liarli.itli.iii Aversion lo 4iian^t k Must llit k The llralli To Tht Eduor l SIR.— 1 W %  morruni. to llw \ atls?mp. <>f tl in tht is!..i.,. ver) %  int. and gi BCClUtOI think •l walk <>r Ufa wlio Mb tying 1 What greatest k' number and i or c. • .. ittompl %  %  the 11 1 *>u\ %  i %  %  P %  %  %  FV-iv I -. %  %  %  ...i park in Pal..il* or Chun .... %  over Uu b ol TnffJk lion for %  i .Tic ;it rcgulniiy %  run pas' thsT •>, i .., fnwn hot MB in : | i-orson cauglw %  eluding, lha "ulease crow hore" .lOkiilion Cop ihOUld .i patrol woik tail nu-cting places for gossipm* that th. will bj ; complain I |ust it Unit%  Hotel, : in and around Bi tdgato 1 capacity but how aooul oaaat gotxi Hotels and clubs on the l*eautiful St Phihp. B und St. James coasts which lo my idgB haT iiniplc and good acrommodatton avail%  %  have motor cars run. nominal charge Of cars are at reasor able rates. Barbados should not discourtata by stating that no %  t fui rsfjw. n ) i.nr I uiiuh I SIR,A thO othei afternoon the (ollowinj: Advertise— i N %  April 19 Boston on April 20." 1 think th;>l the Agents should have notified the local public i lar and the world in i. ith the mid show %  Damask U rho natural %  %  ro signed with a nom-de-piun.e, but un g— ' •' '-"i'' customcof bom Hdoo, witl be Igaorvd Manv aoc* raoch (he Editor's desk each weolr. and readors ore aqain reminded ol the necessity for fhe wrffer'g name to bo known to rho Editor, nol /or publication, but as an • ~v oi oood faiti:. IULK RD TURKEYS MILK \TED CHK KF.NS VEAL CHOPI i \MH t IH CANADIAN SAL1 >D FILLETS I -.EL lias*Wraaaaa% 9 SHERRY HOCK MER i.RAlD RLTM CROWN DRINKS POTATO^ 5SSS B ,e^ RABBITS^ (DoftV