Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


Sunday

August 27,

1930



REDS GAIN

Chinese |
To Join —
Reds?.

WASHINGTON Aug. 26.

American military officials com-
menting on reports that two!
(Chinese armies were concen-
tvating near the Manchuria- |
Korean border, said here they
doubted if these troops would
move south to join North Korean
forces. Although these movements
were held to pose new threats to |
the United Nations forees in|
Korea, few thought that they in-
dicated Communist China's early |
entry. into the Far-East war, Re-
ports about the Chines: armies |
were announced here ace!

Asked about other reports that
120 heavy Russian tanks had been
moved into North Korea from a
Manchurian port during the last
two weeks of July, officials said
that the presence cf Russian tanks
in North Korea had been known
for some days.

But they emphasised that none
of the tanks believed to be Joseph
Stalin’s three tyve: had been able
to get into actior.. ‘sntinuouws Am- |
erican bom! yg of sailroad:, roads |
and bridges was ! cUeved to have}
prevented the r movement south |
they said. ’

Other offieis!s «uggested it was!
possible that the Chinese Commu-!
nist armies wh'ch they estimated
at between 169,090 and 200,000 |
men had been moved to the |
Korean border as a ecoeg
measure in case the United Na-|
tions forces decided to drive past
the 38th paralle) towards Man- |
churia.

This possibility they said was
hacked up by reports that Chinese
Commpnists had built formidable
defences near the horder, . Some|
army sources said they believed
that constant battering being nivent
te North Korean communications
as a whole was deterring Chinese
Communist armies from moving
down. into the attack on United
Nations troops.

—Reuter.







LUCKNOW, Aug. 25.
More than 2,300 villages in the

United Provinces have been
swamped by the flood waters of
eight rivers running through the
state, writes a correspondent: who
accompanied Pandit Gobind Bal-
labh Pant, Premier of the United
Provinces on a tour of the area.

Damage to property including
crops was estimated at 50,000,000
rupees. No deaths have been re-
ported so far, but about 600,000
people have been affected by the
floods. The rivers in spate in-
clude the Ganges, Ghagra, Gan-
dak, Saryu, Rapti, Rohini and
Sarrayani,

Similar reports of ‘flooding ot
villages in West Bengal and the
Buhar State were received today
It is estimated that 80 per cen
of the standing jute crops haye
been totally destroyed. Buhar
state four rivers were in spate,
inundating hundreds of small
villages on their banks.

—Reuter.

COMMUNISTS

2



_} suing







|RedsKill43

In Raids On
11 Towns

MANILA, PHILIPPINES,
Aug. 26.

Communist guerillas killed 43
people during raids on 11 towns
near here last night, it was
officially announced to-day.

Government Forces were pur-
i the raiders—believed to
rumber 5,000—who had. taken
captives back with them into the
hills,

The raiders were “huks”, a
group who have been in armed
opposition to the authorities since
early in 1946.

The main target, reports said,|
was Tarrac, the home town . of}
Senor Carlos Romulo, permanent
Philippines delegate to the United
Nations. Two Army nurses and{
20 hospital patients.in the town|
were bayonetted and disembowel- |
ed. Forty-eight prisoners, releas- |
ed from the town gaol, joined the
guerillas and left with them for}
the hills. |

Reports from’ the city of Naga, |
150 miles to the south, said a
Communist amphibious force had |
occupied a nearby coastal town.!

At a nearby camp two Army |
majors were’ repofted shot and all
the buildings burned down.

Other towns reported raided
were Dasol on the west coast of
Arayat in the Pempane province
where barracks, post office and |
hospitals were ransacked, Santo!
Domingo in the Neuva Ecija pro- |
vince and Ilagan in the Isabel |
province. —Reuter.

“HELD UP”
: ae





eR,



oo & Pe.

SUSPECTED COMMUNISTS QUESTIONED ON THE KOREAN

FRONT LINE: The battle of the forces of freedom against the
Communist menace from the North goes on in Korea— and in
this picture suspected Communists caught wandering around near
the lires are brought in for questioning and thoroughly proven

before they are released.
to great advantage.
line

Infiltration has been used by the enemy
Picture just received from the Kerean front

—EXPRESS





Sunday





GROUND IN

SERETSE KHAMA AND FAMILY

=





Seretse Khama and his wife Kuth walk from the giant flytag boat that brought them from

Africa) to Southampton—and into exiie. A B.O.A.©. officer carries their baby Jacqueline, e e
in her travel cot. Behind is Nali.i, Seretse’s sister. Ruth, is in tweed suit and woollen N; t 7 d
gloves. . a 1onwl e

‘HOSPITAL

DURING TRIAL CRUISE

19 KILLED:

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 26. :
. Nineteen people were killed and little hope was held 4? production, a priority consider-

dé
tal Si

during a trial cruise before leaving for

Captain. Robert Voortmeyer, Marine Superintendent

of the San Francisco Embarkation Office, said he did not
think any of the missing people would be found alive.

* The ebb tide would have swept them out to sea he

added.

The Benevolence with over 500 people aboard got int:
collision with the 8162-ton freighter Mary Luckenback in
fog four miles off the Golden Gate on her first run afte:

being laid up since the war.

Patel, President
Of Moslem

Association

THE Barbados Moslem As-
sociation celeLrated its third
anniversary recently. Amoug
the celebration activities was

the election of new officers
for the ensuing year. Elected
President was Mr. Suleman
I. Patel. Vice-President is

Mr. A. I. Patel. Mr. §S. A.
Patel was elected Secretary
and serving with hirn as
Joint Secretary is Mr. M
Bahkaria. Treasurer is Mr.
S. A. Sacha,

A new General Committee
of the Association was also
appointed

Strikers Want
f4ély Year Bonus

ROME, Aug 26.
Gas and electricity workers in
Rome today intensified their strike
for a Holy Year living bonus,
Gas workers announced they
would strike for six hours, one
hour more than yesterday, during
the busiest part of the day. Elec-
tricity workers extended their
strike to all distribution centres
in the city.—Reuter.

SMUTS DOING WELL
PRETORIA, South Africa,
Aug. 26.
Field Marshal Jan Christian
Smuts was allowed to get up for
a while on Friday. His doctors
said the 80 year old former
Prime Mniister was making good
progress toward recovery from an
attack of influenza he suffered
this week just as he was getting
over a serious case of pneumonia.
—Can, Press.



Labour,

STRASBOURG, Aug. 26.
British Conservative and Labour
Representatives arguing over the



In Chile Floods:

SHIP SINKS \More

|

Factories Strike In
To Make Arms} Finland

NDON, Aug. 26,
Pes as HELSINKI, Aug. 26

North Atlantic Treaty Deputies 7 ‘

to-day announced plans to use ad- | ,, Finland’s social democrat-led

| Jitional factory capaeity to speed | Trade Unions Federation tonight
detied the Agrarian Government

and calléd a nationwide



65 MISSING

i issi : anni | My » its overall defence pro- strike
for 65 believed missing from the American Hospi- | (#\\abeabthe Atlavitie atea. In a|thveateving to upset her new
ip Benevolence which sank last night after a collisict: Comments issued to-day $300,000,000 Trade . Agreement

orea, th :
fies announced that a report from The strikes for wages increases
the Military Production and Sup-/ of up to 60 per cent. will start on
ply Board ‘of the North Atlantic; Monday when about 5,000 metal
Pact had indicated a “substantial workers are to put down. jtools
additional capacity which can be| They will be joined later in the

on > ba
their past week's work the Pee | Russia

put to use in the immediate| week by 60,000 more men and
future.” women in other trades
“Arrangements to utilise such a The Federation refused an
Feumolty for accelerating co-or- | # peal from Premier Ufho to delay
| dinated production of high priority |the strikes for two weeks for
items are being made hew negotiations

Ufho Keykone» assured Parlia-
ment yesterday he would maintain

Deputies also have under con-

Only one life boat could ; v
sideration various financial prob-

launched but a number of life

|
|

|lems involved in the enlarged de-|the pegged wages agreement and

rafts were thrown over the side. | fence effort including the initiation } won a narrow vote of confidence
According to a navy officer 423 of the high priority production }in his policy
people were belicved ‘o heve been programme. In this connection | Under the New Trade Agree
saved they have received s report from} ment Finland undertakes to sell
Only heroic res: ue er tts by the working staff of the Defence’ Russia metal goods at current
Coast Guards and other ships pre- {Finance and Beonomic Committee. ; world prices. Agrarian politicians
vented heavier ioss of iife as the | “Council Deputies have form-/}bave said that increased wages
hospital ship sank he ripped ally approved the appointment of, would drive Finnish prices well

open from stern iA. G, Chariton as Secretary to the

ubove the world level
The “Mary Luckenback” with a | North} Atlantic Council and to the |

Exports to Russia would have to



smashed bow but no casualties |Council of Deputies.” ; be subsidised, they added,
among her 49 crew picked up | Secretary Appointed | —Reuter.
some of the survivors, The “Bene- | Usuniiy well informed quarters

volence” sailed yesterday for a! here wnderstood that the Working
cruise off the coast with 15 nurses | Committee co-ordinating the de- |

” . ‘Be
Communist China
and 33 other medical personnel | fence plan proposals of Member | , |
including doctors, 200 American | Governments had not ene | To Be Represented

army men and an unknown num- |
| In U. N. Assembly

ber of “unofficial guests” who |

, went for a cruise.—Reuter, i
| LONDON, Aug. 26.
| Foreign Minister Chou En La,

| telegraphed Tryvge Lie that Com

; munist China proposed to send ;
delegation to the Fifth Session o
the United Nations Assembl,
| Gpening on September 17, the Tass
Agency reported in a messag?
| eceived in London tonight.

| va e te'egram said the Pekin;:

|G »vernment had appointed Chiar «



Four Drowned)

SANTIAGO, Chile. Aug, 26. |
Widespread floods tonight cover-
ed a 300- mile expanse of South-
ern Chile between the towns of |



Osorno = Seaee.s after two | Wen-T.cn as Chairman and fou:

weeks 0 torrentia es a Soi |members of its delegation to the
Four farmers were rowne Assembly

in the Rahue River running

The ‘ssage as issued b g<
through Osorno, The damage was 1e message as issued by Mo:

; : ‘cow Radio quoting “Tass’ said
estimated to be heavy. Chillan is Vie : i
about 220 miles south of Santiago Rit ra as as to inform the in.
and Osorno nearly another 300 ) terested parties of this, and take
miles farther south—Can. Press. , the necessary measures for th



‘delegation of the Chinese Peoples
; Republic to take part in the work
{of the Fifth Session. I request you
| urgently to telegraph a reply.”
Kuomintang Not Wanted
The message reiterated that on!
the Peking Government was
legally qualified to represent ‘h



“And t/ you want to make me

T ye r real
No Brazilian Troops! |#

For Korea

angry, just
m crab on
china | *

serve
some

me
Red

ity’ work, Experts assisting the

BRAZIL, Aug. 26. | group are due to meet on Monday. | !¢é

A War Ministry spokesman At the next meeting of Deputies|Chinese people and that the
stated today that help to United | later on Monday it is expected that | “remnants of the Chinese Kuomir
Nations forces in Korea would{a general decision will have to be \tang clique” should therefore b

remain limited to “economic co-|taken about the problem of filling expelled from all United Nations

operation”. | the gap between proposed financial | work
He denied that Brazil had | Detenee pe: and the target of thé} Chou En Lai declared he



tended to send troops to Korea. Defence programme. sent notes to this effect to Lie and

—Reuter. Reuter. @ On Page 16

Conservatives Clash Over
Schuman Plan |

blunder To try to change con-
tinental convictions at this late
hour was worse than sabotage

Schuman Plan to-day had their it was stupidity” he declared.
biggest clash in the European Plan is a mutilated and parti- purticular brief forthe Commit- “The original MacMillan plan
Consultative Assembly’s second tioned scheme. teé of Ministers, especially for igned by all the Conserva-
annual session. Continental repre- “Without Britain there may sc:ne of them. But after all they tives except Churchill, but ac-
sentatives. sat silent as criticisms yell be doubts and hesitations in are not fixed stars in the poli- cording to the undemocratic or-
of Foreign Secretary Ernest many of the parliaments con- tical firmament.’ Some I admit ganisation of the Party, Churchill
Bevin and Conservative Leader cerned when the plin comes to have seemed a bit too fixed but is the sole decider of the Party’s
Winston Churchill were bandied’ them for ratification “With (ey wax and wane policy,” Blyth stormed lan?
across the floor of the Assembly. Pritain there will be a sense of “Why did he not sign the plan
security and confidence.” “After all, one of the most Will it be that when th Assem-

Conservative Harold MacMil- owerful of these luminaries is bly is over, Conservative spokes-
lan provided the spark with a Answering criticisms that wader -day only sustained by a micro- tmen would be*able to say the
last minute bid to revive his plan his scheme the Committee of opic parliamentary majority.” action of their colleagues in
which he claims would enable Ministers for the Upper House of Labour Representative Will Strasbourg did not represent the
Hritain to join the plan the Council would control jyth who said he had worked policy of the party”

MacMillan declared t pool, MacMillan said in obviou miner attacke MacMil T lebate wa ijourned t
IBritain therence, the Schuman reference to Bevin. “1 hold ne nendment a tupend th fte Reuter



‘

,

Aduncate

!
had

arated areas of the

threat to Pusan, the key

coast and

defence.

Reuter’s trontline correspondent
Roy Macartney, said the American
Fifth Air Force pilots reported the
‘communist drive in this region
{had “apparently gained consider-

ible ground,”

The second threat to Pusan—
rom the south coast—has so far
| not been translated into action, but
two northern divisions rere re-
ported massing around Chinju ane
another Communist division was
arree north along the Naktong
iver

es ameemesnapiisincapiatesillipmccaitincneactintice



Reds Press On

General Mae Arthur's reported
strong Communist pressure late
to-day in the northern sector held
by the South Korean Eighth Divi-
sion, as well as heavy Communist
artillery and mortar fire in the
area of the South Korean second
corps

Headquarters warned that there
vas still danger of .a. break-
through on the 120-thile front
where, intelligence officers
the Communists could launch
heavy attacks against several vital
sectors at the same time,

Sharp Communist activity in the
south pointed increasingly to a
drive on. the Chinju-Masan axis
towards Pusan,

From this area Reuter’s corre-
spondent Alex Valentine reported
that the North in stabbing attacks
were in a search for a possible
weak point.

They’ were thrown back all
ong che line witheut piercing a
fap

Communist concentrations and
patrol activity suggested they still
intended to make at least one
more determined attempt to reach
Pusan before the build-up of
United Nations Forces gained in-
tensity

A North Korean communique
juoted by Moscow Radio, claimed
in extension of guerilla opemations
in the Pusan area, with derailment
of a train carrying war materials
is One Of their feats.

Heaviest Pressure

But the main North Korean
weight was still concentrated op-
posite the Waegwan-Kunwi front
which protects Taegu, at the head



Makhe....

RALEIGH



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Year 55



DRIVE SOUTH

U.S. Troops Await .
Reinforcements

TOKYO, Aug. 26.

RENEWED Communist activity over widely sep-

South Kast Korean front

to-day appeared to foreshadow a new all-out north-
ern attempt to settle the issue while the Americans
await British and Australian reinforcements.
With two British battalions s
the South China Sea to join the fight, with another
American division on the way—the second already
in action, and the Australians preparing in Japan,
the United Nations were clearly
But the Communists had again begun their

through

together.
supply port at the extreme

end of the Americans’ “Defence Box’’ where they
were —s at the port from two sides, the south
0

‘wnwards from the east.

A Communist attack causing some loss of ground in the
east coast sector was admitted in General MacArthur’s late
night communique with the main thrust placed near the
Pohang-Kigye area, well above Pusan and also dominatin
the beleaguered town of Taegu, hub of the U.N. centra

, cf the Allied supply line to Pusan.

Farther east they were exerting
“the heaviest pressure” Mac
Arthur announced, against Soutb
Koreans.

South Koreans backed by C.t’s.
attacked at dawn noxineast--of
Waegwan following up yesterday's
offensive. when they rolled Com-
munists pack for nearly a mile
willing 300 and capturing 42.

The newly-arrived American
Second Division which moved into
the front-line sector of the Nak-
tong River to relieve the battéred
24th Division captured high ground
overlooking Communist
bridgehead which threatened Tae-
fu from the southwest. They were
obbing shell and mortar fire down
to the river's edge.

In the past 36 hours.
Koreans have punched 1,500
up “bowling alley” near
Dong, 12 miles north of the high»
water mark of their advance on
the city. They were bac
American troops and supported by
American artillery sending white
phosphorous shells screaming on
to ridges flanking the valley.

Supporting Southerners clear-
ed mud from « village on the
right. whete, a et of Com-
munists had infiltrated,

Survivors were trying to
back to their own lines while
patrols played hide and seek
with them among the rugged
ridges flanking the valley. It is
dubbed “bowling alley” because

Communists persistently send

armour up the road in a single

line to be knocked out by Amer-
ican super-Bazookas, tanks and
artillery.

One mile of the road was lit-
tered with ten splintered or
charred wrecks,

Reds Driven Back
On the South Coast where North
Koreans were estimated to have
five full regiments, the outnum-
bered American infantry repelled
two Communist attacks during the
night. They were harassed by
sporadic mortar and artillery fire.
Northerners were moving rein-
forcements along the coast, mainly
@ on page 5

Sou



STOCK

3 or 4 Speeds,

3 or 4 Speeds.

BROAD STREET





PAGE TWO
2 EZ
AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT TO TULBSPAY
ROBERT HUTTON

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Carb Gm

OFF TO CANADA

SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950

Married At St. Leonard’s

N THURSDAY afternoon at St.
Leonard's Church. Mr. Lisle
Clarke, of the Audit Office and son
of Mr. and Mrs. T. A. D. Clarke of
Tth Avenue Belleville was married



ADY SEEL, wife of Sir George
Seel, K.C.M.G., Head of

Cc. D. and W. in the West Indies
will be among the passengers ar-
riving by the “Ggjfito” from Eng-
land on Saturday September 2nd.
Sir George is at present in Trini-
dad, and is due back this after-











NIGHT at 8.30
JOYCE REYNOLDS JANIS Ff

in “WALLFLOWER

AIGE

A Warner Bros. Picture



|
i

4

eeaticepster

————
——

A ATE OREN LE OORT ANE RSS CROP LEE QI:

“xo 99
=

Screen Play by Harry Brown—James Edward Grant * Story by Harry Br wn « Directed by Allan Dwan



MATINEE WEDNESDAY at 5 and 8.20 p.m
THURSDAY NIGHT at 6.30
DENNIS MORGAN BLLANUR PARKER

in “THE VERY THOUGHT OF YoU"

A Warner Eres. Pieture

SS es
—_c(AB[G(C SaaS

EMPIRE THEATRE

To-day, 4.45 & 8.45 and Continuing at Matinee and
Night Shows Daily

LE Ee NEE AG OE NRE MS Me eR eon UIT



J0 H N’ "WAY N E ADELE MARA + FORREST TUCKER

co-tterring JOHN A AGAR A REPUBLIC PICTURE

et ARE Mh af toto} ae

oy tasseut + ames, BROWN - hicwana WEBS * ARTHUR FRANZ
JULIE BISHOP > JAMES HOLDEN + PETER COE > RICHARD JAECKEL

Associate Producer —Edround Grainger
Also British Movietone News

Korea—Security Council’s historic meeting

Anglo-American Universities Athletic Contests
at White City

Bluebird ready to try again

—— OS

iii eN50tleelelleeeee

ROX Y

LAST TWO SHOWS — TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15
Republic Action Double - - -

William MARSHALL Adele

in “BLACKMAIL”
and “SAN ANTONIO KID”
with William Elliott — Bobby Blake

MARA



BOISCSGGGSSISISSIOIOS SENOS 53S GF ISVSSISSSSSIOSSS

!

MONDAY & TUESDAY 4.30 & 8.15
Republic Whole Serial -

“KING OF THE ROYAL MOUNTED”

ROYAL

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY —
Republic Big Double - - - <3

Robert ARMSTRONG — Marti KOSLECK
in “GANGS OF THE WATERFRONT”
and “THE CATMAN OF PARIS”
Carl ESMOND — Adele MARA
MONDAY & TUESDAY 4.30 & 8.30

“SWINGING ON THE RAINBOW” and
“CALL OF THE CANYON”

OLYMPIC

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY — 4.30 & 8.30





Republic Big Double - - -

Riehard ARLEN — Chery! WALKER

in “IDENTITY UNKNOWN”
and “FLAME OF BARBARY COAST”

with John Wayne — ~ Ann Dvorak
Monday 4.30 and 8.15 Tuesday 4.30 Only _

“THAT BRENNAN GIRL”
and “GOODNIGHT SWEETHEART”









We

BEET,
LETTUCE, TOMATO, BUTTER BEANS

have a Fresh Stock of —

GARDEN TOOLS

WATERING CANS, SHEARS

FORKS, SHOVELS, RAKES,

AT

| THE CORNER STORE









STEELE
BRIGGS
SEEDS

CUCUMBERS, CARROTS, CABBAGE,

noon,

Other passengers
the “Golfito”
min, Mr, and Mrs, H. H. Hart,
Miss M. Maude, Miss G. Meagher,
Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Moll,
P. J. Stanford, Rev. H. St.
Tud
ec;
E.
Mr.

Miss L, Welch,
A. Wells, Miss E. A. Weston,

J. M. Cave, Major J. &
Griffith, Mr. C. E. Neblett, Mr
T. A. L. Roberts, Capt. C. R. E.
Warner and Major A. S. Warren

Back From U.S. Holiday
M®. DAVID READ, son of
Canon and Mrs. Harvey

Read, returned from his U.S.
holiday yesterday morning by
T.C.A. To hear David tell it,

it was certainly some holiday.
Staying in Hillside, Wyoming, New
York, he also visited Buffalo as
well as other parts of the coun-

try
Birthday Party

Ts was a visser ae last

night in the’ Xanadu of the
Ocean View Hotel. Host was Mr.
Victor Marson who was celebrat-
ing his birthday. Cars on the main
highway stretehed from the Hast-
ings Rocks past the Ocean View.

Married Yesterday In
bes Trinidad
ARRIED in Trinidad yester-
day afternoon were Miss
M ssie Mendes, Gaugates of Mr.
Mrs. Oswald Mendes and
Mr. John Rooks, son of Major
end Mrs. Courtenay Rooks of
Port- of-Spain.
Both John and Jessie are well
known in Barbados, and they are
expected to arrive here to-day to
spend their honeymoon at Accra,
Rockley.

Here For Three Weeks
RRIVING from Trinidad yes-
terday by B.W.I.A. to
spend three weeks with her family
was Mrs. Dorothy Griffith and she
6 spending the first part of her
with her sister and

holiday

brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Bancroft, who are holi-
)

and

daying at the Crane.

Her two children Barbara and
David are already in Barbados
and she expects her husband on
Saturday for two weeks. He is with
the Royal Bank of Canada in Port-
of-Spain. Her mother Mrs. Iris
Patterson and sister in law Mrs.
Peter Patterson, were at the air-
port to meet her.

oF bela dea

eee



(9)

actoss
l, Diekensian Halil
6. Trick. (5)
Â¥. | cord ten to make a principle.
(8) 10. Blow a drink. (5)
id, Skin. (3)
1%. Snow, (5)
14, Not so common, (5)
1d. Pism. (4)
16. Popalar summer cvad-wors. (7)
ty This causes much trouble (4)
20 Rearrange 4 cone. (5)
Classically deiigntful place. (7)
vown
i or & spare dig w run down
}
| —
1}
ae ‘
} jax
oe t

Hau Tule Makes -TuOdurn io



Suc penatiour i loreian ft as
(8)
@ Sometaine tm view im?
® Phe ware Oruduce- ome 8 6)
o Phe & aiterent &
4 Its ath about us 6a)
8 Vesse: adie—te hed things? i 4
i
3




westerGay» Qutcie Arras:
Hupee lk Sue
(Uris bee



Yield !!

THERE IS A REAL
DIFFERENCE WITH

8¢ and
16¢ per pk.

arriving by
are, Miss G. Benja-
Miss

H.P. Welch, Miss
Miss



So ee en



A Week in Trinidad

M* GEOFFREY RAMSAY was
among the passengers leav-
ng by T.C.A. i peeer y morning.
Gaoft is en ee entte but
will be i a week in Trini-
dad first. Formeriy with Cable and
Wireless both here and in Trini-
dad, no doubt he has several
friends to look up in Trinidad, be-
fore he severs connections with the
West Indies to settle in Canada.
Harold said that his Water Polo





~——

Leaving by T.C.A. yesterday were (left to right) Mr, and Mrs. Desmond Proverbs, Mrs, Edna Hutchinson, Miss Barbara Hutchinson,

Mr, Geoffrey Ramsay, Mr, Keith Gooding and Mr. Stanley Haskell.

‘eam in Trinidad wanted him to
play a match for them during the
shart time he is there. Geoffrey
was a former member of
Swordfish Water Polo Club
Barbados.

On Long Leave

RS.

and her daughter Barbara
left yesterday by T.C.A. for about
eight or ten weeks holiday in

the
in

EDNA HUTCHINSON rhe

go over to Vancouver. Barbara is
with the Royal Bank of Canada’s
Branch here and is on Jong leave.

oask On The Job

R. BILL RAMSAY T.C.A.

Navigator who was here for
a week’s “stop over,” was back
the job yesterday mee
when he left by T.C.A.,
over from Stan Glendening, whee
turn it is to spend week’s ston

Canada. After arriving at Montreal over in Barbados. Stan is staying

Coming SAT. Sept. 2ud 8.30 p.m.
New WONDERS FROM WARNER BROS!
Was al
OK FORTHE SILVER LINING
dive HAVER: polo HINER ni RE ®

DIRECTED BY EYAVYID) BUTLER sion aston ty Ses toimur a Ruby» Mav! Oxecton

PLAZA











GAIET Y (the



Jimmie DAVIS in

| Monogram Presents - - -
j (ist Instalment of Seria!
with Rex LEASE — Ruth MIX

We are fully Stocked » ic
Butts & Hinges
Locks
Hasps & Staples
Barrel Bolts

Lamp Chimneys
Burners & Wicks

FACTORY

LAST:
“LOUISIANA”

7 an
Johuny Mack BROWN in
A Moneritam Double.

THEATRE

pa ac presiee Theatre

Garden) ST. JAMES

TO-DAY 5.00 and 8.30 P.M.

Metro Goldwyn Mayer presents :— |
| NEPTUNES DAUGHTER
OPENING MONDAY 28th and Continuing
EASTER PARADE
PRICES: Baleony 48; House 30; 24; Pit 16.

SHOWS TODAY 5 and 8.30 p.m,
(Musieal)

“SIX GUN GOSPEL”



MONDAY and TUESDAY 5 and 8.30 p.m.

CUSTER’S LAST STAND”
Bobby WALCOTT and others













THE HURRICANE AND RAINY SEASON IS
APPROACHING

Latches

Nails

Hammers

Rite Roofing Compound
Galvd. Buckets

Sisal Rope

Call at Our Hardware & Ironmongery Dept.
Telephone No. 2039
REMEMBER :
There is no Parking Problem when you shop with us !



BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON

LIMITED.

i

TONITE 8.30 Mcnday & Tuesday 5 & 8.30 p.m.

If you miss this fine motion! picture you would have robbed

your treasure house of a fra
Gee



THE GRIPPING STORY OF 8

THE HATFIELDS AND
THE M°COYS !

.-.America’'s most

EXTRA!
LEON ERROL — CUTIE ON DUTY
—

Special BRITISH MOVIE TONE FLASH!

LEARIZ CONSTANTINE

Starring
= FARLEY GRANGER - CHARLES BICKFORD - RAYMOND MASSEY
’ RICHARD GIG! PERREAU

int and lasting memory

OLLI RA: ai






BASEHART GIGI
‘VANS

and introducing E
Unwend.to NING ROMS - Screen Play by ee Caties ro
Diane ty RKO RADIO MCTURES, aoe

EXTRA!

vs. DENNIS COMPTON

WIMBLEDON LADIES TENNIS FINALS

TENNIS FASHIONS by ‘

LOCAL TALENT

‘Gorgeous”,

AUDITION TO-DAY 9.3"

GUSSY MORAN
A.M,

| |like

iy | wicket.

they pian to visit Toronto and then at the Marine Hotel.
$$

Back To Universit,
R. KEITH GOODING who has
been holidaying in Barbados
since May 13th returned to Can-
ada yesterday morning where he
has recently finished his third year
B.Sc. at MeGill University. He re-

turns to continue his studies.

Been in These Parts Since

1920

EPRESENTATIVE in Vene-
zuela of the Federation of
British Industries is Mr. Rowland
E. Henry, who returned to Vene-
zuela yesterday by B.W.I1.A., has
been in Venezuela since 1946 and
in South America and the West
Indies since 1920. He visited Bar-

bados last in 1920.

Staying at the Crane Hotel, he
was here for two weeks. A Lon-
doner, he hopes to return to Eng-
lana in October,

From U.K. Visit
RS. AILEEN SEALY, who
seven weeks ago left by
the Golfito for a holiday in Eng-
lend, returned yesterday morn-
ing by T.C.A., via Canada.
Returned To Montreal
. ANNIE BROOKS, daugh-
ter of Rev. and Mrs. Fran-
cis Godson who has been holi-
daying in Barbados since August
12th returned to Montreal yester-
day morning by T.C.A.

Returned to Venezuela
OL. and Mrs. “Dick” Vidmer
were at Seawell yesterday
morning to see some friends safely
off to Venezuela. They were Mr.
Jose Delcarril, First Secretary at
the Argentine Legation in Caracas.
whose wife incidentally is remain-
ing on a few days more in Barba-
dos, and Mrs. Marie Vallenilla and
her daughter Cristina. Mr. Vallen-
illa was also in Barbados for a
holiday, but he returned about a
week ago. He is a lawyer in Vene-
suela. They were here for about a
month’s holiday, staying at the
Paradise Beach Club.



UN seems to flicker over the
loathsome surface of my paper

summer lightning over a
mountain of rollymolly and tum-
ble-cumtrivy .

First, there is a picture of
W. G. Grace in his cricket cap,
his benign face moored in 40
fathom of beard. Beneath is
written: “The Siegfried of Brit-
ain.” Now rat me and sink me
and stuff me with eels, if I ever
thought of a more exquisite com-
parison. All you have to do, to
savour the richness of it is to
imagine Siegfried (in his cricket
cap) at Lord’s or W. G. Grace
facing Brunhilde on a_ rocky

Mrs. MeGurgle’s American
HE inspector who had inter-
viewed Mr. Chadstone re-
ported that the McGurgle estab-
ishment certainly qualified for
Government aid, as it seemed to
be full of American visitors. But
a higher official was suspicious,
md went along himself. On the
doorstep he ran into the librarian,
‘Atta, pal,” said Mr. Chadstone
‘You from New Orleans?” asked
the offieial. “Sucker,” replied the



Was teaieine With

ATT two erent holiday in
Barbados Mr. and Mrs.
Desmond Proverbs returned to
Canada | morning by
ey were staying with
Mr. Proverbs’ parents, Mr. and
Mrs. I. G. Proverbs. Desmond is
at MacDonald College, studying
for his Ph.D. His wife is a Cana-
dian.

To Continue His Studies
R. STANLEY HASKELL, son
of Mr. H. N. Haskell, former
Headmaster of Harrison College
and Mrs. Haskell, after four
months’ holiday in Barbados,
staying with his family, left yes-
terday morning by T.C.A., to

return to his studies at Mac -

Donald penne where he is
studying for his Ph.D. in Animal
Nutrition,

First Visit

R. JEAN BLONDIN’S sister
Laurette and her husband

Mr. Guy Durocher who have
been. holidaying at Sam Lord’s
left for Canada yesterday morn-
ing by T.C.A,, after two weeks
holiday in Barbados. Mr. Blondin,
is the Manager of Sam Lord’s
and this was his sister’s first visit
to Barbados. In Montreal, Mr.

Durocher is an Automobile Dealer. i

Undecided

‘tr young Canadian girls ar-

rived from Montreal yesterday
morning by T.C.A., and expect to
be in Barbados until the middle of
September. They are both students
at McGill University and _ will
therefore have many friends in
Barbados.

They were a long time getting
off the ’plane, and Joy must have
made three attempts to get down
the plane steps. I don’t think she
was undecided about staying, but
each time she apparently remem-
bered something she had left
behind and had to dash back up
for whatever it was. However
they are now comfortably settled
with what should be an enjoy-
able holiday in front of them.

Gone Fora Week
R. BILL STUART, T.C.A.,
Station Manager here left
by T.C.A., yesterday on a week's
visit to Montreal. Bill’s wife and
daughter are alrg@idy in Canada
on holiday.

librarian: “You have said a
mouthful. Yassah. I sure am
from Noo Orleens, law sakes, huh,
huh, you all is, e tellin’
me.” The official scratched his
head. “You don’t ‘seem like an
American,” he said. “Buddy,”
replied the librarian, “when
you’ze next in da States, I’ll blow
you to a baked clam and a bar-
bican and some cookies like only
ma ald mammy can turn out.”
“Why should a lumber king
choose this place to stay? I

thought they all lived in suites in

London?” “Patootie,” replied the
librarian, “I guess guys of my sort
go big for a slice of democratic
living. And now, if you'll excuse
me, I must be seramming, bozo.
Wanna look up something in da
public library, yoo-hoo.”
Grand Census Gala
guard against a universal
boycott of next year’s census,
Suet has suggested that the whole
thing should be organised more
as a popular quiz or question-
naire, designed to appeal to the
public, than as a Government
foolery. Suet wants to add to the
census form a few questions about
film stars. He thinks this would

to Miss Juanita Morris, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Morris of
Station Hill.

The bride who was given in
marriage by her father looked
eharming in a dress of oyster s

r gatin and blonde |
Pee was clooene.. hile |
full skirt was pretti

Kha peabae

a redingote style
train.

Her finger tip veil of tulle was
edged with blonde lace and was
kept in place by a pill-box head-
dress trimmed with lilies of the
valley. She carried a si er bou-
quet of gerberas, nee roses
Michaelmas daisies and tube roses.
Her Maid-of-Honour was Miss
Merle Clarke, sister of the bride-
groom, whd wore a maize sheer
dress with picture hat to match
and gold sandals.

The two Bridesmaids were Mis:
Rosalind Morris, sister of the
bride and Miss Monica Hutson,
who wore aresses of pink and biue
georgette with pitture nats to
mateh and gold sandals. They each
carried bouquets made in horse

sha

The two bridesmaids were Miss

Ushers were Mr, Cecil Frank
Clarke, Mr. Joseph Kirton and
Mr. Keith Morris.

The Reception was held at tha
home of the Bride’s parents
‘Bromley’, Station Hill.

Back From B.G, Trip

R. ADA COTTINGHAM was

at Seawell on Thursday

afternoon to meet his good friend,

Mr. O. Henry, who has been ip
British Guiana since April.

T.C.A. Personnel Return

R. AND MRS. PHILIP
CLARKE and Mr. and Mrs.
Ernest Campeau after two weeks
holiday in Barbados staying at
Cacrabank, returned to Canada
yesterday morning, where both
Mr. Clarke and Mr. Campeau are
with T.C.A. in Montreal,

Present Plans

SEE that the Camera Club, are
re-sliarting their monthly meet-
ings tomorrow afternoon at 5 p.m.
at Wakefield, the British Councii
headquarters. This club was
formed about one year ago and
already has quite a few members,
but hope to enlarge their mem-
bership as these meetings con-
tinue.

Their present plans are to
discuss the forthcoming Advocate
Photo competition and the Annual
Exhibition.

Quick Work

N airmail letter via T.C.A.

timed in Montreal at 12.30
p.m. on Friday was opened at one
of the business offices in Bridge-
town yesterday morning at 9
o’clock. That’s certainly quick
work!

Originally Front Texas

} R. EDWARD McASHAN, who
M is originally from Texas has

en living for one and a half
years in Aruba where he is with
the Lago Oil Company, has been
holidaying in Barbados, staying
at the Ocean View Hotel. Yes-
terday he left here for Venezuela,
to connect up with K.L.M,. from
there to Aruba to-day. He was
here for ten days.

Back From Bermuda Trip

R. KENNETH DAVIS, Part-
ner of Messrs. Stansfeld
Scott and Co. Ltd. returned from
his Bermuda and Bahamas trip
yesterday by T.C.A. There was
no bad weather up that side as a
result of the Antigua hurricane,
although it was very hot.

By Beachcomber

induce people to fill up the form.
Also, every town should elect a
Census Queen, who would be
kissed by the Mayor after he had
signed his form. Mimsie Slop-
corner might tour England, as
Miss Census, and read out, on the
steps of Town Halls, such ques-
tions as, “Was your grandmother
(paternal) happily married?”

On Familiarisation Tour

R. THOMAS BLACKSTOCK,

representative of the Melville
avel Service in Toronto who
arrived from Trinidad on August
24th left yesterday morning by
T.C.A. for Bermuda, He is ena
familiarisation tour of the West
Indies, and will spend a short
while in Bermuda, having already
visited Trinidad, Jamaica and
Barbados, before he returns to
Toronto.

With only two days here, he
had a busy time and wished it
could have been longer. Sam
Lords, he said, presents a very
attractive ‘Old World’ atmosphere.
He thought however that the
island needs more accommodation
for tourists, as it has much to
offer its visitors.

Evans & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606

JUST IN = A

FINE NEW

DIAL 4220



LADIES’ CASUAL SHOES

In many Colours and Designs at

$4.58

$6.28

$7.00

LADIES’ STRAWS at 6a¢

YOUR SHOE STORE











ELLIO CCE POSSE

‘ t

ase
FOO POSCOS





~)
=

IN A CRICKET MATCH |

i



SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950

MADAME PARIS (Gardening Hints

r 7

BY JOAN

PARIS Sunday.
N a third floor apartment over-
looking the cocktail bar of the
Ritz Hotel, ornately furnished with
golden clocks, Venetian glass mir-
Tors, terra-cotta animals, and
glass, glass everywhere, a woman,
no longer young, lives as a
legend of the fabulous world

of Paris fashion.

She is Madame Chanel—a per-
fume was named after her— a
rich woman who made a fortune
between the two world wars but
who no longer dresses the inter-
nationally chic women.

She says: “One loses money
now in couture. I don’t like losing
money”.

MADAME CHANEL’S dress-
es: (above) Gipsy-type eve-
ning-gown in black and
raspberry. The skirt is separ-
ate from the bodice and made
in one enormous wrap-around
piece, Material is faille, the
frills edged with red to match

of slightly stiffened tulle. The

top the same cross-over line
in black silk faille.



But she dresses herself as only
herself can. Amid the glass
animals, the Chinese tables and
those hard, high, uncomfortable
sofas that the French love, she
posed for ROBB and myself in
the six dresses she is taking with
her to Venice this week.

They are simple dresses, with
the old “Chanel touch”, unique
because, though hundreds of
women would gladly buy them,
only their creator will wear them.

OBB chose two which illustrate
how a woman with courage



HARRISON

and personality, even if weil over
the 60 mark, can wear a dress in
flaming raspberry red, providing
the line is perfect.

And providing she knows—as
Chanel knoWs—every line and

movement of her own figure.
“Why”, said Chanel, throwing
wide her hands,

should a woman



be made to suffer in a dress in
which she cannot move from the
knees down, with a _ neckline
which is one long fear of exposure,
and a waistline which kills tne
enjoyment of a good meal?

“T live these days mostly in an
Atlantic liner between Paris and
New York. I need dresses that
I can roll into a ball and put on
at a moment’s notice”.

She pulled up the skirt of a
flouncing black dinner gown and
squashed it up in two hands—
“Viola!” she said.

{° is only fair to add that the

Chanel effect is also helped by
about three or four pounds—by
weight of jewellery.

“I”, said Chanel, ‘Now imitate
the false. Years ago I started the
‘dress jewellery’ vogue so that
women could wear ropes of pearls
and chunks of false stones
Now mine are real.”

The value? “I don’t even know”
said Chanel, “and if I did now is
not the time to talk about it when
one thinks of what has been hap-
pening in the South of France.

With a black, tulle dinnergown
worn with a small eye veil,
Chanel wore a triple rope of
pearls which reached to her
waist, a real ruby and emerald
necklace, an emerald pendant
the size of a pullet’s egg, pearl
earrings the size of a half-crown,
and rings reaching up to the mid-
dleknuckles of her anaes “9

WOMAN TO WOMAN:

The Beret Moves Back

By SUSAN DEACON
7PHE Basque beret, worn by
French porters. takes the place
next season of the large pliable
berets women have been wearing.
These new, small berets are now
worn straight, and slightly to the
back of the head. ,
In Paris, women are wearing
them with a wide meshed coarse
eye-veil or with a diamante clip
pinned straight on the front. These
berets are easy to wear with the
new hair styles. ss
Perfume points
AM constantly asked by women
the difference between toilet
water, Cologne and perfume.
Perfume is the strongest, most
concentrated scent. Cologne is the
weakest. 2
Toilet water is not strong enough
to be used as a regular perfume.
Use a light flower perfume in the

summer and a heavier. more spicy
one in the winter.
FANCIES THAT PASS...
Cloche hats .-. . The Doe-eyed
look... The Urchin Cut... White
shoes usually grubby.
Some ideas
ALL braid in different colours
is used to trim many of next
season’s clothes.
Here are some

noted: —

A collar of white silk ball braid
on a plain black dress. Black braid
edging the lapels of a dark green
jacket. A bJack plush beret cov-
ered with rows of brald.

Soft lights
ONCEALED lighting gives an
original effect to an ordinary
living-room. It is simple to arrange
and not expensive if low power
bulbs are used. Fix lights under
the curtain pelmet to switch on

ideas I have

For Amateurs

The Rese Garden

THE Rose has often been called
the “Queen of the Garden” and
most gardeners have had the
ambition at some time to grow
Roses.

The cultivation of Roses in Bar-—
bados is not difficult, although we
never get such good results as are
obtained in England, yet, with a
little knowledge, and some initial
trouble, Rose-trees will succeed
in Barbados well enough to make
the whole business of Rose grow-
ing well worth while.

Position

Rose-trees like an open sunny
spot, sheltered from excessively
high winds. They will not succeed
under the shade of trees or in a
bed infested with tree-roots.
Rose-trees are selfish plants, and
demand a bed or Tub all to them-
selves, so, do not put a border
of annuals around your Rose
beds, or stick in bits and pieces
Rf other plants here and there.

oose a sunny position free
from tree-roots (and remember
these can creep up even under
tubs) and if the spot is wind-
swept give the plants some pro-
tection from the wind. ‘

Size And Preparation Of

The Beds

For a single row of Rose-plants,
three feet is a comfortable width
to make the bed. For a double
row, a five foot wide bed is just
right, with the plants placed three
feet apart. To prepare the bed, dig
it out to a depth of two feet, but
should the ground be at all soggy,
dig out another foot, and put in
a layer of large stones for drain-
age, as Rose trees must have a
well drained bed. Now fill in the

cavity with a mixture of good
black mould leaf-mould, well
rotted cow manure and some

charcoal, In shaping up the bed
do not bank it too high, as this
causes the water to run off the
bed before it has a chance to
soak in, Let the bed settle and
find its own level for a week

re planting it, .
peRone-trees will also succeed if
planted in large tubs. Fill with
the same mixture as that given for

beds.
Planting

In planting the Rose-tree, do
not make the mistake of planting
(1). too deep, (2), too loosely.
If the plant is an imported one
see that the hole is wide enough
for the roots to be spread out
to their full length all around. If
the plant is taken from a pot,
turn it out of the pot with the

mould around it uae ape
removing the stones 4a e
pottom before planting man

both cases, tread the ground
firmly around the plant after it
is planted, as for Rose-trees to
succeed they must be firm and
tight in the ground, while the
surface soil must be kept loose
and well forked. +

Treatment

Give the Rose trees a good
soaking once a day. Avoid fre-
quent light sprinklings, as this
causes the roots to come too near
the surface seeking moisture
instead of striking down. Rose—
trees are rich feeders and need
regular applications of manure.
Cut off all dead flowers, and
dead wood, and, when picking
the Roses cut them with a good
length stem, as this keeps the
trees pruned, all the pruning tat
is necessary in this country.
During the dry months give the
Fose-trees a rest, by picking oif
all buds, lessening the watering,
and trashing over the beds after
the manner that a cane field is
trashed.

The best flowering time for
Rose-trees is during the rainy
season.

———_

when the curtains are drawn.
Cupboards with glass doors,
flowers arranged in a recess, book-
shelves and window bays all look
more attractive when softly lit.
London Express Service



Specially designed for Barbados, this
brown broque is now on sale in
the leading stores. See them for yourself

‘made by

JOHN WHITE



A, ony: ae he

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



At The Cinema:

War In The Pacific

By G. &
TWO of the bloodiest and most famous battles to take

nlace in the Pacific duri

World War It are depicted in

“SANDS OF IWO JIMA”, now showing at the Empire
Theatre. They are the battles of.Tarawa and Iwo Jima,
both of which will long be remembered by officers and
men of the United States Marine Corps, whose job it was
to capture these two Jap strongholds.

The rigours of and life
under battle conditions ot a squad
of U.S. Marines constitute the
story of this war film. Under the
hard tutelage of. a seasoned
sergeant who is alternately dis-
liked and ited by his men,
they are by him in their first
taste of actual warfare—the land-
ings at Tarawa—and finally in the
battle of Iwo Jima, where, after
four days of murderous fighting,
the Stars and Stripes is raised on
Mount Surabachi. Into these
events and backgrounds, which
are taken from authentic docu-
ments, are blended the conflicts,
camaradarie, and personal actions
and reactions encountered when
men of different education, back-
ground, faith and ideals are
thrown together under the stress
of war. But the points of interest
in the film are the battle scenes,
where the men, as a solid fighting
unit, take their place in the huge
panorama of battle

John Wayne and John Agar
have the two principal roles, the
former as the sergeant and the
letter as the young idealist, who
is a marine purely because it is
tradition in his family. Both men
give convincing performances, as
do all the other members of a
large cast which has been well
chosen to represent the different
types encountered in a group of
fighting men.

Made with the co-operation of
the United States Marines, real
combat footage is skilfully inter-
woven into the film sequences
with the result that the landings,
bombardments and battle scenes
have a quality of realism in the
actual sounds and sights of war.

“ROSEANNA McCOY”
Family feuds have long been

the subject of plays and novels,
from the Capulets and the Mon-



ENGLISH FOR AMERICANS

By Fred Doeerflinger

LONDON.
American tourists are chuckling
over some of the “quaint” and
“amusing” places they have “dis-
covered” while having a look-see
at the countryside.

They found both a Sharp Nose counties,
Bugle in Cornwall, a

and a

Twitchi in Devonshire and
Itchen Abbas in Hampshire.

fordshire.
Not

shire, and there is a Strawbe
Hill in Middlesex.

Surrey County boasts a Hogs

Back, Devonshire a Sheeps Wash
and Lincolnshire has both a Cow-
bit and a Swineshead.

In Laneashire tourists found 4
Bare Lane, a Daisey Field and
wondered about Besses O’ Th’
Barn and Chorlton-Cum-Hardy.

Ashby-De-La-Zouch in Leices-
tershire always hit them like
Spital-In-The-Street, Lincolnshire

Bat and Ball

In Kent county
located a Bat and Ball and a
Sandwich, in Derbyshire a Bols-
over and a Whatsandwell while
in Gloucestershire there was @
Paneeeae and a Chipping Sod-
Dury.

Leighton Buzzard and Luton
Hoo took the prizes for Bedford-
shire with Six Mile Bottom,

22, pee ericans. Who wi L
5 -to» pronounce Cwm,” Mon-
There is a Rum in Invernes- mouthshire, the secret ig to blow
shire, Scotland. a Beer in Devon- with your tongue through your
shire and a Rye House in Hert- teeth and say “whim.”

far from Cherry _ Tree, county
Lancashire, is Pear Tree, Derby- “Stewkey”, inhabitants in Ciren-
TTY e@ester, Gloucestershire insist on

the tourists



tagues down to the present day,
and in “Roseanna Mocoy™ now

aying at the Globe Theatre, a

mous American feud is brought
to the screen. The hostility be-
twéen the saturnine, mountain-
eering Hatfields and the God-
fearing farming McCoys is legen-
dary in America, and has been the
theme of folk-songs and ballads as
well as stories.

Against a background of Ken-
tucky mountains, the film tells the
— of the love of Johnse Hat-
field for Roseanna McCoy. It is
full of local colour and develops

struggle between

into a ‘tense
tw falies de old hatreds, as the
termine to prevent
the age.
There

has been no attempt to
glamourize the plain folk of Ken-
tucky, and the costumes, settings
and way of life are portrayed
accurately, There is an excellent
musical background and splendid
characterizations on the part of an

all star cast, includi: Farley
Granger, Charles Bickford and
Raymond Massey.

“WALLFLOWER”

Of lighter vein is “Wallflower”
now playing at the Aquatic Club.
From all reports, the accent in
this film is on youth, with plenty
of comedy and romance. Starring
Robert Hutton, Joyce Reynolds
and Janis Page, with Edward
Arnold playing the paternal role,
it is the story of a younger sister
who is resigned to playing second
fiddle

ever, with the help of her father,

she succeeds in winning the man| |

she wants from under her sister's
nose, only to have a situation de-
velop where she and her boy
friend land in jail. There should
be plenty of laughs, and the
ending is a happy one.

Cambridgeshire; Uphill, Somerset;
Chesshire;

; Leoudwater,
Buckinghamshire; Eye, Hereford~-
shire; Pokesdown, Hampshire;

Tar Pots, Essex and Zeals, Dorset
easy winners for their respective

Strange pronunciations baffled
ould dream

Locals in

stiffkey,
call

their

Norfolk
hometown

“Sister” as the correct pronunci-
ation, and the villagers of St.
QOast, Essex demand that the place
be called “St. Oath.”

When it comes to Welsh names
the Yankee tourists simply give
up. This reporter will leave it
to the reader to try to pronounce
for le, Aberystwyth, Llw-
chwr, Mynyddishlywn, Liancai-
ach, Llanerchymed, Llanuwchllyn
or Lianfairpwligwyngwllgogery~
ehwryndrobwllillantisiliogogogoch
(editor correct).

Yes, sir, that’s all one word
and the town is the first railway

in Angelsey, Wales, on the
m. line from Landon to Holy-
head. Most people call it “Lian-
fairpwil” and let it go at that.
re guides cut it to “Llian-
air.”



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PAGE FOUR





wr of the finances of the West Indies tearm? I agree with you,
this is a strange question in the mids? of all the rejoicing. The Oder of the day.
West Indians, who before this tour had never won a Test match in J. W. Byer,

England, now, by popular opinion, rank with Australia in proven
capacity to reduce English cricket to ashes.

Let us assume for the sake of argument that it will be possible
for the West Indies to visit Australia in 1952-53 or 1953-54, then what
are our chances for securing the services of the key men in this team?

In the first place I give my irrevocable opinion that one of the
safest measures is that each,of the amateur members of the 1950 West

team should receive a bonus of not less than £350 from the
fo Indies Cricket Board of Control out of the profits gained from
is tour.

IN THE PAST, NO BONUS

°
T is true that in the past we have never been able to lay any store

by from the profits gained from West Indies touring teams to behi

England and conversely from M.C.C. touring teams to the West Indies.
The 1950 tour presents a different picture and the West indian
Cricket Board of Control will receive profits of several thousands of
pounds.
Now is the time for some .angible appreciation to be given to
those who have sacriticed much in tne hope of earning little by com-
parative standards.

AMATEURISM v. PROFESSIONALISM

E in the West Indies have suffered much from this bogey of
so-called amateurism. Tne time is ripe for us to improve
upon this obviously unreal state of affairs.

It is common knowledge that every member of the 1948 Australian
team to England received a bonus of £800 from Bradman down to
Neil Harvey, the youngest member of the team, and there were no
“professionals” included in the Australian team,

W.I. FINANCES
SHALL make but a pasty appreciation of the financial svatus and
commitments of some of tie leading players on the West indies
team and this should be sufficient to subsvantiate the argument which i
am. posing.
Alan Rae, West Indies opening batsman will remain a law s.udent
at Lincoln’s Inn and C. “Boogies’ Williams, a member ot the stat? o1
Harrison College and a B.A., of Durham University, wul be staying on
in England on a year’s post-graduate course.

Clyde Walcott, who is one of the most curious cases of all, is an
insurance agent and his six months absence overseas will mean much.
Even in our moments of fondest imagination one could not think that
the not too lavish allowance of £4 per week would equate with any
decent percentage olf his commission as an insurance agent.

Valentine, the siow left arm bowling tind 1s due to fill a
post as a machinist in Jamaica if je does mot reconsider nis aecision
not to go to India as a member of the Commonwealth team ‘this winter,

WEEKES HAS KNEE TROUBLE

VERTON WEEKES, the West incies animated run getting machine
has cartilage trouble in one knee. He is to have the knee examined
and if an operation is necessary it will be performed in England before
he returns to Barbados,
He will return to England, of course, to play again in League
ericket in the Lancashire League,

_ This subject of professionalism versus amateurism, I have siudied
very carefully. I find that no one can seriously maintain that Sir
Donald Bradman didn’t receive considerable indirect financial benefit

his magnificent performances—apart from the gifts got from
wealthy patrons,

EASY JOBS

OLF “blues” in England, I even read, used to be offered good jobs

on the Stock Exchange and some of the lilies of the tennis
lawns who toiled not, neither did they spin (except on wet courts)
have made more than comfortable incomes out of sport firms.

Here in the West Indies there is not that ideal set up and the
West Indies Cricket Board must step into the breach.

I for’one have heard that there are tw. Cars and a bungalow
waiting for Sonny Ramadhin in Trinidad and one wonders why such
a fund has not yet been started here say for Walcott, who by virtue
of his profession must be many many dollars out of his pocket be-
cause of the West Indies tour.

SIX MEDALS FOR THE BOYS

Sport fans will be glad to know that Mr, Ernie Proctor, well
known local turfite and sportsman has ordered six silver medals with
gold facings from Mr. Louis Bayley, one of the colony’s best known
silversmiths to be presented to the six members of the Barbados
contingent of the 1950 West Indies team.

Hon'ble V. C. Gale will make the presentation and the jovial
Ernie tells me that he desires to make special mention of the able
manner in which Skipper John Goddard led his team and also of
the competent managership of Jack Kidney.

INTERESTING WATER POLO

At this point in the Water Polo season, the clubs are in a very
interesting position. Snappers by defeating Flying Fish on Thursday
are now in the lead with ten points and hive therefore put themselves
in a strong position at the beginning of the second round of the com-
petition. Fiying Fish and Bonitas are tied for second place with
eight points and Swordfish follow just one point behind. Barracudas
and Police complete the line-up in that order.

It is generally recognised in Water Polo circles that Snappers and
Fiying Fish are the strongyst teams in the league. So Snappers, by
defeating Flying Fish have, therefore, only the so-called ‘weaker’
teams to face, Notice I say ‘so-called,’ for Bonitas, Swordfish and
Barracudas have shown that they have plenty of fight in them and
it wouldn’t surprise me a bit if one of these teams puts it over Snap-
pers when they meet in the second round.

In the past week or so, however, Swordfish has lost two leading
players, but I hear Billy Gilkes is re-entering the game in the Sword-
fish centre line. Bonitas too have lost two of their leading players,
Harold Bynoe and Herbert Grannum, who have been replaced by
Ian Inniss and Alan Taylor, Flying Fish are also losing one of their
forts in the back line, as Tony Johnson will shortly be returning to
Canada to continue his studies, and Barracudas will be losing Keith
Lewis. The Snappers and Police line-ups remain unchanged.

Bonitas and Swordfish meet this Thursday, to decide who is going
to climb into position te challenge Snappers. The other fixture will
be between Barracudas and Police, who lie bottom of the league in
that order.

veteran

COMBERMERE vs. POLICE
Police (for 8 wkts) ........ 230

Police scored 230 runs for the
loss of 8 wickets against Comber-
mere after batting the whole day
at Combermere yesterday when
the third round of First Division
Cricket got started. The 230 runs
were built up chiefly by J. Byer’s
confident century at number four
before he was caught by Norville
nd the stumps off a slow ball
from Knight.

Throughout the day Police had
complete control of the Comber-
mere bowlers, and change after
change, until they eventually
bowled seven bowlers, made but
little impression on the stolidity of
the Police batsmen. The 230 runs
were scored off 77 overs.

Byer did not show marked pol-
ish and flash, but punished the
loose balls and batted with a cool
security which outdid Comber-
mere’s most strenuous efforts. He
hit 9 fours and one six, It onl
took him a short while at the
wicket to get the going of the
bowling, and thereafter, he timed
his strokes nicely. After he had
reached his 100, his keenness
slackened and he soon got caught.

H. Wiltshire with 24 and G.
Cheltenham 33, were the other two
tall scoring batsmen.

Pacer S. I. Smith, during a spell
of 20 overs of which 9 were maid-
ens, was the most successful howl-
er. He took four wickets for 44
runs, C, E. Beckles took two wick-
ets, but his bowling yielded 62
runs.

Police won the toss and decided
to bat on the good wicket. C.
Blackman and F. Taylor opened

their innings, and against the
pacers, S. I. Smith and M. E.
Murrell, began a cautious, but

confident period.

Both Smith and Murrell caught
a good length early and scoring
was uphill work, the best efforts
only conceding singles. With the
score 15. Taylor, who had so far
only scored four, was adjudged
lL.b.w, to a fast one from Smith in
his third over. His first two overs
had been maidens. In the last ball
of the same over, Farmer, who had
joined Blackman, made an uncer-
tain stroke and spooned the ball to
Murrell who took the catch. He
had made no additional runs.

With J. Byer and Blackman as-
sociated the mastery of the Com-
bermere attack was checked and
runs increased steadily. To keep
down the rate of scoring, skipper
Knight made a double change and
brought on his spin bowlers, Grant
and Seckles. Beckles got an accur-
ate length in his first over. but
Knight was treated with but
scant respect, He got a wicket in
his first over, however. It was
a slow ball which bowled Black-
man when he made a swiping
attempt The scoreboard then read
4 ls

Warner Out

Warner and Byer carried the
score to 76 before Warner was

caught by Knight in Beckles’
seventh over. The luncheon score
was 106 for the same four wickets.
Byer’s wicket was still intact with
48. He had hit one six and four
fours. Wiltshire was then not out
with 12 runs.

After lunch, Byer and Wiltshire
settled down to punish the bowling
and change after change was
effected without result until the
two had added 57 runs to the score.
It was Wiltshire who was sent
back to the pavilion after scoring
24 runs. He was completely beaten
and bowled by a fast change from
spinner Beckles, That was Beckles’
second wicket.

For five wickets the total was
133. Byer was then in his sevens
ies,

Like other partnerships which
had given Combermere bowlers
much trouble, Cheltenham joined
Byér to increase the pile. These
two batsmen batted carefully, but
did not spare the loose balls.

With Police 194, Byer backdrove
Knight to the boundary for four to
complete his individual century.

had hit nine fours and a six.
He did not survive long after.
After he had reached three figures,
two runs later he edged one to
Norville behind the stumps. It was
off Knight whom he had made
the century hit, that he was
caught, The scoreboard read 205










°

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

J. W. BYER SCORE 100FOR POLICE

Wanderers In The Lead
In Game With Pickwick

FINE WEATHER prevailed yesterday as the third series of
First Division Games opened, and bright cricket was the

iy *
Police batsman helped himself to_a
century at the expense of Combermere,
best individual score for the day.

and this was sthe

—6—102, The other two wickets
fell quickly afterwards.

COLLEGE vs, CARLTON
Carlton 22... 6. ccc cece seen e 148
College (for 1 wkt.) ...... 67

HARRISON COLLEGE are in a
strong position of gaining
innings lead in their First Divi-
sion match against Carlton at the
College grounds

Cariton won the toss and went
out to bat on a perfect —_
They only managed to score 1:
in reply College are 67 for. the
loss of one wicket. ‘

skipper Hutchinson and Denise
Wiliams, who shared in a
wicket partnership, saved
from looking like a disastrou
fall. They took the score from
23 for the loss of four wickets to
119 before Hutchinson was ovt
for 59. Williams knocked up 37.

The College attack and fielding
was good. Cammie Smith sent
down 17 overs and capture three
for 33. Corbin took three for 40
and King two for 26. The other
wicket was taken by Worme a!
the cost of six runs after he had
bowled four overs,

The College opening pair C
Smith and M. Worme broke dow"
the Carlton opening attack and
they were forced to bring on thei:
spinners. Worme gave Kennv
Hutchinson a return.

Smith and R. Rock scored
rapidly until stumps were drawn
At the close Smith was 44 not ou’
and Rock 14.

—19

The Start

Carlton opened their first inn-
ings with L. Hutchinson and
G. Edghill. Edghill played the
first three balls from J. Corbin,
who opened the College attack
from the Park end. He took .
single off the fourth ball. In the
fifth ball Hutchinson, who went
up to face, was clean bowled
before he could open his account.

N. S. Lucas filled the breach
but when the total was nine
C. Smith at first slip took a bril-
liant left hand catch off the bowl-
ing of Corbin to dismiss Edghill
for four.

Skipper R. Hutchinson was
next out to bat. A run later Lucas
edged the second delivery of Cor-
bin’s fourth over and wicket-
keeper Harrison took an easy
catch, Lucas made five.

K. A. Greenidge, who part-
nered Hutchinson, appeared to be
settling down when at 23 he was
caught by V. Smith off the bowl-
ing of Worme, who took over
from Corbin at the Park end. His
score was six.

D, Williams shared the fifta
wicket partnership with skipper
Hutchinson. This pair changed
she whole atmosphere of the
game. They quickly settled down
and runs came easily.

Hutchinson soon after passed
his quarter century and by lunch
they had added 53 runs—Williams
was 21 and Hutchinson 38.

On resumption Corbin bowled
from the Park end and Blackman
the Combermere. Hutchinson
took three runs off the fourth
delivery of Corbin’s tenth over
to take his score to 50 and the
total to 100. Williams afterwards
reached his quarter century.

At 4.15 o’clock, when the total
was 119, and the partnership had
added 96, Skipper Hutchinson
attempted to glide the fourth
delivery of King’s over but the
ball spooned. Rock ran around
from first slip to fine leg and
took a brilliant catch to dismiss
Hutchinson for a well played 59

Williams Out

With the score reading 119 for
5 W. Greenidge partnered Will-
iams. In the following over from
C. Smith, Williams was caught
Ly Worme at first slip for 37.

Marshall was next in but at 127
he was unfortunately run out be-
fcre he could open his account. A
Cox, who was playing his first
game in this Division, filled the
breach.

He opened with a four to the
leg boundary off King. Greenidge
made a flashy 15 before he was
stumped by wicket-keeper Harri-





SCOREBOARD

EMPIRE vs. SPARTAN
SPARTAN’S—ist Innings

an

L, F. Harris b Alleyne . ia
T, Pilgrim ¢ Fields b Alleyne 13
K, Walcott b Alleyne 0
N.-\Wood b Williams ; 29
K, Bowen Lb.w. b Milling 15
B. D. Morris c Fields b Williams ul
c.o0 Sitens c Harper b Williams 2
F, Phillips not out 6
£, Smith b Williams . 0
Extras: b. 11; 1b. 1; nb. 4 16
Total ....... certieshads ae
Fall of wickets: 1 for 24; 2 for 31; 3
for 58; 4 for 58; 5 for 61; 6 for 95; 7 for
116; 8 for 119; 9 for 127; 10 for 127.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
. M R W.
H. Barker... . 1 23 1
E. A. V. Williams 905 2 33 5
E. Millington 2 2 1
Cc. Alleyne 4 S$ @ 3
EMPIRE’S—ist Innings
O. M, Robinson c Bowen b Phillips 19
B. Bourne ec Walcott b Phillips o
E. A. V. Williams not out . 25
E. Cave not out 20
Extras: b. 3 3
Total (for 2 wkts.) 67
iwG ANALYSIS
BOWL 0. M R w.
. Phittips 8 1
Me E Smith 4 0 13 0
a K. Bowen 5 1 15 0
L. F. Harris 6 2 il 0
K. Walcott € 2 8 0
POLICE vs. COMBERMERE
POLICE—Ist Innings
Cc. Blackman b Grant 19
F. Taylor l.b.w. b Smith ’ 4
Capt. Farmer c Murrell b Smith 0
J. Byer c Norville b Knight 102
T. Warner c Knight b Beckles 15
H. Wiltshire b Beckles 24
G. Cheltenham b Smith . 33
FE. Brewster not out 13
B, Morris b Smith 5
Extras 14
Total (for 8 wkts.) .........+ 230
Fall of wickets 1-15; 2—15; 3—46; 4~
16; 5-133; 6—205; 7--222; 8—230.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M. R. W.
M. BE. Murrell il 1 30 0
S. I, Smith 20 9 44 4
G. N. Grant 4 0 20 1
Cc. E. Beckles 22 3 62 2
oO. V. Elliott 12 1 32 0
F. Harris 6 0 21 0
O. R. Knight 2 0 ¥ 1
WANDERERS vs. PICKWICK
PICKWICK—Ist Innings
A. M, Taylor 1.b.w. b D. Atkinson 25
G. L. Wood ¢ Proverbs b N. Marshall 6
T. S. Birkett L.b.w, b D. Atkinso 4
H, Kidney b D. Atkinson . 14

son after going forward and miss-
ing one from C. Smith. Warren
went out but was soon caught by
the substitute for J. Williams off

the bowling of King for three.
K. Hutchinson was next in but
he was soon after clean bowled
by C. Smith before he opened his
account. The Carlton innings clos-
ed at 148 with Cox seven not out.
Cammie Smith and W. Worme
opened for the school boys. Smith
scored four runs off the first over
from Edghill from the Park end.
They carried the total to 19 be-
fore Worme was caught and
bowled in the second delivery of
K. Hutchinson’s first over from
the Park end. Worme made four.
R. Rock partnered Smith who soon
after passed his quarter century
by taking two fours, a two and
a Single off the fifth over from
W. Greenidge, Smith continued to
boundaries freely off the

neat over from K. Hutchinson,
ip to when stumps were drawn
this pair were still going after the

bowiers.

EMPIRE vs, SPARTAN

Spartan 66. wusasilek

Empire (for 2 wkts. 67)

E. A. V. “Foffie’ Williams in an
accurate bowling performance
yesterday at Bank Hall, took 5
of Spartan’s wickets to play the
major role in the dismissal of the
yg team for the small score of
127.

Williams took these wickets in
10.5 overs and only conceded 33
runs, He sent down two maidens,

Spartan took first turn at the
wicket and by 4.30 p.m. were all
out for 127 runs. Empire, at the
close of play were 67 runs for
two wickets,

Charles Alleyne of Empire alsu
turned in a good howling perform.
ance, taking 3 for 26. ;

Quite a few batsmen reached
double figures. The best score for
Spartan was 29 by N. Wood and
E, A. V. Williams is 25 not out for

Empire,
The Game

Spartan won the toss on a per-
fect wicket and decided to bat.
Their innings was opened by A.
Atkins and S. Griffith while
E. A. V. Williams and H. Barker
opened the attack for Empire.

Atkins and Griffith started con-
fidently and took the score on to
24 before Atkins was clean bow!-
ed by Barker for 6. He played
back to a good length ball and
was completely beaten by the
pace. Griffith was then 11 not out.





— all day long

*

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D. Evelyn c D. Atkinson b T. Pierce
. King e St. Hill b T. Pierce
Camacho b D. Atkinson ..
Hoad ¢ D. Atkinson b E. Atkinson
. Inniss stpd. (w.k. Skinner) b
T. Pierce
R, Jordan not out...
Marshall b D. Atkinson

Extras ve

= opor

Total

of
5

1—8; 2-25;
@—51; 7—51; 2—70;
iG aS

wickets ;
—51;

ll

4

-» 15.4

lerce il
WANDERERS—iIst Innings

Marshall b H. Jordan ........

Atkinson not out

Proverbs c b H.
Atkinson not

2
1
7

SRokz

|3| eee sang



vomz nomz

out .

Total (for 2 wkts.) .

Fall of wickets: 1—43; 2—120.
COLLEGE vs. CARLTON
CARLTON—Iist Innings

Hutchinson b J. Corbin ...

. Edghill ¢ Smith b J. Corbin

. Lucas ¢ wkpr. (Harrison) b

pe ee ear

oe U_Smien vb Wore

Hu! c b

Williams ec Worme b Smith

Greenidge c wkpr. (Harrison)

b Smith . te ‘

Marshall run out

Cox not out ‘

Warren c sub b King

Hutchinson b Smith

Extras

AREM
Total ...

Fall of wickets: 1—1; 2—9; 3—10;
23; 5—119; @—127; 7—127; 8—144; 9—147.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
12
2
4
12
17

| =| feo Sa, sf

t

Corbin
S

Coco Ome
S8Randz

n 8

ON COLLEGE—1

Smith not out. +4

Worme c & b K. Hutchinson

Rock not out ...........
Extras

Total (for 1 wkt.)
BOWLING ea

a,

H.

M.

K.

Cc.

Cc,
st Innings

Cc, -

M.

R.

aned ounmowd

noooood | 3

AREATO
FNnRarwo
woOCoHKs



L, F. Harris joined Griffith. This
pair only added 7 runs for the sec-
ond wicket. Williams, who was
bowling steadily all the while from
the Southern end, got Griffith to
drive out at one well up on his
leg stump.

Griffith mistimed and was bowl-
ed neck and crop.

With the score at 31 for z
“Torry” Pilgrim partnered Harris,
The 50 was sent up in as many
minutes and Skipper Alleyne
brought on Millington in place of
Barker and himself from the
Southern end.

Alleyne’s third ball of his third
over saw Harris going back to the
pavilion for a well played 14.

Harris played forward to a leg
break pitched on his leg stump,
did not get a touch and the ball
took his centre stump.

Spartan was then 58 for the loss
of three wickets with Pilgrim 10

not out.
Two Balls

K. Walcott, the next man in,
could only survive two balls from
Alleyne. The first he played late
on to his pads and the second he
was bowled in attempting to cut
an off break pitched on the off
stump.

Walcott did not score and the
total score remained at 58 with 4
wickets taken. In came N, Wood.

The score rose to 61 as Milling-
ton bowled another over yielding
3 runs,

Alleyne, who had now taken 2
wickets in 3 maiden overs, ended
his fourth over by taking another
wicket without a run scored off
him. Pilgrim was his third victim.
He was caught at cover by Fields
for 13 when he drove at one of
Alleyne’s deliveries. This brought
Wood and K. Bowen ‘.

The scoreboard read 61 for
and Alleyne’s figures were 4 overs,
4 maidens, 3 wickets.

Another bowling change was
effected, with Millington brought
back from the Southern end and
pacer Barker from the Bank Hall

end.

Millington got Wood at 14 to
edge to Robinson at second slip
but Robinson put it down,

Good Stand
Wood and Bowen retrieved Spar-
tan’s position by making a sixth
wicket stand of 34 runs. Bowen,
however, did not hold on any
longer. With his score at 15, he
tried to pull a short pitched ball
from Millington to square leg and

@ On Page 5

SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950



A visit to the Government Farm at tne Pine Estate during the

. week has set me thinking very seriously about an aspect of racing

in Barbados, and Trinidad too, for that matter, which causes me

. considerable annoyance. It is mainly to do with the breeding side

of the sport.

But why, I would like to know, is Racing not regarded as a
kind of industry in these two colonies. When compared with racing
in England, where there is a National Stud, it seems to me that
.we have far more reason for regarding racing in these islands as
an industry than there is in the United Kingdom.

At first glance these may appear to be exaggerated words.
Racing in England, one will be tempted to say, has been carried on
now for twe hundred years or more and today there are a few
thousand horses taking part at numerous meetings with millions of
people in attendance, either betting or taking some active part in
the upkeep of horses and tracks, etc. But the fact remains that
racing in England, no matter how many people are employed in the
process, or how much is paid in taxes to the Government, is still run
chiefly for the benefit of those who own the race tracks. If a race
track ceases to make a profit for its shareholders it is not long
before it ceases to function altogether.

Now here, in this part of the West Indies we do not suffer by
comparison when it comes to the number of people pro ratio to the
population employed in carrying on the racing game, or the number
of horses in training in relation to the number of people who can
afford to keep them. But we are decidedly in a better position when
it comes to the question of profit, for, racing in these islands is run
for racing’s sake, and no other. That is, all profits made from racing
out here is immediately put back into the game itself and barring
the Government, the lucky punter and ticket holder, the lucky horse
owner, and numerous hard worked employees of the various racing
bodies, there is no other section of the community which benefits
from the revenue derived from racing. In addition to this, racing
also causes a number of people to be employed simply to look after
the welfare of the horses themselves,

Having established the fact that racing cut here is run on a non-
profit making basis and taking into consideration the revenue, em-
ployment and recreation which it provides for the community as a
whole, why, then, should the local government exclude the thorough-
bred race horse from its stock breeding activities? As far as I am
concerned there is no satisfactory answer to that question.

But what makes it worse is the fact that the Government, which
has an annual revenue of some £10,000 from racing, actually had
a thoroughbred stallion standing at the Pine Estate, and, would you
believe it, sold him to one of the other islands. As an incidental it
is interesting to note that this stallion, William’s Hill, had his first
progeny appear on the race track at our recent meeting and although
only a half-bred he still managed to run second once to Best Wishes
while he defeated his other rivals who were all thoroughbreds.

But right now I am not concerned with whether William’s Hill
will be a success as a sire of race horses or not. What I would like
to see is not only another stallion bought but some thoroughbred
mares as well. Spread them around the various Agricultural stations
and breed pedigreed horses just as pedigreed cows, goats, sheep, pigs
and Guinea pigs are bred there today. Above all let us be rid of
the idea that thoroughbred race horses, just because they cannot ba
eaten, render no useful service to the community.

ARIMA TO-DAY — Sangre Grande.....

The above, if I am not mistaken, is the triumphant cry of the
saga boys as they wend their inebriated way from the race meeting
which forms part of the celebration of the Feast of Santa Rosa in
the town of Arima, Trinidad, B.W.I. I have never been there at
this time so I speak merely from hearsay, But I am told on good
authority that everybody has a whale of a time.

Well the race meeting opened yesterday and normally I should
have had an opportunity to listen in at my radio and give you a few
impressions in this column today. But as I write this I happen to
be enjoying a few days of rest at the Edgewater Hotel, Bathsheba.
Consequently I can do no more than make mention of the fact that
one of our major race meetings is likely to come off.

However at least one of the most important races on the pro-
gramme, the Derby Trial Stakes, is not due to be run off until the
second day and therefore I hope that by next Sunday I will be able
to draw some conclusions from the result of this classic. Meanwhile
the feature Cipriani Memorial will have taken place by the time
this appears and I expect Blue Streak will have played a prominert
part. I also noticed that Ocean Pearl was once again entered in an
A class distance when her owners put her in this race, and I shall be
very surprised if she does anything of note. However I think she has
splendid chances in the sprints now that the best sprinter in the West
Indies, September Song, has been removed from the scene.

The Trinidad two-year-olds also make their debut to South-
Caribbean racing at the Arima meeting. This year I notice they are
not as numerous as last season but of course that does not mean that
they may not be as good. Next week I should imagine we should
also be able to express a few opinions about these youngsters. Until
then



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SUNDAY, AUGUST 27,

1950



To hmprove
British Empire
Policemen

MAJOR R. A. Stoute, Deputy
Commissioner of Police, returned
to the island last week after at-
tending a Senior Officer’s course
at Police College, Ryton-on-Duns-
more, near Coventry.

This College was opened two
years ago by the Home Secretary
Mr. Chuter Ede, with a view of

increasing the efficiency of the
Police services of the British
Commonwealth,



MAJOR R. A, STOUTE
It was formerly an

industrial
workers’ camp and is situated
Jess than a miles from the beau-
tiful Warwickshire village of
Ryton-on-Dunsmore,

At the College with Major
Stoute were 190 men and four
women—none below the rank of
Sergeant. On completion of the
course the students are generally
promoted,—Major Stoute being
recently made Deputy Commis-
sioner of Barbados Police Force,

Fifty-three year old Brigadier
Duncan Dunn, who was a soldier
for 34 years, is Commandant of
the College

No Instructors
There are no instructors ui the
, College, instead there is a direct-
ing staff made up of specially
elasen officers whose job it is to
guide the students.
While Major Stoute
Chief Inspector Bert Palmer,
who played a big part in the
Liverpool Cameo murder case,
took part in many debates with
Colonial students.

was there,

At Ryton, rural policemen are
given the chances of learning
first-hand work of men _ from
Scotland Yard, and many of the
subjects dealt with are beyond
the normal range of police acti-
vities.

The College Library has a col-
lection of over 1,000 books.

Every student has to give two
lectures—one on his speelal sub-
ject, the other is chosen for him,

There are no fatigues, roll call,
examinations or house rules,
They all wear uniform at morn-
ing sessions but are afterwards
free to wear civilian clothes.

A Mess President is appointed
every week while on Thursdays
the “dress dinner” is an establish-
ed social event.

The Commandant takes a keen

interdst in practical demonstra-
tions of police work which the
various groups in turn. give in

the College Theatre. These dem-
onstrations are written, acted and
produced by the students and are
presented in two acts.
Recreation includes billiards,
archery and play-reading.



Hurricanes

Win At Polo

Fast chukkas were played by
members of the Barbados Poio
Club at the Garrison yesterday
when Hurricanes won one over
Cyclones by 2 goals to one. The
other two chukkas were played to

a draw after a “no quarter”
struggle.

This was the fourth in a series
of practice games in which team
have assumed names instead of it
being just a case ot Red versus
Blue.

Mark Edghill shot the tv.u geals
for Hurricanes and Colonel Mich-
elin scored the one for Cyclones

Nearing completion is the
pavilion which the Government
has given the Club permission
erect on the Savannah.

17 Tenants
More For
Pine Estate

THE Housing Board at a meet-
ing yesterday approved the selec-

tion of 17 pew tenants for house:
wt the Pine Housing Sstate
Among the new tenants selected
is Frederick Lewis whose house
collapsed at Hothersal Turning
recentiy.

Lewis, among others, was tu

have got a house at the Pine
before, but had to wait while the
Government aided victims of last
year’s flood. Seventeen people
have been selected for new houses.

Tenants at the Pine Hili wil
be allowed to keep feathered

stock, sheep and goats, the Board
decided. Any pens or enclosures
erected by the tenants for that
purpose must be approved by the
Board.

The Board discussed the build-
ing of a main traffic road at the

Pine. and it was decided to
recommend to the Government
to construct a road. connecting

the Pine Cross Road with the
existing 18-foot road to the hous-
ing estate.

Transportation will then be a
less difficult problem.

Mr, John Beckles M.B.E., asked
what had been done about the
erection of a small pavilion fo
the Deacons Road Playing Field
and was told by the Board’s Sec-
retary, Mr. T. Q. Lashley, that
it was expected that the matter
would be dealt with by the Leg-
islature shortly.

In connection with the case of
a tenant at Belfield who opened
a shop at the Area—an offence
against the Board’s Regulations—
a letter was read from Mr.
H. Proverbs informing the Board
that arrangements were being
made to purchase a spot to which
to remove the shop.

The Board allowed Davis, the
tenant, four weeks in which to
settle the matter,

Football
Results

: LONDON, Aug. 26

¢ Scottish League Cup Division A:
Airdrieonians 2, Motherwell 6.
Clyde 4, Aberdeen 1,
Dundee 0, Hibernian 2



Aban-
doned after seventy minutes
torrential rain,
East Fife 1, Celtic 1.
Hearts 2, Partrick Thistle 0
Rangers 6, Morton 1.
Saint Mirren 2, Falkirk 0.
Third Lanark 1, Raith Rovers 0.
First Division:—
Arsenal 2, Tottenham

9

ol

Hotspur
Athleti.

Bolton Wanderers 2, Manchester
United 0.

Derby County 4, Astonville 2

Fulham 2, Wolverhampton Wan.
derers 1.

Hud@¢ersfield. Town 2, Ports-
mouth 1,
Liverpool 4, Sunderland 0.
Middlesbrough 3, Chelsea 0.
Newcastle United 1, Everton 1,
Sheffield Wednesday 0, Burnley

Blackpool 0. Chariton

9,

1.

West Browich Albion 1, Stoke
City 1.

Third Division Northern:—

Barrow 2, Oldham Athletic 1.

Bedford City 2, Halifax Town 6

Carlisle United 8, Tranmere
Rovers 1.

Chester 3, Darlington
; Crowe Alexandra

Mansfield Town 1, Scunthorpe
United 1.

New Brighton
United 0.

Rotherham 5, Wrexham 0.

Shrewsbury Town 1, Lincoln
City 2.

York City 1, Bradford 3.

Second Division:

Birmingham City
Town 1.

Blackburn Rovers Leyton
Town 0.

Brentford 1, Leeds United 2.

Cardiff City 2, Nottingham
County 0.

Chesterneld 1, Barnsley 2.

Coventry City 1, Preston North
End 0.

Leicester City 6, Queen’s Park
Rangers 2.

Manchester City 5, Bury 1.

Southampton Town 1, Sheffield
United 0.

Scottish League Cup Division B:

Arbroath 1, Albion Rovers 0,

Dunfermere Athletic 5, Kilmar-
nock 4,

Forfar Athletic 3, Alloa Athletic

1.
0, Gateshead

1, Hartlepools

1, Grimsby

1

’

1.

Hamilton Academicals 1, Queen
of The South 1.

Saint Johnstone 2.

Cowdenbeath 2.
Stenhouse Muir 3, Dundee
United 2.





Recent Arrivals in Books

INCLUDE

PLAYFAIR CRICKET ANNUAL
AND

CRICKETERS
WEST

FROM THE
INDIES

ON SALE AT

ADVOCATE
JOHNSON'S

STATIONERY,
STATIONERY,

ROBERTS & CO.
COLE'S STATIONERY,

BOWEN

and TODDS STATIONERY STORE

& SONS

- Kmguwire Early —



oneness
a





BARBADOS CYCL

SUNDAY
ING

s





ADVOCATE

ACE

At left Ken Farnum, the Barbados eycling ace who recently returned from a successful Interna-

tional Cycle and Athlet)
He is seen at the rigl
A Gordon, B.G’s. “A
Farnum was

mile events

ul recel



firs?



th



Meet in British Guiana ;
ving the gold medal for winning the special two mile event.
‘hampion is on his immediate left. ‘
vo mile interaational race and also won the two mile, three 1



Middlesex Score
228 Against W.LI.

Robertson Hits 105 In Good

Batting

A CENTURY ‘by Jack

Robertson

Display

LONDON, August 26.
in determined mood,

featured the first day’s play between Middlesex and West

Indies at Lord’s. Rebertson

assistance from John Dewes and Denis Compton.

displayed sound batting with
Batting

just under four hours he hit 12 fours in his 105,



Dewes, going torward played
ball from Valentine on to his
wicket and Bill Edrieh, after

shaping confidently was leg before
Robertson produced
tive drives and

ome elle

strikes tc

hit seven tours in hiv fr fly
On a pitch which gaye little help
even after heavy rain hed held
up play for an hour around tex
time, West Indies bowle! God-
dard in particular kept t bat
men playing at the ball, and
fielding was well up to ther



high standard. On the resump
tion after the delay Rehert

his century reaching 103 out af
i78. At 183 he was fourth

being well caught on the le






by the wicket-keeper. By s
methods Sharp and Brown ‘took
the Middlesex total to 228 at ihe

close. The attendance was 13,000
The teams: —

Middlesex: D. Compton
tain); J. G. Dewes; J. Robertson;
W. J. Edrich; H. Sharp; S. M.
Brown; J. Sims; L. Laws; J. J
Warr; J. Young; A. E. Moss

West Indies: J. Goddard (Capt.),
A. Rae; R. Marshall; F. Worrell; E.
Weekes; C. Walcott; G. Gomez; R.

(Cap-

Christiani; H. Johnson; J. Storl-
meyer; and A. Valentine.
The “.art
Middlesex won the toss and

probably, because of the counte

attraction at the Oval, Surrey v

Lancanshire, the crowd for the
last appearance in London of the
tourists, numbered only abot

6,000 when Dewes and Robertson
opened the Middlesex inning

The weather was cloudy with a
stiff breeze blowing, and Dewes
and Robertson felt their way
carefully against accurate earl;
bowling by Johnson and Gomez
The latter found Robertson's paa
with successive balls but the
Middlesex man replied with two
-plendid fours, a cover drive and

a hook. ‘
Johnson lifted the ball awk-
wardly and appealed ainst



THE SINGER DEALERS IN
Left to Right J. M. Kidney,
P. J I L,, I

k ud



WEST IND

NOTTINGHAM

JACK "ROBERTSON

both batsmen After an hour,
with the total at 38, Goddard
made his first change Valent:
for Gore? Scoring became still
slower. At 47 Dewes mishit
full toss off Valentine straight t
mid-on where Stolimeyer dropp«
the eatech. Valentine was
long denied the wicket, for
running out played the ball on
‘is stumps. The opening pair he
made 53 in 84 minutes
Robertson took four pvoundaries
off Marshall after Dewes had lefi
and his 50 came in 108 minute

n

Dev

Edrich nit tne ball firmly, but
could no* penetrate the field, anc
at 82 he moved into a good ball

from Johnson and fell |.b.w
Three runs were added befur
lunch,

After Lunch
Johnson and Marshall yenewed
ihe attack after lunch and kept
the batsmen quiet.



stroke off Marshall

ile and six

Robertson cou'd score only aa
occasional legside run and Comp
ton took 20 minutes
score,

The fielding was of the custom-
ary high standard for the West
Indies with Goddard outstanding
The batsmen were playing at the
ball rather than forcing it away

Compton was unusually quiet
until he scored seven with one
three run
and, four overthrows were added

Goddard declined the new bail,
preierring tt) keep Valentine on
at the Nursery End, and himself
taking over at the other

Valentine was unable to turn the
ball mueh but at 146 Goddard
moved one away and bowled
Compton who was haping to
drive. The third wicket stand with
Robertson, much more re-

ained partner, yielded 64 runs

An effortless off-drive off God
card took Robertson ind» the 80's
Goddard called for the new bal!
157. Johnson used it against
Robertson who had only just play

s

to open hi

al

ed the firs’ ball te leg when raic
came in torrents
Rain at Tea
Rain delayed play just cver an
hour On the resumption Johnson

bowled two balls to complete hi
rain-interrupted over and Gome
took over al the other end

R berison hooked Gomez to the
quare boundary and cutting
the next ball for his twelfth fou
went to 103 madg ou 178 in
three and three quarter hours, He
stayed ten more minutes before
Johngon had him finally caugh! on
the legside by wicketkeeper Wai-
cott to end a workmanlike inning

ot

Sharp and Brown the next pali
showing occasional aggressive
strokes against Johnson
Goddard and Valentine stayed to
rether until stumps were drawn

th Micilesex 228 runs for four
wicke’s

Following are the scores:—

MIDDLESEX—tIst Innings

Gomez,



J. Dewes b Valentine 2
J »bertson ¢ Walcott b Johnson 105
N Edrich i.b.w. b Johnson 8
PD. Compton b Goddard 38
harp not out 21
srOv not out 32
Extras 3
Total ifor 4 wkt 2728
Fal! of wiekets Lief; 2-82; 9-146
4-18:

Sports Club
Meets Tomorrow

An Extraordinary Meeting of
he Advocate Sports Club will be
held st the Printers Department
on Monday, August 28 at 4.30 p.m

Included in the agenda for the
vening is their proposed tour to
Trinidad im 1951,

IES TEAM AT NOTTINGHAM,

a,

See

provided transport for

Manager, John 8S. Wooley (Singer d«

A. Rae, ©. B. Williams, K. Trestra





ne W.I. Cricketers by putting at th
in Nottingham), John Goddard (Capt.)

Ma E. Weeke R. Christian
wl i j & War





First Division Cricket

@ From page 4
was adjudged Lb.w. Six wickets
were down for 95 and Wood was
19 not out when the interval was
taken,
The first over after lunch was
sent down by Alleyne from the

Bank Hall end and in that same
over 106 went up on the tins in
117 minutes.

Bourne deputised for Drayton
who was hurt behind the’ stumps
The seventh wicket fell at 117
when Wood drove over a_ well
pitched ball from Williams and
was clean bowled é
Williams came back in his next
vver to take the eighth Spartan
wicket. Morris made a big hit,
dic not connect properly, and was
caught at mid-on by Fields for 11
I’. Phillips filled the breach. He
saw his partner Gittens caught
by Harper at mid-on off Williams
w 2. Williams bowled a slow
leg break well up which Gittens

misimed. The score was 127
for 9

Last men in, B, Smith was given
ene balt by Williams. He wes
beaten and bowled for nought
Thillips carried back his bat for
6 runs

Empire Batting

Ympire started on their first

innings at about 440 pm. Rob-

inson and Bourne opened to the
bowling of Phillips and Smith.

They were off to a bad start,
losing Bourne for nought off the
bowling of Phillips with only 3
rvnas an the tins.

Phillips tewled an. in-swinger.
moving outside the leg stumo
“iticing Bourne to hook. The ball
truck the upper edge of the bat
ind flew up giving Walcott at
eeond slip a dolly catch.

Williams and Robinson met
‘nd took the score on to 24 when
‘he first bowling change was
made. Bowen was brought on
from Phillips’ end while Phillips
vos changed around to the Bank
Hall end,

The second wicket fell to Phil-
lips at 30 when Robinson pushed
a rising ball on the leg stump
into the hands of Bowen at short

leg. Robinson» scored 19 while
Williims was 11 not out.

Next in was Cave, who with
Williams, sent up the 50 in 56

minutes. Skipper Walcott bowled
himself, L. F. Harris and brought
back Phillips but these changes
did not worry the two batsmen
At close of play, Empire had
scored 67 for 2 wickets, Williams
20 net out and Cave 20 not ort
WANDERERS yv. PICKWICK
Pickwick . i
Wandercrs (for 2 wkts), i741
On a perfect wicket Pickwick
were bowled out for 114 runs
when they met Wanderers, Their
collapse was due mainly to the
eady bewling of Denis Atkinson
vho TOUR
4 runs -tter bowling 15 overs
Wandeters in their first innings
have replied with 174 runs for the
loss of two wickets with Eric At-
son 6! not out and his brother,
Denis, 44 not out
Pick vick winning the toss open-
ed their batting with A. M, Tay-
icy and G. L, Wood to the bowling
of Norman Marshall and Eric At-

kinson. A. M. Taylor took the first
bell of the day form Marshall
nd was completely beaten by the
tall which swung away to the
lips In the third ball Taylow
tcok a single and Wood played
it the remainder of the over.

Taylor in taking strike from Eric
Atkinson in his first over was not
setties.so well over the ball and
frequently edged to slip

In Marshall’s second over Wood
executed a beautiful on drive
which yielded him four runs, but
was finely eaught by G. Proverbs
in Marshall's fifth ball. The score-
beard then read 8—1—6.

T. S. Birkett then came in to
ioin Taylor and he quietly play-
ed the last ball to midoff, Mar-
ball now bowling at medium pace
sent down a maiden to Taylor

hile Birkett at the other end
elso played out a maiden from
Nenis Atkinson in his first over.
hirkett’s end soon came when he
rttempted to hook Denis Atkin-

n and was given out leg before

Left hander Kidney followed
Pirkett and opened his scoring
ith a drive whieh got him a
nele. Taylor continued to bat
ell and Norman Marshall after
‘owling nine overs was relieved

}y Tom Peirce from the pavilion
eid. Peirce sent down his first
ever to Kidney who scored two in

1cir disposal 8.M.1,500 Singer Cars.
Sir Pelham Warner, H. Johnson,

i, A. Valentine and F. Worrell. The

and the

1939

45 World War

five of the wickets for '

ball Both batsmen
used their feet well to Peirce’s
high tosses and the fifty mark
was soon reached when Kidney
steered a ball on the leg side for
a brace from Peirce.

Denis Atkinson was now bowl-
ing to a good length and took his
second wicket when ‘laylor in
making the same stroke as his
team mate Birkett was also giver

the second



cut leg before after scoring 2
patient 25. Evelyn, the next mat
‘ sayed OUL «ue remainder of
the over However Evelyn did
rot stay long and Peirce soon haa
him caught by Denis Atkinso:
al second = slip Ning came hb
and Denis Atkinson in his fifth
tall of the ninth over properly
teat and bowled Kidney anc

so bowled Camacho British

( vicna Intercolonial captain in

i next ball. King quickly fol-
lowed Camacho when he wa
¢ aught by St. Hill oft T. Peirce

®. Hoad and B. Inniss then tried
'. settle down to a partnershiy
it Denis Atkinson continued te
n down them both Norman
arshall was again brought on to
lieve Denis Atkinson Peires
:ow get his third wicket when
ruce Inniss in attempting to lift
m missed and was = smartly
‘umped by Skipper Skinner,
‘ordan went in and was off the
rark with a brace and at the end

cf that over lunch was taken,
/fter lunch the century was

joached in 120 minutes Hoad did
) ot bat so well to Atkinson as he
«'d before lunch and was out
hen he edged to slip. The Hoad-
rdan naiinership had yielded 37
ns. Marshall came in with
rdan and the Pickwick innings

osed when Marshall was bowled

Denis Atkinson, Pickwick had
ered 114 with H. Jordan not out
Marshall and Eric Atkinson
vened for Wanderers and inp
ing’s frst over Marshall had a

fe in the slip. Birkett took the
ew ball with Kin and in his first
rer beat Atkinson twice with hi
cotewingers
When the score reached
st Wanderers wicket fell
arshall was completely beaten
id bowled by Jordan. G. Pro-|
rbs thes went in and was bat-
‘g soundly until he gave an easy

43 the)
when!



PAGE FIVE



AUG, 27 — NO, 134

The Topic

Clouds banked up black last Monday |
After a pourt.: rain

nd Lou told Joe and Robert

Look for a hurricane

Well Joe and Robert Tuesday
Went in the strongest place
But boys high winds start blowing
As the Marshal gest the mace

‘

Seme comrades ti a canoe
Cried Captain “you must halt”
Or im this stormy weather
We'll turn a somersavlt

The Captain’s passion boiled up
And he admit he knew
He was sailing into harbour
With a disloyal crew
Of course a cyclone started
Bright fires star) to burn
When a sailor said the Captain
Was trying to “back-a-stern”

2 . .

If it were in the land ship a

It would be a different case

For that sailor would be greeted

With a hard slap in his tage =o
. . ’

But it was round a table
Which cause taxpayers grief
To take up their good mone
To bank tt om a reef
A member said now Captain
Don't spend money so fast
Re patient, wait a minute
Do! tet the hurricane past

. ’ .

The Captaty said you dullards

If you had come to sehbol

I'm sure you would be bright boys
And vot o pack of fools
Twas then we hewd the fog horn
No more the whistle blast

For the said grim tones were saying

‘urn to H. Marshall to end his The canoe's sinking fast

v at the wicket, He scored an Don't put the blame on “Sam Lord
‘raetive 35. At the end of play | Don't put the blame on Lou

i 3 , »\" ye ane y Th you

nis Atkinson who followed after Hoth Je wed Robert te :

vert was not out with hi The blame calls to the crew

ther Fric and they had 44 and We tike an ancient poet

runs respectively to their credit Repeat now as before

4 to enohle Wanderers to reply Tol! for the brave” my brothers

: i » breve > more
*h 174 for 2 wickets to Pick lhe ’ x tiwat are no ny
ie’o 104 lou said to Joe and Robert



Reds Gain Ground

White comrades atert to weep
No one is lett to bury them
Beneath the briny deep

Those bee were brave, courageous



‘Thomee'ves they could defend
@ from 1 age 1 x Hut thes lve to hear the Bishop
small groups ot 30 and 50 to Sas tts Ointehed" bey Amen
oid air attacks, This territory : . a. a a
; : a Well Joo and Robert sa
ong the Nam and Naktong rivey We kanw the Heda way
suitable for a west-east move- The 1925 promise
ent of troops and equipment, It

They all forget to-day

not mountainous and north of :
é rds Weil we can't join the mourner
he Nam affords a rail and road Sa wees ae rant On & eores
{works adequate for transporta- with a bettle of J & P Rum
on suppiies the runt that unites three

Most observers believe an attack
tere would be to attract United
iialions reserves or to hold them
ai bay while the big offensive is
fnunched in the north,

Though little information was
immediately available about the
reported Communist onslaught on
the East Coast returning piiots re-
ported “considgrable penetration”
ny North Koreans

One reported Communist troops
nd equipment travelling south,
Superforts ranging far north to-
coy plastered 60 tons of bombs on
he important rail junction of Kil-
‘au 15 miles north of Songjin on
ic East Coast below the 41st par-
lel.

Invaders loosed thousand pound-
s on a pontoon bridge west of
eoul and damaged another near
ommunist-held former South
orean territory. Fifth Air Force
\ooting Star planes thrust 300
les into North Korean territary,
eaiding half a dozen Communist
elds in North and South Korea,

They met no “live” Conmunist
jlanes-——only previously shot up
ireraft and dummies

Reuter.

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A.1. D.1. F.2. (Cont'd)
‘eacon Bright Bow Bells Perseverance
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rake’s Drum Firemist River Mist
lizabethan Wellington Sinbad
‘un Site Watercress Sir Bernard
torms Gift Siren

D.2. Soprano

A.2. Examiner Straight Aim
tomic II Sunbeam
Yhe Gambler E,1. Sun Fire

Pepper Wine Ali Baba The Eagle
Kendal Fort Tornado

B.1. Lady Belle Typhoon
‘nfusion Mary Ann Usher
'indy Pink Oatcake Vanguard
Landmark Waterbell
S iver Bullet E.2.

Siainte Comet G1.
Sun Queen Dulcibella Betsam
Suntone Monsoon

B.2. Victory
Calandra F.1. Vixen
Catania Best Wishes
Fabulous Bowmanston G.2,
inny Adams Joint Command Blue Diamond
Merfect Set Lazy Bones Brahmin’s Choice
River Sprite Postscript Chindit
War Lord Tango Diana

Tying Aap
1. F.2. ron opper
loaisibe Apollo Gallant “awk
Leading Article April Flowers Joan’s Star
Rebate Bonnie Lass Lucky Shot
Swiss Roll Brown Girl Maytime
Bullseye wey
Clementina Otcedol
C.2. Colleton Silke Plant
Ability Consternation Sun Jewel
Ante Diem Cross Bow



Fair Contest Cross Roads

Fair Sally Dunese

Flieuxce Epicure

Kidstead Facetious

Kitchen Front First Flight

Link Stream Flame Flowe

Miss Panic Foxglove a

Musk Hi-Lo Classifiers:

St. Moritz Joan of Arc

Sailors Fun Lady Rommel T. N. Peirce
Southern Cross Miracle F
Starry Night Mocassin L. E. R. Gill
| Tiberian Lady Mountbatten cs

| War Queen Miss Friendshiy G. D. Bynoe

Subject to change he event of any horse taking part in any

| Meeting prior to the Barbados AUTUMN Meeting, 1950













Â¥ PAGE SIX

THE



IT IS because the poetry in the

last six months most clearly
focuses the major West Indian
problem so sharply raised in ow
Symposium iast July that I an.
dealing with it first, although the
prose wag again much more vital

and varied. The problem, you
may remember, was, whether
writers should eccept outs:de

Standards. Well, the most ambi-
tious production in the half-year
was Derek Walcott’s short poetic
drama, Senza Alcun Sospeziwo, a
brief acccunt of the tove drama
of Francesca da Rimini, freely
adapted from Dante. It had many
beauties

Look in the silver poplars, by the flat

marshes,

The lake is laced with silver, In the

green coverts,

Whose edges are filmed with the first

jets of autumn,

lesan hear here a deliberation of doves,

The rivulets giggie under the cool

ferns

'

That passage was picked out
by Roy Fuller in his criticism
following the play, possibly be-
cause Fuller is a European—and
those lines are purely European.
He then suggested that Walcott
should write more directly out of
his background. And yet this
comment, surely mild enough
when we consider that Walcott is
a young poet, still uncertain of h's
detection, was savagely attacked
by a poet in Jamaica, who called
it “Patronising”’. I hope that this
counter-critic had had time now
to contrast Senza Alcun Sospett»
wth Walcott’s recent play, Henr+
Christophe, and see the contrast
in power, when the poet is
expressing not only himself, but
the whole balance of forces of
which he is the centre.

Other poets in the last few
months have also concentrated
this problem of the West Indian
writer and the outside world.
You may remember George Lam-
ming’s poem after he came to
London.

Now I venturing from
lands

To redissover my roots,

Have found an impersona! city,

Where your tales are incredibly true

scattered is-

}
The tales are the songs of
Marian. Anderson, the Coloured
singer, whom Lamming heard at
the Albert Hall, And what is the
upshot? He is “urged to register
with the outlaws”; and the poems
end: “Hate thy brother as thy-
self”. Samuel Selvon, a fellow-
adventurer, has written a prose-
poem: his attitude is very similar,
except that he finds release in the
beauty of the English countryside.
But is it European complacency
alone which suggests that Lam-
ming, like most sensitive people,
unsure of direction, is moved by
love and hate at the same time?
I think it possible. How then
does a third poet, maturer than
the other two, solve the problem?
Ian Carew is a young Guianese,
who studied in America, went in
revulsion behind the Iron Curtain
to Prague, was horrified by the
philistinism he found there of
Communist committees telling
writers what they should write,
and now lives with a French
family in a fashionable street in
Paris. For him, the main fact of
the world, beyond love or hate,
and the personal in isolation, is
the emergence of one thousand
million people in the world, So
he writes his dignified epic of

Potaro, song of the world,
River of the world. . . .

Please note. This most sophis-
ticated of West Indian poets, in
fact, takes up a purely local
attitude, making use of sonorous
Indian names of his homeland,
Tumatumari, Essequibo, Maku-
mata, Pakaraimas, Kaietur, the
god of waters, Accewayo. . .

Oh Accewayo,

Wherefore Your Sorrow?

In the Caribbean itself, the
poetry, has been rather scarce
and on one occasion we lifted a
whole section from the excellent
magazine BIM: Popham, Roacn,



















eating

What do you know
about ENO?

DO YOU KNOW thar a giess
of cooling, refreshing BNO,
will correct the effects of fover-

Sold in bottles for lasting freshness

Eno’s ‘Fruit Salt’

The words “ Eno” aud “ Fruit Salt" are registered (ade marke,

Barrow, Walcott, Carr, Arch-
bald, Gomes, Vaughen, Seymour.
On another ocession we heard
one of these writers again, E. M
Roach of Tcbago

The poui trumpets forth

Her golden semibreves

It is no reflection on this poet



that one notes the possible
influence of C. Day Lewis, with
words like Eldritch, At least I
am certain that E. M. Roach
wil’ never, in his own words,
Plunge graceful os a swan

Into oblivion

‘Lwere is little tu say about the
short collections of poems from
ihe different islands, which ac-

companied the experimental] prose
in June. Indeed, only Ramon-
Fortune’s Nursery Rhyme A La
Mode remains in the memory. I
simply note that what seemed to
me the freshest examples came
from the smaller islands, St.
Vincent, discovered by Owen
Campbell and Daniel Williams,
who are apparently influenced
by Walcott. They have charm.

The gay butterflies manoeuvr-

ing but also considerable inex-
perience, and Williams can use
the line,

They have resigned themselves
te day-long swishing when he is
talking of washerwomen,...On
the other hand, from the same
island, E. McG, Keane contribu-
ted a powerful poem on the
peasant,

Save in The Just our
harsh hands are dumb,

And idle our tears,
lament.

I also remember A. N_ Forde,
who raises the central issue again,
in his poem on Grenada:—

Where we wipe

Beads of foreign culture from our face.

And there was Clare McFar-
lane's recollection of his Words-
worthian poems Daphne, Beauty,
Villanelle of Pâ„¢mortal Love,,....
forming a complete contrast to
the dialect poems from Jamaica,
where Louise Bennett once again
showed her superiority in this
field,

I suppose one should start the
summary of the prose with the
experimental month of June, but
I found it a little disappointing,

no leisure for

although I hope useful. For
instance, I for one did not
altogether agree with Arthur

Calder Marshall's rather harsh
criticism of Eagar Mittelholzer’s
Sibilant ad Lost, the madman
giving his fascist philosophy, in
prose which I thought did some-
times triumphantly succeed,

For a year, and then another year,
all went without turgid or untoward
event. The flame of love wore well;
no warped fork warned of what lay
ahead. Even her mother, falcon wo-
man, deemed our mating to have
panned out fair,

On the other hand I thought

Calder Marshall's criticism of
Karl Sealy’s Dream °f Gold
almost too ingenious; the man

who goes with his wife’s golden
ring to win gold in Panama, the
friend who so enigmatically sends
it back, I had, however, nothing
but agreement for his praise or
Samuel Selvon’s hard lyrical
story, What's the Use, much
truer to the life of adolescent
love than Walcott’s Italian idyll.
I also agreed, I fears with Alfred

Mendes’ biting attack on a
classical Jamaican example ot
trying to run before you can

walk, under a pretentious title
taken from James Joyce,

The most interesting prose
writings, in fact, I thought lay
outside the experimental month
altogether. One may start per-
haps with the veteran Trinidad
journalist, Seepersad Naipaul.
Like most East Indian writers,
he has an accurate eye, but what
is much more interesting, a sense
of objectivity and humour. He
started, you may remember, with
the very common Indian theme
of the forced marriage; but Son-
ya’s Luck had all the detail of
the good reporter, I thought his
second story, Gratuity, was im

and drinking?

DO YOU KNOW
that ENO, with its
gentle laxative action,
. Will freshen you up
) mentally and
physically ?

re.






quite a different class, with its
brilliantly amusing yet tender
study of the Indian road-mender
Sanyasi, called Moach “as
though he were all moustache
and nothing else,” and also
Gagat — Guru (which means
world — teacher) “but only
the elders called him _ that.”
Poor Sanyasi! The Colonial
Secretary signed himself as his
obedient serVant; but he got
little of an old-age pension from
Mr. Button, and in the doing of

it, he also lost his job...... The
last item we heard from Nai-
paul’s pen was the rather

impersonal report on the Shouters
Visiting Chima, which had pleas-
ent touches: you may remember
the niceties of the movements of
the initiates in their trance, some
riding horses and some (with a
different motion) camels,

Probably the most ingenious
piece of work in all six months
was Willy Richardson’s amusing
satire, The Argument, whicn
gave a loving account of a typical
conversation of intellectuals, un-
aware that their house was on
fire. I also hope you liked, as
much as I did, the tart little
morality by George Phillips, A
Man ad a Boy, about a bitter
race quarrel in Trinidad, over an
accident, which no one saw, but
one man heard...... The impact
of that single word tap-tap-tap-
ping, by which you are finally
told he was blind, remains one
of the very sharpest memories
I have of four years of the
programme,

These were successes, I thought,
Two failures, gallant failures,
came from Jamaica. They were
attempts at epic, at building a
tradition as in Carew’s poetry
noted earlier. The first was by
a well-known name, Victor Reid,
his short story, No Mourning in
the Valley, was criticised at the
time by Calder Marshall, so I
will not do more than recall the
plot: the girl, Noreen, being
rescued from the flood by the
boy Rupert, }

In the second attempt, Inez
Sibley did not succeed in Pre-
sentimeâ„¢t, as she did with her
brilliant Terror Bull and Taunt
Song. Apart from a good deal
of realistic detail, out of place
in a legend of the Kingston
disaster of 1907, there was very
little feeling for form,

And now for what I hope it is
not rude to call the catalogue or
inventory, the main collection of
stories and sketches. which were
really of a high standard. Lets
start with moralities, perhaps with
O. M. Howard's interesting com-
bination of a detailed repoyt on an
old Moravian mission house in the
mountains of Santa Cruz, with the
wisdom a brash young missionary
learns from his predecessor. Hugh
Blackman’s story of Barbados
childhood, The Champ, was less
skilfully written, but more subtle
in its lesson; it was not Big Jack’s
ability to run or swim that made
him a champion of his little gang:
but the fact that he would not do
an unfair thing, to stave off the
challenge of Harry the Horse. A
less persuasive story was written
by Michael Browne whose Dance
of Stones recounted the rather im-
probable sacrifice of a girl who
comes between stick fighters in the
old days.

In the world of pure story tell-
ing, R. Warren had an interesting
and nightmarish tale, in Foo-Foo,
of a little boy. dying in a Jamaican
hospital, who hears the sea-gods
roaring and the swamps coming
alive. Miss Bird contributes an-
other of her charming sketches
from the Jamaica Museum, this
time about Maxy Mongoose, his
wife Maggie, and the vulgar
Snatcher, Lennox de Paiva wrote
a competent professional tale. on
an old theme. The Spy and the
Informers, with refreshing crisp-
ness and humour. Two stories of
suspense were written, one- by
Elsie M. Hutton’on coastal erosion
in Jamaica (Perilous Night) and

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

LAST SIX MONTHS

By HENRY SWANZY

In A Broadcast To The West Indies



the other by Edgar Boyce, in
which a Barbadian’'s race against
death by drowning is linked with
a drama of’ jealousy, (Saving His



Life). For his part. Jack J. Gordon
contributed two frankly escapist
stories, based on the films and
American magazines: The Case of
the Crimson Candle, and The
Affair of the Meamu Diamond.
They are programmes in them-

selves, those titles! How could one
fail to be enthralled- by a_ story
which starts Reynard Lozenge con-
templatively stroked his neatly
trimmed beard which some people
thought rainer caprine?

Then as usual, there were a,
great many storjes reporting
these, I thought, was The Mouser.
R. B. Sears’ rather disenchanted
comedy of the Guiana streets and
a lovely Chinese-African girl who
virtuously complains to a palice-
man of a “wolf” (humaa) whose
wallet she then proceeds to steal.
More dignified, perhaps, was an
old-fashioned technique dealing
with a new situation, rehousing in
Jamaica. (Changing Times), by
Mrs. Ormsby Marshall. Two
stories having the familiar theme
of garden versus gambling, city
slicker versus humble fisher-folk,
came from Barbados, (William S.
Arthur’s Horse of Another Colou;)
and Grenada,—(Eula Redhead’s
Just in Time). Samuel Selvon’s
Johnson and the Casadura was
also on a routine theme, the ex-
patriate Englishman who falls in
love with the West Indies, Ernest
Carr dealt pretty thoroughly with
the racial fears of Ursula Bayson,
who has to employ a black tutor
for her backward little son (Civil
Strife). He was perhaps more
original, (and less successful) with
a rather embarrassing little story
of mother-love, She Named Him
Roderick, about a lady who adopts
a cook. A. K. Elliott's story of
mother-love in Jamaica. A Seat in
the Shade, was far more unsettling.
Do you remember the poor old
peasant woman, Elizabeth, come
to see her two daughters in King-
ston, with her mind pathetically
set on the cool drink they will
bring her, symbol of what she
hoped would be their love; and
her collapse after they tell her
sharply, “Call the maid?”

Finally, in the catalogue, we
come to the folklore: George
Spence’s amusing Proverbial En-
counter, and, right at the begin~
ning of our half-year, Willy
Richardson’s brilliant Snapshots of
Carnival in which he brings in all
the life of Port-of-Spain seen
through the eyes of different
people, a girl, a business man, an
old man, children, each preceded
by an appropriate canticle from
the armoury of carnival.

Jour ouvert, barre Yo!

Pas levez la main
asur Yo.

It is not so easy to bring six
months into the compass of a 16
minute talk. I wanted to say
something about production, some-
thing about the success of Mittel-
holzer’s novel Morning at the
Office, something about the useful
er.ticism in the recent Kykoveral
But I should if possible like to
return to that main theme, raised
by the Symposium. Should West
Indian writers accept outside
standards or not? At least, that
seemed to be the main problem;
but in my opinion, the real prob-
‘em was, who is to lay down the
standards? Obviously, the writers
themselves. In the meantime
surely, if a programme like this
is to succeed at all, it has to
adopt, or try to adopt, absolute
standards. And I also think that
West Indian writers must accept
the paradox: what is nearest is
also widest, what is most personal
is most impersonal, what is truly
local is universal. Of course, we
do not want to compel you to
write up insincere details of loca!
colour, simply to pass muster ir
the programme, and to flatter
what you think is the bias of the
producer. But I repeat, literature
is local and concrete if ft is any-

thing, and only science is th«
universal language. The worl
will accept what is wel! don
whatever it is. One writes bes

of what one knows.

S 6.C. 6-volt Radio





DAVID LEWIN’S

Spotlight

Platonic love
~in black and
white—gets by
_ the censors...

THE film-makers’ list of Things
We Pretend Don't Happen gets a
little shorter.

IN LONDON: Ealing Studios
recognise that coloured men are
seen out with white giris, In a
picture started recently—“Pool
of London” — Earl Cameron, a
26-year-old actor from Bermuda,
plays a Merchant Navy sailor.

He is lonely, meets Susan Shaw
and takes her out. They go to a
dance together (but sit it out),
have a “platonic friendship” (the
studio insists it is that).

Just the same it is something
no film—either British or Ameri-
ean — has presented before, Sir
Michael Balcon, head of Ealing,
says he is not being courageous
“We're just reporting facts. This
happens—we show it.”

‘ * *

There could be no suggestion of
murriage at the end. The British
censor would not’ have accepted
that. Nor would he have agreed
to-a kiss

IN AMERICA: Hollywood
admits (1) that war victims can
sometimes Le paralysed (in “The
Men”), and (2) that the message
of God may be filmec (in “The
Next Voice You Hear’).

The censors in both countries
have accepted “The Men,” al-
though most producers said the
story could not be filmed.

‘The Next Voice You Hear’ is
the voice of God. You do not
hear Him speak, but what He says
in a series of broadcast messages
is reported in conversations after-
wards. This film has run into
some trouble with the censor here

The Hollywood studio last night
said that cuts would have to be
made for Britain because of the
censor’s fears that the subject
might be considered as treating
God “with over-familiarity.”

AFTER MARTHA

WHO did it first anyway—1:

That meeting between Julie
Wilson and Marion Harris, cabaret
stars both, was polite—but icy.

Miss Wilson had followed Miss
Harris at a West End restaurant
—and then sung the same satire
on Dr, Kinsey’s report on the
human (American) male.

When they finally met they
wanted to know — well who did
introduce it, anyway?

For the record it was Martha
Raye in a Broadway musical, says
Marion Harris. So take your place
in the line Miss Wilson.

»_ ,
AFTER GEORGE
WHO did it first anyway—2:
Was it the Bernard Brothers or

the Smeddle Brothers who started
the miming act to a gramophone
record background? In the West
End the Brothers used to feud.

Now along comes a nine-year-
old reissue of George Formby’s
film “South American Geonge’—
and there is George miming away
to an operatic gramophone record.

So take your place in the line.
Brothers,

PRICE OF FAME
THREE of the original star

names in British pictures

back again filming here: Rex

Harrison, Lilli Palmer and David

Niven,
Hollywood put them under
contract—and made them world

stars. Now they want to work on
their own — either here or in



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America because they have
‘earned the iessoa that in Holly-
wood the cost of being a contract

star can be too high

It is always a question of living
up to the position your
demands that you maintain:
swimming pools, cocktail parties,
expensive homes,

Harrison’s servants even turned
up for work in Cadillacs or
Euicks — and their pay was on
the same high level. With the
swimming pool went a poolman
although the gardener could have
done the job just ag well.

And if any or whe stars rejected
a part, they could be suspended
without pay up to six months.

So Rex Harrison and his wife
put their money into a *ritish
picture, “The Long Dark Hall,”
and now work together for the
first time since “The Rake’s Pro-
gress.” David Niven, after «
Goldwyn contract, takes a chance
in a British musical, ‘Happy Go
Lovely.

In future it will be Hollywood
—but on a_ picture-to—pictyre
basis. “That way,’ says Rex
Harrison, “you can stay at an
hotel, and not always have to keep
up with the Joneses down the
road.”

GROWING-UP

TO mark Tyrone Power's
rise from film star to su
stage actor in “Mister Roberts,” in
London, his studio prepares to give
him more serious parts to play.

First will probably be a remake
of an old Leslie Howard _ film,
“Berkeley Square’, with Power
in the Howard role.

Tyrone Power welcomes the
change. “After six months of
Mister Roberts—that is how long
I shall be in it—I wouldn’t want
to return to swashbuckling or
rushing around with a sword in
my hand,

“That would be like going bacx
to the hors d’oeuvres after tasting
the meat.....”

THE -ENEMY’

WAR commentary by Groucho

Marx: “Korea can’t hurt Holly-
wood any more than television
has already....”

—L.E.S.



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How to make a million with
Two -Boops”

And A -Doop’

Hy ... JOHN PREBWLE

AMONG such remarkably
American phenomena as the Grand
Canyon, the Declaration of Inde-
pendence, air-conditioning, and
bubble-gum, history will record
twe human beings.

They are Mr. Crosby and Mr.
Sinatra—singers.

For eight years they have been
engaged in friendly contest for
supremacy im a world where the
diagnosis for a sore throat could
be written in falling doar signs.

Last month, as Mr. Sinatra
obtained a £1,000,000 television

Crosby’s melodious phrasing is
smogth. Sinatra gets his near-
death rattle by breathing down
his nose as he sings, a
practice hitherto only
used by -the Red
Indian.

No one ever scream-
ed when Crosby sang.
Sinatra brings out the
berserk in the female.

And Crosby is big
business. The firm of
Crosby Ine., occupies
a three-storeyed white

, hs , tuceo) «building on
contract, it looked as if he had at s NS

‘ act, x - Sunset Boulevard, a
last taken the lead trom Crosby tangible statement of

Incorporated. If so, tet the sociolo-

gists take note. For although these What can be done with

boops and a‘ doop.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE et

Whiz

IFES too short to go into things

a: length, so short expressions

are in favour. This Whit Quiz tests

whether you're a Man, or Woman,

of Letters by presenting a number

of short terms or abbreviations for
you to identify.

1. SOS means distress in any
Janguage. What do the letters
mean in English?















2. ABC’s are important in any
language; col‘ectively they're im-
portant in bowling. Why?

3. When B.O.’s a degree, it’s of
what”

4. When the AA's
what goes on?

5. You know what 1-A means
in the draft, but what does A-1
signify at Lieyds?

be K.O’ed, you'd be
where?

7. On the other hand, to be OK.,
you’d be what?

ack-ack,



SINATRA
Phe angry dandy

temporary support of £980 a

8. NEWS we read, but the let-
ters singly also guide us. How?

9. Remember way back to NRA,
and what it stood for?

Ouiz

19. Why would a professor end |
a theorem, Q.E.D.?
. PHBSUOUAP oq OF sem GOTUM,, |
407 UNS] ‘UMNpuEssuOUeP jess Pon ‘at |
“AULIY OF Ul “ONSET Jes9UeD “gl “Silo
-jougpent yotetg & FO WoNFABIqge 44)
Sa} “ON st “JUEUIET IY” jo Jequiew “oT |
utti0yw quod.rid wyor ‘fo [eyayooy a



uyor (4ansuUR 3994100 © oq O8TF vey |

sIMeT) UeATTING “TT wyor “CL

suorsmna |

“OD oTPOYOOTY 20 “SuSE, LUENQITTEq “Pr |

‘suOsrad pooeTdsiqy 91,Kaq) ‘sypensn WuON
cr, wRV Wy yO WORE, “BT "ue |
-eSo1r9}u] 5D ‘sdiyje q “pues. ey

u UOHeIURApY KTeACgey UWEdorN |
Ol “Gonenspupapy Ssaaccey TeuOREN ¢
SUOTIOOP aSoUy FO WONWPAeAqqe Ue Wo!T
SAATIOP SMU, POM 9 "yANOS Ysam
sto “UMON ‘@ ‘“ITwopro! ACZS9 BP. Ao0. |
OY LO, 10 YM YY 4 eouRRd Bud

-omj1d UF NO Paysouy Gg ad" eur |
Leu Uy ABEL SSPID-4S2y VW “g “IeZUTY |
“Huy § “Anew pO soltHheutew ‘M101

“MQ JO Jojayoeg “fF ods eq) uy fpoq |
ao}weid ‘SseaBUeD Ssulnog titoneuy |
z S)10M JO UONBPARIGQeE uv oq Oo}
pepusy! jou Sram Seu) ‘peuiits s#ansrp
Oy} SB UaseyO UU A Woyssarduly sepndow
a4} St (OAS YO OAGg,, [| oeemsUYy

HOW MUCH ? |

“SLIM” minds not his extra |
pounds. In fact, he takes great |
pleasure in giving his friends cor-

men are internationally famous
the appeal they have to Americans
is a synthesis of all that is healthy,
banal, and naive in the Great
American Soul. You might call
that synthesis “Crosatra.”
.

Man with a teupee=

It was in 1942 that Sinatra’s
throaty ululations first brought
about paroxysms in his young
female listeners. At that date
Crosby was already among the
elect.

With
would
than

his assets liquidated he
have been worth more
£2,000,000. He owned race
tracks, cattle ranches, baseball
teams, and a much-publicised
£18 toupee,

If Crosby’s rise to @€minence was
slow, Sinatra’s was meteoric. A
generation se@parates them in age,
Crosby is 49, Sinatra is 33. Bob
Hope said that Crosby was “the
man who made Sinatra’s mother
swoon.”

In their efforts to make the
larynx the mightiest money-
earmer known to private enter-
prise they have points of cOmpari-
fon and distinct contrast.

Both are devout Catholics.

Both came up the hard way.

Both were discovered by well-
known band leaders.

=Roy with a temper

But a continent separates them
in breeding. Crosby is the boy
from Tacoma, Washington, pro-
duet of a big all-American family.
A sunlit personality.

Sinatra is East Coast, from
Hoboken, a boy with one foot still
on the~immigration boat. His
father was an Italian, a profes-
sional fighter, boilermaker, and
lately captain in the Hoboken Fire
Department.

There is complacency in Crosby,
a frustrated anger in Sinatra. The
last time Crosby ever hit a man
was in his school-days. Sinatra
recently punched a man for anti-
Semitic talk.

s

Rusiness man=

THIS temperamental difference
is reflected in their singing tech-
nique. Crosby has a benign appeal,
sings of requited love. Sinatra
sings of frustration and wnhappi-
ness .

It controls the £53,-
000 share he has in tha

Pittsburg (baseball)
Pirates; the £10,000
ranch at Santa Fe
Springs, the 20,000
shares in an orange
juice company. It

handled his race-track
et Del Mar. It invests
the £165,000 he makes

yeerly from record-
ines, the £150,000
from hroadeasts. the
LISA HAN from films
Crusader=
iS there a Sinatra
Inc.? There is not

Sinatra bought an oil
well once, but it cost
him money to run it

He can make nearly)
£400,000 a year, but has scant

business sense, At one time he
was said to have been rationed
to. £25 a week by a_ perplexed
agent.

Both men are gererous. Crosby
donates about £5,000 a year to
charities. Im one year Sinatra
distributed 300 gold cigarette

lighters at a cost of £30 each. He

gave the Roosevelt Campaign
Fund £1,000 He adopted 12
orphans.

Each has a highly developed
sense of social responsibility. In
Crosby it is hard afd realistic
His Crosby Research Foundation
gave America valuable wartime
inventions.

Sinatra is a white-faced
crusader. In his youth he watched
Ku-Klux-Klan excesses and deter-
mined to do something about it
He writes articles called “Let’s not
forget we're all Foreigners.’
Crosby’s journalistic enterprise
has been confined to telling the
story of the bull moose he once
shot.

Sinatra stomps the country
pleading for racial tolerance. His
appeals in this direction, inter-
lard the banalities which his Press
agent ‘distributes to 2,900 Ameri-
can Sinatra Fan Clubs.

Sinatra is a dandy. In 1946 he
had 25 sport suits, 100 pairs of
slacks, 50 lounge suits, 60 pairs

,



B.B.C. Radio

SUNDAY August 27 1950

7 a.m. The News: 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m, General Assembiy
of the Council of Europe; 7.30 a.m
Nights at the Opera; 8.10 a.m. From
the Editorials: 8.10 a.m. Programme
Parade; 9.15 a.m, Coekney Cabaret;
8.30 a.m. From the Children’s Hour; 9
a.m, Close Down; 12 noon The News
12,10 p.m, News Analysis; 12.15 p.m
Puffney Post Office; 12.45 p.m. London
Forum; 1,15 p.m. Radio ‘Nowareal: 1.80
p.m. Sunday Service; 2 p.m, The News:
2.10 p.m. Home News from Britain; 2.15
p.m. Musi¢ Magazine; 2.20 p.m a-
riety Bandbox; 3.30 p.m Pride and
Prejudice; 4 p.m. The News; 4.10 p.m
Interlude; 4.15 p.m. The Piano for
Pleasure; 4.30 p.m. Sunday Half Hour;
4.55 p.m. Epilague; 5 p.m. Montmartre
Players; 5.15 p.m. Programme Parade:
5.30 p.m. From the Children’s Hour; ¢
p.m, New Records; 6.45 p.m. The
Hymns we Sing; 7 p.m. The News; 7.10
p.m, News Analysis; 7,15—7.30 p.m.
Caribbean Voices. 8 p.m. Radio’ News-
reel; 8.15 p.m. English Magazine; 8.45
p.m, Interlude; 8.55 p.m. From the
Editorials; 9 a.m. Sunday Service; 9.30
p.m, London Forum; 10 p.m. The News;
10,10 p.m. Interlude; 10.15 p.m. Anjr-
thing to Declare; 10.45 p.m. English
Eloquence; 11 p.m. Musig in Miniature.
Benn 10 p.m,




Programme

MONDAY, August 28

7.00 a.m, The News; 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m. The African Queen;
7.30 a.m. Music Magazine; 8.00—8.30 a.m.
Commentary on W.1. vs. Middlesex; 9.00

1950

a.m. Closé Down; 12.00 (moon) The
News; 12.10 p.m. News Analysis; 12.15
p.m. Programme Parade; 12.18 p.m, Lis-
teners Choice; 12.45 p.m, Middlesex ys
West Indies; 1,00—1,30 p.m. Commentary
on W.1. vs. Middlesex; 2.00 p.m. The
News; 2.10 p.m, Home News From Brit-

ain; 2.15 pup. Sports Review; 2.30 p.m.
Edinburgh International Festival; 3.15
p.m. Interlide; 3.30 p.m. Meet the Com-
monwealth; 4.00 p.m. The News; 4.10 p.m.
The Daily Service; 4.15 p.m. My Kind of
Music; 5,00 p.m, Listeners Cholce; 5.15
p.m. Programme Parade 30 p.m, The
Story Teller; 5.45 p.m. Dance Music; 6.00
p.m, The African Queen; 6.15 p.m. What
a Difference a Day Makes; 7.00 p.m. The
News; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15—7.30
p.m. Cricket Report on W.1. vs. Middle-
sex; 7.30—7.45 p.m. Calling The West In-
dies; #.00 p.m, Radio Newsreel; 8,15 p.m.
Science Review; 8.30 p.m. Roland Peachy;
8,55 p.m. From the Editorials; 9.00 p.m.
The Batsman Bride} 9.30 p.m. Books to







Read; 9.45 p.m. Theatre Talk; 10.00 p.m.
The News; 10.10 p.m. Interlude; 10.15
p.m. Much Binding in The Marsh; 10.45
p.m, Commonwealth Survey; 11.00 p.m.
A Talk.

BOSTON—WRUL 15.29 Mc WRUW
11.75 Me. WRUX 17.75 Me



“pm PB snare

of shoes. Crosby likes to
like a contented tramp.

aress

Married man=
IN Hollywood, where you can
get awards for anything, the

Motion Picture Research Society
gave the Crosbys a certificate “for
happy home life.”

Recently Sinatra was ordered
to pay his estranged wife Nancy

BBC Radio Notes:
‘The War Of
The Worlds’

Serial of Wells’ Story

Beginning in the coming week
the BBC will broadcast in serial
form a new radio adaptation of
‘The War of the Worlds’ the ex-
citing story by H. G. Wells of
the landing of Martians on the
earth. Ultra-realistice versions
of this Wellsian thriller have in
the past caused panic among
credulous listeners in New York
and Chile but this new BBC ver-
sion will stick closely to the fan-
testie and fascinating novel which
Wells wrote in 1898. Broadcasts
will be given at 6.80 p.m. on
Wednesdays and at 4.15 p.m. on
Thursdays starting on the 380th
and 31st inst.



Man’s Use of Energy

The 1950 meeting of the Bri-
tish Association for the Advance-
ment of Science opens in Birm-
ingham with an inaugural meet-
ing on Wednesday, 30th August.

At this meeting the president
— this year Sir Harold Hartley,
F.R.S, — gives his address. Sir
Harold has recorded a shortened
version of his address for the
radio and it will be broadcast in
the General Overseas Service a
few hours befere he gives the
full address in Birmingham. His
subject, ‘Man’s Use of Energy,’ is
the theme chosen by UNESCO as
a subject for publicity and dis-
cussion this year. The radio ver-
siom of the address will be on
the air on Wednesday at 8.15 p.m.

For Music-lovers

Those who can listén at 2.30
p.m, in the coming week will get
a musical treat in BBC broad-
casts in the coming week. Two





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month, pending the hearing of

her separate maintenance suit.

The restless Sinatra with his

polka-dot bow ties, the relaxed

Crosby taking off his wig in public

restaurants, symptomise America.
The sweet sentimentality

epitomise the American tempera-

ment.
Messiah=

THUS do the boy from Hobo-
ken and the boy from Tacoma
make a contribution to American
history. They are in tradition.

Crosby started work by washing

cucumbers in a pickles factory

or
frustrated bitterness of their lyrics

reet but different
whenever bis weight is discussed.
Yesterday I overheard him say:
“Ll weigh 81 pounds, and in adei-
11. What are the names of these tion to that, 27 pounds less than
abbreviations within the parenthe- 7/9 of my weight. If you
ses—a. (&). b. (....). ce (2). fi €
a . is the short way of mind your knowing.”
saying United States of America—
and of what other nation?
13. Te what nation do D.P.’s be-







10 The years sped by and we
_ a new era, and ERA. Meaning
what

“spunod fee s 7UsTemM © oum
siqy pue ‘spunod p¢ st 1yBjam syq 7) 6/5

14 Without having had any ex-
rience with them, you should
ow D.T.'s are?

15. Three Americans have been
so famous as to be recognizable
from these shortened names—John
L., John D., John P. Their full

ENIGMATIC
LANGUAGE

. uauL spuned pg 70 ‘yg pue fg Ue neq
long QoueseyIP ey OF Peppe I4GFIEM © 4y FO
6/2 OF Tenbde st .yBem sug sHeypnes

statements |

\

can |
are out how heavy I am, I won’t |



oo 9tectls smnantoured with

Sinatra was a £5-a-week waiter
Their goal was the same.

The day Sinatra walked out of
a cinema after a Crosby film and
decided to be a crooner rather
than a journalist, that was the
day Crosby had to work hard for
his money.

It was also the day a messiah
was born for the frustrated,
lonely, teen-ager.











names were ?

16. In Canada, M. P. might
mean Mounted Police, but in Bri-
tain it would more likely desig-
nate a

17. Is Mile. just a short way of





saying Millie?

18. You’ve seen a lot of G-I,
but have you looked into what the
letters come from?

—LE.S.

concerts from the Edinburgh Fes-
tival and two from the Promen-
ade concerts will be on the air
‘live’ to listeners in this area ,at
that time. On Monday the con-
eert from Edinburgh will be given
by the Siatsradiofonien Orchestra
from Copenhagen, conducted by
Fritz Busch, with Kathleen Fer-

rier (contralto). The programme
includes works by orneman,
Hindemith, and Brahms, On

Saturday William Primrose, the
Scottish-born viola player, will
be the soloist in the first European
performance of Bartok’s ‘Concerto
for viola and orchestra.’ This



Rupert's first idea to put help
concert, which will be given by fis Sanit Gest, Ch 80 ie 7 caw
the Halle Orchestra with its con- tants’ gloss dt Vee tua eed
ductor, Sir John will a jooks ¢ ; ' ‘ ALR, he
also include works by Beeth- eet ae 8 ae anOUght a
even and Mozart. On Thursday, This is another tree hat nobody's
elso, this time at 3.00 p.m. there eversoen before, it's the work of

that black nip that they call the

will be another broadcast from
back-room boy. I was on my way

the Edinburgh Festival with
Hindemith’s ‘Das Marienleben, in
which you will hear the celebrated
1ezzo-soprano, Jennie Tourel, The
‘Prom’ broadcasts are on Wednes-
day and Friday with the BBC
Symphony and London Philhar-
monie Orchestras respectively.

Cricket Operetta

On Monday, 28th August, the
BBC will broadcast the operetta,
‘The Batsman’s Bride’ or ‘The
Man Who Bowled the Maiden
Over,’ This gay piece was written
hy Donald Hughes, Headmaster
of Rydal School at Colwyn Bay
in North Wales, with musie by
the school’s director of music,
!. H. Heywood, It is not usually
part of a Headmaster’s activities
to write an operetta, but this way
written last summer for the boys
to perform as part of their efforts
to raise money for a school war
memorial. Many people thought
it was good ‘enough for the wire-
less’ so the headmaster took the
plunge and submitted it to the |
BBC. The BBC agreed _ it)
was ‘good enough for the wire- |













Ic’s keyed to your
iess’ and broadcast it in the Home
Service and are now repeating it
for overseas listeners at 9.00 Pm. |

on Monday, 28th inst, | It makes you look

TO YOUR FINGERTIPS



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In fear, but not in love.

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In north, but not in south

In chapter, but not in verse.

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Search for the word; find it you
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. PAGE SEVEN



Hair getting thin”?

Picture yourself in ten years!
















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PAGE RIGHT

BARBADOS sG ADVOGATE

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.



Sunday, August 27, 1950



Are You Registered?

SINCE the amendments which have
taken place in recent years in the qualifi-
cations for voters in the election of mem-
bers to serve in the General Assembly, the
method of registering such voters is no
longer satisfactory. This is reflected by
the smal! percerrtage of those who are en-
titled to vote doing so. Many persons who
are fit to render some contribution to the
life of this community are not even on the

register of voters.

The Representation of the People
(Amendment) Act 1944 provides that the
Governor shall appoint registering officers.
Such registering officers shall be chosen j
from fit and proper persons residing in the !,
parish for which he is a registering officer. ¢
The Representation of the People Act »
1901 prescribes the procedure to bef
adopted on the making of an application ;
for registration. A form has to be filled 4
up by the applicant and sworn to before
a Justice of the Peace or Police Magis- +

trate. The Registering Officer must then _

enquire into the qualifications of the appli-
cant, and if satisfied the applicant is then
registered in the manner prescribed by the
Act.

In actual practice it has become the work
of political organisations to get their sup-
porters registered and even with the work
which is thus done, there is cause for dis-
satisfaction. Those who do not realise the
difficulties of the procedure blame the
political organisations for the fact that so
many eligible voters remain unregistered.
The problem of getting Justices of the
Peace who are prepared to travel around
and: join in urging the people to register
is a very real one. Added to this many
persons dislike being registered by party
politicians feeling perhaps a distaste for
what may appear to be canvassing for a
particular group.

When the Adult Suffrage Bill becomes
law the present electorate will be consid-
erably increased and the machinery which
has proved incapable of dealing with the
present electorate will be completely
swamped.

The'Government should move quickly to
improve the system of registration. Indeed
that is a pre-requisite to the proclamation
of the Adult Suffrage Act. No time should be
lost so that whether the elections of next
year are held with Adult Suffrage or not,
the number of voters will more nearly re-
flect the number who are entitled to vote.

It should not be unduly difficult to pro-
vide simple means of registration. Appli-
cation forms should be obtainable from
every Parochial Office and branch Post
Office, The members of the Parochial Office
and Post Offices could administer the oath
required. Too many people do not even
know who are the registering officers of
the various parishes.

For the proper working of democratic
government, .the people must take an
active and continuous interest in political
affairs. The exercise of the right to vote
is one of the most important duties of a
citizen. By voting he helps to choose
those persons who will represent him in
the Legislature and who will enact those
laws necessary for the peace and progress
of the country.

Every encouragement should be given
so that all persons eligible to do so may
vote. A Government which by perpetu-
ating an outworn and cumbersome and
inconvenient procedure of registration is
failing in its duty. It is failing to inculcate
in the people a sense of civic responsibility
and is doing a grave disservice to the cause
of political democracy in this island.

Bad Weather

IF the destructiveness of hurricanes in
Barbados has not yet been appreciated by
readers of this newspaper there is little



hope for such readers.

The Government of Barbados has also
given much publicity telling people what
to do in the event of a hurricane and what
arrangements to make before and after
should that tragedy occur.



But in one important respect they have
shown lack of appreciation of an elemen-
tary fact which every householder knows.
They have concentrated overmuch on the
word hurricane and neglected the obvious
danger which comes from normal routine
high winds, heavy rains and landslides. It
did not take a hurricane to dislodge an
enormous stone which some days ago des-
troyed a wooden house in St. John. Pic-
tures in this newspaper have made only
too evident the condition of roads and
built-up areas near to Bridgetown after a
“blow.” Bridges collapse, telephone ser-
vice are disrupted and the only consola-
tion that bewildered thousands have is the
knowledge that no hurricane is expecied,
because they have received no warning.

The Director of Agriculture in a lecture '!
last week appealed to the public to stop|
‘panic-mongering.” Everyone acquainted
with Barbados will agree that the use of
the word “panic” is not an exaggeration.
But what is the condition which breeds
ranic? Ignorance. Just that and nothing
)vore.

It is not enough that the Director of
.\griculture or the Assistant Colonial Sec-

etary should feel satisfied with the hurri-
cane warning system which exists. “Con-

tant weather reports are made to Piarco
‘1 Trinidad and if a Hurricane is suspected
ve in Barbados are told about it. So you
see everything possible is being done to
ensure that the public will know of a hur-
ricane well in advance of its arrival—per-
haps 18 or 20 hours before it reaches us.”
In these words Mr. Donald Wiles attempt-
ed to reassure subscribers of Radio Distri-
bution on Friday evening—subscribers
who live in St. Michael and Christ Church
only.

It is imperative that a new attitude be
adopted by the Government during the
hurricane season. No amount of reading
of books, no amount of arrangements for
hurricane relief can take the place of
breeding confidence in the population of
the island during periods of bad weather.

The only way to keep the public in-
formed is for the Government to issue
daily meteorological bulletins in the Press
for the duration of the hurricane season.
This newspaper has offered its columns
free of charge for the publication of these
bulletins. But there are inadequacies in
communication services for the collection
and dissemination of meteorological data
during the night. To remove these inade-
quacies action is said to have been taken
by the Caribbean Commission on recom-
mendations made by the Second meeting
of Meteorological Specialists in Martinique
in June this year.

The first recommendation was that a full
24 hour official weather observing station
should be established as soon as possible
in Antigua. There is no news of this having
been done.

A proposal was also made that national
Governments should express their views
as to the establishment of a radio-telegraph
network for the collection and dissemina-
tion of meteorological information with St.

Croix as the control station and with
stations in St. Martin, St. Kitts, Antigua,
Guadeloupe, Martinique, St. Lucia, Barba-
dos, Grenada, Trinidad and Curacao.

If meteorological experts are critical of
the inadequacies of communications facili-
ties for disseminating meteorological data,
there is no reason why the public of Bar-
bados should be satisfied with uncertainty
every time there is bad weather.

Internally too there is great need for a
system of syrens as suggested by a corre-
spondent so that remote country dwellers
can be given adequate warning of
approaching storms. Simple daily weather
bulletins published in the Press and effec-
tive syrens throughout the parishes will
breed confidence. The nowledge that in-
formation is being passed to the public and
not kept for the Government experts will
eliminate panic-mongering.



In any discussion of the Public
Utilities . Bill, certain. . principl¢s
must be initially accepted. Clear-
ly the State owes it to the citizen

SUNDAY









ADVOCATE

Sitting On The Fence

Hy Nathaniel Gubbins

According to a writer in
West Country newspaper, loca
Communists “finding the na-
tives hostile when asked to
sign Stalin’s trick peace peti-
tion are touring the villages
engaging oldest inhabitants in
genial conversation and buy-
ing them pints of beer in ex-
change for their signatures.”

OOD morning, Mr. Gargle.
Marnin,
Fine day?
Moight a-bin better.
Like a pint?
Oi allus as a quart.
*

I expect you're a grandfather
and a great-grandfather.
Ah

How many children?

Oi’ve ad twalve and buried
fower.

And grandchildren?

Last countin there was tharly-
foive on em.

And lots of great-grandchildren,
too, I expect?

Ah, My darters and granddaters
breed loike rabbits. Two more
pupped on April Fool’s Day, an
three more last dung spreadin.

I expect you'd like them to live
peacefully in this beautiful vil-

Pe’
hey’ll never ave no peace
whoile they live ere.

They'll never have peace if we
don’t come to an agreement with
Russia. ‘

Dont’ know nothin abouts that,
but there'll never be no peace ere,
what with their jaw waggin an
back bitin an scandalmongerin,

* » *

But you wouldn't like an atomic
bomb dropped on them?

That I would. Do em good, Oi
rackon,

But you can’t mean that, Mr.
Gargle. Think of your grand-
children.

Drat em all, Oi say. Rackon a
bomb moight shake em up, the
lazy lot of varmints,

But your. dear little great-
grandchildren?

Drat em, too, with their shouin
an bawlin an screamin,

As I am sure you don’t under-
stand, Mr. Gargle, can I persuade
you to sign this peace petition to
outlaw the atomic bomb?

Oi’ve never put my and to nothin
since Oi signed away the lease of
my cottage. Ee was a lawyer, too.

But I’m not a lawyer. This is for
the good of you and your family,

That's what the lawyer said.

If war breaks out, Mr. Gargle,

it may be hell fire for everybody
in this village.

And sarve em roight. They got
it comin to em so they moight as
well ave a taste of it now. |

Would you like another pint, Mr.
Gargyle?

Oi allus as a quart.

Home Front
BEN an American news-
paper, the Richmond News
Leader, printed maps showing
Korean war lines of battle super-
imposed over a map of the local
country, a presser employed by
W. J. Wiseman of Enfield, N.C.,

left his job without notice as the

map showed the Communists were
only a few miles away,

Nobody knows where the poor
chap is now, but if he is travelling
west he has probably reached (let
us say) South Dakota where, ac-
cording to superimposed maps
printed by the local papers, the
Communists have now infiltrated
into the Black Hills, threatening
Rapid City

Fearing encirclement, he will
then strike north and west again
till he comes to Montana, where
he will find the cunning little
gooks entrenched in the Big Belt
Mountains.

Striking south and west this
time he will read the Idaho news-
papers, which will show the Com-
munists’ line over the Salmon
River Mountains.

When he gets to Oregon the
Wallowa Mountains will be stiff
with Communists.

* oe *

He now has the choice of going
north to Washington or south to
California.

If he goes to California, where
newspapers are printed mainly for
fun, he may read an imaginative
account of a North Korean occupa-
tion of Hollywood.

Outflanked and surrounded, ex-
cept for the ocean escape route, he
will then decide on a one man
Dunkirk, and beat it across the sea
to Japan.

As the Japanese copy everybody
they will also have superimposed
maps. He will find, according to
the Japanese newspapers, that
Communist armies are advancing
on Tokyo.

7 * *

Packing his bags again he will
board another ship which will take
him to Korea, of all places.

There he will find some real
Communist troops and probably
be shot as a spy by one side or the
other.



Forward Glance

O*E week the experts tell you
the weather in Britain is
growing colder. The next week
they say it’s getting hotter.

They now say it is not only get-
ting hotter, but the average tem-
perature has been rising steadily
since 1840.

If this goes on for another two
or three centuries Britain may be-
come a tropical island, with palm
trees and hula-hula girls at Mar-
gate and alligators in the Ser-
pentine.

Snake bites may become as com-
mon as a cold in the nose, parrots
may shout insults from trees in the
parks, and monkeys hurl coconuts
at the heads of a race long accus-
tomed to the respectful subservi-
ence of all the native fauna, ex-
cept cats. |

As climate is held largely, re-
sponsible for character and per-
sonal appearance, the manners and
‘aces of the British may undergo
« complete change.

The pink, wooden pans of young
upper-class Englishmen once so
admired and welcomed on the
Continent by head waiters because
they were a signal to charge
double for everything, may be-
come as dark as any dago’s, and
animated by dazzling white smiles
and black eyes flashing the side-
long. glances which give. a girl
goose pimples, and send her’ run-
ning home to mum for a quiet chat
on the facts of life.

As for the English character, it
may degenerate like English sport.

Foreigners, so willing to believe
our character is like our cricket,
cool, clean, decorous and without
passion, may find us playing
games like the lesser breeds,
shouting, screaming, cheating and
letting off fireworks to unnerve
our opponents.

Football may become a massacre
and the Oval a shambles after a
lost Test Match.

* if *

As the centuries roll by and the
country gets hotter and hotter
Englishmen may become darke*
and nastier, ending up as chatter-
ing guides, furtively selling dirty
posteards to American tourists.

But it will take at least a cen-
tury before Englishmen give up
wearing hot tweeds in the summer
and another before there is cen-
tral heating in every home. Just
when nobody wants it.

—L.ES.



He Might Make Men

I2 Feet Tall

STOCKHOLM.

A new race of Martian men,
nine to 12 feet tall may have be-
come possible as a result of ex-
periments conducted over the last
three years by a team of scientists
headed by Professor Gosta Hagg-
qvist, of the Caroline Institute
Stockholm.

Already Haggqvist

By GEORGE AXELSSON

The next experiment is to pro-
create giant dogs.

“So far we are. only able to
judge the size of animals produced
by my method,” says the profes-
sor.

“With dogs we shall begin to

has pro- investigate their intelligence,”
duced frogs twice their natu The professor declares yvehe-
size and pinkseyed white Danish»mently, “I elf. will never ex-
rabbits half as big again. periment with"humans.” He has

Much Bigger

About September three litters
of pigs will be born, having been
procreated by Haggqvist's special
special method of artificial insem-
ination.

He tells me he expects them
to grow “at least 60 per cent,
Jarger than usual.”

But he qualifies himself by
saying, “There’s always the risk
in these experiments that the
progeny may be dwarfs.”



to sée that he is not exploited by
overcharge or in other ways by
public services that have become
an essential part of his daily liv-
ing, convenience and comfort.
That is the State’s duty, But in its
attempt to control those services
for the benefit of the public, it
should _ as clearly no purpose
of the te so to exercise its con-
trol as to give the impression
that itis an avenging and spite-
ful agency set up for the coercion
of public corporations in the pur-
suit of their legitimate undertak-
ings.

The devolution of powers
granted to the proposed Board
of Control are such as to give
that body dangerously arbitrary
powers. e public corporation is
after all as clearly entitled to

justice as any individual citizen.
but it has no appeal whatever to
any body or court from an order
of the Board. And nowhere is it
laid down that such orders must
be governed by a “reasonable
cause”. Whatever the supposed
integrity of such authority as
constitutes the Board, it is dan-
gerous to the principles of ele-
mentary justice that such orders
can be purely arbitrary. The
mind or minds of those responsi-
ble for certain sections and
clauses of this Bill have been so
dominated by the theory of au-
thoritarian administration as tu
make of the proposed Board a
dictatorial tribunal if there ever
Was one,

If this Bill is ratified by the
Legislature as it stands it will be
farcical to refer to these public

—

. no ambition, he says to produce a

race of Frankenstein monsters.
“But” he adds, “undoubtedly
there is nothing to prevent such
experiments being attempted.
“There would, of course be the
risk of the human progeny being

dwarfs, as may happen with ani-
mals, ’ a *\

Abnormal
“Moreover,
risk that the progeny may be
idiots. We shall not know much
about what happens so far as in-

our experiments on dogs.

“I also fear that my method of
procreation may start a growth
process which wouid destroy the
normal nerve cells and conse-
quentiy cause abnormalities,

“I have no wish to bring mis-
ery on any human being. Big peo-
ple are no better than small ones;

From Lilies

“Colchinin, the substance which
I mix in the ordinary process of
artificial insemination, is fairly
common, f

“It is derived from autumn
lilies found in Switzerland, the
aw, and elsewhere.

“An army of giants, posstibl
with the brains of robots tnd
possessing enormous physical
strength, might theoretically be

there is also the pred

“The main use of my discov-
eries will be in food production.”
—L.E.S.



By SCRUTATOR

utilities as within the realm of
private enterprise.

The only parallel to the start-
ling powers contained in parts 6
and 7 of the Bill, is Regulation
58A of the Emergency Powers
Defence Act of 1939 and 1940 in
the U.K., which were constantly
challenged in the courts and con-
sistently condemned by the for-
ensie genius of both Bench and
Bar in the U.K.

Such alarming powers as is
contained in Parts 6 and 7 of the
Bill have only been directly un-

dertaken by Governments, not
delegated Authorities, and then,
have only been exercised by

those Governments in an emer-
gency of unmistakable national
proportions.

The powers of these sections of
the Bill are similar to those delé-
gated only to National Service
Officers in the United Kingdom
at the height of the War Emer-
gency, and would be unthinkable
by any peace Administration ex-
cept as a nationalised Industry,
The Bgard’s Order is Law, its
powers of direction are unquali-

fled and no Court has power to
question the manner in which it
exercises it. Some genuine or
“reasonable cause’ may exist to

prejudice the public corporation’s
compliance with an order, and

PUBLIC UTILITIES BOARD

the only agency that should de-
termine what is “reasonable
eause” is a Judge and Jury. But
no appeal to a Judiciary tribunal
is allowed except on a question
of Law. But questions of fact are
so often intricately bound up with
questions of Law that if the pos-
sibility of appeal is only confined
to one of law it gives to “the
executive discretion of the Board
an almost unlimited Charter.”

In England itself Boards with
such powers are really voluntary
domestic Tribunals, “in as much
as they do not come into exist-

ence unless the majority of an
Industry has. derided in
favour of a scheme”. If we want
a public Authority for any com-
parison in Enxland in peace time
we must cite the “Railway Rates
Tribunal.” “This is a body in per-

manent session, and has such a
well defined technical jurisdiction,
that they are for all common
purposes, Administrative Courts.
Its procedure is laid down in
tutory rules and-arders is
general on High Court .
Â¥ 4 Cont of Records
of three members, presided over
by a trained lawyer, with the ad-
dition when necessary of assessors
selected from an elaborately con-
stituted panel. Obviously the pro-
posed board has no similar speci-
fic constitution.

It is no easy abuse of language
nor any exaggeration to state that
the proposed Bill for the control
of public utilities is a document
of Nationalization exclusive of
the moral principle of compensa-
tion. The fact that it is formally
stated that the Board recognises

gz
iiss

the interests of shareholders is}!
no assurance that it will in fact} }
function .to guarantee those in- }}
terests

4

telligence is concerned until after |

SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950

| II
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HARDWARE & OFFICE 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

SATURDAYS
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seit

SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1930

Molotov Made
The Plans



@ America’s State Depart-
ment adviser answers the
questions that everyone is
poe WHY are the Com-
munis gaining 7
HOW can they be “nechea ?
WILL there be another world
war ?

Mr. John Foster Dulles is the
wealthy American lawyer who
would have been Secretary of
State if Dewey had defeated Tru-
man in the Presidential elections
of 1948. As the acknowledged ex-
pert of the Republican Party on
foreign affairs, it is still possible
that Dulles may attain that office
after the election of 1952,

His book, War or Peace, pub-
lished by Harrap (15s.), would
consequently be well worth study-
ing at any time. But, as one of
the architects of “bipartisanship”
iu American policy-making, Mr
Dulles has been a member of the
United States delegation to almost
every important international con-
ference since the war, and is now
back in harness as Special Adviser
to Mr. Acheson,

He can therefore give an eye-
witness account of the history of
American - Soviet relations since
the war, which is of outstanding
interest.

Finally, the outbreak of war in
Korea, whose danger Dulles fore-
saw, has invested his challenging
title with a new and sombye sig-
nificance.

The answer which he gives to
his self-posed question will not
arcuse false optimism: “War is
prcbable,” he says, “unless by
positive and well directed efforts
we fend it off. War is not inevi-
table and I do not think it is immi-

nent. Something can be done
about it.”
Throughout the book Dulles

stresses the immense gains which
Communism has made and its re-
lentless urge for expansion.

“Already Soviet Communism
has extended its control over more
than 700 million people or about
one-third of the human race. This
has happened in 33 years. Such
successes usually make men lose
their heads and go on more reck-
lessly -

Masaryk said ...

Since the war Communism has
consolidated its position in Cen-
tral Europe. (Jan Masaryk, the
Czech Foreign Minister who later
committed suicide, told Dulles that
“Soviet proposals often smelled
so bad that he had to hold his
nose with one hand while he rais-
ed the other hand to vote for
them.” Dulles drily comments:
“But he did it.”)

It has won a victory in China
“which surpassed what Japan was
seeking and we risked war to
avert”.

In other parts of Asia, and par-
ticularly in Africa, governments
are vulnerable to indirect aggres-
sion by Communism.

Dulles, remarking that the Bel-
gian Congo is America’s principal
source of uranium for atomic
bombs considers that the South
African policy of white supremacy
“both wrong and obsolete in the
world today”, is giving Commu-
nism the opportunity to precipi-
tate a bloody struggle throughout
Africa.

Against that, he counts the de-
fection of Yugoslavia the stabili-
sation of Western Europe, the
check to Communist expansion in
Greece, and the isolation of Rus-
sia in the United Nations.

Totting up the net score he con-
siders that the hard core of West-
ern civilisation comprises 350,-
000,000 people, with another 100,-
000,000 in South America,

Why they gain

Out of the remaining 1,700,000,-
000 people in the world, more than
700,000,000 are already under
Communist control and the Rus-
sion leaders have good chances of
further expansion in much of the
remaining areas whenever they
may be disposed to move strongly.

Dulles concludes: “There has
been a very definite shift in the
balance of power, and that shift
has been in favour of Soviet Com-
munism.

Why does Communism gain in
strength? Dulles gives three rea-
sons:

1—Communist propaganda has
a universal appeal. “The ‘Great
Soviet Experiment’ is the most
advertised, the most ballyhooed
scheme for softening up the oppo-
sition that the world has ever
known.”

2.—The propaganda is backed
up by a party with “the most
ruthless, unscrupulous, highly-

trained, omnipresent, secret army
that the world has ever known”.

3.—Communism has the advan-
tage of the offensive.

At present that offensive is
mainly being pursued in Asia and
Africa,

“Contrite” Bevin

Dulles makes the startling dis-
closure that when Molotov retired
from Minister of Foreign Affairs
last year, “he apparently did so
because the Politburo felt that he
should devote his entire time to
working out the Soviet Com-
munists programme for revolution
in Asia—a task so important that
it deserved the concentrated atten-
tion of the best international



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brains that the Soviet Government
could commend.”

Dulles pays a remarkable
tribute to Molotev’s diplomacy at
the London conference of Foreign
ane in 1945 od

‘o gain his ends Molotov played

eaknesses of his col-
leagues. He encouraged Mr.
Byrnes (the then United States
of

use as fitting into the Russian

programme.

Molotov at once got up and
made for the door, which, says
Mr. Dulles, he opened slowly.
By now Mr. Bevin was contrite,
and, ‘as a mark of sincerity,
conceded the point at issue.

Molotov -hoped to provoke the
fourth member of the group,
M. Bidault, to leave the confer-
ence. So he tried to outrage
French honour with petty slights,
omitting, for instance, to tell M.
Bidault that the time of the
meeting had been postponed.

Fanatics

Of Molotov, Dulles writes:

I have seen in action all the
great international statesmen of
this century, beginning with those
met at The Hague Peace Confer-
ence of 1907. I have never seen
personal diplomatic skill at so
high a degree of perfection as
Mr. Molotov’s at that session.”

Was it at Molotov’s direction
that the Communists attacked
South Korea? This book was, of
course, in print before the invasion
began. (Incidentally, it is surpris-
ingly up to date—events up to
February 1950 are included in the
text). But Dulles, who was in
Seoul only a week before the
attack was launched, can hardly
have been surprised as he wrote
in this book:

“Many feared lest the with-
drawal of the United States troops
would be the signal for an invasion
of South Korea from the North,
where the Soviet army had created
a large, fanatical, well-disciplined
and well-armed Communist force.

Dulles was hopeful, however
and believed that “at least the
South Korean Government has
passed safely the dangerous
period of its greatest. weakness.”

Reform Uno

How does Duties propose to
counter Communist expansion
throughout the world?

“Power is the key to success in
dealing with the Soviet leadership,
he writes, explaining that this
includes not merely military power
but economic power and the intan-
gibles such as moral judgment and
wor.d opinion.

He places great importance on
the reform of the United Nations,
which should be quite universal.
Apparently he would even includ
Communist: China as a member.
And he would attempf to limit the
veto.

Secondly, he wants Western
Europe, including Britain, to
unite. He would apply “friendly
but firm pressure” from America
using the bait of Marshall dollars
to hurry the process along. '

Dulles seems to believe that the
only reason why Britain will not
join in a Federal Europe is th®
necessity for “insulating” Social-
ism from natural economic forces.
He makes no attempt to understand
Britain’s links with the Empire.

In Asia, Dulles looks for the
establishment of a rmanent
association of Free Nations of
Asia and the Pacific, and he would
attempt to make Japan into “an
exhibit in Asia of what a free
society can develop in spiritual
and intellectual richness and
material well-being” .

Cheerless

Dulles is emphatic that military
expediency must not be allowed
to run American policy: “We shall
not qualify for survival, he says,
“if we become a nation of material-
ists, and if we give the impression
of growing and inhuman, and
deaf to the cry of mankind that
a way be found to save them
from the death, the misery, the
starvation of the body and soul
that make up the human cost of
recurrent wars,”

He believes also that much
could be done through new
techniques of political warfare to
encourage resistance within Com- |
munist countries.



SUNDAY ADVOCATE





ANTIGUA



ANTIGUA

TOP LEFT: Freeman’s Bay. RIGHT: English

Harbour.

By 8S. CUNLIFFE OWEN

ERHAPS the most. striking
difference between Antigua
and Barbados lies in the feeling
of its being not isolated, of its
being part of a larger community.
From its highest point, Boggy
Peak, no less than a dozen islands
are visible in clear weather.
From Barbados, none, hence a
sense of self-sufficiency and a
narrowness of outlook which
Antigua lacks.

Most of my readers are familiar
with Antigua in a general way,
the town of St. John, one of the
first to be planned on the gridiron
system, Rat Island, joined by a
causeway to the mainland, where
ihey make the rum, the “double-
skinned” hurricane proof Cathe-
dral with its 18th century French
statutes destined for Guadeloupe
over the gate, Government House
and its dining room with fourteen
doors and English Harbour, the
Gibraltar of the West Indies two
hundred years ago.

But there are one or two inter-
esting, but less familiar features
which I shou'd like to mention,

Pre Historic

One is Green Castle Hill. This
is one of the most impressive pre-
historic sites in the Caribbean. On
the top of the 700 ft. high hill sits
the moon Goddess and below her
the Sun god a monolith twenty
feet high. From these, on the
appropriate axes radiate statues,
tombs and fertility emblems all
the way down the hill culminating
in a temple enclosure approached
by a triumphal way. All this,
though overgrown by bush, is in
an excellent state of preservation.

It is nor widely known that
there were at one time camels in
Antigua imported by the planters
from the Canary Islands, where
I myself have seen them in sugar
fields. They were brought to the
Canary Islands from the near East
by African mainland. To feed
them, the variety of acacia known
as “camel thorn” was __ also
imported, and now grows freely
over the pastures affording wel-
come shade to the cattle and
together with the date palm im-
ported to feed the camel drivers,
giving the island an __ exotic
appearance peculiar to itself, This
thorn flowers like mimosa and
smells very sweet.

Glory

The glory of Antigua is its
beaches mile upon mile of white
sand, gently sloping to the crys-

tal clear water, and usually
backed by a belt of trees and a
lagoon. Thése lagoons are of

great extent but shallow and one
may often see a fisherfuan stand-
ing half a mile out from the
shore. At sunset thousands of birds
cover the surface of the lagoon
and the bushes svrrounding it
including a bright yellow canary
which I have not seen elsewhere.

The best beaches are barely

And he con-|accessible by very rough roads,

cludes with an eloquent appeal such as Dickenson Bay with its

for greater confidence in our
spiritual heritage.

War or Peace was, of course,
written mainly for an American
public; but everyone who wishes
to see the Korean battles in the
perspective of the global struggle
for power should read what Mr
Dulles has to say.

If his voice at times sounds
grim and cheerless if he lacks
full understanding of the Euro-
pean scene, let us acknowledge
that he has written the most out-
standing and enlightening survey
of world affairs published since
the end of the war.—L.E.8.

CHARLES WINTOUR

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BOTTOM: Nelson's Dockyard.

RIGHT: Admiral’s
Nelsen’s Dockyard.

House,

colony of pelicans, Gatley Bay,
with its magnificent view of the
lighthouse and the sunken ship,
ifalf Moon Bay, the most perfect
crescent imaginable, but it is worth
the rough journey to visit them.
Fort James is surrounded by
beautiful old buildings and this
beach and the lovely Fry’s Bay
and Morris Bay which look across
to Montserrat are approachable
by a good road.

On Foot

Really to appreciate Antigua,
however, one must walk, which
fortunately is easy as there are
fine footpaths all over the island
The walk along the crest of the
hills from Boggy Peak to Fal-
mouth, is breathtaking in_ its
beauty. So is the deep defile of
the Christian Valley with it
gigantic shade trees, its gent!)
flowing stream, pasturing cattle
and luxuriant tree ferns.

Every now and then you pass a
lotus filled pond, sometimes with a
little mission church, or old mil!
reflected in its waters, sometimes
out in open country with sheep and
cows, the magnificent white Zebus |
coming down to drink. |

Antigua has an empty look |
after Barbados. Great stretches
of uncultivated land with not a
house or village visible. In the
rains it is bright green and cov-
ered with wild flowers, in the dry
season all brown and parched.

The exception to this is the great
plain, stretching along the foot
of the hills from Five Islands Bay
past Bendalls to the Body Ponds
Reservoir and covered with mile
after mile of waving cane, At
evening, the hills beyond are
cobalt blue in the bright air. Here
end there boys and girls sit watch -
ing their cattle in the shade ot
huge old mango trees.

Over by Five Islands where the
lepers .ive the shapes of the hil!s
are contorted into weird shapes
by volcanic action and across the
great mud flats below poles are
placed to guide the traveller)
through the swamp.

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In the remotest recesses of the |
isiand, far, one would say, from |
civilization, appears, behind gates, |
the American luxury club of Mill-
reef, with its lovely houses and up
to date equipment |

But perhaps the most striking
memory of Antigua is of Shirley
Heights on a night of full moon
The guant and massive skeletons

of the barrack buildings of Nelson's
day rise out of the cactus (gcrub
against the night sky and the old
gun emplacements glitter in the
moon Far below, the yachts lie
snug in English Harbour and
across a shining sea can be seen
the faint outlines of Guadeloupe

It is an eerie spot, remote, wind-



swept ful of ghosts, with the
smugglers’ lair of Indian Creek
just below You a'most expect

to hear bugles blow as you tramp
the deserted path.

From here the neglected island
seems to stretch to infinity, this
poor sister of the Caribbean fam-
ily, waiting with her superb
beaches and genial climate tu
welcome the tourist who never
comes. The Millreef club, how-
ever, is a start, and there is a hope
that better days for Antigua may
be in store.

C. F. HARRISON
& Cia. LTD.
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(

|Army Life Begins
With A Slice
Of Cake

From FREDERICK COOK

FORT DIX, New Jersey,
Friday. A subdued group of
young men tumble out of a bu
from New York at the entrance
to this huge United States tyain-
ing camp every few hours

nowadays.
They come

in grimy overalls

and undershirts, clutching a tooth. |

brush, towel and razor, |
They are the material wito
which America is building

PAGE NINE





;

her |

“new army.” On their first day |

they do not look impressive. One
Sympathises with the
drill sergeants who
them on, and whose @omments on |
the whole business of a “new |
army” are often unprintable, |

ave to take |

}
14 weeks later—
Fourteen weeks later, eat
the recruits move off tor the next |
Stage in the complicated technical |
schooling that is needed now to!
turn a civilian into a fighting man,

old-time |

|
|
they look different. And they —t

What happens to the youngsters
from whom Fort Dix has coined

a new word — “raweruits”—in |

their first few days as soldiers? |

Surprises come from the |
moment they arrive. They come |
expecting orders, bawling

| sergeants, incomprehensible duties,

of cake, and a cup of coffee.

Then they are “marched” (if you |

can call it that) a hundred yards |
or so, into a large wooden hut,
where they come face to face with
their first general. Major-generai
John Devine, commander at Fort |
Dix, is not terrifying of aspect or
of voice. To the new recruits. he
talks like a father.

What General Devine tries to
do is to convey to the bewildered
youngsters the thoughts underly-
ing this country’s “new army.” It
is like the old army in aims; it
wants total obedience and intends







to have it, But “theirs not to |
reason why" is gone for ever,
Recruits now are te!d why, made
to understand, The final result,
they say, is the same.



Wisdom—and_ unwisdom

In their three menths at Fort |
Dix the “raweruits’ may not
become front-line soldiers; But
when they leave they are equipped
with some knowledge of how to
make a bed, how to march, how
to read a map, how to treat sore
feet. Lots of them have learned
how to drink a glass of beer. And
all of them have learned the un-
wisdom of saying “Scram” to a4
superior who issues what sounds
like a ridiculous order,

Fort Dix has its own staff of
psychiatrists. Some of the people
who need them most are the old-
time NCOs.

Said one of the psychiatrists.

“They have quite a job to
edjust themsel
Army and its ideas! In the old
days, they will tell you, sergeants
told a man to hurl himself off a
cliff and he hurled. Now they come
to us full of bewilderment at the
coffee-and-cake routine, In their
time it simply didn’t happen, Well,
like the recruits, they have to get
used to a lot of new things. They're
in the Army, too!”

—L.E.S



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PAGE TEN



William Blake-Poet, Painter

And Mystic

By IRIS

sae

Bern in 1757, William Blake
was a visionary from the age
of four. Poet, paister and
mystic, his escape from con-
ventionalism in art has in-
fluenced painters until the
present day. His best known
poem is probably “Jerusalem,”
and perhaps his most success-
‘ul drawings are the “Divina
Commedia” illustrations, The
“Sengs. 0’ Innocence and Ex-
cilo sec, with their exquisite
wiarguial engravings, were his
cio. perfect achievement.

i substantial, Queen
“one house at the corner of Broad
Street, Golden Square, London on
November 28th, 1757, William
tiake was_born wo a hosier, James
Flake, and his wife Catherine, No
coubt his Birth was like any other
in his family; he was duly baptised,
in Grinlimg Gibbon’s ornate font
in the Wren Church of St. James's

rd of hiS‘infancy little is known
except what can be glimpsea

1 a large

CONLAY

met the advancing mob of rioters
who carried him with them down
Holborn to Newgate. There he
sSuw the prison’s gates stormes,
the place set on fire and its three
hunared inmates released. Weeks
o! indiscriminate vengeance {ol-
kuwed, and Blake remembered it
vividly, making it the corner stone
of his philosophy of forgiveness
and war which emerges with such
force in “Jerusalem”, the greatest
of his prophetic poems:
“....es..df I could find these
Criminals
I could not dare to take vengeance,
tor all things are so constructe?
And builded up by the Divine
hand that the sinner shall always
escape;
And he who takes vengeance is
alone the criminal of Providence
If 1 should dare to lay my finger
on a grain of sand
In way of vengeance, I punish the
already p da.”
When he was twenty-five, he
married Catherine Boucher, the

reug. taese holes in the blanket black-eyed aq illiterate daughter

memcx? of which Blake him- of a market

elf wrot&years later.

They lived in

ener at Battersea.
Green Street,

I cangginto the world like a Leicester Fields, in London ana set

epatit hidden in a crowd” he said.

up a print shop which eventually

When hé-avas four he knew that failed because Blake's younger

he had s@@n the Eternal face to
fece ‘ent his hoary visage
against ie window pane and the
-ttle boy burst into tears.
rents, worldly-wise, saw value
(rents but none in his
When little eight-year-
v1 began to describe the
Jul\.ich as being covered
wherein were angels
crignt wings bespangled
bough with stars, or said
that angelic figures walked among
haymakers, his father threaten.
him with a thrashing for hi:
eiperate perversion of truth,
Sut the youthful Blake did not
change his opinion Grown-up
and an accepted genius, he wrote
im exactly the same vein, explain
tng his way of seeing things: “I
assert for My Self that I do not
behold the outward Creation and
that to me it is a hindrance and
not Action;...... ‘What’ it will be
Question’d, ‘When the Sun rises,
dO you not see a round disc of fire
somewhat like a Guinea?’ ‘O no
no, [ see an Innumerable compan.
of the Heavenly host crying,
Poly, Holy is the Lord
Almighty! I question not my
Corporeal Vegetative Bye any
more than I would Question a
Window concerning a Sight.
look thro’ it and not. with it.”
This was the king of small boy,
who at the age of twelve, wrote
verse and.,at fourteen was ap-
prenticed to an engraver. The
engraver was an understanding
rean, and realised that he had a
rupil Who might not fit easily into

every

u
e
C

brother, who managed it for him,

died. Marriage meant everything
to Blake. His whole philosophy,

His forestalling that of D. H. Lawrence,

centred around the idea of a per-
fect rélationship between man and
woman. Both preached a doctrine
of sexual regeneration, but Blake
went much further than Law-
rence, and by setting his doctrine
inside the conviction that Body
and Soul are a living unity he
‘avoided Lawrence's error of deny-
ng the Soul altogether

Blake and his wie SxeMpiunier,
the theories Wancn we Peer sieia,
“hey livea devotediy twgewer au
tieir lives, althougn uley were not
always so united as appearances
might have suggested. at ine be-
guiming, absorped in g@acn otner,
iney tound endless delight: Wii-
liam in teaching Catherine to read
and write, Catherine in learning.
William was at that time begin-
ning (6 combine writings with

awings, and the “Songs of In-
ocence”’, poems inscribea wiui
elicate and poetic marginal

ney decorations, were a joint produc-

tion of himself and his wife—she
tinting a few of the engravings
and pulling the impressions — he
writing and engraving the copper.
Sut as time went on there were
difficulties between them. Never-
theless, won by patient pains for
the wisdom of mankind, William
and Catherine’s marriage suc-
ceeded, and passing from a sterile
and elemental oppostion, in time
it became the truly creative

an apprentices’ school, but whojg?tlationship that every marriage

could teach himself more than he S!0uld be.

It was a rare and

since his position as the greatest

would Jearn in any Classes, se Bptce achievement for Blake,

therefore invited Blake to go ou’
and to spend his time drawing the
monuments of London’s Churches,
With a. budding passion for the
Gothic, Blake was happy day after
Cay, sketching the medievad tombs
in Westminster Abbey and dream-
ing palpable. shapes from the

phantom past.

When his seven years’ ap-
prenticeship was over, Blake
turned seriously to the engraver’s
art. He worked hard at his draw-
ing too. even exhibiting at the first
show held by London’s Royal
Academy of Arts. But the two ex-
periences which made the greatest
impact on his life at that time
were his marriage and his inyol-
untary participation in. the Gor-~
don Riots of 1780, wi oe.
= in the strong religion of those

ays.

The artist happened to be walk—
itig near Leicester Fields when he

prophet of the modern world
caused him to be the most isolated,

“Songs of Innocence” was fol-
lowed by “Songs of Experience,”
with the same exquisite marginal
decorations. Blake’s powers of
design were steadily improving.
He accomplished a mass of work
by an extraordinary union of ex-
houstless patience with a fiery,
restless, creative imagination. He
never paused between one task
and another. “I don’t understand
what you mean by the want of
@ holiday,” he said, and he de-
clared that writing and design
were relaxation, after engraving
aud woodcutting.

oe best known amo the
woodcuts are those he made for
Tharnton’s text of Vergil, Samuel
Palmer has & lo tion of
them in one of his letters, “They
are visions of little dells and nooks

and corners of Paradise; models of
the exquisite pitch of intense
poetry. I thought of their light and
shade, and looking upon them 1
found no word to describe them.
Intense depth, solemnity, and vivid
brilliancy only coldly and partial-
ly describe them. There is in all
such a mystic and dreamy glim-
mer as penetrates and kindles the
inmost soul and gives complete and
unreserved delight, unlike the
gaudy daylight of this world, They
are like all that wonderful artist’s
works the drawing aside the fleshly
curtain, and the glimpse of that
rest which remaineth to the people
of God.”

Periods of happiness and under-
standing alternated in Blake's life.
There was the peaceful interlude
in the country at Felpham which
would have lasted probably far
more than three years had the
poet not ma@fie an unfortunate mis-
take. One day a soldier came into
his garden and was insulting when
Blake asked him why he was
there, Words flew about and after-
wards threats and even blows. The
soidier was eventually forcibly re-
moved, but afterwards be brought
a case against Blake for seditior.
In the interval of waiting for the
trial the poet returned to London
and found lodgings in South Mou!l-
ton Street. He was acquitted, but
the strain of a trial for high treas-
on would weigh on most men.
Blake's withdrawal frorn even his
friends began at this time. For two
years, it is said, he never went out
of the house.

Gradually his work brought him
more and more admirers. Samuel
Palmer, Fuseli and John Varley
were among those of his closest
friends who managed to penetrate
his seclusion. Varley would be al-
lowed to sit by him far into the
night and would ask him, “Draw
me Moses”, or, “Draw me Julius
Caesar”, Then, straining his eyes
in an effort to see what Blake saw,
he would hear the poet say, “There
he is,” and afterwards watch him
draw with alacrity, looking up
from time to time as if he had a
flesh and blood sitter before him.
Sometimes, suddenly leaving off,
he would say, “I can’t go on, it is
gone”, or, “It has moved, the
mouth has gone.” Thus were pro-
duced the series of “spiritual por-
traits.” “You can see what I see,
if you choose. Work up the imag-
ination to the state of vision and
the thing is done”, Blake used to
remark,

Among his last drawings were
the “Divina Commedia” illustra-
tions, and perhaps his most suc-
cessful, apart from those whjch
adorned his own poetry, were the
designs for Blair’s Grave. The
theme of these was death; and who
more qualified to interpret such
heights and depths?

His last poetic work was “Jeru-
salem”, This was summed up and
brought together the themes of his
earlier works and gave a unity to
“The Book of Thel’, “The Marri-
age of Heaven and Hell”, “The
Songs of Innocence and Experi-
ence”, “The First Book of Urizen’”,
“The Song of Los”, “The Book
of Ahania” and “Milton”. And in
the end his philosophy was dis-
tilled into these few phrases, “I
want nothing. I am quite happy. J
should grieve to possess earthly
glory, for everything that a man
wins in way of materia] glory
detracts from his spiritual glory.”
He thought less of himself and his
achievements even than of success.
Of “Jerusalem” he wrote that the
poem was hardly his, “I have
written this poem from immediate
dictation, twelve or sometimes
twenty or thirty lines at a time,
without premeditation or even
against my will. ...I may praise
it since I dare not pretend to be
other than the secretary, the

are in Eternity”.

Whenever av spoke of his own
death, he would say that he could
not think of it “as more than going
out of one room into another”, or
of going “into that country which
all my life long I have desired to
explore,” When the day came on
August 12th, 1827, he died joyous-
ly, gently and imperceptibly.

Wm. Blake's engravings are on sale at
the Advocate,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Our Readers Say:
Vo Information
The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—In the lecture on Hurri-
canes by the Director of Agricul-
ture on August 2'st., I see that
Mr. Skeete referred ‘to what he

aptly described as “panic-mon-
gering.’

At the time the lecture was
being delivered, the island was

vife with rumours of a hurricane,

and ma people were seri
concerned as to whether Kd
should start to make their houses
secure against a storm, but could
find nv 4efinite information, one
way or the other.

The only way to end this sort
of thing is to have a simple and
effective means of signalling the
approach of storms, and this could
be done by a number of electri-
cally operated sirems, such as
were used in Britain for air taid
warnings during the war. The
whole island could be effectively
covered by from six to eight
sirens, or at most, say one per
parish, Strategically loeated. The
cost would be very reasonable.

The present system of warnings
to the general public cannot be
called effective as, with the best
intentions, too many houses will
not be reached by any of the
various methods laid down.

If the public could feel confi-
dent that an unmistakable warn-
ing would be heard by the entire
population before the approach of
a storm, they would probably
cease to panic on the strength of
rumours, but nothing short of this
‘will serve the purpose.

R. E. SMYTHIES
“Instow,”
St. Peter,

Soceer
To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—It is known that Football
has more fans, draws bigger
crowds, and is a much more in-
ternational game than Cricket as
witnessed by England’s de-
feat by U.S.A. in Brazil recently,
yet local footballers have to be
content with the crumbs from the
cricketers table, surely the time
has arrived for the incorporation
of the B.A.F.A. and the start of a
new era with regard to Football,
in the purchase by the Commit’:
tee of a ground of its own. It was
noted that the newly formed Ten.
nis Association was noti asked to
play at Kensington merely be.
cause they could provide pavilion
accommodation, but were genér-
ously provided with a pround of
their own at the Pine, and the
Public appealed to, to support the
erection of stands.

Why then mus) footballers be
debarred from playing football at
the most suitable time of the year,
namely, when the rains are fall-
ing and the ground is in a soft
condition? Those who recall the
triangular tournament held here
in 1982 will remember that we
were leading in that tourhament
until the rain fell, and after that
we were soundly beaten througn
not being accustomed to playing
on a heavy ground, and with a
heavy wet ball.

Football enthusiasts were told
in the past to content (:emselves
in patience and await the disposal
of Weymouth. The last portion
remaining has now been given to
Combermere, meanwhile two very
suitable sites have changed hands,
where the new Biscuiti Factory is
being built, and “Wakefield”
Pinfold Street, also “Stockton”
which the Hospital has now de-
cided to use. The advice giver
has thus proved fruitless

I have been informed that a
substantial balance has been car-
ried forward on this year’s season,
I should therefore like to advise
thet tihis be not dissipated on
tours as in the past, on sccount of
not taking a long view, but that
steps be taken to incorporate the
Association, and a diligent search

for a suitable ground be made and },

acquired,
SOCCER FAN.





FERGUSSON

RAD

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If this were England I would say:
| HELLFIRE CORNER

IS

From LIONEL

IF THIS WAR were taki
‘be reporting to-night that He.

SAVED

CRANE: Taegu

place in England, I would
Corner is now safe.

Imagine for a moment that during the past two weeks
an enemy has pressed the defenders of democracy in
England into a box bounded by Dover in the south, Har-
wich in the north, and Chelmsford in the west.

Those two weeks have been
critical. Any day could have
brought a break-through. There
were moments when the best

military minds féared that the
enemy was coming ih to put the
lid on the box.

Now, for the first time since the
enemy came sweeping down from
the north, there is a real feeling
of security.

REE) p04)"
ra Ye
yey













In two days 1 have toured aii
fronts in Korea. each I
bring back the message: “We are
here to stay.”

Let me itemise.

FIRST, the area of Pusan, the
Dover of this campaign:—

When the Reds forced a bridge-
head over. the Naktong River,
Pusan was a town of nerves. This
is the port into which flow the
lifeline supplies for the defenders.

Without those supplies there
could be no resistance to the
Reds... For days there were omi-
nous whispers that this was the
place where the Americans would
be forced to stage a Dunkirk.

Then the Marines were ordered
in to pick that pocket over the
Naktong. Succeed or burst were
their orders. They succeeded.

They cut and chopped that
bridgehead, so savagely that only
a handful of Reds were left to
limp dazedly back to the other
Side of the river. Pusan was

safe,
LIKE THE 8.53

SECOND, the sector round Tae-
gu (Korea’s Chelmsford) a town
that lies at a road and rail junc-
tion to the south—a town that has)
a top priority airfield lying be-
hind it.

From Taegu’s hot and dusty air
strip the fighter planes—Austra-
lian and’ American—go up with
the regularity of suburban trains
to cut and harry the enemy.

On that same strip vital sup-
plies are arriving steadily. Planes
are bringing in day and night
everything from C rations to land-
mines.

The threat to Taegu became so
real that on the night I arrived
there, the inhabitants were ordeér-
ed to evacuate.

I saw them pouring down the
roads south with their shabby
possessions on their backs—
another pitiful contribution to
the long column of refugees that

has traipsed its way across ihe

battlefronts of the world,

Two days later, and what a
change! Back in the hills 16 miles
north of Taegu, American and
South Korean infantry have hit
those would-be attackers so hard
that they have put their heads
cewn, in the scrub and kept them
tnere. it

All they have been able to do in
the last 48 hours is to lob a few
harmless shells around the outer
fringe of the town.

The evacuation has been stop-
ped. The people are back at their
normal business of selling apples,
rice, and watermelons,
clothes and sitting around smok-
ing 20-inch pipes. .

wich), where tonight I spoke to

General Kim Hon Ill whose

great victory on the east coast

in the last two days has made
him the Montgomery of South

Korea.

When I met him he was sitting
in an almost bare billet cooling
himself with a green and scarlet
paper fan.

‘7-Stone Monty’

There is a good deal of resem-
blance between him and Mont-
gomery. He is sparé—he would
not turn a scale at more than 7st.
He despises comfort. He works at
a bare kitchen table as a desk and
sleeps in a camp bed in the
corner of his office.

Like Montgomery he is not too
precise about uniform. When I
saw him he was wearing a Gl.
fatigue suit, with two silver stars
on a pocket, and a pair of gym
shoes.

Like Montgomery he has given
his life to the army. Behind him
are bitter campaigns in China and
Manchuria. Unlike Montgomery,
he chain smokes.

About the future of the war

he was in no doubt. He said: “I

can clearly say I will advance.”

As a man who has crushed a

North Korean division his view

is entitled to respect.

Well that is the physical posi-
tion. Almost more important is
the psychological improvement.
The “old sweats” of this campaign,
who remember the days when we
were desperate enough to put on
a battalion to defend one point,
now find themselves in a proper
line with their flanks defended. . .

An Army Now

“Defending a line” is a phrase
that has died out here. Now the
men talk only of attack. They
have the materials to do it.

The period when the Americans
thought they were acting as local
policemen to try to keep the peace
bas gone for good. These Ameri-
cans and South Koreans are now
an -
They have begun to kill the
enemy in large numbers. They
have shredded his supply lines.
Night and day they harass him
fiom the air.

The best military judges here
say the tide has turned. Soon,

they believe, it may begin flow-

ing towards the 38th Parallel. I
believe them. —L.ES.



Tet the




we CASHMERE BOUQUET

he al



haunt his every dream?

find in any soap.

Bouquet toiletries!

SSeS

o>
Sees ee eee e C8 ORORe

At the wonderful evening is over;
will the fragrant memory of you

Of course it will, if you bathe with
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Bouquet gently caresses your skin leav-
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SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950
a






Doing fine on
’ LER

/

°

‘KEPLER’...

Cale Agents for Sarbedes: Collien’ Led., 26 Bread Swen.



Play safe! Brylcreem your hair. Dandruff on your collar,
loose hair on your comb—these are danger signals that

point the need for Brylcreem’s double benefit:
(1) Day-long smartness. (2) Lasting hair health.
Massage with Brylcreem stimulates the scalp,
encourages natural hair growth,
wards off Dandruff. Its pure
emulsified oils put life into Dry
Hair and impart a splendid
gloss. Don’t take any chances,
Brylcreem your hair — most
men do!


























CHEERFUL mind

so often goes with a
healthy body. To main-
tain good health, don’t
forget essential Jmner
Cleanliness. | Andrews
not only provides a
sparkling, refreshing
drink — it helps to keep
you clean inside as well.
It functions by cleaning the mouth,
settling the stomach and toning up
the liver. Finally, Andrews gently
clears the bowels.
Take this “fizzy” drink whenever
you need refreshing. One teaspoonful
iti a glass of water is all you need
to use,

ANDREWS uversatr

THRE



5





97

SUNDAY, AUGUST

1950

































































































all the markings on the vast
map in General MacArthur's
Oo war room, the most eye-
ng is a wide circle drawn
nd the little village of Pisan-
behind the American lines
ie Naktong River.

he circle is in red. That is
colour used by MacArthur's
to distinguish enemy units.
there is no divisional or regi -
1 number to go with it, us
is with our markings of
y dispositions.

Mside the red circle there are
three words and a figure
ugees command approxi-
ely 30,000.”

the red circle on his ma)
und Pisandong and _ those
nd other refugee-infested areas
it represent the generalis-
p’s unwilling tribute to the
successful, most dongerous
implest of the secret weapons
Jacked from the Soviet arm-
for the Korean war.

is a weapon, moreover which
effective even to-day
pn the Communists in Korea
ttaggering under blows from
‘ever-increasing deploy:nent
ited States air power against

rperts tell me we can look
mrd to seeing it used more
more wherever the Soviet is
sed to the West.

Three Jobs

HETHER it is a cold war
or a shooting war, in Asia
Europe, the principle of the
@apon will be the same. Put in
simplest terms, it is the use of
k-change-artist troops—men
ind women.

In Europe's cold war their job
Yould be to stir up trouble by
Cting not as Communist or Rus-
lans, but ostensibly as agents of
me other Power or authority.

in Korea, their main jobs so far
e been: —

To infiltrate behind the
and attack the Americans in
—



The tanker Servitor which has
een in port for 17 days already
xpects to be anchored off the
Aquatic Club for 3 months. This
is so because the Seervitor brought
300 barrels of terolas for use on
e new runway at Seawell, while
e B.U.O.C. tank that is re-
eiving it has a capacity of only
,000 barrels.
Capt. B, Barzey, Master of the
itor, told the Advocate that
"She will be making trips here with
~ terolas until the new runway at
Se) Seawell is completed. aii
He said that the truck which is
onveying the terolas from the
U.O.C. tank to Seawell can
arry very little and this also adds
o the delay.

Terolas is specially made for
unways and contains 50% water.
t is heavier than oil and will
“turn to a solid block if exposed
o the wind. It will also turn
hard if it comes into contact with
salt water.

Capt. Barzey said, before the
Servitor took its load of terolas
from Point Fortin, therefore, the
tanks had to be steamed and
washed out and all water in them



ITS HERE AGAIN/

SEFTON

the rear, In this they have been
successful, we are told, on several
occasions,

2. To act as spies and sabo-
teurs.

3. Most important of all to my
mind-—to cause a conflict between
the Americans and the Korean
civil population.

Men and women members of
this special corps are trained by
a special division of the North
Korean Communist Army, which

acts as the parent organisation
for all guerrillas,
There they are taught to

assume whatever disguise is most
suitable for their mission. One
moment they will be in the front
line fighting as correctly uni-
formed soldiers of the Nortn
Korean army. Next they will te
trying to sneak into the American
lines dressed in American steci
helmets and those shapeless green:
fatigues which G.1.’s are wearing
in Korea,

New Arms

N one occasion when they
were up against the 25th
Division many of whose soldiers
are coloured men they went so
far as to black their faces like
coons in a seaside minstrel troupe.
But the favourite trick is to
put on the wide-brimmed straw
hat white homespun coat and
jodhpurs of the Korean peasant
and join the trek of heavily laden
refugees fleeing from the war
through the American lines.

As oiten as not they will leave
their arms behind them. There
are plenty of arms caches which
were prepared before the Com-
munists invaded Korea where
they can pick up all they need,
Or they can get one of the old
peasant women to stack her bun-

‘ANKER HERE FOR
3 MONTHS

bailed out. The pipe lines were
also dried and the tanks were
afterwards inspected by a chemist
from the United British Oilfields
at Point Fortin.

The captain said that terolas
was also used on the runways at



The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 5.30 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.22 p.m.
Moon: (Full Moon)
High Water; 3.15 a.m., 4.11

p.m,
YESTERDAY
Temperature (Min.) 72.5°F
Wind Velocity: 6 miles per

hour
Wind Direction: 9 a.m., E,
ll a.m., E by N

Total Rainfall (to date)
7.29 inches
Barometer: 9 a.m., 29.914,

11 a.m., 29.908

Piarco and on the American Base
at Waller Field.

The Servitor was built in France
in 1923 as a bunkering barge. It



i

i

DELMER

enemy’s ability

MacARTHUR
‘RED-RINGS’
A VILLAGE




gi!



= Se
... TRIBUTE TO
AKEY WEAPON

dle with
ition.

What could be simpler or more
normal than for a tired refugee
to sit down on a hilltop from
which he can see the Americans
moving up a road to the front and
installing their artillery in the
bed of a dried-up stream?

What more natural than that
a large party of peasants should
cross the mountains by normally
unused paths in order to escape
from the Communists? I have
seen it come off again ond again,

weapons and ammun-

It Worked
HE successful attack by the
Communists a week ago on
Pohang was largely the work of
guerilla troops disguised as peas-
ant refugees.

afterwards changed hands with
the Dutch and was bought by
Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd. in 1929.
It is at present owned by the
Trinidad Shipping Company and
was chartered locally to bring
terolas to Barbados.

It carries a crew of 14. In the
evening some of the crew go
ashore but a_ skeleton crew is
always left on board.

Captain Barzey, who hairs from
San Fernando, Trinidad, has been
Master of the vessel for the past
three months. He said that the
vessel can only do about four
knots per hour under power.
When they were coming to Bar-
bados it was towed by a supply
ship until it was about seven
miles off the island.

He explained that the Servitor
ean sail from Barbados to Trinidad
but cannot sail against the tide
when coming from Trinidad to
Barbados. They had a very good
crossing until they were near to
Barbados when the vessel began
to roll in large swells.

The Servitor also brought abqut
four cylindrical tanks, each about
forty feet long, which were un-
loaded in Carlisle Bay and after-
wards taken to Spring Garden.

Captain Barzey said that in
Trinidad he was informed that as
soon as he is ready to sail out of
Carlisle Bay he will be given 9,000
tons of fresh water as ballast.

eal iter: fee

In Your Horoscope

Your Real Life Told Free

Would you like to know what the Stars
indicate for you, some of your past exper-
lences, your strong and weak points, etc. 7?
Here is your chance to test FREE the
skill of Pundit Tabore, India’s most fam-

ous Astrologer,
to useful purposes
who by applying
the ancient science
has built up an en-
viable reputation ?
The accuracy of his)
predictions and the
sound practical ad-
vice contained in




























his Horoscopes on:
Business, Specula-
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Love affairs,
Friends, Enemies,
Lotteries, Travels,
Pa Changes, Litiga-

tion, Lucky Times, |
Sickness ete.,
have astounded
educeted people
the word over
3SEORGE MACKEY cf New York,
velleves that Tabore must possess some
sort of second-sight,

To popularise his systern Tabore will |
vent you FREE your Astral Interpretation |
{ you forward him your full name (Mr., |
Mrs. or Miss), address and date of birth |
all clearly written by yourself. No money
required but enclose 6d. in B.P.0O. (No
Stamps or Coins) to help cover postage |
and misc. costs. You wiil be amazed at |
the remarkable accuracy of his state-|
ments about you and your affairs. Write
now as this offer may not be made

gain. Addr PUNDIT TABORE
Dept 213-B Upper Forjett Street
Bombay . India, Postage to India is 2d



Startling. Predictions ,

|
i

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

COMMANDOS TRY

In the Waegwan area I came

across a battery which had ‘been
forced to change its position four in occupied South Korea, is hkely
times in two days because of the scon to be faced with a strong

locate and Fifth Column movement ai nome.

to
bombard it before it had settled

Then General Hobart Gay,
commander of the Ist. Cavaliy
Division gave the order that ail
refugees were to be moved cut
of the area within 24 hours and

in,

that any Koreans found there
after that were to be shot. ~ It
worked,

But just think what it means to
the Americans to have to ae
all Koreans here as e les.
Just try to estimate the political
damage to them of having to
mark up as hostile the 30,000
men, women and children arund
tions in his own territory, and
Pisandong the vast majority of
whom are certain to be genuine
refugees.

Nazi Praise

HEN I talkéd with Goeb- “EXHE Americans are thus al-
' ready preparing to create a

refugee population in Communist-

bels’s number one propagan-
dist, Hans Fritzsche, after his
acquittal in the Nuremberg trials,
he told me that Britain's politicat
warfare would have failed com-
pletely but for one thing,

“When your agents as3i
Heydrich you forced us to take
measures against the whole Czech
nation which estranged them from
us and drove them into your
camp.”

The objective of North Korea's
Kim Il Sung’s” quicx-change—
artist Commandos is ‘o achieve
just this and clearly the greatest
care has to be taken aot to help
them.

There is one big consolation
however. If the Korean war
continues to go as it has been
going these last days, the damage
which a Fifth Column coup can
do may well become progressively
smaller. Especially as it had been
prepared to coincide with the
last knock-out offensive.



Scout Notes:
Boy Scouts

BACK FROM CAMP

THE 79th Barbados (St.
Patrick’s R.C.) Troop which was
in camp at Barrow’s, St. Lucy,
from Saturday 19th broke camp
yesterday morning. The Scoutmas-
ter, Mr. S. J. Flemming, was in
charge, assisted by A.S.M. Mr.
G. Hutson Clifford and Mr.
Worrell.

A very well varied and balanced
programme was arrariged, and de-
spite the inclemency of the weath-
er, the entire programme was
carried out. This included Nature
‘Trails, Hikes, Tracking, Signal-
ling, Pioneering, and First Aid,
and was climaxed with a “Wide
Game’ which called for the use
of all these on Friday evening.
The ‘Story’ on which this game
was based was about Indian war-
fare, was written in code, and
before the boys could start this
had to be decided. Having done
so, they were divided into special
patrols and given two sets of in-
structions, also in code, to be
opened at specified places. The
boys, carrying out the instruc-
tions, brought the game to a suc-
cessful completion. On Friday
night a ‘Campfire’ was held, and

A

IM IL SUNG, harassed by the
disruption of communica-

The Americans are
measures which seem
admirably calculated
such a development: —

1. South Korean guerilla regi-
ments have been forme! and
marauding
hind the Communist lines.
2. Commando raids have taxen
place within the last few days
successively, a
tunnel was blown up on the
and

are already
in which

northeast coast
islands overwhelmed.

3. Leaflets have been dropped *
the inhabitants
in Communis:-
their

warning
ten towns
held territory

to get out.

held territory.

The problem it will present for
Kim II Sung, harassed by day
and night air-raids will certainly

no smaller than that in the
ith is for MacArthur's General

Walker.

As Kim’s power decreases un- 4
der the blows ot tae American
Air Force and artillery it will be
more and more difficult for him

QUICK-CHANGE ACT

On ‘The New Enemy in Disguise’

Oils And |
Fats |

{
THE Fourth Meeting of the Oils |
and Fats Conference will open at
Hastings House on Tuesday, 29th
August, under the Chairmanship
ef, Sir George Seel, K.C.M.G.,
Comptroller for Development and
Welfare.
Those attending the Conference
besides the Chairman are as fol-



lows:

Barbados—-Hon, E J, Petrie, and Mr
taking A. del. Loniss and Mr. K. R_ Hunte
to me Advisers

help British Guiana—-Mr. &, H. Croucher
Jamaica—D C. Ferguson, Mr. A. G

to

that

cities are strategic anil
dustrial objectives which will
be bombed. They are urged

Squire, and a Representative of the Coco-
nut Industries Board as Adviser

leeward Islands—Mr H. D. C. Moore
Trinidad—-Mr. E. Wharton, Mr. A. A
Shenfield and Mr J, Dent, Adviser.

re- Dominica-—Mr. L. A, Pinard

Grenada—Hon. J_ B. Renwick and Mr

E. G. Knight

S. Lucia—Mr. A. duBoulay, and Mr
A. M. Lewis, and Mr 8S, A. Schouten,
Advisers.

St. Vincent—Mr. E. A. C. Hughes and

Mr. A. V. Sprott, Adviser

Adviser to Chairman:--Mr. D A
cival of Development and Welfare
isation.
Secretary:

two Per
Or

ot Mr. BE. Rolfe



ne

Colas, Cigars Come

FIVE HUNDRED drums of colas
was brought by 59-ton schooner
Burma D, which arrived from
Trinidad on Friday (under Capt.
Gooding). It also brought two
crates of furniture and metal.

Also arriving on Friday was the
Motor Vessel Caribbee under Capt.
Gumbs. It brought from Dominica
two cases of cigars, four bags of
cinnamon, one bag of dried peas,
49 bags of copra. 41 casks, four
berrels, 52 crates, six boxes and
two cases of fresh fruit, four and
half bags of cocoanuts and a
ce k of cabbages.

Both vessels are consigned to the
Sc 1ooner Owners’ Association,

to hold down the thousands and

thousands of South Koreans whom
he has press-ganged into his army,

Do not let this optimism
mine, however lead you into un-
derestimating the importance of
those red circles on MacArthur's

map.

We must study deeply the les-
son of Stalin’s new quick-change
going to
them performing elsewhere yet.

London Express Service

guerillas. We are

Association

attended,
considering the very late invita-

this was fairly well

tions which were extended.

Mr.

entire camp.

We take this opportunity to
express our sincere thanks to Dr.
Kirton for allowing the boys to
camp on the grounds, and for the
other facilities extended. To all
those who in any way contributed
to ‘the success and enjoyment of
this camp, we say ‘Thank you.’

SCOUTING COMICS!

Three weeks ago ‘Jiggs’ was .
about to receive a lesson in Menda tee protects you.
Firelighting from Magg e's | Ends Asthma % Bronchitis % Hay Fever

nephew, who was a Boy Scout,
Last Tuesday scouting was again
‘Comic

playing a part in the
Section’ when Cary,

Worrell must be compli-
mented for the very valuable
assistance he rendered, and also
for the zeal with which he worked,
which was an inspiration to the

jin



“Specialist” Loads Sugar ;
“Challenger” Brings Shoes

Labourers and tally clerks were
busy at the waterfront yesterday
seeing after the loading of the
Harrison Liner Specialist which is
\aking a cargo of sugar. The Spe-
cialist arrived shortly before mid-
day on Friday and loading began
a few hours later. It is consigned
to Messrs. DaCosta & Co. Ltd.

Shortly after the Specialist was
anchored the S.S. Canadian Chal-
lenger came in sight. It arrived
via St. Lucia from Montreal with
a cargo of footwear, eggs, spruce.
and pickled meat. From Dominica
it brought mangoes, oranges. and
pears.

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see



the

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to prepare a meal of fish for HER!

Even in the Comic World scout-

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INC.

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in B, G.

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PAGE TWELVE



THE FINAL

Bs



HUTTON drives VALENTINE to boundary during England's
Hutton played one of the finest inn'ngs of his career to

first Innings on the third day of the game.
score an undefeated double century.



GODDARD, the West Indics captaia, goes down on one knee to pull a ball from WRIGHT to the
boundary curing the second day's play. Goddard played a skipper'’s innings at a critical period.



BAILEY dives to field a ball from GOMEZ off BROWN during the second day of play.
Gomez also made a gallant effort to help his team's score go past the 500 run mark.



BRIAN CLOSE RELEASED ENTERTAINED
FOR AUSTRALIAN TOUR’ W.1. TEAM






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SUNDAY ADVOCATE



WHEN the West Indies beat Enc jland im the fourth and final!
Test match at the Oval, it was their third Test victory of the!

‘our and clinched the winning of the Rubber.
Here are some incidents during this game, as the English!

selectors watch the ups and downs of fortune as the game}
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WATCHING points during the final Test match at The Oval, Test selectors
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BAILEY dives to field a ball¥rom GODDARD off BROWN during the
second day of the game at the Oval.

SUGAR RAY RETAINS
MIDDLEWEIGHT CROWN

SCRANTON, Pennsylvania, Rican contender out in 52 seconds.
































OGIO AA te!
















SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950





for long and
short drinks





In all cases of chronic constipation,
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gredients. Particularly suitable for

take
delicate people and for women DELAX 5
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b
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= Tonite Food, *Sapatogen’ com- On sate at geod chemists
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LONDON August, 26. Tes i b LONDON August 26. 1 36. His seconds had not got down Wholesale & Retail Druggist
wi Cin Hee aeakomie heel ee The West Indies cricket Team Sugar Ray adalat Oe ete: the steps when Basora hit the 136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813
The British Army today got into }atsman is the youngest cricketer Y/ere tonight entertained to dinner out Jose Basora to-night in less’ canvas for the first time as Rob- 568066.066050264.566696
the fight to. salvage Britain’s ever picked to visit Australia for 4t Savoy Hotel, London by Trini- than'a minute to defend success- inson landed a left hook on| ——=———=—-—————<{""-
cricket r€putation shattered re- {). > gland-Australia encounters. dad Leaseholds Ltd. Mr. Simon fully his Middleweight CHampion- /Basora’s right ear bringing blood.
cently by the victorious Australian ~~ ” J. Vos was in the Chair, and ¢yjp_ (Pennsylvania Version) . Basora was knocked down four
and West Indies teams. It decided Close did not represent England among the guests present were, times in a fast and furious action.
to release 19 year old Brian Close, in the Tesi series played against Sir Pelham Warner, Mr. Walter It was one of the fastest knock- The Harlem negro weighed in at
army draftee, because England the West Indies. Hammond, Mr. J. R. Jardine and cuts in Championship history, 1593/4 Ibs, Basora at 1543/4 lbs.
will need him this Winter to do —(C.P.) Mr, Herbert Sutcliffe Johnny Kelly counted the Puerte —C.P.
———— LL
* Beauty, you lifted seca Aw Dh
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And filled my heart *
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with gig wth ok exseanc Me © WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD. §
; ee ants ~
JOHN MASEFIELD Gad vaaet "ah Shain: ive ®
ar mainly on cellulose ~ & |
—— which means wood! Be t INC. IN B.G
safe — remember w& Fe eat y
<<

Tones attack
wood mere with
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Staion.
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On Sale at BOOKBER’S DRUG STORES

(B’dos)

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toughens the timber and %



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SPOS SOS SE CCE

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condition throughout its life—with spares and mechanical re-
pairs at low fixed prices! Thames Trucks carn more money
because they SAVE MORE!




CHARLES MeRNEARNEY & CO, UTD.





SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN










King Seme hex, Weed et

MICKEY MOUSE
77

| NOT FUNNY... AWAY
WITH HIM... NEXT!








GOSH..I DON'T
KNOW HOW TO BE
FUNNY! 1...

pg mmm













BLONDIE
ee 5 Si
il Eee en SuCURELL VEEN USER a pm NSAP ToD
1 | THIS House , )d En nenae an a
| mae an er tS HAUNTED. | n |
LO ee Our Service Department —



peepee eta cat At Your Service

REPAIRS TO REFRIGERATORS em
| MOTORS AND GENERATORS
DIESEL ENGINES
|
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GASOLINE ENGINES
TRACTORS

BY FRANK STRIKER
y)



=r { ~

LECTRICAL WIRING INSTALLATIONS

* COMMERCIAL
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a,

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. THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LTD.

Tweedside Road, = St. Michael =— Phone 1629 - 4371












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Sunshine and sea-bathing, sailing and fishing—whatever joys your holiday %

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= * ( Sunburn can be a very painful thing, and can spoil several days of your 3






il too short holiday, That’s why we recommend that you take along a bottle
of L.UMACOL with you when you leave for the sea-shore, because LIMACOL
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nc sting of sunburn, and will help to keep your body cool and refreshed in
ite of your overdose of sun. Try it next time you feel as if you are on
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LIMACOL

Pe? Pn, ay
aT
~

a THE FAVOURITE TOILET LOTION R
ee : OF THE CARIBBEAN 3

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[THANKS, KID...YOU 019 4 y JUST CALL ME |
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LOOKING FOR

ia —f i STEEL
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES PINKING



BOUTS & NUTS—





















& Iron & Bright Steel — All sizes $
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AG RITA AND CARY, TERRIFIED, WATCH \cOnt £° FROM THE GATE. ¥ on and Cast Iron Brass %
THE RUGGI CEREMONIES «~ [ ' — 2 &
THEY'RE COMING FOR Ss ee WE HAVE THEM % BOLT TAPS & DIES— %
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TF LA Se ape. 1” —$9.89—8 1/2” —$11.89 - 8 ASBESTOS RCPE, TAPE and 3
wh ay is FIBRE, etc. ‘
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Call early at i % FIRE CLAY, BAFFLE BRICKS, ete.
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| J YOUR JEWELLERS : we: She Kis Pod S
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po A A fea Os 3 Phone 4644 sis 0.1 % SUPPLIES. x
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A ——





-PAGE FOURTEEN



CLASSIFIED

TELEPHONE 2508





DIED

PATTERSON — William Goddard 1
night at his residence “Kens:nkion
Fontabelle. The funeral will le



dor the Westbury Cemeters
William, Daphne, Sally and
Patterson

David

IN MEMORIAM

our
wG

25th

WOODING-——In loving memor
beloved One ALPHONSYNE WO
who depevted this life on August
1944,

You live with us in memory still
Not only now, but always wiil

Lovirigly remembered by Husband and

Son, 27.8.50—1n

In loving and affectionate memory of
my beloved daughter WINIFRED A.
WIGGINS. .

Today has brought anew to us of five

years ago,

A loving daughter so gentle and kind;

When I think what a wonderful mem-
ory she left behind.

Though in sorrow yet in joy we shall
meet again and we shall know as we
were known,

The bows of the mighty men

broken and they that stumble
girded with were.

R.LP

Mother, Enid, George Clarke, G_ Pil-
grim, 27.6.'50-——in.

are
are

——Lines



Tn loving memory of our dear Dal -
ter and Sister ALBERTHA SMALL
(Dollie), who died on the 26th day of
Au , 148.

we see a precious blorsom,

That we tended with such care,

Rudey, taken from our bosom,

How our aching hearts despair!

Round her little grave we lingered

Till the setting sun was lowed

Feeling all our hopes had perished

With the flower we cherished 5o

Mf. Charles Small (Father), Gaston,
Jervis (Brothers), Tinpie, Mrs. Judith
Sherry, Maggie, Nellie (Sisters).

27.8.50—in

In_ loving memory of
BROWNE who departed
August 28th, 1949,

Deep in our hearts

kept,
We smile with the world but never
forret.

LILIAN A.
this life on

your memory ‘s











loursey Browne, Marie Small. Har-

old Straker. 27,8,50.—In.
FOR SALE
“AUTOMOTIVE

CARS-~ Four (4) V-8 Ford Sedan Cars
Two (2) Fimo Setsh Cate Ore (1)
Willys Secay Cre. Joseph Vulcanizin
Depot, Réd Bird Girage, 47 Roobee’ st

a



“in

CAR One Pr

‘uth Car M. 1931. Al
mest new, Sul'eble for tavi. 1948 model
Apply to V. E. Moore, Corner Peesage
Rd. erd Baxters Rd 27,8,50—In

nl ARG tll pabpccecippeentcecnemnternenoatitepmaipgneem

CAR—1947 Hillman Minx. 17,000 miles.
Perfect condition. Owner leaving is!and
Price $1,400.00. Greeniand. Phone 3283, or
2775. 25.8.50-—3n

TRUCK—One 1934 Ford V-8 Truck
Apply "D. V. Scott & Co. ‘Vhite Pak
x 16.8,50—t.f.n

LIVESTOCK

PUPS—Pure bred Cocker Spaniel Pups
Apri’: Mrs. 9. H. Seale, Ashbury Pltn.,
St George. Dial 9522 26.8.50—6n

MECHANICAL
AUTO BYKE—One Excelsior Auto Byke
‘with spring fork) Price $130.00. (A
Neal Bergain). Hurry to Olympic Store

Cor, James and Roebuck Stree
26.8.50—2n













BIKES. Hercules Silver King, on terms,
all models, Biack, Green. A. Barnes &
Co., Li 25,6.50—t.f.n.

MACHINE ~~ Singer Sewing Machine
ftreadie). Perfect condition, Apply to
William F. Skeete, Corner Queen Victoria
Road and Bank Hall X Poad.

2% .8.50—2n

MISCELLANEOUS
of every description
old Jewels, fine Silver,







Glas,

wee ete Beer ra Roto
graphs, » a Gerrinase ie Shop,
adjoining Yaeht ;

AAR ar amin etee
PESCHIENS SYRUP OF HEMOGLO-
BINE: The remedy for Colds par-excel-

lence; do not delay, buy a bottle and
bi your resistance. Obtainable at all
Drugsist=. 13,8.50.—-3n.



DECCA AND BRUNSWICK RECORDS
—Old Tuncs some Classical, Poplar and
Dance H'** a!! at 50 cents each. Lashleys
Limited, Pr. Wm. Hy. St. 27.8.50,—-2n,

a
GLASSWARE FROM CZECH As
KIA~Vset6, Powder wis, Cups &
Fruit “**"- reduced to helf price. See

ovr Show Windows, Knight's Lid
25.8.50—3n



IMPEX Worle’s best cycle generators
and headlights. Obta'nabie, from all lesd-





ing stores. 15 .8.50—Tn
MEN'S SOCKS—Made of Cotton and
Rayon, Geet dems. elastic tons. 1 Pr.
for 34 ernts; & Prs. for $1.00. Lashley's

Limited, Pr. Wm. Henry St
27.8.'50—2n.



arene |
PINKING SYFARS of the highest qual.

ity. Only SO.8% pend $11.98, Li-cited

quantity. See your Jewellers, ¥. De Lima

& Co,, Ltd., 20, Broad Street.

26.8. 50—Tn

;CORDS—Latest Dance Tunes and
Calypsoes at $1.08, Lashleys Limited, Pr.
Wm, Hy. St. 27.8.°50—2n

ee

RECORD ALBUMS for 10-inch and for

12-inch and carrying cases for 10-inch

records, and we breve the records too
A. BARNES & CO, LTD.

10.8. 50—t. fon



CALM-ASMINE TABLETS: why
suffer the agonising pens of su'Yoca-
tion caused by ASTHMA? CALM-

by the Leboratories of FRANCE,
can relieve the most acute attack ana
restore easy breathing. Obtainable at
Leading Druggists. 20.8.50--8n,

YAWL—“Frapida” approx. 37% feet
long with Grav Marine engine, Good
condition $3,000 — a bargain. Apply
J. R Edwards. Phone 2520,

15.8.50-—.T.F tT.

OO
WANTED
HELP

COOK--Willing to undertake general
housework, Apply: Mrs. James A, Mil-
lington, “The Nook", Worthing View,
Christ Church. 27.6.°50 —2n









QUALIFIED ELECTRICAL FOREMAN,
—Apply in person and letter stating
experience etc. to H. E. D. W. Deane,
City Garage Trading Co. Ltd., Victoria
Street 17.8.50—t.f.n.

PERSON to take charge of Office—
Male or Female. Position requires sound
bookkeeping experience, initiative and
judgment. Apply in writing only, stating
selary required to: Herbert A. } swding,
Lower Fstate Plantation, St. Michael

26.8.50—5n

MISCELLANEOUS
CRITEPON OIL STOVES.—Any con-
dition. Cantact John Shannon, c/o City
Pharmacy 27.8.50—In











PAYING GUEST -—- Wanted by Mrs.
Rose, “Mimster House", Marine Gardens
Deiightful house and garden. Every com-



fort, Good Food, Six dollars per day.
Telephone 2758. 27.8.'50,—1n,
ch het teh en ain cineca

POSITION WANTED
DENTAL THCHNICIAN with over 20
years experience in preparing and est
ing all gold fittings Acnylic processing
of portal an edentulous cases a spe-
‘y.

Modern Techn que ured in ell
Reply to Geo. Wilkins, 11,
Street, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad
% 33.8.50—6n

stare *
Picvor



— Used and Mint Postage
of Barbados and other Islands of

the WE, Curecao and Aruba. Best
Prices at Caribbean Stamp Society,
No, 10 in Street. 26.8,50—3n

WANTED TO BUY
ST. }-Used Postage Stamps of U.S
America 4nd B.W.1. Islands, James’ West
Indies Stamp Co., Bay Street. St. Mich-
ael. rig ’

WANTED TO BUY
MACHINES—Old Sewing Machines ot
or order. Any make. Good Prices paid
Corner Fairchild and Probyn Streets or
ii Street—-Mrs. Vaughan.
— 26.8.50-—2n,



his |
late residence at 4.30 this afierngon |











gentleman preferred. Phone 4420

FLAT — Upstairs Flat at Waverley,
Blue Waters Terrace.

semi-furnished with modern conveni-
ences.

large Bedreum, Dining Room, Kitchen,
(Light and Water), Apply at Westmeath,
sores of Chapman St. and White Park

THERSISDON-Maxwell's Coast Road
Pulke furnished, m September. Mrs.
hb. Lashley, Sth Bungalow, Maxwell's
Road. Dial 8417 25.8. 50—ar

Bat sheba,

25.8.50—3n |

oe

FOR RENT







HOUSES

a |

APARTMENTS — Two well-furnished, |
ol apartments @fid one unfurnished flat








with use of garden in » Gardens
Apply: Box A.A. c/o Advocate

27.8.°50—-1n

PEDROOM=Picasant Double Bedroom
for gentlemen or Young couple, Full
Laundry. Exeellent Sea Bath

sonable terms to right party
Telephone 6496 of write Box C., c/o
The Advocate 27.8.'50.—In
BEDROOM—One large bedroom, Bank |
Hall X Rd. Light and water Nurse or

27.8.50—in



8 large Bedrooms

‘Phone 8283. 20.8.50.—7n.

HOUSE—Part of house — eontaining





27.8.50—In







ADS. |



September onwards, monthly or other-
wise, 3 double bedrooms with single
Simmons bedsteads, children's room. din-
ing room and lounge. Refrigerator, gar-
age, sefvant’s room Apply Mowe.

27.8. 50—t.f.n



TRELAWNY — On the Hastings Main
Road Three bedrooms, running water in
each, Usual public ms, Servants’ room
and tollet. ‘Phone i 27,8.50—1n



WOODYARE — Pine Hill. — Furnished
From 15th September to mid January
Ring Haslett 3311 or John Bladon 4640.

26 .8.50—3n

WORTHY DOWN—Top Rock having 3
bedrooms connecting Toilet and Bath.
large Lounge-dining room. Delightful
Fully a :

8

Apply: Ralph Beard. 4683 or 2328.
25 .8.50—3n

FOR RENT OR LEASE
UNFURNISHE

D
“PARAISO”—Barbarees Road. Situ-
ated one mile from the City. Drawing
and dining room, Front and side Galleries,
Kitchenette, three large bedrooms each
with running water, modern tiled bath
with shower and tub bath with hot
weter laid on upstairs, Large games
room, bedroom with running water.
kitchen and store rooms on gtound floor
Servant’s room with toilet and bath. Gar.
age with room for two cars, Electricity
and Gas. Please ring 8382
22.8.50—t.f.n

PUBLIC SALES
AUCTION

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

BY instructions received I will sell at
my Auction Mart, Shepherd Street, on
Friday, September Ist, at 2 p.m. (1) Bar
Gender. (1) Steel Guiliteen with set
of spare jaws. (1) Galvanized Pipe Cut-
ter “%-in. to 2 in. (1) 6 cylinder Far
Pick-up (Good condition). (1) 10 HP.
Ford Prefect. (1) Standard “Royal”
Typewriter. (1) Dumpy Level with Tri-
pod and Levelling Rod. (2) Office Desks.
4 Office Chairs. (1) Electric Fan, (1!
Calculator, Catalogues, Books
Terms Cash



VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON TUESDAY 29th by order of Mrs.
BE. P. Baker, we will sell her Furniture
at “Banyan Beach", Brighton, which in-
cludes Sideboard, Serving, Coffee and
Side Tables, Arm, Morris and Easy
Chairs, Gate-Leg Tea Table; Book Case
(Glass Doors) all in Mahogany, Rugs,
Well Mirrors, Glass and China, Lloyd
Loom are Rush Chairs and Rockers; 2
Single Bedsteads with Vono Simmons
Springs, Deep-Sleep Mattresses, Mird,
Press, Dressing and Bed-side Tables,
Linen Press, all in Mahogemy; G.E
Refrigerator, 3-Burner Stoye,
Larder, Step Ladder, Palms in Cement
Pots, Pressure Cooker, Electric Iron and
other Items.

Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms Cash
BRANKER. TROTMAN < CO.,
Auctioneers

25.6.50—22n



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 31st by order of Canon
PW. D. Moore, we will sell the Purni-
ture at the Rectory, St, John,
which includes: -

Dining Table (seat 16)
Upright Chairs, Antique Couch, Sofa
(3 ft. wide) and Cellarette all in old
Mahogany: Mlat Top Pine Desks, Carved
Oak Table, Oak Bookcase (Glass Doors)
Glass & China, Electro-Lux Refrigerator,
Frigidaire, Cabinets, Ornament Tables,
White Linen Press, Children’s Bedstegds
& Beds, Mahog. M.T. Washstands &
Dressing Tables, Chamber Ware, Dress
Form, Wash Basin & Fittings, Larder.
Coal Stove, Garden Swing, Good Tennis
Net, Vauxhall 14 Motor Car in good
working order and other items.



Extension

Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms Cash
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO
Auctioneers
27.8. 50—2n



REAL ESTATE

ACT NOW! Rare Bargains Hammering
At Your Doors!--Two Large Stonewall
Residences (One Seaside, Sandy Beach),
Excellent Locations, Near Cit», Ideal fo
Guest Houses: A 3 Bedroom Bungalow
Type at Main Rd., Thornbury Hill, Near
Plaza Theatre, Modern Convéniences, A-1
Condition, Fine View, Vacant: Three—3
Bedroom Stonewall Bungalows, Almost
New, one at Fontabelle (Seaside) and Two
at Navy Gardens, Modern Conveniences'
all Going at Amazingly Low Prices. A
2! Bedroom Bungalow Type at Worthing
Main Rd. Right of Way to Sea, Modern
Conveniences, Good Condition, Over 6,000
sq. ft., Going for Only £1,850. A 3
Bedroom Bungalow Type by Bank Hall
Main Road., Modern Conveniences, Good
Condition, Spacious Yard, Going for
Only £1.150. C Me for The Most De-
sirable Stonewall Residences including
Seaside Bullding Sites — Seaside and
Elsewhere. Mortgages Arranged. Dial
311. D. F. de Abreu — The Only
Man To Sell Good and Attractive Bus
with Assured Re-Sale Values. Call at
“Olive Bough,” Hastings.



BUILDING SITES--A Most Desirable
Building Site overlooking the sea, Wor-
thing, St. Lawrence and the Golf Course
rext to “Cloud Walk” at Rendervous
Terrace, Christ Church. App\y: C. E
Clarke, 7 Swan Street. Phone 2671 or



26.8.50—2n
HOUSE—Cool furnished House, Marine
Gardens, 19,753 square feet of land,

eleven rooms and five bath rooms, two
with water heaters. Spacious Verandahs
Part mortgage no objection. Apply: Rox
A. A,, c/o Advocate, 27.8.50,—1n.

The undersigned will offer for sale at
their Office No, 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Wednesday, 30th August, 1950,
ut 2 p.m

(1) Lot 29, Navy Gardens, containing
11,008 square feet, abutting on lands
of the Marine Hotel on thg south,
and on York Road on the North.
5.994 square feet of land at Chelsea
Road, St. Michael, adjoining lands
of Mr. J. N rshall on the West
and Mr. Jobnson on the Socth.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale, apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
22.8.50—8n







HOUSE—(1) Double roof house each
29 x 12 x 8 covered with galvanise,
situated in Yearwood Land, Black Rock.
Telephone 3369 D, A. Browne
18.8.50—t.f.n.

{



~~ | (Amendment)
| Ones Gazette of Monday 28th August, 1950.

All that chattel dwelling house called
“Laurenceville’ Constitution Ruad, St
Michael. The House contains gallery,
Drawing room, 3 bedrooms, Breakfast
160M and usual out offices, Electric light

nd water service.

Inspection on application to the tenant
} The above will be set \up for sale at/
public competition at our oMee = in|
Lucas St Bridgetown, on Friday the |
lst September 1950. at 2 p.m

CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors
26.8.50--8n

SUN

GOVERNMENT NOTICES.

ATTENTION is drawn to the Contro! of Prices (Defence)
Order, 1950, No. 30 which will be published in the



2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
prices of “Cornmeal” are as follows:—

WHOLESALE PRICE
(not more than)

RETAIL PRICE

ARTICLE (not more than)







Cornmeal $8.70 per bag of 98 ibs. 10 cts. per Ib.
I
26th August, 1950.

27.8.50.—2n.



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

The Secretary of State for the Colonies has notified His Excellency
the Governor that Royal Naval Prize Money, granted under a Royal
Proclamation dated 4th March, 1949, is now available for payment to
persons residing in Barbados who are entitled thereto by reason of
service in the Naval and Marine forces of the United Kingdom.

2. Persons eligible to apply are members of the Naval and
Marine Forces raised by the Government of the United Kingdom,
crews (including certain civilians) of His Majesty's Ships and mem-
bers of the Royal Artillery, who served id) days between the 3rd
September 1939 and the 2nd September 1945 either—

(a) on the books of sea-going ships of war, or

(b) on the books of non-seagoing ships or establishments for
service in sea-going ships of war, operational coasta)
force craft, Defensively armed Merchant Ships, Merchant
Air Carrier Ships, convoy staffs, or as members of regular
erews of Combined Operations craft.

8. The legal personal representative may claim entitlement for
persons in the above categories who were killed in action at sea, died
of wounds received in or from causes directly attributabie to action at
sea, were lost at sea, or died at sea‘of injury or illness attributable to
service afloat before completing 180 days’ service, provided that when
the death occurred or the wounds, injury or illness were sustained, the
officer or man was serving in a sea-going ship of wer or on convoy
duties or in a merchant ship as a member of the gun's crew or for the
purpose of operating or maintaining naval aircraft.

4. Forms of application for Naval Prize Money can be obtained
at the Office of the Harbour and Shipping Master and must be for-
warded, when cumpleted, to the Director of Navy Accounts, Branch 3
B, Admiralty, Bath, Somerset, United Kingdom.

5. The Admiralty will be prepared to consider applications for-

warded within three months of this announcement.
26.8.50-—2n.

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION :

Applications are invited from teachers and other suitably qualified
persons for the following vacan¢ies: —
MEN
St. Mary’s Boys’ School
St. Christopher’s Boys’ School

WOMEN
St. Mary’s Girls’ School
Ebenezer Girls’ School
Bayley’s Girls’ School.
St. Christopher’s Boys’ School

2. The minimum qualification for entry to the teaching service is
the Cambridge School Certificate.

3. Applications must be submitted on the appropriate forms
(E.35(b) for men and E.35(c) for women) which may be obtained
from the Department of Education, but candidates who have already
submitted one of these forms in respect of previous vacancies (now
filled) may apply by letter accompanied by a recent testimonial,

4. Any teacher who applies for a vacancy on the staff of another
school must inform his or her present Chairman of Managers and the
Head Teacher of any application for such a transfer.

5. All applications must reach the Director of Education not later

rday, 2nd September, 1950.
a r 26.8.50—2n.



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Vacancies in the Elementary Teaching Service

Applications are invited from teachers with at least 10 years |



DAY ADVOCATE



SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950



CHURCH SERVICES | HARBOUR L0G | SHIPPING NOTICES

SUNDAY, 27th AUGUST, 1950
METHODIST
JAMES STREET: 11 aim. Rev. R
Re: Cullough, 7 p.m. Rev. H. C
yne.

AYNES BAY: 9.30 a.m. Mr. G. Mc.
A er, 7 p.m. Rev. R. Mc. Cullough

WHITEHALL: 9.30 a.m. Mr. G. Per-
kins, 7 p.m. Mr. S. Phillips.

GILL MEMORIAL: 11 a.m. Mr. F.
Moore, 7 p.m. Mr. P. Dew

HOLETOWN: 8.30 a.m.
Bannister,
BANK

me.
Mr, EZ. L.

SPKIGHTSTOWN:; 11 am. Mr. L. B
Waithe, 7 p.m. Rev. F. Lawrence.
ae 3 a.m. Rev. F. Lawrence,

â„¢, . G. Grant

Barnesba: 9.30 a.m, Rev. F. Law-
Tence, 7 p.m. Mr. N. Blackman.

BETHEL: 11 a.m. Rev. H. C. Payne.

2th at 7.30.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church Christ, Soientist,
Bridgetown, Bay Street.
ndays 11 mm, and 7 p.m,
ednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which
ae Testimonies of Christian Science
img.
ject of Lesson-Sermon: CHRIST

THE NE TAMENT
SnUnen OF GoD

ST. MICHAEL: 11 a.m. Etkstein
Village, Elder R. H. Walkes, 7 p.m.
Eckstein Village; EMier R. H. Walkes.

CHRIST CHURCH: 7 p.m. Cox Road;
Rev. E. W. Weekes.

ST. JOHN; 11 a.m, Venture; Rev
J.B. Winter.

ST. PHILIP: 11 a.m. Breretons; Rev.
E.W. Weekes.

ST.- THOMAS: 11 a.m. Bridgefield;

Rev. J. B. Winter.
ST. MAIER LUTHERAN CHURCH
7 p.m. Open ajr service; 7.15 p.m.

Wednesday at Fairehild Street.
or. CONTENT LUTHERAN CHURCH
Content, St. Thomas; 11 a.m. Rev Wm.
. O'Donohue, speaker; 4 p.m. Open

air service, 7 p.m. Fitz G. Prescot.

SALVATION ARMY

BRIDGETOWN TRAL: 11 a.m
Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Company
Meeting, 7 p.m. al



Preacher: Major ith .
WELLINGTON Srkuer: 11 a.m. Holi-

ness Meeting, 3 p.m. Company Meeting,
7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher:
Major Gibbs.

DIAMOND CORNER: 11 a.m. Holiness
Mecting, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7

-.m, Salvation Meeting. Preacher:

eutenant Moore.

cS : 11 a.m, Holiness Meeting,
ao
vation

ne,

oer Meeting, 7 p.m. Sal-

TE CORNER: 11 a.m. Holiness Meet-

a 3 p.m, Company Meeting, 7 p.m.

vation Meeting. Preacher; Major
Hollingsworth.

FOUR ROADS: 11 a.m. Holiness Meet-

. 3 p.m, Company Meeting, 7 p.m
vation Meeting. Preacher: Lieutenant

Hinds

CHECKER HALL: 11 a.m. Holiness
iny Meeting, 7
Z.

Meeting, 3 p.m. %
Preacher:

Salvation
Lieutenant Cox,
MORAVIAN CHURCHSS

ROEBUCK : 9 am ae |
Service; 10 a.m, day 1 3.
p.m. Sunday Sehoo! ening

7_p.m.
Service preacher: Rev. Ernest

GRACE HILL: 11 a.m. Morning Ser-
viee preacher: Mr. 6. R. Lewis 7 p.m.

Eveni ice a
‘FULNECK: iL a.m. Morning

11 a.m. Service
followed by Holy Comm i
Rev. Ernest New 7 mgr Ev Ser-

fteham.
p.m. Evening Ser-

VI ONTOOMERY:

vice preacher ‘
SHOP LL. ua ing Service
preacher Mr. S. Weekes. er
DUNSCOMBE: 9 a.m. Morning Ser-
vice preacher ‘ .m, Eve-
ning Service preacher . Hewitt.

ee te

teaching experience for the Headships of the following schools:— )

St. Margaret’s Mixed School, St. John —~ Grade I.

All Saints’ Boys’ School, St. Peter — Grade I.

2. The minimum professional qualification required is the Certifi-
cate A of the Department of exemption therefrom.

3. Salary will be in accordance with Government Scales for Head

4 Candidates who have already submitted application forms in
respect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, ac-
companied by a recent testimomal. All other candidates should make
form which may be obtained from the

Teachers in Elementary Schools. |

application on the appropriate
Department of Education.
the Director of Education

All applications must be in the hands ot
by Saturday, 2nd September, 1950.
26.8.50—2n.



Vacant Post of Cultivation Officer, ‘
Department of Science and Agriculiure, Barbados.

Applications are invited for the post of Cultivation Officer, De-
partment of Science and Agriculture, Barbados. Applicants should
hold the minimum qualification of the Diploma of the Imperial College
of Tropical Agriculture but consideration will be given to candidates
with the necessary experience who are not so qualified. The post is
pensionable and carries salary on scale $2,880 x $144 to $4,320. Point
of entry determihed by experience and qualifications. Applications

Director of Science and Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should reach
him not later than the 30th of September, 1950. Further details will

be supplied on request.
y brea 26.8.50—2n.

ne

Applications are invited for the post of Headmaster of the Boys’
Grammar School in St. Kitts, which will be vacated by the present
holder on the 31st December, 1950. The s:hool roll at present num-
bers 110 and courses are offered up to the Higher School Certificate

examination of Cambridge University.
2, The post is pensionable and carries a salary scale of $2,640 by

$120 to $2,880. A temporary cost of living allowance of $240 per
annum is also payable and free quarters are provided for the Head-
master. The appointment will be on probation for 2 years and subject
to the passing of satisfactory medical examination,

3. Applicants should possess a degree of a University within the
British Commonwealth, preferably in Mathematics and Physies. Teach-
ing experience will be regarded as an asset, and the appointment will
be made at a point in the salary scale commensurate with the appli-
cant’s qualification and experience.

4. Applications with at least two testimonials and photograph
should be submitted to the Administrator of St. Kitts-Nevis not latet

than the 1st Novernber, 1950.
26.8.50—2n.

nn ne En EEE cEnE

PART ONE ORDERS

by Major O. F. C. WALCOTT, ED.
Commanding,
The Barbados Regiment
Issue No. 31.
1. PARADES — Training
All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700_hours on Thursday,
Sist Aur, ‘50, for further bayonet training.
Specialist training for signallers, MT personnel and pioneers will be carried
out under platoon arrangements,
2 ANNUAL MUSKETRY COURSE
All volunteers who have not yet fired the L.M.G, must contact the Regimental
Serjeant Major as soon as possible. No names will be aceepted after the
7th Sep. ‘50,
3. HURRICANE
All members of the Signal and M.T. platouns are warned that if there is a
hurricane, they will be required to attend at HQ on_ notification, after the
cautionary warning has been given. Arrangements will be made to shelter
their families at St. Ann's Fort, if necessary, during the period of the hurricane.
4. ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING
SRD SEP. ‘50,

25th Aug. °50.

Orderly Officer — Liewt, BE. R. Goddard

Orderly Serjeant 217 L/S Blackett, L.L.
NEXT FOR DUTY

Orderly Officer — 2/Lt. S. G. Lashley

Orderly Serjeant -- 235 L/S Quintyne. K
MLD SKEWES-COX, Major;
SOLF & Adjutant;
The Barbados Regiment

PART II ORDERS

THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
25th August, 1950

SERIAL NO. 19
Sheet I & Only



1 PROMOTIONS
235 L/S Quintyne, K re
234 Cpl Williams, E. D
384 ,, Laurie, C. K '
274 L/C Blackman, H. |
407 L/C Quintyne. L. G.)
409 Reid, N. E ’
351 Pte Agard, D. H
363 ,, Hinds, H.R
2. LEAVE
206 CQMS Ish

Coy Promoted to Sit wef 25

Aug. 50
Promoted L/S wef 25

Aug, 50



Promoted to L/C wef 25 Aug 50

50 |



weeks P/Leave wef 25 Aug

M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major
8.0.L.F, & Adjutant

The Barbados Regiment

4



mentioning the names of two referees, should be addressed to the

| “+. I shall

not want”

Today through the
light shed upon the twenty-
third Psalm by the Christian
Science textbook, “Science and
Health with Key to the Scrip-
tures,” by Mary Baker Eddy,
its promise brightens into prao-
tical fulfillment.

Supply, health — whatever
is legitimately needful—is
available to man without fail,
and comes through the spirit-
ual understanding of God,
divine Love, which Christian

Anyone who thoughtfully
studies Science and Health and
puts its teachings to the test in
his daily life will find the “still
waters” of the Bible promise

Science and Health may be
bought, borrowed or read at

the Christian Science Read-
ing Rooms, 1st Floor Bowen
& Sons, Broad _ Street,
Bridgetown.

PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE

PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH

The Vi of Christ Chureh is de-
sipous of ining approximately three
(3) acres of non-agricultural land in

low Rock aréa for conversion
ito Playing field.

‘The owner of any such land, who may
}& willing to dispose of it should sub-
soit offers to the undersigned before 3ist
August, 1950, stating the exact location,
erea and price.

WOOD GODDARD,
Clerk of the Vestry.
17.8.50—3n.







NOTICE
‘ The Officers of The Good Samaritan
riendly Society request through this
riends that ‘The Raleigh Bicycle Draw-
ing’ which was to have taken place on
medium to notify their patrons and

12th August, has been postponed until
ith September, at Six O'clock at Bel-
‘vonte Hotel, Cheapside. The lucky

1 cketholder will appear next day in this
1 cwspaper.
27,.8.50—1n



NOTICE

THE SURTI UNITED Co.,
No. 23 ant Street,
ai

THE ORIENTAL,

No. 156 Roebuck Street.
Centres for high class sports wear at
bargain prices. Come in and make your
selections.

Dial 4469 and 4404.
27.8.50—2n

LIQUOk LICENSE NOTICE
The of Annetta Bryan,
holder wor license No. 194 of 1950
granted to ta Clarke in respect of

Michael,
ed the ath ay 2 Kc
a at Au; 5 >
To H. A. TALMA, weit
The Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
Signed ANNETTA BRYAN,
Appli i.
N B.—This application will oe ccnnl:
ered at & Léeensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A”, on Tuesday,
the Sth Gay of September, 1960, at 11
o'clock, &.â„¢m.



H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
27.8.50—In

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Philip H. Davidson; Sch. Bur
ma D; Sch. Rosarene; Sch. Bluenose
Mee: Sch. Zita Wondta: Sch. Francis

Smith: M.V. Blue Star: Sch. Emeline:
Sch. Belgueen: Sch. Laudalpha; Sch.
Princess Louise: Tanker Rufina: Sch.
Burma D; M.V. Caribbee; S.S. Specia-
list; Sch. Gardenia W; Sch. Interpreter,
Sch. Turtle Dove: Sch. Many M. Lewis,
Sch, Marion Belle Wolfe; Sch. Marea
Henrietta; S.S. Canadian Challenger:
Sch. Lucille M, Smith:
ARRIVALS

Sch. Lucille M. Smith, 74 tons, .
Hassell, from British Guiana, !
Messrs, Robert Thom & Co. Ltd.

Ships In Touch With
Barbados Coastai Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.,
advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their
Barbados Coast Station : S.S. Myken, S.S.
Gulf Dise, “= Oran) . 8.8. Belita,



8.8. Petter, . Beech Hill, S.S. Urugay,
S.S. Arakaka, S.S. T le Inn, S.S. At-
lantian, S.S. Sun Jewel, S.S. American
Oriole, &.S. Athe! . 8.8. Lianishen,
-. rrinaga, S.S. Esso

erett, S.S. Tamarao, S.8. Fort Char-

lotte, S.S. Buena Vista, $.S. Delaires,
§.S. Prins Bernard, S.S, Lady Nelson,
S.8. Jeanny, S.S. Tectarius, S.S, Michael
Tracy, S.S. Geirulv, S.S. Sun Avis, SS.
Mormacdawn, S.S. Rufina, S.S. Alcoa

Polaris.
SEAWELL

FROM TRINIDAD
Mr. Jajnool Hosein, Richard Barrett,
Miss Joyce Rawlins, Mrs. Ruth Laing,
Mr. Joseph Le Blane, Gladys Namsoo,
Samaroo, Miss Cynthia Beale.

Margaret be 5
Mr. D. K. Frampton, Mr. Gildard
Stoute, Mr Herbert King, TLaurino
Murray. a
FROM MONTREAL

Mr. Guy Durocher, Mrs. Laurette
Durocher, Mr Keith Gooding, Mr.
Stanley Haskell, Mrs. Edna Hutchinson
Miss Barbara Hutchinson, Mrs. Annie
Brooks Mr. Morris Proverbs, Mrs Muriel
Proverbs, Me ioe ys — Emily
Sanderson, Mr. Henry x exe
Ward, Mr. Bill Stuart, Mr Phil Clarke,
Mra. Mary Clarke, Mr Ernest mpeau,
Mrs, Yvette Campeau.



Sweet Potatoes Are
Being Reaped

For the last few months, sweet
potatoes have been scarce, but a
seller told the Advocate yesterday
that he would soon be “on the
alreai

aes t G eeittes.
to e grea .
Also obtainable too, are pumpkins.

A

CHIROPRACTIC
RESTORES HEALTH

DRS. JOS. and GLADYS FERREIRA,
gg a
method of electrical massage Phone
2881 Datly (except Holidays)



RAYMOND JORDAN is the man
to Clean your SUIT and HAT.

Bay Street, :
Opposite Combermere St.

UNBREAKABLE
GARDEN POTS

That is the name given them
by purchasers.
Have you seen them?

They are the Iron meter cases,
FOR

SALE
At Your Gas Works, Bay St.
Small size @ 1/3 medium size
2/6 and a few large ones @ 4/+
each dozen lots cheuper.





AT THE Annual General Meet-
ing of the Y.M.P.C. held at the
Club House, Beckles Road, on

} Wednesday, 29rd. August, 1950, the
{ following persons were proposed
for Membership on the Governing

as
>
=

ArmZonar sprees:

re peopered. ® ballot ‘will taice

vers pro) mu w
place at the Club House, Beckles
} Road, on Wednesday, 30th August,
1980, between the of 4 p.m
and 8 p.m, All members are kind-
iN) ly asked to a point of
tending and recording their vote

P. G. POTTER,

?

VENEZOLANOS AMIGOS

TE NEMOS ATICLOS DE

ORIENTAL

Se Habla Espanol
Curios... 1s es

THANI BROS.






Phone 2336
Industrial-Commercial
Residential
Office: Hastings Hotel Ltd.

OFFER FOR SALE

En-Dah-Win, Pine. Hill
New bungalow. Attractive
location.

‘Cove Spring House,
James.

Pine House, St. Michael.
Abbeville Guest House,
Worthing.

Dover, Christ Church. Build-
ing sites and acreage.

Rockley, Near Golf Course.
Building sites.

Block of Factory Buildings.
In the City.

Rices, St. Philip. Acreage.
27.8.50—1n,



St.





ag ys on y



The M.V. “DAERWOOD’ will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
STEAMSHIP co. St. Lucia, St, Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba. Sailing Friday, ist
SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM a
AND ER The M.V. “CARIBBES” will
ae as ‘UBA A =, = = oth accept Cargo and Passengers for

Dominica, Antigua,
Nevis and St. Kitts
Sailing Monday, 28th inst

Montserrat,

The M.V. “MONEKA” will ac
PLYMOUTH, cept Cargo and Passengers for
ANTWERP AND AMSTERDAM Dominice, Antigua, Montserrat,
1s ORANJESTAD Aug. 22nd Nevis and St. Kitts
.S. WILLEMST. Sept. 19th Stiling Friday ist September, 1080

SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO
DEMERARA, ETC.

33 COPTICA Sept. Oth.

Owners











8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD. Cooma: Sy See:
AGENTS
Canadian National Steamships
SOUTHBOUND Sails ‘ Sails Sails Arrives Sails
Montreal Halifax Boston Garbados Barbados
CANADIAN CHALLENGER . I! aug. 14 Aug. = 25 Aug. 26 A
LADY RODNEY .. ée --23 Aug. 23 Aug. 2% Aug. 6 Sept. 7 Bent.
CANADIAN CRUISER .. .. 31 Aug. 3 Sept. -= 13 Sept. 15 Sept.
LADY NELSON .. __.. ++ 11 Sept. 14 Sept. 16 Sept. 25 Sept. 26 Sept.
CANADIAN CHALLENGER . 27 Sept. 30 Sept. _ lu Oct. 10 Oct.
LADY RODNEY .._.. ..18 Oct. 16 Oct. 18 Get. (27 Oct. 28 Oct.
CANADIAN CRUISER .. -.23 Oct. 27 Oct. - 7 Nov. 7 Nov.
LADY NELSON .. + 1 Nov. 4 Nov. € Nov. 15 Nov. 16 Nov.
NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal St. John
LAI-Y RODNEY 19 Sept. 21 Sept. 2 Sept. 1 Oct. 5 Oct.
LADY NELSON 8 Oc. 10 Oct. 19 Oct. 20 Oct. 24 Oct.
LADY RODNEY 9 Nov. 11 Nov. 20 Nov. — - 21 Nov.
LADY NELSON 28 Nov. 30 Nov. 9 Dec. _ — 10 Dec.



.B.—Subject to change without notice. Ali vessels fitted with cold
bers. Passenger Fares and freight rates on application ee

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.


















TO-DAY’S |
NEWS FLASH

SAFETY RAZOR BLADES,
BRASS CHAINS,
HAIR CLIPPING

The Barry Guest House

1500 MOUNT ST.,
MONTREAL.

Homely Atmosphere,
Quiet & Restrul,

When visiting or on a business
trip.



MACHINES,
Special daily or weekly rates SHOE BRUSHES
after September Ist. all at

Reference if required



JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
& HARDWARE

$$$

We have just received - - -

Round, Square & Flat Bar Iron

Send us your orders now as stocks are moving fast.

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.
BROAD STREET and PIER HEAD




| FRESH FISH BEING SCARCE
1 Tin Fish cae } For 70c.

1 Tin Corned Beef Jj
SUPPLY LIMITED


































CRANE VILL
CRANE VIEW

These valuable Freehold properties with over 4% Acres
are offered for sale as a whole or separately. Furniture
may be taken over if required.



Full Particulars Obtainable from the Agent - - -

JOHN M. BLADON

Real Estate Agents—Auctioneers—Surveyors

Phone 4640 Plantations Building



te: te:
tet st



(|

BELIEVE IT OR NOT
TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM = {%

——————~————_\}

(With the Distinctive Flavour)

' ~~
+4)
)) is the Outstanding Blend of Yesterday,
To-day and To-morrow.
Use this Brand Always - - -
SIP IT — TO ENJOY IT.
\ Blenders - - -
John D. Taylor & Sons Ltd.
GROCERS ROEBUCK ST. DIAL 4335



Have You Thought
of Getting a

BREAKFAST |
CARRIER ?

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED SOME
IN nee
ALUMINIUM (3 Tier)
COME AND GET YOURS TO-DAY
— also —

1-PINT VACUUM THERMOS FLASKS

AND
4-PINT VACUUM ICE FLASKS
All attractively Priced

The Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
» Nos. 33 & 52 Swan Street — ’Phone 2109, 3534, or 4406 %





PSOE SOS GSES

{

+

SeSotees





SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950

Be Prepared For.
Hurricane

The hurricane season in Bar-
bados lasts from July 15th to
October 3ist, Mr. Donald Wiles,
Assistant. Colonial Secretary told
listeners to Radio Distribution on
Friday evening.

He said “We are in constant
touch with the U.S. Weather
Bureau at San Juan in Puerto
Rico and with the Air Ministry
Weather Station at Piarco in Tri-
nidad. From Puerto Rico, if
there are any signs that a hurri-
cane is forming in the Atlantic
due east of Barbados—and that ‘s
the danger area for us—a plane
is sent out to report back by
radio to San Juan. If such inves~
tigation leads the weather experts
there to think that a hurricane
is forming or has formed, we are
immediately informed. Again,
there is an airline that operates
on the route running from the
Cape Verde islands off the West
coast of Africa to Trinidad. This
is almost the exact route of the
hurricanes that might strike Bar-
bados. Constant weather reports
are made to Piarco in Trinidad,
and if a hurricane is suspected,
we in Barbados are told about it.
So you see everything possible is
being done to ensure that she
public will know of a hurricane
well in advance of its arrival—
perhaps 18 or 20 hours before it
reaches us, and if you prepare
now a lot can be done to render
your home somewhat less liable
to be destroyed. Remember what
the cautionary warning is: By day
a flag with a black square on a
red background flown at the mast

head at The Public Buildings,
Office of Harbour and Shipping
Master. South Point Lighthouse,

East Point Lighthouse, Harrison's
Point Lighthouse. Crane Hotel,
Hackleton’s Cliff, St. John, Mount
Standfast, St. James, District “B”
Police Station, District “C” Police
Station, District “D” Police Sta-
tion, District ‘“E” Police Station.
District “F” Police Station.

By night a red light will be
used instead of the flag. This
signal means that it is probable
the hurricane will hit the island,
and this is the time to go into
action immediately. When it is
cértain that a. hurricane will hit
the island two flags by day and
two red lights by night will be

You can do a lot before the
used.
You can do a lot before the
Cautionary Signal goes up, you
can make your house secure
now. See that all latches and
bolts and locks on your win-
dows and doors are in order.
If you are contemplating the
building of outside shutters to
protect your glass windows,
have them built right away.
Put in a small stock of nails
and see that a hammer is
handy. It would be sensible to
pack a box with some nonper-
ishable food—an amount that
might last a day or two—in a
container that you can pick up

easily and move to some place

of safety if you think that your

house may not stand the foree
of a hurricane.

There will be no other food
at the shelters until after the
hurricane has passed, and then
under the Emergency Feeding
Scheme which has been care-
fully worked out by the St.
Michael's Hurricane Relief
Committee, it will only be pos-
sible to give each person a
total of three hot drinks and six
biscuits within the first twenty-
four hours after the hurricane.
The food will “be carefully
rationed, and it will be a good
thing to take along some food
with you when you're going to
one of the shelters.

Find out now who is the officer
in charge of your district. These
names were published recently in
the daily newspaper. It was sug-
gested that you cut out the sections
and keep them.

It is hoped that these bui
ings will stand, and after the
hurricane has passed other ;
rangements will have to be ms 2
to house the homeless.

Decide now to which one ycu
would go, probably the nearest
one to your home.

must make it clear that
whether or not you go to one of
these shelters must be your own
decision. If you do go to a shel-
ter and it is damaged by the

hurricane and any one inside js |

injured, the Government does
accept any responsibility for
this.

If you can reach home, batten
down all windows and doors,
using some of, the nails put in
stock now. Pack up a change of
clothing. any valuables, a cup

(tin or enamel), a fork and
spoon, the food you have set
aside, a bottle of water for

drinking and put these all in a
bucket ready for handy moving
if you have to leave your home.
If you are going to one of these
shelters take these things with
you—remember take the bucket
along too—it can be used for
many purposes. Remember—a
change of clothing, food, drinking
water, cup. fork, spoon and
bucket, and if you have a storm
lantern fill it with oil and take
it with you.

At the shelter you will have
to carry out the instructions of
the wardens in charge. You
will have to help to keep the
shelters clean. A great many
people have put in a lot of work
to set up what exists at present
to preserve the safety of the
public, but the public must
make it their business to find
out as much as they can now
about the Hurricane Relief Or-
ganisation,

A Handbook has been issued
and may be purchased at the Co-
lonial Secretary’s Office for 2/6
plus 6d., for the 1950 Amend-
ments or read at the Public

Library. Pamphlets have been
posted in Public Buildings,
Churches, Schools—please stop

and read these pamphlets.





THESE ARE REAL i.
LOW PRICES “

LOVELY TAFETTA 36 ins.

71¢ a yd.

Beautiful Quality SATIN
in Pink, White, Lemon
and Blue 31 ins.

70¢ a yd.

JERSEY SILK in Pink
36 ins. wide

68¢ a yd.

WASHABLE PRINTS from
CALL TO-DAY
These and Many More Lines at:

THANI Bros.

Pr. Wm. Hry. & Swan Sts.






INSIST

TOMATO

CREAM of PEA
MIXED











ON - =

MY LADY

CANNED

Select your Favourite Variety
CREAM of
BEEF & VEGETABLES
VEGETABLES

EASY TO SERVE

EASY ON YOUR



13 Cyclists Rode

‘Lighte
ighted
TYURING THE LAST two days

13 cyclists were charged
for riding their cycles without
a light. During that period 22
traffic offences were also record-
ed.

Two cyclists were charged for
failing to stop at major roads and
two motorists for not paying
taxes on’ their motor vehicles. One
motorist was charged for driving
without due care and attention
and another for parking in a
restricted area.

‘g.yIS EXCELLENCY the Gov-
ernor will be attending the
70th Annual Meeting of the
Y.M.C.A., at the Y.M.C.A., on
Friday September 1, at 5 p.m,

The Hon. H. A. Cuke C.B.E.,
will preside and a large turn out
of members and _ subscribers is
expected.

T THE TALENT SHOW at
the Globe Theatre last
Friday night Oliver Arthur, who
sang “My Foolish Heart,” car-
ried off the First Prize.
The large crowd that attended

+. saw a keen competition between

three of the six contestants. The

. Judges, who were Mr. F. Peterkin,

Miss Thelma Sarjeant and Miss
Nancy Went, found it difficult to
choose between Oliver Arthur,
Trevor Marshall and Cosford Hus-
bands and were long in arriv-
ing at their decision.

Trevor Marshall, who san
“La Rue, La Rue,” and Cosf
Husbands with “You Do,” how-
ever tied for the second position.

HE RECENT RAINS have
afforded planters the op-
portunity to plant vegetables.



GOVERNMENT NOTICE
NOTICE

HEAVY PLOUGHS



It is hereby notified for the i
importing heavy ploughs that the M

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Without |
Lamps

'
Many weeks ago labourers could |
be seen forking the ground bu!
planting only started recently.
Already the grass and canes ih
country districts are looking
green.
PARLOUR WEDDING took
place at St. Matthias Road
recently between Mr. David Trot-
man and Miss Mabel Jackman,
formerly of Chelsea Road. The
Bride was “given away” by Mr
Seymour Blades while the duties
of bestman fall to Mr. “Doe”
White.
His Honour Mr. H. A. Talma,
Gity Police Magistrate, perform-
ed the ceremony.

A’ “AT HOME” was kept by
Mr. A. Rollock, City Mer-
chant, to welcome Mr. Roy Rol-
lock, his brother, who recently
1eturned to the island after travel-
ling between Bermuda and the
U.S.A.

He was last in Barbados 23
years ago and is on two months

holiday.

Mr. Rollock is pleased with the
progress of the island but feels
that there is scope for the tourist
trade.

He is of the opinion that the

authorities should get ahead with}

the Deep Water Harbour. )
"THE SCHOONER LUCILLE M.| |

SMITH brought 1,500 bags of} }}
rice to the island yesterday from}
British Guiana.

This vessel, which is under the
command of Capt. Hassel, also
brought 34 tons of firewood, 400
bags of charcoal and 100 drums of
cocoanut oil.

It is . censigned) to Messrs.
Robert Thom & Co. Ltd.

nformation of persons desirous of
inistry of Agriculture and Fisheries

report the availability of 15 No. 55 and 23 No. 66 John Deery heavy

sharing ploughs (unused) 3 and 4
plus to United Kingdom requireme

Suppliers are Jack Olding & Co., Hatfield, Hertfordshire.

furrows 14 inches which are sur-
nts.
Price

approximately £130 each payable in sterling.

2.
guaranteed,
3.
Supplies not later than 12 noon on































Alka-Seltzer to brin

Not a laxative,

Alka-S

MILES LABORATORIES, IN

ie

problem

A complete stock

54

SOUPS

ONION

‘FOOD BUDGET

ASK FOR --MY LADY” SOUPS AT YOUR GROCER



{

Atka-Seltzer brings pleasant relief

The same safe analgesic that re-
lieves headaches so quickly causes
quick com-
fort from muscular aches and sore-
aess. Drop one or two Alka-Seltzer
cablets in a glass.of water. Watch
\t sparkle, then drink it down. Here
is reliable First Aid—pleasant to
tak> too. Keep a package handy,

What ever your shin

DOROTHY GRAY

has a special preparation for it.

Dory Gray

BEAUTY PREPARATIONS now available at
COLLINS LTD.

Provision @f spare parts from the United Kingdom cannot be

Persons interested should get in touch with the Controller of

Tuesday, 29th August, 1950.
27.8.50.—In.

eltzer

ELKHART, IND ue S.A



se
a

of








ll
VI-STOUT
Is
HERE
AGAIN

tt

SIMEON HUNTE & SONS
LTD. - Agents.



IRON





YES, its fact..

more dentists in the U.S.A.

recommend and use IPANA

than any other tooth paste
a

We Recent U.S.A. poll





ARTIST—here's your chance of selecting what you've been

waiting for from the following :
CANVAS—Ready stretched and per yard
PALLETTES, PALLETTES KNIVES, PAINT KNIVES
DIPPERS—double and single, .
FIXATIVE and DIFFUSSERS, TURPENTINE,
LINSEED OIL, DRAWING BOOKS, ARTIST OIL PAINTS,
STUDENTS’ OIL PAINTS, POSTER COLOURS,
DRAWING PAPER, BRUSHES, ETC.

*: Also e.



DRAUGHTMAN'S SET SQUARES, RULING PENS, ETC.

ROBERTS & CO. — DIAL 3301



Chicken Haddies
Rabbit ”
Steak & Onions

Sweet Corn

Macaroni & Cheese
Apple Sauce ”



PERKINS & CO., LTD.

Roebuck Street

BEDSTEADS
—3 ft. 0 ins; 3 ft. 6 ins;
4ft. dins,

KITCHEN CHAIRS
GALVANIZED BATH PANS
—18 ins; 24 ins; 30 ins.

GALVANIZED BUCKETS
—10 ins; 14 ins.

COAL POTS
—13 ins; 14 ins,

BUCK POTS
—3-Gallon

COOKING POTS
—2-Gallon; 3-Gallon



To

VieSt

> THE VITAMIN STOUT
OBTAINABLE FROM:




SERVE

DELICACIES !!



‘SOG: nme eo




PLANTATIONS





out |

ALL GOQD DEALERS



THESE

TABLE

Microbe 5% Bottle
Macaroni Pkgs.
Cheese Tins & Ib.
Icing Sugar Pkgs.
Table Jellies Pkgs.

Golden Arrow Rum

Dial 2072 & 4502 |

LIMITED

=> oe





PAGE FIFTEEN

——-

Pe a ae
i 8s7.. = :
=a
Sanita. GIANY TIR s ¢ |
ad
That's why — ae, !

STs ae
more tons, the world over, are

hauled on Goodyear giant tires
‘than on any other make!: .

For performance—mileage—value, Goodyear
giant tires are best. They are extra-tough—
last longest — give lowest cost-per-mile.



CITY GARAGH TRADING CO, LTD.

_
OOF F995 95454454
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$57.60

FREQUENT SERVICE



VIA TRINIDAD



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$57.60

DAILY SERVICE
FROM BARBADOS

—





a EFSF SSS SS PFS OS



GRENADA

Round-Trip

$41.40

MONDAYS AND
THURSDAYS

FRPSPO OPO oO oe

ELE EEE E ELS OSES ES





MIAMI





SPECIAL EXCURSION
FARE

‘ $340.00

ys

>

$ FREQUENT FLIGHTS

LLLBDLLLLLLLLLL LLLP EL LLLP LPLL PPLE

10th ANNIVERSARY YEAR

BWI

BRITISH WEST INDIAN A



IRWAYS

Lower .f tridgetown =

PPLE COLE LSI DIS



|
|
|



PAGE SIXTEEN



‘ANNOUNCE (2 °

Tec 0)

ipoAy CENTAL DRIES
re BANNED SOOKS Cle.
yE CHEATE CARO ao




cme we oO
PUSEM

btn ae
Cis EN SA

& MISERY TP IN
AEA MC CARTHY
em. gre ts
és
SP. $4
AT US SAME

NEXT PROGRAMME (IK



2. -

“ano Now LADIES
AND CENTS — 1M SAKRRY -PLL Kea
THAT AGAIN -- GENTLEMEN — FOR THE
NEXT BA MINUTES WE ARE TH HEAR
MS SHOO TE HEAD.
Wnt PROGRAMME 1S _ HR NUGHY
ite you Ay THe OGURTES*S OF
Re WIS WHS RELIC Co.

ME FLATE IAT SHSE co.

THe MA SHOOT Man Sac ETS
# ~S a FDA aad,
SARNALLE REsrove d RY. : .
EVERLASTING CHAR E TTR #e.,:

ARST & Aor Tee LAUN DRS |
FADED FLOWER THAT

UM AGRE
FERHAPS NEXT
PUPTE YO oye
& Q@NOOZTEHEAD « — -- UN

CRE IS PART OF THE O

2 .

Lat,

HORE.

foro
& Se.

One he

A
Pe

NOTES ON
AGRICULTURE

THE rainfall for July was much
below average, but it was well
distributed, writes the Director
of Agriculture.

According to rainfall returns
received from 30 stations, situ-
ated in areas typical of the vari-
ous rainfall categories, the
average total fall for the Island
for the month was 3.46 inches.
The corresponding figure for 1919
was 2,95 inches, and the avera qe
for July for the past 100 years was
6.28 inches.

The highest total for July 195°
was 4.69 inches, measured at a
station in the parish of St. George,
and the lowest was 1.78 inches
recorded at a station in the parish
of St. James.

The young cane crop, in gen-
eral, remained green and in goocl
condition. There are, however,
some ficlds of ratoons in certain
areas which have a_ yel'owish
appearance and give the impres-
sion of suffering from lack of
moisture under their particulac
conditiens of soil tilth.

For the past twenty-one
seasons the majority of planters
in the Island have co-operated
with this Department in volun-
tarily furnishing Crop Yield
Returns giving the acreages ans
tonnages of cane harvested during
the season. This year, returns
have been received covering an
average of 31,962 acres, out of a
total of 34,241 acres reaped by
plantations. The results for the
crop reaped in 1950 have been
analysed, and the following table
gives the average tons of cane
per acre obtained for plant canes
and ratoons in the various par-
ishes of the Island, together with
the total acres of cane which wer®
to be reaped according to the
Sugar Cane Census Returns.

the month seed was distributed
to plant 314 5/6 acres made ur
as follows: — Plantations 16 acres,
Peasants 297} acres and Agricul-
tural Stations 1 7/12 acres. Ger-
mination of the seed was excel-
lent. Owners and occupiers are
informed that for this crop just
p.anted, the Barbados Cottor
.actory are offering 20 cts. per lb.
as a beginning price for clean,
mature cotton delivered to the Fac-
ory in Bridgetown. The cotton
variety trials were planted during
the month at Codrington.

The weather during the month
was relatively dry. On the whole,
however, the main food crops
which were planted early,
suffered little set back, and yams,
Indian corn, eddoes, and cassava
are growing well. Very limited
areas of sweet potatoes could b¢
planted in the circumstances
Irrigated vegetable gardens are
doing as well as could be expected
at this time of the year; beans,
shallot, carrot and beet being in
fair supply.

Plant and ratoon canes con-
tinued to make satisfactory pro-
gress. On the whole, the crop is
growing vigorously and is more
advanced than usual for this time
of the year.

‘Cotton

The demand for seed for plant-
ing in the main cotton growing
areas of St. Philip, Christ Church
ond St. Lucy has fallen short of
expectations. Good germination
was reported by growers who
planted early. Planting or supply~-
ing later in the month was limit-
ed, owing to the dry conditions.

Groundnuts

Increasing interest is being
shown in the growing of ground-
ruts. Some peasant crops are near -
ing maturit¥ and give promise of

Sugar Cane harvested by Plantations during 1950

Plant Canes

r Acres to Acre



: Ratoons of all kinds

sages Tons Acres to Acreages (ons cant

be reaped for which cane be reaped for wh ch pe> scre
according Crop per according Crop Calculated
to Sugar Yield Re- acre to Sugar Returns from Crop
Cane turns calcu- Cane Cen- were Yield
Census were re- lated sus Re- received
Returns ceived from turns Returns
Crop
Yield
Returns
St. Michael 911.00 806.37 35.9 1,361.00 1,249.23 284
Ch. Chureh 095. 1,984.47 349 2,076.00 2,050.49 28 1
St. Philip 2,415.75 2,195.75 344 2,254.25 2,105.75 29.7
St, Lucy 1,325.25 1,299.10 314 1,086.50 1,073.37 25 3
St. George * 1,354.28 1,289.34 397 2,566.47 2,407.44 33.4
St. John 1,158.25 1,134.35 384 2,808.25 2,806.48 369
St. Peter 981.00 981.00 33 6 1,794.25 1,779.25 30.2
St. James 952.00 768.07 32.6 1,528.75 1,243.03 26.9
St. Thomas 1,065.50 826.74 37.9 2,686.00 2,287.78 342
St. Joseph 529.75 512.00 36.0 1,419.25 1,311.25 33.4
St. Andrew 647.25 7.00 34.7 1,224.75 1,211.35 294



The general average tons of
cane per acre, for plant canes and
ratoons, reaped by plantations,
was 32.98 tons, the corresponding
figure for the crop reaped in 1949
was 34.97 tons. There were 1,536
more acres of canes reaped in
1950 than in 1949.

The final figure for the crop
reaped in 1950 is the equivalent
of 158,183 tons of sugar, a record
for the Island.

Provision crops made satisfac-
tory growth during the month
Sweet potatoes were in limited
supply as usual at this season.

Distribution of cotton seed for
planting commenced at the begin-
ning of the month, and during



| They'll Do It Every Time

pec Se










O.K.=GO AHEAD)
( AN’ LAFF BUT I WAS
CATCHIN’ BEHIND THE BAT,
PLAYIN’ WITH MY NEPHEWS
AND A FOUL TIP GOT ME
WHAT'S SO FUNNY ABOUT

A BLACK EYE? HOW

DID YOU THINK I











good yields within the next few
weeks, Only shortage of seed for
planting has prevented more wide-
spread cultivation of the Crop.
Cultivators are being urged to
avoid, as far as possible a_ re-
currence of this handicap.

Tree Crops
Good supplies of mangoes, sugar
apples, cocoanuts and limes were
obtainable in the market during
the month. :
Pests and Diseases
Control measures were continued
ogainst plant pests and diseases,
especially the cabbage white but-
terfly, scale insects and slugs,
which were reported attacking
crops in some districts.

Registered ¥. & Patent Oflee



HIS WIFE 2 AND WHAT IN ALL BEAT UP IT WAS 4 aoe
ABOUT THE SCRATCHES? j{ HS WIFE'S PRESERVES )”:
ywer HAVE EEN THAT EXPLODED +++ Ba + BARBADOS
i} LL Wi
AMATEUR BOXING



edhah IN [Tes



sai



4


















SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Peasant Livestock
supply of Concentrated
showed marked improve-

The
feed
ment, and was almost normal by

the end of the month In many
districts, however, it was difficult
to obtain supplies of succulent
fodder.

Extension Work

The Peasant Agricultural In-
structors visited 792 peasant hold-
ings and 23 school gardens during
the month, Nine mango trees
were top-worked.

Four soil conservation projects
were undertaken in July. Heavy
cultivation work on most peasant
holdings has been completed for
the present. It is expected, how-
ever, that further soil conservation
projects will be undertaken next
month

Irrigation

Under the provisions of the
Colonial Development and Wel-
fare Scheme, peasants continued
to receive assistance with the in-
stallation of new irrigation units
as well as with improvements to
existing units,

Crop Husbandry

Work was continued on the lay-
ing down of the peasants’ investi-
gational units at The Home, Sayes
Court, Jerusalem and Haggatts.
Ploughing and heavy forking were
completed during the month and
all fields have now been laid out
on the contour. Planting of cot-
ton, Guinea corn, fodder and
food crops is proceeding. At
each of these Stations a banana
plot is also being established.

Livestock

The total number of livestock at
the six stations at the end of the
month was 132, Five hundred and
seventy-two gallons of cow’s milk
were produced. Three young pigs
were sold for rearing: and 4 head
of elder stock sold for slaughter.



Distribution of Ornamental
Plants

Six hundred and ten ornamental
plants of different species were
distributed.

Afforestation
Two hundred and ten casuarina
trees were planted at Needham’s
Point, the Garrison. during the
month of July. Casuarina seeds
were collected for sowing at later
dates.

Control of Moth Borer

During July 53,603,000 egg para-
sites Trichogramma were bred up,
and 46,903,000 were made avail-
able for distributi to planters.
This makes the tofal number of
parasites liberated for the year t
315,000,000. During the latter part
of the month there was a reduction
in number of planters who called
for their quota .of parasites, with
the result, that a surplus of para-
sites remained on cold storage, ard
was eventually distributed depart-
mentally. This reduction is possi-
bly due to the favourable weatner
conditions prevailing, which have
caused rapid growth of plant
canes, rendering access through
them difficult.

The breeding of the Lixophaga
fly parasite continued during the
month.

Counts were continued of moth
borer Diatraea egg deposition and
parasitism in the entomological
cane plots at Codrington.

Cane Root Borer, A survey was
made in parts of St. Peter, St.
Philip and Christ Church to ascer-
tain the damage root borer caused
to ratoon and plant cane fields.



Some ratoon fields showed moder-
atc infestation, which caused the
canes Ww be of a yellowish appeur-
ance, and patchy growth. Sonik

pluni cane fields were also slightly
afiected by the root borer

Cabbage and Caulifiower ec.
The rearing of ihe Pteromalus
parasite for the control of the

white butterfly puparia P. monuste
continued, and 5,758 parasites
were bred up and liberated. This
brings the total for the year tu
109) 863 Pteromalus parasites bred

up.
Weod Ant Control. Inspections
were continued during the month

CHEMICAL

Twenty-five soil samples
total organic

Soils,
were analysed for
carbon content,

Six samples were completed for
total phosphate content.

Three soil samples were selecteo
for the laboratory investigation
into the persistency of B.H.C. in
Coral Limestone soils. Determina-
tions of pH and free CaCo3 were
carried out on these samples.

Field. Twelve soil samples
were taken from fields at Black-
mans Plantation in connectiv:
with an investigation in the soil
potash status,

Four soil samples, two fro
eroded slope, and two trom t
detrital zone at Durants Plaut: -
tion in connection with the inve:
tigation of soil nutrient losses dus
to erosion.

General Analytical Work. The
following samples were receiveâ„¢
and analysed in the Laboratory: --

Forty-nine samples consisting G:

milks, counterfeiting exhibits.

water, rum, tea and cocoa es-
sences, edible oil and feeding
stuffs submitted by the Police

* Authorities.

Twelve samples consisting of

feeding stuffs. gasolene and fuel

oils, condensed milk and milk

powders, tinned meat with
cereal and butter concentrate

« July, 1949 July, 1950 Jan.-July Jan.-July
. 1949 1950
2,995 26,480 218,311 247,825
B'town Fish Market 11,645 22,638 92,880 104,053
Rural Market Sheds 4,880 1,220
Oistin’s Fish Market iu (June & July!



Communist China
To Be Represented

In U.N. Assembly

i @ from page 1
to the preceding President of the
General Assembly, General
‘Romulo last November, January,
‘February and May.

These notes also stated that
Chiang Wen Tien had _ been
appointed the Peking representa-
tive to United Nations meetings
including the Security Council.

The telegram added according
to Moscow radio “in spite of this,
the illegal delegation of the rem-
nant of the Chinese Kuomintang
reactionary clique have not up io
now been expelled from the United
Nations and from its various
bodies,

“I consider this not only a viola-
tion of the United Nations Char-
ter, but it also ignores the legiti-
mate demands of the population
of the Chinese Peoples ublic.

—Reuter.




submitted by the Customs Au-
thorities for classification
Sixty-five samples consisting of
&C. disinfectant submitted by
rnilks, feeding stufis, soil and
oficial departments

Nine miscellaneous samples con-
sisting of milks, fancy molasses
and one industrial thermometer
for checking calibration

Plant Diseases

Mosaic. Nineteen returns wei?
received during July under tbe
Mosaic Disease (Eradication) Act.
1943-22. No infected holes were re-
ported for this period. Owners
and occupiers are reminded that
failure to make the necessary re-
turns is a breach of the law.

Ce‘ton Inspections. The search
fer wild cotton trees was contin—
ued and 279 trees were found,

Fisheries

During the month the sum ot
$1,134.53 was repaid by boat own--
ers as loans issued by the Fishery
Advisory Committee. This brings
the total amount repaid to date
to $49,654.27. The amount of in-
terest paid for he morth was
©5.15 making a total of $583.12
paid to date. The sum of $666.70
was issued in loans for the month.
This makes a total of $88,732.13
loaned to boat owners to date.

July marked the end of the
fishing season and all flying fish
Loats were hauled up for repairs
ey refitting. A‘ the end of July,
f-ce taken by the tractor at
Lathsheba for hauling up boats
emounted to $251.66.

Returns of fish at the several
marketing centres were moderate,
and a total of 26,480 lb. of fish
were marketed through the
bridgetown Fish Market. Append—
ed below is a comparison of re-
turns from the Bridgetown Fish
Market and the Rural. Market
Sheds for like periods of 1949 and
1950 as well as returns from the
Oistin’s Fish Market for 1950.

Fish Marketed, 1b


































ANNUAL -
DANCE

of the
FORTRESS
CLUB

at Queen's Park

on Friday, ist. September, 1950
Music by Mr. C. B. Browne’s Orchestra
Dancing 9 p.m. — Admission 3/-

|



Tickets must be presented on admission.



Remember!
1950's Biggest Event

COTTON DRESS DANCE

QUEEN'S PARK
Saturday Nite Sept, 2nd 1950
Admission 3/-
CLEVIE GITTENS & His ork.

Suppers Served.
27.8.50—2n.







Hello Boys and Girls! What's On?

A Grand Dance





SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950



[So ST SSS SS








PERFUMES THAT
LAST

GOYA—Perfumes, Colognes
Powder (Face and Bath)

A very beautiful assortment
to cheose from

THE COSMOPOLITAN

DAY PHONES 2041 & 444;
NIGHT PHONE 41-4)














Variety of

Shades

AT

| CAVE SHEPHERD
& CO, LTD.

10, 11, 12 and 13 Broad Street.







MERE

GRAPES Se

Luscious, Juicy, Delicious
GET THESE WHILE THEY LAST

; F 8
cod

ASSORTED JAMS<6 Tins for $1.44
“{ Pks CAKE MUX-—per pk 25.
In VANILLA, CHOCOLATE, ORANGE, GINGER

Large Bots SOUTH AFRICAN
BRANDY-=per bot





$3.00







ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO., Ltd.

HIGH STREET.





WHO WAS PITCHIN’? Wf ‘ve LAST TIME HE CAME

HE, WAS TALKING
TO SOME LAWYER
OVER THE PHONE ABOUT )
MENTAL CRUELTY **+
GUESS HE'S SUING
THE BALL TEAMS





=
=
/ = ,
ee ee Wa ills AINE Dee: Eta




































Four hundred and twenty-fiv
stud services were paic fcr: he will be given by
stations LOUIS GILL .and
LIVINGSTONE WARD
BOTANICAL (better known as Livie)
ion Sk
i Sy? .P Road
Ligh yy tl ; CLUB WILLOW, Passage Ro
The (pplication of strong arti- Reo MONDAY NIGHT, 28th August,
eis chi to the su an r- Ci
he : ei ! ound ‘s ¢ ene eh Mei nee SUBSCRIPTION $33 2/-
pes ted to result in the suppression iy ONE Music by Meta Browne's
of fowering. With a light of is me Sadia eais

suitable intensity, an exposure of
as little as one minut» at midnight
is reported to be sufficient to stop
arrowing. .To test the effect of
artificial light in Barbados, a
battery of six lights has been
erected at Society over a field of
B.4098 plant canes, These will be
exposed to fifteen minutes artificial
light every night from the middle
of August until about the middle
of October.

Economic Tree Propagation
and Distribution

Please Invite Your Friends.
27.8.50—I1n

ONE










MR. J. K. HUNTE

requests the pleasure of your
company to his

BIRTHNIGHT DANCE

iat:
THE CHILDREN'S GOODWILL
LEAGUE



ONE-O-ONE CLEANSER, the Cleanser in the large
Blue Drum—when you buy 1-0-1 you get 26 ozs. of the






i 3 7 WEDNESDAY. NIGHT, 30TH
world’s finest Cleanser for only 22c. 1-0-1 cleans with- AVGQUET § «tet




Admission:
The following fruit trees were out scratching, when you or nser j -0- GENTS 2/- ::: LADIES 1/6
budded during the month:— lime f & y der Cleanser just say 1-0-1 Music by Mr. Perey Green's
195, orange 80, lemon 36, pomelo Obtainable from all Groceries, Druggists and Hard- Refreshments on Sale

26. Fruit trees delivered from

Codrington were as follows:—
Orange .....-+++ 68
Grapefruit
Lim

27.8.'50—In,

ware Stores, in fact obtainable everywhere. |



MR. CECIL LUCAS
invites you to his


















Pomeélo .....ccsesesecee :
POAT sce cssec sre ner eves
ens os ce ats 5 ANNUAL DANCE z
Golden Apple .....--+-++ 7 On TUESDAY NIGHT, STH
Guava ..ccceceeeveeeees 17 SEPTEMBER, 1950
Pawpaw .....0--see ents 13 AT ST. CATHERINE’S SOCIAL
Sugar Apple .......555: 2 Aces af
Fig cc eeceeeeeeeeeeere 4 GENTS 2/- 2: LADIES 1/6
ovens Music by panne aeey Green's
Total .....sssses0es 285 Transportation “wil be available
Town and Country before and



after Dance
Bar Solid—Please extend this
Invitation
27.8.'50—In.

By Jimmy Hatlo
















I THINK HE
GOT IT CLOSED
FOR TAKING TOO
MANY EYE-
OPENERS =>

ASSOCIATION

Under the Distinguished
Patronage
His Excellency the Governor

Cail in To-day and inspect












our range of Tropical










Suiting, Specially Selected






announces
A Series of Thrilling Con-
tests on the night of - -

4th SEPTEMBER
at 8 o’clock

At the MODERN HIGH
SCHOOL STADIUM




for your comfort in this

warin weather.

REASONABLY PRICED







TAILORED TO PLEASE
+

P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd. |
TOP SCORERS | IN TAILORIN |

|
Entire proceeds in aid of the
Bay Street Boys’ Club |
|

|

|

|





The Police Band will play |
Popular Prices:



OFFICE QUIXOTE
EXPLAIN HIS LATEST |
BRUISES**s THANX To |

BILL M€ CLEARY
M496 47HAVE.,NEW YORK, N.Y.
en cls



BAR & REFRESHMENTS |ff|§
17.8.550—5n. || %

y

|





SSS SESS =
SOSTSSSTIOOD > os POF
x POPOEOP EPSPS DPOE PP SO SPSS A SOOO A CESPOT,






We can supply from stock ex recent arrivals

B.R.C. Metal Fabric

NO. 9 MEDIUM WEIGHT
NO. 14 LIGHT WEIGHT

in rolls 3” x 12” mesh 7 wide

Expanded Metal Sheets

















Iron 4” mesh 4 x 8
ee a ae
Be ap oe a ae
Oe ik Sigg sy: ee RA

Galv. 4” mesh 2' x 8’

Bienvenida Cordial

Nuestra casa ofrece todas las
elegancias en trajes de primera clase.
Sefioras y Sejiores pueden vestirse
ripida y c6modamente. Por qué no
aprovechar esta oportunidad ?

Tenemos siempre los mejores materiales
Todo es
Sobretodo

nuestra casa esti especialmente equipada

ingleses al mejor precio.

moderno y muy satisfactorio.

para hacerles sus trajes segiin sus deseos.

Sus amigos en Barbados son :—

C.B. Rice Y Cia

Sastres de Primera Clase
Bolton Lane & Victoria Street.
Bridgetown.



POSSE SOOSOO GOSS FOSD aisaiisiiipihaimeseaiadidal

\



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PAGE 1

V T e BVNDAT, .ur.rsr 21. 1850 SUNDAY ADVOCAIt PAdK III \ i N £L COMM4iVDOS 2/? Y A QUICK-CHANGE ACT 1 O F .Hi UM m-irkm* m-ip in Genera! Mi | •jMP 1 1 jaBf room. the | V* 1 :hr n le village of Piaan^^M. Mhind the Amu CO II.. \.,k Be circle is in red. That Is ^ %  colour used by Mac Arthur* ^B to distinguish enemy units Mat there is no divisional or rrgiJBantal number to g> wtfti it. ui %  9is with imi ilisposiUons ide the Nd i three words and a tlgurr tfugees rommflinl .loproxi%  ly 30.0Q07' circle on hi id Pisandong ami thoaa other refugee*infested area* t iepn.'M-ut lha generalix* tilling tribute to the wsful. BBMl dongenAi* ^^^hunplest of The secret weapon:. ^^pcknl from the Soviet unnKorean war On 'The New Enemy in Disguise* SI I IO\ IIIa Ml K IM IL SUNG. hira-ed by tlu disruption of cam 'apon, moreover whirh is effective even to-day the Communists in Koren s taggering under blows fnm. Wm e\i r-increasing dtployment at Un. % %  • i Si i-.es air power against "ass* %  pett* -fll me we cun look ird to seeing It used more ion vherever the Soviet is %  d to the WW Three Jobs WHETHER it is a cold war shootiiig war. in ASM Europe, the principle of the ^•pon will be the uime. Put in MaV simpler tenns, ii is the use of %  nick-change jrli>t '.MM ^^H women. ^n Europe's cold war Hien JII'> stir up trouble by |ling not as Communist or Busi, but ostensibly as agents of • other Power or authority, %  n Korea, their main jobs so far I'ftkve been; To infiltrate behind the and attack the Americans in the rear. In this they have been successful, we are Sold, on several occasions. 2. Tu act as spies and saboteurs. S. Musi important of all to m* miiHl -to tause a conflict betwei the Amei leans and the Korean civil pnimiaiinti Me %  nban oi this aiievial corps are ti a special division of the North Korean Communist Army, which acts as tile i'.n.-ni org lor all guerrilla' %  BSBMBM srhsibmr '"ffii'w H BOB suitable for their mission. On" moment they will be in the front tkafl as correctly uniformed soldiers of the Nortu Korean army. Next they will ii-trying to sneak into the American lines dressed In American steel helmuU and those shapeless grev. fatigues which til's are wearing „, Korea MocARTHUR RED-RINGS' A VILLAGE In the Wjegwan acroaa a battery which had been forced So change its position four in occupied South Korea, ,s ld.cl>' tunes In two days because of the •* on to be faced with a strong enemy 'a ability to locate and Fifth Column movement a. r,ume. bombard It before It had settled The Americans are taking m<-wires which seem to nte Then General Hobart day. admirably calculated :o help commander of the 1st Cavahy ssjeh development: — gave the order thai ail New Arm* (\N one occasion when they KJ wc-e up against the 2S*h Division many of wnose soldiers are coloured men they went so far as to black their faces liko coons In a seaside minstrel troupe. But the (wraurita trlok Ii to put on the wide-brimmed straw Ml white homespun coat am! jodhpurs of the Korean peasant and Join the trek of heavily laden icfugees fleeing from the fir tlirough the American lines. As oiten a> not they will leave their arms iiehind ihem. There an plenty of arms caches whic'i were prepared before the Communists invaded Korea where they can pick up all they need Or they can get one of the oil peasant women to stack her bun... TRIBUTE TO A KEY WEAPON die with weapons and animunIUOD, What could be simpler or more normal than for a tired refugee to sit down on a hilltop from which he can see the Americans moving up a road to the front and installing their artillery' in the bed of a ilrieJ-up *ti< What more natural than that u large party of peasants should cross the mountains by normally unused paths In order to escape from the Communists? I have CM oil again ;-nd again. It Warned T HE successful attack by the Communists a week ago on Pohang was largely the work of guerilla troops disguised as peasant relugecs. efngees were to be moved out of the area within 24 hours and that any Koreans found there altar that were to be shot. It worked liul just think what it means to the Americans to have to regard all Koreans here as enemies. Just 'ry u> estimate the i>olitlcal damage to them of having to nark up as hostile the 30,000 awn women and children arund llang in his own territory, and I'isamlong the vast majority of w.inir. are certain to he genuine nlugees. Nazi Plane HEN I talked with Ooebbels's number one propaganHans FriUsehe. after South Korean guertr. 1 tettV ii.rnta ha\-c been forme I and •ire already marauding rehind the Communist lines. (' %  kmmaikdo raids have la.111 place within the last few days in which successively, a tunnel was blown up on the northeast coast an 1 two islands overwhelmed. I. leaflets have been ircppci varning the inhabitants .l Un towns In Cosnmun is*hvld territory that then cities are strategic in 1 MIdustrial objectivewhi h will be bombed. They urc urged to get out. r"MIK Americans aie Uius already preparing to create a refugeepopulation in CommunistOils And Fats THE Fourth Meeting and Fat* < 11 open at Hastings House on Tuesday. zBlh August, under the Chairmanship -, S.,Qasjgsja Se.1 K C H (. Comptroller for Development ant Waafara Those attending the Conference besides the Chairman nrr as folBarN .lo* Hon. r J PXti*. and Mr A 0*1. LmiM ,.nd Mr K AaMaan Hrlli*h Oulax* Mr U II CnnnKri Januara D C PentUHin. Ur A V. I Rrvrraxtlalivr n* in* (".>(> %  nu liuL.-lnr. Ihxr.l .. A.1* I M law* *•) l.uitd* Mr II t' T.II.HIMI Mi r. WHaitn". Mi A A SnniArld and Mr I, Dj Mr I, A (Jrncla Hurt J R BamBtrl. and Mr II li Krtlahl —— and Wvllan< Holfr w, "111. nnin rutuiiir, ami %  > %  — -, amtiiUal In lli€ Nuroiibcr. lri.il. held urrtury. I.o luld me Ihut BrlUln', |llli...i g* P"*' !" •"" PWKM 'r -. ,.i_...would have hlled comKim II Sumi. Uuel by dw lil.tfly bul for one thing. "d nlfhl lr-md> will crrlalnly Wlun vour ivnu Mualulnhlf no ""r II. vii-K-l. you forced u lo lake w"h to (or MacAnhur-. Oeneral measures %  aalnat the whole Caeoh Walker. nation which estranged Ihem trom decroM unu. and drove Ihem Inlo you, J^^ m ^ 0 ^"S u"T-i '''TK.; ..l.lpellvp nt North Koies't ir l '* orce nd ^^^"y ,l wi U K,m P n b)< SuS-. r ?ulcT-c^ngV more and more difhcult for him artist Commando* is .0 achieve U> hold down the thousands and lust this and clearly the greatest thousands of South Koreans whom eaie has lo be token >•* to help he has press-ganged into his army lncm Do not let this optlminn oi Thore is one big conaolailon mine, however lead you into unnowever. If the Korean wai derestlmaUng the Importance of continue* to go as it has been those red circles on MacArthur going these last days, the damage map. which **"th Column eoup can We must study deeply the les do may well become p.vgresslvcly aon of Stalin"* new quick-change smaller. Especially as it had been guerillas. We are going to see prepared to coincide with the them performing elsewhere yet. ... -i knock-out offensive. London Express Service Coiaa, Cigars Came I 1VE HUNDHED drums of colas wi.. brouRht ba II last sthoaaasT Burma D, which arrived from Tilnidad on Friday (under t'apt 3 kodiug). It also brought 1.ites of furniture and metal Also arriving on Friday was the loto. VSSS*. ("arlbhec under Capt. lambs. It brought from l*oriiiiiua wo cases of cigars, four bags of 1 1 moil, one bag of dried peas. '* bags of copra. -II casks, four Bl crates, six boxes and v 1 cases of fresh fruit, four and naif bags of cocoanuts am 1 Vt of cabbages. loth vessels are MesjtgXsMl lo I* iisomr Owners' Association. TANKER HERE FOR 3 MONTHS > %  The tanker Servitor which has in port for 17 days already pacts lo be anchored off the luatlc Club for 3 months. This because the Servitor brought 100 barrels of terolas for use on new runway at Scawell, while B.U.O.C. tank that is reiving It has a capacity of only ,000 barrels. Capt. B. Borrey, Master of the KOI. told the Advocate that -ill be making trips here w>th Iterolas until the new runway at Seawell is complete 1 He said that the truck which Is eonveylng the terolas from the IB.U O C tank to BssV Harrv very little and this also add* %  D the delay. m Terolas is specially made foi Runways and contains 50% water. Kit is heavier than oil and will %  turn to a solid block if exposed %  to the wind. Ii will also turn %  hard If it comes into contact with I salt water. I Capt. Baney said, before the I Servitor took its load of terolas I from Point Fortin, therefore, the I tanks had to be steamed and I washed out and all water in them ballad out. The pipe llnea were also dried and the tanks were afterwards inspected by a chemist from the United British Oilfields at Point Fortin. The captain suid that terolas was also used on the runways at Th Weather awsa Mat a. put iim.li. (full MOOU) IIIBII Water: 3 1ft s-m.. 4 11 p m YESTERDAY Temperature lMln.1 72.5 F Wind Velocity: 6 mile* per hour Wind IlireeUon: 9 a.m.. E, 11 a m.. E by N l ui 11 Katnfall Itu dale) 7.29 Inches Barometer: 9 a.m. 29 914, 11 A m 39 ilOH Plareo and on the American Base at Waller Field. The Servitor was built in IVanca in 1923 as a bunkering barge. It afterward? changed hands with the Dutch and was bought by Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd. in 1929. It is at present owned by the Trinidad Shipping Company and was chartered locally to bring terolas to Barbados. It carries a crew of 14. In the evening some of the crew go ashore but a skeleton crew is always left on board. Captain Barzey. who hairs from San Fernando. Trinidad, has been Master of the vessel for the past three months. H e said that thu vessel can only do about four knots per hour under power. When they were coming to Barbados It was towed by a supply %  hip until it was about seven miles off the island. He explained that tin' tWttOaT run sail from Barbados to Trinidad but cannot sail against the H4a when coming from Trinidad to Barbados. They had a very good crossing until they were near to Barbados when the vessel began to roll In large swells. The Servitor also brought about four cylindrical tanks, each about forty feet lonp, which were unloaded in Carlisle Bay and afterwards taken to Spring Garden Captain Barzey said that in Trinidad he was informed that ns soon as he is ready to sail out of Carlisle Bay he will be given 9.000 tons of fresh water as ballast. Sraaiil Notts*! Boy Scouts Association BACK PROM CAMP THE 79th Barbados (St. 1'atrick's B.C.) Troop which waa 11 .amp at Barrows. St. Lucy, from Saturday 19th broke camp >esterday morning. The Scoutmaster, Mr. S J. Flemmlng. was in charge, assisted by A.S.M. Mr. Q. Hutson Clifford and Mr. Worrell. A very well varied and balanced piogramme was ariaitged, and de%  pHa the Inclemency of the weather, the entire programme WJS carried out. 'It-, included Nature Trails. Hiker, Tracking. Signalling. Pioneering, and First Aid. and was climaxed with a "Wide Game' which called for the usn of ul| these on Friday evening. The 'Story' on which this gam*, was based was about Indian warfare, was written In code, and before the boys could start thll had to be decided. Having dona so. they were divided Into special jiatrols and given two sets of intniitlons, also In code, to be o'sPtied at specified places. Tho boys, carrying out the Instructions, brought the game to u successful completion. On Friday night a 'Campflre* was held, and this was fairly well attended, considering the very late .nvltatloiM which were extended. Mr Worrell must be complim-ntcd for the very valuable assistance he rendered, and also for the zeal with which he worked. wnich waa an Inspiration to the mHra ramp. We take this opportunity to express our sincere thanks to Dr. Klrton for allowing the boys lo camp on the grounds, and for the oilier facilities extended To all those who in any way contributed to the success and enjoyment of ihiramp, we say Thank you SCOUTING COMICS! Three weeks ago Jiggi>' ^a> at ul tu receive a lesson In Fli (flighting from Magg e' tRvhcw, who waa a Boy Bcottl Lgst Tuesday scouting was again playing a part In the 'Come Section' when Cary. m the •"Plantom") despite the taunts of Rita, used tact In lighting a ft to 1 repare a meal of fish for HER! Even In the Comic World scouting is doing its work. "Specialist" Loads Sugar; Challenger" Brings Shoes IjilMHircrs and tally clerks v biis> at the watetfionl M'siiiil.i aging afti't (he loading of (he !ln n Mnrt SwctglaM which I. '..iking a cargo of sugar. The Npeuiii.f arrived shortly before midday on Friday and loading began few hour* later. It Is consigned to Messrs. DaCosta ft Co. Ltd. Shortly after the .S'peciaiii! mcbored the S.S. Canadian Cheicnyer came In sight. It arrived ,'i.i St Lucia from Montreal with > cargo of footwear, eggs, spruce, and pickled meat. From Dominica it brought mangoes, oranges, and Eiastoplast FIRST AID DRFSSINGS <^*g* W ,TH THB SKIN; ^ •--' Se cowforBsMs ta nnvMot OWaa fsmow* drMungi •nabhi you lo wort anal pa*y I ama a iasa aas. a sa s ss ai of a s s sa a sg ag far I ulM.iWmy (u,te*s,i>' flAITIC COMP \ \\ I / LAtwm AT \ x >^-<<^ THE mm HUBBUCKS PERMANENT GREEN No. 112 Throimrmut IhiKlubr from th* Ironio, lo ih. frox.-n North. IIUBBUCK'S PGRMANKNT GREEN PAINT enjoys %  high Minii.iiii.il for IU weather-reslsllnie qualilirs and reliability under the moat Mating climatic conditions. At homp and abroad it is dally proving itself, in a thousand different ways, the most durable of all Asthma Mucus Dissolved 1st. Day I Aalima anrl : %  ;;.! • "*'' ruin yiiur hralili ati-l %  >•> % %  fcrail In Imlnum Maodaco—in-1*1 1.1 i. ..( • f.iii.. .1,1. I... it. ,,!,i,., 1 the blond. .1 ui. lilt .lulling tha allai *-r nral dar Ihairai>|lln( mucyi aolvatl. ilnja ai'lruf fraa, *aay txealliiiia; and raallul al—p. N dipaa ix. iniokas, n.> %  ,. ii.... Jaal Dak* plHMfll lUlsUsi %  ••(• %  aio raJ.lrf. al maala and ba ,nin.-i t 'rra froin AIIMM an.I llrorxhllla In nH IS mi iim-. a> Ihi.iijh ou may hava ...1Inra lor yaara ManSaca la ao ati,. ..-fuj oval II la %  oarant—* %  If (HTsuasivcly and forcefully, you have an immense advantage in v<>ur professional work as well as in social life. 'In Evprylhlni la explained with the utmoat umplicity. (t You are not required to memorise tedious ll*ts of rules. ITS HERE AGAIN/ Startling Predictions In Your Horoscope Your Real Life Told Free • .-.-York, lhat T Uularla* Ml •yilvm Tabora will your Aatral lnlrrpr*-Ulx.n h'rn >our full nama IMI inrl dau of birth It -rilt.. l younwH. No motva> irkablo accuracy of Ma aiMatitxivil yffu ar.d your aflalri Wri'.in>lii ASdraa*: PUM3BT TABORX. Dapi 11B. Upt-r PorlaO *oa*> rjo(T*.^> %  ii,d.. tasvasi ^ ii"i• H WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD. INC. in B. G. NEW! NEW! NEW! A new Shipment of . MOSS CREPE in several delightful shades "the ideal material for Weddings" I Thousand* of men and women Bra handicapped because they cannot speak and wrile English correctly. Every day you may be committing mistakes that depreciata n the eyes if others. Aro urc of your upelllng'' For Instance, do you write IU.C ar .ui,:-brnrfltted or benetlter!. slrlthl or all rlaht? \h> you (Eturnblt' Over piomn••lation? For example, can vou (>-onounce amateur, hosriUMe, in\-nta>r>. n-oblt* Hnd sebra cometl;/? Is your aramin. Can j ou depend upon your Kn|[U*h no) "IIUIIIK you down"? .11.11 iUmfiilviwv The Regent way to the mastery of English i* the sure way and lha svwft way. Vou can study the I "' '''' English Course in the odd mlnUtM (.f the day. The Course is so planncii that you make definite progress from %  first le*son. It will eituip yuu to Bpaak Bttd write correctly and lo U -\\ It will give yotl enable you to make the right Impression '"i Writ* today for details, and learn how friendly and thoiough is the method of tuition by post. #>/ I his I „..p,,r. VOII THE REGENT INSTITUTE i li.-l.i .-."111 i. Palace Gale. London, W.8. England rirj.r ,.ii,i r„.—without i.hli. iiii.ii—s Irrr copr of "Word Msstrrr". dnrrlblns roar Postal tours* In Effective EDlUsh and' tlir speelal srrsnirmrnts for ov.ra.ss students. NAME (Block Lettarsl ADDRESS



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SCNDAY, AlC.l'ST*?. IMU SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIFTEEN Be Prepared For Hurricane Tin' huiTMftUc Mthin in Barbados lasts from Julv ,51!, tu Octobgr Sill. Mr. Dunald Will*. Assistant Colonial Sei: : listeners to Radio Disiribut.on cm Friday tin He said "We arc In constant touch with the U.S. Weather Bureau at San Juan In Puerto Rico and Kith the All Weather Slailon at Piarco in Trinidad. From Puerto Rico, if there are any signs that a huincane is forming in the AUJI.I.C due east of Barbados—and thut 's the danger area for us—a plane Is sent out to report tack by radio to San Juan. If such Investigation leads Uuweather experts tr.ere to think that a hurricane is forming or has formed, we are immediately informed Again, there is uu airline that operates i 13 Cyclists Rode Without 'Lighted Lamps ) V KING THE LAST two days Many weeks ago iabo.ii. 13 .vilists were charged be seen forking the gruun.i U. for riding their cycles without planting only started recently easily and move to some place %  light. During that period 22 Already the gras> and canes D< of safety if you think that youi trattl offences were also recordcountry districts are looking house may not stand the fores ed. uf a Hurricane. Two cyclists were charged, lor A PAKLOVK WEDDING too* There will be no other food failing to stop at major toads and / place at St. Matthias Roa4 at the shelters until after the two motorists for not paying recently between Mr David Troihurricane has passed, and than taxes on their motor vehicles. One man and Miss Mabel Juckmaii. under the Emergency Feeding motorist was charged for driving formerly of Chelsea Rood The Scheme which hns been carewithout due care and attention Bride was "given away" by Mr fully worked out by the S'. and another for parking in a Seymour Blades while the dutieMichaels Hurricane Relief restricted area. of bestman fall to Mr "Doc" Committeeit will only be pos|_IIS EXCELLENCY the GovWhite sibla to give each parson a IT. ernor will be attending the His Honour Mr H A. Talma total of three hot drinks and six ?Oih Annual Meeting of the s"**y Police Magistrate, performblscultt within the first twentyjfjj c A., at the Y.M C.A.. on ed the ceremony. four hours after the hurricane Friday September I, at 5 pjn. „ . The food will be carefully The lion H A Cuke C.B.E.. A N AT "PS 1 ?. w keP i^ rationed, and it will be a good U( l| preside and a Urge turn out %  **• Mr. A. Rollock. City Met thing to take along some food 0 f members and subscribers is chant, to welcome Mr. RoyWjwith you when you're going to expected. ll K h broiner. who fBiU> one of the shelters *T THE TALENT SHOW av ;^^_l h *f^^ CT _^\!!. Find out noic who isthe officer A the Globe Theatre last |\| A ^.._. t he, Globe .,_ --charge of jour aistriri These rvidav ninht Ol the route running from the names were published recently Cape Verde islands off Uio West the daily newspaper. It Bermuda and th< Arthur, who He was M| "My Foolish Heart," cary^r, ago and oast of Africa to Trinidad. This RestedVhaVvnu'cuVout the'sections ri off thc r>nX Pri ?*holiday. Is almost the exact route of thc and keep them hurricanes that might strikeBarIt Is hoped that these but bados. Constant weather reports ln*s will stand, and after t I. • hurricane has passed other Barbados IS [i two months are made to Piarco In Trinidad, and If a hurricane is suspected, wc In Barbados are told about It. So you see everything possible Is being done to ensure that ma public will know of a hurrlca.ie well In advance of its arrival— perhaps 18 or 20 hours before it reaches ua, and if you prepare now a lot can be done to render your home somewhat less liable t.i be destroyed. Remember what the cautionary warning; Is; By day a flag with a black square on a red background flown at the mast head at The Public Buildings. Office of Harbour and Shipping Master. South Point Lighthouse. East Point Lighthouse. Harrison's Point Lighthouse Crane H-tel. HackMon's Cliff. St. John. Mount 8tandfa.it. St. James, District "B" Police Station. District "C" Police Station, District "D" Police Station. District "E" PoUop BUtton District "F" Police Station. By night a red light will be used instead of the flag. This bignal means that It is probable thc hurricane will hit the Island, and this is the time to go into fiction immediately. When it is certain that u. hurricane wUl hit the island two flags by day and two red lights by night will be You can do a lot bofoiy the used. You can do a lot before the Cautionary Signal goes up, you can make your house secure now. See that ill latches and bolts and locks on your windows and doors are in order. If you are contemplating the building of outside shutters to protect your glass windows, have them built right away. Put In a small stock of nails and see that a hammer is handy. It would be scnsibl pack n box with some nonperLibrary L* liable food—an amount that poalad might last a day or two—in a Churches. Schools—please container that you can pick up and read these pamphlets angiments will have to be rr to house the homeless Paring noui to which one yai would go, probably the nearest one to your home. 1 must make It clear tl at whether or not you go to one < f these shelters must be your ov n derision. If you do go to a %  belts* and It is damaged by the hurricane and any one Inside %  •. injured, the. Government does not accept any responsibility for this. If you can reach home, batten down all windows and doors, using some of. the nails put in stock nou' Pack up a change of clothing, any valuables, a cup (tin or enamel), a fork and spoon, the food you have sot Ulde, a bottle of water for drinking and put these all in a bucket leady for handy moving if you have to leave your home. If you arc going to one of these gfttltan take these things with you—remember lake the bucket along too—It can be used for many purposes Remember—a change of clothing, food, drinking gfgttr, cup. fork, spoon and bucket, and if you have a storm lantern 111) It with oil and take it with you. At the shelter you will havo to carry out the Instructions of the wardens in charge. You will have tu help to keep thc shelters clean. A great many people have put in a lot of work to set up what exists at present to preserve the safety of the public, but the public must make it their business to find out as much as they can now about the Hurricane Relief Oriii) I ill Ion A Handbook has been issued and may be purchased at the Colonial Secretary's Office for 2'6 plus 6d.. for the 19SQ Amenditt or read at the Public Pamphlets have been bile Building*. itop The large crowd that attended Mr. Rollock is pleased with the %  ..* a keen competition between progress of the island hut feeltl.ree of the six contestants. Thc that there is scope for the tourfclt Judges, who were Mr. F. Peterkin. trade. Miss Thelma Serjeant and Miss He is of the opinion that the Nancy Went, found It difficult to authorities should get ahead with choose between Oliver Arthur. X m \]&t* m l&J!Sft &-m, m Trevor Marshall and Cosford Hus"'" %  ?**" V\"V binds and were long in arrivMaTslI brought 1J00 bags of uig at their decision. "* ' he ,ri nd yt"da> from Trevor Marshall, who.sang British Gutaj* • •La Rue. La Rue. and Coaford command of Capt Hawet. tJu Husbands with "You Do. howhrough S4 loIl of nrew ood. 400 JEss?t£j£ ^ %  5rla* tk£; >"*• of charcoal <>d 100 drums tt '"THE RECENT RAINS have coco.,,,,, ol i. M afforded planters the opn u consigned to Messrs portunity lo plant vegetables. Robert Thorn & Co Ltd. GOVERNMENT NOTICE NOTICE HEAVY PLOUGHS U is hereby notified for the information of persons desirous of Importing heavy ploughs that the Ministry of Agriculture and FUhorleraped the availability of 15 No 15 and 23 No. W John Deary heavy sharing ploughs (unused) 3 and 4 furrows 14 inches which are surplus to United Kingdom requirements. Suoplicrs arc Jack Olding & Co., Hatflcld. Hertfordshire Price approximatelv £ ISO each payable in sterling. I. Provision of spare parts from thc United Kingdom cannot be guaranteed. 3. Persons interested should get in tgttfh with the Controller of Supplies not later than IS noon on Tuesday. 29th August 1950. 37.8.SO —In FIRSTA/D THESE ARE REAL >^ LOW PRICES LOVKl.Y TARTU 36 ins. l\t a yd. Bcautitul Quality SATIN in Pink. Willie, Umi i.nil Blue 31 ins. 70y a yd. JERSEY SILK In Pink 36 ins. wide 681 a yd. WASHABLE PRINTS from 40c. up CALL TO-DAY These and Many More Lines al: THANI BROS. 1'r. H m. Hry. & Swan Sts. Arki-Stitiir krtifs %  limit nllit The aame safe analgesic that relieves headachea so quickly ca u ses \ik.i-Se!tJcr to bring quick comfort from muscular acnes and aoreless. Drop one or two Alka-Seltsex ablets in a glass of water. Watch t sparkle,then drink it down. Here is reliable First Aid pleasant to tak* too. Keep a package handy. Nut a laxative. Alka-Seltzer n n'hal MW yomr akin prublvm DOROTHY GRAY has a special preparation for It. A complete stock of !l)Yotlu| C|t£f BEAUTY PREPARATIONS now available al COLLINS LTD.—Broad Slreel. MAKE A VOTE ARTIST— here's your chance of selerllng what you'vr been walling for from the fellow/tog i CANVAS—Ready itretched and per vard i'ALLETTES. PALl.ETTES KNIVKS. PAINT KN1VKS IJII'I'FHS diiul>Uiin.i Miiglr. %  FIXATIVE mid DIFFt'SSERS. TURPENTINE. l.lNbfc.KD OIL. DRAWINC ROOKS. ARTIST OIL PAINTS, .STL'lJENTS' OIL PAINTS. POSTER COLOURS. THAWING PAPER. I1HUSHES. ETC : Also : DRAUOHTMAN'SSETSQUARKS. RUI.INO PENS Hi. ROBERTS & CO. W 3301 FIX*; i tat r Chicken Ha.iill.-s Habblt Steak it oiuiin, Sweci Corn Macaroni 8c Cheese Apple Saute Microbe 3-;. Macaroni Chece Icing Sugar Vakjt JL-HI.-S i^iiikPkgs Tins $c lb mm Pkgs. Golden Arrow Rum PERKINS & CO., LTD. L Roebuck Street — Dial 2072 & 4VI2 'AVAVAW.*AV*.W.W/6WAV.'.V.9VA'.W. USEFUL ITEMS FOR THE HOME WON BEDSTEADS —3 (t. U in.. 3 tl. li ins: 411. Bins KITCHEN CHAIRS GALVANIZED BATH PANS —II law M Ins: 30 lm. GALVANISED BUCKETS —10 Ins; 14 ins. COAL POTS —13 MIS. 14 lm. BUCK POTS 3-Gallon COOKING POTS —2-Gallim: 3-Gnllnn PLANTATIONS LIMITED I.XSIST O V MY LADY CANNED SOUPS S.-iV.-* your I'livmirilf I Uriflff lltMMIt fHfJltfflf at OMO.X 1 HI-:\1I nl I'l \ lllll A VEGETABLES Ml \ I II I I 1,1 I-IIII.ES BAST TO SI III I; EASY .v i oi ii i oon III in.; i ASK FOH •-.#! #..1" SOI PS AT YOIH i.HOIF.K DRINK VI-STOUT VI-ST0UT HERE AGAIN yore HEALTH/ sssjf STRSMCTH/ vm ^^MTY/ • I imrnrntiu ^^^ CONTUIDNO fl\S VITAMIMB, ip£*f W&mA SIMEON HUNTE t, SOrlS ITO Aganti 02 j THE VITAMIN STOUT TAIN ABIC PROM! ALL GOOD DEALERS Thai's why — *"—~—-^_. more tons, the world over, are"" hauled on Goodyear giant tires -than on any other make!" For |"M lm in.intr —mill-.,pvalur,Good*car giant lit.-.arc beajt. They oe citri*-uugh— l.i-i I"ii"i -i jivtLuwcist cu6l.-px-milc. iv. ..I II,. '*V*W>*>V* /AVWAW/AW MWUJWKJ JIu BWIA *^ f BRITISH WCSTINDIAN AIRWAYS TO TOBAGO KIIIITHI Trip $57.60 5 PMQURNI sun Hi \ IA I I.I Ml Ml TRINIDAD | Hound-Trip $57.60 DAM SEKVICE nUaM II VKIIAIMI.S J GRENADA ItMUIHl'I'liP $41.40 MONDAYS AND TIU'ltSDAYS I MIAMI ill I Al. I-.XC I'KSION 5 KAKE $340.00 I I FREQUENT PLIGHTS S llllh ANN1V1 :\KV VEAR BWIA BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS Bra I ;* Lawfll BroaMl Btnal BrNafelMni I ,: BH fc 6IW WiKMW %  %  %  ,: %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  ,: %  %  .. %  %  %  %  .:: %  % 



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PAGE Eir.iiT iVSH V\ AUVCX lit si MOAT, AUGUST 87. !'.-„, MRBADOS&I Am (Mil, t... IJ t -i Sunday. August 37. 1950 Are Ion It* :isi I'-il p SINCE the amendments which have taken place in recent years in the qualifications for voters in the election uf members to serve in the General Assembly, the method of registering such voters is no longer satisfactory. This is reflected by the small percentage nf those who are entitled to vote doing so. Many persons who are fit to render some contribution to the life of this community are not even on the register of voters. The Representation of the People (Amendment) Act 1944 provides that the Governor shall appoint registering officers. Such registering officers shall be chosen from fit and proper persons residing in the '\ parish for which he is a registering officer. The Representation of the People Act \. 1901 prescribes the procedure to be I adopted on the making of an application | for registration. A form has to be filled %  up by the applicant and sworn to before a Justice of the Peace or Police MagisI trate. The Registering Officer must then enquire into the qualifications of the applicant, and if satisfied the applicant Is then registered in the manner prescribed by tne Act In actual practice it has become the work of political organisations to get their supporters registered and even with th'e work which is thus done, there is cause for dissatisfaction. Those who do not realise the difficulties of the procedure blame the political organisations for the fact that so many eligible voters remain unregistered. Tha problem of getting Justices of the Peace who are prepared to travel around and join in urging the people to register is a very real one. Added to this many persons dislike being registered by party politicians feeling perhaps a distaste for what may appear to be canvassing for a particular group. When the Adult Suffrage Bill becomes law the present electorate will be considerably increased and the machinery which has proved incapable of dealing with the present electorate will be completely swamped. The Government should mow quickly to improve the system of registration. Indeed that is a pre-requisite to the proclamation of the Adult Suffrage Act No time should be lost so that whether the elections of next year are held with Adult Suffrage or not, the number of voters will more nearly reflect the number who are entitled to vote. It should not be unduly difficult to provide simple means of registration. Application forms should be obtainable from every Parochial Office and branch Post Office. The members of the Parochial Office and Post Offices could administer the oath required. Too many people do not even know who arc the registering officers of the various parishes. For the proper working of democratic government, the people must take an active and continuous interest in political affairs. The exercise of the right to vote is one of the most important duties of a citizen. By voting he helps to choose those persons who will represent him In the Legislature and who will enact those laws necessary for the peace ond progress of the country Every encouragement should be given so that all persons eligible to do so may vote. A Government which by perpetuating an outworn and cumbersome and inconvenient procedure of registration is failing in its duty. It is failing to inculcate in the people a sense of civic responsibility and is doing a grave disservice to the cause of political democracy in this island. Bad Weather IF the destructivenes5 of hurricanes in Barbados has not yet been appreciated by readers of this newspaper there is little hope for such readers. %  %  vernment of Barbados has also given much publicity telling people what to do in the event of a hurricane and what arrangements to make before and after should that tragedy occur. But in one important respect they have shown lack of appreciation of an elemenMI> fail which every householder knows. They have concentrated overmuch on the word hurricane and ne<;lec!**<* the obvious danger *hich comes from normal routine high winds, heavy rains and landslides. It did not take a hurricane to dislodge an enormous stone which some days ago destroyed a wooden house in St. John. Picmres in this newspaper have made only too evident the condition of roads and nutlt-up areas near to Bridgetown alter a blow." Bridges collapse, telephone services* are disrupted and the only consolalion that bewildered thousands have is the iLnowledge that no hurricane is expected, i ecause they have received no warning. The Director of Agriculture in a lecture '.isi week appealed to the public to stop pamc-mongering." Everyone acquainted with Barbados will agree that the use of •he word "panic*" is not an exaggeration. Rut what is the condition which breeds anic? Ignorance. Just that and nothing It is not enough that the Director of .griculture or the Assistant Colonial Sectary should feel satisfied with the hurril .me warning system which exists. "Con>ant weather reports are made to Piarco i Trinidad and if a Hurricane is suspected e in Barbados are told about It So you see everything possible is being done to ensure that the public will know of a hurricane well in advance of its arrival—perhaps 18 or 20 hours before it reaches us." l ii these words Mr. Donald Wiles attempted to reassure subscribers of Radio Distribution on Friday evening—subscribers who live in St Michael and Christ Church %  >lv It is imperative that a new attitude be adopted by the Government during the hurricane season. No amount of reading of books, no amount of arrangements for hurricane relief can take the place of breeding confidence in the population of the island during periods of bad weather. The only way to keep the public informed is for the Government to issue daily meteorological bulletins in the Press for the duration of the hurricane season. "his newspaper has offered its columns free of charge for the publication of these bulletins. But there are inadequacies in communication services for the collection and dissemination of meteorological data during the night. To remove these inadequacies action is said to iave been taken by the Caribbean Commission on recommendations made by the Second meeting of Meteorological Specialists in Martinique in June this year. The first recommendation was that a full 24 hour official weather observing station should be established as soon as possible in Antigua. There is no news of this having been done. A proposal was also made that national Governments should express their views as to the establishment of a radio-telegraph network for the collection and dissemination of meteornlogical information with St Croix as the control station and with stations in St. Martin, St Kitts, Antigua, (iuadeloupe, Martinique, St. Lucia, Barbados, Grenada. Trinidad and Curacao. If meteorological experts are critical of the inadequacies of communications facilities for disseminating meteorological data, there Is no reason why the public of Barbados should be satisfied with uncertainty every time there is bad weather. Internally loo there is great need for u system of syrens as suggested by a correspondent so that remote country dwellers can be given adequate warning of approaching storms. Simple daily weather bulletins published in the Press and effec tive syrens throughout the parishes will breed confidence. The nowledge that information is being passed to the public and not kept for the Government experts will eliminate panic-mongering. GKT TUEM HXHI.Y SCHOOL WEAR *< < I --""" PANAMA HATS HOYS LAI'S BOYS'* GIKLS SHI 13 HOYS S'lN.l'S N.'V-. BCOJB -v "MH UM i < %  COTTON PANTIES. %  RCUl m:m< riON ON BANDAU Mm | 1 |t SI.M pn Mir: II %  : ' %  *• P" Mir I—5 *2.M prr Mir. •JIIOAIIW \> Hlll.SS SHIM*. NOTICE Sitting On The Fence Will our Customers please note that from FHIDAY. 1st SEPTEMBER. 1950. our LUMBER YARD ONLY will bo closed for breakfast from 11 to 12 noon daily with the exception of SATURDAYS vten ALL DEPARTMENTS will open from Sam. to NOON. Our hours of business will therefore be as follows:— MONDAY TO FRIDAY LUMBER YARD 8 ;. m to II n m-12 to 4 p.m. HARDWARE & OFFICE 8 a in to 4 p.m. SATURDAYS ALL DEPARTMENTS 8 a.m. to noon. H ILK1NS' \ HAYNBS CO. LTD. Su r ca—srs to C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. 'Phones 4472 4W7 II* .\M.haniel Gnbbin West Country newspaper, local Communists "finding the natives hostile when asked to sign Stalin's trick peace petition are touring the vill.i/i' engaging oldest inhabitants In genial conversation and buying them pints of beer In exchange for their signatures" G OOD morning. Mr. Gargle. Manim Fine d,i> Afmphr a-bin better. Uke a pint? Oi alluM as a Quart. I expect you're a grandfather and a great-grandfather Ah. How many children? Oi've ad twalve oad buried /oi And grandchildren? Last rounlm there was tharlyfotve on em. And lots of great-grandchildren, too, I expect? My darters and aranddaierf, breed toike rabbits. Tiro more pupped on April Fools Day. a" three more last dung spreadin. I expect you'd like them to Uve E aecfully In this beautiful vilie? They'll neoer are no peoe ii'fiotle Ihry lire ere. They'll never have peace If wa don't come to an agreement with Russia. DOHf If note notliin obfiuO* that. bin rh.-rr'll nerer he no pCSKB tFt, U'haf ii'ith fheir jaw wagain an back birin an sraitdalmonacrt'i. But you wouldn't like an atomh bomb dropped on them'' Thar f u'ould. Do em good, Oi rackon. But you can't menn thnt. Mr Gargle. Think of your grandhildren. Drat etn a'J. Oi say. Ra.kon s bomb moiohr shake em up, the a.u lot of rar mints. But your dear little great grandchildren? Draf em. too. u-ilh fheir sho-m i bautlin an srreamin. As 1 am sure you don't understand, Mr. Gargle, can I pertuodiyou to sign this peace petition to outlaw the atomic bomb? OTM Merer put my and lo not-'fn since Oi Bined au'ay the lease of my eofcaur. Ee icu s lawyer, to... But Pin not a lawyer This is for the good of you and your family. That's what the lawyer said If war breaks out, Mr Gargle. it DUJ !* %  hell fire for everybody in this village. .4nd sarve cm rotvht. Thru eyed white Danish rabbits half as big again. Much Bigger About September three litters of pigs will be born, having been •created by HaggqvUt'g special special method of artificial insemination He tells me he expects thergj to grow "at least 80 per cci.t. larger than usual" But he qualities himself i saying. "There's always the nsg in these experiments that U\a progeny may be dwarfs." By GEORGE AXELSSON The next experiment is to procreate giant dogs. "So far we are only able to judge the size of animals produced by my method," says the profes' With dogs we .-hall begin to investigate their intelligence.'* The professor declares vehemently, I mysauT will never experiment with humans." He has no ambition, he say to produce a race of Frankenstein monsters. "But" he adds, "undoubtedly there Is nothing; to prevent such experiments being attempted. "There would, of course be the risk of the human progeny being dwarfs, as may happen with anlnab Abnormal "Moreover, there is also the risk that the progeny may -e idiots. We shall not know muci, about what happens so far as Intelligence is concerned until after our experiments on dogs. "I also fear that my method of procreation may start a growth process which wouid destroy the normal nerve cells and consequently cause abnormalities. "I have no wish to bring misery on any human being. Big propie are no better than small ones. From Lilies "Colchinin. the substance which I mix in the ordinary process of artificial Insemination, is fairly common. „ ," 11 •• derived from autumn lilies found in Switzerland, the Caucasus, and elsewhere. "An army of giants, possibly witn the brains of robots and possessing enormous physical strength, might thcoretlc*1|v be bred. The main use of my discov eries will be in food production' —t*sU In any discussion of the Public Utilities Bill, certain principle must be Initially accepted. Clearly the State owes it to the citizen t'i see that he is not exploited by overcharge or In other ways by public services that have become an essential part of his dally living, convenience and comfort. That is the State's duty. But in its attempt to control those service* for the benefit of the public, it should be as clearly no purpose of the State so to exercise Its control as to give the impression that it Is an avenging and spiteful agency set up for the coercion of public corporations in the pursuit of their legitimate undertakings. The devolution of powers granted to the proposed Board of Control are such as to give that body dangerously arbitrary powers. The public corporation is after all a* clearly entitled to PUBLIC I III 11 IIS HOAItl) justice as any individual citizen, but it has no appeal whatever to any body or court from an order of the Board. And nowhere is it laid down that such orders must be governed by a "reasonable cause". Whatever the supposed integrity of such authority as constitutes the Board, it is dangerous to the principles of elementary Justice that such orders can be purely arbitrary The mind or minds of those responsible for certain ^vtions and clauses of this Bill have been so dominated by the theory of authoritarian administration as U, make of the proposed Board a dictatorial tribunal if there ever was one. If this Bill Is ratified by the legislature as It standi it will be farcical to refer to these public lij M III TAlOlt utilities as within the realm of private enterprise. The only parallel to the startling powers contained In ports 6 and 7 of the Bill, is Regulation 58A of the Emergency Powers Defence Act of 1939 and 1B40 ir the U.K., which were constantly challenged in the courts and consistently condemned by the forensic genius of both Bench and Bar In the U.K. Such alarming powers as Is contained in Parts 6 and 7 of the BUI have only been directly undertaken by Governments, not delegated Authorities, and then, have only been exercised by those Governments in an emergency of unmistakable national proportions. The powers of these sections of the Bill are •inuhir to those delegated only to National Service Officers In the United Kingdom at the height of the War Emergency, and would be unthinkable by any peace Adm In i=t ration except as a nationalised IndusUv. The Board's Order bj I powers of direction are unqualified and no Court has DOWN to question the manner in which it exercises It. Some genuine or "reasonable Mossy prejudice the public corporation's compliance with an order, and the only agency that should dcUsrsnsM what is '•reasonable cause" is a Judge and Jury. But no appeal to a Judiciary tribunal is allowed except on a question Of Law. Hut questions of fact arc BO often intricately bound up with questions of Law that if the possibility of appeal is only confined to one of Uw it gives to "the executive discretion of the Board an almost unlimited Charier." In England itself Boards with such powers are really voluntary domestic Tribunals, "in as much ag tiicv do not come Into existence unless the majority of an Industry has dt -ided In favour of a scheme" If we want a public A-.ih"*,t% fox -my compr.rison in England m peace time rite the "Railwav Rates Tribunal." "This Is a body in permanent session, and has such well defined technical )urisdictton, that they are for all cocunon purposes. AdrmnisuRBstvo Courts 1W procedure is laid down lo Statutory rules and ardors and is in general on High Court lines. It is a Court of Record* composed of three members, presided i by a trained lawyer, with the addition when necessary of nsBcranrs selected from an elaborately constituted panel. Obviously the promised board has no similar sped•ic const!ration. It Is no easy abuse of language nor any exaggeration to state that the proposed BID for the control of public utilities Is s document of Nationalisation exclusive of the moral principle of compensation. The fact that it is formalry stated that Ihe Board recognises the inter ."its of shareholders is no assurance that H srHl in fact function to guarantee those Interests. LOOKING LINEN SLITS MAKE A REALLY DISTINGUISHED ADDITION TO YOUR SUMMER WARD-ROBE NOW YOU CAN ENJOY Anticrtishable Linens in Ready Mades, by Lomic these Suits are Sanforised and Mercerised Da COSTA & Co., Ltd. DRY GOODS DEPI. EVERY CONNOISSEUR CAN TESTIFY TO THE QUALITY ,\ FLAVOUR of GODDARDS GOLD BRAID RUM and what is more "GOLD BRAID" ia regarded Ihe world over as the FINEST RUM Produced in Barbados.



PAGE 1

PAf.F. FOCRTBRN SUKOAV ADVOCATE Sl'NDAV. AL'Gl'ST 27. 1W CLASSIFIED ADS. .o\ I:H\>II;.M NOTICES. 1>\T1I**UN William Goddard r.Mtit at hie iaaldned "KcvBnu>n rontab*llr The funeral UN. rerldencc al < •wr ID) W.-t'.M, . . % %  %  n William Dnafcnr "l "" I -It.-: .< rOII HI..M not -I S ATTKNTloN || drawn U i (Amen. ;0. No > wen. known Tnf bow. of Ihe mmhty men %  broken and the. i>.i .tumble > a,triad rllh •trrnxlh ]ud. Gorge Claike. :: l -i u jm of IN and SUtar A LI iPoUtn. who died on in* Ai.guat. IBM Wlin •>.* %  ** prtcwi" hlrwMn. Thai - tended wllh urtt eara. Rude. Ukm from our boaom. Haw our aching heartdeer-air' Hound her liillr grave r llnfirt TUI the eatting fun %  %  kw.1 real", all our hop-, had perl.haS WHh Ihe Bower aw ci.ei i.hed o Mr. ChMlft Sm.ll iFalhen. ciaMon .i.rvai iBr-othcr*' Tlnm> Mr. Judith W iam Maggie. Nriiie .si.icnv I .vTS. inl K Bait. .. %  I.I party WHOLKSALE PHII r. in** mofw than) tt 70 prt hag of M lbs. RETAIL PRICE (not more than) 26th August. 1950 BCOPOOM one large hOmoiti. Bank ..: V. U.I light and wo<— N...— ... iiiilni.au p-ele-rcd Phone **J" 77 %  *> Li PLAT — UMUlm rial at Wavctley. modern convenlHOURS Part ol houae eonlalnlna%  'If Mnlnai DIIIK-K nWm KiUhen Ught an Water. Applv at VMrn-atk jBfBMB ol CTha-imaii Si and Whit* Pnrk Road II a la THaVUtUlHW MiMWi VM H^ad Ail.fu'ittafctw frar-i Vll r. 1-.-IU.1 Ml, B,H'-WManwrlV' %  II...I Ban IS %  to i, CHURCH SERVICES i'KWV JTth AOOVST, iaw MITNODHT JA'W. STKa*T : II ... lUv It M i ullouan. T m Rov K C •*,YNI BAY: • %  a m Mr G ale Ala—.. J P m. Hr> %  Mt i-iaauch WlinXKAIJ-AM a m Mr O PaiHIBr 7pm Mr S. Phillip. Qi;J. MKMOatlAI.Ham Mr P %  tea.*, 1 p m Mr P Dnw %  (MaVT/OWN B JO a m Mr C L. I..nl.t, 7pm Mr D Sn.H BANK MAIi %  a m lUv R Mki-uik>ch 7 p ", Mr J T Oalay V'VK'HTBTOWNII am Mr IR Wain :IAJI 11 BaTTHEBA rtar. i ,. m % %  ' %  i BltOWNE who daoart Auian nth. law Da*p In our haari. .i..-irv ol LILIAN f.r-i %  o'd BS nlla with th* w^M "t IOII SAI I AUTOMOTIVE t'AR* Pour •' V- Ford -t-i H M i -.. | f P %  .!•'. %  ti a so—in CAJt— a**7 Hllbnan Mini T*ert>d ronditlan Ownai I Pr (!.0 CO Oramiand '•vlnt t.'-ld PtoajM K*m H B a so—i TRUCK-Ona IBM Tord VI Truck Apalp n V. Broil AT CO "Vhlla Pan P-W ll.IM-lf n :iu| !•!•< % %  Mr. • OrorfI.IVKSTOCK MECHANICAL AIITO HVKE Our IHHTHW Auli> Bh<%  with iprlie lorhi l"iur SIMM A i tal BTMII" Hum lo Olympic Btora for Jama, and Borb.ick sirr<* M a Mt—t" BIKI". KarnikM .t'isr Kinc M laram ail mad>h. Black, Graan. A Harnaa A Co.. Lid. 13W—t fn MAl'HWr. H.nni Bcwini Marl ••laadln rVlnl condllMn Apply Hilllam F Mhrrtr Cam** Onrrn Victoria Botd and Bank Hall X foad IB B H In rNc;UN Bao'i vptambar o.i--rd, n. .il.lv M mhvr •lac I Oaufela badr—nn with rlnaVr %  rr~i..na Bndala.da. chlldrvn'B met". dtn> n n .im and U. in(r RMrtfMwl I i I %  %  •. f*raam' room Aprrtomr rr %  ao tin V.i, TWBLAWNV On ihr IU. •ark Haual pidtlW nn-. Bn wtd i..,i Pkona al WOUDYARK Pine HIM FumJUtad liom 15th Itapicrnoar to n.ld Jana-v IUn HoaMtt Mil or John Hl ltw wM> WORTHY DOWN-Top Bock havlnr 3 Dodrooma connactlnc Tollci and Baih larta Louna-dlnlna< room OvlltThtful FOR RIKT OB I.BAM vsri KNIMBO PAHAIBO %  nartNi'Cc. Road i ,'. .Im nv Front and Uda Gallcri.. OFFICIAL AN NOUNCEMEUT The Secrelnry of State for the Colonic. ha* noUfled His Excellency the Governor that Royal Naval PrU* Money, granted under a Royal Proclamation dated 4lh March. 1948. Is now available for payment to person, residing in Barbados who artentitled thereto by rtaaon of urvlei FITJ Church ol Chrl-l. BBIci-i iiridgaV>wn, Uppar Boy SlrcM II i 1th runnini water, modern tllad bal>< i;i. ahowor and tub balh wllh ho' %  %  Icr laid tn u|iii.iiri larae % %  mrroom, bedroom with runnans wotar. %  Ilrhcn alxl alnre c-r-n aTwu"-l fl— Servant'* room with ti.llel .id -in ia with mn for too t..iElrctncitv and Oa. 1'leaae ring 3aJ n %  It—I In IM'III.MSAI IS s. per*. .if ! :aa. i i forapplicatior 26850—2n. AUCTION UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER IIY i I "ii al rllon Mart. Shephatd rrlday. Saptember la. al 1 p m Hi Bar r.endrr iH Steel Oullllaan with at ol -r-.MMWI IU Gaivanired Pipe Cuttar ', in to a in III • cyllr.de. r.rao -•Uk-iip GO".I rtMwlitl.*i ill 10 H P. n.d Pratart Hi fctandaiw Royal" Typewriter iH t>.mp Laval with Tripod nnd l-evallina; Rod 'II Omce rea. t OfBeiChair. • J %  Electric Fan H> CalaloaUM. Book. tan VINXTNT oHivrrtii MISCELLANKOCS AHTIQUXS— o( aver, deoiTlotto-i Glaa>. China, old Jewel.. Una HU*ar Wn.rc l.imllnl P. B*BI Hi SI I7BS0 >i OLA-WAR* FltoM |-*ELTIllX>VAKIAVitPowdc. n.wH. Cup. a nun %  radvtad la h-'l pnet s-i O.T *h.w Windowa KnicM'a Lid LMIT.X iVn-k*'* Iie.1 cycle iencrnlori nnd bwSwttghU ot.ia naMe,fraai e.*1 load Irax ror*-. n %  *o -7i Ml v KS Made FRXKtV'l ^"FARS ->l |he hlah—' qua lip. Only SB fA "J SUM. LI*-lt qiiantlir Baa your Jeweller.. V Da Un A Co.. lid.. SB. Broad Btraai lUtCORDSI*l".l naivce Catppwiaa al II OH Laahk-yi W*. Il> SI Time. an. Limited. Pr JTT B 'M-n RSCUKI) ALBUMS for IB-tnch and lor It-btrh and r.rrtlnf caaaa lor 10 In recardv and •h-e the rcor-"' tr A I* A I!NFS A CO I TO 10 a ia ti CAIM-ASMINT TABUCT8 A YAWL 'PrapMa' appro* IT', I, long wllh Orav M.-I.ie onslna. no (ondll.on S3.SM a baraatn. Apu J R Edward. Ph. ne SSS*. %  %  a •" i > i WANTED UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER ON TfCBpAY th by order of Mr. L P Baker, w* will -II war Purnltun il "Banyan Boach '. Ilniliimi. which In ludr-a Aldeboard, Merviii||. CnfTee an. Ide T.J-le. Aim. Morrt. nnd Ea> %  hair.. Gate Leu Tea Table. Book Cm. Glau IV-.r-i all In M*lxi||an> HuijW.II Mi.ru... Glaaa and China. I.ioyn .. %  i Hu*h Chair* and lU-k.-r.. 1 rlm.le Be for men and E.35(c) for women) which may be obtained from the Department of Education, but candidates who have already submitted on. or these forms in respect of previous vacancies (now filled, may apply by letter accompanied by a recent testimonial. 4 Any teacher who applies for a vacancy on the staff of another school must Inform his or her present Chairman of Manager* and the Head Teacher of any application for such a transfer. 5. All applications must reach the Director of Education not laiei than Saturday, and September. 1950. ^ ( ^ ^ W.:.>r.d*T* I | Let-en-Sermon CSJOtaTST HARBOUR LOG SHIPPING NOTICES Crli.le B.y S. I. BBf> llluenoe* • i* i.. s Philip H. Da.td*oti nj D. Beh Roaar-ne. Bd i.et Bch Zlta WorMla Bmlik Bch lav-daApha Tanker BuBaia l.i.mia u M V Carlbbea; B B KM; Bch Garda-ola W, Sch Inl S.h Turtle Do-c Bch Ma-j.M Lewi. Srh Marlon Ball* Wollr. WOt Maraa H* nrlMta. S S Canadian < tutl lender %  PL). IAHIIIC M Smith ARRiVAtH Sch Lucille M Smith H t !" . Cajd I'.BM-1I. from Brltlah Guiana. Aaanta: Mcawa Rabcrt Tbam & Co Lid Ships In Touch With Barbados Co.itai SUtloo Cable and WUaleaa iWaal Indlaai Ltd %  dvlae that iht" tan now communicate Barbado. C.-.i Station 81 Mykai CuK Di.c " Oranjarlad. MM I 81 Pettor. MB Beech Hill S-B U II Altai. SB TemoW Inn. SI lantlan, S 8 Sun Jaw. Oriole. FS Alhah-lllaf. IS l.Unt.hen. SB Danlalo Oe tamnaea. IS Eaaa %  vrralt. 88 Timir.i. IS Port Chall..'ia. Bit Buena Vt'ta. II Delalrea. SB Prta* rV'nard, II. Ladv Nelean 18 Jeanny. SS TerUrlo*. 8 8. Michael Tracr. IB Oain.lv. SS Sun A*la. SJL Mermac.1.—n. SB. RuAna. SS Alcoa Pnlarta. A ServM* aha* Cttrlatlan Helen.' Haallnd Bjbie-i TBI NEB TESTAMENT mi(H OP OOD BT MTCTIAJXII am Brkatali V'Un Elder R H Walkr. 7pm B-ointaM VIIUB.; ESdar R H Walkea rtlPIST C""-T" T p m Co. Head. Rav g W %  Varkea BT JOHNII a m. Vanture. Raw I D Winter BT I'Hiui' Ham Braratonf. Rev %  W Weekaa ST.TIIOMABr II a rh BridiMlekl. %  taa j B wirua* •T. MAIRB LITHE RAN HIIHH t i> rn Open air awvlcai III pa. WMneaBav evening FaU-ehild Btreet %  T lONTBNT I.ITBBBAN CHCBCII Cbnirnl, St Thoma. II a.m. Rev Wm. P OOonahu*. ipaakar. t p m Open air —rvk*. 7pm Pit* O Preacol SAA.VAT10N ARMT %  RrDOFJTOWn* CB2.TRAL: II B • Itoli — Meetlna S p m Company Ma.. T pa aalvatlon Meeting. I 11 I blAUOND OORSrTOI Ham Hollnaa. M. %  %  . a p m Compon>M.m,. rf 7 p n. BaJvatlon Mealing Praa<-h-r U* .tenant Moore CAJILTON: Ham Kollra-t, M.ell.^ J p m Company Meatlng. 7pm Bateat Ion MaaUng Preach*-Opt* in SEA WELL rnt cofftNXR ii %  lag. I p.m Compan Salivation Meelinf Halt im •wnrth POI K ROADR: II a a ] MI Compan %  lion. Meetin P riihdi CHECKER MAU. II n Maatn^i. S p m Compan. p m -.m alloc Meeting I taut-nan* Coa MOBAVIANt HI m ROrill.-CK STREET: B n Hollnt-a. MaatMeatina. I p.m .-reacher Ma|o< .. Hollnea* Mrat Maatlna. 7 p in •char: Liutenant 1 a m Hollnoa. Mretlmr 1 Praacha* r-KOM TRTM1DAD Mr Jajneol Hoaeln. Blchard Barre' Ml*a Joyce Rawllna. Mr. Ruth Laln_ Mr Joaeph Le Blanc. Oladv* Namaoo. Mirmret Samaroo. Mta* Cynthia Real. ttr D K Prampton. Mr Oildard SloaU. Mr Htrtaart King. Launn Murray. FROM MONTREAL Mr Our Durocher, Mr*. Laurati Lnirocher. Mr Koiih Gaodina. Mi M.i-.ieHaakell. Mr. Edna Hutchlnm Mi-. Barll-tira Hutchinaon. Mr. Ann I* in.-en. Mr. Morrl* Pro%acb*. Mia Muriel pKn-Hba. Mr. John Band errJI. Mr. Emily gMaSeraon. Mr Hanrv T* W, !5 -. MY _FS" U w.rd Mr BUI Stuart. Ml* Mary Clarke. Mr Mrs. Yvetie Cejnpaau rM Hip Clarke. Camper*!. ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. SAIt-INO mow AMBTBBAAJfl lOTTEBfrAM AND ANTWBgC BE-n-BA Am *th, 5th. aft % liriXNA fr>Dl laS. and, Mh -UIIM; FROM AMSTSBBAJB UHANIENBORO Ail* IBth IJI. COTTICA AuB. lash %  ABLINIi TO MADEIRA. Fl.TMOtTR. ANTWERP AMI AM-.II 111 AM Ml ORANJESTAP Aug. Xtnd M A WILIJEMRTAD Bapt lth %  •Aii IM. ro rmvinAii. PASAMARIBO ftBBtBBARA. ETC I S. HECUBA All*. Mlh 3 COTTICA Sepl MB. a. p MvaaON. BOM a co LTD AOBJDTS r>AFftwnor>' win %  aiilnaE-ulay. niaa. APtlgua. Montaacral. i %  • Bi Kill* ling Mandv. Bath i-n %  M V MOaXEXA win -e(arpo and fataie.fr-. lor AiillgK. M.-ntaeyrat i ...„] SI Kill..•--.-. %  .r IP*. \>..>cU>ta>n arturinrr Ow.ee* Canadian National Steamships -'ANA I^DY lANADIAN CIIAIJ.ENGEf( I ANADIAN ClIAl.l.KNl LADY RUtlMEV CAN'ADIAN CRUISER LADY NELSON 17 Sept. 11 Oot as Oct. a a-pt 14 Sept ac Sept. a Sepl II BasM 3S Sept 7 Rapt 1'. H.-,* %  Sept 10 Oct NORTBBOl'ND LATV RODNEY LADV NeUBON LADY RODNEY LADV NT-laeON > Scjt. II Sept. 30 Sapt I wllOo-rt ooUaa • fined with cold GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. Agent.. Sweet Potatoes Are Being Reaped For the last fsrw months, sweet potato*, have been scare*, but a seller told the Advtaeate yesterday that ha. would soon ba "on the to again". A few farnvera hava already bagun to dig their poUtoeg Breadfruits ape being brought to th* dty In graat quansltles Also obtainable too, are pumpkins and bale : RKANKF.K TYOTMAN Am UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER On Thuraday Slal by order o( Canon 1' W D Moore w* will tall Ihe Pumllure at Ihe Reclorr. •> *<•*"'. which tn.li.-l.. blapatoa ii,in,.. Table taeal I0< Hpiiiiht Chair*. AiMiqn' Cou-h. Both ,l (i wldei and Ccllerette all in old Ma.u-caii> nal Top I'm. Deak*. Carved Oak Table. Oak Bookcaw iGlaa. Doom (ll.iu aChina. Electro Lu* Rc'rlairatar I '.._1.nr .'II.l-irta. Illiiaiiical TablPJ. unite Limn Prea*. Children'* Bedrtaada A Beda, Mahog M T Waah.taiid. A Dreuln. Tablra. Chanrbor Ware. Draa. I'orm. Wuh Ba*ln A Fitting.. I.ird.i Coal Stute. Garden Swing. Good Tennl* Net Vauahall 14 Motor Car In good wurking order and other llama Bale 11 SO o'clock Terma Caah IIHANKFH. TR'ITMAN A CO DBPABTMENT OF EDUCATION Vacancies in the Elementary Teaching Bervice J Applications arc invited from ica.hcn. with at least 10 yearsj teaching experience for the Headships of the following schools:1 St Margaret's Mixed School. St. John Crade 1. All Saints' Boys' School, St Peter — Grade II. 2 The minimum professional quaUflcaUou required Is the Certlflcatc A of the Department of exemption therefrom. 3. Salary will be in accordance with Oovtrnment Scale-* for Head | Teachers in Elementary Schools 4 Candidates who have already submitted application forms in respect of previous vacancies mow filled) may apply by letter, ac-•ompanied bv a recent testimonial All other candidates should make application on the appropriate form which may bo obtained fr Department of Education All applications m Morning sea-vie., la a in Nun., School 1 00 i> m Sunday School 7pm Evening Servli' i.raarher Rav Ernest Now OBACE MILLII a m. Maraing Sar vita p-iwher: Mt 0 R Lewln 7 p m F n, %  > i vice preachar Mr rranel* FULNECK: II a.m Morning Barvlc* foiloonl by Moh/ Cammunlon. preacher Rev Ernaat Naw 7 p.m. Evening Ber.! pi.achfr Mr. A Oraham \X)NT10MERY: I p m Evanlng Scr viei-e*char Mr Oraena SHOP Hlt.T.. 7 a m Bvaning Service pre.ichar Mr a Waaka* DL'NSCOMBE:. B a_,Ri. Morning S*ritjaf CHIROPRACTIC RESTORES HEALTH DRS JOB. Bhd QLADYS PERREIRA. %  ChlrovUle". Upper Bay St maar EapUnadei. ClUTopracuc aarvta* alao "ateat nielhod "f .leclilcal maaraaa Phona %  MI Dally laaaepl Holiaa>*i TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH SAFETY KAZOR BLADES. BRASS CHAINS. HAIR CLIPPING MACHINES. SHOE BRI'SIIEK all at JOHNSON'S STATIONERY HARDWARE We have just received Hound. Squarv A Flat Hmr Iran Send us your orders now as slocks are moving fast. CEXTMtAE. FOVJVOHY LTD. •ROAD SIMil IKI UK HEAD RBB nust be in the hands of REAL KSTATK ExcelKnt l.~ • r~.ni<-"> *a|,,de--i C IUI al Am..i.gl> i.i _Uiiru-al..w Type l Only HaTJ HELP QUAi :*•>:• I....IHH —Apply In per ton and c-cparumce eic U> H E City Oarage Trading Co ntl-OOt flood Modern ('.,". Condition, Bpavloui Yard, Going li Only El ISO C Me to. The Mott D< .ble Btonewall Hevktenr— Includli urta n.. i--.l>-.ar sue* s,.,.ir .., %  where Mortgage* Arranged Dial I D F de Abreu • The Only PfUtSON' MISCRU.ANEOUS CHITEP-ON OIL STOVES An> niH.ii Contact Ji*n Sh-dinaii. c'o Ctty IIIII,.II r) a so -i PAVING C.I'IM P.M -Mtmater n,. Dei-ghllul houae and urn fort. Good Food Si* Telephone 1 i' ar* par day ^8'r.fl In i-o-irins WANTTII Df-NTAl. THCHNM IAN \ ., %  -... ^ Ing on B*M A. proraaJng of r-rllal an cdenl.ilo. !" ca-ea a cialMy. Modern Tochn qua ured Bap:* I" fVb Wllkin. i' 11 Blraet I'urt pf-4pa.n. Trlnld>d STAMPS i'..d B..-1 .Siampa ol rii.nl tUa B.W.1. • %  • Prica* pah* al Caitbo.-n NO IS BW-JII Struct. trvi Bi HlMlli III HI V STAMPSUsarl I' .i ae St..i.i.. n Ama-rtca and B W 1 i-iid. J.. Ii-dle. .-Hamr Co Hajr Sired*. W\M>M 711 Bl'V M^CTTINBN Old Rawing Machlt-e ef order AL. %  i*ke 0 Corner Falrrhlld and Probyn SU-aeta King Sii-e**-Mr. VBughan BUILDING BTT*aV-A Mo.t DeetrBulldlng Site ovarlooking the aea. Wo.. thing St Lawrence and Ine Golf Cour*r*.t io '-Cloud Walk' at Rcc.de.vov Terrac-*'. Chrlat Church Appl" C II tlarae. 7 Swan Strc-rt. Phona" SP7\ r was ass so-in HOt-BE Cool Oarden.. IB.7SS eouaic feet of land, d Sve balh room*, tw.. Part mortgage r nb)cc1ir.i. Apply P... A A c n Adto, -aia. rrau In The iindrr.Igncd will oflet for *>la al Ihatf Office No 17 High SU-eel. Brldffe lown. on Weflne-dav. BTlh Auguat. I %  1> laM SB Hava Garden*, conlainln| I1.00S wiiiarc feel, abutting; en land. ..I the Marina Hotel on Ihe south, and on York Road on the North S.SB4 square feet 0 u r ^ a | Chetapa Uvc Dir-etor of Education by Saturday, 2nd September. 1M0. Vicant Post of Cultivation Officer. Department of Science and Agriculiura. Barbadoi. AppllcaUons are invited for the post of Cultivation Ofllcer. Department of Science and Agriculture. Barbados. Applicants should hold the minimum qualillca.ton of the Diploma of the Imperial College of Tropical Agriculture but consideration will be given to candidate* with the nac-ssary experience who .'re rot so qualified. The post is pensionable and carries salary on scale $2,880 x $Ht to M.320. Point of entry determined by experience and qualifications. Applications mentioning Ihe name* of two referees, should be addressed to the Director of Science and Agriculture. Bridgetown, and should reach him nol Inter than the 30th of September. 18*0. Further details will be supplied on request 8 5 0-2n. Appti-ations are invited for the i-ost of Headmaster of the Boys' Grammar School In St Kuts. which will be vacated by the present holder on the 31st DCJCIHIHI. IBM The hool roll at pres nt num. bers 110 runt .. u: : are Bared UP to thHii-her School Certificate examination of Cambridge (JrUVCStKj 2. The post is pensionable ami carries a salary scale of $2,8t0 by $120 to $2,880. A tempo.ary cost of living allowance of 240 per juinum is also payable and free quarters are provided for the Headmaster. The appointment will be on probation for 2 years nnd subject to thepassing of satisfactory medical examination. S. Applicants shr.uld possess a degree of a Unlvcrai:y within the British Common wealth, preferably In Mathematics and Physics. Teaching experiencewill be regarded as at. asset, and th* aoieMiitment will be made at a point in the salary scale commensurate with the applicant's qualification and experience. 4. Applications with at least two testimonials and photograph should be submitted to the Adi lhan the 1st November, 1950. linlStr-tOt of St Kltts-Nevis not latet 20 8 ISO—2n PART Dv Malar C ONE ORDERS WAI/-OTT. ID r,l„.,-.lLT.I ba>l. Keglmcnl Mm - %  %  > Sp.OI.lM .il parade hi lor h.r -SawBI further bayoj Iir-ienlal llid(|iiai:. i %  rt training. MT per-mnnel an ii Thursday. %  .. %  i.e.. will lie carried khaal. -.no Mar.il '" mhei nartlculari m.p for —le al ,u O-Ve !•> m PrlSav the In.pe-rtlon on anpllratioi The -drove uHI he ..t %  %  in-. Rt Bridgetown, i Ul Bepternher IBSn ,.t ? i CARRINOTON A Seneant Ma|nr a* aoon a. poaataai No natnaa will be BOOepiad khcr ihe 7ih Sep %  •• :,' % %  ":;*£:,..... ..r....-— ---— %  •. <> %  -• • • huiricanc. |he will ba leqv.irrd la attend al HQ aa noUftcalion. after EM ci.Liii.inai> warning ha* been glvan. ArranaemanU will aa made I.. .aalU. thcilamlhaa a1 SI Ann', l.-n if nece.-ary. during Ihe paiiod i>f lha huniaaiii llgnrll.T OrPM'RB AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEBB ENB1N0 SRD as. i Ofllct Ordet.. • %  .lerlSericanI •XT roB DUTY llrderl' OBVcei (Thwaerj Serteanl I i—i G LaahMy -Juii.tww K M I P SKEWES-COX Malm B O L F Ad'utant. The Bfirhait !" Hi-iimrnl PART II ..ORDERS PROMOllllNh U* I. I O.ilnti SM Cpl t ui. E 11 ic C K I I. ST4 1. C Black ir 007 L^C Quintvm 40B .. Hei-i N a. l Pie Agard. D. H %  JO Hind*. H K I IAVI MM CQMS Whmarl. A F. OX. Majoi "(ll.r A Adlu'.anThe Barbadn. Reilmem Xodaj through taa light sbed upOB the twantythird PariUn by the (iiarUan Si'i"-'Ual L .-k. 'Seicm--aDd Health with Key to the Scriplurea," by Briar/ Baker Eddy. iU proiauae brightens alto ptaeli.nl fiilliilmant Supply, hearth — -tja-rfar Is legitiimaUly ne-adful—fa 'auahla to iii'ii witlmut fail, %  i in I %  i lines Uiniugh the aparitnal U'lwC'ifn.'i-firi)of God, divine Love, which Christian S -nee briags. Anyone who Uioughtfully studies Sretnce and llealth and puU iU ta.. 1,in-'to the test in hi. daily Ufe -ill find the "still waters" of lhr Bible prontaM Scir-ni-' and Henlth rnay be bought, borrowed or read at the Christian Science Reading iloomx, 1st Floor Bowen A Sons, Broad Street, Bridgetown. pum.ii NOTICES NOTICE PABISB The Vertry ol C •awila ol obtaining HI., a pi..v.-m The B-n-r .1 will agrlrumiri co.nar.loi Bald anv lueh land, who dlapoar of it ahould %  Mbit oner* to the nndenlgned before Slit ig.nl 1BM>. Btatmg the exert location, ea and price WOOD GODDARD, Clerk of the Veatry. 17 a The OnVara of The Gnod Bamarttar icrutlv Societv leque.t through thli .-nd. mat The Raleigh Becyclr Drawg' which waa to hava idium io notary their patron* ih Aiig-aat. baa been poatponad '" Septambec. at Sii O'clock al Be*onta Hatel. Chaapaid* The luok i ketholder will appear iiant d*y m thl* w.paper SI '. %  •. BREAKFAST CARRIER? The asssllriBtlr-n af vmi. Idar a/llqaar lleanaa No IN of II TALAtA h. Paliaa Magiclralr. Dtai i ANNrrTA WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED SOME — IN — VIIMIMIV (2 Tter> COME AND GET YOURS TO-DAY — also — 1-PINT VACUUM THERMOS FLASKS AND 4-PINT VACUUM ICE FLASKS All aUraollvely rn-cd The Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd. (THI HOIISl TOR IIARGAIKS) NOL 33 & M Swu Slml — Thane 210*. 3534. or 440*



PAGE 1

PACK TWO SUM ill ADVOCATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 27. 19S0 AVI AI II I 1.1 H I I.MvMA IM.mb.rs Only) I Tl la*l\. Mi.Ill vovoi nm %  mfunt MM %  *ri.i.i. I* IMI Ml I It'll I.III *.-. i'w rxi.i EMPIRE THEATRE To-day. 4.45 & 8.45 and Continuing a I Mnti.iic and Night Shows Dail> am ....•~'L"!.. ^r P|i'#|ijH'*J JOHN WAYNE AMU MM %  FMRKT TUCM MI —, JOHN AGAR A Mweiic NCTUM L ADY SEEL, if? <>t Sir George Seal. K.C M.O.. Heed of C D. and W :n the Wat Indies will be among the imnnpn arriving by Ihc Gojnto'' from England on Saturday September kid Sir George M at present In Trinidad, and i> due bark this afterOther passengers arriving bv the "Golnto" are. MUs G. Benjamin. Mr and Mn. H. H Hart. Miss M Maude. Miss G Mcaghei. Mr ..nd Mrs. E R. Molt. Miss • J Stanford. Rev H. St C Tudor. Mi HP Watch, Mia* C Welsh. Mm L Wolch. Mull A Walls. MU K A W.-Moi: Mr J. ft. Cave. Major J I Ciifliui. Mi C E Nrbletl. Mr T A L Roberts, Capt. C R E Warner and Major A S. Warren Back From U.S. Holiday M R DAVID READ, son of Canon and Mn. Harvey Read, returned from his 1)8 holiday yesterday morning; by T C A To hear David tall It. ortamly some holiday SUvin* In Hillside. Wyoming. New ha also vlilted Buffalo aa ai other parts of tqe counBirthday Party T HERE as a large party last night in the' Xanadu of the Ocean View Hottl Hut was Mi Victor Marion who was celebrating his birthday. Cara on the main highway stretched from the Hasting* Rocks past the Ocean View. Married Yesterday In Trinidad M ARRIED in Trinidad yealarday afternoon ware MM Jessie Metides, daughter of Mr %  and Mrs Oswald Mende* and Ml John Rooks, son of Major *-y|R GEOFFREY RAMSAY wa and Mr.-. C'ourtenay Rooks of 1*X among the passengers lea* 1-of-Spain. |ng by T.C A. yesterday morn! QoJub Qcdlinq orr TO I A.\AA leaving bv TCA A Wek in Trinidad taiday ucrs (toft to itgkt) Mr. and Mrs. Deassoad Proverbs, Mrs. Bdna Hutchinson, Miss Barbara HutckiONon. Mi. Uaoffray Rasasay, Mr. Keith Oaoelog and Mr. atanlay Baakall. • fill. UllUL • USH1 MOM • IKIUM I'M • UTSSI llUf \W% MMf IMIS HHBII • t\\.l CO. • IKUII JMIMl Auocaita froducii-rdvunc Gi.iasat .1Mb. 1VI411 Dnffl I Also British Movietone News Korea—Security Council's historic meeting Anglo-American Universities Athletic Contests at Whit? City Bluebird ready to try again Both John and Jessie are well oeonV la en route to Canada, b. t 1 mown In Barbados, and they are wtll ^ Bp endlng a week in Trim K| ected to arnvc here to-day to 0^4 fl r ,t Formerly with Cable am ipand their honeymoon at Accra, wireless both here and in Trimtocklaj*. d a d, no doubt he has seveiu Here For Three Weeks mends to look up m Trinidad, be(HIVING from Trinidad yesfore he severs coniicclloi.s with th. Wetl Indira to nettle in Canada Harold said that hia Water Pol •am n Tiiindad wanted him to play a match l>r them during MM %  hurt time he 11 thore Geoffrey was a former member of the r.llUh Wator Polo Club I'l ,'." over to Vancouver. Barbara ll with the Royal Bank of Canada 1 Mi,tnch hare and Is on long leave HOW LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4 1tll.il Republic Action Donblo . William MAHS1IAI.I. Ai, 1, MARA in "BLACKMAIL" and "AN ANTONIO KID" ""h William Elllnl! Bobby Illak.MONDAY t TUESDAY 4.30 4 8 15 mtpnbUc Whola Son.I . "aUNO OF THE ROYAL MOUNTED ROYAL L LAW TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4. JO 6 30 B.yuiilii Bis DaubU • HC.IHTI ABM3TRONG Marlln KOSI.rTK In "0AN08 Or THE WATERrRONT" and "THE OATMAN 0E PARIS" '' %  KSM ONI) A,l.lo MARA MONDAY a TUESDAY 4 30 a a 30 •WIN0IN0 ON THE RAINBOW and "CALL 0E THE CANYON" O I. V M %  • | LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4 30 k 8 30 Republic Big Double • KIVIKIUI AIIII'S Ciin.l WA! KER in "IDENTITY UNKNOWN" and FLAME OF BARBARY COAST ""I' JeBB Wayne Ann Dvorak Monday A. 30 and 8.15 Tuesday 4 30 Only THAT HRKNNAN GIRL and GOODNIGHT SWEETHEART" Trinidad yesn. trrday by M W I A to i|end three weeks with her family u Mm. Dorothy GriRlth and aha i-Milmg the hrst part of her hollda) with her slater and i [..tlur-in-law. Mr and Mrs Richard Baneroft, who are holiriuylng at the Crane Her two children Harbe.ru and David ore already In Barbadoa %  mi she eauevta her husband on Saturday for two weeks. He Is with MI Royal Itank of Canada In Portof-Spaln Her mother Mrs Iris Patterson and sister In law Mrs i 'luson, were at the air iK meet her J | V P4-j p 1 1 I r 1 r T 1. Oioaeniian Han IUI '. ini-s Hi ill 10. bio* %  dims. h> TC.A lor -bout eiglit oi ten wveks holiday in Canada After arriving at Montreal %  hey plan to i Igtt Toionlo and then f eeaassj aMiF. abssa 'J—i -••/ %  >.. NtwVfcaaiiafsoaWMNiRBaos! iVl • %  % %  DAVID BUTLER —.a—'•• %  —•—-" %  —. PLAZA THEATRE Bridgetown's Prestige T heatr e 11 Har-<1 '. %  s %  %  I - "V i .z I. !" la... •V k ''O MWiW'/,V/W,v < '-',',',•-----. .-.'.; *'*'>*','rss.;;-i WTiaf A Yield!! THERE IS A REAL DIFFERENCE WITH STEELE BRIGGS SEEDS W* have a Fre.h Stock of — — BEET, CUCUMBERS, CARROTS, CABBAGE, 8^ LETTUCE, TOMATO. BUTTER BEANS 16*" GARDEN TOOLS P k. FORKS, SHOVELS, RAKES. WATERING CANS, SHEARS AT THE CORNER STORE NOW THE lll-KHK AM AND RAINY SEASON IS APPROACHING ' orr '-II. .SJMarrf rt . Bull, tc Hiixea Ulchn Locka Sail, Hasp, & Slaplr. Hammcra Barrrl Bolu Riio Roollnt Compound Lamp Chinivi. Galvd Butkrli Burners V Wicka Sisal Bopr Call ai Our H;,rd,rr A Ironmoticrrv Depl. TcIrph m No 2039 KI.ME.MBI.R There la no Parkia Problem when you ahop with us BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LIMITED. GLOBE TONITE 3 30 Mriday Tunda> i 4 a 10 pm II you mlM this fins raoiloi plcturr you would have robbco >our treasure house of s fr..|TBM sod lasurs memon THE GRIPPING STORY OF THE HATFIELDS AND THEM c C0YS! ...America's moot famous feud! SAMUEL (I0LDWYN presents Hoseanna McCoy" r MU> CRASott OlAUXS BMaJOU) RAi UjUtli aASKt KSaMtDtUQMT (JU niliu HMNEVRNB CXTRAI LION ERROL — CVTIK OS DUTY EXTRA! Special BRITISH MOVIE TONE FLASH! LEARTK CONSTANTINF vs. DENNIS COMprON IN A CRICKET MATCH WIM111.EDON LADIES TENNIS FINA1 S TENNIS FASHIONS by "Gorgeous", GUSSY Moil.W LOCAL TALENT AUDITION TO-DAY 9 3n A.M •* o* a ae ee>a o t > '^cav 1 M week Back On The Job a BILL RAMSAY T.C A Wag Holidaying With Parent* A FTER two weeks holiday Barbados Mr and Mrs Desmond IVoverbs returned to Canada yeslerdgy morning by Navigator who was here tor T.CA. They were staying with Mr, Proverbs' parenta, Mr. and Mrs. I Q. Proverbs. Desmond is i.t Mac Donald College, studying for his Ph.D. His wife is a Canadian. 'slop over.' was back job yesterday morning, hen he left hv T C A taking < r from Sun Glemlenlng, whoso turn It Is to spend week's stoo B.ibado*. Stan Is staying >t tho Marine Hotel. Married At St. Leonard's O N THURSDAY afternoon at St Leoswrd's Church. Mr. Lisle Clarke, of the Audit Office and son of Mr and Mrs. T. A. D. Clark.si 7ta Avenue Belleville was married to Miss Juanita Morris, daughter of Mr and Mrs. Duncan Morris of Station Hill. The bride who was given la marriage by her father looked eh-.rw.ns In a dress of oyster staauer satin ... bJonAr ls*. fV bo lice HOS cliSlAllJaj while IS-full gkirt was prettily desismed in B resUngola style with a flowing ir.iil: Her finger tip veil of tulle was edged with blonde lace and was kept in place by a pill-box headdress trimmed with lilies of the valley. She earned a shower bouquet of getberas. radlanee rset. Michaelmas daisies and tube roses. Her Ma id-of-Honour wa* Misi Merle Clarke, sister of the bridegroom, who wont a mauw she-' dress with picture hat to match ana gold sandals. The two Bridesmaids were Mi* RoiDlincl Morris, sister of thv bnde and Miss Monica Hutson vhc wora aresa>(t of pink and b.u. %  etta i made in ho> • Tiie two biideMiiaidH were Ml>-. Ushers were Mr, Cecil Frank Clarke. Mr. Joseph Kirton and Mr. Keith Morris. The Reception was held st tha home of the Bride's .m-ir Bromley', Station Hill. Back From B.G, Trip M R. ADA COTTINGHAM was at SeaweU on Thursday afternoon to meet his good friend. Mr. O. Henry, who has been u> Brltlsh Guiana since April. T.C.A. Personnel Retu M R c rn Back To Univcrsit, M R KEITH UOODING who has been holidaying in Darbadoi To Continue His Studies M R STANLEY HASKELL. sot of Mr. H. N. Haakell, forme. Headmaster of Harrison College with T.C.A. Present Plans AND MRS. PHIL II' LARKE and Mr. and Mi>. Ernest Campcau after two weeks holiday in Barbados staying at Cacrabank. returned to Canada yesterday morning, where both Mr. Clarke and Mr. Campcau are ,.... _. with T.C.A. in Montreal, since May 13th returned to Can"d Mrs. Haskell, after four ada yesterday morning where he monUu.' holiday in Barbados. recently finished his third year staying with his family, lelt yesB Ic al Mu.ill University. He reterday morning by T.C.A.. to T SEE that the Camera Club f are to continue his studies. return to his studies at Mac -L re-suirting their monthly meetBeen in These Parts Since Donald College where he is ings tomorrow afternoon at 5 p.m iq20 studying for his Ph.D. in Animal "' Wakeflcld. the British Council R KPH^rNTATiVK ,n Vena Nulrl " 1 headquarters. This club was M'HL&fcNTATlVE in Vetie-. ... formed about one year ago and /.ucla of the Federation of *%  *•* sais iilreadv hat auitc o fpw memben British Industries to Mr. Rowland 1>>|R. JEAN BLONLWS sister Jut hop? loT^SmtmiS^SZ Henry, who returned to VaneI'L Laurette and her husband bership 'uela yesterday by B W. I A has Mr. Guy Durocher who have tinue, jeen in Venezuela since 1046 nnd been hojidaying at Sam Loid's Their present plans are to went ] or t f 0r Canada yesterday morndiscuss the forthcoming Advocate by TC.A., after two weeks Photo competition and the Annual holiday in Barbados. Mr. Blondin. Exhibition, is the Manager of Sam Lord's nd this was his sister's first visit L Barbados. In Montreal, Mr. Durocher la an Automobile Dealer. Undecided T WO young Canadian girls rived from Montreal yesterday morning by T.C.A., and expect to be In Barbados until the middle of September. They are both students at MoOill University and will M BS. ANNIE BROOKS, daughtnerefore have many friends ter of Rev. and Mrs. FranBarbados. -LTA ( originally from Texas has pis Oodson who has been holiThey were a long time getting occn living for one and a half laying In Barbados since August off the 'plane, and Joy must hive years in Aruba where he is with 12th returned to Montreal yestermade three attempts to get down the Lugo OH Company, has been day morning by TC.A the plane steps. I don't think she holidaying in Barbados, staying Ratiiritatft *-. Vannriiela v a!< undecided about staying, but .it the Ocean View Hotel. YesC ni m i Mn "Net? Vidmcr "* tin, e ahe apparently remanterday he left here for Venesuela. b'*i .t ft-aweU vesterdav ^^ something she had left to connect up with K L. M from fft^CextTelT The{ wiMf. for whatever it was. However here for ton days. ose Dclcnrrll. First Secretary at they are now comfortably settled p L P_-._ B.—...JT-; the Argentine Legation in Caracas, vith what should be an enjoyB ck trom Bermuda 1 rip ,!e hoUday In front of them KENNETH DAVIS. PartGone For a Week JY1 ner of Messnt stansfeid M R. BILL STUART. TC.A., Scott and Co. Ltd. returned from Station Manager here left Ida Bermuda and Bahamas trip Ly TCA, ycatcrdoy on a week's yesterday by T.C.A. There was visit to Montreal. Bill's wife and no bsri weather up that side as a daughter are alrgftdy in Canada r.*ult of the Antigua hurricaiw, holiday. although It was very hot. South America and the Indies sin.e 1920 He visited Barbados U-t in 1020. Slaying nt the Crane Hotel, was here for two weeks. A Londoner, he hopes to return to England In October. From U.K. Visit HS. AILEEN SEALY. who seven weeks ago left by the Golflto for a holiday in England, returned yesterday morning by T.C .A., via Canada. Returned To Montreal M" these meetings conQuick Work A N airmail letter via T.C A. timed In Montreal at 12.30 p.m. on Friday was opened at one of the business offices in Bridgetown yesterday morning at 9 o'clock. That's certainly quick work! Originally From Texas \MR. EDWARD McASHAN who %  *. tori i-hose ng < ife Incidentally i few days more In Barbaios. and Mrs. Marie Vallenllla and daughter OrttUna, Mr. Vallenwas also in Barbados for holiday, but he returned about n week ago. He Is u lawyer in Vene%  ur|.i They were here for about a nonth's holiday, staying at the Paradise Beach Club. pi'N BY THE WAY ... By Beachcomber seems to flicker over the librarian: "You hove said a Induce people to fill up the form. loathsome surface of my paper mouthful. Yassah. I sure am Also, every town should elect l like summer lightning over u ,rom No Orleens, law .takes, huh. Census Queen, who would be %  nounuin of rollymolly and turnhuh. you all is ri*ggone tellln' kissed by the Mayor after he had Me-cumtrivy. %  *•" Th e official scratched his signed his form. Mlmsie SlopFirst there il a picture of head. "You don t seem like an corner might tour England, as W G Grace in his cricket cap American." he said. "Buddy." Miss Census, and read out. on the his benign face moored in 40 rc P w lnc librarian, "when steps of Town Halls, such quesfathom of beard Beneath Is y u "*e next In da States. I'll blow tlons as. "Was your grandmother wnUen The Siegfried of Britvou *<> a baked clam and a bar(paternal) happily married?" sin Now rat me and sink me blcan ""d some cookies like only nd stun me with eels, if i ever m old n.smmy can turn out On Familiarisation Tour thought of a more exquisite comWhy should a lumber king partson. All you have to do. to choose this place to stay? I fkMR. THOMAS BLACKSTOCK. savour the richness of It is to thought they all lived In suites In |iMrepresenUUv e of the Melville imagine Siegfried 'in his cricket London?" "Patootle." replied the Travel Service in Toronto who cap) at Lord's or W. G. Grace librarian. "I guess guys of my sort arrived from Trinidad on AuguM taring Brunhilde on a rocky K big for a slice of democrat.!.24th left yesterday morning by wicket living. And now, if you'll excuav T.C.A. for Bermuda. He is tin a iin-, I must be scrumming, boio. familiarisation tour of the West Sir*. Hit.urfilv* imvritun Wanna look up something in da Indies, and will spend a short [ %  rct.-i who had inter" ,ubltc library, yoo-hoo." viewed Mr Chadstone reUrand Crnuun Gala -pitF, 1 VII ported that the McGurgle estab'T'O guard against a universal Toronto rtatnlv qualified for boycott of next year' Ishment Oovern while In Bermuda, having ilready vislted Trinidad. Jamaica and Barbados, before he returns to ensua, With only two days here, he id. as It seemed to Suet has suggested that the whole had a busy time and wished it be full of American visitors. But thing should be organised mnn could have been longer. Sam mclal was suspicious, as a popular quiz or questionLords, he md, presents a very ilong hlmselr On the naire, designed to appeal to the attractive 'Old World' atmosphere, loorstep nr ran into the hbrar-an. public, than as a Government He thought however that the Alia, p,I. said Mr Chadstone foolery Suet wants to add to the Island noeds more accommodation You from New Orleans?" aske 1 census form a few questions about for tourists, as it has much to the official "Sucker." replied tinfilm stars. He thinks this would offer its visitors. higher md EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4606 DIAL 4220 JVST MX I.X A I l\i: H&W LADIES' CASUAL SHOES In many < n luurs ...../ Ih'sif/ns ml $4.58 LADIES' $6.28 STRAWS $7.00 at 64* YOUR SHOE STORE /




Sunday

August 27,

1930



REDS GAIN

Chinese |
To Join —
Reds?.

WASHINGTON Aug. 26.

American military officials com-
menting on reports that two!
(Chinese armies were concen-
tvating near the Manchuria- |
Korean border, said here they
doubted if these troops would
move south to join North Korean
forces. Although these movements
were held to pose new threats to |
the United Nations forees in|
Korea, few thought that they in-
dicated Communist China's early |
entry. into the Far-East war, Re-
ports about the Chines: armies |
were announced here ace!

Asked about other reports that
120 heavy Russian tanks had been
moved into North Korea from a
Manchurian port during the last
two weeks of July, officials said
that the presence cf Russian tanks
in North Korea had been known
for some days.

But they emphasised that none
of the tanks believed to be Joseph
Stalin’s three tyve: had been able
to get into actior.. ‘sntinuouws Am- |
erican bom! yg of sailroad:, roads |
and bridges was ! cUeved to have}
prevented the r movement south |
they said. ’

Other offieis!s «uggested it was!
possible that the Chinese Commu-!
nist armies wh'ch they estimated
at between 169,090 and 200,000 |
men had been moved to the |
Korean border as a ecoeg
measure in case the United Na-|
tions forces decided to drive past
the 38th paralle) towards Man- |
churia.

This possibility they said was
hacked up by reports that Chinese
Commpnists had built formidable
defences near the horder, . Some|
army sources said they believed
that constant battering being nivent
te North Korean communications
as a whole was deterring Chinese
Communist armies from moving
down. into the attack on United
Nations troops.

—Reuter.







LUCKNOW, Aug. 25.
More than 2,300 villages in the

United Provinces have been
swamped by the flood waters of
eight rivers running through the
state, writes a correspondent: who
accompanied Pandit Gobind Bal-
labh Pant, Premier of the United
Provinces on a tour of the area.

Damage to property including
crops was estimated at 50,000,000
rupees. No deaths have been re-
ported so far, but about 600,000
people have been affected by the
floods. The rivers in spate in-
clude the Ganges, Ghagra, Gan-
dak, Saryu, Rapti, Rohini and
Sarrayani,

Similar reports of ‘flooding ot
villages in West Bengal and the
Buhar State were received today
It is estimated that 80 per cen
of the standing jute crops haye
been totally destroyed. Buhar
state four rivers were in spate,
inundating hundreds of small
villages on their banks.

—Reuter.

COMMUNISTS

2



_} suing







|RedsKill43

In Raids On
11 Towns

MANILA, PHILIPPINES,
Aug. 26.

Communist guerillas killed 43
people during raids on 11 towns
near here last night, it was
officially announced to-day.

Government Forces were pur-
i the raiders—believed to
rumber 5,000—who had. taken
captives back with them into the
hills,

The raiders were “huks”, a
group who have been in armed
opposition to the authorities since
early in 1946.

The main target, reports said,|
was Tarrac, the home town . of}
Senor Carlos Romulo, permanent
Philippines delegate to the United
Nations. Two Army nurses and{
20 hospital patients.in the town|
were bayonetted and disembowel- |
ed. Forty-eight prisoners, releas- |
ed from the town gaol, joined the
guerillas and left with them for}
the hills. |

Reports from’ the city of Naga, |
150 miles to the south, said a
Communist amphibious force had |
occupied a nearby coastal town.!

At a nearby camp two Army |
majors were’ repofted shot and all
the buildings burned down.

Other towns reported raided
were Dasol on the west coast of
Arayat in the Pempane province
where barracks, post office and |
hospitals were ransacked, Santo!
Domingo in the Neuva Ecija pro- |
vince and Ilagan in the Isabel |
province. —Reuter.

“HELD UP”
: ae





eR,



oo & Pe.

SUSPECTED COMMUNISTS QUESTIONED ON THE KOREAN

FRONT LINE: The battle of the forces of freedom against the
Communist menace from the North goes on in Korea— and in
this picture suspected Communists caught wandering around near
the lires are brought in for questioning and thoroughly proven

before they are released.
to great advantage.
line

Infiltration has been used by the enemy
Picture just received from the Kerean front

—EXPRESS





Sunday





GROUND IN

SERETSE KHAMA AND FAMILY

=





Seretse Khama and his wife Kuth walk from the giant flytag boat that brought them from

Africa) to Southampton—and into exiie. A B.O.A.©. officer carries their baby Jacqueline, e e
in her travel cot. Behind is Nali.i, Seretse’s sister. Ruth, is in tweed suit and woollen N; t 7 d
gloves. . a 1onwl e

‘HOSPITAL

DURING TRIAL CRUISE

19 KILLED:

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 26. :
. Nineteen people were killed and little hope was held 4? production, a priority consider-

dé
tal Si

during a trial cruise before leaving for

Captain. Robert Voortmeyer, Marine Superintendent

of the San Francisco Embarkation Office, said he did not
think any of the missing people would be found alive.

* The ebb tide would have swept them out to sea he

added.

The Benevolence with over 500 people aboard got int:
collision with the 8162-ton freighter Mary Luckenback in
fog four miles off the Golden Gate on her first run afte:

being laid up since the war.

Patel, President
Of Moslem

Association

THE Barbados Moslem As-
sociation celeLrated its third
anniversary recently. Amoug
the celebration activities was

the election of new officers
for the ensuing year. Elected
President was Mr. Suleman
I. Patel. Vice-President is

Mr. A. I. Patel. Mr. §S. A.
Patel was elected Secretary
and serving with hirn as
Joint Secretary is Mr. M
Bahkaria. Treasurer is Mr.
S. A. Sacha,

A new General Committee
of the Association was also
appointed

Strikers Want
f4ély Year Bonus

ROME, Aug 26.
Gas and electricity workers in
Rome today intensified their strike
for a Holy Year living bonus,
Gas workers announced they
would strike for six hours, one
hour more than yesterday, during
the busiest part of the day. Elec-
tricity workers extended their
strike to all distribution centres
in the city.—Reuter.

SMUTS DOING WELL
PRETORIA, South Africa,
Aug. 26.
Field Marshal Jan Christian
Smuts was allowed to get up for
a while on Friday. His doctors
said the 80 year old former
Prime Mniister was making good
progress toward recovery from an
attack of influenza he suffered
this week just as he was getting
over a serious case of pneumonia.
—Can, Press.



Labour,

STRASBOURG, Aug. 26.
British Conservative and Labour
Representatives arguing over the



In Chile Floods:

SHIP SINKS \More

|

Factories Strike In
To Make Arms} Finland

NDON, Aug. 26,
Pes as HELSINKI, Aug. 26

North Atlantic Treaty Deputies 7 ‘

to-day announced plans to use ad- | ,, Finland’s social democrat-led

| Jitional factory capaeity to speed | Trade Unions Federation tonight
detied the Agrarian Government

and calléd a nationwide



65 MISSING

i issi : anni | My » its overall defence pro- strike
for 65 believed missing from the American Hospi- | (#\\abeabthe Atlavitie atea. In a|thveateving to upset her new
ip Benevolence which sank last night after a collisict: Comments issued to-day $300,000,000 Trade . Agreement

orea, th :
fies announced that a report from The strikes for wages increases
the Military Production and Sup-/ of up to 60 per cent. will start on
ply Board ‘of the North Atlantic; Monday when about 5,000 metal
Pact had indicated a “substantial workers are to put down. jtools
additional capacity which can be| They will be joined later in the

on > ba
their past week's work the Pee | Russia

put to use in the immediate| week by 60,000 more men and
future.” women in other trades
“Arrangements to utilise such a The Federation refused an
Feumolty for accelerating co-or- | # peal from Premier Ufho to delay
| dinated production of high priority |the strikes for two weeks for
items are being made hew negotiations

Ufho Keykone» assured Parlia-
ment yesterday he would maintain

Deputies also have under con-

Only one life boat could ; v
sideration various financial prob-

launched but a number of life

|
|

|lems involved in the enlarged de-|the pegged wages agreement and

rafts were thrown over the side. | fence effort including the initiation } won a narrow vote of confidence
According to a navy officer 423 of the high priority production }in his policy
people were belicved ‘o heve been programme. In this connection | Under the New Trade Agree
saved they have received s report from} ment Finland undertakes to sell
Only heroic res: ue er tts by the working staff of the Defence’ Russia metal goods at current
Coast Guards and other ships pre- {Finance and Beonomic Committee. ; world prices. Agrarian politicians
vented heavier ioss of iife as the | “Council Deputies have form-/}bave said that increased wages
hospital ship sank he ripped ally approved the appointment of, would drive Finnish prices well

open from stern iA. G, Chariton as Secretary to the

ubove the world level
The “Mary Luckenback” with a | North} Atlantic Council and to the |

Exports to Russia would have to



smashed bow but no casualties |Council of Deputies.” ; be subsidised, they added,
among her 49 crew picked up | Secretary Appointed | —Reuter.
some of the survivors, The “Bene- | Usuniiy well informed quarters

volence” sailed yesterday for a! here wnderstood that the Working
cruise off the coast with 15 nurses | Committee co-ordinating the de- |

” . ‘Be
Communist China
and 33 other medical personnel | fence plan proposals of Member | , |
including doctors, 200 American | Governments had not ene | To Be Represented

army men and an unknown num- |
| In U. N. Assembly

ber of “unofficial guests” who |

, went for a cruise.—Reuter, i
| LONDON, Aug. 26.
| Foreign Minister Chou En La,

| telegraphed Tryvge Lie that Com

; munist China proposed to send ;
delegation to the Fifth Session o
the United Nations Assembl,
| Gpening on September 17, the Tass
Agency reported in a messag?
| eceived in London tonight.

| va e te'egram said the Pekin;:

|G »vernment had appointed Chiar «



Four Drowned)

SANTIAGO, Chile. Aug, 26. |
Widespread floods tonight cover-
ed a 300- mile expanse of South-
ern Chile between the towns of |



Osorno = Seaee.s after two | Wen-T.cn as Chairman and fou:

weeks 0 torrentia es a Soi |members of its delegation to the
Four farmers were rowne Assembly

in the Rahue River running

The ‘ssage as issued b g<
through Osorno, The damage was 1e message as issued by Mo:

; : ‘cow Radio quoting “Tass’ said
estimated to be heavy. Chillan is Vie : i
about 220 miles south of Santiago Rit ra as as to inform the in.
and Osorno nearly another 300 ) terested parties of this, and take
miles farther south—Can. Press. , the necessary measures for th



‘delegation of the Chinese Peoples
; Republic to take part in the work
{of the Fifth Session. I request you
| urgently to telegraph a reply.”
Kuomintang Not Wanted
The message reiterated that on!
the Peking Government was
legally qualified to represent ‘h



“And t/ you want to make me

T ye r real
No Brazilian Troops! |#

For Korea

angry, just
m crab on
china | *

serve
some

me
Red

ity’ work, Experts assisting the

BRAZIL, Aug. 26. | group are due to meet on Monday. | !¢é

A War Ministry spokesman At the next meeting of Deputies|Chinese people and that the
stated today that help to United | later on Monday it is expected that | “remnants of the Chinese Kuomir
Nations forces in Korea would{a general decision will have to be \tang clique” should therefore b

remain limited to “economic co-|taken about the problem of filling expelled from all United Nations

operation”. | the gap between proposed financial | work
He denied that Brazil had | Detenee pe: and the target of thé} Chou En Lai declared he



tended to send troops to Korea. Defence programme. sent notes to this effect to Lie and

—Reuter. Reuter. @ On Page 16

Conservatives Clash Over
Schuman Plan |

blunder To try to change con-
tinental convictions at this late
hour was worse than sabotage

Schuman Plan to-day had their it was stupidity” he declared.
biggest clash in the European Plan is a mutilated and parti- purticular brief forthe Commit- “The original MacMillan plan
Consultative Assembly’s second tioned scheme. teé of Ministers, especially for igned by all the Conserva-
annual session. Continental repre- “Without Britain there may sc:ne of them. But after all they tives except Churchill, but ac-
sentatives. sat silent as criticisms yell be doubts and hesitations in are not fixed stars in the poli- cording to the undemocratic or-
of Foreign Secretary Ernest many of the parliaments con- tical firmament.’ Some I admit ganisation of the Party, Churchill
Bevin and Conservative Leader cerned when the plin comes to have seemed a bit too fixed but is the sole decider of the Party’s
Winston Churchill were bandied’ them for ratification “With (ey wax and wane policy,” Blyth stormed lan?
across the floor of the Assembly. Pritain there will be a sense of “Why did he not sign the plan
security and confidence.” “After all, one of the most Will it be that when th Assem-

Conservative Harold MacMil- owerful of these luminaries is bly is over, Conservative spokes-
lan provided the spark with a Answering criticisms that wader -day only sustained by a micro- tmen would be*able to say the
last minute bid to revive his plan his scheme the Committee of opic parliamentary majority.” action of their colleagues in
which he claims would enable Ministers for the Upper House of Labour Representative Will Strasbourg did not represent the
Hritain to join the plan the Council would control jyth who said he had worked policy of the party”

MacMillan declared t pool, MacMillan said in obviou miner attacke MacMil T lebate wa ijourned t
IBritain therence, the Schuman reference to Bevin. “1 hold ne nendment a tupend th fte Reuter



‘

,

Aduncate

!
had

arated areas of the

threat to Pusan, the key

coast and

defence.

Reuter’s trontline correspondent
Roy Macartney, said the American
Fifth Air Force pilots reported the
‘communist drive in this region
{had “apparently gained consider-

ible ground,”

The second threat to Pusan—
rom the south coast—has so far
| not been translated into action, but
two northern divisions rere re-
ported massing around Chinju ane
another Communist division was
arree north along the Naktong
iver

es ameemesnapiisincapiatesillipmccaitincneactintice



Reds Press On

General Mae Arthur's reported
strong Communist pressure late
to-day in the northern sector held
by the South Korean Eighth Divi-
sion, as well as heavy Communist
artillery and mortar fire in the
area of the South Korean second
corps

Headquarters warned that there
vas still danger of .a. break-
through on the 120-thile front
where, intelligence officers
the Communists could launch
heavy attacks against several vital
sectors at the same time,

Sharp Communist activity in the
south pointed increasingly to a
drive on. the Chinju-Masan axis
towards Pusan,

From this area Reuter’s corre-
spondent Alex Valentine reported
that the North in stabbing attacks
were in a search for a possible
weak point.

They’ were thrown back all
ong che line witheut piercing a
fap

Communist concentrations and
patrol activity suggested they still
intended to make at least one
more determined attempt to reach
Pusan before the build-up of
United Nations Forces gained in-
tensity

A North Korean communique
juoted by Moscow Radio, claimed
in extension of guerilla opemations
in the Pusan area, with derailment
of a train carrying war materials
is One Of their feats.

Heaviest Pressure

But the main North Korean
weight was still concentrated op-
posite the Waegwan-Kunwi front
which protects Taegu, at the head



Makhe....

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DRIVE SOUTH

U.S. Troops Await .
Reinforcements

TOKYO, Aug. 26.

RENEWED Communist activity over widely sep-

South Kast Korean front

to-day appeared to foreshadow a new all-out north-
ern attempt to settle the issue while the Americans
await British and Australian reinforcements.
With two British battalions s
the South China Sea to join the fight, with another
American division on the way—the second already
in action, and the Australians preparing in Japan,
the United Nations were clearly
But the Communists had again begun their

through

together.
supply port at the extreme

end of the Americans’ “Defence Box’’ where they
were —s at the port from two sides, the south
0

‘wnwards from the east.

A Communist attack causing some loss of ground in the
east coast sector was admitted in General MacArthur’s late
night communique with the main thrust placed near the
Pohang-Kigye area, well above Pusan and also dominatin
the beleaguered town of Taegu, hub of the U.N. centra

, cf the Allied supply line to Pusan.

Farther east they were exerting
“the heaviest pressure” Mac
Arthur announced, against Soutb
Koreans.

South Koreans backed by C.t’s.
attacked at dawn noxineast--of
Waegwan following up yesterday's
offensive. when they rolled Com-
munists pack for nearly a mile
willing 300 and capturing 42.

The newly-arrived American
Second Division which moved into
the front-line sector of the Nak-
tong River to relieve the battéred
24th Division captured high ground
overlooking Communist
bridgehead which threatened Tae-
fu from the southwest. They were
obbing shell and mortar fire down
to the river's edge.

In the past 36 hours.
Koreans have punched 1,500
up “bowling alley” near
Dong, 12 miles north of the high»
water mark of their advance on
the city. They were bac
American troops and supported by
American artillery sending white
phosphorous shells screaming on
to ridges flanking the valley.

Supporting Southerners clear-
ed mud from « village on the
right. whete, a et of Com-
munists had infiltrated,

Survivors were trying to
back to their own lines while
patrols played hide and seek
with them among the rugged
ridges flanking the valley. It is
dubbed “bowling alley” because

Communists persistently send

armour up the road in a single

line to be knocked out by Amer-
ican super-Bazookas, tanks and
artillery.

One mile of the road was lit-
tered with ten splintered or
charred wrecks,

Reds Driven Back
On the South Coast where North
Koreans were estimated to have
five full regiments, the outnum-
bered American infantry repelled
two Communist attacks during the
night. They were harassed by
sporadic mortar and artillery fire.
Northerners were moving rein-
forcements along the coast, mainly
@ on page 5

Sou



STOCK

3 or 4 Speeds,

3 or 4 Speeds.

BROAD STREET


PAGE TWO
2 EZ
AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT TO TULBSPAY
ROBERT HUTTON

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Carb Gm

OFF TO CANADA

SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950

Married At St. Leonard’s

N THURSDAY afternoon at St.
Leonard's Church. Mr. Lisle
Clarke, of the Audit Office and son
of Mr. and Mrs. T. A. D. Clarke of
Tth Avenue Belleville was married



ADY SEEL, wife of Sir George
Seel, K.C.M.G., Head of

Cc. D. and W. in the West Indies
will be among the passengers ar-
riving by the “Ggjfito” from Eng-
land on Saturday September 2nd.
Sir George is at present in Trini-
dad, and is due back this after-











NIGHT at 8.30
JOYCE REYNOLDS JANIS Ff

in “WALLFLOWER

AIGE

A Warner Bros. Picture



|
i

4

eeaticepster

————
——

A ATE OREN LE OORT ANE RSS CROP LEE QI:

“xo 99
=

Screen Play by Harry Brown—James Edward Grant * Story by Harry Br wn « Directed by Allan Dwan



MATINEE WEDNESDAY at 5 and 8.20 p.m
THURSDAY NIGHT at 6.30
DENNIS MORGAN BLLANUR PARKER

in “THE VERY THOUGHT OF YoU"

A Warner Eres. Pieture

SS es
—_c(AB[G(C SaaS

EMPIRE THEATRE

To-day, 4.45 & 8.45 and Continuing at Matinee and
Night Shows Daily

LE Ee NEE AG OE NRE MS Me eR eon UIT



J0 H N’ "WAY N E ADELE MARA + FORREST TUCKER

co-tterring JOHN A AGAR A REPUBLIC PICTURE

et ARE Mh af toto} ae

oy tasseut + ames, BROWN - hicwana WEBS * ARTHUR FRANZ
JULIE BISHOP > JAMES HOLDEN + PETER COE > RICHARD JAECKEL

Associate Producer —Edround Grainger
Also British Movietone News

Korea—Security Council’s historic meeting

Anglo-American Universities Athletic Contests
at White City

Bluebird ready to try again

—— OS

iii eN50tleelelleeeee

ROX Y

LAST TWO SHOWS — TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15
Republic Action Double - - -

William MARSHALL Adele

in “BLACKMAIL”
and “SAN ANTONIO KID”
with William Elliott — Bobby Blake

MARA



BOISCSGGGSSISISSIOIOS SENOS 53S GF ISVSSISSSSSIOSSS

!

MONDAY & TUESDAY 4.30 & 8.15
Republic Whole Serial -

“KING OF THE ROYAL MOUNTED”

ROYAL

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY —
Republic Big Double - - - <3

Robert ARMSTRONG — Marti KOSLECK
in “GANGS OF THE WATERFRONT”
and “THE CATMAN OF PARIS”
Carl ESMOND — Adele MARA
MONDAY & TUESDAY 4.30 & 8.30

“SWINGING ON THE RAINBOW” and
“CALL OF THE CANYON”

OLYMPIC

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY — 4.30 & 8.30





Republic Big Double - - -

Riehard ARLEN — Chery! WALKER

in “IDENTITY UNKNOWN”
and “FLAME OF BARBARY COAST”

with John Wayne — ~ Ann Dvorak
Monday 4.30 and 8.15 Tuesday 4.30 Only _

“THAT BRENNAN GIRL”
and “GOODNIGHT SWEETHEART”









We

BEET,
LETTUCE, TOMATO, BUTTER BEANS

have a Fresh Stock of —

GARDEN TOOLS

WATERING CANS, SHEARS

FORKS, SHOVELS, RAKES,

AT

| THE CORNER STORE









STEELE
BRIGGS
SEEDS

CUCUMBERS, CARROTS, CABBAGE,

noon,

Other passengers
the “Golfito”
min, Mr, and Mrs, H. H. Hart,
Miss M. Maude, Miss G. Meagher,
Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Moll,
P. J. Stanford, Rev. H. St.
Tud
ec;
E.
Mr.

Miss L, Welch,
A. Wells, Miss E. A. Weston,

J. M. Cave, Major J. &
Griffith, Mr. C. E. Neblett, Mr
T. A. L. Roberts, Capt. C. R. E.
Warner and Major A. S. Warren

Back From U.S. Holiday
M®. DAVID READ, son of
Canon and Mrs. Harvey

Read, returned from his U.S.
holiday yesterday morning by
T.C.A. To hear David tell it,

it was certainly some holiday.
Staying in Hillside, Wyoming, New
York, he also visited Buffalo as
well as other parts of the coun-

try
Birthday Party

Ts was a visser ae last

night in the’ Xanadu of the
Ocean View Hotel. Host was Mr.
Victor Marson who was celebrat-
ing his birthday. Cars on the main
highway stretehed from the Hast-
ings Rocks past the Ocean View.

Married Yesterday In
bes Trinidad
ARRIED in Trinidad yester-
day afternoon were Miss
M ssie Mendes, Gaugates of Mr.
Mrs. Oswald Mendes and
Mr. John Rooks, son of Major
end Mrs. Courtenay Rooks of
Port- of-Spain.
Both John and Jessie are well
known in Barbados, and they are
expected to arrive here to-day to
spend their honeymoon at Accra,
Rockley.

Here For Three Weeks
RRIVING from Trinidad yes-
terday by B.W.I.A. to
spend three weeks with her family
was Mrs. Dorothy Griffith and she
6 spending the first part of her
with her sister and

holiday

brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Bancroft, who are holi-
)

and

daying at the Crane.

Her two children Barbara and
David are already in Barbados
and she expects her husband on
Saturday for two weeks. He is with
the Royal Bank of Canada in Port-
of-Spain. Her mother Mrs. Iris
Patterson and sister in law Mrs.
Peter Patterson, were at the air-
port to meet her.

oF bela dea

eee



(9)

actoss
l, Diekensian Halil
6. Trick. (5)
Â¥. | cord ten to make a principle.
(8) 10. Blow a drink. (5)
id, Skin. (3)
1%. Snow, (5)
14, Not so common, (5)
1d. Pism. (4)
16. Popalar summer cvad-wors. (7)
ty This causes much trouble (4)
20 Rearrange 4 cone. (5)
Classically deiigntful place. (7)
vown
i or & spare dig w run down
}
| —
1}
ae ‘
} jax
oe t

Hau Tule Makes -TuOdurn io



Suc penatiour i loreian ft as
(8)
@ Sometaine tm view im?
® Phe ware Oruduce- ome 8 6)
o Phe & aiterent &
4 Its ath about us 6a)
8 Vesse: adie—te hed things? i 4
i
3




westerGay» Qutcie Arras:
Hupee lk Sue
(Uris bee



Yield !!

THERE IS A REAL
DIFFERENCE WITH

8¢ and
16¢ per pk.

arriving by
are, Miss G. Benja-
Miss

H.P. Welch, Miss
Miss



So ee en



A Week in Trinidad

M* GEOFFREY RAMSAY was
among the passengers leav-
ng by T.C.A. i peeer y morning.
Gaoft is en ee entte but
will be i a week in Trini-
dad first. Formeriy with Cable and
Wireless both here and in Trini-
dad, no doubt he has several
friends to look up in Trinidad, be-
fore he severs connections with the
West Indies to settle in Canada.
Harold said that his Water Polo





~——

Leaving by T.C.A. yesterday were (left to right) Mr, and Mrs. Desmond Proverbs, Mrs, Edna Hutchinson, Miss Barbara Hutchinson,

Mr, Geoffrey Ramsay, Mr, Keith Gooding and Mr. Stanley Haskell.

‘eam in Trinidad wanted him to
play a match for them during the
shart time he is there. Geoffrey
was a former member of
Swordfish Water Polo Club
Barbados.

On Long Leave

RS.

and her daughter Barbara
left yesterday by T.C.A. for about
eight or ten weeks holiday in

the
in

EDNA HUTCHINSON rhe

go over to Vancouver. Barbara is
with the Royal Bank of Canada’s
Branch here and is on Jong leave.

oask On The Job

R. BILL RAMSAY T.C.A.

Navigator who was here for
a week’s “stop over,” was back
the job yesterday mee
when he left by T.C.A.,
over from Stan Glendening, whee
turn it is to spend week’s ston

Canada. After arriving at Montreal over in Barbados. Stan is staying

Coming SAT. Sept. 2ud 8.30 p.m.
New WONDERS FROM WARNER BROS!
Was al
OK FORTHE SILVER LINING
dive HAVER: polo HINER ni RE ®

DIRECTED BY EYAVYID) BUTLER sion aston ty Ses toimur a Ruby» Mav! Oxecton

PLAZA











GAIET Y (the



Jimmie DAVIS in

| Monogram Presents - - -
j (ist Instalment of Seria!
with Rex LEASE — Ruth MIX

We are fully Stocked » ic
Butts & Hinges
Locks
Hasps & Staples
Barrel Bolts

Lamp Chimneys
Burners & Wicks

FACTORY

LAST:
“LOUISIANA”

7 an
Johuny Mack BROWN in
A Moneritam Double.

THEATRE

pa ac presiee Theatre

Garden) ST. JAMES

TO-DAY 5.00 and 8.30 P.M.

Metro Goldwyn Mayer presents :— |
| NEPTUNES DAUGHTER
OPENING MONDAY 28th and Continuing
EASTER PARADE
PRICES: Baleony 48; House 30; 24; Pit 16.

SHOWS TODAY 5 and 8.30 p.m,
(Musieal)

“SIX GUN GOSPEL”



MONDAY and TUESDAY 5 and 8.30 p.m.

CUSTER’S LAST STAND”
Bobby WALCOTT and others













THE HURRICANE AND RAINY SEASON IS
APPROACHING

Latches

Nails

Hammers

Rite Roofing Compound
Galvd. Buckets

Sisal Rope

Call at Our Hardware & Ironmongery Dept.
Telephone No. 2039
REMEMBER :
There is no Parking Problem when you shop with us !



BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON

LIMITED.

i

TONITE 8.30 Mcnday & Tuesday 5 & 8.30 p.m.

If you miss this fine motion! picture you would have robbed

your treasure house of a fra
Gee



THE GRIPPING STORY OF 8

THE HATFIELDS AND
THE M°COYS !

.-.America’'s most

EXTRA!
LEON ERROL — CUTIE ON DUTY
—

Special BRITISH MOVIE TONE FLASH!

LEARIZ CONSTANTINE

Starring
= FARLEY GRANGER - CHARLES BICKFORD - RAYMOND MASSEY
’ RICHARD GIG! PERREAU

int and lasting memory

OLLI RA: ai






BASEHART GIGI
‘VANS

and introducing E
Unwend.to NING ROMS - Screen Play by ee Caties ro
Diane ty RKO RADIO MCTURES, aoe

EXTRA!

vs. DENNIS COMPTON

WIMBLEDON LADIES TENNIS FINALS

TENNIS FASHIONS by ‘

LOCAL TALENT

‘Gorgeous”,

AUDITION TO-DAY 9.3"

GUSSY MORAN
A.M,

| |like

iy | wicket.

they pian to visit Toronto and then at the Marine Hotel.
$$

Back To Universit,
R. KEITH GOODING who has
been holidaying in Barbados
since May 13th returned to Can-
ada yesterday morning where he
has recently finished his third year
B.Sc. at MeGill University. He re-

turns to continue his studies.

Been in These Parts Since

1920

EPRESENTATIVE in Vene-
zuela of the Federation of
British Industries is Mr. Rowland
E. Henry, who returned to Vene-
zuela yesterday by B.W.I1.A., has
been in Venezuela since 1946 and
in South America and the West
Indies since 1920. He visited Bar-

bados last in 1920.

Staying at the Crane Hotel, he
was here for two weeks. A Lon-
doner, he hopes to return to Eng-
lana in October,

From U.K. Visit
RS. AILEEN SEALY, who
seven weeks ago left by
the Golfito for a holiday in Eng-
lend, returned yesterday morn-
ing by T.C.A., via Canada.
Returned To Montreal
. ANNIE BROOKS, daugh-
ter of Rev. and Mrs. Fran-
cis Godson who has been holi-
daying in Barbados since August
12th returned to Montreal yester-
day morning by T.C.A.

Returned to Venezuela
OL. and Mrs. “Dick” Vidmer
were at Seawell yesterday
morning to see some friends safely
off to Venezuela. They were Mr.
Jose Delcarril, First Secretary at
the Argentine Legation in Caracas.
whose wife incidentally is remain-
ing on a few days more in Barba-
dos, and Mrs. Marie Vallenilla and
her daughter Cristina. Mr. Vallen-
illa was also in Barbados for a
holiday, but he returned about a
week ago. He is a lawyer in Vene-
suela. They were here for about a
month’s holiday, staying at the
Paradise Beach Club.



UN seems to flicker over the
loathsome surface of my paper

summer lightning over a
mountain of rollymolly and tum-
ble-cumtrivy .

First, there is a picture of
W. G. Grace in his cricket cap,
his benign face moored in 40
fathom of beard. Beneath is
written: “The Siegfried of Brit-
ain.” Now rat me and sink me
and stuff me with eels, if I ever
thought of a more exquisite com-
parison. All you have to do, to
savour the richness of it is to
imagine Siegfried (in his cricket
cap) at Lord’s or W. G. Grace
facing Brunhilde on a_ rocky

Mrs. MeGurgle’s American
HE inspector who had inter-
viewed Mr. Chadstone re-
ported that the McGurgle estab-
ishment certainly qualified for
Government aid, as it seemed to
be full of American visitors. But
a higher official was suspicious,
md went along himself. On the
doorstep he ran into the librarian,
‘Atta, pal,” said Mr. Chadstone
‘You from New Orleans?” asked
the offieial. “Sucker,” replied the



Was teaieine With

ATT two erent holiday in
Barbados Mr. and Mrs.
Desmond Proverbs returned to
Canada | morning by
ey were staying with
Mr. Proverbs’ parents, Mr. and
Mrs. I. G. Proverbs. Desmond is
at MacDonald College, studying
for his Ph.D. His wife is a Cana-
dian.

To Continue His Studies
R. STANLEY HASKELL, son
of Mr. H. N. Haskell, former
Headmaster of Harrison College
and Mrs. Haskell, after four
months’ holiday in Barbados,
staying with his family, left yes-
terday morning by T.C.A., to

return to his studies at Mac -

Donald penne where he is
studying for his Ph.D. in Animal
Nutrition,

First Visit

R. JEAN BLONDIN’S sister
Laurette and her husband

Mr. Guy Durocher who have
been. holidaying at Sam Lord’s
left for Canada yesterday morn-
ing by T.C.A,, after two weeks
holiday in Barbados. Mr. Blondin,
is the Manager of Sam Lord’s
and this was his sister’s first visit
to Barbados. In Montreal, Mr.

Durocher is an Automobile Dealer. i

Undecided

‘tr young Canadian girls ar-

rived from Montreal yesterday
morning by T.C.A., and expect to
be in Barbados until the middle of
September. They are both students
at McGill University and _ will
therefore have many friends in
Barbados.

They were a long time getting
off the ’plane, and Joy must have
made three attempts to get down
the plane steps. I don’t think she
was undecided about staying, but
each time she apparently remem-
bered something she had left
behind and had to dash back up
for whatever it was. However
they are now comfortably settled
with what should be an enjoy-
able holiday in front of them.

Gone Fora Week
R. BILL STUART, T.C.A.,
Station Manager here left
by T.C.A., yesterday on a week's
visit to Montreal. Bill’s wife and
daughter are alrg@idy in Canada
on holiday.

librarian: “You have said a
mouthful. Yassah. I sure am
from Noo Orleens, law sakes, huh,
huh, you all is, e tellin’
me.” The official scratched his
head. “You don’t ‘seem like an
American,” he said. “Buddy,”
replied the librarian, “when
you’ze next in da States, I’ll blow
you to a baked clam and a bar-
bican and some cookies like only
ma ald mammy can turn out.”
“Why should a lumber king
choose this place to stay? I

thought they all lived in suites in

London?” “Patootie,” replied the
librarian, “I guess guys of my sort
go big for a slice of democratic
living. And now, if you'll excuse
me, I must be seramming, bozo.
Wanna look up something in da
public library, yoo-hoo.”
Grand Census Gala
guard against a universal
boycott of next year’s census,
Suet has suggested that the whole
thing should be organised more
as a popular quiz or question-
naire, designed to appeal to the
public, than as a Government
foolery. Suet wants to add to the
census form a few questions about
film stars. He thinks this would

to Miss Juanita Morris, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Morris of
Station Hill.

The bride who was given in
marriage by her father looked
eharming in a dress of oyster s

r gatin and blonde |
Pee was clooene.. hile |
full skirt was pretti

Kha peabae

a redingote style
train.

Her finger tip veil of tulle was
edged with blonde lace and was
kept in place by a pill-box head-
dress trimmed with lilies of the
valley. She carried a si er bou-
quet of gerberas, nee roses
Michaelmas daisies and tube roses.
Her Maid-of-Honour was Miss
Merle Clarke, sister of the bride-
groom, whd wore a maize sheer
dress with picture hat to match
and gold sandals.

The two Bridesmaids were Mis:
Rosalind Morris, sister of the
bride and Miss Monica Hutson,
who wore aresses of pink and biue
georgette with pitture nats to
mateh and gold sandals. They each
carried bouquets made in horse

sha

The two bridesmaids were Miss

Ushers were Mr, Cecil Frank
Clarke, Mr. Joseph Kirton and
Mr. Keith Morris.

The Reception was held at tha
home of the Bride’s parents
‘Bromley’, Station Hill.

Back From B.G, Trip

R. ADA COTTINGHAM was

at Seawell on Thursday

afternoon to meet his good friend,

Mr. O. Henry, who has been ip
British Guiana since April.

T.C.A. Personnel Return

R. AND MRS. PHILIP
CLARKE and Mr. and Mrs.
Ernest Campeau after two weeks
holiday in Barbados staying at
Cacrabank, returned to Canada
yesterday morning, where both
Mr. Clarke and Mr. Campeau are
with T.C.A. in Montreal,

Present Plans

SEE that the Camera Club, are
re-sliarting their monthly meet-
ings tomorrow afternoon at 5 p.m.
at Wakefield, the British Councii
headquarters. This club was
formed about one year ago and
already has quite a few members,
but hope to enlarge their mem-
bership as these meetings con-
tinue.

Their present plans are to
discuss the forthcoming Advocate
Photo competition and the Annual
Exhibition.

Quick Work

N airmail letter via T.C.A.

timed in Montreal at 12.30
p.m. on Friday was opened at one
of the business offices in Bridge-
town yesterday morning at 9
o’clock. That’s certainly quick
work!

Originally Front Texas

} R. EDWARD McASHAN, who
M is originally from Texas has

en living for one and a half
years in Aruba where he is with
the Lago Oil Company, has been
holidaying in Barbados, staying
at the Ocean View Hotel. Yes-
terday he left here for Venezuela,
to connect up with K.L.M,. from
there to Aruba to-day. He was
here for ten days.

Back From Bermuda Trip

R. KENNETH DAVIS, Part-
ner of Messrs. Stansfeld
Scott and Co. Ltd. returned from
his Bermuda and Bahamas trip
yesterday by T.C.A. There was
no bad weather up that side as a
result of the Antigua hurricane,
although it was very hot.

By Beachcomber

induce people to fill up the form.
Also, every town should elect a
Census Queen, who would be
kissed by the Mayor after he had
signed his form. Mimsie Slop-
corner might tour England, as
Miss Census, and read out, on the
steps of Town Halls, such ques-
tions as, “Was your grandmother
(paternal) happily married?”

On Familiarisation Tour

R. THOMAS BLACKSTOCK,

representative of the Melville
avel Service in Toronto who
arrived from Trinidad on August
24th left yesterday morning by
T.C.A. for Bermuda, He is ena
familiarisation tour of the West
Indies, and will spend a short
while in Bermuda, having already
visited Trinidad, Jamaica and
Barbados, before he returns to
Toronto.

With only two days here, he
had a busy time and wished it
could have been longer. Sam
Lords, he said, presents a very
attractive ‘Old World’ atmosphere.
He thought however that the
island needs more accommodation
for tourists, as it has much to
offer its visitors.

Evans & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606

JUST IN = A

FINE NEW

DIAL 4220



LADIES’ CASUAL SHOES

In many Colours and Designs at

$4.58

$6.28

$7.00

LADIES’ STRAWS at 6a¢

YOUR SHOE STORE











ELLIO CCE POSSE

‘ t

ase
FOO POSCOS





~)
=

IN A CRICKET MATCH |

i
SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950

MADAME PARIS (Gardening Hints

r 7

BY JOAN

PARIS Sunday.
N a third floor apartment over-
looking the cocktail bar of the
Ritz Hotel, ornately furnished with
golden clocks, Venetian glass mir-
Tors, terra-cotta animals, and
glass, glass everywhere, a woman,
no longer young, lives as a
legend of the fabulous world

of Paris fashion.

She is Madame Chanel—a per-
fume was named after her— a
rich woman who made a fortune
between the two world wars but
who no longer dresses the inter-
nationally chic women.

She says: “One loses money
now in couture. I don’t like losing
money”.

MADAME CHANEL’S dress-
es: (above) Gipsy-type eve-
ning-gown in black and
raspberry. The skirt is separ-
ate from the bodice and made
in one enormous wrap-around
piece, Material is faille, the
frills edged with red to match

of slightly stiffened tulle. The

top the same cross-over line
in black silk faille.



But she dresses herself as only
herself can. Amid the glass
animals, the Chinese tables and
those hard, high, uncomfortable
sofas that the French love, she
posed for ROBB and myself in
the six dresses she is taking with
her to Venice this week.

They are simple dresses, with
the old “Chanel touch”, unique
because, though hundreds of
women would gladly buy them,
only their creator will wear them.

OBB chose two which illustrate
how a woman with courage



HARRISON

and personality, even if weil over
the 60 mark, can wear a dress in
flaming raspberry red, providing
the line is perfect.

And providing she knows—as
Chanel knoWs—every line and

movement of her own figure.
“Why”, said Chanel, throwing
wide her hands,

should a woman



be made to suffer in a dress in
which she cannot move from the
knees down, with a _ neckline
which is one long fear of exposure,
and a waistline which kills tne
enjoyment of a good meal?

“T live these days mostly in an
Atlantic liner between Paris and
New York. I need dresses that
I can roll into a ball and put on
at a moment’s notice”.

She pulled up the skirt of a
flouncing black dinner gown and
squashed it up in two hands—
“Viola!” she said.

{° is only fair to add that the

Chanel effect is also helped by
about three or four pounds—by
weight of jewellery.

“I”, said Chanel, ‘Now imitate
the false. Years ago I started the
‘dress jewellery’ vogue so that
women could wear ropes of pearls
and chunks of false stones
Now mine are real.”

The value? “I don’t even know”
said Chanel, “and if I did now is
not the time to talk about it when
one thinks of what has been hap-
pening in the South of France.

With a black, tulle dinnergown
worn with a small eye veil,
Chanel wore a triple rope of
pearls which reached to her
waist, a real ruby and emerald
necklace, an emerald pendant
the size of a pullet’s egg, pearl
earrings the size of a half-crown,
and rings reaching up to the mid-
dleknuckles of her anaes “9

WOMAN TO WOMAN:

The Beret Moves Back

By SUSAN DEACON
7PHE Basque beret, worn by
French porters. takes the place
next season of the large pliable
berets women have been wearing.
These new, small berets are now
worn straight, and slightly to the
back of the head. ,
In Paris, women are wearing
them with a wide meshed coarse
eye-veil or with a diamante clip
pinned straight on the front. These
berets are easy to wear with the
new hair styles. ss
Perfume points
AM constantly asked by women
the difference between toilet
water, Cologne and perfume.
Perfume is the strongest, most
concentrated scent. Cologne is the
weakest. 2
Toilet water is not strong enough
to be used as a regular perfume.
Use a light flower perfume in the

summer and a heavier. more spicy
one in the winter.
FANCIES THAT PASS...
Cloche hats .-. . The Doe-eyed
look... The Urchin Cut... White
shoes usually grubby.
Some ideas
ALL braid in different colours
is used to trim many of next
season’s clothes.
Here are some

noted: —

A collar of white silk ball braid
on a plain black dress. Black braid
edging the lapels of a dark green
jacket. A bJack plush beret cov-
ered with rows of brald.

Soft lights
ONCEALED lighting gives an
original effect to an ordinary
living-room. It is simple to arrange
and not expensive if low power
bulbs are used. Fix lights under
the curtain pelmet to switch on

ideas I have

For Amateurs

The Rese Garden

THE Rose has often been called
the “Queen of the Garden” and
most gardeners have had the
ambition at some time to grow
Roses.

The cultivation of Roses in Bar-—
bados is not difficult, although we
never get such good results as are
obtained in England, yet, with a
little knowledge, and some initial
trouble, Rose-trees will succeed
in Barbados well enough to make
the whole business of Rose grow-
ing well worth while.

Position

Rose-trees like an open sunny
spot, sheltered from excessively
high winds. They will not succeed
under the shade of trees or in a
bed infested with tree-roots.
Rose-trees are selfish plants, and
demand a bed or Tub all to them-
selves, so, do not put a border
of annuals around your Rose
beds, or stick in bits and pieces
Rf other plants here and there.

oose a sunny position free
from tree-roots (and remember
these can creep up even under
tubs) and if the spot is wind-
swept give the plants some pro-
tection from the wind. ‘

Size And Preparation Of

The Beds

For a single row of Rose-plants,
three feet is a comfortable width
to make the bed. For a double
row, a five foot wide bed is just
right, with the plants placed three
feet apart. To prepare the bed, dig
it out to a depth of two feet, but
should the ground be at all soggy,
dig out another foot, and put in
a layer of large stones for drain-
age, as Rose trees must have a
well drained bed. Now fill in the

cavity with a mixture of good
black mould leaf-mould, well
rotted cow manure and some

charcoal, In shaping up the bed
do not bank it too high, as this
causes the water to run off the
bed before it has a chance to
soak in, Let the bed settle and
find its own level for a week

re planting it, .
peRone-trees will also succeed if
planted in large tubs. Fill with
the same mixture as that given for

beds.
Planting

In planting the Rose-tree, do
not make the mistake of planting
(1). too deep, (2), too loosely.
If the plant is an imported one
see that the hole is wide enough
for the roots to be spread out
to their full length all around. If
the plant is taken from a pot,
turn it out of the pot with the

mould around it uae ape
removing the stones 4a e
pottom before planting man

both cases, tread the ground
firmly around the plant after it
is planted, as for Rose-trees to
succeed they must be firm and
tight in the ground, while the
surface soil must be kept loose
and well forked. +

Treatment

Give the Rose trees a good
soaking once a day. Avoid fre-
quent light sprinklings, as this
causes the roots to come too near
the surface seeking moisture
instead of striking down. Rose—
trees are rich feeders and need
regular applications of manure.
Cut off all dead flowers, and
dead wood, and, when picking
the Roses cut them with a good
length stem, as this keeps the
trees pruned, all the pruning tat
is necessary in this country.
During the dry months give the
Fose-trees a rest, by picking oif
all buds, lessening the watering,
and trashing over the beds after
the manner that a cane field is
trashed.

The best flowering time for
Rose-trees is during the rainy
season.

———_

when the curtains are drawn.
Cupboards with glass doors,
flowers arranged in a recess, book-
shelves and window bays all look
more attractive when softly lit.
London Express Service



Specially designed for Barbados, this
brown broque is now on sale in
the leading stores. See them for yourself

‘made by

JOHN WHITE



A, ony: ae he

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



At The Cinema:

War In The Pacific

By G. &
TWO of the bloodiest and most famous battles to take

nlace in the Pacific duri

World War It are depicted in

“SANDS OF IWO JIMA”, now showing at the Empire
Theatre. They are the battles of.Tarawa and Iwo Jima,
both of which will long be remembered by officers and
men of the United States Marine Corps, whose job it was
to capture these two Jap strongholds.

The rigours of and life
under battle conditions ot a squad
of U.S. Marines constitute the
story of this war film. Under the
hard tutelage of. a seasoned
sergeant who is alternately dis-
liked and ited by his men,
they are by him in their first
taste of actual warfare—the land-
ings at Tarawa—and finally in the
battle of Iwo Jima, where, after
four days of murderous fighting,
the Stars and Stripes is raised on
Mount Surabachi. Into these
events and backgrounds, which
are taken from authentic docu-
ments, are blended the conflicts,
camaradarie, and personal actions
and reactions encountered when
men of different education, back-
ground, faith and ideals are
thrown together under the stress
of war. But the points of interest
in the film are the battle scenes,
where the men, as a solid fighting
unit, take their place in the huge
panorama of battle

John Wayne and John Agar
have the two principal roles, the
former as the sergeant and the
letter as the young idealist, who
is a marine purely because it is
tradition in his family. Both men
give convincing performances, as
do all the other members of a
large cast which has been well
chosen to represent the different
types encountered in a group of
fighting men.

Made with the co-operation of
the United States Marines, real
combat footage is skilfully inter-
woven into the film sequences
with the result that the landings,
bombardments and battle scenes
have a quality of realism in the
actual sounds and sights of war.

“ROSEANNA McCOY”
Family feuds have long been

the subject of plays and novels,
from the Capulets and the Mon-



ENGLISH FOR AMERICANS

By Fred Doeerflinger

LONDON.
American tourists are chuckling
over some of the “quaint” and
“amusing” places they have “dis-
covered” while having a look-see
at the countryside.

They found both a Sharp Nose counties,
Bugle in Cornwall, a

and a

Twitchi in Devonshire and
Itchen Abbas in Hampshire.

fordshire.
Not

shire, and there is a Strawbe
Hill in Middlesex.

Surrey County boasts a Hogs

Back, Devonshire a Sheeps Wash
and Lincolnshire has both a Cow-
bit and a Swineshead.

In Laneashire tourists found 4
Bare Lane, a Daisey Field and
wondered about Besses O’ Th’
Barn and Chorlton-Cum-Hardy.

Ashby-De-La-Zouch in Leices-
tershire always hit them like
Spital-In-The-Street, Lincolnshire

Bat and Ball

In Kent county
located a Bat and Ball and a
Sandwich, in Derbyshire a Bols-
over and a Whatsandwell while
in Gloucestershire there was @
Paneeeae and a Chipping Sod-
Dury.

Leighton Buzzard and Luton
Hoo took the prizes for Bedford-
shire with Six Mile Bottom,

22, pee ericans. Who wi L
5 -to» pronounce Cwm,” Mon-
There is a Rum in Invernes- mouthshire, the secret ig to blow
shire, Scotland. a Beer in Devon- with your tongue through your
shire and a Rye House in Hert- teeth and say “whim.”

far from Cherry _ Tree, county
Lancashire, is Pear Tree, Derby- “Stewkey”, inhabitants in Ciren-
TTY e@ester, Gloucestershire insist on

the tourists



tagues down to the present day,
and in “Roseanna Mocoy™ now

aying at the Globe Theatre, a

mous American feud is brought
to the screen. The hostility be-
twéen the saturnine, mountain-
eering Hatfields and the God-
fearing farming McCoys is legen-
dary in America, and has been the
theme of folk-songs and ballads as
well as stories.

Against a background of Ken-
tucky mountains, the film tells the
— of the love of Johnse Hat-
field for Roseanna McCoy. It is
full of local colour and develops

struggle between

into a ‘tense
tw falies de old hatreds, as the
termine to prevent
the age.
There

has been no attempt to
glamourize the plain folk of Ken-
tucky, and the costumes, settings
and way of life are portrayed
accurately, There is an excellent
musical background and splendid
characterizations on the part of an

all star cast, includi: Farley
Granger, Charles Bickford and
Raymond Massey.

“WALLFLOWER”

Of lighter vein is “Wallflower”
now playing at the Aquatic Club.
From all reports, the accent in
this film is on youth, with plenty
of comedy and romance. Starring
Robert Hutton, Joyce Reynolds
and Janis Page, with Edward
Arnold playing the paternal role,
it is the story of a younger sister
who is resigned to playing second
fiddle

ever, with the help of her father,

she succeeds in winning the man| |

she wants from under her sister's
nose, only to have a situation de-
velop where she and her boy
friend land in jail. There should
be plenty of laughs, and the
ending is a happy one.

Cambridgeshire; Uphill, Somerset;
Chesshire;

; Leoudwater,
Buckinghamshire; Eye, Hereford~-
shire; Pokesdown, Hampshire;

Tar Pots, Essex and Zeals, Dorset
easy winners for their respective

Strange pronunciations baffled
ould dream

Locals in

stiffkey,
call

their

Norfolk
hometown

“Sister” as the correct pronunci-
ation, and the villagers of St.
QOast, Essex demand that the place
be called “St. Oath.”

When it comes to Welsh names
the Yankee tourists simply give
up. This reporter will leave it
to the reader to try to pronounce
for le, Aberystwyth, Llw-
chwr, Mynyddishlywn, Liancai-
ach, Llanerchymed, Llanuwchllyn
or Lianfairpwligwyngwllgogery~
ehwryndrobwllillantisiliogogogoch
(editor correct).

Yes, sir, that’s all one word
and the town is the first railway

in Angelsey, Wales, on the
m. line from Landon to Holy-
head. Most people call it “Lian-
fairpwil” and let it go at that.
re guides cut it to “Llian-
air.”



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PAGE FOUR





wr of the finances of the West Indies tearm? I agree with you,
this is a strange question in the mids? of all the rejoicing. The Oder of the day.
West Indians, who before this tour had never won a Test match in J. W. Byer,

England, now, by popular opinion, rank with Australia in proven
capacity to reduce English cricket to ashes.

Let us assume for the sake of argument that it will be possible
for the West Indies to visit Australia in 1952-53 or 1953-54, then what
are our chances for securing the services of the key men in this team?

In the first place I give my irrevocable opinion that one of the
safest measures is that each,of the amateur members of the 1950 West

team should receive a bonus of not less than £350 from the
fo Indies Cricket Board of Control out of the profits gained from
is tour.

IN THE PAST, NO BONUS

°
T is true that in the past we have never been able to lay any store

by from the profits gained from West Indies touring teams to behi

England and conversely from M.C.C. touring teams to the West Indies.
The 1950 tour presents a different picture and the West indian
Cricket Board of Control will receive profits of several thousands of
pounds.
Now is the time for some .angible appreciation to be given to
those who have sacriticed much in tne hope of earning little by com-
parative standards.

AMATEURISM v. PROFESSIONALISM

E in the West Indies have suffered much from this bogey of
so-called amateurism. Tne time is ripe for us to improve
upon this obviously unreal state of affairs.

It is common knowledge that every member of the 1948 Australian
team to England received a bonus of £800 from Bradman down to
Neil Harvey, the youngest member of the team, and there were no
“professionals” included in the Australian team,

W.I. FINANCES
SHALL make but a pasty appreciation of the financial svatus and
commitments of some of tie leading players on the West indies
team and this should be sufficient to subsvantiate the argument which i
am. posing.
Alan Rae, West Indies opening batsman will remain a law s.udent
at Lincoln’s Inn and C. “Boogies’ Williams, a member ot the stat? o1
Harrison College and a B.A., of Durham University, wul be staying on
in England on a year’s post-graduate course.

Clyde Walcott, who is one of the most curious cases of all, is an
insurance agent and his six months absence overseas will mean much.
Even in our moments of fondest imagination one could not think that
the not too lavish allowance of £4 per week would equate with any
decent percentage olf his commission as an insurance agent.

Valentine, the siow left arm bowling tind 1s due to fill a
post as a machinist in Jamaica if je does mot reconsider nis aecision
not to go to India as a member of the Commonwealth team ‘this winter,

WEEKES HAS KNEE TROUBLE

VERTON WEEKES, the West incies animated run getting machine
has cartilage trouble in one knee. He is to have the knee examined
and if an operation is necessary it will be performed in England before
he returns to Barbados,
He will return to England, of course, to play again in League
ericket in the Lancashire League,

_ This subject of professionalism versus amateurism, I have siudied
very carefully. I find that no one can seriously maintain that Sir
Donald Bradman didn’t receive considerable indirect financial benefit

his magnificent performances—apart from the gifts got from
wealthy patrons,

EASY JOBS

OLF “blues” in England, I even read, used to be offered good jobs

on the Stock Exchange and some of the lilies of the tennis
lawns who toiled not, neither did they spin (except on wet courts)
have made more than comfortable incomes out of sport firms.

Here in the West Indies there is not that ideal set up and the
West Indies Cricket Board must step into the breach.

I for’one have heard that there are tw. Cars and a bungalow
waiting for Sonny Ramadhin in Trinidad and one wonders why such
a fund has not yet been started here say for Walcott, who by virtue
of his profession must be many many dollars out of his pocket be-
cause of the West Indies tour.

SIX MEDALS FOR THE BOYS

Sport fans will be glad to know that Mr, Ernie Proctor, well
known local turfite and sportsman has ordered six silver medals with
gold facings from Mr. Louis Bayley, one of the colony’s best known
silversmiths to be presented to the six members of the Barbados
contingent of the 1950 West Indies team.

Hon'ble V. C. Gale will make the presentation and the jovial
Ernie tells me that he desires to make special mention of the able
manner in which Skipper John Goddard led his team and also of
the competent managership of Jack Kidney.

INTERESTING WATER POLO

At this point in the Water Polo season, the clubs are in a very
interesting position. Snappers by defeating Flying Fish on Thursday
are now in the lead with ten points and hive therefore put themselves
in a strong position at the beginning of the second round of the com-
petition. Fiying Fish and Bonitas are tied for second place with
eight points and Swordfish follow just one point behind. Barracudas
and Police complete the line-up in that order.

It is generally recognised in Water Polo circles that Snappers and
Fiying Fish are the strongyst teams in the league. So Snappers, by
defeating Flying Fish have, therefore, only the so-called ‘weaker’
teams to face, Notice I say ‘so-called,’ for Bonitas, Swordfish and
Barracudas have shown that they have plenty of fight in them and
it wouldn’t surprise me a bit if one of these teams puts it over Snap-
pers when they meet in the second round.

In the past week or so, however, Swordfish has lost two leading
players, but I hear Billy Gilkes is re-entering the game in the Sword-
fish centre line. Bonitas too have lost two of their leading players,
Harold Bynoe and Herbert Grannum, who have been replaced by
Ian Inniss and Alan Taylor, Flying Fish are also losing one of their
forts in the back line, as Tony Johnson will shortly be returning to
Canada to continue his studies, and Barracudas will be losing Keith
Lewis. The Snappers and Police line-ups remain unchanged.

Bonitas and Swordfish meet this Thursday, to decide who is going
to climb into position te challenge Snappers. The other fixture will
be between Barracudas and Police, who lie bottom of the league in
that order.

veteran

COMBERMERE vs. POLICE
Police (for 8 wkts) ........ 230

Police scored 230 runs for the
loss of 8 wickets against Comber-
mere after batting the whole day
at Combermere yesterday when
the third round of First Division
Cricket got started. The 230 runs
were built up chiefly by J. Byer’s
confident century at number four
before he was caught by Norville
nd the stumps off a slow ball
from Knight.

Throughout the day Police had
complete control of the Comber-
mere bowlers, and change after
change, until they eventually
bowled seven bowlers, made but
little impression on the stolidity of
the Police batsmen. The 230 runs
were scored off 77 overs.

Byer did not show marked pol-
ish and flash, but punished the
loose balls and batted with a cool
security which outdid Comber-
mere’s most strenuous efforts. He
hit 9 fours and one six, It onl
took him a short while at the
wicket to get the going of the
bowling, and thereafter, he timed
his strokes nicely. After he had
reached his 100, his keenness
slackened and he soon got caught.

H. Wiltshire with 24 and G.
Cheltenham 33, were the other two
tall scoring batsmen.

Pacer S. I. Smith, during a spell
of 20 overs of which 9 were maid-
ens, was the most successful howl-
er. He took four wickets for 44
runs, C, E. Beckles took two wick-
ets, but his bowling yielded 62
runs.

Police won the toss and decided
to bat on the good wicket. C.
Blackman and F. Taylor opened

their innings, and against the
pacers, S. I. Smith and M. E.
Murrell, began a cautious, but

confident period.

Both Smith and Murrell caught
a good length early and scoring
was uphill work, the best efforts
only conceding singles. With the
score 15. Taylor, who had so far
only scored four, was adjudged
lL.b.w, to a fast one from Smith in
his third over. His first two overs
had been maidens. In the last ball
of the same over, Farmer, who had
joined Blackman, made an uncer-
tain stroke and spooned the ball to
Murrell who took the catch. He
had made no additional runs.

With J. Byer and Blackman as-
sociated the mastery of the Com-
bermere attack was checked and
runs increased steadily. To keep
down the rate of scoring, skipper
Knight made a double change and
brought on his spin bowlers, Grant
and Seckles. Beckles got an accur-
ate length in his first over. but
Knight was treated with but
scant respect, He got a wicket in
his first over, however. It was
a slow ball which bowled Black-
man when he made a swiping
attempt The scoreboard then read
4 ls

Warner Out

Warner and Byer carried the
score to 76 before Warner was

caught by Knight in Beckles’
seventh over. The luncheon score
was 106 for the same four wickets.
Byer’s wicket was still intact with
48. He had hit one six and four
fours. Wiltshire was then not out
with 12 runs.

After lunch, Byer and Wiltshire
settled down to punish the bowling
and change after change was
effected without result until the
two had added 57 runs to the score.
It was Wiltshire who was sent
back to the pavilion after scoring
24 runs. He was completely beaten
and bowled by a fast change from
spinner Beckles, That was Beckles’
second wicket.

For five wickets the total was
133. Byer was then in his sevens
ies,

Like other partnerships which
had given Combermere bowlers
much trouble, Cheltenham joined
Byér to increase the pile. These
two batsmen batted carefully, but
did not spare the loose balls.

With Police 194, Byer backdrove
Knight to the boundary for four to
complete his individual century.

had hit nine fours and a six.
He did not survive long after.
After he had reached three figures,
two runs later he edged one to
Norville behind the stumps. It was
off Knight whom he had made
the century hit, that he was
caught, The scoreboard read 205










°

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

J. W. BYER SCORE 100FOR POLICE

Wanderers In The Lead
In Game With Pickwick

FINE WEATHER prevailed yesterday as the third series of
First Division Games opened, and bright cricket was the

iy *
Police batsman helped himself to_a
century at the expense of Combermere,
best individual score for the day.

and this was sthe

—6—102, The other two wickets
fell quickly afterwards.

COLLEGE vs, CARLTON
Carlton 22... 6. ccc cece seen e 148
College (for 1 wkt.) ...... 67

HARRISON COLLEGE are in a
strong position of gaining
innings lead in their First Divi-
sion match against Carlton at the
College grounds

Cariton won the toss and went
out to bat on a perfect —_
They only managed to score 1:
in reply College are 67 for. the
loss of one wicket. ‘

skipper Hutchinson and Denise
Wiliams, who shared in a
wicket partnership, saved
from looking like a disastrou
fall. They took the score from
23 for the loss of four wickets to
119 before Hutchinson was ovt
for 59. Williams knocked up 37.

The College attack and fielding
was good. Cammie Smith sent
down 17 overs and capture three
for 33. Corbin took three for 40
and King two for 26. The other
wicket was taken by Worme a!
the cost of six runs after he had
bowled four overs,

The College opening pair C
Smith and M. Worme broke dow"
the Carlton opening attack and
they were forced to bring on thei:
spinners. Worme gave Kennv
Hutchinson a return.

Smith and R. Rock scored
rapidly until stumps were drawn
At the close Smith was 44 not ou’
and Rock 14.

—19

The Start

Carlton opened their first inn-
ings with L. Hutchinson and
G. Edghill. Edghill played the
first three balls from J. Corbin,
who opened the College attack
from the Park end. He took .
single off the fourth ball. In the
fifth ball Hutchinson, who went
up to face, was clean bowled
before he could open his account.

N. S. Lucas filled the breach
but when the total was nine
C. Smith at first slip took a bril-
liant left hand catch off the bowl-
ing of Corbin to dismiss Edghill
for four.

Skipper R. Hutchinson was
next out to bat. A run later Lucas
edged the second delivery of Cor-
bin’s fourth over and wicket-
keeper Harrison took an easy
catch, Lucas made five.

K. A. Greenidge, who part-
nered Hutchinson, appeared to be
settling down when at 23 he was
caught by V. Smith off the bowl-
ing of Worme, who took over
from Corbin at the Park end. His
score was six.

D, Williams shared the fifta
wicket partnership with skipper
Hutchinson. This pair changed
she whole atmosphere of the
game. They quickly settled down
and runs came easily.

Hutchinson soon after passed
his quarter century and by lunch
they had added 53 runs—Williams
was 21 and Hutchinson 38.

On resumption Corbin bowled
from the Park end and Blackman
the Combermere. Hutchinson
took three runs off the fourth
delivery of Corbin’s tenth over
to take his score to 50 and the
total to 100. Williams afterwards
reached his quarter century.

At 4.15 o’clock, when the total
was 119, and the partnership had
added 96, Skipper Hutchinson
attempted to glide the fourth
delivery of King’s over but the
ball spooned. Rock ran around
from first slip to fine leg and
took a brilliant catch to dismiss
Hutchinson for a well played 59

Williams Out

With the score reading 119 for
5 W. Greenidge partnered Will-
iams. In the following over from
C. Smith, Williams was caught
Ly Worme at first slip for 37.

Marshall was next in but at 127
he was unfortunately run out be-
fcre he could open his account. A
Cox, who was playing his first
game in this Division, filled the
breach.

He opened with a four to the
leg boundary off King. Greenidge
made a flashy 15 before he was
stumped by wicket-keeper Harri-





SCOREBOARD

EMPIRE vs. SPARTAN
SPARTAN’S—ist Innings

an

L, F. Harris b Alleyne . ia
T, Pilgrim ¢ Fields b Alleyne 13
K, Walcott b Alleyne 0
N.-\Wood b Williams ; 29
K, Bowen Lb.w. b Milling 15
B. D. Morris c Fields b Williams ul
c.o0 Sitens c Harper b Williams 2
F, Phillips not out 6
£, Smith b Williams . 0
Extras: b. 11; 1b. 1; nb. 4 16
Total ....... certieshads ae
Fall of wickets: 1 for 24; 2 for 31; 3
for 58; 4 for 58; 5 for 61; 6 for 95; 7 for
116; 8 for 119; 9 for 127; 10 for 127.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
. M R W.
H. Barker... . 1 23 1
E. A. V. Williams 905 2 33 5
E. Millington 2 2 1
Cc. Alleyne 4 S$ @ 3
EMPIRE’S—ist Innings
O. M, Robinson c Bowen b Phillips 19
B. Bourne ec Walcott b Phillips o
E. A. V. Williams not out . 25
E. Cave not out 20
Extras: b. 3 3
Total (for 2 wkts.) 67
iwG ANALYSIS
BOWL 0. M R w.
. Phittips 8 1
Me E Smith 4 0 13 0
a K. Bowen 5 1 15 0
L. F. Harris 6 2 il 0
K. Walcott € 2 8 0
POLICE vs. COMBERMERE
POLICE—Ist Innings
Cc. Blackman b Grant 19
F. Taylor l.b.w. b Smith ’ 4
Capt. Farmer c Murrell b Smith 0
J. Byer c Norville b Knight 102
T. Warner c Knight b Beckles 15
H. Wiltshire b Beckles 24
G. Cheltenham b Smith . 33
FE. Brewster not out 13
B, Morris b Smith 5
Extras 14
Total (for 8 wkts.) .........+ 230
Fall of wickets 1-15; 2—15; 3—46; 4~
16; 5-133; 6—205; 7--222; 8—230.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M. R. W.
M. BE. Murrell il 1 30 0
S. I, Smith 20 9 44 4
G. N. Grant 4 0 20 1
Cc. E. Beckles 22 3 62 2
oO. V. Elliott 12 1 32 0
F. Harris 6 0 21 0
O. R. Knight 2 0 ¥ 1
WANDERERS vs. PICKWICK
PICKWICK—Ist Innings
A. M, Taylor 1.b.w. b D. Atkinson 25
G. L. Wood ¢ Proverbs b N. Marshall 6
T. S. Birkett L.b.w, b D. Atkinso 4
H, Kidney b D. Atkinson . 14

son after going forward and miss-
ing one from C. Smith. Warren
went out but was soon caught by
the substitute for J. Williams off

the bowling of King for three.
K. Hutchinson was next in but
he was soon after clean bowled
by C. Smith before he opened his
account. The Carlton innings clos-
ed at 148 with Cox seven not out.
Cammie Smith and W. Worme
opened for the school boys. Smith
scored four runs off the first over
from Edghill from the Park end.
They carried the total to 19 be-
fore Worme was caught and
bowled in the second delivery of
K. Hutchinson’s first over from
the Park end. Worme made four.
R. Rock partnered Smith who soon
after passed his quarter century
by taking two fours, a two and
a Single off the fifth over from
W. Greenidge, Smith continued to
boundaries freely off the

neat over from K. Hutchinson,
ip to when stumps were drawn
this pair were still going after the

bowiers.

EMPIRE vs, SPARTAN

Spartan 66. wusasilek

Empire (for 2 wkts. 67)

E. A. V. “Foffie’ Williams in an
accurate bowling performance
yesterday at Bank Hall, took 5
of Spartan’s wickets to play the
major role in the dismissal of the
yg team for the small score of
127.

Williams took these wickets in
10.5 overs and only conceded 33
runs, He sent down two maidens,

Spartan took first turn at the
wicket and by 4.30 p.m. were all
out for 127 runs. Empire, at the
close of play were 67 runs for
two wickets,

Charles Alleyne of Empire alsu
turned in a good howling perform.
ance, taking 3 for 26. ;

Quite a few batsmen reached
double figures. The best score for
Spartan was 29 by N. Wood and
E, A. V. Williams is 25 not out for

Empire,
The Game

Spartan won the toss on a per-
fect wicket and decided to bat.
Their innings was opened by A.
Atkins and S. Griffith while
E. A. V. Williams and H. Barker
opened the attack for Empire.

Atkins and Griffith started con-
fidently and took the score on to
24 before Atkins was clean bow!-
ed by Barker for 6. He played
back to a good length ball and
was completely beaten by the
pace. Griffith was then 11 not out.





— all day long

*

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D. Evelyn c D. Atkinson b T. Pierce
. King e St. Hill b T. Pierce
Camacho b D. Atkinson ..
Hoad ¢ D. Atkinson b E. Atkinson
. Inniss stpd. (w.k. Skinner) b
T. Pierce
R, Jordan not out...
Marshall b D. Atkinson

Extras ve

= opor

Total

of
5

1—8; 2-25;
@—51; 7—51; 2—70;
iG aS

wickets ;
—51;

ll

4

-» 15.4

lerce il
WANDERERS—iIst Innings

Marshall b H. Jordan ........

Atkinson not out

Proverbs c b H.
Atkinson not

2
1
7

SRokz

|3| eee sang



vomz nomz

out .

Total (for 2 wkts.) .

Fall of wickets: 1—43; 2—120.
COLLEGE vs. CARLTON
CARLTON—Iist Innings

Hutchinson b J. Corbin ...

. Edghill ¢ Smith b J. Corbin

. Lucas ¢ wkpr. (Harrison) b

pe ee ear

oe U_Smien vb Wore

Hu! c b

Williams ec Worme b Smith

Greenidge c wkpr. (Harrison)

b Smith . te ‘

Marshall run out

Cox not out ‘

Warren c sub b King

Hutchinson b Smith

Extras

AREM
Total ...

Fall of wickets: 1—1; 2—9; 3—10;
23; 5—119; @—127; 7—127; 8—144; 9—147.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
12
2
4
12
17

| =| feo Sa, sf

t

Corbin
S

Coco Ome
S8Randz

n 8

ON COLLEGE—1

Smith not out. +4

Worme c & b K. Hutchinson

Rock not out ...........
Extras

Total (for 1 wkt.)
BOWLING ea

a,

H.

M.

K.

Cc.

Cc,
st Innings

Cc, -

M.

R.

aned ounmowd

noooood | 3

AREATO
FNnRarwo
woOCoHKs



L, F. Harris joined Griffith. This
pair only added 7 runs for the sec-
ond wicket. Williams, who was
bowling steadily all the while from
the Southern end, got Griffith to
drive out at one well up on his
leg stump.

Griffith mistimed and was bowl-
ed neck and crop.

With the score at 31 for z
“Torry” Pilgrim partnered Harris,
The 50 was sent up in as many
minutes and Skipper Alleyne
brought on Millington in place of
Barker and himself from the
Southern end.

Alleyne’s third ball of his third
over saw Harris going back to the
pavilion for a well played 14.

Harris played forward to a leg
break pitched on his leg stump,
did not get a touch and the ball
took his centre stump.

Spartan was then 58 for the loss
of three wickets with Pilgrim 10

not out.
Two Balls

K. Walcott, the next man in,
could only survive two balls from
Alleyne. The first he played late
on to his pads and the second he
was bowled in attempting to cut
an off break pitched on the off
stump.

Walcott did not score and the
total score remained at 58 with 4
wickets taken. In came N, Wood.

The score rose to 61 as Milling-
ton bowled another over yielding
3 runs,

Alleyne, who had now taken 2
wickets in 3 maiden overs, ended
his fourth over by taking another
wicket without a run scored off
him. Pilgrim was his third victim.
He was caught at cover by Fields
for 13 when he drove at one of
Alleyne’s deliveries. This brought
Wood and K. Bowen ‘.

The scoreboard read 61 for
and Alleyne’s figures were 4 overs,
4 maidens, 3 wickets.

Another bowling change was
effected, with Millington brought
back from the Southern end and
pacer Barker from the Bank Hall

end.

Millington got Wood at 14 to
edge to Robinson at second slip
but Robinson put it down,

Good Stand
Wood and Bowen retrieved Spar-
tan’s position by making a sixth
wicket stand of 34 runs. Bowen,
however, did not hold on any
longer. With his score at 15, he
tried to pull a short pitched ball
from Millington to square leg and

@ On Page 5

SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950



A visit to the Government Farm at tne Pine Estate during the

. week has set me thinking very seriously about an aspect of racing

in Barbados, and Trinidad too, for that matter, which causes me

. considerable annoyance. It is mainly to do with the breeding side

of the sport.

But why, I would like to know, is Racing not regarded as a
kind of industry in these two colonies. When compared with racing
in England, where there is a National Stud, it seems to me that
.we have far more reason for regarding racing in these islands as
an industry than there is in the United Kingdom.

At first glance these may appear to be exaggerated words.
Racing in England, one will be tempted to say, has been carried on
now for twe hundred years or more and today there are a few
thousand horses taking part at numerous meetings with millions of
people in attendance, either betting or taking some active part in
the upkeep of horses and tracks, etc. But the fact remains that
racing in England, no matter how many people are employed in the
process, or how much is paid in taxes to the Government, is still run
chiefly for the benefit of those who own the race tracks. If a race
track ceases to make a profit for its shareholders it is not long
before it ceases to function altogether.

Now here, in this part of the West Indies we do not suffer by
comparison when it comes to the number of people pro ratio to the
population employed in carrying on the racing game, or the number
of horses in training in relation to the number of people who can
afford to keep them. But we are decidedly in a better position when
it comes to the question of profit, for, racing in these islands is run
for racing’s sake, and no other. That is, all profits made from racing
out here is immediately put back into the game itself and barring
the Government, the lucky punter and ticket holder, the lucky horse
owner, and numerous hard worked employees of the various racing
bodies, there is no other section of the community which benefits
from the revenue derived from racing. In addition to this, racing
also causes a number of people to be employed simply to look after
the welfare of the horses themselves,

Having established the fact that racing cut here is run on a non-
profit making basis and taking into consideration the revenue, em-
ployment and recreation which it provides for the community as a
whole, why, then, should the local government exclude the thorough-
bred race horse from its stock breeding activities? As far as I am
concerned there is no satisfactory answer to that question.

But what makes it worse is the fact that the Government, which
has an annual revenue of some £10,000 from racing, actually had
a thoroughbred stallion standing at the Pine Estate, and, would you
believe it, sold him to one of the other islands. As an incidental it
is interesting to note that this stallion, William’s Hill, had his first
progeny appear on the race track at our recent meeting and although
only a half-bred he still managed to run second once to Best Wishes
while he defeated his other rivals who were all thoroughbreds.

But right now I am not concerned with whether William’s Hill
will be a success as a sire of race horses or not. What I would like
to see is not only another stallion bought but some thoroughbred
mares as well. Spread them around the various Agricultural stations
and breed pedigreed horses just as pedigreed cows, goats, sheep, pigs
and Guinea pigs are bred there today. Above all let us be rid of
the idea that thoroughbred race horses, just because they cannot ba
eaten, render no useful service to the community.

ARIMA TO-DAY — Sangre Grande.....

The above, if I am not mistaken, is the triumphant cry of the
saga boys as they wend their inebriated way from the race meeting
which forms part of the celebration of the Feast of Santa Rosa in
the town of Arima, Trinidad, B.W.I. I have never been there at
this time so I speak merely from hearsay, But I am told on good
authority that everybody has a whale of a time.

Well the race meeting opened yesterday and normally I should
have had an opportunity to listen in at my radio and give you a few
impressions in this column today. But as I write this I happen to
be enjoying a few days of rest at the Edgewater Hotel, Bathsheba.
Consequently I can do no more than make mention of the fact that
one of our major race meetings is likely to come off.

However at least one of the most important races on the pro-
gramme, the Derby Trial Stakes, is not due to be run off until the
second day and therefore I hope that by next Sunday I will be able
to draw some conclusions from the result of this classic. Meanwhile
the feature Cipriani Memorial will have taken place by the time
this appears and I expect Blue Streak will have played a prominert
part. I also noticed that Ocean Pearl was once again entered in an
A class distance when her owners put her in this race, and I shall be
very surprised if she does anything of note. However I think she has
splendid chances in the sprints now that the best sprinter in the West
Indies, September Song, has been removed from the scene.

The Trinidad two-year-olds also make their debut to South-
Caribbean racing at the Arima meeting. This year I notice they are
not as numerous as last season but of course that does not mean that
they may not be as good. Next week I should imagine we should
also be able to express a few opinions about these youngsters. Until
then



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SUNDAY, AUGUST 27,

1950



To hmprove
British Empire
Policemen

MAJOR R. A. Stoute, Deputy
Commissioner of Police, returned
to the island last week after at-
tending a Senior Officer’s course
at Police College, Ryton-on-Duns-
more, near Coventry.

This College was opened two
years ago by the Home Secretary
Mr. Chuter Ede, with a view of

increasing the efficiency of the
Police services of the British
Commonwealth,



MAJOR R. A, STOUTE
It was formerly an

industrial
workers’ camp and is situated
Jess than a miles from the beau-
tiful Warwickshire village of
Ryton-on-Dunsmore,

At the College with Major
Stoute were 190 men and four
women—none below the rank of
Sergeant. On completion of the
course the students are generally
promoted,—Major Stoute being
recently made Deputy Commis-
sioner of Barbados Police Force,

Fifty-three year old Brigadier
Duncan Dunn, who was a soldier
for 34 years, is Commandant of
the College

No Instructors
There are no instructors ui the
, College, instead there is a direct-
ing staff made up of specially
elasen officers whose job it is to
guide the students.
While Major Stoute
Chief Inspector Bert Palmer,
who played a big part in the
Liverpool Cameo murder case,
took part in many debates with
Colonial students.

was there,

At Ryton, rural policemen are
given the chances of learning
first-hand work of men _ from
Scotland Yard, and many of the
subjects dealt with are beyond
the normal range of police acti-
vities.

The College Library has a col-
lection of over 1,000 books.

Every student has to give two
lectures—one on his speelal sub-
ject, the other is chosen for him,

There are no fatigues, roll call,
examinations or house rules,
They all wear uniform at morn-
ing sessions but are afterwards
free to wear civilian clothes.

A Mess President is appointed
every week while on Thursdays
the “dress dinner” is an establish-
ed social event.

The Commandant takes a keen

interdst in practical demonstra-
tions of police work which the
various groups in turn. give in

the College Theatre. These dem-
onstrations are written, acted and
produced by the students and are
presented in two acts.
Recreation includes billiards,
archery and play-reading.



Hurricanes

Win At Polo

Fast chukkas were played by
members of the Barbados Poio
Club at the Garrison yesterday
when Hurricanes won one over
Cyclones by 2 goals to one. The
other two chukkas were played to

a draw after a “no quarter”
struggle.

This was the fourth in a series
of practice games in which team
have assumed names instead of it
being just a case ot Red versus
Blue.

Mark Edghill shot the tv.u geals
for Hurricanes and Colonel Mich-
elin scored the one for Cyclones

Nearing completion is the
pavilion which the Government
has given the Club permission
erect on the Savannah.

17 Tenants
More For
Pine Estate

THE Housing Board at a meet-
ing yesterday approved the selec-

tion of 17 pew tenants for house:
wt the Pine Housing Sstate
Among the new tenants selected
is Frederick Lewis whose house
collapsed at Hothersal Turning
recentiy.

Lewis, among others, was tu

have got a house at the Pine
before, but had to wait while the
Government aided victims of last
year’s flood. Seventeen people
have been selected for new houses.

Tenants at the Pine Hili wil
be allowed to keep feathered

stock, sheep and goats, the Board
decided. Any pens or enclosures
erected by the tenants for that
purpose must be approved by the
Board.

The Board discussed the build-
ing of a main traffic road at the

Pine. and it was decided to
recommend to the Government
to construct a road. connecting

the Pine Cross Road with the
existing 18-foot road to the hous-
ing estate.

Transportation will then be a
less difficult problem.

Mr, John Beckles M.B.E., asked
what had been done about the
erection of a small pavilion fo
the Deacons Road Playing Field
and was told by the Board’s Sec-
retary, Mr. T. Q. Lashley, that
it was expected that the matter
would be dealt with by the Leg-
islature shortly.

In connection with the case of
a tenant at Belfield who opened
a shop at the Area—an offence
against the Board’s Regulations—
a letter was read from Mr.
H. Proverbs informing the Board
that arrangements were being
made to purchase a spot to which
to remove the shop.

The Board allowed Davis, the
tenant, four weeks in which to
settle the matter,

Football
Results

: LONDON, Aug. 26

¢ Scottish League Cup Division A:
Airdrieonians 2, Motherwell 6.
Clyde 4, Aberdeen 1,
Dundee 0, Hibernian 2



Aban-
doned after seventy minutes
torrential rain,
East Fife 1, Celtic 1.
Hearts 2, Partrick Thistle 0
Rangers 6, Morton 1.
Saint Mirren 2, Falkirk 0.
Third Lanark 1, Raith Rovers 0.
First Division:—
Arsenal 2, Tottenham

9

ol

Hotspur
Athleti.

Bolton Wanderers 2, Manchester
United 0.

Derby County 4, Astonville 2

Fulham 2, Wolverhampton Wan.
derers 1.

Hud@¢ersfield. Town 2, Ports-
mouth 1,
Liverpool 4, Sunderland 0.
Middlesbrough 3, Chelsea 0.
Newcastle United 1, Everton 1,
Sheffield Wednesday 0, Burnley

Blackpool 0. Chariton

9,

1.

West Browich Albion 1, Stoke
City 1.

Third Division Northern:—

Barrow 2, Oldham Athletic 1.

Bedford City 2, Halifax Town 6

Carlisle United 8, Tranmere
Rovers 1.

Chester 3, Darlington
; Crowe Alexandra

Mansfield Town 1, Scunthorpe
United 1.

New Brighton
United 0.

Rotherham 5, Wrexham 0.

Shrewsbury Town 1, Lincoln
City 2.

York City 1, Bradford 3.

Second Division:

Birmingham City
Town 1.

Blackburn Rovers Leyton
Town 0.

Brentford 1, Leeds United 2.

Cardiff City 2, Nottingham
County 0.

Chesterneld 1, Barnsley 2.

Coventry City 1, Preston North
End 0.

Leicester City 6, Queen’s Park
Rangers 2.

Manchester City 5, Bury 1.

Southampton Town 1, Sheffield
United 0.

Scottish League Cup Division B:

Arbroath 1, Albion Rovers 0,

Dunfermere Athletic 5, Kilmar-
nock 4,

Forfar Athletic 3, Alloa Athletic

1.
0, Gateshead

1, Hartlepools

1, Grimsby

1

’

1.

Hamilton Academicals 1, Queen
of The South 1.

Saint Johnstone 2.

Cowdenbeath 2.
Stenhouse Muir 3, Dundee
United 2.





Recent Arrivals in Books

INCLUDE

PLAYFAIR CRICKET ANNUAL
AND

CRICKETERS
WEST

FROM THE
INDIES

ON SALE AT

ADVOCATE
JOHNSON'S

STATIONERY,
STATIONERY,

ROBERTS & CO.
COLE'S STATIONERY,

BOWEN

and TODDS STATIONERY STORE

& SONS

- Kmguwire Early —



oneness
a





BARBADOS CYCL

SUNDAY
ING

s





ADVOCATE

ACE

At left Ken Farnum, the Barbados eycling ace who recently returned from a successful Interna-

tional Cycle and Athlet)
He is seen at the rigl
A Gordon, B.G’s. “A
Farnum was

mile events

ul recel



firs?



th



Meet in British Guiana ;
ving the gold medal for winning the special two mile event.
‘hampion is on his immediate left. ‘
vo mile interaational race and also won the two mile, three 1



Middlesex Score
228 Against W.LI.

Robertson Hits 105 In Good

Batting

A CENTURY ‘by Jack

Robertson

Display

LONDON, August 26.
in determined mood,

featured the first day’s play between Middlesex and West

Indies at Lord’s. Rebertson

assistance from John Dewes and Denis Compton.

displayed sound batting with
Batting

just under four hours he hit 12 fours in his 105,



Dewes, going torward played
ball from Valentine on to his
wicket and Bill Edrieh, after

shaping confidently was leg before
Robertson produced
tive drives and

ome elle

strikes tc

hit seven tours in hiv fr fly
On a pitch which gaye little help
even after heavy rain hed held
up play for an hour around tex
time, West Indies bowle! God-
dard in particular kept t bat
men playing at the ball, and
fielding was well up to ther



high standard. On the resump
tion after the delay Rehert

his century reaching 103 out af
i78. At 183 he was fourth

being well caught on the le






by the wicket-keeper. By s
methods Sharp and Brown ‘took
the Middlesex total to 228 at ihe

close. The attendance was 13,000
The teams: —

Middlesex: D. Compton
tain); J. G. Dewes; J. Robertson;
W. J. Edrich; H. Sharp; S. M.
Brown; J. Sims; L. Laws; J. J
Warr; J. Young; A. E. Moss

West Indies: J. Goddard (Capt.),
A. Rae; R. Marshall; F. Worrell; E.
Weekes; C. Walcott; G. Gomez; R.

(Cap-

Christiani; H. Johnson; J. Storl-
meyer; and A. Valentine.
The “.art
Middlesex won the toss and

probably, because of the counte

attraction at the Oval, Surrey v

Lancanshire, the crowd for the
last appearance in London of the
tourists, numbered only abot

6,000 when Dewes and Robertson
opened the Middlesex inning

The weather was cloudy with a
stiff breeze blowing, and Dewes
and Robertson felt their way
carefully against accurate earl;
bowling by Johnson and Gomez
The latter found Robertson's paa
with successive balls but the
Middlesex man replied with two
-plendid fours, a cover drive and

a hook. ‘
Johnson lifted the ball awk-
wardly and appealed ainst



THE SINGER DEALERS IN
Left to Right J. M. Kidney,
P. J I L,, I

k ud



WEST IND

NOTTINGHAM

JACK "ROBERTSON

both batsmen After an hour,
with the total at 38, Goddard
made his first change Valent:
for Gore? Scoring became still
slower. At 47 Dewes mishit
full toss off Valentine straight t
mid-on where Stolimeyer dropp«
the eatech. Valentine was
long denied the wicket, for
running out played the ball on
‘is stumps. The opening pair he
made 53 in 84 minutes
Robertson took four pvoundaries
off Marshall after Dewes had lefi
and his 50 came in 108 minute

n

Dev

Edrich nit tne ball firmly, but
could no* penetrate the field, anc
at 82 he moved into a good ball

from Johnson and fell |.b.w
Three runs were added befur
lunch,

After Lunch
Johnson and Marshall yenewed
ihe attack after lunch and kept
the batsmen quiet.



stroke off Marshall

ile and six

Robertson cou'd score only aa
occasional legside run and Comp
ton took 20 minutes
score,

The fielding was of the custom-
ary high standard for the West
Indies with Goddard outstanding
The batsmen were playing at the
ball rather than forcing it away

Compton was unusually quiet
until he scored seven with one
three run
and, four overthrows were added

Goddard declined the new bail,
preierring tt) keep Valentine on
at the Nursery End, and himself
taking over at the other

Valentine was unable to turn the
ball mueh but at 146 Goddard
moved one away and bowled
Compton who was haping to
drive. The third wicket stand with
Robertson, much more re-

ained partner, yielded 64 runs

An effortless off-drive off God
card took Robertson ind» the 80's
Goddard called for the new bal!
157. Johnson used it against
Robertson who had only just play

s

to open hi

al

ed the firs’ ball te leg when raic
came in torrents
Rain at Tea
Rain delayed play just cver an
hour On the resumption Johnson

bowled two balls to complete hi
rain-interrupted over and Gome
took over al the other end

R berison hooked Gomez to the
quare boundary and cutting
the next ball for his twelfth fou
went to 103 madg ou 178 in
three and three quarter hours, He
stayed ten more minutes before
Johngon had him finally caugh! on
the legside by wicketkeeper Wai-
cott to end a workmanlike inning

ot

Sharp and Brown the next pali
showing occasional aggressive
strokes against Johnson
Goddard and Valentine stayed to
rether until stumps were drawn

th Micilesex 228 runs for four
wicke’s

Following are the scores:—

MIDDLESEX—tIst Innings

Gomez,



J. Dewes b Valentine 2
J »bertson ¢ Walcott b Johnson 105
N Edrich i.b.w. b Johnson 8
PD. Compton b Goddard 38
harp not out 21
srOv not out 32
Extras 3
Total ifor 4 wkt 2728
Fal! of wiekets Lief; 2-82; 9-146
4-18:

Sports Club
Meets Tomorrow

An Extraordinary Meeting of
he Advocate Sports Club will be
held st the Printers Department
on Monday, August 28 at 4.30 p.m

Included in the agenda for the
vening is their proposed tour to
Trinidad im 1951,

IES TEAM AT NOTTINGHAM,

a,

See

provided transport for

Manager, John 8S. Wooley (Singer d«

A. Rae, ©. B. Williams, K. Trestra





ne W.I. Cricketers by putting at th
in Nottingham), John Goddard (Capt.)

Ma E. Weeke R. Christian
wl i j & War





First Division Cricket

@ From page 4
was adjudged Lb.w. Six wickets
were down for 95 and Wood was
19 not out when the interval was
taken,
The first over after lunch was
sent down by Alleyne from the

Bank Hall end and in that same
over 106 went up on the tins in
117 minutes.

Bourne deputised for Drayton
who was hurt behind the’ stumps
The seventh wicket fell at 117
when Wood drove over a_ well
pitched ball from Williams and
was clean bowled é
Williams came back in his next
vver to take the eighth Spartan
wicket. Morris made a big hit,
dic not connect properly, and was
caught at mid-on by Fields for 11
I’. Phillips filled the breach. He
saw his partner Gittens caught
by Harper at mid-on off Williams
w 2. Williams bowled a slow
leg break well up which Gittens

misimed. The score was 127
for 9

Last men in, B, Smith was given
ene balt by Williams. He wes
beaten and bowled for nought
Thillips carried back his bat for
6 runs

Empire Batting

Ympire started on their first

innings at about 440 pm. Rob-

inson and Bourne opened to the
bowling of Phillips and Smith.

They were off to a bad start,
losing Bourne for nought off the
bowling of Phillips with only 3
rvnas an the tins.

Phillips tewled an. in-swinger.
moving outside the leg stumo
“iticing Bourne to hook. The ball
truck the upper edge of the bat
ind flew up giving Walcott at
eeond slip a dolly catch.

Williams and Robinson met
‘nd took the score on to 24 when
‘he first bowling change was
made. Bowen was brought on
from Phillips’ end while Phillips
vos changed around to the Bank
Hall end,

The second wicket fell to Phil-
lips at 30 when Robinson pushed
a rising ball on the leg stump
into the hands of Bowen at short

leg. Robinson» scored 19 while
Williims was 11 not out.

Next in was Cave, who with
Williams, sent up the 50 in 56

minutes. Skipper Walcott bowled
himself, L. F. Harris and brought
back Phillips but these changes
did not worry the two batsmen
At close of play, Empire had
scored 67 for 2 wickets, Williams
20 net out and Cave 20 not ort
WANDERERS yv. PICKWICK
Pickwick . i
Wandercrs (for 2 wkts), i741
On a perfect wicket Pickwick
were bowled out for 114 runs
when they met Wanderers, Their
collapse was due mainly to the
eady bewling of Denis Atkinson
vho TOUR
4 runs -tter bowling 15 overs
Wandeters in their first innings
have replied with 174 runs for the
loss of two wickets with Eric At-
son 6! not out and his brother,
Denis, 44 not out
Pick vick winning the toss open-
ed their batting with A. M, Tay-
icy and G. L, Wood to the bowling
of Norman Marshall and Eric At-

kinson. A. M. Taylor took the first
bell of the day form Marshall
nd was completely beaten by the
tall which swung away to the
lips In the third ball Taylow
tcok a single and Wood played
it the remainder of the over.

Taylor in taking strike from Eric
Atkinson in his first over was not
setties.so well over the ball and
frequently edged to slip

In Marshall’s second over Wood
executed a beautiful on drive
which yielded him four runs, but
was finely eaught by G. Proverbs
in Marshall's fifth ball. The score-
beard then read 8—1—6.

T. S. Birkett then came in to
ioin Taylor and he quietly play-
ed the last ball to midoff, Mar-
ball now bowling at medium pace
sent down a maiden to Taylor

hile Birkett at the other end
elso played out a maiden from
Nenis Atkinson in his first over.
hirkett’s end soon came when he
rttempted to hook Denis Atkin-

n and was given out leg before

Left hander Kidney followed
Pirkett and opened his scoring
ith a drive whieh got him a
nele. Taylor continued to bat
ell and Norman Marshall after
‘owling nine overs was relieved

}y Tom Peirce from the pavilion
eid. Peirce sent down his first
ever to Kidney who scored two in

1cir disposal 8.M.1,500 Singer Cars.
Sir Pelham Warner, H. Johnson,

i, A. Valentine and F. Worrell. The

and the

1939

45 World War

five of the wickets for '

ball Both batsmen
used their feet well to Peirce’s
high tosses and the fifty mark
was soon reached when Kidney
steered a ball on the leg side for
a brace from Peirce.

Denis Atkinson was now bowl-
ing to a good length and took his
second wicket when ‘laylor in
making the same stroke as his
team mate Birkett was also giver

the second



cut leg before after scoring 2
patient 25. Evelyn, the next mat
‘ sayed OUL «ue remainder of
the over However Evelyn did
rot stay long and Peirce soon haa
him caught by Denis Atkinso:
al second = slip Ning came hb
and Denis Atkinson in his fifth
tall of the ninth over properly
teat and bowled Kidney anc

so bowled Camacho British

( vicna Intercolonial captain in

i next ball. King quickly fol-
lowed Camacho when he wa
¢ aught by St. Hill oft T. Peirce

®. Hoad and B. Inniss then tried
'. settle down to a partnershiy
it Denis Atkinson continued te
n down them both Norman
arshall was again brought on to
lieve Denis Atkinson Peires
:ow get his third wicket when
ruce Inniss in attempting to lift
m missed and was = smartly
‘umped by Skipper Skinner,
‘ordan went in and was off the
rark with a brace and at the end

cf that over lunch was taken,
/fter lunch the century was

joached in 120 minutes Hoad did
) ot bat so well to Atkinson as he
«'d before lunch and was out
hen he edged to slip. The Hoad-
rdan naiinership had yielded 37
ns. Marshall came in with
rdan and the Pickwick innings

osed when Marshall was bowled

Denis Atkinson, Pickwick had
ered 114 with H. Jordan not out
Marshall and Eric Atkinson
vened for Wanderers and inp
ing’s frst over Marshall had a

fe in the slip. Birkett took the
ew ball with Kin and in his first
rer beat Atkinson twice with hi
cotewingers
When the score reached
st Wanderers wicket fell
arshall was completely beaten
id bowled by Jordan. G. Pro-|
rbs thes went in and was bat-
‘g soundly until he gave an easy

43 the)
when!



PAGE FIVE



AUG, 27 — NO, 134

The Topic

Clouds banked up black last Monday |
After a pourt.: rain

nd Lou told Joe and Robert

Look for a hurricane

Well Joe and Robert Tuesday
Went in the strongest place
But boys high winds start blowing
As the Marshal gest the mace

‘

Seme comrades ti a canoe
Cried Captain “you must halt”
Or im this stormy weather
We'll turn a somersavlt

The Captain’s passion boiled up
And he admit he knew
He was sailing into harbour
With a disloyal crew
Of course a cyclone started
Bright fires star) to burn
When a sailor said the Captain
Was trying to “back-a-stern”

2 . .

If it were in the land ship a

It would be a different case

For that sailor would be greeted

With a hard slap in his tage =o
. . ’

But it was round a table
Which cause taxpayers grief
To take up their good mone
To bank tt om a reef
A member said now Captain
Don't spend money so fast
Re patient, wait a minute
Do! tet the hurricane past

. ’ .

The Captaty said you dullards

If you had come to sehbol

I'm sure you would be bright boys
And vot o pack of fools
Twas then we hewd the fog horn
No more the whistle blast

For the said grim tones were saying

‘urn to H. Marshall to end his The canoe's sinking fast

v at the wicket, He scored an Don't put the blame on “Sam Lord
‘raetive 35. At the end of play | Don't put the blame on Lou

i 3 , »\" ye ane y Th you

nis Atkinson who followed after Hoth Je wed Robert te :

vert was not out with hi The blame calls to the crew

ther Fric and they had 44 and We tike an ancient poet

runs respectively to their credit Repeat now as before

4 to enohle Wanderers to reply Tol! for the brave” my brothers

: i » breve > more
*h 174 for 2 wickets to Pick lhe ’ x tiwat are no ny
ie’o 104 lou said to Joe and Robert



Reds Gain Ground

White comrades atert to weep
No one is lett to bury them
Beneath the briny deep

Those bee were brave, courageous



‘Thomee'ves they could defend
@ from 1 age 1 x Hut thes lve to hear the Bishop
small groups ot 30 and 50 to Sas tts Ointehed" bey Amen
oid air attacks, This territory : . a. a a
; : a Well Joo and Robert sa
ong the Nam and Naktong rivey We kanw the Heda way
suitable for a west-east move- The 1925 promise
ent of troops and equipment, It

They all forget to-day

not mountainous and north of :
é rds Weil we can't join the mourner
he Nam affords a rail and road Sa wees ae rant On & eores
{works adequate for transporta- with a bettle of J & P Rum
on suppiies the runt that unites three

Most observers believe an attack
tere would be to attract United
iialions reserves or to hold them
ai bay while the big offensive is
fnunched in the north,

Though little information was
immediately available about the
reported Communist onslaught on
the East Coast returning piiots re-
ported “considgrable penetration”
ny North Koreans

One reported Communist troops
nd equipment travelling south,
Superforts ranging far north to-
coy plastered 60 tons of bombs on
he important rail junction of Kil-
‘au 15 miles north of Songjin on
ic East Coast below the 41st par-
lel.

Invaders loosed thousand pound-
s on a pontoon bridge west of
eoul and damaged another near
ommunist-held former South
orean territory. Fifth Air Force
\ooting Star planes thrust 300
les into North Korean territary,
eaiding half a dozen Communist
elds in North and South Korea,

They met no “live” Conmunist
jlanes-——only previously shot up
ireraft and dummies

Reuter.

BARBADOS

OFFICIAL CLASSIFICATION

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AUTUMN MERTING 1950

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A.1. D.1. F.2. (Cont'd)
‘eacon Bright Bow Bells Perseverance
ue Streak Coronado Pharos Il
rake’s Drum Firemist River Mist
lizabethan Wellington Sinbad
‘un Site Watercress Sir Bernard
torms Gift Siren

D.2. Soprano

A.2. Examiner Straight Aim
tomic II Sunbeam
Yhe Gambler E,1. Sun Fire

Pepper Wine Ali Baba The Eagle
Kendal Fort Tornado

B.1. Lady Belle Typhoon
‘nfusion Mary Ann Usher
'indy Pink Oatcake Vanguard
Landmark Waterbell
S iver Bullet E.2.

Siainte Comet G1.
Sun Queen Dulcibella Betsam
Suntone Monsoon

B.2. Victory
Calandra F.1. Vixen
Catania Best Wishes
Fabulous Bowmanston G.2,
inny Adams Joint Command Blue Diamond
Merfect Set Lazy Bones Brahmin’s Choice
River Sprite Postscript Chindit
War Lord Tango Diana

Tying Aap
1. F.2. ron opper
loaisibe Apollo Gallant “awk
Leading Article April Flowers Joan’s Star
Rebate Bonnie Lass Lucky Shot
Swiss Roll Brown Girl Maytime
Bullseye wey
Clementina Otcedol
C.2. Colleton Silke Plant
Ability Consternation Sun Jewel
Ante Diem Cross Bow



Fair Contest Cross Roads

Fair Sally Dunese

Flieuxce Epicure

Kidstead Facetious

Kitchen Front First Flight

Link Stream Flame Flowe

Miss Panic Foxglove a

Musk Hi-Lo Classifiers:

St. Moritz Joan of Arc

Sailors Fun Lady Rommel T. N. Peirce
Southern Cross Miracle F
Starry Night Mocassin L. E. R. Gill
| Tiberian Lady Mountbatten cs

| War Queen Miss Friendshiy G. D. Bynoe

Subject to change he event of any horse taking part in any

| Meeting prior to the Barbados AUTUMN Meeting, 1950










Â¥ PAGE SIX

THE



IT IS because the poetry in the

last six months most clearly
focuses the major West Indian
problem so sharply raised in ow
Symposium iast July that I an.
dealing with it first, although the
prose wag again much more vital

and varied. The problem, you
may remember, was, whether
writers should eccept outs:de

Standards. Well, the most ambi-
tious production in the half-year
was Derek Walcott’s short poetic
drama, Senza Alcun Sospeziwo, a
brief acccunt of the tove drama
of Francesca da Rimini, freely
adapted from Dante. It had many
beauties

Look in the silver poplars, by the flat

marshes,

The lake is laced with silver, In the

green coverts,

Whose edges are filmed with the first

jets of autumn,

lesan hear here a deliberation of doves,

The rivulets giggie under the cool

ferns

'

That passage was picked out
by Roy Fuller in his criticism
following the play, possibly be-
cause Fuller is a European—and
those lines are purely European.
He then suggested that Walcott
should write more directly out of
his background. And yet this
comment, surely mild enough
when we consider that Walcott is
a young poet, still uncertain of h's
detection, was savagely attacked
by a poet in Jamaica, who called
it “Patronising”’. I hope that this
counter-critic had had time now
to contrast Senza Alcun Sospett»
wth Walcott’s recent play, Henr+
Christophe, and see the contrast
in power, when the poet is
expressing not only himself, but
the whole balance of forces of
which he is the centre.

Other poets in the last few
months have also concentrated
this problem of the West Indian
writer and the outside world.
You may remember George Lam-
ming’s poem after he came to
London.

Now I venturing from
lands

To redissover my roots,

Have found an impersona! city,

Where your tales are incredibly true

scattered is-

}
The tales are the songs of
Marian. Anderson, the Coloured
singer, whom Lamming heard at
the Albert Hall, And what is the
upshot? He is “urged to register
with the outlaws”; and the poems
end: “Hate thy brother as thy-
self”. Samuel Selvon, a fellow-
adventurer, has written a prose-
poem: his attitude is very similar,
except that he finds release in the
beauty of the English countryside.
But is it European complacency
alone which suggests that Lam-
ming, like most sensitive people,
unsure of direction, is moved by
love and hate at the same time?
I think it possible. How then
does a third poet, maturer than
the other two, solve the problem?
Ian Carew is a young Guianese,
who studied in America, went in
revulsion behind the Iron Curtain
to Prague, was horrified by the
philistinism he found there of
Communist committees telling
writers what they should write,
and now lives with a French
family in a fashionable street in
Paris. For him, the main fact of
the world, beyond love or hate,
and the personal in isolation, is
the emergence of one thousand
million people in the world, So
he writes his dignified epic of

Potaro, song of the world,
River of the world. . . .

Please note. This most sophis-
ticated of West Indian poets, in
fact, takes up a purely local
attitude, making use of sonorous
Indian names of his homeland,
Tumatumari, Essequibo, Maku-
mata, Pakaraimas, Kaietur, the
god of waters, Accewayo. . .

Oh Accewayo,

Wherefore Your Sorrow?

In the Caribbean itself, the
poetry, has been rather scarce
and on one occasion we lifted a
whole section from the excellent
magazine BIM: Popham, Roacn,



















eating

What do you know
about ENO?

DO YOU KNOW thar a giess
of cooling, refreshing BNO,
will correct the effects of fover-

Sold in bottles for lasting freshness

Eno’s ‘Fruit Salt’

The words “ Eno” aud “ Fruit Salt" are registered (ade marke,

Barrow, Walcott, Carr, Arch-
bald, Gomes, Vaughen, Seymour.
On another ocession we heard
one of these writers again, E. M
Roach of Tcbago

The poui trumpets forth

Her golden semibreves

It is no reflection on this poet



that one notes the possible
influence of C. Day Lewis, with
words like Eldritch, At least I
am certain that E. M. Roach
wil’ never, in his own words,
Plunge graceful os a swan

Into oblivion

‘Lwere is little tu say about the
short collections of poems from
ihe different islands, which ac-

companied the experimental] prose
in June. Indeed, only Ramon-
Fortune’s Nursery Rhyme A La
Mode remains in the memory. I
simply note that what seemed to
me the freshest examples came
from the smaller islands, St.
Vincent, discovered by Owen
Campbell and Daniel Williams,
who are apparently influenced
by Walcott. They have charm.

The gay butterflies manoeuvr-

ing but also considerable inex-
perience, and Williams can use
the line,

They have resigned themselves
te day-long swishing when he is
talking of washerwomen,...On
the other hand, from the same
island, E. McG, Keane contribu-
ted a powerful poem on the
peasant,

Save in The Just our
harsh hands are dumb,

And idle our tears,
lament.

I also remember A. N_ Forde,
who raises the central issue again,
in his poem on Grenada:—

Where we wipe

Beads of foreign culture from our face.

And there was Clare McFar-
lane's recollection of his Words-
worthian poems Daphne, Beauty,
Villanelle of Pâ„¢mortal Love,,....
forming a complete contrast to
the dialect poems from Jamaica,
where Louise Bennett once again
showed her superiority in this
field,

I suppose one should start the
summary of the prose with the
experimental month of June, but
I found it a little disappointing,

no leisure for

although I hope useful. For
instance, I for one did not
altogether agree with Arthur

Calder Marshall's rather harsh
criticism of Eagar Mittelholzer’s
Sibilant ad Lost, the madman
giving his fascist philosophy, in
prose which I thought did some-
times triumphantly succeed,

For a year, and then another year,
all went without turgid or untoward
event. The flame of love wore well;
no warped fork warned of what lay
ahead. Even her mother, falcon wo-
man, deemed our mating to have
panned out fair,

On the other hand I thought

Calder Marshall's criticism of
Karl Sealy’s Dream °f Gold
almost too ingenious; the man

who goes with his wife’s golden
ring to win gold in Panama, the
friend who so enigmatically sends
it back, I had, however, nothing
but agreement for his praise or
Samuel Selvon’s hard lyrical
story, What's the Use, much
truer to the life of adolescent
love than Walcott’s Italian idyll.
I also agreed, I fears with Alfred

Mendes’ biting attack on a
classical Jamaican example ot
trying to run before you can

walk, under a pretentious title
taken from James Joyce,

The most interesting prose
writings, in fact, I thought lay
outside the experimental month
altogether. One may start per-
haps with the veteran Trinidad
journalist, Seepersad Naipaul.
Like most East Indian writers,
he has an accurate eye, but what
is much more interesting, a sense
of objectivity and humour. He
started, you may remember, with
the very common Indian theme
of the forced marriage; but Son-
ya’s Luck had all the detail of
the good reporter, I thought his
second story, Gratuity, was im

and drinking?

DO YOU KNOW
that ENO, with its
gentle laxative action,
. Will freshen you up
) mentally and
physically ?

re.






quite a different class, with its
brilliantly amusing yet tender
study of the Indian road-mender
Sanyasi, called Moach “as
though he were all moustache
and nothing else,” and also
Gagat — Guru (which means
world — teacher) “but only
the elders called him _ that.”
Poor Sanyasi! The Colonial
Secretary signed himself as his
obedient serVant; but he got
little of an old-age pension from
Mr. Button, and in the doing of

it, he also lost his job...... The
last item we heard from Nai-
paul’s pen was the rather

impersonal report on the Shouters
Visiting Chima, which had pleas-
ent touches: you may remember
the niceties of the movements of
the initiates in their trance, some
riding horses and some (with a
different motion) camels,

Probably the most ingenious
piece of work in all six months
was Willy Richardson’s amusing
satire, The Argument, whicn
gave a loving account of a typical
conversation of intellectuals, un-
aware that their house was on
fire. I also hope you liked, as
much as I did, the tart little
morality by George Phillips, A
Man ad a Boy, about a bitter
race quarrel in Trinidad, over an
accident, which no one saw, but
one man heard...... The impact
of that single word tap-tap-tap-
ping, by which you are finally
told he was blind, remains one
of the very sharpest memories
I have of four years of the
programme,

These were successes, I thought,
Two failures, gallant failures,
came from Jamaica. They were
attempts at epic, at building a
tradition as in Carew’s poetry
noted earlier. The first was by
a well-known name, Victor Reid,
his short story, No Mourning in
the Valley, was criticised at the
time by Calder Marshall, so I
will not do more than recall the
plot: the girl, Noreen, being
rescued from the flood by the
boy Rupert, }

In the second attempt, Inez
Sibley did not succeed in Pre-
sentimeâ„¢t, as she did with her
brilliant Terror Bull and Taunt
Song. Apart from a good deal
of realistic detail, out of place
in a legend of the Kingston
disaster of 1907, there was very
little feeling for form,

And now for what I hope it is
not rude to call the catalogue or
inventory, the main collection of
stories and sketches. which were
really of a high standard. Lets
start with moralities, perhaps with
O. M. Howard's interesting com-
bination of a detailed repoyt on an
old Moravian mission house in the
mountains of Santa Cruz, with the
wisdom a brash young missionary
learns from his predecessor. Hugh
Blackman’s story of Barbados
childhood, The Champ, was less
skilfully written, but more subtle
in its lesson; it was not Big Jack’s
ability to run or swim that made
him a champion of his little gang:
but the fact that he would not do
an unfair thing, to stave off the
challenge of Harry the Horse. A
less persuasive story was written
by Michael Browne whose Dance
of Stones recounted the rather im-
probable sacrifice of a girl who
comes between stick fighters in the
old days.

In the world of pure story tell-
ing, R. Warren had an interesting
and nightmarish tale, in Foo-Foo,
of a little boy. dying in a Jamaican
hospital, who hears the sea-gods
roaring and the swamps coming
alive. Miss Bird contributes an-
other of her charming sketches
from the Jamaica Museum, this
time about Maxy Mongoose, his
wife Maggie, and the vulgar
Snatcher, Lennox de Paiva wrote
a competent professional tale. on
an old theme. The Spy and the
Informers, with refreshing crisp-
ness and humour. Two stories of
suspense were written, one- by
Elsie M. Hutton’on coastal erosion
in Jamaica (Perilous Night) and

KLI

Limit Wo
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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

LAST SIX MONTHS

By HENRY SWANZY

In A Broadcast To The West Indies



the other by Edgar Boyce, in
which a Barbadian’'s race against
death by drowning is linked with
a drama of’ jealousy, (Saving His



Life). For his part. Jack J. Gordon
contributed two frankly escapist
stories, based on the films and
American magazines: The Case of
the Crimson Candle, and The
Affair of the Meamu Diamond.
They are programmes in them-

selves, those titles! How could one
fail to be enthralled- by a_ story
which starts Reynard Lozenge con-
templatively stroked his neatly
trimmed beard which some people
thought rainer caprine?

Then as usual, there were a,
great many storjes reporting
these, I thought, was The Mouser.
R. B. Sears’ rather disenchanted
comedy of the Guiana streets and
a lovely Chinese-African girl who
virtuously complains to a palice-
man of a “wolf” (humaa) whose
wallet she then proceeds to steal.
More dignified, perhaps, was an
old-fashioned technique dealing
with a new situation, rehousing in
Jamaica. (Changing Times), by
Mrs. Ormsby Marshall. Two
stories having the familiar theme
of garden versus gambling, city
slicker versus humble fisher-folk,
came from Barbados, (William S.
Arthur’s Horse of Another Colou;)
and Grenada,—(Eula Redhead’s
Just in Time). Samuel Selvon’s
Johnson and the Casadura was
also on a routine theme, the ex-
patriate Englishman who falls in
love with the West Indies, Ernest
Carr dealt pretty thoroughly with
the racial fears of Ursula Bayson,
who has to employ a black tutor
for her backward little son (Civil
Strife). He was perhaps more
original, (and less successful) with
a rather embarrassing little story
of mother-love, She Named Him
Roderick, about a lady who adopts
a cook. A. K. Elliott's story of
mother-love in Jamaica. A Seat in
the Shade, was far more unsettling.
Do you remember the poor old
peasant woman, Elizabeth, come
to see her two daughters in King-
ston, with her mind pathetically
set on the cool drink they will
bring her, symbol of what she
hoped would be their love; and
her collapse after they tell her
sharply, “Call the maid?”

Finally, in the catalogue, we
come to the folklore: George
Spence’s amusing Proverbial En-
counter, and, right at the begin~
ning of our half-year, Willy
Richardson’s brilliant Snapshots of
Carnival in which he brings in all
the life of Port-of-Spain seen
through the eyes of different
people, a girl, a business man, an
old man, children, each preceded
by an appropriate canticle from
the armoury of carnival.

Jour ouvert, barre Yo!

Pas levez la main
asur Yo.

It is not so easy to bring six
months into the compass of a 16
minute talk. I wanted to say
something about production, some-
thing about the success of Mittel-
holzer’s novel Morning at the
Office, something about the useful
er.ticism in the recent Kykoveral
But I should if possible like to
return to that main theme, raised
by the Symposium. Should West
Indian writers accept outside
standards or not? At least, that
seemed to be the main problem;
but in my opinion, the real prob-
‘em was, who is to lay down the
standards? Obviously, the writers
themselves. In the meantime
surely, if a programme like this
is to succeed at all, it has to
adopt, or try to adopt, absolute
standards. And I also think that
West Indian writers must accept
the paradox: what is nearest is
also widest, what is most personal
is most impersonal, what is truly
local is universal. Of course, we
do not want to compel you to
write up insincere details of loca!
colour, simply to pass muster ir
the programme, and to flatter
what you think is the bias of the
producer. But I repeat, literature
is local and concrete if ft is any-

thing, and only science is th«
universal language. The worl
will accept what is wel! don
whatever it is. One writes bes

of what one knows.

S 6.C. 6-volt Radio





DAVID LEWIN’S

Spotlight

Platonic love
~in black and
white—gets by
_ the censors...

THE film-makers’ list of Things
We Pretend Don't Happen gets a
little shorter.

IN LONDON: Ealing Studios
recognise that coloured men are
seen out with white giris, In a
picture started recently—“Pool
of London” — Earl Cameron, a
26-year-old actor from Bermuda,
plays a Merchant Navy sailor.

He is lonely, meets Susan Shaw
and takes her out. They go to a
dance together (but sit it out),
have a “platonic friendship” (the
studio insists it is that).

Just the same it is something
no film—either British or Ameri-
ean — has presented before, Sir
Michael Balcon, head of Ealing,
says he is not being courageous
“We're just reporting facts. This
happens—we show it.”

‘ * *

There could be no suggestion of
murriage at the end. The British
censor would not’ have accepted
that. Nor would he have agreed
to-a kiss

IN AMERICA: Hollywood
admits (1) that war victims can
sometimes Le paralysed (in “The
Men”), and (2) that the message
of God may be filmec (in “The
Next Voice You Hear’).

The censors in both countries
have accepted “The Men,” al-
though most producers said the
story could not be filmed.

‘The Next Voice You Hear’ is
the voice of God. You do not
hear Him speak, but what He says
in a series of broadcast messages
is reported in conversations after-
wards. This film has run into
some trouble with the censor here

The Hollywood studio last night
said that cuts would have to be
made for Britain because of the
censor’s fears that the subject
might be considered as treating
God “with over-familiarity.”

AFTER MARTHA

WHO did it first anyway—1:

That meeting between Julie
Wilson and Marion Harris, cabaret
stars both, was polite—but icy.

Miss Wilson had followed Miss
Harris at a West End restaurant
—and then sung the same satire
on Dr, Kinsey’s report on the
human (American) male.

When they finally met they
wanted to know — well who did
introduce it, anyway?

For the record it was Martha
Raye in a Broadway musical, says
Marion Harris. So take your place
in the line Miss Wilson.

»_ ,
AFTER GEORGE
WHO did it first anyway—2:
Was it the Bernard Brothers or

the Smeddle Brothers who started
the miming act to a gramophone
record background? In the West
End the Brothers used to feud.

Now along comes a nine-year-
old reissue of George Formby’s
film “South American Geonge’—
and there is George miming away
to an operatic gramophone record.

So take your place in the line.
Brothers,

PRICE OF FAME
THREE of the original star

names in British pictures

back again filming here: Rex

Harrison, Lilli Palmer and David

Niven,
Hollywood put them under
contract—and made them world

stars. Now they want to work on
their own — either here or in



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America because they have
‘earned the iessoa that in Holly-
wood the cost of being a contract

star can be too high

It is always a question of living
up to the position your
demands that you maintain:
swimming pools, cocktail parties,
expensive homes,

Harrison’s servants even turned
up for work in Cadillacs or
Euicks — and their pay was on
the same high level. With the
swimming pool went a poolman
although the gardener could have
done the job just ag well.

And if any or whe stars rejected
a part, they could be suspended
without pay up to six months.

So Rex Harrison and his wife
put their money into a *ritish
picture, “The Long Dark Hall,”
and now work together for the
first time since “The Rake’s Pro-
gress.” David Niven, after «
Goldwyn contract, takes a chance
in a British musical, ‘Happy Go
Lovely.

In future it will be Hollywood
—but on a_ picture-to—pictyre
basis. “That way,’ says Rex
Harrison, “you can stay at an
hotel, and not always have to keep
up with the Joneses down the
road.”

GROWING-UP

TO mark Tyrone Power's
rise from film star to su
stage actor in “Mister Roberts,” in
London, his studio prepares to give
him more serious parts to play.

First will probably be a remake
of an old Leslie Howard _ film,
“Berkeley Square’, with Power
in the Howard role.

Tyrone Power welcomes the
change. “After six months of
Mister Roberts—that is how long
I shall be in it—I wouldn’t want
to return to swashbuckling or
rushing around with a sword in
my hand,

“That would be like going bacx
to the hors d’oeuvres after tasting
the meat.....”

THE -ENEMY’

WAR commentary by Groucho

Marx: “Korea can’t hurt Holly-
wood any more than television
has already....”

—L.E.S.



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How to make a million with
Two -Boops”

And A -Doop’

Hy ... JOHN PREBWLE

AMONG such remarkably
American phenomena as the Grand
Canyon, the Declaration of Inde-
pendence, air-conditioning, and
bubble-gum, history will record
twe human beings.

They are Mr. Crosby and Mr.
Sinatra—singers.

For eight years they have been
engaged in friendly contest for
supremacy im a world where the
diagnosis for a sore throat could
be written in falling doar signs.

Last month, as Mr. Sinatra
obtained a £1,000,000 television

Crosby’s melodious phrasing is
smogth. Sinatra gets his near-
death rattle by breathing down
his nose as he sings, a
practice hitherto only
used by -the Red
Indian.

No one ever scream-
ed when Crosby sang.
Sinatra brings out the
berserk in the female.

And Crosby is big
business. The firm of
Crosby Ine., occupies
a three-storeyed white

, hs , tuceo) «building on
contract, it looked as if he had at s NS

‘ act, x - Sunset Boulevard, a
last taken the lead trom Crosby tangible statement of

Incorporated. If so, tet the sociolo-

gists take note. For although these What can be done with

boops and a‘ doop.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE et

Whiz

IFES too short to go into things

a: length, so short expressions

are in favour. This Whit Quiz tests

whether you're a Man, or Woman,

of Letters by presenting a number

of short terms or abbreviations for
you to identify.

1. SOS means distress in any
Janguage. What do the letters
mean in English?















2. ABC’s are important in any
language; col‘ectively they're im-
portant in bowling. Why?

3. When B.O.’s a degree, it’s of
what”

4. When the AA's
what goes on?

5. You know what 1-A means
in the draft, but what does A-1
signify at Lieyds?

be K.O’ed, you'd be
where?

7. On the other hand, to be OK.,
you’d be what?

ack-ack,



SINATRA
Phe angry dandy

temporary support of £980 a

8. NEWS we read, but the let-
ters singly also guide us. How?

9. Remember way back to NRA,
and what it stood for?

Ouiz

19. Why would a professor end |
a theorem, Q.E.D.?
. PHBSUOUAP oq OF sem GOTUM,, |
407 UNS] ‘UMNpuEssuOUeP jess Pon ‘at |
“AULIY OF Ul “ONSET Jes9UeD “gl “Silo
-jougpent yotetg & FO WoNFABIqge 44)
Sa} “ON st “JUEUIET IY” jo Jequiew “oT |
utti0yw quod.rid wyor ‘fo [eyayooy a



uyor (4ansuUR 3994100 © oq O8TF vey |

sIMeT) UeATTING “TT wyor “CL

suorsmna |

“OD oTPOYOOTY 20 “SuSE, LUENQITTEq “Pr |

‘suOsrad pooeTdsiqy 91,Kaq) ‘sypensn WuON
cr, wRV Wy yO WORE, “BT "ue |
-eSo1r9}u] 5D ‘sdiyje q “pues. ey

u UOHeIURApY KTeACgey UWEdorN |
Ol “Gonenspupapy Ssaaccey TeuOREN ¢
SUOTIOOP aSoUy FO WONWPAeAqqe Ue Wo!T
SAATIOP SMU, POM 9 "yANOS Ysam
sto “UMON ‘@ ‘“ITwopro! ACZS9 BP. Ao0. |
OY LO, 10 YM YY 4 eouRRd Bud

-omj1d UF NO Paysouy Gg ad" eur |
Leu Uy ABEL SSPID-4S2y VW “g “IeZUTY |
“Huy § “Anew pO soltHheutew ‘M101

“MQ JO Jojayoeg “fF ods eq) uy fpoq |
ao}weid ‘SseaBUeD Ssulnog titoneuy |
z S)10M JO UONBPARIGQeE uv oq Oo}
pepusy! jou Sram Seu) ‘peuiits s#ansrp
Oy} SB UaseyO UU A Woyssarduly sepndow
a4} St (OAS YO OAGg,, [| oeemsUYy

HOW MUCH ? |

“SLIM” minds not his extra |
pounds. In fact, he takes great |
pleasure in giving his friends cor-

men are internationally famous
the appeal they have to Americans
is a synthesis of all that is healthy,
banal, and naive in the Great
American Soul. You might call
that synthesis “Crosatra.”
.

Man with a teupee=

It was in 1942 that Sinatra’s
throaty ululations first brought
about paroxysms in his young
female listeners. At that date
Crosby was already among the
elect.

With
would
than

his assets liquidated he
have been worth more
£2,000,000. He owned race
tracks, cattle ranches, baseball
teams, and a much-publicised
£18 toupee,

If Crosby’s rise to @€minence was
slow, Sinatra’s was meteoric. A
generation se@parates them in age,
Crosby is 49, Sinatra is 33. Bob
Hope said that Crosby was “the
man who made Sinatra’s mother
swoon.”

In their efforts to make the
larynx the mightiest money-
earmer known to private enter-
prise they have points of cOmpari-
fon and distinct contrast.

Both are devout Catholics.

Both came up the hard way.

Both were discovered by well-
known band leaders.

=Roy with a temper

But a continent separates them
in breeding. Crosby is the boy
from Tacoma, Washington, pro-
duet of a big all-American family.
A sunlit personality.

Sinatra is East Coast, from
Hoboken, a boy with one foot still
on the~immigration boat. His
father was an Italian, a profes-
sional fighter, boilermaker, and
lately captain in the Hoboken Fire
Department.

There is complacency in Crosby,
a frustrated anger in Sinatra. The
last time Crosby ever hit a man
was in his school-days. Sinatra
recently punched a man for anti-
Semitic talk.

s

Rusiness man=

THIS temperamental difference
is reflected in their singing tech-
nique. Crosby has a benign appeal,
sings of requited love. Sinatra
sings of frustration and wnhappi-
ness .

It controls the £53,-
000 share he has in tha

Pittsburg (baseball)
Pirates; the £10,000
ranch at Santa Fe
Springs, the 20,000
shares in an orange
juice company. It

handled his race-track
et Del Mar. It invests
the £165,000 he makes

yeerly from record-
ines, the £150,000
from hroadeasts. the
LISA HAN from films
Crusader=
iS there a Sinatra
Inc.? There is not

Sinatra bought an oil
well once, but it cost
him money to run it

He can make nearly)
£400,000 a year, but has scant

business sense, At one time he
was said to have been rationed
to. £25 a week by a_ perplexed
agent.

Both men are gererous. Crosby
donates about £5,000 a year to
charities. Im one year Sinatra
distributed 300 gold cigarette

lighters at a cost of £30 each. He

gave the Roosevelt Campaign
Fund £1,000 He adopted 12
orphans.

Each has a highly developed
sense of social responsibility. In
Crosby it is hard afd realistic
His Crosby Research Foundation
gave America valuable wartime
inventions.

Sinatra is a white-faced
crusader. In his youth he watched
Ku-Klux-Klan excesses and deter-
mined to do something about it
He writes articles called “Let’s not
forget we're all Foreigners.’
Crosby’s journalistic enterprise
has been confined to telling the
story of the bull moose he once
shot.

Sinatra stomps the country
pleading for racial tolerance. His
appeals in this direction, inter-
lard the banalities which his Press
agent ‘distributes to 2,900 Ameri-
can Sinatra Fan Clubs.

Sinatra is a dandy. In 1946 he
had 25 sport suits, 100 pairs of
slacks, 50 lounge suits, 60 pairs

,



B.B.C. Radio

SUNDAY August 27 1950

7 a.m. The News: 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m, General Assembiy
of the Council of Europe; 7.30 a.m
Nights at the Opera; 8.10 a.m. From
the Editorials: 8.10 a.m. Programme
Parade; 9.15 a.m, Coekney Cabaret;
8.30 a.m. From the Children’s Hour; 9
a.m, Close Down; 12 noon The News
12,10 p.m, News Analysis; 12.15 p.m
Puffney Post Office; 12.45 p.m. London
Forum; 1,15 p.m. Radio ‘Nowareal: 1.80
p.m. Sunday Service; 2 p.m, The News:
2.10 p.m. Home News from Britain; 2.15
p.m. Musi¢ Magazine; 2.20 p.m a-
riety Bandbox; 3.30 p.m Pride and
Prejudice; 4 p.m. The News; 4.10 p.m
Interlude; 4.15 p.m. The Piano for
Pleasure; 4.30 p.m. Sunday Half Hour;
4.55 p.m. Epilague; 5 p.m. Montmartre
Players; 5.15 p.m. Programme Parade:
5.30 p.m. From the Children’s Hour; ¢
p.m, New Records; 6.45 p.m. The
Hymns we Sing; 7 p.m. The News; 7.10
p.m, News Analysis; 7,15—7.30 p.m.
Caribbean Voices. 8 p.m. Radio’ News-
reel; 8.15 p.m. English Magazine; 8.45
p.m, Interlude; 8.55 p.m. From the
Editorials; 9 a.m. Sunday Service; 9.30
p.m, London Forum; 10 p.m. The News;
10,10 p.m. Interlude; 10.15 p.m. Anjr-
thing to Declare; 10.45 p.m. English
Eloquence; 11 p.m. Musig in Miniature.
Benn 10 p.m,




Programme

MONDAY, August 28

7.00 a.m, The News; 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m. The African Queen;
7.30 a.m. Music Magazine; 8.00—8.30 a.m.
Commentary on W.1. vs. Middlesex; 9.00

1950

a.m. Closé Down; 12.00 (moon) The
News; 12.10 p.m. News Analysis; 12.15
p.m. Programme Parade; 12.18 p.m, Lis-
teners Choice; 12.45 p.m, Middlesex ys
West Indies; 1,00—1,30 p.m. Commentary
on W.1. vs. Middlesex; 2.00 p.m. The
News; 2.10 p.m, Home News From Brit-

ain; 2.15 pup. Sports Review; 2.30 p.m.
Edinburgh International Festival; 3.15
p.m. Interlide; 3.30 p.m. Meet the Com-
monwealth; 4.00 p.m. The News; 4.10 p.m.
The Daily Service; 4.15 p.m. My Kind of
Music; 5,00 p.m, Listeners Cholce; 5.15
p.m. Programme Parade 30 p.m, The
Story Teller; 5.45 p.m. Dance Music; 6.00
p.m, The African Queen; 6.15 p.m. What
a Difference a Day Makes; 7.00 p.m. The
News; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis; 7.15—7.30
p.m. Cricket Report on W.1. vs. Middle-
sex; 7.30—7.45 p.m. Calling The West In-
dies; #.00 p.m, Radio Newsreel; 8,15 p.m.
Science Review; 8.30 p.m. Roland Peachy;
8,55 p.m. From the Editorials; 9.00 p.m.
The Batsman Bride} 9.30 p.m. Books to







Read; 9.45 p.m. Theatre Talk; 10.00 p.m.
The News; 10.10 p.m. Interlude; 10.15
p.m. Much Binding in The Marsh; 10.45
p.m, Commonwealth Survey; 11.00 p.m.
A Talk.

BOSTON—WRUL 15.29 Mc WRUW
11.75 Me. WRUX 17.75 Me



“pm PB snare

of shoes. Crosby likes to
like a contented tramp.

aress

Married man=
IN Hollywood, where you can
get awards for anything, the

Motion Picture Research Society
gave the Crosbys a certificate “for
happy home life.”

Recently Sinatra was ordered
to pay his estranged wife Nancy

BBC Radio Notes:
‘The War Of
The Worlds’

Serial of Wells’ Story

Beginning in the coming week
the BBC will broadcast in serial
form a new radio adaptation of
‘The War of the Worlds’ the ex-
citing story by H. G. Wells of
the landing of Martians on the
earth. Ultra-realistice versions
of this Wellsian thriller have in
the past caused panic among
credulous listeners in New York
and Chile but this new BBC ver-
sion will stick closely to the fan-
testie and fascinating novel which
Wells wrote in 1898. Broadcasts
will be given at 6.80 p.m. on
Wednesdays and at 4.15 p.m. on
Thursdays starting on the 380th
and 31st inst.



Man’s Use of Energy

The 1950 meeting of the Bri-
tish Association for the Advance-
ment of Science opens in Birm-
ingham with an inaugural meet-
ing on Wednesday, 30th August.

At this meeting the president
— this year Sir Harold Hartley,
F.R.S, — gives his address. Sir
Harold has recorded a shortened
version of his address for the
radio and it will be broadcast in
the General Overseas Service a
few hours befere he gives the
full address in Birmingham. His
subject, ‘Man’s Use of Energy,’ is
the theme chosen by UNESCO as
a subject for publicity and dis-
cussion this year. The radio ver-
siom of the address will be on
the air on Wednesday at 8.15 p.m.

For Music-lovers

Those who can listén at 2.30
p.m, in the coming week will get
a musical treat in BBC broad-
casts in the coming week. Two





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month, pending the hearing of

her separate maintenance suit.

The restless Sinatra with his

polka-dot bow ties, the relaxed

Crosby taking off his wig in public

restaurants, symptomise America.
The sweet sentimentality

epitomise the American tempera-

ment.
Messiah=

THUS do the boy from Hobo-
ken and the boy from Tacoma
make a contribution to American
history. They are in tradition.

Crosby started work by washing

cucumbers in a pickles factory

or
frustrated bitterness of their lyrics

reet but different
whenever bis weight is discussed.
Yesterday I overheard him say:
“Ll weigh 81 pounds, and in adei-
11. What are the names of these tion to that, 27 pounds less than
abbreviations within the parenthe- 7/9 of my weight. If you
ses—a. (&). b. (....). ce (2). fi €
a . is the short way of mind your knowing.”
saying United States of America—
and of what other nation?
13. Te what nation do D.P.’s be-







10 The years sped by and we
_ a new era, and ERA. Meaning
what

“spunod fee s 7UsTemM © oum
siqy pue ‘spunod p¢ st 1yBjam syq 7) 6/5

14 Without having had any ex-
rience with them, you should
ow D.T.'s are?

15. Three Americans have been
so famous as to be recognizable
from these shortened names—John
L., John D., John P. Their full

ENIGMATIC
LANGUAGE

. uauL spuned pg 70 ‘yg pue fg Ue neq
long QoueseyIP ey OF Peppe I4GFIEM © 4y FO
6/2 OF Tenbde st .yBem sug sHeypnes

statements |

\

can |
are out how heavy I am, I won’t |



oo 9tectls smnantoured with

Sinatra was a £5-a-week waiter
Their goal was the same.

The day Sinatra walked out of
a cinema after a Crosby film and
decided to be a crooner rather
than a journalist, that was the
day Crosby had to work hard for
his money.

It was also the day a messiah
was born for the frustrated,
lonely, teen-ager.











names were ?

16. In Canada, M. P. might
mean Mounted Police, but in Bri-
tain it would more likely desig-
nate a

17. Is Mile. just a short way of





saying Millie?

18. You’ve seen a lot of G-I,
but have you looked into what the
letters come from?

—LE.S.

concerts from the Edinburgh Fes-
tival and two from the Promen-
ade concerts will be on the air
‘live’ to listeners in this area ,at
that time. On Monday the con-
eert from Edinburgh will be given
by the Siatsradiofonien Orchestra
from Copenhagen, conducted by
Fritz Busch, with Kathleen Fer-

rier (contralto). The programme
includes works by orneman,
Hindemith, and Brahms, On

Saturday William Primrose, the
Scottish-born viola player, will
be the soloist in the first European
performance of Bartok’s ‘Concerto
for viola and orchestra.’ This



Rupert's first idea to put help
concert, which will be given by fis Sanit Gest, Ch 80 ie 7 caw
the Halle Orchestra with its con- tants’ gloss dt Vee tua eed
ductor, Sir John will a jooks ¢ ; ' ‘ ALR, he
also include works by Beeth- eet ae 8 ae anOUght a
even and Mozart. On Thursday, This is another tree hat nobody's
elso, this time at 3.00 p.m. there eversoen before, it's the work of

that black nip that they call the

will be another broadcast from
back-room boy. I was on my way

the Edinburgh Festival with
Hindemith’s ‘Das Marienleben, in
which you will hear the celebrated
1ezzo-soprano, Jennie Tourel, The
‘Prom’ broadcasts are on Wednes-
day and Friday with the BBC
Symphony and London Philhar-
monie Orchestras respectively.

Cricket Operetta

On Monday, 28th August, the
BBC will broadcast the operetta,
‘The Batsman’s Bride’ or ‘The
Man Who Bowled the Maiden
Over,’ This gay piece was written
hy Donald Hughes, Headmaster
of Rydal School at Colwyn Bay
in North Wales, with musie by
the school’s director of music,
!. H. Heywood, It is not usually
part of a Headmaster’s activities
to write an operetta, but this way
written last summer for the boys
to perform as part of their efforts
to raise money for a school war
memorial. Many people thought
it was good ‘enough for the wire-
less’ so the headmaster took the
plunge and submitted it to the |
BBC. The BBC agreed _ it)
was ‘good enough for the wire- |













Ic’s keyed to your
iess’ and broadcast it in the Home
Service and are now repeating it
for overseas listeners at 9.00 Pm. |

on Monday, 28th inst, | It makes you look

TO YOUR FINGERTIPS



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In chapter, but not in verse.

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. PAGE SEVEN



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PAGE RIGHT

BARBADOS sG ADVOGATE

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.



Sunday, August 27, 1950



Are You Registered?

SINCE the amendments which have
taken place in recent years in the qualifi-
cations for voters in the election of mem-
bers to serve in the General Assembly, the
method of registering such voters is no
longer satisfactory. This is reflected by
the smal! percerrtage of those who are en-
titled to vote doing so. Many persons who
are fit to render some contribution to the
life of this community are not even on the

register of voters.

The Representation of the People
(Amendment) Act 1944 provides that the
Governor shall appoint registering officers.
Such registering officers shall be chosen j
from fit and proper persons residing in the !,
parish for which he is a registering officer. ¢
The Representation of the People Act »
1901 prescribes the procedure to bef
adopted on the making of an application ;
for registration. A form has to be filled 4
up by the applicant and sworn to before
a Justice of the Peace or Police Magis- +

trate. The Registering Officer must then _

enquire into the qualifications of the appli-
cant, and if satisfied the applicant is then
registered in the manner prescribed by the
Act.

In actual practice it has become the work
of political organisations to get their sup-
porters registered and even with the work
which is thus done, there is cause for dis-
satisfaction. Those who do not realise the
difficulties of the procedure blame the
political organisations for the fact that so
many eligible voters remain unregistered.
The problem of getting Justices of the
Peace who are prepared to travel around
and: join in urging the people to register
is a very real one. Added to this many
persons dislike being registered by party
politicians feeling perhaps a distaste for
what may appear to be canvassing for a
particular group.

When the Adult Suffrage Bill becomes
law the present electorate will be consid-
erably increased and the machinery which
has proved incapable of dealing with the
present electorate will be completely
swamped.

The'Government should move quickly to
improve the system of registration. Indeed
that is a pre-requisite to the proclamation
of the Adult Suffrage Act. No time should be
lost so that whether the elections of next
year are held with Adult Suffrage or not,
the number of voters will more nearly re-
flect the number who are entitled to vote.

It should not be unduly difficult to pro-
vide simple means of registration. Appli-
cation forms should be obtainable from
every Parochial Office and branch Post
Office, The members of the Parochial Office
and Post Offices could administer the oath
required. Too many people do not even
know who are the registering officers of
the various parishes.

For the proper working of democratic
government, .the people must take an
active and continuous interest in political
affairs. The exercise of the right to vote
is one of the most important duties of a
citizen. By voting he helps to choose
those persons who will represent him in
the Legislature and who will enact those
laws necessary for the peace and progress
of the country.

Every encouragement should be given
so that all persons eligible to do so may
vote. A Government which by perpetu-
ating an outworn and cumbersome and
inconvenient procedure of registration is
failing in its duty. It is failing to inculcate
in the people a sense of civic responsibility
and is doing a grave disservice to the cause
of political democracy in this island.

Bad Weather

IF the destructiveness of hurricanes in
Barbados has not yet been appreciated by
readers of this newspaper there is little



hope for such readers.

The Government of Barbados has also
given much publicity telling people what
to do in the event of a hurricane and what
arrangements to make before and after
should that tragedy occur.



But in one important respect they have
shown lack of appreciation of an elemen-
tary fact which every householder knows.
They have concentrated overmuch on the
word hurricane and neglected the obvious
danger which comes from normal routine
high winds, heavy rains and landslides. It
did not take a hurricane to dislodge an
enormous stone which some days ago des-
troyed a wooden house in St. John. Pic-
tures in this newspaper have made only
too evident the condition of roads and
built-up areas near to Bridgetown after a
“blow.” Bridges collapse, telephone ser-
vice are disrupted and the only consola-
tion that bewildered thousands have is the
knowledge that no hurricane is expecied,
because they have received no warning.

The Director of Agriculture in a lecture '!
last week appealed to the public to stop|
‘panic-mongering.” Everyone acquainted
with Barbados will agree that the use of
the word “panic” is not an exaggeration.
But what is the condition which breeds
ranic? Ignorance. Just that and nothing
)vore.

It is not enough that the Director of
.\griculture or the Assistant Colonial Sec-

etary should feel satisfied with the hurri-
cane warning system which exists. “Con-

tant weather reports are made to Piarco
‘1 Trinidad and if a Hurricane is suspected
ve in Barbados are told about it. So you
see everything possible is being done to
ensure that the public will know of a hur-
ricane well in advance of its arrival—per-
haps 18 or 20 hours before it reaches us.”
In these words Mr. Donald Wiles attempt-
ed to reassure subscribers of Radio Distri-
bution on Friday evening—subscribers
who live in St. Michael and Christ Church
only.

It is imperative that a new attitude be
adopted by the Government during the
hurricane season. No amount of reading
of books, no amount of arrangements for
hurricane relief can take the place of
breeding confidence in the population of
the island during periods of bad weather.

The only way to keep the public in-
formed is for the Government to issue
daily meteorological bulletins in the Press
for the duration of the hurricane season.
This newspaper has offered its columns
free of charge for the publication of these
bulletins. But there are inadequacies in
communication services for the collection
and dissemination of meteorological data
during the night. To remove these inade-
quacies action is said to have been taken
by the Caribbean Commission on recom-
mendations made by the Second meeting
of Meteorological Specialists in Martinique
in June this year.

The first recommendation was that a full
24 hour official weather observing station
should be established as soon as possible
in Antigua. There is no news of this having
been done.

A proposal was also made that national
Governments should express their views
as to the establishment of a radio-telegraph
network for the collection and dissemina-
tion of meteorological information with St.

Croix as the control station and with
stations in St. Martin, St. Kitts, Antigua,
Guadeloupe, Martinique, St. Lucia, Barba-
dos, Grenada, Trinidad and Curacao.

If meteorological experts are critical of
the inadequacies of communications facili-
ties for disseminating meteorological data,
there is no reason why the public of Bar-
bados should be satisfied with uncertainty
every time there is bad weather.

Internally too there is great need for a
system of syrens as suggested by a corre-
spondent so that remote country dwellers
can be given adequate warning of
approaching storms. Simple daily weather
bulletins published in the Press and effec-
tive syrens throughout the parishes will
breed confidence. The nowledge that in-
formation is being passed to the public and
not kept for the Government experts will
eliminate panic-mongering.



In any discussion of the Public
Utilities . Bill, certain. . principl¢s
must be initially accepted. Clear-
ly the State owes it to the citizen

SUNDAY









ADVOCATE

Sitting On The Fence

Hy Nathaniel Gubbins

According to a writer in
West Country newspaper, loca
Communists “finding the na-
tives hostile when asked to
sign Stalin’s trick peace peti-
tion are touring the villages
engaging oldest inhabitants in
genial conversation and buy-
ing them pints of beer in ex-
change for their signatures.”

OOD morning, Mr. Gargle.
Marnin,
Fine day?
Moight a-bin better.
Like a pint?
Oi allus as a quart.
*

I expect you're a grandfather
and a great-grandfather.
Ah

How many children?

Oi’ve ad twalve and buried
fower.

And grandchildren?

Last countin there was tharly-
foive on em.

And lots of great-grandchildren,
too, I expect?

Ah, My darters and granddaters
breed loike rabbits. Two more
pupped on April Fool’s Day, an
three more last dung spreadin.

I expect you'd like them to live
peacefully in this beautiful vil-

Pe’
hey’ll never ave no peace
whoile they live ere.

They'll never have peace if we
don’t come to an agreement with
Russia. ‘

Dont’ know nothin abouts that,
but there'll never be no peace ere,
what with their jaw waggin an
back bitin an scandalmongerin,

* » *

But you wouldn't like an atomic
bomb dropped on them?

That I would. Do em good, Oi
rackon,

But you can’t mean that, Mr.
Gargle. Think of your grand-
children.

Drat em all, Oi say. Rackon a
bomb moight shake em up, the
lazy lot of varmints,

But your. dear little great-
grandchildren?

Drat em, too, with their shouin
an bawlin an screamin,

As I am sure you don’t under-
stand, Mr. Gargle, can I persuade
you to sign this peace petition to
outlaw the atomic bomb?

Oi’ve never put my and to nothin
since Oi signed away the lease of
my cottage. Ee was a lawyer, too.

But I’m not a lawyer. This is for
the good of you and your family,

That's what the lawyer said.

If war breaks out, Mr. Gargle,

it may be hell fire for everybody
in this village.

And sarve em roight. They got
it comin to em so they moight as
well ave a taste of it now. |

Would you like another pint, Mr.
Gargyle?

Oi allus as a quart.

Home Front
BEN an American news-
paper, the Richmond News
Leader, printed maps showing
Korean war lines of battle super-
imposed over a map of the local
country, a presser employed by
W. J. Wiseman of Enfield, N.C.,

left his job without notice as the

map showed the Communists were
only a few miles away,

Nobody knows where the poor
chap is now, but if he is travelling
west he has probably reached (let
us say) South Dakota where, ac-
cording to superimposed maps
printed by the local papers, the
Communists have now infiltrated
into the Black Hills, threatening
Rapid City

Fearing encirclement, he will
then strike north and west again
till he comes to Montana, where
he will find the cunning little
gooks entrenched in the Big Belt
Mountains.

Striking south and west this
time he will read the Idaho news-
papers, which will show the Com-
munists’ line over the Salmon
River Mountains.

When he gets to Oregon the
Wallowa Mountains will be stiff
with Communists.

* oe *

He now has the choice of going
north to Washington or south to
California.

If he goes to California, where
newspapers are printed mainly for
fun, he may read an imaginative
account of a North Korean occupa-
tion of Hollywood.

Outflanked and surrounded, ex-
cept for the ocean escape route, he
will then decide on a one man
Dunkirk, and beat it across the sea
to Japan.

As the Japanese copy everybody
they will also have superimposed
maps. He will find, according to
the Japanese newspapers, that
Communist armies are advancing
on Tokyo.

7 * *

Packing his bags again he will
board another ship which will take
him to Korea, of all places.

There he will find some real
Communist troops and probably
be shot as a spy by one side or the
other.



Forward Glance

O*E week the experts tell you
the weather in Britain is
growing colder. The next week
they say it’s getting hotter.

They now say it is not only get-
ting hotter, but the average tem-
perature has been rising steadily
since 1840.

If this goes on for another two
or three centuries Britain may be-
come a tropical island, with palm
trees and hula-hula girls at Mar-
gate and alligators in the Ser-
pentine.

Snake bites may become as com-
mon as a cold in the nose, parrots
may shout insults from trees in the
parks, and monkeys hurl coconuts
at the heads of a race long accus-
tomed to the respectful subservi-
ence of all the native fauna, ex-
cept cats. |

As climate is held largely, re-
sponsible for character and per-
sonal appearance, the manners and
‘aces of the British may undergo
« complete change.

The pink, wooden pans of young
upper-class Englishmen once so
admired and welcomed on the
Continent by head waiters because
they were a signal to charge
double for everything, may be-
come as dark as any dago’s, and
animated by dazzling white smiles
and black eyes flashing the side-
long. glances which give. a girl
goose pimples, and send her’ run-
ning home to mum for a quiet chat
on the facts of life.

As for the English character, it
may degenerate like English sport.

Foreigners, so willing to believe
our character is like our cricket,
cool, clean, decorous and without
passion, may find us playing
games like the lesser breeds,
shouting, screaming, cheating and
letting off fireworks to unnerve
our opponents.

Football may become a massacre
and the Oval a shambles after a
lost Test Match.

* if *

As the centuries roll by and the
country gets hotter and hotter
Englishmen may become darke*
and nastier, ending up as chatter-
ing guides, furtively selling dirty
posteards to American tourists.

But it will take at least a cen-
tury before Englishmen give up
wearing hot tweeds in the summer
and another before there is cen-
tral heating in every home. Just
when nobody wants it.

—L.ES.



He Might Make Men

I2 Feet Tall

STOCKHOLM.

A new race of Martian men,
nine to 12 feet tall may have be-
come possible as a result of ex-
periments conducted over the last
three years by a team of scientists
headed by Professor Gosta Hagg-
qvist, of the Caroline Institute
Stockholm.

Already Haggqvist

By GEORGE AXELSSON

The next experiment is to pro-
create giant dogs.

“So far we are. only able to
judge the size of animals produced
by my method,” says the profes-
sor.

“With dogs we shall begin to

has pro- investigate their intelligence,”
duced frogs twice their natu The professor declares yvehe-
size and pinkseyed white Danish»mently, “I elf. will never ex-
rabbits half as big again. periment with"humans.” He has

Much Bigger

About September three litters
of pigs will be born, having been
procreated by Haggqvist's special
special method of artificial insem-
ination.

He tells me he expects them
to grow “at least 60 per cent,
Jarger than usual.”

But he qualifies himself by
saying, “There’s always the risk
in these experiments that the
progeny may be dwarfs.”



to sée that he is not exploited by
overcharge or in other ways by
public services that have become
an essential part of his daily liv-
ing, convenience and comfort.
That is the State’s duty, But in its
attempt to control those services
for the benefit of the public, it
should _ as clearly no purpose
of the te so to exercise its con-
trol as to give the impression
that itis an avenging and spite-
ful agency set up for the coercion
of public corporations in the pur-
suit of their legitimate undertak-
ings.

The devolution of powers
granted to the proposed Board
of Control are such as to give
that body dangerously arbitrary
powers. e public corporation is
after all as clearly entitled to

justice as any individual citizen.
but it has no appeal whatever to
any body or court from an order
of the Board. And nowhere is it
laid down that such orders must
be governed by a “reasonable
cause”. Whatever the supposed
integrity of such authority as
constitutes the Board, it is dan-
gerous to the principles of ele-
mentary justice that such orders
can be purely arbitrary. The
mind or minds of those responsi-
ble for certain sections and
clauses of this Bill have been so
dominated by the theory of au-
thoritarian administration as tu
make of the proposed Board a
dictatorial tribunal if there ever
Was one,

If this Bill is ratified by the
Legislature as it stands it will be
farcical to refer to these public

—

. no ambition, he says to produce a

race of Frankenstein monsters.
“But” he adds, “undoubtedly
there is nothing to prevent such
experiments being attempted.
“There would, of course be the
risk of the human progeny being

dwarfs, as may happen with ani-
mals, ’ a *\

Abnormal
“Moreover,
risk that the progeny may be
idiots. We shall not know much
about what happens so far as in-

our experiments on dogs.

“I also fear that my method of
procreation may start a growth
process which wouid destroy the
normal nerve cells and conse-
quentiy cause abnormalities,

“I have no wish to bring mis-
ery on any human being. Big peo-
ple are no better than small ones;

From Lilies

“Colchinin, the substance which
I mix in the ordinary process of
artificial insemination, is fairly
common, f

“It is derived from autumn
lilies found in Switzerland, the
aw, and elsewhere.

“An army of giants, posstibl
with the brains of robots tnd
possessing enormous physical
strength, might theoretically be

there is also the pred

“The main use of my discov-
eries will be in food production.”
—L.E.S.



By SCRUTATOR

utilities as within the realm of
private enterprise.

The only parallel to the start-
ling powers contained in parts 6
and 7 of the Bill, is Regulation
58A of the Emergency Powers
Defence Act of 1939 and 1940 in
the U.K., which were constantly
challenged in the courts and con-
sistently condemned by the for-
ensie genius of both Bench and
Bar in the U.K.

Such alarming powers as is
contained in Parts 6 and 7 of the
Bill have only been directly un-

dertaken by Governments, not
delegated Authorities, and then,
have only been exercised by

those Governments in an emer-
gency of unmistakable national
proportions.

The powers of these sections of
the Bill are similar to those delé-
gated only to National Service
Officers in the United Kingdom
at the height of the War Emer-
gency, and would be unthinkable
by any peace Administration ex-
cept as a nationalised Industry,
The Bgard’s Order is Law, its
powers of direction are unquali-

fled and no Court has power to
question the manner in which it
exercises it. Some genuine or
“reasonable cause’ may exist to

prejudice the public corporation’s
compliance with an order, and

PUBLIC UTILITIES BOARD

the only agency that should de-
termine what is “reasonable
eause” is a Judge and Jury. But
no appeal to a Judiciary tribunal
is allowed except on a question
of Law. But questions of fact are
so often intricately bound up with
questions of Law that if the pos-
sibility of appeal is only confined
to one of law it gives to “the
executive discretion of the Board
an almost unlimited Charter.”

In England itself Boards with
such powers are really voluntary
domestic Tribunals, “in as much
as they do not come into exist-

ence unless the majority of an
Industry has. derided in
favour of a scheme”. If we want
a public Authority for any com-
parison in Enxland in peace time
we must cite the “Railway Rates
Tribunal.” “This is a body in per-

manent session, and has such a
well defined technical jurisdiction,
that they are for all common
purposes, Administrative Courts.
Its procedure is laid down in
tutory rules and-arders is
general on High Court .
Â¥ 4 Cont of Records
of three members, presided over
by a trained lawyer, with the ad-
dition when necessary of assessors
selected from an elaborately con-
stituted panel. Obviously the pro-
posed board has no similar speci-
fic constitution.

It is no easy abuse of language
nor any exaggeration to state that
the proposed Bill for the control
of public utilities is a document
of Nationalization exclusive of
the moral principle of compensa-
tion. The fact that it is formally
stated that the Board recognises

gz
iiss

the interests of shareholders is}!
no assurance that it will in fact} }
function .to guarantee those in- }}
terests

4

telligence is concerned until after |

SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1930

Molotov Made
The Plans



@ America’s State Depart-
ment adviser answers the
questions that everyone is
poe WHY are the Com-
munis gaining 7
HOW can they be “nechea ?
WILL there be another world
war ?

Mr. John Foster Dulles is the
wealthy American lawyer who
would have been Secretary of
State if Dewey had defeated Tru-
man in the Presidential elections
of 1948. As the acknowledged ex-
pert of the Republican Party on
foreign affairs, it is still possible
that Dulles may attain that office
after the election of 1952,

His book, War or Peace, pub-
lished by Harrap (15s.), would
consequently be well worth study-
ing at any time. But, as one of
the architects of “bipartisanship”
iu American policy-making, Mr
Dulles has been a member of the
United States delegation to almost
every important international con-
ference since the war, and is now
back in harness as Special Adviser
to Mr. Acheson,

He can therefore give an eye-
witness account of the history of
American - Soviet relations since
the war, which is of outstanding
interest.

Finally, the outbreak of war in
Korea, whose danger Dulles fore-
saw, has invested his challenging
title with a new and sombye sig-
nificance.

The answer which he gives to
his self-posed question will not
arcuse false optimism: “War is
prcbable,” he says, “unless by
positive and well directed efforts
we fend it off. War is not inevi-
table and I do not think it is immi-

nent. Something can be done
about it.”
Throughout the book Dulles

stresses the immense gains which
Communism has made and its re-
lentless urge for expansion.

“Already Soviet Communism
has extended its control over more
than 700 million people or about
one-third of the human race. This
has happened in 33 years. Such
successes usually make men lose
their heads and go on more reck-
lessly -

Masaryk said ...

Since the war Communism has
consolidated its position in Cen-
tral Europe. (Jan Masaryk, the
Czech Foreign Minister who later
committed suicide, told Dulles that
“Soviet proposals often smelled
so bad that he had to hold his
nose with one hand while he rais-
ed the other hand to vote for
them.” Dulles drily comments:
“But he did it.”)

It has won a victory in China
“which surpassed what Japan was
seeking and we risked war to
avert”.

In other parts of Asia, and par-
ticularly in Africa, governments
are vulnerable to indirect aggres-
sion by Communism.

Dulles, remarking that the Bel-
gian Congo is America’s principal
source of uranium for atomic
bombs considers that the South
African policy of white supremacy
“both wrong and obsolete in the
world today”, is giving Commu-
nism the opportunity to precipi-
tate a bloody struggle throughout
Africa.

Against that, he counts the de-
fection of Yugoslavia the stabili-
sation of Western Europe, the
check to Communist expansion in
Greece, and the isolation of Rus-
sia in the United Nations.

Totting up the net score he con-
siders that the hard core of West-
ern civilisation comprises 350,-
000,000 people, with another 100,-
000,000 in South America,

Why they gain

Out of the remaining 1,700,000,-
000 people in the world, more than
700,000,000 are already under
Communist control and the Rus-
sion leaders have good chances of
further expansion in much of the
remaining areas whenever they
may be disposed to move strongly.

Dulles concludes: “There has
been a very definite shift in the
balance of power, and that shift
has been in favour of Soviet Com-
munism.

Why does Communism gain in
strength? Dulles gives three rea-
sons:

1—Communist propaganda has
a universal appeal. “The ‘Great
Soviet Experiment’ is the most
advertised, the most ballyhooed
scheme for softening up the oppo-
sition that the world has ever
known.”

2.—The propaganda is backed
up by a party with “the most
ruthless, unscrupulous, highly-

trained, omnipresent, secret army
that the world has ever known”.

3.—Communism has the advan-
tage of the offensive.

At present that offensive is
mainly being pursued in Asia and
Africa,

“Contrite” Bevin

Dulles makes the startling dis-
closure that when Molotov retired
from Minister of Foreign Affairs
last year, “he apparently did so
because the Politburo felt that he
should devote his entire time to
working out the Soviet Com-
munists programme for revolution
in Asia—a task so important that
it deserved the concentrated atten-
tion of the best international



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brains that the Soviet Government
could commend.”

Dulles pays a remarkable
tribute to Molotev’s diplomacy at
the London conference of Foreign
ane in 1945 od

‘o gain his ends Molotov played

eaknesses of his col-
leagues. He encouraged Mr.
Byrnes (the then United States
of

use as fitting into the Russian

programme.

Molotov at once got up and
made for the door, which, says
Mr. Dulles, he opened slowly.
By now Mr. Bevin was contrite,
and, ‘as a mark of sincerity,
conceded the point at issue.

Molotov -hoped to provoke the
fourth member of the group,
M. Bidault, to leave the confer-
ence. So he tried to outrage
French honour with petty slights,
omitting, for instance, to tell M.
Bidault that the time of the
meeting had been postponed.

Fanatics

Of Molotov, Dulles writes:

I have seen in action all the
great international statesmen of
this century, beginning with those
met at The Hague Peace Confer-
ence of 1907. I have never seen
personal diplomatic skill at so
high a degree of perfection as
Mr. Molotov’s at that session.”

Was it at Molotov’s direction
that the Communists attacked
South Korea? This book was, of
course, in print before the invasion
began. (Incidentally, it is surpris-
ingly up to date—events up to
February 1950 are included in the
text). But Dulles, who was in
Seoul only a week before the
attack was launched, can hardly
have been surprised as he wrote
in this book:

“Many feared lest the with-
drawal of the United States troops
would be the signal for an invasion
of South Korea from the North,
where the Soviet army had created
a large, fanatical, well-disciplined
and well-armed Communist force.

Dulles was hopeful, however
and believed that “at least the
South Korean Government has
passed safely the dangerous
period of its greatest. weakness.”

Reform Uno

How does Duties propose to
counter Communist expansion
throughout the world?

“Power is the key to success in
dealing with the Soviet leadership,
he writes, explaining that this
includes not merely military power
but economic power and the intan-
gibles such as moral judgment and
wor.d opinion.

He places great importance on
the reform of the United Nations,
which should be quite universal.
Apparently he would even includ
Communist: China as a member.
And he would attempf to limit the
veto.

Secondly, he wants Western
Europe, including Britain, to
unite. He would apply “friendly
but firm pressure” from America
using the bait of Marshall dollars
to hurry the process along. '

Dulles seems to believe that the
only reason why Britain will not
join in a Federal Europe is th®
necessity for “insulating” Social-
ism from natural economic forces.
He makes no attempt to understand
Britain’s links with the Empire.

In Asia, Dulles looks for the
establishment of a rmanent
association of Free Nations of
Asia and the Pacific, and he would
attempt to make Japan into “an
exhibit in Asia of what a free
society can develop in spiritual
and intellectual richness and
material well-being” .

Cheerless

Dulles is emphatic that military
expediency must not be allowed
to run American policy: “We shall
not qualify for survival, he says,
“if we become a nation of material-
ists, and if we give the impression
of growing and inhuman, and
deaf to the cry of mankind that
a way be found to save them
from the death, the misery, the
starvation of the body and soul
that make up the human cost of
recurrent wars,”

He believes also that much
could be done through new
techniques of political warfare to
encourage resistance within Com- |
munist countries.



SUNDAY ADVOCATE





ANTIGUA



ANTIGUA

TOP LEFT: Freeman’s Bay. RIGHT: English

Harbour.

By 8S. CUNLIFFE OWEN

ERHAPS the most. striking
difference between Antigua
and Barbados lies in the feeling
of its being not isolated, of its
being part of a larger community.
From its highest point, Boggy
Peak, no less than a dozen islands
are visible in clear weather.
From Barbados, none, hence a
sense of self-sufficiency and a
narrowness of outlook which
Antigua lacks.

Most of my readers are familiar
with Antigua in a general way,
the town of St. John, one of the
first to be planned on the gridiron
system, Rat Island, joined by a
causeway to the mainland, where
ihey make the rum, the “double-
skinned” hurricane proof Cathe-
dral with its 18th century French
statutes destined for Guadeloupe
over the gate, Government House
and its dining room with fourteen
doors and English Harbour, the
Gibraltar of the West Indies two
hundred years ago.

But there are one or two inter-
esting, but less familiar features
which I shou'd like to mention,

Pre Historic

One is Green Castle Hill. This
is one of the most impressive pre-
historic sites in the Caribbean. On
the top of the 700 ft. high hill sits
the moon Goddess and below her
the Sun god a monolith twenty
feet high. From these, on the
appropriate axes radiate statues,
tombs and fertility emblems all
the way down the hill culminating
in a temple enclosure approached
by a triumphal way. All this,
though overgrown by bush, is in
an excellent state of preservation.

It is nor widely known that
there were at one time camels in
Antigua imported by the planters
from the Canary Islands, where
I myself have seen them in sugar
fields. They were brought to the
Canary Islands from the near East
by African mainland. To feed
them, the variety of acacia known
as “camel thorn” was __ also
imported, and now grows freely
over the pastures affording wel-
come shade to the cattle and
together with the date palm im-
ported to feed the camel drivers,
giving the island an __ exotic
appearance peculiar to itself, This
thorn flowers like mimosa and
smells very sweet.

Glory

The glory of Antigua is its
beaches mile upon mile of white
sand, gently sloping to the crys-

tal clear water, and usually
backed by a belt of trees and a
lagoon. Thése lagoons are of

great extent but shallow and one
may often see a fisherfuan stand-
ing half a mile out from the
shore. At sunset thousands of birds
cover the surface of the lagoon
and the bushes svrrounding it
including a bright yellow canary
which I have not seen elsewhere.

The best beaches are barely

And he con-|accessible by very rough roads,

cludes with an eloquent appeal such as Dickenson Bay with its

for greater confidence in our
spiritual heritage.

War or Peace was, of course,
written mainly for an American
public; but everyone who wishes
to see the Korean battles in the
perspective of the global struggle
for power should read what Mr
Dulles has to say.

If his voice at times sounds
grim and cheerless if he lacks
full understanding of the Euro-
pean scene, let us acknowledge
that he has written the most out-
standing and enlightening survey
of world affairs published since
the end of the war.—L.E.8.

CHARLES WINTOUR

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BOTTOM: Nelson's Dockyard.

RIGHT: Admiral’s
Nelsen’s Dockyard.

House,

colony of pelicans, Gatley Bay,
with its magnificent view of the
lighthouse and the sunken ship,
ifalf Moon Bay, the most perfect
crescent imaginable, but it is worth
the rough journey to visit them.
Fort James is surrounded by
beautiful old buildings and this
beach and the lovely Fry’s Bay
and Morris Bay which look across
to Montserrat are approachable
by a good road.

On Foot

Really to appreciate Antigua,
however, one must walk, which
fortunately is easy as there are
fine footpaths all over the island
The walk along the crest of the
hills from Boggy Peak to Fal-
mouth, is breathtaking in_ its
beauty. So is the deep defile of
the Christian Valley with it
gigantic shade trees, its gent!)
flowing stream, pasturing cattle
and luxuriant tree ferns.

Every now and then you pass a
lotus filled pond, sometimes with a
little mission church, or old mil!
reflected in its waters, sometimes
out in open country with sheep and
cows, the magnificent white Zebus |
coming down to drink. |

Antigua has an empty look |
after Barbados. Great stretches
of uncultivated land with not a
house or village visible. In the
rains it is bright green and cov-
ered with wild flowers, in the dry
season all brown and parched.

The exception to this is the great
plain, stretching along the foot
of the hills from Five Islands Bay
past Bendalls to the Body Ponds
Reservoir and covered with mile
after mile of waving cane, At
evening, the hills beyond are
cobalt blue in the bright air. Here
end there boys and girls sit watch -
ing their cattle in the shade ot
huge old mango trees.

Over by Five Islands where the
lepers .ive the shapes of the hil!s
are contorted into weird shapes
by volcanic action and across the
great mud flats below poles are
placed to guide the traveller)
through the swamp.

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In the remotest recesses of the |
isiand, far, one would say, from |
civilization, appears, behind gates, |
the American luxury club of Mill-
reef, with its lovely houses and up
to date equipment |

But perhaps the most striking
memory of Antigua is of Shirley
Heights on a night of full moon
The guant and massive skeletons

of the barrack buildings of Nelson's
day rise out of the cactus (gcrub
against the night sky and the old
gun emplacements glitter in the
moon Far below, the yachts lie
snug in English Harbour and
across a shining sea can be seen
the faint outlines of Guadeloupe

It is an eerie spot, remote, wind-



swept ful of ghosts, with the
smugglers’ lair of Indian Creek
just below You a'most expect

to hear bugles blow as you tramp
the deserted path.

From here the neglected island
seems to stretch to infinity, this
poor sister of the Caribbean fam-
ily, waiting with her superb
beaches and genial climate tu
welcome the tourist who never
comes. The Millreef club, how-
ever, is a start, and there is a hope
that better days for Antigua may
be in store.

C. F. HARRISON
& Cia. LTD.
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(

|Army Life Begins
With A Slice
Of Cake

From FREDERICK COOK

FORT DIX, New Jersey,
Friday. A subdued group of
young men tumble out of a bu
from New York at the entrance
to this huge United States tyain-
ing camp every few hours

nowadays.
They come

in grimy overalls

and undershirts, clutching a tooth. |

brush, towel and razor, |
They are the material wito
which America is building

PAGE NINE





;

her |

“new army.” On their first day |

they do not look impressive. One
Sympathises with the
drill sergeants who
them on, and whose @omments on |
the whole business of a “new |
army” are often unprintable, |

ave to take |

}
14 weeks later—
Fourteen weeks later, eat
the recruits move off tor the next |
Stage in the complicated technical |
schooling that is needed now to!
turn a civilian into a fighting man,

old-time |

|
|
they look different. And they —t

What happens to the youngsters
from whom Fort Dix has coined

a new word — “raweruits”—in |

their first few days as soldiers? |

Surprises come from the |
moment they arrive. They come |
expecting orders, bawling

| sergeants, incomprehensible duties,

of cake, and a cup of coffee.

Then they are “marched” (if you |

can call it that) a hundred yards |
or so, into a large wooden hut,
where they come face to face with
their first general. Major-generai
John Devine, commander at Fort |
Dix, is not terrifying of aspect or
of voice. To the new recruits. he
talks like a father.

What General Devine tries to
do is to convey to the bewildered
youngsters the thoughts underly-
ing this country’s “new army.” It
is like the old army in aims; it
wants total obedience and intends







to have it, But “theirs not to |
reason why" is gone for ever,
Recruits now are te!d why, made
to understand, The final result,
they say, is the same.



Wisdom—and_ unwisdom

In their three menths at Fort |
Dix the “raweruits’ may not
become front-line soldiers; But
when they leave they are equipped
with some knowledge of how to
make a bed, how to march, how
to read a map, how to treat sore
feet. Lots of them have learned
how to drink a glass of beer. And
all of them have learned the un-
wisdom of saying “Scram” to a4
superior who issues what sounds
like a ridiculous order,

Fort Dix has its own staff of
psychiatrists. Some of the people
who need them most are the old-
time NCOs.

Said one of the psychiatrists.

“They have quite a job to
edjust themsel
Army and its ideas! In the old
days, they will tell you, sergeants
told a man to hurl himself off a
cliff and he hurled. Now they come
to us full of bewilderment at the
coffee-and-cake routine, In their
time it simply didn’t happen, Well,
like the recruits, they have to get
used to a lot of new things. They're
in the Army, too!”

—L.E.S



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PAGE TEN



William Blake-Poet, Painter

And Mystic

By IRIS

sae

Bern in 1757, William Blake
was a visionary from the age
of four. Poet, paister and
mystic, his escape from con-
ventionalism in art has in-
fluenced painters until the
present day. His best known
poem is probably “Jerusalem,”
and perhaps his most success-
‘ul drawings are the “Divina
Commedia” illustrations, The
“Sengs. 0’ Innocence and Ex-
cilo sec, with their exquisite
wiarguial engravings, were his
cio. perfect achievement.

i substantial, Queen
“one house at the corner of Broad
Street, Golden Square, London on
November 28th, 1757, William
tiake was_born wo a hosier, James
Flake, and his wife Catherine, No
coubt his Birth was like any other
in his family; he was duly baptised,
in Grinlimg Gibbon’s ornate font
in the Wren Church of St. James's

rd of hiS‘infancy little is known
except what can be glimpsea

1 a large

CONLAY

met the advancing mob of rioters
who carried him with them down
Holborn to Newgate. There he
sSuw the prison’s gates stormes,
the place set on fire and its three
hunared inmates released. Weeks
o! indiscriminate vengeance {ol-
kuwed, and Blake remembered it
vividly, making it the corner stone
of his philosophy of forgiveness
and war which emerges with such
force in “Jerusalem”, the greatest
of his prophetic poems:
“....es..df I could find these
Criminals
I could not dare to take vengeance,
tor all things are so constructe?
And builded up by the Divine
hand that the sinner shall always
escape;
And he who takes vengeance is
alone the criminal of Providence
If 1 should dare to lay my finger
on a grain of sand
In way of vengeance, I punish the
already p da.”
When he was twenty-five, he
married Catherine Boucher, the

reug. taese holes in the blanket black-eyed aq illiterate daughter

memcx? of which Blake him- of a market

elf wrot&years later.

They lived in

ener at Battersea.
Green Street,

I cangginto the world like a Leicester Fields, in London ana set

epatit hidden in a crowd” he said.

up a print shop which eventually

When hé-avas four he knew that failed because Blake's younger

he had s@@n the Eternal face to
fece ‘ent his hoary visage
against ie window pane and the
-ttle boy burst into tears.
rents, worldly-wise, saw value
(rents but none in his
When little eight-year-
v1 began to describe the
Jul\.ich as being covered
wherein were angels
crignt wings bespangled
bough with stars, or said
that angelic figures walked among
haymakers, his father threaten.
him with a thrashing for hi:
eiperate perversion of truth,
Sut the youthful Blake did not
change his opinion Grown-up
and an accepted genius, he wrote
im exactly the same vein, explain
tng his way of seeing things: “I
assert for My Self that I do not
behold the outward Creation and
that to me it is a hindrance and
not Action;...... ‘What’ it will be
Question’d, ‘When the Sun rises,
dO you not see a round disc of fire
somewhat like a Guinea?’ ‘O no
no, [ see an Innumerable compan.
of the Heavenly host crying,
Poly, Holy is the Lord
Almighty! I question not my
Corporeal Vegetative Bye any
more than I would Question a
Window concerning a Sight.
look thro’ it and not. with it.”
This was the king of small boy,
who at the age of twelve, wrote
verse and.,at fourteen was ap-
prenticed to an engraver. The
engraver was an understanding
rean, and realised that he had a
rupil Who might not fit easily into

every

u
e
C

brother, who managed it for him,

died. Marriage meant everything
to Blake. His whole philosophy,

His forestalling that of D. H. Lawrence,

centred around the idea of a per-
fect rélationship between man and
woman. Both preached a doctrine
of sexual regeneration, but Blake
went much further than Law-
rence, and by setting his doctrine
inside the conviction that Body
and Soul are a living unity he
‘avoided Lawrence's error of deny-
ng the Soul altogether

Blake and his wie SxeMpiunier,
the theories Wancn we Peer sieia,
“hey livea devotediy twgewer au
tieir lives, althougn uley were not
always so united as appearances
might have suggested. at ine be-
guiming, absorped in g@acn otner,
iney tound endless delight: Wii-
liam in teaching Catherine to read
and write, Catherine in learning.
William was at that time begin-
ning (6 combine writings with

awings, and the “Songs of In-
ocence”’, poems inscribea wiui
elicate and poetic marginal

ney decorations, were a joint produc-

tion of himself and his wife—she
tinting a few of the engravings
and pulling the impressions — he
writing and engraving the copper.
Sut as time went on there were
difficulties between them. Never-
theless, won by patient pains for
the wisdom of mankind, William
and Catherine’s marriage suc-
ceeded, and passing from a sterile
and elemental oppostion, in time
it became the truly creative

an apprentices’ school, but whojg?tlationship that every marriage

could teach himself more than he S!0uld be.

It was a rare and

since his position as the greatest

would Jearn in any Classes, se Bptce achievement for Blake,

therefore invited Blake to go ou’
and to spend his time drawing the
monuments of London’s Churches,
With a. budding passion for the
Gothic, Blake was happy day after
Cay, sketching the medievad tombs
in Westminster Abbey and dream-
ing palpable. shapes from the

phantom past.

When his seven years’ ap-
prenticeship was over, Blake
turned seriously to the engraver’s
art. He worked hard at his draw-
ing too. even exhibiting at the first
show held by London’s Royal
Academy of Arts. But the two ex-
periences which made the greatest
impact on his life at that time
were his marriage and his inyol-
untary participation in. the Gor-~
don Riots of 1780, wi oe.
= in the strong religion of those

ays.

The artist happened to be walk—
itig near Leicester Fields when he

prophet of the modern world
caused him to be the most isolated,

“Songs of Innocence” was fol-
lowed by “Songs of Experience,”
with the same exquisite marginal
decorations. Blake’s powers of
design were steadily improving.
He accomplished a mass of work
by an extraordinary union of ex-
houstless patience with a fiery,
restless, creative imagination. He
never paused between one task
and another. “I don’t understand
what you mean by the want of
@ holiday,” he said, and he de-
clared that writing and design
were relaxation, after engraving
aud woodcutting.

oe best known amo the
woodcuts are those he made for
Tharnton’s text of Vergil, Samuel
Palmer has & lo tion of
them in one of his letters, “They
are visions of little dells and nooks

and corners of Paradise; models of
the exquisite pitch of intense
poetry. I thought of their light and
shade, and looking upon them 1
found no word to describe them.
Intense depth, solemnity, and vivid
brilliancy only coldly and partial-
ly describe them. There is in all
such a mystic and dreamy glim-
mer as penetrates and kindles the
inmost soul and gives complete and
unreserved delight, unlike the
gaudy daylight of this world, They
are like all that wonderful artist’s
works the drawing aside the fleshly
curtain, and the glimpse of that
rest which remaineth to the people
of God.”

Periods of happiness and under-
standing alternated in Blake's life.
There was the peaceful interlude
in the country at Felpham which
would have lasted probably far
more than three years had the
poet not ma@fie an unfortunate mis-
take. One day a soldier came into
his garden and was insulting when
Blake asked him why he was
there, Words flew about and after-
wards threats and even blows. The
soidier was eventually forcibly re-
moved, but afterwards be brought
a case against Blake for seditior.
In the interval of waiting for the
trial the poet returned to London
and found lodgings in South Mou!l-
ton Street. He was acquitted, but
the strain of a trial for high treas-
on would weigh on most men.
Blake's withdrawal frorn even his
friends began at this time. For two
years, it is said, he never went out
of the house.

Gradually his work brought him
more and more admirers. Samuel
Palmer, Fuseli and John Varley
were among those of his closest
friends who managed to penetrate
his seclusion. Varley would be al-
lowed to sit by him far into the
night and would ask him, “Draw
me Moses”, or, “Draw me Julius
Caesar”, Then, straining his eyes
in an effort to see what Blake saw,
he would hear the poet say, “There
he is,” and afterwards watch him
draw with alacrity, looking up
from time to time as if he had a
flesh and blood sitter before him.
Sometimes, suddenly leaving off,
he would say, “I can’t go on, it is
gone”, or, “It has moved, the
mouth has gone.” Thus were pro-
duced the series of “spiritual por-
traits.” “You can see what I see,
if you choose. Work up the imag-
ination to the state of vision and
the thing is done”, Blake used to
remark,

Among his last drawings were
the “Divina Commedia” illustra-
tions, and perhaps his most suc-
cessful, apart from those whjch
adorned his own poetry, were the
designs for Blair’s Grave. The
theme of these was death; and who
more qualified to interpret such
heights and depths?

His last poetic work was “Jeru-
salem”, This was summed up and
brought together the themes of his
earlier works and gave a unity to
“The Book of Thel’, “The Marri-
age of Heaven and Hell”, “The
Songs of Innocence and Experi-
ence”, “The First Book of Urizen’”,
“The Song of Los”, “The Book
of Ahania” and “Milton”. And in
the end his philosophy was dis-
tilled into these few phrases, “I
want nothing. I am quite happy. J
should grieve to possess earthly
glory, for everything that a man
wins in way of materia] glory
detracts from his spiritual glory.”
He thought less of himself and his
achievements even than of success.
Of “Jerusalem” he wrote that the
poem was hardly his, “I have
written this poem from immediate
dictation, twelve or sometimes
twenty or thirty lines at a time,
without premeditation or even
against my will. ...I may praise
it since I dare not pretend to be
other than the secretary, the

are in Eternity”.

Whenever av spoke of his own
death, he would say that he could
not think of it “as more than going
out of one room into another”, or
of going “into that country which
all my life long I have desired to
explore,” When the day came on
August 12th, 1827, he died joyous-
ly, gently and imperceptibly.

Wm. Blake's engravings are on sale at
the Advocate,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Our Readers Say:
Vo Information
The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—In the lecture on Hurri-
canes by the Director of Agricul-
ture on August 2'st., I see that
Mr. Skeete referred ‘to what he

aptly described as “panic-mon-
gering.’

At the time the lecture was
being delivered, the island was

vife with rumours of a hurricane,

and ma people were seri
concerned as to whether Kd
should start to make their houses
secure against a storm, but could
find nv 4efinite information, one
way or the other.

The only way to end this sort
of thing is to have a simple and
effective means of signalling the
approach of storms, and this could
be done by a number of electri-
cally operated sirems, such as
were used in Britain for air taid
warnings during the war. The
whole island could be effectively
covered by from six to eight
sirens, or at most, say one per
parish, Strategically loeated. The
cost would be very reasonable.

The present system of warnings
to the general public cannot be
called effective as, with the best
intentions, too many houses will
not be reached by any of the
various methods laid down.

If the public could feel confi-
dent that an unmistakable warn-
ing would be heard by the entire
population before the approach of
a storm, they would probably
cease to panic on the strength of
rumours, but nothing short of this
‘will serve the purpose.

R. E. SMYTHIES
“Instow,”
St. Peter,

Soceer
To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—It is known that Football
has more fans, draws bigger
crowds, and is a much more in-
ternational game than Cricket as
witnessed by England’s de-
feat by U.S.A. in Brazil recently,
yet local footballers have to be
content with the crumbs from the
cricketers table, surely the time
has arrived for the incorporation
of the B.A.F.A. and the start of a
new era with regard to Football,
in the purchase by the Commit’:
tee of a ground of its own. It was
noted that the newly formed Ten.
nis Association was noti asked to
play at Kensington merely be.
cause they could provide pavilion
accommodation, but were genér-
ously provided with a pround of
their own at the Pine, and the
Public appealed to, to support the
erection of stands.

Why then mus) footballers be
debarred from playing football at
the most suitable time of the year,
namely, when the rains are fall-
ing and the ground is in a soft
condition? Those who recall the
triangular tournament held here
in 1982 will remember that we
were leading in that tourhament
until the rain fell, and after that
we were soundly beaten througn
not being accustomed to playing
on a heavy ground, and with a
heavy wet ball.

Football enthusiasts were told
in the past to content (:emselves
in patience and await the disposal
of Weymouth. The last portion
remaining has now been given to
Combermere, meanwhile two very
suitable sites have changed hands,
where the new Biscuiti Factory is
being built, and “Wakefield”
Pinfold Street, also “Stockton”
which the Hospital has now de-
cided to use. The advice giver
has thus proved fruitless

I have been informed that a
substantial balance has been car-
ried forward on this year’s season,
I should therefore like to advise
thet tihis be not dissipated on
tours as in the past, on sccount of
not taking a long view, but that
steps be taken to incorporate the
Association, and a diligent search

for a suitable ground be made and },

acquired,
SOCCER FAN.





FERGUSSON

RAD

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If this were England I would say:
| HELLFIRE CORNER

IS

From LIONEL

IF THIS WAR were taki
‘be reporting to-night that He.

SAVED

CRANE: Taegu

place in England, I would
Corner is now safe.

Imagine for a moment that during the past two weeks
an enemy has pressed the defenders of democracy in
England into a box bounded by Dover in the south, Har-
wich in the north, and Chelmsford in the west.

Those two weeks have been
critical. Any day could have
brought a break-through. There
were moments when the best

military minds féared that the
enemy was coming ih to put the
lid on the box.

Now, for the first time since the
enemy came sweeping down from
the north, there is a real feeling
of security.

REE) p04)"
ra Ye
yey













In two days 1 have toured aii
fronts in Korea. each I
bring back the message: “We are
here to stay.”

Let me itemise.

FIRST, the area of Pusan, the
Dover of this campaign:—

When the Reds forced a bridge-
head over. the Naktong River,
Pusan was a town of nerves. This
is the port into which flow the
lifeline supplies for the defenders.

Without those supplies there
could be no resistance to the
Reds... For days there were omi-
nous whispers that this was the
place where the Americans would
be forced to stage a Dunkirk.

Then the Marines were ordered
in to pick that pocket over the
Naktong. Succeed or burst were
their orders. They succeeded.

They cut and chopped that
bridgehead, so savagely that only
a handful of Reds were left to
limp dazedly back to the other
Side of the river. Pusan was

safe,
LIKE THE 8.53

SECOND, the sector round Tae-
gu (Korea’s Chelmsford) a town
that lies at a road and rail junc-
tion to the south—a town that has)
a top priority airfield lying be-
hind it.

From Taegu’s hot and dusty air
strip the fighter planes—Austra-
lian and’ American—go up with
the regularity of suburban trains
to cut and harry the enemy.

On that same strip vital sup-
plies are arriving steadily. Planes
are bringing in day and night
everything from C rations to land-
mines.

The threat to Taegu became so
real that on the night I arrived
there, the inhabitants were ordeér-
ed to evacuate.

I saw them pouring down the
roads south with their shabby
possessions on their backs—
another pitiful contribution to
the long column of refugees that

has traipsed its way across ihe

battlefronts of the world,

Two days later, and what a
change! Back in the hills 16 miles
north of Taegu, American and
South Korean infantry have hit
those would-be attackers so hard
that they have put their heads
cewn, in the scrub and kept them
tnere. it

All they have been able to do in
the last 48 hours is to lob a few
harmless shells around the outer
fringe of the town.

The evacuation has been stop-
ped. The people are back at their
normal business of selling apples,
rice, and watermelons,
clothes and sitting around smok-
ing 20-inch pipes. .

wich), where tonight I spoke to

General Kim Hon Ill whose

great victory on the east coast

in the last two days has made
him the Montgomery of South

Korea.

When I met him he was sitting
in an almost bare billet cooling
himself with a green and scarlet
paper fan.

‘7-Stone Monty’

There is a good deal of resem-
blance between him and Mont-
gomery. He is sparé—he would
not turn a scale at more than 7st.
He despises comfort. He works at
a bare kitchen table as a desk and
sleeps in a camp bed in the
corner of his office.

Like Montgomery he is not too
precise about uniform. When I
saw him he was wearing a Gl.
fatigue suit, with two silver stars
on a pocket, and a pair of gym
shoes.

Like Montgomery he has given
his life to the army. Behind him
are bitter campaigns in China and
Manchuria. Unlike Montgomery,
he chain smokes.

About the future of the war

he was in no doubt. He said: “I

can clearly say I will advance.”

As a man who has crushed a

North Korean division his view

is entitled to respect.

Well that is the physical posi-
tion. Almost more important is
the psychological improvement.
The “old sweats” of this campaign,
who remember the days when we
were desperate enough to put on
a battalion to defend one point,
now find themselves in a proper
line with their flanks defended. . .

An Army Now

“Defending a line” is a phrase
that has died out here. Now the
men talk only of attack. They
have the materials to do it.

The period when the Americans
thought they were acting as local
policemen to try to keep the peace
bas gone for good. These Ameri-
cans and South Koreans are now
an -
They have begun to kill the
enemy in large numbers. They
have shredded his supply lines.
Night and day they harass him
fiom the air.

The best military judges here
say the tide has turned. Soon,

they believe, it may begin flow-

ing towards the 38th Parallel. I
believe them. —L.ES.



Tet the




we CASHMERE BOUQUET

he al



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find in any soap.

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SSeS

o>
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At the wonderful evening is over;
will the fragrant memory of you

Of course it will, if you bathe with
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SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950
a






Doing fine on
’ LER

/

°

‘KEPLER’...

Cale Agents for Sarbedes: Collien’ Led., 26 Bread Swen.



Play safe! Brylcreem your hair. Dandruff on your collar,
loose hair on your comb—these are danger signals that

point the need for Brylcreem’s double benefit:
(1) Day-long smartness. (2) Lasting hair health.
Massage with Brylcreem stimulates the scalp,
encourages natural hair growth,
wards off Dandruff. Its pure
emulsified oils put life into Dry
Hair and impart a splendid
gloss. Don’t take any chances,
Brylcreem your hair — most
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CHEERFUL mind

so often goes with a
healthy body. To main-
tain good health, don’t
forget essential Jmner
Cleanliness. | Andrews
not only provides a
sparkling, refreshing
drink — it helps to keep
you clean inside as well.
It functions by cleaning the mouth,
settling the stomach and toning up
the liver. Finally, Andrews gently
clears the bowels.
Take this “fizzy” drink whenever
you need refreshing. One teaspoonful
iti a glass of water is all you need
to use,

ANDREWS uversatr

THRE



5


97

SUNDAY, AUGUST

1950

































































































all the markings on the vast
map in General MacArthur's
Oo war room, the most eye-
ng is a wide circle drawn
nd the little village of Pisan-
behind the American lines
ie Naktong River.

he circle is in red. That is
colour used by MacArthur's
to distinguish enemy units.
there is no divisional or regi -
1 number to go with it, us
is with our markings of
y dispositions.

Mside the red circle there are
three words and a figure
ugees command approxi-
ely 30,000.”

the red circle on his ma)
und Pisandong and _ those
nd other refugee-infested areas
it represent the generalis-
p’s unwilling tribute to the
successful, most dongerous
implest of the secret weapons
Jacked from the Soviet arm-
for the Korean war.

is a weapon, moreover which
effective even to-day
pn the Communists in Korea
ttaggering under blows from
‘ever-increasing deploy:nent
ited States air power against

rperts tell me we can look
mrd to seeing it used more
more wherever the Soviet is
sed to the West.

Three Jobs

HETHER it is a cold war
or a shooting war, in Asia
Europe, the principle of the
@apon will be the same. Put in
simplest terms, it is the use of
k-change-artist troops—men
ind women.

In Europe's cold war their job
Yould be to stir up trouble by
Cting not as Communist or Rus-
lans, but ostensibly as agents of
me other Power or authority.

in Korea, their main jobs so far
e been: —

To infiltrate behind the
and attack the Americans in
—



The tanker Servitor which has
een in port for 17 days already
xpects to be anchored off the
Aquatic Club for 3 months. This
is so because the Seervitor brought
300 barrels of terolas for use on
e new runway at Seawell, while
e B.U.O.C. tank that is re-
eiving it has a capacity of only
,000 barrels.
Capt. B, Barzey, Master of the
itor, told the Advocate that
"She will be making trips here with
~ terolas until the new runway at
Se) Seawell is completed. aii
He said that the truck which is
onveying the terolas from the
U.O.C. tank to Seawell can
arry very little and this also adds
o the delay.

Terolas is specially made for
unways and contains 50% water.
t is heavier than oil and will
“turn to a solid block if exposed
o the wind. It will also turn
hard if it comes into contact with
salt water.

Capt. Barzey said, before the
Servitor took its load of terolas
from Point Fortin, therefore, the
tanks had to be steamed and
washed out and all water in them



ITS HERE AGAIN/

SEFTON

the rear, In this they have been
successful, we are told, on several
occasions,

2. To act as spies and sabo-
teurs.

3. Most important of all to my
mind-—to cause a conflict between
the Americans and the Korean
civil population.

Men and women members of
this special corps are trained by
a special division of the North
Korean Communist Army, which

acts as the parent organisation
for all guerrillas,
There they are taught to

assume whatever disguise is most
suitable for their mission. One
moment they will be in the front
line fighting as correctly uni-
formed soldiers of the Nortn
Korean army. Next they will te
trying to sneak into the American
lines dressed in American steci
helmets and those shapeless green:
fatigues which G.1.’s are wearing
in Korea,

New Arms

N one occasion when they
were up against the 25th
Division many of whose soldiers
are coloured men they went so
far as to black their faces like
coons in a seaside minstrel troupe.
But the favourite trick is to
put on the wide-brimmed straw
hat white homespun coat and
jodhpurs of the Korean peasant
and join the trek of heavily laden
refugees fleeing from the war
through the American lines.

As oiten as not they will leave
their arms behind them. There
are plenty of arms caches which
were prepared before the Com-
munists invaded Korea where
they can pick up all they need,
Or they can get one of the old
peasant women to stack her bun-

‘ANKER HERE FOR
3 MONTHS

bailed out. The pipe lines were
also dried and the tanks were
afterwards inspected by a chemist
from the United British Oilfields
at Point Fortin.

The captain said that terolas
was also used on the runways at



The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 5.30 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.22 p.m.
Moon: (Full Moon)
High Water; 3.15 a.m., 4.11

p.m,
YESTERDAY
Temperature (Min.) 72.5°F
Wind Velocity: 6 miles per

hour
Wind Direction: 9 a.m., E,
ll a.m., E by N

Total Rainfall (to date)
7.29 inches
Barometer: 9 a.m., 29.914,

11 a.m., 29.908

Piarco and on the American Base
at Waller Field.

The Servitor was built in France
in 1923 as a bunkering barge. It



i

i

DELMER

enemy’s ability

MacARTHUR
‘RED-RINGS’
A VILLAGE




gi!



= Se
... TRIBUTE TO
AKEY WEAPON

dle with
ition.

What could be simpler or more
normal than for a tired refugee
to sit down on a hilltop from
which he can see the Americans
moving up a road to the front and
installing their artillery in the
bed of a dried-up stream?

What more natural than that
a large party of peasants should
cross the mountains by normally
unused paths in order to escape
from the Communists? I have
seen it come off again ond again,

weapons and ammun-

It Worked
HE successful attack by the
Communists a week ago on
Pohang was largely the work of
guerilla troops disguised as peas-
ant refugees.

afterwards changed hands with
the Dutch and was bought by
Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd. in 1929.
It is at present owned by the
Trinidad Shipping Company and
was chartered locally to bring
terolas to Barbados.

It carries a crew of 14. In the
evening some of the crew go
ashore but a_ skeleton crew is
always left on board.

Captain Barzey, who hairs from
San Fernando, Trinidad, has been
Master of the vessel for the past
three months. He said that the
vessel can only do about four
knots per hour under power.
When they were coming to Bar-
bados it was towed by a supply
ship until it was about seven
miles off the island.

He explained that the Servitor
ean sail from Barbados to Trinidad
but cannot sail against the tide
when coming from Trinidad to
Barbados. They had a very good
crossing until they were near to
Barbados when the vessel began
to roll in large swells.

The Servitor also brought abqut
four cylindrical tanks, each about
forty feet long, which were un-
loaded in Carlisle Bay and after-
wards taken to Spring Garden.

Captain Barzey said that in
Trinidad he was informed that as
soon as he is ready to sail out of
Carlisle Bay he will be given 9,000
tons of fresh water as ballast.

eal iter: fee

In Your Horoscope

Your Real Life Told Free

Would you like to know what the Stars
indicate for you, some of your past exper-
lences, your strong and weak points, etc. 7?
Here is your chance to test FREE the
skill of Pundit Tabore, India’s most fam-

ous Astrologer,
to useful purposes
who by applying
the ancient science
has built up an en-
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The accuracy of his)
predictions and the
sound practical ad-
vice contained in




























his Horoscopes on:
Business, Specula-
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Love affairs,
Friends, Enemies,
Lotteries, Travels,
Pa Changes, Litiga-

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Sickness ete.,
have astounded
educeted people
the word over
3SEORGE MACKEY cf New York,
velleves that Tabore must possess some
sort of second-sight,

To popularise his systern Tabore will |
vent you FREE your Astral Interpretation |
{ you forward him your full name (Mr., |
Mrs. or Miss), address and date of birth |
all clearly written by yourself. No money
required but enclose 6d. in B.P.0O. (No
Stamps or Coins) to help cover postage |
and misc. costs. You wiil be amazed at |
the remarkable accuracy of his state-|
ments about you and your affairs. Write
now as this offer may not be made

gain. Addr PUNDIT TABORE
Dept 213-B Upper Forjett Street
Bombay . India, Postage to India is 2d



Startling. Predictions ,

|
i

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

COMMANDOS TRY

In the Waegwan area I came

across a battery which had ‘been
forced to change its position four in occupied South Korea, is hkely
times in two days because of the scon to be faced with a strong

locate and Fifth Column movement ai nome.

to
bombard it before it had settled

Then General Hobart Gay,
commander of the Ist. Cavaliy
Division gave the order that ail
refugees were to be moved cut
of the area within 24 hours and

in,

that any Koreans found there
after that were to be shot. ~ It
worked,

But just think what it means to
the Americans to have to ae
all Koreans here as e les.
Just try to estimate the political
damage to them of having to
mark up as hostile the 30,000
men, women and children arund
tions in his own territory, and
Pisandong the vast majority of
whom are certain to be genuine
refugees.

Nazi Praise

HEN I talkéd with Goeb- “EXHE Americans are thus al-
' ready preparing to create a

refugee population in Communist-

bels’s number one propagan-
dist, Hans Fritzsche, after his
acquittal in the Nuremberg trials,
he told me that Britain's politicat
warfare would have failed com-
pletely but for one thing,

“When your agents as3i
Heydrich you forced us to take
measures against the whole Czech
nation which estranged them from
us and drove them into your
camp.”

The objective of North Korea's
Kim Il Sung’s” quicx-change—
artist Commandos is ‘o achieve
just this and clearly the greatest
care has to be taken aot to help
them.

There is one big consolation
however. If the Korean war
continues to go as it has been
going these last days, the damage
which a Fifth Column coup can
do may well become progressively
smaller. Especially as it had been
prepared to coincide with the
last knock-out offensive.



Scout Notes:
Boy Scouts

BACK FROM CAMP

THE 79th Barbados (St.
Patrick’s R.C.) Troop which was
in camp at Barrow’s, St. Lucy,
from Saturday 19th broke camp
yesterday morning. The Scoutmas-
ter, Mr. S. J. Flemming, was in
charge, assisted by A.S.M. Mr.
G. Hutson Clifford and Mr.
Worrell.

A very well varied and balanced
programme was arrariged, and de-
spite the inclemency of the weath-
er, the entire programme was
carried out. This included Nature
‘Trails, Hikes, Tracking, Signal-
ling, Pioneering, and First Aid,
and was climaxed with a “Wide
Game’ which called for the use
of all these on Friday evening.
The ‘Story’ on which this game
was based was about Indian war-
fare, was written in code, and
before the boys could start this
had to be decided. Having done
so, they were divided into special
patrols and given two sets of in-
structions, also in code, to be
opened at specified places. The
boys, carrying out the instruc-
tions, brought the game to a suc-
cessful completion. On Friday
night a ‘Campfire’ was held, and

A

IM IL SUNG, harassed by the
disruption of communica-

The Americans are
measures which seem
admirably calculated
such a development: —

1. South Korean guerilla regi-
ments have been forme! and
marauding
hind the Communist lines.
2. Commando raids have taxen
place within the last few days
successively, a
tunnel was blown up on the
and

are already
in which

northeast coast
islands overwhelmed.

3. Leaflets have been dropped *
the inhabitants
in Communis:-
their

warning
ten towns
held territory

to get out.

held territory.

The problem it will present for
Kim II Sung, harassed by day
and night air-raids will certainly

no smaller than that in the
ith is for MacArthur's General

Walker.

As Kim’s power decreases un- 4
der the blows ot tae American
Air Force and artillery it will be
more and more difficult for him

QUICK-CHANGE ACT

On ‘The New Enemy in Disguise’

Oils And |
Fats |

{
THE Fourth Meeting of the Oils |
and Fats Conference will open at
Hastings House on Tuesday, 29th
August, under the Chairmanship
ef, Sir George Seel, K.C.M.G.,
Comptroller for Development and
Welfare.
Those attending the Conference
besides the Chairman are as fol-



lows:

Barbados—-Hon, E J, Petrie, and Mr
taking A. del. Loniss and Mr. K. R_ Hunte
to me Advisers

help British Guiana—-Mr. &, H. Croucher
Jamaica—D C. Ferguson, Mr. A. G

to

that

cities are strategic anil
dustrial objectives which will
be bombed. They are urged

Squire, and a Representative of the Coco-
nut Industries Board as Adviser

leeward Islands—Mr H. D. C. Moore
Trinidad—-Mr. E. Wharton, Mr. A. A
Shenfield and Mr J, Dent, Adviser.

re- Dominica-—Mr. L. A, Pinard

Grenada—Hon. J_ B. Renwick and Mr

E. G. Knight

S. Lucia—Mr. A. duBoulay, and Mr
A. M. Lewis, and Mr 8S, A. Schouten,
Advisers.

St. Vincent—Mr. E. A. C. Hughes and

Mr. A. V. Sprott, Adviser

Adviser to Chairman:--Mr. D A
cival of Development and Welfare
isation.
Secretary:

two Per
Or

ot Mr. BE. Rolfe



ne

Colas, Cigars Come

FIVE HUNDRED drums of colas
was brought by 59-ton schooner
Burma D, which arrived from
Trinidad on Friday (under Capt.
Gooding). It also brought two
crates of furniture and metal.

Also arriving on Friday was the
Motor Vessel Caribbee under Capt.
Gumbs. It brought from Dominica
two cases of cigars, four bags of
cinnamon, one bag of dried peas,
49 bags of copra. 41 casks, four
berrels, 52 crates, six boxes and
two cases of fresh fruit, four and
half bags of cocoanuts and a
ce k of cabbages.

Both vessels are consigned to the
Sc 1ooner Owners’ Association,

to hold down the thousands and

thousands of South Koreans whom
he has press-ganged into his army,

Do not let this optimism
mine, however lead you into un-
derestimating the importance of
those red circles on MacArthur's

map.

We must study deeply the les-
son of Stalin’s new quick-change
going to
them performing elsewhere yet.

London Express Service

guerillas. We are

Association

attended,
considering the very late invita-

this was fairly well

tions which were extended.

Mr.

entire camp.

We take this opportunity to
express our sincere thanks to Dr.
Kirton for allowing the boys to
camp on the grounds, and for the
other facilities extended. To all
those who in any way contributed
to ‘the success and enjoyment of
this camp, we say ‘Thank you.’

SCOUTING COMICS!

Three weeks ago ‘Jiggs’ was .
about to receive a lesson in Menda tee protects you.
Firelighting from Magg e's | Ends Asthma % Bronchitis % Hay Fever

nephew, who was a Boy Scout,
Last Tuesday scouting was again
‘Comic

playing a part in the
Section’ when Cary,

Worrell must be compli-
mented for the very valuable
assistance he rendered, and also
for the zeal with which he worked,
which was an inspiration to the

jin



“Specialist” Loads Sugar ;
“Challenger” Brings Shoes

Labourers and tally clerks were
busy at the waterfront yesterday
seeing after the loading of the
Harrison Liner Specialist which is
\aking a cargo of sugar. The Spe-
cialist arrived shortly before mid-
day on Friday and loading began
a few hours later. It is consigned
to Messrs. DaCosta & Co. Ltd.

Shortly after the Specialist was
anchored the S.S. Canadian Chal-
lenger came in sight. It arrived
via St. Lucia from Montreal with
a cargo of footwear, eggs, spruce.
and pickled meat. From Dominica
it brought mangoes, oranges. and
pears.

Asthma Mucus
Dissolved 1st. Day

Choking, gasping, wheezing Asthma and
Bronchitis poison your system, sap your
energy, ruln your health and weaken your
heart. In 3 minutes Mendaco—the prescrip-
tion of a famous doctor—circulates through
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and restful slee 0 dopes, no smokes, no
injections. Just take pleasant, tasteless
Mendaco tablets at meals and entirely
free from Asthma and Bronchitis in next
to no time, even though you may have guf-
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that it is guaranteed to give you free, easy
breathing in 24 hours and to completel:

stop your Asthma in 8 days or money back
on return of empty package. Get Mendaco
rom your Chem-

of

see



the

“Phantom”) despite the taunts of
Rita, used tact in lighting a fire
to prepare a meal of fish for HER!

Even in the Comic World scout-

ing is doing its work.





INC.

PAIN

On Sale at

in B, G.

MOSS

C

REPE

in several delightful shades



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ideal material
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KEEP A BOTTLE OF
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SACROOL
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with complete
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PAGE ELEVEN





an

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Are you content with the way you speak and write?
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press yourself fluently and effec-
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mitting mistakes that ayerncleye You are shown how to avoid
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Do you stumble over pro jun-

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Guard Against
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PAGE TWELVE



THE FINAL

Bs



HUTTON drives VALENTINE to boundary during England's
Hutton played one of the finest inn'ngs of his career to

first Innings on the third day of the game.
score an undefeated double century.



GODDARD, the West Indics captaia, goes down on one knee to pull a ball from WRIGHT to the
boundary curing the second day's play. Goddard played a skipper'’s innings at a critical period.



BAILEY dives to field a ball from GOMEZ off BROWN during the second day of play.
Gomez also made a gallant effort to help his team's score go past the 500 run mark.



BRIAN CLOSE RELEASED ENTERTAINED
FOR AUSTRALIAN TOUR’ W.1. TEAM






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SUNDAY ADVOCATE



WHEN the West Indies beat Enc jland im the fourth and final!
Test match at the Oval, it was their third Test victory of the!

‘our and clinched the winning of the Rubber.
Here are some incidents during this game, as the English!

selectors watch the ups and downs of fortune as the game}
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WATCHING points during the final Test match at The Oval, Test selectors
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BAILEY dives to field a ball¥rom GODDARD off BROWN during the
second day of the game at the Oval.

SUGAR RAY RETAINS
MIDDLEWEIGHT CROWN

SCRANTON, Pennsylvania, Rican contender out in 52 seconds.
































OGIO AA te!
















SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950





for long and
short drinks





In all cases of chronic constipation,
Delax is the ideal laxative. It is
highly effective in restoring normal
action of the bowels, yet contains
no griping or habit-forming in-
gredients. Particularly suitable for

take
delicate people and for women DELAX 5
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Don't delay—

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Wholesale enquiries to: C. F. Harrison & Co.

b
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y Ny en se PL LE

26





start josing energy and
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ee a)

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= Tonite Food, *Sapatogen’ com- On sate at geod chemists
ewe eat essential foods c :
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A good selection to secure from - - -

N.B. HOWELL

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LONDON August, 26. Tes i b LONDON August 26. 1 36. His seconds had not got down Wholesale & Retail Druggist
wi Cin Hee aeakomie heel ee The West Indies cricket Team Sugar Ray adalat Oe ete: the steps when Basora hit the 136, Roebuck St. Dial 2813
The British Army today got into }atsman is the youngest cricketer Y/ere tonight entertained to dinner out Jose Basora to-night in less’ canvas for the first time as Rob- 568066.066050264.566696
the fight to. salvage Britain’s ever picked to visit Australia for 4t Savoy Hotel, London by Trini- than'a minute to defend success- inson landed a left hook on| ——=———=—-—————<{""-
cricket r€putation shattered re- {). > gland-Australia encounters. dad Leaseholds Ltd. Mr. Simon fully his Middleweight CHampion- /Basora’s right ear bringing blood.
cently by the victorious Australian ~~ ” J. Vos was in the Chair, and ¢yjp_ (Pennsylvania Version) . Basora was knocked down four
and West Indies teams. It decided Close did not represent England among the guests present were, times in a fast and furious action.
to release 19 year old Brian Close, in the Tesi series played against Sir Pelham Warner, Mr. Walter It was one of the fastest knock- The Harlem negro weighed in at
army draftee, because England the West Indies. Hammond, Mr. J. R. Jardine and cuts in Championship history, 1593/4 Ibs, Basora at 1543/4 lbs.
will need him this Winter to do —(C.P.) Mr, Herbert Sutcliffe Johnny Kelly counted the Puerte —C.P.
———— LL
* Beauty, you lifted seca Aw Dh
we is ae Manan A ] ANOTHER REMARKABLE THING POR SLDG DODO IODI OOS PD OS SUPP PSSOSSOOG SVOSOICSS
) fZ ‘yes }
: t PINs Oe |) ABOUT WHITE ANTS...
And filled my heart *
: | ‘
with gig wth ok exseanc Me © WILLIAM FOGARTY LTD. §
; ee ants ~
JOHN MASEFIELD Gad vaaet "ah Shain: ive ®
ar mainly on cellulose ~ & |
—— which means wood! Be t INC. IN B.G
safe — remember w& Fe eat y
<<

Tones attack
wood mere with
ATLAS*AL

UNIVERSAL—Dip or
brush for positive protection

Staion.
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Exe tf ntl...



Like a happy memory, the haunting
gf =, fragrance of Mitcham Lavender brings

bados against White Ants, Borers

v the English countryside to Barba Sek iid Sonik Sao. cdoor
Originally made by Potter & Moore No fire-risk.

‘in their Mitcham Distillery two hun- ECONOMICAL —Highly

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goes further and costs less,

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Combines with the fibres,

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ue the World over.

way

makes it fire-resistant.

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For permanent Protection 5

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ER-SHAVE LOTION







Atlas Preservative Co. Ltd., Erith, Kent :, Engla
On Sale at BOOKBER’S DRUG STORES

(B’dos)

‘

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toughens the timber and %



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SPOS SOS SE CCE

When thinking of a.

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Good enough for the “QUEEN MARY”,
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PPLE
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a8 to service facilities, we keep your Thames truck in tip-top
condition throughout its life—with spares and mechanical re-
pairs at low fixed prices! Thames Trucks carn more money
because they SAVE MORE!




CHARLES MeRNEARNEY & CO, UTD.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN










King Seme hex, Weed et

MICKEY MOUSE
77

| NOT FUNNY... AWAY
WITH HIM... NEXT!








GOSH..I DON'T
KNOW HOW TO BE
FUNNY! 1...

pg mmm













BLONDIE
ee 5 Si
il Eee en SuCURELL VEEN USER a pm NSAP ToD
1 | THIS House , )d En nenae an a
| mae an er tS HAUNTED. | n |
LO ee Our Service Department —



peepee eta cat At Your Service

REPAIRS TO REFRIGERATORS em
| MOTORS AND GENERATORS
DIESEL ENGINES
|
|



GASOLINE ENGINES
TRACTORS

BY FRANK STRIKER
y)



=r { ~

LECTRICAL WIRING INSTALLATIONS

* COMMERCIAL
°* INDUSTRIAL
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a,

aoe ene aneenerenin oensigin emer niceeeetintee

WHY NOT You snewer | / WIRE? 2 HAD

MY WIRE THOT 8 MLS NO VIRS FROM
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ONLY ONE FROM COUNT

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AS HIS BODYGUARD! HE

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. THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LTD.

Tweedside Road, = St. Michael =— Phone 1629 - 4371












THE COUNT WELL.SOMEONE
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Sunshine and sea-bathing, sailing and fishing—whatever joys your holiday %

brings you can depend on it you will be in the sun a lot more than usual. $

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3 up in offices and sales rooms, or in any form of indoor work, tend to overdo >

BY GEORGE MC. MANUS weer nanmmntning when they at last have the opportunity to indulge in it. %
= * ( Sunburn can be a very painful thing, and can spoil several days of your 3






il too short holiday, That’s why we recommend that you take along a bottle
of L.UMACOL with you when you leave for the sea-shore, because LIMACOL
patted freely on the affected areas can and does quickly relieve the pain
nc sting of sunburn, and will help to keep your body cool and refreshed in
ite of your overdose of sun. Try it next time you feel as if you are on
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LIMACOL

Pe? Pn, ay
aT
~

a THE FAVOURITE TOILET LOTION R
ee : OF THE CARIBBEAN 3

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LOOKING FOR

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BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES PINKING



BOUTS & NUTS—





















& Iron & Bright Steel — All sizes $
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AG RITA AND CARY, TERRIFIED, WATCH \cOnt £° FROM THE GATE. ¥ on and Cast Iron Brass %
THE RUGGI CEREMONIES «~ [ ' — 2 &
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A ——





-PAGE FOURTEEN



CLASSIFIED

TELEPHONE 2508





DIED

PATTERSON — William Goddard 1
night at his residence “Kens:nkion
Fontabelle. The funeral will le



dor the Westbury Cemeters
William, Daphne, Sally and
Patterson

David

IN MEMORIAM

our
wG

25th

WOODING-——In loving memor
beloved One ALPHONSYNE WO
who depevted this life on August
1944,

You live with us in memory still
Not only now, but always wiil

Lovirigly remembered by Husband and

Son, 27.8.50—1n

In loving and affectionate memory of
my beloved daughter WINIFRED A.
WIGGINS. .

Today has brought anew to us of five

years ago,

A loving daughter so gentle and kind;

When I think what a wonderful mem-
ory she left behind.

Though in sorrow yet in joy we shall
meet again and we shall know as we
were known,

The bows of the mighty men

broken and they that stumble
girded with were.

R.LP

Mother, Enid, George Clarke, G_ Pil-
grim, 27.6.'50-——in.

are
are

——Lines



Tn loving memory of our dear Dal -
ter and Sister ALBERTHA SMALL
(Dollie), who died on the 26th day of
Au , 148.

we see a precious blorsom,

That we tended with such care,

Rudey, taken from our bosom,

How our aching hearts despair!

Round her little grave we lingered

Till the setting sun was lowed

Feeling all our hopes had perished

With the flower we cherished 5o

Mf. Charles Small (Father), Gaston,
Jervis (Brothers), Tinpie, Mrs. Judith
Sherry, Maggie, Nellie (Sisters).

27.8.50—in

In_ loving memory of
BROWNE who departed
August 28th, 1949,

Deep in our hearts

kept,
We smile with the world but never
forret.

LILIAN A.
this life on

your memory ‘s











loursey Browne, Marie Small. Har-

old Straker. 27,8,50.—In.
FOR SALE
“AUTOMOTIVE

CARS-~ Four (4) V-8 Ford Sedan Cars
Two (2) Fimo Setsh Cate Ore (1)
Willys Secay Cre. Joseph Vulcanizin
Depot, Réd Bird Girage, 47 Roobee’ st

a



“in

CAR One Pr

‘uth Car M. 1931. Al
mest new, Sul'eble for tavi. 1948 model
Apply to V. E. Moore, Corner Peesage
Rd. erd Baxters Rd 27,8,50—In

nl ARG tll pabpccecippeentcecnemnternenoatitepmaipgneem

CAR—1947 Hillman Minx. 17,000 miles.
Perfect condition. Owner leaving is!and
Price $1,400.00. Greeniand. Phone 3283, or
2775. 25.8.50-—3n

TRUCK—One 1934 Ford V-8 Truck
Apply "D. V. Scott & Co. ‘Vhite Pak
x 16.8,50—t.f.n

LIVESTOCK

PUPS—Pure bred Cocker Spaniel Pups
Apri’: Mrs. 9. H. Seale, Ashbury Pltn.,
St George. Dial 9522 26.8.50—6n

MECHANICAL
AUTO BYKE—One Excelsior Auto Byke
‘with spring fork) Price $130.00. (A
Neal Bergain). Hurry to Olympic Store

Cor, James and Roebuck Stree
26.8.50—2n













BIKES. Hercules Silver King, on terms,
all models, Biack, Green. A. Barnes &
Co., Li 25,6.50—t.f.n.

MACHINE ~~ Singer Sewing Machine
ftreadie). Perfect condition, Apply to
William F. Skeete, Corner Queen Victoria
Road and Bank Hall X Poad.

2% .8.50—2n

MISCELLANEOUS
of every description
old Jewels, fine Silver,







Glas,

wee ete Beer ra Roto
graphs, » a Gerrinase ie Shop,
adjoining Yaeht ;

AAR ar amin etee
PESCHIENS SYRUP OF HEMOGLO-
BINE: The remedy for Colds par-excel-

lence; do not delay, buy a bottle and
bi your resistance. Obtainable at all
Drugsist=. 13,8.50.—-3n.



DECCA AND BRUNSWICK RECORDS
—Old Tuncs some Classical, Poplar and
Dance H'** a!! at 50 cents each. Lashleys
Limited, Pr. Wm. Hy. St. 27.8.50,—-2n,

a
GLASSWARE FROM CZECH As
KIA~Vset6, Powder wis, Cups &
Fruit “**"- reduced to helf price. See

ovr Show Windows, Knight's Lid
25.8.50—3n



IMPEX Worle’s best cycle generators
and headlights. Obta'nabie, from all lesd-





ing stores. 15 .8.50—Tn
MEN'S SOCKS—Made of Cotton and
Rayon, Geet dems. elastic tons. 1 Pr.
for 34 ernts; & Prs. for $1.00. Lashley's

Limited, Pr. Wm. Henry St
27.8.'50—2n.



arene |
PINKING SYFARS of the highest qual.

ity. Only SO.8% pend $11.98, Li-cited

quantity. See your Jewellers, ¥. De Lima

& Co,, Ltd., 20, Broad Street.

26.8. 50—Tn

;CORDS—Latest Dance Tunes and
Calypsoes at $1.08, Lashleys Limited, Pr.
Wm, Hy. St. 27.8.°50—2n

ee

RECORD ALBUMS for 10-inch and for

12-inch and carrying cases for 10-inch

records, and we breve the records too
A. BARNES & CO, LTD.

10.8. 50—t. fon



CALM-ASMINE TABLETS: why
suffer the agonising pens of su'Yoca-
tion caused by ASTHMA? CALM-

by the Leboratories of FRANCE,
can relieve the most acute attack ana
restore easy breathing. Obtainable at
Leading Druggists. 20.8.50--8n,

YAWL—“Frapida” approx. 37% feet
long with Grav Marine engine, Good
condition $3,000 — a bargain. Apply
J. R Edwards. Phone 2520,

15.8.50-—.T.F tT.

OO
WANTED
HELP

COOK--Willing to undertake general
housework, Apply: Mrs. James A, Mil-
lington, “The Nook", Worthing View,
Christ Church. 27.6.°50 —2n









QUALIFIED ELECTRICAL FOREMAN,
—Apply in person and letter stating
experience etc. to H. E. D. W. Deane,
City Garage Trading Co. Ltd., Victoria
Street 17.8.50—t.f.n.

PERSON to take charge of Office—
Male or Female. Position requires sound
bookkeeping experience, initiative and
judgment. Apply in writing only, stating
selary required to: Herbert A. } swding,
Lower Fstate Plantation, St. Michael

26.8.50—5n

MISCELLANEOUS
CRITEPON OIL STOVES.—Any con-
dition. Cantact John Shannon, c/o City
Pharmacy 27.8.50—In











PAYING GUEST -—- Wanted by Mrs.
Rose, “Mimster House", Marine Gardens
Deiightful house and garden. Every com-



fort, Good Food, Six dollars per day.
Telephone 2758. 27.8.'50,—1n,
ch het teh en ain cineca

POSITION WANTED
DENTAL THCHNICIAN with over 20
years experience in preparing and est
ing all gold fittings Acnylic processing
of portal an edentulous cases a spe-
‘y.

Modern Techn que ured in ell
Reply to Geo. Wilkins, 11,
Street, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad
% 33.8.50—6n

stare *
Picvor



— Used and Mint Postage
of Barbados and other Islands of

the WE, Curecao and Aruba. Best
Prices at Caribbean Stamp Society,
No, 10 in Street. 26.8,50—3n

WANTED TO BUY
ST. }-Used Postage Stamps of U.S
America 4nd B.W.1. Islands, James’ West
Indies Stamp Co., Bay Street. St. Mich-
ael. rig ’

WANTED TO BUY
MACHINES—Old Sewing Machines ot
or order. Any make. Good Prices paid
Corner Fairchild and Probyn Streets or
ii Street—-Mrs. Vaughan.
— 26.8.50-—2n,



his |
late residence at 4.30 this afierngon |











gentleman preferred. Phone 4420

FLAT — Upstairs Flat at Waverley,
Blue Waters Terrace.

semi-furnished with modern conveni-
ences.

large Bedreum, Dining Room, Kitchen,
(Light and Water), Apply at Westmeath,
sores of Chapman St. and White Park

THERSISDON-Maxwell's Coast Road
Pulke furnished, m September. Mrs.
hb. Lashley, Sth Bungalow, Maxwell's
Road. Dial 8417 25.8. 50—ar

Bat sheba,

25.8.50—3n |

oe

FOR RENT







HOUSES

a |

APARTMENTS — Two well-furnished, |
ol apartments @fid one unfurnished flat








with use of garden in » Gardens
Apply: Box A.A. c/o Advocate

27.8.°50—-1n

PEDROOM=Picasant Double Bedroom
for gentlemen or Young couple, Full
Laundry. Exeellent Sea Bath

sonable terms to right party
Telephone 6496 of write Box C., c/o
The Advocate 27.8.'50.—In
BEDROOM—One large bedroom, Bank |
Hall X Rd. Light and water Nurse or

27.8.50—in



8 large Bedrooms

‘Phone 8283. 20.8.50.—7n.

HOUSE—Part of house — eontaining





27.8.50—In







ADS. |



September onwards, monthly or other-
wise, 3 double bedrooms with single
Simmons bedsteads, children's room. din-
ing room and lounge. Refrigerator, gar-
age, sefvant’s room Apply Mowe.

27.8. 50—t.f.n



TRELAWNY — On the Hastings Main
Road Three bedrooms, running water in
each, Usual public ms, Servants’ room
and tollet. ‘Phone i 27,8.50—1n



WOODYARE — Pine Hill. — Furnished
From 15th September to mid January
Ring Haslett 3311 or John Bladon 4640.

26 .8.50—3n

WORTHY DOWN—Top Rock having 3
bedrooms connecting Toilet and Bath.
large Lounge-dining room. Delightful
Fully a :

8

Apply: Ralph Beard. 4683 or 2328.
25 .8.50—3n

FOR RENT OR LEASE
UNFURNISHE

D
“PARAISO”—Barbarees Road. Situ-
ated one mile from the City. Drawing
and dining room, Front and side Galleries,
Kitchenette, three large bedrooms each
with running water, modern tiled bath
with shower and tub bath with hot
weter laid on upstairs, Large games
room, bedroom with running water.
kitchen and store rooms on gtound floor
Servant’s room with toilet and bath. Gar.
age with room for two cars, Electricity
and Gas. Please ring 8382
22.8.50—t.f.n

PUBLIC SALES
AUCTION

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

BY instructions received I will sell at
my Auction Mart, Shepherd Street, on
Friday, September Ist, at 2 p.m. (1) Bar
Gender. (1) Steel Guiliteen with set
of spare jaws. (1) Galvanized Pipe Cut-
ter “%-in. to 2 in. (1) 6 cylinder Far
Pick-up (Good condition). (1) 10 HP.
Ford Prefect. (1) Standard “Royal”
Typewriter. (1) Dumpy Level with Tri-
pod and Levelling Rod. (2) Office Desks.
4 Office Chairs. (1) Electric Fan, (1!
Calculator, Catalogues, Books
Terms Cash



VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON TUESDAY 29th by order of Mrs.
BE. P. Baker, we will sell her Furniture
at “Banyan Beach", Brighton, which in-
cludes Sideboard, Serving, Coffee and
Side Tables, Arm, Morris and Easy
Chairs, Gate-Leg Tea Table; Book Case
(Glass Doors) all in Mahogany, Rugs,
Well Mirrors, Glass and China, Lloyd
Loom are Rush Chairs and Rockers; 2
Single Bedsteads with Vono Simmons
Springs, Deep-Sleep Mattresses, Mird,
Press, Dressing and Bed-side Tables,
Linen Press, all in Mahogemy; G.E
Refrigerator, 3-Burner Stoye,
Larder, Step Ladder, Palms in Cement
Pots, Pressure Cooker, Electric Iron and
other Items.

Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms Cash
BRANKER. TROTMAN < CO.,
Auctioneers

25.6.50—22n



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 31st by order of Canon
PW. D. Moore, we will sell the Purni-
ture at the Rectory, St, John,
which includes: -

Dining Table (seat 16)
Upright Chairs, Antique Couch, Sofa
(3 ft. wide) and Cellarette all in old
Mahogany: Mlat Top Pine Desks, Carved
Oak Table, Oak Bookcase (Glass Doors)
Glass & China, Electro-Lux Refrigerator,
Frigidaire, Cabinets, Ornament Tables,
White Linen Press, Children’s Bedstegds
& Beds, Mahog. M.T. Washstands &
Dressing Tables, Chamber Ware, Dress
Form, Wash Basin & Fittings, Larder.
Coal Stove, Garden Swing, Good Tennis
Net, Vauxhall 14 Motor Car in good
working order and other items.



Extension

Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms Cash
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO
Auctioneers
27.8. 50—2n



REAL ESTATE

ACT NOW! Rare Bargains Hammering
At Your Doors!--Two Large Stonewall
Residences (One Seaside, Sandy Beach),
Excellent Locations, Near Cit», Ideal fo
Guest Houses: A 3 Bedroom Bungalow
Type at Main Rd., Thornbury Hill, Near
Plaza Theatre, Modern Convéniences, A-1
Condition, Fine View, Vacant: Three—3
Bedroom Stonewall Bungalows, Almost
New, one at Fontabelle (Seaside) and Two
at Navy Gardens, Modern Conveniences'
all Going at Amazingly Low Prices. A
2! Bedroom Bungalow Type at Worthing
Main Rd. Right of Way to Sea, Modern
Conveniences, Good Condition, Over 6,000
sq. ft., Going for Only £1,850. A 3
Bedroom Bungalow Type by Bank Hall
Main Road., Modern Conveniences, Good
Condition, Spacious Yard, Going for
Only £1.150. C Me for The Most De-
sirable Stonewall Residences including
Seaside Bullding Sites — Seaside and
Elsewhere. Mortgages Arranged. Dial
311. D. F. de Abreu — The Only
Man To Sell Good and Attractive Bus
with Assured Re-Sale Values. Call at
“Olive Bough,” Hastings.



BUILDING SITES--A Most Desirable
Building Site overlooking the sea, Wor-
thing, St. Lawrence and the Golf Course
rext to “Cloud Walk” at Rendervous
Terrace, Christ Church. App\y: C. E
Clarke, 7 Swan Street. Phone 2671 or



26.8.50—2n
HOUSE—Cool furnished House, Marine
Gardens, 19,753 square feet of land,

eleven rooms and five bath rooms, two
with water heaters. Spacious Verandahs
Part mortgage no objection. Apply: Rox
A. A,, c/o Advocate, 27.8.50,—1n.

The undersigned will offer for sale at
their Office No, 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Wednesday, 30th August, 1950,
ut 2 p.m

(1) Lot 29, Navy Gardens, containing
11,008 square feet, abutting on lands
of the Marine Hotel on thg south,
and on York Road on the North.
5.994 square feet of land at Chelsea
Road, St. Michael, adjoining lands
of Mr. J. N rshall on the West
and Mr. Jobnson on the Socth.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale, apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
22.8.50—8n







HOUSE—(1) Double roof house each
29 x 12 x 8 covered with galvanise,
situated in Yearwood Land, Black Rock.
Telephone 3369 D, A. Browne
18.8.50—t.f.n.

{



~~ | (Amendment)
| Ones Gazette of Monday 28th August, 1950.

All that chattel dwelling house called
“Laurenceville’ Constitution Ruad, St
Michael. The House contains gallery,
Drawing room, 3 bedrooms, Breakfast
160M and usual out offices, Electric light

nd water service.

Inspection on application to the tenant
} The above will be set \up for sale at/
public competition at our oMee = in|
Lucas St Bridgetown, on Friday the |
lst September 1950. at 2 p.m

CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors
26.8.50--8n

SUN

GOVERNMENT NOTICES.

ATTENTION is drawn to the Contro! of Prices (Defence)
Order, 1950, No. 30 which will be published in the



2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
prices of “Cornmeal” are as follows:—

WHOLESALE PRICE
(not more than)

RETAIL PRICE

ARTICLE (not more than)







Cornmeal $8.70 per bag of 98 ibs. 10 cts. per Ib.
I
26th August, 1950.

27.8.50.—2n.



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

The Secretary of State for the Colonies has notified His Excellency
the Governor that Royal Naval Prize Money, granted under a Royal
Proclamation dated 4th March, 1949, is now available for payment to
persons residing in Barbados who are entitled thereto by reason of
service in the Naval and Marine forces of the United Kingdom.

2. Persons eligible to apply are members of the Naval and
Marine Forces raised by the Government of the United Kingdom,
crews (including certain civilians) of His Majesty's Ships and mem-
bers of the Royal Artillery, who served id) days between the 3rd
September 1939 and the 2nd September 1945 either—

(a) on the books of sea-going ships of war, or

(b) on the books of non-seagoing ships or establishments for
service in sea-going ships of war, operational coasta)
force craft, Defensively armed Merchant Ships, Merchant
Air Carrier Ships, convoy staffs, or as members of regular
erews of Combined Operations craft.

8. The legal personal representative may claim entitlement for
persons in the above categories who were killed in action at sea, died
of wounds received in or from causes directly attributabie to action at
sea, were lost at sea, or died at sea‘of injury or illness attributable to
service afloat before completing 180 days’ service, provided that when
the death occurred or the wounds, injury or illness were sustained, the
officer or man was serving in a sea-going ship of wer or on convoy
duties or in a merchant ship as a member of the gun's crew or for the
purpose of operating or maintaining naval aircraft.

4. Forms of application for Naval Prize Money can be obtained
at the Office of the Harbour and Shipping Master and must be for-
warded, when cumpleted, to the Director of Navy Accounts, Branch 3
B, Admiralty, Bath, Somerset, United Kingdom.

5. The Admiralty will be prepared to consider applications for-

warded within three months of this announcement.
26.8.50-—2n.

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION :

Applications are invited from teachers and other suitably qualified
persons for the following vacan¢ies: —
MEN
St. Mary’s Boys’ School
St. Christopher’s Boys’ School

WOMEN
St. Mary’s Girls’ School
Ebenezer Girls’ School
Bayley’s Girls’ School.
St. Christopher’s Boys’ School

2. The minimum qualification for entry to the teaching service is
the Cambridge School Certificate.

3. Applications must be submitted on the appropriate forms
(E.35(b) for men and E.35(c) for women) which may be obtained
from the Department of Education, but candidates who have already
submitted one of these forms in respect of previous vacancies (now
filled) may apply by letter accompanied by a recent testimonial,

4. Any teacher who applies for a vacancy on the staff of another
school must inform his or her present Chairman of Managers and the
Head Teacher of any application for such a transfer.

5. All applications must reach the Director of Education not later

rday, 2nd September, 1950.
a r 26.8.50—2n.



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Vacancies in the Elementary Teaching Service

Applications are invited from teachers with at least 10 years |



DAY ADVOCATE



SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950



CHURCH SERVICES | HARBOUR L0G | SHIPPING NOTICES

SUNDAY, 27th AUGUST, 1950
METHODIST
JAMES STREET: 11 aim. Rev. R
Re: Cullough, 7 p.m. Rev. H. C
yne.

AYNES BAY: 9.30 a.m. Mr. G. Mc.
A er, 7 p.m. Rev. R. Mc. Cullough

WHITEHALL: 9.30 a.m. Mr. G. Per-
kins, 7 p.m. Mr. S. Phillips.

GILL MEMORIAL: 11 a.m. Mr. F.
Moore, 7 p.m. Mr. P. Dew

HOLETOWN: 8.30 a.m.
Bannister,
BANK

me.
Mr, EZ. L.

SPKIGHTSTOWN:; 11 am. Mr. L. B
Waithe, 7 p.m. Rev. F. Lawrence.
ae 3 a.m. Rev. F. Lawrence,

â„¢, . G. Grant

Barnesba: 9.30 a.m, Rev. F. Law-
Tence, 7 p.m. Mr. N. Blackman.

BETHEL: 11 a.m. Rev. H. C. Payne.

2th at 7.30.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church Christ, Soientist,
Bridgetown, Bay Street.
ndays 11 mm, and 7 p.m,
ednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which
ae Testimonies of Christian Science
img.
ject of Lesson-Sermon: CHRIST

THE NE TAMENT
SnUnen OF GoD

ST. MICHAEL: 11 a.m. Etkstein
Village, Elder R. H. Walkes, 7 p.m.
Eckstein Village; EMier R. H. Walkes.

CHRIST CHURCH: 7 p.m. Cox Road;
Rev. E. W. Weekes.

ST. JOHN; 11 a.m, Venture; Rev
J.B. Winter.

ST. PHILIP: 11 a.m. Breretons; Rev.
E.W. Weekes.

ST.- THOMAS: 11 a.m. Bridgefield;

Rev. J. B. Winter.
ST. MAIER LUTHERAN CHURCH
7 p.m. Open ajr service; 7.15 p.m.

Wednesday at Fairehild Street.
or. CONTENT LUTHERAN CHURCH
Content, St. Thomas; 11 a.m. Rev Wm.
. O'Donohue, speaker; 4 p.m. Open

air service, 7 p.m. Fitz G. Prescot.

SALVATION ARMY

BRIDGETOWN TRAL: 11 a.m
Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Company
Meeting, 7 p.m. al



Preacher: Major ith .
WELLINGTON Srkuer: 11 a.m. Holi-

ness Meeting, 3 p.m. Company Meeting,
7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher:
Major Gibbs.

DIAMOND CORNER: 11 a.m. Holiness
Mecting, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7

-.m, Salvation Meeting. Preacher:

eutenant Moore.

cS : 11 a.m, Holiness Meeting,
ao
vation

ne,

oer Meeting, 7 p.m. Sal-

TE CORNER: 11 a.m. Holiness Meet-

a 3 p.m, Company Meeting, 7 p.m.

vation Meeting. Preacher; Major
Hollingsworth.

FOUR ROADS: 11 a.m. Holiness Meet-

. 3 p.m, Company Meeting, 7 p.m
vation Meeting. Preacher: Lieutenant

Hinds

CHECKER HALL: 11 a.m. Holiness
iny Meeting, 7
Z.

Meeting, 3 p.m. %
Preacher:

Salvation
Lieutenant Cox,
MORAVIAN CHURCHSS

ROEBUCK : 9 am ae |
Service; 10 a.m, day 1 3.
p.m. Sunday Sehoo! ening

7_p.m.
Service preacher: Rev. Ernest

GRACE HILL: 11 a.m. Morning Ser-
viee preacher: Mr. 6. R. Lewis 7 p.m.

Eveni ice a
‘FULNECK: iL a.m. Morning

11 a.m. Service
followed by Holy Comm i
Rev. Ernest New 7 mgr Ev Ser-

fteham.
p.m. Evening Ser-

VI ONTOOMERY:

vice preacher ‘
SHOP LL. ua ing Service
preacher Mr. S. Weekes. er
DUNSCOMBE: 9 a.m. Morning Ser-
vice preacher ‘ .m, Eve-
ning Service preacher . Hewitt.

ee te

teaching experience for the Headships of the following schools:— )

St. Margaret’s Mixed School, St. John —~ Grade I.

All Saints’ Boys’ School, St. Peter — Grade I.

2. The minimum professional qualification required is the Certifi-
cate A of the Department of exemption therefrom.

3. Salary will be in accordance with Government Scales for Head

4 Candidates who have already submitted application forms in
respect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, ac-
companied by a recent testimomal. All other candidates should make
form which may be obtained from the

Teachers in Elementary Schools. |

application on the appropriate
Department of Education.
the Director of Education

All applications must be in the hands ot
by Saturday, 2nd September, 1950.
26.8.50—2n.



Vacant Post of Cultivation Officer, ‘
Department of Science and Agriculiure, Barbados.

Applications are invited for the post of Cultivation Officer, De-
partment of Science and Agriculture, Barbados. Applicants should
hold the minimum qualification of the Diploma of the Imperial College
of Tropical Agriculture but consideration will be given to candidates
with the necessary experience who are not so qualified. The post is
pensionable and carries salary on scale $2,880 x $144 to $4,320. Point
of entry determihed by experience and qualifications. Applications

Director of Science and Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should reach
him not later than the 30th of September, 1950. Further details will

be supplied on request.
y brea 26.8.50—2n.

ne

Applications are invited for the post of Headmaster of the Boys’
Grammar School in St. Kitts, which will be vacated by the present
holder on the 31st December, 1950. The s:hool roll at present num-
bers 110 and courses are offered up to the Higher School Certificate

examination of Cambridge University.
2, The post is pensionable and carries a salary scale of $2,640 by

$120 to $2,880. A temporary cost of living allowance of $240 per
annum is also payable and free quarters are provided for the Head-
master. The appointment will be on probation for 2 years and subject
to the passing of satisfactory medical examination,

3. Applicants should possess a degree of a University within the
British Commonwealth, preferably in Mathematics and Physies. Teach-
ing experience will be regarded as an asset, and the appointment will
be made at a point in the salary scale commensurate with the appli-
cant’s qualification and experience.

4. Applications with at least two testimonials and photograph
should be submitted to the Administrator of St. Kitts-Nevis not latet

than the 1st Novernber, 1950.
26.8.50—2n.

nn ne En EEE cEnE

PART ONE ORDERS

by Major O. F. C. WALCOTT, ED.
Commanding,
The Barbados Regiment
Issue No. 31.
1. PARADES — Training
All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700_hours on Thursday,
Sist Aur, ‘50, for further bayonet training.
Specialist training for signallers, MT personnel and pioneers will be carried
out under platoon arrangements,
2 ANNUAL MUSKETRY COURSE
All volunteers who have not yet fired the L.M.G, must contact the Regimental
Serjeant Major as soon as possible. No names will be aceepted after the
7th Sep. ‘50,
3. HURRICANE
All members of the Signal and M.T. platouns are warned that if there is a
hurricane, they will be required to attend at HQ on_ notification, after the
cautionary warning has been given. Arrangements will be made to shelter
their families at St. Ann's Fort, if necessary, during the period of the hurricane.
4. ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING
SRD SEP. ‘50,

25th Aug. °50.

Orderly Officer — Liewt, BE. R. Goddard

Orderly Serjeant 217 L/S Blackett, L.L.
NEXT FOR DUTY

Orderly Officer — 2/Lt. S. G. Lashley

Orderly Serjeant -- 235 L/S Quintyne. K
MLD SKEWES-COX, Major;
SOLF & Adjutant;
The Barbados Regiment

PART II ORDERS

THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
25th August, 1950

SERIAL NO. 19
Sheet I & Only



1 PROMOTIONS
235 L/S Quintyne, K re
234 Cpl Williams, E. D
384 ,, Laurie, C. K '
274 L/C Blackman, H. |
407 L/C Quintyne. L. G.)
409 Reid, N. E ’
351 Pte Agard, D. H
363 ,, Hinds, H.R
2. LEAVE
206 CQMS Ish

Coy Promoted to Sit wef 25

Aug. 50
Promoted L/S wef 25

Aug, 50



Promoted to L/C wef 25 Aug 50

50 |



weeks P/Leave wef 25 Aug

M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major
8.0.L.F, & Adjutant

The Barbados Regiment

4



mentioning the names of two referees, should be addressed to the

| “+. I shall

not want”

Today through the
light shed upon the twenty-
third Psalm by the Christian
Science textbook, “Science and
Health with Key to the Scrip-
tures,” by Mary Baker Eddy,
its promise brightens into prao-
tical fulfillment.

Supply, health — whatever
is legitimately needful—is
available to man without fail,
and comes through the spirit-
ual understanding of God,
divine Love, which Christian

Anyone who thoughtfully
studies Science and Health and
puts its teachings to the test in
his daily life will find the “still
waters” of the Bible promise

Science and Health may be
bought, borrowed or read at

the Christian Science Read-
ing Rooms, 1st Floor Bowen
& Sons, Broad _ Street,
Bridgetown.

PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE

PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH

The Vi of Christ Chureh is de-
sipous of ining approximately three
(3) acres of non-agricultural land in

low Rock aréa for conversion
ito Playing field.

‘The owner of any such land, who may
}& willing to dispose of it should sub-
soit offers to the undersigned before 3ist
August, 1950, stating the exact location,
erea and price.

WOOD GODDARD,
Clerk of the Vestry.
17.8.50—3n.







NOTICE
‘ The Officers of The Good Samaritan
riendly Society request through this
riends that ‘The Raleigh Bicycle Draw-
ing’ which was to have taken place on
medium to notify their patrons and

12th August, has been postponed until
ith September, at Six O'clock at Bel-
‘vonte Hotel, Cheapside. The lucky

1 cketholder will appear next day in this
1 cwspaper.
27,.8.50—1n



NOTICE

THE SURTI UNITED Co.,
No. 23 ant Street,
ai

THE ORIENTAL,

No. 156 Roebuck Street.
Centres for high class sports wear at
bargain prices. Come in and make your
selections.

Dial 4469 and 4404.
27.8.50—2n

LIQUOk LICENSE NOTICE
The of Annetta Bryan,
holder wor license No. 194 of 1950
granted to ta Clarke in respect of

Michael,
ed the ath ay 2 Kc
a at Au; 5 >
To H. A. TALMA, weit
The Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
Signed ANNETTA BRYAN,
Appli i.
N B.—This application will oe ccnnl:
ered at & Léeensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District “A”, on Tuesday,
the Sth Gay of September, 1960, at 11
o'clock, &.â„¢m.



H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
27.8.50—In

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Philip H. Davidson; Sch. Bur
ma D; Sch. Rosarene; Sch. Bluenose
Mee: Sch. Zita Wondta: Sch. Francis

Smith: M.V. Blue Star: Sch. Emeline:
Sch. Belgueen: Sch. Laudalpha; Sch.
Princess Louise: Tanker Rufina: Sch.
Burma D; M.V. Caribbee; S.S. Specia-
list; Sch. Gardenia W; Sch. Interpreter,
Sch. Turtle Dove: Sch. Many M. Lewis,
Sch, Marion Belle Wolfe; Sch. Marea
Henrietta; S.S. Canadian Challenger:
Sch. Lucille M, Smith:
ARRIVALS

Sch. Lucille M. Smith, 74 tons, .
Hassell, from British Guiana, !
Messrs, Robert Thom & Co. Ltd.

Ships In Touch With
Barbados Coastai Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.,
advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their
Barbados Coast Station : S.S. Myken, S.S.
Gulf Dise, “= Oran) . 8.8. Belita,



8.8. Petter, . Beech Hill, S.S. Urugay,
S.S. Arakaka, S.S. T le Inn, S.S. At-
lantian, S.S. Sun Jewel, S.S. American
Oriole, &.S. Athe! . 8.8. Lianishen,
-. rrinaga, S.S. Esso

erett, S.S. Tamarao, S.8. Fort Char-

lotte, S.S. Buena Vista, $.S. Delaires,
§.S. Prins Bernard, S.S, Lady Nelson,
S.8. Jeanny, S.S. Tectarius, S.S, Michael
Tracy, S.S. Geirulv, S.S. Sun Avis, SS.
Mormacdawn, S.S. Rufina, S.S. Alcoa

Polaris.
SEAWELL

FROM TRINIDAD
Mr. Jajnool Hosein, Richard Barrett,
Miss Joyce Rawlins, Mrs. Ruth Laing,
Mr. Joseph Le Blane, Gladys Namsoo,
Samaroo, Miss Cynthia Beale.

Margaret be 5
Mr. D. K. Frampton, Mr. Gildard
Stoute, Mr Herbert King, TLaurino
Murray. a
FROM MONTREAL

Mr. Guy Durocher, Mrs. Laurette
Durocher, Mr Keith Gooding, Mr.
Stanley Haskell, Mrs. Edna Hutchinson
Miss Barbara Hutchinson, Mrs. Annie
Brooks Mr. Morris Proverbs, Mrs Muriel
Proverbs, Me ioe ys — Emily
Sanderson, Mr. Henry x exe
Ward, Mr. Bill Stuart, Mr Phil Clarke,
Mra. Mary Clarke, Mr Ernest mpeau,
Mrs, Yvette Campeau.



Sweet Potatoes Are
Being Reaped

For the last few months, sweet
potatoes have been scarce, but a
seller told the Advocate yesterday
that he would soon be “on the
alreai

aes t G eeittes.
to e grea .
Also obtainable too, are pumpkins.

A

CHIROPRACTIC
RESTORES HEALTH

DRS. JOS. and GLADYS FERREIRA,
gg a
method of electrical massage Phone
2881 Datly (except Holidays)



RAYMOND JORDAN is the man
to Clean your SUIT and HAT.

Bay Street, :
Opposite Combermere St.

UNBREAKABLE
GARDEN POTS

That is the name given them
by purchasers.
Have you seen them?

They are the Iron meter cases,
FOR

SALE
At Your Gas Works, Bay St.
Small size @ 1/3 medium size
2/6 and a few large ones @ 4/+
each dozen lots cheuper.





AT THE Annual General Meet-
ing of the Y.M.P.C. held at the
Club House, Beckles Road, on

} Wednesday, 29rd. August, 1950, the
{ following persons were proposed
for Membership on the Governing

as
>
=

ArmZonar sprees:

re peopered. ® ballot ‘will taice

vers pro) mu w
place at the Club House, Beckles
} Road, on Wednesday, 30th August,
1980, between the of 4 p.m
and 8 p.m, All members are kind-
iN) ly asked to a point of
tending and recording their vote

P. G. POTTER,

?

VENEZOLANOS AMIGOS

TE NEMOS ATICLOS DE

ORIENTAL

Se Habla Espanol
Curios... 1s es

THANI BROS.






Phone 2336
Industrial-Commercial
Residential
Office: Hastings Hotel Ltd.

OFFER FOR SALE

En-Dah-Win, Pine. Hill
New bungalow. Attractive
location.

‘Cove Spring House,
James.

Pine House, St. Michael.
Abbeville Guest House,
Worthing.

Dover, Christ Church. Build-
ing sites and acreage.

Rockley, Near Golf Course.
Building sites.

Block of Factory Buildings.
In the City.

Rices, St. Philip. Acreage.
27.8.50—1n,



St.





ag ys on y



The M.V. “DAERWOOD’ will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
STEAMSHIP co. St. Lucia, St, Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba. Sailing Friday, ist
SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM a
AND ER The M.V. “CARIBBES” will
ae as ‘UBA A =, = = oth accept Cargo and Passengers for

Dominica, Antigua,
Nevis and St. Kitts
Sailing Monday, 28th inst

Montserrat,

The M.V. “MONEKA” will ac
PLYMOUTH, cept Cargo and Passengers for
ANTWERP AND AMSTERDAM Dominice, Antigua, Montserrat,
1s ORANJESTAD Aug. 22nd Nevis and St. Kitts
.S. WILLEMST. Sept. 19th Stiling Friday ist September, 1080

SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO
DEMERARA, ETC.

33 COPTICA Sept. Oth.

Owners











8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD. Cooma: Sy See:
AGENTS
Canadian National Steamships
SOUTHBOUND Sails ‘ Sails Sails Arrives Sails
Montreal Halifax Boston Garbados Barbados
CANADIAN CHALLENGER . I! aug. 14 Aug. = 25 Aug. 26 A
LADY RODNEY .. ée --23 Aug. 23 Aug. 2% Aug. 6 Sept. 7 Bent.
CANADIAN CRUISER .. .. 31 Aug. 3 Sept. -= 13 Sept. 15 Sept.
LADY NELSON .. __.. ++ 11 Sept. 14 Sept. 16 Sept. 25 Sept. 26 Sept.
CANADIAN CHALLENGER . 27 Sept. 30 Sept. _ lu Oct. 10 Oct.
LADY RODNEY .._.. ..18 Oct. 16 Oct. 18 Get. (27 Oct. 28 Oct.
CANADIAN CRUISER .. -.23 Oct. 27 Oct. - 7 Nov. 7 Nov.
LADY NELSON .. + 1 Nov. 4 Nov. € Nov. 15 Nov. 16 Nov.
NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal St. John
LAI-Y RODNEY 19 Sept. 21 Sept. 2 Sept. 1 Oct. 5 Oct.
LADY NELSON 8 Oc. 10 Oct. 19 Oct. 20 Oct. 24 Oct.
LADY RODNEY 9 Nov. 11 Nov. 20 Nov. — - 21 Nov.
LADY NELSON 28 Nov. 30 Nov. 9 Dec. _ — 10 Dec.



.B.—Subject to change without notice. Ali vessels fitted with cold
bers. Passenger Fares and freight rates on application ee

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.


















TO-DAY’S |
NEWS FLASH

SAFETY RAZOR BLADES,
BRASS CHAINS,
HAIR CLIPPING

The Barry Guest House

1500 MOUNT ST.,
MONTREAL.

Homely Atmosphere,
Quiet & Restrul,

When visiting or on a business
trip.



MACHINES,
Special daily or weekly rates SHOE BRUSHES
after September Ist. all at

Reference if required



JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
& HARDWARE

$$$

We have just received - - -

Round, Square & Flat Bar Iron

Send us your orders now as stocks are moving fast.

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.
BROAD STREET and PIER HEAD




| FRESH FISH BEING SCARCE
1 Tin Fish cae } For 70c.

1 Tin Corned Beef Jj
SUPPLY LIMITED


































CRANE VILL
CRANE VIEW

These valuable Freehold properties with over 4% Acres
are offered for sale as a whole or separately. Furniture
may be taken over if required.



Full Particulars Obtainable from the Agent - - -

JOHN M. BLADON

Real Estate Agents—Auctioneers—Surveyors

Phone 4640 Plantations Building



te: te:
tet st



(|

BELIEVE IT OR NOT
TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM = {%

——————~————_\}

(With the Distinctive Flavour)

' ~~
+4)
)) is the Outstanding Blend of Yesterday,
To-day and To-morrow.
Use this Brand Always - - -
SIP IT — TO ENJOY IT.
\ Blenders - - -
John D. Taylor & Sons Ltd.
GROCERS ROEBUCK ST. DIAL 4335



Have You Thought
of Getting a

BREAKFAST |
CARRIER ?

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED SOME
IN nee
ALUMINIUM (3 Tier)
COME AND GET YOURS TO-DAY
— also —

1-PINT VACUUM THERMOS FLASKS

AND
4-PINT VACUUM ICE FLASKS
All attractively Priced

The Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
» Nos. 33 & 52 Swan Street — ’Phone 2109, 3534, or 4406 %





PSOE SOS GSES

{

+

SeSotees


SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950

Be Prepared For.
Hurricane

The hurricane season in Bar-
bados lasts from July 15th to
October 3ist, Mr. Donald Wiles,
Assistant. Colonial Secretary told
listeners to Radio Distribution on
Friday evening.

He said “We are in constant
touch with the U.S. Weather
Bureau at San Juan in Puerto
Rico and with the Air Ministry
Weather Station at Piarco in Tri-
nidad. From Puerto Rico, if
there are any signs that a hurri-
cane is forming in the Atlantic
due east of Barbados—and that ‘s
the danger area for us—a plane
is sent out to report back by
radio to San Juan. If such inves~
tigation leads the weather experts
there to think that a hurricane
is forming or has formed, we are
immediately informed. Again,
there is an airline that operates
on the route running from the
Cape Verde islands off the West
coast of Africa to Trinidad. This
is almost the exact route of the
hurricanes that might strike Bar-
bados. Constant weather reports
are made to Piarco in Trinidad,
and if a hurricane is suspected,
we in Barbados are told about it.
So you see everything possible is
being done to ensure that she
public will know of a hurricane
well in advance of its arrival—
perhaps 18 or 20 hours before it
reaches us, and if you prepare
now a lot can be done to render
your home somewhat less liable
to be destroyed. Remember what
the cautionary warning is: By day
a flag with a black square on a
red background flown at the mast

head at The Public Buildings,
Office of Harbour and Shipping
Master. South Point Lighthouse,

East Point Lighthouse, Harrison's
Point Lighthouse. Crane Hotel,
Hackleton’s Cliff, St. John, Mount
Standfast, St. James, District “B”
Police Station, District “C” Police
Station, District “D” Police Sta-
tion, District ‘“E” Police Station.
District “F” Police Station.

By night a red light will be
used instead of the flag. This
signal means that it is probable
the hurricane will hit the island,
and this is the time to go into
action immediately. When it is
cértain that a. hurricane will hit
the island two flags by day and
two red lights by night will be

You can do a lot before the
used.
You can do a lot before the
Cautionary Signal goes up, you
can make your house secure
now. See that all latches and
bolts and locks on your win-
dows and doors are in order.
If you are contemplating the
building of outside shutters to
protect your glass windows,
have them built right away.
Put in a small stock of nails
and see that a hammer is
handy. It would be sensible to
pack a box with some nonper-
ishable food—an amount that
might last a day or two—in a
container that you can pick up

easily and move to some place

of safety if you think that your

house may not stand the foree
of a hurricane.

There will be no other food
at the shelters until after the
hurricane has passed, and then
under the Emergency Feeding
Scheme which has been care-
fully worked out by the St.
Michael's Hurricane Relief
Committee, it will only be pos-
sible to give each person a
total of three hot drinks and six
biscuits within the first twenty-
four hours after the hurricane.
The food will “be carefully
rationed, and it will be a good
thing to take along some food
with you when you're going to
one of the shelters.

Find out now who is the officer
in charge of your district. These
names were published recently in
the daily newspaper. It was sug-
gested that you cut out the sections
and keep them.

It is hoped that these bui
ings will stand, and after the
hurricane has passed other ;
rangements will have to be ms 2
to house the homeless.

Decide now to which one ycu
would go, probably the nearest
one to your home.

must make it clear that
whether or not you go to one of
these shelters must be your own
decision. If you do go to a shel-
ter and it is damaged by the

hurricane and any one inside js |

injured, the Government does
accept any responsibility for
this.

If you can reach home, batten
down all windows and doors,
using some of, the nails put in
stock now. Pack up a change of
clothing. any valuables, a cup

(tin or enamel), a fork and
spoon, the food you have set
aside, a bottle of water for

drinking and put these all in a
bucket ready for handy moving
if you have to leave your home.
If you are going to one of these
shelters take these things with
you—remember take the bucket
along too—it can be used for
many purposes. Remember—a
change of clothing, food, drinking
water, cup. fork, spoon and
bucket, and if you have a storm
lantern fill it with oil and take
it with you.

At the shelter you will have
to carry out the instructions of
the wardens in charge. You
will have to help to keep the
shelters clean. A great many
people have put in a lot of work
to set up what exists at present
to preserve the safety of the
public, but the public must
make it their business to find
out as much as they can now
about the Hurricane Relief Or-
ganisation,

A Handbook has been issued
and may be purchased at the Co-
lonial Secretary’s Office for 2/6
plus 6d., for the 1950 Amend-
ments or read at the Public

Library. Pamphlets have been
posted in Public Buildings,
Churches, Schools—please stop

and read these pamphlets.





THESE ARE REAL i.
LOW PRICES “

LOVELY TAFETTA 36 ins.

71¢ a yd.

Beautiful Quality SATIN
in Pink, White, Lemon
and Blue 31 ins.

70¢ a yd.

JERSEY SILK in Pink
36 ins. wide

68¢ a yd.

WASHABLE PRINTS from
CALL TO-DAY
These and Many More Lines at:

THANI Bros.

Pr. Wm. Hry. & Swan Sts.






INSIST

TOMATO

CREAM of PEA
MIXED











ON - =

MY LADY

CANNED

Select your Favourite Variety
CREAM of
BEEF & VEGETABLES
VEGETABLES

EASY TO SERVE

EASY ON YOUR



13 Cyclists Rode

‘Lighte
ighted
TYURING THE LAST two days

13 cyclists were charged
for riding their cycles without
a light. During that period 22
traffic offences were also record-
ed.

Two cyclists were charged for
failing to stop at major roads and
two motorists for not paying
taxes on’ their motor vehicles. One
motorist was charged for driving
without due care and attention
and another for parking in a
restricted area.

‘g.yIS EXCELLENCY the Gov-
ernor will be attending the
70th Annual Meeting of the
Y.M.C.A., at the Y.M.C.A., on
Friday September 1, at 5 p.m,

The Hon. H. A. Cuke C.B.E.,
will preside and a large turn out
of members and _ subscribers is
expected.

T THE TALENT SHOW at
the Globe Theatre last
Friday night Oliver Arthur, who
sang “My Foolish Heart,” car-
ried off the First Prize.
The large crowd that attended

+. saw a keen competition between

three of the six contestants. The

. Judges, who were Mr. F. Peterkin,

Miss Thelma Sarjeant and Miss
Nancy Went, found it difficult to
choose between Oliver Arthur,
Trevor Marshall and Cosford Hus-
bands and were long in arriv-
ing at their decision.

Trevor Marshall, who san
“La Rue, La Rue,” and Cosf
Husbands with “You Do,” how-
ever tied for the second position.

HE RECENT RAINS have
afforded planters the op-
portunity to plant vegetables.



GOVERNMENT NOTICE
NOTICE

HEAVY PLOUGHS



It is hereby notified for the i
importing heavy ploughs that the M

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Without |
Lamps

'
Many weeks ago labourers could |
be seen forking the ground bu!
planting only started recently.
Already the grass and canes ih
country districts are looking
green.
PARLOUR WEDDING took
place at St. Matthias Road
recently between Mr. David Trot-
man and Miss Mabel Jackman,
formerly of Chelsea Road. The
Bride was “given away” by Mr
Seymour Blades while the duties
of bestman fall to Mr. “Doe”
White.
His Honour Mr. H. A. Talma,
Gity Police Magistrate, perform-
ed the ceremony.

A’ “AT HOME” was kept by
Mr. A. Rollock, City Mer-
chant, to welcome Mr. Roy Rol-
lock, his brother, who recently
1eturned to the island after travel-
ling between Bermuda and the
U.S.A.

He was last in Barbados 23
years ago and is on two months

holiday.

Mr. Rollock is pleased with the
progress of the island but feels
that there is scope for the tourist
trade.

He is of the opinion that the

authorities should get ahead with}

the Deep Water Harbour. )
"THE SCHOONER LUCILLE M.| |

SMITH brought 1,500 bags of} }}
rice to the island yesterday from}
British Guiana.

This vessel, which is under the
command of Capt. Hassel, also
brought 34 tons of firewood, 400
bags of charcoal and 100 drums of
cocoanut oil.

It is . censigned) to Messrs.
Robert Thom & Co. Ltd.

nformation of persons desirous of
inistry of Agriculture and Fisheries

report the availability of 15 No. 55 and 23 No. 66 John Deery heavy

sharing ploughs (unused) 3 and 4
plus to United Kingdom requireme

Suppliers are Jack Olding & Co., Hatfield, Hertfordshire.

furrows 14 inches which are sur-
nts.
Price

approximately £130 each payable in sterling.

2.
guaranteed,
3.
Supplies not later than 12 noon on































Alka-Seltzer to brin

Not a laxative,

Alka-S

MILES LABORATORIES, IN

ie

problem

A complete stock

54

SOUPS

ONION

‘FOOD BUDGET

ASK FOR --MY LADY” SOUPS AT YOUR GROCER



{

Atka-Seltzer brings pleasant relief

The same safe analgesic that re-
lieves headaches so quickly causes
quick com-
fort from muscular aches and sore-
aess. Drop one or two Alka-Seltzer
cablets in a glass.of water. Watch
\t sparkle, then drink it down. Here
is reliable First Aid—pleasant to
tak> too. Keep a package handy,

What ever your shin

DOROTHY GRAY

has a special preparation for it.

Dory Gray

BEAUTY PREPARATIONS now available at
COLLINS LTD.

Provision @f spare parts from the United Kingdom cannot be

Persons interested should get in touch with the Controller of

Tuesday, 29th August, 1950.
27.8.50.—In.

eltzer

ELKHART, IND ue S.A



se
a

of








ll
VI-STOUT
Is
HERE
AGAIN

tt

SIMEON HUNTE & SONS
LTD. - Agents.



IRON





YES, its fact..

more dentists in the U.S.A.

recommend and use IPANA

than any other tooth paste
a

We Recent U.S.A. poll





ARTIST—here's your chance of selecting what you've been

waiting for from the following :
CANVAS—Ready stretched and per yard
PALLETTES, PALLETTES KNIVES, PAINT KNIVES
DIPPERS—double and single, .
FIXATIVE and DIFFUSSERS, TURPENTINE,
LINSEED OIL, DRAWING BOOKS, ARTIST OIL PAINTS,
STUDENTS’ OIL PAINTS, POSTER COLOURS,
DRAWING PAPER, BRUSHES, ETC.

*: Also e.



DRAUGHTMAN'S SET SQUARES, RULING PENS, ETC.

ROBERTS & CO. — DIAL 3301



Chicken Haddies
Rabbit ”
Steak & Onions

Sweet Corn

Macaroni & Cheese
Apple Sauce ”



PERKINS & CO., LTD.

Roebuck Street

BEDSTEADS
—3 ft. 0 ins; 3 ft. 6 ins;
4ft. dins,

KITCHEN CHAIRS
GALVANIZED BATH PANS
—18 ins; 24 ins; 30 ins.

GALVANIZED BUCKETS
—10 ins; 14 ins.

COAL POTS
—13 ins; 14 ins,

BUCK POTS
—3-Gallon

COOKING POTS
—2-Gallon; 3-Gallon



To

VieSt

> THE VITAMIN STOUT
OBTAINABLE FROM:




SERVE

DELICACIES !!



‘SOG: nme eo




PLANTATIONS





out |

ALL GOQD DEALERS



THESE

TABLE

Microbe 5% Bottle
Macaroni Pkgs.
Cheese Tins & Ib.
Icing Sugar Pkgs.
Table Jellies Pkgs.

Golden Arrow Rum

Dial 2072 & 4502 |

LIMITED

=> oe





PAGE FIFTEEN

——-

Pe a ae
i 8s7.. = :
=a
Sanita. GIANY TIR s ¢ |
ad
That's why — ae, !

STs ae
more tons, the world over, are

hauled on Goodyear giant tires
‘than on any other make!: .

For performance—mileage—value, Goodyear
giant tires are best. They are extra-tough—
last longest — give lowest cost-per-mile.



CITY GARAGH TRADING CO, LTD.

_
OOF F995 95454454
. ORG MO, Oo oe

PPP PPAPLEP PO POOL PIO EG PPLE PPPOE

SOFFOS

FOOF

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POSES SESS SPOS



69

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BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS

Fly

TOBAGO

Round-Trip

$57.60

FREQUENT SERVICE



VIA TRINIDAD



Round-Trip

$57.60

DAILY SERVICE
FROM BARBADOS

—





a EFSF SSS SS PFS OS



GRENADA

Round-Trip

$41.40

MONDAYS AND
THURSDAYS

FRPSPO OPO oO oe

ELE EEE E ELS OSES ES





MIAMI





SPECIAL EXCURSION
FARE

‘ $340.00

ys

>

$ FREQUENT FLIGHTS

LLLBDLLLLLLLLLL LLLP EL LLLP LPLL PPLE

10th ANNIVERSARY YEAR

BWI

BRITISH WEST INDIAN A



IRWAYS

Lower .f tridgetown =

PPLE COLE LSI DIS
|
|
|



PAGE SIXTEEN



‘ANNOUNCE (2 °

Tec 0)

ipoAy CENTAL DRIES
re BANNED SOOKS Cle.
yE CHEATE CARO ao




cme we oO
PUSEM

btn ae
Cis EN SA

& MISERY TP IN
AEA MC CARTHY
em. gre ts
és
SP. $4
AT US SAME

NEXT PROGRAMME (IK



2. -

“ano Now LADIES
AND CENTS — 1M SAKRRY -PLL Kea
THAT AGAIN -- GENTLEMEN — FOR THE
NEXT BA MINUTES WE ARE TH HEAR
MS SHOO TE HEAD.
Wnt PROGRAMME 1S _ HR NUGHY
ite you Ay THe OGURTES*S OF
Re WIS WHS RELIC Co.

ME FLATE IAT SHSE co.

THe MA SHOOT Man Sac ETS
# ~S a FDA aad,
SARNALLE REsrove d RY. : .
EVERLASTING CHAR E TTR #e.,:

ARST & Aor Tee LAUN DRS |
FADED FLOWER THAT

UM AGRE
FERHAPS NEXT
PUPTE YO oye
& Q@NOOZTEHEAD « — -- UN

CRE IS PART OF THE O

2 .

Lat,

HORE.

foro
& Se.

One he

A
Pe

NOTES ON
AGRICULTURE

THE rainfall for July was much
below average, but it was well
distributed, writes the Director
of Agriculture.

According to rainfall returns
received from 30 stations, situ-
ated in areas typical of the vari-
ous rainfall categories, the
average total fall for the Island
for the month was 3.46 inches.
The corresponding figure for 1919
was 2,95 inches, and the avera qe
for July for the past 100 years was
6.28 inches.

The highest total for July 195°
was 4.69 inches, measured at a
station in the parish of St. George,
and the lowest was 1.78 inches
recorded at a station in the parish
of St. James.

The young cane crop, in gen-
eral, remained green and in goocl
condition. There are, however,
some ficlds of ratoons in certain
areas which have a_ yel'owish
appearance and give the impres-
sion of suffering from lack of
moisture under their particulac
conditiens of soil tilth.

For the past twenty-one
seasons the majority of planters
in the Island have co-operated
with this Department in volun-
tarily furnishing Crop Yield
Returns giving the acreages ans
tonnages of cane harvested during
the season. This year, returns
have been received covering an
average of 31,962 acres, out of a
total of 34,241 acres reaped by
plantations. The results for the
crop reaped in 1950 have been
analysed, and the following table
gives the average tons of cane
per acre obtained for plant canes
and ratoons in the various par-
ishes of the Island, together with
the total acres of cane which wer®
to be reaped according to the
Sugar Cane Census Returns.

the month seed was distributed
to plant 314 5/6 acres made ur
as follows: — Plantations 16 acres,
Peasants 297} acres and Agricul-
tural Stations 1 7/12 acres. Ger-
mination of the seed was excel-
lent. Owners and occupiers are
informed that for this crop just
p.anted, the Barbados Cottor
.actory are offering 20 cts. per lb.
as a beginning price for clean,
mature cotton delivered to the Fac-
ory in Bridgetown. The cotton
variety trials were planted during
the month at Codrington.

The weather during the month
was relatively dry. On the whole,
however, the main food crops
which were planted early,
suffered little set back, and yams,
Indian corn, eddoes, and cassava
are growing well. Very limited
areas of sweet potatoes could b¢
planted in the circumstances
Irrigated vegetable gardens are
doing as well as could be expected
at this time of the year; beans,
shallot, carrot and beet being in
fair supply.

Plant and ratoon canes con-
tinued to make satisfactory pro-
gress. On the whole, the crop is
growing vigorously and is more
advanced than usual for this time
of the year.

‘Cotton

The demand for seed for plant-
ing in the main cotton growing
areas of St. Philip, Christ Church
ond St. Lucy has fallen short of
expectations. Good germination
was reported by growers who
planted early. Planting or supply~-
ing later in the month was limit-
ed, owing to the dry conditions.

Groundnuts

Increasing interest is being
shown in the growing of ground-
ruts. Some peasant crops are near -
ing maturit¥ and give promise of

Sugar Cane harvested by Plantations during 1950

Plant Canes

r Acres to Acre



: Ratoons of all kinds

sages Tons Acres to Acreages (ons cant

be reaped for which cane be reaped for wh ch pe> scre
according Crop per according Crop Calculated
to Sugar Yield Re- acre to Sugar Returns from Crop
Cane turns calcu- Cane Cen- were Yield
Census were re- lated sus Re- received
Returns ceived from turns Returns
Crop
Yield
Returns
St. Michael 911.00 806.37 35.9 1,361.00 1,249.23 284
Ch. Chureh 095. 1,984.47 349 2,076.00 2,050.49 28 1
St. Philip 2,415.75 2,195.75 344 2,254.25 2,105.75 29.7
St, Lucy 1,325.25 1,299.10 314 1,086.50 1,073.37 25 3
St. George * 1,354.28 1,289.34 397 2,566.47 2,407.44 33.4
St. John 1,158.25 1,134.35 384 2,808.25 2,806.48 369
St. Peter 981.00 981.00 33 6 1,794.25 1,779.25 30.2
St. James 952.00 768.07 32.6 1,528.75 1,243.03 26.9
St. Thomas 1,065.50 826.74 37.9 2,686.00 2,287.78 342
St. Joseph 529.75 512.00 36.0 1,419.25 1,311.25 33.4
St. Andrew 647.25 7.00 34.7 1,224.75 1,211.35 294



The general average tons of
cane per acre, for plant canes and
ratoons, reaped by plantations,
was 32.98 tons, the corresponding
figure for the crop reaped in 1949
was 34.97 tons. There were 1,536
more acres of canes reaped in
1950 than in 1949.

The final figure for the crop
reaped in 1950 is the equivalent
of 158,183 tons of sugar, a record
for the Island.

Provision crops made satisfac-
tory growth during the month
Sweet potatoes were in limited
supply as usual at this season.

Distribution of cotton seed for
planting commenced at the begin-
ning of the month, and during



| They'll Do It Every Time

pec Se










O.K.=GO AHEAD)
( AN’ LAFF BUT I WAS
CATCHIN’ BEHIND THE BAT,
PLAYIN’ WITH MY NEPHEWS
AND A FOUL TIP GOT ME
WHAT'S SO FUNNY ABOUT

A BLACK EYE? HOW

DID YOU THINK I











good yields within the next few
weeks, Only shortage of seed for
planting has prevented more wide-
spread cultivation of the Crop.
Cultivators are being urged to
avoid, as far as possible a_ re-
currence of this handicap.

Tree Crops
Good supplies of mangoes, sugar
apples, cocoanuts and limes were
obtainable in the market during
the month. :
Pests and Diseases
Control measures were continued
ogainst plant pests and diseases,
especially the cabbage white but-
terfly, scale insects and slugs,
which were reported attacking
crops in some districts.

Registered ¥. & Patent Oflee



HIS WIFE 2 AND WHAT IN ALL BEAT UP IT WAS 4 aoe
ABOUT THE SCRATCHES? j{ HS WIFE'S PRESERVES )”:
ywer HAVE EEN THAT EXPLODED +++ Ba + BARBADOS
i} LL Wi
AMATEUR BOXING



edhah IN [Tes



sai



4


















SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Peasant Livestock
supply of Concentrated
showed marked improve-

The
feed
ment, and was almost normal by

the end of the month In many
districts, however, it was difficult
to obtain supplies of succulent
fodder.

Extension Work

The Peasant Agricultural In-
structors visited 792 peasant hold-
ings and 23 school gardens during
the month, Nine mango trees
were top-worked.

Four soil conservation projects
were undertaken in July. Heavy
cultivation work on most peasant
holdings has been completed for
the present. It is expected, how-
ever, that further soil conservation
projects will be undertaken next
month

Irrigation

Under the provisions of the
Colonial Development and Wel-
fare Scheme, peasants continued
to receive assistance with the in-
stallation of new irrigation units
as well as with improvements to
existing units,

Crop Husbandry

Work was continued on the lay-
ing down of the peasants’ investi-
gational units at The Home, Sayes
Court, Jerusalem and Haggatts.
Ploughing and heavy forking were
completed during the month and
all fields have now been laid out
on the contour. Planting of cot-
ton, Guinea corn, fodder and
food crops is proceeding. At
each of these Stations a banana
plot is also being established.

Livestock

The total number of livestock at
the six stations at the end of the
month was 132, Five hundred and
seventy-two gallons of cow’s milk
were produced. Three young pigs
were sold for rearing: and 4 head
of elder stock sold for slaughter.



Distribution of Ornamental
Plants

Six hundred and ten ornamental
plants of different species were
distributed.

Afforestation
Two hundred and ten casuarina
trees were planted at Needham’s
Point, the Garrison. during the
month of July. Casuarina seeds
were collected for sowing at later
dates.

Control of Moth Borer

During July 53,603,000 egg para-
sites Trichogramma were bred up,
and 46,903,000 were made avail-
able for distributi to planters.
This makes the tofal number of
parasites liberated for the year t
315,000,000. During the latter part
of the month there was a reduction
in number of planters who called
for their quota .of parasites, with
the result, that a surplus of para-
sites remained on cold storage, ard
was eventually distributed depart-
mentally. This reduction is possi-
bly due to the favourable weatner
conditions prevailing, which have
caused rapid growth of plant
canes, rendering access through
them difficult.

The breeding of the Lixophaga
fly parasite continued during the
month.

Counts were continued of moth
borer Diatraea egg deposition and
parasitism in the entomological
cane plots at Codrington.

Cane Root Borer, A survey was
made in parts of St. Peter, St.
Philip and Christ Church to ascer-
tain the damage root borer caused
to ratoon and plant cane fields.



Some ratoon fields showed moder-
atc infestation, which caused the
canes Ww be of a yellowish appeur-
ance, and patchy growth. Sonik

pluni cane fields were also slightly
afiected by the root borer

Cabbage and Caulifiower ec.
The rearing of ihe Pteromalus
parasite for the control of the

white butterfly puparia P. monuste
continued, and 5,758 parasites
were bred up and liberated. This
brings the total for the year tu
109) 863 Pteromalus parasites bred

up.
Weod Ant Control. Inspections
were continued during the month

CHEMICAL

Twenty-five soil samples
total organic

Soils,
were analysed for
carbon content,

Six samples were completed for
total phosphate content.

Three soil samples were selecteo
for the laboratory investigation
into the persistency of B.H.C. in
Coral Limestone soils. Determina-
tions of pH and free CaCo3 were
carried out on these samples.

Field. Twelve soil samples
were taken from fields at Black-
mans Plantation in connectiv:
with an investigation in the soil
potash status,

Four soil samples, two fro
eroded slope, and two trom t
detrital zone at Durants Plaut: -
tion in connection with the inve:
tigation of soil nutrient losses dus
to erosion.

General Analytical Work. The
following samples were receiveâ„¢
and analysed in the Laboratory: --

Forty-nine samples consisting G:

milks, counterfeiting exhibits.

water, rum, tea and cocoa es-
sences, edible oil and feeding
stuffs submitted by the Police

* Authorities.

Twelve samples consisting of

feeding stuffs. gasolene and fuel

oils, condensed milk and milk

powders, tinned meat with
cereal and butter concentrate

« July, 1949 July, 1950 Jan.-July Jan.-July
. 1949 1950
2,995 26,480 218,311 247,825
B'town Fish Market 11,645 22,638 92,880 104,053
Rural Market Sheds 4,880 1,220
Oistin’s Fish Market iu (June & July!



Communist China
To Be Represented

In U.N. Assembly

i @ from page 1
to the preceding President of the
General Assembly, General
‘Romulo last November, January,
‘February and May.

These notes also stated that
Chiang Wen Tien had _ been
appointed the Peking representa-
tive to United Nations meetings
including the Security Council.

The telegram added according
to Moscow radio “in spite of this,
the illegal delegation of the rem-
nant of the Chinese Kuomintang
reactionary clique have not up io
now been expelled from the United
Nations and from its various
bodies,

“I consider this not only a viola-
tion of the United Nations Char-
ter, but it also ignores the legiti-
mate demands of the population
of the Chinese Peoples ublic.

—Reuter.




submitted by the Customs Au-
thorities for classification
Sixty-five samples consisting of
&C. disinfectant submitted by
rnilks, feeding stufis, soil and
oficial departments

Nine miscellaneous samples con-
sisting of milks, fancy molasses
and one industrial thermometer
for checking calibration

Plant Diseases

Mosaic. Nineteen returns wei?
received during July under tbe
Mosaic Disease (Eradication) Act.
1943-22. No infected holes were re-
ported for this period. Owners
and occupiers are reminded that
failure to make the necessary re-
turns is a breach of the law.

Ce‘ton Inspections. The search
fer wild cotton trees was contin—
ued and 279 trees were found,

Fisheries

During the month the sum ot
$1,134.53 was repaid by boat own--
ers as loans issued by the Fishery
Advisory Committee. This brings
the total amount repaid to date
to $49,654.27. The amount of in-
terest paid for he morth was
©5.15 making a total of $583.12
paid to date. The sum of $666.70
was issued in loans for the month.
This makes a total of $88,732.13
loaned to boat owners to date.

July marked the end of the
fishing season and all flying fish
Loats were hauled up for repairs
ey refitting. A‘ the end of July,
f-ce taken by the tractor at
Lathsheba for hauling up boats
emounted to $251.66.

Returns of fish at the several
marketing centres were moderate,
and a total of 26,480 lb. of fish
were marketed through the
bridgetown Fish Market. Append—
ed below is a comparison of re-
turns from the Bridgetown Fish
Market and the Rural. Market
Sheds for like periods of 1949 and
1950 as well as returns from the
Oistin’s Fish Market for 1950.

Fish Marketed, 1b


































ANNUAL -
DANCE

of the
FORTRESS
CLUB

at Queen's Park

on Friday, ist. September, 1950
Music by Mr. C. B. Browne’s Orchestra
Dancing 9 p.m. — Admission 3/-

|



Tickets must be presented on admission.



Remember!
1950's Biggest Event

COTTON DRESS DANCE

QUEEN'S PARK
Saturday Nite Sept, 2nd 1950
Admission 3/-
CLEVIE GITTENS & His ork.

Suppers Served.
27.8.50—2n.







Hello Boys and Girls! What's On?

A Grand Dance





SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, 1950



[So ST SSS SS








PERFUMES THAT
LAST

GOYA—Perfumes, Colognes
Powder (Face and Bath)

A very beautiful assortment
to cheose from

THE COSMOPOLITAN

DAY PHONES 2041 & 444;
NIGHT PHONE 41-4)














Variety of

Shades

AT

| CAVE SHEPHERD
& CO, LTD.

10, 11, 12 and 13 Broad Street.







MERE

GRAPES Se

Luscious, Juicy, Delicious
GET THESE WHILE THEY LAST

; F 8
cod

ASSORTED JAMS<6 Tins for $1.44
“{ Pks CAKE MUX-—per pk 25.
In VANILLA, CHOCOLATE, ORANGE, GINGER

Large Bots SOUTH AFRICAN
BRANDY-=per bot





$3.00







ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO., Ltd.

HIGH STREET.





WHO WAS PITCHIN’? Wf ‘ve LAST TIME HE CAME

HE, WAS TALKING
TO SOME LAWYER
OVER THE PHONE ABOUT )
MENTAL CRUELTY **+
GUESS HE'S SUING
THE BALL TEAMS





=
=
/ = ,
ee ee Wa ills AINE Dee: Eta




































Four hundred and twenty-fiv
stud services were paic fcr: he will be given by
stations LOUIS GILL .and
LIVINGSTONE WARD
BOTANICAL (better known as Livie)
ion Sk
i Sy? .P Road
Ligh yy tl ; CLUB WILLOW, Passage Ro
The (pplication of strong arti- Reo MONDAY NIGHT, 28th August,
eis chi to the su an r- Ci
he : ei ! ound ‘s ¢ ene eh Mei nee SUBSCRIPTION $33 2/-
pes ted to result in the suppression iy ONE Music by Meta Browne's
of fowering. With a light of is me Sadia eais

suitable intensity, an exposure of
as little as one minut» at midnight
is reported to be sufficient to stop
arrowing. .To test the effect of
artificial light in Barbados, a
battery of six lights has been
erected at Society over a field of
B.4098 plant canes, These will be
exposed to fifteen minutes artificial
light every night from the middle
of August until about the middle
of October.

Economic Tree Propagation
and Distribution

Please Invite Your Friends.
27.8.50—I1n

ONE










MR. J. K. HUNTE

requests the pleasure of your
company to his

BIRTHNIGHT DANCE

iat:
THE CHILDREN'S GOODWILL
LEAGUE



ONE-O-ONE CLEANSER, the Cleanser in the large
Blue Drum—when you buy 1-0-1 you get 26 ozs. of the






i 3 7 WEDNESDAY. NIGHT, 30TH
world’s finest Cleanser for only 22c. 1-0-1 cleans with- AVGQUET § «tet




Admission:
The following fruit trees were out scratching, when you or nser j -0- GENTS 2/- ::: LADIES 1/6
budded during the month:— lime f & y der Cleanser just say 1-0-1 Music by Mr. Perey Green's
195, orange 80, lemon 36, pomelo Obtainable from all Groceries, Druggists and Hard- Refreshments on Sale

26. Fruit trees delivered from

Codrington were as follows:—
Orange .....-+++ 68
Grapefruit
Lim

27.8.'50—In,

ware Stores, in fact obtainable everywhere. |



MR. CECIL LUCAS
invites you to his


















Pomeélo .....ccsesesecee :
POAT sce cssec sre ner eves
ens os ce ats 5 ANNUAL DANCE z
Golden Apple .....--+-++ 7 On TUESDAY NIGHT, STH
Guava ..ccceceeeveeeees 17 SEPTEMBER, 1950
Pawpaw .....0--see ents 13 AT ST. CATHERINE’S SOCIAL
Sugar Apple .......555: 2 Aces af
Fig cc eeceeeeeeeeeeere 4 GENTS 2/- 2: LADIES 1/6
ovens Music by panne aeey Green's
Total .....sssses0es 285 Transportation “wil be available
Town and Country before and



after Dance
Bar Solid—Please extend this
Invitation
27.8.'50—In.

By Jimmy Hatlo
















I THINK HE
GOT IT CLOSED
FOR TAKING TOO
MANY EYE-
OPENERS =>

ASSOCIATION

Under the Distinguished
Patronage
His Excellency the Governor

Cail in To-day and inspect












our range of Tropical










Suiting, Specially Selected






announces
A Series of Thrilling Con-
tests on the night of - -

4th SEPTEMBER
at 8 o’clock

At the MODERN HIGH
SCHOOL STADIUM




for your comfort in this

warin weather.

REASONABLY PRICED







TAILORED TO PLEASE
+

P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd. |
TOP SCORERS | IN TAILORIN |

|
Entire proceeds in aid of the
Bay Street Boys’ Club |
|

|

|

|





The Police Band will play |
Popular Prices:



OFFICE QUIXOTE
EXPLAIN HIS LATEST |
BRUISES**s THANX To |

BILL M€ CLEARY
M496 47HAVE.,NEW YORK, N.Y.
en cls



BAR & REFRESHMENTS |ff|§
17.8.550—5n. || %

y

|





SSS SESS =
SOSTSSSTIOOD > os POF
x POPOEOP EPSPS DPOE PP SO SPSS A SOOO A CESPOT,






We can supply from stock ex recent arrivals

B.R.C. Metal Fabric

NO. 9 MEDIUM WEIGHT
NO. 14 LIGHT WEIGHT

in rolls 3” x 12” mesh 7 wide

Expanded Metal Sheets

















Iron 4” mesh 4 x 8
ee a ae
Be ap oe a ae
Oe ik Sigg sy: ee RA

Galv. 4” mesh 2' x 8’

Bienvenida Cordial

Nuestra casa ofrece todas las
elegancias en trajes de primera clase.
Sefioras y Sejiores pueden vestirse
ripida y c6modamente. Por qué no
aprovechar esta oportunidad ?

Tenemos siempre los mejores materiales
Todo es
Sobretodo

nuestra casa esti especialmente equipada

ingleses al mejor precio.

moderno y muy satisfactorio.

para hacerles sus trajes segiin sus deseos.

Sus amigos en Barbados son :—

C.B. Rice Y Cia

Sastres de Primera Clase
Bolton Lane & Victoria Street.
Bridgetown.



POSSE SOOSOO GOSS FOSD aisaiisiiipihaimeseaiadidal

\






PAGE 1

SUNDAY. AUGUST 27. 19W SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGI TORES .\l Th< in. M. i MADAME PARIS Gardening Hints .. For Amateurs war In I.he Pacific lr. JOW II \IIIIISOA PARIS Sund,,) tad personality, even .f well over I N a third lloor apartment overthe 00 mark, oao wear a dreaa in looking the cocktail bar of the flaming raspberry red, providing H.tz Hotel, ornately furnished with the line is perfect THE Rose has often been called golden clocks. Venetian glass mirAnd providing ah* knows—a< the "Queen of the Garden" and animals, and Chanel knows awry line and rnoM hardeners have had the AT 31, HE FELT LIKE Ml OLD I'lW Host( %  ardeii glass, glass everywhere, a no longer young, lives as K legend of the fabulous world of Pans fashion. She is Madame Chanel—a peifume was named after her— a rich woman who made a fortunbetween the two world wars but who no longer dresses the Internationally chic women. She says: "One loses money now in couture. I don't like losing money". MADAME lll.VMLS dresses: (above) (ilaay-type evening-gown in blark and raspberry, the skirt b separate from ihr bod lee and made in one rnormoua wrap-sround piece. Material Is falllr. Ihr frill* edged with red to match the hedlee. The blouse lest Is tllhtly liitinc rrossed over and lied al the back. < Below I RI.A( K II II I evening gown. Transparent ruehrd slip worn over a skirt %  I alLihtlp stiffened tulle. The top the same creaa-ever line In black -ilk faille. movement of her own figure. ambition at some time to grow "Why-, .aid Chanel, throwing Rang. wide her hands, should a woman Thtcultivation ol Roses in Barbados is not difficult, although u. never get such good results as arc (fctaincd in England, ret, WMI ., littleknowledge, and some inlt-al trouble. Rose-trees will succeed in Barbados well enough to mak< By G. S TWO of thf bloodiest and most famous battle* to lake nlace in the Pacific during World War IIare depicted in "SANDS OF IWO JIMA", now showing at the EmptD Theatre They are the battles oi Tarawa and Iwo Jima both of which will long be remambered by officers and men of the United Slates Marine Corps, whose i"b it was to capture these two Jap atrongholds. The rlg& h ;: l ^ b srs:1 "~ row c ^u.'^dm'^T, ^ of training and life tague %  :i ivorth while Position of US. Marines constitute the play story of this war Aim. Under the farm.down to Ihe present day, "Reaeanna Met'**** no* at the Globe Theatre. • American feud Is brought -trees like an open sunny hard tutelage of • seasoned to U-.> screen The hostilm Despot, sheltered from excessively sergeant who a alternately distwflei, the saturnine, mountainhigh winds They will not succeed liked and appreciated by his men. eerlr.g Hatflelds and the Codunder the shade of trees or in a thy era led by him In their first fearing farming McCoys it legenbed infested with tree-roots, taste ol actual warfare— the landdar> m America, and has been the Ro*e-tree* are seinsh plants, and mgs at Tarawa—and finally In the theme of foUt-songs and ballads as demand a bed or Tub all to thembattle of Iwo Jlm. where, after well as ..tones stives, so. do not put a border ft'Ur days of murderous fighting. .. . _^_ „ „ „f annuals around your Row the Sur* and Stripes Is raised on Jg*' ;\ "^ !" un J *' K !" h,.is aslUck in bits and piece* Mount Surabachi. Into theso luc ky mountains, the film tells the o other plants here and therT •• %  and backgrounds, which ff of the love of Johnac Hat?W Zrn,,iiiM frea %  taken from autneniic docuflc f? ,or Hoseanna McCoy. It la ftonT tr^-ioote^(and^rSUra !" ments are blended the conflicts. '" '•• colour and jeflups ,!. ~ ,> M rven under ramaranar e, and personal action* Wo tMI e t !" g-e Iwlween tUta! and ifX spoTS wind"d reactions encountered when ^1 toy* "d old hatreds, as lh swept give thi 'planu'some"^ ncn vt different education, back**• fi*" 1 dtermlne to v ivent w!nd ground, faith and ideals are %  •* %  %  ** "•town together under the stress Than, ha. haa-n n.> adsaaaau aa of war. tivticn from the ... She And Preparation Of The-Beds For %  single row of Rose-plants, whore the three feet is a comfortable width unit, take their pinto make the bed. For a double panorama of battle row, a five foot wide bed Is just right with the plants placed three be made to suffer in a dree hich she cannot move from Uie u out to a oeptn oi iwo ***. uu% h —MM M*-.lut knee. down, with a neckline should the ground be at all soggy, ^nwnn* Purely beet! !" it Iwhlch is one long fear of exposure diK out -"other fooVand put (n lradl|to ln m 1mmay Both m ,„ mid a waistline which kills the enjoyment of a good meal? •I live these days mostly in an well drained bed. Now fill I Atlantic liner between Paris and cavity with a mixture solid fighting „<, my of hfe Uv portrnvwi the hug* .rcurfciciy There „ ,„ nimllilil musical background and splendid ngh.. ^ p. at, pu-oinrj. J^J' !" t £* t &*f£ t"^''"^'^&T\^ in feet .part To prepare th,-bed, dl J" 1 "„,„.,",2 Su <: •'•>"' %  Charts lla-kford aial !• ". 5* t? ^'tfi <*£%£? ' !" <*' yeun7~dslS d who "aj-noad Uae,. : a layer ol "amertcme, '<>r drainpn conv inclnK performance.. .,! ge as Ro trees must have a d| M U]e olhor mcmbOT or of hahtet vein I. "Wallllner" I S '' %  '"* CMt l,l< h ""* mn weU "" P'> ln l "> Aquatic Club • well CB aaao to represent the diffarent From all reports, the accent in New York I need drives that black mould lei-mould, well tyvm cncounKwd n „ troup & this nlm 1.. on youth, wlt|i plenty 1 can roll Into a ball and put on lotted cow manure anil '""' Hahtlna men of comedy and romance. Starrlne 'UTStX-m* of a So-VST'baS l!". P 8 hih. .J.M. ih ade ( .,,h the c„-oper.Uon of ^T).TT.^ 0 i7 U ISSSi ^^fu^i^ 2 K d 21 stf & o^! tirJTJS a^^a yvTaea a." ^^ lys^ssa. to add that Uie pUntlna II „ bombardment, and baltle .cenw and aapMallcated step--tei i I.ulen kaiM.1 Ku ...i< Jaa .-W-I-IUV if tlBUs* B IIIIDlllv of ma lam In >K. ^. .. r . .kiUully Inter|. „ i hc h aetyal >ounds snd ilahts of war. *. ,„,.„, In wlnnln R ibe Tl —It.riL ...Ihi naafl f *HHW Ihc ramaeff to rasfara YOUTHFUL VIGOUR This yotiQn man was bvlng rreinatiirelv aired by kUney ina In his l.-ttat how Kruf< hen i him baik bU bal< h alter wnvka of pain '— "I auft"reil for weeks from kidney trouble an-1 telr like ast old man ..;'t'..ni.rh I sm only it. If I StOOpivl U) .1. -ny'liiruIt waa agony to stralanten up again f*fvral pe-l a>1vlssd me to try Km-hen Saltaa they had founil fl.nin wonderful. I trietl ihem and found they cave me relief from pain, and I fslt better in .-very . 1 shall keep on with the daily doeo because I can now do my day's work snd not feel any tho worse for It." —8.VXJ. Unleaa the kidney* function properly, certain m-wi *>a\ats. insCeaa of oelng espelled, are allowed to pollute the blood i tr able. wnHalnta -backache, iheumatlsm and eiceaalve fatigue. KniFH^ben In one oi Ihe finest -v.irettr* or kidney sperionta. 'I'ne *mall daily doae koeps toe kidney .-land other inten. til organs workiiist smoo'.hlv and naturally, HO thai theblood stream is purlReil and vigorous health restored Ask youi nearest Chemist Of Drug more for Krusvliea. and chunks of false Now mine are reed." The value? "I don't even k But she dresses herself as only said Chanel, "and if I did ni herself can. Amid the gla animals, the Chinese tables ar those hard, high, uncomfortabl sofas that the French love, sh weight of jewellery. t h0 same mixture • that given for ,.-,,.-,mB „_„, *h, wants rrom under her sl.trr ^ "V, said Chanel, 'Now imitate fc^ U!rw\N>A McCOY noaa, only to have a situation Ihe false Years qgo 1 stalled the Planting ,, . velop where she Bnd her dress jeweUery' voguo so that nlanting the lue-tree, do Family feuds have long oeen friend land In JalL There should omen could wear ropes of pearls Ivn nS the mi-ttake of planting g* ^U"J* vfT aome of the "quaint" and Buckinnhamshirf. Eye. Hereford the old "Chsnel touch", unique necklace, an emerald pendant -' saasq • ^ flRn wl "amuslnt" places they hsve "dlsahlre; Pokesdown, HamreJure, because, though hundreds of the ze of a pullet's •. pearl ' %  "> !" "' ound while the covered" while having a !oc*-eee Tar Pots. Essex and Zeala. Dorset AOmen would gladly buy them, earrings the sise of a half-crown, "ay ? ,. y., K^ Kcp ., loose at the countrvslda. eauy winners for their NaMkttn aid rings reaching up to the mid'"" %  JJJy" ,„ k ^i They found both a Sharp Noaa countle.. R OBB chose two which Illustrate dleknuckles of her fingers. and a Bugle In Cornwall, a Strange pronunciations baffled how a woman with courage —t 8 Treatment Twiu-hmg in Devonshire and an lha Americana. Who would diesm nlve the Rose trees a good Hch ,en Abbas In Hamaahlre. .that to pronounce Cwnt. MonDaaSaa !" ri*j. Avoid fre ..fh" !" %  a Rum In Invemesmouthshlre. toe .ecret I. to 61 uen "St aprlnklaigs. as this •'•'" %  B*y4 %  g~ r In Devonwill, your tongue through ,. Sa InVrooS to come too near SI" %  "" • !" ""~ ' Hertteeih and y -whim." I %  surface aeealng moisture '""f"' Lacab m mffkey, Norfolk ilead M alrtalria d!wn Rose, N "> ' 'rom Cherry Tree, e^i, „„ Ihrtr lumMl .^STar? rVch feed m and need lgj"^ \i!jfrJ&*!!£Z: SaWkatr. Inh.bit.,,1. iu Cl only their creator will wear tlirm. and rings reaching up to the mld OBB chose two which Illustrate dleknuckles of her lingers. how a wom an with courage —1* 8 WOMAN TO WOMAN: The Beret Moves Back more spicy By St'SAN DEACON summer and a heav; rr-vHE Rapque beret, worn hy one in the winter. next season of the large pliable berets women have been wearing These new, small berets are now worn straight, and slightly to the back of the head. In Paris, women are wearing them with ... eye-veil or with a diamante clip p'inned straight on the front. These noted: — berets are easy to wear with the A coll White B A regular applications of manure Cut off all dead flowers, and dead wood. and. when plcklns a !" r Uie Roses cut them with, a good ]ength stem, aa this keeps the tires pruned, all the pnmlng il. nhire, and then Strawberry KMmtt Gloucestershire m lull In Mlddleses. -Stater" a. the correct p. Surrey (ounly boasts a Hogs Mon mt „,,. Tjjj,-,,, „, s .ek Devonshire a Sheep) Waah 0 „„ f demand that the plan bit andl"a" Sw'iniahaad " ""•* Sl ""'" In tauicarhlre'tourlit) found a .When il cornea, to Welsh iiani-i —If 2^,7. %  •' l-"ne. a DaiK-y Field .nd 'he Y-ak.,loun.u .....|.ly >... dry monuia glvf, ui. wonderad about Besaea O' Th up. Tab reportei will leave il i rest, by picking oil B irn al|<| C horlton-Cum-Hardy. to the reader to try to pionouiu. ing the watering, sjhhy-De-La-Zouch i„ lancesfor aaampl.. Abaryitwytli, Uslershire always hit them Ukc chwr, Mynyddlshlywn, Llancal ejpttal-ln-The-Street, Lincolnshire ach. Llanerchymed, Llanuwchlly %  B and Ball or IJaraTalrpwllgwyrigwlulogery ir. ,...., .h„ • n ..*i.i. chwryivlrobwlllUntlstlingo|--.i;nch T AM constantly ked by women IK.W.STS Bali 'Sd a <** "^^\. „ I the difference between toilet .red with rows of braid. C ** OR S.mdwich. in Derbv.Kire n BolsVcs sir. Ihut's all one *ord over and a WhaUandwell while %  "> lown ^ ">o nrst railway Perfume is the strongest, most g-iONCEALED lihting gives an when the curtains are drawn |„ Gloucestershire there was a !" V "f AngeUey, Walos, oi. MILconcentrated scent Cologne is the Ks original effect to an ordinary Cupboards with glaw doors. i.| auahUll und „ chipping Sod''n Urn from Landon to Ilolvweakest living-room. It is simple to arrange flowers arranged in a recess book, ury head. Most fsdaA it Toilet water is not strong enough and not expensive if low power shelves and w,n .do*_ b y 1 11 1 looK Uighloii Buzzard and Luton ^*nrwir and le* It go at that look . The Urchin Cut shoes usually grubby. Some idea* ALL braid In different colours is necessary _jed to trim many of next During the wide meshed coarse geason's clothes l.oae—trees Here are some ideas t have j.11 buds, li d trashing over the beds attei manner that a cane field i %  hair styles Perfume points AM constantly asked by women the difference between toilet a tor. Cologne and perf of while silk ball braid vi. a plain black dress. Black braid trashed. edging the lapels of a dark green Trie beat dowering time for Jacket. A black plush beret cov[{oaav-trees is during Uis> rain.%  /red with rows of braid. reason. Soft light* to be used as a regular perfume. bulbs are used Fix light* under Use a light flower perfume in the the curtain pelmet to switch on %  attractive when softly lit London Express Service lloo took the prises for BedfordBailv .-.hire with Six Mile Bottom, fair." i/ guides cut it Lla.ll• So easy to apply • So soothing to skin • So kind to clothes llpt fo &m §hcvmpto 5 iimoK No oil'> ihiii.ixxi I.oi row th* um m.(Hl 1 AMOltN-b rod ||taSf lor tXltHilul. lutl'Otii lUHf loii(rH he cm Sit new sheen in your hair. Mil %  !. c.nes**We wjttne.,. Y.. fonigrit . il you uve lu.ire-Creme ShAn>poo lodi.-! Only Lu.lrc-C*e-"C Ui thi. nugKdll blend of ictrel tngrrd.er.U plus gentle laraoiir So fKh-lsthering in nsrde>t water, leavet ha fragrantly clean, ih-ning. arid so iriansgeable. Try iudre-Cremel Now on sale everywhere i" Ihe hirdiome blue and white jir. NOT A 50AI" NOT A HC-.WV UT A WONrXAfUl ISIW Of*rOVf"T' r-TOO WilH LANOLIN (OH M." LUSlSOUi GlAMOSeOUS H THE DESERT BOOT. Men all over the world are .£ it . supple suede uppers . pliable rt'pe rubber soles . ankle protection . Clarks craftsmanship. You'll like it. — opowf SEA VIEW GUEST I1AST1NOH, I.AMIAIH.S CXI•l.I.I.F.NT CUISINE ni.LV sunn i> MB I KATI-S: $SO0 per IFJT upwards (Ineinslvel Apply-airs. W. S. mWKI.[. £1u ran depend on il, for it is maHj arcoi'ling to G.E.C standard* of quality. Table, wall, ceiling and exhaust model* itt available in many diHcrent designs. THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS ££SENT1NC THI GENtMl IUCTMC CO. ttO. W EKCUND /^FRESHER BREATH ...not for minutes ID scientific tests, more than 80% of cases of simple bad breatli were overcome—not for minutes but for hours — with a single brushing of LISTERINE TOOTH PASTECOMPARE THIS WITH ANY OTHER DENTIFRICE! You're ok* 10 be Dear with your hresih %  weet sod your smile sparkling wheo you use New LISTFRINK TOOTH PASTB. Il C lislics teeth whiitr t .freshen* breath tier. Use delightful, rafr,,bi*g New Unmpfll TOOTH PASTE! igCLusivi ACTION AND airai.i I riAvouti New USTKRINB TOOTH PASTE tlcans your teeth to spafkling -"' beauty. Its bdsaaVg Lu,ter(aai action aoJ KStiul mioty H.>ur bathe youf whole mouth in loogarlaitingFRPSHNTsS.



PAGE 1

SUNDAY. AUGUST 27. ItSO SUNDAY IDVOCATC PAC;K KIVK To Improve British Empire Policemen 17 Tenants Mate For Pinz Estate H.llHAItOS IVMIU ME MAJOR R A. Sloute. Deput> THE itixugng Board at %  meet i %  Police retufl proved MM aetei% % %  tiMr tlt,o,| '*' |T ** Osssdlni a Se-ninr (HliiWi MBgne 1 Houtlng EeUi'.iCollcas. Ji^tuii-uri-Dtin.— Among ihe ne tenant* ,Hirl more, near Covntr\ l %  H lb tfkoaa h*xi-< This College was opi I %  'lapsed at Hothersal Tufnmi years ago by the Homo Secretary kacentU Mr Chuter Ede. with a view of I-ewis. amung othars. eai iU-creaslng the efficiency of the *"" %  a** a houaw ai the Pin* Police servteee of the British l*"ore. bui had to wait while the Commonwealth. Government aided victims of lav' vc;irs Hood Seventeen peopl have been %  elec te d for new houseTenant* at the Ptne Mm will br allowed to keep %  -tnck. sheep and floats, the Bnar I decided Any pans or encluaun erected by the tenants for thai purpose must bo approved by ih" Board The Board dlacusaed the building of a main traffic road at th>Ptne and it was decided Urecommend to the Govemmen' tu coaatruct a roaa eonnacung the Pino Cross Road with thr existing 18-foot road to the houking estate. Transportation will then be %  less difficult problem. Mr. John Beckle* M H V. B *ked what had boon done about the erection of a small pavilion fo thr Deacons Road Playing Fieln and was told by the Board's Secretary. Mr. T. O. Lashlev. Hint it was expected that the matter would be dealt with by the Legislature shortly. In connection with the case of a tenant at BclfMd who opened %  u'iai a ahop at the Aim—an offence jateii against the Board's Regulationsletter waa read from Mr of II. Proverbs Informing the Board that arrangements were being; inadt to purchase a spot to which remove the shop. Board allowed Davis, tha four weeks in which t First Division Cricket # Frasn page 4 the aacono bull rkah baiMuer. -..nudged Ibw Six arkketi used their feet well to Peirce • down for 9S and Wood was high toss** and the fifty mark ,.l out when the mtarv.il wa* *•> sow. >•ached when Kidney tahan The first over aftei lunch was Ml OOWO by Aile\ne from the Hall end and m that same mei i' aseM up en the UM in 117 miuuiev DoUfflM deiiuuse.1 for Druyton who was hurl behind the slumps The -eventh wicket fell at in when Wood drov< pit.-hod baffl from Will' bowled l -inc bark in liia next lakt tdc eighth Spartan wicket Morris made a tig htl. die not connect properly, and wa* OUfBl Jl mid-on b> Fieldloi U ; %  Wiiiiips (tiled the French He kaa In* parinei Gitleir caughi rlaroei at mul-on off Williams ai Williams bowled a slow liK break well no wm.'i OsOsH The score wan \2~. for W AUG. 27 NO. 134 l. H I. Ihi n in h South it by Williams and fowled rained bark hi gavan for tlonai C % %  uana ~ is seen i lying the gold medal lor vanning the Miecial tWO mile evenl M immediate left Farnuoi .'tonal . i. • Hi MAJOR R. A. STOCTE 1. was formerly a workers' camp and less than a miles from the oexu* tiful Warwickshire village R y ton on D um. more. At the College with Major Stoulo wero 190 men and four women—none below the rank of Th Sergeant. On completion of the tena course the students are generally settle thr matter promoted.—Major Stoute being recently made Deputy Commlsaloner of Barbados Police Force. Fifty-throe year old Brlgadiei Duncan Dunn, who was a soldier for 34 years, is Commn!i's pin) batwxn UiddlstM Bnd V.'fst "'"i> Indies m Lord H> bortaon dlsptJiycd sound baitint; with niststancc (r-wii John Do#l I I 11M I mpttN •ust under four hours he hit 12 fours in his 10^ CUiief Inspector Bert Halmer, who played a big part in the Livailpool Camao miutiur rase, took part in many dabatea with Colonial students. At Ryton, rural poli given the chances of learning first-hand work of men from Scotland Yard, and mar? of the subjects dealt with are beyond the normal rgflga of |>olice activities. The Colics* Ubrary has a collection of over 1,000 books. Di w/as %  itall from Val 'i wtestsR and BUI v li tUPhnl cuniidenlly \^•a^ i< i Ua *lriM hit seven roun m t %  > <.m J pi;.-. whK b even after he..\rath up play for an hour an I in. W' %  I'.ard in i ..' men plav Utgj at > Dal flekimn *< M m i %  ,:l %  .-' Bolton Wanderers J, Manchaatcr his cssrtui re I'nit. ,i 0 ,',Q A' IR3 he Derby County 4. Astnnvillc -' being wall Pulhama. Wolverhampton Wun. by tha wicket *iat*-*ra l. methorik Sharp i Sr i Fife 1. Celti. i Hearts :•. Panrtrk TblMla 0 itni.aars 'i, Morton l Sfint Mlrren 2. Falkirk 0. Third Lanark I, Raii'i Rovi i 0 First Dit'iMon:— Arsenal 1. Tottenham Hotapn niackpnnl 0 Charltm, Athh-n Every studa'nt has to give two mouth I. lIucManfteld To 2. Portslectures—one on his spaclil subject, the other is chosen for him. There are no fatipcues, roll call. examinations or house rule*. They all wanr uniform at morning sessions but are afterwards !: %  •* to wear civilian clothes. A Mean President lx appointed every week while on Thursdayt the "dress dinner" is an established social evenl. The Commandant takes %  kern intere*&t in practical demonstrations of polirt* work which the various groups in turn give in the College Theatre. These demonstrations are written, acted and Untiad I. Uvernoo) 4, Sunderlond 0 Middlesbrough 3. Chelsea 0 Newcastle United |, Everton Sheffield Wednesday 0, Bum Hie Mirhii. rinse The attendan pioduced by the Itudanta and ar presented In two acts. Recreation includes billiards archery and play-reading. West nroui.h Albii City 1 Third DtoMoa .Vorfhem:— 1 I I 7. Oldham Athletk I Bedford City 2. Halifax Town 0 Carlisle United 3. Trnnnuie Itover* 1. CheatST 3. Darlington 1 Crowe Alexandra o. Gaieshead Seiinthorn.' Uni'leimolMiddle*.. I) ComtrtW) (Captain i. j O. Dewes; J. Rol w .i. astrJeh; H Sharpj s || 1 Stoke Bf 0 11 ; J Stins, L IJIWS, J. J Warr; J Young; A. E Most tt'esf fndlf* J. Goddard (Capt >. A. Rae; H Mnrsnall: F Worrell; E Woekes; C Wah-ott; G Gomer; R. i hristUni; h Ji meyi r; aad A Vatentlcgt, i oc.Bsion-i :< p" took 2 Compton was. unuauallj DAiaM until he scored seven with one abikke off Mm shall :i I nnd. four ovecthr PWV were added Guddaid decline I the MX baO, .1 b kca \ kwtlng on i• i Nur-e Kiwi, and hlmaelf n %  ovai .ii the oitu i Una WH. unable to turn the hut a' HA OotHard BWB) and baarlad i eptna t i %  %  land with i much the Miiiic i>) ieided 84 run* •aat off-eli Iv* all <;<~ i i iheWs Oeddart %  ka a\M Juhuaon used it igaswW i barti II who had afllj |uat plar liall II Igej whan ml. 1 Ktiin at Ten I Kiiir ui, the reaun bowled two b*iu to coaopleta hi .it lonw i.''.,, i n ha k< %  Oon %  q id cutting the next Iwll for his Iwi i 101 Bsadt WH of I"H i. l| raj threa quat i" ti Fmplre Ratliiig Trnpirg started on their first t1 about 4 40 p m. Kobn*on ^nd Ikiuine opened to the • \slin fc of 1'hlllips and Smith TAOJ were oft to a bad start It sing Bourne for nought off the %  tkling of Phillips with only 3 i' on thr tins Thillips l-wled an in-s'nger ".ing outside the leg %  toino itiatng Bourne to hoek The ball %  i k Uaa upper M'.ge of the bai %  few up giving Walrott at slip .. dolly calch. Williams and Robinson met th poors tw to 24 ashen bOWtlof ehange WM .'. ii. wan brouglit on from Phillips' end while Phillips i> .hanged around to the Hank Hall -ml Thi se...nd Irlokol Bsll lo PhilI when Robinson poslu-i a rising ball on the leg stump into trie hands of bowen at short leg Kobinaon scored 19 while Willi. nis was II nut out N" I Hi wan Cave, who with WUliaOM, nent up the .' in S riMiiula.s Skipper Walcolt bnwlen himself, I.. F Harm and kflajugjM baek Phillip* but UMn ebssMM %  nil not worry the two Og to j U OW At eh.se of play. Empire hai. B foi I arlekoti Wflllafni I m i .'*• and Cave n | out 'leered a bull on the leg HSM mi I brace from Peirce. Denis Atkinson was now bowling to a good length and took h Hionn arackst wngO making tintame tlroke a* his team mate Birketl was .. mi leg kaforo ftn atpyini i %  the owes Howei ei Bvelj n dk %  ng and Pinna aooo hsu i i"i r ii [hi bj Denai Aikinw* %  ..( %  KI %  • • i.d Denik Alkiii.on hi his llltl i til of ihe ninth over properl> teat and bowled Kidne> bOWWd Camacno Hritil. l .' na in'en DtOfUal CSptl I nex* tall King folI ved Camacho when he w aghi !.. St Mill iff T Peirce ,.nd II Inniss then 'ried %  in, down to a partnershii \ IX-liU Alkmsoii rontmurrt t. •i down them both Normal arshall wa* again brought On t*. IIOIN m-nls Atkinson I'eu.v w g t hithird wicket whet ut'C I in its in attempting to lift m mii.e,i and nes iiaswtt} imped by Shipper Sktimer .rilaii weul in and wa* off the ark with a brace and st the end that over lunch %p* taken (tcr lunch Ihe century was -ai-haif in 120 minutes Hoatl did it bat so well to Atkinson as he d iHsfOTg lunch and was out hen he edgod to slip The HoadH ;itership had yielded 1" i 'n shall came In with Man and the Pickwick innings n Marshall WSJ howled DN | H Atkinson Pukwiek had Bred l' wWh % %  Jordan not out Marshall ><">> BAI Atkinson anod I I Wanderers ami in ingfl I I l pvai Ml i shall had a ff in IhS IIID Ibikelt tutih ihe hall with Km • Mhl in hll flrSl 11 i eel Atkinson twice sdlh hi i %  %  When the score reached 43 the si Wanderen wicket fell when i hall • in > ini'h'leU IMMII'II %  I ) Jordan G PTOwent in .MI.I was l'.it; aoundh until he ove an eon •um tn H Marsh di to end hn k ai Ihe 'Vi.k.i lie icored an .1 v M At the end Ol l'i. •ib Atkinson %  he followed iftei v, ii .... not out with hi thai r*rh end thai h>i 44 in 1 uni loactiveli to then credll 1 (1 e>i >Me Wmiderei' apt •S n* fm •• wtrkrti in Plea The Topic of Last Week 1 %  ." %  * '— •' ••• Id tir • tllffnenl fni*1 Hlln< ..nia M rlrt 1 h.nl .1.1. 1.. •••• SSf%  .. .1 nunfv ~> na* IU paMirt, -U • % %  1i1n.tr Dai i-1 "i iiuiriami p*1 1 ,. 1 .,.i..,. Hast HN d.ii-..it .a 1. l" -11." Im MIx... aauH 1<-lM > And .'"i Bath "I I"" 1 H I Oi' .hi.Hr blMl I... ii.. ,na film ttis wsrs MrRif ankln lad aged '" JulUkNRI hud hm cntt to end a *> llnall. CSU 11 ketheapei %  oin-nT.is ilas before Ui and Q V, W.^KI lo ihe bOwUtUJ .'AfiK KOWIRTKON I. Manslleld Town 1, Nv Brighton 1. United O Rotherliam S. Wroxhom 0. Shrcwsburv Town I, lincoln City 2. York City 1. Bradford 3. Second DiHtinn. Birmingham City I, Grimsbv Town 1. Blackburn Rovers 1, Leyton Town 0. Brentford 1. Leeds United 2 p . ., Cardiff City 2. Nottingham Fast chukkas were played b> County 0. meiiiltera of the Barbados poio Cliestertield 1. Burnsley 2. Club at the Oarrlaon yesterday Coventr>Cit\ I, Preston North when Hurricanes won one over End 0. Cyclones by 2 goals to one. The Leicester Citv 0, Queen's Park other two chukkas were played to Hangers 2 a draw after a "no quarter" Manchester City 5, Bury I strugglHurricanes Win At Polo Tin .r.jrt MlUJIeaa t praoablj because 0 tin ate h '' it the Oval Isncanshue. the crowd for the i. at appi iranea In Londoi tourists, numbered only aboi 1 i.i.oii 0 hen Dewoi and c opened the Middlniior inn ng 1 he waathet wus cloudy with a s'.iff breeze blowing, and DOWI and Robertson felt the 1 wa] 1 an-fully against accurate earlhowling by Johnson and Gome/. The hitler fnund Robertson's pao %  t successive balls l>ui th< Middlesex man replied with two olendid fours, a cover drive and 1 hook. Johnson lifted the ball awkwardly nnd appealed ogains; belli botsmen AC.! an lion. With the total at 33. Goddai Brat liange V I %  %  .".' 47 Dwwes mishit nt! Valentl tralghl i on where BtoUi i i catch. Valenlr I the wicket, fi ruanJag out pu>ed the i The ..peniiiK uhli In made ti'S in H4 minuteRobertson tooh four boundarle%  iff Mnrsh'ill after Dewes had let*. and his 50 -imc in 10R m.u in Sharp and Brown H i next pai. owing oc asional aggressive okga .igain^t Gi lohn i i | VahmUna I thet until stuni| were drawn Ml Ulesex 22H runs lor ft"' rkgfg K'ihiwm K are ihe acorm HIKIII.I *-ll l-MMi ... V l> f;r I -kt. n I 13 1 l I. Shemell This wss the fourth bj a series of practice games In which team have assumed names Instead of It being Just a case ot Red versus Blue. Mark Edghill shot the twu mail for Hurricanes and Colonel Michelm scored the one lor Cyclone* Nearing completion ia the pavilion which the Government has given the Club permlaslon U erect on the Savannah. Southampti United o Scottish League Cup Division B: Arbrouth I, Albion Rovers 0 V Dunfermere Athletic ft. Kllmar:.ock 4. Forfiir Athletic 3. Alloy AthletiiI Hamilton Academicals ]. Queen Ol The Soulh I. Saint .lohnstone 2. Cowdenbeath 2. Stenhouse Muir 3. Dundee CniUd 2. asinok mt tne ball nrmiy. <. could n<>* penetrate the Held, am al 82 he in ved into ., wll from Johnson and fell 1 b w I IU were added bvfo. lunch After Lunch Johnson and Murshall lerseweo after lunch and kepi the batsmen quiet. Sport* Club Meets Tomorrow An F.xtraordli i.t"'letint %  M Adv ib will be lishl -l the I'mitti DaPaituieni tat Monday. August 28 at 4 30 p m L-gdudOd in the agenda for ihe -vaiting II their proposed tour to Trinidad In 1*51 >M>. Ill ll \ I'll KHKK I'rkw.rh tit uu %  ,.. (far t ki. Ill %  erftei wfckai Pickwick .. ii bowlod out (or 114 runs "hen the} met Wandeieis i urn Maps.wa> due mainly to the f l i %  Atkinson five %  i the wickets for %  > ions 111 i bnwlini 18 overs I m then nisi Innlngi Kavc "et li Mj with 174 rultl fnt |h iekat with Iric M i...I um an.i tnbrothet i" HIII not out Pick vi. k winning the to i u.. i n iltll I 3. U Wm %  .I Norm in Marshall and Eric Al '-.nson A M Taylor took (he first bill of the dav form Marshall iMh-t.K beaten b> the i il which 'MiitiB aerj) to tta* lips In Ihe third ball Taylor i I IIIKIC nd Wmid played t the lema'nder of the over Tavloi in taking strike from Bru /tkin-on tn his first over was not ietUnd ."|0 lo aid „•• all •'* i Thia larrltiH ng the N..OI and Naktong rtvsts till %  %  wi I %  % %  i movt nt ..t 'ioopa ami equip i not II. ii.iitiont.il and i ..ill ; ha Nam altold,i tall I load \MII. ...:.-.(.. %  (. %  : % %  %  ,t-, ...... ,. ',' %  . re would i* '• attri latlora reeervea ui t" hold 'in . bap while tin big otri %  I" in d ; Ihe ii'irth. Though uttie Informal < .. ,i ati:. at allabfc gboul thr %  ommuniu omleughi on la • i oast returning \ u n w iied "considerable pern .. Noith Korean! 11 ported Communist troopt id eipitpinnt tiavelhng HUth Superfi its langini: f.o north to* ij ptsatered •> 'mis >>i bombs on he Important rail lunctlon of KIIiu i^ ooie.s iimtii o| Bongtln on HI East Coesl %  >rii' tii> 'isi parlei Invader: loosed thousand poiiudiin a pontoon bridge west of mil anil ilainagi d *liothei neai 'inimunit-held tormei Si.ulh nrean lerntorv Fifth All r*etOf axitlng Mai plane, thrust 300 iles Into Nnrlh Korean territory. aiding half a 00000 Co*nnuinist Ids In North ami Smith Korea Thev met no "live" Coirjmunut lanea onli pearrlousti h..t on aft i I dun n|at Ol-! mm T ... II,,, %  ... L.J.%  i. a %  !• 1 OiisMi aM -, i Ss W.I W, II,. li. II..I.,,I ..IS •> R I..I. *-< i-T, peashiM .11 '|ii la d. Wl • %  %  ,11 II'" . .K ,1,11 I-.OI, III • ... .n, •• %  BJMM ,ponoted by J & R BAKERIES maker* ol ENRICHED BREAD and ihblenden ol J S R RUM VI I w T WtNIN O TIIVBAfl CITTINI WF.LU1NC UTtUT I'MAKOINL Mm un UrAlli GORDON BCLDHi UAI'IIADOS -;ARAIK. I I3f, Kuahuck S' UUil 36". I | Mlfci'nl Arrivals in Books INCLUDE PLAYFAIR CRICKET ANNUAL AND CRICKETERS FROM THE WEST INDIES ON SALE AT ADVOCATE STATIONERY, JOHNSON'S STATIONERY, ROBERTS & CO.. COLES STATIONERY, BOWEN & SONS and TODDS STATIONERY STORE — Enquire Kmrly — BARBADOS TIRF CLUB linKIAL flASSinfATON AUTUMN MUliNd 1150 THE SINOFR DEAI.F.RH IN NOTTINOHAh. pioridfd trsiuaort f^' a* WI C ket'rhy putting at their de-po-al B M I.8O0 Slnysi Oam Lefl u> Rieat J M Kldnny, Msnaser. John 8. WooUy taiager OSSlai in NotUanhsmi. John Ooddsrd iCapt i. Sir Palham Warner. H Jeaaseu. P. Jones, . Bawilhln. L. Purr*. A. las. C I. Wtlussu, K Tr.-tru a. ataishsll. E WSSftes, Ctm.Uanl. A TalasUns *u* T. WerreH Tha bachgrLi" %  %  mortal to sun of tha Servicwho fell attttei IS War anO the 1030—45 World Wn A.l. D.I. Ft tCont'dl .con Hriitit Bow ItelU Herseverauce %  e Streak Pharos II %  ke' Drum Fireiniil River Mist i/abrthai. Welllnglon Sin bad %  un Site W-tei. i. Sir R'mard 'orma Gift Siren M Soprano A.1. F.s.iniinei Straichl Aim tomlc II Sunhaam H (i.tinhlcr hi. Sun Fire %  pprr Wine Ah Baba The Eagle Kendal Fort Torn n do B.I. Lady Be lie Typhoon .fusion Mary Ann Usher %  ly rink Oatcakr Vanguard : *iidinrk Waterhell S I'.ar llullet nut '.'.iinte Comet ci. Sim Queen Dulcibella Bst-am Sunton" Monsoon B.Z. Victors 1djndra ri. Vixen I iianla Bsat Wmhes Bow mansion G.Z. inDS Adam> rrfeset Set Joint Command Blue Diamond Lacy Bone 1 Brahmin's Choice Rlvor Sprite Poeterripi Cnlndll Waf Lord Tango Diana Flying Ann C.I. P.f. Front Hopper Gallant "lawk Beaattafi Apollo i ..dinif Article April Flower* JoanStar i I'Stc Bonnie Lass Lucky Shci Rw iss Roll Brown Girl May time Bullsayr Clement um OleesW C.t. Collelon Silk Plant A1 nitty Consteni-iion Sun Jewel Ante Diem Cross Bow Fair Contest Cross Road* Fair Sally Uune. naMBBEO Epicure Kldstean Facetious Kitchen Front Plrst Flight Link Stream Flame Flower Miss Panic Foxglove htusk lli-Lo Clsasinera: — St M


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PACE TEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, AUGUST J7. l*M William Blake-PoeL Painler Th. i.I And Mystic Hi -ail. rs Sj ** lltfttriimlinn -nd corners of Paradise; models of ihe exquisite pilch if intense i*>ctr> I thougM .f their h K ht jnd By IRIS COXLAY [him in IW. .V.it.jm lll*k>Mas a li-lonaij limn ihr jjr if i..ur Port. p.i only coldly .. ly dearnbe tnem There i> ,i, .11 Al th* time 'he lecture .vs. mystic and dreamy ! i big delivered. ih* bland waa If this trerr England I would say: HELLFIRE CORNER IS SAVED From IIOMI < IIAM : Toegta such Jerusalem", the gn .'. %  .-:. %  >!..: t^< %  tiis prophetic poairu if 1 COUld BIHt tli.-. Criminals l could not dare to take vensjean.v. II 'r-ios> are so constnu poet not mime an unfortunate mii'nke. One day a wtldicr came mm hU garden and was intuiting when Blake asked him why he was i t* flew about and itftei• %  •:<: "' '• %  it .... % %  :, n >>:,. %  | soldier was ev. ntually farnbly r. moved, but afterwards he broucht auiy oapuseo. on grain of M tYS 8S£ KaltS. GrtlUm Gibbons onw]e font In w .y of vengeance. I punish Iht trial th. o^ reiurne : r T. S^sSi.^ Jam Sk** P" n ^'d" •<* found lodemg, ,n BouB -f hKnfancy little ts known When he was twenty-live, M ton street He can be *hmpeca married Catherine Boucher %  note in the blanket black-eyed aad illiterate daugh PI tT or wnlcii BUKe himnf a market dUrdeutr at Batte 'O-ars Liter. They lived in Groan Strev i ..rminto the world like a Leicester Field*, in London ana s r .i.i U-: in d crowd" he HI' I :>><• corner of Hro.id And bullded up by the Divine London fund that ihe tinner ..hall alw.iv::.i;. wIDJauri ..cape, ..-born ui a hosier. Janies And he who takes vengeance i 1 : galas .tornieo. gaudy da> light of thit world The) hould start to mah" their house-, ine place set on nre and itt Ihre* a,,like all th-.t wonderful arti*l't '^me against s ttormTbut^could hunurvd inmates released. Weeaa wmKn the drawing aside Ihe fleshly "nd n^ lefliiiuinformiition one t uidmiiininatv veiujeaiire folcurtain, and Uie glimpse ol ;hai *•> or the other tuweo, ana Blake remeniberea it rest which remaineth to the peopi Mvniv. making it the corner stoniof God .' Ins philosophy ul l ur given-si, Periods of happiness and undei ~l. ~ """ *** ••*." simple and %  nd *-r which emerges with such standing alternated In Blake* life ** !" ** '"eons of ign-limg Ihe le greatest There wos the peaceful Interlude %  'I''" !" 1 ' storms, and this could The -•f Uii, tily vay io Is to ha; end tin niplt w\ %  111 covered by from •Wif. or al rao.1. my O no a Piruh. ilratcmrally kMttd rn,. cost would !• ,,-r, r,-mo„nblr TJKurewnt vfcm of warnin,. !" n2f f" c r al P !" l connol hB EX??, €U,e "* %  WIUl U U>I ntcnt.or... ,„ „.„> houM wM nol be reached by any „! ihe 'Methods laid Uowu the public iculd lel conll•I reeln e, inion atreel He wa, acnumed. bin ,i,„ i h ., . . t 77' co ""r. ,„.. Ih. ..ram of Irud (or h,|hnu. ElmU UhSfffS w,n oabicr on would weieh on mt men L,,.,T • ?. *"! br '"" '"" l ..I said. Lp a print shop which eventually nrum h^avas (our he knew that failed because Blake's younger %  hao Ten -he Eternal face to brother, who managed It for hi it his hoary visas* died Marriage meant everythi:ur -,-.;. .• window pane and the to Make His whole philosophy • bum into tears HU fcrerUlllng that of D. H. Lawrence ,vorldl>-wiM-. saw value centred around the idei Ue, | U .mi.T H V n vJr* (,C1 "1 "* brt T* n man anrt 'Ught andw^uld'att h'.m.'^Draw When little a*t-yearwoman Both preached a doctrine me Motes', or Draw m Jullu, to describe the W ., ua l regeneration, but Ulake Caesar'. Than, ttrammJThta m Vnerl^,i wel'TT^ *•"' W fur her H ttT in -" ^ " see what Blake sa". rie T .,nl f ansjeta rence. and by setting his doctrine lie would hear the poet gav '-There .* (>e, P un k ie 1 ii skle the conviction that Body he is," and afterwards watch him >'d and Soul are a living unity ha '"raw with alacrily, looking friends begun at this years, it is said, he never went of the bouse. Gradually his work brought htm more and more admirers. Samuel Palmer, Fuseli and John Varle. those of his closest friends who managed io ponetrst.his seclusion. Varley would be al 1 P*-' r 7 lowed to sit by him f,i storm. anic on the slrenirth i ^'Hl serve fhc purpoee. lUjlow," SI PrUr. E SMYTM1KS U U k h My Sell that 1 do not absoroed in lac. nol Action:. Whatbehold th. outward C.e.uon and £ T," a l" a "7" ?"""' W "lhl Uiat to m. II U hindnuice ^ S ? ?JZ"^"* C lh '" <• "'' %  < n ked i play at Kensington merely be Soc#*r To The Ctftter, Th.AasMasfi SIR -n I hat m.-e crowds, and Is i ternatloniil game than CrldnVt' t'o you nut see a round romewhat like a Guinea? no. I tec an Innumerabl. 0| the Heavenly host crying, Jloly I'oly. Holy uj the Lord God Almighly 1 I quesUon not combine awlngs. and the "Songs of in •ocence", povnu inscrioi-u wiu viicate and poetic margin.* dr-corations. were a joint proouc lion of himself and nis wife—sm m linting a few of the (nation Io the state thing Is done", Blake used to remark. learning. Among his last drawings wen the "Divina Commedia" lllustrawriluigi. with tions, and perhaps hit most sueousIv l)n)V ,de}d v ">ch ^,1, „;;.,, t lnf /,, Public apuealed to t. rectlon of standnous whispers that this was the Manchuria. Unlike Montgomery, place where ihe Americans would ha chain smoke* cause 1ihe^rp^vldTp'vil^ ! '"'" """"tL acwrniriodaUoii. hut were 8*"*rMarines were ordered t upporl aha <'oiiK>real Vegetative *> c ^ n un M rew or ln n*(ravings more than 1 would Question a H!S "*. ln *J ni P r "; on — na Window concerning a Sight. I look thro' it and not with It." anting and engraving the copper lima weni on there er wful. apart from ... adnrned his own poetry, were 'ihe designs for Stair's Grave. The theme of these was death; and who more qualified to interpret such heights and depths? His last poetic work was "Jerusalem". This was summed up and brought together the themes of hu earlier works and gave a unity to "The Book of Thel". "The Marn— age of Heaven and Hell", "The verse and..at fourteen was ap."^T, 0 mankind, Willi.nu Songs of Innocence and Experirrennced to an engraver. The Catherine's marriage sue ence", Tha First Book of Uri*en" engraver was an undersiandinit ,vcaud *""* passing from a slcrilv 'The Song of Lot". "The Book :,! ** rat Ml -ni! a,lpr thai a %  an. and realised that he had a nd •'•'"•nlal opposlion, in lime Of Ahanla" and "Milton". And In wp 1VI '"' f^undly bawttfli tl-i-ouari l upil Who might nol flt easily Into ll Mcam the truly creative tha end his philosophy was dis" ol **""* haefliUmita Io playing an apprentices' school, but w ho|i rel "" nn,, 1 ^' that every marriage "Mad '"to these few phrases. "I ,m heavy grouitd, and with a could teach himself more than r.e* s,unjld ** %  :i w a rare and %  * nothing. I am qplie happy. I "envy wet boll, v.ould leam in apy classes. Ha ,p,ri,liaI achievement for Blake, hould grieve Io possess earthly rimthaii ...n.nsa ... therefore invited Blake to so ouol 8lflc hl P'n the greatest '<". for everything that a man ... v *S^. %  —. i. — *a. urlhai Ih f l..-. .. .i i % %  i This was ihe kind of small boy difflcuIllc between ahem. who al Ihe ajte of twelve, wrote u '* li *. wor > by paUenl Why then mUB*. U,nV debarred fr mi plgyblg u./ibill at %  namely, when the rains ;ir. falling and lh grouno* K in a soft ffOBdltlon? Those who r-;i ll Uie tournsment held here In li. pick that pocket over the Naktong. Succeed or burst were their ciders. They succeeded. They cut and chopped thai oeidgeliejd so savagely that only a handful of Reds were left io t'on. Ihnp L f^in w 1ha l,es al • 'oad nd rail Juneli,!e wl their flanka defended. I I'T.'III*. Ill *>! %  • line*--<>e.l .. .< of Uri7.cn ; 1 " '" f 1 *' '>rnament i the |Mist to content -einselv The last portion IOW been given |.i L meanwhilf ^I'ni^of^n^^u^^^un BSt^T^S^ "' ^S^ fmsSS SSTiKEE K£HH:^TS mvassvgi INS ralpsble shapes from fc & W over. Blake "" %  unless patience with a t\ry, against my will. ... I may praise turned seriously to Ihe engraver's ***tle9s. creative imagination. He it since I dare not pretend to be art Me worked hard at his draw"•vtr paused between one task olher than the secretary, the in* too even exhibiting at Ihe first i,ld another "I don't understand authors are In Eterni^". show held by London's Royal wnat you mean by the want of Whenever s. spoke of his own Academy of Arts. But the two ex* holiday." he said, and he dedeath, he would say that he could ried forward on this cerienres which made the greatest clared that writing and design not think of it "as more than going 1 should therefore like lo advise DM i his life ol thnt time, were relaxation, after engraving out of one room into another", oi 'hrt *ls be nol dissipated on ii'irriaae and his involfind woodcutting. uI BOing "into that country which Inuis us in the past, on I tenant unl nartielpanon In the OorTb* best known among the al1 "*>' life long I have desired to not taking a long view, but that don Him, nf 1780. which originwoodcuts nre those he made for plore When the day came on steps be taken to incorporate tr d in the strong religion of those Thornton's text of Vergil. Samuel A"*"* 1 'h. 1827, he died joyousAisoeiatinn, and a diligent tear, h Palmer hat a lovely description of lv ently and imperceptibly for a suitable ground be made and ,".' *-"< SOCCER ,A N which the II linos They have begun lo kill the The threat lo Taegu became so enemy in large numbers. They real that on the night I arrived have shredded his supply lines. there, the inhabitants were orderNight and day they harass him ed to evacuate. f.om th* air. I saw them pouring down the The best military Judges here roads south with their shabby sty Ihe tide has turned. Soon. j "-.cations on their backs— they believe, It may begin flo< another pitiful contribution to ing towards the 38th Parallel. %  lojpsj column of refugees thnt believe them. — L.E.8. dav. The artist happened to be walkthenTin one of his" letters. "They ii* near Leicester Fields when he are visions of little dells and nooks FERGUSSON RADIOS Svi> flifin at . IHE CENTRAL EMPORIUM CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietor. 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SI 9mm$ $ Por Smart Healthy Hair X Play safe! D ry k rcem your hair. Dandruff n TOUT col'ir, loose hair on your cxiral)—these arc danger signals thu: point the need for Brylcreem's double benefit: |1| Osy-MNtg imartneu. (1) Lailmg hair health. I*L Massage with Brylcreem stimulates ihe scalp, /('~ -, encourages nstursl hair growth, wards off Dandruff. Its pure %  emulsified oils put life into Dry ^^ Hair and impart a splendid [ gloss. Don't tskc any chances, L {Jtlj Brylcreem your hair — most V** "* men dot ,i A CHEERFUL mind so often goes with healthy body. To maintain good health, don't forget essential 'MOST Cleanlimtt. Andrew* not only provides a sparkling, refreshing drink — it helps to keep you clean inside as well. It functions by cleaning the mouth, settling the stomach snd toning up the liver. Finally, Andrews gently clears the bowels. Take this "fizzy" drink whenever you need refreshing. One icaspoonful ii. a glass of water is all you need ANDREWS UVERSALT THI IDEAL FORM OF LAXATIVE ~ —:_--^-'j-iJiM m immammmWMMmmmmmi



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Saatlay Amtusi 27. IS...O ^untoy. tY 6> r MIX in Year .13 REDS GAIN GROUND IN DRIVE SOUTH Chinese To Join Reds? WASHINGTON Aug. 28. I American military officials com! menting en report* that two Chines.armiaa were .onceni tiatlng near t h c Manchuria. Korean border, *ui,i hcr they doubled if these troops would meve south lo join North Korean 1 force*. Although tlieatr movement* | were held to po*e new Ui reals \o I the United Nation* force* in | Koieu. nrw thought that thev Indicated Communist China'* early i er-try. Into the Tar-East war. ReI ports about the Chine*armlee were announced here yesterday Asked about other reports that I2u heavy Russian tanks had been moved Into North Korea from a Manchurlan port curing the last two week* cf July, officials said that the presence e.f Russian tank* in North Korea had been known let some days. ilut they emphasised that nono of the tanks believed to be Joseph UtBlin'a three ;y.* :,acl teen abla lo get Into a*-;or. mtinuo.i. AmI M, Jri bora* uj „i aJiros %  Ad Ln.t.. prsraepted n e i .. i o ith %  Otbei • ffl i I in led it wait possible that the Chinc-re I'unimunlst armie* wb eh Ihej eailmeted •I between IC'U to Blul 200.000 men had teen moved to the Korean border as a precautionary income :i, eat* the I' ltd Nations forces derided to drive past the 38th parallel towards Manchuria This pjssi^ilitv they said was hacked uo by reports that Chlnesoi Cnmrruinlsts had built formidable dafaaoai near thborder. Somel army source* *i.ul ihey believed the* constant l.aUert.ig being liven to North Korean communication* a*, a whole was deterring Chinese Communist armies from movlnm down Into the attack on United Nations troops. —Re liter. SERKTMC KIIA.HA AXIl F,%tlll,t 2,300 ViUagee Swamped In India LUCKNOW. Aug 25 More than 2,300 villages in the United Provinces have been swamped by the flood water* of eight rivers running through the state, writes a correspondent who accompanied Pandit Gobind Ballabh Pant, Premier of the United lrovinces on a tour of the area. Oamagc to property including crops was estimated at 50,000.000 rupees No deaths have been reported so far. but about 800,000 people have been affected by the flood*. The rivers in spate Include the Ganges, Ghagra. Gandak. Suryu, Hapti, Rohinl and Sarrayani. Similar reports of flooding oi villages in West Bengal and the Buhar State were received today It Is estimated that 80 per cen of the standing Jute crop* havi been totally destroyed. Buhar state four rivers were In spate, inundating hundreds of small villages on their bank*. —Heater. lOMMI'NIftTS RedsKill43 In Raids On 11 Towns MANILA, PHILIPPINES. Aug. 28. Communist guerilla* killed 43 people during raid* on II towns near here last night. It was < fflcially announced to-day. Government Forces wera pursuing the raiders—believed to rumber 8.000— who had taken captives back with them into the hill*. The raiders were huks", a group who have been In armed opposition to the authorities tinea early In 1948. The main target, report* said, was Tarrac, the home town of ; Senor Carlo* Romulo. permanent! Philippines delegate to the United' Nations. Two Army nurses and 20 hosptfll patient* in the town were baynncttcd and disemboweled. Forty-eight prisoners, relcase i from the town gaol, Joined the guerillas and left with them for the hills Reports from the city of Nagn. 150 miles to the south, said a Communist amphibious force had occupied a nearby coo;t:d town At a nearby camp two Army ( majors were reported shot and all the buildings burned down Other towns reported raided were Da*ol on the wet coa*t of Ararat in the Pempane province where barracks, post office and hospitals were ransacked, Santc Domingo in the Neuva Ecija province and Ilagan In the Isabel province —Reuler. •in 1.1 ri'' serrinr Kh.m. tad m. ii I.UCI, .alt rren ihr rum n.in i.. ,i tn..i i,r !" .i.l ihn Afrle. •., -,.„ili.,:,,„i.„, „„l ,. „, e.lk A B <> \ (' oWr rirrlr. thrlt tuhv .1 u In hir travel cl. II I I* Nail i. Serelac'i sister. Ruth. N In :... ,t .,.,1 .,,,( KloVM. II.Hi: II. I Ml" HOSPITAL SHIP SINKS More Factories DURING TRIAL CRUISE To Make Arms 19 KILLED: 65 MISSING LONDON. Aug. 26. North Atlantic Treat, l>eputics l<-dBv announced plan* to use adiitluu.il factory capacity to speed ai production, a priority considerJ'il^.J-.? 5 ^^? ved !" '^ sm i ir Qm ,hc American Huspi ^' imiat J. # li,\he V AtVanfe ana in'a communique Issued to-day on their past week'.' work the Deptfties announced that a report from the Military Production und Suppi. Board "f UN North Atlantic i indicated a "substantial additional rapacity which can be put t> uvr in the immediate. fidu < %  ngemenU to utilise such a cap* itj for %  nelaialliig co-ordinn> i production of hi h priorit) I'.cnu .ire being made Da % %  ibo %  ... under tondai various financial problem* !i\ ulved in tin an argad de. in*: the Initiation .. program n %  i SAN FRANCISCO, Au 26. Nineteen people were killed and little hope VU h.-Ui day for 65 believed missing hum tinAin.-i n\i;i li:,pi tal Ship Benevolence which sank last nichl aftflf a eolllsii !, during a trial cruise before leaving for Korea. Captain Robert Voortmeyer, Marine Sup'i intendeni of the San Francisco Embarkation Office, said he did not think any of the missing people would he found alive. The ebb tide would hawe swept them out to sea h > added. The Benevolence with over 500 pfJOpl afa m v<'liision with the H162-ton freighter Mary l.urkcnback In fos four miles off the Golden Gate on her HIM rui .,: being laid up since the war Only one 11fr> boat 0OMM launched but a number of life • %  :r throw n over the side According to %  rurvj ofAl m *" I peoplr wen bell< ve i o save-l Patel, Prosidi nl Of Moslem Association THE Barbado* Mosl.-t. AsMK-iation ceJaLratad it* third annivei-siiry raeantly. Among the celebration activities was the election of new officers for the ensuing year. Elected President was Mr Suleman I. Patel Vice-Piesident Is Mr A I Patel Mr S A Patel was elected Secretary and serving with him as Joint Secretary is Mr. M Bahkaria Treasurer is Mr. S. A. Sacha. A new General Convniltee of the Asaociaiion WM also nppolried report fi<> Nationwide Strike In Finland UCLBINKI. Aug 26 r inland'* social democrat-led node Unions Pederation toniglii oaned ti>. Agtoiiari Governfnant und CHIIC.I H ruUaatuvtda atrilia ( tn uufcti her new 0nft.Dm.OM1 r,.„T AgM*n.ent "nh rliiasln. 'Flip striken for wages Increase* Of up to HO |>er cent will start on hen nlH.ul 5.000 metal) %  rfcai an t.i put ilnwn gools They will be joined later In the veek by 60.000 mor,. mes> and I i omen ui OOMI ti The I'.'.r i. fused i In Aala) the itrikaa for tn rek.s for %  ew lyaantialluiii I'fho Keykmie assured Parli^ i em yestenlay he w..ul.| maintain ii if. in. -nl .u.i 1 Won a narrow vote nf eonfide II, his policy Under he New Trade Agr.. ineiil Kn.liind undertakes to aeU urrent c ,;"ia„;:. ...... -sss i^snr^s !^ l ^j h ^"""' • %  ""' -'.--is 1 ;;> r .;; :;;-;:::',. w r; open it .in aura Th Mai LueJteoba* k • with a smashed iow but no caauaJUaa among her 49 crew picked up seme of Uie turvlvors The "Ben' voience" siiih>"i roatardaj rar .^ cruise <>fi the coaat orrUi 15 nuras* and 3:i other roedkol penonaal including doctors. 200 Amartaan [cpyai army men and an unknown number of "unofficial guests" wh" v.ent fur a cruise -Renter traajag ... ..., I '' nni ve the world level North! Atlantic Council I 1 lo tha Exports to lUissia wituld have to Council Of Deputies." ( be subsidised, tliev added. S.irelary Ap|>oiuleri — Keuter. %  rormad quarte in-tr laderstood thai th. Working! *-, ..... lomnitu-e ro-ordinaUng the de< HI III 11II II I ~ I (. |li[|;i renea plan propoaali 1 1 MemK-i To Be Hepresented strikers W ant iloly Year Bonus HOME. Aug 20. Cias and electricity workers in Home today intensified their strike for a Holy Year living bonus, Ga* workers announced they would strike for six hours, one hour more than yesterday, during the busiest part of the day. Electricity workers extended their strike to all distribution centre* in the city.—Keuter. S/M/jrs DOING WELL PRETORIA, South Afirfca Aug. 28. Field Marshal Jan Christian Smuts wa* allowed lo get up for a while on Friday. Hi* doctors said the 80 year old former PrUna Minister was making good progress toward recovery from an attack of influenza he suffered this week just as he was getting case of pneumonia. —Can. Preaa. Four Drowned In Chile Floods SANTIAGO, Chile. Aug 20. Widespread floods tonight covet ed a 300mile expanse of South cut Chile U'tween the town* of Osomo and Chillaa, after two weeks of torrential rain Four farmen were drowned in the Rahue River running through Osorno. The damage was estimated to be heavy Chilian is about 220 miles south of Santiago urn! Osoino nciih anothei 300 miles farther south —Can. Pre**. No Brazilian Troops For Korea BRAZIL. Aug 26 A War Ministry spokesman stated today that help to United Nations forces in Korea would rein,mi limited to "ecot.0". operation". He denied thai Brazil had Intended in send troops to Korea —Reuler. And if BOU K**J 1 u*< "T really ang'f. iwi % %  > 1. mt ffnailan crab on umr R* china l In U. \. Asneiiihly LONDON, Am: 26. F IIIKU Minister Chotl Kn Lr. t.-l. %  ..pi,..) Tryvae U* that Com nuinist China proposed lo tend CWagaUon to the Fifth Session < %  the United Nation', A %  ,,,!,] opening on Septcmbe, 17. |ha Tas. Ateoe, reported in 1 %  ,, 1 I'tved in London tonight. %  1 tn dd tii,. i-ekin Guverninenl ha 1 peotMed CbJni 1 I ...,| In ui' nii--i ol II* deli %  11 I 1,1 %  ;",' % %  aa laauad \,v Mo-.%  cow Radio quoting 'Tans' sii d UBHI a* to inform the in;...rUes ,,| thla, ..ml i.,v %  tii. nooaaaary measures for t'i %  "f Uie CInlieMPeopii'i i: !" Ml taka part in the work %  %  Final Session I requeet yon %  aJ lalagnplj ,, reply" I Kuomintanu Not Wanted : that <>n' • work Experid assisting Uie,""' bating Governrnenl w;.•up are due lo meet on Monday j legally qualified to ropra* ..| At the next meeting of Deputies!Chinese poople and thai th 'er on Monday it |* expected that, "remnant* of the Chine*" Kuomlr general decision Will have to be^tang clique" shi!d therefore b t. Ken about the problem ..f flllii ted Nations t'e gap between proposed financial w.„ l ntrtbUtion and th. l.nget of thel Chou Kn luu de.lai--1 h bad 1 -fence programme. aent noU to this effect pi Ua and # (III I'.irr !•> Labour, Conservatives Clash Over 1 SlSl'U llll (OMMIMSTS Ul t STKINUI ON III* KOKF AN FRONT l IM The battle of the forces f freedom again*! Uir Communlsl nteruee from Use North goea u in Korea— and In this picture nuspcrted ConunankUa caaght wandering around near the Urea are brought in for queatloninr and thoroughly praven befere they are released. Infiltration ha* been used by the enemy *• great advantage. Picture Just received from the Korean front Una —EXPKI-;s STRASBOURG. Aug 26. I*i itish Conservative and Labour epre^entatlve* arguing over the Schuman Plan to-day had their biggest clash in the European Consultative Assembly's second annual session. Continental representatives sat silen! aa criticism* of Foreign taovtan aalafal Bevin and Con*ervatiM I Wlruttor. Churchill were bandied' across the floor of the Assembly Conservative Harold MacMillan provided the spark with a li-st minute bid to I which he claim* would enable i'ritai'i to join the plan MarMillan declared: Without Britain's L 'herence. the Schuman Schuman Plan Plan is a mutilated and partitioned scheme "Without Britain there ma. veil bg rjoubts and hesitations in many of the parliaments conrcrned when the plr.n come* to them for ratification With Britain there will be a sense of security and confldem e Answering criticisms U hi* scheme the Commit t-e ol Ministers for the Upper House of the Council would Off I pool MacMillan said In obvious rateraaea to %  rrli "t bol | nc particular brief for th< 1 •-• o| ui tan %  pi ill) %  %  .ne ol them But after all they boa not fixed star* in the poll%  al rimiamenl. Some I admit ive seemed a bit toe ig and wane. "After all. one ol '1 •werful of these luminaries is -day only suftaii oplc parliamentary m labour live Will i iyth who said he had miner. atta. 1 1 %  nendment as a "stupendous bsUndaT." 1*0 try lo chang>oon> tinental convictions at this lat< hour wa* worse than sabotage it was stupidity" he declared. The original MacMillan plan ill the ConnervnlOapt Churchill, but accr'iiiig to the undenu" ratic or%  r>f the Part>. Oh Uft Dill .. .. 'lie plan? Will it be that %  nwvativo spokesmen woull be able to say 1h action of their eolk 11 did not represent the %  ,rty" U adjourned till this afternooi Healer. U.S. Troops Await Reinforcements TOKYO, Aug. 86. [RENEWED Communiat activity over widely sp anted areas of the South tast Korean front today appeared to foreshadow a new all-out north era attempt to settle the issue while the Americans await British and Australian reinforcements. With two British battalions speeding through the South China Sea to join the ftgnt, with another American division on the way -the second already in action, and the Australians preparing in Japan, the United Nations were clearly acting together. But the Communists had again begun their threat to Pusan, the key supply port at the extreme end of the Americans' "Defence Box" where they were aiming at the port from two sides, the south coast and downwards from the east. A CVmmumst nttack causing some loss of ground in the t mast sector was admitted in General MacArthur's late niKht communique with the main thrust placed near the Pohann-KiKy.area, well above Pusan and alto dominating the U'leHHuered town of TaoRU, hub of the U N central defence I 1.outline iiirreaponrient Roy Macartney, sail thr America Fifth A Communist activity In the south pointed ineronalnily aVlVl -11 the Clmijit-Masan axis inwards llisan. From this area ttettlef pondent Alex Valentine reported that Ihe North in stabbing attacks were In a search for a po*>IMe iis .111*1 %  atrol % %  ti-.it-%  UOBjatad they still intended t<> make at least one more .litcrmlned .ittempt to reach %  foil I hf Iillll.l-up of United Natmu Force* faltiiq ln< t.'lislt' A North Korean communique in. .N.I h> Moscow Hiidm, claimed Ion of v ,„ nil. opaabUoni in the Puitan area, with derailment it .1 train carrying war inntertal. "I their feats HeavleHt Preaaure But the main North Korean laid was slill .oiHciiUatcd np the 1 piol W.n-KWiin-Kunwl fr. •eta THeu. at the f the Allied soajeay line to Pusan farther east they were exerting "the heaviest pressure" Ma. Arthur announced, attain*! South Koreans. South Koreans backed b* CX't. attacked at dawn re.'.u.east of Waegwan followi'ij, >ip yesterday* offenaive. when they rolled Communists i..Kk for nearly a mile nillinit 300 and capturine 42 The newly.arrived American Second Division which moved into Ihe front-lino sector of the Naklong River to relieve the battered 24th Division captured high ground overlooking the Communiat bridgehead which threatened TatKii from the southwest They were lobbing shell and mortar Ore down to the river's edge In the past 36 hour*. South Koreans have punched 1.500 yard* bowliiiH alley" near TabuDong. 12 miles north of the highwater mark of their advance on Ihe city. They were backed by icrlcan troops and supported by American artillery sending white 'hnsphomu* shells screaming eh lo ridges flanking the valley, Suppoitir. Southerners cleared mud from a village cm the tight where a pocket of Communist* had fnitltnited. Survivors were trying to get back to their own lines whale patrol* played hide and seek with them among the rugged ridge* Hanking the valley. It I* dubbed "bowling alley" because o. i.iiinun. Is persistently send armour up the rued In a single line to be knocked out by American supei-Bazookas, tanks and ..rtlllery One mile of the road was Uttired with ten splintered or charred wrecks Bed* Driven Back On the South Coast where Nnrlh Koreans were estimated to have five full regiments, the outnumi-red American Infantry repelled two Communist attacks during the night They were harassed bv sporadic mortar and artillery Are. Northerners were moving reinit forcementi along the roast, mainly ftakt* RALEIGH Your Choice NOW IN STOCK (.(NTS STIMUlll MODOA HAM —