Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


Sunday. Price:

duoraty

Year 35.

Janwary i

1950.



-







ne

).S. EXPECTED TO CUT FOREIGN AID



trasb Be ] ta ———;: vACED Wiita
Strasbourg Bells wer : PE ogi per DEFICIT
OF $5,000,000, 000

By PAUL SCOTT RANKINE
WASHINGTON, Dec. 31.

"[ (HE United States Congress is expected to make

drastic cuts in American aid to foreign coun-
tries in the new session opening here on Tuesday.
A bitter debate is forecast over Government re-
quests for funds for the third year of the Marshall
Plan and re-armament of the North Atlantic pow-
ers. Proposals for assisting under-developed areas
of Asia, Africa and South America were also expect
ed to come under fire.

Ring In Another
Half Century

LONDON, Dee. 31.
Bats in the Twelfth Century Cathedral at Strasbousg—
“capital of EKurope’’—will tonight chime a new half-
century into millions of European homes.
The Council of Europe's first attempt at an International
Parliament, will then broadcast greetings for 1950 through

its leaders. :
A -! The speakers will be Mr, Gus-
|tav Rasmussen, Danish Chairman

of the Council’s Committee of
e Ministers, and M. Paul-Henri
Spaak, Beigian President «fits

} Consultative Assembly.
In Stockholm, Old Green. lead-

| ing Swedish actor, will send the

aces {Old Year out by reciting “Ring
: {Out Wild Bells” by Tennyson.

| watering midnight dinners, and

nost theatres will double their

| For many Frenchmen, tonight’s
In Good Heart | xces

«{ Cuts seem inevitable for these

y . reasons:
\ .
6a a) f ay lhe Government is faced with
Rescue After |, % Government is tsced wi
the prospect of a deficit of ab
$9,000,000,000 in a budget of abou

. i W oO Y ears? $43,000,000,000,

Ways of mee



elebration is more important
n Chritsmas. Paris restaurants
offer extravagant, mouth-

ting the
clude increasing tax¢



fig





\LERS’ BAY, Deception
Island, Dec. 30
he iritish Rescue Expedition

nauional debt, decreasing
expenditure or cutting ter:
xpenditure,



co Te ed Deception Island But majority ae
Sut oa g oO BLE
sib ater tas te a nonth in the reliet aves 8
LONDON, Dee. 31 a New xear since the war. | = re eat 7 —" taxes. Both Democrats and Rep
; They will see it in riotous r base at Whalers’ Bay licans have their ey t ;
ane a : é a . s . A a ave their eye on the Co
British Prime M:nisier, Cleink vie,” MME. BYARIE: ‘sunita : From there, the Expedition’s sat i . :
i in a Ne Year me >» wat mpl upplies o : ssional Elections next Nove
ELEC, ea - aes beer, eines, and schnaps. Farm-

Norseman aircraft
sd tnat the British Labour M .

r will fly to



| | They say it would be lik
}ers observing an ancient custom







was 200d hea ( 1 : ecg, | biting the hand that is about
fut was in good heat mt will share the New Yeur’s cake I Island, about 360! ¢ ., beeen, o is. abi
m ng General Klection } , +) e ‘ D1 > cea lem to suggest hat peop
nng 1 ol ea vith their domestic animals e pois TMA deeper into their pocket
a that a pleages made in Me e ° ‘ ihe into I
re o t all 5 7 ' i Many Greeks will follow the | ul riti cientist he Wanhrons: te, timeaehal a
ao had been furilled. old custom of | u , : ’ ‘ ‘ ve ber rande: ere ty : ‘ aim
: : gambling on New Ss ®>PERS at St Catt al kr 1 e! ‘ re ( . en iil rtain to say “no’
He called on the Movement for] Years Rye. to tes aio =) WORSHIPPER , inns ertain to say “no” to any plar
; ; : | Year’s Eve, to test their chances r : higher taxes. (Truman want
re-dedication of their Sociali | forthe coming year. { Bath: itanen feve > rane i igh taxes. mé Ve
jief now that they had reached 8 , sful prelimin teats everal thousand million dollars
. Norwegian Law provides that sful preliminary tests

tr jubilee ‘in momentous, | no spirits may be served in put - ! e r rw * (Reuter : reel ee =~ a one
Mallenging times” | : i. C ? { Y ] 7 R il hi , e will make such a request),
y ene =. to the Labour molt’ te ete Ree a | ®-opera on Ch ure UZ rges ortes eV e ers \nother factor in the pre-elec-
: . Pe oe peel i t e drunk in beer and | ’ nh manoet ng, is that the Gov-

bvement at this historic ME | wine rn ‘ ” . C; is | W , : ur ivring, i iat

at there is no greater tribute Thanks to the e : M st ] 6 k - Ti C b t L b L « ) 22a 5 O50 Zé ¢ aT ay nment is heavily committed by
at we could pay to our founders! ;), I ae ie i? a at ae us a € oO an the return of a second Labout greet 1950 with vatons aitantiies





ioe . . ° 48 clection campaign, for ex
gellple 1 é S| ~ ge 7 . . 24 LONDON. D arrinve mely expensive social welfare
pvernment, | of traditional doughnuts and k irst t lac € LONDON, De Millior . : ler at I hae Oogrammes
a —_ on WWINCNON ‘ Y ’ v : . Viillions e\ Ci Bran :
“We are fortified by a fine re~| Oph fritters, and with bumpers MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL today urged Conserva ope PRAGUE, Dee. 31 ‘ .
d of progress and achievement oa ' ee s red wine” made —Adenauer ives to combat on every possible occasion the “unscrupulo « ech couples can. get marri¢ Reduction Favoured
, . Sanat pas shia with cloves, lemon and sugar : es : , : 1:7 5} ressmen of every shade of
the face of unprecedentect! aS and sugar, 3ON , 1 ms anc ies” the rernment w in e iniad ’ ! fe « | imimediately by merely producing y shade ¢
Sersity. From the unremitting | Midnight Masses will be cele- r We j SIN i es ee eee a nm Labour hed a ees eee ‘i he identity card ita Mar- litical opinion declare them
rts of both Government and| Prated throughout the world to mG WEB SAG Moreno: he forthcoming General Election. This, he said, mig} bicin esl . riage Bureau, when the new ves in favour of a general re-
pple a new and more just} @ or page 12 CNceemee ee, na oa = come “before many months-——may be weeks a ite. “Ctwa ‘come « thte. fase tion of Government expendi-
| co- ‘auion ol a rern * , , ‘ . wul . 7 A
fotv is “oj } \ , ssag t from ton ‘ I t the same time most of
jety is emerging. | a bt res , ae In a New Year Message to Wr aay rom tomorro ( \t Sé
ct us go into 195¢, therefore, | a Pree ae a - ‘ /members of the Consateatios rs ; { ’ "he ystem of banns is ended el have also declared them
: oO Ss é e ¢& eis i $ecek F . . ‘ . ¢ j 1 « . ite 4 1i-
ermined that it is to be a year} ee ° ; 1 C y 1 \ » st Ge ‘6 ~ | Party, Mr. Churchill said they had i vinth ; ) nd civ eremonies must pre ve opposed to cuts in indi
victory for the forces of pro-| ” L £ or rote Se Seb Semen een V € s rimans ilready had a foretaste of the Ve age ede church wedding lual items of home expenditure
Se dae ae ek hts, R n an article published bys : hich. Tuat actin tally ranted Christ r ; , ecting their individual consti-
peg and that he bitter inter ress ervice of h Ch on vay in which Labour was goin Men and women Nay retail ; ir vidu Ce 1
*rvice his hristia:
Ar years of unemployment, want P. 99 S a: Se 5 FT airsciees f\ » Li ag to conduct ! umpaign fo ieir own surnan r ma '
’ 7 i wemocratic Party, Di Adenaue V3 , bd ' > |
Manik sn . setae aah oa | é yy Ln their own surviv: . oose to ta P , 1 joth Democrats and Republi-
d injustice shall never return. eace ay. et te eee een eee » j their own survival hoose t ke -eith + i
—Reuter. They will make false clain

e also opposed to financing

e Sete ne O se FRANFURT, Dec. 31 about their own achievement and Che new laws give equal pro; ernment expenditure by in
“A im. ec ; & cause of peact President Huess to-day signed, untruthful attacks on the past re rty rights to hu Casir the national debt.

l } ’ «oO Husband ana wite ‘ .
Ste g the 949 had brought} , . ’ : 3 t ite or
Stating that 194 ad ~Hrougi he West rerman Christmas | cord and future itentions of the Reuter rotect the interests of both legi t therefore appears that the

my the G people to vne “thres! ; \ s f
be ¢ I h 7 : the German people to vnc n mnesty law which came into | wicked Tories imate and illesiti: hile ‘ brunt: ofthe eleciinn year
ear ce BERLIN, Nec. 31. lold of their own political life t cked Torie ite and ille imate childrer as

in his New Year message broad- effect : mmed ately, the Allied They will use every possible } our Policemen d make divorc: ore difficult viv lrive will have to b

err rr) cast over the east Germ: yt Y issiloner having pro- vice to conceal from the electorate Reuter. ne ig programme
/ ara as an radio} gelongs to the European Unity
W : eckage network shortly before midnight, | She cannot lead an isolated lif : ‘ pproval earlier. the results of their n folly ane > ry y lilax ind economi i







ie added: “Germany inseparably | yy



















i
Wilhelm Pieck, President of the | vt her awn rhe umnesty will not apply to) mismanagement”, he said Injured In Clash i rm ¢ ° fore.gn countries,
ens meee East German Republic, called up|”! ¢% be a iat ities imposed by courts of (Reuter) Xe p onunuiists | cet the “big cut” advocate:
BONN, Dec. 31 ii Giawiarie “in, ceat sae fe ( ra a k (in 1949) wa e O ation Authorities and CAI UTA | 7 " f vay, President Truman
> Jes yerman President, | *)” r ” boda s : e-establish the broken ti With | j ¢<¢ e extended to “perpe ‘py | ‘ { now being ¢ te ll
The re G I oiten teeitienl fight for peace and the unity of . . Seine te an aie 10 o b ex ende o “perpe- “ 7 A A f rom 1ormosa-T AFT et, »w being completed, wil
Bewerr, +neodor pe re Germany in the ranks of the dee Me aee.. <-tueighgedig We yley rT FaLOTS Gl Ss. aire ' against End Ot Rationing a it ably include, some cuts in
ined the “primary tasks” fo1 RaMoWal fronts . and to win confidence. the democratic order”, the an- } i CINCINNATTI, Dec. 31 ! id expenditure. The b
srmany in the coming year, as NOR edi) Miia pes Cier ies ec “The Petersberg agreement, | a } nouncement saic Hi t R li ® ‘ i 3 tor Robert Taft, Republi iestior , will they satisfy Co
“clear the wreckage of history nia odes aspeen int a is ; . joining the international Ruhi The Allied Authorities decision as no enlevet ne ' arty Leader in the Senate ress
Btween the French and Germa leaves ia all Pua ehae oe as jautharity, were the first steps Vas reached fte everal ex- Whe poli last night vhat Formo lhe Government's position In
foples, and to restore “clarity omy end supply. owlne’.to the jprecious fruit of the policy of| changes of view vith the Ger- Headaches cept ( i ; uld be kept out of the hand ongress is somewhat weakt
4% Stet ‘ é r { t ‘ ooo Jence s the . " < * ¢ ‘ ‘ +
Drelations with Britain. Feat AGHieD moamentt the “Wes growing. confidence, was the dis-} man Government part of whos« : ; s ‘a ; he Chinese Communists, ever han last veat Senator Arthur
In a speech, broadcast by ull | Ce Aah sal eta i cen : nical mantling halt that save d anc rigin draft was considered to : : LONDON, Dx l tH . Lic f the American Navy had io denberg, Republican _ polic)
fest German radio stations ‘tand rnore ruined hiv ae AG rshall | 9° ured that means of «¢ xistenc leave too many possible interpre- Wes’ European housewives wil! adit sds hh OK t to protect the island fortress ef, will probably be prevented
Emewstee before manish’ Te) pinn, diam ntling and the re |r ousands of German workers.’ | tations.—Reuter enter 1950 with the hope th is oll Me told reporvers that “the pre ill-health from playing h
Bsident said “it is unique in os See ad eta th ‘he ane First German Step d rationing will end early it » the . ence of the United States Nav ual active role of mobilising
story that the victor in war ae ania oe , or ; Dr. Adenauer described ihe} > > ‘ the new half century. Belgium | jo; ‘{ , 1 waters surrounding Formos epublican support for the “two
ian 4 of | Sage sé . neat r : u . ‘ ' - .
Med a helper when the role of | "ye therefore appen! purticu-|Buropean Co-operation Adminis-| Peasants Pray For | 2.¢ Swivzerland have airea nd be enough to prevent a | programme
; subsided. rave at this ¥ ADDER! Vat | trati “me between th 7 endec od rationing altogett . ’ sing vo t l {
ie pares ul iy ns I se tive larly to the West German popu-| ration A\gre ement, ae se i ; 1 Sli Sule ; ide 1 food é ic ning alt t [ } : ing io that island by he |
pu : Sta PP ete» Re errs, lation to join the national front.| United States ana “ermany, sand ¢ ide lo Stop nd France, Holland and Swede ‘ Chinese Communists”.—Reuter. @ on page 12
eet rotates . Together with them we intend tc} the “first German step into wor I +7 Rear. eee, reir See ents u ' { eae SS = a
“We know that in the minds of Bey ae “ 1 y t {economy and world politic | BOLOGNA, Dee. 31 coffee, ; i} ASS Wo
somes sreate a united, democratic ana} ’ \ ) i i ATE , ,
he American people two views} ‘ ’ : | The > of internal German! Peasants of four Italian village But t at hy : ceed Xi
e : ae le with} peace-loving Republic for th The course of in Deane hase ike aee oe Me SRe- Gh of ‘rations ms u ee policemen. | {tt
bout Germany still wrestle with] Pra ean any ff conomic politics would be con-| near here, prayed in their churches! nov’ relieved ll post-war heac Reuter
)\ ove ¢ rerma . , “ ket I y ¢ 1 . ? ?, 7
Ach other, just as in our peopl Pres era Pieck said tha ye | Unued towards the “social market | Mis 1 erning Tor God to give \hem{ aches for prices have soared 1
no of this (American) , es oe’ ec - said. | vew Year present by stopping! Bel n hot ve h f th
be knowledge ¢ 1 ‘by. some re-|of the most significant events of} conomy he said ined: “2 ; hen % CEPAE) SOU NOUR Pr " "Di
d is jeopardizec lthe coming. yer was to. be “the}. D® Adenauer mentions ane ent home eturn of meat rationing when the Yew sweek | rector \f
piment. To overcome lH 1S 8/7 nocratic elections in Octobar"| fugees, the housing shortage an le { their humble belongings, } butcher tells them i of the \\ f n TH Y ‘
sk of the soul.” eee ei ithe ownership of basic Germa i fled teak they hav t bought i’ , b, t
|lwhich, he said. would net vel 4 Seb ‘ ’ rhe — ‘ vere . - ine 2a \ )) |
“ae honey (uwireal) elections like| industries as the most pressin lide started 20 days ago Western Germany ‘fhe onl; 0 ce er eer ) 7 f i : »
| tl i We rt Germany last year | Problem and said he had “wels Pm vorthern \pennine slope suntry still theoretically ration- | WASH Yi |
| ' Reuter. founded” hope that the SEMA | Se we ores t traveling about! ing bread teuter, } reside dd amed
y 7: - iTrade Union would support the | tire inches an hour. The four | , t
» st Vy 6 acannon r ean ninamsen Government in solving them villages of Poggiolino, Casa Brun- | cae : \
unnie Ss ear —Reuter. cll nd Casa D’Oro — already ? ¢ +
|



}
. oth)
Doctor Charged estroyed once before by a land-| 17 @ Doltey Will gaz Beate, De

Since 1880 i" UK Has Deficit Of | —teuter. tio it
LONDON, De. 1. | With Murder | + ae | Not Matter Mpcvie Atfires tie sill dlapet The Publi —
For Kew Botanical Gardens s +spsp ‘ : : ‘“Voles. of America” broad- e ublic are ereby nore
49 was the semniaee year since | By Air 22,170, Longer Life For Man? Britain susan tk eae with | ' nd other, information pro-

Bcords were first kept there in
880, a Meteorclogical Office
rvey said to-day.

Sunshine at Kew in 1949 ex-; charged here with murderims

IDO Yec. 3 | s ; “ceede Geo
LONDON, Dev ‘ A new hormone drug, Cortisone,| present plans to recognise the! mune He succeeded Mr. Ge

may be the long-sought elixir for ,Chinese Communist regime to
prolonging man’s life, according | ward the end of next week, no]
to | mavler what changes may be

ae HAMPSHIRE, yc 4 ‘ Britain had a deficit of £22,-
Dr. Herman Sander, whe WaS| 1.977 when the first nine |

ait | months of the financial year end- |

eeded the yearly average by|cancer patient by injecting | ed tonight.

Allen, new American Ambas-

lor to Yugoslavia teuler,
‘ ; nine nleaded 1! . ithe An ‘an Associat for >| ing ace d » | : ) ol.
i than 300 hours. into ! 7 veins and we ‘ot | “Official figures showed that in s iV eae ee nas we ee pl the F — or | A\ orkers ‘ trike
ondon’s weather was consist- | guilty vas «heen released = ON | 454 period ordinary revenue dvat i Sx C ards t ar East, an authorita-

Mily sunny, warm arid dry over | £8,926 vail, tetalled £ 2.388,421,363 against | , Dr ir yam eee eee we senaoe ae today. In Turi

png periods. The autumn was Tne case will come before the F £2.410,592,130 | tologi issue ucture special- According to vhis source, Bri-
;
(
(
{
(



that Effective JANUARY Ist,



© a report made here to-



WE have been appointed





Distributors for ....

© warmest since 1871. Jan-| grand jury nex’ Tuesday.—Reuter A big influx of ievenue always

. } ‘ aie : ‘ ROME, D 31
ary was the sunniest jsince 1928. | we in the last quarter of the | eos OE be the key _ | United States Government of the warn lee
bruary was the sunniest since | 5 | financial year, but some financial ; “°°P'™8 ee ~— ' or ies x ve on which she will begin re-
880. April brought the highest | | quarters were speculating on young and thus lengthening the | lations with the Chinese Commu
pril temperature on record in P MINCE | whether Sir Stafford Cripps wou!d ite span ; \ ni The date is still a stri
ondon. | 4 4 —(Reuter.) secrev.—Reuter.

“ Workers in vhe giant Fiat Motor
wctory in Tur
protest against the dismissal ol
] 48, nplyyees.
i wens the driest se ee | get all the surplus of £48, | They set no. time limit: for the
a t ariest summer sincé

1
’ \he had budgeted for. ding of the strike which begat
wl. Absolute drought lasted GREE: S SHAH By March 31, he has estims ee peter bes

vould r revenue woulc eich “ 4 ‘
na preaa 1rougn At
0,000. Expenditure was AAV ¥ k loods Hit B. G. | y during the day Reuter.
at £3,329,707,000. luring th
Reuter.

truck today in





MORRIS, WOLSLEY, RILEY

}

2 ure of ¢ + r Ital | j

| expendit . ) of the University of Utah, re-| tain has already informed ‘
|

}

om June 18 to July 3 but that
utunin rains brought up the £3,777



and M. G. CARS, MORRIS



al.—Reuier | AMSTERDAM, Dec. 31
The Shah of Persia, who ha

Mee +¢n¢
“ars tot



j estimat

——— jbeen on a 6 weeks visit to the

— 7
‘ | Univted States, arrived here by ait i Suspected Discoverias
de Bak eee mente ees] Bemnath Aeuembh Damage Kstimated To ~—



COMMERCIAL Cars and Mar-

}Bernhard and officials of the}

i ¥ 7 Of Uranium Reported
Jews Or Catholies PsShortly afterwards he ba al \ ote Credits Be Thousands Of $ LANSING, Michigan, Dec. 3

liscoveri¢



ine and Industrial Engines.

)
| +



ip > , hi ‘ v te ohere PARIS vec o oe =
NNSYLVANIA. Dec. 31, |0me_om his way to Teheran meray

$13,506 bequest from the
state of a graduate, who stipu-
aed the money could not be used
Or Scholarships for Jews or
atholics, has been accepted by
4 Fayette Colle

quest by Frederic

!
|
|
| Neuter. The French tional A nbhy ‘GEORGETOWN, Dec y train and the Public Works De- f uranium ore o he Stat
to-day voted credits
|
|
|
|
|

one-twelfth of the 1949 exver



eouivatent to partment is keeping emergency ; *‘'*‘ reported

An abnoxmal December rainfall squads on duty day and night in

nundated





on Depart
tT > > > ? “Nae
he entire B.G. coast- in effort to prevent breaches. ment

% fu awe ture to keep wAtlor Beil I ind resulting in loss of thousands ‘ p= < hee ¥
400,000 GePrMay¥es | funds unti! the 1950 budevet is ap- | aan are season Cattle On The Road One has been confirmed, six

ground provisions, rice te
proved elds and hundieds of head of “looded pastures have forced

Returned Home The Parliamentary crisis over itthe and livestock from Pome- undreds of head of cattle on to

haye been found “promising
‘ne



here. The bx



for submission to













approved r F. Dumont was | he 1950 Budget was ended ‘ast on 0 Cécatiture the. public roads while farmer: State Atomic i Ene By
man eT REO SOE Se Se BERLIN, Dec. 31 jnight when the Assembly gave Swollen by raore than 32 inches | ®"¢ Shipping poultry and livestoc & tat * Sinaiate FOR RO AL GARAGE Ltd
; s by state ge sts I Y *
| Nearly 400,000 German prison- | the Governme:it two votes of cor { nfall for the past three to the city i b tave geologist
Dupont, vho lied in 1939, | er of ar returned from the lence on new tax measure bu eek ver and eeks hich Sugar plantations are also se-
Served 30 vea _ 8 tinited!S + 1 jurir 949, accor there no chan ting t ‘ t overflawed the verely affected and managements : ’
eS Se VOR S deures puntenea: ie ict before Ning into| @re evacuating residents to ho VHAT IS YO Yo? ||}! St. Michael's Row
: re I am ‘ ‘ ex hir “ lee Read what Hastings says )) se
, i : eras t Bel ‘ ure € wcroaching on worker : . “
es . . : en hen the Ce ht while nges } about Yo ¥« 1 the Even 1§} PHONE 2362 4504
i0t like t ach- | Fr cfur n- I oie pol ‘ . i ign i os
. mack is-|of entry, dvuri mber A ent’s taXaclo til fh i re pushing addition- feavy rains mark every day and | ing Advocate on Tuesday |
c atior ‘ th : st 3.000 a t t efore the Upper Hous elief me ires. Gravest fears | Night throughout the Yuletide sea- Don’t miss it iI]
pone yuld be de vir he for tl ) j neil of the Re lic, € houl onservancy ums | Son affecting all entertainment =i oo 1}
i i g ire 1 1 . ‘ + {ty
, ene Reuter, | Reuter. Reuter nd kokers collapse under the @ On page 16. ee eee = SEF FFF EPO



ARES



PAGE TWO



| IS Excellency the Governor

|} 44 and Mrs. Savage, celebrated

|New Year’s Eve by attending the
lance at the Royal 3ar bados
Yacht Club

«<> «>

1
|
r |
Thriving Business
| ores and Clubs did a thriv-
} | ing business with dinner
@ pow orders last night, as hardly any-
y All the
inviting and

Baby

ene had dinner at home
nenus looked very
the dining rooms were all at-
tractively decorated. Even at this
early stage, everyone was in a gay
festive mood.

At the Windsor, Arnold Mean-
weil and his little Meanies pro-
idéd music for dining and dancing,
pleasure until quite late in the
evening. Balloons seemed to be
everywhere, hundreds of them,
hanging in clusters in the dining

Today to Tues 5 & 8.30 p.m
Warner Bros
James CAGNEY

present



GUEST HOUSE
Cpposite Hastings Rocks
























Zz. Humphrey BOGART in I. BOURNE, room and in the lobby. bade

‘4 s Tel.—3021. Maonageress of the Hotels also ha we

A Oklahoma Kid ee ne illuminated Christmas trees which

SSS a. | all helped make the scene a gay
olen othe == = SSS | one.



«> «>

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
RONALD REAGAN VIRGINIA MAYO
EDDIE BRACKEN

in THE GIRL FROM JONES BEACH”

Happy New Year
{' WAS Midnight December 31,
1949, time to welcome in the
New Year, and Barbadians did it
right merrily. All over the island

———~_— |

with last night and right on into ng

his . ‘ : . . early hours of this morning cele-
DONA DRAKE . HELEN WESTCOTT || Seatlane ‘were do aun Seem

A Warner Bros. Picture \ At the Marine Hotel there were

about five bars going. The dance
floor was packed. At midnight
a rocket shot into the air; twelve
ringing chimes and the playing
of ‘Auld Lang Syne’ all signalled
in the New Year.

Meanwhile at the Aquatic Club
much the same thing was going
on, there were novelty balloon and
spot dances, the lights went out
at midnight, to switch on the New
Year.

At the Club Morgan there were
two orchestras, and _ between
dances Peter Lacy played the new
piano near the bar. Almost every-
one séemed to be wearing some
crazy looking paper hat, and
noise makers, balloons and people,
so many people making as much
noise as they possibly could.
| Everyone enjoying this night of
nights which is celebrated in all
parts of the world





———



| Happy Now Year, Folks
|









i



‘LOBE vararne

TONITEH at 830 p.m. and continuing over the

Holidays at 5 and 8.30

“A Date with Judy"

Technic

Musical with - - -

CARMEN MIRANDA —

een

TONIGHT at 8.30 pam. ARNOLD MEANWELL

our
oul

XAVIER COGAT



«> «>

and Orchestra playing:
The New Runway

| HREE representatives of Cana.
dian Construction Companies



(1) “Everywhere You Go”
(2) “Don't Cry Joe”

Guest Stars
(3) “Baby It’s Cold Outside”







s THE ) arrived yesterday by Trans-

(4) Selection of Gid Favourites MILTON | Canada. They were Mr. Thomas

(5) Calypso Medley, 7 ay pe | Stevenson, Mr. Cecil Dexter and

. _— - wipes | QUARTETTE | Mr. Asley Colter, all interested in

Siibibieinaliss sili inal he construction of the new run-
a en SSS"! way at Seawell

| “> «>

/

Finishing Touches
S*° workmen in the building ad-
}h joining Newsam and _ Co.,
busily putting the finishing touches
jto a new store, which, it is under-
stood will open on Friday. It has
two very wide entrances and there
are rows of shelves running along
two sides of the building, which
by next week probably will be
full of goods ready for the opening
jdav. “The Novelty Store,’ as it
will be called is a branch of the
Modern “Dress Shop Have you
heard that they will specialise in
accessories for ladies who make
their own clothes?









New Year

70




ALL





OUR



CUSTOMERS




and




© “>

Son And Heir

Ce eee to
A and Mrs. Colin



FRIENDS



Mr

Thomas of












| ‘Lower Greys’, Christ Church o1
ithe arrival of a son and heir on
December 29
PLAN TATIONS Be pes ae
Engagement

over the week-end between
Colin Williams of Blackmans,
Joseph and Miss Jean McLean
daughtér of Mr. and Mrs. Archie
McLean of Spring Garden, Black
Rock

NG NG AG NG NG NGG NENG NYY

|
|
ss Babe engagement was announced
j
|

lr
t



NENG MAES

WE WIisH YoU... &

ee ar er

Company in
; here recently by













ves : ill ' SUNDAY, JANUARY
SUNDAY ADVOCATE s uae 1, 1950
eeeeeneeeeeeneemaiona: sa racine meamaae aie ett ie iis 10RD .
Re-Transferred e e : |
To Trinidad
R. George Hutchinson, ha + {
been transferred to the Trini- .
cad Branch of Messrs. Cable and
Wireless (W.1.) Ltd,, and he left r
for Trinidad by B.W.LA. yester- Actor And Journalist
day George Was stationed in Here
Hons onal 8 Yi Man Maen FJOLIDAYING in Barbados for ;
" 1 Port ¢-Sy ain Granciia ek about a month are Mr. ,and ‘
yx . ‘ort=« ree z rf Mrs. Leopold Tepper of George- ,
Cae oe ee town, British Guiana, They
a3 oer a rived here recently by B.W.1.A., :
Sold Qu and are staying at the Hastings
RIED to get into the Empire Hotel we od '
Theatre on Friday night to M-. Tepper who is in the R -
see the premiere performance of "state busiress in ee ee 4
the film ‘Pinky’ but the crowd iso an actor and journalist. =
was so dense it was impossible to -ontributes many articles to:t “
get through. They were com- } itish Guiana Press and is gar
pletely sold out, and hundreds “n station ZFY, Georgetown i ‘
were turned away. Heard that Dramatics. taland
another terrific crowd was there A frequént visitor to the island,
again last night. se said that the sefvice at the ,
“ «> Hotels was very good. It measured
Proof! up to many of the hotels in the
@IX | thirty o'clock ‘esterday vig cities up _ and should
bp Rae : isitors,
morning found several people — Rou tea that he was
at S ll t t the ‘l'rans- - ¢
Geahde ‘plans, neat of them feel- , preparing three stage plays all . |
ing very cold as the Sun slowly or -—4. local talent in Sader a eat ;
: ‘ “ t il resen
nosed its way above the horizon. a4 vole eo which ‘it is 4
cue Mined the Gaesengere alighted Mie DORR CARNE, Mi ent ne ed that a tour will be made ot q
from the aircraft, with their heavy the first prize at the first Talen pI West Indies including ’
winter coats and clothing, they Night Show at the Globe Theatre. weet " es’ ndies
made most of us feel almost hot This op pee ella very barbados. :
just looking at them. It was popular with patrons. * * * ;
interesting to note that while wo Weeks
lifreen passengers left the plane at The Ideal Place wnided Up aoe ? and her 1
Bermuda and seven were intransit “PQARBADOS was recommended RS. ise D the Seart 1
for Trinidad, éighteen passengers to us as the ideal piace for daughter Miss Dorothy :
got off at Barbados. Certainly a holiday by Mr. D. kutzgerald, of Caracas, Venezuela on ona. :
proof that we are enticing more onetime Manager of your local spending . “ BWLA. ;
Tourists than the other West Branch of the Canadian Bank ot They came in recently by ‘4 ys ‘
Incian islands, ! Commerce.” So said Mr. Fred F. for about two weeks an i
«> «> Macdermid, who with his wife staying at the Hastings Hotel.
" arrived yesterday by T.C.A. to Mrs. Searl is Secretary to the {
Congrats spend five or six weeks at the Manager of the Grace Line De- {
ae _“* am Ocean View Hotel. Mr. Macder- partment in Caracas, while her ;
Wishes to Mr. Fred Toppin, mid is a Lawyer and they live in daushter is a Secretary of K.L.M.
vu of Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Toppin, sockatoon Saskatchewan. Dutch Airlines.
svew Haven’, Hastings, and Miss «> «> eis “ t
joyce Johnson, daughter of Mr. ruts . , JOHN GODDARD, who will lead Barbados against British :
and Mrs. Eric yohnson ot Grenada, Midnight Revelry R. ROGER MIRO, originally is a strong candidate for the Captaincy of the WI Giang ‘
: i ITTENS and his full d working is a strong cz ate p ; e WAI, team to fo 1
on the announcement of their en- LEVIE G r h from Paris and now England
gagement last night. ; orchestra will be making the ,. an Architect in a Venezuelan g f :
«>» «> musie tonight from a ha Government Ministry, was an |
. 7 a.m. tomorrow, at the 61" arrival from Venezuela recently ‘
Married : Detie-aha evel’ at “Edgeton, by BWLA. for two weeks, Toured Island On Bicycle From Caracas |
R. D. N. BENSKIN of Cod- 7 i, where Mr. J. Dal- } aig d is staying at the
, Country Road, w holiday and is y , a ; OHN REID
M rington Hill, St. Michael was 761) Douglas will be host to @ £8Y ‘fastings Hotel. ISS MARY BAZSO, a school J and small in net ane
married on Thursday afternoon at party. = teacher of California, now nile ete al ye Susan ary |
Mt. Tabor Moravian Church to ; «> «> «>» «> residing at Maracaibo, Venezuela asi D Ca aa and a
Miss E. A _ Nurse, Assistant 4 Ji ; in a similar capacity. returned 2° 8 acrabank for a
Teacher of Grace Hill Girls Jump and Jive — Visitors Like Barbados = home on Thursday by BWIA via “8Y: ahd
School UEEN’S Park House jumped R. and Mrs. J. T. V. Watson Trinidad after a short holiday in , M®. Reid is the Representa f
with jive last night as pretty of age England, were the island. She was staying at the ! Venezuela and vhe Caribbes,
ae pe girls, and Gents in their shining ~~ 3 sh un a by the S.S. Hotel Royal Area for B.F. Goodrich Compan:
Used to Live Here dirmer jackets, danced in the cpa = baie a s oe yal. Mrs. Reid is from Boston. ‘
oe oe “Gascogne”. y are now d- ; ‘
R. and Mrs. H. Ormiston, who Wey year. It was the Spartan iron chat holiday here as guests _ Miss Bazso who arrived here on Mr . "ea 7 a |
from 1937 to 1941 used to live @rieket and Football Club’s An- .t the Hastings Hotel before leav- Christmas Day told Carib that she the a a is also a gy tha
in Barbados arrived here yester- jal Dance. ing for Antigua. had an excellent holiday, her only i dias le - nal tive | <¢
day from Halifax via Montreal by Mr. C. B. Browne’s orchestra "Héad of the firm of Walter disappointment being that it was einéatinn a = & Musay el,
ao 2 re ee Ween supplied the phe a cried Tempest Son and Watson, too short. Fernando, Trinidad om 1
Jcean Viev Hotel. making and i he a Sts Solicitors of Leeds, Mr. Watson 2 es ; ¥ d 1
«> =e until the early hours ” ig now on his way to Antigua to eee ae are neni - Bahamian Pro
$ norning. : oei - im « . actice Plcycie riding anc auring 1er verbs
tien & ie et saler . Balloons and other decorations, mar > 6 Spe penctiee stay, she made a five-hour tour of ET another book of Bah
j R. G. i ue pee ‘ae hung all over the Ballroom. The ; re . + risit the island on bicycle. Leaving ian interest has been pub
fr Montreal, who was : : : vith This is the Watsons’ first visit :
rom Montreal, -, New Year certainly came in wit te ‘e the Hotel on Tuesday afternoon, ed by John Culmet, fdimek
here last year likes Barbados so w ance was © the West Indies and they are er abatehace , mere
4 tet hé has returned again 2 Swing as the Spartan Dance wa: so impressed that they would like She rode to Powell Spring where aaeee ant-editor of the “Nassay;
. ae ‘He coe Sees a rollicking success. to live in Barbados. — she spent the night. The follow- Tribune, who is now living ing,
Ag * eee ak cae Se «> «x ing morning she went to St John’s Shae time oo me
day by shrek hay > 4 i P : sf erga iaiaehe roverk , 4
for approximately one month. He Baldwin’s Secretary «» «» Sen i tan rear a has dedicated to Eugene Dupueh,
will spend another month visiting Intransit Enj d Holid thid-day snd Sakching the Tivvel Editor of the “Nassau Tribune's
some of the other West Islands, AJOR Denis Vaughan, Private k njoye Oliday at 1.05 in time for lunch ; The book is illustrated by B
after which he will be golig on Secretary to Earl Baldwin EV. Clarence A. Lowe, a Peek. Copies are now on their
to North. Africa, and Murdge. He ., Antigua, was an arrival on nen now residing a This was nothing: new to Miss ‘© the Bahamas, if
is staying at the Windsor Hotel. Friday from England on _ the Aiden eras teers . a Bazso as she was accustomed do- «> ” ja
«» «» “Gascogne” intransit for Antigua. on : r aise . ing a 200 mile stretch on bicycle 5 a
Staying On He is now spending a couple of hureh in Detroit, Michigan, re~ while at home over the week- Comings And Goings
D. VEEN formerly of days in the island before leaving | “urned home yesterday by air via ands. ;
t Pant oa ; a nie edges _ snl. da at iying at the Marine] Trinidad after spending about \v R. and Mrs, Lisle Smith, who
and and now manutfac- Ye - ; 9 ian, ¢ es hatin ‘ ; pos par acanit
turers’ yee er a number oi Hotel. uine weeks’ holiday in the island. While in the island, she did a were married on D :

european firms with headquarters
in Caracas, came in here a week
g0 on holiday and will be stay-
ing on for about another week
or two before returning home. He

staying at the Ocean View Hotel

«>» «>»

Expect To Return
At spending the Christmas
holidays here, My James
toohney, Jnr., of the Ford Motor
Company of Detroit, Michigan
left for Trinidad by B.W.1.A. yes-
terday evening. He was accompan-
ied by his sister Miss Mary Toohey
and Miss Mary Katherine Shutts
of Louisiana. They were all stay-
ing at the Ocean View Hotel and
expect to return for a longer stay.
Miss Toohey and Miss Shutts

are both school teachers in Aruba

working with the Standard Oil

Company for the past 1} years.

«>» «>»

Geologist Takes Time

Out
R. WILLIAM BELL a Geolo-
gist of the Shell Caribbean
Venezuela, arrived
B.W.1LA, for a
‘lidav and is staying at the Ocean

View Hotel

Originally from England. Mi

Bell had been working in Vene-

zuela for the past 14 years
«» «»
U.K. Horticulturist
Intransit

R. P. COBBALD, a horticul-
turist of England, was an

arrival recently intransit to Dom-
Inica. He was accompanied by his
&| mother and they are staying at the





as

AND, OF COURSE WHEN

1

YOU NEED LIGHT FOR
THE WAY AND LIGHTS
FOR EVERY DAY...

—~ SELECT . :

PHILIPS
LAMPS

nee

|



Manning & (Co. Lid. Agemts

WE SGN NE SN, 8 RR NG

ie

CAA GSS



BW var

M Arlington, Virginia, are now
n the island for about five weeks’
holiday, They came in recently
and are staying at Sea View Guest




war | Sea View Guest House.

To Spend Five Weeks
AND MRS. W. J. ECK of

House,
—~-



==
=









'.

MIRRORS

BEVELLED

KOUND
; TRIPLE—polished edges

WARDROBE—rectangular and dome top
CLIPS, CORNERS, MOVEMENTS, PLATES

ALSO

LIGHT MIRRORS—24 & 32 Oz.

From $1.67 to $2.14

*

THE BARBADOS

SS

So

)
COTTON FACTORY LTD. i

SKELETON



CLUES ACROSS
1. The mane is made into a rope.
6. Short officer I have
prisoner, -
10, ‘Talk back in a message.
ll, Are differance.

12, Behoid the

He was staying with his relatives ik. oe 17th at Mrs, Smith’s parents ho

swimming, sailing and
Mr. and Mrs, M. Morris ot 97, 77 5”) ae hjepennie, tsar Ae ae Chester, Peninsylyani
a : water colour paintings and thought 7, : w
assage Road. . ae i : F returned on Friday by. BW.
that Barbados was an ideal : pot : ;
An old Combermerian, Rev thin hbtiday along with Miss Barbara, Mation
szowe was paying his first visit fi om

and Master Nickey Canby, chil

o the island in 37 years, During dren of Mrs, Smith.
* ut

’ . : «»
is stay which he said was very .
njoyable, he met many old friends
ind visited many places of interest.

«>» *

M® and Mrs. Hugh Coxe and

; Teachers on Holiday son arrived from Jamacak
le was greatly impressed by the via Trinidad on Friday by
ast improvements made in the UE to leave the Island today B.W.1A. Mr. Coxe is Branch
land and spoke highly of the are three school teachers from Manager of B.W.1.A. in Jamaica
ospitality extended him, Venezuela. They are American 8d is here for a holiday and is

born, Miss Mary Elizabeth Waring Staying at the Hotel Royal,
«» «>» from Chicago, Mrs Nancy Yarnall . i <3
: {rom Philadelphia, and Miss Eliz- IR EDWARD CUNARD left
R Spent Christmas oe abeth Burns from Minnesota. They yesterday by B.W.LA, fo
’ *. ** teach at the American school of Tobago via Trinidad. He returm
student of the Caribbean

‘Campo Alegre’ in Caracas. Mrs _ to
Yarnall has been io Barbados be-
fore some two years ago and she
bersuaded the other two to come
here for the holiday. They were
staying at the Hastings Hovel

Barbados on Saturday. Mr.

Douglas Robbins was an

passenger for Tobago yesterday.
* * *

Training College at Maracas, re-
urned to Trinidad by B.W.1LA..,
n Friday after spending Christmas
rith his parents Mr. and Mrs. m Retreas i Avia|
\lfted Boyee of Passage Road. I Cre ae =
left for Trinidad by B.W.

at yesterday,

‘ * *



Brae



RS. Graham Rose, who a
rived on the first TCA



beginning of
departed skill (two words),
3. It's seldom drawn ly.
i4. These pealing letters are
. wothing less than indifferent,
15. Lucte can’t impress it on us.
16, Tithe not quite enough for

Your Majes'

She's a bit of @ kid anyhow.

It takes money in booth,

maybe (two words),

- Pile of five cards ?
Thus M.L5 shows
reverse of en !

24. Very high wa
25. aren’, jue, os has "ca aa:
ables

on

cor

the very

CLUES DOWN
Wouters eee Sat
O ers (two i.
. Partly Giagonal ) .
B 'y Government air-
|

to be emetusime

we

-

Always

in reverse.
They're proverbiaiiy a@ection

ae (two we i

als m (Onna tant
, gage. 7

Spring oUt posabhig,
& cholefie,

68. Human

18. A team’s milddie

20 “amous painter Can mee
re entirel er ao

2) HY has Davai © dtiguse,

esses in the Aue
rat.

————
SaaS





and REFLEX HINGES

j



CO-OPERATIVE

= SSS SSS i

Ae
Ne

‘plane that landed in B
returned yesterday by T.C.A, alte}
spending a holiday with he
family.
ae * *

R. E. S. Robinson, Chairmaty

of the Board of Directors
Messrs, Plantations Ltd., and Mb
H. A, C, Thomas, Assistait
Manager of the same firm lel)
by T.C.A. yestéfday on a shen

business visit to Montreal.
* * %

ISS G. GAGNON from Mate

treal arrived yesterday «i
T.C.A. to join the Secretarial stat
of the Marine Hotel.

* * * :
M® A. I. BEACH and Mr, BG

Heimbecker from Bartle
Ontario, whose firm exports Fie é
Oats, ete., are here for we -
on a business visit and
ing at the Ocean View Hotel.




AT THE SIDE OF THE RUNWAY
twin-engined Cabin aireraft which belongs to Mr. John Bogart of
Venezuela. He, his wife and party are spending a short holiday in
Barbados and are staying at the Paradise Beach Club,

at Seawell yesterday was this

A Bright Now Year is Yours!

IN THE ‘

CHEERFUL PLAIDS

36 ins.

EVANS

wide - B6 ects.

per yd.

A VERY BEAUTIFUL RANGE

and WHITFIELDS

JUST OPENED !

Canadian Ladies Flotiatisin

and Children s Shoes

2 1 ahd ale
You cant miss _ these

presi oor







'

pert

re eer gee ee

INDAY, JANUARY





Show Talk



i, 1950



A

1

A British Film In Cold Storage

One of the things they did not

uction at Shepherd's Bush
Studios now dark and forlorn was
£120,000 invisible asset. This

was Sydney Box’s last Gains-
porough picture to be made be-
fore the _ closed down—
lier’s Joy.

ets Withers and husband
Jonn McCallum starred in this
screen version of the stage
success—with Yolande Donlan
and Dora Bryan (who is also in
the play) supporting thein.

But after many months Trav-
eller’s Joy remains literally an
jnvisible asset on Mr. Rank’s
jedger. For a clause in the con-
tract says it must not be shown
anywhere until vhe play’s West
End run finishes.

When the film production began,
that clause did not seem impor-
tant. But now the play—with
Yvonne Arnaud as star—has de-
veloped into one of those surprise
record-breakers, and looks like
running on indefinitely.

So Anthony Darnborough, who
made Traveller’s Joy for Mr, Box,
is going to show the film this
week to the one man who can lift
the ban, if he chooses—theatrical
manager Hugh Beaumont.

The film-makers hope Mr.
Beaumon’ will agree that there
is ample living-room in London
and the provinces for both ver-
sions.

After all, Miss Arnaud and her
fellow players have had the field
to themselves for nearly two
yeras now.

Censored Role

Shepherd’s Bush’s last produc-
vion certainly deserves a_ break,
considering its troubles-in-the-
making. These included a com-
plete shut-down when John Mc-
Callum dGeveloped ‘mumps—and
a series of skirmishes with the
censors over Yolande Donlan’s
part.

Miss Donlan vold me recently
she had to remake so many
seenes, with blue pencilled
dialogue, that she wondered if
her role had not been censvred
out of the picture by now.

Disney’s Ship

When Wilt Disney went homa
recently—none too jovial after
that Bobby Driscoll court case—
he unwittingly lef’ behind a New
Year present to a inumber of
Denhain Studio workers.

The present? None other than
Yhe good ship Hispaniola, known
to every reader of Treasura
Island. Disney had the famous
vessel reconstructed for his film
of the story. The picture is fin-

ished but the Hispaniola still
stands on the Denham set.
Because of this there will be

some weeks work next month for
part of the Denham staff—after

' the close-down of Rank produc-

tion there.

quatic

Girls and more girls—all in
bathing suits—with plenty of

laughs and gaiety predominating
are.on. deck for local movie goers
in Warner Bros’ “The Girl From
Jones Beach,’ now showing at
the Aquatic Cinema.

Starring Ronald Reagan,
ginia Mayo and Eddie Bracken,
“The Girl From Jones Beach”
has as its background the famous
public beach for New Yorkers
just outside the city on the south
shore of Long Island.

The story, with Reagan ‘Vir-

ginia providing the heart interest,
and comedian Bracken, the laughs,
aided in no little part by Dona
Drake, is about a beautiful but
demure schoo] teacher who takes
a daily swim at Jones Beach, She
is possessed of one of the most
charming figures ever seen on
those sands. When commercial
artist Reagan, with pal Bracken,
a talent agent try to find the com-
posite girl of all the beauty he
has fashioned on his drawing
board, of course, Virginia is the
girl. But, she just isn’t interes-
ted in being beautiful and famous.
She has serious ideas it seems.
t In this situation Reagan pro-
jects himself, even playing an
immigrant for a time into Miss
Mayo’s Americanization class, and
here the laughs are loudest.

How the various models pursue
the hapless Reagan, however,
makes for more fun on the screen
than has been around in a long
while, The gay beach life, the
Surf, the parties, are all there,
and lccal fans are in for a beach
excursion of happy proportions
without setting one foot out of
town when they see “The Girl
From Jones Beach,”

The picture was
Peter Godtrey.

Vir-

directed by

-———_—_—_



all London





‘Nelson from his column
keeps a look-out over

iy



Warold Conway



|
|

COMPLETED BUT NOT fOR SHOWING — YET
Googie Withers and John McCallum in a scene from Traveller's Joy

Another Hollywood
Warner’ Brothers, have heard
about tha’ ready-made craft. And
they are temporarily in tue sail-
ing business. They are to begin
production—av Elstree—of Cap-
tain Horatio Hornblower, with
Gregory Peck as C, §. Forester’s
Nelsonian hero.

Director Raoul Walsh, who is
coming from Hollywood with
Peck, vhinks it’s silly to build a
new ship—when one is to hand,
only needing a little camouflage
to be ready for Captain Horn-
blower’s command.

What about Gregory Peck as
vhe sailor who has been accepted
as a prototype of Nelson him-
self? Well, we have taken severe7'
shocks in our cinematic stride—
including Errol Flynn as Soames
Forsyte. And Peck is a very good

actor.
New Role
Svage time marches on for Sir
Ralph Richardson. Next month

he leaves the cast of The Heiress:
exchanges thé frock-coat and top
hav of Henry James’s dignified
doctor for a modern adventure
drama.

Ricgardson is to star in a new
play by R. C, Sheriff—who is
determined never to writé any-
thing which could be described
as a second Journey’s End. This
time I gather, he has turned out
a near-thriller.

Godfrey Tearle and Wendy
Hille join The Heiress cast on
January 14, for Peggy Ashcroft,

too, is leaving—in readiness for
her Sv'ratford season with John
Gielgud. A season which sounds
like restoring Shakespearean
—— ——
Empire

PINKY: This is a picture about
that thorny question, the colour
bar. It is a real life drama which
affecl’s every country where Jim
Crow exists. Those who saw ‘“Im-
itation of Life” and thought it
was good will be delighted wivh
“Pinky,” which has a different ap-
proach. If this story were told on
the screen in the opposive way to
which it is filmed it would still
rank among the best. The picvure
revolves around a girl (Jeanne
Crain) who though the offspring
of negro forbears was fair enough
to pass for white. She knew that
coloured blood ran in her veins,
but was not courageous enough to
be proud of it. No one could
blame her, for in passing as white
she benefited from a good educa-
tion and an equally good society.
This went on until she returned
to the hut where she and her negro
grandmother lived. She then re-
alised that the South wivh its
rigid stand against coloured peo-
ple is not worth living in. Just
as she hal decided to pack up

and go back North to a white
doctor (William Lundigan) who

is in love with her, her grand-
mother (Ethel Waters) persuades
her her stay and nurse a rich
white landotwner (Ethel Barry-
more), Miss Barrymore dies and
leaves for Pinky (Miss Crain) a
palatial home. Miss Barrymore's
relatives dispute the will on the

grounds thai’ the old lady was
forced into making such a will
while in an unsound frame of

mind. The whole town is against
Pinky bécause of her colour and
the odds are against her Bui
just then the realisation came that
she was fighting for something,
and it was worth fighting for. So
in face of great opposition she



a look-out for

"BLACK: WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKY

ne ca



“And all London keeps

‘Black & White’’’

company, glory to the banks of the Avon. |

Not Anxious

Later in the year Ralph Kichard-
son may make another film. But
nov, it seems, Love in Idleness—
that Rattigan comedy which the
Lunts played here and in New
York.

Thereby hangs a sad little vale.
When Myrna Loy and her pro-
ducer-husband, Gene Markey,
were in England this summer,
she said she hoped to make more
pictures over here with him, One
was to have been Love in Idleness
with Myrna and Richardson co-
svarring in the original Lunt roles.

Mr. Markey is due back in
London this week from the Tyrol
—where he has been directing
location shots for the new Bobby
Henrey film, Wonder Kid.

But Miss Loy is still in Holly-}

| cinema.—some of them as



SUNDAY ADVOCATE





For Our Films

By

Milton Shulman

cece a sp NS RS

Here Is One American Market |



have come to look forward to a
British pieture as a stimulating
and refreshing experience.

Since our movies are in con-
stant and vigorous competition
with Hollywood in this market,

WHEN both Hollywood and London are prematurely we cannot afford to discourage
digging the grave of the British film industry, it is refresh-
ing to discover at least one market where the bells are not

yet being tolled.
“or in Canada British
are to-day more popular, earning

mcre money and gaining more
prestige than ever in their his-
tory.

Not only are they being shown
at the small specialised houses
which exhibit only foreign films,
but ‘here are now 116 Odeon
lux-
urious and spacious as anything
in the West End—which can com-

| pete on even terms with the best

cinemas associated with
large American companies.

the

Record Breaking

Before the war a British film
over here had about as much
curiosity value as a Ubangi na-
tive in a cireus. They earned
about £100 to £150 each and
were forgotten the moment the
cinema lights went out.

Now British films like Hamlet
and Red Shoes are _ discussed
everywhere, and they will earn
as much as such record-breaking
box-office American successes as
Best Years of Our Lives and
Gone With the Wind.

Both of these pictures should
earn for us over £30,000 each
in Canadian dollars, and it is
expected that Quartet and Blue
Lagoon will net almost as much.
So steady has been the increase
in the earning power of tritish
films since the end of the war
that it is expected this year
Canada -will send us _ almost
$1,000,000 net for our pictures.

More Mature
| The firm base upon which this
interest in British films depends

Clarke Gable



wood—and svaying there. Film

friends she made in Londoni M ) n (i Man
gather that she is no longer} a

anxious to work with her husband.;

Overtime Star

Postscript to my Pinewood
progress repor? last week, They’ve
obviously decided that, where
Jean Simmons is concerned, time
is money. The girl is really being}
put to work.

One, picture finished this week;
two new ones in_ prepara\ion-
and now she is to be sandwiched }
into that Somerset Maughain Trio}
production.

Miss Simmons will act with Guy
Rolfe (whose Spider and the Fly
performance recently put him
suddenly into the front rank) in
the The Sanavorium—most dra- |
matic of the three Maugham}
stories.—L.E.S.

stood her ground and fought aj
good battle. In the meantime

her fiancee came to see her, she
told him of her true colour, but!
this did nov’ worry him. |

How this story ends is well

worth seeing and Miss Crain, as-|
sociated with Miss Evhel Waters;
has risen to new heights as one
of the top flight actresses in film- |

dom. This picture of the girl
‘who passed for white is not!
worth missing. (20th Century-

Fox. Darryl F. Zanuck, Producer. |
Elia Kazan, director).

| camera fiend.
flex and a contax and does much

| ing.

| frien’

|
| by

Hobbies

CLARKE
many hobbies.

GABLE is a man of
Currently he is a
He owns’a rollie-

of his own printing and develop-
He is interested in auto-
mobiles of any kind, and enjoys a
morning spent in taking apart a
motor and putting it together
again. He is also a good golfer.
Fishing, however, is his greatest
hobby. He owns a small amount
of property on the Rogue River in
Oregon, and plans to build a fish-
ing lodge. some day right on the
water’s edge. Between pictures

along this well-stocked river. His
contract calls for four months off
between each film.

He won an Academy Award for
“It happened One Night” in 1934.
But he gave his “Oscar” to the
twelve-year-old son of his good
Walter Lang, because the
boy, who worships Gable, asked
him for it. His contract stipulates
that he can never be loaned out
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. He
had that clause inserted himself



Royal

THE BRIBE: Crime does not;
pay. This is what this story is
meant to convey. It is centred
around Carlota, an island just off
the coast of Central America.
Carlota is a rough and tumble
the main industries of which
seems to be bartending, fiestas,
tourist fishing and illegal deals
in aeroplane engines. The busi-
ness of these engines brings to
this paradise one Rigby (Robert
Taylor) an honest federal agent
disguised as a playboy fisherman
One of the scoundrels he is after
(John Hodiak) has a wife (Ava
Gardner) who is as discontented
as she is curvaceous. Then there
is Charles Laughton as a bum
whose feet ‘hurt, and Vincent
Price in the role of archvillain
All go to make up a picture of
torrid love, crookery and gaiety
Good entertainment

(M-G-M. Pandro .S. Berman,
producer. Rebert Z. Leonard, di- |



rector.)

Last Week's
Winner

WINNER of Lagi’ Week’s Guess
Star is Betty Carrington, Parade
View, Hastings. The name of tha,
Star is June Allyson.








} a film elsewhere



because, he says, he knows every-
one at his home studio so well
that he wouldn't feel right making
“It Happened
Night” and “Call Of The
are the only two he made
away from M-G-M, although
“Gone With The Wind”, an
M-G-M release, was filmed on the
Selznick lot.

One
Wild”

Roxy
ANY NUMBER CAN PLAY:
Yes Gable is back at his old
game. But this time beside the
usual run of wine women and
song, he has the dice and guns

thrown in. In this picture Clark
Gable is a big time honest gam-
bler who has risen in wealth, He
is a married man with a son. But
this does not keep other women

away from him In the cast
there as such lovables as Mary
Astor, Audrey Trotter, Majorie

Rambeau and Gable’s wife, Alex-
is Smith. Others who lend colour
to this dramatic story are Wen-
dell Corey, Frank Morgan, Lewis
Stone, Barry Sullivan, Daryll
Hickman, Edgar Buchanan and
that neted negro adqtor-singer,
Caleb Peterson. Good entertain-
ment

(M.G.M. Mervyn Le Row, direc-
tor.. Arthur Freed, producer).

|

|

he spends at least a month fishing |

filmsis the 500,000 members of Cana-

da’s armed forces who acquired
a taste for the British way
life during the war.

They have brought back with
them fond and sentimental re-
miniscences of England and its
people which have awakened a
new c’iriosity about our institu-
tions, our customs and “ur hopes,

of

British flims have also a spe-
cial appeal to the teen-age
youngsters just finishing second-
ary school. Graduating from the
cowboy and bubble-gum class of
picture-goers, their taste has
swerved from Gene Autry to
Laurence Olivier.

To them British films are more
intelligent and more mature than
the regular Hollywood product,
and in their new-found adult-
hood they enthusiastically sup-
port films like Hamlet, Great
Expectations and The Fallen
Idol.

But in order to maintain and
increase this interest we must
continue to make an adequate
quantity of good pictures
Each bad film that is sent over
here merely does a disservice to
the cause of all British films.

Unfortunately Canada has had
to sit through her share of dull
and adolescent British pictures.
Films like Stop Press Girl. The
Perfect Woman, Poets Pub, Wo-
men in the Hall, Esther Waters
have not only-met aa agonising
fate at the box-office but they
have disillusioned eudiences that







Ethel Barrymore, the Woman and Actress

WBbartcenn

iby

It took Hollywood thirty-five
years to get Ethel Barrymore to
sign a long-term screen contract,
but Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer fin-
ally accomplished the feat.

Since 1914, when the star made
her first silent film, “The Night-
ingale,” every swdio in Holly-
wood has offered her a long-term
contract, but to no avail. Upon
finishing her role in “The Great
Sinner” at M-G-M, Miss Barry-
more finally succumbed and
signed on the dotted line.

She initiated her new contract
with a stellar role in “That Mid-
night Kiss,” her first appearance
in technicolor, and followed this
with the dramatic portrayal of
Mother Auxilia in “The Red
Danube,” exciting story of post-
war Vienna.

Today the star lives in a ramb-
ling white house with blue shu:-
ters which overlooks the Pacific
Ocean in Palos Verdes, California.

ovel

much ’
ia m how
st} s «show
Tong"

No other shampoo gives you the ee

same magical LANOLIN-biend lather
beautiful, lustrous hair

ae

LANOLIN

ier your hal

a

hese recently won audiences.

Canada sees over 300 pictures

year. Britain cam continue to
arn between a million and a
million and a quarter Canadian |
dollars annually if she can sup-
ply 10 per cent of this require- |
ment.

But that means 30 quality pic-
tures—not merely 30 hackneyed,
second rate imitations of inferior
American films.

They do not all have to be ex-
pensive productions like Hamlet
and Red Shoes but they must at
least have the appeal and intel-
ligence of Passport to Pimlico
Blue Lagoon, The Winslow Boy
and Whiskey Galore.

Foot in Door

It is not only financial consid-
erations that should prompt our
desire to show British pictures
in Canada. In a country that is
flooded with American radio,
Amerfean magaaines, American
goods and American television.
British films are one of the few
mediums left to us to further
Canada’s understanding and ap-
preciation of the British way of
lite.

In
the

the current discussions on
future of the film industry
it should be remembered that
any drastic curtailment in the
production of British films will be
bound to jeopardise our position
in Canada and other parts of the
Empire just as we are beginning
for the first time to have our foot

firmly wedged in the open door.

Good British films can be much
more than just an asset on the
dollar side of an_ international
ledger.



Young
Instead of 45 minutes from Broad-
way, she is 45 minutes from
M-G-M. She has many of her

treasures and furniture from her
New York home and lives with her
oldest son Samuel. Her
er son, John Drew Colt, is in New
York studying dramaties. Her
daughter, Ethe] Barrymore Colt
Miglietta, is a busy mother of a
two-year-old son, John Drew
Miglietta, and an accomplished
actress gnd singer as well. The
Barrymore heritage of talent still
‘thrives. Marriage, motherhood
and a career have been well |
handled by the Barrymore women. |

Energetic, dynamic, strikingly

beautiful, Miss Barrymore is as
dominent a figure in Hollywood}
today as she was on Broadway.
She is a great sports fan and can
rattle off the names of every

heavyweight boxing champion of}
the past 40 years,
|



—London Express Service





' It Doesn’t

young- |



r can look + + *





for





PAGE THREE













a ee Ss
, A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO OUR PATRONS AND FRIENDS. :

WE THANK YOU for your Patronage in the past
years, and assure you that we intend to give vou
the best of Entertainment for 1950.

ROODAL THEATRES=Caribbean

EMPIRE—OLYMPIC-—ROXY—ROYAL.

-EMPIRE

To-day to Thurs.—Mat. & night shows daily.

ave
rT
FOR WHITE

" JEANNE CRAIN - ETHEL BARRYMORE |

ETHEL WATERS - WILLIAM LUNDIGAN
Protuced by DARRYL F.ZANUCK - oivectes by ELIA KAZAN

——— a

OLYMPIC

Today last 2 Shows.
The M.G.M. Doubie
“THRILL OF A

AND

"VALLEY OF DECISION”

Mcatinse and Night

ROMANCE”

MONDAY AND TUESDAY
First Instalment Columbia Serial

"WILD BILI, HICKOK”

Starring William Elliott

- Matinee and

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY—Finai Insialmen! _
“WILD BILL H?CKOK”

ROX Y
TODAY TO TUESDAY, Matinee and Night
Shows Daily

p MATNO. 210 2 COLS. x 2° (56 LINES)

ROYAL

TO-DAY TO TUESDAY
Shows

M.G.M. presents .. .
“THE 3RIBE”
Starring

Matinee and Night
Daily




Robert Taylor Ava Gardiner





Mat
BLACK

Whether You’re

WHITE...

C1

Or

ay er ae)
marry you ay
no one

i mou ae
know

our

secret.”’

.RRYL F. BANU CK

aT LL.



Starring a distinguished cast :

JEANNE CRAIN
ETHEL BARRYMORE
ETHEL WATERS
WILLIAM LUNDIGAN

Produced by DARRYL F. ZANUCK

Directet by ELIA KAZAN +. Screen
- Play by Philip Dunne and Dudley Nichols
<= Based vel by Cid Ricketts Summer



EMPIRE THEATRE
NEW YESR PRESENTATION
—~ NOW SHOWING

r-







PAGE FOUR



HE year 1949 has been, in my opinion, the greatest year of sport

S i rticular branch

i istory of Barbados. It is true that one pa :

of shat migih we have reached the eS ne oo aoa

ai never before has there

esaiaat oon aa so many competitions on an Intercolonal level.

iy Cricket undoubtedly our first love, attracted Trinidad ag in

the regular post-war Intercolonial ge oon oe ae nee
5 the impressive consistency 0 oy Marsha "

sped Saline, the fluidity and power of tall scoring Johnny Lucas

and the accurate spinners of C. “Boogles” Williams for the Barbados

m.
ve TRINIDADIANS WHO EXCELLED
OR Trinidad we saw an excellent all round performance by Clar-
ence Skeete, some resolute and finally elegant batting by
J. E. D. Sealy and a promising and commendable performance by
young Chicki Sampath who made his bow to big cricket in the series.
A team of the East Indian Cricket Board of Control visited Bar-
bados for the first time and were not disgraced although they were
below the standard of the island’s full strength. They drew a fix-
ture with a Colts XI, defeated outright a Barbados Cricket League
XI, but bowed the knee to a Colony XI. em
" ‘The domestic season was not the most brilliant that we have had
but it gave Roy Marshall the opportunity to score over six hundred
runs and Clyde Walcott the chance to establish himself as a very
useful fast inedium bowler and share top honours with Errol Milling-
ton in the line-up of First Division bowlers.

PICKWICK CHAMPIONS

ICKWICK, thanks to their magnificent team spirit and determina-
P carried off the First Division trophy although on merit alone there
was not much to choose between Empire, Wanderers and themselves.

The experiment with the introduction of the Intermediate Divis-
ion proved to be a success. So keen was the competition that two
teams, Pickwick and Empire, tied in the First place.

The three day atmosphere produced more serious cricket and
the First Division teams found worthy recruits in these ranks. It
should definitely be retained next season but the Barbados ‘Cricket
Association should study the performances of the individual teams
during the season and promote or demote accordingly as they think
fi

oe
WINNERS FIRST TIME

HE Second Division saw Cable and Wireless celebrate their entry

into cup cricket by carrying off the championship of the Second
Division, only by a narrow margin however from the Mental Hospita!

The final game alone decided the issue, another proof of a sea-
son of very keen competition.

The Barbados Amateur. Football Association also tried an experi-
ment in taking the staging of the competition from Queen's Park to
Kensington, The result was a net profit of over one thousand dollars
—-Improved accommodation for players and public alike and a better
standar’ of football.

Spartan carried off both the First Division Cup and the Knock-
out Cup. Their deadly rivals Carlton had the pleasure of being the
only team to have beaten them for the season, twice to be exact
But this di@ not prevent the Park team from consolidating when
once they were given a slight advantage either by accident or a mis-
take on their opponents’ part.

ONLY A NOSE
ees nosed out Everton only by goal average in the Second
Division to round off an extremely keen battle but in the Third
Division, Notre Dame (the former All Blacks) swept everything be-

fore them and won quite d few of their games by the tallest of mar-
gins

A Combined Casuals-Shamrock te
of the Pickwick Club. They played a series of games against colony
teams and won the rubber, These fixtures only showed that the Col-
ony, in having played teams composed of members who had no expe-
perience of playing together before, presented a weaker force than
they might hve done in the circumstances,

Next season, benefiting by this experienc
an Association team early in the season th
if there is no tournament immediately,

EXCELLENT REFEREEING
retereeing was excellent and there was a keenness that
bromises much for future seasons,
The Amateur Athletic Associ
ful meetings during the year,
one

am paid a visit as the guests

e it is hoped to select
at will play together even

“HE

ition of Barbados staged two success-
e an Inter-club one and an Intercolonial
Ken Farnum and Carmichael held their own in the cycle events
but the flat events saw Barbados outclassed and clearly in need of
more experience in the Intercolonial field,

The Water Polo Association which has bee
to strength ever since its formation in 1947,
team from Trinidad in addition to Staging
They are now preparing to return the
Trinidad on January 1]

Delbert Bannister, Ken Ince, Peter and
and Paul Foster are players who could fill
West Indian water polo team,

n going from strength
were able to entertain a
a Successful local season.
yisit and are due to leave for

“Boo” Patterson, Geoffrey
a place of distinction in any

TABLE TENNIS VS. B.G. AND TRINIDAD

“HE Barbados Table Tennis Association toured British Guiana
earlier in the year“and played in Trinidad while they were in-

ae there. Later in the year they entertained a Trinidad team

iere,

They were defeated on their British Guiana
wide margin to Trinidad here. Skipper Louis
but it has been realised that our players have
as far as tournament play is concerned but
Should pay handsome dividends in the years to come,

Basketball, a form of Sport that has not really caught on here yet
got another fillip with the formation of an Association during the year.
Kudolph Daniel is to be commended for much industry in bringing the
Association into being, in addition to being its first Secretary,

BASKETBALL EXCITING INTEREST

*POHE game gained popularity and it should excite more interest this

year. The novelty of floodlighting the field at the Y.M.C.A, fox
some of the games was an added attraction.

Professional boxing was not successful
modic attempts were made to fill the breach created when Messrs.
Layne and Chandler, promoters of the Yankee Stadium threw in the
Sponge after years of good work, but these met with hardly even luke-
warm support from the public,

On the other hand the newly formed Amateur Boxing Association
has gained much public confidence and support. They were able to

send a team of amateurs to Grenada and recently staged their own
championship tournament,

B’DOS TO JOIN BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS
HEY expect to send another team to Grenada this year to compete
in the Caribbean championships and, Sam King, Lightweight,
Baggott, featherweight, Perkins welterweight are among those who

tour and lost by a
Stoute was outstanding
still a long way to go
the experience gained

during the year, Spas-



“.. ©

THROUGH.
OUT 1950

Ride Together
and Ride
with

Pleasure



GH

ALL-STEEL '1CVCLE

4

43
Sole Distributors in Barbados
k, SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.
8, 31, 12, 13, BROAD STREET

—— |

CAV
1













| The new



Storm’s Gift
Wins T.T.C.
‘A’ Class Race

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent!
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 31.
Mrs. Rita Augustine’s Rumour,
Jamaica-bred filly by Exaggerat-
ed—Dalrymple put an unexpect-
ed lacing on the F Class animals
going a mile and a distance and
fetched her backers $89 on each
$1 ticket to win at the pari-mutuel
as the T.T.C. races reached the
third day at Queen’s Park Savan-

nah,

Honeymvon, 3-year old daugh-
ter of Beachcomber—Soceress fol-
lowed Rumour in the second place
and the Jamaican pair brought a
Forecast to punters of $958 on a
two-dollar ticket.

In this race, Jamaicanbred ani-
mals secured three winning
brackets for the Wilhelmina,
Sprightly son of Rock William
ran third,

Fabulous, four-year son of Gate-
hurst won the St. Clair Handicap
over nine furlongs and 55 yards
for the “C” class animals. Bobby
Hardwidge. rode Fabulous. Miss
Vie ran second and Silver Bullet
vhird,

The T.T.C. Handicap for Class
“A” animals saw the Jamaicans,
Blue Streak and Gauntlet beaten
out of place.

Barbados-owned Storm’s Gift
won a great race from Gunsite
and The Gambler also Barbados-
owned in that order. Blue Streak
was prominent in the first mile,
then faded out of the picture
Pharlite never got up to vhe com-
pany,

Following were the day’s re-
sults:—-
MAIDEN HANDICAP—6 FURS
ASS C
1—Rallandra, 2—September Song, 3
Catania
IMPERIAL HANDICAP—G FURS
CLASS B.
—Fitche’s Green, 2—Ocean Pear
*-War Lord
NEWTOWN HANDICAP—1 MILE AND
1 YRDS. CLASS F
Rumour, 2—Honeymoo: Wall

Trea

PRODUCE HANDICAP—6 FURS
CLASS F

Top Flight, 2—Cross Bow, 3-—-Co

MARAVAL HANDICAP—6 FURS

CLASS D
The Atom, 2—Bow Bells, 3—Fly
Away
ST. CLAIR HANDICAP—9 FURS
OLASS C.
Fabulous, 2—Miss Vic, 3—Silver
Bullet
T.T.C. HANDICAP—9 FURS
CLASS A,
1—Storm's Gift, 2—Gunsite, 3—The
Gambler.
—By Cable.

Elizabeth’s
: ‘
Monaveen
Wins
LONDON, Dec. 31.

Monaveen, the steeplechaser
jointly owned by the Queen and
Princess Elisabeth, to-day won
the Queen |‘lizabeth Chase Han-
dicap over 3 miles 180 yards here,
beating Free booter with Klaxton
third,

The Princess, who only recently
returned from Malta was present
to see Monaveen score a most
popular victory in the event
worth £2,300. Monaveen light-
ly weighted with only 10 stone
although hotly challenged by the
northern jumper, Wot No Sun,
entered the straight going much
better of the two. It was then
left to the fast finishing Free-
booter 7 to 1 to take secolid place
with Klaxton 8 to 1 third.

Monaveen, an 8-year-old geld-
ing with which the Princess hopes
to Win the Grand National next
year, fenced faultlessly, and Tony
Grantham, his rider made the
best use of his light weight to win
by 6 lengths with 3 lenghs sep-
arating second and third

Wot Not Sun finished fourth of
12 runners of whom Roimond \as
a disappointing 7 to 2 favourite

Princess Elizabeth followed by
Lord Mildway and her trainer
Peter Cazalet was first into the
unsaddling enclosure to greet the
winner, and was obviously over-
joyed by the success of the horse
which she patted affectionately
while smiling at Grantham to
whom she said “congratulations”
with much feeling. —Reuter,

will surely be asked to represent Barbados.

The Barbados Polo Club have

year, having entertained a team from Jamaica and will be off to Vene-

zuela to play there on January 6,

Lawn Tennis Association. With
Skeete and Hon'ble V. C. Gale
a working policy for the



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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

India Scores 422

vs. Commonwealth

Hazare Hits 175 .N.O.

CALCUTTA, Dec. 31.

A magnificent innings of 175 not out by V. S. Hazare, Cap-

tain of the side in the absence of the injured Vijay Merchant,

featured the India first innings today when the third un-
official Test with ‘+2 Commonweatth was continued.

India ran up the respectable
total of 422 in reply to which the
Commonwealth scored 15 runs
without loss before stumps were
drawn,

Winston Place, the Lancashire



batsman, was playing after all
although there had been some

confusion yesterday when it was
announced, in error, that he was
twelfth man and that Norman
Oldfield was in the side.

The first hour’s play to-day pro-
duced only 23 runs but batsmen
needed to be alert. In the early
Stages today three wicktes fell for
32 runs but Hazare stood firm and
completed his century in 4 hours,
9 minutes, including thirteen fours.

The alliance of Eishenchand
and Hazare had checked the fall
of wickets before the interval and

they were together at lunch
having added 56 runs in 50
minutes.

By the tea interval three more
wickets had gone, but Hazare was
still there with 163 out of a total
of 401. His stand with Kishen-
chand added 92 runs in 81 minutes
for the seventh wicket. Hazare’s
150 took him 6 hours, 12 minutes
and included 18 fours.

Twenty-five minutes after tea
sufficed to finish off the innings
which had lasted 9 hours, 25
minutes, Hazare’s undefeated 175
including 23 fours.

The Commonwealth had only a
short period of batting but neither
Livingston nor Place appeared un-
duly worried as they played to
keep the opening stand unbroken
until stumps were drawn.



V. HAZARE

Livingstone brought on Tribe and
the left-hander had the new bats-
man leg before. Hazare was un-
perturbed by the fact that India
had lost three wickets for thirty
two runs and went on to com-
plete his century in 4 hours, 9
mins. including 13 feurs. Joined
by Kishenchand, the pair added
56 runs in 50 minutes for the
unbroken seventh wicket when
lunch was taken

‘einatigneiernerpeencamiinnaesathtnnneieiesenlieatrenaiaihonaaiee

INPIA’S ist INNINGS



Mushtaq All c Smith b Tribe 40

thin veil of fog again hung V. Mankad b Smith .......... 91
#9 ; SERED » as R. S. Modi b Tribe : 9
over the ground this morning as ae "6
a £ V. Hazare not out tae és 175

He e and Phadkar resumed p' phadkar c Freer b Lambert. . 13
india’s first innings against the H. Adhikari run out .. 2

bowling of Freer and Lambert. P. Umrigar lbw b ‘Tribe 4





A crowd of 20,000 was present Klsendand ¢ & bp smith®.. r
to see Lambert strike an early c. gs, Nayudu b Pettiford .......... 25
blow having Phadkar caught by N. Chowdhury ¢ Worrell b Tribe .. .
Freer in the slips with his third PETERS Fae PRE SNA TRE F AVES tp eet
ball. After an hour’s slow cricket PO Ai tl ae so, 422
during which twenty three runs : oi ‘ ee
were scored Adhikari trying a jg) quick single was run out by Alli. 337’ 8 for 360, 9 for 391.
When Umrigar joined Mazare —Reuter.
By BRUCE HARRIS
LONDON. Just to Show Thew

THOSE anything-but-peaceful UNUSUAL “weigh-in” faces
people, the boxing managers, seem Cockell ir > ; -egari a6
more than usually belligerent this ~ ekell, lived of being regarc

ed officially as a heavy-weight, he
is to step on the scales at the
offices of the Board of Control—
Just tO prove that he can still
make the cruiser weight. 12st. 7b.

If the authorities are satisfied.
Don hopes to be included in the
official series of eliminators for
the British title held by Freddie
Mills.

His immediate plans include a
fight with Charlie Collett at Read-
ing to-night, a match with a
French opponent, 27-year-old
Andre Iicfrane, at Streatham Ice
Rink on January 17, and a series
of three contests under the Brait-
man and Ezra banner at Empress
Hall.

The Streatham match is at 12st.

Christmas,

Tom Hurst, who looks after the
affairs of Bruce Woodcock, will be
spending Christmas in America.
Before he left he gave the world
a good-will message to the effect
that anybody who could knock
Bruce over would be paid £100.
The idea is a toughening-up course
in preparation for Woodcock’s
fight with Lee Savold next May.

Here's His Choice

Four fighters, represented by
two managers have immediately
accepted the challenge—in appro-
priate terms,

Says John Simpson. “I’ve got
three lads who'll take him on.
He can have any oo all of Jack
Gardner, Don

Cockell or Tony se ba :
Lord on those £100 terms.” Mlb. over ten x wunds.
Ted Broadribb, on behalf of

rounded Gian

Johnny Williams, is even quicker . G ; " ‘ ;

to the punch—like this: HARLEQUINs, delighted with

“Williams has an eye on the the tugby football played last

British and world titles himsclf bsg ve a gain on
and is prepared to act as a u : ae arranged o XehuEn
‘door-mat’ for Woodcock for the Match for April 23, in Paris (writes
time being. Anyone who wants Hylton Cleaver).

Woodcock will have to get there At Twickenham they did not
over Johnny’s dead body.” encounter after all that giant
Peace on earth. Good will to- !rward Dr. Adani, whose boots
wards men. are size 12. He was prevented

by his mother from entering the
airplane which was to bring them
because the conditions were too
swolen some of the limelight this W!"dy.

There may perhaps have been
something in this maternal solici-
tude. Many of the team who
travclled by ship arrived too sea-
sick to play and reserves took their

Seasoned players like Dr. H. E.

places!
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Aussies Hit

312 For 4
vs. S. Africa

CAPETOWN, Dec. 31.

Australia and South (frica
opened their Second Test match
on the Newlands Ground here to-
day when Australia batted all day
to score 312 runs for the loss of
four wickets. ‘

This was a rate that was behind
the run a minute considered good
and credit for pegging Australia
down belonged to the spin bowl-
ers Mann, Tayfield, and Smith who
found little response from a slug-
gish wicket.

All batsmen have so far done
well if at times slow and J. Mo-
roney with 87 was top-scorer of
the day while half centuries came
from Keith Miller, Lindsay Has-
sett and Neil Harvey.

Ian Johnson was declared fit
after a test in the nets to take his
p'ace in the Australian team and
so both sides had the same teams
which contested the First Test,
won cymfortably by Australia.

By the lunch interval the open-
ing pair had scored 90 for the loss
of Aithur Morris’s wicket and his
confident 42 was in contrast to his
failure to score in the earlier Test.

Miller’s 58 was a laborious effort
which took nearly two and one
half hours but Hassett showed
more aggressiveness. His 57 was
made up of fluent strokes all round
the wicket. He showed ability to
pierce a well placed field with
uncanny accuracy and his stand of
61 with Harvey for the fourth
wicket was the day’s brightest

cricket. La entein



Horse-W oman
e *
Dies At 32
NEWBURY, Dec. 31.

Mrs. Diana Walwyn, brillian‘
horsewoman known as “The
Woman Wifhout Fear” who diea
in hospital here on Thursday tool:
an accidental overdose of a pain-
killing drug, it was decided at an
inquest here today. :

The jury returned a verdict of
death by misadventure. Mrs. Wal-
wyn was found unconscious in a
locked room. By her bed was a
hypodermic syringe with a broken
needle and a carton and bottle
containing drugs.

Mrs. Walwyn, aged 32, was the
wife of Fulke Walwyn, wellknown
race horse trainer. A woman of
classical beauty, she lived adven-
turously. She knew more about
racing form than most men and
her racing colours were wellknown
on most English racecourses.

—Reuter.

Guderian Denies

Press Reports

MUNICH, Dec. 31.
Former German General Heinz
Guderian, to-day denied Press re-
ports that he had received “any
offers from a foreign power.”
Commenting on the alleged
movement of former German offi-
cers to the United States first re-
ported last Tuesday, he said: “It
is entirely out of question that 5
as a German, should enter the
service of a foreign country.

Spain Holds Close
Relation With U.S.

MADRID, Dec. 31.

General Franco told his people
in a New Year broadcast to-night
that Spain’s relations with ihe
peoples of America were becom-
ing “closer every day.”

“We are not hurt by the bad
faith of those who pretend to
ignore us or who fail to see the
greatness of our effort.”

“Those people are mistaken
who think that by attempting io
hinder our recovery, they can
achieve anything except to make
us even tougher and to increas:
our contempt for those who ac:
in this way.”

—Reuter.

MORE VOTES MONDAY!
PARIS, Dec, 31
French Prime Minister Georges
Bidaul’ who last night won vote
of confidence on two points of
his 1950 budget tonight asked the
National Assembly for similar
votes on vhree more points. The
three votes were expected to be
taken on Monday.—Reuter.



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SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 1939




R

= ourse, J continue my comment on the Tyn¢ ¢ a
eae ee seeing the first two days of racing, oa
In the T.T.C. Cup Storm's Gift gave a grand display ana,
ve made us realize that the high opinion held of her of
Tune meeting was quite justified. For some reason the g













































































\

? i at the beginning of this ind ti
poorest T cowid. ae 04 was that his rider = atta ae :

cai a front runner and that once pa

that Blue Se OT that was proved was that

would give in. i B class and no match for Blue Stpe

is no better than a gooc ; at excell treak,

ik himself then proceeded to show what excellent stuff he
Streak I ing up the lead to Storm's Gift and then eo ,
of by giving up Storm’s Gift, however, would npt be beaten.

a fighting finish. torm’s » \ i

he her head in the most determined yp
collared she put down Ve i
the best stayers and beat the Jamaican Derby winner h

What also impressed me about this race was the very f;
ning and the even faster finish. is +S considered tj
Streak was concerned in both, his true colours are a em]

With regard to the two-year-olds, two of them have stp E
far as very good ones in the making. The first ig Fair Props
strong looking chestnut colt about fifteen hands two or three |
that he is going to give the creoles of the South Caribbean gt, :
Jamaica’s best in the classic races of 1950. There is little ¢
had Bow Bells been fit for the Preeders Stakes he may not} ;
beaten her, but there is also no doubt that he finished his race in .|
manner which bore the stamp of the stayer. He was not in the #,
three at the two but he came with such a strong bid in the streis|
that he was going away from the field when he passed the post, 1)
only unfortunate that on the second day he had to run against th
older horses in B class and was well and truly beaten by two seasons
campaigners like Rosalind and Tiduc. In fact this race
excellent example that the policy of placing Jamaican two-yea)
in E2 is, in my opinion, a mistaken one. So far the best Jam
two-year-old we have seen on this side of the Carib’ 4
year was Brown Rocket. I think that Fair Profit is
Brown Rocket was at the same age. But yet he was by t
F class horses from whom he was receiving less than his weipht-t,
age because he is in a class above them. I am sure that this sort y
thing will spoil our two-year-old racing .

Incidentally Fair Profit’s breeding is interesting, Hy by
Tip, an imported stallion by Fair Trial out of Tip the Wink, while i
dam, The Brunette, is by Scatter, sire of the famous Browy Bombe
and many other good ones in Jamaica, Again further irA cation het
he will probably be good at longer distances than six furlongs,

NOT A WINNER :

The other two-year-old of i omise, strange to tell, is one who ¢
not win. No less than the colt Cross Bow, But what he did wal
nothing short of amazing. He got left by what I thought to be thra|
lengths. Mr. Bennett, who started them told me he thought it rs
more like five. But by the time two furlongs had been covered hy
was fourth in a field of thirteen and after three furlongs he wa
third. After this tremendous acceleration | think Holder had sop
difficulty in bringing him round the turn and had the course been ;
straight one he might have got closer to the winner, As it was wh
he came into the stretch he subdued Leap On, who was. fighting!
gamely, with his big stride but his handicap at the start was too much
to allow him to catch the winner. J

Of Bow Bells, the sensational and only two-year-old ever to race
in E2 at the Christmas meeting, it can only be said that she is not
well. In this she is like Suntone although I think that Mr. Cox's
filly is the worse of the two. Apparently the fever which she has
had caused all her stamina to deserit her as she did not even finish
within three lengths of the field.

There is also something else taking place at the Christmas meet.
ing which is worthy of special mention. That is, the large number
of promising importeds now in Trinidad and the predominance of the
Jamaican Creoles at the meeting.

The London Bloodstock Cup brought out the maidens and in
September Song, the winner of this race, Catania, Czarina, Sunbeay
and Ballandra, they are obviously the makings of some good race
horses which are going to give the creoles a lot of trouble in the
future. On top of that there are Lady Pink, Pescadores, Mist Maid
and Fitches Green who are winners already and all impress
being worth while. The form of the four-year-old colt
Article also suggests that he is coming into his own asa late developer,
These horses I am sure will form the nucleus of Ciasses B and C in
the next year and some of them I expect to be in A sooner or later. |
oo witheee $4 the ee all the time it therefore looks as
if we will have not only crowc ed fields in C é ind
and quite a few in A, . nn © Dut almogt aaae

With regard to the Jamaicans, Blue Streak is of course the best
at present. But we have the performance of Pharlite in the Imperial
Stakes as a reminder that his win at Arima was hot the fluke every:
body imagined it to be. T must say that this Pharlite is the type of
horse that I admire. Out of the same dam as Jeeves and The Gauntlet
he is a much better looking horse than his half brothers and particu-
larly so about his quarters. He is obviou: ly a good stayer for he
prefers mud and is better at nine than anything else. Yet he is built
more on the powerful lines of the sprinter and cuts a much better
figure than the lanky Blue Streak.

Next we move down to E class where we find William II and Fait
Profit, whom I have already disc ussed, and then into F class where
there is Rosalind, China Doll and the two-ycar-old Mon Ami There
is also another two-year-old who catches the eye in the shape of
Sun Glee. She ran fourth in the Breeders’ Stakes but was outelassed
by the older ones in the Woodbrook Stakes, being classified E2 with
Fair Profit. These | think are tho best but there are Jamaicans in
every class in ‘Trinidad, some on the out-going list and others on the
in-coming. In fact it grows more evident every day that Trinidad is
the centre of racing in the British West Indies, There is even one
from a French colony. The dapper Tiduc, one of the gamest I have §

seen,
ANYBODY’S GUESS

What the last two days of the meeting will bring forth is any:
body’s guess but the luck of the Barbados horses can get no worse.

That’s a certainty,

I am also impressed so far with the crowd that has turned out
to see the races. We know already that the big Sweep broke a record.
Now I am sure the Pari Mutuel and Forecast have also broken the
records established during the War Years, To begin with there is a
entire hew set of booths for both stand and field spectators and th
Stand itself has been enlarged to seat 300 extra. Even this extensioi
however does not prevent it from being cramped, This is a very
healthy Sign indeed for racing in the South Caribbean and for Trini-
dad in particular, For my part I hope it means that the day is no
far distant when we will see all the improvements long planned by
the T.T.C. are put into effect. Such things as an Electric Tote ma
chine, new Members’ and Grand Stands, extension of the home
stretch and added to this my suggestion that the Trial Stakes be made
a seven furlong race and the Derby nearly a mile and a apache By
that time we may also see a revival of the Governor's Cup over 4
more respectable distance than 91 furlongs,



oem WEN NEES

TO OUR FRIENDS
AND
CUSTOMERS

eG

ONGNG9G NG NG NG NG NONE NG SGN NG NGG NG 8G NG NG

5

WE EXTEND



DOWDING ESTATES
& TRADING Co., Lid.

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SUNDAY, JANUAR

——

GOALKEEPER AT WORK No-1.



1950

Keep Off The Bike

By BERT WILLIAMS

(England and Wolves goalkeeper)

S° you want to be a goalkeeper? Weil, there
~ are two schools of thought on the subject.
One, that goalkeepers are born not made. The
other, that any half-wit can do the job with
distinction. I agree with neither.

Goalkeeping is a combination of art and science,
put there is one great essential before we touch on
those subjects—physical fitness.

The average fan has an idea that height and
weight are the first essentials of good goalkeeping.
This is pure fallacy. The ability to reach and

catch high balls

is useful, but perfection can't be

reached without absolute physical fitness.

So training is the first item. Sprinting to de-
velop agility and strong calf muscles, muscles to
withstand that quick leap from a standing position.

Bending, with
flat on the floor,
the quick bend

the legs straight and the hands
is a good exercise to prepare for
to pick up the ball when it is

rolling along the ground.

Trunk bending from side to side gives
extra bit of tone to the

when stretching

that
muscles so necessary

your hands for the ball when

your body is not behind them.
Exercises which call for co-ordination of body

and mind are vitally important.

In fact, mental

training is as important to a goalkeeper as the

physical side.

By mental training I mean the study of posi-
tional play and its relation to angles you will

adopt under

player is

certain
coming in

circumstances —
from

when a
the wing, or when

an inside forward is racing towards goal from

any of
Do



One big don’t-
heaviness in the

a dozen slightly

different directions,

reises regularly and you'll have the
suppleness necess

ary to the good goalkeeper.
cycling. f find it leaves me with
legs. That's a bad thing.

BIG DECISION

¥ ET’S take it you are compictels

fit. Now con-

iL: sider the big decision every goalkeeper has to

make several times in each

out of goal.

game—-when to come

Come out at the right moment and the fans will

love you, the Press praise you.

Come out at the

wrong moment and the criticism will pour on you.
So here are a few tips that I find helpful.

Understanding
is the first

essential.

with your backs and centre half
Tell them how you'll let

them know you are O.K. or otherwise.

If I am coming out I shout loudly to indicate I
have the ball covered—“My ball, Bill,” or “Back
Bill,” as the case may be.

Notice I mentioned the player by name.

to do that can






—_



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BERT WILD}

penalised.
tacker

He might be

bali is on the
possession of

Now for a warning
while on one knee, I’ve
and it’s dangerous.

1 defender

I always endeavy
my legs strai
ball. That’

our to




where

So often I’ve
sailing over the
keeper, or go w
your

seen a
head of



OLD LOW'S ALMANACK

shouting to
and that’s an offence
This type of “coming out”
floor running

Never

seep my

ball
an

ind agile

feet

hit a

fool





at-

is in order when the
towards gaal or in the

pick up the ball
seen goalkeepers do it,

together,
and bend down to pick up the
suppleness comes in.
bump and go
on-one-knee
hizzing between his legs.
knees together and your legs straight.
—London Express Service.

goal-
No, keep

PROPHECIES er (950

SUNDAY



Battle For
Bolton Cup

THE Advocate Challenge Cup
has been won by the Mosquitccs.
On Wednesday January 4, 1950.,
the Polo season closes. On this
»ecasion the two teams Mosquitoes
and Bluebottles which were tied
in the number of goals scored in
the tournament will play orf for
the Warner Bolton Cup.

3esides this play-off, a presenta-
1on match will be played by two
teams, chosen from the whole
-uc, and at the conclusion of this
match Mrs. Arthur, widow ot the

te H. A. Arthur; Esq., founder
< the Club, nas kindly corsen isd
) present the cups. The teams to

ay in the presentation match

ve been chosen with a view to
‘ffording the team which is to
‘our Venezuela as much practice
1s possible.

Seats may be obtained on the

yund at one shilling each, ani

y starts at 4.15 p.m.

Che following are the teams:---

Mosquitoes: E. Williams
—upt.), E. Deane, J. Marsn,
id A. Arthur.

Bluebottles: C. Deane (Capt.),

M. Edghill, W. Bradshaw and M.
kewes-Cox,

For the Presentation match the
following eight members have
»2en chosen; —

Col. Michelin, J. Marsh, E.

-tiams, M. Edghill, L. Deane,

Deane, C, Deane and K. Deane.

Messrs. Victor Weekes and

ic Deane will be the Umpires.

e

Pat Todd Wins

al . e
Tennis Title
CALCUTTA, Dec. 31.

Mrs. Patricia Todd, United
States, won the Women’s Singles
title of of the Asian Lawn Tennis
Championships here today beating
Mrs, Bettey Hilton, Britain, 6—4;
6—0; in the finals.

The Men’s Doubles final was
won by Dilep Bose and Sumant
Misra of India, who beat the Phil-
ippines pair Felicisimo Ampon and
C. Carmona 3—6; 10—8; 6--1;
and 6—4.—Reuter.

REEF WORK WILL
BE RESUMED

Work will begin again on the
Reef Pavilion and grounds when
funds are available this year.

The Pavilion is now to be paint-
ed and wired while the grounds
will be levelled and grass planted.





A Hungarian comrade denounces Stalin for (a) having, had close dealings

with fhe enemy (Roosevelt and Churchill) in 1941-45 5

(v) having, then

received aid from America (Wall St ele.) fo Russia, and (c),in réfurn,

having, deliberalely plotled a Soviet policy which

ve reactionary capilalisl

forces the opporlunily To build an armed: world ront agains! Communism.







THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO, LTD.
BRIDGETOWN,

ENERAL

the comrade was execuléd immediately for being, inconvenient.

electric
lighting
accessories



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BARBADOS

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ADVOCATE



Two Teams Xmas Holidays Cause



Upset In English

Soccer

League

LONDON, Dee, 31.

High scoring and some surprise results occurred in the
English Soccer League today due largely to the aftermath
of the severe Christmas holidays programme.

Many clubs, plagued by injuries to star players, were vorced
to make sweeping changes. Bottom of the league Birming-
ham City made eight alterations but so well did the reserves
rise to the occasion that Brimingham led until late in the
game at Burnley when the home team snatched an equaliser.

Arsenai foung League
Liverpool in a lively
went down fighting Liverpoo!
exerted terrinc pressure against
the solid Arsenai defence which
they pierced once in each half.
Witn 35 points they still lead by
two points trom Manchester
Unitea -who beat their neighbours,
ihe City, after trailing at halr
time.

Wolverhampton fielded a com-
plete new half back line due to
injuries, but scored a convineins
victory over Blackpool, after a
goalless first half.

Biggest surprise in division two
was the defeat promotion seeking
Hull City. . Their defence cracked
badly against lowly Bradford who
whipped in five goals before Hull
scored a consolation goal.

Tottenham Hotspurs the League
leaders played below their best
but two first half goals gave them
both points at the
Cardiff City.

Sheffield Wednesday, ten points
behind in second place, kept in «he
promotion hunt with a fine win :
Chesterfield. Notts County haa
their big lead in the third Division
South cut slightly due to their
defeat at Bornemouth. Doncaster

teaders
mood anu

expense of

Rovers cracked in five goals
against Southport and now lead
the Northern section by clear

points from Rochdale.
RESULTS
Scottish League—Division A
Aberdeen 1, East Fife 2. Clyd:
0; Hibernian 1. Hearts 4; Celtic

SUPA ate

FORCING BID

By M. Harrison-Gray
Dealer: West. East-West

TITTLE



West opens with the
forcing-to-game bid of
Two Clubs. East bids
Two Diamonds, the
conventional negative
response, although Dia-
monds this time happens
to be his genuine suit.
West bids Two Hearts, Fast
shows a biddable suit with
Three Diamonds, and
West tries for a fit in his
second suit with Three
Spades. East bids Three
No Trumps and West
passes.

South leads 4 6, and
declarer must be careful
to win with dummy’s
ee A in order to preserve
an entry to his own hand.
@ Q is now led and over-
taken with ¢ K. This play
ensures nine tricks. The
contract will fail if
dummy’s ‘fe 9or of J@ is \
played to the first trick. }

4

n>
woo &
NI
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N
CCC RSET ERS T SSSR CRETE Ce RSC REeE EEE ee Ee Se PeceeeeneeeeeeUENSEESSEESSEREE Ss SUTECSUETENETEESECE SS eee Deen TSS T ERE REARS RES SR OEE EEE

London Exvress Service






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BIRMINGHAM ENGLAND



T. GEODES GRANT



Motherwell 4, Third Lanark 0,
Queen of the South 8, Patrick
Thistle 1. Raith Rovers 6; Fal-
kirth 4. Rangers 2; Dundee: 2.
Stirling 1; St. Mirren 3.

S ottish League —Division 1B.

Albion Rovers 1, Hamilton Aci.-
demicals 3. Arbroath 1, Kilmar-
nock 2s Ayr United 1, Dunfermline
Athletic 1. Cowdenbeath 5, John -
stone 1. Dundee United 0, Air-
drieonians 1. Morton 3, Alloa Ath -
letic 1. Queens Park 0, Forfir
Athletic 0, Stenhousemuir 1, Dun. -
barton 2,

Second Divsion

Bradford 5, Hull City 1. Bury 3,
Blackburn Rovers 0. Chesterfiel i
1, Sheffield Wednesday 2. Grimsby
Town 6, Luton Town 1. Leicester
City 1, Brentford 1. Preston North
End 0, Southampton 3. Queens
Park Rangers 2, Coventry City 0.
Sheffield United 1, Barnsley 1.
Swansea Town 1, Leeds United 2.
Tottenham Hotspurs 2, Cardiff
City 0. West Ham United 2, Ply-
mouth Argyle 2.

Third Division (Southern)
Aldershot 0, Swindon Town (
Bournemouth 3, Notts County 0
Bristol Rovers 1, Southend United
1. Crystal Palace 0, Port Vale 1.
Newport County 6, Bristol City 4.
Northampton Town 2, Walsall 0.
Norwich City 1, Brighton and
Hove 2, Nottingham Forest 3, Mill-
wall 1. Reading 3, Exeter City 2.
Torquay United 4, Leyton Orient

1. Watford 6, Ipswich Town 0.

First Division

iston Villa 0, Newcastle United
i. Burnley 1, Birmingham City 1
Charlton Athletic 2, Fulham
Chelsea 2, West Bromwich Albion
1. Huddersfield Town 1, Evertor
2. Liverpool 2, Arsenal 0. Man-
‘hester City 1, Manchester United
2. Portsmouth 1, Middlesbrough
1. Stoke City 1, Derby County 3
Sunderland 2, Bolton Wandere

Wolverhampton Wanderers 3,
Blackpooi 0.

Third Division (Northern)

Accrington Stanley 2, Lincclr
City 0. Darlington 1, Rochdale
Doncaster Rovers 5, Southport |
Gateshead 4, Chester 0. Hartl
pools United 3, Bradford City 0

Mansfield Town 0, Rotherhi
United 2. New Brighton 1, Hali-
fax Town 1. Oldham. Athletic 2

Crewe Alexandria 1. Stockperi
County 2, Carlisle United 0. Wrex
ham 1, Barrow 0. York City 1
Tranmere Rovers 0.

—Reuter.



Record Profit

LONDON, Dee 31.
Arsenal Football Club which
toured South America earlier this
year made a record profit of £59
128 on last season working accord-
ing to an official announcement
to-day
Gate receipts
tours last
£1,397,20

and
season
Reuter,

profits
amounted to



GOLFER INJURED

SEATTLE Dec. 31.

Ed Silver, former United States
injured |
when his motor car was in collis-

Ryder Cup golfer, was

ion with a lorry at Eugene (Ore-
gon)

an ankle,

—Reuter.





For comfort
and ease of
riding, the
Hercules 3-
Speed Gear
fitted with the
new Synchro-
Switch Handle.
ber Control — is far and
owoy the finest

gear today
ti





\Z SOLD BY
==" PL LEADING



LTD., BRIDGETOWN

EAS) 14/40
See a ee

from

Oliver damaged a knee and |



DeSilan Leading |
By 4% Points |
IN. CHESS

LONDON, Dec. 31.

Moscow radio reported tonight
that Chaude De Silan of France
was leading with 414 poinis ai
the end of the sixth round of the
Women’s World Chess Champion-
ship in Moscow.

Other leading players, wita 4
points each, were Olga Rubtsova
Valentina Belova and Ludm lla
Rudenko, all of the Soviet Union,
and Gisela Gresser of the United
States, The seventh round will
take place on Tuesday.

—Reuter.



3 Records Broken
ats
In N. Zealand Trials
WELLINGTON, Dec. 31.
Athletes broke 5 national re-
cords, and equalled 7 today when
the New Zealand track and fiela
championship and final Empire
Games trials were held at Napier.
One of the best perfo\nances oi
the day was that of Miss Yvette
Wi tiams of Otago, who bettered
the 1948 Olympic Games record
of 18 feet, 84 inches by 354 inches
in the Women's Long Jump.
The women’s 220 yards record
of 25.6 secs. was broken 3 jimes



Miss I. J. Hart, Auckland, clock-
ed 24.9 in the first heat, Miss ‘
Rower, returned 24.8 in the heat
and Miss D. Parker, Wakito.
equalled Miss Nower's time in th
third. }

ase oa Reuter.
Mile in 4 Mins. |
15.8 Seconds

ADELAIDE, Dee. 31. |
D. McMillan, Victoria, set up a
new Australian record of 4 min
15.8 secs. for the mile on the fir:
day of the Australian Amateu |
Athletic Championships.
MeMillan’s was one of two new
records set up during the day. The |



other was a time of 12%’ 43.5’ |
returned by D. Keane, Wesici ;
Australia, who beat the title |

holder, A. Stubb, by inches in the |
wo miles walk.—Reuter. |

\
Arthur Peall says:

BILLIARD SHOTS CAN
HELP YOUR SNOOKER

i *cer: when a snooker is :¢
4 quired to win, I am genera!
in favour of potting the ball “ o:
Yet I draw the line at undue
and would never

advise



average ————
suemen to at- rc Se
tempt pocketing | .

my

diagram \} © !
yellow, 1 \
Nearly straight, { .
with the cue-ball i

hampered by the

cushion at long |

range, the pot is

far too risky. . !
Not 60 my | 4
snooker. A fairly LLOW ©

. ye
full contact on
yellow sends itin || x 7S
and out of baulk |
{ \

towards the spot- | { bi |
1 ‘ain

end, and_ white
comes off two
cushions to halt
behind brown,
You will not make this snooke:
every time, but the stroke is sound
should



and always leave yellow
remsonably sate.
Billiard players enjoy delicate

|

|

|

|

|

strokes like this gentle half-ball kiss |

in-off red into the top left pocket |

While in-offs are disastrous at |

snooker, this little shot has oem
in the 22-ball game.

There are }

|

'

many positions where
the ability

to send white squarely
slong @ cusbion rail will build a
valuable snooker. Learn this billiard
shot and your snooker will benefit.



|



checks biliousness,



LIVER SALT

|

«147



ITNESS through inner cleanliness

makes even routine tasks pleasant to
perform. A morning glass of sparkling,
effervescing Andrews settles the stomach,
| corrects acidity, tones up the liver, and
Then, to complete
your inner cleanliness, Andrews gently
and surely clears the bowels. Try it, and
you'll find you feel brighter and more
vital when you ensure regular inner
cleanliness with Andrews Liver Salt.

ANDREWS



PAGE FIVE



NO. 100

The Topic



Well this is new year morning

And 1950 too

And everybody's planning

A few great, things to do.
. . *

Last year about the same time
The pianning was the same
But after a whole “twelve-month”
There's nothing new to claim,

. . e * *

Lou said in “Bajan language”
She would contended be

But boys Jet's take a “back-look”
Before you all agree.

She called on Joe in April
For a new bungalow

One built of modern design
To rake the neighbours crow.

Of course Joe made the promise
That he would do his best
To-day Joe has the blue-prints
With nothing more nor less.

: . ¢ .

Well June, just two months later
Right in the dead of night
Lou said, Oh Joe my darling
I love Fleurescent Light
. ‘

It makes the home look

It’s helpful to the eye

And if you love vour darling

Fluerescent light you'll buy.
. . :

modern

This, Joe agreed to give her
And promised to the }

To-day the lights are abssnt
Joe said “Time flies too fast

She called again in August
For a brand new spring bed
Because the next door neighbour
Put these things in her head,

’ : .
Well this Joe gladly gave her
‘Twas a financial load
But early in September
‘Twas landed in River Road

Yes people all do promise
Especially at new year

To give without retaining

Good things and words of cheer.

But sometimes before sunset
The very new year day
The promises are vanished
Forever; we may say

Tis true of politicians

And legislators too

They promise at elections

To make this old world new.



But if they too would look back
And check things undone
They'll say as it’s the custom

Boys “politic ain't fu

But one thing we can t



Wherever we meet “a sp:

Throughout the year 1950

We shall all drink J. & R.
oth TOPIC NOT OUT

We wish all
pies and

Prosperous

the Reade
Drinker f y,& R Rum
New Ye«

sponsored by
J & R BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM

| COOLS - REFRESHES «: INVIGORATES







{

ae

1950

News

From Britain

Our Own ¢

ASTRONOMERS, and other
kinds of experts, who think the
new half century should begin in
1951 have béen shouted down by
newspaper editors,
and, the like; who are encourag-
ing us to “célebrate” the halfway
mark of this 20th century. Taking
a long viewhither and thither—
from Moscow to Hiroshima and
back again — I wonder whether
we have anything to celebrate, I
suppose that the first half of this
century will eventually be mark-
ed down in history books as two

chapters -— one headed “Henry
Ford”, and the other headed
“Joseph Stalin”. Neither of

these chapters—still imaginary—
makes very pleasant reading for
the unconverted. But I think we
have one reason for self-congrat-
ulation at the beginning of 1950.
If you read the books of predic-

tion, some novels and some
treatises, such as H. G. Wells’
“Shape of Things tc Come”, that

have been written in the last 50
years, you can start shaking your-
self by the hand at finding that
you at least exist. Dark Pessim-
ism that miechanical monsters
would get out of hand and refuse
to stop making war when their
masters tell them, have not
proved true. Perhaps, in
the world is a little wiser and a
trifle less inclined to throw itself
into quite pointless wars, than it
was in centuries past. Abandon-
ing this theme of the new half
empty century, we come down to
the prosaic, annual, and almost
trivial matter of reviewing the
past vear and trying to peer into
the present

Looking Back

Even at this short distance a
glance back at the year 1949, and
the course Britain has taken
shows some things that we did
not notice last summer. Putting
it in a sentence, the devaluation
crisis in Britain in 1949 was due
to reckless over-confidence at

home by our politicians, and a
somewhat unwarranted lack of
confidence in Britain felt by
people overseas. I remember that
it was early last year that our
political leaders were talking of

the British “recovery” being com-



plete. This mood of self-satis-
faction almost brought the Labour
Government down, in the sum-
mer, and it certainly has dam-
aged the reputation of the Gov-
ernment’s bes asset—Sir Staf-
ford Cripps. On the other hand,
Jooking back at 1949, there ig
certainly some justification in

bemoaning the extraordinary lack
of confidence in Britain that
countries all over the world are
inclined to In some respects the










crisis last summer was against
all sense and reason A glance
at a few comparisons shows that
half the countries of the world
had much more unbalanced trade,
were not paying their way by
balancing their budget and can
show no comparison with pro-
gress made here in the last three
years But they sailed through
1949 \ 10ut crisi The reason
a burst of over-confidence at
home and a wail of under-confi
dence abroad did uch dar i
that Britain extraordinavily
more sensitive than most coun
tries to international torn

Looking Forward
We cannot expect inything bet
ter than

a choppy sea in the next
few years. If the temporary and
minute recession in American
business in 1949 threw us off bal-
ance, What would a Digger storm
do? This,~ef course, brings me
to the politital problem of 1950

Old Moore's Almanac avoids pre-
dicting the date of the General
Election and is fairly cautious to-

wards the end of the year about
all political matters! I will not
try to do better than the eld lady
All I can attempt is a few cau-
tiously chose remark on the
political scene just at the
moment. First, I think we should

be glad that the extremes in
politics here Are both remarkably
weak Of the two Communists
in the House of Commons, one is
almost certain to lose his seat,
and the other, the merry and re-
doubtable William Gallagher, will
have a stiff fight. The Conserva-
tive Party has a minute “extreme
right wing” that is approximate
in political attitude with the big
“right wing” parties in many
Continental countries.» Four and
a half years in opposition has
helped the Conservative Party to
lake itself seriousty and to laugh
at its few flambuoyant “last
ditches.” The same four and a
half years have mellowed the
Labour Party into a responsible
Parliamentary reformist organi-
sation. If the election brings them
back again I would be surprised
if they «ing the Red Flag—as they
did in 1949—when taking their
Seats in the House of Commons!
Of course this fact that the two
principal parties in Britain could
be described as “centre left” and
“centre right—with precious little
room. for the Liberals—is com-
pletely obscured by the election-
eering going on at the moment
We are far too near to the general
election to be able to see what
the real issues are from reading
the « newspapers Personally

1950,§

‘orrespondent

‘hink ‘hat the
voter is much
newspaper.
Party

average British
wiser than his
He will vote for the
slightly to left of centre

broadcasters or slightly to right of centre as

he chooses. I doubt if the aver-
age voter will believe that voting
Labour means “red ruin” or the
Socialist paradise, or believe that
voting Conservative means “lettin;
the people free” or “good times
for bloated Capitalists,”
Pre Election Jitters

One of the less pleasant signs of
a coming election is increasing
Government querulousness From
the way Ministers speak you
would think they were persecuted,
Herbert Morrison thinks the law
must be altered at the earliest op-
portunity if it cannot be stretched
to seotch Mr. Cube and Sir Loin.





(Sir Loin, Campaigning at the
bu‘cher’s, has joined Mr. Cube
who defends privately refined
Sugar on the outside of every

pa" kage.) According to Lord Addi-
80, periodicals should lay off the
gro.ndnuts scheme. Sir Hartley
Sh weross is shocked at the Con-
fer vative Party claiming an inter-
est in Child Welfare. Dr. Dalton





waits to curb money lenders all
beca the Stock Exchange is
marking down the price of the
hares that bear his name This

“tone of voice should wear off when
the election rises to more racous
tones. A little angry shouting is
bette: than this peevishness.

On the other side, I think that
he campaign of Mr. Cube has
ver-reached itself. It seems that

customer cannot get his sugar
10w without a dose of political
propaganda as well, unless he de-
mands of his grocer that the sugar
be weighed and put into a new
bag Conservatives rightly com-
jlain if the Government uses pub-
lic organisations for Party pur-

poses—such as the B.B.C. and the
Central Office of Information I
think they would complain even

more if « political slogan were put

on iy, a postage stamp—particu-
larly if no stamps could be bought
without political: slogans.



POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER










The Baiance of Advantage









“\ great deal that is printed
verseas about the present state of
B ems to me to be under
e the remarkable
achiey nt « he last four years
(r on respe the material
) perity of ain very high
o-da) The fact that many peo
pl vhole classes, not the ve
rich—are very n r to-day
S wcll-known general
level of employment health, child
‘Cifare, and ever ing is in
proving steadily But the intangi
tle, unaccountable wealth of Brit
tall has certainly declined while

the present Government has been







in office. Again and again, I am
forcibly reminded that our pres

tige in the world is not what it
was Visitors from Eastern coun

tries dismiss us as an almost ban}

rupt nation. Visitors from our
colonies are loyal—but de paiing
Mr. Bevin's foreign policy in the
Middle East has lost potential
friends in what was, in 1945, re

garded as a British area In Eu

rope our wartime allies are sick
of what they call our smugness
and consider themselves let down
It is certain that when Winston
Churchill left office all the world
talked of the Big Three Now,
after five years, all they think oft
js, at the most, the “Big Two and a
Half”—-and we are the Half. The
Labour Party is inclined to claim
that good progress at home is all to
its credit and weakness abroad
was “inevilable’ The Conserva

tives reverse this, and imply that

any Government could have g
post war Britain this degree of
prosperity but another government
would have kept up Churchillian
prestige.

Predictions for the New Year

My correspondent
that the Oxford versus Cambridge
Boat Race will be won by Britain
again this year. ‘

My private eye in the film in-
dustry Suggests that it wouldn’t be
a bad thing if the British film
industry did break down in July
as Mr, Rank threatens. “Break
down” wouldgfobably mean fewer
British films, better British films
and the delight of seeing again
Some older good films in the loca!

ven

Sports says

Healthy People i
TEETH WiHeR





S.W. African Natives
Fear For Their Land

Says Rev. Michael Scott

(From Our London Correspondent)

There was

LONDON, (By Mail)

a tinge of sadness in his voice when the Rev.
Michael Seott, a former London curate and now

a mission-

ary in South Africa, told me the shocking story of how South

African natives had been robbed
- ————-+

‘ °

Short-Sighted
* .
Oil Policy?
LONDON, (By Mail)

OIL CIRCLES in London will
not comment § at present on
Britain’s devision to import no
more dollar oil next year until
surplus stocks held by British
oil companies are used up. But
the private opinion of at least
one oil company in this country
is that though this wili help in
the drive to save dollars it is
nevertheless a short-sighted pol-
icy

Rritain’s decision has already
provoked vigorous reaction in
the United States. American oil
interests over the past twelve
months have been increasingly
alarmed by the rapidity with
which British oil production and
refining tacilities have expanded,
They have also been concerned
by the prospective loss of mar-
kets for dollar oil owing to the
recent two-way trade pacts which
Britain has concluded with
Argentina and Sweden. (Under
the trade pacts Britain barters
some of her oil for’ Swedish or
Argentine products). The US.
State Department say they
appreciate that Britain is mak-
ing the present cut to save dol-

lar but they complain that it
will hit the American oil com-
panies hard,
End Speculation
Coniirmation by the British
Gvuvernment that they intend w
Unpose restricuons on the market-

iny of fuel
’
Auierican

Oll and petrol py
companies in the New
year puts an end to three days ol!

pecuwwalion on the reported oil!
cuts Which Britain was proposing
at the anglo-U.S. oil taiks um

Washington, Discussions are still
£0ing on beiween the British and
Goveraments—on the long-
probiem of the cost of dol-

US

term



4ar Oll——but the policy seems to
be settled.
Dollar oil imports constitute the
i item in British doliar ex-
venditure, The British Fuel &
“ower Ministry estimate that for
the year 1950, dollars spent on

Oi i amount to $625,000,000, of

Which $350,000,000 would go to
American oil companies selling
to Britain

As a result of increased oil
production — and the expected
compleuon of another British
reinery in the Middle East next

June—British oil companies hope
to have built up a considerable
oil surplus in 1950. British oil
importers will be asked to absorb



this surplus before buying fron
dollar source In this way th
Government expects to save 5 (
/V per cent of the net dollar “out-

I "in 1950

An official statement issued by
the Ministry of Fuel & Powei
acids, however, that the Govern-
ment j ready, to consider pro-
posals “to minimise any imi edi
ite practical difficulty to the US.
i companies,” This is one of the
Subjects now under discussion in
the Washington oil talks

Ce ienting on Britain's ne¢



the “Financial Time:

( poliey







It may be expected that

ericcn oil interests, and espec-

i e politically powerful lobby
of the independent producer
will ng a good deal of pressut
to bear in order to preserve thei

present share of the world oil

trade But the over-riding
aeration (for Britain) mus

I the conservation of our s¢ ld

id dollar reserves, and no othe r

t can be allowed to take

recedence,”

Mexieo Wants
Loan For Oil

Fro Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, (By Mail)
Antonio Caritlo Flores,
the National Financi-
ero of Mexico, recently arrived in
Washington to reopen negotiations
ith American authorities for $200
million oil development loan

Senor

Clrector of

It will be remembered _ that
Carlier this month the director
#eneral of Pemex, the Mexican
Government’s oi] monopoly, stated
that the new oilfields which ex-

plorations

were bringing ‘to light
n Mexico might enable the coun-

try’s oil production to be even-
y doubled,

To pay for its oil development

programme, the Mexican Govern-

ment approaghed the United

States on the subject of a loan,
but the American Government
were not forthcoming in this. The
present visit of Senor Flores to
Washington js presumably a fur-

ther attempt by Mexico to per-
uade the Americans to give them
a loan

For the time being the Export-

Import Bank is not showing much
enthusiasm for Senor Flores's pro-
posals

ep their




For white teeth, use the PEROXIDR
tooth paste—use Macleans every day, |

a

Bis

}



|
t

of their Jand.

He said that the natives made
up % of South Atricas population,
aod that by a policy of “whole-
sale robbery” tne white South
Africans had reduced them to
Ownership ot only 13% of the
land.

The natives of South West
Africa believed, and they had
every ground to do so, that if their
country was incorporated with
South Africa, their land would be
stolen from them also.

“This is their great fear” said
Michael Scott, “this is why they
wish to be administered by the
Trusteeship Council of the U.N.O.”

He then put the case against
S.W. Africa being incorporated in
the Union to me, as he had before
the U.N.O. at Lake Success a few

weeks before. §.W. Africa, he
said. was formerly a German
colony.

It was taken by stealth and
superior force from the original
inhabitants, and colonised by
Germans.

They took away most of the
frazing land from the natives, and,
impressed by the ease of their
conquest, they began to develop
in Africa the idea of the “Master
Race”, an idea which became the
basis of Facism.

After the first World War, S.W.



| POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER








COVENT GARDEY

SALOME







Africa

was taken away. from
(Germany and placed under the
mandate of the Union of South

Atrica by the League of Nations.

The Rev. Scott said that the
South Africans now wanted to
incorporate S.W. Africa into the
Union against the wishes of the
native inhabitants, and that they
had refused to U.N.O’s
resolutions that S.W. Africa should
° acministered by the Trustee-
hip Council

neces t

No Permission

“IT hed hoped that some of the
S.W. African Chiefs have
een able to go to Lake Success
‘to tell U.N.O. that the native
pypulation was not in favour ol
their country becoming part of
the Union, but the Malan Govern-

would



ment would not allow them to
It { t country So I had to
At the U.N.O. he -
i i that partly hi



evidence the General’



Assembiy
the





lave decided to ask Inter-
tional Court at the Hague it
outh Africa has the right to in-
orporate §.W. Africa
Michael Scott, who u ed to
preach in the shanty-town d rt
id Johannesbur knows all
about the evils of th Sout
African land policy

He told me that the policy of
king away the natives’ land had
sulted in the overstocking o1
tie native reserves, and this ‘n
turn had led to soil erosion in the
reserves, 7

Ce hsequently every year more
iid more natives were being
criven out of the reserves, to live

in the filthy shanty towns around
the big cities where they found
employment as
ks ete,

porters, butvers





Dim lighting is bad — for
for your general well-being,



BRIDGETOWN,

~ REPRESENTING THE GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. LT



with Osram, the bright, cheerful

THE CA

What I don’t like about George

is that no matter whatever the
party in power in the House of
Assembly does, he always says
it is wrong. Mark you, I don’t
mean to say that I am one of
those bigoted people who think

that any party in power is always
right. Heaven knows I would be
the last person to place myself in
the ridiculous position of admit-
ting anything so absurd; or to
admit that even, if by chance, it
did happen to do the right thing,
it could ever do it in the right
way. What I really mean to say
is, that it annoys me when George
takes it upon himself to point
out to me, me of all people, where
the Governrfient is wrong about
anything.

George’s. style of criticism
always gives me the impression
of a great hulking bully out to
chastise a worthy body of men
who, with the best intentions,
are merely treading the path that
leads to the place to which good
intentions usually lead. After all,
I have every reason to flatter my-,
self that I am perfectly capable
of rapping the knuckles of the
Government whenever they de-
serve rapping. And I must say
that when George gets on his high
horse and begins, before I can
get a word in, to abuse the Govy-~
ernment, it is enough to irritate
a saint, much less a fair-minded
person like myself. When he
begins throwing his weight about
like this, the only effect it has on
me is to cause me at once to dive
headlong into the fray on the side
of the Government. The fact that
I had come prepared te say exact-
ly what he so inadequately tries
to say, not only puts me at an
unfair disadvantage, but makes
me more determined than ever
to defend the poor ill-treated
Government from his unjust and
uncalled for attack, What I find
so irritating and object to most is,
that George, without actually
saying so, has a mean underhand
way of creating the impression
that if he was the leader of a
House composed of other men
Ike George, the House would not
only always come to right decis-
ivns, but also find the right means

cf putting those decisions into
actual practice.
Everyone knows how difficult

it is to contradict the other chap
ebout what he hasn’t actually
said in words. They can there-
fore easily understand how irri-
tating it is when George adopts
aa attitude that puts you suddenly
in the position of having to argue
ezainst what you had evevy right
to believe to be your own origi-
nal idea. One puts up with that
Sort of thing from a woman be-
cause one knows that it’s natural
for her to try and have the first
as well as the last word. But no
reasonable male of the species
could be expected to tolerate this
feminine technique being adopted
by one of his own sex.

That is why, after the tropical
disturbance, I went to the club
in the hope of meeting George
and of having an opportunity of
tel'ing him what I thought about
the neglect of the Government and |
everyone else who ought to have
done anything to prevent what |
happened or to relieve the situa- |
tion after it happened. But before
I had time to begin, in fact before
I had more than half swallowed

my preliminary drink, George |
started off ‘with: “Look, Bertie,
have you ever heard of a more

scandalous state of affairs ?”

“What affairs?” I asked warily.
haven't
neglect

“My

heard

giddy
about

aunt,
the

you

of the



ANGLING CLUB










“The only person who doesn't
tave about his catches is his
wife-—they live in a prefab.”
London Express Service








your eyes, for your nerves, ~ ~

Light up mn and smile



THE CITY GARAGE co.

BARBADOS ®

0., OF ENGLAND \





a

CARPING CRITIC |

By C.

G.

Government to remove the people
from the flooded area before it
became flooded? The lack of fore-
sight shown in allowing them to



build their houses in that danger-
ou area, The incorrect news
given out. The failure to canal-
ize *

“Bah!” I said, cutting him short.
“Canalize me foot. You're talking
through your hat. Do you know
what you people who criticise
merely for the sake of being
critical remind me of?” Then
before he could answer I told
him, “You remind me of the sort
of woman who slaps an innocent
child for having narrowly escaped
being run over by a _ careless
driver.” George gave his famous
imitation of an open-mouthed
codfish and then began, “But—
St ei”

“Bui, but, nothing,” I broke in
sharply, “the woman can’t beat
up the driver of the car so she
relieves her anxiety by beating
the wretched child; and you get
the wind up when Nature sends
us a storm and ag you can’t beat
up Nature you immediately try
to take it out of the wretched
Government.”

“Ah, I might have known you’d
take the side of this rotten Gov-
ernment,” he said losing his tem-
per and raising his voice. “Of ali
the double crossing sods I ever
met you’re about... .”

“Now, now, George,” I inter-
rupted with restrained but un-
mistakeable firmness, “You know
perfectly well I’m never on the
side of the Government when it
is in the wrong. But I’ll be hang-
ed if I let you blame them un-
fairly. And while we’re on the
subject, may I ask what you your-
self have done to help? For in-
stance, have you sent a sub to the
‘Advocate’ relief fund?”

“Well—er—not yet,” he said.
“You see, what with one thing
end another I’ve been rather busy
these last few days, Have you?”

“Have I?” I sneered, in a tone
one of the first subscribers might
have used, and then made a men-
tal note to do go that evening.

“Well”, he said, “you needn’t
look so darned noble and virtuous
about it.”

U.fortunately, when I got home
1 1orgot all about sending in my
Ccntribution; and the next morn-
ing when I saw George’s name in
the iist it was too late for me to
Go it then and so let him know
i had not done it days ago. When
hext we met, George greeted me
with: “Hullo, Bertie, I hope
youve seen that I have sent in
my sub,”

“Yes, I’ve seen

it,” I replied |

dryly. “So have lots of others who |

prcterred to do so anonymously.”

Oh quite, quite,” he said in a
nasty suggestive voice. “And no
doubt lots of others have got
credit for anonymous subs they |
never made,”

That shows you the sort of
fel'ow George is, Always tries to
insinuate non-existent faults in

cthers. Must try to have the last
werd. No wonder I get so annoyed
w..h him sometimes,



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SUNDAY, JANUARY

LS LL







l,

1950

ee
eS





ca eee

a

FOR BOY OR GIRL this cosy cardigan will fit a child of one and a half to two and a

half years.



It needs four ounces of three-ply or

Child’s Cardigan And
Jersey

Cardigan

MATERIALS
4 ounces of three-ply
3 ounces of baby wool.

wool.



| pair each of No, 9 and No. 12
neeaies.
5 medium-siz
MEASUREME

Width all round under arms
23 inches.

Length from shoulder 12
inches.

Length of undersleeve seam
10 inches ’
TENSION
One pattern (12 stitches) and 9
rows equal one inch (No. 9 nee-
dies).
ABBREVIATIONS:
K—knit; p—purl; sts—
stitches; ins—inches; tog—to-
gether; SKPO—slip one, knit
one, pass slipped stitch over;
m—make a Stitch by bringing
wool to front of work before a
knit stitch and by wrapping wool
round the needle before a purl
stitch; C4—slip two stitches on
to a spare needle in front of

work, knit 2, then knit 2 off
spare needle; Garter st—each

row knit.
BACK

Using No. 12 needles, cast on 84
sts. and work in kl, pl rib for 24
rows.

Change to No. 9 needles
pattern as. follows:

**I1st row.—K2, * p2, k4, Repeat
from * ending p2, k2.

and

2nd row.—P2 * k2, p4. Repeat
from * ending k2, p2.
$rd row.—K2, * p2, C4, p2, k4.

Repeat from * ending
”
4th row.—As 2nd row.

Repeat Ist and 2nd rows twice
more, * *

Repeat these 8 pattern rows until
werk measures 8 ins.

SHAPF ARMHOLE

Keeping in pa;tern:

Cast off 5 sts. at beginning of
next 2 rows, then k2 tog. at each
end of following 2 rows. (69 sts.).

Continue on these sts, in pat-
tern until work measures 12 ins.

SHAPE SHOULDER ,

Cast off 10 sts. at beginning ~f
rext 4 rows. Cast off remaining
Sts.

p2, C4, p2,

RIGHT FRONT

(Buttonholes this hide for Girl—
omit for Boy)

Using No
50 sts.

Ist row.—K4,
from * to end.

2nd row.—* kl, pl. Repeat from
* to within 4 sts., k4. Repeat these
2 rows, once more.

5th row.—(Make a buttonhole)
kl, k2tog., ml, kl, * kl, pl. Repeat
from * to end,

6th row.—* KI, pl. Repeat from
* to within 4 sts., k4. Repeat Ist and
2nd rows nine times more.

Change to No. 9 needles and
pattern as follows, making button-
holes, as before, at 24, 44, 64
and 83 ins.

Ist row.—-K4, * p2, k4. Repeat
from * ending p2, k2.

2nd row.—P2, * k2, p4.
from * ending k6.

12 needles, cast on

* kl, pl, Repeat

Repeat

LONDON, (By Mail).

About the only time a British
* woman does not. give away the
social group to which she belongs
is when she is stripped to a
Swim suit, according to Anne
Edwards, fashion editress on th:
London “Daily Express.”

With only a six-inch chart
Edwards to-day ruthlessly dis-
sected women into four classes
and destroyed the age-old illusion
of the “mysterious sex.”

Listing 20 personal preferences
which take a woman, Edwards
Claimed to be able to brand the

titled. rich, bohemian or subur-
hanite femme by means of the
chart,

The Honourable Miss trom

One the stately homes of England
_ a cashmere sweater,
by

suit

family tailor and crocodile
Shoes. She favours a long bod,
One string of peal pearls and
hekimental badge,
Conversation includes phrase
€ chaps” for escorts t
i vacatn
Pp
on the hai t
Silver rame and
ires Indiffere

3rd row.—
Repeat from
k2,
4th row.—As 2nd row
Repeat Ist and 2nd rows twice
more,
Repeat these 6 pattern rov
til work measures 8 ins.
SHAPE ARMHOLES
Keeping in pattern, with border:
Cast off 8 sts., at opposite edge
c border then k2tog., at same edge
each row until 36 sts. remain,
SHAPE NECK
Right side fucing:
Next row.—K4, SKPO, work in
pattern to end.

K4, p2, C4, p2, k4,
ending p2, C4, p2,

Next row.—Pattern to within
4 sts., k4.

Repeat last 2 rows until 24 sts.
remain,

Continue on these sts., until
work measures 12 ins.

SHAPE SHOULDER

Commencing at armhole edge,

cast off 10 sts., at beginning of

rext and alternate row

Continue in garter st., on 4 bor-
der sts., for 16 more rows. Cast
off

LEFT FRONT

(Buttonholes this side for Boy—
omit for Girl).

Using No. 12 needles, cast on 50
sts.

Ist row.— * K1, pl. Repeat from
* ending k4.

2nd row.—K5, * pl, kl.
from * ending pl.

Repeat these 2 rows once more.

5th row.—(Make Buttonhole): *
Kl,pl. Repeat from * to within four
sts., kl, ml, k2tog. kl.

6th row.—-K5, pl, kl.
from * ending pl.

Repeat Ist and 2nd rows nine
times more.

Change fo No. 9 needles and
pattern as follows, making button-
holes, as before, at 24, 44, 63, and
@} ins.

Ist row.—K2,
from * to end.

2nd row.—K6, * p4, k2. Repeat
from ending p2.

3rd row.—K2, * p2, c4, p2, is4.
Repeat frm to end.

4th row.—K6, * p4,
from * ending p2,

Repeat 1st and 2nd rows twice
more.

Repeat these 8 pattern row@ yn-~-
til work measures 8 ins.

SHAPE ARMHOLES
Keeping in pattern;
Commencing at opposite edge to

border, cast off 8 sts., then k2tog.
at same edge each row until 36 sts.
remain,

Repeat

Repeat

p2, k4. Repeat

k2. Repeat

SHAPE BACK

Right side facing:

Next row.—Pattern to within 6
sts., k2 tog., k4.

Next row.—K4, pattern to end.

Repeat these 2 rows until 24 sts.
remain.

Continue on these sts. until work
measures 12 ins.

SHAPE SHOULDER
As first side.
SLEEVES

Using No. 12 needles, cast on 48

ets, and work in kl, pl rib for 2 ins.

three ounces of baby wool to make.



Change to No.
work in pattern
* * to * *, increasing one st., at
each end of every 8th row until
g.eeve measures 10 ins.

SHAPE HEAD

Keeping in pattern:

9 needles and

as Back, from

K2tog. at each end of next 20
rows. Cast offi
TO MAKE UP
Join, side, shoulder and sleeve
scams. Sew in sleeves, placing

centre of head of sleeve to shoul

dear seam. Join together bands
from fronts and sew to back of
Neck. Sew on buttons to match
button-holes. Press all seams.
JERSEY
Materials: 4 ounces of three-ply
wool, or 3 ounces of baby wool.

Same needles as for Cardigan. 2
small buttons,

Measurements: As for Cardigan.

Tension: As for Cardigan.

Abbreviations: As for Cardigan.

Back: Work as Back of Cardi-
gan.

Right side facing:

Next row,—Work
pattern, turn.

Next row,—P2tog., work in pat-
tern to end.

Next row,—Pattern to within 2
sts. of division, k2tog.

Next row,—P2tog.,
end.

Repeat last 2 rows, until 20 sts.
remain.

Front: Work as Back of Cardi-
gan until armhole shaping have
been completed (68 sts.)

Continue on these sts.
work measures 104% ins.

SHAPE NECK
Continue on these sts. in pattern
until work measures 12 ins.
SHAPE SHOULDER
Commencing at neck edge:
Next rew.—P)0, turn; knit back.
Next rew,—k10, p10.

31. sts. in

pattern to

until

Next row,—Cast off 10 sts., k3,
k2tog., ml, k5.

Cast off knitwise.

Return to remaining sts., slip

first 6 sts. on to a safety pin, work
in pattern to end,

Next row,—Pattern to within 2
sts., p2tog.

Next row,—K2tog.,
end.

Repeat last 2 rows until 20 sts.
remain,

Continue on these sts. until work
measures 12 ins.

Commencing at armhole edge,
east off 10 sts. at beginning of next
and alterns*e row.

wxCK BAND ;

Join Right shoulder seam. With
right side facing and commencing
at Left front shoulder, rejoin wool
and, using No. !2 needles, pick up
and knit 26 sts. to sts. on safety
pin; work in ki, pl, rib across
these sts.; pick up and knit 26 sts,
to right shoulder and finally work
in kl., pl rib across 28 sts. of Back.
(86 sts.) .

Work 3 rows in rib.

Next row,—Rib 3, ml, k2tog,., rib
to end. oy

Next row,—Rib. Cast off loosely

in rib.

pattern to

SLEEVES

Work as Cardigan Sleeves.

buttonholes. Press all seams.
TO MAKE UP

Join together 10 cast off sts. of
Left shoulder. Join side and sleeve
seams. Sew in sleeves, placing
centre oi head of sleeve to shoulder
seams, Sew on buttons to match
buttonholes. Press all seams.

Eee ne

Women Know Yourselves

Spring Fashion Preview

:f a good time is a “houseparty”’
and she likes to drink champagne.

Won't Marry
She refuses to marry anyone
from the other groups and her
children will be Charles and
Sarah.
Her “To stay as

aim is life?

she is.”

Littie Miss Rich has a luxury
appartment with girl friend; pre-
fers a shortcut with two-string
earl choker; refers to “the man
for escort: “Riviera” for vacation
and “the end” for criticism.

Clotnes are black suit, little
vith feather and suede shoes.
Photographs are usually a close-

of the head by a theatrical

‘notographer white leather frame,
slack dress and pearls. She is

,tevested” in foreign politics.

Her notepaper 1s embossed «ud

she likes ballet and the theatre.
Martini is the drink
Rolling stones are out as hus-









ands and besus from Society
ellectual group preferred
istopher and Pat will be 1
That Wee etc
peasant biouses, CiOan
noes; wears i Ya
g, stiaight or Edwardian st)
Jeweller includes amber,
ade neck! with
ilver clasps. Likes readi

calls her escort “a very dea
friend” and takes a vacation in
“olde world cottages” in the
puntry.

A Soul Mate

re

To criticize she uses “abysmal”
and lives at the old miil” with
a soul mate. She prefers a bust
of herself made by a friend and
is absorbed in politics.

Notepaper is handwritten 1
coloured ink and she likes old
French and German movies. She
refuses to marry “steady” types
and rer children will be Torquil

nd Melissa. Her aim in life 1s
“recognition,” and she drinks
‘snteresting litte wines.”

fives In a semi-
detached house “the Larches
with her family; wears brown
herringbone suits and hand-knit
jumpers. Skirts are shorter and
pearls artificial. Her escort is the
“boy friend” and she likes the
Coney Island vacation. ‘
Her idea of a good time is an
American movie and she drinks
gin and lime. She uses the local
photographer and wears 4 brides-
maid’s dress for the cecasion. Un-
steady types are ruled out a
husbands and the children will be
yrol-Anne and David.

Miss Suburb



Her aim in life is a “home
i
tress Edwards doe |
ex} why all four ec
ceording to her chart, unanimous-

cotton dresses a
vacation wear

LD

cnoose

ns for
far OY



SUNDAY

—.

Spring Fashion
Pre-view



MATERIALS “include lots of
gaberdines There are also
printed pure silks for frocks and
a fascinating spotted. silk shan-

tung, which washes well, but has
a pleasing stiff look Utility
whipcords seem to have killed
the demand for this material in
the model range.

Other materials: Reversible
spot cottons, patterned sea island
cotton, Swis Broderie Anglaise
and dark West African printed
cotton and rainproof cotton. A
pleasing contrast is a tie silk
tunie jacket combined with a
barathea skirt.

Poison Ivy Green

COLOURS include all shades of
brown and grey, soft lime
green, mauve pink, a_ brighter
clear green called Poison Ivy,
net in pastel shaded colourings
over a black silk evening ba'let
skirt soft water blues and all
shades of yellow from citron to
deep mustard gold.

Tandon Fernrese Service



3s
«* oe

GAKISTMAS and the

brating the year’s end and the arrival of 1950





ADVOCATE

Rupert a



bag a ot the
aight Mes. : brings bus
breakfast in bed, oats tee sits
by tim. * That Mare’s Nest was

the most “on See

Mr. Bear. that
I'm not sure that we were not
drearmng last -— or whether we
ceally saw it, ['m going by days

Figure It Ouse

THE slope of a long hill is the
same all the way. A bus runs haif-
way up and back again in 10
minutes’ running time. But it takes
'2 minutes to run from bottom t
top. Then in what time should t
run from top to bottom?

“saqgnupur anoy ur uMop
Ue SaPWUPU XIS UT dn AwM-srey
“Ly “SA NTL LURIT swomnied

ey




Aw.

Â¥
&
W YKAK are the same the

in Australia.

How Good A Deteetive
Are You?

MAJOR DOEXX was off duty
and off airborne division’s training
centre when it happened, so his
death was a case for civil author-
ities,

His wife’s telephone call brought
County Detective 3rown 4nd
Deputy Sheriff Jones to the bunga-
low at Oceanside, 25 miles from
the military reservation.

Mrs, Doexx, amid spasms
grief, told the officers;

“We lived here together until
last month. We had a quarrel, He
was jealous of every man I ever
talked to, I went home to my
mother. He called me many times,
begging me to return. This even-
ing, when he phoned me, he said
he’d commit suicide if I didn’t
come and talk to him.

ol

“When I got here, he begged me
not to get a divorce and to live
with him again. When I refused
he got a rifle out of the closet and
said he’d kill himself, I told hin
he was just being dramatic He
said, ‘Oh, you think so!’ then put
the muzzle to his head and placec
the toe of his boot on the trigge
There was an explosion. I fainted.
When I came to, I found he was
dead.”

Detective Brown stared at mud
on the Major’s heavy army boots
and went out to pick up the phone
and. get the operator, Then he
asked Deputy Jones to join him
outside. “Two things make me
think this was murder,” he told
Jones.

“Ts ene of them her having
blood on her dress?” Jones asked.

“She’d naturally take hold of
him to see if he was dead. No, it

was something else.”
One of the things which made

him suspicious is plainly stated
above. The other was the result

IL,






* Hermione’ by Clarks
Available at leading shee shops

With several widths to every size

choice of women who demand that Fashion fits them well.

of his phone call. Can you detec.
one and guess the other?

‘wry JOYS peYy “BHuryyrey ‘p
sur} dn yo ed oO} puRgsHy 104 OF
4ad 0} pata} ays Apueseddy eo
peut pkey Xxe0q “Sa JEU} Puno; U\oIg

DATPAJA ‘SPsodar S10} B1adO aoUBysIp Nuc

ayy WA Suryoeyo Aq ynq tsewity ru
12y paleo py pewyelo 8YysS pres oy
se ‘agit Oy2 JO PABNS sAVAA A) [[euIs oY
DPISU, 19BSTI} ey, UO }OOG B YONS JO a0}
ay} pedetd saey },UpfRoo aH s00q AULIV
SAvay a1OmM Xxe0q JOreW LOFNLOS



r -"

Tongue Tester
WITH “apt alliteration’s artfu
aid,” the following provides
double test. First, see if
read it through rapidly alou
without tripping your tongue
Second, see if you can memorize
it. You'll pever have to wonder
what letter the next word starts
with.

Sudden swallows
ming,
Sunset’s slowly spreacing shade
Silvery songsters sweetly singing,
Summer’s soothing serenade.

you ca

suiftly skim-

Susan Simpson. strolled sedately,
stifling sobs, suppressing sighs.

Seeing Siephen Slocum, stately
She stopped, showing some sur-

prise,

“Say,” said Stephen, “sweetest
sigher;

Say shall Stephen spouseless
stay?”

Susan seeming somewhct shyer,
Showed submissiveness straight-
way.

Summer’s season slowly stretches,
Susan Simpson Slocum she—
So she signed some _ simple

sketches—
Soul sought soul successfully.

Six Septembers Susan swelters!
Six sharp seasons snow supplies;
Susan's satin sofa shelters
Six small Slocums side by side.



THE SHOES WITH THE FULL CHOICE P' ‘DTH

FASHION-FIT PERFECTION

* Clarks

, Skyline shoes ave the inevitable

They

are styled with impeccable yrace by Clarks, famous the world over

ior fine quality footwear.

LOCAL AGENTS {LEC Rt

0 BARBADOS

oe

Nest—44

ro

Find The Number

THERE is a certain number
with four even digits. The first

two digits compose a number one-

half

by
twe

of the number represented
the last two digits. The middle
» digits when added equai the

last, the second digit is twice the
first, and the third is half the last

dig

worid over,





Birthday Greetings

it. What is the number?
VUST® INOT INOZ OMB ST 2 uonnyosg

< At 65666666 SO
FE ELOCE ECP FSS SS SAE AGO OS SS EFF

OPO SO SOF SS SPOS PFS EPPA PFI FFP PPADS

4

hese chuaren were cele-

OO et byb Ab tryb bb bbb bff 6A ID







HAPPY BIRTHDAY to Phyl!
Archer and Mary Brathwaite whc
elebrate their Birthdays thi
week,

New Member

ANTONIA SEALY

1¢
.
‘ae
Letter Enigma {5
. %
. wr >

WITHOUT my 1, 5, 7, I am al&
garment R

Without my 2, 4, 5,7, I ama %
poet. x

Without .my 1, 4, 7, I am a %
charactex ?

7” s

Without my 4, 5, T am a poetic] &
reface *

Without my 5, 7, I am an in- %
quiry *

With my oe a BS Bae
am a difficult matte 1%

es
qoid ‘weord $
Wq ‘AGO Ruroq ‘asinoo jo 19uiK >
weqoid st prom 4 Us WNPOS ‘OS
is







PAGE SEVEN



SMOKERS CAN SMILE..

You can light up without fear
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use Nicota, the toothpaste that
lights up your smile. Nicota,
with ics clean, fresh flavour,
offsets unsightly nicotine stain,
yet contains no harmful abra~
sive. Nicota keeps your teeth
really white from morning to
night. Get a tube today,

wy







a



[ee oeee en | MAKERS
PE aan t3 3. eo

CL Say Seat ee Eee



NICOTA
SMOKERS’ TOOTHPASTE
whifens your teeth—



“a

brightens your
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NOTICE.

Our Custom
are asked
from Tuescc

our Broad S|

closed for Lu

and Friends
note that as
3rd January
will be

t Store

h from 12 noon

to lp.m. instead of from
ram. © 2 sae oe a
present.

CENTRAL

FOUNDRY

LD
4 °














the \NIIEl



aq MAW,

ey

7 WEIR



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TURKEY 14—16}bs ‘ th
. s PINEAPPLE < om
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Published by The Advocate Co. Ltd., 34, Broad St., Bridgetown

Sunday, January 1, 1950

The New Year

TO-DAY is the day set apart for the
making of good resolutions, and even
though some of the resolutions are doomed
to be broken before the holiday season
ends yet the practice cannot, on this
account, be condemned out of hand. It
is a season of stock-takng, and at least
the fact that an individual has pondered
over his short-comings and has decided to
turn over a new leaf in the coming year is a
sign that he is conscious of his faults and is
entitled to an entry on the credit side in
the final record.

So, also is it a time for Governments and
Legislatures to take stock and to plan ior
the future. Here in Barbados there is ur-
gent need for good resolutions and the pre-
paration of a planned programme for the
coming year. Action must take the place
of a surfeit of aimless words; unending
debates on technical details must give way
to practical measures; and a definite
attempt must be made to bring home to
one and all the necessity to settle essentials
before such delectable pastimes .as “Back
to Africa”, “Christmas Bonus for Civil Ser-
vants”, “Raincoats for Writ Servers” or
“Nylons for Nurses” can be thoroughly en-
joyed. Above all the Legislature must
guard against a failing that is all too preva-
lent in the present Labour Government‘and
the present Legislature. While everyone
expects Legislators to be cautious yet tim-
idity can be carried to excess and has in the
past cost this island dearly.

Almost one hundred years ago Bridge-
town was on the verge of having a deep
water harbour. The plans and specifica-
tions were prepared, the Legislature de-
bated the project at length, but nothing
materialised. That plan remains in the
archives of the Secretariat. Since then
several other deep water harbour plans
have been prepared at great expense and
have suffered a similar fate. The public is
beginning to wonder whether the latest
plan prepared by the same firm of United
Kingdom Engineers who submitted the
original plan, almost a century ago, is to
suffer the same fate, or whether the pres-
ent Government will decide at this season
to put their fortunes to the test on this occa-
sion. Nothing has been left to chance.
Everything that could be done to determine
whether the project is a practical proposi-
tion, and whether it is likely to be an
economic success has been done. Blue-
prints have been made; estimates for two
alternative sites have been prepared; and
an official from the Port-of-London Author-
ity as examined the economic factor. The
public had hopes of definite action in the
near future but, instead, there has been a



curious silence while the Legislature has
turned its attention to the intricate problem
of how best to safeguard the Writ Server
from contracting pleurisy, pneumonia or
rheumatism.

The deep water harbour is by no means
the only project left in the air, Oil explora-
tion is awaiting the go-ahead signal.
Favourable geological reports have renew-
ed interest in oil development in Barbados.
It is believed that oil may be present in
paying quantities at depths of nine thous-
and feet, and the British Union Oil Com-
pany in co-operation with Trinidad Lease-
holds and the Central Mining and Invest-
ment Corporation Limited, is anxious to
put the theory to the test by sinking deep
wells, They are awaiting the passing of
the Oil Bill which was amended by the Leg-
islative Council and is now before the
Assembly. Discovery of oil in paying quan-
tities may revolutionise the whole ecom-
omy of the island and it is for this reason
that the entire community is keenly inter-
ested in the result of the borings which
will begin as soon as the Assembly decides
to pass the amended Bill.

The public is no less concerned about the
future of the pottery industry, A ceramic
expert has been to this island. He has test-
ed the clays of Barbados. He is satisfied
that they are suitable for pottery manufac-
ture, He has manufactured pottery success-

fully in a pilot plant using natural gas as

OUR READERS SAY:



West Indies Must Be

To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR, The West Inides have
made two discoveries in recent
days. From the U.K. - W.I.

Sugar talks we find that (1) all
that’s Sugar is not sweet; and from

Colonial

ber we find (2) that West Indians’
ole desire is to have. the Mother
‘ountry’s dole to us changed from
that of direct and given in the
form of guaranteed high prices
for our agricultura] products.
The last finding must be feared,
for though ‘only evhereal, it may
reate a false impression in Eny-
and as to our craving. Until we
ave succeeded in encouraging
and erecting industries
would give to us bargaining
strength; until these islands be-
come agriculturally zoned and
ease to produce an abundance
of one thing with no competitive
strength, they will.aiways remain
‘ badly managed British infirma y

reaches,

Marshal]

stand on their
are probably

$$$ TS SSS one EE seenesne

outcome of the present attivity.
have become despondent. They have reach-
cd a stage when they just can’t conceive of
a clearcut decision being taken by the
Covernment or any Committee or Board.
eppointed by the Government.
remember the strange excuses that can be
put forward when it is intended to flout

€

improve the
furthering our natural secondary industry
~tournm. For they know that the welfare
of the community and the improvement of
social and cultural amenities go hand in
hand with economic prosperity.

pendence which cannot be stable for the
/y way of yearly grants and ten
ear preferences with restrictions
to trade with our donor. Let the
Developmeny
tion do some sensible spending
your Editorial of the 30th Decem- jn the West Indies and stop hang-
ing bread on a cord out of our
Let England make us
a credit of half dozen ships. Let
the British Government apply for
a loan and grant from the US.A.,
Aid Fund for us and
stop their own grants.

Your editorial stated inter alia:
“The real difference between the
two policies (meaning American
which and British) seems to be that after
the period of tutelage, the West
Indies people will be expected to

own fee.”
right,
there is too inuca artificiality and
theory attached to this tutelage.





the fuel for the ovens. The Government has
been assured that there are adequate sup-
plies of this cheap fuel to last for many
years and that attractive pottery, which
will find an easy saleable market, can be
manufactured in this island. Yet, the Gov-
ernment holds back. No plan for exploit-
ing the clay anc the
extensive scale has yet materialised and

natural gas on an

there seems every likelihood that the old

potter’s wheel at Chalky Mount will con-
tinue to reign supreme.

The same indecision and uncertainty is

in evidence in dealing with health matters.
Plans and counter-plans have been pre-
pared for a new hospital and discarded.
Sites are suggested and purchased and then
at the eleventh hour some imaginary flaw

is discovered and new sites are obtained

only to suffer the same fate. After circling
the island the industrious explorers for a
site for a new hospital have come to roost
on the old site in Jemmott's Lane and at the
present moment the Advisory Committee
are as busy as a hive of bees examining
plans for remodelling the hospital to meet
present needs.

Frankly the public has little faith in the

They

They still

cir wishes. They remember the mys-

t:rious caves which honeycombed Erdis-
tcn when parents and public were urging
Government to transfer Queen’s College to
Pdiston but which just as mysteriously dis-
‘ gpeared ten years later when the same site
was selected for the Teachers’ Training
College. Erdiston, they remember was sup-
posed to be unsuitable because it possessed
too many acres for a girls’ school of 300
pupils but not too many for a Training Col-
lege of 30 teachers

The public is up to all the tricks and

dodges; they are no longer willing to stom-
ach many more excuses. They want action.
They want to see all these projects accom-
plished, and they want to see the Govern-

int lose no time in making every effort to
economy of the island by

This is the season to turn over a new

leaf; for it is only by action that the com-
munity can be assured of a
Prosperous 1950.

Happy and

30 Years After’:

IT HAS taken fifty years for West Indies Cricket

to gain in England recognition only second to that
accorded to Australia. In the summer of 1900, a

year when W. G, Grace was still active in the

field and those giants of the game J. Tunnicliffe
ha ake

Taylor, R. E. Foster, G. H. Hirst and S,
Haigh were selected by Wisden's Almanack as

the five cricketers of the year, when Ranji and

Fry were pre-eminent with the bat and Lord
Hawke was still leading Yorkshire to victory, an

experimental West Indian Team, under the cap-
taincy of the late Aucher Warner, toured Englanc,

The team succeeded better than was expected,

and allowing that they were treated with ex-
treme consideration by the counties their record

of five wins, eight defeats and four draws was
highly ereditable. But in spite of this the matches
were not counted as first class.

Even in those far off days it was two fast bowl-

ers, Burton and Woods—the former having the
distinction of dismissing W.G. on two occasions—

who put the West Indies on the map and laid the
foundations for the spectacu!ar performance of
Francis, John and Constantine twenty-three years
years later at Scarborough when they almost
vanquished the flower of England's stalwarts.
This year in England, the West Indies will
undergo their severest test. They will be called

upon to show that they have overcome all the

faults of fifty years ago when bad judgment in
running between the wickets, alternate brilliance

and slip-shod fielding, and unaccountable!batting

collapses were severe handicaps. They have had
four further experiences of cricket in England
but they are yet to win a test match in the mother

country. On West Indian wickets they can hold

their own with any team, but their position in a
classification table of the cricketing countries
will depend on their ability this summer to adapt
themselves to English conditions. West Indians are
confident that the team—now in the process of
selection—led by John Goddard will be able to
demonstrate conclusively that they have learnt
their lesson and can meet England on English
wickets on even terms,



Virgin Islands of the
United States.” Only your leader
writer would say this — although
p obably not in agreement -— for
America is also aiming to have
those islands self-supporting, but
while and during this process the
people are enabled, with healthy
aids, to live as human beings, Who
can deny the fact that Englar.d
is spoon feeding us — and for ‘ll
the years with an unsweetened
gruel? Who can deny that had
England in her prosperity em-
barked on programmes for her
“olonial peoples with any slight
similarity to those which Am-
erica is pushing that we — West
Indians — would have been the
helpless people we are now?
Many people seem to think
You that the £15,000,000 the West Indies
find are wo receive—of which a part
has already been spent—is respon-
sible for the slight improvement

Corpora-

but 1

Geod training in spending, dress- -» our standard of livi Thi

, ms : ‘ . s r sta ng. This

ae a a few abie-bodied jng. eating, housing ete., but with ‘< 2 false belief. It took a war

‘ rugglers. nothing to make this training real raise our standard of living,

. . we 9 to enjoy the politica!- Your le der went on “It is no stly at the expense of America
ndependence tonic which is be- ogress to expect generou ish- ‘ } yar has act

Sone tee ger darsen oe pect @ ous dish 14 now that war has reached

us first have economic inde-

ings out from Uncle Sam's pocket,
which appears to be the

alf time and the Americans are
prospect all home again our way of living

esa iy

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

a nr ee rn cea ms em



“CHRISTMAS is not like it was when I was you ng—we had real tin hats, parties down the shelter,
lovely boxes of anti-gas ointment to put on the soles of Auntie Aggie’s shoes. . .”
—London E-vpress Service





Sitting on the Fence BY THE

By Nathaniel Gubbins

OW do you like the room?

It ain’t bad, Did you say
in the advertisement you was
‘slightly deaf?

No. Left.

What do you mean? Left anded?

No, Faat left.

Left of what?

Left of right. Politically left.

Do you mean you’re a Bolshie?
o + WO INGE CMRID, 0. oe ee et 3k

My wife won’t live in the same
ouse with a Bolshie.

I'm a right-wing: Socialist.

First you say you’re left. Then
you say you’re right. Which is it?

Well, I’m right of left.

O. So yow’re right of left, are
you?

Yes. And left of right.

And you’re left of right, too?

"ERS WES io. , asdttuny sao, Gdce

Are you trying to be funny? .

No. Why?

When I said you're left of right,
you said that’s right. What do you
think we are? A couple of cross-
talk comedians?

No. I was only trying to say
it is right that I am left of right.
It is also right that I am right of
left.

If you're not trying to be funny,
ue you know what I think you fy)
are?

No,

You're balmy.

I beg your pardon?

Balmy, screwey, loopy,
crackers, Goced-night.

In an action for the recovery of
stolen sheep, before the Glouces-
ter Assizes, a farmer’s statement
read: “I recognised my two sheep
from the expression on their
faces.”

MIRABELLE has melting eyes,
Clarabelle looks bolder;
Mirabelle she frets and sighs,
Clarabelle is colder;
Mirabelle, my Mirabelle,
Daintily she nibbles,
Clarabelle, old Clarabelle,
Chews the cud and dribbles.

jection.

chair,
heated

tions.

his knee.

nuts,

mas?”

man.
lessons

Mirabelle has tiny ears,
A little nose bewitching,
With Clarabelle’s advancing years
Hers is always twitching;
Mirabelle, my Mirabelle,
Prettily she passes,
Chagenelie, old Clarabelle,
Waddles through the grasses.

assault.”

clever.

Mirabelle has lively ways,
Mirabelle is gayer;
Clarabelle’s seen better days,
Clara’s wool is greyer;
Mirabelle will pick and choose,
Clarabelle’s a glutton.
Mirabelle is tender lamb,
Clarabelle is mutton,

SOME say Good Old Joe Stalin.
Some say different.

But whatever opinion is held of
him, few will be happy to hear
that his birthday gift from Rus-
sian scientists is the injection of
a serum which will make him live
“almost for ever,”

A man can become a bit of a
bore after the first 200 years,
even if, like Uncle Joe, he doesn’t
talk much.

But suppose they give it to
Vyshinsky, the greatest bore in
the world since Hitler died?

children?”

man,

a reaction.

is not far from what it was in
1935.

vain can spoon feed us like Ameri- theft

islands become _ self-supporting

she Nas so long used. Let us have

which

rrica do so, but not the U.N.O. motor ve

LV.B,

Protection on ihe Roads
To The Editor, The Advocate

and as lon,
ciency

SIR,—The t of a case in
which a M sentence of
twelve months’ ‘imprisonment

was confirmed by the Judges of
the Assistant Court of Appeal
on Friday shows that there is
need for caution and restriction
in the use of motor vehicles in
this island.

Two men were sentenced for Traffic
the larceny of a sheep and. the
car confiscated. I do not eithe
by statement or implicatior
accuse the owner of the car of have not
being concerned in this deal. His the law.
car might have been innocently their
congo but in the end he is the upon
oser.

daily



For hundreds of years Vyshin-
sky may go on talking nonsense,
hurling abuse at imaginary ene-
mies, and being in a perpetual
state of fury about nothing.

He has already called Sir Hart-
ley Shawcross a boa constrictor.
Others, who have been unable to
agree to whatever Vyshinsky is
talking about, have been called
cannibals, crocodiles, cockroaches,
and serpents.

Maybe they look like that to
him after a few vodkas.
case, as this is the season of good
will, it would be kinder to put
him out of his misery with an-
other kind of injection.

Regarding another kind of in-
Uncle Joe had better
watch out. You never know with
these Russians.

It is Christmas week in the
-An old man sits
in his atomically heated arm-~
wearing his
slippers.
crowd round him, asking ques-

year 1980.
The

“Tell us more about the awful
1950's,” they ask, climbing on to

“Well”, says the old man, “apart
from rationing and taxes, the aw-
1950’s will be remembered
mainly for the awful children the
period produced.”

“How awful?” asked the chil-
dren, “Putting their tongues out
at people?”

“Much worse than that,” says
“A humanitarian
Government was in power then.
They were mostly sincere men
and women with a hard child--
hood behind
wanted the children of their gen-
eration to have a softer time.

“With all the sweets they want
ed and full stockings at Christ-

tne old man.

them. So

“Worse than that,” says the old
“If they wouldn’t do their

they weren’t
They were sent to a doctor.
schoolmaster hit one for being a
little beast he was summoned for

“Hooray!” shout the children.

“If they did something serious
they were tried at a children’s
court, where they were
think they had done symething
The result was anarchy?
“What’s anarchy?” asked the

“Doing what you. like without
considering others,” says the old
“The humanitarians, who
had acquired character through
early hardship, denied it to the
children of their generation. So,
when the children grew up, they
either became criminals or idle
good-for-nothings,”

“What hapr ned then?”
In the middle 1960’s there was
Children were treat-
ed harder than they were ever
treated before. But we, at least,
produced some real men.
ing our great Leader of to-day.
“The one who had all
criminals painlessly destroyed?”
Do I hear carols?
How beautifully they sing. In
the 1950's they squeaked a few
bars out of tune with their fin-

“The same.

The point I would like to make third party insurance in
ee two men each of
It is not now expected that Bri- had previous convictions

is not now expes could with such
ca but she can see to it that our secure the vehicle used to con-
vey the sheep from the country
nd stop the trade racket whict. districts to the City.
here fis an aspect of
our economic freedom and if Brit- â„¢atter which I think deserves Commissioner
ain cannot give it, then let Am- careful study, It is the ease with vince the
le can get the use of should be
cles today.
from any country can come
g a 7 show profi-
in e ndling of a from the side
motor vehicle or show some sort a ce
of license they can drive a car
at any time any place in this
island. This practice Opens itselt
grave dangers, Within recent
months many of the accidents in
this island (and there have been
well over five hundred in 1949)
have had self driven hired cars
implicated. The figures from the
Department of the Police It
would be interesting. It ;
} to road users against people wh:

always
People who use cars in

to pay high prices for them
and as there ig no compulsory

WAY

By Beachcomber

THE proposal to call the World
Economic and Cultural Union



-

SAFO SEPP OS PS OS SS SSOSF



Oteosabofaticazuxiterobolpineduli-
xigelorogentosatulegrikelofibuled+
orimotogol has now been aban-
doned,

AS Dingi-Poos and Egham were
being driven towards the moun-
tains by a taciturn chaffeur named
Dhurti, the wily adventuress said
suddenly: “Qh, by the way, you
might like to see our famous fish-
warehouse. Perhaps it is a bit un-
fair to take them by surprise, but
we're so near that it’s hardly worth
while ringing up.” Egham readily
assented, saying to himself: “If
we arrive like this, without any-
body expecting us, it will prove
that they’ve nothing to hide.” He
looked about him at the peaceful
country scene. Yokels with tow-
coloured hair touched their fore-
locks as the car went by. Droves
of Yaks reposed in shady ditches.
Once they passed an armed police
official, whom a number of yokels
were evidently trying to push
under a culvert. “It’s so peace-
ful here,” said Dingi-Poos, “that
the farm-folk won’t stand for any
police supervision.” Egham was
feeling sentimental. But as his
arm stole round the waist of his
seductive companion Dhurtj turn-
ed in the driver’s seat, and gave
him a look that made him recall
the old saying; “Not in front of
the servants.”

The Ministry of Food still
seems to think that if you pro-
duce a White-paper full of rub-
bish about calories, calcium,
grammes of protein, and all the
other chemical jargon, you will
persuade people that they are
having a grand time, With what
triumph will it be anneunced one
day that more riboflavin is being
intaken per unit of personnel per
working man-hour-day than
before the war. If ever we can
eat what we want again, let us
always remember that, without
the guidance of a Ministry, we
are probably doing ourselves out
of 14 milligrammes of carbohy-
drates per week,

Hitting the Target
The judge held that it is not
part of a barmaid’s job to throw

beer in customers’ faces to restore
orver in the bar.

(Morning . paper.)

In which

atomically
children

they

smacked.
Ifa

made to

in the inn at Ledbury, whose ‘iim
was so unerring that she could
throw the contents of a glass of
beer clean down the throat of a
man standing eight feet away?
That stopped him talking, and so
restored order. Years ago in the
— — in Fleet-street they used to
keep a special inferior beer for

port when Oxford was Oxford,
ee

gers on the door bell. If you
didn’t give them money they
threw bottles through your win-
dow.”

“What happened to them?”

“When they grew up they were
painlessly destroyed by the great
Leader.”

—London Express Service,

Includ-

the





Made Economically Self-Supporting

Barba
( the need for this protectioi
for is all the more necessary.

ease SAFETY FIRST.

Health Habits

To The Editor, The Advocate
sIR— It has taken a new
of Police to con
orm that more car¢
I aken in the prepara-
tion and handling of Sood ton
ere sale. The first step in this direc-
tion is the removal of hawkers
of gutters.

Let me add that this practice
has been going on for years and
nobody seemed to have taken any
notice of it. There is another as.
pect of this question which
should lead the Chief Medica
Officer to enforce the regulations
which call for health certificates

whom dos,

this

Strangers





sale. |

1S Within my knowledg
time that a woman who sold puddi,
and souse buried one child
then another of +t iberculosis a
complied with then fate topped the |
h prea
when she too suecumbed to the |
are called dread disease, I< this sufficient |
warning?
HEALTH, '

But, stay! How about that girl | 3

from people who handle food for | &

s

a eter tearing me





cates



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throwing about, like the Wadham =

NGG NG NGG NG NG NN NG NN NG NN BN NSN GA

cd
=

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ae



MOM

to thank

i

We should like
. patronage during 1949 and

wish them a

1950.





JAMAICA TOMATO JUICE—per tin

TROUT HALL ORANGE JUICE—per tin .......

ROMAY’S GINGER BAKE BISCUITS—per tin .,,
ROMAY’S HONEY BAKE BISCUITS—per tin...
ROMAY’S PARMESTIKS BAKE BISCUITS—per

LITTLEMOON SCOTCH WHISKY—per bot.

LOCAL GUAVA JELLY—per bot. ........... owike

“COCKADE" FINE RUM

+

Customers and Friends for thep

Happy and Lrosperous F

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTW., Successors tp

C.S. PITCHER & CO,

Phones: 4472 & 4687

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Our Entire Organization

JOINS IN A WHOLE-HEARTED







WISH FOR YOUR HAPPY
HOLIDAY’ AND MAY YOUR .
EVERY DREAM BE REALISED .
IN THE |
New Wear ~
’ ae

DACOSTA & CO. LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT.

© NIRS GIN NIN IN SIN DK DK DK OK ON OH BN OE A NE

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POCO

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WE WISH ALL



AND REMEMBER y OUR
TRIP WILL BRE MOST
ENJOYABLE WITH A
REGULAR SUPPLY Or

eee ens

GODDARD'S cow sea RUM

*oeooosoooososoosestososousceceoenseneeIeooe





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SUNDAY, JANUARY 1,

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¢



It has been towed in and out of
the Careenage, it has been shifted
to various parts of Carlisle Bay
and now it lies on the west coast
just off the Mental Hospital and
has been left grounded there.

One of the few remaining three-
masted schooners that carried
Nova Scotia’s flag and merchand-
ise across the sea since the early
nineteenth century, the Frederick
P. Elkin was one of the victims of
the modern iron and steam age.

Fined: Puton Bond

Two fines were imposed on
Elouise Rock of Bush Hall Cross
Road yesterday by His Worship
Mr. H. A. Talma.

The first fine 10/- in 14 days or
in default 14 days’ imprisonment
was for throwing stones across
Bush Hall Cross Road and the
second, 30/- in 14 Gays or one

‘month’s imprisonment for assault-
ing Gwendolyn Grandison on
December 31.

She was also put on a bond with
Darnley Rock for three months in
the sum of £1 for resisting Island
Constable Bennett on Bush Hall
Cross Road while in the execution
of his duty

The Frosty Tide
Is Here

“VILLAGERS all this frosty
tide’—a piece which has_ been
chosen for the test piece of the
Choir competition on Monday at
Kensington Oval stand—is_ in-
cluded in the first programme of
» the Police Band for the New Year

at Queen’s Park beginning at 4,45
> p.m. to-day.
ee The Programme: —

2 Processional March—

THE STATE TRUMPETERS
Symphonic Excerpt—

Ist MOVEMENT UNFINISHED

Sehubert

Barsotti

Ballet Selection
La BOUTIQUE FANTASQUE
~~ Rossini-Respighi
The music of this work was amongst
the unpublished MSS of Rossini, be-
ing probably rejected by the pub
lishers of his period. It was discoy-
ered lately and adapted by Otto
Respighi for the use of Russian Ballet
Sacred Song ( By request)
NAZARETH . Charles Gounod
(Solo Euphonium; Bandsman L. Murreii
CAROLS
“From the Eastern Mountains”
“Villagers all this Frosty Tide”
Two Messiah Choruses-

+ AMEN CHORUS ...... G. F. Handel
Grand Mareh—CLEOPATRA
| -Mancine'li
EYMNS—. re

“I Vow to thee my Country”
tune Thaxed

“The Lord is my Shepherd”
—~twue Crimond

GOD SAVE THE KING

IN PORT: Yawl Potick, Sch, Lindsyd
Il, Sch. Princess Louise, Yacht Beegie,
Sch. Adalina, Sch. Manuata, Sch. Philip
H, Davidson, Yacht Maya, M.V. Daer-

Wood, Yawl Stortebecker, Sch. Sunshinc
R., Sch. Mary M. Lewis. Sch _Alexan-
drina R., Sch. Frances W Smith, M,V.

Cable and Wireless (W.1I.) Lid., advise
they can now communicate with the
following ships at sea thraugh their Bar-
bados Coast Station;—
8.S. Veronico, S.S. Philosopher, S.S.
Silversandal,

s.s. Katherine, S58.
mavia, S$.S, Hurworth, S.S.
Megna, S.S. Peter Jebsen, 8.S. Prins-

bernhard, S.S. Elona, S.S. Runa, $.S

ARRIVALS by B.W.I.A L

From TRINIDAD...

Michael Ramdin, Timothy
Dorothy Morris, Arthur Morris, Olive
Gittens, Lillian Sealy Edmunc, Boon
Lily Boon, Alvaro Lopez, Mari. Busta-
Marte, Alfredo Bustamante, Errol Mar
Shall, Gwendolyn Coxe, Lloyd Coxe,
Hugh Coxe, Peter Rawlins, Clyde Mec-
ford, Elvina Bushell, Aylmer Blades
John Bayne. a
From JAMAICA. .

Mr. John Page, Mrs. Bilen Gardiner.
Mr, Cyril Hunte, Mr, Alfred Gardiner
From ANTIGUA....

Lawrence Greaves, William Cluett, Anno
Cluett,

Marion
Canby.

Headley.

Canby, Barbara Canby, Nickey

DEPARTURES by B.W.I AL
Yor TRINIDAD....

ai. Rupert Dolsingh,
Miss Derrice
Leacock, Miss Sauel Todd, Mr
erick Green, Miss Cynthia Green, Mis

Mrs, Monica



The Weather

TO-DAY
Rises: 6.17 a.n
im Sete; 5.*9 p

Shting: 6.30 0,1
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington)

otal for month to 3

emperature (Min.)
Wind Directions
Wind Velocity 7
Barometer (9 a.m






per h

29.925 (11



Margaret Smith, Howard Smith,

Leacock, Mrs, Carmen
Frod-

Sylvia Green, Mrs. Mable Larson Miss

mn.) 29.958

1950



‘THE FREDERICK P. ELKIN lies at anchor, aground on the west coast
of the island, just off the Mental Hospital.

Frederick P. Elkin
~ Dies A Slow Death

The Frederick P. Elkin, St. John’s, Newfoundland, that was
scrapped here and her fittings auctioned last September,
seems to be taking a long time to die.

tion to run a schooner that carrie:
two thousand yards of canvas.
The remaining parts of the
Frederick P, Elkin, which includec
the hull were anchored in Carlisl :
Bay but it leaked so badly that th«
Harbour and Shipping Master con-
sidered it to be a menace to ship-
ping and ordered it to be taken
out to sea and sunk or grounded,
It was towed on Tuesday by the
Government craft Lord Comber-
mere down the west coast and then
run aground by the launch Sea

No longer is it a paying proposi- Prince just off the Mental Hospital.

Fruits, Greens
Are Plentiful

FRUiTS and greens were to be
had yesterday in as full a supply
as for the last few weeks. Water
coconuts, grapefruits, oranges,
bananas, all of them have had a
flourishing period, The neighbour-
ng islands have done their shae
a the fruit supply, but the steady
low of greens was due to the
‘uick move of the local farmer:
vho made the most of the rain.

Given as good rain as the past’

ar, the farmers are all out to
how their worth again. Bananas

e not yet at their acme and dur-
ing the coming weeks, housewives

expect good quantities

Money, Books Missing

Elsworth Holder of Garden, St.
James, manager of Queen’s Fort
Farm, reported that his office was
broken and entered between 6.00
p.m. on Thursday and 6.45 a.m, on
Friday.

He stated that a small amount

Oo. money and some books are
missing. The matter is being
investigated,

HOUSE DESTROYED

ON Friday at about 10.30 a.m.
a fire of unknown origin broke out
at a wall and wooden house at
Surinam Village, St. Joseph, and
completely destroyed it.

The size of the house is 30 x 20

16 feet and it is valued £250,
but it was not insured. It is the
property of Oscar Chandler of
Hopewell, St. Thomas, At the
time of the fire it was unoccupied.

CANES BURNT

Another fire also of unknown
crigin oecurred on Friday ,at
Bushey Park Plantation, St.

Joseph, and destroyed 54 acres of
first crop and 2} acres of third
crop ripe canes. The damage is
covered by insurance. The canes

are the property of A. Cameron,



In Carlisie Bay

Plue Sar, Seh
Belle Wolfe.

Turtle Dove, Sch. Marion

ARRIVALS
S.S. PANTER, 3,616 tons net.
Hornsden, from U.K., Agents:
& Co., ltd.

Cap’.
Da Coste

IN TOUCH WITH BAKBADOS COAST STATION

Sanvulfrano, S.S. Bonaire, S.S. Macug,
8.S. Loide Uruguay, S.S. Loide Ver :-
Zuela, S.S. Abbedyk, S.S. Katy, S.S.
Mo r, 8.8. New Texas S$‘

Dolores, S.S. Rio Dale, .S.S. Hers'lia,
8.S. Cornell, S.S. Telamon, S.S. Faco.
S.S. Musa, S.S. Mary Ashig’. S.S.
Gotd Haab, 8.8. Brazil, S.S. Goivanni
Amendola,

Monica Keliman, Sir Edward Cunard,
Mr, Douglas Robbins, Mr. George Hu atae
inson, Miss Sylvia Hutchinson, Mus.
Mildred Seay, Miss Elizabetly Burns, Miss
Elizabeth Waring, Miss Nancy Yarnall,
Mr, Clarence Lowe, Miss Mary Shutts.
Mr. Toosey, Mrs. Toosey, Mr: Gerald
Isaacs.

For ANTIGUA....

Mrs. Hynd Sarkis, Miss Myra Jacobs

The following passengers arrived from
Montreal by T.C.A. yesterday:—
Mr. Allen Beach, Mr. Oren Brown,

Mr. Ashley Colter, Miss Shirley Colter,
Mr. Ceeil Dexter, Mrs. Maud Dexter,
Miss Germaine Gagnon, Mrs. Berry

Goodwin, Mr. Herbert Heinbecker, Mr
Evelyn Holmes, Mr. Frederick Mc Der-
mid, Mrs. Margaret Mc Dermid, Mr
Harry Ormiston, Mrs. Dorothy Ormiston,
Mr. Thomas Stevenson, Mr Patrick
Labrie

From BERMUDA

Mrs. Eispeth Eric, Mr. George Watt

Passengers leaving for Canada by
T.C.A. were:—Mrs. Graham Rose, Rus-
sell Dorland, Mr. H. A. C.. Thomas,
Druscilla Headley, Mr. E. S. Robinson
Helena Miller

For BERMUDA Hazel Cood +"!

For TRINIDAD: Mr. Chester Tuscheray

What’:

Sunday School

; on Today

9 and. 11 a.m

3.30 and 4 p.m

n's Park 4.45 m

ew Year Music,
‘aul's 4,30 p.m

Evensong and Carols, St. Ambrose 7







p.m

while

LOCAL NEWS



Shoppers Were
Busy Yesterday

IT was Old Year Day yesterday
and Saturday at that. Besides,
tomorrow is bank-holiday, and
these factors must have been
responsible in the City for the
hustle and bustle which was equal
to that of Christmas Eve.

Shopping like then, was in full
swing, giving one the impression
that no pains were being spared
to make the New Year festival as
joyful as that of Christmas.

Tailors, dressmakers, shoe-
makers and other craftsmen were
hustling to carry out their

promises to their various clients,
seme of whom had suffered dis-
appointment at Christmas time.

Most people were indulging in
stock-taking; not of their business
of course but of their lives. “I
will turn over a new leaf next
year;” “New Year—new rules for
me.” “I will take life more seri-
ously from tomorrow.”’ These
ond other expressions were reso-
lutions made to be carried out
during the year which has just
‘ egin. A check-up at its end by
‘he fortunate ones who live
through it, will reveal to them
how much determinziion was be-
hind their utterances.

Reginald N. Wallace
On Way to Barbados
“Gloria May’ Still Missing

NEWS was received yesterday
that the 117-ton schooner “Regi-
nald N. Wallace’ under Captain
Wallace is on its way to Barbados.

Consequent upon rumours that
this vessel had sailed from British
Guiana for Barbados over a week
ago and did not arrive here up
to Friday, the Schooner Owners’
Association cabled St. Vincent to
find out whether or not it was
there.

A reply received late Friday
read “Reginald N. Wallace sailed
from St. Vineent for Barbados’.
Nothing further has been heard,

but the vessel is expected here
momently.
There is still doubt as to the

safety of the “Gloria May” which

“'so sailed from British Guiana

for Barbados over a week ago.
Names of the crew which were

signed on at the Harbour and
Shipping Office in October last
year are:— George Graham

(Captain), James Rice, Gladstone
Dummett, Joseph DeRange, Alfred
Headley, Gladstone Eastmond,
Clarence Sargeant, W. Murray,
Frederick Perkins and Amos
Nelson.

The first six are Barbadians
the other four, taken in
rdey are from St. Lucia, Antigua,
Grenada and St. Vincent.
3arrow D.

Our own correspondent from
Georgetown, British Guiana,
wrives that two cabin passengers,
David N. E. Hughes and Donald
Rafael Nichols are aboard. The
vessel carries 230 tons of genera!
cargo and she left Georgetown on
Wednesday, ecember 21.

Elementary Teachers
Hold Meeting at Ch. House

A meeting of Elementary
teachers was held at the Church
House, Si. Michael’s Row, yester-
day. Teachers protested against
longer hours which were intro-
duced by the Director of Educa-
tion,

A resolution, agreeing vhat the
hours remain as usual, that is from
9 am. to 3 p.m., was carried.
Over 50 teachers agreed with this
resolution.

The majoriv’y were of the opin-
ion the Elementary children could
not stand up to a 6-hour day in
school because this method was
not even employed in Secondary
schools.

12 Months For
.

One Pair Shoes

Nineteen year old Rupert Ellis
of Sobers Lane listened calmly
as His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
yesterday morning sentenced him
to 12 months’ impvisonment with
hard labour for stealing. one pair
of gents John While brown shoes
valued at $7.62, the property of
C. F. Harrison & Co., Ltd.

Island Constable Sobers said he
arrested Ellis about 9.50 on De-
cember 31 on Hinks Street. He
saw he was carrying a pair of
shoes and asked him if he had
paid for them. Ellis told him no,

Ellis had six previous convic-
tions, vhe last one being on June
24 when he was sentenced to four
months’ imprisonment with hard
labour for stealing one pair of
shoes.

He Spent Xmas
Away From Prison

TAKING iv easy ina cave in
gully of Warrens Plantation, St.
-omas, 38-year-old Courtney
Sealy, alias Fish Eye, who
»-caped from prison on November
25, was routed and captured yes~-
riay about 11 a.m., *y a squad
yt police under Superintendent
A, Farmer.
Sealy escaped while he and
her prisoners. were working at
‘ojrington. When caught yester-
‘y, his clothes were ragged but
“e looked as though he had been
well fed. He had a basin and
other articles in the cave. He
gave the police a good run before
» was finally caught.
Sealy said he had felt like
vending out the Christmas season.

M.V. Blue Star
On Dock
M.V. “Blue Star” took its turn
1 the dry dock on Friday even-
when M.V. “Daerwood” came
ff,
The “Blue Star” returned here
on Monday from Nassau via St.

{artin with cargo. It has gone on
lock to have a general clean up.



Scouts Hold
Dance To
Help Funds

SENIOR SCOUTS of the First
Barbados Sea Scout Group had

a jolly time on Thursday nigh
last when they held a dance at
their H.Q. in aid of funds. hi
wus well attended and everyone

enjoyed themselves until well
after midnight.
Rover Scout Leader Coa

Alleyne and his quartette sup-
plied the music on the occasion
In Camp
The Rovers of the 34th B’dos.
(St. Philipts) Crew went into
camp at Warrens woods over
last weekend and are having a

good time.

Included in their programme is
a Campfire on Jackson’s pasture
next Tuesday night after which
six rover squires will be invested.

Wood Badge

We are glad to be able to in-
form Scouters that we have
received Scout and Cub Wood
Badge Studies Part I (Theoreti-
cal) 1949—50, and these wil)
sgon be ready for circulation. A
notice to this effect will be pub-
lished in these notes as soon as
they are ready.

‘EXTRACT’

From “Spiritual Adventure”

in the November Scouter
_ With the exception of the clos«
ing session; this third session is
the only one in the Conference
the title of which does not begin
with the letter “P”. We have had
Probation and Preparation, and
we have Progress and Practic
to come. But here, stuck in the
middle, is a session called “Spir-
itual Adventure”, I’m — sorry
about that (or should I say
Penitent) because I chose tha:
ttle. Although I still think it is
a good one, I am sorry because
vhen you glance at the pro-
gramme and see this session,
which quite obviously deals wit)
the religious aspect and basis of
Scouting, it appears to be some-
ihing apart, something different
from all the rest, with the result
that we tend to approach this
session from the wrong angle.
For religion ig not someth ng
“added on to” of “thrown in
with” Scouting. Religion is the
basis, the foundation, the aim
and the motive power of Scout-
ing.

Scouting—An Adventure
Scouting is not a Religion. It
is not limited to any one religion;
it is not denominational, but it
is a religious and spiritual Move-
ment. Its whole set-up is spirit-
ual. It is not only a method of
training, but is also a_brother-
hood, a fellowship based on duty
to God and = service to our
fellow-men, with a common rule
of life. Duty to God is net part
of Scouting; it is the whole
purpose of Scouting. Purpose—
here we have a word beginning

with the letter “P” which we
might use as our title. The Pur-
pose of all our _ Probation,
Preparation, Progress and Prac-
lice. ‘

I still think, however, that my
title is better, because it links

is on to the title for the whole
Conference, which is “Adventure

through couting”’. For the
adventure of Scouting is a
:piritual adventure. This game
of Scouting is the adventure
‘ourney which takes the boy,

tage by stage, along the road
which leads to true manhood,

Man as God intended him to b«

With whatever section of the
Movement we as Scouters may
be concerned, we must always
take that long view and kee)
that ultimate aim in mind, act-
ng on that long-term policy. (It
is very easy to become short-
sighted or narrow-minded and
think only in terms of Cubs o1
Scouts rather than of Men.) Our
ultimate aim is to make good men
We may, in passing, produce
good boys or good youths, bu
cur aim is to produce men.

It makes a good deal of differ-
ence if we keep that aim always
in mind. (1) It makes our job
something really worthwhile.
(2) It helps us‘to face that fecl-
ing of disappointment which
always comes when our boys
grow up and “grow out” of our
particular section; when we havc
to send our best Cub up into
the Scouts, or a really usefu
P.L. into the Seniors. (3) It g.ves
to the Group a very real sense
of unity because throughout
there is a unity of purpose.

If the Scouter of any one pa.-
ticular section will take this
“long view” he will see his job
of training the boy in its righ:
perspective — as that of leadin
the boy along one part of the
journey and then passing him on
the next stage. The “finished
article’—the true man—is some-
thing which he has helped to
create.

(TO BE CONTINUED
NEXT WEEK)

Planter Brings
Motor Cars

HARRISON liner S.S. “Planter”
called at Barbados yesterday with
eargo from London. ,

Vauxhall saloons, a Morris
Oxford Saloon and a Citroen 15
Saloon were among this vessel's
cargo. Also a shipment of 7,996
bags and 520 drums of cement,
toilet preparations, French Polish

and essences.

Messrs DaCosta & Co.,, Ltd. are
Agents.

Rumour Denied

"HE Advocate has bee
im.,oimed by the Head Office oi:
Canadian National Steamships
Montreal, (through their locat

agents Messrs, Gardiner Austin &
Co. Litd.,) that they are still in
sole control of the Steamships or
their Company,

There is no tasis of faci in tte
umour that ownership of tne
C.N.S., had been changed,

Died Suddenly

Fifty-year wid Harold Burnett
of Kew Road, St. Michael. died
uddenly at his home on Thurs-

A post mortem examination was

performed at the Public Mortuary
and death was attributed to
natural causes



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Exhibition At



THE exhibition at the Museum
of drawings and watercol®urs are

&@ selection of the gitt recently
made by Mrs. Lucey Carringtou
Wertheim te the Museum. It

affords’ an opportunity {or art lov-
ers lO se@ some; of the work of
eontemporary English artisis. ‘fhe
Museum ic iortun’te to have been
presented with this collection, for
iis the function of a museum) not
only to preserve whatever is of
interest trom the past, but ‘to pre-
sent matters of contemporary in-
terest.

Adrian Allinson, R.O.L., is rep-
resented in the Wertheim collec-
tion by an arresting — charcoal
study of a nude. He was educated
at Wycliffe, and obtained a
scholarship at the Slade Art
School, For sometime he was
Art Master ~ at Westminster
School. He is a member ‘oi the
Royal Institute of Oil Painters,
and has~held~exhibitions of’ his
work in London, Zurich, Munich
and Toronto. Since 1944, he has
frequently had his works hung
at the Royal Academy.

Phelan Gibb has an excellent
taste in colour, his water colour
of a Manchester Canal conveys
the atmosphere of the industrial
North of England. There is also
a spirited wash drawing of Pic-

Circus. Phelan Gibb
died last year at the age of 78.
He studied in Newcastle, Edin-
burgh, Paris and Munich. At
Julian’s in Paris, his masters
were Jean Paul-Laurens and
Bouguerau. In 1906, he had prac-
tically decided to give up art
when he saw an exhibition of
Cezanne’s work. Thereupon he
threw up his work at Julian’s
and began to work alone. In
1909, he was elected an Associate
of the Autumn Salon, and during
that year he held exhibitions of
his work in London and Sweden
In 1913, he held an important ex-
uibition of his work at the Bern-
ueim-Jeune Gallery, Paris, There-
after he exhibited chiefly in Lon-
ion and Manchester. Towards the
end of his life he became inter-
ested in pottery, which he mod-
vlled by hand instead of using
a potter’s-wheel, An exhibition
of his pottery was held in London
before the last war. After the
success of his Paris exhibition he
was invited to hold an exhibition
in Dublin, but as a_ result of
priestly opposition the show was
never opened to the public. Gibb
is represented by works in both
the Tate Gallery and the Victoria
and Albert Museum, London. ]

Sensitive Artist

Kenneth Hall's: watercolours
reveal an extremely sensitive ar-
tist. “Boats on the River Rance” |
and “St, Enogat” are interesting
examples of the effects which can
be obtained by outlining obects
with pen and ink or brush, and
of the use which can be made oi
uncoloured portions of the back-
ground to light a picture. The
artist died in tragic circumstances
in 1946, at the early age of 32. He
first exhibited his work in Lon-
don in 1936, and subsequently at
the Mid-day Studio, Manchester,
the Little Gallery, Dublin and the
Arcade Gallery, Bond Street, Lon-
don,

“The Irish Train”—a watercol
our by Leslie Hurry, portrays
three bored travellers executed in
low tones. Hurry is 40; he studied
at St. John’s Wood Art School,
and won a scholarship to the Royal
Academy of Painting. In 1937
he held his first exhibition at the
Wertheim Gallery, In 1940—41, he!
producéd two books of drawings, ;
and has since held exhibitions at |
the Redfern Gallery, London.|
Hurry was commissioned to de-|
sign the costumes for Robert|
Helpman’s ballet “Hamlet” and|
later for Tchaikovsky’s romantic
ballet “Le Lac des Cygnes”, |

Amy Kraus is represented by a;
landscape with a graveyard en-|
titled “Falling Angel.”” Miss Kraus
was a close friend of the artist
Frances Hodgkins, but her work
differs from that ef Frances
Hodgkins in that her drawing is
more exact, although her colour is
less rich and sensuous. Miss
sraus was born of a Bristol fam-
ily and studied at an art school
in that City and later in Paris,
Like Phelan Gibb, she took up
pottery in her later life, but her
pottery is of a more domestic
character than his,

Cornish Water Colours

Two Cornish water colours
with sailors showing the influ-
ence of sculpture are the work of
Basil Rak6éczi. His colour is pleas-
ng and he has also used ink to
strengthen the outline of his fig-
ures, Rakéczi has travelled in
Greece, Spain and France. He has
held exhibitions of his work in
London, Dublin and Manchester.
At present he is living in Paris,
where he is working under the
patronage of the sculptor Zadkine.

Rowland Suddaby’s water col-
ours show great strength of model-
ling by the use of juxtaposition
of colours. Born in 1912, he
studied at the Sheffleld College of
Art, and spent some years =:
ing sets for films. He held his
first one-man exhibition at the
Wertheim Gallery in 1934. His
work is represented in many pro-
vincial art galleries in Britain, in

«thn NSN NEYO MONEE NEN
© HIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT

>
WHEREAS
®

‘3 WHEREAS
iz

n>
S WHEREAS
AND

WHEREAS

THEREFORE

New

KNIGHTS

SG OE NN NS NN NS

the joyous Holiday Season is now here

the Spirit of Friendship and Good Will
now prevails everywhere

we value greatly our Friendly relations
we want to express our appreciation for
this Friendly Association

we are pleased to send you this Certifi-

cate of Good Will which carries with
it our sincerest wishes for a

Happy and Lrosperous



DRUG Si
YA NAAN AIRCON

The Museum S%%
Mrs. Wertheim’s Gift |

BARRA ATA

Australia and New Zealand. He
has recently worked for *'.2 Pil-
grim Trust Scheme “necording
Britain.” He is also a designer of
textiles,

John Skeaping is well known
for his animal drawings and sculp-



ture. His work is frequently ex-
hibited in London. He has pro-
dueed posters for the London

Passenger Transport Board. In
1944, the Tate Gallery purchased
from him a horse’s head carved
in wood. A fine drawing by him
¢ oo is among the Wertheim

Interested in Animals

Another artist who is closely in-
terested in animals -—— especially
horses, is L. D. Rust. His study
of a London cart-horse is a sen-
sitive drawing. Rust has also an
affection for trees, this can be seen
both in his Horse Study, and in
his drawing of “Trees, East-
bourne.” His work has been
shown in London and Manchester
as well as at the Royal Academy.

Something of the Eighteenth
Century spirit appears in the
landscape of Algernon Newton,
R.A. Canaletto and Guardi have
influenced both his compositions
and his skies. Algernon Newton
was born in 1880, and has ex-
hibited regularly at the Royal
Academy for a number of years.
He is represented in many Pro-
vincial.Galleries. and private col-
lections. In the Tate Gallery
there is a fine oil painting of “The
Surrey Canal, Camberwell.” There
is a delicate water colour of “The
Thames from the Embankment”
in the Museum collection.

The work of two Continental
artists is included in the collec-
tion Drivier and Kolle, Drivier’s
pastel with its delicate tones is
essentially French in the treat-
ment of the nude figure. Kolle’s
oil painting, on the other hand,
shows a vigorous treatment of his
subject which is almost crude in
its strength. Kolle was born at
Charlottenbu~¢ in 1899, at the age
of 25 he settled in Paris, where
he lived for a time in an obscure
hotel in the Latin Quarter which
had once sheltered Verlaine and
Rimbaud, Kolle was a great lover
of sport, especially: tennis, foot-
ball, hunting and riding, and it is
net surprising that he was much
ip “Suenced by the work of Geri-
eanlt, the femous French horse
peinter. Sport has formed the
subject of many of Kolle’s paint-
ings. His work has been exhibited
in Paris, London and Berlin and
he is represented in many Con- |
tinental collections,

SDE

For
the COMFORT

of your

POULTRY

USE....



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PAGE NINE

from

Pharmacy

TO ALL OUR

FRIENDS & CUSTOMER:

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Health, Flappiness and Prosperity

C.F. HARRISON & CO. (BD0S) ITD.

IN WE TAKE THE SEASONAL
OPPORTUNITY TO EXPRESS OUR DEEP
APPRECIATION OF YOUR CONT-NUED

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CAVE, SHEPHERD
& Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.




AND A PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR IS OUR
WISH TO CUSTOMERS.

AND FRIENDS

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PERKENS & Co., Ltd.

?OEBLCK STREET.

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PAGE TEN









REVIEW OF THE YEAR:

Year of Economic Difficulties Has Sobering Effect —

To call 1949 a year of crises
would suggest that preceding
Years since 1945 were free of
crises. Of course, they were not.
Indeed, the crises of the past four
years have been so numerous as
to numb the sensitivity of the pub-
tic. It has been difficult to get
certain of men to believe
that there would be ing seri-
ously wrong with the state of the
country so long as the wage packet
maintained its plumpness.

. The year now ending, however,
has wrought a change. Its -
tive feature has been its
effect, The wage packet has re-
tained its plumpness, but there has
been an increasing awareness that
its purchasing power was falling:
or put another way, that the cost
of living was rising. Side by side
with this development t*.ere has
been -a-growing realisation that
Wages were not to be permitted to
pursué_fising prices; that if the
Wage packet would no longer
cover expenses, some expenses
Would have to be cut.

Early in the year there were
doubts whether the “wage freeze”
would be made really effective.
Unions continued to file claims for
advances, and negotiations were
opened. But as the months went
Ty it became clear that the Gov-
Graticat could not retreat from
their policy of a wages’ ceiling.
Painfully, reluctantly, the Unions
have been persuaded that the Gov-
ernment must be supported.

Two events have helped to bring
home the realities of Britain's
economic dangers. The first was
a Budget which was bleak in the
extreme, and brought none of the
tax easements which any Govern-
ment would like to make in a pre-
élection year, Then, in the autumn,
came the de-valuation of the
pound, with an immediate increase
in the price of bread, and the
prospect of further rises in the
cost of living within a few months.
The price of bread up; the value
of sterling down: and wages
frozen. The complex economic
causes of these unpleasant hap-
penings might not be generally
understood, but those three stark
facts were accepted as evidence
that something was seriously
amiss. As the year ended, Mr.
Maurice Webb, M.P., Chairman of
the Parliamentary Labour Party,
summed it all up thus:

“This is something worse than
a crisis, It is a fundamental
maladjustment in our whole
economic system. It is going
te take many long years of
effort to correct.”

With that diagnosis there would
be a-large measure of agreement
among all Parties, though there
are “wide differences about the
remedies,

A Busy Year

So far as Parliament is concern-
ed, the year has been one of the
busiest within living memory.

Following immediately upon a
Government majority of 90 on its
Palestine policy came the British
de facto recognition of the Israeli
Government Soon afterwards
Parliament gave a second reading
to the National Theatre Bill which
projects a State theatre as a part
of the larger scheme of the Festi-
val of Britain 1951, on which Fes-
tival approximately 10 millions
are to be spent, with the uneasy
approval of the Opposition, se-
cured in less anxious days by the
Parliamentary skill of Mr, Herbert
Morrison.

There was a warmer welcome
for the restoration of the right of
Private Members to introduce
Bills into the Commons, but the
Iron and Steel Bill has been met
throughout the year with uncom-

romising opposition, Finance has

n a constant anxiety. Early in
the year there were supplementary
estimates for £221,000,000 includ-
ing fifty-eight millions for the Na-
tional Health Service, and fifty-
two millions more for the Minis-
try of Food.

The Budget presented by Sir
Stafford Cripps had to take into
account the formidable deficit on
dollar account of no less than
£423 millions for the sterling area.
The Chancellor had to tell Gov-
ernment supporters candidly that
he wondered if those who spoke
about reducing taxation while the
cost of social services was rising
rapidly, appreciated to the full
the old adage that we could not
have our cake and eat it, But in
July there had to be further sup-
plement-*y estimates for @ver
twenty-one millions.

Money Troubles; Labour
Unrest

At this time the Chancellor had
most emphatically denied being
pressed to devalue sterling. It
therefore came as the greater

k when the Government
amnouneed devaluation tw o
months later,

Banks and the Stock Exchange
closed for a day. Thereafter the
eeonomic consequences began to
demand attention. The Govern-
ment had to face the grim task of
deciding on economies. Mr.
Churchill promised support for all
measures which the Opposition
could accept as being demonstrab-
ly in the national interest, but the

use as a whole was not satisfied
with the programme ultimately
ons by the Government aim-
1g at economies of £250,000,000
a year. These cuts affected hous-
ing and other ae school
als, Food Ministry administra-
n, the much-discussed Festival











ing them...

Lrospero

WE would like to thank our Friends and
Customers for their Patronage during
1949 and take this opportunity of wish-

A Happy and

of Britain, and the programme of
imports from dollar areas.

Although still enjoying a mark-
ed, though reduced favour at by-
elections, the Government have
not been fortunate this year.
Strikes have proved a serious em-
barrassment. The year opened
with thirty thousand bus drivers
striking for time-and-a-half pay
for Saturday afternoon work. A
sequence of strikes in the London
docks began in April, and reached
a grave climax in July with a
strike lasting twenty-four days
and involving sixteen thousand
dockers. Troops had to be used
to clear cargoes of scme food ships.
The Government civ‘used a State
of Emergency to be declared by
Royal Proclamation,

“Go Slow,” and “Work to Rule”
measures by railwaymen brought
a serious threat to summer rail
traffic, and culminated in the Na-
tional Union of Railwaymen ap-
pealing directly to the Prime Min-
ister to intervene to prevent a
possible national railway stoppage.
That event was fortunately avert-
ed, but thorny points of difference
remained to be settled, and still
remain. Strikes in Lancashire and
Yorkshire collieries were algo
among labour’ troubles which
proved costly.

Tribunal Set Up

An event happily rare in British
public life was the setting up of a
Tribunal to investigate allegations
reflecting on the conduct of some
Ministers and Civil Servants. Mr.
Justice Lynskey presided over an
inquiry which exonerated every
Civil Servant, but resulted in the
resignation of the then Parliamen-
tary Secretary to the Board of
Trade from his office and his
membership of Parliament, and
the resignation of a Labour nomj-
nee as a Director of the Bank of
England. A_ further sensational
sequel was the escape to Israel of
a “contact man” who hac! been the
chief witness of the joquiry and
who had been summoned to ap-
pear at Bow Street magistrates
court on alleged bankruptey
charges. |

In May came an unprecedented
experience when five Parliament-
ary Frivate Secretaries lost their
appointments because they had
acted contrary to Government
policy on the Ireland Bill. On
other issues the Government lost
the support of two Socialist M.P'’s
and one peer—Mr. Ivor Thomas,
M.P. and Mr. A. Edwards, M.P.
leaving the Socialist benches for
the Conservative Party and Lord
Milverton transferred his allegi-
ance to the Likerals

Late wi me year the Govern-
ment’s catalogue of misfortunes
was extended by the admission of
heavy losses on the African
ground-nuts scheme and on the
first year’s administration of the
nationalized railways.

“This mistletoe was terribly
expensive— probably works
out at about 2s, 3d. a kiss,”



The most hopeful political event
of the year was the recognition by
the Russians of the success of the
“Berlin Air Lift,’ and the conse-
quent abandonment of the Russian
policy of trying to drive her Allies
out of the German capital by a
precess. of blockading the city
against surface transport from the
West. The feat of keeping the city
supplied by air throughout the
winter was a tremendous achieve-
ment, and the Russian change of
attitude which it brougitt about,
greatly relieved the tension in
Europe.

Royal Activities

The happiest records of the year
have heen concerned with the
Royal House whose popularity
with the nation is always enhanced
at times when political issues di-
vide the nation, thus emphasising
anew the value of a monare >
which is always aloof from politi-
cal controversy,

The news of the King’s illness
early in the year, and of the post-
ponement of his Australian tour,
evoked many manifestations of
deep sympathy, and there was a
great popular welcome for the
King, when, in June, he made his
appearance at the King’s Birthday
review, his first ceremonial en-
gagement after a trying illness and
an exceptional operation.

The King inaugurated Colonial
Month in a ceremony at the
Church House, Westminster. On
the Canadian Dominion Day Their
Majesties went to Westminster
Abbey for the service. The Canada
Club had presented chairs and
faldstools for Their Majecties’ use
in memory of the Canadigis who
lost their lives in the war.

A memorable legal occasion was



us 1950.

LOUIS L. BAYLEY,
Jewellers
Bolton Lan« y

PLANS ARLENE



SUNDAY



Hy Recorder

when the Queen, as Treasurer of
the Middle Temple, officiated at
the reopening ceremony of the
ancient Middle Temple Hall re-
stored after war damage, His
Majesty honoured the heroes of
H.M.S. Amethyst who had gallant-
ly beaten off attacks by Commun-
ist forees in China and brought
thew ship through a menacing
situation, The Sovereign present-
ed colours to the Irish Guards; re-
ceived the Western Europe Chiefs-
of-Staffs arriving in London for
consultations; and, with the Queen,
visited Edinburgh for its great fes-
tival of all the arts, The Ascot
race meeting restored to its pre-
war glamour had the presence of
the King and Queen on three days.
His Majesty had a great ovation
when his horse Avila won the
Coronation Stakes.

Keen On Public Interest

Princess Elizabeth and the Duke
of Edinburgh have been most assi-
duous in their discharge of public
duties. They had a particularly
warm welcome in Edinburgh for
the festival. Lancashire, York-
shire, the Channel Islands, and
Ireland were visited by the Royal
couple. They attended the Royal
Agricultural Show at Shrewsbury.
In the autumn the Duke of Edin-
burgh left to take up his Naval
duties at Malta, and Princess Eli-
zabeth paid an extended visit to
the west country, before joining
the Duke at Malta for the anni-
versary of their wedding. ;

Princess Margaret whose nine-
teenth birthday evoked congratu-
lations from all parts of the Em-
pire, made a long Continental
tour during the year,

Queen Mary attended the cen-
tenary celebrations of the Bed-
ford College for Women of which
she is Patroness, Another notable
engagement she undertook was
the reopening service of the his-
toric old church at All-Hallows-
by-the-Tower which was damag-
ed in the war.

There was a romance of Royal
importance in September when
the Earl of Harewood, son of the
Princess Royal, was married to
Miss Marion Stein. The Austrian-
born bride was a concert pianist
The Earl is a_ discriminating
patron of music, and since his
war service has written much on
the subject Mutual interest in
music first brought bride and
bridegroom together. The King
and Queen and the Princesses
were at the wedding at St. Marks,
North Audley Street, where music
specially composed for the ocea-
sion was rendered. Not since the
marriage of Princess Elizabeth
and the Duke of Edinburgh had
a wedding excited such interest,
and the bride won vast popular
admiration by her charm and her
bearing.

Some Highlights of The Year

Recalling the nighlights of the
year from month to month, the
liner Queen Mary went aground
off the French coast in the ter-
rific storms which ushered in the
New Year, but the same week
the new 34,000 ton liner Caronia,
largest built since the war, start-
ed on her successful maiden voy-
age to New York. Historic Derby
House became Hutchinson House
in February and the permanent
home of a new National Gallery
of British Sports and Pastimes.
In Guildhall before a_ brilliant
Anglo-Dutch assembly, Mr. Win-
ston Churchilt received the Gro-

tius Medal for distinguished
services to international peace
and international law. There

were messages of gratitude from
Germany to the British when the
landing of a British aircraft at
Berlin completed delivery of the
millionth ton of food and freight
since the airlift began. The
famous library of Oriel College,
Oxford, was damaged by fire in
March

Arctic Expedition

A notable Naval achievement
was the expedition in Arctic
waters testing special equipment
and armaments in conditions of
extreme cold. Mr. Churchill was
in Boston in April where he re-
viewed the last fifty historic
years and uttered a solemn warn-
ing against the sinister and
malignant policy of the “men in
the Kremlin.” Lord Reith be-
eame chairman of the new
National Film Finance Corpora-
tion under Board of Trade aus-

pices the King welcomed the
Conference of Commonwealth
Prime Ministers which sat in

London. The twenty-eighth Brit-
ish Industries Fair opened in
London and Birmingham with a
record number of exhibitors in
May. That month brought the
French Ambassador to Broadcast-
ing House, presenting a tapestry
on behalf of the French Govern-
ment in recognition of “the help
and comfort London radio offered
in the dark days of the occupa-
tion.” Nottingham attained the
full status of a university city,
Two air records broken by Mr.
Neville Duke were those from
London to Rome and London to
Karachi: 28,924 Royal Artillery
men who fell in the war were
commemorated by three bronze
plaques on the Royal Artillery
Memorial at Hyde Park Corner,
unveiled by Princess Elizabeth



mysterious disease that causes more
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nee. The very first dose of Noxcr
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tfedical discovery, reduces High Blooc
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Five Drowned

It was announced in June that
Hughendey Manor, famous home
of Disraeli, had been handed over
to the National Trust. Field Mar-
shal Montgomery spoke at the
D-Day memorial service held in
the British cemetery at Ranville.
The cross channel steamer Prin-
cess Astrid struck a mine in the
channel and was submerged. Five
of the crew were drowned, but
all passengers mostly Britons on
holiday, were safely landed. i
July ships of the Western Union
Navies assembled off Penzance to
proceed to combined operation:

Memories of the South African
war were revived when veterans,
who included Mr. Churchi!!,
marched from the Mansion House
to St. Paul’s to commemorate
And Vikings landed in England
again; they came in the Viking
ship Hugin, and visited London



and many coast towns, being \he

recipients of spectacular civi
welcomes. The Rangitofo, lar \-
est merchant ship built on
Tyne since the war, went to

in August. Mr. Patrick Horna
idge covered 3,600 miles lasting;
\2 hrs. 3 mins., thereby settin
up an endurance record for j«
powered aircraft Mr. Church]
was honoured with the Freedo n
of Strasbourg for his war lead -
ship, and his great services to ‘he
city.

The religious world was stirres
by reports of the arrival in Lo
don of fragments of Old Testa
ment scrolls __pre-dating ll
existing records. TWey had been
found in a cave by the Dead
Sea. The largest civil aircraft
in the world, “Brabazon I”, made
her maiden flight in Septembe
Prime Minister Attlee had an
underwater cruise at Portsmouth
in a new type submarine. French
Dutch and Belgian fight
squadrons joined the R.A.F. i:
large-scale air exercises over
Britain.



Royal Commission’s Repo {

One unprecedented event m«
its its own distinctive place, t!«
publication of the Report of tie
Royal Commission on the Pre
After two years of investigati:
the Commission pronounced ()x
British Press “free from corru
tion,” and “inferior to none
the world.” The Commission co: \-
sidered however that it was “dc -
ficient in the practice of sel’-
criticism,” that its performanc:
was capable of improvement, a: d
mde suggestions whereby tho
alleged weaknesses might
remedied. The Report destroycd
many misconceptions about
ownership of the Press, and co
rected several common I
erroneous ideas concerning new
papers.

Another Royal Commission
report in 1949 was that deali:
with the trends of population
Great Britain. Much of its wo
is chiefly of benefit to legislato
and administrators, but amor
its general observations was th
more attention should be paid
the family in social legislation

Politics Again

As the year drew towards i
close, politics and economi
again asserted their claim to t!
nation’s undivided attentio
There was much talk of a ge
eral election, partly because, ov
a period of thirty years, most ge)
eral elections have fallen in tle
late autumn, and partly becau
of a feeling that a demonstrati:
of the nation’s determination
sanction drastic measures
economy would have had a go
effect on foreign confidence
sterling. But the Governm<
decided otherwise, and thou
uncertainty about the date of t.
elections continues, the parti
are busy arraying themselves {
battle.

As in the period after 1918, ;
now, the influence of a great w:
continues to express itself in
lowering of moral standards a,
im Many crimes of violence. On
of the murders of the past yea
by reason of originality
method, will go down in the bhi:
tory of crime. The trial of Jo
George Haigh for the killing
Mrs. Olive Durant Deacon di
closed a startling use of scienti(
knowledge in the disposal of |
body, but was otherwise a squa
murder for gain, and its perpet:
tor was executed

“Dream Madness”
Before Haigh stood his tria!



Through this mediu

and friends the con

For your past

our thanks, and we }
in the New Year

patronage
0k

N. B.

Dial 3306. Lumber and

PATENTED RAR RL DEN NEN IN EN ANNE RE

ADVOCATE



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m we desir
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Varad

HOWELL



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London editor was sent to Brix-
ton Prison for three months for
contempt of court, and a fine of
£10,000 was imposed on the pro-
prietors of the newspaper. But
as the trial revealed, Haigh con-
fessed to the murder of no fewer
than nine persons, in what he
claimed to be ‘dream madness.”
Thus the case provided material
even stranger than is found in the
type of crime fiction presented in
books and films to a public which
has an insatiable appetite for
such fare, but which, at the same
time, deplores the alarming
growth of crime.

Theories that theft is a conse-
quence of unemployment and
poverty have been heavily dis-
credited by a large increase in
convictions for larceny during a
period of abundant employment

There were several large rob-

- beries and frauds during the year.

A moonlight raid on a Hunger-
ford mansion while the family
were at dinnei resulted in the
thieves getting away with £20,-
000-worth of jewellery; only a
fortnight later a gang of “dinner
time” raiders took £18,000 worth
of furs and jewellery from the
home of a racehorse owner. In
one London case a bank was said
to have been defrauded of
£92,500. ‘

“Perfect?” Crime

Two men were heavily fined in
London in connection with what
counsel called “a fantastic story”
of a £400,000 gun-running airlift
to Hyderabad. Although the ad-
jective “perfect” is out of place
in connection with crime, the
“Perfect Forger” was, according
to counsel, a young woman
twenty-six who was jailed at
Middlesex sessions for no fewer
than 195 cunning forgeries,
whereby monies were obtained
from trustee savings banks.

ot

Worst of Britain’s post-
war, crime statistics is the growth
of juvenile delinquency, the latest
figures showing that in one out vi
three of all -the ‘convictions for

arceny the thief was a youngster

feature

under 17 years of age. As the yea
closed Mr. Justice Hilberry
declared “Young people who

mut erimes are not immoral

nowing that their conduct

wrong. Thev are amoral They
would not understand me if |
ealled their conduct wicked »,
sinful.’

There is some ditference f
ypinion about the causes of this

ituation, but certainly the loss ctf
irental control during the war,
some instances due to evacua-
from bombed areas, is

clor. Again, the tragic housing

n, making home life im-
ossible for thousands of families,
has contributed,

Whether the exaltation of the
riminal in films and other pic-
torial media is to blame to any
legree, is a matter of dispuce
among authorities. But there is no
uch dispute over the view that
the decline of religious observan e



y very large sections vf the
population has helped to bring
about a general lowering of moral
tandards, by which the children
ire sharply affected.

Obituary
Notwithstanding the increasing
xpectation of life, and the fact

that survival into the nineties 1s
iow fairly common, the annual

loss Oi: people

eniu or

distinguished
leadership is

for
! not
ightened

Among those who died during
949, Lord Londonderry had been
Leader in the House of Lords, held
inisterial in the Imperial
rovernment and in Northern
re‘and, Viscount Ullswater was
speaker of the House of Commons
H sixteen years, while

posts

Lord

éueenborough had» been M.P., for |
ambridge, and was known
loughout the Empire by his;
enerous devotion to the Roval
society of St. George. Eminent |

iwyers Who passed over included

Sir Ernest Jelf, who had been
King's Remembrancer and a
Master of the Supreme Court,
Lord Uthwatt, a Lord of Appeal,
and Lord Du Pareq, a Lord »t |
Appeal, and a distinguished |
Channel Islander. The ranks ot

famous figures of the wars were
thinned by the loss, among many
thers, of General Sir Walter
Kirke, remembered for his great
exertions in maintaining the
Cerritorial Force, Sir Fabian Wave
vho established the Imperial War
‘raves Commission and performed

unique service to those who fell |
i two World Wars, the Earl of |

Lucan, Admiral] Somerville,
Admiral Boyle, General Sir }
Kenneth Wigram, General

Gathorne Hardy, and Air Marshal

Sir. -G. Gossage

NENG NN NG BENG NN BH NB 8B NN 8G 81 8 8G 8G



The death roll in letters was
‘eavy. There were Dr, O. E.
Somerville, Mrs. Baillie Sanders,
Muriel Hine, and Miss E. H.
Young among women authors, Dr,
Robert Lynd the essayist; Sir
Charles Igglesden, Sir Malcolm
Fraser, and Sir Jonn Hammerton,
were well-known in differing
pheres of journalism, and Sir}

Bernard Pares one of the greatest
authorities on Bussia. Sir John
Sheeby, who was financia] adviser
to General Robertson, Britis;
Military Governor of Germany
was brutally murdered by two |
burglars who tried to break into

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his home. The arts los: Sir Walter

Russell, R.A. Alfred Hardman
the sculptor of the Haig Memori il
in Whitehall, Sir William +

Nicholson famous portrait artist, ;
and Professor Laurie noted. for |
his research and achievements ‘1 |
the preservation of old masters. ;
Sir Frederick Ogilvie sometimes |
head of the B.B.C., was also a
distinguished educationist. Frank
Smythe was knewn for his great
adventures in mountaineering.
The higher branches of medicine
and science lost Sir R. Robertson;
also Sir J. Purves Stewart and Sir
Maurice Cassidy both Royal
shysicians, Eminent churchmen
who hive died included yd
bishop Amigo, who received the
title of Archbishop on his jubilee
in Holy Orders and for his long
devoted service as-Roman Catholic
Bishop of Southwark, the Dean of
Lincoln, and Lord Daryington wio
had been a great figure in Anglican
mission and propaganda
organisations,

Commerce lost Lord Leverhulme
who had rendered signal generous
services to education also; Pas-
coe Rutter the Grand Old Man
of the insurance world, Lord
Portal who had many big indus-
trial interests, and had held Min-
isterial office, and Mr. A. V. Roe
pioneer in aviation and famous
in the aircraft industry. Man)
have gone over whe had in ther ,
iay added to the gaiety of the
nation. There was Sir Seymour
Hicks, a truly great comedy ac-
tor, whom France had also hon-
oured by making him a Chevalier
the Lesion of Honour. Dame
T-ene Vanbrugh left fragrant
memories of sixty years service
to the theatre. Tommy Handley
as the most popular of radio
entertainers. Tom Walls, out-|
tanding actor in farce and owner |
f a Derby winner, Davy Burnaby |
the pierrot of pierrots, George
G:aves the last of the great “
gers”, C. V. France accomplished
actor and author, and Firth |
Shephard who produced some t |
London’s brightest and most suc-





cessful shows in dark days. Of
these actors and actresses it id
particularly apt to quote, “All, |
all have gone, the old familiar |
faces”, in this year of reckoning,
1949. |
A feat of endurance ana navigation
which ihrilled the country during the }
Auantic by the Brothers Smith ir

20 ft. boat in 43 days.



RHEUMATISM.
and agonising |
BACKACHE

GONE!



Sufferers from |
Obstinate rheumatism will] |
complaints be interested in |

the experience |

related in this
relieved by 10. °."; letter :—. |
“Some years |

KRUSCHEN ago I began to |

feel rheumatism
in my arms and shoulders. Then |
pains Started in the small of my
back, increasing until they were
really severe. I bought a bottle |
of Kruschen and was surprised to |
find that I got a little relief. 1
bought another and before it was |
finished all my pains had gone |
and from that day have not
appeared again. My pains were |
obstinate and the ‘relief really |
)



surprised me.’’--T.R
Rheumatic pains and backache |}
are usually the result of poisons |}
in the blood—poisons which lazy (
bowels and tired kidneys are i)
to expel. Foi these | {\\
)



failing
complaints there is no finer |
treatment than Kruschen Salts,

which cleanses all the internal
organs, stimulates them to nor- |
mal healthy action and thus |
restores freshness and vigour, |

All Chemists and St 22 |
Kruschen, ae

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SUND: TY 155 SUNDAY ADVOCATE

| The Commonwealth
Develops A Collective
Foreign Policy

Article—I The Treaty With Japan
By David Temple Roberts

LONDON. Dec. 23. Siates is tired of the burden. A
[These are a series of two former Security for War, Mr.
articles reviewing the work Royall, blurted out the truth a
before the Commonwealth year ago that occupation of Japan
Foreign Ministers when they is militarily wasteful and does
meet at a Conference in not fit into United States Pacific

PAGE ELEVEN









MY WIFE
By Dr. W. BR. Umge Former Dean of St. Paul's

Mrs. Mary Catherine Inge,
wife of Dr, W. R. Inge, the
former Dean of St. Paul’s, died
last April at the age of 69 after
44 years of marriage. Now Dr.
Inge has written a tribute to
her. It is printed in his Diary
of a Dean (just published by
Hutchinson, 21s.)}.

It is a noble and senore 1s
leave-taking; exquisitely phras-
ed and profcundiy moving.

I am in my ninetieth year and
hope soom te be at rest. Let my
las’ effort be to pay a tribute to








When colds threaten, cub throat, chest
and back with double-action Tiermo-
f4| gene Medicated Rub. Its medicinal
i} vapours startright away to break upcon-
gestion, soothe irritation, ease eeughing



January that the writer re- Strategy. The policy planners, he
gards as very significant for indicated, must think of a way to
the Commonwealth’s future. withdraw. So the problem of the
WHEN the Foreign Ministers of Japanese Peace Treaty is pushed
Commonwealth meet in véry forcibly in front of the Com-
slombo in January and take up monwealth Foreign Ministers.
» difcussion on the Japanese
ace Treaty they will find cross- Self Government F
ents and a number of vested 2 D

Pe Th self- " = . a °
srests within the British Com- ey have to prepare for aself- He MAP shows Japan in relation to Asia and her Commonweaith



a very beautiful life and a perfect
mafriage, never once clouded,
during forty~fom years, by any
shadow of disagreeinent or mis-
understandir g.

The continued strain of house-
keeping and social duties, and the
care of our children. were beyond
her strength, and medical advice
somewhat hastened ray retire-
ment from London. (Dr. Ince
left {t. Paul’s in 1934 and went

MARY CATHERINE INGE
bus small knowledge of the char-
acter of one’s partner. But it
changes by degrees into some-
thiag holier and more spiritual, as
to exquisive beauty of God’s
g) .ce_in a very human person-
al ty unfolds itself more and more
viibly.

“Marriage is the best thing in
human life,” my mother used vo







*MEN CAN PREVENT
*‘ MIDDLE-AGE’ HAIR WITH




ROWLAND’S

MACA SSAR OIL

: o _ governing Japan. There are two ; kas
on amie’ varea a ere major points of view, within the ishbours. The shaded area indicates territory that the Japanese
nt mu ;

Soeicas conmbegedinn’



say. St. Paul missed it, but he

te tive. a6 ightwell Manar, near knew that though faith and hope

Wallingford, Berkshire). The



i — nomic problems of Japan’s future. the last war. quieter life at Bright,.eil gave her ‘“Pide” indestructible, love is land's. Micasent (0! 5 e048
jcal ere ete ie oe Strong pressure comes ‘rom both some refreshmeny, but general Seater _ cme a ihe 29 ist introduced inty93 only a hair the Oaceoel nace :
tical a ; per ae Labour ti 0 : weakness, attaci f i c : Preparation with v i te

Canberra in 1947. sax dee aoe = eee e of its agony, Thakin Nu The situation of the two is dif- asthme, and camel ae ae “Love is as strong as death.’ Properties could remain pope a work. Strong, healthy hair result, ehen
More than two vents ae a ae cn iieie pavers that the future of his ferent. The assets of the Burma came more frequen. after the Many bereaved men must have shows, £90 youts apaiesen One deeb pavient 2

i to hope that, wi ; A country was. i > as * Bich ne us 3 i aa on the hair ee,

2s ees, a Peace ‘Treaty industry. This is commonly refer- road,” that taowaist agnarxist Oil Company were destroyed, in shock caused uy Richw.’s death felt us I_am feeling now, the The ideal hair dressing for men ete“

soft and easy to control
Rowland’s rubbed into the scalp 29°30
with the finger tips prevents

marxist education

major part, by events of war—
wculd be compulsory for Burmese

‘ruth of Shakespeare’s beautiful
particularly British dictated

must discipline the hair unobrru-
words (Much Ado About Nothing,

with Japan Ted to a “unfair” competition. sively, It must not make the hair

on active service in 1941. (Richard,
Accurately, there is a distinction

uld be concluded Dr. Inge’s son, was a clergyman

no ip ; 7 E 5 t : : icky or quickly soil the | i i cy
; all the war-time Allies and that the aim of his govern- policy”~-ans fis Nerden as Act 4, Scene 1): ee the lining of | hair, receding temples and other. -
“ey the Soviet Union. After ~ = — e between, on the one ment was “ownership a con- Salers Sopa pn for as > when he ees _— “ ia : h lif i aot gum o ans ig | Rowland’ ha ioe den Ths
c! ht tile 2 and, cut-price competition, not trol of the means of production.” i c / : ; . e© idea o er life shat. dients which repress . aOR 0 il is both
wed negotiating an agreed u fe ~ production.” United Kingdom Government In April this vear I had to go ts which repress the easy flow | a hair dressin d ‘oni
B F Notes necessarily “unfair”, due to the But recently there h: i A : nau to sweetly creep of the oil along the hair follicle. | ing and a tonic—
Treaty had been achieved , | as crossed bearing responsibility for com- to Lonvon for th s His sta maginati and’s fuldlealrrtee ae twllicle. | the very thing to prevent hai
en Italy. But since then the low price of Japanese labour and, the face of this Burmese Gov- pensation to shareholders and the British Deciees aaa othe = : wel eee oveland’s fulfils all these conditions, from getting that Frniddle-age
ory of Chinese Communist ©" the other, the’ dumping of ¢rnment a look of remorse, per- not accounting this to the Rur- business, and she sev’ her heart ren eee aan ; ee ee a
ae uh altered the pattern in Japanese goods caused by the haps a touch of pleading, towards jese Government. This has been n gz mi “USED BY DISTINGUISHED

Se ei ind entirely dee BISWSr practice of providing that capitalist, exploiting world recognised. in itr, Adibaiit cues on accompanying me. A full list shall come apparelled in more MEN FOR OVER 150 YEARS

which the Can- @xport bonuses to Japanese in- 50 recently denounced. Industries
ge olution. “ot ihe Japanese dustry. Grinding the face of the ©Xpropriated, including the Ir-
hem was founded, poor was Japan’s pre-war recipe "@awaddy Flotilla Company, with
0 for re-armament. American ad- SUch marxist fervour soon after
ministration has brought proper the astrologically determined
labour standards — wages and C&lebration of “independence”
factory conditions. Insisting on “%@ now being offered a mod-
their continuance by incorporating veeasin et tas ae ae
Neste : j : s ity—
Treaty was impossible. They een Treaty is a sanguine \yi+), mendy to. be Tecneaiien
: Spice é g approach to the prob- I ;

reed, too, that the Treaty lam. Th oitier pratiee, called the Burmese Government is
ould be concluded by all major “dumping” ie ceaeaee to the Sceking to persuade other com-
gerenits and interested parties thactar: ae Triterhational Trade panies that Capital invested in

statement that £10,000,000 would
be distributed between various
companies seeking compensation.
The position of the Irrawaddy
Flotilla Company is different. It
was expropriated by the Bur-
mese Government, led into office
by H. Aung San, in that Gov-
ernment’s early, marxist phase,
As originally announced, this po-
litical move was an expropria-
tion—with no mention of com-
pensation. Since then less marx-

impossible

then all Commonwealth coun-
es agreed that Russia’s claim
the Four-Power negotiation of

a eeaee os : n t p
ne , eee oe nee Organisation to which ‘Japan urma is secure. at ew ees. “ae
Gee Holland and) Fran try, Might be required to subscribe. But such a harsh description . on set on their assets by
eee choliinens, of the Burma Government is un- {"¢ !¥rawaddy Company has never

at Commonweath Conterence, Second Point of View
p years ago, was looked on jal 3 6
ance by Washington. United u ere is a second Common- ma, sin
tes diplomats thought that the wealth point of view. Cheap cuainied 7 to at ee
mmonwealth was evolving an Japanese goods are, in the short The writ of British law, under
-American point of view term erning Japan. In a sense there ¢ven Pakistan, and certainly the fact run far beyond the Irra-
some truth in that as the countries of South-East _ Asia, waddy. British Government did
was critical of MacArthur's They lower the cost of living in not hand over, to U. Aung San,
de policy in Japan, which the East, below that possible if a going concern. Britain, not
med to be excluding British those countries are compelled to told of this post-war chaos, con-
iness, and the Pacific domin- buy from high-cost producers— demns Thakin Nu too readily.
of Australia and New Zealand especially their textiles from The two rival elements, facing
a greater anxiety than the Lancashire. this Government in Burma are
ited States concerning security _AS Mr. Mayhew, Under- the “Communists” and the Ka-
Inst renewed Japanese aggres- Secretary for Foreign Affairs Tens. The so-called Communists
in another generation. At remarked to an M.P. questioning 8" @ confused mixture, There
Colombo Conference some of him on this point recently, . de are cocivinnive. - Dyasian
same opinions will probably “Certain countries are more in- of th marxists che indeed more
expressed and developed..But, terested in Japan as a source of side “Th ak a ee
from the victory of Com- Supply than as a competitor in 7," ft ee, Sr OUDe
; L 3 has rade.” follow their own Thakin, who
nist ene, oe ae . wan, be the wartime resistance
oo mie pa seo ne .he attitude of Australia and 2nd bargaining with the Japanese
once “ eae aee 7 New Zealand is uncettain. On o the intellectual | and aesthetic
eresente : : ” the one hand Australia is intensely Sid¢ of Burmese life, rather than

been offered by the Burma Gov-
ernment. But there have been
strong and persistent reports—
denied, it should be said—that
Burma has converted an offer of
“25 per cent compensation” in
Burmese shares—that is blocked
assets—into an offer of ‘ouble
that size in sterling.

The Commonwealth Foreign
Ministers should, and_ surely
will, take a wider view of the
Burmese problem. There are
two factors. One is geographical.
The security of Burma, India
and Pakistan have to be consid-
ered as one. The other is eco-
nomic, South-East Asia will
rot be place on a sound footing
until Burma exports, again, a
large surplus of its rice crop in
order to lower the high cost of
living of the whole area,

The

Just. It pays no account of the
under-publicised fact that Bur-

;



geographical factor—‘a

matter of security’—leads to the

@y Governments. So the cross- ry ; leading, as Aung San did, the conclusion that although Burma
H : " suspicious of concessions that ; B ’ ate Grn Same ees
; mts in the enna a d make Japan more pow- ‘tough elements of Burma, Per- is not a member of the Com-
Bicy towards Japan RYE. erful On. the other hand’ ton sonal - rivalry, distrust, dacoity monwealth, she should be re-
ged and become more com- stricting Japanese exports and assassination and race hatred garded, from the point of view of
qt ated. consequently reducing her wealth, ®%¢ the principal elements in defence, and when eligibility for
} iid et f , Burmese politics. Confusion faces certain forms of assistance is
Two Threats wou certainly force Japanese h ; i

ne threats People to emigrate en masse the observer. The Karens, who considered, as if she were a

ere are now 4 ree

towards--South-Hast»Asia, And control large areas, won grati- Commonwealth country. This is

| ;
st which the Commonwealth tude and respect from the Allied
i

an attitude that, I believe, India
be made secure in the Far that Australia finds even more forces in Burma—largely be- Three years ago it was Slarming. Australia is more cause they were willing to aid is very acceptable to Pakistan
sumed that a treaty with Japan likely to ask for the ,Strongest parachuted saboteurs as a means and Ceylon.
d deal with Japan’s own “anti-militarism clauses” in the of harming the collaborationist ¥ eee
dency to renewed aggression Japanese Treaty. The argument Burmese. The British Cansarcn. Rice Distribution
® balan “g against Japan a that Japan should be allowed an tive circles — and newspapers — a feu satis ;
Vefful China that would take @™my in order to defend herself that have assisted Karens to ex- . 1%¢ _ distribution of rice in

South East Asia is still chaotic.
Until the Burmese Government
can collect a crop, and until it
can encourage even greater pro-
duction, its rice is no more than
a hypothetical asset. In these

ra large proportion of the 4gainst Communism will not ap- press their demands for inde-
MBinland territories of the “Co- Peal to Australasia, Any Japanese pendence, are now alarmed to
Mpsperity Sphere.” But the @™my is t ~ dangerous. find the Karens tending towards

pmbo Conference has to con- The Problem Of alliance with the “Communist”

r two threats: one is the spread ~~as the obvious and nearby

Communism — or Russian in- anti-Rangoon” allies. cconomic matters the U.K. Com-
nee, the other is that Japanese Burma No Improvements missioner for South-East Asia
Mionalism will be driven by J has, since the war, played an
Pulation pressure to another Officially Burma does not ap- This being the state of affairs cflective part. But now that of-
Wenture. In a sense China and Pear on the agenda of the For- it is obvious that there will be no fice has been abandoned. The
pan are now both dangerous. _— Ministers meeting in Colom- steady improvement in Burma cne_ organisation in Zast Asia
most careful distinctions cae Rey is Burma is not until the Rangoon Government that is thinking of these prob-

t bé made. The new Chinese th ers, be renee and :omes to a political understand- lems ‘is the offshoot of the Uni-
lime is probably now at its ai Tk. Ceteemenan eee of ing that forestalls an alliance of ted Nations—the Ezonomic Com:
active; it will probably dis- But ever Geseeatmiahtin cae the separatists, (Karens) with mission for Asia and tie Far

bd forces and tackle internal 4,. an dae a pans in the disgruntled, (White Band). Far Nast, (E.C.A.Â¥.E.) This organi
blems. But Japanese potenti- ihe security of the Tidian: Ocean At the time of writing the Ran- sation, which has published ex-

goon Government is attempting
to placate the Karens and asks
that the past—the old days of
Rangoon’s domination, should be

ceilent reports, even if they are
ec.cmentary ivy European statis-
tical standards, should be en-
couraged by Commonweaith
support I have heard prejudiced
criticiym in J.ondon against
B.C.A.F.E. Its work is easily
criticised. But it represents a
constructive effort by experts in
Asia to tackle the problems oi
Asia without denending on the
West. The: progress of such ef-
forts should be watched eererly.
Asian countries will never have
a real status of equality in the
world if they continue for ger -
erations to depenc on European
or American abiJities. This should
be appreciated by the Common-

y as an aggressor will not be area, Burma is patently a weak
t for many years. She needs Jink jn the chain of countries
pping, steel, armies, planes. She surrounding the Indian Ocean.
indeed, at present, only a Discussion, probably informally, wined. out
ional industrial capacity re- and certainly not in plenary con- “*P® :
ve to before the war. But she ference, on the Burmese weak- Until Rangoon’s Government
too dense population, an ex- ness is bound to continue at Co- achieves such a solution, no finan-
Mal payment problem that will lombo. cial aid will do more than provide
d only to cheap exportation— a pile of small arms for a country

an adaptable industrial skill. that is already torn asunder by too
“Solution” of her problem is

pansion, which she attempted in
@Y! and might try again within
@nty years. The temptation, to
se who see the Communist
ry in the Far East as a
wiet victory, is to “solve”
furity by assisting a Japanese

The recent report, subsequent-
ly denied, that Burma had been
invited to the Colombo Confer- Against this background the
ence was technically incorrect in approaches of the Burmese Gov-
every way—nevertheless it ex~ ernment to the Commonwealth
pressed a certain reality. Burma, countries will be considered. The
though actively absent, will British Government has not made
effectively present, at the Colom- any financial grants to the Gov-

ks, ernment of Burma since the de-
elaration of the independence of



‘0 j Si - 1 x Ith
i discussion. betrceen Common; urma on January 4th, 1949, wealth. fon ‘ne, Comat
The Parallel wealth Ministers and diplo+ #286 oe oe in the that there ie equal consideration

mats for the past year. In April, 2" @ for the strongest, the United

The parallel is not with ] nwealth Prime Mouse of Commons Sir Stafford ; the smallest and
Many today but with the Ministore ae in London, ©“IPPS save figures of loans and ue en
mar Republic. Dawes loans decided to ask their Ambassa- Sfts| made by Britain “since ;

1945.” These included under the
in heading “gifts” a sum totalling

granted to Germany in the dors in Rangoon to report
v8; permission was given to the financial needs of Burma

ild an army — albeit small order to give her government Seine ena et a ae BYE BYE OLD YE AR!
‘controlled’ at first; inter- stability and greater assurance ©” oo ced claim against Burma -

ona

equality was granted; all’ against Communist insurgents.
asa means of keeping Trotsky ‘he scheme proposed was that a
t of Europe. There followed financial contribution should

@zism; there followed a second Come from: Great Britain, Pakis-
man adventure — immediately tan, India and Ceylon. The Am-
atrangement had been made Passaders met in Rangoon, spor-
h the Soviet Union, The par- ®dically, during the

llel is a warning.

for military expenditure by Brit-
ish forces operating in Burma
against Burmans, On the account
of British “loans” there appears
a figure totalling £36,000,000. But
it must be repeated again that
none of these gifts or loans, al-

So you must go. Alas, the fate
Of all things!—Comes it scon ur
lute
Bye-bye Old Year!
In going, we would wish that you

without advancing the matter to Might take aiong the “False”. The

To build an though they benefitted Burma in “True”
fhaermunist bastion on Mac 4 {Sm the Burmese Foreign S€ReFal, has actually been de- Hand orer to the coming, “Nev”.
ays new “democratic” Japan 75 ister U. Maung, passing livered to the “successor ov- Bye-bye Old Year!
id lead to stern Japanese , ernment of Burma. * * *

i t
Monalism, and ultimately fs a through London on his way to

i f We'll never meet again this way
den ~~ accommodation with the United Nations —, The almost desperate requests isnt follows quickly after day.
Mmunist China — the utter Pressed the urgency of Burma's of the Government of Burma for Bye-bye Old Year!
truction of South Eest Asia, DCed. Recently discussions have gnancial aid are now to be met by The. menivies. that, you. leave

. ae the advanced a step forward. ac- 4 grant from tl.ree neighbouring ;
greater ruin of the ar behind,
mmonwealth tual sum of money—£15,000,000, countries and the United King- Perforce, will keep fresh in some
These : ; ‘ has been put forward. dem. The figure Rovian. ‘ , mind
calculations must be est £15,000,000, is regarded as too : : \
#e now — and where better Political Struggle high’ by Government departments “ omega sorta tock 96 kind
E, &t Colombe, the Western To understand the Burma i? London—but negotiations will * ? nu

Bereign Ministers of the Common- o open on that figure.
being guests of the East.

problem, firsi, it is necessary t Each passing breath of air now





; ne have a clear picture of the poli- says;—

A - no avoiding the issue. tig} struggle ih that fcuntty. ie. Confused ; “We're at the parting of the ways,
Som 1 tPan to undertake anti- sentially there are three forces. The affairs of the British-own- Bye-bye Old Yeor!”
appa is es nt i In Rangoon, and with very little ed companies in Burma have And, as we finally bid you

—— that if effective control beyond the city become confused, unfortunately, A miz’d and lingering “Adieu”

"a8 LO be restrain ll n 1 the river up to Mandalay, is to Burma’s detriment, with this We hear the whisp’ring of the
nd ones ar the Government of Thakin Nu. question of the Burma loan. The New” :—

cally th I ; very difficult to be clear ‘wo most-mentioned Companies “Bye-bye Old Year!”

to keep Japan unde xecupa- what is the political complexion are the Burma Oil Company and

for a period. But the United of this government. At one ex- the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company. F. A, SQUIRES.

of engagevaents was mace, and
she tooh a fortnight of compiete
rest at the Acland Home to pre-
pare for the ordeal which her
doctors, rather to my distress, did
not forbid.

Hospitality
* . *

We were given nospivality at
Lord Beéverbrook’s flat at Ar-
lington House, and enjoyed lunch-
eons with the architects who im-
proved our house at Brighiwell,
Lord Mottistone and Paul Paget,
and with Mr. and Mrs, Amery on
the day before her death.

We were vo have gone to the
Archbishop of Canterbury, to

Neville Chamberlain, to
Lady Ravensdale and to my pub-
lisher, before our return home.
I went to say good night vo her
on the night of the 22nd, and she
seemed quite comfortable.

April 23 was “Richard’s Day,”
as she called it, “now it is my
day,” she would have said if she
had known that her call had
come,

She had a heart attack such as
she had often had before, and
then lost consciousness, I was not
summoned, of course she would
have sent for me if she had known
phe was dying.

My elder son was informed by
telegram, and came at once in
the small hours. It fell to him vo
tell me the sad news, for I never
expected it, her specialist had
given an encouraging report only
two days before. He wrote to me
that he did not expec’ it but
knew that it was possible.

It was the end vhat he would
have wished for her, she might
have had much to suffer. Most
of us, I think, would choose such
a death if we were prepared for
it, as she cervainly was.

Met In 1904

We met first in 1904 at
house of my uncle, F. G.
a noted Oxford cricketer,
held what was when a_ family
living in the gift of my fat*er,
Baswiek and Walton, near Staf-
ford.

We took long walks togevher on
Canrock Chase, and soon after
became engaged. It was a great
change for me, since Canon Hen-
svuu had just offered me the living
of All Saints’ Ennismore Gardens,
which had been carved ouv' of the
parish of St. Margaret's, West-
minster. We were married in the
following spring by Archbishop
Davidson, a cousin of my wife, in

the
Inge,
who

Canterbury Cathedral, and we
spent our honeymoon av’ Gras-

mere. My wife was a grand-

daughter of Harvey Goodwin,

Bishop of Carlisle, and she was

always happy in the Lake district.
* *

My new work was entirely
strange to me, and I could noi
have done it without her help.
The Vicarage was at 34, Rutland
Gate, a quiei’ square; my old
friend Sir Frarcis Gaiton lived
almost next door.

The parish was aristocratic,
with a preponderance of rather
elderly people. Three of his
Majesty’s judges, Lord Halsbury,
Lord Macnaghten, and Lord
Darling, sat under me, and Ernest
Pollock, afterwards Master of the
Rolls. But there were also sev-
eral ladies in black bonnets, who
preferred simple fare, so the
preaching was rather difficuit.

The go'den age of the West End
incumheuts had come to an end,
nud J was often discouraged,
fearing that 1 was a failure. In
reality 1 Kept my congregation
together fairly weli, and Kitty
woud not allow me to be anxious.
She soon made many friends in
the parish, and managed her
household well, which i was quite
incapable of doing.

Oléest Chair

We were only less than three
years in Rutland Gate. The Lady
Margarev professorship at Cam-
bridge fell vacant, and I was
asked to stand for it. This is the
oldest chair in the University,
and has been held by many dis-
tinguished theologians.

I countea it a great
when I was elected.

The main work of a professor
is to give lectures, which have to
be ravher simpie, since the intel-
jectual level of young men who
are preparing for ordination is
not, on an average, very high.
But in each year there were ‘wo
or three really able men, and

honour

these used to come to my house °*

for a little more advanced study.

The work suited me exactly,
and in the long vacations I was
able vo do a_ great deal of read-
ing and writing. My hore life
was ideally happy. I find in my
diary such entries as “every year
that I spend with Kitty is betvc:
then the lasv.”

This I think is the way with a
perfectly happy marriage. Love
et first is a comparatively poor
thing, an external attraction with

Precious habit

Mare moving delicate and full
of life,

Into the eye and prospect of his
soul

Than when she lived indeed.

{ found among her papers «4
sealed packet addressed “1'o my
dear husband, to be opened afte:
my death.” It was written, not
atter her health began to fail, but
at Rutland Gave in 1906, just be-
fore the birth of our first-born.

Like many in her generation,
she greatly exaggerated wha’ ow
Prayer Book absurdly calls the

great peril of childbirth. Statis-
tically the chances are about 250
to 1 in favour of the mother.

She wrote: “My own Best-
beloved, I am quite alone this
evening. I wish vo tell you a little

What is in my heart, though 1
shall not be able to express a
hundredth part of what I really
feel.

“Perhaps I hardly know my-

self: only sometimes I am filled
with a grateful and wondering
surprise that God has given me
the power to love you so much.

feel more and more how un-
certain the fuvure is for me; but
whatever God has settled for us
I am absolutely content.

“If I am vo go before you I do
not much mind, because I feel
more and more that to such love
as ours is nothing can separate
us, not even death.

“You will never know or guess,
unless God shows iv to you, what
you have been to me, what you
have taught me and shown me,
and made this life so beautiful
that vhis world seems more like
an immortal place and nearer
heaven.

“You have taught me
longer to fear death, for perfect
love casieth out fear, and if | am
to leave you soon it will only be
the regret of leaving you and our
babe for a short space. O God,
bless my Best-beloved, my own
dear, husband. Pour upon him the
fulness of Thy grace that he may
show forth to Thy people the
love, the power, and the near-
ness of Thy Kingdom unto men.

“God bless you now and always
Your Kitty.”

Bride

youne

After 43 years it has fallen ‘c
me to read this letter, which came
from vhe gentle heart of a young
bride—we had been married just

no

over a year. lt was not meant
for any eyes fut my own. But 1}
have allowed her to tell in her
ewn words ‘he love which has

showered upon my unworthy self
the greatest of earthly blessings. |

I do not feel that I have really
losit her, but only that the links

which bind me to this world of
time and change, of gain and
loss, of good and evil, are almost



severed, But I still have my dear
children and grandchildren
—L.E.S

What’s In
A Slogan?

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, (By Mail).

Tate and Lyle’s advertising
campaign for free sugar—in
particular the printing of slogans
on their sugar packets—was the
subject of a letter to the
“Observer” this week. The write,
Mr. G. E, Chandler, is a wholesale
grocer, and distributes sugar to a
rumber of retail shops. His letter
followed on the heels of Mr.
Herbet Morrison’s recent protesi
against workers employei b)
late & Lyle having to pack anc

andle political propaganda—in
the shape of anti-nationalisation
3.0fans,

Mr. Chandler’s point was this
fe was asked by a retailer if he
might not have packet sugar with-

' political slogans on the packet
i hinking this a reasonable request,
Vr. Chandler asked Messrs. Tate
& Lyle if they would arrange tc

ad a portion of his supplies in

ain packets. He was told this
ce uld not be done.

“But sugar is a rationed food’
writes Mr. Chandler “distributed
cn the instructions of the Ministry

Food. Packet sugar is a great
saving of time and inoney; every
rotailer is entitled to a proportion
his supplies in this way. Now
*>e only refinery from which our
supplies can come insists that
yolitical propaganda‘ must be dis-
‘ributed at the same time!”



n effect, says Mr, Chandler, he

s been compelled io say to his
tomers: “Take this packet
with these slogans, or else

ave bulk sugar.” He feels that the
egality of his position, a i

wholesaler imposing such a condi-
tion on a retailer, is questionable.

—(LE.S.) 2

tn = ecient,’ &, Diath slide, 4

NUS NN NH NNN NNN

IS OUR SINCERE
WISH TO ALL
CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS






THE SEASON'S GREETINGS...

To wish all of our customers
A Very Happy and
Prosperous New Year !

A. BARNES & CO.,

LRINK-

at



See





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Obtainable leading Grocers



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SEES SSS BRASS 6S SSS

—









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FOR THE

New Year




THe BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LID.

THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS
Nos. 33 & 52 Swen Street



4406 or 2109

TT TT a





SUNDAY Al O
aa 4 ah.
















Ee ee ee

UN. Trouble ,AREA INVOLVED IN RECOGNITION

nieces xe s<-, strasbourg
' Bells

Not Battle COSTA tae
Of The Titans | a cem ree !,

GULF Of
-NY. TIMES an

mn
NEW YORK, Dec. 31.





























—

jAQUE













«
The New York Times to-day A er on YM
i commented on United Nations Ye P ‘ rr" Sire n ol ill East German
Secretary—yGeneral Tryeve Lie's SAN JOSE 1$ or : tionalised factories will sound
new year statement in en he F 1 ° for one minute to begin a ‘half
placed emphasis on the shadow CHRIQUI ~~ OF . a ny if Weacé ~>¢ialism
cast on the United Nations by the nate ape ; IP ANAM a on fed ine lle Se ‘Ses
: “great power conflict”. —_—_— a

“There is of course no doubt
that the east-west struggle is at
the root of the United Nations dif-

‘4 ficulties but that is “a different
thing froni implying that the
struggle is merely a struggle of
the Titans in which the rest of the
world is not involved”. The news-
paper wrote.

“On most of the political ques-

viet Union”.
Special fireworks in red and |
sold at the Soviet Control Com-;
ion headquarters will begin
what is described as “the Com-
munist Epoch”. In West Berlin,
regulations against explosives will
not be waived to allow fireworks.

In New York, a_ thousand
policemen will patrol New York’s



COLOMBIA





NaN eae

= PACIFIC
“OCEAN —













: : . . ;
ations which Times Square, where a
Se ae Se eeeare of the sais crowd will give the peeing year tine
, e little pow- ne : its traditional noisy welcome.
ors hae of thelr tl teen will pe Ft RANDOLPH BI Traffie is almost at a standstill, AFRICAN BROTHERS
expressed a choice that with re- A ® eee tne Ea and extra trains, planes and buses A AT RR

markable consistency places them
with the United States and in op-
position to Soviet Russia”, it
added.—Reuter.

have been pressed into service to
WHILE “deploring” the revolution- carry travellers to and from the
ary means “by which political bigger cities. ‘ose
changes were made,” the U. S. has Thousands of revellers will in-
recognized Panama’s President Az- Vade London’s West End tonight
nulfo Arias, Recent “putsches” and ‘*? dance, drink, and sing in the
-, i a ee ee : New Year :
,, ° ‘ or ae ee and Colombia Sreod-of Mukting* restuetions
‘1 ChaYTON SPANAMA ave bey sebaanaan re fot ‘tie: Gest 4ighe “stnde tha: wae:
. moments. Lecated in these trouble ;
PANAMA HALBOA

. ral London will be more
areas (top on map) is the Panama i ith sky signs than at

*
SOMEBODY WANTING To
INCORPORATE ME ?





















OLD LOWS ALMANACK = YO4/CES yor joan)
SURACHEY AND PLUMMER START THE GROUNDNUTS ScHEMe

Germ Experts |
Sentenced







Canal, vitally important to the








9 ; Year’s Eve for a decade OVER AGAIN FROM SCRATCH , ee PLANTING AN EXPERT witit
eeigiem~em United States. At left isa close-up 3 undreds of extra police wer« QWERY Bust, “OR INDIIDUAL ,
LONDON, Dec. 31 pow eee, ee ee of Canal Zone. (Central ~ -7*) jeiy d to these strategic ,
Moscow radio reported today mcnn “1 7 % ‘ : g

its Trafalgar Square,
lights of the
as Tree from Nor-
ind the iliuminated
y Eros Statute in
Circus, magnet for
st. Paul’s Cathedral
will toll out
; N






that a Soviet Military Tribunal

has sentenced 4 Japanese “Germ U7. S SHIPPERS APPE 4 /
Experts” to 25. years imprison- e . am 4 , te.

ment for planning a “Bacterio-

seein Bam wae TO CONGRESS FOR FAIR

Twelve Japanese officers and

men of the Bacteriological Wat PANAMA CANA j 1 TOLL the Old Year
Unit 73 have 1 . ere








zy in the Nev
73 been on trial in onal now through radic
Khabarovsk, on the Soviet-Man- sages ita se ; ational tradition,

p . 2K Dec 3 .
churian borcer, since Christmes ae is NEW YORK, Dec. 31 Reuter.
Day. The American Shipping Industry has appealed to Congr

They admitted carrying out to establish a “fair and equitable policy” in determini
experiments on human guinea tolls for commercial shipping passing through the na ; 1 7 ‘
pigs, including American prison- Gara] Aull U.S. Expected to Cut
ers of war, and spreading bubecni : t

= The Industry contends ti
plague in Central and Southe





China in 1941 and 1942. Panama Canal UL v RB ie I oreign Aid

‘
( . sed for National Defer
General Ottozo Yamada, former kgypt oes I oO oh : BOs e “altho y - 5

Commander-in-Chief of the Kwan-





7 ; ag
tung Army, the force entrusted “vehicles ee the last 35; ye ( 2. ar ks *saieibien
with preparing the bacetria war Polls Tuesday have borne the burden ee adie y cause controversy are
Lieutenant-General Riuji, head a a ee the ieee Recoshition of the Commi
the Kwantung Army Health iii hash See ee ee regime in China and of re-
Service, who directed research and After a bitterly fought two a Institute splay 1d te the Chinese Nation
experiments on living people to months campaign in which clashes ah me rem hs ‘ ts ee alist Government for the defenc«
test the most effective bacterio- cost at least ten lives Egyptians the National Federation of Ameri Formosa
logical response, Lt-General Taka— Will go, to the polls on Tuesday to can Shipping, an Ree meee ee Collaboration by Britair
hassi, a Medical Services Officer, elect a Chamber of Deputies. Pacific Coast Maritime groups in ihe United States and Canada o
who also admitted leading experi- Premier Hussein Sirry Pasha urging Port Authoritic Seen development of atomic weap-
ments on living people, Kiyushi “Catetaker’s” Government in- of} Commerce, and other rarer sas
Kawashima, who headed an ex- creased the number of seats from parties to bring the matter to the Tr} Japanese Peace Treat)
periment which injected deadly 260 to 315 before King Farouk attention of Congress and Pre vill require Congressiona
bacteria into Russian and Chinese eae the old House on No- an ruman. on and ultimately ap
isoners of ei . OR acu vember 7 “The need or Congressit val
Nciibonmant Pen 25 year Many of the 5,000,000 voters will action is urgent, as 11 } ce Congressional action is also re

have to be shown where to put















: increase in tolls has been order¢ 1 on the question of assist-
: Sentences their cross as they are illiterate by Presidential declaration, eff to Greece, Turkey and Sout!
Tomio Alasawa, physician and The Egyptian Government has not tives Avril 1, 1950”. the stateme ; a permanent Charter fo
bacteriologist in charge of pro- yet granted votes to women in saat P ae 8 1 International ‘Trade Organisa
ducing germ cultures for war use, spite of campaign for equal civic ~“)\ io 4 f d proposals for a -mor
and Shunji Shato, whose uni rights for women led by 32 year The toll policy rane, am : 4) progr Ce of admittin
100 incubators for breeding old Madame Dorea Shafik, Doctor C@® shipping ch a Sree laced persons to the Unitec
bacteria got 20 years. Tossiade Of Philosophy and editor of wo- sive proper FSCORS RD ce ee ie
Mishi, chief of the unit 731 train. ™en’s magazines, military und civil expense of th alien
ing unit, 18 years: Kazou Mitomo The main struggle in the cam- Canal as National De fenc © iten
| a senior non-Commissioned Office: P&ign_is between the nationalist and wenn against Samer
in unit 731, 15 years W.AF.D. Party and its off shoot shipping those costs directly « : '
Masao Onoe, bacteriologist and [N° tre etesan sete AED. led cerned with the operation of t Astronomers To
Major in the Japanese Army oben diane air tend Biceriae ae canal”, it added. J
7 ave ae ae a, = : . »
Medical Services 10 years; Jensaku Egypt claims to be the Peoples rue Saeee Meet In Russia
, Hiraza, a Staff Officer in Detach- Party It was founded by the “At a present cat ba <
} ment 100; one of the Bacteriologi- late Saad Zaghlul Pasha “father margal SRD INE Day PP 3 ART ONA Dec .81.
cal Warfare Organisations, who of the Egyptians” 620,000,000 in tolls, Le ae The next General Assembly of
helped in experiments with gland- The Saadists are known as the $9,000,000 is required tor actual the International Astronomical
ers (cattle plague) and malignant land owning and big business Canal operation and mainten i1ion i) be held in Leningrad
anthrax 12 year Jiji Kurusima party The leader is Ibrahim exclusive of depreciatic uy probably in August, 1951, it was
Medical Orderly end laboratory Abdel Hady Pasha. They were ments to the Republic of Par announced here :
worker 3 years: Norimitsu Kikuchi, the strongest party in the old However, more than $10,000,00 Profe rA. M khailov of the
medical orderly and laboratory House. Other parties are: Liberal is paid out by Canal ithorit Soviet Academy of Sclences has |
worker, 2 years, Constitutions led by Hesseit or schools. cemeteries, libraries, give surance hat all cet
The State Prosecutor I N Haykal Pasha, Nationalists Ex police, fire, courts pating organisations will be in-
Smirnov in his final peech, saide treme Right Wing Party led by sewers, air terminal in ite
that the trial had shown. that Hafez Ramadam Pasha. facilities, used largels rhe nouncement was mac -
that t rial ha 1own dé Kotla also called the Independ- |” Healy. ae enittsaiey t met g here of the Ameri-
Japanese militarists had been ent Wafdist block has a nucleus of —,°) a 4 * the Gan il n Astronomical Society Rus
actively preparing bacteriological men who seceded from the "an ty edie aie 40) ia and the United States both
wee WAPD. The Leader is Makram _, NObwiistanemg, me, 10.8 20 issued invitations to the Interha-
They were trving to bring man- Ebeid Pasha. Ali Parties demand other revenues were sulficien . Group, but the United
kind back to the times of pes- the complete evacuation of British cover not only these, but to per-



: : , ks invitation was lately with-
tilence, of destructive epidemics troops from Egypt and unity of mit a profit of more than $2,00(



‘ Ape ; a drawn

of cholera and bubonic plague, te the Nile Valley (Egypt and the 000 in the fiscal year of Rae ta Sir Harold Spencer Jones, Brit-
the darkest periods of the middle Sudan) ee the Egyptian —Reuter. ish Astronomer Royal, and form-
ages,” he declared, Crown.—Reuter. I ini




























the



(gemntemicqnndittiemmminnins er Presi nt f the T ,
Unit 731, with headquarters in y juested the assurance that al)
Harbin, had prepared bacterio- ¢ Mi h | H . rticipating organisations wouid
? > .
logical warfare for several years, 2 Journals Reappear 1¢ ae as 1 1 to Russia Such an
the nrosecutor said urance reached President Ber-

The Unit. he said. began with In B. Aires Ho es For ime Lindblad, Lund Observatory
“the selection of death-dealing Pp stockholm, in

June, the an-



















infection, testing on thousands of BUENOS AIRES, Dec. 3! e Ouncement sald,-—Reuter
victims, and working out methods The Buenos Aires tabloic R «
of cultivating bacteria.” Clarion” at a this aa umanta . :
They finishes with “mass pro- ing as result of the solution of the . a a J Sore ,
Ps 4 of means. for deeveian on problem caused by intervention we basa coe = om . “ annings Still
5 ssive bhacteriolovic: ae paper supplies by congressiona »X11eC ng cnael oO vu ee
ee ven committee "investigating anti-Ar- mania to-day addressed a Ne Practising
> Japanese General Staff haq Bentine activities, Year message to his countrymen es 5 rp
The Japanese General Staff had B° he daily “Los Princeples” of proclaiming: ‘For all enslaved VIENNA, Dec. 31
approved three basic methods for cordoba also re-appeared after peoples, the day of freedom b« Emil Jannings, 64-year-old
using the bacteria for war pur- being ordered by provincial au- gins to dawn.” former German actor, who is
poses s i thorities to effect repairs in build- The message from King Mic! eriously il here, was studying
(1) Spreading of bacteria from ing, Meanwhile the Congressional ael, who is at present on holiday proposed next part as Pope
planes; Committee carried out activities in in Italy, said; “Rumanians,” { Bonitace in bed today, though his
(2) Dropping special bacterio- Rosario yesterday, where they vis- the second time from Foreign soi! ndition is unchanged. He is suf-
logical bombs from vlanes: and ited the Argentine-United States I am addressing you wherever [tering from jaundice and inflam-
(3) Infection on the ground of Cultural Institute, detailing am you are, at home or abroad 1 ma of the liver, but he still
} populated places, water supplies auditor to inspect the institute’s Word of comfort and encourage 1opes to take on the role. Jan
and pastures, books.—-Reuter. ment at the opening of a Ne is, w of the film “The Blue
The Prosecutor outlined the be ingel in which Marlege Die-
x rocess of Japan’s bacteriological r ‘ “It opens at a time of great 1 rose to fame, was Planning
; ato as follows; Work was a. U.K. I roops stress. Even greater suffering a come-back when he was taken
3 ed many years age in the laboro- , . ol may be in store—yet there are on December 2
i tory of Shiroishi, “the ideological oO eave — oe hopes. ' ie l eens to acon men-
i champion of bacteriological war- . . oo. dae © profourd and unshakeable tally very alert and greatly an-
ae with the support of the All Britist Soren ee Pe belief which has always guided sted in the telegrams and
Japanese Csneral Staff. awe sn alone «nl . oT een Rumanians, in both our past letters, which pour unceasingl)
Me \Feliel \ta“eie meacken , Greece by January 31, it wos and present difficulties, has been c his countrv ‘ome on the Wol
fs His ‘work ws surrounded by officially announced here today our faith in God and the nat : vensiaed | ¥ob-
secrecy,” the prosecutor — said On January 30, the last British “Our none aoe m ee ngee. Thotige eae orci a i
5 xo . f th — ore troops will embark in the Empire which we hav e wou au te 4 Werner a we f oe ore- : oe ine
y e work of the laboratory he Windrush, which will call at oe he wae to a ae ee sim , ine. ; ‘ 3 r
: chased it to Toso, oid Be Sar next day to take. on > ay shall, any sacrifice, is free- cer Fr ae filr I'm an insurance collector and | have to answer more silly questions about the Pru and
abdoratory was called the Togo board the last men in the Athens ie

; —(R P
t Unit. area.—Reuter. pacer)

the Co-op than any M.P., and {'m tired.”



4 ee .

| PE RED DIDK AED EN AITO, 7 % | ROUEN
Hi “We wish our customers and friends USED CLOTHING

f _ A Prosperous “toate
i A Happy and Prosperous

| New SVear =



London Express Service





Stanley Gibbons Stamp
Catalogue 1950,
Beer Mugs of Dickens Characte®
Poker” Chips in Gift Sets
Blue Band Waiz—Plates, Cups
Chair Cane and Varnish



wy

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SUNDAY

BY CARL ANDERS

got

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4

ON





















CKEY MO BY WALT DISNEY
y / THEY €VEN nal
Bien) =a - A HE PALL ARP ERY
ie Be) eo
aoe A 6 6 BUSINESS! Guar rex, PELE?

PMELITTLE :
ISALESMAN- ) ==
BHIP, YOU J Seon
KNOW! 4 ||| |@0R86e HH fans








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—~S
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THE LONE: RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER
x) LES! TT spleens she cinta sil Epes. %
iY el WHAT'S THAT ? *Â¥OU Sai) T wi YOU CAN'T STOP THAT IT CAN IR LET GO/ You CAN TRY AFTER









SHERIFE, NOU CANT LET THAT MOB Pe YOU'VE INSURED THE
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( "IM AFRAID | MUST ASK YOU TO \———————
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\ CASTLE MCGINK UNTIL .. uf WOULDN'T WANT

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FRIEND - TO THIN}
THAT JIGGS Wot
FLIRT WITH ANOTHER
GIRL; a
CEga>),
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14), King Features Syndicate, Inc, World

RIP KIRBY





MAYBE YOU THINK I HAVEN'T!
GOT ONE! MY MOTHER WAS
A MOVIE STAR...MY FATHER
WAS A FAMOUS EXPLORER...
THEY RE BOTH DEAD, AND
T'M ONS OF THE RICHEST
ORPHANS IN THE WORLD..
SO THESE ! 7














FLASH CODE # COMING FROM THE
LIGHT INTHE THUGGEES CELL!

THERE THEY GO+WITH THE NEWS
THAT THE RANSOM PLOT FAILED!
THAT MEANS DEATH FOR DIANAs
UNLESS | ACT FAST?

a
\ VES, AND WE MUSTN'T
LET THE THREE IN THE
ELL CONTACT ANYONE
“T°. OUTSIDE + NEY!
\






FROM THAT

jal









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PAGE THIRTEEN



CR te





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THE WILL OF LONELINESS 4
Radclyffe Hall |
CRICKET IS MY LIFE
The autobiography of Len Hutton
CRICKET MY WORLD |
By Walter R. Hammond.
CONCERNING CRICKET bee
t
ILLUSTRATED ieatiade Bieta iia Seceen. . nanan
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ALL items of different classification
must be set out in “eparate #(ver's.



narien ot ARRIA' Thnursaay Dec. 29th
. Philips Church, KENSiNGTON
ROBERT CHALLENOR and HILDA,



widow of the late GEORGE CNALLE-

NOR tz. &- -In
DIED

INNISS: SYDNEY BISHOP. His fun-

1 will Jeave his late residence

rlisie View” Bay Street, at 4.30

o'clock this afternoon for the West-

bury Cemetery. Friends " asked
to attend

Fanny Inniss,

MARSHALL~.ADRIANA, Last night o°
the General Hospital, Her fumeral wii
leave the residence of her grandsor.,
Lionel R. Arthur ‘Florvilie’, Brittoms
Cross Road at 4.15 this afternoon for
the King Street 8.D.A. Church ax
thence to the Westbury
Friends are asked to attend

Percy Marshall



Cemetery

(sor), Ferris Arthur
Lilian Marshall, [lene Scott, Miriar
Meblett (daughters), Cuthbert B. Arthur
and Lionel R. Arthur «sia dencst | e*





THANKS

undersigned, beg through this
medium to thank all those who attended
the funeral, send cards, wreaths or
sympathised with us in our recent be
reavement of our beloved JASMINE
REID

Samuel Reid (husband), George and
Fred Reid (Sons), Ivy, Millicent, Mabel,
Alma, Marjorie (Sisters)

WE, the

1.1.30. ms



iN MEMORIAM
IN Memory of our Dear Husband anc
Father COURTENAY H. MASSIAH, who
departed this life January ist 1947
“He went forth to his work, and to his
labour,—-until the evening.”
The Massiah Panne

IN loving memory of our Dear Mother
Mrs. ALBERTHA BAILEY who was call-
ed to rest on the 2nd January 1948,

Sleep on mother dear sleep on,

And take your rest

Ever to be remembered by her chil-
dren Mrs. E, Odell, Gwen, Olive
(daughters) and Oliver Nurse (son), Mr
Charies Odell (son-in-law). 15) grand
children 1.1.50—In

IN loving
loved father

memory of our dear be
JOHN BG PRTO” CcoD-
RINGTON who died 2nd Jan 1949
A home has missed a father
No one to fill his place,
in life we loved him dearly
In death we do the same,
Ever to be remembered by»
lowing, Eunice Codrington (Wife
Louis (Son) Yvette (daughter) ;, etc
1.1.50.

the fol

In



dear be

BRANCHE

IN loving memory of my
loved mother, MARTHA
who departed thig life Jan Ist 197

She has gone from toil and Sorrow

She has gone from grief and pain,,

She has gone to be with Jesus,
And | hope to meet her there
Ever to be remembered by
Maynard (son) Leonard and,
Brewster (grandchildren

FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

AUTO CYCLE—One
Cycle. M.2320. Owner
Dial 3939

Geralc
Sylviz









(1) Norman Aut
leaving shortly
30, 12.49—On





ENGINE Anmver.can
Horse) Outboard Engine, 5 h.p. As goor
as New. Also several extra gaskets t
go with it Phone 6140 or 2840

30.12.49

Johnson (Sea

t.f.1

tle





CAR—One Willys Motor Car in gv
condition, No reasonable offer refused
Apply to W Nurse, Cocoanut Walk
Hastings, Ch. Ch

31.12,.49—2n
TS

CAR: One Roekney Motor Car in goox
running order, Five new Tyres Nev
Battery and New Top. Apply: A Edg-
hill, Strathelyde, Phone 3378 or 2122

31.12.49-—2

_————_—_

TRUCK-—-One ‘334 V-8 Ford. In gooc
condition, OLIVER MOORE, Lower Carl-
ton, St. James

1.1.50.—1In

ELECTRICAL
GERATOR -- One (1) Genera
Electric Refrigerator Monitor toy

unit about 4 years old. Good edition
Apply:—Jotnson's Stationery Oslce
20.12 4n



G.B. REFRIGERATOR: 4 Cu. ft. in
good order. Offers, accepted, Reason for
selling owner buying a larger one





Phone 2342. between 10 a.m. and 12 noon
31.12.49—2n

LIF STOCK

GOATS — 7 Milch goats, 1 Saan

buek, 2 teeth. Bred from impor e

Stock. Apply B. A. Rayside, Contedence

Station Hill, St. Michael

29. 12.49—4n

PUPPIES—Half bred Bull & Mastiff
Bulls, $15.00, Bitches $10.00. Dial 8325
31.12. 49—3n





LIVESTOCK—One Graded Saanen Buck
2 years old, and one Black Belly Ram &
months ald, both r y for service, Apply
,. N. HUTCHINS West India Rum
Refinery, Phone

1,1,60.--2n.

ate Suiver King

all models, in c
oe a migdela in gree an fa

Bil.sont.en








MISCELLANEOUS
MANURE—Horse Manure suiteble fo

gardens. 8/- horse cart load. jal 318

C, A. Proverbs. 90.12 .49-—3n

3.12.49—t.i.n

re
GOODS—Just received a new shipment
of electrical goods 1/044 triple, 7/04
twin, ie triple, 7/029 twin, 3/02
triple 3/029 twin €.T.S. cables 1/044
7/029, 3/029, V.ILR. Switches, plug recep
tacles and several items. Enquire Aut
Company. 16.12.40
sane
WE still have a small supply of Am
— Chocolates in stock, 1/- per 1
ust received Black Magic Choco
iaies 1 % tins, & 1% I boxes
KNIGHTS DRUG STORES
30 .12.40—2r
ea
FREEDOM FROM FIRE—lInstal a Fire-
proof Safe with doors secured b:
Combination lock: Suitable for office o:
store. Ure your gecords. Contac!
A. 8S. BRYDEN & SONS (B’dos) Lid.
13.1240— Tue, Fri., Sun.. — tf.n

ANTIQUES of every description. Glass
China old ore Sne Silver, Water-
a, early books, Maps, Autographs



etc.. at Gorringes Shop, adjoin,
ing Royal Yacht Club.
18 48—s.w.n
SOUR GRASS—25 acres sour grass &
Ashion Hail, St. Peter Apply C. A
Thariton, Pleasant Hall Plantatfor St
Peter 1.1.50—3
eect
GALVANISE: SHEETS A limite:
ae unt of new galvanise sheets. 7 fce
2aVY gouge Appiy. Central Auction
Mart, Magazine Lane a

1.1.56

a



:





FOR RENT















=



PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE
We beg to notify our Custom-~
ers that we will be closed for
Stock-taking from Tuesday, Jan-





eee









HELP















SUNDAY ADVOCATE
WANTED | LOST
LOST board see Cosvantoet

| roof attached, eee we
BRACELET—Between Wildey, Bridge>; Ch. Ch. within District

town and Hastings, lady’s flexible gold Dated this 30th day of December 1949
link bracelet. Finder will be rewarded | To the Police Magistrate, Dist. B'.





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of ROSE STUART «
Queen Street, St

& FOUND

1 ae een + sem







Malt Liquors, &c., at
shop with she
Otstins Town

A COOK—Apply the Palms, Cheapside
31.12.49—n



















Michael for permission |

SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, iy i

. SHIPPING iG NOTICH)
Canadian National Steam,

| shi;

al
da















Leacock Signed GEORGE T. YARD,
ENGINEER — Diesel Engineer, Six; on returning same ‘o D. @ for Applicant \THROUND SAILS Sails Bails
—— | uar | until further notice. vears practical experience in interna | mr. at Musson's office or Wildey House. = Relgen a gets. SOUTHBO oi MON- Realifax Beats Arrives
y ¥ 30.12.49—3n. | N.B.—This_ applicat NAME OF Sit r
USES Wm. D. RICHARDS & SON, Combustion Engines Holding 1.C.S dered at a Licensing Court to be held TREAL Brdoy &
= McGregor St. ee he We eee Sel LADY’S WRIST WATCH—In vicinity | at Police Court, District ‘B’, on Friday | LADY RODNEY mms 24th Dec. 26th Dee .
7 aise ‘ . tact: EX W.Gibbs, Allendale, Rich- Sea|the 13th day of January, 1950 at 11 .nY NELSON oe 12th Jan. 14th Jun, Jan, ;
GLENCOE", St. Lawrence Ave., con- | 31 19 49.-2n, mond Gap, St. Michael Marine Hotel, Finder comsaunicate, Sei e 3 ; , RODNEY ibaa 8th Feb. 10th
taining 2 bedrooms, Drawing abd pat A626 ’ ’ " . St. 29.12.49-—4n | View Guest House, TON sacakok o'otoek, a.m DD. MORRIS. LAR pore rae on Ba an Feb. Jan, +
ing rooms, Kitchen, W.C. an ak = i «88 n. 3 BAS Dist. ‘B ADY RODNEX a 25th Mar, ih Men }
Large Yard, Dial 3455 for sag wie NOTICE PAYING GUESTS RECLIVED, Cool. | —— — Actg. Poiice Magistra 2s Y bsiyi ant neLaoe oe 13th Apr. 14th re ats hy
—_.—| The Cattlewash Rored leading from Single ms Se ee naaie al pesicaniohesaati ; herd
v nies for re- minutes ub or y. Specia ‘ ives Sails ”
“KRISHAUA" -Fontabeile Lands End. | Tobruk to Borva will be closed NORTHBOUND Arrives s Arrives j
Dial 2700 or 2442. T, Maraj, Hindu Store, ‘paige from Segue ans ad ee ee wore ttn | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE B'dos Bidos Boston gives
3 29.12.49-—t.f.n. iy er mums i
Re ithe rai itil inion rc Highways. ai. Jens The application oe an ee LADY RODNEY ao} Jon. ists Jan. 28th Jan, “ee
JRNISHED BUNGALOW—A!. Worth- ’ < of Bent . . ey for permis LADY N rd Feb. h Feb. 1 th Feb,
ae one hele ee Saat MeL ectee ag nies hep | OT Bae aim Mar. Sana gree 38 Moe MS
lery linen. Nice . best sea double e rd and shingle st Mar mn ar. J
Gothing. ‘Dial. 8138 NOTICE 7 er ae oe eee rns 3 Holders Hill; St. James. LADY RODNEY 17th Apr. 19th Apr. 2uh am
15.0048 Salma G Seen geeperty cae ie DON’T WORRY YOURSELF ABOUT | “Dated this 30th day of December 1949.| LADY NELSON 6th May 8th May 18th
PARISH OF 8T. PETER een ea ae de Ah Big MOVING To the Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘E' -
WORTHY DOWN-3 bedrooms furnish-| Wanted by the Commissioners of ee aod ; at Uideaeae. Well ‘aid a dae, Holetown.
ga. Available from Ist Jan. 1980; Apply! Health tor the Barish of Gt. Peter 3/ Dov colsniy: private grounds an ade LET Un Aes ans Signed ST. CLAIR LAYNE, iN 4
Galph A. Beard. Hardwood Alley.| (Two) fully qualified nurses to perfogm | To 258” Good price for suitable prop- laion Assured Sie AY PHOR IY: N.B.—Subject to change without notice. all vessels fitted wi
Phone 4683. or 8402. Ae re LA duties District Nurses for the | eee Apply DIXON & BLADON, Real Personal Supervision Ass ee ee ee cients bers, Passenger Fares and freight rates on application old
: , | above Parish. Estate Agents, Auctioneers, Plantations Pho: 3309 Gere a Licens ur a
Applications will be received by the i 4640 pe Police Court, District ‘E’ Holetown, on x
WINSLOW—Cattlewash, St. Joseph. | undersigned up to 12th Jan; 1950 at {| Building, Phone 4640, 1.1,50—1n,| BARBADOS FURNITURE REMOVER | ft) the 13th day of January: 1950 at| GARDINER AUSTIN & co., LTD, <2 gs
For the months Jan. Feb pare “" 10.00 a.m. : oo S. CODRINGTON 11 o'clock, a.m. ,
and June 1950. Apply Mrs . Terms: Salary $40.00 per month. “ot RA 30.11.49—t.f.n. S. H. NURSE, =— — ie
Gooding, Strong Hope Pantation, st Appointment on 3 tion. 10 Britton’s X a Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘E’ Holetown.. —S =
Thomas 1.1.50—2n.| Birth certifieate and Doctor's. certii-| PROFESSIONAL NOTICE 1.1,50—In The M.V. CARIBBEE will ac- ts
| cate must accompany Applicatioris. c sthiaineenenmenepsenrenecneaseiteanestinenemasriasiacetrenneraatt cept Cargo and Passengers for MOTOR VESSEr,
OBAN-—St. Lawrence Gap, e e DR. FERREIRA of “Chiroville” Upper St. Kitts-Nevis Montserrat, Anti-
rooms, having dining and drawing rooms, outa COBRIN. | Say'St. (near Meplanade) by Chiropractic big: ap e 1sé LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE gua, Dominica, sailing Fivey 30th “BLUE ST,
itech tte, etc. er pa rs. ‘omms: .
iar s11o. 14.12.48—t.f.n St. Peter. | rnethod corrects diseases of eyes, ears, The application of GWENDOLYN December. Ar
31,12.49—4n. | nose, throat, lungs, stomach, kidneys and HARRIS of Eagle Hall, St. Michael, for The M.V. DAERWOOD will

BUSINESS PREMISES—No. 46 Roebuck
Street, from Ist October 1949. For par-
ticulars. Ring 2655. 4,12, 49—t.fn.
—————$

FLAT—At Haggatt Hall to approved
terants. Phone 2859. 30.12.49—3n.



“THE WOLD", — Marine Gardens,
Hastings Unfurnished. Containing 2
bedrooms, bath & toilet upstairs. Veran-



NOTICE
PARISH OF 8ST. PETER
The Vestry of St. Peter request that
every person who on the first day of
January 1950 shall ote the owner or
occupier of any land liable to be assess-
ed shall sometime during the said
month make a return in writing to the

doh, Drawing & Dining Room, Pantry &| Parochial Treasurer of the Parish en-

Kitchen downstairs. Garage and ser-
vants room in yard, room for a farden.
From January Ist, 1950. Dial 8310. Mrs.
Stuart Bynoe



“MELBOURNE” on-Sea, Worthing, Ch.
Ch From ist January 1950, Phone
Springer 2606. 23.12 .49--t.f.n.

‘FLAT—One fully furnished 3 bed
Som luxury Flat, at White Hall, Cod-
rington Hill, 3 miles from Bridgetown
From December 15th. Apply Mrs. F. L.
Lynch, Telephone 3427.

7.12.49—t.f.n



FARAWAY, Skeete’s Bay, St. Philip.
fully furnished. Lighting plant, garage,
servant-rooms, $50.00 per month. From

lst November on, Dial 4476.

27.10.49—t.f.n
“WATERFORD"—Hastings (near Gar-
rison Savannah). Desirable residence,

{lly furnished. Available from Ist Feb-
ruary. Dial 8330,
31.12.49—8n





~RESTDENCE- Modern Residence with
over 1 acre, 3 miles from town,
elevated with beautiful view, 3

rooms, large lounge, covered verandah
kite hen, servants’ quarters, storerooms
55.00 per month unfurnished. "Another
ittractive 2 bedroom property similar
location furnished $65.00 per month
DIXON & BLADON, Real Estate Agents,
Auctioneers, Plantations Building, Phone
4640 1.1,50—In

3°

OCP.

“LORRAINE HALL''—Situated x
next to the St. Lawrence Hotel, %
> from Ist February, 1950. Inspec- é

tion, on appointment, being kindly ss
allowed by present occupant For S
§ further information ple ase apply ¢&
— tc. s Johnson, Seaston, Hast-
% ings 31,12.49—3n. gS

SLL







PUBLIC SALES



AUCTION
———_—.
I have been instructed by
nissioner of Police
next the Sth Jan
it the Harbour
ng Boats
26mm, OF
me 214 x
Terms

the Com-
to sell on Thursday
beginning at 1 o'clock
Police Station (3) Row-
2” x 8” overall by ¥
« 5/7 overall by 5’ bean
5” overall by 5” beam
Strictly Cash.
D'ARCY A
Govt





SCOTT,
Auctioneer, Dist A”

31.12.49-—4n
re I.

UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER



SALES JANUARY 1950
Tuesday 10th—Mrs, Beatrice Gooding's
Sale Armagh”, 6th Ave, Belleville.

Tuesday 17th—Sale of Antiques at ‘White-
hall’, St. Peter
Thursday 1vth—Mrs, P 0.
Sale Carlisle View,
Tuesday w4th—Dr,. R. L,
The Pine
Thursday 26th—Miss O. E. Spence’s Sale.
Olive Dale, Marine Gardens, Hastings,
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
Auctioneers

Crichlow's
Bay Street
Hutson’s Sale,

7~_—_——

REAL ESTATE

SHARES~-18 shares of $5.00 each in

THE WEST INDIA BISCUIT CO,

LIMITED,

48 shares of £1. each in THE BARBA-

DOS FIRE INSURANCE COY

136 shares of 10/- each in THE BAR

a CO-OP; COTTON FACTORY

LTD

These shares will be offered to public

‘competition at the office of the under-

igned on Friday the 6th day of January

1950 at 2 p.m

CARRINGTON & SEALY
LUCAS STREET

30,12.49-—5n

FOR SALE at our office No. 17 Higt

Street on Friday, 6th January 1950, at
p.m

£200 349% Barbados Government Bonds



b00 3% % British War Loan
600 Shares Barbados Shipping &
Trading,Co. Ltd
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
31,12,40—4n
SCAFELIL,""—St. Philip,
police Station, Newly
»odroomed bungalow
ng room, kitchen, washroom, servants
juarters, garage, Concrete construction
vith aluminium roof. Lodge School 1%
miles, Cvane and Sam Lords 4 miles
wher leaving Colony. The location
fers superb scenic beauty and is cool
at all times. The price is extremely ‘at-
£2,100 — ($10,080) DIXON &
Real Estate Agents, Auction-
Plantations Building, Phone 4640
1.1,.50—1n

Close District
built compact 3
with lounge, din

tractive
SLADON,

eers,

“CARLTON” St. James,. Single
storey coral block house, shingled roof,
150 feet above sea level. Standing in 3
scres of land. % mile. from bathing
veach. Bridgetown 10 miles Speights-
own 1% miles. Living room, dining
room, patio, 3 bedrooms, kitchen, pantry,
farage and workshop. Servants’ quar-
ters. Mains water and electric light
Furniture at valuation if desired. A
modern up-to-date residence, ..DIXON
& BLADON, Real Estate Agents, Aue-
Uoneers, Plantations are Phone
4640 1.1.50—1n

“CLOUD WALK Hill,
Christ Church aan single storey
house standing on ridge overs wegying
Hastings and Worthing. 260 feet aoe “4
moa level, Magnificent. view, 3 bed
living room, dining room, siuaye 2 ba bath
rooms, with tub bath and shower, modern
Kitchen, laundry, servants’ quarters, tiled
patio facing the sea. Laid out gardens,
BLADON, Real Btaie'Agents, Pants
ea tate Agents, Pl
Building, Phone 4640 eee

Rendezyous

+1,50,-1n,

“SALISBURY”, Gun Hill, charming
country home standing 750 feet above sea
level on Gun Hill giving unrivalled views
over the Island. This well built modern
Stone residence contains 3 reception, 3



bedrooms, 2 verandahs and all modern
conveniences Garage, stabling, stock
Pens all in first class order. Carriage-

way encircles house. Approximately 8
acres ground. DIXON & BLADON, Real
Estate Agents, Auctioneers, Plantations
Building, Phone 4640

1.1.60.—1n,

OO

PERSONAL









The public hereby






are warned against
giving credit to m ife Phyllis Holder
hee Wilson) as I ¢ t hold myself re-



wible for her or yone else contract-
ty debt or deb nh my name unh-
4 written order signed by me,
Signed REGINALD BRAD HOLDER
Park Read, Bush Hall

rark
91,12.49-—2n

of

Section 53 Sub: of the Vestries

hee

NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. PETER

Wanted by the Vestry of St. Peter,
A loan of £3,000 (three thov.sand
pounds) as authorised by Thé Saint
Peter's Parish Loan Act, 19

Tenders for the above, loan will be
received by the undersigned up to
January 12th 1950 at 10.00 a.m. Tenders
must be sealed,

Terms: Interest must be at the rate
not exceeding 4% per annum.

Principal repayable by £300 per an-

No Tender of less than £300 will be
considered.

30.12.49-—3n. | Act 1911-5.



Signed.
G. S. CORBIN,
Vestry Clerk.
31.12.49—6n



NOTICE

TO THE VESTRY ELECTORS OF THE
PARISH OF 8ST. JAMES

This is to notify you that I shall be
contesting a seat for the Vestry at the
forth-coming election.

I shall do all that lies in my power tc
serve you to the best of my ability, an
I am asking you for your whole-hearted
support at the polls.

ELLSWORTH HOLDER,
Colvilla,
Garden, St. James.
18.12,.49—2n.



NOTICE

TO THE VESTRY ELECTORS OF THE
PARISH OF ST. JAMES

I ABRAHAM HOLDER give notice to
the Electors that I am not standing o
January 3rd 1980, for re-election as ;
member of the St. James Vestry as m)
health will not permit me.

I beg to return you my sincere thanks
for the sup pert you have given me during
the past fifty years of life, both as
en active parishioner as a Vestry-
man,

My son E. 8. Holder is offering himself
as_a candidate for a seat in your Vestry.

I am asking you give him the same
loyal support as you gave me during the
past sixteen years, and elect him.

Thanking you for all you have done,

Yours sincerely,
A. .
18.12,49—2n

THE BARBADOS sour MOVEMENT
1



The Executive Committee of The Bar-
bados Youth Movement wishes ‘one and
all a bright and Prosperous New Year:
thanks for your Past Assistance ajid again
solicits your future support.

Rey. L, BRUCE—CLAPKE
Founder nd President
Rey. J. B, GRANT 1,1,
Director and Cnaplain,
Mrs. OLGA BROWNE,
General Secretary.
1.1.50—In,
(a

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of VE
ARDS of Dayrells Road, Ch. Cn.
permission to sell Spirits, Malt ,Liquors,
&c., at a Board and shingle shop with
shedroof attached at Dayrells’ Road, Ch.
Ch, within District ‘A’ .
Dated this 30th day of eee 149.
To the frail Magistrate. ist. ‘A’.
od VERNESE RICHARDS,
Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consi-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
xt Police Court, District ‘A’, on"Monday
the 9th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock

a.m,
E. A. McLEoOp,
Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’.
1.1.50—1n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of SHIRLEY HALAL of
Cave Hill, St. Michael, far permission to
sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &e., at a

E
é
d
%
bal
2

4

two years, but it-is possible that this period may be extended at a

1

allowance equal to 10%

of the appointee. The salaries for each appointment are set out

lower organs. Dial 2881,



at dates to be arranged later.
new waterproof bag as supplied by the Cement Marketing Company,
Ltd. Prices should be quoted for delivery on the wharf at Bridgtown
and should be exclusive of import duty and package tax.
should reach the Director of Highways and Transport not later than

British Guiana Government.

| Advertise ....

&e.,



The cement should be packed in the

Mrs M. SEALBY begs to inform
all that her Parlour
“The Beauty Box” will be closed
from December 3st.

customers

Tenders





p.m. on Friday, the 6th of January, 1950. ‘The Government does || Se een te Janvary
not bind itself to accept the lowest or any tender. { : :
29th December, 1949. 30.12.49-—-2n |)
ALL PERSONS interested in
PERSONNEL REQUIRED FOR THE ROAD CONSTRUCTION ||} ing « course with the Bennett

College, Ltd., Sheffield, kindly
contact their representatiye J. R
Hunte, Joyceville, Abbeville Gar-
dens, Christ Chureh, Dial 8156,

PROG IN BRITISH GUIANA
The following staff is required by the Public Works Department,

2. The appointments are temporary and are for a period of

ater date.

For Handsome Handcrafts, such as
3. No housing accommodation will be provided but a housing

HATS, SLIPPERS, HANDBAGS,
MATS, CURIOS, BASKETS, Ete.
-~+. it's Always...
DOMINICA HANDCRAFTS CO.

% of the officer’s salary will be paid.

4. The salary will depend on the age and previous experience



permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors
at a double roof board and shingle
shop situate at Weston, near Reids Bay.













Acce
accept Cargo and Passengers ‘for pting

St. Lueia, St. Vincent, Grenada, Passengers

Aruba, sailing 7th January, 1950.











Foe Nassau,
T NOTICES. e Stated’ tints 30th day of December 1249. seat ftw ig eo wil Trinidaa, Balti,
GOVERNMEN e To the Police Magistrate, Set St, Lucia, sailing gaturday gist Sailing - . .
Signed GWENDOLYN Eamets December. a 1TH
Applican Soret
N.B.—Thi licati ill be consi- B.W.I. SCHOONER OWN- B. HARRIS
CEMENT FOR RUNWAY cered v2 Licensing Court to ‘2 held. at ERS’ ASSOCIATION (INC.) c/o H. P Agent,
P oletown, on P.
Tenders are invited for the supply of approximately 45,000 94 Ib. woltte Tea watt ner bt Sane AO ot Consignee: Tel. No. 4047 pet cae
bags of Portland Cement required by the Government for the pro~-| 11 o'clock, a.m. i aialiea i Broad
posed runway at Seawell airport, 15,000 bags should arrive in the Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘E’ Holetown.. = == SS
Island between March Ist—15th and the balance ir. two shipments 1.1.50—In

FOR INFORMATION CONCERNING Youn
HAGGAGE AND HOUSEHOLD EFFETe

Consult

SMITHS SHIPPING SERVICE

For Packing
For Shipping
For Insurance
‘ For Preterence
epresentatives in all th Hi the prines al P F
presentatives i ll the prineip orts Aasaot the wor,

PHONE 3024 —

UVC CCU CCB ,
TO OUR PRESENT AND FUTURE
FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS 7

|

HI 1 A Lrosperous and Happy 1950

ati | L ;
low, but a higher salary may be paid depending on experience, : soneaeen itis acu: 9 TO ALL OF YOU
qualifications, etc. SSS we e
5. Free passages to and from British Guiana will be provided " x

for an officer, his wife and family, not exceeding five passages.

current Government rates.

Works, British Guiana, and full details of qualifications and experi-

6. The applicants should be over twenty-eight years of age.
7. Travelling and subsistence allowances will be paid at the

EXHIBITION

- of -

‘ PAINTINGS and
DRAWINGS

8. Applications should be addressed to the Director of Public



ence should be enclosed together with copies of at least three recent
references. The envelope should be endorsed “STAFF ROAD CON- Bika
STRUCTION”. G. D. AKED

I. CLERK OF WORKS.

Il.

board and shingle shop attached to resi-)

dence at Cave Hill, St. Michael
Dated this 29th day of December 1949
To the Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’.
Signed S. HALL.
Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consi-
idered at a Licensing Court to ‘be held
at Police Court, District ‘A’, on Monday
the 9th day of January 1950 ‘at lfo "olock

a.m
BE. A, McLBoo,

Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’.

1,1.50—In

—

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of EVELYN H. KING
of Brighton, St. Michael for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c, at Qnd
floor of a 8 wo wall building known
as Colonial Tudor Street, City.

Dated this 30th day of December i949



To the Police Magistrate, Dist. . ‘A’
Signed EVELYN H. KING,
Applicant.
N.B.—This a ation will be consi-
sidered at a Licens! Court to .be held
at Police Court, t ‘A’, on Monday
the 9h day of January.1060 ‘at 11 o'clock
m.
TALMA,
Police Nastia Dist. ‘A’.
-1.50--1n.



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

of renege ton ot BAe ROBINSON
wofho ; SS ats Fi, smen. A per-

on to Spir it quors,
&c,, at a board and shop at
au of Jessamy and Jordan's Lane,

Dated this Sist day of December 19
Signed M. Ji

N.B.—This pueden s tenn
oy w consi-
sidered at a Useheing Court to be held

at Police Court, District ‘A’, on Mongay
the 9th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock

a.m
Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’,
H. A. TALMA, :

1.1.50—In.

———— eee,

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of BUNICE AUSTIN
ef Union Land, St. Joseph for is-
sion to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
at ground floor of a 2 storey wall and
wooden building at Union Land, St
Joseph,

Dated this 30th day of December 1949
To the Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘F’.

Signed KING,
for Applicant

N.B.This application will be consi-
dered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District ‘F on Ty y the
1th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock,

a.m
J. R. EDWARDS,

Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘F.
1.1. 60630.







»@t<
The British Council, Wakefield,

Until January 7
Wednesdays 9—5, Sat.

A Clerk of Works is required to supervise all phases of work
for a Road Construction Scheme. The applicant must have had
considerable experience in road construction using modern equip-
ment, general survey and setting out for road construction, R.C.
Culvert construction, pre-mix Sand/bitumen and stone/bitumen
work and general administration and costing.

SALARY £800 PER ANNUM.
SOIL MECHANICS LABORATORY SUPERINTENDENT.

The Laboratory Superintendent is required to supervise and
carry out laboratory and field tests in connection with a Road

P—12.30





\jS SSS SSS

BELL,
CONSTUCTION C6.

a

Construction Scheme. The applicant must have had considerable ENGINEERS & CONTRACTORS
experience of modern soil-stabilized road construction methods,
the laboratory and field testing of materials connected with this fe

type of work, including soil surveys, the testing of bituminous
materials and all types of aggregates.

Estimates and Plans prepar-
SALARY £600 PER ANNUM.

ed for all Types of Buildings,
Repairs and Alterations.









COS proscesocooes







WE ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO
YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT,

®
\ Bony D. TAYLOR & SONS LI
a CANNES SSN DADE DN BN SN

~~

CUeMEEEES

465



FOR YOUR NEXT VACATION
THE GRAND HO L,

in
THE ISLE OF SPICES
GRENADA B.W.L.
Luxuriously furnished, Bathrooms to nearly
}
|

Bedroom, Two Lounges, Super Views, Best

Area, Hotel Car at very reasonable rates--also Outboard

Motor Boat, when not on scheduled journeys to beach

















III, BITUMINOUS MIXING PLANT FOREMAN, Phone 3100
A foreman is required to take charge of a bituminous mixing
plant to produce material for a Road Construction Scheme. The DOUBLE BEDROOMS — from $10. 00 to ee per day
Applicant must have had considerable experience in the opera- |! inclusive of Breakfast, Lunch, 2
tion, repair and maintenance of large batch-type bituminous mix- |! r . ($5.00 to $7.00 per person
ing plants, especially in connection with sand/bitumen cold mixes |! NOTICE : an
and stone/bitumen cold mixes. SINGLE BEDROOMS — from $5.00 to $7.00 per day
SALARY £600 PER ANNUM. ‘cialis ; inclusive of Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
IV. ROAD CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN. Mins 18 Wl LOCAL BOOKING AGENT: ‘ Ralph’ A. ‘Bea Beard, Hani
A foreman is required to supervise all phases of work in Pp . ICHOLLS % Mts. wood Alley, Phone 4683.
connection with a Road Construction Scheme, The applicant Be t. INCE of the Banford { S
must have had considerable experience in earth moving, rein- eauty Salon, Bolton Lane, RPNSSSSS: PPO PLES SSCS LESS
forced concrete culvert construction and bitumen base course hereby notify their Patrons I 4 ae ts nt
and surface course work. It is essential that the applicant has that their Shoppe will be (i) %
had experience of the operation and maintenance of modern plant closed until 9th January, } x
used on this type of work including the ‘Barber Greene’ type of HS
finisher, - i %
SALARY £600 PER ANNUM. = Ig
30.12.49 —2n : Oe ee ae
- SHANA AIAAAE, |
eon cern nitrite penile ais ire cen a. K
PART 0 im C. Carlton Brown & ap
3 ‘
NE ORDERS S Stat IA
By Wish Our Customers a
Lieut.-Col. J. Connell, O.BE., E.D., ’ and Friends =
Commanding,
The Barbados Regiment, A Happy a
Issue No. 49 30 Dee. 49 Fs 8 THE
1. “TRAINING ete ee ey ee ene ae ie New Sear S 9 od
(a) pas ee ” January, 1950 at 1700 hours, there will be a = eason S Gr eetings
‘arade for all Ranks of the Regiment, 4
(b) jy eg be a N.C.O. voluntary class at 1700 hours on Tues- ¢. CARLION BROWNE e — FROM YOUR JEWELLERS —
, or anuary, 1950. .
®. ORDERLY OFFICER AND SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING Wiplode 2 ae Y. DE LIMA LD
9 JAN. 50 ggis' x
Lieut. TA. Gitten 136 Roebuck St. Dial 281388 | $ ; & (0, Me
83 Sjt. Peterkin, C. G, 2 x *0, Broad Street "Phone 4644 4
sleek ter tes NOMONONENONG NEN)
2/Lt. E. R. Goddard en eee eer Se ens a
212 Sjt. Haynes, G. L. ) Saas
2. APPOINTMENT || MAY :
The Commanding Officer is pleased to approve the appoin Q— (ESS §
, 1) tment A P :
a a F. Stuart to an Acting Unpaid Lance Serjeant wef Be yours Sire " PINE the
e Christmas Season,
M. L. D, SKEWES-COx, Maior | FURNISH GOOD | ~ fos . + marked indelibly in your
S.O.LF. & Adjutant, an TH FTY uccess, Expansion and Ac
The Barbados Regiment. d Rl |
oe NOTICE . | U
interested personnel of the Regiment are notified that Foot- |
ps a, — on Tuesday 3 Jan, 50 at 1700 hours. It is GOOD AND THRIFTY” tecmn, toe | LET US HELP YO
~— os . at the a tae Football match will take fay things we have for you 4d ve this Success. Continue curing the age
700 hours on Friday 6 Jan, 50. : | ear to give us your Orders for all manner
Mah
Saft |) Tare, teks tht Ry sui
ene na and ra: and panelled— em 0 ardware you may r ir
REAL ESTATE AGENTS — AUCTIONEERS — SURVEYORS Linen Pritess-“Variines an tent | oe :
iow Tables in na styles ae Sizes-— j
DIXON & BLADON || 22222 ||| wep name am een ow
i Dining and Luncheon ables— }))| ings witb all our customary sincerity:—
on an at ome. G. S. DIXON, OBE | Chir “Belce and Rush Chains tH! RD
AF. (Eng. ) MRSI AM.LB. E n = ar ite = Cabinets— | A
Genaeniiiiie, be Sideboards and Liquor Case af’ rosperous CW ear
U.K CANADA — USA.
Before buying, examine our extensive lisis of high L. § WILSON ; pid
elass property and 1} ad i : ;
etek wa perty and land located in pe ouinind Trafal St. -o- Dial 4069 | THE BABBADOS FounpRY
Sa . x . White Park Road saute St. Micha
SSS SSS SS"! ae









en





Mr. and Mrs. Lilliboy Shinbag Throws a Party



SUNDAY, JANUARY 1,
cee





1950



SUNDAY ADVOCATE









Jungle Has Swallowed
Ford’s Rubber Empire

}
| By RICHARD DYER
|

PARA, BRAZIL, (By Mail)

The dream of a rubber empire, upon which the late
Henry Ford spent more than $15,000,000, has been swallow-
ed up by the tangle of the Amazon jungle.



PAGE FIFTEEN

This plantation, near the junc- ; Here better results were ob-

‘ion of the River Tapajoz with | tained in cross-breeding of the
the world’s greatest water shed /two plants, but the Ford techni-

; has become overrun and neglected j clans were never able to conquer

yy in the few years since the Ford j the ravages of the “South Ameri-
Company experts burned their re- | can leaf disease” on rubber trees

Ni cords and pulled out. | mixed with East Indian plants.

s Old Henry Ford, always perse- | Easier To Harvest

3 cuted by his mania for complete The only real advantage ob-
independence in every phase of | tained by the Ford experiment
the automobile building industry, | was proof that systematically
sent his men to the Amazen in | planted trees are much easier to

F 1927 to establish an experimental | harvest than those encountered
rubber plantation that would as- haphazardly in the jungle, but the
— him of freedom from war | rubber vield of the ny ga GD?
shortages and vival monopolies. tion trees was never much better :

They went first to Fordiandia, | than those grown wi!d in the | So good to —

more than 100 miles up the Tapa-; Amazons for centuries.
joz from its confluence with the The Ford Company was ready s so easy to make
Amazon, to abandon the experiment in 1940

a





Pleasure

of Your |

Company
is

h

Requested















Hacked Clearing

Here they hacked a clearing
from the jungle and started a
plantation in which they intended
to cross the “Hevea Brasileira”
with the highly productive rub-
ber trees of the East Indies.

The Brazilian variety, never a
big producer, even in the days of
the Brazilian rubber boom at the
turn of the century, had the ad-
vantage of being resistant to heat
and insects.

But the Pordlandia experiment
after ten tough years, had to be
abandoned.

The land did not lend itself to
rubber culture, and cross-breed-
ing of the two plants never pro-

but held out during the war when
East Indian shortages caused an-
other rubber rush to the Amazon
Basin.

Until 1945, the vast experience
of the Ford experimenters proved
invaluable to the Rubber Devel-
opment Corporation in its attempt
to inerease Amazon rubber pro-
duction.

However, the R.D.C. failure was
indicative of the Ford experience
In the best year, when the rubber
development experts predicted
harvest of 100,000 tons from the
Amazon Basins as the result of
the millions of American dollars
poured in there, only 17,000 tons
eame out, or slightly less than the







Itching, Burning and Smarting of

Stopped In
23 Minutes

Since the discovery of Nixoderm by
an American physician it is no longer
necessary for anyone to suffer from |
ugly, disgusting and disfiguring skin









. blemishes such as Eezema, Pimples, | /
duced the expected rubber re-; ormal Amazon production before Rash, Ringworm, Psoriasie, Acne, ,
ke — . s _— sults. the Americans arrived. Hlackheads, Scabies and Red Blotches, BEFORE AFTER
“Ah—how sweet of you to come!: You know, of course, 1 ithor Of those rousing broad to the nation. Dr. Sum- Ford technicians in the mean- Venture Abandoned lorlee Mad aeune Yan, tb ieee’ your
. merskill, who’s made our diet so much richer and more exciting—in cajories—than prewar. And Jenny Lee.: —whose husband, the
Beau Brummell of political etiquette, has set those high standards of

gentlemanly

the dash of Palmerston with the subtlety of a Talleyrand
the embodiment of the Christmas spirit

anc

Mr. Harold Wilson



i McNeil



behaviour.

ing ‘ditto’ so well.

hen Mr Bevin, combining all
Now, the Attorney-General—

while had surveyed an area of al-

With the end of the war, the
most 1,000,000 acres near this

Rubber Development Corporation

terior and cause you to lose your | the scientific treatment you have been
friends. Clear your skin this new scien- | needing to clear your skin—the treat-
tile way, and don’t let a bad skin make | ment to make you look more attractive,

t i 193 h k i i people think you are diseased, | to eye ee win Se eee atin a
. Eat Own, and in 2 the first in- | venture was abandoned as an- | bvought clearer, hea hier 4 4
3 stma i in the background. _ Here's Tom Williams AND Herbert— | stallations were begun here. other monument to American in- | s A New Discovery liffer- eee sratsd tran toile ieee
so right in his view that all Tories should be barred from the next Parliament on account of Tate and Lyle. What! That dis- The next five years Fordlandia Nixoderm is an ointment, but differ
© . . * , a 4 als “
turbance over there? A gate-crashing snake called Cummings being ejected by M.1.5, L.E.S : é





e

a





































experience and short, afterward

|
|

























writes: “Ll suffered from terribly itch-





































































































ent from any ointment you have ever | ing, burning and smarting Eczema for
ras abs . — ‘or > > re receiv seen or felt. It isa new discovery, and |12 years. Tried everything, At last I
+ - bs abandoned gr adually and the. For d people here rec eived in- ee but f aia “aimost tia: a | he a of Nixederm, It stepped the itch-
si — LU 1€ eg an ne plantation was rea OGn to liquidate their en- | powder when you apply it, It penetrates | ing in 19 minutes. I could gee my, aikin
moved comp ely ra. erprise. rapidly into the pores and fights the | clearing up on the second ay. e
is ¢ aus in polities. + ¢ . . . , 1 : 4 est 7 So. Pantern ne | Caran oeanctane dite blciitahes, Nixo- ly d disfiguring blotches and Sealy skin
Berns is 8 pause in petits. The Season of’ Anxious Consideration The leaders of the threatened} { derm contains 9 ingredients | which | disappeared in 10 days. My friends were
At this season it is a pause which industries have been considering s Yee e e | fight skin troubles in these 3 ways, 1, Jt | at t the improvement insmy ape
; ri , > : cS * t fights and kills the microbes or para- | pearance
should be filled with goodwill ‘ ° the astonishing pronouncement on It SE# li C f {site often responsible for skin disor. | ti N
it is is j 1 8 | sites often respc © for isfaction Guaranteed
Howards men. But it is not. It is ir. Bevin s ethal Wa of election law given by Sir Hartley s Ll ommuntca tons | ders, 2. It stops itching, burning and | atroaet 1 costs absolutely nothise
led with what the Attorney Shawcross recently. | a ee cH etic ae ite nites | wnle kin to your com=
General would call “anxious con~ R l/ 7 o 0 / Mh R b i I said last week that I would By Mr. P. C. Donald Rowson, Drew & Clydesdate | heal the siin clear, soft and velvety | Piet ay, Lock imithe sateen
ideration.” O ing i ts e e Ss not say that the Attorney was a | smooth. jint ng and you will be amazed
) Thus Ministers are “anxiously very bad Attorney. But, indeed. leet. tendon 2 Works Fast ie Let provement, Then just Keep on
onsidering” when to take the Politi 1 might just as well have said it . . secause Nix derm i, selentifeat! Se ee eee
olitical Newsfront a ae -P. " , COS alte. he bike co AER oot Ne s
Hectoral plunge. ‘ by W. J. BROWNE, M.P ror it seems that everybody has} Communications are the corner-, 5, The Caribbean Tourist Con- Mares Paget A ge ta dad i cog pba Baber Sh dda an eae etoetan aie
Mr. Bevan wanted has take nS jee : : been saying so. stone of any progress. Surely the ference, 1946. itching, burning and smarting in a few | kind of shin tl 1 will make you admired
ponths ago. He thinks with the 1929 Election was in May that’ of Members include the Parlia- bi 2 first duty of the Ministry of Trans- 6. The Development and Wel- nutes, then starts to work immedi- | whereve 1 gO, OF you simply return
i i i )45 M ; : he . « cle ne an wealing your akin he ¢ ut Re a yo y
@epoet—‘He either dreads his fate 1945 in June. Bad weather pulls mentary Secretaries of Mr. Bevan Emvitation ignored port is to ensure direct and regular fare Conference, 1946. ote ere r, ah ee Pe pee mh Cofh thee red 16 tual, Gat Nixoderm
po much of his deserts are small, down the Socialist vote more and Mr. Shinwell, are said to be mail, passenger and appropriate 7. My own Caribbean Report of mooth, In 3 a day or two yous ’ i «mist today, Th9 guaran
‘ ; “s E ; pprop ’ : : : ,
ho fears to put it to the test, than it does the Tory vote. The in conclave to find ways ana Sir Hartley has doubtless been] cargo facilities to every Colony. 1948. ror will tell you that here at last oe asst
gain or lose it all. Mr. Bevan Prime Minister is saiq to be neans of ensuring that Mr. Bevin anxiously considering what to do Why should it be impossible to it is Ships that are wanted, not =
pes not fear his fate still less yet undecided, but I have noticed does not :0 back to the Foreign about this. He has ignored my] Visit by direct, regular British | Reports. The proposal made by : ra
pes he think that his deserts are about him a strong indisposition Office after the election invitation to the Government to}Steamer or plane, such Colonies} me as to the scheduled and regula) SKA VIEW GUEST
all, to have long-laid plans distribu- bicans that his habit of treat- give us an amendment to the Re- | 4S SoM. A use of 25 per cent. of a Britis! ve 4 ,
; ris yants an election ted. He may well come down on witamalis. nore. GRIP thine ee, Sresentetioh:= al-diw. Denis Act, ; oa.M. Area tf refrigerated ships regularly pass- U1
_ Mr. Morrison Ww an 8 an elect , : - may W 1 come do ing foreign powers as if hey were P 1 atic ea op € e British Honduras 8,598 d tisoliah. tie Pianiine Ganels i HOUSE
», rly in the Nev’ Year Bradford the side of June. yreakaway branches of the Trans- 894 Lord Lyle’s invitation to him British. Somaliland 68'000 ing through ‘ ne Ps 7 me. é N
Z ame ; 43 1 a en . ; . oe Bhgaied st ae ate aq? moma anc 96, | ad , Ss y ships ov
practically cured hig politi For purely selfish” reasons port and General Workers Union, ‘© prosecute and be damned. British Solomons 11,500 es rae ke ont p wal rays { Hastings, barbados
1 thrombosis. . hope he does. Election campaign- results in Defence Bills which ad- - ee will tee eae tag Mauritius 762 Soe e offered.” but no sound |} High Class Cuisine
: >» Chancellor wants B= ing j a hes a Pals ar ; én, thie ; s doria) cer. Nothing whatever e shan’ Seat ae - s , . - - , » |
The Chancellor eres re “et ing in the country in February ded to the cost of the cial sei c a a ae nadie as as Seychelles 156 economy can develop on such }) Comfortable Beds. |
ore the Budget anyway. “is hell. In June, in Shakespeare vices, may bust the Budget. I am “ Bot a Back Hel propose Socotra 1,382 slender grounds } Fully Stocked Bar
Budget is to be a good Budget it country, it is a delight. as yet not clear who is the suc- Supported by the Government for ONE i satis eek 47,0714" . - "i { ee
afmwill have to be, so to speak, a cessor-desi nate. a Royal Commission to be ap- ARM EL ais an 170 Sugar \ RATES : |
WWabad Budget, a tough Budget, @Q¢saly tm The Hack pointed on the matter. Montserrat ........... 52 $5.00 per day up
W@ewhich may lose many votes. { do not think Mr. Bevin is very After the Report of the Press British Virgin Islands. 21 The following trade position (inclusive) |
ah hi ) : . 7 : , eh ‘ : . |
But massive Ernest Bevin is Mr. Bevin is considering, but anxious about the mavter, his way Commission this method is out of Dominica 304} with the Caribbean sugar produc- Apply:
aid to prefer June. He has noted I think not “anxiously,” the of dealing with vevolt is not to; favour. Like the weather the law St. Lucia .. 233 | ing countries in 1948 is significant: MANAGER. iS |
hat Labour has done best at the threatened stab in the back. stamp on the rebels, but to roll! will continue unsettled. St. Vineent 150 British Caribbean Colonies sold | ( Ss = as |
elections of 1929 and 1495 The number of Left-Wing Labour on them. This is usually lethal.| Ana now { note that a lawyer} Grenada ......., od 133] to us £88,000,000 and bought from ‘ FO PPOSS POS |
|Mr. Mark Jolyon has been| Gilbert & Ellice Islands 175 fF us £21,000,000. 1d * x
—_— S| : : ; , - " TT 95 ‘ oO £ 5 ingo solc ’
|‘anxiously considering’ Sir Hart-| Tongo 2507 Cuba and Santa Domingo : x on 1 YADD ,
1 Paeay | ie in ‘ »| Bahamas . 4,375 T to us £36,000,000 and bought from | % MAI VERN A( ADE MY Xx
wT. . wa ey. In his recent statement the SPEC : » tf ve AY d
CUT 1 mis OUT. oe sae Cayman Islands 76 Fus £2,700,000. ss ew *
E As ] . lerstand it the ropa-{' Turks & Caicos Islands 166 Thus we must find £33 millions } FREIDHEM, CHEAPSIDE sy
T FF ] ] CE | g nda (the eendite of Pehicn St. Helena 47] —in dollars — to pay Cuba and *s : %s
NOTI 11) aap reas coelee re ohtecahe: fet Ascension 38} Santa Domingo balances, for|\$ = AN Entrance Examination will & DOES Ir EVERY
- Lin / he was discussing)- Reed: Noy Sugar that our owr® Colonies are |} be held at this School on Monda » DOES If EVE
tf | have reference to any particu-| What would be the fate of the capable of producing, They sell x ""uwstanoe, Reopened: Git veeion 3 TIME
AMR YEATES lar candidate. Quite clearly no} Postmaster General if he failed to their surplus to us, and then buy |S examinations up the School ‘ i
ard " ae m particular candidate need be in-! provide postal facilities to over 1 their own requirements with the |‘ Certificate ang L.C.C, Standard yf Removes Chronic Pains,
ach, : bs) es ayer eis 1951 IR dicated in it.’ | nillion of the Home population, | Holars we have provided—trom |G Ore Wien pupus. are. alld)’ priv © ) Rheumatism, ete. and
Consequent on changes in B.W.1.A. Flights Schedule effecti inuar Ua, sxe nd of the Authorities if they]in. USA. Surely “bulk buying” | vately coached, Bntrance fee $1.20 S$ | )) puts you on your feet
Ss } 2-) t > rl Se nyc } > s r e . , "OL o? oe A * 7 naai
MAILS wili be closed at the General Post Office as follo Uwe Opposites ailed to provide roads? should have provided for mutual | % eet la a q again.
a —_—————_—_—_-. What right have we to own, and} tpading? But the anomaly. does |’ ee. i e
cay | Now this Mr. Jolyon has been] then deny them proper Hable of | Bot end at this. ‘To cultivate the | st Headmasters) {) KNIGHT'S DRUG STORES
Destination Time Day Destination Time Day looking up what Sir Hartley saic | facilities? They are capa © °} | Sugar they draw on our West In- |* seeae0 CCOOOOOCUCOOCOS.—S SSS
sting : |when the meaning of the words | °eing grouped for a direct ser ee dian labour and then apparently See eee, GES BFS SSL GBS FOIA ESS
Oe ona |‘a candidate,’ was discussed on | but many could be re y leave it dereliet, inasmuch as we © tie tala i
Section 88 of the Representation | °*iSting regular steamers that, at} jv. budgeted for £15,000 to alle- VISIT the beauty spot of t Islan (
ay ANTIGUA 1.00 p.m. | Wednesday GREAT BRITAIN 00 p.m Wednesday 7 the: Dharsle Ast. air Hates Amen pennant, meas —— It yp viate distress of West Indians in .
9.00 a.m. | Saturday ».00 a.m. | Saturday 7 ee r y Goes not spell progress when } Guba and §. Domingo. . . rn > nN
ard: aa se ( fact, thic|YOU Consider that the Caribbean | “" EDGE WATER HOT EL
ISTRALIA Tednesday suo eh ni ; Tednesday ‘AS a matter of 1act, - | Colonies had better sea cémmuni- istory will regard with amaze-
Speen re aie Senieaey, a r 00 an besa : expression of a candidate 'S ications before the Boer War. aot aes naateet of our own gar- BATE HERA
a i used throughout this code of The Merchant Venturers re-]| den in order that we may deveiop | { | ; :
i 5 < xine Uy : IPE law and throughout this Bill) carded transport costs and trade yur neighbour’s, and then pay |) This newly erected modern hotel is situated in the
AUSTRALIA s 11.45 a.m. | Wednesday GUADELOUPE a ware Tete fg t :
(to Panama only) .. 9.00 a.m, | Saturday (via Antigua) 1.00 p.m. | Wednesday and refers as the courts havejas one. Later, when transport } for the result in Dollars. ’ most picturesque part of the island.
: , eo 7 : ; deciced to a particular candi-| was segregated a profit was ex- ae si
ARGENTIN/ ‘ .45 a.m. | Monday HAITI 11.45 a.m. | Monday date. pected with both. A country can | SSeS SSS SS TELEPHONE 95 ~— 76 FOR RESERVATIONS
BG ma i * 27 »dnesday a ai Friday ite clearly if I may say so,} well afford a loss on transport, } - Ww ;
n Wednesday 11.4 n Frida Qui E i
2 ‘* am. b3riday eee : ‘the Attorney who says two dia-] provided they make up the loss by INTERIOR DECORATOR l-oms with or without private bath etc. We specialise
INDIA 00 p.m, | Wednesday | metrically opposite things a ‘J trade. in lish and Lobster Luncheons, —- Well Stocked Bar |
AFRICA aS iad eS a ean 9.00 a.m, | Saturday oe ey oy oem Se Recent recommendations by the + Yn + haps OP aa — So on aaa
9. a.m, } Sz ay : ; both times. S aune -eove |COMMonwealth Shipping Commit- PEAUTIFY THE HOME sy TeTOTe ToT Te” ; A NH WZ A 2 Ri it
ARUBA eae 020 fam | Saree eae the came) ‘2 call for the establishment of yen ane cream 4 {ease NONE NENSNONENSNE NEN NSNE NGM
é si 9.00 a.m. ree j take different views of the same) q.ribbean Shipping services. This ne Lates shes
via Curacao) 11.45 a.m. | Monday é law. But what are we to do when[>“,"c : r Fe eal , Seems 72 Sanh \ : ‘ iia can. 2) j i 5 a
| MARTINIQUE 11.45 a.m. | Mondas the leading Law Officer takes of“! The West Indinn Colonics for |{] United States and Canada 3 THANKING YOU FOR YOUR KIND PATRONAGE :
° sdav . aide . } ine ne saw 7 - » - . ,
BAHAMAS 1.00 p.m. | Wednesday 11.45 a.m, | Friday ifferent view from himself.? yer 75 years Call 3005—or write ‘
a.m. | Saturday , ' lifferent view , ; over 79 years. ‘ { é . ‘
ea ae er MEXICO 11 af ; Monda\ As for me I am oe oe 2.¢ The reg oeene eral Com- 68 Roebuck Street and ask 2 WITH ANTICIPATION FOR 1950. &
. ue 45 a.m. ay dering yhether I should no mission Report , ' —
. | Wednesday i Dri dn sidering whet port,
ees a2 4:00 ro Friday. . 11.45 a.m. | Friday \study for the Bar. Without -— 3. The Stockdale Report, 1940, for... on | i : oe
= MONTSERRAT 1.00 pm. | Wednesday | training T could do better that 1943/4, 0 : - Mr. L, LEWIS 2 BROADWAY DRESS SHOP.
BRAZIL 11.45 a.m. | Monday (via Antigua) 9.00 a m. | Saturday — | this. With it to what heights might] 4. mA eport, rs
ails ee - . v. ' : | acniva? . . q
EL +48 ats) Dogmenday [+e to all WISHING A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS 1950
5 a.m, | Friday NEW ZEALAND Wednesday A prosperous New Year | ( Sass Se HING I SPE S 1950.
11.45 N oe ‘ * P e ae . 1} 3 ae “TO ALL Ot oom REN DS AND
9.00 a.m, | Sk ay ° Us
BR. GUIANA.. --| 9.00 am, | Tuesday ‘ | t] P ed ct sie baa eas sea aici . —n .
. 9.00 a.m, | Saturday NEW ZEALAND 11.45 am. | Wednesday | r In I l 10ns WE WISH YOU d A GRINDS IN IN DN DNDN ON PN ON BIN IN PNR ON OK RN,
(to Panama only) 9,00 a.m. | Saturday A Ve Ha an | |p SSS SSS
BR. HONDUR: 1.00 p.m. |! Wednesday ] Y ul ry ppy
NDURAS 9.00 a.m, | Saturday PUERTO RICO 11.45 a.m. | Monday n our OFOScd P 1950
Tuesd 11.45 a.m. | Wednesday | E rosperous ; aul
CANADA ° 11.45 a.m. oe iw 11.45 a.m. Friday i old ree end sincerely thank you for your ane ‘
2.00 p.m, | Friday ‘ Your Real Life T Mincrces during 1949 Jo You WE
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vtadiniatiace ; 9.00 a.m. | Saturday ome of your past experiences, your }
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ST. KITTS 1.00 p.m. | Wednesday | SOME and weak pommeE the skill of sv }
COLOMBIA REP. 31.45 am, | Monday 9.00 ah, | Saturday 1 felis snack Same: > A RWA L ;
gg 11.45 am, | ¥riday us Astrologer,
ST. THOMAS V.I 11.45 a.m. | Monday who by applyita
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11.45 a.m, | Friday ‘ The accuracy o TLL
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; . 9.00 He Saturday contained in his 2 DUE to several changes in schedule which
TRINIDAD 11.45 a.m. | Monday Secinied Riles: become effective Sunday, ist January, 1950, all
| DOMINICA 2 nm, atneetn :; ao on een Iation, Pinarces persons holding reservations on or after that
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30.12.49, | to Indie is 24. BA DK PAIN BEN DELIA DEIN NN IRIN EN INN PRR REINS, a





PAGE SIXTEEN



TALKING ABOUT



VUSIC .

Will Today’s Youth Sit
Through This Wagner Opera?

By

To these of us who are in or
beyond middle-age, the revival of
Lehengrin at Covent Garden will
recall the times when this opere
and Tannhauser were the only
ways of approach to Wagner i:
this country to music-lovers at
large. The Flying Dutchman was
seldom given here; and Trisian
Meistersinger and The Ring ws
the exclusive preserves of the
German seasons at Covent Garden.

It will be interesting to see if
the young people of to-day are
able to sit through the great extent
of Lohengrin—from the Prelude t
the departure of the last swan 1:
Montsalvaat and the last Tube t
Finchley Strasse.

For the opera is lengthy even
for Wagner, lengthier even tha:
it looks on the paper of the score
And there is a special reason whys
we need to listen to the music with
unusual patience and fortitude

SAME TEMPO
Nearly the whole of it is in the
same tempo. I haven't, Sila:
Wegg might say, “been so to spea<
slap-bang through” the score very
lately, but I think I am ri
estimating that there are not t






as





many bars in the whale ol
Lohengrin composed in tripk
time.

This strange atrophy of Wasier

sense of rhythm was caused by hs
intense preoccupation with expe
ments in harmony, for the purpose





of







of suggesting the atmosphere
Lohengrin, an atmosphere of
luminous spiritualised height and
distance.

Lohengrin presents, as Wagner
himself said contrast t
altitude and depth. Lot
comes from the upper ether in
answer to Elsa's prayer; and in the

end he returns to the upper ether

So the problem for Wagner wa
to create timeless
and insubstantial, a harmony tha

a tone at once








was not solid but fluent anc easils
modulated into dissolving view
of musie

In each of his operas, Wagne
discovered a new tone, not mere}!
a new method or vyie—a tone
conceived within the é of the
psychological action, not app
from without by music-maki
alone

Wagner never was an abstra
musician. In Tannhauser, he had
needed to concentrate on stark
conflicts and contrasts: Venus an
Elizabeth and Tannhauser; Sire
sensuousness and the hair-shirt ¢
piety

For his next work, Lobengrit
another kind of music entirely








was demanded, as we have seen
So in the prelude the orchestra
slowly descends from violins and
flutes in the highest registers o1
reaches, and floats imperceptibly
down to the lowest notes of the
horns and trombones.
‘VER HEARD BEFORE
Then uv again, an ascent, the

Heavy Floods
Hit B.G.

from page 1
cluding the postponement of Fred-
die Singh’s bout
In rural areas weddings took
place under strange conditions,
couples and guests being trans-
ported on shoulders of ablebodied



men or in small boats, while
funerals were delayed awaiting
word from the nearest cemetery
where water did not reach a

height to affect burial

Government issued a warning

to-day that floods have affected
the milk supply and the Milk
Board was forced to resort to

powdered milk to supply the citi-
zens of Georgetown.
Harrowne Tales

The situation was discussed in
the Legislature where members
were told of harrowing tales of
distress among the rural popula-
tions and appealed to the Govern-
ment to speed up emergency meas-
ures, vem

Government gave the assurance
that everything possible was being
done, but relief work was handi-
capped by continuous rainfall

The City Council also met to
discuss the situation and recom-
mended fitting pumps around the
City areas which were suffering
from floods not principally the re-
sult of rainfall but from the fact
that many East Coast estates vil-
lages and drainage canals pass
through the city into the Demerara
River.—By Cable.



Chureh Services





s
7.20 ur
Proce p
ol Service of N p
Solemn Evensong id Process ;
Lazaretto, Carol Service 11
A Coral Service will be held at St
Stephen's Church to-day at 4 1
St. Stephen's Choir will render Carol
at the Lazaretto tt orning iar

They'll

420 if every



Thy HEN TRIES
DOLD.
TO DRIVE THE FRAU






ANY



OWNED A JTALOPY,
\ COULON’T BE COAXED

( NONG! Go ON!
» | YOU CAN DRIVE IT

Neville Cardus

whole ranging from soft to lou:
and returning to vanishing soft-
ness. This tone, and this dis-
embodied movement and solution
of tone, had never been heard on
earth before, it was the conjura-
tion into sounds of a dramatic and
poetic idea first of all experienced
by an imagination which was as
visual and dramatic as it was
musical.

The last time Lohengrin wa:
presented on an ambitious scale
at Covent Garden was, I think
the occasion when Sir Thoma
Beecham turned to the occupants
of the “boxes” and told them t
cease talking during the prelude

If his famous “Shut up!” was
rot spoken during Lohengrin, i!
certainly should have been,
because the whole burden and
morai of the opera’s story warn
us of the dire consequences of
talking out of place, though, in
f-irness to Elsa, we have to admit
that she was, as a woman, perhaps
not going too far and beyond a
natural and excusable curiosity,
when she wished to know her own
husband’s name and “whence he
Cé me.”

Wagner's sense of humour was

% of the keenest. To love and

» loved unquestioningly was for
hm (at the moment) “the tragic
peeblem of the modern world.”

As usual, he dramatised in his
eperas and music dramas some
idea or emotional experience o
1s actual lifes When he was
«orking on Lohengrin, Minna (his

st wife), not without a point of
\ew that claims our sympathy.
as concerned about the “new
path” upon which Wagner had set

rth.

NO COMPROMISE

He could not go on repeatin :
mself. Whatever may be sgid
oy Wagner in the ordinary traiic
the world, as an artist he never
mpromised integrity. He quickly
itgrew Rienzi and Tannhause
id launched himself on the way
at, after terrible travail, was to
cad him to the truly Wagnerian
“Art-work.”
Who will blame Minna that she
‘ew fearfully back and could not
ways share his incredible faith
id his inevitable nay necessary,
egoism?

In an originat draft of Lohen-

in, Lohengrin is made to say
Though all know me as the
chosen of Heaven and all believe
n me, yet there is one who doubts
me—the wife I love and cherish.’

Oh! the witnesses called by
Wagner on his own behalf, to plea
for him (in wonderful music)
before posterity, the wise and
exonerating judge being, of course
hKiichard Wagner.

—London Express Service.

|LuropeMustBecome
A Big Single Market
Zeeland

BRUSSELS, Dee. 31.
Mr, Paul Van Zeeland, Belgian
Foreign Minister, currently Presi-

dent of the Organisation tor
kkuropean Economic Cooperation,
declared in a new year message
today that Europe must again

become a “great single market.
“Europe will only recover
economic health if it be
again, despite ational frontiers,
a great single market within
which goods and services, capitals
and persons flow freely in an
orderly reasoned and intelligently
cooperative manner,”-—(Reuter.)

NO COMMENT

Ils
comes

WASHINGTON, Dee, 30.

A State Department spokes:
man, asked to comment to-day
on India’s decision to recognise

the Chinese Communists replie@
No comment. It is India’s prero-

t ative.”

fhe spokesman, Mr. Michaei
MMeDermott, added in reply to
questions that other countries

were keeping the State Depart-
ment informed, as India had
done, of their views on recogni-
tion

—Reuter,

‘LIBERATION ARMY'S"
TASK

LONDON, Dee. 31
The Chinese Communist Party
declared tonight vhat the task of
the “Liberation Army” and the
Chinese people for 1950 was “to



liberate Taiwan (Fermosa) and
Hainan Islands and Tibet, and
annihilave the remnant forces of
Chiang Kai Shek”, according to
the new China News Agency
Reuter. ;
i ime Registered U.S. Patent Often





E
PLACE

————






Zi, @

COPR 1949, Kina





“Seek Peaceful
Methods” Say

Peace Men
WASHINGTON, Dec. 31
[he Inter-American Peace Com-

mittee composed of the United

States, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina

and Cuba, today criticised the

Dominican Republic for handing

its President war powers in a dis

pute with- Cuba. :

It sent a note to the Dominican
Covernment urging it to sec!
peaceful methods of settling cis
putes and to use armed force only
if under armed attack and recall-
ing the fact that the American



ritions had formally renounced
war.
Dominican President, Refel

Trujillo recently asked and re-
ceived power from his Congress to
declare war on any country which
he considered was harbouriag plot-
ters conspiring against him. At
tl e same time he accused Cuba of
preparing a new attempt to invade
the Republic

Cuba denied the charge and
American Secretary of State, Mr.
Dean Acheson denounced Presi-
dent Trujillo’s move as “entirely
inappropriate” for settling differ-

ences arising among American
Stotes,
The Inter-American Peace

Committee was set up in 1940 at
the Havana meeting of Americ*n
Foreign Ministers to seek peaceful
settlement of Inter-American dis-
putes.—Reuter.



F.0. Disapproves
Of Press Ban
in Nigeria

LONDON, Dec. 30.

Restrictions imposed locally by
the British Administration on the
Eritrean Press announced yester-
day are far beyond what is ap-
proved in London, it was learned
from a usually reliable source
here tonight

The restrictions were announc-
ed in Asmara yesterday by the
British Political Adviser, Mr.
B .C. A. Cook, when the authori-
ties lifted the ban on publication
of all Italian and Eritrean papers
in Asmara imposed after discade
on Dec. 13

Observers here believe that the
Foreign Office will institute in-
quiries which will result in modi-
fication of the restrictions. As
announced from Asmara, these
include prohibition on the dis-
cussion by local newspapers of
the future of the country, due to
be settled by the United Nations
and a ban on criticism of the
British Administration.

These restrictions do not accord
with normal British Nations of
Freedom of the Press, and were
being strongly criticised in Lon-
don political quarters to-day.

—Reuter.

Lloyd Line
Reaches India

—Reuter.

ROTTERDAM, Dee. 30.
The “Ned Lloyd” Line estab-
lished jointly about a year ago by
the Royal Rotterdam Lloyd and
the Netherland Steamship Com-
pany, has been extended to take



in Indian East Coast ports up to |

Calcutta, it was learned tonight.

The Ned Lloyd Line originall)
operated between the Gulf of
Mexico, up to the United States
eastern seaboard, across the
Atlantic and through the Suez
Canal to the Persian Gulf.

The Rotterdam Lloyd 8,099 ton
steamship Drente, is the first ship
to sail on the extended line from
the Persian Gulf to India,
is due at Calcutta (after a call
at Koweit on the Persian Gulf)
by February 1. —Reuter.

Oils Dull

LONDON, Dee, 30.

Last working day of the year
in London Stock Exchange
brought a wave of speculative in-
terest to overseas issues. Ger-
man and Japanese loans were
marked higher on fresh support
and there were widespread gains
among Brazilian bonds. Mexi-
can Light and Power stocks
moved sharply higher,

British funds were fractionally
higher where changed but many
of industrials moved to slightly
tower levels. Dullness was shown
in oils Mexican Eagles eased to

1/7, Mexican Eagle warrants
were steady around six and four
Other commodity shares were idle
and seldom changed. ‘The three
week trading period draws to a
close. Last day is Tuesday next
and domestic issues are expected
to remain idle until perhaps the
start of a new account,

South African gold share
selectively higher to-day

~—(Reuter.)

By Jimmy Hatlo



Ss were




UT SINCE THEY GOT THE NEW
‘ATOMIC SIX++sHB HASN'T LET HER
DRIVE IT AROUND THE BLOCK...






—
FEATURES SYNDICATE. Inc, WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED



She

SUNDAY

__

B.B.C. Programme
Changes Ia The
New Year
‘Laiks, Music, ric.

WITH the start ot a new yeul
there will pe quite a tew cuau

Lore
ere.

es



in programme dal
the times of old programmes anu

in the introductivou

Sscneduuies,

Ui NEW Oiucs.
Followers of s3rious music wii
nnd that ‘From tne ‘“mra bro-

g.amme’ which used to be hearu
on Thursdays at 6.00 p.m. — a
repeat of Mondays at o.vwv p.m.—
is now on the air on Tuesaays at
6.00 p.m. The* Monday proaccasi
is at the same time as tormeriy.
New programmes for tnese uste.-
ers will include extracts from ta2
winter Promenade Concert seu-
son which will run trom January
9 to 21 at the Albert Hall, wiu
the BBC Symphony Orcneswu
under Sir Malcolm. Sargent anu
Basil Cameron. ‘british Concert
Halls’ still continues tut is now (ou
be heard cn Thursdays at 6.00
p.m. The broadcast on the 5th
Jan. will be by the Halls Orches-
tra conducted by Sir John Bar-
birolli. In the field of light
music there will be series of
light classical concerts by Cor-
stant Lambert and the Fhilhar-
monit Orchestra and the well-
tried favourite, ‘Music from the
Movies’ which latter is to be
heard on Saturday’s at 9.15 p.m.,
with Louis Levy and his Orches-
tra. The former is also on the air
on Saturdays at 8.15 p.m. New
monthly, fortnightly and other
programmes, at dates not yet anr-
nounced, will include an economic
commentary. on the sterling area.
The first of these will be entitled
‘Sterling Value’ and can be heard
on Wednesday next, 4th January
at 10.45 p.m.

New Year’s Eve Through
W.I. Eyes

Next Thursday's version of
“We See Britain’—the weekly
survey of the contemporary

scene—changes its form slightly.
Instead of the trio of John Met-
calf, Tony Brown and A. E. T
Henry, you will hear a number of
West India’ broadcasters givin;
their impressions of New Year's
Eve in London, They will describe
their visits to the pantomine anc!
circus, and give the news of the
West Indian’s London. They will
be on the air at the regular time
of 7.15 p.m.
London Forum

A special edition of ‘London
Forum’ will be broadcast on Sun-
day, lst January. During the. past

year this programme has dealt
with the important > historical
events of the year. This first

broadcast of 1950 will review the
events of the past twelve months
and look forward to 1950. Vernca
Bartlett, M.P., who has frequent-
ly been chairman of ‘London
Forum’ will describe the princi-
pal trends of the year, with illus-
trations from past discussions, and
try to show where these trends
may lead us. ‘London Forum,’
1949-1950’ will be heard at 10:00
p.m. on Sunday, Ist January,

Marshall 69

WASHINGTON, Dec, 31.
General George Marshall, for-
mer Secretary of State, celebrate.
his 69th birthday quietly today at
his home at Pinehurst, North
Carolina,—-Reuter.



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B.B.C. Programme |

SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 1950

7 aan. The News. 7.10 a.m. News Analy
is. 7.15 a.m. Nights at the Opera. 8 a.m
From the Editoriais. 8.10 a.m. Programme
Announcements, 8.15 a.m. Anthology—1.
8.30 a.m. We beg to Differ. 9 a.m. Close |
Down. 12 Noon The News. 12.10 p.m
News Analysis. 12.15 p.m. Black Manic
12.30 p.m. Sunday Service. 1 p.m. Life |
in Britain. 1.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel. 1.30
p.m, Ray's a Laugh. 2 p.m. The News
2.16 p.m. Home News From Britain, 2.15
p.m. Music Magazine. 2.30 p.m. Portrait
of Istanbul. 3.15 p.m. Light Music. 3.30
p.m. The Card. 4 p.m. The News. 4.10!
p.m, Interlude. 4.15 p.m. Pavilion Players.
430 p.m. Sunday Half-Hour. 4.55 p.m.
Epilogue, 5 p.m. Variety Bandbox, 6 p.m
Programme Announcements. 6.05 p.m. In-
terlude, 6.15 p.m. From the Children’s |
Hour. 6.45 p.m. Small Band Music. 7 p.m. |
The News. 7.10 p.m. News Analysis. 7.15
p.m, Caribbean Voices. 7.45 p.m. A Mes-
sage for the New Year. 8 p.m. Radio,
Newsreel. 8.15 p.m. Tom Jones Trio. 8.30 |
p.m, Sunday Service. 9 p.m. The News i
9.10 p.m. Home News From Britain. 9.15 |
pun. Life in Britain. 9.30 p.m. Tip-Top |
Tunes. 10 p.m, London Forum, 10.30 p.m

|



Ray's a Laugh. 11 p.m. The News.
MONDAY, JANUARY 2, 1950

7 a.m, The News, 7.10 a.m. News Analy-
sis. 7.15 a.m. Listeners’ Choice. 7.45 a.m.
Places of Interest. & a.m. From the Edi-
torials. 8.10 a.m. Programme Announce-
ments. 8.15 a.m. Music for Dancing. 9
a.m. Close Down. 12 Noon The News,
12.10 p.m. News Analysis. 12.15 p.m. Pro-
gtamme Announcements. 12.18 p.m.
Music From Grand Hotel. 1 p.m. Science
Review. 1.15 p.m, Radio Newsreel. 1.30
p.m. Have a Go. 2 p.m. The News. 2.10
p.m, Home News From: Britain. 2.15 p.m.
Sports Review. 2.30 p.m, London Forum.
3 p.m, From the Third Programme, 4 p.m.
The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily Service
4,15 p.m. Sweet Seranade. 5 p.m. Listen-
ers’ Choice. 5.15 p.m, Programme An-
nouncements, 5.20 p.m, Interlude. 5 30
p.m, Places of Interest. 5.45 p.m. Accor-
de2on Interlude, 6 p.m, Ring up the Cur-
tain. 7 p.m. The News. 7.10 News Analy-
s/s. 7.15 p.m. Calling the West Indies. 7.45
p.m. William Krasnik. 8 p.m. Radio
Newsreel. 8.15 p.m. Let’s Make Music
9.p.m. The News. 9.10 p.m. Home News
From Britain. 9.15 p.m. Science Review
9.30 p.m. Denis Matthews. 10 p.m. Paul
Temple and the Madison Mystery. 10 30
p.m. Eve Becke. 10.45 p.m. Common-
wealth Survey. 11 p.m. The News,
BOSTON
WRUL 15.29 Mc, WRUW 11.73 Mc, WRUX
17.75 Me. |

t
|

TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 1950

7 a.m. The News. 7.10 a.m. News Analy-
sis. 7.15 a.m. Northern Ireland Light Or-
Generally Speaking. 8
8.10 a.m. Pro-

ehestra. 7.45 a.m.
From the Editorials.
gramme Announcements. 8.15 a.m.
Souvenirs of Music. 9 a.m. Close Down
12 Noon The News. 12.10 p.m, News An-
alysis. 12.15 p.m. Accordeon Interlude
12 30 p.m. Tip-Top Tunes. | p.m. On the
Jo». 1.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel. 1.30 p.m
John Buil’s Band, 2 p.m. The News. 2.10
p.m. Home News From Britain. 2.15 p.m.
Sports Review. 2.30 p.m. Ring up the
Curtain. 3.30 p.m. Cinderella. 4 p.m. The
News. 4.10 p.m. The Daily Service. 4.15
p.m, Paul Temple and the Madison Mys-
tery. 4.45 p.m. Tom Jones Trio. 5 p.m, In-
cidental Music. 5.15 p.m. Programme An-
nouncements. 5.20 p.m. Interlude 5 30
p.m. Generally Speaking. 5.45 p.m. Sandy
Macpherson at the Theatre Organ. 6 p.m
From the Third Programme. 7 p.m. The
News. 7.10 p.m. News Analysis. 7.15 p.m.
Westward Ho! 7.45 p.m. Letter from Lon-
don. 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel. 8.15 p.m,
Souvenirs of Music. 9 p.m. The News
9.10 p.m. Home News From Britain, 9.15
p.m. On the Job. 9.30 p.m. BBC Midland
Light Orchestra. 10 p.m. The Storyteller
10,15 p.m. Light Music, 10.30 p.m. Pipe
Band. 10.45 p.m. Report from Britain. 11
p.m. The News.

an,



14 INJURED IN
ELEVATOR CRASH

ROME, Dec, 31.

Fourteen people were injured
when an elevator crashed in a
crowded store here tonight during
‘he last minute New Year’s Eve
. hopping rush.

They were travelling in a goods
lift which was being used to sup-
plement the normal elevator ser-
vice when a cable snapped. The



emergency brakes lessened the
shock of the impacv.
Several of the injured were

taken to hospital with leg wounds.
—(Reuter.)

POSE

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CZECH |
MARKETS

PRAGUE, Dec. 31.

Czechoslovakia today reduced
ee market food prices by un
vverage of one-fifth and free
aarket prices of clothing and
yetrol similarly.

Tne cuts were announced today
» Minister of Commerce, Francis
. Krajeir.

All footwear,
‘athe; soles, will
e ration.
Clothing coupons, previously
sued only to employed peopie,
il be issued to everyone, but
1e “village rich” and those wno
.cite against the State” may be
rr.ved of tneir ration and force
» buy on the free market, where
vices. are still high.

Krajcir estimated that the con-

except

be taken off

ssions would save consumers
,000,000,000 crowns in the
oming year.

—Reuter.

Important ?

LONDON, Dec. 31.

The Soviet periodical “New
Times” in a new year article
quoted by Moscow Radio voday
said the most important event of
the first half of the cenvury was
the birth of the Soviet Union.—-
Reuter.
SSS

\ Rediffusion Programmes



|



SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 1950
LOCAL PRESENTATIONS —
7.15— 7.30 Chapel by the Sid>

of the Road












Cathedral 8.30 p.m.
Lift in Britain 9.15 p.m.
Tip Top Tunes 9.30 p.m

p.m

9.00 p.m,
9.50 pom
10.00

7.20— 8.00 Music tor Sunday
9.15— 8.30 An eye to the Future
8.30— 9.00 Much Binding in the
Marsh
9.00-— 9.30 The Pilgrim Hou
),20—11.00 Closed
11.c€0—12.00 Church Servic
James Street
1.00 New Year Greet ngs
from Canada
100— 1.15 Showers of Blessin
3 30— 4.00 Time for Music
6§.00— 6.30 Christ to
6.20— 6.40 an Review
6.40— 7.00 Request Time
7.45 8.15 London Studio
Melodies
8.15 8.30 Anne Zeigler and
Webster Booth Pre
sented by Ponds
R.B.C
News 7 a.m 8 a.m 12 noon
2 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. and
9 pm
New Year Message—Secretary of
a or Colonies 12.15 p.m
2.30 p.m
Radio Newsreel 1.15 p.m 1.30
p.m
Roy's a laugh 1.30 p.m.—2.00 p.m
{ Music Magazine 2.15 p.m 2.3
p.m
Portrait of Istanbul 2.30 p.m
3.15 p.m
Tight Music 3.15 p.m {@30 p.m
Pavilion Players 4.15 p.m.—4.30
p.m
Sunday Half Hour and Epilogue
4.30 p.m.—5.00 p.m
Variety Bandbox 5.00 p.m 6.00
p.m
Cgribbean Voices 7.15 p.m.—7.45
p.m
Sunday Service—St. Paul's

MONDAY, JANUARY 2%, It
LOCAL PRESENTATIONS
7.15— 7.30 Studio Sarvice
7.30— 8.00 Morning Special
9.00— 9.15 Dance Music
$,30—11.00 Closed
00—11.15 Programme Parade
15—11,40 Music for Breakfast
Time Listening

2.15—12,.30 Interlude





SSS ==

5.30. 5.45 Programme Sum-
mary and Interiude

6.30—- 7.00 Request Time

7.15— 7.30 Art Talk-—-Mr
Harrison

7.30—- 7.45 Magic and Moonlight
presented by



Da Costa & Co. td
Nat Brandwynne and
Orchestra presented
by W. A. Griffith &
Co.

Local News
presented by B'dos
Bottling Co

Nestles Present

7.45

5— 8.30

6.30— 9.00 Theatre of Famous
Radio Players pre
sented by Liver

Bros,

U.S.A

News 9.15 a.m. and 9.45 p.m

New York Bandstand 6.00 p.m
6.30 p.m

Donald Voorhees and
9.15 p.m.—9.45 p.m

B.B.C,

News 7 a.m 8
7 pm. and 9 p.m

Music for Dancing
9.00 a.m

Orchestra

a.m., 12 noon,

8.15 a.m

Commonwealth Survey 11.45 an
12.00 p.m
Accordeon Intertude 5.45 _
6.00 p.m.
Trinidad
Race Commentary 12,30 p.t
“ 1.10 p.m
50 p.m

2.30 p.m
3.10 p.m
3.50 p.in
30 p.m
5.15

}
p.m

TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 1950
LOCAL PRESENTATIONS
7.15— 7.30 Studio Service

20.
9.00-
9. 30-
1.190.

15-

8.00
9.15

Morning Special
Dance Music

Closed

Programme Parade
Music for Breakfast
Time Listening
Orchestral Concert
Dance Music

In Chancery Ep. 7
Picture Parade
Programme Sum-
mary and Interlude
Children’s
Programme

Request Time
Songtime Presented
by Stokes & Bynoe
Dick Haymes Show
presented by
Spivak Serenade pre

sented by Zephirins
Bakery

Local News pre-
sented by B'dos

Bottling Co.

Murder Serapbook
presented by City
Garage F

8.30 Strange as

8.45 it seems
presented by Lever

i Bros. .
8.45— 9.00 Eddie

Arnold Show

presented by Lever
Bros.
USA
News 9.15 aim and 9.45
é 3 n m
Make Believe Ballroom 9.15 5 m

4.45 p.m
RBC
News 7 a.m., 8 a.m .

a ee ee
Souvenirs of Music
9.00
Report

12 noon,
and 9 p.m
8.15 a.m
a.m
from Britain 11.46 m
12.69 p.m rt
Accordeon Interlude 12.15
1 ® 12.15 _
12.30 p.m miner
Radio Newsreel 1
p.m

15 p.m.—1,30





John Bull's Band 1,30 p.m-« ’
3 ee
Soot Review 215 p.m.—2 %
Ring up the Curtain 3.00 pn (
p.m
Cinderella 3.9 p; ) .
| Music by Richand Sides 5 i
pt 6.15 pon
YW) Gene x 0
tt q!
(( 4
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RADIO DISTRIBUTION
(BARBADOS) LTD.





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SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 1959

FO

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GLOBE THEATRE |

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The Management of the Globe —

the inconvenience occasioned by Sue:

Patrons in securing tickets and geqp }

on our Local Talent Show on RP,

30th December and wishes to ¢ dy

that tickets for our Talent Show aa

oe

Friday 6th January will be on sale

ite



at the Globe Theatre daily from

red



Wednesday 4th January and every

i

effort shall be made to ensure

comfortable entry and seats

4,44,

44, SS 454,466,664 POOR PS OSS ODO OS SESS AG GOOSS sa =

aor PPE RF





TO ALL THE COW AND GATE
BABIES OF BARBADOS,
SENDS




“SMILER"
BEST WISHES FOR A
HAPPY, HEALTHFUL,
PROSPEROUS

¢

COW & GATE LTD.

Guildford

AND
YEAR.

England. -

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J. B. LESLIE, & CO., LTD.—AGENTS







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Full Text



PAGE 1

^r SUNDAY, IWI1RV I, |M -I \!).\Y AUVOt IT] PAGE Kllr Mr. and Mrs. Zilliboy Shinhag Throws a Party "Ah—iv !*et nl you to m i so much richer ud Beau BrumnMU at poUUcal etiquetti thi' dash *itn the wbtlety oj .i Tali %  %  dimerrt of th Christ Iril Mr. Harold Wilson so right in hU vn'w that all Torla hould be barred from thi turban,.ovei there Jungle Has Swallowed Ford's Rubber Empire Bv RICHARD DVII1 1'AHA. BRAZIL, (By Mail) The ilrpam of a rubber empire, upon which the late Henry Port (pant more than $15,000,000. has been swallowp by 'lie tangle of the Amazon iungle. This plantation, near the JuneH .ion of the River Tapajoi with talntd In crQee-braaatn the woilil nan shrd 'Mr Foril mhnihns become overrun and neflected to conquet in the few year, since the Ford the ravage) Company experts bumed their re[ can leaf disease" on rubber trees 10 tinnotion. Dr SumJenny Lee.: ,*h„ S e osband. the ...ur Then Ml Bavin, combining all linej Dener.il-.towl i William. AND Merlinceounl of r le and I.Ma pause in politics 71 C-.( • s* • 1 ua vvi.1,1, ne reason o/ Anxious Consideration with goodwill loe. hi ill s thrum basis. The Chancellor wants one bethe B II '•' %  PudKfi is to be a good B rill tune to be, so to speak, a *d BudRct. a tough Budget, Khu h % %  e nanj %  Bui massive BrtKSl Bevln i lam to prefer Ji M B 1 ibour has done belt at the thi flections of 1929 and 1498 The number of Let THERE At this reason should M towards men But il is not. II llled with what the lenerat would call "ana i fc.en.n>OM. RFPI'BI IC EUROPE ** QULANA 1. 00 p.m. I 1.00 p.m. I I A i 11.45 a.m. I 00 p.in 1.00 p.m. 9.00 a.m. 1.00 p.m. 2 00 pin. II .45 a.m. %  'I in) ., :u g IK) ...111. 1.00 p.m. 11 45 a.m. 2 00 p.m. 11 43 a.m. 9 00 a.m. 11 45 a.m. 11.45 a.m. 11.45 a.m. 1 00 p.m. 9.00 a.m. 1.00 p.m. II 45 a.m. 11 45 a.m 9.00 a.m. 1.00 p.m. 9 Ml a.m. 11 45 a.m. ... %  %  % %  M Wednesday I Saturday I I % %  i ... Saturday %  Satm oaj r.if. %  .(., %  Friday I %  atardaj Mondav I %  %  I Saturday Monday Friday Wadneadsj Saturday % %  .KITAIN I MART'" %  r NBW BAJ ST. THOMAS V I ST VINCENT renada) %  %  %  %  I .00 p.m. 9.00 a.m. I1.4J a.m. %  •I 00 a.m. II 45 a.m. 9.00 a.m. i %  %  %  I %  %  Saturday Wednesday Monday Friday I Wednt adav Saturday I Tuaaday Wednesday Saturday Wsdnsa laj Wednesday %  ii.t unsettled. I W i note that a lawyer Mi Mark Jol] Sai Hartley, In his recenl itatemenl the Attorney i % %  land II the propeof which %  u\ partlcu* Hnltn elearli no partjnrlar raasjlflatn need he la i i -n it.' Tw s 0|*|M*il*si .. lodZkni up whgl i i meaning i the word! He was tii^i Section M %  %  'As a matter of (a la* ami llu aaihoal Mda BUI and rrtrr* BS ihe rou-tliv< iecfa sd le %  paMtteastr rndllUlr-. fral'e Heerly If I rnsq the Attorn %  % % %  i H iv dlffaCull enoi.iiii %  o do whw -. lew rrom Mi %  i ne, i ihould no] %  eould do b H to what hell plref \ pi..-.! i. HI. Nr-w Vrur to M. Startling Predictions In Your Horoscope Your Real Life Told Free i urn •< %  ; i I uiida Taboi lndi- moil lai oui Ai'rviloO wha it ih* xtrds and pulled out. Old Henry Ford, always persecuted by his mania for complete independence in every phase of the automobile building industry, sent his men to the Amazon in i itahHah an experimental rubber plantation that would assure him of freedom from war shorlaRes and rival monopolies They went rtrrt to Fordlandla. more than 100 miles up the Tapakn from its confluence with the Amazon. Hacked Clearing Here they hacked a clearing from the jungle and started a plantation in which they intended en eross the Hevea Braslleiru" .' Ith ma highi> productive rub4 the |M indies. The Brazilian variety, never | OIR producer, even in the days of the l.r.i/ilian rubber boom at the turn of the century, had the ad4 being resistant to heat and insects. Bui the Tbrdlandia experiment ifter ten tough years, had to be abandoned. The laud did not lend itself to rubber culture, and cross-breeding of the two plants never produced the expected rubber results. Ford technicians in the meanwhile had sun-eyed an arta of almost 1.000.000 acres near this and in 1932 the ilr.-t u> %  ta ll atloPS .'ere begun here The next five yeari Knnil.mdi:. was abandoned gradually and the experimental plantation vrai %  noveri completely to Helterrn Indian plants. Easier Tn Harvest The only real advantage ob' "ned I *periment planted trees are nnirh harvest than those encountered haphaiardly in the JUI.K.. rubl)er > icld of the Ford plantation trees ueh better than those grown wtld la the %  %  . %  The Kurd Company u to abandon the experiment in 19-4(1 but heM out duruag the wai when East Indian shoi; other rubber rush to the Amazon Basin. Until IMS, the vast experience U %  proved C to the Rubber l>evelopment Corporation In us attempt "ii lubber production. I the R !)i' failure wa indicative of the Ford e> In the l>est year, when the rubber ttevelopinent experts predicted :on.ii00 tons from the f Amazon BftMDI J .he millions of American dollar? only 17.000 tons i than the normal Araaaou prpducti the AmeritSHM arrived Venture Abandoned %  and Of the war, the nuhbar Davesotanent Corporation venture was slwi rt do n ed r L_ illy. ilUituximu ii" ''•-Iill*hr* tnh lip. i' tU*. Hlnft-wnrti, I'norlnata. Acnt). ilarfchaani.. | |i|.noh< ~ "•n't lot .. Knl -llli %  rlor nnd eamaa I mi Hit* nw pel*nii.' w.v. and .Liu t Ut II l.,i .. ... A Mew Discovery Nliedwm i an Mnimeni t it. r CrIt II I mm It's Still Communications By Mr. P C Donald Rowson, Drew £ Clydtsdate Ltd. London. Conununiuitions stone df any progress. Surely the %  port is to ensure direct and regular mail, passenger and ;LI rgo facilities to every Colonv. Uld it be impossible to Will h) direct, regular British 4 plane, such Colonies So M Are. 1 8.51)8 iiiitish Somalllai I.8.UIHI lliatisli 9 11,500 Mauntltu 782 h 156 1.382 Sarawak .7.071 VII Butch Virgin 11 :ui4 St. l.uria 233 St. Vlneeni 150 Granada 133 Gilbert It Ellice blah l173 ii'liea 4.373 Cayman lllandl 76 '•land. llll Si Helena 41 38 What would be the late of the, 'oatrMiU i i it nasal -i u own, and 'leu denj thorn propel i racilitiei .ipable of icing group i I ran We, bul many could I* aerved by xistniR regular steamers that, at present, by-pus* them, It certaindocs not spell piugresa when Id** that the Caribbean Colonies had better sea comniuniolions tt-fore thc Boer War. The Merchanl Venn,:, i i osts and trade one. Later, when trHiinpoit %  %  %  nitiy can all afrord %  loai on transport. provided they make up the loss by ni by the i i mmonwealth ShlppiBg Committ %  call for the estahhshiu.nl of '• libbenn snipping MI vices. This 'ml supports the demands of:— l The Watt tr* over 78 I The West Indian Hoyal Com' Report, i93. 3 The Stockdale Report. 1940. 1943'4. i The Macpbereon Report, 1941,2. 1945/6. A Ym Happy and rrus|ir| Mllv run 5. The Caribbean TOUI 1946. s The Deveiopmenl nferenee, L04g M> own Caj 1948 ilpa thai -ne wanted, not Reporti The pn cent regularly passigb the Pantrna .liiuicnt induee' %  i i %  an di velop %  i Sugi.r The following trade position with the Caribbean lugau produc* '.'48 is significant; British Caribbean ColOI s.000.000 and bought fiorn IIl'21,000.000. Cuba and Santa Doin i. 000,000 and bought from IIIKKHI. Tin.' WO I 1^ millions —in doll.u to pu Cuba and Santa Domingo nuances, foi it oui owrt Colonl ei an %  i prcehu 'UK. They sell their Mirpli l 'hen buy their own requirements with the Dollars we have provided—from in I S \ Surebj bulk buying* ivkKed lot mutual HatUng" Hut the anomaly doe. not end at this. To culttVatt Ha Sugar they .iiii1a. %  w h ua Mr. R %  i •ai n i niittui.'. l i —1—1 m> %  'hH..(.nd day. Alt ih >ktn %  t %  %  %  . Satisfaction Guarnnieed ; 1 %  i""K in tlio mirror I VISIT the beauty jpot of the island I:IN.I; u \n II IIOI I I HA IIIMIKIIA rected modem hotel is situated In the 4 the island. TELEI-HOM M -Til ui: M -i i:v \ riovs %  % %  > ' VcfJ w rim i Bar m if J aai Ulifallon, Lurk; TIIIIN SScknaM r%t have aStaU a.>\ .ducalrd am.it I ha otld -vrt OILOMit MACKEV ot New York i>. •itht. To pofuUrla* hi a ayiun. Tnborr • %  DI Mr Of Mia. addr—a and dale r all rMul; ar.IMn itio—y wa,iiud lor Am.. %  loatas* etc.. but mm SlaMi.p. or i n.unUU and Othajr b aittaod ai II. >our aifcin Write now aa thia ofl may not oe mod* .*iti Addrraa PUNDIT TABORK (Dept1IS-B>. U|pm r.r)rti etroot. BMnbay M, India Potiaat U> Inali* la as. ItOBKHVS HIGH STREET. •u>naisinaHainnfnnfinHHfl BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAVS LIMITED I o i i c i: HUE to sovora! changes in Achodule which hocomo ofleclive Sunday, Is! January, 1950, all persons holdinq roservationr on or alter that dalo aro kindly requoslod to communicate with our OfHco, Lower Bioua Street, t^Hhonos 4585 and 2798) lor information reqarding changes in times of arrivals and departures, eel. BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LTD. (Registried in Trinidad) Lower Broad Street. Bridgetown, Barbados, IMIONKS: 4585 & 278.



PAGE 1

1 SUND-W ADVOCATE DAY. JANlAliv | Publfiti^^^naAtfvocair Co. Lid., M BioM St Brldirlotvii Sunday. January 1, 1950 ""The Xew Tear TO-DAY is the day set apart lor the making of Rood resolutions, and tTtD Uwoflh acrae a* the rasolutfcmi tit doomed to ^ | )n ,,, UM holiday season v. I the practice cannot, on thii account, he condemned out of hand. It is a season of stock-takn^, and at least Met that an individual has pondered over his shon-comings and has decided to turn over a new leaf in the coming year is a sign that he is conscious of his faults and is ,-nmled to an entry on the credit side in the final record. So. also is it a time for Governments and Legislatures to take stock and to plan for tinfuture Here in Barbados there is urgent need for good resolutions and the preparation of a i lanned programme for the coming year. Action must take the place of a surfeit of aimless words; unending debates on technical details must give way to practical measures; and a definite ...tempi must be made to bring horn* to one and all the necessity to settle essentials before such delectable pastimes as "Back to Africa", "Christmas Bonus for Civil Servants". "Raincoats for Writ Servers" or "Nylons for Nurses'' can be thoroughly enjoyed. Above all the Legislature must guard against a failing that is all too prevalent in the present Labour Government*and the present Legislature. While everyone expects Legislators to be cautious yet tim,ilnv ciin be carried to excess and has in the past cost tins island dearly. Almost one hundred years ago Bridgetown VH on i he verge of having a deep water harbour. The plans and specifications were prepared, the I.eeislatmv debated the project at length, but nothing materialised. That plan remains in the %  rchiVH of the Secretariat Since then several othai deep water harbour plans have been prepared at great expense and Rlflarcd i similar fate. The public is Dntng to wonder whether the latest plan prepared by the same firm of United Kingdom Engineers who submitted the Oft] pi. HI. almost a century ago. is tO %  tte, 01 whether (he | | ent Government will decide at this .-< to put their fortunes to the test on thia OCca%  ton. Nothing bai bean lett to ehu thing that could be done to determine I ei the project is %  practical pn tion. and whether it is likely to be an eron iccef has been dune Blueprints have been made; estimates for two eitee have IH^'II prepared; and an offlcl il froii the Port4j|London Authority ias examined the economic factor. The pubii' i Qita action In the i bean a %  OCe while ll %  itura has turned ita attention to the Intricate problem oj hi %  £ iiard the Wi It bai ver pfa ui is> pneumonia oi rheumi The deep w.'tet harbour is by no means the only project left In the air. Oil exploration is awaiting the go-ahead signal Few i Leal report! have renew* oi] developmi nt in Bui hailos. It is believed that oil may be present in paying quantities at depths of nine thousand (eat, and the British Union Oil Coml>>-i at !i>n ith Trinidad LeaseCftntral Mining and Investn 1.united, is anxious to put the theory to the test by sinking deep They era awaiting the passing of the Oil Bill which was amended by the Legislative Council and is now before the Assenii.lv Diet iverj Oi Oil In paying quantities may revolutioniaa the whole ecomOMJ oi the (aland and it is for this reason that the entire community is keenly Intel eeted in the result of the bortnga which will begin as soon as the Assembly decides to pass the amended Bill The public is no less concerned about the future ' %  the potter) Induatry, A ceramic expert lias been U) this island He lias testbe clays of Barbados. He is satisfied that i: able for pottery manufacture He has manufactured pottery successfully in a pilot plant using natural gas as Olll III AIM IIS SAY: '.he fuel for the oven*. The Government has been assured Ihal [here arc adequate supip fuel lo last lor many years and that attractive pottery, which will And an easy saleable market, can be manufactured in thus island. Vet, the Government holds hack. N in the clay am: ;he natural gas on an ale has yet materialised and there seems every likelihood that the old potter*! wheel at Chalky Mount will continue to reign tupfi The same indecision and uncertainty is ir. evidence in dealing with health matters. Plans and counter-plans have been prepared for a new hospital and discarded. Sites are suggested and purchased and then it the eleventh hour some imaginary flaw is discovered and new sites are obtained only to suffer the same fate. After circling the island the industrious explorers for a be a new hospital have come to roost on the old site in Jemmott's Lane and at the pi sent moment the Advisory Committee are as busy as a hive of bees examining plans for remodelling the hospital to meet 1 resent needs. Frankly the public has little faith in the cjtcome of the present activity. They h ive become despondent. They have reach.. il was two l\ist bowltie, Burton and Woods--the former having tin• ll l s nii a sln | WO on two occasions— who put the West Indies on the map and Laid "" fovndattOUl for the spertri.performance of i-i.iiH i-.. John and Conatantlne twmty-thuv years >''•"> %  l ll< i % %  St.ti; uiih when thQ almost I netanrt*a stalwarts. This >c..i in England, the West Indies will undergo their severest teat. They will be called upon to show that they have overcome all the I..11IU of lift, years ago when bad I idgment in runoing between the wickeU. alternate brilli.nu, and d t p ahOd in'Mlng. and unaccountable baiting eullupaN were severe handicaps. The) have had four further experiences of assaW I but the. are fU to win a test matth in the mo. tit r On West Indian wicket* the. .an hold their own with any team, but iheir position m .. oattea table of the cricketing aountrin ill depend on their ability this summer to adapt themselves to English conditions. WeM Indian-; arc l 01 that the team—now in the process of selection—led by John Goddard will be able to damonstrata conclusively that they have learnt their lesson and can meet England un English wickets on even terms HB Wt should lil/oii say you're right. Which is it? Well. I'm right of left. O. So you're right oj lef. artyou'' Yes. And left of right And you're left of riyhr. too? That's right Are you ft,my to be funny? No Why.' Wften I said you're i>/t o/ nyhr. you said (hal's riyht. What do you Utink Mfl are" -4 couple of eroutalU corricdiaiu? No 1 was only trying to say it is riKht that I am left of right. It Is also right that 1 am right of left. If you're not trytny to be /tinny. u< you knou' what I think you ar. ? Ne You're balmy. I beg your pardon? Halmy. screuiey. loopy, nufs, %  'in leers, (ropd-niuht. In an action for the recovery of stelae aheap, i>efore the (;i-,-. '.--',',',v,',v-v,v,ygers on the door bell If %„u didnt give them monev inev threw bottles through vour window." "Whaf happened to them?" "When lha grew up they were painlessly destroyed by the great Leader" —London Express Service. Wattl Intli* s >lusi II, Made I>OIIOIII it-ally ttelf-Suppoi fin.. Till" AlillH-atP eitiercal. It may •a false Impression in Engand as to our craving Until art succeeded in encouraging erecting in.: would give to us bargaining gth; unUl these Island.. Intoned and ease to produce an abu: Ihlng wltb DO congpi n they will always remain 'vllh but a few ..i %  crs. if we are to en) Independence tonic which n Lcroiiej down our Ihl us Oiat bava tcoaomlc inJcpendence which cannot be stable "l yearly grants and ten ifienrea with reslrlcUo .. to trade with our t'onor Let the Colonial Development' Corporation do IOJSM M-nMble spending ka and stop hanging bread on a cord out of our reaches Lei England make us a credit of half dozen ships Let UM Hriti.h Government apply for a loan and grant from thr USA, Marshall Aid Fund for us and stop their own grants. Your editorial stated inter alia: 'The real difference between the two polities (meaning Aimn,.,:. 'II seems to be that after i of tutelage. Ihe West Indies people will IKexpected to their own l<'t re probabl' right, but I find • inn -iiliniiallly anj inched to this tutelage • in In spending, dressI housing etc.. cut with lining real "'g-tas lo expect generous dlariIngs out from Uncle Sam's pocket • hub appears to be Ike prospect -•i.e Vngm Islands of the I itle.1 Slates tinlv your leader itei would say this — althouih iinliU net in agreement — for is also aiming lo have %  mis self-supporting, but while and during this process the people in ,-h healthy aids, to live as human beings. Who Ha) l.t,'I that Eiial.tt I is spoon feeding us — and for ill he years with an unsweelentxl gruel? Who can deny thai had England in her prosperity emSM for ber olonlal people* with my slight 10 those which Am• .-shlng that we W .t Indians — would have been Ihe ... ui people seem lo Ihjnk thai the f 15.000.000 the V. • are it. receive—of srkl has already been spent—Is respoo'lie slight lm| :i our standard of living. Thia It took j w.u out ataadard of living tha expense „i •nil war ll "If < !" a and Ova Amei all home again out tj is nol far from what it was n IMS It Is not now expected that Britain can spoon feed us like America but she can see to it that our islands become self-supporting n.l slop the trade racket whirl, she has so long used. Let us have our economic freedom and if Br'l•iin cannot give it. then let Amrl.a do so. but not the VH O. I V.B. Prolprliun on Ihe Koaih To The Editor, The Advocate SIR.-Tha report of a case In which a Magisterial sentence of Msetve month,' imprisonment _as confirmed by the Judges of the Assistant Court of Appeal on Friday shows thai tli,,,. L need tor caution and reatrictlon m the use of motor vehicles in this Island. Tw-o men were sentenced foi the larceny of a sheep and the ear conftacated. I do no eithcT o> statement or implication •ccuaa Ihe owner of the car nf "rang concerned In this deal His cat might have been Innocantly eagatgeaf but in l lie end he Is the The point I would like to make .. that two men each of had previous conviction-. lot theft could with such ease secure the vehicle used to conic, the sheep from the countrv districts to the City. There Is an aspect of thi matur which i ti.mk deserves "reful study. Ii is the ease with which people can get the use of motor vehicles today. Strangers from any country can comeTiero and as long as they show proflthe handling of a motor vehicle or show some son of license they can drive a car *' any Urn* any place in this Island. Thia practice opens nsell to grave dangers Within recent months many of the accnl. Iras island (and there have been well over five hundred in 1MH have had self driven hired cars Implicated. The figures from lha Iran* tsepartment of would be Interesting II that some protection be afordec to road users against people whi> have not always People who use cars ir iheir daily calling are called upon lo pay high price, for then and aa there, la no corcveuutory dos. the need for this is all the more ncees. • SAFETY FIRST 11,-allh llnbil, To The Editor. The M dlH, It has taken ;, ,.,,.,, Commiss.on,, vinccj the public thai should be lake,, u, ,h,. prcpara lata T2 d ."""""'I "' food fo, 1, V" "* "" *"uon u the removal of hawkers from the side of gutter, "*""" Let me add that this practic, has been going on for sear, ,' iaSo m, should lead the I'htef M„,„„ which call for h from peo,... ••ilhin my that a .„m.n wh and sous, eaSlliyS when she loo so. HEALTH, Our Entire Organization JOiyS /A A WHOLEHEARTED WISH won row HAPPY HOLIDAY A.\D MAY YOUR SVUy DREAM HE REALISED Bl THE &Cew ^ear. DA COSTA a CO.. LTD. DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT. :> -'-'•'--•^v-'.v>^-.^-.-,v^..^.....,..,....,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,., v ,.^^ WE WISH \LL IN 1950 i\< nsmttmn mm IHIIMill. BE won BltOYAMU arm i UGVLAM si /•/>/.) OF jGODDARD'S WBKIII, RUM -'-•-nillfiM M *>.>.<.<.vs^.< MtA ,,.. VM ^ v s,s A ,,-*'*



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I'Al.t FOUR -I Ml \\ ADVIH \ 1 I SIMJAV J.WfAHV |, ,^ Storm's Gift \\ ins T.T.C. 'A* Class Race VS. Dec 31. Hiiii,y ExajuiTated—Dairympie put an unexpected lacing on the F Class animals going a mile and a di (etched her backers $89 on each $1 ticket to win at the p.irl-mutuei as the T.T.C. races reached the total ok US In third day at Queen's 1'ark SavanComnionve;.lih scored (I the standard of the best of former I there been such a variety of organised sport and so many competitions on an Intercolonal level undoubtedly our first love, attracted Trinidad here in OM car. recall with pleanan it loss before stumps ...irahaU a*, the Barbados Honeymoon, 3-year old daugh F OR Trinidad we snv -i performance by Thu some resolute and finally elegant batting by ring and commendaole performance b> young Chlckl Sampath who made his bow to big cricKet in Indian Cricket Board of Control visited Barbados for the first time and were not disgraced although th<> wen l>eli>w the Btandgrd of the island's full strength. They drew a flxr — brought a U I y5B on | two-dollar ticket. had been som %  us race, J., !" ,.!,.,: ih Wllhebnli mals %  Spriehm '-day proture %  :!h ran third. %  needed to be alert. In I Colls XI. defeated outright a Ba-bados Cricket League hurst won the St Clair Hancl'ic m l 1 **** ,od;,y ,hree wlcktcs M'or bowed UM RDM ua Colony XI. ot the most brilliant that we have ha>< but It gave Roy Marshall the opportunity to scon over six hundred runs ano H the chance to establish himself as a verv useful taffj medium bowler and share top honours with Errcl Millington in th> Rnt Division bowlers. over nine fuilongs and 55 rarda M ? s '"'i } {,zare slood "rm and for the "C" clan animals. Bob) %  hour;i Hard* idge, rode Fabulous Vic ran second and Silver B ddrd. including thirteen fours The alliance of llishenchand and Hazare had checked the fall The T.T.C. Handicap for Class r PKkUiru rnamiAve i£" %  nlm ,: together at lunch .,„-,,. rit nwit.lv l ll.-VMrlU.Na Blue Streak and Gauntlet beaten having added 56 runs in 50 piLKWlCK. thanks to their magnificent team spirit and determinacut of place. mi:: tarried off the First Division trophy although on merit alone there Barbados-owned Storm's Otfl ree more was not much to choose between Empire. Wanderers and themselves *" %  a %  Tea;' race from Gunslte wtcktU had gone, but Hazare was the experiment with the introducUon of the Intermediate Divisand The Gambler also Barbadosstill there with 163 out of a total ion prov. ,. a. So keen was the competition that two rwned In that order. Blue Streak of 401. His stand with Kish.-nTheJh^ H B 8 v P""!!!* Pd ^, ,he J Flnrt Place WM P !" "" !" %  the first mile, 'hand added 92 runs in 81 minutes the F^/JliSift Produced more serious cricket and 'hen faded out of Ao picture for the seventh wicket. Harare's Livingstone brought on Tribe ard . **& Harvev n teams found worthy recruits m these ranks. It fharlite never got up to trie com150 took him 6 hours, 12 minutes the left-handerjKthe new bS*** w th Boaku nue m) 'lie T.Xt; f-. 4 i Ming. ^"Jo. _..rm's titlt gave a grand dianla* ._. credit (or pegging Australia ad0 us rcaU ,e that the high opinion held ofTS5*<*I ; belonged to the spin bowl, ,. ., ''-'ii tot aLS**' four wickets. This was a rate that was behind the run a minute considered good and down TO-DAY. of course, 1 oonlin In the T.T.C. Cup Storm I Gift gave a grand dispu, m Mann Taylleld. and Smith who ^[^""g" !" ..' %  %  'h.s\a£ £ %  £" tie response from a slugconclujioI1 i CO uld come to was thai his ruler was .Hen,^ *•_•* gish wicket. fhal Blue Sir, %  %  rumu-r and thai "oS^S*!* All batsmen have so far done ' thatthTS? 1 the day while half centuries came fro set Ian Johnson was declared fit after a test in the nets to take his p'ace in the Australian team and so both sides had the same teams which contested the First Test. won comfortably by Australia. By the lunch Interval the opening pair had scored 90 for the loss of Aithur Morris's wicket and his confident 42 was in contrast to his failuie to score in the earlier Test. Miller's 58 was a laborious effort V II \/ Mil roi iilue Streak nC f?JS?{iff TSES H Ol by giving up the Had lu Storm Gifi and then coming Slj"* the best stayers and bt i *n Hi-i bv WITHHT hon. KT^* %  the verv faL'ni? ning and the even fastci ill onsidered thM?" Streak was concerned In both, hi trui e ;igain n*SL^ With regard to the two-year-olds, two .< (hem have dnSt* 11 far as very good ones in the making. The first is ralr iv!? fi strong looking chestnut cult about ilfteen hands two or thwf? that M Is going lo gii i South '"anbbeanV^ ** Jamaica best in the i %  iy5U. There 1> little dlrf** had Bow Bells been lit lor tti* "lecders Stakes he ma %  ?S? beaten her, but there is also no doubt that he finished bta whiVh'took" neaVfy two and one manner which bore the : lamp of ih, wu ^ • Jl half hours but Hassett showed '""f !" " "' • -'• %  > bid In ttaZS more aggressiveness. His 57 was • he WK going away from the held when he passed the %  St*?* made up%f fluent strokes all round "' unfortunate that on the second day he had to run ££*** the wicket. He showed abihly to JJ hOTSM In H dan and was well and truly beaten by JOM1> ..,.^. n W ell placed Held with l i !" fi* nert ulto R 8a ."P. d and Tlduc. In fact this ra<-^ should del next season but the Barbados Cricket Panr Association should study the performances of the individual teams during the searon and pronv.tc or demote according:v as tf. \UNMKS HKST TIMK I "W Cable and Wireless celebrate their entn 1 t off the championship of the Second iw margin howl Mental Hosnita' The imal gam, %  ihc issue, another proof of a Ve.l _. J!" ,l ll Association also tried an expense compet.tlor, from Queen', pi?" n %  icadly rivals Carl. „ o( „,,"„, e lo be exact li, h "! ,l,e "*" %  •" %  '"•"> consolidituT. whe, Following were the da.\ re%  Mtipis BAinMCAJ^-4 reea n-*sa c l-IUltan*.. S-a^rtwnber fcnf. 3KIPIKMl HWOI. \p.- TIM CLASS B. Gron, -OCf.1 \ War Lord. • I*T ( -IV BAMOirAP—t %  !' iw :. mt i BU M Mf 1 ifcjiHJiiittM. 3 and included IK : man leg before. Hazaje was unTwenty-five minutes after tea perturbed by the fact that India sufficed to finish off the innings had lost three wickets for thirty which had lasted 9 hours. 25 two runs and went on to com%  '.IS P lp te his century in 4 hours. 9 Inf 23 fours. mins Including 13 fours. Joined The Commonwealth had only a b Kishen cha_nd, the pal nny accuracy and his stand of "*cell<-nt example that the policy of placing Jamaican tv^SliS in E2 is, in my opinion, a So far the b# i"** two-year-old we hav. side of the CaribijeaiTiJ*** cricket. E tnoM ONLV A NOSK " un onl v *>y al average In the Seco,,,. si 1 !" .K' =.-l^illlllg IX-I tttdr Kair.es l,y the XMtA 0 mar 'fZL&i LU !" > .'he guests %  ei of games against colonv !" — •"' only showed that the Col"'">< < BANWICAP%  i * r i Top r.iciu. i <:. man * % %  \l HVM-tt M--., || |r. • I \-. 11 : T*\* At am. 1 Bo<* H-r < I \|R M\MUl \v. i u t I V" l *"bulo-.. 1 Mi V %  BuUn III RVNDII vr-_. II K> %  OaHatari I-., i % % %  Elizabeth s Monaveen Wins short period of batting but neither Ion nor place appeared unduly worried as they played to %  aolag .stand unbroken until stumps were dr A Ihln veil of fog again hung %  a ground Lhu n rn I'hadkar M I innings agaii L; at Rear and Lambert. %  I aberl '.like un earl> bavlni I'hadkar caught b"\ Freer In the slips with his third After an hour's slow cricket during which iv enly thnxruns Adhlkar] trying %  quick single was run out by All'. I'mi-iRiir joincl ': J6 runs in 50 minutes for the unbroken seventh wicket when lunch WU taken Horse-Woman Dies At 32 r Fa ^T?jst ime age. But yet he was ilSL!" horses from whi ., j n l. ;ss than hlT^. Z *' age because he is in a class above them. I am sure -hat l : l llW year was Brown Rock Brown Rocket was Bt tba KM 1 ""re that tm, ^ interesting. fi t thing will spoil our two-vear-old lacing Inddantal H>K is ....ensui Tip, an imported stallion by Fair Ti .,,. JJv !" %*• ny other good ones in Jamaica. Ai n f..,.ul ^t ^ w • *&' no will i'i %  %  it aarnih I s Mc-li I, TrtUV U.iruimil out U 1'hadk.r c Fl-Mt b Ullilxtn IkSffl run oui P Umnaar Ibw b Tll ,, r %  i a Kuhmhaod c b .siniih "udu b Peitiford H r.i^dhnry c W U ri*ll b TnlNKWiJL'RY. Dec. 31. Mrs. Duma Walwyn, brilliant horsewoman known as "The Woman WI|iout Fear in hospital here on ThlU an accidental overdose of a painkilling drug, it v.. inquest here today. /xtttafi han id f ur i,„ a lx furlongs. rough! tooei|„ TOUl NOT A WINNER !" '' ,-i ,. ._, ..„,. ,,.„.!!?.".'"d • wai fourlii _""v*""l I, v Hoiria"" The Jtny returned %  trei Ufflculty In bringing hli .. "'_""" %  death by misadventure. Mrs. Walf" 1 1 .,' .,,'" wyn was found unconscious in '•!""' """ subdued Leap On uim ... locked room. By her bed was ., ,* %  [* "'' h h andlea, at :l %  s art W as i*^ hypodermic syringe -** % —l— %  lllow hlm '" 'at, h Ihc u,i„„-, toldme XughH.'S o furlongs Hw •'•• J Vl ? k £' **"—* tor . i tor W. S (or l8. tor IIS, S for Ml. 8 for MA, 7 lor ^7. 8 for 3M. 8 for ml. —Reuter. T HE I \< BLUNT Itrl KKKKINf; Keenness that prop.. %  11 I&H a turn UM Maftll local season leave for tenon, Ceoffrej I ttta ,„ an.. •1MH, nNMNXS. 1 )( ;.,.N..TKIM.,A 0 I on tour< % %  -mi %  long way „, LONDON. Dec .11 ,.. tba slecplecha^c, jointly own-d by the Quttn and Princess Ell-abeth, t„i the Queen ,'.l,/ ,1 :i mil,inn ,.,r,is hare, < i with KKunvn The Prin, ei who a I returned from Italia was present lo I I popular victor) In I i,let win, only in .. although Imti. lumper, Wrt \ , cnni.ii the straight loing much The Idoa la a tougnnin| ",',''!' "; was "" %  " i IT Woodcock'''.',';'-' -,void next May Hen'. II,Choice Four Will Accept 6100 Challenge needle and a carton and bottle containing drugs. Mrs. Walwyn, aged 32, was the wife of Fulkc Walwyn. irallknowit race horse trainer, A woman ot %  Ki.s-Mt.il beauty, she live Of Bow Bells, the K | only two-vear-oW <.u.. ., %  nly he sam "hat Su'S well, in tins she Is like Sum,,,,,, ^though I think tha Mr to, '"", ""I"'" Apparentb the fever "wchsbTS lid not !" T within three lengths of the Held. Classical beauty, she lived advenTI ... ,.. \. %  -' i ,. turously. She know more about inL I, e at d racing form than mo*t men and ,f Dro u tol ; s her racing colours were weUknown Lm u '';. %  w n. w en>iM. wZZZ£Z Jamaican ( reoh i at the .,, %  on most English racecourses. —Reuter -;t the Christmas raws, the large numte onuoaaei of th The Londo By BRUCE LONDON. I HOSE anything-but-peacefui people, the boxlni man,. n usually belllgierenj t ;n %  Woodcock, will be Anu'ii. HARRIS Jnat to Show Then* UNUSUAL "weigh-in' taCM CockelL Tired of being regarded olHcially as a heavy-weight, he i lap I.II the acalai at tha ornceg of Uw Board ol Control %  %  '" '' %  just to prove :s that ha had reoalTad "anj Guderiau Denies Press Reports MUNICH, Dec 31. Former German General Bain; "ii HI* _nii s i(ims in Aim-tnu *" — -.-.,., w can still 'V' T—• !" "-" ^>-v-i !" U-nt. Before ha left ha gave the world %  £•?• e u ? t ** %  %  '!" %  "SL.S2, n to £* k t £ ow 1; %  llsaejerl movement of former dermal, „f]inioi „f •Umlaaton (.„ ',"' r ,,'',' !!"', V-"" 1 '','. Sla ,"~ '"' s "J^agtin liHf fllttl s- L who coukl knock !" V ",'"*•.'" D '' I 1 0 .,. l m U u Ch ..l ,c ; ,*; r '"<*."• >>r?o >l>n his half brother, and paroOe >,.„ Man enteruunod ., 'i,muiad tea,, Bnuan Oul f* lei .-......* ... mc ycais to tonic ,,.,„,„„,, H.\SM 11! XI I I \(ITIN(i INTEREST ith Kl,i,, i entad by Mill. ,,,. ^ nll . M a German, should enter the !" '' "iclude a servue ot ., toteigi. country. ,!,e Collet! at Read. the viar h :a.e",heu b 'ov.n | """" M, MNMM ^ =^ i" nan th. Qrand National nexl Qrantnan f hla hstht are! lha wiili ^ leofha aep. I •mi third Ut,r Vot Sea Inlahed fourth of II runnara <>r whom Kv.irno.id \ as a disappointiim 1 lowed b> Lord Miitiw.iv and '., U tii^t into tin Joyed by the success of which ih patted aff< whlk amUini at Orantham i.. wfton. ane said congratulations a4ta miuh feelingRealer nge—in ctepted U terms 9 three lads wholl take h or all of Jack Don CockeU or Tony i | % %  D, on behalf ot 1 i ran quicker u ch—like thi.s; lama nas an eye on the ing to-night, a match with .. French opponent. 27-year-old Andre I • '• it Stn .'.ham lee Rink on January IT, and a and K/i.i bannei ;( ; EmDi-ess Hall. Spain Holds Close Relation ^ ith U.S. Vfllhth, '•".' •" '" ">A sooner or U "we will h therefore lo*. and quit, u !" neias in c but al -las many i: m ul The Gauntltl Tho Streatham match Cirollllricfl I .,.,111 HARUQUINa, delighted MADRID, D> <-,,„ ml rranco told hia people HI, • '-'! %  ... ProllHl ..IWIIta.ndfc Into F class warn l I D S,"nii he _!w-> Moa Ami. Thai in a New Yei (hat Spain?. mat Spain', rolationa ...u, Jie -„„. .'" ''''=' '"""• i'"i'ies of An omeon ti : i ":'.. f '.'!";".'.. '.. Breeders' Slakei hut was „,,tcUlc laaailV d B aaj are Jamalcania outg oinR list and others on tie colony. *£*, oy ..an, n?OWSS iSn'ess" o? JSJS Id a, a Club, ban UKnitd a return Those people Woodcock forth.. %  ,F.„, (writa. who think tha by atte,, """ %  <" %  > % % %  •'"> hinder our lecovcrv they c. II luiekcnhani they did not aohlava anylhini n %  < % %  ,ii that Hant u. even tougher and to It earth Good will to!" !" !" Adani, whose boots our contempt for Ua Thed no of tho gamerbm ANYBODY'S GUESS oody* gues, I > ,l ; wiU b >'" < nh W .„, e. no wont „.*d that has turned at that the big sweep broke a res*. ^.ench,,, ^c,'',U, lh"c" rh S !aV,T •"''',' There may perhaps have been B ldaull 'who last nigh: DI %  Sufi -2; £ ssaSafs-s -"o„ * — will sineiv be aakad Ion i tha limelight thl. n,l will li, oB lo VencII He was proront, by his niother from entering Hie M I.. f.r',ii %  nt Whn turn u.111 >> -. H TT.C. china, new Caribbean and for Trin mean; that the day Is M eho IIIUOI l.llWBV #.! Ride Together and Ride with Pleasure ALL-STEEL •Man In llarbid -HI I HI HI, 4 ( ,1 BICYCLE i in MOAD -l in i i New Different Tire gives amazingly different ride! MMS K voteT^r^'Spect; —. ... taken on Monday.—Reuter. %  I.,? -„ng punned n Heclric Tot. %  extonalon of the Ian. the Trial Stakes be nM* i i,.,le.,„da,|uarter.,1 „f the Governor's Cup over han 8', hi A Happy New Year New TO OUR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS Year Attraction* BLANKETS (In Various Qualities) TOWELS 1.98 up I FRIENDS (Various Prices) | DAMASK NAPKINS 34. NIGHT GOWNS 2.97 eo Th. mm s.,,...Cu.h,on kj 1 1"'" 1 ) •" <• KUf! It'. —IUr\ 11 run. on only 2. |u : ~d of tha usual J8 I Supar-Cuahioii. mean an incredibly anwoll.. I Th* 1*H; Softat rid* on on, ood L0M wooiand lor on your cor Ffcwor rani*, -lower ropair billt Woro rr.i# i9 o coon;vE/4w *" "*'•*• -•* •—• '* o~ ET1 THA NI 'S 5' 's 1 I a I %  %  I %  1 CUSTOMERS EXTEND MUM \>I,I II %  waatat, •' %  %  %  %  • %  ••V.>W**


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:r. Foriiii i N St \UU VDVOCAJ.E si MiAV. J.\NX'Af l lUa CLASSIFIED ADS. BATES 1 Oil HIM vvTB ron SALE per %  ** foil RENT %  MBBBBB ,-hBige .. PUBLIC AUCTION SEAL %  BTATE per agate %  ' Blntmum cn.rge P*c..,n.i i iau ia***i lOTICSSt. Per ....te lie* •• , Minimum in>rM .. 11* • • %  EVENING ADVOCATE (llU per U-cri ........ .Sec < i OSIMU TIMI \ \ 3 pm 0* p m tvsag AIJItem. <•< different ^* m H Hl muM h Ml n I n aawsio %  %  "' %  CIIAI-IFNOM "• SBt' BPWJIT IIAIJ^KOK aj-l HIIOA wide* of the late C.EOBGF. CMAU.E NO* 1 • **-ln I %  own • %  CLIWrOF. %  UU'.IIK li' • and Dnw Inf twitr. KIWhM W.C .*** Both. Lan>Yard. DUit Jf. 1 1 SO Jn vl'V PlIBLir NOTICES WAMUI LOST A fOIMI NOTICE W< beg to notify our Cutumers that we will be closed for Slock-takins from Tuesday. January 2nd. until further notice Wm D RICHARDS It SON. McGregor S* 31 12 41.—in. LOST — I NOTICE -...ALOW A' WorthBos including. IWriYigOTator. i linen Nice tnwh. beat ie* batc.mi, Dial 1193 1.1 W—In HORVIIY DOWN 3 he.lr.so..*. runuwed Available fiom 1H Jan IMC. Apply •t.ii" A Beard Hardwood Alley Phr. 4MJ or aWI I I 50 7n O-ltlew.-i.h. HI Joaoph POT the nwwrth* Jan Feb Marcn. May •til Jimr IMO Apply Mr. W T Good I rig Himni Hop* Plant* lion. Si T' QBkM I I M M OflANh, Lawrence Oep. 1 bed 1%'iiin. hatine dining and drawing roorna, r'r Fiiitt-.er piirt'culart DtfD rjrBTSl mrcMK srogior Hhi ii leave hi* lair resident* "Car INI* VI**" fcv fan %  .clock trim •rtertioofi I Fnend. .< %  aa*m '.ivd Ml Innla* MABSBAU IBaUJM "nml p rou4rn it. lee, won fr lluKing l ft D A |g -nr WaMUu Pi-inul. are asked In attend P*i<% Matronal) ..U. Mir i'i ajfaj w 1'SINFJSS PW-VrSKS Nn 4* Roer-icret from lit Ortobw IBM "*" POTilar" Rina MM 4 U -1(r THANKS id**irad. h, II %  %  Hi. I...14T-1 am.! tardi. -tra*hor %  r—titii bl*l<.vrd JMjaMINr ftatmiot Held ihiawwhd'. i I 1 Uaaar Mol h W Mrs AUaFIITHA IA1U\ who wa> Cll M l>v *">d Januar> IW1 %  infamart btfT.-d y her ctiil%  %  I* tnand %  hwrd latkM JOHN BTJaTJaJ] m I**" A )n" fjthvr. 3i*B Jn I U) MarliiP Gardxni lf*iri Uhlumlanad CanUlnlr.i r-flrnoma. balh ft tn.lrt upiUIr* Vaian*-ih. Drawtnc ar Dmin| Ra->m, Pantry ft Kiichni downtialn. Ganp> and tr %  IffSO Dial UIO Mr* Bmo* Til4.m MElJIOUBNr or>-f*m. Worthini-. Ch Ch Prom i,t January IMO Phn< tpnniw MM U U 4 • fn^T -On* fully fnrni*h*d 3 h*d ^m luxury Plat, at WhIU Hall. Cod 'Iniilnn Hill. 1 ml!*trWB ndMon t.r ISth Apply Mn. P. L i''-.4>phan<> Mil. | mil If: FARAWAY. •*•*•% %  Bay 5t Philip %  'I l.l(hUng plant. Carter %  ir\-il-rnrn* MOM per month Pror. 1*1 November on Dial 44TB XI 10 *ft-l I r .vATWiroMrv v. rtmm Hannnah< D-.irahlr roaldonc* •t-i AvallaMa r l( .m i.i rrt ruary Dial 8330 31 II On In dM'd %  loAiitg. EUIIM-I IN Mm •*••!< rmmmbmrm4 b? I Mi I'. lnvt rnolhor MAJiTHA BltANflll Who daparlml inn Hi. Jaa %  Hh* haa aurie frimi (fru-l m '„.T S %  .... ,i MtH \%l> AUTOMOTIVE AUTO llu. PW U fti I. llorar Vutlxixrd Kfutnw I h p A> %  !•• %  a' NrAI-) aa)VI PaXMi* 0140 or 2Mb 3D 13 4B I 1 Mi->i i NO INt.il.ll. ,.[< Appu u. u .S.HK Coon CAB O .. I.,,*,,., Mou i runttitm urOM. Plvo oow I'M I Nw Top Appu lull. Hioiihclyft, Pbuiur Mil .PHH;UlATfl • lorrrui. all .ivodoU. In ton and Iblac* A. IMM Co.. U4 nial OH* U II M id MISrrilANEOUS klANTJItr I|O,M .,,„,, ^.ubl* (v •OMooftl fatw eon luod • C A Provorto ad Dial 31* M l)V k riTTlNflS Galvantard plpa All aorW Rom Uj in. to IH in*. Pbooo OOo" lilof-t.fo OOOM Jual rocoivad a now dtlpmaBl I flood! T/OM trtplr. DOOM luncMrn DRUG STORO so ii In Moc* FRJBCDOM FROM nil* ln.ui PlroHUM Tut. rl *.,. %  i AN ngi.njBg 04 .v*,, aa.^^u,,. Jr. 4.1a •> iU.er Ojkva'old JrZob"r # g||Vi"'o5bjr %  otou-o .!y lk. Map. Aulographa I 0 4* wn I. HA 111 UtlfUl vlr. Urgjo %  rvOMb quartri M\t*> prr month iinfuri>h. Atv..(h-. bedroom propcit^ tm.i.n •T.iehed fMM per month BIX I in UXM r.l R*ute Agerrla ri..nt,it"irL. riiiiidLng, Phone MOD 1 1.50in nXMWAlMI II.M .1. Siiuatod S II. .i. iv. 1M0 Iruipoc lion, on appointing*--.' I %  llowi-d ] %  urM For .InrthrT irifnrinataoi plra<* apply A '.hrvrin. Sraato'n. IU-tA 31 II M fa A 8 ** PI Hill SMhS han boon nu*ruri*d by the ComThurodaj .i ii* yh Jon bosinnlng ..i i o'clock 1 i 1 %  W X B* <"--.ll by V m nti* Hi V %  •.mil by IV boon 1 II' >* overall by y boom. Coin. O'ARCY A s. H VI 40 -4i UNDER THE SILVER HAMMFR 11 i -.ID I 1MbMy. I MM l,UJ %  HrlleMlle AritujM*.1 -WhiteP O. i total 1. Hulann* Sale. roaodai rtilj 1 Ha.ungi BHANKMI TIlilTMAN ft CO. Au*tiun*er* 1EAL ESTATE SHAKES || iharei ol 1500 eh In tKI WlaTI INMA |HM I'll .II IJMITEJl ol t\ each in THE HAHBA %  HE INSL-hANl't COV %  M atutroa of 10 each in Till HAR IIA DOS CO-OP CuTToN fACTORV LTD %  Ml will be oAwted to pub... "iiipFtillun at th* oRVce ol thr imdri mr .d on Friday the KJi d-> .M0 at 1 p in < AHRINCiTON ft SEAl.V I UCA* STHJ0ET DUN 3li I OH fa v. .-it Ivt Hritlah War lan M0 Snoroo aWbodoo Bhlppmfl & Trodnifl Co IM l < ATFOHD ft CO II I'**i •**APU.l st | ,,, ilom DPrtrict M Hflrtxmujd b.iiu!al.i* win. ng room, kitchen, waaluoom. aoivonia luoriaeO. carac* Conrrot* conalruclion lum tool [,.u B ,aVhool I', UloB. Crano and Aam I o.da 4 mileinor ioavinai Colony Th* location i. araauc beauty and la cool .i ail liatM The prk* U ntrenie4y lTactlvr al.100 i|goao< II *DOM Ural Eal.4tr Agenl rota PUnUtwit* Building Phone 4040 I lk> In ARl.roK si Jamaa. rRngap doroy carol block houar. ahinfllod roof, m leot above a*. Ir>el *., .*„, Ia j Halt Irom bathing K' mllea Apeiflhl.% % %  MOM, tltl.m, boo pantry brag* and worhihop Bertan!.' ,utr%  *Mmt and ele.ti I,,M -i valualloti II deaircd A I -d-t* leiMl.i.. l'l}\o.s & B1.ADON. Real Balale A.nU Aue' Mn pi %  %  II Hiding Pho ••* 0 I I M-ln "*i HH %  _nt.il ihui.ii Modern .Inaie >lor*y BpuM *taronui on %  >dar rtM faltlM MO f-riTK! %  vino room, dm ma room, iludy. 1 bath lub balh and .bower modern %  t >iter. Ulad BMB _____ |I90 In IAUHVB1 i. || .II. .harnuna ..n-d.,,7. %  TI,I. -,n bum nvodara -one reeldence contain. 3 %  **"* *"*dah* and .. Carede. itablina. .loefc %  id.r Carrlaar%  • houae Appmilmaiely | £ • IR A III AIHiN p-l Ut. Aaenl) Auctioneer-. FUnlation. %  ulldina. Phone 44M 1 IM In I'lllSOMI -ia7:\ sio*ns t The Cnlih-waah Road leodlral fmi> Tohnd* to Bnrva will bo rloaod lor r* p.i|ra from Januroy 3rd IMO S orter (I the CornrnJioBBnttO 0 wayBt Joorph I IJB— fa ENGINEER — DWool Kngiaoor S.. -. ear* practical opertetice in Intern Wilder. Bridgeand Hj.ti.igi lady. Boxlbto gob' link btoaaut. Pindar will fa an telurnlng aama j l %  Muooni ofnc L*aroc> LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE 3U 12.01 IADVS WRIST WATCH-ln vii M..rlne Hotel. Finder eonununicata. lion \ .ew Guaat Houae. Reward Jl II *-S.i The application or ROSE BTUART ol Qiicn Slroot. St Michael lor paotuoalnn to Ml SpirlU. Mall Liqu..i D....rd anal Galvanuod atwD r.->( attached .Ht.ate a4 Ch Cti within Dtatrict B' Dated thi* 30th day M December To the Police Maglatnt.. Dfd B Signed GEORGE T YARD. lor Applicant V R Tht. application will b-. I der*d a* a U*-natng Co'irt to bo I aPoliao Court. Duinc. the 13th day ' January, low a Or ".irk. a ni D D MORRIS Arlg, I' SHEFPIN G NOTICE Canadian National Stc IV. MISCELLANEOUS NOTICE ,).'!-" OF PfTBB ttantrd by the Commloooneet ol Health for the Pari*h of St Peter J iTwo! fully quallned nuroea to perform ihe duuoa ol DlalTlrt Nuraro lor the above PMtah. Application* will be received by th* -..t^eralcneal up lo 11th Jan I0M a m f Term*HaUry M' par month Appointment on S nontha probation Btrth certificate and Doctor* cerilflcate "uM accompany Application*. Signed. O. B COKBIN. Clerk lo Comma: Health St Peter 31 IS 4 4n Si •I'lUIMI WANT1D lor purrruue m •elecl. central 4rea Well constructed medium to larar property with lane reception and dininfl roomandah* and 3 or 4 bedroom. Well laid out reasonablv private Around* an advantage Good price lor -..liable properly Apply DIXON ft RI.ADON. Real K-iaie AaentAu.i-.neei. Plantalion. : I-.. | B i. 1 IS NOTICE i VIM -ii OF BT PFTI.R The Veetry ol 81. Peter roquoX Ih every paroon who on the flr*t day January IBM aha 11 be ihe owner nccupier of iny land liable lo bo a*ac* rd -Jiall •omeiim* during the M Ve-ary Cat'3.1 li 4. NOTICE IM'1-II OF T. I I .1 K Wanted by th* Veatry ol St. Peter A loan Of E3.000 .Ihree tho *and l-miTidn aa aulhorlied by The Saint Peter-. Pariah Loan Act. 1040 Tender* for to* nbov* kuin will be i (reived by the underaUDied up to January ISth 1M0 al 1000 %  m Tender* miut bo leeJaal Terma Inter*** tnatat be at the rat* not eaceedlng 4*1 par annum Principal repayable by £300 per mn1 than £300 will be Signed G S COHBIV. Veatry Clerk. 31 UH-fti PROFESSIONAL NOTICE DR. FTRREIRA ol %  •Chlmvlll*" Upper Say St. inear Fipianadei by Chiropractic method eorracti dlaeaao* ol eye*, aara, noaa. throat, .unit, *tomacn. kldn*7* and it—er orgaaaDial SMI. IJW US TAKE CARE OF ALL YOUR WORRIES Personal Superviaion Aaaurod .... Be Wise Advertise — LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application of OORDAN PARR1S. of Brntnaina. SI IAICV IBC pe-mi-*lon 10 Ball SplrlM. Mall Laquor.. ft%  -i double mnfed board and )hlnle *ho at Holder* Hill. Si I Dated Ihla 10th day of December IMO To the Police Magistrate DUt F Holetown Smned ST Cl.AIR LAI lie .fit MB—Thla application wtB u. red at a l.lcenaing Court to be hcln a' 111 r>l1rirt F 1 llol %  toun. .in Friday the IJIh day of January l**o at 11 o'clock, am. S H NURSE. fjBct Mag.atn.tr. Dial. 'E 1 Holetown 1 I W In I.O\ I l(\>ll \ I NOTICES. CEMENT FOR RUNWAY Tenders are invited for the supply of approximately 45.000 91 lb. bags of Portland Cement required by the Government for the proposed runway at Seawcll airport. 13.000 bags should arrive in the Island between March 1st—15th nd the balance ii Iwo shipments at dates to be arranged later. Tor caBaont should be packed in the new waterproof bag as supplied by the Cement Marketing Company, Ltd. Prices should be quoted for delivery on the wharf at Bridgtown and should be exclusive f import duty and package tx. Tenders should reach the Dirertnr <>f Highways and Transport not later than 4 p.m. on Friday, the 6th of January, 1950. The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any tender. 29th December, 1949. SO. 12.4ft— 2n LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The appllc.it ion of 0* HARRIS ol Eagle Hall. St Michael, for permlaalon lo .ell Spirit*. Mall Uqnor* ftc at a double roof board and %  hlna'le •J-op iltiuilr .1 Weeton, near Heidn Boy. SI Jamea Dated thl* 30th day ol December 1 MO r the Police Maflitratc. Dirt "E" II aMw Signed GWENDOLYN HARRIS Applicant N B. Thia appllc.ition will be conquered at a Licensing Court to be held at Polic* Court. DlaO-lct X Hohrlown. on Friday Ihe 13th day of January' 1950 .it II o'clock a m S H NURSE. Police Migntratr. Dlt T/ Holctotvn I i 50 In IADV RODNEY I H1NEY NOKTHROl ND IADV RODNEY LADY NELSON LADY Ii LADY RODNfcY LADY NELSON N B -Subject lo rhanfle withoi Sail. Ball. Halllai %  *•(.„ Mth Dec th Da. 13th Jon 14th j~! h Fab. HMh f„' aftUl PUJ 37th Feh laih Apr l.ih Ap.. SalU Arrlv,, Bdm Boelor, ISth Jan 58th j,_ ltd Fcb 14th Feh' Ml. Mar 15th M,r" Slit Mar aSitd Mar 1*| Tor 17th Apr mill Apr. *u>b. AS" SU) M-y gih May lat.. irj; lTlh J ( 3rd F i application u, GARDINER AUSTIN & l_a. LTD. *eo The M V CARITIHEP. arUJ .„-tt-pt Cargo and l^aaorcer* for St Kitta-Ncvis Motitaermt. Antigua, Domlnlcn. wiling Friday ,10th %  eSMStJMJ*. The M V DAERWOOD will accept Cargo and Pa avengers for St l.ucia. SI Vlncenl. Greiiada. Aruba. aalling 7th January, 1M0. Tba Schooner ADA1JNA will accept Cargo and Paaaonflei* for SI Lucia, millng JAturday J|.| I>eceuiber B.W.L -( liiinsi i! OWNERS' ASSUCIATION Censignee: Tel. Nt>. 4047 MOTOR VE8STX •BLUE STAT u '"i'Hni "Hfsfaiii p "nien Ft,.Nassau, Bahama. Trinidaa. ""* %  . i Sailing ... JANCA1Y TTt A K HARHj. „ A 8"", c/0 H PHARRIS NOTICE TO no YF.STRY %  1 • 1 net ~ OF THF r\RIMI OF ST. JAMFR Thl. I* to notify you thai I shall be oontaMlng a ami for the VSfJ forth-coining elootlon. I ahall do all that ilea in my power t. aervo you to Ihe beat of my abll %  •*. %  I am aaklni you for your whorf-rararlrd %  uppon at the poll* ELLSWORTH HOLDER. CMvUlo. Garden. St Jame* II 11 M In NOTICE lo I Ml VFkTRV ILEOTORN OF Till PABSBB OF *T. JAMII AIUIAHAAI IKIUJEK Kiv.i..l..-e 1.. 'l.e Fle-tora that 1 am not %  tandu-e Imiarv 3rd IMS. lor reeleclaon ... member of Ihe St. Jame* VM health will IKII permit BM far the augport yoti har* given t Ilia peal ally year* of mr life My eon E S Holder I* oflerlnai hlnuai >< a candidate for a Beat In your Yeatr I nm aalUng you U jve him the aor .oval auppof*. aa you gave me gunnx ti paat *ialeen year*, and elect him Ttuiiimng you for all you have doYoura slnceraly. A. HOi.nnt II 111* 7 fill Ml.livim1 1 Mill I Ml M lS1 -ISM The Executive Committee of The I l-ado* Youth Movement wiahrs One all %  burnt and Pn)fp*n.ua New Y lhanka for your Past Aaaiatancr -pd again •olKit* viiur luture aupporl Ho I IIHUCB CLARX1 Pounder nd p.oaidenl Rev J. B. GRANT I TI'. Director and (ia plain Mn*. OlAlA BROWNE, General Sarretarv i i 5o in LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The appllcallon ol \TCH*nfJ*JL Hir||. ARD8 of Unyrella Road. Ch CTn lo. perimaalon to sell Spun. Malt .Liq.ua**. ftc al a Board ai.d ihingle ahop with tJvMBgaM attached at D-ymlU Head. Ch i" ithm Dtatiict A' Dated thla 30th day of December 1IM lo Ih* Police Maa lat rate. Diet A' Slsnad VEKNaMF RICHAMJkri Applu.i.t NU ThU appltratton will be M_— -•aervd al a lJ.nia.ug Court lo be IwHd %  i Police Court. rMalrtrl A 1 on'Mondav Hie 0th day of January IMO at Iffo I A ..Him Police Magiatiate. Dial A LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The applUatlon of SlltBI "Y IIAIJ. pi i Itrg irill. SI Michael fc*r perntlaa>u)i t. Malt Uque**, arc at board and anlrgle ahop attached U> re*i den.-* at Cave Hill, SI Michael Haled thl* Mtb day of December IP4J To the Police Magistrate. DIM 'A' Blamed S HAH. Applicant N B Thla application will b rousi lered it a IJcenalng Court to be hold .al I'ollte Court. District A', on Monday the Bih day ol January ISM al II o'clock •V A. McLBOD. Police M.(latr.tr. DIM 'A' L1QU0 LICENSE NOTICE The application ol EVELYN II KIN*: ol HrlhU.ii. HI Michael for pernuaaion lo .,n •g.u.u. Malt Llouor*. ft.at .Kd r*oot ol fl g Mroy wa U bio-i I aa Colonial Hotel. Tudor •*•.. Doled thu SOU. dav ^1 DecenJ>r> 1*40 To Ih* Police M*JUtr>te. Dtal A Signed BVEt.YN H KING. N %  Thia appticaUon will be lawiM •iilered at a I .eeolng Court Uj be hclu .II IV.lii* Court, Dtalrirt 'A', on Monda\ the Mh day ol January MM at II eel*. %  LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE IHE auplavalton of ElaALNF. MOBINrU)\ of T-eedoJe Road. St Michael, lor pet minion to sell Spun.. Malt IJ^-IK **I.. M ? bo *"* % %  ahingle ,w.op at corner ol Jaaaamy and Jordan, l.ne Dated this IIM day ol December 1PM S'gued M JO*. 14 „_ %  Appllcani %  ppltcauon mil b* conoi 'irtT*? *' ,ic ***"*s Court to ha hetu al Polk, Coun Dislrm A' on alonoay th. Mh day ol January ISM al II o clock Pollr* Magistral*. Diet A PERSONNEL REQUIRED FOR THE ROAD CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMME IN BRITISH GUIANA The following sUfl is required by the Public Works Department. British Guiana Government. 2. The appointments are temporary and are for a period of two years, but it is possible that this period may be extended at a later date. 3. No housing accommodation will be provided but a housing allowance equal to 10' t of the officer's salary will be paid. 4. The salary will depend on the age and previous experience of the appointee. The salaries for each appointment are set out below, but a higher salary' may be paid depending on experience, qualifications, etc. 5. Free passages to and from British Guiana will be provided for an officer, his wife and family, not exceeding five passages. 8. The applicants should be over twenty-eight years of age. 7. Travelling and subsistence allowances will be paid at the current Government rates. 8. Applications should be addressed to the Director or Public Works, British Guiana, and full details of qualifications and experience should bo enclosed together with copies of at least three recent references. The envelope should be endorsed "STAFF ROAD CONSTRUCTION". I CLERK OF WORKS. A Clerk of Works is required to supervise all phases of work for a Road Construction Scheme. The applicant must have had considerable experience in mad construction using modern equipment, general survey and setting out for road construction, R.C\ Culvert constructiun, pre-mix Sand/bitumen and stone/bitumen work and general administration and coiling. SALARY £800 PER ANNUM. II SOIL MECHANICS LABOHATORY SUPERINTENDENT. The Laboratory Superintendent Is required to supervise and carry out laboratory and field tests in connection with a Road Construction Scheme. The applicant must have had considerable experience of modern soil-stabilized road construction methods, the laboratory and field testing of materials connected with this t>Ppe of w.nk including the Barber Green. finisher. ^ SALARY GPU I'EU ANNUM. 30.12.4s)-2n Collrce. Ltd. Sheffield, kind, ti.nioct their reprr.eiitaU) # t J R Hunte. Joycovill*. Abbeville Oau dene. Chrlal Church. Dtal SIM. Far lislua. EaadrrafU. *a*h aa %  ATS. SLIPP1ES. BANBBAQS. MATS, CtUOS, RASKSTS. l.u. . If* Alwar* . DOMINICA DANDCEAFTB CO. ghapfeerd S4. Phaaa SSOS FOR INFORMATION CONCERNING YOm BAGGAGE AND HOUSEHOLD EFFECT? Consul! SMITHS SHIPPING SERVICE for Packing For Shipping For Insurance For Pie/ereoce RepresenUIives m all the principal Ports of the aali PHONE 3034 — AliXANDEB HOUSE. JAMH ST ^ r vmmmmBHmm TO OUR PRESENT AND FUTUftE~ FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS | 2? Prosperous and Uiappy 1950 TO ALL OF YOU EXHIBITION ; WE ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT. PAINTINGS and DRAWINGS %  I V SMOII.\ II. TAYLOR A SONS u e No. 4B PART ONE ORDERS leSBMM J. Com.,11, O.B.E.. E.D.. Comni.it dmi, Th Barbados Regiment. EMIUEHSfclUCTHU-nittS Eltimates and Plans prepared (or all Tjpea o[ Buildings, Repairs and Alterations. Phone 3100 .NOTICE NICHOLLS & Mrs P II 1NCE of the B Beauty Salon. Bolton Lane, hereby notify their I itiat their Shoppe will b. closed until Kth Januarv 19511. !" C. Carlton Brown 6 S Staff Wish Our Customers J £SO FOR YOUR NEXT VACATION THE GRAND HOTEL THE ISLE OF SPICES GRENADA B.W.I Luxuriously furnished, Bathrooms to nearly eve. Bedroom, Two Lounges, Super Views, Best Residenlii. M a n el Car al very %  "osonable rates-alfo Oulbom Motor Boat, when not on i ;lieduled journeys to besA DOUBLE BEDROOMS from $10.00 to $14.00 po *! inclusive of Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner ($5.00 to $7.00 per person) SINGLE BEDROOMS-from $6.00 to $700 perd* i !" ., '?. cluslv e of Breakfast, Lunch, Dinoa. LOCAL BOOKING AGENT: Ralph A. Bear., Bs+ wood Alley, Phone 4683. I Dee. 49 LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE 1*. ...IK.tMn at BUKICK AUSTIN ..d Si Jo^ph (Qr pwml^ *' to Mil Spir.i.. Mall u.uon, Sx ii ."u^a soar of 1 •!,.., ..ii mna i"^.T buuaa> th*M Laos, as BUM aas.,„ Dninu, IMB To Ih. POUc. M..I.U.,. DHI r •aM WlliJAli KB.O. roc Applkani "a-", .aauc.iwr, win .. roiai0. !" a .1 a Ucnjrna CMrt lo be MM al DUlrkt T on TKMoa, to. •• Jaaaant IMS a. lT%M.k. J H %  OW.RDfl. eollc HaaMral, p.. TRAINING (a) On Thursday, 5th January. 1050 at 1700 hours, there lull ta a Parade l ( .r all Ranks of Ihe Regiment (bl Then.will be N.C.O. rahl nary cUss .1 1700 hours on Tuesday, 3rd January, 19.50. OBDIILT OFFKEK AND SI RJEANT FOR WEE* ENDING JAN. 54 Lieut T A C.illens 2H3 S)l Peterkin. C. C. Nel fse Dulj -ll E R. Goddaul III Sjt Haynes. G I AFPUINTMtNT Th. Commanding OIBcr I. |,lud lo aporove Ihe appomlmenl 1 Jan 50 '" "" ""'"" UnP W U C SCT ''" *•' M. L. D. SKEW1S-COX. Maior. SOLE. B Adjutant, The Barbados Regiment. NOTKl. All interastea personnel of ihe Regiment are notified that Foot, ""•'" helm, on Tuesdsy 3 Jan. 50 at 1700 hours. It is •lao notmed thai the first Inter-Coy Football match will lake place at 1.00 hours on Friday S Jan. 50. HEAL ESTATE AGENTS AUCTIOIOaaS DIXON & BLADON Lt Cmdr Q s DIXON, OB E J M BLADON, A.FS (Eng.). sf.R.S.I, AM I B E Conneetioru in I K CANADA — USA. Before buying, examine our clen.ive u. u „f high sslta sroperty and land located in all anus. a*" PUnulion. Building. %  & i k i and Friends fl ZHappy Wew 'year %  I E C CARLTON Hiiim \ \ %  Wholesale f, Retail S {gj Druqgial an { %  j 136 Roebuck Si Dial 2rJ13BB BMSHMKUMMMMI 1950 FURNISH GOOD and THRIFTY ll Will W r-*u* t„ Furr'Bh \ND TirniFTY f-ora \n* %  SUB 'hinsi w hate for >o.i hsfay Mahogonv or Par afalataad. Mont daalgna. S urn Pui. ;uin*iled and railed and penMled har*robe*. Dr*M**r rtobea agtd I inon Proaae* Vanllie* and Dr*Me. m 40 M.le.„,d ore-. fnajf ^wnioc, %  ,ttm •* M Du.iiul and I'UMheu, Tablei %  l-rlcht. Arm Tub an.l B-cki %  „ ( '-1fafafa %  „ : ..,.. %  %  I rt aB u a r da and Uqu*. CaLS. WILSON Trafalgai' 84. ... ntu < IB Season's Greetings — nOkV YOU* JEWSLLKH V. DEUMA & CO., LTD. 20, Broad Slrert Those 41.44 '-%  ''V-v^v J VA.v,v,v, v v ,, j WjV MAY ALL HAPPINESS Be your, during the Christmas Season, and may U ear l50 be one marked Indelibly in your mataoO — year of Success, Expansion and Achievement LET US HELP YOU To attain this Success. Contain t'uring Ihe CoBiM Year to give us your Orders for all tnanaer ol •*o,. .a klnd „, Fac|0 Supp | l4fc or •ny Hem of H ardware y ou may retire And now may we extend lo vou ihe Season's Greetings wilb .11 our customary sincerity:— X Prosperous SWew ^ • THE HAHHADOS I Of VWI *** White Park Road St M****'



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PACK TEN li .l>\ I if \\ I SUNDAY, i IM illy | ,, a REVIEW OF THE VEAII: Year of Economic Difficulties Has Sobering Effect To call IM9 a year of crises of Britain, and the programme ol would suggest that preceding Miporls from dollar areas, years since 1945 were free of Although Mill enjoying a narkMaae. Of course, they were not. ed. though reduce*) favour af bywhti Treasurer of • i-(I, the crises of the past foul elections, the Government have the Middle Temple, officiated at yean, have been so numerous an not been fortunate this year, (he reopening ceremony of the to numb the sensitivity of the pubStrikes have proved a serious emaiMlaal Middle Temple Hall reli* It has been difhcult to gel barrassment. The year opened stored after war damage. Hit certain types of men to believe wilt, thirty thousand bus drivers Majesty honoured the heroes of that there would be anything seristriking for time-and-a-half pay ouily wrong with the state of the for Saturday afternoon work. A country so long as the wage packet 5equence of strikes in the London maintained its plumpness. docks began in April, and reached The year now ending, however, a grave climax -in July with a ho* wrought a change Its distincstrike lasting twenty-four day* tive feature has been its sobering and involving sixteen thousand CciVCd the Western Europe Chiefseffect. The wage packet has redockers. Troops had to be used of-Staffs arriving in London for tamed its plumpness, but there has to clear cargoes of s< me food ships, consultations; and, with the Queen, been an increasing awareness that The Government ivused a State \,.,ied Edinburgh for Hsgni IN purchasing power was falling: of Emergency to be declared by tival of all the arts. The Ascot ui put another way, that the cost Royal Proclamation. race meeting restored to its preOf living was rising. Side by side "Go Slow." and "Work to Rule" A'lth QMS development ''.ere has measures by railwayman brought Deen a_growing realisation that a serious threat to summer rail wages were not to be permitted to traffic, and culminated in the Npiifue rising prices: that if the tional Union of Railwaymen apwnge packet would no longer pealing directly to the Prime Mmcover expenses, some expenses ister to intervene to prevent .1 Would have to be cut. possible national railway itoppasjr Early In the year then. ere That event was fortunately averl%  rhethor the "wage f: would be made really effective remained to be settled, and still duous in their discharge of public Unions continued to (lie claimfoi remain Strikes in Lancashire ad duties. They had a particularly advancer and negotiations ere Yorkshire collieries were also warm welcome in Edinburgh for am But ai the months went among labour troubles which the festival. Lancashire, York. ,eai that the Govproved costly *hire, the Channel Islands, and Ireland were visited by the Royal Tribunal Set I'p couple. They attended the Royal Agricultural Show at Shrewsbury. An event happily rare in British i„ (he autumn the Duke of Edinpubhc life was the setting up of a burgh left to take up hli Naval *" duties at Malta, and Princess EliKv Hnoii'.i H.M.S Amethyst who had gallan:K beaten 1 fl attacks by Communn' forces in China and brought then ship through a menacing situation. The Sovereign presentto the Irish Guards *>ar glamour had the presence of the King and Queen on three days. His Majesty had a great ovation when his horse Avila won the Coronation Stakes. K-*n On Public Interest .\\\Jii/* %  montha for contempt of court, and £ 10.000 was imposed on the pro:per. Biias the trial revealed, Haigh confessed to the murder of no fewer %  A %  %  111 'Whitei'JJ. Sir Nicholson famous por;i and Professor Laurie noted for his reaeareri and achievement%  %  parsons. In What :->the preservation of old maslt:... claimed to be "dream mad:., r Frederick Ogilvi, Fi\r Drowned could not retreat from policy of a wages' ceilinn luctantly, Ihe Unions .laclcd thai the government must be supported. Two events have helped to bring Tribunal to investigate allegation home econom a Budget extreme. • ment would like to make in a preen, m the autumn. l %  the Board Of tame the dr-valuation of the T " d ? '">" his_office and hjs It was announced in Jum Princess Elizabeth and the Duke Hugin ndV Manor, famous hone ed, but thorny points of difference of Edinburgh have been most awiot t>,„aeli. had been handed over to the "National Trust. Field Marshal Montgomery spoke at the D-Day memorial service held In the British cemetery at RanvilW The cross channel steamer Psincrst Ait rid struck a mine in Ihe channel and was submeud r of the crew were drowned, but all passengers mostly B were safely landed. irnvided material Lind in the type of crime fiction presented in books and films to n public which has an polite for siKh fare, but which, nt the same l the alarming growth of crime. %  theft is a conseOf unemployment and poverty I convictiw during 1 period of abundant employment There were several large rob%  A moonlight raid on a Hungerford man toe family resulted In the thieves getting away a 000-worth of jewellery; only a fortnight later a gang of "dinner bOOk L IH.000 worth .nrt jewellery from '.he home of :i racehorse owner. In one London case a bank to have been defrauded of %  Trri.-rt" Crime pound, with an immediate increase in the price of bread, and the ol further rises in the tost of living within ii few months %  of bread up; the value U down and wage* iTW complex economic causes of these unpleasant hapis.ni not be generally understood, but those three stark %  : % %  . !•' that something urai seriously amiss. As the year ended. Mi Maurice Web.. Ml'. Chairman of the Parliamentary Lat> summed it all Ufl "This is something worse lhan I kp of Parliament, arid the resignation of a Labour nominee as a Dlractoi of the Bank of England A further I sequel was the escape to Israel at I chief witness of the Inquiry ami r#en summoned to appear at Bow Strae' magistrates alleged bankruptcy ^ ,„ h(1 ngratulations from all parts of the Empire, made a long Continental tour during the jrasjr awry attended the cenLonS of the Bedlord Colleen for Women of which %  he li Patronesa Another notable %  I' she undertook was the reopening Nrvlci of the historic old church at All-Hallowsby-the-Tower whuh was damagI'OLllI .il. was married to acted contrary to Government Miss Marion Stein The policy on the Ireland I I. On born bride was a concert plants! It is a fundamental ofhnr Uswaa the Government lost The Raj maladjustment in our %  rhoM ,l '% %  Pport of two Soeiallsl M.P*s ia tron of music __. %  ,__ •. .ml .in*. U UB 1. I.. 1*1 discrimination marched from the Mansion Hi to si Paul's' to corns* And Vikings landed in Engla id again; they came in tin ship Htim. and and m:iii\ The RavQiv est merchant ship bulll Tvnr itacc the war, went to in August. Mr Pntrii %  : ad M00 l hrs. 3 mins., there up an endurance raeof Mi Churcl ill was honoured %  1 of Strasbourg fur Ins Wl < ity The religious world a %  I %  "Perfeci r to counsel, a young %  %  N cunning %  %  1 one most su. %  ly ipl to qu b | njeUmes | ol the B.B.C -. I'tnguished aduonttonJ Smythe was Known for his gre it nounf medicine •• lost Sii R, Robertson; grt and Sir Maurice Cassidy both Royal Eminent churchmen who hiive died lnclud< bishop Amigo. who rec is )ubtlec ., Holy '• %  his long < %  : vice as Rom;iBishop of Southwark, the Dean ol, Lincoln, and Lord Daryington w' 0 had been a great figure m Anglic HI mission and propagan'i 1 mganisntlons. Commerce lost Lord Leverhuim" who had rendered signal generous to education ad Obi Ma 1 %  I who had many big li terests. and ha nterial office, and Mr. A. V U 1 in the aircraft Inrtu had In the:r %  nation. There a %  ..I making him u of Honour. Dame ::. left fragrant U n 1 Wallj %  itfarcc and owner I 1 G r .V f irn t B< %  II.'!!, r. and PlrUi %  eronomic system It is going **n<* one paar—Mr. Ivor Thomas to take many long years of M >*• nd Mr. A. Edwards. M.P and since his by report* of the arrival in !> %  : l lias written much on don of fragments of o effort to correct." With that diagnosis there would be a large measure of agreement amona all Parties, though there %  %  leaving the Socialist benches for v.itiv. Party and I*rd Milverton transferred his allegl.ince to ihe Liberal* Late in uie year Ihe Government's catalogue of misfortunes \ lluw Year a extended bv ihe admission of heavy losses on the African Parliament is concernground-ruts schema and on the ed. the year has been one of the first year's administration of the % % %  ith.n living memoi> Following immediately upon a Government majority of 90 on its PaletUjii' policy came the British *> tseio recognition of the Israeli Government Soon afterwards Parliament (BV e a second reading to the National Theatre Bill which projects ;, State theatre as a par) of the larger scheme of the Festival of Britain 1051, on ni %  irosrimatab 10 inlUloni arito I*' IMDt, with • gjgProval ol the Opposition, secured in levanxious days by the fcriiamentan tk U |fa n, 1, n Morrison %  %  %  for the restoration of the light of 10 introdui 1 lid. Into the Commons, but the Iron and Steel Hill bu been met throughout the year with uncomn a constant autiaty. Early in the vein there were supi > 1 foi l'J21.OU0.tMKi including flit) -eight millions for the National Health s nrtoa, and ilftyt*o millions more for the Minifrood. The Budget presented by Sir Staflom tiipp* had to account the furmidable delicii on %  %  nut of no less lhan £423 millions for the sterling area The Chancellor bud tu tell OCA eminent %  upoortara candidly that ho spoke .ixal.on while the < ial services was rising rapidh appraelntad to the full %  could no) %  .ike and eat It, But in Otnatai for gjvoi lions atiunah/ed railways. ""• miaOmm nw tarrlMj %  ipen.i.r prohably worki •ml .11 ahoui .'.. 1J. ,i MS*.' I 1 l Mutual music first brought bride and bridegroom togeth. MM King %  n and the Pftnceatc were at the wedding M North Ac %  pactaUj cornpoatd foi the occaEllis %  h I kburgh had %  and the l -1 ml popular TI by her (harm and her Some Highlights of The Year scrolls p re-da ting existing records Tsfe> I found in a cave by the Ih id Sea. The lariji I In the world, "Brabuorj 1 her maiden flight in S> Piime Minister Attlee had an underwater crtll • in a new type subman::' Dutch and Belgian 1 joined the B A I large-sea!" Britain. Koyal t'oininissiniiv Ke : Kecalling the mghhgh %ear from month to month, the iinei yuceii Mart went aground off the French coast in the torlleh ushered in the New Ve:ir. but the same waafc the H 14,000 Ion Untr Canmia, largest built since the war, started on her successful nuslden myrie Dai House became Hutehinaon House m Fclmiary and the |" 1 nt a Natloi Of British Sports and I'astimes in Oulldhall before a brilliant Ajlglo-Dut Mr. Winston Chi.; the (li< tius Medal for distinguished to international and international law. One unprecedented event 1 %  its Its own dlsUnctW* I publication of the RepOl Royal Commission on U After two vi-ai c.f in'. 1 the Commission pronounced I Brttlah Pi tiun," ami "inferior to none 1 %  ddarnd however that .1 fictent in the pra I %  was capable of In pi rrtide suggestions wbaffl weaknesses might resnndltd The Report d mart) ml itaout v 1 %  i'i. reeted several rs mn peace efTOI %  I Immoral g that thai Pb would n 1 ickad rinful.'' %  %  • the war, %  s due to evacuambed %  1 takj ; families, %  M dlapiica %  %  %  helped ij bring : by which th< %  %  A f*T %  trlttsf UM counti 20 fl. OMI in 43 day*. RHEUMATISM and agonising BACKACHE GONE! OMttwr} ;ul political event lie raeognltloa b> %  lleriin An Lift, and the consequant attandonrnaot of tha Russian polU > o| trj UUJ U) 'li ive her Allies nut of the (irrman capital by u Of blockading the cltj at.amst surfitcc liaiikport from the W*t The feat of keeping the cil> %  uppUad by air throughout the winter was a tremendous achieve and lh> 1 iiang* of HUpss of gratitude from Kn Germany to tha British when the rsmorl la I KM landing of a British aircraft at with the I iterlm commuted delivery ut the Oreo! Britain Much ol millionth ton of food and freight %  airlift began 1 %  1 ftntoui llbrarj of O itandina the 1 1 the fact %  %  0 m.v i I In the small of ray h. ,i *' V r -. 1 bottl. Obstinate eompiainli rJiavcd by NRUSCHEN rheumatlam u atari itod ... parlenoa • years ago 1 bi oomatlain id shoulde: Mareh w* damaged by fln Arctic Expedition ittentlon should I 1 r4slatioi Politics Ai-ain %  %  ... eni and in %  1 oramons ... %  ir by ins 11 U) the R %  Ol I, N..\.il ichit axpaeUtloo in Arctt attitude which II broucHl about, waters testing >pucial •quipmeut greatb I um pi 1 the tension Royal Activities 1 1 the yeai have bssn eoncarnad with tha Royal House whose pupulani. %  lib tha nation 1alway %  it time* when poUtsi M vide the njlion. thus amp) Ai ihl tuna UM ChesjareUor had a "e tha value of a monarr' %  E i*sed to devalue sterling li refore came as the greater MtJW) Troubles: labour 1311 r- ( ments in cond Old Mr. Churchill was in Boston In April %  ne last Oft) htskork >ears and uttered a solemn warn* nit; fupsihri tha dniatar and maUgnant poUc) of tha tha K.enilin" Ui,i Heith bs> 1 .nrman o| the new ntm Ftnanea Corporu1 Board of Trade auspices the King wall 1 nonweaUh inch sat A.-the dose, politics and nation uiuiK %  ra was much tl h reeral elect..-i .1 period ol thirty ym r.d elections ban Ea %  late autumn, and parti • ol j findiiiii thai "' the : %  lanctlon drastic mag econornj would have had a go d loraUpi %  01 starllni Bui decided othei i ty about the dale ..t | im.l that I „„i a little 1 nniilinu n my paina li.. 'ii that day I.., %  tlel renllv surprised me." TR Rheumatic pains and backache SI George. Eminent ''"''t-J-ud -poisons which lazy 1 faiMn? T5 d S£ -n.r all ihe i„.o"„., U.rd ni Api., imull. ihem lo norf.d Lord Du Preq. %  l.,„,l whleta is ilwaya tlool from ,,,. ,,t The PM| of llukm*, UlniM l-"'l.... Hi.' l*rnt>-iiKh!h hui .. early in tht year, and of the potls "> Induirtrlea Fair opened in m bus. •rraylnl Ihtn poneine.it of Ins Australian lour, l -ndon and Biriiimgliain with a lialtle evoked many manifestationol i.'.orct number of cxhihllon ... As .11 the period alter 11)18 Bank, and the Stork Exchange deep sympathy, and there was a "Jay That month brought :, influence of a great closed foi a day. ThereafUr the great popular welcome fo. the y ''" h Ambassador to Broadcaaisnon.,c .o.u^uence. began to King, wlvsn. ,n June, he mad. Ml l>H House, prssartnol a l.pest.j low. ikfm.n.1 allrnl.on The Governappearance at the Kmj. Bull %  I IKh GoWn,., 1 of review, his rtrst ceremonial enmem 1.1 recognln. I "thl help "f tin suirsWn ,.( the shock when Ihe Government announ.-ed devaluation t w month, later and ment had lo face the grim t. deciding on economics Mi gagemciit-ru-i a u. nig ill Churchill piomtsed support for all SO exceptional operation rsoasures which tha Opposition The King uiaugursled Colonial could accepl as being demorutrabMonth m a ceremony al the ly ill the national interest, bul the Church House. Wcstminstei On .1 whole was not satisfied ihe Can taiga Dominion Dsy Then Ihe programme ultimately Majesties want to Wesl: and comfort London radio offered BJ resson of onginallt. i' : • K.. '''" *•" l !" ,h d "i" " down in ||M 1 Nottingham attained the lot] ..I crlata The trial of J, full status of ,. OaorgN Halgh fo. the killp u ,,? 'll ,0 "" u,d broken by M. Mrs Oluc Durant Deacon ii, Neville Duk. were those from closed a sUrthng use of scmtl produce., „; tfi %  .ovein.iVenlTim' AblSTi iSg^irrk. TSXSS iSSZ "lUM SSJlftlLX *EF*F& O„ Ing at economies of £250,000.000 Club had pre., ..,,,1 men who fell ,„ th* war c,c murder f.„ a. mJ'^nd "cT ""fSr ,Wi £ u \ '• l "'"'''" Tliei, Man-.'i.us. .ommemor.ted h. thrie \^ '' ^ • ill* and other la.ld.na. school ,n memory of the Canadk u wh the RovalArtilvf meal. Food M.mstr, .Jmw ,n the wa, Hid Parkt Dream \ladn-s. lion the much-dlscuwd Fe.liv.. A memo, able legal occasion was .... veiled b> Prime,, Ellz.i, !" '''"!.". among man. 0 airii sir Walur li 1. gren. Intajnlns ,, K list Imperial W... [ormed unique service to those who fell I irl .,1 Imlral So,,.,. W,„,a,n. ,,. ..-Hi roll „. fl v.e„ H r Mn ii.iiii,, St M Itsto authors. Dr. 1 the essoyis ,. %  ,... Sir Malcolm 'I %  -i Hammerton. %  on of the ... B "as financial ad 1 man. 1 murdered I.. tied to break I 'liv action and (hag restores freshness and vigour. A" Chemists and stores s>l'. Kruscbeo. BOB MARTIN'S^ world famous, preparations FOR IIGGS COSOIIHI" I'OHWHs W0RH MESICINfS • DISISMf-Eg rOHDERg FIT UO HSICI TaKETS • t2 ClaTHEIT • CANKER tOTION • CANNER MWDER gLOOM SHaMPr? CHALK RLOCK • CLEAaSflia rOWOEB AKTIHATE INSECT POWDER %  riu'vr it—fUHUt DDT AND CATS 'TIBS' CAT poantti The prsaar.-i 11 er Itp ^ mirtisa r art ate* m+ tar Puts. D. MF.YERS a CO. LTD. PO BOX 171, BBrDnETOwil D in Mo strike remember Phensic Wise is the sufferer from headache or nerve psio who keeps a supply of Phensic! In a mailer ol' minutes ihe wor i of pains give way to Phensic and as the pain lessens, you fee! lit and cheerful, ready again for work or play, h is good to know iliai fan can always tan da Uef of Phensic. Be prepared for headache, keep a supply of Phensic handy. /JusttahtS Tablets* Phensic %  FROM %  NtRVE for wiick. solo relief HEtOACHES. RHEUMxTIC PAINS, LUMBICO, PAINS. NEURALGIA, INFLUENZA, COLD. I CHILLS WILLIAM FOGARTY LID. Inc Br. Guiana "We ft4tcriti i i )><-k BC hMd tsS kbova • -M ot WMU. r M : B rr. tr •. Wf t>lMp. % %  • ml DI, 1 •••*&. lmli. w L.J— F"wViftiSma S : '•'irt. jour Ufa % %  1 ; i i' %  i I %  (. %  • i %  %  %  "• TI> rr flrt 4OM t I I-i*uurt avm TOST eMmlit tixUt in thf \ 'he Mason. ofnUl •I N t( >• B. UnviU I.HMil.,, ., %  sapir i,,.sg* "mHnmmmmmmmmkimiS EXTEND TO THEIR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS THEIR BEST WISHES FOR A NEW YEAR OF PROSPERITY %  Jcc Sill Ills' I 1 at Ti if. fflflfffff(KRfism;(9in{aiaiffaaifi*^



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T SUNDAY, JANUARY I. 1M0 SUNDAY \DVOCATF. PAGE THBEF. Mi. W T.Ik A British Film In Cold Storage Here Is One American Market one of the things they did not auction a t Shepherd's Bush StudK* ao* (UM iml toriorn WBS a £120.000 invisible asset. This wa s Sydney Box's lasv G borougn picture to be made helot* the Bush doeed 0) Traveller's Joy. Goog'*' WIUHTS jud husband John MK allum starred in this gcpjen version of the stage Success— wM Yolande Donlon and Do ra Kryan (who is nlso in the play) supporting them. But after many months Traveller's Joy remains literally an invisible asset on Mr Rank's ledger For a clause in Hie contract says it must not bo shown an vwhere until ;he play's West End jun finishes. When the Aim production began. that clause did not seem important Bui' now the play—with Yvonne Arnaud as star -has developed into one of those surprise record-breakers, and looks like running on indefinitely So Anthony Darnborough. who made Traveller's Joy for Mr. Box. If going to show itie film this week *o 'he one man who can Llfl the ban. if he chooses—theatrical manager Hugh Beaumont. The film-makers hope Mr. Beaumont' will agree that there is ample living-room in London and the provinces foe both versionsAfter all. Miss Arnaud and her fellow players have hod the field to ihernselves for nearly two yeras now. Censored Role Shepherds Bush's last production certainly deserves a break, conaiderinc s troubles-in-thcmaking. Thesis included a complete .shut-down when John IfeCallum enveloped 'mumps—and a series of skirmishes with the censors over Yolande Donlan'spartMiss Donlan told me recently she had to remake so many scenes, with blue pencilled dialogue, that she wondered if her role had not been censired out of the picture bv now. Disney's Ship When W l Disney went homo recently—none too jovial after that Bobby Driscoll court ease— I he unwittingly led' behind I i Year present to u number of Denham Studio workers. The present? None other than the good ship Hispaniola. known to every reader of Treasure; Island. Disney had the famous vessel reconstructed for his film of the story. The picture is finished but me Hispaniola still stands on the Denham set. Because of this there will be some weeks work next month for pan' pf the Denham staff—after the close-down of Rank production there. II; Harold (onwav For Our Films 111 Milton Still I III 41II have come to look forward to a British picture as a stimulating ': tuning experience. Since nur movies are in constant and vigorous competition % % % % % % %  i TT with Holljwood in this muiket, WHEN bnth Hollywood and London are prematurely we cannot afford to discourage digging the prava of the British film Industry, it is rel %  > won audiences. i discowr at least one mark* whan tha Lv %  300 pictures vet beiiu lolled. r | British ttlnuli the 500.000 members of Canaare to-day more popular, earning da's armed forces who acquired and gaining more a taste for the British way of than ever in their hitlife during the war. tory. They have brought back with 00000 to am between a null:' million an Canadian dollars annually if she can supply 10 per cent of this requirement. But that means 30 quality picNo! only are they tieing shewn them fond and sentimental re•. U res— not mcrclv 30 hackneved I tin j.nxill imlnlluil nn.iaiu % %  l-l..— ... ..( — J. I I .... _". .it the small specialised houses minlscences of England and its which exhibit only foreign illms. people which have awakened |Mn are now 116 Ode-i DtW ciriosity about our irslUuaomc of ihem as luxMont, our custom-and air and spacious as anything in the West End—which can comBritish films have also a spe! prtejm even terms with the beet rial appeal to the laan-aae ^,; n ,.;; lf p^n to pi muco .-inemas associated with the youngsters just finishing secondB i ue Lagoon The Window Bov 'large American companies. ary school. Graduating from the md Wheutcv* Galore Record Hrrakinu cowboy and bubble-gum Before the war a British 01m P'cture-goers, their taste has y %tot in 4 j oor second rate imitations of infer! American films. They do not all have to be ex..' pioductions like Hamlet and Red Shoos but they must at cast have the appeal and mtelA HAPPY AND PPOSPEHbOSNEW YEAH TO OUR PATRONS AND FTW 9 WE THANK YOV /or you Patronage in the IKJSI year*, and assure you thai we in'snJ 'o give vou the best of fc'nferfainmenf for I9SG. ROODAL THEATRES-4ribbu EMPIRE—OLYMPIC—UOXY—ROYAL. EMPIRE To-day to Thurs. Mat. & i phi shows daily. over here had about as mucli COMPUTED BUT NOT rOB G**9 WMen eW Jotw MtColfom in SHOWING r*T i SCCM '/orti TttniNtr't lor iiu-nui lights went out Ni and Red Shoes are discussed i very where, and they will earn as much as such record-breaking box-oflea American successes as Uest Years of Our Lives and Gone With the Wind. production--** .Btatree-of Capthat Rattlgan comedy wh.ch_.tln. !" ^£ t gJ k ggfrfZ££ i Another Hollywood company, glory to the banks of the Avon Warner Brothers, have heard Not Anxious about thai' ready-made craft. Aim Later in the year Ralph Weherd they are temporarily in Uie sailBon may make another him. But ing business. They are to begin no:, it seems, Love in Idlenesslain Horatio Hornblower, with Lunts played here and in New Gregory Peck as C. S. Forester's York. Nelsotuan hero. Thereby hungs u sad little Mle. Director Raoul Walsh, who is When Myrna Loy and her procoming from Hollywood with ducer-husband. Gaoa Mar**) Peck, chinks it's silly to build a were in England this summer. new ship—when one is to hand, she said she hoped to moke more only needing a little camoutlago pictures over here with him. One to be ready for Captain Hornwas to have been Love in Id i blower's command. with Myrna and Richardson coWhat about Gregory Peck as Marring in the original Lunt roles. tlie sailor who has been memd from Gene Aulry to n ls lutl OIlIv )inailclal coiuUd%  urtosity value as a Ubangi nai a rcn "' l v iC r '. rt erations that should prompt our iv ni a circus. They earned T ' them British Aims are more deslre lo show British pksures about £100 to £150 each and ntelligenl and more mature than „ Canada In s country wan forgotten the moment the the regular Hollywood product. l(lodC( U)lh Anu-ruan i.uiio. hghu went out fnf. '" lheir ICW 'i ( un d adu11 Am.ir. g Unariean llntisn tllms like Hamlet J hey ..nthusiasticnlly supK0Oiis and American television. like "anilet. r.reat Bpltish lUms m f h fcw hxpcctations and The Fallen „ ,,, 1(lft „, us Iu flirlhcr 1 '* Canada's understanding and apBut in order to maintain and i'"' 1 %  •'" "< xiiv British way of increase this interest we mus'. *' le continue to make an adequate In the current discussions on .luantity of good pictures 'hifuture of the film Industry Each bad film that is sent over '' should be raUMBDbarad that In Canadian dollars, and it is iwtv mcr ,.i v does a disservice to W drastic curtailment in the I that Quartet and Blue lne cause 0 ( 0 n British lilins, production of British (ilins will be Lagoon will net almost as much. bound to jeopardise our position i.v has tx-en the increase Unfortunately Canada has bad In Canadl HM ottMl DaWtl Oi I in the 'Iirough her share nf dull Empire just Bl am ara l>ciniunw films since the end of the war and adolescent British pictures, 'or the first time to have our foot that it is expected this year Films like Stop Press Girl. The lirmly wedged in the open door. Canada will send us almost Perfect Woman. Poets Pub. WoS 1,000.000 net for our pictures. m en in the Hull. Esther ff .More Mature have not only-met ad agonlaJng The firm base upon which this fate at the box-office but the; dw l h ^ yr m UmVrest"in British' films depen ds have disillusio ned audiences "that prototype of Nelson himLondon this week fn self? Well, we have taken severer —where he has been directing shocks in our cinematic stride— location shots for the new Bobby including Errol Flynn as Soames Henrey film. Wonder Kid. Forsyte. And Peck is a very good But Miss Loy is still in Ilullyuctor. wood—and staying there. Film New Role friends she made in London Srtge time marches on for Sir gather that she is no longer Ralph Richardson. Next month anxious to work with her husband he leaves the east of The H< : Overtime Star exchanges the" frock-coat and top Postscript to my Pins hai' of Henry James's dignified progress report,' last week. Theyve doctor for a modern adventurq obviously decided that, wbera drama. Jean Simmons is concerned, time Richardson is to star in a new is money. The girl is really being piny by R. C Sheriff—who i-i put to work. determined never to write anyOne picture finished this week; ttiing which could be described Iwo new ones in preparation as a second Tourney's End. Thin and now she is to be sandwiched time I gather, he has turned out into that Somerset Maugham Tiio a near-thriller. production. Godfrey Tearle and Wendy Miss Simmons will act with Guy Hille join The Heiress cast on Jlolfe (whose Spider and the Fly January 14, for Peggy Ashcroft, performance recently put him too. is leaving—in readiness for suddenly into the front rank) in her Stratford season with John the The Sanatorium—most draGiclgud. A season which sounds matic of the three Maugham like restoring Shakespearean 'lories.— L.K.S. Good British films can be much D just ait asset on UM %  a international ledger. —London Express Siivirr \i|ll.lll< Girls and more girls—all in bathing sin'with plenty of laughs and gaiety predominating ore on deck for local movie goers in Warner Bros' "The Girl From Jones Beach." now showing at the A(|uatie Cinema. Starring Ronald Reagan, Virginia Mayo and Eddie Bracken. "The Girl From Jones Beach" has as its background the famous public beneh for New V jusl outside the city on the south shore of Long Island. ry. with Reagan Virginia providing the heart interest, and comedian Bracken, the laughs. aided in no little part by Don;i Drake, ls about a beautiful but demure school teacher who takes a dally swim at Jones Beach. She Is possessed of one of the most charming figures ever seen on those sands Whan commercial artist Reagan, with pal Bracken, a talent agent try to lind the composite Kir! of all the beauty he has fashioned on his drawing board, of course, Virginia is the girl. But. r.he just Isn't interested in being beautiful and famous. She has serious ideas it seems. In this situation Reagan projects himself, even playing an immigrant for a time into law auuro's Americanization class, and here the laushs ire loudest. How the various models pursue the hapless Iteagan, however, makes for more fun on the screen than has been around in a long while. Tho gay bai surf, the parties, are all there, and lecal fans are In for a beach excursion of happy proportions without setting one foot out of town when they see "The Girl From Jones Beach." The picture was directed by J*eter Godfrey, Clarke Gable Man Of Many Hobbies CLARKE GABLI is n man of many hobbus. Currently ha li %  camera Hand He owns'a PoUlefiex and a contax and does much a| ins own printing and developing. He is intareated In automobiles of any kind, and enjoys a inornlni spent in taking apart u motor and putting It together again. Me is also a good golfer. Fishing, however, is his greatest hobbj He owns a small amount of pro p erty on the Rogue River In Oregon, and plans to build a flshIng lodge some day right on the water's edge. Between pictures he Spend* a* least a month tlshing along thi^ well-stocked river. His contract calls for four months off between each tilm MONDAY AND TUESb*'* Matinee nnd Niqnl First Instalment Columbia Serial "WILD 6IL1. iHCKOK" Starring Wijj.nm Elliott WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY—Finai lnslalmeu' "WILD BILi. H'CKOK' ROXY TODAY TO TUESDAY, M^ r.ee and Niqht Shows VWy lomy Award for 'It happened One Night" in IDS*. But he gave his "Oscar" to the I'miiire* stood ner ground and fought a %  %  npiir gQod b||tt | e In lne meantime PINKY; This is a picture about her fiancee came to asa that thorny question, the colour told him of her true colour, but bar tt is a real life drama which this did not' worry him every country where Jim How this storv ends is well Crow exists. Those who saw "Imworth seeing and Miss Grain, asitotion of Life" and thought it spciated with Miss Ethel Watei I twelve^yeer^old •on' of hhTaaod was good will be delighted wuh has risen to new heights as onu, friem Walter Lang. Iwrausc tho %  •Pinky," which has a different apof the top flight actresses in film-I boy. \i,o worships Gable, asked proaco If ihis story were told on dotn. This picture of the girl i bun for tt. His contract stipulates the Mraail In the opposhv ray to \vho passed for wihite is not that he can never IKloaned out which it is filmed ft would still worth missing. (20th Century| |, y Matro-Goldwyn-Mayer. He rank among the baft. Thapiouira for. Darryl F. Zanutk, Protlui.r. ^ thil! ( i illlS( m ,.,-t c d himself revolves around a girl (Jeanne FMa Koran, director). beiau; e, he says, he knows evi-r\ Craln) who though the offspring ||(;|| at his homo studio BO well of negro forbears was fair enough TH # K BRIBE: Crime does not lhal hi arouldnl faal right making to pass for white. She knew that pav Tnls ls wnill ,|„ s .i, bere it Happened coloured blood ran in her veins, m ^ nl to convey It Is oantrad and "Call Of The but was not courageous enough to arount j Carlota, an island just oft Wild" are the onb two he madi -****** SB •STs-*r be proud of it. No one could lnp ( oa5l „f Central America, blame he', for in passing as whitle Carlota is a rough and tumble she benefited from a good educalhe mjnn industries of which tlon and an equally good society seems to be bartending, fiestas. This went on until she returned t( ur i 5 t fishing and illegal lo the hut where she and her negro m aero pi a ,ie engines. The IJUMgrandmother lived. She then rehCSS 0 f these engines bin: alised that the South with its (hj s paradise one Rigby (Robert rigid stand against coloured peoTaylor I an honest federal agent pie is not worm living in Just disguised as a playboy fisherman as she hail decided to pack up Q nt () f (he scoundrels he Is aftai und go back North to a white Hriii ^SIIIIII* 11 took Hollywood thirty-live Instead ofla minutes Irom Broadyears to get Etnel Barrymore to sign a long-term but MBtro-OoMwyn-Mayer fin.npiism.l tue Eaati she is 4a iniuuies from BM DM many of her and turnltuxa Since 1914, when the star made oldest son Samuel. Her youngLlent Um, Tha Nightingale." every stuon. m Hollywood has Ofltrad hai a long-term contract, but to no avail. Upon linuhing her role in The Greet >s Barry..illy suceumbed and signed on the dotted line. She initiated her new contract i liar role m % %  That MldI:I Dm *lolti York studying dramatn S Her Bthe] Banynioia Colt MiglietU. is a lm.y moll old son. John Drew MlgUetta, and an accomplished actress and singer as well. The Banymora haritaga od talent still |M| i.ilherhiKMi mghi Kifc*." her Brat tn the Danynsata waaaan in teihnuolor. and followed this with tic portrayal trlMngly Mother Auxilla In The Bed bei itlful. Miss Bon Danube." exetttag story of JHI^Idominant a ilRiire ill Hollywood war Vienna. Today the lb i fambShe Is u great s|rts fan and I;>D ting wd %  ft biueshurattle off the names of every Pacific heavyweight boxing champion of n Paloi V ardai, California, the i>asi w ft "Nelson from his column keep* a look-out over all London." 'And all London keeps a look-out for Slack & White" %  4 BLACK&WHITE SCOTCH WHISKY •,.v-t'.hiniM* „..' %  No oiher ihampoo fit rO*i urn* magiul LAMOLIN-Mflnd lllhvr -or Issaafak lastreai hab %  in ,r>.. >'tAMblc ioftnc tonig'.: >mpoo todi,! blend of secret in^reoWnti ploi ganttc &a rnh-lsth*ring in hardest water. Lt-.. irigranby c*en. ihinmg, nd so manageable. Now on \aie ai*r y wh s re m the handscna blue and wrhhi NOT A SOAP NCI A itQU'C Sul A WONDCUUt. Nfv. OiSC'.'. CAfSHAMPOO .'• LANOLIN JS \OTi . i :*OVl CtAMOSC. ng a disimgt.itM east JEANNE CRAIN BTHEL BARRYMORE ETHEL WATERS WILLIAM LUNDIGAN l'rud..!.-.! by DAIIBYL P. ZANUCK Scrau Pky by l-Mtp Duma ud Diattm Nicbofa EMPIRE THEATRE NEW YE.W PRESENTATION — NdW SHOWING —



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SUNDAY, i \lh : 1950 SI M)A* AI1VOI All. I'ACI GOALKEEPER AT WORK No-L B^UJVT Keep Off The Bike By BERY WILLIAMS (Ki)ylu'(i in.ci Rfota I DOgll S O you want to be a goalkeeper? Well, thenare two schools of thought mi One, that goalkeepers are born not made. The other, that my half-wit ran do the fob with disiinetion. I ugree with neither. Goalkeeping is a combination of art and science, but there is one groat essential before we louch on those subjects—physical fitness. The average fan has an Idea that height and weight are the first essentials of good foaUci This is pure fallacy. The ability to reach and catch high balls is useful, but perfection cant be reached without absolute phv So training is UH first u<'rn Sprinting to develop agility and strong call withstand that quick leap from a standing potation. Bending, with the legs straight and the hanus flat on the floor, is a good aa the quicK b*nd to pick up the hall when it Ig rolling along the ground. Trunk bending ffOffl extra bit uf tonu to the n •-.-essary :.tching vour hands for the ball your body inot behind them. nation of body and mln Important [i mining Impi side. By mental tl in the study of positional ou will adopt under certain the wing, or when rig towards goal from any 11 Do tl' you'll have the d goalkeeper. One b! me . K. or other .. If I am coming out I shout loudly to Indicate I %  Bill." as UM ease may be. Notice I mentioned the player by name. Failure to do that can result in i.t.ui n It might be shouting to tool in ordsn hen the %  wards goal or In the %  k up the ball a one knee .Lkeepers do it, iangerous. cfa up the bump and go sailing over the head of an on-one-knee goaleen his legs. No, keep your kw %  Iraigtht, —Lonoon F;ipr...t Service. Bolton Cup THE Advocate Challenge Cup I en won by the Mosqutlci '.YuneaUay Jsnuarv 4. 19S0.. UM Polo season CaBtaa. On this km the two teams \l.ist,u!ioes .iiui-butlles which were tie.i m the number of goals scored i I the tournament will play oil for the Warner Bolton Cup. i: play-oft*, a presents,natch will be played by iw. > chosen from the whole ud at the conclusion of tnis natch Mrs. Arthur, widow tl. A. A> astir; Esq.. tout d w the Club, JIBS kiiuiu oon oresent the cups. The te. r la the presentation match vt been chosen with %  .. (fording the team Which i| our Venezuela as much practice posathte. State may le obtained n lind it one shilling e.u'ii. .. U at 4.15 p.m. e toUuwmg are the teasM MoaqulteM: t. VII1 ia n i %  apt.). E. Deane, J. Mario. \ Arthur. Bluebottles. C. Deane (CapU. M. Edghill, W. Bradshaw and M K ewes -Cox. For the Presentation match the following eight members have oeen: — Col. Mieheim. J. Marsh. E. NL Edghill. L. Deane. Deane. C. Deane and K. De.ui. Messrs. Victor Weekes ami .c Deane will be the Umpires Pat Todd Wins Tennis Title CALCUTTA. Dec. 31. Itn Patricia Todd. Uniteo as, won the Women's Singles title of of the Asian Lawn Tennis Championships here tcdav beating in llettey Hilton. Britain. 6—4; 0—0; In the Una Is. The Men's Doubles final was by Dilep Bose and Sumant Misra of India, who beat the Philippines pair Pelicisimo Ampon ami C. Carmona 3—6; 10—8; --1; and 6—4.— Reuter. REEF WORK WILL BE RESUMED Work will begin again on the Reef Pavilion and grounds when i.vis .,iv %  veJlgbke this year. The Pavilion is now to be paint id wired while the BOvasoa will be levelled and grass planted. \inas Holidays Cause Upset In English Soccer League DeSilan Leading B> PA Points IN CHESS LONDON. Dtc 31. Moscow radio reported lonigh. ng with 4>j points 3. the end ol llu> sixth round of Ihc I.ONtX)N. Dec. :il. WoRMn'i World Chcta championMotcow. %  day due lately ,o the adermaln J5~Jg*Sf3m or the severe Christmas holm name. mini, Belovo and l Many clubs, planned by Injuries to BtU players, were .orccd Rudcnko. all of the Sovfc ;o mak. change*. Bottom oj BlrmingSS. a,, SiJ!2!£. ? hait, City made eight alteration, but n well did the rcscrv.v. gfcj*, **J T^XT !" 1 "'" i ise to the occasion that Hnmintfham led until !ate in the „... P Kiime;il Burr, lev A hen the home learn snatched: neqinlisr.f the South tl. PatricK went down Hghtuig l-iwrpuo. Thistle l Kaith Rove-.-s 8; Falexerted tarriai asi kirth 4 Rangers 2; Dundee• 3 the loud Arsenal del< %  [; ft llirrtn 3. Ifirj pierced ooca in u.li lull sou thej sUll ktad bo S .otti.h LcssgM MiMggi i\ """i^-^^JJF****"^' .*> KiM-ords Broken In IN. Zealand Trials WEU-1NGTON. Dee. 31. Athletes broke 5 national dafltsMli 3 Arbrouth 1. Kilmai nock >*Ayi United I. Dunfermlin • AthtoUc I. Cowdenbeath 5. Johistone 1. Dundee United 0. Ai. drleonhuu i Morton 3. Ailoo Ati %  letlc 1. yurpn.-. Park 0. Fort; Athletic 0. Stenhousemuir 1, Dun barton 2. Second Divsion Bradford 5, Hull Citv 1. Buiy Blackburn Roven 0, Cheetcrflt i Uniteo who heal ttioti netghbours, %  %  time, %  plete new ball I i %  Unrt ball %  Hull Cltj %  %  %  . whlpj scored a consolaUon Tottcnh.i leaders but two ilrst ha;: both points Cardiff City. Sheffield Wednesdaj. >lUth Ar ^.^ 2 behind In second place, ktpt n, '. Third IMwlaWiw i^nlluaiw iff. c n v ,U "', ''" • %  l ,:;it '' %  P*rt Vale : defeat at Bonier.. t; nnslol CUy ,. Hovers cracked in live roals Northampton Town 2. Walsall against Southpurl anc City I, Brighton and the Nor:-. [ 0 v< %  .' Noumghinn Foi est 3. Millpomti from Rochdale wall I. Hewding 3. Exeter l It) 2 ItKsi i i> sj United 4. l^yton Orleni Sfottivl. League—Division \ Watford -s: pgrfot lh" day was that .if Miss Yvrtu Wi >iams of Otago, win the 1948 Olympic Can I of 18 feet. 81 inch. > i>> 3-' l i Inchui Jump. The women'! KM of 25.6 sees, was brtken 3 iinnMiss 1. J. Hart. Auckland, clockM 24.9 in the llrst lu. eld Wednesday 2. Grlnis Town 6. l^ton TownL Uicest, Wi|k ,, C Ity 1, Brentford 1. l*reston North ^...ii.a Mlt< w tlm* in th 0 Southampton 3. Queans JJS \ Coventry City o. ir United I. Barnsley 1 rown I, lAKJ4 >752 VAKJw east &f -> *Mi093 +A*9 ..-.-'* S. 4>4 2 &f A 8 7 52 -f. K g 7 6 3 Weat opns with the forcing •to-game bid of Two Clubs. East bids Two Diamonds, the conventional negative response, although Diamonds Ihis time happens to be his genuine suit. West bids Two Ii< shows a biddable suit with Three Dinmorn 1 West tries for a fit In his second suit .vilh Three Spadr I'.i .1.1 i :-..' No Trumps and West South leaoa + <*. and declarer must be careful to win with dummy'* 4 A in order to preserve un entry to his own handgt Q Is now led ; K ensures nine Irld con tra cl a/Ill tall i duxnnw' + •"' &f W played to ihe h-st trick. I irsi Division I Burnley 1, Birmingham Cltj West Bromwlch Albion I. Huddersllcld Town i.ivcipool 2, AreeoaJ 0 He It) 1. Manchester Unitxl iouth l, auddleebrough Dcrb) CI'UIHS a Bolton Wanderti : hnrnpton Wanderei n 0 Third Division (Northern Ad i IngtOO Stai.lo t, Lnu. i Cit) o. Darlington 1, Rochdale I Roven •'. Bouthport i .; 4. Cheslei 0. rlartJ ted 3, Bradford Cu> Maoaneld Town 0. Rotherh. Naw Brifh: m i. H I 1, Oldham Athletic 2 %  ii i.i | Stockp Mile in I Minn. L>.8 Seconds AUr'.i \IDE, Dec 31 I) \K-Mi;i,.n. \ new Australian 11 ^5 8 sees, for the day of the Australian Athletic Champion.shii McMillan's was one of two new :ecords set up during the day. Thi other was a time of l 9 43.'.' jetumed by i> Raw i Australia, who beat ihe til older. A. Stubb. by inches in th. wo mih Iteiiter JAN. I NO. .00 The Topic of Last Week Arthur P.all say, : BILLIARD SHOTS CAN HELP YOUR SNOOKER ESK. 3n UNUUWiN i. .-)i.*i" i %  uiwsrU the spotCounty 2, Carlisle United 0. Wrtx.-ud. nd white V I draw .... a ud wau ndvUi uemsu to st'finpt ;•• iagram Nc*m akritlfliL >u-bi. ismni %  • J ''> kai i tuUiloii at Ion* anga the pot :w u> risky. No: %  oiiooker. A fairi)lull oonti %  toward* tlw i Well lltls .. new y*r n.nni And ISO* loo And *v*fybady %  %  | A few Sraet thing, tu u>. %  r about lh* inie tin*riupiannina w*> ih Bam* llul aller a whol> iwslvi Therr'. nvlhuuc ntw lo .laini. ln -Hi in llajan lanluaSw" snr noiiid rantonded b* Hul U. kin lake • beck-look" IWovr you all a(re. Sne called on Joe in Asjfffl •w bunaaluw one (mill of modern i*f M Joe lu the blur i With nuihiim inoie nor lota. M hari twa n~.mi latsi Huihl in the d.-a.i l^.j maid. Oh Joe my .1. I MSN Fleureicent Llsht It makes the li.-nir look %  -Ifm And i( you love vour .tirllnf r'lueretcenl Hal it >oull m ^•r-.-'.l t.i It. To-day the llshu arc el Joe >ald "Time RIM too She ealled r.i bc-euM' the tn-xt duoi ii. • I iirnl Well UIM Joe gladly save her Twe a Aiumr-ial load lint early in September Test laudeJ in River Road •taJnhwi %  t.ne euneet The \erv not year day KM >!• >aniah^ we may tay. Ti |nw el ptiliiieian. %  1, Barrow %  ii ll"\< i 0, York Citv 0. —Reuter. lint II And ii My m %  i ik back -tone Record Profit LONDON. Dec 31. year mads) ;i rooord profit of £5. :. working accord* 1V>1 Mnc y Ii u tuMncantent • gated Rruler. two %  %  -•111 .d htoian. You wiU not make Una SHOOS*: evary t4me. but Uie atraae u aound and ahould always lea.' % %  xtriaLiy aalc. Billiard playoia eiiio, •.iroum like tliia uejiUe hsJi-i.aU ku.. %  i-orr i-i-d into tlio top left i>ocfce: WhUe ln-ona ar.dlaaatmus at -nookcr. mis ;utl>' sbot lisa use' D the aj-i-.i naa Thar* are nuuiy positions woe:* oablll-.y 10 aaud while equare:. \loo4 a oualiloii rail wlU aiuable anooXer. Leatiu thl* bUUard Mtooker will iwiieni. %  .. %  J. . R. I—.I, Toru NOT Ol I tl %  sponsored by J & R BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of J & R RUM GOLFER INJURED I !.K Dot || %  i %  : M Unttad BtaU i . i .-.., Cat -.. %  j inn With J HUT) "t lugggfl U)i. 1 ' ' 1 an nkle, -Reuter. \Vi-: r i >-<=> Over 50.000 people buy lliem even week The FINEST BICYCLE BUILT to-day l^S^-^ electric lighting accessories ••4 Mlf •< %  %  MB I f .tk>. M> Imp*h '*• fi bnti-li lujjf liainU"im.l SuiitliAlarmBN n ulvr thoier beaawee Ian oulalamliug in tacil n it\. .|\lc and valaa are luodrlt to aas in delightful esaaaal W any bedrooui fan glad to OMU 'Uf SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS 100% BRITISH MADE Aao-e. VICTORY, lit paaUl Mue or ertan aaadea with f hroluiuni pla'sd (>IUo>. or mast with (ill typo sad fillius*. *' luiuiouua ang non-luuiiiHiut .ii-i* Below. MEW DAWN, Coea I -ail* vs>> poeUble refaaei Ki aHahlo witb blur or gntm f 'l 'J. Hercules I GEDOES GRANT LTD., BRlDGfTOWN F ITNESS through inner c It online s* mako e\-en routine tsk pleassnt lo perform. A morning ghm of sparkling. erTervescing Andrews settles the stomach, gggggdl audity, tones up the liver, and checks hilKiu*ncs*. Then, to complete your inntr cleanliness, Andre*, gently sad surely clesrs the bowels. Try it, and you'll llnd you feel brighter and more ejisl when you ensure regular intier iUanlineas wtUi Andrews Liver Salt. ANDREWS LIVER SALT COOLS • REFRESHES %  INVIGORATES



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1950 News From Britain On II I IIIIIAJ Inn 0r ASTRON kinds of experts who Hunk tin new hall century should begin In newspapn 1951 have been shouted down by Parly slightly lo left of centre newspaper i i ...dcaslcrs or slightly to right ul i ana.'he like, who arc emouragS.W. African Natives Fear For Their Land Says Rev. Michael Scott m Out London Cormpondi i 11 when the Rev : mnsr Loodo .lth the tivM had been robbed of thtir I. THE *"". m i.e.*-, "1IU slit Fill t'Ul •!£ ing us to "celebrate" the halfwit., mark of this 20ih century Taking a lon view hither and thither from Moscow in Hiroshima and back again — I wonder whether we have anything to celebrate. I suppose that the first half of this will eventually be marked di.wn in history books as tWC chapters on Ford 1 and the %  loubt if the aver%  %  %  'or bloatr-. I'n Dcctftta JHtan On-of the lei %  Short-Sighted Oil Policy? LONDON. OIL CI1 not comment at Lo n don pri Hi' CARPING CRITIC H C. .. don'l like about Qm ant to remove the people no matter whatever the from the looded ares (tarty in power in the HOUM ,ck of fore%  does, he ahi own ii allowing thi-m W %  ig. Mark you. I da -< I in that danger*ay that I M rtect news %  It The failure to canalpart) in power ll arWl I llodven knows I would ..ihr I said, cutting him short ist person to place myself • me foot. You're talking ilous position of admitthrough your hat. Do you know ting anything so absurd; or to what you people who criticise nc natives made admit that even, if by chan-e, <• merely for the sake of being us Douuiain.i. "id happen to do the right ih > remind me of?" Then it ctuld ever do it in the right before lie coui : answer I told way. What I really mean to say him. "You remind me of the sort is, that it annoys me when George of woman who slaps an innocent upon himself to point rhild for having; narrowly escaped tut to mo, me of all people, where being run over by a careless West Government Is wrong about driver" George gave his famouf i.-,. anything. Imitation of an open-mouthed %  _, codfish and then began. "~ style of cnticis.n but . %  I oilcy of whoierta South >>-uui.<-i he .I. !" ., .!. IftlW noulTthiTwU have one reason fo, self-congrat%  %  ubc and Sir Sn ,h< nve w >v e cj lUation a, the h^.nn.n* of ,950 " % %  me. .......c,,. navi vx ';; n z would ge out of hand a ... ,,[.„ ,„,.,, lie prospective loss of mar' %  -' %  ""Ki, i mj or mil. fOf dollar oil oaftini then, I lit; down Ihi : "' '• %  %  I Ir.don'a'cts which ra^Z l'Z K lJ"".i '" S t "' "" " f^jS: SwiH^S S45S.1S3WS SSS barter, |„ Alrl(i , h c idea of ,„ %  Matter ?'„ rt* Government The fact thai ,. ta hl wrong%TlTl bctangmast* %  the u fl nd a trifle |aa inclined to thro* into quite poinUon wars, than it was in centuries past Al Ing this theme of the new half empt\ oBOtury, we come down to the prosaic, annual, and almost trivia! r ittl past year and trying to poor Into the pi i I no!, ill;; Bock ll the year 1949. and the course Britain has taken show.-, %  ome things that we did not Q rnrr. Putting it in a sentence, ihi* devaluation crisis in Britain in 1949 was due to ro r k leu OVOTH • and a aomewii.it confidence in Britain f: people thai our politi.ing of %  f-SOUsght the 1-abour Oovornmeni down. dam%  %  %  ford Cnppb On the other hand, JookJi.t MS lion in bemoan.i. lh< i gti lord countn n) iltv %  all lonaa and reason. A | at a iv half in. had much mm. %  1949 v a OUT %  l.nokm. Furwurd minute mes*ion in I.CounclollheUN.O. Intention, usually lead After ^T t a T^J'.^ 1 *" """"J^i '' %  ,'"' n P"! ">• ease a.ut I have ever, re..on to flatter myZ N.SS vco "Sn^r"." ^" ^ W ;, A rl " incorporated In elf that I am perfecllv cmS.' £*% 2? 'mmcdiately try UnlOB 10 ,„e. a, he had before ' rapping the knuckles of the g.S £JLg of ,he "•'' the t.NO. at I*ke Success a few (iovernment whenever thev de-ILI-W K.. v. %  %  '-re. S.W. Africa, he •" "PPing And I must y lk ; ,' h i T gh ,""" lcn wn %  d %  formerly a German '"•< %  '' George geu on his h"h cn/mem' £^ said iSdnoW.?,^" horse and begins, before I can [.^Tnri „?L M ^ g h ?ci em ." It was ,. k ,„ by stealth and *• %  ""'I 5 • <">use 'he GovS" double crr^Tn/^ PI "J" (<• from the original '""""• Is enough to irritate "... TJco So7t ^ •, and colonised bv """• much '"" 'alr-mlnded rc about 1 "mini i.ram like myself. When he -Vow -„„ n*~~." i i ... They look away most of the ^S^^^^JS^^" "* -h '^SSid bu ^ %  Hill Kind from the natives, and. 2?.?? *?_"? '?' ". ta .."> mistakeable llnnness. You know has already vigorous reaction hi American oil 'vn the past twelve navQ been bv I %  b> the rapiditv witii Relieves INDIGESTION Yes — just one dose of MACLEAN < %  *% ,.. ,i A ,h"j"" l cts Britain barters [ Facism. After the first World War. S W 'POCKET CARTOON '•> OSBERT LANCASTER pa could be bought without political*slogans. POCKET CARTOON h "'HI Rl LAN< ASTI R I o Ducussaoni .,,, n i Itl—on the long. •t of U„lll lot poUcj natltute the Puol | %  Innate that ful 080 would go lo i "lies Mlllni AUca \SHM si.ving so, has a mean underhand >>,,,", „, do,s a " K 0 7 way of creating the ImpJess'Cn r^T, h l'.l S "T'\ in Xo "' tfat If he ni the leadeTol „iv„ ,,21 .7 'Ubscnbers mlghl HotlM competed of other men ^a 'nojff' d ""J^" m,de a mCT Cfft the House would not Sr k. ?. J !" 1 "'', inly always come to right dcci. ha.i, „ H.. t y0U nWln %  _ns. but also And the right inc., i,..:,, It" Yes — just one dose of MAOLi!" BRAND STOMACH POWDER relieves Indigestion pain and discomfort! This wonderfully quick and effective relief from Hrarthurn. Flatulence. Acidity and Stomach Pains due to Indigestion is made postihlc by the fact that MACLEAN BRAND STOMACH POWDER is a pertecdy haUnLcd A %  dentine formula. .i, Make Meal Times yj" a Pleasure! / Whycoonsuffcring? Tryjust one dose / to-di L MAC DPR MACLEAN' "** <>"r ii^ni ir putting those decisions i -tual practice. Igati %  varyona knows how difflcLlt II ll to contradict the other chip DOUI what he hait actual y snd In words. They can ther.I .-,' easily understand how irrit ding it Is when George adopts an .itlltude that puts you suddenly sttton of having to argue I Btntl what you had eve v right 1 to be your own orlgl. MU idea. One puts up wllh that s rl of thing from a woman because one know, that it's natural '• i her to try and have the rlrst u .s well as the last word. But no %  .liable male of the species I DO expected to tolerate this I Africa was taken away rmany and placed -, t .another ft tha Union of ajgh ggff.?* JW* *—* thU In-ica by the u-ague o( N,S„ '""'"'ne technique being adopted .I Nations l,y one of his own sex African, now wanted h, Porata s.W Airier on ,i tlus suVnii, .7. %  •'"•" •'"nsi ii„. rrtihai ,,i i w "I IVM> Old Hoore'f fUmai c.iutious toil, " ." %  '' old l.dy All I ..I ll., moaw ., saouui ba dad iKal the cxtrenes In in tin almost cartaui lo lose hi. scat, and tb, doubtable William Gatl The H.ii.in, ,ii Idvanlage 1 .lih. chihl ril h ipeel : I evei that l %  -lev, — That Is why. after the tropical bance, I went to the club in the hope of meeting George i and of having an opportunity of let ing him what I thought about l he negled of the Government and veryone elM who ,jght t„ have '•thing to prevent w hal or to relieve Ihc situait happened Rut before I to begin, in fact hefor. %  ............. .... %  %  ii* the I %  %  %  %  1945, rei In Eul arc sick %  %  a la 'I" foul .ltd .. ., l",lj, chilhan f* u ori i.rings Ihem pn Jffij PreAl ,.„ %  N,„ y,.r '•"" %  I Ml „ the Him „, .. Id,,, Jut, 11.. % %  % %  and ii peego. kt the U.M 1 ""• "vet one! Courl ai the Haiua ll A L'jTo •U Alnc, should latered %  nip Council No rendition i %  lo begin, m %  SW At, 1 * ** 'bo c ..fortunau..!}-, when I got home • i.rgot all about sending m my lUen; and the next ruom%  I saw George's name in I ami too Ian for me to no It then and so lei ... done It days ago. When oixt we met, George greeted me uii.n: -Hullo. Bertie, 1 hope louve seen that I ; mj sub. %  n it, I replied have lots of others who to do TO anonymously Oh quite, quite," he said in a : %  ;, stive voice, "And no is of others have got l anonynaoui subs they ade." That shows you the sort of f It Ahntra tries to non-existenl faults in %  I* try to have the last fonder 1 get s„ annoyed | n nim sometimes ITS HIRI AC jl/ lain) musl %  be allowed i„ tak, Mexico Wauls Loan For Oil %  i i %  itth i Mexican ,: to llghl Ui . %  • vernmenl i ably a furani to give th"> • ,:ig rnuch t. %  "i the si,.,iit>-t,,w,i Dilcy He I ,. In the oventoctting oi i. lh, %  i avi % %  ill,, 1 aren I the i in the tlluhy ami ttiej found rmonl ai porti rl, Palmolive Beauty Plan proved by Doctors brings lovelier skin to 2 women out of 3in 14 days! After.. on ,,384 women for 14 days, 39 doctor, (includileading skin stalls,,) report that ,.,c • %  Pah-olive Beaut, H.,,,' | ,,„ .,,,,,„;„. nUceablc ilnprovcncnl in „„ %  complcxl „„ ln , Uefiiutc, noliccublc ini|.n,>cnicnu were;— •• ...al hn ,,„!,,, i, 1 •a—Ikav l„ t i N t .irtjfc." iJu lip,an sin,,. Li S ht u P ^? nd s "iHe! Healthy People keep their Tannin wiau^ii and healthy with Fewe Fresher, smoother Brighter Dim ughung i, bad for ,,,„ eve, lor your nerves." with tHrani, the bright, chccrrul lamp. ^^ Par wbhc tcoh, uae the PHROXIDB loothpaMe—uaeMact eeM i e u .d|t. THE WONDERFUL LAMP THE CITY GARAGE CO GAlD&fTOWN. a*a>*f>rM mmuiitwa: rut tvajan manar (OOOt" i^jrir*d ,d:,u 3 ,^„ "" H ''%  '' %  ''' Plan I. .1. la " Keep 'hai l IUSI %  'HUcmTiAI.IV KM I




Sunday. Price:

duoraty

Year 35.

Janwary i

1950.



-







ne

).S. EXPECTED TO CUT FOREIGN AID



trasb Be ] ta ———;: vACED Wiita
Strasbourg Bells wer : PE ogi per DEFICIT
OF $5,000,000, 000

By PAUL SCOTT RANKINE
WASHINGTON, Dec. 31.

"[ (HE United States Congress is expected to make

drastic cuts in American aid to foreign coun-
tries in the new session opening here on Tuesday.
A bitter debate is forecast over Government re-
quests for funds for the third year of the Marshall
Plan and re-armament of the North Atlantic pow-
ers. Proposals for assisting under-developed areas
of Asia, Africa and South America were also expect
ed to come under fire.

Ring In Another
Half Century

LONDON, Dee. 31.
Bats in the Twelfth Century Cathedral at Strasbousg—
“capital of EKurope’’—will tonight chime a new half-
century into millions of European homes.
The Council of Europe's first attempt at an International
Parliament, will then broadcast greetings for 1950 through

its leaders. :
A -! The speakers will be Mr, Gus-
|tav Rasmussen, Danish Chairman

of the Council’s Committee of
e Ministers, and M. Paul-Henri
Spaak, Beigian President «fits

} Consultative Assembly.
In Stockholm, Old Green. lead-

| ing Swedish actor, will send the

aces {Old Year out by reciting “Ring
: {Out Wild Bells” by Tennyson.

| watering midnight dinners, and

nost theatres will double their

| For many Frenchmen, tonight’s
In Good Heart | xces

«{ Cuts seem inevitable for these

y . reasons:
\ .
6a a) f ay lhe Government is faced with
Rescue After |, % Government is tsced wi
the prospect of a deficit of ab
$9,000,000,000 in a budget of abou

. i W oO Y ears? $43,000,000,000,

Ways of mee



elebration is more important
n Chritsmas. Paris restaurants
offer extravagant, mouth-

ting the
clude increasing tax¢



fig





\LERS’ BAY, Deception
Island, Dec. 30
he iritish Rescue Expedition

nauional debt, decreasing
expenditure or cutting ter:
xpenditure,



co Te ed Deception Island But majority ae
Sut oa g oO BLE
sib ater tas te a nonth in the reliet aves 8
LONDON, Dee. 31 a New xear since the war. | = re eat 7 —" taxes. Both Democrats and Rep
; They will see it in riotous r base at Whalers’ Bay licans have their ey t ;
ane a : é a . s . A a ave their eye on the Co
British Prime M:nisier, Cleink vie,” MME. BYARIE: ‘sunita : From there, the Expedition’s sat i . :
i in a Ne Year me >» wat mpl upplies o : ssional Elections next Nove
ELEC, ea - aes beer, eines, and schnaps. Farm-

Norseman aircraft
sd tnat the British Labour M .

r will fly to



| | They say it would be lik
}ers observing an ancient custom







was 200d hea ( 1 : ecg, | biting the hand that is about
fut was in good heat mt will share the New Yeur’s cake I Island, about 360! ¢ ., beeen, o is. abi
m ng General Klection } , +) e ‘ D1 > cea lem to suggest hat peop
nng 1 ol ea vith their domestic animals e pois TMA deeper into their pocket
a that a pleages made in Me e ° ‘ ihe into I
re o t all 5 7 ' i Many Greeks will follow the | ul riti cientist he Wanhrons: te, timeaehal a
ao had been furilled. old custom of | u , : ’ ‘ ‘ ve ber rande: ere ty : ‘ aim
: : gambling on New Ss ®>PERS at St Catt al kr 1 e! ‘ re ( . en iil rtain to say “no’
He called on the Movement for] Years Rye. to tes aio =) WORSHIPPER , inns ertain to say “no” to any plar
; ; : | Year’s Eve, to test their chances r : higher taxes. (Truman want
re-dedication of their Sociali | forthe coming year. { Bath: itanen feve > rane i igh taxes. mé Ve
jief now that they had reached 8 , sful prelimin teats everal thousand million dollars
. Norwegian Law provides that sful preliminary tests

tr jubilee ‘in momentous, | no spirits may be served in put - ! e r rw * (Reuter : reel ee =~ a one
Mallenging times” | : i. C ? { Y ] 7 R il hi , e will make such a request),
y ene =. to the Labour molt’ te ete Ree a | ®-opera on Ch ure UZ rges ortes eV e ers \nother factor in the pre-elec-
: . Pe oe peel i t e drunk in beer and | ’ nh manoet ng, is that the Gov-

bvement at this historic ME | wine rn ‘ ” . C; is | W , : ur ivring, i iat

at there is no greater tribute Thanks to the e : M st ] 6 k - Ti C b t L b L « ) 22a 5 O50 Zé ¢ aT ay nment is heavily committed by
at we could pay to our founders! ;), I ae ie i? a at ae us a € oO an the return of a second Labout greet 1950 with vatons aitantiies





ioe . . ° 48 clection campaign, for ex
gellple 1 é S| ~ ge 7 . . 24 LONDON. D arrinve mely expensive social welfare
pvernment, | of traditional doughnuts and k irst t lac € LONDON, De Millior . : ler at I hae Oogrammes
a —_ on WWINCNON ‘ Y ’ v : . Viillions e\ Ci Bran :
“We are fortified by a fine re~| Oph fritters, and with bumpers MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL today urged Conserva ope PRAGUE, Dee. 31 ‘ .
d of progress and achievement oa ' ee s red wine” made —Adenauer ives to combat on every possible occasion the “unscrupulo « ech couples can. get marri¢ Reduction Favoured
, . Sanat pas shia with cloves, lemon and sugar : es : , : 1:7 5} ressmen of every shade of
the face of unprecedentect! aS and sugar, 3ON , 1 ms anc ies” the rernment w in e iniad ’ ! fe « | imimediately by merely producing y shade ¢
Sersity. From the unremitting | Midnight Masses will be cele- r We j SIN i es ee eee a nm Labour hed a ees eee ‘i he identity card ita Mar- litical opinion declare them
rts of both Government and| Prated throughout the world to mG WEB SAG Moreno: he forthcoming General Election. This, he said, mig} bicin esl . riage Bureau, when the new ves in favour of a general re-
pple a new and more just} @ or page 12 CNceemee ee, na oa = come “before many months-——may be weeks a ite. “Ctwa ‘come « thte. fase tion of Government expendi-
| co- ‘auion ol a rern * , , ‘ . wul . 7 A
fotv is “oj } \ , ssag t from ton ‘ I t the same time most of
jety is emerging. | a bt res , ae In a New Year Message to Wr aay rom tomorro ( \t Sé
ct us go into 195¢, therefore, | a Pree ae a - ‘ /members of the Consateatios rs ; { ’ "he ystem of banns is ended el have also declared them
: oO Ss é e ¢& eis i $ecek F . . ‘ . ¢ j 1 « . ite 4 1i-
ermined that it is to be a year} ee ° ; 1 C y 1 \ » st Ge ‘6 ~ | Party, Mr. Churchill said they had i vinth ; ) nd civ eremonies must pre ve opposed to cuts in indi
victory for the forces of pro-| ” L £ or rote Se Seb Semen een V € s rimans ilready had a foretaste of the Ve age ede church wedding lual items of home expenditure
Se dae ae ek hts, R n an article published bys : hich. Tuat actin tally ranted Christ r ; , ecting their individual consti-
peg and that he bitter inter ress ervice of h Ch on vay in which Labour was goin Men and women Nay retail ; ir vidu Ce 1
*rvice his hristia:
Ar years of unemployment, want P. 99 S a: Se 5 FT airsciees f\ » Li ag to conduct ! umpaign fo ieir own surnan r ma '
’ 7 i wemocratic Party, Di Adenaue V3 , bd ' > |
Manik sn . setae aah oa | é yy Ln their own surviv: . oose to ta P , 1 joth Democrats and Republi-
d injustice shall never return. eace ay. et te eee een eee » j their own survival hoose t ke -eith + i
—Reuter. They will make false clain

e also opposed to financing

e Sete ne O se FRANFURT, Dec. 31 about their own achievement and Che new laws give equal pro; ernment expenditure by in
“A im. ec ; & cause of peact President Huess to-day signed, untruthful attacks on the past re rty rights to hu Casir the national debt.

l } ’ «oO Husband ana wite ‘ .
Ste g the 949 had brought} , . ’ : 3 t ite or
Stating that 194 ad ~Hrougi he West rerman Christmas | cord and future itentions of the Reuter rotect the interests of both legi t therefore appears that the

my the G people to vne “thres! ; \ s f
be ¢ I h 7 : the German people to vnc n mnesty law which came into | wicked Tories imate and illesiti: hile ‘ brunt: ofthe eleciinn year
ear ce BERLIN, Nec. 31. lold of their own political life t cked Torie ite and ille imate childrer as

in his New Year message broad- effect : mmed ately, the Allied They will use every possible } our Policemen d make divorc: ore difficult viv lrive will have to b

err rr) cast over the east Germ: yt Y issiloner having pro- vice to conceal from the electorate Reuter. ne ig programme
/ ara as an radio} gelongs to the European Unity
W : eckage network shortly before midnight, | She cannot lead an isolated lif : ‘ pproval earlier. the results of their n folly ane > ry y lilax ind economi i







ie added: “Germany inseparably | yy



















i
Wilhelm Pieck, President of the | vt her awn rhe umnesty will not apply to) mismanagement”, he said Injured In Clash i rm ¢ ° fore.gn countries,
ens meee East German Republic, called up|”! ¢% be a iat ities imposed by courts of (Reuter) Xe p onunuiists | cet the “big cut” advocate:
BONN, Dec. 31 ii Giawiarie “in, ceat sae fe ( ra a k (in 1949) wa e O ation Authorities and CAI UTA | 7 " f vay, President Truman
> Jes yerman President, | *)” r ” boda s : e-establish the broken ti With | j ¢<¢ e extended to “perpe ‘py | ‘ { now being ¢ te ll
The re G I oiten teeitienl fight for peace and the unity of . . Seine te an aie 10 o b ex ende o “perpe- “ 7 A A f rom 1ormosa-T AFT et, »w being completed, wil
Bewerr, +neodor pe re Germany in the ranks of the dee Me aee.. <-tueighgedig We yley rT FaLOTS Gl Ss. aire ' against End Ot Rationing a it ably include, some cuts in
ined the “primary tasks” fo1 RaMoWal fronts . and to win confidence. the democratic order”, the an- } i CINCINNATTI, Dec. 31 ! id expenditure. The b
srmany in the coming year, as NOR edi) Miia pes Cier ies ec “The Petersberg agreement, | a } nouncement saic Hi t R li ® ‘ i 3 tor Robert Taft, Republi iestior , will they satisfy Co
“clear the wreckage of history nia odes aspeen int a is ; . joining the international Ruhi The Allied Authorities decision as no enlevet ne ' arty Leader in the Senate ress
Btween the French and Germa leaves ia all Pua ehae oe as jautharity, were the first steps Vas reached fte everal ex- Whe poli last night vhat Formo lhe Government's position In
foples, and to restore “clarity omy end supply. owlne’.to the jprecious fruit of the policy of| changes of view vith the Ger- Headaches cept ( i ; uld be kept out of the hand ongress is somewhat weakt
4% Stet ‘ é r { t ‘ ooo Jence s the . " < * ¢ ‘ ‘ +
Drelations with Britain. Feat AGHieD moamentt the “Wes growing. confidence, was the dis-} man Government part of whos« : ; s ‘a ; he Chinese Communists, ever han last veat Senator Arthur
In a speech, broadcast by ull | Ce Aah sal eta i cen : nical mantling halt that save d anc rigin draft was considered to : : LONDON, Dx l tH . Lic f the American Navy had io denberg, Republican _ polic)
fest German radio stations ‘tand rnore ruined hiv ae AG rshall | 9° ured that means of «¢ xistenc leave too many possible interpre- Wes’ European housewives wil! adit sds hh OK t to protect the island fortress ef, will probably be prevented
Emewstee before manish’ Te) pinn, diam ntling and the re |r ousands of German workers.’ | tations.—Reuter enter 1950 with the hope th is oll Me told reporvers that “the pre ill-health from playing h
Bsident said “it is unique in os See ad eta th ‘he ane First German Step d rationing will end early it » the . ence of the United States Nav ual active role of mobilising
story that the victor in war ae ania oe , or ; Dr. Adenauer described ihe} > > ‘ the new half century. Belgium | jo; ‘{ , 1 waters surrounding Formos epublican support for the “two
ian 4 of | Sage sé . neat r : u . ‘ ' - .
Med a helper when the role of | "ye therefore appen! purticu-|Buropean Co-operation Adminis-| Peasants Pray For | 2.¢ Swivzerland have airea nd be enough to prevent a | programme
; subsided. rave at this ¥ ADDER! Vat | trati “me between th 7 endec od rationing altogett . ’ sing vo t l {
ie pares ul iy ns I se tive larly to the West German popu-| ration A\gre ement, ae se i ; 1 Sli Sule ; ide 1 food é ic ning alt t [ } : ing io that island by he |
pu : Sta PP ete» Re errs, lation to join the national front.| United States ana “ermany, sand ¢ ide lo Stop nd France, Holland and Swede ‘ Chinese Communists”.—Reuter. @ on page 12
eet rotates . Together with them we intend tc} the “first German step into wor I +7 Rear. eee, reir See ents u ' { eae SS = a
“We know that in the minds of Bey ae “ 1 y t {economy and world politic | BOLOGNA, Dee. 31 coffee, ; i} ASS Wo
somes sreate a united, democratic ana} ’ \ ) i i ATE , ,
he American people two views} ‘ ’ : | The > of internal German! Peasants of four Italian village But t at hy : ceed Xi
e : ae le with} peace-loving Republic for th The course of in Deane hase ike aee oe Me SRe- Gh of ‘rations ms u ee policemen. | {tt
bout Germany still wrestle with] Pra ean any ff conomic politics would be con-| near here, prayed in their churches! nov’ relieved ll post-war heac Reuter
)\ ove ¢ rerma . , “ ket I y ¢ 1 . ? ?, 7
Ach other, just as in our peopl Pres era Pieck said tha ye | Unued towards the “social market | Mis 1 erning Tor God to give \hem{ aches for prices have soared 1
no of this (American) , es oe’ ec - said. | vew Year present by stopping! Bel n hot ve h f th
be knowledge ¢ 1 ‘by. some re-|of the most significant events of} conomy he said ined: “2 ; hen % CEPAE) SOU NOUR Pr " "Di
d is jeopardizec lthe coming. yer was to. be “the}. D® Adenauer mentions ane ent home eturn of meat rationing when the Yew sweek | rector \f
piment. To overcome lH 1S 8/7 nocratic elections in Octobar"| fugees, the housing shortage an le { their humble belongings, } butcher tells them i of the \\ f n TH Y ‘
sk of the soul.” eee ei ithe ownership of basic Germa i fled teak they hav t bought i’ , b, t
|lwhich, he said. would net vel 4 Seb ‘ ’ rhe — ‘ vere . - ine 2a \ )) |
“ae honey (uwireal) elections like| industries as the most pressin lide started 20 days ago Western Germany ‘fhe onl; 0 ce er eer ) 7 f i : »
| tl i We rt Germany last year | Problem and said he had “wels Pm vorthern \pennine slope suntry still theoretically ration- | WASH Yi |
| ' Reuter. founded” hope that the SEMA | Se we ores t traveling about! ing bread teuter, } reside dd amed
y 7: - iTrade Union would support the | tire inches an hour. The four | , t
» st Vy 6 acannon r ean ninamsen Government in solving them villages of Poggiolino, Casa Brun- | cae : \
unnie Ss ear —Reuter. cll nd Casa D’Oro — already ? ¢ +
|



}
. oth)
Doctor Charged estroyed once before by a land-| 17 @ Doltey Will gaz Beate, De

Since 1880 i" UK Has Deficit Of | —teuter. tio it
LONDON, De. 1. | With Murder | + ae | Not Matter Mpcvie Atfires tie sill dlapet The Publi —
For Kew Botanical Gardens s +spsp ‘ : : ‘“Voles. of America” broad- e ublic are ereby nore
49 was the semniaee year since | By Air 22,170, Longer Life For Man? Britain susan tk eae with | ' nd other, information pro-

Bcords were first kept there in
880, a Meteorclogical Office
rvey said to-day.

Sunshine at Kew in 1949 ex-; charged here with murderims

IDO Yec. 3 | s ; “ceede Geo
LONDON, Dev ‘ A new hormone drug, Cortisone,| present plans to recognise the! mune He succeeded Mr. Ge

may be the long-sought elixir for ,Chinese Communist regime to
prolonging man’s life, according | ward the end of next week, no]
to | mavler what changes may be

ae HAMPSHIRE, yc 4 ‘ Britain had a deficit of £22,-
Dr. Herman Sander, whe WaS| 1.977 when the first nine |

ait | months of the financial year end- |

eeded the yearly average by|cancer patient by injecting | ed tonight.

Allen, new American Ambas-

lor to Yugoslavia teuler,
‘ ; nine nleaded 1! . ithe An ‘an Associat for >| ing ace d » | : ) ol.
i than 300 hours. into ! 7 veins and we ‘ot | “Official figures showed that in s iV eae ee nas we ee pl the F — or | A\ orkers ‘ trike
ondon’s weather was consist- | guilty vas «heen released = ON | 454 period ordinary revenue dvat i Sx C ards t ar East, an authorita-

Mily sunny, warm arid dry over | £8,926 vail, tetalled £ 2.388,421,363 against | , Dr ir yam eee eee we senaoe ae today. In Turi

png periods. The autumn was Tne case will come before the F £2.410,592,130 | tologi issue ucture special- According to vhis source, Bri-
;
(
(
{
(



that Effective JANUARY Ist,



© a report made here to-



WE have been appointed





Distributors for ....

© warmest since 1871. Jan-| grand jury nex’ Tuesday.—Reuter A big influx of ievenue always

. } ‘ aie : ‘ ROME, D 31
ary was the sunniest jsince 1928. | we in the last quarter of the | eos OE be the key _ | United States Government of the warn lee
bruary was the sunniest since | 5 | financial year, but some financial ; “°°P'™8 ee ~— ' or ies x ve on which she will begin re-
880. April brought the highest | | quarters were speculating on young and thus lengthening the | lations with the Chinese Commu
pril temperature on record in P MINCE | whether Sir Stafford Cripps wou!d ite span ; \ ni The date is still a stri
ondon. | 4 4 —(Reuter.) secrev.—Reuter.

“ Workers in vhe giant Fiat Motor
wctory in Tur
protest against the dismissal ol
] 48, nplyyees.
i wens the driest se ee | get all the surplus of £48, | They set no. time limit: for the
a t ariest summer sincé

1
’ \he had budgeted for. ding of the strike which begat
wl. Absolute drought lasted GREE: S SHAH By March 31, he has estims ee peter bes

vould r
revenue woulc eich “ 4 ‘
na preaa 1rougn At
0,000. Expenditure was AAV ¥ k loods Hit B. G. | y during the day Reuter.
at £3,329,707,000. luring th
Reuter.

truck today in





MORRIS, WOLSLEY, RILEY

}

2 ure of ¢ + r Ital | j

| expendit . ) of the University of Utah, re-| tain has already informed ‘
|

}

om June 18 to July 3 but that
utunin rains brought up the £3,777



and M. G. CARS, MORRIS



al.—Reuier | AMSTERDAM, Dec. 31
The Shah of Persia, who ha

Mee +¢n¢
“ars tot



j estimat

——— jbeen on a 6 weeks visit to the

— 7
‘ | Univted States, arrived here by ait i Suspected Discoverias
de Bak eee mente ees] Bemnath Aeuembh Damage Kstimated To ~—



COMMERCIAL Cars and Mar-

}Bernhard and officials of the}

i ¥ 7 Of Uranium Reported
Jews Or Catholies PsShortly afterwards he ba al \ ote Credits Be Thousands Of $ LANSING, Michigan, Dec. 3

liscoveri¢



ine and Industrial Engines.

)
| +



ip > , hi ‘ v te ohere PARIS vec o oe =
NNSYLVANIA. Dec. 31, |0me_om his way to Teheran meray

$13,506 bequest from the
state of a graduate, who stipu-
aed the money could not be used
Or Scholarships for Jews or
atholics, has been accepted by
4 Fayette Colle

quest by Frederic

!
|
|
| Neuter. The French tional A nbhy ‘GEORGETOWN, Dec y train and the Public Works De- f uranium ore o he Stat
to-day voted credits
|
|
|
|
|

one-twelfth of the 1949 exver



eouivatent to partment is keeping emergency ; *‘'*‘ reported

An abnoxmal December rainfall squads on duty day and night in

nundated





on Depart
tT > > > ? “Nae
he entire B.G. coast- in effort to prevent breaches. ment

% fu awe ture to keep wAtlor Beil I ind resulting in loss of thousands ‘ p= < hee ¥
400,000 GePrMay¥es | funds unti! the 1950 budevet is ap- | aan are season Cattle On The Road One has been confirmed, six

ground provisions, rice te
proved elds and hundieds of head of “looded pastures have forced

Returned Home The Parliamentary crisis over itthe and livestock from Pome- undreds of head of cattle on to

haye been found “promising
‘ne



here. The bx



for submission to













approved r F. Dumont was | he 1950 Budget was ended ‘ast on 0 Cécatiture the. public roads while farmer: State Atomic i Ene By
man eT REO SOE Se Se BERLIN, Dec. 31 jnight when the Assembly gave Swollen by raore than 32 inches | ®"¢ Shipping poultry and livestoc & tat * Sinaiate FOR RO AL GARAGE Ltd
; s by state ge sts I Y *
| Nearly 400,000 German prison- | the Governme:it two votes of cor { nfall for the past three to the city i b tave geologist
Dupont, vho lied in 1939, | er of ar returned from the lence on new tax measure bu eek ver and eeks hich Sugar plantations are also se-
Served 30 vea _ 8 tinited!S + 1 jurir 949, accor there no chan ting t ‘ t overflawed the verely affected and managements : ’
eS Se VOR S deures puntenea: ie ict before Ning into| @re evacuating residents to ho VHAT IS YO Yo? ||}! St. Michael's Row
: re I am ‘ ‘ ex hir “ lee Read what Hastings says )) se
, i : eras t Bel ‘ ure € wcroaching on worker : . “
es . . : en hen the Ce ht while nges } about Yo ¥« 1 the Even 1§} PHONE 2362 4504
i0t like t ach- | Fr cfur n- I oie pol ‘ . i ign i os
. mack is-|of entry, dvuri mber A ent’s taXaclo til fh i re pushing addition- feavy rains mark every day and | ing Advocate on Tuesday |
c atior ‘ th : st 3.000 a t t efore the Upper Hous elief me ires. Gravest fears | Night throughout the Yuletide sea- Don’t miss it iI]
pone yuld be de vir he for tl ) j neil of the Re lic, € houl onservancy ums | Son affecting all entertainment =i oo 1}
i i g ire 1 1 . ‘ + {ty
, ene Reuter, | Reuter. Reuter nd kokers collapse under the @ On page 16. ee eee = SEF FFF EPO



ARES
PAGE TWO



| IS Excellency the Governor

|} 44 and Mrs. Savage, celebrated

|New Year’s Eve by attending the
lance at the Royal 3ar bados
Yacht Club

«<> «>

1
|
r |
Thriving Business
| ores and Clubs did a thriv-
} | ing business with dinner
@ pow orders last night, as hardly any-
y All the
inviting and

Baby

ene had dinner at home
nenus looked very
the dining rooms were all at-
tractively decorated. Even at this
early stage, everyone was in a gay
festive mood.

At the Windsor, Arnold Mean-
weil and his little Meanies pro-
idéd music for dining and dancing,
pleasure until quite late in the
evening. Balloons seemed to be
everywhere, hundreds of them,
hanging in clusters in the dining

Today to Tues 5 & 8.30 p.m
Warner Bros
James CAGNEY

present



GUEST HOUSE
Cpposite Hastings Rocks
























Zz. Humphrey BOGART in I. BOURNE, room and in the lobby. bade

‘4 s Tel.—3021. Maonageress of the Hotels also ha we

A Oklahoma Kid ee ne illuminated Christmas trees which

SSS a. | all helped make the scene a gay
olen othe == = SSS | one.



«> «>

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
RONALD REAGAN VIRGINIA MAYO
EDDIE BRACKEN

in THE GIRL FROM JONES BEACH”

Happy New Year
{' WAS Midnight December 31,
1949, time to welcome in the
New Year, and Barbadians did it
right merrily. All over the island

———~_— |

with last night and right on into ng

his . ‘ : . . early hours of this morning cele-
DONA DRAKE . HELEN WESTCOTT || Seatlane ‘were do aun Seem

A Warner Bros. Picture \ At the Marine Hotel there were

about five bars going. The dance
floor was packed. At midnight
a rocket shot into the air; twelve
ringing chimes and the playing
of ‘Auld Lang Syne’ all signalled
in the New Year.

Meanwhile at the Aquatic Club
much the same thing was going
on, there were novelty balloon and
spot dances, the lights went out
at midnight, to switch on the New
Year.

At the Club Morgan there were
two orchestras, and _ between
dances Peter Lacy played the new
piano near the bar. Almost every-
one séemed to be wearing some
crazy looking paper hat, and
noise makers, balloons and people,
so many people making as much
noise as they possibly could.
| Everyone enjoying this night of
nights which is celebrated in all
parts of the world





———



| Happy Now Year, Folks
|









i



‘LOBE vararne

TONITEH at 830 p.m. and continuing over the

Holidays at 5 and 8.30

“A Date with Judy"

Technic

Musical with - - -

CARMEN MIRANDA —

een

TONIGHT at 8.30 pam. ARNOLD MEANWELL

our
oul

XAVIER COGAT



«> «>

and Orchestra playing:
The New Runway

| HREE representatives of Cana.
dian Construction Companies



(1) “Everywhere You Go”
(2) “Don't Cry Joe”

Guest Stars
(3) “Baby It’s Cold Outside”







s THE ) arrived yesterday by Trans-

(4) Selection of Gid Favourites MILTON | Canada. They were Mr. Thomas

(5) Calypso Medley, 7 ay pe | Stevenson, Mr. Cecil Dexter and

. _— - wipes | QUARTETTE | Mr. Asley Colter, all interested in

Siibibieinaliss sili inal he construction of the new run-
a en SSS"! way at Seawell

| “> «>

/

Finishing Touches
S*° workmen in the building ad-
}h joining Newsam and _ Co.,
busily putting the finishing touches
jto a new store, which, it is under-
stood will open on Friday. It has
two very wide entrances and there
are rows of shelves running along
two sides of the building, which
by next week probably will be
full of goods ready for the opening
jdav. “The Novelty Store,’ as it
will be called is a branch of the
Modern “Dress Shop Have you
heard that they will specialise in
accessories for ladies who make
their own clothes?









New Year

70




ALL





OUR



CUSTOMERS




and




© “>

Son And Heir

Ce eee to
A and Mrs. Colin



FRIENDS



Mr

Thomas of












| ‘Lower Greys’, Christ Church o1
ithe arrival of a son and heir on
December 29
PLAN TATIONS Be pes ae
Engagement

over the week-end between
Colin Williams of Blackmans,
Joseph and Miss Jean McLean
daughtér of Mr. and Mrs. Archie
McLean of Spring Garden, Black
Rock

NG NG AG NG NG NGG NENG NYY

|
|
ss Babe engagement was announced
j
|

lr
t



NENG MAES

WE WIisH YoU... &

ee ar er

Company in
; here recently by













ves : ill ' SUNDAY, JANUARY
SUNDAY ADVOCATE s uae 1, 1950
eeeeeneeeeeeneemaiona: sa racine meamaae aie ett ie iis 10RD .
Re-Transferred e e : |
To Trinidad
R. George Hutchinson, ha + {
been transferred to the Trini- .
cad Branch of Messrs. Cable and
Wireless (W.1.) Ltd,, and he left r
for Trinidad by B.W.LA. yester- Actor And Journalist
day George Was stationed in Here
Hons onal 8 Yi Man Maen FJOLIDAYING in Barbados for ;
" 1 Port ¢-Sy ain Granciia ek about a month are Mr. ,and ‘
yx . ‘ort=« ree z rf Mrs. Leopold Tepper of George- ,
Cae oe ee town, British Guiana, They
a3 oer a rived here recently by B.W.1.A., :
Sold Qu and are staying at the Hastings
RIED to get into the Empire Hotel we od '
Theatre on Friday night to M-. Tepper who is in the R -
see the premiere performance of "state busiress in ee ee 4
the film ‘Pinky’ but the crowd iso an actor and journalist. =
was so dense it was impossible to -ontributes many articles to:t “
get through. They were com- } itish Guiana Press and is gar
pletely sold out, and hundreds “n station ZFY, Georgetown i ‘
were turned away. Heard that Dramatics. taland
another terrific crowd was there A frequént visitor to the island,
again last night. se said that the sefvice at the ,
“ «> Hotels was very good. It measured
Proof! up to many of the hotels in the
@IX | thirty o'clock ‘esterday vig cities up _ and should
bp Rae : isitors,
morning found several people — Rou tea that he was
at S ll t t the ‘l'rans- - ¢
Geahde ‘plans, neat of them feel- , preparing three stage plays all . |
ing very cold as the Sun slowly or -—4. local talent in Sader a eat ;
: ‘ “ t il resen
nosed its way above the horizon. a4 vole eo which ‘it is 4
cue Mined the Gaesengere alighted Mie DORR CARNE, Mi ent ne ed that a tour will be made ot q
from the aircraft, with their heavy the first prize at the first Talen pI West Indies including ’
winter coats and clothing, they Night Show at the Globe Theatre. weet " es’ ndies
made most of us feel almost hot This op pee ella very barbados. :
just looking at them. It was popular with patrons. * * * ;
interesting to note that while wo Weeks
lifreen passengers left the plane at The Ideal Place wnided Up aoe ? and her 1
Bermuda and seven were intransit “PQARBADOS was recommended RS. ise D the Seart 1
for Trinidad, éighteen passengers to us as the ideal piace for daughter Miss Dorothy :
got off at Barbados. Certainly a holiday by Mr. D. kutzgerald, of Caracas, Venezuela on ona. :
proof that we are enticing more onetime Manager of your local spending . “ BWLA. ;
Tourists than the other West Branch of the Canadian Bank ot They came in recently by ‘4 ys ‘
Incian islands, ! Commerce.” So said Mr. Fred F. for about two weeks an i
«> «> Macdermid, who with his wife staying at the Hastings Hotel.
" arrived yesterday by T.C.A. to Mrs. Searl is Secretary to the {
Congrats spend five or six weeks at the Manager of the Grace Line De- {
ae _“* am Ocean View Hotel. Mr. Macder- partment in Caracas, while her ;
Wishes to Mr. Fred Toppin, mid is a Lawyer and they live in daushter is a Secretary of K.L.M.
vu of Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Toppin, sockatoon Saskatchewan. Dutch Airlines.
svew Haven’, Hastings, and Miss «> «> eis “ t
joyce Johnson, daughter of Mr. ruts . , JOHN GODDARD, who will lead Barbados against British :
and Mrs. Eric yohnson ot Grenada, Midnight Revelry R. ROGER MIRO, originally is a strong candidate for the Captaincy of the WI Giang ‘
: i ITTENS and his full d working is a strong cz ate p ; e WAI, team to fo 1
on the announcement of their en- LEVIE G r h from Paris and now England
gagement last night. ; orchestra will be making the ,. an Architect in a Venezuelan g f :
«>» «> musie tonight from a ha Government Ministry, was an |
. 7 a.m. tomorrow, at the 61" arrival from Venezuela recently ‘
Married : Detie-aha evel’ at “Edgeton, by BWLA. for two weeks, Toured Island On Bicycle From Caracas |
R. D. N. BENSKIN of Cod- 7 i, where Mr. J. Dal- } aig d is staying at the
, Country Road, w holiday and is y , a ; OHN REID
M rington Hill, St. Michael was 761) Douglas will be host to @ £8Y ‘fastings Hotel. ISS MARY BAZSO, a school J and small in net ane
married on Thursday afternoon at party. = teacher of California, now nile ete al ye Susan ary |
Mt. Tabor Moravian Church to ; «> «> «>» «> residing at Maracaibo, Venezuela asi D Ca aa and a
Miss E. A _ Nurse, Assistant 4 Ji ; in a similar capacity. returned 2° 8 acrabank for a
Teacher of Grace Hill Girls Jump and Jive — Visitors Like Barbados = home on Thursday by BWIA via “8Y: ahd
School UEEN’S Park House jumped R. and Mrs. J. T. V. Watson Trinidad after a short holiday in , M®. Reid is the Representa f
with jive last night as pretty of age England, were the island. She was staying at the ! Venezuela and vhe Caribbes,
ae pe girls, and Gents in their shining ~~ 3 sh un a by the S.S. Hotel Royal Area for B.F. Goodrich Compan:
Used to Live Here dirmer jackets, danced in the cpa = baie a s oe yal. Mrs. Reid is from Boston. ‘
oe oe “Gascogne”. y are now d- ; ‘
R. and Mrs. H. Ormiston, who Wey year. It was the Spartan iron chat holiday here as guests _ Miss Bazso who arrived here on Mr . "ea 7 a |
from 1937 to 1941 used to live @rieket and Football Club’s An- .t the Hastings Hotel before leav- Christmas Day told Carib that she the a a is also a gy tha
in Barbados arrived here yester- jal Dance. ing for Antigua. had an excellent holiday, her only i dias le - nal tive | <¢
day from Halifax via Montreal by Mr. C. B. Browne’s orchestra "Héad of the firm of Walter disappointment being that it was einéatinn a = & Musay el,
ao 2 re ee Ween supplied the phe a cried Tempest Son and Watson, too short. Fernando, Trinidad om 1
Jcean Viev Hotel. making and i he a Sts Solicitors of Leeds, Mr. Watson 2 es ; ¥ d 1
«> =e until the early hours ” ig now on his way to Antigua to eee ae are neni - Bahamian Pro
$ norning. : oei - im « . actice Plcycie riding anc auring 1er verbs
tien & ie et saler . Balloons and other decorations, mar > 6 Spe penctiee stay, she made a five-hour tour of ET another book of Bah
j R. G. i ue pee ‘ae hung all over the Ballroom. The ; re . + risit the island on bicycle. Leaving ian interest has been pub
fr Montreal, who was : : : vith This is the Watsons’ first visit :
rom Montreal, -, New Year certainly came in wit te ‘e the Hotel on Tuesday afternoon, ed by John Culmet, fdimek
here last year likes Barbados so w ance was © the West Indies and they are er abatehace , mere
4 tet hé has returned again 2 Swing as the Spartan Dance wa: so impressed that they would like She rode to Powell Spring where aaeee ant-editor of the “Nassay;
. ae ‘He coe Sees a rollicking success. to live in Barbados. — she spent the night. The follow- Tribune, who is now living ing,
Ag * eee ak cae Se «> «x ing morning she went to St John’s Shae time oo me
day by shrek hay > 4 i P : sf erga iaiaehe roverk , 4
for approximately one month. He Baldwin’s Secretary «» «» Sen i tan rear a has dedicated to Eugene Dupueh,
will spend another month visiting Intransit Enj d Holid thid-day snd Sakching the Tivvel Editor of the “Nassau Tribune's
some of the other West Islands, AJOR Denis Vaughan, Private k njoye Oliday at 1.05 in time for lunch ; The book is illustrated by B
after which he will be golig on Secretary to Earl Baldwin EV. Clarence A. Lowe, a Peek. Copies are now on their
to North. Africa, and Murdge. He ., Antigua, was an arrival on nen now residing a This was nothing: new to Miss ‘© the Bahamas, if
is staying at the Windsor Hotel. Friday from England on _ the Aiden eras teers . a Bazso as she was accustomed do- «> ” ja
«» «» “Gascogne” intransit for Antigua. on : r aise . ing a 200 mile stretch on bicycle 5 a
Staying On He is now spending a couple of hureh in Detroit, Michigan, re~ while at home over the week- Comings And Goings
D. VEEN formerly of days in the island before leaving | “urned home yesterday by air via ands. ;
t Pant oa ; a nie edges _ snl. da at iying at the Marine] Trinidad after spending about \v R. and Mrs, Lisle Smith, who
and and now manutfac- Ye - ; 9 ian, ¢ es hatin ‘ ; pos par acanit
turers’ yee er a number oi Hotel. uine weeks’ holiday in the island. While in the island, she did a were married on D :

european firms with headquarters
in Caracas, came in here a week
g0 on holiday and will be stay-
ing on for about another week
or two before returning home. He

staying at the Ocean View Hotel

«>» «>»

Expect To Return
At spending the Christmas
holidays here, My James
toohney, Jnr., of the Ford Motor
Company of Detroit, Michigan
left for Trinidad by B.W.1.A. yes-
terday evening. He was accompan-
ied by his sister Miss Mary Toohey
and Miss Mary Katherine Shutts
of Louisiana. They were all stay-
ing at the Ocean View Hotel and
expect to return for a longer stay.
Miss Toohey and Miss Shutts

are both school teachers in Aruba

working with the Standard Oil

Company for the past 1} years.

«>» «>»

Geologist Takes Time

Out
R. WILLIAM BELL a Geolo-
gist of the Shell Caribbean
Venezuela, arrived
B.W.1LA, for a
‘lidav and is staying at the Ocean

View Hotel

Originally from England. Mi

Bell had been working in Vene-

zuela for the past 14 years
«» «»
U.K. Horticulturist
Intransit

R. P. COBBALD, a horticul-
turist of England, was an

arrival recently intransit to Dom-
Inica. He was accompanied by his
&| mother and they are staying at the





as

AND, OF COURSE WHEN

1

YOU NEED LIGHT FOR
THE WAY AND LIGHTS
FOR EVERY DAY...

—~ SELECT . :

PHILIPS
LAMPS

nee

|



Manning & (Co. Lid. Agemts

WE SGN NE SN, 8 RR NG

ie

CAA GSS



BW var

M Arlington, Virginia, are now
n the island for about five weeks’
holiday, They came in recently
and are staying at Sea View Guest




war | Sea View Guest House.

To Spend Five Weeks
AND MRS. W. J. ECK of

House,
—~-



==
=









'.

MIRRORS

BEVELLED

KOUND
; TRIPLE—polished edges

WARDROBE—rectangular and dome top
CLIPS, CORNERS, MOVEMENTS, PLATES

ALSO

LIGHT MIRRORS—24 & 32 Oz.

From $1.67 to $2.14

*

THE BARBADOS

SS

So

)
COTTON FACTORY LTD. i

SKELETON



CLUES ACROSS
1. The mane is made into a rope.
6. Short officer I have
prisoner, -
10, ‘Talk back in a message.
ll, Are differance.

12, Behoid the

He was staying with his relatives ik. oe 17th at Mrs, Smith’s parents ho

swimming, sailing and
Mr. and Mrs, M. Morris ot 97, 77 5”) ae hjepennie, tsar Ae ae Chester, Peninsylyani
a : water colour paintings and thought 7, : w
assage Road. . ae i : F returned on Friday by. BW.
that Barbados was an ideal : pot : ;
An old Combermerian, Rev thin hbtiday along with Miss Barbara, Mation
szowe was paying his first visit fi om

and Master Nickey Canby, chil

o the island in 37 years, During dren of Mrs, Smith.
* ut

’ . : «»
is stay which he said was very .
njoyable, he met many old friends
ind visited many places of interest.

«>» *

M® and Mrs. Hugh Coxe and

; Teachers on Holiday son arrived from Jamacak
le was greatly impressed by the via Trinidad on Friday by
ast improvements made in the UE to leave the Island today B.W.1A. Mr. Coxe is Branch
land and spoke highly of the are three school teachers from Manager of B.W.1.A. in Jamaica
ospitality extended him, Venezuela. They are American 8d is here for a holiday and is

born, Miss Mary Elizabeth Waring Staying at the Hotel Royal,
«» «>» from Chicago, Mrs Nancy Yarnall . i <3
: {rom Philadelphia, and Miss Eliz- IR EDWARD CUNARD left
R Spent Christmas oe abeth Burns from Minnesota. They yesterday by B.W.LA, fo
’ *. ** teach at the American school of Tobago via Trinidad. He returm
student of the Caribbean

‘Campo Alegre’ in Caracas. Mrs _ to
Yarnall has been io Barbados be-
fore some two years ago and she
bersuaded the other two to come
here for the holiday. They were
staying at the Hastings Hovel

Barbados on Saturday. Mr.

Douglas Robbins was an

passenger for Tobago yesterday.
* * *

Training College at Maracas, re-
urned to Trinidad by B.W.1LA..,
n Friday after spending Christmas
rith his parents Mr. and Mrs. m Retreas i Avia|
\lfted Boyee of Passage Road. I Cre ae =
left for Trinidad by B.W.

at yesterday,

‘ * *



Brae



RS. Graham Rose, who a
rived on the first TCA



beginning of
departed skill (two words),
3. It's seldom drawn ly.
i4. These pealing letters are
. wothing less than indifferent,
15. Lucte can’t impress it on us.
16, Tithe not quite enough for

Your Majes'

She's a bit of @ kid anyhow.

It takes money in booth,

maybe (two words),

- Pile of five cards ?
Thus M.L5 shows
reverse of en !

24. Very high wa
25. aren’, jue, os has "ca aa:
ables

on

cor

the very

CLUES DOWN
Wouters eee Sat
O ers (two i.
. Partly Giagonal ) .
B 'y Government air-
|

to be emetusime

we

-

Always

in reverse.
They're proverbiaiiy a@ection

ae (two we i

als m (Onna tant
, gage. 7

Spring oUt posabhig,
& cholefie,

68. Human

18. A team’s milddie

20 “amous painter Can mee
re entirel er ao

2) HY has Davai © dtiguse,

esses in the Aue
rat.

————
SaaS





and REFLEX HINGES

j



CO-OPERATIVE

= SSS SSS i

Ae
Ne

‘plane that landed in B
returned yesterday by T.C.A, alte}
spending a holiday with he
family.
ae * *

R. E. S. Robinson, Chairmaty

of the Board of Directors
Messrs, Plantations Ltd., and Mb
H. A, C, Thomas, Assistait
Manager of the same firm lel)
by T.C.A. yestéfday on a shen

business visit to Montreal.
* * %

ISS G. GAGNON from Mate

treal arrived yesterday «i
T.C.A. to join the Secretarial stat
of the Marine Hotel.

* * * :
M® A. I. BEACH and Mr, BG

Heimbecker from Bartle
Ontario, whose firm exports Fie é
Oats, ete., are here for we -
on a business visit and
ing at the Ocean View Hotel.




AT THE SIDE OF THE RUNWAY
twin-engined Cabin aireraft which belongs to Mr. John Bogart of
Venezuela. He, his wife and party are spending a short holiday in
Barbados and are staying at the Paradise Beach Club,

at Seawell yesterday was this

A Bright Now Year is Yours!

IN THE ‘

CHEERFUL PLAIDS

36 ins.

EVANS

wide - B6 ects.

per yd.

A VERY BEAUTIFUL RANGE

and WHITFIELDS

JUST OPENED !

Canadian Ladies Flotiatisin

and Children s Shoes

2 1 ahd ale
You cant miss _ these

presi oor




'

pert

re eer gee ee

INDAY, JANUARY





Show Talk



i, 1950



A

1

A British Film In Cold Storage

One of the things they did not

uction at Shepherd's Bush
Studios now dark and forlorn was
£120,000 invisible asset. This

was Sydney Box’s last Gains-
porough picture to be made be-
fore the _ closed down—
lier’s Joy.

ets Withers and husband
Jonn McCallum starred in this
screen version of the stage
success—with Yolande Donlan
and Dora Bryan (who is also in
the play) supporting thein.

But after many months Trav-
eller’s Joy remains literally an
jnvisible asset on Mr. Rank’s
jedger. For a clause in the con-
tract says it must not be shown
anywhere until vhe play’s West
End run finishes.

When the film production began,
that clause did not seem impor-
tant. But now the play—with
Yvonne Arnaud as star—has de-
veloped into one of those surprise
record-breakers, and looks like
running on indefinitely.

So Anthony Darnborough, who
made Traveller’s Joy for Mr, Box,
is going to show the film this
week to the one man who can lift
the ban, if he chooses—theatrical
manager Hugh Beaumont.

The film-makers hope Mr.
Beaumon’ will agree that there
is ample living-room in London
and the provinces for both ver-
sions.

After all, Miss Arnaud and her
fellow players have had the field
to themselves for nearly two
yeras now.

Censored Role

Shepherd’s Bush’s last produc-
vion certainly deserves a_ break,
considering its troubles-in-the-
making. These included a com-
plete shut-down when John Mc-
Callum dGeveloped ‘mumps—and
a series of skirmishes with the
censors over Yolande Donlan’s
part.

Miss Donlan vold me recently
she had to remake so many
seenes, with blue pencilled
dialogue, that she wondered if
her role had not been censvred
out of the picture by now.

Disney’s Ship

When Wilt Disney went homa
recently—none too jovial after
that Bobby Driscoll court case—
he unwittingly lef’ behind a New
Year present to a inumber of
Denhain Studio workers.

The present? None other than
Yhe good ship Hispaniola, known
to every reader of Treasura
Island. Disney had the famous
vessel reconstructed for his film
of the story. The picture is fin-

ished but the Hispaniola still
stands on the Denham set.
Because of this there will be

some weeks work next month for
part of the Denham staff—after

' the close-down of Rank produc-

tion there.

quatic

Girls and more girls—all in
bathing suits—with plenty of

laughs and gaiety predominating
are.on. deck for local movie goers
in Warner Bros’ “The Girl From
Jones Beach,’ now showing at
the Aquatic Cinema.

Starring Ronald Reagan,
ginia Mayo and Eddie Bracken,
“The Girl From Jones Beach”
has as its background the famous
public beach for New Yorkers
just outside the city on the south
shore of Long Island.

The story, with Reagan ‘Vir-

ginia providing the heart interest,
and comedian Bracken, the laughs,
aided in no little part by Dona
Drake, is about a beautiful but
demure schoo] teacher who takes
a daily swim at Jones Beach, She
is possessed of one of the most
charming figures ever seen on
those sands. When commercial
artist Reagan, with pal Bracken,
a talent agent try to find the com-
posite girl of all the beauty he
has fashioned on his drawing
board, of course, Virginia is the
girl. But, she just isn’t interes-
ted in being beautiful and famous.
She has serious ideas it seems.
t In this situation Reagan pro-
jects himself, even playing an
immigrant for a time into Miss
Mayo’s Americanization class, and
here the laughs are loudest.

How the various models pursue
the hapless Reagan, however,
makes for more fun on the screen
than has been around in a long
while, The gay beach life, the
Surf, the parties, are all there,
and lccal fans are in for a beach
excursion of happy proportions
without setting one foot out of
town when they see “The Girl
From Jones Beach,”

The picture was
Peter Godtrey.

Vir-

directed by

-———_—_—_



all London





‘Nelson from his column
keeps a look-out over

iy



Warold Conway



|
|

COMPLETED BUT NOT fOR SHOWING — YET
Googie Withers and John McCallum in a scene from Traveller's Joy

Another Hollywood
Warner’ Brothers, have heard
about tha’ ready-made craft. And
they are temporarily in tue sail-
ing business. They are to begin
production—av Elstree—of Cap-
tain Horatio Hornblower, with
Gregory Peck as C, §. Forester’s
Nelsonian hero.

Director Raoul Walsh, who is
coming from Hollywood with
Peck, vhinks it’s silly to build a
new ship—when one is to hand,
only needing a little camouflage
to be ready for Captain Horn-
blower’s command.

What about Gregory Peck as
vhe sailor who has been accepted
as a prototype of Nelson him-
self? Well, we have taken severe7'
shocks in our cinematic stride—
including Errol Flynn as Soames
Forsyte. And Peck is a very good

actor.
New Role
Svage time marches on for Sir
Ralph Richardson. Next month

he leaves the cast of The Heiress:
exchanges thé frock-coat and top
hav of Henry James’s dignified
doctor for a modern adventure
drama.

Ricgardson is to star in a new
play by R. C, Sheriff—who is
determined never to writé any-
thing which could be described
as a second Journey’s End. This
time I gather, he has turned out
a near-thriller.

Godfrey Tearle and Wendy
Hille join The Heiress cast on
January 14, for Peggy Ashcroft,

too, is leaving—in readiness for
her Sv'ratford season with John
Gielgud. A season which sounds
like restoring Shakespearean
—— ——
Empire

PINKY: This is a picture about
that thorny question, the colour
bar. It is a real life drama which
affecl’s every country where Jim
Crow exists. Those who saw ‘“Im-
itation of Life” and thought it
was good will be delighted wivh
“Pinky,” which has a different ap-
proach. If this story were told on
the screen in the opposive way to
which it is filmed it would still
rank among the best. The picvure
revolves around a girl (Jeanne
Crain) who though the offspring
of negro forbears was fair enough
to pass for white. She knew that
coloured blood ran in her veins,
but was not courageous enough to
be proud of it. No one could
blame her, for in passing as white
she benefited from a good educa-
tion and an equally good society.
This went on until she returned
to the hut where she and her negro
grandmother lived. She then re-
alised that the South wivh its
rigid stand against coloured peo-
ple is not worth living in. Just
as she hal decided to pack up

and go back North to a white
doctor (William Lundigan) who

is in love with her, her grand-
mother (Ethel Waters) persuades
her her stay and nurse a rich
white landotwner (Ethel Barry-
more), Miss Barrymore dies and
leaves for Pinky (Miss Crain) a
palatial home. Miss Barrymore's
relatives dispute the will on the

grounds thai’ the old lady was
forced into making such a will
while in an unsound frame of

mind. The whole town is against
Pinky bécause of her colour and
the odds are against her Bui
just then the realisation came that
she was fighting for something,
and it was worth fighting for. So
in face of great opposition she



a look-out for

"BLACK: WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKY

ne ca



“And all London keeps

‘Black & White’’’

company, glory to the banks of the Avon. |

Not Anxious

Later in the year Ralph Kichard-
son may make another film. But
nov, it seems, Love in Idleness—
that Rattigan comedy which the
Lunts played here and in New
York.

Thereby hangs a sad little vale.
When Myrna Loy and her pro-
ducer-husband, Gene Markey,
were in England this summer,
she said she hoped to make more
pictures over here with him, One
was to have been Love in Idleness
with Myrna and Richardson co-
svarring in the original Lunt roles.

Mr. Markey is due back in
London this week from the Tyrol
—where he has been directing
location shots for the new Bobby
Henrey film, Wonder Kid.

But Miss Loy is still in Holly-}

| cinema.—some of them as



SUNDAY ADVOCATE





For Our Films

By

Milton Shulman

cece a sp NS RS

Here Is One American Market |



have come to look forward to a
British pieture as a stimulating
and refreshing experience.

Since our movies are in con-
stant and vigorous competition
with Hollywood in this market,

WHEN both Hollywood and London are prematurely we cannot afford to discourage
digging the grave of the British film industry, it is refresh-
ing to discover at least one market where the bells are not

yet being tolled.
“or in Canada British
are to-day more popular, earning

mcre money and gaining more
prestige than ever in their his-
tory.

Not only are they being shown
at the small specialised houses
which exhibit only foreign films,
but ‘here are now 116 Odeon
lux-
urious and spacious as anything
in the West End—which can com-

| pete on even terms with the best

cinemas associated with
large American companies.

the

Record Breaking

Before the war a British film
over here had about as much
curiosity value as a Ubangi na-
tive in a cireus. They earned
about £100 to £150 each and
were forgotten the moment the
cinema lights went out.

Now British films like Hamlet
and Red Shoes are _ discussed
everywhere, and they will earn
as much as such record-breaking
box-office American successes as
Best Years of Our Lives and
Gone With the Wind.

Both of these pictures should
earn for us over £30,000 each
in Canadian dollars, and it is
expected that Quartet and Blue
Lagoon will net almost as much.
So steady has been the increase
in the earning power of tritish
films since the end of the war
that it is expected this year
Canada -will send us _ almost
$1,000,000 net for our pictures.

More Mature
| The firm base upon which this
interest in British films depends

Clarke Gable



wood—and svaying there. Film

friends she made in Londoni M ) n (i Man
gather that she is no longer} a

anxious to work with her husband.;

Overtime Star

Postscript to my Pinewood
progress repor? last week, They’ve
obviously decided that, where
Jean Simmons is concerned, time
is money. The girl is really being}
put to work.

One, picture finished this week;
two new ones in_ prepara\ion-
and now she is to be sandwiched }
into that Somerset Maughain Trio}
production.

Miss Simmons will act with Guy
Rolfe (whose Spider and the Fly
performance recently put him
suddenly into the front rank) in
the The Sanavorium—most dra- |
matic of the three Maugham}
stories.—L.E.S.

stood her ground and fought aj
good battle. In the meantime

her fiancee came to see her, she
told him of her true colour, but!
this did nov’ worry him. |

How this story ends is well

worth seeing and Miss Crain, as-|
sociated with Miss Evhel Waters;
has risen to new heights as one
of the top flight actresses in film- |

dom. This picture of the girl
‘who passed for white is not!
worth missing. (20th Century-

Fox. Darryl F. Zanuck, Producer. |
Elia Kazan, director).

| camera fiend.
flex and a contax and does much

| ing.

| frien’

|
| by

Hobbies

CLARKE
many hobbies.

GABLE is a man of
Currently he is a
He owns’a rollie-

of his own printing and develop-
He is interested in auto-
mobiles of any kind, and enjoys a
morning spent in taking apart a
motor and putting it together
again. He is also a good golfer.
Fishing, however, is his greatest
hobby. He owns a small amount
of property on the Rogue River in
Oregon, and plans to build a fish-
ing lodge. some day right on the
water’s edge. Between pictures

along this well-stocked river. His
contract calls for four months off
between each film.

He won an Academy Award for
“It happened One Night” in 1934.
But he gave his “Oscar” to the
twelve-year-old son of his good
Walter Lang, because the
boy, who worships Gable, asked
him for it. His contract stipulates
that he can never be loaned out
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. He
had that clause inserted himself



Royal

THE BRIBE: Crime does not;
pay. This is what this story is
meant to convey. It is centred
around Carlota, an island just off
the coast of Central America.
Carlota is a rough and tumble
the main industries of which
seems to be bartending, fiestas,
tourist fishing and illegal deals
in aeroplane engines. The busi-
ness of these engines brings to
this paradise one Rigby (Robert
Taylor) an honest federal agent
disguised as a playboy fisherman
One of the scoundrels he is after
(John Hodiak) has a wife (Ava
Gardner) who is as discontented
as she is curvaceous. Then there
is Charles Laughton as a bum
whose feet ‘hurt, and Vincent
Price in the role of archvillain
All go to make up a picture of
torrid love, crookery and gaiety
Good entertainment

(M-G-M. Pandro .S. Berman,
producer. Rebert Z. Leonard, di- |



rector.)

Last Week's
Winner

WINNER of Lagi’ Week’s Guess
Star is Betty Carrington, Parade
View, Hastings. The name of tha,
Star is June Allyson.








} a film elsewhere



because, he says, he knows every-
one at his home studio so well
that he wouldn't feel right making
“It Happened
Night” and “Call Of The
are the only two he made
away from M-G-M, although
“Gone With The Wind”, an
M-G-M release, was filmed on the
Selznick lot.

One
Wild”

Roxy
ANY NUMBER CAN PLAY:
Yes Gable is back at his old
game. But this time beside the
usual run of wine women and
song, he has the dice and guns

thrown in. In this picture Clark
Gable is a big time honest gam-
bler who has risen in wealth, He
is a married man with a son. But
this does not keep other women

away from him In the cast
there as such lovables as Mary
Astor, Audrey Trotter, Majorie

Rambeau and Gable’s wife, Alex-
is Smith. Others who lend colour
to this dramatic story are Wen-
dell Corey, Frank Morgan, Lewis
Stone, Barry Sullivan, Daryll
Hickman, Edgar Buchanan and
that neted negro adqtor-singer,
Caleb Peterson. Good entertain-
ment

(M.G.M. Mervyn Le Row, direc-
tor.. Arthur Freed, producer).

|

|

he spends at least a month fishing |

filmsis the 500,000 members of Cana-

da’s armed forces who acquired
a taste for the British way
life during the war.

They have brought back with
them fond and sentimental re-
miniscences of England and its
people which have awakened a
new c’iriosity about our institu-
tions, our customs and “ur hopes,

of

British flims have also a spe-
cial appeal to the teen-age
youngsters just finishing second-
ary school. Graduating from the
cowboy and bubble-gum class of
picture-goers, their taste has
swerved from Gene Autry to
Laurence Olivier.

To them British films are more
intelligent and more mature than
the regular Hollywood product,
and in their new-found adult-
hood they enthusiastically sup-
port films like Hamlet, Great
Expectations and The Fallen
Idol.

But in order to maintain and
increase this interest we must
continue to make an adequate
quantity of good pictures
Each bad film that is sent over
here merely does a disservice to
the cause of all British films.

Unfortunately Canada has had
to sit through her share of dull
and adolescent British pictures.
Films like Stop Press Girl. The
Perfect Woman, Poets Pub, Wo-
men in the Hall, Esther Waters
have not only-met aa agonising
fate at the box-office but they
have disillusioned eudiences that







Ethel Barrymore, the Woman and Actress

WBbartcenn

iby

It took Hollywood thirty-five
years to get Ethel Barrymore to
sign a long-term screen contract,
but Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer fin-
ally accomplished the feat.

Since 1914, when the star made
her first silent film, “The Night-
ingale,” every swdio in Holly-
wood has offered her a long-term
contract, but to no avail. Upon
finishing her role in “The Great
Sinner” at M-G-M, Miss Barry-
more finally succumbed and
signed on the dotted line.

She initiated her new contract
with a stellar role in “That Mid-
night Kiss,” her first appearance
in technicolor, and followed this
with the dramatic portrayal of
Mother Auxilia in “The Red
Danube,” exciting story of post-
war Vienna.

Today the star lives in a ramb-
ling white house with blue shu:-
ters which overlooks the Pacific
Ocean in Palos Verdes, California.

ovel

much ’
ia m how
st} s «show
Tong"

No other shampoo gives you the ee

same magical LANOLIN-biend lather
beautiful, lustrous hair

ae

LANOLIN

ier your hal

a

hese recently won audiences.

Canada sees over 300 pictures

year. Britain cam continue to
arn between a million and a
million and a quarter Canadian |
dollars annually if she can sup-
ply 10 per cent of this require- |
ment.

But that means 30 quality pic-
tures—not merely 30 hackneyed,
second rate imitations of inferior
American films.

They do not all have to be ex-
pensive productions like Hamlet
and Red Shoes but they must at
least have the appeal and intel-
ligence of Passport to Pimlico
Blue Lagoon, The Winslow Boy
and Whiskey Galore.

Foot in Door

It is not only financial consid-
erations that should prompt our
desire to show British pictures
in Canada. In a country that is
flooded with American radio,
Amerfean magaaines, American
goods and American television.
British films are one of the few
mediums left to us to further
Canada’s understanding and ap-
preciation of the British way of
lite.

In
the

the current discussions on
future of the film industry
it should be remembered that
any drastic curtailment in the
production of British films will be
bound to jeopardise our position
in Canada and other parts of the
Empire just as we are beginning
for the first time to have our foot

firmly wedged in the open door.

Good British films can be much
more than just an asset on the
dollar side of an_ international
ledger.



Young
Instead of 45 minutes from Broad-
way, she is 45 minutes from
M-G-M. She has many of her

treasures and furniture from her
New York home and lives with her
oldest son Samuel. Her
er son, John Drew Colt, is in New
York studying dramaties. Her
daughter, Ethe] Barrymore Colt
Miglietta, is a busy mother of a
two-year-old son, John Drew
Miglietta, and an accomplished
actress gnd singer as well. The
Barrymore heritage of talent still
‘thrives. Marriage, motherhood
and a career have been well |
handled by the Barrymore women. |

Energetic, dynamic, strikingly

beautiful, Miss Barrymore is as
dominent a figure in Hollywood}
today as she was on Broadway.
She is a great sports fan and can
rattle off the names of every

heavyweight boxing champion of}
the past 40 years,
|



—London Express Service





' It Doesn’t

young- |



r can look + + *





for





PAGE THREE













a ee Ss
, A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
TO OUR PATRONS AND FRIENDS. :

WE THANK YOU for your Patronage in the past
years, and assure you that we intend to give vou
the best of Entertainment for 1950.

ROODAL THEATRES=Caribbean

EMPIRE—OLYMPIC-—ROXY—ROYAL.

-EMPIRE

To-day to Thurs.—Mat. & night shows daily.

ave
rT
FOR WHITE

" JEANNE CRAIN - ETHEL BARRYMORE |

ETHEL WATERS - WILLIAM LUNDIGAN
Protuced by DARRYL F.ZANUCK - oivectes by ELIA KAZAN

——— a

OLYMPIC

Today last 2 Shows.
The M.G.M. Doubie
“THRILL OF A

AND

"VALLEY OF DECISION”

Mcatinse and Night

ROMANCE”

MONDAY AND TUESDAY
First Instalment Columbia Serial

"WILD BILI, HICKOK”

Starring William Elliott

- Matinee and

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY—Finai Insialmen! _
“WILD BILL H?CKOK”

ROX Y
TODAY TO TUESDAY, Matinee and Night
Shows Daily

p MATNO. 210 2 COLS. x 2° (56 LINES)

ROYAL

TO-DAY TO TUESDAY
Shows

M.G.M. presents .. .
“THE 3RIBE”
Starring

Matinee and Night
Daily




Robert Taylor Ava Gardiner





Mat
BLACK

Whether You’re

WHITE...

C1

Or

ay er ae)
marry you ay
no one

i mou ae
know

our

secret.”’

.RRYL F. BANU CK

aT LL.



Starring a distinguished cast :

JEANNE CRAIN
ETHEL BARRYMORE
ETHEL WATERS
WILLIAM LUNDIGAN

Produced by DARRYL F. ZANUCK

Directet by ELIA KAZAN +. Screen
- Play by Philip Dunne and Dudley Nichols
<= Based vel by Cid Ricketts Summer



EMPIRE THEATRE
NEW YESR PRESENTATION
—~ NOW SHOWING

r-




PAGE FOUR



HE year 1949 has been, in my opinion, the greatest year of sport

S i rticular branch

i istory of Barbados. It is true that one pa :

of shat migih we have reached the eS ne oo aoa

ai never before has there

esaiaat oon aa so many competitions on an Intercolonal level.

iy Cricket undoubtedly our first love, attracted Trinidad ag in

the regular post-war Intercolonial ge oon oe ae nee
5 the impressive consistency 0 oy Marsha "

sped Saline, the fluidity and power of tall scoring Johnny Lucas

and the accurate spinners of C. “Boogles” Williams for the Barbados

m.
ve TRINIDADIANS WHO EXCELLED
OR Trinidad we saw an excellent all round performance by Clar-
ence Skeete, some resolute and finally elegant batting by
J. E. D. Sealy and a promising and commendable performance by
young Chicki Sampath who made his bow to big cricket in the series.
A team of the East Indian Cricket Board of Control visited Bar-
bados for the first time and were not disgraced although they were
below the standard of the island’s full strength. They drew a fix-
ture with a Colts XI, defeated outright a Barbados Cricket League
XI, but bowed the knee to a Colony XI. em
" ‘The domestic season was not the most brilliant that we have had
but it gave Roy Marshall the opportunity to score over six hundred
runs and Clyde Walcott the chance to establish himself as a very
useful fast inedium bowler and share top honours with Errol Milling-
ton in the line-up of First Division bowlers.

PICKWICK CHAMPIONS

ICKWICK, thanks to their magnificent team spirit and determina-
P carried off the First Division trophy although on merit alone there
was not much to choose between Empire, Wanderers and themselves.

The experiment with the introduction of the Intermediate Divis-
ion proved to be a success. So keen was the competition that two
teams, Pickwick and Empire, tied in the First place.

The three day atmosphere produced more serious cricket and
the First Division teams found worthy recruits in these ranks. It
should definitely be retained next season but the Barbados ‘Cricket
Association should study the performances of the individual teams
during the season and promote or demote accordingly as they think
fi

oe
WINNERS FIRST TIME

HE Second Division saw Cable and Wireless celebrate their entry

into cup cricket by carrying off the championship of the Second
Division, only by a narrow margin however from the Mental Hospita!

The final game alone decided the issue, another proof of a sea-
son of very keen competition.

The Barbados Amateur. Football Association also tried an experi-
ment in taking the staging of the competition from Queen's Park to
Kensington, The result was a net profit of over one thousand dollars
—-Improved accommodation for players and public alike and a better
standar’ of football.

Spartan carried off both the First Division Cup and the Knock-
out Cup. Their deadly rivals Carlton had the pleasure of being the
only team to have beaten them for the season, twice to be exact
But this di@ not prevent the Park team from consolidating when
once they were given a slight advantage either by accident or a mis-
take on their opponents’ part.

ONLY A NOSE
ees nosed out Everton only by goal average in the Second
Division to round off an extremely keen battle but in the Third
Division, Notre Dame (the former All Blacks) swept everything be-

fore them and won quite d few of their games by the tallest of mar-
gins

A Combined Casuals-Shamrock te
of the Pickwick Club. They played a series of games against colony
teams and won the rubber, These fixtures only showed that the Col-
ony, in having played teams composed of members who had no expe-
perience of playing together before, presented a weaker force than
they might hve done in the circumstances,

Next season, benefiting by this experienc
an Association team early in the season th
if there is no tournament immediately,

EXCELLENT REFEREEING
retereeing was excellent and there was a keenness that
bromises much for future seasons,
The Amateur Athletic Associ
ful meetings during the year,
one

am paid a visit as the guests

e it is hoped to select
at will play together even

“HE

ition of Barbados staged two success-
e an Inter-club one and an Intercolonial
Ken Farnum and Carmichael held their own in the cycle events
but the flat events saw Barbados outclassed and clearly in need of
more experience in the Intercolonial field,

The Water Polo Association which has bee
to strength ever since its formation in 1947,
team from Trinidad in addition to Staging
They are now preparing to return the
Trinidad on January 1]

Delbert Bannister, Ken Ince, Peter and
and Paul Foster are players who could fill
West Indian water polo team,

n going from strength
were able to entertain a
a Successful local season.
yisit and are due to leave for

“Boo” Patterson, Geoffrey
a place of distinction in any

TABLE TENNIS VS. B.G. AND TRINIDAD

“HE Barbados Table Tennis Association toured British Guiana
earlier in the year“and played in Trinidad while they were in-

ae there. Later in the year they entertained a Trinidad team

iere,

They were defeated on their British Guiana
wide margin to Trinidad here. Skipper Louis
but it has been realised that our players have
as far as tournament play is concerned but
Should pay handsome dividends in the years to come,

Basketball, a form of Sport that has not really caught on here yet
got another fillip with the formation of an Association during the year.
Kudolph Daniel is to be commended for much industry in bringing the
Association into being, in addition to being its first Secretary,

BASKETBALL EXCITING INTEREST

*POHE game gained popularity and it should excite more interest this

year. The novelty of floodlighting the field at the Y.M.C.A, fox
some of the games was an added attraction.

Professional boxing was not successful
modic attempts were made to fill the breach created when Messrs.
Layne and Chandler, promoters of the Yankee Stadium threw in the
Sponge after years of good work, but these met with hardly even luke-
warm support from the public,

On the other hand the newly formed Amateur Boxing Association
has gained much public confidence and support. They were able to

send a team of amateurs to Grenada and recently staged their own
championship tournament,

B’DOS TO JOIN BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS
HEY expect to send another team to Grenada this year to compete
in the Caribbean championships and, Sam King, Lightweight,
Baggott, featherweight, Perkins welterweight are among those who

tour and lost by a
Stoute was outstanding
still a long way to go
the experience gained

during the year, Spas-



“.. ©

THROUGH.
OUT 1950

Ride Together
and Ride
with

Pleasure



GH

ALL-STEEL '1CVCLE

4

43
Sole Distributors in Barbados
k, SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.
8, 31, 12, 13, BROAD STREET

—— |

CAV
1













| The new



Storm’s Gift
Wins T.T.C.
‘A’ Class Race

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent!
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 31.
Mrs. Rita Augustine’s Rumour,
Jamaica-bred filly by Exaggerat-
ed—Dalrymple put an unexpect-
ed lacing on the F Class animals
going a mile and a distance and
fetched her backers $89 on each
$1 ticket to win at the pari-mutuel
as the T.T.C. races reached the
third day at Queen’s Park Savan-

nah,

Honeymvon, 3-year old daugh-
ter of Beachcomber—Soceress fol-
lowed Rumour in the second place
and the Jamaican pair brought a
Forecast to punters of $958 on a
two-dollar ticket.

In this race, Jamaicanbred ani-
mals secured three winning
brackets for the Wilhelmina,
Sprightly son of Rock William
ran third,

Fabulous, four-year son of Gate-
hurst won the St. Clair Handicap
over nine furlongs and 55 yards
for the “C” class animals. Bobby
Hardwidge. rode Fabulous. Miss
Vie ran second and Silver Bullet
vhird,

The T.T.C. Handicap for Class
“A” animals saw the Jamaicans,
Blue Streak and Gauntlet beaten
out of place.

Barbados-owned Storm’s Gift
won a great race from Gunsite
and The Gambler also Barbados-
owned in that order. Blue Streak
was prominent in the first mile,
then faded out of the picture
Pharlite never got up to vhe com-
pany,

Following were the day’s re-
sults:—-
MAIDEN HANDICAP—6 FURS
ASS C
1—Rallandra, 2—September Song, 3
Catania
IMPERIAL HANDICAP—G FURS
CLASS B.
—Fitche’s Green, 2—Ocean Pear
*-War Lord
NEWTOWN HANDICAP—1 MILE AND
1 YRDS. CLASS F
Rumour, 2—Honeymoo: Wall

Trea

PRODUCE HANDICAP—6 FURS
CLASS F

Top Flight, 2—Cross Bow, 3-—-Co

MARAVAL HANDICAP—6 FURS

CLASS D
The Atom, 2—Bow Bells, 3—Fly
Away
ST. CLAIR HANDICAP—9 FURS
OLASS C.
Fabulous, 2—Miss Vic, 3—Silver
Bullet
T.T.C. HANDICAP—9 FURS
CLASS A,
1—Storm's Gift, 2—Gunsite, 3—The
Gambler.
—By Cable.

Elizabeth’s
: ‘
Monaveen
Wins
LONDON, Dec. 31.

Monaveen, the steeplechaser
jointly owned by the Queen and
Princess Elisabeth, to-day won
the Queen |‘lizabeth Chase Han-
dicap over 3 miles 180 yards here,
beating Free booter with Klaxton
third,

The Princess, who only recently
returned from Malta was present
to see Monaveen score a most
popular victory in the event
worth £2,300. Monaveen light-
ly weighted with only 10 stone
although hotly challenged by the
northern jumper, Wot No Sun,
entered the straight going much
better of the two. It was then
left to the fast finishing Free-
booter 7 to 1 to take secolid place
with Klaxton 8 to 1 third.

Monaveen, an 8-year-old geld-
ing with which the Princess hopes
to Win the Grand National next
year, fenced faultlessly, and Tony
Grantham, his rider made the
best use of his light weight to win
by 6 lengths with 3 lenghs sep-
arating second and third

Wot Not Sun finished fourth of
12 runners of whom Roimond \as
a disappointing 7 to 2 favourite

Princess Elizabeth followed by
Lord Mildway and her trainer
Peter Cazalet was first into the
unsaddling enclosure to greet the
winner, and was obviously over-
joyed by the success of the horse
which she patted affectionately
while smiling at Grantham to
whom she said “congratulations”
with much feeling. —Reuter,

will surely be asked to represent Barbados.

The Barbados Polo Club have

year, having entertained a team from Jamaica and will be off to Vene-

zuela to play there on January 6,

Lawn Tennis Association. With
Skeete and Hon'ble V. C. Gale
a working policy for the



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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

India Scores 422

vs. Commonwealth

Hazare Hits 175 .N.O.

CALCUTTA, Dec. 31.

A magnificent innings of 175 not out by V. S. Hazare, Cap-

tain of the side in the absence of the injured Vijay Merchant,

featured the India first innings today when the third un-
official Test with ‘+2 Commonweatth was continued.

India ran up the respectable
total of 422 in reply to which the
Commonwealth scored 15 runs
without loss before stumps were
drawn,

Winston Place, the Lancashire



batsman, was playing after all
although there had been some

confusion yesterday when it was
announced, in error, that he was
twelfth man and that Norman
Oldfield was in the side.

The first hour’s play to-day pro-
duced only 23 runs but batsmen
needed to be alert. In the early
Stages today three wicktes fell for
32 runs but Hazare stood firm and
completed his century in 4 hours,
9 minutes, including thirteen fours.

The alliance of Eishenchand
and Hazare had checked the fall
of wickets before the interval and

they were together at lunch
having added 56 runs in 50
minutes.

By the tea interval three more
wickets had gone, but Hazare was
still there with 163 out of a total
of 401. His stand with Kishen-
chand added 92 runs in 81 minutes
for the seventh wicket. Hazare’s
150 took him 6 hours, 12 minutes
and included 18 fours.

Twenty-five minutes after tea
sufficed to finish off the innings
which had lasted 9 hours, 25
minutes, Hazare’s undefeated 175
including 23 fours.

The Commonwealth had only a
short period of batting but neither
Livingston nor Place appeared un-
duly worried as they played to
keep the opening stand unbroken
until stumps were drawn.



V. HAZARE

Livingstone brought on Tribe and
the left-hander had the new bats-
man leg before. Hazare was un-
perturbed by the fact that India
had lost three wickets for thirty
two runs and went on to com-
plete his century in 4 hours, 9
mins. including 13 feurs. Joined
by Kishenchand, the pair added
56 runs in 50 minutes for the
unbroken seventh wicket when
lunch was taken

‘einatigneiernerpeencamiinnaesathtnnneieiesenlieatrenaiaihonaaiee

INPIA’S ist INNINGS



Mushtaq All c Smith b Tribe 40

thin veil of fog again hung V. Mankad b Smith .......... 91
#9 ; SERED » as R. S. Modi b Tribe : 9
over the ground this morning as ae "6
a £ V. Hazare not out tae és 175

He e and Phadkar resumed p' phadkar c Freer b Lambert. . 13
india’s first innings against the H. Adhikari run out .. 2

bowling of Freer and Lambert. P. Umrigar lbw b ‘Tribe 4





A crowd of 20,000 was present Klsendand ¢ & bp smith®.. r
to see Lambert strike an early c. gs, Nayudu b Pettiford .......... 25
blow having Phadkar caught by N. Chowdhury ¢ Worrell b Tribe .. .
Freer in the slips with his third PETERS Fae PRE SNA TRE F AVES tp eet
ball. After an hour’s slow cricket PO Ai tl ae so, 422
during which twenty three runs : oi ‘ ee
were scored Adhikari trying a jg) quick single was run out by Alli. 337’ 8 for 360, 9 for 391.
When Umrigar joined Mazare —Reuter.
By BRUCE HARRIS
LONDON. Just to Show Thew

THOSE anything-but-peaceful UNUSUAL “weigh-in” faces
people, the boxing managers, seem Cockell ir > ; -egari a6
more than usually belligerent this ~ ekell, lived of being regarc

ed officially as a heavy-weight, he
is to step on the scales at the
offices of the Board of Control—
Just tO prove that he can still
make the cruiser weight. 12st. 7b.

If the authorities are satisfied.
Don hopes to be included in the
official series of eliminators for
the British title held by Freddie
Mills.

His immediate plans include a
fight with Charlie Collett at Read-
ing to-night, a match with a
French opponent, 27-year-old
Andre Iicfrane, at Streatham Ice
Rink on January 17, and a series
of three contests under the Brait-
man and Ezra banner at Empress
Hall.

The Streatham match is at 12st.

Christmas,

Tom Hurst, who looks after the
affairs of Bruce Woodcock, will be
spending Christmas in America.
Before he left he gave the world
a good-will message to the effect
that anybody who could knock
Bruce over would be paid £100.
The idea is a toughening-up course
in preparation for Woodcock’s
fight with Lee Savold next May.

Here's His Choice

Four fighters, represented by
two managers have immediately
accepted the challenge—in appro-
priate terms,

Says John Simpson. “I’ve got
three lads who'll take him on.
He can have any oo all of Jack
Gardner, Don

Cockell or Tony se ba :
Lord on those £100 terms.” Mlb. over ten x wunds.
Ted Broadribb, on behalf of

rounded Gian

Johnny Williams, is even quicker . G ; " ‘ ;

to the punch—like this: HARLEQUINs, delighted with

“Williams has an eye on the the tugby football played last

British and world titles himsclf bsg ve a gain on
and is prepared to act as a u : ae arranged o XehuEn
‘door-mat’ for Woodcock for the Match for April 23, in Paris (writes
time being. Anyone who wants Hylton Cleaver).

Woodcock will have to get there At Twickenham they did not
over Johnny’s dead body.” encounter after all that giant
Peace on earth. Good will to- !rward Dr. Adani, whose boots
wards men. are size 12. He was prevented

by his mother from entering the
airplane which was to bring them
because the conditions were too
swolen some of the limelight this W!"dy.

There may perhaps have been
something in this maternal solici-
tude. Many of the team who
travclled by ship arrived too sea-
sick to play and reserves took their

Seasoned players like Dr. H. E.

places!
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New Year Attractions

(In Various Qualities)

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NIGHT GOWNS 2.97 ea §

BLUE FLANNELS 78 |




Aussies Hit

312 For 4
vs. S. Africa

CAPETOWN, Dec. 31.

Australia and South (frica
opened their Second Test match
on the Newlands Ground here to-
day when Australia batted all day
to score 312 runs for the loss of
four wickets. ‘

This was a rate that was behind
the run a minute considered good
and credit for pegging Australia
down belonged to the spin bowl-
ers Mann, Tayfield, and Smith who
found little response from a slug-
gish wicket.

All batsmen have so far done
well if at times slow and J. Mo-
roney with 87 was top-scorer of
the day while half centuries came
from Keith Miller, Lindsay Has-
sett and Neil Harvey.

Ian Johnson was declared fit
after a test in the nets to take his
p'ace in the Australian team and
so both sides had the same teams
which contested the First Test,
won cymfortably by Australia.

By the lunch interval the open-
ing pair had scored 90 for the loss
of Aithur Morris’s wicket and his
confident 42 was in contrast to his
failure to score in the earlier Test.

Miller’s 58 was a laborious effort
which took nearly two and one
half hours but Hassett showed
more aggressiveness. His 57 was
made up of fluent strokes all round
the wicket. He showed ability to
pierce a well placed field with
uncanny accuracy and his stand of
61 with Harvey for the fourth
wicket was the day’s brightest

cricket. La entein



Horse-W oman
e *
Dies At 32
NEWBURY, Dec. 31.

Mrs. Diana Walwyn, brillian‘
horsewoman known as “The
Woman Wifhout Fear” who diea
in hospital here on Thursday tool:
an accidental overdose of a pain-
killing drug, it was decided at an
inquest here today. :

The jury returned a verdict of
death by misadventure. Mrs. Wal-
wyn was found unconscious in a
locked room. By her bed was a
hypodermic syringe with a broken
needle and a carton and bottle
containing drugs.

Mrs. Walwyn, aged 32, was the
wife of Fulke Walwyn, wellknown
race horse trainer. A woman of
classical beauty, she lived adven-
turously. She knew more about
racing form than most men and
her racing colours were wellknown
on most English racecourses.

—Reuter.

Guderian Denies

Press Reports

MUNICH, Dec. 31.
Former German General Heinz
Guderian, to-day denied Press re-
ports that he had received “any
offers from a foreign power.”
Commenting on the alleged
movement of former German offi-
cers to the United States first re-
ported last Tuesday, he said: “It
is entirely out of question that 5
as a German, should enter the
service of a foreign country.

Spain Holds Close
Relation With U.S.

MADRID, Dec. 31.

General Franco told his people
in a New Year broadcast to-night
that Spain’s relations with ihe
peoples of America were becom-
ing “closer every day.”

“We are not hurt by the bad
faith of those who pretend to
ignore us or who fail to see the
greatness of our effort.”

“Those people are mistaken
who think that by attempting io
hinder our recovery, they can
achieve anything except to make
us even tougher and to increas:
our contempt for those who ac:
in this way.”

—Reuter.

MORE VOTES MONDAY!
PARIS, Dec, 31
French Prime Minister Georges
Bidaul’ who last night won vote
of confidence on two points of
his 1950 budget tonight asked the
National Assembly for similar
votes on vhree more points. The
three votes were expected to be
taken on Monday.—Reuter.



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ew Year

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POCO BOCA A ESSS

SHADES.

For UNDERWEAR %
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SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 1939




R

= ourse, J continue my comment on the Tyn¢ ¢ a
eae ee seeing the first two days of racing, oa
In the T.T.C. Cup Storm's Gift gave a grand display ana,
ve made us realize that the high opinion held of her of
Tune meeting was quite justified. For some reason the g













































































\

? i at the beginning of this ind ti
poorest T cowid. ae 04 was that his rider = atta ae :

cai a front runner and that once pa

that Blue Se OT that was proved was that

would give in. i B class and no match for Blue Stpe

is no better than a gooc ; at excell treak,

ik himself then proceeded to show what excellent stuff he
Streak I ing up the lead to Storm's Gift and then eo ,
of by giving up Storm’s Gift, however, would npt be beaten.

a fighting finish. torm’s » \ i

he her head in the most determined yp
collared she put down Ve i
the best stayers and beat the Jamaican Derby winner h

What also impressed me about this race was the very f;
ning and the even faster finish. is +S considered tj
Streak was concerned in both, his true colours are a em]

With regard to the two-year-olds, two of them have stp E
far as very good ones in the making. The first ig Fair Props
strong looking chestnut colt about fifteen hands two or three |
that he is going to give the creoles of the South Caribbean gt, :
Jamaica’s best in the classic races of 1950. There is little ¢
had Bow Bells been fit for the Preeders Stakes he may not} ;
beaten her, but there is also no doubt that he finished his race in .|
manner which bore the stamp of the stayer. He was not in the #,
three at the two but he came with such a strong bid in the streis|
that he was going away from the field when he passed the post, 1)
only unfortunate that on the second day he had to run against th
older horses in B class and was well and truly beaten by two seasons
campaigners like Rosalind and Tiduc. In fact this race
excellent example that the policy of placing Jamaican two-yea)
in E2 is, in my opinion, a mistaken one. So far the best Jam
two-year-old we have seen on this side of the Carib’ 4
year was Brown Rocket. I think that Fair Profit is
Brown Rocket was at the same age. But yet he was by t
F class horses from whom he was receiving less than his weipht-t,
age because he is in a class above them. I am sure that this sort y
thing will spoil our two-year-old racing .

Incidentally Fair Profit’s breeding is interesting, Hy by
Tip, an imported stallion by Fair Trial out of Tip the Wink, while i
dam, The Brunette, is by Scatter, sire of the famous Browy Bombe
and many other good ones in Jamaica, Again further irA cation het
he will probably be good at longer distances than six furlongs,

NOT A WINNER :

The other two-year-old of i omise, strange to tell, is one who ¢
not win. No less than the colt Cross Bow, But what he did wal
nothing short of amazing. He got left by what I thought to be thra|
lengths. Mr. Bennett, who started them told me he thought it rs
more like five. But by the time two furlongs had been covered hy
was fourth in a field of thirteen and after three furlongs he wa
third. After this tremendous acceleration | think Holder had sop
difficulty in bringing him round the turn and had the course been ;
straight one he might have got closer to the winner, As it was wh
he came into the stretch he subdued Leap On, who was. fighting!
gamely, with his big stride but his handicap at the start was too much
to allow him to catch the winner. J

Of Bow Bells, the sensational and only two-year-old ever to race
in E2 at the Christmas meeting, it can only be said that she is not
well. In this she is like Suntone although I think that Mr. Cox's
filly is the worse of the two. Apparently the fever which she has
had caused all her stamina to deserit her as she did not even finish
within three lengths of the field.

There is also something else taking place at the Christmas meet.
ing which is worthy of special mention. That is, the large number
of promising importeds now in Trinidad and the predominance of the
Jamaican Creoles at the meeting.

The London Bloodstock Cup brought out the maidens and in
September Song, the winner of this race, Catania, Czarina, Sunbeay
and Ballandra, they are obviously the makings of some good race
horses which are going to give the creoles a lot of trouble in the
future. On top of that there are Lady Pink, Pescadores, Mist Maid
and Fitches Green who are winners already and all impress
being worth while. The form of the four-year-old colt
Article also suggests that he is coming into his own asa late developer,
These horses I am sure will form the nucleus of Ciasses B and C in
the next year and some of them I expect to be in A sooner or later. |
oo witheee $4 the ee all the time it therefore looks as
if we will have not only crowc ed fields in C é ind
and quite a few in A, . nn © Dut almogt aaae

With regard to the Jamaicans, Blue Streak is of course the best
at present. But we have the performance of Pharlite in the Imperial
Stakes as a reminder that his win at Arima was hot the fluke every:
body imagined it to be. T must say that this Pharlite is the type of
horse that I admire. Out of the same dam as Jeeves and The Gauntlet
he is a much better looking horse than his half brothers and particu-
larly so about his quarters. He is obviou: ly a good stayer for he
prefers mud and is better at nine than anything else. Yet he is built
more on the powerful lines of the sprinter and cuts a much better
figure than the lanky Blue Streak.

Next we move down to E class where we find William II and Fait
Profit, whom I have already disc ussed, and then into F class where
there is Rosalind, China Doll and the two-ycar-old Mon Ami There
is also another two-year-old who catches the eye in the shape of
Sun Glee. She ran fourth in the Breeders’ Stakes but was outelassed
by the older ones in the Woodbrook Stakes, being classified E2 with
Fair Profit. These | think are tho best but there are Jamaicans in
every class in ‘Trinidad, some on the out-going list and others on the
in-coming. In fact it grows more evident every day that Trinidad is
the centre of racing in the British West Indies, There is even one
from a French colony. The dapper Tiduc, one of the gamest I have §

seen,
ANYBODY’S GUESS

What the last two days of the meeting will bring forth is any:
body’s guess but the luck of the Barbados horses can get no worse.

That’s a certainty,

I am also impressed so far with the crowd that has turned out
to see the races. We know already that the big Sweep broke a record.
Now I am sure the Pari Mutuel and Forecast have also broken the
records established during the War Years, To begin with there is a
entire hew set of booths for both stand and field spectators and th
Stand itself has been enlarged to seat 300 extra. Even this extensioi
however does not prevent it from being cramped, This is a very
healthy Sign indeed for racing in the South Caribbean and for Trini-
dad in particular, For my part I hope it means that the day is no
far distant when we will see all the improvements long planned by
the T.T.C. are put into effect. Such things as an Electric Tote ma
chine, new Members’ and Grand Stands, extension of the home
stretch and added to this my suggestion that the Trial Stakes be made
a seven furlong race and the Derby nearly a mile and a apache By
that time we may also see a revival of the Governor's Cup over 4
more respectable distance than 91 furlongs,



oem WEN NEES

TO OUR FRIENDS
AND
CUSTOMERS

eG

ONGNG9G NG NG NG NG NONE NG SGN NG NGG NG 8G NG NG

5

WE EXTEND



DOWDING ESTATES
& TRADING Co., Lid.

ae
bs

BRERA AS NED DN D8




aw



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#4 S8eBS522e3838 eres

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weSsekRebPees Felt EB

SUNDAY, JANUAR

——

GOALKEEPER AT WORK No-1.



1950

Keep Off The Bike

By BERT WILLIAMS

(England and Wolves goalkeeper)

S° you want to be a goalkeeper? Weil, there
~ are two schools of thought on the subject.
One, that goalkeepers are born not made. The
other, that any half-wit can do the job with
distinction. I agree with neither.

Goalkeeping is a combination of art and science,
put there is one great essential before we touch on
those subjects—physical fitness.

The average fan has an idea that height and
weight are the first essentials of good goalkeeping.
This is pure fallacy. The ability to reach and

catch high balls

is useful, but perfection can't be

reached without absolute physical fitness.

So training is the first item. Sprinting to de-
velop agility and strong calf muscles, muscles to
withstand that quick leap from a standing position.

Bending, with
flat on the floor,
the quick bend

the legs straight and the hands
is a good exercise to prepare for
to pick up the ball when it is

rolling along the ground.

Trunk bending from side to side gives
extra bit of tone to the

when stretching

that
muscles so necessary

your hands for the ball when

your body is not behind them.
Exercises which call for co-ordination of body

and mind are vitally important.

In fact, mental

training is as important to a goalkeeper as the

physical side.

By mental training I mean the study of posi-
tional play and its relation to angles you will

adopt under

player is

certain
coming in

circumstances —
from

when a
the wing, or when

an inside forward is racing towards goal from

any of
Do



One big don’t-
heaviness in the

a dozen slightly

different directions,

reises regularly and you'll have the
suppleness necess

ary to the good goalkeeper.
cycling. f find it leaves me with
legs. That's a bad thing.

BIG DECISION

¥ ET’S take it you are compictels

fit. Now con-

iL: sider the big decision every goalkeeper has to

make several times in each

out of goal.

game—-when to come

Come out at the right moment and the fans will

love you, the Press praise you.

Come out at the

wrong moment and the criticism will pour on you.
So here are a few tips that I find helpful.

Understanding
is the first

essential.

with your backs and centre half
Tell them how you'll let

them know you are O.K. or otherwise.

If I am coming out I shout loudly to indicate I
have the ball covered—“My ball, Bill,” or “Back
Bill,” as the case may be.

Notice I mentioned the player by name.

to do that can






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BERT WILD}

penalised.
tacker

He might be

bali is on the
possession of

Now for a warning
while on one knee, I’ve
and it’s dangerous.

1 defender

I always endeavy
my legs strai
ball. That’

our to




where

So often I’ve
sailing over the
keeper, or go w
your

seen a
head of



OLD LOW'S ALMANACK

shouting to
and that’s an offence
This type of “coming out”
floor running

Never

seep my

ball
an

ind agile

feet

hit a

fool





at-

is in order when the
towards gaal or in the

pick up the ball
seen goalkeepers do it,

together,
and bend down to pick up the
suppleness comes in.
bump and go
on-one-knee
hizzing between his legs.
knees together and your legs straight.
—London Express Service.

goal-
No, keep

PROPHECIES er (950

SUNDAY



Battle For
Bolton Cup

THE Advocate Challenge Cup
has been won by the Mosquitccs.
On Wednesday January 4, 1950.,
the Polo season closes. On this
»ecasion the two teams Mosquitoes
and Bluebottles which were tied
in the number of goals scored in
the tournament will play orf for
the Warner Bolton Cup.

3esides this play-off, a presenta-
1on match will be played by two
teams, chosen from the whole
-uc, and at the conclusion of this
match Mrs. Arthur, widow ot the

te H. A. Arthur; Esq., founder
< the Club, nas kindly corsen isd
) present the cups. The teams to

ay in the presentation match

ve been chosen with a view to
‘ffording the team which is to
‘our Venezuela as much practice
1s possible.

Seats may be obtained on the

yund at one shilling each, ani

y starts at 4.15 p.m.

Che following are the teams:---

Mosquitoes: E. Williams
—upt.), E. Deane, J. Marsn,
id A. Arthur.

Bluebottles: C. Deane (Capt.),

M. Edghill, W. Bradshaw and M.
kewes-Cox,

For the Presentation match the
following eight members have
»2en chosen; —

Col. Michelin, J. Marsh, E.

-tiams, M. Edghill, L. Deane,

Deane, C, Deane and K. Deane.

Messrs. Victor Weekes and

ic Deane will be the Umpires.

e

Pat Todd Wins

al . e
Tennis Title
CALCUTTA, Dec. 31.

Mrs. Patricia Todd, United
States, won the Women’s Singles
title of of the Asian Lawn Tennis
Championships here today beating
Mrs, Bettey Hilton, Britain, 6—4;
6—0; in the finals.

The Men’s Doubles final was
won by Dilep Bose and Sumant
Misra of India, who beat the Phil-
ippines pair Felicisimo Ampon and
C. Carmona 3—6; 10—8; 6--1;
and 6—4.—Reuter.

REEF WORK WILL
BE RESUMED

Work will begin again on the
Reef Pavilion and grounds when
funds are available this year.

The Pavilion is now to be paint-
ed and wired while the grounds
will be levelled and grass planted.





A Hungarian comrade denounces Stalin for (a) having, had close dealings

with fhe enemy (Roosevelt and Churchill) in 1941-45 5

(v) having, then

received aid from America (Wall St ele.) fo Russia, and (c),in réfurn,

having, deliberalely plotled a Soviet policy which

ve reactionary capilalisl

forces the opporlunily To build an armed: world ront agains! Communism.







THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO, LTD.
BRIDGETOWN,

ENERAL

the comrade was execuléd immediately for being, inconvenient.

electric
lighting
accessories



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ADVOCATE



Two Teams Xmas Holidays Cause



Upset In English

Soccer

League

LONDON, Dee, 31.

High scoring and some surprise results occurred in the
English Soccer League today due largely to the aftermath
of the severe Christmas holidays programme.

Many clubs, plagued by injuries to star players, were vorced
to make sweeping changes. Bottom of the league Birming-
ham City made eight alterations but so well did the reserves
rise to the occasion that Brimingham led until late in the
game at Burnley when the home team snatched an equaliser.

Arsenai foung League
Liverpool in a lively
went down fighting Liverpoo!
exerted terrinc pressure against
the solid Arsenai defence which
they pierced once in each half.
Witn 35 points they still lead by
two points trom Manchester
Unitea -who beat their neighbours,
ihe City, after trailing at halr
time.

Wolverhampton fielded a com-
plete new half back line due to
injuries, but scored a convineins
victory over Blackpool, after a
goalless first half.

Biggest surprise in division two
was the defeat promotion seeking
Hull City. . Their defence cracked
badly against lowly Bradford who
whipped in five goals before Hull
scored a consolation goal.

Tottenham Hotspurs the League
leaders played below their best
but two first half goals gave them
both points at the
Cardiff City.

Sheffield Wednesday, ten points
behind in second place, kept in «he
promotion hunt with a fine win :
Chesterfield. Notts County haa
their big lead in the third Division
South cut slightly due to their
defeat at Bornemouth. Doncaster

teaders
mood anu

expense of

Rovers cracked in five goals
against Southport and now lead
the Northern section by clear

points from Rochdale.
RESULTS
Scottish League—Division A
Aberdeen 1, East Fife 2. Clyd:
0; Hibernian 1. Hearts 4; Celtic

SUPA ate

FORCING BID

By M. Harrison-Gray
Dealer: West. East-West

TITTLE



West opens with the
forcing-to-game bid of
Two Clubs. East bids
Two Diamonds, the
conventional negative
response, although Dia-
monds this time happens
to be his genuine suit.
West bids Two Hearts, Fast
shows a biddable suit with
Three Diamonds, and
West tries for a fit in his
second suit with Three
Spades. East bids Three
No Trumps and West
passes.

South leads 4 6, and
declarer must be careful
to win with dummy’s
ee A in order to preserve
an entry to his own hand.
@ Q is now led and over-
taken with ¢ K. This play
ensures nine tricks. The
contract will fail if
dummy’s ‘fe 9or of J@ is \
played to the first trick. }

4

n>
woo &
NI
Â¥
N
CCC RSET ERS T SSSR CRETE Ce RSC REeE EEE ee Ee Se PeceeeeneeeeeeUENSEESSEESSEREE Ss SUTECSUETENETEESECE SS eee Deen TSS T ERE REARS RES SR OEE EEE

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Motherwell 4, Third Lanark 0,
Queen of the South 8, Patrick
Thistle 1. Raith Rovers 6; Fal-
kirth 4. Rangers 2; Dundee: 2.
Stirling 1; St. Mirren 3.

S ottish League —Division 1B.

Albion Rovers 1, Hamilton Aci.-
demicals 3. Arbroath 1, Kilmar-
nock 2s Ayr United 1, Dunfermline
Athletic 1. Cowdenbeath 5, John -
stone 1. Dundee United 0, Air-
drieonians 1. Morton 3, Alloa Ath -
letic 1. Queens Park 0, Forfir
Athletic 0, Stenhousemuir 1, Dun. -
barton 2,

Second Divsion

Bradford 5, Hull City 1. Bury 3,
Blackburn Rovers 0. Chesterfiel i
1, Sheffield Wednesday 2. Grimsby
Town 6, Luton Town 1. Leicester
City 1, Brentford 1. Preston North
End 0, Southampton 3. Queens
Park Rangers 2, Coventry City 0.
Sheffield United 1, Barnsley 1.
Swansea Town 1, Leeds United 2.
Tottenham Hotspurs 2, Cardiff
City 0. West Ham United 2, Ply-
mouth Argyle 2.

Third Division (Southern)
Aldershot 0, Swindon Town (
Bournemouth 3, Notts County 0
Bristol Rovers 1, Southend United
1. Crystal Palace 0, Port Vale 1.
Newport County 6, Bristol City 4.
Northampton Town 2, Walsall 0.
Norwich City 1, Brighton and
Hove 2, Nottingham Forest 3, Mill-
wall 1. Reading 3, Exeter City 2.
Torquay United 4, Leyton Orient

1. Watford 6, Ipswich Town 0.

First Division

iston Villa 0, Newcastle United
i. Burnley 1, Birmingham City 1
Charlton Athletic 2, Fulham
Chelsea 2, West Bromwich Albion
1. Huddersfield Town 1, Evertor
2. Liverpool 2, Arsenal 0. Man-
‘hester City 1, Manchester United
2. Portsmouth 1, Middlesbrough
1. Stoke City 1, Derby County 3
Sunderland 2, Bolton Wandere

Wolverhampton Wanderers 3,
Blackpooi 0.

Third Division (Northern)

Accrington Stanley 2, Lincclr
City 0. Darlington 1, Rochdale
Doncaster Rovers 5, Southport |
Gateshead 4, Chester 0. Hartl
pools United 3, Bradford City 0

Mansfield Town 0, Rotherhi
United 2. New Brighton 1, Hali-
fax Town 1. Oldham. Athletic 2

Crewe Alexandria 1. Stockperi
County 2, Carlisle United 0. Wrex
ham 1, Barrow 0. York City 1
Tranmere Rovers 0.

—Reuter.



Record Profit

LONDON, Dee 31.
Arsenal Football Club which
toured South America earlier this
year made a record profit of £59
128 on last season working accord-
ing to an official announcement
to-day
Gate receipts
tours last
£1,397,20

and
season
Reuter,

profits
amounted to



GOLFER INJURED

SEATTLE Dec. 31.

Ed Silver, former United States
injured |
when his motor car was in collis-

Ryder Cup golfer, was

ion with a lorry at Eugene (Ore-
gon)

an ankle,

—Reuter.





For comfort
and ease of
riding, the
Hercules 3-
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fitted with the
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EAS) 14/40
See a ee

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Oliver damaged a knee and |



DeSilan Leading |
By 4% Points |
IN. CHESS

LONDON, Dec. 31.

Moscow radio reported tonight
that Chaude De Silan of France
was leading with 414 poinis ai
the end of the sixth round of the
Women’s World Chess Champion-
ship in Moscow.

Other leading players, wita 4
points each, were Olga Rubtsova
Valentina Belova and Ludm lla
Rudenko, all of the Soviet Union,
and Gisela Gresser of the United
States, The seventh round will
take place on Tuesday.

—Reuter.



3 Records Broken
ats
In N. Zealand Trials
WELLINGTON, Dec. 31.
Athletes broke 5 national re-
cords, and equalled 7 today when
the New Zealand track and fiela
championship and final Empire
Games trials were held at Napier.
One of the best perfo\nances oi
the day was that of Miss Yvette
Wi tiams of Otago, who bettered
the 1948 Olympic Games record
of 18 feet, 84 inches by 354 inches
in the Women's Long Jump.
The women’s 220 yards record
of 25.6 secs. was broken 3 jimes



Miss I. J. Hart, Auckland, clock-
ed 24.9 in the first heat, Miss ‘
Rower, returned 24.8 in the heat
and Miss D. Parker, Wakito.
equalled Miss Nower's time in th
third. }

ase oa Reuter.
Mile in 4 Mins. |
15.8 Seconds

ADELAIDE, Dee. 31. |
D. McMillan, Victoria, set up a
new Australian record of 4 min
15.8 secs. for the mile on the fir:
day of the Australian Amateu |
Athletic Championships.
MeMillan’s was one of two new
records set up during the day. The |



other was a time of 12%’ 43.5’ |
returned by D. Keane, Wesici ;
Australia, who beat the title |

holder, A. Stubb, by inches in the |
wo miles walk.—Reuter. |

\
Arthur Peall says:

BILLIARD SHOTS CAN
HELP YOUR SNOOKER

i *cer: when a snooker is :¢
4 quired to win, I am genera!
in favour of potting the ball “ o:
Yet I draw the line at undue
and would never

advise



average ————
suemen to at- rc Se
tempt pocketing | .

my

diagram \} © !
yellow, 1 \
Nearly straight, { .
with the cue-ball i

hampered by the

cushion at long |

range, the pot is

far too risky. . !
Not 60 my | 4
snooker. A fairly LLOW ©

. ye
full contact on
yellow sends itin || x 7S
and out of baulk |
{ \

towards the spot- | { bi |
1 ‘ain

end, and_ white
comes off two
cushions to halt
behind brown,
You will not make this snooke:
every time, but the stroke is sound
should



and always leave yellow
remsonably sate.
Billiard players enjoy delicate

|

|

|

|

|

strokes like this gentle half-ball kiss |

in-off red into the top left pocket |

While in-offs are disastrous at |

snooker, this little shot has oem
in the 22-ball game.

There are }

|

'

many positions where
the ability

to send white squarely
slong @ cusbion rail will build a
valuable snooker. Learn this billiard
shot and your snooker will benefit.



|



checks biliousness,



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|

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makes even routine tasks pleasant to
perform. A morning glass of sparkling,
effervescing Andrews settles the stomach,
| corrects acidity, tones up the liver, and
Then, to complete
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you'll find you feel brighter and more
vital when you ensure regular inner
cleanliness with Andrews Liver Salt.

ANDREWS



PAGE FIVE



NO. 100

The Topic



Well this is new year morning

And 1950 too

And everybody's planning

A few great, things to do.
. . *

Last year about the same time
The pianning was the same
But after a whole “twelve-month”
There's nothing new to claim,

. . e * *

Lou said in “Bajan language”
She would contended be

But boys Jet's take a “back-look”
Before you all agree.

She called on Joe in April
For a new bungalow

One built of modern design
To rake the neighbours crow.

Of course Joe made the promise
That he would do his best
To-day Joe has the blue-prints
With nothing more nor less.

: . ¢ .

Well June, just two months later
Right in the dead of night
Lou said, Oh Joe my darling
I love Fleurescent Light
. ‘

It makes the home look

It’s helpful to the eye

And if you love vour darling

Fluerescent light you'll buy.
. . :

modern

This, Joe agreed to give her
And promised to the }

To-day the lights are abssnt
Joe said “Time flies too fast

She called again in August
For a brand new spring bed
Because the next door neighbour
Put these things in her head,

’ : .
Well this Joe gladly gave her
‘Twas a financial load
But early in September
‘Twas landed in River Road

Yes people all do promise
Especially at new year

To give without retaining

Good things and words of cheer.

But sometimes before sunset
The very new year day
The promises are vanished
Forever; we may say

Tis true of politicians

And legislators too

They promise at elections

To make this old world new.



But if they too would look back
And check things undone
They'll say as it’s the custom

Boys “politic ain't fu

But one thing we can t



Wherever we meet “a sp:

Throughout the year 1950

We shall all drink J. & R.
oth TOPIC NOT OUT

We wish all
pies and

Prosperous

the Reade
Drinker f y,& R Rum
New Ye«

sponsored by
J & R BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM

| COOLS - REFRESHES «: INVIGORATES




{

ae

1950

News

From Britain

Our Own ¢

ASTRONOMERS, and other
kinds of experts, who think the
new half century should begin in
1951 have béen shouted down by
newspaper editors,
and, the like; who are encourag-
ing us to “célebrate” the halfway
mark of this 20th century. Taking
a long viewhither and thither—
from Moscow to Hiroshima and
back again — I wonder whether
we have anything to celebrate, I
suppose that the first half of this
century will eventually be mark-
ed down in history books as two

chapters -— one headed “Henry
Ford”, and the other headed
“Joseph Stalin”. Neither of

these chapters—still imaginary—
makes very pleasant reading for
the unconverted. But I think we
have one reason for self-congrat-
ulation at the beginning of 1950.
If you read the books of predic-

tion, some novels and some
treatises, such as H. G. Wells’
“Shape of Things tc Come”, that

have been written in the last 50
years, you can start shaking your-
self by the hand at finding that
you at least exist. Dark Pessim-
ism that miechanical monsters
would get out of hand and refuse
to stop making war when their
masters tell them, have not
proved true. Perhaps, in
the world is a little wiser and a
trifle less inclined to throw itself
into quite pointless wars, than it
was in centuries past. Abandon-
ing this theme of the new half
empty century, we come down to
the prosaic, annual, and almost
trivial matter of reviewing the
past vear and trying to peer into
the present

Looking Back

Even at this short distance a
glance back at the year 1949, and
the course Britain has taken
shows some things that we did
not notice last summer. Putting
it in a sentence, the devaluation
crisis in Britain in 1949 was due
to reckless over-confidence at

home by our politicians, and a
somewhat unwarranted lack of
confidence in Britain felt by
people overseas. I remember that
it was early last year that our
political leaders were talking of

the British “recovery” being com-



plete. This mood of self-satis-
faction almost brought the Labour
Government down, in the sum-
mer, and it certainly has dam-
aged the reputation of the Gov-
ernment’s bes asset—Sir Staf-
ford Cripps. On the other hand,
Jooking back at 1949, there ig
certainly some justification in

bemoaning the extraordinary lack
of confidence in Britain that
countries all over the world are
inclined to In some respects the










crisis last summer was against
all sense and reason A glance
at a few comparisons shows that
half the countries of the world
had much more unbalanced trade,
were not paying their way by
balancing their budget and can
show no comparison with pro-
gress made here in the last three
years But they sailed through
1949 \ 10ut crisi The reason
a burst of over-confidence at
home and a wail of under-confi
dence abroad did uch dar i
that Britain extraordinavily
more sensitive than most coun
tries to international torn

Looking Forward
We cannot expect inything bet
ter than

a choppy sea in the next
few years. If the temporary and
minute recession in American
business in 1949 threw us off bal-
ance, What would a Digger storm
do? This,~ef course, brings me
to the politital problem of 1950

Old Moore's Almanac avoids pre-
dicting the date of the General
Election and is fairly cautious to-

wards the end of the year about
all political matters! I will not
try to do better than the eld lady
All I can attempt is a few cau-
tiously chose remark on the
political scene just at the
moment. First, I think we should

be glad that the extremes in
politics here Are both remarkably
weak Of the two Communists
in the House of Commons, one is
almost certain to lose his seat,
and the other, the merry and re-
doubtable William Gallagher, will
have a stiff fight. The Conserva-
tive Party has a minute “extreme
right wing” that is approximate
in political attitude with the big
“right wing” parties in many
Continental countries.» Four and
a half years in opposition has
helped the Conservative Party to
lake itself seriousty and to laugh
at its few flambuoyant “last
ditches.” The same four and a
half years have mellowed the
Labour Party into a responsible
Parliamentary reformist organi-
sation. If the election brings them
back again I would be surprised
if they «ing the Red Flag—as they
did in 1949—when taking their
Seats in the House of Commons!
Of course this fact that the two
principal parties in Britain could
be described as “centre left” and
“centre right—with precious little
room. for the Liberals—is com-
pletely obscured by the election-
eering going on at the moment
We are far too near to the general
election to be able to see what
the real issues are from reading
the « newspapers Personally

1950,§

‘orrespondent

‘hink ‘hat the
voter is much
newspaper.
Party

average British
wiser than his
He will vote for the
slightly to left of centre

broadcasters or slightly to right of centre as

he chooses. I doubt if the aver-
age voter will believe that voting
Labour means “red ruin” or the
Socialist paradise, or believe that
voting Conservative means “lettin;
the people free” or “good times
for bloated Capitalists,”
Pre Election Jitters

One of the less pleasant signs of
a coming election is increasing
Government querulousness From
the way Ministers speak you
would think they were persecuted,
Herbert Morrison thinks the law
must be altered at the earliest op-
portunity if it cannot be stretched
to seotch Mr. Cube and Sir Loin.





(Sir Loin, Campaigning at the
bu‘cher’s, has joined Mr. Cube
who defends privately refined
Sugar on the outside of every

pa" kage.) According to Lord Addi-
80, periodicals should lay off the
gro.ndnuts scheme. Sir Hartley
Sh weross is shocked at the Con-
fer vative Party claiming an inter-
est in Child Welfare. Dr. Dalton





waits to curb money lenders all
beca the Stock Exchange is
marking down the price of the
hares that bear his name This

“tone of voice should wear off when
the election rises to more racous
tones. A little angry shouting is
bette: than this peevishness.

On the other side, I think that
he campaign of Mr. Cube has
ver-reached itself. It seems that

customer cannot get his sugar
10w without a dose of political
propaganda as well, unless he de-
mands of his grocer that the sugar
be weighed and put into a new
bag Conservatives rightly com-
jlain if the Government uses pub-
lic organisations for Party pur-

poses—such as the B.B.C. and the
Central Office of Information I
think they would complain even

more if « political slogan were put

on iy, a postage stamp—particu-
larly if no stamps could be bought
without political: slogans.



POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER










The Baiance of Advantage









“\ great deal that is printed
verseas about the present state of
B ems to me to be under
e the remarkable
achiey nt « he last four years
(r on respe the material
) perity of ain very high
o-da) The fact that many peo
pl vhole classes, not the ve
rich—are very n r to-day
S wcll-known general
level of employment health, child
‘Cifare, and ever ing is in
proving steadily But the intangi
tle, unaccountable wealth of Brit
tall has certainly declined while

the present Government has been







in office. Again and again, I am
forcibly reminded that our pres

tige in the world is not what it
was Visitors from Eastern coun

tries dismiss us as an almost ban}

rupt nation. Visitors from our
colonies are loyal—but de paiing
Mr. Bevin's foreign policy in the
Middle East has lost potential
friends in what was, in 1945, re

garded as a British area In Eu

rope our wartime allies are sick
of what they call our smugness
and consider themselves let down
It is certain that when Winston
Churchill left office all the world
talked of the Big Three Now,
after five years, all they think oft
js, at the most, the “Big Two and a
Half”—-and we are the Half. The
Labour Party is inclined to claim
that good progress at home is all to
its credit and weakness abroad
was “inevilable’ The Conserva

tives reverse this, and imply that

any Government could have g
post war Britain this degree of
prosperity but another government
would have kept up Churchillian
prestige.

Predictions for the New Year

My correspondent
that the Oxford versus Cambridge
Boat Race will be won by Britain
again this year. ‘

My private eye in the film in-
dustry Suggests that it wouldn’t be
a bad thing if the British film
industry did break down in July
as Mr, Rank threatens. “Break
down” wouldgfobably mean fewer
British films, better British films
and the delight of seeing again
Some older good films in the loca!

ven

Sports says

Healthy People i
TEETH WiHeR





S.W. African Natives
Fear For Their Land

Says Rev. Michael Scott

(From Our London Correspondent)

There was

LONDON, (By Mail)

a tinge of sadness in his voice when the Rev.
Michael Seott, a former London curate and now

a mission-

ary in South Africa, told me the shocking story of how South

African natives had been robbed
- ————-+

‘ °

Short-Sighted
* .
Oil Policy?
LONDON, (By Mail)

OIL CIRCLES in London will
not comment § at present on
Britain’s devision to import no
more dollar oil next year until
surplus stocks held by British
oil companies are used up. But
the private opinion of at least
one oil company in this country
is that though this wili help in
the drive to save dollars it is
nevertheless a short-sighted pol-
icy

Rritain’s decision has already
provoked vigorous reaction in
the United States. American oil
interests over the past twelve
months have been increasingly
alarmed by the rapidity with
which British oil production and
refining tacilities have expanded,
They have also been concerned
by the prospective loss of mar-
kets for dollar oil owing to the
recent two-way trade pacts which
Britain has concluded with
Argentina and Sweden. (Under
the trade pacts Britain barters
some of her oil for’ Swedish or
Argentine products). The US.
State Department say they
appreciate that Britain is mak-
ing the present cut to save dol-

lar but they complain that it
will hit the American oil com-
panies hard,
End Speculation
Coniirmation by the British
Gvuvernment that they intend w
Unpose restricuons on the market-

iny of fuel
’
Auierican

Oll and petrol py
companies in the New
year puts an end to three days ol!

pecuwwalion on the reported oil!
cuts Which Britain was proposing
at the anglo-U.S. oil taiks um

Washington, Discussions are still
£0ing on beiween the British and
Goveraments—on the long-
probiem of the cost of dol-

US

term



4ar Oll——but the policy seems to
be settled.
Dollar oil imports constitute the
i item in British doliar ex-
venditure, The British Fuel &
“ower Ministry estimate that for
the year 1950, dollars spent on

Oi i amount to $625,000,000, of

Which $350,000,000 would go to
American oil companies selling
to Britain

As a result of increased oil
production — and the expected
compleuon of another British
reinery in the Middle East next

June—British oil companies hope
to have built up a considerable
oil surplus in 1950. British oil
importers will be asked to absorb



this surplus before buying fron
dollar source In this way th
Government expects to save 5 (
/V per cent of the net dollar “out-

I "in 1950

An official statement issued by
the Ministry of Fuel & Powei
acids, however, that the Govern-
ment j ready, to consider pro-
posals “to minimise any imi edi
ite practical difficulty to the US.
i companies,” This is one of the
Subjects now under discussion in
the Washington oil talks

Ce ienting on Britain's ne¢



the “Financial Time:

( poliey







It may be expected that

ericcn oil interests, and espec-

i e politically powerful lobby
of the independent producer
will ng a good deal of pressut
to bear in order to preserve thei

present share of the world oil

trade But the over-riding
aeration (for Britain) mus

I the conservation of our s¢ ld

id dollar reserves, and no othe r

t can be allowed to take

recedence,”

Mexieo Wants
Loan For Oil

Fro Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, (By Mail)
Antonio Caritlo Flores,
the National Financi-
ero of Mexico, recently arrived in
Washington to reopen negotiations
ith American authorities for $200
million oil development loan

Senor

Clrector of

It will be remembered _ that
Carlier this month the director
#eneral of Pemex, the Mexican
Government’s oi] monopoly, stated
that the new oilfields which ex-

plorations

were bringing ‘to light
n Mexico might enable the coun-

try’s oil production to be even-
y doubled,

To pay for its oil development

programme, the Mexican Govern-

ment approaghed the United

States on the subject of a loan,
but the American Government
were not forthcoming in this. The
present visit of Senor Flores to
Washington js presumably a fur-

ther attempt by Mexico to per-
uade the Americans to give them
a loan

For the time being the Export-

Import Bank is not showing much
enthusiasm for Senor Flores's pro-
posals

ep their




For white teeth, use the PEROXIDR
tooth paste—use Macleans every day, |

a

Bis

}



|
t

of their Jand.

He said that the natives made
up % of South Atricas population,
aod that by a policy of “whole-
sale robbery” tne white South
Africans had reduced them to
Ownership ot only 13% of the
land.

The natives of South West
Africa believed, and they had
every ground to do so, that if their
country was incorporated with
South Africa, their land would be
stolen from them also.

“This is their great fear” said
Michael Scott, “this is why they
wish to be administered by the
Trusteeship Council of the U.N.O.”

He then put the case against
S.W. Africa being incorporated in
the Union to me, as he had before
the U.N.O. at Lake Success a few

weeks before. §.W. Africa, he
said. was formerly a German
colony.

It was taken by stealth and
superior force from the original
inhabitants, and colonised by
Germans.

They took away most of the
frazing land from the natives, and,
impressed by the ease of their
conquest, they began to develop
in Africa the idea of the “Master
Race”, an idea which became the
basis of Facism.

After the first World War, S.W.



| POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER








COVENT GARDEY

SALOME







Africa

was taken away. from
(Germany and placed under the
mandate of the Union of South

Atrica by the League of Nations.

The Rev. Scott said that the
South Africans now wanted to
incorporate S.W. Africa into the
Union against the wishes of the
native inhabitants, and that they
had refused to U.N.O’s
resolutions that S.W. Africa should
° acministered by the Trustee-
hip Council

neces t

No Permission

“IT hed hoped that some of the
S.W. African Chiefs have
een able to go to Lake Success
‘to tell U.N.O. that the native
pypulation was not in favour ol
their country becoming part of
the Union, but the Malan Govern-

would



ment would not allow them to
It { t country So I had to
At the U.N.O. he -
i i that partly hi



evidence the General’



Assembiy
the





lave decided to ask Inter-
tional Court at the Hague it
outh Africa has the right to in-
orporate §.W. Africa
Michael Scott, who u ed to
preach in the shanty-town d rt
id Johannesbur knows all
about the evils of th Sout
African land policy

He told me that the policy of
king away the natives’ land had
sulted in the overstocking o1
tie native reserves, and this ‘n
turn had led to soil erosion in the
reserves, 7

Ce hsequently every year more
iid more natives were being
criven out of the reserves, to live

in the filthy shanty towns around
the big cities where they found
employment as
ks ete,

porters, butvers





Dim lighting is bad — for
for your general well-being,



BRIDGETOWN,

~ REPRESENTING THE GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. LT



with Osram, the bright, cheerful

THE CA

What I don’t like about George

is that no matter whatever the
party in power in the House of
Assembly does, he always says
it is wrong. Mark you, I don’t
mean to say that I am one of
those bigoted people who think

that any party in power is always
right. Heaven knows I would be
the last person to place myself in
the ridiculous position of admit-
ting anything so absurd; or to
admit that even, if by chance, it
did happen to do the right thing,
it could ever do it in the right
way. What I really mean to say
is, that it annoys me when George
takes it upon himself to point
out to me, me of all people, where
the Governrfient is wrong about
anything.

George’s. style of criticism
always gives me the impression
of a great hulking bully out to
chastise a worthy body of men
who, with the best intentions,
are merely treading the path that
leads to the place to which good
intentions usually lead. After all,
I have every reason to flatter my-,
self that I am perfectly capable
of rapping the knuckles of the
Government whenever they de-
serve rapping. And I must say
that when George gets on his high
horse and begins, before I can
get a word in, to abuse the Govy-~
ernment, it is enough to irritate
a saint, much less a fair-minded
person like myself. When he
begins throwing his weight about
like this, the only effect it has on
me is to cause me at once to dive
headlong into the fray on the side
of the Government. The fact that
I had come prepared te say exact-
ly what he so inadequately tries
to say, not only puts me at an
unfair disadvantage, but makes
me more determined than ever
to defend the poor ill-treated
Government from his unjust and
uncalled for attack, What I find
so irritating and object to most is,
that George, without actually
saying so, has a mean underhand
way of creating the impression
that if he was the leader of a
House composed of other men
Ike George, the House would not
only always come to right decis-
ivns, but also find the right means

cf putting those decisions into
actual practice.
Everyone knows how difficult

it is to contradict the other chap
ebout what he hasn’t actually
said in words. They can there-
fore easily understand how irri-
tating it is when George adopts
aa attitude that puts you suddenly
in the position of having to argue
ezainst what you had evevy right
to believe to be your own origi-
nal idea. One puts up with that
Sort of thing from a woman be-
cause one knows that it’s natural
for her to try and have the first
as well as the last word. But no
reasonable male of the species
could be expected to tolerate this
feminine technique being adopted
by one of his own sex.

That is why, after the tropical
disturbance, I went to the club
in the hope of meeting George
and of having an opportunity of
tel'ing him what I thought about
the neglect of the Government and |
everyone else who ought to have
done anything to prevent what |
happened or to relieve the situa- |
tion after it happened. But before
I had time to begin, in fact before
I had more than half swallowed

my preliminary drink, George |
started off ‘with: “Look, Bertie,
have you ever heard of a more

scandalous state of affairs ?”

“What affairs?” I asked warily.
haven't
neglect

“My

heard

giddy
about

aunt,
the

you

of the



ANGLING CLUB










“The only person who doesn't
tave about his catches is his
wife-—they live in a prefab.”
London Express Service








your eyes, for your nerves, ~ ~

Light up mn and smile



THE CITY GARAGE co.

BARBADOS ®

0., OF ENGLAND \





a

CARPING CRITIC |

By C.

G.

Government to remove the people
from the flooded area before it
became flooded? The lack of fore-
sight shown in allowing them to



build their houses in that danger-
ou area, The incorrect news
given out. The failure to canal-
ize *

“Bah!” I said, cutting him short.
“Canalize me foot. You're talking
through your hat. Do you know
what you people who criticise
merely for the sake of being
critical remind me of?” Then
before he could answer I told
him, “You remind me of the sort
of woman who slaps an innocent
child for having narrowly escaped
being run over by a _ careless
driver.” George gave his famous
imitation of an open-mouthed
codfish and then began, “But—
St ei”

“Bui, but, nothing,” I broke in
sharply, “the woman can’t beat
up the driver of the car so she
relieves her anxiety by beating
the wretched child; and you get
the wind up when Nature sends
us a storm and ag you can’t beat
up Nature you immediately try
to take it out of the wretched
Government.”

“Ah, I might have known you’d
take the side of this rotten Gov-
ernment,” he said losing his tem-
per and raising his voice. “Of ali
the double crossing sods I ever
met you’re about... .”

“Now, now, George,” I inter-
rupted with restrained but un-
mistakeable firmness, “You know
perfectly well I’m never on the
side of the Government when it
is in the wrong. But I’ll be hang-
ed if I let you blame them un-
fairly. And while we’re on the
subject, may I ask what you your-
self have done to help? For in-
stance, have you sent a sub to the
‘Advocate’ relief fund?”

“Well—er—not yet,” he said.
“You see, what with one thing
end another I’ve been rather busy
these last few days, Have you?”

“Have I?” I sneered, in a tone
one of the first subscribers might
have used, and then made a men-
tal note to do go that evening.

“Well”, he said, “you needn’t
look so darned noble and virtuous
about it.”

U.fortunately, when I got home
1 1orgot all about sending in my
Ccntribution; and the next morn-
ing when I saw George’s name in
the iist it was too late for me to
Go it then and so let him know
i had not done it days ago. When
hext we met, George greeted me
with: “Hullo, Bertie, I hope
youve seen that I have sent in
my sub,”

“Yes, I’ve seen

it,” I replied |

dryly. “So have lots of others who |

prcterred to do so anonymously.”

Oh quite, quite,” he said in a
nasty suggestive voice. “And no
doubt lots of others have got
credit for anonymous subs they |
never made,”

That shows you the sort of
fel'ow George is, Always tries to
insinuate non-existent faults in

cthers. Must try to have the last
werd. No wonder I get so annoyed
w..h him sometimes,



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hy

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LG

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After tests on 1,384 women for 14 days, 39 doctors (
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COMPLEXION

Hoke
SUNDAY, JANUARY

LS LL







l,

1950

ee
eS





ca eee

a

FOR BOY OR GIRL this cosy cardigan will fit a child of one and a half to two and a

half years.



It needs four ounces of three-ply or

Child’s Cardigan And
Jersey

Cardigan

MATERIALS
4 ounces of three-ply
3 ounces of baby wool.

wool.



| pair each of No, 9 and No. 12
neeaies.
5 medium-siz
MEASUREME

Width all round under arms
23 inches.

Length from shoulder 12
inches.

Length of undersleeve seam
10 inches ’
TENSION
One pattern (12 stitches) and 9
rows equal one inch (No. 9 nee-
dies).
ABBREVIATIONS:
K—knit; p—purl; sts—
stitches; ins—inches; tog—to-
gether; SKPO—slip one, knit
one, pass slipped stitch over;
m—make a Stitch by bringing
wool to front of work before a
knit stitch and by wrapping wool
round the needle before a purl
stitch; C4—slip two stitches on
to a spare needle in front of

work, knit 2, then knit 2 off
spare needle; Garter st—each

row knit.
BACK

Using No. 12 needles, cast on 84
sts. and work in kl, pl rib for 24
rows.

Change to No. 9 needles
pattern as. follows:

**I1st row.—K2, * p2, k4, Repeat
from * ending p2, k2.

and

2nd row.—P2 * k2, p4. Repeat
from * ending k2, p2.
$rd row.—K2, * p2, C4, p2, k4.

Repeat from * ending
”
4th row.—As 2nd row.

Repeat Ist and 2nd rows twice
more, * *

Repeat these 8 pattern rows until
werk measures 8 ins.

SHAPF ARMHOLE

Keeping in pa;tern:

Cast off 5 sts. at beginning of
next 2 rows, then k2 tog. at each
end of following 2 rows. (69 sts.).

Continue on these sts, in pat-
tern until work measures 12 ins.

SHAPE SHOULDER ,

Cast off 10 sts. at beginning ~f
rext 4 rows. Cast off remaining
Sts.

p2, C4, p2,

RIGHT FRONT

(Buttonholes this hide for Girl—
omit for Boy)

Using No
50 sts.

Ist row.—K4,
from * to end.

2nd row.—* kl, pl. Repeat from
* to within 4 sts., k4. Repeat these
2 rows, once more.

5th row.—(Make a buttonhole)
kl, k2tog., ml, kl, * kl, pl. Repeat
from * to end,

6th row.—* KI, pl. Repeat from
* to within 4 sts., k4. Repeat Ist and
2nd rows nine times more.

Change to No. 9 needles and
pattern as follows, making button-
holes, as before, at 24, 44, 64
and 83 ins.

Ist row.—-K4, * p2, k4. Repeat
from * ending p2, k2.

2nd row.—P2, * k2, p4.
from * ending k6.

12 needles, cast on

* kl, pl, Repeat

Repeat

LONDON, (By Mail).

About the only time a British
* woman does not. give away the
social group to which she belongs
is when she is stripped to a
Swim suit, according to Anne
Edwards, fashion editress on th:
London “Daily Express.”

With only a six-inch chart
Edwards to-day ruthlessly dis-
sected women into four classes
and destroyed the age-old illusion
of the “mysterious sex.”

Listing 20 personal preferences
which take a woman, Edwards
Claimed to be able to brand the

titled. rich, bohemian or subur-
hanite femme by means of the
chart,

The Honourable Miss trom

One the stately homes of England
_ a cashmere sweater,
by

suit

family tailor and crocodile
Shoes. She favours a long bod,
One string of peal pearls and
hekimental badge,
Conversation includes phrase
€ chaps” for escorts t
i vacatn
Pp
on the hai t
Silver rame and
ires Indiffere

3rd row.—
Repeat from
k2,
4th row.—As 2nd row
Repeat Ist and 2nd rows twice
more,
Repeat these 6 pattern rov
til work measures 8 ins.
SHAPE ARMHOLES
Keeping in pattern, with border:
Cast off 8 sts., at opposite edge
c border then k2tog., at same edge
each row until 36 sts. remain,
SHAPE NECK
Right side fucing:
Next row.—K4, SKPO, work in
pattern to end.

K4, p2, C4, p2, k4,
ending p2, C4, p2,

Next row.—Pattern to within
4 sts., k4.

Repeat last 2 rows until 24 sts.
remain,

Continue on these sts., until
work measures 12 ins.

SHAPE SHOULDER

Commencing at armhole edge,

cast off 10 sts., at beginning of

rext and alternate row

Continue in garter st., on 4 bor-
der sts., for 16 more rows. Cast
off

LEFT FRONT

(Buttonholes this side for Boy—
omit for Girl).

Using No. 12 needles, cast on 50
sts.

Ist row.— * K1, pl. Repeat from
* ending k4.

2nd row.—K5, * pl, kl.
from * ending pl.

Repeat these 2 rows once more.

5th row.—(Make Buttonhole): *
Kl,pl. Repeat from * to within four
sts., kl, ml, k2tog. kl.

6th row.—-K5, pl, kl.
from * ending pl.

Repeat Ist and 2nd rows nine
times more.

Change fo No. 9 needles and
pattern as follows, making button-
holes, as before, at 24, 44, 63, and
@} ins.

Ist row.—K2,
from * to end.

2nd row.—K6, * p4, k2. Repeat
from ending p2.

3rd row.—K2, * p2, c4, p2, is4.
Repeat frm to end.

4th row.—K6, * p4,
from * ending p2,

Repeat 1st and 2nd rows twice
more.

Repeat these 8 pattern row@ yn-~-
til work measures 8 ins.

SHAPE ARMHOLES
Keeping in pattern;
Commencing at opposite edge to

border, cast off 8 sts., then k2tog.
at same edge each row until 36 sts.
remain,

Repeat

Repeat

p2, k4. Repeat

k2. Repeat

SHAPE BACK

Right side facing:

Next row.—Pattern to within 6
sts., k2 tog., k4.

Next row.—K4, pattern to end.

Repeat these 2 rows until 24 sts.
remain.

Continue on these sts. until work
measures 12 ins.

SHAPE SHOULDER
As first side.
SLEEVES

Using No. 12 needles, cast on 48

ets, and work in kl, pl rib for 2 ins.

three ounces of baby wool to make.



Change to No.
work in pattern
* * to * *, increasing one st., at
each end of every 8th row until
g.eeve measures 10 ins.

SHAPE HEAD

Keeping in pattern:

9 needles and

as Back, from

K2tog. at each end of next 20
rows. Cast offi
TO MAKE UP
Join, side, shoulder and sleeve
scams. Sew in sleeves, placing

centre of head of sleeve to shoul

dear seam. Join together bands
from fronts and sew to back of
Neck. Sew on buttons to match
button-holes. Press all seams.
JERSEY
Materials: 4 ounces of three-ply
wool, or 3 ounces of baby wool.

Same needles as for Cardigan. 2
small buttons,

Measurements: As for Cardigan.

Tension: As for Cardigan.

Abbreviations: As for Cardigan.

Back: Work as Back of Cardi-
gan.

Right side facing:

Next row,—Work
pattern, turn.

Next row,—P2tog., work in pat-
tern to end.

Next row,—Pattern to within 2
sts. of division, k2tog.

Next row,—P2tog.,
end.

Repeat last 2 rows, until 20 sts.
remain.

Front: Work as Back of Cardi-
gan until armhole shaping have
been completed (68 sts.)

Continue on these sts.
work measures 104% ins.

SHAPE NECK
Continue on these sts. in pattern
until work measures 12 ins.
SHAPE SHOULDER
Commencing at neck edge:
Next rew.—P)0, turn; knit back.
Next rew,—k10, p10.

31. sts. in

pattern to

until

Next row,—Cast off 10 sts., k3,
k2tog., ml, k5.

Cast off knitwise.

Return to remaining sts., slip

first 6 sts. on to a safety pin, work
in pattern to end,

Next row,—Pattern to within 2
sts., p2tog.

Next row,—K2tog.,
end.

Repeat last 2 rows until 20 sts.
remain,

Continue on these sts. until work
measures 12 ins.

Commencing at armhole edge,
east off 10 sts. at beginning of next
and alterns*e row.

wxCK BAND ;

Join Right shoulder seam. With
right side facing and commencing
at Left front shoulder, rejoin wool
and, using No. !2 needles, pick up
and knit 26 sts. to sts. on safety
pin; work in ki, pl, rib across
these sts.; pick up and knit 26 sts,
to right shoulder and finally work
in kl., pl rib across 28 sts. of Back.
(86 sts.) .

Work 3 rows in rib.

Next row,—Rib 3, ml, k2tog,., rib
to end. oy

Next row,—Rib. Cast off loosely

in rib.

pattern to

SLEEVES

Work as Cardigan Sleeves.

buttonholes. Press all seams.
TO MAKE UP

Join together 10 cast off sts. of
Left shoulder. Join side and sleeve
seams. Sew in sleeves, placing
centre oi head of sleeve to shoulder
seams, Sew on buttons to match
buttonholes. Press all seams.

Eee ne

Women Know Yourselves

Spring Fashion Preview

:f a good time is a “houseparty”’
and she likes to drink champagne.

Won't Marry
She refuses to marry anyone
from the other groups and her
children will be Charles and
Sarah.
Her “To stay as

aim is life?

she is.”

Littie Miss Rich has a luxury
appartment with girl friend; pre-
fers a shortcut with two-string
earl choker; refers to “the man
for escort: “Riviera” for vacation
and “the end” for criticism.

Clotnes are black suit, little
vith feather and suede shoes.
Photographs are usually a close-

of the head by a theatrical

‘notographer white leather frame,
slack dress and pearls. She is

,tevested” in foreign politics.

Her notepaper 1s embossed «ud

she likes ballet and the theatre.
Martini is the drink
Rolling stones are out as hus-









ands and besus from Society
ellectual group preferred
istopher and Pat will be 1
That Wee etc
peasant biouses, CiOan
noes; wears i Ya
g, stiaight or Edwardian st)
Jeweller includes amber,
ade neck! with
ilver clasps. Likes readi

calls her escort “a very dea
friend” and takes a vacation in
“olde world cottages” in the
puntry.

A Soul Mate

re

To criticize she uses “abysmal”
and lives at the old miil” with
a soul mate. She prefers a bust
of herself made by a friend and
is absorbed in politics.

Notepaper is handwritten 1
coloured ink and she likes old
French and German movies. She
refuses to marry “steady” types
and rer children will be Torquil

nd Melissa. Her aim in life 1s
“recognition,” and she drinks
‘snteresting litte wines.”

fives In a semi-
detached house “the Larches
with her family; wears brown
herringbone suits and hand-knit
jumpers. Skirts are shorter and
pearls artificial. Her escort is the
“boy friend” and she likes the
Coney Island vacation. ‘
Her idea of a good time is an
American movie and she drinks
gin and lime. She uses the local
photographer and wears 4 brides-
maid’s dress for the cecasion. Un-
steady types are ruled out a
husbands and the children will be
yrol-Anne and David.

Miss Suburb



Her aim in life is a “home
i
tress Edwards doe |
ex} why all four ec
ceording to her chart, unanimous-

cotton dresses a
vacation wear

LD

cnoose

ns for
far OY



SUNDAY

—.

Spring Fashion
Pre-view



MATERIALS “include lots of
gaberdines There are also
printed pure silks for frocks and
a fascinating spotted. silk shan-

tung, which washes well, but has
a pleasing stiff look Utility
whipcords seem to have killed
the demand for this material in
the model range.

Other materials: Reversible
spot cottons, patterned sea island
cotton, Swis Broderie Anglaise
and dark West African printed
cotton and rainproof cotton. A
pleasing contrast is a tie silk
tunie jacket combined with a
barathea skirt.

Poison Ivy Green

COLOURS include all shades of
brown and grey, soft lime
green, mauve pink, a_ brighter
clear green called Poison Ivy,
net in pastel shaded colourings
over a black silk evening ba'let
skirt soft water blues and all
shades of yellow from citron to
deep mustard gold.

Tandon Fernrese Service



3s
«* oe

GAKISTMAS and the

brating the year’s end and the arrival of 1950





ADVOCATE

Rupert a



bag a ot the
aight Mes. : brings bus
breakfast in bed, oats tee sits
by tim. * That Mare’s Nest was

the most “on See

Mr. Bear. that
I'm not sure that we were not
drearmng last -— or whether we
ceally saw it, ['m going by days

Figure It Ouse

THE slope of a long hill is the
same all the way. A bus runs haif-
way up and back again in 10
minutes’ running time. But it takes
'2 minutes to run from bottom t
top. Then in what time should t
run from top to bottom?

“saqgnupur anoy ur uMop
Ue SaPWUPU XIS UT dn AwM-srey
“Ly “SA NTL LURIT swomnied

ey




Aw.

Â¥
&
W YKAK are the same the

in Australia.

How Good A Deteetive
Are You?

MAJOR DOEXX was off duty
and off airborne division’s training
centre when it happened, so his
death was a case for civil author-
ities,

His wife’s telephone call brought
County Detective 3rown 4nd
Deputy Sheriff Jones to the bunga-
low at Oceanside, 25 miles from
the military reservation.

Mrs, Doexx, amid spasms
grief, told the officers;

“We lived here together until
last month. We had a quarrel, He
was jealous of every man I ever
talked to, I went home to my
mother. He called me many times,
begging me to return. This even-
ing, when he phoned me, he said
he’d commit suicide if I didn’t
come and talk to him.

ol

“When I got here, he begged me
not to get a divorce and to live
with him again. When I refused
he got a rifle out of the closet and
said he’d kill himself, I told hin
he was just being dramatic He
said, ‘Oh, you think so!’ then put
the muzzle to his head and placec
the toe of his boot on the trigge
There was an explosion. I fainted.
When I came to, I found he was
dead.”

Detective Brown stared at mud
on the Major’s heavy army boots
and went out to pick up the phone
and. get the operator, Then he
asked Deputy Jones to join him
outside. “Two things make me
think this was murder,” he told
Jones.

“Ts ene of them her having
blood on her dress?” Jones asked.

“She’d naturally take hold of
him to see if he was dead. No, it

was something else.”
One of the things which made

him suspicious is plainly stated
above. The other was the result

IL,






* Hermione’ by Clarks
Available at leading shee shops

With several widths to every size

choice of women who demand that Fashion fits them well.

of his phone call. Can you detec.
one and guess the other?

‘wry JOYS peYy “BHuryyrey ‘p
sur} dn yo ed oO} puRgsHy 104 OF
4ad 0} pata} ays Apueseddy eo
peut pkey Xxe0q “Sa JEU} Puno; U\oIg

DATPAJA ‘SPsodar S10} B1adO aoUBysIp Nuc

ayy WA Suryoeyo Aq ynq tsewity ru
12y paleo py pewyelo 8YysS pres oy
se ‘agit Oy2 JO PABNS sAVAA A) [[euIs oY
DPISU, 19BSTI} ey, UO }OOG B YONS JO a0}
ay} pedetd saey },UpfRoo aH s00q AULIV
SAvay a1OmM Xxe0q JOreW LOFNLOS



r -"

Tongue Tester
WITH “apt alliteration’s artfu
aid,” the following provides
double test. First, see if
read it through rapidly alou
without tripping your tongue
Second, see if you can memorize
it. You'll pever have to wonder
what letter the next word starts
with.

Sudden swallows
ming,
Sunset’s slowly spreacing shade
Silvery songsters sweetly singing,
Summer’s soothing serenade.

you ca

suiftly skim-

Susan Simpson. strolled sedately,
stifling sobs, suppressing sighs.

Seeing Siephen Slocum, stately
She stopped, showing some sur-

prise,

“Say,” said Stephen, “sweetest
sigher;

Say shall Stephen spouseless
stay?”

Susan seeming somewhct shyer,
Showed submissiveness straight-
way.

Summer’s season slowly stretches,
Susan Simpson Slocum she—
So she signed some _ simple

sketches—
Soul sought soul successfully.

Six Septembers Susan swelters!
Six sharp seasons snow supplies;
Susan's satin sofa shelters
Six small Slocums side by side.



THE SHOES WITH THE FULL CHOICE P' ‘DTH

FASHION-FIT PERFECTION

* Clarks

, Skyline shoes ave the inevitable

They

are styled with impeccable yrace by Clarks, famous the world over

ior fine quality footwear.

LOCAL AGENTS {LEC Rt

0 BARBADOS

oe

Nest—44

ro

Find The Number

THERE is a certain number
with four even digits. The first

two digits compose a number one-

half

by
twe

of the number represented
the last two digits. The middle
» digits when added equai the

last, the second digit is twice the
first, and the third is half the last

dig

worid over,





Birthday Greetings

it. What is the number?
VUST® INOT INOZ OMB ST 2 uonnyosg

< At 65666666 SO
FE ELOCE ECP FSS SS SAE AGO OS SS EFF

OPO SO SOF SS SPOS PFS EPPA PFI FFP PPADS

4

hese chuaren were cele-

OO et byb Ab tryb bb bbb bff 6A ID







HAPPY BIRTHDAY to Phyl!
Archer and Mary Brathwaite whc
elebrate their Birthdays thi
week,

New Member

ANTONIA SEALY

1¢
.
‘ae
Letter Enigma {5
. %
. wr >

WITHOUT my 1, 5, 7, I am al&
garment R

Without my 2, 4, 5,7, I ama %
poet. x

Without .my 1, 4, 7, I am a %
charactex ?

7” s

Without my 4, 5, T am a poetic] &
reface *

Without my 5, 7, I am an in- %
quiry *

With my oe a BS Bae
am a difficult matte 1%

es
qoid ‘weord $
Wq ‘AGO Ruroq ‘asinoo jo 19uiK >
weqoid st prom 4 Us WNPOS ‘OS
is







PAGE SEVEN



SMOKERS CAN SMILE..

You can light up without fear
of smoke-stained teeth, if you
use Nicota, the toothpaste that
lights up your smile. Nicota,
with ics clean, fresh flavour,
offsets unsightly nicotine stain,
yet contains no harmful abra~
sive. Nicota keeps your teeth
really white from morning to
night. Get a tube today,

wy







a



[ee oeee en | MAKERS
PE aan t3 3. eo

CL Say Seat ee Eee



NICOTA
SMOKERS’ TOOTHPASTE
whifens your teeth—



“a

brightens your
smile



NOTICE.

Our Custom
are asked
from Tuescc

our Broad S|

closed for Lu

and Friends
note that as
3rd January
will be

t Store

h from 12 noon

to lp.m. instead of from
ram. © 2 sae oe a
present.

CENTRAL

FOUNDRY

LD
4 °














the \NIIEl



aq MAW,

ey

7 WEIR



Your Cost of Living Bonus for JAMAICAN ORANGE JUICE...... $ .44
Tuesday & Wednesday TRINIDAD CRAPE FRUIT JUICE... .23
Usually Now TINS PEARS-—-Large ........ Jl
Australian Bartlett Pears ee giles: 16 Ss hall
Large Tins Of 46 , PEACHES—Large 57
, APRICOTS—Large ........ lll
: e “ ’
Bottles Mincemeat____6 bi J BROT BAe 2 ae
Mckwans Red LabelBeer_27 33 a
» 1
$5.00 per Carton
OF $9 00 p QUAKER OATS—Tins............ $.
“ ‘ Large Pkts. 89
JACOB'S CREAM CRACKERS .... $1.39 : fei. ‘aj
PEAK FREAN'S TWIGLETE, . «..... 1.22 | TINS ANCHOVEY FILLETS ....... 19
PEAK FREAN’S V.ARTINI . i
Sting iit. se TINS VIENNA SAUSAGES ....... Sf
CADBURY'S CHOCOLATE
BISCUITS © ate SBR 1.48 Meat Department
FRY'S DELUXE CASKET BEST AUSTRALIAN BEEF
CHOCOLATES .......... 4.16
FULLE®’S SHORTBREAD 1.45 - MOTTON: ay
2S te ise hae la ‘ | ; z 7" ~s
» LIVE
—. t a TRIPE
SOUTH AFRICAN PLUM JAM 2ib $ .5 er
4 [i APRICOT JAM " " OX TAILS
RO eds 53 Specially Selected Milk Fed
TURKEY 14—16}bs ‘ th
. s PINEAPPLE < om
IAM 2Ib ...... 59 $1.00 ver Ib
j a MELON & @
GINGER JAM

216





43 |



SCOTT'S LIQUEUR RUM

“COLONNADE STORES

LL ——.—





444 644 4
SSO OO OOS S SOPOT EE SED SSS CLF LOSSLESS Sr

464466

OSS

4 4, < < n>
SOO OSS OOS SO SOO SOS SL OCB SBE SSG SS BSS OSSOSOO*





























Published by The Advocate Co. Ltd., 34, Broad St., Bridgetown

Sunday, January 1, 1950

The New Year

TO-DAY is the day set apart for the
making of good resolutions, and even
though some of the resolutions are doomed
to be broken before the holiday season
ends yet the practice cannot, on this
account, be condemned out of hand. It
is a season of stock-takng, and at least
the fact that an individual has pondered
over his short-comings and has decided to
turn over a new leaf in the coming year is a
sign that he is conscious of his faults and is
entitled to an entry on the credit side in
the final record.

So, also is it a time for Governments and
Legislatures to take stock and to plan ior
the future. Here in Barbados there is ur-
gent need for good resolutions and the pre-
paration of a planned programme for the
coming year. Action must take the place
of a surfeit of aimless words; unending
debates on technical details must give way
to practical measures; and a definite
attempt must be made to bring home to
one and all the necessity to settle essentials
before such delectable pastimes .as “Back
to Africa”, “Christmas Bonus for Civil Ser-
vants”, “Raincoats for Writ Servers” or
“Nylons for Nurses” can be thoroughly en-
joyed. Above all the Legislature must
guard against a failing that is all too preva-
lent in the present Labour Government‘and
the present Legislature. While everyone
expects Legislators to be cautious yet tim-
idity can be carried to excess and has in the
past cost this island dearly.

Almost one hundred years ago Bridge-
town was on the verge of having a deep
water harbour. The plans and specifica-
tions were prepared, the Legislature de-
bated the project at length, but nothing
materialised. That plan remains in the
archives of the Secretariat. Since then
several other deep water harbour plans
have been prepared at great expense and
have suffered a similar fate. The public is
beginning to wonder whether the latest
plan prepared by the same firm of United
Kingdom Engineers who submitted the
original plan, almost a century ago, is to
suffer the same fate, or whether the pres-
ent Government will decide at this season
to put their fortunes to the test on this occa-
sion. Nothing has been left to chance.
Everything that could be done to determine
whether the project is a practical proposi-
tion, and whether it is likely to be an
economic success has been done. Blue-
prints have been made; estimates for two
alternative sites have been prepared; and
an official from the Port-of-London Author-
ity as examined the economic factor. The
public had hopes of definite action in the
near future but, instead, there has been a



curious silence while the Legislature has
turned its attention to the intricate problem
of how best to safeguard the Writ Server
from contracting pleurisy, pneumonia or
rheumatism.

The deep water harbour is by no means
the only project left in the air, Oil explora-
tion is awaiting the go-ahead signal.
Favourable geological reports have renew-
ed interest in oil development in Barbados.
It is believed that oil may be present in
paying quantities at depths of nine thous-
and feet, and the British Union Oil Com-
pany in co-operation with Trinidad Lease-
holds and the Central Mining and Invest-
ment Corporation Limited, is anxious to
put the theory to the test by sinking deep
wells, They are awaiting the passing of
the Oil Bill which was amended by the Leg-
islative Council and is now before the
Assembly. Discovery of oil in paying quan-
tities may revolutionise the whole ecom-
omy of the island and it is for this reason
that the entire community is keenly inter-
ested in the result of the borings which
will begin as soon as the Assembly decides
to pass the amended Bill.

The public is no less concerned about the
future of the pottery industry, A ceramic
expert has been to this island. He has test-
ed the clays of Barbados. He is satisfied
that they are suitable for pottery manufac-
ture, He has manufactured pottery success-

fully in a pilot plant using natural gas as

OUR READERS SAY:



West Indies Must Be

To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR, The West Inides have
made two discoveries in recent
days. From the U.K. - W.I.

Sugar talks we find that (1) all
that’s Sugar is not sweet; and from

Colonial

ber we find (2) that West Indians’
ole desire is to have. the Mother
‘ountry’s dole to us changed from
that of direct and given in the
form of guaranteed high prices
for our agricultura] products.
The last finding must be feared,
for though ‘only evhereal, it may
reate a false impression in Eny-
and as to our craving. Until we
ave succeeded in encouraging
and erecting industries
would give to us bargaining
strength; until these islands be-
come agriculturally zoned and
ease to produce an abundance
of one thing with no competitive
strength, they will.aiways remain
‘ badly managed British infirma y

reaches,

Marshal]

stand on their
are probably

$$$ TS SSS one EE seenesne

outcome of the present attivity.
have become despondent. They have reach-
cd a stage when they just can’t conceive of
a clearcut decision being taken by the
Covernment or any Committee or Board.
eppointed by the Government.
remember the strange excuses that can be
put forward when it is intended to flout

€

improve the
furthering our natural secondary industry
~tournm. For they know that the welfare
of the community and the improvement of
social and cultural amenities go hand in
hand with economic prosperity.

pendence which cannot be stable for the
/y way of yearly grants and ten
ear preferences with restrictions
to trade with our donor. Let the
Developmeny
tion do some sensible spending
your Editorial of the 30th Decem- jn the West Indies and stop hang-
ing bread on a cord out of our
Let England make us
a credit of half dozen ships. Let
the British Government apply for
a loan and grant from the US.A.,
Aid Fund for us and
stop their own grants.

Your editorial stated inter alia:
“The real difference between the
two policies (meaning American
which and British) seems to be that after
the period of tutelage, the West
Indies people will be expected to

own fee.”
right,
there is too inuca artificiality and
theory attached to this tutelage.





the fuel for the ovens. The Government has
been assured that there are adequate sup-
plies of this cheap fuel to last for many
years and that attractive pottery, which
will find an easy saleable market, can be
manufactured in this island. Yet, the Gov-
ernment holds back. No plan for exploit-
ing the clay anc the
extensive scale has yet materialised and

natural gas on an

there seems every likelihood that the old

potter’s wheel at Chalky Mount will con-
tinue to reign supreme.

The same indecision and uncertainty is

in evidence in dealing with health matters.
Plans and counter-plans have been pre-
pared for a new hospital and discarded.
Sites are suggested and purchased and then
at the eleventh hour some imaginary flaw

is discovered and new sites are obtained

only to suffer the same fate. After circling
the island the industrious explorers for a
site for a new hospital have come to roost
on the old site in Jemmott's Lane and at the
present moment the Advisory Committee
are as busy as a hive of bees examining
plans for remodelling the hospital to meet
present needs.

Frankly the public has little faith in the

They

They still

cir wishes. They remember the mys-

t:rious caves which honeycombed Erdis-
tcn when parents and public were urging
Government to transfer Queen’s College to
Pdiston but which just as mysteriously dis-
‘ gpeared ten years later when the same site
was selected for the Teachers’ Training
College. Erdiston, they remember was sup-
posed to be unsuitable because it possessed
too many acres for a girls’ school of 300
pupils but not too many for a Training Col-
lege of 30 teachers

The public is up to all the tricks and

dodges; they are no longer willing to stom-
ach many more excuses. They want action.
They want to see all these projects accom-
plished, and they want to see the Govern-

int lose no time in making every effort to
economy of the island by

This is the season to turn over a new

leaf; for it is only by action that the com-
munity can be assured of a
Prosperous 1950.

Happy and

30 Years After’:

IT HAS taken fifty years for West Indies Cricket

to gain in England recognition only second to that
accorded to Australia. In the summer of 1900, a

year when W. G, Grace was still active in the

field and those giants of the game J. Tunnicliffe
ha ake

Taylor, R. E. Foster, G. H. Hirst and S,
Haigh were selected by Wisden's Almanack as

the five cricketers of the year, when Ranji and

Fry were pre-eminent with the bat and Lord
Hawke was still leading Yorkshire to victory, an

experimental West Indian Team, under the cap-
taincy of the late Aucher Warner, toured Englanc,

The team succeeded better than was expected,

and allowing that they were treated with ex-
treme consideration by the counties their record

of five wins, eight defeats and four draws was
highly ereditable. But in spite of this the matches
were not counted as first class.

Even in those far off days it was two fast bowl-

ers, Burton and Woods—the former having the
distinction of dismissing W.G. on two occasions—

who put the West Indies on the map and laid the
foundations for the spectacu!ar performance of
Francis, John and Constantine twenty-three years
years later at Scarborough when they almost
vanquished the flower of England's stalwarts.
This year in England, the West Indies will
undergo their severest test. They will be called

upon to show that they have overcome all the

faults of fifty years ago when bad judgment in
running between the wickets, alternate brilliance

and slip-shod fielding, and unaccountable!batting

collapses were severe handicaps. They have had
four further experiences of cricket in England
but they are yet to win a test match in the mother

country. On West Indian wickets they can hold

their own with any team, but their position in a
classification table of the cricketing countries
will depend on their ability this summer to adapt
themselves to English conditions. West Indians are
confident that the team—now in the process of
selection—led by John Goddard will be able to
demonstrate conclusively that they have learnt
their lesson and can meet England on English
wickets on even terms,



Virgin Islands of the
United States.” Only your leader
writer would say this — although
p obably not in agreement -— for
America is also aiming to have
those islands self-supporting, but
while and during this process the
people are enabled, with healthy
aids, to live as human beings, Who
can deny the fact that Englar.d
is spoon feeding us — and for ‘ll
the years with an unsweetened
gruel? Who can deny that had
England in her prosperity em-
barked on programmes for her
“olonial peoples with any slight
similarity to those which Am-
erica is pushing that we — West
Indians — would have been the
helpless people we are now?
Many people seem to think
You that the £15,000,000 the West Indies
find are wo receive—of which a part
has already been spent—is respon-
sible for the slight improvement

Corpora-

but 1

Geod training in spending, dress- -» our standard of livi Thi

, ms : ‘ . s r sta ng. This

ae a a few abie-bodied jng. eating, housing ete., but with ‘< 2 false belief. It took a war

‘ rugglers. nothing to make this training real raise our standard of living,

. . we 9 to enjoy the politica!- Your le der went on “It is no stly at the expense of America
ndependence tonic which is be- ogress to expect generou ish- ‘ } yar has act

Sone tee ger darsen oe pect @ ous dish 14 now that war has reached

us first have economic inde-

ings out from Uncle Sam's pocket,
which appears to be the

alf time and the Americans are
prospect all home again our way of living

esa iy

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

a nr ee rn cea ms em



“CHRISTMAS is not like it was when I was you ng—we had real tin hats, parties down the shelter,
lovely boxes of anti-gas ointment to put on the soles of Auntie Aggie’s shoes. . .”
—London E-vpress Service





Sitting on the Fence BY THE

By Nathaniel Gubbins

OW do you like the room?

It ain’t bad, Did you say
in the advertisement you was
‘slightly deaf?

No. Left.

What do you mean? Left anded?

No, Faat left.

Left of what?

Left of right. Politically left.

Do you mean you’re a Bolshie?
o + WO INGE CMRID, 0. oe ee et 3k

My wife won’t live in the same
ouse with a Bolshie.

I'm a right-wing: Socialist.

First you say you’re left. Then
you say you’re right. Which is it?

Well, I’m right of left.

O. So yow’re right of left, are
you?

Yes. And left of right.

And you’re left of right, too?

"ERS WES io. , asdttuny sao, Gdce

Are you trying to be funny? .

No. Why?

When I said you're left of right,
you said that’s right. What do you
think we are? A couple of cross-
talk comedians?

No. I was only trying to say
it is right that I am left of right.
It is also right that I am right of
left.

If you're not trying to be funny,
ue you know what I think you fy)
are?

No,

You're balmy.

I beg your pardon?

Balmy, screwey, loopy,
crackers, Goced-night.

In an action for the recovery of
stolen sheep, before the Glouces-
ter Assizes, a farmer’s statement
read: “I recognised my two sheep
from the expression on their
faces.”

MIRABELLE has melting eyes,
Clarabelle looks bolder;
Mirabelle she frets and sighs,
Clarabelle is colder;
Mirabelle, my Mirabelle,
Daintily she nibbles,
Clarabelle, old Clarabelle,
Chews the cud and dribbles.

jection.

chair,
heated

tions.

his knee.

nuts,

mas?”

man.
lessons

Mirabelle has tiny ears,
A little nose bewitching,
With Clarabelle’s advancing years
Hers is always twitching;
Mirabelle, my Mirabelle,
Prettily she passes,
Chagenelie, old Clarabelle,
Waddles through the grasses.

assault.”

clever.

Mirabelle has lively ways,
Mirabelle is gayer;
Clarabelle’s seen better days,
Clara’s wool is greyer;
Mirabelle will pick and choose,
Clarabelle’s a glutton.
Mirabelle is tender lamb,
Clarabelle is mutton,

SOME say Good Old Joe Stalin.
Some say different.

But whatever opinion is held of
him, few will be happy to hear
that his birthday gift from Rus-
sian scientists is the injection of
a serum which will make him live
“almost for ever,”

A man can become a bit of a
bore after the first 200 years,
even if, like Uncle Joe, he doesn’t
talk much.

But suppose they give it to
Vyshinsky, the greatest bore in
the world since Hitler died?

children?”

man,

a reaction.

is not far from what it was in
1935.

vain can spoon feed us like Ameri- theft

islands become _ self-supporting

she Nas so long used. Let us have

which

rrica do so, but not the U.N.O. motor ve

LV.B,

Protection on ihe Roads
To The Editor, The Advocate

and as lon,
ciency

SIR,—The t of a case in
which a M sentence of
twelve months’ ‘imprisonment

was confirmed by the Judges of
the Assistant Court of Appeal
on Friday shows that there is
need for caution and restriction
in the use of motor vehicles in
this island.

Two men were sentenced for Traffic
the larceny of a sheep and. the
car confiscated. I do not eithe
by statement or implicatior
accuse the owner of the car of have not
being concerned in this deal. His the law.
car might have been innocently their
congo but in the end he is the upon
oser.

daily



For hundreds of years Vyshin-
sky may go on talking nonsense,
hurling abuse at imaginary ene-
mies, and being in a perpetual
state of fury about nothing.

He has already called Sir Hart-
ley Shawcross a boa constrictor.
Others, who have been unable to
agree to whatever Vyshinsky is
talking about, have been called
cannibals, crocodiles, cockroaches,
and serpents.

Maybe they look like that to
him after a few vodkas.
case, as this is the season of good
will, it would be kinder to put
him out of his misery with an-
other kind of injection.

Regarding another kind of in-
Uncle Joe had better
watch out. You never know with
these Russians.

It is Christmas week in the
-An old man sits
in his atomically heated arm-~
wearing his
slippers.
crowd round him, asking ques-

year 1980.
The

“Tell us more about the awful
1950's,” they ask, climbing on to

“Well”, says the old man, “apart
from rationing and taxes, the aw-
1950’s will be remembered
mainly for the awful children the
period produced.”

“How awful?” asked the chil-
dren, “Putting their tongues out
at people?”

“Much worse than that,” says
“A humanitarian
Government was in power then.
They were mostly sincere men
and women with a hard child--
hood behind
wanted the children of their gen-
eration to have a softer time.

“With all the sweets they want
ed and full stockings at Christ-

tne old man.

them. So

“Worse than that,” says the old
“If they wouldn’t do their

they weren’t
They were sent to a doctor.
schoolmaster hit one for being a
little beast he was summoned for

“Hooray!” shout the children.

“If they did something serious
they were tried at a children’s
court, where they were
think they had done symething
The result was anarchy?
“What’s anarchy?” asked the

“Doing what you. like without
considering others,” says the old
“The humanitarians, who
had acquired character through
early hardship, denied it to the
children of their generation. So,
when the children grew up, they
either became criminals or idle
good-for-nothings,”

“What hapr ned then?”
In the middle 1960’s there was
Children were treat-
ed harder than they were ever
treated before. But we, at least,
produced some real men.
ing our great Leader of to-day.
“The one who had all
criminals painlessly destroyed?”
Do I hear carols?
How beautifully they sing. In
the 1950's they squeaked a few
bars out of tune with their fin-

“The same.

The point I would like to make third party insurance in
ee two men each of
It is not now expected that Bri- had previous convictions

is not now expes could with such
ca but she can see to it that our secure the vehicle used to con-
vey the sheep from the country
nd stop the trade racket whict. districts to the City.
here fis an aspect of
our economic freedom and if Brit- â„¢atter which I think deserves Commissioner
ain cannot give it, then let Am- careful study, It is the ease with vince the
le can get the use of should be
cles today.
from any country can come
g a 7 show profi-
in e ndling of a from the side
motor vehicle or show some sort a ce
of license they can drive a car
at any time any place in this
island. This practice Opens itselt
grave dangers, Within recent
months many of the accidents in
this island (and there have been
well over five hundred in 1949)
have had self driven hired cars
implicated. The figures from the
Department of the Police It
would be interesting. It ;
} to road users against people wh:

always
People who use cars in

to pay high prices for them
and as there ig no compulsory

WAY

By Beachcomber

THE proposal to call the World
Economic and Cultural Union



-

SAFO SEPP OS PS OS SS SSOSF



Oteosabofaticazuxiterobolpineduli-
xigelorogentosatulegrikelofibuled+
orimotogol has now been aban-
doned,

AS Dingi-Poos and Egham were
being driven towards the moun-
tains by a taciturn chaffeur named
Dhurti, the wily adventuress said
suddenly: “Qh, by the way, you
might like to see our famous fish-
warehouse. Perhaps it is a bit un-
fair to take them by surprise, but
we're so near that it’s hardly worth
while ringing up.” Egham readily
assented, saying to himself: “If
we arrive like this, without any-
body expecting us, it will prove
that they’ve nothing to hide.” He
looked about him at the peaceful
country scene. Yokels with tow-
coloured hair touched their fore-
locks as the car went by. Droves
of Yaks reposed in shady ditches.
Once they passed an armed police
official, whom a number of yokels
were evidently trying to push
under a culvert. “It’s so peace-
ful here,” said Dingi-Poos, “that
the farm-folk won’t stand for any
police supervision.” Egham was
feeling sentimental. But as his
arm stole round the waist of his
seductive companion Dhurtj turn-
ed in the driver’s seat, and gave
him a look that made him recall
the old saying; “Not in front of
the servants.”

The Ministry of Food still
seems to think that if you pro-
duce a White-paper full of rub-
bish about calories, calcium,
grammes of protein, and all the
other chemical jargon, you will
persuade people that they are
having a grand time, With what
triumph will it be anneunced one
day that more riboflavin is being
intaken per unit of personnel per
working man-hour-day than
before the war. If ever we can
eat what we want again, let us
always remember that, without
the guidance of a Ministry, we
are probably doing ourselves out
of 14 milligrammes of carbohy-
drates per week,

Hitting the Target
The judge held that it is not
part of a barmaid’s job to throw

beer in customers’ faces to restore
orver in the bar.

(Morning . paper.)

In which

atomically
children

they

smacked.
Ifa

made to

in the inn at Ledbury, whose ‘iim
was so unerring that she could
throw the contents of a glass of
beer clean down the throat of a
man standing eight feet away?
That stopped him talking, and so
restored order. Years ago in the
— — in Fleet-street they used to
keep a special inferior beer for

port when Oxford was Oxford,
ee

gers on the door bell. If you
didn’t give them money they
threw bottles through your win-
dow.”

“What happened to them?”

“When they grew up they were
painlessly destroyed by the great
Leader.”

—London Express Service,

Includ-

the





Made Economically Self-Supporting

Barba
( the need for this protectioi
for is all the more necessary.

ease SAFETY FIRST.

Health Habits

To The Editor, The Advocate
sIR— It has taken a new
of Police to con
orm that more car¢
I aken in the prepara-
tion and handling of Sood ton
ere sale. The first step in this direc-
tion is the removal of hawkers
of gutters.

Let me add that this practice
has been going on for years and
nobody seemed to have taken any
notice of it. There is another as.
pect of this question which
should lead the Chief Medica
Officer to enforce the regulations
which call for health certificates

whom dos,

this

Strangers





sale. |

1S Within my knowledg
time that a woman who sold puddi,
and souse buried one child
then another of +t iberculosis a
complied with then fate topped the |
h prea
when she too suecumbed to the |
are called dread disease, I< this sufficient |
warning?
HEALTH, '

But, stay! How about that girl | 3

from people who handle food for | &

s

a eter tearing me





cates



SOSSSP SSP SS OSS SSS PSS S PSS SS

throwing about, like the Wadham =

NGG NG NGG NG NG NN NG NN NG NN BN NSN GA

cd
=

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ae



MOM

to thank

i

We should like
. patronage during 1949 and

wish them a

1950.





JAMAICA TOMATO JUICE—per tin

TROUT HALL ORANGE JUICE—per tin .......

ROMAY’S GINGER BAKE BISCUITS—per tin .,,
ROMAY’S HONEY BAKE BISCUITS—per tin...
ROMAY’S PARMESTIKS BAKE BISCUITS—per

LITTLEMOON SCOTCH WHISKY—per bot.

LOCAL GUAVA JELLY—per bot. ........... owike

“COCKADE" FINE RUM

+

Customers and Friends for thep

Happy and Lrosperous F

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTW., Successors tp

C.S. PITCHER & CO,

Phones: 4472 & 4687

INDE DRIN IN DEN DN DS NNN NINN DE

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SUNDAY, JANUARY l, 19 :

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STANSFELD SCOTT & Co, Lid, I

BROAD STREET

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Our Entire Organization

JOINS IN A WHOLE-HEARTED







WISH FOR YOUR HAPPY
HOLIDAY’ AND MAY YOUR .
EVERY DREAM BE REALISED .
IN THE |
New Wear ~
’ ae

DACOSTA & CO. LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT.

© NIRS GIN NIN IN SIN DK DK DK OK ON OH BN OE A NE

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POCO

CPPS

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WE WISH ALL



AND REMEMBER y OUR
TRIP WILL BRE MOST
ENJOYABLE WITH A
REGULAR SUPPLY Or

eee ens

GODDARD'S cow sea RUM

*oeooosoooososoosestososousceceoenseneeIeooe


ee ee a
SUNDAY, JANUARY 1,

i q ee




¢



It has been towed in and out of
the Careenage, it has been shifted
to various parts of Carlisle Bay
and now it lies on the west coast
just off the Mental Hospital and
has been left grounded there.

One of the few remaining three-
masted schooners that carried
Nova Scotia’s flag and merchand-
ise across the sea since the early
nineteenth century, the Frederick
P. Elkin was one of the victims of
the modern iron and steam age.

Fined: Puton Bond

Two fines were imposed on
Elouise Rock of Bush Hall Cross
Road yesterday by His Worship
Mr. H. A. Talma.

The first fine 10/- in 14 days or
in default 14 days’ imprisonment
was for throwing stones across
Bush Hall Cross Road and the
second, 30/- in 14 Gays or one

‘month’s imprisonment for assault-
ing Gwendolyn Grandison on
December 31.

She was also put on a bond with
Darnley Rock for three months in
the sum of £1 for resisting Island
Constable Bennett on Bush Hall
Cross Road while in the execution
of his duty

The Frosty Tide
Is Here

“VILLAGERS all this frosty
tide’—a piece which has_ been
chosen for the test piece of the
Choir competition on Monday at
Kensington Oval stand—is_ in-
cluded in the first programme of
» the Police Band for the New Year

at Queen’s Park beginning at 4,45
> p.m. to-day.
ee The Programme: —

2 Processional March—

THE STATE TRUMPETERS
Symphonic Excerpt—

Ist MOVEMENT UNFINISHED

Sehubert

Barsotti

Ballet Selection
La BOUTIQUE FANTASQUE
~~ Rossini-Respighi
The music of this work was amongst
the unpublished MSS of Rossini, be-
ing probably rejected by the pub
lishers of his period. It was discoy-
ered lately and adapted by Otto
Respighi for the use of Russian Ballet
Sacred Song ( By request)
NAZARETH . Charles Gounod
(Solo Euphonium; Bandsman L. Murreii
CAROLS
“From the Eastern Mountains”
“Villagers all this Frosty Tide”
Two Messiah Choruses-

+ AMEN CHORUS ...... G. F. Handel
Grand Mareh—CLEOPATRA
| -Mancine'li
EYMNS—. re

“I Vow to thee my Country”
tune Thaxed

“The Lord is my Shepherd”
—~twue Crimond

GOD SAVE THE KING

IN PORT: Yawl Potick, Sch, Lindsyd
Il, Sch. Princess Louise, Yacht Beegie,
Sch. Adalina, Sch. Manuata, Sch. Philip
H, Davidson, Yacht Maya, M.V. Daer-

Wood, Yawl Stortebecker, Sch. Sunshinc
R., Sch. Mary M. Lewis. Sch _Alexan-
drina R., Sch. Frances W Smith, M,V.

Cable and Wireless (W.1I.) Lid., advise
they can now communicate with the
following ships at sea thraugh their Bar-
bados Coast Station;—
8.S. Veronico, S.S. Philosopher, S.S.
Silversandal,

s.s. Katherine, S58.
mavia, S$.S, Hurworth, S.S.
Megna, S.S. Peter Jebsen, 8.S. Prins-

bernhard, S.S. Elona, S.S. Runa, $.S

ARRIVALS by B.W.I.A L

From TRINIDAD...

Michael Ramdin, Timothy
Dorothy Morris, Arthur Morris, Olive
Gittens, Lillian Sealy Edmunc, Boon
Lily Boon, Alvaro Lopez, Mari. Busta-
Marte, Alfredo Bustamante, Errol Mar
Shall, Gwendolyn Coxe, Lloyd Coxe,
Hugh Coxe, Peter Rawlins, Clyde Mec-
ford, Elvina Bushell, Aylmer Blades
John Bayne. a
From JAMAICA. .

Mr. John Page, Mrs. Bilen Gardiner.
Mr, Cyril Hunte, Mr, Alfred Gardiner
From ANTIGUA....

Lawrence Greaves, William Cluett, Anno
Cluett,

Marion
Canby.

Headley.

Canby, Barbara Canby, Nickey

DEPARTURES by B.W.I AL
Yor TRINIDAD....

ai. Rupert Dolsingh,
Miss Derrice
Leacock, Miss Sauel Todd, Mr
erick Green, Miss Cynthia Green, Mis

Mrs, Monica



The Weather

TO-DAY
Rises: 6.17 a.n
im Sete; 5.*9 p

Shting: 6.30 0,1
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington)

otal for month to 3

emperature (Min.)
Wind Directions
Wind Velocity 7
Barometer (9 a.m






per h

29.925 (11



Margaret Smith, Howard Smith,

Leacock, Mrs, Carmen
Frod-

Sylvia Green, Mrs. Mable Larson Miss

mn.) 29.958

1950



‘THE FREDERICK P. ELKIN lies at anchor, aground on the west coast
of the island, just off the Mental Hospital.

Frederick P. Elkin
~ Dies A Slow Death

The Frederick P. Elkin, St. John’s, Newfoundland, that was
scrapped here and her fittings auctioned last September,
seems to be taking a long time to die.

tion to run a schooner that carrie:
two thousand yards of canvas.
The remaining parts of the
Frederick P, Elkin, which includec
the hull were anchored in Carlisl :
Bay but it leaked so badly that th«
Harbour and Shipping Master con-
sidered it to be a menace to ship-
ping and ordered it to be taken
out to sea and sunk or grounded,
It was towed on Tuesday by the
Government craft Lord Comber-
mere down the west coast and then
run aground by the launch Sea

No longer is it a paying proposi- Prince just off the Mental Hospital.

Fruits, Greens
Are Plentiful

FRUiTS and greens were to be
had yesterday in as full a supply
as for the last few weeks. Water
coconuts, grapefruits, oranges,
bananas, all of them have had a
flourishing period, The neighbour-
ng islands have done their shae
a the fruit supply, but the steady
low of greens was due to the
‘uick move of the local farmer:
vho made the most of the rain.

Given as good rain as the past’

ar, the farmers are all out to
how their worth again. Bananas

e not yet at their acme and dur-
ing the coming weeks, housewives

expect good quantities

Money, Books Missing

Elsworth Holder of Garden, St.
James, manager of Queen’s Fort
Farm, reported that his office was
broken and entered between 6.00
p.m. on Thursday and 6.45 a.m, on
Friday.

He stated that a small amount

Oo. money and some books are
missing. The matter is being
investigated,

HOUSE DESTROYED

ON Friday at about 10.30 a.m.
a fire of unknown origin broke out
at a wall and wooden house at
Surinam Village, St. Joseph, and
completely destroyed it.

The size of the house is 30 x 20

16 feet and it is valued £250,
but it was not insured. It is the
property of Oscar Chandler of
Hopewell, St. Thomas, At the
time of the fire it was unoccupied.

CANES BURNT

Another fire also of unknown
crigin oecurred on Friday ,at
Bushey Park Plantation, St.

Joseph, and destroyed 54 acres of
first crop and 2} acres of third
crop ripe canes. The damage is
covered by insurance. The canes

are the property of A. Cameron,



In Carlisie Bay

Plue Sar, Seh
Belle Wolfe.

Turtle Dove, Sch. Marion

ARRIVALS
S.S. PANTER, 3,616 tons net.
Hornsden, from U.K., Agents:
& Co., ltd.

Cap’.
Da Coste

IN TOUCH WITH BAKBADOS COAST STATION

Sanvulfrano, S.S. Bonaire, S.S. Macug,
8.S. Loide Uruguay, S.S. Loide Ver :-
Zuela, S.S. Abbedyk, S.S. Katy, S.S.
Mo r, 8.8. New Texas S$‘

Dolores, S.S. Rio Dale, .S.S. Hers'lia,
8.S. Cornell, S.S. Telamon, S.S. Faco.
S.S. Musa, S.S. Mary Ashig’. S.S.
Gotd Haab, 8.8. Brazil, S.S. Goivanni
Amendola,

Monica Keliman, Sir Edward Cunard,
Mr, Douglas Robbins, Mr. George Hu atae
inson, Miss Sylvia Hutchinson, Mus.
Mildred Seay, Miss Elizabetly Burns, Miss
Elizabeth Waring, Miss Nancy Yarnall,
Mr, Clarence Lowe, Miss Mary Shutts.
Mr. Toosey, Mrs. Toosey, Mr: Gerald
Isaacs.

For ANTIGUA....

Mrs. Hynd Sarkis, Miss Myra Jacobs

The following passengers arrived from
Montreal by T.C.A. yesterday:—
Mr. Allen Beach, Mr. Oren Brown,

Mr. Ashley Colter, Miss Shirley Colter,
Mr. Ceeil Dexter, Mrs. Maud Dexter,
Miss Germaine Gagnon, Mrs. Berry

Goodwin, Mr. Herbert Heinbecker, Mr
Evelyn Holmes, Mr. Frederick Mc Der-
mid, Mrs. Margaret Mc Dermid, Mr
Harry Ormiston, Mrs. Dorothy Ormiston,
Mr. Thomas Stevenson, Mr Patrick
Labrie

From BERMUDA

Mrs. Eispeth Eric, Mr. George Watt

Passengers leaving for Canada by
T.C.A. were:—Mrs. Graham Rose, Rus-
sell Dorland, Mr. H. A. C.. Thomas,
Druscilla Headley, Mr. E. S. Robinson
Helena Miller

For BERMUDA Hazel Cood +"!

For TRINIDAD: Mr. Chester Tuscheray

What’:

Sunday School

; on Today

9 and. 11 a.m

3.30 and 4 p.m

n's Park 4.45 m

ew Year Music,
‘aul's 4,30 p.m

Evensong and Carols, St. Ambrose 7







p.m

while

LOCAL NEWS



Shoppers Were
Busy Yesterday

IT was Old Year Day yesterday
and Saturday at that. Besides,
tomorrow is bank-holiday, and
these factors must have been
responsible in the City for the
hustle and bustle which was equal
to that of Christmas Eve.

Shopping like then, was in full
swing, giving one the impression
that no pains were being spared
to make the New Year festival as
joyful as that of Christmas.

Tailors, dressmakers, shoe-
makers and other craftsmen were
hustling to carry out their

promises to their various clients,
seme of whom had suffered dis-
appointment at Christmas time.

Most people were indulging in
stock-taking; not of their business
of course but of their lives. “I
will turn over a new leaf next
year;” “New Year—new rules for
me.” “I will take life more seri-
ously from tomorrow.”’ These
ond other expressions were reso-
lutions made to be carried out
during the year which has just
‘ egin. A check-up at its end by
‘he fortunate ones who live
through it, will reveal to them
how much determinziion was be-
hind their utterances.

Reginald N. Wallace
On Way to Barbados
“Gloria May’ Still Missing

NEWS was received yesterday
that the 117-ton schooner “Regi-
nald N. Wallace’ under Captain
Wallace is on its way to Barbados.

Consequent upon rumours that
this vessel had sailed from British
Guiana for Barbados over a week
ago and did not arrive here up
to Friday, the Schooner Owners’
Association cabled St. Vincent to
find out whether or not it was
there.

A reply received late Friday
read “Reginald N. Wallace sailed
from St. Vineent for Barbados’.
Nothing further has been heard,

but the vessel is expected here
momently.
There is still doubt as to the

safety of the “Gloria May” which

“'so sailed from British Guiana

for Barbados over a week ago.
Names of the crew which were

signed on at the Harbour and
Shipping Office in October last
year are:— George Graham

(Captain), James Rice, Gladstone
Dummett, Joseph DeRange, Alfred
Headley, Gladstone Eastmond,
Clarence Sargeant, W. Murray,
Frederick Perkins and Amos
Nelson.

The first six are Barbadians
the other four, taken in
rdey are from St. Lucia, Antigua,
Grenada and St. Vincent.
3arrow D.

Our own correspondent from
Georgetown, British Guiana,
wrives that two cabin passengers,
David N. E. Hughes and Donald
Rafael Nichols are aboard. The
vessel carries 230 tons of genera!
cargo and she left Georgetown on
Wednesday, ecember 21.

Elementary Teachers
Hold Meeting at Ch. House

A meeting of Elementary
teachers was held at the Church
House, Si. Michael’s Row, yester-
day. Teachers protested against
longer hours which were intro-
duced by the Director of Educa-
tion,

A resolution, agreeing vhat the
hours remain as usual, that is from
9 am. to 3 p.m., was carried.
Over 50 teachers agreed with this
resolution.

The majoriv’y were of the opin-
ion the Elementary children could
not stand up to a 6-hour day in
school because this method was
not even employed in Secondary
schools.

12 Months For
.

One Pair Shoes

Nineteen year old Rupert Ellis
of Sobers Lane listened calmly
as His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
yesterday morning sentenced him
to 12 months’ impvisonment with
hard labour for stealing. one pair
of gents John While brown shoes
valued at $7.62, the property of
C. F. Harrison & Co., Ltd.

Island Constable Sobers said he
arrested Ellis about 9.50 on De-
cember 31 on Hinks Street. He
saw he was carrying a pair of
shoes and asked him if he had
paid for them. Ellis told him no,

Ellis had six previous convic-
tions, vhe last one being on June
24 when he was sentenced to four
months’ imprisonment with hard
labour for stealing one pair of
shoes.

He Spent Xmas
Away From Prison

TAKING iv easy ina cave in
gully of Warrens Plantation, St.
-omas, 38-year-old Courtney
Sealy, alias Fish Eye, who
»-caped from prison on November
25, was routed and captured yes~-
riay about 11 a.m., *y a squad
yt police under Superintendent
A, Farmer.
Sealy escaped while he and
her prisoners. were working at
‘ojrington. When caught yester-
‘y, his clothes were ragged but
“e looked as though he had been
well fed. He had a basin and
other articles in the cave. He
gave the police a good run before
» was finally caught.
Sealy said he had felt like
vending out the Christmas season.

M.V. Blue Star
On Dock
M.V. “Blue Star” took its turn
1 the dry dock on Friday even-
when M.V. “Daerwood” came
ff,
The “Blue Star” returned here
on Monday from Nassau via St.

{artin with cargo. It has gone on
lock to have a general clean up.



Scouts Hold
Dance To
Help Funds

SENIOR SCOUTS of the First
Barbados Sea Scout Group had

a jolly time on Thursday nigh
last when they held a dance at
their H.Q. in aid of funds. hi
wus well attended and everyone

enjoyed themselves until well
after midnight.
Rover Scout Leader Coa

Alleyne and his quartette sup-
plied the music on the occasion
In Camp
The Rovers of the 34th B’dos.
(St. Philipts) Crew went into
camp at Warrens woods over
last weekend and are having a

good time.

Included in their programme is
a Campfire on Jackson’s pasture
next Tuesday night after which
six rover squires will be invested.

Wood Badge

We are glad to be able to in-
form Scouters that we have
received Scout and Cub Wood
Badge Studies Part I (Theoreti-
cal) 1949—50, and these wil)
sgon be ready for circulation. A
notice to this effect will be pub-
lished in these notes as soon as
they are ready.

‘EXTRACT’

From “Spiritual Adventure”

in the November Scouter
_ With the exception of the clos«
ing session; this third session is
the only one in the Conference
the title of which does not begin
with the letter “P”. We have had
Probation and Preparation, and
we have Progress and Practic
to come. But here, stuck in the
middle, is a session called “Spir-
itual Adventure”, I’m — sorry
about that (or should I say
Penitent) because I chose tha:
ttle. Although I still think it is
a good one, I am sorry because
vhen you glance at the pro-
gramme and see this session,
which quite obviously deals wit)
the religious aspect and basis of
Scouting, it appears to be some-
ihing apart, something different
from all the rest, with the result
that we tend to approach this
session from the wrong angle.
For religion ig not someth ng
“added on to” of “thrown in
with” Scouting. Religion is the
basis, the foundation, the aim
and the motive power of Scout-
ing.

Scouting—An Adventure
Scouting is not a Religion. It
is not limited to any one religion;
it is not denominational, but it
is a religious and spiritual Move-
ment. Its whole set-up is spirit-
ual. It is not only a method of
training, but is also a_brother-
hood, a fellowship based on duty
to God and = service to our
fellow-men, with a common rule
of life. Duty to God is net part
of Scouting; it is the whole
purpose of Scouting. Purpose—
here we have a word beginning

with the letter “P” which we
might use as our title. The Pur-
pose of all our _ Probation,
Preparation, Progress and Prac-
lice. ‘

I still think, however, that my
title is better, because it links

is on to the title for the whole
Conference, which is “Adventure

through couting”’. For the
adventure of Scouting is a
:piritual adventure. This game
of Scouting is the adventure
‘ourney which takes the boy,

tage by stage, along the road
which leads to true manhood,

Man as God intended him to b«

With whatever section of the
Movement we as Scouters may
be concerned, we must always
take that long view and kee)
that ultimate aim in mind, act-
ng on that long-term policy. (It
is very easy to become short-
sighted or narrow-minded and
think only in terms of Cubs o1
Scouts rather than of Men.) Our
ultimate aim is to make good men
We may, in passing, produce
good boys or good youths, bu
cur aim is to produce men.

It makes a good deal of differ-
ence if we keep that aim always
in mind. (1) It makes our job
something really worthwhile.
(2) It helps us‘to face that fecl-
ing of disappointment which
always comes when our boys
grow up and “grow out” of our
particular section; when we havc
to send our best Cub up into
the Scouts, or a really usefu
P.L. into the Seniors. (3) It g.ves
to the Group a very real sense
of unity because throughout
there is a unity of purpose.

If the Scouter of any one pa.-
ticular section will take this
“long view” he will see his job
of training the boy in its righ:
perspective — as that of leadin
the boy along one part of the
journey and then passing him on
the next stage. The “finished
article’—the true man—is some-
thing which he has helped to
create.

(TO BE CONTINUED
NEXT WEEK)

Planter Brings
Motor Cars

HARRISON liner S.S. “Planter”
called at Barbados yesterday with
eargo from London. ,

Vauxhall saloons, a Morris
Oxford Saloon and a Citroen 15
Saloon were among this vessel's
cargo. Also a shipment of 7,996
bags and 520 drums of cement,
toilet preparations, French Polish

and essences.

Messrs DaCosta & Co.,, Ltd. are
Agents.

Rumour Denied

"HE Advocate has bee
im.,oimed by the Head Office oi:
Canadian National Steamships
Montreal, (through their locat

agents Messrs, Gardiner Austin &
Co. Litd.,) that they are still in
sole control of the Steamships or
their Company,

There is no tasis of faci in tte
umour that ownership of tne
C.N.S., had been changed,

Died Suddenly

Fifty-year wid Harold Burnett
of Kew Road, St. Michael. died
uddenly at his home on Thurs-

A post mortem examination was

performed at the Public Mortuary
and death was attributed to
natural causes



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Exhibition At



THE exhibition at the Museum
of drawings and watercol®urs are

&@ selection of the gitt recently
made by Mrs. Lucey Carringtou
Wertheim te the Museum. It

affords’ an opportunity {or art lov-
ers lO se@ some; of the work of
eontemporary English artisis. ‘fhe
Museum ic iortun’te to have been
presented with this collection, for
iis the function of a museum) not
only to preserve whatever is of
interest trom the past, but ‘to pre-
sent matters of contemporary in-
terest.

Adrian Allinson, R.O.L., is rep-
resented in the Wertheim collec-
tion by an arresting — charcoal
study of a nude. He was educated
at Wycliffe, and obtained a
scholarship at the Slade Art
School, For sometime he was
Art Master ~ at Westminster
School. He is a member ‘oi the
Royal Institute of Oil Painters,
and has~held~exhibitions of’ his
work in London, Zurich, Munich
and Toronto. Since 1944, he has
frequently had his works hung
at the Royal Academy.

Phelan Gibb has an excellent
taste in colour, his water colour
of a Manchester Canal conveys
the atmosphere of the industrial
North of England. There is also
a spirited wash drawing of Pic-

Circus. Phelan Gibb
died last year at the age of 78.
He studied in Newcastle, Edin-
burgh, Paris and Munich. At
Julian’s in Paris, his masters
were Jean Paul-Laurens and
Bouguerau. In 1906, he had prac-
tically decided to give up art
when he saw an exhibition of
Cezanne’s work. Thereupon he
threw up his work at Julian’s
and began to work alone. In
1909, he was elected an Associate
of the Autumn Salon, and during
that year he held exhibitions of
his work in London and Sweden
In 1913, he held an important ex-
uibition of his work at the Bern-
ueim-Jeune Gallery, Paris, There-
after he exhibited chiefly in Lon-
ion and Manchester. Towards the
end of his life he became inter-
ested in pottery, which he mod-
vlled by hand instead of using
a potter’s-wheel, An exhibition
of his pottery was held in London
before the last war. After the
success of his Paris exhibition he
was invited to hold an exhibition
in Dublin, but as a_ result of
priestly opposition the show was
never opened to the public. Gibb
is represented by works in both
the Tate Gallery and the Victoria
and Albert Museum, London. ]

Sensitive Artist

Kenneth Hall's: watercolours
reveal an extremely sensitive ar-
tist. “Boats on the River Rance” |
and “St, Enogat” are interesting
examples of the effects which can
be obtained by outlining obects
with pen and ink or brush, and
of the use which can be made oi
uncoloured portions of the back-
ground to light a picture. The
artist died in tragic circumstances
in 1946, at the early age of 32. He
first exhibited his work in Lon-
don in 1936, and subsequently at
the Mid-day Studio, Manchester,
the Little Gallery, Dublin and the
Arcade Gallery, Bond Street, Lon-
don,

“The Irish Train”—a watercol
our by Leslie Hurry, portrays
three bored travellers executed in
low tones. Hurry is 40; he studied
at St. John’s Wood Art School,
and won a scholarship to the Royal
Academy of Painting. In 1937
he held his first exhibition at the
Wertheim Gallery, In 1940—41, he!
producéd two books of drawings, ;
and has since held exhibitions at |
the Redfern Gallery, London.|
Hurry was commissioned to de-|
sign the costumes for Robert|
Helpman’s ballet “Hamlet” and|
later for Tchaikovsky’s romantic
ballet “Le Lac des Cygnes”, |

Amy Kraus is represented by a;
landscape with a graveyard en-|
titled “Falling Angel.”” Miss Kraus
was a close friend of the artist
Frances Hodgkins, but her work
differs from that ef Frances
Hodgkins in that her drawing is
more exact, although her colour is
less rich and sensuous. Miss
sraus was born of a Bristol fam-
ily and studied at an art school
in that City and later in Paris,
Like Phelan Gibb, she took up
pottery in her later life, but her
pottery is of a more domestic
character than his,

Cornish Water Colours

Two Cornish water colours
with sailors showing the influ-
ence of sculpture are the work of
Basil Rak6éczi. His colour is pleas-
ng and he has also used ink to
strengthen the outline of his fig-
ures, Rakéczi has travelled in
Greece, Spain and France. He has
held exhibitions of his work in
London, Dublin and Manchester.
At present he is living in Paris,
where he is working under the
patronage of the sculptor Zadkine.

Rowland Suddaby’s water col-
ours show great strength of model-
ling by the use of juxtaposition
of colours. Born in 1912, he
studied at the Sheffleld College of
Art, and spent some years =:
ing sets for films. He held his
first one-man exhibition at the
Wertheim Gallery in 1934. His
work is represented in many pro-
vincial art galleries in Britain, in

«thn NSN NEYO MONEE NEN
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the joyous Holiday Season is now here

the Spirit of Friendship and Good Will
now prevails everywhere

we value greatly our Friendly relations
we want to express our appreciation for
this Friendly Association

we are pleased to send you this Certifi-

cate of Good Will which carries with
it our sincerest wishes for a

Happy and Lrosperous



DRUG Si
YA NAAN AIRCON

The Museum S%%
Mrs. Wertheim’s Gift |

BARRA ATA

Australia and New Zealand. He
has recently worked for *'.2 Pil-
grim Trust Scheme “necording
Britain.” He is also a designer of
textiles,

John Skeaping is well known
for his animal drawings and sculp-



ture. His work is frequently ex-
hibited in London. He has pro-
dueed posters for the London

Passenger Transport Board. In
1944, the Tate Gallery purchased
from him a horse’s head carved
in wood. A fine drawing by him
¢ oo is among the Wertheim

Interested in Animals

Another artist who is closely in-
terested in animals -—— especially
horses, is L. D. Rust. His study
of a London cart-horse is a sen-
sitive drawing. Rust has also an
affection for trees, this can be seen
both in his Horse Study, and in
his drawing of “Trees, East-
bourne.” His work has been
shown in London and Manchester
as well as at the Royal Academy.

Something of the Eighteenth
Century spirit appears in the
landscape of Algernon Newton,
R.A. Canaletto and Guardi have
influenced both his compositions
and his skies. Algernon Newton
was born in 1880, and has ex-
hibited regularly at the Royal
Academy for a number of years.
He is represented in many Pro-
vincial.Galleries. and private col-
lections. In the Tate Gallery
there is a fine oil painting of “The
Surrey Canal, Camberwell.” There
is a delicate water colour of “The
Thames from the Embankment”
in the Museum collection.

The work of two Continental
artists is included in the collec-
tion Drivier and Kolle, Drivier’s
pastel with its delicate tones is
essentially French in the treat-
ment of the nude figure. Kolle’s
oil painting, on the other hand,
shows a vigorous treatment of his
subject which is almost crude in
its strength. Kolle was born at
Charlottenbu~¢ in 1899, at the age
of 25 he settled in Paris, where
he lived for a time in an obscure
hotel in the Latin Quarter which
had once sheltered Verlaine and
Rimbaud, Kolle was a great lover
of sport, especially: tennis, foot-
ball, hunting and riding, and it is
net surprising that he was much
ip “Suenced by the work of Geri-
eanlt, the femous French horse
peinter. Sport has formed the
subject of many of Kolle’s paint-
ings. His work has been exhibited
in Paris, London and Berlin and
he is represented in many Con- |
tinental collections,

SDE

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PAGE NINE

from

Pharmacy

TO ALL OUR

FRIENDS & CUSTOMER:

AM A
snus

| ONCE

PATRONAC

THROUGHL

Health, Flappiness and Prosperity

C.F. HARRISON & CO. (BD0S) ITD.

IN WE TAKE THE SEASONAL
OPPORTUNITY TO EXPRESS OUR DEEP
APPRECIATION OF YOUR CONT-NUED

AND
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CAVE, SHEPHERD
& Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.




AND A PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR IS OUR
WISH TO CUSTOMERS.

AND FRIENDS

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PERKENS & Co., Ltd.

?OEBLCK STREET.

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PAGE TEN









REVIEW OF THE YEAR:

Year of Economic Difficulties Has Sobering Effect —

To call 1949 a year of crises
would suggest that preceding
Years since 1945 were free of
crises. Of course, they were not.
Indeed, the crises of the past four
years have been so numerous as
to numb the sensitivity of the pub-
tic. It has been difficult to get
certain of men to believe
that there would be ing seri-
ously wrong with the state of the
country so long as the wage packet
maintained its plumpness.

. The year now ending, however,
has wrought a change. Its -
tive feature has been its
effect, The wage packet has re-
tained its plumpness, but there has
been an increasing awareness that
its purchasing power was falling:
or put another way, that the cost
of living was rising. Side by side
with this development t*.ere has
been -a-growing realisation that
Wages were not to be permitted to
pursué_fising prices; that if the
Wage packet would no longer
cover expenses, some expenses
Would have to be cut.

Early in the year there were
doubts whether the “wage freeze”
would be made really effective.
Unions continued to file claims for
advances, and negotiations were
opened. But as the months went
Ty it became clear that the Gov-
Graticat could not retreat from
their policy of a wages’ ceiling.
Painfully, reluctantly, the Unions
have been persuaded that the Gov-
ernment must be supported.

Two events have helped to bring
home the realities of Britain's
economic dangers. The first was
a Budget which was bleak in the
extreme, and brought none of the
tax easements which any Govern-
ment would like to make in a pre-
élection year, Then, in the autumn,
came the de-valuation of the
pound, with an immediate increase
in the price of bread, and the
prospect of further rises in the
cost of living within a few months.
The price of bread up; the value
of sterling down: and wages
frozen. The complex economic
causes of these unpleasant hap-
penings might not be generally
understood, but those three stark
facts were accepted as evidence
that something was seriously
amiss. As the year ended, Mr.
Maurice Webb, M.P., Chairman of
the Parliamentary Labour Party,
summed it all up thus:

“This is something worse than
a crisis, It is a fundamental
maladjustment in our whole
economic system. It is going
te take many long years of
effort to correct.”

With that diagnosis there would
be a-large measure of agreement
among all Parties, though there
are “wide differences about the
remedies,

A Busy Year

So far as Parliament is concern-
ed, the year has been one of the
busiest within living memory.

Following immediately upon a
Government majority of 90 on its
Palestine policy came the British
de facto recognition of the Israeli
Government Soon afterwards
Parliament gave a second reading
to the National Theatre Bill which
projects a State theatre as a part
of the larger scheme of the Festi-
val of Britain 1951, on which Fes-
tival approximately 10 millions
are to be spent, with the uneasy
approval of the Opposition, se-
cured in less anxious days by the
Parliamentary skill of Mr, Herbert
Morrison.

There was a warmer welcome
for the restoration of the right of
Private Members to introduce
Bills into the Commons, but the
Iron and Steel Bill has been met
throughout the year with uncom-

romising opposition, Finance has

n a constant anxiety. Early in
the year there were supplementary
estimates for £221,000,000 includ-
ing fifty-eight millions for the Na-
tional Health Service, and fifty-
two millions more for the Minis-
try of Food.

The Budget presented by Sir
Stafford Cripps had to take into
account the formidable deficit on
dollar account of no less than
£423 millions for the sterling area.
The Chancellor had to tell Gov-
ernment supporters candidly that
he wondered if those who spoke
about reducing taxation while the
cost of social services was rising
rapidly, appreciated to the full
the old adage that we could not
have our cake and eat it, But in
July there had to be further sup-
plement-*y estimates for @ver
twenty-one millions.

Money Troubles; Labour
Unrest

At this time the Chancellor had
most emphatically denied being
pressed to devalue sterling. It
therefore came as the greater

k when the Government
amnouneed devaluation tw o
months later,

Banks and the Stock Exchange
closed for a day. Thereafter the
eeonomic consequences began to
demand attention. The Govern-
ment had to face the grim task of
deciding on economies. Mr.
Churchill promised support for all
measures which the Opposition
could accept as being demonstrab-
ly in the national interest, but the

use as a whole was not satisfied
with the programme ultimately
ons by the Government aim-
1g at economies of £250,000,000
a year. These cuts affected hous-
ing and other ae school
als, Food Ministry administra-
n, the much-discussed Festival











ing them...

Lrospero

WE would like to thank our Friends and
Customers for their Patronage during
1949 and take this opportunity of wish-

A Happy and

of Britain, and the programme of
imports from dollar areas.

Although still enjoying a mark-
ed, though reduced favour at by-
elections, the Government have
not been fortunate this year.
Strikes have proved a serious em-
barrassment. The year opened
with thirty thousand bus drivers
striking for time-and-a-half pay
for Saturday afternoon work. A
sequence of strikes in the London
docks began in April, and reached
a grave climax in July with a
strike lasting twenty-four days
and involving sixteen thousand
dockers. Troops had to be used
to clear cargoes of scme food ships.
The Government civ‘used a State
of Emergency to be declared by
Royal Proclamation,

“Go Slow,” and “Work to Rule”
measures by railwaymen brought
a serious threat to summer rail
traffic, and culminated in the Na-
tional Union of Railwaymen ap-
pealing directly to the Prime Min-
ister to intervene to prevent a
possible national railway stoppage.
That event was fortunately avert-
ed, but thorny points of difference
remained to be settled, and still
remain. Strikes in Lancashire and
Yorkshire collieries were algo
among labour’ troubles which
proved costly.

Tribunal Set Up

An event happily rare in British
public life was the setting up of a
Tribunal to investigate allegations
reflecting on the conduct of some
Ministers and Civil Servants. Mr.
Justice Lynskey presided over an
inquiry which exonerated every
Civil Servant, but resulted in the
resignation of the then Parliamen-
tary Secretary to the Board of
Trade from his office and his
membership of Parliament, and
the resignation of a Labour nomj-
nee as a Director of the Bank of
England. A_ further sensational
sequel was the escape to Israel of
a “contact man” who hac! been the
chief witness of the joquiry and
who had been summoned to ap-
pear at Bow Street magistrates
court on alleged bankruptey
charges. |

In May came an unprecedented
experience when five Parliament-
ary Frivate Secretaries lost their
appointments because they had
acted contrary to Government
policy on the Ireland Bill. On
other issues the Government lost
the support of two Socialist M.P'’s
and one peer—Mr. Ivor Thomas,
M.P. and Mr. A. Edwards, M.P.
leaving the Socialist benches for
the Conservative Party and Lord
Milverton transferred his allegi-
ance to the Likerals

Late wi me year the Govern-
ment’s catalogue of misfortunes
was extended by the admission of
heavy losses on the African
ground-nuts scheme and on the
first year’s administration of the
nationalized railways.

“This mistletoe was terribly
expensive— probably works
out at about 2s, 3d. a kiss,”



The most hopeful political event
of the year was the recognition by
the Russians of the success of the
“Berlin Air Lift,’ and the conse-
quent abandonment of the Russian
policy of trying to drive her Allies
out of the German capital by a
precess. of blockading the city
against surface transport from the
West. The feat of keeping the city
supplied by air throughout the
winter was a tremendous achieve-
ment, and the Russian change of
attitude which it brougitt about,
greatly relieved the tension in
Europe.

Royal Activities

The happiest records of the year
have heen concerned with the
Royal House whose popularity
with the nation is always enhanced
at times when political issues di-
vide the nation, thus emphasising
anew the value of a monare >
which is always aloof from politi-
cal controversy,

The news of the King’s illness
early in the year, and of the post-
ponement of his Australian tour,
evoked many manifestations of
deep sympathy, and there was a
great popular welcome for the
King, when, in June, he made his
appearance at the King’s Birthday
review, his first ceremonial en-
gagement after a trying illness and
an exceptional operation.

The King inaugurated Colonial
Month in a ceremony at the
Church House, Westminster. On
the Canadian Dominion Day Their
Majesties went to Westminster
Abbey for the service. The Canada
Club had presented chairs and
faldstools for Their Majecties’ use
in memory of the Canadigis who
lost their lives in the war.

A memorable legal occasion was



us 1950.

LOUIS L. BAYLEY,
Jewellers
Bolton Lan« y

PLANS ARLENE



SUNDAY



Hy Recorder

when the Queen, as Treasurer of
the Middle Temple, officiated at
the reopening ceremony of the
ancient Middle Temple Hall re-
stored after war damage, His
Majesty honoured the heroes of
H.M.S. Amethyst who had gallant-
ly beaten off attacks by Commun-
ist forees in China and brought
thew ship through a menacing
situation, The Sovereign present-
ed colours to the Irish Guards; re-
ceived the Western Europe Chiefs-
of-Staffs arriving in London for
consultations; and, with the Queen,
visited Edinburgh for its great fes-
tival of all the arts, The Ascot
race meeting restored to its pre-
war glamour had the presence of
the King and Queen on three days.
His Majesty had a great ovation
when his horse Avila won the
Coronation Stakes.

Keen On Public Interest

Princess Elizabeth and the Duke
of Edinburgh have been most assi-
duous in their discharge of public
duties. They had a particularly
warm welcome in Edinburgh for
the festival. Lancashire, York-
shire, the Channel Islands, and
Ireland were visited by the Royal
couple. They attended the Royal
Agricultural Show at Shrewsbury.
In the autumn the Duke of Edin-
burgh left to take up his Naval
duties at Malta, and Princess Eli-
zabeth paid an extended visit to
the west country, before joining
the Duke at Malta for the anni-
versary of their wedding. ;

Princess Margaret whose nine-
teenth birthday evoked congratu-
lations from all parts of the Em-
pire, made a long Continental
tour during the year,

Queen Mary attended the cen-
tenary celebrations of the Bed-
ford College for Women of which
she is Patroness, Another notable
engagement she undertook was
the reopening service of the his-
toric old church at All-Hallows-
by-the-Tower which was damag-
ed in the war.

There was a romance of Royal
importance in September when
the Earl of Harewood, son of the
Princess Royal, was married to
Miss Marion Stein. The Austrian-
born bride was a concert pianist
The Earl is a_ discriminating
patron of music, and since his
war service has written much on
the subject Mutual interest in
music first brought bride and
bridegroom together. The King
and Queen and the Princesses
were at the wedding at St. Marks,
North Audley Street, where music
specially composed for the ocea-
sion was rendered. Not since the
marriage of Princess Elizabeth
and the Duke of Edinburgh had
a wedding excited such interest,
and the bride won vast popular
admiration by her charm and her
bearing.

Some Highlights of The Year

Recalling the nighlights of the
year from month to month, the
liner Queen Mary went aground
off the French coast in the ter-
rific storms which ushered in the
New Year, but the same week
the new 34,000 ton liner Caronia,
largest built since the war, start-
ed on her successful maiden voy-
age to New York. Historic Derby
House became Hutchinson House
in February and the permanent
home of a new National Gallery
of British Sports and Pastimes.
In Guildhall before a_ brilliant
Anglo-Dutch assembly, Mr. Win-
ston Churchilt received the Gro-

tius Medal for distinguished
services to international peace
and international law. There

were messages of gratitude from
Germany to the British when the
landing of a British aircraft at
Berlin completed delivery of the
millionth ton of food and freight
since the airlift began. The
famous library of Oriel College,
Oxford, was damaged by fire in
March

Arctic Expedition

A notable Naval achievement
was the expedition in Arctic
waters testing special equipment
and armaments in conditions of
extreme cold. Mr. Churchill was
in Boston in April where he re-
viewed the last fifty historic
years and uttered a solemn warn-
ing against the sinister and
malignant policy of the “men in
the Kremlin.” Lord Reith be-
eame chairman of the new
National Film Finance Corpora-
tion under Board of Trade aus-

pices the King welcomed the
Conference of Commonwealth
Prime Ministers which sat in

London. The twenty-eighth Brit-
ish Industries Fair opened in
London and Birmingham with a
record number of exhibitors in
May. That month brought the
French Ambassador to Broadcast-
ing House, presenting a tapestry
on behalf of the French Govern-
ment in recognition of “the help
and comfort London radio offered
in the dark days of the occupa-
tion.” Nottingham attained the
full status of a university city,
Two air records broken by Mr.
Neville Duke were those from
London to Rome and London to
Karachi: 28,924 Royal Artillery
men who fell in the war were
commemorated by three bronze
plaques on the Royal Artillery
Memorial at Hyde Park Corner,
unveiled by Princess Elizabeth



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Five Drowned

It was announced in June that
Hughendey Manor, famous home
of Disraeli, had been handed over
to the National Trust. Field Mar-
shal Montgomery spoke at the
D-Day memorial service held in
the British cemetery at Ranville.
The cross channel steamer Prin-
cess Astrid struck a mine in the
channel and was submerged. Five
of the crew were drowned, but
all passengers mostly Britons on
holiday, were safely landed. i
July ships of the Western Union
Navies assembled off Penzance to
proceed to combined operation:

Memories of the South African
war were revived when veterans,
who included Mr. Churchi!!,
marched from the Mansion House
to St. Paul’s to commemorate
And Vikings landed in England
again; they came in the Viking
ship Hugin, and visited London



and many coast towns, being \he

recipients of spectacular civi
welcomes. The Rangitofo, lar \-
est merchant ship built on
Tyne since the war, went to

in August. Mr. Patrick Horna
idge covered 3,600 miles lasting;
\2 hrs. 3 mins., thereby settin
up an endurance record for j«
powered aircraft Mr. Church]
was honoured with the Freedo n
of Strasbourg for his war lead -
ship, and his great services to ‘he
city.

The religious world was stirres
by reports of the arrival in Lo
don of fragments of Old Testa
ment scrolls __pre-dating ll
existing records. TWey had been
found in a cave by the Dead
Sea. The largest civil aircraft
in the world, “Brabazon I”, made
her maiden flight in Septembe
Prime Minister Attlee had an
underwater cruise at Portsmouth
in a new type submarine. French
Dutch and Belgian fight
squadrons joined the R.A.F. i:
large-scale air exercises over
Britain.



Royal Commission’s Repo {

One unprecedented event m«
its its own distinctive place, t!«
publication of the Report of tie
Royal Commission on the Pre
After two years of investigati:
the Commission pronounced ()x
British Press “free from corru
tion,” and “inferior to none
the world.” The Commission co: \-
sidered however that it was “dc -
ficient in the practice of sel’-
criticism,” that its performanc:
was capable of improvement, a: d
mde suggestions whereby tho
alleged weaknesses might
remedied. The Report destroycd
many misconceptions about
ownership of the Press, and co
rected several common I
erroneous ideas concerning new
papers.

Another Royal Commission
report in 1949 was that deali:
with the trends of population
Great Britain. Much of its wo
is chiefly of benefit to legislato
and administrators, but amor
its general observations was th
more attention should be paid
the family in social legislation

Politics Again

As the year drew towards i
close, politics and economi
again asserted their claim to t!
nation’s undivided attentio
There was much talk of a ge
eral election, partly because, ov
a period of thirty years, most ge)
eral elections have fallen in tle
late autumn, and partly becau
of a feeling that a demonstrati:
of the nation’s determination
sanction drastic measures
economy would have had a go
effect on foreign confidence
sterling. But the Governm<
decided otherwise, and thou
uncertainty about the date of t.
elections continues, the parti
are busy arraying themselves {
battle.

As in the period after 1918, ;
now, the influence of a great w:
continues to express itself in
lowering of moral standards a,
im Many crimes of violence. On
of the murders of the past yea
by reason of originality
method, will go down in the bhi:
tory of crime. The trial of Jo
George Haigh for the killing
Mrs. Olive Durant Deacon di
closed a startling use of scienti(
knowledge in the disposal of |
body, but was otherwise a squa
murder for gain, and its perpet:
tor was executed

“Dream Madness”
Before Haigh stood his tria!



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London editor was sent to Brix-
ton Prison for three months for
contempt of court, and a fine of
£10,000 was imposed on the pro-
prietors of the newspaper. But
as the trial revealed, Haigh con-
fessed to the murder of no fewer
than nine persons, in what he
claimed to be ‘dream madness.”
Thus the case provided material
even stranger than is found in the
type of crime fiction presented in
books and films to a public which
has an insatiable appetite for
such fare, but which, at the same
time, deplores the alarming
growth of crime.

Theories that theft is a conse-
quence of unemployment and
poverty have been heavily dis-
credited by a large increase in
convictions for larceny during a
period of abundant employment

There were several large rob-

- beries and frauds during the year.

A moonlight raid on a Hunger-
ford mansion while the family
were at dinnei resulted in the
thieves getting away with £20,-
000-worth of jewellery; only a
fortnight later a gang of “dinner
time” raiders took £18,000 worth
of furs and jewellery from the
home of a racehorse owner. In
one London case a bank was said
to have been defrauded of
£92,500. ‘

“Perfect?” Crime

Two men were heavily fined in
London in connection with what
counsel called “a fantastic story”
of a £400,000 gun-running airlift
to Hyderabad. Although the ad-
jective “perfect” is out of place
in connection with crime, the
“Perfect Forger” was, according
to counsel, a young woman
twenty-six who was jailed at
Middlesex sessions for no fewer
than 195 cunning forgeries,
whereby monies were obtained
from trustee savings banks.

ot

Worst of Britain’s post-
war, crime statistics is the growth
of juvenile delinquency, the latest
figures showing that in one out vi
three of all -the ‘convictions for

arceny the thief was a youngster

feature

under 17 years of age. As the yea
closed Mr. Justice Hilberry
declared “Young people who

mut erimes are not immoral

nowing that their conduct

wrong. Thev are amoral They
would not understand me if |
ealled their conduct wicked »,
sinful.’

There is some ditference f
ypinion about the causes of this

ituation, but certainly the loss ctf
irental control during the war,
some instances due to evacua-
from bombed areas, is

clor. Again, the tragic housing

n, making home life im-
ossible for thousands of families,
has contributed,

Whether the exaltation of the
riminal in films and other pic-
torial media is to blame to any
legree, is a matter of dispuce
among authorities. But there is no
uch dispute over the view that
the decline of religious observan e



y very large sections vf the
population has helped to bring
about a general lowering of moral
tandards, by which the children
ire sharply affected.

Obituary
Notwithstanding the increasing
xpectation of life, and the fact

that survival into the nineties 1s
iow fairly common, the annual

loss Oi: people

eniu or

distinguished
leadership is

for
! not
ightened

Among those who died during
949, Lord Londonderry had been
Leader in the House of Lords, held
inisterial in the Imperial
rovernment and in Northern
re‘and, Viscount Ullswater was
speaker of the House of Commons
H sixteen years, while

posts

Lord

éueenborough had» been M.P., for |
ambridge, and was known
loughout the Empire by his;
enerous devotion to the Roval
society of St. George. Eminent |

iwyers Who passed over included

Sir Ernest Jelf, who had been
King's Remembrancer and a
Master of the Supreme Court,
Lord Uthwatt, a Lord of Appeal,
and Lord Du Pareq, a Lord »t |
Appeal, and a distinguished |
Channel Islander. The ranks ot

famous figures of the wars were
thinned by the loss, among many
thers, of General Sir Walter
Kirke, remembered for his great
exertions in maintaining the
Cerritorial Force, Sir Fabian Wave
vho established the Imperial War
‘raves Commission and performed

unique service to those who fell |
i two World Wars, the Earl of |

Lucan, Admiral] Somerville,
Admiral Boyle, General Sir }
Kenneth Wigram, General

Gathorne Hardy, and Air Marshal

Sir. -G. Gossage

NENG NN NG BENG NN BH NB 8B NN 8G 81 8 8G 8G



The death roll in letters was
‘eavy. There were Dr, O. E.
Somerville, Mrs. Baillie Sanders,
Muriel Hine, and Miss E. H.
Young among women authors, Dr,
Robert Lynd the essayist; Sir
Charles Igglesden, Sir Malcolm
Fraser, and Sir Jonn Hammerton,
were well-known in differing
pheres of journalism, and Sir}

Bernard Pares one of the greatest
authorities on Bussia. Sir John
Sheeby, who was financia] adviser
to General Robertson, Britis;
Military Governor of Germany
was brutally murdered by two |
burglars who tried to break into

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his home. The arts los: Sir Walter

Russell, R.A. Alfred Hardman
the sculptor of the Haig Memori il
in Whitehall, Sir William +

Nicholson famous portrait artist, ;
and Professor Laurie noted. for |
his research and achievements ‘1 |
the preservation of old masters. ;
Sir Frederick Ogilvie sometimes |
head of the B.B.C., was also a
distinguished educationist. Frank
Smythe was knewn for his great
adventures in mountaineering.
The higher branches of medicine
and science lost Sir R. Robertson;
also Sir J. Purves Stewart and Sir
Maurice Cassidy both Royal
shysicians, Eminent churchmen
who hive died included yd
bishop Amigo, who received the
title of Archbishop on his jubilee
in Holy Orders and for his long
devoted service as-Roman Catholic
Bishop of Southwark, the Dean of
Lincoln, and Lord Daryington wio
had been a great figure in Anglican
mission and propaganda
organisations,

Commerce lost Lord Leverhulme
who had rendered signal generous
services to education also; Pas-
coe Rutter the Grand Old Man
of the insurance world, Lord
Portal who had many big indus-
trial interests, and had held Min-
isterial office, and Mr. A. V. Roe
pioneer in aviation and famous
in the aircraft industry. Man)
have gone over whe had in ther ,
iay added to the gaiety of the
nation. There was Sir Seymour
Hicks, a truly great comedy ac-
tor, whom France had also hon-
oured by making him a Chevalier
the Lesion of Honour. Dame
T-ene Vanbrugh left fragrant
memories of sixty years service
to the theatre. Tommy Handley
as the most popular of radio
entertainers. Tom Walls, out-|
tanding actor in farce and owner |
f a Derby winner, Davy Burnaby |
the pierrot of pierrots, George
G:aves the last of the great “
gers”, C. V. France accomplished
actor and author, and Firth |
Shephard who produced some t |
London’s brightest and most suc-





cessful shows in dark days. Of
these actors and actresses it id
particularly apt to quote, “All, |
all have gone, the old familiar |
faces”, in this year of reckoning,
1949. |
A feat of endurance ana navigation
which ihrilled the country during the }
Auantic by the Brothers Smith ir

20 ft. boat in 43 days.



RHEUMATISM.
and agonising |
BACKACHE

GONE!



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)



surprised me.’’--T.R
Rheumatic pains and backache |}
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to expel. Foi these | {\\
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SUND: TY 155 SUNDAY ADVOCATE

| The Commonwealth
Develops A Collective
Foreign Policy

Article—I The Treaty With Japan
By David Temple Roberts

LONDON. Dec. 23. Siates is tired of the burden. A
[These are a series of two former Security for War, Mr.
articles reviewing the work Royall, blurted out the truth a
before the Commonwealth year ago that occupation of Japan
Foreign Ministers when they is militarily wasteful and does
meet at a Conference in not fit into United States Pacific

PAGE ELEVEN









MY WIFE
By Dr. W. BR. Umge Former Dean of St. Paul's

Mrs. Mary Catherine Inge,
wife of Dr, W. R. Inge, the
former Dean of St. Paul’s, died
last April at the age of 69 after
44 years of marriage. Now Dr.
Inge has written a tribute to
her. It is printed in his Diary
of a Dean (just published by
Hutchinson, 21s.)}.

It is a noble and senore 1s
leave-taking; exquisitely phras-
ed and profcundiy moving.

I am in my ninetieth year and
hope soom te be at rest. Let my
las’ effort be to pay a tribute to








When colds threaten, cub throat, chest
and back with double-action Tiermo-
f4| gene Medicated Rub. Its medicinal
i} vapours startright away to break upcon-
gestion, soothe irritation, ease eeughing



January that the writer re- Strategy. The policy planners, he
gards as very significant for indicated, must think of a way to
the Commonwealth’s future. withdraw. So the problem of the
WHEN the Foreign Ministers of Japanese Peace Treaty is pushed
Commonwealth meet in véry forcibly in front of the Com-
slombo in January and take up monwealth Foreign Ministers.
» difcussion on the Japanese
ace Treaty they will find cross- Self Government F
ents and a number of vested 2 D

Pe Th self- " = . a °
srests within the British Com- ey have to prepare for aself- He MAP shows Japan in relation to Asia and her Commonweaith



a very beautiful life and a perfect
mafriage, never once clouded,
during forty~fom years, by any
shadow of disagreeinent or mis-
understandir g.

The continued strain of house-
keeping and social duties, and the
care of our children. were beyond
her strength, and medical advice
somewhat hastened ray retire-
ment from London. (Dr. Ince
left {t. Paul’s in 1934 and went

MARY CATHERINE INGE
bus small knowledge of the char-
acter of one’s partner. But it
changes by degrees into some-
thiag holier and more spiritual, as
to exquisive beauty of God’s
g) .ce_in a very human person-
al ty unfolds itself more and more
viibly.

“Marriage is the best thing in
human life,” my mother used vo







*MEN CAN PREVENT
*‘ MIDDLE-AGE’ HAIR WITH




ROWLAND’S

MACA SSAR OIL

: o _ governing Japan. There are two ; kas
on amie’ varea a ere major points of view, within the ishbours. The shaded area indicates territory that the Japanese
nt mu ;

Soeicas conmbegedinn’



say. St. Paul missed it, but he

te tive. a6 ightwell Manar, near knew that though faith and hope

Wallingford, Berkshire). The



i — nomic problems of Japan’s future. the last war. quieter life at Bright,.eil gave her ‘“Pide” indestructible, love is land's. Micasent (0! 5 e048
jcal ere ete ie oe Strong pressure comes ‘rom both some refreshmeny, but general Seater _ cme a ihe 29 ist introduced inty93 only a hair the Oaceoel nace :
tical a ; per ae Labour ti 0 : weakness, attaci f i c : Preparation with v i te

Canberra in 1947. sax dee aoe = eee e of its agony, Thakin Nu The situation of the two is dif- asthme, and camel ae ae “Love is as strong as death.’ Properties could remain pope a work. Strong, healthy hair result, ehen
More than two vents ae a ae cn iieie pavers that the future of his ferent. The assets of the Burma came more frequen. after the Many bereaved men must have shows, £90 youts apaiesen One deeb pavient 2

i to hope that, wi ; A country was. i > as * Bich ne us 3 i aa on the hair ee,

2s ees, a Peace ‘Treaty industry. This is commonly refer- road,” that taowaist agnarxist Oil Company were destroyed, in shock caused uy Richw.’s death felt us I_am feeling now, the The ideal hair dressing for men ete“

soft and easy to control
Rowland’s rubbed into the scalp 29°30
with the finger tips prevents

marxist education

major part, by events of war—
wculd be compulsory for Burmese

‘ruth of Shakespeare’s beautiful
particularly British dictated

must discipline the hair unobrru-
words (Much Ado About Nothing,

with Japan Ted to a “unfair” competition. sively, It must not make the hair

on active service in 1941. (Richard,
Accurately, there is a distinction

uld be concluded Dr. Inge’s son, was a clergyman

no ip ; 7 E 5 t : : icky or quickly soil the | i i cy
; all the war-time Allies and that the aim of his govern- policy”~-ans fis Nerden as Act 4, Scene 1): ee the lining of | hair, receding temples and other. -
“ey the Soviet Union. After ~ = — e between, on the one ment was “ownership a con- Salers Sopa pn for as > when he ees _— “ ia : h lif i aot gum o ans ig | Rowland’ ha ioe den Ths
c! ht tile 2 and, cut-price competition, not trol of the means of production.” i c / : ; . e© idea o er life shat. dients which repress . aOR 0 il is both
wed negotiating an agreed u fe ~ production.” United Kingdom Government In April this vear I had to go ts which repress the easy flow | a hair dressin d ‘oni
B F Notes necessarily “unfair”, due to the But recently there h: i A : nau to sweetly creep of the oil along the hair follicle. | ing and a tonic—
Treaty had been achieved , | as crossed bearing responsibility for com- to Lonvon for th s His sta maginati and’s fuldlealrrtee ae twllicle. | the very thing to prevent hai
en Italy. But since then the low price of Japanese labour and, the face of this Burmese Gov- pensation to shareholders and the British Deciees aaa othe = : wel eee oveland’s fulfils all these conditions, from getting that Frniddle-age
ory of Chinese Communist ©" the other, the’ dumping of ¢rnment a look of remorse, per- not accounting this to the Rur- business, and she sev’ her heart ren eee aan ; ee ee a
ae uh altered the pattern in Japanese goods caused by the haps a touch of pleading, towards jese Government. This has been n gz mi “USED BY DISTINGUISHED

Se ei ind entirely dee BISWSr practice of providing that capitalist, exploiting world recognised. in itr, Adibaiit cues on accompanying me. A full list shall come apparelled in more MEN FOR OVER 150 YEARS

which the Can- @xport bonuses to Japanese in- 50 recently denounced. Industries
ge olution. “ot ihe Japanese dustry. Grinding the face of the ©Xpropriated, including the Ir-
hem was founded, poor was Japan’s pre-war recipe "@awaddy Flotilla Company, with
0 for re-armament. American ad- SUch marxist fervour soon after
ministration has brought proper the astrologically determined
labour standards — wages and C&lebration of “independence”
factory conditions. Insisting on “%@ now being offered a mod-
their continuance by incorporating veeasin et tas ae ae
Neste : j : s ity—
Treaty was impossible. They een Treaty is a sanguine \yi+), mendy to. be Tecneaiien
: Spice é g approach to the prob- I ;

reed, too, that the Treaty lam. Th oitier pratiee, called the Burmese Government is
ould be concluded by all major “dumping” ie ceaeaee to the Sceking to persuade other com-
gerenits and interested parties thactar: ae Triterhational Trade panies that Capital invested in

statement that £10,000,000 would
be distributed between various
companies seeking compensation.
The position of the Irrawaddy
Flotilla Company is different. It
was expropriated by the Bur-
mese Government, led into office
by H. Aung San, in that Gov-
ernment’s early, marxist phase,
As originally announced, this po-
litical move was an expropria-
tion—with no mention of com-
pensation. Since then less marx-

impossible

then all Commonwealth coun-
es agreed that Russia’s claim
the Four-Power negotiation of

a eeaee os : n t p
ne , eee oe nee Organisation to which ‘Japan urma is secure. at ew ees. “ae
Gee Holland and) Fran try, Might be required to subscribe. But such a harsh description . on set on their assets by
eee choliinens, of the Burma Government is un- {"¢ !¥rawaddy Company has never

at Commonweath Conterence, Second Point of View
p years ago, was looked on jal 3 6
ance by Washington. United u ere is a second Common- ma, sin
tes diplomats thought that the wealth point of view. Cheap cuainied 7 to at ee
mmonwealth was evolving an Japanese goods are, in the short The writ of British law, under
-American point of view term erning Japan. In a sense there ¢ven Pakistan, and certainly the fact run far beyond the Irra-
some truth in that as the countries of South-East _ Asia, waddy. British Government did
was critical of MacArthur's They lower the cost of living in not hand over, to U. Aung San,
de policy in Japan, which the East, below that possible if a going concern. Britain, not
med to be excluding British those countries are compelled to told of this post-war chaos, con-
iness, and the Pacific domin- buy from high-cost producers— demns Thakin Nu too readily.
of Australia and New Zealand especially their textiles from The two rival elements, facing
a greater anxiety than the Lancashire. this Government in Burma are
ited States concerning security _AS Mr. Mayhew, Under- the “Communists” and the Ka-
Inst renewed Japanese aggres- Secretary for Foreign Affairs Tens. The so-called Communists
in another generation. At remarked to an M.P. questioning 8" @ confused mixture, There
Colombo Conference some of him on this point recently, . de are cocivinnive. - Dyasian
same opinions will probably “Certain countries are more in- of th marxists che indeed more
expressed and developed..But, terested in Japan as a source of side “Th ak a ee
from the victory of Com- Supply than as a competitor in 7," ft ee, Sr OUDe
; L 3 has rade.” follow their own Thakin, who
nist ene, oe ae . wan, be the wartime resistance
oo mie pa seo ne .he attitude of Australia and 2nd bargaining with the Japanese
once “ eae aee 7 New Zealand is uncettain. On o the intellectual | and aesthetic
eresente : : ” the one hand Australia is intensely Sid¢ of Burmese life, rather than

been offered by the Burma Gov-
ernment. But there have been
strong and persistent reports—
denied, it should be said—that
Burma has converted an offer of
“25 per cent compensation” in
Burmese shares—that is blocked
assets—into an offer of ‘ouble
that size in sterling.

The Commonwealth Foreign
Ministers should, and_ surely
will, take a wider view of the
Burmese problem. There are
two factors. One is geographical.
The security of Burma, India
and Pakistan have to be consid-
ered as one. The other is eco-
nomic, South-East Asia will
rot be place on a sound footing
until Burma exports, again, a
large surplus of its rice crop in
order to lower the high cost of
living of the whole area,

The

Just. It pays no account of the
under-publicised fact that Bur-

;



geographical factor—‘a

matter of security’—leads to the

@y Governments. So the cross- ry ; leading, as Aung San did, the conclusion that although Burma
H : " suspicious of concessions that ; B ’ ate Grn Same ees
; mts in the enna a d make Japan more pow- ‘tough elements of Burma, Per- is not a member of the Com-
Bicy towards Japan RYE. erful On. the other hand’ ton sonal - rivalry, distrust, dacoity monwealth, she should be re-
ged and become more com- stricting Japanese exports and assassination and race hatred garded, from the point of view of
qt ated. consequently reducing her wealth, ®%¢ the principal elements in defence, and when eligibility for
} iid et f , Burmese politics. Confusion faces certain forms of assistance is
Two Threats wou certainly force Japanese h ; i

ne threats People to emigrate en masse the observer. The Karens, who considered, as if she were a

ere are now 4 ree

towards--South-Hast»Asia, And control large areas, won grati- Commonwealth country. This is

| ;
st which the Commonwealth tude and respect from the Allied
i

an attitude that, I believe, India
be made secure in the Far that Australia finds even more forces in Burma—largely be- Three years ago it was Slarming. Australia is more cause they were willing to aid is very acceptable to Pakistan
sumed that a treaty with Japan likely to ask for the ,Strongest parachuted saboteurs as a means and Ceylon.
d deal with Japan’s own “anti-militarism clauses” in the of harming the collaborationist ¥ eee
dency to renewed aggression Japanese Treaty. The argument Burmese. The British Cansarcn. Rice Distribution
® balan “g against Japan a that Japan should be allowed an tive circles — and newspapers — a feu satis ;
Vefful China that would take @™my in order to defend herself that have assisted Karens to ex- . 1%¢ _ distribution of rice in

South East Asia is still chaotic.
Until the Burmese Government
can collect a crop, and until it
can encourage even greater pro-
duction, its rice is no more than
a hypothetical asset. In these

ra large proportion of the 4gainst Communism will not ap- press their demands for inde-
MBinland territories of the “Co- Peal to Australasia, Any Japanese pendence, are now alarmed to
Mpsperity Sphere.” But the @™my is t ~ dangerous. find the Karens tending towards

pmbo Conference has to con- The Problem Of alliance with the “Communist”

r two threats: one is the spread ~~as the obvious and nearby

Communism — or Russian in- anti-Rangoon” allies. cconomic matters the U.K. Com-
nee, the other is that Japanese Burma No Improvements missioner for South-East Asia
Mionalism will be driven by J has, since the war, played an
Pulation pressure to another Officially Burma does not ap- This being the state of affairs cflective part. But now that of-
Wenture. In a sense China and Pear on the agenda of the For- it is obvious that there will be no fice has been abandoned. The
pan are now both dangerous. _— Ministers meeting in Colom- steady improvement in Burma cne_ organisation in Zast Asia
most careful distinctions cae Rey is Burma is not until the Rangoon Government that is thinking of these prob-

t bé made. The new Chinese th ers, be renee and :omes to a political understand- lems ‘is the offshoot of the Uni-
lime is probably now at its ai Tk. Ceteemenan eee of ing that forestalls an alliance of ted Nations—the Ezonomic Com:
active; it will probably dis- But ever Geseeatmiahtin cae the separatists, (Karens) with mission for Asia and tie Far

bd forces and tackle internal 4,. an dae a pans in the disgruntled, (White Band). Far Nast, (E.C.A.Â¥.E.) This organi
blems. But Japanese potenti- ihe security of the Tidian: Ocean At the time of writing the Ran- sation, which has published ex-

goon Government is attempting
to placate the Karens and asks
that the past—the old days of
Rangoon’s domination, should be

ceilent reports, even if they are
ec.cmentary ivy European statis-
tical standards, should be en-
couraged by Commonweaith
support I have heard prejudiced
criticiym in J.ondon against
B.C.A.F.E. Its work is easily
criticised. But it represents a
constructive effort by experts in
Asia to tackle the problems oi
Asia without denending on the
West. The: progress of such ef-
forts should be watched eererly.
Asian countries will never have
a real status of equality in the
world if they continue for ger -
erations to depenc on European
or American abiJities. This should
be appreciated by the Common-

y as an aggressor will not be area, Burma is patently a weak
t for many years. She needs Jink jn the chain of countries
pping, steel, armies, planes. She surrounding the Indian Ocean.
indeed, at present, only a Discussion, probably informally, wined. out
ional industrial capacity re- and certainly not in plenary con- “*P® :
ve to before the war. But she ference, on the Burmese weak- Until Rangoon’s Government
too dense population, an ex- ness is bound to continue at Co- achieves such a solution, no finan-
Mal payment problem that will lombo. cial aid will do more than provide
d only to cheap exportation— a pile of small arms for a country

an adaptable industrial skill. that is already torn asunder by too
“Solution” of her problem is

pansion, which she attempted in
@Y! and might try again within
@nty years. The temptation, to
se who see the Communist
ry in the Far East as a
wiet victory, is to “solve”
furity by assisting a Japanese

The recent report, subsequent-
ly denied, that Burma had been
invited to the Colombo Confer- Against this background the
ence was technically incorrect in approaches of the Burmese Gov-
every way—nevertheless it ex~ ernment to the Commonwealth
pressed a certain reality. Burma, countries will be considered. The
though actively absent, will British Government has not made
effectively present, at the Colom- any financial grants to the Gov-

ks, ernment of Burma since the de-
elaration of the independence of



‘0 j Si - 1 x Ith
i discussion. betrceen Common; urma on January 4th, 1949, wealth. fon ‘ne, Comat
The Parallel wealth Ministers and diplo+ #286 oe oe in the that there ie equal consideration

mats for the past year. In April, 2" @ for the strongest, the United

The parallel is not with ] nwealth Prime Mouse of Commons Sir Stafford ; the smallest and
Many today but with the Ministore ae in London, ©“IPPS save figures of loans and ue en
mar Republic. Dawes loans decided to ask their Ambassa- Sfts| made by Britain “since ;

1945.” These included under the
in heading “gifts” a sum totalling

granted to Germany in the dors in Rangoon to report
v8; permission was given to the financial needs of Burma

ild an army — albeit small order to give her government Seine ena et a ae BYE BYE OLD YE AR!
‘controlled’ at first; inter- stability and greater assurance ©” oo ced claim against Burma -

ona

equality was granted; all’ against Communist insurgents.
asa means of keeping Trotsky ‘he scheme proposed was that a
t of Europe. There followed financial contribution should

@zism; there followed a second Come from: Great Britain, Pakis-
man adventure — immediately tan, India and Ceylon. The Am-
atrangement had been made Passaders met in Rangoon, spor-
h the Soviet Union, The par- ®dically, during the

llel is a warning.

for military expenditure by Brit-
ish forces operating in Burma
against Burmans, On the account
of British “loans” there appears
a figure totalling £36,000,000. But
it must be repeated again that
none of these gifts or loans, al-

So you must go. Alas, the fate
Of all things!—Comes it scon ur
lute
Bye-bye Old Year!
In going, we would wish that you

without advancing the matter to Might take aiong the “False”. The

To build an though they benefitted Burma in “True”
fhaermunist bastion on Mac 4 {Sm the Burmese Foreign S€ReFal, has actually been de- Hand orer to the coming, “Nev”.
ays new “democratic” Japan 75 ister U. Maung, passing livered to the “successor ov- Bye-bye Old Year!
id lead to stern Japanese , ernment of Burma. * * *

i t
Monalism, and ultimately fs a through London on his way to

i f We'll never meet again this way
den ~~ accommodation with the United Nations —, The almost desperate requests isnt follows quickly after day.
Mmunist China — the utter Pressed the urgency of Burma's of the Government of Burma for Bye-bye Old Year!
truction of South Eest Asia, DCed. Recently discussions have gnancial aid are now to be met by The. menivies. that, you. leave

. ae the advanced a step forward. ac- 4 grant from tl.ree neighbouring ;
greater ruin of the ar behind,
mmonwealth tual sum of money—£15,000,000, countries and the United King- Perforce, will keep fresh in some
These : ; ‘ has been put forward. dem. The figure Rovian. ‘ , mind
calculations must be est £15,000,000, is regarded as too : : \
#e now — and where better Political Struggle high’ by Government departments “ omega sorta tock 96 kind
E, &t Colombe, the Western To understand the Burma i? London—but negotiations will * ? nu

Bereign Ministers of the Common- o open on that figure.
being guests of the East.

problem, firsi, it is necessary t Each passing breath of air now





; ne have a clear picture of the poli- says;—

A - no avoiding the issue. tig} struggle ih that fcuntty. ie. Confused ; “We're at the parting of the ways,
Som 1 tPan to undertake anti- sentially there are three forces. The affairs of the British-own- Bye-bye Old Yeor!”
appa is es nt i In Rangoon, and with very little ed companies in Burma have And, as we finally bid you

—— that if effective control beyond the city become confused, unfortunately, A miz’d and lingering “Adieu”

"a8 LO be restrain ll n 1 the river up to Mandalay, is to Burma’s detriment, with this We hear the whisp’ring of the
nd ones ar the Government of Thakin Nu. question of the Burma loan. The New” :—

cally th I ; very difficult to be clear ‘wo most-mentioned Companies “Bye-bye Old Year!”

to keep Japan unde xecupa- what is the political complexion are the Burma Oil Company and

for a period. But the United of this government. At one ex- the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company. F. A, SQUIRES.

of engagevaents was mace, and
she tooh a fortnight of compiete
rest at the Acland Home to pre-
pare for the ordeal which her
doctors, rather to my distress, did
not forbid.

Hospitality
* . *

We were given nospivality at
Lord Beéverbrook’s flat at Ar-
lington House, and enjoyed lunch-
eons with the architects who im-
proved our house at Brighiwell,
Lord Mottistone and Paul Paget,
and with Mr. and Mrs, Amery on
the day before her death.

We were vo have gone to the
Archbishop of Canterbury, to

Neville Chamberlain, to
Lady Ravensdale and to my pub-
lisher, before our return home.
I went to say good night vo her
on the night of the 22nd, and she
seemed quite comfortable.

April 23 was “Richard’s Day,”
as she called it, “now it is my
day,” she would have said if she
had known that her call had
come,

She had a heart attack such as
she had often had before, and
then lost consciousness, I was not
summoned, of course she would
have sent for me if she had known
phe was dying.

My elder son was informed by
telegram, and came at once in
the small hours. It fell to him vo
tell me the sad news, for I never
expected it, her specialist had
given an encouraging report only
two days before. He wrote to me
that he did not expec’ it but
knew that it was possible.

It was the end vhat he would
have wished for her, she might
have had much to suffer. Most
of us, I think, would choose such
a death if we were prepared for
it, as she cervainly was.

Met In 1904

We met first in 1904 at
house of my uncle, F. G.
a noted Oxford cricketer,
held what was when a_ family
living in the gift of my fat*er,
Baswiek and Walton, near Staf-
ford.

We took long walks togevher on
Canrock Chase, and soon after
became engaged. It was a great
change for me, since Canon Hen-
svuu had just offered me the living
of All Saints’ Ennismore Gardens,
which had been carved ouv' of the
parish of St. Margaret's, West-
minster. We were married in the
following spring by Archbishop
Davidson, a cousin of my wife, in

the
Inge,
who

Canterbury Cathedral, and we
spent our honeymoon av’ Gras-

mere. My wife was a grand-

daughter of Harvey Goodwin,

Bishop of Carlisle, and she was

always happy in the Lake district.
* *

My new work was entirely
strange to me, and I could noi
have done it without her help.
The Vicarage was at 34, Rutland
Gate, a quiei’ square; my old
friend Sir Frarcis Gaiton lived
almost next door.

The parish was aristocratic,
with a preponderance of rather
elderly people. Three of his
Majesty’s judges, Lord Halsbury,
Lord Macnaghten, and Lord
Darling, sat under me, and Ernest
Pollock, afterwards Master of the
Rolls. But there were also sev-
eral ladies in black bonnets, who
preferred simple fare, so the
preaching was rather difficuit.

The go'den age of the West End
incumheuts had come to an end,
nud J was often discouraged,
fearing that 1 was a failure. In
reality 1 Kept my congregation
together fairly weli, and Kitty
woud not allow me to be anxious.
She soon made many friends in
the parish, and managed her
household well, which i was quite
incapable of doing.

Oléest Chair

We were only less than three
years in Rutland Gate. The Lady
Margarev professorship at Cam-
bridge fell vacant, and I was
asked to stand for it. This is the
oldest chair in the University,
and has been held by many dis-
tinguished theologians.

I countea it a great
when I was elected.

The main work of a professor
is to give lectures, which have to
be ravher simpie, since the intel-
jectual level of young men who
are preparing for ordination is
not, on an average, very high.
But in each year there were ‘wo
or three really able men, and

honour

these used to come to my house °*

for a little more advanced study.

The work suited me exactly,
and in the long vacations I was
able vo do a_ great deal of read-
ing and writing. My hore life
was ideally happy. I find in my
diary such entries as “every year
that I spend with Kitty is betvc:
then the lasv.”

This I think is the way with a
perfectly happy marriage. Love
et first is a comparatively poor
thing, an external attraction with

Precious habit

Mare moving delicate and full
of life,

Into the eye and prospect of his
soul

Than when she lived indeed.

{ found among her papers «4
sealed packet addressed “1'o my
dear husband, to be opened afte:
my death.” It was written, not
atter her health began to fail, but
at Rutland Gave in 1906, just be-
fore the birth of our first-born.

Like many in her generation,
she greatly exaggerated wha’ ow
Prayer Book absurdly calls the

great peril of childbirth. Statis-
tically the chances are about 250
to 1 in favour of the mother.

She wrote: “My own Best-
beloved, I am quite alone this
evening. I wish vo tell you a little

What is in my heart, though 1
shall not be able to express a
hundredth part of what I really
feel.

“Perhaps I hardly know my-

self: only sometimes I am filled
with a grateful and wondering
surprise that God has given me
the power to love you so much.

feel more and more how un-
certain the fuvure is for me; but
whatever God has settled for us
I am absolutely content.

“If I am vo go before you I do
not much mind, because I feel
more and more that to such love
as ours is nothing can separate
us, not even death.

“You will never know or guess,
unless God shows iv to you, what
you have been to me, what you
have taught me and shown me,
and made this life so beautiful
that vhis world seems more like
an immortal place and nearer
heaven.

“You have taught me
longer to fear death, for perfect
love casieth out fear, and if | am
to leave you soon it will only be
the regret of leaving you and our
babe for a short space. O God,
bless my Best-beloved, my own
dear, husband. Pour upon him the
fulness of Thy grace that he may
show forth to Thy people the
love, the power, and the near-
ness of Thy Kingdom unto men.

“God bless you now and always
Your Kitty.”

Bride

youne

After 43 years it has fallen ‘c
me to read this letter, which came
from vhe gentle heart of a young
bride—we had been married just

no

over a year. lt was not meant
for any eyes fut my own. But 1}
have allowed her to tell in her
ewn words ‘he love which has

showered upon my unworthy self
the greatest of earthly blessings. |

I do not feel that I have really
losit her, but only that the links

which bind me to this world of
time and change, of gain and
loss, of good and evil, are almost



severed, But I still have my dear
children and grandchildren
—L.E.S

What’s In
A Slogan?

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, (By Mail).

Tate and Lyle’s advertising
campaign for free sugar—in
particular the printing of slogans
on their sugar packets—was the
subject of a letter to the
“Observer” this week. The write,
Mr. G. E, Chandler, is a wholesale
grocer, and distributes sugar to a
rumber of retail shops. His letter
followed on the heels of Mr.
Herbet Morrison’s recent protesi
against workers employei b)
late & Lyle having to pack anc

andle political propaganda—in
the shape of anti-nationalisation
3.0fans,

Mr. Chandler’s point was this
fe was asked by a retailer if he
might not have packet sugar with-

' political slogans on the packet
i hinking this a reasonable request,
Vr. Chandler asked Messrs. Tate
& Lyle if they would arrange tc

ad a portion of his supplies in

ain packets. He was told this
ce uld not be done.

“But sugar is a rationed food’
writes Mr. Chandler “distributed
cn the instructions of the Ministry

Food. Packet sugar is a great
saving of time and inoney; every
rotailer is entitled to a proportion
his supplies in this way. Now
*>e only refinery from which our
supplies can come insists that
yolitical propaganda‘ must be dis-
‘ributed at the same time!”



n effect, says Mr, Chandler, he

s been compelled io say to his
tomers: “Take this packet
with these slogans, or else

ave bulk sugar.” He feels that the
egality of his position, a i

wholesaler imposing such a condi-
tion on a retailer, is questionable.

—(LE.S.) 2

tn = ecient,’ &, Diath slide, 4

NUS NN NH NNN NNN

IS OUR SINCERE
WISH TO ALL
CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS






THE SEASON'S GREETINGS...

To wish all of our customers
A Very Happy and
Prosperous New Year !

A. BARNES & CO.,

LRINK-

at



See





The Tea with oa Tang”

Obtainable leading Grocers



The Barbados Co-Operative Cotton Pactory Lid.



SEES SSS BRASS 6S SSS

—









Best Wishes

FOR THE

New Year




THe BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LID.

THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS
Nos. 33 & 52 Swen Street



4406 or 2109

TT TT a


SUNDAY Al O
aa 4 ah.
















Ee ee ee

UN. Trouble ,AREA INVOLVED IN RECOGNITION

nieces xe s<-, strasbourg
' Bells

Not Battle COSTA tae
Of The Titans | a cem ree !,

GULF Of
-NY. TIMES an

mn
NEW YORK, Dec. 31.





























—

jAQUE













«
The New York Times to-day A er on YM
i commented on United Nations Ye P ‘ rr" Sire n ol ill East German
Secretary—yGeneral Tryeve Lie's SAN JOSE 1$ or : tionalised factories will sound
new year statement in en he F 1 ° for one minute to begin a ‘half
placed emphasis on the shadow CHRIQUI ~~ OF . a ny if Weacé ~>¢ialism
cast on the United Nations by the nate ape ; IP ANAM a on fed ine lle Se ‘Ses
: “great power conflict”. —_—_— a

“There is of course no doubt
that the east-west struggle is at
the root of the United Nations dif-

‘4 ficulties but that is “a different
thing froni implying that the
struggle is merely a struggle of
the Titans in which the rest of the
world is not involved”. The news-
paper wrote.

“On most of the political ques-

viet Union”.
Special fireworks in red and |
sold at the Soviet Control Com-;
ion headquarters will begin
what is described as “the Com-
munist Epoch”. In West Berlin,
regulations against explosives will
not be waived to allow fireworks.

In New York, a_ thousand
policemen will patrol New York’s



COLOMBIA





NaN eae

= PACIFIC
“OCEAN —













: : . . ;
ations which Times Square, where a
Se ae Se eeeare of the sais crowd will give the peeing year tine
, e little pow- ne : its traditional noisy welcome.
ors hae of thelr tl teen will pe Ft RANDOLPH BI Traffie is almost at a standstill, AFRICAN BROTHERS
expressed a choice that with re- A ® eee tne Ea and extra trains, planes and buses A AT RR

markable consistency places them
with the United States and in op-
position to Soviet Russia”, it
added.—Reuter.

have been pressed into service to
WHILE “deploring” the revolution- carry travellers to and from the
ary means “by which political bigger cities. ‘ose
changes were made,” the U. S. has Thousands of revellers will in-
recognized Panama’s President Az- Vade London’s West End tonight
nulfo Arias, Recent “putsches” and ‘*? dance, drink, and sing in the
-, i a ee ee : New Year :
,, ° ‘ or ae ee and Colombia Sreod-of Mukting* restuetions
‘1 ChaYTON SPANAMA ave bey sebaanaan re fot ‘tie: Gest 4ighe “stnde tha: wae:
. moments. Lecated in these trouble ;
PANAMA HALBOA

. ral London will be more
areas (top on map) is the Panama i ith sky signs than at

*
SOMEBODY WANTING To
INCORPORATE ME ?





















OLD LOWS ALMANACK = YO4/CES yor joan)
SURACHEY AND PLUMMER START THE GROUNDNUTS ScHEMe

Germ Experts |
Sentenced







Canal, vitally important to the








9 ; Year’s Eve for a decade OVER AGAIN FROM SCRATCH , ee PLANTING AN EXPERT witit
eeigiem~em United States. At left isa close-up 3 undreds of extra police wer« QWERY Bust, “OR INDIIDUAL ,
LONDON, Dec. 31 pow eee, ee ee of Canal Zone. (Central ~ -7*) jeiy d to these strategic ,
Moscow radio reported today mcnn “1 7 % ‘ : g

its Trafalgar Square,
lights of the
as Tree from Nor-
ind the iliuminated
y Eros Statute in
Circus, magnet for
st. Paul’s Cathedral
will toll out
; N






that a Soviet Military Tribunal

has sentenced 4 Japanese “Germ U7. S SHIPPERS APPE 4 /
Experts” to 25. years imprison- e . am 4 , te.

ment for planning a “Bacterio-

seein Bam wae TO CONGRESS FOR FAIR

Twelve Japanese officers and

men of the Bacteriological Wat PANAMA CANA j 1 TOLL the Old Year
Unit 73 have 1 . ere








zy in the Nev
73 been on trial in onal now through radic
Khabarovsk, on the Soviet-Man- sages ita se ; ational tradition,

p . 2K Dec 3 .
churian borcer, since Christmes ae is NEW YORK, Dec. 31 Reuter.
Day. The American Shipping Industry has appealed to Congr

They admitted carrying out to establish a “fair and equitable policy” in determini
experiments on human guinea tolls for commercial shipping passing through the na ; 1 7 ‘
pigs, including American prison- Gara] Aull U.S. Expected to Cut
ers of war, and spreading bubecni : t

= The Industry contends ti
plague in Central and Southe





China in 1941 and 1942. Panama Canal UL v RB ie I oreign Aid

‘
( . sed for National Defer
General Ottozo Yamada, former kgypt oes I oO oh : BOs e “altho y - 5

Commander-in-Chief of the Kwan-





7 ; ag
tung Army, the force entrusted “vehicles ee the last 35; ye ( 2. ar ks *saieibien
with preparing the bacetria war Polls Tuesday have borne the burden ee adie y cause controversy are
Lieutenant-General Riuji, head a a ee the ieee Recoshition of the Commi
the Kwantung Army Health iii hash See ee ee regime in China and of re-
Service, who directed research and After a bitterly fought two a Institute splay 1d te the Chinese Nation
experiments on living people to months campaign in which clashes ah me rem hs ‘ ts ee alist Government for the defenc«
test the most effective bacterio- cost at least ten lives Egyptians the National Federation of Ameri Formosa
logical response, Lt-General Taka— Will go, to the polls on Tuesday to can Shipping, an Ree meee ee Collaboration by Britair
hassi, a Medical Services Officer, elect a Chamber of Deputies. Pacific Coast Maritime groups in ihe United States and Canada o
who also admitted leading experi- Premier Hussein Sirry Pasha urging Port Authoritic Seen development of atomic weap-
ments on living people, Kiyushi “Catetaker’s” Government in- of} Commerce, and other rarer sas
Kawashima, who headed an ex- creased the number of seats from parties to bring the matter to the Tr} Japanese Peace Treat)
periment which injected deadly 260 to 315 before King Farouk attention of Congress and Pre vill require Congressiona
bacteria into Russian and Chinese eae the old House on No- an ruman. on and ultimately ap
isoners of ei . OR acu vember 7 “The need or Congressit val
Nciibonmant Pen 25 year Many of the 5,000,000 voters will action is urgent, as 11 } ce Congressional action is also re

have to be shown where to put















: increase in tolls has been order¢ 1 on the question of assist-
: Sentences their cross as they are illiterate by Presidential declaration, eff to Greece, Turkey and Sout!
Tomio Alasawa, physician and The Egyptian Government has not tives Avril 1, 1950”. the stateme ; a permanent Charter fo
bacteriologist in charge of pro- yet granted votes to women in saat P ae 8 1 International ‘Trade Organisa
ducing germ cultures for war use, spite of campaign for equal civic ~“)\ io 4 f d proposals for a -mor
and Shunji Shato, whose uni rights for women led by 32 year The toll policy rane, am : 4) progr Ce of admittin
100 incubators for breeding old Madame Dorea Shafik, Doctor C@® shipping ch a Sree laced persons to the Unitec
bacteria got 20 years. Tossiade Of Philosophy and editor of wo- sive proper FSCORS RD ce ee ie
Mishi, chief of the unit 731 train. ™en’s magazines, military und civil expense of th alien
ing unit, 18 years: Kazou Mitomo The main struggle in the cam- Canal as National De fenc © iten
| a senior non-Commissioned Office: P&ign_is between the nationalist and wenn against Samer
in unit 731, 15 years W.AF.D. Party and its off shoot shipping those costs directly « : '
Masao Onoe, bacteriologist and [N° tre etesan sete AED. led cerned with the operation of t Astronomers To
Major in the Japanese Army oben diane air tend Biceriae ae canal”, it added. J
7 ave ae ae a, = : . »
Medical Services 10 years; Jensaku Egypt claims to be the Peoples rue Saeee Meet In Russia
, Hiraza, a Staff Officer in Detach- Party It was founded by the “At a present cat ba <
} ment 100; one of the Bacteriologi- late Saad Zaghlul Pasha “father margal SRD INE Day PP 3 ART ONA Dec .81.
cal Warfare Organisations, who of the Egyptians” 620,000,000 in tolls, Le ae The next General Assembly of
helped in experiments with gland- The Saadists are known as the $9,000,000 is required tor actual the International Astronomical
ers (cattle plague) and malignant land owning and big business Canal operation and mainten i1ion i) be held in Leningrad
anthrax 12 year Jiji Kurusima party The leader is Ibrahim exclusive of depreciatic uy probably in August, 1951, it was
Medical Orderly end laboratory Abdel Hady Pasha. They were ments to the Republic of Par announced here :
worker 3 years: Norimitsu Kikuchi, the strongest party in the old However, more than $10,000,00 Profe rA. M khailov of the
medical orderly and laboratory House. Other parties are: Liberal is paid out by Canal ithorit Soviet Academy of Sclences has |
worker, 2 years, Constitutions led by Hesseit or schools. cemeteries, libraries, give surance hat all cet
The State Prosecutor I N Haykal Pasha, Nationalists Ex police, fire, courts pating organisations will be in-
Smirnov in his final peech, saide treme Right Wing Party led by sewers, air terminal in ite
that the trial had shown. that Hafez Ramadam Pasha. facilities, used largels rhe nouncement was mac -
that t rial ha 1own dé Kotla also called the Independ- |” Healy. ae enittsaiey t met g here of the Ameri-
Japanese militarists had been ent Wafdist block has a nucleus of —,°) a 4 * the Gan il n Astronomical Society Rus
actively preparing bacteriological men who seceded from the "an ty edie aie 40) ia and the United States both
wee WAPD. The Leader is Makram _, NObwiistanemg, me, 10.8 20 issued invitations to the Interha-
They were trving to bring man- Ebeid Pasha. Ali Parties demand other revenues were sulficien . Group, but the United
kind back to the times of pes- the complete evacuation of British cover not only these, but to per-



: : , ks invitation was lately with-
tilence, of destructive epidemics troops from Egypt and unity of mit a profit of more than $2,00(



‘ Ape ; a drawn

of cholera and bubonic plague, te the Nile Valley (Egypt and the 000 in the fiscal year of Rae ta Sir Harold Spencer Jones, Brit-
the darkest periods of the middle Sudan) ee the Egyptian —Reuter. ish Astronomer Royal, and form-
ages,” he declared, Crown.—Reuter. I ini




























the



(gemntemicqnndittiemmminnins er Presi nt f the T ,
Unit 731, with headquarters in y juested the assurance that al)
Harbin, had prepared bacterio- ¢ Mi h | H . rticipating organisations wouid
? > .
logical warfare for several years, 2 Journals Reappear 1¢ ae as 1 1 to Russia Such an
the nrosecutor said urance reached President Ber-

The Unit. he said. began with In B. Aires Ho es For ime Lindblad, Lund Observatory
“the selection of death-dealing Pp stockholm, in

June, the an-



















infection, testing on thousands of BUENOS AIRES, Dec. 3! e Ouncement sald,-—Reuter
victims, and working out methods The Buenos Aires tabloic R «
of cultivating bacteria.” Clarion” at a this aa umanta . :
They finishes with “mass pro- ing as result of the solution of the . a a J Sore ,
Ps 4 of means. for deeveian on problem caused by intervention we basa coe = om . “ annings Still
5 ssive bhacteriolovic: ae paper supplies by congressiona »X11eC ng cnael oO vu ee
ee ven committee "investigating anti-Ar- mania to-day addressed a Ne Practising
> Japanese General Staff haq Bentine activities, Year message to his countrymen es 5 rp
The Japanese General Staff had B° he daily “Los Princeples” of proclaiming: ‘For all enslaved VIENNA, Dec. 31
approved three basic methods for cordoba also re-appeared after peoples, the day of freedom b« Emil Jannings, 64-year-old
using the bacteria for war pur- being ordered by provincial au- gins to dawn.” former German actor, who is
poses s i thorities to effect repairs in build- The message from King Mic! eriously il here, was studying
(1) Spreading of bacteria from ing, Meanwhile the Congressional ael, who is at present on holiday proposed next part as Pope
planes; Committee carried out activities in in Italy, said; “Rumanians,” { Bonitace in bed today, though his
(2) Dropping special bacterio- Rosario yesterday, where they vis- the second time from Foreign soi! ndition is unchanged. He is suf-
logical bombs from vlanes: and ited the Argentine-United States I am addressing you wherever [tering from jaundice and inflam-
(3) Infection on the ground of Cultural Institute, detailing am you are, at home or abroad 1 ma of the liver, but he still
} populated places, water supplies auditor to inspect the institute’s Word of comfort and encourage 1opes to take on the role. Jan
and pastures, books.—-Reuter. ment at the opening of a Ne is, w of the film “The Blue
The Prosecutor outlined the be ingel in which Marlege Die-
x rocess of Japan’s bacteriological r ‘ “It opens at a time of great 1 rose to fame, was Planning
; ato as follows; Work was a. U.K. I roops stress. Even greater suffering a come-back when he was taken
3 ed many years age in the laboro- , . ol may be in store—yet there are on December 2
i tory of Shiroishi, “the ideological oO eave — oe hopes. ' ie l eens to acon men-
i champion of bacteriological war- . . oo. dae © profourd and unshakeable tally very alert and greatly an-
ae with the support of the All Britist Soren ee Pe belief which has always guided sted in the telegrams and
Japanese Csneral Staff. awe sn alone «nl . oT een Rumanians, in both our past letters, which pour unceasingl)
Me \Feliel \ta“eie meacken , Greece by January 31, it wos and present difficulties, has been c his countrv ‘ome on the Wol
fs His ‘work ws surrounded by officially announced here today our faith in God and the nat : vensiaed | ¥ob-
secrecy,” the prosecutor — said On January 30, the last British “Our none aoe m ee ngee. Thotige eae orci a i
5 xo . f th — ore troops will embark in the Empire which we hav e wou au te 4 Werner a we f oe ore- : oe ine
y e work of the laboratory he Windrush, which will call at oe he wae to a ae ee sim , ine. ; ‘ 3 r
: chased it to Toso, oid Be Sar next day to take. on > ay shall, any sacrifice, is free- cer Fr ae filr I'm an insurance collector and | have to answer more silly questions about the Pru and
abdoratory was called the Togo board the last men in the Athens ie

; —(R P
t Unit. area.—Reuter. pacer)

the Co-op than any M.P., and {'m tired.”



4 ee .

| PE RED DIDK AED EN AITO, 7 % | ROUEN
Hi “We wish our customers and friends USED CLOTHING

f _ A Prosperous “toate
i A Happy and Prosperous

| New SVear =



London Express Service





Stanley Gibbons Stamp
Catalogue 1950,
Beer Mugs of Dickens Characte®
Poker” Chips in Gift Sets
Blue Band Waiz—Plates, Cups
Chair Cane and Varnish



wy

We have large stocks of Civilian and Ex-servi i

: arg s i X-s ce Clothing,
Soots and equipment of every description for immediate ais
ment to all parts of the world. Cable or write your enquiries
for: K.D, Trousers, Shorts, Denim Drill Overalls, Blankets,

Respirator Haversacks, protective clothin

' s, Felt Hats, Khaki

hv at Baitle-dress Blouses. Write for price lists and full
iculars,



Bankers : William Deacons Bank, Manchester,
Cables : Recuvery, Manchester.
Phone: Blackfriars 7694

H. NEWMAN & CO. (MERCHANTS) LTD.

88/92. E

IS THE SINCERE WISH OF



ALL AT

WOMCMO NGO Nee

COLLINS’ DRUG STORES

Johnson's Stationery & Hardwatt |

abeth Street

GONG SEEMS

BOOKER'S (B'DOS) DRUG STORES LTD. |

SSS] 555235- SS

w

BUN TLDS PN AN IN IN IA PAAR BN AN ON DN ON AED

8 SPS BRGS GR GEIS PEE DRE ES

anche 3. England

i TA EK BSR RE RKRCRERE







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>
>

2

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SUNDAY

BY CARL ANDERS

got

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CKEY MO BY WALT DISNEY
y / THEY €VEN nal
Bien) =a - A HE PALL ARP ERY
ie Be) eo
aoe A 6 6 BUSINESS! Guar rex, PELE?

PMELITTLE :
ISALESMAN- ) ==
BHIP, YOU J Seon
KNOW! 4 ||| |@0R86e HH fans








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RES NOTHING





THE LONE: RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER
x) LES! TT spleens she cinta sil Epes. %
iY el WHAT'S THAT ? *Â¥OU Sai) T wi YOU CAN'T STOP THAT IT CAN IR LET GO/ You CAN TRY AFTER









SHERIFE, NOU CANT LET THAT MOB Pe YOU'VE INSURED THE
GET DIFF 5 SAFEN OF YOUR
“th \SONER. GIVE

PRI
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DO



| | OF ME!







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( "IM AFRAID | MUST ASK YOU TO \———————
- ( ACCEPT THE HOSPITALITY OF = /-—————==! .
\ CASTLE MCGINK UNTIL .. uf WOULDN'T WANT

THE LADIES HURT

> a o
..THE SCORPION \ &
DECIDES WHAT To J

LO

00 WITH YOu!








FRIEND - TO THIN}
THAT JIGGS Wot
FLIRT WITH ANOTHER
GIRL; a
CEga>),
% o
4, \e ~
ei le
we »










14), King Features Syndicate, Inc, World

RIP KIRBY





MAYBE YOU THINK I HAVEN'T!
GOT ONE! MY MOTHER WAS
A MOVIE STAR...MY FATHER
WAS A FAMOUS EXPLORER...
THEY RE BOTH DEAD, AND
T'M ONS OF THE RICHEST
ORPHANS IN THE WORLD..
SO THESE ! 7














FLASH CODE # COMING FROM THE
LIGHT INTHE THUGGEES CELL!

THERE THEY GO+WITH THE NEWS
THAT THE RANSOM PLOT FAILED!
THAT MEANS DEATH FOR DIANAs
UNLESS | ACT FAST?

a
\ VES, AND WE MUSTN'T
LET THE THREE IN THE
ELL CONTACT ANYONE
“T°. OUTSIDE + NEY!
\






FROM THAT

jal









ADVOCATE





















PAGE THIRTEEN



CR te





THE NEW GOLDEN

Remember this label! _



IT IS ONLY PLACED ON GOODS OF FIRST QUALITY

as for
oe MORTON —





STRONG PEPPERMINT

LOZENGES
AS. BRYDEN & SONS (B'dos) LID.









TWENEY,

YOU CAN RELY ON IT.

MARINE ENGINES COMPLETE 8—32 HLP.

ENGINES 8—32 HP.

DIESEL ELECTRIC SETS 4—18 K.W.
PUMPING SETS

CLUTCH AND REDUCTION GEAR UNITS

Backed by a Dependable Parts and Service Organisation.
Please Phone us and a representative of the Company will cali on you
to discuss your problem.
Electric Motors:

1/6—5 H.P. motors ex-stock at highly competitive Prices.

Also Starters for large size Motors.



ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LTD.

TWEEDSIDE ROAD DIAL 4629, 4371

tute SSS tee











THE WILL OF LONELINESS 4
Radclyffe Hall |
CRICKET IS MY LIFE
The autobiography of Len Hutton
CRICKET MY WORLD |
By Walter R. Hammond.
CONCERNING CRICKET bee
t
ILLUSTRATED ieatiade Bieta iia Seceen. . nanan
NS MO ME Trevelyan, O.M. the NEW Golden Platigoum
—with sleek stream - lined
BAHAMIAN INTERLUDE barrel; half-hooded nib;
—Peter Henry Bruce : 7
gleaming engine-turned
THE COMPLETE SHORT STORIES OF LAKI Sicduhelivenguab-cnciuedts
BIGGLES DEFIES THE SWASTIKA 1 built-in clip. Obtainable ina
—Capt. W. E. Jones ¥ colour range of blue, doves
‘ BIGGLES IN BORNEO ’ grey, maroon, green and black.
—Canpt. W. E. Jones
SPITFIRE PARADE : “ gi Cae
—Capt. W. E. Jones Pi
THE DEATH OF A GOD NY \ | a IGT
R —Osbert Sitwell — anne
A WIND IN THE WEST } Distaisutor :
‘ By Elizabeth Coxhead } c. L. PITT,
THATS ME ALL OVER }| GP.O. BOX 246
—Corneliaotis Skinner | BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS,
ADVOCATE STATIONERY H|
RINE em: TIRE a eI
= : — =.)








‘+E FOURTEEN



CLASSIFIED ADS.



RATES



Week Sun. |
ANNOUNCEMENTS $1.00 1.20
FOR SALE per word
FOR RENT » » + con -
WANTED ” = }
LOST, FOUND per word -
Minimum charge .. 8 ‘
i
PUBLIC SALES
+19
AUCTION & REAL -08
ESTATE per agate line ‘
Minimum charge .- . 1.00 4.
Personal _ wm. 1
«Maximum 14 ‘agate lines)
PUBLIC See hs as
Per agate line .. 4
Minimum charge 1,20 1.00

EVENING ADVOCATE “ (Monday?



WEEK-DAYS:—2 p.m.
SUNDAY :—2.00 p.m. Friday

ALL items of different classification
must be set out in “eparate #(ver's.



narien ot ARRIA' Thnursaay Dec. 29th
. Philips Church, KENSiNGTON
ROBERT CHALLENOR and HILDA,



widow of the late GEORGE CNALLE-

NOR tz. &- -In
DIED

INNISS: SYDNEY BISHOP. His fun-

1 will Jeave his late residence

rlisie View” Bay Street, at 4.30

o'clock this afternoon for the West-

bury Cemetery. Friends " asked
to attend

Fanny Inniss,

MARSHALL~.ADRIANA, Last night o°
the General Hospital, Her fumeral wii
leave the residence of her grandsor.,
Lionel R. Arthur ‘Florvilie’, Brittoms
Cross Road at 4.15 this afternoon for
the King Street 8.D.A. Church ax
thence to the Westbury
Friends are asked to attend

Percy Marshall



Cemetery

(sor), Ferris Arthur
Lilian Marshall, [lene Scott, Miriar
Meblett (daughters), Cuthbert B. Arthur
and Lionel R. Arthur «sia dencst | e*





THANKS

undersigned, beg through this
medium to thank all those who attended
the funeral, send cards, wreaths or
sympathised with us in our recent be
reavement of our beloved JASMINE
REID

Samuel Reid (husband), George and
Fred Reid (Sons), Ivy, Millicent, Mabel,
Alma, Marjorie (Sisters)

WE, the

1.1.30. ms



iN MEMORIAM
IN Memory of our Dear Husband anc
Father COURTENAY H. MASSIAH, who
departed this life January ist 1947
“He went forth to his work, and to his
labour,—-until the evening.”
The Massiah Panne

IN loving memory of our Dear Mother
Mrs. ALBERTHA BAILEY who was call-
ed to rest on the 2nd January 1948,

Sleep on mother dear sleep on,

And take your rest

Ever to be remembered by her chil-
dren Mrs. E, Odell, Gwen, Olive
(daughters) and Oliver Nurse (son), Mr
Charies Odell (son-in-law). 15) grand
children 1.1.50—In

IN loving
loved father

memory of our dear be
JOHN BG PRTO” CcoD-
RINGTON who died 2nd Jan 1949
A home has missed a father
No one to fill his place,
in life we loved him dearly
In death we do the same,
Ever to be remembered by»
lowing, Eunice Codrington (Wife
Louis (Son) Yvette (daughter) ;, etc
1.1.50.

the fol

In



dear be

BRANCHE

IN loving memory of my
loved mother, MARTHA
who departed thig life Jan Ist 197

She has gone from toil and Sorrow

She has gone from grief and pain,,

She has gone to be with Jesus,
And | hope to meet her there
Ever to be remembered by
Maynard (son) Leonard and,
Brewster (grandchildren

FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

AUTO CYCLE—One
Cycle. M.2320. Owner
Dial 3939

Geralc
Sylviz









(1) Norman Aut
leaving shortly
30, 12.49—On





ENGINE Anmver.can
Horse) Outboard Engine, 5 h.p. As goor
as New. Also several extra gaskets t
go with it Phone 6140 or 2840

30.12.49

Johnson (Sea

t.f.1

tle





CAR—One Willys Motor Car in gv
condition, No reasonable offer refused
Apply to W Nurse, Cocoanut Walk
Hastings, Ch. Ch

31.12,.49—2n
TS

CAR: One Roekney Motor Car in goox
running order, Five new Tyres Nev
Battery and New Top. Apply: A Edg-
hill, Strathelyde, Phone 3378 or 2122

31.12.49-—2

_————_—_

TRUCK-—-One ‘334 V-8 Ford. In gooc
condition, OLIVER MOORE, Lower Carl-
ton, St. James

1.1.50.—1In

ELECTRICAL
GERATOR -- One (1) Genera
Electric Refrigerator Monitor toy

unit about 4 years old. Good edition
Apply:—Jotnson's Stationery Oslce
20.12 4n



G.B. REFRIGERATOR: 4 Cu. ft. in
good order. Offers, accepted, Reason for
selling owner buying a larger one





Phone 2342. between 10 a.m. and 12 noon
31.12.49—2n

LIF STOCK

GOATS — 7 Milch goats, 1 Saan

buek, 2 teeth. Bred from impor e

Stock. Apply B. A. Rayside, Contedence

Station Hill, St. Michael

29. 12.49—4n

PUPPIES—Half bred Bull & Mastiff
Bulls, $15.00, Bitches $10.00. Dial 8325
31.12. 49—3n





LIVESTOCK—One Graded Saanen Buck
2 years old, and one Black Belly Ram &
months ald, both r y for service, Apply
,. N. HUTCHINS West India Rum
Refinery, Phone

1,1,60.--2n.

ate Suiver King

all models, in c
oe a migdela in gree an fa

Bil.sont.en








MISCELLANEOUS
MANURE—Horse Manure suiteble fo

gardens. 8/- horse cart load. jal 318

C, A. Proverbs. 90.12 .49-—3n

3.12.49—t.i.n

re
GOODS—Just received a new shipment
of electrical goods 1/044 triple, 7/04
twin, ie triple, 7/029 twin, 3/02
triple 3/029 twin €.T.S. cables 1/044
7/029, 3/029, V.ILR. Switches, plug recep
tacles and several items. Enquire Aut
Company. 16.12.40
sane
WE still have a small supply of Am
— Chocolates in stock, 1/- per 1
ust received Black Magic Choco
iaies 1 % tins, & 1% I boxes
KNIGHTS DRUG STORES
30 .12.40—2r
ea
FREEDOM FROM FIRE—lInstal a Fire-
proof Safe with doors secured b:
Combination lock: Suitable for office o:
store. Ure your gecords. Contac!
A. 8S. BRYDEN & SONS (B’dos) Lid.
13.1240— Tue, Fri., Sun.. — tf.n

ANTIQUES of every description. Glass
China old ore Sne Silver, Water-
a, early books, Maps, Autographs



etc.. at Gorringes Shop, adjoin,
ing Royal Yacht Club.
18 48—s.w.n
SOUR GRASS—25 acres sour grass &
Ashion Hail, St. Peter Apply C. A
Thariton, Pleasant Hall Plantatfor St
Peter 1.1.50—3
eect
GALVANISE: SHEETS A limite:
ae unt of new galvanise sheets. 7 fce
2aVY gouge Appiy. Central Auction
Mart, Magazine Lane a

1.1.56

a



:





FOR RENT















=



PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE
We beg to notify our Custom-~
ers that we will be closed for
Stock-taking from Tuesday, Jan-





eee









HELP















SUNDAY ADVOCATE
WANTED | LOST
LOST board see Cosvantoet

| roof attached, eee we
BRACELET—Between Wildey, Bridge>; Ch. Ch. within District

town and Hastings, lady’s flexible gold Dated this 30th day of December 1949
link bracelet. Finder will be rewarded | To the Police Magistrate, Dist. B'.





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of ROSE STUART «
Queen Street, St

& FOUND

1 ae een + sem







Malt Liquors, &c., at
shop with she
Otstins Town

A COOK—Apply the Palms, Cheapside
31.12.49—n



















Michael for permission |

SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, iy i

. SHIPPING iG NOTICH)
Canadian National Steam,

| shi;

al
da















Leacock Signed GEORGE T. YARD,
ENGINEER — Diesel Engineer, Six; on returning same ‘o D. @ for Applicant \THROUND SAILS Sails Bails
—— | uar | until further notice. vears practical experience in interna | mr. at Musson's office or Wildey House. = Relgen a gets. SOUTHBO oi MON- Realifax Beats Arrives
y ¥ 30.12.49—3n. | N.B.—This_ applicat NAME OF Sit r
USES Wm. D. RICHARDS & SON, Combustion Engines Holding 1.C.S dered at a Licensing Court to be held TREAL Brdoy &
= McGregor St. ee he We eee Sel LADY’S WRIST WATCH—In vicinity | at Police Court, District ‘B’, on Friday | LADY RODNEY mms 24th Dec. 26th Dee .
7 aise ‘ . tact: EX W.Gibbs, Allendale, Rich- Sea|the 13th day of January, 1950 at 11 .nY NELSON oe 12th Jan. 14th Jun, Jan, ;
GLENCOE", St. Lawrence Ave., con- | 31 19 49.-2n, mond Gap, St. Michael Marine Hotel, Finder comsaunicate, Sei e 3 ; , RODNEY ibaa 8th Feb. 10th
taining 2 bedrooms, Drawing abd pat A626 ’ ’ " . St. 29.12.49-—4n | View Guest House, TON sacakok o'otoek, a.m DD. MORRIS. LAR pore rae on Ba an Feb. Jan, +
ing rooms, Kitchen, W.C. an ak = i «88 n. 3 BAS Dist. ‘B ADY RODNEX a 25th Mar, ih Men }
Large Yard, Dial 3455 for sag wie NOTICE PAYING GUESTS RECLIVED, Cool. | —— — Actg. Poiice Magistra 2s Y bsiyi ant neLaoe oe 13th Apr. 14th re ats hy
—_.—| The Cattlewash Rored leading from Single ms Se ee naaie al pesicaniohesaati ; herd
v nies for re- minutes ub or y. Specia ‘ ives Sails ”
“KRISHAUA" -Fontabeile Lands End. | Tobruk to Borva will be closed NORTHBOUND Arrives s Arrives j
Dial 2700 or 2442. T, Maraj, Hindu Store, ‘paige from Segue ans ad ee ee wore ttn | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE B'dos Bidos Boston gives
3 29.12.49-—t.f.n. iy er mums i
Re ithe rai itil inion rc Highways. ai. Jens The application oe an ee LADY RODNEY ao} Jon. ists Jan. 28th Jan, “ee
JRNISHED BUNGALOW—A!. Worth- ’ < of Bent . . ey for permis LADY N rd Feb. h Feb. 1 th Feb,
ae one hele ee Saat MeL ectee ag nies hep | OT Bae aim Mar. Sana gree 38 Moe MS
lery linen. Nice . best sea double e rd and shingle st Mar mn ar. J
Gothing. ‘Dial. 8138 NOTICE 7 er ae oe eee rns 3 Holders Hill; St. James. LADY RODNEY 17th Apr. 19th Apr. 2uh am
15.0048 Salma G Seen geeperty cae ie DON’T WORRY YOURSELF ABOUT | “Dated this 30th day of December 1949.| LADY NELSON 6th May 8th May 18th
PARISH OF 8T. PETER een ea ae de Ah Big MOVING To the Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘E' -
WORTHY DOWN-3 bedrooms furnish-| Wanted by the Commissioners of ee aod ; at Uideaeae. Well ‘aid a dae, Holetown.
ga. Available from Ist Jan. 1980; Apply! Health tor the Barish of Gt. Peter 3/ Dov colsniy: private grounds an ade LET Un Aes ans Signed ST. CLAIR LAYNE, iN 4
Galph A. Beard. Hardwood Alley.| (Two) fully qualified nurses to perfogm | To 258” Good price for suitable prop- laion Assured Sie AY PHOR IY: N.B.—Subject to change without notice. all vessels fitted wi
Phone 4683. or 8402. Ae re LA duties District Nurses for the | eee Apply DIXON & BLADON, Real Personal Supervision Ass ee ee ee cients bers, Passenger Fares and freight rates on application old
: , | above Parish. Estate Agents, Auctioneers, Plantations Pho: 3309 Gere a Licens ur a
Applications will be received by the i 4640 pe Police Court, District ‘E’ Holetown, on x
WINSLOW—Cattlewash, St. Joseph. | undersigned up to 12th Jan; 1950 at {| Building, Phone 4640, 1.1,50—1n,| BARBADOS FURNITURE REMOVER | ft) the 13th day of January: 1950 at| GARDINER AUSTIN & co., LTD, <2 gs
For the months Jan. Feb pare “" 10.00 a.m. : oo S. CODRINGTON 11 o'clock, a.m. ,
and June 1950. Apply Mrs . Terms: Salary $40.00 per month. “ot RA 30.11.49—t.f.n. S. H. NURSE, =— — ie
Gooding, Strong Hope Pantation, st Appointment on 3 tion. 10 Britton’s X a Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘E’ Holetown.. —S =
Thomas 1.1.50—2n.| Birth certifieate and Doctor's. certii-| PROFESSIONAL NOTICE 1.1,50—In The M.V. CARIBBEE will ac- ts
| cate must accompany Applicatioris. c sthiaineenenmenepsenrenecneaseiteanestinenemasriasiacetrenneraatt cept Cargo and Passengers for MOTOR VESSEr,
OBAN-—St. Lawrence Gap, e e DR. FERREIRA of “Chiroville” Upper St. Kitts-Nevis Montserrat, Anti-
rooms, having dining and drawing rooms, outa COBRIN. | Say'St. (near Meplanade) by Chiropractic big: ap e 1sé LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE gua, Dominica, sailing Fivey 30th “BLUE ST,
itech tte, etc. er pa rs. ‘omms: .
iar s11o. 14.12.48—t.f.n St. Peter. | rnethod corrects diseases of eyes, ears, The application of GWENDOLYN December. Ar
31,12.49—4n. | nose, throat, lungs, stomach, kidneys and HARRIS of Eagle Hall, St. Michael, for The M.V. DAERWOOD will

BUSINESS PREMISES—No. 46 Roebuck
Street, from Ist October 1949. For par-
ticulars. Ring 2655. 4,12, 49—t.fn.
—————$

FLAT—At Haggatt Hall to approved
terants. Phone 2859. 30.12.49—3n.



“THE WOLD", — Marine Gardens,
Hastings Unfurnished. Containing 2
bedrooms, bath & toilet upstairs. Veran-



NOTICE
PARISH OF 8ST. PETER
The Vestry of St. Peter request that
every person who on the first day of
January 1950 shall ote the owner or
occupier of any land liable to be assess-
ed shall sometime during the said
month make a return in writing to the

doh, Drawing & Dining Room, Pantry &| Parochial Treasurer of the Parish en-

Kitchen downstairs. Garage and ser-
vants room in yard, room for a farden.
From January Ist, 1950. Dial 8310. Mrs.
Stuart Bynoe



“MELBOURNE” on-Sea, Worthing, Ch.
Ch From ist January 1950, Phone
Springer 2606. 23.12 .49--t.f.n.

‘FLAT—One fully furnished 3 bed
Som luxury Flat, at White Hall, Cod-
rington Hill, 3 miles from Bridgetown
From December 15th. Apply Mrs. F. L.
Lynch, Telephone 3427.

7.12.49—t.f.n



FARAWAY, Skeete’s Bay, St. Philip.
fully furnished. Lighting plant, garage,
servant-rooms, $50.00 per month. From

lst November on, Dial 4476.

27.10.49—t.f.n
“WATERFORD"—Hastings (near Gar-
rison Savannah). Desirable residence,

{lly furnished. Available from Ist Feb-
ruary. Dial 8330,
31.12.49—8n





~RESTDENCE- Modern Residence with
over 1 acre, 3 miles from town,
elevated with beautiful view, 3

rooms, large lounge, covered verandah
kite hen, servants’ quarters, storerooms
55.00 per month unfurnished. "Another
ittractive 2 bedroom property similar
location furnished $65.00 per month
DIXON & BLADON, Real Estate Agents,
Auctioneers, Plantations Building, Phone
4640 1.1,50—In

3°

OCP.

“LORRAINE HALL''—Situated x
next to the St. Lawrence Hotel, %
> from Ist February, 1950. Inspec- é

tion, on appointment, being kindly ss
allowed by present occupant For S
§ further information ple ase apply ¢&
— tc. s Johnson, Seaston, Hast-
% ings 31,12.49—3n. gS

SLL







PUBLIC SALES



AUCTION
———_—.
I have been instructed by
nissioner of Police
next the Sth Jan
it the Harbour
ng Boats
26mm, OF
me 214 x
Terms

the Com-
to sell on Thursday
beginning at 1 o'clock
Police Station (3) Row-
2” x 8” overall by ¥
« 5/7 overall by 5’ bean
5” overall by 5” beam
Strictly Cash.
D'ARCY A
Govt





SCOTT,
Auctioneer, Dist A”

31.12.49-—4n
re I.

UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER



SALES JANUARY 1950
Tuesday 10th—Mrs, Beatrice Gooding's
Sale Armagh”, 6th Ave, Belleville.

Tuesday 17th—Sale of Antiques at ‘White-
hall’, St. Peter
Thursday 1vth—Mrs, P 0.
Sale Carlisle View,
Tuesday w4th—Dr,. R. L,
The Pine
Thursday 26th—Miss O. E. Spence’s Sale.
Olive Dale, Marine Gardens, Hastings,
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
Auctioneers

Crichlow's
Bay Street
Hutson’s Sale,

7~_—_——

REAL ESTATE

SHARES~-18 shares of $5.00 each in

THE WEST INDIA BISCUIT CO,

LIMITED,

48 shares of £1. each in THE BARBA-

DOS FIRE INSURANCE COY

136 shares of 10/- each in THE BAR

a CO-OP; COTTON FACTORY

LTD

These shares will be offered to public

‘competition at the office of the under-

igned on Friday the 6th day of January

1950 at 2 p.m

CARRINGTON & SEALY
LUCAS STREET

30,12.49-—5n

FOR SALE at our office No. 17 Higt

Street on Friday, 6th January 1950, at
p.m

£200 349% Barbados Government Bonds



b00 3% % British War Loan
600 Shares Barbados Shipping &
Trading,Co. Ltd
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
31,12,40—4n
SCAFELIL,""—St. Philip,
police Station, Newly
»odroomed bungalow
ng room, kitchen, washroom, servants
juarters, garage, Concrete construction
vith aluminium roof. Lodge School 1%
miles, Cvane and Sam Lords 4 miles
wher leaving Colony. The location
fers superb scenic beauty and is cool
at all times. The price is extremely ‘at-
£2,100 — ($10,080) DIXON &
Real Estate Agents, Auction-
Plantations Building, Phone 4640
1.1,.50—1n

Close District
built compact 3
with lounge, din

tractive
SLADON,

eers,

“CARLTON” St. James,. Single
storey coral block house, shingled roof,
150 feet above sea level. Standing in 3
scres of land. % mile. from bathing
veach. Bridgetown 10 miles Speights-
own 1% miles. Living room, dining
room, patio, 3 bedrooms, kitchen, pantry,
farage and workshop. Servants’ quar-
ters. Mains water and electric light
Furniture at valuation if desired. A
modern up-to-date residence, ..DIXON
& BLADON, Real Estate Agents, Aue-
Uoneers, Plantations are Phone
4640 1.1.50—1n

“CLOUD WALK Hill,
Christ Church aan single storey
house standing on ridge overs wegying
Hastings and Worthing. 260 feet aoe “4
moa level, Magnificent. view, 3 bed
living room, dining room, siuaye 2 ba bath
rooms, with tub bath and shower, modern
Kitchen, laundry, servants’ quarters, tiled
patio facing the sea. Laid out gardens,
BLADON, Real Btaie'Agents, Pants
ea tate Agents, Pl
Building, Phone 4640 eee

Rendezyous

+1,50,-1n,

“SALISBURY”, Gun Hill, charming
country home standing 750 feet above sea
level on Gun Hill giving unrivalled views
over the Island. This well built modern
Stone residence contains 3 reception, 3



bedrooms, 2 verandahs and all modern
conveniences Garage, stabling, stock
Pens all in first class order. Carriage-

way encircles house. Approximately 8
acres ground. DIXON & BLADON, Real
Estate Agents, Auctioneers, Plantations
Building, Phone 4640

1.1.60.—1n,

OO

PERSONAL









The public hereby






are warned against
giving credit to m ife Phyllis Holder
hee Wilson) as I ¢ t hold myself re-



wible for her or yone else contract-
ty debt or deb nh my name unh-
4 written order signed by me,
Signed REGINALD BRAD HOLDER
Park Read, Bush Hall

rark
91,12.49-—2n

of

Section 53 Sub: of the Vestries

hee

NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. PETER

Wanted by the Vestry of St. Peter,
A loan of £3,000 (three thov.sand
pounds) as authorised by Thé Saint
Peter's Parish Loan Act, 19

Tenders for the above, loan will be
received by the undersigned up to
January 12th 1950 at 10.00 a.m. Tenders
must be sealed,

Terms: Interest must be at the rate
not exceeding 4% per annum.

Principal repayable by £300 per an-

No Tender of less than £300 will be
considered.

30.12.49-—3n. | Act 1911-5.



Signed.
G. S. CORBIN,
Vestry Clerk.
31.12.49—6n



NOTICE

TO THE VESTRY ELECTORS OF THE
PARISH OF 8ST. JAMES

This is to notify you that I shall be
contesting a seat for the Vestry at the
forth-coming election.

I shall do all that lies in my power tc
serve you to the best of my ability, an
I am asking you for your whole-hearted
support at the polls.

ELLSWORTH HOLDER,
Colvilla,
Garden, St. James.
18.12,.49—2n.



NOTICE

TO THE VESTRY ELECTORS OF THE
PARISH OF ST. JAMES

I ABRAHAM HOLDER give notice to
the Electors that I am not standing o
January 3rd 1980, for re-election as ;
member of the St. James Vestry as m)
health will not permit me.

I beg to return you my sincere thanks
for the sup pert you have given me during
the past fifty years of life, both as
en active parishioner as a Vestry-
man,

My son E. 8. Holder is offering himself
as_a candidate for a seat in your Vestry.

I am asking you give him the same
loyal support as you gave me during the
past sixteen years, and elect him.

Thanking you for all you have done,

Yours sincerely,
A. .
18.12,49—2n

THE BARBADOS sour MOVEMENT
1



The Executive Committee of The Bar-
bados Youth Movement wishes ‘one and
all a bright and Prosperous New Year:
thanks for your Past Assistance ajid again
solicits your future support.

Rey. L, BRUCE—CLAPKE
Founder nd President
Rey. J. B, GRANT 1,1,
Director and Cnaplain,
Mrs. OLGA BROWNE,
General Secretary.
1.1.50—In,
(a

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of VE
ARDS of Dayrells Road, Ch. Cn.
permission to sell Spirits, Malt ,Liquors,
&c., at a Board and shingle shop with
shedroof attached at Dayrells’ Road, Ch.
Ch, within District ‘A’ .
Dated this 30th day of eee 149.
To the frail Magistrate. ist. ‘A’.
od VERNESE RICHARDS,
Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consi-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
xt Police Court, District ‘A’, on"Monday
the 9th day of January 1950 at 11 o'clock

a.m,
E. A. McLEoOp,
Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’.
1.1.50—1n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of SHIRLEY HALAL of
Cave Hill, St. Michael, far permission to
sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &e., at a

E
é
d
%
bal
2

4

two years, but it-is possible that this period may be extended at a

1

allowance equal to 10%

of the appointee. The salaries for each appointment are set out

lower organs. Dial 2881,



at dates to be arranged later.
new waterproof bag as supplied by the Cement Marketing Company,
Ltd. Prices should be quoted for delivery on the wharf at Bridgtown
and should be exclusive of import duty and package tax.
should reach the Director of Highways and Transport not later than

British Guiana Government.

| Advertise ....

&e.,



The cement should be packed in the

Mrs M. SEALBY begs to inform
all that her Parlour
“The Beauty Box” will be closed
from December 3st.

customers

Tenders





p.m. on Friday, the 6th of January, 1950. ‘The Government does || Se een te Janvary
not bind itself to accept the lowest or any tender. { : :
29th December, 1949. 30.12.49-—-2n |)
ALL PERSONS interested in
PERSONNEL REQUIRED FOR THE ROAD CONSTRUCTION ||} ing « course with the Bennett

College, Ltd., Sheffield, kindly
contact their representatiye J. R
Hunte, Joyceville, Abbeville Gar-
dens, Christ Chureh, Dial 8156,

PROG IN BRITISH GUIANA
The following staff is required by the Public Works Department,

2. The appointments are temporary and are for a period of

ater date.

For Handsome Handcrafts, such as
3. No housing accommodation will be provided but a housing

HATS, SLIPPERS, HANDBAGS,
MATS, CURIOS, BASKETS, Ete.
-~+. it's Always...
DOMINICA HANDCRAFTS CO.

% of the officer’s salary will be paid.

4. The salary will depend on the age and previous experience



permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors
at a double roof board and shingle
shop situate at Weston, near Reids Bay.













Acce
accept Cargo and Passengers ‘for pting

St. Lueia, St. Vincent, Grenada, Passengers

Aruba, sailing 7th January, 1950.











Foe Nassau,
T NOTICES. e Stated’ tints 30th day of December 1249. seat ftw ig eo wil Trinidaa, Balti,
GOVERNMEN e To the Police Magistrate, Set St, Lucia, sailing gaturday gist Sailing - . .
Signed GWENDOLYN Eamets December. a 1TH
Applican Soret
N.B.—Thi licati ill be consi- B.W.I. SCHOONER OWN- B. HARRIS
CEMENT FOR RUNWAY cered v2 Licensing Court to ‘2 held. at ERS’ ASSOCIATION (INC.) c/o H. P Agent,
P oletown, on P.
Tenders are invited for the supply of approximately 45,000 94 Ib. woltte Tea watt ner bt Sane AO ot Consignee: Tel. No. 4047 pet cae
bags of Portland Cement required by the Government for the pro~-| 11 o'clock, a.m. i aialiea i Broad
posed runway at Seawell airport, 15,000 bags should arrive in the Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘E’ Holetown.. = == SS
Island between March Ist—15th and the balance ir. two shipments 1.1.50—In

FOR INFORMATION CONCERNING Youn
HAGGAGE AND HOUSEHOLD EFFETe

Consult

SMITHS SHIPPING SERVICE

For Packing
For Shipping
For Insurance
‘ For Preterence
epresentatives in all th Hi the prines al P F
presentatives i ll the prineip orts Aasaot the wor,

PHONE 3024 —

UVC CCU CCB ,
TO OUR PRESENT AND FUTURE
FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS 7

|

HI 1 A Lrosperous and Happy 1950

ati | L ;
low, but a higher salary may be paid depending on experience, : soneaeen itis acu: 9 TO ALL OF YOU
qualifications, etc. SSS we e
5. Free passages to and from British Guiana will be provided " x

for an officer, his wife and family, not exceeding five passages.

current Government rates.

Works, British Guiana, and full details of qualifications and experi-

6. The applicants should be over twenty-eight years of age.
7. Travelling and subsistence allowances will be paid at the

EXHIBITION

- of -

‘ PAINTINGS and
DRAWINGS

8. Applications should be addressed to the Director of Public



ence should be enclosed together with copies of at least three recent
references. The envelope should be endorsed “STAFF ROAD CON- Bika
STRUCTION”. G. D. AKED

I. CLERK OF WORKS.

Il.

board and shingle shop attached to resi-)

dence at Cave Hill, St. Michael
Dated this 29th day of December 1949
To the Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’.
Signed S. HALL.
Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consi-
idered at a Licensing Court to ‘be held
at Police Court, District ‘A’, on Monday
the 9th day of January 1950 ‘at lfo "olock

a.m
BE. A, McLBoo,

Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’.

1,1.50—In

—

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of EVELYN H. KING
of Brighton, St. Michael for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c, at Qnd
floor of a 8 wo wall building known
as Colonial Tudor Street, City.

Dated this 30th day of December i949



To the Police Magistrate, Dist. . ‘A’
Signed EVELYN H. KING,
Applicant.
N.B.—This a ation will be consi-
sidered at a Licens! Court to .be held
at Police Court, t ‘A’, on Monday
the 9h day of January.1060 ‘at 11 o'clock
m.
TALMA,
Police Nastia Dist. ‘A’.
-1.50--1n.



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

of renege ton ot BAe ROBINSON
wofho ; SS ats Fi, smen. A per-

on to Spir it quors,
&c,, at a board and shop at
au of Jessamy and Jordan's Lane,

Dated this Sist day of December 19
Signed M. Ji

N.B.—This pueden s tenn
oy w consi-
s