Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
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“

(GRE got

VFoesday.

sx" Parbados

_—

STRACHEY WINS BATTLE OF SUGA

SS say : aie | No Increase In 1950 Price
Cripps Calls Himself! as ioe Meee eee

_ A Pessimist AFTER 1952 CONTRACT EXPIRES
But Calle For “Go Slow.’ | ani

In Helping Others No Human (Creech Jones Pleads In Vain
| LONDON, Jan. 9. Rights In

(CHANCELLOR of the Exchequer, Sir Stafford Cripps, i
| Colombia

spoke of “unrequited exports” and sterling balances
at his Press Conference in London today. “We want to
diminish our unrequited exports $0 that we can divert : : :
more af our exports to the hard currency, and particularly | Says Liberal President
the dollar countries.” ae ae aoe that NEW YORK, Jan. 9
e must do”, * is an- ni te Sabie:
other very tenet side to this ie reer tae ne ay .
picture, The resources have been gs ty 8 aun ae
made available, many of them 6 aia-temserantaae laoaeh
to countries urgently in need of Colombia during the last 3 years |
“Since the Conservative Party }
began their desperate campaigi
to destroy all opposition,” Dr

assistance in their post-war
Lleras-Restrepo, a member of the | 7
nas been the question of a “fair

reconstruction, . — ee , On
Colombian Senate, has been ir ? :
States for the last 3| ele as oO price” for producers: Until re-

Ib, we hid ad provided this) DH VESTRY ELECTORS OF ST. MICH AEL had cast their votes, and the long
the United
jcently the Food Ministry have
Finished Her
Practically all human rights | ;

help, we should undoubtedly have ; : ; ;
business of counting them began. The picture shows election officials engaged in
weeks, and is returning to Colom- made West Indian producers sejl—
‘ e
|have disappeared in Colombia, he J iwi EK
} |
f hee ommun ist said. I myself have been living oO ni urope
e

Price:

FAVE CENTS

Year 35.













(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan. 9

{T IS NOW fairly obvious that discussions be-

tween the Food Ministry and Colonial sugar
delegates have from the West Indian point of
view served no useful purpose. The Ministry with
the knowledge that they have all West Indian
sugar under contract until the end of 1952 are
understood to have driven a hard bargain and in
the circumstances it vould not be surprising if
the B.W.I. delegates are obliged to turn down
whatever offers are made to them.

*





ln ne



Dominating the whole picture

—valuable. supporting imports to}
countries threatened by the cold
war.

These have helped to enable |
them, despite all their difficulties, |





seen an even greater spread of
Communism. What are unrequit- the count. From left to right are :—Mr. C. B. Sisnett; Mr. R. M. Cave, Sub-Sher-
riff; Mr. F. J. Cole, Sheriff; Mr. E. C. Redman, Vestry Clerk; Mr. H. O. Ramsay.
bia in a few days
| under existing contract—to
Britain at a price influenced by

ed exports to us are immensely
Two Arrested |







the Cuban “dump”’ figure,
7 withstand the onslaught of | = : ane nae that devaluation has had
that cold war, and to build up| O F , d )in imminent danger of my life for | the effect of
their own production”, the Chan_| n rau

increasing the price
to Britain of all non-dollar sugar,
the Ministry are understood to
have completely disregarded the

many months. |

The 41-year-old Senator said
jthat he had come to the United
| States “ in order to get the opinion

cellor added: “But we have now |
reached a stage where we must go!
slower, whether we wish it or!
not, for the sake of preserving

—HOFFMAN

WASK: NGTON, Jan, 9
Paul

Charge Expans ion In

Mr.











in: Hoffman, Economic| free market prices and_ instead

: @ ;of Americans about the political | Co-operation Administrator, said| have set their own figure which

helo eth and ability to| ; BRUSSELS, Jan. 2. ituation in Colombia. | today that European recovery hac| they are not prepared to alter.

- Bir States roned on this point,| Belgian Police today arrested ou “Cas Sia He had unofficial talks with | been so successful that there was|For this reason there seems

Rs WOU ee that an attempt] two. prominent opted Pawar gr State Department friends” in| the danger that the United States! little hope that 1950 will bring

would, be made to agree on a/men in connection with frauds in : Vashington, “and everybody 1] would consider the job done. | any imerease in the price paid

Sir STAFFORD CRIPPS reduction in the amount releas-| stock and bonds, which should Ts Keynote Of Colombo Talks ret was at Teast surprised a'| The ultimate result of such ajfor sugar by Britain to the West

able from Sterling balances when | have been declared under the : 2 decision might be war. Russia | Indies. The Distienod lof lone

Gold Coast we. erae negotiations took plane | Government’s anti-Inflation law (By SYLVAIN MANEGOT) @ On Page 3 | had sought to create chaes in| term agreement to run on when

with each country. ae after the liberation COLOMBO. Jan. 9 Western Europe, Mr. Hoffman told! {he 1952 contract expires . also

. : . in 1944, “ * eerore 9 anes ; the Women's National Democratic | appears re », The Food Minis-

’ orkers Ss e anes They are M. Henri Stock- COMMONWEALTH co-operation to check expansion ‘ ° ¥ . | Cluj in a prepared address. hi ee ronan ia hie

; nigepetins Mean eee Tf of Communism in South East Asia was the keynote of the Spain Considers | “Today, despite. al! that Russia | agreement with Australia guaran-

e at , j i “onference. t se | could do to prevent it, I think I i » fr “mm 600,006

A Strike erican bankers that the United|sens, former Director of a well- opening sessions of the eae Conference, to judge from Economies Sveak \ce — ~ Sera || teeing to buy trea thes » 800, ”

| States should take over liability} known business Banking House.| information available tonight. i ; | cee abiaeiinaio:” han cee | tons annually and this has had

for part of Britain’s Sterling Brussels Police said that the| ~~~ recreate —enneitenate The sessions are being held in| Te mee Mr. Hoffman ad tae thins | the effect of reducing the quota

GOLD COAST, Jan. 9 Balance debts, Sir Stafford said: | men were alleged to be concerned , secret. The Commonwealth For- | W ith Argenti na : i |for other areas.

Workers in Accra began a Civil} “I am very glad the suggestion | in a fraud totalling 1,000,000 Bel-

‘ / pean nations to drop barriers t
was learned,
Disobedience campaign today!came from American bankers. |

ie {e@ign Ministers, it
U.S. Offficials | sesecats sarees uss



| iE > , trade with e other, N Virure
; 7 : gian frances, Belgian Premier, , COsOREE a | _ NEW YORK, Jan. 9. “eonmnls-Uetdinrecion for West Aith ae : tne huve
Slosing and stopping buses. The| think it a sound and excellent Gaston Eyskens, announced on tion—not intervention—and th The New York Times in a re+ | Qin Europe is no longer an idea! ‘ ae oa ~ the Fo “Mir try
npaign, part of a move to| idea.” Friday that police had uncovered | elimination of the economic con-| port from Madrid to-day said that ltt is a. Sataatiend ns < ‘as ts a Use rele oe by ne ; san se ;
biain Dominion Status for the} Reviewing the economic results | frauds, totalling 10,250.000 Bei- In U.K. For | ditions, on which Communisin| the Spanish Government was con- | | wa BEF é essity,” he! it is understood that the offer
Fold Coast, also included other | of 1949, the industrial output had| gian francs, and that two of the | thrives, were the only effective | sidering breaking off all economic | °°: ‘he West Indies
it at home strikers and lesser | continued to rise rapidly through

srovides for

“Europe must give her people guaranteed purchase ‘of approxim-

tangible proof that Democracy} jtely 650,000 tons annually which

means something more than free-!;. fay below the figure for which

dom to see your children hungry.” | West Indian producers have been
—Reuter. } asking.

| Mr, Creech Jones. is

country’s leading bankers
others had been arrested
charged with implication. “he
bankers named were: M. Emile
Mallien, head of the-big Krediet
Bank and M, Jules Cardyn, a high
the

and
and

oycotts.

Post Office, electricity jnder-
tings, railways, and Government
partments were, however, work-

hg normally.

A general strike to support the
emand and the re-instatement of

the year “with the result that our
economic position had been bas-
ically strengthened,”

~ rt... | means of achieving this aim, Mr.| relations with Argentina. A meet-

e ence Talks Ernest Bevin and Pandit Nehru|ing of the Spanish Cabinet would

both opposed the idea of a Pa-|Study the question to-day, the re-
cific Pact similar tc the Atlantic | Port stated.

Pact. "The British Foreign Sec- |

Mili-| retary thought a different reme-

tary and Civil Officials arrived dy was needed in Asia. He said |



@ on page 3 LONDON, Jan. 9.

—Reuter,
senior American

Right

known to
official of





Belgian National



|
rms a former Company
some Am-| Director and M. Laurent Hans-



aN a have intervened with the Ministry
Bank. here by air from Washington;that interventi : ae een. i e % én tahall of Colenialidelegates:but
dismissed i. * 3 é rvention had not been | ) oO erm nis I | : ‘ t
ep ffi ee ten meee Bill To Appoint Another Fraud today for the Mutual Defence|the method adopted among West- 20% Cut Will Not a aking |it now seems, despite all effort
nded _ We heitn we tha ee . Police said that they thoughty Assistance Progremme Talks on;ern Powers in meeting the Eu- Whalin Fle *t Plt at ie erst a. ae ee Sie se Prince Bernhard that they were on the point of dis-| Wednesday. jropean crisis. Why, he asked, | Balance Budget i § Mauritius will be offered in
SD inian ee Balluny- covering yet another fraud involv- The meetings will last for 2]should Russia attempt to inter- more than 1,000,000 tons under the

itech, “cae ee those THE HAGUE, Jan. 9. ling 3,000,000 francs’ worth of| days, and only Americans will| yene waltore..gawers: in. Asin. cai WASHINGTON, Jan. 9. | Ciena

: he _sirike. A Bill appointing Prince Bern- ieclared stocks : . take part. , d
The Ground Staff of the British bP & undeclared stocks and bonds. Ke

FOR U.S. FIRM

1 hard of the Netherlands, Regent
pverseas Airways Corporation at] in

ecra stopped work on Saturday,

The 20% cut in spending of In-
ternational activities proposed in

elsewhere are trying to w
their own problems in

aa —(Ry Cable.)
The Talks are believed to con- ;

According to the police, the] , Ts ae
sider America’s Military Aid

the event of the decease of }frauds concern stocks and bonds



thelr own





|ways? Asia was facins ortst |President Truman’s Budget to The W HAMBURG, ve 9.
Queen Juliana before their eldest | ii, pew if Programme in the light of reports} ;,. are ; . 4 Congress to-day will not balance he West German news Agency |
aa : ere : which have been falsely. certified, ; & ports | 3 . . 1 st we g a) e
ut servicing of planes continued. | daughter Beatrice has come of 48, Some of them Soe earviea off by by United States officials, who} ~— - eae eee cook the | the budget. ).P.A. reported today that the} Protection
— Reuter. | aS ‘been submitted to the Second the Germans ‘durin the war, andj Mave been surveying the require- | : I at ne Se i fowaldt docks in Kiel and Ham-| eh
Chamber of the States General. Tits. Seba dante a pack into] ents of Britain ind other mem. oa ; Se oe te nomic nev"! needed to help finance the 2,100,- | surg have started converting an |
T a c aitenten Deion c fon eee Aap bers of the North Atlantic) & pense < Communist Nn, | 000,000 Social Welfare Pro-| \merican 16,000 ton tanker ana } Only
rinidad Gets | known : convitted Gifiabneratein Treaty. | Seimei Sateen nepal ger ut { gramme, on the bas is of which 0 former British corvettes into ¢
who were “afraid to declare their The Programme is to increase} er aees 7 oe President Truman's

The $1,300,000,000 saved will |
Democratic

New Bishop

|operation of the Western

2 Skiers Killed







, powers | > nodern whaler fleet to be manne} LONDON, Jan. 8
ill-gotten gains,” police said, the collective strength for de- | nolitically soomestaiie .. In Parlinchtat Pea vrcale, Count fence of North Atlantic Area, oe Gaba ts eld yy | sone ¢ potions in oe Tine ‘| Whaling Company here, branch of sass auntie British Press reports
bados Advocate Correspondent TURIN, Jan. 9. iumiats are to sk the Belgian Reuter. ; | the oe a hy yo ‘oll t ” me Duessel-Dorf Hankel and | tnat Britain would continue to
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 9. Two Italian skiers were killed Government for ‘a statement on @ From Page 3 hi steer tits ie al eens ie Co., Ltd, has accepted an offer | teers ode taco Yeletions “ The Rt. Reverend Douglas John| yesterday when the cable of a Pit iunatal ucmiuihis toate : Hi . ith ed mae * which rom an un-named whaling com-| (yy ese Nationalist Government
Wilson, Bishop of British Hondu-| Ski-lift in the mountains of tis vate . sardving “ohmaraaaia an would Seine Sa couane "$250,000 000 | pany in San Francisco, California, | ;, Formosa. aut
Bs, was today elected Bishop of;™Moon, Italian Alps, slipped off wm dl sareenaiitins of the fin- Russia Goes To Miners Re rect as a Health Fund in 1950-51, | © provide ships and crews for a| British Consuls were remaining
is eae wirite a Special Synod or Pr Sane & pews ee Mh political waitin . J Racaiisa this. it aection year, Con- ie expedition to be run ay fin Formosa to protect British sub-
an glican Diocese. He suc- |}! e. =five skiers, inc hea ee re ; mr a . 1 6 gress is expected to pass the Bud- | ‘he merican Company next] jects he said. They would have
a ’ y aged ten, were seriously in-| The Communist question adds M , gt is expecte I j
ds the Rt. Reverend Fabian | POY. eee nics, ee that “ the scandals are ofesuch a Polls arch 12 Proposal

get as a whole more speedily than
LONDON, Jan. 9. ete ae

: “ ‘ ym wlec : é s could > .
wae & oe Yorkshire, | Grable changes may be made in
le sir landers that ue | future reductions in expenditures

a »*.|on Foreign Aid Programmes and
should forego wage increases for | é ere

ackson who resigned because 0i|
health.
The new. appointment will have |
© be confirmed by. other Bishops |
nh the province of the West Indies.
Bishop Wilson 46-year-old, is a

eason. It was also stated that) contact with the authorities,
conversion work would be carriec | “whoever they may be”, that did
out despite Norwegian protests. | not constitute recognition of any
Representatives of the docks said | kind, he declared. He added that
that they hoped to finish the con-! Britain had not yet veceived any
version by the time the Argentine | communication from the Chinese

nature as to throw suspicion on
services of the Belgian

certain i
Ministry of Finance.” Premier
Eyskens told the Press on Friday
|

R.C. Bishop Dies

PRAGUE,, Jan, 9.
Skrabik, Roman Catholic

political cam-
But consid-

LONDON, Jan. 9.
Elections to the Supreme So-
viet of the U.S.S.R. will be held
on March 12, 1950 by decree of
the Presidium of the Supreme So-

that if personalities were involved
Dr.



even if they were personalities} viet reported by “Moscow Radio” |a year to aid British economic re-|/2 Social expenditure. eee So" Settivaed iguane ing: ar taacany | Smeets Government about her
5 : 4 ; — 3 ‘ , ‘ ~ = ya : -— (Reuter. ai tis to recognise it.
eduate of Queen’s College | Bishop of Banska, Slovakia, who |¢ the Catholic Party, (his own),| to-night. covery. These first results of a| . to sail, a Soeieten te: eepagnan viii
@ Cambridge. He is, married was attacked by the Ministers of | jstice would be done, and justice| Last elections to the Supreme | Mation-wide poll of miners sug- | ree 3
Be has two children. This is his Justice for “refusing to take the | Would be severe: Soviet, the highest organ of State |SeSted the possibility that the |
eventh year of ministrative ex-| oath of allegiance” to the Com-

—Reuter.





power in Russia, were held in| 750,000 strong National Union of |
February, 1946, when 99.7 per | Mineworkers may join 75,000 en- |
cent. of the electorate went to the | Gimeers and 450,000 railwaymen |
polls. Candidates were elected for |to lead the fight against the offi-
a four-year term. The Supreme | cial wage “restraint” policy of the
Soviet consists of two chambers— | Trades Union Congress.

the Soviet of the Union and the| Leaders of all 187 Unions affili-

erience in the West. Indies. ;munist Government, died at
—(By Cable). ' home to-day.—Reuter.

WHICH IS U.K.

his

Soviet “Criminals”
Flee Finland

HELSINKI,
Finland will send a preliminary





AUSTRO-RUSSIA MUST
AWAIT DECISION

Koster Mother
Murder?

Jan. %&



Soviet of Nationalities—Reuter. j|ated to the T.U.C. will meet in| reply at_the end of the week to
? ; 's and for the
ELECTION DA Y YORKSHIRE, Jan. 9. |London on Thursday to take a} Soviet Russia’s demand for ihe LONDON, Jan. 9.
o Ps ee tee toch Fos ft final decision on wages poliey, extradition of 300 Soviet “war The k ting of the Austrian De uties Conference
‘used of tasked : woman S tik oO } —Reuter, |criminals,” circles close to the The 257th meeting of the Aus p
LONDON, Jan. 9. oreo ae wastika ver

who, with her husband intended} Foreign Ministry said to-day. The} to negotiate an Austrian State Treaty opened here this
POLITICAL QUARTERS here tonight speculated on ; Ty



to adopt him. The husband a | reply will be corey at, ae afternoon.
: Mae \ r Foreign | stry or e basis | : : . @ sol
ip Possibility that Prime Minister Clement Attlee might | found his wife, Mrs, Emme Mob Parliament China Accepts a Coveenmant tapentiainn into fi The American Deputy, Mr. Sam Reber was in the
x Febr . i ; loy, aged 48 dead by her fireside eae ‘.2 demand, / completed. cnalr.
hruary.2 aa: Generel Blection wey mean the dissolu-| last night. MUNICH, Jan. 9. See here ears ee a

- The British Deputy is Mr. Wil-
A detective told a special court













iT * ese :
; , Barli ilies An aeroplane of unidentified | U.K. Ss Reco nilion Most of the 56 persons listed ° | liam Ivo Mallett, the French, M.
® | shows oF ee ad eer 3 | that it appeared that two shots] nationality to-day drew a Swas- | en ua the demand as “guilty of par- Queen Amelia | Marcel Berthelot, and the Rus-
loyds Did this week) bub: Giese Set a ~y| were ‘fired from a_ rifle which] tika with its vapour trail above LONDON, Jan. 9 ticularly grave crimes against the cede. aa ” | sian, Mr. George Zarubin, Soviet
3 political opEnton held to Soruary | ay alongside the body. the Bavarian Parliament in Mu- The Chinese Communist Govy-| Soviet Union” have already fled Not Sinking | Ambassador in London.
23 as the most likely election day, | The boy was remanded in cus-|nich, the West German news/|ernment has agreed to Britain’s|the country. Freezing, snowclad | Soviet Deputy Minister, George
ot Refuse and predicted. dissolution for | sody until January 17, —Reuter,| agency, “D.P.A.” reported. recognition of its regime, the| Helsinki was to-day gay with PARIS, Jan. 9. | Zarubin’ told the Ccaference of
P February 3. bo F % 7 Bavarian members of Parlia- | Communist New China news| posters for the forthcoming presi-~ French newspaper reports} Foreign Ministers’ Deputies on
LONDON, Jan. 9 All pastigmantary opcaes “an Tae watched the performance. | agency reported in a message re-| dential elections. The _ Social } said that 84 year old ex-Quee*| an Austrian Treaty here to-day
Lloyds of London to-day de- | 28sume that a Government an- : ili. The Swastika dissolved after ajceived in London to-night. Democrats, supporters with the} Amelia of Portugal was “sinking” | that there was no point in dis-
mied reports trom the Israel port| MQURCement will be made soon Wealthy Brazilian | Short time.—Reuter. —Reuter. | Conservative, Liberal and Swed-| and had received the Last Sacra: | cussing further articles, until
of Haifa that the: had rebssed after tomorrow's Cabinet meeting. . ish Peoples Party of the re-elec-| ment were described as|Russia’s direct negotiations with
® insure shipments of non-mili-| . Some observers’ think that the Refused Bail SUT ame tion of Litheral’s 70-year-old } “nonsense” today by a Lady-in-| Austria had been completed.
ty goods passing through the| Government, if it proposed a late | e President Pring a i Movotatten Waiting. M, =’ said < ~ mone
‘Sue s M : tion, may in the first : ‘ St k Thi t L I l their posters that a edn eel ws+} approach e-appropriate Sovie
x anal co ~— way to ray pier mag ale ae that | Murdered Wife rire rea n la ry President would Nain a Commun- fm sige Gavin ee ree siabesition "30, hake .cmn, vlan
ssurances we. a conduc | the King has been asked to post-, BAYONNE, Jan. 9 ist head foy the State Police. pape Pp these ftegotiations. would be fin-
“It is still possible to arrange| pone the opening of the new h San, ov.

r sent to Lisbon to make’ ready aj} *
\n examining Magistrate to-| Afte Street Battle ane place for her in the family tomb | iShed. He undertook to report
wurances, and we have had no| session of Parliament from ANE t bm









i 5 f her husbana| on their progress at the next
. i ay Tetum Seg be Faener Ot) alongside those o er ; â„¢
official intimation about Egypt| January 24 until a later date. =. pr ly “actos ¥ Rienat | ROME, Jan. 9 Prefegt of Modena said that the and son, Amelia was in no oa oT i ae sae or
ing to give firm assurance that} This would give a broad indi- wealthy Brazilian accused of| A lightning general strike to-|clash arose when “thousands: of Pr osalsSubmitted mediate danger, she* said. The Lira, mune af he
ee aiiteey Supplies destined! cation of timing. but the eee murdering his beautiful * wits night threatened Italy after at workers attacked palice forces on| PP femaner Googe, Meaeney = ocean, -: oreras
Srael would be allowed to| ment could still keep its opponents Mon » | giving her arrow| least 5 workers were killed, and| guard outsi + steslworks and ‘ ugal is a welikno a then.
pass though the Suez Canal. | guessing a little lender before aaietalt a deed ar " | many workers and police were oo an ie to reins For $94,200,000 Versailles, where ane nee 4 British Foreign Office spokes.
i: —Reuter. | announcing the actual date. ae Ramos. who is the son of a| injured in a street battle in the! with firearms, hand grenades, eat ree re ian ‘said that the next Deputies
| ies oy ae | Home Secretary James Chuter|;ormer Brazilian Diplomat is industrial Communist stronghold| hammers, sticks and stones. The | By Nationalists o ; OG | meeting could be held earlier,
| 7 | Ede’ who had a private talk with) peing held in Bayonne gaol. of Modena, Northern Italy. police returned the fire to avoid | M. Zarubin obtained an answer
: Quake Shakes | Prime’ Minister Clement Atlee tian

The Communist-led Confedera- | being





. overpowered,” the ‘com-| WASHINGTON, Jan. 9 Greece Gets | about the Austro-Soviet men
| 7 ‘ ; this morning — ee . un of a, rag amie ned in | — adde } Culpate pene Pe -; . . (oes scence aad
| nations tonight on the election ‘ ome tonight gave the workers ress reports reaching Rome| mittec re als to e ni Cc. : A 4 r.
| Calais l register and the afeguarding of DenmarkReco nises deathroll a 5, Se oatlie 6. | ssid that if rker vere dead. } States Pe the use in Formosa of aretaker Gov t. supplies and services made avail.
& CALAIS, Jan., 9. | voling rights. He was speaking | 8 Two police Non-Commissioned| two dying, 3% badly injured, and! the $94,200,000 worth of economic ATHENS, Jan. 9% able from Russia in ane Sere
| The town af Calais was vio-|about the new spring register} cv_ « * .4,,, Officers were gravely injured and|60 s'ightly injured. Telephone! aid still remaining from the te he: ae | the. end of the” war | , et 8
‘ lently Shaken by a four-second! which me to «fore fr | ¢ ‘hineseCommunists another hurt Ten thousand! commur ti etween Modena! $275,000,000 Aid programme voted The Gréek Caretaker Cabinet deadlock at the Deputies r—

Sarthquake at 1943 GMT this! uw ‘ t vorkers from Modena and the and the re Ite hich were 1948 of John Thotokis was completed} tiations in New York in mid-
| e evenin Wit ee ee sg ; DENMARK, Jan. 9 irrounding country clashed wit! ‘ Ft he h President, Truman last weekj|tn-day when the King swore in; December. The Soviet Delega~
Bevery ee & i , entia gen mas §6. decided ‘ th e poliee, when they ¢alled an 8) strikin pe that economic . assistance | fc ur Under-Seoretaries tion made oN een Pe
Towed vith frighte le} Secretary | nise Communist Govern-/ hour strike, and attempted to! storcii 5 hours later. At the Min-| would coftinue to be sent to the the most important .was that) pendent ona sett won ge repel
Who had seen tt ae sitar, aioe a eaalae Shi aaiethith in ye held | t, it Wa announced here| storm four steel workers where a| istry of Interior, officials renorted | Nationalist Government .in ac-|of General Stilianos Mandi aes reached in the re Russian-

haken off aes tan wir Salune ip he ~ a wie révicter \t ‘lock out had been declared, the situation “under control” to.‘ cordance with ECA legislation. eer Soretary 7m me rete —iapaiter:
a oe hes a ow —Reuter. A communique issued by the! night,—Reuter. —Reuter. Order. Renee

Reuter. ame into force. —Reuter. qa \















a 4
Hl

$
% : {

PAGE TWO

Shee eam NNN BELEN SE OE TOR







— Caub Calling

ON’BLE L. COOLS-LAR-
H TIGUE, Assistant Adminis-
trator! of St. Lucia and the Wind-
ward ‘Islands representative on
the Customs Union Commission,
was an-arrival on Sunday by
B.W.I1.A. for the Customs Talks
which will open to-day at Hast-
ings House, ~

Accbmpanying Mr. Cools-Lar-
tigue were three of his advisers,
Hon’ble -A. C. H. Baynes, Trea-
surer of. St. Lucia, Hon'ble V.
Archer, Treasurer of St. Vincent
and Mr. &. Gittens Knight, M.B.E.,
Controllér of Supplies, Grenada.
His other adviser Hon'ble A. D.
Boyd, Acting Financial Secretary
of Dominica came in last week.

These delegates are all staying
at the Hastings Hotel with the
exception of Mr. Gittens Knight
who is staying at the Hotel Royal.

Other delegates arriving on
Sunday by B.W.I%A. for the
Customs Talks were Mr. R. K.
Masson, Collector of Customs,
British Honduras and Mr. J. O.
Fletcher, O.B.E., Controller of
Supplies, British Guiana who was
accompanied by his wife.

Hon'ble E, A. Thompson, Trea-
surer -of Antigua and Hon'ble
W. O, Peters, Treasurer of St.
Kitts came in on Saturday by
B.W.LA. while the Trinidad
delegates Mr. Louis Spence, Con-
trollersof Supplies and Mr. A. T.
Shill, Acting Comptroller of Cus-
toms dime in yesterday morning.
They are all staying at the Marina
Hotel. «

Mr, Val Archer, a Barbadian,
who arrived recently for the Cus-
toms talks, is the St. Vincent dele-
gate, dnd brother to Mr. Clyde
Archer, Legal Draughtsman in
Trinidad.

Up From Caracas
Meet Mrs. R. W. Worman

of Caracas, Venezuela were
arrival§ over the week-end by
B.W.I:A. for about two weeks'
holiday. and are staying at the
Hotel Royal.

~

coer er ee

ae eee

Engineer Returns Home
R. HAROLD BRANSTETTER
of Venezuela. returned
home by B.W.1.A. over the
week-end via Trinidad to resume
his duties as engineer of the
Creole Petroleum Corporation at
Caripito, after spending two
weeks’ holiday here. He was ac-
companied by his wife and they
were staying at the Ocean View
Hotel.

Mr. Branstetter told Carib that
the only regret he had was the
length of his holiday which was
too short. He and his wife had
enjoyed every moment here. They
toured the island and visited
many places of interest including
St. John’s Church, Sam Lord’s
Castle, the Crane and Bathsheba.

«> «>
Was Here 2 Years Ago

R. J. ADAMIRA, who arrived

in Barbados last week, is here
as Acting Manager of the Bata
Shoe Stores, until the new Mana-
ger arrives. Mr. Adamira, who
is at present stationed in Trini-
dad, acted here in a similar ca-
pacity two years ago, and will be
remembered as a keen footballer,
turning out on several occasions
in the forward line of the Carlton
Football Club. His wife will be
joining him later this week, and
he expects to be here about six
weeks. He is staying at the Hotel
Royal.

en <>
Here For The Winter
OLIDAYING here for the
winter is Dr. R P. Mac-
Donald, retired Dental Surgeon of
Hamilton, Ontario. He arrived
recently and is staying at the
Hastings Hotel, '
«> «“
Will Show
EE that the Aquatic Club Cine-
ma will be showing Warner
Bros., Paramount, Universal-In-
ternational, Film Classics as well
as Monogram and Allied Artists
productions this year.



PICTURED is the Polo team shortly before they left Seawell for

Venezuela,

No doubt the subjec
everyone was in a happy mood. Left to right are: Mrs. Michelin,
Mark Edghill, Lee Deane, Mr. Herbert Dowding (Manager), Mrs.

t of conversation was Polo and

Dowdimg, John Marsh, Elliot Williams, Colonel R. T, Michelin

(Capt.).

That Holiday Spirit

HE holiday spirit is still pre-
vailing judging from the
large crowd at Club Morgan on
Saturday night. As well as the

usual familiar faces there were
many new ones, some of the many
visitors on the Island right now,

Everyone seemed to be enjoying
themselves and the dance floor
was crowded with people doing
the ever popular Calypsoes. Peter
Lacy's playing between the dances
has proved very popular and there
is alwayS a crowd around the
piano with their requests for
their favourite tunes.

Mr, Oscar Boline, a New York
Times travel representative was
there and said how much he liked
Barbados, Among a few of the
familiar faces, was Tommy Ed-
wards, just back from a success-
ful race meet in Trinidad. Also
Mr. J. R. Edwards, Col. and Mrs,
Vidmer, the Misses Lenegan, Mr.
Campbell Greenidge, Mr. and Mrs.
David Henderson, Mr. and Mrs.
John Furnival, Mr. and Mrs.
Nicky Williams, Mr. and Mrs, Sis-
nett, Mr, and Mrs, A. L. Thomas
from Venezuela entertaining a
large party which included Mr.
and Mrs. Jean Iverson. Among
the diners were Mr and Mrs. Jim
O'Neal, Mr. and Mrs, Don Claire-
mont and Mr .and Mrs. Arnold
here on holiday from Venezucta,
and Mr. and Mrs. Stephen»Psaila
here on holiday from Venezuela,

and party, '
oo § «BURY

Former “Pipe” Instructor
UESTS atgClub Morgan were

3

G given a surprise treat on
Saturday” night when Richard
McCommachie played the Bag
Pipes. “Woy. McCommachie is one
of the crew on the S.S. “Interpre-
ter” visiting Barbados, and a for-
mer Pifé Instructor with the
Camerogr=Highlanders.. It was a
rare event to hear the pipes in
Barbad@8* and judging from the
applause Mr, McCommachie per-
formed very well indeed,

—— 9 parensineni aes ae

tro
teerh



Sylvia

VISITOR to the West Indies | Hot a guest at the Queen’s Park}

early in the New Year may be
Lord Stanley of Alderley, He has
just bought a new yacht which he
witends to sail to Gibraltar, Malta
and then possibly the West Indies.
The yacht, a 250-tonner, is moored
near Southampton. Lord Stanley
is an excellent sailor. During the
war he was a Lieutenant Com-
mander in the Royal Navy. Two
weeks ago his former wife, Sylvia,
married film actor Clark Gable in
California. What is the name of
the new yacht? “It is Sylvia,” says
Lord Stanley,



«> «>
Maroon And White
THE Barbados Water Polo
team, which leaves for Trinidad
tomorrow will use as their
“colours”, white caps and maroon
swimming trunks. The caps will

have “Barbados” written in
maroon aciu3ss the forehead and
numbers on the caps will also]

be of maroon
There will be the last practice

match this afternoon at the
Aquatic Club. The team is due |\4
to leave Seawell at 5.15 p.m

tomorrow,

‘ «Dn, «»
Valentine Dance
ATURDAY, February 11 is the
date fixed for the Annual
Valentine Dance at the Marine
Hotel in aid of local charity and
organised by the Woman’s Cana-
dian Club

There will be the usual fea-
tures of Bridge, Games of Chance,
Flower Stalls, Valentine Post
Office etc. Light refreshments
donated by the Club’s members
are included in the price of the
ticket. "

Tables around the ball room
may be engaged by ringing Mrs.
Anthony Lewis at 2135,

Overheard in a Bus
” EM always making mistakes
in de ‘papers. Luk uh dis
Madame Bovary.”
“Wuh duh means?”
Madam DuBarry of course.”
“Of course!”

ide

WOVEN-STRIP

SANDALS

Our Last and Latest
Shipment of Mexican
HUARACHES.

“op

4606 and 4220





Who Said It Was Cold?

ISS ROSEMARY PAPE, who

has been spending a holiday
here is due to return to Trinidad
tomorrow. She was guest of
honour at a moonlight picnic held
at Gibbs’ Beach on Friday night.
Miss Dorothy Eckstein did most
of the arranging, in fact it was
her idea. Despite the weather
about fifty people arrived at
Gibbs’ all of them heavily wrap-
ped in warm coafs, etc, but
with the lighting of, a couple of
coal-pots on which hot dogs were
roasted and a good supply of
liquid refreshment, the party soon
got very warm, some even had
a moonlight bath, and the party
didn’t break up until well after
2 a.m.

«Pp «»

To Join Husband
RS. E. V. D. GOULDING of
British Guiana who was
holidaying here for the past week
with her son-in-law and daugh-
ter Mr. and Mrs. N. L. Chapman
at “Ellbank”, St. Lawrence, has
now gone to join her husband who
came in on Sunday by B.W.LA.
for the Customs Talks and is stay-
ing at the Marine Hotel. ;
Mr. Goulding is Comptroller of

Customs, British Guiana.

<> <>

Comings and Goings
M*: BEXYL HOWELL, pro-
prietress of the Seaview
Guest House returned from a
seven week holiday in Montreal.
She is glad to be back in the
warmth of the West Indies. She
returned from Canada via P.A.A.
to Trinidad and via B.W.LA. to
Barbados.
= . =
Dr. P. Van Der-Brugh, Director
of Economic Affairs in Dutch
Guiana, arrived yesterday by
B.W.LA. for three weeks, to spend
a holiday at the Hotel Royal.
* * !

Mr. J. S. M. Johnston, repre-
sentative of H. J. Heinz Co., is
touring the Caribbean Area on a

* routine business trip. He arrived

yesterday by B.W.LA.
* * *

Mrs, Dione Skinner, wife of the
Director of Highways and Trans-
port returued yesterday from
Trinidad by B.W.1LA.

> * a

Dr. Charlie Manning also re-
turned yesterday from Trinidad
by B.W.LA,

. * >

Mrs. Marjorie Clarke left on
Sunday for a holiday in Jamaica.
She will be staying with her
sister, Mrs. H. W. Springer, wife
of the Registrar of the West Indian
University College,

«> «>

Mr. B. A. Callender, formerly
Assistant Mathematical Master at
the Parry School, St. Lucy, left on
Sunday by B.W.LA. to take up
an appointment with fhe Boys’
Secondary School in Grenada
Mr. Cuthbert Thorpe also left to
Join the staff of this school.

«nv «

Mrs. C. G., Conyers of Bay
Street returned from Trinidad
last week by B.W.LA. She spent
a holiday there with her son and

otel.

CROSSWORD







pique as trimming.

White, too, is used on tailored
suits. At a recent show I saw
a navy suit with white piqne
showing through eyelet-hole em-
broidery on the lapels. There
were chalk white jackets with
dark skirts, and vice versa. We
noticed also a number of white
folded felt hats, and tiny round
ones.

But if the idea of brightening
your entire wardrobe with paper~
stiff white cotton pique, broderie



anglaise, or taffeta, appeals to
you, let me once again remind
you of a fact so often ignored

These accessories must be washed
after each wearing. If you have
neither the time nor the inclin-

jation to clip them off, and sew

them on again after each wash-

ing, why not attach them with
press studs?

Brenner Sports showed sume
interesting fabrics. Their shirt

waist cotton dresses were partie-

ularly attractive. They were
| either in light striped cotton,
with sectioned skirts, making

clever use of the stripes or they



were in the new dark African
prints. These prints, as their
name implies, have their origin
in West Africa and the designs
resemble closely the traditional
Across | Paisley patterns of Scotland. The
2 ate ohte,® stout beginning, butt | deep glowing colours, with an
6. You giao a second Blade wit | unusual use of crimson and
arr (6 orange together, strike a com-
8. You'd har rr 7 : ‘
one, cqparaly write if servin pletely new note.
2 i comes from Iran, (4)
2. No royal killing. (3) Skirt-Wais Ses
8 Whew! What‘a Stinger. (6p me Skirt Waist Dresses _
is Let's tone ny ening but. (5) any of these _ shirt-waist
» Le @ this as pineapple. (4 dresse: ave £ eves
\6, The key ‘varsity of America? {3} boo: .t et eng pd _
2 m to the fair girl who sun-

. Sygaective of brillant company
- This t@ closely related. (4)

burns easily
gracefully ful

The skirts
again, the

were
ful-

}22. Just look how ents oats. (8) ness falling from unpressed pleats
193. The meaning you will get from in most cases. Basket handbags
sclt-aasertive alk and threats | were carried, with the gathered
em Down tops made to match the dresses.
| & Charms sit around on this day | One dress éven had a large
ry) brimmed hat made to match it.
; geaeure of @ fox's pelt? (7) There were — several severe
rhe evidence of four or even six ack . ald ie ise ie}
in a trial may be of no impor- ) black cotton shirts worn with

tance. (7)
« With the utmost speed. (7)
» Nothing could be more pure

prety. (9) 7% Reassemble. (5)
10. A colled snake breaks step t
11, Sort St Clscut

. rt oO cult you're likely tc
See at 1 Down, (7) J
1%, They're often followed by lasses
or should it be the otner way
ground ? (4) 18. Out you got (4)
Balled but with wowvere to
sleep, (3)

Aglution of yesterday's puszie.—Across

Wows; 9, Erne: 10, Other; 11, “Tis

. Van: 14, ‘tre; 15, 16,’ Pear:

; 26, Kin
Down

on

20.

ore;

24. Ratten:



Whirl; 7,
19,



PAIR

Buy now for comfort & Hard W ‘eur

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial

gaily striped skirts; and an even
greater number of black strapless

cotton dresses for really hot
weather,

The most sensational material
used in the show was Glazed

Chintz—formerly only considered
as a furnishing fabric. One dress
was in yellow, grey, white and
black chintz, It was Strapless,
and there was a three-cornered
scarf to wear as a “cover-up.”
The shiny look of the fabric

closely resembled a waterproof—
swept by

and as the model it

® CANE BILLS
® CUTLASSES
@ PLANT KNIVES
® SHOVELS

® PACK

FACTORY








DEEP rounded white collar on button through dress
in dark grey jersey,



Chintz And African PrintsSeen
In The New Collections

By Joan Erskine

EVERYTHING FOR THE CROP

: including :

® GALVANIZED BUCKETS
® BRASS WOVEN WIRE

® STENCIL INK AND BRUSHES
® SEWING

+

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

As aN A Se NO A&A
rnc







LONDON, December 9.

ALWAYS in the spring collections there are touches
of white on the clothés, at neck, wrists, or waist, and the
1950 previews show an even greater use of white cotton

sounded suspiciously like a
mackintosh! We learned that when
washed, the glaze disappeared,
but when ironed, it reappeared!

Another Dress
Another dress was pink and
white glazed chintz, with fuil!
tiered skirt. The bright pink

strapless top was scattered with
ceris sequins to give it a Sree



up appearance.
Pleased as we were to see
something really new at the

shows, we could not help disloy-
ally comparing some of these
dresses to shelfpaper, or a



can cloth!
Rayon shantung for
suits

teen-age
is another smooth fabric,

very suitable for tailored summer} '

clothes,

Many of the dark summer
dresses featured appliqued em-|
broidery on the skirt, pocket, or
bodice. Some of the beading was!
almost too elaborate, and gave a
somewhat bizarre appearance |
the clothes,

There were a_ great many
crocheted yokes and knitted in.
set waists, braid embroidery, and
fringes, on cocktail dresses.

Quilting is being tentatively
offered by most designers, and
3renner showed an unusual ver-
sion, A short straight jacket, in
wide blue and grey checks, was
quilted
skirt.

and worn over a_ tight

Matching of Checks

We liked the usual matching
of different checks.
walked on, two at a time, to
show these off to their best
advantage, and then followed a
session of jacket and coat chang-
ing.

The models

Checks were also mixed on

Suits. One jacket in small grey
and blue check was worn over a
skirt in darker grey and blue.
_ Lace-effect fabrics are enjoy-
ing a great wave of popularity.
In some cases real lace is used
over a contrasting backing, but
equally effective is the material
printed to look like lace.

Before we left the show we
discovered an interesting fact,
Have you ever wondered how
jackets managed to fit tightly in
front, and yet hang loosely at
the back? The answer is a fit-
ting back, ‘beneath the loose
folds.














TWINE
NEEDLES







LIMITED.



ee LA NORRIS HE

Women’s Worlc

|
Want To Be |
Hegant ? |

Follow Gertie’s
10 Basie Rules

The secret of elegance, accord-
ing to one of the world’s most
sophisticated actresses, lies simply
in 10 common and basic rules of
dress, hair-do and makeup.

It’s easy if you only follow the
rules, says Gertrude Lawrence,
now starring in “The Glass Mena-
gerie” at Warner Bros. Studio.

The actress, close friend ot
such notables as Noel Coward and
George Bernard Shaw, recently
was chosen as one of the world’s
most 10 elegant women by the
London Daily Express.

“Elegance is probably just a
state of mind,” says Miss
Lawrence, “but there are ways in
which you can help it along. I
use these 10 basic rules because
they do something for me and
help me in my work and play.
If they result in elegance, so much
the better.”

Here are Gertrude’s 10 rules;

1. “Simplicity of clothes. .I
wear basically simple things: tail-
ored clothes in the daytime and
basic black dresses at night.

2. “Individuality. I try to look
different but with an eye to cur-
rent fashion.

3. “I wear colours according to
my complexion.

4. “I prefer a few clothes well-
chosen to a wardrobe full of things
I’d never wear.

5. “I’m mad about good groom-
ing — well-kept hair, hands and
skin, with very little makeup.

6. “I wear simple shoes.

7. “No frills, no buttons and
bows.

8. “I wear useful and
changeable accessories.

9. “I buy hats for my head and
not for a laugh.

10. “I don’t spend fabulous
amounts on clothes. I budget ac-
cording to the means available.

inter-





Tues. and Wed. 8.30 p.m.

Mat Tues. 5 p.m








Warners Hit Double!
Dennis MORGAN
Jack CARSON in
“TWO TEXAS KNIGHTS’
in Technicolor and
“HIGHWAY WEST”
KENNEDY —
a Willie BEST!












Action Packed Double .. .
Gracie FIELDS—xurt KRUGER

in
“PARIS UNDERGROUND”
and

WILLIAM BOYD
as Hoppalong Cassidy

in
‘THE DEVIL'S PLAYGROUND



EMPIRE

To-day 4.45 and 8.30 and
continuing
Presents . - ,

t

M.G.M.
JONES—Van HEFLIN

Jennifer
in
“MADAME BOVARY”
with
Louis JOURDAN—
Christopher KENT



ROXY

Last Two Shows To-day 4.45 & 8,15

Eable Lion Film Presents . . .
Bud ABBOTT—Lou COSTELLO
in

ROYAL = (Worthings)
To-day & Tomorrow 4.30 & 8.15

“THE NOOSE HANGS HIGH”
with

Joseph CALLEIA—Leon ERROL
st

OLYMPIC

TODAY LAST TWO SHOWS
4.30 and 8.15
R.K.O. Double .. .
Robert RYAN—Audrey TOTTER



in
“THE SET-UP”
and
“RETURN OF THE BAD MEN”

with
Randolph SCOTT—Robert RYAN







DRINK

JEFFREY'S
BEER

lo ~






i}
i?
i{

OS AL ty








{

|



|

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members)

Perr






4 40, ey

Ch ildr én °S Cornep p ,
ert and the Caravan— |



“?










As the taxi disappears Rupert

rubbing against his
Why, it’s Dinkie
the cat,”” he smiles. ** What are you
doing here? I’m going to search for
Bep the monkey, It’s my, idea
he I be in the forest ; monkeys love
climbing trees. Let’s go that way.

Dinki

feels ii

* Hullo bounds
some boulders ang out
Rupert. turns in rise.
why ever did she that?
murmurs, ‘She's an aay |
Feeling rather inquisitive, he hy

ie only purrs and keeps close er.



































to
nF : strong and a ly ody bate
ip
t's
i * feel
more than just a tonle9
tonic, rich in natural A&D
tasting,

Make baby strong—so he can
an important future citizen
mu need more A&D Vitamins oor
your own energy,
ee en * iow much
it’s POWERFUL NOURISHMENT
Scott’s Emulsion is a scientific
Vitamins, a wonderful help when
you need it, It’s econ ° ‘
= r 7 “a
ke SCOTS E E
HIGH ENERGY FOOD 1





TO-NIGHT to Thursday Night at 8.30
MATINEE: TO-MORROW at 5 p.m,
PATHE PICTURES LTD. Presents - -

“THE MAN FROM MOROCCO”

Starring ANTON WALBROOK .
with MARGARETTA SCOTT, REGINALD TATE,

PETER SINCLAIR
re




























GLOBE THEATRE

LAST SHOWING — TO-DAY at 5 & 8.30
PERCY MARMOTH and LESLE BROOKS

in

“TLL WALK BESIDE YOU

Starting Wednesday and Thursday at 5 and 830
JAMES MASON and JOYCE HOWARD in

THEY MET IN THE DARK

oo » WIR oe

A GRAND VARIETY SHOW — Wednesday at 830

'
Featuring:

(1) THE MILTON QUARTETTE

(2) THE MIGHTY CHARMER

(3) MADAM LAZONGO

(4) MAC LESLIE JINGLE-JANGLE FOUR and the F
(5) “THEY MET IN THE DARK” :

GRAND ALL STAR NIGHT - FRI i

++.» Sponsored by...

ZEPHIRIN’'S BAKERY
(BDOS TOP NOTCH BAKERS)

Free Samples of Zephirin’s Delicious Cookies given away I™

SOLD OUT

ALL TICKETS SOLD FOR FRIDAY NIGHT.

TOOLS

FOR THE

TASK!

onderful assortment just opened :



Aw

sae PLANES RIP SAWS

JACK ” BOW SAWS

BLOCK ” BACK SAWS
” CHISELS

RABBET ”
PLANE IRONS
SPOKE SHAVES

HAND DRILLS
BREAST DRILLS
VISES

A “STANLEY” MITRE BOX
See Them in Qur Show Window.

PLANTATIONS LUMITED







—



~



: ripps Calls
| Himself
A Pessimist

from page 1
each of the first three



pout 8 points above the
ponding periods of 1948.

managements are on the oys

doing,” Sir Stafford said. Argentine
dy should make the ridi- formed part of the corporation.

Reliably understood New Urban
some of which
applied late last year, and others
sinee January 1, wil) cover orig
the estimated
teers from 1947. Most of operating deficit of some 35,000,000

crease, 22 per cent out of Pesos. —Reuter.

suggestion that our people

pt working”.

pn the long term programme

rawn up the expectation

een that the output would
by 25 per cent in the

per cent, had been achiev-
‘© years.

Stafford said that the No-
index of production was

ied to rise further, and the

e level of industrials pro-
for the first 11 months

9 was estimated provision-

1% Above Pre-War tee”,

bove pre-war.

arly 25 per cent. riot.

showed an output per ‘ ae
isi above the last Colonia 'si
: ieee achievement last week to devalue the British
paralleled elsewhere in Honduras dollar to conform with
the recent depreciation of the

>| roduction, too, British pound sterling.
See anid, had continued Government. officials described
nd. Pigs, cattle, and sheep the situation today as “almost

"were all higher than a normal”.

9. Increase in the hay
had meant that the
was less dependent on
d feeding stuffs.
increase in national in-
in 1949 was above 4 per
hich was available for in- ,

was lower spending on
tobacco and entertain-

Stafford said that it was
ly yet to judge whether
iget forecast of £449,000,-
enue surplus during the
financial year would be

for the first 9 months carry
that it would not. ports.

estment announced last
would prove sufficient to
the necessary state of
ion; so far there were no
the contrary.
afford stated that he was
ist when he had prophe-
large rise in the cost of
billowing Sterling devalua-

overnment forecast of a
he percent rise had itself
oved to be slightly on the
ic side. —Reuter.

).E. Deputies
eet In Paris
PARIS, Jan. 9.

Ssibility of building the
bn Parliament’s first home

bourg. Tiny Adventurer
MARKET HARBOROUGH,

al budget presented by
y General Camille of
will be drawn up for the

The 12 member nations

population.

eSDAY, JANUARY 10, 1950



Argentina
Subsidises

Transpors

BUENOS AIRES, Jan. 9
Argentine Government author-
ers of 1949, and at the be- ised new credit 76,350,000 pesos to
ng of the fourth quarter, the cover operating deficit of transpor?
~ of industrial productioa corporation of Buenos Aires.

This is in keeping with Gov-

C f ernment’s policy supporting the
indicated a rise in output oorporation

nan of about 5 per cer¥ per operated by
" pending

s time that everyone realis- -orporation

s and payment
hat a good job our workers foreign

shareholders
(including Anglo-

transport

part of



‘Resistance

Movement?”
BRiTISH HONDURAS,

it described as
128 or 129 compared with beginning of a resistance move-
x the first 11 months of ment to the dictatorial colonial
policy”

fighting devaluation, .
output for the year should planned a second protest rally

er here for tomorrow night.
hing approaching 30 p A demonstration
ehicle production, the rise night nearly developed into a

In. what

Government’s

Sign Of Progress

LUCKNOW, India.
Lucknow reports an sake
xpendi- ing sign in India’s development o:
pt, Zee amanda: sanitation and home comforts,
xpenditure factory t r _ wate
Rie a house- metres will begin production in
as. . the near future—(C.P.)

to manufacture



® = o
Indian Ocean
Shipping

DURBAN, South Africa.
A New South African shipping
But nothing in the company has been formed here to
to Indian Ocean
The service will link Dur-
tafford said that it was ban with Madagascar, Mauritius,

early to say whether the Reunion
Government expenditure jslands—(C.P.)



An Impasse

MELBOURNE, Australia.
Unless a newspaper i
lished seven days a week it can’t
be called a daily under the law of
the state of Victoria, a magistrate
decided recently. But his
cision is to be challenged. The law
in Victoria doesn’t permit Sunday
newspapers.—(C.P.)

Predicts Air Giant

BRISTOL, England.
A. E. Russell, chief designer of
the’ Bristol Aeroplane Company,
French Forei + forecasts air liners twice as heavy
ed today tank te foo as the 130-ton Brabazon. Such a
the 12 Foreign Ministers Plane, he said, would have a wing
Council of Europe wil] span of 300 feet and passenger

Paris tomorrow to study accommodation for 250.—(C.P.)



Two-year-old Elizabeth Deacon
Bhare the cost of building unfastened the strap of her pram,
embly hall in proportion walked out of a shop and took a
three-mile bus ride.
trow’s talks will prob- now has fitted a stronger pram-
d on January 11,.—Reuter, strap—(C.P.)

Her mother





“Owing to a very efficient book run by Smith Junior this term quite a few of us will

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



be remaining at school for the hols. sir.”



Government
Funds Dull

LONDON, Jan. 9

There was some uneasiness in
London Stock Exchange to-day.

The prospect of an early Geh-
eral Election was the main topic
of conversation among market
men, and active interest was re-
stricted. Small selling orders in
domestic issues found few uy-
ers, and prices moved to lower
levels.

British Government Funds were
particularly dull.

Losses of half per cent, were
widespread in medium and long
dated stocks.

Leading industrials followed
the lead of giltedged
Textiles were on offer from
provinces, but irons and steels
were restricted with prices steady
at previous 2losing levels.

Oils were easier in sympathy
with decline 4 in Burma’s oil at
around 2%. Fall followed news
of British Government withdraw-
al of aid to Burma.

—Reuter.



Unfrocked Priest
“i .

Leads Anti-Church
; ° °
Organisation

PARIS, Jan. 9

The Conservative Paris news-
paper “Figaro” to-day alleged
that an unfrocked priest in War-
saw was director of Moscow
controlled organisation for oper-
ating against the Church, known
as the “originform”.

He was 60-year-old Vasily
Gorelov, a Russian who entered
Holy Orders under the Tsarist
regime but was unfrocked shori-
ly after the revolution and be-
came a Colonel in the Russian
secret police, “Figaro” said,

The paper added that aspir-
ants were trained in four special-
ist schools. One was in Theodosia
Crimea, for agents in France,
Switzerland, Belgium, Italy,
Spain and South America,

Another at Signould, Lithuania,
rained “missionaries to Scandi-
navia, Holland, Germany, Britain,
and Austria. In Constaza, Ru-
mania, specialists were trained
for the Middle East and in a
fourth unspecified place, agents
were trained for North America,
the paper said.

—Reuter.



Specially designed for Barbados, this
brown broque is now on show in

leading

made by





| JOHN WHITE

means made just right

stores. See them for yourself.



New Zealand’s

New PrimeMinister



Mr. S. HOLLAND

MR. SIDNEY HOLLAND, the
National Party leader, has be-
come Prime Minister of New
Zealand. He was born in 1893
at Greendale, in the province
of Canterbury. Both his pa-
rents came from England. His
father, Henry Holland, C.B.E.,
was a Yorkshireman. After
serving as a subaltern with
the New Zealand Artillery in
the First World War, Sidney
Holland took up a business
career and in time became
managing director of the Mid-
land Engineering Company.
It was in 1935 that he first
took up politics, when he be-
came an opposition member in
the first Labour session. For
five years he was Parliamen-
tary Secretary in the House
and then became Leader of
the Opposition. In 1940 he
succeeded Mr, Adam Hamil-
ton as Leader of the Nation-
al Party.

Red Guerrillas
Smash Chinese
Battalions

LONDON, Jan. 9.

According to a New China news
agency report received in Lon-
don to-night, Chinese guerillas
have smashed more than two bat-
talions of a Nationalist division
in the West of Hainan Island.
The report added that 360 Nation-
alist officers and men were killed,
wounded or taken prisoners, and
their Divisional Commander seri-
ously wounded. Quantities of war
material were captured ,and the
remainder of the division put to
flight.

Hainan Island is the southern-
most point of China, forming the
eastern side of the Gulf of Tonk-
ing.

The same source said that Chou
En Lai, Prjme Minister of the Cen-
tral Chinese People’s Government
(the Peking Government), to-day
ordered the staffs of all Na-
tionalist Government agencies in
Hong Kong to safeguard state
property and await their taking
over.

—Reuter.

Sell Air Fleet

LONDON.
The British Overseas Airways
fleet of Plymouth flying-boats,
which was recently replaced by
Canadian Argonauts, is for sale.
—(C.P.)

JUST RECEIVED

e
|)) 1- tins PRARL BARLEY
| i-tb tins OATMEAL
{



Large CREAM OF WHEAT
Small CREAM OF WHEAT

Large QUAKER OATS with
China ware

Large ROBIN HOOD OATS
with Glass Tumbler

1-1 iin TONO
Tins NESTLE’S CREAM
Tins FRUIT —

Pears, Pineapple, Straw-
belies.

K





No Human
Rights fi
8" n
Colombi
Colombia
@ From Page i
what is happening in Colombia
at the present time.”

Dr. Carlos Lleras-Restrepo de-
clared that “what is happening
in Colombia cannot be considered
just a change in Government, or
another coup similar to those that
had occurred in other Latin
American countries.”

It was the first time for 40
years that the “wildest uprising”
had oecurred during a change in
the constitutional order of the
Colombia Government.

“Practically, all human rights
have disappeared in Colombia”,
he said. The freedom of the
Press has completely disappeared,
and not only is internal news
suppressed, but any Overseas re-
ports, detrimental to the interests
of the Conservative Party, are
also forbidden.” Freedom of
Assembly, too, has been entirely
banned, and the right to live
where you want has been
forbidden.”

—Reuter.

50,000 Miners
Strike In U.S.

PITTSBURGH, Jan. 9.
About’ 50,000 soft coal miners
struck to-day in Ohio, Pennsyl-
vania, West Virginia and Ala-
bama, closing pits, worked by the
United States Steel Corporation,
half a dozen other Steel Firms
and the Pittsburgh Consolidation
Coal Company. A sign posted at
one West Virginia mine, said
“No contract, no work’. Miners
contract in mines east of the
Mississippi River expired last
June, and the miners’ leader,
John L, Lewis then instructed
Miners Union at those pits
work only three days a week un-
til his demands for contracts were
met. Previously miners had al-
ways downed tools when con-
tracts expired. Mine owners filed
suits seeking millions of dollars
damages against Lewis and his
Union in Ohio last week. Mr
John L. Lewis last week report-
ed there was “grave unrest’
among American coal miners be-
cause owners “will not permit
the workers to share in the in-
crease in the price of coal”. ‘There
has been no increase in the cost
of production,” he ‘added.
—(Reuter.)



r . +

rip To Housewives
LONDON

The Order of the Boot is the
order for the day at sculptor
Dora Cordine’s home. She asks
visitors to remove their shoes and
offers them a pile of slippers
from which to choose. She claims
her keep-the-floor-clean policy
gives her more time for her ari
—(C.P9

Heavy Loot

SHEPPEY, Kent. England
Thieves stripped £570 worth of
lead from the roof of the historic
Shurland Hall here.—(C.P.)

& SPOPSSOSSS SOOO POL POLL PPL ALOT SAE,





Check Communist |
Expansion

@ from page 1

It was learned that Canada’s;
Foreign Minister, Mr. Lester |
Pearson said that his country’s}
Foreign Policy was based on
Recognition of the dangers re-}
sulting from “the new Russian}
Imperialism”. The United Na-
tions had not solved the probvlem
of Russian expansionism, and}
the North Atlantic Pact was the
outcome of this realisation. By
demonstrating that its signatories |
were prepared to meet aggres- |
sion, the Pact would serve the}
cause of security throughout the
world, Mr. Pearson said. Pandit
Nehru said that Russia, while
promising benefits through her
own experiment, seemed unable
to combine these with freedom
Only New Zealand's’ Foreign
Minister, Mr. F. W. Doidge, show-
ed any inclination to support the |
concept of a Pacific Pact. He
suggested that the security prob-
lem was world wide and that it]
was useless to secure the Atlan-
tic alone. Mr, P., C., Spender, |
Australian Foreign Minister, said
the Pacific Pact idea should not
be pursued, unless the Major
Powers were prepared to enter
into fuller commitments than
they at present seemed inclined |
to consider

|
|
|

A Hint

According to one informed
Source, Mx. Spender threw out a
hint that interested powers might,
allow a proportion of their na-
tional incomes to help southeast
Asia in facing her present eco-'
nomic plight. It is understood
that a five point agenda was
agreed:

(1) Genera] International Sit-

uation,

(2) China.

(3) Japanese Peace Treaty.

(4) Southeast Asia, particu-

larly Burma and _ Indo-
China.

5) Europe, with special refer-

ence to Britain's role

An official communique sum-
marised the opening speech made
by Mr: Don Senanayake, Ceylon’s

}



Prime Ministery and Chairman of
the Conference, He-said: “The
fundamental problem of Asia is

economic not political: And it i
essential to the future peace ot
the world that the problem of
poverty and want in Asia should
be clearly seen and boldly tackled
‘Communism would have no
appeal to the masses of Asia
since they were assured of steady
improvement in their conditions
of life.”
Reuter.

DELEGATION TO DISCUSS
CHINA PROBLEM

COLOMBO, Jan. 9.

Sources close te the Austra-
lian Delegation said tonight that
while no delegation was expected
to submit a perfected scheme for
securing South-East Asia against
Communism, it was hoped that
the conference might produce a
workable plan for early com-
bined action.

Tomorrow the ministers are
likely to discuss the problem of
China.

—Reuter.

66

THE

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS

ee

Published by The Advocage Co, Ltd., 34, Broad St., Bridgetown

ADVOCATE



Tuesday, January 10, 1950



Safety At Sea

THE uncertainty of the fate of the
Auxiliary Schooner Gloria May sixteen
days overdue on a voyage from Demerara
to Barbados serves to focus attention on
the lack of proper facilities for the safety
of seagoing vessels in the Caribbean.

The Gloria May left Demerara on
December 24 with a crew of twelve beside
the skipper Capt. George Graham and two
passengers, If no news of their whereabouts
comes to hand it will mean that fifteen
lives will have been lost without trace.
If at some point in the journey there had
been a wireless transmitting set. on board
the vessel, it would have been ascertained
at what stage the vessel began to encounter
difficulties.

The first essential in this measure of
safety is the enforcing by means of the
law that all vessels and especially those
carrying passengers should be equipped
with wireless transmitting and receiving
sets. It might be possible to relieve a vessel
in danger or to rescue any or all of its pas-
sengers and crew who had taken to boats.
In this way even if a vessel is lost it would
be possible to save human life. Govern-
ments of the West Indies should not allow
vessels to ply for hire in this area with-
out making the necessary provision for the
safety of the lives carried. The carriage
of life boats demanded by the law is an
indication that it was intended that some
succour should be given to those aboard
if misfortune befalls any vessel. This
then should be carried to its logical con-
clusion,

The other provision is another safety
measure of ensuring that masters of these
vessels hold certificates such as are de-
manded by the Board of Trade or awarded
by the School of Navigation in Jamaica.
During the last war, the loss of time and
sometimes cargo caused by the arrival at
one port when intending to go to another
was brought clearly to public notice. The
intercolonial vessels were doing a fine job
in carrying cargoes from one port to
another when the large vessels could not
afford to run the gauntlet with the German
submarines lurking in these waters. But

it was good fortune that more of them
were not lost.

In past years vessels have been lost
without trace and it was presumed that
storms had overtaken them and that crews
had no opportunity to get out the boats.
No one was ever in position to say what
measure of suffering the members of the
crew or the passengers endured before
death or whether there had been any
Opportunity to rescue them after hours in
the open boats. The last such tragedy
was that of the Island Queen lost on a
journey of a few hours between Grenada
and St. Vincent.

When the intercolonial schooners
attempted to run the submarine blockade

during the last war, it was pointed out »

by this newspaper that if the masters all
held certificates much of the time would
have been saved and some of the cargoes
too. Nothing was ever done and now this
tragedy has come to emphasise the need
for some measure of precaution.

The Dutch Government has just made
it compulsory for masters of vessels in the
Dutch West Indies to have certificates and
to this end provided the facilities for study.
It should not be difficult for the British
Government through Colonial Develop-
ment & Welfare to improve the school in
Jamaica for this purpose.

The lack of proper shipping facilities at
the moment shows that the West Indies
will have to depend on these smaller craft

for a long time and there should be some
protection, for those who are compelled to
travel by them,

OUR READERS SAY:



Should Pedestrians Walk on the Left or Right Side of the Road?

A Spring Clean Needed

To the Editor, The Advocate,

eee BERR Gro ae

SMALL EXPECTATIONS

LONDON, (By Mail).

For Britons 1950 will be a year
of uncertainties and smal] expec-
tations.

The stock markets — like the
people — face the new year un-
steadily after a momentous twelve
months spotlighted by devalua-
tion and with British Government
securities barely holding their
ground due to all the uncertain-
ties.

With a national election loom-
ing up and the possibility of an-
other unpleasant budget little else
could be expected. ;

The arguments for or against
devaluation will take some decid_
edly stiff beating. Fears have been
expressed that. unless dynamic
impetus is given to the nation’s
dollar export drive it will wallow
hopelessly in the “crawling” stage
and the opportunity offered by
devaluation will have been
missed.

For Mr. and Mrs. John Bull and
family the rising cost of living,
high taxes and austerity put a
formidable damper on prospects,
but these are a few bright spots.

There is a possibility of more
home-produced meat, milk, bacon,
eggs and cheese but less food from
dollar countries will be imported.

Mrs. Bull can expect better fur-
niture and larger quantities and
more varieties of furnishing
fabrics.

Motorists will have a slightly
better chance of getting a new
car delivered, but chances of
getting a house in 1950 will remain
very slim. Private building will
be resumed on February 1, but at
a ratio of only one private license
to every nine local authority
licenses, :

Rents are expected to remain
fairly steady with little likelihood
of decreases.

There will be fewer clothes and
higher prices for most articles of
cothing.

With some restrictions remov-
ed, more and cheaper wines wil
be imported, but the shortage of
whisky will remain.. Tobacco sup~
plies will not improve the temper
of smokers. ;

With two stations operating,
1950 is expected to be a boom
year for television.

A survey of prospects for the
new year makes rather grim
reading:



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By Fred Doerflinger

Food: Recent ration increases
built up a hope that the lean years
are ‘passing, but it is not at all
certain that the present levels can
be maintained in every case.

Traders term it a “false state of
plenty” and cannot conceive that
the present increases in rations
and imports of many kinds can
last %

Clothing: The trade has warned
the public to expect either higher
prices in utility goods or smaller
supplies of them. Cotton goods
will continue in short supply until
production is boosted and deval-
uation and rising costs can be
counted on to keep up prices. °

The Board of Trade spokesman
said there should be no difficulty
as far as woollen goods were
concerned, but traders insist if
wool prices stay up then prices
of finished products will have to
be raised.

Housing: Recent Government
economy cuts in building plans
will not become a reality until the
end of 1950. The cut in November
1949 in the rate of building

(220,000 houses a year) will have pec

no repercussions until the autumn
of 1950, as it takes about 12
months to build a house.

During early 1950, Ministry of
Health housing experts will try
to get an accurate figure of the
houses really needed.

Although restricted private
building resumes on February 1,
private house prices will be gov-
erned by the local authorities.
They have power to approve pri-
vately built houses costing up to
$8,400, but these cases will be
rare

Prices of second-hand houses
will probably climb in the early
Spring as accommodations for
large families become more acute.

Rents: Local authorities con-
trol the rents question and no re-
ductions are envisaged. Several
local authorities have upped the
rents of council houses recently.

Agriculture: There are pros-
pects for a bigger wheat acreage
and increased livestock in 1950.
The four-year agricultural plan
to increase production will con-
tinue at full steam. In addition,
a nation-wide drive to use mar-
ginal land to produce more meat
and milk is expected,

Blames The Car

By JOHN McCAFFERTY

PHILADELPHIA, (By Mail)

Dr. Fletcher D. Woodward, of
the University of Virginia Hos-
pital, warned to-day that death
will take no holiday of the
nation’s highways until automo-
biles are designed for “safe and
sane transportation,”

He informed the Keystone Au-
tomobile Club of Philadelphia
that he (elieves sleek modern-
day automobiles are “unsafe,
unapproprie‘e and harlots of the
highways.”

Dr. Woolward charged that
alleged emphasis on “fancy do-
dads” in the modern car was
“indirectly responsible” for send-
ing many motorists to their
graves annually.

Stress uy. so-called “eye
appeal of colour, chromium, gad-
gets and blown-up bodies” he
contended, is “detrimental to the
safety” of the motoring public.

Dr. Woodward termed the
“fancy do-dads” on recerit edi-
tions of the modern, streamlined
automobile “entirely useless.”
And he proposed that the auto-
mobile industry discard them for
“new designs assuring safe and
sane transportation.”

Dr. Woodward said that the
automobile remains a “lethal and
crippling agent” despite the suc-
cess of safety campaigns, law
enforcement and strides in the
medical profession. He added:

“Any further reduction in the
rate of injuries and deaths on
our highways must come from
alterations in the designs of the
machine itself.”

Dr. Woodward offered the au-
tomobile industry these “safety
suggestions”:

1. installation of “governors”
on all cars to limit top speed to
55 miles per hour without inter-
fering in any way with accelera-
tion at lower speeds.

2. installation of safety belts
such as are standard equipment
in aircraft.

3. installation of crash pads,
such as sponge rubber padding on
dashboards and*the back of front
seats.

4. elimination of all projecting
handles, knobs, buttons, ash trays,
ete.

5. mounting of “oleo” shock
absorbers on front bumpers to
act similarly to an aecroplane’s
landing gear in absorbing shoe.

6. installation of rear-end en-
gypes ta provide drivers with

ment are

very unsavoury.

better and wider vision such as
is now done in many trucks and
busses.

7. elimination of shiny, reflect-
ing surfaces from the driver’s
visual field by doing away with
all chromium trim.

8. shelving of sleek convertible
models entirely “because of the
danger to passengers in event of
an upset or a “turnover.”

9. installation of “polarized
windshields” to minimize daytime
driving glare and reduce “night
blinding.”

Dr. Woodward said that that
most of his “safety suggestions”
can be employed immediately
while others will require new
laws or additional research.”

—IN.S.



“Can you walk a little,
dear—mummy’s hands are
frozen.”

London Express Service.



Teday’s Thought

THE KEY to every man is
his thought. Sturdy and
defying though he looks, he
has a helm which he obeys,
which is the idea after which
all his facts are elassified.
— EMERSON

THERE is nothing that
makes men rich and strong
but that which they carry
inside of them. Wealth is
of the heart, not of the
hand,

—John Milton.



also made reference.

The

Furniture: Better quality fur-
niture will reach British shops in
1950 but prices will remain high.
Recent high demand is expected
to slacken because of prices. The
trade states that production is
about equal to demand at present
prices.

¢ fabrics: Devaluation
is expected to push up prices but
there will be larger supplies and
greater variety because of in-

creased home production and im-/

ports. <

China and pottery: ates =
forecasts a good supply of plain
white china and pottery but little
decorated will be avail-
able. Only small quantities mark.
ed “export reject” will reach
British shops.

Tobacco: There is little hope
for an improvement in supplies.
A reduction in purchases of
American tobacco would not affect
supplies before the end of the
year.

Wines: Some good wines at
cheaper prices are already enter-
ing the country as is evidenced by
the excellent Christmas selection.
Sherry and port importers ex~=
+ more variety, and bigger
quantities if the budget is fav-
ourable.

Vacations: Devaluation will in
crease the price of vacations in
Europe by as much as 10 to 15
per cent. For Britons, vacations
at home will cost about the samc
as in 1949.

Motoring: Manufacturers plan
to produce some 440,000 automo-
biles in 1950. Under existing
arrangements with the Ministry
of Supply manufacturers will
have to export 330,000 but they
are doubtful if this target actually
can be reached.

Any seasonal decline in sales
to some countries would mean
diversions to the home market
Some 4,000 extra cars reached the
home market in this way during
1949.

Television: The wate aoe =
roducing 300,000 television sets
> 16a “nearly twice the 1949
figure| Efforts will be made to
reduce costs (the cheapest set on
the British market is about $110)
but hopes of price reductions are
offset by price increases in raw
materials. No important changes
in design are expected.—I,.N.S.



.

Dear Pedestrians!

Dear Motorists!
FRANKFURT (By Mail).

The police of Frankfurt appar-
ently are striving to out-do any
officer in the world when it comes
to courtesy,

This move is highly favourea
by the German people, who for
many years, lived under the iron
rules of the black-booted “Third
Reich” policemen.

Tickets and stickers are well-
known measures to curtail traffic
violators. However, the tickets
issued by the Frankfurt Police are
of a different nature and, some-
what more pleasant for the of-
fender,

So-called “warning tickets,”
bear the following text:

“Dear pedestrians ——- motorists!
By your conduct, you have vio-
lated the traffic rules and thus
endangered the life of your fel-
low-citizens as well as your own.
The Frankfurt Police politely ask
you to observe all existing traffic
rules in the future, thus helping
to decrease the accident rate in
our city. ;

In case of repeated violation
we are reluctantly compelled to
serve notice against you.”

In addition to this, new cour-
tesy signs have been installed at
all major roads leading to and
from Frankfurt. The “gns, bear-
ing two inscriptions. One for in-
coming automobiles, reads: The
Frankfurt Police ask you to ob-
serve all traffic regulations.” The
second, for departing traffic says:

“The Frankfurt Police appreci-
ate your observance of all traffic
regulations. —L™MS.



*
Pan-African Roads
NAIROBI, Kenya Colony.

A network of all-weather roads
to cover the African continent
within the next ten years was
recommended by the International
Congress of African Touring,
which met here. Some of the
countries represented said they
plan to start building some of the
roads suggested.—(C.P.)

Wee
“Back Home” Visit
CORNER BROOK, Canada.
It will be an “old home visit”
for Newfoundlanders on _ the
Canadian mainland if a planned
steamship tour takes shape. New-
foundlanders in Montreal, plan to
charter a boat next summer, load
it with fellow islanders and make
a leisurely tour of the principal
ports of Newfoundland.—(C.P.)









Whatever



health and not the Chairman,
In the neighbouring parish of

eS ee

287th Talk

By Thomas €. Watson

LONDON (By Mail). |

The four deputy ministers of the United |
States, Britain, France and Russia res' ed
their apparently interminable negotiations
to produce a draft Peace Treaty for Austria
in London yesterday. \
This was their 287th meeting. The talks};
began in January, 1947 and while much has
been accomplished there are still one or two
vital outstanding matters yet to be cleared

up.
Throughout the talks Russia has E



tained an uncompromising position to these
vital matters. If any compromise has been
effected it was on the initiative of the West-
ern Powers. 5

The issue which must be settled at this
meeting is the amount the Austrian Govern-
ment will have to pay the Russians for sup-
plies and services rendered to Austria by
Russia since 1945.

The talks in Lake Success flopped on this
point. Austria, in addition to the 160,000,000
dollars reparations to Russia, offered a fur-
ther four million dollars for services. Russia
refused it point blank and the deputies de-
cided that the matter might be settled bilat-
erally.

So the talks resumed on a bilateral scale
in Vienna. Over three weeks ago the Aus-
trian Government amended their offer and
despatched a note to Moscow outlining their
new terms. So far, despite urgings on the|
part of the other deputies, no reply has
been received.

Russia has stated in unequivocal language
that they cannot continue their talks on other
financial aspects of the peace with Austria
until this point is finally settled.

Therefore, pending, the result of the bilat-
eral talks the deputies can get down to other
problems that have yet to be solved. First,
there is the question of the employment of
foreign technicians to aid Austria’s economic
and industrial recovery,

Up to now Russia has been adamant in
refusing to allow foreign technicians to be
employed by Austria in the building up of
her civil aviation, The Russian see in this a
revival of the Austrian Air Force and the
talks on this particular subject are likely to
be long and acrimonious,

Another point is the settlement of the
refugees in Austria. Austria is willing to
nationalize and absorb about 50,000 of these
people. Russia on the other hand wants
these refugees carefully screened before they
are absorbed into Austria’s population.

As many of these refugees are from coun-
tries now under Russian domination. Russia
is demanding that they be returned to the
country of their origin whether the refugees
like or not. Britain, USA and France com:
promised on this issue by saying that only
those who freely volunteered to return should
be repatriated.

Russia refused to accept. The Western
Powers, fearing that serious consequences
might befall these people if they are forcibly
returned to their country of origin, have re-
fused so far to yield and it is more than likely
that they will maintain that attitude.

So, unless there is a change of heart on the
part of the Soviet authorities, the deadlock
appears to be as insoluble as ever—I.N.S,





Legislation Helps The Boars

OBERLINGEN, Germany, (By Mail).

Man-hunting by wild boars instead of boar-
hunting by man is a new post-war “turnabout” in
German forests.

The 100 percent disarmament since the close of
World War II, which also was extended to hunters,
has reversed relations between civilized man and
the wild beasts.

Recently a group of foresters in the neighbour-
hood of Goppingen in the South West of Germany
became the object of a mass attack by 20 wild
boars in open daylight.

The woodmen had just settled down for a short
rest and snack, when the black beasts, led by a
strong boar, suddenly rushed forward from a
thicket where they apparently had hidden and
prepared their assault.

The Woodmen, many of them obviously war-
trained, quickly took refuge in improvised trenches
and between piles of fallen trees. No one was
hurt, but they had to hold out in their “forts” a
long time before the “enemy” retreated,

In another case, a single boar boldly strolled
through the streets of the town of Stuttgart. It left
the impression that it had an uncanny knowledge
of man’s unarmedness,

Only when many citizens had been alarmed and
began an organised clatter of teapots, bells and
other “instruments” did the visitor slowly retreat
toward the forest.

In the Lake of Constance District wild boars
pay so many visits to the borders of the lake that
no private persons or tourists venture to leave the
precincts of town and village very far.

The recently-announced “rearmament” of Ger-

man hunters is expected to reverse the
in favour of civilization. situation



olution to provide funds for the



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“THE MASTER Sl

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'










ods
i
ey
*
i
ath



5
Hy

‘

anne Sa

SIR.—Now that
Association is

a code of rules for pedestrians
with the object of its becoming

law,

One of the things w should
be determined is the aan of the
road on Which they should walk
Recent ions stated
the left side of the road. In my
ae * a mistake as the
esponsibility is pl
the vehicular fee —e

I remember on a previous oc-
casion a code for pedestrians was
drawn up during Colonel Dick-
ens’ regime and in this it was
suggested that pedestrians should
walk on the right so as to face
oncoming traffic thus placing re
sponsibility on both parties.

In view of these conflicting in-
structions J think there should be
a general ‘airing of the subjec?
so that the general public should
know what is expected of them.

BEN GI ;
White Park Road, _

Jan 7, 1950,



To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Nomination day in the
parish of St. James went off very
smoothly, There was a marked
absence of mud-slinging and
Wwarme-stuff! as was expected in
Some quarters and as was let off
at the last Vestry Election. Mr.
Stephen Walcott, the out-going
Churchwarden in a very brief
speech told the taxpayers that
the parish had succeeded in main-
ae an — & at mini-

im waeges an at the poor
had been well attended to, fom
glad to know that the poor re-
ceived a satisfactory measure of
attention because the poor and
destitute should be always taken
care of. Dealing with sanitation
the Churchwarden said that the
Public Health Bill would put all
wrong things right.

Now everybody was waiting to
hear from Mr. Walcott who is
a Commissioner of Health and one
who is really deeply interested in
the affairs of the parish of plans
for reorganising the sanitary de-
partment because it is well known
that a few things in that depart-

Chief Sanitary Inspector should
be solely in charge and responsi-
ble for the health of the parish
but it is not so. The Chairman who
is a layman and has no know-
ledge whatsoever of health meth-
ods supervises the health matters
of the parish and the Chief In-
spector has also to perform the
duties of a sub-sanitary inspector
and go about daily inspecting
yards, houses, etc, ind along
with the other sub-sanitary in-
spectors has to report daily to
the Chairman the work he has
done. Instead of detailing his
men to their respective districts,
paying them surprise visits during
the day checking up on their
work, receiving and investigating
complaints at his office and at-
tending ato the numerous things



which this important office calls
for, he has to suffer the in lignity
of performing the duties of a sub
sanitary inspector, rubbing
shoulder .to shoulder with them
thus losing the respect from the
men which was evidenced by the
behaviour of-one of the members
of the staff to which Mr, Walcott





might have been the object of
carrying on this system in the past,
it is not good enough for today
nor does it stand good for the
future.

We have at the head of one
Sanitary Department a_ fully
trained, qualified, efficient and
capable offi@er and the people of
St. James require and earnestly
desire the same modern method
of running the sanitation of the
parish as i$ obtainable in each
of the other ten parishes. Every
chairman feels proud when he has
a competent man at the head of
affairs and the people rest quietly
in their beds when they know
that their sanitation is entrusted
into capable hands.

_ At present there are only three
inspectors in this parish which
takes fifth place in the island in
population and in. houses—the
Same which was had fifty years
ago with one third the number
of houses and people. The parish
requires an increased staff of
inspectors ard one or more dis~
trict nurses with the Chief In-
spector in charge of the people’s

WARE. Lov

clay making plant at Lancaster
is inaccurate and I crave your
indulgence to make the necessary
corrections.

Paragraph three states that
“Government was convinced that
the industry was not a profitable
one etc.” What I did say was
that the Government was con-
vinced that the industry could be
made profitable, but that the
Government must undertake cer-
tain industries that private con-
cerns would not undertake owing
to the returns on their money,









St. Peter with lesser houses and
smaller population there are four
sub-inspectors and the Chief In-
spector and now I notice from
your columns that the commis-
sioners of that parish are calling
for two district nurses. St. James
should not lag behind the times.
It will be the duty of the new
Vestry to put its house in order
immediately and not wait to be
forcec by the Public Health Bill
te do what is already a duty to
the taxpayers but what-is clearly
necessary and long overdue. They
have just broken faith by appoint-
ing an outsider to the post of sub-
sanitary inspector in preference
to a bright and intelligent man
already in the service with the
> ag aged ee It is yet ite
ime to make wrong things right t should have bee on-
and there should be no delay. nessee Valley Authority eee |
S. B. SEARLES, of the greatest Public pre

that the world had seen {

for

Paragraph four contains a
greater mistake in stating that
the pottery industry was one of
the greatest private Projects that
the world had seen for some-
time.



projects |
some- |
ume and that no private indus-
trialists would have undertaken |
this scheme. |

i

|

Orange Hill,
St. James

The Pottery Industry

ny : al F L W Le

To The Editor, The Advocate, Bank Hall, aerree
SIR,—Your report in to-day’s St. Michael, |

issue on my speech for the res- January 5,

1950,



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TUESDAY, JANUARY 10,





1950



2 Ladies Successful
In Vestry Elections

Mottley Heads Poll Again InSt. Michael

TWO ladies were successful candidates in

Vestry Elec-

tions held yesterday.’ They were Mrs. H. A. Talma in

Christ Church, and Mrs. F. E. Daysh in St. Philjp. In St. |

Michael Mr. E. D. Mottley again headed the polls, this time
with 730 votes out of a total of 1,000. Mr. T. W. Miller was

second with 566 votes.

Mr. J. W. Hewitt was unsuccess-
ful. He secured 421 votes, and
so the old Vestry was returned.

Successful newcomers in Christ
Church apart from Mrs. Talma
were Mr. A. M. Jones, and Mr.
M. E. R. Bourne. Mr. A. N. Chad-
derton who served on the Vestry
on previous occasions, but who
did not serve last year, was also
successful yesterday.

Another lady, Mrs. R. C. Skin-
ner who came forward for St.
Lucy did win the favour of the
electorate.

Electors Thanked

At the end of the count in St.
Michael Mr. H. A. Tudor, retiring
Churchwarden, thanked the elect-
ors for having re-elected him and
the Sheriff, Mr. F. J. Cole and the
Sub-sheriff, Mr. R. M. Cave for
the orderly way in which the pro-
ceedings had been carried out.
He congratulated Mr. Mottley and
Mr. Miller and extended his sym-
pathy to Mr. Hewitt.

Mr. Cole paid tribute to the
orderly way in which the electors
had gone about their business.

Mr. Mottley also thanked the
electors for their support. He said
he was gratified at the result es-
pecially in view of the fact that
he had ween ill, and had not been
able to contact all of his support-
ers. He promised to do his best
in their interest.

Mr. Miller, Mr. Weatherhead,
Mr. Symmcnds and Mr. Chase
also returned thanks, and Mr.
Hewitt after saying thanks for the
support he had got, promised. to
come again.

Total Return

The total return for St. Michael
was as follows: Mr. E, D. Mottley,
M.C.P., 730; Mr. T. W. Miller, 566;
Mr. H .A. Tudor, 540; Mr, F. C,
Goddard, M.C.P., 523; Mr, V. W.
A. Chase, 520; Mr. F. McD Sym-
monds, 517; Mr. A. S. Bryden, 511;
Mr. C. C. Browne, 509; Mr. B. A.
Weatherhead,505; Hon. V. C. Gale,
M.L.C., 501; Mr. C. A. Braithwaite,
498; Mr. A. R. Toppin, 494; Mr.
D. G. Leacock (Jr.), 476; Mr, T.
Bowring, 474; Mr. E. F. C. Bethell,
M.C.P., 465; Mr. J. K. C. Gran-
num, 425.

Mr. J. W. Hewitt, the unsuc-
cessful candidate got 421 votes,

Successful candidates in Christ
Church were: Mr. G. C. Ward,
327 votes; Mr. F. C, Goddard, 319;
Mr. C. S. McKenzie, 319; Mr, H.
St. G. Ward, 311; Hon’ble A, G.,
Gittens, M.L.C., 297; Mr. C. M.
Drayton, 283; Mr. J. E. Webster,
280; Mr. V. W. A, Chase, 278; Mr.
C. D. Branford, 268; Mr. G, C,
Ashby, 264; Mrs. H. A. Talma, 263;
Mr. U. J. Parravicino, 253, Mr.
Hugh Garnes, 251; Mr. A. M.
Jones 241; Mr. C. Ifill, 229; Mr.
M. E. R. Bourne, 222.

St. Philip’s Returns

St. Philip’s parish. who had no
Nomination Day last Monday
because a Sheriff or sub-Sheriff
was not available had Nomin-
ation Day yesterday. Mr. Scott,
Assessor of the parish, acted as
Sheriff and Mr. Moore, Poor
Law Inspector as Sub-sheriff,

The old Vestry was proposed
with the exception of Mr. H. Man.
ning who retired. He proposed

S| RR eer

Mrs. F. E. Daysh, sister of Mt,
H. L. Smith, another member
of the Vestry. There were no
other candidates and the old
Vestry along with Mrs. Daysh
was declared elected.

The Vestry for this year is
therefore composed of the follow.
ing members: Mr. A. G. F. Farmer,
Mr. D. D. Garner M.C.P.; Mr.
E. L. Lyte; Mr. T. D. Mayers;
Mr. E. L. Moore; Mr. A. T.
Skeete; Mr. R. B. Skeete; Mr.
H. LL. Smith Mr. RR. St.c:
Weekes; Mrs. F. E. Daysh.

Three newcomers found favour
with the St. Lucy Electorate.
They were. Mr. F. A. Greaves;
Mr. G. Harris and Mr. Kenneth
C. O’Neale. Three of last year’s
vestrymen were dropped — Mr.
C. O. Knight, Mr. W. Connell
and Mr. D. E. Webster.

Mr. J. &. T. Brancker M.C.P.
an old Vestryman topped the
polls with 1385 votes; Mr. E. L.
Ward M.C.P..was next with
125; Votes secured by other suc-
cessful candidates were as fol-
lows: Mr. E. L. Bannister, 118;
Mr. F. A. Greaves, 117; Mr.
W. L. Greaves, 108; Mr. G. G.
Harris, 102; Mr. K. C. O’Neale,
100; Mr. W. H. Yearwood, 90;
Mr. I. C.. Sobers, 81; Mr. G.
Fitz G, O’Neale. 73.

New Candidates

Two candidates who did not sit
on the Vestry last year were for-
tunate in St. Thomas. One of
them, Mr. V. E. Reeves, tied with
Mr. Julian Mahon, veteran Ves-
tryman, for the highest number
of votes, The other was Mr. C, M.
Collins. Two members of last
year’s Vestry who were dropped
were Mr. R. S. Bancroft and Mr.
Cc. E. Tryhane.

List of successful candidates
follow: Mr. J. Mahon and Mr.
V. E. Reeves, 150 votes each; Mr.
K. Sandiford, 130; Mr. C, M. Col-
lins, 124; Mr. A. E. Cave, 123; Mr.
L. D. Gill, 123; Mr. J, C. Thorne,
122; Mr. S. A. Walcott, 121; Mr.
W. T. Gooding, 116; Mr. D. A.
Watson, 106.

Nine members or iast year’s
Vestry were returned in St. James.
The tenth, a newcomer, wes Mr
E. Holder, who was nominated
after his father, an old vestryman,
had resigned.

This year’s Vestry will there-
fore be: Mr. S, A. Walcott whc
topped the poll with 167 votes;
Mr. J. H. Wilkinson M.C.P., i€3;
Mr. A. L. Jordan, 156; Mr. C. G.
Massiah, 144; Mr. S. Massiah, 139;
Mr. A. G. Johnson, 139; Mr. W. W,
Denny, 122; Mr. E. Holder, 122;
Mr. R. S. Bancroft, 113; Mr. D. E.
Webster, 111.

Unsuccessful candidates were
Mr. J. M. Crick, Mr. C. E. Jem-
mott, and Mr. C. B. Searle.

In St. Joseph the old Vestry
was returned. Names of the mem-
bers are: Mr, W. R. Coward, 34
votes; Mr. A. P. Cox, 84; Mr.
H. W. Carter, 77; Mr, L. L. Gill,
74; Mr. W. T. Gooding, 72; Mr.
J. A. Haynes, 70; Mr, L. E. Smith,
M.C.P., 70; Mr. G. R. Hutson, 68;
Mr. C. A. Williams, 60; Mr. J.
Branch, 55.

Unsuccessful were, Mr. C.
Holder, Mr, R. Lee and Mr, McD,
Chandler.



In Carlisle Hay

IN PORT—Yawl Potick, Sch. Laudai-
pha, Sch. Manuata, Sch. Philip H
avidson, Yacht Maya, Yawl Stortebecker
Sch. Sunshine R., Sch. Mary M. Lewis,
Sch. Alexandrina R., Sch. Frances W.
Smith, Sch. Turtle Dove, Sch. Marion
Belle Wolfe, Sch. Emanug C. Gordon,
Sch, Reginald N, Wallace, Sch. Mandalay
Il, Sch. Marea Henrietta, Swedi:

Barquentine Sunbeam, M.V. Lady Joy

ARRIVALS

S.S. Fort Amherst, 1,946 tons net, Capt.
Kean, from Grenada; Agents: Da Costa
& Co., Ltd.

Yacht Beegie, 25 tons net, Capt. Nolan,
from Grenada.

M.V. Canadian Challenger, 3.935 tons
net, Capt. Andersson, from St: Croix;
Agents: Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd.

8.S. Alcoa Pegasus, 3,931 tons net,
Capt. Morgan, from Dominica; Agents;
Da Costa & Co., Lid. \

8.s. » 1,856 tons net, Capt,
Roorda, from Trinidad; Agents; Da Costa
& Co., Ltd.

Schooner Princess Louise, 34 tons net
Capt. Mitchell, from St. Lucia; Agents

Schooner Owners’ Association.



M.V. Arocosta, 28 tons net, Capt
Lewis, from Trinidad; Agents: Gittens

Croney & Co.

Swedish S.S. C. G. Thulin, 1,317 ton
net, Capt. Andersson, from St. Croix;
Agents; Robert Thom Ltd. é

DEPARTURES

M.V. Rufina, 1,856 tons neg, Capt

ish | Roorda, for Grenada; Agents: la Coste

& Co., Ltd.
M.V. Blue Star,
Fergusson, for Trinidad; Agent: A.

130 tons net, Gr

Harris, . : .
M.V. Daerwood, 94 tons net, Cap

Archibold, for St. Llwcia; Agent:
Schooner Owners’ Association.
S.S. Sundial, 1,652 tons net, Capt

Russell, for Trinidad; Agents: Piantatior
Ltd.

S.S. C. G, Thulin, 1,317 tons net, Cegt
Andersson, for Trinidad; Agents: Robert
Thom Ltd, ‘

Arriving by S.S. “C. G. ‘Thulin
yesterday were—from Brooklyn: William
Barclay, Mrs. Barclay, Herbert T. Mic
dleton, Mrs. Middleton, B. M, Jones,
Mrs. Jones.

IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Lta., S.S. San Vulfrano, S.S. Tindefjell, S.S

Advise that they can now communicet>

with the followi ships through their | Jeanny, S.S,
Bar! a ri Ale

S.s.
S.S. Estero, S.S. New-
brough, S.S. S, Virgilio, S.S. Carrabulle



ARRIVALS—By B.W.LA.L,
ones TRINIDAD; Trevor Gale, Daphne
Wen Hilda Altholz, Robert Altholz, Cyril
vi ters, Itic Feldman, Power J juin,
Wier Goulding, Graham Riley, Elliot
len Ernest Peterkin, John ' Deane,
nt 'y Deane, Marie Clarke, Audrey Can-
Soe Althea Linton, Moniea St. John,
sorephine Douglas, Audrey
zimes Douglas, Malcolm Riley,
rown, Sylvia Kamchin, William Cash,
Â¥ Brown, Clifford Regan, Frank Bush,
hnanan Naipal, Sir Edward Cunard,
mel Archer, Lester Reeves, Kather-
Ca Ward, Preston Alexander, Ernest
adogan, Helen Cummings, Marie Cum-

The Weather

TODAY.
p.m

Quarter)
p.m.

: 8.52 a.m.,
YESTERDAY:
Rainfall (Codrington) nil
_— for Month to Yesterday:



January 11

9.02 p.m

Temperature (Max.)

1,44 Mr.

, 83.0 deg. F

Wind Direction (9.a m en by E
{3.p.m.) N. by E
Wind Velocity 7 miles per hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 30,004 (3 p.m.)
28.954

What's on
Customs nic Ta Hastings Hc

e Court

Today | .

S.S, Esso Knoxville, S.S

Sunray,
ny, Benny, S.S. Rafina, S.S

oa Pegasus, S.S. Gulfmoon, §.S. §
Mateo, S.S, Joshua Three, S.S. Dewdale
8.S. Fordsdale, S.S. Atlantic, S.S
Morrractern, S.S. Delft, S.S. Delsud
S.S.

Alcoa Corsair, S.S. Gulfcoast

mings, Eunice Nelson, Harold Hare, Rob-
ert Worman, Margaret Price, Thomas
Davis, Keeling Davis, Cecilia Davis, Lu-
cille Davis, Maureen Davis, Basil Broo!
Robert Masson, Fle

Pataricia De Cates, Jeffrey De Cates,
Lucila Leiser, Gert Leise, Beatriz Ochoa,

* | Ramon Ochoa, Guillemina Banch, Fran-

cisco Banch, Isabel Matlock, Mercedes
Mirabal, Alberto Solariz, Maurice Jones.

From ST, LUCIA: Joseph Andrieux,
Yvonne Andrieux, Carolyn Berkenkamp,
Marita Berkenkamp, Lionel Paul, Louis
Cools-Lartigue, Alfred Baynes, Daphne
Theobalds, William Grace, Bertram Kay,
James Wooster.

From ST. KITTS: Mr. Wilfrid Peters,
Miss Howard King, Mr, John Mestier,
Mr. George Johnson, Mr, Peter Johnson.

From ANTIGUA: Daniel Walwyn, Ed-
win Thompson.

From GRENADA: Gittens Knight, Val-
entine Archer.

DEPARTURES-—-By B.W.LA.L.

For TRINIDAD: Mr. John Bayne, Mr.
Arpad Sorger, Mrs. Alicia Sorger, Master
George Sorger, Mr, Frederick Greenidge,
Wennel Best, Mr. Gerald Batson,
| Master Edward Batson, Miss Emmie Ron-
alds, Mr. John Gordon, Miss Derothy
MeConn Anoni Mastelloni, Mrs
jlance i, Mr. Walter Eggert,
c rt, Mr. Marcos Shad-
r Max Sihman, Mrs. Rivca Sih-
Arthur Goddard, Mr. Frank









M



Mr. Clifford Regan.
LUCIA: Mr, Charles DuBou-
Elsie DuBoulay, Miss Patricia
P r, Mrs, Sheila
nu Miss
, Mr, Augu





















LOCAL N



| B.H. Governor
Very Popular

The Governor of British Hon-
duras.is very popular among the
people and promises to be one of
the most progressive the colony
has ever had, Mr. R. K, Masson.
Collector of Customs of that
| colony told the “Advocate” yes-
terday.

Mr. Masson came in on Sunday
by B.W.LA. via Jamaica and
Trinidad for the Customs Talks
and is staying at the Marine
Hotel.

He said that he did not antici-
pate any trouble in British Hon-
duras over the devaluation of the
dollar as the people were known
for their loyalty to the King and
the British Empire and were per-
haps, among the most loyal sub-
jects in the British Empire.





EWS



!
|



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Delegate Alleges

Discrimination

On C.N.S. Boat

DOMINICA has the brightest prospects for the econ-
omic development and prosperity she has had for the past
50 years Hon’ble A. D. Boyd, Acting Financial Secretary of
that colony told the “Advocate” yesterday.

emenind

“Amherst” Brings
Food Stuff

THE “Fort Amherst”, passen-
ger freighter of the Furness

He said that with the revalua-| Withy Steamship Company, ar-
tion of the British Hondures dollar rived at Barbados yesterday from

it was hoped that more English

New York via St. Thomas, Trini-

capital would be invested in in-| dad and Grenada.

dustries. Before he left home, it

was rumoured that Colonial De-| and refrigerated picnic
velopment and Welfare would] taken at Trinidad, ;
begin certain operations and that brought supplies of flour,

the plans for the erection of the

Along with oranges, egg pulp

hams

this vessel

cocoa,

lk powder, spaghetti, cooking

new hotel which was badly need- butter, naval beef, boneless ba-

ed, were before the Board in a

London.

On his trip over from Belize to
Jamaica, he spoke to Mr. Bay
Sharp who was perhaps one of
the leading businessmen in the
West Indies and informed him
that with the revaluation of the
dollar, British Honduras would
ahead to be in a much better
position than she was at the
present.

British Honduras had wonderful
possibilities. It only needed capi-
tal and the correct kind of
businessmen. Adventurers were
not needed at all.

Must Be Paid
JUDGMENTS were entered for
Winley Jones and Henry’ Brath-
waite, carpenters of St. Patricks,
Christ Church, by Their Honours
Mr. G L. Taylor and Mr J. W. B
Chenery yesterday. Their Hono’
reversed the decision of Mr. C. W.
Rudder, Judge of the Petty Debt
Court of District “B”, who had
entered judgment for Joseph
Mottley of the same district.
Brathwaite and Jones claimed
$7.40 and $7.70 respectively from
Mottley as money due to them
for repairs they had carried out
to his house at St. Patrick.
Mottley held that he had ar-
ranged with Brathwaite to do the
work and Brathwaite should not
have brought Jones to help him
do it. Their Honours felt that
since the carpenters had not



charged too high and Mottley had] was

go herst”

picnic hams, saltpack hams,
M. U. and steel angles which
were transhipment cargo ex the
steamships “Senator”, ‘“Come-
dian”, “Governor” and “Pioneer

She brought from New York
machine parts, belting, varnish
and materiak The “Fort Am-
left port yesterday evening
for Martinique. Its local repre-
sentatives are Messrs. Da Costa\
& Co., Ltd.

Will Take
Away Rum

ABOUT 600 puncheons of mo-
lasses for St. John and Halifax
and a quantity of rum for St.
John will be loaded on M.V.
“Canadian Challenger” which ar-
rived here from Trinidad yester-



it brought here from Trinidad
a cargo comprised of fresh fruit,

‘| bitters, stationery, shirts and per-
Urs | sonal effects.

Seven race horses
consigned to Hon. V. C. Gale,
M.L.C., Mr. H. Edwards and
Mr. J. R. Edwards also arrived by
this vessel.

The “Challenger” will be sail-
ing to-day for St. John and Hali-
fax. Messrs. Gardiner Austin &
Co., Ltd., are agents.

FUEL FROM
ST. LUCIA

AMONG
the



arrivals
“Princess

yesterday’s
schooner

had the work done to his satisfac-} Louise” under Captain Mitchell.

tion, the carpenters were entitled| This vessel

to their pay.

Error Case



brought from St.
Lucia a cargo of charcoal, fire-
wood, hoesticks and cocoanuts.
Messrs. Schooner Owners’ Asso-
ciation are local agents.



Adjourned 10/- For Misconduct

A foreclosure action claim
which was set down for hearing
in the Court of Error yesterday
was adjourned until January 23.

THEIR Honours Mr. G. L.
Taylor and J .W. B. Chenery yes-
terday agreed with the decision
of Mr, S. H. Nurse, Police Magis-

The action is between Weber| ‘Tate of District “C” who imposed

Johnson of Near Roach’s, St. Lucy
(claimant), Etheline G. Beckles of
Tudor Gap, St. Michael, (Plain-
tiff) and Westerman D. Bowen,
also of Tudor Gap (Defendant).

The property in dispute is one h

acre, one rood and twenty-four
perches of land and a dwelling
house standing on the land,

Maltreated
His Donkey



a fine of 10/- and 2/- costs on
Leon Farley of Orange Hill, St.
James, Their Honours ordered
Farley also to pay 7/8 Court of
Appeal costs.

He had been found guilty of
aving misconducted himself





Car Damaged
In Accident
The right front fender, the
rear fenders, and the right side

JAMES WEBSTER of Clapham | of the motor car M—1817, were
was fined 5/- in 14 days or 14| damaged in an accident on
days’ imprisonment when he ap- | Saturday.

peared before His Worship Mr.

The accident occurred at about

A. J. H. Hanschell for maltreat- | 1.30 p.m. on Rouen Road, St.

ing his donkey
Road on November 23.

£10 For Stolen

Furniture

A decision of Mr. H, A. Talma,
Police Magistrate of District “A”
remained in force when the case
in which he had fined Julian
Murray of the Pine Housing
Scheme £10 to be paid by month-
ly instalments, was reviewed by
Their Honours Mr. G. L. Taylor
and Mr. J.W. B, Chenery yester-
day. Proper notice of appeal had
not been given.

Murray had been found guilty
of having stolen furniture and
other articles which were th@
property of Doris Jones during
September 1949, Jones and Murray
had been living in Constitution
on the night of the flood of August
1949. Jones’ house had been
washed away. Sgt, Holder told
the court that he had found the
articles claimed in Murray’s
house.

9 Acres Of Canes
Were Burnt

One of the largest cane fires
this year occurred at Farm Plan-
tation St. George at about 4.15
P.m., on Saturday,

The fire, origin unknown,
destroyed 934 acres of first and
second crop canes. The damage is
covered by insurance.

The canes are the property of
Mr. R. Jordon of the same Plan-
tation.







Games Cancelled

LONDON, Jan. 9.
As no assurance has been re-
ceived from the Racing Club of
Rio de Janeiro that the matches
against Wolverhampton Wander-

ers and Portsmouth would be
played, the games have been
cancelled. The Football Asso-

ciation, on behalf of the English
clubs, to-day cabled to Argentine
that the tour could not take
place, as insufficient time re-
mained to make adequate ar-
rangements,

—Reuter.

along Culloden pomnedl.

between the motor
orry P—142, ovned by A. G.
and W. K. Farmer of Oughter-
son, St. Philip and driven by
Elliot Gittens of East Point, in
the same Parish, and M—1817,
which is owned by Clement
Austin, shopkeeper at the corner
of Constitution and Martindales
Road, and was driven by his
daughter, Claire Aystin of the
same address. No damage was
done to the lorry.

Bicycle And Car
Collide



The front waeel of a bicycle
owned and ridden by Rupert
Belgrave of Bush Hall, was ex-
tensively damaged in an ac-
cident which occurred on White
Park Road at about 11.40 a.m.,
on Saturday,

The cycle and the motor car
M—2472, owned and driven by
Alistair Edghill of “Hamilton”,
Strathclyde, collided.

Belgrave was slightly injured.

quickly relieves

COLDS and
CATARRH

It clears the nasal pas-

sages to remove stuffiness
and the distressing con-
ditions of head colds and
catarrh. The patent nasal
application bottle is infinitely better than spray
or dropper, and can be carried conveniently in
handbag or pocket without fear of leakage.

Made by CLAY & ABRAHAM LTD., |

Estab



He said that the banana in-
dustry was largely responsible
for that changed outlook and a
15-year contract had been signed
up with an English company to
take all their bananas for that
period at fixed prices.

Mr. Boyd arrived last week by
B.W.1LA. via St. Lucia for the
Customs Union Talks and is
staying at the Hastings Hotel.

He said that the large estates
and peasants were all planting
heavily and the only drawback
was the lack of communications;
however, there was a four-year
scheme to spend about £300,000
on roads which would consider-
ably improve the situation.

There was also a Greek firm
which was putting up a factory
to process citrus and other fruits,
and there were prospects of the
Food Ministry taking the island’s
entire crop of orange and grape-
fruit during the next few years.

Contrary to rumours that had
filtered through to Dominica, he
was greatly impressed by the
work that the Colonial Develop-
ment Corporation was doing on
the reconstruction of Castries and
he hoped it would be possible
to persuade them to undertake
some of the larger road jobs in
Dominica.

Great Difficulty

Mr. Boyd said that he had
great difficulty in getting proper
cabin accommodation on the
“Lady Rodney” although he had
made efforts to get a booking
three weeks previous to the ar-
rival of the ship with the agents
in Bermuda,

He stated that various senior
officers with whom he had dis-
cussed the matter both in St.
Lucia and Barbados, had express-
ed dissatisfaction with the lack
of facilities afforded to delegates
to Conferences by the C.NS.
which was a subsidised line,

He expects that action will be
taken by his Government in
order that in future, accommo-
dation will be secured for dele-

gates attending conferences
abroad through the head office of
C.N.S. in Montreal, instead of

relying on the local agents who
seemed unable to prevail upon
the ships’ officials to provide
Suitable accommodation for West
Indians of all complexions.

3 Trucks
Arrive

M.V. “Arocosta” returned to the
island yesterday from Trinidad
under Captain Lewis,

It brought three trucks and a
motor car for Mr. Wexler. Mr.
Wexler is expected to arrive here
by plane today.

After he arrives, it will be de-
cided whether or not the “Ar-
ocosta” will take old iron here
and also the next port of call,

Local agents are Messrs Gittens,
Croney & Co,

Lorry And Car
In Collision



An accident occurred on Has-
tings Road, Christ. Church at
about 11.15 am. on Saturday
between the motor car X—427,

Maarleveld of St. Lawrence,
Christ Church, and the motor
lorry X—895, owned and driven
by Clarence Thorpe of Silver
Hill, Christ Church.

The right running beam and
cross beam of the lorry were
damaged; while damage was
done to the right front fender,
rear fenders,
windscreen

right door and
of tle car.



Car Brakes
Were Bad

ST CLAIR GRIFFITH was
fined 7/- in 14 days or 14 days’
imprisonment by His Worship
Mr. A. J. H. Hanschell yesterday
when he was found guilty of diiv-
ing the car M.883 on September
5 with inefficient brakes,

Obituary

NEWS has been received in An-
tigua of the death on Tuesday 3rd
January of the Rev. C. G. Erry,
Methodist Minister and father of
Mrs. J. R. A. Branch wife of Col.
J. R. A. Branch, Commissioner of
Police. Rev. Erry was stationed
in Antigua for many years as well
as British Guiana,

DROL

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owned and driven by =

FLOUR FROM
HALIFAX

ONE THOUSAND, six hundred
sacks of flour arrived in the col-
ony late on Saturday evening
when S.S. “Alcoa Pegasus”
called from Halifax. There were
also moderate quantities of pow-
dered milk, bran, cereals, cream
of wheat, pickled pork, feeds and
copper wire on this vessel for
Barbados. .

The “Pegasus” is consigned to
Messrs. Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

120 Bags Of Mail
For Barbados

SWEDISH S.S. “C. G. Thulin”
called yesterday with cargo from
New York. Foodstuffs, meats,
Sausages, Martini, Vermouth,
paint, machinery, auto parts, cal-
lenders and two plows were items
among the cargo.

This vessel also brought 115
bags of regular mail and five bags
of registered mail. It was sched-
uled to sail last night for Trini-
dad. Messrs. Robert Thom Ltd,
are agents,

Neeteeadsrsinmnanetieonee
ARTICLES MISSING

Mr. John Beckles of the Bar-
bados Dye & Laundry Works
reported the
and a hair brush from the Chil-
dren’s Goodwill League.

He stated that the loss occur-
red between December 12 and 19,

e ’ -

25 YEARS AGO
(BARBADOS ADVOCATE,
January 10, 1925)
Dedication of Organ
The Organ Dedicatory Service
at the Collymore Rock A.M.b.
Chureh last Sunday was well at-
tended and very inspiring. It was
conducted by the Rev. J. D. Smith

Pastor of the Church.

The instrument is a_two-
manual read organ of excellent
tone and splendid variety. Its
range and quality were well de-
monstrated by Mr. W. H. Moore,
in solos, a violin solo and an
anthem by the choir of the
Church, Vocal solos were sung in
characteristically good voice and
style by Miss Marjorie Moore,
Miss Onida Sealy and Mr. Beres-
ford Tubbs.

Mr. G, C, Williams rendered
Handel’s “Largo” on the violin
with very pleasing effect.

The people of Collymore Rock
are highly pleased over the ren-
ditions of the artistes who per-
formed on the occasion and have
invited them to make an early
return. Much pleasure was af-
forded, too, by the presence of so
many music-loving friends from
surrounding communities and
Bridgetown including Mr, C. A.
Brathwaite, M.C.P., and John S.
Maughn, J.P.









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PAGE SIX









}CHILDREN’S
BOOKS



wOu'RE GOOD

DETECTIVES...

YOu CAN HAVE MY
AS



NOW... WHAT SEEMS
TO’ BE YOUR
PROBLEM?

THE LONE “RANGER
Sls sacs Bev ror
AND WE:

eS ea ty Vv
| SOE OF US WILL RUSH) THEY'LL GET






TONTO! HOW CAN WE GET THE LONE
RANGER OFF THAT fa
ROOF ? << ie.

KILL! SNEAD,
GOING TD GET HIM!
x os













WE'VE GOT TO
HURRY WITH
: SHIRT... AND THAT
: BLUE JERSEY OF YOURS
NICKY...



BRINGING UP FATHER

WELL- I HAVEN'T DADDY - Dif > YOu 1 NOW
A SINGLE MOTHER HAS TAKEN >
aes. ¥ okey THE CAR AND IS GOING Macees. DRIVIN'
SeeT, TODAY TO ORIVE DOWNTOWN !? DOWNTOWN= =~
Lie SHE MAY DRIVE
NEAR YOu, PLACE!
ae pepo
:





MISS FAIN WE'VE PICKED uP



_ HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

IT'S NOTHIN’! THAT'S

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



THE TROUBLE! }

SOMEONE STOLE

THE PICTURE
OuT OF IT!



BY FRANK STRIKER

aa - 7



/ Taras SOMEON®
COMING OFF IN A



THANKS -JIGGS --I’LL
KEEP ALL THE KIDS

IN THE HOUSE - AND
WARN THE NEIGHBORS !/
IS YOUR CAR FULLY
INSURED ?

(OMY AAS

i















VALERIE'S TRAIL,.GHE HITCHED
A RIDE ON A BIG RED TRAILER
TRICK... JOE GOWDY Ari) T
«WILL TRY TO CATCH

A BIG RED TRAILER THAT'S THE
TRUCK® I HAD BETTER NEW TEACHER
NOTIFY THE POLICE... YOU'RE OATIN’
BUT FIRST I'LL
TELEPHONE VALERIE’S
GRANDPARENTS...















| bait mor! PO
| at THE PHANTOM BY LEE FAL
Pi hE : THEY'LL KILL YOUS

SHH. QUICK? GIVE ME AND THEN + FIND

YOUR TURBAN AND
ROBE. 97

i

«| + [THE THUGcEES
_ PARE ~ON THE /”
i ee ~JusT
+ if EUS ++
be






Mi
rf ‘

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‘i
i



moe ad AD

CLIMBS INTO 7\D0RES BEP ++
THE AGED PRINCES PLACE

| IN THE BARK Rooat T~
\ \





: i]
\WALKS QUIETLY TO THE CLOSET WHERE
WWOO2E HIDES, TREMBLING IN FEAR «~'
NOTA SOUND. Guu? ==

THE POOR, TYDORE ++









JOE |S TEACHER'S J/THAT MAKES
4 CRACK GETS
4 MOUTHFUL ©’
KNUCKLES!

KE. I'M TURNING THE

LIGHTS QUT NOWs~ =

QUIETY,

ORD Rec ets Pike vo

COME ALONG, THUGGEES
I'M WAITING. WE GHALL
SEE WHAT WE

SHALL SEE ««



a |



AN! IT LOOKS LIKE THE NEXT Gu |

)
\



SWAN

Oysters? We
Can Eat "Em |

| LikeCal’sMeat!

j PARIS, (By Mail)

MY daughter’s cat Timothy fre-
| quently eats a dozen oysters for
}lyncheon. In the accompanying
| picture you can observe Timothy
| getting down to it. He prefers

| them straight. No Tabasco. No
lemon, 3 .
This oyster diet for a Ssix-



month-old pet is not the result of
| sore mad caprice which is carv-
ing big inroads into the MacColl
pocketbook. The exact opposite
is true.

So cheap and plentiful are oys-
ters in France that my wife finds
it an economically sound proposi-
tion to let Timothy have them
several times a week.

Like all cats Timothy thinks
the world of fish. Unlike other
cats he gets a go at shellfish.
| Only drawback is that Timothy
jis unlikely ever to learn how to

open the oysters for himself Thus
the be



delicious dozen must



lover (which we're not: we're
ju®t run-of-the-miil cat likers)
it occasionally proves a touch irk-
some to have to tackle the messy
business on behalf of a feline con-
noisseur.

(The by-laws of the Paris
suburb where I Vive forbid fish-
mongers to sell opened oysters.)

Penny Each
| But there it is. Horsemeat for
cats works out at 3s. 8d. per lb.
And the oysters? I am sad indeed
to be assured that this season they
are something like a shilling each
in the London restaurants.

Believe it or not, over here you
ean buy them in the markwts for a
penny each or
less. I have seen
them at 81d. a
dozen at my lo-
cal market.

I know that
this is heresy,
but
oysters we r
here to Whitsta-
bles or Colches-
ter “natives.” A



dozen fines de
claire served on
a bed of sea-
weed with a half
of lemon and
some brown
bread and butter]
make a very
Gharming | start Timothy's
to a meal. It y

costs little even oyster lunch
when you're eating out.

After the restaurant has taken
jits profits you can still get your
dozen in all except the expensive
Paris places for around 2s. 6d.

Paris alone consumes about 50
tons of oysters every day. They
‘ome from places on the west
coast. One great region is in and
around Brittany. Another is on
the Bay of Biscay.

All over Paris, as the autumn
naps into winter there appear
outside cafes and restaurants the
white-painted wooden oyster
talls. The man or woman in
‘harge arranges the row of big,
square baskets, each containing a
separate variety, nestling in their
beds of seaweed.

Good for—
There may be an odd plate of
prawns or even snails. But the





MAKE IT A

BUY BATA























opened for him first.
Unless you are a Grade A cat

Oe ee

It’s win To
Stay famous

UNLESS POLITICS

AY up top among the world’s
most famous men there are!
few to jostle year by year for ||

highest place in the minds and ||

hearts of the people. oe 1|

The people of Britain—asked ' |
this month to name their own and |.
the world’s Man of the Year at
1949—gave their votes to Mr. |
Winston Churchill. He tops both},
polls. a: dl

In the World role ne repiaces |
Harry S. Truman, who topped
1948’s_ Daily Express Poll of |
Public Opinion after his startling |
personal victory in the US.!
Presidential elections.

The voting positions of the two |
men have almost reversed in the;
past 12 months. Behind them in
the queue, the rest of the world’s
great names seem like also-rans.
Look at the lists on the right.

All the Iron Curtain praise anc
adulation on Stalin’s 70th birth-
jay does not give him more than
three per cent. support for his
third place among the world-
eaters. It moves him up merely
1 couple~of places on last year’s
list.

Quick Mover

, E only sparkle of freshness

in the people’s choice comes
in the Man of the Year in Britain.
First six names are straight from} |
the House of Commons -
Churchill, Cripps, Attlee, Bevin
Bevan, and Eden. Sir Statford
Cripps has moved up, Bevin has
moved down. 5

Aneurin Bevan is the quick
mover of the year: his four per
cent. of the votes is four times as
many as he polled last year, pull-
ing him up from tenth place te
fifth.

But Yorkshire—and the B.B.C
—have a promising lad in Wilfred



Pickles, who just got into the first
12 in the 1948 poll, but now ranks
fin seventh place.

If this poll had been for the
ship of the year, the Amethyst
would have been a favourite. As
it is, Lieut.-Commander Kerans

oyster is the heart of inis matter.
Nearby is a battery of bottles
containing the many condiments
and sauces which ingenious spirits
have dreamed up through the
years to accompany the oyster to
its manifold destiny. Little tin
signs show the prices. These fines
de claire are 1s, 94d. a dozen.
The Portugaises are 2s. 1d. And
the beautiful Belons 3s. 4d.

You can have your oysters
standing there at the kerb, or, if
it’s not too cold, at a table in the
open air. Or should you order
them as part of your restaurant
meal, the waiter nips outside and
fetches you in a plateful from the
stall. All very stimulating.

And as you undoubtedly are
aware, the oyster is “non-fatten-
ing,” “nutrition-packed,” ‘vitamin-
rich.”

—Oh yes, and appeals to eats.
Patience, Timothy, patience: The
master is about to open another
dozen for you.

—L.E.S.



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1. Winston Churchiil 1. os 2AM
2. Harry Truman ... 12% | 2. Winston Churchill 13%.
3. Marshal Stalin .... 3% | 8. General Marshall 104,
4. Clement Attlee ... 2% | 4. Count Bernadotte |. 49,
5. General Marshall 5. Marshal Stalin .... 2%
(U.S.A.) 2% | 6. Ernest Bevin .... 2% |
6. Ernest Bevin ..... 2% | 7. Sir Don Bradman 1% |
7. Marshal Tito ..... 2% = | 8. Anthony Eden .... 1g,
8. Sir Stafford Cripps 1% | 9. Clement Attlee . 1%
9, General Smuts ... 1% 10, General Smuts ., 1%
10. Lord Boyd Orr ..... 1% | 11. Duke of Edinburgh 19,
11. Robert Menzies .. 1% | 12. Sir Stafford Cripps 1
(Austraiia’s P.M.) Other nominations 7
12. Anthony Eden .... 1% No suggestion .... 39
Others ahs gO cei
Don’t know ....-- 35% | 100%, |
100% | :
1949 IN BRITAIN 1948
1. Winston Churchill 28% 1, Winston Churchill 26%
2. Sir Stafford Cripps 17% 2. Ernest Bevin sssy 8%
3. Clement Attlee ... 6% | 3. Sir Stafford Cripps 79% /
4. Ernest Bevin 5% | 4. Anthony Eden ,.,. 5%
5. Aneurin Bevan 4% | 5, Duke of Edinburgh 4%
6. Anthony Eden 4% 6. Clement Attlee ... 4%
7. Wilfred Pickles ... 3% 7. Sidney Stanley .. 3%
8. Lt.-Commander 8. Sir Hartley Shaw-
TEI, unser trots 2% CPOBS oe eee BM
9. Duke of Edinburgh 2% | 9. Denis Compton ., 2%
10. Lord Boyd Orr 1% 10. Aneurin Bevan 1%
11. John Strachey .... 1% 11. Freddy Mills .... 1%
12. Denis Compton 1% 12, Wilfred Pickles ... 1%
Others ioscan ere Other nominations 11%
Don’t know ...... 19% No suggestion .... 24%
100% 100%
we ae ee i

bursts his way up among Britain’s

men of the year—tying with}of votes each to Aneurin
another Navy man, the Duke of|the Pope, Paul Hoffman (Marshall.
Edinburgh. Aid administrator), the

man
Boyd
Denis
one per cent. of the votes.
food is a more lively topic than
sport in world affairs, Lord Boyd
Orr gets a place in the World list.

names were suggested for Britain’s
Man
Olivier, Sidney Stanley
seventh in last year’s list and no-
where

Lord Lyle, cricketer Len Hutton,}**4 , (Australia’s new Prime
comedian Ted Ray—even zither|Minister), Anthoney Eden—all
man Anton Karas. But not as|are there, with Tito joining them”
Third Man. to prove the popularity. of any”
rebel, He ousts Bradman for

Now to the World list. It is|sveenth place. ,
net easy to find a name that{ Barring the occasional soallys)

stands out against the background
of a whole year’s news.
investigators found that more than
one in three of the people they
questioned
“Don't know”,

TUESDAY, JANUARY i9, 1954

_

ugh To |








































IS YOUR BUSINESS











i949 IN THE WORLD 194

22% Harry Truman









| Those who did, gave a h

Windsor, Pandit Nehru, ‘
Lie, Mr. Vishinsky, and Israel's
President Weizmann.
Still-flowing Marshall Aid did
nothing to increase the fame, or
popularity of General George
Marshall during these past 12
months. His name has slipped
from third to fifth place, sand.
wiched between Mr. Attlee (just ”
in front) and Mr. Bevin (just

behind).
Popular Rebel
Pres, Smuts, Robert Menzies.

Two food men and one sports-
bring up the vrear—Lord
Orr, Mr. Strachey, and
Compton—each claiming
Since

After the top 12, more than 100

of the Year—Sir Laurence

(he was
now), J.

Arthur Rank,

wag, fame is reserved year
year for those who serve.

the nearer that service is wedded
‘o politics, the nearer may go the
name to the top of the list,

The poll

just gave the reply:






Seitzer ordi,
headache three ways: i) Re Es
teves pain of hea
4) Relieves di meter

scComfort of up.
Set stoma -

. 3) Quiets jumpy
nerves w "a May team up

e. Caution: Us



BOOKER’S (B’DOS) DRUG STORES LTD.
Broad Street and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)











—o.



eee Lat Oe ae ree

Pres pte >













.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 10







RATES





» 1950

PUBLIC NOTICES





NOTI
RE THE ESTATE OF
THEODORE DUDLEY SEALY
(Deceased)
WOTICE is hereby given that all per-








| FOR RENT



1 — a sons having any debt or claims against

, he er" == br Estate of Theodore Dudley Sealy,

UNCEMENTS \ ‘ eceased, late of Bank Hali Main Road,

tae per word HOUSES - the parish of Saint Michael in this

ro PROPERITY—At Station Hill. House] October 1049 cee ne ete tee ees

FORRENT » » \ es | Containing Modern conveniences, Apply | i, iculars of their claims duly at-

02 W. H. Bey part! of thi cla: S

Tne oe yan & C. M, ae Roe-! tested to the undersigned Adeline Eudora

WANTED “ ” eet. 7.1,50—4n. oar. and B Aber, = a Sealy.

} . ‘o Messrs Haynes Griffith, icitors,

LOST, yer ent word ‘a a. oan ee ~ ee | Esters seventy No. 2 Swan Street, Bridgetown, on or
Minimum charge .. ‘ , oo

PUBLIC SALES

ESTATE per agate .

10.1.50—5n.
: 10 parties entitled thereto having regard
AUCTION & REAL ee FU only to such claims of which we shall
= RNISHED FLAT—At Coral Sands,| then have had notice and we shall not
â„¢ ve ing Linen, and Silver. Good sea-| be liable for the assets or any part
bi ing for further particulars. Dial| thereof so distributed to any person of
Minimum charge = +. 1.20 1.50 -_ Alma Lashley. 10.1.49—t.f.n Whose debt or claim we shall not then
; i . _ ve notice.
sae ee tachel Ure” — House with shop at-| "And all persons indebted. to the said
{Maximum 14 aga ae ed, three dining and! estate are requested to settle their in-
| drawing rooms, electric light and all] gebtedness without delay.
PUBLIC NOTICES es M . outer offices, Black Rock, near Wavoll Dated this 6th day of January 1950.
Per agate line .. . : vet Avenue. Apply: W. A. Bibby, River ADELINE EUDORA SEALY,
Minimum charge .. oe 1,20 1,50] Road,

EVENING ADVOCATE (Monday)
per inch



THANKS

We the undersigned, beg through this
medium to express our thanks and ap-
preciation to all those who attended the
funeral, sent cards, wreaths, letters or
in any other way expressed sympathy
to us on the occasion of the death of

‘A SARJEANT.
a and F. Sarjeant, Bhat Sarjeant,
Francis, Pearl Daniel.
ae 10,1,50—2n.



We the undersigned beg through this
medium to thank all those who attend-
ed the funeral sent cards, wreaths, or
sympathised with us in our recent
beveaverent of my beloved husband
ELYN CHANDLER. :

Millicent Chandler (wife), Hartley

(sons), Ridell, Phillis, Joyee and

Chandler and Strathmore Chandler
zel Chandler (sisters).

anit 10.1.50—2n.



IN MEMORIAM

In lovi memory of our dear mother
in ELFREDA CARMICHAEL
(Aunt Sue), who depatred this life
January 10th 1948.
Two ania have passed since that sad
day
When the one we loved was called
away
She had a kindly word for each and
died
Beloved by all
Ever to be remembered by—



Blanche’ Griffith (daughter) Charles
Carmichael (Son) Myrl, Dew, Leon
Carmichael (Grand children) William

Griffith (Son-in-Law), Edna Carmichael
(Daughter-in-Law).
New York = and

Panama _ Papers.

§ please copy.

10. 1, 50—In



SALE





FOR





AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—Vauxhall 12 h.p., late 1946
Model, leather Upholstery 5 new tyres,
new batteries repainted light grey,
very good condition. Price $1,100. Phone
Peter de Verteville 4317 in office hours.

8.1.50—3n.







TRACTOR — One FARMALL “H”
Tractor very little used in Al condition.
Owner purchasing larger. Cole & Co.,
Ltd. 6.1.50—Jn.

MECHANICAL

|

TYPEWRITERS—A small quantity ot
second hand Remington Typewriters now
available. Apply: T. Geddes Grant Ltd.
Phone 4376, 8.1.50—6%



BICYCLES: Hercules Silver King, on
terms, all models, in green and in black.
A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476.

13,11,.49—t.f.n,

MISCELLANEOUS
—_—_—

FREEDOM FROM FIRE—lInstal a Fire-
Proof Safe with doors secured by
Combination lock: Suitable for office or
store. Secure your records. Contact
A. 8. BRYDEN & SONS (B’dos) Ltd.

13.12.49— Tue., Fri., Sun., — t.f.n.

Cn
fITTINGS—Galvanised pipe. All sorts
m % in, to 1% ins, Phone 4684
A. Barnes & Co. Lid.

3.12.49—t.f.n,

a
GALVANISED SHEETS—6 ft., 6% ft.,
8 ft. Apply: Auto Tyre, Trafalgar Street.
Phone 2696. 5.1.50—t.f.n.
ic iiernnaiietisththaimeentiniteeteen aaah
STREL SHEETS: 1\16,
8/6 and various sizes.
Trafalgar Street,



1/8, “4, 5/16,
Auto Tyre Co
Dial 2696.

10.1,50—t.f.n.

GLAZED TILES 6 x 6” White, Green,
and Blue, 12c each at Ralph A.. Beard’s
Show Room, Hardwood Alley. .

10,1,50—3n

BREAKFAST CARRIERS — Aluminum
Breakfast or Lunch Carriers with three
food compartments. Only $2.74 each.
G. W. Hutchinson & Co. Ltd. Dial 4222,

8.1,50—2n



seep
LUNCH TINS—Just in time for school.
Punch Tins with inner tray. Assorted
olours at only 8lc, each. G. W. Hutch-
fnson & Co. Lid. Dial 4222,
10.1.50—4n,

WASH BASINS & SINKS — at Shop
Olid prices at Ralph A. Beard's Show
Room, Hardwood Alley.
10,1,50—3n

LIPTON’S TEA - Why worry,
ve it at 34 cents per ‘lb package.
Iso tins of Toffee, Peppermints, Pears,
Nestles Cream, Macaroni and Cheese, and
R varied assortment of Sweet Biscuits.
JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS Ltd. Roe-
buck Street Dial 4335. 10.1,50—2n



we





BLANKETS—Cotton Crib Blankets 86c
ach, Woollen Crib Blankets $3.00 each,
Bingle Bed Woollen Blankets $4.32 eacn
it the Modern Dress Shoppe.

8.

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
ving credit to my wife MURIEL YARD
n Tull) as I do not hold myself
bonsible for her or anyone else con+
Ing any debt or debts in my name

is by a written order signed by me.

SYDNEY YARD,
Hindsbury Road,

St. Michael.
20.1.50—2n °

The public are hereby warned against
living credit to my wife RUBY ODESSA
DWARDS (nee Cumberbatch) as 1 do
not hold myself responsible for her or
one else contracting any debt or debts
nm My name unless by a written order
ined by me,
Fitz Roy Edwards,
Rock Hall,

St. Andrew.

0.1,50—n

wine bublie are hereby warned, against
Wing credit to my wife IONE THORPE
Jone Ertha Harte) as I do not hold
myself responsible for, her or anyone
Contracting any debt or debts in

Y‘ name unless by a written

ed by me order

WILLIAM THORPE,
Bannister Land,

0.1,50—2n St. Michael.

wums Bleed ¢::)/':":

jums, Sore
Mouth and
bU8e Teeth me
ench M:

an that you have Pyorrhea
Bhat w the pg m= rhaps some bad diseas«

r later cause your teeth





Amosa

n fr



F°? Prorrhea—Trench Mouth |









missioner. Occupation on March Ist. before the 15th day of March, 1950, after

KNIGHT'S LTD. which date we shall proceed to distribute

the assets of the deceased among the








10.1.50—2n.

FOR SALE OR RENT
Newly-built Bungalow at Perry's Gap,
juck Street. Three bedrooms. two
with inbuilt cedar presses and one with
running water. Apply to Victor E. Cob-
ham, Corner of Bank Hall and Barracks
Roads, 8.1.50—3n.

FOR SALE OR RENT—Farley Hill,
St. Peter. Old Plantation house with
large ballroom, Dining room library,
fourteen bedrooms ete. Ideal for convert-
ing to residential club. For detaiis,
Apply to Bradshaw & Company.

4.1.50,—t.£.n.

see

THE WOLD — Marine Gardens, un-
furnished. Containing three bedrooms
bath and toilet upstairs, Drawing, dining
rooms, kitchen and pantry downstairs,
Garage, servants room in yard, room for
a garden. Dial 8310. Mrs. Stuart Bynoe,

8.1.50—3n.

——

HOUSE—Furnished or unfurnished, in
Prospect, St. James. Apply: Norman D.
Ellis, “Clevedale’, Black Rock. Dial
2451. 7.1.50—2n.

—

“KRISHANA", Fontabelle, Lands End.
Apply; T. Maraj, Hindu Store, 51 Swan
Street. 29.12.49—+.f.n

SS

HOUSE—One Modern House situated
at Grazettes Road, St. Michael, con-
taining 2 bedrooms, and usual convenien-
ces. Apply D. Gaskin, Thomas
Michael,

PUBLIC

| SS
AUCTION

By instructions of the Executrix of
the Estate of C. Lashley, deceased, I will
set up for sale at Bryden Gap, Britton’s
Hill, on Thursday 12th at 1 p.m., a board
and shingle house 16 x 8 x 8 to be re-
moved. Terms cash.

R. ARCHER McKENZIE, ~
Victoria Street,





———

I will offer for sale by Public Com-
petition at my office Victoria Street, on
FRIDAY 13, at 2 p.m. the following:—

| (1) 2640 square feet of land at Mahog-
any Lane with the wall building stand-
ing thereon. House contains closed
gallery, drawing, 2 bedrooms, usual outs
offices, enclosed yard.

(2) 1 Rood LAND at Thornbury Hill,
near the road leading to Wilcox Estate
in ae Se os Christ Church, For
conditions of sale apply to: R. ARCHER
Mec KENZIE, Victoria Street. Dial 2947.

10.1,50—4n

—_———

The undersigned will offer for sale al
their Office No. 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday, 20th day of January
1950, at 2 p.m.

The messuage or Dwelling House

| called “PARKVILLE’ and the land

thereto, containing 1,829 square feet
situate at White Park opposite The Bar-
bados Foundry.

Inspection any day except Sundays
between the hours of 4 p.m. and 6 p.m
on application to the tenant Mr. Boyce,

For further particulars and conditions
of Sale, apply to:—

» CATFORD & CO.
5.1,50—8n



boats are very suitable as sail,
t, or taking boat labourers
to and from the ships, there are three
boats and the sizes are (1) one 20 x 8
overall by 5 beam (2) two 23 x 5 by 5
beam (3) third 21 x 5 by 5 beam. Your
inspection is invited any day on appli-
cation to the Harbour Police Station.
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Govt. Auctioneer,
Dist. “A”.
8.1.50—4n

THE undersigned will offer for sale
by public auction at their office, No. 17,
High Street, on Friday the 13th instant
at 2 p.m.

The dwellinghouse called LANDSMERE
COTTAGE and land containing 11,960
square feet, Constitution Road, St. Mi-
chael, The dwellinghouse comprises —
ON THE GROUND FLOOR: Drawing
room and three bedrooms (one with run-
ning water), gallery, toilet and bath.
UPSTAIRS: One very large bedroom;
IN THE BASEMENT: Dining room,
kitchen; Seperate bathroom in

Government water and electric light
installed.

Inspection any day except Sunday
between the hours of 4 p.m. and 6
p.m. on application to the owners, the
Misses Lynch on the premises.





REAw ESTATE

Offers in writing are invited for 21,150
square feet of land situate in Sobers
Lane, Bridgetown, and having a frontage
of 118 feet on Sobers Lane and at present-
under tenantry.

For further particulars apply to the
undersigned.

CARRINGTON & SEALY.
Lucas Street.
7.1,50—6n,











nd

« For Properties ete., contact

RALPH A. BEARD
A.M., Inst., B.E., F.V.A.
Auctioneer and Estate Agent
Who has numerous properties
for sale. For f er
particulars ring 3s or
call Hardwood Alley
opposite Cathedral





LIQUOR “LICENSE NOTICE

THE lication of Delphine Forde of
Beckles Road, St. Michael, for permis-
sion to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c.,
at a board and shingle shop attached to
residence neax Bay Pasture, Beckles
Road, St. Michael.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950,

To E. A. ee ra
Police Magistrate, A
Signed DELPHINE FORDE,
ger

N.B.—This - application wil con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District ‘A’, on Thurs-
day the 19th day of January 1950, at

1-o’clock, a.m.
ne B. A. McLEOD,

Police Magistrate, Dist. a Me



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of William Cadogan of
Dayrells Road, Ch. Ch, for permission |
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at
a board and shingle shop with shedrocf
attached at Dayrell's Road, Ch. Ch.
within District “A”.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950
To: E. A, McLEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”
WILLIAM CADOGAN,
Applicant



:pplication will be’ cor
ered at : eensing Court to be held
Poli District “A”, on Thursda
the 19th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock,

EB. A, MeLEOD,
Police Magistrate,
District









}
}































EVAN DAVID CARNEY SEALY,
Qualified Executors of the Estate of
THEO! DUDLEY SBALY,
Deceased



SE

NOTICE
SCHOOL.

Church Boys’

years six months and 12 years
be chidren of Parents iving

cumstances.

will be held by the Headmaster on Fri
day, 13th. January, 1950., at the Boys
Foundation School at 9.45 a.m.
Forms, can
the Secretary, must be
: woemedin, im oa
on . January.
W. H. ar, en
Body, ver Road,

batten: St. Michael.
4.1.50—4n
—__———__.__

NOTICE

SCHOOL.

place on Tuesday, 17th. January 1950
at 9.45 a.m. There will be an entrance
examination for New Pupils on Monday
16th. January at 9.45 a.m., when the
Parents may interview the Headmaster.
New candidates are requested to
bring their Birth Certificates and re-
commendations from former school.
W. H. ANTROBUS, Secretary
Governing Body, Hilton, River Road,

St. Michael.
5.1,50—6n
Eee
LODGE SCHOOL

New Boys who wish to enter the School
in the January Term commencing on
Tuesday, January 17th 1950, must present
themselves for examination at the Schoo!
at 10 a.m. om Monday, January 16th 1950.

Boarders are expected for dinner on
Monday the 16th.

CYRIL E. STOUTE,
Sec. and Treas, Gov. Body,
Lodge School.
6.1.50—3n.



OFFICIAL NCTICE

BARBADOS.

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF

APPEAL
(Equitable Jumsdiction)

ELOISE M RILEY Plaintiff,

HERBERT BARNETT (Qualified Exor.
Est. GEORGE BARNETT Dec'd

Defendant.

IN pursuance of an order in this
Court in the above action made on the
28th day of April 1949, I give notice to
all persons having any estate, right or
interest in or any lien or incumbrance
affecting all that certain piece or parcel
of land situate at Venture in the parish
of Saint John in this island containing
by admeasurement one rood nineteen
perches abutting and bounding on
lands of Milly Brathwaite on lands of
Easy Hall Plantation on lands of Eme-
line Nicholls and on the public road
to bring before me an account of theit
said claims with their witnesses, docu-
ments and vouchers, to be examined by
me on any Tuesday, or Friday between
the hours of 12 (noon) and 3 o'clock in
the afternoon, at the Office of the Clerk
oi the Assistant Court of Appeal at the
Court House Bridgetown, before the
llth day of January 1950, in order that
such claims may be ranked according
to the nature and priority thereof re-
Spectively; otherwise such Persons will
be precluded from the benefit of the
Said Decree, and be deprived of all
claim on or against the said property.

Claimants are also notified that they
must attend the said Court on Wednes-
day the llth day of January 1950, at
iC o'clock a.m, when their said claims
will be ranked,

Given under my hand this 4th day of
November 1949,

A. W. HARPER,

Clerk of the Assistant Court of Appeal.



OFFICIAL SALE

APPEAL
(Equitable Jurisdiction)

ELOISE MILLICENT RILEY Plaintiff.

HERBERT BARNETT (Qualified Exer.
Est. GEORGE BARNETT Dec'd

Defendant.

NOTICE is hereby given that by vir-
tue of an Order of the Assistant Court
of Appeal dated the 28th day of April
1949 there will be set up for sale to the
highest bidder at the Office of the
Clerk of the Assistant Court of Appeal
at the Court House, Bridgetown, be-
tween the hours of 12 (noon) and 2
o'clock in the afternoon on Friday 13th
day of January 1950

All that certain piece or parcel of
land situate at Venture in the parish of
Saint John in this island containing by
admeasurement one rood nineteen per-
ches abutting and bounding on lands of
Milly Brathwaite on lands of Easy Hall
Plantation on lands of Emeline Nicholls
and on the public road
and if not then sold the said property
will be set up for sale on every suc-
ceeding Friday between the same hours
until the same is sold for a sum not
less than £62. 10. 0.

Dated this 4th day of November 1949,

W. HARPER

a. W. .
Clerk of the Assistant Court of Appeal.
5,11.49—3n

Se
NOTICE
LOST SHARE CERTIFICATES

NOTTCE is hereby given (hat A. H.
Ward, Executor to the Estate of ENOS
CAIN WARD and the Estate of WILLIAM
WARREN WARD, Deceased, has made
application for the issue of Share Cer-
tificates in place of the following Share
Certificates which have been lost:—

Certificate No. 207 10 Shares No. 9779

to 9788.

Certificate No. 226 10 Shares No. 10719
to 10728.

Certificate No. 613 2 Shares No. 20553
to 20554.

Certificate No. 614 2 Shares No, 20555
to 20556.

Certificate No. 982 1 Share No. 25605.

Certificate No. 983 1 Share No. 25606.

If no objection to this application ir
made by the 20th January 195, new

Certificates will be issued.

By Order of the Board of Directors.
THE BARBADOS CO-OPPRATIVE.
COTTON FACTORY LTD. '
E.

A. CLARKE,
Secretary.
10.1.50—3n.

——





TUITION

Mrs. R. A. HEARD, A.L.C.M,
(Bronze, Silver, Gold, Medalist)
Will accept a small munber of
Kindergarten Pupils at ‘Maristow’
Maxwell Coast, ages 3%-—5 years.
Also Tuition in Speech Training.
For further particulars, ring 8402.
10.1. 50—3n

















FOUND

DOG—One Brown and White Bull Dog. |

2r can communicate with E. D }
erts, Roberis Manufac. Co. Lid., ¢ |
Hili—Dial 4425.



ernment

CHRIST CHURCH BOYS’ FOUNDATION
The reopening of School will take

7.1.50—4n.

{

CHRIST CHURCH BOYS’ FOUNDATION

There are one or more vacant Founda-
tion Scholarships, tenable at the Christ

Founda
didates must be between the ages of 10
"the
parish and who are in straitened cir-

An Examination for these candidates

be obtained from
filled in and re-

|

| LOST & FOUND |

10. 1, 50,—2n |
















BARBADOS ADVOCATE

!

| WANTED





ss

—
SHORTHAND-TYPIST—Christian pre-
ferred. Apply in writing to Box 57,
Bridgetown, stating salary expected.

8.1. 50—3n.

—
BOOKKEEPER/ACCOUNTANT: Serv-
ices of experienced bookkeeper/A®count-











NOTICE.

PARISH OF ST. MICHAEL

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at the holding by me of the
Election of Members to serve in the Vestry of the parish of Saint
Michael, on Monday, the 9th day of January, 1950, at the Parochial
Buildings, Cumberland Street, the following is the result: —







ant required in Barbados. Aavertioers’ VOTES
for ability up to quater thal balance| 1. ERNEST DEIGHTON MOTTLEY ....... visceice ama
ness nna “Dowledge Dry Goods busi-) 2. THOMAS WASHINGTON MILLER .............+++00) 568
considered assets. Isusines hours. oa 3. HAROLD ATHELSTON TUDOR ..........cc..sseseee a
weekdays 8—12.30 Saturdays. Write 4. FRED CARLTON GODDARD ................
confidence ; ils ,
eppointments and salary’ desired: FO'| 5. VICTOR WALLACE, AUSTIN CHASE... 520
Box 144" Bridgetown. 7-150 | 6. FREDERICK DRURARD McD. SYMMONDS .......... 517
cae nanat fin Be Service man age 30. 7. ARTHUR SPENCER BRYDEN ............ sho Ce ent be Cllice: Mise 8. CHARLES CARLTON BROWNE ................sss0e
Po! . Writ Box BSB. C/
Advocate Advig. Dept, ~"1,h40-an.| 9° BRUCE ARUNDALE WEATHERHEAD ........@..... 505
OCCUPATION as house Servant or|10. VALENCE CHENERY GALE ..............cceccsseeee 50)
Cook. iene a Oras, tne ce 11. CHRISTOPHER AUGUSTUS BRAITHWAITE .. 498
tw tires 38. AUBMEY RUSSELL TOPIN....................... an
YORUM DART tec ae anes | 20). .DUDLEY GORDON USACOCK. Jur... ....... Broad
aire Tim te Gott ot, work, 14, TREVOR BOWRING ........... es Ae am
Typing An eieten of Shorthand andi is. EUSTACE CONNELL BETHELL ...................e
. ted | 19-
cpundenialy "Apply "by eter e7e 16. JOHN KENNETH CHARLTON GRANNUM .........e6 425
Ss focal’ ice. ions to
be typea ell fed in and were duly declared elected. '
handwriting, “OP ow" 27. JOHN WINSTON HEWITT ..............cccccceceece - 421
os Dated this 9th day of January, 1950. ‘
F. J. COLE, ,

MISCELLANEOUS

TWO (2) GARDEN TORTOISES
Young ones. Please apply X : * peve-

cate Office,



TENDERS
TAMARINDS at Graem Hall Plantation,
Christ Church. Apply by letter or
person. F. S. Storey, Manager.
10.1.50—3n.

NE

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
THE application of Francis F. Elias

og Hill, St,

Bea eet? Sell Spirits, Malt Liquors.
at a board galvanized
Webbeck, Black Rock,
Dated this 9th day of January 1950.
To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate,
District “A”,

BF, Py oe
nt.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A”, on Thursday
the 19th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock,

a.m,
B. A. MALEOD,
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
10.1.50~In



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Sydney LL. Niles
of Eagle Hall St. Mic ye ission
to sell Spirits, Malt quors &c. at a
board and shingle shop at Eagle Hall,
St. Michael.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950.

: BE. A. McLEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”,
SYDNEY L. NILES,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A’, on Thursday
the 19th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock,

a.m,
B. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
10.1,.50—In

ee
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of J. Kerr Johnston
& Co., Ltd. of James St. City for per-
mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &e.,
&c., at Top floor of a 2 storey wail build-
ing in James Street, City.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950.
To: H. A, TALMA, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”,
R. HOPE,
for Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A”, on iy
the 19th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock,

a.m, .
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate,
District “A’’.
10.1.50—In c

eee

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Samuel T, Small.
of Bay Street, St. Michael for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors &c., at a
board and shingle shop attached to resi-
dence at St.eHill and Tweedside Roads,
St. Michael.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950.

: KE. A. McLEop, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”,
S. T. SMALL,
Applicani

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A’, on Thursday
the 19th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock,

a.m,
BE. A. McL&op,
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
10.1,50—1n

ee eetseasisaeeseeesienenatseees
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

'

THE application of Cleo Clarke of
Roberts Tenantry, St. Michael, for per-
mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
&c., at a board and shingle shop attach-
ed to residence at Roberts Tenantry,
St. Michael.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950,
To: E. A, McLEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”,
CLEO CLARKE,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be ‘held at
Police Court, District “A”,
the 19th day of January 1950
a.m,

on Thursday
at 11 o'clock,

B. A. M OD,

Police Magistrate,
District “A”.

10.1,50—I1n ,



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Beatrice Henry of
Suttle Street, City for permission
sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at bot-
tom floor of a 2 storey wall building
in Suttle Street, City.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950,
To: H. A, TALMA, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”.
BEATRICE HENRY,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be, consid-
cred at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A”, on Thursday
the 19th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock,

a.m,
H. A, TALMA,
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
10.1, 50—In

ARE YOU EAGER TO

FURNISH WELL

AND SAVE ?

Then you are eager to..
COME and SEE our variety
es

FURNITURE

NEW and RENEWED
in Mahogany, Cedar, Birch,
Deal and Pine

For Your HOME & OFFICE

L.S. WILSON

Trafalgar St. -:- Dial 4069,














"Sheriff & Returning Officer.
PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH

Return of persons elected as Vestrymen for the Parish of Christ
Church this 9th day of January, 1950.

1. MR. GEORGE CHRISTOPHER WARD .... Received 327 votes
2. MR, FRED CARLTON GODDARD ..... ; a 319
3. MR. CHARLES STRAUGHAN MacKENZIE a 319 =}
4. MR. HARRY ST. GEORGE WARD ...... s 311
5. Hon. ARCHIBALD GRAHAM

Are eS MAA, sda kes sececss oe * 297
6. MR, CHARLES MANNING DRAYTON .. ” 283
7. MR. JOSEPH EVAN WEBSTER ........ ” 20 —(,
8. MR, VICTOR. WALLACE AUSTIN CHASE a 278
9. MR. CHARLES BERESFORD BRANDFORD » 268 Ci,
10. MR. GIDNEY CUTHBERT ASHBY ...... ” 264 =(,,
11. MRS. EDNA EVELYN TALMA .......... ” 263 =,
12. MR. UMBERTO JOSEPH PARRAVICINO ” 253 Ci,
13. MR. HUGH FODERINGHAM GARNES .. » 251 ,
14. MR. ARTHUR MacCAULEY JONES .... ” 241
15. MR. COURTENEY IFILL .............. ‘ * 229. —(,,
16. MR. MORRELL EWART R. BOURNE .... » 222 ,

I hereby declare the above sixteen persons duly elected.

17. MR. WILLIAM TRAVERS WATSON .... Received 161 votes
18. MR, ARTHUR NOVELL CHADDERTON ” GO %
19. MR. DAVID CLIFFORD DRAYTON ..... ” 149,

Sgd. VERNON J. WILLIAMS,
Sheriff.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES.

LAND ACQUISITION ACT 1949
(Notice required by Section 3)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that it appears to the Goyernor-
in-Executive Committee that the land described in the Schedule hereto
and situate at Paynes Bay in the parish of Saint James (part of the
land of a place generally known as “Derricks”) is likely to be needed
for purposes which in the opinion of the Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee are public purposes, namely as a site bounding on the sea on
which fishing boats can be hauled up and on which shelters may be

THE SCHEDULE ‘

A parcel of land at Paynes Bay in the parish of Saint James con-
taining 7,710 square feet bounding on the north on lands of B. H,
Moore and others, on the east on the Public Road running from Hole-
town to Bridgetown, on the south on other lands of B. H. Moore and
others, and on the west on the sea.

Dated this 6th day of January, 1950, at the Publi Buildings in

i in the Island of Barbados,
the City of Bridgetown a
Acting Colonial Secretary.





INCOME TAX NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Income Tax returns are re-

quired from every married man whose income is $1200.00 per annum
or over, from every other person whose income is $720.00 per
annum or over and from companies whether incorporated or unin-
corporated, societies, persons engaged in any trade or profession, and
owners of land or property whether a taxable income has acc:tued
during the past year or not.

Forms of Return my be obtained from the Income Tax Depai't-
ment AFTER THE 1ST DAY OF JANUARY, 1950, and the forns
duly filled in must be delivered to me on or before the following
respective dates;

1. Returns of persons whose books were closed on the 3lst
day of December, 1949, on or before the 31st day of March,
1950.

2. Returns of persons whose principal place of business is not
situate in the island on or before the 30th day of June, 1960,

3. Returns of all persons, on or before the 31st of January,
1950,

F, CLAIRMONTE
Commissioner of Income Tax and Death Duties.
NOTE: Any person failing to make his return within the due

date will be liable to a fine not exceeding £100 and
not less than £2 and will be prosecuted unless a satis-
factory reason is given,
10,1.50,—19n, i
SS ASL
POLICE NOTICE
At about 4.30 p.m. on the”>fternoon of the 2nd January, a man
Was stabbed in the back in Queen’s Park by an unknown person.
Will anyone who can give the Police ANY information concern-
ing this incident kindly report to the CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION
DEPARTMENT.
R. T, MICHELIN, Colonel,
Commissioner of Police.
Police Headquarters,
6th January, 1950.

7.1,50—2n,

Be Wise...
oe ADVERTISE



BOXING

Middle-weight Championship
KID RALPH

vs.
PETER JACKSON









IMPORTANT NOTICE
e

ON and after Monday 9th Janu-
ary the Gas supply will be
off on all districts from Gasworks
to Top Rock each day (Saturday
and Sunday excluded) from 1.15
P.m,. to approx, 3.30 p.m. until
‘the work of clearing Gas Main is
completed.

TENDERS are invited for
1950 for the exclusive right
to sell Liquor, Refreshments
ete., at the Garrison Savan-
nah on Race Days.

NEW ARRIVALS

Tins Macaroni and Cheese
Bottles Peanut Butter





” or poene
” ea oe Tenders must be forward-
- oo Dressing ed in gealed env.
Tins Foanata marked “Tender for Liguor
Bottles Tomato Ketchups and ts” and ad-

Tins Tomato Soup
Tins Apricots
Bottles Guava Jelly.

dressed to the Secretary not
later than noon on Saturday
14th January, 1950.

€ The Committee does not
bind itself to accept the
Stu art & S$ ampson highest or any other Tender.
: G. A. LEWIS,
LTD.

Headquarters for Best RUM

















QUICKLY—
LIKE MAGIC

*Mentholatum’ is the wonderful
soothing healing balm. If you have
awful pains in your head or body,
if you have a nasty cold or chill, if
you are tormented by skin trouble,
you need ‘ Mentholatum’. It is so

easy to use and acts like magic.

JUST RUB ITON

RUB it where the Pain is and the
pain is ended,
RUB it well into the chest and

put a little in the nose
and the Cold soon goes.

RUB it on your skin and your

Skin gets better.

‘Mentholatum’ acts quickly—there

is nothing like it.

Get a jar or tin to-day, but make
sure you get genuine *Mentholatum’,
(Ask for ‘MEN-THO-LAY-TUM')

PAGE SEVEN





-RUB IT HERE

ee

-RUB IT THERE _
-IT BENEFITS YOU
EVERYWHERE



In Tins and Jars.
The Mentholatum Co., Ltd. (Estd. 1889), Slough, England.

Also at Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A,

SHIPPING NOTICES





MONTREAL, AUSTEALIA NEW
ZEALAND LINE LIMITED
(MLA.N.Z.) LINE)

M.S. “PORT PIRIE” is scheduled to
sail Geelong 16th December, Melbourne.
Dec. 24th, Brisbane December jist Syd
ney January 4th arriving Trinidad about
end January 1950.

M.S. “KAIPAKI" is scheduled to sail
Adelaide December 28th, Port Pirie De-
cember 3ist, Burnie January 7th, Mel-
bourne January 2ist, Sydney January
48th, Brisbane February 2nd, arriving
Trinidad about 4th March.

These vessels have ample space for
chilled, Hard Frozen and General Cargo.

Cargo accepted on Through bills 0)
ading with transhipment at Trinidad for
dritish Guiana, Barbados, Windward &
eward Islands.

For further particulars apply —
FURNESS WITHY & Co., Ltd.

Agents, TRINIDAD.
DaCOSTA & Co Ltd.
Agents. BARBADOS.



\ s
.



CANADIAN

SOUTHBOUND
Name of ship

S.S. “ALCOA PEGASUS”
8.8, “ALCOA PLANTER”

ee

Sailing every two

Made only by e



The Sch. “PHILLIP H, DAVID.

SON” will accept Cargo” ani
Passengers for Demerara, Sailing
Thursday 12th Januory 1950,

The Sch. “LAUDALPHA’ Will
accept Cargo and Passengersfor
ai Lucia, Sailing To-dayeed@th
nst.

The M.V. “CARIBBEE” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St,

Kitts.
Friday 13th inst,

The M.V. “DARRWOOD” will
accept Cargo and Passengers: for

Sailing

St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba, Date of sailing to be
given, ~

oe

B.W.I. Schooner Owners’ Associa:
tion (Inc.) Tel. 4047, ‘
6th January, 1950,

_—



SERVICE
Sails Arrives
Halifax Barbados
Decr, 29th January 9th
Jany. 9th January 20th
weeks,

NEW YORK SERVICE 3
8.8. BYFJORD sails from New York 13th, arrives in Barbados 22nd,

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

S.S. ALCOA ROAMER sails from Ne

15th January,
S.Ss.
30th January,

Ce ee

Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — Canadian Service
ROBERT THOM LTD. -- New York and Gulf Service



| ANEROID BAROMETERS ~

}

ROBERTS & Co

on,

Dial 3301

METAL CASH BOXES, AIR TRAVEL SUIT CASES, DESK BLOTTERS,
COCKTAIL SHAKERS with INSET STRAINERS, PLATE GLASS .AND
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JOHNSON’S STATIONERY & HARDWARE.

a Tose <

A NEW. SHIPMENT .
‘HI GRADE—HEAVY DUTY BATTERIES:
| FULLY GUARANTEED- GENEROUS PRICES

MORRIS SERVICE STATION.
H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD,

maf

a

BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY |
CORPORATION 1D.









> Abcoa Stean — Co.

w Orleans 30th Devtember, arrivés

ALCOA RUNNER sails from New Orleans 14th January, arriving

=

a


















~

eds keke ee bere 2h





A
pris
e"{

r
34
fate
4
ey
;
}
‘i
e



Metioreen

EO

PAGE EIGHT



See ee

Cricket 3

Footbal, Racing

Sports



U.K. Cricket

Supremacy

Questioned | {

By VERNON MORGAN
LONDON, Jan. 8.
- ‘The 1950 cricket season is still
‘distance away and the at-
r m-of the British spoeeng
public is thinking more of soc
sup~ties which get into their
Srlae vhis week end.
- At. the same time there is an
unusual amount of talk about the
summer game at vhe present mo-
ament- because of the many articles
being written on “Fifty Years of
Spoit’M Britain”, this being ‘he
halt-cetitury year.
“* Wrong Century
“Mostly it is not very compli-
One writer saysg tha:
3 cricket is still trying to
live ix the wrong century. All
must’ agree that cricket in Britain
today is not what it was and
that the British have most de-
finitely los’ their earlier supre-
Jmacy to the “streamlined” Aus-
tralians who do appear to move
with the times.
It is being the

suggested vo

British that if they wish to be- |
leading |
cricket nation they should moulca ;

come once again the
themselves on the Australian pat-
tern in many respects.

“British Played To Death

Of the major cricketing coun-}

Vries only British players may be
said to be played to death. Only
the British are stale. In Australia
they have. their Sheffield Shield |
matches, in Souvh Africa the Cur- |
rent Cup, in New Zealand the
Plunket Shield, and in India and
the West Indies their provincial
and inter-island matches.
tournaments do not en-
tail play day after day for more
than four months on end without
a break. They do allow teams
going on a tour in the off season
Yo look upon the tour with enthu-
siasm and approach it with fresh-
ness energy. ‘
oi Enough Cricket
Indeed in some of these coun-
tries they feel they do not get
enough cricket. The remedy is
drastically to alter the whole of
the County league programme.
Some suggest making two divi-
siong and playing matches on the
Soccer league principle. Others
think the maiches might be cut
to not more than one a week.
But it is not going to be easy
to gev the M.C.C. to revolutionise
the whole of the old cricket sys-
Phere are more conserva-
tives in the pavilion at Lords
than in any other building of
Similar proportions in the world.
Another idea which would un-
Westionably result in a_ better
British team. for the all important
‘matches would be to take all
those chosen out of county cricket
for at least a week, give them a
Special manager - coach to look
after them and lev them prepare
diligently for the task in hand.
M.CC, Should Copy
The M.C.C. could well take a
Ieat out of the book of the Eng- |
lish Football Association who at
least see that the men to repre
pent England are given every |
Opportunity to be fresh and eager
for the big task in hand

In their talks about cricket
one of the chief topics for dis-
cussion is the next Captain of
England. Freddie Brown took
ever from George Mann lasi'|
year and it is thought probable
that Norman Yardley, the cap-
— of Yorkshire, will be re-

\y called.

Yardley knows the Reni
lians. He was Captain of Eng-
Jand when Sir Donald Bradman
brought his men over here two
years ago. Thus he would be a

good man to skipper England
during the coming season
against vhe West Indians in

preparation for the tour of Aus-
tralia next winter
ers, apart from Brown,
spoken of as “possibles” are Wil-
fred Wooller, the former Welsh
SER omational of Glamorgan,
and "R@g. Simpson of Notts, who
headed the Test batting averages
against. the New Zealanders last
season.—Reuter

Basket Ball
Starts February

The-Committee of Management
of the Basket Ball Association
has decided to start the Basket
Ball season from the last week in
February. Clubs are asked to
send in their entries with their
affiliation fee to the Secretary,
A. W. Symmonds, Bank Hall Road
by the end of this month Sec-
retaries of affiliated clubs will be
notified of the date of the Annual
General Meeting -which wil! be
held in February.



ethey'll | Do it ‘Every



HEN DRIVING IN THE CITY:<.
IT REALLY IS A PITY-~"THE EXHAUST
FUMES NAUSEATE SUBURBAN JOE...

—



4

=



MONOXIDE! I CAN'T WAIT
es) TO GET OUT TO MY LITTLE
\. PLACE IN THE COUNTRY:

7!



i...

THE POLO TEAM as they left t

\

yesterday morning, bound for

Elliot Williams, Mark Edghill, Mfs. Michelin, Mr. H
Michelin, Col

and Lee Deane, behind
John Marsh and Mrs

Mrs

Dowding.

—-%
!

Aussies Rout
Kast Province

F eB
or 137
PORT ELIZABETH. Jan, 9. |
Eastern Province needed 187}
runs with 9 second inning wie |
1 hand to avoid an innings)
aefeat when play closed on the!
second day of their match against |
he Australian tourists.
Forced to follow on after
biying to the Australian total of |
418 with 137, Province were 94}
for 1 their second innings, |
when stumps were drawn today
rhe match ends tomorrow,
Accurate bowling by the Aus-
tralian attack completely sub-
jued the Province batsmen, who
‘nally collapsed against some
icry bowling with the new ball
by Ray Lindwall and Billi John-
ston, who had spells of 4 for 8
and 4 for 13 respectively.
Lindwall’s final figures were 5
for 25 and Bill Johnston claimed
4 for 16. The top scorer for the
Province was Ken. Dimbleby
who batted 3% hours for his 54,
which ineluded 3 fours
Forced to follow on 281 runs
behind, Eastern Province made a





kets

e- |
re-

in

| good start in their second innings.

Ron Draper and Ken Dimbleby
featured in the highest opening |
partnership against the Austra-
lians. Dimbleby made 42 before
being separated by Noblet.

The previous best opening
stand was 50 by Eric Rowan and
Owen Wynne in the second
innings of the first Test at Johan
nesburg which was won b the
Australians. Dimbleby made 4?
before being caught at the wicket

hl cc ee ma

am ELST

T

Yachting,



he terminal building at Seawell

fenezuela. Left to right are:
Dowding
Michelin (Capt.),

|

|
|
|

Poio Team
Leaves |

Five members tae
Polo Club, Col. R. 1 Michelin, |
(Capt.), Elliot Williams, Mark |
Edghill, Lee Deane, John Marsh
and their Manager Mr. Herbert |

OL Barbados

>”

BD \ R b
oR
canis

Boxing, cte,







“STANDARD. BRIDGE

The ONLY
artificial bid |

by M. HARRISON-GRAY

NY call that does not carry

its natural significance is a
blot on the bidding landscape.
Standard bridge employs one
artificial bid only—a necessary
evil which, as we shall see, is
but a very slight taint on a
natural system.

Hands 50 strong in themselves
that game can be made under
their own power occur about
once in every 100 deals. But itis
as well to have adequate
machinery to deal with these
important hands when they do
turn up.

The first step is to have a bid
at one’s disposal that will compel
the partner to keep the bidding
open (even though he holds
nothing of value) until the best
game or slam contract has been
rea¢ned. At the same time the
call must allow the maximum
bidding space for the exchange
of information.

In the early days of Contract
Ely Culbertson tried to solve the
problem with his Forcing Two
convention. The player who
picked up a hand strong sous
in itself to suggest a probable
game was supposed to o with
a forcing-to-game call of Two m
his best suit.

This meant that the openang
One-bid in the Culbertson system
had an enormous range. with
result that the responder had to
keep the bidding open on the
most tenuous values for fear of
missing a game. But if spent
happened to have a minimum
One-bid, disaster was apt to
follow. Responder was always
on_the horns of a dilemma,

It was to overcome this
ridiculous state of affairs that
the forcing-to-game bid of 2
Clubs was adopted in this
country. The call is artificial,
for it bears no relation to the
actual holding in the Club suit;
put it has this great advantage,
that it frees the opening bids of
2 Spades, 2 Hearts and 2
Diamonds for use with their
ral meaning.
ng bid of 2 Clubs,
e special situation, is
lly forcing to game,
weak the responde
With less than one an



.





may be.
a half high card tricks, he must



Dowding with Mrs, Dowding and |
Mrs. Michelin lett Seawell yester- |
Gay morning by B.W.I.A’s Flight |

383 for Venezuela They expe
| to return on January 21
Their visit however though |

primarily to play Polo will serve as
one of the biggest free advertise
ments the Island has ever had in





| this very rich S An i

public Barbacdk \ h is
Browing in popularity with Vene
zuelans as a haven tor a holiday,

for the next twelve days, will be
widely adveriised throughout the
Republic, and many who have
never heard of our Island, will
be reading about Barbados and the
Barbadians. Col. Michelin told the
Advocate that the tour will be
given the utmost publicity in tne
Venezuelan press
Every Day
As far as the games were con-
cerned they were looking forward
very much to the tour and besides
the three test matches to
played, they would be playing
polo practically every day; some
of the matches would. start as}
early as 9 a.m, |
!
|
'

be

About thirty relations and Pol
fans were at the Airport t !
the team good luck, and as the
plane took off aud quickly became
a tiny speck in the sky, those who]
were left behind i}
watched it disappear, some
ladies with handkerchiefs Wipir

wi

waved

off Noblet. Draper was undefeated away tears, so great wa
at the close with 46, Noblet's| emotion They, and all lovers of
wicket was gained at a persona!| the Sport in Barbados, eager|]s
cost of 13 runs. await news of the team’s succe
Reuter | ‘n the matches to come |
wg PRES ere se Among those at the Airpot
¢; monwealth seeing them off were
; Mr. and Mrs Roy Gill, Mr
V. Edgnill, Mr. J. B. Marsh, Mi

TT e° e |
Wins Again
JAMSHEDPUR, Jan, 9
Scoring their first win in
Zonal fixtures the Commonwealth
cricketers today deteated Eas
Zone by 10 wickets, a day aheac
of schedule
Final scores were: Common-
wealth 286 and 63; East Zone 225

and 120.
Tribe, slow left arm bowler,
took 7 wickets for 61 puns in

Zone's second innings, and was the
chief factor in his. team’s victory
The East Zone’s overnight not
out batsmen had wiped off the
arrears before Tribe came _ into
the attack to cause complete
collapse

There was no excuse for the
batting failure, for the perfect
matting surface was unaffected by
the two days’ play. Tribe, how-
ever, was at his best and his
figures today were accomplished in





ane
+. MLE











S GhsOu,







| sive

‘18 THE LIFE NO
NOTHIN’ BUT GREEN GRASS/
YOU CITY GUYS DON’T

Mary Marsh, Mrs. Elliot William
and tamily, Mrs, Jack Kirton, The
Deane Family, Mr. O. H
Major M. L
Victor Weekes, Mr. Lisle
Mr. Trevor Davis, M1

Belmar and many others

ee
21.1 overs, six

Johnsor

Davi
Alfre

of which ere
maidens
His match figures were 11 fox
102. Highest scorer for East Zone
was §S. Bannerjee, the captain,}

who made 35 in 113 minutes with
5 fours as his best hits.

Bill Alley and Fred Freer
opened the Commonwealth second
innings and rattled up 50 in 25
minutes Another single cam
and then Alley, with two succes-
sixes off Girdhari,
victory.

This was
(irst win’ in
matches with
zones

the Commonwealth's |
the Zonal fixtures
North and West}
been’ drawn

—Reuter. |

each having





Â¥! THis
TRAPRIC...

ht. Ve

RD, Skewes-Cox, Mr.| °

brought | N

as a first step give a conven-
tional response of 2 Diamonds.
On subsequent rounds both

opener and responder are free
to bid their hands naturally,




wo Clubs should never be
opened, except on very rare
oceasions where the long suit
happens to be Clubs, with less
than five quick -cicks. It must

be borne in mind, however, that
five quick tricks are not in them-
selves sufficient to Suarantee @
game; the hand should be of




and solidity tnat a

ntract can feariessly be

i “nh, even opposite a
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n Express service.











UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF

EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT





| well
|
|

\DOS ADVOCATE

To Find The Missing Link | Wirt BACKACHE

ae
em SE

es

THE 324-TON RESEARCH SHIP WILLIAM SCORESBY in Shad-
The vessel is under the command of Lieutenant
Comnginder A. F. Macfie, R.N.R. and the chief scientists aboard
are Dr. T. J. Hart, Mr. R. Clarke and Mr. R. I, Currie, all mem-

Basin.



IT DI OT



bers of the National Institute of Oceanography.

from London last week.

gest fish trip, the longest fishing
line, the biggest fish hook and!
deepest trawl ever made were}
21
ten

taken three scientists and
crew men on a 25,000 mile,
months research cruise.

Off the shore of East London,
South Africa, the seas’ missing
link is believed still, to exist.

Ronald I. Currie, the 21-year- |
old biologist, who is making the





pm ieacenmenasantice

England in Tudor Times DONALD WILES,



Q
o,

B.A., B.L.S. (12) Thurs., Jan, 12
| History of European
Painting .. NEVILLE CONNELL,
M.A. (8) Friday, Jan. 1
| Earlier History of Bar-
| hados .- E. M, SHILSTONE,

M.A.

} :
British and American
Constitutions ° }

| English Poetr:
Hi

story of Barbados,
1794— 1902

English History and
' ;

Literature

FREE

\UBREY DOUGLAS-

FOR BACH COURSE:

(5) Mon., Jan. 16

W. B. CHENERY,

(6) Tues., Jan. 24.

'{ POPHAM (6) Wed., Jan. 18,

I ‘ (10) M Ja 0

60 Cts,

H. A. VAUGHAN (10) Friday, Jan 20,

_ 24 Men Are Sailing
| 25,000 Miles

LONDON (By Mail). |

ATTEMPTS to trap the “missing link of the sea”—the
cavern-mouthed Latimeria chalumnae, thought to have
become extinct 50 million years ago—is being made by
the British research ship William Scoresby which sailed

What is claimed to be the big- | research work at Oxford before

joining the institute.

remain aboard for the whole trip.

Millions of creatures too tiny to
loaded aboard the ship which has | be seen will also be fished for with
| bottles at
with delicate
levels above the 18,000 feet depth.

SSSI



the 18,000

silken





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5.00 Museum

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ee

COTTON PLAIDS
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TREEN, BLUE

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feet level,

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—LN.S.

seahiaueie
LENIN NC NCE



Rediffusion Programmes
.p Ye trip, can identify the Latimeria &
s & a
\ chalumnae. | ee €
oe One. was caught off East Lon- TUESDAY JANUARY 10, 1950 | Jo.
EDITOR don by & trawler in 1998 accord |i} | oneemeramons Wt Lrosperous
ing to Currie and it was hardly tt Se meee ice i&
; yd to be alone. 7.30. 8.00 Morning Special | ee
4 “The trawler men had the sense 9.00— 9.15 Dance Music
Answers Question aay : 7 ‘ o 9.30-—-11.00 Closed &
to send it to a South African mu 11,00—11.15. Programme Parade |
, en seum, There they dtuffed jthe 11.15—11.40 Music for Breakiast x
1, When Johnny Morris skin and threw away the all- Time Listening eCW Car
joined Derby C ounty important insides.” , 12.30— 1.15 Orchestal Concert | ee
from Manchester Unit- r : > Ms 2 7 es Music = 2 j &
. . > > = 2.3— 3.0 n Chancery Ep :
ed at the end of last Remote Chance 4.154 4.45 Picture Parade <
season the County were Currie, youngest of the scien- 5.15— 5.30 Programme Sum-
reported have paid . . se eke 2 4 *y . mary and Interiudc gee OF
eee COR A I sts on the staff of the National 6.00— 6.30 Children’s ie IS THE SINCERE WISH
mm carat , Institute of Oceanography, said Programme |
<. Nort ptonshire that the chances of finding the fish §.30— 7.00 Request Time i
3 Hel ae . 7.15— 7.30 Songtime presented 8
‘ H ee a were remote, but the specially- by Stokes & Bynoe
2© 1 I an amateur : : . 8 ¢ 5 : * i f
: ar designed fish tra Y 1.30— 7.45 Dick Haymes $ (| age ° : .
5) ee 4 nocae tee the on d fish trap might turn the 0 5 Dick Hay mies Show & q OLLINS DRUG STORES
Der tn 7 7.45— 8.00 Interlude _ | ee
Dr. N. A. Mackintosh, director | > on 5 w
oO wppeared in : 4 . _ 8.00— 8.15 Local News : een i aiaiiatai lie . nee
© erections, gppecred in 1 or research behind the tip spon: cco von |} AN ORONO OCR OCR R CoCr gE gE
™ sored by ~ institute, designed 8.15— 8.20 neoc - bi {PPP OSSD SFT SPSS SSSOPIOPV OS OOSS oO ry ‘
the new fish trap. psented : ¥ me
é 7 = presented by City
i “Until 1938, that fish was known Garage x 1
> ;only as a fossil. And today we’ve §.30— 8.45 Strange as it seems g ( :
1B... rO throw a lot of light on evolution,” 8.45— 9.00 Eddy Arnold pre % 4
UESDAY 10, 1950. he declared. sented by Lever st
| The William Scoresby was itis x
\ H Or , ye CeUy as U.S.A ‘ ‘kK 'NY in O ; .
( Speaking, | scheduled to sail late in December News 9.15 a.m. and 9.45 p * CEMENT in 94-1 Bags 4
ria 0) but the bursting of three boiler Make Believe Ballroom 9.15 ; ‘
k ene 5 : = 9.45 “A 7 " * » 7
» AnnouncetnanG, 8:18] Digs delayed oe acre cane nai Do % WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT
e Down, 12.60 noon The News, 12.10| The ship will sail to Dakar, News 7 a.m., 8 a.m., 12 noon, x ,
; No a _Analyals Ac-| West Africa, and ‘to Capetown, a + p.m., 7 p.m. and 9 p.m % RED COLORCRETE CEMENT
1.00. x On |Surveying the Benguala current OR ne Site wm | $s ts
Radio Newsree |Off the West Coast, then on to Report from Britain 11.4 1% ,
: , \ t f 5 a.m ‘ i. , "
Band, "2.00 p.1 Australia to mark whales in order ry 00 p.m, 1% EXPANDED METAL — |
/ k 2 to plot the course of seasonal mi- “ccordéon Interlude 12.15 p.1 i 3 ig
Si 0 Ring ; : seasona \. 12.30 p. | 1s ‘ 9.; ‘ '
The 1 \ “jack And| gration. Some 1,800 whales will Radio Newsreel 1,15 p.m.—1,39 p,t iS ain. L-in., 2-in, & 3-in, Mesh Tron ;
» Bea : 4.00 p.m. The News,|/be tagged by painless dart John Bull's Band 1.30 p.m.—200 Ml &
® pu Dally Service 16 p.m 7 Care ee Nee % a: ‘ :
e Dally Service, 418 P.™:| Igbeted “1 pound reward on te ete acs a s s-in, & 1-in. Mesh Galvanized
4 p.m. Tom 's ‘Trio, 5.00 p.m.|turn te Colonial Office, London.” Ring up the Curtain 300 5 %
M A Sik : i | 5. “ Curtain 3.00 p.m 4
cide ic y Sibelius, 5.15 p.m y . 3.3 p.m, y
ramme An cements, 5.20 p.m Lt. c Four Guns re Jack the Beanstalk 3.30 p.m.—4,00 B.R.C, METAL ¥ABRIC —,
nterlude, 5.30 4 Generally Speak- ommander A. F. Macfie of p.m x ‘
45 p.m. Sandy MacPherson A’ |Glasgow is captain of the vessel Tom Jones Trio 4.45 p.m.—-5.00 p.n ¥ 9: : f
a hen ¢ Org € a m _ British which carries four guns for firing ae a Sibelius 5.00 p.m 5.15 x No 9 12-in by 3-in, Mesh ‘
Ne i West-) the 10-ineh darts to mark the Generally Speaking 5 1 . 2 ® ,
to! 7.45 | Letter From London | whales, ; inane OM % No. 65 — 6-in by 6-in. Mesh A
ve r 8.15 » e * ‘ p, re m ee . & °
i. s oes I a Dr. x J. Hart, of the Marine ehenes een Selections 5.45 p.m Py ia
Ded o job. 9.3) charge of research work until the » ”
| 3 M ght « tra 5 . »
i B.B.C. | Midland 1 : | Ship reaches Capetown, where he RADIO DISTRIBUTION {i | } ay :
eller 191 h aan ; x -: PHONE 4267. :- :
‘ vilion} Will be succeeded by Robert BADOS) LTD. % 7 ry :
Re From’ Clarke, a biologist who was doing [4 PS

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Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOC ATI MMIIII Mil .". Cahib QcJlinq Who Said It Wat Cold? M R. HAROLD BRANSTETTER \/| ISS ROSEMARY PAPE. who turned XTL ha H : .E L COOLS-LARTIGCE. Assistant AdminisSt. Lucia and th* Windward Island* i fprg a rntaUvf on the Cusv %  .'fnmwaion, was an arrival on Sunday by \ w \ for the Customs Talks which 'nil open today at Hastings H Accompanying Mr. Cools-Lartlguc were three ot his advisers. Hon'ble A. C H. Bayno*. Treasurer of St. Lucia, Hontle V. Archer, Treasurer of St. Vincent I Gittens Knight, MB.E. Controller of Supplies, Grenad;i His other adviser Hon'ble A. D Boyd, Acting Financial Secretary of Dominica came in last week at thexception of Mr. Gittens Knight who is staying at the Hotel Royal. ._, t 2' _, a __ * Other delegates arriving on was nere i. Tears Ago To Join Husband Sunday by B.W.T7A. for the lUP J ADAMIRA, who arrived TfcifRS. E V. D. GOULDING of Customs Talks were Mr. R. K. ITI ,n Barbados las' week, is here IV1 British Guiana who was Masson, Collector of Customs, as Acting Manager of the Bata holidaying here for the past week Honduras and Mr. J. O. Shoe Stores, until the new Manaw ,(h her son-in-law and daughPlatebar, O.B.E., Controller of ger arrives. Mr. Adamira, who ter Mr. and Mrs. N. L. Chapman Supplies, British Guiana who was is at present stationed in Trinia | "Ellbunk" St Lawrence has accompanied by Ms wile. dad, acted here in a similar canow gone to j oln her husband who Honble L. A Thompson, Tn %  %  %  ,, years ago. and will ba came j n on Sunday by B.W.I A. surer of Antigua and Hon'ble remembered as a keen footballer, f or the Customs Talks and is stayW. O. Peters, Treasurer of St. turning out on several occasions ,„g at the Marine Hotel. Its came in^on Saturday ^by in ihe forward line of 'he Carl ton Mr. Gouldlng is Comptroller of Engineer Returns Home R HAROLD BRANSTETTER Im been spending a holiday B.W.I.A. over the here is due to return to Trinidad via Trinidad to resume tomorrow. She was guest of as engineer of the honour at a moonlight picnic held Crttte Petroleum Corporation at at Glbbs' beach on Friday night. ling two Miss Dorothy Eckstein did most [ was acof the arranginf, in fact it was comp.i'iied by Ins wife and they her idea. Despite the weather :ng at the Ocean View about fifty people arrived nt Hotel. Glbbs' all of them heavily wrapMr Bumstetter told Carib that ped in warm roafa, etc, but regret he had was the with the lighting ot a couple of length of his holiday which was coal-pots on which hot dogs were too short. He and his wife had roasted and a good supply of own! here They liquid refreshment, the party soon Sd got very warm, some even had Women's World toured the island and Wri^b? are all **rinm m,n> ptacM "' ,n "'" im lud "> a moonlight bath, and the party hTl£SrHotel w$he Sl Joh "' Church Sam '• ord 5 didn't break up until well after epuor, o, Mr. "Tli !" KnliK Ca '"-' ,h ( '""' %  Bothsheba J arn i slaying at the Hotel B W.C.A. while the Trinidad Football Club. His wife will be delegates Mr. Louis Spencc, ConJoining him later this week, and troller-of Supplies and Mr. A. T. h( expects to be here about six Shlll, Acting Comptroller ot Cusweeks. He toms cfcme in yesterday morning. Royal. They Sfe nil staying at the Marino H, M? Va, Archer, 'a Barbadian. w 3gjJS*P* !" who arrived recently for the CusIJOLIDAYING here for the toms talks, is the St. Vincent dele* winter is Dr. R gate, and brother to Mr. Clyd* An h,r Lcgnl Draughtsman Trinidad. Donald, retired Dental Surgeon of Hamilton, Ontario. He arrived recently and is staying at the Hasting* Hotel. Customs, British Guiana. o <> Comings and Goings M RS. BirtrX HO WELL, proprieties* of the hiaviev.' Gupst House jelurned iroin l m seven week holiday in Montreal P MacSnc u : '*"' to ** %  batk '" th,: warmtli of the West Ir.dies. She returned from Canada via P.A.A. to Trinidad and via B.W.I.A. to Hail'.iU". Up From Caracas M R. and Mrs. R. W. Worman of Caracas, Venezuela were arrivals over the week-end by Bros., Paramount, Universal-InB.W I.A for about two weeks' tcrnational. Film Classics as well holiday and are staying at the as Monogram and Allied Artists Hotel Royal. productions this year. Will <*knw ^ r **^' fln Der-Brugh, Director PP1 , !" "' ,7*. ..,, o' Economic Affairs in Dutch EE lhat he Aquatic Club CineGuianai „ rived yostvnl b 11 be showing Warner B .W I.A. for three weeks, to spend a holiday at the Hotel Royal. Mr. J. S. M. Johnston, representative of H. J. Heinz Co, Is touring the Caribbean Area oi routine business trip. He arrived yesterday by B.W.I A. • • • Mrs. Dione Skinner, wife of the Director of Highways and Transport returned yesterday from Trinidad by B.W.I A. • • • Dr. Charlie Manning sl turned yesterday from Trinidad by B W.I.A. l*i Children's Corner Rupert and the Caravan Mrs. Marjoric Clarke left on Sunday for a holiday in Jamaica. She will be staying with her sister, Mrs. H. W. Springer, wife of the Registrar of the West Indian University College. DKEP rounded white collar on button through dress In dark grey jersey, Chintz And African Prints Seen In The New Collections lly Joan I i skin. PICTURE) i DM Pull liefore they left Seawell for motion in Polo ..mi everyone wan in a happy mood. Left to right arc: Mri. Michehn. lie. Mr Herbert Dowding (Manager). Mrs. Dowding. lotao Marsh, Elliot Williams, Colonel 11. T. Michelln Sylvia That Holiday Spirit 'T^HE holiday spin! li still pre W8IIOB to the West Indies early in the New Year may he vUltm judgVrig iT'om'the 'I'" Stanley of Alderley. He bit ,,\ at Club Morgan ..„ '"•> ndcr in the Royal Navy. Two popular Calypsoes. Peter **• o hi, former wife, Sylvia, UC) : ,,!„ %  I ClOlll OOblO III iopular and Iheie '-'I''"""' What is the DOOM ,,t is alwayj a crowd around the ""' ?•* >" cl """ Sylvia," soys piano witn then ic.iucsts foi 1 0,a S'-' I .a ** Mi Oscar llollne, ,i New York! Maroon And White Times travel representative was^ THE Barbados Water Polo iii he liked team, winch leaves for Trinidad Among a few of the tomorrow will use as the'r LONDON, December 9. ALWAYS in the spring collections there are touches of white on the clothes, at ivik. wrists, or waist, and the 1950 previews show an even greater use of white cotton pique as trimming. White too, is used on tailored sounded suspiciously like a Ass slam M,th. !" !\ "T^. At ". IWM show w !" ekintoh! We learned that when toPtoSr; 1'a'' .h" aVy iS* W h uW,t >••" "* %  %  * !" disappeare.1. SundJTbv BWli £ y ; L e "" fT B ""-""S 1 ; eyelet-hole em-, but when ironed, it reappeared! ^-unoay By B.W.I.A. to take Up| broid.-rv 00 Ihe lapels. There appolntrnent with ffic Boys'I were elialk Another Dress School in Grenada dark skirt... and vli noticed atio s number ol white Another iin. %  ...: pink folded Ml bat* and llnv round "'"'" %  glazed cliiiiU, with "nes tiered skirt. The bright But If the idea of brightening strapless top was scattered your enure wardrobe with paper"'rts sequins to give it I stiff white cotton pique, broderic "P appearance, anglaise, or taffeta, appeals to you. let mo nine a.un remind Want To Be Elegant ? 10 it.isM Uni. v The secret of elegance, according to one of the world's most sophisticated actresses, lies simply in 10 common and basic rules ol dress, hair-do and makeup. It's easy If you only follow the rules, says Gertrude Lawrence, now starring in "The Glass Menagerie*' at Warner Bros. Studio. The actrass, close friend ,ot such notables as Noel Coward ami George Bernard Shaw, recently was chosen as one of the world's 1 most 10 elegant women by the London Daily Express. ; "Elegance is probably just a state of mind," says Miss Lawrence, "but there are ways Ih which you can help it along. I I use these 10 basic rules because they do something for me and help me in my work and play. I If they result in elegance, so much the better." | Here are Gertrude's 10 rules; 1. "Simplicity of clothes. .11 wear basically simple things: tail-I orcd clothes in the daytime and| i basic black dresses at night. ) 2. "Individuality. I try to lookl 1 different but with an eye to cur-| I rent fashion. [ 3. "I wear colours according to| f my complexion, t 4. "I prefer a few clothes well-I chosen to a wardrobe full of things | | I'd never wear. 5. "I'm mad about good groom-1 ing — well-kept hair, hands and) skin, with very little makeup. 6. "I wear simple shoes. 7. "No frills, no buttons and| bows. 8. "I wear useful and inter-| changeable accessories. 9. "I buy hats for my head and| not for a laugh. 10. "I don't spend fabulous I amounts on clothes. I budget ac-| cording to the means available." At th taxi diuppears Rupert fecli jomerhing rubbing against his kg. "HulloT Why. its Dinkie eh* cir." he unite., What jre you doing her* ? I'm going 10 search lor Ikppo the monkey. It's my idea he II be in the lorest j monkeys low climbing trees. Let's go that way." Dinkie only Durti and kccoi clost to hi common AH 0 (e ,,leaves h.m -nl bourV *?' some bo.ldet, aSTS,^ Rupert iurn. n a%r£L\f why ever did she d?iL>,1 murmurs -She's Z Feeling raiher inquwtm her. ;, "f.l| SrtMFi.l.,: Mr. Cuthbert Thorpe also left to join the gttfl of this school. Mir. C. G. Conym of Bay Btrwl returned from Trinidad last week by B.W.I.A. She spent u holiday there with her son and was u guest at the Queen's Park Hotel. 4IIOSMYOHII vv.ts Tniiuny K<1maa( in Trnudad, Also Mr J. H Edwarda, Col. and Mrs. KBf U-negan, Mr (.mnidsc. Mr. and Mrs. David Henatrson, Mr. and Mr*. John K.iiniw.l. Mi and Mrs. Mr and Mrs. Slsne*t. Mr. and Mrs. A. L Thomas from Vtmnuala .nuitaiiung a large part> whkcjta included Mr. and Mrs Amotig O'Neal. M Mi .and Mrs. Arnold %  "coluurs", white caps and maroon .swimming trunks. The caps Will Harbados" written in UU forehead and on the caps will also be of maroon There will Uthe List pnoUct match this afternoon at the Aquatic Club. The team is due 10 leave Se.iu.ll ;,l 5.IS p m lii:il!HM/rt Valentine Dance SATURDAY, I'ebruary 11 the Annual date i VaUnUne Dam. it the Me Hutd in aid of local charity and \ enexuaU or l"'d by the Woman's Cunaand part>. <^"> Club w i JT; Former "Pipe" Instructor rUMI *> M i nan were V %  treat on night when McComBMehie played the it.i; •V' l. MeC iwa ii and a fi nei ii(S Uittructoi with the C'unerojr^lhghl..! rare -ve* ubear the pipes in UarbadoT" and judging applause' Mr. MrCommachie perBonaed vry well indeed. Tb re will inthe usual lea* Brklfe, Games of Chance, Flower Stalls, Valentine Post Ught refreshment.donated by the Clubs members are laetiMwd la the price of the ftckal Tables around the ball room %  waged by ringing Mrs. x- . Mi-Commachie is one '"-?. MCeii by nr the craw on the S-S. "InterpreA ''^ Lcwu at 2185. Overheard in a But [A M .ilways making inistakcf, *-' m T*chniclor **l im.itw \. wi:.ir" Arthur KENNKliV Will itBEST Pleased as we were to you of a fact so often ignored" s ? meth,n 8 ml\y new at the! be wnshrd shows we cu l(I not help disloyThese accessories must be washed after each wrtiring. If you have aerther the lime nor UH ation tn clip them off, and sew them on again after each washing, why not ittach them witli %  llreiuiei S|>rts shi.v. i interesting falm. waist cotton dresses wen ui.,ii> attractive). They ivare either in light with ally comparing some of these dresses to shelfpaper, or American cloth! Rayon shantung for leen-aji .mother smooth fabric, very suitable for tailored lununei %  Mhet. of the dark summer dreesea featured appllqued embroidery on the skirt, pocket, er striped cotton b 5 >dioe Some r lhe beading was skirts, maklnu almoKl to elab <>rate. and gave a 'icwhat bizarre appearance to 'Me clothes. 3. wne | eflSI*. *innssled-Bnythin^ There were a great m.-mv (i.ieheted yokes and kmtleit inset waists, braid i fringes, on cocktail dresj.es Quilting is being tentatively offered by most desim bowed en unu %  ton. A short straight I and grey checks, was quilted and worn over a tignt skirt. Ul'An.e'iV' IU ,11. S^arfMUTt Ol brUttat OSfDpSU^T 31. Tbls la clOMly reiatM (4) Bt, Jiut loos ho* Denu *au isi *W. The metknlikg you win git from t. '"J'" 0 *" •* around on thU day a. Mruui or a fewa pen t n 3 Tha avidpncf of four or mn tit lu a iriu stisy M of 00 luipurt>noe. (7| J2". lh th utmu*t SDM-U n 6Notninf could be more pure . i^^lJ"" 7 *"uweint, 1P ,Ji 10. A culled msti break* ittD l %  priuf. (Si "• K'.? 1 BSS! ,'?, u !" """ i7. They're often toHo*d 0 IIJUIO or abouid it h the otaer wai arouodt 14) 18. out FOUIOI i to. Bjued but with aowjen u aelutton of MitrrdiTi CUMII -,,.., fi'SZ'i. ",.V;,v 0 „? v^r l .i„ T ;; :."b,tt ff'IK; ii MSI i§Wi, If. O.ln: li .T! s trong teerhide WO.VEN-STRIP SANDALS Our Last and Latest Shipment of Mexican HUARACHES AT 5B8, tin Buy nou tar rumfnrt A Hard II wr EVA2VS A \\ mi I II ius Dial 4606 and 4220 lirints. 'I | lg i|, tfir name ImpUca, h Mnci .iml Ht raatmbsa claaery tha • Paisley patterns of Scotland. Tho deep glowing colours, witii an lIMINUHl orann lots ,. a com. plelely nee SkirlWiiisl llro,,,.. Many ot thoso shlrt-waltt drones have long boon to tha taj, girl < burns aai gracefully lull again call "h''" !" t on ,w 2 I' ; """' %  '" la i I ... I:...,..; .., .. ^ "'"" "'"'' "" '" "Wr beat %  Xred ^'""T '"1 the ? tollow 1 topa made to match the drataet J**" 0 "' l ockM %  ""' """ chan;One dresi even had a large "' briinmed hat mu.lc to match it. Checks were .W, 1—a as a urnlshmg fabric. One dress BefOie we left ih. %  •-TLSS. STLB 1 £ %  SWTl'j; Matching of rhecks W ,!„" k Miua BKEAST DKILI.S VISES EAMLKI MITKIBOX Them in Our Show Window. Bee Hi, ni in Our Sh„ Wind.... PLANTATIONS LlMlTEfJ



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TI r.SDAY, JAXI:ABY 10. PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE HENRY BY CARL ANDERSoN i MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY pT'S NCTTHIN'! THA T'STU; Taou-si"l SOsVKKI STOLB ^_TMB PrCTUCE 71 OUT OP IT | r^_ 1 f MMfA l. VBBV 1 LI UNUSUAL y Prrt CASE i %  PYHP Stair 1i^ %  WQ ^7^ THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER BRINGING UP FATHER •C-T A %  THc .i TO W06W ABOUT T(>JAV WMAT A ffBLIBFBY GEORGE MC.MANUS CHDOV-D MJU vxow %  XJTMfil? KAS TAKEN 1 l^Jz** NP If * : TO OQIVE DOWNTO.VN KLLO-D*JNV COWMH %  ,-. B*-m MAV poi\e RIP KIRBY hTMANK& JK3G6 --rut. "*pAU. TUB KOt "J TV* HOU&S-ANp *AOKI T\ NCIQHBOW.'.' •6 KXJt CAR PUCCV ^^V, ___ if W J BBBfl Wmmil^fU Oysters? We Can Eat 'Em LikeCafsMeal! PARIS. (By Mail) MY daughter's cat Tin qnentb "ts a rtoMn waters lor luncheon. In the accompanying picture you can observe fimoihy Rotting down 'o it. He prefers f hi No Tabasco. No lemon. This oyster diet for a xmonth-old pet is not the result of some mad caprice which is carving big inroad* into the MacColl iKK-ketbook. The exact opposite is true. So cheap and plentiful art oysters in France that my wife finds l'.. onomically sound pTOj tion to let Timothy have them i MVCfa] times I week. Like alt cats Timothy thinks the world of fish. Unlike other cats he gets a go at shellfish. Only drawback is that Timothy is unlikely ever to learn how to open the oysters for himself Thus tha delicious dozen must be opened for him first. rou are n Grade A cat lover (which we're not: we're ju*t run-of-the-mill cat likers) it occasionally proves a touch irksome to have to tackle the messy business on behalf of a feline connoisseur. (The by-Iaa-i of the Port* suburb where / Hue forbid fishmongers to sett opened oystera.) Penny Each Mul than it is. Horsemeat for e*rt> works out at 3s. 8d. per lb. And the oysters? I am sad indeed vad that this season they are something like a shilling each in tha London nataunttti it Off not. over here you M k as for a penny each or let i ham them at I u my lol know that 'iiis i.bu' I pref. i the ara get] WhitstaColrhes,-. ter "nv dozen fines de\ rlaire served oi n bed of sea ith ahal of lemon aim brown] i,t butten very fcharming starit naal it costs lit'! when you're eating out. tha restaurant has taken its profits von can still get your dozen in all except the expensive Parll places for around 2s. 6d. Paris alone consumes about 50 'oiis of oysters every da] 'hey oiiiifrom places on the west %  o.ist. One great region is in and around Brittany. Another is on l ha Bay of Biscay. All over Paris, as the autumn i. ;J. into winter there appear .urants the white-painted wooden oyster 1 a man or woman in harge arranges the row of big, square baskets, each containing a Og in their beds of seaweed. Good furThere may be an odd plate of rrowns or even snails. Bur the L* It's (stui) Tough To Stay Famous UNLESS POLITICS IS YOUR BUSINESS W AY up top among the world's moat famous men there are few to Jostle year by yea highest place in the minds and | hearts of the people The people of Britain—asked this month to name their own and | the world's Man of the Year for 949— gave their wotes bo f Winston Churchill. He tops both) pom In The World role iie re, Harry S. Truman, who topped! 1948s Dal Po oI Public Opinion altar hi< startling personal victory in the U.S dial elections. I The voting positions of the two len have almost reversed in the. past 12 months Behind them in the queue, the rest of the world's ml names seen, iike also-rans xok at the lists on the right. All the Iron Curtain praise ano on StalhVl 70th birthlay does not give him more than Jw-ee per cent, support for his %  Mrd place among the worldniters. It moves him up merely couple of places on last year s i Quick Mover T IE only sparkle of freshness in the people" choice come* In the Man uf the Yenr in Britain ^irst six names are straight from t h c House of Commons — Churchill. Cripps. Attlee. Bavin Bevan. and Eden Sir StSffOM Cripps has moved up. Bevln ha.' moved down. Aneurin Uevan is Utf OUH* mover of the year; ah cent, of the votes is four tunas a many as he polled last year, pull ing him up from tenth place tc fifth But Yorkshire—and the BBC —have a promising lad in Wilfred Pickles, who Just got into the first 12 in the 1M8 poll, but now ranks in seventh place. If this poll had been t t m ship of the year, the Amethyst would have been a favourite. A It is, Lieut.-Commander Reran* oyster is the heart of (Ufa matter Nearby is a battery of bottles containing the many condiments and sauces which ingenious spirits have dreamed up through the years to accompany the oyster to its manifold destiny Little tin signs show the prices Th.se R*kM rfe rlairr are Is. >id. a dozen. The Portnoci.se> are 2s. Id. And the beautiful Scions 3s. 4d. You can have your oysters standing there at the kerb, or, if it's not too cold, at a table in the open air. Or should you order them as part of your restaurant meal, the waiter nips outside and fetches you in a plateful from the stall. All very stimulating. And as you undoubtedly are aware, the oyster is "non-fatten1118." "nutrition-pneked rich." —Oh yes, and appeals to cats. Patience. Timothy, patience. The master is about to open another dozen for you. — L.E S. 1949 IN THE WORLD m Winston Churchill Harry Truman Marshal Stalin Clement Attlee (irneral Mar.li.ill II S.A.I Inict Brvin Marshal Til Sir Stafford Cripps General Smuts Lord Boyd Orr Robert Mru/ic (Australia's P.M.) Anthony Eden Others PMl't know It% :i'V 1 n i i 1 15* HI lM'r Harry Truman Winston Churchill General Marshall Count Brrnadottr Marshal Stalin Froest It.-Mn Sir Don Bradman Anthony Eden Cli-iiicnt Attlee ... '. .emr.il MiinK Duke ot Edinhtinth Sir Stafford Cripps i^ Other nominations 7C No suKrestion n '-4* '% >•* *% 2* •n 1* 1". %  i I-, .949 IN BRITAIN 948 I. WlrL.ton Churchill .' sir Stafford Cripps 3. Clement Attlee . 4 Frnesl Bevln 5. Aneurin Bci'an fi. Anthon> Kilcn T. Wilfred Plcklea . 8. LL-Cominander Heram. !i Dukr of F.dinburrh Ml. Lord Boyd OtT .. II lohn Strarhey I'!. Denis Compton Others Don't know .... M* 6% Jli, *% I' I !* l'. 1% 1% IT* 1% Winston Churchill Ernest Bevln Sir Stafford Crlpp* 7^ Anthony Eden .. i% Duke of Edinburgh 4% Clement Attlee Shlney Stanley Sir Hartley shawcroas Denis t'omplon .Anrnrin Bevan .. Freddy Mills Wilfred Plcklea Other nominations No suggestion 11 HI %  i", l I* 1% ii'24, BY ALEX RAYMOND bursts his way up among Britain'?. men ot the year—tying with another Navy num. the Duke ol Edinburgh. Two food men and o. man bring up the ix*ar—Lord Boyd Orr. claiming aM per cent, uf the votes. Sine-! V more lively to) Hum sport in world affairs, Lord Boyri Orr gets a place in the World list. After the top 12, more than 100 names were suggested lor Britain's Man of the Year—Sir Laurence Olivier. Sidney Stanley (he was seventh in hist y< where now). J. Arthur Rank. Lord Lyle, cricketer Len Hutton, %  '. %  "!' man Anton Karas. Bui not us Third Man, Now to the World ; to find a name that -lands out against the ba of a who!-The poll investigators found thai %  MM in threo of the people they questioned tujt gave the reply Don't know". Those who did, gave a haadfsj of votes each to Aneurin Bam. the Pope, Paul Hoffman (Marshil niistrator), the Duke of Pandit Nehru, Trrgit I Mr, Viahinaky, and Isnwri President Weizmann. StiU-flowmg Marshall Aid dU nothing to inci-ea.se the fame or popularity of General Georst Marshall during these past U months. His name has sllppal from third to fifth place, sandwiched between Mr. Attlee (Just in front) and Mr. Eeviu (list behind). Popular Rebel C KIPPS, Smuts, Robert Menu*. (Australia's new Prim Minister). Ant honey Eden—ill iro there, with Tito joining thai to prove the popularity of asf rebel. He ousts Bradman far sveenth place. Barring the occasional scallywag, fame is reserved year by year for those who serve. And the nearer that sen-ice is weckhd 'o polities, the nearer may gotta name to the lop of the list. -Lit PEEK FREAN BISCUITS ARE BRITAIN'S BEST IT i .ir.i BUY BATA YEAR \l HtatmUM mm m wmu rou AND > U THE BRITISH BATA SHOE CO. LTD. ji srinriifi: H : HMDmn irwwiuw ^UVl^Xiia 1 to a H OUT friends and Customers %  !" R,S '"-DOS, DR,,. STORt '"~ ~>




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TUESDAY. JANUARY II). 1950 LOCAL NEWS BARBADOS IDVOI 2 Ladies Successful |B.H. Governor In Vestry Elections Very Popular Mottley Heads Poll Again In SL Michael PAGE I I \I: TWO ladies were successful candidates in Vestrv Elections held yesterday. They were Mrs. H. A. Talma in Christ Church, and Mrs. F. E. Daysh in St. Philjp. In St. Michael Mr. E. D. Mottley again headed the polls, this time with 730 votes out of a total of 1,000. Mr. T. W. Miller was second with 566 votes. Mrs. F. E. Daysh, sinter of Mi. Mr. J. W. Hewitt was unsuccessful. He secured 421 votes, and so the old Vestry was returned. Successful newcomers in Christ Church apart from Mrs. Talma were Mr. A. M. Jones, and Mr. M. E. R. Bourne. Mr. A. N. Chadderton who served on the Vestry on previous occasions, but who did not serve last year, was also successful yesterday. Another lady, Mrs. R. C. Skinner who came forward for St. Lucy did win the favour of the electorate. Electors Thanked At the end of the count in St. Michael Mr. H. A. Tudor, retiring Churchwarden, thanked the electors for having re-elected him and the Sheriff. Mr. F. J. Cole and the Sub-sheriff. Mr. R. M. Cave for the orderly way in which the proceedings had been carried out. He congratulated Mr. Mottley and Mr. Miller and extended his sympathy to Mr. Hewitt. Mr. Cole paid tribute to the orderly way in which the electors had gone about their business. Mr. Mottley also thanked the electors for their support. He said he was gratified at the result especially in view of the fact that he had oeen ill, and had not been able to contact all of his supporters. He promised to do his best in their interest. Mr. Mh'er. Mr. Weatherhead, Mr. Symnunds and Mr. Chase also returned thanks, and Mr. Hewitt aftei saying thanks for the support he had got, promised to come again. Total Return The total return for St. Michael H. L. Smith, another member of the Vesiry. There were no other candidates and the old Vestry along with Mrs. Daysli was declared elected. The Vestry lor this year ll therefore composed of the follow, ing members: Mr. A. G. F. Farmer. Mr. D. D. Garner M.C.P.; Mr. E. L. Lyte; Mr. T. D. Mayers; Mr. E. L. Moore; Mr. A. T. Skeete; Mr. R. B. Skeete; Mr. H. L. Smith; Mr. R. St.C. Weekes; Mrs. F. E. Daysh. Three newcomers found favour with the St. Lucy Electorate. They were. Mr. F. A. Greaves; Mr. G. Harris and Mr Kenneth C. O'Neale. Three of last year's vestrymen were dropped — Mr. C. O. Knight. Mr. W. Connell and Mr D. E. Webster. Mr. J. b. T. Biancker M.C.P. an old Vestryman topped the polls with 1S5 votes; Mr I, L Ward M.C.P. was next with 125; Votes secured by other successful candidates were as follows: Mr. E. L. Bannister, 118; Mr. F. A. Greaves, 117; Mr W. L. Greaves. 108; Mr. G. G Harris. 102; Mr. K. C. O'Neale, 100; Mr. W. H. Vearwood. 90; Mr. I. C. Sobers, 81; Mr. G. Fltz G. O'Neale. 73. New Candidates Two candidates who did not sit on the Vestry last year were fortunate in St. Thomas. One of them Mr. V. E. Reeves, tied with Mr. Julian Mahon. veteran Vestryman, for the highest number of votes. The other was Mr. C. M. Collins. Two members of last vein's Vestry who were dropped were Mr. R. S. Bancroft and Mr. was as follows : Mr. E. D. Mottley, I C. E. Tryhane. M.C.P.. 730; Mr. T. W. Miller. 5W;, List of successful candidates Mr. H .A. Tudor, 540; Mr. F. C.. follow: Mr. J. Mahon and Mr. Goddard, M.C.P.. 523; Mr. V. W.Iv. E. Reeves, 150 votes each; Mr A. Chase, 520; Mr. F. McD SymK. Sandiford. 130; Mr. C. M. Colmonds. 517; Mr. A. S. Bryden. 511 Mr. C. C. Browne, 509; Mr. B. A. Weatherhead.505; Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C.. 501; Mr. C. A. Braitnwaite, 488; Mr. A. R. Toppin. 494; Mr. D. G. Leacock (Jr.), 476; Mr. T. Bownng, 474; Mr. E. F. C. Bethell, M.C.P.. 465; Mr. J. K. C. Grannum, 425. Mr. J. W. Hewitt, the unsuccessful candidate got 421 votes. Successful candidates in Christ Church were: Mr. G. C. Ward, 327 votes; Mr. F. C. Goddard, 319; Mr. C. S. McKenzie. 319; Mr. H. St. G. Ward. 311; Hon'ble A. G. Gittens, M.L.C.. 297; Mr. C. M. Drayton, 283; Mr. J. E. Webster, 280; Mr. V. W. A. Chase. 278; Mr. C. D. Branford. 268; Mr. G. C. Ashby. 264; Mrs. H A. Talma, 263; Mr. IT. J. Parrav.cino, 253, Mr Hugh Games. 251; Mr. A. M. Jones 241; Mr. C. Hill. 229; Mr. M. E. R. Bourne, 222. St. Philip's Returns St. Philip's parish, who had no Nomination Day last Monday because a Sheriff or sub-Sheriff was not available had Nomination Day yesterday. Mr. Scott, Assessor of the parish, acted as Sheriff and Mr. Moore, Poor Law Inspector as Sub-sheriff. The old Vestry was proposed with the exception of Mr. H. Man. ning who retired. He proposed Hns. 124; Mr. A. E. Cave, 123; Mr L. D. Gill. 123; Mr. J. C. Thornc. 122; Mr. S. A. Walcott, 131; Mr W. T. Gooding 116; Mr. D. A. Watson, 106. Nine members oi iast year's Vestry were returned in St. James. The tenth, a newcomer, was Mr E. Holder, who was nominated alter his father, an old vestryman, had resigned. This year's Vestry will therefore be: Mr. S. A. Walcott whe topped the poll with 167 votes,* Mr. J. H. Wilkinson M.C.P.. :t f 3; Mr. A. L. Jordan. 156; Mr. C. G. Massiah. 144; Mr. S. Massiah 139. Mr. A. G. Johnson. 139; Mr. W. W. Denny, 122; Mr. E. HoldT. 122; Mr. R. S. Bancroft 113; Mr. D. E. Webster, 111. Unsuccessful candidates were Mr. J. M. Crick, Mr. C. E. Jemmott, and Mr. C. B. Searle. In St. Joseph the old Vestry was returned. Names of the members are: Mr. W. K. Coward, 84 vote*; Mr. A. P. Cox 84; Mr. H. W. Carter. 77; Mr. L. L. Gill, 74; Mr. W. T. Gooding, 72; Mr. J. A. Haynes, 70; Mr. L. E. Smith M.C.P., 70; Mr. G. R. Hutson, 68; Mr. C. A. Williams, 60; Mr. J. Branch, 55. Unsuccessful were Mr. C. Holder. Mr. R. Lee and Mr. McD. Chandler. In Carlisle Hay IN PORT-Y*l Pouck. Bch. L*udal£*>*. Srh. ManuaU. Sch Philip H Davidson, Yachl Maya. Yawl Storlabackar Sen. Suitthina fL, Sch. Mary M. L**la, Btb. Aknundrina R-. Srh. r^ncn W Smith, Urn. Turtle Dove. &ch. Marlon BaU, Woli*. Sth. Emanua C Gordon. Srh. fUtutaldN. Wallace. Srh. Mandal^ II. Sfch. Man* Hennetla. S**dla* Barquenilue Sunbeam, M.V. Lanly Joy ARRIVALS U. Fort Amber*!. 1.048 lona net. Capt. Kmn. from Grenada, AeariU; Ua Coat.* Co.. ..Id. Yacht Beetle. lona net. Capt. Nolan. (rom Grenada. H-V. Canadian Challenger, SJM tons ***. Cap*. Anderaaon, from si CNO ASWita: Gardiner Auitin Si Co Ltd. a.8. Alcua Peajaagi, 3*31 ton* net Capt Mocafan, from Dominii*. Anon. Da Coata & Co.. i,ui. %  .. RUflna, l.BM lona net, Cap* Hoorda. from Trinidad. Ajcnl*. Da Lim* Co.. Lid. SMwoner FMncaaa Louiae. M ton* net rapt MitcheU. from, St. Lucia, Agent* aehooner CHtrmv AaauctaiUm M.V. Arucoata, 1*4 tone net, Capt Lvwla. from Trinidad; AganU: Oillem Cruney Co. Sv-edlah S S C. G Thulln. 1J1T Ion net. Capt Anderaaon. from St. CroU. Agent i; Robert Thorn Lid BirAMvau M V. RuBna. IJH lona ne-. Capt Roorda. for Grenada; Agent*. La Coil. Co., Ud. M V. Blue Star. 110 lona net, Capi iVrgiueuit. for Trlixdad; Affenl. A. E Harris. Eaq. M.V. Daerwood, M tone nel. Cap Archibald. for St. Lucia, .Agent Schooner Owners' Aaeocution. S.S. Sundial. 1M tone net. Capt fat; %  Ruaacll. for Trinidad. AaenU Pwniatioi Ltd. S.S. C. G. Ttuilm. 1J1T tone net. Ca, *n• CUrk.. Audi., Cr. j£Lhi ta V L 'iMoosw 81. John. j?fr 55 DnusU.. Audrtr Dousu. ii,; %  ",• % %  • %  •-:''"''%  K.I % %  .. K, .„..-.. %  ""k Jlvi. Kanwhii.. WlllUm C.I., ELK? "' CWTora H*. n r..nk B u .l,. •ST,??".? !" 1 ? 1 *" ""*"' C """ d QJ!! !" Pi.lot. Abiudti. Imt-i vl **n. H.Wii Cummlna.. sun. Cumrjpte Weather "" RUM ; i, „,,,_ "•inlall Caiaa PaUrlrU Da Cat**. Jatflrrv Da Catta Uicila Lrtaar. Oarl Laiaa. Baairlr Oclma aa, Guilltmina Baiwh, Frantlco Hanrh. Imabal Mallock, Mrcdaa Mlrabal. Albarto SoUrn. Mauitoa Jonci From ST. LUCIA; Joaaph Andrlaux. Vvunnr Andrlaux. Carolyn Bark.nkamp. Mama Barkarkamp, Uonal Paul. Louu CaoU-Lartlcua, Alfred Ba>na*. Daphna TrwrobaM*. Wllliar. Oraca, Barlram Kav, J.ri.t-. ,.,.-!rr From ST. KITTSMr Wilfrid Ftten, Ho.ard Kirn. Mr John Maillar. Mlaa 5— 'ax-i ror.iatar X 004 dpi What's on Todav Cuatcn, Oiuan Talkt, HaiUnfa Haw %  "I ajr. poiie. caru at 10 JJB. Oaortw Johnaon. Mr. PaUr Johnn From ANTIGUA: Danlal Walwjn. Ed. WM Tiio'i aa**a From GRENADA Quian* Knmhl, ValrntlD* Arclarr. DKFARII *fK-Hj R.H I VI For TRINIDAD Mr. John Bavur, Mr Arpad S.,**>, %  ;. Mr. Alma Sorfar, MaiUl Gaoro Sorter. Mr. rradanck OraawiaVt*. Mr. WannH Baal. Mr Gerald Boteor.. Ma.lar Edward Bataon. Mlaa Bmmva HOB-Id.. Mr John Gordon. MMa Darothr MeConne>. Mr Anonl MaalaBonl. Mr. Blanco MaateJaaol. Mr Wallar Enart Mr*. Dorothy EMtrt. Mr. Marco* Shadach. Master Max BUunan. Mr*. Rivca Sihman, M Arthur Goddard, Mr. Frank Buah. Mr. Clifford Re_n F... IT 1 fClA Mr. Charloa DuBo< Uv. Mr.. EJ*.r DuBouLay. Mlaa Palric DuBoular. Mr. Ltonal Arthur, Mr*. ShaiU Artho-. Kaatrr Cuthbart Arthur. Mm i-vi. Baal. Mra. A|nn Boekh, Mr, Aua-i lot Andrew. "Amherst" Brings Food Stuff THE "Fort Amherst", passenger freighter of the Furness Withy Steamship Company, arrived at Barbados yesterday from New York via St. Thomas, Trinidad and Grenada. Along with oranges, egg pulp and refrigerated picnic hams taken at Trinidad, this vessel brought supplies of Hour, cocoa, milk powder, spaghetti, cooking butter, naval beef, boneless bacon, picnic hams, saltpack hams, G. M. U. and steel angles which were transhipment cargo ex the steamships "Senator". "Comedian", "Governor" and "Pioneer Gem." She brought from New York -machine parts, boiling, varnish and material. The '"Fort Amherst" left port yesterday evening for Martinique. Its local representatives are Messrs. Da Costa* & Co., Ltd. (iustry was largely responsible for that changed outlook and 15-year contract had been signed up with an English company to take all their bananas for that period at fixed prices. Mr. Boyd arrived last week bv B.W.I.A. via St. Ijicia for the Customs Union Talks and the Hastings Hotel He said lhat the large estates and peasants were all planting heavily and the only drawback was the lack ot cumnuintcation*; however, there was a four-year scheme lo spend about £300,000 on roads which would considerably improve the situation. Thore was also a Greek firm which was putting up a factoty to process citrus and other fruits. %  ad that** were prospects of the Food Ministry taking ItM entire crop of orange and grapefruit viuring the next few y Contrary to rumours that hud filtered through to Dominica, he was greatly impressed by the work that the Colonial Development Corporation was doing r.n the reconstruction of Castries and he hoped it would be possible to persuade them to undertake some of the larger road jobs in Dominica. Great Difficulty Mr. Boyd said that he had great difficulty in getting proper cabin accommodation on the and a quantity of rum for St. j "Lady Rodney" although he had John will be loaded on M.V. ( made efforts to get a booking; Will Take Aivay Rum ABOUT 600 puncheons of mo. lasses for St. John and Halifax "Canadian Challenger" which ar rived here from Trinidad yesterday. It brought here from Trinidad a cargo comprised of fresh fruit, bitters, stationery, shirts and personal ertects. Seven rac*J DOtsai consigned to Hon. V. C. Gale. three weeks previous to the arivai of the ship with the agents n Bermuda. us senior -Ulcers with whom he had disI UaMd the matter oth i n St. l.u.i.i and Barbados, had expressed dissatisfaction with the laek M.L.C.. Mr. II.iaw.rVte and £ S£ 'VftTnlZ ? J2J*. this vessel. The "Challenger" will be sailing to-day for St. John and Halifax. Messrs. Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd., are agents. FUEL FROM ST. LUCIA AMONG yesterday's arrival;! was the schooner "Princess Louise" under Captain Mitchell. This vessel brought from St. Lucia a cargo of charcoal. (Irewood, hoestlcks and cocoanuts. Messrs. Schooner Owners' Association are local agents. 10/For Mi^'onduH THEIR Honours Mr. G. L. Taylor and J W. B. Chenery yesterday agreed with the decision of Mr. S. H. Nurse, Police Magistrate of District "C" who imposed a fine of 10.'and 2/costs on L*on Farley of Orange Hill, St., James. Their Honours ordered Farley also to pay 7/8 Court of Appeal costs. He had been found guilty of haying misconducted himself while on the property occupied by Edith Collins of Holder's Hill. Car Damaged In Accident The right front fender, the r*r fenders, and the right side of tha, motor cir M—1817. were damaged in an accident on Saturday. The accident occurred at about 1.30 p.m. on Rouen Road. St. Michael, between the motor lorry P—142. .> vned by A. G. and W. K. Farmer of Oughterson. St. Philip and driven by Elliot Gittens of East Point, in the same Parish, and M—1817. which is owned by Clement Austin, shopkeeper at the corner of Constitution and Martindalcs Road, and was driven by his daughter. Claire Austin of the same address. No damage w.i done to the lorry. Bicycle And Cur Collide The front w MM of I owned and ridden by Rupert Belgrave of Bush Hall, was extensively damaged in an accident which occurred on White Park Road at about 11.40 a.m., on Saturday. The cycle a.id the motor car M—2472, owned and driven by Alistair Edghill of "Hamilton", Strathclyde, collided. Belgrave was slightly injured. which was a subsidised line. He expects that action will be taken by his Government in m future. Meanono(iation will be secured for delegate, attending conferences abroad through the head office of C.N.S. I n Montreal, instead of relying on the local agents who seemod unable to prevail upon tha ships' officials to provide suitatle accommodation for West Indians of all complexions. 3 Trucks Arrive M.V. "Arocosla" relumed lo the island yesterday from Trinidad under Captain Lewis. H brought three trucks and a motor car for Mr Wexler. Mr. Wexler is expected to arrive here by plane today. After he arrives, it will be deeded whether or nol the "Arocosla" will take old iron hero and also the next port of call. Local agents are Messrs Gittens. Croney & Co. Lorry And Car In Collision An accident occurred on Hastings Road. Chr.st Church at about 11.15 a.m. on Saturday between the motor car X—427. owned and driven by Johannes Maarleveld o/ St. Lawrence. Christ Church, and the motor lorry X—80S, owned an by Clarence Thorpe of Silver Hill Christ Church. The right running beam and cross beam of the lorry were damaged, while damage was done to th. right front fender, rear fenders, right door and windscreen of 11 e car. FLOUR FROM HALIFAX ONE THOUSAND, six hundred sacks of flour arrived in the ioiony late on Saturday when S.S. "Alcoa Pegasus" called from Halifax. There were also moderate quantities of powdered milk. bran, cereals, cream of wheat, pickled pork, feeds and copper wire on "his vessel for Barbados. The "Pegasus" Is consigned to Messrs. Da Coat. 4 Co., Ltd. 120 Bags Of Mail For Barbados SWEDISH S.S. "C. G. Thulin" called yesterday with cargo from New York. Foodstuffs, meats, sausages. Martini, Vermouth, paint, machinery, auto parts, callende/s and two plows were items among the cargo. This vessel also brought 115 bags of regular mail and five bag. of registered mail. It was ..heuulcd to sail last night for Timidad. Messrs. Robert Thorn Ltd, are agents, AFTER STOCK TAKING WE HAVE MADE SPECIAL REDUCTIONS ON DRESSES. BLOUSES, SLACKS and SKIRTS Etc., Eta BROADWAY DRESS SHOP. ARTICLES MISSING Mr. John Heckles of tha. Barbados Dye St Laundry Works reported the loss of U and a hair brush from the Children's Goodwill League. He rtated that th*. loss occurred between December 12 and 19. 23 YEARS AGO tBARBAUOS ADVOtATIv. Janaar> 10, 1925) Dedication of Organ The Organ Dedicatory Servkc at the Collymore ROCK A.M.h. ihurcn last Sunday was well attended and very inspiring. It was conducted by the Kev. J. u. Sniiin 1'astor of the Church. The instrument is a twomanual read organ of excellent tone and splendid variety. Its range and quality were well demonstrated by Mr. W. H. Moore, in solos, a violin solo and an anthem by (he choir of the Church. Vocal solos were sung in characteristically good vouv and style by Miss Marjorle Moore, Miss Onida Sealy and Ml ford Tubbs. Mr. G. C. Williams rendered Handel's "Largo" on the violin with very pleasing effect. The people of Collymore Hock ;.re highly pleased over the renditions of Hie artistes who informed on the occasion and have invited them to make teturn. Much pleasure was afforded, too. by the presence of so many music-loving friends train surrounding communities and Bridgetown including Mr C A Brathwalte. M.C.P, and John S. Mauglin. J.F. HARRISON'S-BROAD ST. e j CROP SEASON REQUISITES — AT — ROCKBOTTOM PRICES. SHOVKl.S a BUCKETS a CANE BILLS a CUTLASS KS a PLANT KNIVES a BAG NEEDLES AND S PLY ENGLISH SEWING TWINE OBTAIN YOUR QUOTATION BEFORE BUYING ELSEWHERE. HARRISONS HARDWARE DEP1. Dial 2364. 'W/^///V///AV.V,V/,V,V//.V,V/.V^,V/V///'/W/A4 'Sorry I can't saa you! "1/Don't let this ajn happen to you \*o^i Don i tm terry — *• tott using Amoltn. DON'T NLCLEC1 LITTLE BURNS THI THING TO USI IS UNGUENTINE NO fmlf.wgy mi do -Sol ico'twtaj. UNGUCNTINt •*> dj • liMIVI PAIN • f:GHi INIKIION • PftOMOtl HlAIINO NOtWJCN ANIMATED OPINIONS Say* Mr. Tiger Rag : "IT'S A HOT NUMBER! 1 VfatW Toffee MADE IN U.K. The Perfection of Confection WAITERS PALM TOFfK LID. PLM' WORKS. LONDON. W.3 Car Brakes Were Bad ST CLAIR GRIFFITH was Hi.ni liIn 14 day. or 14 days' inipiisunnicnt by His Worship Mr. A. J. 11. Hanschell yesterday when he was found guilty of driving Ihe car M.883 on September 5 with inefficient br.u Obituary NEWS has. been received in Antigua of the death on Tuesday 3rd January of the Rev. C. G. Erry, Methodist Minister and father of Mrs. J. R. A. Branch wife of Col. J. R. A. Branch, Commissioner of Polka. Ban, Eny was stationed In Antigua for many years as well as British Guiana. 9 Acres Of Canes WenBurnt One of the largest cane fires this year occurred at Farm Plantation St. George t about 4.15 p.m.. on Saturday. The fire, origin unknown. destroyed * acres of Ant and second crop canes. The damage ii covered by Insurance. The canes are the property of Mr. R. Jordon of the same Plan'ation. Gameg Cancelled LONDON. Jan. . As no assurance has been received from the Racing Club of RW de Jan.ini that the matches against Wolverhampton Wanderers and Portsmouth would be played, the fames have been cancelled. The Football Association, on behalf of the English clubs, to-day cabled to Argentine that the tour could not take place, as Insufficient time remained to make adequate arrangements. —Sealer. EPHEDROL quickly rt.ueve.s | r— COLDS and ^jMrT\ CATARRH W~ Ki It clears the nasal pat.^^^^^^m~^^L_ ftages remove sturnrtcss | Es&^^fl ^^^ and the di<>trc*!tiiig conl^^aVfl diiion* t head inlJa and 1 ** 1 catarrh. The patent natal application In.nit is btfiafcak bcttaff than spra or dropper, and can In anted • <"i\ • imml\ n handbag or pocket without fear of leakage f i MaaV h CLAY & ABRAHAM III)., Liverpool. England Enable i Obtainable fram all Drag Hlarea: KNIGHTS LTD.. AGENTS St MSTKIBLTOBK. HERE AGAiMU ANKLETS FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN in Navy Blue and Nigger Brown OTHER ANKLETS in Light Beige with Striped Top; ulso While wilh Striped Top. from 74c. to 97c. \\ i i' & CO., LTD. It. 11, It g| 13 BROAD STREKT I.VTO Ift.iO U llli FLYIXG COLOURS V AI VII A I I WYVERN 12 h.p—4 cyls. — VKLOX 18 h.p.—6 cyli. (All Leather Upholstery — Fabric optional) Main New Fcnlures Include • Mere attractive fruntal appearance •Improved steering • Wider front scat •Larger tyres •Larger headlamps •Wide range of scintillating new • Separate parking lamps Mctallichrome Colours M.U silll'Ml M II M .KKIVI.I) aW Vour enquiries c...-...allv invited DIAL 4616 (ROBERT THO.1l Ltd.) Whit. Park Rd. COURTESY GARAGE ^



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T~" ,y, JAKCAftV 10. list Cripps (.alls Argentina [ Himself Subsidises I Pessimist Transport BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE THREE g, from past 1 each of BUENOS AIRES. Jan. 9 three Argentine Govemmer.l author,„ of IM> and al the bei*ed new credit 70.3SO.OOO pesos to I of the fourth quarter, the r0V er operating deficit ol transport of Industrial production corporation ol Euenos Aires about 8 polnu "hove the Thls 1( ,„ k( *pj n g wilh Gov ponding per.ods or llMe. olicy supporting the indicated a rise in output corporation which is now i of about 5 per cer per operated by ArgentineState. landing liquidation of the tune that everyone realis-orpcration, and payment of at a good job our workers (nrrtgI | shareholders in vartmanaements are Mi the n us „u, lM < deluding Anglodoing.'' Sir Stafford said. A rgnUn tramwayil which dy should make the ridiformed port of the corporation suggestion that our people R ,|i, D i v understood New Urtaa working". transport fares, some of which „ ,hc long term Pr.^am,n, ^ ^ ^ ^^ !" Wn ,hat P ..e ou pTwo'utd * %  •-> >.1 cover !j the pan of the estimated monthly operating deficit of some 35.000,000 pesos. —Renter. by 25 per cent -ears from IM". Mott of tacreasc. 22 per cent out of per cent, had been aehievwo years. Stafford said that the No• index of production was d to rise further, and the • level of industrials proI for the flrst 11 months j was estimated provision128 or 129 compared with the first fct Resistance Movement?" BRITISH HONDURAS, Jan, 9. In what it described as "the beginning of a resistance movemonths of mem to the dictatorial colonial policy" fhe "People's Commiti% Above Pre-War *". lighting devaluation, has output for the year should planned a second protest rally hlng approaching 30 per here for tomorrow night, %  pvc pre-war. A demonstration on Friday hide production, the rise night nearly developed into a ^fcarlv 25 per cent. riot. showed an output per The unrest arose from the It rising above the last Colonial Government's decsion year—an achievement last week to devalue the British paralleled elsewhere in Honduras dollar to conform with the recent depreciation of ultural production, too. British pound sterling:. CLARKE'S "BLOOD MIXTURE" Cleanse the system from blocd impurities ; many sufferers from rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago, neuritis, pimples, boils, sores and minor skin ailments, can derive great benefit from this well-known medicine. fa LIQUID or TABLET FOIM 'Owing to a vary efficient book be remaini run by Smith Junior this term quite g at schoal for the hols, sir." a few of us will ord said, had continued Government officials described eral Election was nd. Pigs, cattle, and sheep the situation today as "almost of convmuti !" were all higher than a normal". B. Increase In the hay had meant thut the was less dependent on I feeding stuffs. Increase in national inin 1MB was above 4 per hlch was available for In. Lucknow reports an encouragpanic,,,.,,. "" %  "_ ins olam In Inrlla'a /lumlniimntil (if r Sign Of Progress Government Funds Dull LONDON, Jan. 9 inere was some uneasiness in the London Stock Exchange to-day, The prospect of an .-arlv Garinl Election was the main topic or conversation among mark"! men, and active interest u stricted. Small MtUnf „r„, domestic issues lound few I ,n era. and prices moved t„ lows* levels. New Zealand's N<*w PrimeMinister Government expend!mg sujn in India s development of u ^ J d persona, expenditure, "nitatlon ^home^mfort, A w d d Xn"Sl Z, "personal expenditure factory food, clothing, and housemanufacture water date j stocks to metres will begin production the near future.—(C.P.) was lower spending on tobacco and enlertaintafford said that it was v yei to judge whether get' forecast of £449,000.enuc surplus during the financial year would be But nothing In the for the flrst 9 months that ii would not Leading industrials followe-i Je lead of g i 11 o d g e d, Texules were on offer from provinces, but irons und steels were restricted wilh prices Jt previous closing levels. Oils were easier in svmpathv with decline i In Burma's oil at Indian Ocean Shipping DURBAN, South Africa. company has been formed here to a ^ ald B carry cargoes to Indian Ocean ports. The service will link Dur-Reuter .afford said that it was ban with Madagascar, Mauritius. early to say whether the Government expenditure %  estment announced last would prove sufficient to the necessary state of Bon, so far there were no the contrary. afford stated that he was list when he hnj prophcReunion and Islands—(C.P.) the Seychelles An Impasse Unfrocked Priest Leads Anti-Church Organisation MELBOURNE. Australia. Unless a newspaper is published seven days a week it can't PARIS. Jan. 9 iliwin*St^r ins iSSmZ ** caUed <**"* undcr e law of ThC Sfi!? rv B tfl Miouing Marling detaluathe state of Victoria .a magistrate P"Pr "Figaro" to-day alleged decided recently. But his detnal a n unfrocked priest in Wurof Moscow ... ...aa t lon id[ ating against the Church, known as the "originform". • J *.n~ Hc WM 60 -V<-r-old Vasilv I reuicts Air Giant S owlov a Ru sia wh m* Holy Orders under the Tsarist BRISTOL, England. r 8e ,n Vlc,or,a d0Mn, t P ermil Sunda V tro ">. <*m*lmU lyed to be slightly on the ide. —Rruter. newspapers—(C.P.) ).E. Deputies eet In Paris PARIS. Jan. 9 Mr S HOLLAND MR SIDNEY HOLLAND, the National Party leader, has become Prima Ministc-r of New Zealand. He was born in 189S at Greendale, in the province of Canterbury. Both I ime from England. His father, Henry Holland. C.B.E. was a Yorkshlreman. After serving us u subaltern with the New Zetland Artillery in the First World War. Sidney Holland took up a business career ;ind in time became managing director of tht Midland Engjiieenng Company. In 1935 that he Urst look up politics, when he became an opposition member in the first Labour session. For %  A he was Parliamenrnry Secretary In lhe House and then became Leader of the Opposition. In 1940 he B licoaadtd Mr. Adam Hamilton as Leader of the a) PartJ No Human Rights In Colombia • From Paap i what is happening in Colombia at the present time/' Dr. Carlos Ufras-Restrepo dedared that "what is happening m Colombia cannot be con just a change in Qovtrnmnt, or another coup sjgeilar to those that had occurred in other Latin American MUDtl It was the first time for 40 years thai the wildest uprising" had occurred during a change in the constitutional order of the Colombia Government. "Practically, all I have disappeared In Colombia", he aaid. The freedom of the Press has completely disappeared, and not only is Internal suppressed, but anj ports, detrimental to the ll of the Conservative part] also forbidden." Freedom ol Assembly, too. has been entirely banned, and the rihi where you bsjan lorbtdden —Rfitirr. 50,000 Miners Strike In U.S. —....-, England. A. E. Russell, chief designer of v after ,he revolution and belhe Bristol Aeroplane Company. cam a Colonel in the Ruaatan French Foreign bmce 'recasts air liners twice as heav> s crel POUca, "Figaro" said. i today that the Depuas **** 130-ton Brabazon. Such a The pstpar addad tin the 12 Foreign Ministers plane, he said, would have a wing an, s were trained in four specialCouncil of Europe will s P an ' 30 Fp *t and pasaenger i*t schocils. One was in Theodosia Paris tomorrow to study accommodation for 850.—(C.P.) isibillty of building the — — n Parliament's first home %  ourg. •1 budget presented by y General CamUle of will be drawn up for the The 12 member nations Tinv Adventurer MARKET HARBOROUGH. England. — Two-year-old Elizabeth Deacoi hare the cost of building unfastened the strap of her pram, !" Dlv h H in proportion walked out of a shop and took i population. three-mile bus ride. Her mother were trained for North Amenr s talks will probnow has fitted a stronger pramthe paper said. January 11.—Reuter PITTSBURGH. Jan. 9. About 50,000 soft coal miners struck to-day in Ohi. vania. West Virginia and Alabama, closing pits, workru bv tin United States Steel Corporation, naif a dozen other Steel Firm* and the Pittsburgh Consolidation Coal Company. e\ sign posted a> oata West varajaua nib ttaat, no work*. Mtnen contract in mines east of thr Mississippi Rival expired last mi the miners' leader, John L. Lewis than Instructed Miners Union at thoai work only three days a week unCrlmea, for agents in France. LONDON. Jan. 9. til his demands for emit nuts wan Switzerland. Belgium. Italy According to a New China news mat. Previously miners had al* Spain and South America "W" iveint of China, forming the la of the Gull of Tonking. The same source said that Chou En Lai. Prime Minister of the Cen• at People's Govn itinciii aaj Government), tu-dav ordered the staffs of all Nationalist Government B| l Hong KUIIK to safeguard state property and await their taking —Renter. Sell Air Fleel LONDON. Airway Plymouth flying-boats. aplhaad b> Canadian Arionuuts. is for sale — (C.P.I in the price of coal" Th*i hs baan no Incranaa in the cost of production," he'added. — Ceiiter.i Tip To Hoiuewivefl LONDON The Order of the Boot is ttn order for the day at SLUIUUH Dora f'ordine's home She asks visitort to remove then : hoes and onTecs then* a pile of Bltjapai from which to choose. She claims her keep-the-floor-clean policy gives hec more time for her art — (c.rft Heaw l-rool sm-.l'PKV. Kent. England Tkuevw siripuvd t:r~o a lead from the roof of the historic Shurland Hall here -IC.P.) Check r.oinuuinist Expunsion g) frem i-sse 1 it was Tsarncd that c ; Pearson said that %  is based oni lasgan TS-suiting frorr imperialism". The Untied Nations had not solved the projlemj of Ruaatan ncpmikoUbm, and! the North Atlantic Pact was thel outcome of this realisation. Fly rtrattng thai its signatories were prepared to meet aggres'• sion. nw P;HI would serve the | cause of security throughout the world. Mi HI Pandit Nehru laid thai Russia, while promising I ough her own cx, >>t asssbsa li. COtnUna these with freedom. Only New EMland'a POreiun Mi K W Doidge, showuppori the coskcapl ol i Pnetilc ravt i'1 suggested thai the ncurit) probwas useless to lacura the Atlaiw Mi. 1' C. Spendei. Australian ''• %  Minister, saiu hou Id n.it be pursued, unless the Major Powers m 'o entei into fuller commitments than Bd nulin.'d •ider A Hint ing to one •ourcas V... :j;eniii'i threna out • hint that interested psja m a might allow a proptirtion of thenTiato help southeas: Asia In facing her PIIM.H ,...itOsnk plight It is understood that a live iiolnt agi ttonal sitU.ltlOTI. Ohlna. %  (4) So::' i Indosotal refer%  An olli' Loug Miniby Mr. Don I'm ,iMIM U the Confeirce. H< I %  not political; And it is %  the world t%  t the problean <>f md want i M ,i be clearly seen and boldly tackled. 'Communism would .ippe.ii to trio magoi %  of life." R ruler. BUENOS A/RES? VV ASHING TON ? I STAMBUL? A DEL Al DEC Whalavar the Destination la YOUR FLIGHT STARTS with mtnm WEST INDIA* AIRWAYS You earn book your Air '•„..,,. to .nywh.r. In tha world at No Etr* Coat at th* booking orftoa off . BRITISH WESTINOIAN AIRWAYS\ LIMITSD. K. .; %  !. i I'll in Trinidad) lAiivcr lltoad Slrwl. Bridgetown. Barbados. I'HONKS: 4585 & 2789. OtLEGATION TO DISCUSS CHINA PROBLEM 'WHO, Jan. 9. Sources close to thi ban Delegation said tonight lha; while no delegation w. %  lecuring South-Easi Asia aga-Bat Communism, it was hi %  Aorkable plan for early conibtnad action U i MI misters are iiscuss the pioblciu ol China. —Re ul#f. 1-lh tii:.v PFARL BARLEY • IATMEAL Laige CHEAM OF WHEAT Small CHEAM OF WHEAT Large QUAKER OATS vith China ware I Large ROBtN HOOD OATS 1 lasai Tumbler TONO MasWIsM CREAM 'IT — Pears. Pineapple, Bl I INCE & Co., Ltd. OIAL 223 BOtsUCK ST. *'t4 g 4f) THE ^^ TEST IS THE TASTE Throughbut 1950 ENJOY the EXCELLENT QUALITY OF J & R BREAD fUtogr.i.cd over a (tAiury uo by Her Gr.o Msiesty. Queen Vtcto. it, at the leading maken of Quillt, BIKOII.. Carr'i ojl Carhilft to-day mil carry forward iht tame proud tradmon. From every corner of the world comet an in..uent demand f-r the Bucu.t, which are known and remembered (or ihcir hi|h quality. TH£ £fl/Gl/SH 8/SCU/r MAKFPS • I Qeessts -im Pnif storee. Sole Agenls in Barbados: THE OOWDING ESTITrS 4 I RIDING CO. LID., BRIDGUOWN. BIRBtDOS. B.W I f.'i.'iiun*. 3372 .;:-.-.:::;::::



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inn I'M.I FOIR |'.M:.(\DOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, ^AMUm | BARBADOS & mWifl t -T "^ f — 1 ruUWMd l nt Una)! Co Ltd.. . Brel SI. Br*atto Tuesday. January 10, 1950 Safety \i Sea THE uncertainty of the fate of the Auxiliary Schooner Gloria May sixteen days overdue on a voyage from Demerara to Barbados serves to focus attention on the lack of proper facilities for the safety of seagoing vessels in the Caribbean. The Gloria May left Demerara on December 24 with a crew of twelve beside the skipper Capt. George Graham and two passengers. If no news of their whereabouts comes to hand it will mean that fifteen lives will have been lost without trace. If a' some point in the journey there had been a wireless transmitting set on board the vessel, it would have been ascertained at what stage the vessel began to encounter difficulties. The first essential in this measure of safely is the enforcing by means of the law els and especially those carrying passengers should be equipped with wireless transmitting and receiving sets. It might be possible to relieve a vessel in danger or to rescue any or all of its passengers and crew who had taken to boats. In this way even if a vessel is lost it would be possible to save human life. Governments nf the West Indies should not allow to ply for hire in this area without making the necessary provision for the H carried. The CU of life boats demanded by the law is an indication'that it was intended that some succour should be given to those aboard if misfortune befalls any vessel. Tins then should be carried to its logical conclusion. The other provision is another I ensuring that masters of these li hold certificates such as are demanded by the Board of Trade or awarded by the School of Navigation in Jamaica. During the last war, the loss of time and sometimes cargo caused by the arrival at ; it when intending to go to another I rough! clearly to public notice. The inter. || were doing a fine job in carrying cargoes from one port to r when the large vessels could not afford, to run the gauntlet with the German submarines lurking in these waters. But it was good fortune that more of them "in not lost. In past years vessels have been lost without trace and it was presumed that %  torn)* had overtaken them and that crews had no opportunity to get out the boats. No one was ever m position to say what re of suffering the members ul the i (he passengers endured before death ..r whether there had been any tunttj to rwctM lb i in in pan bo***. The last such tragedy I the Island Queen lust on a J 01 "'" hours between On anil St Vincent. %  i th* iDtarcotaial schooners run th* siil.in.iune blockade during th* 1....1 war, it was pointed out by ilns newspaper that if the masters all held cartlSoatk* much of th* Urn* would -MM and IOBM ..1 th* ... too. Nothing was ever done and now this v has come to emphasise the need for some measure of precaution. The Dutch Government has just made pulaory for masters of vessels in the Dutch West Indies n, have eertificates and i" this end providad th* facilities f..r Kady li should not be difficult for the British Government through Colonial Develop%  I lo Improvi th* Mhool in 'his rnifio**. Ipplng facilities at s that the West I ill have to depend on these smaller craft Urn* and lh*r* thauM be EOT those who aie compelled to travel by them. SMALL EXPECTATIONS LONDON, (B) For Britons 1950 will be a year unties and small expectations. The stuck market!people — face the new ifltr a momentous twelve month* spotlighted by devaluation and Kith British O securities barely holding their ground due to all the uncertainties. With l national dcttion looming up and the possibility "f another unpleasant budget little else could be expected. The arguments for or again?t %  (.eating. Fears have been expressed that uniesa impetus Is given to UH dollar export drive it will waJJOW hopelessly In the "crawling" stage and the opportunity offered by devaluation will have been missed For Mr. and Mrs. John Bull and family the rising cost of livin/, high :i1t, i ;,n,i • iu:, '"i y P U a formidable damper on prospect.-, but there are a few bright spots. ia possibility of mora I need meat, milk, bacon, eggs and cheese but less food from dollar countries will be imported. Mrs. Bull can expect I niturc and larger quantities and of furnishing will have a slightly better cruime of g*ttll M.I. but chances of getting a house in 1950 will remain very slim. Private building will be resumed on February % %  llUl ,,: a ratio of only OIKprivate li cense to every nine local authority licenses. Rents are expected I Eh little UkchhoI of decreases. There will be fewer clothes and i. es for most articles of r'othing. With some restrictioi %  be Imported, but the shortage of ; remain. Tobacco supnot improve the temper of mota With two itatiou operating, I9M is expected to be a boom television. A survey of prospects for the t tW ft %  II. I r.il llfierflirtigr-r Feod Recent ration increases built up a hope that the lean years are passing, but it is not at all certain thai the present levels can IK.' maintained in every case. Traders term it a "false state of plenty" and cannot conceive that the present increases in rations and import of many kinds can last nothing; The trade haa warned the public to expect either higher prices In utility goods or smaller of them. Cotton goods will continue in short supply until production is boosted and devaluation and rising costs can be counted on to keep up prices. The Board of Trade spokesman said there should be no difficulty as far as woollen goods were concerned, but traders Insist If wool prices stay up then prices of finished products will have to ,.< ralissL Housing: Recent Government economy cuts in building plans will not become a reality until the end of 1950, The cut in November 1949 in the rate of building (220,000 houses a year) will have nsfoni until the autumn of 1950, as it takes about 12 months to build a house. During early 1950, Ministry of Hi.ilth housing experts will try to get an accurate figure of the houses really needed. Although restricted private building resumes on February 1, private house prices will be governed by the local authorities. They have power to approve privates^ built houses costing up to $8,400, but these cases will be rare Prices of second-hand houses will probably climb in the early Spring as accommodations for lies become more acute. Kmis Local authorities control the rents question and no reductions are envisaged. Several ,i! authorities have upped the i ouncil houses recently. Agriculture: There are prosI bigger wheat acreage rod tocmaaW) livestock in 1950. -.oar agricultural plan M production will conU ana in addition, %  nation-wide drive to use mari to produce more meat mid ir.iIK is expected. Furniture: Better quality furniture will reach British shops in 1950 but prices will remain high. Recent high demand Is expected to slacker, because of prices. The trade states that production is about equal to demand at prese.it prices. Furnishing fabrics: Devaluation Is expected to push up prices but there will be larger supplies and greater variety because of increased home production and im< tuna aad patter?: The trade forecasts a food supply of plain white china and pottefy but little decorated pottery will be available. Only small quantities mark. ed "export reject" will reach British shops. Tobacco: There is little hope for an Improvement in supplies. A reduction in purchases of American tobacco would not affect supplies before the end of the year. Wines: Some good wines at cheaper prices are already entering the country as is evidenced by the excellent Christmas selection. Sherry and port importers expect more variety, and bigger quantities if the budget is favourable. ... Vacation: Devaluation will In. crease the price of vacations in Europe by as much as 10 to 15 per cent. For Britons, vacations at home will cos* about the same as in 1949. Motoring: Manufacturers plan to produce some 440.000 automobiles In 1950. Under existing arrangements with the Ministry of Supply manufacturers will have to export 330.000 but they are doubtful if this target actually can be reached. Any seasonal decline In sales to some countries would mean diversions to the home market Some 4,000 extra tars reached the home market In this way during 1949. Televhlsa: The trade plans on producing 300.000 television sets in 1950. nearly twice the 1949 ngure Efforts will be made to reduce costs (the cheapest set on the British market is about $110* but hopes of price reductions are offset by price Increases in raw materials No important changes in design are expected.—I.N.S. HliiiiM s The Car By JOHN McCAFFERTY PHn.ADFI.PHIA, (By Mail) the Univerity of Vn will take no lu.iui.r. nation's highways Until biles are designed for lie Infori K tomolnle Club of Philadelphia that bt elie\: day automobile unapproprU' %  sod bfjti %  Dr. Wooiward changed that alleged emphasis on "i dads" In the m ing BUay BMtoriate ti> their graves a nn ua ll y. Stress ii| MI so I ;. gad. id blown-op contended, is • %  iietnmeiit.il to tha i Di Wood* 1 %  tho t edt%  automobile "entirely u %  And hi %  autuI I %  %  'new i %  Dg rale Ml I itlon." Dr. Wood Id I %  erippUi 1,1 V In the "Ao. ut'ii in tha rate of Injun [ions in the designs of the Dr. Wood\ tomobll I On •''' COI I" limit top ID) l 55 miles |KT hour without Inti fering in an] tiun at 1 2. ii.'i such as arc standard aqutpntnl in Bin 3. in-' such as sponge nibber padding on daahboarda knoTtha book of front 4. cl; h-iuiU etc. 5. Bounties] of OtOO" shock absorbers on (rout bumpers lo %  6. installati. : gUlCS to BfSS| better and wider vision such .is is now done in many trucks and bu Ml 7. elimination of shiny, reflect M from the driver's visual BOM by doing away with .ill chromium trim. 8. shelving of sleek convertible models entirely "because of the J.tnger lo passengers In event of an upset or a "turnover." (tattoo of "polarized wridshields" to minimize daytime driving glare and reduce "night blinding." Dr. Woodward said that that %  ii.-st of his 'safety suggestions' can be employed immediately while others will require new laws or additional research." —INS. "Can you walk a little, dear— mummy s hands ass) Jro;en." LoaSoa ttfiti St'whm ToiftWfc I'houUlit THE KEY lo every man is his fhouqht. Sfutdy and defying !hou#h he looJis. ho has a helm which he obeys. which is the idea after which all his faclj aie classified. —EMERSON THERE is nolhing fhat makes men rich and strong buf fhaf which they carry inside of fhem. Wealth is of the heart, not of the hand. — John Milton. Dear Pedestrians! Dear Motorists! FRANKFURT (By Mail). The police of Franklurt apparently arc striving to out-do any officer in the world when it comes to courtesy. This move is highly favoured by the German people, who for many years, lived under the iron rules of the black-booted "Third Reich" policemen Tickets and stickers are wellknown measures to curtail traffic violators. However, the tickets Issued by the Frankfurt Police are of a different nature and, somewhat more pleasant for the offender. So-called "warning tickets," bear the following text: "Dear pedestrians — motorists! By your conduct, you have violated the traffic rules and thus endangered the life of your fellow-cituens as well as your own. The Frankfurt Police politely ask you to observe all existing traffic rules in the future, thus helping to decrease the accident rate in our city. In case of repeated violation we are reluctantly compelled to %  erve notice against you." In addition to this, new courtesy signs have been installed at all major roads leading to and from Frankfurt. The :Vgns. bearing two Inscriptions. One for incoming automobiles, reads: The Frankfurt Police ask you to obv, rve ill trafflc regulations.'' The second, for departing trafflc says' "The Frankfurt Police appreciate your observance of all traffic regulations. —I.N 8. By Thomaw I". Wal*on LONDON (By Mail). The four deputy ministers of the I States, Britain, France and Russia resumed their apoarently interminable negotiations to produce a draft Peace Treaty for Ausl a in London yesterday. This was their 287th meeting. The tali:;; began in January'. 19*' and while much has 1 been accomplished there are still one or two vital outstanding matters yet to be clearcV up. Throughout the talks Russia has maintained an uncompromising position to these vital matters. If any compromise has been effected it was on the initiative of the Western Powers. The issue which must be settled at this meeting is the amount the Austrian Government will have to pay the Russians for supplies and services rendered to Austria by Russia since 1945. The talks in Lake Success flopped on this point. Austria, in addition to the 160,000.000 dollars reparations to Russia, offered a further four million dollars for services. Russia refused it point blank and the deputies decided that the matter might be settled bilaterally. So the talks resumed on a bilateral scale in Vienna. Over three weeks ago the Austrian Government amended their offer and despatched a note to Moscow outlining their new terms'. So far, despite urgings on the part nf the other deputies, no reply has been received. Russia has stated in unequivocal languai refugees in Austria. Austria is willing to nationplize and absorb about 50,000 of these people. Russia on the other hand wants these refugees carefully screened before they are absorbed into Austria's population. As many of these refugees are from countries now under Russian domination. Russia is demanding that they be returned to the country of their origin whether the refugees like or not. Britain, USA and France com promised on this issue by saying that only those who freely volunteered to return should be repatriated. Russia refused to accept. The Western Powers, fearing that serious consequences might befall these people if they are forcibly returned to their country of origin, have refused so far to yield and it is more than likely that they will maintain that attitude. So, unless there is a change of heart on the part of the Soviet authorities, the deadlock appears to be as insoluble as ever.—I.N.S. For irjjj totdUtejL ^Hv/ CROWN MALT EXTRACT Pkts. SELECTED TABLE RAISINS SINGAPORE PINEAPPLE CUBES 4 SLICES .. CREAM OF WHEAT (Small pkts.) ^ COLONNADE STORES Pan-African Roads NAIROBI, Kcnja Colony. A network of aU-wtalhtr rOMf to cover the African continent within the Met !• %  yean was recommended b> the International Congress o( Africsn Touring, which met hero. Some of tho countries represented said they plsn to start building some of the roads suggested.—I C.P.I "Back Home" Visit COHNER UROOK, Canada. L, will be an "old hume visit" for Newfoundlanders on the Canadian mainland if a planned steamship lour takes shape Newfoundlanders in Montreal plan to charter a boat next summer, load it frith fellow islanders and make %  leisurely tour of the principal ports of Newfoundland av.\ TABLE TOPS ENAMEL 42" x 30" BLACK GLASS, round, Vilrolit* 18", 22", & 24" diameter ALUMINUM SHEETING, cut to sin LINOLEUM, cut to size WILKINSON & HA V \ IS CO.. LTl>„ *jj C S. PITCHER & CO.. L Phones: 4472 & 111X7 %  ""' Fine Chocola CADBURY'S CHOCOLATE BISCUITS—per tin ilHtl CADBURY'S CHOCOLATES—per box U .Bjl TERRY'S CHOCOLATES— per box 87, ,9J, 1*1 TERRY'S CHOCOLATE BARSeach KEILLER DUNDEE CAKE—well CARR'S CUMBERLAND FRUIT CAKE—each., FIGS—per pkt CANDIED PEEL—1-tb pkt CARR'S CHEESE CRISPS—per tin ODEX SOAP— pei eak* "COCKADE" Fine KIM STANSFELD. SCOTT a CO.. Ul Legislation Helps The Boars THE BEST THAT MONEY CAN OBERUNCEN, Germany, (By Mall). Hi in-hunting by wild boars instead of boarhunting by man is a new post-war "turnabout" in German forests. The 100 pereent disarmament since the close of World War II, which also was extended to hunters, has reversed relations between civilized man and the wild beasts. Recently a group uf foresters in the neighbourhood of Goppingen in the South West of Germanv became the object of a mass attack by 20 wild boars in open daylight. The woodmen h.d just settled down for n short rest and snack, when the black beasts, led by a l-oar, suddenly rushed forward from n thicket where they apparently had hidden and prepared their assault. The woodmen, many of them obviously wartrained, quickly took refuge in improvised trenches and between piles of fallen trees. No one was hurt, but they had to hold out in their ilong time before the "e!l•my %  retreated. In another case, a single boar boldly strolled through the streets of the town of Stuttgart, it left the impression that i; had an uncanny knowledge of man's unarmednc&s. Only when many citizens had been alarmed and began an organised clatter of teapots, bells aiul other "instruments" did the visitor slowly retreat I forest. In the Lake of Constance District wild boars pay so many visits to the borders of the lake that no private persons or tourists venture to leave the precincts of town and village very far. The recently-announced "rearmament" of German hunters is expected to reverse the situation in favour of civilization. Mill HEADERS SAY: Miouhl IN civilians Walk on the Left or Ktghtf Side of I InItoad? • u kJitar. The Adiocule, I Association is being formed "l uld be soluble to have /"I" for ptdWrun, l %  J'V. ..I it, bKoininit the ibmss which should ll the side ot the ud on which ihc>should walk iruction, stated ihe road In BJ "poikm this Is a mistake as the rwponslblbij. U placed only en uular trafflc. luoer on a previous occasion a code tor pedestrians was |P during; Colonel DIcVthis 11 wa, "•flPMad that pedestrians shoul I -alk on the right so as to lac.. trafflc thus placing re aponHblllty on both parlies. Ink there should be J general airing ol the subjei: so that the general public ghouW hat Is expect,.^ White Park R M d BEN G ,BSON Jan 7, 1W0. I Spring Clvan V<-./i Mtor. TI i Ad SIH. N parish of St Jssssas srasM at very smoothl) Thrre was a asarked nbsence of mud-sUngl at the la tjon. Ml out-going 1 speech told tho Uotpa the parish had succeeded' in maintaining *m efficient sUtl mum wess* and that tha poor had been well attended to, 1 am glad to know th*.t the poor received a satisfatpoor and dcMitule should be always taken hwarden sam hear from Mr Waleosi wtn u a Comsniasloner at* TtTaraa assi atw who is really doaptjr irinasliJ to the affair for reorganising the san rartmer.t I that a few things in that department are very unsavoury. Tho . la charge and responsive parish %  i hast also to pi I a sub-sanitary inspector and go about daily n^pecting i.nd along other sub-sanitary inraporl daOj to we Chan ,,, he hag done. Instead of dcv.i %  K up on their its at hi* oJBl i sssamary inspector, rubbing % %  * *ae evkiMK. %  li Walcolt also nude reference. Whatever might have been the object of carrying on this system in the past. it is not good enough for today nor does it stand good for the MUM. ft ..'. thai heiid of one A fully uaHlicd. ef)u . 'isser and the people of St. James require and earnestly desire the same modem method of running the sanitation of tha parish as fc obtainable in each of the other ten parishes. Every chairman feels proud when he has a competent man at the head of effairs and the people rest quietly in UMta beds when they know that their sanitation is entrusted into capable 1. 11 arc only three Jsssssielors in this parish which island in in houses—the one third the number of houses and people. The parish %  n increased staff of inspectors ard one or more disaa uith the Chief In ipector in charge of the people'* health and nut the Chairman. In the neighbouring pgfam of St. Peter with lesser houses and smaller population there are foui sub-inspectors and the Chief Inspector and now I notice from your columns that the commis%  .'..'. . for two u< should not lag behind the times It will be the duty of the new Vestry to put its house in order taiy and not wait to bo forced by the Public Health Bill to do what is already a duty to the taxpayers but what-is clearly necessary and long overdue. They have Just bioken faith by appointing an outsider to the post of submspector in preference to a bright and Intelligent man already | with Unnecessary qualiiications. It Is yet time to n tings right and there should S. B Orange Hill. St James. Tho Pottery l,u/u*tf\ To The Editor. The Ad: SIH. Your report in to-day's Issue OB my speech for the res"THE MASTER M FOR MEN STOP LN TO-DAY AND THE SHOE OF THE FI ENGLISH CRAFTMANSHIP DA COSTA & CO., LTD. DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT. *'WVW^v, olution Ui provide funds for the CalS making plant at Lancaster -rate and I a indulgence to make the necessary corrections. Paragraph three si "tiovcni!:.. the indus: >' %  that the Government .it the Indusli made profitable, but that the ndcrtake certain industries that private concerns would not undertake ow'ng to the returns QB their money. Paragraph four contains i, greater mistake m stating thM the pottery industry was one of the greatest private srojecu that U had seen for sometime. It should have been the Tennessee Valley A ' "? %  k projec.. %  i seer, for somctrialists ..ndertaken this •an F I. WALCOTT. January 5, 150. These On Vow Shopping^ POWDEKEU GELATIN—lb LEMON CURD—botlle CATELLI EGG NOODLE—pkt. MORTON'S SCOTCH OATMEAL—tin* PEANUT BUTTER-bottle Moon EMPIHK cornr-pkt CKUTM :, ot „ c PAPRIKA I'EPPEH-bottl.. CROWN DRINKS all the delightful Flavours j & R ENRICHED BREAD for stronger bo* ORDER TODAY FROM GODDARD'S


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STRACHEY WINS BATTLE OF SUGA

SS say : aie | No Increase In 1950 Price
Cripps Calls Himself! as ioe Meee eee

_ A Pessimist AFTER 1952 CONTRACT EXPIRES
But Calle For “Go Slow.’ | ani

In Helping Others No Human (Creech Jones Pleads In Vain
| LONDON, Jan. 9. Rights In

(CHANCELLOR of the Exchequer, Sir Stafford Cripps, i
| Colombia

spoke of “unrequited exports” and sterling balances
at his Press Conference in London today. “We want to
diminish our unrequited exports $0 that we can divert : : :
more af our exports to the hard currency, and particularly | Says Liberal President
the dollar countries.” ae ae aoe that NEW YORK, Jan. 9
e must do”, * is an- ni te Sabie:
other very tenet side to this ie reer tae ne ay .
picture, The resources have been gs ty 8 aun ae
made available, many of them 6 aia-temserantaae laoaeh
to countries urgently in need of Colombia during the last 3 years |
“Since the Conservative Party }
began their desperate campaigi
to destroy all opposition,” Dr

assistance in their post-war
Lleras-Restrepo, a member of the | 7
nas been the question of a “fair

reconstruction, . — ee , On
Colombian Senate, has been ir ? :
States for the last 3| ele as oO price” for producers: Until re-

Ib, we hid ad provided this) DH VESTRY ELECTORS OF ST. MICH AEL had cast their votes, and the long
the United
jcently the Food Ministry have
Finished Her
Practically all human rights | ;

help, we should undoubtedly have ; : ; ;
business of counting them began. The picture shows election officials engaged in
weeks, and is returning to Colom- made West Indian producers sejl—
‘ e
|have disappeared in Colombia, he J iwi EK
} |
f hee ommun ist said. I myself have been living oO ni urope
e

Price:

FAVE CENTS

Year 35.













(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan. 9

{T IS NOW fairly obvious that discussions be-

tween the Food Ministry and Colonial sugar
delegates have from the West Indian point of
view served no useful purpose. The Ministry with
the knowledge that they have all West Indian
sugar under contract until the end of 1952 are
understood to have driven a hard bargain and in
the circumstances it vould not be surprising if
the B.W.I. delegates are obliged to turn down
whatever offers are made to them.

*





ln ne



Dominating the whole picture

—valuable. supporting imports to}
countries threatened by the cold
war.

These have helped to enable |
them, despite all their difficulties, |





seen an even greater spread of
Communism. What are unrequit- the count. From left to right are :—Mr. C. B. Sisnett; Mr. R. M. Cave, Sub-Sher-
riff; Mr. F. J. Cole, Sheriff; Mr. E. C. Redman, Vestry Clerk; Mr. H. O. Ramsay.
bia in a few days
| under existing contract—to
Britain at a price influenced by

ed exports to us are immensely
Two Arrested |







the Cuban “dump”’ figure,
7 withstand the onslaught of | = : ane nae that devaluation has had
that cold war, and to build up| O F , d )in imminent danger of my life for | the effect of
their own production”, the Chan_| n rau

increasing the price
to Britain of all non-dollar sugar,
the Ministry are understood to
have completely disregarded the

many months. |

The 41-year-old Senator said
jthat he had come to the United
| States “ in order to get the opinion

cellor added: “But we have now |
reached a stage where we must go!
slower, whether we wish it or!
not, for the sake of preserving

—HOFFMAN

WASK: NGTON, Jan, 9
Paul

Charge Expans ion In

Mr.











in: Hoffman, Economic| free market prices and_ instead

: @ ;of Americans about the political | Co-operation Administrator, said| have set their own figure which

helo eth and ability to| ; BRUSSELS, Jan. 2. ituation in Colombia. | today that European recovery hac| they are not prepared to alter.

- Bir States roned on this point,| Belgian Police today arrested ou “Cas Sia He had unofficial talks with | been so successful that there was|For this reason there seems

Rs WOU ee that an attempt] two. prominent opted Pawar gr State Department friends” in| the danger that the United States! little hope that 1950 will bring

would, be made to agree on a/men in connection with frauds in : Vashington, “and everybody 1] would consider the job done. | any imerease in the price paid

Sir STAFFORD CRIPPS reduction in the amount releas-| stock and bonds, which should Ts Keynote Of Colombo Talks ret was at Teast surprised a'| The ultimate result of such ajfor sugar by Britain to the West

able from Sterling balances when | have been declared under the : 2 decision might be war. Russia | Indies. The Distienod lof lone

Gold Coast we. erae negotiations took plane | Government’s anti-Inflation law (By SYLVAIN MANEGOT) @ On Page 3 | had sought to create chaes in| term agreement to run on when

with each country. ae after the liberation COLOMBO. Jan. 9 Western Europe, Mr. Hoffman told! {he 1952 contract expires . also

. : . in 1944, “ * eerore 9 anes ; the Women's National Democratic | appears re », The Food Minis-

’ orkers Ss e anes They are M. Henri Stock- COMMONWEALTH co-operation to check expansion ‘ ° ¥ . | Cluj in a prepared address. hi ee ronan ia hie

; nigepetins Mean eee Tf of Communism in South East Asia was the keynote of the Spain Considers | “Today, despite. al! that Russia | agreement with Australia guaran-

e at , j i “onference. t se | could do to prevent it, I think I i » fr “mm 600,006

A Strike erican bankers that the United|sens, former Director of a well- opening sessions of the eae Conference, to judge from Economies Sveak \ce — ~ Sera || teeing to buy trea thes » 800, ”

| States should take over liability} known business Banking House.| information available tonight. i ; | cee abiaeiinaio:” han cee | tons annually and this has had

for part of Britain’s Sterling Brussels Police said that the| ~~~ recreate —enneitenate The sessions are being held in| Te mee Mr. Hoffman ad tae thins | the effect of reducing the quota

GOLD COAST, Jan. 9 Balance debts, Sir Stafford said: | men were alleged to be concerned , secret. The Commonwealth For- | W ith Argenti na : i |for other areas.

Workers in Accra began a Civil} “I am very glad the suggestion | in a fraud totalling 1,000,000 Bel-

‘ / pean nations to drop barriers t
was learned,
Disobedience campaign today!came from American bankers. |

ie {e@ign Ministers, it
U.S. Offficials | sesecats sarees uss



| iE > , trade with e other, N Virure
; 7 : gian frances, Belgian Premier, , COsOREE a | _ NEW YORK, Jan. 9. “eonmnls-Uetdinrecion for West Aith ae : tne huve
Slosing and stopping buses. The| think it a sound and excellent Gaston Eyskens, announced on tion—not intervention—and th The New York Times in a re+ | Qin Europe is no longer an idea! ‘ ae oa ~ the Fo “Mir try
npaign, part of a move to| idea.” Friday that police had uncovered | elimination of the economic con-| port from Madrid to-day said that ltt is a. Sataatiend ns < ‘as ts a Use rele oe by ne ; san se ;
biain Dominion Status for the} Reviewing the economic results | frauds, totalling 10,250.000 Bei- In U.K. For | ditions, on which Communisin| the Spanish Government was con- | | wa BEF é essity,” he! it is understood that the offer
Fold Coast, also included other | of 1949, the industrial output had| gian francs, and that two of the | thrives, were the only effective | sidering breaking off all economic | °°: ‘he West Indies
it at home strikers and lesser | continued to rise rapidly through

srovides for

“Europe must give her people guaranteed purchase ‘of approxim-

tangible proof that Democracy} jtely 650,000 tons annually which

means something more than free-!;. fay below the figure for which

dom to see your children hungry.” | West Indian producers have been
—Reuter. } asking.

| Mr, Creech Jones. is

country’s leading bankers
others had been arrested
charged with implication. “he
bankers named were: M. Emile
Mallien, head of the-big Krediet
Bank and M, Jules Cardyn, a high
the

and
and

oycotts.

Post Office, electricity jnder-
tings, railways, and Government
partments were, however, work-

hg normally.

A general strike to support the
emand and the re-instatement of

the year “with the result that our
economic position had been bas-
ically strengthened,”

~ rt... | means of achieving this aim, Mr.| relations with Argentina. A meet-

e ence Talks Ernest Bevin and Pandit Nehru|ing of the Spanish Cabinet would

both opposed the idea of a Pa-|Study the question to-day, the re-
cific Pact similar tc the Atlantic | Port stated.

Pact. "The British Foreign Sec- |

Mili-| retary thought a different reme-

tary and Civil Officials arrived dy was needed in Asia. He said |



@ on page 3 LONDON, Jan. 9.

—Reuter,
senior American

Right

known to
official of





Belgian National



|
rms a former Company
some Am-| Director and M. Laurent Hans-



aN a have intervened with the Ministry
Bank. here by air from Washington;that interventi : ae een. i e % én tahall of Colenialidelegates:but
dismissed i. * 3 é rvention had not been | ) oO erm nis I | : ‘ t
ep ffi ee ten meee Bill To Appoint Another Fraud today for the Mutual Defence|the method adopted among West- 20% Cut Will Not a aking |it now seems, despite all effort
nded _ We heitn we tha ee . Police said that they thoughty Assistance Progremme Talks on;ern Powers in meeting the Eu- Whalin Fle *t Plt at ie erst a. ae ee Sie se Prince Bernhard that they were on the point of dis-| Wednesday. jropean crisis. Why, he asked, | Balance Budget i § Mauritius will be offered in
SD inian ee Balluny- covering yet another fraud involv- The meetings will last for 2]should Russia attempt to inter- more than 1,000,000 tons under the

itech, “cae ee those THE HAGUE, Jan. 9. ling 3,000,000 francs’ worth of| days, and only Americans will| yene waltore..gawers: in. Asin. cai WASHINGTON, Jan. 9. | Ciena

: he _sirike. A Bill appointing Prince Bern- ieclared stocks : . take part. , d
The Ground Staff of the British bP & undeclared stocks and bonds. Ke

FOR U.S. FIRM

1 hard of the Netherlands, Regent
pverseas Airways Corporation at] in

ecra stopped work on Saturday,

The 20% cut in spending of In-
ternational activities proposed in

elsewhere are trying to w
their own problems in

aa —(Ry Cable.)
The Talks are believed to con- ;

According to the police, the] , Ts ae
sider America’s Military Aid

the event of the decease of }frauds concern stocks and bonds



thelr own





|ways? Asia was facins ortst |President Truman’s Budget to The W HAMBURG, ve 9.
Queen Juliana before their eldest | ii, pew if Programme in the light of reports} ;,. are ; . 4 Congress to-day will not balance he West German news Agency |
aa : ere : which have been falsely. certified, ; & ports | 3 . . 1 st we g a) e
ut servicing of planes continued. | daughter Beatrice has come of 48, Some of them Soe earviea off by by United States officials, who} ~— - eae eee cook the | the budget. ).P.A. reported today that the} Protection
— Reuter. | aS ‘been submitted to the Second the Germans ‘durin the war, andj Mave been surveying the require- | : I at ne Se i fowaldt docks in Kiel and Ham-| eh
Chamber of the States General. Tits. Seba dante a pack into] ents of Britain ind other mem. oa ; Se oe te nomic nev"! needed to help finance the 2,100,- | surg have started converting an |
T a c aitenten Deion c fon eee Aap bers of the North Atlantic) & pense < Communist Nn, | 000,000 Social Welfare Pro-| \merican 16,000 ton tanker ana } Only
rinidad Gets | known : convitted Gifiabneratein Treaty. | Seimei Sateen nepal ger ut { gramme, on the bas is of which 0 former British corvettes into ¢
who were “afraid to declare their The Programme is to increase} er aees 7 oe President Truman's

The $1,300,000,000 saved will |
Democratic

New Bishop

|operation of the Western

2 Skiers Killed







, powers | > nodern whaler fleet to be manne} LONDON, Jan. 8
ill-gotten gains,” police said, the collective strength for de- | nolitically soomestaiie .. In Parlinchtat Pea vrcale, Count fence of North Atlantic Area, oe Gaba ts eld yy | sone ¢ potions in oe Tine ‘| Whaling Company here, branch of sass auntie British Press reports
bados Advocate Correspondent TURIN, Jan. 9. iumiats are to sk the Belgian Reuter. ; | the oe a hy yo ‘oll t ” me Duessel-Dorf Hankel and | tnat Britain would continue to
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 9. Two Italian skiers were killed Government for ‘a statement on @ From Page 3 hi steer tits ie al eens ie Co., Ltd, has accepted an offer | teers ode taco Yeletions “ The Rt. Reverend Douglas John| yesterday when the cable of a Pit iunatal ucmiuihis toate : Hi . ith ed mae * which rom an un-named whaling com-| (yy ese Nationalist Government
Wilson, Bishop of British Hondu-| Ski-lift in the mountains of tis vate . sardving “ohmaraaaia an would Seine Sa couane "$250,000 000 | pany in San Francisco, California, | ;, Formosa. aut
Bs, was today elected Bishop of;™Moon, Italian Alps, slipped off wm dl sareenaiitins of the fin- Russia Goes To Miners Re rect as a Health Fund in 1950-51, | © provide ships and crews for a| British Consuls were remaining
is eae wirite a Special Synod or Pr Sane & pews ee Mh political waitin . J Racaiisa this. it aection year, Con- ie expedition to be run ay fin Formosa to protect British sub-
an glican Diocese. He suc- |}! e. =five skiers, inc hea ee re ; mr a . 1 6 gress is expected to pass the Bud- | ‘he merican Company next] jects he said. They would have
a ’ y aged ten, were seriously in-| The Communist question adds M , gt is expecte I j
ds the Rt. Reverend Fabian | POY. eee nics, ee that “ the scandals are ofesuch a Polls arch 12 Proposal

get as a whole more speedily than
LONDON, Jan. 9. ete ae

: “ ‘ ym wlec : é s could > .
wae & oe Yorkshire, | Grable changes may be made in
le sir landers that ue | future reductions in expenditures

a »*.|on Foreign Aid Programmes and
should forego wage increases for | é ere

ackson who resigned because 0i|
health.
The new. appointment will have |
© be confirmed by. other Bishops |
nh the province of the West Indies.
Bishop Wilson 46-year-old, is a

eason. It was also stated that) contact with the authorities,
conversion work would be carriec | “whoever they may be”, that did
out despite Norwegian protests. | not constitute recognition of any
Representatives of the docks said | kind, he declared. He added that
that they hoped to finish the con-! Britain had not yet veceived any
version by the time the Argentine | communication from the Chinese

nature as to throw suspicion on
services of the Belgian

certain i
Ministry of Finance.” Premier
Eyskens told the Press on Friday
|

R.C. Bishop Dies

PRAGUE,, Jan, 9.
Skrabik, Roman Catholic

political cam-
But consid-

LONDON, Jan. 9.
Elections to the Supreme So-
viet of the U.S.S.R. will be held
on March 12, 1950 by decree of
the Presidium of the Supreme So-

that if personalities were involved
Dr.



even if they were personalities} viet reported by “Moscow Radio” |a year to aid British economic re-|/2 Social expenditure. eee So" Settivaed iguane ing: ar taacany | Smeets Government about her
5 : 4 ; — 3 ‘ , ‘ ~ = ya : -— (Reuter. ai tis to recognise it.
eduate of Queen’s College | Bishop of Banska, Slovakia, who |¢ the Catholic Party, (his own),| to-night. covery. These first results of a| . to sail, a Soeieten te: eepagnan viii
@ Cambridge. He is, married was attacked by the Ministers of | jstice would be done, and justice| Last elections to the Supreme | Mation-wide poll of miners sug- | ree 3
Be has two children. This is his Justice for “refusing to take the | Would be severe: Soviet, the highest organ of State |SeSted the possibility that the |
eventh year of ministrative ex-| oath of allegiance” to the Com-

—Reuter.





power in Russia, were held in| 750,000 strong National Union of |
February, 1946, when 99.7 per | Mineworkers may join 75,000 en- |
cent. of the electorate went to the | Gimeers and 450,000 railwaymen |
polls. Candidates were elected for |to lead the fight against the offi-
a four-year term. The Supreme | cial wage “restraint” policy of the
Soviet consists of two chambers— | Trades Union Congress.

the Soviet of the Union and the| Leaders of all 187 Unions affili-

erience in the West. Indies. ;munist Government, died at
—(By Cable). ' home to-day.—Reuter.

WHICH IS U.K.

his

Soviet “Criminals”
Flee Finland

HELSINKI,
Finland will send a preliminary





AUSTRO-RUSSIA MUST
AWAIT DECISION

Koster Mother
Murder?

Jan. %&



Soviet of Nationalities—Reuter. j|ated to the T.U.C. will meet in| reply at_the end of the week to
? ; 's and for the
ELECTION DA Y YORKSHIRE, Jan. 9. |London on Thursday to take a} Soviet Russia’s demand for ihe LONDON, Jan. 9.
o Ps ee tee toch Fos ft final decision on wages poliey, extradition of 300 Soviet “war The k ting of the Austrian De uties Conference
‘used of tasked : woman S tik oO } —Reuter, |criminals,” circles close to the The 257th meeting of the Aus p
LONDON, Jan. 9. oreo ae wastika ver

who, with her husband intended} Foreign Ministry said to-day. The} to negotiate an Austrian State Treaty opened here this
POLITICAL QUARTERS here tonight speculated on ; Ty



to adopt him. The husband a | reply will be corey at, ae afternoon.
: Mae \ r Foreign | stry or e basis | : : . @ sol
ip Possibility that Prime Minister Clement Attlee might | found his wife, Mrs, Emme Mob Parliament China Accepts a Coveenmant tapentiainn into fi The American Deputy, Mr. Sam Reber was in the
x Febr . i ; loy, aged 48 dead by her fireside eae ‘.2 demand, / completed. cnalr.
hruary.2 aa: Generel Blection wey mean the dissolu-| last night. MUNICH, Jan. 9. See here ears ee a

- The British Deputy is Mr. Wil-
A detective told a special court













iT * ese :
; , Barli ilies An aeroplane of unidentified | U.K. Ss Reco nilion Most of the 56 persons listed ° | liam Ivo Mallett, the French, M.
® | shows oF ee ad eer 3 | that it appeared that two shots] nationality to-day drew a Swas- | en ua the demand as “guilty of par- Queen Amelia | Marcel Berthelot, and the Rus-
loyds Did this week) bub: Giese Set a ~y| were ‘fired from a_ rifle which] tika with its vapour trail above LONDON, Jan. 9 ticularly grave crimes against the cede. aa ” | sian, Mr. George Zarubin, Soviet
3 political opEnton held to Soruary | ay alongside the body. the Bavarian Parliament in Mu- The Chinese Communist Govy-| Soviet Union” have already fled Not Sinking | Ambassador in London.
23 as the most likely election day, | The boy was remanded in cus-|nich, the West German news/|ernment has agreed to Britain’s|the country. Freezing, snowclad | Soviet Deputy Minister, George
ot Refuse and predicted. dissolution for | sody until January 17, —Reuter,| agency, “D.P.A.” reported. recognition of its regime, the| Helsinki was to-day gay with PARIS, Jan. 9. | Zarubin’ told the Ccaference of
P February 3. bo F % 7 Bavarian members of Parlia- | Communist New China news| posters for the forthcoming presi-~ French newspaper reports} Foreign Ministers’ Deputies on
LONDON, Jan. 9 All pastigmantary opcaes “an Tae watched the performance. | agency reported in a message re-| dential elections. The _ Social } said that 84 year old ex-Quee*| an Austrian Treaty here to-day
Lloyds of London to-day de- | 28sume that a Government an- : ili. The Swastika dissolved after ajceived in London to-night. Democrats, supporters with the} Amelia of Portugal was “sinking” | that there was no point in dis-
mied reports trom the Israel port| MQURCement will be made soon Wealthy Brazilian | Short time.—Reuter. —Reuter. | Conservative, Liberal and Swed-| and had received the Last Sacra: | cussing further articles, until
of Haifa that the: had rebssed after tomorrow's Cabinet meeting. . ish Peoples Party of the re-elec-| ment were described as|Russia’s direct negotiations with
® insure shipments of non-mili-| . Some observers’ think that the Refused Bail SUT ame tion of Litheral’s 70-year-old } “nonsense” today by a Lady-in-| Austria had been completed.
ty goods passing through the| Government, if it proposed a late | e President Pring a i Movotatten Waiting. M, =’ said < ~ mone
‘Sue s M : tion, may in the first : ‘ St k Thi t L I l their posters that a edn eel ws+} approach e-appropriate Sovie
x anal co ~— way to ray pier mag ale ae that | Murdered Wife rire rea n la ry President would Nain a Commun- fm sige Gavin ee ree siabesition "30, hake .cmn, vlan
ssurances we. a conduc | the King has been asked to post-, BAYONNE, Jan. 9 ist head foy the State Police. pape Pp these ftegotiations. would be fin-
“It is still possible to arrange| pone the opening of the new h San, ov.

r sent to Lisbon to make’ ready aj} *
\n examining Magistrate to-| Afte Street Battle ane place for her in the family tomb | iShed. He undertook to report
wurances, and we have had no| session of Parliament from ANE t bm









i 5 f her husbana| on their progress at the next
. i ay Tetum Seg be Faener Ot) alongside those o er ; â„¢
official intimation about Egypt| January 24 until a later date. =. pr ly “actos ¥ Rienat | ROME, Jan. 9 Prefegt of Modena said that the and son, Amelia was in no oa oT i ae sae or
ing to give firm assurance that} This would give a broad indi- wealthy Brazilian accused of| A lightning general strike to-|clash arose when “thousands: of Pr osalsSubmitted mediate danger, she* said. The Lira, mune af he
ee aiiteey Supplies destined! cation of timing. but the eee murdering his beautiful * wits night threatened Italy after at workers attacked palice forces on| PP femaner Googe, Meaeney = ocean, -: oreras
Srael would be allowed to| ment could still keep its opponents Mon » | giving her arrow| least 5 workers were killed, and| guard outsi + steslworks and ‘ ugal is a welikno a then.
pass though the Suez Canal. | guessing a little lender before aaietalt a deed ar " | many workers and police were oo an ie to reins For $94,200,000 Versailles, where ane nee 4 British Foreign Office spokes.
i: —Reuter. | announcing the actual date. ae Ramos. who is the son of a| injured in a street battle in the! with firearms, hand grenades, eat ree re ian ‘said that the next Deputies
| ies oy ae | Home Secretary James Chuter|;ormer Brazilian Diplomat is industrial Communist stronghold| hammers, sticks and stones. The | By Nationalists o ; OG | meeting could be held earlier,
| 7 | Ede’ who had a private talk with) peing held in Bayonne gaol. of Modena, Northern Italy. police returned the fire to avoid | M. Zarubin obtained an answer
: Quake Shakes | Prime’ Minister Clement Atlee tian

The Communist-led Confedera- | being





. overpowered,” the ‘com-| WASHINGTON, Jan. 9 Greece Gets | about the Austro-Soviet men
| 7 ‘ ; this morning — ee . un of a, rag amie ned in | — adde } Culpate pene Pe -; . . (oes scence aad
| nations tonight on the election ‘ ome tonight gave the workers ress reports reaching Rome| mittec re als to e ni Cc. : A 4 r.
| Calais l register and the afeguarding of DenmarkReco nises deathroll a 5, Se oatlie 6. | ssid that if rker vere dead. } States Pe the use in Formosa of aretaker Gov t. supplies and services made avail.
& CALAIS, Jan., 9. | voling rights. He was speaking | 8 Two police Non-Commissioned| two dying, 3% badly injured, and! the $94,200,000 worth of economic ATHENS, Jan. 9% able from Russia in ane Sere
| The town af Calais was vio-|about the new spring register} cv_ « * .4,,, Officers were gravely injured and|60 s'ightly injured. Telephone! aid still remaining from the te he: ae | the. end of the” war | , et 8
‘ lently Shaken by a four-second! which me to «fore fr | ¢ ‘hineseCommunists another hurt Ten thousand! commur ti etween Modena! $275,000,000 Aid programme voted The Gréek Caretaker Cabinet deadlock at the Deputies r—

Sarthquake at 1943 GMT this! uw ‘ t vorkers from Modena and the and the re Ite hich were 1948 of John Thotokis was completed} tiations in New York in mid-
| e evenin Wit ee ee sg ; DENMARK, Jan. 9 irrounding country clashed wit! ‘ Ft he h President, Truman last weekj|tn-day when the King swore in; December. The Soviet Delega~
Bevery ee & i , entia gen mas §6. decided ‘ th e poliee, when they ¢alled an 8) strikin pe that economic . assistance | fc ur Under-Seoretaries tion made oN een Pe
Towed vith frighte le} Secretary | nise Communist Govern-/ hour strike, and attempted to! storcii 5 hours later. At the Min-| would coftinue to be sent to the the most important .was that) pendent ona sett won ge repel
Who had seen tt ae sitar, aioe a eaalae Shi aaiethith in ye held | t, it Wa announced here| storm four steel workers where a| istry of Interior, officials renorted | Nationalist Government .in ac-|of General Stilianos Mandi aes reached in the re Russian-

haken off aes tan wir Salune ip he ~ a wie révicter \t ‘lock out had been declared, the situation “under control” to.‘ cordance with ECA legislation. eer Soretary 7m me rete —iapaiter:
a oe hes a ow —Reuter. A communique issued by the! night,—Reuter. —Reuter. Order. Renee

Reuter. ame into force. —Reuter. qa \












a 4
Hl

$
% : {

PAGE TWO

Shee eam NNN BELEN SE OE TOR







— Caub Calling

ON’BLE L. COOLS-LAR-
H TIGUE, Assistant Adminis-
trator! of St. Lucia and the Wind-
ward ‘Islands representative on
the Customs Union Commission,
was an-arrival on Sunday by
B.W.I1.A. for the Customs Talks
which will open to-day at Hast-
ings House, ~

Accbmpanying Mr. Cools-Lar-
tigue were three of his advisers,
Hon’ble -A. C. H. Baynes, Trea-
surer of. St. Lucia, Hon'ble V.
Archer, Treasurer of St. Vincent
and Mr. &. Gittens Knight, M.B.E.,
Controllér of Supplies, Grenada.
His other adviser Hon'ble A. D.
Boyd, Acting Financial Secretary
of Dominica came in last week.

These delegates are all staying
at the Hastings Hotel with the
exception of Mr. Gittens Knight
who is staying at the Hotel Royal.

Other delegates arriving on
Sunday by B.W.I%A. for the
Customs Talks were Mr. R. K.
Masson, Collector of Customs,
British Honduras and Mr. J. O.
Fletcher, O.B.E., Controller of
Supplies, British Guiana who was
accompanied by his wife.

Hon'ble E, A. Thompson, Trea-
surer -of Antigua and Hon'ble
W. O, Peters, Treasurer of St.
Kitts came in on Saturday by
B.W.LA. while the Trinidad
delegates Mr. Louis Spence, Con-
trollersof Supplies and Mr. A. T.
Shill, Acting Comptroller of Cus-
toms dime in yesterday morning.
They are all staying at the Marina
Hotel. «

Mr, Val Archer, a Barbadian,
who arrived recently for the Cus-
toms talks, is the St. Vincent dele-
gate, dnd brother to Mr. Clyde
Archer, Legal Draughtsman in
Trinidad.

Up From Caracas
Meet Mrs. R. W. Worman

of Caracas, Venezuela were
arrival§ over the week-end by
B.W.I:A. for about two weeks'
holiday. and are staying at the
Hotel Royal.

~

coer er ee

ae eee

Engineer Returns Home
R. HAROLD BRANSTETTER
of Venezuela. returned
home by B.W.1.A. over the
week-end via Trinidad to resume
his duties as engineer of the
Creole Petroleum Corporation at
Caripito, after spending two
weeks’ holiday here. He was ac-
companied by his wife and they
were staying at the Ocean View
Hotel.

Mr. Branstetter told Carib that
the only regret he had was the
length of his holiday which was
too short. He and his wife had
enjoyed every moment here. They
toured the island and visited
many places of interest including
St. John’s Church, Sam Lord’s
Castle, the Crane and Bathsheba.

«> «>
Was Here 2 Years Ago

R. J. ADAMIRA, who arrived

in Barbados last week, is here
as Acting Manager of the Bata
Shoe Stores, until the new Mana-
ger arrives. Mr. Adamira, who
is at present stationed in Trini-
dad, acted here in a similar ca-
pacity two years ago, and will be
remembered as a keen footballer,
turning out on several occasions
in the forward line of the Carlton
Football Club. His wife will be
joining him later this week, and
he expects to be here about six
weeks. He is staying at the Hotel
Royal.

en <>
Here For The Winter
OLIDAYING here for the
winter is Dr. R P. Mac-
Donald, retired Dental Surgeon of
Hamilton, Ontario. He arrived
recently and is staying at the
Hastings Hotel, '
«> «“
Will Show
EE that the Aquatic Club Cine-
ma will be showing Warner
Bros., Paramount, Universal-In-
ternational, Film Classics as well
as Monogram and Allied Artists
productions this year.



PICTURED is the Polo team shortly before they left Seawell for

Venezuela,

No doubt the subjec
everyone was in a happy mood. Left to right are: Mrs. Michelin,
Mark Edghill, Lee Deane, Mr. Herbert Dowding (Manager), Mrs.

t of conversation was Polo and

Dowdimg, John Marsh, Elliot Williams, Colonel R. T, Michelin

(Capt.).

That Holiday Spirit

HE holiday spirit is still pre-
vailing judging from the
large crowd at Club Morgan on
Saturday night. As well as the

usual familiar faces there were
many new ones, some of the many
visitors on the Island right now,

Everyone seemed to be enjoying
themselves and the dance floor
was crowded with people doing
the ever popular Calypsoes. Peter
Lacy's playing between the dances
has proved very popular and there
is alwayS a crowd around the
piano with their requests for
their favourite tunes.

Mr, Oscar Boline, a New York
Times travel representative was
there and said how much he liked
Barbados, Among a few of the
familiar faces, was Tommy Ed-
wards, just back from a success-
ful race meet in Trinidad. Also
Mr. J. R. Edwards, Col. and Mrs,
Vidmer, the Misses Lenegan, Mr.
Campbell Greenidge, Mr. and Mrs.
David Henderson, Mr. and Mrs.
John Furnival, Mr. and Mrs.
Nicky Williams, Mr. and Mrs, Sis-
nett, Mr, and Mrs, A. L. Thomas
from Venezuela entertaining a
large party which included Mr.
and Mrs. Jean Iverson. Among
the diners were Mr and Mrs. Jim
O'Neal, Mr. and Mrs, Don Claire-
mont and Mr .and Mrs. Arnold
here on holiday from Venezucta,
and Mr. and Mrs. Stephen»Psaila
here on holiday from Venezuela,

and party, '
oo § «BURY

Former “Pipe” Instructor
UESTS atgClub Morgan were

3

G given a surprise treat on
Saturday” night when Richard
McCommachie played the Bag
Pipes. “Woy. McCommachie is one
of the crew on the S.S. “Interpre-
ter” visiting Barbados, and a for-
mer Pifé Instructor with the
Camerogr=Highlanders.. It was a
rare event to hear the pipes in
Barbad@8* and judging from the
applause Mr, McCommachie per-
formed very well indeed,

—— 9 parensineni aes ae

tro
teerh



Sylvia

VISITOR to the West Indies | Hot a guest at the Queen’s Park}

early in the New Year may be
Lord Stanley of Alderley, He has
just bought a new yacht which he
witends to sail to Gibraltar, Malta
and then possibly the West Indies.
The yacht, a 250-tonner, is moored
near Southampton. Lord Stanley
is an excellent sailor. During the
war he was a Lieutenant Com-
mander in the Royal Navy. Two
weeks ago his former wife, Sylvia,
married film actor Clark Gable in
California. What is the name of
the new yacht? “It is Sylvia,” says
Lord Stanley,



«> «>
Maroon And White
THE Barbados Water Polo
team, which leaves for Trinidad
tomorrow will use as their
“colours”, white caps and maroon
swimming trunks. The caps will

have “Barbados” written in
maroon aciu3ss the forehead and
numbers on the caps will also]

be of maroon
There will be the last practice

match this afternoon at the
Aquatic Club. The team is due |\4
to leave Seawell at 5.15 p.m

tomorrow,

‘ «Dn, «»
Valentine Dance
ATURDAY, February 11 is the
date fixed for the Annual
Valentine Dance at the Marine
Hotel in aid of local charity and
organised by the Woman’s Cana-
dian Club

There will be the usual fea-
tures of Bridge, Games of Chance,
Flower Stalls, Valentine Post
Office etc. Light refreshments
donated by the Club’s members
are included in the price of the
ticket. "

Tables around the ball room
may be engaged by ringing Mrs.
Anthony Lewis at 2135,

Overheard in a Bus
” EM always making mistakes
in de ‘papers. Luk uh dis
Madame Bovary.”
“Wuh duh means?”
Madam DuBarry of course.”
“Of course!”

ide

WOVEN-STRIP

SANDALS

Our Last and Latest
Shipment of Mexican
HUARACHES.

“op

4606 and 4220





Who Said It Was Cold?

ISS ROSEMARY PAPE, who

has been spending a holiday
here is due to return to Trinidad
tomorrow. She was guest of
honour at a moonlight picnic held
at Gibbs’ Beach on Friday night.
Miss Dorothy Eckstein did most
of the arranging, in fact it was
her idea. Despite the weather
about fifty people arrived at
Gibbs’ all of them heavily wrap-
ped in warm coafs, etc, but
with the lighting of, a couple of
coal-pots on which hot dogs were
roasted and a good supply of
liquid refreshment, the party soon
got very warm, some even had
a moonlight bath, and the party
didn’t break up until well after
2 a.m.

«Pp «»

To Join Husband
RS. E. V. D. GOULDING of
British Guiana who was
holidaying here for the past week
with her son-in-law and daugh-
ter Mr. and Mrs. N. L. Chapman
at “Ellbank”, St. Lawrence, has
now gone to join her husband who
came in on Sunday by B.W.LA.
for the Customs Talks and is stay-
ing at the Marine Hotel. ;
Mr. Goulding is Comptroller of

Customs, British Guiana.

<> <>

Comings and Goings
M*: BEXYL HOWELL, pro-
prietress of the Seaview
Guest House returned from a
seven week holiday in Montreal.
She is glad to be back in the
warmth of the West Indies. She
returned from Canada via P.A.A.
to Trinidad and via B.W.LA. to
Barbados.
= . =
Dr. P. Van Der-Brugh, Director
of Economic Affairs in Dutch
Guiana, arrived yesterday by
B.W.LA. for three weeks, to spend
a holiday at the Hotel Royal.
* * !

Mr. J. S. M. Johnston, repre-
sentative of H. J. Heinz Co., is
touring the Caribbean Area on a

* routine business trip. He arrived

yesterday by B.W.LA.
* * *

Mrs, Dione Skinner, wife of the
Director of Highways and Trans-
port returued yesterday from
Trinidad by B.W.1LA.

> * a

Dr. Charlie Manning also re-
turned yesterday from Trinidad
by B.W.LA,

. * >

Mrs. Marjorie Clarke left on
Sunday for a holiday in Jamaica.
She will be staying with her
sister, Mrs. H. W. Springer, wife
of the Registrar of the West Indian
University College,

«> «>

Mr. B. A. Callender, formerly
Assistant Mathematical Master at
the Parry School, St. Lucy, left on
Sunday by B.W.LA. to take up
an appointment with fhe Boys’
Secondary School in Grenada
Mr. Cuthbert Thorpe also left to
Join the staff of this school.

«nv «

Mrs. C. G., Conyers of Bay
Street returned from Trinidad
last week by B.W.LA. She spent
a holiday there with her son and

otel.

CROSSWORD







pique as trimming.

White, too, is used on tailored
suits. At a recent show I saw
a navy suit with white piqne
showing through eyelet-hole em-
broidery on the lapels. There
were chalk white jackets with
dark skirts, and vice versa. We
noticed also a number of white
folded felt hats, and tiny round
ones.

But if the idea of brightening
your entire wardrobe with paper~
stiff white cotton pique, broderie



anglaise, or taffeta, appeals to
you, let me once again remind
you of a fact so often ignored

These accessories must be washed
after each wearing. If you have
neither the time nor the inclin-

jation to clip them off, and sew

them on again after each wash-

ing, why not attach them with
press studs?

Brenner Sports showed sume
interesting fabrics. Their shirt

waist cotton dresses were partie-

ularly attractive. They were
| either in light striped cotton,
with sectioned skirts, making

clever use of the stripes or they



were in the new dark African
prints. These prints, as their
name implies, have their origin
in West Africa and the designs
resemble closely the traditional
Across | Paisley patterns of Scotland. The
2 ate ohte,® stout beginning, butt | deep glowing colours, with an
6. You giao a second Blade wit | unusual use of crimson and
arr (6 orange together, strike a com-
8. You'd har rr 7 : ‘
one, cqparaly write if servin pletely new note.
2 i comes from Iran, (4)
2. No royal killing. (3) Skirt-Wais Ses
8 Whew! What‘a Stinger. (6p me Skirt Waist Dresses _
is Let's tone ny ening but. (5) any of these _ shirt-waist
» Le @ this as pineapple. (4 dresse: ave £ eves
\6, The key ‘varsity of America? {3} boo: .t et eng pd _
2 m to the fair girl who sun-

. Sygaective of brillant company
- This t@ closely related. (4)

burns easily
gracefully ful

The skirts
again, the

were
ful-

}22. Just look how ents oats. (8) ness falling from unpressed pleats
193. The meaning you will get from in most cases. Basket handbags
sclt-aasertive alk and threats | were carried, with the gathered
em Down tops made to match the dresses.
| & Charms sit around on this day | One dress éven had a large
ry) brimmed hat made to match it.
; geaeure of @ fox's pelt? (7) There were — several severe
rhe evidence of four or even six ack . ald ie ise ie}
in a trial may be of no impor- ) black cotton shirts worn with

tance. (7)
« With the utmost speed. (7)
» Nothing could be more pure

prety. (9) 7% Reassemble. (5)
10. A colled snake breaks step t
11, Sort St Clscut

. rt oO cult you're likely tc
See at 1 Down, (7) J
1%, They're often followed by lasses
or should it be the otner way
ground ? (4) 18. Out you got (4)
Balled but with wowvere to
sleep, (3)

Aglution of yesterday's puszie.—Across

Wows; 9, Erne: 10, Other; 11, “Tis

. Van: 14, ‘tre; 15, 16,’ Pear:

; 26, Kin
Down

on

20.

ore;

24. Ratten:



Whirl; 7,
19,



PAIR

Buy now for comfort & Hard W ‘eur

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial

gaily striped skirts; and an even
greater number of black strapless

cotton dresses for really hot
weather,

The most sensational material
used in the show was Glazed

Chintz—formerly only considered
as a furnishing fabric. One dress
was in yellow, grey, white and
black chintz, It was Strapless,
and there was a three-cornered
scarf to wear as a “cover-up.”
The shiny look of the fabric

closely resembled a waterproof—
swept by

and as the model it

® CANE BILLS
® CUTLASSES
@ PLANT KNIVES
® SHOVELS

® PACK

FACTORY








DEEP rounded white collar on button through dress
in dark grey jersey,



Chintz And African PrintsSeen
In The New Collections

By Joan Erskine

EVERYTHING FOR THE CROP

: including :

® GALVANIZED BUCKETS
® BRASS WOVEN WIRE

® STENCIL INK AND BRUSHES
® SEWING

+

BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

As aN A Se NO A&A
rnc







LONDON, December 9.

ALWAYS in the spring collections there are touches
of white on the clothés, at neck, wrists, or waist, and the
1950 previews show an even greater use of white cotton

sounded suspiciously like a
mackintosh! We learned that when
washed, the glaze disappeared,
but when ironed, it reappeared!

Another Dress
Another dress was pink and
white glazed chintz, with fuil!
tiered skirt. The bright pink

strapless top was scattered with
ceris sequins to give it a Sree



up appearance.
Pleased as we were to see
something really new at the

shows, we could not help disloy-
ally comparing some of these
dresses to shelfpaper, or a



can cloth!
Rayon shantung for
suits

teen-age
is another smooth fabric,

very suitable for tailored summer} '

clothes,

Many of the dark summer
dresses featured appliqued em-|
broidery on the skirt, pocket, or
bodice. Some of the beading was!
almost too elaborate, and gave a
somewhat bizarre appearance |
the clothes,

There were a_ great many
crocheted yokes and knitted in.
set waists, braid embroidery, and
fringes, on cocktail dresses.

Quilting is being tentatively
offered by most designers, and
3renner showed an unusual ver-
sion, A short straight jacket, in
wide blue and grey checks, was
quilted
skirt.

and worn over a_ tight

Matching of Checks

We liked the usual matching
of different checks.
walked on, two at a time, to
show these off to their best
advantage, and then followed a
session of jacket and coat chang-
ing.

The models

Checks were also mixed on

Suits. One jacket in small grey
and blue check was worn over a
skirt in darker grey and blue.
_ Lace-effect fabrics are enjoy-
ing a great wave of popularity.
In some cases real lace is used
over a contrasting backing, but
equally effective is the material
printed to look like lace.

Before we left the show we
discovered an interesting fact,
Have you ever wondered how
jackets managed to fit tightly in
front, and yet hang loosely at
the back? The answer is a fit-
ting back, ‘beneath the loose
folds.














TWINE
NEEDLES







LIMITED.



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dress, hair-do and makeup.

It’s easy if you only follow the
rules, says Gertrude Lawrence,
now starring in “The Glass Mena-
gerie” at Warner Bros. Studio.

The actress, close friend ot
such notables as Noel Coward and
George Bernard Shaw, recently
was chosen as one of the world’s
most 10 elegant women by the
London Daily Express.

“Elegance is probably just a
state of mind,” says Miss
Lawrence, “but there are ways in
which you can help it along. I
use these 10 basic rules because
they do something for me and
help me in my work and play.
If they result in elegance, so much
the better.”

Here are Gertrude’s 10 rules;

1. “Simplicity of clothes. .I
wear basically simple things: tail-
ored clothes in the daytime and
basic black dresses at night.

2. “Individuality. I try to look
different but with an eye to cur-
rent fashion.

3. “I wear colours according to
my complexion.

4. “I prefer a few clothes well-
chosen to a wardrobe full of things
I’d never wear.

5. “I’m mad about good groom-
ing — well-kept hair, hands and
skin, with very little makeup.

6. “I wear simple shoes.

7. “No frills, no buttons and
bows.

8. “I wear useful and
changeable accessories.

9. “I buy hats for my head and
not for a laugh.

10. “I don’t spend fabulous
amounts on clothes. I budget ac-
cording to the means available.

inter-





Tues. and Wed. 8.30 p.m.

Mat Tues. 5 p.m








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Dennis MORGAN
Jack CARSON in
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in Technicolor and
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KENNEDY —
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Action Packed Double .. .
Gracie FIELDS—xurt KRUGER

in
“PARIS UNDERGROUND”
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WILLIAM BOYD
as Hoppalong Cassidy

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continuing
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Jennifer
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Robert RYAN—Audrey TOTTER



in
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he I be in the forest ; monkeys love
climbing trees. Let’s go that way.

Dinki

feels ii

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some boulders ang out
Rupert. turns in rise.
why ever did she that?
murmurs, ‘She's an aay |
Feeling rather inquisitive, he hy

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with MARGARETTA SCOTT, REGINALD TATE,

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PERCY MARMOTH and LESLE BROOKS

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JAMES MASON and JOYCE HOWARD in

THEY MET IN THE DARK

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Featuring:

(1) THE MILTON QUARTETTE

(2) THE MIGHTY CHARMER

(3) MADAM LAZONGO

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: ripps Calls
| Himself
A Pessimist

from page 1
each of the first three



pout 8 points above the
ponding periods of 1948.

managements are on the oys

doing,” Sir Stafford said. Argentine
dy should make the ridi- formed part of the corporation.

Reliably understood New Urban
some of which
applied late last year, and others
sinee January 1, wil) cover orig
the estimated
teers from 1947. Most of operating deficit of some 35,000,000

crease, 22 per cent out of Pesos. —Reuter.

suggestion that our people

pt working”.

pn the long term programme

rawn up the expectation

een that the output would
by 25 per cent in the

per cent, had been achiev-
‘© years.

Stafford said that the No-
index of production was

ied to rise further, and the

e level of industrials pro-
for the first 11 months

9 was estimated provision-

1% Above Pre-War tee”,

bove pre-war.

arly 25 per cent. riot.

showed an output per ‘ ae
isi above the last Colonia 'si
: ieee achievement last week to devalue the British
paralleled elsewhere in Honduras dollar to conform with
the recent depreciation of the

>| roduction, too, British pound sterling.
See anid, had continued Government. officials described
nd. Pigs, cattle, and sheep the situation today as “almost

"were all higher than a normal”.

9. Increase in the hay
had meant that the
was less dependent on
d feeding stuffs.
increase in national in-
in 1949 was above 4 per
hich was available for in- ,

was lower spending on
tobacco and entertain-

Stafford said that it was
ly yet to judge whether
iget forecast of £449,000,-
enue surplus during the
financial year would be

for the first 9 months carry
that it would not. ports.

estment announced last
would prove sufficient to
the necessary state of
ion; so far there were no
the contrary.
afford stated that he was
ist when he had prophe-
large rise in the cost of
billowing Sterling devalua-

overnment forecast of a
he percent rise had itself
oved to be slightly on the
ic side. —Reuter.

).E. Deputies
eet In Paris
PARIS, Jan. 9.

Ssibility of building the
bn Parliament’s first home

bourg. Tiny Adventurer
MARKET HARBOROUGH,

al budget presented by
y General Camille of
will be drawn up for the

The 12 member nations

population.

eSDAY, JANUARY 10, 1950



Argentina
Subsidises

Transpors

BUENOS AIRES, Jan. 9
Argentine Government author-
ers of 1949, and at the be- ised new credit 76,350,000 pesos to
ng of the fourth quarter, the cover operating deficit of transpor?
~ of industrial productioa corporation of Buenos Aires.

This is in keeping with Gov-

C f ernment’s policy supporting the
indicated a rise in output oorporation

nan of about 5 per cer¥ per operated by
" pending

s time that everyone realis- -orporation

s and payment
hat a good job our workers foreign

shareholders
(including Anglo-

transport

part of



‘Resistance

Movement?”
BRiTISH HONDURAS,

it described as
128 or 129 compared with beginning of a resistance move-
x the first 11 months of ment to the dictatorial colonial
policy”

fighting devaluation, .
output for the year should planned a second protest rally

er here for tomorrow night.
hing approaching 30 p A demonstration
ehicle production, the rise night nearly developed into a

In. what

Government’s

Sign Of Progress

LUCKNOW, India.
Lucknow reports an sake
xpendi- ing sign in India’s development o:
pt, Zee amanda: sanitation and home comforts,
xpenditure factory t r _ wate
Rie a house- metres will begin production in
as. . the near future—(C.P.)

to manufacture



® = o
Indian Ocean
Shipping

DURBAN, South Africa.
A New South African shipping
But nothing in the company has been formed here to
to Indian Ocean
The service will link Dur-
tafford said that it was ban with Madagascar, Mauritius,

early to say whether the Reunion
Government expenditure jslands—(C.P.)



An Impasse

MELBOURNE, Australia.
Unless a newspaper i
lished seven days a week it can’t
be called a daily under the law of
the state of Victoria, a magistrate
decided recently. But his
cision is to be challenged. The law
in Victoria doesn’t permit Sunday
newspapers.—(C.P.)

Predicts Air Giant

BRISTOL, England.
A. E. Russell, chief designer of
the’ Bristol Aeroplane Company,
French Forei + forecasts air liners twice as heavy
ed today tank te foo as the 130-ton Brabazon. Such a
the 12 Foreign Ministers Plane, he said, would have a wing
Council of Europe wil] span of 300 feet and passenger

Paris tomorrow to study accommodation for 250.—(C.P.)



Two-year-old Elizabeth Deacon
Bhare the cost of building unfastened the strap of her pram,
embly hall in proportion walked out of a shop and took a
three-mile bus ride.
trow’s talks will prob- now has fitted a stronger pram-
d on January 11,.—Reuter, strap—(C.P.)

Her mother





“Owing to a very efficient book run by Smith Junior this term quite a few of us will

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



be remaining at school for the hols. sir.”



Government
Funds Dull

LONDON, Jan. 9

There was some uneasiness in
London Stock Exchange to-day.

The prospect of an early Geh-
eral Election was the main topic
of conversation among market
men, and active interest was re-
stricted. Small selling orders in
domestic issues found few uy-
ers, and prices moved to lower
levels.

British Government Funds were
particularly dull.

Losses of half per cent, were
widespread in medium and long
dated stocks.

Leading industrials followed
the lead of giltedged
Textiles were on offer from
provinces, but irons and steels
were restricted with prices steady
at previous 2losing levels.

Oils were easier in sympathy
with decline 4 in Burma’s oil at
around 2%. Fall followed news
of British Government withdraw-
al of aid to Burma.

—Reuter.



Unfrocked Priest
“i .

Leads Anti-Church
; ° °
Organisation

PARIS, Jan. 9

The Conservative Paris news-
paper “Figaro” to-day alleged
that an unfrocked priest in War-
saw was director of Moscow
controlled organisation for oper-
ating against the Church, known
as the “originform”.

He was 60-year-old Vasily
Gorelov, a Russian who entered
Holy Orders under the Tsarist
regime but was unfrocked shori-
ly after the revolution and be-
came a Colonel in the Russian
secret police, “Figaro” said,

The paper added that aspir-
ants were trained in four special-
ist schools. One was in Theodosia
Crimea, for agents in France,
Switzerland, Belgium, Italy,
Spain and South America,

Another at Signould, Lithuania,
rained “missionaries to Scandi-
navia, Holland, Germany, Britain,
and Austria. In Constaza, Ru-
mania, specialists were trained
for the Middle East and in a
fourth unspecified place, agents
were trained for North America,
the paper said.

—Reuter.



Specially designed for Barbados, this
brown broque is now on show in

leading

made by





| JOHN WHITE

means made just right

stores. See them for yourself.



New Zealand’s

New PrimeMinister



Mr. S. HOLLAND

MR. SIDNEY HOLLAND, the
National Party leader, has be-
come Prime Minister of New
Zealand. He was born in 1893
at Greendale, in the province
of Canterbury. Both his pa-
rents came from England. His
father, Henry Holland, C.B.E.,
was a Yorkshireman. After
serving as a subaltern with
the New Zealand Artillery in
the First World War, Sidney
Holland took up a business
career and in time became
managing director of the Mid-
land Engineering Company.
It was in 1935 that he first
took up politics, when he be-
came an opposition member in
the first Labour session. For
five years he was Parliamen-
tary Secretary in the House
and then became Leader of
the Opposition. In 1940 he
succeeded Mr, Adam Hamil-
ton as Leader of the Nation-
al Party.

Red Guerrillas
Smash Chinese
Battalions

LONDON, Jan. 9.

According to a New China news
agency report received in Lon-
don to-night, Chinese guerillas
have smashed more than two bat-
talions of a Nationalist division
in the West of Hainan Island.
The report added that 360 Nation-
alist officers and men were killed,
wounded or taken prisoners, and
their Divisional Commander seri-
ously wounded. Quantities of war
material were captured ,and the
remainder of the division put to
flight.

Hainan Island is the southern-
most point of China, forming the
eastern side of the Gulf of Tonk-
ing.

The same source said that Chou
En Lai, Prjme Minister of the Cen-
tral Chinese People’s Government
(the Peking Government), to-day
ordered the staffs of all Na-
tionalist Government agencies in
Hong Kong to safeguard state
property and await their taking
over.

—Reuter.

Sell Air Fleet

LONDON.
The British Overseas Airways
fleet of Plymouth flying-boats,
which was recently replaced by
Canadian Argonauts, is for sale.
—(C.P.)

JUST RECEIVED

e
|)) 1- tins PRARL BARLEY
| i-tb tins OATMEAL
{



Large CREAM OF WHEAT
Small CREAM OF WHEAT

Large QUAKER OATS with
China ware

Large ROBIN HOOD OATS
with Glass Tumbler

1-1 iin TONO
Tins NESTLE’S CREAM
Tins FRUIT —

Pears, Pineapple, Straw-
belies.

K





No Human
Rights fi
8" n
Colombi
Colombia
@ From Page i
what is happening in Colombia
at the present time.”

Dr. Carlos Lleras-Restrepo de-
clared that “what is happening
in Colombia cannot be considered
just a change in Government, or
another coup similar to those that
had occurred in other Latin
American countries.”

It was the first time for 40
years that the “wildest uprising”
had oecurred during a change in
the constitutional order of the
Colombia Government.

“Practically, all human rights
have disappeared in Colombia”,
he said. The freedom of the
Press has completely disappeared,
and not only is internal news
suppressed, but any Overseas re-
ports, detrimental to the interests
of the Conservative Party, are
also forbidden.” Freedom of
Assembly, too, has been entirely
banned, and the right to live
where you want has been
forbidden.”

—Reuter.

50,000 Miners
Strike In U.S.

PITTSBURGH, Jan. 9.
About’ 50,000 soft coal miners
struck to-day in Ohio, Pennsyl-
vania, West Virginia and Ala-
bama, closing pits, worked by the
United States Steel Corporation,
half a dozen other Steel Firms
and the Pittsburgh Consolidation
Coal Company. A sign posted at
one West Virginia mine, said
“No contract, no work’. Miners
contract in mines east of the
Mississippi River expired last
June, and the miners’ leader,
John L, Lewis then instructed
Miners Union at those pits
work only three days a week un-
til his demands for contracts were
met. Previously miners had al-
ways downed tools when con-
tracts expired. Mine owners filed
suits seeking millions of dollars
damages against Lewis and his
Union in Ohio last week. Mr
John L. Lewis last week report-
ed there was “grave unrest’
among American coal miners be-
cause owners “will not permit
the workers to share in the in-
crease in the price of coal”. ‘There
has been no increase in the cost
of production,” he ‘added.
—(Reuter.)



r . +

rip To Housewives
LONDON

The Order of the Boot is the
order for the day at sculptor
Dora Cordine’s home. She asks
visitors to remove their shoes and
offers them a pile of slippers
from which to choose. She claims
her keep-the-floor-clean policy
gives her more time for her ari
—(C.P9

Heavy Loot

SHEPPEY, Kent. England
Thieves stripped £570 worth of
lead from the roof of the historic
Shurland Hall here.—(C.P.)

& SPOPSSOSSS SOOO POL POLL PPL ALOT SAE,





Check Communist |
Expansion

@ from page 1

It was learned that Canada’s;
Foreign Minister, Mr. Lester |
Pearson said that his country’s}
Foreign Policy was based on
Recognition of the dangers re-}
sulting from “the new Russian}
Imperialism”. The United Na-
tions had not solved the probvlem
of Russian expansionism, and}
the North Atlantic Pact was the
outcome of this realisation. By
demonstrating that its signatories |
were prepared to meet aggres- |
sion, the Pact would serve the}
cause of security throughout the
world, Mr. Pearson said. Pandit
Nehru said that Russia, while
promising benefits through her
own experiment, seemed unable
to combine these with freedom
Only New Zealand's’ Foreign
Minister, Mr. F. W. Doidge, show-
ed any inclination to support the |
concept of a Pacific Pact. He
suggested that the security prob-
lem was world wide and that it]
was useless to secure the Atlan-
tic alone. Mr, P., C., Spender, |
Australian Foreign Minister, said
the Pacific Pact idea should not
be pursued, unless the Major
Powers were prepared to enter
into fuller commitments than
they at present seemed inclined |
to consider

|
|
|

A Hint

According to one informed
Source, Mx. Spender threw out a
hint that interested powers might,
allow a proportion of their na-
tional incomes to help southeast
Asia in facing her present eco-'
nomic plight. It is understood
that a five point agenda was
agreed:

(1) Genera] International Sit-

uation,

(2) China.

(3) Japanese Peace Treaty.

(4) Southeast Asia, particu-

larly Burma and _ Indo-
China.

5) Europe, with special refer-

ence to Britain's role

An official communique sum-
marised the opening speech made
by Mr: Don Senanayake, Ceylon’s

}



Prime Ministery and Chairman of
the Conference, He-said: “The
fundamental problem of Asia is

economic not political: And it i
essential to the future peace ot
the world that the problem of
poverty and want in Asia should
be clearly seen and boldly tackled
‘Communism would have no
appeal to the masses of Asia
since they were assured of steady
improvement in their conditions
of life.”
Reuter.

DELEGATION TO DISCUSS
CHINA PROBLEM

COLOMBO, Jan. 9.

Sources close te the Austra-
lian Delegation said tonight that
while no delegation was expected
to submit a perfected scheme for
securing South-East Asia against
Communism, it was hoped that
the conference might produce a
workable plan for early com-
bined action.

Tomorrow the ministers are
likely to discuss the problem of
China.

—Reuter.

66

THE

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS

ee

Published by The Advocage Co, Ltd., 34, Broad St., Bridgetown

ADVOCATE



Tuesday, January 10, 1950



Safety At Sea

THE uncertainty of the fate of the
Auxiliary Schooner Gloria May sixteen
days overdue on a voyage from Demerara
to Barbados serves to focus attention on
the lack of proper facilities for the safety
of seagoing vessels in the Caribbean.

The Gloria May left Demerara on
December 24 with a crew of twelve beside
the skipper Capt. George Graham and two
passengers, If no news of their whereabouts
comes to hand it will mean that fifteen
lives will have been lost without trace.
If at some point in the journey there had
been a wireless transmitting set. on board
the vessel, it would have been ascertained
at what stage the vessel began to encounter
difficulties.

The first essential in this measure of
safety is the enforcing by means of the
law that all vessels and especially those
carrying passengers should be equipped
with wireless transmitting and receiving
sets. It might be possible to relieve a vessel
in danger or to rescue any or all of its pas-
sengers and crew who had taken to boats.
In this way even if a vessel is lost it would
be possible to save human life. Govern-
ments of the West Indies should not allow
vessels to ply for hire in this area with-
out making the necessary provision for the
safety of the lives carried. The carriage
of life boats demanded by the law is an
indication that it was intended that some
succour should be given to those aboard
if misfortune befalls any vessel. This
then should be carried to its logical con-
clusion,

The other provision is another safety
measure of ensuring that masters of these
vessels hold certificates such as are de-
manded by the Board of Trade or awarded
by the School of Navigation in Jamaica.
During the last war, the loss of time and
sometimes cargo caused by the arrival at
one port when intending to go to another
was brought clearly to public notice. The
intercolonial vessels were doing a fine job
in carrying cargoes from one port to
another when the large vessels could not
afford to run the gauntlet with the German
submarines lurking in these waters. But

it was good fortune that more of them
were not lost.

In past years vessels have been lost
without trace and it was presumed that
storms had overtaken them and that crews
had no opportunity to get out the boats.
No one was ever in position to say what
measure of suffering the members of the
crew or the passengers endured before
death or whether there had been any
Opportunity to rescue them after hours in
the open boats. The last such tragedy
was that of the Island Queen lost on a
journey of a few hours between Grenada
and St. Vincent.

When the intercolonial schooners
attempted to run the submarine blockade

during the last war, it was pointed out »

by this newspaper that if the masters all
held certificates much of the time would
have been saved and some of the cargoes
too. Nothing was ever done and now this
tragedy has come to emphasise the need
for some measure of precaution.

The Dutch Government has just made
it compulsory for masters of vessels in the
Dutch West Indies to have certificates and
to this end provided the facilities for study.
It should not be difficult for the British
Government through Colonial Develop-
ment & Welfare to improve the school in
Jamaica for this purpose.

The lack of proper shipping facilities at
the moment shows that the West Indies
will have to depend on these smaller craft

for a long time and there should be some
protection, for those who are compelled to
travel by them,

OUR READERS SAY:



Should Pedestrians Walk on the Left or Right Side of the Road?

A Spring Clean Needed

To the Editor, The Advocate,

eee BERR Gro ae

SMALL EXPECTATIONS

LONDON, (By Mail).

For Britons 1950 will be a year
of uncertainties and smal] expec-
tations.

The stock markets — like the
people — face the new year un-
steadily after a momentous twelve
months spotlighted by devalua-
tion and with British Government
securities barely holding their
ground due to all the uncertain-
ties.

With a national election loom-
ing up and the possibility of an-
other unpleasant budget little else
could be expected. ;

The arguments for or against
devaluation will take some decid_
edly stiff beating. Fears have been
expressed that. unless dynamic
impetus is given to the nation’s
dollar export drive it will wallow
hopelessly in the “crawling” stage
and the opportunity offered by
devaluation will have been
missed.

For Mr. and Mrs. John Bull and
family the rising cost of living,
high taxes and austerity put a
formidable damper on prospects,
but these are a few bright spots.

There is a possibility of more
home-produced meat, milk, bacon,
eggs and cheese but less food from
dollar countries will be imported.

Mrs. Bull can expect better fur-
niture and larger quantities and
more varieties of furnishing
fabrics.

Motorists will have a slightly
better chance of getting a new
car delivered, but chances of
getting a house in 1950 will remain
very slim. Private building will
be resumed on February 1, but at
a ratio of only one private license
to every nine local authority
licenses, :

Rents are expected to remain
fairly steady with little likelihood
of decreases.

There will be fewer clothes and
higher prices for most articles of
cothing.

With some restrictions remov-
ed, more and cheaper wines wil
be imported, but the shortage of
whisky will remain.. Tobacco sup~
plies will not improve the temper
of smokers. ;

With two stations operating,
1950 is expected to be a boom
year for television.

A survey of prospects for the
new year makes rather grim
reading:



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By Fred Doerflinger

Food: Recent ration increases
built up a hope that the lean years
are ‘passing, but it is not at all
certain that the present levels can
be maintained in every case.

Traders term it a “false state of
plenty” and cannot conceive that
the present increases in rations
and imports of many kinds can
last %

Clothing: The trade has warned
the public to expect either higher
prices in utility goods or smaller
supplies of them. Cotton goods
will continue in short supply until
production is boosted and deval-
uation and rising costs can be
counted on to keep up prices. °

The Board of Trade spokesman
said there should be no difficulty
as far as woollen goods were
concerned, but traders insist if
wool prices stay up then prices
of finished products will have to
be raised.

Housing: Recent Government
economy cuts in building plans
will not become a reality until the
end of 1950. The cut in November
1949 in the rate of building

(220,000 houses a year) will have pec

no repercussions until the autumn
of 1950, as it takes about 12
months to build a house.

During early 1950, Ministry of
Health housing experts will try
to get an accurate figure of the
houses really needed.

Although restricted private
building resumes on February 1,
private house prices will be gov-
erned by the local authorities.
They have power to approve pri-
vately built houses costing up to
$8,400, but these cases will be
rare

Prices of second-hand houses
will probably climb in the early
Spring as accommodations for
large families become more acute.

Rents: Local authorities con-
trol the rents question and no re-
ductions are envisaged. Several
local authorities have upped the
rents of council houses recently.

Agriculture: There are pros-
pects for a bigger wheat acreage
and increased livestock in 1950.
The four-year agricultural plan
to increase production will con-
tinue at full steam. In addition,
a nation-wide drive to use mar-
ginal land to produce more meat
and milk is expected,

Blames The Car

By JOHN McCAFFERTY

PHILADELPHIA, (By Mail)

Dr. Fletcher D. Woodward, of
the University of Virginia Hos-
pital, warned to-day that death
will take no holiday of the
nation’s highways until automo-
biles are designed for “safe and
sane transportation,”

He informed the Keystone Au-
tomobile Club of Philadelphia
that he (elieves sleek modern-
day automobiles are “unsafe,
unapproprie‘e and harlots of the
highways.”

Dr. Woolward charged that
alleged emphasis on “fancy do-
dads” in the modern car was
“indirectly responsible” for send-
ing many motorists to their
graves annually.

Stress uy. so-called “eye
appeal of colour, chromium, gad-
gets and blown-up bodies” he
contended, is “detrimental to the
safety” of the motoring public.

Dr. Woodward termed the
“fancy do-dads” on recerit edi-
tions of the modern, streamlined
automobile “entirely useless.”
And he proposed that the auto-
mobile industry discard them for
“new designs assuring safe and
sane transportation.”

Dr. Woodward said that the
automobile remains a “lethal and
crippling agent” despite the suc-
cess of safety campaigns, law
enforcement and strides in the
medical profession. He added:

“Any further reduction in the
rate of injuries and deaths on
our highways must come from
alterations in the designs of the
machine itself.”

Dr. Woodward offered the au-
tomobile industry these “safety
suggestions”:

1. installation of “governors”
on all cars to limit top speed to
55 miles per hour without inter-
fering in any way with accelera-
tion at lower speeds.

2. installation of safety belts
such as are standard equipment
in aircraft.

3. installation of crash pads,
such as sponge rubber padding on
dashboards and*the back of front
seats.

4. elimination of all projecting
handles, knobs, buttons, ash trays,
ete.

5. mounting of “oleo” shock
absorbers on front bumpers to
act similarly to an aecroplane’s
landing gear in absorbing shoe.

6. installation of rear-end en-
gypes ta provide drivers with

ment are

very unsavoury.

better and wider vision such as
is now done in many trucks and
busses.

7. elimination of shiny, reflect-
ing surfaces from the driver’s
visual field by doing away with
all chromium trim.

8. shelving of sleek convertible
models entirely “because of the
danger to passengers in event of
an upset or a “turnover.”

9. installation of “polarized
windshields” to minimize daytime
driving glare and reduce “night
blinding.”

Dr. Woodward said that that
most of his “safety suggestions”
can be employed immediately
while others will require new
laws or additional research.”

—IN.S.



“Can you walk a little,
dear—mummy’s hands are
frozen.”

London Express Service.



Teday’s Thought

THE KEY to every man is
his thought. Sturdy and
defying though he looks, he
has a helm which he obeys,
which is the idea after which
all his facts are elassified.
— EMERSON

THERE is nothing that
makes men rich and strong
but that which they carry
inside of them. Wealth is
of the heart, not of the
hand,

—John Milton.



also made reference.

The

Furniture: Better quality fur-
niture will reach British shops in
1950 but prices will remain high.
Recent high demand is expected
to slacken because of prices. The
trade states that production is
about equal to demand at present
prices.

¢ fabrics: Devaluation
is expected to push up prices but
there will be larger supplies and
greater variety because of in-

creased home production and im-/

ports. <

China and pottery: ates =
forecasts a good supply of plain
white china and pottery but little
decorated will be avail-
able. Only small quantities mark.
ed “export reject” will reach
British shops.

Tobacco: There is little hope
for an improvement in supplies.
A reduction in purchases of
American tobacco would not affect
supplies before the end of the
year.

Wines: Some good wines at
cheaper prices are already enter-
ing the country as is evidenced by
the excellent Christmas selection.
Sherry and port importers ex~=
+ more variety, and bigger
quantities if the budget is fav-
ourable.

Vacations: Devaluation will in
crease the price of vacations in
Europe by as much as 10 to 15
per cent. For Britons, vacations
at home will cost about the samc
as in 1949.

Motoring: Manufacturers plan
to produce some 440,000 automo-
biles in 1950. Under existing
arrangements with the Ministry
of Supply manufacturers will
have to export 330,000 but they
are doubtful if this target actually
can be reached.

Any seasonal decline in sales
to some countries would mean
diversions to the home market
Some 4,000 extra cars reached the
home market in this way during
1949.

Television: The wate aoe =
roducing 300,000 television sets
> 16a “nearly twice the 1949
figure| Efforts will be made to
reduce costs (the cheapest set on
the British market is about $110)
but hopes of price reductions are
offset by price increases in raw
materials. No important changes
in design are expected.—I,.N.S.



.

Dear Pedestrians!

Dear Motorists!
FRANKFURT (By Mail).

The police of Frankfurt appar-
ently are striving to out-do any
officer in the world when it comes
to courtesy,

This move is highly favourea
by the German people, who for
many years, lived under the iron
rules of the black-booted “Third
Reich” policemen.

Tickets and stickers are well-
known measures to curtail traffic
violators. However, the tickets
issued by the Frankfurt Police are
of a different nature and, some-
what more pleasant for the of-
fender,

So-called “warning tickets,”
bear the following text:

“Dear pedestrians ——- motorists!
By your conduct, you have vio-
lated the traffic rules and thus
endangered the life of your fel-
low-citizens as well as your own.
The Frankfurt Police politely ask
you to observe all existing traffic
rules in the future, thus helping
to decrease the accident rate in
our city. ;

In case of repeated violation
we are reluctantly compelled to
serve notice against you.”

In addition to this, new cour-
tesy signs have been installed at
all major roads leading to and
from Frankfurt. The “gns, bear-
ing two inscriptions. One for in-
coming automobiles, reads: The
Frankfurt Police ask you to ob-
serve all traffic regulations.” The
second, for departing traffic says:

“The Frankfurt Police appreci-
ate your observance of all traffic
regulations. —L™MS.



*
Pan-African Roads
NAIROBI, Kenya Colony.

A network of all-weather roads
to cover the African continent
within the next ten years was
recommended by the International
Congress of African Touring,
which met here. Some of the
countries represented said they
plan to start building some of the
roads suggested.—(C.P.)

Wee
“Back Home” Visit
CORNER BROOK, Canada.
It will be an “old home visit”
for Newfoundlanders on _ the
Canadian mainland if a planned
steamship tour takes shape. New-
foundlanders in Montreal, plan to
charter a boat next summer, load
it with fellow islanders and make
a leisurely tour of the principal
ports of Newfoundland.—(C.P.)









Whatever



health and not the Chairman,
In the neighbouring parish of

eS ee

287th Talk

By Thomas €. Watson

LONDON (By Mail). |

The four deputy ministers of the United |
States, Britain, France and Russia res' ed
their apparently interminable negotiations
to produce a draft Peace Treaty for Austria
in London yesterday. \
This was their 287th meeting. The talks};
began in January, 1947 and while much has
been accomplished there are still one or two
vital outstanding matters yet to be cleared

up.
Throughout the talks Russia has E



tained an uncompromising position to these
vital matters. If any compromise has been
effected it was on the initiative of the West-
ern Powers. 5

The issue which must be settled at this
meeting is the amount the Austrian Govern-
ment will have to pay the Russians for sup-
plies and services rendered to Austria by
Russia since 1945.

The talks in Lake Success flopped on this
point. Austria, in addition to the 160,000,000
dollars reparations to Russia, offered a fur-
ther four million dollars for services. Russia
refused it point blank and the deputies de-
cided that the matter might be settled bilat-
erally.

So the talks resumed on a bilateral scale
in Vienna. Over three weeks ago the Aus-
trian Government amended their offer and
despatched a note to Moscow outlining their
new terms. So far, despite urgings on the|
part of the other deputies, no reply has
been received.

Russia has stated in unequivocal language
that they cannot continue their talks on other
financial aspects of the peace with Austria
until this point is finally settled.

Therefore, pending, the result of the bilat-
eral talks the deputies can get down to other
problems that have yet to be solved. First,
there is the question of the employment of
foreign technicians to aid Austria’s economic
and industrial recovery,

Up to now Russia has been adamant in
refusing to allow foreign technicians to be
employed by Austria in the building up of
her civil aviation, The Russian see in this a
revival of the Austrian Air Force and the
talks on this particular subject are likely to
be long and acrimonious,

Another point is the settlement of the
refugees in Austria. Austria is willing to
nationalize and absorb about 50,000 of these
people. Russia on the other hand wants
these refugees carefully screened before they
are absorbed into Austria’s population.

As many of these refugees are from coun-
tries now under Russian domination. Russia
is demanding that they be returned to the
country of their origin whether the refugees
like or not. Britain, USA and France com:
promised on this issue by saying that only
those who freely volunteered to return should
be repatriated.

Russia refused to accept. The Western
Powers, fearing that serious consequences
might befall these people if they are forcibly
returned to their country of origin, have re-
fused so far to yield and it is more than likely
that they will maintain that attitude.

So, unless there is a change of heart on the
part of the Soviet authorities, the deadlock
appears to be as insoluble as ever—I.N.S,





Legislation Helps The Boars

OBERLINGEN, Germany, (By Mail).

Man-hunting by wild boars instead of boar-
hunting by man is a new post-war “turnabout” in
German forests.

The 100 percent disarmament since the close of
World War II, which also was extended to hunters,
has reversed relations between civilized man and
the wild beasts.

Recently a group of foresters in the neighbour-
hood of Goppingen in the South West of Germany
became the object of a mass attack by 20 wild
boars in open daylight.

The woodmen had just settled down for a short
rest and snack, when the black beasts, led by a
strong boar, suddenly rushed forward from a
thicket where they apparently had hidden and
prepared their assault.

The Woodmen, many of them obviously war-
trained, quickly took refuge in improvised trenches
and between piles of fallen trees. No one was
hurt, but they had to hold out in their “forts” a
long time before the “enemy” retreated,

In another case, a single boar boldly strolled
through the streets of the town of Stuttgart. It left
the impression that it had an uncanny knowledge
of man’s unarmedness,

Only when many citizens had been alarmed and
began an organised clatter of teapots, bells and
other “instruments” did the visitor slowly retreat
toward the forest.

In the Lake of Constance District wild boars
pay so many visits to the borders of the lake that
no private persons or tourists venture to leave the
precincts of town and village very far.

The recently-announced “rearmament” of Ger-

man hunters is expected to reverse the
in favour of civilization. situation



olution to provide funds for the



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ods
i
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5
Hy

‘

anne Sa

SIR.—Now that
Association is

a code of rules for pedestrians
with the object of its becoming

law,

One of the things w should
be determined is the aan of the
road on Which they should walk
Recent ions stated
the left side of the road. In my
ae * a mistake as the
esponsibility is pl
the vehicular fee —e

I remember on a previous oc-
casion a code for pedestrians was
drawn up during Colonel Dick-
ens’ regime and in this it was
suggested that pedestrians should
walk on the right so as to face
oncoming traffic thus placing re
sponsibility on both parties.

In view of these conflicting in-
structions J think there should be
a general ‘airing of the subjec?
so that the general public should
know what is expected of them.

BEN GI ;
White Park Road, _

Jan 7, 1950,



To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Nomination day in the
parish of St. James went off very
smoothly, There was a marked
absence of mud-slinging and
Wwarme-stuff! as was expected in
Some quarters and as was let off
at the last Vestry Election. Mr.
Stephen Walcott, the out-going
Churchwarden in a very brief
speech told the taxpayers that
the parish had succeeded in main-
ae an — & at mini-

im waeges an at the poor
had been well attended to, fom
glad to know that the poor re-
ceived a satisfactory measure of
attention because the poor and
destitute should be always taken
care of. Dealing with sanitation
the Churchwarden said that the
Public Health Bill would put all
wrong things right.

Now everybody was waiting to
hear from Mr. Walcott who is
a Commissioner of Health and one
who is really deeply interested in
the affairs of the parish of plans
for reorganising the sanitary de-
partment because it is well known
that a few things in that depart-

Chief Sanitary Inspector should
be solely in charge and responsi-
ble for the health of the parish
but it is not so. The Chairman who
is a layman and has no know-
ledge whatsoever of health meth-
ods supervises the health matters
of the parish and the Chief In-
spector has also to perform the
duties of a sub-sanitary inspector
and go about daily inspecting
yards, houses, etc, ind along
with the other sub-sanitary in-
spectors has to report daily to
the Chairman the work he has
done. Instead of detailing his
men to their respective districts,
paying them surprise visits during
the day checking up on their
work, receiving and investigating
complaints at his office and at-
tending ato the numerous things



which this important office calls
for, he has to suffer the in lignity
of performing the duties of a sub
sanitary inspector, rubbing
shoulder .to shoulder with them
thus losing the respect from the
men which was evidenced by the
behaviour of-one of the members
of the staff to which Mr, Walcott





might have been the object of
carrying on this system in the past,
it is not good enough for today
nor does it stand good for the
future.

We have at the head of one
Sanitary Department a_ fully
trained, qualified, efficient and
capable offi@er and the people of
St. James require and earnestly
desire the same modern method
of running the sanitation of the
parish as i$ obtainable in each
of the other ten parishes. Every
chairman feels proud when he has
a competent man at the head of
affairs and the people rest quietly
in their beds when they know
that their sanitation is entrusted
into capable hands.

_ At present there are only three
inspectors in this parish which
takes fifth place in the island in
population and in. houses—the
Same which was had fifty years
ago with one third the number
of houses and people. The parish
requires an increased staff of
inspectors ard one or more dis~
trict nurses with the Chief In-
spector in charge of the people’s

WARE. Lov

clay making plant at Lancaster
is inaccurate and I crave your
indulgence to make the necessary
corrections.

Paragraph three states that
“Government was convinced that
the industry was not a profitable
one etc.” What I did say was
that the Government was con-
vinced that the industry could be
made profitable, but that the
Government must undertake cer-
tain industries that private con-
cerns would not undertake owing
to the returns on their money,









St. Peter with lesser houses and
smaller population there are four
sub-inspectors and the Chief In-
spector and now I notice from
your columns that the commis-
sioners of that parish are calling
for two district nurses. St. James
should not lag behind the times.
It will be the duty of the new
Vestry to put its house in order
immediately and not wait to be
forcec by the Public Health Bill
te do what is already a duty to
the taxpayers but what-is clearly
necessary and long overdue. They
have just broken faith by appoint-
ing an outsider to the post of sub-
sanitary inspector in preference
to a bright and intelligent man
already in the service with the
> ag aged ee It is yet ite
ime to make wrong things right t should have bee on-
and there should be no delay. nessee Valley Authority eee |
S. B. SEARLES, of the greatest Public pre

that the world had seen {

for

Paragraph four contains a
greater mistake in stating that
the pottery industry was one of
the greatest private Projects that
the world had seen for some-
time.



projects |
some- |
ume and that no private indus-
trialists would have undertaken |
this scheme. |

i

|

Orange Hill,
St. James

The Pottery Industry

ny : al F L W Le

To The Editor, The Advocate, Bank Hall, aerree
SIR,—Your report in to-day’s St. Michael, |

issue on my speech for the res- January 5,

1950,



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TUESDAY, JANUARY 10,





1950



2 Ladies Successful
In Vestry Elections

Mottley Heads Poll Again InSt. Michael

TWO ladies were successful candidates in

Vestry Elec-

tions held yesterday.’ They were Mrs. H. A. Talma in

Christ Church, and Mrs. F. E. Daysh in St. Philjp. In St. |

Michael Mr. E. D. Mottley again headed the polls, this time
with 730 votes out of a total of 1,000. Mr. T. W. Miller was

second with 566 votes.

Mr. J. W. Hewitt was unsuccess-
ful. He secured 421 votes, and
so the old Vestry was returned.

Successful newcomers in Christ
Church apart from Mrs. Talma
were Mr. A. M. Jones, and Mr.
M. E. R. Bourne. Mr. A. N. Chad-
derton who served on the Vestry
on previous occasions, but who
did not serve last year, was also
successful yesterday.

Another lady, Mrs. R. C. Skin-
ner who came forward for St.
Lucy did win the favour of the
electorate.

Electors Thanked

At the end of the count in St.
Michael Mr. H. A. Tudor, retiring
Churchwarden, thanked the elect-
ors for having re-elected him and
the Sheriff, Mr. F. J. Cole and the
Sub-sheriff, Mr. R. M. Cave for
the orderly way in which the pro-
ceedings had been carried out.
He congratulated Mr. Mottley and
Mr. Miller and extended his sym-
pathy to Mr. Hewitt.

Mr. Cole paid tribute to the
orderly way in which the electors
had gone about their business.

Mr. Mottley also thanked the
electors for their support. He said
he was gratified at the result es-
pecially in view of the fact that
he had ween ill, and had not been
able to contact all of his support-
ers. He promised to do his best
in their interest.

Mr. Miller, Mr. Weatherhead,
Mr. Symmcnds and Mr. Chase
also returned thanks, and Mr.
Hewitt after saying thanks for the
support he had got, promised. to
come again.

Total Return

The total return for St. Michael
was as follows: Mr. E, D. Mottley,
M.C.P., 730; Mr. T. W. Miller, 566;
Mr. H .A. Tudor, 540; Mr, F. C,
Goddard, M.C.P., 523; Mr, V. W.
A. Chase, 520; Mr. F. McD Sym-
monds, 517; Mr. A. S. Bryden, 511;
Mr. C. C. Browne, 509; Mr. B. A.
Weatherhead,505; Hon. V. C. Gale,
M.L.C., 501; Mr. C. A. Braithwaite,
498; Mr. A. R. Toppin, 494; Mr.
D. G. Leacock (Jr.), 476; Mr, T.
Bowring, 474; Mr. E. F. C. Bethell,
M.C.P., 465; Mr. J. K. C. Gran-
num, 425.

Mr. J. W. Hewitt, the unsuc-
cessful candidate got 421 votes,

Successful candidates in Christ
Church were: Mr. G. C. Ward,
327 votes; Mr. F. C, Goddard, 319;
Mr. C. S. McKenzie, 319; Mr, H.
St. G. Ward, 311; Hon’ble A, G.,
Gittens, M.L.C., 297; Mr. C. M.
Drayton, 283; Mr. J. E. Webster,
280; Mr. V. W. A, Chase, 278; Mr.
C. D. Branford, 268; Mr. G, C,
Ashby, 264; Mrs. H. A. Talma, 263;
Mr. U. J. Parravicino, 253, Mr.
Hugh Garnes, 251; Mr. A. M.
Jones 241; Mr. C. Ifill, 229; Mr.
M. E. R. Bourne, 222.

St. Philip’s Returns

St. Philip’s parish. who had no
Nomination Day last Monday
because a Sheriff or sub-Sheriff
was not available had Nomin-
ation Day yesterday. Mr. Scott,
Assessor of the parish, acted as
Sheriff and Mr. Moore, Poor
Law Inspector as Sub-sheriff,

The old Vestry was proposed
with the exception of Mr. H. Man.
ning who retired. He proposed

S| RR eer

Mrs. F. E. Daysh, sister of Mt,
H. L. Smith, another member
of the Vestry. There were no
other candidates and the old
Vestry along with Mrs. Daysh
was declared elected.

The Vestry for this year is
therefore composed of the follow.
ing members: Mr. A. G. F. Farmer,
Mr. D. D. Garner M.C.P.; Mr.
E. L. Lyte; Mr. T. D. Mayers;
Mr. E. L. Moore; Mr. A. T.
Skeete; Mr. R. B. Skeete; Mr.
H. LL. Smith Mr. RR. St.c:
Weekes; Mrs. F. E. Daysh.

Three newcomers found favour
with the St. Lucy Electorate.
They were. Mr. F. A. Greaves;
Mr. G. Harris and Mr. Kenneth
C. O’Neale. Three of last year’s
vestrymen were dropped — Mr.
C. O. Knight, Mr. W. Connell
and Mr. D. E. Webster.

Mr. J. &. T. Brancker M.C.P.
an old Vestryman topped the
polls with 1385 votes; Mr. E. L.
Ward M.C.P..was next with
125; Votes secured by other suc-
cessful candidates were as fol-
lows: Mr. E. L. Bannister, 118;
Mr. F. A. Greaves, 117; Mr.
W. L. Greaves, 108; Mr. G. G.
Harris, 102; Mr. K. C. O’Neale,
100; Mr. W. H. Yearwood, 90;
Mr. I. C.. Sobers, 81; Mr. G.
Fitz G, O’Neale. 73.

New Candidates

Two candidates who did not sit
on the Vestry last year were for-
tunate in St. Thomas. One of
them, Mr. V. E. Reeves, tied with
Mr. Julian Mahon, veteran Ves-
tryman, for the highest number
of votes, The other was Mr. C, M.
Collins. Two members of last
year’s Vestry who were dropped
were Mr. R. S. Bancroft and Mr.
Cc. E. Tryhane.

List of successful candidates
follow: Mr. J. Mahon and Mr.
V. E. Reeves, 150 votes each; Mr.
K. Sandiford, 130; Mr. C, M. Col-
lins, 124; Mr. A. E. Cave, 123; Mr.
L. D. Gill, 123; Mr. J, C. Thorne,
122; Mr. S. A. Walcott, 121; Mr.
W. T. Gooding, 116; Mr. D. A.
Watson, 106.

Nine members or iast year’s
Vestry were returned in St. James.
The tenth, a newcomer, wes Mr
E. Holder, who was nominated
after his father, an old vestryman,
had resigned.

This year’s Vestry will there-
fore be: Mr. S, A. Walcott whc
topped the poll with 167 votes;
Mr. J. H. Wilkinson M.C.P., i€3;
Mr. A. L. Jordan, 156; Mr. C. G.
Massiah, 144; Mr. S. Massiah, 139;
Mr. A. G. Johnson, 139; Mr. W. W,
Denny, 122; Mr. E. Holder, 122;
Mr. R. S. Bancroft, 113; Mr. D. E.
Webster, 111.

Unsuccessful candidates were
Mr. J. M. Crick, Mr. C. E. Jem-
mott, and Mr. C. B. Searle.

In St. Joseph the old Vestry
was returned. Names of the mem-
bers are: Mr, W. R. Coward, 34
votes; Mr. A. P. Cox, 84; Mr.
H. W. Carter, 77; Mr, L. L. Gill,
74; Mr. W. T. Gooding, 72; Mr.
J. A. Haynes, 70; Mr, L. E. Smith,
M.C.P., 70; Mr. G. R. Hutson, 68;
Mr. C. A. Williams, 60; Mr. J.
Branch, 55.

Unsuccessful were, Mr. C.
Holder, Mr, R. Lee and Mr, McD,
Chandler.



In Carlisle Hay

IN PORT—Yawl Potick, Sch. Laudai-
pha, Sch. Manuata, Sch. Philip H
avidson, Yacht Maya, Yawl Stortebecker
Sch. Sunshine R., Sch. Mary M. Lewis,
Sch. Alexandrina R., Sch. Frances W.
Smith, Sch. Turtle Dove, Sch. Marion
Belle Wolfe, Sch. Emanug C. Gordon,
Sch, Reginald N, Wallace, Sch. Mandalay
Il, Sch. Marea Henrietta, Swedi:

Barquentine Sunbeam, M.V. Lady Joy

ARRIVALS

S.S. Fort Amherst, 1,946 tons net, Capt.
Kean, from Grenada; Agents: Da Costa
& Co., Ltd.

Yacht Beegie, 25 tons net, Capt. Nolan,
from Grenada.

M.V. Canadian Challenger, 3.935 tons
net, Capt. Andersson, from St: Croix;
Agents: Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd.

8.S. Alcoa Pegasus, 3,931 tons net,
Capt. Morgan, from Dominica; Agents;
Da Costa & Co., Lid. \

8.s. » 1,856 tons net, Capt,
Roorda, from Trinidad; Agents; Da Costa
& Co., Ltd.

Schooner Princess Louise, 34 tons net
Capt. Mitchell, from St. Lucia; Agents

Schooner Owners’ Association.



M.V. Arocosta, 28 tons net, Capt
Lewis, from Trinidad; Agents: Gittens

Croney & Co.

Swedish S.S. C. G. Thulin, 1,317 ton
net, Capt. Andersson, from St. Croix;
Agents; Robert Thom Ltd. é

DEPARTURES

M.V. Rufina, 1,856 tons neg, Capt

ish | Roorda, for Grenada; Agents: la Coste

& Co., Ltd.
M.V. Blue Star,
Fergusson, for Trinidad; Agent: A.

130 tons net, Gr

Harris, . : .
M.V. Daerwood, 94 tons net, Cap

Archibold, for St. Llwcia; Agent:
Schooner Owners’ Association.
S.S. Sundial, 1,652 tons net, Capt

Russell, for Trinidad; Agents: Piantatior
Ltd.

S.S. C. G, Thulin, 1,317 tons net, Cegt
Andersson, for Trinidad; Agents: Robert
Thom Ltd, ‘

Arriving by S.S. “C. G. ‘Thulin
yesterday were—from Brooklyn: William
Barclay, Mrs. Barclay, Herbert T. Mic
dleton, Mrs. Middleton, B. M, Jones,
Mrs. Jones.

IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COAST STATION

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Lta., S.S. San Vulfrano, S.S. Tindefjell, S.S

Advise that they can now communicet>

with the followi ships through their | Jeanny, S.S,
Bar! a ri Ale

S.s.
S.S. Estero, S.S. New-
brough, S.S. S, Virgilio, S.S. Carrabulle



ARRIVALS—By B.W.LA.L,
ones TRINIDAD; Trevor Gale, Daphne
Wen Hilda Altholz, Robert Altholz, Cyril
vi ters, Itic Feldman, Power J juin,
Wier Goulding, Graham Riley, Elliot
len Ernest Peterkin, John ' Deane,
nt 'y Deane, Marie Clarke, Audrey Can-
Soe Althea Linton, Moniea St. John,
sorephine Douglas, Audrey
zimes Douglas, Malcolm Riley,
rown, Sylvia Kamchin, William Cash,
Â¥ Brown, Clifford Regan, Frank Bush,
hnanan Naipal, Sir Edward Cunard,
mel Archer, Lester Reeves, Kather-
Ca Ward, Preston Alexander, Ernest
adogan, Helen Cummings, Marie Cum-

The Weather

TODAY.
p.m

Quarter)
p.m.

: 8.52 a.m.,
YESTERDAY:
Rainfall (Codrington) nil
_— for Month to Yesterday:



January 11

9.02 p.m

Temperature (Max.)

1,44 Mr.

, 83.0 deg. F

Wind Direction (9.a m en by E
{3.p.m.) N. by E
Wind Velocity 7 miles per hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 30,004 (3 p.m.)
28.954

What's on
Customs nic Ta Hastings Hc

e Court

Today | .

S.S, Esso Knoxville, S.S

Sunray,
ny, Benny, S.S. Rafina, S.S

oa Pegasus, S.S. Gulfmoon, §.S. §
Mateo, S.S, Joshua Three, S.S. Dewdale
8.S. Fordsdale, S.S. Atlantic, S.S
Morrractern, S.S. Delft, S.S. Delsud
S.S.

Alcoa Corsair, S.S. Gulfcoast

mings, Eunice Nelson, Harold Hare, Rob-
ert Worman, Margaret Price, Thomas
Davis, Keeling Davis, Cecilia Davis, Lu-
cille Davis, Maureen Davis, Basil Broo!
Robert Masson, Fle

Pataricia De Cates, Jeffrey De Cates,
Lucila Leiser, Gert Leise, Beatriz Ochoa,

* | Ramon Ochoa, Guillemina Banch, Fran-

cisco Banch, Isabel Matlock, Mercedes
Mirabal, Alberto Solariz, Maurice Jones.

From ST, LUCIA: Joseph Andrieux,
Yvonne Andrieux, Carolyn Berkenkamp,
Marita Berkenkamp, Lionel Paul, Louis
Cools-Lartigue, Alfred Baynes, Daphne
Theobalds, William Grace, Bertram Kay,
James Wooster.

From ST. KITTS: Mr. Wilfrid Peters,
Miss Howard King, Mr, John Mestier,
Mr. George Johnson, Mr, Peter Johnson.

From ANTIGUA: Daniel Walwyn, Ed-
win Thompson.

From GRENADA: Gittens Knight, Val-
entine Archer.

DEPARTURES-—-By B.W.LA.L.

For TRINIDAD: Mr. John Bayne, Mr.
Arpad Sorger, Mrs. Alicia Sorger, Master
George Sorger, Mr, Frederick Greenidge,
Wennel Best, Mr. Gerald Batson,
| Master Edward Batson, Miss Emmie Ron-
alds, Mr. John Gordon, Miss Derothy
MeConn Anoni Mastelloni, Mrs
jlance i, Mr. Walter Eggert,
c rt, Mr. Marcos Shad-
r Max Sihman, Mrs. Rivca Sih-
Arthur Goddard, Mr. Frank









M



Mr. Clifford Regan.
LUCIA: Mr, Charles DuBou-
Elsie DuBoulay, Miss Patricia
P r, Mrs, Sheila
nu Miss
, Mr, Augu





















LOCAL N



| B.H. Governor
Very Popular

The Governor of British Hon-
duras.is very popular among the
people and promises to be one of
the most progressive the colony
has ever had, Mr. R. K, Masson.
Collector of Customs of that
| colony told the “Advocate” yes-
terday.

Mr. Masson came in on Sunday
by B.W.LA. via Jamaica and
Trinidad for the Customs Talks
and is staying at the Marine
Hotel.

He said that he did not antici-
pate any trouble in British Hon-
duras over the devaluation of the
dollar as the people were known
for their loyalty to the King and
the British Empire and were per-
haps, among the most loyal sub-
jects in the British Empire.





EWS



!
|



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Delegate Alleges

Discrimination

On C.N.S. Boat

DOMINICA has the brightest prospects for the econ-
omic development and prosperity she has had for the past
50 years Hon’ble A. D. Boyd, Acting Financial Secretary of
that colony told the “Advocate” yesterday.

emenind

“Amherst” Brings
Food Stuff

THE “Fort Amherst”, passen-
ger freighter of the Furness

He said that with the revalua-| Withy Steamship Company, ar-
tion of the British Hondures dollar rived at Barbados yesterday from

it was hoped that more English

New York via St. Thomas, Trini-

capital would be invested in in-| dad and Grenada.

dustries. Before he left home, it

was rumoured that Colonial De-| and refrigerated picnic
velopment and Welfare would] taken at Trinidad, ;
begin certain operations and that brought supplies of flour,

the plans for the erection of the

Along with oranges, egg pulp

hams

this vessel

cocoa,

lk powder, spaghetti, cooking

new hotel which was badly need- butter, naval beef, boneless ba-

ed, were before the Board in a

London.

On his trip over from Belize to
Jamaica, he spoke to Mr. Bay
Sharp who was perhaps one of
the leading businessmen in the
West Indies and informed him
that with the revaluation of the
dollar, British Honduras would
ahead to be in a much better
position than she was at the
present.

British Honduras had wonderful
possibilities. It only needed capi-
tal and the correct kind of
businessmen. Adventurers were
not needed at all.

Must Be Paid
JUDGMENTS were entered for
Winley Jones and Henry’ Brath-
waite, carpenters of St. Patricks,
Christ Church, by Their Honours
Mr. G L. Taylor and Mr J. W. B
Chenery yesterday. Their Hono’
reversed the decision of Mr. C. W.
Rudder, Judge of the Petty Debt
Court of District “B”, who had
entered judgment for Joseph
Mottley of the same district.
Brathwaite and Jones claimed
$7.40 and $7.70 respectively from
Mottley as money due to them
for repairs they had carried out
to his house at St. Patrick.
Mottley held that he had ar-
ranged with Brathwaite to do the
work and Brathwaite should not
have brought Jones to help him
do it. Their Honours felt that
since the carpenters had not



charged too high and Mottley had] was

go herst”

picnic hams, saltpack hams,
M. U. and steel angles which
were transhipment cargo ex the
steamships “Senator”, ‘“Come-
dian”, “Governor” and “Pioneer

She brought from New York
machine parts, belting, varnish
and materiak The “Fort Am-
left port yesterday evening
for Martinique. Its local repre-
sentatives are Messrs. Da Costa\
& Co., Ltd.

Will Take
Away Rum

ABOUT 600 puncheons of mo-
lasses for St. John and Halifax
and a quantity of rum for St.
John will be loaded on M.V.
“Canadian Challenger” which ar-
rived here from Trinidad yester-



it brought here from Trinidad
a cargo comprised of fresh fruit,

‘| bitters, stationery, shirts and per-
Urs | sonal effects.

Seven race horses
consigned to Hon. V. C. Gale,
M.L.C., Mr. H. Edwards and
Mr. J. R. Edwards also arrived by
this vessel.

The “Challenger” will be sail-
ing to-day for St. John and Hali-
fax. Messrs. Gardiner Austin &
Co., Ltd., are agents.

FUEL FROM
ST. LUCIA

AMONG
the



arrivals
“Princess

yesterday’s
schooner

had the work done to his satisfac-} Louise” under Captain Mitchell.

tion, the carpenters were entitled| This vessel

to their pay.

Error Case



brought from St.
Lucia a cargo of charcoal, fire-
wood, hoesticks and cocoanuts.
Messrs. Schooner Owners’ Asso-
ciation are local agents.



Adjourned 10/- For Misconduct

A foreclosure action claim
which was set down for hearing
in the Court of Error yesterday
was adjourned until January 23.

THEIR Honours Mr. G. L.
Taylor and J .W. B. Chenery yes-
terday agreed with the decision
of Mr, S. H. Nurse, Police Magis-

The action is between Weber| ‘Tate of District “C” who imposed

Johnson of Near Roach’s, St. Lucy
(claimant), Etheline G. Beckles of
Tudor Gap, St. Michael, (Plain-
tiff) and Westerman D. Bowen,
also of Tudor Gap (Defendant).

The property in dispute is one h

acre, one rood and twenty-four
perches of land and a dwelling
house standing on the land,

Maltreated
His Donkey



a fine of 10/- and 2/- costs on
Leon Farley of Orange Hill, St.
James, Their Honours ordered
Farley also to pay 7/8 Court of
Appeal costs.

He had been found guilty of
aving misconducted himself





Car Damaged
In Accident
The right front fender, the
rear fenders, and the right side

JAMES WEBSTER of Clapham | of the motor car M—1817, were
was fined 5/- in 14 days or 14| damaged in an accident on
days’ imprisonment when he ap- | Saturday.

peared before His Worship Mr.

The accident occurred at about

A. J. H. Hanschell for maltreat- | 1.30 p.m. on Rouen Road, St.

ing his donkey
Road on November 23.

£10 For Stolen

Furniture

A decision of Mr. H, A. Talma,
Police Magistrate of District “A”
remained in force when the case
in which he had fined Julian
Murray of the Pine Housing
Scheme £10 to be paid by month-
ly instalments, was reviewed by
Their Honours Mr. G. L. Taylor
and Mr. J.W. B, Chenery yester-
day. Proper notice of appeal had
not been given.

Murray had been found guilty
of having stolen furniture and
other articles which were th@
property of Doris Jones during
September 1949, Jones and Murray
had been living in Constitution
on the night of the flood of August
1949. Jones’ house had been
washed away. Sgt, Holder told
the court that he had found the
articles claimed in Murray’s
house.

9 Acres Of Canes
Were Burnt

One of the largest cane fires
this year occurred at Farm Plan-
tation St. George at about 4.15
P.m., on Saturday,

The fire, origin unknown,
destroyed 934 acres of first and
second crop canes. The damage is
covered by insurance.

The canes are the property of
Mr. R. Jordon of the same Plan-
tation.







Games Cancelled

LONDON, Jan. 9.
As no assurance has been re-
ceived from the Racing Club of
Rio de Janeiro that the matches
against Wolverhampton Wander-

ers and Portsmouth would be
played, the games have been
cancelled. The Football Asso-

ciation, on behalf of the English
clubs, to-day cabled to Argentine
that the tour could not take
place, as insufficient time re-
mained to make adequate ar-
rangements,

—Reuter.

along Culloden pomnedl.

between the motor
orry P—142, ovned by A. G.
and W. K. Farmer of Oughter-
son, St. Philip and driven by
Elliot Gittens of East Point, in
the same Parish, and M—1817,
which is owned by Clement
Austin, shopkeeper at the corner
of Constitution and Martindales
Road, and was driven by his
daughter, Claire Aystin of the
same address. No damage was
done to the lorry.

Bicycle And Car
Collide



The front waeel of a bicycle
owned and ridden by Rupert
Belgrave of Bush Hall, was ex-
tensively damaged in an ac-
cident which occurred on White
Park Road at about 11.40 a.m.,
on Saturday,

The cycle and the motor car
M—2472, owned and driven by
Alistair Edghill of “Hamilton”,
Strathclyde, collided.

Belgrave was slightly injured.

quickly relieves

COLDS and
CATARRH

It clears the nasal pas-

sages to remove stuffiness
and the distressing con-
ditions of head colds and
catarrh. The patent nasal
application bottle is infinitely better than spray
or dropper, and can be carried conveniently in
handbag or pocket without fear of leakage.

Made by CLAY & ABRAHAM LTD., |

Estab



He said that the banana in-
dustry was largely responsible
for that changed outlook and a
15-year contract had been signed
up with an English company to
take all their bananas for that
period at fixed prices.

Mr. Boyd arrived last week by
B.W.1LA. via St. Lucia for the
Customs Union Talks and is
staying at the Hastings Hotel.

He said that the large estates
and peasants were all planting
heavily and the only drawback
was the lack of communications;
however, there was a four-year
scheme to spend about £300,000
on roads which would consider-
ably improve the situation.

There was also a Greek firm
which was putting up a factory
to process citrus and other fruits,
and there were prospects of the
Food Ministry taking the island’s
entire crop of orange and grape-
fruit during the next few years.

Contrary to rumours that had
filtered through to Dominica, he
was greatly impressed by the
work that the Colonial Develop-
ment Corporation was doing on
the reconstruction of Castries and
he hoped it would be possible
to persuade them to undertake
some of the larger road jobs in
Dominica.

Great Difficulty

Mr. Boyd said that he had
great difficulty in getting proper
cabin accommodation on the
“Lady Rodney” although he had
made efforts to get a booking
three weeks previous to the ar-
rival of the ship with the agents
in Bermuda,

He stated that various senior
officers with whom he had dis-
cussed the matter both in St.
Lucia and Barbados, had express-
ed dissatisfaction with the lack
of facilities afforded to delegates
to Conferences by the C.NS.
which was a subsidised line,

He expects that action will be
taken by his Government in
order that in future, accommo-
dation will be secured for dele-

gates attending conferences
abroad through the head office of
C.N.S. in Montreal, instead of

relying on the local agents who
seemed unable to prevail upon
the ships’ officials to provide
Suitable accommodation for West
Indians of all complexions.

3 Trucks
Arrive

M.V. “Arocosta” returned to the
island yesterday from Trinidad
under Captain Lewis,

It brought three trucks and a
motor car for Mr. Wexler. Mr.
Wexler is expected to arrive here
by plane today.

After he arrives, it will be de-
cided whether or not the “Ar-
ocosta” will take old iron here
and also the next port of call,

Local agents are Messrs Gittens,
Croney & Co,

Lorry And Car
In Collision



An accident occurred on Has-
tings Road, Christ. Church at
about 11.15 am. on Saturday
between the motor car X—427,

Maarleveld of St. Lawrence,
Christ Church, and the motor
lorry X—895, owned and driven
by Clarence Thorpe of Silver
Hill, Christ Church.

The right running beam and
cross beam of the lorry were
damaged; while damage was
done to the right front fender,
rear fenders,
windscreen

right door and
of tle car.



Car Brakes
Were Bad

ST CLAIR GRIFFITH was
fined 7/- in 14 days or 14 days’
imprisonment by His Worship
Mr. A. J. H. Hanschell yesterday
when he was found guilty of diiv-
ing the car M.883 on September
5 with inefficient brakes,

Obituary

NEWS has been received in An-
tigua of the death on Tuesday 3rd
January of the Rev. C. G. Erry,
Methodist Minister and father of
Mrs. J. R. A. Branch wife of Col.
J. R. A. Branch, Commissioner of
Police. Rev. Erry was stationed
in Antigua for many years as well
as British Guiana,

DROL

TRADE MARK



England

iverpool

2a 151

Obtainable from all Drug Stores :

KNIGHTS LTD., AGENTS & DISTRIBUTORS.







owned and driven by =

FLOUR FROM
HALIFAX

ONE THOUSAND, six hundred
sacks of flour arrived in the col-
ony late on Saturday evening
when S.S. “Alcoa Pegasus”
called from Halifax. There were
also moderate quantities of pow-
dered milk, bran, cereals, cream
of wheat, pickled pork, feeds and
copper wire on this vessel for
Barbados. .

The “Pegasus” is consigned to
Messrs. Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

120 Bags Of Mail
For Barbados

SWEDISH S.S. “C. G. Thulin”
called yesterday with cargo from
New York. Foodstuffs, meats,
Sausages, Martini, Vermouth,
paint, machinery, auto parts, cal-
lenders and two plows were items
among the cargo.

This vessel also brought 115
bags of regular mail and five bags
of registered mail. It was sched-
uled to sail last night for Trini-
dad. Messrs. Robert Thom Ltd,
are agents,

Neeteeadsrsinmnanetieonee
ARTICLES MISSING

Mr. John Beckles of the Bar-
bados Dye & Laundry Works
reported the
and a hair brush from the Chil-
dren’s Goodwill League.

He stated that the loss occur-
red between December 12 and 19,

e ’ -

25 YEARS AGO
(BARBADOS ADVOCATE,
January 10, 1925)
Dedication of Organ
The Organ Dedicatory Service
at the Collymore Rock A.M.b.
Chureh last Sunday was well at-
tended and very inspiring. It was
conducted by the Rev. J. D. Smith

Pastor of the Church.

The instrument is a_two-
manual read organ of excellent
tone and splendid variety. Its
range and quality were well de-
monstrated by Mr. W. H. Moore,
in solos, a violin solo and an
anthem by the choir of the
Church, Vocal solos were sung in
characteristically good voice and
style by Miss Marjorie Moore,
Miss Onida Sealy and Mr. Beres-
ford Tubbs.

Mr. G, C, Williams rendered
Handel’s “Largo” on the violin
with very pleasing effect.

The people of Collymore Rock
are highly pleased over the ren-
ditions of the artistes who per-
formed on the occasion and have
invited them to make an early
return. Much pleasure was af-
forded, too, by the presence of so
many music-loving friends from
surrounding communities and
Bridgetown including Mr, C. A.
Brathwaite, M.C.P., and John S.
Maughn, J.P.









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PAGE FIVE4



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PAGE SIX









}CHILDREN’S
BOOKS



wOu'RE GOOD

DETECTIVES...

YOu CAN HAVE MY
AS



NOW... WHAT SEEMS
TO’ BE YOUR
PROBLEM?

THE LONE “RANGER
Sls sacs Bev ror
AND WE:

eS ea ty Vv
| SOE OF US WILL RUSH) THEY'LL GET






TONTO! HOW CAN WE GET THE LONE
RANGER OFF THAT fa
ROOF ? << ie.

KILL! SNEAD,
GOING TD GET HIM!
x os













WE'VE GOT TO
HURRY WITH
: SHIRT... AND THAT
: BLUE JERSEY OF YOURS
NICKY...



BRINGING UP FATHER

WELL- I HAVEN'T DADDY - Dif > YOu 1 NOW
A SINGLE MOTHER HAS TAKEN >
aes. ¥ okey THE CAR AND IS GOING Macees. DRIVIN'
SeeT, TODAY TO ORIVE DOWNTOWN !? DOWNTOWN= =~
Lie SHE MAY DRIVE
NEAR YOu, PLACE!
ae pepo
:





MISS FAIN WE'VE PICKED uP



_ HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

IT'S NOTHIN’! THAT'S

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



THE TROUBLE! }

SOMEONE STOLE

THE PICTURE
OuT OF IT!



BY FRANK STRIKER

aa - 7



/ Taras SOMEON®
COMING OFF IN A



THANKS -JIGGS --I’LL
KEEP ALL THE KIDS

IN THE HOUSE - AND
WARN THE NEIGHBORS !/
IS YOUR CAR FULLY
INSURED ?

(OMY AAS

i















VALERIE'S TRAIL,.GHE HITCHED
A RIDE ON A BIG RED TRAILER
TRICK... JOE GOWDY Ari) T
«WILL TRY TO CATCH

A BIG RED TRAILER THAT'S THE
TRUCK® I HAD BETTER NEW TEACHER
NOTIFY THE POLICE... YOU'RE OATIN’
BUT FIRST I'LL
TELEPHONE VALERIE’S
GRANDPARENTS...















| bait mor! PO
| at THE PHANTOM BY LEE FAL
Pi hE : THEY'LL KILL YOUS

SHH. QUICK? GIVE ME AND THEN + FIND

YOUR TURBAN AND
ROBE. 97

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«| + [THE THUGcEES
_ PARE ~ON THE /”
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+ if EUS ++
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| IN THE BARK Rooat T~
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\WALKS QUIETLY TO THE CLOSET WHERE
WWOO2E HIDES, TREMBLING IN FEAR «~'
NOTA SOUND. Guu? ==

THE POOR, TYDORE ++









JOE |S TEACHER'S J/THAT MAKES
4 CRACK GETS
4 MOUTHFUL ©’
KNUCKLES!

KE. I'M TURNING THE

LIGHTS QUT NOWs~ =

QUIETY,

ORD Rec ets Pike vo

COME ALONG, THUGGEES
I'M WAITING. WE GHALL
SEE WHAT WE

SHALL SEE ««



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AN! IT LOOKS LIKE THE NEXT Gu |

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SWAN

Oysters? We
Can Eat "Em |

| LikeCal’sMeat!

j PARIS, (By Mail)

MY daughter’s cat Timothy fre-
| quently eats a dozen oysters for
}lyncheon. In the accompanying
| picture you can observe Timothy
| getting down to it. He prefers

| them straight. No Tabasco. No
lemon, 3 .
This oyster diet for a Ssix-



month-old pet is not the result of
| sore mad caprice which is carv-
ing big inroads into the MacColl
pocketbook. The exact opposite
is true.

So cheap and plentiful are oys-
ters in France that my wife finds
it an economically sound proposi-
tion to let Timothy have them
several times a week.

Like all cats Timothy thinks
the world of fish. Unlike other
cats he gets a go at shellfish.
| Only drawback is that Timothy
jis unlikely ever to learn how to

open the oysters for himself Thus
the be



delicious dozen must



lover (which we're not: we're
ju®t run-of-the-miil cat likers)
it occasionally proves a touch irk-
some to have to tackle the messy
business on behalf of a feline con-
noisseur.

(The by-laws of the Paris
suburb where I Vive forbid fish-
mongers to sell opened oysters.)

Penny Each
| But there it is. Horsemeat for
cats works out at 3s. 8d. per lb.
And the oysters? I am sad indeed
to be assured that this season they
are something like a shilling each
in the London restaurants.

Believe it or not, over here you
ean buy them in the markwts for a
penny each or
less. I have seen
them at 81d. a
dozen at my lo-
cal market.

I know that
this is heresy,
but
oysters we r
here to Whitsta-
bles or Colches-
ter “natives.” A



dozen fines de
claire served on
a bed of sea-
weed with a half
of lemon and
some brown
bread and butter]
make a very
Gharming | start Timothy's
to a meal. It y

costs little even oyster lunch
when you're eating out.

After the restaurant has taken
jits profits you can still get your
dozen in all except the expensive
Paris places for around 2s. 6d.

Paris alone consumes about 50
tons of oysters every day. They
‘ome from places on the west
coast. One great region is in and
around Brittany. Another is on
the Bay of Biscay.

All over Paris, as the autumn
naps into winter there appear
outside cafes and restaurants the
white-painted wooden oyster
talls. The man or woman in
‘harge arranges the row of big,
square baskets, each containing a
separate variety, nestling in their
beds of seaweed.

Good for—
There may be an odd plate of
prawns or even snails. But the





MAKE IT A

BUY BATA























opened for him first.
Unless you are a Grade A cat

Oe ee

It’s win To
Stay famous

UNLESS POLITICS

AY up top among the world’s
most famous men there are!
few to jostle year by year for ||

highest place in the minds and ||

hearts of the people. oe 1|

The people of Britain—asked ' |
this month to name their own and |.
the world’s Man of the Year at
1949—gave their votes to Mr. |
Winston Churchill. He tops both},
polls. a: dl

In the World role ne repiaces |
Harry S. Truman, who topped
1948’s_ Daily Express Poll of |
Public Opinion after his startling |
personal victory in the US.!
Presidential elections.

The voting positions of the two |
men have almost reversed in the;
past 12 months. Behind them in
the queue, the rest of the world’s
great names seem like also-rans.
Look at the lists on the right.

All the Iron Curtain praise anc
adulation on Stalin’s 70th birth-
jay does not give him more than
three per cent. support for his
third place among the world-
eaters. It moves him up merely
1 couple~of places on last year’s
list.

Quick Mover

, E only sparkle of freshness

in the people’s choice comes
in the Man of the Year in Britain.
First six names are straight from} |
the House of Commons -
Churchill, Cripps, Attlee, Bevin
Bevan, and Eden. Sir Statford
Cripps has moved up, Bevin has
moved down. 5

Aneurin Bevan is the quick
mover of the year: his four per
cent. of the votes is four times as
many as he polled last year, pull-
ing him up from tenth place te
fifth.

But Yorkshire—and the B.B.C
—have a promising lad in Wilfred



Pickles, who just got into the first
12 in the 1948 poll, but now ranks
fin seventh place.

If this poll had been for the
ship of the year, the Amethyst
would have been a favourite. As
it is, Lieut.-Commander Kerans

oyster is the heart of inis matter.
Nearby is a battery of bottles
containing the many condiments
and sauces which ingenious spirits
have dreamed up through the
years to accompany the oyster to
its manifold destiny. Little tin
signs show the prices. These fines
de claire are 1s, 94d. a dozen.
The Portugaises are 2s. 1d. And
the beautiful Belons 3s. 4d.

You can have your oysters
standing there at the kerb, or, if
it’s not too cold, at a table in the
open air. Or should you order
them as part of your restaurant
meal, the waiter nips outside and
fetches you in a plateful from the
stall. All very stimulating.

And as you undoubtedly are
aware, the oyster is “non-fatten-
ing,” “nutrition-packed,” ‘vitamin-
rich.”

—Oh yes, and appeals to eats.
Patience, Timothy, patience: The
master is about to open another
dozen for you.

—L.E.S.



ee

BATA YEAR ||

FOOTWEAR FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY AND SAVE

THE BRITISH BATA SHOE CO. LTD |

Branches:

SWAN STREET BROAD





Cosmopolizan



STREET

to all our

Friends

Bes
a
=
s
2
=
S
2
=
2
=

=

2

E

S

2

=

=

=

ENCE NE NCS ee oO

and
Customers

from

Pharmacy

ACNE NAGA



1. Winston Churchiil 1. os 2AM
2. Harry Truman ... 12% | 2. Winston Churchill 13%.
3. Marshal Stalin .... 3% | 8. General Marshall 104,
4. Clement Attlee ... 2% | 4. Count Bernadotte |. 49,
5. General Marshall 5. Marshal Stalin .... 2%
(U.S.A.) 2% | 6. Ernest Bevin .... 2% |
6. Ernest Bevin ..... 2% | 7. Sir Don Bradman 1% |
7. Marshal Tito ..... 2% = | 8. Anthony Eden .... 1g,
8. Sir Stafford Cripps 1% | 9. Clement Attlee . 1%
9, General Smuts ... 1% 10, General Smuts ., 1%
10. Lord Boyd Orr ..... 1% | 11. Duke of Edinburgh 19,
11. Robert Menzies .. 1% | 12. Sir Stafford Cripps 1
(Austraiia’s P.M.) Other nominations 7
12. Anthony Eden .... 1% No suggestion .... 39
Others ahs gO cei
Don’t know ....-- 35% | 100%, |
100% | :
1949 IN BRITAIN 1948
1. Winston Churchill 28% 1, Winston Churchill 26%
2. Sir Stafford Cripps 17% 2. Ernest Bevin sssy 8%
3. Clement Attlee ... 6% | 3. Sir Stafford Cripps 79% /
4. Ernest Bevin 5% | 4. Anthony Eden ,.,. 5%
5. Aneurin Bevan 4% | 5, Duke of Edinburgh 4%
6. Anthony Eden 4% 6. Clement Attlee ... 4%
7. Wilfred Pickles ... 3% 7. Sidney Stanley .. 3%
8. Lt.-Commander 8. Sir Hartley Shaw-
TEI, unser trots 2% CPOBS oe eee BM
9. Duke of Edinburgh 2% | 9. Denis Compton ., 2%
10. Lord Boyd Orr 1% 10. Aneurin Bevan 1%
11. John Strachey .... 1% 11. Freddy Mills .... 1%
12. Denis Compton 1% 12, Wilfred Pickles ... 1%
Others ioscan ere Other nominations 11%
Don’t know ...... 19% No suggestion .... 24%
100% 100%
we ae ee i

bursts his way up among Britain’s

men of the year—tying with}of votes each to Aneurin
another Navy man, the Duke of|the Pope, Paul Hoffman (Marshall.
Edinburgh. Aid administrator), the

man
Boyd
Denis
one per cent. of the votes.
food is a more lively topic than
sport in world affairs, Lord Boyd
Orr gets a place in the World list.

names were suggested for Britain’s
Man
Olivier, Sidney Stanley
seventh in last year’s list and no-
where

Lord Lyle, cricketer Len Hutton,}**4 , (Australia’s new Prime
comedian Ted Ray—even zither|Minister), Anthoney Eden—all
man Anton Karas. But not as|are there, with Tito joining them”
Third Man. to prove the popularity. of any”
rebel, He ousts Bradman for

Now to the World list. It is|sveenth place. ,
net easy to find a name that{ Barring the occasional soallys)

stands out against the background
of a whole year’s news.
investigators found that more than
one in three of the people they
questioned
“Don't know”,

TUESDAY, JANUARY i9, 1954

_

ugh To |








































IS YOUR BUSINESS











i949 IN THE WORLD 194

22% Harry Truman









| Those who did, gave a h

Windsor, Pandit Nehru, ‘
Lie, Mr. Vishinsky, and Israel's
President Weizmann.
Still-flowing Marshall Aid did
nothing to increase the fame, or
popularity of General George
Marshall during these past 12
months. His name has slipped
from third to fifth place, sand.
wiched between Mr. Attlee (just ”
in front) and Mr. Bevin (just

behind).
Popular Rebel
Pres, Smuts, Robert Menzies.

Two food men and one sports-
bring up the vrear—Lord
Orr, Mr. Strachey, and
Compton—each claiming
Since

After the top 12, more than 100

of the Year—Sir Laurence

(he was
now), J.

Arthur Rank,

wag, fame is reserved year
year for those who serve.

the nearer that service is wedded
‘o politics, the nearer may go the
name to the top of the list,

The poll

just gave the reply:






Seitzer ordi,
headache three ways: i) Re Es
teves pain of hea
4) Relieves di meter

scComfort of up.
Set stoma -

. 3) Quiets jumpy
nerves w "a May team up

e. Caution: Us



BOOKER’S (B’DOS) DRUG STORES LTD.
Broad Street and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)








—o.



eee Lat Oe ae ree

Pres pte >













.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 10







RATES





» 1950

PUBLIC NOTICES





NOTI
RE THE ESTATE OF
THEODORE DUDLEY SEALY
(Deceased)
WOTICE is hereby given that all per-








| FOR RENT



1 — a sons having any debt or claims against

, he er" == br Estate of Theodore Dudley Sealy,

UNCEMENTS \ ‘ eceased, late of Bank Hali Main Road,

tae per word HOUSES - the parish of Saint Michael in this

ro PROPERITY—At Station Hill. House] October 1049 cee ne ete tee ees

FORRENT » » \ es | Containing Modern conveniences, Apply | i, iculars of their claims duly at-

02 W. H. Bey part! of thi cla: S

Tne oe yan & C. M, ae Roe-! tested to the undersigned Adeline Eudora

WANTED “ ” eet. 7.1,50—4n. oar. and B Aber, = a Sealy.

} . ‘o Messrs Haynes Griffith, icitors,

LOST, yer ent word ‘a a. oan ee ~ ee | Esters seventy No. 2 Swan Street, Bridgetown, on or
Minimum charge .. ‘ , oo

PUBLIC SALES

ESTATE per agate .

10.1.50—5n.
: 10 parties entitled thereto having regard
AUCTION & REAL ee FU only to such claims of which we shall
= RNISHED FLAT—At Coral Sands,| then have had notice and we shall not
â„¢ ve ing Linen, and Silver. Good sea-| be liable for the assets or any part
bi ing for further particulars. Dial| thereof so distributed to any person of
Minimum charge = +. 1.20 1.50 -_ Alma Lashley. 10.1.49—t.f.n Whose debt or claim we shall not then
; i . _ ve notice.
sae ee tachel Ure” — House with shop at-| "And all persons indebted. to the said
{Maximum 14 aga ae ed, three dining and! estate are requested to settle their in-
| drawing rooms, electric light and all] gebtedness without delay.
PUBLIC NOTICES es M . outer offices, Black Rock, near Wavoll Dated this 6th day of January 1950.
Per agate line .. . : vet Avenue. Apply: W. A. Bibby, River ADELINE EUDORA SEALY,
Minimum charge .. oe 1,20 1,50] Road,

EVENING ADVOCATE (Monday)
per inch



THANKS

We the undersigned, beg through this
medium to express our thanks and ap-
preciation to all those who attended the
funeral, sent cards, wreaths, letters or
in any other way expressed sympathy
to us on the occasion of the death of

‘A SARJEANT.
a and F. Sarjeant, Bhat Sarjeant,
Francis, Pearl Daniel.
ae 10,1,50—2n.



We the undersigned beg through this
medium to thank all those who attend-
ed the funeral sent cards, wreaths, or
sympathised with us in our recent
beveaverent of my beloved husband
ELYN CHANDLER. :

Millicent Chandler (wife), Hartley

(sons), Ridell, Phillis, Joyee and

Chandler and Strathmore Chandler
zel Chandler (sisters).

anit 10.1.50—2n.



IN MEMORIAM

In lovi memory of our dear mother
in ELFREDA CARMICHAEL
(Aunt Sue), who depatred this life
January 10th 1948.
Two ania have passed since that sad
day
When the one we loved was called
away
She had a kindly word for each and
died
Beloved by all
Ever to be remembered by—



Blanche’ Griffith (daughter) Charles
Carmichael (Son) Myrl, Dew, Leon
Carmichael (Grand children) William

Griffith (Son-in-Law), Edna Carmichael
(Daughter-in-Law).
New York = and

Panama _ Papers.

§ please copy.

10. 1, 50—In



SALE





FOR





AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—Vauxhall 12 h.p., late 1946
Model, leather Upholstery 5 new tyres,
new batteries repainted light grey,
very good condition. Price $1,100. Phone
Peter de Verteville 4317 in office hours.

8.1.50—3n.







TRACTOR — One FARMALL “H”
Tractor very little used in Al condition.
Owner purchasing larger. Cole & Co.,
Ltd. 6.1.50—Jn.

MECHANICAL

|

TYPEWRITERS—A small quantity ot
second hand Remington Typewriters now
available. Apply: T. Geddes Grant Ltd.
Phone 4376, 8.1.50—6%



BICYCLES: Hercules Silver King, on
terms, all models, in green and in black.
A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476.

13,11,.49—t.f.n,

MISCELLANEOUS
—_—_—

FREEDOM FROM FIRE—lInstal a Fire-
Proof Safe with doors secured by
Combination lock: Suitable for office or
store. Secure your records. Contact
A. 8. BRYDEN & SONS (B’dos) Ltd.

13.12.49— Tue., Fri., Sun., — t.f.n.

Cn
fITTINGS—Galvanised pipe. All sorts
m % in, to 1% ins, Phone 4684
A. Barnes & Co. Lid.

3.12.49—t.f.n,

a
GALVANISED SHEETS—6 ft., 6% ft.,
8 ft. Apply: Auto Tyre, Trafalgar Street.
Phone 2696. 5.1.50—t.f.n.
ic iiernnaiietisththaimeentiniteeteen aaah
STREL SHEETS: 1\16,
8/6 and various sizes.
Trafalgar Street,



1/8, “4, 5/16,
Auto Tyre Co
Dial 2696.

10.1,50—t.f.n.

GLAZED TILES 6 x 6” White, Green,
and Blue, 12c each at Ralph A.. Beard’s
Show Room, Hardwood Alley. .

10,1,50—3n

BREAKFAST CARRIERS — Aluminum
Breakfast or Lunch Carriers with three
food compartments. Only $2.74 each.
G. W. Hutchinson & Co. Ltd. Dial 4222,

8.1,50—2n



seep
LUNCH TINS—Just in time for school.
Punch Tins with inner tray. Assorted
olours at only 8lc, each. G. W. Hutch-
fnson & Co. Lid. Dial 4222,
10.1.50—4n,

WASH BASINS & SINKS — at Shop
Olid prices at Ralph A. Beard's Show
Room, Hardwood Alley.
10,1,50—3n

LIPTON’S TEA - Why worry,
ve it at 34 cents per ‘lb package.
Iso tins of Toffee, Peppermints, Pears,
Nestles Cream, Macaroni and Cheese, and
R varied assortment of Sweet Biscuits.
JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS Ltd. Roe-
buck Street Dial 4335. 10.1,50—2n



we





BLANKETS—Cotton Crib Blankets 86c
ach, Woollen Crib Blankets $3.00 each,
Bingle Bed Woollen Blankets $4.32 eacn
it the Modern Dress Shoppe.

8.

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
ving credit to my wife MURIEL YARD
n Tull) as I do not hold myself
bonsible for her or anyone else con+
Ing any debt or debts in my name

is by a written order signed by me.

SYDNEY YARD,
Hindsbury Road,

St. Michael.
20.1.50—2n °

The public are hereby warned against
living credit to my wife RUBY ODESSA
DWARDS (nee Cumberbatch) as 1 do
not hold myself responsible for her or
one else contracting any debt or debts
nm My name unless by a written order
ined by me,
Fitz Roy Edwards,
Rock Hall,

St. Andrew.

0.1,50—n

wine bublie are hereby warned, against
Wing credit to my wife IONE THORPE
Jone Ertha Harte) as I do not hold
myself responsible for, her or anyone
Contracting any debt or debts in

Y‘ name unless by a written

ed by me order

WILLIAM THORPE,
Bannister Land,

0.1,50—2n St. Michael.

wums Bleed ¢::)/':":

jums, Sore
Mouth and
bU8e Teeth me
ench M:

an that you have Pyorrhea
Bhat w the pg m= rhaps some bad diseas«

r later cause your teeth





Amosa

n fr



F°? Prorrhea—Trench Mouth |









missioner. Occupation on March Ist. before the 15th day of March, 1950, after

KNIGHT'S LTD. which date we shall proceed to distribute

the assets of the deceased among the








10.1.50—2n.

FOR SALE OR RENT
Newly-built Bungalow at Perry's Gap,
juck Street. Three bedrooms. two
with inbuilt cedar presses and one with
running water. Apply to Victor E. Cob-
ham, Corner of Bank Hall and Barracks
Roads, 8.1.50—3n.

FOR SALE OR RENT—Farley Hill,
St. Peter. Old Plantation house with
large ballroom, Dining room library,
fourteen bedrooms ete. Ideal for convert-
ing to residential club. For detaiis,
Apply to Bradshaw & Company.

4.1.50,—t.£.n.

see

THE WOLD — Marine Gardens, un-
furnished. Containing three bedrooms
bath and toilet upstairs, Drawing, dining
rooms, kitchen and pantry downstairs,
Garage, servants room in yard, room for
a garden. Dial 8310. Mrs. Stuart Bynoe,

8.1.50—3n.

——

HOUSE—Furnished or unfurnished, in
Prospect, St. James. Apply: Norman D.
Ellis, “Clevedale’, Black Rock. Dial
2451. 7.1.50—2n.

—

“KRISHANA", Fontabelle, Lands End.
Apply; T. Maraj, Hindu Store, 51 Swan
Street. 29.12.49—+.f.n

SS

HOUSE—One Modern House situated
at Grazettes Road, St. Michael, con-
taining 2 bedrooms, and usual convenien-
ces. Apply D. Gaskin, Thomas
Michael,

PUBLIC

| SS
AUCTION

By instructions of the Executrix of
the Estate of C. Lashley, deceased, I will
set up for sale at Bryden Gap, Britton’s
Hill, on Thursday 12th at 1 p.m., a board
and shingle house 16 x 8 x 8 to be re-
moved. Terms cash.

R. ARCHER McKENZIE, ~
Victoria Street,





———

I will offer for sale by Public Com-
petition at my office Victoria Street, on
FRIDAY 13, at 2 p.m. the following:—

| (1) 2640 square feet of land at Mahog-
any Lane with the wall building stand-
ing thereon. House contains closed
gallery, drawing, 2 bedrooms, usual outs
offices, enclosed yard.

(2) 1 Rood LAND at Thornbury Hill,
near the road leading to Wilcox Estate
in ae Se os Christ Church, For
conditions of sale apply to: R. ARCHER
Mec KENZIE, Victoria Street. Dial 2947.

10.1,50—4n

—_———

The undersigned will offer for sale al
their Office No. 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday, 20th day of January
1950, at 2 p.m.

The messuage or Dwelling House

| called “PARKVILLE’ and the land

thereto, containing 1,829 square feet
situate at White Park opposite The Bar-
bados Foundry.

Inspection any day except Sundays
between the hours of 4 p.m. and 6 p.m
on application to the tenant Mr. Boyce,

For further particulars and conditions
of Sale, apply to:—

» CATFORD & CO.
5.1,50—8n



boats are very suitable as sail,
t, or taking boat labourers
to and from the ships, there are three
boats and the sizes are (1) one 20 x 8
overall by 5 beam (2) two 23 x 5 by 5
beam (3) third 21 x 5 by 5 beam. Your
inspection is invited any day on appli-
cation to the Harbour Police Station.
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Govt. Auctioneer,
Dist. “A”.
8.1.50—4n

THE undersigned will offer for sale
by public auction at their office, No. 17,
High Street, on Friday the 13th instant
at 2 p.m.

The dwellinghouse called LANDSMERE
COTTAGE and land containing 11,960
square feet, Constitution Road, St. Mi-
chael, The dwellinghouse comprises —
ON THE GROUND FLOOR: Drawing
room and three bedrooms (one with run-
ning water), gallery, toilet and bath.
UPSTAIRS: One very large bedroom;
IN THE BASEMENT: Dining room,
kitchen; Seperate bathroom in

Government water and electric light
installed.

Inspection any day except Sunday
between the hours of 4 p.m. and 6
p.m. on application to the owners, the
Misses Lynch on the premises.





REAw ESTATE

Offers in writing are invited for 21,150
square feet of land situate in Sobers
Lane, Bridgetown, and having a frontage
of 118 feet on Sobers Lane and at present-
under tenantry.

For further particulars apply to the
undersigned.

CARRINGTON & SEALY.
Lucas Street.
7.1,50—6n,











nd

« For Properties ete., contact

RALPH A. BEARD
A.M., Inst., B.E., F.V.A.
Auctioneer and Estate Agent
Who has numerous properties
for sale. For f er
particulars ring 3s or
call Hardwood Alley
opposite Cathedral





LIQUOR “LICENSE NOTICE

THE lication of Delphine Forde of
Beckles Road, St. Michael, for permis-
sion to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c.,
at a board and shingle shop attached to
residence neax Bay Pasture, Beckles
Road, St. Michael.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950,

To E. A. ee ra
Police Magistrate, A
Signed DELPHINE FORDE,
ger

N.B.—This - application wil con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District ‘A’, on Thurs-
day the 19th day of January 1950, at

1-o’clock, a.m.
ne B. A. McLEOD,

Police Magistrate, Dist. a Me



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of William Cadogan of
Dayrells Road, Ch. Ch, for permission |
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at
a board and shingle shop with shedrocf
attached at Dayrell's Road, Ch. Ch.
within District “A”.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950
To: E. A, McLEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”
WILLIAM CADOGAN,
Applicant



:pplication will be’ cor
ered at : eensing Court to be held
Poli District “A”, on Thursda
the 19th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock,

EB. A, MeLEOD,
Police Magistrate,
District









}
}































EVAN DAVID CARNEY SEALY,
Qualified Executors of the Estate of
THEO! DUDLEY SBALY,
Deceased



SE

NOTICE
SCHOOL.

Church Boys’

years six months and 12 years
be chidren of Parents iving

cumstances.

will be held by the Headmaster on Fri
day, 13th. January, 1950., at the Boys
Foundation School at 9.45 a.m.
Forms, can
the Secretary, must be
: woemedin, im oa
on . January.
W. H. ar, en
Body, ver Road,

batten: St. Michael.
4.1.50—4n
—__———__.__

NOTICE

SCHOOL.

place on Tuesday, 17th. January 1950
at 9.45 a.m. There will be an entrance
examination for New Pupils on Monday
16th. January at 9.45 a.m., when the
Parents may interview the Headmaster.
New candidates are requested to
bring their Birth Certificates and re-
commendations from former school.
W. H. ANTROBUS, Secretary
Governing Body, Hilton, River Road,

St. Michael.
5.1,50—6n
Eee
LODGE SCHOOL

New Boys who wish to enter the School
in the January Term commencing on
Tuesday, January 17th 1950, must present
themselves for examination at the Schoo!
at 10 a.m. om Monday, January 16th 1950.

Boarders are expected for dinner on
Monday the 16th.

CYRIL E. STOUTE,
Sec. and Treas, Gov. Body,
Lodge School.
6.1.50—3n.



OFFICIAL NCTICE

BARBADOS.

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF

APPEAL
(Equitable Jumsdiction)

ELOISE M RILEY Plaintiff,

HERBERT BARNETT (Qualified Exor.
Est. GEORGE BARNETT Dec'd

Defendant.

IN pursuance of an order in this
Court in the above action made on the
28th day of April 1949, I give notice to
all persons having any estate, right or
interest in or any lien or incumbrance
affecting all that certain piece or parcel
of land situate at Venture in the parish
of Saint John in this island containing
by admeasurement one rood nineteen
perches abutting and bounding on
lands of Milly Brathwaite on lands of
Easy Hall Plantation on lands of Eme-
line Nicholls and on the public road
to bring before me an account of theit
said claims with their witnesses, docu-
ments and vouchers, to be examined by
me on any Tuesday, or Friday between
the hours of 12 (noon) and 3 o'clock in
the afternoon, at the Office of the Clerk
oi the Assistant Court of Appeal at the
Court House Bridgetown, before the
llth day of January 1950, in order that
such claims may be ranked according
to the nature and priority thereof re-
Spectively; otherwise such Persons will
be precluded from the benefit of the
Said Decree, and be deprived of all
claim on or against the said property.

Claimants are also notified that they
must attend the said Court on Wednes-
day the llth day of January 1950, at
iC o'clock a.m, when their said claims
will be ranked,

Given under my hand this 4th day of
November 1949,

A. W. HARPER,

Clerk of the Assistant Court of Appeal.



OFFICIAL SALE

APPEAL
(Equitable Jurisdiction)

ELOISE MILLICENT RILEY Plaintiff.

HERBERT BARNETT (Qualified Exer.
Est. GEORGE BARNETT Dec'd

Defendant.

NOTICE is hereby given that by vir-
tue of an Order of the Assistant Court
of Appeal dated the 28th day of April
1949 there will be set up for sale to the
highest bidder at the Office of the
Clerk of the Assistant Court of Appeal
at the Court House, Bridgetown, be-
tween the hours of 12 (noon) and 2
o'clock in the afternoon on Friday 13th
day of January 1950

All that certain piece or parcel of
land situate at Venture in the parish of
Saint John in this island containing by
admeasurement one rood nineteen per-
ches abutting and bounding on lands of
Milly Brathwaite on lands of Easy Hall
Plantation on lands of Emeline Nicholls
and on the public road
and if not then sold the said property
will be set up for sale on every suc-
ceeding Friday between the same hours
until the same is sold for a sum not
less than £62. 10. 0.

Dated this 4th day of November 1949,

W. HARPER

a. W. .
Clerk of the Assistant Court of Appeal.
5,11.49—3n

Se
NOTICE
LOST SHARE CERTIFICATES

NOTTCE is hereby given (hat A. H.
Ward, Executor to the Estate of ENOS
CAIN WARD and the Estate of WILLIAM
WARREN WARD, Deceased, has made
application for the issue of Share Cer-
tificates in place of the following Share
Certificates which have been lost:—

Certificate No. 207 10 Shares No. 9779

to 9788.

Certificate No. 226 10 Shares No. 10719
to 10728.

Certificate No. 613 2 Shares No. 20553
to 20554.

Certificate No. 614 2 Shares No, 20555
to 20556.

Certificate No. 982 1 Share No. 25605.

Certificate No. 983 1 Share No. 25606.

If no objection to this application ir
made by the 20th January 195, new

Certificates will be issued.

By Order of the Board of Directors.
THE BARBADOS CO-OPPRATIVE.
COTTON FACTORY LTD. '
E.

A. CLARKE,
Secretary.
10.1.50—3n.

——





TUITION

Mrs. R. A. HEARD, A.L.C.M,
(Bronze, Silver, Gold, Medalist)
Will accept a small munber of
Kindergarten Pupils at ‘Maristow’
Maxwell Coast, ages 3%-—5 years.
Also Tuition in Speech Training.
For further particulars, ring 8402.
10.1. 50—3n

















FOUND

DOG—One Brown and White Bull Dog. |

2r can communicate with E. D }
erts, Roberis Manufac. Co. Lid., ¢ |
Hili—Dial 4425.



ernment

CHRIST CHURCH BOYS’ FOUNDATION
The reopening of School will take

7.1.50—4n.

{

CHRIST CHURCH BOYS’ FOUNDATION

There are one or more vacant Founda-
tion Scholarships, tenable at the Christ

Founda
didates must be between the ages of 10
"the
parish and who are in straitened cir-

An Examination for these candidates

be obtained from
filled in and re-

|

| LOST & FOUND |

10. 1, 50,—2n |
















BARBADOS ADVOCATE

!

| WANTED





ss

—
SHORTHAND-TYPIST—Christian pre-
ferred. Apply in writing to Box 57,
Bridgetown, stating salary expected.

8.1. 50—3n.

—
BOOKKEEPER/ACCOUNTANT: Serv-
ices of experienced bookkeeper/A®count-











NOTICE.

PARISH OF ST. MICHAEL

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at the holding by me of the
Election of Members to serve in the Vestry of the parish of Saint
Michael, on Monday, the 9th day of January, 1950, at the Parochial
Buildings, Cumberland Street, the following is the result: —







ant required in Barbados. Aavertioers’ VOTES
for ability up to quater thal balance| 1. ERNEST DEIGHTON MOTTLEY ....... visceice ama
ness nna “Dowledge Dry Goods busi-) 2. THOMAS WASHINGTON MILLER .............+++00) 568
considered assets. Isusines hours. oa 3. HAROLD ATHELSTON TUDOR ..........cc..sseseee a
weekdays 8—12.30 Saturdays. Write 4. FRED CARLTON GODDARD ................
confidence ; ils ,
eppointments and salary’ desired: FO'| 5. VICTOR WALLACE, AUSTIN CHASE... 520
Box 144" Bridgetown. 7-150 | 6. FREDERICK DRURARD McD. SYMMONDS .......... 517
cae nanat fin Be Service man age 30. 7. ARTHUR SPENCER BRYDEN ............ sho Ce ent be Cllice: Mise 8. CHARLES CARLTON BROWNE ................sss0e
Po! . Writ Box BSB. C/
Advocate Advig. Dept, ~"1,h40-an.| 9° BRUCE ARUNDALE WEATHERHEAD ........@..... 505
OCCUPATION as house Servant or|10. VALENCE CHENERY GALE ..............cceccsseeee 50)
Cook. iene a Oras, tne ce 11. CHRISTOPHER AUGUSTUS BRAITHWAITE .. 498
tw tires 38. AUBMEY RUSSELL TOPIN....................... an
YORUM DART tec ae anes | 20). .DUDLEY GORDON USACOCK. Jur... ....... Broad
aire Tim te Gott ot, work, 14, TREVOR BOWRING ........... es Ae am
Typing An eieten of Shorthand andi is. EUSTACE CONNELL BETHELL ...................e
. ted | 19-
cpundenialy "Apply "by eter e7e 16. JOHN KENNETH CHARLTON GRANNUM .........e6 425
Ss focal’ ice. ions to
be typea ell fed in and were duly declared elected. '
handwriting, “OP ow" 27. JOHN WINSTON HEWITT ..............cccccceceece - 421
os Dated this 9th day of January, 1950. ‘
F. J. COLE, ,

MISCELLANEOUS

TWO (2) GARDEN TORTOISES
Young ones. Please apply X : * peve-

cate Office,



TENDERS
TAMARINDS at Graem Hall Plantation,
Christ Church. Apply by letter or
person. F. S. Storey, Manager.
10.1.50—3n.

NE

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
THE application of Francis F. Elias

og Hill, St,

Bea eet? Sell Spirits, Malt Liquors.
at a board galvanized
Webbeck, Black Rock,
Dated this 9th day of January 1950.
To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate,
District “A”,

BF, Py oe
nt.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A”, on Thursday
the 19th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock,

a.m,
B. A. MALEOD,
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
10.1.50~In



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Sydney LL. Niles
of Eagle Hall St. Mic ye ission
to sell Spirits, Malt quors &c. at a
board and shingle shop at Eagle Hall,
St. Michael.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950.

: BE. A. McLEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”,
SYDNEY L. NILES,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A’, on Thursday
the 19th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock,

a.m,
B. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
10.1,.50—In

ee
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of J. Kerr Johnston
& Co., Ltd. of James St. City for per-
mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &e.,
&c., at Top floor of a 2 storey wail build-
ing in James Street, City.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950.
To: H. A, TALMA, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”,
R. HOPE,
for Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A”, on iy
the 19th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock,

a.m, .
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate,
District “A’’.
10.1.50—In c

eee

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Samuel T, Small.
of Bay Street, St. Michael for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors &c., at a
board and shingle shop attached to resi-
dence at St.eHill and Tweedside Roads,
St. Michael.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950.

: KE. A. McLEop, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”,
S. T. SMALL,
Applicani

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A’, on Thursday
the 19th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock,

a.m,
BE. A. McL&op,
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
10.1,50—1n

ee eetseasisaeeseeesienenatseees
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

'

THE application of Cleo Clarke of
Roberts Tenantry, St. Michael, for per-
mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
&c., at a board and shingle shop attach-
ed to residence at Roberts Tenantry,
St. Michael.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950,
To: E. A, McLEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”,
CLEO CLARKE,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be ‘held at
Police Court, District “A”,
the 19th day of January 1950
a.m,

on Thursday
at 11 o'clock,

B. A. M OD,

Police Magistrate,
District “A”.

10.1,50—I1n ,



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

THE application of Beatrice Henry of
Suttle Street, City for permission
sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at bot-
tom floor of a 2 storey wall building
in Suttle Street, City.

Dated this 9th day of January 1950,
To: H. A, TALMA, Esq.

Police Magistrate,

District “A”.
BEATRICE HENRY,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be, consid-
cred at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A”, on Thursday
the 19th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock,

a.m,
H. A, TALMA,
Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
10.1, 50—In

ARE YOU EAGER TO

FURNISH WELL

AND SAVE ?

Then you are eager to..
COME and SEE our variety
es

FURNITURE

NEW and RENEWED
in Mahogany, Cedar, Birch,
Deal and Pine

For Your HOME & OFFICE

L.S. WILSON

Trafalgar St. -:- Dial 4069,














"Sheriff & Returning Officer.
PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH

Return of persons elected as Vestrymen for the Parish of Christ
Church this 9th day of January, 1950.

1. MR. GEORGE CHRISTOPHER WARD .... Received 327 votes
2. MR, FRED CARLTON GODDARD ..... ; a 319
3. MR. CHARLES STRAUGHAN MacKENZIE a 319 =}
4. MR. HARRY ST. GEORGE WARD ...... s 311
5. Hon. ARCHIBALD GRAHAM

Are eS MAA, sda kes sececss oe * 297
6. MR, CHARLES MANNING DRAYTON .. ” 283
7. MR. JOSEPH EVAN WEBSTER ........ ” 20 —(,
8. MR, VICTOR. WALLACE AUSTIN CHASE a 278
9. MR. CHARLES BERESFORD BRANDFORD » 268 Ci,
10. MR. GIDNEY CUTHBERT ASHBY ...... ” 264 =(,,
11. MRS. EDNA EVELYN TALMA .......... ” 263 =,
12. MR. UMBERTO JOSEPH PARRAVICINO ” 253 Ci,
13. MR. HUGH FODERINGHAM GARNES .. » 251 ,
14. MR. ARTHUR MacCAULEY JONES .... ” 241
15. MR. COURTENEY IFILL .............. ‘ * 229. —(,,
16. MR. MORRELL EWART R. BOURNE .... » 222 ,

I hereby declare the above sixteen persons duly elected.

17. MR. WILLIAM TRAVERS WATSON .... Received 161 votes
18. MR, ARTHUR NOVELL CHADDERTON ” GO %
19. MR. DAVID CLIFFORD DRAYTON ..... ” 149,

Sgd. VERNON J. WILLIAMS,
Sheriff.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES.

LAND ACQUISITION ACT 1949
(Notice required by Section 3)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that it appears to the Goyernor-
in-Executive Committee that the land described in the Schedule hereto
and situate at Paynes Bay in the parish of Saint James (part of the
land of a place generally known as “Derricks”) is likely to be needed
for purposes which in the opinion of the Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee are public purposes, namely as a site bounding on the sea on
which fishing boats can be hauled up and on which shelters may be

THE SCHEDULE ‘

A parcel of land at Paynes Bay in the parish of Saint James con-
taining 7,710 square feet bounding on the north on lands of B. H,
Moore and others, on the east on the Public Road running from Hole-
town to Bridgetown, on the south on other lands of B. H. Moore and
others, and on the west on the sea.

Dated this 6th day of January, 1950, at the Publi Buildings in

i in the Island of Barbados,
the City of Bridgetown a
Acting Colonial Secretary.





INCOME TAX NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Income Tax returns are re-

quired from every married man whose income is $1200.00 per annum
or over, from every other person whose income is $720.00 per
annum or over and from companies whether incorporated or unin-
corporated, societies, persons engaged in any trade or profession, and
owners of land or property whether a taxable income has acc:tued
during the past year or not.

Forms of Return my be obtained from the Income Tax Depai't-
ment AFTER THE 1ST DAY OF JANUARY, 1950, and the forns
duly filled in must be delivered to me on or before the following
respective dates;

1. Returns of persons whose books were closed on the 3lst
day of December, 1949, on or before the 31st day of March,
1950.

2. Returns of persons whose principal place of business is not
situate in the island on or before the 30th day of June, 1960,

3. Returns of all persons, on or before the 31st of January,
1950,

F, CLAIRMONTE
Commissioner of Income Tax and Death Duties.
NOTE: Any person failing to make his return within the due

date will be liable to a fine not exceeding £100 and
not less than £2 and will be prosecuted unless a satis-
factory reason is given,
10,1.50,—19n, i
SS ASL
POLICE NOTICE
At about 4.30 p.m. on the”>fternoon of the 2nd January, a man
Was stabbed in the back in Queen’s Park by an unknown person.
Will anyone who can give the Police ANY information concern-
ing this incident kindly report to the CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION
DEPARTMENT.
R. T, MICHELIN, Colonel,
Commissioner of Police.
Police Headquarters,
6th January, 1950.

7.1,50—2n,

Be Wise...
oe ADVERTISE



BOXING

Middle-weight Championship
KID RALPH

vs.
PETER JACKSON









IMPORTANT NOTICE
e

ON and after Monday 9th Janu-
ary the Gas supply will be
off on all districts from Gasworks
to Top Rock each day (Saturday
and Sunday excluded) from 1.15
P.m,. to approx, 3.30 p.m. until
‘the work of clearing Gas Main is
completed.

TENDERS are invited for
1950 for the exclusive right
to sell Liquor, Refreshments
ete., at the Garrison Savan-
nah on Race Days.

NEW ARRIVALS

Tins Macaroni and Cheese
Bottles Peanut Butter





” or poene
” ea oe Tenders must be forward-
- oo Dressing ed in gealed env.
Tins Foanata marked “Tender for Liguor
Bottles Tomato Ketchups and ts” and ad-

Tins Tomato Soup
Tins Apricots
Bottles Guava Jelly.

dressed to the Secretary not
later than noon on Saturday
14th January, 1950.

€ The Committee does not
bind itself to accept the
Stu art & S$ ampson highest or any other Tender.
: G. A. LEWIS,
LTD.

Headquarters for Best RUM

















QUICKLY—
LIKE MAGIC

*Mentholatum’ is the wonderful
soothing healing balm. If you have
awful pains in your head or body,
if you have a nasty cold or chill, if
you are tormented by skin trouble,
you need ‘ Mentholatum’. It is so

easy to use and acts like magic.

JUST RUB ITON

RUB it where the Pain is and the
pain is ended,
RUB it well into the chest and

put a little in the nose
and the Cold soon goes.

RUB it on your skin and your

Skin gets better.

‘Mentholatum’ acts quickly—there

is nothing like it.

Get a jar or tin to-day, but make
sure you get genuine *Mentholatum’,
(Ask for ‘MEN-THO-LAY-TUM')

PAGE SEVEN





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In Tins and Jars.
The Mentholatum Co., Ltd. (Estd. 1889), Slough, England.

Also at Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A,

SHIPPING NOTICES





MONTREAL, AUSTEALIA NEW
ZEALAND LINE LIMITED
(MLA.N.Z.) LINE)

M.S. “PORT PIRIE” is scheduled to
sail Geelong 16th December, Melbourne.
Dec. 24th, Brisbane December jist Syd
ney January 4th arriving Trinidad about
end January 1950.

M.S. “KAIPAKI" is scheduled to sail
Adelaide December 28th, Port Pirie De-
cember 3ist, Burnie January 7th, Mel-
bourne January 2ist, Sydney January
48th, Brisbane February 2nd, arriving
Trinidad about 4th March.

These vessels have ample space for
chilled, Hard Frozen and General Cargo.

Cargo accepted on Through bills 0)
ading with transhipment at Trinidad for
dritish Guiana, Barbados, Windward &
eward Islands.

For further particulars apply —
FURNESS WITHY & Co., Ltd.

Agents, TRINIDAD.
DaCOSTA & Co Ltd.
Agents. BARBADOS.



\ s
.



CANADIAN

SOUTHBOUND
Name of ship

S.S. “ALCOA PEGASUS”
8.8, “ALCOA PLANTER”

ee

Sailing every two

Made only by e



The Sch. “PHILLIP H, DAVID.

SON” will accept Cargo” ani
Passengers for Demerara, Sailing
Thursday 12th Januory 1950,

The Sch. “LAUDALPHA’ Will
accept Cargo and Passengersfor
ai Lucia, Sailing To-dayeed@th
nst.

The M.V. “CARIBBEE” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St,

Kitts.
Friday 13th inst,

The M.V. “DARRWOOD” will
accept Cargo and Passengers: for

Sailing

St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba, Date of sailing to be
given, ~

oe

B.W.I. Schooner Owners’ Associa:
tion (Inc.) Tel. 4047, ‘
6th January, 1950,

_—



SERVICE
Sails Arrives
Halifax Barbados
Decr, 29th January 9th
Jany. 9th January 20th
weeks,

NEW YORK SERVICE 3
8.8. BYFJORD sails from New York 13th, arrives in Barbados 22nd,

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

S.S. ALCOA ROAMER sails from Ne

15th January,
S.Ss.
30th January,

Ce ee

Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — Canadian Service
ROBERT THOM LTD. -- New York and Gulf Service



| ANEROID BAROMETERS ~

}

ROBERTS & Co

on,

Dial 3301

METAL CASH BOXES, AIR TRAVEL SUIT CASES, DESK BLOTTERS,
COCKTAIL SHAKERS with INSET STRAINERS, PLATE GLASS .AND
MIRRORS, All the above just received by:—

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY & HARDWARE.

a Tose <

A NEW. SHIPMENT .
‘HI GRADE—HEAVY DUTY BATTERIES:
| FULLY GUARANTEED- GENEROUS PRICES

MORRIS SERVICE STATION.
H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD,

maf

a

BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY |
CORPORATION 1D.









> Abcoa Stean — Co.

w Orleans 30th Devtember, arrivés

ALCOA RUNNER sails from New Orleans 14th January, arriving

=

a


















~

eds keke ee bere 2h


A
pris
e"{

r
34
fate
4
ey
;
}
‘i
e



Metioreen

EO

PAGE EIGHT



See ee

Cricket 3

Footbal, Racing

Sports



U.K. Cricket

Supremacy

Questioned | {

By VERNON MORGAN
LONDON, Jan. 8.
- ‘The 1950 cricket season is still
‘distance away and the at-
r m-of the British spoeeng
public is thinking more of soc
sup~ties which get into their
Srlae vhis week end.
- At. the same time there is an
unusual amount of talk about the
summer game at vhe present mo-
ament- because of the many articles
being written on “Fifty Years of
Spoit’M Britain”, this being ‘he
halt-cetitury year.
“* Wrong Century
“Mostly it is not very compli-
One writer saysg tha:
3 cricket is still trying to
live ix the wrong century. All
must’ agree that cricket in Britain
today is not what it was and
that the British have most de-
finitely los’ their earlier supre-
Jmacy to the “streamlined” Aus-
tralians who do appear to move
with the times.
It is being the

suggested vo

British that if they wish to be- |
leading |
cricket nation they should moulca ;

come once again the
themselves on the Australian pat-
tern in many respects.

“British Played To Death

Of the major cricketing coun-}

Vries only British players may be
said to be played to death. Only
the British are stale. In Australia
they have. their Sheffield Shield |
matches, in Souvh Africa the Cur- |
rent Cup, in New Zealand the
Plunket Shield, and in India and
the West Indies their provincial
and inter-island matches.
tournaments do not en-
tail play day after day for more
than four months on end without
a break. They do allow teams
going on a tour in the off season
Yo look upon the tour with enthu-
siasm and approach it with fresh-
ness energy. ‘
oi Enough Cricket
Indeed in some of these coun-
tries they feel they do not get
enough cricket. The remedy is
drastically to alter the whole of
the County league programme.
Some suggest making two divi-
siong and playing matches on the
Soccer league principle. Others
think the maiches might be cut
to not more than one a week.
But it is not going to be easy
to gev the M.C.C. to revolutionise
the whole of the old cricket sys-
Phere are more conserva-
tives in the pavilion at Lords
than in any other building of
Similar proportions in the world.
Another idea which would un-
Westionably result in a_ better
British team. for the all important
‘matches would be to take all
those chosen out of county cricket
for at least a week, give them a
Special manager - coach to look
after them and lev them prepare
diligently for the task in hand.
M.CC, Should Copy
The M.C.C. could well take a
Ieat out of the book of the Eng- |
lish Football Association who at
least see that the men to repre
pent England are given every |
Opportunity to be fresh and eager
for the big task in hand

In their talks about cricket
one of the chief topics for dis-
cussion is the next Captain of
England. Freddie Brown took
ever from George Mann lasi'|
year and it is thought probable
that Norman Yardley, the cap-
— of Yorkshire, will be re-

\y called.

Yardley knows the Reni
lians. He was Captain of Eng-
Jand when Sir Donald Bradman
brought his men over here two
years ago. Thus he would be a

good man to skipper England
during the coming season
against vhe West Indians in

preparation for the tour of Aus-
tralia next winter
ers, apart from Brown,
spoken of as “possibles” are Wil-
fred Wooller, the former Welsh
SER omational of Glamorgan,
and "R@g. Simpson of Notts, who
headed the Test batting averages
against. the New Zealanders last
season.—Reuter

Basket Ball
Starts February

The-Committee of Management
of the Basket Ball Association
has decided to start the Basket
Ball season from the last week in
February. Clubs are asked to
send in their entries with their
affiliation fee to the Secretary,
A. W. Symmonds, Bank Hall Road
by the end of this month Sec-
retaries of affiliated clubs will be
notified of the date of the Annual
General Meeting -which wil! be
held in February.



ethey'll | Do it ‘Every



HEN DRIVING IN THE CITY:<.
IT REALLY IS A PITY-~"THE EXHAUST
FUMES NAUSEATE SUBURBAN JOE...

—



4

=



MONOXIDE! I CAN'T WAIT
es) TO GET OUT TO MY LITTLE
\. PLACE IN THE COUNTRY:

7!



i...

THE POLO TEAM as they left t

\

yesterday morning, bound for

Elliot Williams, Mark Edghill, Mfs. Michelin, Mr. H
Michelin, Col

and Lee Deane, behind
John Marsh and Mrs

Mrs

Dowding.

—-%
!

Aussies Rout
Kast Province

F eB
or 137
PORT ELIZABETH. Jan, 9. |
Eastern Province needed 187}
runs with 9 second inning wie |
1 hand to avoid an innings)
aefeat when play closed on the!
second day of their match against |
he Australian tourists.
Forced to follow on after
biying to the Australian total of |
418 with 137, Province were 94}
for 1 their second innings, |
when stumps were drawn today
rhe match ends tomorrow,
Accurate bowling by the Aus-
tralian attack completely sub-
jued the Province batsmen, who
‘nally collapsed against some
icry bowling with the new ball
by Ray Lindwall and Billi John-
ston, who had spells of 4 for 8
and 4 for 13 respectively.
Lindwall’s final figures were 5
for 25 and Bill Johnston claimed
4 for 16. The top scorer for the
Province was Ken. Dimbleby
who batted 3% hours for his 54,
which ineluded 3 fours
Forced to follow on 281 runs
behind, Eastern Province made a





kets

e- |
re-

in

| good start in their second innings.

Ron Draper and Ken Dimbleby
featured in the highest opening |
partnership against the Austra-
lians. Dimbleby made 42 before
being separated by Noblet.

The previous best opening
stand was 50 by Eric Rowan and
Owen Wynne in the second
innings of the first Test at Johan
nesburg which was won b the
Australians. Dimbleby made 4?
before being caught at the wicket

hl cc ee ma

am ELST

T

Yachting,



he terminal building at Seawell

fenezuela. Left to right are:
Dowding
Michelin (Capt.),

|

|
|
|

Poio Team
Leaves |

Five members tae
Polo Club, Col. R. 1 Michelin, |
(Capt.), Elliot Williams, Mark |
Edghill, Lee Deane, John Marsh
and their Manager Mr. Herbert |

OL Barbados

>”

BD \ R b
oR
canis

Boxing, cte,







“STANDARD. BRIDGE

The ONLY
artificial bid |

by M. HARRISON-GRAY

NY call that does not carry

its natural significance is a
blot on the bidding landscape.
Standard bridge employs one
artificial bid only—a necessary
evil which, as we shall see, is
but a very slight taint on a
natural system.

Hands 50 strong in themselves
that game can be made under
their own power occur about
once in every 100 deals. But itis
as well to have adequate
machinery to deal with these
important hands when they do
turn up.

The first step is to have a bid
at one’s disposal that will compel
the partner to keep the bidding
open (even though he holds
nothing of value) until the best
game or slam contract has been
rea¢ned. At the same time the
call must allow the maximum
bidding space for the exchange
of information.

In the early days of Contract
Ely Culbertson tried to solve the
problem with his Forcing Two
convention. The player who
picked up a hand strong sous
in itself to suggest a probable
game was supposed to o with
a forcing-to-game call of Two m
his best suit.

This meant that the openang
One-bid in the Culbertson system
had an enormous range. with
result that the responder had to
keep the bidding open on the
most tenuous values for fear of
missing a game. But if spent
happened to have a minimum
One-bid, disaster was apt to
follow. Responder was always
on_the horns of a dilemma,

It was to overcome this
ridiculous state of affairs that
the forcing-to-game bid of 2
Clubs was adopted in this
country. The call is artificial,
for it bears no relation to the
actual holding in the Club suit;
put it has this great advantage,
that it frees the opening bids of
2 Spades, 2 Hearts and 2
Diamonds for use with their
ral meaning.
ng bid of 2 Clubs,
e special situation, is
lly forcing to game,
weak the responde
With less than one an



.





may be.
a half high card tricks, he must



Dowding with Mrs, Dowding and |
Mrs. Michelin lett Seawell yester- |
Gay morning by B.W.I.A’s Flight |

383 for Venezuela They expe
| to return on January 21
Their visit however though |

primarily to play Polo will serve as
one of the biggest free advertise
ments the Island has ever had in





| this very rich S An i

public Barbacdk \ h is
Browing in popularity with Vene
zuelans as a haven tor a holiday,

for the next twelve days, will be
widely adveriised throughout the
Republic, and many who have
never heard of our Island, will
be reading about Barbados and the
Barbadians. Col. Michelin told the
Advocate that the tour will be
given the utmost publicity in tne
Venezuelan press
Every Day
As far as the games were con-
cerned they were looking forward
very much to the tour and besides
the three test matches to
played, they would be playing
polo practically every day; some
of the matches would. start as}
early as 9 a.m, |
!
|
'

be

About thirty relations and Pol
fans were at the Airport t !
the team good luck, and as the
plane took off aud quickly became
a tiny speck in the sky, those who]
were left behind i}
watched it disappear, some
ladies with handkerchiefs Wipir

wi

waved

off Noblet. Draper was undefeated away tears, so great wa
at the close with 46, Noblet's| emotion They, and all lovers of
wicket was gained at a persona!| the Sport in Barbados, eager|]s
cost of 13 runs. await news of the team’s succe
Reuter | ‘n the matches to come |
wg PRES ere se Among those at the Airpot
¢; monwealth seeing them off were
; Mr. and Mrs Roy Gill, Mr
V. Edgnill, Mr. J. B. Marsh, Mi

TT e° e |
Wins Again
JAMSHEDPUR, Jan, 9
Scoring their first win in
Zonal fixtures the Commonwealth
cricketers today deteated Eas
Zone by 10 wickets, a day aheac
of schedule
Final scores were: Common-
wealth 286 and 63; East Zone 225

and 120.
Tribe, slow left arm bowler,
took 7 wickets for 61 puns in

Zone's second innings, and was the
chief factor in his. team’s victory
The East Zone’s overnight not
out batsmen had wiped off the
arrears before Tribe came _ into
the attack to cause complete
collapse

There was no excuse for the
batting failure, for the perfect
matting surface was unaffected by
the two days’ play. Tribe, how-
ever, was at his best and his
figures today were accomplished in





ane
+. MLE











S GhsOu,







| sive

‘18 THE LIFE NO
NOTHIN’ BUT GREEN GRASS/
YOU CITY GUYS DON’T

Mary Marsh, Mrs. Elliot William
and tamily, Mrs, Jack Kirton, The
Deane Family, Mr. O. H
Major M. L
Victor Weekes, Mr. Lisle
Mr. Trevor Davis, M1

Belmar and many others

ee
21.1 overs, six

Johnsor

Davi
Alfre

of which ere
maidens
His match figures were 11 fox
102. Highest scorer for East Zone
was §S. Bannerjee, the captain,}

who made 35 in 113 minutes with
5 fours as his best hits.

Bill Alley and Fred Freer
opened the Commonwealth second
innings and rattled up 50 in 25
minutes Another single cam
and then Alley, with two succes-
sixes off Girdhari,
victory.

This was
(irst win’ in
matches with
zones

the Commonwealth's |
the Zonal fixtures
North and West}
been’ drawn

—Reuter. |

each having





Â¥! THis
TRAPRIC...

ht. Ve

RD, Skewes-Cox, Mr.| °

brought | N

as a first step give a conven-
tional response of 2 Diamonds.
On subsequent rounds both

opener and responder are free
to bid their hands naturally,




wo Clubs should never be
opened, except on very rare
oceasions where the long suit
happens to be Clubs, with less
than five quick -cicks. It must

be borne in mind, however, that
five quick tricks are not in them-
selves sufficient to Suarantee @
game; the hand should be of




and solidity tnat a

ntract can feariessly be

i “nh, even opposite a
7 hand ’





n Express service.











UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF

EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT





| well
|
|

\DOS ADVOCATE

To Find The Missing Link | Wirt BACKACHE

ae
em SE

es

THE 324-TON RESEARCH SHIP WILLIAM SCORESBY in Shad-
The vessel is under the command of Lieutenant
Comnginder A. F. Macfie, R.N.R. and the chief scientists aboard
are Dr. T. J. Hart, Mr. R. Clarke and Mr. R. I, Currie, all mem-

Basin.



IT DI OT



bers of the National Institute of Oceanography.

from London last week.

gest fish trip, the longest fishing
line, the biggest fish hook and!
deepest trawl ever made were}
21
ten

taken three scientists and
crew men on a 25,000 mile,
months research cruise.

Off the shore of East London,
South Africa, the seas’ missing
link is believed still, to exist.

Ronald I. Currie, the 21-year- |
old biologist, who is making the





pm ieacenmenasantice

England in Tudor Times DONALD WILES,



Q
o,

B.A., B.L.S. (12) Thurs., Jan, 12
| History of European
Painting .. NEVILLE CONNELL,
M.A. (8) Friday, Jan. 1
| Earlier History of Bar-
| hados .- E. M, SHILSTONE,

M.A.

} :
British and American
Constitutions ° }

| English Poetr:
Hi

story of Barbados,
1794— 1902

English History and
' ;

Literature

FREE

\UBREY DOUGLAS-

FOR BACH COURSE:

(5) Mon., Jan. 16

W. B. CHENERY,

(6) Tues., Jan. 24.

'{ POPHAM (6) Wed., Jan. 18,

I ‘ (10) M Ja 0

60 Cts,

H. A. VAUGHAN (10) Friday, Jan 20,

_ 24 Men Are Sailing
| 25,000 Miles

LONDON (By Mail). |

ATTEMPTS to trap the “missing link of the sea”—the
cavern-mouthed Latimeria chalumnae, thought to have
become extinct 50 million years ago—is being made by
the British research ship William Scoresby which sailed

What is claimed to be the big- | research work at Oxford before

joining the institute.

remain aboard for the whole trip.

Millions of creatures too tiny to
loaded aboard the ship which has | be seen will also be fished for with
| bottles at
with delicate
levels above the 18,000 feet depth.

SSSI



the 18,000

silken





THE WEST INDIES

, 8.15 Harrison

College
(Library)

5.00 Museum

8.15 Y.M.C.A.

8.15 Wakefield

8.15 Combermere

6.00

|

School

8.15 British Council Weekly

Wakefield

opeignt

orary

SINGLE LECTURES:








-

—— le es na

‘Haro Times





| i
Often due to sluggish kidney action
| LIFE IS NOT so good when you

are troubled with backache,
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Why put up with pain and dise
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relief by taking Doan’s Backache
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ee

COTTON PLAIDS
(45" Wide)

in GOLD, BROWN, RED,
TREEN, BLUE

$1.24 & $1.25 per yard.

PRINTED LINENES
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$1.07 per yard







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Currie will -“

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, IID,

10, 1, 12 & 13 Broad Street,



feet level,

trawls |

on |

















—LN.S.

seahiaueie
LENIN NC NCE



Rediffusion Programmes
.p Ye trip, can identify the Latimeria &
s & a
\ chalumnae. | ee €
oe One. was caught off East Lon- TUESDAY JANUARY 10, 1950 | Jo.
EDITOR don by & trawler in 1998 accord |i} | oneemeramons Wt Lrosperous
ing to Currie and it was hardly tt Se meee ice i&
; yd to be alone. 7.30. 8.00 Morning Special | ee
4 “The trawler men had the sense 9.00— 9.15 Dance Music
Answers Question aay : 7 ‘ o 9.30-—-11.00 Closed &
to send it to a South African mu 11,00—11.15. Programme Parade |
, en seum, There they dtuffed jthe 11.15—11.40 Music for Breakiast x
1, When Johnny Morris skin and threw away the all- Time Listening eCW Car
joined Derby C ounty important insides.” , 12.30— 1.15 Orchestal Concert | ee
from Manchester Unit- r : > Ms 2 7 es Music = 2 j &
. . > > = 2.3— 3.0 n Chancery Ep :
ed at the end of last Remote Chance 4.154 4.45 Picture Parade <
season the County were Currie, youngest of the scien- 5.15— 5.30 Programme Sum-
reported have paid . . se eke 2 4 *y . mary and Interiudc gee OF
eee COR A I sts on the staff of the National 6.00— 6.30 Children’s ie IS THE SINCERE WISH
mm carat , Institute of Oceanography, said Programme |
<. Nort ptonshire that the chances of finding the fish §.30— 7.00 Request Time i
3 Hel ae . 7.15— 7.30 Songtime presented 8
‘ H ee a were remote, but the specially- by Stokes & Bynoe
2© 1 I an amateur : : . 8 ¢ 5 : * i f
: ar designed fish tra Y 1.30— 7.45 Dick Haymes $ (| age ° : .
5) ee 4 nocae tee the on d fish trap might turn the 0 5 Dick Hay mies Show & q OLLINS DRUG STORES
Der tn 7 7.45— 8.00 Interlude _ | ee
Dr. N. A. Mackintosh, director | > on 5 w
oO wppeared in : 4 . _ 8.00— 8.15 Local News : een i aiaiiatai lie . nee
© erections, gppecred in 1 or research behind the tip spon: cco von |} AN ORONO OCR OCR R CoCr gE gE
™ sored by ~ institute, designed 8.15— 8.20 neoc - bi {PPP OSSD SFT SPSS SSSOPIOPV OS OOSS oO ry ‘
the new fish trap. psented : ¥ me
é 7 = presented by City
i “Until 1938, that fish was known Garage x 1
> ;only as a fossil. And today we’ve §.30— 8.45 Strange as it seems g ( :
1B... rO throw a lot of light on evolution,” 8.45— 9.00 Eddy Arnold pre % 4
UESDAY 10, 1950. he declared. sented by Lever st
| The William Scoresby was itis x
\ H Or , ye CeUy as U.S.A ‘ ‘kK 'NY in O ; .
( Speaking, | scheduled to sail late in December News 9.15 a.m. and 9.45 p * CEMENT in 94-1 Bags 4
ria 0) but the bursting of three boiler Make Believe Ballroom 9.15 ; ‘
k ene 5 : = 9.45 “A 7 " * » 7
» AnnouncetnanG, 8:18] Digs delayed oe acre cane nai Do % WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT
e Down, 12.60 noon The News, 12.10| The ship will sail to Dakar, News 7 a.m., 8 a.m., 12 noon, x ,
; No a _Analyals Ac-| West Africa, and ‘to Capetown, a + p.m., 7 p.m. and 9 p.m % RED COLORCRETE CEMENT
1.00. x On |Surveying the Benguala current OR ne Site wm | $s ts
Radio Newsree |Off the West Coast, then on to Report from Britain 11.4 1% ,
: , \ t f 5 a.m ‘ i. , "
Band, "2.00 p.1 Australia to mark whales in order ry 00 p.m, 1% EXPANDED METAL — |
/ k 2 to plot the course of seasonal mi- “ccordéon Interlude 12.15 p.1 i 3 ig
Si 0 Ring ; : seasona \. 12.30 p. | 1s ‘ 9.; ‘ '
The 1 \ “jack And| gration. Some 1,800 whales will Radio Newsreel 1,15 p.m.—1,39 p,t iS ain. L-in., 2-in, & 3-in, Mesh Tron ;
» Bea : 4.00 p.m. The News,|/be tagged by painless dart John Bull's Band 1.30 p.m.—200 Ml &
® pu Dally Service 16 p.m 7 Care ee Nee % a: ‘ :
e Dally Service, 418 P.™:| Igbeted “1 pound reward on te ete acs a s s-in, & 1-in. Mesh Galvanized
4 p.m. Tom 's ‘Trio, 5.00 p.m.|turn te Colonial Office, London.” Ring up the Curtain 300 5 %
M A Sik : i | 5. “ Curtain 3.00 p.m 4
cide ic y Sibelius, 5.15 p.m y . 3.3 p.m, y
ramme An cements, 5.20 p.m Lt. c Four Guns re Jack the Beanstalk 3.30 p.m.—4,00 B.R.C, METAL ¥ABRIC —,
nterlude, 5.30 4 Generally Speak- ommander A. F. Macfie of p.m x ‘
45 p.m. Sandy MacPherson A’ |Glasgow is captain of the vessel Tom Jones Trio 4.45 p.m.—-5.00 p.n ¥ 9: : f
a hen ¢ Org € a m _ British which carries four guns for firing ae a Sibelius 5.00 p.m 5.15 x No 9 12-in by 3-in, Mesh ‘
Ne i West-) the 10-ineh darts to mark the Generally Speaking 5 1 . 2 ® ,
to! 7.45 | Letter From London | whales, ; inane OM % No. 65 — 6-in by 6-in. Mesh A
ve r 8.15 » e * ‘ p, re m ee . & °
i. s oes I a Dr. x J. Hart, of the Marine ehenes een Selections 5.45 p.m Py ia
Ded o job. 9.3) charge of research work until the » ”
| 3 M ght « tra 5 . »
i B.B.C. | Midland 1 : | Ship reaches Capetown, where he RADIO DISTRIBUTION {i | } ay :
eller 191 h aan ; x -: PHONE 4267. :- :
‘ vilion} Will be succeeded by Robert BADOS) LTD. % 7 ry :
Re From’ Clarke, a biologist who was doing [4 PS

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PAGE 1

PACE EIGHT BARB MM. s UH(K \TK >** %  MWQA Ig M > 1_ Ukket l-.afl.nH. R.rl-B Sgiorls YarMiat-. Basing-, rlr. HARD TIMES 1 To flbUl Wlfc Missing Link fl, TH | | ACKWHE U.K. Cricket Supremacy Questioned By VEKNON MOKT.AN LONDON. Jan. 8 The 1950 cnckci season is still some distance away one) thr -it•Nilwn of the British sponlnf public if thinking more of soccer Cup ties which get into their atnde itils week end. Ai the same time there is an unusual amount of talk about the summer gsme at itie present momem because of the many articles being written on 'Fifty Years of Di Britain", this being .he r.fllf'eWUury year. Wrong Century Mostly it is not very complimentary. One writer says* tha Stmkh riefcet ii still trying tc llvi'. the wrong century. All musf agree that cricket In Britain today is not what it was and that the British have mol definitely lotV ihi-ir earlier supre.macy to the -*trwimlincd" AUJtmliurb. who do appear to move with the times. It i >tng suggested A> the British thai if ihe> wish to LM eoene once attain the leading cnckci nation they should muula themselves an the Australian pattern In manv respects. British Played To Death Of the majoi Lrukeling coun-1 vTtes only British player* n %  aid to be played to death ODI) the British are stale. In Australia they have their Sheffield Shield matches, in Sourh Africa the Current Cup, In New Zealand the Plunket Shield, and in India and the West Indies their provincial and inter-island matches. These tournaments do not entail play day after day for more than four months on end without a break They do allow teams itoiag on a tour in the off season vo look upon the tour wllh enthusiasm and approach it with freshmaa, and cncrgA Not Knough Cricket indeed in samp of these countries they feel loey do not get enough cricket The remedy is drastically to alU-i the whole uf the county league programme. Some suggest making I along, and playing matches on tht soccer league prlnripU i think the maiVhes might be rut to not more than one a week. But it Is not going to be easy to gev the M C.C. lord the whole of the old cricket system There are more conservative, in the pavilion at Lords than in. any other building of similar proporttons in the world Another Idea which \>oulrl unquestionably result In a better British leajn for uag -II imp-rtunt Teal" matches would be to lake all those chosen out of count) 111 gsfl for at least a week, gh special manager coach to look after them and lei* them prepare diligently for the task In hand. iH.CX. Should Cop\ The M.C.C. could well lake a leaf out of the bonk ol UM Ei Ush Football Association srhi least see that tha man u, !,.,; %  •ent England are %  *) i opportunity to itrash and eager fur flic big task in t in taatr talks about crl one or the chief top) ** %  € separated by Ni cussion is tinnext rirrtajsn ..i Tht England Freddie Brown to over from George Mann lajpi Owen Wynne in (hi | year and it u thought prohabU haalnaa; of la* fMt Trt at Joh THE POLO TEAM as Ussy left the terminal building at Senwcll yesterday morning, bound for Veneauela Left to rigli: Klliot Williams. Mai' and I-eo Deane. behind Mrs Michelin, Col Michelin (Capt ) John Marsh and Mm Dowding. Aussies Rout hast Province For 137 PORT ELIZABETH Jan. 9 seded 18! I %  hand to avoid ... out) closed second day i.f their match ajajnsl U'.irists. to follow on after itniian total of %  191 Provtnc usalr second utahiga, r.owere drawn today I; ends tomirrnw Accurate bowling h> the Australian attack complet. dued the I'r-vinee batsmen, who ollapsad against some lm i>owiing with the new ball Raj l.indwall and Bill Johnand 4 for 13 res p ectively l.indwall's final flguifor 25 and Bill Johnston claimed 4 for 18 The top scorer for the was Ken Dfmhlcbv i t>, hours for his M, which included 3 lOUM Forced It. follow on 281 runt tiehind. Eastern Province made a nd innings. Ron Draper and Ken IXmlilebv features] In tha partnership against the Austin* Dimblebj made I Polo Team Leaves i Polo Club, Col. K i iCapt.,. Elliot Will,,,: Sdgnili. 1 DM t6t, UOWOUII anil tht at WIA '" hl 383 fci On Januar) 2! though pnmarsl> u,pl> l'„|.. uillserveas ""' ol li ndverU* mowing m popularity w i* vanecuelans as a haven loi ftir the next In, i throughout UM Hcnuulic, and many a •art of our bland, will STANDARD BRIDGf The ONLY artificial bid by M. HARRISON-GRAY A NY call that does not carry Its natural significance Is a blot on the bidding landscape. Standard bridge employs one artificial bid only—a necessary evil which, as we shall see, is but a very slight taint on a natural system. Hands %  •> stum to themselves that game can b nude under their own power occur about once in every KM) deals. But It is as well to nave adequate %  %  v to deal with these important h^uds when they do turn up. The first Hep Is to have a bid at one's disposal that will compel the partner to keep the bidding open (even though he holds nothing ot value) unUl the best game or slam contract has been reasmd. At the same lime the I alio,v the maximum bidding space for the exchange In the early days of Contract Ely Culbertson tried to solve the problem with hi, Forcing Two Tha player who In Itself to suggest s prubaul %  ...-', a forclnj-to game call of Two in ln best sulL This meant that the openang I la the Culbertson system had ao enormous range with toe rvsult that lha reaponder had to keep the bidding open on the most lenuou* vulues tor fear Of missing a game. But if opener %  : :...:. Or. P -bid. disaster was apt to K''Spender was always on the horns of a dilemma. It was to overcome this il state of affairs that gama bid of S Clubs was adopted In this couniry. The can Is artificial. for It ocars no relation to the actual holding In the Club suit; great advantage. that it frees the opening bid* of Hearts and 2 Diamonds for use with their %  mlngThe opening bid of 2 Clubs, one s-rlnl situation, is Dg to game, tlio responder mav fee. with less than one ana a half hkh card tricks, he murt conven'tetul r^*nonse of 2 l> On subsequent rounds both opener and n .-ponder aie free Laratty. IS* ; never be on very rare lbs long anlt happens to be Clubs, with less It must ue borne In mind, however, that IB ihem' nd should be of I esa opposite a 1 'l •-^i *MMIM*M' Often dse le staggtsfl Udsey actAae [ IFE IS NOT so good when yoa l arc troubled with backache, rheumatic pains, stiff, aching Uiuarjss. and joints, lumbago of i innary disorders due to iluggi h kidney action. Wtw put up wirh psin and Ihw comton when you mighi get nappy relief t>v r.ikmg Doan'i rUckacrta Kidnv* Ms, rivcjsdmubic and ^Icinsc 'laggish kidney and so help them to rid the blood uf excess uric add and other impurities which otherwise might collect ia the sy*tem sod cause distress. Doan' *Vk liare helped many thousands; let them help vou. DOANS I; WANTED Old RaG! *DVOC*TC MUSS ROOM I" COUGH LOZEIL V''*' '-'' *-'"*'*****V>>6*, I "GOD'S WAY G,j SALVATION | MADE runrJ 30, Central Avnua,| N. Ireland. that Norman Yard;. tain of YorkshliT. will be recalled | mm Yardley know, the Auslr lians. He was t aptaiu of £n; land when Sir Donald Hradtnan brought his men cm yeajs ago. Thus he good man to skipper England dining the coming seawni against the Watt Ii preparation for the toui of Au.tralia next wlnuH Others, apart frmi spoken of as "posKlbb fred Wooller. the formal W.Wi rugby unVmational of Glamorgan, and Reg Simpson of N headed th. Tas| batting averaged against the New Zoalandtn last naajoa Daskvt Ball Starts February Tt\t Cbmmlller of ManajemTOl of inr Basket Ball Aaauclalioo haa dcidad to atari thr Baakct Ball season from UM lajt week In fi1>iuar> club, are askod to send In their entries m. ih,„ alHliatlon tev to the Se>ri-li.. A W. Synunontb. Bank llau Koad by the end of this tru reUnes of afflliatcil clubs will be notllled of the dale of OilAnnual General Meetln, whl.b srul IKheld in Frbruary. Barbadians Col Mulu-hn l„ld the • % %  • %  •M lh.lt the toui u]ll M alvan the utmost publui Venezuelan press Brat] Day As far as the games a* cerned the> wan lookn very much to the lour u thi three lest i.iatilie, to be pluyed. they would u .. of Ihc niatihes would Abuuf thiity nteiiona and Poa faM man tot leam >ood luck, and .' UMl quickly becauuI behlinl • I II .'.'I %  I I await neu Among those al Ml .II t Ed.hlll, Mi .1 B •. | %  Ml) M.i %  .no laiml.v. Mrs JJ.K K. 'A . !" '"' It Alfreil n I. tha AostialMiis. Dimblcbv mndr i" before belni rauphl ai the nickel IIIJIH i u.iv unililc.ited lose with 4,6, Nabwtl w lmed at I runs. kruter C'liionueultli \\ ins Again JAMSIitiJl'UH. Jan. y Bcortng their Arsl ( m n, Zonal Axaursa tha Zone by 1U wickct.s. a day aheac. of scheduU wealth .8.i and N and I2M loa laft ..mi bowler look ", .. tones second innings, and was the CAM i.i, tor in his tean • Zone's osasj i out batsmen had wip. : the stuck u> aaaaa .i oHa| sg tor the '.ilure. (or u.matting surface was unafl Uie two days' play Trl SPORTS EDITOR Answers Question 1. V | %  untv i'nltad it i last season the Count) % % %  2 1 %  i Hi i • 11.IH IVoitr.iiiiiiit%  1 .til tilt > ich wen art ii log \n iiigi.. I n.ttinenoe. tha who made V, in 113 nun I latin •• %  his bast hlti I %  I Fun uiiiings •no 10 in 29 mituilas. %  lint wtn H :>nes with Norl ever, was at his beet and hi, roneeach havtni bet figure* today were accomplished in _..„,,, •They'll Do It I TOMEN DRIVING IN THE ory*** "J IT REALLY ISA Pliy-THE EXHAUST RiAAES rMU66ATE SUBURBAN &>c-%  '-^B^.'. SPUMED I /i|aA-OH,|OV''^t; "\ jJf is THE ;. =E! MC '<4FRC...^B1 >t>u GTyaufc* DQK'TJS KNOW WHAT yco'te. r MISS1H6! 1 v .1 %  %  %  s OS u m %  .is p m %  > JO p m rsu> Speak. !ii|i. S U i B-ft ( m Bntith %  %  %  all p m. %  %  %  atari %  , THK 324-TON RESEARCH SHIP WILMAM lOOUfBI %  rtU Basbi The vessel ts under the command ol Lit I \ f : Rd the chief scientists aboard r J. Hart. Mr. R. Clarke and Mr. R. I Currie. all mem• ihc National Institute of Oceanography 24 Men Are Sailing 25,000 Miles LONDON (By Mail). ATTEMPTS to trap the "missing link c I t: cavern-mouthed Latimenu chalumnae. thought to have become extinct 50 million years ago— is beint; made by the British research ship William Scoresby which Bailed Erogn London last week. What is claimed to be the bigresearch work at Oxford before gist Hsh trip, the longest fishing joining the institute Currie will line, the biggest fish hook and icmain aboard for the whole trip deepest trawl over made were Millions of creatures too tiny to :< aded aboard the ship which has be seen will also be ilshed for with taken three scientists and 21 bottles at the I8.QO0 i< crew men on a 25.000 mile, ten with delicate silken trawls on months research cruise OtT the shore of East London. South Africa, the seas' missing link is believed still, to exist. Konald 1 Cunie, the !l-ya>rold biologist, who Is making the trip, can identify the Latlmena thalumnae One, was caught off East London by a trawler in 1938 according in Currie and it was hardly likely to be alone. Tintrawler men had the sense to sand it to a South African mu•eum. Inert* they fluffed the skin ami the allimportant insides." Kemoie CaVfcgftN Cunie. vounue%  il the National Institute of On lhal the chances of rinding me Rah i. IB might tuiti the trMi I'i v \ Macklntoah, director bv-liiM.I lint UM instituu % %  tish trap. Until 1H38. th;it lish a only as a fussil. An.i today we've I t*S I kill lli~ iiiMdca would throw a lot of light on evolution." he dee] The William Scoresby i M ilubursting of three boiler l i'.irture. The ship will sail to Dakar. Wait Africa, mil to Capetown. Mirveying the Bonguala current Uttl Coast, then on to 10 mark whules In order %  course of aeai nation. Some l.BOO whales will Wlagged by painless darts labelled "I pound reward on return to Colonial Office, London." ronr I.mi, Ll Commander A F Maclle of • captain of t h ""!/*"'" ,our un or nrln i.' lu-inah darts to mark the nasal . D "'_, T IHart, of the Marine biological station. Plymouth, i, in I research work until the Ml Capetown, where be MH M succeeded hj Roh,-rt | iraa %  M i t l n g l gl srho srai aoti 2 Astounding Values in PLAIDS AND LINENES conoN PUIDS (45" Wide) in COLD, BROWN, RB GREEN. BLUE S1.24 & $1.25 per vira PRINTED LINENES , B %  a 30 I IS Orchaalnl Ci I 00 2 IS Diw* MU.II; 3 J 00 In Chancery Ep B 4 IS 4 45 inclure Paraor 5 1* 5 3D ("rogramm, ntaary Mad S OS— S 30 Cf.ii IYuarasmiii*> • i so K*, 7 IS 3 30 SOngllinr .'• 1 30 7 4* U„ %  • %  %  a ovB Roll in a is. %  S 30 pMirn1t-cl by Lever %  4S | „„. il Lvver I IS s.m ,.. ,,. M-k t |spii nr n-lir !" ,,. ., %  *• P in nni <57 ^Prosperous New ^ear IS THE SINCERE WISH OF lOI.I.I.W IIIIK. SIOIIIS £ 1 iS i & I & Si •M ..I.I,%  12 M u in. %  1130 p HI. iHewi •'rui Bull Inlarludr II 15 Wl I.U pin | ; I --iliarU K.'vin. I IS g,n Ring up iivr Ci.ii.it, S.JS i J-ck live BMntUlk 1 Su p t V ill %  5 43 p m RADIO II.MKI.., | ins 'HAItuxiHISi LTI>. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES I I III \ M1RA1. DKHART.MKNT I i I nil in Tinlnr Times DflNAI.P WILES 1'A HLS. ^ (12)Thurs.. Jan. 12. 8.15H.r.,s„„ H sloi i i I in n,M-an t.iv; .. NEVILLE CONNELL M.A. Collcuc (Library) Weekly (8)'Friday. Jan. It, 5.00 Museum FortI uli.i Mi i,,i. „t |li, r niuhtly la**" .. I M SH1I.STONE, (5)Mon., Jan. 10 8.15Y.MC.A. FortSriltah III.I \m nightly I "ii-iiintiui'.s i ,\ B CHEKERY. (F '" (8)Tue.„ Jan. 24, 8.15 WakelieUl Weekly I ii li.h I'uelrlli.liirt „f K.irhatlus. JBasglnh Mi > ., % %  ,1 SSVU, (ttSMa, Jan 18, .15Combermere School MANdOiFr.J.y.J.nlo. 8.15Briti.h Counc. Wak %  30, aoo s, '" """""<">^ •S.NGL. IMMKIS 1ICfc We Can Supply from Stock 1 I Ml.NT in 4-lh Bai;> mm bwweaen aaaajit BSD COLORCKKTE CEMKNT KXPANDED METALin I in. .'-in. & 3.1B. Mesh Iron Mil. & l-in. Mesh (iiilvanizerl H.K.C. METAL KABUIt— No. — 12-in hy :)-in. Mesh No. 05 — G-in hy 6-in. Mesh ^ WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., Lft -: PHONE 4287 or *#.v.f; !1V CHECK THIS LIST! "•'" "i i .„> ,, 1M — I, nssaaas, VI ~ '|' s ! ii \ nil rsi: AXLEYNE --•.-.-.-.-.•.•.-.-.'.-,-..,.,.,., VHTHIK a. CO, HIGH STREET



PAGE 1

Tnrtilai. •lannarv 10 I.-,. Barhafcos Jfouncate Price: ** / *£>** CIVi: CENT SI Year 33. STRACHEY WINS BATTLE OF SUGAR Cripps Calls Himself A Pessimist But Calls For "Go Slow" In Helping Others LONDON. Jan. 9. /CHANCELLOR of thtExchequer. Sir Stafford Cripps. *-* spoke of "unrooniled exports" and sterling halani at Ins Press Conference in London today. "We want lo dimmish oar unrequited exports lo that we can divert mere f our exports lo I he hard currency, and particularly the dollar roiinlries.' He ..-,,d. adding: indeed, that ne mii.*i do". -Bui toon ether very important side !o ihis pleiure. The resource* neve been made availnhlc. many of ihem lo countriao urgently in need of assistance In Iheir post-war i %  %  < %  nn st met ion. "Unless we had provided this help, we should undoubtedly have MO en even greater .spread of Communiom. What are unrequitrc! exports to UE are Imomnsely -valuable .supporting imports to countries threatened by the cold ana. These have helped to enable them, despite all their difficulties tu withstand the onslaught of thai cold war, and to build up their own production", the Chan, eellor added: "Bui we have now reeehed I slagc where we must go slower, whether we wish it or not. for the sake of pi our own strength and ability to help." Questioned on th Sir Stafford said that an attempt would be mad* to agree on • reduction in the amount releasable from Sterling balances when the annual negotiations took place with each countrv. No Increase In 1950 Price NO LONG TERM AGREEMENT AFTER 1952 CONTRACT EXPIRES No Human Creech Jones Pleads In Vain (From Our Own Correspondent) IMI VIsTHY BUM TORS Or ST. MICH AKI. had cast lheu VOM long business if counting Ihem began. The picture shows election official th* QOUfll From left to right are:—Mr. C. B. Sisnetl: Mr. R. M. Cave, Sub nil; Mr, F. J. Cole. Sheriff; Mr. E. C. Redman. Vestry CUrk. Ml H 0 Rai Sir STAFFORD CRIPPs Gold Coast Workers Stage A Strike A Sound Itlea Asked whai he thought of %  suggestion made by some American bankers that the United Slates should take over luibiliu I for part of Britain's Sterling GOLD COAST, Jan. 9 Balance debts. Sir Stafford said: Workers in Accra began a Civil "1 am very glad the suggestion isobedieiire campaign today came from American hunkers. 1 osing and stopping buses. The empaigii. part of a mow to rtain Dominion Status for the Old Coast, also included olher t at home strikers and lesser >ycotis. Post Office, electricity poderWngs. railways, and Government 'partmenUt were, Uuwe. i g normally A general strike to support the %  mand and the re-instntemeitt of l l-laiag Government workers iun officially yesterday was? ided on Wednesday. It was unirstood. The colony's RoilwaygV*ens Union was among those supporting the strike. The Ground Staff of the British vcrseas Airways Corporation at ecra slopped work on Saturday. Jt servicing of planes continued. —Heater. Trinidad Gets New Bishop think it a sound and excellent idea." Reviewing the economic results of 1949. the industrial output had continued to rise rapidly through the year "with the result thut our economic position had been basically strengthened." Bill To Appoint Prince Bernhanl THE HAOUI, Jan. 9. A Bill appointing; Prince Bern%  HI the event of the |g %  Queen Juliana before iheir eldest daughter Beatrice has come of age. hns fceen submitted lo the Chamber of Ihe Sjnie.i General. —Rruter. 2 Skiers Killed TURIN. Jan II. Two Italian Bleu vatsj killed vlien ihe cable of irbsdo. Advocate torroniondriic PORT-OF-SPAIN. Jan. a. Tne Rl. Reverend Douglas John Ilsun, Bbhop "I British id i..iusi-WI m Ihe mounluins of Ihe s, was today elected Bishop or Moon. Italian All *idad~during a Special Synod om ,l '"H a power an Anglican Diocese. He up %  Bum t*n "dels, including a -ids the Rl. Reverend Fabian lx, > ""'A "'" %  •"* %  *&*>* '•'eckjoii who resigned because 01 ""*•' %  —"euler. II health. Bid new appointment will have D p ,'„/,„,, /;,,„ ba conUnnni hy other Bishop. "•'" BlunO/l IJIt'S the province of the West Inilir nnar-iTr i !" o Bishop Wilson ,, „, sl( ,.„J."ll„ < ; n J „ E „" J c a a \hol i e raduate „f Q u0> .„ ^ collet, Slovakia, who nd tambtidge. He Is married „ M attacked by tha Mil nd has two children This Is his Justice for "leTOauU 10 lake the seventh year of minlstratlvo ex, oath of allegiance to die Comp in the Wei Indies. miimst Government, Oied el his — (By Cable). honta to-day. Itealrr. Two Arrested Check Communist On r raud ^' # Charge LxpaflSlOtl III South-east Asia Is Keynote Of Colombo Talks BRUSSELS, Jan. 9. nelgiat: tWO prominent Antwerp IncineM men in connection with frauds in lock and bonds, which should have baea declared Govti ament 1 anU-Inflatkm law ter the liberation in 1M4. They an M Henri StockI former Company Director and M. Laurent Hans•ma, former Director of a wellknown busmeko Banking House. Police said lhat the men were alleged to be concerned m a I raud totalling 1.000,000 Bel|ltn francs. Belgian Premier Goaton ktyaakena. announced on %  a police had uncovered frauds, totalling 10.250.000 Bellet, and that two of the .caring hankers ana others had been arrested ana barged with implkatioii gSj bankers named were: M. Emile MoWen, he->d of the big Kredlet i!ank and M. Jules Cardyn a high ofhcial of tha Belgian National Bank. Anoilier Fraud Police said lhat they thought ih.it they were nn me point of dls%  another :r.md involving 3.000.000 francs" worth of red stocks and bonds. Ing to the police, the '.ocks and bonds which nave been falsely oeftlAesJ Some of tl i ried oft* by Ihe Germans during the later found thoJl w.iy back into Belgium. lloneod to ted collaborators. afraid to decline iheir In Parliament thai week. Comic Belgian %  dement on uials implinktag organisation-.um (crtain peraonoTltloi of the ftf> KM ial .ui" "'nriu. if it nropaeed a late %  " Cenal on their wav lo Haifa Fol.ruary eleetion. may In tne lirsl in the absence of safe conduct "prances from Egypt is still possible to arrange _n"ances. and we have had no !*!•'•' mtimaUon nbout Egypt MUlng to give firm assurance that {" %  -mint,,,, supplies destined t". ''rael would be allowed to f* though the Sue? Canal — eater. (By SYI.VAIN MANBGOT) COLOMBO. Jan 9, COMMONWEALTH eiwiper.unn, tpansion nf ('ommunism in South East Asia was th, ., opening sessions of the Colombo Com, i information available tonight Tin. eitfn \hi:. Is ase r a ll j agraed thai ou ueeie ..mi elimination >i Lea HI isaieiilii mo•rhich OomrnuEusw Hsflvei, %  U.S. Officials In L.K. For Defence Talks Rights In Colombia Says Liberal President mm ram, Jan ;. %  OOMpO, President o I CokanMan LjlH-rai I'arty. to! Preaa Conference today thn nns had been killed v. ouitep the Mail %  he Conservative Par7 'i desperate eampaiici I all oppoaltlon." Dt I member i>f th* is been ii fhe United States for the last 3 week*, and is returning to Colombia in a few days. iv ail batman righto •:'geared in Colombia, he said. 1 myself have l>een livinv 10 life for PTlthl. The 41-year-nld Senator said that he had come to Ihe Waited BUtea in order to net the opinion ol Americans about the political itualion in Colombia He had unofficial talk.s with Stale Department friends" in A'.ishlngton. "aii' met was at leu I On Pace I LONDON, Jan. 9 }T IS NOW fairly obvious that discussions be tween the Food Ministry and Colonial sugar delegates have from the West Indian point of view served no useful purpose. The Ministry with the knowledge that they have all West Indian sugar under contract until the end of 1962 ire understood to have driven a hard bargain and in the circumstances it v auld not be surprising if the B.W.I, delegates are obliged to turn down whatever offers are made to them. Spain Considt-rs Economic Bmtk \\ ill. Yrp'iitiiia Dominant!!, the whole picture Ul te%  %  > .isiry have tact—to '-le Cuban "dump" figure. Now Tha; devaluation hats had the effect of innreaiini the > Britain of all non-dollar sugar, ihe Ministry are understood to nave completely illnaginleil the iree market pines and have sat their awn lhe\ are not alter. its reason there little hope thai 19.10 will bctnc any infiense La ilu |im. paid for sugar by BrtUm io :h. Indies. The likelihnod ol .1 Ion", term ej iho 1952 ionti.nl ixplrea also MhUairy nai iignad one ml with Aii-n.ih.i luaranteelna to bu from than tiuo.ooo tons annually and %  %  the aflat I of 1 quotas '" a ? "J^ ."" 'er areas. U.S. Has Vo/ Finished Her Job In Europe -HOFFMAN WASK:NGrON. JaL. 9 Mr Paul Hoffman. Economic Co-operatlo'i Administrator, said today that European n-cover> ha. t-een so successful thai there wm the danajer that the Unr, v.ould consider the 10b doiuThe ultimate raa wl l 1 daaWN imght u^ srai naaw lad Baatelri to eraaai ehaai m A'estera Kuropv. Mr HoilmanioUiha Women's NaUun.il D ''iuH in a prepare-i Today, despiie alt lhat Russia <*ouid do to pcaaanl it, i think : K The -Vi "' Voral /"i"ics in a ivMadrid to-day MUO that fan Mcienna breaking off all economti LONDON. Jan. 9. [Pact. Th. Eight senior American MUl-Iretarj ilnuisht %  dlffarci Ury and Civ.l OfflciaU arrived dy here by air from Washington,that IntarvenUoo Mutual Defer,, Paw an in mai means lone with Argentina. A meetF.rnest Bavin and Pandtl Mahru "K "''be Spanish Cabinet would both opposed the idea ol ., !' ,study the uu*Uon to-day. the re; ilar t< tlaj At] taaett. —Heater. %  Wednesday. •lays, and only Americans will lakuart. The Talk* anU'iieved to consider America's Military Aid Programme in the light of report*, by L'mied Slater isflfli jtfg, have been surveying the require-;'r !" ^ mania of Britain ..nd other m> vene, what 1 aoa 1 %  prnblanii in iheir own like that bers of the North Atlantic and hl Treaty. ( rroachmeni Europa*! The Programme is to increase %  oeen lar K pl >' | "y11 the rollertive strength for defence of North Atlantic Area —aealer. 20% Cm Win \oi lialaiicc liuil^cl %  ASHINOTON. Jan 9. ling of in. Cudgel to Congrtea to-day will not balance the budget The $1,300,000,000 saved will be nance Die 11,100,000.000 Social w. Hi %  i' %  Qasu of whici. %  Presideni Truman'* I> WjUon of the W. l" Ulk !" d "Is.onai Jm. A 1.11s lo drop 1. trade with each oth. 1 "Economic inlegrntioii faff We I in Burope Is no long*. It b a 1: aid. '•Europe must give !• tangible proof that Democrac* :nens somethina more than freedom to !ee your children hungry,' Ihe seciii II l.isler Mother Huraer? YORKSH1RB, Jan 9 %  gad If), toda; cuaed ol miUilermg g wonuB who, with In 1 husband intended to adopt him. The husband iound hi%  niia Mo|eftd by her rtreside lust night 1 special court this week but the main bod) ; ; :^ hoU ; political opinion bald to Februao ,M1 :i nne v 23 as the most likely election and predicted dissolution for February 8. All parliamentary dl assume that a Government announcement will be made soon after tomorrow's Cabinet meeting Russia GOVH To Polls March 12 LONDON. Jan. 9. lUcllOCU to the Supreme Soviet of the U.S.S.H. will be held on March 12. 1950 by decree of the Presidium of the Stuj viet reported by Moscow Radio" to-ntght. Last elections to thi Soviet, the iughcM organ ol Btata power in Russia, were held in February. 1946. when 99.7 pei cent, of the electorate went to the polls. Candidates were elected for four-year term. The MjyatU Miners Reject Proposal LONDON. Jan. 9. Mill.i 11 S. ..-!.., %  proposal by their leaders that ihey should foiej a year to aid But. %  gesteci the pussibiliU that the MtOM trong National Union of Minew.-.kers may join "a.OOO enbtaears and 450,000 ral to lead the light agaii:-' ial wage > ..( the striking feature of the Budget %  •* .....roll tax" 1 would bring in some S250.0OO.0OO a-. %  Health Fund m . . %  • !>ected to paa?> the linage* as a whole more speedily than ..it political cam1 beflsfl Hut considerable hanges may be made in .j-enditures .HI Foreign Aid Progrm: • j aruter.l Soviet consists of two chambers— [Trades Union Congress. ihe Soviet of the Union and the Soviet of Nationalities. Kruu-r. Quak e Shakos Calais _. CALAIS Jan.. 9 Qat'taan 1 raw %  Whaling Company here, branch ol tha Duessel-Dorf llank-i god Con Ltd. has gecepted an offet Nej Tigurr no figures %  een n • understood lhat Use the West ll .ced purchase of approxamI i.ually which 11-low the figure for '.Vest Indian producers have heen asking. Mr. Creech Jone> have intervened with I M <>n behalf of Colonial deleg.n%  II MauTittoa w.u be eflarad than 1.000.000 %  ..iiarantee. Protection Only LONDON. Jon. 8. in to• MH-i iinhsi; Praea report* thai Britain would continue to 2£JS 1'i Fonilniuih Consuls wan I itiah -ubCompany ItOXl contact with the auth< • u % % %  %  %  0 provide ships and crews for a •vhallng expedition to be run byhe American Company next .eason. It was also slated thai iitivi-i'Mon work would out despite NOT %  Representatives of the tk lhat they hoped ti > .it did not onat ol anykind, he declared. He added that Britain had 1 version by the time the Argentine 'hlneee luan PeraB out her -Keuter. — Keuler China 4|eoeptB L'.K/s IWo^mtioii ^ LONDON, Jan. ft ineee Conwuyuel Oewi-tnineni hgl ..fcii-.-i, :.. !ti ItalO I recognition of its regime, the c-.nHiuiriri Nem 1 1 1 ."filed in a message received m London to-night. HAYONNE. Jan. 9. An exaiuning Magistrate today refused bail to 23-year old Joas Carlos Dasilva Ramos. LHaa accused of 1. his beautiful wife vmg her arrow • %  on of f\ .1.1:1111 P.razilian Diplomat 1* 1 tiaol. —heater. IJciimarkRt-t'o^iiix-H rhincsfConiinunisIs Strike Threat In Italy After Street Battle .._. ROME, Jgn. 9 Prefect of Modenn A lightning general strike to-1 claefa arose when tbouaai mght threatened Italy aft) least 5 workers were killed, ano 1 KU ard outside many workers and police werei other factorle injured in g street battle in Ihe : .nades. Industrial Communist stronghold | hamme 0^ -niy C>d ^ ni Nf)r,hern I,al > Tha Communist-led Confederabemr Labour headquarters Rome tonight gave the workerg, press reports reaching I as 5. possibly 6 So\irl "rrimiilal^" Kin' Finland HELSINKI ( %  'inland a ill Band n I' I retail -it the end of the week, to 1 lor the KM Soviet "wai %  1 iminaali aa lo the Foreign hQaaeti) iniulated by the r*oreiga Mlnaatrj on taai m investigation into gltd 'in\ 1 .anpleted. Most of the 56 persons listed %  mated as "guilty nl paiticulaily grave crimes against the Soviel Union" have already fled the country. Freezing. Helsinki was to-day gay with r>.*teis far Use tetwtaaeerauaa! prs**dential elections. The Social Democrats, supporters with the Conservative. Liberal BO ish Peoples Party of iL. tion of Liberal's 70-yecr-old Presideni Juho Paasikv. their posters thai a Communist Presideni would mean a CommunfOf U>e Slate Police. —IteaUr. ^ryposalsSubinitlt'd For S94.2(M),(MM) By Nationalists WASHINGTON, Jan fl Chinese Nationalists have *ubmitted niapoaal' Stales for I'ormoaB of AUSTRO-RLSSIi MUST AWAIT DECISION U'MX>N. Jan. 9. The 257th meeting o( the AusUian Daputicai Confl to ncKOtiatP an Auilnan Stfsta Tnatv opened here ihis %  itei noon. The American Deputy. Mr. Sam Reber was in the chair. The British Deputy is 111 Ham Ivo Mallelt, : ilan. 11 Ambassador In Ixmdon. 2k George PARIS. Jan 9 Zaiubin told the < French itewspapei 1 e p... FOI.KII Minlsten, I>eputie-. on said that 84 year old an Austrian Treaty hare to-day Amelia o. Portugal was "sinking' that there was no point in disand had rai Bit 1 sacrament were d e s c r 1 1 "nonsense" toda' WaKang Stv also denied .1 Ki< 1 l-apri iei>ort that Amelia hud .tent to Lisbon to make ready a place for her in the far < of her husban" and son Amelia wa Queen Amelia Not Sinking" further .,uicle*. Russia s dii-ect negotiations with •M. Zaiubin said that he would approach the appropriat. gUthoaitles to find out when these negotiations would l>e flniifhed. He undertook to report on their progress at the next tm-J meeting of ihe DeDutles on Frlpolice Non-Commissioned two dylagf. V bad SM.200.000 worth of economic injured and! 60 another hurt Ten thousand ec workers from Modcna and tha g| surrounding eou the police, when they called am I it .' %  gnU) lining from the me voted mediate danger, she' said The 'V. rart ha JB>BS -loubtf-.il if h. former QueenMakthei ..I Portwould be able to forerast their uge.1 1 w. % %  a>| con-lusi ba has lived Pot laigaoe —Reutrr. revolution GrciMii'tets Caretaker Govt ATHJl MARK. Jan. 9 • 41: -.'.n has derided Communist Govt fee, and attempted -nnounced herej storm four steel worker* where a I lock out had been declared. A communique issued by the %  -. opssnrt-' >\ economic asasftaaeai i fc %  tNhaar-9ecffe>ta lo be seat to iste J 1 %  %  the gituatk dance with ECA legislation. \Uasler 8e nighl— heuter. —heater. Order. >\ British Foreign Office spokes. deputies' r ould be held earlier, it Zarubin obtained an about the Austro-Soviet negotiaB then The qiW of Austrian payment foi supplies and services mad* able from Russia in Austria the end of ihe war lad liatu bag awo lelegaa settlement is Mandl as; reached in the direct Russianfor Public i Austrian discussion in V ih-r.



PAGE 1

DAY. JANUARY 10. HH BARBADOS ADVOCATE CLASSIFIED ADS. l W Mjr !"!" 'l * !" PAGE SEVEN BATES WM Sun ft.00 1 >' | untovticatBTTB POR SALE per wo** I FOR RENT I M WANTED IXjiT. FOUND per wort' MlBliniim chars* *• PUBLIC 5ALIS i AUCTION REAL J *• %  ajTATX P*r *f* UtJ Minimum chart* •. 1* Personal H ,lU*in>um 14 agate lines i PUBLIC NOTICES pr aCate Uno Hlniro*••. Apl : c. M. ?*0 by ft. Income Ta* th-ink .ill thr>-c who attended the funeral sent cards, wreath*, aympathiacd with U* In our ree bcicjvament of mv beloved husband ELVN CHANDLER. Mllliccnt Chan > . Rldell. Chandler and Strathmorr Chandler Harel Chandler lusters'. 10.1 50ntiS;^ T ** "rtreonw. dining and ,?*."*.. r00,n £. • %  *** light and at: %  uter office*. Black Rock, near Wsvvl, Apply: W. A. Blot.. 10.1 40-rn Head IN MEMORIAM In loving memory of our denr mother THERESA EI.mEDA CAHMICHAEl. who depatred this life January loth iota. Two year* have paaaed since thai sad day When the unt we loved *u called She had .i kind!) word for each and died Beloved by all Ever to be remembered by— Blanche Griffith i daughter i Chart** Carmwhari iSoni Mvri. Carmichael (Grand chlldn QrtfBth iSon-ln-l-v.'. Edna Carmichnel n New York and Panama Paper* % %  jaai no* %  „ FOB ftALB OR RENT Newly-bum Bungalow at Perry, Gap, Hoebuvk Street Three bedroom. two with inbuilt cedar preaae* and one with running water. Apply to Victor E Cob£*>m Comer of Bank Hall and Barrack. II S0-3n Road*. . FC £.* AL f.. OR RENT-rarley Hill. St. Peter. Old Plantation hooe* with large ballroom. Dining ro*OTICE 1* hereby given that all par*on* javmg any debt or claim* again*! '"• Eaut* of Theodore l>idley Scaly, deceaaed. late of Bank Hal. Main Road. in the pirtah of Saint Michael in Ihl* laiand who died im the 4th day o October INO. iri r , u t d ,o *en( in particular of their claim* duly at te*ted to the underugned Adeline Eudon Saaly and Evan DavH Carney Sealy Co Meeart Hnvne* & Griffith. Solicitor*. No i swan Street, Bridgetown, on or before the nth jay of March. !*. attar which date we shall proceed i.> dutrtbute thd aaaet* of the dereaaed among the partle* entitled thereto having regard only to lurh claim* of which we nhall then have had notice and we shall not be liable for the m ee t or any part thereof so distributed to any rjanun of whose debt or claim we shall not than nave ha gag gaga i An Examination for these rand id* let will be held by the Headmaster'on Frt day. isth January. 1900., at the Boy* Foundation School at 9 U a m. Form*, which can be obtained from ihp soctetary. must be filled in and returned to him not Uter than p. m on Wednesday llth January. W. H. ANTROBUS. Secretary Body. Hilton. River Road, St Michael. 4 1 so—an HELP SHORTHAND-TYPIST -Oirtattan !•* %  trrred Apply In writing to Box 1? Bridgetown, atatlag aalary eipected. i.|.gg—djgl BOOKKJanPEgt ACCOITNTANT Ser^-Mag of cxneTWnced bookkeeper Arcountant leajumad in Barbadoa. Adveniser* *gi -taff aware of vacancy which calls lor ability up to quarterly trial balance ttandard. Knowledge Dry Qooda buatnaae and control of offto* pereonnel considered assets. Bualneaa hour* 1-4 weekday* •—1X.W Saturday*. Write in ronndenr-e itaUng ag*. detail* paat fppomuTvenU and aalary desired: P Q Booc 144 Bridgetown T 1 60—Cn POSITION At, Ex Service mj %  mVe I Box Mi M OCCUPATION a* houa* Servant Of Cot* Willing to aleep In Please contact Muncl Garner. Venture St. John. 10 1 SO—In YOUNQ LADY required by Bread Sireet Firm lor Qeneral OAVe work. with a knowledge of Shorthand and,. Typing. All application* will be treated I *' >onndentially. Apply by letter X Y Z. Advocate Office. Application* to be typed aa well as copied tn owi i-and writing. 10 1 so-an MISCELLANEOUS Govei FOB SAt.ii ULTION By m.tnictlon. of ih Itawulri. w Hill, on Thursday llth t i p m .. a bo—-. and shlngj* houa* 18 x a x 8 u> b7N ""oved. Term. cash. R. ARC1IEK McKENSBt, Victoria Street. NOTICE iii-i-. i in lu ii HOYBFOINDATION SCHOOL Tlie reopening of School will take Piece, on Tuesday. lTth. January 1VS0 I 4* am Thar* will be an entranc. examination foe New Puplla on Monday "1th. January at 9 49 a.m.. when the ipanta may interview the Headmaster New candidate* are requested to bring their Birth Certiftcai** and] recommendation* from former achooL W H ANTROBUS. SecreUrv Gov-ming Body. Hilton, River Rood St Michael IJJ> gg AUTOMOTIVE CAR-Vauxhall 11 hp., Ute IMf> Modrl. leather Upholdery 9 new tyre*, new batteries repainted light grev. very good condition. Price Si.ioo. Phone Peter de Vertcvllle 4317 in ofnee hour*. 9.1.60—an. TRACTOR — On* rAKMALL "H* Tractor very llttl* used In Al condition. Owner purchasing larger. Col* t Co,, Ltd. 6.1.90—In. MECHANICAL "lis A email q %  erond hand Kemumton Typewriters now available Apply: T. Gcddr* Grant Ltd Ram* tltt 8 I So ** BICYCLES: Heicules Silver King, on term*, all model*, in green and in black. A. Bam** Co.. Ltd. Dial 44T8. 13.11.49— t.f.n MISCELLANEOUS FREEDOM FROM FIRE— ln.Ul a Ftr*prooi Safe with door* xecured by combination lock: Suitable for office or •tore Secuie your record* Contact A. S. RHYDEN *, SONS llfloi Lid. ^3 12 40— T ue.. WtL. Sun., t f n FITTINGS-GalvanUad pip*. All aorta T"l H '?• J J* "• ' h, " *•*• .A. Bunas at Co. Ltd. I 8.11.49— t.f n. I GALVANISED SHEETS C It. i,, ir lilt Apply: Auto Tyre, Trafalgar Strcc%  Phone 399U. 8.1 60—t.f., ~„..,r ","" 'L h by P"D\* ComKleSVe"!."*. 0 mce Vctorla Street, on R1DAY 1J, at g p.m.. the following;(1) 2840 square feet of (and at Mono* any i^ne with the wall building giind. ing thereon. Houa* contain* ckxaM K-jllery. drawing. 3 bedroom*, usual outomeei, enclosed yard. (31 I Rood LAND al Thornbury H.„. %  ear tho road leading to Wllcox Batata in Ihp pariah, of Chrt*t Church For u? d iV4 "'•.""Ply to R. ARCHER Ha KENZIE, Victor,* street Dial 3947 10.1.30—4n The undersigned will otl rT lo, —i. iheir Offlce No. IT High Street. BridL !S£?-.,"i rsr"" %  J %  fe Th* meaauage or Dwelling House called 'PAJUCVILLEa„d the Und thereto, containing 1,829 snuar* Taet .Ituate at White Park oppoaH* Tti Barbado* Foundry. lnapecllon any day except Sundnyi between the hour* of 4 p.m. and • p %  on.application lo the tenant Mr. Bayer of 2i'l. Ur ?7 P*"*""!" "<1 condmon of Sale, app ly t o COTTli, CATFORD at CO. 9.1.30—On THE AUCTION SALE of boat* at thr Harbour Police Station was postponed •fid MB take place on THURSDAY next the Ittn January at 1 o'clock. Thee* boats aro very sultabl* aa sail. oi I'aasenger* boat, or taking boat laboureri to and from (he ship*, there or* three boat* and the fire* are ill one 30 x 8 overall by S beam Hi two S3 x 5 by S b*Xsaa in third 21 x 6 by 5 beam. Youi inapeclion la invited any day on application to ihe Harbour Police Station, DARCY A. SCOTT. Qovt. Auctioneer, hTBEL SHEETS: 1 Id. p and vartoui 'lies An 10 1 SO— t.f.n. '•'1 '' 1 -' rn --s i. ,wi... "• Hl '-'-' Hi Rgksa ft Board %  Room. Hard*.->,| All-y. 10.1.SO—3n BREAKFAST CABRDOu* Aluminum P %  with three .* U W III!" 8 1.90—Sh umcH TINS j *nch Tin. nun *0Un at only 81i %  on A Co. Ltd. Tor whool. inner Iray. Assorted each. G. W. Hutch%¡ ioi %  --%  10 1 50—4n WASH BASS*. t SINKS at Ralph A. Braid a •wotn. Hardwood Alley. LlFTONS TEA Why worry. W* %  r* It at 34 cents per '.lb package. l0 tin* of TonVe. Peppermlntl. Pears. MtaCraatn, MM ,,..,,, ..,. Che. md LJSr*** ***orUnent .1 BhroM Buruiia. JOHN D, TAYLOR k SONS Ltd. Roenutx wbmm ii.... BM, H i •• 2•( "A". ; -dB THE uiulenilgnad will offer for le i-y publkauction at their office. No. IT, High Street, on Friday th 13th instant at 2 p m I'l %  •• %  :1 .;li. 1 i, ua* .,11^,1 IANDSMERE COTTAGE and land containing 11.950 .quare feel. Constitution Road, St MlI'hael, The dwellinghouse cornprlv* — ON THE GROUND F1XX>R: Drawing room and thrrc liedroom* ion* with running water), gallery, toilet and bath UPSTAIRS One very large liedroom IN THE HASEMBNT: Dining room, nftgdry, kitchen; Seperat* bathroom In •ga*g. Gowrnnient water and electric light in, tailed Inspection any day except Sunday between th* hour* of 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. on application to tho owners, the Misses Lynch on the premises. For further particular* and condition* of aale apply to %  -COTTLX. CATFORD Co. Solicitor*. T 1.30—to LODGE SCHOOL New Boya who wish lo enter the School :n the January Term commencing on Tuesday. January lTth 1930. mtiW present tnemaelvca lor examination at the Srhool at jo *m on Monday. Januarv llh 1904. Hoarder* are expected (or dinner on Monday the IBth. CYRIL E. STOl-TE. Sec. and TYrea. Oov. Body. Lodge School 8 1.50—3n .!>. I tffli-C •-RDEN TORTOISES rase apply X Y Z, AdvoT 1.90—5*, TSNBERg TAMARINDS at Graem Mall Plantation. Christ Church. Apply by letter oi person. F. s. Storey. Manager. 10 I 90—3n LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE T1BB application of Franci* T. E3U* * %  —Ultla Hill. St Michael for [•"•niinton to sell SpirlU. Malt Liquor*. ? %  -1 board and galvanised *hop Mebbeck. Black Rook, SI. Michael. Dated thl* 9th day of January 1990. TO: B. A MclXOD, Eaq. Foneo HUMMo, Dldrlct A~. r. r. ELIAS. N -B —Thl* anpUratlon will be considered at a Licensing Court to be held at Police Court Dutrict "A", on Thursday the 19ih day of January 1900 at II o'clock. E A. MclXOD, Police Maglltrate. -. „ ... Dinrlct 'A' OFFICIAL NOTICE BARBADOS. IN TBE ASSISTANT COI'BT OF AJrVBAL • Equitable JunsdlcMoni ELOISB MIUJCENT RII£\ Plamllff „ HERBERT DARNirTT QuallfUd Exor. E*t GEOKGE BARNETT Deed M ii..iii IN punuancr of an order In 'hi* Court in Ihe above action made on the JWh day of April 19*9. 1 give rgdgag to all person, having any estate right or Interest in or any Hen or inru-iUMunce affecting all that .eetaln piece or parcel of land attuate nt Venture in the pariah ol Saint John In thl* l*land containing by admcaturemenl one rood nineteen perch** abutting and bounding on lands of Mllly Bralhwall* on land* of Easy Hall Plantation on Und* of Emetine Nicholls and on the public road to bring before me an account of their Hid claim* with their wllneaae*. documd voucher*, to be .xanmied t.y any Tueaday. or Friday Iwtween the hour* of 11 moom and 3 o'clock In the afternoon, at Ihe Office of the Clerk he Aialitant Court of Appeal at the Court Hou*v Bridgetown, before the 1th day of January 1990. in order that uch claim* may be ranked according o ihe nature and priority thereof respectively; otherwise, such persona will be precluded from the benani of the nd Decree, and be deprived of all %  Im on or again*! the aald property. (JlainLBiita are also notiiWd that tn* niu*t attend the said Court on Wednesday tho llth day of Januarv l!i> at 'Clock a.m. whan their said claim* wlU be i Qlv nked. REAL ESTATE Offers In writing are Invited lor 31.190 ii>arr feet of land situate In Sober* I-n.e. Bridgetown, and having %  frontage Of 118 feet on Sober* Lone and at presentunder tenantry. For further particular* apply to the undersigned. CARR1NCTON & SEALY. Lucas Street. T.1.90--9O. n.inini aau MURIEL YARD H '-.Id HVYM'U *ht public are fnot credit 10 m •aponaibie for he !" *whg any debt CM debt* %  •* by g written .a-de. Mgned b] IB SYDNEY YARD. Hl'-.cMnii. H.."cl. •.1.19-to % %  %  %  .. n ag-IHH !" jg'redll tn • . liUHY OfJ&tBA "U* ld "iy*eu respniinble fo. her or %  Jan* ehw contracting any debt qr debt* -SJ5 !"""* """'' %  1 "•**• by mg. IMi Ifc.i Ig Wg j d g, • 159-an *" An * r tieeVJ £ ' 1MORPE •^i^ns-^ IU, fc H • m, OO hOt hok 1 %  %  1 BaaaT****" > nvt ..^ir~ %  1 -2n THORJ-E. St. Michael Teeth Loose ttms Bleed Mosan' lor Properlie* etc.. contact RALPH A. HEARD AM Inal. BE. F.V A. Aucuoneer and Estate Agent Who has numerous properties (or %  atj }\.r hartlM %  panicuUrs ring 400a or c.ll Hardwood Alley opposite Cathedral LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE TWI appUcauon Of Delphln* Forde ol Beikle* Road, Si. Michael, for permission to sell Spirits. Malt Liquor.. Ac. at a board and >hlngle shop attached to reaadence near Hay Pasture. Beckles Road. St. Michael. Dated thl. 9th day of January lot* To E A. McLJDOD. Esq. Police Magistrate. Out A Signed DELPH1NE FORDE. Applicat' N B -This application will be o Udered at Ucenabuj Court to be held at Police Court. District "A", on Thursday ihe 19th day of January 1990. M 11.o'clock, a m. E A Mcl-EOD. Pouce Magtotratr. Di*t. A' 10 1 60 LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE application of William Cadogan of syrelU Road. Ch Cn lor p*rml*s-n 1 sell Spirits. Malt Liquor*, Ore. at a board and shingle shop with shediocf attached at Dayrella Road. Ch. Ch To; K A MrlJCOD. Eaq. A* WIIJJAM CADOGAN. AppiKalit .tpplaraliosi *>lU be'conald-' ered at a Licensing Court to be held at Police Court. Durtnrt "A", on Thursday ihe 19th day of January IBM al II o'clock, j OFFICIAL SALE aARBADOl IS III! VSSIMAM I <>| |,i •>) APPEAL 1 Equitable JuriMllctloni ELOISE MILLICENT H1LEV Plaintirt HXJUiERT IIAILNKTT UaaliBed Exor It GEORGE BAHNBTT Dev'd Defendant NOTICE is herrby given that by Urje of an Order of the Assistant Court ofAppoal dated the 20th day of April 1*49 there will be set up for sale lo the highest bidder al the Office of the Clerk of the As Mutant Court o.' Appeal at the Court Hou*e, Bridgetown, between the hours of 12 moon} an o flock In ihe afternoon n Friday day of January 19*0 All that certain place or parcel of Und situate at Venture In the parish of Saint John in this island iontainlng by admeasurement one rood nineteen petche* abutting and bounding on land* of Mllly Hrathwaite on lands of Easy Hall Plantation on landa of Emeline Nichqlta and on the public road .nd M not then sold the said property LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE apphcatlon of Sydney L, NUes .1 haglc lull st Michael for permission o -ell Spirits, Malt liquor* *c. at a board and shingle hop at Eagle Hall, sasatgtaj Dated this 9th day of January I960 %  II A McLfXOD, E*q Police Maglltrate, District -A". SYDNEY L. N1LES, Applicant rTH —This application will be conaidered at a Licensing Court, to be held at lelice Court. Dlatrict A", on Thursday the 19th day of January 1990 at II o'clock. B. A. McLEDD. Police MuglMrat.-, .. ,. Dlatrlci "A" LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE NOTICE, PARISH OF ST. MICHAEL NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN lhat nt the holding by mc of Ihe Election of Members to serve in the Vestry of the parish of Saint Michael, on Monday. Ihe 9th day of January. 150, at the Parochial Buildings, Cumberland Street, the following is the result: — VOTES 1 ERNEST BRIGHTON MOTTI.EY 7,0 2. THOMAS WASHINGTON MILLER 5SS 3. HAROLD ATHELSTON TUDOR MO I. FRED CARLTON GODDARD 51S 5. VICTOR WALLACE AUSTIN CHASE 5,0 6. FREDERICK DRURARD McD. SYMMONDS Sit 7. ARTHUR SPENCER BRYDEN 511 8 CHARLES CARLTON BROWNE SOS 9. BRUCE ARUNDALE WE ATI IERIIE AU SOS 10. VALENCE CHENEUY GALE 501 11. CHRISTOPHER AUGUSTUS BRAITHWAITE 4M II. AUBREY RUSSELL TOPPIN 4>4 IS. DUDLEY GORDON LEACOCK. Jnr 47S 14. TREVOR BOWRING 474 EUSTACE CONNELL BETHELL 45 U. JOHN KENNETH CHARLTON ORANNUM 425 and were duly declared elected. '.7. JOHN WINSTON HEWITT Ol Dated this 9th day oi January. 1950. F. J. COLE. Sheriff & Returning Officer PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH Return of persons elected as Vestrymen for Ihe Parish ot Christ Church Ihis 9th day of January. 1950. &£&>/'// KILLS PAIN MR. GEORGE CHRISTOPHER WARD ... Received 3J7 volM MR. FRED CARLTON GODDARD SIS MR. CHARLES STRAUGHAN MacKENZIE ,. SIS MR. HARRY ST. GEORGE WARD „ 311 Hon. ARCHIBALD GRAHAM GITTENS. MLC 27 MR. CHARLES MANNING DRAYTON .. ,. 283 MR. JOSEPH EVAN WEBSTER 280 MR. VICTOR. WALLACE AUSTIN CHASE .. 278 MR. CHARLES HERESFORD BRANDFORD .. 288 MR. GIDNEY CUTHBERT ASHBY 284 MRS. EDNA EVELYN TALMA 283 MR. UMBERTO JOSEPH PARRAVICINO .. 253 MR. HUGH FODERINGHAM GARNES .. .. 281 MR. ARTHUR MacCAULEY JONES 241 MR. COURTENEY IFILL 229 MR. MORRELL EWART R. BOURNE 222 I hereby declare the above sixteen persons duly elected. MR. WILLIAM TRAVERS WATSON .... Received 161 votes MR. ARTHUR NOVELL CHADDERTON „ 160 MR. DAVID CLIFFORD DRAY'TON „ 148 „ Sgd. VERNON J. WILLIAMS. Sheriff. I.OVI ll\>l! \ I NOTICES. LAND ACQVIS1TION ACT IN* (NntJcc required by srrli.ni 3) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that it appears to the Govcrnorin-Executive Committee that the land described in the Schedule hereto and situate at Paynes Bay in the parish of Saint James (part ot the land oi* a place generally known as "Derricks") is likely to to needed for purposes which in the opinion of the Governor-in-Executive Committee ore public purposes, namely as a site bounding un the FCB on which fishing boats can be hauled up and on which shelters may be THE SCHEDULE A parcel of land ot Paynes Bay in the parish of Saint James conTHE application of J Kerr Johnston lin !" ** jBm ** ** Clly f0r V r ~ AC ., „ n Tg, floor'o?'.* Sorey'^-nui'nuS-' lamm 7 710 Sl uaie feet bounding on the north on lands of B. H. Moore and others, on the cast on the Public Road running from Holetown to Bridgetown, on the south on other lands of B. II. Moore and others, and on the west on the sea. Uated this 6th day of January, 1950, at the Public Buildings in the City of Bridgetown in the Island of Barbados. P. F. CAMPBELL, Acting Colonial Secretary >y wall build>'* in Jama* Street, City. ated this 0th day of January 1050. To: H. A. TALMA, Raq. roliea Magistrate. Olalrlct "A". R HOPE. .. .. — ,ar Applicant N O ~ Thl* application wlU be considered at a Ucenalna Court to be held at foilce Court. District "A'*, on Thursday in* Itth day of January 1900 at It o'clock. H. TALMA. I'ollce Maajyitrete. Dlatrict "A" LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE application of Samuel T. Small, ol Hay Street. St. Michael for permisiioii 10 *rll Httu-,,., Malt Llquora Ore, at a hoard end ahnwtle ftp attached to rreidence at St, Hill ,.nd Ta-eeda.de Roada, %  lOOBaal Oaied thl* 0th day of January 1*40. To: E. A. MclXOD. Esq. J'olire Maaistrale, District A'*. 8. T. SMAU., N.B.—Thla application will bo'coiuidered at a Licensine; Court to be held at I'ollce Court. District "A", on Th.n*ua\ the i*tti day of January IS90 at 11 o'cloch, D. A. MnLTOD. MfeM M,..;,., .. ,. „ Dtatrki M A 111 ue set up for ceedlnK Friday between the until the same 1* sold for less than £01 10. 0 Daled this 4th day of November 1 Clerk of I day of No' • HAIU'lit Assistant Co-rt of Appeal NOTICE MMI SHARK CERTIFICATES NOTSU* Is hereby ghna. :nn A H *-rd. Executor to the )ute of MO* t:AlN WARD and ihe Estate ..I WIU.IAM WARJWN WARD Deceased, ha. m*d* appllcatloii for Ihe Issue of %  tificales in place of the fuiloumK fUiart CerUflcale* which have been lost: Certificate No. 101 10 Slur** No OTTO lo OTST LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE application of Cleo Clarke of Robert* Tenantry. St. Michael, for permission to *ell Spirit., u.1, l JquorB •>c.. at a board and shirt*)* shop attached to residence al Roberta T*n*nlrv, St. Michael. Daled this >tn ay of j anllar v 1H0 To: |. A. Mcl-EOD. Eaa. PoUe* Matlstrate, Dirtrtct "A". CIXO CLARKE. .. _ Atpllcant B Thl* application wUl be conalded at a Licenalnc Court to be held *t i'ollce 01.rt. Dlstrici "A on Thuisday the 10th day of January 10*0 al 11 o'clock, X. A. MoLEuD. Police Maa-.si._ie. INCOMK TAX NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Income Tax returns are required from every married man whose income is $1200.00 per annum or over f from every other person whose income is $720.00 per annum or over and from companies whether incorporated or unincorporated, societies, persons engaged in any trade or profession, and owners of land or property whether a taxable income has ncivurd during the past year or not. Forms of Return my bo obtained from the Income Tax Depart ment AFTKK IW 1ST DAY OF JANUARY, 1M0, and the fornta duly tilled in must lxdelivered to me on or before the following resperlive dates: 1. Returns of persons whose books were closed on the 31st day of December 1948, on or before the 31st day of March, 1950. 2. Returns of persons whose principal place of business if not situate in thr island on or before tho 30th day of June, I960. 3. Returns of all persons | on or before ihe 31st of January, 1950. F. CLAIRMONTE Commissioner ol Income Tax and Death Dulles. NOTE : Any prraein failing to make his return within the? due date will be liable lo a fine not exceeding £100 aad not lefts than 0J and will be prosecuted unless a satisfactory reason is given. 10.1.50.—lfeL LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE application of Beatrice Henry of SoiiLr streel. Ctty for penruauon to •ell Spirits, Malt Liquor*, etc at bottom Boor of a 2 storey wall building In Suttle Street. City. Dated thi. th day of January ItOO. To: HA TALMA. ESQ. Polsr* Magistrate. Distnci %  A' BEATRICE HENRY, .. Applicant N H —This application will be conddrted at a Licrnalns Court to be held at I Folir* Court. Dtatrtrt • A'\ on Thursday the 1*th day of January 1000 at II o'clock. r No. HO 10 Shan C Of title! 9 10710 Certifi cate No slj 2 S.-i... OoMttrahl Ho OH ~ Share. No, I., mtj Certificate No "L 1 Certificate No 003 If no objection to itade b,v Ihe lOtb Certificate* Mill tai I Rv Order of th* Board of Dtrector*. THE HARHADos CO-OPERATIVE. IN .'ACTORY LTD. II II ION Mr*. R. A. BEARD. A L C M. •Rroiu*. Stiver. Gold. Medalleti WlU aceapt a email number 01 Kindergarten Pupil* at 'Mai .stow Maxwell Coast. ag> 1 Also Tuition in ftpes.cn Vtx. For further particular*. >in| OtOS roi.it>; KOTit'K Al aboul 4.30 p.m. on Iht -'^rnoon of Ihe 2nd January, a man was stabbed in the back in Queen's Park by an unknown person. Will anyone who can give the Police ANY information concerning this incident kindly icport to Ihe CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DEPARTMENT. R. T. MICHEL1N, Colonel. Commissioner of Police. Police Headquarters, 6th January, 1950. 7.1.50—2n. '/'M.|.|'\ ACTS QUICKLYLIKE MAGIC Mentholatum %  is the wondcrfn. soothing healing halm. Ifyouhave awful pain* in >our head or body, if you have a nay cold or chill, if you are tormented hy skin trouble, you need %  Mentholatum'. It ii so easy lo use and acts like magic. JUST RUB IT0N RUB it where the Pain is and the pain is ended. RUB it well into the chest and put a little in the nose and the told soon goes. RUB it on >our skin and your Skin gets better. 'Meniholatum' acts quickly—there is nothing like It. Get a jar or tin to-day. but make tun* yougeifenuiw'Mcniholjuiin'. (Askfor'MEN-THO-l AVIl \D -RUB IT HERE -RUB IT THERE -IT BENEFITS YOU EVERYWHERE %  ".H.'i.lMJsJII'B In Tins and Jars. Made only by 0 The Meniholatum Co.. Ltd. (Esid. 1889), Slough, England. Abo 11 Buffalo. N.V.. U.S.A. SHIPPING NOTICES *ONTlvEAU AUSTRALIA NsTfT | ZEALAND UNI IJMTTFD IM-VNl.) UNI) MS PORT PnUC' I* scheduled to all (.eelorut 10th December, Mellmui %  Dec. MUi. Brisbane December Slat Syd noy January 4th arrivtn* Trinidad about %  nd January 1000. M S "KAIPAKI" I* scheduled to sail Adelaide December loth. Port Pirn. Dean bar Jilt. Ilurnie January lih, Melbourne Januarr Slat. Sydnev Januarj ntn, iirisbane February Jnd. anivln* rrinldad about tin March. These vessels iave ample space for hilled. Hard Tt'uen and Uenerul Careo carao accepted on Throuafli bill* 0 idlna With transhipment at Trinidad foi irUlsh 'iuuna. Barbados, Windward award island* For liirtlter oarticulan apply — renwsaa WITHY a Co., i.u. Asonto. TRINIDAD. DaCOSTA A Co Ltd.. AganU. itARBAl'OS. n*a Sen PHILLIP H DAVItV laaaansan* for Detnerara. Sallies Thiiraday 13th Jjuu-n-y UsM. The SCh •LAtnaALrHA'' Kill '•crept (arm and Passendes. 4ec it. Lucia. S. ioih S i A "' OA UM**lsH sail* from New Orleans Mil, January, arriving Apply: DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. — Canadian Service ROBERT THOU LTD. — New York and GuU Service ANEROID BAROMETERS HOIII III S sV Co II...I .1.101 METAl. l'AS.1 noXRS, AIR TIIAVEL SUIT CASKS. DUK BLOTTOIS, COCKTAII. SJIAKERB *ilh INSET STRAlNEItS. P1ATB OLASS .AND MDUtORS. All the ^bov. (un IK 4vfld by:— JOHNSON'S STATIONERY & HARDWAK* A NEW SHIPMENT 'HI GRADE-HEAVY DUTY BATTERIESi FULLY GUARANTEED-GENEROUS PRICES MORRIS SERVICE STATION LOST A FOUND FOUND DOC—One Broom and Whit* Bull Dos. Owner ran coasaaunlcale with E. D. Robert*. Roe art* Manufac. Co Ltd Oov. liill-Dtel *** 10. 1.