Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


Thursday

January 12



1950.

ee





el



FIVE CENTS

Wear 55.



TIONALISATION WILL KILL W.L. SUGAR

Lord Lyle Warns Of

“Violent Repercussions”

he Sugar Delegates
jopeToriesWillWin

1 Carry Out Their Promises To W.¢.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Jan. 11,
EWS that Britain is to have a General Election on
Kebruary 23 was welcomed by the West Indian sugar
elegates this morning.

Aities —~e Their negotiations with the
Food Ministry are not bearing |
\ e€ Should |fruit as they had hoped and

| they have now asked the Ministry |
if the discussions can be post- |

: e

Continue =" |
J ; | If the Ministry agree to this}
5 request they will retum to the

West Indies and will wait there
until the election :esult has been)
decided. |

Sugar Fight

nys Harry Davson } The general feeling of the
, delegates is that a change of
ORGETOWN, B.G., Jan. 11, 1Government would assist their

delegation at Lon-
ks should fail this
duty of all colonies
prned to continue the fight
they get their just rights. So
s Lieutenant Colonel Harry
avson, C.M.G., D.S.O., Chair-
of §. Davson and Company
ed, now back from a 2i
s stay in England.

e WI. delegation are seek-
a higher price for export

the W.I.
Bsugar tal
it is the

efforts to secure guarantees and
a fair price for the West Indian
sugar industry.

They base this view on the
strength of promises outlined in
the Conservative publication “The
Right Road for Britain”,

In this. Conservative policy is
stated as the “greatest possible
development in Empire trade”.

It says a Conservative Govern-
ment will offer Empire produc-
and a long term purchase Die at’ dnt arn creek Sia ae
pniee for expanding produc~ | place in the United Kingdom
land, commenting when it had intitak Seeds. Cais, teat Gated

reported that the success

e delegation at the valks
ed unlikely, Colonel Davson
“J think we in the West In-
must feel very disappointed
e talks in so far as they’ve

pecause after the U.K. Gov-
env’s promises in the summer
ad hoped something definite
4 come of it. I believe the Co-

Office, from the Secretary of

downwards, would be fully
athetic with our wishes, but

unately other Ministries)
into the picture mestie|





home producers.

| “We recognise special respon-
sibility for maintaining a market
for certain colonial products and
a Consetvative Government in
the United Kingdom will offer a
guaranteed market at a remun-
erative price.”

—(By Cable).

Bermuda Naval
Base Will Close
A Reliable Report

LONDON, Jan. 11.

Britain will probably close her
naval base at Bermuda for econo-
my reasons, usually reliable
sources said here today.

A British Admiralty spokesman,
told Reuter, “As was stated some
time ago, the Admiralty has been
examining all Naval Services
with the object of making all
possible economies.”

Interest here in the future of
the British Naval Base at Bermuda
has been heightened by the ac-
tivities of an Admiralty Delega-
tion visiting Bermuda at present.

Since Britain leased
Bermuda bases to the United
States in 1940, American war-
ships often avail themselves ol
the two floating docks and other
facilities. —Reuter.

U.K. Assures
Pakistan

shts tend more to domestic
than to the Empire as a
e, I feel sure the committee
strive to the bitter end. |
y they’re men of great pow-
of persuasion, but if they
d fail this time it is the
of all of us to continue this
until we get what we con-
our just rights.
blso know the thinking por-
of the British public are
sympathetic with W.1. aims.
ordinary man of education is
rather proud of the W.l.
e’d sacrifice a good deal to
em prosperous but there are
s, of course, who take little
est outside their own imme-
affairs,
will be staying in British
ma until April and TI hope by
we shall have good news”
pneluded.—(C.P.)

——

ruman’s Great
Ferry Plan

or Caribbean
WASHINGTON (By Mail)



psident Truman has a dream / KARACHI, Jan. 11.
ast ship-ferry system linking 3ritain has assured Pakistan
aribbean lands to the United}that there is “no intention of

taking unilateral action with re-
gard to Pakistan’s Sterling balan-
ces®’ the Deputy Foreign Minister,
Dr, Mahmud’ Hussain, told Parlia-
ment here today. —Reuter.

s. He has explained his con-
to Mr. Warren Austin, chief |
delegate to the United Na-
who leaves Washington for
r of the Caribbean on Jan-



26.

. Austin says that so far the “t

is “just a vision” to the} Australian Labour
dent and has not been work-

vin ay detail. He explained} Tht

Mr. Truman envisions the | Leader Dies

d States’ terminus of the BRISBANE, Jan. 11.
System. '

Mr. Clarence George Fallon, of
the Queensland Labour Movement
and probably the strongest anti-

|

y large ferry network in vhe
bbean would probably touch

places as Jamaica, Cuba. P , . f

i i ~ Australia, died
, Puerto Rico and various Communist in Australie

in the West Indies. Mr.j today.

Mr. Fallon led the Queensland
Labour Movement for the past 17
years, and was Federal President
of the Australian Labour Party.
From 1940 to 1943, he was General
Secretary of the Australian Work-
ers Union. He was also 4a
Director of a Labour newspaper 1D
Queensland. —Reuter.

in noted tha’ a ferry is now
B built which wil! operate
yeen Key West and Havana, |
tance of 90 miles.
» Austin said that the Presi-
S hope was that the United)
Bs and the navions of the
ibbean might be brought into
r association through the
ng of a ferry system. As ‘he }
ident envisions it, he said, the
would include British |
essions, as well as indepen- |
Nations such as Cuba. Mr.)
added tha’ he presumed
the President had in mind a

tely financed venture.
—B.U.P./ on Monday,

ighting Gurkhas Can Eat
eat Touched By Britons

SINGAPORE, Jan. 11.
GURKHAS on operations in the Malayan jungle have
een exempted from observing one of their religious laws}
@ that they can be supplied with fresh meat from the air. |



BACK TO WORK

WASHINGTON, Jan. 11.





States Miners leader today ordered

back to working a three day week
Reuter.



4





_ « A _ religious dispensation has}

° 4 | been gt inted so that the Gurkhas
hurchill Going | meat which is slaughtered at}
© | Kuala Lumpur under their own}

| religious rites, may be handled by |

British Royal Army Service Corps}

spatches. —Reuter.

«| Interview In Moscow |

LONDON, Jan

Moscow Radio ted that
Vilk a nvernir rresice
ar. and - {
Bon T
m :
toria Castle
oh B ;
OM Chireiss} ee ' oe
ED urchill was to have «| Mosc A ! Hsiar
arty litie ¥
loWin bie ;
ring day —Reutes —Reuter



ie

|
|
|
|

|
}

end



62.000 U.S.| “GLORIA MAY” SUNK:

ca

nearly 62,000.

Ww

Moungstown
Company today that it is curtail-
ing production of steel for Tack o1
the coal,

fr

the Mine Workers Union for the
spread’ of

U
or

Ww

ar

to
th

is
w

nion continues to deny that it
rdered them.
Coupled with the short work]







|

Persian Govt.

Has Resignea

TEHERAN, Jan. 11

The Persian Government re
signed to-day. The Premie
Ohammed Saed in a letter to th
Shah stated that the country’
present situation demanded
change of Government.

Political circles here expected
that either Mohammed Saim c!
Guli Gholshaian, Finance Minis-
ter in the last Cabinet woul
head the new Government, La:
November the Committee whici
supervised General Elections
October announced that it has
burned all the voting papers an
cancelled the elections because ©!
“incompetence of certain electio!
officials, inadequate protection 0!
ballot boxes’ and other irregu-
larities.

The Committee Chairman an-
1ounced that the Shah would not
open the two Houses of Parlia-
ment until his return from the
United States.

The Shah returned to Teheran
m January 2,

—Reuter.

FireRobs6,000

Of Homes In

THE PICTURE (at top) shows the Reef ground as it was before the St. Michael’s Vestry took

it over to turn it into a Parish Playing-field. At bottom another picture shows the progress Kowloon
that has been made since the Vestry has been developing the ground from Labour Welfare

Funds The trees have been removed and labourers can be seen levelling off the playing HONG KONG, Jan. 11.
field,

Miners Cut |
The Coal

NEW YORK, Jane,
The number of striking Ameri-
an coat miners today rose to

One of the strike’s first effect.
as) an announcement by the
Sheet and Tube



There is still no explanation
om John L. Lewis, President ol

the stoppages, and the

eek in other mines, the strikes
e expected to cut the country’s
tal production of coal to less
an half of normal this week.
—Reuter.|



U.S. Consider
Policy Change
ONLY FOR SPAIN

WASHINGTON, Jan. 11.
A State Department spokesman

| said to-day that the United States

considering a change of policy
hich would support a move to
the diplomatic boycott of

Spain.

It was reported here that the

State Department would be wifl-

in

Ambassador to Madrid

United States
if a ma-

g to return the

jority of United Nations members
agreed to follow suit.

ed Nations,

Under a resolution of the Unit-
members withdrew

their Ambassadors about three
years ago. —/(Reuter.)



Wafdists Top

Elections In Egypt

CAIRO, ‘Jan. 11.
Egypt’s Nationalistic Wafd
Party had captured 225 seats in

Mr. John L. Lewis the United the new 319-seat Parliament when

final results after the second ballot

in

66,000 striking coal miners tO 8°). noe to-

77 constituencies
night.

The Saadists, majority party in

were an-

the outgoing Coalition, had won
28; Liberals 26, Nationalists 6, So-

cialists

K

1, Independents 33,
itla Party nil.
Leader of the Wafdists, Musta-

and

pha El Nahas Pasha, was. seeing

K

m
m

ing Farouk to-night.

Sirry Pasha, Independent Pre-
ier of the Caretaker Govern-
ent is expected to hand in his

Cabinet's resignation to-morrow.

eosidy —Reuter.
Shirley Temple

Denies Romance
HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 11.









SKIPPER, 2 PASSENGERS
HAVE BEEN DROWNED

THE 99-ton schooner, “Gloria May,’ which left British
Guiana~on December 21 with two passengers’ and cargo
for Barbados under Captain Graham and a crew of ten,
foundered due to bad weather, it was reported in a cable

Fire\sweeping through a hutte
area on the outskirts of Kowloo:
today made thousands of poo
Chinese homeless. Firemen esti
mated that 6,000 huts had alread)
been destroyed, leaving 6,00
people with nowhere to live.

Many people were injured, bu
there were few fatalities.

British Royal Airforce an
Army “were called out to help
fight the fire; which was racins
near to Kaitak airport.

The fire has destroyed almost
all buildings in the historic old
walled city of Kowloon — a smal)

received here by Mr. Vernon Knight, honorary Vice-Consul | arear, over which Chinese havé
for Venezuela at Barbados. always claimed sovereignty,
H—t—=——-—»---eny The cable reads:— All available fire engines ip

‘ ‘ “Amplifying our radio of yes- | modern Kowloon were sent to ths
Ex.-D.M.S. Jamaica | ‘crcay it is my duty to inform | fire, and other equipment was

| ¥ that the names of the sur-| ferried over from Hong ——

7? . | vivors who are now in Curiapo Tonight a fairly strong wind was,

‘ ill Conduct of this jurisdiction are :~— . iinaed the flames, which were}

James Rice threatening a built up area. }

Hospital Enquiry

THE

Governur has ap- |!
pointed Dr. T. J. Hallinan,
C.B.E., to undertake an

enquiry into the administra-
tion and organisation of the
General Hospital. Dr. Halli-
nan, who was Director of
Medical Services, Jamaica,
from 1933 to 1946, is ex-
pected to arrive in the
Island on Friday, the 13th
of January.

Persons wishing to give
oral or written evidence
should make application, in
writing, to the Secretary, |
Hospital Board of Enquiry, |!
General Hospital. :



Third Bloe Will

Prevent Third War | medicine

POITERS, Jan. 11.
Professor Daniel Villy, of Poi- |
tiers University, Law Faculty, to-
day created a “European citizens
Association” following the pattern
set by self-styled world citizen,
Garry Davis.

Professor Villey, who has taught |

at Rio De Janeiro and Cairo Uni- |
versities, in a newly published
booklet, asks all youth to “follow
him and create a third bloc to}
“prevent a third world war.” |
. He expects to hold his first pub-
lic meeting in Paris sometime in
February or March, }

* =m (Reuter.)



.
Italian Government
.
Has Resigned
ROME, Jan. 11 |

The Italian Government head-
ed by Premier Aleide De Gas-
peri, resigned tonight.

This followed a Cabinet Meet-
ing to-day which discussed resig- |
nation following the long drawn}
out Cabinet crisis, provoked by
the withdrawal of three right-|
wing Socialist Ministers in Oc-
tober.



—Reuter.





Film Star Shirley Temple to-
day denied rumours of a romance
}with 29-year-old Charles . W
Mapes, jnr., Hotelier of Reno, Ne-
vada, and said she was “pretty
mad” at the sab am selena VIENNA, Jan. 11
f such a thing. An illegal Austrian’ Monareh
t know where this thing} OTeanisation is reported to ph
started, and I wish I did,” said the | very active 1¢ Tyrol, actor.!-
21 -ol tre who last]ing t tele ic me e re
Actor Jol Agar eive } the A : Py
¢ e| ag
All and rganisation Jl Atsett
take re nee-| “The League Austrian Patri-
n-a-while s *} ots *, and has it eadquarters in
I rt 2} Innsbruck Recently leaflets, |
eal he \were found at Lienz

in the Brit-

| residents and neighbours of

| about 100 miles from the first port

'eare of by the Capuchin Mission-

‘ernment stavion in the Northwest

| have cabled the British Ambassa-

Hapsburg Monarchists
Come To Life In Tyrol

More U.S. Aid
For M. Tito

WASHINGTON, Jan, 11
The State Department was to-
day reported to have decided on
measures of limited military aid
for Marshal Tito, which it would

Clarence Sarjeant
Gladstone Eastmond
Amos Charles Nelson
Alfred Raimie
Charles Clarke
William Phillips

Bar- |
bados. According to their state- |
ments they left Demerara for
Barbados in the Motor Schooner,
“Gloria May” (99 tons) and when

the boat went down due to weath-
er. The Captain, George Graham

The “we Rn th eee recommend to the President in
i 1e@ crew Savec remselves in 4) an “emergency” This would
lifeboat in which they remained

a , mt iv ; » : ri {
out of their course for nine days probably be given, if the Soviet

till they arrived at the Island of Communist bloc began to use
du b oe au Sear tele ge eyo bee! force to crush Yugoslavia’s inde-
aguporojo where y Vv é \ pendence,

The National Security Council,
the nation’s top policy-making
body on foreign affairs, was re-
ported to have approved a stand-
by programme of possible mea-
sures by the United States to sup-
plement the aid already given to
Marshal Tito in the economic and
political phases of his struggle.

In the light of this action the
State Department has determined
what specific steps it would re-

ary of the Venezuelan Govern-
ment.”

Captain Graham is married and
his home is at “Paraiso,” Barba-
rees Road. He has a wife and
one son, Albert, who is studying
at McGill University,
Canada.

Venezuelan police notified Dis-
triet Commissioner P. A. Forte,

stationed at Mabaruma, a gov-



District of British Guiana, near | Ses to President Truman.
Venezuela frontier station, who To date, American Aid to Yugo-
immediately radioed Georgetown slavia has been limited to econo-

nic and political assistance, but
American influence has been used
with Western European countries
to ease economic pressures on the
Yugoslavs. ;

The British Guiana Government

dor in Caracas. requesting him to
have the men sent back to British
Guiana at the B.G. Government's

expense. —(Reuter.)

British BoatBombed
By Chinese Planes

HONG KONG, Jan. il

Two Chinese Nationalist plane:
today strafed the 1,200 ton British
steamer Leongbee at Sawtow, 15¢
miles northeast of Hong Kong
according to Chinese reports
reaching here.

The reports said thav she suffer-
ed ‘some damage, but there were
no casualties. The bLeongbee,

“Bad Night”
For Gustav

STOCKHOLM, Jan. 11
Ailing 91-year-old King Gustav
had a “rather bad night,” the
Royal physician, Dr. Hjalmar
tasserman said in a bulletin this
morning.
The king is suffering from
bronchitis and a septic throat.
“He was only able to sleep for

short ‘periods,’ Dr, Casserman| which is registered in Singapore
added, “and felt tired this morn-]| and is Chinese owned, was de-
ing.’ s ‘ tained by the. Nationalists some

His condition is unchanged.|yjme ago when she was caugh!

and his temperature is 374 de-
grees centigrade this morning.
—Reuter.

running the Yangste blockade.
—Reuter.



No More Bonus For
French Workers

PARIS, Jan. 11.



ish Zone, containing “court The French Council of Minis-
circulars”, amd reports on t€/ ters to-day approved the refusai
activities of the League. A] of Prime Minister Georges Bidault
neeting was held recently IN} to repeat the 3,000 francs bonus
Lienz to celebrite the birthday'| granted last month to the lowest
Otte Aus ‘| paid French workers to tide them
I eT f | ove intil free collective bargain-
918 “ } nd tele | fg restored
Yara. was ‘ to “our young | ‘he Couneil decided, however,
empero Branches are being|to pay the bonus to low grade
cormed throughout 1 Western} civil servants, who did not get
Austria, the rmports add t originally
—Keuter —(Reuter,)









LONDON, Jan. 11
(From Our Own Correspondent) .
ATIONALISATION of the sugar refining in-

dustry if put into effect would have “violent
repercussions’ in the West Indies, Lord Lyle of
Messrs Tate and Lyle said today.

‘ cm At eeerae time = ee

. e wou go on w e “Mr.
“Tt Will Mean
A Great Deal

; Cube” campaign against nation-
| alisation despite Attorney General
If the Tories Win”
Says N.Y. Times

|Sir Hartley Shawcross’ warning
that expenses incurred by private
sources on “propaganda calculat-
ed vo influence an election” might

' be held to constitute election ex-

NEW YORK, Jan. 11. | and thus leave vhe way open for

The New York Times in an}{a court of law to declare an
sditorial today warns its readers clec}ion void.
aot to exaggerate the importance| He announced that Tate and
of the result of the British Genera. ; Lyle were also organising a na-

| penses over and above the amount

| allowed by law to each candidate

lection, adding: “It will mean « ; tionwide petition againsv national-
sreat deal, if the Tories win, bu. | isation and signed the first form

he differences will be in degree | himself before a cozen press

itmosphere, emphasis and spirit | °@Meramen y bb

cather than in any violent chang< He said that nationalisation

in the social structure of Britain. would mean vhe end of West
On the other hand, the New | Indian hopes of further expansion.

’ >, > , ve
York Herald Tribune comments | People Seauko ae care. Ja. pit
: : t ay y'

Americans will watch the pro } wo Paar are try » :

eedings with the deepest interes: re - c Cee

was directed against any political

yess fer iaelg the _ outcome with *' party and said he acted entirely

ealisation that, to a perceptible ji the interests of Tate and Lvle

ssn p t aha z cas eee . : ; Mu ar anc ayh

egree, heir own future wilt be chareholders.

iffected by the results. He was taking legal advice t
—Reuter iecide ‘ne course of action after

dissolation of Parliament

—(By Cable)

No Loan To Fight

; P .
General Election osters Come Down

LONDON, Jan. 11.
Anti-nationalisation posters to-
a _. LONDON, Jan. 11 day vanished from the windows
fhe British Conservative Party! of the Prudential Assurance
Central Office today denied Company offices throughout the

soviet report that it had receive
a loan of $10,000,000, with whicl
to fight the General Election
Campaign.

“We have heard this report be-
fore, about 3 or 4 months ago,’
a Spokesman told Reuter. “Ot|

course, it is absolute nonsense’ |
the Associated Portland Cement

The report appeared today in|
the official Soviet newspaper in| Manufacturers Limited, announced
li' today that posters against the

Berlin Taegliche Tundschau.
alléged the loan was being made | nationalisation of this industry—
through the Chase National Bank | proposed in the Labour Party

—Reuter | programme—were being covered

Labour Backs é
Labour Party

TEL-A-VIV, Jan. 11.
Changes in the Government, il

ountry The Prudential, with a
vast business in cheap lite insur-
ince, popular among industria!
} workers, is due to be turned into
® co-operative enterprise under
the control of policy holders, if
Labour wins the elections,

Mr. Georges Earle, Chairman of



He-said that the posters “might
9 an embarrassment to candidates
n the expenses issue.’

—Reuter.

People’s Committee

Labour returns to . powel >
sritain’s General Election or Of Belize Protest
Sebruary 23 were forecast today



by Mr. Sam Watson, Chairman of
he British Labour Party

To King, Commons

Mr. Watson, on a visit to Israel, rhe ee s” committee, form-
a) . ‘“ ea to protest against the devalua-

.old a Press Conference, “I thin : . p 7
tion of the British dollar to-day

Labour will win because we have

repared to carry its campai )
Reiter. 5 ) 3 ampaign tc

the industrial district of the colony.
A mass meeting in Belize last
, night gave the Committee author-
| ity to approach world organisa-
tions and foreign Governments
‘if and when necessary to inform
them of developments and request
aid”.

better leadership.

U.S. Still Selling
Tanks To Formosa |

WASHINGTON, Jan. 11. In a message to the British King
America is still selling large] anq Parliament the Committee
numbers of tanks and armourec

had complained that devaluation
of the British Honduras dollar
had brought 2 43 per cent rise in
the cost of clathing, food and
other essential commodities.
—Keuter.

N.Y. Stock Market
Climbs High

NEW YORK, Jan; 11
The Stock Market clir{bed to-
day to the highest level since
Augusi’ 1946 Trading was the

cars to Marshal Chiang Kai Shek’s
island stronghold of Formosa.

Several hundred “combat vehi-
cles’ are reported to have been
loaded on board a Turkish freight-
er at Philadelphia. The ship leave
for Formosa next week.

The Chinese Embassy in
Washington said that the vehicles
were bought under the $125,000,00
Aid Programme voted by Congress
in 1947.

yovernment sources said tha
the shipment ineluded 70 medium
tanks, 100 armoured cars, and 100
scout cars. Another 30 tanks lef!| heaviest for about !4 months,
for Formosa about a week ago, with 2,630,000 shares changing

—Reuter. hands.—Reuter. :

91-Year-Old King Gustav
Misses First Parliament
During 40 Years
STOCKHOLM, Jan. 11.
PRINCE GUSTAV ADOLF opened the Swedish Par-

liament today in the absence of 91 year old King Gustav,
ill in bed with bronchitis and a septic throat.







This was the first time for 49
years Gustay had failed to be
there. The last time he opened
| Parliament, he had to be carried
|through the Parliament, grounds
in a. sedan chair, and helped to

Frogmen Search
For Missing Boy
WOLVERHAMPTON, Jan. 11.

Six frogmen “in rubber suits the throne by his Aides,
and diving helmets,” led by a war- 1’ Crown. ‘Prince Gustav Adolf, in
time hero and winner of the| ’

his speech from the throne, -re-
ported Foreign Relations good.
Sweden hoped that the European
Council would bring theemember
States closer to each other, -and
| promote ‘their economic and sociat
|progress. The economic position
) in Sweden had improved in the
past vear, and most of the ration-
ing and other restrictions had been
abolished. ‘Restraint in spending
by private people and the state

Victoria Cross, voday descended |
to the muddy bed of the Birming- |
ham Canal here to search for the |
body of a five-year-old boy miss-
ing since Christmas Day.
The leader of the divers is
Licutenant Ian Fraser, who won
the Victoria Cross, Britain’s high-
est military award in Singapore
igainst the Japanese.

The frogmen had been working
by floodlight until 9.30 last night,

coinbing over. 450 yards. of the} was still neces.4ry, and. taxes
anal bed which could not be| could not be é@ased° appreciably.
jrained If their search of the

anal is unsuccessful they will try } Has Restful Day

two pools near the"boy’s home.
Scotland Yard experts were |
called in after a widespread |
seareh in Central England.
—Reuter,

King Gustav, according to. to
night’s communique. had a quict
and resiful day.-

—Reuter.



THURSDAY







ow

Children’s Corny _



, JAND
BARBADOS ADVOCATE ANUARY 4

| Just A Toy



PAGE TWO

SS

Cuib Calling



LCS CS A EC, a LS









claring that such a python is

@
® i -
For Jacqueline Rupert and th l
Ie
sce R. T. J. Hallinan who is Trinidad Businessman Here PARIS, (By Mail) “a JED
i coming to Barbados tomor- R. L. Feldman, proprietor of Jacqueline Vaissieres is again bi ; th.
row is the son of the late John M Feldman’s Cate, Port-of- a happy little French girl—she
Thomes Hallinan, J.P. Mayor Of spain, Trinidad, is now in Barba- has received full legal authority
Lewisham. He was educated at dos on his first visit to the island. to play with her 4% foot pink Rf
Archbishop Tenison’s School; ye came in on Sunday by B.W.LA. python. TH
Charing Cross Hospital, He ob- fo, about three weeks’ holiday and As a result she was back al _
tained his M.B., B.S. (Lond), 4. staying at the Hotel Royal. her old Montmartre stand to-day r
or M.R.CS., L.R.C.F. and D.P.H. at rt «» «» happily fondling her 34-pound bed
yet Dublin University. _ oH: First Visit playmate in her father’s travel- ble
| He was appoiniéd Casualty » eps winnifred Waller of the ling sideshow.
aed Officer, East London Hospital for United Kingd sho spent A startled group of spectators . ie,
ip Child¥en from 1908-9 and entered four aati ‘holiday pent vast had protested that she was en- Coes NN Fey i 9
abet ee teen in toto He saw service year during the winter, has now dangering the Dubie eaeviblicly | The disap arance of Dinkiey the down there in the gaa
| during the 1914-18 war in Egypt Yeturned for a similar period, She coaxing the animal into her] Sh QMh'of to'this wild spot?” He gets a sattt & Sam
: and Mesopotamia and was thrice pa = ee or in iat mouth. he thinks. ‘Did she want me to jong ro Roles. oak |
eat ee ee the Marine Hi aa set But her father advanced the} follow, or was she just feeling hasn’t been Ro Yb
i In~1920, he was seconded for ‘¢ Marine Hotel. theory that no pink python could| frisky?" He gets on to a large a good mind to ¢ or OD)
ee serviee with the Iraq Government + e possibly be dangerous at temper-| boulder in order to ft a better forgetting aj; 3 and ee
; and from 1920-22, he was Medical _ To Spend The Winter Peete less than 100 degrees... .| view and gazes around, Then he Dinkie, he seis fy “UME
Officéf of Health at Basrah and R. and Mrs. Martin B. Dill The French legal system, find-| pauses, ‘Hullo, there's a caravan rocks, ,
from: 1922-33, was Inspector of the U.S.A. who were in| (CHARMIAN EVE is the 3 year and one month old daugnter of Mrs, Stephante Kerans, wife of the ing no immediate precedents, ‘Mr
General of Health Services, Iraq. Barbados about three years ago,| Amethyst hero, seen with her here. She can say sentences of six words, loves animals, lives in Devon. called in a ranking member of a tk
His recreations are shooting, golf are now back here to spend the the Museum of Natural History. a a ab
and tennis. winter. They came in recently He rose to the occasion by de~| Whiz Quiz : Switch u ir

Hé lives in Ropley, Irish Town, and are staying at the Marine
















































































































| See! I
— SSS

a



: Jamaica. Hotel, @ 2 harmless, above or below 100 Ti A :
ay : rr degrees. ou me , id
—(LN.S.) $s, or
= : nits been repeatedly said ist aaa pape
‘ iP 5 uman beings ta $ : .
' » *& %& & IS YOUR child backward, bright, He Thinks sex, money and food than any tec: Should be ey Al
: = eal’-@ or precocious ? To help you make an other subjects. However it’s pos- th e on either é A
‘ - estimate, Page Four prints the second ot He e. Di ll , sible that there’s another subject saat number a aq >p
: check-off charts based on ten years’ experi es uit. that’s in pel a ae You're now tenn) A iaiwvot
: Y three, your ‘unge! child’ nas ence of what bright children can do It’s time—and phases ’ a esting puzzle game, ie ind
ba gone, and in its ciierusic pince nas HOLLYWOOD reporter gets|,a8 Second, minute, hour; day, | piace No. 1 counter in immate!
. Guesses gotten meee. eer cee *& *& % THIS WEEK the personat touch is given by around and sends this one. night, morning, ee no tre of the letteh aad bon p
ci aiendontpuaesitgg toanniee fess 5 the wife of Lieut Commander John §. Kerans, She | Fred MacMurray has a complex, | 1ast yea, this year, Ds yal Sve |i the centre of the qilmmec
: ['wenty small white teeth are In the has marked the card tor her daughter Charmian He thinks he’s dull. aire ane i line, and N ad PO
firm mouth, and what they will eat is not ° oe cere e « ” id.“ , contrived many felicitous phrases : ine :
always what mother desires. Not so much ow check up on your own 3-year old. Look,” he said, “I don’t do} ssout time. .Read those below, | ‘he base-line, Thesp ’
Taint int shade aeakedtng GaeneMaeeee j anything that these glamour guys d if y have the memor change the positions of lor
e his sk $ less as the child gets jo. The f POG, S96 SOE Se S Mm
Vv will refuse spinach fish or meat without (This skill grows less as t do. e front pages never heard or literary talent to supply the No. 2 without aC
] ERY. Goharan heaton ehatecevibe okie ed Vv older.) of me. 1 don’t do anything.” right word wherever one is miss.) Counters off the ling. hts
i ¥ The three-vear-old can stand on tip: Can carry a plute safely....se.eeeeee Fred mused: ing: “UOTSOd [RUBIO sy g e'
bs as " “ ’ + e ” ‘4 oq uro¢ T9YUMNO9 Dy 0
toe for three seconds .,....0+-eeeereeereee . Can open a door and use both hands : I don’t night-club, don’t get peep ye map 2
Y Pp into fights or scandals, don’t own is the thief of ee a
Uses the personal pronoun—no ‘longer equally skilfully......+++ Mea CARE Comdinks eee ’ i . + is the ief of | 0 pasour oq mou wep g sam
V * ie the ger al_pro ng “ ice. a yacht, don’t play the horses. | time—Young. ‘% Joc 94M Aq pay e
arv wants.” but “T want.”.seerere+ss ‘ v¥ Is able to get upstairs and downstairs don’t wear plaid overcoats, don’t} 9. Time and wait for | WOMsod oun oO} opsuepy oy,
Vv Speaks tn short sentences, not single without falling......csceeeeeeetereeseereeee go to Hollywood parties, don’t| no man Proverb a a 1 Aequmer spun: 0 |
; WOPdS - oss ea ceenseseseeercseneresennene * (N.B. American children can rarelu do own a motorcycle, don’t run back] 3. Time is the ; coun- | 9 a % cahoaet
“ V Averages $8 tnches in height rvs...» : this until six years old and forth to New York, don’t go} sellor—Pericles aY} UO PapUT}XS BUTT JO amy a
. owing to use of lifts in in for politics. 44 a * oy € AequINU Je}UNOD
(Interesting test at this ace ts that towns and bungalows in “See what I an?” h ked @. Time makes. more converts ’
double present heiqht is said to be an frutt. countryside.) “Pm dull—” Tess ee SSeS. thar —Paine.
cation of full eventual orowth Three fee rr 5. I ___——_—— time, and now 44
non will he «7 siz-foot man later on.) Vv | Can wink each eye in u-ft, pal on the RKO set of}time doth me, —| Mion grave of all.—Dny r
V Can walk two miles without muscle Ree Steines Tae pice oe _MY LOVE.” | shakespeare. 13. Oh Time! the ;
SAIN. sereeese SeEETTN Gs ovo sede ahs ooh ied Head now 19 inches § te hee te ¥ re oe 6. Art is long, and time is ka ;
MR. & MRS. KEITH E, WALCOTT Needs 1.300 calories a day and can cope Conly 2 tnches less than hide be. erates eee —— Longfellow. ein
; aa Vv with the more “windy” vegetables such as full growth) ......... ove $s so busy making millions.’ ; 7. Time is the greatest remedy O Time in your flight);
\ Married Yesterday ae onions turnips A.eeeeeeeeesereeeeeee "4 Citta tnbtiee 22 mmantareay te Po ecoed: for . —Seneca, a ———__——. : ‘
ts afternoon at St. . From Venezuela Sleeps 18 hours tn the 24..sse++-+0% A Weight 31-33Ib .... dough-heaviest guys. And he sistant passes one 7 15 Time which gy
i hias Church, Miss Mar- .é 's. KE, D. Gattrey ¢ > start nen , degen w. ;
garet Slants, Geudnter Me th ge Ah ate Bin Can remember a four-lined rhyme tf ; Still has excellent started out 14 years ago as a} 9, He whe — C time » weakens iilmnd
monve, daughter of Mr. . their three children of Car- repeated regularly each ‘week....... osees VY | resistance to infectious dead-broke saxophone player. averything.—Disraeli Bruyere, '
*, 4. «€, Clairmonte, Commission- acas, Venezuela who were holiday- v t diseases be dam gn ey in 16 i i h c
er of Income Tax, and Mrs. Clair- ing at the Paradise Beach Club ¥ Highs task WAMOUS HOMEINE.:. «+ «50s 4) ye PS Be ae oo SKELETON _ 10. One always has time enough, meme time: pe
monte, ot “Garden,” Christ Church for the past few days have now Can jump three inches off the ground. « nant, lenlausy, at if one ee - haaeceennislliiin| 1 eT |
"< married to Mr. Keith Walcov, come up to the Hotel Royal. They Vv Listens to a story out likes It unless asked to Cco- CROSSWORD 11 Tin oe ee | ‘9t ‘draspuony ‘or “usu
i well known Barbados cricketer expect to be in the island until DEFSONA) ..ecesceweeeeereeeereeereeeees weed operate in some way .. - Time, that black and nar- | -ynvoq er ‘ssAqe ‘er “sonal "
and in of Mr. and Mrs. F. E. the end of next Pa. Poe ck eee row between two] ‘Il ‘Tle 4 4sydde ‘oy ‘cqimmed
Walcatt of “Clarendan,” Black d of next month. Begins to dress and undress, manag: Plays alone with toys . —Cotton 6 ‘aaiddey ‘9 “sosue | sa
be g 1, slack s > V ing undoing of buttons and patent even with other children Fee doh | | | 12. Time’s z ‘sree “poe 0 ae .
"The i : FABLENELS . ovvvewevescuncowseceercescesees present. Sense of pos- ene re » the com~' ‘opp -z “woneunseoig Tam
1e bride, give arriage :
‘oe mori \ ee eaves by For Two Months | Has occasional fits of rebellion to test session heginning ..... ‘ | == =
tiful picture in a dres ‘of I ne RRIVING by the “Fort Am- | ie owe Dower. \Slient varying of iC will res . IN MA .
Slipper Satin wivh an edimaidénnd U Pree on Monday from the V a erect ee ee Sy rae ees "a orignt A eee AQUATIC CLUB C E | :
a ne bro J.S.A. were Mr, and Mrs, George | 40.0 Wo cveestees sonvcerase veadas MMS. is cae sais : : 0
esti oa eee ee ised a 4 Case is Cleveland, Shin” They Prefers to play with toys that ne can .Ghtemene: ob | TONIGHT at 8.30 Commencing FRIDAY ish fe
wore a trai we haath, le are here for about two months’ | move—uch as pushing animals on wate Y chairs boxes, and SR een eee Ae a ;
b ore a train Her headdress was Holiday ghd are ata s ¥ |} volling ball down track, shunting oricks, carts 7 ROBERT MONT
a chantilly lace mantilla held in ogo” ;22a, are staying at the | or lifting cubes fn and out of slots.....+- ‘ Rea ete st 6 ‘ r -— io tm
Sooty 1008, oan Marine Hotel. Has no natural fear { _:
place by a vortoise-shell comb, Mr. Case is Chair : Fix a targe piece of orown pape! at ¥ of horses. dogs ; } r t
and she carried .a bouquet of nied oe a aA of the}, cheac level on wall. and give three-year- peeases . with. MARGE scone ‘| ee JUNE BR | ‘
orchids, m ; irec ors of Lamson & o'd a piece of coloured chalk. An almost vy Does aot mind the | | REGINALD TATE, PETER SINC-| with FAY BAINTER, E TTY LI whi
Miss Dorothy Clairmonte, the ° repel manufacturers of bolts / perfectly drawn circle will be one of the MAPK se eeeee eee eeeeneee REE CLAIR, MARY MORRIS A Warner Bros. F
bride’s sister, was her sole at- and nuts, | COBUItS, ceretesset es ease see ie. Sco tsetse wwaet V | Eilloys batt and GHA REM BER arner
tendant. Her dress was an off , «» water in any form .... ———_—S—S—SS———— aa =
the shoulder bodice of orchid satin Director Returns London Express Servic, UBRBY BM ne by, .y
and vhe skirt was of nylon mar- M*: HARRY FARINHA, Di- LCL CT CLUES ACKOSS ' §
ee ie en with satin, Shi rector of Messrs J. T. John- 9 @ lL, Marl Holst’s greeting %% ot
wore a Milan Picture hat and her son's Ltd. of Port-of-Spain j -Ollowed by a burat @f HEAT a
bouquet was of gerberas and ‘Trinidad, and Mrs, Farinha, te, | Ou an t ema e L ren 6 Unequal’ advantage ? ‘
ground orchids, turned home by B.W.LA, on ; ys 8. Sailor, scholar, and father. TO-DAY, 5 ‘ 3
The Ceremony was performed Tuesday, after spending “about Fy Dora Hell eae ie ik at 9. Whereja you ‘may see = , 5 & 8.30 p.m. — Last Showing of
by the Rev. M. E. Griffiths, and ten days’ holiday in the island. y : i 12, iauminatea $9 or 101 imside, JAMES MASON and JOYCE HOW
the Begtman was Mr, Clyde Wal. ‘hey were staying at the Ocean ted as such by his parents, then wish is allowable, oe WE Bes tric
cott, brother of the ‘groom. anq . View Hotel, MORE than we realize, we make pictures in our| D@mdled wisely, so that his fine) {} Bete conte t ms
popular West Indian and Inter: «» “» minds of what we want our children to be like. Often <¢ Don Sees be Sevenggem “Ae 45. Aid tok record “oc “unuitioat THEY MET
national cricketer, sea bel i arse bide. . N a} some modifying of his faults be progress. IN THE DA :
The reception was held wat ne’ Comings And Guings | 6°" a between ideal and reality follows and this leads to] brought about. : 16. Somewhat toilsome painting a Fi
Hastings Hotel, and the couple | a conflict, or to put it more mildly, some sort of daily| I'm not saying that this is, 18 May be’ seen in the Genere Bs starti p.m,
will Be spending thelf hone reac Mé M. WEXLER was an ar- friction between parents and their children, “| easy to do. In fact, for some | 19 roe nen od. aoe To-morrow at 5 & 8.30 ME” ee
i at Bathsheba, tival irom ‘triniaaa yy y| There is, for instance, this mat-, tain family difficulties. The re- parents it is very difficult. Par-! 21, Time wo “Get uD but done N GOOD OLD SUMMER TI i
j «> «> b.W.LA., on Luesda) ter of standards or averages which| sult of all this was an almost Tie With @ ‘Rome social Senne} 22 80% of dao orth FINED nee
Oo Sh r . s i sit are set up as a parents’ guide, Or} constant impatience with the tend to be impatient with a burden, Pe Se ee ~~. oa 1
n hort Holiday Hoe RABLE J. D. Chandler,| we might call it the picture of| baby’s great activity and drive rather solitary or unconvention- } 23, Deed book ? lll SSS SS
R. JACK DE LIMA, Director M.L.C., and Mrs. Cnandlex re- | “normal” that gets built up.| His personality made such de- al son and daughter. a6, They make Gis-regres, hn
, i : e De Lima and Company turned from ‘Vrinidad by 15. W.1.4. | Parents often have these pictures| mands upon her that she was | t ” st businessman tends 1. Ve CLUES DOWN O
j imited, Jewellers of Pori-of- © ‘uesaay ater actenaing the | 80 held before them that they use! not equal to them. and she often 0 be intolerant of a youth whose ao Flew 4
4 \ s ‘ i is e é g | no a bm she La aeeerts a t a . ure I starnt-weth.
a r Spain, San Fernando and Bridge- ©5ristmas Race Meet there them, like a tape measure, to| said, “How did I’ ever get such satisfaction lies in working with | 3° Gabler ben on ee. | :
4 town, Was an arrival recently ); Bauge their child’s nature of|a child as this? I’m much better his hands, A bustling mother 4 Noturaii }
from Trinidad by the “Golfito” Ms K. Vincent Brown, Senior | #¢hievement. fitted to take care of a quiet has trouble to understand * ‘obituary notice. & Om g
for a short holiday and is staying x Puisne Judge of ‘'Lrinidad Then there is the ideal a mother] little girl.” {a daughter who isn’t the} 5. The bulkiness of the attmse
at the=Marine Hotel, was an arrival on Sunday by ia father builds up of perfection For a time, these comparisons | ROURD- WiHehy type, but cares moat q Theatrical game. |
‘ Shorily after his return home, B-W.1.A. and is staying at the| iS Perfection, of course, is so] in her own mind worked to the to write or draw, or think or) 8. Song of a pariah, ;
it Mr, De Lima will be going to tha Motel Royal, ying contrary to human nature that it} detriment of her relationship read about serious or even pro- | 10, soe of a deparntus-gaaiy ,
United-Kingdom on a two-month as acs can’t be realized. But the struggle| with her little boy. He showed found subjects. Likewise, ser-) 11, Holds out, -
busineg$. visit in the interest of carr John Higham and Capt toward it, and the series of in-| it in becoming very difficult to ious-minded parents do not easily| 17 ie might pass out, ine
his firnt: E. Allen, both Pilots of evitable disappointments that fol-| manage, and quite’ anvagonistic understand | or accept a bouyant]’ 19, Snes part of a clever ach
i Trans-Canada Airlines ee in sre when a child repeatedly acts| to his mother. butterfly of a daughter. 20. on ie
: «> © over the week nee. Oe ike a person, create discord. Then when he got > walk . : BO Ee REY on thenios
) > week-end fr sa : got to the walk- . ‘ be hag
big Came in on T.C.A by LCA: toe ieee tee | Forget Personal Ideals ing age, and everyone was so| ‘scauire Flexible Attitude hi
or RS. K. E. ith naa her Were accompanied by their wives aah Tan ee mers those very per- om i the little bey’s per- “She (or he) is certainly no P To-day (only) 5 & 6.30 p.m.
4 4 dadattie Sikes and her and are staying at the Marine| - ay ows ased on wishfulness| SOMality and so impressed by his| child of mine,” is a usual ex- Warners Double :
Nea vat 3 aughter Miss Barbara Dowd Hotel, = which, when not realized, may| iMtelligence and independence] pression in cases like these. But}}) IL ‘PRINCESS O'ROURKE’ i
Ee T oa roe Canada by * ® e ae 6 or father out of we vigour, his mother realized don’t say it too often, or you may A ‘CASE OF THE .
Veg rh the week-end for R. Douglas Roberts, District joint wi h the situation which ac- | W rat She d been doing: rebelling} convince yourself and, worse BLACK PARROT’
i about two weeks’ holiday and are Tain Gianhina® fas rane tually exists and so very often out! against this little dynamo’s ways| still, your child that neither of Z
staying-at the Ocean View Hotel. po. ee Manager for Trans-) of key with a child. Since instan- because he wasn’t the girl-baby-| you can fi any ‘ Friday, Saturday & Sunday
They ar i Canada Airlines in Ottawa and] ces ar inati , , . ? aby-} you can find any ground of un-}}) Ad ABOTT : > )
; y are the wife and daughter : awa and) ces are often illuminating, let me, oll of her dreams. ) derstandi i > anionshi IN THE NAVY °
of Dr. Dowd Chief Medical om Mrs Roberts, were recent arrivals cite one: *) Ke my ang at Ry cre wort SaaS Saturd Ni 14th.
| Dr. Dowd, i icer ne om : . : . | eep in g ow re) SaaS
of Canadian National Railway and ae “nie about swe wours A young mother I ito k Accept Them As They Are alike Pit may be ae ue oY ight January
Trans-Canada Airlines who came ~ >: rey are staying at the ’ other 1 used to know Just as with the adults wel ;: , aot “th a
; anes i ‘ean View : had always wanted a little gir adults we} along together; but that whe
ot a on the inaugural flight las View sora. . aioe: delat child hoes on — . and live with, we must not| you’re different, your er "a PERCY GREEN & HIS ORCHE
y T.C.A, sprint : . . . e} try »make children: we i, ad . ow —s .
y T.C.A, in December. R. and Mrs. Frank L. Lewis} COUld make lovely clothes for, and accept en eee i ave ae a ne Sar a a ae D 3
«» «» of Halifax, were arrive vey| Whose ways would be gentle and} jn | nite. Ge e yum} give you, and you may have To-day , i WW)
the week-end by T.CA. eee appealing. What the fates brought Seana are wenieee A me at ee i See wg from 9 to all hours 7 $
Member of Offics Staff a month's ioliday and ate staying her was a big husky baby boy, so] flicts are inevitable whan senate ae. on aren said, United Artists Double . . . iat |
MONG the. visitors to this at the Marine Hotel, vigorous and independent that he| are much in each other’s com-|! y a hildren around keeps Edward G. ROBINSON in SSS FFE
colony is Miss Daphne Theo- $ 2 ° ct sven want to be held on/ pany ways ott vent re eat: A8® BONER” i
balds, a member ; ar R. Fred Burns of Consolidate er lap or cuddled any longer} [It ; ils A Laaee 18 true, but it is espec- a and
bEa aes ee = = -* a oar . ee than was necessary for his feed-| that f tan Aiea he he Ry 7 — when your children are COPACABANA”
f Ped ese : » St. Lucia, s ansas, U.S.A.,| ings. " y ont r different in tastes ersonali- ARMEN 1}
bees } Miss Theobalds who is a gues} came in recently by T.C.A. for eis mother wash't t¢ 1] MY readers, that each child is an ty from you. Meas yen aoe GS MIRANDA
he j av Indramer, Worthing, is spends about ten days’ holiday and is'f : _ was 00 Well) individual exactly like no other acquire flexibility of minc ‘oO
ih ing a short holiday in Barbados int Tegan ‘ 8 for some time after he was born,! in the world, and S ae nn OF Can: ae
He ay ados, staying at the Marine Hotel. d was quite nervous ov, ne World, and must be accep- manner
eet b.s —_—_—_- silica neue ord and was quite nervous over cer- .
, OF '
Tae ® “ Last Two Shows To-day 4.45 & 8.30 i
‘ on M.G.M. Presents... ya
EVERYTHING FOR THE CROP ||) “Soe
teerhid | are TOOL
e tna : ‘ with
e€ : including : Louis JOURDAN— is
WOVEN Christopher KLNT
-STRIP @ CANE BILLS THE
@ CUTLASSES ROXY FOR +
NDALS fe ae Sage i Dette tee tm a TASK!
j -R.C, uble...
| © SHOVELS Lola Sheldon LKONARD AS °
@ GALVANI “WHY GIRLS LEAVE HUME” F
Our Last and Latest AT F — “ Ei A wonderful i ed:
f @ BRASS WOVEN _ STRANGE ILLUSION” : ul assortment just openee:
Shipment of Mexican } James LYDON dally . CIRCULAR PLANES RIP SAWS
HUARACHES . @ STENCIL INK AND BRUSHES St ee ae io < BOW SAWS
| | . i CK
PAIR | @ SEWING TWINE | OLYMPIC 1} BLOCK , RACE: SAN |
{ ’ CHISELS o
Buy now fo r iE '}) RABBE : ;
uy vr comfort & Hard Wear | ® PACK NEEDLES | ast two shows to-day az0.aess Mii} PLAN ho HAND DRILLS
i= 25.0, eh OO ee en I E IRONS BREAST DRILLS
; ' y % y r | ¥ K{ Robert YOUNG t SPOKE SHAVES VISES ep
| " \ ) Robert MI M
EVANS & WHITFIELDS | : : nt won ff peau orcs a
‘ey \ BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON } inte sain y ie NLEY” MITRE BOX A
} ) aes _ and ) see Them in Our S > Wi w. :
Dial 4606 and 4220 | FACTORY LIMITED, Wee a ti PLANT AT viet pp
iis ues John WAYNE—Ella RAINES y ANT: } iT
a nr = ) i ae a¥i 4M.







TR Te Te a eee

5 RSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1950

»lombo Talks End Soon;
Back Jap Peace Treaty |

(By SYLVAIN MANEGOT)
COLOMBO, Jan. 11.

= 'THE Commonwealth Foreign Ministers, believed to|

sr widely over Japanese Peace Treaty terms, to-day

bed in principle to set up a working party to study the }

lem. They heard a 75 first hand
——~« report on South East Asia by Mr.

i are Malcolm MacDonald, british

Amnest Commissioner General there. The

) y working party will be at Ambas-
n templated

¢ Germans

sador or High Commissioner level,

Although it was not decided

where it should meet, London

was considered a possibility. Ob-

servers here saw in the establish-

ment of a working -party an

KFURT, Jan. 11. admission that Commonwealth
pd States High Commis-
Mr. John J. McCloy staved
that he was consider-
ablishing a procedure to
individual petitions for

y by German war erim-

countries have widely differing
views on the Treaty, and that
further consultation is required
betore a detailed, co-ordinated
policy can emerge. They pointed
out that any decisions depend on
other interested powers besides
those represented at Colombo. |

Divergencies in emphasis over
the Japanese Treaty Talks did not
mar the friendly atmosphere.
Britain’s Foreign Secretary, Ernest
Bevin, opened the discussion, and
delegates reported he was in ex-
cellent form throughout vhe ses-
sion, wir. Philip Noel-Baker,
British Secretary for Common-
wealth Relations, told reporters
atter the session that the Ministers
had had “a very good day and a

id that he was not, how-
ontémplating a genera)
for Germans sentenced
crimes. In a letter to
Aloys J. Muench. Regent
Apostolic Nunciature in
, Mr. McCloy said, “any
pproaching a general am-
yould, I fear, be taken as
mdonment of the princi-
ablished in the trials of
petuals of war crimes”.
loy stated that he was
“ ay} ee ‘Regal | Most useful discussion.”
“¥ the “prosectitions and, Mr. Pearson went out of his way
ticial soundness of the| to ridicule a local newspaper re-
hts. He said thav he_did| Port attributed to the correspond-
ieve that world opinion|¢®t of one London newspaper
pared to accept the pro- that the Conterence was dragging
that those crimes had] through waning enthusiasm, and
Miciently atoned for that that the British Election announce:
ans should now be al-| ment made delegates feel that in|_
o forget them. the event of a Conservative
victory, the present British dele-
gation’s views might be repudiated.
On the contrary, he asserted that
the talks, covering widely different
regional approaches, had revealed
all delegates as essentially
reasonable and understanding.
Views expressed at today’s talks
on Japan, put India at one ex-
treme and Australia at the other.



—Reuter.

100,000,000
nt On Atomic
Energy

NEW YORK, Jan. 11.













U.K. Hears Adams On Sympathy

NOTABLE WEST INDIES politicians were heard pre-



———ers— —

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



200.000 Witness
Last Rites

MODENA, Jan.
estimated 200,000 people—!
| twice population of Modena }
'—heard Palmiro Togliatti’s fu-}
jneral oration over

be i
An

the

the tri-colour}
} draped coffins in the Piazza San |
| Acoscino of the six Italian work-
‘ers killed in Monday’s strike
| troubles.

| The Piazza was a
flags and floral wreaths brought
'by workers’ delegations from as
j iar south as Bari.

! Togliatti’s charge that the Gov-
}ernment was responsible for the
j}shooting was repeated by other
|speakers who included Giuseppe
De Vittorio, Seeretary-General of
|the Communist Confederation of
| Labour and Mayor Corasori

| Before walking behind the
| coffirs, which were borne on the

sea of red

shoulders of overall-clad work-
men to the cemetery, Togliatti
jhad visited the bodies lying in

state in the courtyard of the City
|; Museum. Here, hysterical wives
and mothers wept bitterly, one of
them shouting “assassin De Gas-
peri.” —Reuter.

Belgian Premier
Asked To Resign

BRUSSELS, Jan, 11.

Belgian Socialist Deputy Fran
Tielmans to-day urged Belgia
Premier Gaston Eyskens re
sign this evening lest the whok
Government collapse in a
weeks time in what he describec
as Belgium's post-wal
| financial seandal.

Tielmans was ioning the
Government on widespread frauas
recently discovered by the Bel-

lo

fe

biggest

quest



~ CO i iif : : gi olice. The frauds concern
LEONARD COTTRILL, Pauline Dowding and Barbadian.children in a studio of Radio ae acd ae ‘that “ebouid |
Distribution. have been declared to the Belgian |
— —-——__ - - —___— - ~ --- - police The frauds concern |
5 ° i ‘ | stocks and bonds that should | Babr
; } b lanlat to » Bel- 4
B.B.C. Commentator Finds, — Split In Jap | ise" veer aeciarea ote Ber Powis
gian rovernme € y | * -
6eé 59. * mic after the liberation as part of!
Colour Bar rt ar 7 Os Communist Belgian anti-inflation and ant-

war profiteering drive. M. Tiel-



Party Predicted mans said to-day that the fraud
TOKYO J 11 amounted t ».000,000,000 Bel
SN 4 in L .
ao g rancs —Reuter.
LONDON (By Mail) The Central Committee of the gian fran
. : iy f Japanese Communist Party has}











| Vietnam Government asks us to”. |

; it-| Pandit Nehru, Indian Prime : . : ; : expelled Ko Nakanishi, the only; ‘ae Aeeuses
be 7 will yi snoen Minister, strongly supported a, ‘Senting their colonies’ cases and discussing federation and] prominent Party member to sup Moscow Accuse
9.000 in atudying mili-| quick settlement of Japanese issue other problems in a B,B,C, programme relayed to millions} port ese campaig! Bevin of “Curtain
@ non-military uses of| under conditions that will allow] of listeners on the Home Service. The programme con- ~ wc Eran Ee on eens,
energy. The figure was ores seen oe ae sisted of recordings made throughout the West Indies for] Phe 4 panese Press today Tacties

Mr. Wilbur E. Kelley,| politica self- etermination, an the annual Christmas Day round-the-Empire tour always] forecast a big split in the party jf
of the New York Office | an early withdrawal of occupation “ ! ee biNateapia) : : .
tomic Energy Commis- | forces. put on by the B.B.C. and surplus to needs on December 25,| Nakanishi — after xpul- LONDON, ae
‘ * B.C. commentator Leonard} 0m, that he would lead Japan- Vioscow , commentn
a three-day Conference The Difficulties Sie ey 2h x B.B Seen Chiat, Min the dinentin | Oy
Sent “, a 4 rn dates escribe: ife oy ‘ 2se IMUNISts 1 the Irection | Jasi nigh Tuesday
Bie she Coramaission: and Canada's External Affairs Min- Te peer renece ett ean eee of the true Marxism Lenin-| | ; iti ( mmonweaittt rorei
i i ad nai ‘ ated ° ~\ ee > ahé as, a 8 aica “love- a a tal Britis omr nwe:
Benversny. et i ister, Lester B. Pearson, while “W illiam Scoresby |liest of them all” and Harry Ven-| ism.” He was expected to ap-| Ministers Conference at Co
ee’ cack meesanber aewing = TG" Value te te : | dryes Jamaican businessman and peal to a meeting of Commun-] alleged “the very fact that b*
s *I | desirability of an early settlement, i Beds eee epeeeet, oot eed a ae and) ists from all parts of Japan on} Secretary Bevin and his colleague
hen the Government be- | made an appraisal of the difficul- Begins Scientific oe 1S aa ra t a January 18 for action f aor ubl
a tee % : storicé yvackgr ) » : fea yubh
; ei sal i on vite in the way of such ® solution. . island oa veel rs couieaniion on the Central Committ plot §
000 tow the ‘current fecal Gh legal: grounds, he reminiee Voyage current business difficulvies aris | The Party crisis has boiled preparati
Bid not. eas how ania Ministers that a formal Peace Ling rom stetling-dollar problems. of the recent Comintorm critic- The commentator added: “D
oted t nae f milit Conference with two Communist _ LONDON, Jan. 11. Barbados—“‘where there is | J8™m of the Japanese Party lead-| jomatic recognition of the Chine
da, ety | Powers.— Russia and China —|,The British Research Ship| io. ba# was compared with| ers, gravest since the campaign | People’s Republi: the Labow
P said security restrictions | osent would meet an insur-| ‘William Scoresby”, directed py | Oe ne ee eee ie und| 2gainst Yugoslavia 58 year olé} Government of Britain does not
impossible for the Com- |? : , . th : ‘+s, | damaica “where there is none and} ¢ eee a a i Ove ent of Britain ac
to “ t letely to| Mountable difficulty in agreeing ay Renee Serene, OF black and white mingle freely.” |'52920_ Nozaka, party intellec-} mean any change in the Imperi- |
31 a ait es ©] on a common approach. Oceanography, set out to-day on uM ii S Bry can ee Barbados} tual leader” was singied out by} alist trend of British Foreign
Bale eee etna Or tical grounds as repre-| 19 months Scientific voyage| ,.- por ae yee OTe te aeeS! the Cominform for his “errone-| policy, Bovh Churchill and Bevin,
ims have been expended. nh Pracheas BrOU D inl : discussed the sugar price and its : apes y. B
sentati the neighbour of the} ™@nly to mark whales off the |; ‘ : ous theories. representing as they do the in-
—Reuter, | sentative of the neighbou res : + importance to Wesi Indian econ- eres. | ee? ese ‘ eee
United States, he felt that the west coast of Australia to enable and ta Gitte ot-aite Carers Nozaka was a wartime guer-J}terest of the British monopolies,
, , : h their movements to be checked, | OMY and the voice of “Vir. Grant CY illa leader and a personal friend} have the same desire—to suppress
. ° Goenmneriwealth POWER OO uh Adams was also heard. Mr. of Mao Tse Tung, the Chinese the people f vhe colonies, and

: : > . ‘ . = en , " , owe 5 => - > . 91es oO > Cd. + &
stria Claims ecient the ,, peviitan F The marking will be done with | Adams spoke on the prospects of} Communist leader. strangle the National Liberation

er merica as See power w 10-inch Steel Darts fired from |1¢deration and in a reference to From 1931 onwards, he repre-]\oyement in South East Asia.’

M. Schillin Ss security responsibility. guns. Each dart when returned | the colour bar said “We are more} sented the Japanese Communist} ‘The main issue at the Confer
” £ A source close to the Confer-| wil entitle the finder to a re-|Sympathetic to the English people) payty_then illegal in Moscow Jonce, he said, was “vhe intensi-
R e ence said that South Africa’s ap-{ ward and, from t'1e position and | in our midst than to the local| tH. went “underground” in North fication of Imperialist expansion
rom ussia proach was cautious, influencea} gate of its findiug, will tell the | Whites. The local whites see their’) Gying during the Chino-Japan- end the creation of a Pacific Bloc
mainly by her regard for}sejentists more about the whales, political power slipping and are) .<. war, and helped spread dis-| supplement — the ressiv
ye VIENNA, Jan. M, Australia’s point of view, and her] seasonal migration habits. more inclined to be reactionary} ofrection among thy Japanese| Norih “Atlantic. Paci’”—-Reuter.
a is counterclaiming 240] gesire to see Japan become self- First stage of the voyage is to| because of that. wi: troops. | a eee
schillings from the Soviet) supporting again. Capetown. Vivid Deseription | He returned to a Haros wel-|
for civilian occupation) “jy, MacDonald’s review 01 ad , Cottrill provided a vivid de-| come in Japan in January 1946 | cc
ainst the Soviet claim of| south East Asia, it was learnt On the way « survey is 0 %€ | scription of the bauxite setvlement| Nakanishi, the mar rho « | W hat Of German
pica schillings for post-| was presented frankly as Pearson’: | Dade of the Benguela Current, 4} 5+ Mackenzie, British Guiana and] gemned him, was a member of |
, and, according to Aus- impressions. While hoping for the old stream flowig north along | gicoussed the potential wealth of] the Central. Committe Whil ip O W is In F ‘arice ?
premment sources: here, best, he urged the Commonwealtt he coast of West Africa. J the colony and then introduced| other Leaders were defending)" *â„¢~* . 7 *
me, which they said, had to be realistically prepared for the On their way home the Three} ji pressions of Trinidad with a] Nozaka against the Cominform | BONN. Ji
in principle the Aus- . . x r Scientists of the ship’s research | slaved alyps ' ea Nagar 1 cehtn: beled Nak et i : : )
| worst in assessing the repercus- ; super-loya calypso that was| charges earlier this 1 i | West German ( ancelle I
right to make counter-| * : he : team hope to capture a specimen aiein dhe el . » Shed ondit-lineiaht ial ft 1t the Partv | x a shcaiiidad 4 Paine w
sions of the Chinese Communis specially written for the broadca anishi said he thougl he Par Konrad Adenauet raise Wi
pnd Dr. Leopold Figl, the | °” , r ; of vhe rare Latimeria Chalumnae. | , opted ; ; an ca, IE a ley tor gra ran tnd Bs pee pore TS
| victory on South East Asia a An oil well tapped less than a] should be re-organised Reuter.| French Foreign Minister ol
nh Chancellor, put the * ihe. the ¥ ST anes It was thought the fish was eX- | 10041 previously, Well number Be Suhusties: the 4
orward on December five. | Taking MD. AS i wa Chi OS | tinct until a trawler captured ajog¢ was heard bursting invo ac- a hithaderuhn | itino?
representatives at daily| touched on yesterday o ina | live specimen off East London in}+i.i}. "ang Albert Gomes pleaded Not The eed aan ceeaen, 1a
s with Austrian officials | “Sth column” potential, MacDonal: | i938, but the fish was destroyed | Oye so paderation, urging it ss ; | attabiabs. ie. forthoumds +
ying that they were still) was reported +0 have singled ou n error, leaving only the skin comes before self-rule on ‘the S M crimes rials
instructions from Mos- | Indo-China, Siam —s me ole which was stuffed and placed in| na. that polivical progres ame man | West German Justi liniste
i i : ic as > ‘< i i vulnerable Muce ero § z vice o SS 8 ; 1 Ju ust
this point and. this was} the most immediately ulne an East London Museum. must be matched by economic de- GEORGETOWN, (By Mail) | Dr. Thomas Dehle1 he Bi
on for the present delay | to Communist infiltration. ;
negoti tion " —Reuter, | —Reuter —Reuter.| velopment and the Caribbeon Freeman Reese, a negro held|destag here today that he hac
y vicinal of ‘ could only be enriched eer Py the British Guiana police, we | asked the Chancellor to raise the
- = = Sa OE ae a federation, not through individual! found to have finger-prints wide-| matter during M Schuman’s visi
gn Me ee ae ete eats, ene oh itis efforis. ly different from those flown to| this weekend
Dr. Solomon gave the Socialist} British Guiana by Scotland Yard The question of revision 0
point of view, urging self-govern-| although his physical description} sentences on ordinary soldiers
ment first and Miss Beryl Mc-| corresponds to that supplied by} which are regarded here as Un:
Birney, a dancer, described local] the Yard, it is learned in George-| duly harsh may also be mooted
dances and mimes. town, Reuter.
Cottrill summed up his own Scotland Yard officers had been ae
\ impressions of the West Indies:| seeking to interview a negro in cis /
} ‘T found thav where there was} connection with the death of po- Planes And Ships
most freedom there was most) lice constable Booth at Burton- we .
friendship ‘for ‘Britain.”’—B.U.P. on-Trent, England, in May, 1946 Search E. Baltic
Cc t D ti M | aoe ge ing a! a om
| ustoms utes \VEAV | with a safe, who clubbed fim ti '
IC ATE | > “ | with a jemmy and killed him | For Schooner Mary Ann
D i L mm. dl | Be Adiusted In U S Before he died the constabl oa ;
: J ; che es gave a description of his attack- ! COPENHAGEN, Jan. 11.



as a moonbeam





|

COOL BEAUTIFUL |

|

'“FERGUSON FABRICS” |

FOR WEAR AT NIGHT. |
/ STOCKED BY LEADING STORES.

.





WASHINGTON, Jan. 11 er and finger-prints—those seni| Planes and ships are searching
United States Treasury Secre-| to British Guiana—were found |the Eastern Baltic for the 90-ton
tary, John Snyder told a Press| on the safe. |Danish Motor Schooner, “Mary
Conference here to-nighi’ that he! Reese was held by the British|Ann,” missing since she left
might recommend to the present| Guiana police on a local charge Gdynia, Poland, on January 3.

“Mary Ann,” which hed four men
aboard, was due in Copenhagen on.
January 5 or 6.—Reuter.

session of Congress an adjustment |
of United States Cus’oms on im-} f F
ports from overseas .—Reuter,. | of his prints.

when Sotland Yard heard of
him and asked for a comparison
—B.U.P.





PROTECTION

It has come to our notice that a few people are under the impression
that ordinary un-refined petroleum jelly sold in drug stores in boxes or
paper parcels is the genuine ‘Vaseline’ Petroleum Jelly.

For your protection, we, the Chesebrough Manufacturing Co. (owners

of the registered trade mark ‘Vaseline’), would like it to be known that
genuine ‘Vaseline’ Petroleum Jelly is sold in Barbados only in*pots,

tubes and tins each bearing the trade mark ‘Vaseline,’ and that any
other type of box or paper wrapping does not contain genuine ‘Vaseline’
Petroleum Jelly.



For your all-round protection (cuts, burns, bruises, scalds, skin irri-
tations, sunburn, work-sore hands, baby’s rash, etc. etc.) don’t just ask
for Vaseline—ask for ‘Vaseline’ Petroleum Jelly and see that the
pot, tube or tin is marked:

CHESEBROUGH MANUFACTURING CO. CONS'D

Distributors: T. Geddes Grant Ltd.



RE TRIS ANT" BR GMs AE TE IE ET

PAGE THREE





France Will Be |
“Glad To Pull Out” |
Of Indo-China

PARIS, Jan. 11.
Pierre Henri Tiegen, French}
Minister of Information, said to-|}
day that France will be “glad to
pull out” of Indo-China “if the}






REDUCTIONS

ON

LADIES’ COATS
& WOOLLEN
SWEATERS

Quite an Assortment

.
}
|

France’s armies there, are not}
against the Vietnarhese people |
but against Ho Chi Minh. We}
know that if we pulled out now
they would sweep Indo-China” |

M. Tiegen told the Anglo-!
American’ Press- Association at}
lunch that vhne Auriol-Bao Dai}
igreements gave complete freedom |
to Vietnam. “If Bao Dai’s Gov-!



ernment was to ask us to occupy of Colours
only these bases named in the

agreements, we would — gladly

oblige. At SPECIAL






it is now up to Bao Dai’s Gov-
ernment to keep peace and order. |

Indo-China asked us for:
AT THE

(1) Independence within the}
framework of the French Union MODERN DRES

BROAD STREET.

REDUCED PRICES

(9

2) Our help to keep this in-;
dependence. }
England and the. United State

1ave freed so many countries thai |

they will understand the necessary |
resencs troops achieve |
iberation.”





of to



—Reuter. i












|——














sromo-Seitzer fighis ordinary
ache three wWways:' 1) Re-
lieves pain of headache
Relieves discomfort of up-

3) Quiets jumpy
vhich may team up
j t» cause trouble. Caution: Use
s directed. Get Bromo- Seltzer
at your drugstore fountain or
counter today. A product of

s

set stomach
nerves...





Emerson Drug Co, since 1887, Y
im i.
BOOKER’S (B’DOS) DRUG STORES LTD.
Broad Street and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)
. on
—

Ree

steel rolling shutters

GNOME HOU WALTHAMSTOW

SOOO On em ita
HORE

LONDON, €E.i7

ING ESTATES & TRADING
MLL MCL AIRC CCRT



MERE'S THE



BREAD

FOR A

PERFECT

|
|
|
|



é SANDWICH

‘the Bread with a wonderful flavour .... tender -

golden brown crust ... and an appetising texture...

Of Course, That's .

| BREAD

in Sale at J. & R. BAKERIES & GODDARDS

a a
S.-i SS SSS Se aaa



PAGE FOUR



ADVOGATE

nee"

Published by The Advocate Co, Ltd., 34, Broad St., Bridgetown



Thursday, January 12, 1950



Who Will Win?

THE General Elections in Great Britain
will be held on February 23, Parliament
will be dissolved and the Government
will go to the country for approval or dis-
approval of a national policy which has
latterly become the battle ground of fierce
political controversy.

The circumstances under which the
announcement was made give rise to
further speculation whether the Labour
Party is as sure of its ground as many
of its adherents believed six months ago.
Two weeks before a scheduled meeting
of Parliament the Prime Minister has
advised His Majesty to proclaim dissolu-
tion and to postpone that meeting. The
{ Labour Party has decided to brave the
rigours of winter and fight the election
; before another budget has been presented
and the full effects of devaluation felt.



=< aren

6 nse egie 08- ede ae

The country has been sharply divided

EO eS

nt on the question of devaluation of the
‘ pound and it was claimed by the Opposi-
i tion that the necessity for devaluation
ar mi was the direct result of the mismanage-
i ee ment by the Labour Party which had
ick attempted a spendthrift policy of creating
ars the welfare state before economic recov-
t ery had been ensured.
The nationalisation of railways and in-
if dustry, the Opposition claim, had further
$ contributed to the economic crisis. On

the other hand the Labour Government
claimed that it has carried out the plan
which it. originally set out to aceemplish.
Feai et But neither the Liberals nor the Con-
servatives are satisfied that the results
have been beneficial to the country,

The elections will be fought on clear
cut issues, They will centre around
whether nationalisation of industry or
the more flexible management of private
enterprise is more conducive to economic
recovery. Whichever policy gains favour
‘it is crystal clear that there is no short
cut and that a long and arduous road
must be travelled before the country can
regain the stability at home and the pres-
tige abroad which she had before 1929.

There have been Socialist Governments
in Great Britain before. It was in 1924
that the Socialists, led by Mr. Ramsay
MacDonald, formed a Government with
the help of the Liberal Party and again
in 1929 when the late Mr. Baldwin took
office with them and succeeded the Prime
Minister shortly after in a coalition gov-
ernment. There has however, seldom
been any government whose national
policy has been fraught with such serious
consequences for the entire Common-
wealth. The Socialist Government of 1945
came into power at a time when the coun-



4

:
5
'
vr
'
t
:
af
'
a¢
|
'
'
'

ie 4 : try was ready and willing for any change.
ee) me of Government after seven years of a
f i ; ‘i wartime Coalition Government, And the
yt ‘4 Tories were blamed for the war.

j we

Whether the country will have had
enough of Socialist experiment will be
decided within the next six weeks. In
spite of its many blunders and its un-
popular undertakings, the Labour Party
approaches the election with a confidence
engendered by their remarkable record at
the polls in the many bye-elections which
it has fought. It is true that in every
case the majority has been severely re-
duced but nevertheless, Labour has been
able to retain the seat. There is little
doubt that in the coming election the
number of votes cast for Labour will be
a great deal less than the aggregate of
those cast in 1945, and that the Conserv-
ative vote will be increased considerably
but it remains to be seen whether the
individual Conservative candidate vote
will be sufficiently large as to win the
greater number of seats for that Party.

OUR READERS SAY:
Sevenanmmalindingdastemenanee

SILENT TASS SATS TV SETI T SSS Te SegE, sprees

a



Sis nose nal

a
torte ¢

wegen

Sos

Le EIR ote

=

ae

Mini Ftd

paee ost
aes ok



ee




ne



ome ce mt pee erree nee ns a

{| eee

‘2 Apost

Do you know the pamphlet
entitled, by mo means briefly:
“Concerning the reorganisation of
European society, or the neces-
sity and the methods of gather-
ing together the peoples of Europe
in one political body, inside which
each conserves its national inde-
pendence”?

It might be thought that this
pamphlet was written by ‘some
eminent and honestly intentioned
member of the present Council of
Europe, who wished to communi-
cate to his colleagues certain side-
lights known to himself, but of
which they were not aware,

It is not so. Although the pam-
phlet is up-to-date enough;
although its ideas are now more
than ever worthy of consideration,
and of active meditation by men
of good will, the author has long
since quitted this earth and its
quarrels—or shall we call them
controversies?

The author? Or rather the
authors. For, in order to be sure
of the utility of their counsels to
the world, the propagandists of
that epoch—it was in 1814—
made up a team of two. Two is
not too many.

First there is Count-Saint-
Simon, a nephew ci the author of
the “Memoires”. Certain men were
over-sagacious enough to consid-
er him a little mad. At the least
he was an adventurer of genius,
and both these terms are to be
taken in the best sense. Saint
Simon: had ideas about every-
thing, especially about society, He
was indeed a precursor, an ini-
tiator who cannot be held in too
great esteem. “Saint-Simonism”
marks a striking step towards the
future. And this great propagand-
ist of ideas knew when to be
practical. History will affirm the
value of his name.

It was in 1814 and Europe was
disturbed and did not hide it.
Saint Simon, was not disturbed
for he knew how to bring tran-
guility to Europe. He, and the
young Augustin Thierry. He was
over fifty and Thierry was just
beginning his life—beginning it
with hope, with confidence and
with some ideas as well. And the
two thinkers were glad to meet
together, and collaborated im-
petuously to bring about a salu-
tory reformation of Europe. Saint

Simon continued his self-
appointed task as a reformer, a
visionary and a man of sense
Augustin Thierry was on the



BARBADOS ADVOCAT



les Of European New Laws Against West Indies

Union

By J. Ernest Charles

verge of those vast undertakings
which were to make him one of
the great leaders of French his-
tory. 5

Saint-Simon was an optimist.
His optimism was based as much
on the boldness of his nature as
upon his remarkably keen and
clear-sighted mind. Augustin
Thierry was young, enough to
profess optimism without any
particular reason, But you had to
be enormously optimistic to
affirm at that time, among the
squabbles of the Congress of
Vienna, the doctrine of a politi-
cally and economically unified
Europe, and to do the ground-
work for the establishment of its
principles and its plan. Thanks
to God and to strength of char-
acter oplimism flourished in the
minds of the two collaborators,
And they wrote in a charming
unanimity;

“The golden age of the human
race is not behind us; it is ahead
of us. Our fathers have not seen
it; our children will experience it
one day. It is up to us to prepare
the way for them.”

The golden age is always ahead
of us. If we do not see it very
clearly, it is because it does its
best to hide itself. But how we
shall exalt when we suddenly dis_
cover that it is close upon us.

Saint Simon and Augustin
Thierry both had a little of this
necessary and salutory exalta-
tion. Even so they were by no
means lacking in perspicacity and
logic. They were prepared to win
over the many as well as the few
and to gain althority over them.

An authority which it would be
churlish on our part to attempt
to deny them now. The ideas sown
by them in the intellectual and
moral climate of their time and
unreceived then, are now begin-
ning to prosper. It is time,

The authors of “the reorganisa_
tion of European society” had
made a vigorous note that “com-
mon institutions would be essen-
tial.”

“Congress after congress can
be gathered together, treaties and
conventions be piled up, but all
that will lead to nothing. At every
meeting of nations as at every
meeting of men, common institu-

tions are a necessity, an organi-
sation is essential. It this does not
exist everything will be decided
by force.” :

Thus our precursors aspired to
a general government for their
European confederation. Indis-
pensable. Ineluctable. And thes2
were their conditions.

1—The general Government to
be entirely independent of nation.
al Governments.

2—Its members must be en-
couraged by their position to have
general views and to concern
themselves with general inter-
ests. *

3—They must be strong and
that strength must reside within
themselves: that is; they must
have public opinion behind them.

Very well. In that way a Europ.
ean patriotism might be created
which would be superimposed
upon national patri Ss, crown-
ing them without absorbing them.
To that end the Parliament —
the greater Parliament” — would
act.

“Every question of general in-
terest to European society will le
brought before the greater Par-
liament and will be examined and
decided by it. It will be the sole
judge of controversies between
the nations.”

It will not have escaped you
that Saint-Simon and Augustin
Thierry were already concerned
with details. It would seem that
these details appear today to be
less ambitious than they appeared
to be 1380 years ago. But they are
certainly ambitious even now, for
the 1814 reformers envisaged.

“A code of general ethics,
national as well as individual, be
drawn up by the Parliament and
be taught throughout Europe
Liberty of conscience and free-
dom to practice any religion will
be respected. Thus there will be
between the peoples of Europe
that which constitutes a bond and
a basis for any political associa-
tion: conformity of education, a
union of interests, similarity be-
tween maxims, and moral and
intellectual cemmunity.”

It would be pleasant to quote
yet more revealing passages from
a pamphlet which. after all, is
almost as short as its title is long.
Modern champions of “European
Union” cannot read it without
deep feeling. And a memory of
its authors must have been in the
air at the “Strasburg rendez-
vous.”



The Medical Research
Council

By Martin Ware,

The Medical Research Council

M.B.. MLR.C.P-

Himsworth, formerly Professor of

are the expert body appointed by Medicine at University College
the United Kingdom Government Hospital, London. The members
to administer the funds provided of the Council are appointed by

annually by Parliament for the
promotion of scientific research in
medicine.

The Council were originally
established in 1913, as the Medi-
cal Research Committee, and in
1920 they received their present
title and constitution; at the same
time they became subject to the

the Committee of Privy Council,
in the case of the scientific mem-
bers after consultation with the
President of the Royal Society
and with the Medical Research
Council themselves. They retire
in rotation at regular intervals,
and the aim is always to ensure
that the council comprise a body
of

distinguished with

first-hand experience of research.

. . ‘ experts
formal direction of the specially :

appointed Committee of Privy
Council for Medical Research. To advise them in the promo-
The members of this Committee tion of research in special
are the Lord President of the branches of medical science, the
Council as Chairman, the Minis- Council have the help of about
ter of Health as Vice-Chairinan, fifty expert committees. These
and the Ministers in charge of may deal with subjects of lasting
the other principal Departinents interest, such as chemotherapy,
concerned with questions of pub- vitamins, the problems of the
lic health at home or inthe Crown deaf, or with more temporary
Colonies, questions, such as the clinical
trial of a promising new drug. A
The Research Programme committee of special interest. is
The programme supported by the Coloniak Medical Research
the Medical Research Counvil is Committee, appointed jointly by
not concerned exclusively with the Council and Colonial Office,
studying the nature and causes to direct work on tropical dis-
of disease, and with devising im- eases and on nutritional and other
proved methods for its preven- questions affecting the health of
tion, diagnosis and treatment: it colonial peoples. In planning re-
deals also with the fundamental,,search on problems of industrial
sciences of medicine, such asi? well-being and efficiency the
physiology, biochemistry, bio- Council have the assistance of
physics and genetics; with the the Industrial Heglth Research
maintenance of human well- Board, which has the status of one
being, mental as well - cape of their committees.
and with physiological and psy- J .
chological Saplonn of the normal | It will be realised that the
human being to his work and Medical Research Council enjoy
environmen’ It may deal, indeed, a high degree of autonomy, being
with almost any question inyolv- responsible only to their directing
ing the human factor. committee of Ministers and to

‘ Parliament for the proper expen-
The Council and Their diture of their grant-in-aid, This
Advisory Committee relative independence of the
Council illustrates an important
The Council consist of twelve principle—long accepted in Brit-
members—three lay and nine ain—that the detailed allocation
scientific—with a Secretary and of money for scientific research is
other administrative officers. From best entrusted to an expert body
1934 till September 1949 the of scientists, with only a modicum
Secretary of the Council was Sir of lay help,
Edward Mellanby, whose own The Council naturally work in
researches on rickets and other close association with the admin-
diseases are well known, He has istrative Government depart-
now been succeeded by Dr. H. P. ments on matters of common in-



A Distinguished Geologist Who Worked for Man

terest. Indeed they are required
to advise these departments on
health problems within _ their
sphere and to undertake such new
researches as may be necessary
for this purpose,

The Council’s Research

Establishments

The Council’s central research
laboratories comprise’the National
Institute for Medical Research in
London, whose Director is Sir
Charles Harington, The research
programme here is very wide,
falling under the general headings
of physiology, pathology, bio-
chemistry, pharmacology and
chemotherapy, endocrinology. and
physics in relation to medicine.
Diseases recently under intensive
study have been influenza, the
common cold, malaria and (dur-
ing the war) the typhus fevers.
A special responsibility of the
Institute is to maintain standard
preparations for the biological
assay of certain drugs, hormones,
vitamins, and anti-toxins. This is
done in many instances on behalf
of World Health Organisation.
Another institute wholly main-
tained by the Council for labora-
tory research, is the Dunn Nutri-
tional Laboratory at Cambridge.

Obviously, in any organised
programme of medical research,
prominence must be given to the
study of clinical problems of
disease and injury as seen in
patients, To this end, the Council
have for long maintained, wholly
or in part, special departments
for clinical research ‘n medicine
at two London teaching hospitals,
and at a hospital for nervous
diseases. More recenily, they have
set ap a number of further re-
search establishments in London,
including centres for the study of
ear diseases and eye diseases, for
research on the radiotheraphy
of cancer, and for the study of
industrial illnesses and toxicology:
units for research in human nu-
trition and in denial disease have
also been established in London,
Research on industrial injuries
and skin diseases is carried out in
a unit at Birmingham, and in
South Wales occupational lung
disease in the coal-miners is be-
ing studied. At Cambridge, the
Council have established an ap-
plied psychology research unit
and a department of experimental
medicine,





!of London, where a huge dance hall which





















sd
7 ry,

Stowaways Are Being Planned

LONDON, (By Mail).

The British Home Office, the Colonial
Office, police and welfare officials and port
authorities are planning new laws to prevent
the country from being flooded with native
stowaways, notably from the West Indies
and West Africa. Conferences between
various bodies have been spurred by a num-
ber of questions during the last Parliamen-
tary session and the growing concern of mag-
istrates at the number of men who- come
before them and cannot be deported because
they have full rights of British citizenship.

About 16,000 West Indians and Africans
are now living in Britain—twice as many as
in 1939. There are a further 5,000 coloured
students with stholarships or private means.

Mr. M. J. Mitchell, Trinidadian General
Secretary of the League of Coloured People,
run by Colonial lawyers and other *

CROWN MALT EXTRACT ...._.
CREAM OF: WHEAT (large size)

SOUTH AFRICAN MELON ang
GINGER JAM, 2-15 tins

| COLONNADE
a

BUILDER'S HARD

FOOT and CHAIN BOLTS
CASEMENT STAYS

CASEMENT FASTENERS
DOOR HANDLES i
CHROMIUM LOOSE-PIN BUTTS — 3y” x
BARREL BOLTS: Chromium 2” to 9” :

noid

4

sional people for the good of their country-

and many Other ITEMS of
men in Britain, says:



“TOLD PLENTY OF JOBS” :
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTy.,, §

C.S. PITCHER & COQ

Phones: 4472 & 4687

“Many coloured people have made good in
Britain. They have settled down in jobs and
are earning good wages, But it must be ad-
mitted that some of the stowaways are a
source of anxiety to the League.

“As a rule the men come from the West
Indies and West Africa in good faith—they
have been told that jobs are plentiful and
wages high. But difficulties arise from the
fact that some of them have no conception
of trade union rules.”

Other authorities, however, pointed out
that local officials in the various West Indian
colonies are always warning would-be emi-
grants of the difficulties of getting work in|’
Britain except of a highly-skilled nature.
Every care was taken to make it plain that
unskilled jobs were far from plentiful.

Typical of the cases causing considerable
irritation is that of a stowaway who got
a fortnight in jail on arrival, then received
24/- a week national assistance money

plus 7/- lodging allowance—and goes on
drawing this and living without working at
all.




|

ag

<2 ae
.
Ay aid Fine Choco}
CADBURY’S CHOCOLATE BISCUITS—per tin
CADBURY'S CHOCOLATES—per box <...,.,,
TERRY’S CHOCOLATES—per box ....
TERRY'S CHOCOLATE BARSeach
KEILLER DUNDEE CAKE—each ......,
CARR’S CUMBERLAND FRUIT CAKE—each,
FIGS—per pkt. ;
CANDIED PEEL—1-16 pkt. ............) q
CARR’S CHEESE CRISPS—per tin ..,
ODEX SOAP—per cake

“COCKADE” Fine RUM i

poy )











COLOURED COLONY

West Indians of this type tend to congre-
gate around the Tottenham Court Road area



STANSFELD, SCOTT &

CO, LI





they have practically monopolised, now ad-

vertises itself as “London’s Harlem.” Police

PREPARE FOR THE 60



and welfare officers report that there is little
vice in this community despite rumours to
the contrary.

Mr. Mitchell advocates tightening the stow-
away regulations, adding:

“I am in favour of repatriating stowaways
who at least cannot show credentials or a



good record and high character. Next to es

is accommodation. The real need is for hos-
tels for Coloured people—cultural and recre-

ational centres to keep them off the street
corners,”

British Council and Colonial Office people |

concerned with the welfare of these men
find however, that the majority dislike the
idea of hostel life and prefer to live privately,
even if in inferior conditions—-B.U.P.

Booker Bros: Sugar & Freights

; LONDON, (By Mail).

The Financial Times commenting on the
new West Indies freight rates, says: |

“One of the companies known to stock
markets which should benefit is Booker
Brothers McConnell & Co. This old-estab-
lished business it dates back to 1833—has
two vessels plying between this country and
British Guiana. Rising costs have been cutting

into shipping profits and made the advance in
freights necessary.

“The interests of Booker Brothers McCon-
nell are in the news, too, in another direction.
Talks between the Ministry of Food and the
West Indian delegation for a new long-terni’



Sugar contract, have been resumed. These|||__.

talks ran into heavy weather recently, as
the delegation regarded the Ministry’s offer
as inadequate, and the possibility of a break-
down in the negotiations was mooted. As the
Booker sugar estates account for 75 per cent
of the British Guiana Sugar output, the com-
pany has a large financial stake in the out-
come of the talks.—B.U.P.





y Years in Bdos



To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—I feel that many of your
readers must have . encountered
Dr. Senn in his innumerable expe-
ditions around Barbados. In par-
ticular he ed almost every
water well in the island and had,

a colleague whose dutiful atti-
tude toward their science prom-
ised many more valuable contri-
butions,

Following preliminary studies
at the universities of Neuchatel

and accepted employment with
the North Venezuelan Petroleum
Company, Ltd. In the years from
1927 to 1932 he, together with
others, explored a large part of
she geologically little known
central eastern Faleén in Vene-

again in the Caribbean region but
this time engaged in qa v y
detailed Seological survey of the
island of Barbados on behalf of
the British Union Oil Company.
During the war the Colonial

ment of the Oceanic formation
and tried to fit the geological
history of Barbados into that of
the Antillean arch,

The commercially engaged
petroleum geologist is generally

Alfred Senn. He was a joyful,
helpful, open-hearted companion,
never dismayed by the vagaries
of nature. After days of tracking
through rain-soaked tropical for-
ests with pack mules and the

as a result, a wide circle of friends
and aecquaintences amongst the
planters.

Some of them may not be aware
of his untimely death which was
the indirect result of climbing up
and down the water wells, and,
others who already know may be
glad to read the enclosed memo-
rial written by his colleague and
friend Dr. Kugler:

“On the Ist July, 1949, Alfred
Senn would have celebrated his
50th birthday had he not suc-
cumbed on the 29th of January
from the after-effects of a minor
operation when seeking strength
: in his beloved Grison Mountains
: of Switzerland. He left behind his
devoted wife and their two daugh-
ters,

pings of a

called him

pe ' : eMoncinal fact serge. Se cade
~
en ae —~






Like many

vocation in
SO poor in

Among his many friends are
Seologists in all parts of the world
who deplore the untimely loss of

followed
pioneer

the
among

and Paris, it was at the alma mater
of his hometown
Alfred Senn finally matriculated
for the study of natural sciences
with preference for geology. Under
the inspiring guidance of Profes-
sor A. Buxtorf he gained promo-
tion with an excellent thesis on
seology of the area between Mend-
risio and Varese at the southern
foot uf the Alps and then, heed-
ing his teacher’s advice, he started
with the detailed geologi«al map~
part
faulted Jura Mountains, a task he
had just completed when death

cannot make a living from their
their
mineral re
So full of geologists, Alfred Senn

Seologists, Professor Carl Schmidt,

zuela. His keen interest in
exploration work, especially his
unflagging energy in applying
paleontology to stratigraphic prob-
lems, was instrumental in secur-
ing for the first time Positive
results in the zoning of Tertiary
sediments of Venezuela with the
aid of smaller foraminifera. True
to his training, he also made use

use of Senn’s

Basel where

nical problems,

bados”
bution

value

succeeding in correlation of sedi-











Development and Welfare made
water supply and other geotech-

“Geological Investigations of the
Groundwater Resources of Bar-
is an outstanding contri-
to the literature of West
Indian water supply and of great

_to the island of Barbados.
‘ 1, ) In his paper dealing with the
of the remaining fossils, thereby “Paleogene of Barbados and its
Bearing on History and Structure



knowledge for

His report on couraged from

paleontological

science.

left with little time for scientific
publications; nay,

such. All the more it is to the
credit of Alfred Senn that he
spent much of his spare time in

study of literature, and prepar-
ations of graphs which allowed
him to make contributions to our

bare necessities for camping, he
still was prepared to carry his
load if it meant reaching a
geologically unexplored region
where no pack animals could
follow. He Wwaquld discuss the
daily problems when stretched
in his hammock, slung between
two trees, and would not lose his
humour when a nocturnal down-
pour forced him to hide field
book and maps under his body

he is often dis-
contemplating

investigations,

ete of ee ean of 8 ; y 4 But science alone could not ' Save them from being soak
of the block- On Gece hae ‘B aye: want whan a a can eae at ‘work “en eto tal when me
se — ere = P sia Se ae Vol. 24, 1940) loving mind, coupled with a 2* Work come to talk of their
pewie Franchise tes Perens aoe & ed ym Srst modern longing te improve his skill in patie eee feelings and it was
carry out investigations feavenet® port on ~ r- ange «frology. mountain climbing and skiing in cs ‘hat one found Alfred Senn |
a ho “nd Morocco, where he found J. W. Wells, and M. de Cizansourt ocr ‘©, maintain a well trained {0,¢ 2 Sensitive thinker, a deeply
young Swiss who ctratisraphic i. eee dk ae Wave , e5 zancourt body. It was, however, in the th ec: man whose interest in
respe like Se in Venezuela Senn in edtenies Tn pee, So fleld of exploration and in the Skee ts oe family and oy"
lt yl alls piiction Satin Se oo -_ “o ‘ na subse- camp where he showed his true 3 gnter future for mankind |
ources and in these ¢ a a paper on “The Geology of mettle, for where men are forced “@S his ever present concern.”
R,% non two countries, Barbados and the Morphogenesis to live and work together under C.S LEE
eee, ee vay, ; \ poe tee Sep. S the Neighbouring Submarine adverse conditions, their inherent Airy Hi)l, hil
Sour’ cibreioae roitolds for purposes Veo nee _ (Ee, Geol, Helv. characters reveal themselves, OO Oi ii
oa tei hina eas oe teas he discussed the Under such circumstances there ~ reorge,
eae senn Nature and depositional environ- was no better comrade than Barbados.

1 1 #99966:












Now in Stock...

WHITNEY ALL-WOOL BLANKETS (Si
Colours; Pink, Gold and Fawn at
White at $7.20

COTTON BLANKETS (Sizes: 70” x 90”) i

DACOSTA & CO, LTD

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT, —



——

69996545

LO0K AT TH

FINE

SPECIA
GROCERY _ DEPT.






IN OUR MEAT DEPT. —

LAMB |} VEAL CHOPS

OX TONGUES

Xx c LS
OX TRIPE | a5 *
BEETROOT CARROTS
BEANS CABBAGE

GODDARD}

699

oS GOOo 66
SSS9S99: 99SS9S99990999909

a

4





ms.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1950
Merchants Agree
To W.I. Conference

On Devaluation

MEMBERS of the Council of the Chamber of Commerce
at their meeting yesterday, expressed themselves in favour
of holding a conference on Government level with full
commercial representation, to consider the effect of
devaluation in the West Indies. They consider, however,
that the time is as yet not ripe and therefore it should
not come about before three months’ time when one



would have a better picture of the state

This was one of the matters
raised in a letter received from
the President of the Incorporated
Chambers of Commerce of the
Caribbean area. In the letter he
suggested Trinidad as a likely site
for the conference should it be
desired.

The Council expressed full
agreement adding their sugges-
tion about the time.

The Secretary was instructed
to reply accordingly and mean-
while a committee from the
Chamber will interview the Co-
lonial Secretary in regard to the
matter,

Landing Facilities For
Tourists

A letter from the Colonial Sec-
retary was read in reply to one
from the Chamber which had
asked the Government to allow
their water boats to be used for
jthe landing of tourists on the
Mauretania, due to arrive on
January 21,

The reply was that insofar as
was practicable and necessary for
the water boats to assist, arrange-
ments would be made for them
to do so.

Members expressed the view
that. this was somewhat vague.
They considered if it was desir-
blethe agents should have some
guarantee that the conveyance of
passengers from the ship to the
land would be facilitated to the
greatest extent possible. Lack of
proper landing facilities had, in
the past, prevented such ships
from coming to the island and
this was certainly a very regretta-
ble state of affairs.

They thought the time had come
that Government should be asked
to purchase some suitable craft
which could be used to help in
such cases. It would be no waste
of money as such craft could be
used for other purposes as well.

The suggestion was made that
it might be well to purchase the
Nina for the purppse.

The Secretary was asked to
forward the Council’s suggestion
to Government.

Landing Difficulties

Mr. Trevor Bowring told the
members how on Saturday a
launch with about forty passen-
gers and on which he happened
to be aboard, was.held up at the
landing place at the Baggage
Warehousé for about an hour be-
fore the passengers could be
landed.

Reason for this, he said, was
because at the time two lighters
discharging baggage were occupy-
ing both berths along the landing
place. Some of the more agile
passengers effected a landing in
a shorter period by climbing from
one water boat to another and
then jumping on to the land.

A policeman was called but it
did not appear that he was in a
position to do anything.

He thought this state of affairs
was a bad advertisement for the
island. Indeed some of the pas-
sengerg who were visitors had
said that such a thing would not
have occurred in Trinidad.

Members after discussing the
matter decided to write the Har-
bour and Shipping Master asking
him to take appropriate action,

of things.

Air Maii Rates

A letter from the Colonial Sec-
retary stated that it is proposed
to send air mail to the United
States and Canada at rates con-
siderably lower than was now in
force, by use of a route which will
provide a service slower by ap-
proximately 24 hours than the ex-
isting service.

_He was requested to ask the
view of the Chamber as _ to
whether in the event of the intro-
duction of the cheaper and slower
service it would be necessary to
retain the present one.

Members of the Council were
of the opinion that frequency of
mails were of great importance to
business and the slower service
might entail the necessity of send-
ing cablegrams which under ex-
isting circumstances might be
avoided. They considered tha
the present service should be re-
tained for at least another six
months.

Another letter from the Colo-
nial Secretary pointed out that
the Secretary of State for the
Colonies had received the Resolu-
tion of the Chamber with regard
to the sugar negotiations between
the U.K. Government and the
B,W.I. Sugar Producers’ Asso-
ciation delegation. The Secretary
of State, he stated, had asked to
say that he would keep in mind
the views expressed in the Reso-
lution,

St. Kitts Sugar Crop
Prospects Good
—SAYS TREASURER

St. Kitts had a very good sugar
crop last year and there are very
good prospects of getting a better
crop this year, Hon’ble W. 0.
Peters, Treasurer and Comptrol-
ler of Customs of that colony
told the “Advocate” yesterday.

Mr. Peters came in over the
week-end by B.W.I.A. for the
Customs Talks and is staying at
the Marine Hotel,

He said that the island de-
pended mainly on sugar for its
economy and had one of the
most efficient sugar factories in
the Caribbean area.

They were looking forward to
the installation of the electrical
system and there were also
plans for public health, public
works and_ educational pro-
grammes which would form part
of the colony’s expenditure for
1950. St. Kitts is served by
British West Indian Airways and
K.L.M. Dutch Airlines. It is
linked up with the other Carib-
bean colonies and is one of the
busiest shipping centres in the
Leeward Islands.

The oldest British colony in the
West Indies, St. Kitts is a delight-
ful place for tourists. It is very
beautiful and clean and there are
places of historic interest like
Brimstone Hill and St. Anne's
Church, Middle Island, the burial
place of Sir Thomas Warner,
founder of the first British colony
in the West Indies,





In Carlisle Bay

IN PORT:—. Yaw) Potick, Aux. Ketch
Leander, Sch. Molly N. Jones, Schooner
Manuata, Sch, Philip H. Davidson, Yacht
Maya, Yaw! Stortebecker, Sch. Sunshine

R., Sch. Mary M. Lewis, Sch, Alexan-
drina R., Sch. Frances W. Smith, Sch,
Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Emanuel C,
Gordon, Sch, Reginald N, Wallace, Sch.
Mandalay _ II, . Marea Henrietta,
Swedish Barquentine Sunbeam, M.V.
Lady Joy, Yacht Beegie, Sch. Princess
Louise, M.V, Aracosta, Schooner En-

deavour W,
ARRIVALS
Dutch S.S. “Ganymedes”’ 1,551 tons net,
Capt. Stevenfon, from Bahia, Agents:
8. P. Musson, Son & Co,, Ltd.




ARRIVALS—By B.W.LA.L,

From TRINIDAD: Geoffrey Webdale,
William Scott, Frank Sieverman, Kata-
Tene Sieverman, Morris Wexler, Ivan
Herreira, Hilda Alshop, Thomas Storrar,
James Best, Robert Bears, Annette Bears,
Hon. John Chandler, Edith Chandler,
Doris Scott, Cynthia Thomasos, Inez
Hinkson, Diana’ Giuseppi, Undine Giu-
Seppi, Neil Giuseppi, John Parkinson,
Lorna Alleyne, Jeanne Alleyne, Bruce

pe, Arthur Smith, Imogene Smith,
Hyacinth Yowchind.

From BRITISH GUIANA: Mr. Regin-
ald Stone, Mrs, Evelyn Stone, Miss Carol
Stone, Mrs, Rose Stone, Miss Louise
Stone, Master Raymond Stone, Mr.
Charles O'Donnell, Mr, Collin O'Don-

» Mr. J, Robertson, Mr. E. Texeira,
Mr. N. Whitehead, Mr. Everad D'Abreu,
Mrs, Evelyn Reid, Dr. D. Atchan, Mr.
Robert Bangaroo, Mr. R. H. Moore, Mr.

. Stir, ar ~

Schooner ‘Hazell Scott,’ 30 tons net,
Capt. Marks; from St. Vincent. Agents:

Schooner Owners’ Association.

Dutch S.S. “Ittersum,’’ 3,199 tons net,
Capt. Bakken, from Antwerp. Agents:
S. P. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd.

DEPARTURES
S.S. “Interpreter,” 4,027 tons net, Capt.
Coates, for Trinidad. Agents: DaCosta &

Co., Ltd.

Schooner “Laudalpha,’’ 60 tons net,
Capt. Gumbs, for St. Lucia, Agents:
Schooner Owners’ Association,

Schooner “Turtle Dove,” 82 tons net,
Capt. Sealy, for St. Vincent. Agents:

Schooner Owners’ Association,

—,

J. Walrond, Mr, C. D, Edghill, Mr. N.

DaSilva, Mrs, A. DaSilva, Mr, J. Bayley.

and Mrs, Daisy Seaton.
DEPARTURES—By B.W.LA.L.

For TRINIDAD: Mrs. Ruth Gordon,
Master Robert Gordon, Mr. Cecil Smith,
Mrs. Jean Templeton, Mr. William Tem-
pleton, Mrs, Charlotte Waith, Mrs, Mar-
garet Carew, Mr. Kjell Ovesch, Mr.
Gunnar Toisberg, Miss Kathleen Pape,
Mr. William Bell, Mr, Bernard Vander-
veen, Mr. Swetozar Schiskin, Mr. James
Johnson, Miss Iona Henry, Master Rich-
ard Bayne, Master George Bayne, Mrs.
Greta Bayne, Mr, George McLean, Mr.
Geoffrey Foster, Mr. Paul Foster, Mr,
Clarence Patterson, Mr, Peter Patterson,
Mr, Alfredo Seigert, Mr. Jacques Cor-
bell, Mrs. Fernande Corbell, Mr. John
Grace, Mr. Harold Bannister, Mr. Thom-
as Yearwood, Mr. Reginald Eckstein, Mr,
Cecil Crawford, Mr, Stanley Niccolls,

IN TOUCH WITH BAKBADOS COAST STATION

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd,,
Advise that they can rfow communicate
With the following ships through their

is Coast Station:—

S.S. Hindanger, 8.S. Rufina, S.S
Port Napier, S.S. Planter, S.S. Regent
Jaguar, S.S, Turicum, S.S. Nidarland,
8.3. Fort Amherst, $.S. Ganymedes,
S.S. Regent Leopard, S.S. Canadian
Challenger, S.S. Monrosa, S.S. Sheaf-
mead, S.S. Esso Glasgow, S.S. Paparui,
S.S. Del Sud, S.S. Utrect, 5.8. Tresus,

-S. UNragaz, S.S. Meline, S S. Adula.

The Weather







TO-DAY

Sun Rises

Sun Sets

Moon (New) January 1

High Water: 10.33 a.m., 11,28 5
Lighting 6.30 p.m.
YESTERDAY

Rai



S.S. Mormacsurf, S.S. Esso Pittsburg,
S.S. Ranghild, 8.S. Antartic Ocean,
S.S. S. Rosa, S.S. Nieuw Amsterdam,
8.S. Monte Ayala, S.S. Rio Araza, M.S.
Carona, S.S. Mormacsun, 8.8. Jamaica.
S.S. Bergeland, S.S. Fortrichepanse
S.S. Camedian, S.S. Borgny, S.S. Sea-
breeze, S.S. Vestvangen, S.S. Hood
River, S.S. Hecuba, S.S. Esso Den Haag,
S.S. Mormachawk, S.S. Cavina, S.S,
Regent Hawk, S.S. San Vulfrano, 8.S.
Repton, S.S. San Velino, S.S. Empire
martaban, 8.8. Corrientes, 8.5. Telamon.
S.S. Norness.

17 miles per hour
3.058 (3 p.n

Wind Velocity
Barometer (9 a.m.)
2.970

What’s on Today

t 16.00 a



Cou

Kensingto



LOCAL NEWS

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





M.V. AROCOSTA which arrived here on Monday bringing four truc



Waterworks
Scheme Not
Good Enough

Says Board Of Health

The General Board of Health
does not think that the verms of
agreement by the Waterworks to
supply water are good enough for
the Board to give approval for
division and sale of land for
building purposes

Members of the Board led by
the Chief Medical Officer express-
ed dissatisfaction at a meeting
yesterday when vhey discussed an
application by Mrs, J. D. E. Year-
wood for division and sale ot
26,776 square feet of land in
four lots at the Pine for building
purposes, but the Board finally
approved Mrs, Yearwood’s appli-
cation.

_ Chase Attended

Major A. De V, Chase, recently
reNigned Clerk of vhe Board at-
tended the meeting. The Presi-
dent of the Board suggested that
Mr. Chase should be made a
member, since he had _ public
health matvers at his finger tips.

Honourable V, C. Gale, M.L.C.,
who was not present at the last
meeting of the Board took oppor-
Vunity yesterday to express his
appreciation of the expert man-
ner in which Major Chase had
always carried out his duties. He
wished him a happy retirement.

The Commissioners of Health
wrote the Board complaining
abouv the insanitary condition of
Btandpipes in St. Joseph. The
Clerk of the Board replied to
them that according vo the Public
Health Act, they (the Commission-
ers) were responsible for keeping
the pipes in a sanitary condition.

The Board yesterday deciatd
that the Clerk should write ae
Commissioners again, re-inform-
ing them of their responsibility.
The Clerk is also to suggest to
them that they should send down
the report, of their own inspectors
on the matver,

Other Applications

Other applications for division
of land granted yesterday were
as follow:—

Division and sale of land in lots by
Mr, Wm. N. Alleyne at Amity Lodge,
Christ Church, Re loss of plan

Division and sale of land in lots at
Welches plantation, St. Michael, by Her-
bert A. Watson and Edward H. Kirton.

Sale by Mrs. Florence Catlyn, of 6,024
Square feet of land in lots as already
divided and let in tenantry at Haggatt
Hall, St. Michael.

Division and sale of 90,365 square feet
of land in lots at Jacksons, St. Michael,
by Mr. Benjamin Gibson.

Division and sale of land in two lots at
Rockley, Christ Church, by Mr, W. D. L,
Warden.

Dividing two lots of land from the
Pine plantation, St. Michael, by Mrs,
J. D. E, Yearwood, for sale to Lieut.-Col,
Jos. Connell, Mrs. J. D. E. Yearwood
having divided off other lots within the
current twelve months.

Dividing one lot containing 14,406 sq.
ft. of land with dwelling-house, from a
place called ‘Malta,”’ St. Joseph, for sale

by Mrs. Iris Weatherhead, she having
divided off another lot from the same
Property within the current twelve
months,

Relative to the division and sale of
land in lots at Welches plantation, St.
Michael, by H. A. Watson and E. H,

Kirton, the Board approved an alteration
of the approved plan by Mrs. D. S§.
Boxill by transferring 930 sq. ft. of land
from lot No. 95 to lot No. 93.

Division and sale of 55,893 sq. ft. of
land in 8 lots at Welches, St. Michael,
by Mr. Herbert A. Watson.

The Board did not approve an appli-
eration by Mr. W. I. Webster for an
alteration to an approved plan, relative
to the sale of land in lots at Carring-
ton’s Village. Mr. Webster wanted to
divide lot No. 151 of 2,325 sq. feet, plus
267 sq. feet in road into two lots.

If this division is done, each lot will
be too small to comply with the pro-
visions of the Public Health Act,

After considering an application for
division and sale of 157,281 sq. feet of
land in 55 lots at Howell's Cross Road,
St. Michael, by the Barbados Co-Opera-
tive Bank Ltd., the Board only approved
of lots 1—23. Consideration of the re-
maining lots was postponed so that the
position of a dump in the land could be
properly defined on the plan.

Also postponed was consideration of
an application for the sale by Mr. Win-
ston Arthur Hassell of 17,308 sq. feet of
land in 10 lots as already divided and
let in tenantry aback of George Street,
in St. Michael.

Present were Dr. E. B. Carter,
(President); Honourable V. C.
Gale, M.L.C., Mr. F. Goddard,
M.C.P.; the Chief Medical Officer;
Mr J. Kidney; Dr. G. Emtage;
Dr. F..N. Grannum, Sanitation
Officer; and Mr, W. Abranams,
Chief Sanivary Inspector of the
Board.

Ignored Major
Road: Fined 10/-

A fine of 10/- and 1/- costs

be paid in seven days or in de-
fault seven days’ imprisonment
was imposed on Richard Brat
waite of Parish Land, Chi
Church yesterday | H WwW
ship Mr. H. A. Talma.

He was found guilty of driving
the motor lorry X—1089 on Wal
rond Street, a road to which a stop
Sign 1 placed andi =6failir to
entering the

ks for Graeme Hall Plantation,

*“AROCOSTA’’ BRINGS
FOUR TRUCKS

FOUR second hand trucks for Graeme Hall Planta-

tion, Christ Church, atrived
M.V. “Arocosta”.

on Monday by the Honduran

Mr. Morris Wexler, who is both owner of the planta-

tion and the
motor ear and



Autonomy For
Surinam Soon

Surinam will shortly have au-
tonomy in its own internal meth-
ods as the Bill has been passed
already by Parbament in J’nu
Hague, Dr. P. G. F. H. Van dex
brugn, Director of Economic Af-
fairs in Paramaribo told the
“Advocate” yeferday.

Dr. Van der rugh was an ar-
rival on Monday by B.W.1LA. via
Trinidad for three weeks’ holiday
in the interest of his health and
jis staying at the Hotel Royal.

He said that unlike Barbados,
Surinam was not over-populated.
The country, although about 20
times the size of Trinidad. only
had a population of 200,000.

Although their economy was
built on the production of the
mining of bauxite, yet the coun~
try had many possibilities of de-
velopment in the field of fores-

try, mining, agriculture and
transportation.
Owing to the lack of capital

and skilled labour up to the pres-
ent moment, very little progress
had been made, but Government
was pushing forward with all the
available means to improve the
possibilities for economic devel-
opment and for ine

Plans were being studied by
the respective departments 0!
Government for improvement ir
education and all kinds of sani
tary questions including the figh

4

eel
social upheaval of the ae

e

vessel, sent up the trucks along with his
asbestos piping from Trinidad.

o

This was the main purpose of
the “Arocosta’s” visit to Barba-
dos. After this cargo is\discharged,
the vessel will be loaded with ap-
proximately 300 tons cf scrap
iron as ballast.

From here it is expected to sail
for Martinique to load cranes and
trucks for British Guiana for the
handling of scrap iron there. The
scrap iron taken from here will
then be shipped back to Trinidad
where it will make a complete
load either for U.K. or U.S.A.

Mr. Cecil Benn, representative
of Mr. Wexler in the West Indies,
came up on the “Arorosta” to
supervise the loading and un-
loading of cargo here,

The “Arocosta” was last here
early last year when it took a load
of scrap iron for Puerto Rico. It
iS expected to leave port around
the end of the month. In the
meantime, minor repairs will be
effected at its berth.

Mr. Benn told the “Advocate”
that he experienced a fine trip up
although it was around the time
vessels were complaining of chop-
py seas.

When the “Arocosta” sailed
from Trinidad for Barbados, it
encountered a squall in the third
Bocus and was forced to return
to Porv-of-Spain. It finally left
Trinidad at midnight on Friday
and arrived Monday morning,



Dutch Ships Make
First Call Here

; Two Dutch steamships made
against mosquitoes. 4 eee Dutch ste amships made

They were not benefited byg St calls av Barbados between
tourism like Barbados, but the Tuesday and yesterday. The SS.

Government was trying to build:
up a scheme to develop the coun-
try with the help of the so-called

Welfare Fund which was given
by the Dutch Government and
amounted to 40,000,000 guilders.



’

Montserrat’s Hotel

- .

Accommodation

. e
Limited

Although hotel accommodavion
in Montserrat is limited, yet there
are a few boarding houses which
offer good service and everything
is pleasant, Honourabte D. R.
Walwyn, Treasurer of the colony
Yold the “Advocate” yesterday.

Mr. Walwyn is now over here
for the Customs Talks and is
staying at the Marine Hotel.

He said that the roads for
travelling were very good, the
country was well cultivated and
vhe chief industry was cotton.
The rainfall was generally good
and last year’s cotvon crop was
regarded as quite successful and
there was every prospect of a
good crop during 1950,

There was no air service in the
colony, but now that iv was in
the line of steamship communi-
cation, it was hoped that vhe
Customs Union will be of very
great benefit to the economy of
whe island.

The people of Montserrat were
very hospitable and visitors al-
ways enjoyed a delightful time
both from vhe point of view of
health and scenery.

Obituary —
Mr. Allan Perkins

THE death occurred at the
General Hospital after a short
illness on Sunday evening of Mr.
Allan Perkirs, accountant of
Messrs. Knigats Ltd. His funeral
attended by a large and represen-
tative gathering took place at
the Westbury Cemetery on Monday
afterncon.

Mr. Perkins was the second son
of Mrs. M. G. Perkins of Black
Rock and was one member of a
family well known in the business
houses of this City for generations,
His father was for many years
Floor Walker at Messrs. DaCosta
& Co., Ltd. one brother was
Manager of Barclays Bank, an-
other at Messrs. Jason Jones &
Co., and another now in South
Africa was in some other form of
business.

Mr. Perkins was quiet
those who penetrated that

found a

but
reserve
true and k geabie
triend

A car accide eal



us ovement as he
recovered
‘ractured

from

were

knee
i ense good

tir
ime N €



frie He wa



“Ittersum” arrived about 3.40
p.m. on Tuesday and at daybreak

yesterday the S.S. “Ganymedes”
dropped anchor in the Bay,
The “Ittersum,” 3,199 - ton

freighter under Qpptain Bukken,
brought here from Antwerp 3,120
bags of sulphate of ammonia.
From Amsterdam, it brought pack-
ages containing figs, fruit juice,
raisins, almonds, enamel and
‘wood ware, nails, bags, and piece
BOOMER am i ee

This vessel has been chartered
by the Royal Netherlands Steam-
ship Company from some other
Dutch Steamship Company.

S.S. “Ganymedes” arrived from
Buenos Aires with 11,044 bags of
linseed oilmeal. This vessel is a
1,551-ton freighter commanded by
Captain Stevenson. It arrived via
Bahia,

Messrs S. P. Musson, Son and
Company Limited are agents here
of both vessels.

“Athel Ruby”
Due To-day

Molasses tanker “Athel Ruby”
which is consigned to Messrs H.
Jason Jones & Co., Litd., is due
to arrive at Bridgetown to-day at
noon, The tanker is coming from
Trinidad to take another load of
vacuum pan molasses,

It was last here for a load of
molasses on Friday and sailed for
Trinidad Saturday,

Car Damaged

The front and rear fenders on
the left side of the car M—2419
were damaged when the car was
involved in an acciden’ with a
donkey cart on Bank Hall Road,
St. Michael, On Tuesday. The
car, which is the property of
Pauline Moore of Passage Road,
was being driven by her son Vin-
cent Moore at the time of the
acciden’, The donkey cart is
owned and was being driven by
Louis Browne of the Barracks
Road, Bank Hall,





Letters andRumours

THEY say that rumours are
flying. So are letters. Yesterday
a letter flew out of a car passing
on Bay Street, It was addressed

to Mrs, D. R. Young; No. 30 Har-
well Road, Sutton, Courtenay,
Berkshire, England.

It was picked up by a Bay

If the owner
2815 the letter can be

Street housewife.
will call
retrieved.

£2 For Bodily Harm

Carmen Alleyne was fined £2
to be paid in instalments of £1
per month by Mr. A, J. H. Han-
chell yesterday fur inflicting
odily harm on Albert Ince a
unor, of Greenfield on. Novem-

pi ent

Farmers’ Day |

To-day |

Cultivation and care of fruit}
trees, management and breeding |
of livestock and the control of |
plant pests and diseases will be
among the subjects discussed at
vhe third annual Farmers’ Day
at Groves Agricultural Station at |
1.45 p.m. vo-day.

The talks and demonstrations
have been specially prepared to
meet the needs of the particular







district and the function also
provides the opportunity for
peasant farmers and others in-

terested. with the opportunity of
meeting some of the _ scientific
officers of the Department of
Agriculture and discussing with
them matters of agricultural im-
portance.



Officers Leave For
B.W.LA. Plane
Inquiry
-IN TRINIDAD

Mr, S. A. Niccolls and Mr. D.
Mendes, operating officers at Sea-
well Airport for British West In-
dies Airways Ltd., left for Trim-
dad yesterday to attend an in-
quiry into the accident involving
the British West Indies ‘plane
R.M.A. St. Vincent which ran
off the runway at Seawell on
Friday.

‘ re .
Stove Missing
Steshen Millar of Waterford
Land, St. Michael, reported to
the police that his house at

Waierford was broken and enter-
ed between 6.15 am. and 4.30

p.m. on Tuesday. A stove and
other articles valued $8.85 are
missing.



Copra, Peanuts, Coconuts
Arrived Yesterday

A shipment of copra, peanuts
and coconuts arrived in the is-
land yesterday by the 30-ton
schooner “Hazell Scott” which
arrived from St. Vincent under
Captain Marks.

Messrs Schooner Owners’ As-
sociation are local agents.





& + }
25 Years Ago |
(Barbados Advocate, January
12, 1925)
CRICKET
Mr. Austin’s Team vs. Mr.
Kidney’s Team

THE first day’s play of this
match which was begun on Satur-
day did not prove as interesting
as had been anticipated.

Mr. Kidney’s team batting first
scored 96 for 8 wickets and de-
clared. Mr. Austin’s team then
went to the wicket and had mus-
tered 84 for 9 wickets when
stumps were drawn.

The wicket had been impaired
by rain and consequently there
was no tall scoring and play was





slow and somewhat tame, Of the
batsmen L. O. Wood played a|
good innings for 25 runs, before |
being nicely caught by Griffith |
right on the boundary, while G.
Challenor showed himself once
more the outstanding batsman in |
an innings of 34 which was not |
brilliant but very sound.

The bowlers made the most of |
the damaged state of the wicket
and had the batsmen in difficul- |
ties most of the time. |

For Mr. Austin’s team K. Mason |
bowled exceedingly well and took
three wickets for 32 runs, while |
the quality of Greaves’ bowling |
cannot be fairly judged from the }
figures, |

In Mr. Kidney’s team Dr, Skeete
distinguished himself with the |
leather taking 6 wickets; E. L. G. |
Hoad captured the remaining
three,
_ L. O. Wood was allowed to bat
in place of L, R. Hutchinson and
J. M, Kidney did not bat.









PAGE







| Without a shadow of doubt





’
~ :





ves
Baek
ae




ie



i
yi



3888
st SUS TENT FROST

EPHEDROL

TRADE MARK

quickly relieves

COLDS and
CATARRH

It clears the nasal pas-
sages to remove stuffiness
and the distressing con-
ditions of head colds and
catarrh. The patent nasal
application bottle is infinitely better than spray
or dropper, and can be carried conveniently in
handbag or pocket without fear of leakage.

Made by CLAY & ABRAHAM LTD., Liverpool, England
Established 1813

Obtainable from all Drug Stores: *
KNIGHTS LTD., AGENTS & DISTRIBUTORS.

USE
MARTINI & ROSSI
VERMOUTH







A POT FOR EVERY

PURPOSE

In your garden

Priced at 4c, 8c, l4c, 18c, 24c,
48c, and 80c.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LID.

11,

10,







INTO 1950 WITH

FLYING
COLOURS

® More attractive frontal appearance

® Wider front seat
@®Larger headlamps

@Separate parking lamps

WYVERN 12 h.p.—4 cyls. — VELOX 18 h.p.—6 cyls.
(All Leather Upholstery — Fabric optional)

12 & 13, BROAD STREET



—
—







a.

Main New Features Include

@Improved steering

@ Larger tyres

@Wide range of scintillating new
Metallichrome Colours

fore

NEW SHIPMENT JUST ARRIVED
ge Your enquiries cordially invited

DIAL 4616 (ROBERT THOM Lid.) White Park Rd.

In d


COURTESY GARAGE





; PAGE SIX



HENRY






FUNNY !
‘ THE
TATTOOED WAN HANDED ME THE























fy WATCH AND RAN AWAY | 77 pvean
iz HE WAS
vit PWE!IRD!
‘
:
|
; Cape. 1949, Web Deney Poateasens
World Rights Rewrved |
ell ashe iabicing i-— a-capiinnslin
NO, BIPF. THOSE MEN THINK YOU'RE A KILLER,| | I DON'T KNOW WHAT TONTO HAD IN )
BUT WE CAN'T SHOOT THEM. THEY'RE OECENT| | MIND, BUT HE SAID,"“GET HORSES”
Soy TOWNSMEN. ;
>. . f j <0 ‘ 44
¥ 6 ’
4
Hy ea
Dh le
wr?r CVoaneuwesr ee THE VERGEANCE
ccc weetaD (I ee
2DIN CLOUDS MAY Lf S$i4'! WE'RE ArT
STOP STRIPEY SPOTTING wa ~ THE ~~ i... mn
.. ‘ AV FOREIGN WIRELESS. (/ SSM! THE MCGINK
sem A BP La pI Noe € { woun eure
$PEED-BOAT he VAR \. SKELP US
NOW, RENO? BY Quick! \/ a wo" s
“ : /, ( INSIOE Wo
f / VEZ.
fF 7 ers
4
|
: at
WHAT'S THAT 7? Ait ae ee
SOVEONE OFFERED KNOW BETTER tae RARED ey ERA
oot oed tea a THAN TO TREAT AN FELL Down | | “eeoTHeR? |
HIM LIKE THAT-- A FLIGHT _
OF STAIRS 4 | we |
ig
aA
j
a
"
ESP y @ PEELED
if SAID} WHILE YOU'RE var OUR EYE PEE
A BIG RED TRUCK,
PX PHONING THE POLICE, MISS MITCHELL
‘a8 Ze» ..T' HEADING FOR _
be =, THE HIGHWAY! 4
vty >

CATCHING HiIN A NET,
THEY RUSH HIM INTO A

a



er ne ee erent me

ODD' YOu NOTICE 'T GOBS

*TOCK TOCK” INSTEAD OF “TICK



SS77T
MATTER
























ON ThE ROAD FROM THE NORTH, 708}
COWDY AND MISS MITCHELL HUNT,
‘ e = " a

THEIR MISSION DONE, THE THUGGEE:
IN TYBORE® SUITE CLiM@ OUT
SILENTLY LIKE GREAT DARK SPIDERS 4«









BARBADOS ADVOCATE



BY CARL ANDERSON

PELIP! CUT IT OUT! WHAT'S THE



CHANCES |
TANDESS

GF THE SCORPION

THUS /§ Thee
98C HOME SERVICE.
MERE (S$ THE
WEATHER FORECAST
mw *OR TO-NIGHT AND





{ AN’ WHEN HE CAME
| TO -SOMEONE GAVE
HIM A GLASS OF
WATER -- AN’ HE
PASSED OUT AGAIN /!










GIRLIE? LET'S |
STO? FER A BITE
TO EAT... AN’ YOU
< CAN TELL ME
j <\ MORE ABOUT

IN YER RICH
\s S ABLATI VES!

ye



= r




THREW HIM«OUT OF THE
WINDOW ~ TEN STORIES ~THAT WAS
SUPPOSED To BE ~ ME++~





ecvnecus staal LLL LL:







Government May )eyaluation Deals West Indian
Students In Canada
Severe Blow

' *

_ Enqujre Into
-

| Film Law

LONDON (By Mail)

| ‘The British Government may

| start inquiries into the operation:
| of the law passed by the Jamaican
Government under which a US.
firm, Kingswood Films Ltd., is
given a monopoly to make films
in the island. A

Film interests in Britain are
waiting to see what effect the Jaw
may have on their plans and it ts
believed that the Colonial Office
has now decided to make further
inquiries about the law and its
possible future effect.

The Governor of Jamaica may
ce asked for a report on the mat-
ter,

Film authorities in London
ecently denied a reported Kings~
wood Films statement they had
secured priority for their films in
Britain. No priority is accorded
to any film in Britain and it
seems dubious whether films made
in Jamaica by a US. firm would
get any showing in Britain be-
cause of the Quota Act. ae



Oppose Increase
On Cotton Duty

BASSETERRE, (By Mail)
At a reeent meeting of the
Legislative Council Government
increased the export duties on
ectton shipped from St. Kitts to
3c. per Ko, lint. The export tax
on lint in the sister islands of

the Presidency Nevis and An-
guilla remains at Ic. per lb. This
liscrimatory legislation was
strongly opposed by the _ two

nominated members of St. Kitts,
but was carried by a major vote,
all elected members supporting
the third elected member for St.
Kitts, Mr. J. N, France, who
stated that cotton was grown
efficiently in St. Kitts by estates
who could afford to pay the tax
whereas it was grown by peas-
ants in the other islands and they
could not afford to pay it. It is
understood that the St. Christo-
pher Sea Island Cotton Associa-
tion intends protesting to the
Secretary of State against this
discrimatory legP lation, and pro-
poses sending copies to the parent
body and to its Advisory Com-
mittee in London.
—B.U.P

~ . .
U.S. Citizen Ordered
To Leave
.
Czechoslovakia
PRAGUE, Jan. 11,

The Czech Government ordered
this afternoon the Amerjcan Joint
Distribution Committee, an Amer-
ican-Jewish relief organisation,
which has functioned in Prague
since May 1945 to close its offices
in Czechoslovakia by the end of
January.

The Government at the same
time requested the departure
from Czechoslovakia by January
31 of Mr. Henry Levy, an Amer-
iean citizen, who since the sum-
mer of 1948 has been an official
of the American Joint Distribu-
tion Committee in Czechoslovakia.
_ The Czech Foreign Office in ask-
ing for the closing of the com-
mittee offices is understood to
heve intimated it considered that
the committee had completed its
function which mainly concerned
Jewish emigration relief for the
destitute and aged.—Reuter



Apology For A
Wound

a SINGAPORE, Jan. 10.
Terror ists apologised to a Sikh
nospital assistant after wounding
him and killing his driver, when
tney attacked a hospital jeep in
Central Pahang yesterday, the
Sikh told the Police to-day.
| —Reuter.

b .
Reports Denied
WASHINGTON, Jan. 11.

A State Department spokesman
\o-day denied reports published
in Germany that the United
States was trying to negotiate
Wich the Soviet Union a settle-
ment of East-West differences.

; He said neivher formal nor in-
formal negotiations between the
United Staves and Russia were
| S0ing on.—Reuter.





‘U8. Cut In
Rum Prices |

NEW YORK (By Mail)

U.S. rum importers have been
euthorised to amend fair trade
pricing schedules so that retail
prices may be cut, Mr. John
O'Connell, Chairman of the State
Liquor Authority has announced.

»He explained that although vhe
price postings for February have
already been made, according to
the law, because of West Indian
tariff reductions already made,
the excepvion is being made in the
interests of the consumer.

Puerto Rican and Virgin Island
rum prices will maintain sched-
uled levels. Both of these islands
are possessions of the United
Svates and'their products are not
subject to import taxes.—B.U.P.

3,200 Soldiers

Leave After
48 Hours Delay

MARSEILLES, Jan. 11

The French troopship Pasteur
(30,477 tons) held up for 48 hours
by a strike of the crew, left here
voday with 3,200 troops and
equipment for Indo-China.

The strike which led to clashes
yesterday between police and
railway staff, who came out in
sympathy. was settled.—Reuter.

.

Threat Of Hostile

Wages Campaign

LONDON, Jan. 11.

With the General Election only
six weeks away, British Labour
Leaders face the threat of a hos-
tile wages campaign by millions
of Trade Unionists.

Tomorrow aé_ conference of
Leaders of all 187 Unions affilia-
ted to the Trade Union Congress
will be asked to vote confidence in
the Labour Government’s
Economic Policy by foregoing all
wage increases for a year.

Three of the movements “Big
Six” Unions — the Miners the
Engineers and the Railwaymen—
have indicated their intention to
fight this policy of wage restraint.
Behind them, observers forecast
they may be able to mobilise
almost half of the eight million
members of the TUC.



—Reuter.

He “Knew Nothing”

NEW YORK, Jan. 11.

Dr. Jose Arce, former head of
the Argentine delegation to the
United Nations, said today that he
knew nothing about a report that
he would become Argentine Am-
bassador to Britain.

Dr. Arce was interviewed on ar-
rival by air from Buenos Aires.
He said he went home and re-
signed as head of the United Na-
tions Delegation to facilitate re-
organisation of the Argentine
Foreign Office.

“IT don’t know if
tion was accepted,”

the resigna-
he added
—Reuter.

Invitation Issued

s KARACHIN, Jan. 10.

Diego Luis Molinair, Chairman
of the Argentine Foreign Affairs
Committee, said here to-night
that on behalf of Senora Eva Per-
on, wife of the Argentine Presi-
dent he had invited the wife of
the Pakistan Prime Minister, to
visit Argentina —Reuter.

Favourable Conditions

For “Liberation''?

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan, 11.

A Chinese Communist broadcast
from Peking to-day said that
Communist victories in south and
southwest China had created fav-
ourable conditions for the “libera-
tion” or Formosa, “Hainan Island
und Tibet.

All the China mainland “with
the exception of Tibet” had been
brought under vhe Red Banner, it
claimed,

—Reuter.

For Your Insuran

West Indian students at uni-
versities in Canada find them-
selves in an extremely precarious
position as a result of the recent
aevaluation of the pound sterling.

Simultaneous with devaluation
came a sharp rise in the cost of
living in Canada, and many West
Inaians are concerned about being
able to complete their courses.
Those most severely affected are
of the graduating class of 1951, and
more particularly, students of the
class of 1950, who should graduate
next May, and who find themselves
in. sight ,of the Promised Land
with their chances of completing
the journey threatened,

The West 'mdian Society of
McGill, representing about 200
students from the West Indies and
British Guiana enrolled at McGill
and Sir George Williams College,
are petitioning the respective Colo-
nial governments for aid. Under
the presidency of Mr. Eric A.
Valere, engineering student from
Trinidad, the Society brought
their plight to the notice of the
University authorities. The
Registrar indicated that
the Board of Governors
were fully sympathetic towards
all students from sterling areas in
the difficult position in which they
found themselves, and were study-
ing ways and means of alleviating
the keenness of the situation.
However, the problem of the West
Indians could not be considered
separately He readily gave hf!
support to the petition.

Special Scholarships

At Dalhousie University, Hali-
fax, there has been set up a group
of scholarships for sterling areas
students affected by devaluation.
This scheme is an implementation
of a decision of the fourth annual
conference of the International
Students’ Service held recently in
Montreal. The 1.8.8. Committee
on the Dalhousie campus took
immediate steps to raise the funds
for setting up these scholarships,
and got permission to hold a tag
day.

In view of the fact that at
McGill, Dalhousie and _ other
Canadian Universities the students
from other sterling countries
greatly outnumber West Indians,
there is little probability that
many West Indians, if any, will
benefit from these schemes.
Nonetheless they show the extent
to which the Canadian populace is
willing to help.

The members of the West
Indian Society of McGill, fired ar
they are with the desire to con-
tribute to the progress of their
homeland, and knowing that this
progress is intimately bound up
with their being qualified, are
hopeful of a favourable and tan-
gible support from their respec-
tive governments in particular,
and the West Indian populace at
large.

Defendants Plead
Guilty



BELGRADE, Jan. 10.
The first four defendants in
the Skoplje-Spy-Trial pleaded
guilty to-day to the charges

against them. They together with

six others, half of them Yugo-
slavs and the other Albanian
citizens, are accused of espion-

age, subversion and terrorism on
behalf of the Pro-Kominforim
Albanian Government,

—Reuter.

Commission Meet

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 10.

The United Nations’ Commis-
Sion on Eritrea, set up by the
Assembly to ascertain the wishes
of the Eritreans to the future
status of their country, met for
the first time here to-day in a

closed session,

—Reuter.

Formosa To
Undercut Cuba

HONG KONG, (By Mail)
Formosa is to export sugar to the
United States for the first time,}
at about 125 dollars (U.S.) nan

ton, five dollars cheaper than
Cuban sugar.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 1 yy, :
a.




Appeal Cours
Postpone Decision

The Court of a : 3
postponed until January et,
cision in a case resulting 4 x
an order for a foreclosure
a? a



Ta nt
smith,” St. Philipy ‘etn ie
roods, two perches of land te Ge F

Mr. H. Adams, ings je
by Messrs. Hute' * Fi
field, represented M. net) +
and Mr. E. K. Waelogy ua ee â„¢
ted by Mesevs "9 wea tet ©
Boyce, appeared for Dp 4%
Kirton of Barrows, tal .
against whom {| li
made. * We F

Mr, Adams held that eM
proceedings in tha Court oat)”
cery dealt with the 6 le ee

a

which formed the



dispute, it was but Fight th oF
whole proceedings shoyig 4,
ferred back to the Court of aA. b

r. Waleott tolg noneabien: 3
as the Registrar- » Mt

not put Mr. Taylor in poser
and had nov given him @ eons
ance, Mr. Taylor had ng in.
standi in the court, “ae

The Registrar-in«Ch;
vendor was .the fit

in pif 4
1 en
bring the claim.



Truman Has Do a "4
About U.S. Budge
LONDON, Jen, Jp,

The U.S. -Budget isn’t neq
unbalanced as it
Britain’s and mest other eoy
budgetary methods, {t, .
probably show a si . Tw
himself, hinted, doubts
is unbalanced enough to dijpes
U.S. business against deflation:
factors, which may ap

where, :

Including Trust Funds, ‘
Treasury's deficit in ‘et
ending June, 1951 ig
forecast to be 2,700 instead of | .
ostensible budget deficit of $j) F

Truman's Budget Message jy)
Section on Social Insurance ya.
terday was almost identical wi!
the wording of the correspondiy)
passage in Britain's ip
report but budget Lure i
cludes 5,600 for capital
ments. ‘

On the current account the J)
Treasury will have a cash i
sufficient to finance about halt ¢
its capital budget. Most be
countries would regard
strict ov even deflationary budg

ing. —Reuter.
Revie,
Cruel Hoax

Swe

ao

prs

a



WOLVERHAMPTON, Jan, 1
The parents of fi ;
Samuel James , migaing
from lis Wolverhampton hom.
since Xmas Day, were believi
to have been the victims of
cruel hoax. 4:
They received an anonyméb
letter yesterday deman 0
if they wanted to see thelt si
alive. They were told vet

the money to a London Pow Gt >
ie ne “4, Me. Rushvon.” &
ut the Wolverhampton }
after sending inquiries to Landa
said to-day they |
a hoax. The boy ;
standing in the 0
car on a canal bridge neat
verhampvon, *
in tight fitting clothing and
bed “feet” were to a
day to seour the bottem
canal,

oF. 24

=>

|

10 Injured In
Italian Strikes

ROME, Jan, fl

Police intervened to-night
disperse an unautho rz.
cession of thousands a
demeactreting. Saka the Uy
ernment in centre P
i

“if



The demonstrators ps
ously attended a meet y
Piazza Del Popolo to m
ate six workers ki by I
fire on Monday during
Modena in Northern Italy.

The Senenetees
through police cordons mh 6
main streets and marched a
columns to the Piazza Golem
outside Parliament, to the
Government Palace of ,
inale. /

Police touring the tro oe
in jeeps detained a number’
demonstrators singing the "We
Flag’ and shouting “Down Wi
the Government.” About ten
ple were slightly injured. . |

—B.U.P. {i

Agents for

The National Employers Mutual General |
Insurance Association Ltd, London.

Protect yourself against the risks of

Fire, Hurricane, Earthquake, Sea Wave, |

Riots and Commotion,

Workmen's Compensation

OT

Insure Your Motor Car.

ces consult,

A. 8S. BRYDEN & SONS (B’dos) Ltd.

a





THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1950
ss a teeeedenclebiles

CLASSIFIED ADS.






i:













Week Sun.
| ANNOUNCEMENTS Ss Sa HOUSES
i foR SALE per word Te Ww
5 . THE WOLD — Marine Gardens. un-
RENT » ad \ 02 og | ‘Urnished. Containing three bedrooms
FOR : bath and toilet upstairs. Drawing, dining
|) wANTED < ° aes kitchen and pantry downstairs.
arage, servants room in yard, room for
J LosT, FOUND per word a wo}? garden. Dial 810. Mrs. Stuart Bynoe.
timimum charge -- ‘ 5 8.1.50—3n.
ana SNeeeneeee
- puBLIC SALES The Offices in Shepherd Street recently
08 io | Occupied the Income Tax Com-
- ON & REAL missioner, Occupation on March Ist.
ucTl KNIGHT'S LTD.
ESTATE per agate line 10.1.50—5n.
FURNISHED FLAT—At
it 1,20 1.50! .. . Coral Sands,
Minimum charge .- Pv 1.20 Worthing Linen, and Silver. Good sed-
anes a . oe . P bathing, for further particulars. Dial
aie ni oon tani 8134. Alma Lashley. 10,1,49—t.f.n.
—_—_————
(Maxi een WORTHY DOWN—Top Rock, having 3
NBLIC N bedrooms each havi communicating
' os » toilet and bath. furnished, avail-
Per agate line .. Pr “an 0 able on monthly tenancy from the 15th
nimum charge .. . . ey), For further particulars apply:
Pp . Beard,
NING ADVOCATE (Monday) Phone 4683. ert Oe

par MOD ..vveeseeeess
CLOSING TIME

EK-DAYS:—2 p.m.
¥:—2.00 p.m. Friday

bene eeeeee



PUBLIC SALES







ALL items of different classification AUCTION

nust be set out in “eparate adverts, ee
HILLMAN SALOON CAR—10 h.p
Camaged in aceident to be sold by

DIED

BRATHWAITE,— HERBERT CRISPIN.

Yesterday at his residence, Barnes
Land, St. Matthias Gap, Christ
Church. Late Deputy Grand Master

of the Barbados District Grand Lodge
No. 1 of the Improved Independent
Order of Oddfellows’ London Unity.
His funeral will leave the Mechan-
f ies’ Hall, 118, Roebuck Street at 4.30
p.m. for the Westbury Cemetery. Re-
latives, friends and members of
kindred Lodges are asked to attend.

ESTELLE BRATHWAITE (wife)

and Family.

ERKINS—ALLAN CLIFFORD, son of
Mrs. Elizabeth Oxley Perkins of
Aberfoyle, Black Rock. His funeral

: took place at St. Michael’s Cathedral

/ on the 9th inst,



12.1.5.

IN MEMORIAM

IN LOVING MEMORY of our dear
Wife and Mother RUBY ELEANOR
HOPE who fell asleep on January 12th

i of sadness still come o'er us,

Secret tears do often flow,

For today has brought before us,

Sad memories of nine years ago
The Hope Family.

vy

2.1,50—1n



In loving memory of our dear wife
nd mother CATHERINE ANNE OXLEY,
ho passed away one year to-day.
“Gone from us but leaving memories
Death can never take away,
Memories that will ever linger,
Whilst upon this earth.”
Ever to be remembered by
OXLEY family.

FOR SALE

UTOMOTIVE

TRACTOR — One FARMALL “H”"

tor very little used in Al condition.
wner purchasing larger. Cole & Co.,
itd. 6.1,50—Jn.

CAR: Ford Prefect Car in perfect con-
ition 15,000 miles. Apply: Harold
featherhead, c/o Bruce Weatherhead.

11,1,.50—in

.
4

the

12.1.50—1n











USED CARS: Vauxhall 14 h.p. A-l
pndition. STANDARD 8 h.p. saloon
good condition. Courtesy Garage,
14610, 11,1,50—3n

1
LECTRiCAL

STOVE —G’E:C. with Gfill and
hermostatie® Control. Oven, in excellent
pndition, one year old $150,00 no offers.
. G., Bancroit, Seawell Airport. Phone
$2. . 12.1,50—Sn.

REFRIGERATOR—642 cubie ft. English

lectric, as new 1949 model, 5 years
- arantee, Price $450.00, on offers
wner leaving island. H. G. Bancroft.
pemmhone 8292. 12.1.50—4n

LIGHTING PLANTS: Climax Petrol
perated Generators 2.75 KVAâ„¢ 110/115
lolts—Orders now being placed for im-
diate shipment. Communicate with
ourtesy Garage, Dial 4616

11,1.50—3n

RNITURE

FURNITURE — Birch -drawing room
ite comprising (1) Settee (3 seats) ()!
lorris Chairs (1) Morris Rocker. All as
Ww with spring cushions, tapestry
pvered. (1) Dressing Table with long
rror (Modern). (1) Chest-of-drawers,
) Kitchen Cabinet (1) three tier-
der (1) small Birch table (2) Kitehen





ae

bles. All can be seen between 4—7 p.m.
i . G. Bancroft, Seawell Airport. Phone
te 92. 11.1,50—5n



STEEL OFFICE FURNITURE: Letter
d fools-cap size 4 drawer letter cabin-
is with locks; Bins suitable for hard-

stores or Garages, etc. Cabinets
ith Locks etc.—Courtesy Garage, Dial
1. 11,1.50—3n

IESTOCK

PUPPIES: Two (2) Wire haired Fox
riers pure bred, with Pedigree. Phone
5. 11.1.50—3n



ECHANICAL

TYPEWRITERS—A small quantity ot
ond hand Remington Typewriters now
ilable. Apply: T, Geddes Grant Ltd.

hone 4376. 8.1,50—62,

BICYCLES: Hercules Silver King, on

ms, all models, in green and in black.

Barnes & Co,, Ltd, Dial 4476.
13.11 ,.49—t.f.n.



:
;
a4
c

ISCELLANEOUS

TRUCKS & CAR TYRES: Various sizes
uding 30 x 5, 8.25 x 20, 5.50 x 17,
es advancing—secure at these prices

w—Courtesy Garage—Dial 4391.

11.1,50—3n

GALVANISED SHEETS: Best quality
and & lengths, $2.91 and $3.07 each.
4684, 4476. A. Barnes & Co., Lid
11,1, 50—t.f.n.

WASH BASINS & SINKS — at Shop

om, Hardwood Alley.
10.1,50—3n.

oa, TILES 6 x 6” White, Green,
nd ie, 12c each at Ralph A. Beard's
how Room, Hardwood Alley.

; 10.1,50—3n

1{16, 1/8, %, 5/16,

Auto Tyre Co
Dial 2696.
10. 1,50—t-£.n.

INGS—Galvanised pipe. All sorts
n % in. to 1% ins. Phone 4684

& Co. Ltd,
3.12.49—t.f.n.
GALVANISED SHEETS—6 ft., 6% {ft.,

Apply: Auto Tyre, Trafalgar Street.
2696. "5.1, 50—t fen,

SHEETS:
various sizes.

and
n ar Street.

ETS: BLANKETS—Here’s some-

you can't do without in the cold
leather. In various sizes and qualities,
$1.98 (Single Bed) up. Thanis
466, 42-53 Swan Street, Speights-

~ 11.1. 50—in



}

BOOKs: School Books of alf kinds at
ern High School, Ring 2846

12.1, 50—2r
CHAMOIS LEATHERS—New shipment
a ived. Price $2.01. Eckstein Brothers,
Pay Street. 12.1.50—3n

—

WATER HOSE—Dunlop Hose in sizes

Teet

$/8 in. % in. Eckstein Bros

Be
1.50---3





ream Deodorant hat





USstralia r1chudir
\ Auliflower Cabbs €
pauash and Bea :
mower Seeds
BPs, § Carmatio
PMight's Dr:

A lsc

z
if stores,



12.1.50. |°

auction at the Courtesy Garage on
Piiday 13th at 2 p.m. on instructions
received from the Insurance Co. DIXON
& BLADON, Auctioneers, Plantations
Building. 11,1.50—3n

SL

aie aor for sale by Public Com-
petition at my office Victoria Street, on
FRIDAY 13, at 2 p.m. the following:—

(1) 2640 square feet of land at Mahog-
any Lane with the wall building stand-
ing thereon. House contains closed
gallery, drawing, 2 bedrooms, usual out-
offices, enclosed yard,

1 Rood LAND at Thornbury Hill,
near the road leading to Wilcox Estate
in the parish of Christ Church, For
conditions of sale apply to: R. ARCHER
Mec KENZIE, Victoria Street. Dial 2947,

10.1.50—4n
Sue

THE AUCTION SALE of boats at the
Harbour Police Station was postponed
and will take place TO-MORROW,
12th January at 1 o'clock. These
boats are very suitable as sail, or
‘yassengers boat, or taking boat labourers
to and from the ships, there are three
boats and the sizes are (1) one 20 x 8
vverall by 5 beam (2) two 23 x 5 by 5
beam (3) third 21 x 5 by 5 beam. Your

\\inspection is invited any day on appli-

cation to the Harbour Police Station.



|
ae ee

|

|

D'ARCY A. ‘
Govt. Auctioneer,
Dist. “A”.

|



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Tuesday 17th by instructions
we will sell at “Whitehall, St.
Peter, a lot of Antiques and other
items, which includes:—

Candelabrae and _ candlesticks,
Epergne with Cut Glass Bowls,
Silvers, Large Waiver, Teapot,
Spirit Kettle &c., in Sheffield
Plate; Fruit Knives and Forks,
Spoons, Forks, Cream Jugs &c., in
Silver, Vegetable and _ Entre
Dishes, Cake Baskets, Fish and
Fruit Services in Plate, Copper
and Brass Ware, Temple and
Chiming Gongs, Bronze Orna-
menis, Napoleonic and Majolica
Plates, Cut Glass Decanters, Bowls
and Glasses; Very Beautiful Jap-
anese Cabinet inlaid with Mother
of Pearl and Gold; Old Mahogany
Liquor Case, French and Spanish
Chest of Drawers, Flat Top Desk
and Revolving Chair; Upholstered
Arm Chairs; Ceylon Screen in
Copper and Ebony; Brass Floor
Lamp; Telescopes, Field Glasses,
Baromevers, Suit Cases and many
other items of value,

Sale 11.45 o'clock — Terms Cash.

BRANKER TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers.
12.1.50—2n,



REAc ESTATE

“PIQUES VILLA”, Kent. Modern
coral stone house with approximately 144
acres land. Owing to its elevation and
position “Piques Villa” is cool and offers
enchanting views over wide expanse n{
coastline. Contains 3 bedrooms, lounge.
kitchen, large square gallery; below ere
servants’ quarters, toilets, storeroom:
and large garage. Reasonable offers
considered, DIXON & BLADON, Real
Kstete Agents, Auctioneers, Plantations
Building, Phone 4640, 11.1,50—In





Offers in writing are invited for 21,150
square feet of land situate in Sobers
Lane, Bridgetown, and having a frontage

| of 118 feet on Sobers Lane and at present



under tenantry,
For further particulars apply to the
undersigned.
CARRINGTON & SEALY.
Lucas Street.
7.1,50—6n

——

THE undersigned will offer for sale
by public Ruction at their office, No. 17,
High Street, On Friday the 13th instant
at 2 p.m.

The dwellinghouse called LANDSMERE
COTTAGE and land containing 11,960
square feet, Constitution Road, St. Mi-
chael, The dwellinghouse comprises —
ON THE GROUND FLOOR: Drawing
room and three bedrooms (one with run-
ning water), gallery, toilet and bath
UPSTAIRS: One very large bedroom;
IN THE BASEMENT: Dining room,
pantry, kitchen; Seperate bathroom in
tard.

Government water and electric light
installed,

Inspection any day except Sunday
between the hours of 4 p.m, and 6
p.m. on application to the owners, the
Misses Lynch on the premises

For further particulars and
of sale apply to :

, CATFORD & Co.
Solicitors.
7.1,50—5n.

—_—
THE undersigned will offer for Sale, at

conditions

d prices at Ralph A. Beard’s Show] their Office No. 17, High Street, Bridge-

town, on Friday 13th day of January
1950 at 2 p.m.
200 Shares in the West India Biscuit

Co,, Ltd. is aPaed
11,1.50—2n
cil liaabahaape tepid liiginaremnriant

The undersigned will offer for sale a‘
their Office No. 17 High Street, Bri
town, on Friday, 20th day of January
1950, at 2 p.m.

The messuage or Dwe House
called “PARKVILLE” and the land
thereto, containing 1,829 square feet

situate at White Park opposite The Bar-
bados Foundry. .
Inspection any day except Sundays
between the hours of 4 p.m. and 6 p.m
on application to the tenant Mr. Boyce.
For further particulars and conditions
of Sale, apply oo on «00
5,1,50—8n.

PROPERTY—At Station Hill. House
containing Modern conveniences, Apply
W. H. Bryan & C. M. Greenidge, Roe-
buck Street. 7.1.50—4n.

THE undersigned will offer for Sale at
their Office No. 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday 20th day of January,
1950 at 2 p.m. a

The Dwelling House cglied “ARNE,
jared the land theretd, containing 4,330
| square feet, situate at 9th Avenue
| Belleville,
| ‘The Dwelling House comprises Gallery,
| Drawing & Dining Rooms, 2 Becrooms,







ene with Dressing room and running)
ter in each, Breakfast room, Kitch-
ette, Toilet and Path
G installed Servant’s room anc;
. € Yard
Inspection x day except Sunday
ween the hours of 4 p.m. ar 5 pr
pplication on the premises Dia

r further particulars anc
le. ipply to

COTTLE, CATFORD & Co ¥



i Conditions| ir

PUBLIC NOTICES |

|





NOTICE

APPLICATIONS are invited for the
Pest of Organist of St. Philip’s Parish
Church.

Applications
Rector of St.
January.

shouki be
Philip by

sent to the
Tuesday 17th
11.1.50—2n



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. PHILIP

The following Vestrymen Were elected
for the Parish of St, Philip for the

year 1950.

Mrs. F. BE, DAYSH

Mr. A. G. FARMER

Mr. D. D. GARNER, M.C.P.

Mr. EB. LYTE,

Mr. E. lL. MOORE,

Mr. T. D. MAYERS,

Mr. A. T. SKEETER,

Mr. R. B. SKEETE,

Mr. H. L. SMITH.

Mr. R. S. WEEKES,

P. SCOTT,

12.1,50—1n Sheriff.











BOOKKEEPER/ACCOUNTANT: Serv~-
ices of experienced bookkeeper/Account-
ant required in Barbados. Advertisers’
own staff aware of vacancy which calls
for ability up to quarterly trial balance
standard, Knowledge Dry Goods busi-
ness and control of office personnel

Box 144 Bridgetown.
—_————————————$—————————T

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Edmund L. A.
Jules of Roebuck Street, St. Michael,
for permission to sell Spirits, Malt
Liquors, &c., at botteam floor of a 2
storey wall building opposite Comber-
mere School, Roebuck St. City.

Dated this llth day of January 1950.

To: H. A. TALMA, Esq.
Police Magistrate,
District “A”,
B. L. A. JULES,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A” on Saturday
2ist day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock

a.m. r
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate,
District “A’.
12.1.50—In



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Ivam Gibbs of
Passage Road, St. Michael for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c. at a
board and shingle shop with shedroof
attached at Baxters Road., City.

Dated this 10th day of January, 1950,
To: H. A. TALMA, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”,
IVAN GIBBS,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A”, on Friday
20th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock

a.m,
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate,
District “‘A’.
12.1.50—In



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Henry Thompson
of Eagle Hall, St. Michael, for permis-
sion to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c.
at bottom floor of a 2 storey board
and shingle building at Eagle Hall, St.
Michael,

Dated this llth day of January 1950.
To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A’’.
HENRY THOMPSON,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A” on Saturday
2ist day of January 1950 at 11 ofclock

a.m,
B. A. McLOD,
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
12.1,50—In





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
THE application of Eudine Beckles of
Eagle Hall, St. Michael ‘for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c. at
a wall building at No. 24 Tudor Street,
City.
Dated this 11th day of January 1950.
To: H. A. TALMA, Esq.
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
0, BECKLES,
for Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consid- |
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at}
Police Court, District “A’’ on Friday
20th day of January 1960 at 11 o'clock

a.m,
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate,
District “A’.
12.1,.50—In



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Eileen Grosvenor
of Church Village, St. Michael, for per-
mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c.,
at a bottom floor of a 2-storey board and
shingle building in Church Village, City
Dated this 1lth day of January 1950
To H. A, TALMA, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’’.
Signed ETLEEN GROSVENOR,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held ai
Police Court, District “A” on Saturday,
the 2ist day of January 1950, at

ll o'clock, a.m,
H. A. TALMA,

Police Magistrate, Si, “A.”
12.1.5



LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE

The application of Evangiline Alleyne

of Grosvenor Road, St. Michael, for
permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
&c., at bottom floor of a 2-storey wooden
building at Nelson Street, City.

Dated this llth day of January 1950
To H. A. TALMA, Eissq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. A’.

Signed E. ALLEYNE,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be he @ a
Police Court, District “A on Saturday,

the 2ist day of January 19580, at
11 o'clock, a.m,
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A.”
12,1,50--In.



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Cardinal T. Trot-
man of Richmond Gap, St. Michael, foi
permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
éec., at a stone building at Fairchild
Street, City.
Dated this llth day of Jafluary 1950
To H. A. TALMA, Esq,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’’.
Signed C. T. TROTMAN,
Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A” on Saturday,
the 2ist day of January 1950, at

11 o'clock, a.m.
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “A.”
12.1, 50—1n

Public Sales—Contd.






















BARBADOS ADVOCATE

LOST & FOUND





LOST

ERACELET: Silver Identification Brace-
let, engraved John Corbin. Suita
Reward. J. A. Corbin & Sons, 3848, Be!
mont Road. 11.1,50—2n



4

SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—
ing 1950, Series “C"’
please return to N. Layne, Demerara
Life Insurance Society over Collins Ltd.,
Broad Street. 12.1. 50—In.

PERSONAL

===

THE public are hereby warned agains:
giving credit to my wife SYBIL CAN-
DACE (nee Straker) as |
do not hold myself onsible for her
or anvone else contracting any debt or
debts in my name unless by a written

Spring Meet-
. Finder









EDUCATIONAL

CHRIST CHURCH BOYS’ FOUNDATION
SCHOOL.









]

CROSSMAN AND CO.,
SAY “KEEP LEFT’”’

LONDON, Jan. 11 employment and fair shares.

A group of 12 Leftist Labour |. Britain should initiaye new
Members’ of Psrliament today Proposals for the elimination, un-
published a new “keep left” man- der international control and in-
ifesto, which their leader. R. H. Spection, of mass destruction
Crossman described as “the way Weapons such as vhe atom bomb.
to win vhe General Election,” The only hope of German
The policy surprised political Democracy depends on prevent-
observers by the way in which it ing her remilitarisation,

keeps within the Party line, par-
ticularly in Foreign Policy, snes eee ng mo ae See en "ie
Crossman and others of the 12 Ger Sock oe
have been in the pasv severe crit- reads : eee te “ oe
Bevin, Porelen Secretary Ernest Deny of Western Germany and
Main deviations from the Gov- —— weeene cr
ernment include criticism of the ey eee See. that
Annual Defence Bill of £760,- Britain should scanned pose
000,000, which is considered ex- “all short cuts” to United Burope
cessive, and opposition to peace- by way of customs or currency
pe pelitery conscription. Seas ona weuaeine our
tae eee papas three Par- ¢4)) employment economy to the
Government Ministes â„¢ oer Pale we "eee
The manifesto says “We reject canes ee enmeaee
utterly the Russian exploitation Western Euro) me
of Communist parties and regimes Socialist pile for European in-
for extending the Soviet Empire.” tegration should include stand



World-Wide
Reaction To U.K.
Election Date

LONDON, Jan. 11.

The following reports from
Reuters correspondenis to-day
gave a picture of world wide re-
action to to-day’s announcement
that Britain will choose a new
Parliament on February 23.

Moscow, Pravda and orher
Moscow newspapers disinissed the
statement in five lines.

New York: The “New York
Times” warned Americans to}
“brace themselves” against “harsh |
comments to be thrown our way”
during the electoral campaign but
hoped such remarks would be
taken as “disputes among old and
good friends.” *

The “New York Herald Tri-

bune” praised as characteristic’
British fairness the Labour Party’s,
decision not to nationalise steel),as_unchallenga
until voters had been able to ex-}:

press themselves,

Sydney : “The Sydney Morning.

Herald” said the British people

must decide on “freedom or mas-',

sive control. A flexible empirical
system of government or a rigid

4

‘

iiss



It declares that a prime re-
sponsibility of British socialism

dollar commodities, international-

capital. investment, join’ bulk
purchase of scarce rouble and

isation of Western European



SHIPPING NOTICES

SLPOPPPS PEEPS SPOS





commendations from former school. Yo expose the fallacy “that

Guna =. = oe. See Rost: military strength is the sole bul-
‘St. Michael,’ | Wark against. Communism.

5.1.50—6n The first line of Democracy’é

lo
MALVERN ACADEMY
FREIDHEM, CHEAPSIDE,
THIS School will reopen. on Tuesday
i7th January at 9.30 a.m. New pupils
will be exemined on Monday 16th Jan-
uary at 9.30 a.m. Entrance Fee $1.20
F. L. MORRIS,

12.1,50—1n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Armintha Yearwood
of Spooners Hill, St. Michael, for per-
mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c.,
at a beard and galvanized shop attached
to residence at Spooners Hill, St. Michael.
Dated this llth day of January 1950.
To E A. McLEOD, Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’.
Signed ARMINTHA YEARWOOD,
Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A" on Saturday
the 2ist day of January 1950, at

11 o'clock, a.m,
f E. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A.”
12.1.50—In



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Cyril Walton of
Two Mile Hill, St. Michael, for permis-
sion to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at
a board and shingle shop with shedroof
attached at Two Mile Hill, St. Michacl.
Dated this llth day of January 1950.
To E. A. McLEOD, Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
Signed CYRIL WALTON,
: Applicant.
_N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A” on Saturday,
the 2ist day of Janyary 1950, at

11 o'clock, a.m.
: E. A, McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A.”
12.1.50—1n,

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Lineaus Augustine
Beckles of Six Cross Roads, St. Philip,
for permission to sell Spirits, Malt
Liquors, &c., at ground floor of a two
storey wall building at Pilgrim Road,
Be Ag a District “B’’.

is of ary ‘
To D. D. MORRIS. * + “
Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. “RB”.
Signed L. A, BECKLES,
licant.

N.B.—This application wil be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “B”,
the 23rd day of January

11 o'clock, a.m.
D. D. MORRIS,
Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. “B”
12.1.50-—-1n.

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Augustus Gittens
of Bay Street, St, Michael, for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at ‘ot-
tom floor of a 2 storey wall at
corner of Lewis Alley, Bay Street, City.

Dated this llth day of January 1950.
To: H. A, TALMA, * F

Police Magistrate,

District “A”.
AUGUSTUS GITTENS,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A” on Saturday

the 2lst day of January 19§0, at 11 o’clock
a.m,



H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
12.1,50—in.

SPP99SS SOS SOS POSS POPS SSE)
(In aid of a deserving cause)
at
Children’s Goodwill League
Hall Constitution Road
on
Sunday, January 22nd 1950,
a’ 4.30 p.m.
TICKETS 2/-, 1/6, 1/-
Obtainable at B’dos Dye

Works or at ithe Door. 3



x

LESS P PPPS





INCOME TAX NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Income Tax returns are re-
quired from every married man whose income is $1200.00 per annum
or over, from every other person whose income is $720.00 per
annum or over and from companies whether incorporated or unin-
corporated, societies, persons engaged in any trade or profession, and
owners of land or property whether a taxable inceme has accrued

during the past year or not.

Forms of Return my be obtained from the Income Tax Depart-
ment AFTER THE 1ST DAY OF JANUARY, 1950, and the forms
duly filled in must be delivered to me on or before the following

respective daies :
i.

1950.

1950.

Commissioner

NOTE: Any person failing to make his return within the due
date will be liable to a fine not exceeding £100 and

SS ss SSeS soneesesnesssvseels seen serene gsm sneer
a

|

GOVERNMENT

Returns of persons whose books were closed on the 3lst
day of December, 1949, on or before the 3lst day of March,

transport with a single Pan-Euro-
pean Airways Corporation.

defence must be a policy of full —Reuter.

ee

The Colonial (ilo Pext
Dollar Loan Oils Bright

LONDON, Jan, 11
WASHINGTON, (By Mail)





i _ Now that General Election date
ere is no deviation in the is Known, further period of un-
non-financial covenants required certainty in the London Stock
by the International Bank from Exchange appears cervain, Trading
those in standard banking proce- today was small and most markets
dure and information on them Colourless, with British Govern-
could have been available to the Ment stocks barely steady around
Colonial Development Corpora- Previous closing levels.
tion through the British repre- Bright feature in ovherwise
sentative on the Board of the dull oil market was produced by
International Bank, says Mr, gaining one shilling in Ultramar
Eugene Black. president of the oil at sevem and three. Small
Bank, buying and cessation of recent
Mr. Black added that he did selling was responsible for the
not know the exact reason why advance.
negotiations with the Corpora- Leading industrials were sveady
tion for a dollar loan were broken for most part of the day, but
off some heaviness was seen at thé
T do not know whether the close. Movements, however, were
Corporation had this information {small and prices never “yeally
when they began to negotiate,” tested,
he said. “As far as I know the Hopes of an early Peace Treaty
British representative on the with Japan, and the possibility
Board of the Bank has not ob- of resumption of debt service
jected to these non-financial brought buyers of bonds. Gains
covenants at any time. were not always fully held, but
“T am very disappointed that were two up to vwo points.
the loan did not go through but Bolivar and La Guaira railway
there are no hard feelings on debentures were strong on pro-
either side and I hope that later posed sale of undertakings.
on we can do business with the South African ‘minings were
Corporation.” erratic. Cape orders were mostly
Britain, Mr. Black said, want- sales, producers and developers
ed the loan to buy a special type were widely few pence lower.
of tractor known as the “Crawl- me Reuter.
er’, suitable for colonial devel-
opment purposes. but which is
not manufactured in Britain.
—B.U.P.

WANTED



MAIL NOTICE

Parcel, Registered and Ordinary Mails
for St. Lucia by the Schooner “Lady Joy"
will be closed at the General Post Office
at 12.15 p.m. on the 12th January, 1950.

Ciean Old RaG

ADVOCATE PRESS ROOM

































oo

Furnishing !

You are Buying SAFE AND SURE
when you...



TUITION

Mrs. R. A. BEARD, A,L.C.M,
(Bronze, Silver, Gold, Medalist)
Will accept a small number of
Kindergarten Pupils at ‘Maristow’
Maxwell Coast, ages 3%—5 years.
Also Tuition in Speech Training.
For further particulars, ring 8402.

10.1. 50—3n.
—————_-- +



For Properties ete., contact . FURNISH HOME
aap 4, BOARD OR OFFICE

Auctioneer and Estate Agent
Who has numerous properties
for sale. For further
particulars ring 4685
call Hardwood Alley
opposite Cathedral

from your Money Saving Store —
preaohes, eae r-robes, Linen
. y ‘anities, Simpler
Dresing Tables, Bedsteads, "Beds,
Washstands, Nightchair Comfort,
Hat and Shoe and Towel Racks,
“Dies ne
ning, Luncheon, Fane nd
Kitchen Tables in big renin t oe
shapes, finishes and sizes, China,
Kitchen and Bedroom Cebinets,

or

IMPORTANT NOTICE
®








Liquor Case,
Morris Furniture, Rush
ON and after Monday 9th Jana- oo Furniture, Rocking, Re-
ary the Gas supply will be clining, Berbice, Upright, Arm

and Tub Chairs,

@aF Brilliant full-long Mirrors:
50 x 16 at $5.05,

L. §. WILSON

Trafalgar St. Dial 4069

off on all districts from Gasworks
to Top Rock each day (Saturday
and Sunday excluded) from 1.15
p.m. to approx. 3.30 p.m. until
the work of clearing Gas Main is
completed.

PIMPLES AND
BLACKHEADS |

jickly hell I hese blemishes
feiving sla"soit in8 sagen, Proven over

Dr. Chase’s Ointment















NOTICE

Returns of persons whose principal place of business is not
situate in the island on or before the 30th day of June, 1950.
Returns of all persons, on or before the 3ist of January,

F. CLAIRMONTE
of Income Tax and Death Duties.

not less than £2 and will be prosecuted unless a satis-

factory reason is given,

10.1,50.—19n.



TREASURE ISLAND by_ Robert Louis
eo ge RETOLD IN 400
PIC by Peter Jackson

PAGE SEVEN



C.M. Conference
-Will Continue

COLOMBO, Jan. 11

British Foreign Secrétary Er-
nest Bevin ana Secretary for
Commonwealth Relations Philip
Noel-Baker said today that the
timing of Britain’s General Blec-
tion for February 23 would not
affect the programme of the Com_
monweaitn Ministers Conference
here. a

They authorised Reuter to’ is-
sue the following comment; “The
work of the Colombo Conference
will not in any way be curtailed
{as a result of the Election an-
mouncement. “We shall carry
through to the end of the Con-

weep ereweese

ference according to the previous ~

*
” ‘

—Reuter.

a
wet of Socialist beliefs enthroned
ble principles,’* ~~
Tel A Viv: Mr. Sam Watson,
{Chairman of the British Labour
“Party, leading a Goodwill Delega- ...
ion on a fortnight’s visit to Israel «=
declared: “I. think Labour will”
in because we have ~ better
Zleadership.’’—Reuter.





















MS. “PORT PIRIE” is scheduled to
sail Geelong 16th December, Melbourne,
Dee. 24th, Brisbane December 3ist Syd
ney January 4th arriving Trinidad about
end January 1950.

M.S. “KAIPAKI" is scheduled to sail
Adelaide December 28th, Port Pirie De-
cember 3ist, Burnie January 7th, Mel-
bourne January 2ist, Sydney January
28th, Brisbane February 2nd, arriving
Trinidad about 4th March.

These vessels have ample space for
Chilled, Hard Frozen and General Cargo.

Cargo accepted on Through bills of
lading with transhipment at Trinidad for
British Guiana, Barbados, Windward &
Leeward Islands.

For further particulars apply —

WITHY

The Sch. “PHILLIP H. DAVID-
SON" will accept Cayay, and
Passengers for Demerara. . <
Thursday 12th Jonusry 1950,

The MV. “CARIBBEE” wilt”
accept Cargo and Passengers. for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
Friday 13th inst.

The M.V. “DABRWOOD” will
accept sg and Passengers fof
St. ‘Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba. Date of sailing-to-be
given.

B.W.I. Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion (Inc.) Tel. 4047.
6th January, 1950.



& Co., Ltd. ri
Agents, TRINIDAD. ‘A & Co Lid. Be Wise “ee a
i ”
ee ansabos.” | .. . ADVERTISE
e
Abcoa Steamslup Co.
CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND
Sail Arrives
Name of ship Pad Barbados ;
ss. “ PEGASUS” ., Decr, 29th January 4
Ss “ALGOA PLANTER”. Jany. 9th January 2!

Sailing e

NEW YOR
S.S. BYFJORD sails from New

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE 4
S.S8. ALCOA ROAMER sails from New Orleans 30th December,

15th January.
8.S. ALCOA RUNNER sails fror
30th January,

Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD, — Canadian Service

very two weeks.

K SERVICE

York 13th, arrives in Barbados 22nd.

arrives

m New Orleans Ith January, arriving

ee

ROBERT THOM LTD. — New York and Gulf Service






=
Cosmopolixan Pharmacy

NN YS NN NNN NN NEN NS NG NSN NG NEN

<<



AFTER STO

BROADWAY

CHILDREN'S BOOKS |

THEY LIVED IN COUNTY DOWN by

Kathleen
THE STORY



SPECIALISTS IN HIGH GRADE PROPERTY |

DIXON & BLADON

REAL ESTATE
Phone 4640 _

AGENTS

WE HAVE MADE

SPECIAL REDUCTIONS ON
DRESSES, BLOUSES, SLACKS
and SKIRTS Etc. Etc.

SHE ES
THANKS —
MAMA
FOR THE=—
STORY |
BOOK!! |



AUCTIONEERS
Plantations Building.



to all our —
Friends and
Customers

.
from



CK TAKING

DRESS SHOP.



te
‘

we
* +
aa Sprmewe Vy
oo oer
we *
—

1,
\
{

wrk
ata
rene. oY
eine tay
WO ee

WE HAVE A WIDE RANGE OF ed be

‘2%

{

Fitzpatrick
OF PETER PAN Retold by





2 Daniel O’Connor Pose? oe
OOOO SCOOPS FOPCPSOO POOP OOOFOF , NANCY AT ST. BRIDES by D. F. Bruce toma oe
REAL ESTATE % . peneneee THE WESTOW TALISMAN by Percy Fy _

FOR SALE OR RENT ix FOR SALE JULIET OVERSEAS by Clare Mallory Westerman +
er Ses Gao tele CHAMPION OF THE MAIN by Captain? ~
Roshunk, Sirect, ree Bat arecens, two x The undersigned will offer For Sale at their Office, No. 17, & PENNY DREADFUL by A. Stephen Tring W. E. Johns aes
running water. Apply Sree EOFS rs Street, Bridgetown, on Friday, 27th day of January, 1950, } > aa 7s fiend
ee ee SV Aee, 5 PANTOMIME ADVENTURES AFLOAT by John ‘De i
Roads, 5.1.00--ta Rs The Dwelling House called “CARLDEEM” and the land $ me ee Miller

. ' |% thereto containing 10,770 square feet, situate on the Sea Coast ¥
tee, = eae ame tie 1% of St. Lawrence Gap, Christ Church, x
ee en re en ee Inspection on application to Miss Kathleen Hunte, “Brat- ¥% —-——-—-
7 Barbados Ice Co., Ltd $ ton,” Maxwells Coast. Dial 8357. g
1.| The above will be set " LP i ¢ For further particulars and conditions of Sale, apply to:— X& ‘
| Public Competition at our Office, Jamies | ¢S ,
Threct, Gn Weanecden. ile, demuany is COTTLE, CATFORD & CO, 3 ADVOCATE STATIONERY
astant at 2 p.m. ;
ON Eo TE Oe eee 2 0 iS 11.1.50—16n. $
Solicitor y EEE
12.1. 50—5n CSCS CIE DOGO SOPOOVOOOO POG POOOOVOOPY MFP PFE EEE FFE FFA EN





ie

ote

1 =e.

Werke eames te



ae

Be



PAGE EIGHT



ww
4 Cricket >

FeothaH, Racing





World Copyrtght Bn arrancem

Boxers Die About One
Every Three Weeks

NEW YORK (By Mail)

T+ THis YEAR'S

with Rrening Standard



nt

Thrills For

300.000 Fans

LONDON, Jan. 11.
Seven third round cup replays
produced thrills for nearly 300,4

On February 20, 1948, Ezzard Charles, the present heavy-|000 soccer fans this afternoon
weight champion of the National Boxing Association,
slapped Sam Baroudi into a coma in which, shortly, he died.
A brief time theretofore, Ray Robinson, the present welter-
weight champion of the world, did as wuch for Jimmy

Doyle.

Since the end of World
War Il, prize fighters have
been dying in the ring at the
rate of better than cme a
month. Frightened athletic
commissions have legislated,
and fight men have pontifi-
cated, but the death and
maiming rates remain the
same. Herewith Internation-
al News Service looks at the
inside of boxing today.





Aussies Beat
East Province
By Innings

PORT ELIZABETH, Jan. 11

Australian cricketers beat Eas.
tern Province before tea here to-
day by an innings and 39 runs
dismissing the home side in their
second innings for 242, With first
innings’ arrears of 281, Eastern
Province had scored 94 for th«
loss of 1 wicket overnight, but at
the lunch interval to-day were
still 122 runs behind with 7 wie-
kets in hand,



| about
| ring.

/ there





Draper and Waite continued)
defiantly this morning. It ap-}
peared that the innings’ defcea

tool

might be ae and they
150

their second wicket stand to
before Waite gave
Langley off Walker

Fast bowlers had to strive hard
to get any life into their deliy
eries, but Ian Johnson flighted
the ball well, and was always
difficult to hit,

At lunch, with the

score 159

|
|
|
!

a catch to}

for 3, Draper had been batting |

for three hours. 40 minutes
his 81 having two chances
the interval, the remaining wic-
kets fell for the addition of 88
runs,

for

—Reuter



Cricket Board
Meets Today

The Board of Management
the Barbados Cricket Association
meets today at the Challenoi
Stand at 4.15 p.m.

The Board is expeci'ed to final-
ise arrangements for the forth-
coming visit of the British Guian
Team and also to deal with ojher
Toutine mavters,

Jockey Leaves
U.K. For India

LONDON, Jan. 11.
A. Roberts, a flat race jockey
from the north of England, left
by air to-day for India, where

Do It Every Time

LEE

After |

one to over a _ hundred
bouts, for pleasure or profit, can
display
Amnesia, delirium, blindness,
leafness, hallucinations, dumb-
ness, paralysis, vertigo, shock, and
hemorrhage These are among |
others
Punch Drunk
Occasionally a veteran fighter
jexhibits mild tendencies towards
all of these maiadie Then he is
known as punchdrunk, and often
becomes a figure of sorts in his
| community
Mr. Tony Zale, who 16 months|

|

{

For some short time after the
Doyle episode, the Clev¢land Box-
ing Commission eated pious
salt, and for an equally brief time
after the Baroudi debacle, the
Illinois Commission held meetings
improving safety in the
One of the numerous sug-
gestions effected in the !atter in-
taneés was to have an ambulance

on call at all times during prize
fight

Boxing, the only sport which
makes persona] injury its prime
objective, may be traced 5,000




years into history to a time when
were no ambulances and it
as difficult to foretell when and
vhy a fighter was going to drop
dead

Every 3 Wecks
In this more enlightened period
in which we live, fighters are dy-

weeks. Either 12 or 18
fighters died in 1949, depending
on whether you feel like counting
amateurs. Without traceable ex-
ception, all 18 of these deaths
could be ascribed bodily malfune-
tion in the area kgown as the
brain, which, in most human
beings, does the thinking.

Blows about the head in boxing
produce the most interesting
after-effects in the world of sport.
Depending upon the time place
ind frequency of assault, a youth
or gentleman who has engaged in
from

igO Wag middleweight
of the world, quit the ring because
he Saw it coming

When you talked to Zale after
the three fights with Roeky Gra-
zano and the-one fight with Mar-

|cel Cerdan, you saw it too.

Where his eyes had been solid,
aqua blue, bright blue, they were
srey-blue now Where his speech
had been straight and intelligent,
his lip, the lower one, fell puffily
in front of the slow words that
came out. When he looked at you,
he cocked his head

When he did retire, he had to
memorize the thirty-word sen-
tence it took him to tell news-
men about it

He was one of the smart ones.

~EN.S.
pi neni
he has accepted a retainer to ride
during the next meeting.
He hopes to return to England
tn time for the opening of the
English flat racing on March 16

—Reuter

WHY SHOULD I DO







champion }

when the anticipated (in home
quarters) seven home wins failed
to materialise.

In fact there were sufficient
surprises to produce only two
home wins while four away sides
were successful within the stipu-
lated 90 minutes. At the end of
that period, Middlesbrough and
Aston Villa were still on terms
and so played extra time.

Big upsets of the programme
were the away victories of North-
ampton, Cardiff and Watford.
When half time arrived in all
seven games only three goals had
been scored, Charlton who always
seem to fight better when the
dice is loaded against them lead-
Fulham while, Liverpool and
Blackburn each scored one goal.

The other games had then pro-
duced a goal,

In The Lead

Charlton led three minutes
from half time when Darcy took
advantage of a miskick by a home
defender. Darey also played a
part in Charlton’s second goal
| scoved by Vaughan and Fulhams

consolation point came 11 minutes
:from the end when McDonald
netted. Charlton deserved their
‘win on to-day’s display.

Watford’s defence carried off
the first half honours and then
the whole side battled with reso-

\lute spirit through the second in
-with a snap goal by Thomas fol-
jlowing a freekick brought vic-
| tory.
} Blackburn Rovers led with a
goal by Edes but Payne equalised
{and in the second half Fagan
netted a rebound.

Plymouth weathered the Wol-
}verhampton attacks before the
interval but two goals within a
;minute sealed their fate, Swin-
|}burn scored after 58 minutes.
|Handock got the second from a
penalty in less than a minute and
| Smith notched the third later.

|

| Goalless
| Southampton and Northampton
‘had

a goalless first half but
then three goals came in three
minutes, Dixon giving the visit-
ors a lead which Scott and Way~
man countered,

This raised excitement to a
iigh piteh and two well placed
corner kicks by Mitchell brougit
goals for Hughes and Candilin to
give Northampton vittory.

The Middlesbrough and Aston
Villa game was always dominated
by defences even though Middles-
brough’s Hardwick was injured
and had to go on the wing.

He withdrew before extra time
was finished but Middlesbrough
held out and the match will ce
replayed next Monday.

Results are as follows: F. A,
Cup Third Bound Replays; Ful-
ham ly Chariton Athletic 2. Liv-
erpool 2,. Blackburn Rovers 1,
Middlesbrough 0, Aston Villa 9
extra time being playéd. Preston
Northend 0, Watford 1, South-
amptén 2, Northampton 3; West
Bromwich Albion 0, Cardiff City
1, Wolverhampton Wanderers 3%,
Plymouth Argyle 0; Middles-
brough 0, Aston Villa 0; after
extra time. Second replay takes
place next Monday January 16.

—Reuter.

ah ie oes By Jiminy Hatlo |

SINESS
WITH YOUR OUTFIT THAT CREDIT
GOON OF YOURS CAUSED ME ALL
KINDS OF TROUBLE ON THAT
LAST ORDER T °

HIM? HE'S WACK
HE'S CAUSED FRICTION
\ ALL ALONG THE LINEâ„¢|
I HEAR THEY RE
TYING THECAN To
HIM THE END OF
THIS WEEK:

GP





PARBADOS ADVOCATE
oa }





Spectators |
Appreciate |
Long Races ©

|
JOHN BARRINGTON) ,
(BY. SEW YORK, (By Mail)
| ‘There are fashion changes 19
| track along with most other |
sports, and at the present time
the longer events—the mile run
| and jonger—are the ones that get
she most attention.
| At least the sports writers and
‘the promoters have decided that
those are the races the specta-
‘tors like the best. Indoors, they
| probably are correct, although it
be a different story on the





may
| outdoor tracks.

| Oytdoors, the thrills of the
hundred yard dash, the hurdles

‘and the 440 seem to overshadow
lthe kick that may ‘se derived
from seeing a bunch of skinny
fellows go around and arounv
| that big oval. ;
Indoors, there never is spate
fo stage dashes of over 60 or 70
yards. And tracks are so cramp-
ed that races under a mile re-
sembie a mob seene o- a tug of
il.
Popular Racés
It is only after the first mile,

or say 20 laps or so, that tne
boys get straightened out and
to race. Thus, the popu-



CIRCUS

larity of the long races.
Zecause of that situation, most
of the interest in the coming
winter track season centres
around the milers and two milers.
As was the case a year ago,
the picture is rather dark for the
| Americans. Don Gebrmann = of
, Wisconsin — probably the best
indoor miler in the U.S.—will ke
P aie . tied up with Western Conference
For Trinidad meets and may not appear in
: ; any of the big Eastern affairs.
Yesterday afternoon. eight of However, it is. hoped that he will
the nine members of the Water! be able to defend his ‘Wanamak-
Polo Team which will play al er Mile Championship at the
series of matches against a Trini-| Millrose Games in New York on
dad side left Seawell for Trini-| January 28. That is one open
dad by B.W.1.A. They were, Peter| date on his schedule,
Patterson, (Capt.), “Boo” Pat- Aside from Gehrmann the best
terson, George MacClean, John| native milers are FBi-man Fred
Grace, Tim Yearwood, Delbert! Wilt and John Twomey of the
Bannister, Geoffrey Foster, and! Illinois A.C., neither of whom
Paul Foster. Kenneth Ince, the; could catch the flying foreign
remaining member is due to join| delegation of a year ago. 7
the team to-day in Trinidad. At the two and three mile dis-



| Water Polo

They are scheduled to play} tances, the top U.S. competitors
four matches. One of the match-| are Curtis Stone and Horace
es will be against one of the] Ashenfelter, both Penn State

leading Trintdad Clubs and this
will be followed by three Test
matches. Two of these matches
will be played at night, under
floodlighting conditions.

The Trinidad Water Polo As-
sociation, announced their team
for the first Test match on Tues-
day. Of this team, Basil Ander-
son, Roddy Bynoe, Johnny Te-
xeira, and Frankie Mayers are
all well known in Water Polo
circles here most of them having
played in the Trinidad Discovery
Tour to Barbados last July. The
rest are unknown to us in Bar-

alumni, Dick Church of Syracuse
University, and Bob Black of
Rhode Island. Jerry Thompson
the tiny star from Texas, is
thinking of making his first
campaign on the eastern boards.

None of the last year’s imported
runners—Gaston Reiff of Bel-
gium, Willy Slykhuis of Holland
and Sweden’s Erik Ahlden and
Ingvar Bengtsson—will be on
deck this year.

Formidable

Instead the AAU has John Joe
Barry, a U.S. citizen who has
lived most of his life in ireland,



bados. fas ; ;
d@ Viljo Heino of Finland.
Three of the Barbados team| ®" L
will be returning on Jan. 16th Barry has marks of 4:08.6 for

the milesand 8.59 for two miles.
Heino holds four worlds records
at longer distances but is a for-
midable two miler as well.
Barry is an interesting young
man who plans to remain in this
country and go to college.
Another collegian from abroad
. rt who may compete some is Alf
Held In Vienna Holmberg of Sweden, who now
is attending the University of
PARIS, Jan. 11. | Tennessee. Holmberg has de-
Austria will organise the Eu-|feated Henry Eriksson, the 1948
repean Swimming Champion- | Olympic 1,500-meter champion.
ships this year, it was announced| Formerly, it was thought that
to-day after a meeting of the; tiie trip to America, unfamiliar
European Swimming League. !food and living conditions, and
The events will be held
Vienna from August 20—27. | turns of
Competitors will be allowed to!
use the “butterfly” breast stroke. |
Hungary was originally awarded |
the championships. but declined
to accept the invitation. Austria, !

and the remainder on the follow-
ing day.



EuropeanSwimming
Championships

|
|
j

in
the board tracks were
an overwhelming handicap to a
foreign runner. One of the few
who had been able to overcome
it prior to last winter was the
immortal Paavo Nurmi,

Realy, One See ee eee nes Slykhuis, Bengtsson and

el § > s- “'|Ahiden changed that way of

wpleh rem Belgium, Holland,| thinking, however. They had

aie ih and swede € b }almost unbroken success in last
sented. | winter’s meets
The Austrian Swimming Fed- Site ie, a)

| i > Chis was partly due to Gehr-

eration will submit the pros}? "Ses Paty barca

ramme for the championships! mann’s participation only in the

aren ! Wanamaker Mile. A great void

was left in American mile ranks
when. Gil Dodds, the galloping
parson, hung up his spikes. To
date, no newcomer has come along
| to step into the limelight. 2

—Reuter. |

Ex-Army Officer





’ . .
Guilty Of Bigamy 148,
LONDON, Jan, 11 3 Cevlo A
: e 7

A British ex-Army Officer, son-4 y n thletes
in-law of wealthy baron De NIWA : .
Meyer, of belgium, was charged At rive In Australia
in London’s Premier Criminal AUSTRALIA Jan. 10
Court, the Old Bailey, today with Three members of the Ceyloness
Bigamously marrying a_ Secret Empire. Games team Cc E
Service Agent during the war Jansz, H. De Sa euin P ioed .

The officer, Edward Jolin Wool- Wijesinghe — have aertiee és R
even Wickens aged 44, distin- by air 1 ea here
uished war-time _ Intelligence “All a ae { ‘
2 . : ave fit. They r *
Officer in North Africa and Sicily, jously about the aerot tinea
and now a Shipping Agent, was} yecorded by Australian cunters
released under supervision for twe ‘ 3



who will compete i :
years after promising to be on P in the ae
good behaviour. He was marriea i —Keuter
at Bombay, | India, in 1934, and Ti.
was the father of one child, a B.T.C, chet

daughter born in 1936. Because ot
Mrs. Wickens’ health, they re-
turned to Europe, but difficulties
arose because his wife wanted to
continue living in her accustomed
luxurious style.

They separated afier be came
home one day to find all furniture
removed, and his clothes on the
joor of an empty room,

Wickens later met a charming
vell-educated woman, Signorina
Albertina Crico, naturalised Brit-
ish Secret Service Agent in Sicily,
She lived with Wickens as his
raistress in Italy, while they were
engaged together on difficult and
dangerous operations. As a mem-
ber of the Italian Bar, she per-
} suaded Tim that his first marriage
was invalid, and they went ht eid eS "9, rend 8.4
through a bigamous ceremony in woon The News; 12.10 oth. oes
| Ongland in 1945. c Analysis; 12.15 p.m. New Records

Sales Good

The sales of 25 Swee S'
tickets for the fortheoming are
Spring Meeting are four Series
ahead of the sales in mid-January
last year. :

The Turf Club is now selling
Series M while at this time las’
roo they were only selling Serie;





B.B.C. Programme

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1950

7 am. The News; 7.10 a m
Analysis; 7.1 am Sporting Record
730 a.m. Music Magazine, 7.45 a.m
Generally Speaking; & a.m From t}
Editorials; 8 10 a.m Programme Ay
nouncements 815 am, Ewe Beck

. 4 1 p.m, British Politic: feeklies: 1
Sir Gerald Dodson, recorder, Me Le

: p.m. Radio Newsree!l: 1 2 p.m. Take *
told the Court he did not think aj from here; 2 The News; 2.10 p.m
rison sentence necessary. Sports Review; 2.30 p.m. Radio Theatre
4 p.m. The News: 4.10 p.m, The Daily

onia

DR N tra Listeners ~ho

. SANDERS GOES Dm me Anno
ON TRIAL : Interh
:






neemen





Spe

Home News from Brits n; 2.158 p.m
—Reuter, | 4
Service; 4.15 p.m. Phitharmu
Cc
Simin af m Generally
MANCHESTER,





NEW HAMPSHIRE, Jan. 11
Hermann N. Sander will
Wial on Februar 20, on ;
harge of Ger in the “merey
Geath of his patient, Mrs, Abbid
Borroto (59), incurably l with
cancer.--Reuter



most of all the unfamiliar banked |

















THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 18 &
edie niet G 8100 — ii
‘ ian ee es
Prat ‘vo| Nurse Gets $ ie -
Imprisoned Pendirig oie | NEW ARRIVAg
. wr For 25 Years Work
His Deportation 08 a
ST. KITTS, Jan. 11. | Tins Macaroni an
i" Magen Yesterday afternoon at six Rottles Peanut peyote
: Ses” ail o'clock Miss Winifred Penny- + Peanut Paste ‘
rise te asada ye the High feather celebrated the ag an- Salng aise J
prectgbererics pelt - f ’ niversary as a Nurse in the Cun- ett. Sdlad sre
Commissioner for India in oo ningham Hospital. The function rips Reamuts ating
on charges of eet pe which marked the event took Botiles Tometo oP
was today committed to pris place in the Matron’s Quarters in Tins Tomato Soup
pending his return to India. Tins Apricots

The Magistrate, Mr. J. F.

Eastwood, told Hoare:

“You may apply to a High}
Court for habeas corpus or such
other remedies as your Legal |
Adviser thinks fit.” |

Today’s proceedings lasted less
than a minute. At an earlier hear-
ing it was stated on behalf of the|
High Commissioner for India that |
Hoare was being tried before 2}
special Tribunal in Calcutta, ana |
that he sailed for England during
an adjournment.



Depositions taken before the
Tribunal in Caleutta and presente
in court here alleged that Hoare, |
as Assistant Superintendent of the |
Instruments — Section,
Workshops, Alapore, had receive 1]
‘gratifications” ior showing favou
in the placing of orders for sup
plies to the workshops.

|
|
|

Hoare’s Counsel, at the previous
hearing, said that he would Z pe iM
against the extradition order \o t :
High Court. He added that Hoare
pleaded not guilty and reserved his
defence. —Reuter.

|















CLUB
(Members Only)

SATURDAY, JAN.
9 p.m.

14TH,

Music by Arnold Meanwell
and his full Orchestra, play-
ing the latest tunes from the
Hit Parade; assisted by Ger-
ald Bannister, the “Singing
Westerner.”

Admission to Ballroom—2/-







MASS

MEETING

-: By :-

CARIBBEAN WORKERS
UNION

-: On :
Friday, January 13th,
7.30 p.m.

-: At :
Synagogue Building,
Bridgetown

All workers are invited
to be present and hear
the aims, objects and
benefits of the Union.

Among the Speakers

A. A. MAYNARD
VINCENT GRIFFITH
L. E. R. GILL, M.C.P.
E. K. WALCOTT, M.C.P.
E. D. MOTTLEY, M.C.P.

. —

will be:
Messrs. E. K. FRANCE











SS
Rediffusi
cdiffusion Programmes
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1950.
{ LOCAL PRESENTATIONS
{ 7.15— 7.30 Studio Service
f co 8.00 Morning Special
00— 9.15 Songtime
KX 9.30—11:00 Closed
11.00—11,.15 Programme Parade
11.15—11.40 Music for Breakfast
Time Listening
2.00— 2.15 Musical Varieties
)) 5.15— 6.30 Programme Sum-
{ , mary and Interlude
6.00— 6.30 Children’s
Programme
i} 0,.30— 7.00 Request Time
7.15— 7.30 Prey resented by

‘ue
1

Ft
i

rea
Ochestra presented

by Cave ‘Shepherd &
Co., Ltd.

§!00— 8.15 Local News pre-
sented by B’dos
Bottling Co.

8.15— 8.30 Bob Eberly Show

8.30— 8.45 5!
presented by Lever
Bros.

8.45— 9.00 Eddy Arnold Show

presented by Lever
Bros,

9.15— 9.45 Paul Temple and the

m Case Ep. 5
U.S.A, â„¢
News 9.15 a.m. and 9.45 Pm
B.B.C.

News 7 a.m., 8 a.m., 12 noon,
4 p.m. 7 p.m, and 9 p.m.

Eve Beche with Leslie Paul at
the Piano 8.15 a.m.—8.30 a.m

Books to Read 8.90 a.m.—9,00 a.m.

Special Dispatch 11.45 a.m.—12.00
P.â„¢.

New ords 12.15 p.m.—1,00 p.m
Brit Political Weeklies 1.00 p.m.
—L.15 p.m.
Radio Newsreel 1.15 P.m.—1,30 p.m
ake it from here 1.30 P.m.—2.00
Sports Nevis
rts riew 2.18 p.m.—2.90 p.m
Radio Theatre “Tne Thpektuthe ¢
of being Earnest” 2.30 p.m

4.00 p.m,
Philharmonia Orchesira 4.15 p.0
5

0 p.m
Listeners’ Choice 5.00 p 5.15
P-m.
Generally Speaking 5.30
p.m {\
Tom Jones Trio 5.45 p.+ 6.00 {|
p.m }

RADIO DISTRIBUTION |
(BARBADOS) LTD. {\

ee.
Ses



; valuable

Telegraph | .

ee a
DANCE |
THE BARBADOS AQUATIC

.
11.1.50.—4n, |


























the Hospital ground. Rottles Guava’ Jelly

As an appreciation of the in-
service rendered by
Nurse Pennyfeather to ghis com-
munity the staff of the hospital,
friends and well-wishers pre-
sented her with a silver bracelet
and $100.00. The presentation was
made by His Honour Mr, H.
Burrowes, Administrator —(C.P.)





=

| : —
| ANEROID BAROMETER
| ROBERTS & Co Dial 24











————





OPPO OOOO EOO OOOO

LADIES!

Begin 1950 the Right Way ....



THAT IS THE ‘DOROTHY GRAY’ Way,

WE have a complete stock of Dorothy Gray Preng,
tions. Drop in and let us explain their uses and ju
you with, your Cosmetic problems,

COLLINS LIMITED, |

28, Broad Street,

= 6st Ot A fk FO
ELE FES EFFI IEE ELIF EFFEC

yt

| LOO SO, OOOO SOOPOBO SOS OOPSOS4

|
| /-—j>-”—— TT
|
|

Keep Your Eye

the BALL.

on

Make sure they

are

-

| SPENCER MOULTON

We also have



the ever popular

Tennis Rackets

FOR JUNIORS
only $3.64 each

CAVE SHEPHERD x co, 1.

UW % @ &B Broad Street.

.





ee



eon :
_ ae POOP SVPE SES SPIO COLO EES

> We Can Supply from Stock.

‘

CEMENT in 94-1b Bags
WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT 4
RED COLORCRETE CEMENT

%
S
3
°
$s

|
|
|
:

EXPANDED METAL —
d-in., l-in., 2-in, & 3-in. Mesh Iron

s-in, & i-in. Mesh Galvanized

B.R.C. METAL FABRIC —

No. 9 — 12-in by 3-in. Mesh

No. 65 — 6-in by 6-in. Mesh

WILKINSON & HAYNES (0., ED.

PHONE 4267



F PES8SS66SSSEGe6KES66Ge0 SSS
9999999995: 39996986 6

GOO

PDLPPPPLPPOAPA PPP LCP PPPS AP PAPA PAPE PPPPSSSS

SELECT THESE
DANISH HAMS in Tins from 4-ibs, upwards
CANADIAN EGGS

VIENNA SAUSAGES

GORGONZOLA and GOUDA CHEESE
SALAMI SAUSAGES ;
POTATO CRISP and a full line of the Cocktail Bist]

* ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO., LTDG
. HIGH STREET

PLLEFSOSS SS OCS SST T



Full Text


Thursday

January 12



1950.

ee





el



FIVE CENTS

Wear 55.



TIONALISATION WILL KILL W.L. SUGAR

Lord Lyle Warns Of

“Violent Repercussions”

he Sugar Delegates
jopeToriesWillWin

1 Carry Out Their Promises To W.¢.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Jan. 11,
EWS that Britain is to have a General Election on
Kebruary 23 was welcomed by the West Indian sugar
elegates this morning.

Aities —~e Their negotiations with the
Food Ministry are not bearing |
\ e€ Should |fruit as they had hoped and

| they have now asked the Ministry |
if the discussions can be post- |

: e

Continue =" |
J ; | If the Ministry agree to this}
5 request they will retum to the

West Indies and will wait there
until the election :esult has been)
decided. |

Sugar Fight

nys Harry Davson } The general feeling of the
, delegates is that a change of
ORGETOWN, B.G., Jan. 11, 1Government would assist their

delegation at Lon-
ks should fail this
duty of all colonies
prned to continue the fight
they get their just rights. So
s Lieutenant Colonel Harry
avson, C.M.G., D.S.O., Chair-
of §. Davson and Company
ed, now back from a 2i
s stay in England.

e WI. delegation are seek-
a higher price for export

the W.I.
Bsugar tal
it is the

efforts to secure guarantees and
a fair price for the West Indian
sugar industry.

They base this view on the
strength of promises outlined in
the Conservative publication “The
Right Road for Britain”,

In this. Conservative policy is
stated as the “greatest possible
development in Empire trade”.

It says a Conservative Govern-
ment will offer Empire produc-
and a long term purchase Die at’ dnt arn creek Sia ae
pniee for expanding produc~ | place in the United Kingdom
land, commenting when it had intitak Seeds. Cais, teat Gated

reported that the success

e delegation at the valks
ed unlikely, Colonel Davson
“J think we in the West In-
must feel very disappointed
e talks in so far as they’ve

pecause after the U.K. Gov-
env’s promises in the summer
ad hoped something definite
4 come of it. I believe the Co-

Office, from the Secretary of

downwards, would be fully
athetic with our wishes, but

unately other Ministries)
into the picture mestie|





home producers.

| “We recognise special respon-
sibility for maintaining a market
for certain colonial products and
a Consetvative Government in
the United Kingdom will offer a
guaranteed market at a remun-
erative price.”

—(By Cable).

Bermuda Naval
Base Will Close
A Reliable Report

LONDON, Jan. 11.

Britain will probably close her
naval base at Bermuda for econo-
my reasons, usually reliable
sources said here today.

A British Admiralty spokesman,
told Reuter, “As was stated some
time ago, the Admiralty has been
examining all Naval Services
with the object of making all
possible economies.”

Interest here in the future of
the British Naval Base at Bermuda
has been heightened by the ac-
tivities of an Admiralty Delega-
tion visiting Bermuda at present.

Since Britain leased
Bermuda bases to the United
States in 1940, American war-
ships often avail themselves ol
the two floating docks and other
facilities. —Reuter.

U.K. Assures
Pakistan

shts tend more to domestic
than to the Empire as a
e, I feel sure the committee
strive to the bitter end. |
y they’re men of great pow-
of persuasion, but if they
d fail this time it is the
of all of us to continue this
until we get what we con-
our just rights.
blso know the thinking por-
of the British public are
sympathetic with W.1. aims.
ordinary man of education is
rather proud of the W.l.
e’d sacrifice a good deal to
em prosperous but there are
s, of course, who take little
est outside their own imme-
affairs,
will be staying in British
ma until April and TI hope by
we shall have good news”
pneluded.—(C.P.)

——

ruman’s Great
Ferry Plan

or Caribbean
WASHINGTON (By Mail)



psident Truman has a dream / KARACHI, Jan. 11.
ast ship-ferry system linking 3ritain has assured Pakistan
aribbean lands to the United}that there is “no intention of

taking unilateral action with re-
gard to Pakistan’s Sterling balan-
ces®’ the Deputy Foreign Minister,
Dr, Mahmud’ Hussain, told Parlia-
ment here today. —Reuter.

s. He has explained his con-
to Mr. Warren Austin, chief |
delegate to the United Na-
who leaves Washington for
r of the Caribbean on Jan-



26.

. Austin says that so far the “t

is “just a vision” to the} Australian Labour
dent and has not been work-

vin ay detail. He explained} Tht

Mr. Truman envisions the | Leader Dies

d States’ terminus of the BRISBANE, Jan. 11.
System. '

Mr. Clarence George Fallon, of
the Queensland Labour Movement
and probably the strongest anti-

|

y large ferry network in vhe
bbean would probably touch

places as Jamaica, Cuba. P , . f

i i ~ Australia, died
, Puerto Rico and various Communist in Australie

in the West Indies. Mr.j today.

Mr. Fallon led the Queensland
Labour Movement for the past 17
years, and was Federal President
of the Australian Labour Party.
From 1940 to 1943, he was General
Secretary of the Australian Work-
ers Union. He was also 4a
Director of a Labour newspaper 1D
Queensland. —Reuter.

in noted tha’ a ferry is now
B built which wil! operate
yeen Key West and Havana, |
tance of 90 miles.
» Austin said that the Presi-
S hope was that the United)
Bs and the navions of the
ibbean might be brought into
r association through the
ng of a ferry system. As ‘he }
ident envisions it, he said, the
would include British |
essions, as well as indepen- |
Nations such as Cuba. Mr.)
added tha’ he presumed
the President had in mind a

tely financed venture.
—B.U.P./ on Monday,

ighting Gurkhas Can Eat
eat Touched By Britons

SINGAPORE, Jan. 11.
GURKHAS on operations in the Malayan jungle have
een exempted from observing one of their religious laws}
@ that they can be supplied with fresh meat from the air. |



BACK TO WORK

WASHINGTON, Jan. 11.





States Miners leader today ordered

back to working a three day week
Reuter.



4





_ « A _ religious dispensation has}

° 4 | been gt inted so that the Gurkhas
hurchill Going | meat which is slaughtered at}
© | Kuala Lumpur under their own}

| religious rites, may be handled by |

British Royal Army Service Corps}

spatches. —Reuter.

«| Interview In Moscow |

LONDON, Jan

Moscow Radio ted that
Vilk a nvernir rresice
ar. and - {
Bon T
m :
toria Castle
oh B ;
OM Chireiss} ee ' oe
ED urchill was to have «| Mosc A ! Hsiar
arty litie ¥
loWin bie ;
ring day —Reutes —Reuter



ie

|
|
|
|

|
}

end



62.000 U.S.| “GLORIA MAY” SUNK:

ca

nearly 62,000.

Ww

Moungstown
Company today that it is curtail-
ing production of steel for Tack o1
the coal,

fr

the Mine Workers Union for the
spread’ of

U
or

Ww

ar

to
th

is
w

nion continues to deny that it
rdered them.
Coupled with the short work]







|

Persian Govt.

Has Resignea

TEHERAN, Jan. 11

The Persian Government re
signed to-day. The Premie
Ohammed Saed in a letter to th
Shah stated that the country’
present situation demanded
change of Government.

Political circles here expected
that either Mohammed Saim c!
Guli Gholshaian, Finance Minis-
ter in the last Cabinet woul
head the new Government, La:
November the Committee whici
supervised General Elections
October announced that it has
burned all the voting papers an
cancelled the elections because ©!
“incompetence of certain electio!
officials, inadequate protection 0!
ballot boxes’ and other irregu-
larities.

The Committee Chairman an-
1ounced that the Shah would not
open the two Houses of Parlia-
ment until his return from the
United States.

The Shah returned to Teheran
m January 2,

—Reuter.

FireRobs6,000

Of Homes In

THE PICTURE (at top) shows the Reef ground as it was before the St. Michael’s Vestry took

it over to turn it into a Parish Playing-field. At bottom another picture shows the progress Kowloon
that has been made since the Vestry has been developing the ground from Labour Welfare

Funds The trees have been removed and labourers can be seen levelling off the playing HONG KONG, Jan. 11.
field,

Miners Cut |
The Coal

NEW YORK, Jane,
The number of striking Ameri-
an coat miners today rose to

One of the strike’s first effect.
as) an announcement by the
Sheet and Tube



There is still no explanation
om John L. Lewis, President ol

the stoppages, and the

eek in other mines, the strikes
e expected to cut the country’s
tal production of coal to less
an half of normal this week.
—Reuter.|



U.S. Consider
Policy Change
ONLY FOR SPAIN

WASHINGTON, Jan. 11.
A State Department spokesman

| said to-day that the United States

considering a change of policy
hich would support a move to
the diplomatic boycott of

Spain.

It was reported here that the

State Department would be wifl-

in

Ambassador to Madrid

United States
if a ma-

g to return the

jority of United Nations members
agreed to follow suit.

ed Nations,

Under a resolution of the Unit-
members withdrew

their Ambassadors about three
years ago. —/(Reuter.)



Wafdists Top

Elections In Egypt

CAIRO, ‘Jan. 11.
Egypt’s Nationalistic Wafd
Party had captured 225 seats in

Mr. John L. Lewis the United the new 319-seat Parliament when

final results after the second ballot

in

66,000 striking coal miners tO 8°). noe to-

77 constituencies
night.

The Saadists, majority party in

were an-

the outgoing Coalition, had won
28; Liberals 26, Nationalists 6, So-

cialists

K

1, Independents 33,
itla Party nil.
Leader of the Wafdists, Musta-

and

pha El Nahas Pasha, was. seeing

K

m
m

ing Farouk to-night.

Sirry Pasha, Independent Pre-
ier of the Caretaker Govern-
ent is expected to hand in his

Cabinet's resignation to-morrow.

eosidy —Reuter.
Shirley Temple

Denies Romance
HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 11.









SKIPPER, 2 PASSENGERS
HAVE BEEN DROWNED

THE 99-ton schooner, “Gloria May,’ which left British
Guiana~on December 21 with two passengers’ and cargo
for Barbados under Captain Graham and a crew of ten,
foundered due to bad weather, it was reported in a cable

Fire\sweeping through a hutte
area on the outskirts of Kowloo:
today made thousands of poo
Chinese homeless. Firemen esti
mated that 6,000 huts had alread)
been destroyed, leaving 6,00
people with nowhere to live.

Many people were injured, bu
there were few fatalities.

British Royal Airforce an
Army “were called out to help
fight the fire; which was racins
near to Kaitak airport.

The fire has destroyed almost
all buildings in the historic old
walled city of Kowloon — a smal)

received here by Mr. Vernon Knight, honorary Vice-Consul | arear, over which Chinese havé
for Venezuela at Barbados. always claimed sovereignty,
H—t—=——-—»---eny The cable reads:— All available fire engines ip

‘ ‘ “Amplifying our radio of yes- | modern Kowloon were sent to ths
Ex.-D.M.S. Jamaica | ‘crcay it is my duty to inform | fire, and other equipment was

| ¥ that the names of the sur-| ferried over from Hong ——

7? . | vivors who are now in Curiapo Tonight a fairly strong wind was,

‘ ill Conduct of this jurisdiction are :~— . iinaed the flames, which were}

James Rice threatening a built up area. }

Hospital Enquiry

THE

Governur has ap- |!
pointed Dr. T. J. Hallinan,
C.B.E., to undertake an

enquiry into the administra-
tion and organisation of the
General Hospital. Dr. Halli-
nan, who was Director of
Medical Services, Jamaica,
from 1933 to 1946, is ex-
pected to arrive in the
Island on Friday, the 13th
of January.

Persons wishing to give
oral or written evidence
should make application, in
writing, to the Secretary, |
Hospital Board of Enquiry, |!
General Hospital. :



Third Bloe Will

Prevent Third War | medicine

POITERS, Jan. 11.
Professor Daniel Villy, of Poi- |
tiers University, Law Faculty, to-
day created a “European citizens
Association” following the pattern
set by self-styled world citizen,
Garry Davis.

Professor Villey, who has taught |

at Rio De Janeiro and Cairo Uni- |
versities, in a newly published
booklet, asks all youth to “follow
him and create a third bloc to}
“prevent a third world war.” |
. He expects to hold his first pub-
lic meeting in Paris sometime in
February or March, }

* =m (Reuter.)



.
Italian Government
.
Has Resigned
ROME, Jan. 11 |

The Italian Government head-
ed by Premier Aleide De Gas-
peri, resigned tonight.

This followed a Cabinet Meet-
ing to-day which discussed resig- |
nation following the long drawn}
out Cabinet crisis, provoked by
the withdrawal of three right-|
wing Socialist Ministers in Oc-
tober.



—Reuter.





Film Star Shirley Temple to-
day denied rumours of a romance
}with 29-year-old Charles . W
Mapes, jnr., Hotelier of Reno, Ne-
vada, and said she was “pretty
mad” at the sab am selena VIENNA, Jan. 11
f such a thing. An illegal Austrian’ Monareh
t know where this thing} OTeanisation is reported to ph
started, and I wish I did,” said the | very active 1¢ Tyrol, actor.!-
21 -ol tre who last]ing t tele ic me e re
Actor Jol Agar eive } the A : Py
¢ e| ag
All and rganisation Jl Atsett
take re nee-| “The League Austrian Patri-
n-a-while s *} ots *, and has it eadquarters in
I rt 2} Innsbruck Recently leaflets, |
eal he \were found at Lienz

in the Brit-

| residents and neighbours of

| about 100 miles from the first port

'eare of by the Capuchin Mission-

‘ernment stavion in the Northwest

| have cabled the British Ambassa-

Hapsburg Monarchists
Come To Life In Tyrol

More U.S. Aid
For M. Tito

WASHINGTON, Jan, 11
The State Department was to-
day reported to have decided on
measures of limited military aid
for Marshal Tito, which it would

Clarence Sarjeant
Gladstone Eastmond
Amos Charles Nelson
Alfred Raimie
Charles Clarke
William Phillips

Bar- |
bados. According to their state- |
ments they left Demerara for
Barbados in the Motor Schooner,
“Gloria May” (99 tons) and when

the boat went down due to weath-
er. The Captain, George Graham

The “we Rn th eee recommend to the President in
i 1e@ crew Savec remselves in 4) an “emergency” This would
lifeboat in which they remained

a , mt iv ; » : ri {
out of their course for nine days probably be given, if the Soviet

till they arrived at the Island of Communist bloc began to use
du b oe au Sear tele ge eyo bee! force to crush Yugoslavia’s inde-
aguporojo where y Vv é \ pendence,

The National Security Council,
the nation’s top policy-making
body on foreign affairs, was re-
ported to have approved a stand-
by programme of possible mea-
sures by the United States to sup-
plement the aid already given to
Marshal Tito in the economic and
political phases of his struggle.

In the light of this action the
State Department has determined
what specific steps it would re-

ary of the Venezuelan Govern-
ment.”

Captain Graham is married and
his home is at “Paraiso,” Barba-
rees Road. He has a wife and
one son, Albert, who is studying
at McGill University,
Canada.

Venezuelan police notified Dis-
triet Commissioner P. A. Forte,

stationed at Mabaruma, a gov-



District of British Guiana, near | Ses to President Truman.
Venezuela frontier station, who To date, American Aid to Yugo-
immediately radioed Georgetown slavia has been limited to econo-

nic and political assistance, but
American influence has been used
with Western European countries
to ease economic pressures on the
Yugoslavs. ;

The British Guiana Government

dor in Caracas. requesting him to
have the men sent back to British
Guiana at the B.G. Government's

expense. —(Reuter.)

British BoatBombed
By Chinese Planes

HONG KONG, Jan. il

Two Chinese Nationalist plane:
today strafed the 1,200 ton British
steamer Leongbee at Sawtow, 15¢
miles northeast of Hong Kong
according to Chinese reports
reaching here.

The reports said thav she suffer-
ed ‘some damage, but there were
no casualties. The bLeongbee,

“Bad Night”
For Gustav

STOCKHOLM, Jan. 11
Ailing 91-year-old King Gustav
had a “rather bad night,” the
Royal physician, Dr. Hjalmar
tasserman said in a bulletin this
morning.
The king is suffering from
bronchitis and a septic throat.
“He was only able to sleep for

short ‘periods,’ Dr, Casserman| which is registered in Singapore
added, “and felt tired this morn-]| and is Chinese owned, was de-
ing.’ s ‘ tained by the. Nationalists some

His condition is unchanged.|yjme ago when she was caugh!

and his temperature is 374 de-
grees centigrade this morning.
—Reuter.

running the Yangste blockade.
—Reuter.



No More Bonus For
French Workers

PARIS, Jan. 11.



ish Zone, containing “court The French Council of Minis-
circulars”, amd reports on t€/ ters to-day approved the refusai
activities of the League. A] of Prime Minister Georges Bidault
neeting was held recently IN} to repeat the 3,000 francs bonus
Lienz to celebrite the birthday'| granted last month to the lowest
Otte Aus ‘| paid French workers to tide them
I eT f | ove intil free collective bargain-
918 “ } nd tele | fg restored
Yara. was ‘ to “our young | ‘he Couneil decided, however,
empero Branches are being|to pay the bonus to low grade
cormed throughout 1 Western} civil servants, who did not get
Austria, the rmports add t originally
—Keuter —(Reuter,)









LONDON, Jan. 11
(From Our Own Correspondent) .
ATIONALISATION of the sugar refining in-

dustry if put into effect would have “violent
repercussions’ in the West Indies, Lord Lyle of
Messrs Tate and Lyle said today.

‘ cm At eeerae time = ee

. e wou go on w e “Mr.
“Tt Will Mean
A Great Deal

; Cube” campaign against nation-
| alisation despite Attorney General
If the Tories Win”
Says N.Y. Times

|Sir Hartley Shawcross’ warning
that expenses incurred by private
sources on “propaganda calculat-
ed vo influence an election” might

' be held to constitute election ex-

NEW YORK, Jan. 11. | and thus leave vhe way open for

The New York Times in an}{a court of law to declare an
sditorial today warns its readers clec}ion void.
aot to exaggerate the importance| He announced that Tate and
of the result of the British Genera. ; Lyle were also organising a na-

| penses over and above the amount

| allowed by law to each candidate

lection, adding: “It will mean « ; tionwide petition againsv national-
sreat deal, if the Tories win, bu. | isation and signed the first form

he differences will be in degree | himself before a cozen press

itmosphere, emphasis and spirit | °@Meramen y bb

cather than in any violent chang< He said that nationalisation

in the social structure of Britain. would mean vhe end of West
On the other hand, the New | Indian hopes of further expansion.

’ >, > , ve
York Herald Tribune comments | People Seauko ae care. Ja. pit
: : t ay y'

Americans will watch the pro } wo Paar are try » :

eedings with the deepest interes: re - c Cee

was directed against any political

yess fer iaelg the _ outcome with *' party and said he acted entirely

ealisation that, to a perceptible ji the interests of Tate and Lvle

ssn p t aha z cas eee . : ; Mu ar anc ayh

egree, heir own future wilt be chareholders.

iffected by the results. He was taking legal advice t
—Reuter iecide ‘ne course of action after

dissolation of Parliament

—(By Cable)

No Loan To Fight

; P .
General Election osters Come Down

LONDON, Jan. 11.
Anti-nationalisation posters to-
a _. LONDON, Jan. 11 day vanished from the windows
fhe British Conservative Party! of the Prudential Assurance
Central Office today denied Company offices throughout the

soviet report that it had receive
a loan of $10,000,000, with whicl
to fight the General Election
Campaign.

“We have heard this report be-
fore, about 3 or 4 months ago,’
a Spokesman told Reuter. “Ot|

course, it is absolute nonsense’ |
the Associated Portland Cement

The report appeared today in|
the official Soviet newspaper in| Manufacturers Limited, announced
li' today that posters against the

Berlin Taegliche Tundschau.
alléged the loan was being made | nationalisation of this industry—
through the Chase National Bank | proposed in the Labour Party

—Reuter | programme—were being covered

Labour Backs é
Labour Party

TEL-A-VIV, Jan. 11.
Changes in the Government, il

ountry The Prudential, with a
vast business in cheap lite insur-
ince, popular among industria!
} workers, is due to be turned into
® co-operative enterprise under
the control of policy holders, if
Labour wins the elections,

Mr. Georges Earle, Chairman of



He-said that the posters “might
9 an embarrassment to candidates
n the expenses issue.’

—Reuter.

People’s Committee

Labour returns to . powel >
sritain’s General Election or Of Belize Protest
Sebruary 23 were forecast today



by Mr. Sam Watson, Chairman of
he British Labour Party

To King, Commons

Mr. Watson, on a visit to Israel, rhe ee s” committee, form-
a) . ‘“ ea to protest against the devalua-

.old a Press Conference, “I thin : . p 7
tion of the British dollar to-day

Labour will win because we have

repared to carry its campai )
Reiter. 5 ) 3 ampaign tc

the industrial district of the colony.
A mass meeting in Belize last
, night gave the Committee author-
| ity to approach world organisa-
tions and foreign Governments
‘if and when necessary to inform
them of developments and request
aid”.

better leadership.

U.S. Still Selling
Tanks To Formosa |

WASHINGTON, Jan. 11. In a message to the British King
America is still selling large] anq Parliament the Committee
numbers of tanks and armourec

had complained that devaluation
of the British Honduras dollar
had brought 2 43 per cent rise in
the cost of clathing, food and
other essential commodities.
—Keuter.

N.Y. Stock Market
Climbs High

NEW YORK, Jan; 11
The Stock Market clir{bed to-
day to the highest level since
Augusi’ 1946 Trading was the

cars to Marshal Chiang Kai Shek’s
island stronghold of Formosa.

Several hundred “combat vehi-
cles’ are reported to have been
loaded on board a Turkish freight-
er at Philadelphia. The ship leave
for Formosa next week.

The Chinese Embassy in
Washington said that the vehicles
were bought under the $125,000,00
Aid Programme voted by Congress
in 1947.

yovernment sources said tha
the shipment ineluded 70 medium
tanks, 100 armoured cars, and 100
scout cars. Another 30 tanks lef!| heaviest for about !4 months,
for Formosa about a week ago, with 2,630,000 shares changing

—Reuter. hands.—Reuter. :

91-Year-Old King Gustav
Misses First Parliament
During 40 Years
STOCKHOLM, Jan. 11.
PRINCE GUSTAV ADOLF opened the Swedish Par-

liament today in the absence of 91 year old King Gustav,
ill in bed with bronchitis and a septic throat.







This was the first time for 49
years Gustay had failed to be
there. The last time he opened
| Parliament, he had to be carried
|through the Parliament, grounds
in a. sedan chair, and helped to

Frogmen Search
For Missing Boy
WOLVERHAMPTON, Jan. 11.

Six frogmen “in rubber suits the throne by his Aides,
and diving helmets,” led by a war- 1’ Crown. ‘Prince Gustav Adolf, in
time hero and winner of the| ’

his speech from the throne, -re-
ported Foreign Relations good.
Sweden hoped that the European
Council would bring theemember
States closer to each other, -and
| promote ‘their economic and sociat
|progress. The economic position
) in Sweden had improved in the
past vear, and most of the ration-
ing and other restrictions had been
abolished. ‘Restraint in spending
by private people and the state

Victoria Cross, voday descended |
to the muddy bed of the Birming- |
ham Canal here to search for the |
body of a five-year-old boy miss-
ing since Christmas Day.
The leader of the divers is
Licutenant Ian Fraser, who won
the Victoria Cross, Britain’s high-
est military award in Singapore
igainst the Japanese.

The frogmen had been working
by floodlight until 9.30 last night,

coinbing over. 450 yards. of the} was still neces.4ry, and. taxes
anal bed which could not be| could not be é@ased° appreciably.
jrained If their search of the

anal is unsuccessful they will try } Has Restful Day

two pools near the"boy’s home.
Scotland Yard experts were |
called in after a widespread |
seareh in Central England.
—Reuter,

King Gustav, according to. to
night’s communique. had a quict
and resiful day.-

—Reuter.
THURSDAY







ow

Children’s Corny _



, JAND
BARBADOS ADVOCATE ANUARY 4

| Just A Toy



PAGE TWO

SS

Cuib Calling



LCS CS A EC, a LS









claring that such a python is

@
® i -
For Jacqueline Rupert and th l
Ie
sce R. T. J. Hallinan who is Trinidad Businessman Here PARIS, (By Mail) “a JED
i coming to Barbados tomor- R. L. Feldman, proprietor of Jacqueline Vaissieres is again bi ; th.
row is the son of the late John M Feldman’s Cate, Port-of- a happy little French girl—she
Thomes Hallinan, J.P. Mayor Of spain, Trinidad, is now in Barba- has received full legal authority
Lewisham. He was educated at dos on his first visit to the island. to play with her 4% foot pink Rf
Archbishop Tenison’s School; ye came in on Sunday by B.W.LA. python. TH
Charing Cross Hospital, He ob- fo, about three weeks’ holiday and As a result she was back al _
tained his M.B., B.S. (Lond), 4. staying at the Hotel Royal. her old Montmartre stand to-day r
or M.R.CS., L.R.C.F. and D.P.H. at rt «» «» happily fondling her 34-pound bed
yet Dublin University. _ oH: First Visit playmate in her father’s travel- ble
| He was appoiniéd Casualty » eps winnifred Waller of the ling sideshow.
aed Officer, East London Hospital for United Kingd sho spent A startled group of spectators . ie,
ip Child¥en from 1908-9 and entered four aati ‘holiday pent vast had protested that she was en- Coes NN Fey i 9
abet ee teen in toto He saw service year during the winter, has now dangering the Dubie eaeviblicly | The disap arance of Dinkiey the down there in the gaa
| during the 1914-18 war in Egypt Yeturned for a similar period, She coaxing the animal into her] Sh QMh'of to'this wild spot?” He gets a sattt & Sam
: and Mesopotamia and was thrice pa = ee or in iat mouth. he thinks. ‘Did she want me to jong ro Roles. oak |
eat ee ee the Marine Hi aa set But her father advanced the} follow, or was she just feeling hasn’t been Ro Yb
i In~1920, he was seconded for ‘¢ Marine Hotel. theory that no pink python could| frisky?" He gets on to a large a good mind to ¢ or OD)
ee serviee with the Iraq Government + e possibly be dangerous at temper-| boulder in order to ft a better forgetting aj; 3 and ee
; and from 1920-22, he was Medical _ To Spend The Winter Peete less than 100 degrees... .| view and gazes around, Then he Dinkie, he seis fy “UME
Officéf of Health at Basrah and R. and Mrs. Martin B. Dill The French legal system, find-| pauses, ‘Hullo, there's a caravan rocks, ,
from: 1922-33, was Inspector of the U.S.A. who were in| (CHARMIAN EVE is the 3 year and one month old daugnter of Mrs, Stephante Kerans, wife of the ing no immediate precedents, ‘Mr
General of Health Services, Iraq. Barbados about three years ago,| Amethyst hero, seen with her here. She can say sentences of six words, loves animals, lives in Devon. called in a ranking member of a tk
His recreations are shooting, golf are now back here to spend the the Museum of Natural History. a a ab
and tennis. winter. They came in recently He rose to the occasion by de~| Whiz Quiz : Switch u ir

Hé lives in Ropley, Irish Town, and are staying at the Marine
















































































































| See! I
— SSS

a



: Jamaica. Hotel, @ 2 harmless, above or below 100 Ti A :
ay : rr degrees. ou me , id
—(LN.S.) $s, or
= : nits been repeatedly said ist aaa pape
‘ iP 5 uman beings ta $ : .
' » *& %& & IS YOUR child backward, bright, He Thinks sex, money and food than any tec: Should be ey Al
: = eal’-@ or precocious ? To help you make an other subjects. However it’s pos- th e on either é A
‘ - estimate, Page Four prints the second ot He e. Di ll , sible that there’s another subject saat number a aq >p
: check-off charts based on ten years’ experi es uit. that’s in pel a ae You're now tenn) A iaiwvot
: Y three, your ‘unge! child’ nas ence of what bright children can do It’s time—and phases ’ a esting puzzle game, ie ind
ba gone, and in its ciierusic pince nas HOLLYWOOD reporter gets|,a8 Second, minute, hour; day, | piace No. 1 counter in immate!
. Guesses gotten meee. eer cee *& *& % THIS WEEK the personat touch is given by around and sends this one. night, morning, ee no tre of the letteh aad bon p
ci aiendontpuaesitgg toanniee fess 5 the wife of Lieut Commander John §. Kerans, She | Fred MacMurray has a complex, | 1ast yea, this year, Ds yal Sve |i the centre of the qilmmec
: ['wenty small white teeth are In the has marked the card tor her daughter Charmian He thinks he’s dull. aire ane i line, and N ad PO
firm mouth, and what they will eat is not ° oe cere e « ” id.“ , contrived many felicitous phrases : ine :
always what mother desires. Not so much ow check up on your own 3-year old. Look,” he said, “I don’t do} ssout time. .Read those below, | ‘he base-line, Thesp ’
Taint int shade aeakedtng GaeneMaeeee j anything that these glamour guys d if y have the memor change the positions of lor
e his sk $ less as the child gets jo. The f POG, S96 SOE Se S Mm
Vv will refuse spinach fish or meat without (This skill grows less as t do. e front pages never heard or literary talent to supply the No. 2 without aC
] ERY. Goharan heaton ehatecevibe okie ed Vv older.) of me. 1 don’t do anything.” right word wherever one is miss.) Counters off the ling. hts
i ¥ The three-vear-old can stand on tip: Can carry a plute safely....se.eeeeee Fred mused: ing: “UOTSOd [RUBIO sy g e'
bs as " “ ’ + e ” ‘4 oq uro¢ T9YUMNO9 Dy 0
toe for three seconds .,....0+-eeeereeereee . Can open a door and use both hands : I don’t night-club, don’t get peep ye map 2
Y Pp into fights or scandals, don’t own is the thief of ee a
Uses the personal pronoun—no ‘longer equally skilfully......+++ Mea CARE Comdinks eee ’ i . + is the ief of | 0 pasour oq mou wep g sam
V * ie the ger al_pro ng “ ice. a yacht, don’t play the horses. | time—Young. ‘% Joc 94M Aq pay e
arv wants.” but “T want.”.seerere+ss ‘ v¥ Is able to get upstairs and downstairs don’t wear plaid overcoats, don’t} 9. Time and wait for | WOMsod oun oO} opsuepy oy,
Vv Speaks tn short sentences, not single without falling......csceeeeeeetereeseereeee go to Hollywood parties, don’t| no man Proverb a a 1 Aequmer spun: 0 |
; WOPdS - oss ea ceenseseseeercseneresennene * (N.B. American children can rarelu do own a motorcycle, don’t run back] 3. Time is the ; coun- | 9 a % cahoaet
“ V Averages $8 tnches in height rvs...» : this until six years old and forth to New York, don’t go} sellor—Pericles aY} UO PapUT}XS BUTT JO amy a
. owing to use of lifts in in for politics. 44 a * oy € AequINU Je}UNOD
(Interesting test at this ace ts that towns and bungalows in “See what I an?” h ked @. Time makes. more converts ’
double present heiqht is said to be an frutt. countryside.) “Pm dull—” Tess ee SSeS. thar —Paine.
cation of full eventual orowth Three fee rr 5. I ___——_—— time, and now 44
non will he «7 siz-foot man later on.) Vv | Can wink each eye in u-ft, pal on the RKO set of}time doth me, —| Mion grave of all.—Dny r
V Can walk two miles without muscle Ree Steines Tae pice oe _MY LOVE.” | shakespeare. 13. Oh Time! the ;
SAIN. sereeese SeEETTN Gs ovo sede ahs ooh ied Head now 19 inches § te hee te ¥ re oe 6. Art is long, and time is ka ;
MR. & MRS. KEITH E, WALCOTT Needs 1.300 calories a day and can cope Conly 2 tnches less than hide be. erates eee —— Longfellow. ein
; aa Vv with the more “windy” vegetables such as full growth) ......... ove $s so busy making millions.’ ; 7. Time is the greatest remedy O Time in your flight);
\ Married Yesterday ae onions turnips A.eeeeeeeeesereeeeeee "4 Citta tnbtiee 22 mmantareay te Po ecoed: for . —Seneca, a ———__——. : ‘
ts afternoon at St. . From Venezuela Sleeps 18 hours tn the 24..sse++-+0% A Weight 31-33Ib .... dough-heaviest guys. And he sistant passes one 7 15 Time which gy
i hias Church, Miss Mar- .é 's. KE, D. Gattrey ¢ > start nen , degen w. ;
garet Slants, Geudnter Me th ge Ah ate Bin Can remember a four-lined rhyme tf ; Still has excellent started out 14 years ago as a} 9, He whe — C time » weakens iilmnd
monve, daughter of Mr. . their three children of Car- repeated regularly each ‘week....... osees VY | resistance to infectious dead-broke saxophone player. averything.—Disraeli Bruyere, '
*, 4. «€, Clairmonte, Commission- acas, Venezuela who were holiday- v t diseases be dam gn ey in 16 i i h c
er of Income Tax, and Mrs. Clair- ing at the Paradise Beach Club ¥ Highs task WAMOUS HOMEINE.:. «+ «50s 4) ye PS Be ae oo SKELETON _ 10. One always has time enough, meme time: pe
monte, ot “Garden,” Christ Church for the past few days have now Can jump three inches off the ground. « nant, lenlausy, at if one ee - haaeceennislliiin| 1 eT |
"< married to Mr. Keith Walcov, come up to the Hotel Royal. They Vv Listens to a story out likes It unless asked to Cco- CROSSWORD 11 Tin oe ee | ‘9t ‘draspuony ‘or “usu
i well known Barbados cricketer expect to be in the island until DEFSONA) ..ecesceweeeeereeeereeereeeees weed operate in some way .. - Time, that black and nar- | -ynvoq er ‘ssAqe ‘er “sonal "
and in of Mr. and Mrs. F. E. the end of next Pa. Poe ck eee row between two] ‘Il ‘Tle 4 4sydde ‘oy ‘cqimmed
Walcatt of “Clarendan,” Black d of next month. Begins to dress and undress, manag: Plays alone with toys . —Cotton 6 ‘aaiddey ‘9 “sosue | sa
be g 1, slack s > V ing undoing of buttons and patent even with other children Fee doh | | | 12. Time’s z ‘sree “poe 0 ae .
"The i : FABLENELS . ovvvewevescuncowseceercescesees present. Sense of pos- ene re » the com~' ‘opp -z “woneunseoig Tam
1e bride, give arriage :
‘oe mori \ ee eaves by For Two Months | Has occasional fits of rebellion to test session heginning ..... ‘ | == =
tiful picture in a dres ‘of I ne RRIVING by the “Fort Am- | ie owe Dower. \Slient varying of iC will res . IN MA .
Slipper Satin wivh an edimaidénnd U Pree on Monday from the V a erect ee ee Sy rae ees "a orignt A eee AQUATIC CLUB C E | :
a ne bro J.S.A. were Mr, and Mrs, George | 40.0 Wo cveestees sonvcerase veadas MMS. is cae sais : : 0
esti oa eee ee ised a 4 Case is Cleveland, Shin” They Prefers to play with toys that ne can .Ghtemene: ob | TONIGHT at 8.30 Commencing FRIDAY ish fe
wore a trai we haath, le are here for about two months’ | move—uch as pushing animals on wate Y chairs boxes, and SR een eee Ae a ;
b ore a train Her headdress was Holiday ghd are ata s ¥ |} volling ball down track, shunting oricks, carts 7 ROBERT MONT
a chantilly lace mantilla held in ogo” ;22a, are staying at the | or lifting cubes fn and out of slots.....+- ‘ Rea ete st 6 ‘ r -— io tm
Sooty 1008, oan Marine Hotel. Has no natural fear { _:
place by a vortoise-shell comb, Mr. Case is Chair : Fix a targe piece of orown pape! at ¥ of horses. dogs ; } r t
and she carried .a bouquet of nied oe a aA of the}, cheac level on wall. and give three-year- peeases . with. MARGE scone ‘| ee JUNE BR | ‘
orchids, m ; irec ors of Lamson & o'd a piece of coloured chalk. An almost vy Does aot mind the | | REGINALD TATE, PETER SINC-| with FAY BAINTER, E TTY LI whi
Miss Dorothy Clairmonte, the ° repel manufacturers of bolts / perfectly drawn circle will be one of the MAPK se eeeee eee eeeeneee REE CLAIR, MARY MORRIS A Warner Bros. F
bride’s sister, was her sole at- and nuts, | COBUItS, ceretesset es ease see ie. Sco tsetse wwaet V | Eilloys batt and GHA REM BER arner
tendant. Her dress was an off , «» water in any form .... ———_—S—S—SS———— aa =
the shoulder bodice of orchid satin Director Returns London Express Servic, UBRBY BM ne by, .y
and vhe skirt was of nylon mar- M*: HARRY FARINHA, Di- LCL CT CLUES ACKOSS ' §
ee ie en with satin, Shi rector of Messrs J. T. John- 9 @ lL, Marl Holst’s greeting %% ot
wore a Milan Picture hat and her son's Ltd. of Port-of-Spain j -Ollowed by a burat @f HEAT a
bouquet was of gerberas and ‘Trinidad, and Mrs, Farinha, te, | Ou an t ema e L ren 6 Unequal’ advantage ? ‘
ground orchids, turned home by B.W.LA, on ; ys 8. Sailor, scholar, and father. TO-DAY, 5 ‘ 3
The Ceremony was performed Tuesday, after spending “about Fy Dora Hell eae ie ik at 9. Whereja you ‘may see = , 5 & 8.30 p.m. — Last Showing of
by the Rev. M. E. Griffiths, and ten days’ holiday in the island. y : i 12, iauminatea $9 or 101 imside, JAMES MASON and JOYCE HOW
the Begtman was Mr, Clyde Wal. ‘hey were staying at the Ocean ted as such by his parents, then wish is allowable, oe WE Bes tric
cott, brother of the ‘groom. anq . View Hotel, MORE than we realize, we make pictures in our| D@mdled wisely, so that his fine) {} Bete conte t ms
popular West Indian and Inter: «» “» minds of what we want our children to be like. Often <¢ Don Sees be Sevenggem “Ae 45. Aid tok record “oc “unuitioat THEY MET
national cricketer, sea bel i arse bide. . N a} some modifying of his faults be progress. IN THE DA :
The reception was held wat ne’ Comings And Guings | 6°" a between ideal and reality follows and this leads to] brought about. : 16. Somewhat toilsome painting a Fi
Hastings Hotel, and the couple | a conflict, or to put it more mildly, some sort of daily| I'm not saying that this is, 18 May be’ seen in the Genere Bs starti p.m,
will Be spending thelf hone reac Mé M. WEXLER was an ar- friction between parents and their children, “| easy to do. In fact, for some | 19 roe nen od. aoe To-morrow at 5 & 8.30 ME” ee
i at Bathsheba, tival irom ‘triniaaa yy y| There is, for instance, this mat-, tain family difficulties. The re- parents it is very difficult. Par-! 21, Time wo “Get uD but done N GOOD OLD SUMMER TI i
j «> «> b.W.LA., on Luesda) ter of standards or averages which| sult of all this was an almost Tie With @ ‘Rome social Senne} 22 80% of dao orth FINED nee
Oo Sh r . s i sit are set up as a parents’ guide, Or} constant impatience with the tend to be impatient with a burden, Pe Se ee ~~. oa 1
n hort Holiday Hoe RABLE J. D. Chandler,| we might call it the picture of| baby’s great activity and drive rather solitary or unconvention- } 23, Deed book ? lll SSS SS
R. JACK DE LIMA, Director M.L.C., and Mrs. Cnandlex re- | “normal” that gets built up.| His personality made such de- al son and daughter. a6, They make Gis-regres, hn
, i : e De Lima and Company turned from ‘Vrinidad by 15. W.1.4. | Parents often have these pictures| mands upon her that she was | t ” st businessman tends 1. Ve CLUES DOWN O
j imited, Jewellers of Pori-of- © ‘uesaay ater actenaing the | 80 held before them that they use! not equal to them. and she often 0 be intolerant of a youth whose ao Flew 4
4 \ s ‘ i is e é g | no a bm she La aeeerts a t a . ure I starnt-weth.
a r Spain, San Fernando and Bridge- ©5ristmas Race Meet there them, like a tape measure, to| said, “How did I’ ever get such satisfaction lies in working with | 3° Gabler ben on ee. | :
4 town, Was an arrival recently ); Bauge their child’s nature of|a child as this? I’m much better his hands, A bustling mother 4 Noturaii }
from Trinidad by the “Golfito” Ms K. Vincent Brown, Senior | #¢hievement. fitted to take care of a quiet has trouble to understand * ‘obituary notice. & Om g
for a short holiday and is staying x Puisne Judge of ‘'Lrinidad Then there is the ideal a mother] little girl.” {a daughter who isn’t the} 5. The bulkiness of the attmse
at the=Marine Hotel, was an arrival on Sunday by ia father builds up of perfection For a time, these comparisons | ROURD- WiHehy type, but cares moat q Theatrical game. |
‘ Shorily after his return home, B-W.1.A. and is staying at the| iS Perfection, of course, is so] in her own mind worked to the to write or draw, or think or) 8. Song of a pariah, ;
it Mr, De Lima will be going to tha Motel Royal, ying contrary to human nature that it} detriment of her relationship read about serious or even pro- | 10, soe of a deparntus-gaaiy ,
United-Kingdom on a two-month as acs can’t be realized. But the struggle| with her little boy. He showed found subjects. Likewise, ser-) 11, Holds out, -
busineg$. visit in the interest of carr John Higham and Capt toward it, and the series of in-| it in becoming very difficult to ious-minded parents do not easily| 17 ie might pass out, ine
his firnt: E. Allen, both Pilots of evitable disappointments that fol-| manage, and quite’ anvagonistic understand | or accept a bouyant]’ 19, Snes part of a clever ach
i Trans-Canada Airlines ee in sre when a child repeatedly acts| to his mother. butterfly of a daughter. 20. on ie
: «> © over the week nee. Oe ike a person, create discord. Then when he got > walk . : BO Ee REY on thenios
) > week-end fr sa : got to the walk- . ‘ be hag
big Came in on T.C.A by LCA: toe ieee tee | Forget Personal Ideals ing age, and everyone was so| ‘scauire Flexible Attitude hi
or RS. K. E. ith naa her Were accompanied by their wives aah Tan ee mers those very per- om i the little bey’s per- “She (or he) is certainly no P To-day (only) 5 & 6.30 p.m.
4 4 dadattie Sikes and her and are staying at the Marine| - ay ows ased on wishfulness| SOMality and so impressed by his| child of mine,” is a usual ex- Warners Double :
Nea vat 3 aughter Miss Barbara Dowd Hotel, = which, when not realized, may| iMtelligence and independence] pression in cases like these. But}}) IL ‘PRINCESS O'ROURKE’ i
Ee T oa roe Canada by * ® e ae 6 or father out of we vigour, his mother realized don’t say it too often, or you may A ‘CASE OF THE .
Veg rh the week-end for R. Douglas Roberts, District joint wi h the situation which ac- | W rat She d been doing: rebelling} convince yourself and, worse BLACK PARROT’
i about two weeks’ holiday and are Tain Gianhina® fas rane tually exists and so very often out! against this little dynamo’s ways| still, your child that neither of Z
staying-at the Ocean View Hotel. po. ee Manager for Trans-) of key with a child. Since instan- because he wasn’t the girl-baby-| you can fi any ‘ Friday, Saturday & Sunday
They ar i Canada Airlines in Ottawa and] ces ar inati , , . ? aby-} you can find any ground of un-}}) Ad ABOTT : > )
; y are the wife and daughter : awa and) ces are often illuminating, let me, oll of her dreams. ) derstandi i > anionshi IN THE NAVY °
of Dr. Dowd Chief Medical om Mrs Roberts, were recent arrivals cite one: *) Ke my ang at Ry cre wort SaaS Saturd Ni 14th.
| Dr. Dowd, i icer ne om : . : . | eep in g ow re) SaaS
of Canadian National Railway and ae “nie about swe wours A young mother I ito k Accept Them As They Are alike Pit may be ae ue oY ight January
Trans-Canada Airlines who came ~ >: rey are staying at the ’ other 1 used to know Just as with the adults wel ;: , aot “th a
; anes i ‘ean View : had always wanted a little gir adults we} along together; but that whe
ot a on the inaugural flight las View sora. . aioe: delat child hoes on — . and live with, we must not| you’re different, your er "a PERCY GREEN & HIS ORCHE
y T.C.A, sprint : . . . e} try »make children: we i, ad . ow —s .
y T.C.A, in December. R. and Mrs. Frank L. Lewis} COUld make lovely clothes for, and accept en eee i ave ae a ne Sar a a ae D 3
«» «» of Halifax, were arrive vey| Whose ways would be gentle and} jn | nite. Ge e yum} give you, and you may have To-day , i WW)
the week-end by T.CA. eee appealing. What the fates brought Seana are wenieee A me at ee i See wg from 9 to all hours 7 $
Member of Offics Staff a month's ioliday and ate staying her was a big husky baby boy, so] flicts are inevitable whan senate ae. on aren said, United Artists Double . . . iat |
MONG the. visitors to this at the Marine Hotel, vigorous and independent that he| are much in each other’s com-|! y a hildren around keeps Edward G. ROBINSON in SSS FFE
colony is Miss Daphne Theo- $ 2 ° ct sven want to be held on/ pany ways ott vent re eat: A8® BONER” i
balds, a member ; ar R. Fred Burns of Consolidate er lap or cuddled any longer} [It ; ils A Laaee 18 true, but it is espec- a and
bEa aes ee = = -* a oar . ee than was necessary for his feed-| that f tan Aiea he he Ry 7 — when your children are COPACABANA”
f Ped ese : » St. Lucia, s ansas, U.S.A.,| ings. " y ont r different in tastes ersonali- ARMEN 1}
bees } Miss Theobalds who is a gues} came in recently by T.C.A. for eis mother wash't t¢ 1] MY readers, that each child is an ty from you. Meas yen aoe GS MIRANDA
he j av Indramer, Worthing, is spends about ten days’ holiday and is'f : _ was 00 Well) individual exactly like no other acquire flexibility of minc ‘oO
ih ing a short holiday in Barbados int Tegan ‘ 8 for some time after he was born,! in the world, and S ae nn OF Can: ae
He ay ados, staying at the Marine Hotel. d was quite nervous ov, ne World, and must be accep- manner
eet b.s —_—_—_- silica neue ord and was quite nervous over cer- .
, OF '
Tae ® “ Last Two Shows To-day 4.45 & 8.30 i
‘ on M.G.M. Presents... ya
EVERYTHING FOR THE CROP ||) “Soe
teerhid | are TOOL
e tna : ‘ with
e€ : including : Louis JOURDAN— is
WOVEN Christopher KLNT
-STRIP @ CANE BILLS THE
@ CUTLASSES ROXY FOR +
NDALS fe ae Sage i Dette tee tm a TASK!
j -R.C, uble...
| © SHOVELS Lola Sheldon LKONARD AS °
@ GALVANI “WHY GIRLS LEAVE HUME” F
Our Last and Latest AT F — “ Ei A wonderful i ed:
f @ BRASS WOVEN _ STRANGE ILLUSION” : ul assortment just openee:
Shipment of Mexican } James LYDON dally . CIRCULAR PLANES RIP SAWS
HUARACHES . @ STENCIL INK AND BRUSHES St ee ae io < BOW SAWS
| | . i CK
PAIR | @ SEWING TWINE | OLYMPIC 1} BLOCK , RACE: SAN |
{ ’ CHISELS o
Buy now fo r iE '}) RABBE : ;
uy vr comfort & Hard Wear | ® PACK NEEDLES | ast two shows to-day az0.aess Mii} PLAN ho HAND DRILLS
i= 25.0, eh OO ee en I E IRONS BREAST DRILLS
; ' y % y r | ¥ K{ Robert YOUNG t SPOKE SHAVES VISES ep
| " \ ) Robert MI M
EVANS & WHITFIELDS | : : nt won ff peau orcs a
‘ey \ BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON } inte sain y ie NLEY” MITRE BOX A
} ) aes _ and ) see Them in Our S > Wi w. :
Dial 4606 and 4220 | FACTORY LIMITED, Wee a ti PLANT AT viet pp
iis ues John WAYNE—Ella RAINES y ANT: } iT
a nr = ) i ae a¥i 4M.




TR Te Te a eee

5 RSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1950

»lombo Talks End Soon;
Back Jap Peace Treaty |

(By SYLVAIN MANEGOT)
COLOMBO, Jan. 11.

= 'THE Commonwealth Foreign Ministers, believed to|

sr widely over Japanese Peace Treaty terms, to-day

bed in principle to set up a working party to study the }

lem. They heard a 75 first hand
——~« report on South East Asia by Mr.

i are Malcolm MacDonald, british

Amnest Commissioner General there. The

) y working party will be at Ambas-
n templated

¢ Germans

sador or High Commissioner level,

Although it was not decided

where it should meet, London

was considered a possibility. Ob-

servers here saw in the establish-

ment of a working -party an

KFURT, Jan. 11. admission that Commonwealth
pd States High Commis-
Mr. John J. McCloy staved
that he was consider-
ablishing a procedure to
individual petitions for

y by German war erim-

countries have widely differing
views on the Treaty, and that
further consultation is required
betore a detailed, co-ordinated
policy can emerge. They pointed
out that any decisions depend on
other interested powers besides
those represented at Colombo. |

Divergencies in emphasis over
the Japanese Treaty Talks did not
mar the friendly atmosphere.
Britain’s Foreign Secretary, Ernest
Bevin, opened the discussion, and
delegates reported he was in ex-
cellent form throughout vhe ses-
sion, wir. Philip Noel-Baker,
British Secretary for Common-
wealth Relations, told reporters
atter the session that the Ministers
had had “a very good day and a

id that he was not, how-
ontémplating a genera)
for Germans sentenced
crimes. In a letter to
Aloys J. Muench. Regent
Apostolic Nunciature in
, Mr. McCloy said, “any
pproaching a general am-
yould, I fear, be taken as
mdonment of the princi-
ablished in the trials of
petuals of war crimes”.
loy stated that he was
“ ay} ee ‘Regal | Most useful discussion.”
“¥ the “prosectitions and, Mr. Pearson went out of his way
ticial soundness of the| to ridicule a local newspaper re-
hts. He said thav he_did| Port attributed to the correspond-
ieve that world opinion|¢®t of one London newspaper
pared to accept the pro- that the Conterence was dragging
that those crimes had] through waning enthusiasm, and
Miciently atoned for that that the British Election announce:
ans should now be al-| ment made delegates feel that in|_
o forget them. the event of a Conservative
victory, the present British dele-
gation’s views might be repudiated.
On the contrary, he asserted that
the talks, covering widely different
regional approaches, had revealed
all delegates as essentially
reasonable and understanding.
Views expressed at today’s talks
on Japan, put India at one ex-
treme and Australia at the other.



—Reuter.

100,000,000
nt On Atomic
Energy

NEW YORK, Jan. 11.













U.K. Hears Adams On Sympathy

NOTABLE WEST INDIES politicians were heard pre-



———ers— —

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



200.000 Witness
Last Rites

MODENA, Jan.
estimated 200,000 people—!
| twice population of Modena }
'—heard Palmiro Togliatti’s fu-}
jneral oration over

be i
An

the

the tri-colour}
} draped coffins in the Piazza San |
| Acoscino of the six Italian work-
‘ers killed in Monday’s strike
| troubles.

| The Piazza was a
flags and floral wreaths brought
'by workers’ delegations from as
j iar south as Bari.

! Togliatti’s charge that the Gov-
}ernment was responsible for the
j}shooting was repeated by other
|speakers who included Giuseppe
De Vittorio, Seeretary-General of
|the Communist Confederation of
| Labour and Mayor Corasori

| Before walking behind the
| coffirs, which were borne on the

sea of red

shoulders of overall-clad work-
men to the cemetery, Togliatti
jhad visited the bodies lying in

state in the courtyard of the City
|; Museum. Here, hysterical wives
and mothers wept bitterly, one of
them shouting “assassin De Gas-
peri.” —Reuter.

Belgian Premier
Asked To Resign

BRUSSELS, Jan, 11.

Belgian Socialist Deputy Fran
Tielmans to-day urged Belgia
Premier Gaston Eyskens re
sign this evening lest the whok
Government collapse in a
weeks time in what he describec
as Belgium's post-wal
| financial seandal.

Tielmans was ioning the
Government on widespread frauas
recently discovered by the Bel-

lo

fe

biggest

quest



~ CO i iif : : gi olice. The frauds concern
LEONARD COTTRILL, Pauline Dowding and Barbadian.children in a studio of Radio ae acd ae ‘that “ebouid |
Distribution. have been declared to the Belgian |
— —-——__ - - —___— - ~ --- - police The frauds concern |
5 ° i ‘ | stocks and bonds that should | Babr
; } b lanlat to » Bel- 4
B.B.C. Commentator Finds, — Split In Jap | ise" veer aeciarea ote Ber Powis
gian rovernme € y | * -
6eé 59. * mic after the liberation as part of!
Colour Bar rt ar 7 Os Communist Belgian anti-inflation and ant-

war profiteering drive. M. Tiel-



Party Predicted mans said to-day that the fraud
TOKYO J 11 amounted t ».000,000,000 Bel
SN 4 in L .
ao g rancs —Reuter.
LONDON (By Mail) The Central Committee of the gian fran
. : iy f Japanese Communist Party has}











| Vietnam Government asks us to”. |

; it-| Pandit Nehru, Indian Prime : . : ; : expelled Ko Nakanishi, the only; ‘ae Aeeuses
be 7 will yi snoen Minister, strongly supported a, ‘Senting their colonies’ cases and discussing federation and] prominent Party member to sup Moscow Accuse
9.000 in atudying mili-| quick settlement of Japanese issue other problems in a B,B,C, programme relayed to millions} port ese campaig! Bevin of “Curtain
@ non-military uses of| under conditions that will allow] of listeners on the Home Service. The programme con- ~ wc Eran Ee on eens,
energy. The figure was ores seen oe ae sisted of recordings made throughout the West Indies for] Phe 4 panese Press today Tacties

Mr. Wilbur E. Kelley,| politica self- etermination, an the annual Christmas Day round-the-Empire tour always] forecast a big split in the party jf
of the New York Office | an early withdrawal of occupation “ ! ee biNateapia) : : .
tomic Energy Commis- | forces. put on by the B.B.C. and surplus to needs on December 25,| Nakanishi — after xpul- LONDON, ae
‘ * B.C. commentator Leonard} 0m, that he would lead Japan- Vioscow , commentn
a three-day Conference The Difficulties Sie ey 2h x B.B Seen Chiat, Min the dinentin | Oy
Sent “, a 4 rn dates escribe: ife oy ‘ 2se IMUNISts 1 the Irection | Jasi nigh Tuesday
Bie she Coramaission: and Canada's External Affairs Min- Te peer renece ett ean eee of the true Marxism Lenin-| | ; iti ( mmonweaittt rorei
i i ad nai ‘ ated ° ~\ ee > ahé as, a 8 aica “love- a a tal Britis omr nwe:
Benversny. et i ister, Lester B. Pearson, while “W illiam Scoresby |liest of them all” and Harry Ven-| ism.” He was expected to ap-| Ministers Conference at Co
ee’ cack meesanber aewing = TG" Value te te : | dryes Jamaican businessman and peal to a meeting of Commun-] alleged “the very fact that b*
s *I | desirability of an early settlement, i Beds eee epeeeet, oot eed a ae and) ists from all parts of Japan on} Secretary Bevin and his colleague
hen the Government be- | made an appraisal of the difficul- Begins Scientific oe 1S aa ra t a January 18 for action f aor ubl
a tee % : storicé yvackgr ) » : fea yubh
; ei sal i on vite in the way of such ® solution. . island oa veel rs couieaniion on the Central Committ plot §
000 tow the ‘current fecal Gh legal: grounds, he reminiee Voyage current business difficulvies aris | The Party crisis has boiled preparati
Bid not. eas how ania Ministers that a formal Peace Ling rom stetling-dollar problems. of the recent Comintorm critic- The commentator added: “D
oted t nae f milit Conference with two Communist _ LONDON, Jan. 11. Barbados—“‘where there is | J8™m of the Japanese Party lead-| jomatic recognition of the Chine
da, ety | Powers.— Russia and China —|,The British Research Ship| io. ba# was compared with| ers, gravest since the campaign | People’s Republi: the Labow
P said security restrictions | osent would meet an insur-| ‘William Scoresby”, directed py | Oe ne ee eee ie und| 2gainst Yugoslavia 58 year olé} Government of Britain does not
impossible for the Com- |? : , . th : ‘+s, | damaica “where there is none and} ¢ eee a a i Ove ent of Britain ac
to “ t letely to| Mountable difficulty in agreeing ay Renee Serene, OF black and white mingle freely.” |'52920_ Nozaka, party intellec-} mean any change in the Imperi- |
31 a ait es ©] on a common approach. Oceanography, set out to-day on uM ii S Bry can ee Barbados} tual leader” was singied out by} alist trend of British Foreign
Bale eee etna Or tical grounds as repre-| 19 months Scientific voyage| ,.- por ae yee OTe te aeeS! the Cominform for his “errone-| policy, Bovh Churchill and Bevin,
ims have been expended. nh Pracheas BrOU D inl : discussed the sugar price and its : apes y. B
sentati the neighbour of the} ™@nly to mark whales off the |; ‘ : ous theories. representing as they do the in-
—Reuter, | sentative of the neighbou res : + importance to Wesi Indian econ- eres. | ee? ese ‘ eee
United States, he felt that the west coast of Australia to enable and ta Gitte ot-aite Carers Nozaka was a wartime guer-J}terest of the British monopolies,
, , : h their movements to be checked, | OMY and the voice of “Vir. Grant CY illa leader and a personal friend} have the same desire—to suppress
. ° Goenmneriwealth POWER OO uh Adams was also heard. Mr. of Mao Tse Tung, the Chinese the people f vhe colonies, and

: : > . ‘ . = en , " , owe 5 => - > . 91es oO > Cd. + &
stria Claims ecient the ,, peviitan F The marking will be done with | Adams spoke on the prospects of} Communist leader. strangle the National Liberation

er merica as See power w 10-inch Steel Darts fired from |1¢deration and in a reference to From 1931 onwards, he repre-]\oyement in South East Asia.’

M. Schillin Ss security responsibility. guns. Each dart when returned | the colour bar said “We are more} sented the Japanese Communist} ‘The main issue at the Confer
” £ A source close to the Confer-| wil entitle the finder to a re-|Sympathetic to the English people) payty_then illegal in Moscow Jonce, he said, was “vhe intensi-
R e ence said that South Africa’s ap-{ ward and, from t'1e position and | in our midst than to the local| tH. went “underground” in North fication of Imperialist expansion
rom ussia proach was cautious, influencea} gate of its findiug, will tell the | Whites. The local whites see their’) Gying during the Chino-Japan- end the creation of a Pacific Bloc
mainly by her regard for}sejentists more about the whales, political power slipping and are) .<. war, and helped spread dis-| supplement — the ressiv
ye VIENNA, Jan. M, Australia’s point of view, and her] seasonal migration habits. more inclined to be reactionary} ofrection among thy Japanese| Norih “Atlantic. Paci’”—-Reuter.
a is counterclaiming 240] gesire to see Japan become self- First stage of the voyage is to| because of that. wi: troops. | a eee
schillings from the Soviet) supporting again. Capetown. Vivid Deseription | He returned to a Haros wel-|
for civilian occupation) “jy, MacDonald’s review 01 ad , Cottrill provided a vivid de-| come in Japan in January 1946 | cc
ainst the Soviet claim of| south East Asia, it was learnt On the way « survey is 0 %€ | scription of the bauxite setvlement| Nakanishi, the mar rho « | W hat Of German
pica schillings for post-| was presented frankly as Pearson’: | Dade of the Benguela Current, 4} 5+ Mackenzie, British Guiana and] gemned him, was a member of |
, and, according to Aus- impressions. While hoping for the old stream flowig north along | gicoussed the potential wealth of] the Central. Committe Whil ip O W is In F ‘arice ?
premment sources: here, best, he urged the Commonwealtt he coast of West Africa. J the colony and then introduced| other Leaders were defending)" *â„¢~* . 7 *
me, which they said, had to be realistically prepared for the On their way home the Three} ji pressions of Trinidad with a] Nozaka against the Cominform | BONN. Ji
in principle the Aus- . . x r Scientists of the ship’s research | slaved alyps ' ea Nagar 1 cehtn: beled Nak et i : : )
| worst in assessing the repercus- ; super-loya calypso that was| charges earlier this 1 i | West German ( ancelle I
right to make counter-| * : he : team hope to capture a specimen aiein dhe el . » Shed ondit-lineiaht ial ft 1t the Partv | x a shcaiiidad 4 Paine w
sions of the Chinese Communis specially written for the broadca anishi said he thougl he Par Konrad Adenauet raise Wi
pnd Dr. Leopold Figl, the | °” , r ; of vhe rare Latimeria Chalumnae. | , opted ; ; an ca, IE a ley tor gra ran tnd Bs pee pore TS
| victory on South East Asia a An oil well tapped less than a] should be re-organised Reuter.| French Foreign Minister ol
nh Chancellor, put the * ihe. the ¥ ST anes It was thought the fish was eX- | 10041 previously, Well number Be Suhusties: the 4
orward on December five. | Taking MD. AS i wa Chi OS | tinct until a trawler captured ajog¢ was heard bursting invo ac- a hithaderuhn | itino?
representatives at daily| touched on yesterday o ina | live specimen off East London in}+i.i}. "ang Albert Gomes pleaded Not The eed aan ceeaen, 1a
s with Austrian officials | “Sth column” potential, MacDonal: | i938, but the fish was destroyed | Oye so paderation, urging it ss ; | attabiabs. ie. forthoumds +
ying that they were still) was reported +0 have singled ou n error, leaving only the skin comes before self-rule on ‘the S M crimes rials
instructions from Mos- | Indo-China, Siam —s me ole which was stuffed and placed in| na. that polivical progres ame man | West German Justi liniste
i i : ic as > ‘< i i vulnerable Muce ero § z vice o SS 8 ; 1 Ju ust
this point and. this was} the most immediately ulne an East London Museum. must be matched by economic de- GEORGETOWN, (By Mail) | Dr. Thomas Dehle1 he Bi
on for the present delay | to Communist infiltration. ;
negoti tion " —Reuter, | —Reuter —Reuter.| velopment and the Caribbeon Freeman Reese, a negro held|destag here today that he hac
y vicinal of ‘ could only be enriched eer Py the British Guiana police, we | asked the Chancellor to raise the
- = = Sa OE ae a federation, not through individual! found to have finger-prints wide-| matter during M Schuman’s visi
gn Me ee ae ete eats, ene oh itis efforis. ly different from those flown to| this weekend
Dr. Solomon gave the Socialist} British Guiana by Scotland Yard The question of revision 0
point of view, urging self-govern-| although his physical description} sentences on ordinary soldiers
ment first and Miss Beryl Mc-| corresponds to that supplied by} which are regarded here as Un:
Birney, a dancer, described local] the Yard, it is learned in George-| duly harsh may also be mooted
dances and mimes. town, Reuter.
Cottrill summed up his own Scotland Yard officers had been ae
\ impressions of the West Indies:| seeking to interview a negro in cis /
} ‘T found thav where there was} connection with the death of po- Planes And Ships
most freedom there was most) lice constable Booth at Burton- we .
friendship ‘for ‘Britain.”’—B.U.P. on-Trent, England, in May, 1946 Search E. Baltic
Cc t D ti M | aoe ge ing a! a om
| ustoms utes \VEAV | with a safe, who clubbed fim ti '
IC ATE | > “ | with a jemmy and killed him | For Schooner Mary Ann
D i L mm. dl | Be Adiusted In U S Before he died the constabl oa ;
: J ; che es gave a description of his attack- ! COPENHAGEN, Jan. 11.



as a moonbeam





|

COOL BEAUTIFUL |

|

'“FERGUSON FABRICS” |

FOR WEAR AT NIGHT. |
/ STOCKED BY LEADING STORES.

.





WASHINGTON, Jan. 11 er and finger-prints—those seni| Planes and ships are searching
United States Treasury Secre-| to British Guiana—were found |the Eastern Baltic for the 90-ton
tary, John Snyder told a Press| on the safe. |Danish Motor Schooner, “Mary
Conference here to-nighi’ that he! Reese was held by the British|Ann,” missing since she left
might recommend to the present| Guiana police on a local charge Gdynia, Poland, on January 3.

“Mary Ann,” which hed four men
aboard, was due in Copenhagen on.
January 5 or 6.—Reuter.

session of Congress an adjustment |
of United States Cus’oms on im-} f F
ports from overseas .—Reuter,. | of his prints.

when Sotland Yard heard of
him and asked for a comparison
—B.U.P.





PROTECTION

It has come to our notice that a few people are under the impression
that ordinary un-refined petroleum jelly sold in drug stores in boxes or
paper parcels is the genuine ‘Vaseline’ Petroleum Jelly.

For your protection, we, the Chesebrough Manufacturing Co. (owners

of the registered trade mark ‘Vaseline’), would like it to be known that
genuine ‘Vaseline’ Petroleum Jelly is sold in Barbados only in*pots,

tubes and tins each bearing the trade mark ‘Vaseline,’ and that any
other type of box or paper wrapping does not contain genuine ‘Vaseline’
Petroleum Jelly.



For your all-round protection (cuts, burns, bruises, scalds, skin irri-
tations, sunburn, work-sore hands, baby’s rash, etc. etc.) don’t just ask
for Vaseline—ask for ‘Vaseline’ Petroleum Jelly and see that the
pot, tube or tin is marked:

CHESEBROUGH MANUFACTURING CO. CONS'D

Distributors: T. Geddes Grant Ltd.



RE TRIS ANT" BR GMs AE TE IE ET

PAGE THREE





France Will Be |
“Glad To Pull Out” |
Of Indo-China

PARIS, Jan. 11.
Pierre Henri Tiegen, French}
Minister of Information, said to-|}
day that France will be “glad to
pull out” of Indo-China “if the}






REDUCTIONS

ON

LADIES’ COATS
& WOOLLEN
SWEATERS

Quite an Assortment

.
}
|

France’s armies there, are not}
against the Vietnarhese people |
but against Ho Chi Minh. We}
know that if we pulled out now
they would sweep Indo-China” |

M. Tiegen told the Anglo-!
American’ Press- Association at}
lunch that vhne Auriol-Bao Dai}
igreements gave complete freedom |
to Vietnam. “If Bao Dai’s Gov-!



ernment was to ask us to occupy of Colours
only these bases named in the

agreements, we would — gladly

oblige. At SPECIAL






it is now up to Bao Dai’s Gov-
ernment to keep peace and order. |

Indo-China asked us for:
AT THE

(1) Independence within the}
framework of the French Union MODERN DRES

BROAD STREET.

REDUCED PRICES

(9

2) Our help to keep this in-;
dependence. }
England and the. United State

1ave freed so many countries thai |

they will understand the necessary |
resencs troops achieve |
iberation.”





of to



—Reuter. i












|——














sromo-Seitzer fighis ordinary
ache three wWways:' 1) Re-
lieves pain of headache
Relieves discomfort of up-

3) Quiets jumpy
vhich may team up
j t» cause trouble. Caution: Use
s directed. Get Bromo- Seltzer
at your drugstore fountain or
counter today. A product of

s

set stomach
nerves...





Emerson Drug Co, since 1887, Y
im i.
BOOKER’S (B’DOS) DRUG STORES LTD.
Broad Street and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)
. on
—

Ree

steel rolling shutters

GNOME HOU WALTHAMSTOW

SOOO On em ita
HORE

LONDON, €E.i7

ING ESTATES & TRADING
MLL MCL AIRC CCRT



MERE'S THE



BREAD

FOR A

PERFECT

|
|
|
|



é SANDWICH

‘the Bread with a wonderful flavour .... tender -

golden brown crust ... and an appetising texture...

Of Course, That's .

| BREAD

in Sale at J. & R. BAKERIES & GODDARDS

a a
S.-i SS SSS Se aaa
PAGE FOUR



ADVOGATE

nee"

Published by The Advocate Co, Ltd., 34, Broad St., Bridgetown



Thursday, January 12, 1950



Who Will Win?

THE General Elections in Great Britain
will be held on February 23, Parliament
will be dissolved and the Government
will go to the country for approval or dis-
approval of a national policy which has
latterly become the battle ground of fierce
political controversy.

The circumstances under which the
announcement was made give rise to
further speculation whether the Labour
Party is as sure of its ground as many
of its adherents believed six months ago.
Two weeks before a scheduled meeting
of Parliament the Prime Minister has
advised His Majesty to proclaim dissolu-
tion and to postpone that meeting. The
{ Labour Party has decided to brave the
rigours of winter and fight the election
; before another budget has been presented
and the full effects of devaluation felt.



=< aren

6 nse egie 08- ede ae

The country has been sharply divided

EO eS

nt on the question of devaluation of the
‘ pound and it was claimed by the Opposi-
i tion that the necessity for devaluation
ar mi was the direct result of the mismanage-
i ee ment by the Labour Party which had
ick attempted a spendthrift policy of creating
ars the welfare state before economic recov-
t ery had been ensured.
The nationalisation of railways and in-
if dustry, the Opposition claim, had further
$ contributed to the economic crisis. On

the other hand the Labour Government
claimed that it has carried out the plan
which it. originally set out to aceemplish.
Feai et But neither the Liberals nor the Con-
servatives are satisfied that the results
have been beneficial to the country,

The elections will be fought on clear
cut issues, They will centre around
whether nationalisation of industry or
the more flexible management of private
enterprise is more conducive to economic
recovery. Whichever policy gains favour
‘it is crystal clear that there is no short
cut and that a long and arduous road
must be travelled before the country can
regain the stability at home and the pres-
tige abroad which she had before 1929.

There have been Socialist Governments
in Great Britain before. It was in 1924
that the Socialists, led by Mr. Ramsay
MacDonald, formed a Government with
the help of the Liberal Party and again
in 1929 when the late Mr. Baldwin took
office with them and succeeded the Prime
Minister shortly after in a coalition gov-
ernment. There has however, seldom
been any government whose national
policy has been fraught with such serious
consequences for the entire Common-
wealth. The Socialist Government of 1945
came into power at a time when the coun-



4

:
5
'
vr
'
t
:
af
'
a¢
|
'
'
'

ie 4 : try was ready and willing for any change.
ee) me of Government after seven years of a
f i ; ‘i wartime Coalition Government, And the
yt ‘4 Tories were blamed for the war.

j we

Whether the country will have had
enough of Socialist experiment will be
decided within the next six weeks. In
spite of its many blunders and its un-
popular undertakings, the Labour Party
approaches the election with a confidence
engendered by their remarkable record at
the polls in the many bye-elections which
it has fought. It is true that in every
case the majority has been severely re-
duced but nevertheless, Labour has been
able to retain the seat. There is little
doubt that in the coming election the
number of votes cast for Labour will be
a great deal less than the aggregate of
those cast in 1945, and that the Conserv-
ative vote will be increased considerably
but it remains to be seen whether the
individual Conservative candidate vote
will be sufficiently large as to win the
greater number of seats for that Party.

OUR READERS SAY:
Sevenanmmalindingdastemenanee

SILENT TASS SATS TV SETI T SSS Te SegE, sprees

a



Sis nose nal

a
torte ¢

wegen

Sos

Le EIR ote

=

ae

Mini Ftd

paee ost
aes ok



ee




ne



ome ce mt pee erree nee ns a

{| eee

‘2 Apost

Do you know the pamphlet
entitled, by mo means briefly:
“Concerning the reorganisation of
European society, or the neces-
sity and the methods of gather-
ing together the peoples of Europe
in one political body, inside which
each conserves its national inde-
pendence”?

It might be thought that this
pamphlet was written by ‘some
eminent and honestly intentioned
member of the present Council of
Europe, who wished to communi-
cate to his colleagues certain side-
lights known to himself, but of
which they were not aware,

It is not so. Although the pam-
phlet is up-to-date enough;
although its ideas are now more
than ever worthy of consideration,
and of active meditation by men
of good will, the author has long
since quitted this earth and its
quarrels—or shall we call them
controversies?

The author? Or rather the
authors. For, in order to be sure
of the utility of their counsels to
the world, the propagandists of
that epoch—it was in 1814—
made up a team of two. Two is
not too many.

First there is Count-Saint-
Simon, a nephew ci the author of
the “Memoires”. Certain men were
over-sagacious enough to consid-
er him a little mad. At the least
he was an adventurer of genius,
and both these terms are to be
taken in the best sense. Saint
Simon: had ideas about every-
thing, especially about society, He
was indeed a precursor, an ini-
tiator who cannot be held in too
great esteem. “Saint-Simonism”
marks a striking step towards the
future. And this great propagand-
ist of ideas knew when to be
practical. History will affirm the
value of his name.

It was in 1814 and Europe was
disturbed and did not hide it.
Saint Simon, was not disturbed
for he knew how to bring tran-
guility to Europe. He, and the
young Augustin Thierry. He was
over fifty and Thierry was just
beginning his life—beginning it
with hope, with confidence and
with some ideas as well. And the
two thinkers were glad to meet
together, and collaborated im-
petuously to bring about a salu-
tory reformation of Europe. Saint

Simon continued his self-
appointed task as a reformer, a
visionary and a man of sense
Augustin Thierry was on the



BARBADOS ADVOCAT



les Of European New Laws Against West Indies

Union

By J. Ernest Charles

verge of those vast undertakings
which were to make him one of
the great leaders of French his-
tory. 5

Saint-Simon was an optimist.
His optimism was based as much
on the boldness of his nature as
upon his remarkably keen and
clear-sighted mind. Augustin
Thierry was young, enough to
profess optimism without any
particular reason, But you had to
be enormously optimistic to
affirm at that time, among the
squabbles of the Congress of
Vienna, the doctrine of a politi-
cally and economically unified
Europe, and to do the ground-
work for the establishment of its
principles and its plan. Thanks
to God and to strength of char-
acter oplimism flourished in the
minds of the two collaborators,
And they wrote in a charming
unanimity;

“The golden age of the human
race is not behind us; it is ahead
of us. Our fathers have not seen
it; our children will experience it
one day. It is up to us to prepare
the way for them.”

The golden age is always ahead
of us. If we do not see it very
clearly, it is because it does its
best to hide itself. But how we
shall exalt when we suddenly dis_
cover that it is close upon us.

Saint Simon and Augustin
Thierry both had a little of this
necessary and salutory exalta-
tion. Even so they were by no
means lacking in perspicacity and
logic. They were prepared to win
over the many as well as the few
and to gain althority over them.

An authority which it would be
churlish on our part to attempt
to deny them now. The ideas sown
by them in the intellectual and
moral climate of their time and
unreceived then, are now begin-
ning to prosper. It is time,

The authors of “the reorganisa_
tion of European society” had
made a vigorous note that “com-
mon institutions would be essen-
tial.”

“Congress after congress can
be gathered together, treaties and
conventions be piled up, but all
that will lead to nothing. At every
meeting of nations as at every
meeting of men, common institu-

tions are a necessity, an organi-
sation is essential. It this does not
exist everything will be decided
by force.” :

Thus our precursors aspired to
a general government for their
European confederation. Indis-
pensable. Ineluctable. And thes2
were their conditions.

1—The general Government to
be entirely independent of nation.
al Governments.

2—Its members must be en-
couraged by their position to have
general views and to concern
themselves with general inter-
ests. *

3—They must be strong and
that strength must reside within
themselves: that is; they must
have public opinion behind them.

Very well. In that way a Europ.
ean patriotism might be created
which would be superimposed
upon national patri Ss, crown-
ing them without absorbing them.
To that end the Parliament —
the greater Parliament” — would
act.

“Every question of general in-
terest to European society will le
brought before the greater Par-
liament and will be examined and
decided by it. It will be the sole
judge of controversies between
the nations.”

It will not have escaped you
that Saint-Simon and Augustin
Thierry were already concerned
with details. It would seem that
these details appear today to be
less ambitious than they appeared
to be 1380 years ago. But they are
certainly ambitious even now, for
the 1814 reformers envisaged.

“A code of general ethics,
national as well as individual, be
drawn up by the Parliament and
be taught throughout Europe
Liberty of conscience and free-
dom to practice any religion will
be respected. Thus there will be
between the peoples of Europe
that which constitutes a bond and
a basis for any political associa-
tion: conformity of education, a
union of interests, similarity be-
tween maxims, and moral and
intellectual cemmunity.”

It would be pleasant to quote
yet more revealing passages from
a pamphlet which. after all, is
almost as short as its title is long.
Modern champions of “European
Union” cannot read it without
deep feeling. And a memory of
its authors must have been in the
air at the “Strasburg rendez-
vous.”



The Medical Research
Council

By Martin Ware,

The Medical Research Council

M.B.. MLR.C.P-

Himsworth, formerly Professor of

are the expert body appointed by Medicine at University College
the United Kingdom Government Hospital, London. The members
to administer the funds provided of the Council are appointed by

annually by Parliament for the
promotion of scientific research in
medicine.

The Council were originally
established in 1913, as the Medi-
cal Research Committee, and in
1920 they received their present
title and constitution; at the same
time they became subject to the

the Committee of Privy Council,
in the case of the scientific mem-
bers after consultation with the
President of the Royal Society
and with the Medical Research
Council themselves. They retire
in rotation at regular intervals,
and the aim is always to ensure
that the council comprise a body
of

distinguished with

first-hand experience of research.

. . ‘ experts
formal direction of the specially :

appointed Committee of Privy
Council for Medical Research. To advise them in the promo-
The members of this Committee tion of research in special
are the Lord President of the branches of medical science, the
Council as Chairman, the Minis- Council have the help of about
ter of Health as Vice-Chairinan, fifty expert committees. These
and the Ministers in charge of may deal with subjects of lasting
the other principal Departinents interest, such as chemotherapy,
concerned with questions of pub- vitamins, the problems of the
lic health at home or inthe Crown deaf, or with more temporary
Colonies, questions, such as the clinical
trial of a promising new drug. A
The Research Programme committee of special interest. is
The programme supported by the Coloniak Medical Research
the Medical Research Counvil is Committee, appointed jointly by
not concerned exclusively with the Council and Colonial Office,
studying the nature and causes to direct work on tropical dis-
of disease, and with devising im- eases and on nutritional and other
proved methods for its preven- questions affecting the health of
tion, diagnosis and treatment: it colonial peoples. In planning re-
deals also with the fundamental,,search on problems of industrial
sciences of medicine, such asi? well-being and efficiency the
physiology, biochemistry, bio- Council have the assistance of
physics and genetics; with the the Industrial Heglth Research
maintenance of human well- Board, which has the status of one
being, mental as well - cape of their committees.
and with physiological and psy- J .
chological Saplonn of the normal | It will be realised that the
human being to his work and Medical Research Council enjoy
environmen’ It may deal, indeed, a high degree of autonomy, being
with almost any question inyolv- responsible only to their directing
ing the human factor. committee of Ministers and to

‘ Parliament for the proper expen-
The Council and Their diture of their grant-in-aid, This
Advisory Committee relative independence of the
Council illustrates an important
The Council consist of twelve principle—long accepted in Brit-
members—three lay and nine ain—that the detailed allocation
scientific—with a Secretary and of money for scientific research is
other administrative officers. From best entrusted to an expert body
1934 till September 1949 the of scientists, with only a modicum
Secretary of the Council was Sir of lay help,
Edward Mellanby, whose own The Council naturally work in
researches on rickets and other close association with the admin-
diseases are well known, He has istrative Government depart-
now been succeeded by Dr. H. P. ments on matters of common in-



A Distinguished Geologist Who Worked for Man

terest. Indeed they are required
to advise these departments on
health problems within _ their
sphere and to undertake such new
researches as may be necessary
for this purpose,

The Council’s Research

Establishments

The Council’s central research
laboratories comprise’the National
Institute for Medical Research in
London, whose Director is Sir
Charles Harington, The research
programme here is very wide,
falling under the general headings
of physiology, pathology, bio-
chemistry, pharmacology and
chemotherapy, endocrinology. and
physics in relation to medicine.
Diseases recently under intensive
study have been influenza, the
common cold, malaria and (dur-
ing the war) the typhus fevers.
A special responsibility of the
Institute is to maintain standard
preparations for the biological
assay of certain drugs, hormones,
vitamins, and anti-toxins. This is
done in many instances on behalf
of World Health Organisation.
Another institute wholly main-
tained by the Council for labora-
tory research, is the Dunn Nutri-
tional Laboratory at Cambridge.

Obviously, in any organised
programme of medical research,
prominence must be given to the
study of clinical problems of
disease and injury as seen in
patients, To this end, the Council
have for long maintained, wholly
or in part, special departments
for clinical research ‘n medicine
at two London teaching hospitals,
and at a hospital for nervous
diseases. More recenily, they have
set ap a number of further re-
search establishments in London,
including centres for the study of
ear diseases and eye diseases, for
research on the radiotheraphy
of cancer, and for the study of
industrial illnesses and toxicology:
units for research in human nu-
trition and in denial disease have
also been established in London,
Research on industrial injuries
and skin diseases is carried out in
a unit at Birmingham, and in
South Wales occupational lung
disease in the coal-miners is be-
ing studied. At Cambridge, the
Council have established an ap-
plied psychology research unit
and a department of experimental
medicine,





!of London, where a huge dance hall which





















sd
7 ry,

Stowaways Are Being Planned

LONDON, (By Mail).

The British Home Office, the Colonial
Office, police and welfare officials and port
authorities are planning new laws to prevent
the country from being flooded with native
stowaways, notably from the West Indies
and West Africa. Conferences between
various bodies have been spurred by a num-
ber of questions during the last Parliamen-
tary session and the growing concern of mag-
istrates at the number of men who- come
before them and cannot be deported because
they have full rights of British citizenship.

About 16,000 West Indians and Africans
are now living in Britain—twice as many as
in 1939. There are a further 5,000 coloured
students with stholarships or private means.

Mr. M. J. Mitchell, Trinidadian General
Secretary of the League of Coloured People,
run by Colonial lawyers and other *

CROWN MALT EXTRACT ...._.
CREAM OF: WHEAT (large size)

SOUTH AFRICAN MELON ang
GINGER JAM, 2-15 tins

| COLONNADE
a

BUILDER'S HARD

FOOT and CHAIN BOLTS
CASEMENT STAYS

CASEMENT FASTENERS
DOOR HANDLES i
CHROMIUM LOOSE-PIN BUTTS — 3y” x
BARREL BOLTS: Chromium 2” to 9” :

noid

4

sional people for the good of their country-

and many Other ITEMS of
men in Britain, says:



“TOLD PLENTY OF JOBS” :
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTy.,, §

C.S. PITCHER & COQ

Phones: 4472 & 4687

“Many coloured people have made good in
Britain. They have settled down in jobs and
are earning good wages, But it must be ad-
mitted that some of the stowaways are a
source of anxiety to the League.

“As a rule the men come from the West
Indies and West Africa in good faith—they
have been told that jobs are plentiful and
wages high. But difficulties arise from the
fact that some of them have no conception
of trade union rules.”

Other authorities, however, pointed out
that local officials in the various West Indian
colonies are always warning would-be emi-
grants of the difficulties of getting work in|’
Britain except of a highly-skilled nature.
Every care was taken to make it plain that
unskilled jobs were far from plentiful.

Typical of the cases causing considerable
irritation is that of a stowaway who got
a fortnight in jail on arrival, then received
24/- a week national assistance money

plus 7/- lodging allowance—and goes on
drawing this and living without working at
all.




|

ag

<2 ae
.
Ay aid Fine Choco}
CADBURY’S CHOCOLATE BISCUITS—per tin
CADBURY'S CHOCOLATES—per box <...,.,,
TERRY’S CHOCOLATES—per box ....
TERRY'S CHOCOLATE BARSeach
KEILLER DUNDEE CAKE—each ......,
CARR’S CUMBERLAND FRUIT CAKE—each,
FIGS—per pkt. ;
CANDIED PEEL—1-16 pkt. ............) q
CARR’S CHEESE CRISPS—per tin ..,
ODEX SOAP—per cake

“COCKADE” Fine RUM i

poy )











COLOURED COLONY

West Indians of this type tend to congre-
gate around the Tottenham Court Road area



STANSFELD, SCOTT &

CO, LI





they have practically monopolised, now ad-

vertises itself as “London’s Harlem.” Police

PREPARE FOR THE 60



and welfare officers report that there is little
vice in this community despite rumours to
the contrary.

Mr. Mitchell advocates tightening the stow-
away regulations, adding:

“I am in favour of repatriating stowaways
who at least cannot show credentials or a



good record and high character. Next to es

is accommodation. The real need is for hos-
tels for Coloured people—cultural and recre-

ational centres to keep them off the street
corners,”

British Council and Colonial Office people |

concerned with the welfare of these men
find however, that the majority dislike the
idea of hostel life and prefer to live privately,
even if in inferior conditions—-B.U.P.

Booker Bros: Sugar & Freights

; LONDON, (By Mail).

The Financial Times commenting on the
new West Indies freight rates, says: |

“One of the companies known to stock
markets which should benefit is Booker
Brothers McConnell & Co. This old-estab-
lished business it dates back to 1833—has
two vessels plying between this country and
British Guiana. Rising costs have been cutting

into shipping profits and made the advance in
freights necessary.

“The interests of Booker Brothers McCon-
nell are in the news, too, in another direction.
Talks between the Ministry of Food and the
West Indian delegation for a new long-terni’



Sugar contract, have been resumed. These|||__.

talks ran into heavy weather recently, as
the delegation regarded the Ministry’s offer
as inadequate, and the possibility of a break-
down in the negotiations was mooted. As the
Booker sugar estates account for 75 per cent
of the British Guiana Sugar output, the com-
pany has a large financial stake in the out-
come of the talks.—B.U.P.





y Years in Bdos



To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—I feel that many of your
readers must have . encountered
Dr. Senn in his innumerable expe-
ditions around Barbados. In par-
ticular he ed almost every
water well in the island and had,

a colleague whose dutiful atti-
tude toward their science prom-
ised many more valuable contri-
butions,

Following preliminary studies
at the universities of Neuchatel

and accepted employment with
the North Venezuelan Petroleum
Company, Ltd. In the years from
1927 to 1932 he, together with
others, explored a large part of
she geologically little known
central eastern Faleén in Vene-

again in the Caribbean region but
this time engaged in qa v y
detailed Seological survey of the
island of Barbados on behalf of
the British Union Oil Company.
During the war the Colonial

ment of the Oceanic formation
and tried to fit the geological
history of Barbados into that of
the Antillean arch,

The commercially engaged
petroleum geologist is generally

Alfred Senn. He was a joyful,
helpful, open-hearted companion,
never dismayed by the vagaries
of nature. After days of tracking
through rain-soaked tropical for-
ests with pack mules and the

as a result, a wide circle of friends
and aecquaintences amongst the
planters.

Some of them may not be aware
of his untimely death which was
the indirect result of climbing up
and down the water wells, and,
others who already know may be
glad to read the enclosed memo-
rial written by his colleague and
friend Dr. Kugler:

“On the Ist July, 1949, Alfred
Senn would have celebrated his
50th birthday had he not suc-
cumbed on the 29th of January
from the after-effects of a minor
operation when seeking strength
: in his beloved Grison Mountains
: of Switzerland. He left behind his
devoted wife and their two daugh-
ters,

pings of a

called him

pe ' : eMoncinal fact serge. Se cade
~
en ae —~






Like many

vocation in
SO poor in

Among his many friends are
Seologists in all parts of the world
who deplore the untimely loss of

followed
pioneer

the
among

and Paris, it was at the alma mater
of his hometown
Alfred Senn finally matriculated
for the study of natural sciences
with preference for geology. Under
the inspiring guidance of Profes-
sor A. Buxtorf he gained promo-
tion with an excellent thesis on
seology of the area between Mend-
risio and Varese at the southern
foot uf the Alps and then, heed-
ing his teacher’s advice, he started
with the detailed geologi«al map~
part
faulted Jura Mountains, a task he
had just completed when death

cannot make a living from their
their
mineral re
So full of geologists, Alfred Senn

Seologists, Professor Carl Schmidt,

zuela. His keen interest in
exploration work, especially his
unflagging energy in applying
paleontology to stratigraphic prob-
lems, was instrumental in secur-
ing for the first time Positive
results in the zoning of Tertiary
sediments of Venezuela with the
aid of smaller foraminifera. True
to his training, he also made use

use of Senn’s

Basel where

nical problems,

bados”
bution

value

succeeding in correlation of sedi-











Development and Welfare made
water supply and other geotech-

“Geological Investigations of the
Groundwater Resources of Bar-
is an outstanding contri-
to the literature of West
Indian water supply and of great

_to the island of Barbados.
‘ 1, ) In his paper dealing with the
of the remaining fossils, thereby “Paleogene of Barbados and its
Bearing on History and Structure



knowledge for

His report on couraged from

paleontological

science.

left with little time for scientific
publications; nay,

such. All the more it is to the
credit of Alfred Senn that he
spent much of his spare time in

study of literature, and prepar-
ations of graphs which allowed
him to make contributions to our

bare necessities for camping, he
still was prepared to carry his
load if it meant reaching a
geologically unexplored region
where no pack animals could
follow. He Wwaquld discuss the
daily problems when stretched
in his hammock, slung between
two trees, and would not lose his
humour when a nocturnal down-
pour forced him to hide field
book and maps under his body

he is often dis-
contemplating

investigations,

ete of ee ean of 8 ; y 4 But science alone could not ' Save them from being soak
of the block- On Gece hae ‘B aye: want whan a a can eae at ‘work “en eto tal when me
se — ere = P sia Se ae Vol. 24, 1940) loving mind, coupled with a 2* Work come to talk of their
pewie Franchise tes Perens aoe & ed ym Srst modern longing te improve his skill in patie eee feelings and it was
carry out investigations feavenet® port on ~ r- ange «frology. mountain climbing and skiing in cs ‘hat one found Alfred Senn |
a ho “nd Morocco, where he found J. W. Wells, and M. de Cizansourt ocr ‘©, maintain a well trained {0,¢ 2 Sensitive thinker, a deeply
young Swiss who ctratisraphic i. eee dk ae Wave , e5 zancourt body. It was, however, in the th ec: man whose interest in
respe like Se in Venezuela Senn in edtenies Tn pee, So fleld of exploration and in the Skee ts oe family and oy"
lt yl alls piiction Satin Se oo -_ “o ‘ na subse- camp where he showed his true 3 gnter future for mankind |
ources and in these ¢ a a paper on “The Geology of mettle, for where men are forced “@S his ever present concern.”
R,% non two countries, Barbados and the Morphogenesis to live and work together under C.S LEE
eee, ee vay, ; \ poe tee Sep. S the Neighbouring Submarine adverse conditions, their inherent Airy Hi)l, hil
Sour’ cibreioae roitolds for purposes Veo nee _ (Ee, Geol, Helv. characters reveal themselves, OO Oi ii
oa tei hina eas oe teas he discussed the Under such circumstances there ~ reorge,
eae senn Nature and depositional environ- was no better comrade than Barbados.

1 1 #99966:












Now in Stock...

WHITNEY ALL-WOOL BLANKETS (Si
Colours; Pink, Gold and Fawn at
White at $7.20

COTTON BLANKETS (Sizes: 70” x 90”) i

DACOSTA & CO, LTD

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT, —



——

69996545

LO0K AT TH

FINE

SPECIA
GROCERY _ DEPT.






IN OUR MEAT DEPT. —

LAMB |} VEAL CHOPS

OX TONGUES

Xx c LS
OX TRIPE | a5 *
BEETROOT CARROTS
BEANS CABBAGE

GODDARD}

699

oS GOOo 66
SSS9S99: 99SS9S99990999909

a

4


ms.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1950
Merchants Agree
To W.I. Conference

On Devaluation

MEMBERS of the Council of the Chamber of Commerce
at their meeting yesterday, expressed themselves in favour
of holding a conference on Government level with full
commercial representation, to consider the effect of
devaluation in the West Indies. They consider, however,
that the time is as yet not ripe and therefore it should
not come about before three months’ time when one



would have a better picture of the state

This was one of the matters
raised in a letter received from
the President of the Incorporated
Chambers of Commerce of the
Caribbean area. In the letter he
suggested Trinidad as a likely site
for the conference should it be
desired.

The Council expressed full
agreement adding their sugges-
tion about the time.

The Secretary was instructed
to reply accordingly and mean-
while a committee from the
Chamber will interview the Co-
lonial Secretary in regard to the
matter,

Landing Facilities For
Tourists

A letter from the Colonial Sec-
retary was read in reply to one
from the Chamber which had
asked the Government to allow
their water boats to be used for
jthe landing of tourists on the
Mauretania, due to arrive on
January 21,

The reply was that insofar as
was practicable and necessary for
the water boats to assist, arrange-
ments would be made for them
to do so.

Members expressed the view
that. this was somewhat vague.
They considered if it was desir-
blethe agents should have some
guarantee that the conveyance of
passengers from the ship to the
land would be facilitated to the
greatest extent possible. Lack of
proper landing facilities had, in
the past, prevented such ships
from coming to the island and
this was certainly a very regretta-
ble state of affairs.

They thought the time had come
that Government should be asked
to purchase some suitable craft
which could be used to help in
such cases. It would be no waste
of money as such craft could be
used for other purposes as well.

The suggestion was made that
it might be well to purchase the
Nina for the purppse.

The Secretary was asked to
forward the Council’s suggestion
to Government.

Landing Difficulties

Mr. Trevor Bowring told the
members how on Saturday a
launch with about forty passen-
gers and on which he happened
to be aboard, was.held up at the
landing place at the Baggage
Warehousé for about an hour be-
fore the passengers could be
landed.

Reason for this, he said, was
because at the time two lighters
discharging baggage were occupy-
ing both berths along the landing
place. Some of the more agile
passengers effected a landing in
a shorter period by climbing from
one water boat to another and
then jumping on to the land.

A policeman was called but it
did not appear that he was in a
position to do anything.

He thought this state of affairs
was a bad advertisement for the
island. Indeed some of the pas-
sengerg who were visitors had
said that such a thing would not
have occurred in Trinidad.

Members after discussing the
matter decided to write the Har-
bour and Shipping Master asking
him to take appropriate action,

of things.

Air Maii Rates

A letter from the Colonial Sec-
retary stated that it is proposed
to send air mail to the United
States and Canada at rates con-
siderably lower than was now in
force, by use of a route which will
provide a service slower by ap-
proximately 24 hours than the ex-
isting service.

_He was requested to ask the
view of the Chamber as _ to
whether in the event of the intro-
duction of the cheaper and slower
service it would be necessary to
retain the present one.

Members of the Council were
of the opinion that frequency of
mails were of great importance to
business and the slower service
might entail the necessity of send-
ing cablegrams which under ex-
isting circumstances might be
avoided. They considered tha
the present service should be re-
tained for at least another six
months.

Another letter from the Colo-
nial Secretary pointed out that
the Secretary of State for the
Colonies had received the Resolu-
tion of the Chamber with regard
to the sugar negotiations between
the U.K. Government and the
B,W.I. Sugar Producers’ Asso-
ciation delegation. The Secretary
of State, he stated, had asked to
say that he would keep in mind
the views expressed in the Reso-
lution,

St. Kitts Sugar Crop
Prospects Good
—SAYS TREASURER

St. Kitts had a very good sugar
crop last year and there are very
good prospects of getting a better
crop this year, Hon’ble W. 0.
Peters, Treasurer and Comptrol-
ler of Customs of that colony
told the “Advocate” yesterday.

Mr. Peters came in over the
week-end by B.W.I.A. for the
Customs Talks and is staying at
the Marine Hotel,

He said that the island de-
pended mainly on sugar for its
economy and had one of the
most efficient sugar factories in
the Caribbean area.

They were looking forward to
the installation of the electrical
system and there were also
plans for public health, public
works and_ educational pro-
grammes which would form part
of the colony’s expenditure for
1950. St. Kitts is served by
British West Indian Airways and
K.L.M. Dutch Airlines. It is
linked up with the other Carib-
bean colonies and is one of the
busiest shipping centres in the
Leeward Islands.

The oldest British colony in the
West Indies, St. Kitts is a delight-
ful place for tourists. It is very
beautiful and clean and there are
places of historic interest like
Brimstone Hill and St. Anne's
Church, Middle Island, the burial
place of Sir Thomas Warner,
founder of the first British colony
in the West Indies,





In Carlisle Bay

IN PORT:—. Yaw) Potick, Aux. Ketch
Leander, Sch. Molly N. Jones, Schooner
Manuata, Sch, Philip H. Davidson, Yacht
Maya, Yaw! Stortebecker, Sch. Sunshine

R., Sch. Mary M. Lewis, Sch, Alexan-
drina R., Sch. Frances W. Smith, Sch,
Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Emanuel C,
Gordon, Sch, Reginald N, Wallace, Sch.
Mandalay _ II, . Marea Henrietta,
Swedish Barquentine Sunbeam, M.V.
Lady Joy, Yacht Beegie, Sch. Princess
Louise, M.V, Aracosta, Schooner En-

deavour W,
ARRIVALS
Dutch S.S. “Ganymedes”’ 1,551 tons net,
Capt. Stevenfon, from Bahia, Agents:
8. P. Musson, Son & Co,, Ltd.




ARRIVALS—By B.W.LA.L,

From TRINIDAD: Geoffrey Webdale,
William Scott, Frank Sieverman, Kata-
Tene Sieverman, Morris Wexler, Ivan
Herreira, Hilda Alshop, Thomas Storrar,
James Best, Robert Bears, Annette Bears,
Hon. John Chandler, Edith Chandler,
Doris Scott, Cynthia Thomasos, Inez
Hinkson, Diana’ Giuseppi, Undine Giu-
Seppi, Neil Giuseppi, John Parkinson,
Lorna Alleyne, Jeanne Alleyne, Bruce

pe, Arthur Smith, Imogene Smith,
Hyacinth Yowchind.

From BRITISH GUIANA: Mr. Regin-
ald Stone, Mrs, Evelyn Stone, Miss Carol
Stone, Mrs, Rose Stone, Miss Louise
Stone, Master Raymond Stone, Mr.
Charles O'Donnell, Mr, Collin O'Don-

» Mr. J, Robertson, Mr. E. Texeira,
Mr. N. Whitehead, Mr. Everad D'Abreu,
Mrs, Evelyn Reid, Dr. D. Atchan, Mr.
Robert Bangaroo, Mr. R. H. Moore, Mr.

. Stir, ar ~

Schooner ‘Hazell Scott,’ 30 tons net,
Capt. Marks; from St. Vincent. Agents:

Schooner Owners’ Association.

Dutch S.S. “Ittersum,’’ 3,199 tons net,
Capt. Bakken, from Antwerp. Agents:
S. P. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd.

DEPARTURES
S.S. “Interpreter,” 4,027 tons net, Capt.
Coates, for Trinidad. Agents: DaCosta &

Co., Ltd.

Schooner “Laudalpha,’’ 60 tons net,
Capt. Gumbs, for St. Lucia, Agents:
Schooner Owners’ Association,

Schooner “Turtle Dove,” 82 tons net,
Capt. Sealy, for St. Vincent. Agents:

Schooner Owners’ Association,

—,

J. Walrond, Mr, C. D, Edghill, Mr. N.

DaSilva, Mrs, A. DaSilva, Mr, J. Bayley.

and Mrs, Daisy Seaton.
DEPARTURES—By B.W.LA.L.

For TRINIDAD: Mrs. Ruth Gordon,
Master Robert Gordon, Mr. Cecil Smith,
Mrs. Jean Templeton, Mr. William Tem-
pleton, Mrs, Charlotte Waith, Mrs, Mar-
garet Carew, Mr. Kjell Ovesch, Mr.
Gunnar Toisberg, Miss Kathleen Pape,
Mr. William Bell, Mr, Bernard Vander-
veen, Mr. Swetozar Schiskin, Mr. James
Johnson, Miss Iona Henry, Master Rich-
ard Bayne, Master George Bayne, Mrs.
Greta Bayne, Mr, George McLean, Mr.
Geoffrey Foster, Mr. Paul Foster, Mr,
Clarence Patterson, Mr, Peter Patterson,
Mr, Alfredo Seigert, Mr. Jacques Cor-
bell, Mrs. Fernande Corbell, Mr. John
Grace, Mr. Harold Bannister, Mr. Thom-
as Yearwood, Mr. Reginald Eckstein, Mr,
Cecil Crawford, Mr, Stanley Niccolls,

IN TOUCH WITH BAKBADOS COAST STATION

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd,,
Advise that they can rfow communicate
With the following ships through their

is Coast Station:—

S.S. Hindanger, 8.S. Rufina, S.S
Port Napier, S.S. Planter, S.S. Regent
Jaguar, S.S, Turicum, S.S. Nidarland,
8.3. Fort Amherst, $.S. Ganymedes,
S.S. Regent Leopard, S.S. Canadian
Challenger, S.S. Monrosa, S.S. Sheaf-
mead, S.S. Esso Glasgow, S.S. Paparui,
S.S. Del Sud, S.S. Utrect, 5.8. Tresus,

-S. UNragaz, S.S. Meline, S S. Adula.

The Weather







TO-DAY

Sun Rises

Sun Sets

Moon (New) January 1

High Water: 10.33 a.m., 11,28 5
Lighting 6.30 p.m.
YESTERDAY

Rai



S.S. Mormacsurf, S.S. Esso Pittsburg,
S.S. Ranghild, 8.S. Antartic Ocean,
S.S. S. Rosa, S.S. Nieuw Amsterdam,
8.S. Monte Ayala, S.S. Rio Araza, M.S.
Carona, S.S. Mormacsun, 8.8. Jamaica.
S.S. Bergeland, S.S. Fortrichepanse
S.S. Camedian, S.S. Borgny, S.S. Sea-
breeze, S.S. Vestvangen, S.S. Hood
River, S.S. Hecuba, S.S. Esso Den Haag,
S.S. Mormachawk, S.S. Cavina, S.S,
Regent Hawk, S.S. San Vulfrano, 8.S.
Repton, S.S. San Velino, S.S. Empire
martaban, 8.8. Corrientes, 8.5. Telamon.
S.S. Norness.

17 miles per hour
3.058 (3 p.n

Wind Velocity
Barometer (9 a.m.)
2.970

What’s on Today

t 16.00 a



Cou

Kensingto



LOCAL NEWS

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





M.V. AROCOSTA which arrived here on Monday bringing four truc



Waterworks
Scheme Not
Good Enough

Says Board Of Health

The General Board of Health
does not think that the verms of
agreement by the Waterworks to
supply water are good enough for
the Board to give approval for
division and sale of land for
building purposes

Members of the Board led by
the Chief Medical Officer express-
ed dissatisfaction at a meeting
yesterday when vhey discussed an
application by Mrs, J. D. E. Year-
wood for division and sale ot
26,776 square feet of land in
four lots at the Pine for building
purposes, but the Board finally
approved Mrs, Yearwood’s appli-
cation.

_ Chase Attended

Major A. De V, Chase, recently
reNigned Clerk of vhe Board at-
tended the meeting. The Presi-
dent of the Board suggested that
Mr. Chase should be made a
member, since he had _ public
health matvers at his finger tips.

Honourable V, C. Gale, M.L.C.,
who was not present at the last
meeting of the Board took oppor-
Vunity yesterday to express his
appreciation of the expert man-
ner in which Major Chase had
always carried out his duties. He
wished him a happy retirement.

The Commissioners of Health
wrote the Board complaining
abouv the insanitary condition of
Btandpipes in St. Joseph. The
Clerk of the Board replied to
them that according vo the Public
Health Act, they (the Commission-
ers) were responsible for keeping
the pipes in a sanitary condition.

The Board yesterday deciatd
that the Clerk should write ae
Commissioners again, re-inform-
ing them of their responsibility.
The Clerk is also to suggest to
them that they should send down
the report, of their own inspectors
on the matver,

Other Applications

Other applications for division
of land granted yesterday were
as follow:—

Division and sale of land in lots by
Mr, Wm. N. Alleyne at Amity Lodge,
Christ Church, Re loss of plan

Division and sale of land in lots at
Welches plantation, St. Michael, by Her-
bert A. Watson and Edward H. Kirton.

Sale by Mrs. Florence Catlyn, of 6,024
Square feet of land in lots as already
divided and let in tenantry at Haggatt
Hall, St. Michael.

Division and sale of 90,365 square feet
of land in lots at Jacksons, St. Michael,
by Mr. Benjamin Gibson.

Division and sale of land in two lots at
Rockley, Christ Church, by Mr, W. D. L,
Warden.

Dividing two lots of land from the
Pine plantation, St. Michael, by Mrs,
J. D. E, Yearwood, for sale to Lieut.-Col,
Jos. Connell, Mrs. J. D. E. Yearwood
having divided off other lots within the
current twelve months.

Dividing one lot containing 14,406 sq.
ft. of land with dwelling-house, from a
place called ‘Malta,”’ St. Joseph, for sale

by Mrs. Iris Weatherhead, she having
divided off another lot from the same
Property within the current twelve
months,

Relative to the division and sale of
land in lots at Welches plantation, St.
Michael, by H. A. Watson and E. H,

Kirton, the Board approved an alteration
of the approved plan by Mrs. D. S§.
Boxill by transferring 930 sq. ft. of land
from lot No. 95 to lot No. 93.

Division and sale of 55,893 sq. ft. of
land in 8 lots at Welches, St. Michael,
by Mr. Herbert A. Watson.

The Board did not approve an appli-
eration by Mr. W. I. Webster for an
alteration to an approved plan, relative
to the sale of land in lots at Carring-
ton’s Village. Mr. Webster wanted to
divide lot No. 151 of 2,325 sq. feet, plus
267 sq. feet in road into two lots.

If this division is done, each lot will
be too small to comply with the pro-
visions of the Public Health Act,

After considering an application for
division and sale of 157,281 sq. feet of
land in 55 lots at Howell's Cross Road,
St. Michael, by the Barbados Co-Opera-
tive Bank Ltd., the Board only approved
of lots 1—23. Consideration of the re-
maining lots was postponed so that the
position of a dump in the land could be
properly defined on the plan.

Also postponed was consideration of
an application for the sale by Mr. Win-
ston Arthur Hassell of 17,308 sq. feet of
land in 10 lots as already divided and
let in tenantry aback of George Street,
in St. Michael.

Present were Dr. E. B. Carter,
(President); Honourable V. C.
Gale, M.L.C., Mr. F. Goddard,
M.C.P.; the Chief Medical Officer;
Mr J. Kidney; Dr. G. Emtage;
Dr. F..N. Grannum, Sanitation
Officer; and Mr, W. Abranams,
Chief Sanivary Inspector of the
Board.

Ignored Major
Road: Fined 10/-

A fine of 10/- and 1/- costs

be paid in seven days or in de-
fault seven days’ imprisonment
was imposed on Richard Brat
waite of Parish Land, Chi
Church yesterday | H WwW
ship Mr. H. A. Talma.

He was found guilty of driving
the motor lorry X—1089 on Wal
rond Street, a road to which a stop
Sign 1 placed andi =6failir to
entering the

ks for Graeme Hall Plantation,

*“AROCOSTA’’ BRINGS
FOUR TRUCKS

FOUR second hand trucks for Graeme Hall Planta-

tion, Christ Church, atrived
M.V. “Arocosta”.

on Monday by the Honduran

Mr. Morris Wexler, who is both owner of the planta-

tion and the
motor ear and



Autonomy For
Surinam Soon

Surinam will shortly have au-
tonomy in its own internal meth-
ods as the Bill has been passed
already by Parbament in J’nu
Hague, Dr. P. G. F. H. Van dex
brugn, Director of Economic Af-
fairs in Paramaribo told the
“Advocate” yeferday.

Dr. Van der rugh was an ar-
rival on Monday by B.W.1LA. via
Trinidad for three weeks’ holiday
in the interest of his health and
jis staying at the Hotel Royal.

He said that unlike Barbados,
Surinam was not over-populated.
The country, although about 20
times the size of Trinidad. only
had a population of 200,000.

Although their economy was
built on the production of the
mining of bauxite, yet the coun~
try had many possibilities of de-
velopment in the field of fores-

try, mining, agriculture and
transportation.
Owing to the lack of capital

and skilled labour up to the pres-
ent moment, very little progress
had been made, but Government
was pushing forward with all the
available means to improve the
possibilities for economic devel-
opment and for ine

Plans were being studied by
the respective departments 0!
Government for improvement ir
education and all kinds of sani
tary questions including the figh

4

eel
social upheaval of the ae

e

vessel, sent up the trucks along with his
asbestos piping from Trinidad.

o

This was the main purpose of
the “Arocosta’s” visit to Barba-
dos. After this cargo is\discharged,
the vessel will be loaded with ap-
proximately 300 tons cf scrap
iron as ballast.

From here it is expected to sail
for Martinique to load cranes and
trucks for British Guiana for the
handling of scrap iron there. The
scrap iron taken from here will
then be shipped back to Trinidad
where it will make a complete
load either for U.K. or U.S.A.

Mr. Cecil Benn, representative
of Mr. Wexler in the West Indies,
came up on the “Arorosta” to
supervise the loading and un-
loading of cargo here,

The “Arocosta” was last here
early last year when it took a load
of scrap iron for Puerto Rico. It
iS expected to leave port around
the end of the month. In the
meantime, minor repairs will be
effected at its berth.

Mr. Benn told the “Advocate”
that he experienced a fine trip up
although it was around the time
vessels were complaining of chop-
py seas.

When the “Arocosta” sailed
from Trinidad for Barbados, it
encountered a squall in the third
Bocus and was forced to return
to Porv-of-Spain. It finally left
Trinidad at midnight on Friday
and arrived Monday morning,



Dutch Ships Make
First Call Here

; Two Dutch steamships made
against mosquitoes. 4 eee Dutch ste amships made

They were not benefited byg St calls av Barbados between
tourism like Barbados, but the Tuesday and yesterday. The SS.

Government was trying to build:
up a scheme to develop the coun-
try with the help of the so-called

Welfare Fund which was given
by the Dutch Government and
amounted to 40,000,000 guilders.



’

Montserrat’s Hotel

- .

Accommodation

. e
Limited

Although hotel accommodavion
in Montserrat is limited, yet there
are a few boarding houses which
offer good service and everything
is pleasant, Honourabte D. R.
Walwyn, Treasurer of the colony
Yold the “Advocate” yesterday.

Mr. Walwyn is now over here
for the Customs Talks and is
staying at the Marine Hotel.

He said that the roads for
travelling were very good, the
country was well cultivated and
vhe chief industry was cotton.
The rainfall was generally good
and last year’s cotvon crop was
regarded as quite successful and
there was every prospect of a
good crop during 1950,

There was no air service in the
colony, but now that iv was in
the line of steamship communi-
cation, it was hoped that vhe
Customs Union will be of very
great benefit to the economy of
whe island.

The people of Montserrat were
very hospitable and visitors al-
ways enjoyed a delightful time
both from vhe point of view of
health and scenery.

Obituary —
Mr. Allan Perkins

THE death occurred at the
General Hospital after a short
illness on Sunday evening of Mr.
Allan Perkirs, accountant of
Messrs. Knigats Ltd. His funeral
attended by a large and represen-
tative gathering took place at
the Westbury Cemetery on Monday
afterncon.

Mr. Perkins was the second son
of Mrs. M. G. Perkins of Black
Rock and was one member of a
family well known in the business
houses of this City for generations,
His father was for many years
Floor Walker at Messrs. DaCosta
& Co., Ltd. one brother was
Manager of Barclays Bank, an-
other at Messrs. Jason Jones &
Co., and another now in South
Africa was in some other form of
business.

Mr. Perkins was quiet
those who penetrated that

found a

but
reserve
true and k geabie
triend

A car accide eal



us ovement as he
recovered
‘ractured

from

were

knee
i ense good

tir
ime N €



frie He wa



“Ittersum” arrived about 3.40
p.m. on Tuesday and at daybreak

yesterday the S.S. “Ganymedes”
dropped anchor in the Bay,
The “Ittersum,” 3,199 - ton

freighter under Qpptain Bukken,
brought here from Antwerp 3,120
bags of sulphate of ammonia.
From Amsterdam, it brought pack-
ages containing figs, fruit juice,
raisins, almonds, enamel and
‘wood ware, nails, bags, and piece
BOOMER am i ee

This vessel has been chartered
by the Royal Netherlands Steam-
ship Company from some other
Dutch Steamship Company.

S.S. “Ganymedes” arrived from
Buenos Aires with 11,044 bags of
linseed oilmeal. This vessel is a
1,551-ton freighter commanded by
Captain Stevenson. It arrived via
Bahia,

Messrs S. P. Musson, Son and
Company Limited are agents here
of both vessels.

“Athel Ruby”
Due To-day

Molasses tanker “Athel Ruby”
which is consigned to Messrs H.
Jason Jones & Co., Litd., is due
to arrive at Bridgetown to-day at
noon, The tanker is coming from
Trinidad to take another load of
vacuum pan molasses,

It was last here for a load of
molasses on Friday and sailed for
Trinidad Saturday,

Car Damaged

The front and rear fenders on
the left side of the car M—2419
were damaged when the car was
involved in an acciden’ with a
donkey cart on Bank Hall Road,
St. Michael, On Tuesday. The
car, which is the property of
Pauline Moore of Passage Road,
was being driven by her son Vin-
cent Moore at the time of the
acciden’, The donkey cart is
owned and was being driven by
Louis Browne of the Barracks
Road, Bank Hall,





Letters andRumours

THEY say that rumours are
flying. So are letters. Yesterday
a letter flew out of a car passing
on Bay Street, It was addressed

to Mrs, D. R. Young; No. 30 Har-
well Road, Sutton, Courtenay,
Berkshire, England.

It was picked up by a Bay

If the owner
2815 the letter can be

Street housewife.
will call
retrieved.

£2 For Bodily Harm

Carmen Alleyne was fined £2
to be paid in instalments of £1
per month by Mr. A, J. H. Han-
chell yesterday fur inflicting
odily harm on Albert Ince a
unor, of Greenfield on. Novem-

pi ent

Farmers’ Day |

To-day |

Cultivation and care of fruit}
trees, management and breeding |
of livestock and the control of |
plant pests and diseases will be
among the subjects discussed at
vhe third annual Farmers’ Day
at Groves Agricultural Station at |
1.45 p.m. vo-day.

The talks and demonstrations
have been specially prepared to
meet the needs of the particular







district and the function also
provides the opportunity for
peasant farmers and others in-

terested. with the opportunity of
meeting some of the _ scientific
officers of the Department of
Agriculture and discussing with
them matters of agricultural im-
portance.



Officers Leave For
B.W.LA. Plane
Inquiry
-IN TRINIDAD

Mr, S. A. Niccolls and Mr. D.
Mendes, operating officers at Sea-
well Airport for British West In-
dies Airways Ltd., left for Trim-
dad yesterday to attend an in-
quiry into the accident involving
the British West Indies ‘plane
R.M.A. St. Vincent which ran
off the runway at Seawell on
Friday.

‘ re .
Stove Missing
Steshen Millar of Waterford
Land, St. Michael, reported to
the police that his house at

Waierford was broken and enter-
ed between 6.15 am. and 4.30

p.m. on Tuesday. A stove and
other articles valued $8.85 are
missing.



Copra, Peanuts, Coconuts
Arrived Yesterday

A shipment of copra, peanuts
and coconuts arrived in the is-
land yesterday by the 30-ton
schooner “Hazell Scott” which
arrived from St. Vincent under
Captain Marks.

Messrs Schooner Owners’ As-
sociation are local agents.





& + }
25 Years Ago |
(Barbados Advocate, January
12, 1925)
CRICKET
Mr. Austin’s Team vs. Mr.
Kidney’s Team

THE first day’s play of this
match which was begun on Satur-
day did not prove as interesting
as had been anticipated.

Mr. Kidney’s team batting first
scored 96 for 8 wickets and de-
clared. Mr. Austin’s team then
went to the wicket and had mus-
tered 84 for 9 wickets when
stumps were drawn.

The wicket had been impaired
by rain and consequently there
was no tall scoring and play was





slow and somewhat tame, Of the
batsmen L. O. Wood played a|
good innings for 25 runs, before |
being nicely caught by Griffith |
right on the boundary, while G.
Challenor showed himself once
more the outstanding batsman in |
an innings of 34 which was not |
brilliant but very sound.

The bowlers made the most of |
the damaged state of the wicket
and had the batsmen in difficul- |
ties most of the time. |

For Mr. Austin’s team K. Mason |
bowled exceedingly well and took
three wickets for 32 runs, while |
the quality of Greaves’ bowling |
cannot be fairly judged from the }
figures, |

In Mr. Kidney’s team Dr, Skeete
distinguished himself with the |
leather taking 6 wickets; E. L. G. |
Hoad captured the remaining
three,
_ L. O. Wood was allowed to bat
in place of L, R. Hutchinson and
J. M, Kidney did not bat.









PAGE







| Without a shadow of doubt





’
~ :





ves
Baek
ae




ie



i
yi



3888
st SUS TENT FROST

EPHEDROL

TRADE MARK

quickly relieves

COLDS and
CATARRH

It clears the nasal pas-
sages to remove stuffiness
and the distressing con-
ditions of head colds and
catarrh. The patent nasal
application bottle is infinitely better than spray
or dropper, and can be carried conveniently in
handbag or pocket without fear of leakage.

Made by CLAY & ABRAHAM LTD., Liverpool, England
Established 1813

Obtainable from all Drug Stores: *
KNIGHTS LTD., AGENTS & DISTRIBUTORS.

USE
MARTINI & ROSSI
VERMOUTH







A POT FOR EVERY

PURPOSE

In your garden

Priced at 4c, 8c, l4c, 18c, 24c,
48c, and 80c.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LID.

11,

10,







INTO 1950 WITH

FLYING
COLOURS

® More attractive frontal appearance

® Wider front seat
@®Larger headlamps

@Separate parking lamps

WYVERN 12 h.p.—4 cyls. — VELOX 18 h.p.—6 cyls.
(All Leather Upholstery — Fabric optional)

12 & 13, BROAD STREET



—
—







a.

Main New Features Include

@Improved steering

@ Larger tyres

@Wide range of scintillating new
Metallichrome Colours

fore

NEW SHIPMENT JUST ARRIVED
ge Your enquiries cordially invited

DIAL 4616 (ROBERT THOM Lid.) White Park Rd.

In d


COURTESY GARAGE


; PAGE SIX



HENRY






FUNNY !
‘ THE
TATTOOED WAN HANDED ME THE























fy WATCH AND RAN AWAY | 77 pvean
iz HE WAS
vit PWE!IRD!
‘
:
|
; Cape. 1949, Web Deney Poateasens
World Rights Rewrved |
ell ashe iabicing i-— a-capiinnslin
NO, BIPF. THOSE MEN THINK YOU'RE A KILLER,| | I DON'T KNOW WHAT TONTO HAD IN )
BUT WE CAN'T SHOOT THEM. THEY'RE OECENT| | MIND, BUT HE SAID,"“GET HORSES”
Soy TOWNSMEN. ;
>. . f j <0 ‘ 44
¥ 6 ’
4
Hy ea
Dh le
wr?r CVoaneuwesr ee THE VERGEANCE
ccc weetaD (I ee
2DIN CLOUDS MAY Lf S$i4'! WE'RE ArT
STOP STRIPEY SPOTTING wa ~ THE ~~ i... mn
.. ‘ AV FOREIGN WIRELESS. (/ SSM! THE MCGINK
sem A BP La pI Noe € { woun eure
$PEED-BOAT he VAR \. SKELP US
NOW, RENO? BY Quick! \/ a wo" s
“ : /, ( INSIOE Wo
f / VEZ.
fF 7 ers
4
|
: at
WHAT'S THAT 7? Ait ae ee
SOVEONE OFFERED KNOW BETTER tae RARED ey ERA
oot oed tea a THAN TO TREAT AN FELL Down | | “eeoTHeR? |
HIM LIKE THAT-- A FLIGHT _
OF STAIRS 4 | we |
ig
aA
j
a
"
ESP y @ PEELED
if SAID} WHILE YOU'RE var OUR EYE PEE
A BIG RED TRUCK,
PX PHONING THE POLICE, MISS MITCHELL
‘a8 Ze» ..T' HEADING FOR _
be =, THE HIGHWAY! 4
vty >

CATCHING HiIN A NET,
THEY RUSH HIM INTO A

a



er ne ee erent me

ODD' YOu NOTICE 'T GOBS

*TOCK TOCK” INSTEAD OF “TICK



SS77T
MATTER
























ON ThE ROAD FROM THE NORTH, 708}
COWDY AND MISS MITCHELL HUNT,
‘ e = " a

THEIR MISSION DONE, THE THUGGEE:
IN TYBORE® SUITE CLiM@ OUT
SILENTLY LIKE GREAT DARK SPIDERS 4«









BARBADOS ADVOCATE



BY CARL ANDERSON

PELIP! CUT IT OUT! WHAT'S THE



CHANCES |
TANDESS

GF THE SCORPION

THUS /§ Thee
98C HOME SERVICE.
MERE (S$ THE
WEATHER FORECAST
mw *OR TO-NIGHT AND





{ AN’ WHEN HE CAME
| TO -SOMEONE GAVE
HIM A GLASS OF
WATER -- AN’ HE
PASSED OUT AGAIN /!










GIRLIE? LET'S |
STO? FER A BITE
TO EAT... AN’ YOU
< CAN TELL ME
j <\ MORE ABOUT

IN YER RICH
\s S ABLATI VES!

ye



= r




THREW HIM«OUT OF THE
WINDOW ~ TEN STORIES ~THAT WAS
SUPPOSED To BE ~ ME++~





ecvnecus staal LLL LL:







Government May )eyaluation Deals West Indian
Students In Canada
Severe Blow

' *

_ Enqujre Into
-

| Film Law

LONDON (By Mail)

| ‘The British Government may

| start inquiries into the operation:
| of the law passed by the Jamaican
Government under which a US.
firm, Kingswood Films Ltd., is
given a monopoly to make films
in the island. A

Film interests in Britain are
waiting to see what effect the Jaw
may have on their plans and it ts
believed that the Colonial Office
has now decided to make further
inquiries about the law and its
possible future effect.

The Governor of Jamaica may
ce asked for a report on the mat-
ter,

Film authorities in London
ecently denied a reported Kings~
wood Films statement they had
secured priority for their films in
Britain. No priority is accorded
to any film in Britain and it
seems dubious whether films made
in Jamaica by a US. firm would
get any showing in Britain be-
cause of the Quota Act. ae



Oppose Increase
On Cotton Duty

BASSETERRE, (By Mail)
At a reeent meeting of the
Legislative Council Government
increased the export duties on
ectton shipped from St. Kitts to
3c. per Ko, lint. The export tax
on lint in the sister islands of

the Presidency Nevis and An-
guilla remains at Ic. per lb. This
liscrimatory legislation was
strongly opposed by the _ two

nominated members of St. Kitts,
but was carried by a major vote,
all elected members supporting
the third elected member for St.
Kitts, Mr. J. N, France, who
stated that cotton was grown
efficiently in St. Kitts by estates
who could afford to pay the tax
whereas it was grown by peas-
ants in the other islands and they
could not afford to pay it. It is
understood that the St. Christo-
pher Sea Island Cotton Associa-
tion intends protesting to the
Secretary of State against this
discrimatory legP lation, and pro-
poses sending copies to the parent
body and to its Advisory Com-
mittee in London.
—B.U.P

~ . .
U.S. Citizen Ordered
To Leave
.
Czechoslovakia
PRAGUE, Jan. 11,

The Czech Government ordered
this afternoon the Amerjcan Joint
Distribution Committee, an Amer-
ican-Jewish relief organisation,
which has functioned in Prague
since May 1945 to close its offices
in Czechoslovakia by the end of
January.

The Government at the same
time requested the departure
from Czechoslovakia by January
31 of Mr. Henry Levy, an Amer-
iean citizen, who since the sum-
mer of 1948 has been an official
of the American Joint Distribu-
tion Committee in Czechoslovakia.
_ The Czech Foreign Office in ask-
ing for the closing of the com-
mittee offices is understood to
heve intimated it considered that
the committee had completed its
function which mainly concerned
Jewish emigration relief for the
destitute and aged.—Reuter



Apology For A
Wound

a SINGAPORE, Jan. 10.
Terror ists apologised to a Sikh
nospital assistant after wounding
him and killing his driver, when
tney attacked a hospital jeep in
Central Pahang yesterday, the
Sikh told the Police to-day.
| —Reuter.

b .
Reports Denied
WASHINGTON, Jan. 11.

A State Department spokesman
\o-day denied reports published
in Germany that the United
States was trying to negotiate
Wich the Soviet Union a settle-
ment of East-West differences.

; He said neivher formal nor in-
formal negotiations between the
United Staves and Russia were
| S0ing on.—Reuter.





‘U8. Cut In
Rum Prices |

NEW YORK (By Mail)

U.S. rum importers have been
euthorised to amend fair trade
pricing schedules so that retail
prices may be cut, Mr. John
O'Connell, Chairman of the State
Liquor Authority has announced.

»He explained that although vhe
price postings for February have
already been made, according to
the law, because of West Indian
tariff reductions already made,
the excepvion is being made in the
interests of the consumer.

Puerto Rican and Virgin Island
rum prices will maintain sched-
uled levels. Both of these islands
are possessions of the United
Svates and'their products are not
subject to import taxes.—B.U.P.

3,200 Soldiers

Leave After
48 Hours Delay

MARSEILLES, Jan. 11

The French troopship Pasteur
(30,477 tons) held up for 48 hours
by a strike of the crew, left here
voday with 3,200 troops and
equipment for Indo-China.

The strike which led to clashes
yesterday between police and
railway staff, who came out in
sympathy. was settled.—Reuter.

.

Threat Of Hostile

Wages Campaign

LONDON, Jan. 11.

With the General Election only
six weeks away, British Labour
Leaders face the threat of a hos-
tile wages campaign by millions
of Trade Unionists.

Tomorrow aé_ conference of
Leaders of all 187 Unions affilia-
ted to the Trade Union Congress
will be asked to vote confidence in
the Labour Government’s
Economic Policy by foregoing all
wage increases for a year.

Three of the movements “Big
Six” Unions — the Miners the
Engineers and the Railwaymen—
have indicated their intention to
fight this policy of wage restraint.
Behind them, observers forecast
they may be able to mobilise
almost half of the eight million
members of the TUC.



—Reuter.

He “Knew Nothing”

NEW YORK, Jan. 11.

Dr. Jose Arce, former head of
the Argentine delegation to the
United Nations, said today that he
knew nothing about a report that
he would become Argentine Am-
bassador to Britain.

Dr. Arce was interviewed on ar-
rival by air from Buenos Aires.
He said he went home and re-
signed as head of the United Na-
tions Delegation to facilitate re-
organisation of the Argentine
Foreign Office.

“IT don’t know if
tion was accepted,”

the resigna-
he added
—Reuter.

Invitation Issued

s KARACHIN, Jan. 10.

Diego Luis Molinair, Chairman
of the Argentine Foreign Affairs
Committee, said here to-night
that on behalf of Senora Eva Per-
on, wife of the Argentine Presi-
dent he had invited the wife of
the Pakistan Prime Minister, to
visit Argentina —Reuter.

Favourable Conditions

For “Liberation''?

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan, 11.

A Chinese Communist broadcast
from Peking to-day said that
Communist victories in south and
southwest China had created fav-
ourable conditions for the “libera-
tion” or Formosa, “Hainan Island
und Tibet.

All the China mainland “with
the exception of Tibet” had been
brought under vhe Red Banner, it
claimed,

—Reuter.

For Your Insuran

West Indian students at uni-
versities in Canada find them-
selves in an extremely precarious
position as a result of the recent
aevaluation of the pound sterling.

Simultaneous with devaluation
came a sharp rise in the cost of
living in Canada, and many West
Inaians are concerned about being
able to complete their courses.
Those most severely affected are
of the graduating class of 1951, and
more particularly, students of the
class of 1950, who should graduate
next May, and who find themselves
in. sight ,of the Promised Land
with their chances of completing
the journey threatened,

The West 'mdian Society of
McGill, representing about 200
students from the West Indies and
British Guiana enrolled at McGill
and Sir George Williams College,
are petitioning the respective Colo-
nial governments for aid. Under
the presidency of Mr. Eric A.
Valere, engineering student from
Trinidad, the Society brought
their plight to the notice of the
University authorities. The
Registrar indicated that
the Board of Governors
were fully sympathetic towards
all students from sterling areas in
the difficult position in which they
found themselves, and were study-
ing ways and means of alleviating
the keenness of the situation.
However, the problem of the West
Indians could not be considered
separately He readily gave hf!
support to the petition.

Special Scholarships

At Dalhousie University, Hali-
fax, there has been set up a group
of scholarships for sterling areas
students affected by devaluation.
This scheme is an implementation
of a decision of the fourth annual
conference of the International
Students’ Service held recently in
Montreal. The 1.8.8. Committee
on the Dalhousie campus took
immediate steps to raise the funds
for setting up these scholarships,
and got permission to hold a tag
day.

In view of the fact that at
McGill, Dalhousie and _ other
Canadian Universities the students
from other sterling countries
greatly outnumber West Indians,
there is little probability that
many West Indians, if any, will
benefit from these schemes.
Nonetheless they show the extent
to which the Canadian populace is
willing to help.

The members of the West
Indian Society of McGill, fired ar
they are with the desire to con-
tribute to the progress of their
homeland, and knowing that this
progress is intimately bound up
with their being qualified, are
hopeful of a favourable and tan-
gible support from their respec-
tive governments in particular,
and the West Indian populace at
large.

Defendants Plead
Guilty



BELGRADE, Jan. 10.
The first four defendants in
the Skoplje-Spy-Trial pleaded
guilty to-day to the charges

against them. They together with

six others, half of them Yugo-
slavs and the other Albanian
citizens, are accused of espion-

age, subversion and terrorism on
behalf of the Pro-Kominforim
Albanian Government,

—Reuter.

Commission Meet

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 10.

The United Nations’ Commis-
Sion on Eritrea, set up by the
Assembly to ascertain the wishes
of the Eritreans to the future
status of their country, met for
the first time here to-day in a

closed session,

—Reuter.

Formosa To
Undercut Cuba

HONG KONG, (By Mail)
Formosa is to export sugar to the
United States for the first time,}
at about 125 dollars (U.S.) nan

ton, five dollars cheaper than
Cuban sugar.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 1 yy, :
a.




Appeal Cours
Postpone Decision

The Court of a : 3
postponed until January et,
cision in a case resulting 4 x
an order for a foreclosure
a? a



Ta nt
smith,” St. Philipy ‘etn ie
roods, two perches of land te Ge F

Mr. H. Adams, ings je
by Messrs. Hute' * Fi
field, represented M. net) +
and Mr. E. K. Waelogy ua ee â„¢
ted by Mesevs "9 wea tet ©
Boyce, appeared for Dp 4%
Kirton of Barrows, tal .
against whom {| li
made. * We F

Mr, Adams held that eM
proceedings in tha Court oat)”
cery dealt with the 6 le ee

a

which formed the



dispute, it was but Fight th oF
whole proceedings shoyig 4,
ferred back to the Court of aA. b

r. Waleott tolg noneabien: 3
as the Registrar- » Mt

not put Mr. Taylor in poser
and had nov given him @ eons
ance, Mr. Taylor had ng in.
standi in the court, “ae

The Registrar-in«Ch;
vendor was .the fit

in pif 4
1 en
bring the claim.



Truman Has Do a "4
About U.S. Budge
LONDON, Jen, Jp,

The U.S. -Budget isn’t neq
unbalanced as it
Britain’s and mest other eoy
budgetary methods, {t, .
probably show a si . Tw
himself, hinted, doubts
is unbalanced enough to dijpes
U.S. business against deflation:
factors, which may ap

where, :

Including Trust Funds, ‘
Treasury's deficit in ‘et
ending June, 1951 ig
forecast to be 2,700 instead of | .
ostensible budget deficit of $j) F

Truman's Budget Message jy)
Section on Social Insurance ya.
terday was almost identical wi!
the wording of the correspondiy)
passage in Britain's ip
report but budget Lure i
cludes 5,600 for capital
ments. ‘

On the current account the J)
Treasury will have a cash i
sufficient to finance about halt ¢
its capital budget. Most be
countries would regard
strict ov even deflationary budg

ing. —Reuter.
Revie,
Cruel Hoax

Swe

ao

prs

a



WOLVERHAMPTON, Jan, 1
The parents of fi ;
Samuel James , migaing
from lis Wolverhampton hom.
since Xmas Day, were believi
to have been the victims of
cruel hoax. 4:
They received an anonyméb
letter yesterday deman 0
if they wanted to see thelt si
alive. They were told vet

the money to a London Pow Gt >
ie ne “4, Me. Rushvon.” &
ut the Wolverhampton }
after sending inquiries to Landa
said to-day they |
a hoax. The boy ;
standing in the 0
car on a canal bridge neat
verhampvon, *
in tight fitting clothing and
bed “feet” were to a
day to seour the bottem
canal,

oF. 24

=>

|

10 Injured In
Italian Strikes

ROME, Jan, fl

Police intervened to-night
disperse an unautho rz.
cession of thousands a
demeactreting. Saka the Uy
ernment in centre P
i

“if



The demonstrators ps
ously attended a meet y
Piazza Del Popolo to m
ate six workers ki by I
fire on Monday during
Modena in Northern Italy.

The Senenetees
through police cordons mh 6
main streets and marched a
columns to the Piazza Golem
outside Parliament, to the
Government Palace of ,
inale. /

Police touring the tro oe
in jeeps detained a number’
demonstrators singing the "We
Flag’ and shouting “Down Wi
the Government.” About ten
ple were slightly injured. . |

—B.U.P. {i

Agents for

The National Employers Mutual General |
Insurance Association Ltd, London.

Protect yourself against the risks of

Fire, Hurricane, Earthquake, Sea Wave, |

Riots and Commotion,

Workmen's Compensation

OT

Insure Your Motor Car.

ces consult,

A. 8S. BRYDEN & SONS (B’dos) Ltd.

a


THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1950
ss a teeeedenclebiles

CLASSIFIED ADS.






i:













Week Sun.
| ANNOUNCEMENTS Ss Sa HOUSES
i foR SALE per word Te Ww
5 . THE WOLD — Marine Gardens. un-
RENT » ad \ 02 og | ‘Urnished. Containing three bedrooms
FOR : bath and toilet upstairs. Drawing, dining
|) wANTED < ° aes kitchen and pantry downstairs.
arage, servants room in yard, room for
J LosT, FOUND per word a wo}? garden. Dial 810. Mrs. Stuart Bynoe.
timimum charge -- ‘ 5 8.1.50—3n.
ana SNeeeneeee
- puBLIC SALES The Offices in Shepherd Street recently
08 io | Occupied the Income Tax Com-
- ON & REAL missioner, Occupation on March Ist.
ucTl KNIGHT'S LTD.
ESTATE per agate line 10.1.50—5n.
FURNISHED FLAT—At
it 1,20 1.50! .. . Coral Sands,
Minimum charge .- Pv 1.20 Worthing Linen, and Silver. Good sed-
anes a . oe . P bathing, for further particulars. Dial
aie ni oon tani 8134. Alma Lashley. 10,1,49—t.f.n.
—_—_————
(Maxi een WORTHY DOWN—Top Rock, having 3
NBLIC N bedrooms each havi communicating
' os » toilet and bath. furnished, avail-
Per agate line .. Pr “an 0 able on monthly tenancy from the 15th
nimum charge .. . . ey), For further particulars apply:
Pp . Beard,
NING ADVOCATE (Monday) Phone 4683. ert Oe

par MOD ..vveeseeeess
CLOSING TIME

EK-DAYS:—2 p.m.
¥:—2.00 p.m. Friday

bene eeeeee



PUBLIC SALES







ALL items of different classification AUCTION

nust be set out in “eparate adverts, ee
HILLMAN SALOON CAR—10 h.p
Camaged in aceident to be sold by

DIED

BRATHWAITE,— HERBERT CRISPIN.

Yesterday at his residence, Barnes
Land, St. Matthias Gap, Christ
Church. Late Deputy Grand Master

of the Barbados District Grand Lodge
No. 1 of the Improved Independent
Order of Oddfellows’ London Unity.
His funeral will leave the Mechan-
f ies’ Hall, 118, Roebuck Street at 4.30
p.m. for the Westbury Cemetery. Re-
latives, friends and members of
kindred Lodges are asked to attend.

ESTELLE BRATHWAITE (wife)

and Family.

ERKINS—ALLAN CLIFFORD, son of
Mrs. Elizabeth Oxley Perkins of
Aberfoyle, Black Rock. His funeral

: took place at St. Michael’s Cathedral

/ on the 9th inst,



12.1.5.

IN MEMORIAM

IN LOVING MEMORY of our dear
Wife and Mother RUBY ELEANOR
HOPE who fell asleep on January 12th

i of sadness still come o'er us,

Secret tears do often flow,

For today has brought before us,

Sad memories of nine years ago
The Hope Family.

vy

2.1,50—1n



In loving memory of our dear wife
nd mother CATHERINE ANNE OXLEY,
ho passed away one year to-day.
“Gone from us but leaving memories
Death can never take away,
Memories that will ever linger,
Whilst upon this earth.”
Ever to be remembered by
OXLEY family.

FOR SALE

UTOMOTIVE

TRACTOR — One FARMALL “H”"

tor very little used in Al condition.
wner purchasing larger. Cole & Co.,
itd. 6.1,50—Jn.

CAR: Ford Prefect Car in perfect con-
ition 15,000 miles. Apply: Harold
featherhead, c/o Bruce Weatherhead.

11,1,.50—in

.
4

the

12.1.50—1n











USED CARS: Vauxhall 14 h.p. A-l
pndition. STANDARD 8 h.p. saloon
good condition. Courtesy Garage,
14610, 11,1,50—3n

1
LECTRiCAL

STOVE —G’E:C. with Gfill and
hermostatie® Control. Oven, in excellent
pndition, one year old $150,00 no offers.
. G., Bancroit, Seawell Airport. Phone
$2. . 12.1,50—Sn.

REFRIGERATOR—642 cubie ft. English

lectric, as new 1949 model, 5 years
- arantee, Price $450.00, on offers
wner leaving island. H. G. Bancroft.
pemmhone 8292. 12.1.50—4n

LIGHTING PLANTS: Climax Petrol
perated Generators 2.75 KVAâ„¢ 110/115
lolts—Orders now being placed for im-
diate shipment. Communicate with
ourtesy Garage, Dial 4616

11,1.50—3n

RNITURE

FURNITURE — Birch -drawing room
ite comprising (1) Settee (3 seats) ()!
lorris Chairs (1) Morris Rocker. All as
Ww with spring cushions, tapestry
pvered. (1) Dressing Table with long
rror (Modern). (1) Chest-of-drawers,
) Kitchen Cabinet (1) three tier-
der (1) small Birch table (2) Kitehen





ae

bles. All can be seen between 4—7 p.m.
i . G. Bancroft, Seawell Airport. Phone
te 92. 11.1,50—5n



STEEL OFFICE FURNITURE: Letter
d fools-cap size 4 drawer letter cabin-
is with locks; Bins suitable for hard-

stores or Garages, etc. Cabinets
ith Locks etc.—Courtesy Garage, Dial
1. 11,1.50—3n

IESTOCK

PUPPIES: Two (2) Wire haired Fox
riers pure bred, with Pedigree. Phone
5. 11.1.50—3n



ECHANICAL

TYPEWRITERS—A small quantity ot
ond hand Remington Typewriters now
ilable. Apply: T, Geddes Grant Ltd.

hone 4376. 8.1,50—62,

BICYCLES: Hercules Silver King, on

ms, all models, in green and in black.

Barnes & Co,, Ltd, Dial 4476.
13.11 ,.49—t.f.n.



:
;
a4
c

ISCELLANEOUS

TRUCKS & CAR TYRES: Various sizes
uding 30 x 5, 8.25 x 20, 5.50 x 17,
es advancing—secure at these prices

w—Courtesy Garage—Dial 4391.

11.1,50—3n

GALVANISED SHEETS: Best quality
and & lengths, $2.91 and $3.07 each.
4684, 4476. A. Barnes & Co., Lid
11,1, 50—t.f.n.

WASH BASINS & SINKS — at Shop

om, Hardwood Alley.
10.1,50—3n.

oa, TILES 6 x 6” White, Green,
nd ie, 12c each at Ralph A. Beard's
how Room, Hardwood Alley.

; 10.1,50—3n

1{16, 1/8, %, 5/16,

Auto Tyre Co
Dial 2696.
10. 1,50—t-£.n.

INGS—Galvanised pipe. All sorts
n % in. to 1% ins. Phone 4684

& Co. Ltd,
3.12.49—t.f.n.
GALVANISED SHEETS—6 ft., 6% {ft.,

Apply: Auto Tyre, Trafalgar Street.
2696. "5.1, 50—t fen,

SHEETS:
various sizes.

and
n ar Street.

ETS: BLANKETS—Here’s some-

you can't do without in the cold
leather. In various sizes and qualities,
$1.98 (Single Bed) up. Thanis
466, 42-53 Swan Street, Speights-

~ 11.1. 50—in



}

BOOKs: School Books of alf kinds at
ern High School, Ring 2846

12.1, 50—2r
CHAMOIS LEATHERS—New shipment
a ived. Price $2.01. Eckstein Brothers,
Pay Street. 12.1.50—3n

—

WATER HOSE—Dunlop Hose in sizes

Teet

$/8 in. % in. Eckstein Bros

Be
1.50---3





ream Deodorant hat





USstralia r1chudir
\ Auliflower Cabbs €
pauash and Bea :
mower Seeds
BPs, § Carmatio
PMight's Dr:

A lsc

z
if stores,



12.1.50. |°

auction at the Courtesy Garage on
Piiday 13th at 2 p.m. on instructions
received from the Insurance Co. DIXON
& BLADON, Auctioneers, Plantations
Building. 11,1.50—3n

SL

aie aor for sale by Public Com-
petition at my office Victoria Street, on
FRIDAY 13, at 2 p.m. the following:—

(1) 2640 square feet of land at Mahog-
any Lane with the wall building stand-
ing thereon. House contains closed
gallery, drawing, 2 bedrooms, usual out-
offices, enclosed yard,

1 Rood LAND at Thornbury Hill,
near the road leading to Wilcox Estate
in the parish of Christ Church, For
conditions of sale apply to: R. ARCHER
Mec KENZIE, Victoria Street. Dial 2947,

10.1.50—4n
Sue

THE AUCTION SALE of boats at the
Harbour Police Station was postponed
and will take place TO-MORROW,
12th January at 1 o'clock. These
boats are very suitable as sail, or
‘yassengers boat, or taking boat labourers
to and from the ships, there are three
boats and the sizes are (1) one 20 x 8
vverall by 5 beam (2) two 23 x 5 by 5
beam (3) third 21 x 5 by 5 beam. Your

\\inspection is invited any day on appli-

cation to the Harbour Police Station.



|
ae ee

|

|

D'ARCY A. ‘
Govt. Auctioneer,
Dist. “A”.

|



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Tuesday 17th by instructions
we will sell at “Whitehall, St.
Peter, a lot of Antiques and other
items, which includes:—

Candelabrae and _ candlesticks,
Epergne with Cut Glass Bowls,
Silvers, Large Waiver, Teapot,
Spirit Kettle &c., in Sheffield
Plate; Fruit Knives and Forks,
Spoons, Forks, Cream Jugs &c., in
Silver, Vegetable and _ Entre
Dishes, Cake Baskets, Fish and
Fruit Services in Plate, Copper
and Brass Ware, Temple and
Chiming Gongs, Bronze Orna-
menis, Napoleonic and Majolica
Plates, Cut Glass Decanters, Bowls
and Glasses; Very Beautiful Jap-
anese Cabinet inlaid with Mother
of Pearl and Gold; Old Mahogany
Liquor Case, French and Spanish
Chest of Drawers, Flat Top Desk
and Revolving Chair; Upholstered
Arm Chairs; Ceylon Screen in
Copper and Ebony; Brass Floor
Lamp; Telescopes, Field Glasses,
Baromevers, Suit Cases and many
other items of value,

Sale 11.45 o'clock — Terms Cash.

BRANKER TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers.
12.1.50—2n,



REAc ESTATE

“PIQUES VILLA”, Kent. Modern
coral stone house with approximately 144
acres land. Owing to its elevation and
position “Piques Villa” is cool and offers
enchanting views over wide expanse n{
coastline. Contains 3 bedrooms, lounge.
kitchen, large square gallery; below ere
servants’ quarters, toilets, storeroom:
and large garage. Reasonable offers
considered, DIXON & BLADON, Real
Kstete Agents, Auctioneers, Plantations
Building, Phone 4640, 11.1,50—In





Offers in writing are invited for 21,150
square feet of land situate in Sobers
Lane, Bridgetown, and having a frontage

| of 118 feet on Sobers Lane and at present



under tenantry,
For further particulars apply to the
undersigned.
CARRINGTON & SEALY.
Lucas Street.
7.1,50—6n

——

THE undersigned will offer for sale
by public Ruction at their office, No. 17,
High Street, On Friday the 13th instant
at 2 p.m.

The dwellinghouse called LANDSMERE
COTTAGE and land containing 11,960
square feet, Constitution Road, St. Mi-
chael, The dwellinghouse comprises —
ON THE GROUND FLOOR: Drawing
room and three bedrooms (one with run-
ning water), gallery, toilet and bath
UPSTAIRS: One very large bedroom;
IN THE BASEMENT: Dining room,
pantry, kitchen; Seperate bathroom in
tard.

Government water and electric light
installed,

Inspection any day except Sunday
between the hours of 4 p.m, and 6
p.m. on application to the owners, the
Misses Lynch on the premises

For further particulars and
of sale apply to :

, CATFORD & Co.
Solicitors.
7.1,50—5n.

—_—
THE undersigned will offer for Sale, at

conditions

d prices at Ralph A. Beard’s Show] their Office No. 17, High Street, Bridge-

town, on Friday 13th day of January
1950 at 2 p.m.
200 Shares in the West India Biscuit

Co,, Ltd. is aPaed
11,1.50—2n
cil liaabahaape tepid liiginaremnriant

The undersigned will offer for sale a‘
their Office No. 17 High Street, Bri
town, on Friday, 20th day of January
1950, at 2 p.m.

The messuage or Dwe House
called “PARKVILLE” and the land
thereto, containing 1,829 square feet

situate at White Park opposite The Bar-
bados Foundry. .
Inspection any day except Sundays
between the hours of 4 p.m. and 6 p.m
on application to the tenant Mr. Boyce.
For further particulars and conditions
of Sale, apply oo on «00
5,1,50—8n.

PROPERTY—At Station Hill. House
containing Modern conveniences, Apply
W. H. Bryan & C. M. Greenidge, Roe-
buck Street. 7.1.50—4n.

THE undersigned will offer for Sale at
their Office No. 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday 20th day of January,
1950 at 2 p.m. a

The Dwelling House cglied “ARNE,
jared the land theretd, containing 4,330
| square feet, situate at 9th Avenue
| Belleville,
| ‘The Dwelling House comprises Gallery,
| Drawing & Dining Rooms, 2 Becrooms,







ene with Dressing room and running)
ter in each, Breakfast room, Kitch-
ette, Toilet and Path
G installed Servant’s room anc;
. € Yard
Inspection x day except Sunday
ween the hours of 4 p.m. ar 5 pr
pplication on the premises Dia

r further particulars anc
le. ipply to

COTTLE, CATFORD & Co ¥



i Conditions| ir

PUBLIC NOTICES |

|





NOTICE

APPLICATIONS are invited for the
Pest of Organist of St. Philip’s Parish
Church.

Applications
Rector of St.
January.

shouki be
Philip by

sent to the
Tuesday 17th
11.1.50—2n



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. PHILIP

The following Vestrymen Were elected
for the Parish of St, Philip for the

year 1950.

Mrs. F. BE, DAYSH

Mr. A. G. FARMER

Mr. D. D. GARNER, M.C.P.

Mr. EB. LYTE,

Mr. E. lL. MOORE,

Mr. T. D. MAYERS,

Mr. A. T. SKEETER,

Mr. R. B. SKEETE,

Mr. H. L. SMITH.

Mr. R. S. WEEKES,

P. SCOTT,

12.1,50—1n Sheriff.











BOOKKEEPER/ACCOUNTANT: Serv~-
ices of experienced bookkeeper/Account-
ant required in Barbados. Advertisers’
own staff aware of vacancy which calls
for ability up to quarterly trial balance
standard, Knowledge Dry Goods busi-
ness and control of office personnel

Box 144 Bridgetown.
—_————————————$—————————T

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Edmund L. A.
Jules of Roebuck Street, St. Michael,
for permission to sell Spirits, Malt
Liquors, &c., at botteam floor of a 2
storey wall building opposite Comber-
mere School, Roebuck St. City.

Dated this llth day of January 1950.

To: H. A. TALMA, Esq.
Police Magistrate,
District “A”,
B. L. A. JULES,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A” on Saturday
2ist day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock

a.m. r
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate,
District “A’.
12.1.50—In



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Ivam Gibbs of
Passage Road, St. Michael for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c. at a
board and shingle shop with shedroof
attached at Baxters Road., City.

Dated this 10th day of January, 1950,
To: H. A. TALMA, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”,
IVAN GIBBS,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A”, on Friday
20th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock

a.m,
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate,
District “‘A’.
12.1.50—In



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Henry Thompson
of Eagle Hall, St. Michael, for permis-
sion to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c.
at bottom floor of a 2 storey board
and shingle building at Eagle Hall, St.
Michael,

Dated this llth day of January 1950.
To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A’’.
HENRY THOMPSON,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A” on Saturday
2ist day of January 1950 at 11 ofclock

a.m,
B. A. McLOD,
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
12.1,50—In





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
THE application of Eudine Beckles of
Eagle Hall, St. Michael ‘for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c. at
a wall building at No. 24 Tudor Street,
City.
Dated this 11th day of January 1950.
To: H. A. TALMA, Esq.
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
0, BECKLES,
for Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consid- |
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at}
Police Court, District “A’’ on Friday
20th day of January 1960 at 11 o'clock

a.m,
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate,
District “A’.
12.1,.50—In



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Eileen Grosvenor
of Church Village, St. Michael, for per-
mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c.,
at a bottom floor of a 2-storey board and
shingle building in Church Village, City
Dated this 1lth day of January 1950
To H. A, TALMA, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’’.
Signed ETLEEN GROSVENOR,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held ai
Police Court, District “A” on Saturday,
the 2ist day of January 1950, at

ll o'clock, a.m,
H. A. TALMA,

Police Magistrate, Si, “A.”
12.1.5



LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE

The application of Evangiline Alleyne

of Grosvenor Road, St. Michael, for
permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
&c., at bottom floor of a 2-storey wooden
building at Nelson Street, City.

Dated this llth day of January 1950
To H. A. TALMA, Eissq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. A’.

Signed E. ALLEYNE,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be he @ a
Police Court, District “A on Saturday,

the 2ist day of January 19580, at
11 o'clock, a.m,
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A.”
12,1,50--In.



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Cardinal T. Trot-
man of Richmond Gap, St. Michael, foi
permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
éec., at a stone building at Fairchild
Street, City.
Dated this llth day of Jafluary 1950
To H. A. TALMA, Esq,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’’.
Signed C. T. TROTMAN,
Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A” on Saturday,
the 2ist day of January 1950, at

11 o'clock, a.m.
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “A.”
12.1, 50—1n

Public Sales—Contd.






















BARBADOS ADVOCATE

LOST & FOUND





LOST

ERACELET: Silver Identification Brace-
let, engraved John Corbin. Suita
Reward. J. A. Corbin & Sons, 3848, Be!
mont Road. 11.1,50—2n



4

SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—
ing 1950, Series “C"’
please return to N. Layne, Demerara
Life Insurance Society over Collins Ltd.,
Broad Street. 12.1. 50—In.

PERSONAL

===

THE public are hereby warned agains:
giving credit to my wife SYBIL CAN-
DACE (nee Straker) as |
do not hold myself onsible for her
or anvone else contracting any debt or
debts in my name unless by a written

Spring Meet-
. Finder









EDUCATIONAL

CHRIST CHURCH BOYS’ FOUNDATION
SCHOOL.









]

CROSSMAN AND CO.,
SAY “KEEP LEFT’”’

LONDON, Jan. 11 employment and fair shares.

A group of 12 Leftist Labour |. Britain should initiaye new
Members’ of Psrliament today Proposals for the elimination, un-
published a new “keep left” man- der international control and in-
ifesto, which their leader. R. H. Spection, of mass destruction
Crossman described as “the way Weapons such as vhe atom bomb.
to win vhe General Election,” The only hope of German
The policy surprised political Democracy depends on prevent-
observers by the way in which it ing her remilitarisation,

keeps within the Party line, par-
ticularly in Foreign Policy, snes eee ng mo ae See en "ie
Crossman and others of the 12 Ger Sock oe
have been in the pasv severe crit- reads : eee te “ oe
Bevin, Porelen Secretary Ernest Deny of Western Germany and
Main deviations from the Gov- —— weeene cr
ernment include criticism of the ey eee See. that
Annual Defence Bill of £760,- Britain should scanned pose
000,000, which is considered ex- “all short cuts” to United Burope
cessive, and opposition to peace- by way of customs or currency
pe pelitery conscription. Seas ona weuaeine our
tae eee papas three Par- ¢4)) employment economy to the
Government Ministes â„¢ oer Pale we "eee
The manifesto says “We reject canes ee enmeaee
utterly the Russian exploitation Western Euro) me
of Communist parties and regimes Socialist pile for European in-
for extending the Soviet Empire.” tegration should include stand



World-Wide
Reaction To U.K.
Election Date

LONDON, Jan. 11.

The following reports from
Reuters correspondenis to-day
gave a picture of world wide re-
action to to-day’s announcement
that Britain will choose a new
Parliament on February 23.

Moscow, Pravda and orher
Moscow newspapers disinissed the
statement in five lines.

New York: The “New York
Times” warned Americans to}
“brace themselves” against “harsh |
comments to be thrown our way”
during the electoral campaign but
hoped such remarks would be
taken as “disputes among old and
good friends.” *

The “New York Herald Tri-

bune” praised as characteristic’
British fairness the Labour Party’s,
decision not to nationalise steel),as_unchallenga
until voters had been able to ex-}:

press themselves,

Sydney : “The Sydney Morning.

Herald” said the British people

must decide on “freedom or mas-',

sive control. A flexible empirical
system of government or a rigid

4

‘

iiss



It declares that a prime re-
sponsibility of British socialism

dollar commodities, international-

capital. investment, join’ bulk
purchase of scarce rouble and

isation of Western European



SHIPPING NOTICES

SLPOPPPS PEEPS SPOS





commendations from former school. Yo expose the fallacy “that

Guna =. = oe. See Rost: military strength is the sole bul-
‘St. Michael,’ | Wark against. Communism.

5.1.50—6n The first line of Democracy’é

lo
MALVERN ACADEMY
FREIDHEM, CHEAPSIDE,
THIS School will reopen. on Tuesday
i7th January at 9.30 a.m. New pupils
will be exemined on Monday 16th Jan-
uary at 9.30 a.m. Entrance Fee $1.20
F. L. MORRIS,

12.1,50—1n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Armintha Yearwood
of Spooners Hill, St. Michael, for per-
mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c.,
at a beard and galvanized shop attached
to residence at Spooners Hill, St. Michael.
Dated this llth day of January 1950.
To E A. McLEOD, Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’.
Signed ARMINTHA YEARWOOD,
Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A" on Saturday
the 2ist day of January 1950, at

11 o'clock, a.m,
f E. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A.”
12.1.50—In



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Cyril Walton of
Two Mile Hill, St. Michael, for permis-
sion to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at
a board and shingle shop with shedroof
attached at Two Mile Hill, St. Michacl.
Dated this llth day of January 1950.
To E. A. McLEOD, Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
Signed CYRIL WALTON,
: Applicant.
_N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A” on Saturday,
the 2ist day of Janyary 1950, at

11 o'clock, a.m.
: E. A, McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A.”
12.1.50—1n,

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Lineaus Augustine
Beckles of Six Cross Roads, St. Philip,
for permission to sell Spirits, Malt
Liquors, &c., at ground floor of a two
storey wall building at Pilgrim Road,
Be Ag a District “B’’.

is of ary ‘
To D. D. MORRIS. * + “
Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. “RB”.
Signed L. A, BECKLES,
licant.

N.B.—This application wil be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “B”,
the 23rd day of January

11 o'clock, a.m.
D. D. MORRIS,
Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. “B”
12.1.50-—-1n.

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Augustus Gittens
of Bay Street, St, Michael, for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at ‘ot-
tom floor of a 2 storey wall at
corner of Lewis Alley, Bay Street, City.

Dated this llth day of January 1950.
To: H. A, TALMA, * F

Police Magistrate,

District “A”.
AUGUSTUS GITTENS,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A” on Saturday

the 2lst day of January 19§0, at 11 o’clock
a.m,



H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
12.1,50—in.

SPP99SS SOS SOS POSS POPS SSE)
(In aid of a deserving cause)
at
Children’s Goodwill League
Hall Constitution Road
on
Sunday, January 22nd 1950,
a’ 4.30 p.m.
TICKETS 2/-, 1/6, 1/-
Obtainable at B’dos Dye

Works or at ithe Door. 3



x

LESS P PPPS





INCOME TAX NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Income Tax returns are re-
quired from every married man whose income is $1200.00 per annum
or over, from every other person whose income is $720.00 per
annum or over and from companies whether incorporated or unin-
corporated, societies, persons engaged in any trade or profession, and
owners of land or property whether a taxable inceme has accrued

during the past year or not.

Forms of Return my be obtained from the Income Tax Depart-
ment AFTER THE 1ST DAY OF JANUARY, 1950, and the forms
duly filled in must be delivered to me on or before the following

respective daies :
i.

1950.

1950.

Commissioner

NOTE: Any person failing to make his return within the due
date will be liable to a fine not exceeding £100 and

SS ss SSeS soneesesnesssvseels seen serene gsm sneer
a

|

GOVERNMENT

Returns of persons whose books were closed on the 3lst
day of December, 1949, on or before the 3lst day of March,

transport with a single Pan-Euro-
pean Airways Corporation.

defence must be a policy of full —Reuter.

ee

The Colonial (ilo Pext
Dollar Loan Oils Bright

LONDON, Jan, 11
WASHINGTON, (By Mail)





i _ Now that General Election date
ere is no deviation in the is Known, further period of un-
non-financial covenants required certainty in the London Stock
by the International Bank from Exchange appears cervain, Trading
those in standard banking proce- today was small and most markets
dure and information on them Colourless, with British Govern-
could have been available to the Ment stocks barely steady around
Colonial Development Corpora- Previous closing levels.
tion through the British repre- Bright feature in ovherwise
sentative on the Board of the dull oil market was produced by
International Bank, says Mr, gaining one shilling in Ultramar
Eugene Black. president of the oil at sevem and three. Small
Bank, buying and cessation of recent
Mr. Black added that he did selling was responsible for the
not know the exact reason why advance.
negotiations with the Corpora- Leading industrials were sveady
tion for a dollar loan were broken for most part of the day, but
off some heaviness was seen at thé
T do not know whether the close. Movements, however, were
Corporation had this information {small and prices never “yeally
when they began to negotiate,” tested,
he said. “As far as I know the Hopes of an early Peace Treaty
British representative on the with Japan, and the possibility
Board of the Bank has not ob- of resumption of debt service
jected to these non-financial brought buyers of bonds. Gains
covenants at any time. were not always fully held, but
“T am very disappointed that were two up to vwo points.
the loan did not go through but Bolivar and La Guaira railway
there are no hard feelings on debentures were strong on pro-
either side and I hope that later posed sale of undertakings.
on we can do business with the South African ‘minings were
Corporation.” erratic. Cape orders were mostly
Britain, Mr. Black said, want- sales, producers and developers
ed the loan to buy a special type were widely few pence lower.
of tractor known as the “Crawl- me Reuter.
er’, suitable for colonial devel-
opment purposes. but which is
not manufactured in Britain.
—B.U.P.

WANTED



MAIL NOTICE

Parcel, Registered and Ordinary Mails
for St. Lucia by the Schooner “Lady Joy"
will be closed at the General Post Office
at 12.15 p.m. on the 12th January, 1950.

Ciean Old RaG

ADVOCATE PRESS ROOM

































oo

Furnishing !

You are Buying SAFE AND SURE
when you...



TUITION

Mrs. R. A. BEARD, A,L.C.M,
(Bronze, Silver, Gold, Medalist)
Will accept a small number of
Kindergarten Pupils at ‘Maristow’
Maxwell Coast, ages 3%—5 years.
Also Tuition in Speech Training.
For further particulars, ring 8402.

10.1. 50—3n.
—————_-- +



For Properties ete., contact . FURNISH HOME
aap 4, BOARD OR OFFICE

Auctioneer and Estate Agent
Who has numerous properties
for sale. For further
particulars ring 4685
call Hardwood Alley
opposite Cathedral

from your Money Saving Store —
preaohes, eae r-robes, Linen
. y ‘anities, Simpler
Dresing Tables, Bedsteads, "Beds,
Washstands, Nightchair Comfort,
Hat and Shoe and Towel Racks,
“Dies ne
ning, Luncheon, Fane nd
Kitchen Tables in big renin t oe
shapes, finishes and sizes, China,
Kitchen and Bedroom Cebinets,

or

IMPORTANT NOTICE
®








Liquor Case,
Morris Furniture, Rush
ON and after Monday 9th Jana- oo Furniture, Rocking, Re-
ary the Gas supply will be clining, Berbice, Upright, Arm

and Tub Chairs,

@aF Brilliant full-long Mirrors:
50 x 16 at $5.05,

L. §. WILSON

Trafalgar St. Dial 4069

off on all districts from Gasworks
to Top Rock each day (Saturday
and Sunday excluded) from 1.15
p.m. to approx. 3.30 p.m. until
the work of clearing Gas Main is
completed.

PIMPLES AND
BLACKHEADS |

jickly hell I hese blemishes
feiving sla"soit in8 sagen, Proven over

Dr. Chase’s Ointment















NOTICE

Returns of persons whose principal place of business is not
situate in the island on or before the 30th day of June, 1950.
Returns of all persons, on or before the 3ist of January,

F. CLAIRMONTE
of Income Tax and Death Duties.

not less than £2 and will be prosecuted unless a satis-

factory reason is given,

10.1,50.—19n.



TREASURE ISLAND by_ Robert Louis
eo ge RETOLD IN 400
PIC by Peter Jackson

PAGE SEVEN



C.M. Conference
-Will Continue

COLOMBO, Jan. 11

British Foreign Secrétary Er-
nest Bevin ana Secretary for
Commonwealth Relations Philip
Noel-Baker said today that the
timing of Britain’s General Blec-
tion for February 23 would not
affect the programme of the Com_
monweaitn Ministers Conference
here. a

They authorised Reuter to’ is-
sue the following comment; “The
work of the Colombo Conference
will not in any way be curtailed
{as a result of the Election an-
mouncement. “We shall carry
through to the end of the Con-

weep ereweese

ference according to the previous ~

*
” ‘

—Reuter.

a
wet of Socialist beliefs enthroned
ble principles,’* ~~
Tel A Viv: Mr. Sam Watson,
{Chairman of the British Labour
“Party, leading a Goodwill Delega- ...
ion on a fortnight’s visit to Israel «=
declared: “I. think Labour will”
in because we have ~ better
Zleadership.’’—Reuter.





















MS. “PORT PIRIE” is scheduled to
sail Geelong 16th December, Melbourne,
Dee. 24th, Brisbane December 3ist Syd
ney January 4th arriving Trinidad about
end January 1950.

M.S. “KAIPAKI" is scheduled to sail
Adelaide December 28th, Port Pirie De-
cember 3ist, Burnie January 7th, Mel-
bourne January 2ist, Sydney January
28th, Brisbane February 2nd, arriving
Trinidad about 4th March.

These vessels have ample space for
Chilled, Hard Frozen and General Cargo.

Cargo accepted on Through bills of
lading with transhipment at Trinidad for
British Guiana, Barbados, Windward &
Leeward Islands.

For further particulars apply —

WITHY

The Sch. “PHILLIP H. DAVID-
SON" will accept Cayay, and
Passengers for Demerara. . <
Thursday 12th Jonusry 1950,

The MV. “CARIBBEE” wilt”
accept Cargo and Passengers. for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
Friday 13th inst.

The M.V. “DABRWOOD” will
accept sg and Passengers fof
St. ‘Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba. Date of sailing-to-be
given.

B.W.I. Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion (Inc.) Tel. 4047.
6th January, 1950.



& Co., Ltd. ri
Agents, TRINIDAD. ‘A & Co Lid. Be Wise “ee a
i ”
ee ansabos.” | .. . ADVERTISE
e
Abcoa Steamslup Co.
CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND
Sail Arrives
Name of ship Pad Barbados ;
ss. “ PEGASUS” ., Decr, 29th January 4
Ss “ALGOA PLANTER”. Jany. 9th January 2!

Sailing e

NEW YOR
S.S. BYFJORD sails from New

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE 4
S.S8. ALCOA ROAMER sails from New Orleans 30th December,

15th January.
8.S. ALCOA RUNNER sails fror
30th January,

Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD, — Canadian Service

very two weeks.

K SERVICE

York 13th, arrives in Barbados 22nd.

arrives

m New Orleans Ith January, arriving

ee

ROBERT THOM LTD. — New York and Gulf Service






=
Cosmopolixan Pharmacy

NN YS NN NNN NN NEN NS NG NSN NG NEN

<<



AFTER STO

BROADWAY

CHILDREN'S BOOKS |

THEY LIVED IN COUNTY DOWN by

Kathleen
THE STORY



SPECIALISTS IN HIGH GRADE PROPERTY |

DIXON & BLADON

REAL ESTATE
Phone 4640 _

AGENTS

WE HAVE MADE

SPECIAL REDUCTIONS ON
DRESSES, BLOUSES, SLACKS
and SKIRTS Etc. Etc.

SHE ES
THANKS —
MAMA
FOR THE=—
STORY |
BOOK!! |



AUCTIONEERS
Plantations Building.



to all our —
Friends and
Customers

.
from



CK TAKING

DRESS SHOP.



te
‘

we
* +
aa Sprmewe Vy
oo oer
we *
—

1,
\
{

wrk
ata
rene. oY
eine tay
WO ee

WE HAVE A WIDE RANGE OF ed be

‘2%

{

Fitzpatrick
OF PETER PAN Retold by





2 Daniel O’Connor Pose? oe
OOOO SCOOPS FOPCPSOO POOP OOOFOF , NANCY AT ST. BRIDES by D. F. Bruce toma oe
REAL ESTATE % . peneneee THE WESTOW TALISMAN by Percy Fy _

FOR SALE OR RENT ix FOR SALE JULIET OVERSEAS by Clare Mallory Westerman +
er Ses Gao tele CHAMPION OF THE MAIN by Captain? ~
Roshunk, Sirect, ree Bat arecens, two x The undersigned will offer For Sale at their Office, No. 17, & PENNY DREADFUL by A. Stephen Tring W. E. Johns aes
running water. Apply Sree EOFS rs Street, Bridgetown, on Friday, 27th day of January, 1950, } > aa 7s fiend
ee ee SV Aee, 5 PANTOMIME ADVENTURES AFLOAT by John ‘De i
Roads, 5.1.00--ta Rs The Dwelling House called “CARLDEEM” and the land $ me ee Miller

. ' |% thereto containing 10,770 square feet, situate on the Sea Coast ¥
tee, = eae ame tie 1% of St. Lawrence Gap, Christ Church, x
ee en re en ee Inspection on application to Miss Kathleen Hunte, “Brat- ¥% —-——-—-
7 Barbados Ice Co., Ltd $ ton,” Maxwells Coast. Dial 8357. g
1.| The above will be set " LP i ¢ For further particulars and conditions of Sale, apply to:— X& ‘
| Public Competition at our Office, Jamies | ¢S ,
Threct, Gn Weanecden. ile, demuany is COTTLE, CATFORD & CO, 3 ADVOCATE STATIONERY
astant at 2 p.m. ;
ON Eo TE Oe eee 2 0 iS 11.1.50—16n. $
Solicitor y EEE
12.1. 50—5n CSCS CIE DOGO SOPOOVOOOO POG POOOOVOOPY MFP PFE EEE FFE FFA EN


ie

ote

1 =e.

Werke eames te



ae

Be



PAGE EIGHT



ww
4 Cricket >

FeothaH, Racing





World Copyrtght Bn arrancem

Boxers Die About One
Every Three Weeks

NEW YORK (By Mail)

T+ THis YEAR'S

with Rrening Standard



nt

Thrills For

300.000 Fans

LONDON, Jan. 11.
Seven third round cup replays
produced thrills for nearly 300,4

On February 20, 1948, Ezzard Charles, the present heavy-|000 soccer fans this afternoon
weight champion of the National Boxing Association,
slapped Sam Baroudi into a coma in which, shortly, he died.
A brief time theretofore, Ray Robinson, the present welter-
weight champion of the world, did as wuch for Jimmy

Doyle.

Since the end of World
War Il, prize fighters have
been dying in the ring at the
rate of better than cme a
month. Frightened athletic
commissions have legislated,
and fight men have pontifi-
cated, but the death and
maiming rates remain the
same. Herewith Internation-
al News Service looks at the
inside of boxing today.





Aussies Beat
East Province
By Innings

PORT ELIZABETH, Jan. 11

Australian cricketers beat Eas.
tern Province before tea here to-
day by an innings and 39 runs
dismissing the home side in their
second innings for 242, With first
innings’ arrears of 281, Eastern
Province had scored 94 for th«
loss of 1 wicket overnight, but at
the lunch interval to-day were
still 122 runs behind with 7 wie-
kets in hand,



| about
| ring.

/ there





Draper and Waite continued)
defiantly this morning. It ap-}
peared that the innings’ defcea

tool

might be ae and they
150

their second wicket stand to
before Waite gave
Langley off Walker

Fast bowlers had to strive hard
to get any life into their deliy
eries, but Ian Johnson flighted
the ball well, and was always
difficult to hit,

At lunch, with the

score 159

|
|
|
!

a catch to}

for 3, Draper had been batting |

for three hours. 40 minutes
his 81 having two chances
the interval, the remaining wic-
kets fell for the addition of 88
runs,

for

—Reuter



Cricket Board
Meets Today

The Board of Management
the Barbados Cricket Association
meets today at the Challenoi
Stand at 4.15 p.m.

The Board is expeci'ed to final-
ise arrangements for the forth-
coming visit of the British Guian
Team and also to deal with ojher
Toutine mavters,

Jockey Leaves
U.K. For India

LONDON, Jan. 11.
A. Roberts, a flat race jockey
from the north of England, left
by air to-day for India, where

Do It Every Time

LEE

After |

one to over a _ hundred
bouts, for pleasure or profit, can
display
Amnesia, delirium, blindness,
leafness, hallucinations, dumb-
ness, paralysis, vertigo, shock, and
hemorrhage These are among |
others
Punch Drunk
Occasionally a veteran fighter
jexhibits mild tendencies towards
all of these maiadie Then he is
known as punchdrunk, and often
becomes a figure of sorts in his
| community
Mr. Tony Zale, who 16 months|

|

{

For some short time after the
Doyle episode, the Clev¢land Box-
ing Commission eated pious
salt, and for an equally brief time
after the Baroudi debacle, the
Illinois Commission held meetings
improving safety in the
One of the numerous sug-
gestions effected in the !atter in-
taneés was to have an ambulance

on call at all times during prize
fight

Boxing, the only sport which
makes persona] injury its prime
objective, may be traced 5,000




years into history to a time when
were no ambulances and it
as difficult to foretell when and
vhy a fighter was going to drop
dead

Every 3 Wecks
In this more enlightened period
in which we live, fighters are dy-

weeks. Either 12 or 18
fighters died in 1949, depending
on whether you feel like counting
amateurs. Without traceable ex-
ception, all 18 of these deaths
could be ascribed bodily malfune-
tion in the area kgown as the
brain, which, in most human
beings, does the thinking.

Blows about the head in boxing
produce the most interesting
after-effects in the world of sport.
Depending upon the time place
ind frequency of assault, a youth
or gentleman who has engaged in
from

igO Wag middleweight
of the world, quit the ring because
he Saw it coming

When you talked to Zale after
the three fights with Roeky Gra-
zano and the-one fight with Mar-

|cel Cerdan, you saw it too.

Where his eyes had been solid,
aqua blue, bright blue, they were
srey-blue now Where his speech
had been straight and intelligent,
his lip, the lower one, fell puffily
in front of the slow words that
came out. When he looked at you,
he cocked his head

When he did retire, he had to
memorize the thirty-word sen-
tence it took him to tell news-
men about it

He was one of the smart ones.

~EN.S.
pi neni
he has accepted a retainer to ride
during the next meeting.
He hopes to return to England
tn time for the opening of the
English flat racing on March 16

—Reuter

WHY SHOULD I DO







champion }

when the anticipated (in home
quarters) seven home wins failed
to materialise.

In fact there were sufficient
surprises to produce only two
home wins while four away sides
were successful within the stipu-
lated 90 minutes. At the end of
that period, Middlesbrough and
Aston Villa were still on terms
and so played extra time.

Big upsets of the programme
were the away victories of North-
ampton, Cardiff and Watford.
When half time arrived in all
seven games only three goals had
been scored, Charlton who always
seem to fight better when the
dice is loaded against them lead-
Fulham while, Liverpool and
Blackburn each scored one goal.

The other games had then pro-
duced a goal,

In The Lead

Charlton led three minutes
from half time when Darcy took
advantage of a miskick by a home
defender. Darey also played a
part in Charlton’s second goal
| scoved by Vaughan and Fulhams

consolation point came 11 minutes
:from the end when McDonald
netted. Charlton deserved their
‘win on to-day’s display.

Watford’s defence carried off
the first half honours and then
the whole side battled with reso-

\lute spirit through the second in
-with a snap goal by Thomas fol-
jlowing a freekick brought vic-
| tory.
} Blackburn Rovers led with a
goal by Edes but Payne equalised
{and in the second half Fagan
netted a rebound.

Plymouth weathered the Wol-
}verhampton attacks before the
interval but two goals within a
;minute sealed their fate, Swin-
|}burn scored after 58 minutes.
|Handock got the second from a
penalty in less than a minute and
| Smith notched the third later.

|

| Goalless
| Southampton and Northampton
‘had

a goalless first half but
then three goals came in three
minutes, Dixon giving the visit-
ors a lead which Scott and Way~
man countered,

This raised excitement to a
iigh piteh and two well placed
corner kicks by Mitchell brougit
goals for Hughes and Candilin to
give Northampton vittory.

The Middlesbrough and Aston
Villa game was always dominated
by defences even though Middles-
brough’s Hardwick was injured
and had to go on the wing.

He withdrew before extra time
was finished but Middlesbrough
held out and the match will ce
replayed next Monday.

Results are as follows: F. A,
Cup Third Bound Replays; Ful-
ham ly Chariton Athletic 2. Liv-
erpool 2,. Blackburn Rovers 1,
Middlesbrough 0, Aston Villa 9
extra time being playéd. Preston
Northend 0, Watford 1, South-
amptén 2, Northampton 3; West
Bromwich Albion 0, Cardiff City
1, Wolverhampton Wanderers 3%,
Plymouth Argyle 0; Middles-
brough 0, Aston Villa 0; after
extra time. Second replay takes
place next Monday January 16.

—Reuter.

ah ie oes By Jiminy Hatlo |

SINESS
WITH YOUR OUTFIT THAT CREDIT
GOON OF YOURS CAUSED ME ALL
KINDS OF TROUBLE ON THAT
LAST ORDER T °

HIM? HE'S WACK
HE'S CAUSED FRICTION
\ ALL ALONG THE LINEâ„¢|
I HEAR THEY RE
TYING THECAN To
HIM THE END OF
THIS WEEK:

GP





PARBADOS ADVOCATE
oa }





Spectators |
Appreciate |
Long Races ©

|
JOHN BARRINGTON) ,
(BY. SEW YORK, (By Mail)
| ‘There are fashion changes 19
| track along with most other |
sports, and at the present time
the longer events—the mile run
| and jonger—are the ones that get
she most attention.
| At least the sports writers and
‘the promoters have decided that
those are the races the specta-
‘tors like the best. Indoors, they
| probably are correct, although it
be a different story on the





may
| outdoor tracks.

| Oytdoors, the thrills of the
hundred yard dash, the hurdles

‘and the 440 seem to overshadow
lthe kick that may ‘se derived
from seeing a bunch of skinny
fellows go around and arounv
| that big oval. ;
Indoors, there never is spate
fo stage dashes of over 60 or 70
yards. And tracks are so cramp-
ed that races under a mile re-
sembie a mob seene o- a tug of
il.
Popular Racés
It is only after the first mile,

or say 20 laps or so, that tne
boys get straightened out and
to race. Thus, the popu-



CIRCUS

larity of the long races.
Zecause of that situation, most
of the interest in the coming
winter track season centres
around the milers and two milers.
As was the case a year ago,
the picture is rather dark for the
| Americans. Don Gebrmann = of
, Wisconsin — probably the best
indoor miler in the U.S.—will ke
P aie . tied up with Western Conference
For Trinidad meets and may not appear in
: ; any of the big Eastern affairs.
Yesterday afternoon. eight of However, it is. hoped that he will
the nine members of the Water! be able to defend his ‘Wanamak-
Polo Team which will play al er Mile Championship at the
series of matches against a Trini-| Millrose Games in New York on
dad side left Seawell for Trini-| January 28. That is one open
dad by B.W.1.A. They were, Peter| date on his schedule,
Patterson, (Capt.), “Boo” Pat- Aside from Gehrmann the best
terson, George MacClean, John| native milers are FBi-man Fred
Grace, Tim Yearwood, Delbert! Wilt and John Twomey of the
Bannister, Geoffrey Foster, and! Illinois A.C., neither of whom
Paul Foster. Kenneth Ince, the; could catch the flying foreign
remaining member is due to join| delegation of a year ago. 7
the team to-day in Trinidad. At the two and three mile dis-



| Water Polo

They are scheduled to play} tances, the top U.S. competitors
four matches. One of the match-| are Curtis Stone and Horace
es will be against one of the] Ashenfelter, both Penn State

leading Trintdad Clubs and this
will be followed by three Test
matches. Two of these matches
will be played at night, under
floodlighting conditions.

The Trinidad Water Polo As-
sociation, announced their team
for the first Test match on Tues-
day. Of this team, Basil Ander-
son, Roddy Bynoe, Johnny Te-
xeira, and Frankie Mayers are
all well known in Water Polo
circles here most of them having
played in the Trinidad Discovery
Tour to Barbados last July. The
rest are unknown to us in Bar-

alumni, Dick Church of Syracuse
University, and Bob Black of
Rhode Island. Jerry Thompson
the tiny star from Texas, is
thinking of making his first
campaign on the eastern boards.

None of the last year’s imported
runners—Gaston Reiff of Bel-
gium, Willy Slykhuis of Holland
and Sweden’s Erik Ahlden and
Ingvar Bengtsson—will be on
deck this year.

Formidable

Instead the AAU has John Joe
Barry, a U.S. citizen who has
lived most of his life in ireland,



bados. fas ; ;
d@ Viljo Heino of Finland.
Three of the Barbados team| ®" L
will be returning on Jan. 16th Barry has marks of 4:08.6 for

the milesand 8.59 for two miles.
Heino holds four worlds records
at longer distances but is a for-
midable two miler as well.
Barry is an interesting young
man who plans to remain in this
country and go to college.
Another collegian from abroad
. rt who may compete some is Alf
Held In Vienna Holmberg of Sweden, who now
is attending the University of
PARIS, Jan. 11. | Tennessee. Holmberg has de-
Austria will organise the Eu-|feated Henry Eriksson, the 1948
repean Swimming Champion- | Olympic 1,500-meter champion.
ships this year, it was announced| Formerly, it was thought that
to-day after a meeting of the; tiie trip to America, unfamiliar
European Swimming League. !food and living conditions, and
The events will be held
Vienna from August 20—27. | turns of
Competitors will be allowed to!
use the “butterfly” breast stroke. |
Hungary was originally awarded |
the championships. but declined
to accept the invitation. Austria, !

and the remainder on the follow-
ing day.



EuropeanSwimming
Championships

|
|
j

in
the board tracks were
an overwhelming handicap to a
foreign runner. One of the few
who had been able to overcome
it prior to last winter was the
immortal Paavo Nurmi,

Realy, One See ee eee nes Slykhuis, Bengtsson and

el § > s- “'|Ahiden changed that way of

wpleh rem Belgium, Holland,| thinking, however. They had

aie ih and swede € b }almost unbroken success in last
sented. | winter’s meets
The Austrian Swimming Fed- Site ie, a)

| i > Chis was partly due to Gehr-

eration will submit the pros}? "Ses Paty barca

ramme for the championships! mann’s participation only in the

aren ! Wanamaker Mile. A great void

was left in American mile ranks
when. Gil Dodds, the galloping
parson, hung up his spikes. To
date, no newcomer has come along
| to step into the limelight. 2

—Reuter. |

Ex-Army Officer





’ . .
Guilty Of Bigamy 148,
LONDON, Jan, 11 3 Cevlo A
: e 7

A British ex-Army Officer, son-4 y n thletes
in-law of wealthy baron De NIWA : .
Meyer, of belgium, was charged At rive In Australia
in London’s Premier Criminal AUSTRALIA Jan. 10
Court, the Old Bailey, today with Three members of the Ceyloness
Bigamously marrying a_ Secret Empire. Games team Cc E
Service Agent during the war Jansz, H. De Sa euin P ioed .

The officer, Edward Jolin Wool- Wijesinghe — have aertiee és R
even Wickens aged 44, distin- by air 1 ea here
uished war-time _ Intelligence “All a ae { ‘
2 . : ave fit. They r *
Officer in North Africa and Sicily, jously about the aerot tinea
and now a Shipping Agent, was} yecorded by Australian cunters
released under supervision for twe ‘ 3



who will compete i :
years after promising to be on P in the ae
good behaviour. He was marriea i —Keuter
at Bombay, | India, in 1934, and Ti.
was the father of one child, a B.T.C, chet

daughter born in 1936. Because ot
Mrs. Wickens’ health, they re-
turned to Europe, but difficulties
arose because his wife wanted to
continue living in her accustomed
luxurious style.

They separated afier be came
home one day to find all furniture
removed, and his clothes on the
joor of an empty room,

Wickens later met a charming
vell-educated woman, Signorina
Albertina Crico, naturalised Brit-
ish Secret Service Agent in Sicily,
She lived with Wickens as his
raistress in Italy, while they were
engaged together on difficult and
dangerous operations. As a mem-
ber of the Italian Bar, she per-
} suaded Tim that his first marriage
was invalid, and they went ht eid eS "9, rend 8.4
through a bigamous ceremony in woon The News; 12.10 oth. oes
| Ongland in 1945. c Analysis; 12.15 p.m. New Records

Sales Good

The sales of 25 Swee S'
tickets for the fortheoming are
Spring Meeting are four Series
ahead of the sales in mid-January
last year. :

The Turf Club is now selling
Series M while at this time las’
roo they were only selling Serie;





B.B.C. Programme

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1950

7 am. The News; 7.10 a m
Analysis; 7.1 am Sporting Record
730 a.m. Music Magazine, 7.45 a.m
Generally Speaking; & a.m From t}
Editorials; 8 10 a.m Programme Ay
nouncements 815 am, Ewe Beck

. 4 1 p.m, British Politic: feeklies: 1
Sir Gerald Dodson, recorder, Me Le

: p.m. Radio Newsree!l: 1 2 p.m. Take *
told the Court he did not think aj from here; 2 The News; 2.10 p.m
rison sentence necessary. Sports Review; 2.30 p.m. Radio Theatre
4 p.m. The News: 4.10 p.m, The Daily

onia

DR N tra Listeners ~ho

. SANDERS GOES Dm me Anno
ON TRIAL : Interh
:






neemen





Spe

Home News from Brits n; 2.158 p.m
—Reuter, | 4
Service; 4.15 p.m. Phitharmu
Cc
Simin af m Generally
MANCHESTER,





NEW HAMPSHIRE, Jan. 11
Hermann N. Sander will
Wial on Februar 20, on ;
harge of Ger in the “merey
Geath of his patient, Mrs, Abbid
Borroto (59), incurably l with
cancer.--Reuter



most of all the unfamiliar banked |

















THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 18 &
edie niet G 8100 — ii
‘ ian ee es
Prat ‘vo| Nurse Gets $ ie -
Imprisoned Pendirig oie | NEW ARRIVAg
. wr For 25 Years Work
His Deportation 08 a
ST. KITTS, Jan. 11. | Tins Macaroni an
i" Magen Yesterday afternoon at six Rottles Peanut peyote
: Ses” ail o'clock Miss Winifred Penny- + Peanut Paste ‘
rise te asada ye the High feather celebrated the ag an- Salng aise J
prectgbererics pelt - f ’ niversary as a Nurse in the Cun- ett. Sdlad sre
Commissioner for India in oo ningham Hospital. The function rips Reamuts ating
on charges of eet pe which marked the event took Botiles Tometo oP
was today committed to pris place in the Matron’s Quarters in Tins Tomato Soup
pending his return to India. Tins Apricots

The Magistrate, Mr. J. F.

Eastwood, told Hoare:

“You may apply to a High}
Court for habeas corpus or such
other remedies as your Legal |
Adviser thinks fit.” |

Today’s proceedings lasted less
than a minute. At an earlier hear-
ing it was stated on behalf of the|
High Commissioner for India that |
Hoare was being tried before 2}
special Tribunal in Calcutta, ana |
that he sailed for England during
an adjournment.



Depositions taken before the
Tribunal in Caleutta and presente
in court here alleged that Hoare, |
as Assistant Superintendent of the |
Instruments — Section,
Workshops, Alapore, had receive 1]
‘gratifications” ior showing favou
in the placing of orders for sup
plies to the workshops.

|
|
|

Hoare’s Counsel, at the previous
hearing, said that he would Z pe iM
against the extradition order \o t :
High Court. He added that Hoare
pleaded not guilty and reserved his
defence. —Reuter.

|















CLUB
(Members Only)

SATURDAY, JAN.
9 p.m.

14TH,

Music by Arnold Meanwell
and his full Orchestra, play-
ing the latest tunes from the
Hit Parade; assisted by Ger-
ald Bannister, the “Singing
Westerner.”

Admission to Ballroom—2/-







MASS

MEETING

-: By :-

CARIBBEAN WORKERS
UNION

-: On :
Friday, January 13th,
7.30 p.m.

-: At :
Synagogue Building,
Bridgetown

All workers are invited
to be present and hear
the aims, objects and
benefits of the Union.

Among the Speakers

A. A. MAYNARD
VINCENT GRIFFITH
L. E. R. GILL, M.C.P.
E. K. WALCOTT, M.C.P.
E. D. MOTTLEY, M.C.P.

. —

will be:
Messrs. E. K. FRANCE











SS
Rediffusi
cdiffusion Programmes
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1950.
{ LOCAL PRESENTATIONS
{ 7.15— 7.30 Studio Service
f co 8.00 Morning Special
00— 9.15 Songtime
KX 9.30—11:00 Closed
11.00—11,.15 Programme Parade
11.15—11.40 Music for Breakfast
Time Listening
2.00— 2.15 Musical Varieties
)) 5.15— 6.30 Programme Sum-
{ , mary and Interlude
6.00— 6.30 Children’s
Programme
i} 0,.30— 7.00 Request Time
7.15— 7.30 Prey resented by

‘ue
1

Ft
i

rea
Ochestra presented

by Cave ‘Shepherd &
Co., Ltd.

§!00— 8.15 Local News pre-
sented by B’dos
Bottling Co.

8.15— 8.30 Bob Eberly Show

8.30— 8.45 5!
presented by Lever
Bros.

8.45— 9.00 Eddy Arnold Show

presented by Lever
Bros,

9.15— 9.45 Paul Temple and the

m Case Ep. 5
U.S.A, â„¢
News 9.15 a.m. and 9.45 Pm
B.B.C.

News 7 a.m., 8 a.m., 12 noon,
4 p.m. 7 p.m, and 9 p.m.

Eve Beche with Leslie Paul at
the Piano 8.15 a.m.—8.30 a.m

Books to Read 8.90 a.m.—9,00 a.m.

Special Dispatch 11.45 a.m.—12.00
P.â„¢.

New ords 12.15 p.m.—1,00 p.m
Brit Political Weeklies 1.00 p.m.
—L.15 p.m.
Radio Newsreel 1.15 P.m.—1,30 p.m
ake it from here 1.30 P.m.—2.00
Sports Nevis
rts riew 2.18 p.m.—2.90 p.m
Radio Theatre “Tne Thpektuthe ¢
of being Earnest” 2.30 p.m

4.00 p.m,
Philharmonia Orchesira 4.15 p.0
5

0 p.m
Listeners’ Choice 5.00 p 5.15
P-m.
Generally Speaking 5.30
p.m {\
Tom Jones Trio 5.45 p.+ 6.00 {|
p.m }

RADIO DISTRIBUTION |
(BARBADOS) LTD. {\

ee.
Ses



; valuable

Telegraph | .

ee a
DANCE |
THE BARBADOS AQUATIC

.
11.1.50.—4n, |


























the Hospital ground. Rottles Guava’ Jelly

As an appreciation of the in-
service rendered by
Nurse Pennyfeather to ghis com-
munity the staff of the hospital,
friends and well-wishers pre-
sented her with a silver bracelet
and $100.00. The presentation was
made by His Honour Mr, H.
Burrowes, Administrator —(C.P.)





=

| : —
| ANEROID BAROMETER
| ROBERTS & Co Dial 24











————





OPPO OOOO EOO OOOO

LADIES!

Begin 1950 the Right Way ....



THAT IS THE ‘DOROTHY GRAY’ Way,

WE have a complete stock of Dorothy Gray Preng,
tions. Drop in and let us explain their uses and ju
you with, your Cosmetic problems,

COLLINS LIMITED, |

28, Broad Street,

= 6st Ot A fk FO
ELE FES EFFI IEE ELIF EFFEC

yt

| LOO SO, OOOO SOOPOBO SOS OOPSOS4

|
| /-—j>-”—— TT
|
|

Keep Your Eye

the BALL.

on

Make sure they

are

-

| SPENCER MOULTON

We also have



the ever popular

Tennis Rackets

FOR JUNIORS
only $3.64 each

CAVE SHEPHERD x co, 1.

UW % @ &B Broad Street.

.





ee



eon :
_ ae POOP SVPE SES SPIO COLO EES

> We Can Supply from Stock.

‘

CEMENT in 94-1b Bags
WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT 4
RED COLORCRETE CEMENT

%
S
3
°
$s

|
|
|
:

EXPANDED METAL —
d-in., l-in., 2-in, & 3-in. Mesh Iron

s-in, & i-in. Mesh Galvanized

B.R.C. METAL FABRIC —

No. 9 — 12-in by 3-in. Mesh

No. 65 — 6-in by 6-in. Mesh

WILKINSON & HAYNES (0., ED.

PHONE 4267



F PES8SS66SSSEGe6KES66Ge0 SSS
9999999995: 39996986 6

GOO

PDLPPPPLPPOAPA PPP LCP PPPS AP PAPA PAPE PPPPSSSS

SELECT THESE
DANISH HAMS in Tins from 4-ibs, upwards
CANADIAN EGGS

VIENNA SAUSAGES

GORGONZOLA and GOUDA CHEESE
SALAMI SAUSAGES ;
POTATO CRISP and a full line of the Cocktail Bist]

* ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO., LTDG
. HIGH STREET

PLLEFSOSS SS OCS SST T




PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY JAM Alty ; Crttkrt t r.lk.H. Marl*. S|MMMS Tcauth VarMhHX. ••! %  . < %  Ir. Boxers Die Ahoul One Thrills For Every Thiree Weeks \TW YORK (IV On February 20, !!', I weight champion of the Nati-i .. slapped Sam Baroudi into .< c >ma in tvraV h, A brief time iheretofnre. B might champion of the IVI rid, did as nouc!: for Jimmy Doyle. rtei lfe %  lilt'. I %  •It, :mci I after th. Ion heir, meetings about Improving leletj La DM ring. Ongestions pffffted in tti. Steer Ifcr rnd at World War II arts* fifhtm have beea dying In thr rinic at thr rale of betlrr lhati iw a month. FrifhU-nrd alhlrtic romniiMiniM ha%r IrckUttrd. and light mrn havr nontilirslrd hut thr death and matmlni rstr* remain thr Hamr. Hrrrith lutrrnatlon at New* Srrvirr look*> ai thr inside of hovtnc legaj Aussies Beat Easl Province By Innings PORT ELIZABETH. Jan. 11 Australian cricketers beat Eas. tern Province before tea La day by an Innings and 39 runs dtsmlssirif the home side in patti second innings for 242 W | Innings' arrears of 281. \ Province had scored 84 I loss of I wirket ov-'innfltt but 11 the lunch Interval to-da still 122 runs brhi, I kets in hand. 1 %  %  %  eared thai the innings' might !* %  averted. ,r. then Moond wldtet befon sTaite gav< langley off Walki-i Past bowlers had to strive hard to get any lif.int.. eries, but Ian John^n fiiwhted the hall well, and difficult to hit. At lunch, errta •.,,. %  for S. Draper had bei for three hours 40 m %  i IIIIK wkkrts fail %  —Heater iring prixe Li 1 I raced 6.000 hi tea %  *.. ., t..-., and It eteU hen and Every 3 Weeks %  .lightened period %  Igfcti leoc aba II or 18 lied in 1849, depending feel ilk.counting iliensaMs % %  > %  could be ascribed bodily malfuncbrain, which, In most human %  i %  %  fan taxing M n %  %  DtlM-ndin:. %  .. la II.-,, %  ire amon rmu h Drunk €'rich'i Board Meets Today %  U..V .i! UH Stand at 4.15 p m. The 11 Jar arrangi the (ortnoaatloi .isii i %  i Jockey Leaven U.K. For India LONDON, laa 11 A Huberts, a flat race ,.,k.. ; i by air to-day lor India, attar* n fighter i 1 %  %  %  !. in In, %  i il coming, %  i R %  oghi svith MarII too. had been solid, thai ware %  %  %  %  • his speech %  Fell pufim 1 %  %  %  .. in u %  %  Inat i<< riga Kt IllOftlllg %  i the opening of I hi English Hat t.icing on March 16 —Rrutcr 300,000 Fans LONDON, Jan. 11. Seven third round cup replay*) produced thrills for nearly 3WM ON this ufternoon when the anticipated (In home quarters) seven home wins failed to materialise. tn fact there were sufficient ;<> produce only two home wins while four away sides were successful within the stipulate! 90 minutes. At the end of >d. Middlesbrough and Aston Villa were still on terms extra lime. Big upsets of the programme ..way victories of Northampton. Cardiff and Watford. When half time arrived In all seven games only three goals had been scored, Charlton who always light better when the dice is loaded against them leadPulhiiin while, Liven %  lllackburn each scored one goal. The uther E m es had then produced a goal. In The head Charlton led three minutes from half time when Darcy took advantage of a miskick by a home defender. Darcy also played a part in Charlton's second goal scored by Vaughan and Fulhams consolation point came 11 minutes fiom the end when McDonald netted. Charlton deserved their win on to-day's display. Watford's defence carried ufT the first half honours and the-i the whole side battled with resoII through the second In aitfa B snap goal by Thomas foli freekick brought victory. Mlack urn Rovers le;l with i goal tn Ida* but Payne equalised. and in the second half Fagan I rfhound. Plymouth weatheied the Woibafora Use Marvel but two goal* within DM ir (ate Sun. burn %  Cored after 58 minute. the aacond awrti a penalty In less than a minute and snuiii notched l i OeaJ let** Southampton ind Northampton 01 i I goalless first half but then thiee goals came in three DtaMo living I I which sott man countered. Tins raiaad exdtaroent to a irigh pitch and Mao wall placed ka bj Mitchell brougiil goals lor Hughes and ( ihnmnton victors The Mlftdleahrough and Aston Villa game was always dominate. 1 es even though Mid llesbrough's Hardwick was injured in n on the wing He wiiii was finished but ICIdd i< il out and the match will e %  cpLiyed next M AS: F. A. tup Third UsMBd Kralays: Fuiirlton Athletic 2 1 \\ er|Kxl 2. Rlackhuin R MiddlMbeough o \ .: pla\eii Presto Norshend 0, Watford i, gouthn .i. West Bruniwich Albion o. Cardiff City %  'tampion Wan.' Plynv nth Argyle 0; Middle.-Aetoa Vim i Bagond read rl Mogday Jan. JT U5TEN TO HOW rtBREftjRTSTDSAiO CtHXTAiANA6EClN 1HE HOWE OFF*C£ I SCARED THR RANTS \ { OfF SKA-cEE •WE WONT / HAVE ANY* TROUBLE WITH i^Ti I HIM"HE'LLPUTUR F*DKTD...I TDuO HA* •NO ocuan, NO 6OO0S/ ,7T1 s* Water Polo Team Leaves For Trinidad Yesterday afternoon, eight ol the nine members of the Water Polo Team which will play a scries of matches against a Trinidad side left Seawell for Trinidad by ll.ff.IA. They i (CagC.), Boo" Patterson, Cieorge MacClean. John Grace, Tim Yearwood. Delbert Bannister. Geoffrey Foster, and tar. Kenneth Ince, th. remaining member is due to Join the team to-day in Tr. They are scheduled to play four matches. One of the matches will bo against one of the leading Trinidad Clubs and this will be followed by three Test matches. Two of these matches will be played at night, under floodlighting conditions The Trinidad Water Polo Association, announced their team for the llrsl Test match on Tuesday. Of this team, Basil Anderson, Roddy Hynoe. Johnny Texeira, and Frankie Mayers are all well known in Water Polo circles here most of them having played in the Trinidad Discovery Tour to Barbados last July The unknown to us in Bor• ado. Three ol the Barbados team will be returning on Jan. 16th and the remainder on the following dag Euro|M-unSvtiiiiinin'i Chum|Monships Held In Vienna PARIS. Jan 1 I Austria will organise the BuBwinicnihg Charaplon* •hipe this year, it was anaounci i to-day after a meeting of the Buropean Swimming i • The events will be from Auguat N Competitors will be allowed t" Uff the "bUtl war original! %  [he chaa pa I decliiuit accepl the Invitation. Austria, Italy, ami Spain them at the Paris rt Belgium, Holland, I I'd. i\ t) m Shimming Fedration will submit the pro%  —Brutrr. Kx-Arim OfIin*r Guilh Of Bigainx LONDUN, Jan. 1). dl %  Mil i. in. | || I oven vt ickens aged 44. ctta&uv ? ua>hei war-ght >ears alu to in on uaroad to I llfncuhaai arose because his wife wanted to conUnue living In %  >iome one day to linri all furniture and his clothes on the ._ %  \lbeitina Crico, Baturall i^h Secret Service Ag u as hii -ustress in Ital;. t< wether on dlfl Lingernus operations. As a niem' %  er of the Italian Bar. she per-t marriage %  hroujh a bisamous ceremony in %  -. 1945 i > nison. recorder. Court be did not think a e necessary. Spectators Appreciate Long Races (B y JOHN BABBWOTON>. NEW YORK. (By Mall) There are fashion changes W -rack along with rnoat other sports. anJ at the present time Ihe longer events-the mile run ( nd longer—are the ones that get s; attention At least the sports writers and the promoters have decided that those are the races the spectatha best. Indoor*, ibey probably are correct, although u may be a different story on the outdoor Outdoors, the thrills of the hundred yard dash, the hurdles and the 440 seem to overshaJow the kick that may :e derived frem welnff n bunch of skinny lellowai go around and aroun.' •hat big oval. Indoors, there never is spa-e whet of over flo or 70 %  iracks arc s> crampander a mile rea tug Of H RaceM tar the ftret mile, With Western Confereine may not appear 11 It II booed that he will l>e able to defend his Wanamaki at th Games in New York on January 28. That is one open Hate on his schedule. r m Gehrmann the best len ^-r FBii-man Fred Wilt and John Tworoey of the \ • %  neither of whom lying foreig' %  At the two an-.l three mile distances, the top U.S. competitor; are Curtis Stone and Horar> Ashenfelter. both Penn State alumni, Dick Church of Syracuse and Bob Black of Jerry Thompson the Uny Itar from Texas, thinking of making his first campaign on the eastern boards. : | importe runners—Gaston Reiff of Belrilly Slykhuis of Holl and Sweden's Erik Ahlden and lngvar Bengtason—will be deck this year. Formidable Instead the AAU has John Joe Barry, a U.S. citizen who has lived most of his life in ireland, and Viljo Heino of Finland Barry has marks of 4:08.6 for the mile-and 8 59 for two miles. Haiao holds (our worlds records t longer distances but is a forwell Barry is n n interesting young man who plans to remain in :hi college. Another collegian from abroad who may compete some is Alt tliilmberg of Sweden, who now ii attending the Unlvi Tennessee. Holmberg has defeated He) the 1948 Olvmpie 1,500-meiev champion nfamiliar food and living eond I I the unJiimiliar banked %  adta were helming handJi One f the fev been able to *. the I 'i Paavo Nureai. %  d thai way <.' thinking, it,,., had almost unbroken i %  f> hi •ion only in the w. ruunalter Mile A great void In American mile ranks DodOa, the galloping ing up his spikes To date no newcomer ha-, come along into the limelight. INS Imprisoned Pending His Deportation LONDON. Jan. 11. Albi Benjamin H |g sought ov the High t omntissioner for India in LandOU on charges nf accepting brit-es. was today committed to priaon pending his return to India The M •' F Eastwood, told Hoare: You may apply to a High Couri for habeas corpu%  I %  Adviser thinks fit." Today's proceedings lasted less than a minute. At an earlier hearing It was stated on behalf of the High Commissioner lor India that Hoare was being tried before a special Tribunal in CaloUtU, and that he sailed for England (hiring. an adjournment. Depositions taken %  Tribunal in Calcutta and pteamta in iourt here jlleged that Hoare. as Assistant Superintendent Of the Instrument Section. Telegraph In the pi* .<• I %  %  ': %  Hoare's Counsel, at th hearing, said that he w / against the extradition i l High Court He I pleaded not gulltj defence. Beater. \urs4Gets *\(H) For 25 Years \S ork ST. KI Yeslcrci. Miss Winili' lebrated the i the fun-1 ningham Hospital. The function which marked the event look place in the Matix>n's Ql pftUrl ground As an appreciation of the invaluable sen-ice rendered by Nurse Pennyfeather tog inunity the staff of the Mends' and well-wishers prer en ted her with a silver bracelet and 1100.00. The presentation was| made by His Honour llr, II Burrowes. Administrator.—(C.P.) .. Nnnf, s *uart & SajM, ANEROID BAROMETERS %  Uni II! S A Co |)i| :iM( '-'••-'" %  * LADIES! DANCE -• At :THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB (Member-! Only) lATOtDitT, JAN. 14TII. 1 p. in. Music by Arnold Ml and bis full Onliestra. playing the latest tunes from the Hit Parade: assisted by Gerald Bannister, the "Singing Westerner." Admission to Ballroom— V11.1.50.—4n. Befta INI tiie Riuhl Way .... 1'ilvT IS THE DOROTHY GRAY' WAY. > rVE have a complete slock of Dnmihy Gray \ !Kins. Drop In and let us explain their uses 1 you with %  ir Cosmetic problems. COLLINS LIMITED. 2S. Rrouil Sired. D SANDERS GOfS ON TRIAL F.R '*"" cm "*" **<' %  > %  .'"*' — *> : • 20. or. ,. .'{ Ccvloii Athletes Vrrivc In Australia AUSTRALIA Tiiw mfiibii ui UM rtylnn**! lean — c H i' — have arrived hii, l Th.-v iniiuiml anxVu .-. runners •HI I .Ml! rnnirietr in Uu BOWI —Hen lei H.T.C. Ticket Sales Good ,.V^ £'*!.. "i.** 8 "PUke| lor the ri.rlhcominf BTC •head of Ihe sales in mld-Januarv last year. ' The Turf Club is now „||„, Serin H wl.ll. .1 thi, |im r ,„. jear lnj were only sellinc Ser Il.ll.r. I'ruijraiiiiii,. THI l*T. JANI'ARV BL M .* I* New,, in ,. \. %  %  %  in , fror ^n^&rRSrsl. i*aa 1 gr7."8j%S £ji"niif_n>iju.i; i jn B %  '<• N^*. 1 U p -n *?• ranuin ni i ** P m R*dM Th*. s. 1 T :.. ; PailfcarniBiiu Orrbt D •" Pr-V P m W w Bnialn. 1 4B a m %  •' ~ I lUmanw AAASS MEETING -: By :I \iiii;i;i W WORKERS IMON -: On :Friday. January 13th, 7.30 p.m. -: At :Synagogue Building, Bridgetown All workers are invited to be present and hear the aims, objects and benefits of the Uni o n. Amon^ the Speakers will be: II EK. FRANCE A. A. MAYNARD VINCENT GRIFFITH L. E. R. GILL, M.C.P. E. K. WALCOTT. M.C.P. E. D. MOTTLEY, M.C.P. Ilnlif fusion l'r)jraniiHrs INI H-.OW. us, KHi | ,.,„ LOCAL PHKHBNTATlONf. !-*• i a. studio aervicf 7 3DH 00 Morning Spcrlnl .0B— t 15 %.niUm ii • ii is Pratniwnts panda H IS U Mi^,(o. Hm.k(,..l Ttnif l.lsiMiliu >0--S.lft Muural VarlMIe* i 13— 5 JO Pronwnm auramary and • 00—S CMMfWB PtOBtamm* T 00 RcquMl Tin>a T It— T IB ftwut> pr>M*nlc 7JO-?4S DW^HhTW-. Stw praaanwd by Boid-i • T 45%  9S HUH Komai. and OclkMlra praaantM by Cave Si,v|>hnd \ Co.. Ltd. •••—SIS Local N> pr*%  rntcd tr\ B'doa BoUlinc Co. • 10— %  30 Bob ga*rl r Sho. p r w i.tia by rr> pnaafttoa] b> L>vtf •48— • OS ldd> Arnold Sho* araal,td by Lr\ai • l 44 Paul Tma.l and lha gd>> Cur ~" C ^ Ne* • IS a n>. and B 4S p m MA Now, T a m a am II noon. am 7 Mb, .mllpm Bv* Bwriw witn LnlM Psul t UM Plajio Lit om.--3n i., Bsolto to SM 3 a.m --0 00 am Spocial Dlapatrh 11.4s m. 1100 P Ml N*w gHvords mi p ni --1 00 o m BMU-a: Pol.ilfal WMklin 100 DP, H am atlo No* rw; 1 T-Kr lt from h-r| SO p m W SpWU Srvlf. I II prri _IKJ „ M( B*dlo Thr.iT. Th. I PhtlhArmon,. Orcn.ai-., •• p m Llssonar,chok* son '.: %  .. I ., Ton. JIN iv 1 Keep Your Bye on the BALL Make sure they SPENCER MOIiLTON We also have the ever popular Tennis Rackets FOR JUNIORS only *:.H4 each CAVE SHEPHERD t :i-in. Msh No. 6S — G-in h.v (i-in. Mesli ,v.'.-wwJa lart A BL R Km io *lr. Ion Iron WILKINSON & HAYNES -: PHONE 4267 :).. LTD. SELECT THESE DANBfl tUan ,„ T|1K lnmi jhv njmard CANADIAN local VHNNA s.\is\ QOMONZOLA „,„ 0OUDWI COM SAI XMI s.\i ; S \ ''"^""'•^' %  i i,u.„f l i,..cockia paina s M Tr s 41 „ tM IAUIO OUTKIBUTION IBABBADOSI LTD. 4LLEYNE VRTHLR & CO.. LTDHIGH STREET '*-'-*-t-*



PAGE 1

Tbnrdn> .1 11111.1 r 12 I!!.-.. Barkens liuncate c$~0 Price: FIVE I'ESTS Year 55. NATIONALISATION WILL KILL W.I. SUGAR hhe Sugar Delegates lopeToriesWillWin id Carry Out Their Promises To WJ. (From Our Own Correspond*!!! I LONDON. Jan. 11. S (lint Brllain is to have a Oenc-r.il Rhcttoa jretiraarj 2:; v\..s weleomwl by Ike Weil Indian ngkt |l*(*tM il"%  •nilnj. We Should Continue fcugar Fight ys Harry Davson QRGETOWN. B.G the W.I. delegation at Lonsugar talks should fall this nux i to ntinue the nghi they get 'I"'" "X l "'* h t f^ %  want Colon 1 C M.G., IISO I of S. Daveon and C %  tfKi now back from %  l!i in England. | higher pr nn a lonu :-rm purchl 8 pa for cxpaiuiiiik producing oomnwi reported thnt the success w unlikely. Colonel Davson 1 trunk we in the West Inmust feel "ry disappointed talks in so far as they vc because after the U.K. Coven's promises in the summer id hoped something definite come of it. I believe tfM ' Office, from the Secretary of dou n wards, would be fully ithetic with our unatelv other Ministries Into the picture whose tots tend more to domestic than lo the Empire ai a I feel sure the com) strive to the Uttar eno 1 they're men of great pow[ persuasion, but if the) J fail this time it of all of us 10 until we get what we conour just right-!. l*o know the thinking porol Ihe British public are •yrmnrtboti.with W.I. aims. irdlnary man of edU rather pmud of the WJ. lot %  good do.il tn icm prosperous but there are of course, who lake liltlr heir own unineaffair*. will I*Staying in British in until April plftl we ih.dt I.' included.—(C V.) Their negotiations with iho r'ood Mil-., i %  bearing %  %  'hey have now a-ked the Ministry I i BM lisenssions can be post, ioned. If the Ministry agree 10 this request they will return 10 the* West indies and will watt there until the e %  has been decided. The genernl leeling of the delegates ii thai I change of Government would aaalai efforts to .nitres and talr pric Waal Indian .sugar indusirv They l> on tho strength of promises outllnad i'. publication -Tho Right Road for Britain In this. Conaervatlve policy ls poastblo development in F.mpn %  i anatlia <; iven mont will ers of food and place HI the United rUofdorri only in I bat oJ home produceis. "We reeofcni.se specta] l mawtaining ,i mark, %  • %  .-. colonial products and ;i Conservative Government in the I'liited K.nitdoin will offer a guaranteed market at — fahlrt. human's Greai Ferry Plan or Caribbean WASHINGTON (B> Mail) sidcnt Truman has R .'•in Unking aibbean Lands to the He has explained hi to Mr. Warren Austin, cruel delegate to the Unit* who loaves Washington tor r of -.tie Caribbean on Jan26. is "just a vision tent and has not i>een workHe explained Mr Truman en.terminus of the %  alara f large ferry network in Aw i probably touch I Puerto Rico at in the %  will operate 1 Havana. %  the Pres> %  nations "1 lb in might be brought Into on through the tog of a fei i he said, the ai would Include ssions. ,is we! led thai" he pi* ident had in mind a %  r.i venture Bermuda Naval Base ^ ill Close A Reliable Report LONDON, Jai iiritaiu will probabl> naval base at Bermuda loi economy reasons, usually reliable %  today. i Admiralty spokesman I:I-UUI time ago. the Admiralty has been examining all with the object of making all possible aconOD Interest hero m ihe future of the British Naval Base -t Bermuda has been heightened by the mines oi HI Admlralta lion visiting .Bermuda Since Britain leased t h e Bermuda bases to lb 1940, American warsnips often avail then the two floating docka and other Reulrr. a Lord Lyle Warns Of Violent Repercussions 99 mi i'H il"iti. also a oi ;i Labour new Queensland. —Renter. BACK TO WORK WASHINGTON. Jan. 11 Mr John 1Lewis ihe L'rulfd en loader lodaj kins coal mi'' back lo uorkinB a three day week It II' OS Rculer lighting Gurkhas Can Eat VIeat Touched By Britons 'GLORIA MAY'' SUM: SKIPPKR, 2 PASSENGERS HAVE BEEN DROWNED SINGAPORE. Jan. 11. GURKHAS on operations in the Malayan iuri ?n exempted from ob i that they can be supplied with fresh meat from the air A eUgkMBI dispensation has ted w that the ; U.S. Consider Poliey Change ONLY FOR SPAIN WASHINGTON, Jan. 11. A State Department spokesman ^•aid to-day that the United States • of policy which would support %  move to end the diplomatic boycott of Spain. It was reported here that the State Department would be willing to return the United Stat' or to Madrid ii S malontv ni United NaUons members agreed to follow suit. the Uniti mbera withdrew their Ambassadors about three — (R'Miler. i \\ afdi. ma 1 o T • i "AiaaUfj H rjX.-U.M.I>. .lainaiea "*•* s mv rtulv '• i,r,rr I you that the names of the sur%  > %  in Curiapo %  '. in Linif-. Rice Oaateawt Sarjeanl QsaaateeM i:a*tmoiid Amos Chertea Nelaan \lfrrd Kaimie Ch.irl.-. Clarke \\ ilium Itullls* %  to their stale| %  %  >i hoOSMH "Gloria May" (99 tons) and when nbout 10(1 the boat W( 10 weathv Graham. %  Iifelx>at in which Ihe) OUl Ol tin u line days litl they arrived ..t the I hiuboroj. iiuuchm Missionary of the Vaneauelan Government" Captam Oi.ih.im is m hi* home is al "1'araiso." Barba-ees Road. He has %  % %  vile and Albert, who U -tudytng medlchM at HcOOl I i lanada Venezuelan police i trtet Conv A. Forte, ... a gov:aAon in tfri. I : District of Brltl ntiar station, who lOed Georgetown %  have eablei h Ambassador in Caracai. requesting him to have the men vnt back to British Ouiana al the B.C. Oovernment's expeiw. Will Conduet Hospital Eii(|uir\ THE Governor has ap%  c B.I to undertake nn enquiry into the adnua inltatlon of tho tel Di KaUlnan. who was Director of ., %  | from 1833 to l4(i. is exU> BfTlVa In Ihe Island on Friday, the ISth of Janu on wlahlni to oral or written ividcnn* make appUcatlon, in writing, to the Pec rosary, Inquiry, Qaajaral Hospital. Persian Gout I Has Resigned rKHF.MAN. Jan. :; 1 The Persian Govefriraant re DM Premie 1 Ohasnined sed m a letter to th Shah state.l that the iountr> hen demanded %  • o( Government. l| circles here expecte that cither Mohammed Saim Ci Qull Gholshaian. Finance Mlnu ter in the last Cabinet wool dead the new Government. La November the Committee whlci 1 luparvlaad General Elections [October announced that it ha i ourned all the voting papers an ciiiirrlled the elections Itecause %  l ^competence of certain clecli" nadequate protection il %  IkM boxes and other Ifteg %  The Committee Chairman anIhat the Shah would n it open the two Houses of Parliament until his return from !" %  The Shah returned fa >n .lamiai' 1, —Reulcr l'ireRobs6,000 Of Homes In Kowloon HONG KONG. Jan. II. Firr^weeping through a hutte. area on the outskirts ol Kowloo today made thousands of poo: hinesi homeless. Fin-! auited lhat 6,000 huts had already (royed. leaving 8,00 live. Many peopoa were injured. bUi there were few fatalities. British Royal Atffe I Army "were called out lo holr. lijtht the lire, which was iscin near to Kaitak airport. The fire has destroyed almoit alt buildings in the historic Oi walled city Of Kowloon irear, over which Chinese hav always rlainu-.! -..vvreiKiU* All available lire engines Ii Kowloon were sent to th (Ire. and other equipment wa ferried over from Hong Kong. Tonight a fairly "tron* wind wa fuming the Barnes, which wets •.hieatemng a built up —Reuter LONDON, Jan. 11 (From Our Own Correspondent). RATIONALISATION of the sugar refining industry if put into effect would nave "violent repercussions" in the West Indies, Lord Lyle of Messrs Tate and Lyle said today. At the same lime he announce-n I he would go on with the Mi Cube" campaign against nationalisation despite Attorney General Sir Hartley Shawrross' w.irnin | that expenses incurred we .1 nr- M 'sources on "propaganda %  I] She lOrteS rVl/1 ed a> influence an election" might 1 be held to constitute election exSays N.Y. Times 'It Will Mean A Great Deal NEW YORK, Jsn II. The New lots, liases in an ditorial today warns It iot lo exaggerate the important^ jf the result (f the British Genera iectton, adding It will mean ,reat deal, if the Tories win. bu he difference* will be in dogjIM itmosphere. emphasis and -piti! .alher than in any violent change .11 the social structure of Britain. On the llrrald Tribune ana will watch tho pro eedinits with the deepial >nd await ttv iiteoms with l eahsatlnn th-l. to a perceptlblagree, then own tntun • ffeetcd bl the results." —ReuUr \o Loan To Fight General Flection LONDON, .'-ii U flaS iintish Conserv.r central Office today port that it had a loan of $10,000,000. with which io right tho Qeners Campaign. oie, about 3 %  %  i %  .. Spokesman told Rralrr. I I course. It is absolute nonsense The report appeared today lr the official Soviet newspaper lu Berlin Taeelkhe Tuadachau. 1 alleged the loan was being mad) hrouRh the Chase National Bank —Keuler Third BICH Will Prevent Third War POITERS. Jan. II. Professor Daniel Vill>. of Poi' dtlseni Association" following tl i %  Lf-stylad woi Garry Davis. Profeaaor Villey. who has taught at Rio De Janeiro and Cairo Universities, in a newly published ifooklet. asks all youth to "follow him and create i third bloc to 'prevent %  iinrd world He expect! to hold his first public meeting in Paris sometime in February or March. —(KenUi More L.S. Aid For M. Tito WASHINGTON. .Ian 11 The Stat< Department was today reported to have decided on measures of limited military aid for Marshal Tito, which it would recommend to the Pr< in "emergency" This would probably be given, if the Soviet Communist bloc began to use force lo crush Yugoslavia's independence The National Security Council. die nation's top policy-mi kin* body on foreign affairs, was reported to have approved a standby programme of possible measures by the United Stales to sup%  Ire.uly niven U) Marshal Tito in the economic and, %  oUtical phases <>i his druggie. In the light of this H pertinent has determined what specific steps it would re%  ommend to President Truman I To date, American Aid to Yugoslavia has been limited I nic and political assistance, but \merican influence has been used vith Western European countries o ease economic pressures on the Yii,;.M;ivs — (Realer.) 'hurehill Coin^ Honif Twlav 1 : %  awday In %  *• Chun "5jy political Wng day_R.„ lnter\i'H liiMtistow Pissiasii ot tcow toMoscow. Wan, ( present -Komr Shirltv IVrnple Denirs Komumr HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 11. Film Star Shirley Temple to. romance with 20-year-old Ch Hotelier of Reno. Nevada, and said she was pretty i thing. ." said the %  "It SWhr said about me. I baby and once. friends. Mapes for year." she declared —Renter. Italian Governmeut Has Resigned KOME, Jan. II The Italian Government headPrei %  i ld De Gaspan, resigned tonight. [lowed a Cabii ing to-day which discussed resig%  .(lowing the long drawn (>ut Cabinet crisis, provoked by (he withdrawal of three rightwing Socialist Ministers In October. —Reuler liatl Mght" For Gustav STOCKHOLM, Jan. 11 Ailing fll-ycar-old King Gustav had '' rather bad night." the Dr. Hjalmai 'asserman said in u bulletin thimorning. .inig from throat %  i Dr. Casscrman I :ired this mornH'K" '.ndltion Is unchanged and his temperature is 31A deitlgrade this morning. —Reulrr Uapsburg Monarchists Come To Life In Tyrol Labour Backs Labour Par(\ TEL-A-V1V. Jan. 11. Changes m ihe Qovstl T^bour returns to tritain's General Baetl "ebruary M st today I j Mt Sam Wataon, Chairman "1 he British Lai oui Pai Mr Watson, on l ristl old a Press CoruTerence, i think Uibour will win because we haw ietter leadership —Reater U.S. Still Selling Tanks To Formosa WASHINGTON. Jan II. u\ selling large cars to Marshal Chiang K. island stronghold of Formosa. Several hundred 'combat vehicles' are reported to have been loadod on board a T ui knh freightei at Philadelphia The ship leave lor Formosa next week. The Chinese Embassy in Washington said that iru •' hSCiei %  ere bought iinner the JliS.OOO.OO. Aid Programms voteii by Coratnas in 1M7. Government ourees said tha. the shipment Included 70 mexlmn tanks. 100 armoured cars, and 100 Another M tanks lef penses over and above the amount allowed by law to each candidate and thus leave die way open for g court of law to declare elecVon void. He announced that Tate and '..yle were also organising a nationwide petition against nationalisation and signed the first form imself before %  dozen pres* men He said that national: would mean ihe end of West Indian hopes of further expansion People would not care to put rnoney into developing it. He dot Use campaign was dlrecTd against' any politics! I he acted sntrreey Lyle iharehoii lie %  ,i takl kwlo> oe courss of action after BMOt ll> <'tidei Fosters Come Down LONDON. Jan. 11. Anu-nationallsaUon postei nsOlaked irom tho winaows of the I'll i; -ante srth a %  %  % %  under .ntroi >f pettcy heMei ions. i Mr oeorges Barie, chairman of (land Cement lataotusers Limited, announced •oday that poster* again" nstiosalisation of this laghasl j proposed in the Labour Pmgramme-were ieing c ,ip He said Ii oighl %  Reettei British BoalBoinbi^d By Chinese Planes HONG KONG, Jan. 11 Two Chinese Nationalist plane .fed the 1.200 ton British steamer EiSinghss at Sswtow. It) miles rtprtheast of Hony K. U according to Chinese report* reaching here. The report* said tha." she suffered tome damage, but there no casualties. The Leoasbe*. which is registered In Singapon hinese owned, was de tained by the Nationalists some lime ago when she was caugh running tne Yangste blockade liasw VIENNA. Jan. II An illegal Au %  %  : The Organ iI he Ixague. ware found at Liens in the BritBranches are being frastai i idd. No More Bonus For French Workcw PARIS. Jan. II The French Council ters to-day approved < : Georges Ridault to ier*at the 3.000 fran. granted last month to the lowest -ide them ing is restored The Council decided, however, low grade • ho did not get it originally —< Hauler, i for Fon. II. ibaui i People's Committee Of Belize Prote*! To Kinji. Commons >rm%  British dollar lo ilgn t> ihe industrial district of the colony. A mass meeting in Belire last night i.< ithor* I %  h world ore nd foreign Go\ernmentv if and when necessary '.o inform ii request Hid menl the Committee had complained that d. of the British Hondun had brougi' (he cost of clMhing, food and entlal commn —Renter. N.Y. 9lOCk Market Climbs lli^li NEW YOHK. Jan. 11 \ day to the ISIKJ l AugusV l4f Trading wss the heaviest for about 14 months, with 2,630.000 shares changing boner. 91-Year-Old King Gustav Misses First Parliament During 40 Years STOCKHOLM. Ian. 11. RWNCE CUSTAV AIXJl.F opened b Parliament today in the abeam u i ; K i Quatav, ill in bed with bronchitis and u septic throat. Frogmen Seureh For Mir&ing Boy was the lirst time tor V\ had failed to IK* there. The last time he opened %  thiough the Parliament, yround* Mn a sedan d iped to the throne by hi* Aides. WOLVERHAMPTON. Jan. II. Six frogmen "in rubb and diving helme' %  Victoria ( %  icscenoed to the muddj in-d of the ham Can. > fm th? hO) nnsvhristmas Day. The leader of the divers is %  >\\>. won •-. !" -ri in's high-1 J* Sw -si nulr .. mesa. The i his speech from the throne, reItetatlons good. Sweden liopad that the Eu;ope:i Council would bring the-memo*;her, an'. .nd such 1 progress. tic posit tor. floodlight until OJO i %  %  not be two pools Scotland Yard experts wer* in Central England. -Renter. (it year, and most of the rstioning and otl

xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EPKO510MH_4KNKQZ INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T16:02:42Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02281
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

PAC.r six BARBADOS ADVOCATE THLR.SDAY. JANUARY 11 u. HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON TYrnrrrpr MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY THE LONE RANGER .S OETJSSOCNER I_ATB. WHY cur* •Hi BflE BACK' --OSE MSN TrflNK V0U96 MLLER, I SOT WI CUNT SMOOT Tit* T*£ CSCOT %  5= cr?-r% %  g .Tcwwaoet BY FRANK STRIKER ^.. ma iSi WWQMI 'onrtuest T HE vFcocHct OF THE SCORPION Government May Enquire Into Film Law LONDON (By Mail) The British Government m..y shirt inquiries into the operalto'i of Ol. law passed by the Jamaican Government unde, which a US firm. Klnffwood fllmi Ltd i< given a monopoly to make nlm in the island. film interests in Britain are waiting to see what effect the la-v nuv have on their plans and it u believed that the Colonial Office has now decided to make further enquiries about the law and Its possible future effect. The Governor of Jamaica muv i> asked for a report on the matter. Film authorities in Lond-m ecently denied a reported Kiniiwood Films statement they ha.1 secured priority for their films in Britain. No priority is accorded to any film In Britain and it seems dubious whether films ma le in Jamaica by a US firm would set any showing In Britain because of the Quota Act. —B.U.'V Devaluation Deals West Indian Appeal Co,„ Students In Canada K*****^ The Court ol O %  if I postponed until tfariuspT?"! Severe Blow .T^^r^S. Phil U.S. Cut In Rum Prices West tecHl %  '' uni"r...„ s %  ^"^'..^L.^.: r£S.; ,w s „ Mr G. H. A**,; Kit-, U a result ol tne recent --. -• % % %  ". ,^ • •..,, of the pound sterling. S, d „". ""'^^ (SB ii Simuitaneou, w,h devajuatiun %% %  „£>?%%JZ ,£ %  arrow*, a. whom the puL Oppose Increase On Cation Duty BASSETERRE. (By Mail) %  •rent meetina: of the ., %  Council Govemmeiv. •i creased the export ccttoo shipped from St. Kttti to Jc. per *>. Unt. The export tax on lint In the sinter islands ol the Presidency Nevis and Anguilla remains nt le. per lb. TWi iisctimatory legislation was ata 11 K i> opposed b) the two nominated member-; of St. Kitt.;. but was carried by a major vot>\ all elected members supporting the third elected member for St. Kitts. Mr. J. N. France, who %  tatan thut cotton mi grown uffliiaollj in St. Kilts by estates who could afford to pay the t,ix ft was grown by peaints in the other islands and they could not afford to pay it. It I* understood that the St. Christoiher Sea Island Cotton Association intends protesting to the Secretary of State against trm liscrimatory Ief01alion. and promises sending copies to the parent body and to its Advisory Committee in London. — B.U.P NEW YORK (By Mall) S"J ?".J.Z. oV M„ *{&£**. US. run, importers have bee, authors t" .mend fair „„„ „ „ pricing schedules so that retail most £ aRected m .gamst piS^ingTfoFebruary ha: .•: May. and who hnd hemsclv,whlrn formed th. „,£,• i readybeeh made, according to in alghl of the Promiaed Land dispute. |, „., but MrtTti *,e law l*?.uVof West Indian with their chances of completing whole proceeding, gStiK tariff reductions already made, the journey threatened tarred back to the Court atd Uie exception Is being made in the The West Indian Society of eery interests of the consumer McGlll. representing about 200 Mr. Walcott tol d th, , Puerto Rlcan and Virgin Island students from the West Indies and as the Reglstrar-ln-C rum prices will maintain schedBritish Guiana enrolled at Mi-Oill not put Mr. Taylor i_ uled levels. Both of these islands and Sir George Williams College, and had not'given him a ( ore possessions of the United are petitioning tinrespective Coloance. Mr. Taylor had n, S.'ates and their products are not nlal governments for aid. Under % % %  %  in the court. sublet! to import taxes —.U.P. llrpresidency of Mr. Eric A The Rcgistrar-in-Chll Valere. engineering student from vendor was the fit Trinidad, the Society brought '"'"' %  the claim. their plight to the notice of the %  authorities. The T nnr i a r, Ha X\ nn U •rar indicated that r "•*" %  nag U0Q|fc i 1 Board ol Governors a a *T r* n ff were fully sympathetic towards /VDOUt U.S. DOOM all students from sterling areas In icujnrtw • J the difficult position in which they Th| ug !j u 3j?Li"* 3.200 Soldiers Leave After IS Hours Delay MARSEILLES, Jan .1 Ibt French troopship Mr -selves, and were studyunbllUncM „ "^ "*J"-(H411 tons, held up for 48 hOUl I "• "ayi and mean, of alleviatlnr UrltMn ., n(J "• by a strike of th. crew, left her,U* kc-nn^ o th,. MtuaUon bud methoos u today with 3,200 troops and However, the problem of the We. probViy'^^ £ %  culpmem for Indo-Chinj Indian, could not be condere,l hlmg<| h aoub !" The strike which led to clasheMpirMb' He readily gave 1/ „ unb „, ncM „ B yMttttfay between police Hid support to the petition. „ s DU „ neM ,,,„„,, %  in .III %  .li.l.^lito. factors, which may ; sympathy, was settled.—Renter. Special Scholurxhips Threat Of Hostile Wages Campaign LONDON. Jan. 11. U.S.Citizen Ordered To Leave Czechoslovakia PRAGUE. Jan. II. The Czech Government ordered this afternoon the American Joint Distribution Committee, an American-Jewish relief organisation. Which has functioned in Prague since May 1845 to close its offices in Czechoslovakia by the end of January. The Government at the same lime requested the departure from Czechoslovakia by January 31 of Mr. Henry I-evy, an American citizen, who zlnce the *ummer of 1048 has been an official The | S>S Committee <*rdfly w" almost idenUsal i six weeks aw.iy. British labour on [he rjalhousie campus took lne wording of the con Leaders face the threat of a hnsimme di.te steps to raise the funds P*e m BnUin's tile wages campaign by millions or seltlng up these scholarships "P^t but budget expei of Trade Lmonists. aild gol pennisalon to hold a tag clufl 5 600 '^ capital Tomorrow conference ol j__ ments. Ixaders of all 187 Unions afflliaj„ vlew of he fa(:t na al On the current account I ted to the Trade Union Congress McQU nnlhousuand other Treasury will have a as* will be asked to vote cuiiiuie,. the students sufficient to finance abewt I. the Labour Oovenunect^ rPm bed "feet" were to be msd day to scour the bottom of at' canal. Apolog) For A Wound SINGAPORE. Jan. 10. is apologised to a Sikh • uii.ii assuunl afl.i Mm and killing hi.in,,., i„ %  itUekad %  hospital jwp i, u^l"" 1 , Pohan J'slerday. the MMl u,ld the Polire to-da. —a'aylrr. Reports Denied WASHINGTON, Jan. II Dmrtmnl spokesman 9M .l.i,i.-,l i,-porls publlshe,! Germany Ihll the Untied iles was trying lo negoliale n the Soviet Union .1 %  .til. Ml of East-West ,litl. 1 ..I lur rornul nor lnrmal MgotlaUoni li'lwoen th*' lUd M...V. .„.., n„ in| ..a Keul.r Invitation Issued I MI espionage, subversion and terrorism 01* of the Ptu-K„iniii(o.... Albanian Government. —Reuter. KARAC'HIN. Jan. 10. Diego Luis Molinair. Chairman "t the Argentine Foreign Affairs "&.,Sse"r; ^".""PS! Commission Meet ,ui.*'fc' h' .""' ,8 l e "!."" P re ": '-AKE SKCKSS. Jan. 10. ,„,... '""• %  i N -'" visit 10 Injured Is Italian Strike* ROME, Jsa 1! Police intervened to-mgW J (tisperse an unauthorised ap cession of thousands of aaP unis''^monstrating against tht US' Prime Minister, to sioll on Eritrea, set 'uu bv the wnment in the centre of Raa* njgswtlna. aasaasW. Assembly to aacertam the wishes ?* demonstrators had ff future ouslv ndad a meeUnf MM 1 1 Ihe aVftiaana to thi Favourable Conditions For Liberation"? SAN FRANCISCO. Jan. 11 A C h i n aae Commtuilal broadcast bam PaUni to-day aild thai Conununist victories in south and southwest China had created favourable eosMttUon tion" or |> ,.„. |g|and 1 i bet. All the chiiui malnaud "with ptton "f Tibet" had been brouatil status of their country, met for %  %  * 1 K^^SJTZtt "he first timr I to-day In i ate six workers killed by psr Formosa To Undercut Cuba HONO KtlNG. (liy Mull) Kport sugar to the i the llrst time,! fire on Monday during rWl" M il.'ii. L in Northern Italy. The demonstrators tf T\ through police cordons la main streets and m.rctuKi ia til i..lumns to the Plajia Cl ouUlde Parliament, and lo %  Govwiiment Palme of Ul. "". I inale. Police touring the Iroubl. • in jeeps detained a nurnMfO demonstrators alnglng_ th. j itU.S.) perl Flag" and shouting "Do" dollars che.ner ih.,l ih,. r.ov.rnnuHtt." About slightly injured. w> dollars cheaper ugar. ix'il Flag' and thunl the Govern r pie were si! meat." About mfl sir. t. THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES !" !" swenw OONC nit nuatcc 1 11 mwM t coin a/Mi gut %  • jaasaaW iafgj''' H Mcrov %  %  % % % %  %  ^* • %  %  -i '*? xmmM,ocintav.uM niiM\ THUWWM-OUTOI IHL H OW-I WN-ItK10ltJ.THI UIMloi.m. For Your Insurances consult, A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (B'dos) Ltd. Agents for The National Employers Mutual General Insurance Association Ltd., London. Protect yourself against the risks of Fire. Hurricane. Earthquake, Sea Wave, Riots and Commotion, Workmens Compensation or Insure Your Motor Car.



PAGE 1

I'M.I FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE n\v. j. BARB^OsdA^OaATE PublMud by Thi Advrvate Co. Lid, H Broad St. BrfdMtown Thursdav, January 12. 19511 Who Will Win? TIIK C'.eneral Elections in Great Britain will be held on February 23. Parliament will be dissolved and the Government will £0 to the country for approval or disapproval of a national policy which has latterly become the battle ground of fierce political controversy. The circumstances under which the announcement was made K' ve ri^ l0 further speculation whether the Labour Party is as sure of its ground as many of its adherents believed six months ago. Two weeks before a scheduled meeting of Parliament the Prime Minister has advised His Majesty to proclaim dissolution and to postpone that meeting. The Labour Party has decided to brave the rigours of winter and fight the election before another budget has been proi and the full effects of devaluation felt. The country has been sharply divided on the question of devaluation of the pound and it was claimed by the Opposition that the necessity for devaluation was the direct result of the mismanagement by the Labour Party which had iittempted a spendthrift policy of creating the welfare state before economic recovery had been ensured. The nationalisation of railways and industry, the Opposition claim, had further contributed to the economic crisis. On the other hand the Labour Government claimed that it has carried out the plan which it originally set out to accomplish. But neither the Liberals nor the Connves are satisfied that the results have been beneficial to the country. The elections will be fought on < cut issues. They will centre around whether nationalisation of industry or the more llexiblc management of private re conducive to economic recovery. Whichever pol i-y glint favour : clear that there is no short cut and that a long and arduous road must be travelled before the country can regain the stability at home and the presi iad which she had belore 1929. I Socialist Governments in Grant Britain before. It was in 1924 thai the Socialist!, led by Mr. Ramsay '.maid, formed a Government with the Liberal Parly ami in 1929 whan the late Mr. Baldwin office with than and succeeded the Prim* Minister shortly after in a coalition gov%  Than hai howarer, seldom been any government whose national policy has been fraught with such serious the anttra Common%  The BodaUft Government of 1945 came into power at a time when the country v. willing tor any el of Government after seven years I And the ..ere blamed lor the war. Whether the country will have had enough of Socialist experiment will be Inn the next six weeks. In if its many blunders and its unpopular undertakings, the Labour Party a PP r Ottoo with a confidence ndend by their remarkable record at the polls in the many bye-elections which fought it is true that m ever; case the majority has been severely reduced but nevertheless. Labour has been able to retain the seat. There is little doubt that in tii, •lection the uml earl (or Labour will be 1 at deal less than the aggregate of those cast in 1945, and that the Conservative vote will be increased considerably but it remains to be seen whether the individual Conservative candidate vote will be sufficiently large as to win the %  bet of seats for that Party. 2 Apostles Of European know the pamphlet irtitl.'ij. 1'. M means briefly: %  "o nec^sI gather%  %  It might be thought that this pamphlet vv;is written by some r'-iirjonl and honestly r member of the present Council of Europe, who wirhed to communlllghts known to himself, but of which tbej were not I I so. Although the pamphlet is ui>-to-d,-.!c enough. Although its Ideas are LV %  and of ail 'i by men of good will, the author has long since quitted thjs earth and Hi Of shall we call them Ittkor? Or rather the authors. For, in order Of the uMiiv of ihelr counstlb to the world, tho pmp.-ignn.lisK of WM in 1H14 made up n tt>am of two. Two Is not loo many. First there Is Count-SalntSimon, a nephew i. Ihe author of Certain men were %  %  he was an adventurer of genius. and both these terms arc to be am. Saint Simon hail loM .1 .MI.it H< i % %  cursor, an initiator who cannot be held In loo toon, "Saint-Simonism" %  i ikirin step t0 future. And this meat propamndiat of ideas knew when to be or.'ictical llistorv will affirm tho value of his name. It was In 1814 and Europe was disturbed and did not hide It. Saint Simon was nut disturbed for hi knew In '.v to bring tianunliu to Europe. He, and the young Augusitn Thierry He was and Thierry beginning his life—beginning it with hope, with coniM< And tin: two think. together, and COlUbOl pctuously tu bring: %  bout i %  Simon continued in appointed task as a red %  on the I Hion II* .1. I %  % %  •"%( i luirlrs verge of those vast undertakings which were to make nil the groat leaders of French history. S man was an optimist. His optimism was based as much on tho boldness of his nature H upon his remarkably keen and clear-sighted mind. Augustin WM young enough to profess optimism without any particular reason. But you had to be enormously optimistic to affirm at that time, among the squabbles of the Congress of the doctrine of a politically and economically unified >nd to do the groundwork for the establishment of Its principles and its plan. Thanks to God and in strength of character optimism flourished in Ihe minds of 'he two collaborators. And they wrote in a charming unanimity; "The golden age of the human rt.ee is not behind us; it Is ahead of us. Our fathers have not seen it; our children will experience it in. da., it is up to us to prepare the way for them." The golden age is always ahead of us. If we do not sec it very clearly, H ibecause it does Its best to hide itself. But how we shall exalt when we suddenly dis cover that it is close upon us. Mini Simon and Augustin 4h had a little of this and salutory exaltation. Even so they were by no means lacking in perspicacity ana logic. They were prepared to win over the many_as well as the few and to gain authority over them. An authority which It would be churlish on our par: to to deny them now. The ideas sown by them in the Intellectual and moral (innate of their time and DOW beginning to prosper. It is time. The authors of "the reorganise. Uon of European society" had IgORNlf note fl %  t .lions would be essential." EtOfl congr-ss can i id together, treaties and oi be piled up, but all that will lead to nothing. At every I nations as at every meeting of men, common institutions are a necessity, an organisation is essential. 11 this does not exist everything will be decided by force." Thus our precursors aspired ti t general government for their European confederation. Indispensable. Ineluctable. And thes? were their conditions. 1—The general Government to be entirely independent of nation, al Governments. 2—Its members must be encouraged by their position to have general views and to concern themselves with general inter• Mi 3—They must be strong and that strength must reside within themselves: that Is; they must have public opinion behind them. Very well. In that way a Europ. can patriotism might be created which would be superimposed upon national patriotisms, crowning them without absorbing them. To that end the Parliament — the greater Parliament" — would act. "Every question of general interest to European society will he brought before the greater Parliament and will be examined and decided by it. It will be the sole judge of controversies between the nations." It will not have escaped you that Saint-Simon and Augustin Thierry were already concerned with details. It would seem that these details appear today to be less ambitious than they appeared to be 130 years ago. But they are certainly ambitious even now, for the 1814 reformers envisaged. "A code of general ethics, national as well as individual, be drawn up by the Parliament and be taught throughout Europe Liberty of conscience and freedom to practice any religion will be respected. Thus there will be between the peoples of Europe that which constitutes a bond and a basis for any political association: conformity of education, a union of interests, similarity between maxims, and moral and Intellectual community." It would be pleasant to quote yet more revealing passages frun a pamphlet which, after all. is almost as short as its title is long Modern champions of "European Union" cannot read It without nig. And a memory of its authors must have been in the air at the "Strasburg rendezvous." rw* riic Hciliial laVsf'arcli 4 on mi I ll> Marital War.-. M.U.. MM A .P The Medical Research Council Himsworth, formerly Professor of (part i>dy appointed by Medicine at University College the United Unadorn Govestunant Hospital, London. The members to administer the funds provided of the Council are appointed by by Parliament for the the Committee of Privy Council, promotion of scientific reeeafch in In the case of the scientific members after consultation with the i. iss, S^UMES I os. They retire In rotation at regular intervals, and the aim is always to ensure established in I y 13. ,is the Mcdi%  I the same '? .o 'z T&SSSTSSS.' as %  %  appointed Committee of Privj Council for Medical this Cummilti e e the I. of lh uished experts with research. To advise them in the promotion of neaarcn m special : %  I ... il |l in., thfl I ouncil have the hi-lp of about I expert committees. These and the Ministers in charge of maj deal with subjects of lasting 1 as chemotherapy, lamina, the problems of the he health at home or In the Crown deaf, or with more temporary lien as the clinical inal of ii promising new drug. A committal interest is il Inteid jointly by 'Ihe Kcsc.reli I'rovr.uiime %  J HtM.iuii wouncil Is 1th ihe Council and Colonial Office, '" "attire ,o direct Waft. 00 tropical diswlth devising on nutritional and other i .-thuds tor its provenquestions affecting the health of peoplai In planning redeals also With the fund,Miirntal search on problems of industrial sciences i Kfl ,.,y u „. m v ,, u i havi U i ., physics ami apnetiot; with the |h Industrial lle/ith the status of one i f thru toinmittees. and with > ,1 It will be realised that the hun.. HI aeial to ids • %  Ucal Research Council enjoy | .;iy deal, nidi .MI, %  high degree of autonomy, being B only to their directing Ing the human factor. commitl.e of Ministers and to Parliament for the proper expenIhe t nuiicil and linn : I .nt-in-ald. This AdviMirv Committee) relative tadependanca of tho ustratos an important of twelve prim ipie-long accepted In Britmembers and nine am thai the detailed %  llocattoa for scuntitlc other administrative ofBV era. Ii | an expert body 1934 till September 1949 the of scientists, with only a modicum %  I la) help. Edward taouanby, whose own I ituralta work in reeearcrH^ .win the admindiscaaes are wreU known Ha has imnsani departnow been succeeded by lh II P, n tuts on matters of common interest. Indeed they arc required to advise these departments on health problems within their sphere and to undertake such new researches as may be necessary for this purpose. The Council's Research Establishments The Council's central research laboratories comprise the National Institute for Medical Research in London, whose Director is Sir iljrington. The research programme here is very wide, falling under the general headings of physiology, pathology, biochemistry, pharmacology and cheniutherapy. endocrinology, and physics in relation to medicine. Diseases recently under intensive study have been influenza, tho common cold, malaria and (during the war) the typhus fevers A special responsibility of the Institute is to maintain standard "iis for the biological assay of certain drugs, hormone?. vitamins, and anti-toxins. This Is dona in many instances on behalf of World Health Organisation. Another institute wholly maintained by the Council for laboratory research. Is the Dunn Nutritional Laboratory at Cambridge. Obviously, in any organised programme of medical research, prominence must be given to the study of clinical problems of disease and injury as seen in pafsOntl To this end. the Council have for long maintained, wholly or in part, special departments for clinical research -n medicine at two London teaching hospitals, and at a hospital for nervous diseases. More reccn.'ly, they have set .ip a number of further research establishments m London, including centres for the stud> of • si daasassM and aye o^lasaaaa, ha %  >n the radiotheraphy of cancer, and for tho study oi Industrial illnesses and i units fur research In human nureuse have also been established In London. Itaeaareh on industrial injuries and skin diseases Is carried out In a unit at Birmingham, and in South Wales occupational lung disease in the coal-miners Is being studied. At Cambridge, the Council have established an applied psychology research unit and a department of experimental nHMKine. New Laws Against West Indies Stowaways Are Being Planned LONDON, (By Mail). The British Home Office, the Colonial Office, police and welfare officials and port authorities are planning new laws to prevent the country from being flooded with native stowaways, notably from the West Indies and West Africa. Conferences between various bodies have been spurred by a number of questions during the last Parliamentary session and the growing concern of magistrates at the number of men who come before them and cannot be deported because they have full rights of British citizenship. About 16,000 West Indians and Africans are now living in Britain—twice as many as in 1939. There are a further 3,000 coloured students with scholarships or private means. Mr. M. J. Mitchell, Trinidadian General Secretary of the League of Coloured People, run by Colonial lawyers and other professional people for the good of their countrymen in Britain, says: "TOLD PLENTY OF JOBS" "Many coloured people have made good in Britain. They have settled down in jobs and are earning good wages. But it must be admitted that some of the stowaways are a source of anxiety to the League. "As a rule the men come from tin Indies and West Africa in good faith—they have been told that jobs are plentiful and wages high. But difficulties arise from the fact that some of them have no conception of trade union rules.'' Other authorities, however, pointed out that local officials in the various West Indian colonies are always warning would-be emigrants of the difficulties of getting work in Britain except of a highly-skilled nature. Every care was taken to make it plain that unskilled jobs were far from plentiful. Typical of the cases causing considerable irritation is that of a stowaway who got a fortnight in jail on arrival, then received 24/a week national assistance money plus IIlodging allowance—and goes on drawing this and living without working at all. COLOURED COLONY West Indians of this type tend to congre-j gate around the Tottenham Court Road area| of London, where a huge dance hall which they have practically monopolised, now ad-| vertises itself as "London's Harlem." Police' and welfare officers report that there is little | vice in this community despite rumours to the contrary. Mr. Mitchell advocates tightening the stowaway regulations, adding: "I am in favour of repatriating stowaways who at least cannot show credentials or a good record and high character. Next to that is accommodation. The real need is for hostels for Coloured people—cultural and recreational centres to keep them off the street corners." British Council and Colonial Office people concerned with the welfare of these men find however, that the majority dislike the idea of hostel life and prefer to live privately, even if in inferior conditions.B.U.P. ****! <&*%*>! CROWN MALT EXTRACT CREAM OF WHEAT (lai SOUTH AFRICAN MELON and GINGER JAM, 2-tb lins (Oiiiwim; BUILDER'S HARDWi FOOT and CHAIN BOLTS CASEMENT STAYS CASEMENT IIIIIWII DOOR HANDLES CHROMUM LOOSE-PIN Bl'TTS — 31" t JJ. BARREL BOLTS: Chromium V to I" ^ and many Other ITEMS or In!*,, WILKINSON & UAYNES CO., LTll, C.S. PITCHER & CO, Phones: 4472 & 4687 Booker Bros: Sugar & Freights It, • ,. LONDON *y Mail). The financial Times commenting on the Daw West Indies freight rates, lan; "One of the companies known to stock markets which should benefit is Booker Brothers McConnell & Co. This old-established business it dates back to 1833—has two vessels plying between this country and British Guiana. Rising costs have been cutting into shipping profits and made the adv., freights necessary. "The interests of Booker Brothers McConnell are in the news, too, in another direction Talks between the Ministry of Food and the West Indian delegation for a new long-term contract, have been resumed talks ran into heavy weather recently as the delegation regarded tinUinlitry'i offer as inadequate, and the possibility of a breakdown in the negotiations was mooted. As the Booker sugar estates account for 75 per cent of the British Guiana sugar output, the company has a large financial stake in the outcome of the talks— B.U.P. ^^j and Fine Choco CADBURY'S CHOCOLATE BISCUITS—utr Ua | CADBURY'S CHOCOLATES—per box TERRY'S CHOCOLATES—per box |7, TEHHY'S CHOCOLATE BARScaih KKIU.I:R DUNDEE CAKE—each .. CARR'S CUMBERLAND FRUIT CAKE—ncb FIGS—per pkt CANDIED PEEL—1-lb pkt CARR'S CHEESE CRISPS—per tin ODEX SOAP—pci cake ,jj "COCKADE'' Fine ltr.M STANSFELD. SCOTT & CO, PREPARE FOR THE CO NIGHTS WITH WARM BLANKETS Now in Stock . WHITNEY ALL-WOOL BLANKETS (Siaart Colours: Pink, Gold and Fawn at I White at $7.20 COTTON BLANKETS (Sites: 70" x 9t") *' DA COSTA & CO., LTD] DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT. OIH III UH IIS Mi A liliiiguilitcl GmlBgisJ Who Worked for Many Year* in B*do* To The Editor. The Adiocoi,-. SIR. -I (Ml that BUMI of yoUl %  "Md.-! i T encountered in.tm.t result of climbing up and down the water wcUs, and, o*br who %  ] n a> be glad tu read the enclosed memorial wi colleague and Dr Kuglcr: !3*y. Alh.M Senn would havecclebr..-rtirthday had he not IUCeumbed on the 2flth of Januarv Amoni; :uends arc teologigt* In all pan who deplotv the untimely loss of colleague Mhosc dutiful gttt" oca promised man} moit l Following pn at the unit Neurhalel Alfred Senn lin ;( ||. i, Hidy of natural %  ti n wnii .HI txci ih ot thesis on %  %  with the iii %  pan ,,f o %  in their hum* ruiUr> i; tiuavnl ituucn aaat so full tif ,, ;. \ t ,. ffntnfjati, ProiWr Carl Schmidt Pttrok um tnn from thai wtth I Uige part of little known unflagging energy in Ing lor thi tiiv, uii i i with tha mad the Cotn1 ' ' '..is m A!;fi,, ooo a ^^^^B eaaw %  %  %  mu mbiu.iHJt t. mug with his In 1937 one found All UjaJa m ihe Caribbean region but this time engaged n, „ X detailed geological lurvaj of ttM llarbados on behalf of tho British Union OH ( During the arai ;il Coloailal iant and Welfare mad* use of Senn's know ledge for water supply and other geotechHis report on Geological Investigations of the J.roundwater Resources of Barbados" ii an outstanding contriIhc literature el Waal Indian water supply and of great VallM to the Island of Barbados in his paper dealing \wth the Paleogene of Barbados and its Bearing on History and Structure Of AnHllean Caribbean Regiot," (Bull. A.A.P.G Vol K 1JMQ) %  •d lha first modern ecology T, W Vausfhan Harbadoa. In W iO. IMS) he dUouawd the natur. and depoilUoa.,'. BUBl of the Oceanic formatiun and tried to lit the geological history of Barbados into that ot the Antillean arch. The commercially engaged peuoleum geologist is generally Itfl uilli littlo time for s, H-IIILII. publicalipi I ..ftcn discouraged from contl such. Alt the more it la to the credit of Alfred Senn that he spent much of his spare time in paleontologlcal Investigations, study of literature, and preparations of graphs which allowed him to make contributions to our But science alone could not truth-seeking and artloving mind, coupled nh .. Ul improve his skill in mountain climbing and skiing in • !l trained %  llcld of camp where he showed his true where men are forced to Uve and work together under •nherenl al themselves. WM no better comrade than Alfred Senn. H, was a joyful, helpful, open-hearted companion '"•'" dismayed by the vagaries %  After ,ia„. „f tracking through tain-soaked tropical foram iii. Men ggoiaj and lnc bare necessltioa for camping, he •till was prepared to carry hi load if it meant reaching geologically unexplored region! where , pack animaJl X? H ;. **i |d diKu >• in h *"***">* * "tretehed in hi. hammock, slung between hZofr*' k nd would not l0 hi humour when a nocturnal downpour forced htm to I, ooox and maps under his body ^eT-en^er-,. HE. SI. George. Barbados. I GODDARD'S %  %  .:'*,:-.::;V4





PAGE 1

T" gfRSDAY. JANUARY 12. 1950 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE klombo Talks End Soon; pack Jap Peace Treaty (Bv SYLVAIN HANBOOT) COLOMBO. Jan. 11. JflE Commonwealth Foreign Ministers, believed to fr widely over Japanese Peace Treaty terms, to-day %  in principle to set up a working party to study the em. lne > '>*ard a 75 Brat r.and report on SouUi East Asia by Mr. otal MacDonald. Commissioner General there. The oi King party wiU be ut Ambassador or High Commissioner level. Although it was not decided where it should meet, London was considered a possibility. Observers here saw in the establishment vt a working party an admission that Commonwealth countries have widely differing views on the Treaty, and thai further consultation is required bet ona detailed, co-ordinated policy ran emerge. They pointed out that any decisions depend on other interested powers besides those represented at Colombo. Divergencies in emphasis over the Japanese Treaty Talks did not DM inendly atmosphere. BrttabVf Foreign Secretary, Ernest Bavin, opened the discussion, and delegates reported he was in excellent form throughout die session .vi r. Philip Noel-Baker, British Secretary for Commonwealth Relations, told reporters -Her the session that the Ministers nad had "a very good day and a %  nost useful discussion." Mr. Pearson went out of his way to ridicule a local newspaper report attributed to the correspondent of one London newspaper that the Conference was dragging through waning enthusiasm, and that U I British Election announcement made delegates feel that in the event of a Conservative victory, the present British delegation's views might be repudiated. On the contrary, he asserted that the talks, covering widely different regional approaches, had revealed all delegates as essentially reasonable and understanding. Views expressed at today's talks on Japan, out India at one extreme and Australia at the other. Pandit Nehru, Indian Prime Minister, strongly supported a quick settlement of Japanese issue under conditions that will allow Japan economic rehabilitation political self-determination, and an early withdrawal of occupation forces. The Difficulties Canada s External Affairs Minister, Lester 1). Pearson, while allowing full value to the desirability o( an early settlement, maue an appraisal of the difficulties in the way of such a solution. On legal grounds, he reminded that a formal Peace Conference with two Communist Powers — Russia and China — present would meet an insurmountable difficulty in agreeing on a common approach. On practical grounds as representative of the neighbour of the United States, he felt that the Commonwealth Powers ought to understand the position ol America as occupying power with security responsibility. A source close to the Conference said that South Africa's approach was cautious, inlluencec mainly by her regard for Australia's point of view, and her •00 Japan become selfsupporting again. Mr. MacDonald's review oi South East Asia, it was learnt was presented frankly as Pearson'* Impressions. While hoping for the best, he urged the Commonwealth to be realistically prepared for tht worst in assessing the repercussions of the Chinese Communls victory on South East Asia. Taking up :he theme alread.' touched on yesterday of China"5th column" potential. MacDonal ingled ou Amnesty ltemplated Germans FRANKFURT. Jan. 11. States High Commls[Mr. John J. McCloy staved that he was consider•blishlng a procedure tc individual petitions for by German war crimlid that he was not. howntemplating a for Germans sentenced %  crimes. In a letter to |Aloys J. Muench. Regent Apostolic Nunciature it. h Mr. McCloy said. "any. preaching a general ampould, 1 fear, be taken as ndonment of the princiabllshed in the trials of Mtuals of war crimes". Cloy stated thai he *H by what appears to l>e bey to question the legal the prosecutions and. ill soundness of the He said thai' he.di |leve that world opinion %  red to accept the pro" that those crimes had Iciently atoned for that nans should now be al1 forget them. —Renter. 400,(MM),000 hit On Atomie Energy NEW YORK. Jan. 11. %  30 this year the Unitlies will have spent K,000 in studying mili|d non-military uses of %  energy. The ligure was y Mr. Wilbur E. Kelley, r of the New York Office Atomic Energy Commisthree-day Conference | by the Commission and l University. Mr. Kelley j amount covered all re|xpenses since September i the Government bt> scale efforts to make Bomb, and includes bOO for the current fiscal pe did not say how much %  ted to study of military I said security restrictions I Impossible for the ComIto "report completely to pie on alt purposes for ms have been expended." —Reuter. %  strut Claims | M. Schillings oTn Russia VIENNA. Jan. II. Is counterclalming 240 %  schillings from the Soviet I for civilian occupation linst the Soviet claim of plion ichlllllies for post, and, according to AusJoverninent sources here. |ia, which they said, hail principle the AusI right to make countcr%  nd Dr. Leopold Fig), the Chancellor, put the prward on December five. representatives at daily 200,000 I Ham Lasi Rites ML 11. —neard Palmiro Tofltti I neral oration over the I %  %  .era killed in MonriiiUewbeee The Piaxra was a sea of red the brought %  nations from as isr south as Bari. 1 Togliur %  'he Government is lesponsible for the shooting was repeater) %  ho include*i De Vittoi %  %  '.eneral of the ConununfcfJ i Labour and M*>or Corasori. Before walking behind the inch were ben %  shoulders ol overall-clad workmen tO Togliatti stale in the COUJ M iind mothers wept btttei them shouting "aeeoaeta I ruler. l-li:i:ii] PrtMiiitr V^k<*tl To Resign LEONAKII COTTKILL. Pauline Dowdlng and Barbadian mlion hildren in %  itudto of Radio B.B.C. Commentator Finds ''Colour Bar" In Barbados U.K. Hears Adams On Sympathy LONDON (By Mail). NOTABLE WEST INDIES politicians were heard presenting their colonies' cases and UiscUMiiiiK It-deration and other problems in a B.B.C. programme relayed lo millions of listeners on the Home Service. The programme consisted of recordings made throughout the West Indies for the annual Christmas Day round-the-Empire tour always put on by the B.B.C. and surplus to needs on December 25. ___^^_^______ B.u.c. commentate* CotiVill described life in Bermuda. j the Bahamas, and Jamaica "loveI licet of them all" and Harry Vcnnuicau buetr* I historian was heard giving the historical background of the island us well as romn i current iui.siness difficulties art* ing from bterlmg-dollar problems. Barbados—'' where u %  colour bo.* was compared with Jamaica "where there l| : white mingle freely." Mr. A. S. Bryden of Barbados, discussed the sugar price and Us importance to West 1 Indian economy and the voice of Mr. Orantlay Adam* was also heardMr. polos on the prospects of ••.•deration and in a reference io the colour bar said "We *rr more Mmpathelic to the English peeale In our midst than to the local whites. The local white* tee their puliii-.il power clipping and are more inclined to be reactionary because of that." Vivid Description Cotlrill provided a vivid derlpUoo vt the l .... Austrian official 1 ying that they were still was reported to hav instructions'from Mo*Indo-China. Siam and Burma this point and this was the most immediately vulnerable for the present delay to Communist infiltration. y negotiations —Reuter. —Heeler "William Scoresby Begins Scientific Voyage LONDON, Jan. 11. The British Hesearch Ship 'William Scoresby", directed by the new National Institute of Oceanography, se; out to-day on | 10 months Scientific voyage mainly to mark whales off the west coast of Australia to unable their movements to be checked. The marking will be done with 10-ineh Steel Darts fired from guns. Each dart when returned will entitle the finder to a reward and. from t'.ie position and date of Its flndi'ig, will tell the scientists more about 'he whales. seasonal migra.ion hubits. First stage of the voyage is to Capetown. On the way ,i survey is to be nade of the Ben,iuela Current. I -old stream flowirg ninth %  long .he coast of West Africa. On their way home the Three Scientists of the ship's research team hope to ceajto thought the Afh met until a trawler captured a .men off East London in '(138. but the fish was destroyed n error, leevlnj which was stuffed and placed In an East I Ion Mueeum, —Reuter DELICATE us u inuonbeum discussed the potential wealth c4 .he colon. Introduced d uf Trinidad with super-loyal calypso that woe specially written for th. An oil well tapped U week previously. Well number lotto Mr %  d Mberl Ootr* urging it %  matched by econonu" development uiui the) Caribbc.'ii could only inenriched baroug) .. not through i Ifoi %  Dr. Solomon point of view, urging M Beryl KeItinu'v. uhed local md %  %  .[11,. ("nttTill summed up his own *l found then; wt* -.'its most Split In Jap Communist Party Predicted TOKW The Cent Japanese Communist expelled .. prominent Parts port the against thi snip. The N km >e expulad Japanese Cofiunu of the tru bun.** He was exptev peal to a meeting ol ists from all pan January IK tot the Central Coi The Part) %  0i the : %  • %  .• %  Ism uf the Japai i er's gravl> '.lUell.r %  the Cominform (or bJM OUI 'hf-oin-. m Hint a pern Tse Tung. th< Comnnniist lefV %  i st-nted the JapaneM I Party—then lUeg) Uf wont undi i ground' 1 in North China during U • and helped spread disB %  ;. Hara weJlejrjr 1M Nakanisln %  i other leaders were defendln<; No7aku again>: I %  nlshl said he 'i should I"' —Reuter Jan. 11. rieeillei i sign this evening Leal %  %  kggeet poet-war Bnanotal rieimai %  red by 'he Belgian police The fraud: d l>onds Utal frauds bcaidi that should lit immediately part Of end %  nuM TIM. that the frauds %  Rraiioe ^ ill Be "faludTo Pull Out" Of liidu-Chinu PAltlS, Jan. 11. %  day that France will be "glad to DM -if the Vietnam Government asks us to". there, are not against the VMnaifMM t people I Ho Chi Utah, We know that it we pulled out now %  M liegen told the AngloAssociation at lunch that >Vie Auriol-Bao Dai late freedom %  ernment was to ask us to occupy -nly these bases named in the %  tgrcemen!. 1 ;. we would glad Dbliflt. it is now up to Bao 11 Indo-China asked in for: (l I.. i >ik ol the French Union %  I England end Ihe Unil i nttar aia nd the necesear\ liberation." —Reute* Not The Same Man GEORGETOWN i i Freemai by the Briti found to %  % %  although his pbj corresponds to the the Yard, it Is learned Scotland 11 negro In it] MOSCOM inoiiwfl Bevin >l "(lurlain Tactics in. II IJ.S.night (Tin • i i %  . : .1 1 %  %  tdisi trend ol Policy, Both Churchill and Bevln, the Bi itteh m have the the peopl' str..n;l, i %  %  iclflc Bloc 1 North -\t Iteuler. W hal Ol (si-rmaii P.O.H ' In I'railn %  held in rra %  %  i he hoi asked the Chancellor to raise th. U ink M SchUl I The queatl I n i which an be moot Reuter friendship for Britain B.I.I'. Customs Duiit's Moj Be Vilju^t.l In U.S. WASHINGTON. Jai II Treasury Sec reI : with a s;,i with a jemmy and killed him %  er and Anger-prints—') to British foune tarv. John Snydcr told a Press on the safe. Conference heie to-inglu' that lu Reese was held 1>> thi miglit recommend to thi luJaiW on a local charge session of Congress an adjustn %  SJ tie) of United rn and asked ft on overseas. -geuter. i t,f hin prints. — B V r IManos Viul Ships Srarrh E. IJaltir For Schooner Mary Ann %  %  Danish 111 % %  '. "Mary she left Odvnia, Poland, on Jai %  Marv Ann." which had I aboard, was due January 5 or 6.—Reuter. COOL BEAUTIFUL "FERGUSON FABRICS" FOR WEAR AT NIGHT. STOCKED BY LEADING STORES. PROTECTION It has come to our notice that a few people nre under the impression that ordinary unrefined petroleum jelly sold in drug stores in boxes or paper parcels is the genuine 'Vaseline' Petroleum Jelly. For your protection, we, the Chesebrough Manufacturing Co. (owners of the registered trade mark 'Vaseline'), would like it to be known that genuine 'Vaseline' Petroleum Jelly is sold in Barbados only in'pots, tubes and tins each bearing the trade mark 'Vaseline,' and that any other type of box or paper wrapping does not contain genuine 'Vaseline' Petroleum Jelly. For your all-round protection (cuts, burns, bruises, scalds, skin irritations, sunburn, work-sore hands, baby's rash, etc. etc.) don't just ask for Vaseline —ask for 'Vaseline' Petroleum Jelly and see that the pot, tube or tin is marked: CHISEIROUGH MANUFACTURING CO. CONS'D Oisfribvtan; T. Gaddu Grant lid. J & R SANDWICH BREAD le it J. ft. BA CHUBS • QOtHM



PAGE 1

Tilt HSDAY JWTARY 12. 1950 LOCAL NEWS Merchants Agree To W.I. Conference On Devaluation MEMBERS of the Council of the Chamber of Commerce at their meeting yesterday, expressed themselves in favour of holding a conference on Government level with full commercial representation, to consider the effect of devaluation in the West Indies. They consider however that the time is as yet not ripe and therefore it should not come about before three months' time when one would have a better picture of the state of things This was one of the matters raised In a letter received from Air Mali Raise aSP S Coerce W r ^a.iwS^£25 ,or ,he conference should 5 be ^?L%X\ n V£Z^ Jl^SL/'ffr* '"" ^^ y a U -r 0 v'ice r0 sl U '^ W r h 'bv h ^ ufn^.nc d Z, ,he r "— rC m r,Ve 24h UrS,han,,ic ?: Jtt£L8'3rsSl viet VSTSBULtX while a committee from the whether m the event oliheTntm .. .„ ""tain the present one. Landing Facilities For Members of the Council were Tourists ' tne opinion that frequency or A letter from the Colonial Secmai J s wero o1 8r at Importance lo retary was read in reply to one .'wiT** 8 !" d lhc slower %  ervlce from the Chamber which had mi ht *n>ail the necessity of sendasked the Government to allow mR caDle l* r *n'W which under extheir water boats to be used for ,s *' n 8 circumstances might be the landing of tourists on the ^oided. They considered thai Mtturefan.a. due to arrive on e P rcfient service should be. reJanuary 21. tained for at least another six The reply was that insofar as BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE Fivi Farmers' Day To-day .''vation and care of trail trees, management and breeding of livestock and the control of plant pests and diseases will be .miong the subjects discussed at third annual Farmeiat Groves Agricultural Station at 1 45 p.m. io-day. The talks and demonstrations bam specially prepared to meet the needs of the particular district and the function provides the opportunity for peasant farmers and others interested, with the opportunity of meeting some of the sclentinr .'fflcers of the Department of Xk-nculture and discussing with them matters of agricultural importance M.V. AROCOSTA which arrived here on Monday bringing four trucks for Graeme Hall Plantation. Waterworks Scheme Not ia months, was practicable and necessary for Al ther letter from the Colof^^ 1 17 %  the water boats to assist, arrangen at Secretary pointed out that OOOCi XjHOllff Fl the Secretary of State for the vwv ** aL*t*viv**£ia\ Colonies had received the Hesoluthe water boats to assist, arim,^ments would be made for them to do so. Members expressed the view that this was somewhat vague. They considered if it was desirble the agents should have some tion of the Chamber with regard to the sugar negotiations between the U.K. Government and the H.w.I. Sugar Producers' AssoProspects Good -SAYS TREASURER St. Kilts had a very good sugar Ule me agents should have some =••' %  sugar Producers' Assoguarantee that the conveyance of ""Bon delegation. The Secretary passengers from the ship to the State, he stated, had asked to land would be facilitated to the y thal ne would keep in mind greatest extent possible. Lack of u,c vlews expressed in the Rcsoproper landing facilities had. in luU n. the past, prevented such ships %  from coming to the Island and c v ... w ~ Ue'sT." VSS&i very trrtta o^Kitte Sugar Crop They thought the time had come that Government should be' asked to purchase some suitable craft which could be used to help in such coses. It would be no waste of money as such craft could be —v „~ used for other purposes as well. cro P las t year and there are veiy The suggestion was made that sood prospects of getting a better it might be well to purchase the crop this year, Hon'ble W '). Nina for the purpose. Peters, Treasurer and ComptrolTho Secretary was asked to 'er of Customs of that colony forward the Council's suggestion told the "Advocate" vesterday. 10 Government. Mr. Peters came in over the 1 — ma i.week-end by B.W.I.A. for the Landing Difficulties Customs Talks and is staying at Mr. Trevor Bowring told the the Morlne Hotel, members how on Saturday a He said thot the island delaunch with about forty passenponded mainly on sugar for its gers and on which he happened economy and had one of the J*„5f bo *f"• was h f' d "P %  'he most elncient sugar factories in Warr-lLi f£ 1 Ba "" c *• Caribbean art? Warehouse for about an hour beThey were looking forward to landed P SS !" OT ""W • the installation of the electrical n.> n an % %  %.„ system and there were also dThrglnglagg^^'ere cfupv" w rta *'* -^.Uonal "^ ing both berthl along the landing % a < !" ><* ""* " uld !"!" Pf Pi.ce. Some_of the more I £*,£* %  %& T^!S British West Indian Airways and K.L.M. Dutch Airlines. It is linked up with the other Caribbean colonies and is one of the busiest shipping centres in the L— wu d Hands, The oldest British colony in the passengers effected a landing in a shorter period by climbing from one water boat to another and then jumping on to the land. A policeman was called but it did not appear that he was in a position to do anything. He thought this state of affairs Tne oldest British colony in the was a bad advertisement for the Wcst Indl . St. Kitts is a delightisland. Indeed some of the pas* u P' ac 'r tourists. It is very sengerg who were visitors hod beautiful and clean and there are said that such a thing would not places of historic inlcrest like have occurred in Tnnidad. Brimstone Hill and St. Anne's Members alter discussing the Church, Middle Island, the burial matter decided to write the Harplace of Sir Thomas w. hour and Shipping Master asking founder of the first British colony him io lake appropriate action. in lhc West Indies. In tarliwle Bn* IM PORT--. Yawl Pour*, Aux Ketch Learrier. Sci. Mollv N. J.mr. Schooner Manuau. s tll 1'htltp it. Davidson, Yacht Maya Yawl Stortebecker. Sch. Sunaltlr* . sh, Mary M. Uwu, Sch, Alexandrine R.. sch. PraiM-r* W. SmiHi. s, I, Marion Belle Wolfe. Sch. Emanuel C Oordoo. -Sch. Hcamald N. Wallace. Sch. %  JfndaUy It. Sch. Marca Henrleile. K*eduh Baiqurnilne Sunbeam. M.V. **ay Jor, Yacht Beene. ML Prlnceea l*mUe. M.V. Aracoila. Schooner Endeavour W. ARRIVALS Duitr. SS. "aanyrnedea I .Ml Ions net, in ,rv n '<>". Itom Bahia. Asenla: . P. Muaaon, Son A Co Ltd. Schooner "Haiell Scott." 30 loin net, Capt. Mark.: (Tom S! Vin.ent. Asenti Schooner Owntn' Aaaoctatlon. DuU'ii s I "Ittenum." 3.1M ton* net. < niit Ilakkrn, from Antwerp. Asentx: S, P. Mdiion. Son Si Co.. Ltd. nrrARTt RKH S.S. 'Interpreter." .0T lorn net. Capt. Coate*. tor Trinidad. AsenU: DvCoaU J> OB i.'d Schooner Uudmlpha. AD tona net, -. (or St. Lucia. Agent*. Schooner Owners' Aaaociatlon. Schooner -Turtle Dove." 11 tona net. Cast. Staly. for St. Vincent. Agent*; Schooner Ownern' Ataoclallon. Says Board Of Health The General Board of Health does not think that the tVrms ot agreement by the Waterworks to supply water are good enough for •tie Board to give approval for division and sale of land for building purposes Members of the Board led by the Chief Medical Officer expressed dissatisfaction at a meeting yesterday when .hey discussed an application by Mrs. J. D. E. Yearwood for division and sale ot 26,776 square feet of land in four lots at the Pine for building purposes, but the Board finally approved Mrs. Yearwood's application. Chase Attended Major A. De *V. Chase, recently re-Vgned Clerk of .he Board attended the meeting. The President of the Board suggested thai Mr. Chase should be made a member, since he had publichealth matters at his finger tips. Honourable V. C. Gale, M.L.C., who was not present at the last meeting of the Board took opportunity yesterday to express his appreciation of the expert manner in which Major Chase had always carried out his duties 1Uwished him a happy retiiemeiu. The Commissioners of IT—Ull wrote the Board complaininfc about' the insanitary condition of ktandpipes in St. Joseph. Tho Clerk of the Board replied to them that according ito the Public Health Act. ihey (the Commissioners) were responsible for keeping the pipes in a sanitary condition The Boaui yesterday deciSm that the Clerk should write AM Commissioners again, re-informing them of their responsibility. The Clerk is also to suggest to them that they should send down the report of their own inspectort On the matter. Other Applications Other applications for IIIVIM.HI of land granted yesterday were as follow:— pivwion and ule ot land In lotby %  Mr. tti.i N Alleyne at Amity Lodge. ChrUt Church, lie lot* 4 Dlvlaton and aale of land in lot, at Welchee plantation. Si. Michael, l.v ilrr. uert A. Wataon and Edward H Sale by Mr*. Florence Catlyn. of &,0H %  fluare feel of land In lotSSV&fiL m """"^ """""' nivliion and iale of S0.J6S M|uare feel of land m lot* at Jatkionn. St. Michael, by Mr. Benjamin Olbeon Dlviilon and aale of land In two lota at Rockley, Chrui Church, by Mr. W. D. L Warden. Dividing two loti of land from the l'me planUtton. St. Michael, by Mr., J D. E. Yeerwood. for iale to Ueul.-Col. Jo. ConneU, Mr. J. D. E Yeaiwu..! having divided ofl other lot* within UM runent twelve month*. Ittvidmg tine lot rnntalnina M.40S iq ft. of land with dwellma-houae. from a place called "Malta." St. Joaeph. for talr by Mrv lr„ Weathcrliead. -he having divided off another lot from the *ame property within the corrn.t UMI,. l!l.:|llll "AROCOSTA" BRIJVGS FOUR TRUCKS FOUR second hand irticks for Graeme Hall Plantation^ Christ Church, arrived on Monday by the Honduran M.\ "Arncosla Mr. Morris Wexlar, who is both owner of the plantation and the vessel, sent up the trucks alom; with his car and asbestos piping from Trinidad. — &f Ttlls u s ,hp mnln purpose of %  ; Ar.. Liverpool, England ftf:Puerto Rico It is expected to leave port around the end of the month, in the Although their economy WU ln I repairs will be built on the production ol the c !" Us IHTUI. mininR of bauxite, yot the coun" %  '**'im told the "Advocate" try had many possibilities ol dc!" ne ••xpenenced a tin* trip up velopment in the Held o( fores' ,ilh u*n it was around the time atfriculturu ana were complaining of rhoD%  afj try. miniiiK, traiiNponalion. Owing to the lack of capital Wnt,n l " "Arocosta" sailed ,md skilled labour up to the pres""'"" rnnidad for Barbados, it ent moment, very little profn "' squaU in the third had been made, but Government. r 0 B and waa >'orcl to return was pushing forward with all the ]•; It finally left available means to improve the '""'"ad at midnight on Friday possibilities for economic iievel,,lia -ifnved Monday morning. opment and Col AM neecssaryi social upluaval of the populatl i J Plans were being itUCUtd b> the mpaottVf uepartments Government for improi fc Dnidi Ships Make education and all kinds of MUl p %  irst Call D0C6 tary questions including the tigh I against moaquitoaB, |f lh / U --<*'"1* made They were not b-swflted taB !" 0 *" 1 l Barbados between tourism like llarbados, but thtl -">d yesterday. The S.S. Government was trying to build" "tersum arrived about 3.40 ne to davatop the coun'" nui at daybreak t,v with lha help .f th. "" -SS. "Ganymcdes" WaUara Fund which wag tfaen *w ;'/;'""' '" ^ Bay. l.v the Dutch Government and unountafl to 4u.niiii.iuiM \loi.tstrral\s Hotel Accoiniiiodution aUmited fha M Ittaguai. M 3,199 ton ndcr Qiptaif) Bukken. brought here from Antwerp 3.120 i it brought packrtgs, fruit juice, raisins, almonds, enamel and wood war*?, n-jiis, hagi, and piece Rooda. This vessel has been chartered Althougli hOti hi tna Royal Netherlands Stcamtaarral la Ihnil Oompany from some other are a few boarduig houses whuti Dutch Steamship Company, offer good %  arvtca and avai^thlBf S.S. "Ganymedes" arrived from Is plcanant. Honour,!Lie 1). R. Buenos Aires wnh 11,044 bags of Walwyn. i. "v ll na aad othnaal Thin vessel Is a .old UM 1 1,551-ton freiRhtei commanded by Mr. Wei '" QntaJn Stavenaon. It arrived via for the Customs Talks and i* Bahia. staying at the M Messrs S. P. Musson. Son and i thai the roade I I,united are agents her* ood, (he nf both vessels, country was well cultivated and 25 Yean \go i Barbados .Advocate. January 12. 1925) CEICKET Mr. Austin's Tram \s. Mr. Kidney's Team THE Jlrst nay's play of this match Which was begun i day did not prove as interesting .is bad bean intlclpatecL Mr. Kidney's learn batting ilrst scored 98 fur 8 wickets and declared. Mr. Austin's team then went to the wicket and had mustered 84 for 9 wickets when stumps were drawn. The wicket had been impaired by rain and consequently there was no tall scoring and play was slow and somewhat tame. Of the I.. O, Wood played | good innings for 25 runs, before being nicely caught by limtith right 00 the boundary, while G. Challenor showed himself once more the outstanding batsman in an Innings of 34 which was not brilliant but very sound. The bowlers made the most of the damaged state of the wicket and had the batsmen in difficulties most of the tin ia, For Mr. Austins team K. Mason bowled i V...,INI:I> rail end took three wickets for 32 runs, while the quality of Qreavee' bowling cannot l>e fairly judged from the figures. In Mr. Kidney s team Dr. Skeete distinguished himself with the leather taking 6 wickets; E. U Q. Hoad captured the lemainlng three. L. O. Wood was allowed to bat III place of L. R. Hutchinson and J M Kidney did not bat. USE MARTINI & ROSSI VERMOUTH af SWEET or DKV Relative lo the dlviilon and aale ol land In lou al Wekhe. plai.uii.ni, si AUIVALs— Bf r i \ i Prom TRINIDAD; Oeoflrey Webdale. Willum Seolt, rranH Sleverman. KalaJjeta Sleveriiian. Mom. Wr.ln. Ivan Herrclra. Hilda Alihop. Thoma. Stt-rrar. Jainr, Br.l. Korwrl ll> a ra. AnnetU Bear.. Hon. John Chandler. Edith Chandler. Dor.i Scoll. Cynthia Thomaaoa, Inez Hinataon. Diana Oluaepfl. Undine Oiu••Ppi. Neil aitweppi, John Parkln-un, Lorna Alleyne. Jeanne Alleyne. Bruea "•. Arthur Smith, lmoaene Smith, Hyetinth Vowchlnd. rroni BRITISH GUIANAMr. ReInold Slone. Mr, Evelyn Stone. Miw Carol i-w. MrHoae Stonr. Mill Loulae %  tone. Ma.ter Raymond Stone. Mr. cnanei O'Donnell, Mr. Collln O'Donjell. Mr J. Robertion. Mr E Texeira, Mr N Wfiitrhead. Mr Exerad DAbifu. M E.PI-I, H*id. Di D Atchan, Mr. Mobtrt Banaaroo, Mr. R. H Moore, Mr. J. Wolrond. Mr. C D. Edahill. Mr. N DaSilva. Mr*. A. DaSllva. Mr. J. Baylev. .ud Mm. Delay Seaton. DlfABTI RES— By B.W.I.A.U For TRINIDAD: Mr.. Ruth Gordon, Ma.ter Robert Gordon. Mr Cecil Smith. Mr. Jean Templeton. Mr. William Ternuleton. Mm. Charlotte Walth, Mr*, MaiHret Care-. Mr. Kiel! Oveech, Mr. C-.miuir Tmiuera, Mlu KalMeen Papc, Mr. William Bell. Mr. llernard Vanderveen. Mr. Swetoxar SchUkin, Mr. Jamei Johnaon. Mm lona Henry, Matter Rich.ird Binir. Master Geoiae Rayrve. Mr Oreta Bevne. Mr. Oeorse McLean, Mr OeorTrey Fouler. Mr. Paul Foater. Mi ('iaren Vea'raood, Mr. Resinald Eckileln. Mr. OWU Cr.tUi.l. Mr. SUnle> Niccolli IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION Cable and Wtralea* iWeet tndle.. Ud.. vlae that they can rfew conununic/ila S S Hlndanfer. S % Ruflna. B fl **" Napier, B S Planter. S S Reatml %  •bar. Bfl Turlcum. SB Nldarland. %  9. Port Amharat, S.S. Ganynwde*. .B. RacMU Leopard. S S Canadlar. ChallenfeT. S Konroaa, S S She[fMd. S S. Raao Glaesow. S S Papomit. % %  . Del Bud. S a Ulrect. S B 1 %  • %  Uhracai, S S Meline. S S Aduio. S 9 MormacaurT. S S. Eaao PlUarnir. S S). Rarurhlld. Ol AnUrtlc Ocean. HI. § Roaa. S.S. Ntouw Amotardam. S 8 Monw Ayala. II. Mo Area*. M s Carona, SI MaWtnaceun. S I. Jamaica. S.S. PaiRalaan. 8.1. Forarlchepanae 8.1. Comedia n II. Bors>. • %  . lea. %  areas*. IS. Vealvangeei. II Hood Bjvar. S I Heouba, 8 I. Eaao Dan Heaf, S a Mormachawk. SI. Cavlna. 8 I. Recent Hawk, I I San Vulfrano. I I. Repton. IS. Ban Veltno. S.S. lanpire martaban. I S. CarrMnbw. U. letiirmn. :^eaa. Michael. by H. A. Wat* i Kirton. the Board approved an alteration u( the approved plan by Boxill by tranaferrma B30 M • from lol No K to lot No. M. Dlviilon and <^ile i.f U.SM iq. fl. ol land In R lot* at Welch**, by Mr. Herbert A. WtUun. The Board did not approvo an appli%  •'.U.n by Mr. W. I. WehI alteration to an approved plan, lelatlva to the aale of land In Iota at Carrlncbm'a Villaie Mr. Webater wanted to divide lot No. 111 of IJIS >q. feet, plua Ml M| feel in road Into two Iot. If ihia division la done, each lol will be too %  mall to comply with the proviatone of the Public Health A**, After c<>(widerins an ppl".n.in for dlvlalon and aale ol IS7.MI -q feel g| land In U lot. at Howeil'i Croaa Hoad, SI Michael, by the Ba.badoa Co-Operalive Dank Ltd. the Board only approved ol Iota I—d Conatderatton of the remalnlni lol. wa* poalponed .iI liar.. Mr. Allan Perkins The front and rear fenders on Ida of ihe car M—241K were damaged when Ihe car wa. Involved In an accidcn." wllh a me deaU, occurred a. the ''"" k 5; v 2 "n^J.u'v "?£. Messn. Kn-nl. Ltd „„„. of hc k-J by a larje and repreaen.„ (lac ,„. Th , lonk er cart I, utiye gaihcnng took place at owned alKl w „ „,,„, driv „ Dv UjaWeslburv Cemetery on Monday I^J,,, Broarn* ol the Barracks a.!ernron Ro di B ,„ k „,,, Mi. Perkins was the aecoii I The Weather TO-DAY Jun HIM.: I, m. " aw.: >.U p n. {"•-• %  ""' J.nuuy II HWi Wl: 10S, fcm .. |1 a p m. JwJ for Month to Yeaterday: 1 70 In ""••rature iMaa TS dear, r "fnwratiare iMfa.) 710 de* T. Wind Velocitr IT Barometer t a m aarro. What's on Today Polic* CDuria at ISO* a.ni Cricket Trial liajne. Kanauvflon at 1 ttp m rarmera' Da* al Orovaa AaT' autlon. at. Oeorae at I Meatiraf. Lala|allve Cauncil al IM pm. MeallnS. Board of Manaaement. BCA. Oaam ru al l ia r Maad at 4 U P IU. Ignored Major Road: Fin<>d 10/A fine if 10'and 1/00 be paid in aeven < % %  I SS <3p m i 'eult seven day*' imprisonment was Imposed on Rl Church yesterday i ship Mr H He was found guilty of di the motor lorry X—109 r m Walrond Street, a road to which sign is placed, and failing to bring his lorry to a halt before rntering the major roed. of Mrs. M. G. Perkins of Black Kfxk and was one member of a family well known in the busineas house* of this City for genciations. His father was for many years Floor 'A ):i Costa cV Co., Ltd. one brother was Manager of Barclays Bank, another at Messrs. Jason Jones it Co., and another now in South Africa was in some other form of Mr Perkins was quiet but those who penetrated that i found a true and k Mead. A cai i ago limited %  %  red from the result' tee but tiler.: times c good i < was in his early fifties an Lrtt K. (All Leather Upholstery — Fnbric optional) Main New Features Include eMore attractive frontal appearance elmp'oved steering e Wider front seat m l.jrger tyres e Larger headlamps • Wide range ol scintillating new eSeparate parking lamps Metallichr ,mc Colours M W slllI'Mi \ r .11 ST \HKI\ I II eaT" Your t'liiinirii's cordially invited DIM. 4616 (ItOIUItT IIIO>l Ltd.) White Park Rd. COURTESY GARAGE



PAGE 1

[•Ill BSDAY, JAM ARY 12. 195(1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS. IATES unmvscaaxn fOB SALE Pr * KUIUNT . WANTED LQgt. FOUND r* w* Hlnitnum tUMW • none SALES I AUCTION ***• IHTATX V •*"• u !" FOR IIIM I'lHIII MH II IS Iflnimum chars* %  • II •4 1 X 1 ,IU*Lrnuni 14 aat* lu4*l BrrjBUC NOTICIS Mtntmurn charge >• .M i.so **• 1 > %  yTj-TNO ADVOCATE (Monday. IWC CLOBtSQ TIME MWC-DAYS %  5 r m. UJNDAY:—a.0 p.m. Friday g.J. Item* Of different BW te Ml out Ui •WWDIED %  ATlin MirHEHBRRT CRISPIN ft Barne* land M Maithia* *;. hrlei finin" i % %  I ,,< tinPtitiTliT' D wel Qr*Bd Lode* at* i ,,f iivr Improved Independent Order of .MdfeiiowU.ndnn Unity. H" funeral will lravc the MechenMV Hall. IIB. Roebuck Street at 4.30 pm lor ItM Vwtburi <-' % %  %  %  alive*, friend* and member* of kindrel l-odse are anked 1.. attend. ESTELLE BHATHWAITr IWtntl and I 1I.I.S0. fBUIIN*—ALI.AN Mrs Eli/.iW'i OaU*J Herkin* of Aberfovle. Black Rock. lli fim.i.1 die Mh Init. HOUSES ID Marine Garden*. ar> "UTnlaMed. Containing three i*4im auction M the Couriaav Garage, o-i Fliday 13th at 2 p.m. on irutructlom irceived from the Inauntnce Co. 1HXO.N ft nLADON. Auctioneer*, Plantation* PmMlng. |, M 3n I will offer for tale by Public Com* ESSTL"! m v offlc VlctorU Street, on rHIDAY 13, at 2 p.m. IM following ;11' 2640 square feat of land at Ibbosany Lane with ihe wall buUdtcdf standing thereon iioua, contain, cloeed Siillery. drawing. 2 bedroom*, usual OAltomcea, enrloaed yard. <2) 1 Rood LAND (1 Thnrnbviry Hill, near Ihe road leading to Wilcox Eatata in the parl.lt of Chi-lal Church. For condltlonii of tale apply to: R ARCHER M. KENZIE. Victoria Street. Dal 3B47 10 1 JO—in IN MEM0RIAM I IN UJVlNG MEMORY ni our dear and Mother nUtTY ELEANOR who fell aaleep on JaaWH fpuv(g -due-. HUI BOSH r IS, I Secret leara do often now. I For today ha* brought before, ua, I Sad memories ol nine year* ago DM BggN VWBU] t 1.30—In I In laviuK memory of oiu Lid molher CATHEKLNE ANN! i\l KM puaed away one year lo-Jiv. %  •'Gone from u* but loivn I Deain can nwr lake away. I Memurlt-ft '"J> ""I %  linger. I Whllit uptm Ihn earth r TO be remembered by !nOXLatY [unlit 12.1.30im. .uvTlON SALE of boaU at th. Harbour Police SUUon waa postponed %  nd will tike place TO-MIIHJIOW. lith January at 1 o'clock. The** <" %  %  -ire very nut table %  *atl, oi *auengcn boat, or Uklng boat labourer io .u.d from Ihe ahipa. there are thre. boat* and the weo are ill one 3D x • overall by S beam i2) two 33 x ft by ft beam i3l third 21 x 5 by 3 beam. \v r ^inapcrtlon i* invited arnday on ..ppliratlou to Ihe Harbour Police Station. D'ABCY A. SCOTT. Qovt. Auciionen. Dirt. "A". fl 1.30—tn I Oil HM.E UT0M0TIVE |TllACTOR~ Ona FAHMA1X 'H r very little used In Al condition, purchaalng larger. Cole ft Co.. I CAR: Parr) Prefect Cnr In %  %  tlor. ISftOO mile*. Apply: HIBWM %  eatherhead. C/0 Bruce Weatberhend. 11.1.50— ir [USED CARS: Vauihall 14 h p. A-l Million STANDARD %  b.p. Milooi , good condition. Couiteay Oarage. U MM. II.I.B0-3n ECTRtCAL [STO\*E fj E C with Grill and Jhermoat.tle Control Oven. Ml •XOaUeml Imdltion. • %  •• year old llHAi) <„, ofler*. G. HwarMft, SC*wi 1* 1 S0-'ii. |lt*'IUl,FJ(A l'K %  etrte. .<* now lvtv model, ft yean %  arantee. Price HUM. oi offera htnar leuvmg inland. II G. Bancroft. k !" -, tmt il i.so—to |lJGHTIN—Order* now being ptod la la ahlpmcnt i 1 Garage. Dial Ml< 11.1 50—Sn URNITURE IrURNITURB Birch drawing room compelling ill Settee <3 aeaUl '..' k* Chair* Ui Mom* llock>: %  •d. Hi Dreolng TBbta wtth lonf .1. . Kmlirii Cabinet tit Ihr.-.II" .11 ilii.ii table 1' All can be teen between 47 p.m. 0. Bancroft, Seawell AtrpM 11.1.30*n UNDER THE Ml\II! HAMMER On Turaday 17(h by iiwlruclioiittf) will -rii at "Whitc/hall. St. I'rtor, a lot of Antique* and other items, vthirh Includes:— I'jiuU-liibme and candlesticks, Kpt-rtiiii' with Cut Glass Bowls, Silviis, LarRc Wairt?r, Teapot. Spirit Keltle &c.. in Puto; II ml Knives und Forks, BpOODli Kinks, Cream Jugs &c, in siiv.-r. Vi-iicuble and Entrc Dishes, Cake Baskets, Fish and Fruit Services in Plate, Copper and Brass Ware, Temple and Chiming Gongs, Bronze Ornament*. Napoleonic and Majolica Plates, Cut Glass Decanters, Bowls and <;i.is-rs; Very Beautiful Japanese Cabinet inlaid with Mother uf Pearl and Gold; Old Mahogany Liquor Case, French and Spanish Chest of Drawers, Flat Top Desk and Revolving Chair; Upholstered Arm Chairs; Ceylon Screen in Copper and Ebony; Brass Floor Lamp; Telescopes. Field Glasses, Barometers, Suit Cases and many other items of value. Sale 11.45 o'clock — Terms Cash. BRANKER TROTMAN A CO. Auctioneers. 12.1.50—2n. NOTICE APPLICATIONS are invited for fhraaj of Onsamtt ol Application* thouM be aent to the Rector of St Philip by Tueedav nil, January. n i s#_j n NOTICE pABisn ST rim ir The followiruj Veetrvmen were eieef* 0 • %  the Pariah of si PMlip for ;h Mr. p E DAVSH Mr. A a FARMTIt Mr. D I> <;AKNER M C P Mr E LYTE. i" E L MOORE. Mr T D MAYERS. Mr A T SKCETr \lr K II KKEETK. Mr H I. KMlTll. Mr R 9. WEEKES. WAITED HEH> YOUNQ LADY reaulred kf Broad Street Firm lor General Omce wort. with a knowledge of Shorthand and Typing. All application* will be treated' confidentially Apply by letter c/o A.I z Advocate Ofnce. Application* to be tvped a* well a. copied ... own handwriting. :r VIB-4B. IUXIKKEEPER ACCOUNTAKT: Sdreicee of experienced bookkeeper'Aceount,.nt required m Barbado*. Advertiaer*' uwn itaff aware of vacancy which call* for ability up to quarterly trial balance standard. Knowledge Dry Good* bualiieaa and control of office personnel i-onaidered aaleU. Bualnea* houra S—4 weekday. 8—1230 Saturday* Write In confidence taUn*T age. detail* part nppoinlmenla and aalary dealred: P.O. Box 144 Bridgetown. 7 1.40—4CI. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE .ipplicullon .if Iklmund L. A Jiilm of Roebuck Street. St Michael. for permlMlon to sell Spun*. Malt Uquora. *e.. al bottom floor of a 2 rtorey wall building oppoaile Combernwre School. Roebuck Ctt| Duled thi* 11th day of January ISM. To: H. A. TAlAtA. Kaq. Police Magwtrnto, Dutrlet 'A"'. B. L. A. JUIJ. A|.|.:....-: N.B —Thl* application will be ronaldi ted al a licensing Court to De held at Police Court, DUSrlct %  A' 1 on s WMf dga 21et day of January 1M0 ;it 11 o clock a.m. H A. TAIWA. I\)Uce Maglrtrate, Dirtrlct "A' 12.1.30—In LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE .ipplicauon of I van Glbb* of Paaaage Road. St. Michael far pirmfcwSon to veil Spirit*. Malt Liquora, &c. at n board and thing le -.hop with \hedroof %  ntached at Baxter* Koad Clt] Dated thu 10th dav of January. 1SW. TO ii A. TALMA. E*q. Police Magirtraie. Di.mil "A", IVAN GIBBS. Ipplit .n>i N' II Thl* appllcitlon will be conaidered at a larcnrtng Court to be held .it Pohcr Court. Dirtrlct A on Friday 20th day of January IBM at 11 o'clock a.m. H. A. TAJ.MA. Polke Magirtraie. DUtriCl "A 1 12.1.SO—In LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE application of Henry Thompson of Eagle Hall. St. Michael, lot permit%  ton to aell Spirit*. Malt Liquor*. Ac al bottom floor of a 3 rtorey board and mingle building al Eagle Hall. St. Michael. Dated thi* nth day of January IPS0 To: E A. McLEOD. Eaq Police Magl.Uale. Dtrtrtct "A". HENRY THOMPSON. AppllCint N B Thi< .ipplicallon will be conud"iiil al a Ucenalng Court lo be hatd "' Police Court. Dtatrict "A" on Saturday 2lat day of January ISM at it OMM B A. MclJROD. Police Magirtra e, District "A' %  EAL ESTATF %  *TTE*L OFFICE I'UKNITIIR9 Man ^:-. %  .li..-. i MUei cabU luki; Bin* aultable for hard rag or Garage*, etc. Cabinet nth Locka etc —Courtesy Garage, Ui.i 11.1. SO3i PIQUES VILLA". Kent. Modern coral Mono houae with approximately I 1 .ii ifland. Owing to Ita elevation and ,.o*iiiou Plquea VIIU" la cool and offer. i ikalafaMtS*] view* over wide expaiiae ; .x.ollmr. Contain* 3 bedrooma, lounge, kitchen, large aquare gallery; below art • crvai.la' quarter*, toilet*, rtoraroon. a.'H large garage. Raaaonable often comldered.' DIXON ft BLAOo:. I trtrle Agent*. Auctioneer*, flantatloiv Miiildliol. Phone 4040. 11 1 30—In jjVt-STOCK | PUPPIES TWO ill Wire haired Fon pure bred, with % %  edigree. Phone II 1 80-3n %  ECHANICAL %  TYPEWRITERS. A mall ^^aoad hand Remington Tfi" ^-*u*ble Apply. T. Gedd. %  Bf %  g | 30fi 5, *BBTI : m H*rculea IBrSi King M ggBrnu, all model* BE. Barnea ft I <> Lid. Dial 44T6. 13 H • fit WISCELLANLOU S ITRLfKS ACAR TYRXR V.HHMI* aire* Teludlng 30 x 5. 8 25 x 20, ft SO x IV. tcee advancing *ecurr at theac prlc^-% %  CJourta Bi Qaiafi Dial *-i 11 1 SO3n (OALVANisKi) SHEETS: Beat quaJlt) ft length*. S3 *1 and $3.07 each. llarne* Co. Ltd 11 1.30—1 f r. I WASH BASINS k SINKS >lld pricea al Ralph A. Beard'. Show >* %  Hardwood A 10.1 •I GLAZED TILES f White, Green "Td Blue, lie each at Ralph A Beard* anr Boom, Hardwood Alley io | %  Bi Offer* in writing are invited for 21,IS" *quare feet of land rttuale in Sober* Lane, Bridgetown, and having a frontage of I IB feet on Sobers Lane and at preeenl under tenantry. For further partlculara apply lo the . dined CARJUNGTON ft SCALY. Luc a* Street VI. 80—n THE iinui'Kigned will offer for aale y.tion at their office. Ho. IT. High Street, on Friday the Illh Inrtanl ,t 2 p in The dwelllnghouat called I-ANDSMXHE COTTAGE and land conUlnlng li.PM %  quara feat. Conrtltutlon Road. St. Michael, The dwelling houae cornnrl*** — ON 3*11; GROUND FLOOR: Drawing I,...n. *aa(I ihree bedrooma .one with runi .md bath UPSTAIRS: One very large bedroom IN THE BASEMENT Dining room. iiiuiry. kitchen; Separata bathroom in :ard. Government water and electric, light .]. lailM Inrpectlon any day except Sunday between the houra of 4 p in. and I & m. on application lo the owner*, the iian Lynch on the preml*e*. For further partlculara and condition. of tale apply lo :— OOTTLE, CATTORD ft Co. SoHcitora. T.l.aO—in r>*TatI. SHEETS 1 lit. 18. '.. .*.!. rioua tire* Auto Tyre Co Hreet. Dial 2a> 10 InTTlNGs Galvanlied pipe. All aorta ^" %  l * ir.. to IS lu Phooa 4BM aVarnaa ft Co. Lid. %  HBT HE [GALVANISED SHEETS—it ft. fl'r ft. Auto Tyre. Trafalgar Street P*M you cant do without in the eol.i rhar. in vartoui .ire. mid qualitlet %  ~? .• 'Single liedup Thanl* 1 *"•. 42-33 Swan "ftreet. SpeighUII I so la IgPOo u* School Booka of alt kmda a* P"**"> High School. Ring 2S40 [ClIAMi.is 1J.ATHKRS-N%  "^ved. |r„ r noi Etikrtetn Rrothe,.. Sweei 12 i soan L* AT R HOBE-Dunlop How in *ie CS" Peeapirction !> ^^^^O**Obtainable Till uqdtTiigned w. ill offer lor SaJe.al their OfBce No. II, High Street. Bridge'.wn. on Friday 13th day of January In the Weal India Bietuit CO., Ltd. COTTLE. CATFOBD ft Oa II I 50 :::. The underalgned will ofler for aale a Iheir Office No 1J High Street. Brldre town, on Friday. BHh day of Januar> IH0. at 2 p m The ni|i or Dwelling llouw called •PARKVILLE" and Ihe Und thereto. conUinlng 1JBB quare feel situate at While Par* oppoaile The Barbadoa l*oundr>. InapecUon any day except Sundayj helween the hour* of 4 p.m. and P m PA application lo the tenant Mr. Boyce For further partlculara and condition* COTTIJC CATTORD ft CO. 3 1 antn PROPERTY-Al Station Hill H< Modern convenience*. Apply W H Bryan ft C. M. Qreenldge. Roe buck Street. 1.1 JO—4n LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE .application of Endlne Heckle* of BaSat lull. St. Michael tor permlanon lo aell Spirila. Malt Liquor*. Ac al a uall building at No. 2. Tudor Street. City. Dated thi* Illh day of January 1030. To II A TALMA, Eaq Police Magirtratr, i "A". O, raeX'KIJS. Ibr Applicant N.B -Thi* application will be ronrtdered al a Licenaing Court lo be held at Police Court, Dtatrict "A" on Friday 20th day of January 1 let at II o'clock H. A. TALMA, Polke Magi.lr;.'..-. DlaUICl "A' It.l 30—In LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application of Eileen Groavenn of Church Village, St. Michael, for per mlaaion to *ell Spirits, Mall LlqtNir.. dual a bottom floor of a I-clorev board am thlngiti building in Chunli Village, City Dated thi* ilth day of January 1090 To H. A. TALMA. Eaq Police Magiatrales I*t. "A Signed FJIJ5EN (.HpSNTWOR, \|.(..i,..ul N R —Thi* application will be conaMared at a Ucenalng Court to be hold a< Police Court. Diatrict 'A 1 the 21*1 day of January 1030. a1 II o'clock, ana. It. A. TALMA. Police Magirtraie. Dirt. "A 12 1' 30— h. UQUOR LICENCE NOTICE The application of BVanglllne Alley inol Grosvanor Hoad. st' Michael, loipermiiHon to aell StnriK. Malt IJquorn. ftc at bottom floor of a 2-atorey wooden building g| N'elaon Sli.et. City. Dated thu 11th da> of January I960 To H. A. TA1AIA, B*q Police Maglaarale, Dial. "A". Signed V~ ALLEYNE. Applicant N B —Thl alll be conaidered at a Uconalng Court lo be M A %  Itolice Court. Dtatrict "A on Saturday the Hat day of Januar, IfoO, al 11 o clock, am, H. A. TALMA, Police Magirtiaie. Out A." 12 ) In LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application ol Caruinal T. Trotrrwn of Richinond Gap. st Michael, foa peniu**ion to *ell Spirit*. Mall Liquoti. ftr at a atone building %  Delad thi* Illh day of Jar.uary lftSO To H. A. TALMA. Eaq Police Maglatrate. Die: A Signed. C T THOrMAN. Applanuai N R Thi* application will ha conatdarad at a Llrenaing Court Io be held at Police Court. Dtrtrkt A" on Saturday, the 21*1 day of January ItM, II o'clock. a.m. If A TALMA. Pol.... M..gi.|r-:.in.t A II I 30! LOST FOUND LOST let, engraved John CorOln Sailtab. R. ward J. A. Corbin A Sona. 3S4S. Be: HH>nt Road. 11 I SO-In plea*e return to N. Lpyne. Demerjra Lift* Insurance Society over O Broad Street 12.1 JO— In PI IISOX II THE public are hereby warned again*.. living credit to my wife ^*BIL CANDACE BLACKMAN ine* Strakari aa l oo rot hold mvaalf reaponalble for her or jr. \ one elae contracting any debt or debt* In my name unleaa by a written order -itmed by me E\'ERTON C3DCn. BLACKMAN. Sechiuon Road. Black Rock. si Michael 11 30m Hill IIIOMI < RUII CHI BU H BOYS' FOI'NDATION SCSSOOL. The reopening of School wifl take place on Tueedav. Itlfc. January ID80 al 43 a.m. Thar* will be an entrance examination for New Pupila on Monday ISUI January at t 43 a.m when the parent* may interview the Haadmaa ter New candidate* are requested to bring their Birth CertlAcetea and reco nun en da ttona from farmer erhooL W. H. ANTROCrus, Secreurv Governing Body-. Hilton. River Hoad. St Michael 3 1.30—del i M \ i i.s AUABEatY fTtEIDHKM. CHEAPsmE. THIS School will reopen on Tueaday ITth January at t 30 a m. New pupil, will be examined on Monday lth January at t 30 a.m. Entrance Fee il.V P. L MORRIS. Headmaster 12 I SO— In LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application of Armintha Year-wood of Spoonen HUl. St. Michael, for permiirton to aell Spirit.. Malt Liquor*, ftc at a board and galvanlred rtiop attached io realdanreat Spooner. Mil. Ikated thu IIUi dav .>f January 1030 To E. A. MeLEOD. Eaq Police Maglatrate. Dim. "A". Signed ARMINTHA YEARWOOD. Applicant N B —Thla application will be considered at a Ucenalng Court to be held at l*>iice Court. Dtatrict 'A" on Saturday the 21*t dav of January 1030, at II o'clock. E A. McLEOD. Police Maglatrate, Dirt A." II 1 30 In LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application of Cyril Walton ol TWO Mile Hill. St Michael, for permi.%  lon to aell Splrila. Malt Liquor*, ftc.. at .. board and Uilngle .hop with -hrdrooi attached al Two Mile Hill. St Mkb-ict Dated tin* Ilth day ol January lift* To E. A. McLEOD, E*q Police Magirtraie. Dial. "A". Signed CYRIL WALTON. Applicant N II Thi. application will be eon.idered at a Ucenrtng Court Io be held at Police Court. Matrici "A" on HtUddaf. the il.i day of January 1960, ai II o'clock, a.m. E A. MclJiOD. Polke Magirtraie. Kui "A." '2.1 30—in. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application of Llneaus Augualine Backlea of Six CToaa Road*, St. Philip, for penmMaion to aell Spirit*, Malt Liquor*. Ac., al ground floor of a two %  torey wall building at Pilgrim itoad Chrtrt Church, within Dtrtrtct "B". Dated thi* lath daj of January 10M To D. D. MORRIS, Eaq.. Ag. Police Maglatrate, Di.t it Signed L A HECKLES. AppUeaa L N.B. -Thl* application will be con(idered at a Lieenalng Court to bo bald at Police Court. Dtatncl "B". on Monday, the 23rd day of January lffto, ai II o'clock, a.m. D D MORRIS, A*. Police Magirtraie. Ih-t B" 11 I 50—lr LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE application of Aufuatu* Qitlen* ( liny Street. St Mlcliael. for prpnlaaion to ipl] spirlU. Mall Liquor*, ale., al xritom Boor of a 2 rtorey wall building al comer of Lewla Alley, Day Street. City Dated thu iiih day of January ItM. To H. A. TALMA. Eaq. Polke Magunate, Dirtrlct "A" AUOUSTUS GITTENS. N.II.-Thi. application will be cuortdered at a LtccnMng Court to lie held at Police Court. Dtatrict "A" on Saturday Ihe 21*1 day of Januarv IftfO. at II o'clock It. A TALMA. Policr Macirtrate, Di.t A u i so la GROSSMAN AND CO., SAY "KEEP LEFT" LONDON, Jan 11 A group of 12 Leftist labour Members of parliament today published a new "keep left" manifesto, which their leader It. II. Crouman described as :hc way to win vhe General Election." The policy surprised ,x>litical observers by the way in which it thin the Party line, particularly in Foreijm IVl. Crossman and others of the 12 have been in the past' s les of Foreign Secretai-% Kins! Bevln. Main deviations from the Government include mticism of thu Annual Defence Bill of £760.CWO.fJOO. which is considered excessive, and opposition to peacetime .mili&ry nmscription. The group includes three Parliamentary private secretaries to Government Ministers. The manifesto says "We reject utterly the Russian exploitation of Communist parties and regimes for extending the SaflM fa pEN %  It declares that a prime responsibility of British socialism Is rt> expose the fallacy "that military strength is the sole bulwark against Communism. The first Sine of DetnocrncVs defence must be a policy of full The Colonial Dollar Loan WASHINGTON, (By Mail) There is no deviation in the non-tinancial covenants required 09 the International Bank from !" e in standard banking procedure ; .nd information on them could have been available to the Colonial Development Corporation through the British representativc on the Board of the International Bank, says Mr MM Black, president uf the Bank. Mr. Black added that he did not know Lbs t-xa.t reason why negotiations with the Corporation for a dollar loan were broken off. "I do not know whether the Corporation had this information •Than they beuan to negotiate." he said. "As far as 1 know the British representative on the Board of the Bank has not objected to these non-financial covenants at any time. "I am very disappointed that the loan did not go through but there m no hard feelings on either side and I hope that later on we can do business with the Corporation." Britain, Mr. Black said, wanted the loan to buy a special type of tractor known as the "Crawler", suitable for colonial devel-i opment purposes, but which Is not manufactured in Britain. —B.U.P. MAIL NOTICE Parcel. Regi.trred and Ordinary Mall* I for St. Lucia by the Schooner %  ladv Joy will be cloeed at the General Poet Office al 1213 pm. on the 12th January. ISM. cmploymf.it and fair shares. Britain should initiate new proposals for the elimination, under international control and inspection, of mass destruction weapons such as ine atom bomb. The only hope of German Democracy depends on preventing her remilitari iation. BritfSh Labour should support the French Government and the German Social Democrats in unreervedly opposing the rearmament' of Western Germany and should seek to make the Ruhr authority really effective. The manifesto declares that Briuin should continue \b oppose "all short cuts" to United Europe by way of customs or currency unions "which would exposo our full employment economy to the lender mercies of continental bankers, and would therefore produce a slump throughout Western F.urope." Socialist plans for European Integration should Include planned capital investment, joini* bulk purchase of scarce rouble and dollar commodities, intemationallsatton of Western European transport wiih a single Pan-European Airways Corporation. —R ruler Oils Bright LONDON, Jan. 11 Now that General Election dato is known, further period of uni IT tunity in the London Stock Exchange appears cerrain. Trading today was small and most markets colourless, with British Government stocks barely steady around previous closing levels. Bright feature in oiherwisc dull oil market was produced by gaining one shilling in Ultramar oil at sevci> and three. Small buying and cessation of recent selling was responsible for the Leading industrials were steady for most part of the day, but some heaviness was seen it theclose. Movements, however, were Small and pricea never -ireally taatftd Hopes of an early Peace Treafy with Japan, and the possibility of resumption of debt brought buyers of bonds. Gains were not always fully helil. but were two up to l*Wo points. Bolivar and La Guaira railway in'heiitures were strong on proposed sale of undertakings. South African minings wen erratic. Cape orders were mostlsales, producers and developers were widely few pence lower. —R cuter World-Wide Reaction To U.K. K lection Dute LONDON, Jan. 11. The following reports from Renter* correspondents to-day gave a picture ot world wide reaction lo to-day's announcement thAl Hntani will choose a new Parliament on February 23. Moscow. Pravda and oitier Moscow newspapers dis.nissed the slat emeu I in five lines. New York: The "New York Times" warned Americans to "brace themselves" against "harsh ,-ommcnis to be thrown our way" during the electoral campaign but hoped such remarks would be taken as "disputes among old and good friends." The "New York Herald Tribune" praised as characteristic BrtUaB i .urness the Labour Party's ecision not to nationalise steel until voters had been able to express themselves. Sydney : "The Sydney Morning Herald" said the British people must decide on "freedom or massive control. A flexible empirical system of government, or a rigid PuMic Hmltm-Conki. _* %  A iTran uilpraml %  encaOaae. m. Cebba*. od Hear,. A -i fcJS*: c aroetion and %  %  •JaraDrug Jtoret, 12 l 30—2n. THE underalgned will offer for Sale al l^elr OfBce No. IT. High Street. Bridge town, on Friday 20th day •>' January. 1AM at 2 p.m. __„ The Dwelling Houae caUed "ARNEV aid lh# land there!*, containing 4JS0 •quare feet, Htuate at fh Avn M Belleville. The Dwelling Houae cornprtaaa Oallarr Drawing; A Dining ROOM. 2 Bedrooma. me with DreealnC room and running *h. Breafcfaat room, KJtchGaa installed. Barvorat'a room and Carafe in Vaed. any day except lundey*. *een ihe houra of 4 p.m. and S pm .^ on the p roa.tee*. Dul 'ror further partlculara and Condition, poly to-— COTTLE, CATTORD ft Co. 11 1.40—An REAL ESTATE W//V*V///V//V/'/,V,1 CONCERT (In aid of a deserving cau Children's Goodwill League Hall ConslHulion Road TUITION Mr*. R. A. BEARD, A 1. V M. 'Drome, Silver, Oold. Medalirti Will accept a email IIUIKJ.I ai Kindergarten Pupila al •Mariatow' Max-ell Coart. age* J',3 yeara. AMU Tuition in Speech Training Tar further partkular*. ring S403. IS 1.30—to. Por PToperUe* etc. contact UAL)'If A. BEARD A M In.l, B.E., P V A. Auctioneer and Eetale Agent Who ha* numrroua propertiri for sale. For further particular* nng 40Sa or call Hardwood Alley agajN i iibadn IMIMIIilAM NOTII I ON and after Monday Btb January the Oaa supply will be off on all dUlrkt* from Oaework* to Top Rock each day .Saturday and Sunday eacluded> from I li p m to approx. 3 30 p.m. uuiii the work ol clearing Gu. npleted. Sunday, January 22nd 1950. at* 4.30 p.m. TICKETS 2/-. 1/8. 1/Obtainable at Bdos Dye Works or at the Door PIMPLES AND BLACKHEADS QaKklr hf'P 1 %  > *'"' "i* lhtM Memiihea Iciiing ikio ton *nd imowib. Proxa oiaf tO year*. Dr. Chose's Ointment Furnishing! Vou are Buying SATE AND SURE when you . FURNISH HOME OR OFFICE from your Money Saving Store — t*ardrober, Draaaer-robea. Unen Prewnta. Oay Vamuea. BUaplei "realng Table*, Badrtaadr. Bed*. Waahglaiida. Nightchair Comfort, Hal and Shoe and Towel Hack*, *reen Frame*. Dining. Luncheon, Pane* and Kitchen Tablea In big rang* of -nape.. rnUrtiea and *Ue*. China, Kitchen and Bedroom t.'abUMU, Liquor Caarv Morria PUrnituro. Kuan Mid t -i-l Furniture, Rocking, Rrllniiu, Berbice, Upright, Am. and Tub Chair*. Settee*, BaT* Brilliant full-long Mirror*: 50 x IS at M. LS. WIWON Trafalgar St. Dial 40St CM, Conference -Will Continue COLOMBO. Jan. 11 li Foreign SecreLu. nst licvm ana Secretary for Commonwealth Relations i' iker said today thai tuning of Bntaln'i General Uon tor February 23 would not %  fjfjd the [irtiRrar.ime of the Com_ inonweiii;ii .Ministers Conference here. They authorised Reuter to issue the following comment; "Th. 1 .work ol tbO Colombo Conf' J*'il1 not in any way be curtailed 'IBS a result of the Electm. ment. "We shall 1 through to the end of the Conurding to the previous nlan." $ —Reuter. .set of Socialist beliefs enthroned ...is unchallengobte principles." i' Tel A Viv Mr. Sun V. %  (Chairman of Ihe British Labour .".Party, leading a Goodwill Delega. tion on a fortnight's visit to Israel declared: "1 think 1-obour will •win because we huvt better i —Keutcr. SHIPPING NOTICES MONTREAL. AUSTKALIA NETT ZEALAND UMV 1-1MITEI> (BE.A.N.Z.) UNI) IS. "PORT PIRIE" I* *chednled to %  all (ieelong lath December. Melbourne. Dee. Seih. Brtabane Dacember Sin Syd ley January 4th arriving Trinidad about nd January ISM. II S -KA1PAK1" I* *rheduled to .ail Adelaide Docember lath. Port PirkDecember llrt. Burnt* January Hh. Melbourne January 2I*t. Sydney January 28th. Briabane rebruary 2nd. arriving Trinidad about 4th March. The** veaael* have ample ipace for Chilled, Hard Froien and Oeneral Cargo Cargo accepted on Thrmaih Mil* 04 lading with Iranahlpment at Trinidad for llrltlah Quiana. llarbado*. Windward ft LlllMl Uland*. Por further partlculara apply FUKNESS WITHY, ft Co.. Lad. Agent*, TRINnJAD. DaCOSTA ft Co LtdAgent*. BARBADOS Tha Sch PIUIJ.IP H DAVIDSON" will aceept '" %  •'a'lO a,M P^Mengrra for Demerarn. SauU'U Thurwtay IJlh Janu-ey USD. The M.V. -CARDlBaaT." wtl' aceept Cargo and Pi grange:, f *r Dominica, Antigua. MontaerraL Nevla and SI. Kitta. Sailing Friday 12th Inrt. Tha M.V. DABBWt-' -ccept Cargo and Paa*encem fuf St. lAkla. St. VHicent, Grenada and Aruba. Date of *aIltrrgo-a* given. B.W.I. Schooner Own. non ItM.) Tel 4047. ttb January, isoo. • A*Mcla f llffAfa* ... .UMSitllSi. Mc0a. S buun £ pC I ANAUIAN SERVICE SOllMIUll m N.toa ef Ulg JO* SS "ALCOA PEQASU8" Deer. th SS. AI-COA PLAHTBR' 1 JafT•"• Sailing every two weeka. Artive* Barbada. January tn January 20th S | MVFJORD ...ila from N-.-w York 12lh. anrlvaa in Bortiado. and. M l\ IIKI I IN* -IKMt t S S ALCOA RQAMBK aalla from New Orleona lh Decemtoer. "tSrtSSbk RUKPDBR MM from New Orlean. H.h J 30th January ___^^ Apply; DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. Canadian SarekaS ROBERT THOM LTD. — New Vork and Gulf Sarvlca SI'KCIALISTS IN 1IU.H I.RAUL l'ROIHU Y DIXON t5c BLADON REAL ESTATE AGENTS — AVCTIONEEKS Thooe lulu PlanUtiou. llu.ltlitu. UU\ I IIAMIM NOIIII 1NC0MK TAX NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Income Tax returns are required from every married man whose income is $1200.00 per annum or over t from every other person whose income Is $720.00 per annum or over and from companies whether incorporated or unincorporated, societies, persons engaged in any trade or profession, and owners of land or property whether a taxable income has accrued during the past year or not Forms of Return my be obtained from the Income Tax Department AFTER THE 1ST DAY OF JANUARY. 1950. and the forms duly filled in must be delivered to me on r> reasoa is giveB. 10.1.50.—19n. -: %  '-'' W/V.V,'//V,V,V//////A rOB BALE OR RCNT New!) -built Bungal.nt at Perry'* Gap. Roebuck, Street Three bedrooma. two with inbuilt cedar pre**** and one with running water. Apply lo Victor B Cobham. Conor r oi Bank Hall and Barrack* SHAKESwith Accruing Dividend20 B-rlj-du. Shipping -.1 T'.dlng Cm Lad 27 Barbadoa Ire CD Lid The above win b* art up for tale V* Publk Competition at our OfBce Jam** Street, on Wedoaaday. ISth January kiatant at 2 p.m. G L W CLARKE A If I SOin I O II KALE %  icrMgncd will offer For Sal, at their Office. No. 17. High Street. Bridgetown, on Friday. 27th day of January, I960, at 3 D-TI. The Dwelling Home called "CAKLUIF.M" and the land thereto containing 10,770 square feet, situate on the Sea Coaat of St. Lawrence Gap. Chriat Chin Inspection on application to Mia, Kathleen Hunte, "Bratton." Maxwells Coast. Dial S3S7. For further particulars and conditions of Sale, apply to:— COTTLE, CATFORD & U.I.W.—It*. ssss.::::::-.::::-ASSAS*.fsss s l*M lll l l l t *** ', VW. to all our SI friends and %  Customers from n—IIJ Pharmat-H AFTER STOCK TAKING WE HAVE MADE SPECIAL REDUCTIONS ON DRESSES, BLOUSES, SLACKS and SKIRTS Etc.. Etc. uuoAiiwvv imilss SHOP. SHE IlllSkS MAMA I Oil IHE SI OKI BOOk!! WE HAVE A WIDE RANGE OF 4 III! IHtl VS BOOKS THEASURF. ISLAND by Robert LouU Stevenson RETOLD IN 400 PICTURES by Peter Jackson NANCY AT ST. BRIDES by D. F. Bruce JULIET OVERSEAS by Clare Mallory PENNY DREADFUL by A. Stephen Tring THE MYSTERY Or THE PANTOMIME CAT by Enid Bh IHV LIVED IN COUNTY DOWN by KiUhlc.T. Fitlpatrick THE STORY OF PETER PAN Retold by DBBM O'Connor THE WESTOW TALISMAN by Percy T. Westerman ( HAMPION OF THE MAIN by C Millrr AFLOAT %  :i ADVOCATE STATION EH Y



PAGE 1

PAGE TWO EARBADOS ADVOCATE TIUKMUV J.\N( Ag (JafuJb CdUum D R. r j. HaUinan who is coming to Barbados tomorrow is lb* son of ItM late John Thomas Halhnan, J.P. Mayor ol Lewlsham. lie wu educated at ji Tcnison's School, during lr.^ Hospital H obtained hfc M.B., B.S. (Lond). M.R.C.S., LH.CI 1 and DPJt at Dublin University. He was appointed Casually Officer. E;ist I-ondon Hospital for Children from 1908-9 and entered tit* Bcpal Army Medical Corps as subaltern in 1910. He saw service during the 1914-18 war in Egypt and Mesopotamia and was thrice mentioned in despatches. In 1920, ho was seconded for FCrviee with the Iraq Government and from 1920-22, he was Medic.nl Officer of Health at Basrah and from 1922-33, was Inspector General of Health Services, Iraq. His recreations are shooting, golf and tennis. He lives in Ropley, Irish Town, Jamaica. Trinidad Businessman Here M R. I. Feldnian, proprietor of Feldman's Cate, Port-ofH:e island. lor about three weeks' holiday and Is staying at the Hotel Royal. MM First Visit M RS. Winnifred Waller of the %  i Kingdom who spent four months' holiday here last year durtBf the winter, has now i 'or a similar period. She arrived on Tuesday by H W I A. from Grenada and is staying at the Marine Hotel. To Spend The Winter D R BBd Mrs. Martin B. Dill of the USA. who were in Barbados about three years ago, %  tsj DOw back here to spend the winter. They came in recently and are staying at the Marine Hotel. MR. A MKhrllll I. W-IWOfT Married Yesterday V/ i ac ru lAl I %  tUuai L'nuivn. ... %  lrmontto, daughti m M B om< i..• %  was imrru-ct to Mr, k.-itn WalcoA, 1 and son of Mr. and Mrs. t\ *.. Walcojl of "CU Rock, %  %  %  i % %  tiful pirn. „f i vory mbroidcred net yoke with bustle effect at the back She wona train Uar boaoV %  i... and aba carried a bouquet of ""•bids. ,f : Miss Dorothy ClairmonL-, UM bride's BISU-I tendant. R| ,u.wm an oil HM gbouldtr bodies of orchid latin and ttie skirt was of nylon mat qiusette trimmed with satin. Sho wore a Milan Pktun h uouqurt was of g?it*ras and %  Tba Car t> tho Ran M B Gi | tman was Mr. a cotl. 1 I, P0ptll.il The rto %  will be %  penduii th> at Bathsheba. > o On Short Holiday V|K JACK DI LIMA. Director 11 of v D In Limited, Jewellers of PorV-ofd Bridgetown, was an ...... Golflto" ft holiday and 1B staving Hotel %  Df Litn.. uill be going l„ iho it* I Kingdom on a i. < Came in on T.C.A. V4KS K i 1T rt " rbara Dowd %  %  set UM SVMBJ %  staying i UM Oo They in i daughter of Dr. Dowd. Chi*! Mi-.ii, of Canadian National Railway and Trans-Canada Ail lural Olgtal I moor From Venezuela M i Murray uu) Ihna ilwldien of Caracas, Venezuela v I Ing at the Paradise Bag %  corns up lo the Rots) ft lo be in the island until Of next month. For Two Months A HHIVlNCi bj the "Fort Am-in Monday from the %  S. Case of Cleveland. Ohio. Thoy tor about two months' i art staying; at the Manns Hotel. Mr. Case is Chairman ot the I Directors of Lamson A manufacturers of bolts sjsjj BUtig Director Returns M M HARRY FARINHA, DiraetSf of Messrs J. T. John*ons Ltd. of Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, and Mrs Partnha, NI1W1A. on | spending 'about tan days" holiday in the island. iiK-v wsre staying at the Oce*i Coinings And doings M H\ %  .. n rom i i %  Member of OKic %  Staff A MONCUM visitors to IhlS colony is Mi balds, a member ol lbs of Mossu Paters *, Co Miss Theobalds who is a guest a; Indramcr. Worthing, is spend* ing a short holiday in Barbados. I 1 II and Mrs. t n .. Bfasua VI !. isnlni 1 I inrudad, %  Nnv.il on Hi* %  %  K ut the * <> C an Hlajuun ai I A V D both Pilots or I sod trom Hooursal %  bj Ibau srivsi staying at tha MarUM : • • • M R. Douglas i I Trans4 Ittawa and Mrs Robt; ii .niu.tb b) ii A for about iv. ln| at the Ocean View Hotel. • • • \ I 1" | ( Halifax, %  I ay and are staging ICartns Hotel. • • I M R. Fred Burns of Con Plour Mills In Kansas. US.A., cama m reearstlj bi 1 n days' holiday and U stayinsj at tha Marins : : s trong teerhfde WOVENSTRIP SANDALS CHARMlAh BVB u the 3 ffeor and one month olo dauontcr of afrj. srepianie e' a a j. wit* oi the Amtthvit hero, seen t**fft *sr hert. Sns can wa senfencei of $ix wordt tocei anlmaU, live* tn Devon How (b)right is your 3-year-old? Just A Toy For Jacqueline PARIS, (By Mall) Jacqueline Vaissicros Is again a happy little French girl—she has received full leeu'authority t play with her III foot pin* l>\:hiiii. As a result she was as* gl her old Montmarmstand to-Jay happily fondling her 34-pound playmate in her lather's travelling sideshow. A startled group of spectators had protested that she VSfl Sttdongering the public safety—as bar own—by publicly coaxing the animal Into her outfc. But her father advanced the theory that no pink python could possibly be dangerous at temperatures less than 100 degrees. . The French legal system, nnuing no immediate precedents, called in a ranking member of the Museum of Natural History. He rose to the occasion by declaring that such a python is harmless, above or below 100 degrees. -(loV.S.) B Y Uiree. VJUI umjoi cmld nas one ana tn its a--rj::c o"ice nan appeared an anr.*:ive or : cblevous oersonallty rwcn'v small wniU? teerh are in Uie firm mouth and what 'nt*v will eat is not alwars what moiner dMites Not ao murh oata'e ou' *hrr awakpn'nir lndprnd-nra will rfuw uplnarh fish or meal without nv *npnr**nr reason wha'*nv^r The nree-Tear-old can and on tipto* Tor 'hriM •wrrnds % f***> th nervinal nrininn—no lon*T Marv wants" hnf "T wnn'" Sneaks in thort wntpnefs not Mnfal word^ * fS YOVR child bacltirard, srigAf. or prtctKirw* ? To help aou moii a" ettimate. Paq* Pout prfnf* Ihr second nl check ol rharti based on Itn veat%' expeil enee ol what bright thildttn ran do • * I ills Itr-.r-.h the peitonai touch h jin A hat r. \0 ATPraars SB Inchf? In hfleht rtnirrrtuno u$t or thtt ao* (s t*f dniihle rtr***nt h'loht f n rountrvsid' I Can wink each eye in mimic" Head now 19 inches (only 1 Inches lrs than full growth i Chest m menes ..•• Weiirht Il4atn — auii nas excellent resistance to infectious disease* He Thinks He's Dull! A HOLLYWOOD reporter gels around and sends this one. Fred MacMurray has a complex. Hs thinks he's dull. "Look." he said, "I don't do / anything that these glamour guys do The front pages never hoard of mat. I don't do anything." Frcii rnusad: "I don't night-club, don't get into tli'hts or scandals, don't own ;i yaeht, don't play the horses. don't wear plaid overcoats, don't go to Hollywood parties, don't own a motorcycle, don't run back and forth to New York, don't go In for politics. "See what I mean?" he asked. "I'm dull—" A pal on the RKO set of "COME SHARE MY LOVE." standing nearby, piped up with: "If Mac Is dull it's because he's so busy rnnkmi; millions.' MacMurruy in case you didn't know, is one of Hollywood':; dough-heaviest guys. And hi started out 14. years ago as i dead-bn.,.. pbyar. *Shows leaious* at arrival of new habv unless asked to co-oerale in wne wa .. Plavs alone wvn *ova efen wiih other children present. Sense of DOSsesslop neglnnlna LOTSS :— I. Pulling tops ott ongnt flowers j. On m DM n t on chairs Doses and can* Has oo natural fear 3f norses dogs Does oot mind ths SKELETON CROSSWORD Enjoys ottth and water In soy form .... •-oodou Express asNTtsa; You Can't Remake Children lly Horn II. II M"KE than we reuluu, tt-c make pictures in our mums of. what we want uur children to be like. Often a conflict between ideal and reality follows and this leads to a conflict, or to put it mon mildly. aonM sort ol friction between parent* and their ehl There iv iilUSa. The rei;n'i. i r aw i.iKes which l ws might call ii tha I %  normal" that get* built up. Parents often huv c that) so held befoitthau that they use them, like a tape measure, to gauge their child's natur c of nenl Than UM or father builds up uf i • •\ course, i> so ire thai It can't be realized Hut Uu IjwttabtS (tisiippoiiitiiienLi that follow when a child repe..i Uhs J persiMi ersjuta itiseord. I i Nfaaasjjl IIMIS AI last, we have those \nv personal Idsals baaad on wlsbiulnssi whs) b whan not keep u mother or fath. %  suit of alt this was an almost h n paUancs with the baby's gnat BCtlfflt) and drive. His personainv maaa such demands upon her that she was nut equal to them, and she often Mid, ''How did I aver get such a child as tl.ts" I'm much better take care of a quiet little gi: tnparisons II, her own iinial SrOrfct dp ti Imaot of I wah her UtUe boj i 1 it in hafomlng vary dUAcnlt to and quite a: to his mother. TtWO when he got t,, | ing age, and -• %  %  sad by hu all little dynamo's ways : • s Cortie\ Rupert and the Caravan '1 Trie divippearance of Dinkir, the cat. puzxlcd Rupert. |"Why did the dj'h off tO ( this wild spot?" he thinks. "Did she want roe to follow, or was she ju feeling frliky?" He geti on 10 a large boulder in order to get a belter view and gaze* around. Then he pjuwa. "Hullo, there'* a caravan down the He gcti a .uddei, i belong to Rol! fl lnt T? hn-, been hire I?" 'good.mind 0W -Jtl D.nlue, he KII |* locks. %  -i Whiz V-ii*: About Time IT'S been repeatedly said that human beings talk more about sex. money and food than any other subjects. However it's possible that there's another subject that's In their conversation more. It's time—and phases of it, such as second, minute, hour, day, night, morning, afternoon, month, last year, this year, next year, etc. Naturally, authors and poets have contrived many felicitous phrases about time. Read those below, and see if you have the mssnon or literary talent to supply the right word wherever one is missing: is the thief of time— Younp. 2. Time and wait for no man.—Prouerb. 3. Time Is the counsellor.—Pericles. 4. Time makes more converts than -. —Paine. 5. I time, and now time doth me.— Shakes peart'. 0. Art is long, and time is %  — %  — — —Lonajellom. 7. Time is the greatest remedy for _. —Seneca. 8. The the time, the quicker it passes.—Pliny. y. He who —— time everything.-Disraeli. 10. One always has time enough. if one will 11. Time, that black ;, row between two —Cot (on. 12. Time's the comDRAW a Urge sheet of paper. 1% the triangle should k-_ little on either Si three pieces of paper >1 and number \hem 1 -1 You're now ready !<,. esting puzzle game. Place No. 1 countat|L tre of the left-hand aJ in the centre of the*." line, and No. 3 in 'j|(2 the base-line. The prat change the positions <| No. 2 without • counters oil th. %  %  ijiiod |M*BU|M H M\ uoa c wqwrnu mmmtm >\ W"ll .K| MOU ,„, ,-J Z .latiuirni jaiimoj < |1T1 auiniod ..JI ot iotui wij >q u i >M|Bmi asgcgM in jo m?n dtn i vim i; J fl "<* i wqtumi t^m ^i "*' IIMS aaa • %  m in grava ol all.13. Oh Ttnai tht the dead.—Byron. 14. Backward, tun () Time in your flights] 15. Time, which weakem i BrHWra. 10. Seize time by U—IHffacua. %  i %  dm*iu. 11J1 tl no*iui| -lliir-q ti H-• f pii 'i 'uonroni AOI ATM II It IIMMA (Mwi.nO TONIGHT UD ANTON WALBROOK In... •MAX FROM .MOROCCO' with MAHGAKETTA SCOTT. %  USGINALD TAT1S. PPJTEH BINC CUA1R, MARY MOtOUB Bgra DAVB, ••JUNE BI *ith PAY HAINTEK, BBRTU A W.,M..I Hrat. ; m. becnuse he wasn't the girl-babyces are often Ulurnhiatl aaBna, V.cepl Them \s riu> \ie Just us with the adults we must not . %  of course), ana %  %  %  Bra muirh in eaih other's cornIt all b to the fact that i try often to posnl iut for %  • no other in the wuild. and gauat be acceyA young mother 1 used n. kno had always wanted a little girl baby—a dainty child a COUld make lovly eloUv whose .. appealing. What the fati her was a big hush) baby Ui>. so vigorous and independent th:n he didnl even wunt SO he held | her lap or cuddled anv longer than wu necessary for his feedinns His mother wasn't too well for some time after he was born, and was quite nervous over ccrted as such by his parents, then handled wisely, so that his linepoints can be developed and some modifying of his faults be brought about. 11 ajrlnaj thut this is] aasy lo . In fact for some I parents it is very diffleult Ppr-( ents with a keen social aenic tend to be impatient with a %  Mary or unconventional son and daughter. An ambitious businessman tanda to b. intolerant of u youth whoe satisfaction lies in working with his hands, A bustling mother has trouble lo understand a daughter who isn't the h"iise-wircly type, but ( SO write or draw, or think or read about serious or oven profound subjects. Uhavrl niis-minded parents do I or accept a bouyant butterfly of a (laughter. Acquire Flexible AttilmUBha hi i is certainly no mine, is a usual expression in cases like these. But t too "'Hen. or you may eonviiiee vourself and, worse still, your child, that neither ol you can find any ground of understanding and companionship. Keep in mind that whenyou'ie •nay be easy to get along together: but that when you're different, your son or daughter n I'u-thing to and you may have something to Rive Uiem. TV Old ouintryw.,1 'Having children around keeps you from getting set in your I' :s true, but it is especially true when your chil-irct, are different in tastes and personality from you. Then you have *o acquire flexibility of mind and maiinei M i i> \. u.. apouiu— Lnequai advaniag* ? i aobolar, and tatMr. 'IB vou may se tunas ..J like. runatea SO or lot i -i ullowabla, ^it -1 'ii. -~ It oonua back to wloa. < Aid to a record ot i. -mwAixtt totlsoms :n. 09 ..... I. May be •ecu la Uw i io ign Dour houd. I. A vuifty u( dates, I. Time to art up but i MDunii fourastt, : I IKr-.ua, pa burden. *^ i. Dvd book l. They make SU ragraS. I. rigure I do like to i. uamniera put mn ID -*:d. I, Naturally you aas %  WHtuary noUoe. K I M BnutUMSS o* pmna I Ttieatrtca! une. J, Profile ot form. 1. HOUB out. I, Ounu up 1 -.he-dcaaai GLOBE THEATRE TODAY, 5 & 8.30 p.m. — Lust Showing ii V JAMES MASON and JOYCE HOWARD I ... in THEY MET IN THE DARK Sturling To-morruw :il 5 & 8-IU pJB, IN (;i)()l) OLD SUMMER TIME" a* nuardoua. fo-ar.i"^iT,'. "i A, aiS-T.i STarnari Deubls raiMiiSH o ao mm: FVlday. Sulurdii ABOTT aim COSTfcLIX)' l\ III! \ \i > 5.68 Our Last and Latest AT Shipment of Mexican HUARACHES % %  • %  |iA( ft? ...... /or n„..f„rt A Hard II Vr KVANi A Will I I II MrS Dial 4606 and 4220 EVERYTHING FOR THE CROP : iiuiudiiiK : • CANE BILLS • Cl'TLASSES • PLANT KNIVES • SHOVELS • GALVANIZED BUCKETS • BBASS WOVEN WIRE • STENCIL INK AND BRUSHES • SEWING TWINE • PACK NEEDLES BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON fACTORY LIMITED. ^\ HOYAL (Worttfaai] To-day Only 4.30 and I Unlird Aib.u Double . COfAt ABA.S'A %  •rlu) CARMEN MIRANDA EMPIRE %  ST JONESVan HETLI.O In MADAME BOVUf with teuii JOUHJJANChriit. ; HOXY I^M T*o akowi To-day I SO A 111 F.% C. Deuale . 1*U lAWSV-tortdo,, U0HMB 'WHIT CIBXM LEAVC II %  Ml and • Ma.wi.i in i,, 4 with Jarnea LYDON -Sally EZUPJU OLYMPIC : W^ISM: TO ^ 43, IU "^•wt YOUNG atabari IIITCHLV "oaos. •TAI.L IN THE SADDLE John WAYNB-EUa RAINES MARINE HOTEL DANCE Saturday Night January 14th. PERCY GREEN & HIS ORCHESTif Dancing from 9 to all hours -1 TOOLS FOR THE TASK! A wonderful um IIIIMII just opened: CIRCULAR I'l. \ M g FCSE JACK BLOCK RABBET PI ^M SONS SPOKE SHAVES Ut SAWS HOW SAWS BACK SAWS CHISELS HAND DRILLS BREAST URIELS VIJ n x ta ua i v MURE BOX See Them in Our Show Window. PLANTATIONS LIMITS