Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
Lith Gob

Price:

Friday la

January 13

FIVE CENTS



1950.



Wear 55.





ee

URCHILL READY FOR “COUNCIL OF WAR”

aed



“Europe Can Be @ a ) = , | SOCIALISTS DETAILED

One Trade Area” MartialLaw| FOR BRIEFING

PRESIDENT TRUMAN PB metas ae Reimposed UNIONS SPLIT OVER
; In Egypt WAGE FREEZING

report urging Marshall Plan countries to weld their
LONDON, Jan. 12 |

onomies into a “single producing and trading area” of
70,000,000 people.
NEW CABINET FORMED| (CONSERVATIVE Leader, Winston Churchill, )
CAIRO, Jan. 12. returned here tonight to lead his election
Martial Law, which was relaxed! troops into battle after a fog threatened air
Guring the " Eayptian | Genera\| journey from Madeira, which had provoked con-

again on the end of the re-ballot-| Siderable anxiety. The 75-year-old war leader dis-






Soviets

Detach

-— American dollars had strength-
| ened Europe’s economy to the
; point when the 16 aid nations
sould take that “radical” step
without risk, the E.C.A. (Economic
Co-operation Aéministration) re-
port said,
“Aithough economic integration
is obviously a long-term objective,





At Left Mr. ©. E. A. BECKLES, Senior Peasant
Instructor, discusses “Cultivation and Care of

ing. 7 i
ies DEGOUAN dkmne ie: Eananiainbe: fon Parvin: Seen Serene se Pe tt Ss pe embarked from a flying boat at Southampton in
the initia Ab: ists Fruit Trees” at Fermers’ Day at Groves axation during the election : “ .

oO ttae pe. citation of this programme, Aaphetindndh *ttnbine: ‘weatagten At Right ue. was so slight as to be scarcely fighting battle, ready for an. early Council of

said. ‘ eo ‘aes ay . noticeable, and Foreign Press ) wri i i Laat

Such a move would bring a Beckles’ assistant demonstrates the budding of 8 : Censorship persisted. Martial Law War with his chief lieutenants- the members of

WASHINGTON, Jan. 12. | 00m in manufacturing and trad-{ a fruit tree. was first introduced, when Egypt the Conservative “Shadow Cabinet.

merican Secretary of State,)iMg througuout all of Western

ernie bene: silipiontaniciet ili aaniaintaes went to war in Palestine, but was
Europe,

-- — ne wmses - }
’ ; ; : aaa : Although Churchill’s chief col- Delegates using block . votes ap-
retained in simplified form for} ,
This would “immeasurably C lti t | purposes of inaaeaat security | leagues. stood by as a precaution | proved the policy by 4,263,000 to
: i impr saile ATOKeAT V e ' vp , "1 ge i “kk ) ir 3,606,000, The Conference opened
ng the northern en’ of hee the sale of European u 1 a : ommon wed mainly to combat undergrounc Paani ton ee =m ? | pera ree ~ Saas
a and “attaching them to! goods in Dollar markets and activities of the now dissolvea! ion was that the ieeuGeunanke cision. postponed untid. after the
Boviet Union. : 2 nearly satisfy” the expectations Moslem brotherhood, and also of| - : : . : ;
. Acheson described this as) and needs of the European People

e | e e the C ‘ ere unlikely to-night Other | General Election, but this was de-
ka f r ree he Communists ; staal reaate
ost significant point” and] aided by E.C.A. uit . Ss L CCO nise it nae ties with the new main election news was a sum- | feated
Problems Still |

“ : * y ge mons to the 390 Socialist Speaker after speaker in the
mothing» we do or say me Wafdist Government, which op me ;
lowed to obscure the reality

Acheson. said in a speech
that Russia was busy de-

eee





























r 2 CX , , members o : debate
Steet Not all the efforts The E.C.A. report said that DO BARBADIANS know how e e posed Martial Law and censor-| parliament among then,
ay geanda will ohtain ive it. | the recent devaluation of European] to cultivete fruit trees and get) hip to decide whether or no!lto a secret Geni wae
Saly thing that all ation currencies will not by itself solve} the best results from them t ao a i e time these will be completely abolishee | briefing by cast their
buld be through ill-conceived Europe’s basic economic problems | Statistics show that the majority Sirry Pasha, Premier of Egypt’: ] their leaders votes for the
2 se Oe canatl tf “nor remove the shackles that are} would be compelled to say “no” 4 ee Jenende ‘aretaker Govern-|on campaig T.U.C. Poii-
tures on your part.” . RotAaa: toe peer eee re hat he: COMMOHOS.:+)- B88 isl (By SYLVAIN MANEGOT) Independent ¢ aretaker Gove i“ 1 campaign MU.C. Poi
eson who was addressing 1olding back International trade”.| Yesterday at Grove’s Agricultura . : rn ment, today handed his Cabinet’: | policy and cy, coms
‘ational Press Club luncheon|. [t made this picture of what] Station, St. George, Mr. C. E. As i COLOMBO, Jan, 12. esignation to King Farouk, who}tactiecs in plained that
hack at critics of President} it had in mind by integration: Beckles, Senior Peasant, Agricul- THE Commonwealth Powers will grant some form 0!] hen appointed him Chief of the} London on vages re-
an’s policy towards China “A single market within which tural Instructor, told oe pr recognition to the Bao Dai Regime in Indo-China as the | Royal Cabinet January 24 straint could
Formosa. It wasvhis third} quantitative restrictions of the air ates I te. one ee French progressively transfer power, observers conclude Wafdist Leader Nahas Pasha,| This will be on!
arance in three days to de- movement of goods, monetary | how it should be done. . a Fa ee ial Fes ; .. 4 whose - party won a _ landslide}the “wind ractised,
the President’s decision not] barriers to the flow of trade Mr. Beckles said :— ; from the reported wens: OF today’s discussion at the Com ictory in the Egyptian General)! © g up there were
md new military aid to the and eventually all tariffs are “Thousands of cocoanut, lime monwealth Ministers’ Conference here. As in the case of mections, today presented his] Meeting — of stricter méa-
bnalist Government in For-] eliminated”. : and other citrus plants, as well China, all the powers will not necessarily move together,] Cabinet list to King Farouk the Parlia ures to con-
p —Reuter. During the first 18 months of| as planting material of other fruit it was believed | it was the first time the twoj mentary trol profits
the Marshall Plan, it said, the| trees are issued every year from : ~ On today’s showing India,| had met formally since an earlier | Panty, Ther Phe general
Ini 3+, ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘odri sasants and the i iF ke, a ks ge ie } Will be mor- oO pit oO?
* United States poured a total of] Codrington to pe asants and which was the first Commonwealth| Administration headed by Nahas} nor I fon
a eAnD A : a" rpener: ic Jnfortunately, . Wee Wee ine ae anne al SA ; : | ale acth mong pias
ittiey Plunges eer Western Europe gence! pupiie. rie Ram Costs 2.100 | couniry to recognise China, ap-| Pashe, wee dismissed by. the. Kina te bre ir among po
- through direct grants and loans. ’ Seem : pears likeiy to.be the last to grant| in October 1944 Nahas Pasha, | he rr
$ . ‘ > ‘ t F: " aturity ° : : ‘ : > . A the ) Yr ‘rvers was
Into A River As a result, industrial production al Eee side, Te Guineas yecognition to Vietnam | who spent an hour with the King Mi Rake ' ne feet Tra
e Dead; One Injured Se ae ret to Sieh seaeuten for this failure ot | Other highlights of today’s two] declared afterwards that the meet Pheu Mis Cinemas
oe" war, and agricultural output in i ae oe me WELLINGTON, Jan. 12. | sessions were the agreement in| jng was “a symbol of unity be- —" pre
“ fruit trees are :— haus. oF cnn Beer ™ Aig Re caalpondi ie s9 ister He ould (
spite of a severe drought was at ; ; : New Zealand stud rams yle te dad Burn 1 Bl tenn i f > > Names | ’
bados Advocate Corresponden ie ‘ : : ae wee (1) Unsuitability of sites, and naa a te gaat pring iple to aid Burt 1a th rough i ween King and tng hin oe bart Motri- alk ae
PORT-OF -SPAIN, Jan. 12. east equal to last year. i (2) Lack of proper care and ten cuties , Bai ee | Ce mmonw enleh Loan, to which all] of his Cabinet were still awai ') gon, Socialist ey dae
s. Rawlie Autancie Winter, attention before and after sheep sales. At. Masterton re ‘ cqesanty i ae maps mi —Reuter,| Campaign f ec -
i re - of St. Jose anti ' Saeeae ) at aye ° | Airiea would probably contribute, awe!? avi f a
ee ee es ore mee’ B’d De ats planting. antag at site ‘te 1,200 guineas were paid for land the ger oe aaa on a \ 4 Bos: ; ur's, Cnal :
1 €¢ and amveo uggins, Os eC As far as the c noice of sil e 1s a Southdown ram from : ; ; fete z nen en Sh i d Shi ? \ split de- of success
y criver, was fearfully injured concerned, this will vary with|] Roland Perry's Kohatu stud, |] eae eee oe end. enue I veloped t in the Ger
h the jitney in which they T; e id d the particular variety of fruit oe pate ie Maus Gen! | Scuth East Asia countries by send- | zi ipy amon eral Electiot
travelling plunged into the rintiaad tree. For example , there are land and possibly for the || ‘&them Commonwealth Technical Arrives Safely ) Britain ae ; on Febru-
en Moracas River early this many areas in Barbados where world. A Rombey ram ear- Specialists. | 8,000,000 iry 23rd. It
P Z 3 . v7 2 © ry a . ‘ “on % | 5 . t an ; . . ; ~'
ing as the bridge was washed coconuts will not thrive. lier in the week fetched a Indian Prime Minister, Pandit 7 aé Trade Union Mr. WINSTON CHURCHILL, is expectec
} In Ist. Water Polo Match Sandy Soils world price of 2,100 guineas Nehru, told the Commonwealth Al Shangh ists—most of that there
is the worst flood that Trini- (By PAUL FOSTER), They do comparatively well on —(Reuter,) || Ministers’ Conference here today HONG KONG, Jan, 12 | them traditional backers of La- | will be a truce, until after Britain
as had in years.

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 12. the free-draining sandy soils of thet no barrier against Soviet

ag “PR 1e t ; or the Socialist Govern- | has gene to the polls.

: ‘ The~-British ffeighter . “Elsi¢ } D0Ur-—over bi : Mn ee ees
arbados sisively sd| the coastal districts and in the Imperialism could be effective .” ‘cessfully ran the| ment Wage Freezing Policy. The) Full force OF the discontent ot
100 people miles along the teianthaks howe i ix one lighter soils in sheltered areas in in South East Asia until the states Moller, successfull} nation’s 187 leading Trade Unions, | 3,500,000 workers is then likely

F ; ie A, = 2 : c Abie . : Chinese Nationalist blockade int« ro ae . A liken deeaodina : uk Tee Widen . Clade
oseph River, the woman's tes’. The score was 6—1.'P. Pat- the higher rainfall districts. In Queen Ingrid | concerned were politically con- Shanghai this morning, the represented by delegates. at. a} to explo: n the New Govern
was found partly covered by

ter three hours search which










































































: § trace 2 annister'| the heavier clay soils of some | tented, according’ to usually re+) oe terers. reporte Conference here, approved the; ment, if it persists in a wage
ri iles terggn: 2, J. Green: 2, Ds, Tecan cies a the Scotland District, or ‘“M7e_e liable Conference Sources € hinese charyapers ro ae th Government Policy on wages by | pressing pol
and debris on a bank miles'|;"%, Ince 1 (for the visivors). | Parts of the Scotle f , ference Source Neither the Royal Navy nor the] °° o rr Magli, gt ee
. ivy ; the thin gravels or rab land,| ISI s us Vv The Ministers discussed Indo- s } 1¢ narrow majority of 660,000. Reuter
; The Trinidadians have not much| 1) the py See 7 . i+ | : seth Thien i a ship’s owners could confirm — the
; e@ remains of the jitney lay} jmproved from las year’s Discov- it is useless to attempt their : i : | ( hina and Burma at the morning news, but if the report is true ot
s side in the river 300 yards| ery Tour in Barbados and notched nee. vide ws a, | dilinds suiet ot tinier aes Fogo anes ner lunch, — she is the. first British ship i 3
stream. The driver hadjan early surprised goal by a flip ith respec o the care ana . Y 0 ma ar- | oO schemes or Economic Aid enter Shanghai since Britair P. > ol t f 2 1 B t l f Pp
bled out and climbed the steep| shot from left-hander Anderson,| attention to be given to the; rived here to-day to see het | South East Asia. recognised the Communist Regimé re mMmeattatec ru a L 4
2 bank after battling the strong the Trinidad skipper plants, the importance cannot be} grandfather, 91 year old King In the case of Indo-China, a China eo
2 € 6 : t a s . Dbiattinians . - ok ee ae ote . a cs 3 | ; . } a. 7 ; ;
ent half mile further down. In the second Test vhis after- overstressed of proper preparation Gustav of Sweden, who is ill with | @ On Page 3 | The agents for the Isbrandtsex WARSAW, Jan. 12, Frenct 1uthorities vowards the
gaping chasm, over 50 feet] noon, MeClean and Gray will be | of the holes, provision of wind-j bronehitis and a septic throat. | ine. which owns the Unites Monsieur Pierre Marshall, aged} Polish Correspondent in Paris
now marks the spot where | left down from the sitors }ereean 2068) eee rene | sete Drovers Se ee atons tr cightes Flyins Arrow 42, for over four years Y rre ~| Following recent expulsion and
. arks spot where Ss. : ieee 5 cs ene : | | States fre . ying / 2, years corres~| Following it expulsion ;
stn > aden ie : planting depth, watering, weed-| daughters, Princess Benedikte | is reagan eel ws Ven tam Gilad DA tinn Aaoe | Stel cof mela., Sao Peas nen
on re, By Cable. | Rey ah) ing, manuring and control off and Princess Anpe Marie. She Opera Workers — baste *s hile Even reat jig Bro ron 0 night be P sp i 1 Sn M saaabahinl te
std Ps sts and di ses will remain until Tuesday. A j alists warships wh oe - * ae ae 7 | paige ,
pests and diseases. } ] i esday. A| f ee Ee d arreste pag 20> te ertlte soll ina Anialaaatshreitlels iin
; on ee | No Resignation For I propose to deal with these | a on King Gustav said that | Strike In Rome jrun the — oe — i tenaine the persion, = Apes a “ Time P ene a aa
"a : Jafiv einisr 4 lation | he spent a res igh é a | - | pbestponed 1e departure é es aris e@ I ork ies, R , and As
Mone NoPa ers z * sre = a ae ‘itr a anigborainre wren dete temead | > , Js 2 | Shanghai of their freighte: | to-day of the Polish Press Agency | socoated Press, Warsaw radio to-~
Ys Pp | B a] sie P “mer to the cultivation of citrus vari. ma pe re Was. f al. | ROME, Jan. 12. | Shanghas j¢hts pending fur- | COrrespondent. Marshall lived in| night said \he arrests by French
" oT =, ry eo koe, eee, ee z oer = a are attending him.| workers of Rome’s opera house arene os 2 : DN wy Warsaw with his wife and two! Police of over 50 Polish citizens
7 "ee srapefrui ‘esterday, he was abs A ‘Cvies . : , arches. | ther instructions from New York 1 é h > ol : POus uizen
d No Luggage BRUSSEL, Jan 12 4 oe t place, many peopie| the formal ee or vee from Prima Donnas oe ee re . —Reuter | Children. It is presumed that his | to-day was an act of premeditated
¥ a. ‘he ay - > hrs ace, any pcop + bg Me 5 € a~ Pa ¢ acks he s, came out = oo ip. " 4 ade | brutali
The Belgian Chamber of Depu fail to realise that when they| Ment for the first time for 40 | tra and backs 8 ands, ¢ , — release or expulsion will be made | brutalivy, Bra
T WILL SEE WORLD \ies today rejected a Communist btait lime or oF inge plant! years on strike today donee —_ upon the action, taken by the| — (Reuter.
a a aetna Srime | Obtain a lime o ange plant!) 8. ; ss of employment all through
FRANKFURT, Jan, 12 Minister Manton teohans Patter from the Department's nursery Renter: ae one “Instead of” “seasonal” 80 Day Voyage i ' caintaiiale etnies eteisneniainis
i Hekzbercer ae yesterday’s Parliamentary storm | &t Codrington, that what they are employment, which provides them : i Bf PERRET EMSS SION TO MRE P IRONS IO IINNS prican ee aan leach Tae over widespread frauds said vo actually getting is a plant which OW > ki : with only six months’ work during lo A Contineuts % 2
“World Citizer ae ber 2.”]involve leading public figures. consists of portions of two plants or ing asses ie sar x i , x
today that he had to aban-| By 125 votes to 74, with 1 ab=| united in such a vat ee bmw . : The strike which affects 480 NEW YORK, Jan. 12. |% Here Again aa %
his plan for a contest to find|stention, the House instead adopt- rt? eee Pan a ae Will Decide workers ‘is Indefinite, but repre-| The Cunard White Star line: 9
girl with the sharpest}ed a Catholic Liberal motion, | * —e es i rs eerie 7 fting a "1 é sentatives of the management said|“Caronia,” 34,183 tons sailec 3
meseel” He blamed the urging the Judicial authorities Ne ee ae Bag ia . va fe Leopold’s Fate tonight that they hoped for a | from here to-day on one of he % %
pidity of the Bureaucrats’|speed up their inquiries into the mS or rll: ; quik solution Renter. most luxurious cruises in modern x
the collapse of his plans, | frauds. Seereter dunt 0h: Sean BRUSSELS, Jan 12. |— |history—an 80-day voyage =‘ x 3
: hove - al ae g j overn- | Kno as Bf ) se ee Deeg 3 aati aiie >
a = the ae of ae ae oP ie to | grafted on to a sour orange seed-} |, ae Pet: Nap os ges. Poli Cle ey Soe thé “Great Afri-| 9 x
arriage > . film a 1 ; ; : p ce aie al eputy for Charleroi, tolc 1€ ‘ee 7 . a ¥, >
contest. Hekberger, 31, said|Parliament when the investiga-| ling, known then as the stock. yr ae , ee ae O1Ce ear can cruise’, the ship’s itinerary|% *
h erger, sa . Jet ‘the’ freuae Similarly, in case of a mango Belgian Chamber of Deputies to . | 4 eT South |% %
mas = “fe y i . auds |” at = b ; . fate i 7 + , s calls at 27 rts In Souln
cacy” ond wer tumaba ee ae ‘ad bonds ‘that tree which has been topworked, ae ve — a Pg | eee Acera Streets peloene wae the Middle East % 8
et ae . : , have your julie mango as the} Will not be decided in the House rica, a, etd & 4 7
oye ae for a trio|should have been ne a nyt ‘eraited im to the ade of Parliament but “among the ACCRA, Gold.Coast, Jan, 12 and Europe, %: * FU 7 T REAM °4
he wo Coys ay hes sdiately ¢ a is » Bre Yin oe. wee 7 ’ L 4 ee , sh amas
rs or Nigenae ee” oon rns ae ihoaier. common mango tree as the stock. = masses . : Steel helmeted pene WONG” | ohne gag tem eT (T° x rm $
: iggage. - i 2 ‘ . many was speaking on the] ishing long truncheons today vig-| Thomas in the 2 ee o O .
Ne " The Reasons second day of a debate on a Bill] orously ' cleared the streets of|!ast at Southampton, Rpaiand < P W DERED %
7 ; Py i ar rovidi * a nation-wide refer- cra, capite » Briti 7 Despite fares Tranging rom | ¥ s
P a] 7 Some of you might be wonder providing for a nation-wide refer-| Acera, capital of the British Gold e pm & °
Ak Hunt For IA y r Old ing why co to all the trouble off ¢ndum of the Belgian people on the} Coast Colony in West Africa, and | 32,400 a person to $20,000 for a % 9 MILK
, growing a sour orange seedling} auestion of the provisionally exiied| arrested six men and a woman.| suite, 556 persons booked passages | .
if 6 ‘ 9] and then bud the grapefruit on King’s return to the throne. Thirty-six more people were ar-| for the long voyage, It was estim- s
4 U un or venture an On Page 8 He added “whatever the result|resved at Kumasi. A state of|ated that the total booking cost) ©
e . of the discussed plebiscite the! emergency came into foree last) would reach $2,780,000. % So
. , +. 9 -__——— — working masses will rise to oppose| night. The strike and a boycott) —Reuter,| * 7
NORFOLK, Jan. 12. ‘ the return of King Leopold’. of British goods began on Sunday ‘oneetin a 3 %
BRITISH AIR FORCE PLANES were today scouring Gl ri a —puter.|in support of a demonsvration for many %
hundreds of square miles of the North Sea from Britain to orlia ' |-Bominion status and re-instate- | Toll Rates %
he Dutch Coast for a trawler believed to be manned only * as zs ment of 61 dismissed Government Y ’ Children 8
by the 14 v . ’ ; ’ Greek Pol ec Guard employees.—Reuter, ¥
y the i4 year old John Guthrie, a school-boy. u l zree ice ; - NEW YORK, Jan. 12. |} x
ee ee ‘ares 5 ‘ : : %
. ; he ed ° | The United States Budget is| > *s
, issin 5 ¥ B 4 eae ate te oe moans THE names of the other three U.K, U.S. Embassies EVA PERON HAD | understood to have proposed in-| are 3
6 ir. boy lfishing boat “Girl Jean”, bound |Survivors of the “Gloria May i SUCCESSFUL OPERATION | creased toll rates for Panama ¢
j ound I Ca l ltor “Adventureland”, He had |given as Gladston Rani, Josep , ATHENS, Jan. 12. Canal Traffic to President Tru- Thriving
emg mt na | enough fuel on board to keep him |Kitm and Alfredo Loongoti, are Reticn, savade. snared: ee BUENOS AIRES, Jan. 12. | man after a recommendation from |
YQLVERHAMPTON, Jan. 12 (one until to-night. Coastwatch- thought to be Gladstene Dum- Britis abd. United Sete yr Traffic was diverted {rom streets| the Governor of the Canal, the
body of five year old Sam- | ers, ‘lighthouses, and shipping in { mett, Joseph De Rouge, Alfred ae yr rm pend er ing round a Buenos Aires’ Nursing| New York Times said today on
Poole, missing since Xmas | the area have been warned to look | Headley, respectively, who are persed Shee’ ew 'YINS! tome today where Eva Peron, ex-| Congressional action is require‘l) %
yy Was ‘found - a ane hate out for the missing 15 yards yel- reported “by the Barsour and gp Sat toe bets seal radio and film star, wife of the, for any change in toll rates in) ¥ o
nm: low painted coat, Pride of Ar-|Shipping Master as being the tena tehesl y Seema with| Argentine President, had a suc-| the Canal, and the President is
Thousands of Police throughout | broath, Scotland fishing fleet. Fast remainder of the crew of the ossen ieee cnikorel “before| cesstul operation for acute} expected to an it sean a ; Prepared iiehdes.tibe’ ie aula
ry ” ” . s _ : tee ‘ 5 s "
Sountry had. searched: for| motor launches were standing by alta the city war memorial to the| #Ppendicitis. : i ae —Reuter, 3 cndit of modern hygiene
mmy since he disappeared | at strategic points along the Brit- Unknown Warrior before the| . President Peron, leading politi- " conditions of n hygiene,
ne home at’ tea. time on | isi: East Coast, hint homes of British news correspon-| clans and ee polities! ss guaranteed by stringent tests to
v —Reuter. x dents and in the city centre] were in attendance. Dr. Osca . a re
“My had searched the canal | 22 Ye ar Old shouting “union”. Some were Vanissevich, Minister of Education, Tsiang Steps e absolutely pure $
$ nome, and Police had r : temporarily detained. —Reuter.. operated. —Reuter, adel. dia
aeged other sections. ' Woman Char ed " ——- Do r Cuba oe ;
aod ean Vat chee, aly | Battered Body” | wi Mund Or 41 ; apr §
nee Tie Oe: eRe ‘ ith Murde P A Isto A t “at. LAKE SUCCESS; Jan. 12
00b a | r ope Appeals to Aristocrats) i sss. Mi.
ae ryan } IOWA, Jan. 12 T. ie F P ~ . the eat Comment Uy. agi K ;
5 oc SCOTLAND, Jan. 12. | A murder charge was filed to- oO Wor. or eace . Tsiang, whose expu ERED 3
Six Bodies Searchers today found a.badly| day against a woman patient who see a ny a 9 o : x
iv * battere body believed to be] reportedly admitted having start- VATICAN CITY, Jan. 12. | other countries : Jacob Malik, tonight agreed to) % ? Pe ee e
Knives And Fire ‘ Mal: bound mining} ed a hospital fire, which took the Pope Pius XII to-day urged Do all you can, in such cir-] step down from the presidency. |@ LL CREA Mtg ijoce Mile x
INDIANA. J ; ‘ ) l vhose| lives of 41 women here last Sat-| merpbers of the Roman aristo- mstances, further under- | M Malik, who walked out on the | ¥ ’ se pth t “ar x
Bodies oj meee ‘ e and ecked ere | ul cracy to work for peace and un- |} standing and peace between men} Security Couneil | meeting oni 2
4 > Vi'SIX people wert : Da Th né ‘ j ‘ > “ “ ne hetween ng ne and betwee nations.” The Pope]! Tuesday lemandi Dr. Tsiang’s ; &
2) ee ter Sunda The Th Stat Attorney f Rock! defstanding between nations and betv n ior 1e Pope] Tu demanding } ~
Peace, who brok oS Cmca. made ae keel) Hhenateicie 1% the consis- t arous Ee ision, took his seat at the | in spite of Devaluation the Price remains %
dentifie the | te hall of the Vati Palace it ‘ < e Holy Y¢é Security CounciY again tonight|¢ >i »
Epper! : fc New Y« udience, tt e for c ; t t ret to discuss his de is 972 1 Ib in $2 27 mm 2 Ib fin %
He hat the woman| Pope said; “The class to which | half ivy, less weighte y 1d for, the expulsion of Dr. x %
rt he peared to| admitted that she started the fire! you belong places you more ire bitterne in | Tsiar ‘ae ee re ree ‘ T. S. GARRAWAY & CO. LTD. ~~ AGENTS >
, le nte ir er roor in a mental ward! quently and easily in contact with be wi g to ss a : COOP eR
Reuter ef th pita Reuter. authoritativ versonalities of —Reuter. delegate Carlos Iblanco. —Reuter. FOOL LEE LLLP ELPLLLAPLLPLL PSE PAD PIOGOER







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PAGE TWO

en te enema






IS E®CELLENCY the Gover-

nor-and Mrs. Savage enter-
tained thé members of the Customs
Union Commission and a number
of ovher guests to Cocktails at
Government House
evening.

&> «>

U.S. War Veteran Here
4 \ENERAL GEORGE VIDMER,

Retired U.S, Army, is now
in Barbados for a holiday. He
arrived here recently on his first
visit to the island and is staying
ai the Marine Hotel.

He is the father of Colonel
Richards Vidmer of “Westley,”
Rockley ‘and a veteran of three
wars, having fought in the Spanish
American War in 1898, the Phillip-
ine Insu¥fection 1901—4 and the
first World War, 1914—18.

During those wars, he received
a number of decorations for
bravery which include the D.S.C.,
the D.S.M, Silver Star with Oak
Leaf CidSter, vhe Purple Heart,
the Officer of the Legion of Hon-
our Framee, and the Crois de
Guerre With two palms

Generaf Vidmer told Carib yes-
terday that after World War I,
he retummed to the U.S.A. and
command@d a brigade in vhe First
Cavalry Bivision in Texas and at
times the Division. He retired in
1935 and was living in Mobile,
Alabama until he came out here.

He said that he is in love with
vhe island, Everything here is
pleasant and should it continue to
be so, he would be remaining for
a year and if at the end of that
time he was well satisfied, he
would spend the rest of his life
here.

«> «>
To-night’s Music
ONIGHT at 9.15 the British
Council is presenting in iis
regular Friday night broadcast
extracts from Vaughan Williams’
music to “Job—A Masque for
Dancing.”

This work draws its main in-
spiration from William Blake’s
illustrations to the Book of Job.
Each musical selection will be
prefaced by a description of the
action in the ballet,

«>

Extra-Mural Lectures

ICKETS for all the Lecture

Courses arranged by the
Extra-Mural Department of the
University College of the West
Indies may be obtained av “Wake-
field,” through the courtesy of the
British Council. Tickets may also
be obtained on the opening night
of gach Lecture Course, and
students may be enrolled during
the first half of the Course,

< «<>

«>

Spent X’mas in Trinidad
MESS IVINE ALLEYNE. Or-

«<>

ganiser, Housecraft Centre,

Street. returned on Monday
by B.W.1A. from Trinidad where
he had pent the Christmas
holidays,

© °
On Holiday
\N RS. MARIE CUMMINGS and
her daughter are here from
Trinidad on a holiday at “Cacra-
bank.” Mrs, Cummings is Secre<
tary to MJ, K, McKenzie who is
Secretary “and Administravive
Manager @& B.W,I, Airways,
“<>


ARS. Giillemino Bancs and her
M on Mr. Francisco Bancs of
enezuclaswere arrivals over the
yd=by B.W.LA. from La
fok a holiday. They ex-
be here for about two
and are staying at the
Marine Hetel,
- + +
M& and Mrs. T. J. Weyl, Mr.
and Mrs. R. C. Weyl, Mrs.
E. O'Neil and Mrs Kirk were
arrivals on Monday
“Fort Amherst”

by the

They have come

for a holiday and are staying at
the Marine Hotel,

B.B.C. Xmas Party

HERE was a cheerful little

party in London at the B.B.C.
just before Christmas; after the
recording of the Christmas Edi-
tion of “West Indian Diary”. The
10st was the producer of the pro-
gramme, diminutive Mr. Willie
Edmett, and there was plenty of
beer and sandwiches for every-
body. Among the guests was Miss
Mona Baptiste, of Trinidad, a very
forceful personality who is mak-
ing good in show business in
England

\

n
Guaira
pect

weeks

DAILY CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it:



yesterday

ee



ea

| POCKET CARTOON |
, 6 OSBERT LANCASTER



the
Americans would say if we
asked ‘em to pick up Mr.

“1 wonder what

Stanley at Tel Aviv?”

- World Theatre
ARIB reminds readers of the
seriés of broadcasts of fa-
mous plays which are to be given
each’ Sunday evening over the
local . broadcast beginning cn
Sunday, January 15. The first
play to be broadcast will be “She
Stoops to Conquer” by Oliver
Goldsmith, It will) be given in
two parts—the first part on Sun-
day January 15 from 8.30—9.30
p.m. and the second part the
following Sunday. The cast—
which was given in full in last
Sunday’s Advocate — includes
Dame Irene Vanbrugh the well
known actress in the leading role
together with a fine cast of sup-
porting players. These plays
which were mostly originally
broadcast over the BBC Third
Programme were recorded by the
BBC Transcription Service for
use overseas. As the local radio
service are making use of these
recordings, reception should be
excellent.

The British Council are arrang-
ing for “Wakefield” to be open
at the times given above so thut
anyone who is unable to listen at
home may join a,listening group.
Those wishing to take advantage
of this should be at “Wakefield”
not later than 8.15 p.m.

Mr, Aubrey Douglas Smith,
Resident Extra Mural Tutor of the
University College of the West
Indies is giving a talk over the
local broadcast on Friday evening
January 13th in connection with
the series of plays. He will speak
on Oliver Goldsmith and his play



“She Stoops to Conquer.” His
talk will be from 7.15—7,30
o'clock,

«> «>

From New Brunswick

R. Victor F. Crosby of Crosby

Molasses Co., Ltd. of St.
Johns, New Brunswick is now
over here for a holiday. He came
in last week by the “Lady Rodney”
and is staying at the Marine
Hotel.

«<> «>

For Further Holiday
R, J. A. CORBEIL,, President
of the Topper Footwear
Limited, shoe manufacturers ot
Monyeal, left for Trinidad by
B.W.LA,. om Wednesday after
spending about ten days’ holiday
here. He was accompanied by
Mrs, Corbeil and they were stay-
ing at the Ocean View Hotel,
Mr. and Mrs, Corbeil will be
spending a further holiday in
Trinidad as guests of Mr, and
Mrs. Harry Farinha before return-
ing to Canada,

«> «>

Comings and Goings

R, T, GRANT MAJOR, Cana-

dian Trade Commissioner
svationed at Trinidad, left yes-
terday by B.W.LA. for St. Lucia.

Mr. Anthony Lewis, Architect
and Town Planner left for St.
Lucia by B.W.1.A. yesterday,

Mr, Hugh Coxe, Branch Mana-
ger of B.W.LA, svationed at Ja-
maica, returned home yesterday
by B.W.1.A, after spending about
two weeks’ holiday, He was ac-
companied by his wife and son
Floyd and they were staying at
vhe Hotel: Royal.

oe * *

Mr. Cameron Livingstone, As-
sistant Teacher of Bay Street
Boys’ School and Mr, Darnley
Clarke of the Central Foundry
Limited, left yesterday by
B.W.LA, for Trinidad to atvend a
Conference of the Scottish M
chanics, ..

AXYDLBAAXR,

is LONGFELLOW
One letter simply stands for another, In this example A is used
‘ three L's, X for the two o's, etc. Single letters, apos-
M * the length and formation of the words are all hints.

lay the code letters are different.

A Cryptogram Quotation

CPEP QE FCP USIEP

iTIK=-MQLQMPE QF
UIVFE—LOQVIQS.

urday'’s Cryptoquote:

TOCOPV? .- Fee

EPSX OWRPB FTB

WISDOM IS BOTH THE FOUNDA-

TION AND FOUNT OF GOOD WRITING—HORACE,

Distributed by King

Se





Features Syndicate

li You Some









BANNED!

‘ HE MADE FUN

OF THE CABINET
(By BRENDAN KEMMET)

Mr. George Woden. novelist



has been banned by Glasgow Li- |

braries Committee because he
used speecnes delivered by Cab-
inet Ministers to illustrate a lec-
ture on the misuse of English.
Socialist Cvuuncillor Jack Da-
vies, of the Libraries Committee,
says that Mr. * Woden took the

opportunity to “make comedy
criticisms of the leading Labour
parliamentarians.’

Mr. Woden replies: “I was try-
ing to show that the man who
wants to produce emotional re-
sults on his hearers chooses
words for that purpose and not
for their actual truth.”

Oldest Profession
Here are the quotations Mr.
Woden used and his comments
which led to the ban:—
DR. EDITH SUMMERSKILL:
Motherhood is the oldest profes-

MR. WODEN: Did she really
mean “profession”? Or was the
word used as a crude form of

ttery?
EC. ANNOUNCER: The

Prime Minister has bought a cot-
tage in the country.

MR. WODEN: This cottage has
14 rooms. I take it the B.B.C.
wanted to suggest the idea that a
modest Prime Minister was buy-
irg a modest house.

SIR STAFFORD CRIPPS said
the pound would never be de-
valued.

MR. WODEN: Sir Stafford
wanted people to be reassured.
He wanted to produce certain re-
sults in people’s minds and he
used words for that purpose.

Tory ‘Vermin’

MR. ANEURIN BEVAN:
Tories are worse than vermin.

MR. WODEN: When Mr, Beyan
said that, he did not tell us much
about the Tories, nor about bugs,
fleas, lice, and rats.

But in those five words he tells
his own autobiography.

MR. STRACHEY: The average

diet to-day is infinitely better
than before the war.
MR. WODEN: Mr. Strachey’s

job is to make statements to per-
suade people not to be despond-
ent, and he manipulates statistical
averages for that purpose.

In this sentence what does he
mean by infinitely? In mathe-
matics it means a number so great
as to be incalculable.

But our diet to-day is not even
ten times better than pre-war,

How Much Snoek ?

MR. STRACHEY, referring to
snoek, said the public had bought
all of it.

MR. WODEN: On the same
day, at a Press conference, Mr.
Strachey was asked how much
snoek had actually reached the
public, and he confessed not so
much as half, showing that he
contradicted himself.

In his anxiety to put people’s
minds at ease he had indeliberate-

ly or deliberately contradicted
himself.
MR. CHURCHILL described

Hitler as That bad man.

Mr. WODEN; This is simple
English that everyone under-
stands, and it is accurate.

—L.E.S.



CROSSWORD



Across

1. Seems the winning crew have
this over the losers. (4)
Seaweed gone to pieces, (5)
As the bath chair attendant
said : “ You can’t get anywhere
without it.” (4)
Sounds a peculiar sort of flower,

‘his sovereign
crowns, (4
hope

c
despair. (5)
» Where lies are broken down.

(4) 15. A broken star. (4)
.» Moderate, it sounds as though
Tage consumed. (9)

. To net this ls not manly. (4)
. Epithet for pantomime rela-
tions. (4)

23. Could be a well-trained fruit

tree. (8) 25. Check! (4)
26. Where the G.I. will return to

a card game, (5)
27. This is a stroke of iuck. (5)
28. This being collected one should
keep it. (4)

Down

Tree with poisonous sap. (4)
Soothe. (4)
Something complete in \tsef.
(5). 5. Bngrossed. (4)
Happen this dog shouid follow
the officer commanding, (3)
Put this to that place. (7)
After this it’s second-hand.
Name of the white horse

4.
8

Es

requires two
rather than

FE2 = #eN

—e—

The tyro loves to supply this
winter sports area. (5
Conveyance of sorts. (3)

. Taken from Liege. (3)

#8 Sen



CELLULAR?

30 ins. wide at 60 cts. per yd.

in Blue, Yellow and Green

THIS IS AN EXCEPTIONAL BARGAIN !

EVANS

1606

«A

DIAL

iii)

WHITFIELDS

41220

}



4

|
ee

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ee

Women’s World





WEARING a new ermine cape, bouquet of orchids—the
Duchess of Kent at the Savoy.



Ghost In Brown Sat

In My

Office

SAID ANGELA

The brightly lit office on the
top floor of the three-storey
concrete building in the busy
shopping street did not seem a
likely place to see a ghost. But
that was where 27 year old AN-
GELA BENSON* repeatedly saw
the Woman in Brown.

The first time the figure ap-
peared Angela was sitting in the
office with her colleague MAR-
GARET WATSON.* Margaret had
just picked up the telephone to
answer a call when Angela sud-
denly realised there was a third
woman sitting in a chair by the
window.

She seemed tall, about 30, and
was dressed in brown. She got
up, turned towards the window,
then vanished.

“Horror”

_ Angela saw the ghost a second
time. And a third time. But the
third time the Woman in Brown
showed herself there was a tinge
of horror to the situation,

Again she appeared as though
conjured up by the ringing of the
telephone, This time she reached
the window and tried to open it
with panic determination that
could only mean she intended to
jump out,

Angela just had time to ery,
“Don't open it,” before the ap-
parition disappeared,

Angela saw the Woman
Brown ten times after that.

When the girl cried, “Who are
you? What do you want?” the
Woman in Brown put her fingers
in her ears, cringed against the
wall, and vanished.

This eerie incident convinced
Angela that the figure was the
ghost of someone killed when the
building had been hit by a bomb,

Three Facts

Angela’s dramatic description
of it convinced Margaret that
the Society for Psychical Re-
search should be called in.



in

Mr. EDWARD OSBORN. an
officer of the society, who has
hunted many ghosts, agreed to

take on the job.

He quickly discovered
Significant facts: —

ky Nobody had been killed in
~ mulding Ween the bomb fell

ough people had beer ow 5
bits outside, pee

2. None of the other 17 e
. " =] 20ple
in the firm had seen the aol
though some of the more imagina-
tive thought they had:

3. Angela was not fooli

ing.

When the Woman in Brown =
peared she seemed as real as
reality itself,
Then, by hypnotising the girl
and asking her questions, Osborn
found she had been deeply im-
pressed by four tragic events in
which women had died.

One of them—an air-raid in-
acetates

three

etna tegrated ener eee amen areca inaretonr coe npor—etaeeti neem pate sateen mantininmreodinoi oma eet





MATS.: To-day & To-morrow 5

EVERYTHING FOR

: including :

@ CANE BILLS
@® CUTLASSES
@ PLANT KNIVES
@ SHOVELS

@ GALVANIZED BUCKETS
® BRASS WOVEN WIRE
® STENCIL INK AND BRUSHES
® SEWING TWINE

@® PACK

+

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON

FACTORY



AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

BETTE DAVIS and ROBERT MONTGOMERY in

“JUNE BRIDE”

with FAY BAINTER and BETTY LYNN

A Warner Bros. Picture

eee nen
ne eet

cident—was linked in her mind
with the ringing of a telephone
bell. She said that the bodies of
the other three had been covered
with brown blankets.

To Osborn all this evidence
strongly suggests that the Woman
in Brown was nothing more su-
pernatural than a recurrent hal-
lucination in Angela’s mind.

Why it was so lifelike may be
explained by a new discovery
reported by British scientists ex-
perimenting with “brainwave”
recording machines.

No Such Things

In his official report of the in-
vestigation just published, Os-
born suggests: “It would appear
that a particular combination of
factors was responsible for the
hallucinations: a foundation of
past experiences, actual or im-
agined: elements in the immedi-
ate surroundings associated with
those experiences; and the gen-
eral background of a_ building
thought to have been the scene
of death.”

* As in Mr. Osborn’s report the
real names of the women involved
in this invegtigation have been
replaced by pseudonyms to pre-
vent personal distress.

L.E.S.

To-morrow |
NIGUT
DINE & DANCE

«| At i-
4

CLUB
MORGAN










THE GAYEST SPOT IN
THE CARIBBEAN !

The Club Morgan Orchestra
and

PETER LACY

at the Piano for continuous
Entertainment,







DIAL 4000 FOR RESERVA-
TIONS.

p.m. : To-Night to Tues. at 8.30

NEEDLES

LIMITED.

she said. Sometimes Harold
_|Warrender was so like him | Rollo’s name there is no reply, but
that I could not believe it was] he hears a slight noise inside the running.
not him. It was astounding— J] caravan and, getting on to a box, nothing to do
he even walked like my brother,} he puts his ear against the side, the little. beare

.| “Abide With Me” heard in “Scott










oan ky SEANUARY







13, 1954 | ig

Children’s Corne,®

upert and the Ca n
| Im Memory Of A | feszay oe ie
| Very Great Man

Harold Warrender, famous on
the radio in Britain but scarce-
ly known om the screen, has be-
come a front-rank film star by
his performance in “Scott of the
Antarctic” of the geologist Dr.
Wilson, the friend of Scott, the
great explorer. Warfender was
deeply moved recently to hear
a sincere tribute to his portrayal
paid to him by Wilson’s sister
Miss Ida Wilson,

“T gained the impression that
I was seeing my brother again,”

A TESA INARI Ser

~ wr



Rupert approaches the caravan
cautiously, hoping for some sign of
his friend Eallo, but there seems to

be nobody about, When he calls






















although of course the voice was
not the same.”
The voice



in the record of

Advertise In The—

“EVENING ADVOCAT

Increasing Circulation Every ¥

DROSPE POSS SPSS POS OFS POPS OOS CSO ones

PORTRAITS AND PICTYR

By Mrs. DOROTHY McAVITY, F.Rg 4, _ 7

of the Antarctic” is that of Dame
Clara Butt, and the record itself
is one of the few in existence
Made in February 1910 it is now
worn and scratched and at first
some doubt existed whether it
would be possible to use it in the
film. But since a similar re-
cording was so beloved by Dr
Wilson that he played it when-
ever possible it was decided that
his record would probably have
been very worn too, and in that
case the record would be authen-
tic,

Ot



will be on view at the

DRILL HALL

Saturday and Sunday, 14th & 15th January,
between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. a

SHAKESPEARE .THE MAN
"AT B.C. TO-NIGHT

T “WAKEFIELD” vonight Mr.
-~ubrey Douglas-Smith will
give his final lecture in the

Shakespeare series. His subject e

will be “Shakespeare the Man” | \

and he will consider some of the] % ADMISSION — 1/-
more recent discoveries about] a

ras ti 4 . 2
the great dramatist Two landscapes in oils are to be sold by silent

and another one raffled during the Exhibition, —
ALL PROFITS ARE FOR THE BARBADOS §pp

8.30
and Mon.

TO-NIGHT To Mon,
Sun.,
5 p.m.
Universal Presents . :
Bud ABBOTT—Lou

Mat. Sat.,

“OSTELLO—Dick POWELL . POO SSOP OOPS SOS Anns
“IN THE NAVY” +

Andrews Sisters and others
Music—Comedy—Romance.

Z.
A POO SPOS PF SSOOOVION


















ROYAL (WortHtings)

To-day to Mon. 5 and 8.30
United Artist Presents...
Mickey ROONEY—Peter LORRE



Starting TO-DAY at 5 & 8.30 p.m. and Con

in

“QUICKSAND”

VAN JOHNSON and JUDY GARLAND
Bee
M.G.M.’s Musical Colour Romance

‘IN GOOD OLD SUMMERI

ot. We

THE GRAND ALL STAR SHO

FEATURING THE WINNERS:

DOREEN GASKIN singing “Don’t You Know IG
HERMAN CRITCHLOW Destin “For You”

CED. PHILLIPS playing “Stormy Weather”

EDDY HALL singing “Irish Lullaby” s
REG. CASEY singing “I Don’t See Me in Your ye
NELL HALLS singing “They say that Falling in
HILTON SPRINGER singing & tapping “Red }
VELDA NICOLLS singing “You’ll Never Know”

Sponsored by B’DOS TOP NOTCH BAKERS
ZEPHIRIN BAKERIES —

Free Samples of Zephirin’s delicious Cookies giv@
away to Patrons attending the ALL-STAR SHOW

with
Barbara BATES—Jeanne CAGNEY



> ¥ SS 9S9999S9999908S SOOSS
»~

EMPIRE

To-day to Tues. 4.45 and 8.30
Eagle Lion Film- Presents oe
Lois BUTLER—Bill GOODWIN

in

“MICKEY”



'



PPPOSSSOD

“RAW DEAL”

with
Marsha HUNT—John IRELAND

OSS





OLYMPIC

To-day to Sun. 4.30 and 8.15
Columbia Double . . .

Warner BAXTER:

>

Fay BAKER

“THE GENTLEMAN
FROM NOWHERE”

_ and
“RIM OF THE CANYON”
Gene AUTRY—Nan LESLIE

Guest Artist — GERALD BANNISTER

with
Irene HERVEY—John SUTTON
To-day to Tues. 4.45 and 8.15
Eagle Lion Film Presents . . .
Dennis O’KEEFE—Ctaire TREVOR
\
e
PPOCEEOPE LEG SSG 9OSG EGS GOO 99 VOODOO
=

2, = =





see

i Fin et on the Pulse

~&



i : a
: } dee tere are happening throughout the world and in different
F : which hore a direct or indirect bearing on Canadian corpo

Ons of our jobs is to keep a fin .
A ger on the pulse of business throughout
the wath Ge Seadion branches keep us in close touch with affairs in all
respondents in other
with Head Office.

All information received is carefully anal : ‘
qecurity situations; This y analyzed in relation to various
; is information i ailab . ee of
the facilities included in what is available to investors; it is part

n Our offices in New York, London, Jamaica and cor+
important centres are also in constant communication

we term a complete investment service:



i
W.C. Pitfield & Company, Limited %
MONTREAL “ ?

MANNING & CO., LIMITED %

Bridgetown Barbados



























































































fence In

10 years.

o Views
Modena
" ooting

EX VALENTINE)
MODENA, Jan. 12

g memcers of the
liament to-day said
4 had proof that the

dH first in the Modena
ry battle last Monday,

workers were killed.
of 20 Communist and
Socialist senators and
lade the report on their
quiry into the incident.
oting occurred when
ed to force their way
1 foundry closed down
agement. The manage~
‘said that it was no
ible to run the works

hions protested against
as “necessary” and
aggravation of already
ployment.”

e report states: “The
io requires one to
this group of work-
f them former partisan
ore expert in the use
, threw hand gren-
lance of not more than
d yet did not injure
nen. “Two policemen,
hospital after the in-
shown by hospital
he suffering from
ainly not the type of
ed by grenades.”

t Menacing

to all this is the fact
It soil around ‘the cross-
no grenade explosion
fact that the work-
hot down on the rail-
ows that they had not
d the point, where
ght reasonably claim
menacing the factory.”
ry commission headed
mist leader, Palmiro
denied this. Their
s based on the hearing
eye-witnesses, and a
ographs stated to have
on the scene by a

government-appointed
Modena, Dr. Musco,
to-day repeated his
tement that the dem-
ad thrown bombs first.
hat material captured
lee afterwards of the
prs included five un-
hand grenades, 106
leeper bolts, and 26
gels.

that the Police open-
© prevent their own
further endangered.”
—Reut”

ny And Japan
Join I.W.A.

LONDON, Jan. 12.
-Nation International
neil, which met pri-
to-day, is considering
by Germany and
bin in the International
sement. A _ statement
bly be issued at the
Talks, expected later
Germany has a rep-
at the Talks, but Japan,
Kesman stated a case
lusion at a meeting
of last year, is not
at the present ses-

Bc1tX-NATION COMMITTEE
ip Council today approved the critical defence
fin the agreement it is drafting for Italy to govern
mer colony of Somaliland, until it attains independ-

AY, JANUARY 13, 1950



Vations Approve Italy’s
| Responsibility For

Somaliland

GENEVA, Jan. 12
of the United Nations

—————* , All delegations passed the fol-

lowing text, which was largely
derived from the original italian
draft:

(1) The administering au-
thority (Italy) may main-
tain Police forces and raise
volunteer contingents fot
the maintenance of peace
and good order in the ter-
ritory.

(2) The administering yau-
thority, after consultation
with the (United Nations)
Advisory Council, may es-

tablish installations and
take all measures in the
territory, including the

progressive development of
Somali Defence Forces,
which may be necessary
within the limits laid down
in the United Nations
Charter, for the defence of
the territory, and for the
maintenance of Interna-
tional peace and security.”
Strong Pleas

This draft clause will be sub-
mitted to the full Trusteeship
Council, when it meets here later
this month to debate the Somali-
land Committee’s work.

In only two and a half hours
of peaceful debate, the Defence
clause was approved after Brit-
ain and France had made strong
pleas for Italy to have adequate
scope for organising Somali
Defence.

The Ethiopean delegate asked
Italy for an assurance that she
had no intention of sending armed
forces to Somaliland which would
be superior to those already there
under the temporary British
administration,

Italian delegate, Enrico Cerull,
replied: “my answer is that Italy
has not the slightest intention
of going beyond that number, arid
would be only too happy if we
could maintain order with smaller
forces.

“This is a statement I make
on behalf of my government.” In
reply to another Ethiopian request
that proposed, Italian Defence
Measures be first submitted to the
Three-State United Nations Ad-
visory Council to be established
in Mogradsu, Italy at onee agreed
that this provision be written
into the draft clause.

The Dominican Republic dele-
gate, Senor T. Franco, said: “We
do not know what the complica-
tions are that may arise in inter-
national life. The only thing we
must insist on is that the forces
must not be excessive for the
needs of External Defence.”

British delegate, John Fletcher-
Cooke, could not agree with the
Iraq view that Somali’s geo-
graphical position made it unne-
cessary to provide for her defence.

—Reuter.

Legislature Opens
In Jamaica—And
The Crowd Boos

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Jan. 12

A crowd booed as Sir John
Huggins, Governor of Jamaica
inspected a Guard of Honour and
a band played the British National
Anthem before the opening of the
island’s new Legislature here to-
day.

The boos continued during the
preliminary ceremony. Sir Noel
Livingston was re-elected Presi-
dent of the Legislative Council.

Prime Minister Alexander Bus-
tamante’s Labour Party, which
won 17 of the 32 parliamentary







ae

ALSO OBTAINABLE

IN



i ee














BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Se tell: Al
SA WA \
A

\ hy \\
/M AN

RIVAL

CHARMERS

AT COLOMBO





Commonwealth

Will Recognise
Bao Dai Regime

@ From Page t
main problem affecting the Com-
monwealth is the political decision
whether to recognise the Bao Dai
Regime at Vietnam.

The argument for Recognition
is that the alternative to Bao Dai
Regime is certainly the Vietnam
Regime under Ho Chieh Minh
and the “Communisation” of
Indo-China.

The Minister asked to curtail
the afternoon meeting by half an
hour to enable four of their num-
ber to receive honorary degrees at
a Colombo University ceremony.
They are British Foreign Secre-

tary, Ernest Bevin, Pandit Nehru,
Lester Pearson, a Canadian
External Affairs Minister, and

Philip Noel-Baker, Britain’s Com-
monwealth Relations Secretary.
The Conference will end on
Saturday morning, the Secretary
of the Ceylon External Affairs
Department told correspondents
today.
—Reuter.

Stocks Drop
After 7 Months

NEW YORK, Jan. 12.

Stock prices plunged one to
three dollars a share late today
under heavy selling. The decline
started without warning sbout one
hour before the market’s close.

Trading was so heavy that the
stock exchange resorted to the
highly. unusual procedure of
“flushing” paces from the floor of
the exchange. This was done
because the highspeed ticker tape
was glutted with quotations and
fell Behind as much as eight min-
utes in recording actual transac-
tions.

A quick survey of leading
brokerage houses disclosed that thé
selling was not influenced by any
particular news.

Brokers were inclined to term
the move as a “natural reaction”
following a seven-month rise.
Grains and other commodities
weakened in sympathy with stocks.

—Reuter.
reats in iast month’s voting,
elected the Speaker and five

ministers including the Premier
himself.

The 13 people’s National Party
(Socialist) members and an in-
dependent with Socialist leadings
refrained from voting.

a —(Reuter.)

Eee

GREEN & TRANSPARENT.



British
Submarine
Sinks

AFTER COLLISION

THE HAGUE, Jan. 12.
According to a message picked
up here from the Dutch steamer
“Almdijk” the British submarine
“Truculent” has sunk northwest
of Redsand Tower between Four

Buoy and East Pile Buoy.

The message goes on “have
picked up five survivors believe
submarine was in collision with
Swedish ship “Divina.” Please
keep lookout for further surviv-
ors.” The message was signed
Master.”

The “Almdijk” is a freighter
of the Holland-Amerika Line
(8,286 tons) on its way from New
Orleans to Rotterdam.

The British submarine “Trucu-
Ient” is one of the 25 “T” class
submarines with a displacement
of 1.575 tons. She carries a crew
of 59. The “Truculent” is equip-
ped for 42 days patrol and is be-
lieved to be fitted with “Snoren-

er” equipment which enables
her to take in air when sub-
merged.

Other men on board could be
saved if rescue work were fast
enough, Dutch Shipping Sources
said,

Thev said it was a matter of get-
ting at the men in the sunken
vessel before their air supplies
gave out.

The Truculent was sunk in col-
lision with the Swedish freighter
Divina, which left the port of
London today.

At least 15 British sailors were
entombed helow the waters of the
Thames estuary tonight. The
tight for the life of the men waiting
helplessly in the Truculent began
immediately British naval vessels
steamed to the disaster spot.

Lifeboats and other craft are
searching for more survivors, The
submarine’s hatches were closed.

—Reuter.

Hungary Claims
Right To Own
Opinion
—ON GERMANY

BUDAPEST, Jan. 12.

Hungary told the British Gov-
ernment in a note delivered to
the British Legation here tonight
that she has an “indisputable and
equitable right” to express her
opinion on the future of Ger-
many. “The formation of the
socalled German Federal Repub-
lic is a fact which the Hungarian
Government and public cannot
but observe with the utmost anx-
icty’, the note said. Hungary
has drawn from her history the
conclusion that a German state
which follows a reactionary and
aggressive policy constitutes a
constant menace to her peace
and security.

“Such reactionary forces have
now come to power in Germany
not by the will of the people but
by that of the British, United
States and French Governments.”
— (Reuter.)



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1-I6 tins PEARL BARLEY
1-15 tins OATMEAL

Large CREAM OF WHEAT
Smail CREAM OF WHEAT

Large QUAKER OATS with
China ware

Large ROBIN HOOD OATS
with Glass Tumbler

1-16 tin TONO
Tins NESTLE’S CREAM
Tins FRUIT —

Pears, Pineapple,
beyries.

Straw-

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‘ guese disputed that the

Trinidad Issues
Up A Few Pennies

LONDON, Jan. 12.

London’s Stock Exchange is in
the grip of election uncertainty
and promises to continue so until
the result is known. Business Tn
domestic issues was again small
and movements today were gener-
ally to lower levels. Some observ-
ers are expecting revival of
interest ir overseas issues but at
present there are very few signs
of such a happening.

There was however firmness in
Internationals. Overnight bright-
ness on Wall Street encouraged
some,.marking up in the United
States group. Gains were frac-
tional.

Trading in British funds com-
prised mainly of switching. Long
dateds were sold and proceeds re-
invested in shorts.

Down frend in industrials
lengthened as the day progressed
and produced small losses in most
of the groups. Tobaccos and brew-
eries were particularly dull

Oils were hesitant and closed
with some irregularity in price
movements. Trinidad issues were
a few pence better.

Local selling of kaffir freestaters
gave the section an easier trend.
The market was looking steadier
at the close when some buyers
came in at lower levels.

—Reuter.

Wanted 43
Tons Of Gold

LONDON, Jan. 12.

Britain is considering with the
United States and France how to
get from Portugal 43.9 tqns of fine
gold, looted by the Germans and
deposited there during the war,
a Foreign Office spokesman said
here today.

Britain maintained that the gold
should go to the Commission for
the restitution of looted monetary
gold, set up under the Paris
Agreement of 1945 in Brussels, he
said.

The matter had been referred
to the Allied Governments, he
added.

The spokesman said the Portu-
gold was

looted, —Reuter.

Will Stancardise
Europe’s Labour
Accounting

WASHINGTON, Jan. 12.

Labour statisticians from at
least 10 of the 16 Marshall Aid
countries will visit the United
States this winter and spring, the
Economic Co-operation Adminis-
tration announced today.

The visits are designed to assist
Marshall Plan Nations in arriving
at a common method of reporting
cost of living, wages and hours,
and employment and productivity
data. The European statisticians
will work in the U.S. Bureau of
Standards. The first of three
teams will leave for America this
month. It will inelude repre-
sentatives from Britain and the
three Scandinavian countries. The
other groups expected to arrive
in April and June will . include
representatives f r o m Austria,
Belgium, Western Germany, Italy,
and the Netherlands.

:














BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION . LTD.

Caribbean May

Grow More Fibres

LONDON, (By Mail)

An increasing world shortage
of jute and the promising devel-
opment of jute substitutes such
as Kenaf, with the possibility
that they can be grown
British Caribbean among
areas, are factors behind
journey to the U.S. of a three-
man Fibre Mission which has
just left Britain. The Mission will
spend a month in the U.S
and Cuba and will study and dis-
cuss fibre production problems,
including mechanical methods of
harvesting and decortication, with
officers of the U.S. Office

Foreign and Agricultural Rela-
tions and other departments and
organisations interested in the
production of fibres.

The team consists of Mr. J
Bradley, of the National Insti-
tute of Agricultural Engineering
(Ministry of Agriculture); Mr.

in the}
other |
the |

A.)

of!

PAGE THREE

REDUCTIONS

ON

Franco
ReceivesPeru’s
Ambassador

MADRID, Jan, 12.
Marshal Eloy G. Ureta, new
Peruvian Ambassador to Madrid,
today presented his credentials to
Generalissimo Franco in thd!
National Palace here. |
Marshal Ureta and his suite
drove through Madrid’s central
streets in horse drawn state

LADIES’ COATS
& WOOLLEN
SWEATERS

Quite an Assortment



coaches which had not been used}
since the days of the monarchy '
and escorted by Franco’s Moor- |
ish guard. }

of Colours

At SPECIAL
REDUCED PRICES

AT THE

MODERN DRESS
SHOPPE

BROAD STREET.

i



|
'



“every hour

of the day



R. H. Kirby, of the Colonial Pro- |

ducts Advisory Bureau and Mr
J. S. Oliver.

The object of the visit js to
further the experimental work
which has already been conduct-
ed in certain British Colonies to
find out whether certain indus- |
trial fibres can be grown andi}
processed economically under
Colenial conditions

The cost of the visit will
met from Marshall Aid Funds
The team will visit the Ever-
glades Agricultural Experiment
Station in Florida They vill
also visit Cuba to examine the
methods of cultivation, harvest-
ing and decortications ot Kenaf

being developed there.—B.U.P.
Cominform Spy
Sentenced To Death
—IN YUGOSLAVIA

BELGRADE, Jan, 12
A Yugoslav Court today sen-
tenced a man named Sali Lisi to

death for spying on behalf of the}

Cominform, and carrying out
versive acts.

Another accused Ahmed
was sentenced to 20 years by the
District Tribunal at Skoplje trying

sub-

five Albanians and five Yugoslavs |
on charges of spying and subver-
sion,

This is the first time a Comin-
formist has been sentenced to|
death for such activity in Yugo-
slavia.

Other defendants, all of whom}
pleaded guilty to similar charges,
received sentencés varying from
18 to 5 years hard labour, and loss

of citizen rights.

In his final speech, the public
prosecutor had said that the trial
showed what “criminal methods
are being used against our country
to force it into servile obedience
to the U.S.S.R.”

It proved also that the Alban-
ian Government had become
puppet” to the Cominform cam-
paign, and was concentrating more
on hostile activities against Yugo-
slavia than on improving the lot
of its own people.

He said that the trial had showed
up the subversive activity of the
Belgrade.
Secretary Risa Hodza had soto
the
“jllegal groups”, and had collected
compromising material on people

Albanian legation in

the initiative in organising

with “dark pasts” like himself
who were to be recruited

slay citiz

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PAGE FOUR





Published by The Advocate Co. Ltd., 34, Broad St., Bridgetown

Friday, January 13, 1950



Divergencies

THE decision to set up, a Working
Committee to study the Japanese peace
treaty problem is an indication that the
opinions of Commonwealth countries on
the question are so varied that it has been
found impossible to reach any conclusion
at Colombo.

This divergence of opinion was not un-
expected having regard to the fact that
some of the representatives of these coun-
tries were viewing the matter through
Asiatic eyes while the others could only
see it from the European viewpoint. ~

India was willing and eager to bring
about a quick settlement of the Japanese
issug on terms favourable to the quick
economic recovery of Japan with provision
being made for the early withdrawal of
occupation forces and the re-institution of
politicial self determination.

Canada had adopted’ a neutral approach
to the matter with one eye focussed on the
United States of America.

On the other hand Australia, as was ex-
pected, stands in fear of a rehabilitated
Japan which without adequate safeguards
might in the next generation attempt once
more to. dominate the East and to find an
outlet for her surplus population in the
Dominion.

While South Africa would not be im-
mediately affected by a prosperous and
independent Japan, yet on racial grounds
she is inclined to line up on the side of
Australia.

The varied approaches to the Japanese
peace treaty by Commonwealth countries
are understandable, especially in the case
of Australia and will be sympathetically
viewed. Australia with a population of
seven million people living on an area of
nearly three million square miles is at-
tempting to maintain a standard of life
which is much higher than that in the sur-
rounding territory and it is obvious that
if the door is opened to the settlement of
millions of Asiatics in the Dominion, the
whole fabric’ of her economic structure
which has been built up at such great cost
will be destroyed,

No doubt in subsequent meetings of the
Working Committee the differences will be
ironed out and a uniform policy adopted.



Another Rub

IT WAS announced by reliable sources

in London during the week that the naval
*base at Bermuda will probably be closed

in the interest of economy. This is pre-
sumed to be part of a decision by the
British Admiralty after examining all the
naval services with the object of reducing
expenditure,

This is another aspect of the effects of
devaluation on the West Indies. The closing
of the Bermuda Base will considerably re-
duce the number of persons employed from
other islands and consequently, the dis-
bursements to their homes,

It is estimated that there are about 265
Barbadians now employed at the naval
base in Bermuda and the fact must be
faced that it might not be possible to place
them all in other employment in Bermuda.
If this cannot be done it will mean that
many of them are likely to return home to
swell the ranks of unemployed.

This is extremely unfortunate for us in
view of the recent announcement by the
Labour Commissioner that the prospects
of employment in the United States of
America, the main source of relief in this
direction in recent years, were not as rosy
as in the past.

The cut in the appropriations of the
fighting services at the time of devaluation
although made in London has now made
its effects felt in the West Indies.

OUR READERS SAY:
Wipanenecemai ne



Pedestrians Should

To the Editor, The Advocate,



NT Sesh essseseseenasesssnnvensnnnensesinsesens
$$ $$ ee

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Australia Attracts Overseas

Australia is receiving a healthy
stimulus by an inflow of over-
sea capital. That is the text for
the following article, written by
Professor T. Hytten, economic
adviser to the Bank of New South
Wales, for a finance supplement
of the Sydney Daily Telegraph

OVERSEAS capital has, been
flowing into Australia in a fairly
steady stream ever since the end
of the war.

It has come in the form of
money transfers through the
banks for investment in Austra-
lian companies or Government
bonds, in the form of plant and
equipment to establish or expand
subsidiaries of overseas compan-
ies, and some, has seéped in
through the internal accounts of
larger businesses.

Much’ worthwhile technical
knowledge has come with the
money inflow. This in itself is a
capital asset.

Added to this investment ow-
ing into Australia are funds such
as dividends on shares owned by
overseas inv rs, which nor-
mally are transferred out of the
country, but which have been left
in Australia for reinvestment.

To estimate with any aceuracy
the volume of this private over-
seas investment is not possible,
but obviously it has been en a
large scale. It has helped tempor-
arily to increase the level of Aus
tralia’s overseas currency re-
serves, it has contributed in no
small way to the pressure on
share markets, and it has hastened
industrial development.

Some estimates have placed the
total capital inflow as high as
£100,000,000 in 1947—48, and there
was no noticeable decline in
1948—49.

If the figure of £100,000,000 was
correct only a part was invested
directly in new industrial devel-
opment, for official estimates
place the total figure, including
Australian-financed development,
at only £74,000,000 in 1947 and
£93,000,000 in 1948; the forecast
for 1949 is £98,000,000.

But even if most of the inflow-
ing funds did not directly inspire
industrial development they could
do so indirectly by stimulating an
easy-money situation.

Quite an important share has
been used to purchase ‘existing
businesses,

As with most economic trends
there is no single simple explan-
ation of the current wave of over-
seas capital investment in Aus-
tralia. But these are some of the
chief factors:

(1) In a_ troubled post-war
world Australia has appeared to
many harassed overseas investors
as an oasis of calm prosperity.

(2) Australia is the second
largest industrial producer within
the sterling area and as such has
immediate entry to most sterling
and soft-currency markets.

(3) Australia seems to have
long-term possibilities as an ex-
port base for Eastern markets.

(4) Overseas companies with
interests in Australia are now ful-
filling plans for expansion which
were vemporarily delayed during
the war.

(5) The possibility of an appre-
ciation of the Australian pound
has attracted “hat money” to
Australia, and so has possibly
the talk of a depreciation of the
pound sterling.

(6) Investment opportunities in
the Far East, South Africa, and
some other countries have reced-
ed during the period.

(7) Elimination of double tax-
ation on British-Australian in-

Literary Newsletter|

Several recent novels have
been about the future. George
Orwell's brilliant 1984 for in-

Stance and Aldous Huxley’s terri-
fying Ape and Essence, both
made 4 deep impression on British
readers. Now comes a new story
by Robert Graves—you will re-
member his fascinating descrip-
tions of life during the early
Roman Empire in I Cladius and

Claudius the God, But with
Seven days in New Crete Mr.
Graves has forsaken the past

and plunged into a
improbable future.

There is a picture of a goddess
surrounded by various votaries
on the jacket of this book and
this gives a clue to the theme
of the novel. For the New Cre-
tan community is really a reviva!
of the Bronze Age way of life—
a society dominated by women
but still with a barbaric and
primitive side to it. A young
poet of our own time appears
in New Crete and, after a promi-
sing start is horrified to find him-
self involved in ritual murder
and cannibalism. He is much
trelieved when he is able to re-
turn to the twentieth century.
Robert Graves is a poet himself
as well as a novelist so it is not
surprising that his central char-
acter carries conviction; while
his profound knowledge of the
myths of the past is used to give
a satiric edge to this extravagan-
za of the future.

somewhat



{ e j

Capita
vestments has made them more
attractive.

(8) Nationalisation of certain
British industries has released
British funds at a time when out-
lets elewhere are limited or
blocked.

(9) Many British and European
manufacturers, traders, and other
people with some investment
funds desire to emigrate and
escape from the present frustra-
tions of their part of the world.

One could add a number of
other influences, but these are
sufficient to show that whatever
we have done or omitted to do
in Australia to make investment
here more attractive, factors
completely beyond our control
have almost certainly been re-
sponsible for the major share of
the capital inflow.

One more rather interesting in-
fluence is at work: the desire of
American concerns to establish
trading and manufacturing bases
within the sterling area.

This movement is akin to the
movement after the Ottawa agree-
ments in the early ‘thirties, when
American interests began, to
develop a base within the British
Empire s@ as to take advantage
of British preferential duties.

Now with Canada in the dollar
area, Australia provides one of
the few possible bases within the
sterling area.

Guessing the real sources of
the capital inflow is even more
difficult than estimating its
volume,

Clearly, however, most of the
solid long-term industrial capital
has come from the United King-
dom and the United Staves largely
through established trading and
manufacturing connections.

The Prime Minister (Mr.
Chifley) recently pointed out that
in the first three post-war years
overseas interests participated in
226 of the 2,404 new manufactur-
ing projects announced in Aus-
tralia.

Of the 226 ventures involving
overseas capital, United Kingdom
interests were connected with 129,
United States interests with 87,
and interests in other countries
with 10,

On a money basis an earlier
survey revealed that established
Australian industrial enterprises
with a capital expansion pro-
gramme of £103,000,000 included
in this amount ‘about £16,000,000
to be obtained from the United
Kingdom and £13,000,000 from the
United States.

Entirely new enterprises plan-
ning a capital programme of
£141,000,000, involved about £15,-
000,000 from the United Kingdom
and £5,000,000 from the United
States.

Such figures, of course, include
many projects which for one
reason or another will not come
to fruition, but may have omitted
others of which little is known.

The period over which the
capital expenditure will actually
be expended is also uncertain and
the estimates themselves may be
faulty.

But they do seem to indicate
that, on a money basis, overseas

interests may be contributing to b

the current wave of Australian
industrial development something
approaching 20 per cent. of the
capital involved. Some 12 per
cent. is of United Kingdom origin,
while eight per cent, comes from
the United States.

By
Richard Mansfield

Mention of the book jacket of
this novel brings me to an ex-
hibition at the Victoria and Al-
bert Museum in London, Nearly
every British and American book
has a protective paper wrapper—a
custom not followed in most other
countries—and this International
Exhibition of book jackets has
proved both popular and enlight-
ening. The difference in design
and production between different
countries is clearly visible; for
instance, whereas the United
States use their covers mainly as
small posters to advertise the
book, British publishers primar-
ily consider their decorative
effect. The jackets from other
parts of Europe are often very
beautiful, particularly the French
editions de luxe. United King-
dom publishers have been using
some of the best contemporary
artists to design for them; the
work of Graham _ Sutherland,
John Piper and Keith Vaughan
among others is represented.

It is always interesting to sur-
vey the new authors and to try
to decide which of them will
write the classics of the future—
interesting but risky. Whatever
the future may hold I have nc
hesitation in recommending some



Apart from this specifically in-
dustrial capital considerable sums
of personal and institutional in-
vestment funds have flowed into
Australia, particularly during
1948, seeking safe refuge and, in
some cases, hoping for a wind-
fall profit if the Australian pound
should appreciate.

On the whole it would seem
tHat the inflow of capital has con-
tributed to the other inflationary
forces which have been affecting
the Australian economy during
the three years.

Bt induced investment which
has been effective and has helped
to increase vhe volume of goods
coming on to the market must
be regarded as 2x offsetting factor.

On the Stock Exchanges the
continued pressure of newly
arrived capital seeking investment
has been felt for some time,
has apparently helped to obscure
the weakening pressure from local
sources, but oe could
be over-em' .

One fact concerning the capital
inflow must oF ee 2
In sending r money
machinery or industrial-secrets to
Australia most overseas investors
anticipate regular withdrawal of

income,

Thus, while the Australian
Government is reducing the
annual service on the public debt
by paying off loans in London,
the cost of servicing private in-
vestments is increasing.

But. fortunately some of the
overseas investment is likely to
increase Australian exports, or
reduce the need for imports, so
that on balance we should ultim-
ately be in a better position to
meet the future outflow of income
on the investments.

American investments pose
special problems. Because of the
inability of this country to balance
its dollar payments against its
dollar receipts, any increase in
interest and dividends flowing to
America could possibly be embar-
rassing.

But that is no reason for offici-
ally discouraging or even prohib-
iting new American investment
here. Surely we should let the
American investor take the risks
of future inconvertibility or ex-
change instability if he wants to
do so. We are the gainers in in-
dustrial knowledge and, industrial
strength,

While predicting developments
in delicately balanced matters
like international capital move-
ments is unwise, some reduction
in the rate of inflow experienced
in the last few years in Australia
does seem likely.

In industry, for instance, Aus-
tralia obviously has reached tem-
porarily a state of unbalance
between the basic industries like
coal, steel, and electric power, and
the numerous consumer goods in.
dustries depending on them.

Overseas industrialists will
realise the practical difficulties in
further expansion until production
in the basic industries is stepped
up or demand in certain other
directions is reduced.

Reduced demand hardly seems
likely when public works pro-
grammes totalling several hun-
dred million pounds, including
some urgent projects, are about to

devaluation on Australian ex-
change, there will be some outflow
of the “hot money” that has come
in during the past two years, but
it should not be sufficient to
worry us. »



books by young writers who
have recently begun to appear in
print. The Far Cry is by Emma
Smith who at 24 has recently
published her second book. In
1948 she published «a lively and
amusing account of a journey
on a canal boat, called Maiden’s
Trip. The Far Cry shows her
to have a really important talent.
The plot is no more thar an ac-
count of how a disappoinved man
leaves his wife and takes their
schoolgirl daughter to visit her
sister on a tea plantation. He
dies and the elder daughter is
killed, while the younger one
stays on. No more than that; yet
without our knowing why this
small stretch in the lives of four
simple people is made vital and
interesting.

_ Miss Smith herself made a
journey across India to the As-
samese tea plantations when she
was working in a documentary
film unit, and without this first-
hand experience the book woula
never have been written, Like
so many other young writers
Miss Smith evidently needs to
“go places” in order to find the
inspiration for her work. Mr.
Somerset Maugham realised this
necessity recently when he offered
an annual] scholarship to a young
writer on condition that he spent
at least six months of the year out!
of Britain; Miss Smith received
one of the first awards,





and|been making threats to

egin,
With the decision on sterling;



eR



Nehru Is Cominform
Target

THE formation of “liberation armies” to
carry out an armed struggle in colonial
areas of Asia and Australasia was de-
manded by Liu Shao-chi, vice-president of
the Communist-controlled World Federa-
tion of Trade Unions, in a speech at the
recent Peking conference. International
News Service herewith presents a survey
of current Red tactics in various sections

of Asia. ,
By James E. Brewn

ELATED by their sweeping victory in
China, Far Eastern Cominform agents have
all the nationalist
non-Communist leaders in Asia. :

Chief target for their abuse, of course, 1s
Pandit Nehru who is becoming the greatest
living symbol of the free world in the Far
East.

munist party in India has been passing
eed crisis, and some of the ablest lead-

and the dominant figure, is Balehand Trim-
bak Ranadive, the son of a Bombay Income
Tax Commissioner.

Ranadive’s family belonged to the Brahmo
Samaj, the Hindu reformist sect, and Rana-
dive rose to power by opposing the wing of
the party which would have compromised
with Congress.

He recently declared: }

“In place of our former wrong characteri-
zation of the Nationalist Government as one
of national advance with which we should
have a joint front we characterize it now as
a Government of national surrender and of
collaborators.” f

Communism is not yet a danger in India,
but the Party is likely to grow in strength
thraugh the failure of the Indian Soeialists
to attract the young elements of the opposi-
tions. ‘

In Burma, the Communists continue in
open civil war with the Government. They
are divided into two parties, the Stalinists
and the so-called Trotskyists, and while they
do not seem to be receiving much aid from
China they naturally benefit from the Gov-
ernment’s futile war with the Karens.

Visitors to Burma say that unless the
Government can get a reconciliation with
the Karens a Communist Burma may be
possible as early as next summer,

In neighbouring Siam a similar situation
exists with the Communists reaping a har-
vest from the fight between Pibul Songram
and Nai Pridi.

In Malaya the British “mopping-up” oper-
ations against the Communists show no sign
of coming to a close while the Reds in Indo-
China are still on the offensive.

The Communist line in Indonesia is to
denounce the Hague settlement as a con-
spiracy between Dr. Hatta and the Dutch to
restore the old colonialism in disguise. The
Cominform. however, starts with a handicap
since they made the mistake of rebelling
prematurely against the Republican Govern-
ment in September, 1948, and were sup-
pressed.—I.N.S.

Crime Drops In U. K.

By Fred Doerflinger

LONDON, (By Mail).
_ Crime declined steadily throughout 1949
in London and prospects of a further reduc-
tion in 1950 are good if citizens continue to
take precautions to protect their property.

Shop and housebreaking decreased sub-
stantially during the year and crime graphs
at Scotland Yard show that the curve twice
went below the 1938 level.

In January 1949, the total of all types of
robbery was averaging 2,000 cases a month,
but by July fell to about 900. This compared
with about 1,000 in July, 1938. In the autumn
the figure rose 1,400 a month, as compared
with 2,000 a month in 1938,

. Scotland Yard believes there are four main
reasons for the decrease:

1. The economic situation. Few people
have enough money to pay exorbitant prices
for goods in short supply. The removal of
clothes rationing and other controls have
tended to kill the black market which devel-
oped at the end of the year,

2. Many bomb-damaged buildings have
nem nies made more secure,

+ Increased cooperation i
tn dialluae ana" Pp from the public
centre) when anything unusual was seen
also by taking greater precautions to a
their property.

e new Criminal Justice A i
a deterrent effect on criminals whe ‘a -
prison sentences for relatively minor offences

The monthly rate of all indic '

in 1949 was 10,500 compared wi
a month in 1938—IN.$. * SPout 8,000







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SEB



SIR,—It seems to me that Mr.
Gibson is right in his opinion that
pedestrians should walk on the
right side of the road to face
on-coming traffic.

Walking on the left side, people
so often step out towards the
middle of the road—perhaps to

avoid obstructions or thought- W.

lessly—whilst in conversation and
a silent on-coming car almost on

them—even one Step to the right ed

“— be fatal,

alking on the right side of
the road this would not happen
for they could see all on-coming

‘traffic.
A. E. :
Windy Ridge, wat
Paynes Bay.

Landing Passengers

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—May I be permitted to
correct a statement attributed t
me in your report of the Char.-
ber of Commerce Council pro-
ceedings on Wednesday last, ap-
bearing in your issue of to-day’s
date. ;

Referring to the landing of






passengers at the Baggage Ware-

house, I stated that on Thursday,
the 5th instant, when two pas-

Senger ships were in port, a
launch bringing ashore between
thirty and forty passengers and
visitors from the Golfito” was
unable to land its passengers at
the landing steps of the Baggage
arehouse owing to the fact that
both berths were blocked by
lighters discharging what appear-
to be passengers’ baggage.
The position was aggravated by
yor fact that a schooner was
either going on or comin p
dock at the time. etn
The launch accordingly made
fast alongside the ‘Lord Com-
bermere”, awaiting a chance to
go alongside the steps. As this
would have entailed a wait of
from one half to one hour, the
passengers became impatient and
climbed ashore via the tw«
ernment water vessels,
through a fenced off
and so into the Baggage War
house. As you correctly stated,
their comments on this uns:
factory state of affairs were 1
favourable,

) gov-
thence

enclosure








Unfortunately the same thing
occurred at 5 p.m. the same day
when some of the passengers
were returning to the ship, Just
before the launch came along-
side another lighter pulled into
the landing steps to discharge
baggage, and completely blocked
both berths as far as the launch
was concerned. Passengers, on
this occasion, were forced to
squeeze along the edge of the
wharf and into the launch which
had tied up below the steps.

Had the lighter pulled up to the
top of ,the landing steps there
would have been room for the
launch to move into the lower
berth. It was on this occasion
that I spoke to the policeman on
duty at the steps, but it appears
that he had not the
authority to take action

These might have

necessary



traae, I am sure everyone will
t Uus state of affairs
orrected
T. BOWRING
C/o DaCosta & Co., Ltd.,

A



Where Is The Motto ?

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—As far back as I can re-
member reading the “Advocate”
I have inseparably and integrally
associated with it the gravidly
earnest motto; “For the cause etc.,
etc. To my mind, it has bequeathed
to the “Advocate” a legacy of
dignity and tradition unique in
its very concepts,

Indeed I find it rather intriguing
to conjecture what strategic and
diplomatic ends are being served
by this glaring omission; for I
cannot conceive of this sacrile-
gious omission being the jolly-
horse of some private whim or
fancy.

What I find even more appalling
is the failure to supply an adequate

substitute
s stitut or any



Substitute for

Journalism in Barbados must be
& Sorry pass if our leading organ
wnet characterize itself with
fitting motto indicative of its

Or is it the policy of the
“Advocate” henceforth to have no





policy? IT shall be pleased to lear
that. this omission was merely ‘

prolonged oversight, though that

would be a rather poor way to
begin the end of the twentieth
century.
RIVERSIDE REX.
Editor's Note: The “Advocate”
has not broken with tradition
nor has it changed its policy.
Our correspondent will find the
motto above the editorial.

Local Pottery

To the Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—When debating on Pot-
tery in the House of Assembly I
see by your report (the “Advo-
cate of Friday January 6) that
Mr. Allder remarked that as far
as he knew of his Barbadian pub-
lic there was no definite liking
for the use of their local pottery.
I wonder if Mr. Allder saw the
collection of pottery shown by
Mr. Brannam at the Exhibition in
1948? These exhibits reached a
standard not yet attained by local
potters in the island. Not only
were the designs, colours and
glazes most attractive, but the







PATE DE PSAUSAGE, tins | DANOCRISP
finish of each article was of high GOUDA cH ey, “ine BREAD,
quality. Another feature was the CURRANTS » per Ib, SULTAN.
greater durability and the fact GATOR ROACH!

that vases and jugs when filled
with liquid left no damp marks,

To my mind these.articles com,
pared favourably with similar
ones in the London shops and §
feel suve that if pottery of this
standard could be put on th:
market the buying public both
here and in other places would
respond accordingly,

G. M. WHITE.
‘ Thanks

To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—Through the medium of

your paper please let me, on be-

half of the Inmates and Staff of

fine Flavor, fer



IN OUR MEAT DEPT.

LAMB

OX TONGUES | VEAL CHOPS

the St. Philip's Almshouse, say a | OX TRIPE we?

ah ot thanks and appreciation ee = ~—
© all those who made it possible BRETROOT “ARROTS

for us to have our Xmas Party | BEANS CARROTS .

; CAE +E
A special word must be —"

to Captain Raison and his men |

especially to Sergeant Archer |

who conducted such a fine and

appropriate programme of music.
MADELINE BYER,

Matron. |

added |

GODDARDS}

6669099



















*

FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1950



Antigua Hail
Record Crop

Antigua’s cotton crop for 1949
was a record one and it is ex-
pected that this year’s crop will
be just as good, Hon’ble E. A.
Thompson, Federal Treasurer of
the Leeward Islands with head-
quarters in Antigua told the
“Advocate” yesterday.

Hon. Thompson came in recent-
ly by BWIA for the Customs
Talks and is staying at the Ma-
rine Hotel.

He said that Antigua had some
very welcomed showers of rain
last year whieh greatly affected
the sugar crop and it is anticipat-
ed that-one of the largest crops
amounting to about 30,000 tons
will be reaped this year,

The Antigua Beach Hotel which

was closed for about six months,
was re-opened on December 20
and they were looking forward
to a good tourist season.



32,000 Bags
2 e
Of Animal Feed
, °
Arrive

Over 7,400 bags of oil meal
from Montevideo and 25,442 bags
of pollard from Rosario arrived
at Barbados yesterday by Ar-
gentine s.s. “Rio Araza”’.

This is the first visit to the
island for the “Rio Araza” which
operates under the Flota Mer-
cante Del Estado line. Vessels
of this line make occasional calls
here from Argentine with feed.

S.S:. “Rio Araza”’, 3,565 tons
net, under Captain Gracian, ar-
rived via Trinidad. On board
were 15 intransit passengers and
a crew of 49.

Messrs Gardiner Austin & Co.
Ltd, are local agents.



Fresh Fruit In
Good Supply

Fresh fruit, chiefly oranges.
have been coming into the island
steadily for the past two weeks.
Yesterday, a call was made from
Dominica by the “Caribbee”
which brought 107 casks,
crates and two boxes of this
commodity.

These were quickly unloaded

and removed from the waterfront
to the various consignees who
will in turn distribute them to
hawkers, -
. Also brought here by the
“Caribbee” were nine crates of
tomatoes, 45 bags of copra, empty
puncheons, rum casks, barrels
and drums,

Messrs Schooner Owners’ As-
sociation are the vessel’s agents.



Police Boat
Sold For $365

With bids coming from only
two people, the three Harbour
Police boats set up for sale by
auction, were quickly disposed of
yesterday, one of them bringing
as high as $365.

Two of these boats were car-
ried off by Mr, L. Hoyte and the
other by Mr. M. Austin. Few
people attended the auction. but
within 15 minutes, it was all
over,







MONEY MISSING

THE loss of cash and certain
articles to the value of $13.90 was
reported by Clarence Grant of
Greenfield, St. Michael.

Grant stated that his house at
the same address was broken and
entered Wednesday and the arti-
cles and money taken.

60} A.

| Patricia Here
For Docking

TEN passengers arrived yester-
day by the 239-ton (net) M.V.
“Lady Patricia.”

Among them were Mr. Freder-
ick A. Casson, merchant of St.
Vincent and owner~of the “Lady
Patricia”, accompanied by Mrs.
Augusta Casson, both of . whom
have gone to stay at the Windsor
Hotel. Also Mr. and Mrs. Cecil
Nicholls. Mr. Nicholls is an elec-
trician. He and his wife are stay-
ing at Dr. Cato.

The “Lady Patricia” came to
Barbados mainly for dry docking.
Cleaning, painting and all neces-
sary minor repairs will be effect-
ed before this vessel sails» again
for St. Vincent.

On July 18 last year, the “Lady
Patricia” came: here to load rum
for Nassau. On that visit, it ar-
rived under Captain Mulzac while
this time it is under the command
of Captain King.



Knitting Mill
Machinery Here

PART of the machinery for the
new knitting mill to be erected by
the West Indian Knitting Mills
Co., Ltd. arrived on Monday by
the Alcoa “C. G. Thulin” from
New York and the remainder is
expected shortly Mr. Ernest Saun-
ders, one of the directors of the
company told the “Advocate”
yesterday. ;

He said that the company had
recently acquired the business
premises formerly occupied by
Messrs. Johnson’s Stables and
Garage, Coleridge Street for the
housing of the plant. They are
now making certain renovations
and hope to start production early
next month.



Bodily Harm
Costs 30/-

A FINE of 30/- to be paid in
14 days or in default one month’s
imprisonment was imposed on
Edridge Chandler of Bank Hall
yesterday by His Worship Mr,
. J. H. Hanschell for inflicting
bodily harm on Florra Reeves on
November 10,



Bicycle Damaged
In Accident

THE front wheel, handle bar
and head lamp of a bicycle owned
and ridden by Ruby King of Brit-
tons Hill, St. Michael were dam-
aged in an accident on Wednes-
day.

The accident occurred at the
junction of Nelson and Welling-
ton Streets at about 5.25 p.m, be-
tween the cycle and a horse drawn
cart owned and driven by Prince
Yard of Bonnetts, St. Michaci
The right shoulder of the horse
was bruised,

5/- For Assault

JOSEPHINE HINDS of Deane’s
Village was ordered to pay 5/-
in 14 days or in default undergo
seven days’ imprisonment by His
Worship Mr. A. J. H Hanschell
yesterday for assaulting Enid
Connell on November 20,



FINED EIGHT SHILLINGS

JOSEPH MAYNARD of Hall’s
Road was fined 8/- in seven days
or seven days’ imprisonment by
His Worship Mr. A. J. H. Han-
schell yesterday for blackguard-
ing on Fairchild Street on Sep-
tember 27.



ee PORT:— Yawl Potick, Aux. Ketch
ander, Sch. Molly N, Jones, Schooner
Manuata, Sch. Philip H. Davidson, Yacht
Maya, Yaw! Stortebecker, Sch. Sunshine
R., Sch, Mary M. Lewis, 5.8. Ganymedes,
Sch. Hazell Scott. Sch, Frances W. Smith,
ner Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Em-
anuel C. Gordon, Sch. Reginald N. Wal-
+» Schooner Mandalay II, Sch, Marea
Henrietta, Swedish Barquentine Sunbeam,
it Beegie, Sch. Princ: ise, M.V,

ita, Schooner oepavour Ww.

A A
Argentine S.S. “Rio Araza,” 3,565 tons
net, Captain Gracian, from Trinidad.
Agents: Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd,

Im Carlisle Hay

M.V. “‘Caribbee,"’ 100 tons net,
Gumbs, from Dominica.
er Owners’ Association.

Capt.
Agents: Schoon-

M.V. “Lady Patricia,” 239 tons net,
Capt. King, from St. Vincent. Agent:
D. L. Johnson, Esq.

DEPARTURES

8.8. “Ittersum," 3,199 tons net, Capt.
Bakken, for Maracaibo. Agents: S. P
Musson, Son & Co., Ltd.

Schooner “Alexandrina R."’ 39 tons net,
Capt. Smith, for St. Lacia. Agent: D. L
Johnson, Esq.

M.V. “Lady Joy,” 46 tons net, Captain
Parsons, for St. Lucia. Agent: D.
Johnson, Esq.

IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.,
with the “Sellbing wane eeeieae
< PS. r

Matador Coast a i
a, Angeles, S.S. Sheaf Mead,
-S. California/Hpnt, $.S. Regent
ss toa T heceaae 3s aie “4
¢ eles t,

Hindanger, 8.8.” N,“O. Ragenaes,
-S. San Vulfrano, S.S.
/Liwt, SS. Atlantic
Rio Araza

S. Gerona,

~

— ae



ARRIVALS—By B.W.LA.L.
m TRINIDAD:

Hal
Simon Schonholz, Jack Pro-

a Harold Bishop.
tal m ST. LUCIA: Lucille Lorde, Wini-

Lorde,

Amed Despointes,
Toole, a ae

John



The Weather

‘TO-DAY:
Sun Rises: 6.18 a.m.
Sun Sets: 5.54 p.m.
Moon (New) January
Hinting: 6.30 p.m
igh Water: 11.28 a.m.
YESTERDAY : 1.28 a.m,
Rainfall (Codrington) .09 in
Total for month to Yesterday: 1.79 ins
ac perature (Maximum) 81.5 deg. F.
semmerature (Minimum) deg. F.
Wind Direction { by E

18

72.5
NE

: S E.

Wind Velocity 6

Barometer (9 9.1
29.954



S.S, Elizabeth, S.S. S. Monica, S.S.
Canabulle, S.S. S.
Mormachawk, 8.8.

Glasgow, S.S. Estaro,
8.8. Brazil, S,S. Toann
S.S. Beresina.

S.S. Normess,
is Zafirakis and

From_ JAMAICA: Helena Gittins, Al-
leyne, Colin Jones, Arthur Reeve, Rosita
Tosta, Humberto Tosta.

DEPARTURES—By B.W.LA.L.

For INIDAD: Mr. Cameron Living-
stone, rs. Agnita Kirton, Mr. Jose;
Scheult, Mr. Ugo Bernard, Mrs, Amy
Lynch, Miss Hilda Thorne, Mr, Kenneth
Ince, Mrs. Doris Taylor, Mr. Ernest Tay~-
lor, Miss Constantia Idenden, Mrs. Anna
Idenden, Mr. Francis Idenden, Mrs. Bar-
bara King, Master King, Mr. Darnley
Clarke.

For ST. LUCIA: Miss Myrtle Holder,
Mr, Ivan Herreira, Mr. Anthony Lewis,
Mr. Grant Major.

For ANTIGUA: Mr, Reginald Margeson,
Mrs, Myra Margeson.

For JAMAICA: Mr. Hugh Coxe, Mrs
Gwendolyn Coxe, Master Floyd Coxe

For ST. KITTS: Mi. Terrence Ryan

What’s on Today

Police Courts at 10.00 a.m.

Courts of Appeal & Petty Debt at 10 a.m.
Court of Ordinary at

Police B i

Mr. A. D

f i
field






t 8 p.m
at Wake-
an”



LOCAL NEWS



Council Considers

Trade Union Bill

Second Reading Passed

THE Legislative Council yesterday began and then
postponed further consideration of the Bill to amend the
Trade Union Act, 1939, and the Better Security Act, 1920.
It will be further discussed when the Council meets next
Tuesday. The Hon’ble Acting Colonial Secretary amended
Clause 6 so as to abandon the principle of peaceful picket-

ing at people’s homes.

The main part of the debate
yesterday was on Section 6 and
7 which deal with peaceful picket-
ing, and with section 4 which
refers to “contracting out”.

As debate started, a motion by
Hon'ble G. D. L. Pile to refer the
Bill to a Select Committee was
defeated, six members voting “no”
and five voting “aye”. The division
was as follows: (Ayes) Hon’bles
G. B. Evelyn, Mrs. Hanschell, Dr.
St. John, G. D. L. Pile, J. D.
Chandler.

(Noes) Hon’bles Dr. H. G. Mas-
siah, A. G. Gittens, F. C. Hutson,
the Lord Bishop, V..C. Gale, the
Acting Colonial Secretary.

Motion for the second reading
was carried by an 8—3 division,
all the members of the Council
voting in favour except Hon’bles
Mr. Chandler, Mr. Pile and Mrs.
Hanschell.

Later in the debate a motion by
Mr. Pile that clause 4 dealing with
contracting out be deleted was
resolved in the negative. Only
Dr. St. John, Mr. Pile and Mr.
Chandler voted for the motion.

Debate was adjourned after a
motion by Mr. Pile that clause 6
dealing with peaceful picketing be
deleted was lost by an 8—4 divi-
sion, Voting in favour of the de-

with which I shall be dealing in a

moment I would say that this
takes recognition of t:. fact that
trade unions do, and I think

always have had for the last forty
years, political affiliation and
associations,”

The majority of trade unions
were the children of one or other
political parties and it was unreal-
istic to suggest that Barba los
should be an exception and their
trade unions not be expected tv
take part in political activities.

Safeguards which were set out
in Clause 5 of the Bill, made it
necessary that there should be,
as in the United ‘tingdom, separ-
ate political funds, and that there
should be adequate opportunity
for persons who did not wish to
contribute to the political funds
not to do so.

Peaceful Picketing ,

“As regards “peaceful picket-
ing” I would only say that this has
been lawful in the United King-
dom since 1906 which was the
date of the Disputes Act. The pro-
visions regarding “peaceful pick-
eting” was slightly but not sub-

letion were Hon’bles Dr. St. John, | St@ntially amended by the 1927

Mr. Pile, Mr. Chandler and Mrs,
Hanschell. ,
Second Reading

Moving the second reading of
the Bill, the Acting Colonial Sec-
retary said that the various sec-
tions of the Act were to achieve
different amendments to the exist-
ing Trade Unions and Trade Dis-
putes Law. There were several
different amendments not having
any particular relation to each
other, he said and he would have
to deal with them individually.

As regards clauses 2 and 3 of
the Bill, the first substituted a
new definition to the expression
“trade union”, and the other a
new clause regarding the “com-
pulsory registration of trade
unions”. Those two new clauses,
however did not effect any major
change in the present law, but
they did substitute what was re-
garded as a better provision on
those points,

He did not think that any par-
ticular comment was called for
and all he wished to say was that
the drafting of those clauses was
based on legislation elsewhere.

“Now the remainder of the Bill
deals with two matters known as
“contracting out” and “peaceful
picketing”. There is no connec-
tion between the two and I must
deal with them separately,” said
the Acting Colonial Secretary.

Contracting Out

The position regarding “con-
tracting out”, was that as long
ago as the beginning of the cen-
tury it was legal for trade unions
to have political association. When
he said at the beginning of the
century, he should have said from
the year 1913.

About the year 1908 there was
a case brought by someone called
Osborne .against a railway com-
pany on this question of political
associations and political activities
of trade unions. This case went
to the House of Lords where it
was decided that political activi-
ties by trade unions were illegal.

Decision Altered

In 1913 this decision was alter-
ed by the passing of the Trade
Union Act of that year which made
it legal for trade unions to in-
dulge in political activities, to
have political associations, and
permit what was known as ‘“‘con-
tracting out.”

The provision of the law,—and
he was speaking from memory~
was that it should, in the first place,
be by secret ballot by the mem-~
bers of a union who engaged in
political activities at all. Second~
ly that there should be a separate
political fund and only money
from that fund could be used for
political activities. Thirdly, what
was known as the “contracting
out” clause which provided that
any person who did not want to
contribute to the fund, should have
the right to do so. That was the
law of 1913 and it remained the
same until after the general strike
in England in 1926, In the follow-
ing year there was passed
the Act of 1927 which among
other things, substituted for “apn-
tracting out” the “contracting in”
clause. In effect that meant in
future members of a trade union
would not contribute to the politi-
cal fund unless they specifically
signified that they wanted to do
so by signing a notice called a
“contracting in” notice. In other
words the form of notice shown
in the first Schedule of the present
Bill was changed so as to read in
effect: “I hereby give notice that.
TU wish to contribute to the politi-
eal fund of the particular union,
‘instead of as set out, “I hereby
give notice that I object to con-
Yribute to the political fund, etc.”

Act Repealed

That was the law between 1927
and 1946 at which time the whole
of the 1927 Act was repealed and
the law went back very largely
to the law before 1927 and was
in large part the 1913 law. That
was the short history of the “con-
tracting out” and “contracting in.”
He would just repeat that the
“contracting out” was made legal
in 1913; it was made illegal or
rather “cqntracting in” 1927, and
“contracting out” was again the
| procedure in 1946.
| The clauses of the Bili regard-
ing “contracting out” were set out
in the Objects and Reasons and
they were based on the United
Kingdom's’ legislation. As far as
he knew, similar legislation “éx-
isted in the majority of the colo-
nial territories. “As regards this
and as regards the other





I

point picketing

Act, and I think D am correct in
saying that Barbados is the only
colony in this area, and almost
the only colony in the British
Empire which has not got pro-
visions regarding “peaceful pick-
eting.”

“Here again in recognition of
what has now become and indeed
regarded as the normal rights of
trade unions in their general la-
bour relations. I think myself that
there is no good reason why Bar-
bados should stand out against
this and be distinguished in this
respect.”

“In the Other Place there had
been some discussion regarding
the rights of persons to picket at
a person’s place or residence.
“Clause 6 of the Bill made iv law-~
ful for a person or persons to at-
tend at or near a house or place
where a person resides or works |
or carries on business or happens |
to be, if they so attend merely for
the purpose of peacefully obtain-
ing or communicating information
or of peacefully persuading any
person to work or abstain frorn
working.”

A Compromise

“I appreciate and it is appre-
ciated that this is likely to be a
controversial clause,” said the
Acting Colonial Secretary, “and
that even though it is most un-
likely that that right will be used,
it would be better to take it out
of the Bill.”

For that reason, he pointed out
he would make an amendment
at the appropriate time which
would have the effect of deleting
the provision for “peaceful pick-
eting” at persons’ residences mak-
ing it only applicable to places
where they worked. °

Of the other clauses he did not
think tt was necessary for him to
Say anything by way of explana-
tion, The Objects and Reasons
made them quite clear and he be-
lieved they were non-controver-
sial.

“It might be asked why has this
Bill been introduced now. Ond@
answer to that is that it is always
well to introduce legislation of
this sort before it is needed. It
is likely to cause very much more
trouble if it is introduced as a re=
sult of any trouble,

“I velieve vhe existence ur non-
existence of the present Bill in
Barbados has so far made no dit-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

with the compromise given by the|
Government,

Against The Bili

_ Honourable G. D. L. Pile said
he was against the Bill as,a mat-
ter of principle. As he under-
stood it, a principle of democracy
was that every individual should
have the right to come to a decis-
ion for his own.on matters afrect-
ing himself, as long, of course, as
ne did not break the law of the
land,

in that connection, the main
points with which he was con-
concerned were the principles of
“contracting out”, and of peace-
ful picketing. The Hon'ble Act-
ing Colonial Secretary in
introducing the Bill had told
them a good deal about “contraci-
ing out.”

The present law followed the
principle of “contracting in.” That
was, that after a ballot had been
taken and the majority of mem-
bers of a Trade Union present
decided that there should be a
political fund, any person who
wanted to contribute to that
fund could contract in. In that
case he signed a form to that
effect.

What the present Bill proposed
was that after the ballot had
been taken, it was assumed that
every member was willing to
subscribe to the political fund,
unless he definitely said no. While
a man might belong to a Trade
Union, he might not agree with
the Union's political ideas. which
the political fund was formed to
support. Was it fair to that man
that he should be obliged to
contribute to it? It seemed to
him a negation of democracy.

Political Action

They should remember that as
the Acting Colonial Secrevary had
said, Trade Unions sought their
objectives to a large extent by
political action, It was reasona-
ble to suppose that the majority
of members would be willing «to
subscribe to the political fund.
But was it fair that a particular
member who was not willing to
subscribe should have undue
influence brought to bear upon
him?

That was what it amounted to
when he was forced to say no
in opposition to the majority
who were saying yes. He was
thus being held up in the lime-
light among his fellows, a thing
which could bring disagreeable
consequences, Undue influence
should not be brought to induce
a man to follow a certain action
which argument had failed to
convince him was right.

If a man could be persuaded

@ On page 7.



N.C.0 s Will
Conduct
Police Band

By the kind permission of Ma-
jor Stoute (Acting Commissioner
of Police, the Police Band will
render the undermentioned pro-
gramme at the Hastings Rocks,
commencing at 8 o’clock to-night.

“N.C.O.s Conducting”: —

C/pls. G, Eastmond, W. Best,
B. Morris ang. Sgi. Archer.

This is a new feature instituted
by Captain Raison A.R.C.M. be-
fore he left the island for Antigua
and in future will be a monthly
attraction. The object of this is
to give each N.C.O. a chance to
develop the art of conducting. It
is done in the British Army and
Capt. Raison states that this is
the only medium by which his
N.C.O.s can get a chance to show
their ability in the art,

Programme
(1) MARCH—‘“Father Rhine”
—Paul Lincke
(2) OVERTURE—“Morning, Noon

and Night” —Suppe
‘3) SELECTION — The Gondo-
OO Es viaa Peano —Sullivan
(Oy VALE So oes P, A, Steck

(5) SELECTION—‘The “Chu
Chin Chow” Frederick Norton
(6) SLAVONIC RHAPSODY
te ee ae oe «eC. Friedemann
(7) TWO BALLADS:
“Little Grey Home in the
West” .... Hermann Lohr
“A Perfect Day” .. C. Jacobs

ference in this community. It is, (8) SELECTION “Hit The Deck”

a tribute to labour and labour re-
lations that this is so; but I sug-
gest for the very serious consid-
eration of honourable members
that it is very much better to et
on the Statute Book the grov,s-
ions in the Bill now that labour
relations are good, than .to be
confronted and be charged at some
later date when vhere be some
rupture in labour tglations, of
having refused to Pu» them on. [
now beg to move thaj this Bill be
read a second time.”

Glad For Compromise

Honourable Dr. Massiah, sec-
onding the motion for the second |
reading of the Bill, said he was |
glad that the Government had
seen fit to reduce the scope. of the
picketing, and to restrict it to the
place of work. It would never .do
in a country like Barbados to
have the peace and quietness oi
people’s home invaded by peace-
ful picketers, or otherwise,

_ They all -ealised of course that
it was a dangerous thing to put
powers of that sort in the hands
of people who were still in their
infancy as regards Trade Union-
ism. His fear was not so much
for the leaders, who had a ,-ertain
amount of balance and jntelli-.
gence. His fear was lest the lead-
ers be pushed off their feet by the
people behind,

As regards the second j,irt of
the peaceful picketing, he vas
satisfied that the provisions tor
keeping it peaceful, and vhe pen-
alties attached, would go a long
way in ensuring that it would be
kept peaceful. -

For that reason he thought they
should accept the compromise
which had been offered by the
abandoning of the provision for
picketing homes, and pass the
other part with its accompanying |
safeguards, .

If they accepted Trade Union- |
ism, they should accept the pri
ciple that Trade Union uld
have certain rights. That was a



universal practice all over the
British Empire, any once they |
were satisfied that there were pro- |
visions for safeguarding the peace |
of the country, they could have|

no reason for not having peaceful

passing the section

—Vincent Goumans
Popular Dance Music.
GOD SAVE THE KING.
Conductor: —
C. ARCHER, A Mus. V.C.M.,
Acting Bandmaster.



Sugar Resolution
Received By Leg. Co.

THE Secretary of State for the
Colonies has received the text of
the Resolution passed by the
Council relative to the Sugar
Negotiations between representa-
tives of the B.W.I. Producers and
the British Government, and will
keep in mind the views expressed
in the Resolution, the Legislative
Council was told yesterday in a
message from the Governor,

Mr. Bertie Graham was yesterday
reported as being a student at McGill,
University, Canada. He is in fact a medi-
Sah shige at GUY'S HOSPITAL, LON-



ev

)

Mire! Gow



Boil
Oats.

SORE MINERALS
MORE PROTEINS

MORE VITAMINS (8, and B,)










0 i oon
oe sag tl
Ps

ENERGY BREAKFAST! ,

When boiling add 1 cup of Quaker
minutes. That's all.

DELICIOUS QUAKER OATS GIVES YOU:





Wants To Drill

Here For Oil

Mr. H. C. Bishop of New York, |
arrived in Barbados yesterday
morning to consult with Govern-
ment officials regarding the re- |
cent enactment of the Oil Bill
which was passed by the Legis-
lature.

He came in from Texas via
Trinidad by B.W.LA. and is
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.

representative of the Gulf
Oil Corporation, a world-wide
organisation with headquarters in



Pittsburgh, Mr. Bishop is seek-|$

ing on behalf of his company.
an application for an oil conces-

sion to drill here, and hopes that ‘

the rules and regulations cover-
ing the Bill will be formulated.

Should his application be fav-| ¥

ourable, his company will be

ready to start operations prompt- | ¥

ly.



25 Years Ago

(Barbados Advocate,
January 13, 1925)

Sugar ang Cocoa Prices

Whilst sugar prices were up
during the last two years and
Cocoa prices were down, the re-
verse is now the case. It is not
expected that the
promised by the Imperial Gov-
ernment will be in operation
early enough to held West Indian
Sugars during the first four or
five months of the year; and con-
Sequent on the reported big
crops in Cuba the market is low,
and somewhat depressed.,

On the other hand ordinary
Trinidad Cocoa is now quoted
at $16 per cwt., where last year
it was little more than half
that price. Trinidad and Gren-
ada were terribly hard hit by
the slump during the last two
years and the improvement in
prices will bring back to them
something of their departea
prosperity.

* Drowning Fatality

On Wew Year’s Day while
passing through the Gulf Stream,
the S.S. “Guiana” met some
heavy seas. The Boatswain,
Phillip Stembar, a native of Car-
riacou, who was standing on deck
was swept off. The Captain
stopped the ship, and made a
search, circling about the vicin-
ity. After remaining about an
hour at this tedious task, and
failing to find the body, the ship
pursued its course.

Brvooeussessosqoooosonen
: FRESH :
: VEGETABLE
$ LANDRETH \

WEATHERHEAD'S

4

,

\ BEET, CABBAGE (2 kinds) %

4% CARROT (3 kinds), LETTUCE 3

. (4 kinds) s

OKRA, BEANS (5 kinds) Ms)

TOMATO (2 kinds), EGGPLANT, %

KOHL RABI (2 kinds) %

CAULIFLOWER »

PEPPER, Sweet & Hot (7 kinds) 4

PARSLEY, CUCUMBER, CORN, ¢

SQUASH (4 kinds) >

SPINACH, TURNIP, ~

RADISH (white; %

ONION, PARSNIP, THYME, s

SWEET MARJORAM, BROCOLLI, *

MUSTARD, CELERY, LEEK, x

SWISS CHARD, PUMPKIN, x

CHINESE CABBAGE, CITRON, %

MUSKMELON, WATERMELON, \

BRUSSELS SPROUTS, x

s

. x

o

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD 3
“A

LTD ;

* %

5

~ HEAD OF BROAD STREET ¥

, on 5

SDSSSO DOSES SESS 9ON






















preference] §



i

=~

—=—_

AFTER STOCK TAKING
WE HAVE MADE

SPECIAL REDUCTIONS ON
DRESSES, BLOUSES, SLACKS
and SKIRTS Ete, Ete.

BROADWAY DRESS SHOP.



{
j



CROP SEASON —
REQUISITES

en HOR eee
ROCKBOTTOM PRICES.

® SHOVELS
@ BUCKETS
® CANE BILLS
@® CUTLASSES
@® PLANT KNIVES
@ BAG

AND
PLY ENGLISH
SEWING TWINE

OBTAIN OUR QUOTATION BEFORE BUYING
ELSEWHERE

HARRISON'S

| 5

|

+
>

HARDWARE DEPT.
Dial 2364.





i fot every

: occasion 7
on Sale at the
leading Stores

~





2

HARRISON'S—sroap sr.

NEEDLES





SINGLE MODEL
LADIES’ HATS



In a variety of colours and styles.
Only recently opened. From $4.50











2 cups of water. Add salt:

Cook it, stirring, for 2%





for strong bones and teeth
for growth; solid Besh ond musce
for energy oad stamina
turn food inte “body-fael”

11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET



MAY ALL HAPPINESS

Be yours during the Christmas ,Season, and may the
Year 1950 be one marked indelibly in your memory
as a year of Success, Expansion and Achievement.



LET US HELP YOU

To attain this Success, Continue during the

any Item of Hardware you may require.



And now may we extend to you the Season’s Greet-
ings with all our customary sincerity:—

A Prosperous New Vear

Year to give us your Orders for all manner of
Foundry work; all kinds of Factory Supplies, or for rao ee

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY Led.

St. Michael

See

White Park noad

SSS







Reece













BY CARL ANDERSON

i

ae a pont
TAKE SOME CLOTHES * aC]
HANGERS OVER TO OUR | | '

OTHER STORE - PLEASE -)

——— eee |







|
|




SUPITER! THAT WATCH!
rT MUST HAVE BEEN A






PUERE HE COMES |
PBack AGAIN!
















RANGER

= ) STO! NOW WHAT | | DAN, YOU FOLLOW

lax

THE LONE






RIFF! FOLLOW ME! TONTO'S }
GIVING US A WAY OUT!

a
[
|
;
Kit Co; 2S% ey «bite 2 WOE pCR: Heeeass a
i 4 Wocal OazZ16 ) ae THE WEATHER
ee . j LOW CLO ee = — THEM L AAKIN’ TH ‘
; , fl. . IN DISTRIC LOG! Z WORDS ! ue TO ne soéee

LAND, ME BOVOS!

LOW PRESSURE, .















BY GEORGE

re

MC. MANUS
— se












NOT TILL 2M READY,

MILLION® NO...BUT
GIS! YOU AIN'T GOIN’
NOWHERE

BE TEN GRANO! TLL
Y YUH ANOTHER

HAMBURGER , S'S...














ae
aac

—




as
rn



es

Paty

Sn
ee:







Pe es






THEY 6oT Him, “Wl
ALL RIGHT~ DIDN'T

>? _NOTHIMS THE
THUGGEES NEVER



Blamed For Loan Flop









































BARBADOS ADVOCATE







Election, Sugar T alks

LONDON (By Mail)
A SENSATION vras caused in West Indian circit
London when it was known that the Jamaica three
half per cent Ioan 1968-73 had turned out a failure. About
90% of the £2,500,000 stock offered to the public (of a}
total of £3,250,000 to be raised) will be left on the hands|
of the underwriters who are now responsible for finding
the money for the colony.

and a

"The Yanks
Are There

PARIS (By Mail)

“The Yanks Are Coming” the
battle cry of 1918, is even more
appropriate to-day.

For as one French wag said,
the line from the World War I
song-hit “Over There” should be
revised to “The Yanks Are Here”

What set off this reminder of
two previous American “inva-
sions” was an American Embas-
sy announcement that 9,980 Am-
ericans—in addition to tourists—
now reside in France.

in 1939, on the eve of the Sec-
ond World War, the registered
American “colony” was hardly
more then 2,000 the Embassy said.
Chiefly responsible for this lat.
cst “invasion” are the Marsha!

+ Business experts blamed ‘ten-
sion over the impending general
election in Britain and bewilder-
ment about the West Indies’ po-
sition generally because of the
protracted sugar negotiations as
prime causes.

“The Financial Times” com-
mented: “Another factor mili-
tating against the success of the
issue was the knowledge that a
number of similar issues are be-
lieved to be pending.”

This does not promise well for
future colonial loans. Many Wes‘
Indian: businessmen had expected
that there might be some short-
fall in subseriptions but nothing
like 90 per cent. The issue came
in a week during which freight)
rates to the West Indies had /|
been raised 10 per cent, Mr. }
Bustamante, newly re-elected to}
power in Jamaica, had been
quoted as making some strong
anti-British comments, and dead-
lock in the sugar talks with the
Ministry of Food persisted. There



Plan, the G.I. Bill of Rights, the could hardly have been a worse
United Nations Educational Sci-}| background. ¥
entific and Cultural Organisation, —B.UP.
and beginning this fall, the Ful-
bright Bill for approximately 250

about $300 a month—or four

students and professors.
American veterans. still wear-
ing flying jackets and Army boots,
overflow the caves of St. Germain
and Montparnasse, living in smali
box-like hotel rooms and drink-
ing beer on $75 a month.
But the average American
yovernment secretary earns

times more than her French col-
league—and is offen able to find}
luxurious apartments out of reac!
of many old French families. |

It prompted one Frenchman to}
joke “The Americans are fast}

France .”—I.N.S.



becoming the ‘grand bourgeois’ of |



FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 195@



‘ Taxis Want
Rear Lights
On Soldiers

LONDON, (By Mail)

Hitler has started a first-class }
squabble between King George’s
Royal Palace Guards and Lon-
den’s taxi drivers.

Early in the war German |
planes rendered the Buckingham |
Palace guardroom unusable and
sentries are marched to and from
nearby Wellington Barracks.

“During the war they always car-
ried a red rear light on their belts”
said one driver, “but they have
since given up carrying this
warning signal. ;

“Tf they were a party of Girl
Guides or Boy Scouts they’d have
to earry a light—or they’d be
pinched”, he said explosively.

Over in the guardroom at Wel-
lington Barracks a 6-foot-tall
Welsh Guard sergeant gave 4
bellow of disgust.

“Look!” He pointed at a group
sf Guards, all around six feet,
4 inches tall.

“If a cabby can’t see those fel-
lows with bearskin hats on, he
must be blind. Sometimes w*
carry a light. Sometimes we
don’t.” he declared.

And from Buckingham Palace,
a little file still marches across
the shadows towards Wellington
barracks. . « « ; without a lamp.

—LN.S.

| Miami,
| Ciudad Trujillo,

rye Ue a.
Vision Claim
NORTH BAVARIA, Jan. 12.

Roman Cathelie Ghurech Au-
thorities here today banned all
religious services and processions
at nearby Heroldback. Children
and others claim to have seen
visions of the Virgin Mary.

—Reuter.





er for
MORTON
ae

| PEARL



AGENTS.

IT IS ONLY PLACED ON GOODS OF FIRST QUALITY

| BARLEY



A.S. BRYDEN & SONS (Bios) LTD.





qT







—E HAVE A WIDE > RANG





TREASURE ISLAND by Robert Louis THEY LIVE

Stevenson RETOLD IN 400 cat
PICTURES by Peter Jackson eee
THE STORY
Daniel O

NANCY AT ST. BRIDES by D. F. Bruce

JULIET OVERSEAS by Clare Mallory Westerm:

PENNY DREADFUL by A. Stephen Tring Cungences
E. Jo

THE MYSTERY FF
CAT by Enid Blytor

Willer



MAMA
FOR THE
STORY

ae
CHILDREN’S BOOKS

THE WESTOW TALISMAN by

ADVENTURE
Me

STATIONERY

HANKS

OOK I!

- @)3

D_ IN COUNTY DOWN by
Fitzpatrick .
_OF PETER PAN Retold by
Connor .
. Percy F.
OF THE MAIN by Captain
S AFLOAT by John D

ad

)
(










'



More WL
Cruises

NEW YORK (By Mail)

A cruise-cargo service bety,
Kingston, Jamaica and
Deminican Re.

public, said to be the first

service will be started on ae
ary 21, by the Fiota Mercante
Dominicana (Dominican Meg
chant Fleet}.
The steamship “Nueva Domj.

nicano” has been transferreg
from the New York-Dominiean

Republic service for the Purpose,
Cruises will last 12 days.
The cruises will start

and will continue ona
round basis. On her run
Kingston to Ciudad
vessel will also call at
Bay, Jamaica. In

passengers, the ship

ages and bananas and other
go northward.

Before her first run on
cruise route, the “Nuevo
nicano” will begin a service
Miami, to Nassau, Bahamas,
second Thursday on a year-round
basis, making her first ae

on

car-

January 19 and returning to
ami in time for her sailing
the 21st.

Fares for the t
will range from 340 to
jars per person and rates for the
Miami-Nassau service will range
from 49 to 72.50 dollars. All rates
quoted are exclusive of tax The
3,500-ton “Nuevo Dom
has accommodation for 177 page
sengers.

Bermuda Water
Shortage

HAMILTON ( Maily
The U.S. Fleet ieee
“Cadmus” has reached
with 100,000 gallons of water
the U.S .Air base at Kindley

here



I

Water is so short t
taps operate only five hours@
Bermuda depends entirely on
rain for fresh water and Decem-
ber with only 2.06 inches of rain
was the driest in 17 years.
—B.UP,

EXAMINE
YOURSELF

Can You Say ‘NO’ te

BEE





Pepto-Bismol is gen-
tle. It spreads a sooth-
ing, protective coating
on irritoted stomach
and intestine! walls.








At, Relief at once!
My ,throat’s” soothed and that wi
‘\ cough eased in no time.
a

acc?
_ COUGH
|

LOZENGES

1) 25 _2ezEB

=

S Byes

ee

OT









Apply to O. Layne, Maxwell,

Fm, Poone Oat. 13.1.50—4n

CAR: Standard Vanguard 3,500 miles



pripay, JANUARY 13, 1950

















offices, enclosed yard.











LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Conrad

Hards of Collymore Rock, St Michael,







ARE AT



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Hon’ble Acting Colonial
Secretary had said that Barba-
dos was the only colony, in tha
B.W.l. and perhaps in the



“ogre state”, More and more to-
day, he said, they were examples
of parties with the majority
becoming small dictatorships, and



tion 7.

There was a Labour Com-
missioner in the island who was
of great value in trade disputes.









arrive at. He himself did not see
the necessity for having it on the
Statute Book, and if some other
member. did not move the dele-











whether the Labour Officer was
in favour of the Bill. If labour



d July 1949 just arrived from) conditions of sale apply to: R. ARCHER| for neneedant to oalt, Sririte: Walt Empire that did not have peace-| interfering with almost every/If he failed, an arbitrator was| tion of clauses 6 and 7 he woulc| relations in the island were good,

ind after routine areas Ems Pied Mc KENZIE, Victoria Street. Dial 2947.| Liquors &c., at Enmore Hotel, Collymore picketing provisions, If he had} aspect of the individual. j called in. The Acting Colonial] do so, and he was glad to hear that they

y Works. On V . 13.1,.50—3n 10.1.50—4n Roek, St. Michael. nothing to congratulate himselt Select Committee Secretary himself had admitted |} were, why introduce machinery

TN y 7 ; ; ) 3 i . * . i ; ; i : ia

—_—____—_—_—_ ~ e ae ee aay Elen 1950. jon in being a Barbadian, it} Mr. Pile said that he was going| that labour relations in the island Welcomed Motion | which might have the effect_ of

CAR: 199 Morris ¢ h pi Sey: REAL ESTATE Police Magistrate, Dist. “A" would be that they were not in} to propose that the Bili. be} Were quite good at the present : : ; making those relations bad?
condition. Phone 3 . |——_—_— G. C. HARDS, | the position of following the} referred to a Select C i time. Why then were they tryin, Hon'ble J. D. Chandler said he} He wonde if th resen

13.1,50—3n SHARES with Accruing Dividends:— a 2 E J to a Select Committee ny y trying h : v' red e@ p t

|» Barbados Shipping and Trading o.,| N.B.—This application will be consia-| W0le Empire in doing some-| for more intensive consideration. to legalise something which in 0 poem Cas oS the. ialend and) time, just before the crop, wasTan

ean—Vexhell 13 bP. a cre er €red at _a Licensing Court to be held at | thing of which he could not see} Although he was bound to admit] big countries had been the cause] had not had a chance to conside1 auspicious time to introduce-sueb
i, leather Upholstery 5 ~' | 27 Barbados Ice Co., Ltd. Police Court, District “A” on Saturday} that an opposite view could be ~

light © grey,

batteries repainted



The above will be set up for sale a

















BOOKKEEPER/ACCOUNTANT: Serv-

that peaceful picketing was the

of much unpleasantness between

the Bill properly. For that reason



| legislation.

condition, Price $1,100, Phone! Public Competition at our Office, James| . 1, [9% Of January 1950 at 11 o'clock. law nearly everywhere, he felt| employers and workers and even|h® welcomed the motion of Mr.| A further report of the discus-
de Verteville 4517 in office hours.| Street, on Wednesday, 18th January E. A. McLEOD, very strongly against it. Refer-/] between workers themselves? Pile that it be referred to a select! sion on the Bill will appear in~e
8.1.50—3n gtom wien Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” WANTED ring a Bill to a Select Committee; The Acting Colonial Secretary; Comittee. He wanted to know later issue. .
One Chevrolet Car in good ye ee ao. Lae eends before it had given its second| had said that it was better to put 1 aaa ate
Bane cle ae ke Derricks, st. 32,1.90—En Li | HELP reading was a practice that was} it on the Statute Book now than ee ee
perio S| SUG e| WQuoR LIceENce notice | HELP sometimes followed in the House| to wait until it was needed, Dr. SHIPPING NOTICES

WRUCK—One (1) Fargo Motor Truck
‘Dual Drive’ (eight forward gears).

1950 at 2 p.m. sion. to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c a c ri i ; cacti thic -reati j = =.
od. Contact Courtesy Garage.|” The Dwelling House colled “ARNE,”| wns,” ee or a vere ae corn ote sane. omer, ee ee ~_— section 6, the section which | merely creating machinery for =
21.1.50—S8n.) ard the land theretd, containing 4,330] ing at Dayrells Road, Ch. Ch. within} standard. Knowledge Dry Goods busi- ret erred to peaceful picket-ng, trouble. . ‘
- arene | square feet, situate at 9th Avenue.} Dist. “A”. ness and control of office personnel} Said it seemed that the follow- The object of peaceful picketing ADVERTISE . . « The MV. “CARIBBEE” “will
(CAR: Ford Prefect Car in perfect con-} Belleville. Dated this llth day of January 1950. considered assets. Business hours 84] ing section was largely a contra-| when a strike arose was to per- accept Cargo and Passengers for
15,000 miles. Apply: Harold! The Dwelling House comprises Gallery,| To: FE. A. McLEOD, Esq. weekdays 8-12.30 Saturdays. Write in| qictj Bins ee ari d i Dominica, Antigua, Montsetrar
whead, c/o Bruce Weatherhead.| Drawing & Dining Rooms, 2 Bedrooms, Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” confidence stating age, details pasi iction of section 6, It was evi-| suade those who had struck not in the Nevis and St ‘Kitts. Sailing
11,1.50—3n poe with Sesedne room and running C. F. WARD, | appointments and salary desired: P.O.| dently an attempt to define what| to return to work, and to persuade Friday 13th inst. ,
voter in each, Breakfast roorn, Kitch- Applicant. | Box Pike -tn. J y intimi i : rs i ’ :
PUSED CARS: Vauxhall 14 h.p. A-1l/ enette, Toilet and Bath. ’ N.B.—This application ‘will Saeed 1 ee ~ was meant 7 ee and } a oan ‘ee take the strikers The MV. “DABRWOOD"> will
ition. STANDARD 8 h.p. saloon} Gas installed; Servant’s room and| ered at a Licensing Court to be held ai] A MAN with knowledge of Edgin, | 22 hOyance. he only conclusion | job, When there was a strike on, EVENING accept Cargo and Passengers ‘for
good condition, Courtesy Garage, Garage in Yard. Police Court, District “A” on Saturday | spectacle Lenses. Only those with pre-| that he could draw ,from the| emotions were aroused, the at- St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
4616. 11,1.50—3n | Inspection any day except Sundays,| 2lst day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock. vious experience need apply to Imperial, presence of section 7 was that} mosphere was highly charged and Aruba, Date of sailing to-be
|| between the hours of 4 p.m. and 6 P.m. | a.m, Optical 13.1. 50—in it os dificult for ‘. th “ . 7 given.
; ft OR — One ee ae on application on the premises, Dial E. A. McLEOD, Mm was dificu or one to say reats were used and violence
tor very little used condition. | 2115. Police Magistrate, Digt. ‘A’. s : Large Second “ ae
purchasing larger. Cole & Co.,! For further particulars and Conditions| 13.1.50—1n * een ieee ae ana or a ye a,
6.1.50—Jn. | of eu Sg fe ie a * B.W.1. Schooner Owners’ Associa-
. ‘oO. BUTLER—Experience Butler required. Ki ) h Sho tion (Inc.) Tel. 4047,
ee ONT CATFORD SP'so-on| LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE | ,2UT8%—Experience Butler required. éep wiite es an tele. nee
CAL >. 5O— » . .
THE undersigned will offer for sale THE application of Gersman King of | ™°'® an mn - S Wh t th
RIGERATOR—62 cubic ft. English} by public auction at their office, No. 17,| Spooners Hill, St. Michael, for permus- OCD nowy 1 é U1
as, a eee 5 oni High Street, on Friday the 13th instant} sion to sell Spirits, eas Semin StS § did
ree. e . no offers} at 2 p.m. a and galvan: shop at se ~ +
leaving. island. HH. G. Bancrott.| * The dwellinghouse called Road, Spooners Hill, St. Michael. ee a woe 2 . ie : °
$292, . 12.1,50—4n.| COTTAGE and land containing 11,960 Dated this 11th day of January 1950. wide range of ailments—Fractures, hi “ae
square feet, Constitution Road, St. Mi-| To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq. Paralysis and Premature Decay, ana a 10n. e Ss “ *
q OVE —"G.E.C. with Grill and] chael, The dwellinghouse co’ ses — Police Magistrate, Dist. “A" etc., ete.
tate Control Oven, in excellent} ON THE GROUND FLOOR: awing GERSMAN KING, ¥ Y ,

ition ong sear old $150,00 no offers.

| A) et SHUWHITE
. G. » Seawell Airport. Phone| ning water), gallery, toilet and bath.| N.B.—This application will be consid- Give Mi we sonia noir SOUTHBOUND SAILS Sails Sails Arrives Satis
12.1,50—5n.| UPSTAIRS: One very large bedroom;} ered at a Licensing Court to be held at ' Cramton, Street, x NAME OF SHIP MON- Halifax Bosten B'dos B'dos
IN THE BASEMENT: Dining room,| Police Court, District “A” on Saturday 13.1:80.~an Pp City TREAL a
a te OVA ise pantry, kitchen; Seperate bathroom in| 2Ist day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock eS : ADY NELSON
ri d Generators 2.75 pard, a.m, Lf — 12th Jan. Mth Jan. 23rd Jan. 28rd Jan
; Orders now being placed for im-} Government water and electric light E. A, McLEOD, — FOR LADY RODNEY — 8th Feb. 10th Feb. ig9th Feb 20th Feb
t te shipment. Communicate with | installed Police Magistrate, Dist. “A"™ LADY NELSON ~o- 25th Feb. 27th Feb. &th Mar. 9th Mar
y Garage, Dial 4616, Inspection any day except Sunday| 13.1.50—1n WHITE KID LADY RODNEY —— 25th Mar. 27th Mar. 5th Apr. 6th Apr.
11.1.50—3n | between the hours of 4 p.m. and 6 IMPORTANT NOTICE BUCKSKIN LADY NELSON 12th Apr. 14th Apr. 23d Apr. 24th Apr.
p.m. on application to the owners, the
tT RE ae eee iti LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE AND NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
or further iculars an: con ions , ‘ s S
“ hens of sale apply to :— : The applicalion. a anes Lynch of ilies is e i CANVAS Ss oe B'dos B'dos Boston St. John Montreal
PUR RS — irch drawing room COTTLE, CATFORD & Co. Bay Street, St. ichael, for permission a after Monday anua- ODNEY 17th Jan. 2 Jan. he
comprising (1) Settee (3 seats) (i) Solicitors. to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &e, at a ary the Gas supply will be « SHOBS LADY NELSON wid tht mnn wae
fris-Chairs (1) Morris Rocker. All as 7.1.50—5n. | wooden building with stone frontage off on all districts from Gasworks LADY RODNEY 4th Mar. 5th Mar. 15th Mar. 16th Mar pes
with Gushions,. tapestry | Near Hospital, Bay Street. St. Michael to Top Rock each day (Saturday LADY NELSON 2ist Mar. 22nd Mar. ist Apr. 2nd Apr aaa
ve (1) ng Table with long THE undersigned will offer for Sale st Dated this llth day of January 1960. and Sunday excluded) from 1.15 LADY RODNEY 17th Apr. 19th Apr. 20th Apr. 30th Apr ee
Pe, (Modern). (1) Chest-of-drawers, | their Office No. 17, High Street, Bridge-| To: EB. A. McLEOD, Esq. p.m. to approx. 3.30 p.m. until LADY NELSON 6th May &th May 18th May 19th May ——
y Kitchen Cabinet (1) three tier-| ‘own, on Friday 18th day of January Police Magistrate, Dist. “‘A’

(1) small Bireh tabie (2) Kitchen
Allcan be seen between 4—7 p.m.



G, Bancroft, Seawell Airport. Phone ‘o., Ltd N.B.—This application will be consid- : uv N.B. bi. ~
Co., Ltd. ’ —— Subject to change without notice. All Is fi :
11.1.50—5n ered at a Licensing Court to be. held at ful . All vesse tted with cold storage cham-
COTTLE, CATFORD 4S a lice Court, District “A’ on Saturday bers. Passenger Fares and freight rates on application to :—

+ EEL OFFICE FURNITURE: Letter
bd fools-cap size 4 drawer letter cabin-
with locks; Bins suitable for hard-
Stores or Garages, etc. Cabinets

Locks ete.—Courtesy Garage, Dia!







their Office No. 17, Migh Street, Bridge-

instant at 2 p.m,
town, on Friday 20th day of —
|



room and three bedrooms (one with run-

1950 at 2 p.m.
200 Shares in the West India Biscuit



FOR SALE OR RENT—Farley Hill,
St. Peter. Old Plantation house with
large ballroom, Dining room library,
fourteen bedrooms etc. Ideal for convert-

THE application of Charles F. Word

of Dayrells Road, Ch. Ch. for, permis-

Applicant



MeDONALD LYNCH,
Applicant

2ist day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock

a.m, b
EB. A: McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “_~ >
13,1,50—In



ices of experienced bookkeeper/Account-
ant required in Barbados. Advertisers’









After seeing Your Doctor, ...



the work of clearing Gas Main is
( completed.
t









of Commons.

Hon'ble Dr. St. John





GOVERNMENT

NOTICE



eect
dealing



) St. John said. He was claiming,
however, that to do so would be







LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of M. E. R. Bourne &
Co. of Roebuck Street, St. Michael, for
| permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
&e., at a bottom floor of No. 38 Roebuck
























GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD. — Agents.









1.1 -3n | in ; ‘ | Street, City. ; —
| en" iraaiuw 8 Comowiy "| LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE INCOME TAX NOTICE ned Mig, aot sary |) CHR. GLE TRANSATLANTIQUE
| Sa Dist. “A”.

ECHANICAL

MTERS—A small quantity ot
bond hand Remington Typewriters now
Milable. Apply: T. Geddes Grant Ltd,
4376, 8.1,.50—6r.



THE undersigned will offer for Sale at
their Office in James Street, Bridgetown,
on Friday the 27th day of January 1950,
at 2 p.m,

The Dwelling House called “BEULAH”

The application of Idalia Hope, holder
of Liquor License No. 656 of 1950, granted
to Howard Hope in respect of board and
shingle shop at Hanschell Land, Eagle
Hall, St. Michael, for permission to use

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Income Tax returns are re-
quired from every married man whose income is $1200.00 per annum
or over, from every other person whose income is $720.00 per
annum or over and from companies whether incorporated or unin-

Police Magistrate,
Signed M, BE. R. BOURNE,
for Applicants.
N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A”, on Saturday,







FRENCH LINE

S.S. “GASCOGNE” sailing to Trinidad and French Guiana

at § ises the 2ist day of January 198, at 11
Bac nd the land thereto belonging containing | $id, Tiauor. License iat sald Prem , , _ on the 5th February, 1950. Sailin é
4 ow aver King, - saat square feet, situate at Hastings, Eagle re eae nena corporated, societies, persons engaged in any trade or profession, andj ©'clock, a.m. aN sia ‘ 3 iling to Southampton and Le
green and in black. | Christ Church . wae : _ A. TALMA, , a oa . 2
4 mes & Co., Lid. Dial 4476. Te, Enwelling Mouse. covtmetess. Closed Pim, 4 McLEOD, Esa... | Owners of land or property whether a taxable income has accrued Police Magistrate, OY ab ca Havre via Martinique and Guadeloupe 12th February, 1950;
‘ 18.11.49—-t.f.n.| Gallery, Drawing and Dining Bectaes : Police See SS omer HOPE, during the past year or not. I.
Redrooms, Dressing Room, Toilet Bath Sign 7 x
CE 0 and Kitchen with Blectric, Water, Gas} 1). wi, ae Forms of Return my be obtained from the Income Tax Depart- LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Minimum First Class Only $425.30 B.W.LCy.

7 DOM FROM FIRE—Instal a Fire-

Safe with doors secured by
tion lock: Suitable for office or
i Secure your records. Contact

ie it For further particulars and conditions a. st. “AM, 1. Returns of ‘sons hos “los St. Michael.
8 EN & Sons (B'dos) Ltd. of Sale, apply to:— Police Magistrate, oe W a i s per whose books were closed on the 3ist Nap ane oni
ie ~ Pri, Sun, — t.f.n HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD, ay of ecember, 1949, on or before the 31st day of March,| To E. A. McLOD, C _— a — ae ane —
DOKS: School Books of ali kinds at eae NOTICE 1950. Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”. REAL ESTATE AGENTS _ AUCTIONEERS
REWh chook Hing ann 8 LIQUOR LICENSE . : Signed E. BARKER,

, 12)1,50—2r . ‘all d shes ee: : 2. Returns of persons whose principal place of business is not ok ess ‘Chatietinn AN be eae .
= > Th icat f Ty ones © : : i” -
; rr For Sale=Cont Baxters Road, St. Michael. fae petmlanion ‘ — in a island on or before the 30th day of June, 1950. aurea ata Saeaene Sat & > eet DIXON & BLADO

0 x 5, 8. ’ } to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at : eturns 0} Court, Distets’ . ,

— ie nee s a A ftesh shipment of Vegetable and. came. thaw sitached.. to a persons, on or before the 3ist of January, the 2ist day of January 1950, a Lt. Cmdr. G. S. DIXON, OBE

; wo Garage—Dial 4391 Seeds has samt, bean ceaeven Si og mgeenee 8 ae icy Sin . o'clock, aim E. A. McLEOD, . +e >. Were

' . , is . a

' 11.1,50—3n | Australian a — ae TH A. TALMA, Seq. F. CLAIRMONTE han J. M. BLADON, A.F.S,, (Eng.), M.R.S.1, A.M.LB.E.

METS: BLANKETS—Here’s some-





aay y » | Flow Seeds, including Balsam, Cal- Signed BERYL JONES, i ?

d In various ees an cries liopsis, Carnation and SOE ns a: Applicant. NOTE: Any person failing to make his return within the due U.K, — CANADA — U.S.A. 4
: at 8 le Bed) ; up. Thanis. Knight's Drug Stores. a. : ad -. y Pe eas held a date will be liable to a e rn z
il 3466, an Street, Speights- | — remrenreenes sidered ata Licensing Court to be. ees: pn a ms a ae £100 and Before buying, examine our extensive lists of high class prop~ ay
11,1,50—8n. | 98 es ee Ge the Bist day of January 1980, at 11 pe than and will be prosecuted unless a satis- erty and land located in all areas. s

Bt M TINS Just in time for school, | Trafalgar Street. Dial ee. eager o'clock, a.m. Brie: taiteme PO a tory reason is given, Ph 4640 <4
immer tray. Assorted at aaa istrate, Dist. “A”. +1 00 .— ~ Plantations Building

f A rnly Bic. each. G. W. Huteh- Raion er ese ae, 3



ects t i ei al ha cinia ’
A. Barnes & Co. Lid. Nelson Road, Navy, Gardens, 3 {\\| 996969696990969990990500909599699999 ~ }
. (OIS LEATHERS New shipment 3.12.49—ti.n. Vv
\ Price $2.01. Eckstein Brothers, ry large airy bedrooms Verandgh, }
Street, 12.1. 503n’| GALVANISED SHEETS—6 ft., 6% ft., FOR SALE
was : | 8 ft. Apply: Auto Tyre; ve Drawing and Dining Rooms, Tiled 5
q $8 LOSE—Duniop Hose in sizes | Phone 2696. 5.1.00-4.8-8

4 » % in. Eckstein Bros., Bay
zk 12.1,50—-Sn

uD

Bee ens ses Deseret aha =m (switch: anged. ten. te,'atl Seevedme, Os. Fe Dealing led “CAR! d the Yand
7 pirat: 1 a swi es) arr ¥ wa ms, ‘ g House ca an ie . ,
2; ion. Does not ig ot. BLANKETS: Blankets at $2.38 ) g . ?

on Obtainable at





Inspection any day between the hours
of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. on application on
the premises.









Squash and Beans. Also a small variety of





iGS—Galvanised pipe. All sorts
% in. to 1% ins. Phone #604







DIVING MASKS: Rubber Diving Masks
Stanway Store, Lucas Street.

Extra Large at $3.11 These are worth

application will
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A"', on Monday,
the 29rd day of January 1960, at

11 o'clock, a.m.
BE. A. McLEOD,



Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”,

ment AFTER THE 1ST DAY OF JANUARY, 1950, and the forms
duly filled in must be delivered to me on or before the following

respective dates :

Commissioner of Income Tax and Death Duties.









CANADIAN INVESTMENTS

bought at 55 per cent. premium or exchanges





The application of Sheila Seo of
Fresh Water, Black Rock, St. Michaei,
for permission to sell Spirits, Malt
Liquors, &c., at a board and shingle shop
attached to residence at Black Rock,



Police Magistrate, Dist.








A newly built BUNGALOW irc

Kitchen with builtsin Cupboards.
Tiled Toilet and Bath, running




2 Servants’ rooms with toilet aod







R. M. JONES &









connections in

The undersigned will offer For Sale at their Office, No 17, -
High Street, Bridgetown, on Friday, 27th day of January, 1

thereto containing 10,770 square feet, situate on the Sea

CO., LTD.- Agents.



























ore













‘ ee PAGE SEVEN
}
: 7
: SSIFIED ADS, |Pesuc xonces| r
P . | Schuman Leaves
i
5 ee siaasaiaiateciiitin
= | | NOTICE | For W. Germany
} } 1. Tenders are invited for the exclu- |
Rg AT ES FOR RENT sive right to sell Liquors ete. and | PARIS, Jan. 12.
Week Sun. | ™ serve lunches amd teas at Ken- | ‘
a. $1.00 1.29 | sington Ovsl during the Tourna- M. Robert Schuman, French
CEMENTS | —= ment. (Approximately fram Febru | Foreign Minister, left Paris lata
aNnoun per word j | HOUSES = 7th to February: 2ist.) | ; last night in « special rail car for
FoR | “FARAWAY”, St Phili . r Walapectalia Tur oe | Mainz, his first stop in a tour of
qr eet - * f 02 ®S| tarnished, Gar . iene = Team froin Abbeville Guest House | | Western Germany and Bertin,
i rs | Bathing beach. From March ist. $50 to the Oval during the tournament. | from which he is due vo return by
wasteD * | per month. Phone 4476. 3. Tenders must reach the undersigned | air nexv Tuesday .-——Reuter.
FOUND per word ia | 6.1.50—t..n oe P. Harrison & Co.'s Office m
. : : a . no! er than 4 p.m. on Monday
vost, charge ‘ “WORTHY DOWN ae. January tee 3 ~
sini ‘bemees Top Rock, having : : . / 1 i
LES ms each having comm 4. The Association does rot bind it- 3 alk d
posuic SA | i 19 | toilet and bath. Wally tusmenen — self {0 accept the lowest or any F inancial TT _ En
ae able on monthly tenancy from the 15th tomes, : . ie an
,ucrion panuary, Por further particulars apply THE BARBADOS CRICKET Without Agr eement
ee! tine Phe - Beard, dwood Alley or Assoc |
TE per ee 1. ne 4683. 12.1.50—3n W. F. HOYOS. —
p esta’ churge vee «= 1.20| “th, Honorary Secretary. LONDON, Jan, {12.
ae . © Offices in Shepherd Street recently 8.1.50—6n An Polish financial’ ;
Personal 4 agate lines) ieee bythe Income Tax) On.) ——————————————— s —_ ttling Pola Aalks,
Maxim missioner. Occupation on March Ist. ‘ aim at settlin, an
ra =. (8 cas KNIGHT'S LTD, LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE war debts to Britain and compen-
charge : -1.50—5n. , ; vion for British concerns nation~
TE (Monday) —————— The application of Elaine Robinson —s i
ens: saan ze em 60e FURNISHED FI “AT—At Coral Sands Grassfield Gap,” St Michael, for berm A alised in Poland, have ended
nen, am 1 . Good ™ Sel Ss, it Li -» at rj gree even
— | bathing, for further pl Dia a board and shingle shop’ attached to without a . ment after >
IN MEMORIAM 8134. Alma Lashley. 10.1.49-t.f.n | 'ésidence at Grassfield Gap. St. Michael months. This was announced to-
MEMORY of our beloved| “FLAwS tulip fammlGd none | Te a ee eh Ay of January 1950 day by the British Treasury,
ul furnished * » A. A ve i 4% i ¥
I LOVING MEither RICHARD H.| erator and linen at Indramer, Worm, | Police Magistrate, Dist.” “A”. which added thay “in view. of the
BTROND (Late Shopkeeper, piudor| Dial 8364, 19:1.60-t4e Signed ELAINE ROBINSON, ayy nf, ang of “- re oe
‘sed to the great be} ennai Applicant. ed it has been foun possi
wun day of January 1947. CHURCHILL, Maxwell's Coast, 3 bed-| N-B.—This application will be con- to continue negotiations.”
the The Walrond Family. rooms, right-of-way to beach, fully tur, | Sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at | Reuter
th nished. Available from March lst Police Court, District “A”, on Monday, | a 7 7
3.1. SMORY of (WILLIE) | APPIY: Ralph A. Beard, Hardwood alley, | {M6 23d day of January 1950, at 11 Tee
VING MEM! 4683. 4 . am,
IN LONThe 18th of January 1947 = ta E. A. McLEOD, : *
diet rs death took her from Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”. Gasperi Will
Thre y® ver from mv heart 3.1.50—~in.
my bome; but never from & Areher,, PUBLIC SALES i isha soot deinen eeeme R . P
Brittons X Roa tal
aie LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE a bch: 2
3.1. Soo » 5 ¥
= : 1953
AUCTION THE application of Owen T. Alider . si ROME, Jan. ab
of Barbarees Hill, St. Michael, for per- a es = Itali Pres: Einaudi
FoR 8 ALE RILLMAN mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., — —— ——— — ident Luigi ‘
Fe SALOON CAR—10 h.p | at a wall shop attached to reidence at up hortl di : f s eo tonight completed the first round
Suction at. the, tee, PS, 801d bs | corner of Richmonds Gap, St. Michael. m shortly attending a meeting of Flect-street journalists—these are my measurements . . of talks on the formation of a new
4 0 Fiiday 13th at 2 p. arage 0" Dated this llth day of January 1950. yA ge i ec re TN Cabinet to succeed the Govern-
TO I p.m. on instructions} To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq : :
: f or refused. | ,Ceived from the Insurance Co. DIXON] Police Ma: “aan e eo ‘ ment which formally resigned
BB CAR—™.G. no reasomable offer ref & IN, Auctioneers, Plantations eae . LILDER, > - parli oday
: Et, betwen the. Ste Philip Euldions . 11.1,50—3n - yen OunCI Onsi el Ss j a hn l ri ie f hie talks with party
contact J. G. 13.1.50—3n. “EGE ellie tee tne te a N.B.—This application will be consid- u Z pany
posi petition at my office Vitae ered at a Licensing Court to be held at leaders tomorrow, the President
’ . on Cow “ae ° - . . , m 2 ac iri
TRUCK—Chevrolet ee a FRIDAY 13, at 2 p.m. the following:—| 2ist day of Viaemey "sei aitaeee @ From Page 5 taken but that it was bringing) where peaceful picketing endedy often resulted. | Was expected to ask the retiring
een Si aes am. by argument, let him be. That} undue influence to bear. and where intimidation began. | Dr, St. John said that the dis-, Premier, Alcide DeGasperi, to
3 : = “Sedan Gar | NY Lane with the wall rare Police winsecie oat _ | Was the democratic way of doing} Mr. Pile called the undue in-} Government recognised that,| tinction between peaceful picket-| form his sixth successive Cabinet.
CAR: oe to vakacatie. offer | on aE = ates 13.1.50—1n =? : things. fluence another example of the| and hence. the presence of sec-| ing and intimidation was hard to —Reuter.
< . . bedr y out-



Fat te a e®

12,1,50—2n.

mM NZED SHEETS —Bes
st Grade,
yen Sheets, from $2.08 and 32.64,

of St. Lawrence Gap, Christ Church

your sssing at-Stenway Mess UNS Inspection on application to Miss Kathleen Hunte, “Brat-

Street. 13,1, 50-—2n

















bath Standing on 8,000 sq. ft. of













Y “eee bi ton,” M ells Coast. Dial 8357.

ee o ene A. BARNES & Co. Ltd 5 cae ane bg at te LONDON SECURITIES sama oie relay wy For further particulars and conditions of Sale, apply to :—

- L 13,1,50—i.f-n. | & colours, Oe ee saree Dial 4321 between 6 a.m. and ATFORD & No : %
ORES BEANS—io cone perm (Stet ta i.8ean bought and sold promptly through Stock Exchange EE ren, COTS oo

Mia. 11.1,50.—15n.





Green Grocers Co., Shepherd
13.1,50—In,

bums Bleed?

G

brokers.



ee eles

4 inch Pipe in 2 & 6 fee.

etc ‘A. E, Taylor,

Dial 4100
13.1.50—-6n

& partitions
lengths Bends
Coleridge Street.



BARBADOS BONDS and SHARES

(also Trinidad) bought and sold. Quotations on



EXPANDED METAL for Railings &}











S

~

[

S
ene kee eel er ter er len































! wie Coneret *«. Round Miid Steel Bars Ni
» Mean that eek reanith ne Looe a, & % inch. A. B. Taylor Lid ew ear request to:
Mouth Pyorrhea, |
a toner oe naps some bad disease | Coleridge Street, Diz! 4100 as total e 3
ater cause yo teeth 1.50 by |
" Hews Troumia 8), ause Rheomation | : A. M WEBB
m ' stops cum
Ser sens eae ‘GC. CARLION BROWNE 3
BRtes Ae ehs the th 7 - . }
; BEA : : s : = 5
> Bere be Wholesale & Retail |i) Dial 3188 .:- STOCKBROKER ~- Hours 93
f y Estate Agent i } _ 7 cea
om your chemis a cus peupertios Druggist 2 \\ 155, Roebuck Street, Bridgetown.
Vhoe tod: y. The guar- | sale. For further & a | (Over Peo le’s Pharmacy)
" —_o lars Ting 4683 or | at 136 RoebuckSt. Dial 2813388 | Pp )
i Hardwood Aligy i ” er : am baht abst
PYerrkea— Trench Mouth opposite Cathedral 5 GN A NN RR : 2
(i OE ne re A ea eae eaecmmearamara LOSSLESS SPLOT FSO SSPF SPS SSOP OSES









ue
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*” PAGE EIGHT



Hits 78 In |
First Trial |

A breezy knock of 78 by Roy |
Marshall of Wanderers enabled}
Mr. John Goddard’s XT to score
135 fer two Wickets in reply to
71 tnade by Mr. W. A. Farmer's
XI when the first trial match—|
in preparation for the B.G.-Bar-!
bados Intercolonial Tournament to}
be playéd in February — began!
yesterday at Kensington Oval. |

Although dark clouds threat-,
ened the game many times, there |
were some bright moments wit-|

nessed. |

Cc. W. Smith and G. Wood
opefiéd the batting for Mr. W. A.

rmer’s XI in their first innings
when théy won the toss. Taking
the first bai! of the first over from
F. D. Phillips, Spartan pace bowl- |
er, Smith tried to get wel! over |
but misjudged and gave C. Al-)
leyne fielding at gully an easy)
catch, Atkinson then joined G.|
Wood but was soon out to Brews-
ter who opened the attack for |
John Goddard’s KI with F. D.)
Phillips. }

E. W. Cave who top-scored for |
his side with 22, batted steadily, |
scoring all around the wicket. |
When he joined E. Atkinson, he
remained ten minutes before scor- |
ing his first run on the leg side;
off Phillips .

Mr. W. A. Farmer. with Cave
soon got into his stride but when
H. King of Empire relieved Brews-
ter from the Pavilion end he had |
Cave caught by C. Alleyne.

No Mistake

Cc. Alleyne in his first over to
Cave sent down a maiden over and
had Cave edging to slip. He gave
a catch to King who did not accept
it but in Alleyne’s third over
King made no-mistake and took
the catch in slip when Cave at-
tempted to cut.

At the close of the innings, Mr.
Farmer’s XI had scored 71.

A. M. Taylor and Roy Marshall
opened the first innings for Mr.
John Goddard's XI, to the bowling
of E. Atkinson and J. A. Williams
When only 17, Marshall was given
a chance when he edged one from
E. Atkinson to E, Cave who was
fielding at second slip. After
that chance, Marshall became
more cautious and was for a time
very reluctant to hit out. He
reached his 50 with a well-timed
glide. He continued to bat stead-
ily until he was given out leg
before to Atkinson. Taylor scored
19, which included many well-
timed drives and glides

G. Proverbs joined Marshall
when the score was 65 for the loss
of one wicket and remained at
the wicket at the end of the day’s

aapeentiimeay

play with Johnny Lucas who
joined hirn when Marshall was
given out.

Mr. John Goddard's XI at the
close of the first day’s play had
scored 135 runs for the loss of
two wickets. The match will be |
continued on Saturday

Mr. Farmer’s XJI—Ist Innings

C. W. Smith c Alleyne b F. Phillips 0
G. Wood c |. Branker b H. Brewster 3
E. Atkinson c¢ Drayton ‘wk.) b C
Alleyne 7
E. W. Cave c H. Kime b C. Alleyne 22
W. A. Farmer c Drayton (wk.) b
H. King 10
K. Goddard c Phillips b R. Marshall 3
A. Lawless c & b Alleyne 2
L. c A. M. Taylor b R. Marshall 9
E. Millington not out 5
L. St. Hill e Taylor b C. Alleyne 4
J. Williams c N. S. Lucas b Alleyne 2
Extras; (byes) 4
Total 7
Fall of wickets: 1—0, 2—14, 3-14, 4-39 |
5—40, 6~61, 7-57, 8-60, 9--64
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO. M R Ww
F. Phillips q7 3 10
H. Brewste: 6 4 ‘
H. King 8 4 15 l
I, Branker 4 i 7 0
Cc. Alleyne 712 0 2% 4
R. Marshall 4 ,

Mr. J. Goddard's XI—Ist Innings

A. Taylor b Millingtor 19
R. Marshall l.b.w., b Atkir

23

G. Proverbs not out |
J. Lucas not out n |
Extras 4]

|

Total ifor 2 wicket 135





B.B.C. Radio Programme

PRIDAY,

ino

a.m

JANUARY 158

7 am. The New 7.10
Analysis; 7.15 a.m Think on
things; 7.30 a.m. From the third Pre
gramme; 7.50 aan. Interlude
From the Exlitorials; 8.10 a.m. Pre
Announcements; 8.15 a.m. Lond '
Concert Orchestra; 9 a.m. Close Down
12 noon The News; 12.10 p.n {
Analysis; 12.15 Programme
roouncements ; 12.18 p.m
Choice; 1 p.m. The Debate
1.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 1.30 p.m
Symphony of Strings; 2 p.m. The News
2.10 p.m. Home News from Britain; 2.1
p.m. Sports Review: 2.30 p.m. Myra
Hess (Piano); 3 p.m. The Shark Arm
Mystery; 4 p.m The News; 4.10 » m
The Daily Service; 4.15 p.m. Nights at

New |
the





|
News |
An
Listeners’ }
Continues

p.m

|



the Opera; 5 p.m. Black Magic; 5.15
pn, Programme Announcements; 5.20 |
pm. Interlude; 5.30 p.m From the /

third Programme; 5.50 p.m. Interlude; |
6 p.m. New Records; 6.45 p.m. Anthology |
~-2; 7 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m. News|
Analysis; 7.15 p.m. West Indian Diary: !
Dance Musi¢e; 8 p.m Radio |
815 p.m BEC Scottish
p.m. The News; 9.10 p.m. |
Home News from Britain; 9.15 p.m. Th
Debate Continues; 9.30 p.m, Take it|
from here; 10 p.m. After Dinner; 10.4
Pun. Music Magazine; 10.45 p.m. World!
Affairs; 11 p.m. The News i



a

AS
TARR ER) be ALLE



‘

ROY MARSHALL (left) Wanderers opening batsman, and A. M.

Taylor (right) of Pickwick, wh
Goddard’s XI at Kensington Ov
i wicket in reply to @1
Firs



Portsmouth |
And Hull

Qualify

LONDON, Jan. 12

Portsmouth and Hull City vo-
day qualified for the fourth round
of the Football Association Cup
with victories over Norwich and
Southport respectively in replayed |
third round ties.

Before a record crowd for the
Worwich ground
home team held Por’smouth in a

|
|

scoreless first half, but after the|

(interval the first division club
class asserved itself. Two goals by



inside right Ride, the second from |

a penalty, clinched the match,
Until midway through tha
second half Hull, Southport
were every bit as dangerous and
a little unlucky to be a goal be-

av

hind. Suddenly Hull burst into
the light and scored ‘two more
goals in quick succession. One of

them was scored by
his first for Hull since they paid
£20,000 to Leicester for his trans-
‘vo months ago.—Reuter.

ey

Brazilian
Lady Player
Eliminated
PARIS, Jan, 12
The Brazilian player, Madame

Sophia De Abreu, was today
eliminated from both the Wo-



men’s and Mixed Doubles events!

in the International Indoor Lawn
rennis Tournament, organised b

the Racing Club De France, here.

In the Semi-finals of the
Women’s Doubles, Madame De
Abreu and Madamoiselle Colette
Soegner (France) were beaten by
Madame Arlette Halff and
Madame Annie -Marie Seghers
(France) 6—3, 6—3, while in the
Mixed Doubles Quarter Finals,

Madame De Abreu and Roger
Dessair (France) lost to Miss Joan

Curry (Britain) and Bernard
Destremau (France) 4—6, 6—8,
6—3.—Reuter.

Third Round Ends:
Draw for Fourih

LONDON, Jan. 11

Result f tl thir round re-



pl on Wedne the Foot
ball Associatio Cup matehe
were

Fulham 1, Chariton Athletic
Liverpool 2, Blackburn Rovers 1;
Middlesbrough 0, Aston Villa 0;
Preston North End 0, Watford 1
Southampton Northampton 3
West Bromw Albion 0, Cardiff |
| City 1; Wolverhampton Wander- |
ers 3, Plymouth Argvle 0

Results of the Rugby Union

games wert
Headingley 5,
London
mouth 3
Draw for fourth round Football
Association Cup to be played Jan
28 was revised on Wednesday on
the basis of re-played third
round tie games. The draw is:

United Hospitals,

8; Glamorgan 17, Mon-

Chelsea vs
Liverpool vs
vs. Derby County,
Port Vale, Arsenal
Town, Stockport C

Newcastle
Exeter

United,

City, Bury
Burnley vs
vs. Swansea
ounty vs

S Patent Ofc



put up by Mr. Farmer’s team as the
st Trial opened at Kensington

of 42,624 the |

Don Revie, |

9. |
>| Mr



| Cardiff City, Tottenham Hotspur
Blackpool vs, Doneaster Rovers, | vs.

By Jimmy Hatlo |

ements re ene hen eR RL IER NNR RNY So seen



© opened the innings for John
al yesterday and put on 65 for





Barbados May |
Have World-Wide
Cricket Broadcast

The possibilities of a world-
wide broadcast of the forthcom-
ing British Guiana—Barbados
tournament was discussed by the
Board of Management of the
Barbados Cricket Association at
their meeting in the George
Challenor Pavilion at the Oval
yesterday evening.

Mr. S. G. Lashley, Agent for
Mullard Radios, has graciously
; consented to lend his wireless
transmitting set to the Associa-
lon.

The Association will now write
the Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee to acquire the necessary
licence for the use of the set.

The Board agreed to certain
arrangements with regards to the!



| local players that may gain se-
; lection on the W.I. team to
England.

| His Exeellency the Governor,|
| Mr. A. W. L. Savage, in answer!
‘o a letter from the Board re-!
plied saying that he had von-'
ented to be their Patron.

The letter, which was address-
}ed to the President of the Board
dated January 12, read: ‘Tam
delighted to have been honoured
by your Association by nomina-
| tion, which I accept, as Patron.
{l have read the Annual Report
with interest”.

The Interim Report from the
Stands Committee for the B.G.-

Barbades tournament was ap-
proved.
The admission prices for the

tour will be: Kensington Stand
$1.00 per day, $8.00 Season Tic-
ket. George Challenor Stand
$1.20 per day, $10.00 Season Tic-
ket. Uneovered Seats 2s. per
day, half price after tea, Grounds
ls per day, half price after tea.
Schoolbeys’ Stand Is per day, (a
temporary stand is being erect-
ed). The Car Park will be Is.
per day.

Uncer the Head of Correspond-
ence a letter was read from the
British Guiang Cricket Associa-
tion which siated that the B.G.
team would have to come to Bar-
bados by a chartered plane be-
cause the usual services would

inconveniént.

The Board agreed to cable the

B.G.C.A, telling them that they

ad agreed to the proposals of a
|} chartered ‘plane and asking them
(B.G.C.A.) to inform Jamaica
amd Trinidad on this nvatter.



be

Viembers present were: Sir
| Allan Collymore, (President), Mr
F. A. Clairmonte, (Vice-President)

E, L. G. Hoad, Mr. J. M.
Kidney, Mr. S. O’C. Gittens, Mr.
'J. W. B. Chenery, Mr. T. N.
|Peiree, Mr. E, A. V. Williams,
Mr. BE. D. Inniss, Mr. John God-
dard, Mr. W. Atkinson (Treas-
urer), and Mr. W. F. Hoyos,

} Secretary.

Southport or Hull City, who re-
play on Thursday; Watford vs.
; Manchester United, Bournemouth
‘and Boscombe Athletic vs. North-
jampton Town, Westham United
ivs. Everton, Charlton Athletic vs.

Sunderland, Portsmouth or

Norwich City, who re-play on
Thursday, vs. Grimsby Town,
Wolverhampton Wanderers vs.

Sheffied United and Leeds United
vs. Bolton Wanderers.—CP)



LONG COMES |
<} THE “THUNDERING HERD

—— el

885 NO.CLARK ST.

WEST HOLWOOR, CAbIF,



einen

Department,





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Cultivate More | London's

Fruit

to that; why not grow tne grape-
fruit you want from seeds and
be finished? Well, there are sev-
eral reasons for doing this: —

(1) First, the budded or grafted
plant always grows true to
type, whereas the seedling
varies considerably and the
fruit produced ‘may be very
different from that of the
parent tree.
Plants may be made more
resistant to disease . by
budding them on to hardy
root stocks which are less
susceptible to disease,
They usually tear quicker
than seedlings, e.g., your
topworked mango or bud-
ded orange under favoura-
ble conditions would bear
in about 214 to 3 years.

You will see then that the
stock is the portion below the
bud union and any side shoots
must be removed from it.

if it is your intention to obtain
some of these plants from the
the best procedure
would be to do so through the
Peasant Agricultural Instructor

(2

~

(3)

of your district. He would inspect

the area where you propose io
plant the trees and advise
whether or not it is suitable. The
site should not bé expose] to
strong winds; it may be necessary
to put up windbreaks as a pro-
tection. The soil should te deep,

if possible at least 2 ft. and
should drain naturally. If the
land available is rocky, then

blasting may have to be resorted
to so as to get a hole about 6 *t.
across.

Holes to receive the “plants
should be prepared well in ad-
vance, if possible 2 months be-
fore planting. These should
about 2 ft. wide and 18 inches to
2 ft. deep. They-should be filled
back with a mixture of soil and
well rotted manure until the time
of planting.
trees is important to prevent
over-crowding and competition for
soil moisture and plant food.
Over-crowding also encourages
the spread of pests and diseases.
A good spacing for citrus shou
be, at least, 20 ft. apart.

How To Plant
Planting should be done as soon
as possible after the plant is re-

he



{4





Spacing between the} ®

er



Trees

ceived. This is done as follows:—
The mixture of soil and memiure
previously put into the prepares
hole is taken out and {he tree put
in with its roots spread out. Avoid
cramping the roots. Press the sol
fivmly around the roots as the
hole is filled, and great eare should
be taken to finish off so that a
low mound results with the top
roots only barely covered, If the
tree is planted too deeply, there is
serious risk, especially in case of
citrus varieties, of the bark rotting
around the collar and the tree
dying.

During the early stages after
transplanting, it may be necessary
fo water the plants well every day. |
After they have become estab-|
lished, Jess water will be required.
If the soil around the tree is
reulched, this will help in con-
serving meisture. |

Around the tree should be kept |
weeded, but eare should be taken!
to see that fe roots are not in-|

ired during this operation. Avoid |
the common mistake of moulding |
the soil up around the tree while |
weeding, and causing coller rot.



Fertilizer
During the early stages, no
rtilicial fertilizer snould be ap-

lied. After growth of the trans-
lanied. tree resumed, V.G.M.
1ay be applied at the rate of
tout 4 lb. per plant. This may
e increased at the rate of 1=-14%/
ibs, per year. In applying the;
iertinzer, the soil should be}
tirred around the tree in a circle|
ipproximately in line with the
cuter leaves of the tree where
most of the feeding rocts will be
iound. The fertilizer should then
be sprinkled evenly along the
cuter edge of the circle which
should then be mrulched and
atered.

As far as pests of fruit trees
are concerned, the most prevalent
in Barbados are scale insects and

nts. Scales should be controlled
by spraying with Niagara emulso

1s



cr D.D.T. emulsion. Where the
attack is heavy, give three
thorough sprayings at intervals of
ten days, Spraying with D.D.T.

emulsion also hetps to control ants
on the trees.”

Budding of ‘citrus was demon-
strated as well as planting and
other operations discussed during
Mr. Beckles’ talk.









Being Introduced for the

in Barbados.

SUNDAY NIGHT

From 7 to 10 O'clock

}
|

COLD DANISH
BUFFET SUPPER



FIRST TIME



Airport

—NO 2.

(By Mail). |
in Surrey |

LONDON,
Gatwiek Airport
county, well situated for Con-
tinental flights, and outsice
London’s fog danger belt, will he
developed as London’s N@ 2
aivport.

The airport, 27 miles from the |
centre of London and midway!
between London and Brighton, |
will be bought from Airports Ltd.,
by the Ministry of Civil Aviation |
and some $5,600,000, spent on its
development. ;

Gatwick has been under Min-
istry requisition and was to have |
been released on January 31.—

But the Ministry and British
European Airways ‘have decided |
on a big expansion scheme, and |
Gatwick will be enlarged, drain- |
ed and laid with concrete run-,
ways.

This scheme will be completed
in 1954, when the B.E.A, meves
from Northolt Airport to Lon-}
don’s No. 1 airport at Heathrow |:

Gatwick then will be Heath-|;
row’s main alternative field. ;

Starting as a flying club base, | 3
Gatwick became an_ alternative |;
to London’s Croydon Airport in
1936, and was built into a mod-
ern airport.

Since the war the airfield has |}
been laid with metal-mesh run |
ways and used by charter firms

It has ona feature possessed
by no other airport in Britair
—an electric train service from







London to within a few yare's
of waiting aircraft. The a7
mile journey takes about 30}
minutes. |

—INS. |




















DA
-: At

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC
CLUB
(Members Only)

SATURDAY, JAN.
9 p.m,

14TH,

Music by Arnold Meanwell
and his full Orchestra, play-
ing the latest tunes from the
Hit Parade; assisted by Ger-
ald Bannister, the “Singing
Westerner.”

Admission to Bailroom—2/-









TAILORED BY

& CO. LTD.
Top Scorers in

Tailoring

Prince Wm. Henry Sireet

=——

oS SSS







YOU CAN ALWAYS
BE ASSURED OF
A PERFECT FITTING
SUIT WHEN ITS

P. C. S. MAFFEI







































11.1.50.—4n. |
|





MEETING

-: By :-

CARIBBEAN WORKERS
UNION

TO-NIGHT

All workers are invited
to be present and hear
the aims, objects and
benefits of the Union.

Among the Speakers
will be :

Messrs. E. K. FRANCE i |



L, E. R. GILL, M.C.P.
E. K. WALCOTT, M.C.P.
E. D. MOTTLEY, M.C.P.





Se







<
CPPS SPOSS

1%

‘,

| Rediffusion Programmes

FRIDAY,



JANUARY 15, 1950.
LOCAL PRESENTATIONS
Studio Service
Morning Special
Tune Time
Closed
Programme Parade
Music for Breakfast
Time Listening
Les Brown's
Orchestra

‘amme Sum-
mary and Interlude
In Chancery Ep. §
Tunes of the Week
Plaza Theatre
Presents
Taik—Mr. Aubrey
Douglas Smith
Your Favourites
bresented by British
American Tobacco
Co., Ltd,
Local News
presented by B’dos
Bottling Co.
Nestles . Presents
Joy Nichols pre-
sented by H. P
Cheeseman & Co.
Carroll Gibbons and
Orehestra presented
he Geddes Grant

8.15— 8.20
8.30— 8.45

8.45— 9.00

9.15— 9.45 Friday Misc

oe ay, Miscellany

News 9.15 a.m. and 9

B.B.C a

News 7 a.m., 8 a.m 12 noon,

: 4 pm., 7 pm. and 9 P.m
andon Light Concert Orchestra
, 3% a.m. ~9.00 am ;

Wor ad Affairs 11.45 sam 12.00 p.r

Listeners’ Choice 12.18 p.m.—1.0¢





Newsree! 1
p.m

Symphony of Strings 1
mâ„¢m

16 p.m

3 p.m

Sports Review 235 p.m.—2.% 9;
Piano Recital—Myra Hess :
x
The Shark A My
4.0 p.m

© Ove












Nig

kK Magic

Records mM

RADIO _DIS1.IBUTION
‘ Ss) LTD.



PPSOS

%

%
Â¥
7.30 8
>
4)
-: At :-
Synagogue Building,
Bridgetown

3
A. A. MAYNARD x
Â¥
VINCENT GRIFFITH %

.

4




















r fights ordinary
headache three ways: 1) Re
lieves pain of headache
(2) Relieves discomfort of up- ,f
set stomach ( 3) Quicts jumoy
nerves... which may team up
to cause trouble. Caution: Use

MA as directed. Get Bromo-Seltzer
at your drugstore fountain or
counter today. A product of

Q Emerson Drug Co. since 1887. (Gives f

BOOKER’S (B’DOS) DRUG STORES LTD,
Broad Street and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)



















IS OUR SINCERE
WISH TO ALL
CUSTOMERS AND FRIRNDg



*

T. HERBERT












WHITE COTTON §
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CLOTHS

54x 54 Ea.
54 «FZ. bai

$3.99
$5.22 #

NAPKINS

Ea.
Ea.

Size 18” square. A7d

Size 22” square.

Cave Shepherd & Co., Lid.

il, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET |i



—_——
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Friday .iMiiunrv It I!.-.. Sarbaons Mitrcate £/jl&^ P r i r %  : FIVE CBIfTt Irar S3. CHURCHILL READY FOR "COUNCIL OF WAR" "Europe Can Be One Trade Area" WASHINGTON. Jan. 12. RI'SIDKN'T TRUMAN lo-tlay submitted in C"on-rc>. %  report nryinu Mnrslmll Plan countries In .velil their onomies into :i "tingle prixlm-ini: and iradincare" <> %  Mum people-. Amo-lcan dollars had stronglliSoviets Detach o Attach WASHINGTON. Jan. 12. Secretary ol State, Acln'snn. said in %  that Russia was ini.v .i, ng the northern provinces c.( and "attaching them to BSovlct Union." on described this as noM significant point" and "nothing we do or lowed to obscure the No! all the ropaganda will obtain It only thing Thai will obscure uld l>e through Ul-conceivod %  htuits on mv put.'' • ho was addrciainj; lational Press Club luncheon •Titles of Pre ion's policy toward* Chlmi Formosa, n was hit Ihir I irance in three day: Prestdent'i decision nol hid new military aid to the ment In For—Keutfr itn<\ Plunges J Into A River Dead; One Injured do* Ad Hi I PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 12. It.iwlic Autancie Winter, endor ol St. Joseph, ind Hamveo Huggins, %  %  the jitney in which they travelling plunge n Into toe an Moracai River early this injj as the bridge walls tile worst Hood thai Tnnilas bad in years. lor three tioun starch which 100 people miles %  long the Joseph River, the was lound partly covered by and debris on n bank mile* remains of the jitney lay tide In the river 300 yards Bt.ttre.im. The driver had he leap r k aitar battling thi ial! mile further dow gapiriK chnsm. over now -narks the spot —B* rl.lr „' ted Europe's economy to the Uli the 16 aid nations %  i Kcananu* %  igh economic inb iobVKMM ii Line i. favi < 'gramme. iUfih I move would bring a ooom in manufacturing wd tiadbuj itaraugSioui Europ". This would "immeasurably improve the silt ut European in Dollar markets and l %  aided by EC A. Problems Still The KI\A report said that devaluation of European rirmirs will not by 11 Europe's basic economic nor remove the shackles that are holding bark Inicrnalumi It made this pi'tuir It had in mind .-. la market wilhin whuh quantitative restriction ol UM >>f trade, entuaUv all I eliminated". During the first IS months of the Marshall Plan, it United States poured a total of $708,600,000 hit through direct grants B production now stood at IIS WAT. MH\ agricultural output In spite of ;i Icistcqu.u • Hriitr;-. B'dos Defeats Trinidad tn ht Water Polo Match (By PALL FOSTER). POHT-OF-SPA1N. Jan. 1. Barbados decisively defeated last night in the llrst test'. The score was 6—1. P. Patterson 2. J. Grace. 2, D. Bannletl t 1, K. Ince l (for the visitors). The Trinidadians have improved from last' year's Discovery Tour In Barbados and notched an early surprised goal by a flip .shot from left-hander Andersoi the Trinidad skipper. In the second Test this afternoon. McCIean and Gray will be, left down from the visitors. —(By Cable). At I-rH .Mr. V. E. V BECKI.ts. Senior Peasa 'ivation and Cat 1 • ... . station, yesterday. Al Rtchi Mr BtCkll the budding i fii: Money, NoPapers Ind No Luggage IT WILL SEE WORLD FRANKFURT, Jan. 12. hid i Hetabarnar. former ant, an i "World Citizen Nun • had to aba.ito llnd girl with the sharpest blamed the pmi'v ri th< Bureauorate" ol his plans would lead to nner of com. it Hi Kbi he was planner 1 % %  ittu ui Heater. So Resignation For Belgian Premier Hitl'SSEL, Jan 12 The Belgian Chamber of Deputies today rejected a Communist call for the resignation of Prime er Go&ton Eyskens, after, yesterday's Parliamentary storm over widespread frauds said ft> involve leading public By 125 votes to 74, with 1 abitantion. (ha Houac Insb ed a Cartiolic Liberal motion, urging the Judicial authoritiea to speed up then inquiries into the frauds. It also called on the Government to make a full report Parliament when the inveetigadone are complete. Tn" tonka and bonds that Should have bean declared to the Government immcdiatei> aftai Ml -.(stouter.) Cultivate Fruit Trees DC) HAR11AD1ANS know how to culttvTtO truit tree them! Btauatli show that UM would i • Boiuaallad lo Bt Grove's Agricultural Station, 91 Gael m Mr, C I A BachlM, Senior i tural Instructor, told attended "Formers' Day" nisi (MUM be done. Mr. Heckles said :— •Thousands of cocoanut. lime and other citrus plant. M planting material ol other fruit ear (ran Codrington lo peasants and the general public. Unfortunately. EtOVtvar, only %  small percentage of these attain a healthy maturity and give satisfactory yields. The main raaaoni tor this failure oi fruil trees an* :— (1) Unsuitabllity of (2) Lack of propel ,-ltrnliun i>etoie and aflci planting. M the choice of site is this Will vary with the particular variety of fruit tree For example there are idea where coconuts will not thrive. Sumly Mb They do comparatively well on draining sandy soils of od In the I shelter*. the higher rainfall AM %  parts ot the Scotland District, 1 ii gravels Of rab land. it Is useless to attempt their Uon. eased to the to the 1 %  of the holes, provision 000. spacing, i planting depth, watering, weedI i and rontrol ol] nd diseases. I propose to denl with these n.iinl: ill relalior ilvatton m % %  cttes. such as hi' l ut. %  fall to realise that w\ obtain i lime or orange plant ,i t*l nureerv at Codrington. n actually getting is I plant which consists of portions of tv. united in such a way that they ait. Thiis brought aboul What you gel then is your lime or sweet orange or grapefruit, known as the giaftem the raportad trend oi totfi monweulth Ministers' Confi %  I II thi p 1 w %  will noi % % %  issi j it was believed. %  China* apUt to gran: %  Other highlights of today's two %  through a i Africa would probably lontributi .. an-t thi B) I :. %  ..i countries t>> %  %  1th Tetbiiicall bnnisn Prune Minister. Pandit U UM i: on mum wealth Ministers' Conterence • % %  • ttuM no barrier agao Imperialism could bt eHuoUvs pi South Bast Asia until the states .'oncerned were politically con•eiited. according to usually reliable Conference S< The Mb ( hlna and Burma at the morning session and, \ffer lunch, turned .lam Costs 2,100 Cuim-us WF.LL1NGTON. Jan. 12. %  eonflnui i fetch high prie annual sheep ^alcs. At H 1.200 gull I nd for a Southdown rant trora Roland Perry's Kohalu stud, a record price m (few Zealand and pussibb tt world. A Kombey rani earUer in the week fetched a world price of 2,100 l —(Rrulcr.) Martial Law Reimposed In Egypt NEW CABINET FORMED CJJBO Jan. 12. Martial Ltw a which was relaxed (iuiiiig the Egyptian Gene Election, has come into full force again on the end of the re-ballotmg. itelaxation during (he election ii^ht as to ! %  nollceable, and Foreign Press Censorship persisted. Martial I..aw win first introduced, when Ki:>o; went to war m Palestine, but ws> ictamed in thUpMsOg lorin foi purpOMl of internal securil) malnrj bt .ombat undergrouiK activitios or the now dissolves Moslem brotherhood, nnd '>i Si1 • ,: thfl Com::. Una wHh the new WafdMt Government, which > p ruaJ Laa BIT I i -hip to dedda wiietlii ihaoa "ill !-• conii'ieteiy sboHahee Siirj Paaba, Prenuer ot Bgypl i ment, toil... csignation to King Farouk. wh Itovsl Cabinet. WaMlel Leader Nona whose pait\ won landalWi ptli %  It was %  i iba tw< id met %  i %  Vdmtnlstratlon bendod by HnhM %  need bj the King 14. M oui with the Kim: Rerwai %  that log was "a symbol ot unity beK, a | | e" Names II awaited -Reutrr FOR BRIEFING UNIONS SPLIT OVER WAGE FREEZING LONDON, Jan. 12 (CONSERVATIVE Leader, Winston Churchill, returned here tonight to lead his election troops into uattle after a fog threatened air journey trom Madeira, which had provoked con siderable anxiety. The 75 year-old war leader disembarked from a flying boat at Southampton in lighting battle, ready for an early "Council of War" with his chief lieutenants-the members of the Conservative "Shadow Cabinet." Although Churchill • (iiinst a quint HIIIT heir lend, i ., impression was that tl ere onhkel> UVlUgl n am ttOetl %  ternbei lent to Queen Ingrid Visits Gustav STOCKHOLM, Jan 12. QUMtl Ingrid of l>eiii rived here tO-dO] to MI hi l grandfather. PI year uld King Sweden, who h bronchitis and a seplic throat. The Queen brought two of her d .lighters. Prlnom Bencdikte and Pri She will remain unnl Tuead i oileim on King Quetav %  •aid that %  rtful mgin. ..i tcmperal i 'day normal Two doctor! Ung him. Y es ter day, he was absent from the formal re-opening of P ment for the first time for 40 —Iteuler. ftseftvd Ship Arritvx Safely At Shanghai ;i. In the rnsr of 1mln-i • On Tur I Opera Workers Strike In Rome RAF Hunt For 14 Yr. Old bund For 'Adventureland* NORFOLK, ran 12. Hit TISH All; FORCE PLAN cOAiring 0O1 Britain to .1 tO IK' nun %  V ,l] 1 M "ki John fJuthrie, a school-boy. John, all OS his own. is believed to M St the wheel of the missii .", bound md" He had enough fuel on board to I %  iouse5. and shipping in 8 ut Arndlng by 1 points along the llrit— Reuter, The Bo na o ni vuu might i>e wondering wh> 0 to ail the irnible growing and than # On Part 8 lissing 5 Yr. Boy couiid In Carnal I AMPTON, Jan 12. Id Sam. since Xmas Kind in a canal here *; piousaii,: we he dlaanponrad his home at tea time on £M day. id searched tin ni< home, ... fjtged other MM 1 lound fulP. p*nca — I'.fUlfl Six Bodits Knives And Tin Gloria Ma(y Survivors Kg il the othe DTI of the 'Oloria Rani. J Kirn and Alfredo Loo thought la 1* Gladstone Duinnph \)r Rouge. Alfred who are reported by the Harbour and Master aa being the ider of the crew of May." "\\ orldllg Masses Will Decide Leopold's Fate' BRUSBl Fei njii.i Donsang, Communist lX'puty lor Charleroi, told the hcigiau Cbambei night the fate of King Leopolo will not be decided in the House of Parliament but "among the ig masses". Deman> was speaking on the second day of a debate on I Hill providing for a nation-v. ciuium ol the Belgian p> I ,i lUon ot the proi laws i sura lo the U %  %  i>f tite aaaouMad working maaaM a i ia return oi King Loot —P.-uKr Greek Poltoe Guanl U.K., U.S. Embassies ROME. Jan IS, | trom Prhna Donnas to the orchestra and hading guarII through %  ,-ith only ^ix monUur' work during :och iffecu isn orkers repre.( the management aid ton lght U ed fr I olution. -Renter. Police Clear Veera Slreels \. Gold Coast, Jan. 12 Steal hetmeted police brandi.hmg long truncheon* today vig%  lony in West Africo. arrested six men and a woman. people were ar. Kvmuisi A emergency tame into I nlgbt. The itrika and ..j Hi it i h lioods began OO Sunday In support of %  demonstration for 1 Donunian status and ra-lnatatemenl of 61 dlanus.sed <•• HONG KONG. Jan The Brttteh freighter i %  i. Chinese Nationalist bio I Shanghai this mon Chinese chaitei. Neither the %  but if the rapt the la UM ftrsi i tnta for the Lai ms thi Unite! States freightei ahstj warahlM while trying t' %  % %  i ot their %  i. r. rroSi New York %  autef %  i %  London on %  I the "windi n g up %  %  %  I %  the Prime Daput) Mlnter, Her< ampaign Boa A spin de%  ti.O00.lKMI Inton teat of %  rurtlon*! 187 leading Trad* %  i i %  •1.263.000 to 3.006.tinM peoed pet the dei General Election, but this was deSpcaK%  the del' among them. Daan} at the T UX om d that re%  i I I to control } ; I %  that Union n o t %  n Pi likely wage I -llenlrr Prem editia ted Bru tu lily \A. Jan. 12. nail, aged 42, for over toui pondem' ol Please In Warsaw, wa at rested by Pollah Bsuturll following iba arroal to-day of the PoUata l*ress Agency Correspondent. Marsh..11 Warsaw wnti his wife and two Kullov. in Polai the thi M con %  %  dd ttlO arrest Police ol OVM M P •' %  80 Duy Voyage To 4 Continent* M:w YI UIK. .Inn 12 The Cunrd Whll* Slr lino; riinrt." •<*•!' '<>"• M "*' 1 from hen :n..sl |UXU in '"Od* rn h'slory—an 80-'y voyage U ,\nru.uiu.i %  'I %  0 i an rrulM". tl mclu OOOC W///.V//.'.'. %  'w>-. Hvrv \fjtiiit 11 NESPRAY la'. --3M,^ &JA THE RICH FULL CREAM POWDERED MILK %  'I. |Bo^. Battered Body found ND, Jan. 12. > %  mining 22 Year Old Woman Charged W ilh Murder Of 11 IOWA. Jan. 12. A murder charge was Aled today agami .T woman patient who %  •dm i tied having start. which took the live* of v ., last SatATIIF.NS. JOS II squads guarded tr, Hntish and United Slates K basslet in Athens today and die. persed rtudents wh. their ban demonstrated iy for union ol the British Mediterranean Islann %  %  lal to the Unknown Warrior beaV homes of British news correspond In the crl shouting '•union". Some were temporarily detained. Reutrr EVA PERON HAD SUCCESSFUL OPERATION BUEN m ia ...t diverted In Buenos Aires' Nursing I-'me tod.. :(e of the %  nt, hod a suci ai nil DPI ration appendicitis. I Peron. leading politicians and high political officials were in attendance Dr. Oscar 10 local ion, Banter a asMnd laiaaynaaon sr< knives and cartridges. —Beater Reader Attorney v made %  nmed thai of Bock %  Pope Appeals to Aristocrats To Work For Peace VATICAN CITY, Jan. 12 Pooc Plus X!l to-day urged I the Roman aristok for peace nnd unions aa geT>i lass to whlct : places you more freill %  underThe Pop* arouset n contact with Kreter. authoritative nersonaliua* of' NEW YORK. Jan 12 The United Slates Budget u understood to have proposed Int'anal Trafttc to I recommendation lion the Governor of the New Verb TPnea eel lonal action is raqulri for any change In loll rates in the Canal and the I'rrsideni U i a messagw Ui Congress on the subject soon. —ReuUr many Children Thriving Tsiang Steps Down For Cuba LAKI st' an >i H %  RHte to the Security CounclL Di T. F. Tsiang. whose expulsion I" demandod by Soviet Jacob Malik, tonight agreed to ^residency who walked o u on the council meeting on emanding Dr. Tsiang'%  his demand lor the fXpuUiu Tiang Dr. Tsiang was said to be willing t 0 hand over jelegate Carlos Iblanco Reulrr n v LTD — MNIS .V.-.-,-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-..:-. %  %  %  .: % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % %  % % %  % % %  % % % % % 



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'. WAT. JANTABY 11 IM Rations ipprove Italy's Responsibility For Jgfence In SomaliUaid C.ENKVA, Jan. 11 DC-NATION COMMITTEE of the United Nations ip Council today approved the critical defence the agreement it it drafting lor Italy to govern er colony of Somalilnnd. until it attains innv; 10 years. All delegations passed the following text, which was largely derived from the original italian draft: *T "I If The administering auModena ,n " ,y ,,iy| !" y %  *l !" "***'"** tain Police force, and raise volunteer contingents fot the maintenance of peace and good order in the territorv. (3) The aitmui'jslcring authority, after consultation BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE to Views lena hooting haa %  EXVAMCNTINF.) IMODENA. Jan 12 -of Hie Hiaroenl to-day said uof thai Ul the battle last Mond.iv. hi workers w?iv of 20 Communist and „_-lalist senators and ide the report tin their luiry into 'hiLttddMit jtinK occurred when led lo force their way foundry closed down agement. The managesaid that it was no Able to run the works Ufa :hc {United Nations) Attvi'iuy Council, may esmstallations and lake all measures In the torrttory. including the progressive development -t Somali Defence Forces, which may be necessary within the limits laid down m the, United Nations Charter, for the defence ol !he territory, and lor the maintenance of International peace and security.' Strong Pleas This dralt clause will be subions protested against nutted to the full Trusteeship .. as "necessary" and Council, when it meets here later aggravation of already this month to derate the Somaliiployment." land Committee's work, e report states: 'The jj, on i y t wo and a half hours an requires one to of peaceful debate, the Defence this group of workclause was oppnved after Britthem lormer partisan d in and France had made strong re expert in the use pleas for Italy to have adequate threw hand grenscope for organising Somnli nee of not more than Defence. ,d yet (lid not injure The Ethiopean delegate asked Two policemen, Italy f 0r an assurance that she hospital after the inhad no intention of sending armed shown by hospital forces to Somaliland which would he suffering from be superior to those alreadv there inly not the type of under the temporary British "'"' administration. _. Italian delegate. Enrico Cerull, Menacinu replied; 'my answer is that Italy all tMi Is the fncl has not the slightest intention soil around -he TOSS„f going bevond that number, and no grenade explosion would be only too happy if we fact that the workcou id maintain order with smaller iot down on the railforces. hows that they had not "This is a statement I make the point, whan on behalf of my government." In fat reasonably claim reply to another Ethiopian request [menacing the factory, that proposed]. Italian Defence ommi-ssion headed Measures be first submitted to -he %  nut aader, t;ilniii< Three-State United Nations Ad%  demej tflta. Ihi-ir visory Council to be e! i baseo on the heavtiii .„ Mogradsu. Italy at OBBM agree i eye-witnesses, and I that this provision I* written paraphs itated lo have into the draft clause. on the scene by ., The Dominican Hepubl: gate. Senor T. Franco, said: 'We I goveu: nent-app >inted do not know what the complitaI Mouen.i. l)r Muaco, tions are that mav arise in InterIto-day repeated Ma national life. The ongy thing we %  tement that the demmust insist on is that the fOrcei Jwd thrown ix.mli< :n-i rmuH not or .vcessive for the %  that material captured needs of External Defence." Ilee afterwards of the British delegate. John Fletcherincluded live unCoolte. could not agree with the %  hand grenades. ins Iraq view that Somali's geo%  eeper DOlta, and L'6 graphical position ma.le It unneP* e £ cessary' to provide for her defence I that the Polite open—Renter o prevent their own further endan Franco KeceivesPeru's Ambassador %  UD. Jan. 12. C. I'reta. new Peruvian Ambassador to Madrid, today presented his credentials to Generalissimo Franco in the National Palace here. Marshal Ureta and his suite drove through Madrid's central streets In horse drawn state roaches which had not been uaM since the davs of the monarchy and escorted by Franco's Moorish guard. iter. RIVAL CHARMERS AT COLOMBO Commonwealth Will Recognise Bao Dai Regime f# From Page 1 main problem affecting the Commonwealth is the political decision whether to recognise the Bao Dai Hegtme at Vietnam. The argument for Recognition is that the alternative to Bao Dai Regime is certainly the Vietnam Regime under Ho Chieh Minn and the "Communisation" ot Indo-Chlna. The Minister asked to curtail tho afternoon meeting by half an hour to enable four of their number to receive honorary degrees at a Colombo University ceremony. They are British Foreign Secretary, Ernest Bevin. Pandit Nehru. Lester Pearson. a Canadian External Affairs Minister, and Philip NOP 1 -Baker, Britain's Commonwealth Relations Secretary. The Conference will end. on Saturday morning, the Secretary of the Ceylon External Affairs Department told correspondents today. —Reater -ReuU iy And Japan |Join LW.A. LONDON. Jan. 12. -Nation Intei natsOfH %  gaaincil, which met pn-%  * to-day. is coneiderinu. by Germany and in in the Internatioiu I J^erncnt. A statement p-Jbly he issued at the %  H Talks, expected later | Germany h; it the Talk.-. | u t Japan. jesman stated a ca^e (elusion .it a meeting of last year at the present seiLegislature* Opens In Jamaica—And The Crowd Boos KINGSTON. Jamaica. Jon 12 A crowd booed as Sir John Muggins, Governor ol Jomaira baapeeted a Guard of Honour and a band played the British National Anthem before the opening of the island's new haaJllaUlta Mere today. The boos continue j during the preliminary ceremony. Sir Nool Livingston was re-elected President of the Legislative Council. Prime Minister Alexander Bustamante's Labour Party, which won 17 of the 32 parliamentary Stocks Drop After 7 Months NEW YORK. Jan. 12. Stock prices plunged one to three dollars a share late today under heavy selling. The decline started without warning ibout one fiour before the market's close. Trading was so heavy that the stock exchange resorted to the lUghly unusual procedure of "flushing" paces from the floor uf the exchange. This was done because the highspeed ticker tape was glutted with quotations and tell behind as much as eight minutes In recording actual transactions. A quick survey of leading. orokerage houses disclosed that the celling was not influenced by any particular news. Brokers were inclined to term the move as a "natural reaction" following a seven-month rise Grains and other commodities veakened in sympathy with stocks. —Beuter. eats in last month''; voting) elected the Speaker and 11 ve ministers including the Premier %  iimself. The 13 people's National Par;y 'Socialist) members and an independent with Socialist leadings refrained from voting. — (Heater.) British Submarine Sinks AFTER COLLISION TI!E HAGUE. Jan. 12. According to a message picked up here from the Dutch steamer "Almdijk" the British submarine "Truculent" has sunk northwest nf Redsand Tower between Four Buoy and East Pile Buoy. The message goes on "have picked up five survivors believe submarine was in collision with Swedish ship "Divina." Please keep lookout for further survivors." The message wag signed Master." The "Almdijk" is a freighter of the Holland-A merika Line (8,286 tons) on its way irom New Orleans to Rotterdam. The British submarine "Truculent" is one of the 25 "T" class submarines with a displacement Of I 573 tons. She carries a crew of 5a. The "Truculent" is equ.pped for 42 days patrol and is believed to be rltted with Snorerter" equipment which enables her to take in air when ub" merged. Other men on board could be saved if rescue work were fast enough, Dutch Shipping Sources said. Thev said it was a matter of getting Pt the men in the sunken vessel before their air supplies Kave nut. The Truculent was sunk in collision with the Swedish freighter Dirina. which left the port of London today. At least 15 British sailors were entombed helow the waters of the Thames estuary tonight. The light for the life of the men waiting helplessly In the Truculent began immediately British naval vessels steamed to the disaster spot. Lifeboats and other craft are searching for more survivors. The submarine's hatches were closed. —Reuter. Trinidad Issues Cariblpenn May Up A Few Pennies Grow More Fibres LONDON. ,U> Mail, An increasing world shortage; i f uite and the proinismn op mem of jute substitutes such I as Kenaf. with the poss.; that they can be penvi British Caribbean among are (actor* brnmd the journey in the US of a threeman Fibre Mission which has j just left Britain. The Mission will I month In the U Itha and will siti.iy ..I,-: cuai fibre product: i including inechanie.il imthods of harvesting and decorlicatmn. with offlcei Foreign and Agricultural Relations and pentf i:e|>.irtmnt oigamsaUons interested in the production of fibres. The team con Bradley, of the National Inslitutfl ol Agrn'iii: of Agnculti.' R u. Klrby, ol U i ducts Aii\: J s. ON The object of the visit jc to % %  Ml work %  nun iii.t. n Bnd "ut whattaat cettela Inrhiaraa can be grown nn t proeeaaed economical 1 ^ %  %  :e visit wi!l be met from Marshall A A ill rndl I gladaa Agriculti. Station IN Flo< also visit Cukai methods of rull mo and deco-"ucali'>ns being developed there.—aVIM'. WEALTHY • Bby tereh In the eslajatfal cmwn-luw luhct of Cuncun Soap. It combine emollient and mcdifiotl healthy ami trmm ftom Nenuabea, ,oitr vtoftajkgsaasnov (uticura V* SOAP LONDON, L, London's Stock Exchange is m the grip of election uncertainty and promises to cont-nue so until the result Is known. Business In domestic Issues was again small and movements today were generally lo lower levels. Some observers are expecting revival of interest Li* overseas issues but at present there are very few signs of .such a happening. There was however firmness in Intcrnal.onals. Overnight brightness on Wall Street encouraged some, marking up in utt States group. Gams were fractional. Trading in British hal prised mainly ol switching. Long dateds were sold and proceeds reinvested fn shorts. Down (rend in industrials lengthened as tne day progre ss ed and produced small losses in most of the groups. Tobaccos and breweries were particularly dull Oils were hesitant and closed with some irregularity in price movements. Trinidad UH I few pence better. Local sellinii of katftr gave the Rtt '.rend. The market was looking teadiei at The close when ton BJsSM m -it lower levels. —Reuter Wanted 43 Tons Of Gold ALSO OBTAINABLE EM GREEN & TRANSPARENT. Eu nga ry Claim s Right To Own Opinion -ON GERMANY BUDAPEST, Jan. 12. Hungary told the British Government in a note delivered to the British Legation here tonight that she has an "indisputable and equitable right" to express her opinion on the future of Germany. "The formation of tho socalled German Federal Republic is a fact which the Hungarian Government and public cannot but observe with the utmost anxiety", the note said. Hungary haa drawn from her history the conclusion that a German state which follows a reactionary and aggressive policy constitutes a constant menace to her peace and security. "Such reactionary forces have now come to power in Germany not by the will oi the people but by that of the British, United State* and French Governments • —(Reater. I LONDON, Jan. 12. Britain is considering with the United States and France how to get from Portugal 43.9 tODI Ol gold, looted by the Germans and deposited there during the war. a Foreign Office spokesman said here today. Britain maintained that the gold should go to the Commission for the restitution of looted monelai > gold, set up under the Parti Agreemcn* of 1945 in BnvsM said. The matter had been referred to the Allied Governments, he added The spokesman said Ihe Portuguese disputed that the gold looted. —Reater Will Standardise Europe's Labour Accounting WASHINGTON. Jan li. Labour statisticians from at least 10 of the 16 Marshall Aid countries will visit the United States this winter and spring, the Economic Co-operation Administration announced today. The visits are designed to assist Marshall Plan Nations in arriving at a common method of reporting cost of living, wages and hours, i.nd employment and productivity data. The Europ-an ill will work In the U.S. Bureau nf Standards. The first uf three teams will leave for America this month. It will include repreenlatlves from Britain and the three Scandinavian countries. The other croups expected to arrive in April and June will include representatives from Austria. Belgium. Western Germany, Italy, and the Netherlands. — (Reuler > JUST RECEIVED l-lb t.ns PEARL BARLEY l-m I IDS OATMEAL Ure CREAM Or WHEAT UuD CSFAM OF WHEAT Lane QUAKER OATS with China ware Large ROBIN HOOD OATS with GIIM Tumbler 1-ft lin TONO Tina NESTLES CREAM Tm FRUIT — Pears. Pineapple. INCE & Co.. Ltd. DIAl 2234 BOttUCK SI 1 BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY CORPORATION LTD. REDUCTIONS ON LADIES' COATS & WOOLLEN Quite an Assortment of Colours At SPECIAL REDUCED PRICES AT THE MODERN DRESS Gomiiiform Spy Sentenced To Death -IN YUGOSLAVIA BEL .%  / I A Yugoslav Com". an%  I tenced a man U I 4*1 'o death tor spying on lie: Comintern vegaJva g-ata, Anolhi %  : aan Ijy the Dtsttiel Trilum.il Bl SI live AU U %  %  l ion. This b tha Aral tl formist has been death ti YutfoOtne. pleaded guilty lo tunllU charges. J rag) sentences varying from) IB to 5 years hard labour, . Cominl o r n. i palgn, and \v.is concentrating it linat Yugoslavia Tha', iDf the lot of its own people. he said that the trial ha un ihe subvorsiM Albanian legation in Belgrade ilisa Hodza had taken the initiative in organising the 'illegal groups", and ha<; !>ing material on people with "dark pant** 1 Ufa who were to be recruited into ggajaj Half the defendants were Albanian and the other half Yugoslav citizens -Reuler %>' -every hour of the day Wt.-ri • A.Tyone el*o is hot and botharail you will faseinute i>\yestf %  ^aahi i U agej I rOfsT hgftfe Of bathe, xliower yniirsnir all over with <*u*hmere bnuquat raaauni r>oaana\ limug.c Ismefa iil ton jreau hkin to -ilk • olotha you ia i %  • i. |gnjaan||ng flfan Innt ker|w \,m,).iiiilil> Ir.-I. sail day lutt. It .ieliniu> |rfumu iii add nan mid aubtle i area i" root anVsii parsxgaalltj. '' rCesJu en B patt bl tha Tnkum Powder with tho foagrauc)' men love. Cashmere Bouquet TALCUM POWDER : O L C A T ( %  ri-rair co. PAINS IN THE BACK Here's a way to relief! Do yon know that one of the common causes of backache lies in the kidneys/ When (hey ie healihy (bey niter harmful mpwiUa out of the system their natural inaction. Wheat they grow sluggish, these impurities accumulate and the resulting congestion is often the cause of backache. De Witt's Pills are specially prepared to help wake up •iluggish kiencys. They have a cleansing and -uitieepuc action on these vital Mgana. soothing and restoring them to their natural activity. Relief from backache follows aa a natural conseq nonce. It is far better to tackle the cause of baikache than to go on suffering in a way which is bound te affect your work and happinessFor over half a century De Wi't-i Pills have been bringing relief to suiferets from bacaacbe and we have received rountless letters of grautude. Go to your < hanust and obtain a supply to-day. De Witts Pills' art mast ipvcisHy for BACKACHE JOINT PAINS RHEUMATIC PAINS LUMBAGO SCIATICA OUR GUARANTEE De Witts Pills are made under strictly hygienic condiuons ana ingredient! uniorni to meat rigid standards of parity. DE WITTS PILLS for Kidney and Bladder Troubles WILLIAM FOGAM INC. IN B.C. • COiNTINLES TO UPHOLD THE TRADITIONS OF FINE TAILORING lore FOGARTVS is in Ihe lead with up-to-the-minule Styling tor Men's Sinis i.ility Workmanship and i* tail M ried to perfection. OKDKK YOLK NEXT si I I NOW BJ li.uiihe I iiu'-l Srle.liun .if Baltbafl in Slock.



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PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE I R inw .IANTA RF,! J Roy Mar-hall i/ils 78 In First Trial A brwrj knrw k of 78 by Roy Marshall of Wandani Mr. Joh:: X\ lo s<*orr 135 for 71 made b, Mr W A XI whan th* first trial matchin preparation for thB.G-Barbados intari-ulontal Tournament U. be played in February — began yesterday al Kensington Oval. AlthouRFi dark XI will, f Phillip itto top-scored foi his aide wlih 22. batted I* scoring all aroumi the When hi lobwd t' Alkmson. he remained tt-n minutes befo > ing hi 'ii I tun on the ioff Phillipllr. W. A. r toon got in 1 • when H. Km* oi Emptn ntUevsjd Brewster from the Pavilion end he had Cave caught by (. Alleyn* No Mistake C. Alleyne in his first over to Cave sent down a maiden < < had Cave edging lo lllp Hi a catch to King who dw not It but In Alleyne' thll King made no mistake and took the catch in slip when Cnve attempted to cut. At the close of the innings. Mr. Farmer's XI had scored 71. A. M. Taylor and Roy Marshall opened the first innings for Mr. John Goddard's XI. to the bowling of E. Alkmsnr. and J A William-. When only IT. Marshall was given a chance when he edged of*) E. Atkinson to E. Cnve who was fielding at second lllp Aft** that chance. Marshall became mutf canUoua and ^;i' for a time very reluctant to hit out Hi reached till 50 with a well-timed glide. He continued to bat steadily until he was given out leg berore to Atkinson Tayloi scored 19. which included many welltimed drives and ( % %  verbs joined Marshall when the score was AS (or the loss of one wicket and remained at the wicket at the end of the day's plav with Johnnj Lucas who joined him when Martha out. Mr. John Goddard's XI at the close of the hi*! days ploy had %  cored 135 runs to) two wickets The match will be continued on Saturday Mr Farmer's XI—1st Isuaum C W %  Nth < Alk-yiw b f Pfctllip• Q. Wood ( I Brn*>r b 11 Hii*r 1 r AUinaon r Dravioii iWk I b C AUsyw %  W CKf r II K*. b < AMe>ne 31 W. A Farmer c Drafter %  *.! D H Kin* '" K (.i.iil-m r Phillipb R Mannall 1 A La*a> r b Alk-'i* t Ueta c A M Tayhtf b H Manhaii S M,r. 3 L, St lim Ti "* j. wnaa i i I bye* %  Total II %  ) U H I in H Brr-ir S < UK%  4 IS 1 111. 4 1 ft Mmhah 4 13 Mr. J. niMllJl Xl-lst liilimiK Maianall lbs, I Ml C Provarbm.t out no* •.. Total 'l"i I %  ll.ll.i. Radiii Priigmminr I lll> \ \ \K thlnf> T 30 a m Front tb> %  %  IS a m Pmcr.tnui.it-nU. I 15 a in I Cottrrrt OavhMtra. S a IT CWna Dun i. Andyua. U II p m PT> nouftcamruu. 13 is p m Clwlcc. 1pm Th, Dafaal. I IS i> m SUdiu Nr.-i.-i I JU p m S\ mplxniy of Stnitfa 1 i> I S IS i> m llu p m SJporU IMMC. 2 M I Hru i Hanoi. 9 p m Tttr Siurk Aim M>itari. 4 p m IB larvwa), 4 IS iv n. KtaM' •< the Over*. 5 p n< Black kUtlr. 5 I' P in P Wyr a iinnr x %  4nd>. S 30 p in From lh* it.u-d Ittvum: IB Pi" Iniaeluda. I. p IT i N luKuril. .! p IIA, ,ih.-!.. %  $. 1 p m Th* Ne T ID p n. N*Wi I ::. i> ITI ft-il Indian Di.ii* 7 •> p m Dai we UH.IT. S p n. K..U.. Nowmrl • IS p nt PIS Oichmra. S p m Th# NcWK I 10 !• n Haw Nr.i from aarilain. S II p m 1> Dwhalr Cuiilluuc*. ft 30 p m Take II flrftrn lietp. 10 p in Altar Dmitri-. Iti j. p m Muatc M-*T*III. lo ASTaln. II p m The Newt Cultivate More Fruit Trees toy MA I Ml 1 1 (left) Wanderer* opening baUman, and A. M right) of Pickwick, who opened the innings for John I> and put on 65 for %  ; mi ft team as the | i:ton. Portsmouth And Hull Qualify LONDON, J;m 12 Portsmouth and Mull City today quahh. .: in round itball Associ.it WKTI fletoriM on Southport respectively in replayed i third round Uo*. Before a record crowd for tho l^orwtch ground of 42.624 the iiith in a reless first half, but after the Interval the ftfirl tii\i class assented itself. Two goals by inside right Ride, the second from a penalty, clinched the match. Until midway through tha second half ml Hull. Southport were every bit -as dangerous and H Httle unlucky to lxa goal be> flull burst Into tbO Ugbl and scored l"wo more 1 iii-k .succesalon One of %  i Hull since they paid £20.000 to Laid ".'inths ago.—Renter. Brazilian Lady Player Kiiminaled PARIS. Jan. 12 The Brazilian player. Madame Sophia De Alireu. was today eliminated from both the WoI Mixier day, half price after tea. ltd I ier day. i G Hoad. Mr. J. M. Igj S O'C GiU.ii.s. Mr J W K Chenerv. Mr. T N 4 I A V William*. i up i.i -. Mi John QodW AUdftaon (Treas%  d Mr. W. K Hogroo, s. 4 ietary. Soulhporl or Hull City, who reS i day; Watford vs i t nitod Bow mill IksKombe Athletic i BmpbMi Town, Wcslham United Urn, Chorlton Athletic vs i>, Tottenham Hotspur %  %  1 Und. Portsmouth or ;> %  k h CHy, who n vs Grimsby Town. • -.'icroro vs. •iod Leeds United n Wanderers g) I torn pare 1 to that; why not grow tne grapcw.mt from seeds and %  d Wei;, theri %  H for doing this: — or grafted piant always growtjpe. whereas tho ind the fruit produced may be very difTerent from that of the parent tree nts may be modi BJION icistant lo dlioojo by budding them on to h;irJy root stocks which are less susceptible to disease. <8) The ear quicker than seedlings, e.g.. your topworkod mango or budJed orango under favourable conditions would bear in about 2'i to 3 years. You will see then that the stock is the portion below th I ud union and :inv aide shoots muat be removed from it. if It is your intention to obtain some of these plants from the Department, the best piocedurc would be to do so through th* Peasant Agricultural Of your district He would haipoct the area where you piti| HOW LO plant the tic v.hethi i or not II i uitoble. T:IC site should not be e\| i • trong winds; it may be necessary la put up windbreaks as a motection. The soil il possible at least 2 ft u-l should drain naturallv. H dto land available is rocky, then i lasting may have to be rooprtcd to so as to get a hole about 6 X 1 DRUBS, Holes to receive I Bh0ttld t>e prepared well in advance. If possible 2 months before planting. These should I'bout 2 ft. wide and IH Inches to 2 ft. deep. They should be nlid back with a mixture of soil and well rotted manure until of planting. Spacing between the trees Is important to over-crowding and competition for soil moisture and plant food. Over-crowding also n id of pest* and A good spacing for citrus shouU be. at least, 20 ft. apart. How To Plant Planting should be dJOl i.s possible after the pla reived Tnis is done as .i.ii manure prepaid %  hen out and U" in with its roots synod tne roots as the raw should be taken to finish off so that a low mound result! with the top roots only barely covered. If the •TOO is planted too deeply, there i* k. especially in case ot %  itnn vaii st ioo, of the bark rotting around the collar and the tree ly inc. During the early stages afte: !ig, it may be necessary lo water the plants well every day.; After they have beeon • water will be foaj u l re d If the soil around the tree Is 11 help in con: DOaV-aaTO, Around 'he tree should be kept %  .ceded. Lui %  are should be taken %  M but* Tic roots are not inI ire., during th's operation Avoid t'ie common mistake of moulding tiie soil up around the tree while weeding, and cau*inp roller rot. Fertilizer During me earlj lid be apftsr growth of the trans%  i iay be -pplicd at the rate of i i. per plant. This may i increa* b ot l — l -i os, per year. In applying the .Mould be I tm In g circle i line with the ihe tree where <• •%  feeding routs will be lound Tin i.ould then I e spriBklOd evenly along the uier edge of the circle which • hould then bo mulched and As far as peats of fruit trees re concerned, the moat prevalent in Barbados are scale insects and ild be controlled by spraying with Niagara cmulso t I) D T emulsion. Where the BttOCk is heavy. give three thorough sprayings at intervals of Si raying with D.DT tmulslon also helps to control ants i n tho trees." Budding of 'citrus was demonstrated as well as planting and other operations discussed during I Mr Heckles' talk. London's Airport —NO 2. LONDON. ( B rountv. Wfll utuaWd lor Conlintnul llifhu. and ouil,London's fog danger bell. ' I* developed as London's N(<. 2 ai-port. The airport, 27 miles from Hir cfntre of I-ondon and midway between London and Brighton, will b bought Irom Airports Ltd by the Ministry of Civil Aviatmr. and some $5,600,000. spent on its developmentGatwick has been under Ministry requisition and was to have btcn released on January 31. But the Ministry and Brllis European Airways liove deride, on %  big expansion scheme, and Calwlck will be enlarged, drained and laid with concrete runways. ( This scheme will be completei i IBM. when the BEA mevc(roai Northolt Airport to London's No. 1 airport at Healnro.v %  then will be Heatnro's main alterna'ive add Starting as a Hying club bas". Gatwick became an alter:,ativ. W London'. Croydotl Airport in 1938, and was built into a modens airport. Since the war tne airheld nat been laid with metal-mesh runways and used by char It has oiv. feature possessci by no other' airport —an electric train sen Ixindor to within a I of waiting aircraft. The 27mile journey Mkea about 3. minute.. o &*\, frtai-eMbar M otdiaary hejdicftt ilire* --rv 1 Re,. of h-.d-che ri HI upt *(X mini.. a met... iiic!i in.' mm up U ciuK IfiiuJ'lt. ( %  i dirwicJ. Synagogue liiiildin:;. %  MfakM %  All workers are invited lo be present and hear the aims, objects and benefits of the U n i o n. Amonii the Speakers will be ; Messrs. E. K. PRANCE A. A. MAYNARU VINCENT GRIFFITH L. E. R. GILL. M.C.P. E. K. WALCOTT. M.C.P E. D. MOTTLEY, M.C.P. M Ri (lilfu.siiiiil riir,iinii| l ix Ullli \l I\M MIV n. ni IXK'AL PIUaBMTATIOA^S T S I 00 Morning SjMtial 9 0OS IS Tun* Tlma %  SO-li os Ooaad 11 0OII |J Piofrumma Put.rtr I IV II 0 Muate for Brn.hfa.1 -OS IU T^^TT' Ore hail ra 3 IS— B FToalar. !5t!5 fc"" .. rVass8.li IST.JS TMk-Mr Aubrr% • . — Douslai Smith T ast as YW* r^vMNitM \— • %  !<•„ fe| 1>, %  .. Am,,lean Tab.*-.,. S SOS IS Loral Nar Dif-itlr.l b> Ilti.. rlouiinc Co %  J*— • M Ntollo. .PTHPU 1 ** %  ** J>' Ntrhou p ( f>. •• % %  ited I. j| ... '""^ii.. A t. £"!" 0 'bl-.i and Orclrtra prntnltd l>v T Grot*, Orant *5 rrida HHKUsn B.II am and *S p m CLOTHS Size 54 x 54 Ea. Sll.iti) Size 54 x 72. Ea. -. $.1.22 NAPKINS Size 18" square. Ea. Size 22" square. Ea. 17* ii!) Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.| 10, II, 12 & 13. BROAD STREET I We Can Supply from Stock I I Ml M „• 111-Hi I!:,:;WBm SNOWCRETE CEMENT BSD COLORCRKTK CEMENT EXPANDED METAL — 'i l-in.. 2-iii. & MB. Mesh Iron I in & l-in. Mesh tijlvuni/ed B.R.C. METAL FABRIC — No. !i 12-i.i by S-in. Mesh No aj ij.;,, ny (1 in Mesh j WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LIB. -: PHONE 4207 > '----.•.•.-.-.-,-.-.-.-,.....,.,...,.,.., %  %  ..,.,.......,...,.,., %  .., %  %  %  .: %  //'>* Kxpvrivnei' Tvarheit II IV(/ofll • 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN TAILORING GOES INTO THE PRODUCTION OF EVERY GABMENT WE MANUFACTURE. THAT IS WHY YOU WILL BE WISE TO HAVE YOUR NEXT SUIT MADE BY . C B. RICE & Co. OF BOLTON LANE



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'FRIDAY. JANIARY 13. 1950 LOCAL NEWS U.iKll.ilMIS \1)\(H ATI'. Antigua Had Record Crop Antigua's cotton crop for 1949 was a record one and it Is expected that this year's crop will be just as good. Honlle E. A. Thompson. Federal Treasurer of The Leeward Islands with headquarters in Antigua told the •Advocate" yesterday. Hon. Thompson came in recently by BW1A for the Customs Talks and la staying at the Marine Hotel. He said that Antigua had some very welcomed showers of rain last year whih greatly affected the sugar crop and it is anticipated that one of the largest cropf amounting to about 30,000 tons will be reapedvthis year. The Antigua Beach Hotel which was closed for about six months, was re-opened on December 20 and they were looking forward to a good tourist season. 32,000 Bags Of Animal Feed Arrive Over 7,400 bags of oil meal from Montevideo and 25,442 bags of pollard from Rosario arrived at Barbados yesterday by Argentine s.s. "Rio Araza". This is the first visit to the island for the "Rio Araza" which operates under the Flota Mercante Del Estndo line. Vessels of this line make occasional calls here from Argentine with feed. SS. "Rio Araza", 3,565 tons net, under Captain Gracian, arrived via Trinidad. On board were 15 lntransit passengers and a crew of 49. Messrs Gardiner Austin & Co. Ltd., are local agents. Fresh Fruit In Good Supply Fresh fruit, chiefly oranges. have been coming into the island steadily for the past two .vctks. Yesterday, a call was made from Dominica by the "Caribbee" which brought 107 casks, 60 crates and two boxes of this commodity. These were quickly unloaded and removed from the waterfront to the various consignees who will in turn distribute them to hawkers. Also brought here by the "Caribbee" were nine crates of tomatoes, 45 bags of copra, empty puncheons, rum casks, barrels and drums. Messrs Schooner Owners' Association are the vessel's agents. Police Boat Sold For $365 With bids coming from only two people, the three Harbour Police boats set up for sale by auction, were quickly disposed of yesterday, one of them bringing as high as $365. Two of these boats were carried off by Mr. L. Hoyte. and the other by Mr. M. Austin. Few people attended the auction, but within 15 minutes, it was all over. MONEY MISSING THE loss of cash and certain articles to the value of $13.90 was reported by Clarence Grant of Greenfield, St. Michael. Grant stated that his house at the same address was broken and entered Wednesday and the articles and money taken. Patricia Here For Docking TEN passengers arrived vesterday by the 239-ton (net> M.V. "Lady Patricia." Among them were Mr. Frederick A. Caason, merchant of St. Vincent and owner"of the "Lady Patricia", accompanied by Mrs. Augusta Casson. both of whom have gone to stay at the Windsor Hotel. Also Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Nicholls. Mr. Nicholls is an electrician. He and his wife are staying at Dr. Cato. The "Lady Patricia" came to Barbados mainly for dry docking. Cleaning, painting and all necessary minor repairs will be effected before this vessel sails again for St. Vincent. On July 18 last year, the "Lady Patricia" came here to load rum for Nassau. On that visit, it arrived under Captain Mulzac while this time it is under the command of Captain King. Knitting Mill Machinery Here PART of the machinery for the new knitting mill to be erected by the West Indian Knitting Mills Co., lAd. arrived on Monday by the Alcoa "C O. Thulin" from New York and the remainder is expected shortly Mr. Ernest Saunders, one of the directors of the company told the "Advocate" yesterday. He said that the company had recently acquired the business premises formerly occupied by Messrs. Johnson's Stables and Garage. Coleridge Street for the housing of the plant. They are now making certain renovations and hope to start production early next month. Bodily Harm Casts 30/A FINE of 30/to be paid in 14 days ur in default one month's imprisonment was imposed on Edridgc Chandler of Bank Hall yesterday by His Worship Mr. A. J. H. Hanschell for inflicting bodily harm on Florra Reeves on November 10. Bicycle Damaged In Accident THE front wheel, handle bar and head lamp of a bicycle owned and ridden by Ruby King of Brittons Hill. St. Michael were damaged in an accident on Wednesday. The accident occurred at the junction of Nelson and Wellington Streets at about 5.25 pjn. between the cycle and a horse drawn cart owned and driven by Prlnco Yard of Bonnetts, St. Michael The right shoulder of the horse was bruised. 5U For issault JOSEPHINE HINDS of Deane'? Village was ordered to pay Vin 14 days or in default undergo seven days' imprisonment by His Worship Mr. A. J. H Hanschell yesterday for assaulting Enid Connell on November 20. FINED EIGHT SHILLINGS JOSEPH MAYNARD of Hall's Road was fined 8/in seven days or seven days' imprisonment by His Worship Mr. A. J. H. Hanschell yesterday for blackguarding on Falrchild Street on September 27. % %  Carlisle Bay t r B 7~ Y-Wl *"•**. Aux. K.lch MV tf'tO". Sri.. Molly N Jon*., School.*! %  <""<•. feh. PhillD II. Dav>don. Y..M •*J>. lUwll Sou. feh. France. %  wwr Marion Ball* Wolfe, feh. E,„"wl C Gordon, feh. Kcfinald N WalJjce. itfeooMi Mandalav II. feh. Ma "•nmtja. S*ed,.h Ba.quatitlne Sunbei... Vachl Bwn-, He),. P,|„CM laoula*. M.V. *aco*la. Kchooner Endeavour W ABBJVAI.ll *" f '""" ss Rio Araia." 3.&U ton* • /El,, P ^""> rwttn ,tom Trinidad. Pa. AaanU; Gardiner Auilin ft Co.. I.id .btN." 100 lom net. Capt .ba. from Dominica. Aaeula: Schooner Owner*' Aiiociatiun. MV %  l*.l> Pamela." SW ton* uat Cn.pt Kim. from St. Vincent. Aianl *. Joluuo... UlrARTI Btn SS. "Iltartum," 3,1M toni nat, Capt. Rokken. for Maracalbo A|*nta: S. P i. swrili.ii Barqoentinc Sunbeam, Muaaon, Son Co.. Ltd. Schooner "Alexandrlna R." St ton* nat. Oast, Smith, for St. laicia. Afant: D. L JolinMin. Raq. M.V. Lady Joy." 4* ton* net Captain St LucUl. Agent D. L JntinK.il. Cat) IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION CSSTIK 11 "! .'ST. C "** *nmun.c.te S !" "* rolatwina, ahipa inroufh their %  !" * Coaet Station :— %  • }??. An ** um ss 9h *' **••*. ?:* _nfomia/l[pnt. 8 S. Racent £ %  ** %  ** %  %  .. Juvenal. S B, Nldarland. ",; V? Fbn *,S-, Heir -,-Papt, 11 mndansw %  M.'o Rurrnae.. it,..^^' R ** n Vulfxano. S S. ki*'i/LI*t. AlUntic • J*^V, aS IltSfim. S* Rio Araxa. % % % %  Hlauw Anulardam. II Oarona. SS nilabolh. g.S ft. Monica, ft ft Canabulla, SS 8 Roav/mda. ft ft Moniuartbtvik. S S Pache Canyon. S S lUiDihlld. S S Hecuba, S ft Bulkaiar ft ft. Ooplnny. 8 ft. AJOanuc Wave. S.S Colombla/Skdl, ft ft DamoaUtanaa, ft ft Alabama, ft ft fcnplro Malta ban. 8 8 C'oiTletitra. SS. Hapton. S.S (lanj-mede* S.S. Ba.wtw.alar. ft ft. Cavlna, BUS. CIO ol Brlotol. ft %  Dvwdala. ft ft Ikac Olaagow. ft.S) Eataro, S S NOmata. I S Brail, ft ft. Ibannla Zaflrakla and S S. Bmaliut. ARB.IVALA— *j BUM.*.I. From TRINIDAD. John Your*, Mar* "jum. Clmina Bowen, Gertrude OntetiCacU omen.. Unda Wotynec. Emeha ^ce. Mllllcanl Crichloi*'. Sm**t Taylor. *J*f* Adamlra, Anna Adamira. Hal HcLachlaa. Simon SchonhoU, Jack Proraf*. Harold BUhop r om ST. LUCIA LucllU Lorda. WlnlJ*. Lorda, Amedec Deipoinlea, John The Weather •TO-ftAY i UB ai>: ill am. • %  *t* 5%4 ftjB 'Kawj January II %  m vm. S^O iCodrUwton. in **MJtor roonlh to Yemwrda, ITS ina. ^*y uf -Maalmui.. II I ;"[?rrtura iMinimun.. TU dec F. ""* Diractlon if a m > N X by t w 'J PJn.) NT by F wind Velocit% : if mlW* par hour aaromato, •> a „. Xttn ,, pJttl From JAMAICA: Helena Ci(Un. AlUyn*. Colin Jonea, Arthur Reeve. Ito.ua Toata. Humberts ToaU. DBPARTIBKS—By RRI.A.L Fat TRINIDAD Mr Cameron Llvlngttona, Mr. AsnlU Kirton. Mr. Joaeph feheult. Mr. Uao Barnard. Mr* Amy Lynch, Mlaa Hilda Thorne. Mr. Kenneth Inca, Mr. DorU Taylor. Mr. Bmrit Taylor. Mlaa ContUntia Idandan, Mr* Anna Idenden. Mr FrancU Idanden. Mr* Barbara Km*;. Maitei Kins, Mr Darnlay Clarke For ST. LUCIA: Mlaa Myrtle Holder, Mr Ivan Herrvlia, Mr. Anthony Lewi*. Mr Orai I For ANTIGUA Mr Rcimald Marceaon, Mr*. Myra Mar.. For JAMAICA: Mr. Hugh Caae. Mra. Gwendolyn Co*e. Maater FV KITTI M. Terrenca Ryan. What's on Today Pol.cc Cou-lm at I*St am. Oaurta of Appeal at Felt) Debt at II am. Court of Ordinal-* *t II M am Police Band. Heatinga Reck* at I p.rn Mr. A. Doullai-Smllh Levturea St Wake• SUke.pere •• Man" a 13 PJB. Council Considers Trade Union Bill Second Reading Passed THE Legislative Council yesterday began and then postj>oned further consideration of the'Bill to amend the Trade Union Act. 1939. and the Better Security Act. 1920. It will be further discussed when the Council meets next Tuesday. The Hon'ble Acting Colonial Secretary amended Clause 6 so as to abandon the principle of peaceful picketing at people's homes. PAGE FIVE The main part ol the debate yesterday was on Section 0 and 7 which deal with peaceful picketing, and with section 4 which refers to "contracting out". As debate started, a motion bv Hon'ble G. D. L. Pile to refer the Bill to a Select Committee was defeated, six members voting "no" and five voting "aye". The division was as follows ; (Ayes) Hon'bles G. B Evelyn, Mrs. Hanschell. Dr. St. John. G. D. L. Pile. J. D. Chandler. (Noes) Hon'bles Dr. H. G. Massum, A. G. Gittens, F. C. Hutson, the Lord Bishop, V. C. Gale, the Acting Colonial Secretary. Motion for the second reading was carried by an 6—3 division, all the members of the Council voting in favour except Hon'bles Mr. Chandler, Mr. Pile and Mrs. Hanschell. Later in the debate a motion by Mr. Pile that clause 4 dealing with contracting out be deleted was resolved In the negative. Only Dr. St. John. Mr. Pile and Mr. Chandler voted for the motion. Debate was adjourned after a motion by Mr. Pile that clause 6 dealing with peaceful picketing be deleted was lost by an 8—4 division Voting in favour of the deletion were Hon'bles Dr. St. John. Mr. p ile. Mr. Chandler and Mrs. Hanschell. Second Beading Moving the second reading of the Bill, the Acting Colonial Secretary said that the various seclions of the Act iran to achieve different amendments to the existing Trade Unions and Trade Disputes Law. There were several different amendments not having any particular relation to each other, he said and he would have to deal with them individually. As regards clauses 2 and 3 of the Bill, the first substituted a new definition to the expression "trade union", and the other a new clause regarding the "compulsory registration of trade unions". Those two new clauses, however did not effect any major change in the present law, but they did substitute what was regarded as a better provision on those points. He did not think that any particular comment was called tor and all he wished to say was that the drafting of those clauses was based on legislation elsewhere. "Now the remainder of the BUI deals with two matters known as "contracting out" and "peaceful picketing". There is no connection between the two and I must deal with them separately." said the Acting Colonial Secretary. Contracting Out The position regarding contracting out", was that as long ago as the beginning of the century it was legal for trade unions to have political association. When he said at the beginning of the century, he should have said from the year 1913. About the year 1908 there was a case brought by someone called Osbome against a railway company on this question of political associations and political activities of trade unions. This case went to the House of Lords whciv U was decided that political activities by trade unions were illegal. Decision Altered In 1913 this decision was altered by the passing of the Trade Union Act of that year which made it legal for trade unions to indulge in political activities, to have political associations, and permit what was known as "contracting out." The provision of the law,—and he was speaking irom memory—> was thai It should, in the rlrst place, be by secret ballot by the members of a union who engaged in political activities at all. Secondly that there should be a separate political fund and only money from that fund could be used for political activities. Thirdly, what was known as the "contracting out" clause which provided that any person who did not want to contribute to the fund, should have the right to do so. That was the law of 1913 and it remained the same until attar the general strike in England In 1926. In the following year there was passed tha Act of 1927 which among other things, substituted for "duntractlng out" the "contracting in" clause. In effect that meant in future members of a trade union would not contribute to the political fund unless they specifically signified, that they wanted, to do to by signing a notice called n "contracting In" notice. In other words the form of notice shown In the first Schedule of the present Bill was changed so as to read in effect: "I hereby give notice that T. wish to contribute to the political fund of the particular union. Instead of as set out. "I hereby give notice that I object to contribute to the political fund, etc." Act Repealed That was the law between 1927 and 194S at which time the whole of the 1927 Act was repealed and the law went back very largely to the law before 1927 and was In large part the 1913 law. That was the short history of the "contracting out" and "contracting in." He would Just repeat that the "contracting out" was made legal in 1913: it was made illegal or iiitrading in" 1927, and (gnu-acting out" was again tb procedure in 1946. The otssMM <>f HM Bill regarding "contracting out" w4fl In the Objects and Reasons and they were based on the United Kingdom's legislation. As far as -imilar legisl %  isted In the majority of the colonial territories 'As regards this and as regards the other point with which I shaU be dealing in a moment 1 would say that lhi. takes recognition of tv fact thai trade unions do, and 1 think always have had for the last forty years, political affiliation and associations." The majority of trade uniois were the children of one or other political parties and it was unrealistic to suggest that Burba los should be an exception and thutt trade unions not be expected to take part in political activiUc-. Safeguards which were set out in Clause 5 of the BUI. made it necessary that there should be, as in the United Ungdom. separate political funds, and that thereshould be adequate opportunit for persons who did not wish tc contribute to the |>o)ltical funiis not to do so. Peaceful Picketing "As regards "peaceful plektting" I would only say that this has lM*en lawful in the United Kingdom since 1906 which was the date of the Disputes Act. The provisions regarding "peace:ui picketlng" was slightly but not substantially amended by the 1927 Ad. and I think r am correct in saying that Barbados I* the only colony in this area, anj almost the only colony In the Briti-ii Empire which has not got provisions regarding "ntt-rjjful picketing" "Here again in recognition nf what has now become mid IndMd regarded as the normal rights .if trade unions in thrar (M hour relations. I think m.wlf thai there is no good reason why Barbados should stand out again'*, this and ba distinguishe I m toll respect." "In the Other Place there hud been some discussion repardin.-; the rights of persons to picket it a person's place or residence. "Clause 6 of the Bill made h' lawful for a person or persons to attend at or near a bouse or place where a person resides or woiks or carrjes on business or happen.-i to be. if they so attend merely for the purpose of peacefully obtaining or communicating informatio i or of peacefully persuading any person to work or abstain from working." A Com prom i-te "I appreciate and it is appreciated that this is likely to be a controversial clause." said the Acting Colonial Secretary, -'aii.i that oven though it is most unlikely that that right will be urssd, it would be better to take it out of the Bill." For that reason, he polsstad mit he would make an amend men I at the appropriate tun. wttrA would have the effect of deleting the provision for "peaceful picketing" at persons' residences making! it only applicable to plans where they worked. Of the other clauses he ^id not think it was necessary for him to say anything by way of explanation The Objects and Keasona made them quite clear and he believed they wore non-controversial. "it might be asked why has this Bill been introduced now. On answer to that is thai it is alwan well to Introduce legt:-,. this sort before it Is needed. It is likely to cause very much more tiouole If it is introduced as a result of any trouble. %  I oelleve '.lie existence or nonexistence of the present Bill ip Barbados has so far made no difference in this community. It is, a tribute to labour and labour relations that thu u so; but I Ml gest for the very serious consideration of honourable members %  that It is very much better to eul on the Statute Book the &n>Cllons In the BUI now that laboui relaUons are good, than to be confronted and be charged at some later date when there be some rupture In labour relations, of having refused to pu. them on. I now beg to move thathis Bill be road a second time." Glad For Compromise Honourable Dr. Messiah, seconding the motion for Ihe second loading of the Bill, said he was glad that the Government had seen fit to reduce the scope, of the picJuflng, and to restrict It to the place of work. It would never .do in a country like Barbados) to have the peace and quietness of people's home invaded by peaceful picketers, or oUivrwise. Tftey all .-calised of course that it was a dangerous thing to put powers of that sort in the hands of people who were still ip their Infancy as regards Trade Unionism. His fear was not so Bttflh for the leader*, who had a.ertaln amount of balance and mtelli gence. His fear was Itcl era be pushed of! their feet by the people behind. A regards the second vrt of '.he peaceful picketing. aaCasned that the provisions tor keeping it peaceful, and the penalties attached would go a long way in ensuring that It would bo kept peaceful. For that reason he thought they should accept the compromise which had been offen. .abandoning of the provision for picketing homes, and pass the Hfeguards. If they accepted Trade Unionism, they should accept nple that Trade Unions anouM tain rights. That was a universal practice all over the British Empire, an-i on were satisfied tti..: visions for safeguarduig kinUy, they could have no reason for not having peaceful picketing, by passing the section vita tha ionipivi.us,rival b* the. :;.ent. A^iins. Tlte Bill Honourable G. D. L. Pile said he was against the LiU as,a matter of principle. As he under>loou it, a principle of democracy was that every' individual should nave the right to come to a decision for his own on matters aliening himself, as Ion*;, of course, aa re did not break tnc law of the land. in that connection, the main points with which he was conconcerned wore the principles of "contracting out", and of peaceful picketing. The Hon'ble Acting Colonial Secretary in introducing the Bill had told them a good deal about "contracting out." The present law followed the principle of "contracting in." That was. that after a ballot had been taken and the majority ol members of %  Trade Union present MCWad that there should be a political fund, any person who wanted to contribute to that fund could contract in. In that case he signed a form to that effect. What the present Bill proposed was that after the ballot had MBB takan, it was assumed that every member was willing to subscribe to the political fund, unless he definitely said no. While a man might belong to a Trade Union, he might not agree with the Union's political ideas which the political fund was formed to support. Was it fair to that man that he should be obliged to contribute to it? It seemed to him a negation of democracy. Political Act Ton They should remember that as the Acting Colonial Secretary had said. Trade Unions sought their objectives to a large extent by political action. It was reasonable to suppose that the majority of members would be willing -to subscribe to the political fund But was it fair that a particular member who was not willing to subscribe should have undue influence brought to bear upon hi m 7 That was what it amounted to when he was forced to say no In opposition to the majority who were saying yes. He was thlU being held up in the limelight among his fellows, a thing hi bring disagreeable ottanqueneea, Undue influence should not be brought to induce a man to follow a certain action Which argument had failed to convince him was right. If a man could be persuaded g) On page 7. Wants To Drill Here For Oil Mr. II. C. Bishop of New York, arrived m Barbados yesterday ] morning to consult with Government officials regarding the re-1 cent enactment cf the Oil Bill j which was passed by the Legislature. He came in from Texas via Trinidad by B.W.I.A. an, staying at the Ocean View Hotel A representative of the Gulf Oil Corporation, a world-wide, organisation with headquarters in: Pittsburgh. Mr. Bishop is Ing on behalf of his company an application for an oil concession to drill here, and hopes that I the rules and regulations covering the Bill will be formulated. Should his application be fsv%  ourable, his company will be ready to start operations promptly. 25 Years Ago N.C.0 s Will Conduct Police Band By the kind permission of MB(Acting Commissioner of Police, the Police Band will render the undermentioned programme at the Hastings Rocks, conimencing at 8 o'clock to-night "N.C.O.S Conducting": — c/pls. G. fesmnnnn. W. Best, B. Morris and^SgV. Archer. This Is a new feature instituted by Captain Haison A.R.CM. before he left the island for Antigua and in future will be %  monthly attraction. The object of this is to give each N.C.O. a chance to develop the art of conducting, It is done in the British Army and Capt. liaison stale* that this is the only medium by which his %  ii get a chance to show their ability in U %  l '"• %  %  (1) MARCH—"Father Rhine" —Paul l.uukv (2) OVERTURE—"Morning, Noon and —6'uppe I) SELECTION — The Gondo.Stillirun (4) VALSE p. A. Sleek (IJ SKl.Li TION The ( hu Chin Chow'' Frederick Norton i /.<,/, A Per feel Hay' C Jacobs <8) SELECTION "Hit The Deck —Vincent Goumans Popular Dance Music. GOD SAVE THE KING. Conductor: — C ARCHER, A Mus. V.C.M.. Acting Bandmaster. Sugar Resolution Received By Leg. Co. THE Secretary of State for the Colonies has received the text of the Resolution passed by the Council relative to the Sugar Negotiations between representatives of the B.W.I. Producers and the British Government, and will keep in mind the views expressed in the Resolution, the Ix-gislativc Coumil was told yesterday in a message from the Governor. Mi-. BertQrham waa yaatacday rapwtad a. batnf .ludrnl ai MrGill. UrilWMly. Canada. Ma la In (art A ndirul ttudant at GUYS HOSPITAL. LON(Barbados Advocate. January 13. 1925) Sugar .cm, Cucou Prices Whilst sugar prices were up during the last two years and Cocoa prices were down the reverse is now the caae. \t is 'M'.ted that the preference promised by the Imperial Govarnnaant will be m operation J early enough to held West Indian fc sugars during the first four or ft five months of the year; and con9 sequent on the reported big IS crops In Cuba the market is low, (ft and somewhat depressed., ^ On the other hand ordinary S Trinidad Cocoa is now quoted!$ at $16 per cwt., where last year A it was little more than half ff that price. Trinidad and Gren-jv ada were terribly hard hit byt the slump during the last two years u nd the improvement in prices will bring back to them something of their departeal prosperity. Drowning Fatality On New Year's Day while I passing through the Gulf Stream, the S.S. Guiana" met some) ft heavy seas. The Boatswain 5 Phillip Stembar, a native Sttat r.acou. who was standing on dock ^ waa swept off Tha Captain stopped the ship, and mads) .< .search, circling about ihe verity. Alter remaining about an hour at this tedious i failing to find the bod> pursued Its course. AFTER STOCK TAKING WE HAVE MADE SPECIAL REDUCTIONS ON DRESSES, BLOUSES, SLACKS and SKIRTS Etc., Eta %  movim w muss SHOP. HARRISON'S-BROAD n. e CROP SEASON REQUISITES — AT — ROCKBOTTOM PRICES. • SHOVELS a BUCKETS a CANE BILLS a CUTLASSES a PLANT KNIVES • BAG NEEDLES AND 5 PLY ENGLISH SEWING TWINE OBTAIN OUR QUOTATION BEFORE BUYING ELSEWHERE HARRISON'S FRESH VEGETABLE SEEDS -• LANDRETH | I WEATHERHEADSI J, IIECT. CABBAGE ll kind.. % AIIHOT %  klndm. LKTTUCE X OKRA. BEANS <:, klitd.l ft KOHL RAW .2 kind.) i: SET? 11 Sw ~> Hoi 7 kind.) S:, C WT K CC N Q SPINACH 'Ii RHIF HADISII iwhlWl %  0 ONION. I'AKSNIP, THYME Q '" BTARD, CBLgRY, I.F.EK ; KWISN O CHINESE 1-AllMAiiF. .ITKIIN ^ i MELON. WATraurr; iinniiF. i' IT HI IN' ->l.s SPBOUT*. BRIKK WEATHER-HEAD ITD. ^ IDEA!) OF ruti>Al> STHfcET ^ HARDWARE DEPT. Dial 2364 J ^^^v^^^^-^^^^^^^%^^v^^^v^^^^ I fot evetif | occasion \ OK Sale at tlte leadina StoteS A touch of 9ndwidjuLcdihj. SINGLE MODEL LADIES' HATS In a variety of colours and styles. Only recently opened. From *!..•• to Stt.ltt Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10 %  '2 & 13, BROAD STREET QUAKER OATS. g> and Your Biggest Bargain I ENIROY aRIAKFASTI Boil 2 cup* of wucr. Add i*lt. Wheo boiliaK.'idd I cup of QMIUT Oma. Cook ic. uiirioj. fot 214 roinuwi. Thai's all. Diuaous auAHtt OATS tms


PAGE 1

Kin n JAM ARY 13, 1W> CLASSIFIED ADS. WfU lea ll.aw > FOH REST HOUSES | menu, Phn. m.~ !" ~ " I —f r n ,ornos HEAL SS&ISWOCATS .--aw^ %  ^ _•* %  • %  *ff^ M f*fg-— POO OB> H ll-* ^.--, LeM %  ft upfc wp* rtjffge. *• The Walrond Family. TLL, bul never fiwn " v n*** 1 %  % % %  • "^ Hilda Archer. Brlttons X Road i* on monthly tenancy bom the ISO ? %  >•• y in. u !" T „ Co „ Oc^^Miion on M.rth Ul. KNIGHTS LTD 10 1 M-ln BARBADOS ADVOCATE PI III H '.Hill is NOTICE I. Te n ders are melted for th* chi•**• rlgaM to Mil liquor* etc and in MTV* lunche, and teas al Kensington OH-1 durtre*. ihr Tourne\pprosirrateiv from Frt.ru arv Tin to February tin 3 Tenderare jk. Invited for the tranaporutl.*! of th* flr Team from Abbeville G^MI llouto the (Hal daring in,uwrnawnl T ,*^W !" " IMTh th* ..rVWTMCMd • C F Harrison Co s C-JBre not bbrthM 4 p m on Monday January Sard 4 The A-oruiKA dan rot bind H—U to accept is* lownt or any tender THT BARBADOS ITHCKATT AOCUT1O.N W. P HOYOR Hnnornry Sccretary n-RMSHCD FLAT-AI Coral Send* Uorthlng Uwn. ,rd Silver Oood sea bath** r lurih-r partleuUr. D m*4. Alma I a s haty. if i *•*_.. f n FLATS Ma furnished with un f fw^'-^ 1 lU,wl -l "*"n. Worthing Dial WM I) 1 SOI f T> I IWaiU^ Maxwell. Coast. 3 bed. rama. right-of-way to (Match, fully lur • T--. Av *"' bl ,ror Vlltll Ut n ** IS 1 SOJr IMHIH uug MITOHOTIVE aajgal I ,bkt offer refuted between T H -i-d P "> j C Klrton. the St. Philip 13 I 9*—an. %  HI rtai-rTii"* Tttirt l0 Model. ar-^a-usTjS A-ply to O l^^n^. Maxwell, !• % %  9Und*rd Vanguard 3JO0 mil*. • -. Juir ItW ^d„ On vw .1 W-fw H1UJ4AN SALOON CAH-H 1, -"" "> 1*M lo b. b. rfJST iK. '",* .~~w am 0 ., "ITiiST "" %  """ Cn DIXOX PulStS" 0 "*' U ~' Pl^UUon. LulWlnJ. lr ^.j,, >• %  )Ht Hum. > 'i 1> Tmir. aUt-Vau*h-U I h p I.te If4. kntnrr Uphnl*!"^ ^ banmea rapamied ndht '•. D gaM MndllWM* Priee W.100. Phone 2, dr\rtrv.n. iUl mnAv',"".?" Victoria Street, on FJUDAY I*, al X p. m thn fellowing:Wl >•*• afluare feet of land at Mahogany Lan. with th* wail building und. ir. K tiiMtwn Houae conuim ckaaM gjllery. drawing. 1 twdroonu. uatui outoffice., ceicloaed yard. ^ !" 1 Rood LAND at Thocnb.gr Hill, near tho rood leading to Wllcpa, ClUta %  n the pmrtth of ChrUt Church Fot ponoitloii. cd ule apply to; R ARCHER m KENZLC VictoHa Slrent Dial mi 10 I.JO— *P LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Tho application of EUlrw DoblnaDn o' Craianetd Oap. St MlrhaWl. for potw.i.*Wn to aetl Spirit.. Malt LJ^onr*. j,,. .,. a board and ahinclo .hop Attached i• Udenco at GraaaAokl O-p St Michael Oated thi. ih day of January 19S* Tt> B A McLCOP Caaj Police Maatatratr DM A Signed ELALVE RIIRINSOK. ., _ Applicant N B —This application wilt bo condd at a Ucenainr Court to be held at Police Court. District "A", on Monday, lh Vj* %  * Janunry lfdo. at 11 E A McLEOD Police Mngutrnte, Dtat "A" IS 1 SS—In LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE application of Owen T Allder of narborcn Hill. Si. Mtcha*!. for pernuttton to eU Spirit-. Malt Liquor*. Ac at a wall .hop attached to reudence al cornar of Rlclunonda Oap. St. Michael Daim ihi. nth day of January itM. To: B A McLSOD. Enq Police Magl.trate Dlmt "A" OWEN T. AUJaEB. N* n Thi. apphcalion will be rotund•td al n Licensing Court to be held at Police Ooun. Diatrtci -A" i Satuivaav tlat day of January ltf. at II o'clock, a mPAGE SEVEN ScliiHtiuii Leuvrs For W. Germuir. PARIS. Jan. 12 M. Roben.* Schuman, FrcncR Forf?lBTi Minister, left Paris latn last night in t special rail car for r return by air next* Tuesday.—! 1 Financial Talks End \\ ithout Agn'rinenl LONDON, Jan. 13. Anglo-Polish nnoncial laiks. aimed at settling PoUnU'j pw'war debts to Britain and com pen.sarton for British concerns nationalised in Poland, have ended without agreement after eleven ntonths. This was announced to> the British Treasury, which added thai' "in view inadequacy of the amounts offered it has been found impossible to continue negotiations." —Renter. I'm shortly uiirnfJuio a Wp M ii ig ,/ I/ t ,[s[i,.[ fmrollm—ihcsf Council Considers Trade Union Bill REAL ESTATF SHAKES with Accruinar Dividn.d• Bortkadoa Shipping and Trading £ 1 SOIn CAg-Oiw Chevrolet Car • ; _jog order, new tyre*. I ^Apply. A. Cuke. Derrick.. SI •fflXK • Hi F-rao Motor True* Dm, DrhnY eight forward gear. i aaaf. Contact Courteay Gara.%  ^ ;i i M. BUCTOH One FAKMAU. II %  rut t*ry lltue uaed in Al condition IM pufthaaing larger. Cold Co., a 1 Jo-Jn lECTRiCAL. aaTTUGERATOH*', cubnft Fjigltah %  tt-ic. n new 1*40 model. 5 yean %  nawe Price S4S0UO no offer* met ia-viog Hiand, It %  Uantioii -m. 13 I **ta UCKTINCi PLANT!) ^\ Petrol %  aUM GaueraU— 2 75 KVA" 110 US aat-Otdara now being plao ataU iBJankenl Comm.o.icaie with %  aStty Oaraie. Dial 4CU 11 I M In fURNITURE ECHANICAL nrtwiUTEBBA small quantity ol jKanfl Banui-^ton T>pcwriieri now ** Apoij T. iiruot. Ovaart i M '*w S.isr>-t*. %  tiwatl; Herculoa aiUac Kuig, on •I i rt ila, in gjraoo and in black %  %  Ca., Ltd Dial 4471. IS II a i f i QUt: Fwd Prefect Car in i^rlcct conK UOai mile. Ayph gaarttaad, c,o Bruce Wrathcrhcad BBS CARS: Vauxhatl 14 h p. A-l am STANDARD • h p. aaloon good condition. Courtory Oaiage. *• oinaua ice to no The abov. will bo aat up for aala i" Public Competition al our Offke. Jam,* I sirtet. on Wedneaday, lath January Q L W. CLARKE At CO. Solicitor! Ill an LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE application of George Conrad llaraa of Collymore Rock. S Michael. Jor jiaiiiHauion to ^>ll Spuita. Mall Uquor. air at Enniorr Uof %  aSfegali Dated thi* nth day of January IM* To B A MclfOD. Eaq Police Maa,iitr*ti\ Dit A' O C llARD-t Applicant N B Tlili application will be conaWltrad al a Ltcenaing Court to be held at Police Court. DUtnct A'' on Seturda< :in dau>of January ISM at 11 o'clock. a m ITOVT. -OtC wuh ii IUIO Control Oven. li. on# year "id S1S0.0O no oflcra. 0. lU-.roft. Se--i Q AirpBI' rai %  II 1 SO M BjRKnTRB — Birch drawing roc-" Brampnalng il< Satla> il eaU' tana Rocker. All .. WRh aanng cushioiii, lapealry __.*.
  • m. and p. ( their Ofneo No IT. Hlffk Street. Bridge'< wn. on Friday IMh day of January HMO at J p m. Ma) Share* In tha We*t India Biscur Co IM. COTTIX, CATTORD aV. Co. II 1 So—> FOR SAIJS OH KENTFarley Hill. St Pater Old PlanUUWn houae with lars* ballroom. Dining room library, fourteen bed/oom* etc Ideal for converting to rrstdential club. For delaus. Apply to Bradahaw at Contpany. 4.1.M.-Lf.n %  SCELLANtOUS % %  DOM FROM FTRE Inrtal a Flra^^^^Z^^'o^Z BU*_ Tue. hl IPOO. School Book, of all • School, fun*; Ms. inde .it SS^t £U CAB TYKES; V HW tu-laea ^^*J* . M x at, S SO x IT. r^nclngsecure al the** price* r ^* UT *y Garasr Dial 4MI 11 I SO 3n THE iinderngned will nffcr for Sale al their Offke in James Street. H.idgrt.>iv OB Friday the 27th day of January Ittt. at 1 p m. The Dwelling House called RCULAH .: rul the land thereto belon*jlii contalnina S41T square feet, sltual* at Hatimga. Christ Church. Ing House comprises Closed Gallery. Drawing and Dining Rooms. : Hedroorna. Dressing Room. Toilet Bait n betwi-< %  I a .. HI ..nd 4 p m on application on For further particular* and conditions it Sale, apply to -HUrCHINSON RANFMXJJ. %  olhellon For Sulr—CooifJ [*' OU: TS RL.VNKKTS %  JJ*. nt do w lUv H %  ISBlVS 0 !^ B' " %  Thani. II 1 50-Sn SMI*! !" Jl ln "• tor "-fr 001 • <* %  Ud. DUU tm i o i aa-ta. ^'^U-ATMrj.s Kew :i,, (1 — il i so m \ A1 *''-' D ... „ 1U UM -ska. k, m. Bffiunn B-OS. Ra> If .l.fjtjw-fa "N^J^' Deodorant thai ^^MiiJ* Obtainable at Knight. U I .-so -9a On, -md not II I SO-t f„ nw ***• Orocers Co Shepherd SEEDSA fteah shipment of VsgeUbU Seed! has just boon received from ii eluding Carrot. Tomato. Cauliflower. Cabbage. Beet. Lettuce. Squash and Bean*. Also a email variety of Flower awed*. Including Balsam. Ciluopsis. Carnation and COcksromb Knight's Drug Wore*. U l Sft-ln Tmfal ,lgar Street. Dial ItM fITTlNGS Galvanised pipe All eon ram Uj in. to IS tatt. Phone **> B Co. asssa Us****4Jl GALVANLSBD a\HXBTB—g n.. SS fl t ft. Apply: Auto Tyre. Trafalgar Street I'hone 20*4. I 1 SI I n DrVING MASKS Rubber Diving Mask. Store, Lucas SSxeet 13 l SV* mms Bleed! i^'-'Vr*Hr """"" %  a -r-? %  •Baai *f %  *'•' cause *! * i£r!i *""•"" •'"!arum %  roe dad ?" % %  r" V. teetb or "Ml f, '"" fc ^-r^. MMIk BLANKBTTS Large Blankets al St St Exba Large at 811 These are worth lour seeing at-Btanway fMer*. IAICJI Street M Lat-S B SlirSTTS Gent. Sport. Shirts In WhlU A colours, ahorl Leg Beeves fron. R 40 upward*. Blanway Stare Luraa EVESUTE FLAT SSHFBTT* for Ceilings a partition. 4 Inch FXpe inlsl lee. lengths Bends etc (A, B. Taylor. r il 111 ilia Street. Dial 410* EXPAMDSD METAL for ReilUif. Concrete work. Bound Mlid Steel Sara inch A B Taylor Ltd Colaridgaj Street. DUl 44Bfl For Propertle* etc., eonUct RAIJ*H A iULAKD S. RE. F V A Auctioneer and CaUle Agent Who has numeiou* properties particulars ring osksayan* C-the-trar LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE THE application of Charlet F la*M oi Day rolls Hoad. Ch Ch lor.permission, to sell SpinU. Malt liquor*. Ac M %  -• % %  ••: B*ag oral i„-ei -A.il! i.iiiMng at Dayrella Road. Ch Ch -iihin lii.i "A" Dated this llth day of January IM. To; B A MclJCDD. Eeq Police M.igistn.T. 0 i WARD. tgaj MM m N B -This applicallon In.ri K l> %  BsUaM H Hcfor%  '.'MUlHltl't' before it had ,... reading was a practice that was followed in the House of I'timmoos. Hon'ble Dr. St. John dealing with seen lion which rt'ferred to peaceful said it seemed that the following section was largely .i I.THI.Idiction of section 6. It dently an attempt to rtefmr what was meant by intimidatum and annoyance. The only conclusion that he could draw .from thipresence of ser-i it was difficult for one to say picketing ended and where intimidation began. "icnt recognised that, and hence the presence of section 7. There wss a Labour Coniin the island who was wlue in trade .imputes If he failed, an arbitrator was called in. The Actinp Tolonul himself had admitted that labour relations in the island were with AB IncriMh, rlreaUUtt rrtrj mak. || Tha MV. "CASUBBEEwill accept Cargo and Passenger• (,^r llonunica. Anligua. MmitaetraT. Nevis and StKills. Sailuig Friday lBh lust. The MV. DABRWOODwill ..-%  %  Rl Luci.1 Grenada and Aruba. Dato of wiling to be IV.II. n W.I. Schooner .lwnera' Assocl* tniii tineTel 4041. •th January, ISOO. Canadian National Steaniships SAILS IffON. TREAL Halifax Bestea Arrive. B'doa sails I.O% I ll* 111 \ I MMMI LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application of M. E. R Rourn* S. t a of Koeaauck Street, St. MkhaeL tot i-imisuon to sell Spirit.. Malt laq. 1 I..1UI aSfg H Ng i > %  :...!. .. t LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application of Barry 1 Jones 01 Baxters Road. St. Michael, for pemuasioT. :o sail Spirtls, Malt Uquors, asc. at board and slusyde shop allached t lOtdence at Baxter* Road. Ot> Dated this llth day of January la* To H A TAI.MA. Baq Itsglilg BERYL JOfiaeV Applicant N B This application will be con l lgO T S d al a Licenaghg Coo it to be held a Police Court Dislrtcl "A'*. an Saturday, the Slat day of January ItSO. at l. o'clock, am. II A TALMA. Police Maatiunte. Ih.t A II 1 St.—In > &f •••>*>>! WANTED [Clean Old KaG ADVOCATE PRESS ROOM I MIMM I MIHOM I MM IBBBHBShBt* C. Car/ion Brown & SB Stall Wiih Our Customers and Friends 5% ZHappy m Wew ^ear \ [C. CARLTON MOWN! J Wholesale & Retail V Druq-jist m INCOME TAX NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Income Tax returns are re-! quired from every married man whose income is $1200.00 per annum, or over p from every other pe/son whose income is $720.00 per annum or over and from companies whether incorporated or unincorporated, societies, persons engaged in any trade or profession, and owners of land or property whether a taxable income has accrued during the past year or not. Forms of Return my be obtained from the Income Tax Department AFTER THE 1ST DAY OF JANUARY. 1950. and the forms duly filled in must be delivered to me on or before the following respective dates: 1. Returns of persons whose books were closed on the 31st day of December, 1940, on or before the 31st day of March, 1B50. 2. Returns of persons whose principal place of business Is not situate in the island on or before tho 30th day of June, 1950. 3. Returns of all persons on or before the 31st ol January 1950. F. CLA1HMONTE ^^ Con>jTussioner of Income Tax and Death Duties NOTfc: Any iffsoB fsilisg |fj retake hi. rrl.r. within the dse dale il| be liable to a fine not exceeding 1:100 Jn j not leas than £2 and will be proaeruted anieu a sausfartery reai M ta gi reM 10.1.50.—J*n. Mteet. City. !>>t*d this 11th day of January ltd To II A TALMA. Laq I'ulM-r Magistrate. Iflvt A Signed M. E. R. BOURNE, for Applicants N D This application will be considered al a IJceusJjng Court to be held at lultce Court. District A ". on Saturday. the list day of January ISM. at II o'clock. e.m. II A TAlaMA Polk* Mjsjpatrat*. DleL A". 11 1 SO ln LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application of Shells fsrotl M Fresh Water. BUck Reak. St Michae.. 10. parmiauon to **u Sasnta. Malt Laquora. arc at a board aad >hing> shop a l tat had lo rsssSssw* at Black Back. M. Michael. Dart* To K. A. MclAaO. !\>1KS Maci.traU-. Signed E. I.AJUCER. for Applksn" N D This application will be ۥ*•scared at a l iseoatng court 4* be keM at Pouee Osurt. Dtetrsrt "A", on Sahsrdai the SLet day of January ISM, St A o'clotk, a an. B. A. McLEOD, Police MagUUaie, Dtst. "A" I) I SO—in CANADIAN INVESTMENTS bought at f>5 per cent, premium or exchanges (switches) arranged. LONDON SECURITIES bought and sold promptly through Stock Exchange brokers. BARBADOS BONDS and SHARES (also Trinidad) bought and sold. Quotations on request to; A. M. WEBB Dial 3188 STOCKBROKER Hour. —3 155, Roebuck Street, Bridgetown. (Over People's Pharmacy) FOR SALE A newly built BUWOALOW lc Walanw Road. Navy. Cartena^ 1 large airy bedrootaa) Verandah. Drawing and Dtnlag Booms. TikV Kikhen with bull'*-la Clapboard*. Tiled Toilet and Bath, running uater la all bedroom.. O*. 1 ServanU' roeen* with toilet gad bath. Staratuvg on I ••> so, ft o. Und He raaxaanakli oSar refused Dul 4JS1 betaeen s an. aad) I pm. ADV NELSON LADY KODNEY IADV NEIaSUN 1ADY ROIJraCY 1ADV NELflON llth Jan. 14th Jan %  O. Fob. 10th Feb. atth Feb. JTth Feb. lath Mai IT'ft Mar llth Apr llih Apt. NWRIHBOt ND Md,IADY HuDNEY LADY NaUaSON IADY RODNXY IADY NTljfON IADY RODNEY :ADY NELSON "th Jan. llth Jan SBth Jan. Ird Feb th Feb. Hlh Feb. 4th Mar ftth Mar IMh Mar. Ugj M.T itM Mar 1st Apr. llth Apr ltth Apr. 70th Apr. 6ih May tin May llth May Sard Jan SJrd Jan -nth Frt MB Mm H* Mas Mh Apr fnh Apr &-d Apr. SSUt Apr. ltth Jan isih Fab iii Ban tnd Apt SMh ArMfB Ha) Ha, "^^llorbaBaht wllnoul nouce. All .euels nited with cold tbirage chameewe. raascnaer Farea aad freight ratea on application to :— GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD. Agents. CSS. faVToaV. lll...\S.\rL.\.\Tli>l i: FRENCH USE S.S. %  CASCOGNE" MOOg lo Trinidad and Frenth Guiana on the 5lh Pcbruarv, l50. Sailing lo Southampton and Lc Havre via Marlimqi.. and Guadeloupe 12th February. IM0. Mlnlnam Flm (i (inlT SUS.M RHI.Cr. R M. JONES & CO. LTD.-Agenta REAL ESTATE U.I s I H \1 t riONKfcK.S DIXON ex BLADON U. Cmdr. G. S. DIXON. O 11 I: J. M. 11LADON, ACS I KIIK i. Mil SI KM ronnertions in U.K. — CANADA — USA. Belorr l.u.lm. rxamine our rxlenaive 1I.U ul Mth rlaw properl> and land lacaled in all areas. Phone <.<• -::;. IMauUlioii. BulldUu FOH SWY The undersigned will offer For Sale ;it Iheir Office, No* 17. 3 High Street. Bridgetown, on Friday, 27th dtu 11*50. X at 2 p.m. I The Dwelling Mouse called "GARI^ll^M" ami the Und \ thereto containing 10,770 square feel, situate on ihe Sea Coast 5 of St. Lawrence Gap, Christ Church. 5 Inspection on application to Miss Kathleen Hunte, "BratT ton. Maxwells Coast. Dial K357. N For further particulars and conditions ol Sale, apply to :— v COTTIJ:, CATFORD AI 11.1.50.— 15B, f •>S**SSS*S*SS&S*S**M**J*****S********S*******+*2\ V/////'//////////rVyi //'/////,V/,',V.VV//.W.V.'i JF. BROBAT ?S.V,'S.-,VSA'SSS>'.'**USS1*-SSS,'S.-,'.-.'.'S.'SSs'M',-.W



    PAGE 1

    I'U'.I I OIK BARBADOS ADVOCATE !" l 2^mv Xi . BAWOsfiMlMXtfTE r. 1 =*f-i rubbsUa W Th, Advocsu Co. LU. K " l. I riiluv. January 13, 1950 IMverin terms favourable to Jhe quick economic recovery of Japan with provision made for the early withdrawal of | ..tim forces and the re-institution of piiliticial self determination. Canada had adopted" a neutral approach to the matter with one eye focussed on the United States of America. On the other hand Australia, as was expected, stands in fear of a rehabilitated Japan which without adequate safeguards might in the next generation attempt once more to dominate the East and to find an outlet for her surplus population in the Dominion, While South Africa would not be immi'rtiately affected by a prosperous and independent Japan, yet on racial grounds the is inclined to line up on the side of Australia. The varied approaches to the Japanese treaty by Commonwealth countries lire understandable, especially in the case of Australia and will be sympathetically i I. Australia with a population of million people living on an area of in.nly three million square miles tempting to maintain a standard of life which is much higher than that in the surrounding territory and it is obvious that if the door is opened to the settlement of millions of Asiatics in the Dominion, the whine fabric of her economic structure which has been built up at such great cost will be destroyed. No doubt in subsequent meetings of th? Working Committee the differences will be ironed out and a uniform policy ado) Yiioiln i Hull IT WAS announced by reliable s m Ixmdon during the week that tlie naval I .1 Bermuda will probably be closed in the interest uf economy. This is preMiln-il to be part of a decision by the British Admiralty after examinnii; all the naval services with the object of reducing I lure. This is another MpOCt ot the etfeets of devaluation on the West Indies. The closing I bermuda Base will coruudarabrjr reLha number of pel suns employed from Other islands and consequently, the dismenta to thenhone. It is estimated that time are about 265 Barbadians now employed at the naval base in Bermuda and the fact must be I that it might not be possible to place than all in oilier employment n Bermuda. If this cannot be done it will mean that > in are likely to return home to swell the ranks of unemployed. This i, • -Atri'iiiely unfortunate for us in >.' aiiii.niiuenient I • %  mlaaionai that the ^aspects i..lit in the United SI.,' e main source of relief in this direction m recent years, were not as rosy as in the past If in the appropriations of the ices at the time of devaluation although made in London has now made its effectl felt in the West Indies. Olll HEADERS V\l Australia Alt rafts Ovrr*ra* AtlUr.. itimtilut b\ m intfa* I feat (l the trit /. th, fotlm iiten hv %  olhe Btuik o\ Vi 11 I'gniph Capital vestments attractive. has made '.hem more some Investmenl emigrate and Apart from this specifically industrial capital considerable sums of personal and Institutif.nal investment funds have flowed into Australia, particularly during 1348. seeking safe refuge" and, in .",225 iXnr.rSff&u^SS SEAS c.,i.a, has been £"" h tl X 5 rf !"!" m i£Tor ^thfrtSTit would em llow.ni inio Auitr.li. .n a fairly teU dawhere "" mlMd or m>l the |„now of capital ha. conT^Z I'??" eV " >>"y BrW.h and European tnbuted to the other;mfatUooary !" .„ >h. f, !" ,r manufacturer., trader., and other force, which have been affect Ing n,„n., hr *.r C .r.ri n ttrnu'gh lb. pj* "th ~ -'"" *""•" K n my *"* bnk. for la.aatwirnt In Auatra' u li.n companies bonds, in the form C TTZ C rlU W „ ( M otS..%omuv'* Influence,," but thaw arc c"omin", on to" the market must f ,?rt me hil .eeS I. nVlent to .how that wh.to.er te re,,^ a.-r. offsetting factor. rT !" .ntbfmUrJuU account Of !" •" *" r om '" ed '" d " the Slock Exchanges the through the inlem.l account |n AuItr u ,„ makc | nV e.tmenl C( ,„| lnuc< ] pressure of newly more attracUve, factor. arr | vc d capital Peking Investment completely beyond our control has been | e | t f or some time, and have almost certainly been reha5 appar cntly helped to obscure sponsible for the maior share of tnc weakening pressure from local th? capital inflow. sources, but iu importance could _. One more rather interesting inb OV er-emphasised. .. divSend, on shares own'd to uonoe ls ot work: ,hc £?K,"i One fact concerning the capital overseatavastorT wluThinvAmerican concern, o catablW. in „ ow mus not be overlooked. trading and manufacturing bases n Mndlng ,heir money or within the sterling area machinery or industrial secret, to This movement is akin to me Aus[ral | a m09 ov enas investors 1 1^*l3S£jSg£ ^SK wh..e the Australian %  ape from the present frus'.raBut industrial Investment which 3 -Tun ,n5 ""* f their P flrt ' lhC WOrM hM b ** n eflW>tlVC ^ haS helP ? iuh £ aSr-m-i One could add a number of to increwe the volume of goods Much worthwhile technical 'JZlZ. knowledge has CODM with the money inflow. This in H capital asset. Added to this investn.' ing Into Australia are IU mally are transferred out of th country, but which have been left .,! for i. investment ^I^f.^fuft.ke'advan'ulgc 2^~f seas Investment is no) large sVele. It has helped tcn.porEmpire V totrte ~* annual *rrvice on the public debt arilv tO increase the level OtAu %  !l '" ''u^'nTrt, ?n fht^dollar b ^ P 8 *" 1 ^ loanS n l L ndon nr.Nl eurr-My reNow A uiSaS mSvldtt^ one of the cost of t*rvlcing private inserves, it has contributed in n. JC"i u *i",' 1 p ^^itWn the vestments is increasmg. small way to ttM preMUrt on the few po^iblc bases within the fiul (orlunately some of the shin.m.irketi, and it has hastened sic ( 1 na i h(> r( ,.,i 0U rce of overseas investment is likely to industrial development ,1 !" inflow is SCT more *"* Australian exports. Some estimates have pteced the '' tdl ln '^^ 'umatinft its reducc ^ need 'or imporls total capital inflow as high as difficult than estimating in [hfll on lM]Maee #e should ultim£100,000.000 in 1M7—48. ami thruvolume. ate | y be in a better posiUon to was no noticeable decline in Clearly, however, most of the mec t the future outflow of Income 1948—49 im industrial capital on the investments. If the figure of £ 100,000.000 was has come from the United KingAmerican investments pose correct onK ; %  part tvea Invested dom and the United Staws largely ipecia i problems. Because of the In new industrial devdthrough established trading and inability of this country to balance for ofllcia! estimates inanufactuiing connections. its dollar payments against its place the total figure, including The Prime Minister (Mr dollar receipts, any increase in Australian-im.inrrH development, Chifley) recently pointed out that mterM t and dividends flowing to at only £74.000,000 in 1947 and In th<> first three post-war years Amer ica could possibly be embarf93.00d.0O0 ni 194K; th. I interests participated in nssing fur 1949 is £98.000.000. 1 the 2.404 new manufacturBut nat ^ n0 reason for offlciprojecta announced in Ausaiiy discouraging or even prohibing funds did i trail*. iting new American investment Industrial development they could Of the 226 ventures involving here. Surely we should let the do so Indiri %  neai capital. United Kingdom American investor take the risks easy-money situation. interests were connected with 129, of future inconvertibility or exi. important atharc baa United States Interests with 87, change instability if he wants to i axial Ing and Interests In other countries do so. We are the gainers in in10. dusiYial knowledge and industrial As with most • odl On a money basis an earlier strength. no rtngfa admple axplannrrve] reveoied that established ation of tlw current wave Of overAustralian industrial enterprises While predicting developmenti .i capital axpanaton proIn delicately balanced matters traUa. Bui ma vi the ayanun* of £103,00fl,000 included like international capital moveehlaf f in this amount -about £16,000.000 ments Is unwise, some reduction (1> In a troubled post-war to be obtained from the United in the rate of inflow expent'i •si ppeared to Kingdom and £13,000,000 from the in the last few years in Australia : overseas Investors United States, does seem likely. as an oasis of calm prosperity. Entirely new enterprises planIn Industry, for instance, Aus(2) Australia is Uv ag a capital programme of tralia obviously has reached temlargaat tadustrlal produotr within £141.000,000. involved about £15,porarlly a state of unbalance Men has 000.000 from the United Kingdom between the basic industries like Immediate entry to most sterling and £5,000,000 from the United coal, steel, and electric power, and Btatai the numerous consumer goods in(3) A.. to have Such figures, of course, include dustries depending on them, long-term potalbl i gmany projects which for one Overseas industrialists will port base rat Batten reaaon or another will not come realise the practical difllculties in (4) Overseas companies with to fruition, but may have omitted further expansion until production Interests in Australia are now fulothers of which little Ls known, in the basic Industries is stepped filling plan Ear ei vhlcfa The period over winch the up or demand In certain other were temporarily delayed dun < \pendituxc will actually directions is reduced. be expended is also uncertain and Reduced demand hardly seems i">) The possibility of Ml apprethe estimates themselves may be likely when public works proeiatlon of the Australian pound faulty, grammes totalling several hunLCtaq "'i'" niuiiiv" to ilut they do seem to indicate died million pounds. Including ami so has possibly that, on a money basis, overseas some urgent projects, are about to the talk of a depreciation of the interests may be contributing to begin. pound sterling, tbi current wave of AuatraUan With the decision on sterling (6) Investment opportunities In industrial development something devaluation on Australian exi i'.ast. South Aft tea. ami approaching 20 per cent of the change, there will be some outflow adcapital Involved. Some 12 per of the "hot money" that has come ed during the period cenl is of United Kingdom origin, in during the past two years, but <7i Elimination of double t..xwhile i-ight per cent, comes from it should not be sufficient to atton on 11> U ; i.itea, worry us. I iterari Newsletter Nehru Is Cominform Target THE fortiation of "liberation armies" to carry out an armed sfruqgle in colonial areas of Asia and Australasia was demanded by Liu Shao-chi, ice-presidenf of (he Communist-controlled World Federation of Trade Unions, in a speech at the recent Peking conference. International News Service herewith presents o survey of current Bed tactics in various sections ot Asia. II. lam.s K. Brown LONDON, (By Mail). ELATED b'y their sweeping victory i" China Far Eastern Cominform agents have been making threats to all the nationalist non-Communist leaders in Asia. Chief target for their abuse, of course, is Pandit Nehru who is becoming the greatest living symbol of the free world in the Far East. As is usual before a campaign, the Communist party in India has been passing through a crisis, and some of the ablest leaders have been purged. The new secretary, and the dominant figure, is Balchand Trimbak Ranadive, the son of a Bombay Income Tax Commissioner. Ranadive s family belonged to the Brahmo Samaj, the Hindu reformist sect, and Rana-| dive rose to power by opposing the wing of .he party which would have compromised with Congress. He recently declared: "In place of our former wrong characterization of the Nationalist Government as one if national advance with which we should have a joint front we characterize it now as a Government of national surrender and of collaborators." Communism is not yet a danger in India, but the Party is likely to grow in strength .hraugh the failure of the Indian Socialist to attract the young elements of the oppositions. In Burma, the Communists continue in open civil war with the Government. They are divided into two parties, the Stalinists and the so-called Trotskyists, and while they do not seam to be receiving much aid from China they naturally benefit from the Government's futile war with the Karens. Visitors to Burma say that unless the Government can get a reconciliation with the Karens a Communist Burma may be possible as early as next summer. Iri neighbouring Siam a similar situation exists with the Communists reaping a harvest from the fight between Pibul Songram and Nai Pridi. In Malaya the British "mopping-up" operations against the Communists show no sign of coming to a close while the Reds in Indochina are still on the offensive. The Communist line in Indonesia is to denounce the Hague settlement as a conspiracy between Dr. Hatta and the Dutch to restore the old colonialism in disguise. The Cominform however, starts with a handicap since they made the mistake of rebelling prematurely against the Republican Government in September. 1948, and were suppressed—I.N.S. ,*'*? fwUl ( osl o |^i CROWN MALT EXTRACT ^ CREAM OF WHEAT (large size) ,. SOUTH AFRICAN MELON and GINGER JAM, :>-ib tins IOI.O\,\IIK BUILDERS FOOT and CHAIN BOLTS CASEMENT STAVS CASEMENT FASTENERS DOOR HANDLES CHROMIUM LOOSE-PIN BCTTS — J|" Ji. %  BARREL BOLTS: Chromium 3" lo _ ,^ and many OHirr ITt.MS of Intantt WILKINSON & IIA V\i:s CO., LTD, C S. PITCHER & CO.. Phones: 4472 & 4G87 SWi##o# iititc tails /or %  %  Iwen about the (uttlN Orwell'i brilliant IM* I ini Aldoui Huxli fying Ape and fcewiu %  nil Biitlah readers. Now comes a i i Graves—you will rell> Hurl...I'll M.iiisa'ifM books by young writers who have recently begun to appear in print. The Far Cry is by Emma Smith who at 24 has recently published her second book. In 1M8 she published i lively and amusing account jf a journey canal boat, called Maiden's The Far Cry shows her of the book jacket nf this is it to 'in • %  inembtj hlbitton at th Victoria and Al^ r( _* ,.| V bcrt Museum in linden Nearly tohavaViain* ImwwtanYtakrt L ( ; , I American boo? T^'^^moTKr^^ Claudius the Ciod Hul With *• • PfOtaoUw papar Wrappaf a ** h disaonoiniVri ml Sevra d*„ in New Crete Mr must other ? Ci.m I,., roffHaMl thl past countries—and this Int. and plui rbat Kxlui.itii.ii of book jackets has leaves his wife and takes their schoolgirl daughter to visit her Mar on a tea plantation !(<• Barvsc ^ri^^ %  %  Hiiij-i %  LONDON, (By Mail). Crime declined steadily throughout 1949 m London and prospects of a further reduction in 1950 are Rood if citizens continue to take precautions to protect their property. Shop and housebreaking decreased substantially during the year and crime graphs at Scotland Yard show that the curve twice went below the 1938 level. In January 1949, the total of all types of robbery was averaging 2,000 cases a month, but by July fell to about 900. This compared with about 1,000 in July, 1938. In the autumn the figure rose 1,400 a month, as compared with 2,000 a month in 1938. Scotland Yard believes there are four main reasons for the decrease: 1. The economic situation. Few people have enough money to pay exorbitant prices for goods in short supply. The removal of ciuthes rationing and other controls have tended to kill the black market which developed at the end of the year. 2. Many bomb-damaged buildings have been repaired and made more secure. 3 j. I n creased cooperation from the public in diallm K "999" (Scotland Yard emergency centre) when anything unusual was seen and also by taking greater precautions to protect their property. 4. The new Criminaj Justice Act has ha.i a deterrent effect on criminals who fear Ion,prUon sentence lor relatively mm „ r ol tncc > b i„ .Sio 1 0 ^ !" le of aM '"datable crimes a n rn 9 th W i a n S ,'93^J!NT rCd """ ^ W S-IUB... per It, STANSFELD. SCOTT & CO., Pecfoati ..ins Should Always WareThe Oii-c'oiiiiiig Traffic* The Advocate. i rn %  I hi naaaiia aTui Unfovtur.at.dv ihi um thin* aan a. aat•.., o .. — To the Editor, The Advocate. I -It seem* to me that Mr liibiBon Is right in his opinion thai pedestrian!, should walk on the "ie ..f Hi,^ad | 'ing traffic. I on the left side, people i—perhaps to avoid obstructions or thoughti in conversation and a slleni ou-eoming car almost on (hem—evan one step to the right Walking on the right side of the road this would not happen for they could tea all on-coming traffic ^ • w,„d> 1W „ A E bEU Paynes 6iy. t mn di mt Pa—ragert h ytetm-altSIR— May I bo p,-, raport uf ihe i -lay last, apn in your iuue ot lo-dav date. In. to the landiui of b Hip 5th instant, when two patport, a I foily puaeniera aurl visitors from ti , unable to land iu pass n mpi of Uio Bamagc Warekousc owinn to ihe fact that both berth, were blocked by lighters discharging what appeared to be passengers' baggage. The position was aggravated by the fact that a schooner was ** %  • / Tho Hullo t iu uiiiy the >• %  ii Tfauxaday, oecurred ai 5 pm. the same s rn., of the passengers To Te editor. The Adeocatf. arore returning to UM ship Just c, B ., ,„ .,„. ~ ssss s as far as the launch 'f'"" 1 ,0l,0: '" lh " c • Passenscra. on '' lc | 0 "'y mind. It has bequeathed •c" a legacy of •quaeze along the edge of the '" n "y and tradlUon unique In wharf and Into tea launch wbnh IU vef y eoncepu. had tied up below the steps. t„j_j i .a ,. _.v. ._. i hall be pleased to learn that this omission was inarel) ., prolonged oversight, though that would be a rather poor way to begin the end ut the twentieth century. HIVERS1DE REX Editor's Note: The • %  Advocate" has not broken wilh tradition nor has it changed Its policy. Our correspondent will llnd the motto above the editorial. leers. Pottery cither .can, „„ j, comTn, off the tfttrEZTSZ <""*"" n h •*•-.*'".= ,_ "* dock at the l, V > !" '^~'"J '"". '"'" diplomatic ends an being served To Ui Idltor. Th. Adoocale, •*> launch „.*„n. <'"""' oml lo, "" S1R Wh !" "ebating on Pot faatalui, ; rd Com """'" •" "' n ' hii u "" oaUMt conctlve ot thu sacrlle•—•-•'-••— awaiting a c ,,ance lo En occ *" on g'ous omission being the lollysome private whin, „. that he finish of each article was of high quality. Another feature was the %  nubility and the fact that vases and ,ugs when idlewith liquid left no damp mark. To my mind these an. parad favourably with similar ones in the London shops and I thai if pottery of thfa standard could be put on th> market ihe buying public both nera and in other places would respond accordingly. G. M. WHITE PREPARE FOR THE NIGHTS WITH WARM "1 BLANKETS Now in Stock . WHITNEY ALL-WOOL BLANKETS (Sim W>\ Colours; I'iiik, Gold uutl Fawn at IU White at $7.20 COTTON BLANKETS (Sizes: 70" x W) DA COSTA & CO., LT&I DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT. ••vs.-.'.-s.:::;:::vs. wait ot from one half lo one : from one half lo on. passengers be. house. As you ,; tnis i:: "inments on this unsatis•tate of affairs wan favourable. L .d C —., ....... ,.,„..,,„ R on i ^ ol tery in the House of Assembly 1 sec by your report (the "Advou* 0 n J Frld y Jlma "y •) that a*r. A ^,-d that as far isms al ma.ler ^ • uh "'""' '<" wond, Mw ^ Barbados most h. u"^" 00 ' v tt "> hu " by SraSDEsSsSSS •Itting mo to „„„.„ n £ uund Not on? re the dvainiiTceJour. „a henceforth to have no glare, most attrtu^bul the Thank, To flu Editor. Th.A.:, SIR. Through the medium of naif of the Inmates and StafT tif the St. PI w, word of thanks and api to all those who made it possible for us t„ Partv n A sp f c,al '"fJ must be added loCaptaln R.i Mn an d "JtcMlly lo Sergeant Archer appropriate programme of music. MADELINE BYER. Mai: oi. COOfCATTM^ FMNE SPECIAL GROCERY DEPT. DANOCRISP BVI^ lilt RAD. I** SULTANAS GATOR ItOACB' £7/ IN OUR MEAT DEPT. LAMB OX TRIPE TAILS I GODDARD'S


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    r\r,r. TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE ngwn, JANUARY CaJdh 0rfung\.?ZZ'[ Women'sWoHd 1 S!St £^5 Ui !fe H is FX rtheCuBiom-s CfBnmisslon and a number of cher KUP*'* >o Cocktails St inniwu House yesterday ev-ning. U.S. War Veteran Here I NMtAI. GEORGE VIDMEIi. Retired US. Army, is now ibados for a holiday. He %  I here recently on his first visit to the Island and Is staying a. the Mnrine Hotel. II is the father of Colonel Richard! Vjdmer of %  'Wejtley, Hocklev and a veteran of three having fourfit In the Spanish American War in 1898. the Phlllipine Insurrection 1901—4 and the first World War. 1914—18. During those wars, he received a number of decorations for M I include the D.S.C., the D.SK, Silver Star with Oak World Theatre Leaf Clatter, the Purple Heart, --^RIB reminds readers of the the Office of the Legion of Hon\^ Mrim of bro dcartJ OI ,,. ?." r r ""£?C ."" d "VL mous plays which are to be given Sunday evening over tiic "I iconaet utiat the Americans tcouia say 1/ tee • bro lc % %  *" "* .I lie retired in Ooldnllh : It will be given in 1935 and was living to Mobile. Wo Pa* *•ar* part On SunAlabama until he came out here, day January 15 from 8 3O-9.30 l that he is In love with p.m. and the second pan the l m thing here is following Sunday. The castUd should It continue to which was given in full in las) be so, he would be remaining for Sunday s Advocate — include! a year and if at the end of that Dame Irene Vanbrugh the well lime he was well satisfied, he known actress in the leading role mold sjiend the rest of hlj life together with line cast of supporting players These plays f> • %  later than 8.15 p.m. Kxtra-Mural Lectures Mr Aubre ^^ Smi h •i ITS for all the Lecture n „ Jdont Extra Mural Tutor of the 1 i ranged by the rniv crsily College of the West txtra-Mural ^partment of the ndi( s ls giving a wlk m0r lhe r College of the West i a v.' "Wakciii'W," Uuuun'i liir courtesy of th iounciL Tickets may also be ottdMd on itie opening night Course, and ii^d during half of the Course. o o o Spent X'mus in Trinidad M V1NE ALLE. gnniideast on FrlH,. January 13th in connection with t.f plays He win path r (lOldsiTiith and his play "She Stoops to Conquer." His talk will be from 7.15—7.30 o'clock. > * From New Brunswick M R. Victor F. Crosby of Crosby Molasses Co., Ltd. of St. Johns, New Brunswitk i* now V.( III. uj a. ,, W | .La* "odney holidays. Ui.e> On Holiday M IABTC CUMMINGS and ,'.n a holiday at "Cacra and is staying at (he Marine Hotel. For Further Holiday M il. J A. CORBE1L, President of the Topper I Limited, shoe manufacturers ot bank" M 'nJA-al, left lor Trinidad by lary to Mr. K. i is B.W.I.A. on Wednesday after and Ad linl tradva spending -bout ten days" holiday lB.W.1, Airway., here. He was accompanied by 0 Corbet! and they were stayM P indhei %  ,' '"•' Otmc Hn Hotel. on Mr. FM oi Mr and Mrs. C..rU-il will bo >parUn< a further holiday in frinidad as guests of Mr. and "' Mrs. Harry Farmlia before returning to Canada. > Comings and Goings M R. T. GRANT MAJOR, Canadian Trade Com truss.oner Motioned at Trinidad, left yes*m lV rday by B.W.1A. for St. Lucia. Mr. Anthony Lewis, Architect and Town Planner left for St. OF THE CABINET (By BRKNDAN KEHMI I Mi. 'ieorge Woden, novelist has been banned by Glasgow Llbrarie* Cmnmiltec because he used speecnes delivered by Cabinet Ministers to illustrate a lecture on the misuse of English. Socialist Councillor vien. of the Libraries Conu ntt tee. says that Mr. Woden took the opportunity to "make omedy criticisms of the leading Labour parliamentarians.' Mr. Woden replies: "I was trying to show that the man who wants to produce emotional results on his hearers chooses words for that purpose and not fa their actual truth." Oldest Prfcv..on Here are the quotation! Mr. Woden used and his comments which led to the ban: DR. EDITH SUMMERSKIIX Motherhood is the oldest profeiMR. WODEN: Did she really mean %  profession"? Or was the word used as a crude form of nattery'' B.B.C. ANNOUNCE.! TM Prime Minister has bouohf a cottaae in the counfry. MR. WODEN: This cottage has 14 rooms I take it the B.B.C. wanted to suggest the idea that a modest Prime Minister was buyirg a modest house. SIR STAFFORD CRIPPS said fhe pound would tieuer be devalued. MR. WODEN: Sir Stafford wanted people to be reassured. He wanted to produce certain results in people's minds and he used words for that purpose. Tory 'Vermin' MR. ANEURIN BEVAN: Tories are morse than rermin. MR. WODEN: When Mr. Beyan said thiit. he did not tell us much about the Tories, nor about bugs. Bets, lice, and rats. But in those live word his own autobiography. Ml! SIHACHEY: The aueraije diet fo-dav is in/imlvli/ be'ler (fi(i)i hrforc the war. MR. WODEN: Mr. Btracbey's job is to make statements to persuade people not to be despondent, and he manipulates statistical averages for that purpose. In this sentence what rioes* he mean by infinitely? In mathematics it means a number BO great as to be incalculable. But our diet to-day is not even ten times better than pft*w tF How Much Snoek ? MR. STRACHEY. referring to snoek, said the public had bouu'ii ait o/ it. MR. WODEN: On the same day, at a Press confer Stiacliey was asked how much moek had actually rein h.nl the public, and he confessed not so much .ihalf. shouuiH that he contradtated himself. In his anxiety to put people's minds at ease he had indeliberatcly or deliberately contradicted himself. MR CHURCHILL described Hitler as Thai bad man. Mr WODEN: This is simple English that everyone understands, and It is accurate. —L.E.S. %  %  %  ag at the M" I Weyl, Mr md iv v, i Mis Kirk Monday by th %  %  Lucia by B.W.I.A. yesterday. M ul Mr. Hugh Coxe. Branch Manao o f'*"*v "r ger ' BWI,A "*tloned at Jab.D.L. Amas Party ea, returned homo yesterday T HXRE sru .* cheerful little by B. W.IA. aiiar apeosnikg about weeks' holiday. He was aci istmas; after the *ompanied by his wife and son b> Christmas EdiFlogd and they were staying at Diary'' The itio Hotel Royal. • • • Mr Wiiii. Mr. Cameron Livingstone, AsEdmett, and there was plenty of sistant Teacher of Bay Street ) sandwiches for 'V who is 111.1kII W.IA. for Trinidad to at*nd a ing gwid in show business in Conference of the Scottish Mechanics. In Hrmorv OI \ Very l>rral Man Harold WnnemliT. taiPOUl on the radio in Britain b iy known ott ihe screen, has become a front-rank film star by his performance in "Scott of th Antarctic" of the geologist Dr. Wilson, the friend of Scot', the ;>iorer. Warrender was deeply moved recently to hear a sincere tribute to his portrayal paid to him by Wilson's sister ; in Wilson. *'I gained the impression that I was seeing my brother again," she said. Soatetimea Harold Warrender was so like him that I could not believe it was not him It was astounding— ha even walked like my brother, although of course the voice was not the same." The voice in the record of Abide With Me" heard in "Scott of the Antarctic" is that of Dam Clara Butt, and the record itself is on of the few in existence Made in February 1910 It Is now worn and scratched and at first some doubt existed whether it would be possible to use It in the film. But since a similar recording was so beloved by Dr Wilson that he played it whenever possible it was decided that his record would probably have been very worn too. and in that case the record would be authentic. WEARING a new ermine cape, bouquet of orchids Duchess of Kent at the Savoy. -thr SHAKESPEARE THE MAN AT B.C. TO-NIGHT A T "WAKEFIELD" tonight Mr. -Jubrcy Douglas-Smith will give his final lecture in the. [Shakespeare series. His subject will be "Shakespeare the Man" and he will consider some of the more recent discoveries about the great dramatist. DAkXV ( mi'iO(>l OTfc—Here's how to work It: A X V 1> I, B A A X K l I. O .\ Q I' Ml n \\ loiter BUnply stands for mi, tin ;. i n this example A Is used 1 two 'j B, etc. Single letters, aposk'ngth and formaUOB of the words are all hints E*. a? the code letters arc different. A ptogr^Ni quotaUM VP QE FCP U8JZP TCPVP FCP MQLQMPE QFEPSX ".WFB FTB I K E L 0 V I Q 8 :uitU>' Cryptosjaetoi WISIXIM IS BOTH THE FOUNDAD FOUNT OF coot) WRTTIHa HORACE. nwiiim 1 ; J %  T 5 r Fr r r r r n rr — f/ i r % %  l. H Aciu lie win %  t th • .. Je.%  .*, SlIWMd (Oil* U DlCvM. l5l As ine bam clilr Ktu-.-.dutt •aid : Tou can'l get u.)*tiere wlLhuut It/' ii tkuunta t peculiar aort of flowar. 141 Till* sovaratgn rvqulrai two crowns. (4) Music of twpa raUier ttuin daapalr. *5> Wnera lira aia broken down. 141 is. A broken t*x ,*, Uoderate. It sounds as Utouah rag* onruwunad. (0) 14) <4> Could ba a *eL:-tramea trull trea (Si 25. Check I t4) Where the O.I. will return to a card same. ,5i Thla Is a stroke of nick. IS! I hi* iieini cotietled on* %  ItouM keep it. 141 pasta Tra* with polsonoui eap (41 Soothe i4i SomeUilas complete ui iua.1. ,S>. i. autroeaed t4. this 0 ••, should lo low the olTKer commanOlu* t.n Put UiU to thai place tit t Alter thla It's second-hSi.d. iSI Name of the white hora* Napoleon lode at Water too ihU naa mar* llkelv II. (7l Bopport th* westMl need*. (Si L Horn* would call It a lark iiveyar.c* Of aotU. 13) l. Taken from Lists*. tt The brightly lit office on the top floor of thr three-storey ouilding in the i.usv shopping street did not seem a e to see a ghost. But that was where 27 year old ANGELA BENSON" repeatedly saw in In Brown. The first time the figure appeared Angela was sitting in the OlllCe with her colleague MARQABET WATSON." Margaret had just picked up the telephone to answer a call when Angela suddenly real woman sitting in a chair by the window. She seemed tall, about 30. and was dressed in brown. She got up. turned towards the window than nnlabad. "Horror" Angela saw the ghost a second time. And a third time. But the ihird time the Woman in Brown showed herself there was a tinge >f hurror to the situation. Again she appeared as though conjured up by the ringing of the telephone. This time she reached the window and tried to open it with panic determination that COUld only mean she intended to Jump out. Angela just had time to cry. "Don't open it," before the apparition Angeli saw the Wonean in thai When the girl tii.d, "Who arc it do you want'" the Woman in Brown put her lingers In her ears, cringed against the wall, and vanished. This eerie Incident convinced thai the figure was the ghost of someone killed when th,' building had been hit by a bomb. Three Farts dramatic description ft it convuiced Margaret thai i iy (or Psychical He•earoh %  boukl be called m Mr. EDWARD OSBORH U Bttetjr, who has I n the job. Ha uuickly discovered three : the bulUttng when the bonio fell hough people had been blown Z to the mm had mm the SS though some <,f the more imagina^ht they had: 3 AIKCIH was Woman %  SAID ANGELA not fooling. n Uruwii pipits real ;ts ,Z'""l b >" >WPnlistlt the girl h.,.l !,,,„ £££?" by ,our ,r ' c vntt in %  Moll women had died. One of them—an Can Wo Soil You Some CELLULAR? 30 ins. wide at 60 cts. per yd in Blue, Yellow and Green THIS IS AN EXCEPTIONAL BARGAIN! EVANS A u in II || is cident—was linked in her mind with the ringing of a telephomhell. She said that the bodies of the other three had been covered with brown blankets. To Osborn all this evidence strongly suggests that the Woman in Brown was nothing more suU than a recurrent hala in Angela's mind. Why it was so lifelike may be explained by a new discovery by British sci< I perimentlng with "brainwave" raeotxttng machines. No Such Things In his official report of the investigation just published. Osborn suggests: "It would appear that a particular combination of factors was responsible for the hallucinations: a foundation of past experiences, actual or Imagined: elements in the immediate surroundings associated with those experiences; and the general background of a building thought to have been the scene of death." A$ in Mr. Osborn't report the real Mantes of lhe women inuolued in Ihts inre;Jf>0STT.U.O Dick POWfcUl. _IKAVT" Si-'-t .tut Bfbl BMd] Hi Ruoert .pprojihes the caravan %  • There Kmt Z ~ cautiooslv, hoping lot some iin of there." he tnrn\m\ u?*l '• hi. friend Olio, but ihcre seem, to "• speak?" Ht Ji?*J i ... .... .nil i. il.._t-T. "IQd^. ~ be nobody about. When he calls Roiio about. When h. calls t^J^'"l !" iS'S^ml -;""< %  ^" 2a.". 'aeisbS^W he heirs a sliht noise inside the runnina "Oh^i ""•! rir.vin and. |etnn| on to boa. nothin. To dgT i,k %  ha puts tus ear a,n M the side, the little tx*. !" ^jfli Al ftwl Pi tie> BAKER III! MMIIMVN aoM MiwiiLKi; RIM OJ 1HL IA.\)II\ 3*SM AUTRV Njn I.KKIIF. ; —nongT GLOBE THEATRl SWrling TO-DAY at 5 & 8.:J p.m. and Cnmitim,! VAN JOHNSON and JUDY GARLAND | . in . M.G.M.'s Musical Colour Romance | IN GOOD OLD SIJMWI . with . THE GRAND ALL STAR SH0< FEATURING THE WINNERS: I SS?. E .? N GASK1N sin K'"K "Don't You Know I ( > HERMAN CRITCHLOW singing "For You" S ^T,-.. PH1LLIPS Paying "Stormv Uiather' S rtR5„ HALL sin e' n K "Irish Lullaby" ? 5a-V, S ASKY sin ln l! "I Don't See Me in Your I ,,,,^T HALI -S singing "They say thai Falling inI* "ILTON SPRINGER singing & lapping "Red Ba VELDA NICOLLS singing "You'll Never KnowSponsored by B'DOS TOP NOTCH BAKOS /i I'II ut i \ o. i tt imis Free Samples pi Zaphirin's delicious Cookies jii" ^ away lo Pairons attending Ihe ALL-STAR SHOT •J Cue.-,' Artbl GERALD BANNISTER | |M %  >:£???• Finge r on fm, da, thing, „, happening throughout the world .ad in diner.ot par* W*la7^ C ^ ,e dirTO r %  ""'"' b "' iQ Q di * 'P""' i '> i la. !" M ?!" '? b i !' k P 6 8" oa ,h !*• f buune.. througho' msVfSl Vl! C U d, n br nch ^ep u. in close touch with affair, in all |Matat lln a M. i g our office, in New York, London. Jamaica and corCtTrllad Officl mp0ma aU m J ' io '<"" %  communicauo. ^J? 1 %  **< '• ^efuUy analy,^ io r


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    FRIDAY. JANUARY IX IK* FACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON Election, Sugar Talks Blamed For Loan Flop LONDON tBv V A SENSATION v.-as caused in West Inci London when it was known, that the Jamaica three and a hall per cent loan 198-73 had turned >ut a failureAbout 90'. of the £ 2.500,000 stock offered to the put MM ,1 £3,230.000 to be raised) will be left on the hands of the underwriters who are now responsible for finding the money for the colony. BUHMU experts bUrrr-i BMInon oeer the impendini ijeneral elation in Britain and bewilderment about the WB Indiea' petition generally because of UK Taxis Want i/ore WJj Ki ar Lights Cruises On Soldiers The Yanks Are There PAKIS (By Mail) The Yanks Ar* Coming" the | battle cry of 1918. is even more appropriate to-day For as one French wag said. *s*j line from the World War I -"iiK-hii "Over There" should bn vised to The Yanks Are HereWhat set off this reminder of. two previous American invasion*" wag an American Embassy announcement that 9.980 Am. • ricans—in addition to tourist*— now reside in France. Jn 19S9. on Uw eve of the Second World War, the registered American "colony" was hardly more than 1.000 the Embassy said. Chiefly responsible for this lat, si "invasion" are the Marsha' Plan, the G.I. Bill of Rights, the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation .ind beginning this fall, the Ful%  right Bill foe approximately 2?c %  indents and professors. American veterans, still wearng flying jackets and Army boot protracted sugar negotiation* as prime causes. %  The Financial Tunes" commented: "Another factor miliuting against the success of the i>sue was the kaowkdge that a number of similar issues are bebe pending." This doss not promise well for future colonial loans Many West Indian businessmen had expected that there might be some shortfall in subscriptions but nothing like 90 per cent The issue earn* in a week during which freight rates to the West Indies had f-een raised 10 per cent. Mr Bustamante. newly re-elected t power in Jamaica, had been quoted as making some strong anti-British comments, and deadlock in the sugar talks with the Ministry of Food persisted There could hardly have been a worse background. —B.UP. LONDON. (By Mail) Hitler has started a first-class squabble between King Georges Roval Palace Guards and London'* taxi drivers. Early in the war German planes indexed the Buckingham Palace guardroom unusable and si ntries are marched to and from nearby Wellington Barracks. During the war they always earned a red rear light on their belts said one driver, but they have sincegiven up carrying this warning signal. •if they were a party of Girl Guides or Boy Scouts they d have to carry a light—or they d be pinched he said explosively. the guardroom at Wellington Barracks a 6-foot-tal. Welsh Guard sergeant ave a bellow of disgust. He pointed at a group of Guards, all round six f**t ( inches tall. "If a cabby can't see those ie, lews with bearskin hats on, he must be blind. Someumes w carry a light. Sometimes w don't." he declared. And from Buckingham Palace, a -ittle file still marches across the shadows towards Wellington barracks. . .without a lamp. about S300 a month—or four times more than her French col_ league—and is ofUjn able to find werfiow the caves <>f St Germain I luxurious apartments out of react ind Montpamssse. living in smalt of many old French families. .x-hkc hotel rooms and drinkIt prompted one Frencnman tc • ng beer on $75 a month. %  Joke 'TheAmericans are fast But the average American becoming the grand bourgeois at .nveminmt secretary earns France.'— I N | Vision Claim NORTH BAVARIA. Jan. 12Catholic Gnurch Au>.ere today banned all religious services and processions at nearbv Heroldback. Children and others claim to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary NEW YORK (By Mattj A cruise-cargo service betnen Kingston. Jamaica an I Trujuio. Dominican *., public, said to be the first sac* service will be started ua Ja_, ary 31. by the Flota Mercaatl Dominican* .Dominican — The staamship Nuevo Donu. n tea no" ha* been tianafanta from the New York-rJoaniaaiTI Republic service for the puroaa* Cruises will last 12 day*. ^^ The cruiaes wiU tsrt *„_ Miami every second S*ba*w and will continue on a vssr. round basis. On her run from Kingston to Ciudad TrujiUo, ih# vessel wiU also call at Monieao Bay. Jamaica. In addition to passengers, the ship will c,,general cargo on southbound vsy. ages .ind bananas and other csrgo northward. Before her first run on the cruise route, the "Nuevo Domi: ,f..ii<. will begin a service ttwn Miami, to Nassau, Bahamas, even second Thursday on a year-ra**g ban*, making her first run m January 19 and returning to IBami in time for her sailing on the 21st. Fares for the twelve-day ens** will ran**from 240 to 3*4 so}. )ars per person and rates fat tfc* Miami-Nassau service wiU rssge from 49 to 72.50 dollars. AU rasa quoted are exclusive of tax Tat 3.500-ton "Nuevo Dominicans" has accommodation for 177 as*, sengers. Hemember this label! IT IS ONLY PLACED ON GOODS OF FIRST QUALITY -Always ask foe MORTON < 1'iuiiiyn > PEARL BARLEY Bermuda Waiter Shortage HAMILTON (By Mall) The US. Fleet Repair ssss "Cadmus" has rasjehed Bemnna with 100,000 gallon* of water for the US .Air case at Kin Jley FieW. Water is so short thsre tkst taps operate only five hours a say. Bermuda depends entirely on rain for fresh water and December with only 2.06 inch** of aM was the driest In 17 year*. —B.UJ. EXAMINE YOURSELF CM Yoa Say 'NO' to All These Questiots? uotom RHEUMATISM? SLEErLESSNESSf HEADACHES? LOSS Of ENERGY? TOO FREQUENT %  MM II n>n.. i. -VEi-l.-i-.Wlk. Hiilimi Aa r~ • I** • **• ImilT tihlTIU-'l *rt. "• i... IMa'a Daw ,—.,1.. Famb l SLX .. 11 HtU W Ih^nLtd a." kml ai*ld| i I>I laHaii^ BaWr "•• %  • "*> •— ~" * nl .... I. I.ILC. hu .1* w*: %  ... Dodd's Kidney Pas A.S. BRYDEN & SONS (Bdos) LTD. SHI IlliSkS VflV,4 fOR THE MOR. BOOK!! Vlt HAVE A WIDE R -V CHILDREN** BOOKS TKEASl'RE ISLAND by Hobatt LouU Slevatuon RETOLD IN 4M PICTURES by Pelar Jaekaoa NANCY AT ST BRIDES by D. F Bcuee JULIET OVERSEAS by Claw Uallory DREADFUL by A Sleohan Tuna Y V)F THE PANT, CAT by Eud Blyton THEY LIVE,) LS COUNTY DOWN by Kathleen Fmpatrick THF STORY OF PETTR PAN Retold bv Daniel O'Connor THE WESTOW TALISMAN by Parcv F MaaKiaa CHAMPION OF THE MAIN by Captain I kSMMH ADV iSS2" ,lcs ArLOAT • Joan D. \lit(N All STATIOMIIV FokBURMS^ f( HI VIS PAiH notm tNMcnoM esoMoras HSAUW *•> MOSWrCH aiai'-* i .fif."i *a a*** BSh tmsssSM lArtat ocUt afl otf to"J *xp**. Atr,Mi t'laet/wd a*e" last -^to*" > eawffi tutd i" no turn. COUGH LOZENGES




    Lith Gob

    Price:

    Friday la

    January 13

    FIVE CENTS



    1950.



    Wear 55.





    ee

    URCHILL READY FOR “COUNCIL OF WAR”

    aed



    “Europe Can Be @ a ) = , | SOCIALISTS DETAILED

    One Trade Area” MartialLaw| FOR BRIEFING

    PRESIDENT TRUMAN PB metas ae Reimposed UNIONS SPLIT OVER
    ; In Egypt WAGE FREEZING

    report urging Marshall Plan countries to weld their
    LONDON, Jan. 12 |

    onomies into a “single producing and trading area” of
    70,000,000 people.
    NEW CABINET FORMED| (CONSERVATIVE Leader, Winston Churchill, )
    CAIRO, Jan. 12. returned here tonight to lead his election
    Martial Law, which was relaxed! troops into battle after a fog threatened air
    Guring the " Eayptian | Genera\| journey from Madeira, which had provoked con-

    again on the end of the re-ballot-| Siderable anxiety. The 75-year-old war leader dis-






    Soviets

    Detach

    -— American dollars had strength-
    | ened Europe’s economy to the
    ; point when the 16 aid nations
    sould take that “radical” step
    without risk, the E.C.A. (Economic
    Co-operation Aéministration) re-
    port said,
    “Aithough economic integration
    is obviously a long-term objective,





    At Left Mr. ©. E. A. BECKLES, Senior Peasant
    Instructor, discusses “Cultivation and Care of

    ing. 7 i
    ies DEGOUAN dkmne ie: Eananiainbe: fon Parvin: Seen Serene se Pe tt Ss pe embarked from a flying boat at Southampton in
    the initia Ab: ists Fruit Trees” at Fermers’ Day at Groves axation during the election : “ .

    oO ttae pe. citation of this programme, Aaphetindndh *ttnbine: ‘weatagten At Right ue. was so slight as to be scarcely fighting battle, ready for an. early Council of

    said. ‘ eo ‘aes ay . noticeable, and Foreign Press ) wri i i Laat

    Such a move would bring a Beckles’ assistant demonstrates the budding of 8 : Censorship persisted. Martial Law War with his chief lieutenants- the members of

    WASHINGTON, Jan. 12. | 00m in manufacturing and trad-{ a fruit tree. was first introduced, when Egypt the Conservative “Shadow Cabinet.

    merican Secretary of State,)iMg througuout all of Western

    ernie bene: silipiontaniciet ili aaniaintaes went to war in Palestine, but was
    Europe,

    -- — ne wmses - }
    ’ ; ; : aaa : Although Churchill’s chief col- Delegates using block . votes ap-
    retained in simplified form for} ,
    This would “immeasurably C lti t | purposes of inaaeaat security | leagues. stood by as a precaution | proved the policy by 4,263,000 to
    : i impr saile ATOKeAT V e ' vp , "1 ge i “kk ) ir 3,606,000, The Conference opened
    ng the northern en’ of hee the sale of European u 1 a : ommon wed mainly to combat undergrounc Paani ton ee =m ? | pera ree ~ Saas
    a and “attaching them to! goods in Dollar markets and activities of the now dissolvea! ion was that the ieeuGeunanke cision. postponed untid. after the
    Boviet Union. : 2 nearly satisfy” the expectations Moslem brotherhood, and also of| - : : . : ;
    . Acheson described this as) and needs of the European People

    e | e e the C ‘ ere unlikely to-night Other | General Election, but this was de-
    ka f r ree he Communists ; staal reaate
    ost significant point” and] aided by E.C.A. uit . Ss L CCO nise it nae ties with the new main election news was a sum- | feated
    Problems Still |

    “ : * y ge mons to the 390 Socialist Speaker after speaker in the
    mothing» we do or say me Wafdist Government, which op me ;
    lowed to obscure the reality

    Acheson. said in a speech
    that Russia was busy de-

    eee





























    r 2 CX , , members o : debate
    Steet Not all the efforts The E.C.A. report said that DO BARBADIANS know how e e posed Martial Law and censor-| parliament among then,
    ay geanda will ohtain ive it. | the recent devaluation of European] to cultivete fruit trees and get) hip to decide whether or no!lto a secret Geni wae
    Saly thing that all ation currencies will not by itself solve} the best results from them t ao a i e time these will be completely abolishee | briefing by cast their
    buld be through ill-conceived Europe’s basic economic problems | Statistics show that the majority Sirry Pasha, Premier of Egypt’: ] their leaders votes for the
    2 se Oe canatl tf “nor remove the shackles that are} would be compelled to say “no” 4 ee Jenende ‘aretaker Govern-|on campaig T.U.C. Poii-
    tures on your part.” . RotAaa: toe peer eee re hat he: COMMOHOS.:+)- B88 isl (By SYLVAIN MANEGOT) Independent ¢ aretaker Gove i“ 1 campaign MU.C. Poi
    eson who was addressing 1olding back International trade”.| Yesterday at Grove’s Agricultura . : rn ment, today handed his Cabinet’: | policy and cy, coms
    ‘ational Press Club luncheon|. [t made this picture of what] Station, St. George, Mr. C. E. As i COLOMBO, Jan, 12. esignation to King Farouk, who}tactiecs in plained that
    hack at critics of President} it had in mind by integration: Beckles, Senior Peasant, Agricul- THE Commonwealth Powers will grant some form 0!] hen appointed him Chief of the} London on vages re-
    an’s policy towards China “A single market within which tural Instructor, told oe pr recognition to the Bao Dai Regime in Indo-China as the | Royal Cabinet January 24 straint could
    Formosa. It wasvhis third} quantitative restrictions of the air ates I te. one ee French progressively transfer power, observers conclude Wafdist Leader Nahas Pasha,| This will be on!
    arance in three days to de- movement of goods, monetary | how it should be done. . a Fa ee ial Fes ; .. 4 whose - party won a _ landslide}the “wind ractised,
    the President’s decision not] barriers to the flow of trade Mr. Beckles said :— ; from the reported wens: OF today’s discussion at the Com ictory in the Egyptian General)! © g up there were
    md new military aid to the and eventually all tariffs are “Thousands of cocoanut, lime monwealth Ministers’ Conference here. As in the case of mections, today presented his] Meeting — of stricter méa-
    bnalist Government in For-] eliminated”. : and other citrus plants, as well China, all the powers will not necessarily move together,] Cabinet list to King Farouk the Parlia ures to con-
    p —Reuter. During the first 18 months of| as planting material of other fruit it was believed | it was the first time the twoj mentary trol profits
    the Marshall Plan, it said, the| trees are issued every year from : ~ On today’s showing India,| had met formally since an earlier | Panty, Ther Phe general
    Ini 3+, ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘odri sasants and the i iF ke, a ks ge ie } Will be mor- oO pit oO?
    * United States poured a total of] Codrington to pe asants and which was the first Commonwealth| Administration headed by Nahas} nor I fon
    a eAnD A : a" rpener: ic Jnfortunately, . Wee Wee ine ae anne al SA ; : | ale acth mong pias
    ittiey Plunges eer Western Europe gence! pupiie. rie Ram Costs 2.100 | couniry to recognise China, ap-| Pashe, wee dismissed by. the. Kina te bre ir among po
    - through direct grants and loans. ’ Seem : pears likeiy to.be the last to grant| in October 1944 Nahas Pasha, | he rr
    $ . ‘ > ‘ t F: " aturity ° : : ‘ : > . A the ) Yr ‘rvers was
    Into A River As a result, industrial production al Eee side, Te Guineas yecognition to Vietnam | who spent an hour with the King Mi Rake ' ne feet Tra
    e Dead; One Injured Se ae ret to Sieh seaeuten for this failure ot | Other highlights of today’s two] declared afterwards that the meet Pheu Mis Cinemas
    oe" war, and agricultural output in i ae oe me WELLINGTON, Jan. 12. | sessions were the agreement in| jng was “a symbol of unity be- —" pre
    “ fruit trees are :— haus. oF cnn Beer ™ Aig Re caalpondi ie s9 ister He ould (
    spite of a severe drought was at ; ; : New Zealand stud rams yle te dad Burn 1 Bl tenn i f > > Names | ’
    bados Advocate Corresponden ie ‘ : : ae wee (1) Unsuitability of sites, and naa a te gaat pring iple to aid Burt 1a th rough i ween King and tng hin oe bart Motri- alk ae
    PORT-OF -SPAIN, Jan. 12. east equal to last year. i (2) Lack of proper care and ten cuties , Bai ee | Ce mmonw enleh Loan, to which all] of his Cabinet were still awai ') gon, Socialist ey dae
    s. Rawlie Autancie Winter, attention before and after sheep sales. At. Masterton re ‘ cqesanty i ae maps mi —Reuter,| Campaign f ec -
    i re - of St. Jose anti ' Saeeae ) at aye ° | Airiea would probably contribute, awe!? avi f a
    ee ee es ore mee’ B’d De ats planting. antag at site ‘te 1,200 guineas were paid for land the ger oe aaa on a \ 4 Bos: ; ur's, Cnal :
    1 €¢ and amveo uggins, Os eC As far as the c noice of sil e 1s a Southdown ram from : ; ; fete z nen en Sh i d Shi ? \ split de- of success
    y criver, was fearfully injured concerned, this will vary with|] Roland Perry's Kohatu stud, |] eae eee oe end. enue I veloped t in the Ger
    h the jitney in which they T; e id d the particular variety of fruit oe pate ie Maus Gen! | Scuth East Asia countries by send- | zi ipy amon eral Electiot
    travelling plunged into the rintiaad tree. For example , there are land and possibly for the || ‘&them Commonwealth Technical Arrives Safely ) Britain ae ; on Febru-
    en Moracas River early this many areas in Barbados where world. A Rombey ram ear- Specialists. | 8,000,000 iry 23rd. It
    P Z 3 . v7 2 © ry a . ‘ “on % | 5 . t an ; . . ; ~'
    ing as the bridge was washed coconuts will not thrive. lier in the week fetched a Indian Prime Minister, Pandit 7 aé Trade Union Mr. WINSTON CHURCHILL, is expectec
    } In Ist. Water Polo Match Sandy Soils world price of 2,100 guineas Nehru, told the Commonwealth Al Shangh ists—most of that there
    is the worst flood that Trini- (By PAUL FOSTER), They do comparatively well on —(Reuter,) || Ministers’ Conference here today HONG KONG, Jan, 12 | them traditional backers of La- | will be a truce, until after Britain
    as had in years.

    PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 12. the free-draining sandy soils of thet no barrier against Soviet

    ag “PR 1e t ; or the Socialist Govern- | has gene to the polls.

    : ‘ The~-British ffeighter . “Elsi¢ } D0Ur-—over bi : Mn ee ees
    arbados sisively sd| the coastal districts and in the Imperialism could be effective .” ‘cessfully ran the| ment Wage Freezing Policy. The) Full force OF the discontent ot
    100 people miles along the teianthaks howe i ix one lighter soils in sheltered areas in in South East Asia until the states Moller, successfull} nation’s 187 leading Trade Unions, | 3,500,000 workers is then likely

    F ; ie A, = 2 : c Abie . : Chinese Nationalist blockade int« ro ae . A liken deeaodina : uk Tee Widen . Clade
    oseph River, the woman's tes’. The score was 6—1.'P. Pat- the higher rainfall districts. In Queen Ingrid | concerned were politically con- Shanghai this morning, the represented by delegates. at. a} to explo: n the New Govern
    was found partly covered by

    ter three hours search which










































































    : § trace 2 annister'| the heavier clay soils of some | tented, according’ to usually re+) oe terers. reporte Conference here, approved the; ment, if it persists in a wage
    ri iles terggn: 2, J. Green: 2, Ds, Tecan cies a the Scotland District, or ‘“M7e_e liable Conference Sources € hinese charyapers ro ae th Government Policy on wages by | pressing pol
    and debris on a bank miles'|;"%, Ince 1 (for the visivors). | Parts of the Scotle f , ference Source Neither the Royal Navy nor the] °° o rr Magli, gt ee
    . ivy ; the thin gravels or rab land,| ISI s us Vv The Ministers discussed Indo- s } 1¢ narrow majority of 660,000. Reuter
    ; The Trinidadians have not much| 1) the py See 7 . i+ | : seth Thien i a ship’s owners could confirm — the
    ; e@ remains of the jitney lay} jmproved from las year’s Discov- it is useless to attempt their : i : | ( hina and Burma at the morning news, but if the report is true ot
    s side in the river 300 yards| ery Tour in Barbados and notched nee. vide ws a, | dilinds suiet ot tinier aes Fogo anes ner lunch, — she is the. first British ship i 3
    stream. The driver hadjan early surprised goal by a flip ith respec o the care ana . Y 0 ma ar- | oO schemes or Economic Aid enter Shanghai since Britair P. > ol t f 2 1 B t l f Pp
    bled out and climbed the steep| shot from left-hander Anderson,| attention to be given to the; rived here to-day to see het | South East Asia. recognised the Communist Regimé re mMmeattatec ru a L 4
    2 bank after battling the strong the Trinidad skipper plants, the importance cannot be} grandfather, 91 year old King In the case of Indo-China, a China eo
    2 € 6 : t a s . Dbiattinians . - ok ee ae ote . a cs 3 | ; . } a. 7 ; ;
    ent half mile further down. In the second Test vhis after- overstressed of proper preparation Gustav of Sweden, who is ill with | @ On Page 3 | The agents for the Isbrandtsex WARSAW, Jan. 12, Frenct 1uthorities vowards the
    gaping chasm, over 50 feet] noon, MeClean and Gray will be | of the holes, provision of wind-j bronehitis and a septic throat. | ine. which owns the Unites Monsieur Pierre Marshall, aged} Polish Correspondent in Paris
    now marks the spot where | left down from the sitors }ereean 2068) eee rene | sete Drovers Se ee atons tr cightes Flyins Arrow 42, for over four years Y rre ~| Following recent expulsion and
    . arks spot where Ss. : ieee 5 cs ene : | | States fre . ying / 2, years corres~| Following it expulsion ;
    stn > aden ie : planting depth, watering, weed-| daughters, Princess Benedikte | is reagan eel ws Ven tam Gilad DA tinn Aaoe | Stel cof mela., Sao Peas nen
    on re, By Cable. | Rey ah) ing, manuring and control off and Princess Anpe Marie. She Opera Workers — baste *s hile Even reat jig Bro ron 0 night be P sp i 1 Sn M saaabahinl te
    std Ps sts and di ses will remain until Tuesday. A j alists warships wh oe - * ae ae 7 | paige ,
    pests and diseases. } ] i esday. A| f ee Ee d arreste pag 20> te ertlte soll ina Anialaaatshreitlels iin
    ; on ee | No Resignation For I propose to deal with these | a on King Gustav said that | Strike In Rome jrun the — oe — i tenaine the persion, = Apes a “ Time P ene a aa
    "a : Jafiv einisr 4 lation | he spent a res igh é a | - | pbestponed 1e departure é es aris e@ I ork ies, R , and As
    Mone NoPa ers z * sre = a ae ‘itr a anigborainre wren dete temead | > , Js 2 | Shanghai of their freighte: | to-day of the Polish Press Agency | socoated Press, Warsaw radio to-~
    Ys Pp | B a] sie P “mer to the cultivation of citrus vari. ma pe re Was. f al. | ROME, Jan. 12. | Shanghas j¢hts pending fur- | COrrespondent. Marshall lived in| night said \he arrests by French
    " oT =, ry eo koe, eee, ee z oer = a are attending him.| workers of Rome’s opera house arene os 2 : DN wy Warsaw with his wife and two! Police of over 50 Polish citizens
    7 "ee srapefrui ‘esterday, he was abs A ‘Cvies . : , arches. | ther instructions from New York 1 é h > ol : POus uizen
    d No Luggage BRUSSEL, Jan 12 4 oe t place, many peopie| the formal ee or vee from Prima Donnas oe ee re . —Reuter | Children. It is presumed that his | to-day was an act of premeditated
    ¥ a. ‘he ay - > hrs ace, any pcop + bg Me 5 € a~ Pa ¢ acks he s, came out = oo ip. " 4 ade | brutali
    The Belgian Chamber of Depu fail to realise that when they| Ment for the first time for 40 | tra and backs 8 ands, ¢ , — release or expulsion will be made | brutalivy, Bra
    T WILL SEE WORLD \ies today rejected a Communist btait lime or oF inge plant! years on strike today donee —_ upon the action, taken by the| — (Reuter.
    a a aetna Srime | Obtain a lime o ange plant!) 8. ; ss of employment all through
    FRANKFURT, Jan, 12 Minister Manton teohans Patter from the Department's nursery Renter: ae one “Instead of” “seasonal” 80 Day Voyage i ' caintaiiale etnies eteisneniainis
    i Hekzbercer ae yesterday’s Parliamentary storm | &t Codrington, that what they are employment, which provides them : i Bf PERRET EMSS SION TO MRE P IRONS IO IINNS prican ee aan leach Tae over widespread frauds said vo actually getting is a plant which OW > ki : with only six months’ work during lo A Contineuts % 2
    “World Citizer ae ber 2.”]involve leading public figures. consists of portions of two plants or ing asses ie sar x i , x
    today that he had to aban-| By 125 votes to 74, with 1 ab=| united in such a vat ee bmw . : The strike which affects 480 NEW YORK, Jan. 12. |% Here Again aa %
    his plan for a contest to find|stention, the House instead adopt- rt? eee Pan a ae Will Decide workers ‘is Indefinite, but repre-| The Cunard White Star line: 9
    girl with the sharpest}ed a Catholic Liberal motion, | * —e es i rs eerie 7 fting a "1 é sentatives of the management said|“Caronia,” 34,183 tons sailec 3
    meseel” He blamed the urging the Judicial authorities Ne ee ae Bag ia . va fe Leopold’s Fate tonight that they hoped for a | from here to-day on one of he % %
    pidity of the Bureaucrats’|speed up their inquiries into the mS or rll: ; quik solution Renter. most luxurious cruises in modern x
    the collapse of his plans, | frauds. Seereter dunt 0h: Sean BRUSSELS, Jan 12. |— |history—an 80-day voyage =‘ x 3
    : hove - al ae g j overn- | Kno as Bf ) se ee Deeg 3 aati aiie >
    a = the ae of ae ae oP ie to | grafted on to a sour orange seed-} |, ae Pet: Nap os ges. Poli Cle ey Soe thé “Great Afri-| 9 x
    arriage > . film a 1 ; ; : p ce aie al eputy for Charleroi, tolc 1€ ‘ee 7 . a ¥, >
    contest. Hekberger, 31, said|Parliament when the investiga-| ling, known then as the stock. yr ae , ee ae O1Ce ear can cruise’, the ship’s itinerary|% *
    h erger, sa . Jet ‘the’ freuae Similarly, in case of a mango Belgian Chamber of Deputies to . | 4 eT South |% %
    mas = “fe y i . auds |” at = b ; . fate i 7 + , s calls at 27 rts In Souln
    cacy” ond wer tumaba ee ae ‘ad bonds ‘that tree which has been topworked, ae ve — a Pg | eee Acera Streets peloene wae the Middle East % 8
    et ae . : , have your julie mango as the} Will not be decided in the House rica, a, etd & 4 7
    oye ae for a trio|should have been ne a nyt ‘eraited im to the ade of Parliament but “among the ACCRA, Gold.Coast, Jan, 12 and Europe, %: * FU 7 T REAM °4
    he wo Coys ay hes sdiately ¢ a is » Bre Yin oe. wee 7 ’ L 4 ee , sh amas
    rs or Nigenae ee” oon rns ae ihoaier. common mango tree as the stock. = masses . : Steel helmeted pene WONG” | ohne gag tem eT (T° x rm $
    : iggage. - i 2 ‘ . many was speaking on the] ishing long truncheons today vig-| Thomas in the 2 ee o O .
    Ne " The Reasons second day of a debate on a Bill] orously ' cleared the streets of|!ast at Southampton, Rpaiand < P W DERED %
    7 ; Py i ar rovidi * a nation-wide refer- cra, capite » Briti 7 Despite fares Tranging rom | ¥ s
    P a] 7 Some of you might be wonder providing for a nation-wide refer-| Acera, capital of the British Gold e pm & °
    Ak Hunt For IA y r Old ing why co to all the trouble off ¢ndum of the Belgian people on the} Coast Colony in West Africa, and | 32,400 a person to $20,000 for a % 9 MILK
    , growing a sour orange seedling} auestion of the provisionally exiied| arrested six men and a woman.| suite, 556 persons booked passages | .
    if 6 ‘ 9] and then bud the grapefruit on King’s return to the throne. Thirty-six more people were ar-| for the long voyage, It was estim- s
    4 U un or venture an On Page 8 He added “whatever the result|resved at Kumasi. A state of|ated that the total booking cost) ©
    e . of the discussed plebiscite the! emergency came into foree last) would reach $2,780,000. % So
    . , +. 9 -__——— — working masses will rise to oppose| night. The strike and a boycott) —Reuter,| * 7
    NORFOLK, Jan. 12. ‘ the return of King Leopold’. of British goods began on Sunday ‘oneetin a 3 %
    BRITISH AIR FORCE PLANES were today scouring Gl ri a —puter.|in support of a demonsvration for many %
    hundreds of square miles of the North Sea from Britain to orlia ' |-Bominion status and re-instate- | Toll Rates %
    he Dutch Coast for a trawler believed to be manned only * as zs ment of 61 dismissed Government Y ’ Children 8
    by the 14 v . ’ ; ’ Greek Pol ec Guard employees.—Reuter, ¥
    y the i4 year old John Guthrie, a school-boy. u l zree ice ; - NEW YORK, Jan. 12. |} x
    ee ee ‘ares 5 ‘ : : %
    . ; he ed ° | The United States Budget is| > *s
    , issin 5 ¥ B 4 eae ate te oe moans THE names of the other three U.K, U.S. Embassies EVA PERON HAD | understood to have proposed in-| are 3
    6 ir. boy lfishing boat “Girl Jean”, bound |Survivors of the “Gloria May i SUCCESSFUL OPERATION | creased toll rates for Panama ¢
    j ound I Ca l ltor “Adventureland”, He had |given as Gladston Rani, Josep , ATHENS, Jan. 12. Canal Traffic to President Tru- Thriving
    emg mt na | enough fuel on board to keep him |Kitm and Alfredo Loongoti, are Reticn, savade. snared: ee BUENOS AIRES, Jan. 12. | man after a recommendation from |
    YQLVERHAMPTON, Jan. 12 (one until to-night. Coastwatch- thought to be Gladstene Dum- Britis abd. United Sete yr Traffic was diverted {rom streets| the Governor of the Canal, the
    body of five year old Sam- | ers, ‘lighthouses, and shipping in { mett, Joseph De Rouge, Alfred ae yr rm pend er ing round a Buenos Aires’ Nursing| New York Times said today on
    Poole, missing since Xmas | the area have been warned to look | Headley, respectively, who are persed Shee’ ew 'YINS! tome today where Eva Peron, ex-| Congressional action is require‘l) %
    yy Was ‘found - a ane hate out for the missing 15 yards yel- reported “by the Barsour and gp Sat toe bets seal radio and film star, wife of the, for any change in toll rates in) ¥ o
    nm: low painted coat, Pride of Ar-|Shipping Master as being the tena tehesl y Seema with| Argentine President, had a suc-| the Canal, and the President is
    Thousands of Police throughout | broath, Scotland fishing fleet. Fast remainder of the crew of the ossen ieee cnikorel “before| cesstul operation for acute} expected to an it sean a ; Prepared iiehdes.tibe’ ie aula
    ry ” ” . s _ : tee ‘ 5 s "
    Sountry had. searched: for| motor launches were standing by alta the city war memorial to the| #Ppendicitis. : i ae —Reuter, 3 cndit of modern hygiene
    mmy since he disappeared | at strategic points along the Brit- Unknown Warrior before the| . President Peron, leading politi- " conditions of n hygiene,
    ne home at’ tea. time on | isi: East Coast, hint homes of British news correspon-| clans and ee polities! ss guaranteed by stringent tests to
    v —Reuter. x dents and in the city centre] were in attendance. Dr. Osca . a re
    “My had searched the canal | 22 Ye ar Old shouting “union”. Some were Vanissevich, Minister of Education, Tsiang Steps e absolutely pure $
    $ nome, and Police had r : temporarily detained. —Reuter.. operated. —Reuter, adel. dia
    aeged other sections. ' Woman Char ed " ——- Do r Cuba oe ;
    aod ean Vat chee, aly | Battered Body” | wi Mund Or 41 ; apr §
    nee Tie Oe: eRe ‘ ith Murde P A Isto A t “at. LAKE SUCCESS; Jan. 12
    00b a | r ope Appeals to Aristocrats) i sss. Mi.
    ae ryan } IOWA, Jan. 12 T. ie F P ~ . the eat Comment Uy. agi K ;
    5 oc SCOTLAND, Jan. 12. | A murder charge was filed to- oO Wor. or eace . Tsiang, whose expu ERED 3
    Six Bodies Searchers today found a.badly| day against a woman patient who see a ny a 9 o : x
    iv * battere body believed to be] reportedly admitted having start- VATICAN CITY, Jan. 12. | other countries : Jacob Malik, tonight agreed to) % ? Pe ee e
    Knives And Fire ‘ Mal: bound mining} ed a hospital fire, which took the Pope Pius XII to-day urged Do all you can, in such cir-] step down from the presidency. |@ LL CREA Mtg ijoce Mile x
    INDIANA. J ; ‘ ) l vhose| lives of 41 women here last Sat-| merpbers of the Roman aristo- mstances, further under- | M Malik, who walked out on the | ¥ ’ se pth t “ar x
    Bodies oj meee ‘ e and ecked ere | ul cracy to work for peace and un- |} standing and peace between men} Security Couneil | meeting oni 2
    4 > Vi'SIX people wert : Da Th né ‘ j ‘ > “ “ ne hetween ng ne and betwee nations.” The Pope]! Tuesday lemandi Dr. Tsiang’s ; &
    2) ee ter Sunda The Th Stat Attorney f Rock! defstanding between nations and betv n ior 1e Pope] Tu demanding } ~
    Peace, who brok oS Cmca. made ae keel) Hhenateicie 1% the consis- t arous Ee ision, took his seat at the | in spite of Devaluation the Price remains %
    dentifie the | te hall of the Vati Palace it ‘ < e Holy Y¢é Security CounciY again tonight|¢ >i »
    Epper! : fc New Y« udience, tt e for c ; t t ret to discuss his de is 972 1 Ib in $2 27 mm 2 Ib fin %
    He hat the woman| Pope said; “The class to which | half ivy, less weighte y 1d for, the expulsion of Dr. x %
    rt he peared to| admitted that she started the fire! you belong places you more ire bitterne in | Tsiar ‘ae ee re ree ‘ T. S. GARRAWAY & CO. LTD. ~~ AGENTS >
    , le nte ir er roor in a mental ward! quently and easily in contact with be wi g to ss a : COOP eR
    Reuter ef th pita Reuter. authoritativ versonalities of —Reuter. delegate Carlos Iblanco. —Reuter. FOOL LEE LLLP ELPLLLAPLLPLL PSE PAD PIOGOER




    vy
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    PAGE TWO

    en te enema






    IS E®CELLENCY the Gover-

    nor-and Mrs. Savage enter-
    tained thé members of the Customs
    Union Commission and a number
    of ovher guests to Cocktails at
    Government House
    evening.

    &> «>

    U.S. War Veteran Here
    4 \ENERAL GEORGE VIDMER,

    Retired U.S, Army, is now
    in Barbados for a holiday. He
    arrived here recently on his first
    visit to the island and is staying
    ai the Marine Hotel.

    He is the father of Colonel
    Richards Vidmer of “Westley,”
    Rockley ‘and a veteran of three
    wars, having fought in the Spanish
    American War in 1898, the Phillip-
    ine Insu¥fection 1901—4 and the
    first World War, 1914—18.

    During those wars, he received
    a number of decorations for
    bravery which include the D.S.C.,
    the D.S.M, Silver Star with Oak
    Leaf CidSter, vhe Purple Heart,
    the Officer of the Legion of Hon-
    our Framee, and the Crois de
    Guerre With two palms

    Generaf Vidmer told Carib yes-
    terday that after World War I,
    he retummed to the U.S.A. and
    command@d a brigade in vhe First
    Cavalry Bivision in Texas and at
    times the Division. He retired in
    1935 and was living in Mobile,
    Alabama until he came out here.

    He said that he is in love with
    vhe island, Everything here is
    pleasant and should it continue to
    be so, he would be remaining for
    a year and if at the end of that
    time he was well satisfied, he
    would spend the rest of his life
    here.

    «> «>
    To-night’s Music
    ONIGHT at 9.15 the British
    Council is presenting in iis
    regular Friday night broadcast
    extracts from Vaughan Williams’
    music to “Job—A Masque for
    Dancing.”

    This work draws its main in-
    spiration from William Blake’s
    illustrations to the Book of Job.
    Each musical selection will be
    prefaced by a description of the
    action in the ballet,

    «>

    Extra-Mural Lectures

    ICKETS for all the Lecture

    Courses arranged by the
    Extra-Mural Department of the
    University College of the West
    Indies may be obtained av “Wake-
    field,” through the courtesy of the
    British Council. Tickets may also
    be obtained on the opening night
    of gach Lecture Course, and
    students may be enrolled during
    the first half of the Course,

    < «<>

    «>

    Spent X’mas in Trinidad
    MESS IVINE ALLEYNE. Or-

    «<>

    ganiser, Housecraft Centre,

    Street. returned on Monday
    by B.W.1A. from Trinidad where
    he had pent the Christmas
    holidays,

    © °
    On Holiday
    \N RS. MARIE CUMMINGS and
    her daughter are here from
    Trinidad on a holiday at “Cacra-
    bank.” Mrs, Cummings is Secre<
    tary to MJ, K, McKenzie who is
    Secretary “and Administravive
    Manager @& B.W,I, Airways,
    “<>


    ARS. Giillemino Bancs and her
    M on Mr. Francisco Bancs of
    enezuclaswere arrivals over the
    yd=by B.W.LA. from La
    fok a holiday. They ex-
    be here for about two
    and are staying at the
    Marine Hetel,
    - + +
    M& and Mrs. T. J. Weyl, Mr.
    and Mrs. R. C. Weyl, Mrs.
    E. O'Neil and Mrs Kirk were
    arrivals on Monday
    “Fort Amherst”

    by the

    They have come

    for a holiday and are staying at
    the Marine Hotel,

    B.B.C. Xmas Party

    HERE was a cheerful little

    party in London at the B.B.C.
    just before Christmas; after the
    recording of the Christmas Edi-
    tion of “West Indian Diary”. The
    10st was the producer of the pro-
    gramme, diminutive Mr. Willie
    Edmett, and there was plenty of
    beer and sandwiches for every-
    body. Among the guests was Miss
    Mona Baptiste, of Trinidad, a very
    forceful personality who is mak-
    ing good in show business in
    England

    \

    n
    Guaira
    pect

    weeks

    DAILY CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it:



    yesterday

    ee



    ea

    | POCKET CARTOON |
    , 6 OSBERT LANCASTER



    the
    Americans would say if we
    asked ‘em to pick up Mr.

    “1 wonder what

    Stanley at Tel Aviv?”

    - World Theatre
    ARIB reminds readers of the
    seriés of broadcasts of fa-
    mous plays which are to be given
    each’ Sunday evening over the
    local . broadcast beginning cn
    Sunday, January 15. The first
    play to be broadcast will be “She
    Stoops to Conquer” by Oliver
    Goldsmith, It will) be given in
    two parts—the first part on Sun-
    day January 15 from 8.30—9.30
    p.m. and the second part the
    following Sunday. The cast—
    which was given in full in last
    Sunday’s Advocate — includes
    Dame Irene Vanbrugh the well
    known actress in the leading role
    together with a fine cast of sup-
    porting players. These plays
    which were mostly originally
    broadcast over the BBC Third
    Programme were recorded by the
    BBC Transcription Service for
    use overseas. As the local radio
    service are making use of these
    recordings, reception should be
    excellent.

    The British Council are arrang-
    ing for “Wakefield” to be open
    at the times given above so thut
    anyone who is unable to listen at
    home may join a,listening group.
    Those wishing to take advantage
    of this should be at “Wakefield”
    not later than 8.15 p.m.

    Mr, Aubrey Douglas Smith,
    Resident Extra Mural Tutor of the
    University College of the West
    Indies is giving a talk over the
    local broadcast on Friday evening
    January 13th in connection with
    the series of plays. He will speak
    on Oliver Goldsmith and his play



    “She Stoops to Conquer.” His
    talk will be from 7.15—7,30
    o'clock,

    «> «>

    From New Brunswick

    R. Victor F. Crosby of Crosby

    Molasses Co., Ltd. of St.
    Johns, New Brunswick is now
    over here for a holiday. He came
    in last week by the “Lady Rodney”
    and is staying at the Marine
    Hotel.

    «<> «>

    For Further Holiday
    R, J. A. CORBEIL,, President
    of the Topper Footwear
    Limited, shoe manufacturers ot
    Monyeal, left for Trinidad by
    B.W.LA,. om Wednesday after
    spending about ten days’ holiday
    here. He was accompanied by
    Mrs, Corbeil and they were stay-
    ing at the Ocean View Hotel,
    Mr. and Mrs, Corbeil will be
    spending a further holiday in
    Trinidad as guests of Mr, and
    Mrs. Harry Farinha before return-
    ing to Canada,

    «> «>

    Comings and Goings

    R, T, GRANT MAJOR, Cana-

    dian Trade Commissioner
    svationed at Trinidad, left yes-
    terday by B.W.LA. for St. Lucia.

    Mr. Anthony Lewis, Architect
    and Town Planner left for St.
    Lucia by B.W.1.A. yesterday,

    Mr, Hugh Coxe, Branch Mana-
    ger of B.W.LA, svationed at Ja-
    maica, returned home yesterday
    by B.W.1.A, after spending about
    two weeks’ holiday, He was ac-
    companied by his wife and son
    Floyd and they were staying at
    vhe Hotel: Royal.

    oe * *

    Mr. Cameron Livingstone, As-
    sistant Teacher of Bay Street
    Boys’ School and Mr, Darnley
    Clarke of the Central Foundry
    Limited, left yesterday by
    B.W.LA, for Trinidad to atvend a
    Conference of the Scottish M
    chanics, ..

    AXYDLBAAXR,

    is LONGFELLOW
    One letter simply stands for another, In this example A is used
    ‘ three L's, X for the two o's, etc. Single letters, apos-
    M * the length and formation of the words are all hints.

    lay the code letters are different.

    A Cryptogram Quotation

    CPEP QE FCP USIEP

    iTIK=-MQLQMPE QF
    UIVFE—LOQVIQS.

    urday'’s Cryptoquote:

    TOCOPV? .- Fee

    EPSX OWRPB FTB

    WISDOM IS BOTH THE FOUNDA-

    TION AND FOUNT OF GOOD WRITING—HORACE,

    Distributed by King

    Se





    Features Syndicate

    li You Some









    BANNED!

    ‘ HE MADE FUN

    OF THE CABINET
    (By BRENDAN KEMMET)

    Mr. George Woden. novelist



    has been banned by Glasgow Li- |

    braries Committee because he
    used speecnes delivered by Cab-
    inet Ministers to illustrate a lec-
    ture on the misuse of English.
    Socialist Cvuuncillor Jack Da-
    vies, of the Libraries Committee,
    says that Mr. * Woden took the

    opportunity to “make comedy
    criticisms of the leading Labour
    parliamentarians.’

    Mr. Woden replies: “I was try-
    ing to show that the man who
    wants to produce emotional re-
    sults on his hearers chooses
    words for that purpose and not
    for their actual truth.”

    Oldest Profession
    Here are the quotations Mr.
    Woden used and his comments
    which led to the ban:—
    DR. EDITH SUMMERSKILL:
    Motherhood is the oldest profes-

    MR. WODEN: Did she really
    mean “profession”? Or was the
    word used as a crude form of

    ttery?
    EC. ANNOUNCER: The

    Prime Minister has bought a cot-
    tage in the country.

    MR. WODEN: This cottage has
    14 rooms. I take it the B.B.C.
    wanted to suggest the idea that a
    modest Prime Minister was buy-
    irg a modest house.

    SIR STAFFORD CRIPPS said
    the pound would never be de-
    valued.

    MR. WODEN: Sir Stafford
    wanted people to be reassured.
    He wanted to produce certain re-
    sults in people’s minds and he
    used words for that purpose.

    Tory ‘Vermin’

    MR. ANEURIN BEVAN:
    Tories are worse than vermin.

    MR. WODEN: When Mr, Beyan
    said that, he did not tell us much
    about the Tories, nor about bugs,
    fleas, lice, and rats.

    But in those five words he tells
    his own autobiography.

    MR. STRACHEY: The average

    diet to-day is infinitely better
    than before the war.
    MR. WODEN: Mr. Strachey’s

    job is to make statements to per-
    suade people not to be despond-
    ent, and he manipulates statistical
    averages for that purpose.

    In this sentence what does he
    mean by infinitely? In mathe-
    matics it means a number so great
    as to be incalculable.

    But our diet to-day is not even
    ten times better than pre-war,

    How Much Snoek ?

    MR. STRACHEY, referring to
    snoek, said the public had bought
    all of it.

    MR. WODEN: On the same
    day, at a Press conference, Mr.
    Strachey was asked how much
    snoek had actually reached the
    public, and he confessed not so
    much as half, showing that he
    contradicted himself.

    In his anxiety to put people’s
    minds at ease he had indeliberate-

    ly or deliberately contradicted
    himself.
    MR. CHURCHILL described

    Hitler as That bad man.

    Mr. WODEN; This is simple
    English that everyone under-
    stands, and it is accurate.

    —L.E.S.



    CROSSWORD



    Across

    1. Seems the winning crew have
    this over the losers. (4)
    Seaweed gone to pieces, (5)
    As the bath chair attendant
    said : “ You can’t get anywhere
    without it.” (4)
    Sounds a peculiar sort of flower,

    ‘his sovereign
    crowns, (4
    hope

    c
    despair. (5)
    » Where lies are broken down.

    (4) 15. A broken star. (4)
    .» Moderate, it sounds as though
    Tage consumed. (9)

    . To net this ls not manly. (4)
    . Epithet for pantomime rela-
    tions. (4)

    23. Could be a well-trained fruit

    tree. (8) 25. Check! (4)
    26. Where the G.I. will return to

    a card game, (5)
    27. This is a stroke of iuck. (5)
    28. This being collected one should
    keep it. (4)

    Down

    Tree with poisonous sap. (4)
    Soothe. (4)
    Something complete in \tsef.
    (5). 5. Bngrossed. (4)
    Happen this dog shouid follow
    the officer commanding, (3)
    Put this to that place. (7)
    After this it’s second-hand.
    Name of the white horse

    4.
    8

    Es

    requires two
    rather than

    FE2 = #eN

    —e—

    The tyro loves to supply this
    winter sports area. (5
    Conveyance of sorts. (3)

    . Taken from Liege. (3)

    #8 Sen



    CELLULAR?

    30 ins. wide at 60 cts. per yd.

    in Blue, Yellow and Green

    THIS IS AN EXCEPTIONAL BARGAIN !

    EVANS

    1606

    «A

    DIAL

    iii)

    WHITFIELDS

    41220

    }



    4

    |
    ee

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    ee

    Women’s World





    WEARING a new ermine cape, bouquet of orchids—the
    Duchess of Kent at the Savoy.



    Ghost In Brown Sat

    In My

    Office

    SAID ANGELA

    The brightly lit office on the
    top floor of the three-storey
    concrete building in the busy
    shopping street did not seem a
    likely place to see a ghost. But
    that was where 27 year old AN-
    GELA BENSON* repeatedly saw
    the Woman in Brown.

    The first time the figure ap-
    peared Angela was sitting in the
    office with her colleague MAR-
    GARET WATSON.* Margaret had
    just picked up the telephone to
    answer a call when Angela sud-
    denly realised there was a third
    woman sitting in a chair by the
    window.

    She seemed tall, about 30, and
    was dressed in brown. She got
    up, turned towards the window,
    then vanished.

    “Horror”

    _ Angela saw the ghost a second
    time. And a third time. But the
    third time the Woman in Brown
    showed herself there was a tinge
    of horror to the situation,

    Again she appeared as though
    conjured up by the ringing of the
    telephone, This time she reached
    the window and tried to open it
    with panic determination that
    could only mean she intended to
    jump out,

    Angela just had time to ery,
    “Don't open it,” before the ap-
    parition disappeared,

    Angela saw the Woman
    Brown ten times after that.

    When the girl cried, “Who are
    you? What do you want?” the
    Woman in Brown put her fingers
    in her ears, cringed against the
    wall, and vanished.

    This eerie incident convinced
    Angela that the figure was the
    ghost of someone killed when the
    building had been hit by a bomb,

    Three Facts

    Angela’s dramatic description
    of it convinced Margaret that
    the Society for Psychical Re-
    search should be called in.



    in

    Mr. EDWARD OSBORN. an
    officer of the society, who has
    hunted many ghosts, agreed to

    take on the job.

    He quickly discovered
    Significant facts: —

    ky Nobody had been killed in
    ~ mulding Ween the bomb fell

    ough people had beer ow 5
    bits outside, pee

    2. None of the other 17 e
    . " =] 20ple
    in the firm had seen the aol
    though some of the more imagina-
    tive thought they had:

    3. Angela was not fooli

    ing.

    When the Woman in Brown =
    peared she seemed as real as
    reality itself,
    Then, by hypnotising the girl
    and asking her questions, Osborn
    found she had been deeply im-
    pressed by four tragic events in
    which women had died.

    One of them—an air-raid in-
    acetates

    three

    etna tegrated ener eee amen areca inaretonr coe npor—etaeeti neem pate sateen mantininmreodinoi oma eet





    MATS.: To-day & To-morrow 5

    EVERYTHING FOR

    : including :

    @ CANE BILLS
    @® CUTLASSES
    @ PLANT KNIVES
    @ SHOVELS

    @ GALVANIZED BUCKETS
    ® BRASS WOVEN WIRE
    ® STENCIL INK AND BRUSHES
    ® SEWING TWINE

    @® PACK

    +

    BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON

    FACTORY



    AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

    BETTE DAVIS and ROBERT MONTGOMERY in

    “JUNE BRIDE”

    with FAY BAINTER and BETTY LYNN

    A Warner Bros. Picture

    eee nen
    ne eet

    cident—was linked in her mind
    with the ringing of a telephone
    bell. She said that the bodies of
    the other three had been covered
    with brown blankets.

    To Osborn all this evidence
    strongly suggests that the Woman
    in Brown was nothing more su-
    pernatural than a recurrent hal-
    lucination in Angela’s mind.

    Why it was so lifelike may be
    explained by a new discovery
    reported by British scientists ex-
    perimenting with “brainwave”
    recording machines.

    No Such Things

    In his official report of the in-
    vestigation just published, Os-
    born suggests: “It would appear
    that a particular combination of
    factors was responsible for the
    hallucinations: a foundation of
    past experiences, actual or im-
    agined: elements in the immedi-
    ate surroundings associated with
    those experiences; and the gen-
    eral background of a_ building
    thought to have been the scene
    of death.”

    * As in Mr. Osborn’s report the
    real names of the women involved
    in this invegtigation have been
    replaced by pseudonyms to pre-
    vent personal distress.

    L.E.S.

    To-morrow |
    NIGUT
    DINE & DANCE

    «| At i-
    4

    CLUB
    MORGAN










    THE GAYEST SPOT IN
    THE CARIBBEAN !

    The Club Morgan Orchestra
    and

    PETER LACY

    at the Piano for continuous
    Entertainment,







    DIAL 4000 FOR RESERVA-
    TIONS.

    p.m. : To-Night to Tues. at 8.30

    NEEDLES

    LIMITED.

    she said. Sometimes Harold
    _|Warrender was so like him | Rollo’s name there is no reply, but
    that I could not believe it was] he hears a slight noise inside the running.
    not him. It was astounding— J] caravan and, getting on to a box, nothing to do
    he even walked like my brother,} he puts his ear against the side, the little. beare

    .| “Abide With Me” heard in “Scott










    oan ky SEANUARY







    13, 1954 | ig

    Children’s Corne,®

    upert and the Ca n
    | Im Memory Of A | feszay oe ie
    | Very Great Man

    Harold Warrender, famous on
    the radio in Britain but scarce-
    ly known om the screen, has be-
    come a front-rank film star by
    his performance in “Scott of the
    Antarctic” of the geologist Dr.
    Wilson, the friend of Scott, the
    great explorer. Warfender was
    deeply moved recently to hear
    a sincere tribute to his portrayal
    paid to him by Wilson’s sister
    Miss Ida Wilson,

    “T gained the impression that
    I was seeing my brother again,”

    A TESA INARI Ser

    ~ wr



    Rupert approaches the caravan
    cautiously, hoping for some sign of
    his friend Eallo, but there seems to

    be nobody about, When he calls






















    although of course the voice was
    not the same.”
    The voice



    in the record of

    Advertise In The—

    “EVENING ADVOCAT

    Increasing Circulation Every ¥

    DROSPE POSS SPSS POS OFS POPS OOS CSO ones

    PORTRAITS AND PICTYR

    By Mrs. DOROTHY McAVITY, F.Rg 4, _ 7

    of the Antarctic” is that of Dame
    Clara Butt, and the record itself
    is one of the few in existence
    Made in February 1910 it is now
    worn and scratched and at first
    some doubt existed whether it
    would be possible to use it in the
    film. But since a similar re-
    cording was so beloved by Dr
    Wilson that he played it when-
    ever possible it was decided that
    his record would probably have
    been very worn too, and in that
    case the record would be authen-
    tic,

    Ot



    will be on view at the

    DRILL HALL

    Saturday and Sunday, 14th & 15th January,
    between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. a

    SHAKESPEARE .THE MAN
    "AT B.C. TO-NIGHT

    T “WAKEFIELD” vonight Mr.
    -~ubrey Douglas-Smith will
    give his final lecture in the

    Shakespeare series. His subject e

    will be “Shakespeare the Man” | \

    and he will consider some of the] % ADMISSION — 1/-
    more recent discoveries about] a

    ras ti 4 . 2
    the great dramatist Two landscapes in oils are to be sold by silent

    and another one raffled during the Exhibition, —
    ALL PROFITS ARE FOR THE BARBADOS §pp

    8.30
    and Mon.

    TO-NIGHT To Mon,
    Sun.,
    5 p.m.
    Universal Presents . :
    Bud ABBOTT—Lou

    Mat. Sat.,

    “OSTELLO—Dick POWELL . POO SSOP OOPS SOS Anns
    “IN THE NAVY” +

    Andrews Sisters and others
    Music—Comedy—Romance.

    Z.
    A POO SPOS PF SSOOOVION


















    ROYAL (WortHtings)

    To-day to Mon. 5 and 8.30
    United Artist Presents...
    Mickey ROONEY—Peter LORRE



    Starting TO-DAY at 5 & 8.30 p.m. and Con

    in

    “QUICKSAND”

    VAN JOHNSON and JUDY GARLAND
    Bee
    M.G.M.’s Musical Colour Romance

    ‘IN GOOD OLD SUMMERI

    ot. We

    THE GRAND ALL STAR SHO

    FEATURING THE WINNERS:

    DOREEN GASKIN singing “Don’t You Know IG
    HERMAN CRITCHLOW Destin “For You”

    CED. PHILLIPS playing “Stormy Weather”

    EDDY HALL singing “Irish Lullaby” s
    REG. CASEY singing “I Don’t See Me in Your ye
    NELL HALLS singing “They say that Falling in
    HILTON SPRINGER singing & tapping “Red }
    VELDA NICOLLS singing “You’ll Never Know”

    Sponsored by B’DOS TOP NOTCH BAKERS
    ZEPHIRIN BAKERIES —

    Free Samples of Zephirin’s delicious Cookies giv@
    away to Patrons attending the ALL-STAR SHOW

    with
    Barbara BATES—Jeanne CAGNEY



    > ¥ SS 9S9999S9999908S SOOSS
    »~

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    To-day to Tues. 4.45 and 8.30
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    fence In

    10 years.

    o Views
    Modena
    " ooting

    EX VALENTINE)
    MODENA, Jan. 12

    g memcers of the
    liament to-day said
    4 had proof that the

    dH first in the Modena
    ry battle last Monday,

    workers were killed.
    of 20 Communist and
    Socialist senators and
    lade the report on their
    quiry into the incident.
    oting occurred when
    ed to force their way
    1 foundry closed down
    agement. The manage~
    ‘said that it was no
    ible to run the works

    hions protested against
    as “necessary” and
    aggravation of already
    ployment.”

    e report states: “The
    io requires one to
    this group of work-
    f them former partisan
    ore expert in the use
    , threw hand gren-
    lance of not more than
    d yet did not injure
    nen. “Two policemen,
    hospital after the in-
    shown by hospital
    he suffering from
    ainly not the type of
    ed by grenades.”

    t Menacing

    to all this is the fact
    It soil around ‘the cross-
    no grenade explosion
    fact that the work-
    hot down on the rail-
    ows that they had not
    d the point, where
    ght reasonably claim
    menacing the factory.”
    ry commission headed
    mist leader, Palmiro
    denied this. Their
    s based on the hearing
    eye-witnesses, and a
    ographs stated to have
    on the scene by a

    government-appointed
    Modena, Dr. Musco,
    to-day repeated his
    tement that the dem-
    ad thrown bombs first.
    hat material captured
    lee afterwards of the
    prs included five un-
    hand grenades, 106
    leeper bolts, and 26
    gels.

    that the Police open-
    © prevent their own
    further endangered.”
    —Reut”

    ny And Japan
    Join I.W.A.

    LONDON, Jan. 12.
    -Nation International
    neil, which met pri-
    to-day, is considering
    by Germany and
    bin in the International
    sement. A _ statement
    bly be issued at the
    Talks, expected later
    Germany has a rep-
    at the Talks, but Japan,
    Kesman stated a case
    lusion at a meeting
    of last year, is not
    at the present ses-

    Bc1tX-NATION COMMITTEE
    ip Council today approved the critical defence
    fin the agreement it is drafting for Italy to govern
    mer colony of Somaliland, until it attains independ-

    AY, JANUARY 13, 1950



    Vations Approve Italy’s
    | Responsibility For

    Somaliland

    GENEVA, Jan. 12
    of the United Nations

    —————* , All delegations passed the fol-

    lowing text, which was largely
    derived from the original italian
    draft:

    (1) The administering au-
    thority (Italy) may main-
    tain Police forces and raise
    volunteer contingents fot
    the maintenance of peace
    and good order in the ter-
    ritory.

    (2) The administering yau-
    thority, after consultation
    with the (United Nations)
    Advisory Council, may es-

    tablish installations and
    take all measures in the
    territory, including the

    progressive development of
    Somali Defence Forces,
    which may be necessary
    within the limits laid down
    in the United Nations
    Charter, for the defence of
    the territory, and for the
    maintenance of Interna-
    tional peace and security.”
    Strong Pleas

    This draft clause will be sub-
    mitted to the full Trusteeship
    Council, when it meets here later
    this month to debate the Somali-
    land Committee’s work.

    In only two and a half hours
    of peaceful debate, the Defence
    clause was approved after Brit-
    ain and France had made strong
    pleas for Italy to have adequate
    scope for organising Somali
    Defence.

    The Ethiopean delegate asked
    Italy for an assurance that she
    had no intention of sending armed
    forces to Somaliland which would
    be superior to those already there
    under the temporary British
    administration,

    Italian delegate, Enrico Cerull,
    replied: “my answer is that Italy
    has not the slightest intention
    of going beyond that number, arid
    would be only too happy if we
    could maintain order with smaller
    forces.

    “This is a statement I make
    on behalf of my government.” In
    reply to another Ethiopian request
    that proposed, Italian Defence
    Measures be first submitted to the
    Three-State United Nations Ad-
    visory Council to be established
    in Mogradsu, Italy at onee agreed
    that this provision be written
    into the draft clause.

    The Dominican Republic dele-
    gate, Senor T. Franco, said: “We
    do not know what the complica-
    tions are that may arise in inter-
    national life. The only thing we
    must insist on is that the forces
    must not be excessive for the
    needs of External Defence.”

    British delegate, John Fletcher-
    Cooke, could not agree with the
    Iraq view that Somali’s geo-
    graphical position made it unne-
    cessary to provide for her defence.

    —Reuter.

    Legislature Opens
    In Jamaica—And
    The Crowd Boos

    KINGSTON, Jamaica, Jan. 12

    A crowd booed as Sir John
    Huggins, Governor of Jamaica
    inspected a Guard of Honour and
    a band played the British National
    Anthem before the opening of the
    island’s new Legislature here to-
    day.

    The boos continued during the
    preliminary ceremony. Sir Noel
    Livingston was re-elected Presi-
    dent of the Legislative Council.

    Prime Minister Alexander Bus-
    tamante’s Labour Party, which
    won 17 of the 32 parliamentary







    ae

    ALSO OBTAINABLE

    IN



    i ee














    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    Se tell: Al
    SA WA \
    A

    \ hy \\
    /M AN

    RIVAL

    CHARMERS

    AT COLOMBO





    Commonwealth

    Will Recognise
    Bao Dai Regime

    @ From Page t
    main problem affecting the Com-
    monwealth is the political decision
    whether to recognise the Bao Dai
    Regime at Vietnam.

    The argument for Recognition
    is that the alternative to Bao Dai
    Regime is certainly the Vietnam
    Regime under Ho Chieh Minh
    and the “Communisation” of
    Indo-China.

    The Minister asked to curtail
    the afternoon meeting by half an
    hour to enable four of their num-
    ber to receive honorary degrees at
    a Colombo University ceremony.
    They are British Foreign Secre-

    tary, Ernest Bevin, Pandit Nehru,
    Lester Pearson, a Canadian
    External Affairs Minister, and

    Philip Noel-Baker, Britain’s Com-
    monwealth Relations Secretary.
    The Conference will end on
    Saturday morning, the Secretary
    of the Ceylon External Affairs
    Department told correspondents
    today.
    —Reuter.

    Stocks Drop
    After 7 Months

    NEW YORK, Jan. 12.

    Stock prices plunged one to
    three dollars a share late today
    under heavy selling. The decline
    started without warning sbout one
    hour before the market’s close.

    Trading was so heavy that the
    stock exchange resorted to the
    highly. unusual procedure of
    “flushing” paces from the floor of
    the exchange. This was done
    because the highspeed ticker tape
    was glutted with quotations and
    fell Behind as much as eight min-
    utes in recording actual transac-
    tions.

    A quick survey of leading
    brokerage houses disclosed that thé
    selling was not influenced by any
    particular news.

    Brokers were inclined to term
    the move as a “natural reaction”
    following a seven-month rise.
    Grains and other commodities
    weakened in sympathy with stocks.

    —Reuter.
    reats in iast month’s voting,
    elected the Speaker and five

    ministers including the Premier
    himself.

    The 13 people’s National Party
    (Socialist) members and an in-
    dependent with Socialist leadings
    refrained from voting.

    a —(Reuter.)

    Eee

    GREEN & TRANSPARENT.



    British
    Submarine
    Sinks

    AFTER COLLISION

    THE HAGUE, Jan. 12.
    According to a message picked
    up here from the Dutch steamer
    “Almdijk” the British submarine
    “Truculent” has sunk northwest
    of Redsand Tower between Four

    Buoy and East Pile Buoy.

    The message goes on “have
    picked up five survivors believe
    submarine was in collision with
    Swedish ship “Divina.” Please
    keep lookout for further surviv-
    ors.” The message was signed
    Master.”

    The “Almdijk” is a freighter
    of the Holland-Amerika Line
    (8,286 tons) on its way from New
    Orleans to Rotterdam.

    The British submarine “Trucu-
    Ient” is one of the 25 “T” class
    submarines with a displacement
    of 1.575 tons. She carries a crew
    of 59. The “Truculent” is equip-
    ped for 42 days patrol and is be-
    lieved to be fitted with “Snoren-

    er” equipment which enables
    her to take in air when sub-
    merged.

    Other men on board could be
    saved if rescue work were fast
    enough, Dutch Shipping Sources
    said,

    Thev said it was a matter of get-
    ting at the men in the sunken
    vessel before their air supplies
    gave out.

    The Truculent was sunk in col-
    lision with the Swedish freighter
    Divina, which left the port of
    London today.

    At least 15 British sailors were
    entombed helow the waters of the
    Thames estuary tonight. The
    tight for the life of the men waiting
    helplessly in the Truculent began
    immediately British naval vessels
    steamed to the disaster spot.

    Lifeboats and other craft are
    searching for more survivors, The
    submarine’s hatches were closed.

    —Reuter.

    Hungary Claims
    Right To Own
    Opinion
    —ON GERMANY

    BUDAPEST, Jan. 12.

    Hungary told the British Gov-
    ernment in a note delivered to
    the British Legation here tonight
    that she has an “indisputable and
    equitable right” to express her
    opinion on the future of Ger-
    many. “The formation of the
    socalled German Federal Repub-
    lic is a fact which the Hungarian
    Government and public cannot
    but observe with the utmost anx-
    icty’, the note said. Hungary
    has drawn from her history the
    conclusion that a German state
    which follows a reactionary and
    aggressive policy constitutes a
    constant menace to her peace
    and security.

    “Such reactionary forces have
    now come to power in Germany
    not by the will of the people but
    by that of the British, United
    States and French Governments.”
    — (Reuter.)



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    Trinidad Issues
    Up A Few Pennies

    LONDON, Jan. 12.

    London’s Stock Exchange is in
    the grip of election uncertainty
    and promises to continue so until
    the result is known. Business Tn
    domestic issues was again small
    and movements today were gener-
    ally to lower levels. Some observ-
    ers are expecting revival of
    interest ir overseas issues but at
    present there are very few signs
    of such a happening.

    There was however firmness in
    Internationals. Overnight bright-
    ness on Wall Street encouraged
    some,.marking up in the United
    States group. Gains were frac-
    tional.

    Trading in British funds com-
    prised mainly of switching. Long
    dateds were sold and proceeds re-
    invested in shorts.

    Down frend in industrials
    lengthened as the day progressed
    and produced small losses in most
    of the groups. Tobaccos and brew-
    eries were particularly dull

    Oils were hesitant and closed
    with some irregularity in price
    movements. Trinidad issues were
    a few pence better.

    Local selling of kaffir freestaters
    gave the section an easier trend.
    The market was looking steadier
    at the close when some buyers
    came in at lower levels.

    —Reuter.

    Wanted 43
    Tons Of Gold

    LONDON, Jan. 12.

    Britain is considering with the
    United States and France how to
    get from Portugal 43.9 tqns of fine
    gold, looted by the Germans and
    deposited there during the war,
    a Foreign Office spokesman said
    here today.

    Britain maintained that the gold
    should go to the Commission for
    the restitution of looted monetary
    gold, set up under the Paris
    Agreement of 1945 in Brussels, he
    said.

    The matter had been referred
    to the Allied Governments, he
    added.

    The spokesman said the Portu-
    gold was

    looted, —Reuter.

    Will Stancardise
    Europe’s Labour
    Accounting

    WASHINGTON, Jan. 12.

    Labour statisticians from at
    least 10 of the 16 Marshall Aid
    countries will visit the United
    States this winter and spring, the
    Economic Co-operation Adminis-
    tration announced today.

    The visits are designed to assist
    Marshall Plan Nations in arriving
    at a common method of reporting
    cost of living, wages and hours,
    and employment and productivity
    data. The European statisticians
    will work in the U.S. Bureau of
    Standards. The first of three
    teams will leave for America this
    month. It will inelude repre-
    sentatives from Britain and the
    three Scandinavian countries. The
    other groups expected to arrive
    in April and June will . include
    representatives f r o m Austria,
    Belgium, Western Germany, Italy,
    and the Netherlands.

    :














    BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
    CORPORATION . LTD.

    Caribbean May

    Grow More Fibres

    LONDON, (By Mail)

    An increasing world shortage
    of jute and the promising devel-
    opment of jute substitutes such
    as Kenaf, with the possibility
    that they can be grown
    British Caribbean among
    areas, are factors behind
    journey to the U.S. of a three-
    man Fibre Mission which has
    just left Britain. The Mission will
    spend a month in the U.S
    and Cuba and will study and dis-
    cuss fibre production problems,
    including mechanical methods of
    harvesting and decortication, with
    officers of the U.S. Office

    Foreign and Agricultural Rela-
    tions and other departments and
    organisations interested in the
    production of fibres.

    The team consists of Mr. J
    Bradley, of the National Insti-
    tute of Agricultural Engineering
    (Ministry of Agriculture); Mr.

    in the}
    other |
    the |

    A.)

    of!

    PAGE THREE

    REDUCTIONS

    ON

    Franco
    ReceivesPeru’s
    Ambassador

    MADRID, Jan, 12.
    Marshal Eloy G. Ureta, new
    Peruvian Ambassador to Madrid,
    today presented his credentials to
    Generalissimo Franco in thd!
    National Palace here. |
    Marshal Ureta and his suite
    drove through Madrid’s central
    streets in horse drawn state

    LADIES’ COATS
    & WOOLLEN
    SWEATERS

    Quite an Assortment



    coaches which had not been used}
    since the days of the monarchy '
    and escorted by Franco’s Moor- |
    ish guard. }

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    REDUCED PRICES

    AT THE

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    SHOPPE

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    i



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    “every hour

    of the day



    R. H. Kirby, of the Colonial Pro- |

    ducts Advisory Bureau and Mr
    J. S. Oliver.

    The object of the visit js to
    further the experimental work
    which has already been conduct-
    ed in certain British Colonies to
    find out whether certain indus- |
    trial fibres can be grown andi}
    processed economically under
    Colenial conditions

    The cost of the visit will
    met from Marshall Aid Funds
    The team will visit the Ever-
    glades Agricultural Experiment
    Station in Florida They vill
    also visit Cuba to examine the
    methods of cultivation, harvest-
    ing and decortications ot Kenaf

    being developed there.—B.U.P.
    Cominform Spy
    Sentenced To Death
    —IN YUGOSLAVIA

    BELGRADE, Jan, 12
    A Yugoslav Court today sen-
    tenced a man named Sali Lisi to

    death for spying on behalf of the}

    Cominform, and carrying out
    versive acts.

    Another accused Ahmed
    was sentenced to 20 years by the
    District Tribunal at Skoplje trying

    sub-

    five Albanians and five Yugoslavs |
    on charges of spying and subver-
    sion,

    This is the first time a Comin-
    formist has been sentenced to|
    death for such activity in Yugo-
    slavia.

    Other defendants, all of whom}
    pleaded guilty to similar charges,
    received sentencés varying from
    18 to 5 years hard labour, and loss

    of citizen rights.

    In his final speech, the public
    prosecutor had said that the trial
    showed what “criminal methods
    are being used against our country
    to force it into servile obedience
    to the U.S.S.R.”

    It proved also that the Alban-
    ian Government had become
    puppet” to the Cominform cam-
    paign, and was concentrating more
    on hostile activities against Yugo-
    slavia than on improving the lot
    of its own people.

    He said that the trial had showed
    up the subversive activity of the
    Belgrade.
    Secretary Risa Hodza had soto
    the
    “jllegal groups”, and had collected
    compromising material on people

    Albanian legation in

    the initiative in organising

    with “dark pasts” like himself
    who were to be recruited

    slay citiz

    Pere |

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    them. Half the defendants were
    Albanian and the other half Yugo- .

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    PAGE FOUR





    Published by The Advocate Co. Ltd., 34, Broad St., Bridgetown

    Friday, January 13, 1950



    Divergencies

    THE decision to set up, a Working
    Committee to study the Japanese peace
    treaty problem is an indication that the
    opinions of Commonwealth countries on
    the question are so varied that it has been
    found impossible to reach any conclusion
    at Colombo.

    This divergence of opinion was not un-
    expected having regard to the fact that
    some of the representatives of these coun-
    tries were viewing the matter through
    Asiatic eyes while the others could only
    see it from the European viewpoint. ~

    India was willing and eager to bring
    about a quick settlement of the Japanese
    issug on terms favourable to the quick
    economic recovery of Japan with provision
    being made for the early withdrawal of
    occupation forces and the re-institution of
    politicial self determination.

    Canada had adopted’ a neutral approach
    to the matter with one eye focussed on the
    United States of America.

    On the other hand Australia, as was ex-
    pected, stands in fear of a rehabilitated
    Japan which without adequate safeguards
    might in the next generation attempt once
    more to. dominate the East and to find an
    outlet for her surplus population in the
    Dominion.

    While South Africa would not be im-
    mediately affected by a prosperous and
    independent Japan, yet on racial grounds
    she is inclined to line up on the side of
    Australia.

    The varied approaches to the Japanese
    peace treaty by Commonwealth countries
    are understandable, especially in the case
    of Australia and will be sympathetically
    viewed. Australia with a population of
    seven million people living on an area of
    nearly three million square miles is at-
    tempting to maintain a standard of life
    which is much higher than that in the sur-
    rounding territory and it is obvious that
    if the door is opened to the settlement of
    millions of Asiatics in the Dominion, the
    whole fabric’ of her economic structure
    which has been built up at such great cost
    will be destroyed,

    No doubt in subsequent meetings of the
    Working Committee the differences will be
    ironed out and a uniform policy adopted.



    Another Rub

    IT WAS announced by reliable sources

    in London during the week that the naval
    *base at Bermuda will probably be closed

    in the interest of economy. This is pre-
    sumed to be part of a decision by the
    British Admiralty after examining all the
    naval services with the object of reducing
    expenditure,

    This is another aspect of the effects of
    devaluation on the West Indies. The closing
    of the Bermuda Base will considerably re-
    duce the number of persons employed from
    other islands and consequently, the dis-
    bursements to their homes,

    It is estimated that there are about 265
    Barbadians now employed at the naval
    base in Bermuda and the fact must be
    faced that it might not be possible to place
    them all in other employment in Bermuda.
    If this cannot be done it will mean that
    many of them are likely to return home to
    swell the ranks of unemployed.

    This is extremely unfortunate for us in
    view of the recent announcement by the
    Labour Commissioner that the prospects
    of employment in the United States of
    America, the main source of relief in this
    direction in recent years, were not as rosy
    as in the past.

    The cut in the appropriations of the
    fighting services at the time of devaluation
    although made in London has now made
    its effects felt in the West Indies.

    OUR READERS SAY:
    Wipanenecemai ne



    Pedestrians Should

    To the Editor, The Advocate,



    NT Sesh essseseseenasesssnnvensnnnensesinsesens
    $$ $$ ee

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    Australia Attracts Overseas

    Australia is receiving a healthy
    stimulus by an inflow of over-
    sea capital. That is the text for
    the following article, written by
    Professor T. Hytten, economic
    adviser to the Bank of New South
    Wales, for a finance supplement
    of the Sydney Daily Telegraph

    OVERSEAS capital has, been
    flowing into Australia in a fairly
    steady stream ever since the end
    of the war.

    It has come in the form of
    money transfers through the
    banks for investment in Austra-
    lian companies or Government
    bonds, in the form of plant and
    equipment to establish or expand
    subsidiaries of overseas compan-
    ies, and some, has seéped in
    through the internal accounts of
    larger businesses.

    Much’ worthwhile technical
    knowledge has come with the
    money inflow. This in itself is a
    capital asset.

    Added to this investment ow-
    ing into Australia are funds such
    as dividends on shares owned by
    overseas inv rs, which nor-
    mally are transferred out of the
    country, but which have been left
    in Australia for reinvestment.

    To estimate with any aceuracy
    the volume of this private over-
    seas investment is not possible,
    but obviously it has been en a
    large scale. It has helped tempor-
    arily to increase the level of Aus
    tralia’s overseas currency re-
    serves, it has contributed in no
    small way to the pressure on
    share markets, and it has hastened
    industrial development.

    Some estimates have placed the
    total capital inflow as high as
    £100,000,000 in 1947—48, and there
    was no noticeable decline in
    1948—49.

    If the figure of £100,000,000 was
    correct only a part was invested
    directly in new industrial devel-
    opment, for official estimates
    place the total figure, including
    Australian-financed development,
    at only £74,000,000 in 1947 and
    £93,000,000 in 1948; the forecast
    for 1949 is £98,000,000.

    But even if most of the inflow-
    ing funds did not directly inspire
    industrial development they could
    do so indirectly by stimulating an
    easy-money situation.

    Quite an important share has
    been used to purchase ‘existing
    businesses,

    As with most economic trends
    there is no single simple explan-
    ation of the current wave of over-
    seas capital investment in Aus-
    tralia. But these are some of the
    chief factors:

    (1) In a_ troubled post-war
    world Australia has appeared to
    many harassed overseas investors
    as an oasis of calm prosperity.

    (2) Australia is the second
    largest industrial producer within
    the sterling area and as such has
    immediate entry to most sterling
    and soft-currency markets.

    (3) Australia seems to have
    long-term possibilities as an ex-
    port base for Eastern markets.

    (4) Overseas companies with
    interests in Australia are now ful-
    filling plans for expansion which
    were vemporarily delayed during
    the war.

    (5) The possibility of an appre-
    ciation of the Australian pound
    has attracted “hat money” to
    Australia, and so has possibly
    the talk of a depreciation of the
    pound sterling.

    (6) Investment opportunities in
    the Far East, South Africa, and
    some other countries have reced-
    ed during the period.

    (7) Elimination of double tax-
    ation on British-Australian in-

    Literary Newsletter|

    Several recent novels have
    been about the future. George
    Orwell's brilliant 1984 for in-

    Stance and Aldous Huxley’s terri-
    fying Ape and Essence, both
    made 4 deep impression on British
    readers. Now comes a new story
    by Robert Graves—you will re-
    member his fascinating descrip-
    tions of life during the early
    Roman Empire in I Cladius and

    Claudius the God, But with
    Seven days in New Crete Mr.
    Graves has forsaken the past

    and plunged into a
    improbable future.

    There is a picture of a goddess
    surrounded by various votaries
    on the jacket of this book and
    this gives a clue to the theme
    of the novel. For the New Cre-
    tan community is really a reviva!
    of the Bronze Age way of life—
    a society dominated by women
    but still with a barbaric and
    primitive side to it. A young
    poet of our own time appears
    in New Crete and, after a promi-
    sing start is horrified to find him-
    self involved in ritual murder
    and cannibalism. He is much
    trelieved when he is able to re-
    turn to the twentieth century.
    Robert Graves is a poet himself
    as well as a novelist so it is not
    surprising that his central char-
    acter carries conviction; while
    his profound knowledge of the
    myths of the past is used to give
    a satiric edge to this extravagan-
    za of the future.

    somewhat



    { e j

    Capita
    vestments has made them more
    attractive.

    (8) Nationalisation of certain
    British industries has released
    British funds at a time when out-
    lets elewhere are limited or
    blocked.

    (9) Many British and European
    manufacturers, traders, and other
    people with some investment
    funds desire to emigrate and
    escape from the present frustra-
    tions of their part of the world.

    One could add a number of
    other influences, but these are
    sufficient to show that whatever
    we have done or omitted to do
    in Australia to make investment
    here more attractive, factors
    completely beyond our control
    have almost certainly been re-
    sponsible for the major share of
    the capital inflow.

    One more rather interesting in-
    fluence is at work: the desire of
    American concerns to establish
    trading and manufacturing bases
    within the sterling area.

    This movement is akin to the
    movement after the Ottawa agree-
    ments in the early ‘thirties, when
    American interests began, to
    develop a base within the British
    Empire s@ as to take advantage
    of British preferential duties.

    Now with Canada in the dollar
    area, Australia provides one of
    the few possible bases within the
    sterling area.

    Guessing the real sources of
    the capital inflow is even more
    difficult than estimating its
    volume,

    Clearly, however, most of the
    solid long-term industrial capital
    has come from the United King-
    dom and the United Staves largely
    through established trading and
    manufacturing connections.

    The Prime Minister (Mr.
    Chifley) recently pointed out that
    in the first three post-war years
    overseas interests participated in
    226 of the 2,404 new manufactur-
    ing projects announced in Aus-
    tralia.

    Of the 226 ventures involving
    overseas capital, United Kingdom
    interests were connected with 129,
    United States interests with 87,
    and interests in other countries
    with 10,

    On a money basis an earlier
    survey revealed that established
    Australian industrial enterprises
    with a capital expansion pro-
    gramme of £103,000,000 included
    in this amount ‘about £16,000,000
    to be obtained from the United
    Kingdom and £13,000,000 from the
    United States.

    Entirely new enterprises plan-
    ning a capital programme of
    £141,000,000, involved about £15,-
    000,000 from the United Kingdom
    and £5,000,000 from the United
    States.

    Such figures, of course, include
    many projects which for one
    reason or another will not come
    to fruition, but may have omitted
    others of which little is known.

    The period over which the
    capital expenditure will actually
    be expended is also uncertain and
    the estimates themselves may be
    faulty.

    But they do seem to indicate
    that, on a money basis, overseas

    interests may be contributing to b

    the current wave of Australian
    industrial development something
    approaching 20 per cent. of the
    capital involved. Some 12 per
    cent. is of United Kingdom origin,
    while eight per cent, comes from
    the United States.

    By
    Richard Mansfield

    Mention of the book jacket of
    this novel brings me to an ex-
    hibition at the Victoria and Al-
    bert Museum in London, Nearly
    every British and American book
    has a protective paper wrapper—a
    custom not followed in most other
    countries—and this International
    Exhibition of book jackets has
    proved both popular and enlight-
    ening. The difference in design
    and production between different
    countries is clearly visible; for
    instance, whereas the United
    States use their covers mainly as
    small posters to advertise the
    book, British publishers primar-
    ily consider their decorative
    effect. The jackets from other
    parts of Europe are often very
    beautiful, particularly the French
    editions de luxe. United King-
    dom publishers have been using
    some of the best contemporary
    artists to design for them; the
    work of Graham _ Sutherland,
    John Piper and Keith Vaughan
    among others is represented.

    It is always interesting to sur-
    vey the new authors and to try
    to decide which of them will
    write the classics of the future—
    interesting but risky. Whatever
    the future may hold I have nc
    hesitation in recommending some



    Apart from this specifically in-
    dustrial capital considerable sums
    of personal and institutional in-
    vestment funds have flowed into
    Australia, particularly during
    1948, seeking safe refuge and, in
    some cases, hoping for a wind-
    fall profit if the Australian pound
    should appreciate.

    On the whole it would seem
    tHat the inflow of capital has con-
    tributed to the other inflationary
    forces which have been affecting
    the Australian economy during
    the three years.

    Bt induced investment which
    has been effective and has helped
    to increase vhe volume of goods
    coming on to the market must
    be regarded as 2x offsetting factor.

    On the Stock Exchanges the
    continued pressure of newly
    arrived capital seeking investment
    has been felt for some time,
    has apparently helped to obscure
    the weakening pressure from local
    sources, but oe could
    be over-em' .

    One fact concerning the capital
    inflow must oF ee 2
    In sending r money
    machinery or industrial-secrets to
    Australia most overseas investors
    anticipate regular withdrawal of

    income,

    Thus, while the Australian
    Government is reducing the
    annual service on the public debt
    by paying off loans in London,
    the cost of servicing private in-
    vestments is increasing.

    But. fortunately some of the
    overseas investment is likely to
    increase Australian exports, or
    reduce the need for imports, so
    that on balance we should ultim-
    ately be in a better position to
    meet the future outflow of income
    on the investments.

    American investments pose
    special problems. Because of the
    inability of this country to balance
    its dollar payments against its
    dollar receipts, any increase in
    interest and dividends flowing to
    America could possibly be embar-
    rassing.

    But that is no reason for offici-
    ally discouraging or even prohib-
    iting new American investment
    here. Surely we should let the
    American investor take the risks
    of future inconvertibility or ex-
    change instability if he wants to
    do so. We are the gainers in in-
    dustrial knowledge and, industrial
    strength,

    While predicting developments
    in delicately balanced matters
    like international capital move-
    ments is unwise, some reduction
    in the rate of inflow experienced
    in the last few years in Australia
    does seem likely.

    In industry, for instance, Aus-
    tralia obviously has reached tem-
    porarily a state of unbalance
    between the basic industries like
    coal, steel, and electric power, and
    the numerous consumer goods in.
    dustries depending on them.

    Overseas industrialists will
    realise the practical difficulties in
    further expansion until production
    in the basic industries is stepped
    up or demand in certain other
    directions is reduced.

    Reduced demand hardly seems
    likely when public works pro-
    grammes totalling several hun-
    dred million pounds, including
    some urgent projects, are about to

    devaluation on Australian ex-
    change, there will be some outflow
    of the “hot money” that has come
    in during the past two years, but
    it should not be sufficient to
    worry us. »



    books by young writers who
    have recently begun to appear in
    print. The Far Cry is by Emma
    Smith who at 24 has recently
    published her second book. In
    1948 she published «a lively and
    amusing account of a journey
    on a canal boat, called Maiden’s
    Trip. The Far Cry shows her
    to have a really important talent.
    The plot is no more thar an ac-
    count of how a disappoinved man
    leaves his wife and takes their
    schoolgirl daughter to visit her
    sister on a tea plantation. He
    dies and the elder daughter is
    killed, while the younger one
    stays on. No more than that; yet
    without our knowing why this
    small stretch in the lives of four
    simple people is made vital and
    interesting.

    _ Miss Smith herself made a
    journey across India to the As-
    samese tea plantations when she
    was working in a documentary
    film unit, and without this first-
    hand experience the book woula
    never have been written, Like
    so many other young writers
    Miss Smith evidently needs to
    “go places” in order to find the
    inspiration for her work. Mr.
    Somerset Maugham realised this
    necessity recently when he offered
    an annual] scholarship to a young
    writer on condition that he spent
    at least six months of the year out!
    of Britain; Miss Smith received
    one of the first awards,





    and|been making threats to

    egin,
    With the decision on sterling;



    eR



    Nehru Is Cominform
    Target

    THE formation of “liberation armies” to
    carry out an armed struggle in colonial
    areas of Asia and Australasia was de-
    manded by Liu Shao-chi, vice-president of
    the Communist-controlled World Federa-
    tion of Trade Unions, in a speech at the
    recent Peking conference. International
    News Service herewith presents a survey
    of current Red tactics in various sections

    of Asia. ,
    By James E. Brewn

    ELATED by their sweeping victory in
    China, Far Eastern Cominform agents have
    all the nationalist
    non-Communist leaders in Asia. :

    Chief target for their abuse, of course, 1s
    Pandit Nehru who is becoming the greatest
    living symbol of the free world in the Far
    East.

    munist party in India has been passing
    eed crisis, and some of the ablest lead-

    and the dominant figure, is Balehand Trim-
    bak Ranadive, the son of a Bombay Income
    Tax Commissioner.

    Ranadive’s family belonged to the Brahmo
    Samaj, the Hindu reformist sect, and Rana-
    dive rose to power by opposing the wing of
    the party which would have compromised
    with Congress.

    He recently declared: }

    “In place of our former wrong characteri-
    zation of the Nationalist Government as one
    of national advance with which we should
    have a joint front we characterize it now as
    a Government of national surrender and of
    collaborators.” f

    Communism is not yet a danger in India,
    but the Party is likely to grow in strength
    thraugh the failure of the Indian Soeialists
    to attract the young elements of the opposi-
    tions. ‘

    In Burma, the Communists continue in
    open civil war with the Government. They
    are divided into two parties, the Stalinists
    and the so-called Trotskyists, and while they
    do not seem to be receiving much aid from
    China they naturally benefit from the Gov-
    ernment’s futile war with the Karens.

    Visitors to Burma say that unless the
    Government can get a reconciliation with
    the Karens a Communist Burma may be
    possible as early as next summer,

    In neighbouring Siam a similar situation
    exists with the Communists reaping a har-
    vest from the fight between Pibul Songram
    and Nai Pridi.

    In Malaya the British “mopping-up” oper-
    ations against the Communists show no sign
    of coming to a close while the Reds in Indo-
    China are still on the offensive.

    The Communist line in Indonesia is to
    denounce the Hague settlement as a con-
    spiracy between Dr. Hatta and the Dutch to
    restore the old colonialism in disguise. The
    Cominform. however, starts with a handicap
    since they made the mistake of rebelling
    prematurely against the Republican Govern-
    ment in September, 1948, and were sup-
    pressed.—I.N.S.

    Crime Drops In U. K.

    By Fred Doerflinger

    LONDON, (By Mail).
    _ Crime declined steadily throughout 1949
    in London and prospects of a further reduc-
    tion in 1950 are good if citizens continue to
    take precautions to protect their property.

    Shop and housebreaking decreased sub-
    stantially during the year and crime graphs
    at Scotland Yard show that the curve twice
    went below the 1938 level.

    In January 1949, the total of all types of
    robbery was averaging 2,000 cases a month,
    but by July fell to about 900. This compared
    with about 1,000 in July, 1938. In the autumn
    the figure rose 1,400 a month, as compared
    with 2,000 a month in 1938,

    . Scotland Yard believes there are four main
    reasons for the decrease:

    1. The economic situation. Few people
    have enough money to pay exorbitant prices
    for goods in short supply. The removal of
    clothes rationing and other controls have
    tended to kill the black market which devel-
    oped at the end of the year,

    2. Many bomb-damaged buildings have
    nem nies made more secure,

    + Increased cooperation i
    tn dialluae ana" Pp from the public
    centre) when anything unusual was seen
    also by taking greater precautions to a
    their property.

    e new Criminal Justice A i
    a deterrent effect on criminals whe ‘a -
    prison sentences for relatively minor offences

    The monthly rate of all indic '

    in 1949 was 10,500 compared wi
    a month in 1938—IN.$. * SPout 8,000







    Always Face The On-coming Traffic






























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    SIR,—It seems to me that Mr.
    Gibson is right in his opinion that
    pedestrians should walk on the
    right side of the road to face
    on-coming traffic.

    Walking on the left side, people
    so often step out towards the
    middle of the road—perhaps to

    avoid obstructions or thought- W.

    lessly—whilst in conversation and
    a silent on-coming car almost on

    them—even one Step to the right ed

    “— be fatal,

    alking on the right side of
    the road this would not happen
    for they could see all on-coming

    ‘traffic.
    A. E. :
    Windy Ridge, wat
    Paynes Bay.

    Landing Passengers

    To The Editor, The Advocate,

    SIR,—May I be permitted to
    correct a statement attributed t
    me in your report of the Char.-
    ber of Commerce Council pro-
    ceedings on Wednesday last, ap-
    bearing in your issue of to-day’s
    date. ;

    Referring to the landing of






    passengers at the Baggage Ware-

    house, I stated that on Thursday,
    the 5th instant, when two pas-

    Senger ships were in port, a
    launch bringing ashore between
    thirty and forty passengers and
    visitors from the Golfito” was
    unable to land its passengers at
    the landing steps of the Baggage
    arehouse owing to the fact that
    both berths were blocked by
    lighters discharging what appear-
    to be passengers’ baggage.
    The position was aggravated by
    yor fact that a schooner was
    either going on or comin p
    dock at the time. etn
    The launch accordingly made
    fast alongside the ‘Lord Com-
    bermere”, awaiting a chance to
    go alongside the steps. As this
    would have entailed a wait of
    from one half to one hour, the
    passengers became impatient and
    climbed ashore via the tw«
    ernment water vessels,
    through a fenced off
    and so into the Baggage War
    house. As you correctly stated,
    their comments on this uns:
    factory state of affairs were 1
    favourable,

    ) gov-
    thence

    enclosure








    Unfortunately the same thing
    occurred at 5 p.m. the same day
    when some of the passengers
    were returning to the ship, Just
    before the launch came along-
    side another lighter pulled into
    the landing steps to discharge
    baggage, and completely blocked
    both berths as far as the launch
    was concerned. Passengers, on
    this occasion, were forced to
    squeeze along the edge of the
    wharf and into the launch which
    had tied up below the steps.

    Had the lighter pulled up to the
    top of ,the landing steps there
    would have been room for the
    launch to move into the lower
    berth. It was on this occasion
    that I spoke to the policeman on
    duty at the steps, but it appears
    that he had not the
    authority to take action

    These might have

    necessary



    traae, I am sure everyone will
    t Uus state of affairs
    orrected
    T. BOWRING
    C/o DaCosta & Co., Ltd.,

    A



    Where Is The Motto ?

    To The Editor, The Advocate,

    SIR,—As far back as I can re-
    member reading the “Advocate”
    I have inseparably and integrally
    associated with it the gravidly
    earnest motto; “For the cause etc.,
    etc. To my mind, it has bequeathed
    to the “Advocate” a legacy of
    dignity and tradition unique in
    its very concepts,

    Indeed I find it rather intriguing
    to conjecture what strategic and
    diplomatic ends are being served
    by this glaring omission; for I
    cannot conceive of this sacrile-
    gious omission being the jolly-
    horse of some private whim or
    fancy.

    What I find even more appalling
    is the failure to supply an adequate

    substitute
    s stitut or any



    Substitute for

    Journalism in Barbados must be
    & Sorry pass if our leading organ
    wnet characterize itself with
    fitting motto indicative of its

    Or is it the policy of the
    “Advocate” henceforth to have no





    policy? IT shall be pleased to lear
    that. this omission was merely ‘

    prolonged oversight, though that

    would be a rather poor way to
    begin the end of the twentieth
    century.
    RIVERSIDE REX.
    Editor's Note: The “Advocate”
    has not broken with tradition
    nor has it changed its policy.
    Our correspondent will find the
    motto above the editorial.

    Local Pottery

    To the Editor, The Advocate
    SIR,—When debating on Pot-
    tery in the House of Assembly I
    see by your report (the “Advo-
    cate of Friday January 6) that
    Mr. Allder remarked that as far
    as he knew of his Barbadian pub-
    lic there was no definite liking
    for the use of their local pottery.
    I wonder if Mr. Allder saw the
    collection of pottery shown by
    Mr. Brannam at the Exhibition in
    1948? These exhibits reached a
    standard not yet attained by local
    potters in the island. Not only
    were the designs, colours and
    glazes most attractive, but the







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    finish of each article was of high GOUDA cH ey, “ine BREAD,
    quality. Another feature was the CURRANTS » per Ib, SULTAN.
    greater durability and the fact GATOR ROACH!

    that vases and jugs when filled
    with liquid left no damp marks,

    To my mind these.articles com,
    pared favourably with similar
    ones in the London shops and §
    feel suve that if pottery of this
    standard could be put on th:
    market the buying public both
    here and in other places would
    respond accordingly,

    G. M. WHITE.
    ‘ Thanks

    To The Editor, The Advocate,
    SIR,—Through the medium of

    your paper please let me, on be-

    half of the Inmates and Staff of

    fine Flavor, fer



    IN OUR MEAT DEPT.

    LAMB

    OX TONGUES | VEAL CHOPS

    the St. Philip's Almshouse, say a | OX TRIPE we?

    ah ot thanks and appreciation ee = ~—
    © all those who made it possible BRETROOT “ARROTS

    for us to have our Xmas Party | BEANS CARROTS .

    ; CAE +E
    A special word must be —"

    to Captain Raison and his men |

    especially to Sergeant Archer |

    who conducted such a fine and

    appropriate programme of music.
    MADELINE BYER,

    Matron. |

    added |

    GODDARDS}

    6669099
















    *

    FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1950



    Antigua Hail
    Record Crop

    Antigua’s cotton crop for 1949
    was a record one and it is ex-
    pected that this year’s crop will
    be just as good, Hon’ble E. A.
    Thompson, Federal Treasurer of
    the Leeward Islands with head-
    quarters in Antigua told the
    “Advocate” yesterday.

    Hon. Thompson came in recent-
    ly by BWIA for the Customs
    Talks and is staying at the Ma-
    rine Hotel.

    He said that Antigua had some
    very welcomed showers of rain
    last year whieh greatly affected
    the sugar crop and it is anticipat-
    ed that-one of the largest crops
    amounting to about 30,000 tons
    will be reaped this year,

    The Antigua Beach Hotel which

    was closed for about six months,
    was re-opened on December 20
    and they were looking forward
    to a good tourist season.



    32,000 Bags
    2 e
    Of Animal Feed
    , °
    Arrive

    Over 7,400 bags of oil meal
    from Montevideo and 25,442 bags
    of pollard from Rosario arrived
    at Barbados yesterday by Ar-
    gentine s.s. “Rio Araza”’.

    This is the first visit to the
    island for the “Rio Araza” which
    operates under the Flota Mer-
    cante Del Estado line. Vessels
    of this line make occasional calls
    here from Argentine with feed.

    S.S:. “Rio Araza”’, 3,565 tons
    net, under Captain Gracian, ar-
    rived via Trinidad. On board
    were 15 intransit passengers and
    a crew of 49.

    Messrs Gardiner Austin & Co.
    Ltd, are local agents.



    Fresh Fruit In
    Good Supply

    Fresh fruit, chiefly oranges.
    have been coming into the island
    steadily for the past two weeks.
    Yesterday, a call was made from
    Dominica by the “Caribbee”
    which brought 107 casks,
    crates and two boxes of this
    commodity.

    These were quickly unloaded

    and removed from the waterfront
    to the various consignees who
    will in turn distribute them to
    hawkers, -
    . Also brought here by the
    “Caribbee” were nine crates of
    tomatoes, 45 bags of copra, empty
    puncheons, rum casks, barrels
    and drums,

    Messrs Schooner Owners’ As-
    sociation are the vessel’s agents.



    Police Boat
    Sold For $365

    With bids coming from only
    two people, the three Harbour
    Police boats set up for sale by
    auction, were quickly disposed of
    yesterday, one of them bringing
    as high as $365.

    Two of these boats were car-
    ried off by Mr, L. Hoyte and the
    other by Mr. M. Austin. Few
    people attended the auction. but
    within 15 minutes, it was all
    over,







    MONEY MISSING

    THE loss of cash and certain
    articles to the value of $13.90 was
    reported by Clarence Grant of
    Greenfield, St. Michael.

    Grant stated that his house at
    the same address was broken and
    entered Wednesday and the arti-
    cles and money taken.

    60} A.

    | Patricia Here
    For Docking

    TEN passengers arrived yester-
    day by the 239-ton (net) M.V.
    “Lady Patricia.”

    Among them were Mr. Freder-
    ick A. Casson, merchant of St.
    Vincent and owner~of the “Lady
    Patricia”, accompanied by Mrs.
    Augusta Casson, both of . whom
    have gone to stay at the Windsor
    Hotel. Also Mr. and Mrs. Cecil
    Nicholls. Mr. Nicholls is an elec-
    trician. He and his wife are stay-
    ing at Dr. Cato.

    The “Lady Patricia” came to
    Barbados mainly for dry docking.
    Cleaning, painting and all neces-
    sary minor repairs will be effect-
    ed before this vessel sails» again
    for St. Vincent.

    On July 18 last year, the “Lady
    Patricia” came: here to load rum
    for Nassau. On that visit, it ar-
    rived under Captain Mulzac while
    this time it is under the command
    of Captain King.



    Knitting Mill
    Machinery Here

    PART of the machinery for the
    new knitting mill to be erected by
    the West Indian Knitting Mills
    Co., Ltd. arrived on Monday by
    the Alcoa “C. G. Thulin” from
    New York and the remainder is
    expected shortly Mr. Ernest Saun-
    ders, one of the directors of the
    company told the “Advocate”
    yesterday. ;

    He said that the company had
    recently acquired the business
    premises formerly occupied by
    Messrs. Johnson’s Stables and
    Garage, Coleridge Street for the
    housing of the plant. They are
    now making certain renovations
    and hope to start production early
    next month.



    Bodily Harm
    Costs 30/-

    A FINE of 30/- to be paid in
    14 days or in default one month’s
    imprisonment was imposed on
    Edridge Chandler of Bank Hall
    yesterday by His Worship Mr,
    . J. H. Hanschell for inflicting
    bodily harm on Florra Reeves on
    November 10,



    Bicycle Damaged
    In Accident

    THE front wheel, handle bar
    and head lamp of a bicycle owned
    and ridden by Ruby King of Brit-
    tons Hill, St. Michael were dam-
    aged in an accident on Wednes-
    day.

    The accident occurred at the
    junction of Nelson and Welling-
    ton Streets at about 5.25 p.m, be-
    tween the cycle and a horse drawn
    cart owned and driven by Prince
    Yard of Bonnetts, St. Michaci
    The right shoulder of the horse
    was bruised,

    5/- For Assault

    JOSEPHINE HINDS of Deane’s
    Village was ordered to pay 5/-
    in 14 days or in default undergo
    seven days’ imprisonment by His
    Worship Mr. A. J. H Hanschell
    yesterday for assaulting Enid
    Connell on November 20,



    FINED EIGHT SHILLINGS

    JOSEPH MAYNARD of Hall’s
    Road was fined 8/- in seven days
    or seven days’ imprisonment by
    His Worship Mr. A. J. H. Han-
    schell yesterday for blackguard-
    ing on Fairchild Street on Sep-
    tember 27.



    ee PORT:— Yawl Potick, Aux. Ketch
    ander, Sch. Molly N, Jones, Schooner
    Manuata, Sch. Philip H. Davidson, Yacht
    Maya, Yaw! Stortebecker, Sch. Sunshine
    R., Sch, Mary M. Lewis, 5.8. Ganymedes,
    Sch. Hazell Scott. Sch, Frances W. Smith,
    ner Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Em-
    anuel C. Gordon, Sch. Reginald N. Wal-
    +» Schooner Mandalay II, Sch, Marea
    Henrietta, Swedish Barquentine Sunbeam,
    it Beegie, Sch. Princ: ise, M.V,

    ita, Schooner oepavour Ww.

    A A
    Argentine S.S. “Rio Araza,” 3,565 tons
    net, Captain Gracian, from Trinidad.
    Agents: Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd,

    Im Carlisle Hay

    M.V. “‘Caribbee,"’ 100 tons net,
    Gumbs, from Dominica.
    er Owners’ Association.

    Capt.
    Agents: Schoon-

    M.V. “Lady Patricia,” 239 tons net,
    Capt. King, from St. Vincent. Agent:
    D. L. Johnson, Esq.

    DEPARTURES

    8.8. “Ittersum," 3,199 tons net, Capt.
    Bakken, for Maracaibo. Agents: S. P
    Musson, Son & Co., Ltd.

    Schooner “Alexandrina R."’ 39 tons net,
    Capt. Smith, for St. Lacia. Agent: D. L
    Johnson, Esq.

    M.V. “Lady Joy,” 46 tons net, Captain
    Parsons, for St. Lucia. Agent: D.
    Johnson, Esq.

    IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION

    Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.,
    with the “Sellbing wane eeeieae
    < PS. r

    Matador Coast a i
    a, Angeles, S.S. Sheaf Mead,
    -S. California/Hpnt, $.S. Regent
    ss toa T heceaae 3s aie “4
    ¢ eles t,

    Hindanger, 8.8.” N,“O. Ragenaes,
    -S. San Vulfrano, S.S.
    /Liwt, SS. Atlantic
    Rio Araza

    S. Gerona,

    ~

    — ae



    ARRIVALS—By B.W.LA.L.
    m TRINIDAD:

    Hal
    Simon Schonholz, Jack Pro-

    a Harold Bishop.
    tal m ST. LUCIA: Lucille Lorde, Wini-

    Lorde,

    Amed Despointes,
    Toole, a ae

    John



    The Weather

    ‘TO-DAY:
    Sun Rises: 6.18 a.m.
    Sun Sets: 5.54 p.m.
    Moon (New) January
    Hinting: 6.30 p.m
    igh Water: 11.28 a.m.
    YESTERDAY : 1.28 a.m,
    Rainfall (Codrington) .09 in
    Total for month to Yesterday: 1.79 ins
    ac perature (Maximum) 81.5 deg. F.
    semmerature (Minimum) deg. F.
    Wind Direction { by E

    18

    72.5
    NE

    : S E.

    Wind Velocity 6

    Barometer (9 9.1
    29.954



    S.S, Elizabeth, S.S. S. Monica, S.S.
    Canabulle, S.S. S.
    Mormachawk, 8.8.

    Glasgow, S.S. Estaro,
    8.8. Brazil, S,S. Toann
    S.S. Beresina.

    S.S. Normess,
    is Zafirakis and

    From_ JAMAICA: Helena Gittins, Al-
    leyne, Colin Jones, Arthur Reeve, Rosita
    Tosta, Humberto Tosta.

    DEPARTURES—By B.W.LA.L.

    For INIDAD: Mr. Cameron Living-
    stone, rs. Agnita Kirton, Mr. Jose;
    Scheult, Mr. Ugo Bernard, Mrs, Amy
    Lynch, Miss Hilda Thorne, Mr, Kenneth
    Ince, Mrs. Doris Taylor, Mr. Ernest Tay~-
    lor, Miss Constantia Idenden, Mrs. Anna
    Idenden, Mr. Francis Idenden, Mrs. Bar-
    bara King, Master King, Mr. Darnley
    Clarke.

    For ST. LUCIA: Miss Myrtle Holder,
    Mr, Ivan Herreira, Mr. Anthony Lewis,
    Mr. Grant Major.

    For ANTIGUA: Mr, Reginald Margeson,
    Mrs, Myra Margeson.

    For JAMAICA: Mr. Hugh Coxe, Mrs
    Gwendolyn Coxe, Master Floyd Coxe

    For ST. KITTS: Mi. Terrence Ryan

    What’s on Today

    Police Courts at 10.00 a.m.

    Courts of Appeal & Petty Debt at 10 a.m.
    Court of Ordinary at

    Police B i

    Mr. A. D

    f i
    field






    t 8 p.m
    at Wake-
    an”



    LOCAL NEWS



    Council Considers

    Trade Union Bill

    Second Reading Passed

    THE Legislative Council yesterday began and then
    postponed further consideration of the Bill to amend the
    Trade Union Act, 1939, and the Better Security Act, 1920.
    It will be further discussed when the Council meets next
    Tuesday. The Hon’ble Acting Colonial Secretary amended
    Clause 6 so as to abandon the principle of peaceful picket-

    ing at people’s homes.

    The main part of the debate
    yesterday was on Section 6 and
    7 which deal with peaceful picket-
    ing, and with section 4 which
    refers to “contracting out”.

    As debate started, a motion by
    Hon'ble G. D. L. Pile to refer the
    Bill to a Select Committee was
    defeated, six members voting “no”
    and five voting “aye”. The division
    was as follows: (Ayes) Hon’bles
    G. B. Evelyn, Mrs. Hanschell, Dr.
    St. John, G. D. L. Pile, J. D.
    Chandler.

    (Noes) Hon’bles Dr. H. G. Mas-
    siah, A. G. Gittens, F. C. Hutson,
    the Lord Bishop, V..C. Gale, the
    Acting Colonial Secretary.

    Motion for the second reading
    was carried by an 8—3 division,
    all the members of the Council
    voting in favour except Hon’bles
    Mr. Chandler, Mr. Pile and Mrs.
    Hanschell.

    Later in the debate a motion by
    Mr. Pile that clause 4 dealing with
    contracting out be deleted was
    resolved in the negative. Only
    Dr. St. John, Mr. Pile and Mr.
    Chandler voted for the motion.

    Debate was adjourned after a
    motion by Mr. Pile that clause 6
    dealing with peaceful picketing be
    deleted was lost by an 8—4 divi-
    sion, Voting in favour of the de-

    with which I shall be dealing in a

    moment I would say that this
    takes recognition of t:. fact that
    trade unions do, and I think

    always have had for the last forty
    years, political affiliation and
    associations,”

    The majority of trade unions
    were the children of one or other
    political parties and it was unreal-
    istic to suggest that Barba los
    should be an exception and their
    trade unions not be expected tv
    take part in political activities.

    Safeguards which were set out
    in Clause 5 of the Bill, made it
    necessary that there should be,
    as in the United ‘tingdom, separ-
    ate political funds, and that there
    should be adequate opportunity
    for persons who did not wish to
    contribute to the political funds
    not to do so.

    Peaceful Picketing ,

    “As regards “peaceful picket-
    ing” I would only say that this has
    been lawful in the United King-
    dom since 1906 which was the
    date of the Disputes Act. The pro-
    visions regarding “peaceful pick-
    eting” was slightly but not sub-

    letion were Hon’bles Dr. St. John, | St@ntially amended by the 1927

    Mr. Pile, Mr. Chandler and Mrs,
    Hanschell. ,
    Second Reading

    Moving the second reading of
    the Bill, the Acting Colonial Sec-
    retary said that the various sec-
    tions of the Act were to achieve
    different amendments to the exist-
    ing Trade Unions and Trade Dis-
    putes Law. There were several
    different amendments not having
    any particular relation to each
    other, he said and he would have
    to deal with them individually.

    As regards clauses 2 and 3 of
    the Bill, the first substituted a
    new definition to the expression
    “trade union”, and the other a
    new clause regarding the “com-
    pulsory registration of trade
    unions”. Those two new clauses,
    however did not effect any major
    change in the present law, but
    they did substitute what was re-
    garded as a better provision on
    those points,

    He did not think that any par-
    ticular comment was called for
    and all he wished to say was that
    the drafting of those clauses was
    based on legislation elsewhere.

    “Now the remainder of the Bill
    deals with two matters known as
    “contracting out” and “peaceful
    picketing”. There is no connec-
    tion between the two and I must
    deal with them separately,” said
    the Acting Colonial Secretary.

    Contracting Out

    The position regarding “con-
    tracting out”, was that as long
    ago as the beginning of the cen-
    tury it was legal for trade unions
    to have political association. When
    he said at the beginning of the
    century, he should have said from
    the year 1913.

    About the year 1908 there was
    a case brought by someone called
    Osborne .against a railway com-
    pany on this question of political
    associations and political activities
    of trade unions. This case went
    to the House of Lords where it
    was decided that political activi-
    ties by trade unions were illegal.

    Decision Altered

    In 1913 this decision was alter-
    ed by the passing of the Trade
    Union Act of that year which made
    it legal for trade unions to in-
    dulge in political activities, to
    have political associations, and
    permit what was known as ‘“‘con-
    tracting out.”

    The provision of the law,—and
    he was speaking from memory~
    was that it should, in the first place,
    be by secret ballot by the mem-~
    bers of a union who engaged in
    political activities at all. Second~
    ly that there should be a separate
    political fund and only money
    from that fund could be used for
    political activities. Thirdly, what
    was known as the “contracting
    out” clause which provided that
    any person who did not want to
    contribute to the fund, should have
    the right to do so. That was the
    law of 1913 and it remained the
    same until after the general strike
    in England in 1926, In the follow-
    ing year there was passed
    the Act of 1927 which among
    other things, substituted for “apn-
    tracting out” the “contracting in”
    clause. In effect that meant in
    future members of a trade union
    would not contribute to the politi-
    cal fund unless they specifically
    signified that they wanted to do
    so by signing a notice called a
    “contracting in” notice. In other
    words the form of notice shown
    in the first Schedule of the present
    Bill was changed so as to read in
    effect: “I hereby give notice that.
    TU wish to contribute to the politi-
    eal fund of the particular union,
    ‘instead of as set out, “I hereby
    give notice that I object to con-
    Yribute to the political fund, etc.”

    Act Repealed

    That was the law between 1927
    and 1946 at which time the whole
    of the 1927 Act was repealed and
    the law went back very largely
    to the law before 1927 and was
    in large part the 1913 law. That
    was the short history of the “con-
    tracting out” and “contracting in.”
    He would just repeat that the
    “contracting out” was made legal
    in 1913; it was made illegal or
    rather “cqntracting in” 1927, and
    “contracting out” was again the
    | procedure in 1946.
    | The clauses of the Bili regard-
    ing “contracting out” were set out
    in the Objects and Reasons and
    they were based on the United
    Kingdom's’ legislation. As far as
    he knew, similar legislation “éx-
    isted in the majority of the colo-
    nial territories. “As regards this
    and as regards the other





    I

    point picketing

    Act, and I think D am correct in
    saying that Barbados is the only
    colony in this area, and almost
    the only colony in the British
    Empire which has not got pro-
    visions regarding “peaceful pick-
    eting.”

    “Here again in recognition of
    what has now become and indeed
    regarded as the normal rights of
    trade unions in their general la-
    bour relations. I think myself that
    there is no good reason why Bar-
    bados should stand out against
    this and be distinguished in this
    respect.”

    “In the Other Place there had
    been some discussion regarding
    the rights of persons to picket at
    a person’s place or residence.
    “Clause 6 of the Bill made iv law-~
    ful for a person or persons to at-
    tend at or near a house or place
    where a person resides or works |
    or carries on business or happens |
    to be, if they so attend merely for
    the purpose of peacefully obtain-
    ing or communicating information
    or of peacefully persuading any
    person to work or abstain frorn
    working.”

    A Compromise

    “I appreciate and it is appre-
    ciated that this is likely to be a
    controversial clause,” said the
    Acting Colonial Secretary, “and
    that even though it is most un-
    likely that that right will be used,
    it would be better to take it out
    of the Bill.”

    For that reason, he pointed out
    he would make an amendment
    at the appropriate time which
    would have the effect of deleting
    the provision for “peaceful pick-
    eting” at persons’ residences mak-
    ing it only applicable to places
    where they worked. °

    Of the other clauses he did not
    think tt was necessary for him to
    Say anything by way of explana-
    tion, The Objects and Reasons
    made them quite clear and he be-
    lieved they were non-controver-
    sial.

    “It might be asked why has this
    Bill been introduced now. Ond@
    answer to that is that it is always
    well to introduce legislation of
    this sort before it is needed. It
    is likely to cause very much more
    trouble if it is introduced as a re=
    sult of any trouble,

    “I velieve vhe existence ur non-
    existence of the present Bill in
    Barbados has so far made no dit-

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    with the compromise given by the|
    Government,

    Against The Bili

    _ Honourable G. D. L. Pile said
    he was against the Bill as,a mat-
    ter of principle. As he under-
    stood it, a principle of democracy
    was that every individual should
    have the right to come to a decis-
    ion for his own.on matters afrect-
    ing himself, as long, of course, as
    ne did not break the law of the
    land,

    in that connection, the main
    points with which he was con-
    concerned were the principles of
    “contracting out”, and of peace-
    ful picketing. The Hon'ble Act-
    ing Colonial Secretary in
    introducing the Bill had told
    them a good deal about “contraci-
    ing out.”

    The present law followed the
    principle of “contracting in.” That
    was, that after a ballot had been
    taken and the majority of mem-
    bers of a Trade Union present
    decided that there should be a
    political fund, any person who
    wanted to contribute to that
    fund could contract in. In that
    case he signed a form to that
    effect.

    What the present Bill proposed
    was that after the ballot had
    been taken, it was assumed that
    every member was willing to
    subscribe to the political fund,
    unless he definitely said no. While
    a man might belong to a Trade
    Union, he might not agree with
    the Union's political ideas. which
    the political fund was formed to
    support. Was it fair to that man
    that he should be obliged to
    contribute to it? It seemed to
    him a negation of democracy.

    Political Action

    They should remember that as
    the Acting Colonial Secrevary had
    said, Trade Unions sought their
    objectives to a large extent by
    political action, It was reasona-
    ble to suppose that the majority
    of members would be willing «to
    subscribe to the political fund.
    But was it fair that a particular
    member who was not willing to
    subscribe should have undue
    influence brought to bear upon
    him?

    That was what it amounted to
    when he was forced to say no
    in opposition to the majority
    who were saying yes. He was
    thus being held up in the lime-
    light among his fellows, a thing
    which could bring disagreeable
    consequences, Undue influence
    should not be brought to induce
    a man to follow a certain action
    which argument had failed to
    convince him was right.

    If a man could be persuaded

    @ On page 7.



    N.C.0 s Will
    Conduct
    Police Band

    By the kind permission of Ma-
    jor Stoute (Acting Commissioner
    of Police, the Police Band will
    render the undermentioned pro-
    gramme at the Hastings Rocks,
    commencing at 8 o’clock to-night.

    “N.C.O.s Conducting”: —

    C/pls. G, Eastmond, W. Best,
    B. Morris ang. Sgi. Archer.

    This is a new feature instituted
    by Captain Raison A.R.C.M. be-
    fore he left the island for Antigua
    and in future will be a monthly
    attraction. The object of this is
    to give each N.C.O. a chance to
    develop the art of conducting. It
    is done in the British Army and
    Capt. Raison states that this is
    the only medium by which his
    N.C.O.s can get a chance to show
    their ability in the art,

    Programme
    (1) MARCH—‘“Father Rhine”
    —Paul Lincke
    (2) OVERTURE—“Morning, Noon

    and Night” —Suppe
    ‘3) SELECTION — The Gondo-
    OO Es viaa Peano —Sullivan
    (Oy VALE So oes P, A, Steck

    (5) SELECTION—‘The “Chu
    Chin Chow” Frederick Norton
    (6) SLAVONIC RHAPSODY
    te ee ae oe «eC. Friedemann
    (7) TWO BALLADS:
    “Little Grey Home in the
    West” .... Hermann Lohr
    “A Perfect Day” .. C. Jacobs

    ference in this community. It is, (8) SELECTION “Hit The Deck”

    a tribute to labour and labour re-
    lations that this is so; but I sug-
    gest for the very serious consid-
    eration of honourable members
    that it is very much better to et
    on the Statute Book the grov,s-
    ions in the Bill now that labour
    relations are good, than .to be
    confronted and be charged at some
    later date when vhere be some
    rupture in labour tglations, of
    having refused to Pu» them on. [
    now beg to move thaj this Bill be
    read a second time.”

    Glad For Compromise

    Honourable Dr. Massiah, sec-
    onding the motion for the second |
    reading of the Bill, said he was |
    glad that the Government had
    seen fit to reduce the scope. of the
    picketing, and to restrict it to the
    place of work. It would never .do
    in a country like Barbados to
    have the peace and quietness oi
    people’s home invaded by peace-
    ful picketers, or otherwise,

    _ They all -ealised of course that
    it was a dangerous thing to put
    powers of that sort in the hands
    of people who were still in their
    infancy as regards Trade Union-
    ism. His fear was not so much
    for the leaders, who had a ,-ertain
    amount of balance and jntelli-.
    gence. His fear was lest the lead-
    ers be pushed off their feet by the
    people behind,

    As regards the second j,irt of
    the peaceful picketing, he vas
    satisfied that the provisions tor
    keeping it peaceful, and vhe pen-
    alties attached, would go a long
    way in ensuring that it would be
    kept peaceful. -

    For that reason he thought they
    should accept the compromise
    which had been offered by the
    abandoning of the provision for
    picketing homes, and pass the
    other part with its accompanying |
    safeguards, .

    If they accepted Trade Union- |
    ism, they should accept the pri
    ciple that Trade Union uld
    have certain rights. That was a



    universal practice all over the
    British Empire, any once they |
    were satisfied that there were pro- |
    visions for safeguarding the peace |
    of the country, they could have|

    no reason for not having peaceful

    passing the section

    —Vincent Goumans
    Popular Dance Music.
    GOD SAVE THE KING.
    Conductor: —
    C. ARCHER, A Mus. V.C.M.,
    Acting Bandmaster.



    Sugar Resolution
    Received By Leg. Co.

    THE Secretary of State for the
    Colonies has received the text of
    the Resolution passed by the
    Council relative to the Sugar
    Negotiations between representa-
    tives of the B.W.I. Producers and
    the British Government, and will
    keep in mind the views expressed
    in the Resolution, the Legislative
    Council was told yesterday in a
    message from the Governor,

    Mr. Bertie Graham was yesterday
    reported as being a student at McGill,
    University, Canada. He is in fact a medi-
    Sah shige at GUY'S HOSPITAL, LON-



    ev

    )

    Mire! Gow



    Boil
    Oats.

    SORE MINERALS
    MORE PROTEINS

    MORE VITAMINS (8, and B,)










    0 i oon
    oe sag tl
    Ps

    ENERGY BREAKFAST! ,

    When boiling add 1 cup of Quaker
    minutes. That's all.

    DELICIOUS QUAKER OATS GIVES YOU:





    Wants To Drill

    Here For Oil

    Mr. H. C. Bishop of New York, |
    arrived in Barbados yesterday
    morning to consult with Govern-
    ment officials regarding the re- |
    cent enactment of the Oil Bill
    which was passed by the Legis-
    lature.

    He came in from Texas via
    Trinidad by B.W.LA. and is
    staying at the Ocean View Hotel.

    representative of the Gulf
    Oil Corporation, a world-wide
    organisation with headquarters in



    Pittsburgh, Mr. Bishop is seek-|$

    ing on behalf of his company.
    an application for an oil conces-

    sion to drill here, and hopes that ‘

    the rules and regulations cover-
    ing the Bill will be formulated.

    Should his application be fav-| ¥

    ourable, his company will be

    ready to start operations prompt- | ¥

    ly.



    25 Years Ago

    (Barbados Advocate,
    January 13, 1925)

    Sugar ang Cocoa Prices

    Whilst sugar prices were up
    during the last two years and
    Cocoa prices were down, the re-
    verse is now the case. It is not
    expected that the
    promised by the Imperial Gov-
    ernment will be in operation
    early enough to held West Indian
    Sugars during the first four or
    five months of the year; and con-
    Sequent on the reported big
    crops in Cuba the market is low,
    and somewhat depressed.,

    On the other hand ordinary
    Trinidad Cocoa is now quoted
    at $16 per cwt., where last year
    it was little more than half
    that price. Trinidad and Gren-
    ada were terribly hard hit by
    the slump during the last two
    years and the improvement in
    prices will bring back to them
    something of their departea
    prosperity.

    * Drowning Fatality

    On Wew Year’s Day while
    passing through the Gulf Stream,
    the S.S. “Guiana” met some
    heavy seas. The Boatswain,
    Phillip Stembar, a native of Car-
    riacou, who was standing on deck
    was swept off. The Captain
    stopped the ship, and made a
    search, circling about the vicin-
    ity. After remaining about an
    hour at this tedious task, and
    failing to find the body, the ship
    pursued its course.

    Brvooeussessosqoooosonen
    : FRESH :
    : VEGETABLE
    $ LANDRETH \

    WEATHERHEAD'S

    4

    ,

    \ BEET, CABBAGE (2 kinds) %

    4% CARROT (3 kinds), LETTUCE 3

    . (4 kinds) s

    OKRA, BEANS (5 kinds) Ms)

    TOMATO (2 kinds), EGGPLANT, %

    KOHL RABI (2 kinds) %

    CAULIFLOWER »

    PEPPER, Sweet & Hot (7 kinds) 4

    PARSLEY, CUCUMBER, CORN, ¢

    SQUASH (4 kinds) >

    SPINACH, TURNIP, ~

    RADISH (white; %

    ONION, PARSNIP, THYME, s

    SWEET MARJORAM, BROCOLLI, *

    MUSTARD, CELERY, LEEK, x

    SWISS CHARD, PUMPKIN, x

    CHINESE CABBAGE, CITRON, %

    MUSKMELON, WATERMELON, \

    BRUSSELS SPROUTS, x

    s

    . x

    o

    BRUCE WEATHERHEAD 3
    “A

    LTD ;

    * %

    5

    ~ HEAD OF BROAD STREET ¥

    , on 5

    SDSSSO DOSES SESS 9ON






















    preference] §



    i

    =~

    —=—_

    AFTER STOCK TAKING
    WE HAVE MADE

    SPECIAL REDUCTIONS ON
    DRESSES, BLOUSES, SLACKS
    and SKIRTS Ete, Ete.

    BROADWAY DRESS SHOP.



    {
    j



    CROP SEASON —
    REQUISITES

    en HOR eee
    ROCKBOTTOM PRICES.

    ® SHOVELS
    @ BUCKETS
    ® CANE BILLS
    @® CUTLASSES
    @® PLANT KNIVES
    @ BAG

    AND
    PLY ENGLISH
    SEWING TWINE

    OBTAIN OUR QUOTATION BEFORE BUYING
    ELSEWHERE

    HARRISON'S

    | 5

    |

    +
    >

    HARDWARE DEPT.
    Dial 2364.





    i fot every

    : occasion 7
    on Sale at the
    leading Stores

    ~





    2

    HARRISON'S—sroap sr.

    NEEDLES





    SINGLE MODEL
    LADIES’ HATS



    In a variety of colours and styles.
    Only recently opened. From $4.50











    2 cups of water. Add salt:

    Cook it, stirring, for 2%





    for strong bones and teeth
    for growth; solid Besh ond musce
    for energy oad stamina
    turn food inte “body-fael”

    11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET



    MAY ALL HAPPINESS

    Be yours during the Christmas ,Season, and may the
    Year 1950 be one marked indelibly in your memory
    as a year of Success, Expansion and Achievement.



    LET US HELP YOU

    To attain this Success, Continue during the

    any Item of Hardware you may require.



    And now may we extend to you the Season’s Greet-
    ings with all our customary sincerity:—

    A Prosperous New Vear

    Year to give us your Orders for all manner of
    Foundry work; all kinds of Factory Supplies, or for rao ee

    THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY Led.

    St. Michael

    See

    White Park noad

    SSS







    Reece










    BY CARL ANDERSON

    i

    ae a pont
    TAKE SOME CLOTHES * aC]
    HANGERS OVER TO OUR | | '

    OTHER STORE - PLEASE -)

    ——— eee |







    |
    |




    SUPITER! THAT WATCH!
    rT MUST HAVE BEEN A






    PUERE HE COMES |
    PBack AGAIN!
















    RANGER

    = ) STO! NOW WHAT | | DAN, YOU FOLLOW

    lax

    THE LONE






    RIFF! FOLLOW ME! TONTO'S }
    GIVING US A WAY OUT!

    a
    [
    |
    ;
    Kit Co; 2S% ey «bite 2 WOE pCR: Heeeass a
    i 4 Wocal OazZ16 ) ae THE WEATHER
    ee . j LOW CLO ee = — THEM L AAKIN’ TH ‘
    ; , fl. . IN DISTRIC LOG! Z WORDS ! ue TO ne soéee

    LAND, ME BOVOS!

    LOW PRESSURE, .















    BY GEORGE

    re

    MC. MANUS
    — se












    NOT TILL 2M READY,

    MILLION® NO...BUT
    GIS! YOU AIN'T GOIN’
    NOWHERE

    BE TEN GRANO! TLL
    Y YUH ANOTHER

    HAMBURGER , S'S...














    ae
    aac

    —




    as
    rn



    es

    Paty

    Sn
    ee:







    Pe es






    THEY 6oT Him, “Wl
    ALL RIGHT~ DIDN'T

    >? _NOTHIMS THE
    THUGGEES NEVER



    Blamed For Loan Flop









































    BARBADOS ADVOCATE







    Election, Sugar T alks

    LONDON (By Mail)
    A SENSATION vras caused in West Indian circit
    London when it was known that the Jamaica three
    half per cent Ioan 1968-73 had turned out a failure. About
    90% of the £2,500,000 stock offered to the public (of a}
    total of £3,250,000 to be raised) will be left on the hands|
    of the underwriters who are now responsible for finding
    the money for the colony.

    and a

    "The Yanks
    Are There

    PARIS (By Mail)

    “The Yanks Are Coming” the
    battle cry of 1918, is even more
    appropriate to-day.

    For as one French wag said,
    the line from the World War I
    song-hit “Over There” should be
    revised to “The Yanks Are Here”

    What set off this reminder of
    two previous American “inva-
    sions” was an American Embas-
    sy announcement that 9,980 Am-
    ericans—in addition to tourists—
    now reside in France.

    in 1939, on the eve of the Sec-
    ond World War, the registered
    American “colony” was hardly
    more then 2,000 the Embassy said.
    Chiefly responsible for this lat.
    cst “invasion” are the Marsha!

    + Business experts blamed ‘ten-
    sion over the impending general
    election in Britain and bewilder-
    ment about the West Indies’ po-
    sition generally because of the
    protracted sugar negotiations as
    prime causes.

    “The Financial Times” com-
    mented: “Another factor mili-
    tating against the success of the
    issue was the knowledge that a
    number of similar issues are be-
    lieved to be pending.”

    This does not promise well for
    future colonial loans. Many Wes‘
    Indian: businessmen had expected
    that there might be some short-
    fall in subseriptions but nothing
    like 90 per cent. The issue came
    in a week during which freight)
    rates to the West Indies had /|
    been raised 10 per cent, Mr. }
    Bustamante, newly re-elected to}
    power in Jamaica, had been
    quoted as making some strong
    anti-British comments, and dead-
    lock in the sugar talks with the
    Ministry of Food persisted. There



    Plan, the G.I. Bill of Rights, the could hardly have been a worse
    United Nations Educational Sci-}| background. ¥
    entific and Cultural Organisation, —B.UP.
    and beginning this fall, the Ful-
    bright Bill for approximately 250

    about $300 a month—or four

    students and professors.
    American veterans. still wear-
    ing flying jackets and Army boots,
    overflow the caves of St. Germain
    and Montparnasse, living in smali
    box-like hotel rooms and drink-
    ing beer on $75 a month.
    But the average American
    yovernment secretary earns

    times more than her French col-
    league—and is offen able to find}
    luxurious apartments out of reac!
    of many old French families. |

    It prompted one Frenchman to}
    joke “The Americans are fast}

    France .”—I.N.S.



    becoming the ‘grand bourgeois’ of |



    FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 195@



    ‘ Taxis Want
    Rear Lights
    On Soldiers

    LONDON, (By Mail)

    Hitler has started a first-class }
    squabble between King George’s
    Royal Palace Guards and Lon-
    den’s taxi drivers.

    Early in the war German |
    planes rendered the Buckingham |
    Palace guardroom unusable and
    sentries are marched to and from
    nearby Wellington Barracks.

    “During the war they always car-
    ried a red rear light on their belts”
    said one driver, “but they have
    since given up carrying this
    warning signal. ;

    “Tf they were a party of Girl
    Guides or Boy Scouts they’d have
    to earry a light—or they’d be
    pinched”, he said explosively.

    Over in the guardroom at Wel-
    lington Barracks a 6-foot-tall
    Welsh Guard sergeant gave 4
    bellow of disgust.

    “Look!” He pointed at a group
    sf Guards, all around six feet,
    4 inches tall.

    “If a cabby can’t see those fel-
    lows with bearskin hats on, he
    must be blind. Sometimes w*
    carry a light. Sometimes we
    don’t.” he declared.

    And from Buckingham Palace,
    a little file still marches across
    the shadows towards Wellington
    barracks. . « « ; without a lamp.

    —LN.S.

    | Miami,
    | Ciudad Trujillo,

    rye Ue a.
    Vision Claim
    NORTH BAVARIA, Jan. 12.

    Roman Cathelie Ghurech Au-
    thorities here today banned all
    religious services and processions
    at nearby Heroldback. Children
    and others claim to have seen
    visions of the Virgin Mary.

    —Reuter.





    er for
    MORTON
    ae

    | PEARL



    AGENTS.

    IT IS ONLY PLACED ON GOODS OF FIRST QUALITY

    | BARLEY



    A.S. BRYDEN & SONS (Bios) LTD.





    qT







    —E HAVE A WIDE > RANG





    TREASURE ISLAND by Robert Louis THEY LIVE

    Stevenson RETOLD IN 400 cat
    PICTURES by Peter Jackson eee
    THE STORY
    Daniel O

    NANCY AT ST. BRIDES by D. F. Bruce

    JULIET OVERSEAS by Clare Mallory Westerm:

    PENNY DREADFUL by A. Stephen Tring Cungences
    E. Jo

    THE MYSTERY FF
    CAT by Enid Blytor

    Willer



    MAMA
    FOR THE
    STORY

    ae
    CHILDREN’S BOOKS

    THE WESTOW TALISMAN by

    ADVENTURE
    Me

    STATIONERY

    HANKS

    OOK I!

    - @)3

    D_ IN COUNTY DOWN by
    Fitzpatrick .
    _OF PETER PAN Retold by
    Connor .
    . Percy F.
    OF THE MAIN by Captain
    S AFLOAT by John D

    ad

    )
    (










    '



    More WL
    Cruises

    NEW YORK (By Mail)

    A cruise-cargo service bety,
    Kingston, Jamaica and
    Deminican Re.

    public, said to be the first

    service will be started on ae
    ary 21, by the Fiota Mercante
    Dominicana (Dominican Meg
    chant Fleet}.
    The steamship “Nueva Domj.

    nicano” has been transferreg
    from the New York-Dominiean

    Republic service for the Purpose,
    Cruises will last 12 days.
    The cruises will start

    and will continue ona
    round basis. On her run
    Kingston to Ciudad
    vessel will also call at
    Bay, Jamaica. In

    passengers, the ship

    ages and bananas and other
    go northward.

    Before her first run on
    cruise route, the “Nuevo
    nicano” will begin a service
    Miami, to Nassau, Bahamas,
    second Thursday on a year-round
    basis, making her first ae

    on

    car-

    January 19 and returning to
    ami in time for her sailing
    the 21st.

    Fares for the t
    will range from 340 to
    jars per person and rates for the
    Miami-Nassau service will range
    from 49 to 72.50 dollars. All rates
    quoted are exclusive of tax The
    3,500-ton “Nuevo Dom
    has accommodation for 177 page
    sengers.

    Bermuda Water
    Shortage

    HAMILTON ( Maily
    The U.S. Fleet ieee
    “Cadmus” has reached
    with 100,000 gallons of water
    the U.S .Air base at Kindley

    here



    I

    Water is so short t
    taps operate only five hours@
    Bermuda depends entirely on
    rain for fresh water and Decem-
    ber with only 2.06 inches of rain
    was the driest in 17 years.
    —B.UP,

    EXAMINE
    YOURSELF

    Can You Say ‘NO’ te

    BEE





    Pepto-Bismol is gen-
    tle. It spreads a sooth-
    ing, protective coating
    on irritoted stomach
    and intestine! walls.








    At, Relief at once!
    My ,throat’s” soothed and that wi
    ‘\ cough eased in no time.
    a

    acc?
    _ COUGH
    |

    LOZENGES

    1) 25 _2ezEB

    =

    S Byes

    ee

    OT






    Apply to O. Layne, Maxwell,

    Fm, Poone Oat. 13.1.50—4n

    CAR: Standard Vanguard 3,500 miles



    pripay, JANUARY 13, 1950

















    offices, enclosed yard.











    LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

    THE application of Conrad

    Hards of Collymore Rock, St Michael,







    ARE AT



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    The Hon’ble Acting Colonial
    Secretary had said that Barba-
    dos was the only colony, in tha
    B.W.l. and perhaps in the



    “ogre state”, More and more to-
    day, he said, they were examples
    of parties with the majority
    becoming small dictatorships, and



    tion 7.

    There was a Labour Com-
    missioner in the island who was
    of great value in trade disputes.









    arrive at. He himself did not see
    the necessity for having it on the
    Statute Book, and if some other
    member. did not move the dele-











    whether the Labour Officer was
    in favour of the Bill. If labour



    d July 1949 just arrived from) conditions of sale apply to: R. ARCHER| for neneedant to oalt, Sririte: Walt Empire that did not have peace-| interfering with almost every/If he failed, an arbitrator was| tion of clauses 6 and 7 he woulc| relations in the island were good,

    ind after routine areas Ems Pied Mc KENZIE, Victoria Street. Dial 2947.| Liquors &c., at Enmore Hotel, Collymore picketing provisions, If he had} aspect of the individual. j called in. The Acting Colonial] do so, and he was glad to hear that they

    y Works. On V . 13.1,.50—3n 10.1.50—4n Roek, St. Michael. nothing to congratulate himselt Select Committee Secretary himself had admitted |} were, why introduce machinery

    TN y 7 ; ; ) 3 i . * . i ; ; i : ia

    —_—____—_—_—_ ~ e ae ee aay Elen 1950. jon in being a Barbadian, it} Mr. Pile said that he was going| that labour relations in the island Welcomed Motion | which might have the effect_ of

    CAR: 199 Morris ¢ h pi Sey: REAL ESTATE Police Magistrate, Dist. “A" would be that they were not in} to propose that the Bili. be} Were quite good at the present : : ; making those relations bad?
    condition. Phone 3 . |——_—_— G. C. HARDS, | the position of following the} referred to a Select C i time. Why then were they tryin, Hon'ble J. D. Chandler said he} He wonde if th resen

    13.1,50—3n SHARES with Accruing Dividends:— a 2 E J to a Select Committee ny y trying h : v' red e@ p t

    |» Barbados Shipping and Trading o.,| N.B.—This application will be consia-| W0le Empire in doing some-| for more intensive consideration. to legalise something which in 0 poem Cas oS the. ialend and) time, just before the crop, wasTan

    ean—Vexhell 13 bP. a cre er €red at _a Licensing Court to be held at | thing of which he could not see} Although he was bound to admit] big countries had been the cause] had not had a chance to conside1 auspicious time to introduce-sueb
    i, leather Upholstery 5 ~' | 27 Barbados Ice Co., Ltd. Police Court, District “A” on Saturday} that an opposite view could be ~

    light © grey,

    batteries repainted



    The above will be set up for sale a

















    BOOKKEEPER/ACCOUNTANT: Serv-

    that peaceful picketing was the

    of much unpleasantness between

    the Bill properly. For that reason



    | legislation.

    condition, Price $1,100, Phone! Public Competition at our Office, James| . 1, [9% Of January 1950 at 11 o'clock. law nearly everywhere, he felt| employers and workers and even|h® welcomed the motion of Mr.| A further report of the discus-
    de Verteville 4517 in office hours.| Street, on Wednesday, 18th January E. A. McLEOD, very strongly against it. Refer-/] between workers themselves? Pile that it be referred to a select! sion on the Bill will appear in~e
    8.1.50—3n gtom wien Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” WANTED ring a Bill to a Select Committee; The Acting Colonial Secretary; Comittee. He wanted to know later issue. .
    One Chevrolet Car in good ye ee ao. Lae eends before it had given its second| had said that it was better to put 1 aaa ate
    Bane cle ae ke Derricks, st. 32,1.90—En Li | HELP reading was a practice that was} it on the Statute Book now than ee ee
    perio S| SUG e| WQuoR LIceENce notice | HELP sometimes followed in the House| to wait until it was needed, Dr. SHIPPING NOTICES

    WRUCK—One (1) Fargo Motor Truck
    ‘Dual Drive’ (eight forward gears).

    1950 at 2 p.m. sion. to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c a c ri i ; cacti thic -reati j = =.
    od. Contact Courtesy Garage.|” The Dwelling House colled “ARNE,”| wns,” ee or a vere ae corn ote sane. omer, ee ee ~_— section 6, the section which | merely creating machinery for =
    21.1.50—S8n.) ard the land theretd, containing 4,330] ing at Dayrells Road, Ch. Ch. within} standard. Knowledge Dry Goods busi- ret erred to peaceful picket-ng, trouble. . ‘
    - arene | square feet, situate at 9th Avenue.} Dist. “A”. ness and control of office personnel} Said it seemed that the follow- The object of peaceful picketing ADVERTISE . . « The MV. “CARIBBEE” “will
    (CAR: Ford Prefect Car in perfect con-} Belleville. Dated this llth day of January 1950. considered assets. Business hours 84] ing section was largely a contra-| when a strike arose was to per- accept Cargo and Passengers for
    15,000 miles. Apply: Harold! The Dwelling House comprises Gallery,| To: FE. A. McLEOD, Esq. weekdays 8-12.30 Saturdays. Write in| qictj Bins ee ari d i Dominica, Antigua, Montsetrar
    whead, c/o Bruce Weatherhead.| Drawing & Dining Rooms, 2 Bedrooms, Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” confidence stating age, details pasi iction of section 6, It was evi-| suade those who had struck not in the Nevis and St ‘Kitts. Sailing
    11,1.50—3n poe with Sesedne room and running C. F. WARD, | appointments and salary desired: P.O.| dently an attempt to define what| to return to work, and to persuade Friday 13th inst. ,
    voter in each, Breakfast roorn, Kitch- Applicant. | Box Pike -tn. J y intimi i : rs i ’ :
    PUSED CARS: Vauxhall 14 h.p. A-1l/ enette, Toilet and Bath. ’ N.B.—This application ‘will Saeed 1 ee ~ was meant 7 ee and } a oan ‘ee take the strikers The MV. “DABRWOOD"> will
    ition. STANDARD 8 h.p. saloon} Gas installed; Servant’s room and| ered at a Licensing Court to be held ai] A MAN with knowledge of Edgin, | 22 hOyance. he only conclusion | job, When there was a strike on, EVENING accept Cargo and Passengers ‘for
    good condition, Courtesy Garage, Garage in Yard. Police Court, District “A” on Saturday | spectacle Lenses. Only those with pre-| that he could draw ,from the| emotions were aroused, the at- St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
    4616. 11,1.50—3n | Inspection any day except Sundays,| 2lst day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock. vious experience need apply to Imperial, presence of section 7 was that} mosphere was highly charged and Aruba, Date of sailing to-be
    || between the hours of 4 p.m. and 6 P.m. | a.m, Optical 13.1. 50—in it os dificult for ‘. th “ . 7 given.
    ; ft OR — One ee ae on application on the premises, Dial E. A. McLEOD, Mm was dificu or one to say reats were used and violence
    tor very little used condition. | 2115. Police Magistrate, Digt. ‘A’. s : Large Second “ ae
    purchasing larger. Cole & Co.,! For further particulars and Conditions| 13.1.50—1n * een ieee ae ana or a ye a,
    6.1.50—Jn. | of eu Sg fe ie a * B.W.1. Schooner Owners’ Associa-
    . ‘oO. BUTLER—Experience Butler required. Ki ) h Sho tion (Inc.) Tel. 4047,
    ee ONT CATFORD SP'so-on| LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE | ,2UT8%—Experience Butler required. éep wiite es an tele. nee
    CAL >. 5O— » . .
    THE undersigned will offer for sale THE application of Gersman King of | ™°'® an mn - S Wh t th
    RIGERATOR—62 cubic ft. English} by public auction at their office, No. 17,| Spooners Hill, St. Michael, for permus- OCD nowy 1 é U1
    as, a eee 5 oni High Street, on Friday the 13th instant} sion to sell Spirits, eas Semin StS § did
    ree. e . no offers} at 2 p.m. a and galvan: shop at se ~ +
    leaving. island. HH. G. Bancrott.| * The dwellinghouse called Road, Spooners Hill, St. Michael. ee a woe 2 . ie : °
    $292, . 12.1,50—4n.| COTTAGE and land containing 11,960 Dated this 11th day of January 1950. wide range of ailments—Fractures, hi “ae
    square feet, Constitution Road, St. Mi-| To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq. Paralysis and Premature Decay, ana a 10n. e Ss “ *
    q OVE —"G.E.C. with Grill and] chael, The dwellinghouse co’ ses — Police Magistrate, Dist. “A" etc., ete.
    tate Control Oven, in excellent} ON THE GROUND FLOOR: awing GERSMAN KING, ¥ Y ,

    ition ong sear old $150,00 no offers.

    | A) et SHUWHITE
    . G. » Seawell Airport. Phone| ning water), gallery, toilet and bath.| N.B.—This application will be consid- Give Mi we sonia noir SOUTHBOUND SAILS Sails Sails Arrives Satis
    12.1,50—5n.| UPSTAIRS: One very large bedroom;} ered at a Licensing Court to be held at ' Cramton, Street, x NAME OF SHIP MON- Halifax Bosten B'dos B'dos
    IN THE BASEMENT: Dining room,| Police Court, District “A” on Saturday 13.1:80.~an Pp City TREAL a
    a te OVA ise pantry, kitchen; Seperate bathroom in| 2Ist day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock eS : ADY NELSON
    ri d Generators 2.75 pard, a.m, Lf — 12th Jan. Mth Jan. 23rd Jan. 28rd Jan
    ; Orders now being placed for im-} Government water and electric light E. A, McLEOD, — FOR LADY RODNEY — 8th Feb. 10th Feb. ig9th Feb 20th Feb
    t te shipment. Communicate with | installed Police Magistrate, Dist. “A"™ LADY NELSON ~o- 25th Feb. 27th Feb. &th Mar. 9th Mar
    y Garage, Dial 4616, Inspection any day except Sunday| 13.1.50—1n WHITE KID LADY RODNEY —— 25th Mar. 27th Mar. 5th Apr. 6th Apr.
    11.1.50—3n | between the hours of 4 p.m. and 6 IMPORTANT NOTICE BUCKSKIN LADY NELSON 12th Apr. 14th Apr. 23d Apr. 24th Apr.
    p.m. on application to the owners, the
    tT RE ae eee iti LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE AND NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
    or further iculars an: con ions , ‘ s S
    “ hens of sale apply to :— : The applicalion. a anes Lynch of ilies is e i CANVAS Ss oe B'dos B'dos Boston St. John Montreal
    PUR RS — irch drawing room COTTLE, CATFORD & Co. Bay Street, St. ichael, for permission a after Monday anua- ODNEY 17th Jan. 2 Jan. he
    comprising (1) Settee (3 seats) (i) Solicitors. to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &e, at a ary the Gas supply will be « SHOBS LADY NELSON wid tht mnn wae
    fris-Chairs (1) Morris Rocker. All as 7.1.50—5n. | wooden building with stone frontage off on all districts from Gasworks LADY RODNEY 4th Mar. 5th Mar. 15th Mar. 16th Mar pes
    with Gushions,. tapestry | Near Hospital, Bay Street. St. Michael to Top Rock each day (Saturday LADY NELSON 2ist Mar. 22nd Mar. ist Apr. 2nd Apr aaa
    ve (1) ng Table with long THE undersigned will offer for Sale st Dated this llth day of January 1960. and Sunday excluded) from 1.15 LADY RODNEY 17th Apr. 19th Apr. 20th Apr. 30th Apr ee
    Pe, (Modern). (1) Chest-of-drawers, | their Office No. 17, High Street, Bridge-| To: EB. A. McLEOD, Esq. p.m. to approx. 3.30 p.m. until LADY NELSON 6th May &th May 18th May 19th May ——
    y Kitchen Cabinet (1) three tier-| ‘own, on Friday 18th day of January Police Magistrate, Dist. “‘A’

    (1) small Bireh tabie (2) Kitchen
    Allcan be seen between 4—7 p.m.



    G, Bancroft, Seawell Airport. Phone ‘o., Ltd N.B.—This application will be consid- : uv N.B. bi. ~
    Co., Ltd. ’ —— Subject to change without notice. All Is fi :
    11.1.50—5n ered at a Licensing Court to be. held at ful . All vesse tted with cold storage cham-
    COTTLE, CATFORD 4S a lice Court, District “A’ on Saturday bers. Passenger Fares and freight rates on application to :—

    + EEL OFFICE FURNITURE: Letter
    bd fools-cap size 4 drawer letter cabin-
    with locks; Bins suitable for hard-
    Stores or Garages, etc. Cabinets

    Locks ete.—Courtesy Garage, Dia!







    their Office No. 17, Migh Street, Bridge-

    instant at 2 p.m,
    town, on Friday 20th day of —
    |



    room and three bedrooms (one with run-

    1950 at 2 p.m.
    200 Shares in the West India Biscuit



    FOR SALE OR RENT—Farley Hill,
    St. Peter. Old Plantation house with
    large ballroom, Dining room library,
    fourteen bedrooms etc. Ideal for convert-

    THE application of Charles F. Word

    of Dayrells Road, Ch. Ch. for, permis-

    Applicant



    MeDONALD LYNCH,
    Applicant

    2ist day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock

    a.m, b
    EB. A: McLEOD,
    Police Magistrate, Dist, “_~ >
    13,1,50—In



    ices of experienced bookkeeper/Account-
    ant required in Barbados. Advertisers’









    After seeing Your Doctor, ...



    the work of clearing Gas Main is
    ( completed.
    t









    of Commons.

    Hon'ble Dr. St. John





    GOVERNMENT

    NOTICE



    eect
    dealing



    ) St. John said. He was claiming,
    however, that to do so would be







    LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
    The application of M. E. R. Bourne &
    Co. of Roebuck Street, St. Michael, for
    | permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
    &e., at a bottom floor of No. 38 Roebuck
























    GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD. — Agents.









    1.1 -3n | in ; ‘ | Street, City. ; —
    | en" iraaiuw 8 Comowiy "| LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE INCOME TAX NOTICE ned Mig, aot sary |) CHR. GLE TRANSATLANTIQUE
    | Sa Dist. “A”.

    ECHANICAL

    MTERS—A small quantity ot
    bond hand Remington Typewriters now
    Milable. Apply: T. Geddes Grant Ltd,
    4376, 8.1,.50—6r.



    THE undersigned will offer for Sale at
    their Office in James Street, Bridgetown,
    on Friday the 27th day of January 1950,
    at 2 p.m,

    The Dwelling House called “BEULAH”

    The application of Idalia Hope, holder
    of Liquor License No. 656 of 1950, granted
    to Howard Hope in respect of board and
    shingle shop at Hanschell Land, Eagle
    Hall, St. Michael, for permission to use

    NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Income Tax returns are re-
    quired from every married man whose income is $1200.00 per annum
    or over, from every other person whose income is $720.00 per
    annum or over and from companies whether incorporated or unin-

    Police Magistrate,
    Signed M, BE. R. BOURNE,
    for Applicants.
    N.B.—This application will be con-
    sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
    Police Court, District “A”, on Saturday,







    FRENCH LINE

    S.S. “GASCOGNE” sailing to Trinidad and French Guiana

    at § ises the 2ist day of January 198, at 11
    Bac nd the land thereto belonging containing | $id, Tiauor. License iat sald Prem , , _ on the 5th February, 1950. Sailin é
    4 ow aver King, - saat square feet, situate at Hastings, Eagle re eae nena corporated, societies, persons engaged in any trade or profession, andj ©'clock, a.m. aN sia ‘ 3 iling to Southampton and Le
    green and in black. | Christ Church . wae : _ A. TALMA, , a oa . 2
    4 mes & Co., Lid. Dial 4476. Te, Enwelling Mouse. covtmetess. Closed Pim, 4 McLEOD, Esa... | Owners of land or property whether a taxable income has accrued Police Magistrate, OY ab ca Havre via Martinique and Guadeloupe 12th February, 1950;
    ‘ 18.11.49—-t.f.n.| Gallery, Drawing and Dining Bectaes : Police See SS omer HOPE, during the past year or not. I.
    Redrooms, Dressing Room, Toilet Bath Sign 7 x
    CE 0 and Kitchen with Blectric, Water, Gas} 1). wi, ae Forms of Return my be obtained from the Income Tax Depart- LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Minimum First Class Only $425.30 B.W.LCy.

    7 DOM FROM FIRE—Instal a Fire-

    Safe with doors secured by
    tion lock: Suitable for office or
    i Secure your records. Contact

    ie it For further particulars and conditions a. st. “AM, 1. Returns of ‘sons hos “los St. Michael.
    8 EN & Sons (B'dos) Ltd. of Sale, apply to:— Police Magistrate, oe W a i s per whose books were closed on the 3ist Nap ane oni
    ie ~ Pri, Sun, — t.f.n HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD, ay of ecember, 1949, on or before the 31st day of March,| To E. A. McLOD, C _— a — ae ane —
    DOKS: School Books of ali kinds at eae NOTICE 1950. Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”. REAL ESTATE AGENTS _ AUCTIONEERS
    REWh chook Hing ann 8 LIQUOR LICENSE . : Signed E. BARKER,

    , 12)1,50—2r . ‘all d shes ee: : 2. Returns of persons whose principal place of business is not ok ess ‘Chatietinn AN be eae .
    = > Th icat f Ty ones © : : i” -
    ; rr For Sale=Cont Baxters Road, St. Michael. fae petmlanion ‘ — in a island on or before the 30th day of June, 1950. aurea ata Saeaene Sat & > eet DIXON & BLADO

    0 x 5, 8. ’ } to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at : eturns 0} Court, Distets’ . ,

    — ie nee s a A ftesh shipment of Vegetable and. came. thaw sitached.. to a persons, on or before the 3ist of January, the 2ist day of January 1950, a Lt. Cmdr. G. S. DIXON, OBE

    ; wo Garage—Dial 4391 Seeds has samt, bean ceaeven Si og mgeenee 8 ae icy Sin . o'clock, aim E. A. McLEOD, . +e >. Were

    ' . , is . a

    ' 11.1,50—3n | Australian a — ae TH A. TALMA, Seq. F. CLAIRMONTE han J. M. BLADON, A.F.S,, (Eng.), M.R.S.1, A.M.LB.E.

    METS: BLANKETS—Here’s some-





    aay y » | Flow Seeds, including Balsam, Cal- Signed BERYL JONES, i ?

    d In various ees an cries liopsis, Carnation and SOE ns a: Applicant. NOTE: Any person failing to make his return within the due U.K, — CANADA — U.S.A. 4
    : at 8 le Bed) ; up. Thanis. Knight's Drug Stores. a. : ad -. y Pe eas held a date will be liable to a e rn z
    il 3466, an Street, Speights- | — remrenreenes sidered ata Licensing Court to be. ees: pn a ms a ae £100 and Before buying, examine our extensive lists of high class prop~ ay
    11,1,50—8n. | 98 es ee Ge the Bist day of January 1980, at 11 pe than and will be prosecuted unless a satis- erty and land located in all areas. s

    Bt M TINS Just in time for school, | Trafalgar Street. Dial ee. eager o'clock, a.m. Brie: taiteme PO a tory reason is given, Ph 4640 <4
    immer tray. Assorted at aaa istrate, Dist. “A”. +1 00 .— ~ Plantations Building

    f A rnly Bic. each. G. W. Huteh- Raion er ese ae, 3



    ects t i ei al ha cinia ’
    A. Barnes & Co. Lid. Nelson Road, Navy, Gardens, 3 {\\| 996969696990969990990500909599699999 ~ }
    . (OIS LEATHERS New shipment 3.12.49—ti.n. Vv
    \ Price $2.01. Eckstein Brothers, ry large airy bedrooms Verandgh, }
    Street, 12.1. 503n’| GALVANISED SHEETS—6 ft., 6% ft., FOR SALE
    was : | 8 ft. Apply: Auto Tyre; ve Drawing and Dining Rooms, Tiled 5
    q $8 LOSE—Duniop Hose in sizes | Phone 2696. 5.1.00-4.8-8

    4 » % in. Eckstein Bros., Bay
    zk 12.1,50—-Sn

    uD

    Bee ens ses Deseret aha =m (switch: anged. ten. te,'atl Seevedme, Os. Fe Dealing led “CAR! d the Yand
    7 pirat: 1 a swi es) arr ¥ wa ms, ‘ g House ca an ie . ,
    2; ion. Does not ig ot. BLANKETS: Blankets at $2.38 ) g . ?

    on Obtainable at





    Inspection any day between the hours
    of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. on application on
    the premises.









    Squash and Beans. Also a small variety of





    iGS—Galvanised pipe. All sorts
    % in. to 1% ins. Phone #604







    DIVING MASKS: Rubber Diving Masks
    Stanway Store, Lucas Street.

    Extra Large at $3.11 These are worth

    application will
    sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
    Police Court, District “A"', on Monday,
    the 29rd day of January 1960, at

    11 o'clock, a.m.
    BE. A. McLEOD,



    Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”,

    ment AFTER THE 1ST DAY OF JANUARY, 1950, and the forms
    duly filled in must be delivered to me on or before the following

    respective dates :

    Commissioner of Income Tax and Death Duties.









    CANADIAN INVESTMENTS

    bought at 55 per cent. premium or exchanges





    The application of Sheila Seo of
    Fresh Water, Black Rock, St. Michaei,
    for permission to sell Spirits, Malt
    Liquors, &c., at a board and shingle shop
    attached to residence at Black Rock,



    Police Magistrate, Dist.








    A newly built BUNGALOW irc

    Kitchen with builtsin Cupboards.
    Tiled Toilet and Bath, running




    2 Servants’ rooms with toilet aod







    R. M. JONES &









    connections in

    The undersigned will offer For Sale at their Office, No 17, -
    High Street, Bridgetown, on Friday, 27th day of January, 1

    thereto containing 10,770 square feet, situate on the Sea

    CO., LTD.- Agents.



























    ore













    ‘ ee PAGE SEVEN
    }
    : 7
    : SSIFIED ADS, |Pesuc xonces| r
    P . | Schuman Leaves
    i
    5 ee siaasaiaiateciiitin
    = | | NOTICE | For W. Germany
    } } 1. Tenders are invited for the exclu- |
    Rg AT ES FOR RENT sive right to sell Liquors ete. and | PARIS, Jan. 12.
    Week Sun. | ™ serve lunches amd teas at Ken- | ‘
    a. $1.00 1.29 | sington Ovsl during the Tourna- M. Robert Schuman, French
    CEMENTS | —= ment. (Approximately fram Febru | Foreign Minister, left Paris lata
    aNnoun per word j | HOUSES = 7th to February: 2ist.) | ; last night in « special rail car for
    FoR | “FARAWAY”, St Phili . r Walapectalia Tur oe | Mainz, his first stop in a tour of
    qr eet - * f 02 ®S| tarnished, Gar . iene = Team froin Abbeville Guest House | | Western Germany and Bertin,
    i rs | Bathing beach. From March ist. $50 to the Oval during the tournament. | from which he is due vo return by
    wasteD * | per month. Phone 4476. 3. Tenders must reach the undersigned | air nexv Tuesday .-——Reuter.
    FOUND per word ia | 6.1.50—t..n oe P. Harrison & Co.'s Office m
    . : : a . no! er than 4 p.m. on Monday
    vost, charge ‘ “WORTHY DOWN ae. January tee 3 ~
    sini ‘bemees Top Rock, having : : . / 1 i
    LES ms each having comm 4. The Association does rot bind it- 3 alk d
    posuic SA | i 19 | toilet and bath. Wally tusmenen — self {0 accept the lowest or any F inancial TT _ En
    ae able on monthly tenancy from the 15th tomes, : . ie an
    ,ucrion panuary, Por further particulars apply THE BARBADOS CRICKET Without Agr eement
    ee! tine Phe - Beard, dwood Alley or Assoc |
    TE per ee 1. ne 4683. 12.1.50—3n W. F. HOYOS. —
    p esta’ churge vee «= 1.20| “th, Honorary Secretary. LONDON, Jan, {12.
    ae . © Offices in Shepherd Street recently 8.1.50—6n An Polish financial’ ;
    Personal 4 agate lines) ieee bythe Income Tax) On.) ——————————————— s —_ ttling Pola Aalks,
    Maxim missioner. Occupation on March Ist. ‘ aim at settlin, an
    ra =. (8 cas KNIGHT'S LTD, LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE war debts to Britain and compen-
    charge : -1.50—5n. , ; vion for British concerns nation~
    TE (Monday) —————— The application of Elaine Robinson —s i
    ens: saan ze em 60e FURNISHED FI “AT—At Coral Sands Grassfield Gap,” St Michael, for berm A alised in Poland, have ended
    nen, am 1 . Good ™ Sel Ss, it Li -» at rj gree even
    — | bathing, for further pl Dia a board and shingle shop’ attached to without a . ment after >
    IN MEMORIAM 8134. Alma Lashley. 10.1.49-t.f.n | 'ésidence at Grassfield Gap. St. Michael months. This was announced to-
    MEMORY of our beloved| “FLAwS tulip fammlGd none | Te a ee eh Ay of January 1950 day by the British Treasury,
    ul furnished * » A. A ve i 4% i ¥
    I LOVING MEither RICHARD H.| erator and linen at Indramer, Worm, | Police Magistrate, Dist.” “A”. which added thay “in view. of the
    BTROND (Late Shopkeeper, piudor| Dial 8364, 19:1.60-t4e Signed ELAINE ROBINSON, ayy nf, ang of “- re oe
    ‘sed to the great be} ennai Applicant. ed it has been foun possi
    wun day of January 1947. CHURCHILL, Maxwell's Coast, 3 bed-| N-B.—This application will be con- to continue negotiations.”
    the The Walrond Family. rooms, right-of-way to beach, fully tur, | Sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at | Reuter
    th nished. Available from March lst Police Court, District “A”, on Monday, | a 7 7
    3.1. SMORY of (WILLIE) | APPIY: Ralph A. Beard, Hardwood alley, | {M6 23d day of January 1950, at 11 Tee
    VING MEM! 4683. 4 . am,
    IN LONThe 18th of January 1947 = ta E. A. McLEOD, : *
    diet rs death took her from Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”. Gasperi Will
    Thre y® ver from mv heart 3.1.50—~in.
    my bome; but never from & Areher,, PUBLIC SALES i isha soot deinen eeeme R . P
    Brittons X Roa tal
    aie LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE a bch: 2
    3.1. Soo » 5 ¥
    = : 1953
    AUCTION THE application of Owen T. Alider . si ROME, Jan. ab
    of Barbarees Hill, St. Michael, for per- a es = Itali Pres: Einaudi
    FoR 8 ALE RILLMAN mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., — —— ——— — ident Luigi ‘
    Fe SALOON CAR—10 h.p | at a wall shop attached to reidence at up hortl di : f s eo tonight completed the first round
    Suction at. the, tee, PS, 801d bs | corner of Richmonds Gap, St. Michael. m shortly attending a meeting of Flect-street journalists—these are my measurements . . of talks on the formation of a new
    4 0 Fiiday 13th at 2 p. arage 0" Dated this llth day of January 1950. yA ge i ec re TN Cabinet to succeed the Govern-
    TO I p.m. on instructions} To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq : :
    : f or refused. | ,Ceived from the Insurance Co. DIXON] Police Ma: “aan e eo ‘ ment which formally resigned
    BB CAR—™.G. no reasomable offer ref & IN, Auctioneers, Plantations eae . LILDER, > - parli oday
    : Et, betwen the. Ste Philip Euldions . 11.1,50—3n - yen OunCI Onsi el Ss j a hn l ri ie f hie talks with party
    contact J. G. 13.1.50—3n. “EGE ellie tee tne te a N.B.—This application will be consid- u Z pany
    posi petition at my office Vitae ered at a Licensing Court to be held at leaders tomorrow, the President
    ’ . on Cow “ae ° - . . , m 2 ac iri
    TRUCK—Chevrolet ee a FRIDAY 13, at 2 p.m. the following:—| 2ist day of Viaemey "sei aitaeee @ From Page 5 taken but that it was bringing) where peaceful picketing endedy often resulted. | Was expected to ask the retiring
    een Si aes am. by argument, let him be. That} undue influence to bear. and where intimidation began. | Dr, St. John said that the dis-, Premier, Alcide DeGasperi, to
    3 : = “Sedan Gar | NY Lane with the wall rare Police winsecie oat _ | Was the democratic way of doing} Mr. Pile called the undue in-} Government recognised that,| tinction between peaceful picket-| form his sixth successive Cabinet.
    CAR: oe to vakacatie. offer | on aE = ates 13.1.50—1n =? : things. fluence another example of the| and hence. the presence of sec-| ing and intimidation was hard to —Reuter.
    < . . bedr y out-



    Fat te a e®

    12,1,50—2n.

    mM NZED SHEETS —Bes
    st Grade,
    yen Sheets, from $2.08 and 32.64,

    of St. Lawrence Gap, Christ Church

    your sssing at-Stenway Mess UNS Inspection on application to Miss Kathleen Hunte, “Brat-

    Street. 13,1, 50-—2n

















    bath Standing on 8,000 sq. ft. of













    Y “eee bi ton,” M ells Coast. Dial 8357.

    ee o ene A. BARNES & Co. Ltd 5 cae ane bg at te LONDON SECURITIES sama oie relay wy For further particulars and conditions of Sale, apply to :—

    - L 13,1,50—i.f-n. | & colours, Oe ee saree Dial 4321 between 6 a.m. and ATFORD & No : %
    ORES BEANS—io cone perm (Stet ta i.8ean bought and sold promptly through Stock Exchange EE ren, COTS oo

    Mia. 11.1,50.—15n.





    Green Grocers Co., Shepherd
    13.1,50—In,

    bums Bleed?

    G

    brokers.



    ee eles

    4 inch Pipe in 2 & 6 fee.

    etc ‘A. E, Taylor,

    Dial 4100
    13.1.50—-6n

    & partitions
    lengths Bends
    Coleridge Street.



    BARBADOS BONDS and SHARES

    (also Trinidad) bought and sold. Quotations on



    EXPANDED METAL for Railings &}











    S

    ~

    [

    S
    ene kee eel er ter er len































    ! wie Coneret *«. Round Miid Steel Bars Ni
    » Mean that eek reanith ne Looe a, & % inch. A. B. Taylor Lid ew ear request to:
    Mouth Pyorrhea, |
    a toner oe naps some bad disease | Coleridge Street, Diz! 4100 as total e 3
    ater cause yo teeth 1.50 by |
    " Hews Troumia 8), ause Rheomation | : A. M WEBB
    m ' stops cum
    Ser sens eae ‘GC. CARLION BROWNE 3
    BRtes Ae ehs the th 7 - . }
    ; BEA : : s : = 5
    > Bere be Wholesale & Retail |i) Dial 3188 .:- STOCKBROKER ~- Hours 93
    f y Estate Agent i } _ 7 cea
    om your chemis a cus peupertios Druggist 2 \\ 155, Roebuck Street, Bridgetown.
    Vhoe tod: y. The guar- | sale. For further & a | (Over Peo le’s Pharmacy)
    " —_o lars Ting 4683 or | at 136 RoebuckSt. Dial 2813388 | Pp )
    i Hardwood Aligy i ” er : am baht abst
    PYerrkea— Trench Mouth opposite Cathedral 5 GN A NN RR : 2
    (i OE ne re A ea eae eaecmmearamara LOSSLESS SPLOT FSO SSPF SPS SSOP OSES






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    " Rey Marshall



    ern neg Gj



    *” PAGE EIGHT



    Hits 78 In |
    First Trial |

    A breezy knock of 78 by Roy |
    Marshall of Wanderers enabled}
    Mr. John Goddard’s XT to score
    135 fer two Wickets in reply to
    71 tnade by Mr. W. A. Farmer's
    XI when the first trial match—|
    in preparation for the B.G.-Bar-!
    bados Intercolonial Tournament to}
    be playéd in February — began!
    yesterday at Kensington Oval. |

    Although dark clouds threat-,
    ened the game many times, there |
    were some bright moments wit-|

    nessed. |

    Cc. W. Smith and G. Wood
    opefiéd the batting for Mr. W. A.

    rmer’s XI in their first innings
    when théy won the toss. Taking
    the first bai! of the first over from
    F. D. Phillips, Spartan pace bowl- |
    er, Smith tried to get wel! over |
    but misjudged and gave C. Al-)
    leyne fielding at gully an easy)
    catch, Atkinson then joined G.|
    Wood but was soon out to Brews-
    ter who opened the attack for |
    John Goddard’s KI with F. D.)
    Phillips. }

    E. W. Cave who top-scored for |
    his side with 22, batted steadily, |
    scoring all around the wicket. |
    When he joined E. Atkinson, he
    remained ten minutes before scor- |
    ing his first run on the leg side;
    off Phillips .

    Mr. W. A. Farmer. with Cave
    soon got into his stride but when
    H. King of Empire relieved Brews-
    ter from the Pavilion end he had |
    Cave caught by C. Alleyne.

    No Mistake

    Cc. Alleyne in his first over to
    Cave sent down a maiden over and
    had Cave edging to slip. He gave
    a catch to King who did not accept
    it but in Alleyne’s third over
    King made no-mistake and took
    the catch in slip when Cave at-
    tempted to cut.

    At the close of the innings, Mr.
    Farmer’s XI had scored 71.

    A. M. Taylor and Roy Marshall
    opened the first innings for Mr.
    John Goddard's XI, to the bowling
    of E. Atkinson and J. A. Williams
    When only 17, Marshall was given
    a chance when he edged one from
    E. Atkinson to E, Cave who was
    fielding at second slip. After
    that chance, Marshall became
    more cautious and was for a time
    very reluctant to hit out. He
    reached his 50 with a well-timed
    glide. He continued to bat stead-
    ily until he was given out leg
    before to Atkinson. Taylor scored
    19, which included many well-
    timed drives and glides

    G. Proverbs joined Marshall
    when the score was 65 for the loss
    of one wicket and remained at
    the wicket at the end of the day’s

    aapeentiimeay

    play with Johnny Lucas who
    joined hirn when Marshall was
    given out.

    Mr. John Goddard's XI at the
    close of the first day’s play had
    scored 135 runs for the loss of
    two wickets. The match will be |
    continued on Saturday

    Mr. Farmer’s XJI—Ist Innings

    C. W. Smith c Alleyne b F. Phillips 0
    G. Wood c |. Branker b H. Brewster 3
    E. Atkinson c¢ Drayton ‘wk.) b C
    Alleyne 7
    E. W. Cave c H. Kime b C. Alleyne 22
    W. A. Farmer c Drayton (wk.) b
    H. King 10
    K. Goddard c Phillips b R. Marshall 3
    A. Lawless c & b Alleyne 2
    L. c A. M. Taylor b R. Marshall 9
    E. Millington not out 5
    L. St. Hill e Taylor b C. Alleyne 4
    J. Williams c N. S. Lucas b Alleyne 2
    Extras; (byes) 4
    Total 7
    Fall of wickets: 1—0, 2—14, 3-14, 4-39 |
    5—40, 6~61, 7-57, 8-60, 9--64
    BOWLING ANALYSIS
    oO. M R Ww
    F. Phillips q7 3 10
    H. Brewste: 6 4 ‘
    H. King 8 4 15 l
    I, Branker 4 i 7 0
    Cc. Alleyne 712 0 2% 4
    R. Marshall 4 ,

    Mr. J. Goddard's XI—Ist Innings

    A. Taylor b Millingtor 19
    R. Marshall l.b.w., b Atkir

    23

    G. Proverbs not out |
    J. Lucas not out n |
    Extras 4]

    |

    Total ifor 2 wicket 135





    B.B.C. Radio Programme

    PRIDAY,

    ino

    a.m

    JANUARY 158

    7 am. The New 7.10
    Analysis; 7.15 a.m Think on
    things; 7.30 a.m. From the third Pre
    gramme; 7.50 aan. Interlude
    From the Exlitorials; 8.10 a.m. Pre
    Announcements; 8.15 a.m. Lond '
    Concert Orchestra; 9 a.m. Close Down
    12 noon The News; 12.10 p.n {
    Analysis; 12.15 Programme
    roouncements ; 12.18 p.m
    Choice; 1 p.m. The Debate
    1.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 1.30 p.m
    Symphony of Strings; 2 p.m. The News
    2.10 p.m. Home News from Britain; 2.1
    p.m. Sports Review: 2.30 p.m. Myra
    Hess (Piano); 3 p.m. The Shark Arm
    Mystery; 4 p.m The News; 4.10 » m
    The Daily Service; 4.15 p.m. Nights at

    New |
    the





    |
    News |
    An
    Listeners’ }
    Continues

    p.m

    |



    the Opera; 5 p.m. Black Magic; 5.15
    pn, Programme Announcements; 5.20 |
    pm. Interlude; 5.30 p.m From the /

    third Programme; 5.50 p.m. Interlude; |
    6 p.m. New Records; 6.45 p.m. Anthology |
    ~-2; 7 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m. News|
    Analysis; 7.15 p.m. West Indian Diary: !
    Dance Musi¢e; 8 p.m Radio |
    815 p.m BEC Scottish
    p.m. The News; 9.10 p.m. |
    Home News from Britain; 9.15 p.m. Th
    Debate Continues; 9.30 p.m, Take it|
    from here; 10 p.m. After Dinner; 10.4
    Pun. Music Magazine; 10.45 p.m. World!
    Affairs; 11 p.m. The News i



    a

    AS
    TARR ER) be ALLE



    ‘

    ROY MARSHALL (left) Wanderers opening batsman, and A. M.

    Taylor (right) of Pickwick, wh
    Goddard’s XI at Kensington Ov
    i wicket in reply to @1
    Firs



    Portsmouth |
    And Hull

    Qualify

    LONDON, Jan. 12

    Portsmouth and Hull City vo-
    day qualified for the fourth round
    of the Football Association Cup
    with victories over Norwich and
    Southport respectively in replayed |
    third round ties.

    Before a record crowd for the
    Worwich ground
    home team held Por’smouth in a

    |
    |

    scoreless first half, but after the|

    (interval the first division club
    class asserved itself. Two goals by



    inside right Ride, the second from |

    a penalty, clinched the match,
    Until midway through tha
    second half Hull, Southport
    were every bit as dangerous and
    a little unlucky to be a goal be-

    av

    hind. Suddenly Hull burst into
    the light and scored ‘two more
    goals in quick succession. One of

    them was scored by
    his first for Hull since they paid
    £20,000 to Leicester for his trans-
    ‘vo months ago.—Reuter.

    ey

    Brazilian
    Lady Player
    Eliminated
    PARIS, Jan, 12
    The Brazilian player, Madame

    Sophia De Abreu, was today
    eliminated from both the Wo-



    men’s and Mixed Doubles events!

    in the International Indoor Lawn
    rennis Tournament, organised b

    the Racing Club De France, here.

    In the Semi-finals of the
    Women’s Doubles, Madame De
    Abreu and Madamoiselle Colette
    Soegner (France) were beaten by
    Madame Arlette Halff and
    Madame Annie -Marie Seghers
    (France) 6—3, 6—3, while in the
    Mixed Doubles Quarter Finals,

    Madame De Abreu and Roger
    Dessair (France) lost to Miss Joan

    Curry (Britain) and Bernard
    Destremau (France) 4—6, 6—8,
    6—3.—Reuter.

    Third Round Ends:
    Draw for Fourih

    LONDON, Jan. 11

    Result f tl thir round re-



    pl on Wedne the Foot
    ball Associatio Cup matehe
    were

    Fulham 1, Chariton Athletic
    Liverpool 2, Blackburn Rovers 1;
    Middlesbrough 0, Aston Villa 0;
    Preston North End 0, Watford 1
    Southampton Northampton 3
    West Bromw Albion 0, Cardiff |
    | City 1; Wolverhampton Wander- |
    ers 3, Plymouth Argvle 0

    Results of the Rugby Union

    games wert
    Headingley 5,
    London
    mouth 3
    Draw for fourth round Football
    Association Cup to be played Jan
    28 was revised on Wednesday on
    the basis of re-played third
    round tie games. The draw is:

    United Hospitals,

    8; Glamorgan 17, Mon-

    Chelsea vs
    Liverpool vs
    vs. Derby County,
    Port Vale, Arsenal
    Town, Stockport C

    Newcastle
    Exeter

    United,

    City, Bury
    Burnley vs
    vs. Swansea
    ounty vs

    S Patent Ofc



    put up by Mr. Farmer’s team as the
    st Trial opened at Kensington

    of 42,624 the |

    Don Revie, |

    9. |
    >| Mr



    | Cardiff City, Tottenham Hotspur
    Blackpool vs, Doneaster Rovers, | vs.

    By Jimmy Hatlo |

    ements re ene hen eR RL IER NNR RNY So seen



    © opened the innings for John
    al yesterday and put on 65 for





    Barbados May |
    Have World-Wide
    Cricket Broadcast

    The possibilities of a world-
    wide broadcast of the forthcom-
    ing British Guiana—Barbados
    tournament was discussed by the
    Board of Management of the
    Barbados Cricket Association at
    their meeting in the George
    Challenor Pavilion at the Oval
    yesterday evening.

    Mr. S. G. Lashley, Agent for
    Mullard Radios, has graciously
    ; consented to lend his wireless
    transmitting set to the Associa-
    lon.

    The Association will now write
    the Governor-in-Executive Com-
    mittee to acquire the necessary
    licence for the use of the set.

    The Board agreed to certain
    arrangements with regards to the!



    | local players that may gain se-
    ; lection on the W.I. team to
    England.

    | His Exeellency the Governor,|
    | Mr. A. W. L. Savage, in answer!
    ‘o a letter from the Board re-!
    plied saying that he had von-'
    ented to be their Patron.

    The letter, which was address-
    }ed to the President of the Board
    dated January 12, read: ‘Tam
    delighted to have been honoured
    by your Association by nomina-
    | tion, which I accept, as Patron.
    {l have read the Annual Report
    with interest”.

    The Interim Report from the
    Stands Committee for the B.G.-

    Barbades tournament was ap-
    proved.
    The admission prices for the

    tour will be: Kensington Stand
    $1.00 per day, $8.00 Season Tic-
    ket. George Challenor Stand
    $1.20 per day, $10.00 Season Tic-
    ket. Uneovered Seats 2s. per
    day, half price after tea, Grounds
    ls per day, half price after tea.
    Schoolbeys’ Stand Is per day, (a
    temporary stand is being erect-
    ed). The Car Park will be Is.
    per day.

    Uncer the Head of Correspond-
    ence a letter was read from the
    British Guiang Cricket Associa-
    tion which siated that the B.G.
    team would have to come to Bar-
    bados by a chartered plane be-
    cause the usual services would

    inconveniént.

    The Board agreed to cable the

    B.G.C.A, telling them that they

    ad agreed to the proposals of a
    |} chartered ‘plane and asking them
    (B.G.C.A.) to inform Jamaica
    amd Trinidad on this nvatter.



    be

    Viembers present were: Sir
    | Allan Collymore, (President), Mr
    F. A. Clairmonte, (Vice-President)

    E, L. G. Hoad, Mr. J. M.
    Kidney, Mr. S. O’C. Gittens, Mr.
    'J. W. B. Chenery, Mr. T. N.
    |Peiree, Mr. E, A. V. Williams,
    Mr. BE. D. Inniss, Mr. John God-
    dard, Mr. W. Atkinson (Treas-
    urer), and Mr. W. F. Hoyos,

    } Secretary.

    Southport or Hull City, who re-
    play on Thursday; Watford vs.
    ; Manchester United, Bournemouth
    ‘and Boscombe Athletic vs. North-
    jampton Town, Westham United
    ivs. Everton, Charlton Athletic vs.

    Sunderland, Portsmouth or

    Norwich City, who re-play on
    Thursday, vs. Grimsby Town,
    Wolverhampton Wanderers vs.

    Sheffied United and Leeds United
    vs. Bolton Wanderers.—CP)



    LONG COMES |
    <} THE “THUNDERING HERD

    —— el

    885 NO.CLARK ST.

    WEST HOLWOOR, CAbIF,



    einen

    Department,





    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    Cultivate More | London's

    Fruit

    to that; why not grow tne grape-
    fruit you want from seeds and
    be finished? Well, there are sev-
    eral reasons for doing this: —

    (1) First, the budded or grafted
    plant always grows true to
    type, whereas the seedling
    varies considerably and the
    fruit produced ‘may be very
    different from that of the
    parent tree.
    Plants may be made more
    resistant to disease . by
    budding them on to hardy
    root stocks which are less
    susceptible to disease,
    They usually tear quicker
    than seedlings, e.g., your
    topworked mango or bud-
    ded orange under favoura-
    ble conditions would bear
    in about 214 to 3 years.

    You will see then that the
    stock is the portion below the
    bud union and any side shoots
    must be removed from it.

    if it is your intention to obtain
    some of these plants from the
    the best procedure
    would be to do so through the
    Peasant Agricultural Instructor

    (2

    ~

    (3)

    of your district. He would inspect

    the area where you propose io
    plant the trees and advise
    whether or not it is suitable. The
    site should not bé expose] to
    strong winds; it may be necessary
    to put up windbreaks as a pro-
    tection. The soil should te deep,

    if possible at least 2 ft. and
    should drain naturally. If the
    land available is rocky, then

    blasting may have to be resorted
    to so as to get a hole about 6 *t.
    across.

    Holes to receive the “plants
    should be prepared well in ad-
    vance, if possible 2 months be-
    fore planting. These should
    about 2 ft. wide and 18 inches to
    2 ft. deep. They-should be filled
    back with a mixture of soil and
    well rotted manure until the time
    of planting.
    trees is important to prevent
    over-crowding and competition for
    soil moisture and plant food.
    Over-crowding also encourages
    the spread of pests and diseases.
    A good spacing for citrus shou
    be, at least, 20 ft. apart.

    How To Plant
    Planting should be done as soon
    as possible after the plant is re-

    he



    {4





    Spacing between the} ®

    er



    Trees

    ceived. This is done as follows:—
    The mixture of soil and memiure
    previously put into the prepares
    hole is taken out and {he tree put
    in with its roots spread out. Avoid
    cramping the roots. Press the sol
    fivmly around the roots as the
    hole is filled, and great eare should
    be taken to finish off so that a
    low mound results with the top
    roots only barely covered, If the
    tree is planted too deeply, there is
    serious risk, especially in case of
    citrus varieties, of the bark rotting
    around the collar and the tree
    dying.

    During the early stages after
    transplanting, it may be necessary
    fo water the plants well every day. |
    After they have become estab-|
    lished, Jess water will be required.
    If the soil around the tree is
    reulched, this will help in con-
    serving meisture. |

    Around the tree should be kept |
    weeded, but eare should be taken!
    to see that fe roots are not in-|

    ired during this operation. Avoid |
    the common mistake of moulding |
    the soil up around the tree while |
    weeding, and causing coller rot.



    Fertilizer
    During the early stages, no
    rtilicial fertilizer snould be ap-

    lied. After growth of the trans-
    lanied. tree resumed, V.G.M.
    1ay be applied at the rate of
    tout 4 lb. per plant. This may
    e increased at the rate of 1=-14%/
    ibs, per year. In applying the;
    iertinzer, the soil should be}
    tirred around the tree in a circle|
    ipproximately in line with the
    cuter leaves of the tree where
    most of the feeding rocts will be
    iound. The fertilizer should then
    be sprinkled evenly along the
    cuter edge of the circle which
    should then be mrulched and
    atered.

    As far as pests of fruit trees
    are concerned, the most prevalent
    in Barbados are scale insects and

    nts. Scales should be controlled
    by spraying with Niagara emulso

    1s



    cr D.D.T. emulsion. Where the
    attack is heavy, give three
    thorough sprayings at intervals of
    ten days, Spraying with D.D.T.

    emulsion also hetps to control ants
    on the trees.”

    Budding of ‘citrus was demon-
    strated as well as planting and
    other operations discussed during
    Mr. Beckles’ talk.









    Being Introduced for the

    in Barbados.

    SUNDAY NIGHT

    From 7 to 10 O'clock

    }
    |

    COLD DANISH
    BUFFET SUPPER



    FIRST TIME



    Airport

    —NO 2.

    (By Mail). |
    in Surrey |

    LONDON,
    Gatwiek Airport
    county, well situated for Con-
    tinental flights, and outsice
    London’s fog danger belt, will he
    developed as London’s N@ 2
    aivport.

    The airport, 27 miles from the |
    centre of London and midway!
    between London and Brighton, |
    will be bought from Airports Ltd.,
    by the Ministry of Civil Aviation |
    and some $5,600,000, spent on its
    development. ;

    Gatwick has been under Min-
    istry requisition and was to have |
    been released on January 31.—

    But the Ministry and British
    European Airways ‘have decided |
    on a big expansion scheme, and |
    Gatwick will be enlarged, drain- |
    ed and laid with concrete run-,
    ways.

    This scheme will be completed
    in 1954, when the B.E.A, meves
    from Northolt Airport to Lon-}
    don’s No. 1 airport at Heathrow |:

    Gatwick then will be Heath-|;
    row’s main alternative field. ;

    Starting as a flying club base, | 3
    Gatwick became an_ alternative |;
    to London’s Croydon Airport in
    1936, and was built into a mod-
    ern airport.

    Since the war the airfield has |}
    been laid with metal-mesh run |
    ways and used by charter firms

    It has ona feature possessed
    by no other airport in Britair
    —an electric train service from







    London to within a few yare's
    of waiting aircraft. The a7
    mile journey takes about 30}
    minutes. |

    —INS. |




















    DA
    -: At

    THE BARBADOS AQUATIC
    CLUB
    (Members Only)

    SATURDAY, JAN.
    9 p.m,

    14TH,

    Music by Arnold Meanwell
    and his full Orchestra, play-
    ing the latest tunes from the
    Hit Parade; assisted by Ger-
    ald Bannister, the “Singing
    Westerner.”

    Admission to Bailroom—2/-









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    |





    MEETING

    -: By :-

    CARIBBEAN WORKERS
    UNION

    TO-NIGHT

    All workers are invited
    to be present and hear
    the aims, objects and
    benefits of the Union.

    Among the Speakers
    will be :

    Messrs. E. K. FRANCE i |



    L, E. R. GILL, M.C.P.
    E. K. WALCOTT, M.C.P.
    E. D. MOTTLEY, M.C.P.





    Se







    <
    CPPS SPOSS

    1%

    ‘,

    | Rediffusion Programmes

    FRIDAY,



    JANUARY 15, 1950.
    LOCAL PRESENTATIONS
    Studio Service
    Morning Special
    Tune Time
    Closed
    Programme Parade
    Music for Breakfast
    Time Listening
    Les Brown's
    Orchestra

    ‘amme Sum-
    mary and Interlude
    In Chancery Ep. §
    Tunes of the Week
    Plaza Theatre
    Presents
    Taik—Mr. Aubrey
    Douglas Smith
    Your Favourites
    bresented by British
    American Tobacco
    Co., Ltd,
    Local News
    presented by B’dos
    Bottling Co.
    Nestles . Presents
    Joy Nichols pre-
    sented by H. P
    Cheeseman & Co.
    Carroll Gibbons and
    Orehestra presented
    he Geddes Grant

    8.15— 8.20
    8.30— 8.45

    8.45— 9.00

    9.15— 9.45 Friday Misc

    oe ay, Miscellany

    News 9.15 a.m. and 9

    B.B.C a

    News 7 a.m., 8 a.m 12 noon,

    : 4 pm., 7 pm. and 9 P.m
    andon Light Concert Orchestra
    , 3% a.m. ~9.00 am ;

    Wor ad Affairs 11.45 sam 12.00 p.r

    Listeners’ Choice 12.18 p.m.—1.0¢





    Newsree! 1
    p.m

    Symphony of Strings 1
    mâ„¢m

    16 p.m

    3 p.m

    Sports Review 235 p.m.—2.% 9;
    Piano Recital—Myra Hess :
    x
    The Shark A My
    4.0 p.m

    © Ove












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    Records mM

    RADIO _DIS1.IBUTION
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