Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


a January

19590.



K Guara

Thursday

>



french Council Approve


































































To Combat

EW French Security

Storm Robs
300 Families
Of Homes

IN ITALY

CATANZARO, Italy, Jan. 25.
three hundred families
nmeless here today after

haged their houses.

ng this poverty striken south-
coast of Italy amounted
000,000 lire.

pavy hail storms added to the
gs and trees. Many
killed. 3%
sea communications
ly werejcut, and many boats
a narrow escape when they
hed for the harbour at the
oach of the storm

es of the coastline road,
south from Cantanzaro,
transformed into gushing
and five miles of railway
washed away.

fietebo observatory, 49 miles
th of Rome, announced today
it recorded an earth tremoi
915 last night, distant about
iniles to the southwest. It said
the tremor was of the fifth
He on the Mercalli scale.
—Reuter.

he Pope Will
eceive Bevin

ROME, Jan. 25
ish Foreign Minister, Ern-
Bevin, is expected to be re-
d by the Pope when he ar-
here on his way home from
bo Commonwealth Con-









first call will be on Presi-
Binaudi.

will also call on Prime Min-
Alcide de Gasperi and For-
Minister Count Carlo Sforza.
mush sources here do not an-
fle much more than a very
al discussion between Bevin
‘Government .—Reuter,

a





Curfew Lifted
e %y - oy
In Gold Coast
GOLD COAST.. Jan. 25,
Gold Coast Government to-
suspended a curfew
cra last week after two
men had heen stabbed to
hin a clash with demonstra-

public was warned that
few would h«

imposed

imposed at
hour of the day or night, if
Hers broke out again. Since
ary 9, the colony has been

bled by strikes and demon-
Ons for Dominion St
med by the Convention Peo-
Party whose leader is
Old Dr, Kwame —Reuter.

atus en-



Yugoslavia
xpelled From
uth Federation

PRAGUE, Jan
slavia has

the World Federation
eratic §=Youth,

Munist hewspaper
ported to-day

Week’s meeting in Buch-
Of the Executive Committee
â„¢ On the step afte;

29
expelled
ol
the Czech
Rude Pro-





been











: agree-
nat Yugoslav youth leadera
o ;
Mentified themselves with
Policy,” the paper said

RRS

eased

treatment for newspapers carrying on “false campaigns
were approved today by the Council of Ministers.
The measures are primarily directed against the Commun-

were
a
ent storm destroyed, or badly
| eral
Dificials said that the damage

to

ential rain in damaging early
animals

with

New Security Measures

Communism

PARIS, Jan. 25.

measures, including “stern

be taken

and strengthened,”
Teitgen,

Minister of State ‘in
char of Information, told the
Press after the ministers had met
with Premier Georges Bidault,
Earlier today, the National
Assembly Defence Committee sup-
ported a motion “stigmatising

M.

ge





authors of sabotage actions against |
the safety of our troops fighting |

; enemies of France in the Far
; East.”
The Commission asked the Gev- |

ernment to act swiftly
“these acts of treason”.

The Communist-led GCT (Gen-
Confederation of Labour)
has appealed to all French work-
ers to hamper the
and transportation of
equipment, and Humanite, Party
newspaper, asked its readers to
show disapproval of the “provo-
cative policy” of the Government
in Indo-China, at a mass meeting

against

military



manufacture |

¢s' opposition to what they call the “dirty war” in Indo- |
rhina and to the forthcoming United States shipment cf |
war materials to Atlantic Pact Nations,

Tet ns — “Necessary Police measures will}

sees

today in front of the Prime Minis- |

ler’s office,

The Hotel Matignon, official
residence of the Premier, was
heavily guarded by steel-helmet-
ed Police.

The anti-sabotage measures are
also aimed at unrest in the nation-
alised railways.—Reuter.

° ES
Hiss Gets

3 Years For

s
Perjury

NEW YORK, Jan. 25.
Alger Hiss, former State Depart-
ment official, was sentenced

today to five years in a
penitentiary for perjury.



Federal



Hiss (48), one time adviser to
President Roosevelt and Secretary
General of the United Nation:



Charter Conference in San Fran-
cisco in 1945, was found guilt
last Saturday by a Federal Court.
The Court found that he lied when
he denied passing State Depart-
ment documents in 1938 to Whit-
taker Chambers, self-sty
er for a Soviet spy ring, and also
when he denied having seen
Chambers after January 1, 1937.

Hiss was not fined. He had faced
a maximum penalty of 10
imprisonment and a $4,000 fine.

Defence Counsel, Mr
Cross, has announced that the case
will be carried to the United St:
Circuit Court of Appeal—one step
below the Supreme Court.

Federal Judge, Henry W. God-
dard, set bail at
the appeal.







The five year sentence was im-'!
posed on each of two counts, the!

terms to run concurrently

crime of this character may not
be permitted with impunity,” the
Judge said. —Reuter



Fleeing Chinese
Enter Indo-China

SAIGON, van. 25

Thirty tnousana Chinese Na-
Uonalists, pursued to me Indo-
Chinese fronuer by Mao ‘Tse
lung’s Communist army and
guerillas, have begun to. enter
indo China near Lao Kay, gener-
ally well-informed sources said
here to-day. The report was not
confirmed by the French High
Command,

The source aid that the Na-
tionalists had retreated from Yu
nan

A French Command spoke



confirmed that 5,000 Chinese

tionalists - had arrived at thg
French outpost at Phongto—43
miles west of Lao Kay and wert

disarmed.
The spokesman added that dif-

culties in communications qla
hot permit an exact report of
present operations .—Reuter.

ie



$10,000 pending |

This ti
|} and Eagle Hall
Pe ig “We picture
| take the placc

|

TOO NeSe sever

ench being dug by the Telephone Co. along Barbarees Hill bet
‘orner, makes it difficult for two
one another.

to pass

of

Court Martial

| ov
| British
which
the Thames estuary with the loss |

of

he

L

a gsi

LONDON, Jan. 25.

he
Was ramr

64 lives, wil

» tonight
he Admiralty

up wa

y statement
that in naval practice the loss of
frequently followed by ;

ned and sunk

lL be court

Truculent,
in

} mar- |
tialled on a charge of “neglige\t-
jly or by default losing his ship”,

here | the British Admiralty announced |

|
}

commanding officer of the|
submarine

|

said |

a court margal, and their deci- |

; Sion
| manaer,

to

fourt
Lt

Cc. P, Bowers, should
“not be taken to convey any im-

martial the Com-|!

plication regarding responsibility |
for the disaster” .—Reuter,

led couri- }

years |

Claude }

§$10n and

Aus

f

; neath them, where petrol was
| stored,

| Six firemen were overcome by
smoke,—Reuter,

A
Cey



tion

| Ratings
“This should be apparent that a} .

turbed”
inquest to-day
dena, Secretary to the High Com-
missione1
Zoysa
Veterinary Stience, but was told

| evidence
was depressed at having his. ambi-



3 Killed: |
19 Injured |

IN EXPLOSION

SYDNEY, Jan, 25,
Three men were killed, and 19}

fire



traliar Nz





y landing

breakfast in the

Celonese Student

Commits Suicide

LONDOw, Jan. 25.

plane will 1
lon on Satu

ashes of Garamul
year-old
found gassed at his London lodg-
ings.
the balance of the mind was dis-
recorded

Veter
A@verdict
was

of Cey
came to

his chances of
‘e| College this year
| hopeles;
cles. The

showed

frustrated.

‘
sO RAPT zi pc TI SE
ll Ke ATS P Pe ; wo pies $4 : ; 4a ay

eave Britain for
irday with the

De Zoysa, 27
rinary student,

of “suicide while

at the
Walter Jayawar-

lon, said that De
Britain to study
an

getting into

English University or Veterinary

were “pretty

as there were no vacan-
Coroner said that

the
that De Zoysa

-Reuter.



Pa



raft
urcral

ifter

{ ernment

seriously injured when an explo-|
swept the 2,410 ton|
ship
Tarakan at Garden Island, Sydney |
Harbour, early to-day.
Nnaving
mess room were trappef.

The explosion occurred under-

|
}

|



tian Democrats,

(Story on



ween
large vehicles such as the Lorrs
An undergro und cable will be laid in this tre
the overhead cable at present in use.

ntees Less Than Cur

—+)

“4 ‘
ee

Road

Passage
and Bus

|
1 r |
ench whict |



Page 5.)

Cour 400 BENEFIT FROM
‘For Truculent HOUSECRAFT CENTRE

- Commander |

Who said the Barbadian woma)

Anyone having this view we

yuld probably

to change it immediately had he seen the
young women at the Housecraft Cent:
were being lectured to in Home Nursing,



His Ideal
Our Daily Life

CHARLESTON, Virgina.

Seven prominent Ameri-
eans have set out in ‘the
schooner “Blue Goose” to
search for “The Ideal Exist-
ence” in the Windward Isles,

1,500 miles to the south-
east.

They include James Sulli-
van, the artist, and Frank

MacLear, a New York Naval
Architect.

“We've hobnobbed
kings and queens
ind countesses, barons and
earls and the big shots of
industry,” said Sullivan
“We're tired of pretence and

with
counts

the false way of life. So
now we're on our way to
ideal existence.”—B,U.P



Bandit Killed
By Police
In Sicily

PALERMO, SICILY, Jan. 25,
Colonel Ugo Luca, head of the
special “anti-bandit” forces hunt-

ing brigand chieftain, Salvator
Guiliano, had a narrow escape
to-day when his car ran into a

hail of machine gun bullets and
hand grenades.

Colonel Luca, who was on hi:
way: to inspect a patrol operating
round the bandits mountain hice
out, leapt from the car, and or-
dered his bodyguard to attack the
bandit position on a hill over-
looking the road,

One bandit, 28-year-old Salva-
tore Pecoraro, was killed as the
bodyguard attacked.

Surprised by the strength of the
attack, the bandits withdrew,
leaving Pecoraro dead on the hill-
top.

He was wanted on many charges,
including one of participating i:
an attack last year on a Police
barracks in which 7
were killed.

Colonel Luca’s headquarters said{ agreed today to raise
that they believed Pecoraro to be

one of the bandit-king Giuliano’:
chief lieutenants.—Reuter,



DE GASPERT FORMS
SIXTH CABINET

policemen

attention
representati
| They wert
; tered for ul
began on the
Ther
many phases
| tanght at the
about 400

jamd thes
main dd
| and the
the many

| “Kitchen”



are



ire

| pastry making,
| dishes and table

and

san

;cooking cour
desserts.

The various
“Lecture R
mentary

; dressmaking,
rug makin
| vanee handic1

ing






anc

Miss Iv)
institution,



art

I
16t

Ce

women
from the teachings of

Bs,

ions

Lecture

T

ut

All
ale

1ew ¢

oup

f
of

n

form one section of the

f worl



There ar¢
who bene
the Centre |
livided into. two
the . “Kitchen”
Room”. Amo

“ntre

ranche e |
regular ike an

ready)

lay elemen-

1avance !

1 advance sewing

ern
ental !

nd home n
eyne, head of the

1 that



women entered into the diffe
| ent branches of the Housecraft |
wo with such il that her j
| assistants and herself are entic-
ed to work long hours
Through lack of space
who wanted to join up with
| present term of workers were
refused. “Given extension” Mi
| Alleyne _ said, the Housecratt
entre would be of even gpreater |

| the island.”

| the kind

The Elsie

7ognised the



today.

She said that many of
| pupils had got employment doing
of work they
| taught at the Centre,

| Elsie Moller Back
In Hong Kong

HONG KONG, Jan, 25
Moller,
ship to run the
de of Shanghai since

Cc

in China, returned to Hong Ko
Reuter.



Status Of Embassies

WASHINGTON, Jan. 25, }

Ireland :4.d
ions in. their
to the tati

Reuter.

tne

re

Nationalist block

benefit to the young women of |

the ol

had been



first Britis
sritain re-
mmunist regin

United State
the Lega-
pective capitals
of Embassies,





|
|
|
|

Liberals Not Included

ROME, Jan. 25.
Italian Premier - Designate
Alcide De Gasperi, told reporters
to-day that “with luck” he will
form his sixth Cabinet since the
war by to-night.







Parliament a

bil



lespatch of. 3,0

the Bast
Somaliland,

| authorising the |

00 Italian troops to
Afriean

are waiting to hand over,



|

SS IT. SIR
HASTINGS
PEARLS in
vening Advo-

|
copy Today
local agent. |

After an hour
and a half talk a
with the Presi- DON’T Mi
dent of the Re- PATRICK
oc, : uigi | tells the TALE OF THE
Enaudi, he began : ny
final negeluations STOLEN .
with the leaders Monday's I
of the three Par- cate.
ties, which will Order your
form the new from your
Coalition. "
These are (the '—~—
majority) Chris-

to whom De Gas-








peri belongs, the Rightwi
| cialis i the Republicans
l= Liberal ho forie
f the on which resigned |
| gramme

The first
will



Reuter

territory of |
where British troop
M. De Gasperi
was expected to
i to his Pre-
lership of ti

nent the

Ministry of Ital- |

iar Africa, a]

linistry dating |

rom Mussolini's |

day and

to

aque

hortly be
lished

The
Count

77-year-
Carlo

vas ex-
eign Minister
I ian Demo-

For

|

ee.

rent Exports
Sugar Leader Replies







bretnei
VE CENTS
Year 355.



To U.K. Announcement

Food Ministry

|
|
|





WILLIAM ROOK _ is
resigning from the Ministry of
Food at the end of January ia |

etain his association v ith

in an Advis ry

William who is 65, is

{ a member of ihe

nittee on Sugar io

ffice. From 1936-40

Director of Sugar

ie i Director f Pure

He Director of Sv gar
41-45

—



“Tent Town”
Home For Hol

ROME, Jan. 25.
Workmen today began buildin

Tent Town”, immediately out-
Ge the walls of Rome to accom-
> over 1,000 pilgrims.

It’s a result of a last minute
lecision. The tents are being put

help cope with the vast flow
rims to Rome for the Catho-
reh's 25 Jubilee Holy Year

experience in the first

nee the Holy Year open-

officials caleulated that the

nmodation they have alread)
n convents, school
and hotels will not }
nt for the spring and sur

r arrivals of pilgrims
Up to now, pilgrims have arrive

the rate of 1,000 a day.

expected to exceed 10,00
n the year,





shu







—Reuter

Will Death
Penalty Be

Abolished?





BONN, Wan, 25
The West German Bundesta
day unanimously adopted a mo
isking the Government
Ollate with the Allies for th
bdolition of the death penalt
ihe motion brought by the
1 Jemocrat as an amend
oO muniust noti
was then withdrawn
The mover, Dr. Otto Heinri
xpressed regret that th
lie la modifyir the penal
or offences against the ax
n authorities maintained
n ( ity for a wide rang
fences, though the deat
bolished in the G
itution,—-Reuter,

‘Man And Wife Who
Love Each Other
Stick Together’

LONDON, Jan. 25.
Counsel prosecuting Brian Don-
‘4 thume tor murder, told a jury

cre today that “a man and wif«
vho love each other stick to-
sether

Counsel, Mr. Christmas Hum-
Nreys, was discussing the evi-
nee given by Mrs. Hume foi
er husband, who has pleaded noi
suilty to murdering car deale:

Stanley Setty, whose dismember-
ea body dropped from a plane
vas found in slimy marshes on
the Thames estuary,

“IT have said that Hume murder-

d Setty,’ Mr. Humphreys said i:
Central Criminal Court (the
id Bailey), “I do ‘not say tha

Irs. Hume
nurdaer

had any part in this
[ say I have no evidenc:
vhatsoever that she had any pari
in it,”

Mr. R. F. Levy, defending
pleaded Hume’s innocence

“Only a madman would have
cut up Setty’s body

flat,” he told the jury.
There was no question and no
possibility that Hume could hav«
murdered Setty anywhere
and then brought the body to the
flat to be cut up, and parcelled
Practically every circumstant
points to Hume's innocence.”
After the concluding speeche:
of Defence and Prosecution, the
Judge summed up. The verdict is



expected tomorrow. —Reuter
7
T.U.C. Outlaw
J
Communists
LONDON, Jan, 25
The General Council of th
tish ‘Trade Union Congres
oday plugged another gap througi
h Communists have reachec
e Movement’s key posi-
tion Henceforward no Commu-
nists will be allowed to sit on the

National Committee, which speak:

for the
Federations of Trades Union
ranches, nor will Communists be
ermitted. to attend the annual
nfe of the Trades Councils
; ‘
With these new steps in thel
against the Commu





EF impaign
ittee was f
4 manifesto calling
ionists to vote labour
—Reuter

else, |

Year Pilgrims



}
j
|

Rook Resigns| AUGUST PLEDGES ARE

NOT IMPLEMENTED

N the Barbados Press on 18th January there
appeared an announcement of H.M. Government
summarising the sugar talks which took place in
London from November to January. Certain ideas
expressed in this announcement require categorical
explanation, and the relevant portions of the
announcement are therefore quoted below, immedi-
ately followed in each case by the comments of the
Hon. H. E. Robinson (Chairman of British West
Indies Sugar Association (Inc.), and leader of the

B.W.I. delegation taking part in the talks).




(1) “On September 22, 1948
announced in the House of
( ns hat the Unitec
Kingdom Governmen
,uaranteed to find an outie:




‘ither in the United Kingdon
or in the Commonwealth
the whole exportable surplu
of Commonwealth sugar pro
ducers until the end of 1992
Shortly afterwards represent
atives of tue West India
sugar producers pressed fo
an extension of this guaran
tee beyond the end of 195
and in the summer of las
year the United Kingdon
Government undertookt
enter into discussions wit!
Commonwealth producers i:
the autumn with a view tk
making long term arrange
ment which would assure
them market beyond 195:
for agreed tonnages of
at reasonably remunerative
prices to be negotiated witt
the producers.”

Reference Omitted

H.M. Government have now

mitted reference to the fact thai

a

Suga.

their announcement of Septem
er 22, 1948, concluded with the
vord “Prices will, unless other-
wise agreed, be negotiated an-
ually, having regard to world
market conditions and all other
factors” That is, although the
ugar bought by the U.K. from

1940 to 1948 had been paid for at



to expand their exportabie
surpluses beyond a igure ol
2,350,000 tons,

“Tne Colonies share of this
total »90,U00 tons, which
compares with their pre-war
present, and prospective ex-
port figures as toliows;

“pre-war average (1935-38)
960,000 tons, 1949 1,200,000
tons, 1952 1,400,000 tons hence,
under the arrangements pro-
posed by the United Kingaom,
the Colonies could lay their
plans up till 1957 on the foot-
ing that they had an annual

is |

export of 1,550,000 tons, or
350,000 tons more than their
exports today and 150,000

more than their expected ex-
ports for 1952. Of this total
1,100,000 tons would consist of
uaranteed in the United
Kingdom

ale

Koi ine balance above the
amount covered by the guaran-

tee, they should finda market
either in the United Kingdom or
in Canada, since in both these
markets the preferential rate of
duty gives a considerable ad-
vantage to Commonwealth sugar

over foreign sugar. If these

arrangements were agreed to
and carried out, and assuming

that the United Kingdom by
1953 will be able to purchase

all tfie sugar it needs, annual
imports from the Colonies into



prices based on a basic price plus the United. Kingdom market
increased costs, the announce- would from 1958 onwards be
ment of September, 1948, intro- about 100% more thar. they
tuced a changed price basis: that were on the average of the
f “world market conditions, an years 1935 and 1938.’
ull other factors.’ This was
larking back to the disastrous An Impression
position for the West Indies be- This tends to give the im-
tween the wars when sugar prices} pression that Colonial export
vere determined by low artificial! will be increased by 100% In
prices in the so-called world, point of fact a true comparison of
narket tepresentatives of West{| this sort must include all Colonial
Indian producers therefore went] experts, that is, those to Canada
London in the summer of 1949}and not only those to the U-K.
to press not only for a long-term | Total Colonial exports were ap
guarantee but for reasonably re- | proximately 1,060,000 t re-
munerative prices entirely; war, and therefore Colonial ex-
livorced from world market con-| porters are only to be sure of a
litions. This point is important| market for much ‘fie same ton-
because if there is to be no long/hage as pre-war; less than cur-
term guarantee, the position re-| rent exports; and far less than
verts to the undertaking of Sep-| called for by the needs of the
tember 22, 1948, and the West! Colonies. (In any case com-
'ndies should receive the benefit} parisons with the pre-war posi-
°

) present favourable world

arket conditions

2) * the United Kingdom

Government has suggested to| tons; the



tion are unfair—see page 3)

On points of detail, the pre-war
average Colonial export for the
quota years 1936-39 was 1,060,000
1949 Colonial exnorts

Commonwealth producers thai| nearer 1,250,000 tons than 1,203,000

as part of the proposed agree-| as stated:
} ports by

ment, they should undertake
for the time being not to plan

and the estimated ex-
1952, wrovided there
@ On Page 3

Communists Charge Britain
With Racial Discrimination



LAKE SUCESS, Jan.

‘he Communist-led World Federation of Trade Unions has
charged Britain, France, the United States, New Zealand

and

nuth Africa with practising racial discrimination at

home and in their colonial territories.
+i

Regrets Speech:

in aren, No Offence Meant

BONN, Jan 25.
The West German Governmen

day expressed regret to Frenc!
ligh Commissioner, M. Andrc
Francois Poncet, tor misunder-

nding caused by the Hamburg
speech of Justice Minister, Dr
Thomas Dehler,

The Government, in repy t
he French High Commissioner’,
rolest against Dr. Dehler’s speech
disavowed its published text and
offered to arrange for the Ministe
£ Justice to explain his real in
ention in a personal conversatior
with M. Francois Poncet,

The French Hign Cominissioner
n his pretest, published by thx
German Government, had des

bed Dr. Dehler’s speech a

eking, and as amounting to ;

tification of Adolf Hitler's policy
at the expense of France.

In his speech in Hamburg o:
Sunday, Dr. Dehler denounced the

500 Trades Councils—local} tales. of German aggression, and

claimed it was untrue that Ger-
many had been guilty -of having
started all aggressions in the past
200 years.

Hitler was, to a great extent, the
it of the Versailles Treaty and
pusillanimity of France, he
reported to have said. France
World War I that
European question could onl;

e solved by preventing Germany
ing

believed

}
|





igain
—Reuter |

|

The Federation has asked the
Economic and Social Council of
the United Nations to consider the
allegations at its meeting next
month.

The W.F.T.U., which last year

Jaunched a bitter campaign against
alleged slave labour in many
countries, gave notice in a report
to the Council published today,
that it would propose a measure
which would constitute the basis
or far-reaching action against
discrimination.
The report alleged that discrit-
ination in employment was rife.
and that discrimination in wag. ;
exists between white and colour: |
populations.

Discrimination was alr >
charged in standards of livin ;
and housing, .in social legisl:. -
tion, and jin pecruiiment of
compulsory labour,

In South Africa, the repo
said, “the measure of discrim -
ination practised against work
ers results in a revivabof slay-
ery.”

The report also alleged that in
Belgium, British and French pos-
sessions in Africa, there was a
racial discrimination in the exer-
cige of Trade Union Rights.

“In territories under British
control,” it was stated that Trade
Union activity is in practice
severely restricted.

This is in the main the result of
a rigorous, although dangerous,
vague interpretation of the term
sedition.

The laws on sedition may he
and have been applied to all kinds
of criticism of the administration
exercised by the Buropean com-
munity, the report claimed.

—Reuter.





|







+a





when

it

PAGE TWO

Caub Calling



Dr. BELFIELD CLARKE (centre) is seen chatting with Mr. C. A.
Coppin, Government Analyst (left) and Mr. Pat Walter (right), the
Doctor's secretary, yesterday at the General Hospital.

Listinguished W.I. Doctor
D‘ C. BELFIELD CLARK,
distinguished West indian
Doctor who arrived recently by
the Lady Rodney, is here io:
months’ holiday. He was accom
panied by his Secretary Mr. Pat
Walter, who has been with Dr.
Clarke for the past twenty years.
Dr Clarke, Barbados Scholar ctf
1914, was a Scholar at St.
atierine’s Collage Camb idge,
Resident Medical Officer at Adden-
brooke's Hospitai Cambridge,
Resident House Surgeon and
Casua:ty Officer of the University
College Hospital, London. He has
p acti d@"in London and Barnet
and ig Medical Advisor to the
WeifareDepar.ment of the
Colonial. Office.

He ig @Yhember of the Secretary
of State’s"iedical ivis Comm
mittee and the Secretary of State's
Adviso:y Committee on the Wel-
fare of Colonial people in the
United Kingdom.

His home “Belfield House,” in
Herts is what might be called the
second home of al] West I: n
students in London wh
there every Sunday for what
Doctor calls “Open House.”

H thinks we
Hospital ‘here and t
good future. The
proved in every
was last.here over twenty ve
ago.

hve









«an an

Returning from Long Leave
R. “AND MRS. FREDD.E
Potter, are hee for a few

days before returning to St.

Lucia. Mr. Potter is Manager >t

Cable and Wireless B.anch in St.

Lucia. Just back from long leave

in England, they have been away

for seven months spending most
of their holiday in Sussex, how-

ever they. were in London for a

short time. For their entire stay

the weather has been fine and
even the Winter has not been as
cold a§ usual. They travelled out
on the “Colombia Star,” a nineteen
passenger ship which was very
comfortable and they had a most
enjoyable trip over to Trinidad.

They arrived from there yester-

day by#B.W.LA. Their daughter

Wendy" @lid son Peter as well ns



Mr. Bernard Moore and Mr. B.
Moore were at the airport to meet
them.

«> «<>»
K.C. On Holiday
Me W. M. C¢ uri
who” is connected h th
firm of Corbett and Harper, Bar-
risters, Solicitors and Notaries of

Jitiseg



Canada is now in Barbados fo1
holiday He arrived on Monday
by the “Lady Nelson” accon
panied by his wife and they are
Staying at the Hotel Royal
> «<>»
“Barbadian Religion”
NYONE who owns a radio
must have had it on yester-

day listening to the Cricket coin-

mentary from Trinidad, and those
working in town were on the
telephone several times during

the day asking the wife for
co-rect scdte

the

-- BY THE WAY >

I SEE that the British Council
is to sponsor a film about the
place of cricket in our national
life. May I suggest that they
should go very gingerly to work
with the love theme?

It ig important that fo eign
audiences should not get the idea
that cricket is a kind of Bohemian
ragamadolio and tumble-cum-
trivy. I would like some simple
tale, showing how a man had ta
choese between cricket and love
Of course, he chooses cricket, and
the girl loves him all the more
for doing the decent, clean thing
and remains his good friend, The
Bulgarians ought to revel in that.
it might even make them take
up ezkrikicz (with a bomb for a
ball). There might tbe a scene
in which a decadent French or





»



“Sea’’ of Grain
T. COL, AND MRS. F. 4.
James who are from Regina
Saskatchewan in Canada are pay-
ing Barbados their first visit
They are staying at the Hastings

Hovel, ar.iving ty the Lady
xiodney some weeks ago. They
like Barbados very much

especially being so close to the
sea. xrum their Hotei they have
a beautiiul view of the ocean, so
umike the scenery from his home
sn Meglua—g.eat expanses of grain
lar as the eye can see. Now
retired, Col. James used to be in
the investment business,

@bs

«> »
From Venezuela
Mi": d. kK. GODrkKeY and her
little son Christopher of San
Joaquin, Venezuela, arrived yes-
day morning by B.W.LA. via
Trinidad on their first visit to the
island for a holiday. They were
accompanied by Mrs. A. Segovia
also of Venezuela and they are
staying at the Hotel Royal.
Mrs. Godfrey is the wife of Mr.
J. R. Godfrey of the Standard Oil
Company in Venezuela.
«> «<>

T.C.A. Officials Return

R. JOHN MAXWELL, Eastern
Regional Traffic Manager,
T.C.A., and Mr. Patrick Labrie,
Traffic and Sales Representative
of T.C.A., for the Caribbean area
returned to Canada via Trinidad
yesterday evening by B.W.LA.,
Mr. Maxwell arrived over the
week-end on a short business trip
and there was a small luncheon
party at the Marine Hotel yester-
day in honour of his visit.



«> «>»

First in 36 Years
AYING his first visit to the
island after an absence of 36

years is Mr. Garnet L. Johnson,
a Barbadian now resident in the
U.S.A. in the Real Estate business.
Mr. Johnson arrived here on
Monday afternoon by the “Lady
Nelson” on a two-month visit and
is staying with his relatives at
Parris Gap, Westbury Road.
He is Treasurer of the West
Indian Storm Relief Society and
has come out here to see for him-
conditions of the recent flood.
He is also interested in Welfare
i the Baby Creche
1's Goodwill League
is conducted by Mr. John
, M.B.E,

on said that the creche
an and sanitary and
could not be a
itution for the care Oo:
ildren,







During the last war, he was an
é loyee of the U.S. Navy and
was also Treasurer of the British
War Relief Society Inc., Washing-
te D.C. and received a certifi-
cate of recognition for aiding
Britain in her struggle for
democracy during the war from
the British War Relief

Mr. Johnson spent ten years in
Panama from 1908—18 during

which time he was engaged in the
construction of the Panama Cans
nd is now a pensioner of that
Government

cricketer yields to the
advances of a pretty vampire on
the eve of a Test Match, and
brings her into the pavilion while
his side is batting—-the dirty cad.
In Passing

NAPOLEON once said, “Mme,
de Genlis talks about virtue as
though she had invented it.” Film
act.esses’ publicity men are today
beginning to talk about mother-
hood as though they had invented
it.

Mrs. Rumpus in Trouble

Spanish

Again
AT a meeting of the Friends of
Culture (Market Harborough

Branch, Mrs. Fibblestone in the
chair, her dog Nupsie under it),
Mrs. Rumpus rose and waved a
ieaflet, crying, “The P.E.N. Club



85

SS
7
6
-

EVANS
ELITE SHIRTS

WHITE, TAN,

KHAKI

COOL LIGHTWEIGHTS
6.00 6.72

FOR THIS WEEK ONLY—CLOSING 12.30 P.M. THURSDAY



AND
OFFER YOU

TRUBENISED COLLAR

DRILL

90 1.04

1.17

PLAIN TROPICALS

JUST OPENED
IN NEW

6.88

6.83



by Beachcomber

WHITFIELDS
4.45

and BLUE

THE

Member of The A.O.A.

HE latest news ot David
Walcott, son of Mr. and
Mrs. E. L. Walcott of St. Anns
Court Garrison, is that he has
been interned at the Montree
General Hospital. David,. who}
left Barbados in 1942 did a three |
year pre-medical course at Mc}
Gill University, continuing his
studies there until July last year |
when he was interned.

He is a member of the A.O.A.
Honorary Medical Society of
North America. Sometime in May
he will take his State Board Ex-
amination and he intends to re-
main in Canada for the present.



«>» GH
in Full Swing

REPANALUNS ace. in fuli
swing for the Cabaret Show
which is scneduled for February
4 at the Drill Hall, Those taking
part are buckling down. But tnere
nas been a smali siiag in arrange-
mentss The rehearsai which was
to have taken place at the Drili
Halli on Friday will not now come
off. Instead this rehearsal will be
heid at the residence of Mrs. A. L.
Stuart, Norham, Tweedside Roaca

on Tuesday 31.

«> «>»
Recent Arrivals
Amore recent arrivais to the

island from Trinidad are Mrs.
Potter and her mother Mrs. Lia-
Potter and her mother Mrs. Lid-
low. Mrs. Potter’s husband is the
Agricultural Supervisor of Usine,
Trinidad and Mrs. Lidlow’s hus-
band has a large Dairy in Trini-
dad,

Another visitor to Barbados is
Mr. Kidd, who is Assistant Ac-
countant to the Apex Oil Com-
pany. Mr. Kidd is a Charterea
Accountant. They are all guests
at Cacrabank.

«> «>
Some Fine Work
OW ON show at the Arts and
Crafts Exhibition is some
fine work in the Pottery section
done by Aileen Hamilton. Her
modelled figures of local colour,
include—Harbour Policeman, St.
Lucia Madam, Woman with 6
basket and a dog and others.
Her Majolica ware include plat-
ters with fish designs on them.

«> «>»

Visited St. Kitts
ME: D. C. FROST, who with

her son Patrick recenfly re-
turned from a holiday in St. Kitts
has been visiting her husband Mr.
D. Courtney Frost, who is Acting
Manager of Cable and Wireles:
Branch there, while the Manage:
Mr. Cyril Maloney is on holiday
in Nevis.

«> «>
Will Go to Schoo! Here
RS. HUGH MONTES whose
husband is with the Phillips
Oil Company at Santa Ana, Bar-
celona, came in yesterday by
B.W.LA. via Trinidad with her
daughter Elena whom she has
brought to put into school at the
Ursuline Convent.
Mrs. Montes is staying at the
Hotel Royal.

«> «>»
From Mackenzie, B.G.
R. JIM CAMPBELL of the
Demerara Bauxite Co. im
Mackenzie and his wife are here
for two weeks’ holiday and are
spending it at the Ocean View
Hotel. i
«> «>

Comings and Goings
M®: J PERCY TAYLOR,

Branch Manager of B.W.LA.
Ltd., left for Trinidad by B.W.LA.,
yesterday evening on a_ short
business visit.

Mr Leslie ROHEE, Civil Servant
of British Guiana returned home
on Monday lbly the “Lady Nelson”
after spending two and a half
months’ holiday here. He was
staying at Indramer Guest House.

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Stoute Jr.,
returned to Trinidad yesterday
afternoon by B.W.LA.



is a hive of Conservatives!” Mrs.
Fibblestone retorted, with great
dignity, “Very likely. But we are
discussing illiteracy in Swedish
Lapland.” ‘Everything,” shouted
Mrs. Rumpus, “is riddled with
reactionary beastliness.” She was
then asked to leave which she did,
with a parting yell., “Expose the
Capitalists!”
A Nest of Rowdies
When you threw a bottle at
Swinburne, you had to make sure
it was an empty one, The poet
had an uncanny knack of catch-
ing the missile neatly in one hand.
If it was half-full, he at once
drank heartily, and the laugh was
on whoever threw it—usually Bill
Morris, hot from Kelmscott.
(Mrs. “Freddie” Upchurch:
+ "Neath Chelsea Skies.)

SHADES

7.08

— OPEN SATURDAY
UNTIL 4 P.M.



inches

BARBADOS



HALF-A-YARD OF CHECKED GINGHAM,’ bids binding, ‘and muslin are all you need to make
this knitting bag which really is handy.

Checked Knitting Bag |

Materials
Half a yard of checked ging-
ham.
Double-fold bias
contrasting colour.
Cardboard.
Button (1% inches diameter) to
match bias binding.
Heavy pre-shrunk muslin for
interlining.
Mercerised thread ¢> match.

Cutting Directions

Bag. Cut three pieces each 16
square (two of fabric,
one of interlining); one fabric
piece is used for lining.

Handle. Two pieces, each 3
inches by 36 inches (one of fab-
ric, one of interlining.)
Cardboard Base. One
inches by 13 inches.

binding

piece,
33



SKELETON
* CROSSWORD ”



CLUES ACROSS

Might wheat meal be a vege-

tarian substitute for it ?

. Subject of teaching in play ?
Not done, perhaps, yet not

Gegis” not,
8
” pot owever, rule in

- PP

One form of reverse.

“V" for this.

River of silk in Prance.
Musical approaches.

Craft, or Just the end of it.
How to cook for a K.B.E.

. Mars his god ?

Nothing to wri

ene te in public, it
issue.

Plowers, in a way.

One of shese Songs of Araby? |

(two words).
CLUES DOWN
Literally, an anagram? (three

words)
Care for it? Possib’

C ly.

He could hard)

10t amusing. ibuasentcnsina
{t gives relief trom teasers.
a, = companionable sort of
Mid the LRA

ane th 8S Wear it upside

To some, at any ra ‘
fool y ve. she’s a

LOHR

ADVOCATE

|

in
i

|

|
|

|
i
|
!
|



12.



wootball team green in age.
Tae disease might be blue rot.
+ the wasp species? They're
armful. anywa
which

art sabre
Step Up. my)
she writes &

y
18 part Kukri,

iittie dears:
letter to Mother

So eaead




















13. Baste raw edges of bag anc
lining together.
| 14. With wrong sides together
Sewing Directions fold ‘the seam edge up to
1. Place the three bag pieces TRESS BREEDS CORBRE Lm
together, edges even, pin,| each side). Baste edges to-
Measure off 6 inches on sides|__ ether. _ ik
(from one corner). Cut oft} 15. Cut 2 pieces of bias binding
this point. Unpin the pieces.| to ft measurement of basted
2. Baste interlining to wrong side edge. : Vis ,
side of one bag piece, edges| 16- Turning in end of bias fo
even, a clean finish, insert each
3. Mark position for button-| basted side edge inside bias.
hole on right side of the in- Baste and top stitch close to
terlined bag piece (corner inner edge of bias. :
opposite the cut corner),|17- Fold the long remaining side
Measure in 1 4nch irom edges of bag to complete the
corner and mark; measure shape of bag; baste. ;
again 14 inches inside andj 18- Im a continuous operation
mark. Run a basting be- insert raw side and pointed
tween marks. edges inside bias; turn in
4. For bound button hole, cut raw edges for a clean finish.
a straight strip of fabric Baste and top stitch close to
24 inch by 24 inches, | inner edge of bias.
5. Baste strip in position over| !9. Baste interlining to wrong
mark on bag. | side of handle piece. Fola
6. Stitch % inch each side of | handle in half lengthwise
basting and across ends., \ right sides together. Stitch a
7. Slash and clip in diagonally inch seam at lung edge
on each side at ends, Turn leaving an opening for turn-
binding to wrong side! ing; at ends, stitch int
through slash. | points. Trim seams, tur
8. On wrong side, fold a pleat| handle right side out. Sliy
at ends, forming a piping on| stitch open edges together.
right side with edges meet-| Press,
ing, baste. Stitch across the| 20. Matching centre of handle tc
triangular pieces at ends of centre of bag (on under
buttonhole. | side), pin both long edges o
9. Sew fabric invisibly to stitch-| handle in place to bag uw
ing line of buttonhole. Trim| to the points on sides. Sliy
off surplus on binding to] stitch long edges to bag.
eliminate bulk. 21. Lap one free handle enc
10. Place the bag and lining! over the other 3 _ inches
pieces, right sides together,| Baste and slip stitch ends to
edge even. Stitch a 4 inch gether.
seam across the ~ short| 22. Slash lining under button-
straight edge. Trim seam,! hole and slip stitch dow
turn right side out. Press along stitching line of button-
1l. With raw edges even hole.
measure up 43} inches from/ 23. Turn down flap (extendin:
the seam edge. Run a bast- point) and determine posi
ing thread across. tion for button; attach butto:
Slip cardboard base be-| to bag.
tween the uae and bag Tit itachi ia
ing, inner long edge of card- patie ig 55 ~~ paren aes
board up to the basting line; TOS ah 2?
match lengthwise centres Mat. TO-DAY at 4.30 p.m
and top stitch close to all | ALAN LADD in
edges of cardboard through | “SALTY O'ROURKE”
all thicknesses. with GAIL RUSSELL





YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION



Mrs. Housewife

Do not let the Electric Cuts harass you

We can supply - - -

KEROSENE TABLE LAMPS (complete)

KELLY NO. 6 LAMPS
LANTERNS

FALKS KEROSENE STOVES—2, 3, & 4 burner
OVENS—-single and double

WOOD and COAL STOVES—Nos. 6,7 and 8
BOX IRONS—614", 7” and 71/9”

CHIMNEYS, BURNERS and WICKS



°

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LIMITED.







A Paramount Picture





EMPIRE

7 +
OLYMPIC
ROXY

AND
_ ROYAL
_ THEATRES

| +



Due to uncertainty
of Electric Current
We will inform |
You of Shows
through RADIO
DISTRIBUTION









|| PLANTATIONS LIM

a A }

THURSDAY JANUARY 2, ty r

Children’s Cornep|







‘
Feeling very puzzled about the
whole affair Rupert decides to go
home, but he walks away trom the ae 3 :
caravan and keeps a sharp loo) out ., codgerst —— Np
for the unfriendly man. Crossings mean?” tHe neo .
lonely part of the common he sees # = and soor in his Hm»
figure standing black against the showing Beppo 1" tal
evening sky and he dodges behinc § o the astonishec Mrs. Best
a
4
4
C
t
1

C)-

|

It’s not surprising how much energy youngsters can gain fo
drinking KLIM milk every day. Every glassful brims wih
wholesome nourishment so necessary for growing children, You
can depend on KLIM to build your youngster sturdy and
strong—full of vigor and vitality. KLIM is safe too, became
it’s milk produced under strict sanitary control to assure isi |
form quality. Just wait until your youngster tastes creamy-tid
KLIM milk—he'll love it and thrive on it!

says ELSIE the BORDEN cow



FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER









~~ KEI“ MILK mae
TAKE PURE WATER, ADD KLIM, STIR a n,
AND YOU HAVE SAFE, PURE MILK | i
A, aor, tere Berdag Oe SS
eerie Ti, ime
BRL : ¢
WEES ee os
} AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members
TO-NIGHT at 8.30

Final Showing of “SONG OF SURRENDIN

WANDA HENDRIX, CLAUDE RAINS, MACDONALD n
A Paramount Picture ;
N.B.—Showing of “NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND EY
been postponed.







GLOBE THEA

IT’S JAM SESSION TONIGHT AT 830 Pil
ICAL
4’s |
16 LEADING MUSICIANS GET TOGETHER ®
CAVALCADE OF RHYTHM TOGETHER W#

BLAZING TRAIL

(CHARLES STARRETT)

MU



Starting FRIDAY 8.30 and continuing
Errol FLYNN and Greer GARSON a
in “THAT FORSYTE WOMAN’ ~



HURRICANE LANTERNS ......+++* s "
OH. STOVES—Single Burner .....--+** gs aeh
» » —Kwo Single Burners with OV | gi
” » —Three Burner ...-::* $56.4) , ¢
” , —Four Burner ....- oes 00 te

PRESSURE STOVES

if ; fh



}

mem re

———<—





: THURSDAY JANUARY 26, 1950

4

aa

» Less
(urrent

‘K. Guarantees

Than
Exports



i. page 1 security for the future. The price
6 -~ actoury long-.ermjreceived for the 260,0u0 tons
a 5 450,000 tons, not) above 640,000 to make a total o1
ne 7 | 900,000 may be’ (that is it the
: sugar can be sold at ail) at such

Not Promise a tevel as to reduce the price over
aspect,. 1 the whole crop and make the

z q that, beyond
‘of 1,100,000 to be guaran-

y the U.K.
oa to make up te tota!

of 1,000,0UU is a;

than a promise. It

; am oifer to purchase |

5 ly remunerative
; Se toe Colonial ex-
ar but.an edict that the
‘must restrict their total
fo 1,550,000. Ot this the
de would be of the order
tons (as against
@ requested to meet the
i the Area). :
er it is unfair to draw
zons with historical pre-
wes; H.M. Government's
of August 1949 to
i, and improve the
of the B.W.I. by means

ferm sugar ayrangements
on a full consiaeration

/ present position of

when prospective ruin
wr unrest was the picture.
Yor the view advanced in
‘ rs that the offer
ives the restriction oi

sugar production in
that the United. King-

n of foreign sugar.”’
ntention of the B.W.I.
has never been that
pstricting colonial sugar
in order to ,buy a
jon of foreign

n was bought pre-war.
ly the figure for foreign
the U.K. proposals was
not 250,000, and the
int was that the U.K.
buy too great a propor-
foreign sugar
restricting Colonial

ex-

offer made represents a}
security |

i degree of
the Colonial producers
Phad.at any previous
Before the war
exports of the Colonies
nied to 960,000 tons, the
of which was without
lee and had to compete
id markets apart from
BBprotection afforded by
‘Bmonwealth preference
polonies export today is
tons. By 1952, on
expansion plans, it)

he 1,400,000 tons. If |
accept fhe present offer, ;
Solonies will be entitled |
8 and for four years
‘that to export 1,550,090 |



1
e
5

f

total 1,100,000 tons, |
ing no less than 71 per

j il be shipped to the}
fingdom with a price!
giving them ample}

against any risk of a;
‘in world prices The|
they will be free to sell!
best advantage in the |
and in so doing they|

the full benefit of |
monwealth preferential |
duty. In these circum-
His Maiesty’s Govern-
that by this offer it

implemented +#he
fiven in the ¢om-
B of August 10.” |
‘may afford sreater |

- Security than pre-war |
Bwas no security at all|

TOUS conditions the |
amount of guaran- |
Age—h40).000—ics in-
that it does not afford!

TABLE OF

‘ly

in

so

Australia
UK. 300,000
d U.K 100,000
*. at ono
on ; 600,900
UK. Only holds out a ho:
eH Would be obtained by

they would not be prepar nore titive ‘ . nia
O Bewpared 3. be. i bene ei (vi acne be} Of an alliance between Westerling | Countries,

7 dumped prices or not.

the

the amount of/|

the ,
not on the historical |

there is no founda- |

‘may buy a greater pro- |

while |

the}

| B.W.1.

guarantee worthless.
The U.K. Government an-
}mouncement of August lv statea



| that “special consiaeration woula
; be given to the neeas o1- the
la :

Colonies (where H.M.G’s first

obligation hes). In the resuit,
j the Dominions have been given a
;3ugar quota for a tonnage ap-
| proaching 100% more than thei
| present exports while the Colonies
|aré only to receive 25% more than
itheir present exports. Tne
;|Dominions are to receive a
guaranteed market for more than

jtheir present exports — tue

| Colonies far less than their prese:.

| exports!
| An brief, the U.n. nas offer-
ed the B.W.I. an 8-year con-
tract (as against 10 years re-
quested) for 640,000 tons of
sugar (as against 1,100,000
requested). It is then pro-
posed to restrict B.W.I. over-
all production for expert to
| 900,000 tons (again against
; 1,100,000 tons requested), but
for about one third of this
the B.W.I. may receive a price
—that is the fictitious “world”
i price plus preference — less
| than it costs to produce it.
All this while being restricted
to a production 200,000 tons
less than that stated to be
| the minimum requirements to
support the peoples of the
West Indies at even their
| present low standards of
| living.

Less Than Current Exports

The figures show that the U.K.
; could now easily (even after the
over-generous treatment of the
dominions) increase the offer to
the Colonies by giving a guaran-
tee on all the Colonial sugar
which it is intended should be
sold in the U.K., i.e., 1,250,000 in-
stead of on only 1,100,000. (The
U.K. view is that the difference
of 150,000 must be kept to main-
tain some element of competition
in the U.K. Market in the in-
terests of U.K. consumers and the
general efficiency of sugar pro-
duction. It should be noted that
the U.K. has insisted on retain-
ing 250,000 tons for foreign sugars
and this quantity should be a
sufficient yardstick, especially
when it is remembered that in
addition the U.K. imports an
amount in the region of a half
million tons of foreign sugar for
refining and re-export, which
amount has not been brought into
any of the U.K. calculations). A
guarantee of 1,250,000 for the
Colonies would give the West
Indies not what they originally
asked, not what they believe to
be sufficient to meet their si
and economic needs, but a guaran-|
tee on current’ exports. A com-
promise such as this the B.W.I
delegation said, against their
better judgment, would be ac-|
cepted, but the U.K. have refused
The U.K. Government an-
nouncement of August 10 stated
that the Government’s policy was
to “maintain and improve” the
economy by these sugar |
arrangements. On the = main}
point at issue, the U.K..s inter-}
pretation of their undertaking has
been to offer to guarantee less
than current exports. How con
any reasonable person feel that







His Majesty's Government h S|
“fully implemenf@4 the pledges!
given in th communique of

August 10?’

U.K. OFFER





(2) (3) (4) B.W.T
South Colonies Total included ;
Africa in (3)
150,000 1,100,000 1,550,000 640,000 i
(a) a)
150,000 250,000 85,000 |
= ee .
(ec) ’
1,800,000
(b) (bi
50,000 200,000 50,000 175,000
200,000 550,000 2 , 000 900,000

pe that with the aid of preference this
Colonial exporters, but made it clear
prices
Further, that the Colonies



L.F.T.U. Gave
Delegates
Assurances

ONE of the most
aspects of the Conference of
International Confederation of
Free Trade Unions held in London
recently, was the way the colonial
delegates spoke of the social and
economic conditions existing in
their island homes Hon’ble E. A.
Mitchell, President General of the
Grenada Workers’ Union told the
“Advocate” yesterday.

Mr. Mitchell who was the Gren-

the

ada delegate at the Conference,
arrived here on Monday by the
S.S. “Cottica” as an intransit
passenger and is staying at the
Cosmopolitan Guest House.

He said that more or less, all

parts of the Colonial Empjre seem-
ed to be suffering from the same



economic conditions. After listen-
ing to the delegates from the
various colonies, they were given
some very good assurance as to

the pert the International Federa-
tion of Free Trade Unions intended
to play in achieving social securit;
and social justice for all, regard-
less of colour, creed or nationality.

If the promises that were made
by the verious leading
the T.U.C. of England, 1.L.0:
and the A.F, of L. and the C.1.0 of
America could become a reality,
then they would he sure that
something would be done in order
to assist colonial peoples of the
world.

th

e
tne

Mr, Mitchell said that the Con-,

ference promised to aid full em-
ployment, the improvement of
working conditions and the raising
of the standard of living of all
countries in the world.

The conference also promised to
provide assistance in the ‘estab-
lishment, maintenance and devel-

opment of trade union organisa-|

tions, particularly in economically,
socially undeveloped countries.



Council Discuss
Seawell On Friday

A special meeting of the Legis-
lative Council has been called for
at 2 p.m. tomorrow to consider the
$500,000 Resolution for the con-
struction of new runway at
Seawell.

The Resolution was passed by
the House of Assembly on Tues-
day, and voting of the money is
considered urgent.

a



Indonesia Blame
Dutch Army For
Bandung Disorder

BANDUNG, Jan. 25
There is much talk in Bandung



outstanding

figures like j

THE



Controls
Hamper W.I.
Canada Trade

There

trade

should be more
between the West

and Canada and the people should
Visit eacn other and at the
time enjoy each other's ¢ limate at
the right time and also buy each
other’s goods, Mr. M, Leo Sweeney,
President and General Manager of
Sweeney Cooperage Ltd., of Van-
couver, B.C., told the Advocate

free

same



yesterday.

ee




Enna enn omen oe

|
}

Mr. M, L. SWEENEY









Indies

Ses leeeeenereesnaneeapeenier teroenueen—isenpunnen



}



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



eerste essen

Lorry Hold Up Acquiiania

Continues
IN BERLIN

| Souvenirs

LONDON (By M









Those whe treasure
{memories of that “granc
BERLIN, Jan. 25 of the sea,” the &S

A 2-mile long file of German | will be able to bi
&00ds lorries queued this after-/ when the liner’ rt
noon on the east side of the Anglo- | auctioned in Februar
Soviet zonal border, delayed by | First part of the
“go-slow” tactics of Soviet offi-|the 44.786 ton. 36
cials, | itself.

Another 120 on the western side | Whole ceili ‘
Waited their turn for the newly | beautifully x
rigorous check-up at the Helm-jto come unde?
stedt control point | hammer

Berlin-bound German supply Wepplehings,
lorries from the west were passing ”
through at the rate of about 10
an hour, a British spokesman said

Na

Russian authorities were ask- yf a
ing drivers to produce additional the “Wy os
purchase certificates countersign- nua
ed by the Eastern Berlin magis-| “Whe,
trate, tthe 6

Similarly, at Luebeck-Herren- | “* ears” have
burg crossing point, traffic had facaia ’ ‘
dropped to about ten per cent of itn
the usual rate. the de

Altogether, 20 lorries had pass- | °f€ c
ed in both directions there in 24 tor Britais
hours, compared with 200 to 250 SaeCUl
normally. eeesure:. CF! tin

Barge traffic up and down the} Which wi
central German canals came to a} , The former .
complete standstill today owing to | 4tlantic,” had a
icé. ; named .after famous

them were reproau

Rail traffic continued normally. | Known paintings

The : Soviet-licensed Berliner | Béyond the fact that the Act
Zeitung; first Berlin newspaper to} tania has retired from ser,

comment on the recent border
traffie hold-ups, said today they
were “promoting real inter-zonal
trading by protecting the Germa

nothing is

plans fo

Known



, He felt that the controls should| Democratic Republic and Berlin Greor
le lessene ammove. » >} le : ‘ .
\ ~ of sened or removed enurely, | from being plundered by the B H o Jib
jpecause they were hampering} west.” ° ° ,
trade and commerce between the Y °
two places, “The row, which certain peopl« ( *OCCTOR
Mr. Sweeney arrived here by) are making, is simply aimed ~ONCE SStOr
| B.W.1.A., on Sunday from Trini- creating tension and disorder,’ it >
dad on a short business visit and! added 2Sits
A c s Cé 1}; aaded, & ,
will be leaving today for Jama a..| —Reuter ro €StS
} He is staying at th Marine Hotel.
: MEXICO CIT’
4 member of the Executive of | The Gi
the Canadian Manufacturers’ As-| Wi. S d publicly prot
sociation, Mr. Sweeney is also a ome & qua ron of petrol
member of the Board of Trade in ish Hor
Vancouver which is one of the M n G. Hi ) {
i ‘ i ! j ernment
largest in the world and very ; ay Oo ome The Ei
active, In ;
}Guatamalan Gove
He said that the political situ-| BERMUDA, (By Mail.) in its refusal to reco (
ation ail over the world was in Vice~Admiral Packer has said Britain’s rights i
| a very hectic conaition on account | that consideration is being given | territory of Be
| of the many controls and restric-| to moving the America-West In-| Qjims the ter! ite
| tions that were in effect in those dies Squadron of one cruiser and} of. its rights
various countries which held back‘ three frigates to England and} colony Mexic ,
free trading, and nowadays, it WaS | operating the station from ther: “if there j
dificult to do business the Way! The station covers North a statu of Seli:
they would like. South America, including Bermuda | oy ust be taken
In Canada, they did not haye|@d the West Indies. “Guatamala



| many restrictions, but in their ex-
port business, they ran into diffi-
culties on account of the devalu-
ation of the sterling eurrency in
most of the natural markets for
the products of British Columbia
which were in British

Empire |

| tic defence plans.

: ‘ rly, } “ver > Ini
js nbete among themselves. Therefore the B.W.I. proportion] and Dar Ul Islam. Such a com- _ Latte rly, nowever, the United
d iy is pure conjecture, bination would offer the greatest|States had purchased quite
: nt on a market be fe n Canada for this sugar rs large : { “te cinch
3 Mpetitive prices as in (a) mone meen.) HS ° threat to the Indonesian Govern- large quantity of products such |
wer of U.K. consumption would be made up of 250,000 tons}ment, whose population contain s lumber. and certain food lines
Sugar and 500,000 tons domestic beet, Total 2,550,000 tons thousands of orthodox Moslem: which had helped the situation. |



RUMANIA REJECTS

GOSLAV

PROPOSAL

BUCHAREST, Jan. 25.

has rejected a Yugoslav proposal, suggested in a

Pa mixed commissi

Rumanian

wed today that thc

$ of the Rumanian

in Belgrade has

eed to reply that
Proposal, the

ment were trying
Msibility for the
idents, and vio-

ue air space of Rumania
; “an Government

' Fepeated|) that these

Yugoslav Foreign Affairs Ministry last month,

on of inquiry into frontier in-

news); criminal actions are not isolated

or accidental incidents, -but ex-
pressions of the hostile -anti-
| Rumanian policy of provocation
and espionage on the part of
| Yugoslavia”, '
“This policy of the Yugoslav
Government is part and parcel of
the policy and the schemes of the
Angio-American warmongers, the
TNumanian spokesman said.
—Reuter.

.
PREPRESS ESPEOPOSS

fF “VALOR”
,OIL STOVES

For dependa

SER MODELS

a

NS and SMALL

a few

BY. HUTCHIN
mr AL STREET.

‘tiie ee

FPSSSS



< $O60%
PPO SOSSOFOSOO SSO SS SOOO POSS

ble Cooking:

$40.23 & $46.81
vi $52.55 & $60,12
STOVES available in

days.

SON & CO., LTD.

DIAL 4222

COOKE CCCCCSOSOOES:

4

>

cece ae me et emerenes

The Dutch Army fears poiiticai
complications more than /ighting
Its ranks include some 15,000 we'|
trained men of the KNii, (th
Royal Netherlands
Army) wiiich is mosily recruited
from East Indonesia. Yesverday’s
declaration by an Indonesian Gov-
ernment spokesman at Djakarta
that the Dutch Army were to
blame for Westerling’s attack on
Bandung amazed and angered
Dutch troops. They contended that
only Dutch intervention prevented
the massacre of Indonesian troops
in the town,
—Reu'er




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- Indones:en ,



To have controls in the sterling
area was a very serious matter,
| also the fact that the sterling was
devalued.

As President of
‘tional Evergreen Playground
ssociation, Mr, Sweeney said
that Vancouver, British Columbia
very fine city. They usually
flowers throughout the year
,;and the grass was always green

The last. two
very tough as they
usual weather.

1 sno\ for

the Interna-

was a

had

Nad very un-
Last year they
weeks, one

SIX

@ On Page 7










of dust,

for three



winters had been

of

|
|
|

Mr. Dugdale said that the Docic- | Will, recognis«
yard is too small and too old to/| Tights that foreign co
be economie and local wages are} to obtain or have acai
too high. | territory of Belize
concessions hande
He said it would take about!de facto authoriti
one year to close it down once! Government),” the

such a decision was made. Th Britain recent!
possible closing is part of an over-|hamas Exploration C:
all naval reduction plan but it sion to exploit B

not connected with North Atlai- | serves, in tide |;
land areas.

Ana

—B.U.P.



IMPERIAL LEATHER @ LINDEN BLOSSOM e

Get the goodness of BE

in a cup of

BOVRIL



EF
~

i}




Maxe yourself a cup of bot Bovril when you feel tired or depressed
You'll feel better as soom as you’ve enjoyed its comforting, ch
warmth, It sharpens your appetite~helps you to est well and ke:
Well, Bovril puts beef into you. Drink it daily.

Remember BOVRAL improves all dishes
and makes excellent sandwiches, too !

BLUE HYACININ





Wall Street
Wonders About
Price Break

By THEODORE KOSLOW



NEW YORK (By Mail).

Wali Street traders aré still
i Significance of the

in. prices,
represent a normal

rrecuion of the seven-
s-tong advance as many
or” does ‘the

te that something
the offing?
iturally, there are supporters



ined up en both sides of the
argument.
The ardent bullish enthusiasts

confident that within a reila-
short time the market will
ave again confounded the
sceptics with a run-up to new
ground. :

ively





pessimists are equally

un that the highs of the
1949—1950 advance have already
een set and that is only a
‘estion of me until the market

eens to retreat in earnest.
However, there an in-be-
ween group of financial analysts
ho lean to the view that the
ll probably not do much
time until cer-

ng for a













major uncertainties are
posed of
Amoi these are the outcome
‘ral election in
ebi Y, and the pr ess of
v tax legislation in Washing-
} roblems be de-
ably and should



dividends be main-
d 1949 levels, the
ded predomin-

i ~ the bul

nd







Little Complaint

Street broker
complain about a
ot Ousiness

€ aurin ne wees

re, Wall
volume

he veek ended
Votalled four-
even hundred and

t thousand six hundred
re heaviest turn-
omparable period in

fourteenth

igi

the



ted with dealings
iirty-eighy thousand
ed and ten shares the
was more than
reat as the four
thty-four thousand five
fty-v‘wo shares dealt









periog of a yea
in al t OrKs were
he hour «

y twelfth, when
atc
heavy

ige which forced the
Ker eleven minutes
floor transactions

ndustrials Declined

veek a whole, the
eclined ‘five dollars
a share in the
hile the railroads
nly 72 cents
f e industrial index had

rty dollars and thirty-

in the advance from
] , and the rails
ximum of only
eventy-seven
ri ‘
vial
r th
he i
Ove





er hort ol

ri Oo far vn the
rt iil t

ad } oO pel

ti out anywhers
—ELN.S

oF AGE?

n aching back
u must expect
when you're

1 caused by the

and liver, |
thy pe SLIPS
Kidney-Liver Pill 7 on a a
ii ee ak : Sizes 32—40 $2.50 each
n r bloodstream.
I -proven, Dr,
yu © conditions at |
couse: MODERN DRESS
he kidney and fiver |
ause backache,
rneout, tired, | SHOPPE
ful joints and |

our kidneys and
Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver
ut. At all drug counters



J & R BREAD
Young and Old. |

16]

: R
ENRICHED BREAD

i along with their delightful



PAGE THREE




co ~
f
Sai

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| good impression when Dry Scalp

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comb, and full of loose dandruff.
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and well-groomed all day.
‘Vaseline’ Hair Tonic works with
nature—it contains no alcohol or
other drying ingredients, Try
‘Vaseline’ Hair Tonic

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ia
anyon

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Cotton ie
Wash
FROCKS

All Sizes $6.00 each
&

}
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Silk







BROAD _ STREET.













is good for







PAGE FOUR





ae —

Published by The Advocate Co, Ltd. 34, Broad St, Bridgetows

Thursday, January 26, 1950

Wisdom Versus
Insularity

THE exodus of a group of specialist
teachers from this colony last year, was a
signal to focus public attention on the fact

at many departments of the public ser-
vice were threatened with inadequate
we staffing. His Excellency the Governor as
Mas a result, appointed a Committee “to ex-
Ber amine the establishment of administrative,
eet ofe: and technical officers in rela-
tion both to their recruitment and to their
retention; and to make recommendations
for the removal of any cases which threat-





i en to affect the public services adversely.”
hy The report of that Committee has been
bass made and it is an enlightening document.

After a delicate and tedious job the Com-
mittee “found evidence that the public
services are adversely affected by the Gov-
ernment’s inability to recruit and retain a
full complement of senior administrative,
professional and technical officers.” The
le reasons for this inability, according to the
ait report, are inadequate remuneration as
compared with similar officers in other
colonies, and the difficulty experienced in
filling the vacancies which occur at the
required standard with the present salaries
and conditions of service.

That the existing conditions of service
gave rise to a measure of dissatisfaction
was not entirely unknown to the Govern-
ment, and the Report emphasises one point
which might serve to prevent an immedi-
ate recurrence of the present condition.
It recommends that return leave passage
privileges should be granted to certain
scheduled officers who would earn one-
forty-eighth of his return passage in re-
spect of each month of service with the
Government. This is a wise provision and
should furnish the remedy for the events
which gave rise to the conditions under
investigation.

As has been already pointed out, the
slogan “Barbados for Barbadians” is out-
dated and it is useless hoping that techni-
cal and professional officers would be con-
tent to remain im, even if they entered, a
service which overlooked their potential
market value outside Barbados and denied
them return passages to their homes at
the end of stated periods.

The report recommends the establish-
ment of certain offices in the teaching ser-
vice and the setting up of a Public Service
Commission which would have the con-
fidence of the Civil Service and could pro-
vide a more efficient method of recruitment
than that existing.

It is as well that the Committee made
some general remarks on other aspects of
the service. They found that the delay
in dealing with staff matters, unsatisfac-
tory structure of the service, the lack of
training facilities and of confidence in the
existing method of recruitment, promotion
and transfer to be contributing causes. The
thoroughness of the investigation has led
the committee to put its finger on the weak
spots and in a concise document to leave
no opportunity for misunderstanding the
condition and the mistaking of the con-
tributory aggravating causes.

If Barbados is to make the progress
which is expected, it is necessary—because
she cannot supply all the technical and
professional officers she needs — for ap-
pointments to be made outside and it is to
the general good when such officers are
encouraged to remain in the island for any

length of time. It can only be done where
conditions of service and salaries are on
a basis which will prevent those in the
neighbouring colonies from being a source
of attraction. We have already lost the
services of a few able men who would have
gad’y remained in this island but for the

isadvantages under which they laboured.
The Committee has made recommendations
which, if implemented will assist in over-
coming the difficulty. In the past, similar
documents of reform have been forgotten
after being submitted. This must not hap-
pen to the report under review.



ead

OUR READERS SAY:



| 630,000 tons of

| it.

THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Battle For West Indies ¢y,4;;

Sugar Goes On |

Seeking British Public
Election Complicates

THE battle for a fair price and
long-term guarantee for British
West Indian sugar has now en-
tered a new stage. Followffig the
return to Trinidad, Barbados, and
Jamaica of the three delegates
who struggled with the Ministry
of Food for nearly two months,
it has become for sugar men a
campaign to win the support of
the British public.

On the whole, relatively little
publicity was given to the West
Indies case during the presence
of the delegation in Britain, be-
cause they rightly felt they could
not push their claims in public
while they were being negotiated
with the British Government. But
when most newspapers carried a
long statement from the Ministry
of Food asserting that the United
Kingdom was living up to the
famous August 10 pledge in the
offer it has now made, the West
India Committee launched 4
counter-attack in the form of a
Press Conference held by Mr.
J. M. Campbell, 37-year-old chief
of Booker Brothers, McConnell &
Co., Ltd., Deputy Chairman of the
West India Committee, and one of
the “backroom boys” of the past
two years’ sugar price battles.

Hit The Headlines

Campbell has hit British head-
lines with the frank statement
that it was only recently he “dare
look my sugar labourers in the
face’ — so deplorable have their
conditions been. He stated as his
personal conviction tbat the West
Indies would not accept the Brit-
ish offer, and released a letter
to the Ministry of Food from Mr.
H. A. Robinson, of Trinidad,
leader of the delegation, which
crystallises the whole West Indies
case.

Mr. Robinson’s summary of
what the Ministry of Food con-
tended was a justification of the
August pledge, was: “In brief,
you have offered the British West
Indies an eight year contract
(against 10 years requested) for
sugar (against
1,100,000 tons requested). You
then propose to restrict our over-
all production for export to

| 900,000 tons, but for about one-

third of this we may receive 4
price that is the fictitious
‘world price’ plus preference —
Tess than it costs us to produce

All this while being restricted
| to the production of 200,000

less than what we have stat
to be the minimum requirement
\to support the peoples of the
West Indies at even their present




appallingly low standard of
living.”

| Campbell made a _ powerful
| point when he stated that It was

| possible for the Ministry of Food

with the Dominions and still give
the Colonies what they need. The

| th to honour their arrangements

} Ministry of Food still insists they

|

are not forcing the Colonies to
| cut production, resting their case

lon the fact that the Colonies

| could sell on the free market.

Tories Want Bulk Purchase
For Sugar

Left-wing criticisms of the
sugar delegation have mentioned
that the delegaticyi in the past
attacked bulk purchase arrange-
ments but Mr. Campbell answer-
ed this point at his Press Confer-
ence, Asked what would happen
if a Conservative Government
were returned to power and were
against the principle of bulk pur-
chase, Mr. Campbell pointed out
that Mr, Oliver Stanley, a former
Conservative Secretary for the
Colonies and a powerful man in
the movement, had stated in the
House of Commons that the Con-
servatives regarded Government
bulk purchase of sugar as essen~
tial and it should go on.

‘The argument that the West
Indies spokesmen in London are
now putting to the British public
comes down to this; The West
Indies have to buy in the sterling
market and they support a high
standard of living in Britain by
buying at whatever prices are
demanded by British exporters.
Britain should therefore support
them, and in any case she is
bound to place the welfare of her
colonies before that of other for-
eign countries such as Cuba.

Complicating te whole posi-
tion is the forthcoming geera:
election in Britain, Plainly the
West Indies’ delegates and the



spokesman left in London will do
everything to avoid making this
a political issue. The wisdom of
this is undoubted, since not only
would such a course prejudice
current negotiations, such as they
are, but it might even lay the
West Indies open to charges of
interfering in the election by is-
suing propaganda against the
Labour Party.

It is no secret hgwever that all
those concerned with the negotia-
tions hope for one of two things:

If the Labour Government is
returned to power it will feel so
fortified that it will be able to
tackle the West Indies’ problem
along the right lines without so

much fear of domestic conse-
quences; or
A Conservative Government

will be returned and can be
induced to place Empire interests
before those of, for instance,
Cuba.

However one of the most signi-
ficant comments on the whole is-
sue was made in a long article
in the “Financial Times” which
suggested that sterling producers
generally must be tempted these
days to ask for guarantees that
virtually amount to insurances
against the effects of dollar prices
undercutting them.

Said the “Financial Times”:
“The West Indies position is
difficult; production can be ex-
panded and should be expanded
in order to provide employment.
But further expansion involves
heavy capital outlay. In the past
the price of sugar was artificially
low and scarcely provided a re-
turn on the capital invested.

“Defeatist”

“Producers naturally want
some assurance against a return
to such conditions. But it would
be dangerous and a defeatist at-
titude to assume that the sterling
area can only solve its problems
by shutting itself off from we rid
markets.”

And the Liberm point of view
as well as of many people in the
city has been expressed by Oscar
Hobson, City Editor of the “News
Chronicle”. who wrote;

“The breakdawn of the West
Indian Sugar talks goes t
heart of ome of the greatest €c
nomic problems with which
world is now faced, namely,
problem of surplus supplies o
majot basic commodities.

“A few weeks ago a Committee
f the Food and Agriculture Or-
ganisation reported on the be
of surveys prepared by F. A: O
statisticians, that in sugar, cotton,
cereals and eertain oils and fats
there is a strong prospect of
plus supply within the next
years and that for some com
t serious problem will ¢
within the next twelve months

Too High

“The sugar talks have broken
down because the West Indian
islands want a guaranteed pric
for sugar over a period of years
and too high a price at that. The
economy of these islands is highly
depen t on the sale i
sugar crops at an ‘adequate
and in the light of the pol
economic philosophy of today, o:





































“I always knew he'd turn
up somewhere.’
London Express Service.

What’s on Today

Arts and Crafts Exhibition

at Queen’s Park at 10.00
a.m,

Cricket Trial Game at Ken-
sington at 1.30 p.m.

Mobile Cinema at Reef Play-
ing Field at 7.15 p.m.

ee LLL DL LL An

'

Support
Issue

perhans it would be better to say)
yesterday, their request Is a rea-
sonable one.

Too Late

“Jt is, however, their misfortune i
to be late in the field. Too many
agricultural producing groups ali
over the world have ‘got away
with’ the same plea, many of them |
with less justification than the}

West Indies. But now inexorable} sat around a long oak

forces are at work. High prices
have stimulated production ana
where Governments, like that of
the U.S.A., not daring to reduce
prices have ventured nevertheless
to reduce acreages, the progress of
science has enabled equal or
greater crops to be produced from
those lower acreages.

“So the prophecies of the
economists are coming home to
roost. Surpluses are accumul-
ating.”

The “Times” said the British
Government's offer could not be

Specifically,
an acceptable

early in January, when they succeeded in
lreaching unanimity on the first stage of a
| history-making attempt to make the consti-
| tution Canadian I
A strategy of making the most of points of
agreement and ignoring as much as possible
the matter of disagreement paid off for chair-
man Louis St. Laurent. E
For two days the 10 provincial premiers

stitution in Canada.
exception of purely federal matters, amend-
ments require legislation by the United
Kingdom parliament.

There were a few differences of opinion
but generally the atmosphere was
iality. The fact remained, however, that
in full view of the press and public, the con-

i TT

First Agreement On
|

Constitution

OTTAWA, Canada.

Canadian Dominion-provincial conferences
have never had much of a reputation for
jagreement. When the subject of such a :

| ference is something as controversial as Can-

ada’s constitution,
agreement quickly
} But 10 premiers :
| Laurent pulled a surprise on most Canadians,

the odds favouring dis-
jump.
and Prime Minister St.

conference table in the

House of Commons chamber and discussed
constitutional matters.

they were attempting to find
formula for amending the con-

in fact as well as in name.

At present, with the

one of gen-

———— « on

=.
p=



_ of sugar, antagonising the colon-

> tum



ference wasn’t getting too much done.

Then Premier Angus Macdonald of Nova
Scotia proposed that the attorneys-general of
the various provinces go into a closed meet-
ing and attempt te work out the details.

‘A three-hour meeting produced the form-
ula which spelled success in the first stage.
The formula was quickly adopted by the
premiers and they agreed to adjourn for sev-
eral months, leaving another committee to
attempt to work out the details of the second
stage.

Here are the major points of agreement
reached during the three days : :
Canada should have complete power to
amend the constitution without going outside
the country;

2. There are certain constitutional mat-
ters which are purely federal and which
should be amendable by the federal parlia-
ment without the necessity of consulting the
provinces.

3. Some provisions of the constitution are
so fundamental that they should not be
changed without the consent of parliament
and every one of the provinces.

4. The constitution contains some sections
on which amendment should require the con-
sent of parliament and only a majority, or
perhaps two-thirds of the provinces.

5. Amendments should be permitted in
cases where they effect only some of the pro-
vinces, providing there is agreement among

termed ungenerous, adding: “If
West Indian goods are going to be
competitive in coming years, the
preference should ensure their
markets....The violence of the
reactions in the West Indies and
British Guiana to the British pro-
posals shows that a special ef-
fort is needed, for the sake of
Colonial and Commonwealth
ties, to reach an understanding,
but the British Government will
be justified in refusing to preju-
dice too far the prospect of
cheaper sugar for British con-
sumers.” .
Clearly the West Indies must
now convince the British public—
and the Ministry of Food (the
Colonial Office is already on their
side)—that the welfare of the
British colonies depfnds on mak-
ing arrangements now to expand
sugar production and that if the
price for colonial happiness is
slightly dearer sugar inside the
U.K.— Gearer that is than dollar
sugar if the dollars were avail-
able—then it is a price that is
well worthwhile.
It is an issue which cuts clean
party politics:—there are
e Labour Party who
this doctrine; on the
ere are Tories who
olicy of economic
ith the U.S. anc

—_
OPO P OPPS POSDSFSPPOSISSS





believe i
other ha
believe i














her satel while Liberals, | the provinces affected and the federal parlia-
pursuing the theme of world Free

Trade, say they have other cures

for colonial ills than protective —-——

tariffs and f
No polit

and reasoned defence of the cur-
rent Ministry of Food policy
‘which strikes the public, on the
face of it, as depriving the U.K.

British Industry tn

1951 Festival

By NORMAN RIBBENS

LONDON. |

Four thousand manufacturers have al-
a Uiumatum Extendea ready submitted designs and samples of their |

‘a a Po case of waiting un- | work for inclusion in the industrial section of

ne eas of a ultima-|the 1951 Festival of Britain.

xpires. Originally set for) [tis expected that the list will eventually

January 21, this has been extend- :
ed to February 18, but it is not|Cntain details of 20,000 products. From

}

}

ment,—Can. Press.
I

ies, and still failing to produce
sugar from dollar areas cheaply,
since we cannot afford dollars.











th tnat the West Indies’ }these, associations and leaders of each indus- |
Su , who asked|try will choose for display what they con-}

for an adjournment until March {sider are the finest illustrations of achieve-
L, will agree because it gives lit- }ment and progress.

ae oe eae ~~ Exhibits selected by each industry will be |
aars wi ; starting. he } }9j > . he ” ‘
Soaks e Aan | aetiienaies laid out by “presentation panels.” They will

|bear number, not name. Prospective buyers
will have to check them in catalogues and go
to information bureaux to discover where
and how they can place orders.

“The Festival of, Britain is not a trade fair,”
a festival spokesman said. Nor was the)
‘British Can Make It’ exhibition of 1946. Just |
the same it produced more than £ 30,000,000 |
worth of orders.

“We hope that the festival will present a
cross-section of all Britain’s best industrial |
achievements dramatically enough for the
buyers themselves to attend.”

_At their headquarters in the Strand offi-
cials are working out ways of reducing
ee - the festival from the original

000,000 estimate to the revised fi
£ 11,300,000. va "

Two proposals which have been abandoned
are a river pageant on the Thames and a
penn . ene movies relating

o the festival whic
275,000, were expected to cost

An ambitious programme of street d -
ations, firework displays and outdoor dente
for London will probably be halved.

The festival staff will not be increased to
the number first contemplated. At present
it is 265 and includes artists, scientists, archi-

will 1
before

be available five days
the election to consider a
- so important that it should
Ministerial and not merely
official consideratioh.

The Ministry of Food want the
decision before February 27,
because the International Sugar
Council meets in London again
then to resume discussions on a
new, world sugar pact demanded
by Cuba and other dollar-area
sugar producing countries. It is
in order that the British Govern-
ment may have some bargaining
power at this conference that they
want to reserve 250,000 tons
definitely and another 250,000
tons probably in practice to be
bought from the dollar market
Admittedly if Britain made no
purchases at all in this field she
would have little or no power at
the world conference. Many sugar
men, however, consider that that
would not matter.

It is clearly up to the sugar
associations and governments
throughout the West Indies now
to express their views and to
give cogent reasons for them
but if there is one thing the sugar











nave







Ten LO no West Indios For | tects, designers, technicians, messengers
they could only make matters tlerks, typists and public relations men. —
far worse.—B.U.P. —Can. Press.





LT

No One Could Have Foreseen Wh at Happened



To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—I am sorry that you
should have thought it advisable
to publish the letter signea by &
St. James Resident on the subject
of the Electric Supply as it is
clear that whoever wrote it has
no understanding, sympathetic or
otherwise, of the circumstances
that-have arisen during the past
few days and the letter therefore
can serve no useful purpos?.

It is common knowledge that
within. the last two years or so
the Corporation has installed, at
great expense, three complete new
Generating Plants whose com-
binéd capacity is considerably in
excess of the normal peak loads
of the island without the use of
any other units which they had
during the war.

Regarding the
downs, I

recent break-
happen to know that
they have been examined by
several of the leading engineers
in the island and they of the
unanimous opinion that blame
whatever
Management or staff Unde

are
no

ean be attached t

circumstance re

foreseen what, in fact, actually
happened,

I hold no brief wigitever for the
Corporation, in fact I disagree
entirely with their main policy of
continuing to use Diesel driven
units, nevertheless, one must be
fair and reasonable.

CONSUMER.
In Agreement
SIR,—Amongst many many

others I should like to endorse
heartily the letter addressed to
your good paper on January 22
by a resident of St. James in re-
gard to the Electric Light situation
in the island,
ANOTHER SUFFERER.

St. James.

Publicity Needed — Indeed!

SIR,—Your Sunday paper ran
an editorial with the above title
quoted concerning publicizing
Barbados in order to lure tourist
trade and earn muvh-needed dol-
lar In your editorial ‘you
classifvd three t; pes tourists
It is yvur thira
t desire

of
type you seem
mostly, i.e., the third

becoming an annual

visitor, wili rent or purchase a
house and will create lasting em-
ploymefit for domestic servants
and chauffeurs. This type will
find in Barbados the atmosphere
he requires. Before we can entice
him to come we must present him
with easily accessible facts about
the island and living conditions
here...”

Are you certain it is acting iu
the best interests of the island to
publicize it at this time of gross
negligence, short-sightedness,
penny-pinching, sheer stupidity,
or whatever term is applicable to
the Barbados Electric Co.? (If it
were not for the fact that the
Electric Company has had ample
warning and plenty of time to
cope with Such foreseeable calami-
ty, I could almost feel sorry for
them then the castigations of the
merchants, inn-keepers,
estate agents, etc. really
pouring in.)

real
start

Americans of the
you seek simply will not com«
an island whose most important

third type

fashion. (Perhaps it is foolishly
believed, like the ostrich, that bad
news of this sort will not travel.)
I, as an American, can tell you
that when we plan long winter
holidays in new pastures, we make
certain we can have the things
we are used to. And, in the
tropics, the first’ things we look
into are light, water, food and
transportation. If those first most
important needs pass the test then
we look into questions such as
land, comfortable homes, pleasant
surroundings, etc. Further, you
seem to overlook a very important
thing in your wish to benefit
Barbados by enticing this “third
type”. This type “sufficiently
well off and without bi ,
who might spend
months here
middle aged
have some ’ i
necessitates an escape
rigors of the north
in these cases
power 18 So esse
would not





1
all
are,
peopic

Nysical ¢










area



of the early 19th century.

Bad news travels fast in this
day of airplanes, telephones,
cable facilities, etc, from dis-
gruntled and inconvenienced is-
land residents and visitors. So I
suggest Mr. Editor’ don't court
publicity at this time for you
are getting enough adverse pub-
licity as it is — better Barbados
“remain unknown and with her
light hidden under a bushel”....
By the way, was that last phrase
of the quotation a typographical
error? because, I can’t even find a
light under a bushel!

AN AMERICAN.
January 23, 1950.

‘Hardy Annuals’




< 20 a
the General Manager
Barbados Electric Supply
tion, offering the public an
ation for the failure t
ana power rec

break

i by

the













Such reports by the Manage-
ment of the Barbados Electric
Supply Corporation have now be-
come what one may term “Hardy
Annuals”, and as this Company
has 4 monopoly, and is really a
public Utility, I suggest Sir, that
the time has arrived when His
Excellency the Governor-in-
Executive Committee should ap-
point a competent committee to
visit, investigate and report to
Government their opinion as to
what is causing these recurrent
constant break-downs.

When _it is
considerable quantity of the water
supplied to the colony is pumped
by electricity, and also that the
various manufacturing Compan- |

r 1€8 producing ice, bread, biscuits

edible oir and other necessities 5: |
life, the Foundries who repair |

Sugar machinery, al i

Su machinery, all being w y
or partially operated b eee
OF ily Operated by electricity |
furnished by j

this Company, I
nis is a very serious |
trust that the

et it have their

oa” |

considered that a

































THURSDAY JANUARY »



ALLSOPPS LAGER BEER—per bottle .

” ” ” —per case
QUAKER CORN FLAKES—per pkt. |.

GOLDEN BEAN ICING SUGAR-per pki,

COLONNADE



Hurry!!

These are selling quickly - -..

2, 3 and 4 Burner on Stands
Single and Double Table Models,
Beatrice and Coleman OIL STO
BOX IRONS—63%4”, 7” and 8”
SAD IRONS—No. 6.

COAL POTS

ES

OIL LAMPS and LANTERNS :



WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTu.. §

CS PITCHER & CO, |

Phones: 4472 & 4687

2
y
<
’

THE BEST

666566839.

NEWS
OF THE a

YEAR
- JUST ARRIVED

DUTCH APP!
3O¢ per th.

(No Delivery)

*

%



SOPPIP PSPS SSS







DUE TO THE ARRIVAL OF THE Im
“MAURETANIA” ON. SATURDAY #

OUR DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT Will!
CLOSED ON |

Thursday 26th atl
and open on
Saturday 28th until3.ii

OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
ASKED TO CO-OPERATE BY SHOM
ACCORDINGLY.



DACOSTA & CO.

DRY GOODS DEP RT

_———SS=

MILK-FED CHICKENS
MILK-FED TURKEYS
AUSTRALIAN RABBITS
LAMB CHOPS

VEAL CHOPS

OX TONGUES

OX TAIL

Specials
FISH CAKES, wer tin 12c.

=" CORNFLAKES—
—18c.

Large tins MAGNET PEAS
—30c.

GRAPE FRUIT, each—6c.
ORANGES, each—4c.



CARROTS, per lb. — 20c.

LIMES; each—2c

BEET ROO”, per Ib. — 16c.

CABBAGE, per Ib. — 24c.

oy

4
Phone GODD:

% ‘
59990599959 55909909 0999099 G IO



THURSDAY JANUARY 26, 1950

De
The Tourists

Return Leave Passages
Recommended For

| Scheduled Publie Servants

That
quately
similar
opinion
Governor
Committee was appointed |

The 1949, |
of November, >|
a ate the establishment of |

ministrative,

s expressed by the

professional a |
j cers in relation bot
bpical cruitment and to their

. ion; and to.make recom-
reeations for the removal of
uses which threaten to af-

“the public services ad-
ersely.” ; |

45 i rt the Committee
oa SS epectal recommenda-
f relative to the staffs of cer-
4 Schools and Colleges, and
tain ed the appointment of an-
r Committee to review sal- |
s in relation to the new salary |
in other West Indian
ds. ,

m ort went on as follows:
eng it has been suggested
us that we could, within our
terms of reference, make recom
mendations regarding all matters
fh we consider affect the pub-
lie services adversely, we regard
ourselves as being required to
recommendations relating to

the removal of causes which ad-
sely affect the services in so
as those services depend on
.dministrative, professional and
hnical officers. We would,
yever, fail in our duty if we
not bring to the notice of
Your Excellency matters which,
while they may be outside the im-
mediate scope of our terms of re-
1 ence, appear to endanger the

public service.
Affected

nO

7e found evidence that

re a Leas are adversely
fected by the Governments in-
bility to recruit and to retain a
Full complement of senior adm ne
istrative, professional and teenni-
officers. We have found vhat
pme officers of those categories |
onsider that they are inadequate-
ly remunerated in the light of the |
emuneration earned by holders |
‘similar offices in neighbouring |
writories. Such officers, whether |
imported from other parts of the |
orld or barn and resident in |
Barbados, realise that they have a
market value outside of Barbados |
nd if for health, family or other
easons they do not feel bound to |
emain in Barbados, must inevi-|
lably seek financial advancement

here.

There are at present Vacan-
cies in some important offices
of the Government and further
‘yacancies will occur in the near
future. We have found that
grave doubts exist as to wheth-
er those vacancies can be filled
at the “required standard so
long as the existing salaries and
‘conditions of service continue.

he first and in our opinion
ee iseportant measure to over-
some the difficulties of recruit-
nt and retention of adminis-
tive, professional and technical
cers we recommend that return
ve passages privileges should
granted to the holders of the
ices mentioned in the Schedule
othis report. It will no doubt be
cessary to add offices to or de-
offices frorh the Schedule
om time to time, We consider
hat a “scheduled” officer should
m 1/48th of return leave pass-
to the United Kingdom by a
al direct route for himself
nd his wife in respect of each
nonth of service with the Gov-
nment and that he should be
ible to use such passage bene-
when he is granted vacation
fave, Passages should be grant-
to places other than the United
kingdom if required but the max-
amount payable by the
bvernment in respect of pass-
to other destinations should
t exceed the value of passages
the United Kingdom by a nor-
route,

W



un

Difficulties

A considerable difficulty in» the
itment and _ retention _of
lor officers arises from the in-
Bequacy of some of the salaries
by the Barbados Goyern-
lent as compared with the salaties
offered by the Governments
British Guiana and Trinidad.
have been required to report
Your Excellency on the 20th
+ December, 1949, and as we be-
fe that the consideration of the
t problem deserves a more
muled examination than can be
Wdertaken by us in the limited
at our disposal, we recom-
i that a committee should be
inted to review the salaries of
histrative, professional and
al offices in their relation
hew salaries of correspond-
Offices in Trinidad, British
na and other West Indian
es,

G

'

While we are not prepared to
8eneral recommendations on i
eati€s of administrative, pro-
oMal and technical officers we
resider that we should make re- |
hendations in regard to the |
teaching staff of Secondary |
where the difficulty of re-
nae, Professional officers is
wa. eave concern, Accord-
> We recommend that the fol-
M hew posts should be
=a as Government Offices
4 Civil Establishment
» Viz.,
tor Assistant Masters —
Harrison College.
or Assistant Masters —
, Lodge School.
lor Assistant Mistresses—
ns College,
lor Assistant Master —
bermere School.

a Should, of course, be a cor-
Ading reduction in the num-
Offices of Assistant Masters |
a Istant Mistresses at those |
and of Lex turers in Na-|
al Science . ‘ |
ye Téecommend ¢} following
? Scale ,
5 Senior Assistant
X $1444 399
PSenio, Ass

|

Ex S12 \ssisiant Mistress $2,880) Actor





480
€Ts app





some local public officers consider them

ly remunerated, when compared wit}

offices in neighbouring colonies, was one of the |

Committee appointed by the |

to examine the public services of the Colony.
|

|
Master $3,600) I

Penman al

authority of Resolution No. 35 of
1949.

Definition

The Director of Education made
the following recommendations in
regard to the definition of and the
filling of the proposed offices: —

(i) The office of Senior Assist-

ant Master is one which
carries the responsibility
for the teaching of a sub-
ject or a group of subjects
throughout a school. This
implies responsibility for
the syllabus and for the
work of any Assistant Mas

ten who may be a junior in |

his department
schon,

of the

(ii) A teacher may be appoint-
ed to an office of Senior
Assistant Master by the
Director of Education on
the recommendation of the |
Headmaster of the School if
in their opinion the teacher
is suitably qualified and has

__, Sufficient experience,

Gii) It is not obligatory on
the part of the Headmas- |
ter to recommend the
filling of all the offices of
Senior Assistant Master jf
teachers with suitable
qualifications and experi-
ence are not available for
appointment.

General Causes

As stated earlier in our report
we believe it to be our duty to
draw Your Excellency’s attention
to various general causes, which
from evidence received, affect
the services of Government
adversely. We now state some of
the more important causes and
give our recommendations there -
on,

(i) The delay in dealing with
staff matters.

We consider that the
office responsible for deci-
sions on_ staff matters
should be strengthened so
that the delays which at
present occur are reduced
to a minimum,
The unsatisfactory
ture of the service.

It has been stated that
the structure of the Barba-
dos Civil Service does not
allow of a_ satisfactory
method of promotion for
officers of promise and that

(ii) struc-

selves inade-|
1 holders of |





the lack of stepping stones
to the more senior offices
inevitably result in a
shortage of officers capable
of filling such offices. We
believe that the structure
of many departments
which provides no offices
between that of the Head
of the Department and the
Clerical Service is not
conducive to the acquisi-
tion of the standard of
responsibility expected of
senior officers nor to the
training of officers to
become Heads of Depart-
ments and we recommend
that specific posts such as
Assistant Auditor in the
Auditor General’s Separt-
ment should be introduced.

(iii) Lack of training facilities.

We are aware that a
committee appointed by
Your Excellency is at

present studying the ques-

tion of training Govern-
ment Officers. While we
are aware that certain

training especially for pro-
fessional and senior tech-
nical offices is not available
in Barbados, we consider
that the standard of effi-
ciency in the service wil
rise and the number of
officers available to fill
senior posts will increase
if steps are taken to pro-
vide promising officers
with the opportunity of
working in direct contact
with Heads of Departments
and othér senior officers on
the important matters of
policy and administration
of their departments. ,
(iv) Lack of confidence in
existing method of recruit~
ment, promotion and trans-
fer. J
We have had sufficient
evidence to show _ that
there is a very considera-
ble lack of confidence -in
the present arrangements

for recruitment and pro-
motion. We have not
studied the proposal for

the setting up of a Public
Service Commission, but
we feel that such a Com-
mission if given an ade-
quate staff could provide
a more efficient method of
recruitment ete. than now
prevails and would have
the confidence of the Civil
Service.

We recommend the set-
ting up of such a Commis-
sion.

We have the honour to be,

Your Excellency’s obedient sez -

vants,
(Sged.) F. L. WALCOTT,
C.. A.. COPPIN,
8. J. SAINT,
H. G. MASSIAH,

E. J. PETRIE.

Schedule of Offices the Hold-
ers of which are eligible to
receive Leave Passage
Privileges

|
|

Chief Judge, Judge Court of |
Appeal, Colonial Treasurer, |

onial Secretary, Financial Secre- |
tary, Assistant Colonial Secretary, |
ssistant Secretary, Auditor |
ral, Harbour and Shipping
Comptroller of Custom
Postmaster Stu
Market, Registrar

Judge Petts





Public
Jeputy Registrar ‘
Police W
Genera, A
General and I

1

A

‘ourt, fagistrate

sistant





mey



@ On Page 7

Broke the Law

; Stated that some* tourists off the

| while
| ship by boat from

| the Comptroller of Customs

| war days controlling the rates of



A story in yesterday’s issue}



“Stella Polaris”, who thought
that they were overcharged by a}
taxi-car driver, eseaped paying|
the fare by keeping the driver |
waiting outside the Aquatic Club}
they made back to their
the Aquatic



Club's pier. j
The tourists

have acted con-|

| trary to the law, but nothing can}

be done now, Mr. Williams,
Comptroller of Customs told the
“Advocate” yesterday. He quot-
ed law which stated that persons
coming to or leaving Barbados!
by ship, must do so throngh the!
Customs except sanctioned by
to
land or depart from another pier.

Mr. Williams was of. the
opinion that the chauffeur was
up to putting a trick over the
tourists, but that the tourists had!
got first opportunity.” He said!
that it should be a lesson to some
taxi-car drivers who charge ex-
orbitant prices for rides.

Miss Joan Kysh of the Publi-
city Committee said that it was |

|



a practise of the taxi-car drivers
to charge tourists one thing and
when they have got far out make
additional charges.

There are schedules from pre-

taxi-riding. When the “Stella
Polaris” was here this last time,
Police were sticking up schedules
in some of the cars.

New rates are expected soon,
she said. She was sorry that
they had not reached before the
tourists’ season began.



Stowaway
Wants Pay

S.S. “Comedian” called at
Bridgetown yesterday, but only
to land Malcolm Pascoll, a Grena-
dian, who stowed away when the
vessel was leaving Grenada for
London,

Pascoll apparently thought that
the “Comedian” was bound for
Barbados, the land where he is
domiciled. It was discovered that
he was aboard when the vessel
was near Barbados, and Capt.|!
Wells steered out of his route to
land him.

No prosecution was made be-
cause Captain Wells had no time
to stay. Pascoll was sent to his
home at Baycroft Road, Carring-
ton’s Village.

Pascoll seemed not at all em-
barrassed when before the ship-
ping authorities. He even asked;
for payment saying that he work-
ed his way up from Grenada on
the “Comedian,”





Tally Clerk’s
Body Found

In Careenage

The body of Kenn+th Ralf Bul-
len, forty-four-year-old tally clerk
of Emerald Villa’, Cheapside, was
fished out of the careenage near
Cavans Lane yesterday morning
about 5.45 by H.P.C. 24 Philip
and H.P.C. 34 Brewster.

The post mortem examination
was performed by Dr. E. B. Simon
at Burton & Co., Ltd. An in-
quiry will be held on Monday,
January 30.



Replacements
Are Coming

FOR ELECTRIC CO.

The “Advocate” has learnt that
news has been received by the
Manager of the Barbados Elec-
tric Corporation, that the crank
shaft and bed for the new Mer-
lees Engine which broke down
last week have been shipped
from England: by the S.S. Crafts-
man,

The machinery is expected to
arrive in Barbados on February
12.



NO REAR LIGHT:
FINED 5/-

A fine of 5/- and 1/- costs to
be paid in seven days or in de-
fault seven days’ imprisonment
was imposed yesterday on James
Applewhaite of Bank Hal] by His
Worship Mr. H. A. Talma.

He was found guilty of driving
the motor lorry M-809 on October
11 on Roebuck Street without
showing a rear light,



Negligent Driver

John Forde of Rock Hall St.
George was yesterday by Magis-
trate E. A. McLeod, fined 20/-
in one month or one month’s im-
prisonment. The tine was imipos-
ed for driving the motor car M—
1534 on Country Road without due
care and attention.

The offence was committed on
December 1.

Fell From
Second Floor

Frederick Downes (22), of Bay-
field, St. Philip, fell from the
parapet of the second floor of the
Savannah Club while he was
washing the wall around the
clock at about 3.30 p.m. yesterday

He was taken to the General
Hospital and when seen there by
an ‘Advocate’ representative he

was complaining of pains in his
back. The fal] was about 11 feet

LEGAL COURSE

freight rates”

dispute be



tween the Tortola Government, | ,
V Islands, and owner of the
f e1 Cyril E. Smith,” is|%
, ge i¥
course, the “Advo-/ 6
I sterday | "sseee<

~ Ler ese een

a
}
a

jally started business.

COO

GSS

sa a Oe
PSLLSOSSSOSSSSSSSSSOVGSSSOOSSSSSS FSOOSSSSSOSSSOSSS PPCSOSSSVSOSSSORN

THE BARBADOS

«
—-*





ADVOCATE



;
.

LADIES at the Housecraft Centre, Bay Street, are seen busily pre-

paring several appetising dishes
held yesterday afternoon.



at one of their classes which was



ST. MICHAEL
- Brick Arches 140 years old are
now being knocked down at
the building of Messrs. Alleyne,
Arthur & Co., at Palmetto Square.
The arches are being replaced by
wall built of concrete blocks.

While the foundation for the
walls was being dug, a gutter
perhaps two centuries old, was
unearthed. The gutter runs
through the building in the direc-
tion of Palmetto Square.

By removing these arches the
firm will have more storage space
on the ground floor and all offices
will be removed to the second
floor.

The alterations are being made
at the spot where the Barbados
Mutual Life Assurance Co. origin-
The spot
where the gutter was unearthed
Was once a courtyard and stalLle.

The concrete blocks that are
being used to build the new wall
were made locally by the Con-
crete Products Company at the
Farm.

The Reef Pavilion is now well
on its way to completion. The

cellar has already been concreted
and two toilets installed. Electric

wiring has also been completed |

but current is awaited.

A road leading from the Reef
Read to the Pavilion has been
planned and is now being pre-
pared. A Steam Roller is expect-
ed any time now from the High-
ways & Transport Department to
level the stones. The road, which
is nearly semi-circular, is situated
at the north end of the field.

Samuel R. Griffith, who is the

present caretaker, said that he
was recently given 120 feet of
hose and a lawn mower. He has

a staff of four groundsmen and
at present they are working on
two tennis courts.

*

When nearly 500 tourists arrive
by the Mauretania on Saturday,
Mr. U. J. Parravicino will have
about 60 motor cars ready to take
them around the island. They will
be taking the usual tourists’ route
and perhaps have lunch at the
Powell Spring Hotel. r

Mr Parravicino told the “Advo-
cate” yesterday that he accom-
panied some of the tourists from
the Stella Polaria on their tour
around the island. He said that
they were very impressed and
especially liked how each small
house in the country had a flower
garden to the front.

He said that a few visited the
Elementary Schools in the coun-
try and were very much surpris-
ed by the tidiness of the children.

A Certain Bank Official told
the Advocate yesterday that
something should be done to
make sure that American dollars,
which the tourists bring ashore,
is changed to Barbados currency,
before the tourists walk around
the City and begin to spend,

He pointed out a few
where tourists go to trays,
stores, etc. and spend
American dollars without
thinking of the value. In

cases
small
their
even
cases









Sandals and Court

REGARDLES

The Goods we are o

=

THE BARGAINS INCLUD
ED FROM

Of course there are many



PARISH ROUND-UP —

HARRISON'S -zn0ap sr.
SHOES AT BARGAIN PRICES,

LADIES’ Red, Tan and Navy Faney Shoes, White



GENTS AND CHILDRENS SHOES—in a Variety of

Styles and a Fair Range of Sizes

ALL TO BE CLEARED

soiled or old stock—they are merely |
types and styles we have decided to
discontinue.

AND LADIES SHOES FROM $5.50 .... to...

the same generous seale—Why not visit us to-day and

make your Choice.



\ where an article is for $1 (Bar-
bados) tourists pay $1 (American)
and just walk away. He said
that sometimes these American
dollars never reach the Banks.

a & Ae EE
The loss of a bicycle valued $50

Was reported by Clarence Good-

ing of Chapman Lane. He stated
that the bicycle was taken from

outside the Phoenix Pharmacy,

Broad Street, on Monday,

s *

Olive Spencer of Codrington
Hill reported the loss of-a goat
valued $18 from her enclosed
yard during Monday night.

The 1950 Yachting Season has
started with a good number of
boats registered in all Classes but

there are still a few yachts haul |

ed up on various beaches that
have never raced,

One of these is the Zandoli
which has been beached at the
Reef for a good many months
now.

4 : ® *

The Fire Brigade wagon left the
Fire Station after mid-day yester-
day with the Sigmund Pump in
tow. It dashed up Barbarees
Hill, full speed ahead, to attend
a fire at Gibbs’, St. Peter, but
on reaching Eagle Hall, certain
information disclosed that the fire

was already extinguished. It re-
turned to the Station.
| ' ‘
ST. JOSEPH
It is understood that the

Manager’s house at Castle Grant
Plantation will be rebuilt after
the crop season. This house was
destroyed by fire a few weeks
ago.

* * tte *

The cricket talk is centred
around Vernon Fenty, Goodwill
C.C. slow left hand bowler, who
took 78 wickets at a cost of 252
runs during the 1949 season in
the Central Division. Fenty, who
| bowled in 13 innings, did not play
in three matches. He capttred
10 wickets in one match on four
occasions,

Ashton Blackman of Romang
C.C. captured 55 wickets at a
cost of 300 runs. Romans C.C.
and Western C.C. are fighting for
the honours in the Central Divis-
ion.



=

TELEPHONE CO.
EXTEND LINES

Workmen of the Barbados Tele-
phone Co. are busy laying down
cables in Barbarees Hill, This
work is part of the regular ex-
j tension of the service in the
Spooner’s » Hill and Black Rock
areas, the “Advocate” was told
yesterday.

HARVEST AT
ST. LUKES’ CHURCH

The Police Band will be in
attendance at the 4 p.m, Service
at St. Luke’s Church, which holds
its Harvest Festival celebrations
on Sunday.










Styles



S OF COST

ffering are not shop-

E GENTS SHOES REDUC-

other lines all reduced on

HARDWARE DEPT.
Dial 2364.



isireacniebeglalnttplibpignanercenenntadinrasilies dee tschtiies
_



| has

























Did Not Stop
At Major Road |

Fitz Worrell of Deacons Road!
was fined 5/- and 1/- costs to
be paid in seven days or seven!
days’ imprisonment by His Wor-|
ship Mr. H. A. Talma yesterday |
for not stopping at a major road}
while riding the bicycle M-8231|
- Chapman Street on December |

Banana Supply
Steady

|

|

|

There is no influx of fruit wl
the City at present, and therefore
trade in that line is somewhat
normal.
Water cocoanuts, oran ges,|
Srapefruits and bananas are the
chief items to be seen about the!
streets,
The banana supply has been!
steady during the past month and!
one seller told the “Advocate”)
yesterday that a fair quantity can)
still be looked for during the)
coming weeks. There are some!
big limes to be had, a very use-/
ful item now the flying fish sea-|
son is underway.

Niles Dies |
In Hospital

1

Allan Niles of Rockley, Christ |
Church, who was admitted to the}
General Hospital on Tuesday |
afternoon died about 11 o'clock!
the same night. |
A_post mortem was performed |

by Dr. H. L. Massiah yesterday |

afternoon at the Hospital Mor-|
tuary,

New Canon For
S. Michael’s Cathedral

The Lord Bishop of Barbados
appointed the Reverend Gay
isle Griffith Mandeville, M.A.,
Rector of St. Philip to the Can-
onry of St. Cyprian in St. Mich-
ael’s Cathedral, vacant by the
death of Canon C. W. Johnson.

25 Years Ago

(Barbados Advocate, January 26,

}

1925)

BARBADOS vs. JAMAICA
Visitors Dismissed For 80 on
Damaged Wicket
SATURDAY morning broke
cloudy. A heavy rain had fallen
between 3 and 4 a.m., and there
were several slight showers up to
9 o'clock, As a result the pitch
was under water and play was
postponed until 1.30 p.m., to en-

able it to dry.

Extensive changes had been
made in the home side. H. B. G.
Austin, L. S. Birkett, R. Challenor,
G. Challenor, F. K. Greaves, H. C.
Griffith and H. W. Ince standing
down and their places being filled
by E. L. Bartlett, C. A. Browne,
Francis (who was played with the
consent of Major Cox and Mr.
Nunes) J. M. Kidney, J. L. Parris,
K Mason and Dr. Skeete.

Tarilton, who skippered the
home team won the toss and sent
the visitors to bat on the damaged
wicket. It was not an unplayable
wicket but the Jamaicans el
it nearly so.

Except E. A. Rae who lashed
out and hit Mason twice for six
very pretty shots, none of their
batsmen could do anything with
the bowling and in a little over
three hours they were all out.

If your feet are tired

aching
street

us















and
As you walk the hard paved

Don't delay but come and let





PIGEON CHOW

The most nutritious Food that can be
had for Pigeons

One of Purina’s best, and obtainable at - - -

H. JASON JONES & CO, LTD.
SoS 8888 ee

aie as oe oe ee ee ee ee

“Utell



BRITISH MADE
HATS

EXPERTS IN EXPORT
FOR 75 YEARS

ON SALE AT ALL |

LEADING STORES |





HED





EP

Quickly

relieves

COLDS

and

CATARRH.



IT clears the nasal
passages to remove
stuffiness and the
distressing condi-
tions of. head colds
and catarrh. The
patent nasal appli-
cation bottle. is in-
finitely better than
spray or dropper,
and can be carried
conveniently in
handbag or pocket
without feer of leak-
age,



Obtainable from all Drug Stores :
KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

BANISH FOOT TROUBLES

THE DR. SCHOLL WAY...




















Give you comfort for your feet.

—_—_——
The joys of -
foot comfort

Think of it! The joy of healthy,
comfortable feet ! You need not
suffer another day from tired,
aching feet, weak and fallen
arches, corns, callouses, bun-
ions and other foot troubles.
Whatever your foot trouble

Dr Scholl
Foot Comfort Appliances

will give you —— wating by
removing the cause. our Foot
Comfort Expert demonstrate them
toyou. Each appliance is adjusted to
meet your individual requirements,

Tired, aching feet

weak and fallen arches;
weak ankles, cramped toes,
ete., quickly re-
lieved by Dr.
Scholl’s Foot-
Eazer. Light
and comforta-













Full details will be gladly given on application to - - - «

ROBERT THOM

' Whitepark,



HOLIDAYING IN UW. K.?

Deliveries can be arranged in the U.K. for one of these popular - « -

VAUXHALL CARS

WYVERN-12 hop. 4 cy.

(COURTESY GARAGE)

A new range of Dr. Scholl’s Foot comfort
remedies and appliances has been opened
in our shoe department

FOOT EAZERS
ARCH SUPPORTS
ZINO PADS

For Corns, Bunions and Callouses













We are the exponents of the Scholl method
of Foot Comfort,

CAVESHEPHERD & co. ua

10, 11, 12 & 18 Broad Street

















VELOX 18 hp. 6 cy.





LTD.

Dial 4616








- PAGE SIX
$$$







RIP KIRBY

THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE







BY. CARL ANDERSON

cat

DISNEY

STZONG "Ss

my, PeLIP! —\} P WATT, PFLIP! YOURE NOT

i | ENOUGH TO GO AFTER
i| WM VveTt

i'M SO SORRY,

DEAR-- HONESTLY, )

LOOK' SOMETHING'S )
FLASHING ON THAT.

wi!

Che,
WHO-EVER QUESTIONS
SCRAMBLED EGGS ON
ANAVALCAP?..,



or HOW COULD Me

GET AWAY WITH Th —

ADMIRAL’S RIG?)
a

FR UTTLE BLuRE
AND BIT OF BRAID
S. \ GO ALONG WAY,
) MY BOV!











WHAT A CONCIDENCE
VASES BROTHER



208 Sigg Seem Sete Ss, Bote ope ewe



BY ALEX RAYMOND

sé : \ TRaNK DOU, Ve =. tT YOu

SiH TD THis OF OTHER PeoP_e| {YOu EVER RAVE A DEAR FRIEND WrOSE FOSTER GUGNTA WR Ta oN -
BF YOU CAN CAUSE Trim... WANT TO | \

E Ana,




SON, A YOUNG MAN OF 30... PEML MISE Fay




= DIPPOSE, VALBAIE, YOU CiON’T! |BUT DON ; NO... THOUGH SOME GROWN-UPS O0...2

Se

CALL FIM ART... DISAPPEARED

& | IT‘, NEVER RUN
HAD A GOOD RBAGON BUT NOW THAT | | Andy AGAIN!

REAGON NO LONGER EXISTS...HE CRS |

NOT KNOW, AND HIS PARENTS HAVE NO | my

WAY OF FINDING HIM











Patan
WW ie gf

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

THE GASPING BEAST STAGGERS BACK & MAKES A (ASSO AND $1/NG$ /T AT
AND THE PHANTOM HURRIEDLY GRASPS See THE SURPRISED TOTO!
= THE ROPE « ~
\QNLY GET ONE TRY.
HERE’ HOPING! ~

AS THE MONSTER REACHES FOR Hi THE
PHANTOM L/A-G)1ES OUT WITH HAS
LEGS, KNOCKING (aia

THE BREATH ‘

Qu? oF Torof







THURSDAY JANUARY 26, jg5¢

ee tt ON.



































DO NOT JUST INSURE—INVEST YOUR MONEY AT THE SAME TIME

This is only possible when you
take out your Fire and/or Hurricane,
and or Riot Insurance with...

THE

BRITISH GUIANA & TRINIDAD MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE

COMPANY LIMITED

The only Mutual Fire Insurance Company in Barbados
All poliey holders share in the profits. All types of Motor Insurance, Workmen’s
We are not a tariff company. Compensation, Marine and Bicycle Insurance
MIKE HUNTE—Branch Manager.
Phone 4349

Room 311

Plantations Building Lower Broad Street








ADVOCATE STATIONERY.

= =e

6.65566
PFS OO ee of

PPLE FPL POOOD
ee <










=
“4
5
|
ae |
ri
"Ti |
"Ti |
oO
ou |

ARTHRITIC PAINS -

But new treatment does more than
ease these terrible agonies.

A new product, DOLCIN, has been created which not only gives
prompt relief from the pains due to the symptoms of arthritis and
rheumatism, but also affects the metabolic processes which constitute
& very important part of the rheumatic state's background,

DOLCI has een thoroughly tested in medical institutions.
DOLCIN is being used now with unprecedented success. DOLCIN
is being prescribed by doctors now. And many sufferers have already
resumed normal living as a result of taking DOLCIN.

Don’t delay. Profit by the experience’ of fellow-victims of theas
Ans. Get DOLCIN today, A boitle of 100 precious tablets costs

On Sale. at BOOKERS

- 46.657 66 36565695 oot
ee

AGAIN?





CELL LCE LPL LLLP EEE > oe + . OPPC IRTUNITY TO ENJOY Ue
5 4 7
g ‘ GREAT CONVENIENCE:
‘ : ;
v O/ ds seal
. ¥, ‘N ar Torr . ‘ \ +
y mA |) 4 ick. Sie. oe : ave an AUSTIN delivered oa iN
s ye Pritain at short notice for your stay 1
% XS | rovided you bring the Car back
~ ss
> Due to the arrival of < rist shi : pels e %
S of a tourist ship on Saturday \ s e suggest you call on us and
. . . ay 723 : iverv
% the 28th, ovr store 28 Broad Siree + : oR Overseas Visitors’ Delivery
’ ne nent a y 3 > AUSTIN MOTOR CO.
* ‘8
* Closed on THURSDAY the 26th instead of oie
% *
SATURDAY for this week only . ne 4697

ECKSTEIN BROTHE®

piAL 4a

Cusptates —
SEES EEF OFF

BAY

COLLINS LIMITED

-%, broad Street

STREET

Mt OA bb OA Ae

6
Ot OOS
a

PARTNERS FOR PROGRESS ~ Sir Charles Jeffries

we itt 3 foreword by Hon, Arthur Creech Jones M. P
it LEAP OVER THE WALL

A Return to the World after 28 years in a Convent
— Monica Baldwin

WALK IN DARKNESS — Hans tale
SAY PLEASE — Virginia Graham
PEARS’ ENCYCLOPEDIA = Carter's Edition

HOLIDAYING IN ENGLAM

, Uk a
















ae

-.”

i
Wa



ee

THURSDAY JANUARY 26, 1950

CLA

TES
es





Week Sun
' 4 0 ’
MB, yoUNCEMENTS .
' : SALE per werd
op RENT b o
‘ANTED ; }
mp per word
sgt, FOUND PF er
imum cparee
RapLic SALES
10
Seg een } we
per agate line
charge - BO eee
e LR
wn 14 agate lines)
UBL NOTICES
Ts ‘ 08 Lab
. ve. in ; 1.20 1.50

eNING ADVOCATE (Monday)
ING TIME
«-DAYS:—2 p.m.

a y:—2.00 p.m. Friday

items of different classification

4 rhe set out in “eparate adverts,

IN| MEMORIAM

ng memory of GEORGE E.
who departed this life on



IN ever lovi

1945.
lost to sight to memory dear
ever wilt remain;
only hope our heart can cheer,,-

hope to meet again. ,
Millicent Marshall (wife) Marion Mar-

fy aitece) . 26.1.50—1n

TT
Th

memory of our dear beloved
ther Mrs. EMILINE YEARWOOD who
‘on the 26th day of January 1949
of sadness still come over us
eret tears do often flow
should sleep but not forever
the long and secret grave
ed be the yord that taketh
ed be the Lord that give
bright eternal city
ed as she lived

in the
every body's

om her rest to home sweet home.
, Muriel, Everil, Itha (daugn.ers
n, Ivan, Ralph (sons), and 9 grand-

drett. 26.1

o

—_—
——————————

FOR SALE

U

One Chevrolet Car. New Tyres



| February

OTIVE

SSIFIED ADS.

FOR RENT

HOUSES

FLATS fully
erator and lini
Dial 8364.

BUNGALOW — «

Clariston”
February situated a

22.1.50—3n





ms,

Apply Ralph A.
Phone 4683 or 8402.
25.1.50—3n

fro: 1
m ist February. Appl
rid Hardwood Alle

Ralph
one 4683



FLATS — Two
| Highgate House, St.
ther particulars Phone
& Haynes Co., Ltd.,

25.1.50—3n



Crane Coast

modern con-

veniences. Apply; Mrs. A. D. Herbert
Phone 8335. 20.1, 50—An
“WATERFORD” —Hastings (near Gar
rison Savannah) . Desirable residence
fully furnished. Available from Ist Feb-
ruary. Dial 8330. 26.1.50—t.f.n

PUBLIC SALES

SUCTION

By order of the Insurance Co., I wil

sell at Me Enearney & C vo Gi
triday ith. at 2 p.m. FORD PREPEC

10 H.P. CAR damaged in accident.

Terms Cash. R. ARC
215. HER MC





THERE will be an Aucti
Hall Hastings, on Wednesday the
Keep this Date open,
"ARCY A. SCOTT,
Auctioneer.

Ist
D
1.50—2n

25

UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER

is

+ on Thursda:
beginning a
: Rocki

it



Battery, suitable for hire. Apply:
‘Cuke, Derricks, St. James.
: 24.1,50--3n.

four

RS—Two (2) Morris 8 h.p. cars
models. One (1) Vauxhall 1947
ly Tower Garage, St. Matthias Gap

21.1.50—6n

R—Vauxhall 14—6 Saloon 1938 mo-
in sound condition. Appl)
y Garage,, Dial 4016. 26,1.50—4n

ORD PREFECT 1948 model—in very
condition Mileage 19,000 Apply

Garage Dial—4616
26.1.50—3n.

DFORD 12 hp. DELIVERY VAN
little used and in A-I condition.
has replaced with Bedford Truck

16 Courtesy Garage.
26.1.50—3n.

)

Ohne Style Master practical);
One Touring Chevrolet in good
ition. H. C. Trotman, Mapp Hill,

26.1.50—2n.

7
lic

RiCAL
ING PLANT—Diesel Electric
ng Plant 20 Kw maximum, 15 Ky,
110/220 volts 3 phase, 5&
pply: Electric Sales & Service
@ 4629 or 4371. 26.1.50—4n

WFRAIR ELECTRIC WASHING

A number of which are in
ily and giving very satisfactory
. We now offer these at $290.00

with Spindrier.

JOHN F. HUTSON LTD.

: 25.1.50—2n

Nee
a

,

sTOC:
UD HORSE in A-1 condition, H. C.

Mapp Hill, St. Michael.
26.1.50—2n

SETTER PUPPY (Dog). 4%
Old, Pedigree supplied. Regis-
ie at the Kennel Club, London.
| Kenneth D. G. Frost,, Stan-

k Rock.
26.1.50—t.f.n.

va
Ne

ICAL

Hercules Silver King, or.
i models, in green and in black
& Co., Lid. Dial 4476
A 14,11 49-—t tr

NEOUS

ORM SCALES—Phone 4517 The
y Co., (B'dos) Lid. High
22.1.50—-6n.

e

Truck and Car Tyres 750 x
% 20; 30 x 5, 600 x 16; 500 x 16:
AB; 400 x 18;' 450 x 17; 500 x i9,

Auto Tyre Co. Trafalgar St
Et 20.1,50—t.f.n.

ANIZED SHEETS—Best Grade,
Mi Bft. sheets, from $2.08 and $2.64,
last. A. BARNES & Co., Lid

MA, 4476, 13,1,.50—t.f.n
ISED SHEETS—6
nd 26 guage. Apply
Street, Phone 2696

G G
in, to
& Co,

ft., 6% ft.
: Auto Tyre

vanised pipe. All sorts
1% ins, Phone 4684
Lid,
3.12.49—t.f.n.
Wholesale and Retail, Factory
i Store.,

17,1.50—13n

S SHIRTS & PYJAMAS — The
_ 17.1,50—13n
BS BRASSIERES — bac. & Doc.
17.1.50—13n.

Pen SS Si ee
26.1.50—3n

— Corn flakes, shredded

d Wheat, Cerevim, All Bran
n of Wheat, also Barley and
W. M. Dial 3489, 35
K Street, 24.1.50—In.
BULBS—36 different colours
just arrived from Holland.

Barrow. SeegNAne Nos.
ae

v

os gs most delicious and

can English Fresh Garden
in the hands of your grocers,
Per tin 26.1.50—2n.

TRUCK TYRES 32 x 6—Best

ke in England. Quite a num-

ue ey ‘at continue giving

‘ “ on. We offer our present

. e mcularly attractive prices
NF. HUTSON LTD.

b 25.1.50—2n



SSS
Y DAY!

RY LUCKY DAY '!

® which you

i.






f for the

cali







with glass top,
one Emerson Shi

Radio,

Sidebo;
2-burner Oil Stove,
et, Bedsteads with S

ard, Larder, one
Kitchen Table, Buck-







furnished with Refrig-
en at Indramer, Worthing,
13.1, 50—t.f.n.

from Ist
t Worthing in Ave. |!

lhe cerned i, cota

CHURCHILL — Maxwell's Coast, Ch.
Ch. 3 available March Ist.
Beard, Hardwood Alley.

a ee naar raeniiniteniiatabiesieecmneas.,

WORTHY DOWN—Top Rock Ch. Ch.
3 ms, fully furnished, available
A.

or
25.1.50—3n.

unfurnished Flats at
Michael. For fur-
4230, Wilkinson

————————

——eee
CAR—Ford Prefect 10 h.p, Ford Car.

n

ion Sale of
well-kept Mahogany Furniture at White

a

ng and Armchairs,
Round Table,

pring and Mattresses,

Wardrobe, Dressing Table, Clock, and

other items of interest, Terms Cash,
D'ARCY A, SCOTT,

Auctioneer,

21.1,50.—4n.

V6===lTlke—Naeo

*EAL . ESTATE

LEETON—On-Sea, well
attractive Seaside Resort

known and

For partioul ee at Maxwell.
ars apply Y. De Lima & Ci oe

20, Broad Street, Phone 4644, ws
22.1.50—6n.

COVE SPRING HOUSE — A modern
ungalow, four bedrooms, two baths,
electricity, water, on the sea, own private

bathing b
table Garden,
at Garden, St, James, Enquiry Sandy-
fields St. Peter. Phone 91-50 or at the
premises Garden, St. James,
20.1..0—1fn.

each, 1% acres of land Vege-

“THE BANYANS”
‘hereto, containing 4
Perches, situate at Upper Bay Street,
St. - Ideally suitable for de-
velopment as a Building Estate.

Inspection any day except Sundays
between the hours of 9.30 a.m, and 11,30
a.m. and 4 p,m, and 6 p.m. on appli-
cation to Mr. Ronnie Gittens on the
premises. Dial 3771.

The above property will be set uw:
Sale at our Office No, 17 H .
Bridgetown, on of

particulars and Conditions

'f Sale, apply to the undersigned:—
COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.,
20.1.50—13n.

ee,

FOR SALE OR RENT—Farley Hill,
St. Peter. Old Plantation house with
large ballroom, Dining room library,
fourteen etc, Ideal for convert-
ng to residential club. For details,
Apply to Bradshaw & Company.

4.1.50.—t.f£.n
_—_—_——

THE undersigned will offer for Sale at
their Office in James Street, Bridgetown,
on Friday the 27th day of January 1950,
at 2 p.m,

The Dwelling House called “BEULAH”
and the land thereto belonging containing
5427 square feet, situate at Hastings
Christ Church.

The Dwelling House comprises Closec
Gallery, Drawing and Dining Rooms, :
Redrooms, Dressing Room, Toilet Bath
and Kitchen with Electric, Water, Gas
and Telephone installed. Servant's Room
and Servant’s Toilet.

Inspection any day between the hours
of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. on application on
the premises.

For further particulars and conditions
of Sale, apply $
HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD,

Solicitors.

— With the land
Acres 2 Roods, 31"

p for





“THE WOLD,” 4th Avenue, Marine
Gardens, with about 10,000 square feet
of land will be offered for sale at the
office of the undersigned on Thursday,
the 2nd day of February, 1950 at 2 p.m.

This freehold dwellinghouse contains
gallery, 2 public rooms, kitchen and
pantry on ground floor and 3 bedrooms,
bath ete. on first floor.

Electric, gas and water services.

The house has recently been renovated
and decorated and is in excellent condi-
tion,

Inspection by appointment with Mrs.
H. S. Bynoe. Dial 8310.

Further particulars and conditions of
sale apply to ...

COTT: CATFORD & CO.,,
oe Solicitors.
21.1.50,—11n.





WANTED





e -m, and 3,30 p.m.

between 9.30 a.m, a Beas
CLERK—Junior Clerk (Male) for our
e. Salary depending on qualifica-

. Apply in person with written ap-
Testimonials to the Secre-

%.1.50—t.f.n.

JUNIOR CLERK—Excellent
for rapid promotion for capab’
man, Apply by letter and in
w & Company. 26.1

TAILORS—First class jacket hands

can apply to P. C. F. Maffei Ltd. Top
Score in Tailoring. ok oh an

PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife MARJORIE
DINA KEIZER (nee Marjorie Adina
Phillips)

Christ Chunu:



THE public are hereby wazned against
giving credit to iny wife RUBY MAYERS
(mee Johnson) as I do not hold myself
responsible for her or
any debt or debts in my nam

a written order signed by me.
Sed. LLOYD CHRISTOPHER MAYERS

Church View

8 miles from Bridgetown

i

anyone else con-|

HSUEH

i

}
}

a startling

portrait of--

TOUTE EGET dd

2S seen b
HIS is a picture y



T.B. Radar, Sch. Emeralda, Sch. Gar- DEPARTURES. *. _.
of YOUR inner Self seen, not & x - : ARRIVALS Co., Lta. : x
through the distorting ite Taree . M.V. Lady Joy, 46 tons net, Capt. S.S. Byfjord, 1,109 tons net»: Capt.
eyes of some surrealist \ DK d WS S x x X ~ N Parsons, from St. Lucia, Agents: D. L. raldsen, Trinidad; Agents: Robert
Bare the ats NNO WW C ee | 3 ae
y the la ES S . vi Ss
brain research. XX WV is S ' Self... noted =
okvery visible part of were aera = oats
y—arms, legs, i. = ‘
lips, and so, eee: iby scientists =
sakes with a@ mental, ‘ = < Ca ;
; reflection” of itself : = c = ARRIVALS by B.W.LA.L, Alice O'Higgins,, rmen >
braln's “tae site SS = Rathiven Boveand Aim — Gondin, ‘Auenitts,cxtees, panes Ay Maia
S thin, wavy = Rosenare King; Mary Stone, Narenlene Reginald Michelin, H .
cin.” s ‘rouse = Sere he eee ine oe ee awiaits” '
- - = ary ; ey Marquez, ry -W.LA, ‘
gether these “reflec. Janet Soke, Temes Wilsa e ee: For TRINIBAD.. ‘ite. David Pursegemtr>
” aunetl ames nm, . . ye
Bot, “ up the From BRITISH GUIANA. . .. Dudley » Mr. Frederiek
mage —a Mr. Eric Baron, Mrs, P. Baron,, Miss monte, Mr, Louis DeVerteuil, cing _
eet the in ppt Dar Miss W. Becon, Mi "5 Delton Mr G chap torah iso .
e brain. — on, Miss W. TON, iss J. Dalton, . Geor roma »
wdtks image is no flattering, in the middle finger and ring where the various parts of the UVVUVUOUUUUAUOUUOOOOUa Aan nOeanORAT AAT Fectei e ke ee ae B- votre Nellie MaeoCcnnail . Ruby
“e og - c portrait, Its parts finger of the missing arm, body are and what they are bour,, Miss J. Grogan, Mr. R. Benn, Goulding, Mr. Ernest Goulding, Me
whether yeu ae eos that, For the same reason a person® Going. Without this running main focus of intense pain is in Mr. S. George, Mr. B. Deane, Mr. F. Violet Weekes,, Miss Keren —
beautiful or plan pti woman, with a paralysed arm may get record the brain | could not co- the Body Image. The pain you McKenzie, Mr. L. Cox, Miss M. Conyers, Alice Greathead,, am John: '
into something like eee © MP the: sensation that it is wavton ordinate the body’s movements. feel in your arm may really be Mrs. D. Seaton, Mr. ‘A. Hintzen, Irene Mrs ache Fletcher, -
. : , Monster = anout although he can seo it Brain damage, believed to have i" the arm’s mental miniature. Pennagchiotti, Renata Pennacchoitti, Adamson, Mr. John Adamson, ”
own above, : ;. Diana Pennacchiotti, Idaline Miner, Linda Brathwaite, Mrs. Beryl Holder; /
hanging by his side, injured the Body Image, caused The fact that it is impossible Miner, Felce J. R. Gomez, Trina de Commander Charles Hayward, Mr.
All fingers Ph tom I left side. to his beady ite ae Se ne, oi SF eens Gomez, Licia Atencio, Noemi Atencio, Charles A. Ablett, Mr. John 4Â¥one,
f mee an clues» i ee

In the real bod
than hands, an

after
gone.




















Transport workers leader
Norway,
conference to plan counter
European ports.

Controls
Hamper

@ From Page 3
the longest periods for 50 years
and this year was the coldest on
record, the temperature being at
zero when he left on January 14,

As a general rule they went
through the year without getting
to freezing point. They got about
58 inches of rain a year and the
weather was usually very nice.
There was very little snow and
very little frost.

In the Evergreen country where
he was residing, the weather was
not too hot or too cold and they
were expecting the spitg flowers
to be sprouting in February. The
people particularly from the
southern climates where it was
so hot and dusty, liked to come
over to the Evergreen country in
the winter time as they would
not be free from snow until May.

“Barbados is a wonderful spot”
Mr. Sweeney said. “It has the
finest swimming in the world,
nice beaches and clear salt water
and he thinks that half of Canada

j would come down here for the

winter if they only knew how de-
lightful it was on the white sandy
beaches and in fhe crystal clear
salt water.”



Ukrainian Army
In “Iron Curtain”

MUNICH, Jan 25.

A Ukrainian Liberty Army
numbering between 100,000 and
200,000 men are operating behind
the “Iron Curtain” according to
Dr. Peter Mirschuk, spokesman of
the S. K. League of Ukrainian
former concentration camp pris-
oners. The Munich Abendietung
in reporting this, said that Dr.
Mirschuk disclosed that the main

operational centre of the liberty |
army © was

in the Carpatho-
Ukraine, but some of the army’s
units were also operating on the
Crimea in the Caucasus, and in
the Baltic Region.—Reuter

NOTICE

Will our Friends and Cus-
tomers please note that we
shall be CLOSED for Busi-
ness TO-DAY 26th at 1 p.m,
and will be Open for Busi-
ness on Saturday 28th from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m,

JOHN F. HUTSON LTD.
MOUNT GAY DISTILLER-
IES LTD.

Butter Shortage?

WE CAN SUPPLY

PEANUT BUTTER at
72¢ per bottle

e

Stuart & Sampson
LTD.

Headquarters for Sest RUM









Tae
y, os






» feet are bigger
fingers longer
the

its real counterpart has

Thus when @ London doctor
Gave an injection to a 50-year-old
man whose right arm had been
amputated 10 years before, the
man said he could feel a tingling











THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

|

= ys
PES bya eee

your. br.



©

oa
umn!

The location and shape of the

than thumbs, But B various parts of the Body Image
Image reflects the importance of are being _mapped by three main
a in our ily life c
rathor than their proper shape. 1 Foc nit . stlectrical
anne fran Peg iy 1 thumbs the grey matter of people who
they are much bi gers. 5° have to undergo brain operations
Tee Hanne stg sae Body and give permission for the ex
tically outsize head and enomes; Periments—which are harmless.
| ips, ee 2 Noting the effects of localised
| The existence of this second brain damage in hospital
sol explains why anyone ye has Patients,
ost a limb may still “feel” it, Studying the “phantom” sen-
The brain-reflection of an arm 3 y
or leg may remain vivid long ue of people who have lost

What use fs the Body Image ?
Tt seems certain that normai life
would be impossible without it.

The Image can be visualised as
& television picture, which kee!
the brain informed of exac y,



ANTI-COMMUNIST
SEAMEN’S UNION FORMED

LONDON, Jan. 25.

s from France, Belgium, Holland,
and Britain have just com

pleted here a two days’

-action against Communists in

When the Communist World
Federation of Trades Unions es-
tablished a seaman’s section last
year, the International Transport
Workers Federation, at a meeting
in Rotterdam, agreed to create a
“vigilance committee”,

The I.T_W.F. is one of the Trade
non-communist World Confeder-
ation of Free Trades Unions. The
Secretariats associated with the
vigilance committee was formed
immediately after the establish-
ment of the Confederation last
month, and it assembled for the
first time in London last Monday.

The representative of the Rhine
German Workers was unable to
attend the London meeting.

T. Yantes, General Secretary of
the British Seamen’s Union, pre-
sided. Each national represent-
ative reported on developments in
his country. The decisions of the
conference are to be announced
later,

—Reuter.

Russia Granted
“Special Rights”

WASHINGTON, Jan, 25.

The United States State De-
partment said today that “two
secret agreements” between the
Chinese Communists and Russia
granted “special rights” to the
Soviet Union in Manchuria.

Supporting recent statements by
the Secretary of State, Mr, Dean
Acheson, the Department issued
a detailed “background document”
which said, “The Soviet Union has
placed the richest industrial area
of China firmly behind the Far
Eastern segment of the Iron Cur-
tain,”—Reuter,

MAIL NOTICE

MAILS for Martinique, Antigua, St
Croix, St. Thomas, V.I and New York
by the FORT AMHERST will be closed
at the General Post Office as under:

Parcel and Registered Mails at 10.15
&.m., Onrdinar,y Mail at 11.45 a.m,
the 28th January 1950,





on
















ca ;
AUCTION SALE

FURNITURE & HOUSEHOLD
EFFECTS
HAZELWOOD HOUSE
BISHOP'S COURT HILL
SATURDAY 28th at 12.15 p.m,

we

WE are instructed by Mrs. I
M. BARRERA and others to se!!
by Auction the following valuable
Furniture and effects, :—

Couches, Occasional Tables,
Dining Chairs, Sideboard, Book-
cases, Rockers, Dressing Tables.
Washstands, Chest of Drawers,
Kidney Table, W: tall
Mahogany). 5-piece Morris Suite
Dining Tables (one oval), 6 Din-
ing Chairs, Sideboard, China
Cabinet, large Gent's Press, Writ-
ing Desk, several Tables and Nest
of Tables, Tea Trolley (all Crab-
wood of modern design). Modern
Dressing Table and Stool, severa:
Double and Single Beds (Simmons
Spring»), Mattresses, Gallery Pur-
niture, several Deal Presses (all
sizes), Deal Tables painted
Child's Press, 2 painted Cots (one
large), painted Playpen, 2 High
Chairs, Singer Sewing Machine,
5-Burner Ot] Stove with Oven.
2 (one-burner) Stoves, Frigidaire,
Electric Iron, Go-Cart, large
quantity Glassware, Silver, China,
Kitchen Ware, Ornaments. Fold-
ing Steps, Suitcases,
Tools, Toys, Ladders, Books and
Many other interesting items.

VIEWING FRIDAY 27th JANU-
ARY and MORNING OF THE
SALE SATURDAY 2th JAN

CASH ON FALL OF HAMMER,

AUCTIONEERS

DIXON & BLADON



HUVUUUUUUUAUEOUEEALAUGEAGUUESUUUUUEeHUUeeUaUeedaaeaneaannaai

THE CHAPMAN PI
COLUMN _ presents ~~

WOU

NCHER' -/


















eae wash only his right
side

and

trouser-leg, sock, and shoe.

In another
the effect was
the patient could not believe his
left arm belonged to him when
he was shown it, :

Sitive to pain, though otherwise Commissioner of Police, Deputy Sister, Sister, Radiographer,
“ “ pie ne probably have some over- Commissioner of Police, Superin- Medical Superintendent Mental
Aid to flying ? Seient ay ie {mage 8 tendent of Police, Superintendent Hospital, Assistant | Medical

Perhaps
tionally deft

>front-rank footballers and may be able to exert some control rector of Education, Assistant Engineer, Assistant to the Col-
fighter Pilots, for instance—are over the Image, so that they do Director of Education, Principal onial Engineer, Commissioner of
a a aie aineite the ee not feel wounds and burns. Erdiston College, Vice-Principal Income Tax and Death Duties,
its brain image than averagely The theory also explains why Erdiston College, Woman-Tutor Labour Commissioner, Director
clumsy folk, are is felt when brain tissue! Erdiston College, Director of Sci- of Highways and Trangpert
Research on the Body Image ts is cut: there is no counters ence and Agriculture, Deputy Executive Engineer, Gove t
being urgently pressed forward art of the brain in the Body! PU aad t Sci 7 Agricul aoe I t Resident
because it seems tebe acne age—which accounts for thei irector oO cience and gricul- Electric nspector,
involved in medicine's chief pur- utish brow in the portrait, ture, Entomologist, Veterinary Mechanical Engineer “Waters
pose—the relief of pain. apove, \ Officer, Chemist, Botanist, Gov- works, Superintendent Water-—
Many doctors believe that the London Express Service ernment Analyst Lecturer in works, Principal Clerk Genéral
Natural Sciences, _ Librarian, Service, Senior Assistant Master
A at A oe Chief Medical Officer, Sanitation of Secondary Schools, Gradiate
Officer, Port Health Officer Gov- Assistant Master of Poor

Police

Italian farmer had confessed to

having
cause sh
tobacco
town,

The body of the woman, Mario

Innocent:

a woodman following the tracks
of a wolf in the lonely moun-

tainous region near Turin. that his Samet regarded the January 10th, Beauty La yn bd Vincent, sailing Thursday 26th
Doctors said that she had been| Vietnam Republic as the legal] 18th, Melbourne January 28th, Sydney anuary, E
murdered and buried more than] government of Vietnam. eda ma * accent O “and 7
two years ago. , : hese is hi 1 f Trinidad, sailing Saturday ..
. The Chinese Communists want-| oihes Ward Whom cid Genel ae January. .

The h

eato Renigio, said to have been

a very h

was arrested by the Police last — the 9 tia countries,” thé/ For further een er,
night. telegram said. pees lee AE,
After all night questioning,| The radio declared that the es- DA COSTA & Co. LTD.,

Police said that Renigio confessed
—but not until Police had prom-
ised to give him a cigarette.



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Income Tax returns are re-
quired from every married man whose income is $1200.00 per annum

or over,

annum or over and from companies whether incorporated or unin-
corporated, societies, persons engaged in any trade or profession, and
owners of land or property whether a taxable income has accrued
during the past year or not.

Forms of Return my be obtained from the Income Tax Depart-
ment AFTER THE 1ST DAY OF JANUARY, 1950, and the forms
duly filled in must be delivered to me on or before the following

respectiv:
i

NOTE; Any person failing to make his return within the due

10.1,50.—19n,

High
at 2

there
of St

I
ton,”

$6906

“a



Killed W
For Tobaeco

Returns of persons whose books were closed on the 3ist
day of December, 1949, on or before the 31st day of March,

Returns of all other persons, on or before the 31st of Jan-

The un

The Dwelling House called “CARLD)

For further particulars and conditions of Sale, apply to :—

or

PAGE SEVEN
i

IRUHVEEUGEUATEUEUUVAEG AM




- Wen














In Carlisle Bay

IN PORT: Schooner Molly N. Jones, M.V. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt.
Sch. Manuata, Sch, Mary M. Lewis, Sch. Gumbs,, from Dominica; Agents: Schdon-
» Smith, Sch. Marion Belle er Owners’ Association.

Wolfe, Sch. Reginald N. Wallace, Sch. S.S. » 3,121 tons net, Capt.
Marea Henrietta, Yacht Beegie, Sch. Wells,, from Grenada; Agents; Da Costa
Endeavour W., Sch. Barca De Oro, M.V. & Co., Ltd. oe f



counterpart in the Body Im
Strongly supports this theory, — ’





forget to put on his left

case of this type
so disastrous tha{

Return Leave Passages —

From Page 5 House Surgeon, Matron, Assistant
. a Matron, Sister Tutor and Home

; Yogi secret

Some children who are insen-'

of Prisons, Superintendent Gov-

proneness to serious accidents, : = :
ernment Industrial Schools, Di-

Yogis, fakirs, and fire-walkers



Superintendent Mental Hospital,
Matron Mental Hospital, Colonial

ople who are excep-
in their movements









ernment Bacteriologist and Path-
ologist, Surgeon Specialist, Radi-
ologist, Medical Superintendent,
House Surgeon and Anaesthetist

Schools, Senior Assistant Mistress
of Secondary Schools, Graduate
Assistant Mistress of Secondary
Schools.

ife China Recognises
Red Vietnam

SINGAPORE, Jan. 25.
Chinese Communist Government
has officially recognised the Viet-
nam Republic, Indo-Chinese Na-
tionalist Regime led by the Com-
munist Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam
radio reported to-day.

The broadcast quoted a tele-
gram from Cho En Lai, Chinese
Communist Prime Minister, who
is also Foreign Minister, saying

SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA NEW
ZEALAND LINE LIMITED
(MLA.N.Z.) LINE)

M.S. “PORT PIRIE"” is scheduled to
sail from Sydney January i4th —
arriving at Trinidad about February

7th

M.S."KAIPAKI” is scheduled to sail
from Port Pirie January 7th, Burnie



ROME, Jan. 25,
to-day alleged that an

murdered his wife be-
e forgot to buy him some
when he sent her into






The M.V. “Caribbee” will «4
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Kitts-Nevis, Antigua, Mont-
serrat, Dgminica, sailing Friday
27th January.

The Schooner “Gardenia W" will
accept Cargo and Passengers for



ina Fourete, was found by










ed to exchange Ambassadors so
as to “strengthen relations, and
enhance friendly. co-operation be~

Cargo accepted on Through Bills of
Lading with transhipment at Trinidad
for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
and Leeward Islands.

usband, 48-year-old Ern- The Endeavour win



eavy drinker and smoker,

tablishment of diplomatic rela-
tions was a “slap in the face for
the French Imperialists and their
lackeys .”—Reuter.

Agents: Barbados.

ee ALeoa Steamship

CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND

Name of ship Sails

Halifax Barbados
S.S. “ALCOA PLANTER” January 3th. January 18h
8.8. “ALCOA PATRIOT i - January 22nd. February rd,
Sailing every two weeks,

NEW YORK SERVICE
S.S. BYFJORD sails from New York 13th, arrives in Barbados 22nd.

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
S.S. ALCOA ROAMER sails from New Orleans 30th December, arrives
15th January.

5.8. ALCOA RUNNER sails from New Orleans 14th January, arriving
80th January, a





*

—Reuter,










GOVERNMENT NOTICE
INCOME TAX NOTICE

from every other person whose income is $720.00 per

a
seer

SeEeReeEEeenEeeT ~-

Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — Canadian Service

e dates: ROBERT THOM







ce

BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LID.

NOTICE

SO far it has been found impracticable to work
out such a Schedule of cuts in Electricity as was. :%
published in May of last year. Our available generating ‘ )
capacity now is considerably less than it was then, ..j
while the overall demand has increased. aod

On weekdays, between 7 a.m. and 11 a.m. and 15
noon and 4.30 p.m, only Bridgetown can be supplied, ~
if continuous water pumping is to be maintain sist

Between 11 a.m. and 12 noon, all areas excepit®
Bridgetown should be “on” and between 4.30 p.m. and. ¥
7 a.m., such capacity as is available, after giving due. }}
priority to the needs of water pumping, baking, icemaiiz }
ufacture, printing, ete., will be distributed as equally.as
possible throughout the system by similar. “on” per
as have been effected during the past few days.

Load studies and exper

1950.
Returns of persons whose principal place of business is not
situate in the island on or before the 30th day of June, 1950.



uary, 1950.
F, CLAIRMONTE
Commissioner of Income Tax and Death Duties,




date will be liable to a fine not exceeding £100 and
not less than £2 and will be prosecuted unless a satis-
factory reason is given.














FOR SALE

dersigned will offer For Sale at their Office, No. 17,
t, Bridgetown, on Friday, 27th day of January, 1950,

alli TEM” and the land
to containing 10,770 oquare feet, situate on the Sea Coast
- Lawrence Gap, Christ Church,
nspection on application to Miss Kathleen Hunte, “Brat-
Maxwells Coast. Dial 8357,




Stree
p.m
























t
)
j
i
'
:

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO,, imental switching o






























11.1,50.—15n. tions are being carried out continuously with a Wey 4!
649SS66466006006 to evolving a. workable Schedule and the Com - 4
wilh be greatly assisted in this if all Consumers, ft
PLLAPLLCLLPLPL SLO SSOD SOOO SS AAAS trial and Domestic, make sure that consumption: 4
both light and power is cut to the barest minim (Se eae
IMPORT ANT the times when current is available, whether d fae
day or night. : we 4
Owing to pany requests from cones - h-
: i whether we could not give some notice o:
For Your Daily and Evening the areas affected, we have decided, although it is not.
standard practice, to switch “off” the area to be cut for”

¥2 minute, then switch “on” again for 3 minutes before
the final cut. By this means it is hoped that Consum a
will have time to, put into operation their auxil lighting. This method of switching: will only be an |
operation between. the hours of 6 and 10 p.m. *

The foregoing proposed arrangements can only be
adhered to if the existing available Sets, which are
already overloaded, can all be kept running. ;

THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION, LTD.

V. SMITH

ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER in
Church Village District,

Contact ...
GEORGE QUINTYNE,
CHURCH VILLAGE,
ST. PHILIP

SPLSCSSSSES SSL OPP SPPOP EPOCH





















26, iy

a







THURSDAY JANUARY
PAGE EIGHT THE BARBADOS ADVOCATI







ce a






















Dias nd itt aaa Siete | Freddie Mills
Â¥ Footbal. Raciug ai ports Yachting, Boxing. efe. _ Will Retire |
| i ONPIEY by Commiws | i-Siccses

TRINIDAD ROUT JAMAICA { STOPPING: ALL STATIONS TO BANKRUPTCY by Cummings | 2S iat



a





Court Stadium here on Tuesday,
said today; “You can take it as |
Imost certain that last night was |
Mills’ last fight.” |

FOR PALTRY 155 RUNS |
Ramadhin Bags Five For 39

Nn i




















































































































































































































































j
|
* “I am going to do my best to |
ay (By O. S. COPPIN) | persuade him to give up the fight |
ee i ‘“ | game. Freddie has had a good run.
aS PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 25. ; | He has always given the crowd | i
a Sam Ramadhin, 24-year-old Indian right-arm slow spixner, | | their money's worth, and has been |
played the major part in Trinidad’s routing of Jamaica for! ; 2 good champion.
‘ 158 runs in just three and a half hours’ play as the first) Broadribb, Mills’ manager and | : s
Trinidad-Jamaica Test opened at Queen’s Park Oval today.| father-in-law, informed | is coming out
Ramadhin secured a bag of five wickets for 38 runs in aS a ae remember
+ : : : : it c } J
overs. Trinidad with all her wickets intact, replied with s conferense at whieh Goth Mills that —
in one and a quarter hours ag BS wicket was perfect) F é ‘a - and his wife, Christie, were pres-
; rowd imated to ,000. Such a fuss about ere Surely you don't expect | ent, the former World Lightheavy- = .
ane the crowd, wap. aenenns aT —__——_——| | Sap itatle Ueiiees, Bie Seat to be ies | weight Champion, said that he i VIKTIN
John Goddard arrived here. ie wat said, £24. are meaning- : : * ‘By the time we'de stopped was retiring from the ring.
to-day to witness the Jamaica- | rend Sion to a | less ” Savcling Heme? the seand See oF Solomons said: “I think that
‘rinidad Tests. ee io the roads. oe | Mills’ decision is a wise one.”
kus a for the games| The batsmen were now Jefinitely dismantling the 5 r rede i a ater. DOES GR OW HAIR
was-Mr. J. W. B. Chenery. lon the defensive in the face of} ae see z i
— ‘won the toss, skipper | Trinidad’s excellent ground field-| : “bee tieaiteiess retail Use Pure Silvikrin in severe cases of dandruff and '
Greves'eiected to bat on 2 perfect | ing and steady Dow tus. ed] : thinning hair. As a daily restorative dressing use
wicket though the gimosphe *| Pha ag Been Pe gemene| - : Footballer Silvikrin Hair Tonic Lotion containing Pure Silvikrin the
was fairly heavy. [oe ers aes ra | ‘ r ¥ bi Pa “i ; a
Colin Bonitto and Vincent Lums-| wicket without addition to a M ial m Can Breaks Contract Hair’s Natural Food. From all chemists, hairdressers aug
den operied the innings, the form-| Pn ete Celt’ winart a pes axt ROME, Jan. 25 Silvikrin Laboratories Ltd., Londen, N.W.10, England,
» from Prior Jones,| of his fou over tos e| : ; . 25. ;
- aaa oe ee | well up which was cleverly flight- 2 Fi The Italian Football Federation a
se A ve pees es eo to beat and bowl Lumsden wno} is or was ex ed to decide today what Z -
4 ito ¢ bail - ai - der fac-| Played back defensively. | i s nition . would take in the case
e ee — Cs ate ou _| Lumsden scored 20 during his | Titles of Argentine footballer, Mario
ing was ; wa 8.4 a appeni | 63-minutes stay at the wicket He ! wo Boye, who left Genoa Club yester- KEEP BABY
armen oy tk o wi ket was ‘di - | hit three fours. The score was now day, and returned to Buenos Aires.
ai a core | 31—2—20. Neville Bonitto join CINCINNATTI, Jan. 25 The board of directors of Genoa
a Lona n-drove the next ball Rickards and played out the ovr) ‘er Sam Becker| Club, after meeting late seat night,
i_ ms nist» ji ly Hg mo giving Ferguson a maiden wicke: an exclu-| sent a telegram to the Federation ON TOP OF
ee econ wet singles, the} Atkinson's three overs ic Maxim’s| in Rome denouncing his depar-
es eA eke yr ; but three s. Ramadhin making wed that the} ture.
over yielding 7 runs re tas. etnies oy ea int ‘ , dy
i > R= ' ‘lie | his w in Intercolonial cricke - heavyweigh The board was today studying
i er er et oe in tig gl is coached by Barbados’ Clarence] «tant im. aie de aie when he] what further action it could take. THE WORLD
‘rap. Some late inswingers kest| Skinner of Intereolonial fame.| “An from now on we SLIGHTEST effect on our riea, would be} It alleges that Boye’s departure
| Sonitt t rc k cas hike wicket n w cheers when he sent dow: | shart be able to provide the decision to rescue steel ‘ror promotion means that he has broken his
the Gutentive at d he took en. In his next over sumptuous —- os the clutches of incompete ut ans.” said Becker.| contract. ON’S ;
: 1g BC SOK ol Rickards swept him past the finc ore. free enterpr ight Ezzard : '
maiden over from Gomez. The| Rickards swept hin — rs ee r Seed The Genoa Club is reported t JOHNS BABY
next over from Jones, Lumsden | leg boule ty scures he celebrated ee | Charles tor the other is| have paid £8,888 to his er
turned one well up neatly to tho; en -ehagparnd ee 2 od ee ; ad sonst <- Moore for} club for his services. ‘
square leg boundary and then on} tits with pulling @ most one | a well-timed late cut for Kid John To i vt Pig f Boye has scored 12 goals for POWDER 2 Sizes 3le. & 60c.
Grove for three. ee ee, ee el a h 1 ont se said, the| Genoa since he joined them.
Bonitto Out four. In the next ove, from| Ganteaume was seoring muce either + » Bove left by air for Buenos
a ey Se n was nearly| more freely then. is score was t id be held in Cincinnatti ’ : ith his
Bonitto facing played back an’ tear o . 4 , . " . i 6° " Aires yesterday evening wil is “c |
a late outswinger from Jones “4 ‘Molly catch| who was TL Btollmeyer pulled a ig tjae CK |r __ wite and mother, 9nd Bre Ane JOHNSON’S BABY SETS
did not cover up sufficiently, on at short fine| full one from Valentine to square . + aes lay, wife of another © :
ball taking the edge of the — i Osnd the bath| leg for two, sending up 50 in 57 Midday Sut Sold player on the Genoa Club’s books. ee th ae th be
for wicketkeeper Guillen aos his leg minutes. Ganteaume was 32 and 2 cian tee 26 Rorhe newspapers said that he e ideal gi or e new-bdorn
© SPRRREN GEECD Re ee een. ched 20 with a, Stollmeyer 18 i = y Sol: rio 5ut ot] booked the plane seats when the
ad runs weer 2 pew Soet ov oo ; Dy la out oF
“- wenitto hed scores 3 , seis runs. The first}, Next over Iffla, bowling much "i Epsom] Genoa Club came to Rome to play
the total was 1 { t : five more ruts | better, sent down a maiden to the Rome Club on Sunday. When a 2bee
the wieest Se vere ed to the score when,)Ganteaume. Ganteaume late cut his team returned to Genoa after
“ t 55 The| the third ball of Valentine’s next being beaten 3—0, Boye said that
. ; r beautifully to the boundary he wanted to stay on in Rome te
ee erate or 4. The score was then 55 arches agree ; ins , -~AT
ke the : see his mother off to Argentina. | I
Seen hae | Mudie relieved Iffa at the farm sia . hie wife haindead rom aaaedl AMM J. DENT TOOTH
one mye lend. Stollmeyer tickled the last He and his wi "
play before lunch lball of the over neatly off the plane.
vo nit t | , —Reuter. T PASTE ‘ie,
eS it <9! pad te the fine leg boundary for pe POW DER POWDER i He
not out 13 Before | four Ifa only changed ends, ~ PASTE & Ee
c over of mu | carrying on in place of Valentine
from the pavilion end. ghee 4 s
rer tune, Trinidad gained}, Play closed for the day B.B.C. Radio 7
RP a Trinidad 63 without loss, eke. “a } a
% poms 40 and Stollmeyer 23 maaan a Programme AVE 0 “
ee a i bre | ne : : PERALTY OC 2b): 3 WEDNESDAY JANUARY 26 1950 "a
ar . , a MAICA’S ist INNINGS 5 MA Ranei Cr. :
i two quick wickets si < ‘ : By M. Harrison-Gray : 1 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m. News 10, 11, 12 +, BROAD STR
kards and get ing| : ed ouny. Grape am : Dealer ruth : snalysis; 7.15 a.m, Sporting Record; 7.: ia
i for a ducl fia . : East-*Vect same : Music Magazine; 7.45 a.m. Gen- ——$——$_
” mped for a Guck. | = — Ferguson 20 | s N : Speaking; 8 a.m From the ——_—_—_——
The remaining batsmen held ot x Bickarts 2 Ramadhir 4 : 3 : . ials. 8.10 a.m, Programme Purade
Jogged|; 2 1 bow!- ae Sere 36 : a = Is m. ive Becke; 8.30 4 00
oggedly wars ane Trin sed w en| J. Groves « Mega b Jones 17 ; : “ : 862 : to Read: 8.45 a og British Masterpieces
ers were definitely on top RED) G. Mudie stpd. Guillen (wkpr.) b Carded for ght 1 : Q9864 = |s a.m. Close Down; 12 noon The News; :
the tea interval was taken Jamaica is Ramadhin ... ©} week is the eig 3 Q3 : 12.10 p.m. News Analysis; 12.15 p.m See US for the following a $9 i
t 9 wickets for 150 runs. | fio" Sones b Ramadbin | contest bety : é : |New Recres: Tab pm, Radio News LETTER BALANCES; WIRE TRAYS; Wil
- a in — H_ Fuller 1.t J 2 | Guiana, and : Oars : reel, 1.30 p.m. Take it from ware ETS: CASH BOXES—different sizes
after tea erg Valentine ¢ Guillen (wkpr.) b the Bearded : : |2 pm. The News; 2.10 p.m. Home ’ c NY . SCA
bowling from the , Bamadhin 5 6 | 7 : aa t : @52 : News from ‘Britain 2.15 p.m. Sport Also: SPRING BACK BINDERS; FOO Us ,
d Ifa turned a full Kentish mt out SP aes #19752 ¢ | Review; 2.30 p.m. Radio Theatre LETTER SIZE :
‘ square leg boundary —s Fh : s : Dally servi at” | , Phithar- —_————— 4
¢ ’ Ss Ss Sew ——| ing forward t c e : : aily rvice; 5 n m4 - F
f Total int hemes i AQ8> ? | monia Orehestra; 5 p.m. Listeners ROBERTS & CO.
F from the | Kid . : AK 53 $ | Choice; 5.15 p.m. Programme Parade; | \ os SS
a” : . F { kets: 1 for 14, 2 for 32.| id - 7 . 7 : 5.20 p.m. Generally Speaking; 5.45 p.m.
Vv took a for 99; 4 for 99; 5 for $8; 6 for 120;| Cotton is giv : AK 108 : Tom Jones Trio; 6 p.m. Australia Calls; ——~——
i > face. The|7 1 %6; 8 for 137; 9 for 150 | ring partners a : 3 | 6 50 p.m. Interlude: 7 p = ane wearers T A
teas” She BOWLING ANALYSIS OF hae : na 17.1 m. News Analysis; p.m, We ; Z 7
ae ae ee : ox R. W | throws leathe us : 1 : ey Britain; 7.48 Dm. Merchant Navy MAKE iT A BAT: ”
oan ’ “ °o M R. W.} no uncerte fas : $ | Newsletter; 8 p.m Ne Ean #
e t took the eage 18 g : | cavs the competent Lex . * |»om. The Fight Aga t xe: ‘ 4
— + stis held an oaay 5 Rg rays tee. camperent & : ? | The News; 9 10 p'm. Home News from ¥ /
n at sup hel - " a 3 youngster se¢ ns € 5 1 : | Britair 9.15 p.m British Political t
“ vo lee g Ferguson 20 4 st 2 | by a K.O., and he is prepare = game-den 2 | Weeklies; 9.20 p.m. Ray Martin 0 om '
iffla red | amaica inmings | Ramadhi 1 61 39 5 c m to the limit § Club is co $ | Meet the Commonwealth; 10 p.m +
vere closed at 155 runs, no ade in , . 0 peck : be Bess 7 ‘ . — Di ar 1 s | Gundy Mav Sec t the Theatre Organ; FOOTWEAR FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
907 minutes _ RRINIDAD’S ist INNINGS PY a ee ; S Was : South : | 10.45 p.m. Special Dispatch; 11.p.m. The
8 eae ¥ a Ganteauiic A Ganteaume {not out 40 | Marine is leaving nothing oe s . 6| News
; . ne . Ltolimeyer an santeal 1€ | J. Stolimeyer mot out) z ‘hance, and is paying | a : st
4 - f opened the Trinidad first innings | Extras 0 prt an eamiuina ‘ | 8 CE Ee PSS, THE
j . on at a - = at 4.20 p.m. “ Ganteaume took i Total ifor o wkt.) ~ 63 first class trim, wher nA ¥ } : tor ; i) 39 JALITY
t % at cover W!-h' strike from Kentish who began | ——J| into the ring. 5 ae | ZEPHIRIN’S QU BRITISH a
a n abs 6 ~ bowling at a good pace from the | BOWLING ANALYIS : There is sure to be a great fight & ian hie a 2 li BAKERIES RIVED
ur of pls farm end. It was an impressive i... ° u B W-1 without a dull mon for t 3 tk aa i Swan & Roebuck Streets |
‘ : ae Yiopening with oct-swingers and Puller 5 who attend the Yankee St 2 y % 10 1) ad J
‘ and his ft ' in-swingers. Kentish sent Gown. | Valentin, i 21 : ‘ ok o 15 announces the arrival of asa
} a maiden Ma 6 2 2 :
; Bouncer Fuller opened from the pavilion yruaie . . ' i ’
oh. Jones hammered the last bal!|end. Stollmeyer got off the mark Q —- ') i | r
ty ¥ of his sixth over and Rickards wos | with a push to silly mid-on for a uarantine d I} ‘ js K | T me for the New
Be ee struck on the forearm “ut appa’-|single. Next over Ganteaume The Weather \ cin & (aster I) n |
} ently was unhurt. With the : »\ turned one well up from Kentish . ite Llaacca 1) j 1) :
at 26 for one, Ferg reli¢ to the deep fine leg boundary. . TODAY Athlete Released \{ |} DESK DIARIES; PLATIGNUM PENS; PENCIL SBIS™®
Gomez at the screen end, Gornz Stollmeyer took four off Fuller |} SUS cen eds'o La wears i
had bowled five overs for five russ| With a glance off his pad to the Sets: 6. tone - [ \ UITS;
and had sent down three meidene /square leg boundary. Moon (First Quarter) Janu- Another Detained i |) FORD'S ASSORTED SWEET BISCUITS; GENTS
x Pergusor , { Pear am i m
st én ee ees *! With the score at 19, useful left Lighting: 6.30 p.m. KARACHI, Jan. 24 } England’s No. 1 Sugar PURSES and WALLETS; LADIES’ PURSES
t eueitets ee d Lumsder d or | Pull Alfred Valentine relieved High Water: 9.06 a.m.,, 952 Martin Jooste, South Afr { Refiners. { r
— ee ee ee a “| Puller at the pavilion end. Easy p.m. Empire Games avnlet ) t HARMACY
ele y take & single Off the last baie ice | action and a good length was YESTERDAY leased from quarantine \} Order early to avoid disap: {|| COSMOPOLITAN P -
iat A a on ug ig Gouble chane®,| shown in the first over. In the Rainfall (Codrington) .26 day } pointment, a2 only » limited { : 4441 ~ ; ‘
j _—— jee brought - hs, second over Valentine had both an ; Ian de Jongh, tt S \ quantity is available. Day Phones: 2041 — pi
1 end in ace 0 Jones} batsme . » To r ont! Tes a ea at ) . ”
Shade Rance: wer Geckotieri eel es an es net i. ry ene to Yester African held since | \ Specify PUMPHREY’S \ BARRA
$i In the next over, Fer; t shat ; € ighte ie . i still in quarantine and | } : neemgn SSS
: patered wer, guene roug?t|one and an unsuccessful appeal qeesneeene (Min.) 70.0° F. {ito Auckland, New Zeal } lend
ci gasps from the crowd by| was made for a stump. emperature Max.) 81.5° F. he Camis én Eeidas a
Le TH diving forward in a magnificeat) Two balls later, Ganteaume Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E., ee een - IT IS GOOD VALUE ! fi
i ont to porn a cate 7 wat | nee 2 high lucky stroke through wit VE hal i ¥. dposia, 35-year-old welverweight : :
Py , uppish stroke from Rick-| slips for four n locity: miles per wrestler, and de Jong og
; ards that dropped inches from| Iffla now relieved Kentish at hour old high jumper et | Rediffusion Pr yamine ee aa Gee d Blue at $1.35 per sh
wh, his outstretched hand ‘the sereen end and Ganteaume cut Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.026; because af faults in their | meneAy sen 26th 1950. in White, Gold, Pink an
: j ne-har i 1 - a faver . : 0: j
ii i it cet os yg field by high through slips for four. The (3 p.m.) 29.901 fever inoc ulation ye vos Gtude Service | SPUN, RAYON in White, Gold, Green & Brown at 2
13) son at mid-oon robbed next over off the same bowler he Col. Jaffar, ) i 20— 8.00 Morning Special i4 at $)
Cundecs of ‘id | “9:15 Songtime \\{ SPUN LINEN in White, Grey, Gold & Rose #
Jooste ‘ : ee eee
? = 1.1 Programme Parad proof
ij South Af er | is — Crease Resisting and Shrunk
4 siven an he w cor- | 3.45— 4.00 ue isical Varieties i
} : etly i | 4 t. ladies. don’t or 2 eee, > 5
eae De Jong! ‘ } nobody move, OK Sadie o— 6.30 Seiten ee BROADWAY DRESS we
t i ; ; what bargain d'you ;
4) ; ant? 6.20 7.00 oe”
| : b 7.0 ot dea Perr ‘ §
ria ised i na Lond ézp s Wipe Roodal Theatres x PPPS SIS OF POGIS
} aid.—Reuter. rage ee - 7.30— 745 Dick Haymes Show if
0 presented by Bor- ° e e e § ‘ a
Â¥ dens 5
i > re tock
i «ve SS woes. 1% Building Materials in |
eee Cave phe & WIié *%
mH Co., Lid . +
7 “DISPA” Eee ig wae aE
oa Bottling Co., Lid. ; in 375 Ib, drums i
$15— 8.30 Bob beriy Show .,
= WONDERFUL NEW WASHING PURER aad presented by 5 dal ‘
> * 3 ge sweat fed : k , Taw b. arums
: > Bre ‘ ; - ™ 9
< Gensamonac Hi 2 pee in 395 tb. & 12]
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. = WOOILENS SILKS ¢ DELICATE FABRICS 3 are :
i¢ = WMire =) nempic ana wwe {Hl RED COLORCRETE CEMENT
VHITER WHITES 2 All HOUSEHOLD
i g WASHING | 3 Usa vee ee SS ee in 275,%b. & 112 ib. drains
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( , a o = New 9.15 : nd 9.45 p.m j
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| S Net cam. ¢pm + M18 PORTLAND CEMENT in S295
s . a
* Z > Eve Pp malice at « a
tan FROM a : . S22 is Il% FLOOR TILES ol
Oe ozs. for 25¢ S ” ‘ i in White, Red, Chocolate 2”
| NIGHT CLUB / cee gam Hig
| ’ ers ve emo HIS GLAZED TILES in White
| DISPA WAS MADE £0 DEAL WIVH DIRT! I ) x
i} Anything that Soap can do DISPA does Better Hii rd : $ a : j
i DISPA used i Washers gives Excellent Results . % WILKINSON ij \} VFS (0, 7
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Distributors | BARBADOS) LTD. x -: PHONE 4267 =
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PAC1 SIX 711' BARBADOS ADVOCATE nil RSDAV JANLARV 2J, njj STATIONERY. RIP KIRBY .-: —fa £ %.CO. T y NC ...HOL*. fc~-i %  J J i-o. e.w | *..E r*-a =o vc ..-ji retrrm --i s. • o. CA>. CM -%  >•.. „*T TO I go. -a.-^ -N of : BY ALEX RAYMOND NEW RELSEr FOR ARTHRITIC PAINS But new treatment does more than ease these terrible agonies. A new product. DO I which not only givei prompt rel*-( fro* iu* to the aympu>ia* ••{ -irihritiii and lOtuDiXkim bill • vary imporUni naii ol [round. DOLCIN baa oeen thoroughly teeled in mednal institution*. DOLCIN i being u*ed m *it k unprecedented nucceae. DOLCIN u> being prennU-J b) dooton -.\ aufferura have already -twumed noraoal living a* a mull of taking DOLCIN. f) Proll by ihv rxparienea of fellow-victimAII^ (i-i DOLCIN U-day. A botUa of 100 preciou* U: On Sm9m m HOOhl IIS >Wy/rVW/*ww1l' HOLIDAYING IN ENGLAND AGAIN? .ITY TO ENJOY IT W 'ECONVENIBNCi: Due N Ihr arrival of a lourM •,),. •; I Vmmk M iiUKsiiw the H*t in-trad ol s\Ti UkAl In ihk COLLINS LIMITED. 2S. Uroad Slreel. '. W.VAWAW///.V. VUST1N delivered lu "*,.^ n.r slay in "*_n i you bring the Car back t %  ou call on us "<* 'J 10 ,!-# IK, rseas \ isilor.' Delivery *"" CO. ECKSTEIN BROTHER DIAL •* BAY STREET ---.•.-.•.-.•., •MW<* >0 \



PAGE 1

mrBSDAY JANUARY M ItH Return Leave Passages Recommended For Scheduled Public Servants The Tourists Broke the Law THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE T % %  qua Mill., Polaris", W |,„ though! %  rchjrged by a laxi-car driver, rscuufvi navinp neighbouring colon !iy keeping the drive. tely ne local public offit remunerated, when compared with expressed by the Committee appointed by the governor to examine the public services of the Colony. appointed Iftt. %  EL Z9tfi of November, %  nment nf fffH office" ,n rc,otlon -** lh ruilment and to their authority IM| cf Resolution No Definition irfe.' %  and to make recomStlions for the removal of Jjcsuses whVh threaten 1 %  h threaten to afpubltc services adthe Committee MX" s report iaam lOOie special recommendaSETrelauvr U) die stalls of cerJjT Schools and Coll.-• lXsted the appointment of anXcommittcc to m .don to the new salary JE, m other West Indian islands. flic report went on as follows: Buwugl ^'xeste.i to us that we ..mid. wttl ri-s uf reference, make rccom-apdationx regarding Ml matters SJch wfl coMd affect the pubtdvertely, we regard IMIVCS rt *"'* required to S mmendalions relating to ST^moval ol ...uses which adverseh %  '' '-' lne Berv ce m so upend on ^unistr;itiv<'. professional and u-hnical officers. We would, Siever, ''" l l our dulv lf we B D %  ""in*, to the notice of bur Excellency matters which. | rtUethev may be outside the LmMtJLatc scope of our terms of reference, appear to endanger the pablic service. Artec led We have found ">>'ncc that M public services are ajtcted bv the << IJJIHV lo recruit and to Mlcompiem.-ii of enlnr adnvnanUvc. professional and teenm!" 7 omcers. We have found that ne officers of those categories —doader that the> are inadequaterremuncrated in the light of the num-r..-. : n earned by holders similar offices in neighbouring Ctort^ Such officers, whether mported from other parts ol the rorld or born and resident in ibados. realise lhat they have %  jrket value outside ol Barbados ** if for health, family or other (gjons the} do not feel bound to nain in Barbados, must Inevibseek financial advaneamant %  here There ire *l present vacancies In Mime important olllcro ol the Government and further Tscanfir-t will occui BIN We have irsve doubu exist i er those \acannes %  thr "tequired lent i* lhe existing in the near found thai ts to whetli .HI be filled Undard alarien and ewidiliiHi"I -.rvice continue. As the lirst and In our Oftajon important measure to overlies of recruitand retention of B rtUve. pmf.^su-iial an I dkn'.< %  recommend that return 'liUlll'l (ranted of the mention*.! m the Schedule fins report, it will no doubt be iry to add offices to or deoffices from the Schedule Bom time to time, We consiuvr a "scheduled" officer should 1,48th of return leave passto the United Kingdom by %  ill direct route for himself %  nd hi~ %  of each ith of %  ervlce with the Govlent and that he should bo is granted vacation I • o place. >ther than the United ^pingdom .! ..nil but the maxpayable bj Tnn.cn, In respeel ol passH to other destinations should 1 exceed the value of passages the United Kingdom by a nora* route. Dillii -ulties A %  ibU dUBcUlty in the ruitment and retention of lor officers arises from the insome of the salaries iiados Gov.crnBtascompi.i.'(i with the salaiies %  Governments i tinidad. o report Your Excellenc> on the 20th pscember. 1949. and as we be%  t thai the consideration of the died examination than can be taken by us in th, > at our disposal, we recomn that a committee should be the salaries of ...,i and m in their relation i British are not |n|i. it'll tu egener.il rccomn 2? "' %  i'"'n*l and technical officers we %  W*r that we should J*ndions in regard to the %  tctchuiK staff of Secondary H* when-the difficulty of rc^-jn Professional officers is %  og grave concern. A %  Vwe recommend that the fnl?a r*w posts should be F* 1 as Government Offices EJ ibllshment slers I Sen ,' ,U, * Wtant Mistresses— lant Master *-n>oermcre School ^Jhould. of course, be a corf !" reduction in the numHI Masters fessuaas H w ^' ,H -54.32e The Director of Education mad,' the following recommendations in regard to the definition of and the illling of the proposed offices: — 0 The office of Senior Assistant Master is one which carries the responsibility lor the teaching of a subject or %  uroup of subjects throughout a school. This implies respnn.d.i;.' the syllabus and for the WOrt of any Assist. tutor in his department of the scho^', (U) A teacher may IK%  ppoint•0 fo an office of Senior Assistant Master by the Director <-f Education on the recommendation of the Headmaster nf the School if in their opinion the teacher issuitai,!, qualified and has %  utneient <\|>.Tience. (nil ii )>s lut oblif., the pan .if ;hc Uoadmas•aw to reei nunend the lining of all the office-* <,] Senior Assist | teachers wttfa suitable qualiflcations and ence are not available for appointment. T.eneral Causes rtler in our report we behove it to be oui draw Your BxceUanc} i attention to various general can % %  from evidence received, affect the .sen-ices^ of Q, adversely. We now state some of the more important causes and give our recommendations thereon. (l) Tindelay in dealing; with Matt %  w.oomtdei thi I oCBee leapaniible sions on stall matters should be strengthened that the delays which at %  nl oeeui are reduced to a minimum, (ii* The unsatisfactory stmc: the service. It has been staled that tructure of iho Barbados i ,ioes not allow of a satisfactory bod of promotion foi officers of promise and that the lack of %  tapping to the more inevitably result in a shortage of officers capable of filling such offices. W. believe that the slructim "f many department: which provides no between that of the Hcau of the Department Cterlee] Service is not iK'ivr In the acqu tion of the slain: responsibility expected of officers nor to the trainiiii; of ofBo i ida of Departthat specific posts such aa Assistant Auditor In the Auditor Gem ~. ment should l>e introduced. mi) Lack of training facilities' We are aware that i, COOUnittee appointed b) xToui Biceiancy is at present studying the queaif training 11 Otllccis. While we aware the) training especially : fessional and senior technical offices is not available in Barbados, we consider that the standard of afd lem % %  rise and the number of officers available posts will increase f tioinutioii and transfer. We have had mH %  A thai %  Ma lack of eonfl % %  the present arran, for recruitment and promotion. We have not studied the proposal for the setting up Of %  Public s,ivioi %  ". but we ft• a Commission if given : ; %  staff could providM it more efficient nK dtment etc. than now id would have the confidence of the Civil Serv We recommend the setting up of such a Commission. We have the honour to be. Sir. Your Excellency's obedient sei F I. WALCOTT. C. A. COPPIN. SAINT. H. G MASSIAH E. J PETKIK Schedule of Offices the Holders of which are eligible to receive Leave Passage Privilege* I white they made luck to their ship by boat from tl The tourist have acted contrary to the law. but nothing can be done now. Mr. Williams. Comptroller of Customs told the lervoaul terday. He quotnch .stated that persons coming to or leaving Barbados by ship, must do so through the LADIES at the Housecraft Centre. lla MNei paring several appetising dishes at one of their held yesterday afte Customs except sanctioned by the Comptroller of Customs to land or depart from another pier Mr. Williams was of the opinion that the chauffeur was up to putting a trick over the hat the tourists had! •unity H .-vaid' that H should be a lesson to some] now being knocked do taxi-car drivers who charge ex-! the building of Messrs Allevne MS" i PnC t l0 L r,de t Arthur Co %  • at Palmetto Square. Miss Joan Kysh of the Publi-1 The arches are being replaced by city Committee said that it was i wall built of concrete block* ;. practise of the taxitrlven WluUthe foundation for the to charge tourists one thing and. walls was being dug. a gutter when they have got far out make \ perhaps two centuries old. was adoitionai charges. unearthed. The gutter runs There are schedules from pre" are seen busily prelasses which was PARISH ROUND-UP '•ontrolljng ihe rates of taxi-riding. When ihe "Stella is here this last time. Police wore sticking up schedules in some of the cars. New rates are expected soon, she said. She was sorry that they had not reached before ihe tourists' season began. and just walk away. He said that someUmes these American dollars never reach the Banks. The IMM of a bicycle valued 150 was reported by Clarence Goodng of Chapman Lane. He stated that the bicycle was taken from outside the Phoenix Pharmacv. Broad Street, on Monday. Stowaway Wants Pay S s "Comedian" called at Bridgetown yesterday, but only to land Malcolm Pascoll (Man, who stowed away when the vessel was leaving Grenada for London. apparently thought that the "Comedian" was bound for Barbados, the land wl I domiciled. It was disc. aboard when the venal a Barbados. W.'ll; W%  land him. No prosecution was made because Captain Wells had no time to stay. Pascoll was sent to his ; Carrington'g Village. PtacoO seemed not at ,-dl omwhen before the shipping authorities He even ifhM for payment saying that he workny up from Grenada on the "Comedian." Tally Clerk's Body Found In Careenage The body of Kenn-th Half Bullen. forty-four-year-old tolly clerk I Villa", (heapside, was fished out of the careenage near Lane yesterday morning about 5.45 by H.P.C. 24 Philip and H.P.C. 34 Brew The post mortem examination was performed by Dr. E. M. Btanon .a Burton At Co.. Ltd. An Inquiry will be held on Monday. January 30. through the building in the direction of Palmetto Square. By removing these arches the Arm will have n* on the ground tloor and ail offices will be removed lo the second floor. The : iterations are being made at the spot where the Barbados Mutual Life Assurance Co. originally started business. The spot where the gutter was unearthed was once a courtyard and staUe. The concrete blocks that are being used to build the new wall were made locally by the Concrete Products Company al the The R*ef Pavilion is now well iy to completion. The cellar has already been concreted and two toilets installed. Electric wiring has also been completed but current is awi A road leading from the Iteef 'lie Pavilion has been nd is now bal Steam Kollei Ime now from the Highrranaporl Department to level the .ui. which is nearly semi-circular, is situated at the north end of the field. Samuel R. Griffith, who is the Dreamt caretaker, said that he was recently given 120 feet of hose and .i town mower. He has a staff of four groundsmen and at present ihey are working on two tennis courts. Olivr Sparer of Codrington Hill reported the loss of a goat valued $18 from her enclosed yard during Monday night. The mo Yaehling Season has started with a good number of boats registered in all Classes but there are still a few yachts hauT-ed up on various beaches that have never raced. One of these is the Zandoli which has been beached at the Heef for a good many months now. I he i irr Brigade wagon left the lire Station after mid-day yesterday with the Sigmund Pump in tow It dashed up Barbarees Hill, full speed ahead, to attend (Jlbba', St. Peter, but on leaching Eagle nail, certain information disclosed that the lire 1 It rethe Station. ST. MMI I'M It Is understood that the Manager's house at Castle Grant Plantation will !* %  rebuilt after the crop season. This house was by (ire a few weeks %  go. The cricket talk is centred around Vernon Fenty, Goodwill C.C. slow left hand bowler, who I took 78 wickets at a cost of 252 When nearly r00 tourists arrive;runs during the 1040 season in by the Maun-tama on Saturday, the Central Division. V, bowled in 13 innings, did not plav Mr. U. J. Parravicino will have about 60 motor cars ready to take %  rid the island. They will be taking the usual tourists' route and perhaps have lunch at the Powell Spring Hotel. Mr Parravicino told the "Advo%  '.erday that he accompanied some nf the tourists from the Stella. Polaris on their tour around the island He said thai Ihej aftre very impressed and especially liked how each small house in the country had garden to the front. I few visited the Elementary Schools in the country and were very much surprised by the tidiness of the children. Replacements Are Coming FOR ELECTRIC CO. The 'Advocate*' has learnt that news has been received by the Manager of the Barbados Electric Corporal!.m. that the crank shaft and bed for the n lees Engine which broke down k hsrVI been shipped trow England by the S.S. Craftsman. The machmeiv is expected to arrive in Barbados on Februa 12. NO REAR LIGHT: FINED r>/A fine of 5/and I/costs to be paid in seven days or in dewas imposed yesterday on James Applewhaite of Bank Hall by His Worship Mr. .H. A. Talma. He was found guilty i the motor lorry M-809 on October 11 on Roebuck Street without showing a rear light. matches. He captured lu wickets in one match on four occasions. rusMen Blackman of Romans C.C. captured 55 wickets at a cost of 300 runs. Romans CC gluing for the honours in the Central Division. A Certain Bank Official told the Adrocate yesterday that something should be done to make sure that American dollars, which the tourists bring ashore, is changed to Barbados currency, before the tourists walk around the City and begin to He pointed out %  few cases where tourists go to trays, small stores, etc. and spend their dollars without •van thinking of the value. In cases TELEPHONE CO. EXTEND LINES Workmen of the Barbados Teleare busy laying down cables in Barbarees Hill. This work is part of the regular extension of the service in the Spooner s Hill and Black Rock areas, the "Advoeate" was told yesterday. HARVEST AT ST. LUKES' CHURCH The Police Band will be in attendance at the 4 p.m. Service at St. Lukes Church, which holds its Harvest Festival celebrations on Sunday. ///,W/,W/i HARRISON'S BROAD ST. Negligent Driver John Forde of Rock Hall St |§ was yesterday by MagisO trale E. A. McLeod, fined 20/in one month or one month's imprisonment. The tine was imposed for driving the motor ear M— 1534 on Country Road without due care and attention. The offence was cor December I. 'udge. Judge Court of Appeal. Colonial Treasurer. Colonial Secretary. I letary. Aud Harbour and •lafhan. Registrar. r Petty I>ebt Court. PUice M Draughtsman, Assistant Legal Draughtsman. Public On Pige 7 Fell From Second Floor k Downes (22). of Bay' i parapet o. the second floor of the Savannah Club while he was washing the wall around the clock at about 3.30 p.m. yesterday He was taken to the General Hospital and when seen theie by <-presentati< e he was complaining of pains n his fall was about 11 feet LEGAL COURSE i"PUte teVirgin Islands, and own taking legal course, t)> cate" was informed yesterday. SHOES AT BARGAIN PRICE LADIES' Bed, Tan and Navy Fancy Shoes, While Sandals and Colin Styles GENTS AND CIIII.DKKNS S||OES-in a Variety ol Slyles and a Fair Ran*e of Slies ALL TO BE CLEARED REGARDLESS OF COST The Goods we arc offering are not shopsoiled or old slock—Ihey are merely lypes and styles we have decided lo discontinue. THE BABOABa IM I I IIK. aSMM SHOES KEDUCFI WOU $13.50 to $8.00 Will. \l)ll s MIOI s IKOM $5.50 to $3.1)0 Ol course there are MB) c,lli, r lines all reduced on the same generous scale—Why „..l visit us to-day and make your Choice. Did Mot Stop At Major Road Fiu Worrell of Deacons Koaa | wai lined 5 and l coats lo j be paid in seven dav* n | days' imprisonment bv Ills Wor. snip Mr. II. A. Talma veaterdav I to '! M '"Wing at a maior road t while riding ihe bicvrle M-8231 nn Chapman Street on December 10. Kuiiuua Supply Steady There Is no influx of fruit In the City at present, and therefore trade In that line Is somewhat normal. Water cocoanuts. oranges, grapefruits and bananas are the chief iwrru to be seen about the streets. The banana supply has been steady during the past month and one seller told the yesterday that a fair quantity can still be looked lor during t Incoming weeks. There are some big limes to be had, %  van lawful item now the Hying lisii season is underway. Niles Dies In Hospital Allan Niles of RockU Church, who was admitted to the ueneral Hospital on Tuesday afternoon died about 11 o'clock the same night. A post mortem was pcrformeo by Dr. H. L. Massiah yesterdav afternoon at the Hospital Mortuary. New Canon For S. Michm-IV Cathedral I The Lord Bishop ol Bai f has appointed the Reverend c.*\ Lisle r.rimth MandeviU, Hector of St. Philip to the onry of St. Cyprian in S-. ael's Cathedral, vacant I death of Canon C*. W. Johnson. 25 Years Ago Q Austin. 1. S. Hirkett. It (J. Challenor. F, K Gnfflth and H. W hue standing ilown and their places being tilled by E. L Bartlext. C. A Francis (who was play* consent of Major Cox and Mi Nunesi J. M. Kidney, J I. Parria, K Mason and Dr. Skeete. Taiilton, who skippered the home team won :!i Ihe visitors to bal %  A-uk.'t it ami no) % %  vrstsUM (nit the .lamuu.H it nearly so. Except E. A Raa arl out and hit Mnson twfc i v.-i. preltu.: , batsmen could do anvthlng wlta IIM lHwhtVK and in .. I PIGEON CHOW The most nutritious Food that can be had fur Pigeons One of I'urina'-. host, ami obtainable at • • H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD. %  %  % %  • a %  a i w BRITISH MADE MATS EXPERTS IN EXPORT FOR 73 YEARS ON SALE AT ALL LEADING STORES i: i* II %  • u n o i Quickly 11 Tie\ "COLDS .in*l CATAKIEII. >liifllni/ •ttnoving ihe cause. Let our Foot Comfort Eipm demon.tratr them to you. Each %  ppliance,, adjuMrd t -. roeet your individual requuemenli. Tired, aching feet weak and fallen archet, wk ankles, rrcrapsd tOM, etcijunkly rrBmdfttl p.im, Udsj-oltmr m BANISH FOOT TROUBLES THBDRSCHOUiWAy... \ neu raaejg of I)r. Scholl's Foot comfort rcnudus .md appliances hus been op<*ned in our shoe department FOOT EAZERS ARCH SUPPORTS ZINO PADS Fin ( iiiv Htimuns and Callouses \\V an ilu i\puinniv of the Stholl rnvthod of Foot Comfort. CAVESHEPHERD&coud III. II. 12 tk U III., ill Slncl HARRISON'S M*DWARf OfPT Dial 2364 y/ can lie arranged in IluIK. fur OaM f llu-se popular • VAUXHALL CARS WYVERN-12 h.p. 4 cy. VELOX 18 h.p. 6 cy. Full details uill he ahiillj ;iven 01 apBlicalioa tu HOItl IM IHO>l LTD. WhUepark. MI ni ,| 441s



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TT llinrtdiK .Inn II a r y 2 i l50. IbtcMns ^5u0cate rice: VE CENTS Year 55. K Guarantees Less Than Current Exports I French Council Approve New Security Measures To Combat Communism PARIS, Jan. 25. N EW French Securily measures. iiu-lmlinL: Men ,treatment for newsp ipers currying on "false campaigns" %  were :iiipi"* Vf "'' today by the Counril ol Ministers. B£ MOaaares arc primarily directed against the Coinimnim0 opposition t> what they call the 'dirty war" in [ndo* ICbina and to the forthcoming United States lUpntenl ofl lanlnrinln fir Atlantic Pact Nations. "NeceMary Polfc i lie taken and stri n, Minuter if State In of Information, totd the tfter thi n Intitei had met 1 w *'h RM llidault. i Earlier today, the \ i j ported i motion "stigmatising authors of nbo :hting Baal" %  rnnii': against "these ails of treason". The Communta) •raj Confederation of Labour) French worki portation l n equipment, and ffamontte, iden to i Of the "provoStorm Robs 300 Families Of Homes IN ITALY (TANZARO ltd were bales* here today aftei .< r badly _jed then ; Btcials said that Die dai [ UUS pert .11111[ oast of Italy amounted 0,000 lire ntiui ram In ttamaglng d trees. Many animals,; cativp poIicy .. Qf ^ Govemmem %  irt Indo-China. at a ma?* today in front of the Prime Minisler's office. The Hotel Matignon, official residence of the Premier, was heavily guarded by steel-helmeted Police. The anti-sabotage measures arc also aimed at unrest in the nationallaed railways.—Renter. Ul sea communications with 1 were cut. and many boats i narrow escape when they for the harbour at the ach of the storm Iches of the coastline road. j south from Cantanzaro, %  transformed into gushing J and live miles of railway j washed away. fcttbo observatory. 49 I of Rome, announced today I tt recorded an earth trcmoi 19.15 last night, distant aboul f miles to'he southwcht. I \ the tremor was of the llftli ie Mercalli stale. — Keuler Sugar Leader Replies To U.K. Announcement Rook Resigns Food Ministry tOOK b %  I : %  I %  %  i: Sugar iO HJ i ie Pope W ill hceive Beviu POME. Jan 25 ptuh ft : Ern, is expi %  : %  • when he arnbo Commonwenlih ConIt call will he on Preafgi Eirtaudi. I %  Bfldde de Ga>i %  plater Count Carlo %  tfi\ aource hei e do a very : Keuler. JCurft'\* Lifted |I Gold Coust GOLD CUAST.. Ian. 23, M* Id ..,,1 to |BpetLi !( imposed ten last A-e< k aftei two had been tabbed to I a clash wah ae i • publi< %  tew would r of the i i broke oui Bgi . the ci lony i tor Dominion status wiI by th v cov< ntion Peo*ty whoae I Dr. K.,.,, K ulrl cable ••n imr 5.1 Vugoslu\iu femellvd From |oulh Federation ... -u Vuum, in, IMH,|„ Knur ProMi • JWII* lenders Hiss Gets 5 Years For Perjury Court Martial! 400 BENEFIT FROM For Truculent HOUSECRAFT CENTRE Commander LONDON. Jim. 25. omandinj 0 mr of the British .submarine rrucujenl. which n rammed and ,IIK In the Thamc :ri t| le loss II 64 ,ivc,s W1 '"' court mar ~ e lla) \ ly or by default jp" Ihe British Admiralty announced isbt NEW YORK. Jan. 25 Alan H,S... (oi met Stale Depart iat, was nutan %  iiy for perjury. Hiss (48), one time adviv President Ro^.M "'f. 111 :1(l1 ;" : %  %  of I of the Unit. tan '' '""' *clc In 1945. was : '' lh e Com.lurday by • l-v „T' , ''" ould The Court found that he lied "> W imhe denied passing SI '' : "" "'Ssrillng responsii>ility mem documents in 1D38 to Wnit"" "" % %  •III. ————^—. i Sovu-t nn rin wlien be denied bavuig seen Chambers after January 1, 1937. HJsa was not fined. He a auudmuin penalty of 10 years diiprisoiuncnt and a S4.HO0 line. Defence COUUM Cross, has announced that the case Circuit Court of Appeal—one step rourt. Federal JudRe. Henry W Goddard. set bail at SlO.Oti" the appeal. The live year Mntenej posed on each of two terms to run COI "This should be apparent thai T I tins character may not > mlnert u -ilh lmm„" ,h. Who said the Barbadian worruu Any.du having thii view tn %  • lo change it immpcliately hiiri he younx women .ii the BOUMI %  were being lectured to in Home Nurv 3 Killed: 19 Injured IN EXPLOSION SYDNEY. Jan. 25. rhree nun wan Killed, and 19 %  erioual) Injured when an explosion anu in..swept the 2.411) ton N'iivy huidini: ship Tarakaa at Garden WaJtd, Bpdoto having break! His Ideal Our Daily Life (HAMI.KSTON. VlTfUm %  pfonUnaaf Amerilava -ei out m tin schooner "Bit.. twarch lo ence" in the Windward lales. 1.500 miles to the southtaaj 'rin %  > IncluOjt Jamaa Sullivan, the tftift, ,,nd Prank MacLear. a New York Naval Architect %  % %  n hiibnobbed with kings and ijimni imd rot.: „ IS <(IHl earls and the bijc shots of i|idustry." said Sullivan ,iT*l, r v,i uf Preter.. the raise way of lit, now we're on our wav to ideal exJsteiu-e."—B.U P he permitted with Impunity." the Judge said. —Reutrr Fleeing Chinese Enter Indo-CIiiifu BA1QON, Ji Thirt;. . puraueo to %  wig's ConunuoJ hav LCKUII to enter Indo China .Uy well here to-day Tnc reporl tm not conllrmed by the l*Tench Minn %  tionalists had retn nan A Frenrh Inn. %  %  at ihq freaeh outposi at i'honglo— 43 miles west of Lao Ka] I'1-.UHK.I The sitokehiiiiiii added tn communications did %  ii raUi II Keuler. Moie.: men wen Keuler. %  Celuuese Student Commits Suicide LONOOM. Jan. 25. A [iljue mil Uava Hnt.iiii (04 Ceylon on vttt the aabea of Garamul ix> Zoysa, 27 year-old Veterinary student, found gassed ai his London lodging Aeverdscl ol "suicuie while tlie balance Ml tha mind wai disturbed" was recorded at the .laynwaro the High Comsid that De i i study ... ol getting Engh:h U this year ware "pretty no vacancies. The Coroner said that the it De Zoysa % % %  lion iriMrntad.— Keeaar. ^ft~ •**fgk.-#. ; -^' •• -n^— Bandit Killed By Police In Sicily PALERMO, SICILY. Jnn 18, Colonel L'go Luca. head ot ihi .special "anti-baiM mi; brigand chietuin. SalvaUr t'Uihaiio, had a nari.u 1M ( to-day when his car ran into hail of machine gun nullats an band grenade*. Colonel Luca. who a i way tu m.spet a patrol round :he baodUi naoui out, leapt from the oaJ oaraa DH bodyguard to attack u> bandit position on a mi, ova. looking the road. One bandit, 2g->uar-o)d Salv.itore Pecoraro, was killiii ..s Lht bodyguard attacked. Bu r p ri aa d bs U> -length of th. attack, the bandiUi Mth • %  UMVlng Ptcaaani deaid on the hill top. He was wanted on many charges, including one of participating in %  last year on a Pol in barracks in which 7 poUoamen were killed. Colonel Luca's headquarters said that they believed Peeoraro to tone of the bandit-king Glullano' chief lieutenants—Beuter. %  attention %  taj m which began on the !6th. i many ph. % %  about 401 wasnan ^^ o •i these into two the the Kltcl • >: : i %  The vai %  rug mokn vanea ham Ing. Mi-Ivy Alley ne, he institution, said that I women entei %  '•or the latct C I ON MISS Ii lelli UM I STOLEN i'l.Wd.s m Mend rate. Order your con Today from your loral | s li datum %  i<-.ish*d. ii Carlo • n ul Town"" Hoiinl orlloh ^ ear Pflgrimi HOME. Jan. 25. mi today began buildin. immadiataly out' Home t<> accom.ooo pilgrims. [att minuti >elng put p cope with the vast flow of pilfrin Jubilaa Holy Yen pet ance In the Aral %  all calculated that tin datton they boa %  •'.els Drill nul it for the spring and n %  i, have arrive kta of l.ooo a \ pre ted to exceed 10,00 %  the '-ear. —Renter W ill Death Penalty Be Abolished? HONN I %  %  Ihe Allies for th I IffjH by th) I motion Heinria that tin II ion Kevin-. Man Vnd WilrW h<> Love Each Other Slick logether" LOMDOff, J-.i Luunsei proscculiag Urun Dontor muidor, told a ju.\ i nan and tdifi Men lo* i %  %  l .Juine foi her iiiiibaud. who has pleaded not | i Bf dealei >-uy, whose dn u %  ; %  d Cro VM found in slimy marshes on Hues estuary. %  .i .... Court (UM %  i any port Lo IHI lay I have no I he had any pan in it. Mi It. F. Levy, defending %  "Only a madman w body In Hum* Hut." he told th. :t and no that Hume ould havi •mirdered SeUy anyui.body to the ut up, and pi %  Hume's inno After The ..iiiludm,. I and Prose* .. mi Krii-'t AUGUST PLEDGES ARE NOT IMPLEMENTED IN the Barbados Press on 18th January there appeared an announcement of H.M. Government summarising the sugar talks which took place in London from November to January. Certain ideas expressed in this announcement require categorical explanation, and the relevant portions of the announcement are therefore quoted below, immediately followed in each case by the comments of the Hon. H. E. Robinson (Chairman of British West Indies Sugar Association (Inc.), and leader of the B.W.I, delegation taking part in the talks). 1) On .1148 .1. .. : M Unite;. :i in i Klngdi.! the v. .i mur pru %  Shortly aRoroaidj n Of UM We-' -ugar producers pressed to. an sotti tee beyond the and of iw. and in the .summer of las HngKlon :ookl Ions wilt dlh producers In Uunn with arrangeid aasuu %  bad IBS: M Of sug,i. oaoonablj ran to be iii'gututad W IU the prodin i Helrrenie Omiltrd mint bova boa too to the fact thai their annotiacornanl ol oncluded urlth th* 1 '. . i ad, be negotiated anpOaUXi having regard to worl market ou all otnei factors' That Ll, .dthough th sugar bought by the U.K. from increased costs, the announcement of September, iiM8. Intro boon): that %  if "world market conditions, ana %  harking back to the disastrous for the West Indies between the wars when suj n the go-calk market Representative Indian producer* their' m the %  ummer of ii49 I long-term nably rernunorottvi tntl rely rrom WOtid tnnrkrt (-on'litlons Thta iioint is important It no long term miamnte.'. the poetUofl rovatti to the undertaking of SepUia Wo 'miles should receive the benefit >* present favourable world onditlons. Kingdom nmenl has Miggi-nted to %  as part of the proposed agreement, they should undertake lnt the time being not tn expand then avportatua MurphttM uMura u L'.Jau.uotl tons. iM share of tnis i.aao.oou long, pro-arox %  'iv. export ngures aj tofJOanH ns-tsj MUi.uuO tons. liHi* l^uo.uou tons, 1952 1.4UO.UO0 tons hence, undor the arrangementi probj the United Kingaoin. lay their plans up tin iy.iT on the footing that they had U Of 1.550.000 tons, ur 350.000 tonmore than their today and 150.000 ports for 19.V MM tons would eonattt of Kingdom. Pol .ne uaiance un arnourri tsoaota o by the guaran. market lha United Kingdom or in Canada, since in both these marione ihe praferantlal rata of duty mves a consider l'h sugar over foreign sugar. it thOM arrangements were gaj and earried out, and l that Ihe United Kingdom b) 195J will be able to p all trie sugar it rStedl. Jimuui imports from the Coii>'i the United Klnndo.mark*t would from 1953 on l about 100% more th. weie 00 the average of the years 1935 and 1938 An hnpres-jun \ ports will I" in %  npanaon of rl must Include all QOI %  %  %  %  i.. I of a / ton•war; leu* than ronl Mrporti ud fir lew than for by ihe %  !%  Colonies. (In any ease comwitfa lha .i. lion are unfair ii' pagt 3). On p o-war average Colonial export for the ers 1936-39 was 1.060.000 the i94 coio" nearer 1,250.000 tons than 1,2&,000 as stated: and the estimated exports by IMa # On I'age 3 l\VC Outlaw Communists LONDON. Jan. 25. I i,1 il.i %  i %  I %  for the 500 anon* of Trades u f the Trades O .. %  • >. tW Gmaral Cou n cil i • %  • %  •eral aThaaeii n Campaign. as formen -J2U^ni^L lhe Tti ,f an ln6c l" nionlsu to von arnment will be to rush through ( nt — Keaier —Kruin Communists Charge Britain With Racial Disc rim ination LAKE SUCESS, .kin . oaunut-lsd World Federation .f Trade Unions has %  mi. Praiiot, the Unlli iland i^i with practising racial u:,ti iminali..: I.I in their colonial U rltoriea. • The FiKlcraliun ha, alkrd Ih.i I Economic and Social CttlB Rfirri'tH Siuiltfh • I ""' Un "' Nalions lo conjidcr Uiu mgrtis Oftvi-in. ritaaattom t it, mowing next month. l\o Offence Meant %  ^W^'*'*'* *•' ** launched u bitter campaign agauiM allcgwl slave labour in matu countries, gave notice in %  i to the Council published tmlav. that it would propose mat which would constitute the bav. for far-reaching action again t discnmination. The report alleged that ni ination in employment was life and that dlsenminulitm in i exists between white ud colour population*. %  nnation waa al i charged In standards of hv. and bousing, in so. Lai Ii, tlon. and 1n ivcmAmei i "inpulsory labour. ith Airtci, tite roao "the measure ut din rin ii I 4av ery." The report also alleged \r... Belgium. British anu French pot< in Africa, there was a racial dtscriminatiun m the cis of Trade l "In territones under Bl control," it wa raoV Union ThiIs in 'he main tha rasuR of a rigorous, although dangerous, vague interpretation of thfe term sedition. The laws on -ind have been sm of the administration exercised by the European com%  .• report claimed. —Reair Jan zb. • day esi Mlgh Co.nmlsiioiui, M. Andn iruaundorrlamburg Hie Oi iissioner'. %  is speech I its puhhshe


PAGE 1

PACE TWO THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE CaJiib Qaliinq D* BELFIELD CLARKE (centre) is seen chatting with Mr. C. A. Coppin, Government Analyst (left) and Mr Pat Walter (right), the Doctor'i atcretao. yesterday at the General Hospital. Lsistinfuishcd W.L Doctor D B L BfcL.FIELD CLARKi ui L ) %  todsao r who arrived reie.it.y by le was accompa.-ieo by his Sec.eury Mr. Pat Walter, who has been with Dr. Clarke for the past twenty years. D Clarke, Barbados Schol-r H 1914, was a Scholar St. a idg-. Re idem Medical Officer ; t Addenbrookes Hosptta. Cambudg?, Reiden: House Sur e^r, ana Casua ty Officer of the Univcrsry College Hospital, London. He has p acti ed In London and Barnet and U Medical Advisor to the We fare Deparmer.t of the Colonia. C Hi is a,Thcmber of the Secretary '"TWedical Advisory Coin %  ^nrfthe Secretary oi Adviso y Committee on the Welfare of Colonial people in the United Kingdom. His home "BeJfleld H Herts is what might be called the Mcond home of al] West Indian students in London who gather there every Sunday for what the Do t r c. Oren House" rg a fine i good future The Island ha* im%  was last here over twent;ago. Reluming from Long Leave M R AND MRS I Putter, are ne e for a few days before retun.ir.g to St. Lucia. Mr. Potter is Manager >l Cable and Wireless B anch in St. Lucia Just back from loni In England, they have beer. for neve;, months spending most of their holiday in > ever they wan short time For thei entire stay the weather has beam fine and tax Winter has not been as cold | ;.d out on the *-Colombia Star, %  nineteen pa ser.ge-1 ship which as very comfortable an! they had a most omo\abIe t'ip over to Trinidad. They arrived from I day hy. ft W I A The* a-Jdng the wife f„r the co reCtscdfe. "Sea of Grain L T CUL AND MKi. r. %  '. ..hu are from hegina awao •. Lanaua are pay tug baibauos tneir b Incy are slaying at the Hasting* I Ska LaJ/ ..oui.ev some weeks ago. They %  iko Baibados very much tape iahy beintj so close to UM notei tney hava a beautiiul view of the ocean, so ULUIK* tne sce.iery f.on. his name — t .ci expanses of gram <•• lax as ine eye can see. Now 1 >i. James used to be in Hal investment business. € From Venezuela M u OODritci* and her Uttk . T.C.A. Official. Return M R JOHN MAXWELL, Eastern Regional Traffic Manager, T.C.A., and Mr. Patrick Labrio, Traffic and Sales Representative A for the Caribbean area returned to Canada via Trinidad yesterday evening by B.W.I A., Mr. Maxwell arrived over the I short business trip and there was a small luncheon party at the Marine Hotel yesterday in honour of his visit. ss First in 36 Years I> ..... OM Brat vanl la BM •IT uiand alter an absence of 36 years is Mr. Garnet L Johnson, rbadaaB now resident in the is.\ in the Real Estate business. Mr. Johnson arrived here on Monday afternoon by the"Lauy Nelson' on a two-month visit and is staying with his relatives at Gap, West bury Road. Hi is Treasurer of the West Storm Relief Society and has come out here to see for hlmM recent flood. also interested in Welfare work and visited the Baby Creche at the Children's Goodwill League i by Mr. John MBE, Johnson said that the creche .in and sanitary and it not be a : i the care o. those children. win. he was an employee of the U.S. Navy and was also Treasurer of the British War Relief Society Inc. WashingI a certificate of recognition for aiding r struggle f o r democracy during the war from War Relief. Mr Johnson spent ten years in Panama from 190*—18 during whi< h time he was engaged in ih* '' • Panama Cam. nd is now a pensioner of that Government. Member of The A.O.A. T HE latest news oi OsnrM Walcott, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. LWalcott of St. Anns Court Garrison, is that he has been Interned st the Montreal (.eneral Hospital. David,, who l.'ft Barbados in 1942 did a thre* i.re-medlcal course at Mc OOI University, continuing his >tudies there until July last year when he was interned. He is a member of the A O A. Honorary Medical Society of North America Sometime in May he will take his State Board Examination and be intends to remain in Canada for the present In ruii Swing piiEi'An.rtinjrt im in fuh MT swing for tne Cabaret Show wnicn is scneduied lor February 4 at We Drill Hail. Tnose taxing part are buckling down. But were ••as been a small s>iag in arrangements.* Tne renearsai whicn was to have taken place at tne Driw Hall on Friday will not now come otf. Instead this rehearsal will be neid at the resilience of Mrs. A. L amort, Nornam. Tweedside Roao on Tuesday 31. s as Recent Arrivals A recent arrivals to tht island from Trinidad arc Mrs. hotter and her motner Mrs. Liat'otier and her mother Mrs. J-idlow. Mrs. Potter's husband is the Agricultural Supervisor of Lsine. Trinidad and Mrs. Udlow's husband has a large Dairy in Trinidad. Another visitor to Barbados is Mr. Kidd, who is Assistant Accountant to the Apex Oil Company. Mr. Kidd Is a Chartereo Accountant. They arc all guests at Cscrabank. Some Fine Work N OW ON show at the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Is some fine work in the Pottery section done by Aileen Hamilton. Her modelled figures of local colour include—Harbour Policeman, St Lucia Madam, Woman with I basket and a dog and others Her Majolica ware Include platters with Ash designs on them. Visited St. KitU M RS. D. C. FROST, who wit* her son Patrick recently returned (rom a holiday in St. Kills has been visiting her husband Mr D. Courtney Frost, who is Acting Manager oi Cable and Wlrcta Branch there, while the Manager Mr Cyril Maloney is on holiday in Nevis. Will Co to School Here M RS. HUGH MONTES whose husband U with the Phillips Oil Company at Santa Ana, Barcelona, came In jeaterday by I! • I A via Trinidad with hex daughter Elena whom she has brought to put into school at the Ursullne Convent. Mrs Monies is staying at the Hotel Royal. . From Mackeniie, B.G. M R. JIM CAMPBELL of the Demerara Bauxite Co. in Mackenzie and his wife are here (or two weeks' holiday and are spending it at the Ocean View Hotel. s Comings and Goings M R. J. PERCY TAYLOR. Branch Manager ot il.W 1 A Ltd.. left lor Trinidad by B.W.LA yesterday evening on a short business visit. Mr Leslie ROHEE, Civil Servant ..! II tush Guuna returned home oa Mondsy Uy the "Lady Nelson" alter spending two and a hall months' holiday here He WM staying at Indramer Guest House. Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Stoute Jr.. returned to Trinidad yesterday afternoon hiB.W I A. HALF-A-VARD OF CrlECKEt> GINGHAM. Ui this knitting bag which really is handy. Checked Knitting BY THE WAY by Beachcomber Spanish i is to the '• * 5 !"!" : BUn ,boul "* advances OI a pietty vampire on R* !" •' ove ol a Test Match, and uld g., ,u *!' TI while y dnfi-rly lo track „,, lir „ balting-the dirty cad In Passing NAPOLEON once said. "Mme. srtth the love theme It u Importaal audiences should tot gat the Idea .hat cricket Is. UM 5 BcwJ • ^^ "*• ,* "' raiamarloU. and lu, would lute some simple • cl M ". ," bl f!!* "E?."*JS?! y tale, showing how a man had to l W nrjn st * sbout motherenoas. between cricket ,d love lood Uloufh Ul *' Md — %  OI cottrse. he chooses cricket, end ihe girl loves him all the mor~ tor doing the decent, clean thing nulgii-ians (.ugh: | It. Mrs. Rumpus in Trouble Again AT a meeting ol the Friends of Culture (Market Harborough ?w, *? nke ihern take Branch, Mrs. Flbblestone in the ^u?^?" M. it uoMcta to wm at ant rftW ana's a i*am freen u, KM. %  %  %  P nwcite Tbty-ra %  %  i n* sea Lpai-t ium ..;:.. Sewing Dircclions Place the three bag pieces together, edges even, pin. Measure off 0 inches on bides (from one corner). Cut i_ft* this point. Unpin the pieces. Baste interlining to wrong side of one bag piece, edgea even. Mark position for buttonhole on right side M lerlined bag piece opposite the cut Measure in 1 inch irom corner and mark: measure again 1| inches inside and mark. Run u bagti tween marks. For bound button hoi?, cut a straight strip of tabrlg 21 inch by 2i inches. Baste strip In position uver mark on bag. 4 inch each side of basting and across ends.. Slash and clip in diagonally on each side at ends. Turn binding to wrong aid* through slash. On wrong side, fold a pleat at ends, forming a piping on right side with edges meeting, baste. Stitch across the triangular pieces at ends of buttonhole. Sew fabric invisibly fc ing line of buttonhole. Trim off surplus on binding to eliminate bulk. Placa the bag and ttBdng pieces, right sides together, edge even Stitch a j inch seam across the short straight edge. Trim seam, turn right side out. Press With raw edges even measure up 4} Inches from the seam edge. Run a basting thread across. Slip cardboard base between the bag and bag lining, inner long edge of cardboard up to the basting Una; match lengthwise centr*-i and top stitch close to all edges of cardboard through all thicknesses. ofT C A N 0 A LTH %  WYR^TFT I'ATRI T l v t lHl Ql S t OV L t R ru 'R'E' s 'R*A r TIAI'B A V c vliVo I*LTRJA OP E>slNf_LM I T f, ti T a£. t A M il E P^SXR/TA^IS YESTERDAY'S SOLITION II 13. Baste raw edges of bag am; lining together. With wrong sides together fold the BMm edge up to adjacent cm each side*. Baste edges together. 15. Cut 2 pieces of bias binding to lit measurement of bastao side edge. 16. Turning in end ot bias foi a clean linish. insert each bitfiuxl side tdge inside bias Baste and top stitch close to uiner edge uf bias. 17. Fold the Long remaining sidi edges of bag to complete tinshape of bag: b In a continuous operation pointoo edges inside bias: turn in raw edges for u clean ilnlsh. ...d top stitch close to inner edge of bias. iterlinmg to wron* side of handle icece. Folo handle in half lengthwise right sides together. Stitch ; inch seam at long edgi leaving an opening for turning; at ends, stitch int. ponits. Trim seams, tun ight side out. Slij stitch open edges together Press. Matching centre of handle t centre of bag (on unde; pin both long edges o handle in place to bag ui to the poin',5 on sides. Slij stitch long edges to bag, 21. Lap one free handle en< ihe other 3 inches Baste and slip stitch ends to gether. lining under buttonhole and slip stitch dowalong stitching line of button hole. Turn down flap (extendin* point) and determine posi tion for button; attach butto: to bag. M 23 FOR THIS Wllh ONLY—CLOSING I2.M PJ1 THURSDAY — OPEN SATURDAY UNTIL 4 P.M. Mrs. Housewife Do not let the ttmttk Cuts harass you We can supply KKROSENE TABLE LAMPS (complete) KELLY NO. S LAMPS LANTERNS FALKS KEROSENE STOVES-^, 3, ft 4 burner OVENS—single and double WOOD and COAL STOVES—Noa. C, 7 and 8 BOX IRON'S—Vi", 7" and 7Vi" ( H1MNEVS, BURNERS and WICKS BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LIMITED. NOTICE + EMPIRE + OLYMPIC + ROXY AND ROYAL THEATRES + Due to uncertainty of Electric Curient We will inform You of Shows through RADIO DISTRIBUTION THURSDAY %  I.XXI'ABV M % 1 Children's Corn^A Rup€rtandthe_CaraDan~~i" Feeling itty puzlled .bout ih. whole eflsu Rupetl deode. 10 sc home, bul he welkl ewe. Uom :Ke at.v.o iM keep. .n.'0 loo o.i 'or the unlnendlv nun. CrouitiR lonely oen ol the common ht wet Seitte asnelint bliek .s.intt .he eventns ikv and he oodje. oeh.no • ct. Then he took,, %  net • not the _," bie.ihe.. • Ho. dre.wd fher. 1.1In?*'li' 'VJ 1 >m. • no *ho*!ni B"KeS getting someJEP VIGOR and VIM V's getting it safely wirJiaHGGIASSofKLlll lays ELSIE Ihs BORDEN cow It's ool Hirpriiing how much enerRV younglten cut sushi I Utinking K1.1M mUk every els; Every K l"iW beiss %  I wholesome nourishment *o neteiwry for KruwiDgchildnsta I UII WII, ADD KLIM, till AND TOO HVI MM. 'Oil MILI '.r... AQI AIIC 4 I.I B (IMUA Me-wi TO-NIGHT al 8.31 Final Showing of "SONG OF SlKIESff | . with . WANDA HENDRIX, CLAUDE RAINS. MACDONAlDCI A Paramount Plclura N.B.—Showing of "NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND ETIT-J beeu pokl poned. GLOBE THEA1 IT'S JAM SESSION TONIGHT AT UlM| 4 afDSKAl 16 LEADING MUSICIANS GET TOGETHB 3 CAVALCADE OF RHYTHM TOGETHER' BLAZING TRAIL (CHARLES STARRETT) Slarling FRIDAY 8.30 and continuing Errol FLYNN and Greer GARSON in "THAT FORSYTE WOMAN* OIL In Slock: on, LAMPS %  •*", Bl'IKICANE LAMEBNS """j OH. STOVES-Slngle Burasr "* ~ Twa Single Burners h* Of* Slan4 •• —Three Barnrr *^ —Faar Buraer . FBESSl'RE STOVM IM-WTATIOXS l 1 ^ 1




a January

19590.



K Guara

Thursday

>



french Council Approve


































































To Combat

EW French Security

Storm Robs
300 Families
Of Homes

IN ITALY

CATANZARO, Italy, Jan. 25.
three hundred families
nmeless here today after

haged their houses.

ng this poverty striken south-
coast of Italy amounted
000,000 lire.

pavy hail storms added to the
gs and trees. Many
killed. 3%
sea communications
ly werejcut, and many boats
a narrow escape when they
hed for the harbour at the
oach of the storm

es of the coastline road,
south from Cantanzaro,
transformed into gushing
and five miles of railway
washed away.

fietebo observatory, 49 miles
th of Rome, announced today
it recorded an earth tremoi
915 last night, distant about
iniles to the southwest. It said
the tremor was of the fifth
He on the Mercalli scale.
—Reuter.

he Pope Will
eceive Bevin

ROME, Jan. 25
ish Foreign Minister, Ern-
Bevin, is expected to be re-
d by the Pope when he ar-
here on his way home from
bo Commonwealth Con-









first call will be on Presi-
Binaudi.

will also call on Prime Min-
Alcide de Gasperi and For-
Minister Count Carlo Sforza.
mush sources here do not an-
fle much more than a very
al discussion between Bevin
‘Government .—Reuter,

a





Curfew Lifted
e %y - oy
In Gold Coast
GOLD COAST.. Jan. 25,
Gold Coast Government to-
suspended a curfew
cra last week after two
men had heen stabbed to
hin a clash with demonstra-

public was warned that
few would h«

imposed

imposed at
hour of the day or night, if
Hers broke out again. Since
ary 9, the colony has been

bled by strikes and demon-
Ons for Dominion St
med by the Convention Peo-
Party whose leader is
Old Dr, Kwame —Reuter.

atus en-



Yugoslavia
xpelled From
uth Federation

PRAGUE, Jan
slavia has

the World Federation
eratic §=Youth,

Munist hewspaper
ported to-day

Week’s meeting in Buch-
Of the Executive Committee
â„¢ On the step afte;

29
expelled
ol
the Czech
Rude Pro-





been











: agree-
nat Yugoslav youth leadera
o ;
Mentified themselves with
Policy,” the paper said

RRS

eased

treatment for newspapers carrying on “false campaigns
were approved today by the Council of Ministers.
The measures are primarily directed against the Commun-

were
a
ent storm destroyed, or badly
| eral
Dificials said that the damage

to

ential rain in damaging early
animals

with

New Security Measures

Communism

PARIS, Jan. 25.

measures, including “stern

be taken

and strengthened,”
Teitgen,

Minister of State ‘in
char of Information, told the
Press after the ministers had met
with Premier Georges Bidault,
Earlier today, the National
Assembly Defence Committee sup-
ported a motion “stigmatising

M.

ge





authors of sabotage actions against |
the safety of our troops fighting |

; enemies of France in the Far
; East.”
The Commission asked the Gev- |

ernment to act swiftly
“these acts of treason”.

The Communist-led GCT (Gen-
Confederation of Labour)
has appealed to all French work-
ers to hamper the
and transportation of
equipment, and Humanite, Party
newspaper, asked its readers to
show disapproval of the “provo-
cative policy” of the Government
in Indo-China, at a mass meeting

against

military



manufacture |

¢s' opposition to what they call the “dirty war” in Indo- |
rhina and to the forthcoming United States shipment cf |
war materials to Atlantic Pact Nations,

Tet ns — “Necessary Police measures will}

sees

today in front of the Prime Minis- |

ler’s office,

The Hotel Matignon, official
residence of the Premier, was
heavily guarded by steel-helmet-
ed Police.

The anti-sabotage measures are
also aimed at unrest in the nation-
alised railways.—Reuter.

° ES
Hiss Gets

3 Years For

s
Perjury

NEW YORK, Jan. 25.
Alger Hiss, former State Depart-
ment official, was sentenced

today to five years in a
penitentiary for perjury.



Federal



Hiss (48), one time adviser to
President Roosevelt and Secretary
General of the United Nation:



Charter Conference in San Fran-
cisco in 1945, was found guilt
last Saturday by a Federal Court.
The Court found that he lied when
he denied passing State Depart-
ment documents in 1938 to Whit-
taker Chambers, self-sty
er for a Soviet spy ring, and also
when he denied having seen
Chambers after January 1, 1937.

Hiss was not fined. He had faced
a maximum penalty of 10
imprisonment and a $4,000 fine.

Defence Counsel, Mr
Cross, has announced that the case
will be carried to the United St:
Circuit Court of Appeal—one step
below the Supreme Court.

Federal Judge, Henry W. God-
dard, set bail at
the appeal.







The five year sentence was im-'!
posed on each of two counts, the!

terms to run concurrently

crime of this character may not
be permitted with impunity,” the
Judge said. —Reuter



Fleeing Chinese
Enter Indo-China

SAIGON, van. 25

Thirty tnousana Chinese Na-
Uonalists, pursued to me Indo-
Chinese fronuer by Mao ‘Tse
lung’s Communist army and
guerillas, have begun to. enter
indo China near Lao Kay, gener-
ally well-informed sources said
here to-day. The report was not
confirmed by the French High
Command,

The source aid that the Na-
tionalists had retreated from Yu
nan

A French Command spoke



confirmed that 5,000 Chinese

tionalists - had arrived at thg
French outpost at Phongto—43
miles west of Lao Kay and wert

disarmed.
The spokesman added that dif-

culties in communications qla
hot permit an exact report of
present operations .—Reuter.

ie



$10,000 pending |

This ti
|} and Eagle Hall
Pe ig “We picture
| take the placc

|

TOO NeSe sever

ench being dug by the Telephone Co. along Barbarees Hill bet
‘orner, makes it difficult for two
one another.

to pass

of

Court Martial

| ov
| British
which
the Thames estuary with the loss |

of

he

L

a gsi

LONDON, Jan. 25.

he
Was ramr

64 lives, wil

» tonight
he Admiralty

up wa

y statement
that in naval practice the loss of
frequently followed by ;

ned and sunk

lL be court

Truculent,
in

} mar- |
tialled on a charge of “neglige\t-
jly or by default losing his ship”,

here | the British Admiralty announced |

|
}

commanding officer of the|
submarine

|

said |

a court margal, and their deci- |

; Sion
| manaer,

to

fourt
Lt

Cc. P, Bowers, should
“not be taken to convey any im-

martial the Com-|!

plication regarding responsibility |
for the disaster” .—Reuter,

led couri- }

years |

Claude }

§$10n and

Aus

f

; neath them, where petrol was
| stored,

| Six firemen were overcome by
smoke,—Reuter,

A
Cey



tion

| Ratings
“This should be apparent that a} .

turbed”
inquest to-day
dena, Secretary to the High Com-
missione1
Zoysa
Veterinary Stience, but was told

| evidence
was depressed at having his. ambi-



3 Killed: |
19 Injured |

IN EXPLOSION

SYDNEY, Jan, 25,
Three men were killed, and 19}

fire



traliar Nz





y landing

breakfast in the

Celonese Student

Commits Suicide

LONDOw, Jan. 25.

plane will 1
lon on Satu

ashes of Garamul
year-old
found gassed at his London lodg-
ings.
the balance of the mind was dis-
recorded

Veter
A@verdict
was

of Cey
came to

his chances of
‘e| College this year
| hopeles;
cles. The

showed

frustrated.

‘
sO RAPT zi pc TI SE
ll Ke ATS P Pe ; wo pies $4 : ; 4a ay

eave Britain for
irday with the

De Zoysa, 27
rinary student,

of “suicide while

at the
Walter Jayawar-

lon, said that De
Britain to study
an

getting into

English University or Veterinary

were “pretty

as there were no vacan-
Coroner said that

the
that De Zoysa

-Reuter.



Pa



raft
urcral

ifter

{ ernment

seriously injured when an explo-|
swept the 2,410 ton|
ship
Tarakan at Garden Island, Sydney |
Harbour, early to-day.
Nnaving
mess room were trappef.

The explosion occurred under-

|
}

|



tian Democrats,

(Story on



ween
large vehicles such as the Lorrs
An undergro und cable will be laid in this tre
the overhead cable at present in use.

ntees Less Than Cur

—+)

“4 ‘
ee

Road

Passage
and Bus

|
1 r |
ench whict |



Page 5.)

Cour 400 BENEFIT FROM
‘For Truculent HOUSECRAFT CENTRE

- Commander |

Who said the Barbadian woma)

Anyone having this view we

yuld probably

to change it immediately had he seen the
young women at the Housecraft Cent:
were being lectured to in Home Nursing,



His Ideal
Our Daily Life

CHARLESTON, Virgina.

Seven prominent Ameri-
eans have set out in ‘the
schooner “Blue Goose” to
search for “The Ideal Exist-
ence” in the Windward Isles,

1,500 miles to the south-
east.

They include James Sulli-
van, the artist, and Frank

MacLear, a New York Naval
Architect.

“We've hobnobbed
kings and queens
ind countesses, barons and
earls and the big shots of
industry,” said Sullivan
“We're tired of pretence and

with
counts

the false way of life. So
now we're on our way to
ideal existence.”—B,U.P



Bandit Killed
By Police
In Sicily

PALERMO, SICILY, Jan. 25,
Colonel Ugo Luca, head of the
special “anti-bandit” forces hunt-

ing brigand chieftain, Salvator
Guiliano, had a narrow escape
to-day when his car ran into a

hail of machine gun bullets and
hand grenades.

Colonel Luca, who was on hi:
way: to inspect a patrol operating
round the bandits mountain hice
out, leapt from the car, and or-
dered his bodyguard to attack the
bandit position on a hill over-
looking the road,

One bandit, 28-year-old Salva-
tore Pecoraro, was killed as the
bodyguard attacked.

Surprised by the strength of the
attack, the bandits withdrew,
leaving Pecoraro dead on the hill-
top.

He was wanted on many charges,
including one of participating i:
an attack last year on a Police
barracks in which 7
were killed.

Colonel Luca’s headquarters said{ agreed today to raise
that they believed Pecoraro to be

one of the bandit-king Giuliano’:
chief lieutenants.—Reuter,



DE GASPERT FORMS
SIXTH CABINET

policemen

attention
representati
| They wert
; tered for ul
began on the
Ther
many phases
| tanght at the
about 400

jamd thes
main dd
| and the
the many

| “Kitchen”



are



ire

| pastry making,
| dishes and table

and

san

;cooking cour
desserts.

The various
“Lecture R
mentary

; dressmaking,
rug makin
| vanee handic1

ing






anc

Miss Iv)
institution,



art

I
16t

Ce

women
from the teachings of

Bs,

ions

Lecture

T

ut

All
ale

1ew ¢

oup

f
of

n

form one section of the

f worl



There ar¢
who bene
the Centre |
livided into. two
the . “Kitchen”
Room”. Amo

“ntre

ranche e |
regular ike an

ready)

lay elemen-

1avance !

1 advance sewing

ern
ental !

nd home n
eyne, head of the

1 that



women entered into the diffe
| ent branches of the Housecraft |
wo with such il that her j
| assistants and herself are entic-
ed to work long hours
Through lack of space
who wanted to join up with
| present term of workers were
refused. “Given extension” Mi
| Alleyne _ said, the Housecratt
entre would be of even gpreater |

| the island.”

| the kind

The Elsie

7ognised the



today.

She said that many of
| pupils had got employment doing
of work they
| taught at the Centre,

| Elsie Moller Back
In Hong Kong

HONG KONG, Jan, 25
Moller,
ship to run the
de of Shanghai since

Cc

in China, returned to Hong Ko
Reuter.



Status Of Embassies

WASHINGTON, Jan. 25, }

Ireland :4.d
ions in. their
to the tati

Reuter.

tne

re

Nationalist block

benefit to the young women of |

the ol

had been



first Britis
sritain re-
mmunist regin

United State
the Lega-
pective capitals
of Embassies,





|
|
|
|

Liberals Not Included

ROME, Jan. 25.
Italian Premier - Designate
Alcide De Gasperi, told reporters
to-day that “with luck” he will
form his sixth Cabinet since the
war by to-night.







Parliament a

bil



lespatch of. 3,0

the Bast
Somaliland,

| authorising the |

00 Italian troops to
Afriean

are waiting to hand over,



|

SS IT. SIR
HASTINGS
PEARLS in
vening Advo-

|
copy Today
local agent. |

After an hour
and a half talk a
with the Presi- DON’T Mi
dent of the Re- PATRICK
oc, : uigi | tells the TALE OF THE
Enaudi, he began : ny
final negeluations STOLEN .
with the leaders Monday's I
of the three Par- cate.
ties, which will Order your
form the new from your
Coalition. "
These are (the '—~—
majority) Chris-

to whom De Gas-








peri belongs, the Rightwi
| cialis i the Republicans
l= Liberal ho forie
f the on which resigned |
| gramme

The first
will



Reuter

territory of |
where British troop
M. De Gasperi
was expected to
i to his Pre-
lership of ti

nent the

Ministry of Ital- |

iar Africa, a]

linistry dating |

rom Mussolini's |

day and

to

aque

hortly be
lished

The
Count

77-year-
Carlo

vas ex-
eign Minister
I ian Demo-

For

|

ee.

rent Exports
Sugar Leader Replies







bretnei
VE CENTS
Year 355.



To U.K. Announcement

Food Ministry

|
|
|





WILLIAM ROOK _ is
resigning from the Ministry of
Food at the end of January ia |

etain his association v ith

in an Advis ry

William who is 65, is

{ a member of ihe

nittee on Sugar io

ffice. From 1936-40

Director of Sugar

ie i Director f Pure

He Director of Sv gar
41-45

—



“Tent Town”
Home For Hol

ROME, Jan. 25.
Workmen today began buildin

Tent Town”, immediately out-
Ge the walls of Rome to accom-
> over 1,000 pilgrims.

It’s a result of a last minute
lecision. The tents are being put

help cope with the vast flow
rims to Rome for the Catho-
reh's 25 Jubilee Holy Year

experience in the first

nee the Holy Year open-

officials caleulated that the

nmodation they have alread)
n convents, school
and hotels will not }
nt for the spring and sur

r arrivals of pilgrims
Up to now, pilgrims have arrive

the rate of 1,000 a day.

expected to exceed 10,00
n the year,





shu







—Reuter

Will Death
Penalty Be

Abolished?





BONN, Wan, 25
The West German Bundesta
day unanimously adopted a mo
isking the Government
Ollate with the Allies for th
bdolition of the death penalt
ihe motion brought by the
1 Jemocrat as an amend
oO muniust noti
was then withdrawn
The mover, Dr. Otto Heinri
xpressed regret that th
lie la modifyir the penal
or offences against the ax
n authorities maintained
n ( ity for a wide rang
fences, though the deat
bolished in the G
itution,—-Reuter,

‘Man And Wife Who
Love Each Other
Stick Together’

LONDON, Jan. 25.
Counsel prosecuting Brian Don-
‘4 thume tor murder, told a jury

cre today that “a man and wif«
vho love each other stick to-
sether

Counsel, Mr. Christmas Hum-
Nreys, was discussing the evi-
nee given by Mrs. Hume foi
er husband, who has pleaded noi
suilty to murdering car deale:

Stanley Setty, whose dismember-
ea body dropped from a plane
vas found in slimy marshes on
the Thames estuary,

“IT have said that Hume murder-

d Setty,’ Mr. Humphreys said i:
Central Criminal Court (the
id Bailey), “I do ‘not say tha

Irs. Hume
nurdaer

had any part in this
[ say I have no evidenc:
vhatsoever that she had any pari
in it,”

Mr. R. F. Levy, defending
pleaded Hume’s innocence

“Only a madman would have
cut up Setty’s body

flat,” he told the jury.
There was no question and no
possibility that Hume could hav«
murdered Setty anywhere
and then brought the body to the
flat to be cut up, and parcelled
Practically every circumstant
points to Hume's innocence.”
After the concluding speeche:
of Defence and Prosecution, the
Judge summed up. The verdict is



expected tomorrow. —Reuter
7
T.U.C. Outlaw
J
Communists
LONDON, Jan, 25
The General Council of th
tish ‘Trade Union Congres
oday plugged another gap througi
h Communists have reachec
e Movement’s key posi-
tion Henceforward no Commu-
nists will be allowed to sit on the

National Committee, which speak:

for the
Federations of Trades Union
ranches, nor will Communists be
ermitted. to attend the annual
nfe of the Trades Councils
; ‘
With these new steps in thel
against the Commu





EF impaign
ittee was f
4 manifesto calling
ionists to vote labour
—Reuter

else, |

Year Pilgrims



}
j
|

Rook Resigns| AUGUST PLEDGES ARE

NOT IMPLEMENTED

N the Barbados Press on 18th January there
appeared an announcement of H.M. Government
summarising the sugar talks which took place in
London from November to January. Certain ideas
expressed in this announcement require categorical
explanation, and the relevant portions of the
announcement are therefore quoted below, immedi-
ately followed in each case by the comments of the
Hon. H. E. Robinson (Chairman of British West
Indies Sugar Association (Inc.), and leader of the

B.W.I. delegation taking part in the talks).




(1) “On September 22, 1948
announced in the House of
( ns hat the Unitec
Kingdom Governmen
,uaranteed to find an outie:




‘ither in the United Kingdon
or in the Commonwealth
the whole exportable surplu
of Commonwealth sugar pro
ducers until the end of 1992
Shortly afterwards represent
atives of tue West India
sugar producers pressed fo
an extension of this guaran
tee beyond the end of 195
and in the summer of las
year the United Kingdon
Government undertookt
enter into discussions wit!
Commonwealth producers i:
the autumn with a view tk
making long term arrange
ment which would assure
them market beyond 195:
for agreed tonnages of
at reasonably remunerative
prices to be negotiated witt
the producers.”

Reference Omitted

H.M. Government have now

mitted reference to the fact thai

a

Suga.

their announcement of Septem
er 22, 1948, concluded with the
vord “Prices will, unless other-
wise agreed, be negotiated an-
ually, having regard to world
market conditions and all other
factors” That is, although the
ugar bought by the U.K. from

1940 to 1948 had been paid for at



to expand their exportabie
surpluses beyond a igure ol
2,350,000 tons,

“Tne Colonies share of this
total »90,U00 tons, which
compares with their pre-war
present, and prospective ex-
port figures as toliows;

“pre-war average (1935-38)
960,000 tons, 1949 1,200,000
tons, 1952 1,400,000 tons hence,
under the arrangements pro-
posed by the United Kingaom,
the Colonies could lay their
plans up till 1957 on the foot-
ing that they had an annual

is |

export of 1,550,000 tons, or
350,000 tons more than their
exports today and 150,000

more than their expected ex-
ports for 1952. Of this total
1,100,000 tons would consist of
uaranteed in the United
Kingdom

ale

Koi ine balance above the
amount covered by the guaran-

tee, they should finda market
either in the United Kingdom or
in Canada, since in both these
markets the preferential rate of
duty gives a considerable ad-
vantage to Commonwealth sugar

over foreign sugar. If these

arrangements were agreed to
and carried out, and assuming

that the United Kingdom by
1953 will be able to purchase

all tfie sugar it needs, annual
imports from the Colonies into



prices based on a basic price plus the United. Kingdom market
increased costs, the announce- would from 1958 onwards be
ment of September, 1948, intro- about 100% more thar. they
tuced a changed price basis: that were on the average of the
f “world market conditions, an years 1935 and 1938.’
ull other factors.’ This was
larking back to the disastrous An Impression
position for the West Indies be- This tends to give the im-
tween the wars when sugar prices} pression that Colonial export
vere determined by low artificial! will be increased by 100% In
prices in the so-called world, point of fact a true comparison of
narket tepresentatives of West{| this sort must include all Colonial
Indian producers therefore went] experts, that is, those to Canada
London in the summer of 1949}and not only those to the U-K.
to press not only for a long-term | Total Colonial exports were ap
guarantee but for reasonably re- | proximately 1,060,000 t re-
munerative prices entirely; war, and therefore Colonial ex-
livorced from world market con-| porters are only to be sure of a
litions. This point is important| market for much ‘fie same ton-
because if there is to be no long/hage as pre-war; less than cur-
term guarantee, the position re-| rent exports; and far less than
verts to the undertaking of Sep-| called for by the needs of the
tember 22, 1948, and the West! Colonies. (In any case com-
'ndies should receive the benefit} parisons with the pre-war posi-
°

) present favourable world

arket conditions

2) * the United Kingdom

Government has suggested to| tons; the



tion are unfair—see page 3)

On points of detail, the pre-war
average Colonial export for the
quota years 1936-39 was 1,060,000
1949 Colonial exnorts

Commonwealth producers thai| nearer 1,250,000 tons than 1,203,000

as part of the proposed agree-| as stated:
} ports by

ment, they should undertake
for the time being not to plan

and the estimated ex-
1952, wrovided there
@ On Page 3

Communists Charge Britain
With Racial Discrimination



LAKE SUCESS, Jan.

‘he Communist-led World Federation of Trade Unions has
charged Britain, France, the United States, New Zealand

and

nuth Africa with practising racial discrimination at

home and in their colonial territories.
+i

Regrets Speech:

in aren, No Offence Meant

BONN, Jan 25.
The West German Governmen

day expressed regret to Frenc!
ligh Commissioner, M. Andrc
Francois Poncet, tor misunder-

nding caused by the Hamburg
speech of Justice Minister, Dr
Thomas Dehler,

The Government, in repy t
he French High Commissioner’,
rolest against Dr. Dehler’s speech
disavowed its published text and
offered to arrange for the Ministe
£ Justice to explain his real in
ention in a personal conversatior
with M. Francois Poncet,

The French Hign Cominissioner
n his pretest, published by thx
German Government, had des

bed Dr. Dehler’s speech a

eking, and as amounting to ;

tification of Adolf Hitler's policy
at the expense of France.

In his speech in Hamburg o:
Sunday, Dr. Dehler denounced the

500 Trades Councils—local} tales. of German aggression, and

claimed it was untrue that Ger-
many had been guilty -of having
started all aggressions in the past
200 years.

Hitler was, to a great extent, the
it of the Versailles Treaty and
pusillanimity of France, he
reported to have said. France
World War I that
European question could onl;

e solved by preventing Germany
ing

believed

}
|





igain
—Reuter |

|

The Federation has asked the
Economic and Social Council of
the United Nations to consider the
allegations at its meeting next
month.

The W.F.T.U., which last year

Jaunched a bitter campaign against
alleged slave labour in many
countries, gave notice in a report
to the Council published today,
that it would propose a measure
which would constitute the basis
or far-reaching action against
discrimination.
The report alleged that discrit-
ination in employment was rife.
and that discrimination in wag. ;
exists between white and colour: |
populations.

Discrimination was alr >
charged in standards of livin ;
and housing, .in social legisl:. -
tion, and jin pecruiiment of
compulsory labour,

In South Africa, the repo
said, “the measure of discrim -
ination practised against work
ers results in a revivabof slay-
ery.”

The report also alleged that in
Belgium, British and French pos-
sessions in Africa, there was a
racial discrimination in the exer-
cige of Trade Union Rights.

“In territories under British
control,” it was stated that Trade
Union activity is in practice
severely restricted.

This is in the main the result of
a rigorous, although dangerous,
vague interpretation of the term
sedition.

The laws on sedition may he
and have been applied to all kinds
of criticism of the administration
exercised by the Buropean com-
munity, the report claimed.

—Reuter.





|




+a





when

it

PAGE TWO

Caub Calling



Dr. BELFIELD CLARKE (centre) is seen chatting with Mr. C. A.
Coppin, Government Analyst (left) and Mr. Pat Walter (right), the
Doctor's secretary, yesterday at the General Hospital.

Listinguished W.I. Doctor
D‘ C. BELFIELD CLARK,
distinguished West indian
Doctor who arrived recently by
the Lady Rodney, is here io:
months’ holiday. He was accom
panied by his Secretary Mr. Pat
Walter, who has been with Dr.
Clarke for the past twenty years.
Dr Clarke, Barbados Scholar ctf
1914, was a Scholar at St.
atierine’s Collage Camb idge,
Resident Medical Officer at Adden-
brooke's Hospitai Cambridge,
Resident House Surgeon and
Casua:ty Officer of the University
College Hospital, London. He has
p acti d@"in London and Barnet
and ig Medical Advisor to the
WeifareDepar.ment of the
Colonial. Office.

He ig @Yhember of the Secretary
of State’s"iedical ivis Comm
mittee and the Secretary of State's
Adviso:y Committee on the Wel-
fare of Colonial people in the
United Kingdom.

His home “Belfield House,” in
Herts is what might be called the
second home of al] West I: n
students in London wh
there every Sunday for what
Doctor calls “Open House.”

H thinks we
Hospital ‘here and t
good future. The
proved in every
was last.here over twenty ve
ago.

hve









«an an

Returning from Long Leave
R. “AND MRS. FREDD.E
Potter, are hee for a few

days before returning to St.

Lucia. Mr. Potter is Manager >t

Cable and Wireless B.anch in St.

Lucia. Just back from long leave

in England, they have been away

for seven months spending most
of their holiday in Sussex, how-

ever they. were in London for a

short time. For their entire stay

the weather has been fine and
even the Winter has not been as
cold a§ usual. They travelled out
on the “Colombia Star,” a nineteen
passenger ship which was very
comfortable and they had a most
enjoyable trip over to Trinidad.

They arrived from there yester-

day by#B.W.LA. Their daughter

Wendy" @lid son Peter as well ns



Mr. Bernard Moore and Mr. B.
Moore were at the airport to meet
them.

«> «<>»
K.C. On Holiday
Me W. M. C¢ uri
who” is connected h th
firm of Corbett and Harper, Bar-
risters, Solicitors and Notaries of

Jitiseg



Canada is now in Barbados fo1
holiday He arrived on Monday
by the “Lady Nelson” accon
panied by his wife and they are
Staying at the Hotel Royal
> «<>»
“Barbadian Religion”
NYONE who owns a radio
must have had it on yester-

day listening to the Cricket coin-

mentary from Trinidad, and those
working in town were on the
telephone several times during

the day asking the wife for
co-rect scdte

the

-- BY THE WAY >

I SEE that the British Council
is to sponsor a film about the
place of cricket in our national
life. May I suggest that they
should go very gingerly to work
with the love theme?

It ig important that fo eign
audiences should not get the idea
that cricket is a kind of Bohemian
ragamadolio and tumble-cum-
trivy. I would like some simple
tale, showing how a man had ta
choese between cricket and love
Of course, he chooses cricket, and
the girl loves him all the more
for doing the decent, clean thing
and remains his good friend, The
Bulgarians ought to revel in that.
it might even make them take
up ezkrikicz (with a bomb for a
ball). There might tbe a scene
in which a decadent French or





»



“Sea’’ of Grain
T. COL, AND MRS. F. 4.
James who are from Regina
Saskatchewan in Canada are pay-
ing Barbados their first visit
They are staying at the Hastings

Hovel, ar.iving ty the Lady
xiodney some weeks ago. They
like Barbados very much

especially being so close to the
sea. xrum their Hotei they have
a beautiiul view of the ocean, so
umike the scenery from his home
sn Meglua—g.eat expanses of grain
lar as the eye can see. Now
retired, Col. James used to be in
the investment business,

@bs

«> »
From Venezuela
Mi": d. kK. GODrkKeY and her
little son Christopher of San
Joaquin, Venezuela, arrived yes-
day morning by B.W.LA. via
Trinidad on their first visit to the
island for a holiday. They were
accompanied by Mrs. A. Segovia
also of Venezuela and they are
staying at the Hotel Royal.
Mrs. Godfrey is the wife of Mr.
J. R. Godfrey of the Standard Oil
Company in Venezuela.
«> «<>

T.C.A. Officials Return

R. JOHN MAXWELL, Eastern
Regional Traffic Manager,
T.C.A., and Mr. Patrick Labrie,
Traffic and Sales Representative
of T.C.A., for the Caribbean area
returned to Canada via Trinidad
yesterday evening by B.W.LA.,
Mr. Maxwell arrived over the
week-end on a short business trip
and there was a small luncheon
party at the Marine Hotel yester-
day in honour of his visit.



«> «>»

First in 36 Years
AYING his first visit to the
island after an absence of 36

years is Mr. Garnet L. Johnson,
a Barbadian now resident in the
U.S.A. in the Real Estate business.
Mr. Johnson arrived here on
Monday afternoon by the “Lady
Nelson” on a two-month visit and
is staying with his relatives at
Parris Gap, Westbury Road.
He is Treasurer of the West
Indian Storm Relief Society and
has come out here to see for him-
conditions of the recent flood.
He is also interested in Welfare
i the Baby Creche
1's Goodwill League
is conducted by Mr. John
, M.B.E,

on said that the creche
an and sanitary and
could not be a
itution for the care Oo:
ildren,







During the last war, he was an
é loyee of the U.S. Navy and
was also Treasurer of the British
War Relief Society Inc., Washing-
te D.C. and received a certifi-
cate of recognition for aiding
Britain in her struggle for
democracy during the war from
the British War Relief

Mr. Johnson spent ten years in
Panama from 1908—18 during

which time he was engaged in the
construction of the Panama Cans
nd is now a pensioner of that
Government

cricketer yields to the
advances of a pretty vampire on
the eve of a Test Match, and
brings her into the pavilion while
his side is batting—-the dirty cad.
In Passing

NAPOLEON once said, “Mme,
de Genlis talks about virtue as
though she had invented it.” Film
act.esses’ publicity men are today
beginning to talk about mother-
hood as though they had invented
it.

Mrs. Rumpus in Trouble

Spanish

Again
AT a meeting of the Friends of
Culture (Market Harborough

Branch, Mrs. Fibblestone in the
chair, her dog Nupsie under it),
Mrs. Rumpus rose and waved a
ieaflet, crying, “The P.E.N. Club



85

SS
7
6
-

EVANS
ELITE SHIRTS

WHITE, TAN,

KHAKI

COOL LIGHTWEIGHTS
6.00 6.72

FOR THIS WEEK ONLY—CLOSING 12.30 P.M. THURSDAY



AND
OFFER YOU

TRUBENISED COLLAR

DRILL

90 1.04

1.17

PLAIN TROPICALS

JUST OPENED
IN NEW

6.88

6.83



by Beachcomber

WHITFIELDS
4.45

and BLUE

THE

Member of The A.O.A.

HE latest news ot David
Walcott, son of Mr. and
Mrs. E. L. Walcott of St. Anns
Court Garrison, is that he has
been interned at the Montree
General Hospital. David,. who}
left Barbados in 1942 did a three |
year pre-medical course at Mc}
Gill University, continuing his
studies there until July last year |
when he was interned.

He is a member of the A.O.A.
Honorary Medical Society of
North America. Sometime in May
he will take his State Board Ex-
amination and he intends to re-
main in Canada for the present.



«>» GH
in Full Swing

REPANALUNS ace. in fuli
swing for the Cabaret Show
which is scneduled for February
4 at the Drill Hall, Those taking
part are buckling down. But tnere
nas been a smali siiag in arrange-
mentss The rehearsai which was
to have taken place at the Drili
Halli on Friday will not now come
off. Instead this rehearsal will be
heid at the residence of Mrs. A. L.
Stuart, Norham, Tweedside Roaca

on Tuesday 31.

«> «>»
Recent Arrivals
Amore recent arrivais to the

island from Trinidad are Mrs.
Potter and her mother Mrs. Lia-
Potter and her mother Mrs. Lid-
low. Mrs. Potter’s husband is the
Agricultural Supervisor of Usine,
Trinidad and Mrs. Lidlow’s hus-
band has a large Dairy in Trini-
dad,

Another visitor to Barbados is
Mr. Kidd, who is Assistant Ac-
countant to the Apex Oil Com-
pany. Mr. Kidd is a Charterea
Accountant. They are all guests
at Cacrabank.

«> «>
Some Fine Work
OW ON show at the Arts and
Crafts Exhibition is some
fine work in the Pottery section
done by Aileen Hamilton. Her
modelled figures of local colour,
include—Harbour Policeman, St.
Lucia Madam, Woman with 6
basket and a dog and others.
Her Majolica ware include plat-
ters with fish designs on them.

«> «>»

Visited St. Kitts
ME: D. C. FROST, who with

her son Patrick recenfly re-
turned from a holiday in St. Kitts
has been visiting her husband Mr.
D. Courtney Frost, who is Acting
Manager of Cable and Wireles:
Branch there, while the Manage:
Mr. Cyril Maloney is on holiday
in Nevis.

«> «>
Will Go to Schoo! Here
RS. HUGH MONTES whose
husband is with the Phillips
Oil Company at Santa Ana, Bar-
celona, came in yesterday by
B.W.LA. via Trinidad with her
daughter Elena whom she has
brought to put into school at the
Ursuline Convent.
Mrs. Montes is staying at the
Hotel Royal.

«> «>»
From Mackenzie, B.G.
R. JIM CAMPBELL of the
Demerara Bauxite Co. im
Mackenzie and his wife are here
for two weeks’ holiday and are
spending it at the Ocean View
Hotel. i
«> «>

Comings and Goings
M®: J PERCY TAYLOR,

Branch Manager of B.W.LA.
Ltd., left for Trinidad by B.W.LA.,
yesterday evening on a_ short
business visit.

Mr Leslie ROHEE, Civil Servant
of British Guiana returned home
on Monday lbly the “Lady Nelson”
after spending two and a half
months’ holiday here. He was
staying at Indramer Guest House.

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Stoute Jr.,
returned to Trinidad yesterday
afternoon by B.W.LA.



is a hive of Conservatives!” Mrs.
Fibblestone retorted, with great
dignity, “Very likely. But we are
discussing illiteracy in Swedish
Lapland.” ‘Everything,” shouted
Mrs. Rumpus, “is riddled with
reactionary beastliness.” She was
then asked to leave which she did,
with a parting yell., “Expose the
Capitalists!”
A Nest of Rowdies
When you threw a bottle at
Swinburne, you had to make sure
it was an empty one, The poet
had an uncanny knack of catch-
ing the missile neatly in one hand.
If it was half-full, he at once
drank heartily, and the laugh was
on whoever threw it—usually Bill
Morris, hot from Kelmscott.
(Mrs. “Freddie” Upchurch:
+ "Neath Chelsea Skies.)

SHADES

7.08

— OPEN SATURDAY
UNTIL 4 P.M.



inches

BARBADOS



HALF-A-YARD OF CHECKED GINGHAM,’ bids binding, ‘and muslin are all you need to make
this knitting bag which really is handy.

Checked Knitting Bag |

Materials
Half a yard of checked ging-
ham.
Double-fold bias
contrasting colour.
Cardboard.
Button (1% inches diameter) to
match bias binding.
Heavy pre-shrunk muslin for
interlining.
Mercerised thread ¢> match.

Cutting Directions

Bag. Cut three pieces each 16
square (two of fabric,
one of interlining); one fabric
piece is used for lining.

Handle. Two pieces, each 3
inches by 36 inches (one of fab-
ric, one of interlining.)
Cardboard Base. One
inches by 13 inches.

binding

piece,
33



SKELETON
* CROSSWORD ”



CLUES ACROSS

Might wheat meal be a vege-

tarian substitute for it ?

. Subject of teaching in play ?
Not done, perhaps, yet not

Gegis” not,
8
” pot owever, rule in

- PP

One form of reverse.

“V" for this.

River of silk in Prance.
Musical approaches.

Craft, or Just the end of it.
How to cook for a K.B.E.

. Mars his god ?

Nothing to wri

ene te in public, it
issue.

Plowers, in a way.

One of shese Songs of Araby? |

(two words).
CLUES DOWN
Literally, an anagram? (three

words)
Care for it? Possib’

C ly.

He could hard)

10t amusing. ibuasentcnsina
{t gives relief trom teasers.
a, = companionable sort of
Mid the LRA

ane th 8S Wear it upside

To some, at any ra ‘
fool y ve. she’s a

LOHR

ADVOCATE

|

in
i

|

|
|

|
i
|
!
|



12.



wootball team green in age.
Tae disease might be blue rot.
+ the wasp species? They're
armful. anywa
which

art sabre
Step Up. my)
she writes &

y
18 part Kukri,

iittie dears:
letter to Mother

So eaead




















13. Baste raw edges of bag anc
lining together.
| 14. With wrong sides together
Sewing Directions fold ‘the seam edge up to
1. Place the three bag pieces TRESS BREEDS CORBRE Lm
together, edges even, pin,| each side). Baste edges to-
Measure off 6 inches on sides|__ ether. _ ik
(from one corner). Cut oft} 15. Cut 2 pieces of bias binding
this point. Unpin the pieces.| to ft measurement of basted
2. Baste interlining to wrong side edge. : Vis ,
side of one bag piece, edges| 16- Turning in end of bias fo
even, a clean finish, insert each
3. Mark position for button-| basted side edge inside bias.
hole on right side of the in- Baste and top stitch close to
terlined bag piece (corner inner edge of bias. :
opposite the cut corner),|17- Fold the long remaining side
Measure in 1 4nch irom edges of bag to complete the
corner and mark; measure shape of bag; baste. ;
again 14 inches inside andj 18- Im a continuous operation
mark. Run a basting be- insert raw side and pointed
tween marks. edges inside bias; turn in
4. For bound button hole, cut raw edges for a clean finish.
a straight strip of fabric Baste and top stitch close to
24 inch by 24 inches, | inner edge of bias.
5. Baste strip in position over| !9. Baste interlining to wrong
mark on bag. | side of handle piece. Fola
6. Stitch % inch each side of | handle in half lengthwise
basting and across ends., \ right sides together. Stitch a
7. Slash and clip in diagonally inch seam at lung edge
on each side at ends, Turn leaving an opening for turn-
binding to wrong side! ing; at ends, stitch int
through slash. | points. Trim seams, tur
8. On wrong side, fold a pleat| handle right side out. Sliy
at ends, forming a piping on| stitch open edges together.
right side with edges meet-| Press,
ing, baste. Stitch across the| 20. Matching centre of handle tc
triangular pieces at ends of centre of bag (on under
buttonhole. | side), pin both long edges o
9. Sew fabric invisibly to stitch-| handle in place to bag uw
ing line of buttonhole. Trim| to the points on sides. Sliy
off surplus on binding to] stitch long edges to bag.
eliminate bulk. 21. Lap one free handle enc
10. Place the bag and lining! over the other 3 _ inches
pieces, right sides together,| Baste and slip stitch ends to
edge even. Stitch a 4 inch gether.
seam across the ~ short| 22. Slash lining under button-
straight edge. Trim seam,! hole and slip stitch dow
turn right side out. Press along stitching line of button-
1l. With raw edges even hole.
measure up 43} inches from/ 23. Turn down flap (extendin:
the seam edge. Run a bast- point) and determine posi
ing thread across. tion for button; attach butto:
Slip cardboard base be-| to bag.
tween the uae and bag Tit itachi ia
ing, inner long edge of card- patie ig 55 ~~ paren aes
board up to the basting line; TOS ah 2?
match lengthwise centres Mat. TO-DAY at 4.30 p.m
and top stitch close to all | ALAN LADD in
edges of cardboard through | “SALTY O'ROURKE”
all thicknesses. with GAIL RUSSELL





YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION



Mrs. Housewife

Do not let the Electric Cuts harass you

We can supply - - -

KEROSENE TABLE LAMPS (complete)

KELLY NO. 6 LAMPS
LANTERNS

FALKS KEROSENE STOVES—2, 3, & 4 burner
OVENS—-single and double

WOOD and COAL STOVES—Nos. 6,7 and 8
BOX IRONS—614", 7” and 71/9”

CHIMNEYS, BURNERS and WICKS



°

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LIMITED.







A Paramount Picture





EMPIRE

7 +
OLYMPIC
ROXY

AND
_ ROYAL
_ THEATRES

| +



Due to uncertainty
of Electric Current
We will inform |
You of Shows
through RADIO
DISTRIBUTION









|| PLANTATIONS LIM

a A }

THURSDAY JANUARY 2, ty r

Children’s Cornep|







‘
Feeling very puzzled about the
whole affair Rupert decides to go
home, but he walks away trom the ae 3 :
caravan and keeps a sharp loo) out ., codgerst —— Np
for the unfriendly man. Crossings mean?” tHe neo .
lonely part of the common he sees # = and soor in his Hm»
figure standing black against the showing Beppo 1" tal
evening sky and he dodges behinc § o the astonishec Mrs. Best
a
4
4
C
t
1

C)-

|

It’s not surprising how much energy youngsters can gain fo
drinking KLIM milk every day. Every glassful brims wih
wholesome nourishment so necessary for growing children, You
can depend on KLIM to build your youngster sturdy and
strong—full of vigor and vitality. KLIM is safe too, became
it’s milk produced under strict sanitary control to assure isi |
form quality. Just wait until your youngster tastes creamy-tid
KLIM milk—he'll love it and thrive on it!

says ELSIE the BORDEN cow



FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER









~~ KEI“ MILK mae
TAKE PURE WATER, ADD KLIM, STIR a n,
AND YOU HAVE SAFE, PURE MILK | i
A, aor, tere Berdag Oe SS
eerie Ti, ime
BRL : ¢
WEES ee os
} AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members
TO-NIGHT at 8.30

Final Showing of “SONG OF SURRENDIN

WANDA HENDRIX, CLAUDE RAINS, MACDONALD n
A Paramount Picture ;
N.B.—Showing of “NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND EY
been postponed.







GLOBE THEA

IT’S JAM SESSION TONIGHT AT 830 Pil
ICAL
4’s |
16 LEADING MUSICIANS GET TOGETHER ®
CAVALCADE OF RHYTHM TOGETHER W#

BLAZING TRAIL

(CHARLES STARRETT)

MU



Starting FRIDAY 8.30 and continuing
Errol FLYNN and Greer GARSON a
in “THAT FORSYTE WOMAN’ ~



HURRICANE LANTERNS ......+++* s "
OH. STOVES—Single Burner .....--+** gs aeh
» » —Kwo Single Burners with OV | gi
” » —Three Burner ...-::* $56.4) , ¢
” , —Four Burner ....- oes 00 te

PRESSURE STOVES

if ; fh



}

mem re

———<—


: THURSDAY JANUARY 26, 1950

4

aa

» Less
(urrent

‘K. Guarantees

Than
Exports



i. page 1 security for the future. The price
6 -~ actoury long-.ermjreceived for the 260,0u0 tons
a 5 450,000 tons, not) above 640,000 to make a total o1
ne 7 | 900,000 may be’ (that is it the
: sugar can be sold at ail) at such

Not Promise a tevel as to reduce the price over
aspect,. 1 the whole crop and make the

z q that, beyond
‘of 1,100,000 to be guaran-

y the U.K.
oa to make up te tota!

of 1,000,0UU is a;

than a promise. It

; am oifer to purchase |

5 ly remunerative
; Se toe Colonial ex-
ar but.an edict that the
‘must restrict their total
fo 1,550,000. Ot this the
de would be of the order
tons (as against
@ requested to meet the
i the Area). :
er it is unfair to draw
zons with historical pre-
wes; H.M. Government's
of August 1949 to
i, and improve the
of the B.W.I. by means

ferm sugar ayrangements
on a full consiaeration

/ present position of

when prospective ruin
wr unrest was the picture.
Yor the view advanced in
‘ rs that the offer
ives the restriction oi

sugar production in
that the United. King-

n of foreign sugar.”’
ntention of the B.W.I.
has never been that
pstricting colonial sugar
in order to ,buy a
jon of foreign

n was bought pre-war.
ly the figure for foreign
the U.K. proposals was
not 250,000, and the
int was that the U.K.
buy too great a propor-
foreign sugar
restricting Colonial

ex-

offer made represents a}
security |

i degree of
the Colonial producers
Phad.at any previous
Before the war
exports of the Colonies
nied to 960,000 tons, the
of which was without
lee and had to compete
id markets apart from
BBprotection afforded by
‘Bmonwealth preference
polonies export today is
tons. By 1952, on
expansion plans, it)

he 1,400,000 tons. If |
accept fhe present offer, ;
Solonies will be entitled |
8 and for four years
‘that to export 1,550,090 |



1
e
5

f

total 1,100,000 tons, |
ing no less than 71 per

j il be shipped to the}
fingdom with a price!
giving them ample}

against any risk of a;
‘in world prices The|
they will be free to sell!
best advantage in the |
and in so doing they|

the full benefit of |
monwealth preferential |
duty. In these circum-
His Maiesty’s Govern-
that by this offer it

implemented +#he
fiven in the ¢om-
B of August 10.” |
‘may afford sreater |

- Security than pre-war |
Bwas no security at all|

TOUS conditions the |
amount of guaran- |
Age—h40).000—ics in-
that it does not afford!

TABLE OF

‘ly

in

so

Australia
UK. 300,000
d U.K 100,000
*. at ono
on ; 600,900
UK. Only holds out a ho:
eH Would be obtained by

they would not be prepar nore titive ‘ . nia
O Bewpared 3. be. i bene ei (vi acne be} Of an alliance between Westerling | Countries,

7 dumped prices or not.

the

the amount of/|

the ,
not on the historical |

there is no founda- |

‘may buy a greater pro- |

while |

the}

| B.W.1.

guarantee worthless.
The U.K. Government an-
}mouncement of August lv statea



| that “special consiaeration woula
; be given to the neeas o1- the
la :

Colonies (where H.M.G’s first

obligation hes). In the resuit,
j the Dominions have been given a
;3ugar quota for a tonnage ap-
| proaching 100% more than thei
| present exports while the Colonies
|aré only to receive 25% more than
itheir present exports. Tne
;|Dominions are to receive a
guaranteed market for more than

jtheir present exports — tue

| Colonies far less than their prese:.

| exports!
| An brief, the U.n. nas offer-
ed the B.W.I. an 8-year con-
tract (as against 10 years re-
quested) for 640,000 tons of
sugar (as against 1,100,000
requested). It is then pro-
posed to restrict B.W.I. over-
all production for expert to
| 900,000 tons (again against
; 1,100,000 tons requested), but
for about one third of this
the B.W.I. may receive a price
—that is the fictitious “world”
i price plus preference — less
| than it costs to produce it.
All this while being restricted
to a production 200,000 tons
less than that stated to be
| the minimum requirements to
support the peoples of the
West Indies at even their
| present low standards of
| living.

Less Than Current Exports

The figures show that the U.K.
; could now easily (even after the
over-generous treatment of the
dominions) increase the offer to
the Colonies by giving a guaran-
tee on all the Colonial sugar
which it is intended should be
sold in the U.K., i.e., 1,250,000 in-
stead of on only 1,100,000. (The
U.K. view is that the difference
of 150,000 must be kept to main-
tain some element of competition
in the U.K. Market in the in-
terests of U.K. consumers and the
general efficiency of sugar pro-
duction. It should be noted that
the U.K. has insisted on retain-
ing 250,000 tons for foreign sugars
and this quantity should be a
sufficient yardstick, especially
when it is remembered that in
addition the U.K. imports an
amount in the region of a half
million tons of foreign sugar for
refining and re-export, which
amount has not been brought into
any of the U.K. calculations). A
guarantee of 1,250,000 for the
Colonies would give the West
Indies not what they originally
asked, not what they believe to
be sufficient to meet their si
and economic needs, but a guaran-|
tee on current’ exports. A com-
promise such as this the B.W.I
delegation said, against their
better judgment, would be ac-|
cepted, but the U.K. have refused
The U.K. Government an-
nouncement of August 10 stated
that the Government’s policy was
to “maintain and improve” the
economy by these sugar |
arrangements. On the = main}
point at issue, the U.K..s inter-}
pretation of their undertaking has
been to offer to guarantee less
than current exports. How con
any reasonable person feel that







His Majesty's Government h S|
“fully implemenf@4 the pledges!
given in th communique of

August 10?’

U.K. OFFER





(2) (3) (4) B.W.T
South Colonies Total included ;
Africa in (3)
150,000 1,100,000 1,550,000 640,000 i
(a) a)
150,000 250,000 85,000 |
= ee .
(ec) ’
1,800,000
(b) (bi
50,000 200,000 50,000 175,000
200,000 550,000 2 , 000 900,000

pe that with the aid of preference this
Colonial exporters, but made it clear
prices
Further, that the Colonies



L.F.T.U. Gave
Delegates
Assurances

ONE of the most
aspects of the Conference of
International Confederation of
Free Trade Unions held in London
recently, was the way the colonial
delegates spoke of the social and
economic conditions existing in
their island homes Hon’ble E. A.
Mitchell, President General of the
Grenada Workers’ Union told the
“Advocate” yesterday.

Mr. Mitchell who was the Gren-

the

ada delegate at the Conference,
arrived here on Monday by the
S.S. “Cottica” as an intransit
passenger and is staying at the
Cosmopolitan Guest House.

He said that more or less, all

parts of the Colonial Empjre seem-
ed to be suffering from the same



economic conditions. After listen-
ing to the delegates from the
various colonies, they were given
some very good assurance as to

the pert the International Federa-
tion of Free Trade Unions intended
to play in achieving social securit;
and social justice for all, regard-
less of colour, creed or nationality.

If the promises that were made
by the verious leading
the T.U.C. of England, 1.L.0:
and the A.F, of L. and the C.1.0 of
America could become a reality,
then they would he sure that
something would be done in order
to assist colonial peoples of the
world.

th

e
tne

Mr, Mitchell said that the Con-,

ference promised to aid full em-
ployment, the improvement of
working conditions and the raising
of the standard of living of all
countries in the world.

The conference also promised to
provide assistance in the ‘estab-
lishment, maintenance and devel-

opment of trade union organisa-|

tions, particularly in economically,
socially undeveloped countries.



Council Discuss
Seawell On Friday

A special meeting of the Legis-
lative Council has been called for
at 2 p.m. tomorrow to consider the
$500,000 Resolution for the con-
struction of new runway at
Seawell.

The Resolution was passed by
the House of Assembly on Tues-
day, and voting of the money is
considered urgent.

a



Indonesia Blame
Dutch Army For
Bandung Disorder

BANDUNG, Jan. 25
There is much talk in Bandung



outstanding

figures like j

THE



Controls
Hamper W.I.
Canada Trade

There

trade

should be more
between the West

and Canada and the people should
Visit eacn other and at the
time enjoy each other's ¢ limate at
the right time and also buy each
other’s goods, Mr. M, Leo Sweeney,
President and General Manager of
Sweeney Cooperage Ltd., of Van-
couver, B.C., told the Advocate

free

same



yesterday.

ee




Enna enn omen oe

|
}

Mr. M, L. SWEENEY









Indies

Ses leeeeenereesnaneeapeenier teroenueen—isenpunnen



}



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



eerste essen

Lorry Hold Up Acquiiania

Continues
IN BERLIN

| Souvenirs

LONDON (By M









Those whe treasure
{memories of that “granc
BERLIN, Jan. 25 of the sea,” the &S

A 2-mile long file of German | will be able to bi
&00ds lorries queued this after-/ when the liner’ rt
noon on the east side of the Anglo- | auctioned in Februar
Soviet zonal border, delayed by | First part of the
“go-slow” tactics of Soviet offi-|the 44.786 ton. 36
cials, | itself.

Another 120 on the western side | Whole ceili ‘
Waited their turn for the newly | beautifully x
rigorous check-up at the Helm-jto come unde?
stedt control point | hammer

Berlin-bound German supply Wepplehings,
lorries from the west were passing ”
through at the rate of about 10
an hour, a British spokesman said

Na

Russian authorities were ask- yf a
ing drivers to produce additional the “Wy os
purchase certificates countersign- nua
ed by the Eastern Berlin magis-| “Whe,
trate, tthe 6

Similarly, at Luebeck-Herren- | “* ears” have
burg crossing point, traffic had facaia ’ ‘
dropped to about ten per cent of itn
the usual rate. the de

Altogether, 20 lorries had pass- | °f€ c
ed in both directions there in 24 tor Britais
hours, compared with 200 to 250 SaeCUl
normally. eeesure:. CF! tin

Barge traffic up and down the} Which wi
central German canals came to a} , The former .
complete standstill today owing to | 4tlantic,” had a
icé. ; named .after famous

them were reproau

Rail traffic continued normally. | Known paintings

The : Soviet-licensed Berliner | Béyond the fact that the Act
Zeitung; first Berlin newspaper to} tania has retired from ser,

comment on the recent border
traffie hold-ups, said today they
were “promoting real inter-zonal
trading by protecting the Germa

nothing is

plans fo

Known



, He felt that the controls should| Democratic Republic and Berlin Greor
le lessene ammove. » >} le : ‘ .
\ ~ of sened or removed enurely, | from being plundered by the B H o Jib
jpecause they were hampering} west.” ° ° ,
trade and commerce between the Y °
two places, “The row, which certain peopl« ( *OCCTOR
Mr. Sweeney arrived here by) are making, is simply aimed ~ONCE SStOr
| B.W.1.A., on Sunday from Trini- creating tension and disorder,’ it >
dad on a short business visit and! added 2Sits
A c s Cé 1}; aaded, & ,
will be leaving today for Jama a..| —Reuter ro €StS
} He is staying at th Marine Hotel.
: MEXICO CIT’
4 member of the Executive of | The Gi
the Canadian Manufacturers’ As-| Wi. S d publicly prot
sociation, Mr. Sweeney is also a ome & qua ron of petrol
member of the Board of Trade in ish Hor
Vancouver which is one of the M n G. Hi ) {
i ‘ i ! j ernment
largest in the world and very ; ay Oo ome The Ei
active, In ;
}Guatamalan Gove
He said that the political situ-| BERMUDA, (By Mail.) in its refusal to reco (
ation ail over the world was in Vice~Admiral Packer has said Britain’s rights i
| a very hectic conaition on account | that consideration is being given | territory of Be
| of the many controls and restric-| to moving the America-West In-| Qjims the ter! ite
| tions that were in effect in those dies Squadron of one cruiser and} of. its rights
various countries which held back‘ three frigates to England and} colony Mexic ,
free trading, and nowadays, it WaS | operating the station from ther: “if there j
dificult to do business the Way! The station covers North a statu of Seli:
they would like. South America, including Bermuda | oy ust be taken
In Canada, they did not haye|@d the West Indies. “Guatamala



| many restrictions, but in their ex-
port business, they ran into diffi-
culties on account of the devalu-
ation of the sterling eurrency in
most of the natural markets for
the products of British Columbia
which were in British

Empire |

| tic defence plans.

: ‘ rly, } “ver > Ini
js nbete among themselves. Therefore the B.W.I. proportion] and Dar Ul Islam. Such a com- _ Latte rly, nowever, the United
d iy is pure conjecture, bination would offer the greatest|States had purchased quite
: nt on a market be fe n Canada for this sugar rs large : { “te cinch
3 Mpetitive prices as in (a) mone meen.) HS ° threat to the Indonesian Govern- large quantity of products such |
wer of U.K. consumption would be made up of 250,000 tons}ment, whose population contain s lumber. and certain food lines
Sugar and 500,000 tons domestic beet, Total 2,550,000 tons thousands of orthodox Moslem: which had helped the situation. |



RUMANIA REJECTS

GOSLAV

PROPOSAL

BUCHAREST, Jan. 25.

has rejected a Yugoslav proposal, suggested in a

Pa mixed commissi

Rumanian

wed today that thc

$ of the Rumanian

in Belgrade has

eed to reply that
Proposal, the

ment were trying
Msibility for the
idents, and vio-

ue air space of Rumania
; “an Government

' Fepeated|) that these

Yugoslav Foreign Affairs Ministry last month,

on of inquiry into frontier in-

news); criminal actions are not isolated

or accidental incidents, -but ex-
pressions of the hostile -anti-
| Rumanian policy of provocation
and espionage on the part of
| Yugoslavia”, '
“This policy of the Yugoslav
Government is part and parcel of
the policy and the schemes of the
Angio-American warmongers, the
TNumanian spokesman said.
—Reuter.

.
PREPRESS ESPEOPOSS

fF “VALOR”
,OIL STOVES

For dependa

SER MODELS

a

NS and SMALL

a few

BY. HUTCHIN
mr AL STREET.

‘tiie ee

FPSSSS



< $O60%
PPO SOSSOFOSOO SSO SS SOOO POSS

ble Cooking:

$40.23 & $46.81
vi $52.55 & $60,12
STOVES available in

days.

SON & CO., LTD.

DIAL 4222

COOKE CCCCCSOSOOES:

4

>

cece ae me et emerenes

The Dutch Army fears poiiticai
complications more than /ighting
Its ranks include some 15,000 we'|
trained men of the KNii, (th
Royal Netherlands
Army) wiiich is mosily recruited
from East Indonesia. Yesverday’s
declaration by an Indonesian Gov-
ernment spokesman at Djakarta
that the Dutch Army were to
blame for Westerling’s attack on
Bandung amazed and angered
Dutch troops. They contended that
only Dutch intervention prevented
the massacre of Indonesian troops
in the town,
—Reu'er




For lovely hair use

BRYLFOAM

—THE cream SHAMPOO

IN A TUBE

See how Brylfoam—the cream shampoo—

quickly removes the sticky coating

grease and soap-scum from your hair,
leaving it clean and radiant. Restored are the
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silken soft and enchanting. Use Brylfoam
straight-from-the-tube, nothing to mix or spall

—quicker to apply anddry. Enough

- Indones:en ,



To have controls in the sterling
area was a very serious matter,
| also the fact that the sterling was
devalued.

As President of
‘tional Evergreen Playground
ssociation, Mr, Sweeney said
that Vancouver, British Columbia
very fine city. They usually
flowers throughout the year
,;and the grass was always green

The last. two
very tough as they
usual weather.

1 sno\ for

the Interna-

was a

had

Nad very un-
Last year they
weeks, one

SIX

@ On Page 7










of dust,

for three



winters had been

of

|
|
|

Mr. Dugdale said that the Docic- | Will, recognis«
yard is too small and too old to/| Tights that foreign co
be economie and local wages are} to obtain or have acai
too high. | territory of Belize
concessions hande
He said it would take about!de facto authoriti
one year to close it down once! Government),” the

such a decision was made. Th Britain recent!
possible closing is part of an over-|hamas Exploration C:
all naval reduction plan but it sion to exploit B

not connected with North Atlai- | serves, in tide |;
land areas.

Ana

—B.U.P.



IMPERIAL LEATHER @ LINDEN BLOSSOM e

Get the goodness of BE

in a cup of

BOVRIL



EF
~

i}




Maxe yourself a cup of bot Bovril when you feel tired or depressed
You'll feel better as soom as you’ve enjoyed its comforting, ch
warmth, It sharpens your appetite~helps you to est well and ke:
Well, Bovril puts beef into you. Drink it daily.

Remember BOVRAL improves all dishes
and makes excellent sandwiches, too !

BLUE HYACININ





Wall Street
Wonders About
Price Break

By THEODORE KOSLOW



NEW YORK (By Mail).

Wali Street traders aré still
i Significance of the

in. prices,
represent a normal

rrecuion of the seven-
s-tong advance as many
or” does ‘the

te that something
the offing?
iturally, there are supporters



ined up en both sides of the
argument.
The ardent bullish enthusiasts

confident that within a reila-
short time the market will
ave again confounded the
sceptics with a run-up to new
ground. :

ively





pessimists are equally

un that the highs of the
1949—1950 advance have already
een set and that is only a
‘estion of me until the market

eens to retreat in earnest.
However, there an in-be-
ween group of financial analysts
ho lean to the view that the
ll probably not do much
time until cer-

ng for a













major uncertainties are
posed of
Amoi these are the outcome
‘ral election in
ebi Y, and the pr ess of
v tax legislation in Washing-
} roblems be de-
ably and should



dividends be main-
d 1949 levels, the
ded predomin-

i ~ the bul

nd







Little Complaint

Street broker
complain about a
ot Ousiness

€ aurin ne wees

re, Wall
volume

he veek ended
Votalled four-
even hundred and

t thousand six hundred
re heaviest turn-
omparable period in

fourteenth

igi

the



ted with dealings
iirty-eighy thousand
ed and ten shares the
was more than
reat as the four
thty-four thousand five
fty-v‘wo shares dealt









periog of a yea
in al t OrKs were
he hour «

y twelfth, when
atc
heavy

ige which forced the
Ker eleven minutes
floor transactions

ndustrials Declined

veek a whole, the
eclined ‘five dollars
a share in the
hile the railroads
nly 72 cents
f e industrial index had

rty dollars and thirty-

in the advance from
] , and the rails
ximum of only
eventy-seven
ri ‘
vial
r th
he i
Ove





er hort ol

ri Oo far vn the
rt iil t

ad } oO pel

ti out anywhers
—ELN.S

oF AGE?

n aching back
u must expect
when you're

1 caused by the

and liver, |
thy pe SLIPS
Kidney-Liver Pill 7 on a a
ii ee ak : Sizes 32—40 $2.50 each
n r bloodstream.
I -proven, Dr,
yu © conditions at |
couse: MODERN DRESS
he kidney and fiver |
ause backache,
rneout, tired, | SHOPPE
ful joints and |

our kidneys and
Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver
ut. At all drug counters



J & R BREAD
Young and Old. |

16]

: R
ENRICHED BREAD

i along with their delightful



PAGE THREE




co ~
f
Sai

=



| YOU CAN'T EXPECT to make a
| good impression when Dry Scalp

| makes your hair messy, hard-to-
comb, and full of loose dandruff.
} Check Dry Scalp by supplement-
ing the natural scalp oils, Loose
dandruff is gone. You stay neat
and well-groomed all day.
‘Vaseline’ Hair Tonic works with
nature—it contains no alcohol or
other drying ingredients, Try
‘Vaseline’ Hair Tonic

today.




ia
anyon

1SED BY MORE MEN TODAY THAN ANY
OTHER HAIR TONIC

MODERN
SPECIALS

Cotton ie
Wash
FROCKS

All Sizes $6.00 each
&

}
|
}
|

















Silk







BROAD _ STREET.













is good for




PAGE FOUR





ae —

Published by The Advocate Co, Ltd. 34, Broad St, Bridgetows

Thursday, January 26, 1950

Wisdom Versus
Insularity

THE exodus of a group of specialist
teachers from this colony last year, was a
signal to focus public attention on the fact

at many departments of the public ser-
vice were threatened with inadequate
we staffing. His Excellency the Governor as
Mas a result, appointed a Committee “to ex-
Ber amine the establishment of administrative,
eet ofe: and technical officers in rela-
tion both to their recruitment and to their
retention; and to make recommendations
for the removal of any cases which threat-





i en to affect the public services adversely.”
hy The report of that Committee has been
bass made and it is an enlightening document.

After a delicate and tedious job the Com-
mittee “found evidence that the public
services are adversely affected by the Gov-
ernment’s inability to recruit and retain a
full complement of senior administrative,
professional and technical officers.” The
le reasons for this inability, according to the
ait report, are inadequate remuneration as
compared with similar officers in other
colonies, and the difficulty experienced in
filling the vacancies which occur at the
required standard with the present salaries
and conditions of service.

That the existing conditions of service
gave rise to a measure of dissatisfaction
was not entirely unknown to the Govern-
ment, and the Report emphasises one point
which might serve to prevent an immedi-
ate recurrence of the present condition.
It recommends that return leave passage
privileges should be granted to certain
scheduled officers who would earn one-
forty-eighth of his return passage in re-
spect of each month of service with the
Government. This is a wise provision and
should furnish the remedy for the events
which gave rise to the conditions under
investigation.

As has been already pointed out, the
slogan “Barbados for Barbadians” is out-
dated and it is useless hoping that techni-
cal and professional officers would be con-
tent to remain im, even if they entered, a
service which overlooked their potential
market value outside Barbados and denied
them return passages to their homes at
the end of stated periods.

The report recommends the establish-
ment of certain offices in the teaching ser-
vice and the setting up of a Public Service
Commission which would have the con-
fidence of the Civil Service and could pro-
vide a more efficient method of recruitment
than that existing.

It is as well that the Committee made
some general remarks on other aspects of
the service. They found that the delay
in dealing with staff matters, unsatisfac-
tory structure of the service, the lack of
training facilities and of confidence in the
existing method of recruitment, promotion
and transfer to be contributing causes. The
thoroughness of the investigation has led
the committee to put its finger on the weak
spots and in a concise document to leave
no opportunity for misunderstanding the
condition and the mistaking of the con-
tributory aggravating causes.

If Barbados is to make the progress
which is expected, it is necessary—because
she cannot supply all the technical and
professional officers she needs — for ap-
pointments to be made outside and it is to
the general good when such officers are
encouraged to remain in the island for any

length of time. It can only be done where
conditions of service and salaries are on
a basis which will prevent those in the
neighbouring colonies from being a source
of attraction. We have already lost the
services of a few able men who would have
gad’y remained in this island but for the

isadvantages under which they laboured.
The Committee has made recommendations
which, if implemented will assist in over-
coming the difficulty. In the past, similar
documents of reform have been forgotten
after being submitted. This must not hap-
pen to the report under review.



ead

OUR READERS SAY:



| 630,000 tons of

| it.

THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Battle For West Indies ¢y,4;;

Sugar Goes On |

Seeking British Public
Election Complicates

THE battle for a fair price and
long-term guarantee for British
West Indian sugar has now en-
tered a new stage. Followffig the
return to Trinidad, Barbados, and
Jamaica of the three delegates
who struggled with the Ministry
of Food for nearly two months,
it has become for sugar men a
campaign to win the support of
the British public.

On the whole, relatively little
publicity was given to the West
Indies case during the presence
of the delegation in Britain, be-
cause they rightly felt they could
not push their claims in public
while they were being negotiated
with the British Government. But
when most newspapers carried a
long statement from the Ministry
of Food asserting that the United
Kingdom was living up to the
famous August 10 pledge in the
offer it has now made, the West
India Committee launched 4
counter-attack in the form of a
Press Conference held by Mr.
J. M. Campbell, 37-year-old chief
of Booker Brothers, McConnell &
Co., Ltd., Deputy Chairman of the
West India Committee, and one of
the “backroom boys” of the past
two years’ sugar price battles.

Hit The Headlines

Campbell has hit British head-
lines with the frank statement
that it was only recently he “dare
look my sugar labourers in the
face’ — so deplorable have their
conditions been. He stated as his
personal conviction tbat the West
Indies would not accept the Brit-
ish offer, and released a letter
to the Ministry of Food from Mr.
H. A. Robinson, of Trinidad,
leader of the delegation, which
crystallises the whole West Indies
case.

Mr. Robinson’s summary of
what the Ministry of Food con-
tended was a justification of the
August pledge, was: “In brief,
you have offered the British West
Indies an eight year contract
(against 10 years requested) for
sugar (against
1,100,000 tons requested). You
then propose to restrict our over-
all production for export to

| 900,000 tons, but for about one-

third of this we may receive 4
price that is the fictitious
‘world price’ plus preference —
Tess than it costs us to produce

All this while being restricted
| to the production of 200,000

less than what we have stat
to be the minimum requirement
\to support the peoples of the
West Indies at even their present




appallingly low standard of
living.”

| Campbell made a _ powerful
| point when he stated that It was

| possible for the Ministry of Food

with the Dominions and still give
the Colonies what they need. The

| th to honour their arrangements

} Ministry of Food still insists they

|

are not forcing the Colonies to
| cut production, resting their case

lon the fact that the Colonies

| could sell on the free market.

Tories Want Bulk Purchase
For Sugar

Left-wing criticisms of the
sugar delegation have mentioned
that the delegaticyi in the past
attacked bulk purchase arrange-
ments but Mr. Campbell answer-
ed this point at his Press Confer-
ence, Asked what would happen
if a Conservative Government
were returned to power and were
against the principle of bulk pur-
chase, Mr. Campbell pointed out
that Mr, Oliver Stanley, a former
Conservative Secretary for the
Colonies and a powerful man in
the movement, had stated in the
House of Commons that the Con-
servatives regarded Government
bulk purchase of sugar as essen~
tial and it should go on.

‘The argument that the West
Indies spokesmen in London are
now putting to the British public
comes down to this; The West
Indies have to buy in the sterling
market and they support a high
standard of living in Britain by
buying at whatever prices are
demanded by British exporters.
Britain should therefore support
them, and in any case she is
bound to place the welfare of her
colonies before that of other for-
eign countries such as Cuba.

Complicating te whole posi-
tion is the forthcoming geera:
election in Britain, Plainly the
West Indies’ delegates and the



spokesman left in London will do
everything to avoid making this
a political issue. The wisdom of
this is undoubted, since not only
would such a course prejudice
current negotiations, such as they
are, but it might even lay the
West Indies open to charges of
interfering in the election by is-
suing propaganda against the
Labour Party.

It is no secret hgwever that all
those concerned with the negotia-
tions hope for one of two things:

If the Labour Government is
returned to power it will feel so
fortified that it will be able to
tackle the West Indies’ problem
along the right lines without so

much fear of domestic conse-
quences; or
A Conservative Government

will be returned and can be
induced to place Empire interests
before those of, for instance,
Cuba.

However one of the most signi-
ficant comments on the whole is-
sue was made in a long article
in the “Financial Times” which
suggested that sterling producers
generally must be tempted these
days to ask for guarantees that
virtually amount to insurances
against the effects of dollar prices
undercutting them.

Said the “Financial Times”:
“The West Indies position is
difficult; production can be ex-
panded and should be expanded
in order to provide employment.
But further expansion involves
heavy capital outlay. In the past
the price of sugar was artificially
low and scarcely provided a re-
turn on the capital invested.

“Defeatist”

“Producers naturally want
some assurance against a return
to such conditions. But it would
be dangerous and a defeatist at-
titude to assume that the sterling
area can only solve its problems
by shutting itself off from we rid
markets.”

And the Liberm point of view
as well as of many people in the
city has been expressed by Oscar
Hobson, City Editor of the “News
Chronicle”. who wrote;

“The breakdawn of the West
Indian Sugar talks goes t
heart of ome of the greatest €c
nomic problems with which
world is now faced, namely,
problem of surplus supplies o
majot basic commodities.

“A few weeks ago a Committee
f the Food and Agriculture Or-
ganisation reported on the be
of surveys prepared by F. A: O
statisticians, that in sugar, cotton,
cereals and eertain oils and fats
there is a strong prospect of
plus supply within the next
years and that for some com
t serious problem will ¢
within the next twelve months

Too High

“The sugar talks have broken
down because the West Indian
islands want a guaranteed pric
for sugar over a period of years
and too high a price at that. The
economy of these islands is highly
depen t on the sale i
sugar crops at an ‘adequate
and in the light of the pol
economic philosophy of today, o:





































“I always knew he'd turn
up somewhere.’
London Express Service.

What’s on Today

Arts and Crafts Exhibition

at Queen’s Park at 10.00
a.m,

Cricket Trial Game at Ken-
sington at 1.30 p.m.

Mobile Cinema at Reef Play-
ing Field at 7.15 p.m.

ee LLL DL LL An

'

Support
Issue

perhans it would be better to say)
yesterday, their request Is a rea-
sonable one.

Too Late

“Jt is, however, their misfortune i
to be late in the field. Too many
agricultural producing groups ali
over the world have ‘got away
with’ the same plea, many of them |
with less justification than the}

West Indies. But now inexorable} sat around a long oak

forces are at work. High prices
have stimulated production ana
where Governments, like that of
the U.S.A., not daring to reduce
prices have ventured nevertheless
to reduce acreages, the progress of
science has enabled equal or
greater crops to be produced from
those lower acreages.

“So the prophecies of the
economists are coming home to
roost. Surpluses are accumul-
ating.”

The “Times” said the British
Government's offer could not be

Specifically,
an acceptable

early in January, when they succeeded in
lreaching unanimity on the first stage of a
| history-making attempt to make the consti-
| tution Canadian I
A strategy of making the most of points of
agreement and ignoring as much as possible
the matter of disagreement paid off for chair-
man Louis St. Laurent. E
For two days the 10 provincial premiers

stitution in Canada.
exception of purely federal matters, amend-
ments require legislation by the United
Kingdom parliament.

There were a few differences of opinion
but generally the atmosphere was
iality. The fact remained, however, that
in full view of the press and public, the con-

i TT

First Agreement On
|

Constitution

OTTAWA, Canada.

Canadian Dominion-provincial conferences
have never had much of a reputation for
jagreement. When the subject of such a :

| ference is something as controversial as Can-

ada’s constitution,
agreement quickly
} But 10 premiers :
| Laurent pulled a surprise on most Canadians,

the odds favouring dis-
jump.
and Prime Minister St.

conference table in the

House of Commons chamber and discussed
constitutional matters.

they were attempting to find
formula for amending the con-

in fact as well as in name.

At present, with the

one of gen-

———— « on

=.
p=



_ of sugar, antagonising the colon-

> tum



ference wasn’t getting too much done.

Then Premier Angus Macdonald of Nova
Scotia proposed that the attorneys-general of
the various provinces go into a closed meet-
ing and attempt te work out the details.

‘A three-hour meeting produced the form-
ula which spelled success in the first stage.
The formula was quickly adopted by the
premiers and they agreed to adjourn for sev-
eral months, leaving another committee to
attempt to work out the details of the second
stage.

Here are the major points of agreement
reached during the three days : :
Canada should have complete power to
amend the constitution without going outside
the country;

2. There are certain constitutional mat-
ters which are purely federal and which
should be amendable by the federal parlia-
ment without the necessity of consulting the
provinces.

3. Some provisions of the constitution are
so fundamental that they should not be
changed without the consent of parliament
and every one of the provinces.

4. The constitution contains some sections
on which amendment should require the con-
sent of parliament and only a majority, or
perhaps two-thirds of the provinces.

5. Amendments should be permitted in
cases where they effect only some of the pro-
vinces, providing there is agreement among

termed ungenerous, adding: “If
West Indian goods are going to be
competitive in coming years, the
preference should ensure their
markets....The violence of the
reactions in the West Indies and
British Guiana to the British pro-
posals shows that a special ef-
fort is needed, for the sake of
Colonial and Commonwealth
ties, to reach an understanding,
but the British Government will
be justified in refusing to preju-
dice too far the prospect of
cheaper sugar for British con-
sumers.” .
Clearly the West Indies must
now convince the British public—
and the Ministry of Food (the
Colonial Office is already on their
side)—that the welfare of the
British colonies depfnds on mak-
ing arrangements now to expand
sugar production and that if the
price for colonial happiness is
slightly dearer sugar inside the
U.K.— Gearer that is than dollar
sugar if the dollars were avail-
able—then it is a price that is
well worthwhile.
It is an issue which cuts clean
party politics:—there are
e Labour Party who
this doctrine; on the
ere are Tories who
olicy of economic
ith the U.S. anc

—_
OPO P OPPS POSDSFSPPOSISSS





believe i
other ha
believe i














her satel while Liberals, | the provinces affected and the federal parlia-
pursuing the theme of world Free

Trade, say they have other cures

for colonial ills than protective —-——

tariffs and f
No polit

and reasoned defence of the cur-
rent Ministry of Food policy
‘which strikes the public, on the
face of it, as depriving the U.K.

British Industry tn

1951 Festival

By NORMAN RIBBENS

LONDON. |

Four thousand manufacturers have al-
a Uiumatum Extendea ready submitted designs and samples of their |

‘a a Po case of waiting un- | work for inclusion in the industrial section of

ne eas of a ultima-|the 1951 Festival of Britain.

xpires. Originally set for) [tis expected that the list will eventually

January 21, this has been extend- :
ed to February 18, but it is not|Cntain details of 20,000 products. From

}

}

ment,—Can. Press.
I

ies, and still failing to produce
sugar from dollar areas cheaply,
since we cannot afford dollars.











th tnat the West Indies’ }these, associations and leaders of each indus- |
Su , who asked|try will choose for display what they con-}

for an adjournment until March {sider are the finest illustrations of achieve-
L, will agree because it gives lit- }ment and progress.

ae oe eae ~~ Exhibits selected by each industry will be |
aars wi ; starting. he } }9j > . he ” ‘
Soaks e Aan | aetiienaies laid out by “presentation panels.” They will

|bear number, not name. Prospective buyers
will have to check them in catalogues and go
to information bureaux to discover where
and how they can place orders.

“The Festival of, Britain is not a trade fair,”
a festival spokesman said. Nor was the)
‘British Can Make It’ exhibition of 1946. Just |
the same it produced more than £ 30,000,000 |
worth of orders.

“We hope that the festival will present a
cross-section of all Britain’s best industrial |
achievements dramatically enough for the
buyers themselves to attend.”

_At their headquarters in the Strand offi-
cials are working out ways of reducing
ee - the festival from the original

000,000 estimate to the revised fi
£ 11,300,000. va "

Two proposals which have been abandoned
are a river pageant on the Thames and a
penn . ene movies relating

o the festival whic
275,000, were expected to cost

An ambitious programme of street d -
ations, firework displays and outdoor dente
for London will probably be halved.

The festival staff will not be increased to
the number first contemplated. At present
it is 265 and includes artists, scientists, archi-

will 1
before

be available five days
the election to consider a
- so important that it should
Ministerial and not merely
official consideratioh.

The Ministry of Food want the
decision before February 27,
because the International Sugar
Council meets in London again
then to resume discussions on a
new, world sugar pact demanded
by Cuba and other dollar-area
sugar producing countries. It is
in order that the British Govern-
ment may have some bargaining
power at this conference that they
want to reserve 250,000 tons
definitely and another 250,000
tons probably in practice to be
bought from the dollar market
Admittedly if Britain made no
purchases at all in this field she
would have little or no power at
the world conference. Many sugar
men, however, consider that that
would not matter.

It is clearly up to the sugar
associations and governments
throughout the West Indies now
to express their views and to
give cogent reasons for them
but if there is one thing the sugar











nave







Ten LO no West Indios For | tects, designers, technicians, messengers
they could only make matters tlerks, typists and public relations men. —
far worse.—B.U.P. —Can. Press.





LT

No One Could Have Foreseen Wh at Happened



To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—I am sorry that you
should have thought it advisable
to publish the letter signea by &
St. James Resident on the subject
of the Electric Supply as it is
clear that whoever wrote it has
no understanding, sympathetic or
otherwise, of the circumstances
that-have arisen during the past
few days and the letter therefore
can serve no useful purpos?.

It is common knowledge that
within. the last two years or so
the Corporation has installed, at
great expense, three complete new
Generating Plants whose com-
binéd capacity is considerably in
excess of the normal peak loads
of the island without the use of
any other units which they had
during the war.

Regarding the
downs, I

recent break-
happen to know that
they have been examined by
several of the leading engineers
in the island and they of the
unanimous opinion that blame
whatever
Management or staff Unde

are
no

ean be attached t

circumstance re

foreseen what, in fact, actually
happened,

I hold no brief wigitever for the
Corporation, in fact I disagree
entirely with their main policy of
continuing to use Diesel driven
units, nevertheless, one must be
fair and reasonable.

CONSUMER.
In Agreement
SIR,—Amongst many many

others I should like to endorse
heartily the letter addressed to
your good paper on January 22
by a resident of St. James in re-
gard to the Electric Light situation
in the island,
ANOTHER SUFFERER.

St. James.

Publicity Needed — Indeed!

SIR,—Your Sunday paper ran
an editorial with the above title
quoted concerning publicizing
Barbados in order to lure tourist
trade and earn muvh-needed dol-
lar In your editorial ‘you
classifvd three t; pes tourists
It is yvur thira
t desire

of
type you seem
mostly, i.e., the third

becoming an annual

visitor, wili rent or purchase a
house and will create lasting em-
ploymefit for domestic servants
and chauffeurs. This type will
find in Barbados the atmosphere
he requires. Before we can entice
him to come we must present him
with easily accessible facts about
the island and living conditions
here...”

Are you certain it is acting iu
the best interests of the island to
publicize it at this time of gross
negligence, short-sightedness,
penny-pinching, sheer stupidity,
or whatever term is applicable to
the Barbados Electric Co.? (If it
were not for the fact that the
Electric Company has had ample
warning and plenty of time to
cope with Such foreseeable calami-
ty, I could almost feel sorry for
them then the castigations of the
merchants, inn-keepers,
estate agents, etc. really
pouring in.)

real
start

Americans of the
you seek simply will not com«
an island whose most important

third type

fashion. (Perhaps it is foolishly
believed, like the ostrich, that bad
news of this sort will not travel.)
I, as an American, can tell you
that when we plan long winter
holidays in new pastures, we make
certain we can have the things
we are used to. And, in the
tropics, the first’ things we look
into are light, water, food and
transportation. If those first most
important needs pass the test then
we look into questions such as
land, comfortable homes, pleasant
surroundings, etc. Further, you
seem to overlook a very important
thing in your wish to benefit
Barbados by enticing this “third
type”. This type “sufficiently
well off and without bi ,
who might spend
months here
middle aged
have some ’ i
necessitates an escape
rigors of the north
in these cases
power 18 So esse
would not





1
all
are,
peopic

Nysical ¢










area



of the early 19th century.

Bad news travels fast in this
day of airplanes, telephones,
cable facilities, etc, from dis-
gruntled and inconvenienced is-
land residents and visitors. So I
suggest Mr. Editor’ don't court
publicity at this time for you
are getting enough adverse pub-
licity as it is — better Barbados
“remain unknown and with her
light hidden under a bushel”....
By the way, was that last phrase
of the quotation a typographical
error? because, I can’t even find a
light under a bushel!

AN AMERICAN.
January 23, 1950.

‘Hardy Annuals’




< 20 a
the General Manager
Barbados Electric Supply
tion, offering the public an
ation for the failure t
ana power rec

break

i by

the













Such reports by the Manage-
ment of the Barbados Electric
Supply Corporation have now be-
come what one may term “Hardy
Annuals”, and as this Company
has 4 monopoly, and is really a
public Utility, I suggest Sir, that
the time has arrived when His
Excellency the Governor-in-
Executive Committee should ap-
point a competent committee to
visit, investigate and report to
Government their opinion as to
what is causing these recurrent
constant break-downs.

When _it is
considerable quantity of the water
supplied to the colony is pumped
by electricity, and also that the
various manufacturing Compan- |

r 1€8 producing ice, bread, biscuits

edible oir and other necessities 5: |
life, the Foundries who repair |

Sugar machinery, al i

Su machinery, all being w y
or partially operated b eee
OF ily Operated by electricity |
furnished by j

this Company, I
nis is a very serious |
trust that the

et it have their

oa” |

considered that a

































THURSDAY JANUARY »



ALLSOPPS LAGER BEER—per bottle .

” ” ” —per case
QUAKER CORN FLAKES—per pkt. |.

GOLDEN BEAN ICING SUGAR-per pki,

COLONNADE



Hurry!!

These are selling quickly - -..

2, 3 and 4 Burner on Stands
Single and Double Table Models,
Beatrice and Coleman OIL STO
BOX IRONS—63%4”, 7” and 8”
SAD IRONS—No. 6.

COAL POTS

ES

OIL LAMPS and LANTERNS :



WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTu.. §

CS PITCHER & CO, |

Phones: 4472 & 4687

2
y
<
’

THE BEST

666566839.

NEWS
OF THE a

YEAR
- JUST ARRIVED

DUTCH APP!
3O¢ per th.

(No Delivery)

*

%



SOPPIP PSPS SSS







DUE TO THE ARRIVAL OF THE Im
“MAURETANIA” ON. SATURDAY #

OUR DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT Will!
CLOSED ON |

Thursday 26th atl
and open on
Saturday 28th until3.ii

OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
ASKED TO CO-OPERATE BY SHOM
ACCORDINGLY.



DACOSTA & CO.

DRY GOODS DEP RT

_———SS=

MILK-FED CHICKENS
MILK-FED TURKEYS
AUSTRALIAN RABBITS
LAMB CHOPS

VEAL CHOPS

OX TONGUES

OX TAIL

Specials
FISH CAKES, wer tin 12c.

=" CORNFLAKES—
—18c.

Large tins MAGNET PEAS
—30c.

GRAPE FRUIT, each—6c.
ORANGES, each—4c.



CARROTS, per lb. — 20c.

LIMES; each—2c

BEET ROO”, per Ib. — 16c.

CABBAGE, per Ib. — 24c.

oy

4
Phone GODD:

% ‘
59990599959 55909909 0999099 G IO
THURSDAY JANUARY 26, 1950

De
The Tourists

Return Leave Passages
Recommended For

| Scheduled Publie Servants

That
quately
similar
opinion
Governor
Committee was appointed |

The 1949, |
of November, >|
a ate the establishment of |

ministrative,

s expressed by the

professional a |
j cers in relation bot
bpical cruitment and to their

. ion; and to.make recom-
reeations for the removal of
uses which threaten to af-

“the public services ad-
ersely.” ; |

45 i rt the Committee
oa SS epectal recommenda-
f relative to the staffs of cer-
4 Schools and Colleges, and
tain ed the appointment of an-
r Committee to review sal- |
s in relation to the new salary |
in other West Indian
ds. ,

m ort went on as follows:
eng it has been suggested
us that we could, within our
terms of reference, make recom
mendations regarding all matters
fh we consider affect the pub-
lie services adversely, we regard
ourselves as being required to
recommendations relating to

the removal of causes which ad-
sely affect the services in so
as those services depend on
.dministrative, professional and
hnical officers. We would,
yever, fail in our duty if we
not bring to the notice of
Your Excellency matters which,
while they may be outside the im-
mediate scope of our terms of re-
1 ence, appear to endanger the

public service.
Affected

nO

7e found evidence that

re a Leas are adversely
fected by the Governments in-
bility to recruit and to retain a
Full complement of senior adm ne
istrative, professional and teenni-
officers. We have found vhat
pme officers of those categories |
onsider that they are inadequate-
ly remunerated in the light of the |
emuneration earned by holders |
‘similar offices in neighbouring |
writories. Such officers, whether |
imported from other parts of the |
orld or barn and resident in |
Barbados, realise that they have a
market value outside of Barbados |
nd if for health, family or other
easons they do not feel bound to |
emain in Barbados, must inevi-|
lably seek financial advancement

here.

There are at present Vacan-
cies in some important offices
of the Government and further
‘yacancies will occur in the near
future. We have found that
grave doubts exist as to wheth-
er those vacancies can be filled
at the “required standard so
long as the existing salaries and
‘conditions of service continue.

he first and in our opinion
ee iseportant measure to over-
some the difficulties of recruit-
nt and retention of adminis-
tive, professional and technical
cers we recommend that return
ve passages privileges should
granted to the holders of the
ices mentioned in the Schedule
othis report. It will no doubt be
cessary to add offices to or de-
offices frorh the Schedule
om time to time, We consider
hat a “scheduled” officer should
m 1/48th of return leave pass-
to the United Kingdom by a
al direct route for himself
nd his wife in respect of each
nonth of service with the Gov-
nment and that he should be
ible to use such passage bene-
when he is granted vacation
fave, Passages should be grant-
to places other than the United
kingdom if required but the max-
amount payable by the
bvernment in respect of pass-
to other destinations should
t exceed the value of passages
the United Kingdom by a nor-
route,

W



un

Difficulties

A considerable difficulty in» the
itment and _ retention _of
lor officers arises from the in-
Bequacy of some of the salaries
by the Barbados Goyern-
lent as compared with the salaties
offered by the Governments
British Guiana and Trinidad.
have been required to report
Your Excellency on the 20th
+ December, 1949, and as we be-
fe that the consideration of the
t problem deserves a more
muled examination than can be
Wdertaken by us in the limited
at our disposal, we recom-
i that a committee should be
inted to review the salaries of
histrative, professional and
al offices in their relation
hew salaries of correspond-
Offices in Trinidad, British
na and other West Indian
es,

G

'

While we are not prepared to
8eneral recommendations on i
eati€s of administrative, pro-
oMal and technical officers we
resider that we should make re- |
hendations in regard to the |
teaching staff of Secondary |
where the difficulty of re-
nae, Professional officers is
wa. eave concern, Accord-
> We recommend that the fol-
M hew posts should be
=a as Government Offices
4 Civil Establishment
» Viz.,
tor Assistant Masters —
Harrison College.
or Assistant Masters —
, Lodge School.
lor Assistant Mistresses—
ns College,
lor Assistant Master —
bermere School.

a Should, of course, be a cor-
Ading reduction in the num-
Offices of Assistant Masters |
a Istant Mistresses at those |
and of Lex turers in Na-|
al Science . ‘ |
ye Téecommend ¢} following
? Scale ,
5 Senior Assistant
X $1444 399
PSenio, Ass

|

Ex S12 \ssisiant Mistress $2,880) Actor





480
€Ts app





some local public officers consider them

ly remunerated, when compared wit}

offices in neighbouring colonies, was one of the |

Committee appointed by the |

to examine the public services of the Colony.
|

|
Master $3,600) I

Penman al

authority of Resolution No. 35 of
1949.

Definition

The Director of Education made
the following recommendations in
regard to the definition of and the
filling of the proposed offices: —

(i) The office of Senior Assist-

ant Master is one which
carries the responsibility
for the teaching of a sub-
ject or a group of subjects
throughout a school. This
implies responsibility for
the syllabus and for the
work of any Assistant Mas

ten who may be a junior in |

his department
schon,

of the

(ii) A teacher may be appoint-
ed to an office of Senior
Assistant Master by the
Director of Education on
the recommendation of the |
Headmaster of the School if
in their opinion the teacher
is suitably qualified and has

__, Sufficient experience,

Gii) It is not obligatory on
the part of the Headmas- |
ter to recommend the
filling of all the offices of
Senior Assistant Master jf
teachers with suitable
qualifications and experi-
ence are not available for
appointment.

General Causes

As stated earlier in our report
we believe it to be our duty to
draw Your Excellency’s attention
to various general causes, which
from evidence received, affect
the services of Government
adversely. We now state some of
the more important causes and
give our recommendations there -
on,

(i) The delay in dealing with
staff matters.

We consider that the
office responsible for deci-
sions on_ staff matters
should be strengthened so
that the delays which at
present occur are reduced
to a minimum,
The unsatisfactory
ture of the service.

It has been stated that
the structure of the Barba-
dos Civil Service does not
allow of a_ satisfactory
method of promotion for
officers of promise and that

(ii) struc-

selves inade-|
1 holders of |





the lack of stepping stones
to the more senior offices
inevitably result in a
shortage of officers capable
of filling such offices. We
believe that the structure
of many departments
which provides no offices
between that of the Head
of the Department and the
Clerical Service is not
conducive to the acquisi-
tion of the standard of
responsibility expected of
senior officers nor to the
training of officers to
become Heads of Depart-
ments and we recommend
that specific posts such as
Assistant Auditor in the
Auditor General’s Separt-
ment should be introduced.

(iii) Lack of training facilities.

We are aware that a
committee appointed by
Your Excellency is at

present studying the ques-

tion of training Govern-
ment Officers. While we
are aware that certain

training especially for pro-
fessional and senior tech-
nical offices is not available
in Barbados, we consider
that the standard of effi-
ciency in the service wil
rise and the number of
officers available to fill
senior posts will increase
if steps are taken to pro-
vide promising officers
with the opportunity of
working in direct contact
with Heads of Departments
and othér senior officers on
the important matters of
policy and administration
of their departments. ,
(iv) Lack of confidence in
existing method of recruit~
ment, promotion and trans-
fer. J
We have had sufficient
evidence to show _ that
there is a very considera-
ble lack of confidence -in
the present arrangements

for recruitment and pro-
motion. We have not
studied the proposal for

the setting up of a Public
Service Commission, but
we feel that such a Com-
mission if given an ade-
quate staff could provide
a more efficient method of
recruitment ete. than now
prevails and would have
the confidence of the Civil
Service.

We recommend the set-
ting up of such a Commis-
sion.

We have the honour to be,

Your Excellency’s obedient sez -

vants,
(Sged.) F. L. WALCOTT,
C.. A.. COPPIN,
8. J. SAINT,
H. G. MASSIAH,

E. J. PETRIE.

Schedule of Offices the Hold-
ers of which are eligible to
receive Leave Passage
Privileges

|
|

Chief Judge, Judge Court of |
Appeal, Colonial Treasurer, |

onial Secretary, Financial Secre- |
tary, Assistant Colonial Secretary, |
ssistant Secretary, Auditor |
ral, Harbour and Shipping
Comptroller of Custom
Postmaster Stu
Market, Registrar

Judge Petts





Public
Jeputy Registrar ‘
Police W
Genera, A
General and I

1

A

‘ourt, fagistrate

sistant





mey



@ On Page 7

Broke the Law

; Stated that some* tourists off the

| while
| ship by boat from

| the Comptroller of Customs

| war days controlling the rates of



A story in yesterday’s issue}



“Stella Polaris”, who thought
that they were overcharged by a}
taxi-car driver, eseaped paying|
the fare by keeping the driver |
waiting outside the Aquatic Club}
they made back to their
the Aquatic



Club's pier. j
The tourists

have acted con-|

| trary to the law, but nothing can}

be done now, Mr. Williams,
Comptroller of Customs told the
“Advocate” yesterday. He quot-
ed law which stated that persons
coming to or leaving Barbados!
by ship, must do so throngh the!
Customs except sanctioned by
to
land or depart from another pier.

Mr. Williams was of. the
opinion that the chauffeur was
up to putting a trick over the
tourists, but that the tourists had!
got first opportunity.” He said!
that it should be a lesson to some
taxi-car drivers who charge ex-
orbitant prices for rides.

Miss Joan Kysh of the Publi-
city Committee said that it was |

|



a practise of the taxi-car drivers
to charge tourists one thing and
when they have got far out make
additional charges.

There are schedules from pre-

taxi-riding. When the “Stella
Polaris” was here this last time,
Police were sticking up schedules
in some of the cars.

New rates are expected soon,
she said. She was sorry that
they had not reached before the
tourists’ season began.



Stowaway
Wants Pay

S.S. “Comedian” called at
Bridgetown yesterday, but only
to land Malcolm Pascoll, a Grena-
dian, who stowed away when the
vessel was leaving Grenada for
London,

Pascoll apparently thought that
the “Comedian” was bound for
Barbados, the land where he is
domiciled. It was discovered that
he was aboard when the vessel
was near Barbados, and Capt.|!
Wells steered out of his route to
land him.

No prosecution was made be-
cause Captain Wells had no time
to stay. Pascoll was sent to his
home at Baycroft Road, Carring-
ton’s Village.

Pascoll seemed not at all em-
barrassed when before the ship-
ping authorities. He even asked;
for payment saying that he work-
ed his way up from Grenada on
the “Comedian,”





Tally Clerk’s
Body Found

In Careenage

The body of Kenn+th Ralf Bul-
len, forty-four-year-old tally clerk
of Emerald Villa’, Cheapside, was
fished out of the careenage near
Cavans Lane yesterday morning
about 5.45 by H.P.C. 24 Philip
and H.P.C. 34 Brewster.

The post mortem examination
was performed by Dr. E. B. Simon
at Burton & Co., Ltd. An in-
quiry will be held on Monday,
January 30.



Replacements
Are Coming

FOR ELECTRIC CO.

The “Advocate” has learnt that
news has been received by the
Manager of the Barbados Elec-
tric Corporation, that the crank
shaft and bed for the new Mer-
lees Engine which broke down
last week have been shipped
from England: by the S.S. Crafts-
man,

The machinery is expected to
arrive in Barbados on February
12.



NO REAR LIGHT:
FINED 5/-

A fine of 5/- and 1/- costs to
be paid in seven days or in de-
fault seven days’ imprisonment
was imposed yesterday on James
Applewhaite of Bank Hal] by His
Worship Mr. H. A. Talma.

He was found guilty of driving
the motor lorry M-809 on October
11 on Roebuck Street without
showing a rear light,



Negligent Driver

John Forde of Rock Hall St.
George was yesterday by Magis-
trate E. A. McLeod, fined 20/-
in one month or one month’s im-
prisonment. The tine was imipos-
ed for driving the motor car M—
1534 on Country Road without due
care and attention.

The offence was committed on
December 1.

Fell From
Second Floor

Frederick Downes (22), of Bay-
field, St. Philip, fell from the
parapet of the second floor of the
Savannah Club while he was
washing the wall around the
clock at about 3.30 p.m. yesterday

He was taken to the General
Hospital and when seen there by
an ‘Advocate’ representative he

was complaining of pains in his
back. The fal] was about 11 feet

LEGAL COURSE

freight rates”

dispute be



tween the Tortola Government, | ,
V Islands, and owner of the
f e1 Cyril E. Smith,” is|%
, ge i¥
course, the “Advo-/ 6
I sterday | "sseee<

~ Ler ese een

a
}
a

jally started business.

COO

GSS

sa a Oe
PSLLSOSSSOSSSSSSSSSOVGSSSOOSSSSSS FSOOSSSSSOSSSOSSS PPCSOSSSVSOSSSORN

THE BARBADOS

«
—-*





ADVOCATE



;
.

LADIES at the Housecraft Centre, Bay Street, are seen busily pre-

paring several appetising dishes
held yesterday afternoon.



at one of their classes which was



ST. MICHAEL
- Brick Arches 140 years old are
now being knocked down at
the building of Messrs. Alleyne,
Arthur & Co., at Palmetto Square.
The arches are being replaced by
wall built of concrete blocks.

While the foundation for the
walls was being dug, a gutter
perhaps two centuries old, was
unearthed. The gutter runs
through the building in the direc-
tion of Palmetto Square.

By removing these arches the
firm will have more storage space
on the ground floor and all offices
will be removed to the second
floor.

The alterations are being made
at the spot where the Barbados
Mutual Life Assurance Co. origin-
The spot
where the gutter was unearthed
Was once a courtyard and stalLle.

The concrete blocks that are
being used to build the new wall
were made locally by the Con-
crete Products Company at the
Farm.

The Reef Pavilion is now well
on its way to completion. The

cellar has already been concreted
and two toilets installed. Electric

wiring has also been completed |

but current is awaited.

A road leading from the Reef
Read to the Pavilion has been
planned and is now being pre-
pared. A Steam Roller is expect-
ed any time now from the High-
ways & Transport Department to
level the stones. The road, which
is nearly semi-circular, is situated
at the north end of the field.

Samuel R. Griffith, who is the

present caretaker, said that he
was recently given 120 feet of
hose and a lawn mower. He has

a staff of four groundsmen and
at present they are working on
two tennis courts.

*

When nearly 500 tourists arrive
by the Mauretania on Saturday,
Mr. U. J. Parravicino will have
about 60 motor cars ready to take
them around the island. They will
be taking the usual tourists’ route
and perhaps have lunch at the
Powell Spring Hotel. r

Mr Parravicino told the “Advo-
cate” yesterday that he accom-
panied some of the tourists from
the Stella Polaria on their tour
around the island. He said that
they were very impressed and
especially liked how each small
house in the country had a flower
garden to the front.

He said that a few visited the
Elementary Schools in the coun-
try and were very much surpris-
ed by the tidiness of the children.

A Certain Bank Official told
the Advocate yesterday that
something should be done to
make sure that American dollars,
which the tourists bring ashore,
is changed to Barbados currency,
before the tourists walk around
the City and begin to spend,

He pointed out a few
where tourists go to trays,
stores, etc. and spend
American dollars without
thinking of the value. In

cases
small
their
even
cases









Sandals and Court

REGARDLES

The Goods we are o

=

THE BARGAINS INCLUD
ED FROM

Of course there are many



PARISH ROUND-UP —

HARRISON'S -zn0ap sr.
SHOES AT BARGAIN PRICES,

LADIES’ Red, Tan and Navy Faney Shoes, White



GENTS AND CHILDRENS SHOES—in a Variety of

Styles and a Fair Range of Sizes

ALL TO BE CLEARED

soiled or old stock—they are merely |
types and styles we have decided to
discontinue.

AND LADIES SHOES FROM $5.50 .... to...

the same generous seale—Why not visit us to-day and

make your Choice.



\ where an article is for $1 (Bar-
bados) tourists pay $1 (American)
and just walk away. He said
that sometimes these American
dollars never reach the Banks.

a & Ae EE
The loss of a bicycle valued $50

Was reported by Clarence Good-

ing of Chapman Lane. He stated
that the bicycle was taken from

outside the Phoenix Pharmacy,

Broad Street, on Monday,

s *

Olive Spencer of Codrington
Hill reported the loss of-a goat
valued $18 from her enclosed
yard during Monday night.

The 1950 Yachting Season has
started with a good number of
boats registered in all Classes but

there are still a few yachts haul |

ed up on various beaches that
have never raced,

One of these is the Zandoli
which has been beached at the
Reef for a good many months
now.

4 : ® *

The Fire Brigade wagon left the
Fire Station after mid-day yester-
day with the Sigmund Pump in
tow. It dashed up Barbarees
Hill, full speed ahead, to attend
a fire at Gibbs’, St. Peter, but
on reaching Eagle Hall, certain
information disclosed that the fire

was already extinguished. It re-
turned to the Station.
| ' ‘
ST. JOSEPH
It is understood that the

Manager’s house at Castle Grant
Plantation will be rebuilt after
the crop season. This house was
destroyed by fire a few weeks
ago.

* * tte *

The cricket talk is centred
around Vernon Fenty, Goodwill
C.C. slow left hand bowler, who
took 78 wickets at a cost of 252
runs during the 1949 season in
the Central Division. Fenty, who
| bowled in 13 innings, did not play
in three matches. He capttred
10 wickets in one match on four
occasions,

Ashton Blackman of Romang
C.C. captured 55 wickets at a
cost of 300 runs. Romans C.C.
and Western C.C. are fighting for
the honours in the Central Divis-
ion.



=

TELEPHONE CO.
EXTEND LINES

Workmen of the Barbados Tele-
phone Co. are busy laying down
cables in Barbarees Hill, This
work is part of the regular ex-
j tension of the service in the
Spooner’s » Hill and Black Rock
areas, the “Advocate” was told
yesterday.

HARVEST AT
ST. LUKES’ CHURCH

The Police Band will be in
attendance at the 4 p.m, Service
at St. Luke’s Church, which holds
its Harvest Festival celebrations
on Sunday.










Styles



S OF COST

ffering are not shop-

E GENTS SHOES REDUC-

other lines all reduced on

HARDWARE DEPT.
Dial 2364.



isireacniebeglalnttplibpignanercenenntadinrasilies dee tschtiies
_



| has

























Did Not Stop
At Major Road |

Fitz Worrell of Deacons Road!
was fined 5/- and 1/- costs to
be paid in seven days or seven!
days’ imprisonment by His Wor-|
ship Mr. H. A. Talma yesterday |
for not stopping at a major road}
while riding the bicycle M-8231|
- Chapman Street on December |

Banana Supply
Steady

|

|

|

There is no influx of fruit wl
the City at present, and therefore
trade in that line is somewhat
normal.
Water cocoanuts, oran ges,|
Srapefruits and bananas are the
chief items to be seen about the!
streets,
The banana supply has been!
steady during the past month and!
one seller told the “Advocate”)
yesterday that a fair quantity can)
still be looked for during the)
coming weeks. There are some!
big limes to be had, a very use-/
ful item now the flying fish sea-|
son is underway.

Niles Dies |
In Hospital

1

Allan Niles of Rockley, Christ |
Church, who was admitted to the}
General Hospital on Tuesday |
afternoon died about 11 o'clock!
the same night. |
A_post mortem was performed |

by Dr. H. L. Massiah yesterday |

afternoon at the Hospital Mor-|
tuary,

New Canon For
S. Michael’s Cathedral

The Lord Bishop of Barbados
appointed the Reverend Gay
isle Griffith Mandeville, M.A.,
Rector of St. Philip to the Can-
onry of St. Cyprian in St. Mich-
ael’s Cathedral, vacant by the
death of Canon C. W. Johnson.

25 Years Ago

(Barbados Advocate, January 26,

}

1925)

BARBADOS vs. JAMAICA
Visitors Dismissed For 80 on
Damaged Wicket
SATURDAY morning broke
cloudy. A heavy rain had fallen
between 3 and 4 a.m., and there
were several slight showers up to
9 o'clock, As a result the pitch
was under water and play was
postponed until 1.30 p.m., to en-

able it to dry.

Extensive changes had been
made in the home side. H. B. G.
Austin, L. S. Birkett, R. Challenor,
G. Challenor, F. K. Greaves, H. C.
Griffith and H. W. Ince standing
down and their places being filled
by E. L. Bartlett, C. A. Browne,
Francis (who was played with the
consent of Major Cox and Mr.
Nunes) J. M. Kidney, J. L. Parris,
K Mason and Dr. Skeete.

Tarilton, who skippered the
home team won the toss and sent
the visitors to bat on the damaged
wicket. It was not an unplayable
wicket but the Jamaicans el
it nearly so.

Except E. A. Rae who lashed
out and hit Mason twice for six
very pretty shots, none of their
batsmen could do anything with
the bowling and in a little over
three hours they were all out.

If your feet are tired

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street

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- PAGE SIX
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RIP KIRBY

THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE







BY. CARL ANDERSON

cat

DISNEY

STZONG "Ss

my, PeLIP! —\} P WATT, PFLIP! YOURE NOT

i | ENOUGH TO GO AFTER
i| WM VveTt

i'M SO SORRY,

DEAR-- HONESTLY, )

LOOK' SOMETHING'S )
FLASHING ON THAT.

wi!

Che,
WHO-EVER QUESTIONS
SCRAMBLED EGGS ON
ANAVALCAP?..,



or HOW COULD Me

GET AWAY WITH Th —

ADMIRAL’S RIG?)
a

FR UTTLE BLuRE
AND BIT OF BRAID
S. \ GO ALONG WAY,
) MY BOV!











WHAT A CONCIDENCE
VASES BROTHER



208 Sigg Seem Sete Ss, Bote ope ewe



BY ALEX RAYMOND

sé : \ TRaNK DOU, Ve =. tT YOu

SiH TD THis OF OTHER PeoP_e| {YOu EVER RAVE A DEAR FRIEND WrOSE FOSTER GUGNTA WR Ta oN -
BF YOU CAN CAUSE Trim... WANT TO | \

E Ana,




SON, A YOUNG MAN OF 30... PEML MISE Fay




= DIPPOSE, VALBAIE, YOU CiON’T! |BUT DON ; NO... THOUGH SOME GROWN-UPS O0...2

Se

CALL FIM ART... DISAPPEARED

& | IT‘, NEVER RUN
HAD A GOOD RBAGON BUT NOW THAT | | Andy AGAIN!

REAGON NO LONGER EXISTS...HE CRS |

NOT KNOW, AND HIS PARENTS HAVE NO | my

WAY OF FINDING HIM











Patan
WW ie gf

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

THE GASPING BEAST STAGGERS BACK & MAKES A (ASSO AND $1/NG$ /T AT
AND THE PHANTOM HURRIEDLY GRASPS See THE SURPRISED TOTO!
= THE ROPE « ~
\QNLY GET ONE TRY.
HERE’ HOPING! ~

AS THE MONSTER REACHES FOR Hi THE
PHANTOM L/A-G)1ES OUT WITH HAS
LEGS, KNOCKING (aia

THE BREATH ‘

Qu? oF Torof







THURSDAY JANUARY 26, jg5¢

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Room 311

Plantations Building Lower Broad Street








ADVOCATE STATIONERY.

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6.65566
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ARTHRITIC PAINS -

But new treatment does more than
ease these terrible agonies.

A new product, DOLCIN, has been created which not only gives
prompt relief from the pains due to the symptoms of arthritis and
rheumatism, but also affects the metabolic processes which constitute
& very important part of the rheumatic state's background,

DOLCI has een thoroughly tested in medical institutions.
DOLCIN is being used now with unprecedented success. DOLCIN
is being prescribed by doctors now. And many sufferers have already
resumed normal living as a result of taking DOLCIN.

Don’t delay. Profit by the experience’ of fellow-victims of theas
Ans. Get DOLCIN today, A boitle of 100 precious tablets costs

On Sale. at BOOKERS

- 46.657 66 36565695 oot
ee

AGAIN?





CELL LCE LPL LLLP EEE > oe + . OPPC IRTUNITY TO ENJOY Ue
5 4 7
g ‘ GREAT CONVENIENCE:
‘ : ;
v O/ ds seal
. ¥, ‘N ar Torr . ‘ \ +
y mA |) 4 ick. Sie. oe : ave an AUSTIN delivered oa iN
s ye Pritain at short notice for your stay 1
% XS | rovided you bring the Car back
~ ss
> Due to the arrival of < rist shi : pels e %
S of a tourist ship on Saturday \ s e suggest you call on us and
. . . ay 723 : iverv
% the 28th, ovr store 28 Broad Siree + : oR Overseas Visitors’ Delivery
’ ne nent a y 3 > AUSTIN MOTOR CO.
* ‘8
* Closed on THURSDAY the 26th instead of oie
% *
SATURDAY for this week only . ne 4697

ECKSTEIN BROTHE®

piAL 4a

Cusptates —
SEES EEF OFF

BAY

COLLINS LIMITED

-%, broad Street

STREET

Mt OA bb OA Ae

6
Ot OOS
a

PARTNERS FOR PROGRESS ~ Sir Charles Jeffries

we itt 3 foreword by Hon, Arthur Creech Jones M. P
it LEAP OVER THE WALL

A Return to the World after 28 years in a Convent
— Monica Baldwin

WALK IN DARKNESS — Hans tale
SAY PLEASE — Virginia Graham
PEARS’ ENCYCLOPEDIA = Carter's Edition

HOLIDAYING IN ENGLAM

, Uk a
















ae

-.”

i
Wa
ee

THURSDAY JANUARY 26, 1950

CLA

TES
es





Week Sun
' 4 0 ’
MB, yoUNCEMENTS .
' : SALE per werd
op RENT b o
‘ANTED ; }
mp per word
sgt, FOUND PF er
imum cparee
RapLic SALES
10
Seg een } we
per agate line
charge - BO eee
e LR
wn 14 agate lines)
UBL NOTICES
Ts ‘ 08 Lab
. ve. in ; 1.20 1.50

eNING ADVOCATE (Monday)
ING TIME
«-DAYS:—2 p.m.

a y:—2.00 p.m. Friday

items of different classification

4 rhe set out in “eparate adverts,

IN| MEMORIAM

ng memory of GEORGE E.
who departed this life on



IN ever lovi

1945.
lost to sight to memory dear
ever wilt remain;
only hope our heart can cheer,,-

hope to meet again. ,
Millicent Marshall (wife) Marion Mar-

fy aitece) . 26.1.50—1n

TT
Th

memory of our dear beloved
ther Mrs. EMILINE YEARWOOD who
‘on the 26th day of January 1949
of sadness still come over us
eret tears do often flow
should sleep but not forever
the long and secret grave
ed be the yord that taketh
ed be the Lord that give
bright eternal city
ed as she lived

in the
every body's

om her rest to home sweet home.
, Muriel, Everil, Itha (daugn.ers
n, Ivan, Ralph (sons), and 9 grand-

drett. 26.1

o

—_—
——————————

FOR SALE

U

One Chevrolet Car. New Tyres



| February

OTIVE

SSIFIED ADS.

FOR RENT

HOUSES

FLATS fully
erator and lini
Dial 8364.

BUNGALOW — «

Clariston”
February situated a

22.1.50—3n





ms,

Apply Ralph A.
Phone 4683 or 8402.
25.1.50—3n

fro: 1
m ist February. Appl
rid Hardwood Alle

Ralph
one 4683



FLATS — Two
| Highgate House, St.
ther particulars Phone
& Haynes Co., Ltd.,

25.1.50—3n



Crane Coast

modern con-

veniences. Apply; Mrs. A. D. Herbert
Phone 8335. 20.1, 50—An
“WATERFORD” —Hastings (near Gar
rison Savannah) . Desirable residence
fully furnished. Available from Ist Feb-
ruary. Dial 8330. 26.1.50—t.f.n

PUBLIC SALES

SUCTION

By order of the Insurance Co., I wil

sell at Me Enearney & C vo Gi
triday ith. at 2 p.m. FORD PREPEC

10 H.P. CAR damaged in accident.

Terms Cash. R. ARC
215. HER MC





THERE will be an Aucti
Hall Hastings, on Wednesday the
Keep this Date open,
"ARCY A. SCOTT,
Auctioneer.

Ist
D
1.50—2n

25

UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER

is

+ on Thursda:
beginning a
: Rocki

it



Battery, suitable for hire. Apply:
‘Cuke, Derricks, St. James.
: 24.1,50--3n.

four

RS—Two (2) Morris 8 h.p. cars
models. One (1) Vauxhall 1947
ly Tower Garage, St. Matthias Gap

21.1.50—6n

R—Vauxhall 14—6 Saloon 1938 mo-
in sound condition. Appl)
y Garage,, Dial 4016. 26,1.50—4n

ORD PREFECT 1948 model—in very
condition Mileage 19,000 Apply

Garage Dial—4616
26.1.50—3n.

DFORD 12 hp. DELIVERY VAN
little used and in A-I condition.
has replaced with Bedford Truck

16 Courtesy Garage.
26.1.50—3n.

)

Ohne Style Master practical);
One Touring Chevrolet in good
ition. H. C. Trotman, Mapp Hill,

26.1.50—2n.

7
lic

RiCAL
ING PLANT—Diesel Electric
ng Plant 20 Kw maximum, 15 Ky,
110/220 volts 3 phase, 5&
pply: Electric Sales & Service
@ 4629 or 4371. 26.1.50—4n

WFRAIR ELECTRIC WASHING

A number of which are in
ily and giving very satisfactory
. We now offer these at $290.00

with Spindrier.

JOHN F. HUTSON LTD.

: 25.1.50—2n

Nee
a

,

sTOC:
UD HORSE in A-1 condition, H. C.

Mapp Hill, St. Michael.
26.1.50—2n

SETTER PUPPY (Dog). 4%
Old, Pedigree supplied. Regis-
ie at the Kennel Club, London.
| Kenneth D. G. Frost,, Stan-

k Rock.
26.1.50—t.f.n.

va
Ne

ICAL

Hercules Silver King, or.
i models, in green and in black
& Co., Lid. Dial 4476
A 14,11 49-—t tr

NEOUS

ORM SCALES—Phone 4517 The
y Co., (B'dos) Lid. High
22.1.50—-6n.

e

Truck and Car Tyres 750 x
% 20; 30 x 5, 600 x 16; 500 x 16:
AB; 400 x 18;' 450 x 17; 500 x i9,

Auto Tyre Co. Trafalgar St
Et 20.1,50—t.f.n.

ANIZED SHEETS—Best Grade,
Mi Bft. sheets, from $2.08 and $2.64,
last. A. BARNES & Co., Lid

MA, 4476, 13,1,.50—t.f.n
ISED SHEETS—6
nd 26 guage. Apply
Street, Phone 2696

G G
in, to
& Co,

ft., 6% ft.
: Auto Tyre

vanised pipe. All sorts
1% ins, Phone 4684
Lid,
3.12.49—t.f.n.
Wholesale and Retail, Factory
i Store.,

17,1.50—13n

S SHIRTS & PYJAMAS — The
_ 17.1,50—13n
BS BRASSIERES — bac. & Doc.
17.1.50—13n.

Pen SS Si ee
26.1.50—3n

— Corn flakes, shredded

d Wheat, Cerevim, All Bran
n of Wheat, also Barley and
W. M. Dial 3489, 35
K Street, 24.1.50—In.
BULBS—36 different colours
just arrived from Holland.

Barrow. SeegNAne Nos.
ae

v

os gs most delicious and

can English Fresh Garden
in the hands of your grocers,
Per tin 26.1.50—2n.

TRUCK TYRES 32 x 6—Best

ke in England. Quite a num-

ue ey ‘at continue giving

‘ “ on. We offer our present

. e mcularly attractive prices
NF. HUTSON LTD.

b 25.1.50—2n



SSS
Y DAY!

RY LUCKY DAY '!

® which you

i.






f for the

cali







with glass top,
one Emerson Shi

Radio,

Sidebo;
2-burner Oil Stove,
et, Bedsteads with S

ard, Larder, one
Kitchen Table, Buck-







furnished with Refrig-
en at Indramer, Worthing,
13.1, 50—t.f.n.

from Ist
t Worthing in Ave. |!

lhe cerned i, cota

CHURCHILL — Maxwell's Coast, Ch.
Ch. 3 available March Ist.
Beard, Hardwood Alley.

a ee naar raeniiniteniiatabiesieecmneas.,

WORTHY DOWN—Top Rock Ch. Ch.
3 ms, fully furnished, available
A.

or
25.1.50—3n.

unfurnished Flats at
Michael. For fur-
4230, Wilkinson

————————

——eee
CAR—Ford Prefect 10 h.p, Ford Car.

n

ion Sale of
well-kept Mahogany Furniture at White

a

ng and Armchairs,
Round Table,

pring and Mattresses,

Wardrobe, Dressing Table, Clock, and

other items of interest, Terms Cash,
D'ARCY A, SCOTT,

Auctioneer,

21.1,50.—4n.

V6===lTlke—Naeo

*EAL . ESTATE

LEETON—On-Sea, well
attractive Seaside Resort

known and

For partioul ee at Maxwell.
ars apply Y. De Lima & Ci oe

20, Broad Street, Phone 4644, ws
22.1.50—6n.

COVE SPRING HOUSE — A modern
ungalow, four bedrooms, two baths,
electricity, water, on the sea, own private

bathing b
table Garden,
at Garden, St, James, Enquiry Sandy-
fields St. Peter. Phone 91-50 or at the
premises Garden, St. James,
20.1..0—1fn.

each, 1% acres of land Vege-

“THE BANYANS”
‘hereto, containing 4
Perches, situate at Upper Bay Street,
St. - Ideally suitable for de-
velopment as a Building Estate.

Inspection any day except Sundays
between the hours of 9.30 a.m, and 11,30
a.m. and 4 p,m, and 6 p.m. on appli-
cation to Mr. Ronnie Gittens on the
premises. Dial 3771.

The above property will be set uw:
Sale at our Office No, 17 H .
Bridgetown, on of

particulars and Conditions

'f Sale, apply to the undersigned:—
COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.,
20.1.50—13n.

ee,

FOR SALE OR RENT—Farley Hill,
St. Peter. Old Plantation house with
large ballroom, Dining room library,
fourteen etc, Ideal for convert-
ng to residential club. For details,
Apply to Bradshaw & Company.

4.1.50.—t.f£.n
_—_—_——

THE undersigned will offer for Sale at
their Office in James Street, Bridgetown,
on Friday the 27th day of January 1950,
at 2 p.m,

The Dwelling House called “BEULAH”
and the land thereto belonging containing
5427 square feet, situate at Hastings
Christ Church.

The Dwelling House comprises Closec
Gallery, Drawing and Dining Rooms, :
Redrooms, Dressing Room, Toilet Bath
and Kitchen with Electric, Water, Gas
and Telephone installed. Servant's Room
and Servant’s Toilet.

Inspection any day between the hours
of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. on application on
the premises.

For further particulars and conditions
of Sale, apply $
HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD,

Solicitors.

— With the land
Acres 2 Roods, 31"

p for





“THE WOLD,” 4th Avenue, Marine
Gardens, with about 10,000 square feet
of land will be offered for sale at the
office of the undersigned on Thursday,
the 2nd day of February, 1950 at 2 p.m.

This freehold dwellinghouse contains
gallery, 2 public rooms, kitchen and
pantry on ground floor and 3 bedrooms,
bath ete. on first floor.

Electric, gas and water services.

The house has recently been renovated
and decorated and is in excellent condi-
tion,

Inspection by appointment with Mrs.
H. S. Bynoe. Dial 8310.

Further particulars and conditions of
sale apply to ...

COTT: CATFORD & CO.,,
oe Solicitors.
21.1.50,—11n.





WANTED





e -m, and 3,30 p.m.

between 9.30 a.m, a Beas
CLERK—Junior Clerk (Male) for our
e. Salary depending on qualifica-

. Apply in person with written ap-
Testimonials to the Secre-

%.1.50—t.f.n.

JUNIOR CLERK—Excellent
for rapid promotion for capab’
man, Apply by letter and in
w & Company. 26.1

TAILORS—First class jacket hands

can apply to P. C. F. Maffei Ltd. Top
Score in Tailoring. ok oh an

PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife MARJORIE
DINA KEIZER (nee Marjorie Adina
Phillips)

Christ Chunu:



THE public are hereby wazned against
giving credit to iny wife RUBY MAYERS
(mee Johnson) as I do not hold myself
responsible for her or
any debt or debts in my nam

a written order signed by me.
Sed. LLOYD CHRISTOPHER MAYERS

Church View

8 miles from Bridgetown

i

anyone else con-|

HSUEH

i

}
}

a startling

portrait of--

TOUTE EGET dd

2S seen b
HIS is a picture y



T.B. Radar, Sch. Emeralda, Sch. Gar- DEPARTURES. *. _.
of YOUR inner Self seen, not & x - : ARRIVALS Co., Lta. : x
through the distorting ite Taree . M.V. Lady Joy, 46 tons net, Capt. S.S. Byfjord, 1,109 tons net»: Capt.
eyes of some surrealist \ DK d WS S x x X ~ N Parsons, from St. Lucia, Agents: D. L. raldsen, Trinidad; Agents: Robert
Bare the ats NNO WW C ee | 3 ae
y the la ES S . vi Ss
brain research. XX WV is S ' Self... noted =
okvery visible part of were aera = oats
y—arms, legs, i. = ‘
lips, and so, eee: iby scientists =
sakes with a@ mental, ‘ = < Ca ;
; reflection” of itself : = c = ARRIVALS by B.W.LA.L, Alice O'Higgins,, rmen >
braln's “tae site SS = Rathiven Boveand Aim — Gondin, ‘Auenitts,cxtees, panes Ay Maia
S thin, wavy = Rosenare King; Mary Stone, Narenlene Reginald Michelin, H .
cin.” s ‘rouse = Sere he eee ine oe ee awiaits” '
- - = ary ; ey Marquez, ry -W.LA, ‘
gether these “reflec. Janet Soke, Temes Wilsa e ee: For TRINIBAD.. ‘ite. David Pursegemtr>
” aunetl ames nm, . . ye
Bot, “ up the From BRITISH GUIANA. . .. Dudley » Mr. Frederiek
mage —a Mr. Eric Baron, Mrs, P. Baron,, Miss monte, Mr, Louis DeVerteuil, cing _
eet the in ppt Dar Miss W. Becon, Mi "5 Delton Mr G chap torah iso .
e brain. — on, Miss W. TON, iss J. Dalton, . Geor roma »
wdtks image is no flattering, in the middle finger and ring where the various parts of the UVVUVUOUUUUAUOUUOOOOUa Aan nOeanORAT AAT Fectei e ke ee ae B- votre Nellie MaeoCcnnail . Ruby
“e og - c portrait, Its parts finger of the missing arm, body are and what they are bour,, Miss J. Grogan, Mr. R. Benn, Goulding, Mr. Ernest Goulding, Me
whether yeu ae eos that, For the same reason a person® Going. Without this running main focus of intense pain is in Mr. S. George, Mr. B. Deane, Mr. F. Violet Weekes,, Miss Keren —
beautiful or plan pti woman, with a paralysed arm may get record the brain | could not co- the Body Image. The pain you McKenzie, Mr. L. Cox, Miss M. Conyers, Alice Greathead,, am John: '
into something like eee © MP the: sensation that it is wavton ordinate the body’s movements. feel in your arm may really be Mrs. D. Seaton, Mr. ‘A. Hintzen, Irene Mrs ache Fletcher, -
. : , Monster = anout although he can seo it Brain damage, believed to have i" the arm’s mental miniature. Pennagchiotti, Renata Pennacchoitti, Adamson, Mr. John Adamson, ”
own above, : ;. Diana Pennacchiotti, Idaline Miner, Linda Brathwaite, Mrs. Beryl Holder; /
hanging by his side, injured the Body Image, caused The fact that it is impossible Miner, Felce J. R. Gomez, Trina de Commander Charles Hayward, Mr.
All fingers Ph tom I left side. to his beady ite ae Se ne, oi SF eens Gomez, Licia Atencio, Noemi Atencio, Charles A. Ablett, Mr. John 4Â¥one,
f mee an clues» i ee

In the real bod
than hands, an

after
gone.




















Transport workers leader
Norway,
conference to plan counter
European ports.

Controls
Hamper

@ From Page 3
the longest periods for 50 years
and this year was the coldest on
record, the temperature being at
zero when he left on January 14,

As a general rule they went
through the year without getting
to freezing point. They got about
58 inches of rain a year and the
weather was usually very nice.
There was very little snow and
very little frost.

In the Evergreen country where
he was residing, the weather was
not too hot or too cold and they
were expecting the spitg flowers
to be sprouting in February. The
people particularly from the
southern climates where it was
so hot and dusty, liked to come
over to the Evergreen country in
the winter time as they would
not be free from snow until May.

“Barbados is a wonderful spot”
Mr. Sweeney said. “It has the
finest swimming in the world,
nice beaches and clear salt water
and he thinks that half of Canada

j would come down here for the

winter if they only knew how de-
lightful it was on the white sandy
beaches and in fhe crystal clear
salt water.”



Ukrainian Army
In “Iron Curtain”

MUNICH, Jan 25.

A Ukrainian Liberty Army
numbering between 100,000 and
200,000 men are operating behind
the “Iron Curtain” according to
Dr. Peter Mirschuk, spokesman of
the S. K. League of Ukrainian
former concentration camp pris-
oners. The Munich Abendietung
in reporting this, said that Dr.
Mirschuk disclosed that the main

operational centre of the liberty |
army © was

in the Carpatho-
Ukraine, but some of the army’s
units were also operating on the
Crimea in the Caucasus, and in
the Baltic Region.—Reuter

NOTICE

Will our Friends and Cus-
tomers please note that we
shall be CLOSED for Busi-
ness TO-DAY 26th at 1 p.m,
and will be Open for Busi-
ness on Saturday 28th from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m,

JOHN F. HUTSON LTD.
MOUNT GAY DISTILLER-
IES LTD.

Butter Shortage?

WE CAN SUPPLY

PEANUT BUTTER at
72¢ per bottle

e

Stuart & Sampson
LTD.

Headquarters for Sest RUM









Tae
y, os






» feet are bigger
fingers longer
the

its real counterpart has

Thus when @ London doctor
Gave an injection to a 50-year-old
man whose right arm had been
amputated 10 years before, the
man said he could feel a tingling











THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE

|

= ys
PES bya eee

your. br.



©

oa
umn!

The location and shape of the

than thumbs, But B various parts of the Body Image
Image reflects the importance of are being _mapped by three main
a in our ily life c
rathor than their proper shape. 1 Foc nit . stlectrical
anne fran Peg iy 1 thumbs the grey matter of people who
they are much bi gers. 5° have to undergo brain operations
Tee Hanne stg sae Body and give permission for the ex
tically outsize head and enomes; Periments—which are harmless.
| ips, ee 2 Noting the effects of localised
| The existence of this second brain damage in hospital
sol explains why anyone ye has Patients,
ost a limb may still “feel” it, Studying the “phantom” sen-
The brain-reflection of an arm 3 y
or leg may remain vivid long ue of people who have lost

What use fs the Body Image ?
Tt seems certain that normai life
would be impossible without it.

The Image can be visualised as
& television picture, which kee!
the brain informed of exac y,



ANTI-COMMUNIST
SEAMEN’S UNION FORMED

LONDON, Jan. 25.

s from France, Belgium, Holland,
and Britain have just com

pleted here a two days’

-action against Communists in

When the Communist World
Federation of Trades Unions es-
tablished a seaman’s section last
year, the International Transport
Workers Federation, at a meeting
in Rotterdam, agreed to create a
“vigilance committee”,

The I.T_W.F. is one of the Trade
non-communist World Confeder-
ation of Free Trades Unions. The
Secretariats associated with the
vigilance committee was formed
immediately after the establish-
ment of the Confederation last
month, and it assembled for the
first time in London last Monday.

The representative of the Rhine
German Workers was unable to
attend the London meeting.

T. Yantes, General Secretary of
the British Seamen’s Union, pre-
sided. Each national represent-
ative reported on developments in
his country. The decisions of the
conference are to be announced
later,

—Reuter.

Russia Granted
“Special Rights”

WASHINGTON, Jan, 25.

The United States State De-
partment said today that “two
secret agreements” between the
Chinese Communists and Russia
granted “special rights” to the
Soviet Union in Manchuria.

Supporting recent statements by
the Secretary of State, Mr, Dean
Acheson, the Department issued
a detailed “background document”
which said, “The Soviet Union has
placed the richest industrial area
of China firmly behind the Far
Eastern segment of the Iron Cur-
tain,”—Reuter,

MAIL NOTICE

MAILS for Martinique, Antigua, St
Croix, St. Thomas, V.I and New York
by the FORT AMHERST will be closed
at the General Post Office as under:

Parcel and Registered Mails at 10.15
&.m., Onrdinar,y Mail at 11.45 a.m,
the 28th January 1950,





on
















ca ;
AUCTION SALE

FURNITURE & HOUSEHOLD
EFFECTS
HAZELWOOD HOUSE
BISHOP'S COURT HILL
SATURDAY 28th at 12.15 p.m,

we

WE are instructed by Mrs. I
M. BARRERA and others to se!!
by Auction the following valuable
Furniture and effects, :—

Couches, Occasional Tables,
Dining Chairs, Sideboard, Book-
cases, Rockers, Dressing Tables.
Washstands, Chest of Drawers,
Kidney Table, W: tall
Mahogany). 5-piece Morris Suite
Dining Tables (one oval), 6 Din-
ing Chairs, Sideboard, China
Cabinet, large Gent's Press, Writ-
ing Desk, several Tables and Nest
of Tables, Tea Trolley (all Crab-
wood of modern design). Modern
Dressing Table and Stool, severa:
Double and Single Beds (Simmons
Spring»), Mattresses, Gallery Pur-
niture, several Deal Presses (all
sizes), Deal Tables painted
Child's Press, 2 painted Cots (one
large), painted Playpen, 2 High
Chairs, Singer Sewing Machine,
5-Burner Ot] Stove with Oven.
2 (one-burner) Stoves, Frigidaire,
Electric Iron, Go-Cart, large
quantity Glassware, Silver, China,
Kitchen Ware, Ornaments. Fold-
ing Steps, Suitcases,
Tools, Toys, Ladders, Books and
Many other interesting items.

VIEWING FRIDAY 27th JANU-
ARY and MORNING OF THE
SALE SATURDAY 2th JAN

CASH ON FALL OF HAMMER,

AUCTIONEERS

DIXON & BLADON



HUVUUUUUUUAUEOUEEALAUGEAGUUESUUUUUEeHUUeeUaUeedaaeaneaannaai

THE CHAPMAN PI
COLUMN _ presents ~~

WOU

NCHER' -/


















eae wash only his right
side

and

trouser-leg, sock, and shoe.

In another
the effect was
the patient could not believe his
left arm belonged to him when
he was shown it, :

Sitive to pain, though otherwise Commissioner of Police, Deputy Sister, Sister, Radiographer,
“ “ pie ne probably have some over- Commissioner of Police, Superin- Medical Superintendent Mental
Aid to flying ? Seient ay ie {mage 8 tendent of Police, Superintendent Hospital, Assistant | Medical

Perhaps
tionally deft

>front-rank footballers and may be able to exert some control rector of Education, Assistant Engineer, Assistant to the Col-
fighter Pilots, for instance—are over the Image, so that they do Director of Education, Principal onial Engineer, Commissioner of
a a aie aineite the ee not feel wounds and burns. Erdiston College, Vice-Principal Income Tax and Death Duties,
its brain image than averagely The theory also explains why Erdiston College, Woman-Tutor Labour Commissioner, Director
clumsy folk, are is felt when brain tissue! Erdiston College, Director of Sci- of Highways and Trangpert
Research on the Body Image ts is cut: there is no counters ence and Agriculture, Deputy Executive Engineer, Gove t
being urgently pressed forward art of the brain in the Body! PU aad t Sci 7 Agricul aoe I t Resident
because it seems tebe acne age—which accounts for thei irector oO cience and gricul- Electric nspector,
involved in medicine's chief pur- utish brow in the portrait, ture, Entomologist, Veterinary Mechanical Engineer “Waters
pose—the relief of pain. apove, \ Officer, Chemist, Botanist, Gov- works, Superintendent Water-—
Many doctors believe that the London Express Service ernment Analyst Lecturer in works, Principal Clerk Genéral
Natural Sciences, _ Librarian, Service, Senior Assistant Master
A at A oe Chief Medical Officer, Sanitation of Secondary Schools, Gradiate
Officer, Port Health Officer Gov- Assistant Master of Poor

Police

Italian farmer had confessed to

having
cause sh
tobacco
town,

The body of the woman, Mario

Innocent:

a woodman following the tracks
of a wolf in the lonely moun-

tainous region near Turin. that his Samet regarded the January 10th, Beauty La yn bd Vincent, sailing Thursday 26th
Doctors said that she had been| Vietnam Republic as the legal] 18th, Melbourne January 28th, Sydney anuary, E
murdered and buried more than] government of Vietnam. eda ma * accent O “and 7
two years ago. , : hese is hi 1 f Trinidad, sailing Saturday ..
. The Chinese Communists want-| oihes Ward Whom cid Genel ae January. .

The h

eato Renigio, said to have been

a very h

was arrested by the Police last — the 9 tia countries,” thé/ For further een er,
night. telegram said. pees lee AE,
After all night questioning,| The radio declared that the es- DA COSTA & Co. LTD.,

Police said that Renigio confessed
—but not until Police had prom-
ised to give him a cigarette.



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Income Tax returns are re-
quired from every married man whose income is $1200.00 per annum

or over,

annum or over and from companies whether incorporated or unin-
corporated, societies, persons engaged in any trade or profession, and
owners of land or property whether a taxable income has accrued
during the past year or not.

Forms of Return my be obtained from the Income Tax Depart-
ment AFTER THE 1ST DAY OF JANUARY, 1950, and the forms
duly filled in must be delivered to me on or before the following

respectiv:
i

NOTE; Any person failing to make his return within the due

10.1,50.—19n,

High
at 2

there
of St

I
ton,”

$6906

“a



Killed W
For Tobaeco

Returns of persons whose books were closed on the 3ist
day of December, 1949, on or before the 31st day of March,

Returns of all other persons, on or before the 31st of Jan-

The un

The Dwelling House called “CARLD)

For further particulars and conditions of Sale, apply to :—

or

PAGE SEVEN
i

IRUHVEEUGEUATEUEUUVAEG AM




- Wen














In Carlisle Bay

IN PORT: Schooner Molly N. Jones, M.V. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt.
Sch. Manuata, Sch, Mary M. Lewis, Sch. Gumbs,, from Dominica; Agents: Schdon-
» Smith, Sch. Marion Belle er Owners’ Association.

Wolfe, Sch. Reginald N. Wallace, Sch. S.S. » 3,121 tons net, Capt.
Marea Henrietta, Yacht Beegie, Sch. Wells,, from Grenada; Agents; Da Costa
Endeavour W., Sch. Barca De Oro, M.V. & Co., Ltd. oe f



counterpart in the Body Im
Strongly supports this theory, — ’





forget to put on his left

case of this type
so disastrous tha{

Return Leave Passages —

From Page 5 House Surgeon, Matron, Assistant
. a Matron, Sister Tutor and Home

; Yogi secret

Some children who are insen-'

of Prisons, Superintendent Gov-

proneness to serious accidents, : = :
ernment Industrial Schools, Di-

Yogis, fakirs, and fire-walkers



Superintendent Mental Hospital,
Matron Mental Hospital, Colonial

ople who are excep-
in their movements









ernment Bacteriologist and Path-
ologist, Surgeon Specialist, Radi-
ologist, Medical Superintendent,
House Surgeon and Anaesthetist

Schools, Senior Assistant Mistress
of Secondary Schools, Graduate
Assistant Mistress of Secondary
Schools.

ife China Recognises
Red Vietnam

SINGAPORE, Jan. 25.
Chinese Communist Government
has officially recognised the Viet-
nam Republic, Indo-Chinese Na-
tionalist Regime led by the Com-
munist Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam
radio reported to-day.

The broadcast quoted a tele-
gram from Cho En Lai, Chinese
Communist Prime Minister, who
is also Foreign Minister, saying

SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA NEW
ZEALAND LINE LIMITED
(MLA.N.Z.) LINE)

M.S. “PORT PIRIE"” is scheduled to
sail from Sydney January i4th —
arriving at Trinidad about February

7th

M.S."KAIPAKI” is scheduled to sail
from Port Pirie January 7th, Burnie



ROME, Jan. 25,
to-day alleged that an

murdered his wife be-
e forgot to buy him some
when he sent her into






The M.V. “Caribbee” will «4
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Kitts-Nevis, Antigua, Mont-
serrat, Dgminica, sailing Friday
27th January.

The Schooner “Gardenia W" will
accept Cargo and Passengers for



ina Fourete, was found by










ed to exchange Ambassadors so
as to “strengthen relations, and
enhance friendly. co-operation be~

Cargo accepted on Through Bills of
Lading with transhipment at Trinidad
for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
and Leeward Islands.

usband, 48-year-old Ern- The Endeavour win



eavy drinker and smoker,

tablishment of diplomatic rela-
tions was a “slap in the face for
the French Imperialists and their
lackeys .”—Reuter.

Agents: Barbados.

ee ALeoa Steamship

CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND

Name of ship Sails

Halifax Barbados
S.S. “ALCOA PLANTER” January 3th. January 18h
8.8. “ALCOA PATRIOT i - January 22nd. February rd,
Sailing every two weeks,

NEW YORK SERVICE
S.S. BYFJORD sails from New York 13th, arrives in Barbados 22nd.

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
S.S. ALCOA ROAMER sails from New Orleans 30th December, arrives
15th January.

5.8. ALCOA RUNNER sails from New Orleans 14th January, arriving
80th January, a





*

—Reuter,










GOVERNMENT NOTICE
INCOME TAX NOTICE

from every other person whose income is $720.00 per

a
seer

SeEeReeEEeenEeeT ~-

Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — Canadian Service

e dates: ROBERT THOM







ce

BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LID.

NOTICE

SO far it has been found impracticable to work
out such a Schedule of cuts in Electricity as was. :%
published in May of last year. Our available generating ‘ )
capacity now is considerably less than it was then, ..j
while the overall demand has increased. aod

On weekdays, between 7 a.m. and 11 a.m. and 15
noon and 4.30 p.m, only Bridgetown can be supplied, ~
if continuous water pumping is to be maintain sist

Between 11 a.m. and 12 noon, all areas excepit®
Bridgetown should be “on” and between 4.30 p.m. and. ¥
7 a.m., such capacity as is available, after giving due. }}
priority to the needs of water pumping, baking, icemaiiz }
ufacture, printing, ete., will be distributed as equally.as
possible throughout the system by similar. “on” per
as have been effected during the past few days.

Load studies and exper

1950.
Returns of persons whose principal place of business is not
situate in the island on or before the 30th day of June, 1950.



uary, 1950.
F, CLAIRMONTE
Commissioner of Income Tax and Death Duties,




date will be liable to a fine not exceeding £100 and
not less than £2 and will be prosecuted unless a satis-
factory reason is given.














FOR SALE

dersigned will offer For Sale at their Office, No. 17,
t, Bridgetown, on Friday, 27th day of January, 1950,

alli TEM” and the land
to containing 10,770 oquare feet, situate on the Sea Coast
- Lawrence Gap, Christ Church,
nspection on application to Miss Kathleen Hunte, “Brat-
Maxwells Coast. Dial 8357,




Stree
p.m
























t
)
j
i
'
:

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO,, imental switching o






























11.1,50.—15n. tions are being carried out continuously with a Wey 4!
649SS66466006006 to evolving a. workable Schedule and the Com - 4
wilh be greatly assisted in this if all Consumers, ft
PLLAPLLCLLPLPL SLO SSOD SOOO SS AAAS trial and Domestic, make sure that consumption: 4
both light and power is cut to the barest minim (Se eae
IMPORT ANT the times when current is available, whether d fae
day or night. : we 4
Owing to pany requests from cones - h-
: i whether we could not give some notice o:
For Your Daily and Evening the areas affected, we have decided, although it is not.
standard practice, to switch “off” the area to be cut for”

¥2 minute, then switch “on” again for 3 minutes before
the final cut. By this means it is hoped that Consum a
will have time to, put into operation their auxil lighting. This method of switching: will only be an |
operation between. the hours of 6 and 10 p.m. *

The foregoing proposed arrangements can only be
adhered to if the existing available Sets, which are
already overloaded, can all be kept running. ;

THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION, LTD.

V. SMITH

ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER in
Church Village District,

Contact ...
GEORGE QUINTYNE,
CHURCH VILLAGE,
ST. PHILIP

SPLSCSSSSES SSL OPP SPPOP EPOCH


















26, iy

a







THURSDAY JANUARY
PAGE EIGHT THE BARBADOS ADVOCATI







ce a






















Dias nd itt aaa Siete | Freddie Mills
Â¥ Footbal. Raciug ai ports Yachting, Boxing. efe. _ Will Retire |
| i ONPIEY by Commiws | i-Siccses

TRINIDAD ROUT JAMAICA { STOPPING: ALL STATIONS TO BANKRUPTCY by Cummings | 2S iat



a





Court Stadium here on Tuesday,
said today; “You can take it as |
Imost certain that last night was |
Mills’ last fight.” |

FOR PALTRY 155 RUNS |
Ramadhin Bags Five For 39

Nn i




















































































































































































































































j
|
* “I am going to do my best to |
ay (By O. S. COPPIN) | persuade him to give up the fight |
ee i ‘“ | game. Freddie has had a good run.
aS PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 25. ; | He has always given the crowd | i
a Sam Ramadhin, 24-year-old Indian right-arm slow spixner, | | their money's worth, and has been |
played the major part in Trinidad’s routing of Jamaica for! ; 2 good champion.
‘ 158 runs in just three and a half hours’ play as the first) Broadribb, Mills’ manager and | : s
Trinidad-Jamaica Test opened at Queen’s Park Oval today.| father-in-law, informed | is coming out
Ramadhin secured a bag of five wickets for 38 runs in aS a ae remember
+ : : : : it c } J
overs. Trinidad with all her wickets intact, replied with s conferense at whieh Goth Mills that —
in one and a quarter hours ag BS wicket was perfect) F é ‘a - and his wife, Christie, were pres-
; rowd imated to ,000. Such a fuss about ere Surely you don't expect | ent, the former World Lightheavy- = .
ane the crowd, wap. aenenns aT —__——_——| | Sap itatle Ueiiees, Bie Seat to be ies | weight Champion, said that he i VIKTIN
John Goddard arrived here. ie wat said, £24. are meaning- : : * ‘By the time we'de stopped was retiring from the ring.
to-day to witness the Jamaica- | rend Sion to a | less ” Savcling Heme? the seand See oF Solomons said: “I think that
‘rinidad Tests. ee io the roads. oe | Mills’ decision is a wise one.”
kus a for the games| The batsmen were now Jefinitely dismantling the 5 r rede i a ater. DOES GR OW HAIR
was-Mr. J. W. B. Chenery. lon the defensive in the face of} ae see z i
— ‘won the toss, skipper | Trinidad’s excellent ground field-| : “bee tieaiteiess retail Use Pure Silvikrin in severe cases of dandruff and '
Greves'eiected to bat on 2 perfect | ing and steady Dow tus. ed] : thinning hair. As a daily restorative dressing use
wicket though the gimosphe *| Pha ag Been Pe gemene| - : Footballer Silvikrin Hair Tonic Lotion containing Pure Silvikrin the
was fairly heavy. [oe ers aes ra | ‘ r ¥ bi Pa “i ; a
Colin Bonitto and Vincent Lums-| wicket without addition to a M ial m Can Breaks Contract Hair’s Natural Food. From all chemists, hairdressers aug
den operied the innings, the form-| Pn ete Celt’ winart a pes axt ROME, Jan. 25 Silvikrin Laboratories Ltd., Londen, N.W.10, England,
» from Prior Jones,| of his fou over tos e| : ; . 25. ;
- aaa oe ee | well up which was cleverly flight- 2 Fi The Italian Football Federation a
se A ve pees es eo to beat and bowl Lumsden wno} is or was ex ed to decide today what Z -
4 ito ¢ bail - ai - der fac-| Played back defensively. | i s nition . would take in the case
e ee — Cs ate ou _| Lumsden scored 20 during his | Titles of Argentine footballer, Mario
ing was ; wa 8.4 a appeni | 63-minutes stay at the wicket He ! wo Boye, who left Genoa Club yester- KEEP BABY
armen oy tk o wi ket was ‘di - | hit three fours. The score was now day, and returned to Buenos Aires.
ai a core | 31—2—20. Neville Bonitto join CINCINNATTI, Jan. 25 The board of directors of Genoa
a Lona n-drove the next ball Rickards and played out the ovr) ‘er Sam Becker| Club, after meeting late seat night,
i_ ms nist» ji ly Hg mo giving Ferguson a maiden wicke: an exclu-| sent a telegram to the Federation ON TOP OF
ee econ wet singles, the} Atkinson's three overs ic Maxim’s| in Rome denouncing his depar-
es eA eke yr ; but three s. Ramadhin making wed that the} ture.
over yielding 7 runs re tas. etnies oy ea int ‘ , dy
i > R= ' ‘lie | his w in Intercolonial cricke - heavyweigh The board was today studying
i er er et oe in tig gl is coached by Barbados’ Clarence] «tant im. aie de aie when he] what further action it could take. THE WORLD
‘rap. Some late inswingers kest| Skinner of Intereolonial fame.| “An from now on we SLIGHTEST effect on our riea, would be} It alleges that Boye’s departure
| Sonitt t rc k cas hike wicket n w cheers when he sent dow: | shart be able to provide the decision to rescue steel ‘ror promotion means that he has broken his
the Gutentive at d he took en. In his next over sumptuous —- os the clutches of incompete ut ans.” said Becker.| contract. ON’S ;
: 1g BC SOK ol Rickards swept him past the finc ore. free enterpr ight Ezzard : '
maiden over from Gomez. The| Rickards swept hin — rs ee r Seed The Genoa Club is reported t JOHNS BABY
next over from Jones, Lumsden | leg boule ty scures he celebrated ee | Charles tor the other is| have paid £8,888 to his er
turned one well up neatly to tho; en -ehagparnd ee 2 od ee ; ad sonst <- Moore for} club for his services. ‘
square leg boundary and then on} tits with pulling @ most one | a well-timed late cut for Kid John To i vt Pig f Boye has scored 12 goals for POWDER 2 Sizes 3le. & 60c.
Grove for three. ee ee, ee el a h 1 ont se said, the| Genoa since he joined them.
Bonitto Out four. In the next ove, from| Ganteaume was seoring muce either + » Bove left by air for Buenos
a ey Se n was nearly| more freely then. is score was t id be held in Cincinnatti ’ : ith his
Bonitto facing played back an’ tear o . 4 , . " . i 6° " Aires yesterday evening wil is “c |
a late outswinger from Jones “4 ‘Molly catch| who was TL Btollmeyer pulled a ig tjae CK |r __ wite and mother, 9nd Bre Ane JOHNSON’S BABY SETS
did not cover up sufficiently, on at short fine| full one from Valentine to square . + aes lay, wife of another © :
ball taking the edge of the — i Osnd the bath| leg for two, sending up 50 in 57 Midday Sut Sold player on the Genoa Club’s books. ee th ae th be
for wicketkeeper Guillen aos his leg minutes. Ganteaume was 32 and 2 cian tee 26 Rorhe newspapers said that he e ideal gi or e new-bdorn
© SPRRREN GEECD Re ee een. ched 20 with a, Stollmeyer 18 i = y Sol: rio 5ut ot] booked the plane seats when the
ad runs weer 2 pew Soet ov oo ; Dy la out oF
“- wenitto hed scores 3 , seis runs. The first}, Next over Iffla, bowling much "i Epsom] Genoa Club came to Rome to play
the total was 1 { t : five more ruts | better, sent down a maiden to the Rome Club on Sunday. When a 2bee
the wieest Se vere ed to the score when,)Ganteaume. Ganteaume late cut his team returned to Genoa after
“ t 55 The| the third ball of Valentine’s next being beaten 3—0, Boye said that
. ; r beautifully to the boundary he wanted to stay on in Rome te
ee erate or 4. The score was then 55 arches agree ; ins , -~AT
ke the : see his mother off to Argentina. | I
Seen hae | Mudie relieved Iffa at the farm sia . hie wife haindead rom aaaedl AMM J. DENT TOOTH
one mye lend. Stollmeyer tickled the last He and his wi "
play before lunch lball of the over neatly off the plane.
vo nit t | , —Reuter. T PASTE ‘ie,
eS it <9! pad te the fine leg boundary for pe POW DER POWDER i He
not out 13 Before | four Ifa only changed ends, ~ PASTE & Ee
c over of mu | carrying on in place of Valentine
from the pavilion end. ghee 4 s
rer tune, Trinidad gained}, Play closed for the day B.B.C. Radio 7
RP a Trinidad 63 without loss, eke. “a } a
% poms 40 and Stollmeyer 23 maaan a Programme AVE 0 “
ee a i bre | ne : : PERALTY OC 2b): 3 WEDNESDAY JANUARY 26 1950 "a
ar . , a MAICA’S ist INNINGS 5 MA Ranei Cr. :
i two quick wickets si < ‘ : By M. Harrison-Gray : 1 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m. News 10, 11, 12 +, BROAD STR
kards and get ing| : ed ouny. Grape am : Dealer ruth : snalysis; 7.15 a.m, Sporting Record; 7.: ia
i for a ducl fia . : East-*Vect same : Music Magazine; 7.45 a.m. Gen- ——$——$_
” mped for a Guck. | = — Ferguson 20 | s N : Speaking; 8 a.m From the ——_—_—_——
The remaining batsmen held ot x Bickarts 2 Ramadhir 4 : 3 : . ials. 8.10 a.m, Programme Purade
Jogged|; 2 1 bow!- ae Sere 36 : a = Is m. ive Becke; 8.30 4 00
oggedly wars ane Trin sed w en| J. Groves « Mega b Jones 17 ; : “ : 862 : to Read: 8.45 a og British Masterpieces
ers were definitely on top RED) G. Mudie stpd. Guillen (wkpr.) b Carded for ght 1 : Q9864 = |s a.m. Close Down; 12 noon The News; :
the tea interval was taken Jamaica is Ramadhin ... ©} week is the eig 3 Q3 : 12.10 p.m. News Analysis; 12.15 p.m See US for the following a $9 i
t 9 wickets for 150 runs. | fio" Sones b Ramadbin | contest bety : é : |New Recres: Tab pm, Radio News LETTER BALANCES; WIRE TRAYS; Wil
- a in — H_ Fuller 1.t J 2 | Guiana, and : Oars : reel, 1.30 p.m. Take it from ware ETS: CASH BOXES—different sizes
after tea erg Valentine ¢ Guillen (wkpr.) b the Bearded : : |2 pm. The News; 2.10 p.m. Home ’ c NY . SCA
bowling from the , Bamadhin 5 6 | 7 : aa t : @52 : News from ‘Britain 2.15 p.m. Sport Also: SPRING BACK BINDERS; FOO Us ,
d Ifa turned a full Kentish mt out SP aes #19752 ¢ | Review; 2.30 p.m. Radio Theatre LETTER SIZE :
‘ square leg boundary —s Fh : s : Dally servi at” | , Phithar- —_————— 4
¢ ’ Ss Ss Sew ——| ing forward t c e : : aily rvice; 5 n m4 - F
f Total int hemes i AQ8> ? | monia Orehestra; 5 p.m. Listeners ROBERTS & CO.
F from the | Kid . : AK 53 $ | Choice; 5.15 p.m. Programme Parade; | \ os SS
a” : . F { kets: 1 for 14, 2 for 32.| id - 7 . 7 : 5.20 p.m. Generally Speaking; 5.45 p.m.
Vv took a for 99; 4 for 99; 5 for $8; 6 for 120;| Cotton is giv : AK 108 : Tom Jones Trio; 6 p.m. Australia Calls; ——~——
i > face. The|7 1 %6; 8 for 137; 9 for 150 | ring partners a : 3 | 6 50 p.m. Interlude: 7 p = ane wearers T A
teas” She BOWLING ANALYSIS OF hae : na 17.1 m. News Analysis; p.m, We ; Z 7
ae ae ee : ox R. W | throws leathe us : 1 : ey Britain; 7.48 Dm. Merchant Navy MAKE iT A BAT: ”
oan ’ “ °o M R. W.} no uncerte fas : $ | Newsletter; 8 p.m Ne Ean #
e t took the eage 18 g : | cavs the competent Lex . * |»om. The Fight Aga t xe: ‘ 4
— + stis held an oaay 5 Rg rays tee. camperent & : ? | The News; 9 10 p'm. Home News from ¥ /
n at sup hel - " a 3 youngster se¢ ns € 5 1 : | Britair 9.15 p.m British Political t
“ vo lee g Ferguson 20 4 st 2 | by a K.O., and he is prepare = game-den 2 | Weeklies; 9.20 p.m. Ray Martin 0 om '
iffla red | amaica inmings | Ramadhi 1 61 39 5 c m to the limit § Club is co $ | Meet the Commonwealth; 10 p.m +
vere closed at 155 runs, no ade in , . 0 peck : be Bess 7 ‘ . — Di ar 1 s | Gundy Mav Sec t the Theatre Organ; FOOTWEAR FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
907 minutes _ RRINIDAD’S ist INNINGS PY a ee ; S Was : South : | 10.45 p.m. Special Dispatch; 11.p.m. The
8 eae ¥ a Ganteauiic A Ganteaume {not out 40 | Marine is leaving nothing oe s . 6| News
; . ne . Ltolimeyer an santeal 1€ | J. Stolimeyer mot out) z ‘hance, and is paying | a : st
4 - f opened the Trinidad first innings | Extras 0 prt an eamiuina ‘ | 8 CE Ee PSS, THE
j . on at a - = at 4.20 p.m. “ Ganteaume took i Total ifor o wkt.) ~ 63 first class trim, wher nA ¥ } : tor ; i) 39 JALITY
t % at cover W!-h' strike from Kentish who began | ——J| into the ring. 5 ae | ZEPHIRIN’S QU BRITISH a
a n abs 6 ~ bowling at a good pace from the | BOWLING ANALYIS : There is sure to be a great fight & ian hie a 2 li BAKERIES RIVED
ur of pls farm end. It was an impressive i... ° u B W-1 without a dull mon for t 3 tk aa i Swan & Roebuck Streets |
‘ : ae Yiopening with oct-swingers and Puller 5 who attend the Yankee St 2 y % 10 1) ad J
‘ and his ft ' in-swingers. Kentish sent Gown. | Valentin, i 21 : ‘ ok o 15 announces the arrival of asa
} a maiden Ma 6 2 2 :
; Bouncer Fuller opened from the pavilion yruaie . . ' i ’
oh. Jones hammered the last bal!|end. Stollmeyer got off the mark Q —- ') i | r
ty ¥ of his sixth over and Rickards wos | with a push to silly mid-on for a uarantine d I} ‘ js K | T me for the New
Be ee struck on the forearm “ut appa’-|single. Next over Ganteaume The Weather \ cin & (aster I) n |
} ently was unhurt. With the : »\ turned one well up from Kentish . ite Llaacca 1) j 1) :
at 26 for one, Ferg reli¢ to the deep fine leg boundary. . TODAY Athlete Released \{ |} DESK DIARIES; PLATIGNUM PENS; PENCIL SBIS™®
Gomez at the screen end, Gornz Stollmeyer took four off Fuller |} SUS cen eds'o La wears i
had bowled five overs for five russ| With a glance off his pad to the Sets: 6. tone - [ \ UITS;
and had sent down three meidene /square leg boundary. Moon (First Quarter) Janu- Another Detained i |) FORD'S ASSORTED SWEET BISCUITS; GENTS
x Pergusor , { Pear am i m
st én ee ees *! With the score at 19, useful left Lighting: 6.30 p.m. KARACHI, Jan. 24 } England’s No. 1 Sugar PURSES and WALLETS; LADIES’ PURSES
t eueitets ee d Lumsder d or | Pull Alfred Valentine relieved High Water: 9.06 a.m.,, 952 Martin Jooste, South Afr { Refiners. { r
— ee ee ee a “| Puller at the pavilion end. Easy p.m. Empire Games avnlet ) t HARMACY
ele y take & single Off the last baie ice | action and a good length was YESTERDAY leased from quarantine \} Order early to avoid disap: {|| COSMOPOLITAN P -
iat A a on ug ig Gouble chane®,| shown in the first over. In the Rainfall (Codrington) .26 day } pointment, a2 only » limited { : 4441 ~ ; ‘
j _—— jee brought - hs, second over Valentine had both an ; Ian de Jongh, tt S \ quantity is available. Day Phones: 2041 — pi
1 end in ace 0 Jones} batsme . » To r ont! Tes a ea at ) . ”
Shade Rance: wer Geckotieri eel es an es net i. ry ene to Yester African held since | \ Specify PUMPHREY’S \ BARRA
$i In the next over, Fer; t shat ; € ighte ie . i still in quarantine and | } : neemgn SSS
: patered wer, guene roug?t|one and an unsuccessful appeal qeesneeene (Min.) 70.0° F. {ito Auckland, New Zeal } lend
ci gasps from the crowd by| was made for a stump. emperature Max.) 81.5° F. he Camis én Eeidas a
Le TH diving forward in a magnificeat) Two balls later, Ganteaume Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E., ee een - IT IS GOOD VALUE ! fi
i ont to porn a cate 7 wat | nee 2 high lucky stroke through wit VE hal i ¥. dposia, 35-year-old welverweight : :
Py , uppish stroke from Rick-| slips for four n locity: miles per wrestler, and de Jong og
; ards that dropped inches from| Iffla now relieved Kentish at hour old high jumper et | Rediffusion Pr yamine ee aa Gee d Blue at $1.35 per sh
wh, his outstretched hand ‘the sereen end and Ganteaume cut Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.026; because af faults in their | meneAy sen 26th 1950. in White, Gold, Pink an
: j ne-har i 1 - a faver . : 0: j
ii i it cet os yg field by high through slips for four. The (3 p.m.) 29.901 fever inoc ulation ye vos Gtude Service | SPUN, RAYON in White, Gold, Green & Brown at 2
13) son at mid-oon robbed next over off the same bowler he Col. Jaffar, ) i 20— 8.00 Morning Special i4 at $)
Cundecs of ‘id | “9:15 Songtime \\{ SPUN LINEN in White, Grey, Gold & Rose #
Jooste ‘ : ee eee
? = 1.1 Programme Parad proof
ij South Af er | is — Crease Resisting and Shrunk
4 siven an he w cor- | 3.45— 4.00 ue isical Varieties i
} : etly i | 4 t. ladies. don’t or 2 eee, > 5
eae De Jong! ‘ } nobody move, OK Sadie o— 6.30 Seiten ee BROADWAY DRESS we
t i ; ; what bargain d'you ;
4) ; ant? 6.20 7.00 oe”
| : b 7.0 ot dea Perr ‘ §
ria ised i na Lond ézp s Wipe Roodal Theatres x PPPS SIS OF POGIS
} aid.—Reuter. rage ee - 7.30— 745 Dick Haymes Show if
0 presented by Bor- ° e e e § ‘ a
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PACK I THK BARBADOS \D\OC \TI THI H-MiAY JANVAU lr..krt t $popts Yarfcliaaj. aWaanaj. r. TRIMDAD ROUT JAMAICA FOR PALTRY 155 RUNS Ramadhin Bags Five For 39 O. S. COMMN) PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 25. Sam Ramadhin, 2->ear-old Indian right-arm slaw sp.\ plaved the major part in Tni.iu.sas routing of Jamaica for i runs in just three and a half hours' play as the first Trinidad-Jamaica Test opened at Queen's Park Oval today Ramadhin secured a bag of five wickets for 33 runs in UP overs Tnnidar with all her wickets intact, u-plied with 63 .>U>\ The wicket was perfect the crowd was estimated to be 7.000. John Goddard arrived here to-dav to witness the Jarr.aicaTnindid Tests Alee arriving for the games WSt Vr J W B Chenery Harms won tie io Grove* eieeted t" bal on a perte-.: the aunospne e was IVColin Bonnie and Vincent U-m,den opened :.-. i tr taking it ike from I' bowling from the larm en i Bon. IV took off the first ball and Luraader. la Ins *** beattn b> late ou'swinger from Jones An appe.i for %  ealcn at the wicket waa dnaOowsd Lusaaden or.-drove V to the lefr of mid-or. for four a. d both bmtaman look singlet, t is over yielding 7 runs. Gomez owled from the pavili n errd to four fieldsmen in the 1 8 trap Some late ln*ir.gers Y< >\ Bonltto back oi, his wicket the defensive and he took maiden over from Gomez. Tnt next over from Jonea. Lumsd* turned one well up neatly to In square lac boundary and then i drove for th:e*. Boniit< (In' Botutto facing played back '.swinger frum Jones b-it did not rover up suffiaantly. tba ball taking the adge of the bat for wwketketver Guillen to take I confidant oaten oetiind the wicket Bor.itio had scored I runs and the total was 14 He bad beer at m* wicker fo15 minutes and played out the over mediate confidence Th* next ovrRlckards of four rune but gave rerguson bis fl.it maiden ovei Th betarnen ware now leSmtei. ve in the face oi excellent ground fielding and steady bowuefc. The first hour's play produc-i wicket without addition to lhi re guton with of bis fourth over tossed one well up which was cleverly flightxJ to beat and bowl Lumsden wn %  > played back defensive!.* Lumsden scored 20 during Ml 63-mlnutes stay at the wicket He hit three lours. The score was no./ 31— 2—20. Neville BOM.' %  leas a -id played out Use ov i giving Ferguson a maiden wickf Atkinson's threa ovei runs Ramad! li his bow Ml ersew. is coarhei by B lal (inw. He drew cheers when he sent dowi. a maiden In his next over Rickards wept him past the fine leg boundary fofour runs sfl enter double figures he celebrated rt one -.1? Fersuion to deep mid-or. for four I: Ramadhin. Bonitto wi, nearly rut He played back t, :,d put up a • ing Choon a? leg did not see ar.d the ba'l Rickards reached 20 with a backdrive for Jour runs. The first STOPPMfi: ALL STATIONS TO BANKRUPTCY by Commrngs 'as* oboal SStSSffSSf wvaa aVIcr' Sftsr !• as Mr. Oreewaood aaag, £ id. ore onto meomnmlen tymboti r don't exycBntUh Aailrayt fo be ran JUST iv lie eeaeli *r r*e tnvellme tmbUcf a, ii= %  : % %  aSaaaj •vroam Freddie Mills Will Retire LONDON. Jan. 25. Ted Broadribb, managar of Freddie Mills, who lost his World Lightheavyweignt Title to the American Joey Maxim at tarli Court Stadium here or. Tuesday, saw today; "You east take it a? almost certain tttafl '.•>'' night was fight." -1 am going to do my best to persuade rum to give up the fight game. Freddie baa had a good run He has always given the crowd I their money's worth, and has been J a good champion.'' Broadribb. Mills' manager and father-in-law informed Jack Solomons, the London promoter. -. *ia% that following a family conference at which both Mill* and his wife. Christie, were present, the former World Lightheavyweight Champion, said that be was retiring from the ring. Solomons said: "I think that Mills' decision is a wise one from IOK I thanh be eoJe to oeoptaV the saassfaeas re/ti'iasenrj Of be lore.mftm i SLIGHTEST • decision to retcue tle*l 'ram lAe rr*'<' •ixical trtTT*" 1 Batpi %  %  I executed a well-bmed late cut for four Gantcaume was scoring much more freely then. His score was S0 as compared with Stollmeyer who was 14 Stolbneyer pulled a full one from Valentine to square leg for two. sending up 50 in 57 minutes Ganteaume waa 32 and Stollmeyer IB Next over Iffla. bowling much 1 ,K.K.^ K IS—1 Tie •light shower aid no damage, out ltd not take the field only one minute remained for play before lurch the third ball of Valentine's next over beautifully to the boundary for 4. The score was then 55 Mudie relieved IfRa at tbe farm end Stollmeyer tickled the last oafi of the over neatly off the Rickards was not ... 0 tM flM leg boun^rjfo tao not out led 55 runs 13 Beforr ; gamea %  %  -oaca 31 runs .i-break t getung I fur a duck The remair.ing batsmen held on loggediy but the Trinidad bowtU4) on top When [ ihe *.*a interval was ui. .jad los* S wickeu for 150 runs Kentish the last man in went Iffla after tea Jones [ >pened the bowling from the farm end and Iffla turned a full ,aare leg boundary runs Ferguson bowled from the • ash too* • i,nd sent lffla to face. The i straight down the • %  • ;o a leg spinner on the off •tump The ball took the edge and Jones at slip held an easy Iffla scored 14 Jama. ere closed at 1M runs, made in i nuts* meyer and Ganteaume 'opened the Trinidad flrst innings p.m. Ganteaume took %  trike from KanUsh wno began iiowling at a good pace Sram the tarm end. It was an impressive •--* r ingers and Ki .',-ii aaat down a maiden Be—tar a the pavilion Jaaws liatawasriii Use last bt.i nat Stollmeyer got off the mark of bis nxth over and Rukards w. with a push to silly mid-on for a struck on the torearn* ut appa -]single Next over Gunie-ui.c sally was unhurt Witr. me ^cv e turned one wail up from Kentish St M for oca, Fergus,he d **P fln ! boundary. Gomez at the k^Umeyef took four off Fuller %  sd bwwtad • : ... i .. *"'"' '-"^ ^ %  i'• ' --' aad had sent : 1"*" lc K boundary r £ CV ^J* knWnt W, .7 r *''" w h We score at 19. useful left on the off stump made ([l d Valentin. cautious and Lumsde.. aWjf „ lhr p,vt uon end j^y take a aingle off the 1-i( L gih was Completing a SoubJ n the Atkinson was brought on i ... had both the farm end In place He beat whose flgures were 6—1-21 wlth wel [ m^htcd In the next over. Ferguson broug K i QM aad an unsuccessful appeal as made for a slump Two balls later. Ganteaume Sfort t, sake MM a high lucky stroke through of an uppish stroke from Rick[ sups for four. %  t dropped inches from Iffla now relieved Kbit outstraSokad hand 'the screen end and Ganteaume cut '•handed field '.. high through aUps for four. The Atkinson at nuaV<*m robbed next over off the same bowler he four lffla only changed ends. arrying on in place of Valentine from the pavilion end. Play closed for the dav %  •.:, Trinidad 63 without loss. Ganaume 40 and Stollmeyer 23 Scores: — JAM Ml * IM BflHISM • Sor.illo c CulUva wkpr i I ItuiMK' %  >>arah b Jn*a Ciuitim wkar i Kid John To FightJatkDick Maxim Can Fight For Two Titles .Ni INNATTI. Jjn J5 fcrnii promoltr Sam Bcltr .jd an cxclu...iured lhal uie nrsl Bt. when h %  America, would be ;*ld under %  s ,P rom u Jf' K ^ k r ..-.* said Becker • in -.oSihiEaarc • ship, and the other n • Archie Moore for %  eight "He" .-.-. he said, the Id In Cmcinnam %  Middaj Sun Sold i Sclano out 01 lha 1937 Er*om .cher and J. C their Alton Lodj? liltrict oi l and will arrive ir .fore the 195u Ihe only other By M. Har;.son Grav Oealri Bair tng Gomez, took with a ad cover dnv e fofour off ai. pitched one. Riikardi was "ft Use mark in the next over with eiegaot covn drive off Jo.". Oas second be) over. R*ck-i another graceful cov> %  clever wrjtwork saeidii in the first haaf aou: Gomes now settled do* overs yielded threa auidens %  I far tt: | far M % %  for in. S for 110 *K.WL1J*G ANALYSIS HI IKNtNGa laiMitAi. %  .mo inoi hll> JOHN Carded for Tu. week is the light-heavy weight %  ^tenders an training and enth.. Ing forward to a keen... ixwit. Cotton Club, is ring pari' %  %  %  %  On the Marine Is leaving nothin I i ing. %  without a dull The Weather TODAY Sun Rlaea: S.Zt a.m. ->un Seta. S.M p.m. MWUM lu.i Quarterl Jai ujr. {• 1 i.hliru M f.m Huh Hater: IH am ? s; p m. 11 MIKIIAl K.uirall 1 ...lnu. 1,.n ... UUI tut Monlll lu Vi.t-|. da): 3.23 Ilia. Irmprralurc IMki 1) i Trmpcraturr Maa.l ll.S i Hind IHrcctiun |9 a.m.) I p.m.) li.. N. Hind 1.1... 11. 17 mile. per hour lUmmeter: (9 a.m.l M.9M; 13 ami 2I.M1 w. J J109J J9 4>AK1I0! + 64 V I 2 J S 91 t 01 &f I j.mii Thcyll Do It Every Time Uuaraiilinrd Vthlotr Releued -Another Detained Jooste, South %  Ian de Jonh. the ot : i ••till in i)v %  old lu. Col J. Gneral Jooste was r^atsased South A %  a> A Q I ; %  AISI 4> I ... awl forcing T%  % %  me-derr %  Ea.t u-' f -naltv T. who left Genoa Club yesterSSB/, and returned to Buenos Ares. The board of directors of Genoa Club, after meeting laie last night, sent a telegram to the Federal .or. Rome denouncing his departure. The board was today studying what further action it could take li alleges that Boye's departunmeans that he has broken hi contract. The Genoa Club is reported tt have paid {8,888 10 his former club for his services. Boye has scored 12 goals for Genoa since he Joined them. Boye left by air for Buenos Airea yesterday evening with his wife and mother, and Mrs. Aballav. wife of another Argenune player on the Genoa Club's books. Rome newspapers said that he booked the plane seats when ihe Genoa Club came to Rome to play lbs Rome Club on Sunday. When Big team returned to Genoa after being beaten 3—0, Boye said that be wanted to stay on in Rome tt r-l. 1 P n Tad. il from Her. 1 a m The Nawi. 3 10 P ' "on" N from BrIUln. S IS P m_Spon | SS p in Badlo %  HMPK 4 10 p m Tiv Osilv 5-rvlc*. 4 IS p monli Orehawtt.. S o m LAjUn CHOW*. Ill pn Proarantin*' Parwlo %  -•wnlly Speakina. 5 * Pm T^m JonsTMu. S p m AiiaUalvC.1U. 10 p m Inlorlud*: T p m Th*. Nr* 7 10 %  m New* Analysts. Tllpm Wo c Bniain :apm Merthanl Navy Nr.ilenr: B p m Had* Nrairwl; S.19 B m The nh' Aaamal Plasue 9 m 10 [, m Home N-. bt" PMUari Fotiurai %  u p m Hay M-riin. 10 p m Meet loo Oommonwoalth. 10 X _p m 'ronoat al ihe T %  -• DOES GROW Lse Pure Silviknn in severe case* of dandruff a thinning hair. As a daily resiorative dreuing i Silviknn Hair Tonic L**ion oxiUining K ^A, K ,^ ^ Hgir* Njli.rml Food. From all rhemitl\. halrdreaert Sil.ikrla l.aboraiorles Ltd., Loadaa. N.W.ig. Eagiw KEEP BABY ON TOP OF THE WORLD JOHNSON'S BABY POWDER 2 si t 31c. & 60c. JOHNSONS BABY SETS the ideal gift for the newborn — ALSO — AMM-I-DENT TOOTH PASTE & POWDER SXSR CAVESHEPHERD&CO, BROAD STrUBS In Time for the New Yeai!| UtSK DIARIES; PLATIGMM TINS: PENCH. %  ASSUKTEU SHEET BISCIUS: 0W' riBSES and WALLETS; LADIW •• COSMOPOLITAN PHARMACY %  aat IT IS GOOD VALUE! SILMYltA CREPE DE (HIM — in White. Gold. Pink and Blur al SL " SPIN. RAYON In White. Gold. Grefl """ SPIN LINEN In ll. Ot. Gold i •' "* Crew KNlatlni and Shrunk Ptoal IIKOAUWAS UIIK.W' W a 1 • DISPA wmmmmfnamm ww iMi B aaijtci hja %  mamtiui n QUAUTT )0t on In 25: 1)1. „ U1K1 kai iiui •„ ,„ . i.i %  MPBM -TiaHa W. 8.MONBUI kOO l IH CMrtMHan Building Materials in Stock tit SNOWCRETE CEMENT HI m lb. dmmt COLORCRETE CEMErfT in IT.", ill .v II"> %  -"'""' CEMENT 112 lb. druiaa COLORCRETE in .%  n. CEMENT 8i T,LES r„%  While. Urd. t'hocolaf "" 0 TILES WILKINSON & m -: PI



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n ISDAV JAM ARY 28, ltM CLASSIFIED ADS. THE BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN FOR HEVF HOUSE; nil saB %  *". "oithini. gTIBK CHAPMAN PIXCUES1 | I'OEC.MX presents IIMI'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMllliiiiiuiUUUiiniL. %  SS-an fl startling portrait of^ Yi U = as seen by %  | | ,H item, of different c la*. I Seat Ion "*,, wiu epareie Hl )M( 1 lit ii %  '< IT %  1 — -.,-mrr will remain; Mpil) hop* "' heart a hope to lii'f. again jhant Manhall iwlll Marlon Mai X I 50— In I taring memory of our dear belove.l u^-ii,* DOLOd MA. .A' OO i iMiiir Win day ol January i*4 If!of eedn !" -i^l nvt teara * *>" %  B "ant fnOU-U --WO %  %  TVtf 1ate Ion* and lecrM grave kajtg he <)" iord that laxrth E be the ii'i (lul O-VP in the I 3*-an .ilrir Ugm >nd iU vt-rueneee. Apply Mr. '•hone BSM. "WATERI-onui Savannah I IIMV furnlihed / iiarv Mai 1330 franc Cbaa) aMBSfl 1 D Hrt..., 1 JO a-, -Haatini:* mea? Gai !V.Ll-.,hV %  %  -,:!.: .•liable from l pe, I M %  1 i _—I • brurtV eternal ell lived everybody ^^ dim * *n r.r •: Ban her ivK Muriel. Even 1, lilm 1.. i*n I' % %  "i. Halph sdtntlsts E >m*jland sketched = Mr i iSS e nl n i d< "' mu r ""^ ""^ *"' ">• !" rtos parts ol the, anger of the missing arm. body „ e and .haTThrv !" r the same reason a person • fount. Without this running IN TOT stbou. ssau, H J<,<^. Vn kUnuau. Sch Un M. U*U. Sell. JlsneU W. Sniih. Vh Url„, B,e olf'. Sen. Reeinaid N Wallace Srh Ifart. B>.,.iu Vaeht ll~>lr. Sen. EiMiravour W Hch. Itarca Oa Oro. M V T R Radar. Sell. Emaialda. Hch. OarOenu W. Sch Adalma.. Sen llt> Am lawry. AEaU\'AtS M V Ladr Jr. 4S tona n*. Capi I'araona. Irom SI 1-ueia. Af*ni< n I. Johnaon Eaa. %  %  I arlislsUur b* II W 1 A L Alii* (VHlCBPtV. ton* HM, Capf. ..-_. i n„ ,.,rf | Ajwiuachoon' Aaaoruauai. V-nadiM,. 3.U1 uma net. Capi ia.. from GrtnMU; A|wii C-> Oata •V Co Lid. %  it I*AKII MS i-sanedian. 3.1U toni nal.-CW. Weila.. for I^piOon, Aimic D' Cb*u & Co.. I4l. I Dyiiort. I.IM tona i^„ c-pi -n.-raldaen. for Trinidad, A|ent; T 7hum Ud. %  O'HUWina.. Carman Da Oaatro. 1 oBfni Ittni Frbmarr Keep ihla D,,. „_._ D'ARCV A SCOTT TOMOTIVE lira. AppU lorn. S J. p CM I Vaiulull IH7 M MitlhtM <...,. 21 I ao-4jn l Saloon 1931 nit, coiidillon. Appi: -Hilo 1 30 -in j UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER D-ARCY A. SCOTT. Aucdoneer. -—-^—-__ M.I .-4n. %  D PREFECT 1*8 I randlllon MlleaKo Wr Uaraie Dial— I. SO—in DFORU 17 I*. Btli* uaed .in tr -wrap acaa I—alia Com".. DEUVERY VAN I In A-I t-oiHlHuiii *iin Hcdlord Truc> Uarufr 21.10-*i. —t-OUe Style Maaier praMtl One T'nu!:u. ClwvrI in good %  L H. C. Trolman, Mapp Hill. IWael SB 1 50— 2n %  CTRiCAL In 'Ue real OQ^, im nands ml ... leli" ,h .'" lb ^ Hut tha ^odi such parta m our .ffiSr iffi m her ti.au iheir proper^napi; 10 We us# nands and ihumlw more umn feet and luiwrs. H5 mucfi blgSjM in tiie Body Image. Hence, toa the faniaji. cilTy ouUize Head and cnorSiS UPjL self explains why anj'one who Has lost a limb may still "feel" it. The Dratn-reiirciion of an arm or lev may remain vivid Ionic %  ner ita real counterpart has Thus when a London doctor gave an injection U a 50-year-old man whose rignt arm had Dem amputated 10 years before, the %  nan said be could Itel a tingling wltii a paralysed arm may get the sensation that it is waving about althoiiKh he can sec It hanging by his side. Phantom clues The location and siiape of the various part* of the Bodv Imaac arc being mapped by three mam methods:— I Prospecting with electrical recording insirumenia over *ne grey matter ol people who nave to undergo brain operations ud give permission lor the ex penmenta—which are harmJca*. 2 Noting the erTecta ol localised patS£ dam c I*-!*** 3 studying the "phant ^satlona ol peoplv ang Umba. What use Is (he Bodv Image ? ?JSS n ? c ' rlu "> 'hat noraiai ido nouia oe impossible without iu The Image ran DO visualised as a television picture, which Jtet-ps the brain infonned ol exactlytorn nenbmVI lolt hi brain could not coordinala the body's moverrhnU. Brain damage, believed to nave Injured the Body Image, caused ne man to "forget" he had a leli side to his body. He would repeatedly wash only hu right side and forget to put on his left trouser-leg. sock, and shoe. Iu another case of this ivrw tat sflaM an ^> rsMattfoui tba. the patient could not be hit arm l>elongcd to liliu when he was shown iL Aid to flying ? Perhaps people who are exceptionally deft .n their movements irnnt rank (ootballers and filthier pilots, for instance—are born with a more .-iTJcieut mechanism linking the bodv and its bnim image than averagely clumsy folk. Research on the Bodv Image 1< being urgently pressed forward Puse [t seems to be deeply lose—the relief of pam. Many doctors believe that the main focus of intense pain Is ln ihe Body image. The pain jou' icTi m your arm may really bel m the arms mental miniature. The fact that It Is Impossible to feel pain in some internal, organs which srem to hav. nol counterpari in tiie Bodv Image. suongly supporu this theor>. ^ Yogi secret Some children who a:e iruenMIII Though otherwise normal, probably have some mr-i In the Body Image a dominant, as proved by theiri proneness to aerioui acctdenu. Vogla. fakirs, and tire-walkers' l owr bM lumgu so iha; not leel M-ounds and burns. iThe meorv also explains vhv bo pain is felt when bn.;: •sell is rut : (here is no eountatpan of tne brain in the Bodj 3WV,TKT~ ,cn Hrr unu for thewutun wow in ihe port rail. London Ixpress Service' . *^ a aaaaaa.B.. v-rf IMWII *** 'M ai .^. : AnlonieU Cta-lnoe, BLanca A. Mu,lT4. „ *MM *L Boucaud, Alma Gordon, nvnoalo Romero Mark Deemond BaghlU. noaanare King. Max? Stone. Narenlene K^iry-ld Muhelin,. Herbart D..wnc. Krwili ilatljii NaUo. Joyca Xavier. j.,-,,, Chffocd llanh Mary rvajB, Shirley M.rque.. Mary OXFAETt BBS by BWIAL %-uaha.n. Wend-. MacKa> YWtta xavan In nUNIDAD ; % %  "*' fjg*h, J*" 1 — WUaon. Maw Joan Roll*, M>. David i^o**£Xr. l.-m IU.in->H OIIANA rud*-> Mah.U. Sir rrwd-XTKlt. Mr DraIbron. Mr.. V Baron.. MM morda, Mr li..il IteVerteuil, Mj* A Baron. Mlai M Itojcr DeVerteuil MM W. Uaron. Mi-. J n^ii,-,. Ml Georae RryanL Mia. J DaNn.. MUj. Uipe.. Mia II r .r BUUTtSH Ut'IAMA ..n-nfl Mr A. Harbour. .Mr. M BarMr. .Vellie MaoCunncll, Mf*. Ruby "'u "> %  J 9r**"Mr """^ f""Wilng. Mr Brnct Oot.ldtM. M,. Slwl s?^?*, H Z n.O^nv. Mr K l/M>aH Wre*w. Mia. Keren Leea-Mn. ^•Keiiile. Mr I. CM MI M Ckave-ra, .\lvre Ureathead., Mi. John FlaWher, •aaion. air. A IliuUen. Irene Mn Ulancnv Fletcher. V" AjuUe I MilapVeriniil. -a*T Mr. Ulou nryant. Mr. ... t '€At ESTATE IXKTON -o,,-8^. well known and in.i.so-an iK.uou. four bedroorm two hii-h* %  Issl ll al U, water. ol trJ^ea MT-. (SaVta touuag Uch, ,., ^^^"v'igi! table Garden. S mile, from Bridget^.,, "' „£"" %  •"• %  J"> Enquiry s7"d,flelda SI. Prter Phone Ul-so „ r ,, n •mlaa. Oardan, s*. Jama. St.I..*i5n. aUTI.NTi PLANT Die Mkng i'i..ui Kw ii.ni %  ea no m m.< J Hmfjply. Eleelr.! S-i.e •1 %  aeti mim. 13 Kphaa*. t> TFA1K i:t i nn> ^ %  7and K..nu VPT wAgHna kaUafaMan JMN F HtTSON LTD %  STOCK OHOKSK m A 1 rondltti %  •, Mapp Hill. St Mlth* :*>—a. KT %  "** PUPPY iDogi. 4'v %  ola I'cdisree .upplled. ReglaI ai Hi. Kennel Club. London aa KViin,-iii ii G Froat,. suin•^dgr. Hiai-k 1U* 2S 1 SO--1 TltK BANTANS" With the land i.rno. ronmh.tng 4 Acre*? Rood., tt' orche.. niuate a| Upper Uav *iti--i vt lopmant as a Building E.tele tn-wviion any day eacep! SUIUIAV hetwMjae hour, of t.Tm. -nd n ., a.m. and 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. on .Dull -atlon to Mr Ronnie Gllten. m t, prenuaaa. Dial 3TT1 The above properly will be tt up to %  ue ;H our Office No. 17 High Stree ir dgotown on Fttday Srd day c February latB. at S p.m. For further particular, and Condition. Sal e, app ly to the under signed-... tXTTTLE. CATFORD 4 CO.. S0.1.Wl3n F>H SAL* OH RUNT-Tartar* H1U, SI. Peter Old Plantation houaa with *rge ballroom. Dining room library, 'ourtaon bedroom, etc. Ideal for conyerli %  fdaU, m green and in biaci. Co.. Ltd Dial 441S tlUNtOUS WORM -A;.I Phone tin me s agancy Co, iBOo.. Ltd. iligii 31.1 dn JAKIZKD SHEgfTIt IU.Grad. lwt ; mceu, f,„„, j2,, ( ., nd W6i J* ]M>A BARNIB a Co Ltd IVANISI-I Btnrra a ii. it, it ^Jla> i,u-ge. Appl>: Aulo Tjrs S ^*L Phone MM THgi undenigned will orTar for Sale at their Ultlce In Jatne. Street, llrldgelowri. t>'. Friday Ihe 27th day of January 1030. The Dwelling Route called "DKULAII" it.d the land thereto balonglng contnmtn. r*n aquar* (eat. altuale -t HaitingCttnal Church. The Dwelling Houaa comprise. Ckrae. Gallery, Drawing and Dining Room*. Hedrooma. Dreaalng Room, Toilet Bati •Ad Kitchen with BtecU-tc. Water. Of ^..l Telephon* inrtallad Servant. Room •md Servant'. Tolle*. In.pecllon ,ii) day beiween lha hour, t S .i m. and 4 p.m. on application on f*", fui.hc-r particular, and condiUon* I Sale, apply to:— HLTCHINSON DANFUELD, ItoUSttnfl ANTI-COMMUNIST SEAMEN'S UNION FORMED m LONDON. Jan. 25. Transport workers leaders from France. Belgium. Holland. Norway, and Britain have just completed hen I two days' "ce to plan counlot-action against Communists in a&uropeun ports. I When the Communist World Federation ol TTadai Unions established a swunan's netlon lag. vt';ir, HM Inlemntional Workors Ft-'deralioti, ,ii in Rotterdam, aoead Ii "vigilante mmmittee". The i.T.W.P. is one of the Trade ntm-ooMiiiiunist World Confederation of 1-Yee Trades Unions. The >ts associated with :hr vi^iliincc <--mitntltt-e was formed immediately nfler the %  stablishment of the Confederation last month, and it assembled for th< first time In London latl The le pr tgasn U ttve ol the ULUM German Workers was untbta to .ittciiti thi aging, T V..:.., lab Seamen's Union, piesided. Each national ative reporte'. The decisions of the conffnnea an to 1Hannounced l.iN-l —Reuler. fcTSSe 11 '" d H,U "'TmCUXy 17 1 B0—13n J" BHASM, %  .,.II 1 pyl.tn THC WOLD.-' 4th Avenue, Marine Garden., with about 10,000 aquare feet of land Will be offered for -vale ai the office of the underetgned on Thursday. Hie 3nd day ol February. ISM ai 3 p.m. Tin. freehold dwelllnghouae cotilalna gallery. 3 public room., kitchen and penny on ground floor and 3 bedroom., b-ith rtc. on dr.! floor Blcclilc. ga> and water %  ervice*. The houaa ha. recently been renovated md decorated and I. In excellent condlControls Hamper 4> From Page 3 Ihe longest periods for 50 years and this year was Ihe coldest on record, the temperature boln| ;>t zero when he leit on January LA, A* a general rule they weni through the year without getting to free/mg jKiint. They got about ^8 inches of rain %  jroar and the weather was usually very m.e M very little snow and very little frost. in the IvargMM oountn where he was residing, the weatln-r *m nol too hot or too cold and they were expecting the sprthg llowen. to be sprouting in Febmai j, TIH ix-ople particularly from t h e suntheiri climates where it was so hot and dusty, liked to come over to the Evergreen country In the winter time as they would not be free from snow "Barbados is n wonderful spot" Mr. Sweeney said. "It has the I tamVlU in the world, nice benches and dear sail watt I and he thinks that half Of Canada would come down here for the winter if they only knew how delightful it was <>:: bogataMl md in BM crvstal clear salt water." Ukrainian Army In "Iron Curtain"' MUNICH, Jan 25. A Ukrainian Liberty Army numbering between 100,000 and 200,000 men are operatim: behind the "Iron Curtain* 1 according to Dr. Peter Mirschuk, spokesman of the S. K. Laacua of Ukrainian former concentration camp prisPha Munich .1 in reportic: thai Dr. Inapecilon by appointment with Mr.. Mirschuk disclosed that the main ii s Bynoe Dial S3io. .operational centre ..f | .u^^v "K rtl ~"" %  ~ nd K > M ot army was ,„ the CarpathoUkrainc. but some of the arm Russia Granted "Special Rights" WASHINGTON, Jan 2b The Unit.a Bta partmBl said today thai "taw %  %  nils" between tlu Chinese Communists and RUBta grunted "special rights" to tlu mria. .Suppui:i the Secretary of State, Ui i n, QM Dcpaiitnient issuen %  '• %  %  'il'-'i -backiiioun.i i which said, -The Soviet Union has placed tin LMhlxkd the Fai %  imant of the Iron Curtain."—Reuler. Killed Wife For Tobacco ROME, Jan. 25. U -daj .iiloged that an I iiner had confessed to having murdered his wife because she forgot to buy him some tobacco when he sent bar into town. The body of :he woman. Mario IU Fount*, was found bv a woodman following the tracks of %  wolf III the lonely mounPurln. Doctors said that she had been lurdered and buriad more than .. The husband, 48-year-oUI Ktneato Renigio, said to hove been i very heavy drinker and smoker, was arrested by the Police last night. Aft*, all night •iiiestioning. Police said that Renlgio confessed —but not until Police had promised to give him a cigarette. —Reuter. China Recognises Red Vietnam SINGAPORE, Jan 25. Chinese Communist Government has officially recognised the Vietnam Republic. Indo-Chinese Nationalist Regime led by the Communist Ho Chi Minii, Vietnam radio reported to-day. The broadcast quoted a telegram from Cho En T-ai. Chinese Communist Prime. Mini is also Foreign Minis ti i thai his (Mivernineiit regarded' the* Vietnam Republic us the legul government of Vietnam. The ihinese Communists wanted to exchange Ambassadors so as to "strengthen relation*, and %  nhaiice friendly i'-operation between the two COatttt. telegram said. The ladio declared thai the establishment of diplomatic relations was a "slap in the face for the French Imperialists and their Keulrr. i, .— ..^— %  '' %  — %  w"j,, OIHT iinnroa,, mr. ^onn risKiia k 2?. ,on ^ '! BUncho Fletcher. Mrtr Ana ....,-orhwtu. Ke,v.i. Adameun. Mr. Jolui Adamaon, Wn fli Diane l-enivacchlotii. Idaline Miner. UiU Brathwalla, Mr. Baryl Holder.. U 'Miner. Felce J K. Uotnor. Trtna ifcCutnmander tli^le. IU)>UM. Mi I faomct. LlcLi ^ \i|,,, M,johik-^yonc. Return Leave Passages l-Voni Taac 5 House Surgeon, Matron. Assistant r „—-,,. .... „ Million, Sister Tutor and Home Joiwc ,.( 1',.!,,,. ll,-|u,i, Sl: ,„.,. Sl „ er luntogra,,,,,.,, L','.."." %  ""y'uT, 2 %  b,, H-n "M.~dical Superintendent Mental """ "' 'i""-' 1 '*l^rtBMod01 Hospital, Assistant Medical MIS. Superintendent GovSupemitendcnt MenUI Hospital, l"d">trial Schools. DiMatron Mental Hospital, Colonial h ^ ucall ". Assistant Engineer, Assistant to the Col..( Uucation. Principal onlal Enaineer. Commissioner o! p^w" ?." ***' Y. 1 c > r "i£""*' Income Tax and Death Duties, Aoman-Tutor Labour Commissioner, Duactcr i College, Director ot Sclol Highways and Transport ire, Deputj Executive Engineer, Government Director :! Science and A K nculElectric Inspector, ItesteHU jure. Li.u,nH.logi..i, v.i, in.,,.. Mechanical Engineer -WaKri hjmlst. Botanist, Govworks, Supennlendent WatVrt Riurant Analyst Lecturer in works, Principal Clerk General SSi ."!._.. ,'"AT' Utalrl '"' Strvlee, Senior Assistant Master t-hlef Medical Officer. Sanitation ol Secondary Schools, Uradlailc Omcer, Pon Health Officer GovAssistant Master of SoepndSrf and PathSchool,, Senior Asslstanl Mistress 'i2SXEF"\ S| I, '" 1|M lla %  %  lIuMnaa, V.I u,-; "'"' General Pmt Oflce a. xmdar i..I 1C || %  "i Ordinary Mail „t tl y lha rath Januarv IHD Nile apply to COTTLE. CATFORD A CO.. •aUalfean Jl l.SO.-lli life ';''• %  laland Had •. Dui aci Ml R ^t XL I JO—3ii ftj*. t'tn fl-kr.. shredded "**.>,. Catovim. All Bran Ft"" "JS %  %  M1 9 %  %  %  rtJL, 14 rw^iaasb i^s till' .1,111% units were algo o|M>raling on the Crinaa in the Caucasus, and in the Baltic Region Reuler W\\TI-;I> HELP aWOAOaVCBNTa made lor priv.ite T TFB. public are hereby HII* I a ajtsat l ftalM rr-dil to aw ile KVH\ MAYaeU %  new JeHaaent a. I da not held myaelf re-p.naa.hi far her or anyone aaaa coni p na aeaai amner or anrone tracUng any debt or deeHa In my aam laataaa by a written order ugned by me Spd. IXOYD CHXUToi'HUt MA)Ut} enure h View ft. John Ml SO-Jr XOTICE I Will our Friends ai I tomers please note that we I shall be CLOSED for BusiI ness TO-DAY 26th at 1 p.m. I and will be Open r. I ness on Saluraay 21th from I a a.m. to 4 p.m. I JOHN F HUTSON LTD, I aVOUNT GAY D1STII.LKRon LTD Buller Shortage ? WE CAN SUPPLY tUm BUTTER ai 72? per bottle &f Stuart & Sampson no. Haadquansr, toi Baal RUM AM TlOA I KMT' nr. a I SALE aa a Roi -i ma o SFFBCTS n*/ll,OOD HOt Kg HIHHOF a cot KT BIIX ATURDAV SSth at IS 15 pi %  ai T* ,nrt "*"d hv Mr. I H IIAIUUJIA and Mhan •„ -. > %  Auction the following t-g.-iabia Furniture and elle.l. Couchee, Otcaalonal Tablea, liming Chalra. aideboard. ll—.k'**•• Rwkera, Dreaalng Tablea. Wa-hatanda. Cheat of Tx.-.-r. KMIhfy Table. W-rdaobai %  ., Wrtter-l Taolea and Ne.t T. %  Trolley nil Crabwood o( modern deaigio Modern Double and Single Beda iSSraaacn. M.lreaaae, OaUery FVr..erwl Daal Praaaaa tail Ieal Tablea. painted t-ni-d %  Preea. 3 painted Cot. tone Jansai, painted Playpen. 1 Hut,, Cnaira. Blnger Bawlng Machi'ie -one-la..net. Stovea. Pngldalre. t.ot.rt. large %  iac.iaare Salver. China, hlichen Wore. Orname. %  "IS Slep.. Trunka, SWtceeea. ^taoU. Toy^ Leader.. Btotu ^4 fciany other laiwwnaa iMtna. VIBWTMO FRIDAY ITIh JAWUARY and MORNING OF THX SAL* SATURDAY SSth JAN <* % %  O" PAIX OF HAMMIB. U 1 uoNBBaa ->I\SVBI wBfwS Ur.lll\>IIM MM U I INCOME TAX NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Income Tax returns are raluired from every married man whose income Is $1200 00 per annum ur over ( from every other person whose income is $720.00 per annum or over and from companies whether incorporated or unincorporated, societies, persons engaged in any trade or profession, and owners of land or property whether a taxable income has accrued 'luring the past year or not, Forms of Return my be obtained from the Income Tax Department AFTER THE 1ST DAY OF JANUARY. 1950, and the forms July filled in must be delivered to me on or before the following respective dates: MONTREAL ADsTKALlA NKW ZEALAND LOWS LUaTTRD (gf-AJ,i) UNIC, MS itlKT 1'lltir.I. .cheduled to eit from Sydney January Itth arriving at Trinidad about rrbntary MS' KAU'AKf It acheduled to aall from Itirl line January 7th. llurnia January loth, lleauly !>>lnt January Uth. Melbourne January 3Sth, Sydney February Sth. arriving at Trinidad about 10th March. Thaae veaaale have ample PMC* tor CMI ... Kanl rtaa-a iad 5esawa| M Cargo accepted on Throtiith Hill. .,1 ...ding with traruthlprnent al Trlnlda.l lor nrlilah Guiana. Barbadoa, Windward and leeward liland. Fiafunher parth-uUr. apply:FVITJOBSS WITHY ACo, LTD Agent. %  Trinidad DA rOWTA A Cb LTD Agenl*: Barbadoa. The M V. 'Caribbce" will 1 ^irgt and I'aiaeitgeee for M-afsvU, Antigua, Mbota earTB*. ttjenlruci. >allmg illd.y -rrth January. The %lMKNve "nardenu W will accept Cargo and Paaaenger. Ir St. Vincent, .ailing Thurtday Hth The Schooner "Rmer.lda" "in accept corao and Paeerngetl'JW Tnmdad. .^ling Saturday .J-S. January. The "tndaavour W" will a g aep. Cargo and l*aaaengar. for TtirBfljrr IUng WadneagUy IVh JantSflt B.W.I. NrHOONXIt t(WNrR.V*ASSSO (INC 1 " 34th January tSSO Tel 4047 1. NOTE 1 10.1.SO.— 19BU Returns of persons whose books were closed on the 31st day of December. 1949, on or before the 31st day of. March 1950. Returns of persons whose principal place of business la not situate in the island on or before the 30th day of June, 1950 Returns of all other persona, on or before the 31st of Jan uary, 1950. 1\ CLAIRMONTE Commissioner of Income Tax and Death Duties Any person failing l,. make bis return within the due dale will be liable to a One not exceeding 110 .ml not leas than i.1 and will be prosecuted unless a satisfsetory reason is given. FOR SALE § Hld.' I si'r^! •"• . Mo W, ? .1! r7m Brldg own Fr i *y. 2'th day of January, lUSo) ^ ih^l? 10 D "''' lln """.e called •t.AKLDIEMand the land oi"r^:;r,:z n v a 0 p 77 chri.v r ch'uTcV' ,u ''' ,h %  c Si .on.-' n M^;7uCoL P Pl 'DL MST." 1 Ka "" Mn UD,e "** For further particular^ and conditions of Sale, apply lo — COTTLE. CATFORD a, CO, 'lift—in Aa. soi-TSIBOirNO Ngate CANAOIAN af .big AU'OA Pl-ANTKR" ALCOA PATHIOT belling every tw JaniMuy hh January II h January -Snd. February 3rd. week.. S3 DYFJOKD waw Toan ggjmcc i irom New York 13th. m ;n aaWSaf ; EBRd 4 U2g"> —JF-BSSlffSS, aa D—, -erel#5i*i.*ua??* Kmam "" %  < !" •" Oila^u IIU> Ju,or. arman. '.-.-.-.-,-.-,-.-,-, %  % % % % %  % % % % % %  ;-.;:::; .:;;;:: % %  % % %  l>llORTA.\T For Your Daily and Evening ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER in Church Village District, 4 Ollll,, | ... GEORGE QUINTYNE, CHURCH VILLAGE, ST. PHILIP Apslj: DA COSTA CO.. LTD. Canadian Sarvica r"'<5^T-g!^M !Tj!. -J"Jj JL.'~' <* %  r vla • BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD. NOTICE SO far it has been found impracticable to work out such u Schedule of cuts in Electricity as was published in May of last year. Our available iieneratina capacity now is considerably less than it was then, while On overall demand lins increased. On weekdays, between 7 a.m. and 11 a.m. aim noon and 4.30 p.m. only Bridgetown can be su|>i> if continuous water pumping is to be maintained. Between II a.m. and 12 noon, all areas except Bridgetown should be "on" and between 4.30 p.m. and 7 a.m., such capacity as is available, after giving due priouty to the needs of water pumping, baking ici man, ufacture. printing, i tc, will be dislributed as equally it possible throughout the. system by similar "on" periods as have been effected during the past few days. Load studies and experimental .switching opes*. lions are being carried out continuously with a viaw to evolving a workable Schedule and the Company' I will be greatly assisted in this if all Consumei Industrial and Domestic, make sure that consumption tor both light and power is cut to the barest mmimunuat the times when current is available, whether during day or nighL Owing to many requests from Consumers as to whether we could not give some notice of "cuts" to the areas affected, we have decided, although it is not standard practice, to switch "off" the area to be cut for Vi minute, than m Itch "on" again lor :i minutes before the final cut. By this means it is hoped .that Consumers will have time to put into operation their auxiliary Hghtii. i thod of switching will only be id operation between the hours of 6 and 10 p.m. The foregoing proposed arrangements can only tit adhered to if the existing available Sets, which are already overloaded, can all be kept running. THE BAKU MM IS KI.KCTRIC SUPPLY COK1-'Hi VI KIN. LTD. V. SMITH General Manager.



PAGE 1

T1UKSDAY PACE roiR THE BARBADOS \DV"XATE iWARY^ m^^MMB^^ Battle For West Indies Sugar Goes On VOMWM4 bf Th* ASret C. Lid **. ( % %  •1 M.. H '-'•%  First Agreement On Canada's Constitution Thursday. January 28. 1950 Wisdom Versus Insularity THE exodus of a group of specialist teachers from this colony last year, was a signal to focus public attention on the fact that many departments of the public service were threatened with inadequate staffing. His Excellency the Governor as a reault, appointed a Committee "to examine the establishment of administrative, professional and technical officers in relation both to their recruitment and to their retention; and to make recommendations for the removal of any cases which threaten to affect the public services adversely." The report of that Committee has been made and it is an enlightening document. After a delicate and tedious job the Committee "found evidence that the public services are adversely affected by the Government's inability to recruit and retain a full complement of senior administrative, professional and technical officers." The reasons for this inability, according to the report, are inadequate remuneration as compared with similar officers in other colonies, and the difficulty experienced in filling the vacancies which occur at the required standard with the present salaries and conditions of service. That the existing conditions of service gave rise to a measure of dissatisfaction was not entirely unknown to the Government, and the Report emphasises one point which might serve to prevent an immediate recurrence of the present condition. It recommends that return leave passage privileges should be granted to certain scheduled officers who would earn oneforty-eighth of his return passage in respect of each month of service with the Government This is a wise provision and should furnish the remedy for the events which Ravi' n-r to the conditions under Investigation. As has been already pointed out, the slogan "Barbados for Barbadians" is outdated and it is useless hoping that technical and professional officers would be content to remain in. even if they entered, a service which overlooked their potential market value outside Barbados and denied them return passage* to their homes at the end of stated periods. The repurt recommends the establishment of certain offices in the teaching service and the setting up of a Public Service Commission which would have the confidence of the Civil Service and could provide a more efficient method of recruitment than that tzj as well that the Committee mjde some general remarks on other aspects of the service. They found that the delay in dealing with staff matters, unsatisfactory structure of the service, the ).. training facilities and of confidence in the existing method of recruitment, promotion and transfer to be contributing causes. The thoroughness of the investigation has led the committee t'. put its linger on the weak spots and in a concise document to leave ^portunity for misunderstanding the condition and the mistaking of the contributory aggravating causes. If Barbados is to make the progress which is expected, it is necessary—because She cannot supply all the technical and prufessional officers she needs — for appointments to be made outside and it is t<> the general good when such officers are encouraged to remain in the island for any length of time It can only be done where conditions of service and salaries arc on a basis which will prevent those in the neighbouring colonies from being a source of attraction We have already lost the services of a few able men who would have S ladly remained in this island but for the isadvanlages under which they lal The Committee has made recommendations which, if implemented will a coming the difficulty In the past documents of reform have been forgotten alter being submitted. This must not happen to the report under review. Seeking British I'uhlie Election Inmplieaies Support Issue ,p*&2 OTTAWA. Canada. Canadian Dominion-provincial conferences j have never had much of a reputation tor agreement. When the subject of such a conference is something as controversial aspanada's constitution, the odds favouring dis-. agreement quickly jump Ba: 10 premiers and Prime Minister St Laurent pulled a surprise on most Canadians. I n would b better to say. January, when they succeeded in reojest i. -| c hjng unanimitv on the first stage of a %  history-making attempt to make the constiToo Late tution Canadian in fact as well as in name. reiurn 10 i rinioau. .. u !" — h "It is, howen *~' A strategy of making the most of points;oi Jamaica of the three delegate, curren negation,. sue ha. they ^ m ^ ^ Too W *^J££ 8 J nd ignoring as much as possible *iAtMS 2. '2SSS w r es, b U „ l d,e S m oiSn t ta"3JE. of agncuuur* produong ^-^'I ^TtUr of dislgreement paid off for chairwu! ALI.SOPPS I ICIK BEER—per bolllr —per rue QUAKER CORN FLAKES—per pkl. GOLDEN BEAN ICING Sl'GAR-per pki For H).[n st of Uvij LsuaU, :: K ypstar lag THE battle for a lair price and spokesman left in Lor." long-term guarantee for British everything to avoid making Uiii we' lndi.ir.ugar ha, now ena political wue !" ^ m * tered a new it.ge FftllowlriJ the this l undoubted, since not return to Trinidad. Barbados'and would ich a cur* prejudice mwSnSTwiS two mono,, West.nd.es open to _charge, of aaricunural proau^. •"-„-j ,fi e ma ,ter of d^greement the Brut* public Labour Party. iSe. 1 Ilut now inexorable j „, irou nd a long oak conference table in the On the whole, relatively little It l. no secret however that all loml n „ work Hia*iprice. House of Commons chamber and discussed .u.hliciG was given to the Wnl those concerned with the negotiah, ve stimulated production an constitutional matters. Cn cJe dunng Ih. presence tion, hope for one two thing.: whe „ Government., Wte that of Q _, fi „„ v thev w nf tS detention In Britain, beIf the Labour Government is y,, ,j. s A ., „>! daring to reduce cause they %*"y felt they coulc returned to power it wffl feel .o prk „ have ventured ncverthel— "„, pSh'tne* claims in public torffled that it will.be able to „ reduce acreage,, the progrea o whil.rthey were being negotiated tackle the Wet Indie, problem Klence „„ enabled eaual or w 'n the Hnliih Government. But along the right line, without so pe aler cr ops to be produced from when most new.paper, crr.ed a much fear of domestic conse„,,, lower *, ^ „,, Ion* statement from the Ministry quences; or "So the prophecies of me of Food W?ting Sat the-ilnlted A Conservative Government economut. are conung home to K,S, !" U up to the will be returned and canbe roo!t SurpluJ es accumulfam^us August 10 pledge In the induced to place Empire interests atin i one?" hi' now made.'the M before those of. for nna.ee. The %  *—'•*'* ^"S India Committee launched a Cuba. _._ %  Government. offer could not be counter-attack m the form of a However one of the met signi„„„„, ungenerous, adding It l^ss Conference held by Mr flc.nt comment, on the whole I,WMt Ind | an ,ood are going to be JU runDbell 37-vear-old chiel sue was made in a long article rompetmve in coming years, of B0Ok BroUier.. McConnell in the "FUuusetol Tt-" which preference Co Ud Deputy Chairman ot the suae.ted that sterling p !" """ market, The of conIhe ensure ".heir violence of the weit^ii^muteerandoneTf generally" must be tempted UV West Indie, and %  ••tackr~rboy.-of the put day. to uk for guarantee, that British Guian, to the Brm.h protwo yetrV^gar price battle,. virtually amount to nmrance. ^ Am „,,, a special eitwo years sugar p ojainst the effect, of dollar prices lcn ls ne eded, for the sake of Hit The Headlines undercutting them Colonial and Commonwealth Campbell ha, hit British headSaid the "Financial Tlasea : ,,„. l0 TC ach an understanding, line, with the frank .utement -The West Indie, position is bul a^ Br j t uh Government will that it was only recently he dare dimcult; production can be nM Justified in refusing to prejulook my sugar labourer, in the panded and should be expanded dice loo f ar me prospect laM K deplorable have their |„ or der to provide employment, eheaper sugar for %  conditions been He stated a. his But further expansion Involve. sum ers.' personal conviction that the West heavy capital o-llay. In the past clearly the West Indies must Indie* would not accept the Britthe price of sugar wu artificially row convince the British public— i.h offer, and releawd a letter i ow and scarcely provided a reand u>e Ministry of Food (the to the Ministry of Food from Mr. t ur n on the capital invested. Colonial Office Is already on their il "A." Robinson, ol Trinidad. "Defeatist" .idel—that the welfare of the leader of the delegation, which "producers natural/ .;i:ih colonies dep#nds on makcrvstallise, the whole West Indies !0m e assurance agamit a return :ng arrangements now to expana ca( e. to such conditions. But it would sugar production and that if the „r be dangerous and a defeatist atprice for colonial happiness is binson summary 01 mude ^ aMum€ u, at ftc sterling slightly dearer sugar inside the what f tended Augurt pieoge. •... %  •-• m r keu you have offered the P.r Oldies an eight year contract And the Liberal po.:.(against 10 years requested! for a. well u of many pe.; 830 000 ton. of sugar l against city has been expresse-. 1100.000 tons requested). You Hobson, City Editor of dews then propoee to restrict our overchronicle'. who wrote: all production for export 900.000 tlillA KA UK STOItEjk l/ rryll These are selling quickly Oaloh Oil Stovt hat the : food con^^ ^ onW joU e ^ prob iemi U.K.(fearer that is than dollar uded was a Justification or vnc s |, u |iing itself off from world sugar if the dollars were availugurt pledge, was): "In brtM, ^ able—then it Ls a price that is The breakdown ot :: .ik.. —— %  n^ *:i.i>i| wnu wcl! worthwhile. It Is an IMM which cuts clean across party politics—there are ...Mir Party who believe In %  •'. n tn0 are Tories who policy tons, but for about oneIndian Sugar talks goes I third of d ne ot tne pea Ahllt uberals. price — that is the rtctitious nomic problems with %  rsuina the UMUM of world Free %  world price plus preference — world is now faced. nam i '^ we Trade, say tbmj have other cures for colonial Uli than protective *s and preferences. in however, has so — • < %  Food and .\gTicuUure Orf mm ni %  • Ai-h a clear cut . hf faHoral oarl'a1 V 2. 3 and 4 Burner on Stand. Single and Double Table Models. Beatrice and Colcman OIL STOVES— SiM,i BOX IRONS—%", 7" and 8" SAD IRONS—No. . COAL POTS OIL LAMPS and LANTERNS WILKINSON ft IIAVMS CO, LTD.. C S. PITCHEE & CO.. ] Phones: 4472 & 4487 OVAWVV/. '.'.-.'. """inn 1 in m mm THE BEST NEWS OF THE I/I/I JST \ 11 IdVI11, DUTCH APPI 30/ per lb. !No Delivery) less th.n It cost, us to produce problem of surplus supplies of ,^ major* basic commodities. it. All this while being restricted JJJ ^ wwkJ agQ CommlUl to th. production of 300,000 tons less than what M have to be the minimum requirement, ^ JurytvJ pr ,p, re d by F sport the P",P^ %  .utlsticians. that in ,aa m Wt Indiea a m> *ft""'-"2 cereals and eert.,n oil Tof tt^deTnWng the U.K. .ppjllingly low standard p ,,,. I*^ ^31ta?the colonUvu, Plu. supply within the next three ^ and lUU llihng to produC e .. made a and that for some commodi§unr ^^ ^^ ^^ cn^p,,, n he .tated t: '' !" l T ob ?T *".„ since we cannot afford dollars. Possible for the V Doth 10 honour their arrange:: %  Too High I llimaluni i:\Uiid.u with the Donunion. and .till give The sugar talks have broki |g a case of waiting uiithe Colonies what thev need. The down becauM the Wl .:. -ii.try PI Food ultimaMinistry of Food sull 1:1 nds want a guaranteed p rat. Originally set for are not forcing the Colonies to for sugar over a pert'-. .:. this has been extendeut production, rejting their case and too high a price at that The cd to February IB, but on the (act that the Colonies economy of these islands is highly tnought mat the west Indies' the provinces affected and the federal parliament.—Can. Press. STANSFELD. SCOTT & CO., •i'S.v.','.::'.*,v.',;','.','.::'.:::::;;i British Industry In 1951 could ill on the free I Turie* Want Bulk Purchase r.ir Sugar Left-wing cniK-isms of the sugar delegation have menuooed that the del--. \ P"t attacked bulk purchase arrangements but Mr. Campbell an ed urn point at his Press Confer*n.e. Aiked what would happen 1. a Conservative Government were returned to power and against the principle of bulk purchase, Mr. Campbell pointed out that Mr. Oliver Stanley, a former Conservative Secretary for the Colonies and a powerful man m the movement, had stated in the House of Commons that the Conservatives regarded Government bulk purchase of sugar as essential and It should go on. The argument that the West Indies spokesmen in London are now putting to the British public comes down to thU: Th. Indies have to buy In market and they support a high standard of living in Britain by buying at wiiaievtr prices artdemanded by British exporters. Hriuiin should lherefoi them, and in any case she is bound to place the welfare of her colonies before that of I eign countries such as Cuba. Complicating tne whole postlu guu'T — ,u BnUiii Plainly the West Indies' delegates and the dependent on the sale of their Su^jr Al sugar crops at an 'adequate' price lot 411 jdjournment utf and in the light of the politico1. wl ,| agree because H ;'hy of today. 0: tie time (ur consult*!.' 1 ularly with crop starting. The "J alienvi knew ht'd (urn tip som**'herf.' 1 t lff.14 tl'IIM \\ hut's on Today Ails jad IrafU l.xhibilion al Qaernn I'jrk at III 00 a.m. Cricket Trial Game al Ken *lniton al 1.30 p.m. >lbilr Cinema al Reef I'U* • lug Field al 11* v m will not be available B before the election to consider a ::iportant thai jnd nut merely I Food want the ruary 27. :;-l Sugar :ri London again then to resume discussions on a DM world sugar pact demanded by Cuba and other dollar-area sugar producing h Governsome bargaining conference that they to reserve 250,000 tons ind another 250,000 ,'iobably in practice to be bought from the dollar market Admittedly if Britain made no purchases at ..11 In ttail lield she would have little or no power men. however, consider that that %  >arly up to the sugar vernmenl* throughout the W If views and tc give cogent reasons for them but if there is MM men do nut want, H v.'. %  laCUaa. Foi %  I'.F. B] NDKMAN KIBBKNS LONDON. Four thousand manuiacturers have alubmilled designs and samples of their work for inclusion in the industrial section of the 1951 Festival of Britain. It is expected that the list will eventually \ contain details of 20,000 products. From Usfociftfioni and leaders of each industry will choose for display what they con-j LTC the finest illustrations of achieve-! elected by each industry will be ; laid out by "presentation panels." They will unber, not name. Prospective buyers will have to check them in catalogues and go to information bureaux to discover where 1 and how they can place orders. "The Festival of.Britain is not a trade fair.'' | dl spokesman said. Nor was the British Can Make it' exhibition of 1946. Just' me it produced more than £30,000.000, worth of orders. "We hope that the festival will present a cross-section of all Britain's best industrial achievements dramatically enough for the buyers themselves to attend.' 1 At their headquarters in the Strand officials are working out ways of reducing expenditure on the festival from the original fc 14.000.000 estimate to the revised figure of £11,300.000. Two proposals which have been abandoned are a river pageant on the Thames and a I programme of documentary movies relating to the festival which were expected to cost £75,000. An ambitious programme of street decor-1 ations. firework displays and outdoor events for London will probably be halved. The festival staff will not be increased to the number first contemplated. At present it is 265 and includes artists, scientists, architects, designers, technicians, messengers, -lerks. typists and public relations men. —Can. Press. Mini i-: DUE TO THE ARRIVAL OF THE 1 "MAURETANIA" ON SATURDAY CUR DRV GOODS DEPARTMENT %  ( CLOSED ON Thursday 2lilh al ii-in and ii|nii OK Saturday 2tli uu.il .1.^ OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS I ASKED TO CO-OPERATE BY SHtfl ACCORDINGLY. DA COSTA & CO.. LI DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT Ol II III VIII Its SAY: \K Out' i oiilil Haw I r's-i>ii Wli al Happened To The Editor, The Advocate SIR.—I am son. s h ould have thought it gdt 10 publish the letter sigm > St. James Resident a of the Electric Supply clear thai whorvn wrote it haft no understanding. sympa'J. otherwise, of the i IBat have arisen dill lew days and the letter th can serve no useful purpo<> rnmon knowledge that within the last two yearthe Corporation has Inst.. great expense, three QHtratins Plants whose blned opacity Is considerably in excess of the normal paaj of thr bjland without the use of any othrr units which th"v had during : Regarding the r.i downs. 1 bl %  .ed by several of tlie Uailn Mai..., [-vlu.tUv happened. 1 hold no brief wlgMevcr for the (iiiporjtiun. in fact 1 disagree .MiK-U ilh l!;eir main poll.y of ronttnuing to use Diesel driven 11 rtheless. one must be i-in gsxl Mtg) utalt CONSt'MKK Im Agrremtnt sin Amongst many many others I should like to endorse the letter addressed to your good paper on Jamil by a resident of St James I gard t I Iflhl Mtuation in the island. ANOTHER surrntm St. James. f'uhlicily W(Ac/ — ln,l. 4 %  SIR. Youi Bundaj p| i an edit quoted concerning puti. Barbados in order t trade and earn muvh-neede-: %  classt^od three t; f ..ho, becoming an annual visitor, will rent 01 house ana u ill ,-ieale LM ploy ment for domestic servants haufleurs. This lyi>, And In Barbados the aim.. he requires. Before wt can entice him to come we must present him with easily accessible facts about land and living GO" here ., Are you certain u is a.t the best Interests of the island to publiciic it at thi> tune of gross negligence, short-sightedness, penny-pinching, sheer that the had ample :eseeable calamilid almoat feel sorry for %  r.ierchants, inn-keepers, real estate agents, etc. really start pour in < Americans of the third you sean island whose m i :.KC the ostrich, tnjt bad news of tnj I, as an A < winter i new pastures, we make certain w I c thlnga we arc ued to And tropics, th. Into are light, water, food and transportation If 1 Important needs pass th. we look Into qn< i ortablc homes, pleasant Mgs, etc. Furl seem to ovvrloi ^ thing In %  type". Tl well on" an I without bu hate are, most likely. necessitates an escape I in the** casea elactruhsti and i> of the early Ifltn ce:/ Bad news travels fast in this day of airplanes, telephones, cable facilities, etc.. from disgruntled and inconvenienced island residents and visitors. So I suggest Mr. Editor/ don t court -.! this tini. Lug enough adverse publicity as It ls — better Barbados ..nknown and with her lignt hidden ygfdi By the way, was that last phrase of the quotation a typographical auae. I cant oven find a light under a bushel! AN AMER: January 23. 1950. //cri/v \nnuul*' There appearI January 20 a letter signed by the Qeneral Manager • :bados Electric Supply .in. offerlni th. as ss ai i lk i ri for tnasr now generating i haw* oaj* worked a short period %  inw ns% have been < Sudi reports by the Management of the Barbados Electric rporation have now bocome what one may term "Hardy Annuals", and as this Companv has a monopoly, and is reallv a nest Mr, thai the time has arnve.1 when His Excellency the Govemor-inExecutive Committee should appoint a competent committee to visit, investigate and report to Government their opinion as to what is causing these recurrent constant break-downs. Whcn_it is considered that a considerable quantity of the water supplied to the colony is pumped that the v *' %  %  aetunng Compan%  %  ;.'.: %  .', ... %  1 '>: %  %  ; . •, .ho repair Sugar m-. | n g whoilv or partially operated by furnished by this Company. I 'hat the MILK-FED CHICKENS MILK-FED TURKEYS AUSTRALIAN RABBITS LAMB CHOPS VEAL CHOPS OX TONGUES OX TAIL FISH CAKES. -*r tin 12c. DALTON CORNFLAKES— —18c. I-arge tins MAGNET PEAS -30c. GRAPE FRUIT, each—c ORANGES.cach -I. CARROTS, per lb. — 20c. HOO", per lb. — 16c. CABBAGE. ,r lb. — 24c. TOMATO S* I H BBfJ VlNEAFPW j IlNF-APrHJJ i iRAHO PRIMS! OLIVIS TOTATOaj DUTCH C***" CROWN %  •hwne i.on MMMNNMHI



PAGE 1

TT THlK*"-' V JAM AKY 2B, H5II WfJL Guarantees Less Than urrent Exports nil BARBADOS VDVOCATE :m> lor Hie UUUra. "uo ion %  %  MfcVIMO u | ..,., MO may be ,tnat u ,1 u, EL* No! Promise '-*•"' ,' %  ''"' " ""a ail) sue*. JO* NOI to ,-ouce t. one. ,frrat' H. musl lost, b3 ifte whole crop %  an d make '.he %  r. ri the aniouni oi. e UK t">vernm*nt anHjure oi I.MU.UOU Iolv remi.e,ui.v*,'' w, aUon ne *> > " WWII. SiSwi COlC ifSu-n edlcl '<""e *PPLTilr """ %  '*" the., • m ,„u resent exportt wnue the Colonies 'would be ol the order "• <"">' l *ve 25% more than j-Tns tat iiaiM 22. Pr J^ueLd to meS he %  Dormnio. '^.Tunfair "... dr.w *£ J Jn, with historical preCil production for expert to 900.000 tons i again *caliul 1.100.000 tons requested), but fr jbout one third of lhi the B.W.I. may receive a, prire —lhal ik (he tirlltlous "world' price plus preference — leaa lhan il costa lo produce it. \ll this while bruin mtMBM to a production 200.000 |SJM lam Hian thai stalai lo he the minimum requirements to support Ihe peoples of Ihe V\jaa,oai • 41 Tnt-,1 i.uo,oen n i nKitidt-a in •!< MMM %  %  1.BO0. .i 5M.O00 ;jso.mm k HUH •JULY'S. !" .• ho ^ ul wllh U M.-" "u. iTSZil "OU'nM by Cotonl.l -xpon.r. but iudr it M F.—." ' t* prFp.rrd to pay wn than nimprlUiv. m *i,t^22. POc ~ "" runher, Ih.1 .h, e\.k U !" .,.„ld b. "• no: JSZH^"**"TI — %  "•'"'' "-> Unfa. If K^T" "' '" '•' abov* a UMANIA REJECTS \90SLAV PROPOSAL BUC'HARKST. .1 -m. U> "J" Jfiecied a Yugoslav proposal, sugnesled in a e >u€,si.. jfair, Mlniatry last month. v* mixed commission of inquiry into frontkr Inta?"? %  """• aW "Ol laol.leu ahirVaf %  ?"•'' "' M '' tcldants, i.ut >JJ" the Humaiiiai. the liotile tntl.,,. an policy oi pro-. HaSr" '" %  .;'• <> the part ol J^nmeni .,,,. Thls pol cv o( tnc y u ,o,|, v %  MSS£ '' ,s •" ond "• r "' 1 lit !" 1 IIMl he MbMBM of Ih. IOUII wrmw(. -?' '..oi .minn spokesman MM. —laalei. PSr/,v.v, .-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.•,•,•.•.•.-.-.'.-.-.-.,; U V A L O R" OIL STOVES for depemlaiii,. Cooking: H OOBLS mm & S48.HI $52.55 & SM.I2 %  and SMAU | nniTlll in a leu days. Council Discuss Seawall On Friday Lng uf the Ix'gis$400.0011 Rttohitl ntruetiot. o. I new runway at Seawall TinRatolutlon wt the Housof Aaaambly on TutaI jfiit. Indonesia Blame Dutch Army For Bandung Disortler BAMDUNO, J.tu. M There is mucn talk .TI of an ulliaiuib4 and Dai I bination '' I ment, whose popul I of orthodox Moslems Tht Dutch Ann. feaji poslUcal .i Miplu.il; %  tralnad man of ihe KRoyal Netherlands In o ergraen Pi | Djakarta that Vain hrough .u the rate ol about"iP authorities ri to produce additional %  % %  Merlin magutrate. simii.n... ,.t U tba ck -Btrrenburg crossing point, trafflc had dropped to about Ten per cent of the usuAltoKctiier. 20 lorries had pajted in boih dliections there En U hours, compared with 200 to "SO normally. Barge trnfflc up and down tin. Wn *h central German canals came to ai Tne '' tandstill today owing to Atl -' %  • rtail iu,ilic continued nonnall>. j known p;, The Soviet-licensed Uerl, 2f"W(h ** Berlin newspajx: ;;, %  n^L'T' l S!i?tt uromoting leal Inttl by protaeting tfaa German tk Republic and Berlin from being plundered bv ih* Wevi IW, which cert;.:' are making, is simply aimed at creating tension and d:~<. added. — Reulei W.L Squadron May Go Home HKKML'DA. iBv Mail.) has B.1I. Oil Concession Protests 1 %  %  two pi. n u! r • 8 H.W.I.A.. mi Sunday fi dad on a short will be leaving today f. i rine Hot. i. %  %  %  %  %  %  thai tht pi Ut nlion .HI i %  %  i nniiun lo do hubiness the wav i-*._i_?i . ... "Guat;,i rights tii U %  He said it would take about,de /atfo .......... wic year to cluse it .. 'ir,.:;,: —B.U.P. j tS lr! ...deration s Mni I 1 die. Sou > kales lo England .1.11. in..oo thaj wouj : not ha\e %  i their axporl buniw %  I %  the products of it which won South A lng Bermu'. t tad ih.',', Mr Dugdale said thai the I mall and too o be economic and local wagaa ai %  too high. It all Slreel Wonders About Price Break %  ti 0D0U BOt. >v\ I %  log the :i'jig? rupporters %  t tht %  in confoundt. rtth .i run-up to new >•( the %  %  KT04 %  %  ess of '.. shing. I %  Little (OPT %  irtlattti %  d fourrad and %  n turnpun '.>le period "' rat tho it as the four -lour thouaai. I %  %  %  %  trials Declined %  I ire in the %  he rails 1 %  %  %  %  i N IS BACKACHE < :> COUGH LOZENOfS I / ifaf Mr/r /oote better. sca/p fae/s fetter. whenyoucheck DrySca/p VOU CANT IPICT to make a good impression when Dry Scalp makes your hair messy, liard-tocomb. nd full of loose dandruff. Check Dry Scalp by supplementing the natural scalp oils. Loose dandruff is gone. You stay nwit aud well-groomed all day. 'Vaseline' Hair Tonic works with nature— it contains IWJ alcohol or other dqraMJ ingredient" Trv %  Vaseline' Hair Tonic today. \aselinc HAIR TONIC m ISID it MOfll kUN TOOAT THAN ANf OTKK >.AII TONIC >JST A SIGN AGE? lumbH -vhich had helped the %  alto KM net thai Ol the Intern:.%  %  %  %  land areas. that the Dutch Army were to Weslerllng's attack on Bandung amazed and %  ulcd that Onl] Dutch inti-iviiiliun prevented the massacre of Indonesian troops In the town. —Rei. r ty They usually ra ihroaKhou: i rid the grass wi %  7 m a On P.sr iiiSCU41.IM> l | SPECIALS Cotton Wash FROCKS All Si,,., M;OO each Art Silk SLIPS ii MODERN DRESS BROAD STREET. CHILDREN XL WA YS SAY For lovely hair use BRYLFOAM -THE cream SHAMPOO IN A TUBE See how BryUoam— tht atom ikmmpoa quickly removes the .lick? coaung of dun, greats tad Htp-Kum from your taur, leaving it clean and r.aun.. Restored ire the beautiful giioung hsglMkjbU of healthy hair, %  ilaen soft sad TrKhspnng Ust Brrlfosaa itT*4ki-tT*m*h*-w*t, niMhaif u> aux or %  pst quicacr to apply and dry. Bnoagb for thnn itaampoos la etch tube Get the goodness of BEEF in a cup of BOVRIL .QakkwaayHr .<•' HlTCHlNsoN x co.. LTD. $ i£y IIIU22 Made by the make of %  ericneiM MAKI -aarsdf a cup of boi Borril oben you feel wed or drpnacd 'ctl bctitt as sooa as jou -. mtarsd ill coml %  wnnih. Ilsharpaas Tout appetite haipa jaw to sal well and seep wall. Bowil puts baaf into you. Drmk it daily. Remember BOVRIL improves all dishes and makes excellent sandwiches, too J A it ENRICHED BREAD along with their delightful f J & R BREAD is good ior Young and Old.