Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


Saturday
August 26
1950



Barbados
G.’'s AWAIT RED.

From Shareholders

Cracks At Cripps And
British Railways

From Our Own Correspondent.
LONDON, Aug. 25.
MB. BILLY BUTLIN scored a great personal
_ Success to-day at the Annual General Meeting
of his English Company in London.

Five hundred shareholders were present to hear
him defend his Board’s actions in going ahead with
the development of the Holiday Camp in the
Bahamas and after he had finished they displayed
their whole-hearted approval.

Mr. Butlin was also questioned about the two hotels
which had been bought and sold in Bermuda and Nassau.
reiterated that had those hotels been retained, they would
have quickly showed a profit.



' As it was, Butlin’s had lost over
£90,000 on them.

Butlin Gets Support) .



Mechanic Dies
In Molassec

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, Aug. 25

Twenty-two year old Enoch
George a mechanic employed at
Montpellier Factory died of Car-
bon dioxide poisoning yesterday
after he had been sent into a
molasses tank to connect a piPe.

It was discovered afterwards
that as the result of the hurri-
cane, five inches of rain water
had entered the tank causing
fermentation. .

George collapsed two minutes
efter he had climbed down into
the tank. Foreman LL, Simon,
along with another mechanic H.
Christopher attempted to rescue
him. They both had to be pulled
out and they too collapsed, but
recovered shortly.

Manager Francis Nunes and
two others climbed halfway down
ecd got George out but he was
already dead,

ELECTRICITY
SUSPENDED

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, Aug. 25.

Following the Globe Hotel and
Secretariat fires there have been
two alarms caused by faulty elec-
trical wiring.

The first incidence was discov-
ered at Brown & Co., where papers
were burnt as the result of entan-
gled telephone and electric wires.
Second was at the residence of
Rupert Lewis in High Street where
the Fire Brigade was called to ex-
tinguish flames caused by an
electrical short circuit.

The Administrator has temporar-
ily suspended the Electric Service
until Electrical Mains damaged by
the Globe fire are corrected.

St. John’s is gloomy and desolate
in the evenings. The public are
depressed and cencerned over
the dangerous state of electricity
and telephone services.



LOO



But Sir Stafford Cripps would
have taken 60,000 anyway” said
Butlin and we have certainly had
£30,000 worth of publicity.”

Reporting on Bahamas Camp he
said that arrangements to obtain
an additional £800,000 for the
completion of the Camp wee
still being pursued.

He revealed that since the
camp was opened there had been
17,000 visitors. about half of whom
were day trippers and were
charged £2 a head.

The remainder stayed on
average for a week.

“Considering the problems we
have encountered, I think that is
pretty fair” he added.

One shareholder asked Mr. But-
fin whether he would abandon his
frequent trips to Bahamas and
concentrate on Butlin’s Camps in
this country.

Butlin’s characteristic reply
was: “Jt is ne more trouble these
days. going by plane to the
Bahamas than it is to get to some
parts of this country by British
railways.

Butlin’s Ltd. showed a_ profit
this year of £491,642 compared
with £514,071 last year.

From this profit, the loss on two
Hotels still has to be deducted.

450 Planes Do
Battle Exercise

PARIS, Aug. 25.

Western Union Air Forces to-
day began a three-day battle exer-
cise at Cupola aimed at testing air
defences from the Dutch Coast to
the Alps.

About 450 aircraft including jet
fighters were taking part in the
exercise, the most extensive ever
staged in Europe.

Eight airfields in France, Bel-
gium. and Holland were serving
squadrons from the Royal Air
Force, the French, Belgian and
Dutch Air Forces.

The exercise involved bombing
Paris.

French Defence Minister Jules
Moch, piloting his own aircraft,
was to observe part of the exer-
cise later to-day. —Reuter.





W. Germany Will Help)
European Defence

STRASBOURG, Aug. 25. |

DR. HEINRICH VON BRENTANO, Chief German re-
presentative to the European Assembly, declared here to-

day that Germany was
European
Authority.

Army under a common
He told a Press Conference here that the West

prepared to take her part in a

European Political

German Republic was against rearmament, but felt it her
right and duty to take part in the defence of Europe.

Asked to clarify this, he

£12,500,000 Will
Be Spent On
Norway Forces

' OSLO, Aug. 25.
j About 190 million kroner
j (£950,000) will be allocated to
| armed forces out of the new
| Norwegian extraordinary defence
_ vote of (250,000,000 kroner
£12,500,000,) according to a Gov-
ernment. proposal to Parliament
published to-day. Civil defence
j will receive £1,750,000 police
' £650,000 and £300,000 will be

i used for stock-piling.

The Government’s proposal also
asks for an additional £300,000
which it is estimated will be the



i annual cost of running merchant
ships which Norway has placed
at United Nations disposal for
Korea.

No information is given about
the way in which the extra money

said”:

“We came here to Strasbourg to
substitute European ideas for na-
tional ideas. Therefore creating a
German army under German com-
mand is out of the question and we
would not know what to do with
it.”

But we are ready to contribute
tthe economic power of Germany
and if necessary also the power
and strength of the German popu-
lation to a European Army under
a common European Political
authority for the defence of Eu-
rope and democratic freedoms.

Dr. Von Brentano who belongs
to Chancellor Konrad Adenauei’s
Christian Democrat Party said in
supporting Churchill’s proposal
for a European Army, that Ger-
mai representatives to the Assem-
bly were in full agreement with
the West German Government.
We do not believe the rearmament
of Germany could further any
German interests, he said. I am
sure I can say a great majority of
the German people are against











UNIONS
BROKE
PLEDGE

SAYS TRUMAN

WASHINGTON Aug. 25.

United States railway workers,
threatening g nation-wide strike
for more pay and shorter hours
on Monday, denied today that
they had broken any pledge to
President Truman.

Truman told a Press conference
yesterday that the two Unions
who called the strike of the
Brotherhood of railroad trained
men and of railway conductors,
had done so within an hour after
he had been assured by both
management and _ unions that
there would be no walkout, The
Unions sent a denial that they
had made any pledge to the
White House. The strike call
was issued on Wednesday after
the collapse of White House
sponsored {peace talks directed
by Dr. John Steelman, President
Truman’s Labour Adviser,

The strike would affect 300,000
guards and ticket collectors on
131 railway liens.

A spokesman for the workers
said that they would continue in
their jobs if the Government
seized railways in the event of
the strike,

Should the strike develop vir-
tually all rail transport on the
North American continent would
be paralysed if the nation-wide
strike now in effect in Canada
is not settled by Monday.

The Canadian strike, now in
its fourth day was called by
124,000 workers also seeking
higher wages and shorter hours.

—Reuter.

Youths Warned
se
Against Reds
HAMBURG, Aug. 25.

Representatives of half a mil-
lion youths of the powerful West
German Trade Union
tion met here today tor their first
Youth Congress since the war.

Trade Unibn Delegates from
Denmark, Italy, Switzerland Aus-
tria, Poland, Belgium, the Saar,
Britain and the United States
were present. Youths and labour
officers of the Western Occupation
powers are taking part as ob-
servers.

Harvey Brown, Director of
Labour Affairs in the Allied
High Commission asked employ-
ers to share with Labour, the
burdens of reconstruction and



culled for a wider use of modern |

mass production methods.
Warning Germah, Youtins
against the totalitarian crowd of
Communist salesmen from the
East he told them not to forget





Federa- |







TRAFFIC HINTS FROM STRATFORD

a Re '

THE WHOLE WORLD knows Stratford-upon-Avon as the birthplace
of Shakespeare. Visitors come here to this house, to the cottage of
his wife Ann Hathaway, and to tomb in Holy Trinity Church.
The performance of Shakespeare's plays in this lovely old town, which
still keeps much of its Elizabethan character, are world fapous, The
Stratford Festival is built around these productions:at- the Memorial
b ncenidag the fine motern building Which stands on the banks of the
von.

America Started
Fighting Before
Council Approved

Says JAKOB MALIK

LAKE SUCCESS, Aug. 25.
The United Nations Security Council meeting held to-
day to resume consideration of Korea, began by listening
to at least two hours of French translations of speeches left
over from the last meeting.

Jakob Malik, Soviet delegate and this month’s Councii
President, proceeded at once to translations of one of his
own speeches, to be followed by that of the British and
American delegates after the adopting of the agenda.

- ————+ Immediately after completion

of the translation Malik again de-

: clared that the United States had

Floods, Quake [committed an act of direct aggres-

Ki 1 000 sion in Korea, by intervening
ill 9

{against the North Korean people
BOMBAY, Aug. 26.

He maintained that neither the
British nor the American delega-
tions on the Security Council

More than 1,000 people have | ¢ > “one si » fact.”
died in the earthquake and floods cetild refute “one single fact.
which have devastated 30,000 “Big Lie”

square miles of Northern Assan bi duets bd . j/

in the past 10 days according to ene pt refuting, the world

unofficial reports, the All-India led “big lie” very loudly and re-

Radio stated today called the dirty memory of Hitler

‘ . 1 - minds,” he said
Indian paratroopers landea to- |'°, gut minds, :

day in the affected areas. The first ae United States and the

group dropped in the devastated |United Kingdom cannot under-

region to help land supplies from stand that this is not the way to

aircraft. nandle facts Speaking a

; co sore etjj) {and deliberately, Malik said “I de-

Intermittent tremors were still clare that the United States Gov-

eing felt in hills in northeast
bees Bridges have ‘ been|emment started armed aggres-
washed away and roads torn up {Sion against the Korean people

without any resolution, of the
Security Council.”

President Truman’s order to
send military and naval forces
to Korea on June 28 was made at
1600 and the Security Council
session at which the United States
“imposed its illegal resolution”
was not called until 1900 G. M. T
that day, Malik told the Council

“Therefore, it is a_ historical
fact that the United States Gov-
ernment arbitrarily and illegally
started aggression in Korea several
hours before the Security Coun-
cil meeting, thereby placing be-
fore the United Nations and the
world an accomplished fact”, he
declared.

everywhere by quakes and_ac-
companying floods, Assar.’s Pub-
lic Works Minister Ramnath has
said after a tour of the area
Assam’s Chief Minister, Bishnu
Ram said that 10,000 people had
been affected in northeast Assam.
It was still impossible to assess
full damage,

Assam’s Government Engineer
said it would be at least ten days
before traffic could be resumed
on the main trunk load through
the area. —Reuter.



First British Troops
Off To Korea

| HONG KONG, Aug. 25.
The Aircraft Carrier Unicorn

and the cruiser Ceylon left the

wharf here at 6.00 p.r_ local time

“Bourgeois” Dipiomats
Turning to the Britis, Delegate,
Sir Gladwyn Jebb, who at the
last Council session quoted state-
ments by Lenin, Stalin and other
Soviet leaders to strengthen his



that Communists the world over
are acting under orders from the

high priests of Moscow.—Reuter.

Cement, Bauxite And Tourists

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Aug, 25
Three finance
Jamaica are in the news to-day

schemes ___ for

to-day, carrying Britain’s first
‘eontingent of greund troops for
'the Korean war,—- Reuter.



argument that Soviet Russia often
@ on page 3

Draw City Talk

Aduncate

ee ee

RIVE ON PUSAN

| ANGLO—U.S.

RIFT OVER
FORMOSA

LONDON, Aug. 25,

Reuter’s Diplomatic Correspon-
dent here to-day considered that
behind the appeal by the Chinese
Foreign Minister Chou En Lai for
Security Council action on For-
mosa lay an attempt to sow dis-
cord between the western powers

A tew weeks ago at the time of
General Douglas MacArthur's un- |
expected visit to Formosa, there
were, signs, that this issue might
seriously divide Britain and the
United States and that the Indian
Government would condemn
American policy, It looked as if
the American decision to neutral-
ise Formosa by means of the U.S
navy might give rise to an impor-
tant issue of principle between
London and Washington

Long-Term Solution

But the potential Anglo-Amer-
ican feud on the Formosa question
did not materialise, and it has been
generally understood that an at-
tempt was being made in diplo-
matic exchanges between the two
governments to find a long term
solution to the problem

The prevailing impression is
that though the crisis in Anglo-
American relations has fortunately
been avoided the problem of re-
conciling the different standpoints
of the two countries has yet
been solved.



not

Consequently Chou En Lai’s
move to raise the matter in the
Security Council which will pre-
sumably be supported by Jacob

Malik, who is Chairman until next
Thursday, could be embarrassing
to both Britain and the United]
States

Until a common policy is achiev-
ed on this question between Lon-
don and Washington, both parties |
are interested in keeping the mat- |
ter out of court, It can be inferred |
they will try to do so if Malik
moves to put Chou En Lai’s appeal |
on the agenda of one of the forth-
coming meetings

Reuter,

ll Killed In |
R.A.F. Crash

SINGAPORE, Aug. 25.

A Royal Air Force Dakot
crashed to-day in a jungle
Malaya with eleven passengers an
crew aboard. Army patrols wert
despatched immediately to searct
the area

Police reports said the Dakoti
POR fire when she hit dens¢
jungle trees. The occupants were |
{feared to have perished.

The place where the crash oc-
curred was pin-pointed by other
aircvaft and it was be}



lieved tha

Ariay search parties woul! react |

it to-night. —Reuter,



ae

Price:
FIVE CENTS
Year 35



| Dig In For
Dawn Attack

By JULIAN BATES
With MacArthur’s Headquarters for Korea,
August 26.

BATTLE WEARY American infantry, dug ing” ,
before Masan on Korea’s south coast, today™* =~.

awaited a major dawn attack from two Communist
divisions which have been ordered to drive straight
for Pusan.

Northern fronts gave no sign of an all-out offensive
yet, though Communist pressure persisted and on
the east coast had forced a mile-wide breach into
the Allied line.

But according to staff officers at General MacArthur's
headquarters, the concentration of two divisions with heavy
tanks west of Masan constituted the real threat.

For days now reconnaissance pilots had reported rein-
forcements moving eastwards from Chinju despite continu-
ous eir attacks

— By daylight they were march-

South Koreans
Strike Back

IN DRIVE TO SEOUL

(By Lio? . HUDSON).
KOREA, Aug. 25

Routed and demoralised twe
nonths ago and since swept back
into a corner of the Korean Penin-
sula, the South Korean Army now
has its tail up again

In rugged red hills and lush val-
leys at the front line north of
laegu, and across the East Coast,
these fighting Southerners have a
ew offensive spirit

American Commanders who
know these tough intrepid troops,
vell, say that they expect them to
mighty force in the drive
back to Seoul and beyond

They say it follows that well-

ained and well-equipped South
Koreans will be better opponents
for North Koreans than any west-
‘rn troops

The families of many of them
were left behind up north, and it
is a personal not a political war
with most of them.

I have watched their morale go
ky high during the last few weeks.
It started when the weapon hun-
ery South Koreans were supplied
with 3.5 Bazookas, At least they
had the means of wiping out Com-
munist tanks



North Koreans Forced Back

It was not long, ‘before, that
reports started flowing back from
the front that South Koreans
Bazooka squads had forced North
Koreans back

It Coes not appear to be realised
generally that South Korean Divi-
ione have had most of the Com-
munist forces against them for
weeks, Practically every fighting
man they had was committed in
the line

An American Military Authority
who has been in Korea since 1946
said that if the South Koreans had
ceased to be fighting forces for one
day since June 25 United Nations
Forces would not be on the Pen-
insula now.

He said South Koreans held the
greater part of the line until just
recently, while now they split half
and half with Americaas,

~-Reuter.





SAILS _v.

ing in little groups of 30 or 50
while bigger formations and
supply columns remained hidden
in railway and mining tunnels

Prisoners taken on this front
yesterday said they had orders
to assault Masan defences over

an 800 yard front on Thursday
night. But American shelling and
air attacks scattered their forces
and disorganised supplies

Severe Mauling

North Korean troops charged
with the south coast offensive are
the 4th Division and regrouped
remnants of the 6th and 7th div-
isions which earlier had taken a
severe mauling.

Prisoners insisted that the
main body of this force, despite
harassing by United Nations’ pa-
trols and strafing from the air,
was ‘argely intact

the Amenican «25th
Division defending Masan have
been on their own there since
the marines were pulled out to
contain the threat on the Nak-
tong River bulge a fortnight ago.

Units of

MacArthur’s headquarters re-
ported yesterday that pressure

on the 25th it . One com-
nany had to ind around
the “battle mountain’’—fercely

embattled ridge northwest of
Haman on the Chinju-Masan
sector of the south coast road.

Too Weak

Alex Valentine Reuver’s corre-
spondent on the south coast front
reported that the Allied lack of
manpower. here appeared to rule
out the possibility of forestalling
the Communist offensive by attack.
An American colonel told him: “L
know attack is the best form of
defence but we are not strong
enough; all we can do is to try
to hold them,” Valentine cabled
hat the American staff officers
ittached great importance to the
expected attack on Masan only
30 miles from the vital supply
port of Pusan,

They feared that a major strike
there might force General Mac-
Arthur to draw troops from the
northern front and thus invite
ar all out offensive,

—Reuter.

ee pm eg



SMOKE



ihe sails of the |
old-time clipper
have given ‘way
to “smoke”



accel





Britain. Finally comes n¢
Sir William Stephenson of the}
£1,200,000 Caribbean

Company He informs
helders to-day that building work

Cement |
share-|

|
fron |



‘CLIPPER



the smoke of the

modern CLIPPER’
still sails the
seven seas !

\99

‘ae a.”

















ion of a German army or an : Susie ‘ aaideiliett lcd or: fone ar ¢ ifty cente to tt 7 :
is to be raised. ate eh German Seshiliteriagthion Two of them, the new Bauxite Mere Plans wget - oe ee hae: t ie ate “ il, and deliveries of the plant are|
. ity § “le poses C ' oO schedule N
But the Government statement] for obtaining national interests. | Factory Plan and Tourist City *Pe "Medennatle £ Devt pole’ ie faveak-dii. wpeeiat Britt ight up to , schedule . hile! oc) GARETTES
) emphasises that private building —Reuter. | Project, both of which have been edemplion o ’ a wenicnnt anoutities despite de aluation ‘< _ have
? and investments will be restricted announced in the past 48 hours, Apart from such project io Mr. Gore ‘hopes to petchis. been kept within the original
to meet military and civil defence | are severely criticised. The third, this, these funds would ke applied |, 000 000 °, about helf of its ‘mat
s needs. Private consumption will se 4 the Caribbean Cement Company, to the redemption of Britich G vo ‘al , ee aad ae 3 Ti balance sheet 4 hows an
Fi also be restricted partly by British Officers reports progress. ernment debt. What actually hap Hot a while the British Gov- ¢*penditure of £121,432, invest- .
2 financial measures, and partly : a os ‘el ai Siasi pens then . that transaction mone - we 1 oat ite desire to ment in Jamaican arene
& through cuts in imports,—-Reuter News Chronicle City Editor amounts to the re-issus of th a ee : a ;. Treasury Bills of £189,287 and
2 Leave For Korea Oscar Hobson this morning sug- national debt es Ip Jamaica prea re ora agp éash of £191,499
4 8TH JEWEL ROBBERY titebieie Jb 4 gests that Bauxite and Tourist The second proje ot, Mr Gore’ an ae J a oe! A profit of £1,4% 18s, lld. wa MANUFACTURED BY
PARIS, Aug. 25. Teri’ British ofmMBere Dae atune eee “2 ot Come ene 0 Tourist ¢ ity : des me Seiad made during the a” re ne
The eighth jewel robbery in Tae § p apes -nignt evelopment Schemes and thai cribed as more interesting au f ‘ ‘ : lor J Exchequer ‘ anc
andes this youth cane to leht by ov _ mare by way of Mon-|the burden of the cost of them more subtle Unrequited F.xports Treasury Bills
ae : 7 | treal- an ew York, the War}| will fall on the British taxpayer Hobsor suggest th Effectively counterpart func The lirector far cost] iti . ‘d d
} today in Paris where burglars'Ofice announced: They are to| He points out that part of the Linted "keane project which for. the Bauxite eine kek Me Comps ’ themes a British American Tobacco Co., B OSs. Lt .
—— — oe unt on Sele ann out Seca teeanees in Korea | funds for the Bauxite Factory are Mr. Gore is advertising in An £3,000,000 I City vren s that theit erati
arnay iast ni and s ;and make preliminary arrange-!to be provided out of the five per can papers will resumabl ¢ ent the cre f e left abe
jewel box containing jewels val-/ments for the arrival of British pant be nter t ste rlir : fund “al vf i ; terlin ia ‘ dn Ww
ved at 1,300,000 francs.—Reuter. | troops.—Reuter, Marshall reserved to the Thi currently oo als







— © a pil





PAGE TWO

Caub ¢

ON. H. A. CUKE, C.B.E.,
A returned by B.W.I.A. from
rinidad yesterday morning. ‘He
was in Trinidad’ for a couple of
days, attending a meeting of the
Board of Directors of British West
Indian Airways, held in Port-of-
Spain.

Amigos Venezoilanos!
“J SEE YOU ran a short para~
graph in your column a couple
of days ago asking authorities to
put up notices on the Manchineel
Trees on Rockley Beach”, said a
lady who telephoned me yester-
day. “But”, she continued “what
about the visitors who speak only
Spanish.” “Two days ago’,” she
said, “a Venezuelan lady ate one
of ¢ berries down on the St.
James coast, not knowing that
they were poisonous.” “Can you
suggest anything to prevent this
sort of thing happening again?”
So Carib burrowed into his
Spanish Dictionary, an hopes

that this little note if prominently ¢

displayed im each hotel room and
in the Guest Houses, will warn
our Venezuelan visitors not to eat
these fruit.

“Amigos Venezolanos. No
coman de las frutas verdes que
cain de las matas de Manzanilla
en las playas. Mucho cuidado
que son venenosas.”

Of course, notices on manchineel
trees on the various beaches in
Spanish would also help.

Brothers Return After

Holiday

‘ R. CYRIL COZIER who has

been holidaying in Barbados
with relatives for the past three
weeks returned to the Dominican
Republic yesterday by B.W.I.A.,
where he is Supt. of Fields in
Santa-Fe. Mr. Cozier has been
living in the Dominican Republic
now for twenty-three years.

His brother Arden, who is Supt.
of the Sugar Factory at Canovanas
in Puerto Rico, also left yesterday
by B.W.I.A. after a month's
hpliday here. He was atcom-
panied by his wife and young son
Arden Jnr. Arden was last in
Barbados in 1946

Here For rive Days

; R. VERNON KNOX arrived
yesterday to spend five days’

holiday with Mr. and Mrs. Austin
ar in Maxwells,

He told Carib, that his sister
and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Alfonso B. De Lima were supposed
to have come over with him, but
at the last moment, Mr. De Lima,
had to cancel his passage owing
to business.

Mr. Knox who does construction
work for the oil fields in Vene-
zuela has just returned from
three months’ holiday in the U.S.
and Trinidad.

On Leave Relief
f RS. JOYCE BABB. arrived

from Grenada on Wednesday
afternoon by B.W.I1.A., to join
her husband, Mr. James Babb,
who is Acting as Assistant
Meteorological Officer at Seawell,
for about six weeks, doing leave

Mr. Babb, who is a Panamanian,
spent most of his boyhood days
in Barbados and is an Old Har-
risonian. Now he is stationed in
Grenada doing similar work. He
arrived here a few weeks ago on
holiday, and resumed work at
Seawell temporarily a few days
ago. His wife is a Grenadian and
so is their baby daughter Ingrid,
who accompanied Mrs. Babb over
on Wednesday.

Frequent Visitor
FTER a week’s holiday in Bar-
. bados, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Porter and their two little
daughters, Katherine and Pamela
left yesterday by B.W.1.A. for a
week’s stay in Puerto Rico.

Mr. Porter is the Good Year
representative in Trinidad and is
a frequent visitor to Barbados,
this time however he was on
holiday. They were staying at
the Ocean View Hotel.

BY THE



Pe EADING bophomologists are
inclined to attribute the re-
cu

ng explosions on Mars to the
bursting of enormous eggs.

It is pointed out, that, owing to
atmospheric conditions on that
planet, eggs must stand on end, If
laid down on their sides they
burst. The theory is that some
huge and ignorant bird built a
nest and laid a number of eggs
horizontally on the floor of the
nest. This would cause the eggs
te explode.

Love Conquers All

IDNIGHT chimed from a dis-
tant clock, and still that
strange contest continued. By
now the cheating was so frank
and open, that each jested about
it. “Why not use that king in
your pocket, Smarty?” “Darling,
I will when you use the queen
you palmed when you dealt.” For
these two had become very in-
timate, and as the headmaster
said afterwards: “The green baize
‘was but a greensward upon which
Cupids seemed to disport them-
selves.” Every time he _ press-



“ Any rebate in case | do not
sit cout the full three hours?”



Off To Antigua

ING COMMANDER R. C.
LAWES, Assistant Opera-
tions Manager of International
Aeradio Ltd., stationed in London,
who arrived here on August
2ist ‘oft yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. for Antigua, with Mr.
“Bob” Greene, also of 1.A.L
After their Antigua visit Wing
Comdr, Lawes will visit Panama.

Delayed By Hurricane

to. CAPTAIN Eric Burton,
SJ Government Airport Manager
in Antigua has been in Barbados
since August 17th on a short visit.
Due to the hurricane in Antigua
hus return was delayed.

The Rabbitts In

Guadalcanal
R. AND MRS. R. RABBITT
are now living in Guadal-
canal, Solomon Islands, in the

South West Pacific.
Dr. Rabbitt will be remembered
here as being House Surgeon and

Anaesthetist at the Barbados
General Hospital from 1947 to
1948. Mrs. Rabbitt is the former

Joyce Fields, eldest daughter of
Mr. and Mrs, E. M. Fields of Cora-
Lynn, Belmont Road.

They left Barbados two years
ago for Canada, and have travelled
over the greater part of the North
American Continent.

Their honeymoon was spent in
Niagara Falls and since then they
have lived in Winnipeg and Mon-
treal, where the Doctor took Post
Graduate Courses at the Manitoba
University and McGill University
in Montreal. They also spent
some time in Ottawa and Toronto,

Leaving Montreal in May, they
crossed over to the Western cities
of Canada through the Rockies to
Vancouver, from which port they
sailed for the South West Pacific
touching at Honolulu, Hawaii,
Suva, Fiji, Sydney and Brisbane
Australia and flew from there to
Guadalcanal, where Dr. Rabbitt
is Superintendent and Admin-
istrator of the Central Hospital
for the South West Pacific.

Although enjoying life in that
part of the world they still have
not forgotten Barbados, and plan
to visit here as soon as the
Doctor's six months’ leave is due

Here For Short Holiday

RS. SHEILA ALLAMBY ar-
rived from Trinidad on
Tuesday by B.W.I.A. to spend a
short holiday with her parents,
Mr. and Mrs, Edward Blades of
“Margate”, Hastings.

On Holiday

OYCE CHU-CHEONG of Trin-
* idad who is studying physio-
therapy at Birmingham is now
holidaying. From the far north,
Joyce has written to say. she is
enjoying her holiday and hopes
to visit Sweden, Denmark and
Norway.

WAY...

ed her hand she missed a card or
two. Every time she returned
the pressure, he bade a_ silent
aaieu to his trumps. Slowly she
wore him down. Bewitched by
foolish hopes, he began to play
wildly, neglecting the very ele-
ments of cheating. She smiled
continually, and his eyes were too
often on her face instead of on
her nimble hands. He beyan to
wonder what kind of a scandal
it would create if a headmaster
had to mortgage his school to pay
his card-debts. Marriage seemed
to be the only way out. He
therefore let the cards go hang,
and began to woo her in earnest
ealling her his poopsiewoopsie
and his little mipsikins.

Life is Like That

{| Marylebone = still insists on
‘ banning private flags, there
will probably be a special meet-

ing of the Cabinet to consider
whether the burgee of the Saucy
Mrs. Flobster, moored off (or
rether tied by an old cabman's

CLEARS STUFFY NOSE-L,/2£ as a Shean, , :

Carry
tanr,
y mort

Comte?

IN YOUR POCKET!

$O HANDY —Carry it with you in
pocket or handbag—neat, feather-
weight Vicks Inhaler. It’s tiny, but
loaded full of soothing, nose-clear-
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EASY TO USE—Wherever you hap-
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just unscrew the cap and put the





tip of Vicks Inhaler right into each
stuffy nostril in turn, Ber-e-a-t-h-e
in, and—quick as a breath!—your
nose feels delightfully cool ‘and
clear. So pleasant. So convenient.
Try tt today!

Use as often as needed

P immater







>









Disillusioned
HERE was a big disappoint-
ment awaiting a very small
girl last week ‘when ghe wept
with her father to a t
match. She thought she was going
to see England vs. West Indies.
Imstead she saw two teams of
Arsenal footballers getting into
training for the new season. Her
father, Laurie Scott, Arsenal and
England full-back did his best to
console her, but in vain, It was
West Indies or nothing for her.
Not even the sight of Alex Forbes,
Arsenal and Scottish wing-half
over-swinging and losing his bal-
enee to be stumped yards out of
his crease could drive the tears
from her eyes.
Hurried Back
ISS ENID MAXWELL of
Atlantis Hotel was among
the Barbadian School Teachers
1eturning to Barbados on Thurs-
day by B.W.LA., after the School
Teachers’ Conference recently
held in BG.

Chatting with her yes' she
told me that they had all had a
very enjoyable time. She would
have remained on for a longer
stay but she had to hurry back
in time for her dance at the At-
lantis to-night.

Visited Kaiteur
R. ORLANDO DA SILVA
who arrived from B.G., by
.W.LA. on Thursday afternoon,
expects to be in Barbados for a
couple of months. This is his
first holiday away from home.

Orlando is on long leave from
Rookersa and has already spent a
few months touring the hinter-
land of B.G., visiting the Kaiteur
Fall. He is staying at Leaton,
Worthing,

Returned To B.G.
“ISS .MARY KIRTON, who

has been holidaying in
Barbados since August 10th, re«
turned to BG. on Thursday

afternoon by B.W.LA., Miss Kir-
ton was staying with relatives in
Worthing. A Barbadian, she now
lives in Georgetown, where she
is with Sprostons Ltd.
No Voodoo In Haiti
HERE is more voodoo in
England than in the black-
magic West Indian island of
Haiti, according to M. H. Bour-
jolly, new Haitian Minister to
London. A slim dark-skinned
man of 46, he arrived in England
last week on board the Mle de
France “Voodoo in Haiti is a
curiosity now, something to be
put in a museum”, he said. “Forty
years ago a child was killed in a
ritual, But two years ago England
had the Haigh murders.” M.
Bourjoily’s appointment is his
first diplomatic job abroad. As a
young man _ he taught French
literature. Fourteen years ago he
entered Haitian politics, among
the stormiest in the world.

Journalist’s Wedding
R. MICHAEL GUNNING-
HAM, until recently on the
staff of the Sundication Depart-
ment of the Fxpress Newspapers
is getting married this month, A
cousin of Mr. Courtenay Hitchins,
Editor of the Trinidad Guardian,
Michael plans to spend his honey-

moon in the South of France.

Double Celebrations
ETURNING from Venezuela
on Thursday afternoon by
B.W.LA., was Mr. L. A. Fletcher
of Da Costa and Co, He was visit-
ing his son William who is with
the Ford Company at La Florida,
Venezuela,

William arrived with him on
his annual leave, and will be re-
turning to Venezuela next month.

It was a day of double cele-
brations for the Fletcher family,
as it was also Miss M. Fletcher’s
twenty-first birthday.



By Beachcomber

belt to) Chelsea Embankment is
a private flag or not. The crumb-
ling old thing can ——. be call-
ea a ship, and Admiral Sir Ewart
Hodgson was mobbed by hens
amidships when he last paid a
formal visit of inspection, The
caretaker’s nephew fired a salute
of one gun, and out of the broken
niuzzle came two pairs of breech-
es, a shirt, and a football cap.

In Passing
LIKE the frank confession of
a “housewife” who says that
what she does not like about the
comic strips is the pictures. That
leaves, for her to like, only the

strange dialogue which floats
(enclosed by balloons) from the
months of beautifully dressed

strong men, nine feet high and
eight broad, and siim girls with
piston-rod legs and hair that fits
ke a_ brass Whenever

cap.
“Hog” Revello hits “Butch” Katz
in the face, the word “Ouch!”
without any illustration, would

become monotonous were there
not “Whar!” to fall back on.
ee Bt APS

and in other gauges. It is the
obtainable anywher~

| details of ‘Grand Prix’ and
Kynoch range.





| “GRAND PRIX? is water proof
This cartridge is now back to pre-war Eley-Kynoch standard,

and is completely waterproof.
lengths with 144 oz. standard, or 1} oz. medium heavy load,

Your ammunition distributor will be pleased to give you

ELEY-KYNOCH

SHOTGUN CARTRIDGES
*GRAND PRIX’.‘ ALPFHAMAX’-* MAXIMUM ’.‘GASTIGHT’

Factory Representatives: T. GEDDES GRANT, LTD.,
JAMAICA, TRINIDAD, B. GUIANA, BARBA®@OS

IMPERIAL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES LTD., LONDON



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Fashioned In Lendon:

“Teen And Twenty”

My Derothy Barkley

IT is a pleasant discovery to
find that a leading milliner in
London has designed a collection
of autumn hats for sale in the
inexpensive salon of a London

shop.

The man with the insight into
the pockets of the young woman
of today is Mr. Aago Thaarup,
the milliner to the Queen and
Princesses. More than this: the
collection is especially for Miss
Teen and Twenty. She will cer-
tainly need little persuasion to
wear once she has seen these —
which have just the right mixtur’
of youthfulness and histication
If she is wise, she remember
Mr. “Hats for the young will be little
but cheeky. They will have «
saucy look about them.”

Imagine a large salon of 4
London sto! brightly lit, with
light-music playing in the back-
ground, and awaiting the arrival
of Mr. Thaarup. He enters caim
and composed, although the morn-
ing has been an endless succes-
sion of rehearsals, last minute
touches and posing photographs

Not Frivolous

From the mirst, sc 1s clear tha
the show is not so frivolous
Quality has not been sacrificed for
the sake of economy; the materiais
are still the best of the best, anc
the hats beautifully finished by
hand. Mr. Thaarup himself is
pleased with the result interjec-
ting the price from time to time,
and adding, “I’m sorry I seem so
pleased.”

“You are going -to see a lot of
soft, shining fabrics”, he said,
“trimmed not only with motifs,
pompoms, petersham bows and
veiling in draped masses, ; but
with something new—wool croch-
eted and knitted into long-
stemmed tassels and fringes’’.

The colours are rich and varied
reflecting the Oriental brilliance
of Persia, and the sunny bright-
ness of Spain. The two most
striking are Khamseen, a desert
dust colour, and Tally-ho, a
heart-warming red.









CROSSWORD
a






heck. cheiiied chk

1. Ben :
. ead these lights and
Dienty. (v) -—“

(5)
1-minded ad
a) gir 3)

id greeting !t sounds. (7)

a, etly. (6) 2. A aigit. (3)
Down

it a worry: pursuit? (6)

+e sort of the ladies like.

. Come hither! (8)

‘ ted.

po

ESSeshesoges 9
z

putzie.—Across:
3. vii _eved: 10. Pent; 11
Bed: 15, Sip; 15, Already

an; 12, : ;
16, LCOE.: 17. Oreels; 19, ‘Teal: 21, Not!
22, Tram: 23, Acne;' 24. Err: 3! a‘
Renugate: 2. Over mer e
iter, 5. Tenderiy: 6. Oves: 7
3 Pvions; 17.

Down: 1.
Tingle: a alt ints
er; 9%, Evidence.

mp: 18 Eras 20. Ba

Supplied in 12 gauge 24"
best general purpose cartridge

other cartridges in the Eley-

&

A.16n09/5








SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1950

18,4

Russians
IN LONDON

DON.

Sir Harold Scott, Metropolitan
Police Commissioner, revealed in
his annual report that an average
of three children aged nine or ten
were arrested every day in Lon-

Besides these for his so-called
“Teen and Twenty” age, he has
designed several for the “Twenty
Plus”, including some with the
new forward movement, sitting
straight on the head.

And even in the heights of such
inspiration he has not forgotten
those two perennials—the pull-on
and the beret, The former he dis-
likes—“But one must remember
one’s customer.” The latter, the
most easily adaptable of all head-
gear, equally suitable whether
you have length in the face or
width in the cheekbones, This
we saw in cognac felt, trimmed
with velvet.

Finally, his favourite nat was
repeated in two different colour
combinations—one worn by each
mannequin. A small close fitting
crown, with a touch of “chop-
suey” "—a long tassel hanging
down the back, first in Tally-ho
red crown and black tassel, then
all in black, It was enthusiasti-
cally greeted, and the piano burst
gaily into “Do you ken John
Peel”. ig

Once these autumn inspirations,
{n soft materials, cheerful trim-
mings and gay colours have been

don last year.

1948,

the report stated.

able offences, Sir Harold said.

tention. The Commissioner stated

an academic interest,



A total of 1,149 children were
arrested compared with 973 in

Police reports from other cities
and towns are likely to reflect a
similar increase in child crime,

But for the first time since the
war there was a substantial de-
erease in the numbers of indict-

He attributed this directly to
the Criminal Justice Act of 1948.
This created new sentences of cor-
rective training and preventive de-

“There is no doubt that its im-
plications have been fully appre-
ciated by the criminal community.

“When habitual criminals are
feund on arrest to be in possession
of copies of an Act of Parliament
it is a safe assumption that their
study of the new criminal law is
dictated by something more than

“Indeed,” the report continued
“it is reported that in some cases
housebreakers have disposed of the
tools of their trade and have de-
cided that the possibilities of a








Nee SSS S|
| AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only) |

MATINEE: TO-DAY at 5 p.m.
TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30

KOBERT HUTTON — JOYCE REYNOLDS — JANIS PAIGE }
in’ * WALLFLOWER ™
with EDWARD ARNOLD

A Warner Bros Picture







OPENING TO-DAY and CONTINUING

emt aa Sn er 3
GALUETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES |
Lovable and IRRESISTASLE ESTHER WILLIAMS |

NEPTUNE’S DAUGHTER |
BALCONY 48 ~ HOUSE 30 & 24— PIT 16 — |

——











ae

TO-DAY & SUNDAY 5 & 8.30 PM.




MONOGRAM’S DOUBLE !

Jimmie DAVIS in “LOUISIANA” (Musical)

— AND —
Johnny Mack BROWN in “SIX GUN GOSPEL”
MONDAY & TUESDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. Ist Instalment of Seria}

“CUSTER’S LAST STAND” with Release

| EMPIRE THEATRE

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30.& Continuing at Mat. & Night
Shows Daily























Feo 9 2 ENS ane OR RS ae



i J0 HN WAY NE. socce mara - rornest rucxer

spe:

placed before Miss Teen and long period of detention raise the co-starring JOHN AGAR A REPUBLIC PICTURE
Twenty’s eyes, (not forgetting (\"\°. : i? Geese gaia aoe aR ecu AmaraA Rene soon IRCNE rR NANO apse Gs
. , risks of their calling beyond the
Twenty Plus), she will need no joint where it is remunerative. with WALLY CASSELL * JAMES BROWN + RICHARD WEBD ARTHUR FRANZ
more persuasion that Mr. Thaarup ~ “The omens are at any rate en- JOLIE BISHOP » JAMES HOWDEN + PETER COE + RICHARD JAECKEL
is quite right—“a dress without a couraging that it is, in fact, possi- Screen Play by Harry Brown—James Edward Grant « Story by Harry Brown - Directed by Allan Dwan
hat is like a stalk without @ ble to make men honest by an Associate Producer —draund Grainger
a eel hit anny we Also British Movietone News
CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how te, work it: Korea—Security Council’s historic meeting
AXYDLBAAXR Anglo-American Universities Athletic Contests
is LONGFELLOW at White Cit
One letter simply stands for another In this example A is used ; y ;
for the three L’s, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters, apos- Bluebird ready to try again
trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints, oo

Each day the code letters are different.
A Cryptogram Quotatioi
LTEF EC RIT AZRED OEFPRI
WTTLC PQ DZWT—YROEQ.
ELEGANCE IS NOT & MANLY

RIER

ORNAMENT—SENECA.

From Billy's anxious expression
upett can see that he is not
Pp me his leg, and he climbs to
mn him, and together they go
igher.@ There they discover poo:
Grannie Goat firmly wedged in the
top branches. “*How on earth did
this happen ?" cries Rupert. “* Well,

we had just set out for the villa
and had paused for breath on this
bank when something seemed to
move tight under our feet,” says
Billy. ‘* Before we could get away
this tree shot out of the ground
and caught us in its branches and
carried us right up into the sky 1"

ESTA NOCHE

VDS. DEBEN CENAR Y BAILAR

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CLUB MORGAN

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I oienahaiiataie re
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—— SFE

ROX Y

TO-DAY AND TOMORROW 4.30 AND 8.15
Republic Double . .

Starring: William MARSHALL—Adele MARA
in “BLACKMAIL”

and
“SAN ANTONIO KID

|
with William ELLIOTT—Bobby BLAKE







————



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Republic Big Double ...
Robert ARMSTRONG—Martin KOSLECK

in
“GANGS OF THE WATERFRONT”

and
“THE CATMAN OF PARIS”
with Carl ESMOND—Adele MARA

|
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Mystery









igang iting ogee



TO-DAY TO SUNDAY 4.30 AND 8.15
Republic Double .. .

Richard ARLEN—Cheryl WALKER
in
“IDENTITY UNKNOWN”
and

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with John WAYNE—Ann DVORAK

a
GLOBE



TO-DAY 5 AND 830 AND CONTINUING DAILY
Do not be among the few to say you’ve missed the
most amazing motion picture



THE GRIPPING STORY OF
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.--America’s most



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RICHARD BASEHART GIGI PERREAU
eemstemseienan Screen Play bs boa Colfer trom + Newel ty Adtecta Hamam
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Leon ERROL—CUTIE ON DUTY
British and American Newsreels . . .

TO-MORROW 9.30 a.m. Local Telent Audition
— ee ee /

ncninee



SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1950



Charlemagne’s
Empire Basis Of
European Fed.

STRASBOURG, Aug. 25.

Count Richard Coudenhove-
Kalergi, Secretary General of a
European Parliamentary Union
said here to-day that the “Charle-
magne group” of Germany,
France, and Italy would probab-
ly be the first step towards a
real European federation.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



U.S. Started
| Fighting Before
| U.N. Approved

@ from page 1
used slogans of peace to hide their
real aims, Malik stated:

“T charge Jebb with a rude dis-
tortion of the meaning of various
quotations he advanced in his re-
marks.”

“The present session of the eames 3 drains mad re

; “bourgeois” diplomats might em-
Couneil of Europe has done 8 A ploy such tricks, he maintained.
one al a a Pe Soviet diplomacy was based on

ropean federation” he told a Press
Conference.

“The Other countries of free
Europe would be linked to them
by more flexible arrangements.

“The states which formerly
constituted Charlemagne’s Empire
together with its African terri-
tories might soon become the
land of liberty, of civilisation and
unparalleled prosperity.

“This Charlemagne union é¢vould;



‘

Goodness me! You surely don’t blame me for trying to mediate between oppasing forces? %



A





can recall Genera] MacArthur

another basis with its main task
to promote peace for the Russiaa
people and to create “foreign con-
ditions which are necessary for
peace,”

Mr. Malik informed the Council

that two new communications had
reached him concerning Formosa
—one from the Chinese Foreign
Minister in Peking, accusing the
United States of aggression against
Chinese territory, and the other
from the American Government
“in justification of its actions.’

|
|

|
i

" PAGE THREE



numerical value of this charge is known as the Atomic Number.





H. GJ
Moseley

whose brilliantly promising
career came to a tragic end
on the Gallipoli beaches
when he was only 28, will
always be remembered for
his discovery that the
atomic nucleus has an
electrical charge the size
of which is characteristic
of the The
Moseley’s

atom.

discovery has been of the greatest importance in the subsequent development

or indeed whether that would
help the morale of American
troops engaged in the desperate
holding operation in Korea

not be set up as a third force but
as a solid pillar of the Atlantic
world.

“The Atlantic union would
also allow our British friends to
view sympathetically and confi-






MacArthur Went

Hy David Temple Roberts
LONDON,

Protests. Pour in

Too . Far

“Undoubtedly members will
Policy Changes want to study these and we will

There have been changes in|“ndoubtedly return to this ques-
the manner of American policy.|tion at a later meeting,” he said



of the Indian sub-continent ahd
China.

| elected to the John Harling Fellowship, His labours were

of atomic physics.

The son of a distinguished zoologist, Moseley was born at Weymouth,
Dorset, in 1887, After a brilliant career at Eton and Trinity College,
Oxford, he became a lecturer in physics at Manchester University. He
resigned this appointment two years later, when he was

dently, the creation of another . Not Satisfactor General in Tokio can no| Malik was about to adjourn the
powerful union—the United States eee eae ous met vr te South Korea, the stern Sir John Pratt, who a Brit- | longer pledge military support/meeting when the American re-
of Europe—which would stand ying action fought by U.S. forces on behalf of the} ish Consul — General in Peking] t0 Chiang. Chiang has now been | presentative objected and then

between it and the Soviet Union

Replying tu a question Count

Coudenhove-Kalergi said a fed—
erated Europe should work with
Britain ‘if possible, without her
if necessary, but never against
her. —Reuter.



McCloy Refuses
To Sign Peace
Appeal

FRANKFURT, Aug. 25.

United Nations will probably have given the world time

to save itself from disaster.

For throughout the nations that
Support the Security Council’s
resolution there has been oppor-
tunity to think of the danger of
the World War with which we
are faced, and time to retract
from foolhardy commitments,
standing more firmly by essen-
tials.

In particular the tense efforts
of the American divisions have
prevented the Far Eastern War
being carried a stage further by
an jmmediate junk-borne inva-
sion of Formosa. If North Korean
troops had swept through the

Refusing to put his signature to| peninsula driving the Americans

Ahe Communist inspired Stock-
holm Peace Appeal, John J.
McCloy, American High Com-

missioner in Germany said here

to-day that the only really aggres-

from Pusan about three weeks
ago -- according to their pro-
gramme — then there would
| have occurred, by now, a whole-
hearted attempt to gain Formosa

sive instrument in the world/ for the Central People’s Govern-

is fully mobilised armed force of

ment of China. The United

Russia and her satellites. He was|States navy was ordered to de-

replying to a _ request

condemning the use of the atom
bomb, made by an Eastern German
Youth Organisation.

McCloy deplored what he called

the basic hypocrisy of the peace

petition, and said he would be
more disposed to believe its ex-
pressed intentions if it condemned
the armed might of the Com-
munist world.

He said the petition purposely
does not cover aggression in other

forms, presently being practised
by Communist forces in Korea.
—Reuter.



Rebel Seeks Refuge

BRUSSELS, Aug. 24.

Captain “Turko” Westerling who
arrived here from Cairo to-day was
told he could not stay in Belgium.

Westerling, wanted by the In-
donesian Government, as a rebel,
was told he would be interned if
he stayed. He said he would
leave Belgium later to-day as he
did not want to spend one day in
a Belgian prison.

Westerling was formerly a Dutch
Commando. He flew into Brussels
and told reporters he was going
to tour Europe.

The bronzed 84-year-old leader
of the “Army of the Heavenly
Host” rebellion in Indonesia early
this year had a seat booked for him
on the afternoon plane for Ams-
terdam, but said he did not want
it.

He said he planned to stay in
Brussels a week or so and then
go on a tour of Europe, visiting
Italy especially.



¢ for his| fend the island; opinion in Brit-
signature to the peace petition|ain was uncertain;

the United
Nations would have been drag-
ged into a war it did not wish,

A Change

But now a great change in
opinion has come across the
|world. By all available indica-
tions there is hardly a responsi-
ble organ of opinion in the world,
or a body of thinking political
leaders, willing to advocate war
on behalf of Chiang Kai-shek
against the Communist Govern-
ment of China. In fact, since
General MacArthur's spectacu-
lar visit to Generalissimo and
Madame Chiang’s fortress there
has been a remarkable change
in opinion. Those, particularly in
London among Conservatives,
who, a few weeks ago were ex-
pressing the view that “war had
begun” and therefore had to be
fought on all fronts with all
available allies, have now fali-
en silent

This does not mean, let it be
made clear, that the policy advo-
cated throughout the United
States, Britain and Western Euro-
pean countries is to hand over
Formosa to the Peking Gov;
ernment, and immediately to
seat that Government at the
United Nations, Moderate opin-
jon and this includes such
newspapers as the “Herald Tri-
bune” in New York and the Sun-
day “Observer” in London — ‘s
now inclined to delimit the war
in the Far East, restrain Chiang
from attacking the Chinese
mainland — and gradually elim-
inate his influence, simultane-
ously deterring the Communist
junks from setting out across the

held out to the People’s Govern-
ment of China that once the
Korean situation is settled and
aggrgssion rebuked there will
be time to seat the Government
of China at the United Nations
and settle its claims on Formosa,

Clearly Put
Quotations from a_ leading
article of the “Manchester
Guardian”, just after Averi!]

Harriman’s visit to General Mac
Arthur, put the view particu-
larly clearly: “Mr. Harriman’s
visit to General MacArthur may
be presumed to reflect the anxi-
ety that the military strategists
must not go too far. But the
political problem cuts deep. Yt
is not only that of avoiding war
but of preparing the conditions
by which the Western countries,
including the United States, can
live at peace with Communist
China .. .. .. But it would
seem that somehow or other the
United States must put herself
right with world opinion on
Formosa .. .. Though the island
was promised to “China,” there
is something to be said— as an
interim measure — for handing
it over to the Formosans to run
as an autonomous State whose
independence and demilitarisa-
tion would be guaranteed by the
United Nations.”



The alarm in Western Europe
is not confined to such news-
papers as the “Manchester Guar-
dian” which has, for months, put

East in the hands of Pandit
Nehru and the chance of a firm



and subsequently adviser to the
Foreign Office on Far East ques-
tions, wrote to the “Times”:—
“For some 18 months Chiang
Kai-shek and his friends have
been blockading the coast of
China and bombing Shanghai, a
city of 6 million inhabitants,
They have been supplied with
arms and money by America.
Therefore the United Nations
have kept silent. But when the
North Koreans invade South
Korea we are told that it is our
duty under the Charter to line
up with America to resist aggres-
sion, Legalistic arguments are
employed to keep Formosa and
Korea in separate dossiers, but
even if, legally, the American
case were watertight (which it
is not) that would not be a very
Satisfactory basis on which to
embark on a world war.”

Sir John Pratt concludes his
letter, (which opened with a
generally accepted favourable
view of Mao Tse Tung’s internal
policies), by declaring that if
we enter a world war while
America still insists on Chiang
as representative of China then
we will be fighting with one hand
tied behind our backs.

The French newspaper “Le
Monde”, which often speaks for
the French Foreign Ministry,
emphasises that what the Rus-
sians most want is Western an-
tagonism towards Communist
China, leading to a disastrous
war. As that newspaper puts
it, “If the junks of Mae try to
seize Farmosa they will be met
by the cruisers of MacArthur,
and America will find herself at
war with China, Whether she
wants it or not the Far East will
become her first task and Europe
become second, Then Moscow
will have virtually won her vic-
tory in the Third World War. She
will only need to wait until the
fruit are ripe.”

Warnings

These sombre warnings have
appeared since General MacArthur
went on his jaunt to Formosa to
be photographed with the Gener-
alissimo, and kissing the hand of
Madame. It is difficult .to pre-
dict what effect on American
policy the change in well-inform-
ed opinion will have. There is
still political danger for President
Truman in flying against the
gale of American sentiment that
“war has begun” and Commun-
ists are the same the world over.
Put President Truman is an

unorthodox man,

Even in election year he can
be expected to act boldly where”

he has to withstand an onslaught

of abuse. If he saves the peace



instructed not to repeat warlike
and
When

rations against China
China-bound _ shipping,
United States forces reverse thei
direction and begin an advance

northwards in Korea the United
but

States will acquiesce in —
not initiate — a_ peace
ment

settle

trusteeshi

the world, as
cing "MOSé nder terim ; 7 ; |
Pe ee ee Tinta: well as from private individuals
nationally protected), It would j and ce ps ‘
be simultaneously announced | The Security Council was bound,
once more. that the United | %¢ declared, to consider the “wish.
,

States does not oppose the
seating of the
at the Security
that were voted by a
of the Council. Great

un

majorit

manent members of the Securit
Council,

This forecast is based on tw
kuppositions The first is

the Korean war extended to
World War. Mr. Malik’s irrita
ting behaviour, but actut

presence, at the Security Council
Soviet
diplomats have been very care~

points that way. And
ful to rebutt all attempts to pi
direct intervention in Korea ©

the Red Army.

On the other side; it has no!
escaped the notice of Washington

policy chiefs that North Kore
extends to a point very close t

the Soviet base at Vladivostok
Long before United States force
have time to advance as far as
that the Red Army would be



The Weather

TO-DAY

Sun Rises; 5.30 a.m.

Sun Sets; 6.22 p.m.

Moon (Full Mbpon)
27.

High Water: 2.27 a.m. 3.40

August

p.m.

Rainfall; .2% inches
YESTERDAY
Temperature (Max): 86.5 °F
Temperature (Min): 73.5 °F
Wind Velocity; 8 miles an

hour.





Wind Direction: 9 a.m E, States during the Jact war. There
8 pm. E.S.E. jwill also be some Dutch women
Barometer: 9 a.m, 29.885 wuxiliaries as medical, clerical
3 p.m, 29,836. ind liaison personne!.—Reuter.
Total Rainfall (to date):
7.20 inches.
taking up defensive posit’ons- Hea ri Tro ul b le
inside Korea — to greet them, o c

Then the last situation would be

far worse than the first,

Washington is surely, by now,

creus'| BLOOD Pressure

peeking an end to the Korea
war that discourages r
aggressions, yet avoids an Ameri

can military advance that woul

involving United Nations
in all Korea, and in

Chiang delegate |
Council if

respors!-
bility falls on the six non-per-

that
the Soviet Union does not, want



read to the Council the American
statement on Formosa.

r Earlier Malik
©lident - said

as Council Pres-
protests against
“United States aggression in
Korea” had been flowing into
United Nations headquarters from
religious, student, and professional
groups throughout

_}es of the broad mass of peoples of
the world.”

Malik instructed the
y | Secretary - General to read

Communists Foreign
y|Chou En Ali, calling
action in Formosa
0} against China.

aggression

the statement of
@lthis very serious
conflict.”

il Chinese Nationalist
Thang replied

ral it
r osa)”.

The Council
until Monday

then

Counci) on its activities for
ear ending last month.

—Reuter.



DUTCH FORCES FOR
KOREA

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 24.
Holland has decided to

Information Bureau

here,

iis government on 8S:
added, He said U fe
omprise of volunteers,

veterans of Indonesian





mostly



Caused by High

lf you have pains the heart
“ palpitation, itcineas “hon dastece al
d (op and back of head and above eyes
e shortness of breath, fee! nervy, or suf

assistant
into
the record the cable from Chinese

Minister
American

Malik declared “we have heard
both parties to
international

delegate
emphatically
‘There has been no United States
aggression against Taiwan (Form-

adjourned
According to rules,
Monday’s session will be private
, |to consider a draft report by bq
; the

send
2,000 infantrymen to Korea, J. P. |
Boudrez, head of the Netherlands
announced

The exact make-up of the con-
tingent would be determined by
saturday, he ;

ree woul ;

fighting
and marines trained in the United





'
\

interrupted by the outbreak ofwar in 1914, but not before he
| had accomplished the researcheswhichwere destined to have
a dramatic effect on the course of the second World War.









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aa ij ing >A, h i is ntries | he can still claim electoral advan- be directly threatening legitimat > heats ‘sleep, loss of memory
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PAGE FOUR



A

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Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St, Bridgetown.



Saturday, August 26, 1950



SEAWELL

THE habit of blaming the British for all
the ills of Barbados is so deeply ingrained
that one is tempted to accept with open
hands and little thanks the gifts they
bring.

One of these gifts of $1,212,000 is visibly
and impressively in evidence at Seawell
Airport today.

There day and night a West Indian con-
struction company has been forging ahead
with the construction of a new runway
which will make Seawell an attractive port
of call for many of the world’s large air-
line companies. The Canadian Government
have loaned expert engineering personnel
and the Barbados Government have con-
tributed a sum approximating to half a
million dollars.

To all those who have made possible the
construction of the new runway at Seawell
the thanks of the Community are due.

But what of the future?

At present Seawell Airport is in a transi-
tional stage.

The Airport building, small as it is, has
been rearranged internally to cope with
the additional traffic which has followed
upon the increased advertising of Barba-
dos in the world outside. Communications
have been taken over mainly by Inter-
national Air Radio Limited and the res-
taurant and waiting room look more like
a restaurant and waiting room than they
did previously.

The Airport is however too small to deal

with even the present volume of traffic.

The Airport manager is overworked and
personally has to act as control officer to
incoming and outgoing planes. No organ-
isation can be said to be 100 per cent. effi-
cient where one man is perpetually on
duty. An assistant manager for Seawell
Airport is an urgent necessity.

pvoeate | Muze

| AN EXPERIMENT in Minnesota



From the Newsletter of the Royal Bank

way, will be disappointed on
learning how few calories are re-
two volunteers, revealed not only quired for brain work. Dr. G. A.
the effect of semi-starvation on Dorsey says in his interesting
behaviour, intelligence and pgr- book Why We BehaYe Like Human
sonality, but the order in which Beings: With the brain aetively
symptoms developed. First was at work so little extra energy is
tiredness, followed by muscle consumed that the calorimeter
soreness, irritability, apatiiy, sen- cannot find it.” On the other
sitivity to noise, loss of ambition, hand, a jazz-band drummer uses
loss of self-discipline, decrease up 7,200 calories daily. A nutri-
in mental alertness and in the tionist, commenting on this figure
ability to concentrate, moodiness which was given im a_ British
and dizziness. publication, remarked: “He must

That was a case of deliberate kave drummed continuously day
semi-starvation over a period of and night.”

months. More to the point is the Cooking Is Important

9 few years ago, involving thirty-

result of surveys made in Can—
ada in 1939—1940, reported in an
article in the Canadian Public
Health Journal. Roughly
ing, only 40 per cent of the people
studied were adequately nour—
ished, 40 per cent were in a
border-line state, and 20 per cent
were seriously undernourished.
Still more striking is the state—
ment by Dr. L. B. Pett, Chief of
the Nutrition Division of the
Department of National
and Welfare, to the effect that
more children died in the year

Health. an be converted

Besides making sure that the
range of food is such as to pro-
vide the essentials of good diet,
we need to watch the cooking to
ensure that the goodness is kept
there. A sensible word of advice
was given by Joseph of the Savoy:
“Make the good things as plain
us possible. God gave a special
flavour to everything. Respect it
vo not destroy it by messing.”

The extent to which good fond
into valueless
food by unintelligent preparatioo
is not generally appreciated, It

1944 from nutritional deficiency (an mike the differsnce between
diseases than from infantile health and malnutrition. Every—
paralysis. To this he added: Gne knows that leafy vegetabies

: despite the fact that our are among the essentials of a good
present knowledge is sufficient to diet, but their goodness too often
avoid malnutrition.” goes down the drain with the

No one would suggest that cooking water. The boiled fibrous
forty per cent of the people in tissue we eat has lost not only
Canada go around in a perpetual jts savour but much of its essen-
state of hunger, in the ordinary {jal chemical] matter. Mineral
sense of the word. There is am— salts have been boiled out. Water
other kind of hunger, the hidden soluble vitamins have been lost.
hunger that lets people pine away, An investigation made. at the
go through life sluggishly, and request of the Government ot
finally die before their time, even Newfoundland by nine Canadian,
when they are eating plenty. British and United States doctors

Many of us drag our way resulted in significant findings.
through life, suffering all kinds of
ailments that could be avoided by surveys, five years apart, reveal--
better feeding. ed that the average person i>

We feel depressed, and blame Newfoundland showed no fewer
our woes on creditors, the familY than eight symptoms of deficiency
or the boss when perhaps we {ijseases; malnutrition in early
suffer from vitamin shortage. We life resulted in three out of four
feel fatigued, out of sorts and dying before the age of 40: only
listless, due perhaps to nothing ong person in ten reached 60;
but improper food. Our tables the overall death rate was twenty
may groan with good things, and per cent higher than in Ontario,
yet we may be starving ourselves and the death rate among children
through ignorance and indiffer- was two to three times the North
ence, American average.

We must not deceive ourselves The investigators were puzzled
by thinking that poor diets are at first, because the diet, while
confined to low-income groups. Jow in eggs, milk, citrus fruit and
It is quite possible to spend a lot tomatoes was good enough in fish
of money on food, and yet not potatoes, cabbage, bread and
be getting the food values that cereals to justify a higher record
tead to health. of health.

The Right Foods An article in Saturday Night

Foods may be divided into three gives the explanation: “It was not
main classes: body—building foods, until the investigators went into
to make good your wear—and-tear; the kitchens of the Islanders that
protective foods, to ward off dis— they discovered that they were
ease; and energy foods, to giva almost literally committing suicide
you power and warmth, by their cooking methods.” Pota -

Good nutrition involves calorjes toes, for example, were boiled
(energy), protein (growth, main- after peeling losing 50 per cent
tenance and repair),-vitamins and of their ascorbic acid; they were
minerals (protection), and “bal— cooked in the morning and held

\

The first of two diet and health *

ance”,
It is not necessary to carry a

until night, by which process they
lost all their ascorbic acid. Cab-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ger. Seen And Hidden

of Canada,

|
malnutrition due to poor a
Similar findings pave been made
by the University of Pennsylvania,
which studies of ea. |




income families.
Besides good: of basic

foods and variety

is neered. can analyse »

5
&
5
a
e

ve elements o:
milk, and in a recent book review
of the New York Times there was
advertised a book containing
250 unusual recipes for cheese
cvokery, from hors d’oeuvres to
clessert.

Every age group has its pwr
special requirements, and ary
important.

Young peoplé up to twenty
years need the right kind of food
to live, to grow to maturity, and
to acquire education. The com-
bined effect of strenuous athletics,
school and home study, the ten-
sion of examinations, and the
general upset feeling of adoles-
cence, all combine to put stress

upon the body machinery, Lunch
is important, and very often an
after school snnack (such as a pea-
nut butter sandwich, and a glass
of milk) would be a lifesaver.

As the years pass, and we slow
down to a decorous pace, the
energy of youth is not needed,
and we don’t exert the muscular
strength of middle life. We dc
need reasonable amounts of pro-
tein, and we should be satisiied
with foods that our experience
has taught us are easily digested,
Milk, fruits and vegetables in full
amounts continue to be important.

Women may lay down the nu-
tritional law in their homes, but
they are often guilty of breaking
their own rules,

Men emerge from some surveys

with a better record than women,
except that they are deficient in
vitamin C because they brush
aside “rabbit foods” like salads
and raw vegetables. On the whole
men eat a good lunch, while
women just nibble at something.
Men make up in sheer volume of
food for their ‘carelessness in se-
lection. A survey in Philadelphia
among families in the $2,500 and
more income range found that
four out of five married women
were undernourished,

“More” is not necessarily “pets
ter” in nutrition. A Chinese
“A well-filled
stomach is indeed a great thing:

poet remarked:

fathom a man’s wish for a
i

they liked it or not.
jewels that had escaped the fire, went to
live in two sordid rooms, and Irfan’s mother
—still only 22 after nine years of marriage—
went to work in a factory.

They Called
It Women’s

Freedom

MARGARET: LANE Reviews New Books

PORTRAIT OF A TURKISH FAMILY.
Irfan Orga. (Gollancz, 16s.) 303 Pages.

TURKEY has changed within one genera-
tion, perhaps more than any other country.
lo see those changes taking place in a middle-

-|class Turkish family, in the lifetime of a

poy born in Istanbul in 1908, is fascinating,
even though this is a naive and not particu-
jarly well-written book.

Irfan Orga’s mother was a veiled Turkish
lady ot the old type, married at thirteen and
living in total seclusion, as befitted her class.
Life tor the little boy was centred in the
women’s quarters and in the weekly visit
with his grandmother to the th
luxurious public ba j
women loved to spend the day, being scrub-
bed by servants, lolling about in the steam,
anointing themselves with scented oils and
eating enormous meals.

Those meals! Turkish life in those days
was obsessed with food, with perpetual meals
of the most cloying and destructive sort.
f£very domestic occasion was celebrated with
mountains of rich and sickly eatables; wed-
dings were orgies of syrups and sweets. One
is not surprised to learn that Turkish ladies
rarely felt enough to do more than sit about
in enclosed gardens hanging their swimming
heads over pieces of embroidery.

To the Orga family the 1914 war brought
disasters which must have been common
enough in Turkey at that time. The father
was killed, their house burned down in the
great fire of Istanbul, and the young mother
and domineering grandmother were left
alone with three young children, a few pieces
of salvaged furniture, and not a penny in
the world.

What could those veiled and sheltered

women do, thrown on their own resources in
a harsh Oriental world which did nothing to
help them?

Emancipation was thrust on them, whether
They sold the few

Facing the hardships of her new life with

unexpected courage, she abandoned the veil,



SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1950







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ge ASK FOR A TIN AT YOUR GROCER

set of scales and a measuring bages were boiled for one to two “ll else is luxury.” It may be]even though she was stoned in the streets



Arrangements for parking of cars are
also inadequate to cope with the stream
of relatives and friends who accompany
passengers to Seawell.

If these inconveniences are noticeable
now, how much the more will they be
obvious when Seawell becomes the most

; A , : t , ’ j - 7 allant struggle for survival in post-war

desired airport in the Eastern Caribbean? | #88ess your dietary requirements. min A. Canned milk was import~ yey in Canada, reported by Dr.|& :
These general tables are only ed. Orange juice was made pett in 1948, ¢ Turke: where hardships and e new KIN
approximate. Their use calls tor available to pregnant women and =e revealed that “rarely y P LOO. G

The greatest credit is due to the British
taxpayer, the Barbados taxpayer and the
Canadian taxpayer for co-operating
through their Governments in making Sea-
well an important airport on world air
routes. Can it be that the need for modern
buildings and adequate staffing have been

glass to the dining table, but only hours losing 90 per cent of their

also a pain.

to apply common sense to a
knowledge of the qualities and
attributes of foodstuffs. The
amounts of individual items vary
from time to time in the same
person, depending on many exter—
tial and internal factors such #5
age, sex and activity. No figure
in any genera) table should be
taken as an absolute value to

good sense and interpretation in
keeping with your special environ—
ment and requirements.

Take calories for example. A

ascorbic acid,

The second survey showed great
improvement, reported by Dr
Russel M. Wilder of the Mayo
Foundation last December. The
government took steps recom-
mended by the doctors. Flour was
enriched with thiamine, niacin,
riboflavin irom and calcium, and
margarine was fortified with vita -

nursing mothers. Schoolchildren

received milk and cod liver oil.
The result of these diet changes,

ali in forms which could not be

as a prostitute for this piece of effrontery.
Her sons were sent to a charity school and the
mother and grandmother lived chiefly on
quarrelling and cabbage soup.

_An_ occasional feast matters
little; it is the continual daily
overloading ourselves with food
that is so injurious and depress-
ing. If you want to eat like a
ditech-digger you must exercise
like a ditch-digger,

Overweight is a problem of
great importance. It shortens life,
decreases efficiency and increases
liability to many diseases. A sur-

It was a hard life, and often makes painful
reading. One is constantly amazed, as her
children were, that a woman so delicately
and heplessly nurtured could make such a

have we encountered ‘overweight’
in less than ten per cent of the
adults in a given area,”

Medical men are opposed to all

regime showed no mercy to the sort of life
she had always known.

IMMACULATE

published table may say that the ruined by bad cooking, was tim-
average man needs 2,250 calorigs mense. The death rate fell from
a day, But if he is sitting at 12.1 to 10.5 per thousand; deaths
home doing nothing he may need from tuberculosis fell sharply,

violent attempts at weight reduc-
tion. Such methods as amount to
starvation for all practical pur-
poses often do permanent damage

The struggle, however, extorted a terrible

price. By the time her sons were old enough
to go through military school, and the eldest,

LINEN

only 2,000, while if he is qut
chopping down trees hv may need
4,000. Another authority may

from 135 per 100,000 to 101; infant
mortality dropped in three years

i ae ia ce tee he ee Ortan, was training to be a pilot, her brain



of drugs is unwise, except under
the care of a physician.

gave way under the pressure of suffering and
anxiety, and she was dragged from her fam-

from 102.3 1,000 to 61; and— The simplest way to reduce is] ily to end her days in an asylum.
overlooked? Surely not! give the amounts in calories per significant this—the children who to cut down the amount of fat- . y ony
pound of body weight for various had been “like littla wooden



THE LORD BISHOP

THE resignation of The Lord Bishop
from the See of Barbados will come as a
surprise to many people in this island.
During the five years of his administration
of the Diocese he had become respected
for his sincerity of views on things ecclesi-
astical and political.

ages: here, again, caution is
needed to interpret the figures in
terms of what is being done with
the body.

The business executive, by the

‘This Very Puzzling Problem Of

DEATHS from heart diseases
have more than doubled in
Britain in the last ten years,
the Registrar-General’s annual
Statistical review revealed,

Number of deaths from diseases
of the coronary arteries and
angina pectoris in 1938 was
15,409. Latest figures shows

Indians” on the first visit “were
row noisy, rambunctious and in--
quisitive, as children ought to be.”

It should not be thought that
Newfoundland alone is suffering

The Heart

heart disease is due to:—

1. Enormous increase in the
strain and tempo of modern
life. We are always tense,
and have lost the ability to

Heart

tening food eaten at each meal,
and this may be done, under
competent advice, without hard-
ship. Don’t try to get rid in three
weeks of the excess poundage you
spent ten years accumulating,






sufferers should always
seek advice from their doctor.
For, if the disease is caught
early, a lot can be done.

They Train

A modern invention, the electro-
cardiogram machine, shows

College; resigned
now living in London,

One learns with relief (since Turkish asy-

lums sound more nightmarish than most)
that she died in 1940, shortly before Irfan
Was sent to England, in charge of a group of
young (Turkish officers dr
training in the RAF.

ted for special

In spite of its shortcomings—and the

author is, remember, writing in English, not

in his own language—this is an interesti
and often movie 5 -s

ook.

*** IRFAN ORGA, born Istanbul; educated at Militar; |

commission with Turkish Air Force 1947;



SUITS

MAKE A REALLY DISTINGUISHED ADDITION

TO YOUR SUMMER WARD-ROBE
NOW YOU CAN ENJOY

=

Anticrushable Linens in Ready Mades, by Lomic
these Suits are Sanforised and Mercerised



VINDICATION OF RUSKIN. J. Howard

Whitehouse.

i ‘ . : relax. changes in the heart long before (Allen and Unwin, 10s.) Da COSTA & Co., Lid.
His recent appointment to a seat in the they have jumped to 36,640 a , Worry caused by the strain. they can be diagnosed by the 64 pages.
Legislative Council gave full scope to his year the
ability as a man of affairs. His speeches
during the early days of the sugar negotia-
tions and his contribution to other debates
in the Legislative Council proved that he
was not only an eminent divine but one
who took a keen and intelligent interest in
the island’s affairs.

It was difficult for Bishop Hughes to be
anything else than an outspoken critic of
diehard policies and restriction of the
rights of individuals. In his first sermon
in St. Michael’s Cathedral after his en-
thronement he launched out against unsat-
isfactory practices in this island and called
on the community to rid itself of the old
shibboleths and to realise that “it was
people that matter.” But it is an irony of
fate that this same strength of view,
according to the Bishop himself, should
have been the unhappy cause of his unex-
pected resignation. He came to Barbados
after having been the Bishop of British
Honduras only five months, and as he said
then it was merely because he felt that dis-
establishment of the Church in Barbados
would give him the opportunity for service
which he so greatly desired.

' The resignation of the Bishop from his

What has caused this alarming
trend?

Are our hearts getting weaker?
Is this the explanation for our
decline in international sport?

The astonishing increase of an

disease is one of the most
miaeing things in medicine to-
ay. es

The disease is found not so much
in the heart but in the clot-
ting of the small arteries sup-
plying it—coronary thrombosis.

If left untreated it can lead to
very prolonged illness, or sud-
den death.

Tension

Doctors believe the increase in

eee iee enna eRe aeSenthepicsiseneninsbesreninene
has an adverse effect on the
heart muscles,

Symptons of heart disease are a
sense of oppression or dull
aching in the left side of the
chest which radiates up to the
left shoulder and down the left
arm.

A sufferer will become breathless
after any exertion, which gen-
erally produces these symptoms.

Years ago the disease was restric-
ted to people between 50 and
70, Now coronary thrombosis is
found among men and women in
the forties and younger.

This, I believe, is because young
people are having to bear more
strain and worry earlier,

OUR READERS SAY

Bo
To, The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—The sponsoring of a Boys’
Club or a Girls’ Club for that mat-
ter is a most laudable idea. by any
line of reasoning; and I have no
doubt that the Bay Street Boys’
Club will do some good in the
community, and I wish it every
success,

Some people seem to think that
it is within the preview of certain
people only to do welfare work.
With that I beg to disagree.

I notice in a certain local journ-
al that it is suggested that the club
has a political flavour for reasons
set out in the said journal. One
should have no fear about that, so
long as Barbados remains a dem-

type which have not completed
their education, if they have “seen
a school door at all;” and spas-
modie lectures and talks are not
enough.

Some provision should be made
whereby those among them who
have never been to school and
those who have run away from
school, or through other circum-
stances have not completed their
education (and I mean elementary
education) are sent to school
wholetime.

It was necessary I quite realize
that somebody should provide the
prerequisites for the accommoda-
tion; but it should be the aim that
their several talents should be ex-
ploited to the full with a view of













pital has one,

Heart diseases can be treated by
drugs and surgically. Research
into their treatment has met
with marked success at Guy's
Hospital, London,

While decline in our sporting
prestige is not due in any way
to the increase $f heart disease,
there is one interesting point to
note.

Very few Britons specialise in one
sport. Our sportsmen do not
train as hard as foreigners.

It is because the foreigner trains
his heart to stand the extra
effort that he wins

B.D.
Londou Express Service.

sure not appreciate any philan-
trophy showered upon them from
around or above. The ultimate
objective should be a home.
Clubs in Barbados have no mean-
ing whatever and this may even-
tually degenerate into one of the
many clubs scattered over the
place.

I do hope our Government will
see the need for the urgency of
compulsory education to 16 years
at least, the speeding up of the
housing position, the introduction
of minor industries and exploring
the possibilities of markets for
them, and ever alertness to our
emigration needs. [ want to make
it crystal clear that I appreciate
the efforts made by the Govern-
ment but first things first and one
of the first should be compulsory

THE more I read about Ruskin the sorrier

I feel for him. Fame has played him an
ugly trick, for now, instead of caring about
his work in education, social reform and
art, posterity is chiefly interested in post-
mortems of his marriage,

Ruskin married the beautiful Effie Gray

in 1848. For reasons which we can never
know for certain (though Mr. Quennell in
his recent biography offered the likeliest
theory) the marriage was never consum-
mated.
bitter and unhappy. Six years later the
marriage was annulled, and Effie married

It became, as one would expect,

the painter Millais, with whom she had
fallen in love.

¢ Ruskin himself later became passionately
infatuated with an Irish girl, Rose La
Touche, when she was only a child, and it
was Effie Millais’s bitter letter to Mrs. La
Touche, warning her sgainst Ruskin’s

“cruelty,” which eventually prevented their
marriage.

The whole story is tragic and mysterious
and Admiral Sir William James’s book, The
Order of Release, and Mr. Peter Quennell’s
slightly abnormal

and distasteful, with

whom no woman, however much in love, |

could have been happy.

Mr. Whitehouse’s new book is a brave
attempt to’ turn the tables on these dis-
affected biographers by showing Ruskin in
a more reverent light, as blameless and

more recent biography, present a Ruskin! |

DRY GQODS DEPT,






I}

|

}

— Woted jor —



: . oducati in St. Micha t s . $ :
ee ams oti cctate d oeracy and the ballot is secret, causing them by their own efforts SCUC&tion in St, Michael at least.| misunderstood. There is certainly truth on
¥ exalted office on a question of principle is What I am concerned about is t0 make the money or at least 80% When first things are done first,| both sides, but, as with Byron's relations ’ e
in keeping with the high moral stature of the fact that the club seemed to Of it which will be needed to keep there will not be the need of ac- | with Augusta Leigh, we can never know the Steak sc toasted Sandssiches
Pp oe : have been presented to these ju- the club going. But so long as they cusing people of exploiting the whole truth for certain
one who has been steadfast in upholding veniles on a platter and no effort are talked at by woe who a ignorant for their political ends. ,
‘ nts of Nattant on their part has been made to pro- "0 experience in teaching youth “Give the people light and they |
the fundamental facts of Christianity and a Cue tha aecieei*iad which I under- 2nd so long as they are not will find their ie kin Seen HOWARD WHITEHOUSE is president of the Rus. |
champion of the divine commandment | stand have been put at their dis- brought up under the influence of CLAUDE RAMSAY executor to deal with, Ruskin's becks snd aveumente "|
¥ h ighbour.” posal. I have no doubt that the @ School, so long as they only listen, Brighton, Black Rock. WORLD COPYWRIGHT RESERVED
love thy neighbour. majority of these boys are of the Play, and go away, they will,Iam August 22, 1950 —L.E.S. rm
4 4 d t i
J





â„¢, .

SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1950



200 Watch
Mystery Stone

Throwing

HE POLICE are investigating

a report of

throwing which is said,to have

taken place at Chimborazo, St.
Joseph, on Thursday.

The report came from Preston

Watts who said that stones and

bottles were thrown at the houses} be
Charlies Small and Eunice, °Ut

of
Coward.
He said that both the stones and

bottles were going in the direction |

of a house occupied by Stanley
Marshall.

, This stone throwing is becom-
ing a mystery to the people of
the district. It was going on for
two days and nights and only

stopped about 12 minutes before |

the Police arrived on the scene.
Broken bottles could be seen in

the road and about 200 people} wren

| Flood

bottle and stone!

| Thanksgiving

It now just over a year
{Since people moved into the
| Government houses at the Pine.

Now with pretty flower gardens

is

around, the houses have a neat
appearance There are well
tarred rocks which join up all

along where the houses are built,
they end abruptly and
residents have to walk along a
track to get into Collymore Rock
Road or a wide rocky road to
get into the Pine Estate Road

There are not many church
goers in the area, Sunday is
usually a little quieter, but that
is the only, difference on that
day. Most of the children go to
school at the Roebuck Boys’
School and the Catholic School,
the schools they used to go to

they lived nearer town.
gathered around on Thursday
night. A few were slightly Collymore Rock is the nearer
injured. road along which buses pass

NOTHER CHOIR is
formed in St. Joseph. It is
being conducted by Mr. Arnold
Harris and is at present practising
songs, hymns and carols at Horse
Hill. It already has 14 members.

being

ECAUSE OF THE RECENT

RAINS breadfruits are plen-
tiful in St. Joseph and other
parishes. Lorry and cart loads
of this type of fruit are brought
into the City nearly every day,
especially on Saturdays.

Various City hawkers buy them
by the hundreds and sell them at
prices ranging from four to eight
cents

FEW FISHING BOATS went
4 out at Bathsheba yesterday

but returned with very small
catches. Fish is at present in
short supply and the residents of
St. Joseph are anxiously looking
forward t the sea egg season

which will begin in a few weeks.

IGHTY-FIVE PEOPLE aitend-

ed Health Talk given by

Dr. Grannum at the St. Joseph

Boys’ School recently. Since that

time many other residents of the

parish are becoming interested in

these talks and look forward to
another.

ILFRED McDONALD of

Paynes Bay, St. James, who
was a passenger on motor lorry
M-2483, fell from the platform
while the truck was travelling
along Trafalgar Street at about
4.10 p.m. on Thursday

The truck is owned by Messrs.
Evelyn Roach & Co. and was being
driven by Cecil Watkins of
Howell's Cross Road.

It is understood that McDonald
was sitting on a bag which also
fell off the truck when it was
turning into Bridge Street. He
complained of internal injuries,
A BARROW Garnett

Street reported that her
residence was broken and entered
on Thursday and a quantity of
cigarettes and cash removed.

eo LOSS of $80 in cash was
reported by Wilhelmina Phil-
lips of Road View, St. Peter. She
told the Police that it was re-
moved from her home earlier in
the year,

of

HE ROAD leading from

Frizers to Burke’s Village is
at present being repaired. This
road goes via Vaughans Land and
will soon be completed.

HE SHAMROCK CREDIT
UNION will stage Co-opera-
tors’ Day at St. Patrick’s School,
Jemmotts Lane at 4.00 o’clock
this evening. All Co-operative
movements are expected to attend.

BLOCKED TRAFFIC

JUSTIN ALLEYNE of Venture,
St. John, who was yesterday found
guilty by City Police Magistrate
Mr. H. A. Talma of obstructing
traffic on Roebuck Street on July }
15, was ordered to pay a fine of
10/- and 2/— costs. In default, he
will undergo 14 days’ imprison
ment with hard labour. ’

Alleyne was also fined 20/- and
1/— costs with an alternative of
one month’s imprisonment with
hard labour for refusing to give |
his name and address when being
reported for obstruction.

PLANTAINS OVERPRICED

A Fine of £2 with 2/- costs was
imposed yesterday on Deleina
Robinson of Pounder Gap, West-
bury Road, when she was found
guilty by City Police Magistrate





SS 0 eee ee





from the houses, but a bus only
passes every hour. Buses pass
every quarter of an hour along
Two Mile Hill, but the distance
is long, the sun generally hot, so
for the residents, transportation
is a problem,

The tree Lady Perowne planted
when the first set of houses was
built, is now about six feet tall.

Good Grazing

Grass in the district provides
g0od grazing for sheep, but many
Go not keep sheep yet. Most of
the sheep one sees grazing be-
long to people of the nearby areas.
Those of the Pine houses are all
eager to rear pigs, but they are
rot sure yet whether they have
sufficient space to conform with
the law.

Some electric
put up in the
electric has been
the houses yet

Mrs. Green, once of flood area,
and one of those who lost much
property because of last year’s hur-
ricane, thinks that she herself and
others who live in the Pine Hous-
ing Estate, should hold a thanks-
giving service on Thursday in
memory of that eventful night.

been
no
of

poles have
district, but
put in any

The thought came to Mrs.
Green when she lay in her bed
last Sunday night, heard the
roaring thunder and saw the light
up of her room as the rain fell

heavily.
Lack of Trees

There are not many big trees
to give shade to the many house,s
but there is always, a good wind
blowing over the wide stretch of
land east of the houses which
keep the area cool. With
mahogany, flamboyant and other
trees now being grown, the area
will have a good supply of trees

soon. 5 !
Mrs. Price and Mrs. Mahon
have families of six each, the

biggest in the district. Virginaj
Jackman and Jeneta Sealey, each

jive in a house alone. There are
five waterfront workers, three
mechanics, a baker, a_ printer,

two chauffeurs, four dress makers
and a Broad Street clerk among

the residents of the district.
Each home has a_ small piece
of land attached and many

keep kitchen gardens.



Auto Owners’
Association

Needed

“I AM sure that the’ formation
of an Automobile Owners’ Asso-
ciation which will work hand in
hand with the Police Highways
and Transport will be a great
success in Barbados.” Major D.
Lenagan a former President of
the Automobile Association of
Trinidad told the “Advocate” yes-
terday.

He said that he has seen that
such an Association is really
needed and is prepared to give
his wholehearted support to the
Chamber of Commerce to get the
Association going.

Major Lenagan believes that
in helping the motorists the public
would also gain benefits from
such help.

He pointed out that in Trinidad
the Association has done quite a
lot for the motorists and he is
sure that if the Association is

tr. C. D. Walwyn of committing |formed affiliation with both the

a breach of the Defence Regula-
tions Act.
Robinson

sold plantains

Automobile Association and the
Royal Automobile Club in the

on| United Kingdom would be easily

August 5 at 8 cents each when she | obtained.

should have sold them at 6 cents
each. ‘

Failing ‘> pay the fine within
14 days, Robinson will be impris-
oned for one month with hard
labour.

He thinks that in Barbados
\there are too many dangerous
bends on the streets and the
Association would be very instru-
mental in remedying this defect
of our streets.





Victims ail
Should Hold , %'

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
LUMBER BARS THE WAY





LUMBER blocks the easy flow of traffic on Bridge Street.

Businessmen Attract “yken Brings

Vezezuelan Tourists

AS THE VENEZUELAN tourists continue to pour into
Barbados, some businessmen are, going all out to find means
of attracting them, as far as getting
ployees are concerned, All businessmen interviewed by
tne “Advocate” yesterday described the Venezuelans as
lavish spenders — and no wonder, for here their dollar is
worth twice as much as it is worth them in their own coun-

try.

Plaza Opens
Next Saturday

THE BRIDGETOWN PLAZA,
will be opened to the public from
Saturday, September 2 when the
Warner Bros. musical “Look For
The Silver Lining” will be shown.
It is expected that His Excellency
and family will attend the open-
ing performance.

The building which started ten
months ago, was erected and
designed by Messrs. Clarke &
Tucker, The seating capacity is
850. The Box seats are of dunlo-
pillo while the Baleony and
entire House contain upholstered
seats which were all imported
from the U.K.

Mr. R. N. W. Gittens and Mr
R. V. Redman, joint Managing
Directors of Caribbean Theatre:
Ltd., owners and operators of the
New Plaza told the “Advocate”
the policy of the Bridgetown
Plaza is to screen outstanding
British and American pictures and
it was conceived and designed in
the confident hope that it will
prove a place of entertainment
worthy of Barbados.”

Fluorescent Lights

They said that the Theatre is
equipped with fluorescent lighting.

Above the marquee is a large
board featuring the current attrac-
tion, Mr. Gittens said, “this wilt
present a striking appearance at
night with light effectively empha-
sising the fact that ‘here indeed is
a theatre,’ ”

Another special feature is tu
shoulder high dado of ‘“semasti
tile’ and aluminum trim. The
spacious foyer includes a cand,
counter with three levels for th
display of sweets.

A vacuum cleaning system
to be employed.

The new cinema also provides
the long felt need of cinema goers
for a_ restaurant, catering to
patrons and the public from 8 p.m.
to midnight. Mr. Gittens said
Patrons may be sure of a well
cooked meal.”

Parking Space
Another desirable feature is
the adequate parking space which
is enclosed. There is also an
enclosed Cycle Room under the
supervision of the caretaker.
Mr. Gittens pointed out that
Caribbean Theatres Ltd. recently
became allied with Teelucksingh
Theatres Ltd. of Trinidad.
Through this alliance a working
agreement has been arranged so
as to permit the productions of
a number of Film companies .o
flow through the entire alliance
circuit which covers 12 cinemas
in Barbados, British Guiana and
Trinidad.

Leading film representatives and
distributors of Port-of-Spain wili
be in Barbados for the opening
of this theatre.

Mr. Gittens said that the elec-
trical equipment is West
made by Western Electric anc
patrons are assured that they
will have the best in sound anc
picture, -.

The possibility of a power
failure has not been overlookec
and provision has been mad:
to meet this emergency

NEXT WEEK-A NEW CINEMA



WORK on the new
ders to put the finishing





eine mt —
an en neve ee

Star.

ea



a e
‘ :
Pitch Pine
THE inner basin of the Careen-
age has its busiest days when
there is a lumber ship in port.
The Norwegian steamship “My-
ken” arrived on Thursday with
249,917 feet of dressed pitch pine
from Florida, and yesterday piles
of this cargo congested two sides
of the inner basin. ;
The lumber stacked on the East
side of the inmer basin overflowed
into bridge street, preventing the
easy flow of traffic along that road.
It was being removed steadily
during the day to the various
jumber yards of Bridgetown

panish speaking em-

There are few of the Broad
Street stores who do not have a
member of the staff who knows
at least a little Spanish. Some ol
them are fluent. Some of them
get on with remnants of what they
learned at school.

But there is room for people
who know enough of the langu-
age to be able tv coax a spender
into spending more, argue about
quality price and the like in a
friendly but business like manner.
One Broad Street store has adver- |
tised for such a person, preferably
a lady with an attractive person-
ality. Many have called in with
a view of securing the position,

but no one has yet been chosen
A Common Language



Two Get Letters Of
f oe -« e
Administration
TWO petitions for Letters of
Administration were granted by
His Honour the Chief Judge, Sir
Allan Collymore in the Court of

Ordinary yesterday.

They were as follows:—

Petition of Nathaniel . Augustus
Skeete of Goodland, St. Michael,
to the estate of his father Charles
Frederick Skeete late of St. Peter,
deceased, .

Mr. C, H. Clarke, K.C. instruct.
ed by Hutchinson and Banfield,
Solicitors, for the petitioner.

Petition of Millicent Eudora
Chandler of Fitts Village, St.
James, Widow, to the estate of
her husband Christopher Alex-
ander Chandler, more commonly
known as Elyn Chandler decd.

Mr. D. H. L. Ward instructed
by Haynes & Griffith, Solicitors
for the petitioner.

The wills of the following were

Since the influx of visitors from | admitted to probate,

Venezuela last Easter, some stores! Justina Eudora Deane; Frank
have kept advertising notices in! Gooding; Gordon Springer; Aus-
Spanish in their show windows, | tine Da Costa Chase (St, Michael)
Yesterday morning, C. B. Rice's, Malvina Croft.

Tailoring Establishment advertised
in Spanish in this Newspaper.

Mr. Vernon Knight, Venezuelan
Vice-Counsui here, said that not
only the stores, but the hotels too
will have to employ Spanish
speaking people if they are really
to make the visitor’s stay comfor-
table. What has helped a great
deal up to now is that some of the
visitors speak French and French
speaking people here have been
able to talk to them in a common
language. Again some of the
Venezuelans speak English well
and can assist their friends who
cannot



_——

Failed To Stop

AGIDNEY ASHBY of Swan
Street, City, was ordered by City
Police Magistrate Mr. E. A. Mc
Leod to pay a fine of 20/- or in
default, to undergo 7 days’ im-
prisonment with hard labour for
failing to stop at a major road
j with the motor car X—230 along
Fairfield Road,



Coat Of Arms

Adorns Court House

THE Business of
Ordinary yesterday was done
under the Shadow of the Lion
and the Unicorn, and petitioners
in that Court could have been
heartened by the words Dieu et:
mon droit—God and my right—-!
appearing on the Imperial Coat;
of Arms. !

The Coat of Arms now occupies |
the panel over the Bench, and}
replaces one which used to adorn|
the Town Hall, and which is now
iu the Legislative Council Cham-
ber. Mr. Went, Colonial Engineer,

the Court of





Cuban Paper
Stops Publication

HAVANA, Aug. 25.
The Communist Daily News-
paper Hoy at whose offices here
the Cuban Government yesterday
installed an official “Government





was responsible for ordering) interventor” has stopped pub-
aod putting in the new one. lication.
The view has been expressed| The interventor is charged

that the Barbados Coat of Arms,| with inspecting newspapers and
rather than the Imperial, would| books to determine whether
be more fitting for the Council) they should remain in Communist
Chamber | Possession or be turned over to

the non-Communist Cuban Con-
What’s on Today

federation of Workers.
Police Courts 10 a.m.

The Confederation claimed Hoy

| has been established with funds
Meeting of Housing Board
at Council Chamber 10.30





contributed by workers whose
object was a newspaper to defend
|Cemmunist workers interests.



a.m 7 | —Reuter.
First, Intermediate and |)
Second Divisions Cricket
ees || PIANIST OFF TO
Joope! rs ay a 5
Patrick's School 4.30 M USIC FESTIVA L
Pp. m. NEW YORK, Aug. 25.

Claudio Arrau, Chilean concert
pianist, left here by air to-day for
Prestwick, Scotland, where he is
to make two appearances at the
Edinburgh, Music Festival on
August 27 and 29. Arrau will play
in a programme featuring Schu-
man’s Fantasy Opus 24 and is to
be soloist with Stradiofonien Or-

10/-_ FOR STONE

THROWING

EDWIN BOYCE of 6th Avenue,
New Orleans, was yesterday fined
by City Police Magistrate Mr.
E, A. McLeod, 10/- with an alter



i , j i age laying
native of 14 days’ imprisonment chestra of Copenhagen play l
with hard labour for throwing eee Concerto No. 3 at
stones on the Upper Wharf on| the same hall. Reuter
Thursday. Wei *





REAL
LOVELY !!

The Mayfair's
Mannequins use

ADDIS BEAUTY BRUSH

j Pink, Green & Blue
COMBS in shades to match.

SEE

it.

in



THe AT, .

| KNIGHTS DRUG STORES
PHOENIX PHARMACY







Thirteen!

| Without One

Schooners leave daily, on
West Indian port for anothe
| with lives and valuable cargo on
| board. But as soon as they

| have sailed out of sight, most of |

| check yesterday of 13 schooner
which were in port, found out
that none of them was equipped
with radio transmitting sets and
only three with receiving sets.
The three schooners equipped

with receiving sets were the
i“Paitie Davidson,” the
i“Timothy A. H. Vansluytman’
jand the “E. M. Tannis.” The
receiving sets, however, are o!

no use in case of an emergency
Captain Clarke, the skipper of

| the 72-ton schooner “Emeline,”
| who has been going to sea now
| for many years and on various
| vessels, told the “Advocate” thai
jhe did not know any schooner
which carried a radio transmit-
ting set

Chronometers On The ‘Dot’

A. H. Vansluytman” said that the



Of the motor vessels, only the}
“Caribbee” and the “T. B, Radar” |
are equipped with transmitting |
and receiving sets. These have aj}
considerable advantage over the}
other intercolonial craft as they
can get into communication with
the nearest port in cases of a hur-
ricane, a leak or any other ills
that should befall them at sea

a

Decision Reversed

NO OBSTRUCTION ;
NO FINE

His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
had fined Mrs. Ethel Gowdey of

“Beaumont,” Hastings, Christ
Church £2 and. 1/- costs to be
paid in 14 days or in default

one month's imprisonment for, ob-
structing H. C. Griffith, Chief
Sanitary Inspector of Christ
Church and Sanitary Inspector
Cyril Morgan while in the execu-
tion of their duty on March 14,
1950. This decision was reversed
by Their Honours Mr. G. L.
Taylor and Mr. J. W. B. Chenery,
Judges of the Assistant Court of
Appeal yesterday





Their Honours dismissed the
case on its merits. Mr. G. H
Adams associated with Mr. D,
H. L. Ward, and instructed by
Messrs. Yearwood & Boyce, ap-
peared on behalf of Mrs. Gowdey.

Inspection
Mr. Griffith in his evidence

said that on March 14 he went to
Mrs, Gowdey’s house to carry out
an inspection there A servant
appeared and he told her to tell
Mrs. Gowdey that he was wait-
ing to be admitted for an inspec-
tion. Mrs, Gowdey appeared at
the window and said that six
was not allowing them to enter
her place that day.

In addressing Their Honours
Mr. Adams pointed out that Mr
Griffith who had several cases
with Mrs, Gowdey repeatedly
vent to her place to inspect. Mr
Griffith, he said, had admitted
that her yard was always in a
clean condition. But this particu-
lar day after many regular vis-
its she had refused to admit him
because in her opinion he did
not come with a bona fide inten-
tion to inspect her place, There-
fore Mr. Adams submitted that
tnis refusal could not be called an
obstruction,

In giving their decision Their
Honours agreed with Mr. Adams
that he did not go there with a
bona fide intention to inspect
and that he was just persecuting
Mrs. Gowdey by the amount of
cases that he brought against her.

|



SPUNS

THAT PUT You “Gd

IN THE

24 LEADING
TO CHOOSE

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

18 BROAD

10, Wt,



Auto

evithe
COU
White Park Road. -

them have no means of com-
munication with land, }
| The “Advocate” in making

Captain Stool of the “Timothy |

three schooners kept receiving
sets for setting their chronome-
ters with G.M.T. The chrono-
meter, he said, should always be
kept on the “dot” as they are
very useful instruments in;
navigation. |







PAGE FIVE





| CONTROL OF SCABIES
WITH

‘TETMOSOL

*Tetmosol’ Soap, a pleasantly perfumed
tablet, with a powerful action against
the parasite causing scabies, is particu-
larly intended as a routine measure tor
the prevention of the disease

This soap has proven especially valuable
for controlling scabics outbreaks in
families, and in communities such as
asylums, hospitals, schools, etc.

The method of use, simply replacing
ordinary toilet soap with ‘Tetmosol’, is
sO convenient as to ensure the willing
co-operation of all who may be exposed
to the infection

*Tetmosol’ is also available as a solution
which, diluted before use, rapidly effects
a cure in all cases of scabies

*Tetmosol’ Soap (5%) Single 3 oz.
tablets and boxes of 36.
*Tetmosol’ Solution (25°) Bottles
of 100 c.c, and 2§0 ¢.c.

A rode of IMPERIAL CHEMICAL
(PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED
A subsidiary company of Imperial Chemical
Industries Lid,
WILMSLOW MANCHESTER ENGLAND

SOLE AGENTS AND DISTRIBUTORS IN BARBADOS

A. S. BRYDEN & SONS
(BARBADOS) LTD.

P.O, BOX 403, BRIDGETOWN



AGAIN

PURINA

IN STOCK ...






CHOWS @yw
ANIMALS & POULTR) ‘ Neg

H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.
DISTRIBUTORS,

——,

Pe Saale aay

=—_—

en: > rl
DOMESTIC
EARTHENWARE

THE LARGEST SELECTION AND THE
LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN.

AMONG MANY OTHER ITEMS OUR STOCK INCLUDES—
CUPS AND SAUCERS—All Kinds
WHITE TANKARD JUGS
EGG CUPS WITH FOOT
DECORATED BOWLS
MIXING BOWLS
TEA AND COFFEE POTS
VEGETABLE DISHES (Covered)
PLATES—In All Sizes
NIGHT CHAIR PANS
TEA, DINNER, and COFFEE SETS

in a good range of attractive decorations

AND
A SPECIAL
PIECK KCORATED
TOILET SETS
At $11.87 Per Set.





—

BROAD ST.

LINE OF



o

HARRISON’

—

BROAD STREET
DIAL 2364





—













Wilts
36” wide at
$1.00

a yard



SHADES
FROM

STREET,





IN BLACK NIGHTS

Fi



DR LONGER BRIGHTER

LIGHWMTS. .. FIT = «

-DURALIFE
Batteries

Ebonite Separators

RFESY GARAG
(ROBERT THOM. LTD.)



— Dial 4391









PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1959
TT LL sent ee ream



) HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



LADIES!!!

Tee
| INTRODUCING TWO
] NEW TOILET SOAPS

: CHIC







Beverege after a
Hot and Tiring Day.

Brewed Specially for
Hot Climates.



















PNOT FUNNY! TAKE
KIM AWAY 1 NECT

» IF HIS EXCELLENCY
DOES NOT FIND VOL
COMICAL , YOU
WiLL BE EXECUTED
|\MMEDIATELY..
NOW, THEN ...-
BE FUNNY,
PLEASE!

=z THE Position OF | [
= COURT VESTER IS
A GOOD ONE... GOOD





&
SWEETHEART

UNBEATEN FOR FRAGRANCE

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING
STORES

AT ONLY Ide. CAKE |
|
|

AND ARRANGE
FOR YOUR X’MAS

CALENDARS









HUTT TT
“~

HU
















-! GREeaT scotT!
(fF. \NHAT MAKES MY
iy. ( RAZOR SCRAPE SO?






AVOID THE et
°

TAKE HOME A FEW CAKES
TO-DAY.

ADVOCATE PRINTING
DEPT.

HERE AGAIN!

YOUR OLD FAVOURITE

“ENAMEL-IT”

MADE FROM BAKELITE

Fe a _
fe
DEKE SAID HE'D DOUBLE MY SHARE OF TH
GOLD IF I KILLED THE LONE RANGER!





HOLD YOUR FIRE! WE COME
AS FRIENDS! pope



MISSED HIM! THATS WHAT T ) FAN
GET FOR FIRIN' Too SOON! Laut

ee pe"
Z f y




i Baby
i Péwder —





New Stone



e
BRUSH... UP... YOUR... SMILE...

P.O. Red
Rose Pink
Golden

THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS

GIORGIO! YOU OLD WAR
HORSE! HAVEN'T SEEN











BIGNOR CANNON 7 7 1 CAN'T 00 MORE

Brown
NO,NO! 8AM A
CAPITANO

CANNON ¢

(S$ AFRAID OF THE [ —
EAT LITTLE SIGNOR

CHIEF OF POLICE!

YOU SINCE THE 8TH. IT 1S SO GOOD TO



¢, aed Saxe Blue
4 ARMY DAYS! WHAT
BIUAMT 7 + es ARE YOU NOW?,, WITH THE co BRUSH
; ‘ (toon we 8) AN ADMIRAL? -—“ ve V nannies: LS os * Wisdom's straight-line head reaches O00
nae ep awkward corners easily. i i ‘i
et mel Be || /\ anaes
aXe : ;
y me , % Wisdom’ s angle in the * Wisdom’ s widely-spaced
- : handle is the secret of tufts ‘comb’ between teeth

its comfortable control. ~clean where decay begins.

Wisdoni

ADDIS LTD. OF HERTFORD, MAKERS OF THE FIRST TOOTHBRUSH IN 1780

OBTAINABLE FROM ALL DEALERS
IN THE SCREW-TOP GLASS JARS!



BY GEORGE MC. MANUS








Liha aT

i fi it th

BOY/ I'M GONNA |

STAY HOME AND

TAKE IT EASY-- |]

DON'T FEEL ||

IKE SEEIN!
NY

2 i
ren u! j
\. iy SL ANYONE
ge Topay // [I
. ‘7 2 : MN £4

Cope. 1930, King Festnres Srnsberte. toc ®

OH+HELLO-BIMMY-

HOW'S MY DARLING

BROTHER FEELING
TODAY ?












‘A » Sg im My

RIP KIRBY








| BY ALEX RAYiivn.
' — / va /.He's THE y” eo
J } ) Prearr Sa f-
6 |) a



y 7
e—F — ieee = eb Reet
My cyes often used to smart and At the Club Jim said: “You're
Driving this sensational new M.G. Midget is like handling Jeuaaes topay lneiagerbnabe’: ..See enine Way net ty Oana
the controls of an aircraft, The smooth, responsive power of its =a
1250 c.c. overhead valve engine gives you that impression.
Cushioned riding comfort made possible by independent front

suspension and latest type shock absorbers



wk

6 si \
WE d
THE PHANTOM

ASTHE KING WATCHES THE CANNIBAL
Fife CAM)

THERE WERE TWO \ LCFREMON/AL® |
THERS + MEN+ WE




i Ne a Neen ‘ add still further to this conception, Come
IW? Ae ‘ Ys
Ne aL and se this “as” vesion ofa eee

world-wide sports car success.
Better still; come for a drive!
eye strain now!" I said to Jim

“No
i later. “Thanks to you—and Optrex!
and germs, toned up eye muscles. !'ll never be without it again.”

PROTECT YOUR EYES wth

HE'LL INTERFERE NO MORE? IF HE
ENTERS OUR LAND AGAIN,

DESTROY HIM! A ‘NEW TD. SERIES

MIDGET
Safely fact

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 MAKE THIS TEST

The rim of the eye and inner
lining should be healthy flesh
colour. If they are red or irri-
tated or the whites bloodshot, packet
your eyes nec treatment designed eyebat!






4 memes 2) 02)
ae























ie
&

SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1950

CLASSIFIED ADS.





BURTON—CAROLINE HARPER,
day evening at her residence
Franeia, Hastings. Her funeral will
leave her late residence at 4.30 p.m
for St. Matthias Church, and thence
to'the Westbury Cemetery. No Flow-
ers by request

Frank, Allan Burton, and Chandler

Family 26.8.50—I1n

yester-
“Villa



GIBBS—SUSAN AUGUSTUS, last night
at her residence, Cave Hill, St. Mich-
ael. Her funeral will leave her late
residence for St. Stephen's Church at
4.30 this afternoon
Olive, Hubert, Maizie, Audrey, Sheila,

Agnes (children).





FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

—_—
AUTO BYKE—One Excelsior Auto Byke
(with spring fork). Price $130.00. (A
Real ‘Bargain). Hurry to Olympic Store,

Cor. James and Roebuck Street
26.8.50—2

perenne

TRUCK—One 1934 Ford V-8 Truck
Apply D. V. Scott & Co. ‘White Pak.
Phone 3493. 16,8.50—t.f.n





a cere

CAR—1947 Hillman Minx. 17,000 miles,
Perfect condition. Owner leaving island
Price $1,400.00. Greenland. Phone 3283, or
2775. 25.8. 50—3n

FURNITURE

—

MAHOGANY DINING TABLE to seat
six; six Birch Chairs, Mahogany Rocker.
Apply S. T. SARJEANT, Roebuck Street,

MAHOGANY CEDAR — Lined 17,
Boy — 4 ft. x 3 ft. x 2 ft. Good con
dition. Three drawers and hanging space
Good bevelled mirror in mahogany
frame, 30 x 20 ins. Price reasons
Archie Clarke, Navy Gardens.
4.8.50—3n

MECHANICAL

MACHINE — Singer Sewing Machine
(treadle). Perfeet condition, Apply to
William F. Skeete, Corner Queen Victoria
Rosd and Bank Hall X Poad

26.8 .50-—2n

MISCELLANEOUS

GLASSWARE FROM CZECHOSLOVA-
KIA—Vases, Powder Bowls, Cups &
Fruit Bowls reduced to half price. See
ovr Show Windows. Knight's Ltd.

25.8.50—3n

















IMPEX Wofld’s best cycle generators
and headlights. Obtainable,.from all lead-
ing stores. 25.8.50—Tn

PUPS—Pure bred Cocker Spaniel Pups.
Appty: Mrs. O. H, Seale, Ashburg Pitn.,
St George. Dial 95227 26.8.50—6n

——$—$——$—$—$——————————————
PINKING SHEARS of the highest qual-
ity. Only $9.89 and $1.98, Limited
quantity. See your Jewellers, Y. De Lima

& Co., Ltd., 20, Broad Street
26.8.50—Tn

RECORD ALBUMS for 10-inch and for

12-inch and carrying cases for 10-inch

records, and we have the records too
A.





& CO., LTD.
10.6,.50—t.f.n.
YAWL—“Frapida” approx. 37% feet
long with Gray Marine engine. Good
condition $3,000 — a bargain. Apply

J. R, Edwards. Phone 2520.
15.8.50—T .F YI.

FOR RENT
HOUSES

FLAT — Upstairs Flat at Waverley,
Blue Waters Terrace. 3 large Bedrooms
semi-furnished with Tame wea

.8.50.—Tn,













HOUSES and Apartments on the Sea,
St. Lawrence Gap. y furnished.
Dial 8367. oo 22.8. 50—2n,

‘THERSISDON-—Maxwell’s Coast Road.
Fully furnished. From September. Mrs
B. Lashley, 5th Bungalow, Maxwell's
Road. Dial 8417, 25.6.50—3n.

WOODYARE — Pine Hill. — Furnished
From 15th September to mid January.
Ring Haslett 331f or John Bladon 4640.

26 .8.50—3nt







WORTHY DOWN—Top Rock having 3
bedrooms connecting Toilet and Bath,
Jarge Lounge-dining room. Delightful
balcony, Two car garage. Fully enclosed
Available unfurnished September Ist
Apply: Ralph Beard. 4683 or 2328

25.8.50—3n

PUBLIC SALES

AUCTION

UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER
sé NINA ”

I have been instructed by Messrs. Da
Costa & Co., Ltd, to offer for sale by
Public Auction on the 3ist day of
August, beginning at 2 o'clock on the
spot, the boat called the “NINA” which
is at present lying above the Victoria
Bridge. It is 66 feet long by 22 feet wide,
and 9 feet deep; with a draft of 6 feet.
It has the anchor and spars and can be
easily converted into a coastal boat or
schooner, For all other particulars apply
to D'Arcy A. Scott, Auctioneer,

19.8.°50.--6n,

- REAL ESTATE

—

BUILDING SITES—-A Most Desirable
Building Site overlooking the sea, Wor-
thing, St. Lawrence and the Golf Course
rext to “Cloud Walk” -at Rendezvous
Terrace, Christ Church. Apply: C. E.
Clarke, 7 Swan Street. Phone 2631 or
3029. 26.8.50—3n.

















a
LAND — One rood twenty-six and a
half perches of land at Prospect, St











QUALIFIED BLECTRICAL FOREMAN.
—Apply in person
experience ete. to H. B. D. W.

Deane,
City Garage Trading Co.
Street.

Ltd., Victoria
i7.8.50—4.f.n.

PERSON to take chat#e of Office—
Male or Female. Position requires sound
bookkeeping experience, ifitiative and
judgment. Apply in writing only, stating
salary required to: Herbert A. Dowding,
Lower Estate Plantation, St. Michael.

26.8.50—8n

MISCELLANEOUS

POSITION W. D
DENTAL TBCHNI' with over 2
years experience in preparing and cyst-
ing all gold fittings Acnylic processing
of partial an edentulous cases a spe-

ciality.

Modern Technique used in all stags
Reply to Geo. Wilkins, 11, Picvon

Street, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad.
33 .8.50—6n

STAMPS — Used and Mint Postage
Stamps of Barbados and other Islands of
the B.W.1L, Curacao and Aruba. Bese
Prices paid at Caribbean Stamp Society,
No. 10 Swan Street. 26.8,50—3n













WANTED TO BUY
STAMPS—Used Postage Stamps of |' 3.
America and B.W.1. Islands. James’ \ st
Indies Stamp Co., Bay Street, St. ">
ael 25.8.59—sn

WANTED TO BUY
MACHINES-—-Old Sewing Machines out
or order. Any make. Good Prices paid.
Corner Fairchild and Probyn Street: or

King Street—Mrs. Vaughan.

26.8,50-—"n

PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE

re the Estate of
ALONZA ELEAZER LASHLEY
deceased

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claims
against the Estate of Alonza Eleazer
Lashley, deceased, — late of Cave-wood
Roaxi, Howell's Cross Road, in the
parish of Saint Michael in this Island
who died on the 5th day of May 1950,
— intestate, are requested to send in
particulars of their claims duly at-
tested to the undersigned Clifford
Alonza Lashley also known as Clifférd
4Jonza Smith, c/o Messrs Haynes &
Griffith, No. 2 Swan Street, Bridge-
town, Barbados Solicitors, on or be-
fore the 30th day of Septermber 1950,
after which date I shall proceed to
distribute the assets of the deceased
emong the parties entitled thereto hayv-
ing regard only to such claims of which
I shall then have had notice and 1
will not be liable for the assets or any
part thereof so distributed to any per-
son of whose debt or claim I shall not
then have had notice,

And all persons indebted to the said
estate ate requested to settle their said
indebtedness without délay.

Dated this 29th day of July, 1950,
CLIFFORD ALONZA Y
also Known as Clifford Alonza Smith
Qualified Administrator of the Es-

tate of Alonza Bleager Lashley deceas-
ed.















ai ee” 1.8.50—4n.
NOTICE
Te tre Poms ot

deceased
NOTICE Is HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim against
the estate of Caroline Simmons, de
ceased late of King Bdward Road
Bank Hal) in the rish of Saint Mich-
ael in this Islan who died on the
Ist day of July 1950 are réquested to
send in particulars of their claims

duly attested to the undersigned
SAMUEL POLLARD and GERGALDINE
DANTEL Qualified Executors of the
will ©f the said Caroline Simmons de-
ceased, c/o Messrs Haynes & Griffith
No. 2 Swan Street, Bridgetown, Ba
bados Solicitors, on or before the 30th
day of September 1950, after which
date we shall proceed to distribute the
assets of the deceased among the par-
ties entitled thereto having regard only
tv such claims of which we shall then
have had notice —/ and we shall not
be liable for the assets or any part
thereof so distributed to any person of
whose debt or claim we shall not then
have had notice. .
And ail persons indebied to the said
estate are requested to settle their in-
debtetiness without delay.
Dated this 29th day of July 1960.
POLLARD

GERALDING DANIEL
Qualified Executors of the will of
Caroline Simmons deceased.



1.8.50—4n.
ls
SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICULTURAL
BANK

APPLICATIONS for the post of Man-
ager of the Sugat Industry Agricultural
Bank, which will become vacant on Ist
November next, will be received by the
ene on or before 15th September,

1. Applicants should have some know-
ledge and experience of accountancy and
a sound general education.

2. They should state age, which must
not exceed forty-eight years last birth-
day, and qualifications.

8. Submit two recent testimonials.

4. Salary £2700 per annum rising by
two annual increments of £50 to £800
per annum,

5. The successful eandidate to assum.
duties on ist November, , and he
will be required to retire at the age of

65 years.
A. L, BAILEY, ©
ager.
Sugar Industry Agricultural Bank.
24th August, 1950
26.8 .50—3n



PERSONAL

—_—_—_—
S== Se
THE public are hereby warned against

James. Price attractive. For particulars! giving eredit to my wife Mrs. HILDA

apply to D'Arcy. A Scott.
Lane. 24.8.50—n.

(eee
The undersigned will offer for sale at

their Office No. 17 High Street, Bridse- |

town, on Wednesday, 30th August, 1950,
at 2 p.m.

(1) Lot 29, Navy Gardens, containing
11,008 square feet, abutting on lands
of the Marine Hotel on the south,
and on York Road on the North.

(2) 5,994 square feet of land at Chelsea
Road, St. Michael, adjoining lands
of Mr. J, N. Marshall on the West
and Mr. Johnson on the Socth.

For further particulars and conditions

f sale, apply to:-—

a COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
22.8.50—8n





THE undersigned will set up for
sale at their office No. 17 High Street.
on Friday ist September 1950 at 2 p.m.
the dwellinghouse called The Cottage
and the land thereto containing 3,250
square feet situate at Cheapside, Bridge-
town.

Inspection any day é¢xcept Thursday
between the hours of 4 p.m. and 6 p.m.
on application to the tenant, Mrs
Thoma

s.
For further particulars and conditions
of sale, apply to:
COTTLE, CATFORD & Co
18.8.50—t.f.n



HOUSE—(1)

29 x 12 x 8 covered with galvanise,

situated in Yearwood Land, Black Rock

Telephone 3369 D. A. Browne.
18.8.50-—t .f.n.

1 asec lreeapl (intemperance lA etn
All that chattel dwelling house cailed
Constitution Road, St.
galleny,
Breakfast
Electric Light

“Laurenceville”
Michael. The House contains
Drawing room, 3 bedrooms,
room and usual out offices
and water service
Inspection on application to the te 1ant
The above will be set
public competition at our
Lucas St., Bridgetown, on
Ist September 1%0. at 2 p.m
CARRINGTON & SEALY,



SMHlicitors
26.8.50—6n
NOTICE

This jis to notify the General Public
that the Auction Sale of the (5 pine
Spars now ing w& th. Constitution
River which was adv dito ‘ak
place on the 3ist day August ha



been Cancelled

tioneer

5.8.50-—1







Double roof house tach

up for sale at
office ir
Friday the

Magazine |> GREEN (née Wall) as I do not hold

rmayself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting any debt or debts in
my name unless by a written order
signed by me.

Signed HORACE Da GREEN,

! Rock Hall, Nr. Walkers,

St. George.
23.8 .50—2n

TILE publie are hereby warned ‘agains’
giving credit to my wife EMELINE
WOOD (née Sealey) as I do not hold

myself responsible for her or anyone

else contracting any debt or debis in

my mame unless by a written order

signed by me,

Signed JOSEPH NATHANIEL WOOD,
Ellerton,

St. George.

23.8.50—2n



THE public are hereby warned against
giving cretlit to my wife RUBY 1D
SPARROCK (née Alleyne) as I do not
jhold myself responsible for her or any-
Jone else contrarting any debt or debts
in my name unless Wy a written order
\sened by me,
i Signed DARNLEY SPARROCK.
Hindsbury Road,
St. Michael,
26 .8.50—2n

Publie Official Sale

The Provost Marshal's Act (1904-6) 30)
ON Friday the 15th day of September
1950. at the hour of 2 o'clock



the appraised value.

All that certain piece of Land con-
tainine about 4,720 squegs feet of which
ares 720 Square Feet form part of a
private Road hereinafter mentioned si-

tuete in the Parish of Christ
Butting and bounding on_ three

Church

| (deed)



to the Public Road called St
Gap, together with
i Dwelling houses, Shop Buildings,
|appraised as follows:—

FIGHTY SEVEN DOLLARS
TWENTY FIVE CENTS
tached from EDLA





EDLA VIOLET SMITH) for

(
towards satisfaction, &c





t
| N.B.- Deposit to be paid on day |
of purthz
Sed. T. T. HEADLEY
35.8. 50—3n

letter stating |



in the
afternoon will be sold at my office to
the highest bidder for any sum not under

sides
on lands of the Pstate of F. A. Layne
and on the fourth side on a
private road eighteen feet wide leading
Matthias
the messuage or
&e.,

| The whole property appraised to FOUP | ‘

THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND
AND

($4,887 25) fe

VIOLET JOHNSON @

and | @)

BARBABOS ADVOCATE

GOVERNMENT NOTICES.

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Applications are invited from teachers and other suitably qualific.
| persons for the following vacancies: —
MEN .
| St. Mary’s Boys’ School

| St. Christopher's Boys’ School



WOMEN i
St. Mary's Girls’ School
Ebenezer Girls’ School
Bayley’s Girls’ School.

2. The minimum qualification for entry to the! teaching serviée is
the Cambridge School Certificate. i

3. Applications must be submitted on the appropriate torms
(E.35(b) for men and E.35(c) for women) which may be obtained
from the Department of Education, but candidates who have already
submitted one of these forms in respect of previous vacancies (how
filled) may apply by letter accompanied by « recent testimonial.

4. Any teacher who applies for a vacancy on the staff of another
school must inform his or her present Chairman of Managers and the
Head Teacher of any application for such a tranafer.

5. All applications must reach the Ditector of Education not later
than Saturday, 2nd September, 1950.

26.8.50—2n.



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Vacancies in the Elementary Teaching Service

Applications are invited from teachers with at least 10 years
teaching experience for the Headships of the following schools: —

St. Margaret’s Mixed School, St. John — Grade I.

All Saints’ Boys’ School, St. Peter — Grade II.

2. The minimum professional qualification required is the Certi‘i-
caic A of the Department of exemption therefrom.

3. Salary will be in accordance with Government Scales for Head
Teachers in Elementary Schools.

4 Candidates who have already submitted application forms in
respect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, ac-
companied by a recent testimonial. All other candidates should make
application on the appropriate form which may be obtained from the
Department of Education. All applications must be in the hands of
the Director of Education by Saturday, 2nd September, 1950.

26.8.50—2n.

eee

Vacant Post of Cultivation Officer,

Department of Science and Agriculture, Barbados.
Applications are invited for the post of Cultivation Officer, De-

partment of Science and Agriculture, Barbados. Applicants should
hold the minimum qualification of the Diploma of the Imperial College
of ‘Tropical Agriculture but consideration will be given to candidates
with the necessary experience who are not so qualified. The post is
pensionable and carries salary on scale $2,880 x $144 to $4,320. Point
of entry determined by experience and qualifications. Applications
mentioning the names of two referees, should be addressed to the
Director of Science and Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should reach
him not later than the 30th of September, 1950. Further details will
be supplied on request.

26.8.50—2n.



Applications are invited for the post of Headmaster of the Boys’
Grammar School in St. Kitts, which will be vacated by the present
holder on the 3lst December, 1950. The school roll at present num-
bers 110 and courses are offered up to the Higher School Certificate
examination of Cambridge University.

2. The post is pensionable and carries a salary scale of $2,640 by
$120 to $2,880. A temporary cost of living allowance of $240 per
annum is also payable and free quarters are provided for the Head-
master. The appointment will be on probation for 2 years and subject
to the passing of satisfactory medical examination.

3. Applicarts should possess a degree of a University within the
British Commonwealth, preferably in Mathematics and Physics. Teach-
ing experience will be regarded as an asset, and the appointment will
be made at a point in the salary scale commensurate with the appli-
cant’s qualification and experience.

4. Applications with at least two testimonials and photograph
should be submitted to the Administrator of St. Kitts-Nevis not later
than the lst November, 1950.

26.8.50—2n.



PRICE OF SULPHATE OF AMMONIA
Until further notice, the following price has been arranged: —





DR
oe

Sulphate of Ammonia. ah

Maximum Price Discount if paid by

30th September, 1950



$120.80 per ton.

$2.25 per ton





25.8.50—2n.



PAYMENT OF WATER RATES

Consumers who have not yet paid water rates in respect of the
quarter ending 30th September, 1950, are hereby notified that unless
these rates are paid on or before the 31st of August, 1950, the Depart-
ment, as authorised by section 46 of the Waterworks Act, 1895—1. may
stop the water from flowing into the premises, in respect of which
such rates are payable. either by cutting off the pipe to such premises
or by such means as they may think fit, and take proceedings to
recover any amount due.

25.8.50—2n.

SOLE AGENTS:—

BLACKMANS
ST. JOSEPH

ONE of the most imposing houses in the Island, This beauti-
ful country property is set in an élevated position encircled with
approximately 5 acres of heavily wooded grounds and orna-

| mental gardens. There are 5 reception, 6 bedrooms. 4 garages
ete. All main services.

£6,500

| Real Estate Agents—Auctioneers—Surveyors
Phone 4640 Plantations Building























































HARBOUR LOG

In Carlisle Bay

Seh. Philip H. Doevideen; Sch Bu

ma D; Sch. Rosarene; Biuenose
Mee; Sch Zita Wonlta; Sch. Frenct:
+ a M.V. Star; Sch. Emeline
. 3 Lauda! Sch

D * Carbbee; 88.6. Spec)s

1 : : SS.6. Specjn-

list; - jin Wo; Sch. iterprise :
Bch Turtle eh! Mant M. Lewis

Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe; Sch Mare
Henrietta; 8.8. Canadian Challenger
ARRIVALS
Tanker Rufinn, 1,835 tons, Capt. Van-
er ont Go ae , Agents: Messrs

4 tons, Capt. Good-
ing, be inided, Agents: Sch. ‘Owners’

M.V. 199 tons,
Gvmbs, from fea,” Agente; ‘Sen
oman,

" Association.
ee, See SEO!

ven Ge Lake nanon,

SS. Clarke,
jesers 8 Austin & Co. Ltd.
A :

Sch. Laudalpha, 60 tons, Capt. Gumbs
for St, Lucia, Agents: Seh. Owners’
Association .

M.V. T. B. Radar, 116 tons, Capt
Archibald, for Dominica, Agents: Sth
Owners’ Assoctation

&.S. Sylvanfield, 4,637 tons, Capt
Pugsley, for Lisbon, Agents: Messrs

Gerdiner Austin & Go. Ltd

S.S. Myken, 4,38 tons, Capt. Dolven
for Grenada, Agents: Messrs Robert
Thom & Co. Ltd

Ships In Touch With
Barbados Coaatai Station

CABLE and Wireless (West Indies?
nicate with the followin
their Barbados Coast Station:—

8.8. Juvenal: 8.8 Sunwhit; S$.Ss
Coulgarve; S.S. San Leonardo; §
Canadian Challenger; S.S. Belita; S

Sylvafield; S.S. Guifbird; S.S. Pathf

ships through

Ltd. Advise that they can now nae

ler; S.S. Sepia; S.S. Rena; S.S. Li _—— es
8. Oberon; §$.S Tindefjell; SS )
Ville D. Ameins; SS. Clarkeswharf {
Sia ore ~=6A DANCE: |
De France; S.S. Ravanger; S.S. Pet- i

\

ter LU;
gull; SS Esso Bethichem;
enneé; S.S. Specialist; SS
grange; S.S. Regent Lion; S.S. Birka-
land; S.S. Byfjord; S.S. Belpareil; S.S.
Myken; S.S. Argentan; 8.S. Hera; S.S
Charmouth Hill; 8.5, Runa; S.S. Rand-
ford; SS Amerigo Vespucci; §.S
Barapara; S.S Arakaka; 5.S. Fiysses

SEAWELL

ARRIVALS BY B.W.1.A.L
from VENEZUELA:
Fred Leisering: Mary Leisering; Aradeo

S.S. San Silvester; S.S. Fern-
8.8. Sur-

Tower-

cotulli; Fakio Marcotulli; Blisabette Mar-
cotulli; Lucian Dadzitis; Mauricio Her-
sehteitt; William Fletcher; Jose Urban-



LIQUOK }
The applicatior wilder
ef liquor license No. S34 of 1950, granted
to Rebecca Spencer in | qqgeweesesee

Marcotulli; Fekio Marecotulli; Favsto :

PAGE SEVEN







LICENSE NOTICE

of Lero Mil

respect of prem
ises viai-—2nd feer of a Istorey building |
known as No. 30 Tudor Si. Bridgetow:

for permission to wee seid liquor licen
Bottom foo

ARTHRITIC PAINS

But new treatment does more than
Se ee. | ease these terrible agonies.
NB —This application will be. cons i-- |

Licenst ‘
) Re te a. ne a | A new product, DOLCIN, has been created which not only gives

the 4th day of September, 1950, at 11 |
o'clock, a.m. |
26 8.50—1n

following pretnises viz- |
of a S-storey wall buildimg st White's |
Alley, Bridgetown '
Dated this Mth day of August, 1950
To H. A. TALMA,
The Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
MILLAR,

prompt relief from the pains due to the symptoms of arthritis and
rheumatism, but also effects the mets bolic processes which constitute
rtant part of the rheumapic state’s background,
add thoroughly tested in medical institutions,
DOLCIN is being used now with unprecedented success, DOLCIN
is being prescribed by doctors now. And many sufferers have already
resumed normal living as a result of taking DOLCIN.
Don’t delay. Proft by the experience of fellow-victims of these
Get DOLCIN today.




a@ very im
DOLCL has

So







Professional Notice

THIS is to inform my friends
and Clients, those whom I have
that 1
the Island for
Yok os
cozt

not contacted personally, A bottle of 100 precious tablets coste
will be out of

approximately
L.

pains,

only

SOLD BY:
On Sale at BOOKER’S DRUG STORES (B’dos) LTD.

ER.

enna ene





:
Notice

Dr. F. A. COX

D.C.P.T. (Chir.
Chiropractor & Optician

has Removed to Lower James St
8.30 to 1 and 2 to 11.30

Removal

Hours




















UNBREAKABLE
GARDEN POTS

That is the name givgn then
by purchasers
seer:

Have you them”?

They are the Tron meter
FOR SALE
At Your Gas Works, Bay St
Small size @ 1/3 medium size @
4/6 and a few large ones @ 4/-
each dozen lots chenper











MISS SYLVIA CALLENDER

& Mr. LAUKIE CALLENDBIK ]
better known as Clgo H
begs to remind you of their (
DANCE
which will be held at the |} patency heirs yur iano eel hand ofl
CHIMMING BELI, UNION )
CLUB ) We
Marchfleld, St. Philip }) aes
On Monday Night 26 August } S.P.MUSSON,SON & CO LTD > BARBADOS
Admission; Gents 2/-: Larlies 1/6 ()
Music by Mr BERTIE HARE. ()
ins wood i
reshments on Sale |
Miss This and blame yourself {!!
26.8.50—1n. §{\

=

cae























ja; David Wolkowiez; Arminuio Borjas
Yolanda Borjas: Dorothy Meudt; Her- ®
bert Meudt; Christina Meudt; Maria an cence
Urbaneja.
y tain BY BW LAL Ki adi nae ie
‘or AD: TRE re > --—--—-
ere Newman; famosie Tirado U ng Room } rene a eee ee im tp ue —
ureand Lopez; Frederick Yard; Ada De [2 : . So ms
Jara; Maria DeJara; Raul DeJara: Cesar IST FLOOR, BOWEN & SONS 6. ee et eiely tat The M.V. “T. B. RADAR” wii
DeJara: Manuel DeJara; Luis Orsini (Broad Street) Hadstone August 17th, Brisbane August hooept Cana and Pasengeerd: ter
Ronald Mackin: Luis Kowalski; Charles Hours: 10 am—2 p.m. ‘ard, Sydney August 80th, arriving Dominica; St. Vineent; Grennads
Kowalski; Alfredo Kowalski; John Grgll: Tuesdays, Wednesday j rbados September 27th. ‘ St. Lucia and Aruba, sailing
Doreen Cozier; Frederick Springer; Mol- 1 ays, 5.8. “GLOULRETER Acad ie Thursday 24th August
tilde Ruiz: James Arkinne; Herbert King Fridays. ast Siet, Adolaide eer 11th ‘ ae , mm
Lily Boon’ 10 a.m.—12 o'clock. evonport Beptamber 18th, Melbourn the MV. “CARIDBEE” _ witt
turd a - m wa G7 . pecept Cargo and Passengers for
( At tht ays. ees ae Dv auny Bet) Sayrembes Dominica; Antigua; Montserrat;
nis §=Roo! be: 1 rriving at Bar a We . .
the Christian 'Solence gs } no wember Att Bui pati Gado he eee
Scion : These vessels have ample space fot r ;
ONRUA: ( ihe Roriptarte ty Maas Gahan } hilled, hard frozen, ond general earge The MV. “DAEBRWOOD" will
For A: ‘ koDY > Cargo acrepted on through bills of accept Cargo snd Passengers for
Harvey Smith; Ernest Lambert; Capt may de reed, borrows, ding with transhipment at Trinidad St. Lucia; St. Vincent; Grenada;
Eric Burton; Barbara Balesterr; Earle re OF pur hased. or Barbados, Britiah Guiana, Windward and Atuba, date of sailing will
stig Legge pomrboe worms” | gv aivors Are Welcome 1 | iis Gait wv; || BW, ;
* ‘ For further particulars app? B.W.I s
For SAN JUAN: a -7 FURNESS W ; % Wot, chooner Owners
Thomas Porter; Amelina Porter; ieee or Trinidad, BWI. cw Association Ine.
Katherine Porter; Pamela Porter: Arden ee and Consignee: Dial: 40
Cozier: Arden Cozier; Catherine Cozier: | DA COSTA & CO. LTD ee; jal; 4047.
James’ Beckles; Clarice Beckles; Cyril TO DAY’S | feruaaaee
-
XK

Corier
For B.G.

Smith Bracewell; Margaret Bracewell,
James Aléxander; Gladys Kirton; Henry
Parker; Gertie Dolphin;
Evelyn Fraser; George
Clement Cha-
ward McPhee,

King, Hilda
John Jeffers:
Collier; William Miller;
derton; Kathleen Sill;
Monica McPhee.
——



MAIL NOTICE

Madls for Dominica; Antigua; Montser-

rat; Nevis, St. Kitts by the M.V Carib-

bee will be closed at the General Post
Office as under:—

Parce!, Registered and Ordinary Mails
at 10.15 a.m. on the 36th August 1950

———————

If You Like...

NICE
FURNITURE

you will Jike these

things





Vanities (nat Charm, in_ pe-
















LOVELY TAFETTA 36 ins.

Beautiful Quality SATIN
in Pink, White, Lemon
and Blue 31 ins.

JERSEY SILK in Pink
36 ins. wide

Pr. Wm. Hry.



For GRENADA;

Marion Kivero; Albert Rivero: Norma
Rivero; Mable Ross; Norma Bain; Frank
Bain; Edward Gittens; Monica Ramsgy:
Eustace Commissiong; Augusta Beckles



LOW PRICES

71¢ a yd.

70¢ a yd.

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WASHABLE PRINTS from
CALL TO-DAY
These and Many More Lines at: 1’

THAN] BROS. R07 "tr we

nectarines,



NEWS FLASH |

) EGG TIMERS |

SAMSONITE: —a heat proof |
adhesive of colossal strength

\een ALcon —

at
yl ORLEANS #E8V1CB
JOHNSON’'S STATIONERY No. Dace
LCOA RANGER i2th July Mth July
& HARDWARE ICOA HOAMER 26th July 1th Aus.
LCOA RUNNER e " Yth Auguet 22nd Augum
NEW YOUR SERVIOR
walle Arr.
N.Y. H'des
( _G THULIN" ‘ 2iet July dist July
BYFJORD" llth August 2ist August

‘a oe
CANADIAN SERVICE



VENEZOLANOS AMIGOS

OUTHBOUND

. Sails Sails Arrives

TE NEMOS ATICLOS DE Name of Ship Montreat Halltax Barbados
S.8. “ALCOA PILGRIM” August 25th August 28th September 10th
8. ALCOA PARTNER" September 8th, September llth, September 2st

ORIENTAL

Se Habla Espanol
SOU acs ks



eet neta a atm ee ee

ORTHBOUND

Arrives

Barbadar

Aug. 27th For St. John, NB,
Lawrence River Ports,

5, “ALCOA PEGASUS" & St.

THANT BROS.
Pr. Wm. Hnry. St.

These Vessels have limited passenger accommodation,





















, , fo , Apply : DACOSTA & CO, LTD,—Canadian Service.
eb RE ho ag wey eines ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Service.
shapes — Wardrebes, Dresser- (\
er eeeen PRBS oe }
hogany or Ma- . ‘
hogenised or Guarnatied, ‘Deal or | Recent ! / “
Fir — Bedstends in Full-pannell- 1 2 ! FB Ne)
el or railed Iron ads } . "
Laths and Tron Side Rails, | Arrivals H
Drawi Room Furniture in sie 7 } —
Morris; Tub or other Suites or } 78 Vonthaoe oe y
seperate pieces —- One 4piece MUTTON & PEAS OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
Upholatered Suite, a Hit, at se | MURTON & PEAS
ne en -plece ijn ec VIEN § s ~
caned Deepsent Suite, Only so QOCKEALE carters Vessel From Leaves Due,
eine anen. one | Besrenn TOMATO SOUP i a : hn
SES Segue ae.e -/ erat oat STEAK & TOMATO ( }>.S. “MOONCREST” Londen 3rd Aug. 24th Aug.
Larders, Waggons — eel i MACARONI & CHERSY 3.8. “BROOKHURST” Glasgow &
Cocktail and Fancy Tables ~ FRUIT SALAD { . ¥ ne 1st Bent
Dining Tables, Extension an’ PLUM JAM : wrverpoo] 17th Aug. st Sept.
Fixed tops, Round, Square ana TOMATO JUICE 8.8. “JUNECREST” London 25th Aug. 8th Sept.
[sine Upright Chairs for all TOMATOES S.S. “TEMPLE ARCH” Mh . A’
joome PINEAPPI FE / - . oa ) ig M
i APRICOTS: London 5th Sept. 26th Sept.
ALL AT MONEY. SAVING .
PpRIC HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
v
STUART & SAMPSON \ Vessel F Closes in Barbados
LID 1.8. “SPECIALIST” Londo 25th Aus.
u ° ) Yor further information apply to—
SS Se
’ DACOSTA & (CO., LTD.—Agents
PASSAGES TO IRELAND
THESE ARE REAL che
ANTILLES PRODUCTS LYD., Roseau, Dominica, offer



Passages to Dublin per M.V. “DUALA”, next sailing from Roseav
about 23rd August, and thereafter about every thirty-three days
Single Fare, £70, usual reductions for children.
apply direct.







GOING TO A WEDDING? Select your gift from our wide

range of - -
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THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(CENTRAL FOUNDRY L&’'D.—Proprietors)
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' PAGE EIGHT



W.I. Defeat Essex
In Race With Clock

~ Weekes Hiis 83

Scored In 2 Hrs.

ESSEX 229 AND
'W.I. 213 AND (FOR

SOUTHEND-ON-SEA, ESSEX, Aug. 25.
The West Indies scored an excellent victory over Essex
here to-day on a pitch which always gave the bowlers some
help. They got rid of the last seven Essex wickets for 120
yuns and then hit the necessary 186 for victory in 2 hours

10 minutes with 5 minutes to

Third Series
Of Ist Division
Open Today

TODAY the third series of First
and Intermediate and the fourth
of the Second Division games
open. Perhaps the most interest-
ing game in the First Division
will be the Empire-Spartan fix-
ture which will be played at Bank
Hall.

Skipper Alleyne has made a few
changes in his side and the two
men brought in are B, Bourne who
has been playing in the Second
Division for the last three matches
and C. Harper from the Interme-
diate.

Although a bit slow in scoring
Bourne is quite useful as an open-
ing bat while on the other hand
Harper who is not a stranger to
first Division cricket can be ex-
pected to pull his weight. "

Today’s Fixtures are:—

FIRST DIVISION
Empire and Spartan at Bank Hall
Combermere and Police at Comber-
mere
Wanderers and Pickwick at the
College and Carlton at College

Bay

INTERMEDIATE DIVISION

Cable & Wireless ana Wanderers at









Boarded Hall

Mental Hospital and Windwerd a’
Black Rock

Spartan and Empire at the Park
Pickwick and ¥.M.P.C at the
Ova!

SECOND DIVISION

Â¥.M.P.C and Leeward at Beckler
Road

ladige and Police at Lodge

Carlton and Ex e at Cariton

Foundation and College at Founda-
tren

Central and Pickwick at Vaucluse

Regiment arxi Combermere at Gar
rison



Five Records
Smashed In
Athleties

BRUSSELS, Aug. 25.
Five championship records were
broken during the third day of the

European Athletic Games here
teday.

Mrs. Fanny Blankers - Koen,
Dutch Olympic champion and

world record holder, easily won
the women’s 100 metres final in
11,7 secs, which knocked 2/10 sec,
off the old record.

Derek Pugh, 24-year-old Bri-
tish runner, took the men’s 400
metres in 47.3 secs. which beat
the old record by 4/10 of a second.

Huseby, of Iceland, became the
men’s “putting the weight” cham-
pion and in doing so broke the old
record and the European record
with a throw of 16.74 metres.

The Russian, Lipp, recently had
a throw of 16.93 metres, but this
has not yet been ratified as a
European record.

G. Derdoni of Italy won the 50
kilometres walk in 4 hours 40
mins. 42.6 secs and then collapsed
and had to be carried from the
arena.

Miss Ben Hammo of France won
the women’s pentathlon.—Reuter.

King To Reward

Channel Swimmers

: DEAUVILLE, Aug. 25.
King Farouk to-day promised
« reward in Cairo to the two
successful Egyptian swimmers in
the marathon English Channel
Race organized by London Daily



Mail this week.
“Egypt and myself are very
proud of your magnificent per-

formance and I will not fail to
reward you on my return to
Egypt.” the King told them when
he received them by royal com-
mand at the Hotel Du Golf here.

Hassan Ad El Rehim who won
the £1,000 first prize in the record
time of 10 hours and 50 minutes
and his fellow Egyptian Mareeh
Hassan Hamad who came third
knelt and kissed the King’s hand.

—Reuter.



They'll Do It Every Time

GALENA DECIDED TO USE HER
EXTRA-SPECIAL GORGEOUS PERFUME
FOR THE BIG DATE WITH DULCIMER ---
4

VM aa
Zs





terday’s

men with their spin, and the only

“minutes bringing victory.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
VICTORY ARCHITECTS



Of 186 Runs
10 Mins.

169
3 WKTS) 186

spare.
On a



pitch, drying after yes- =
soaking Gomez = and

Ramadhin worried Essex bats- E

. WEEKES—hit hurricane
83 in 105 minutes,
batsman to look at all secure was

R. CHRISTIANI—scored a
fine 53 in as many minutes.

G. GOMEZ—captured 5 of
Essex 2nd innings wickets.

County Cricket
Results

LONDON. Aug. 25.

Cricket results: At Oval, Surrey
beat Wercestershire by 114 runs.
Surrey 320; Fishlock 77, Parker
65, Barton 55 and secondly 140;
Perks 6 for 48.

Worcestershire 175; Wyatt 73,
Surridge 6 for 55, and secondly
171, Howorth 54, McMahon 3 for



Stanley, the young Ground-Staff
batsman, who is also an Arsenal
inside forward, He gave a sound
defensive display for 25.

Gomez bowled his off-spinners
unchanged for nearly two and a
half hours and fully earned his
five wickets for 79 runs. The West
Indies suffered a shock at 27 when
they began their bid for victory
Preston taking the wickets of
Stollmeyer and Walcott in three
balls.

Then Weekes and Rae, running

WEST INDIES PLAY
MIDDLESEX TO-DAY

TO-DAY the West Indian crick- W.1. against Middlesex was Con-
eters will make their third 1950 stantine. In 1928 he hit 103 in a
appearance at Lord’s when they match which has been described as
open their fixture against Middle- Constantine’s game, He batted and
sex, It was at Lord’s that they suff- bowled superbly and the West In-
ered the first defeat of the tour, dies won the game.

yas also é 4 e ,
fee i Re warty pte fll gf arse» Batting first the County rattled

laringly wee ickets, t on Scored their first Test victory. Such

ele Sete Saba Pa e are the glorious fluctuations of the UP a for 6 Se as pe geo 24.

which enabled Ray Sm.th to be- fortunes of the game, and to-day The | L. ae ae os / le eae “At Dover. Kent beat Derbyshire
come the first play r to complete they will endeavour to record an- Learie contribute in less than by 9 wickets. Derbyshire 167:

an hour. He then proceeded to get
rid of the County batsmen as he
liked, and took 7 wickets for 51.
The home side was all out for 126.

other win on this historic cricket
ground.

It will be the fifth encounter be-
tween the West Indies and Middle-
sex, and of the four completed
games the West indies have won
two, lost one. and one was drawn.

Mention of these games recall
names dear to the heart of every

Wright 4 for 52, Ridgway 3 for 30,
and secondly 83, Wright 6 for 45,
Dovey 4 for 20.

Kent 214; Ames 54, Hearn 68,
Gladwin 7 for 73, and secondly.
39 for 1.

At Cardiff. Glamorgan-York-
shire match abandoned as a draw,
wicket under water. Glamorgan 14

the double of a hundred wickets
and a thousand runs this season,

Christiani joined Weekes and
had an-escape off an easy return
catch when at 2. This proved
expensive as he stayed witn
Weekes to see the runs hit off,
their unbroken stand of 87 in 55

Set to get 259 runs to win the
W.1. were in troubles with 6 wick-
ets down for 121. Then Constan-
tine stepped into the picture again,
and flashed his bat in characteris-















lover of the ic fashi » hit up 103 and the for 2; Yorkshire did not bat.
Weekes batted 105 minutes for game in these Oe Me tine eee with 3 :
84 runs and hit a six and nine parts. Patsy At Eastbourne, Hampshire beat

fours, while Christiani’s 53 occu- wickets in hand.

; ed 55 minutes.

The Start

The West Indies set an attack-
ing field as soon as play started.
tamadhin had four short legs and
Gomez three, Not until the fifth
over was a run scored, and Peter
Smith took 24 minutes before hit-
ting his first run to-day. He swept
Ramaduin to leg for a four. With
Smith in a mood for hitting and
Horsfall driving well, it was no

Suusex by 59 wuns. Hampshire
229; Rogers 137, James Langridge
7 for 67 and secondly 115, Bridger
55, James Langridge 5 for 19.
*Sussex 247 for 9 declared; Cox
121, Shackleton 6 for 58 and sec-
ondly 38, Knott 5 for 5.

At Manchester, — Lancashire-
Warwickshire match drawn. War-
wickshire 80, Tattersall 7 for 29,
Hilton 3 for 27 and secondly 86
for 1.

Lancashire 192 for 2 declared;
Washbrook not out 111, Ikin 58.

Hendren, 9
undying mem-
ory and Nigel By
Haig to men-
tion only twe
whom we
have seen in
action at Ken-
sington, were

forerunners of

Jack Robert-

son who was?
with the 1948
M.C.C.

Drawn Game

The 1933 game which ended in
a draw also had its epic moment,
when Herman
Griffith and V,
Valentine added
132 in 58 min-
utes ina last®
wicket stand—
Griffith hit 62



























59 not out,

wonder that 32 runs came in the ‘0. the end off the W.I. At Lords, Middlesex-Northamp-

first 35 minutes. Then Smith lofted Indies. Ist innings of tonshire match drawn.

a ball into the leg slips and Weekes Pray “terri- 382 and Middle- Northamptonshire 388; Brookes

held it safely. ip een George Headley sex replied 160, Oldfield 92, and secondly 7
Later Stanley offered resistance, Compton and Edrich, are members With 177. Bat- for 1.

but Gomez claimed his third vic- of the Middlesex team, whom the “28 a_ second Middlesex 296, W. Edrich 57,

tim of the.morning when he dis- West Indies have already encount- “me WI. de- Robertson 56, Sharp 72, Garlick

‘lared at 251 for
8 wickets, and

missed Insole with a ball which

ered on this Tour, and it will be
came back sharply. Stanley contin-

more than interesting to watch the

5 for 58.
Reuter.



ued to bat well until Ramadhin re- Meeting again with Simms the oa oe
turned to the attack, and then the veteran spin bowler who routed ‘Y, ha ost
wickets for 133

our batsmen in the M.C.C. game }
at Lord’s and was directly re- !"
sponsible for our defeat.

Can Simms again spin out the
W.I. batsmen or will the tables be
reversed?

Memories of the last fixture
with Middlesex, in 1939, should
bring cheer to those who recall the
fine batting display put up.

The West Indies batted first and
rolled up 665—their best figures up
to then. George
Headley led the
way with 227, J.
E. D. Sealy fol-
lowed with 181,
and Jeff Stoll-
meyer complet-

young West Indian spinner lured
Stanley forward for Walcott to
make a smart piece of stumping.

Just before lunch Gomez struck
again. He had bowled well this
morning, and one of his best de-
liveries completely deceived Ray
Smith so that at the interval Essex
were 138 runs for 8 wickets and
were 154 runs ahead.

Within half an hour of the re-
sumption after lunch Essex were
all out for 169 runs which left
the West Indies with 24% hours in
which to score 186 runs for vic-

tory.
W.I. Batting
Stollmeyer and Rae opened the

their final

deft Stolimeyer
turn at the crease rain ended play.

e
Frenchman Wins
° . ie
Swimming Title
VIENNA, Aug. 25.
Alex Jany took another swim-
ming title to France today when he
won the Men's 400 metres free-
style event here in the European
championship meeting in 4 mins.
48 secs.
Preliminaries of the Men’s 100
metres back stroke and further

games in the water polo series
were also contested during the day.

the Women’s 400

Only Defeat

So the only game the W.I. have
lost against Middlesex so far is
the first one they played. This was
in 1923, as the County had no fix-
ture in 1900 nor 1906.

In this game the W.I. scored
264, after Middlesex had put up
337. A brilliant 94 by George
Challenor was the feature of the
ten-man innings as Tarilton had
taken ill during the game.

Then WI. fast oF

Results

the bowlers

West Indies innings and the form- ed the trio of Seanrts and Jour eamidkatared’ & mateee, relay “ere ae

er was soon hitting out so that 27 three f sure shock to the County by dismissing Termelen, and I. Schumacher, 4

runs came in 20 minutes. batsmen, with § them for 82. Francis took 6 for mins. 33.9 secs. 2nd, Denmark, 4
Then Preston caused an abrupt 117. It was 34, and John 4 for 35. Be eee p : .

mins. 43.1 secs. 3rd. Sweden, 4

glorious batting mitear ak, 7 eecs

hange of fortune by dismissin:
Stolle ° t and the County

Stollmeyer and Walcott = withia But the 156 runs required for

Tk Aid ‘ were Was defeated j victory proved too much for the r 7 ’

a icha Aimee -— eee ‘ei, DY. an. innings faews W.L., and they were all out for 85 , Men's 400 metres free style: Ist,

i cot catch by the wicket- 92d 228 runs to the bowling of Hearne 4 for 22, Alex Jany (France) 4 mins. 48

a ag ate y v - Apart from and Fowler sees; 2nd Jean Boaireux (France)
eeper who jumped to fine les these three 4 mins. 50.1 secs; 8rd, Heinz Leh-

position. Rae offered a chance at









; ;, the only other So to-day, Compton, Edrich, mann (Germany) 4 mins. 51.2
37 but Preston failed to accept it pateman to Robertson. Dewes and Simms will secs.
and the West Indies were then get i Céhe renew acquaintances with the W.1, Water Polo: Sweden 4, Yugo-
well behind the clock, tury for the Derek Sealy players and strive to get the best slavia 4, Holland 11, Austria 1,

Rae and Weekes however raced : of the meeting. France 7, Switzerland 3.

the score along until at 93 Bailey + —B.M. Reuter.
held a catch off Ray Smith to dis-
miss Rae and give Smith the dis- P. Smith ec Weekes » Gomez 18
tinction of being the first player Horsfall b Gomez Mw

Inosle 1.b.w. b Gomez . a |

PRIZE CROSSWORD

to compl>te the double of a hun- Vigar 1.b.w. b Ramadhin ll
dred wickets and a thousand runs Stanley stpd. Walcott b Ramadhin.. 25 (for Overseas Competitors only)
this searon Ray Smith b Gomez 1
Mis searon, Wade © Gomez b Ramadhin 19 ENTRANCE FEE. Single Entry 6¢
reston not out 5 N
Quick Scoring Extras 5 byes 2 leg byes : Additional Entries 3d. each °
Weekes joined by Christiani was Total “T69 £50 will be awarded for the correct or nearest correct solution

scoring well. Driving and pulling

crandiy ha reached 94 in 85 soln of this Crossword Puzzle In the case of a tre. the prize money,
ra y e -

SOWLENG -ANALVAES already deposited with our Bankers, will be divided Extra solutions

utes and was chiefly responsible 5... eee ae may be sent on plain paper Remittantes should be by Postal or Money
for putting the West Indies on level Gomez 39 4 67 ~«S Order. No stamps accepted
with the clock, Jones 7 3 9 0

With half an hour left for play, {ayjadhin epee aa og Across

the West Indies wanted 45 runs
to win and they got these with a
few minutes to spare.

1 Animal

WEST INDIES SECOND INNINGS
: 2 Sudden outburst

Rae c Bailey b Ray Smith 30

AP rears a . Stollmeyer b Preston . oe 5 Grow wear,

Christiani who was dropped by Walcott c Wade b Preston : 0 10 Exeationt 7
Ray Smith when only 2 completed Weekes not out 84 "W ething eatable
50 at a run-a—minute while Weekes Christiani not out | 5 2 aoe Mal pronoun
was batting freely. The unbroken eee TE PTO +5 3
fourth wicket stand put on 47 Total (for 3 wickets) ou
runs IVIE|S/S/E| | Down

; ‘ BOWLING ANALYSIS bd

EST RST INNINGS 218

vr ESSEX IST INNINGS .. 229 : a et ae 1 tt may frighten timid
ESSEX 2ND INNINGS peteg gree ee ag eople

Dodds run out 28 Sor ’ ; F. ;
Avery c Stollmeyer b Ramadhin 1g Ray Smith 16.2 Whaler 1 Z ne — cold

ail 1.b.w. Gomez 5 _— .
ei 6 Named

7 Small stain
:
Aeved 4 Pn Oe By Jimmy Hatlo 8 Navigators need the
right + + +
aT 9 He





Results will be sent direct
to every competitor, Promoters’ decision is final and legally binding
Entries must reach us by SEPTEMBER 30th Please post early tod

PRESS FEATURES AGENCY, 20 Langside Place, Glasgow, $.1., SCOTLANO

| 1am over 2) years of age. | enclose PD, V0! st nmeememaneims
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No. |!

Rheumatism, Ankles Puffy,
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If you're feeling out o-sorts, Get Up Groton. Hundreds ‘
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| ness, Backache, Leg Pains, Swollen Ankles, it—!
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| Cause.
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» worry, colds or | riakers that Cyatex will satisfy you com-

overwork may create an excess of

| and place a heavy strain on your x acids pletely they ask you to try it under a money
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Dust SMELL HIM FRESH FROM
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ANY SCENT WITHIN THIRTY FEET!



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as aa











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or

tific clinical tests and in actuai practice J \

2\-07 2Q9THAVE that a quick and sure way to help the kid- Se KIDNEYS 7.8.55¢ |
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ASTORIA, LI.





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| with @ scientifically prepared prescription | Tae GLARANTEED Remedy RHEUMATISM

Jamaica Port
Workers Strike

KINGSTON, Jamaica,

Aug. 24. |

Port workers of the Salt River, |
the main shipping port of the West |
Indig Sugar Co.,—Tate % Lyle— |
struck to-day against bulk loading
of sugar going to England. The!
new system reduces their earnings. ;
Negotiations are proceeding be-—
tween the company and a union |
representing the workers |

â„¢



SANTIAGO, CHILE,
Aug. 25.
Arturo Alesandri Palma, 82,
twice President of Chile. died of
a heart attack to-day. He was
the Senate at the
The news ot

President of
time of his death. ;
his death caused mourning
throughout the country. Alesan-
dri had been a leader in Chilean
politics for 50 years and continued
active to the end. —C.P.

PRESIDENT DIES |

What's On?

liello Everybody!

A Grand Dance

Will be given by
MISS ANN HOLDER
(Everybody's Friend)
At the
K.G.V.M. PARK EKALL St. Philip
ON
MONDAY NIGHT, 28th Aug., 1950
Admission
GENTS 2/- :; LADIES 1/6
Music by Perey Green’s Orchestra
b.AR SOLID — DON’T MISS IT!
A Bus will leave the Empire
Theatre at 9 p.m
26.8.50—In

TO-NIGHT

Mr. Seymour Archer
(Better known as Mime Dick
Driver of Electric Van)
Pespectfully invites You to His

|
DANCE

At CLUB WILLOW, Passage Road

Musie Supplied by ,
Mr. Percy Green's Orchestra
ADMISSION 2/-

REFRESHMENTS & BAR SOLID
25.8.50—In

DANCE
TO-NIGHT

CASUARENA CLUB

BERTIE HAYWARD’S
ORCHESTRA
Steaks & Snacks served
throughout The Night

26.8.50—1n.











DANCE
POSTPONEMENT

THIS serves to inform the |
General public that the
Dance which was to be held
by Mr. Elkins Griffith at
Club Royal, Silver Sands
has been postponed until
a later date.












26.8,50—1n. |



INVITFES
to the Dance to be held at
Atlantis Hotel to-night can






be assured that the manage-
ment is sparing no efforts to

give













them an



enjoyable

CALADIUM :
SHOW

WHITEHALL, St. PETER

Owing to rain

THE GARDENS 3);
will be further opened 5
MORNING and AFTER- "

NOON from August 26th
to September 2nd inclusive.
; 26.8.50—2n.



BARBADOS
AMATEUR BOXING

ASSOCIATION

Under the Distinguished
Patronage
His Excellency the Governor














announces
A Series of Thrilling Con-
tests on the night of - -





4th SEPTEMBER
at 8 o'clock

At the MODERN HIGH
SCHOOL STADIUM

Entire proceeds in aid of the |
Bay Street Boys’ Club









The Police Band will

Popular Prices:

play

| BAR & REFRESHMENTS |}





,
i



SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1950

A coffee hit!



mes ids










..-lt’s the improved
Chase and Sanborn!

Mere words can’t describe it. You’ll have to taste
it. Aad when you lift a cup of this new Chase and
Sanborn to your lips, you’ll exclaim with delight!
You'll agree with those who
call it, “the finest coffee
money can buy!*’ Get a can
today—vacuum- packed, from
vour grocer,



PURE IRISH
LINEN SUIT 4

qj
ij
SMART FIT AND
NEATLY TAILORED

$45.15

We also have

LINEN TROUSERS
in White and Wine

$10.96 pr.



SOPPPDPPPPOS OOS

FOR LADIES:
MEXICANS: FOR EVERY DAY WEAR

Black $5.25; White $4.95; Brown $4.00

SPORTIES in Brown, Flat Heels

with Leather Sole $5.30, with Crepe Sole $5.80

NEW DESIGNS IN DRESS SHOES

Black Suede Court; Snake Skin Platform $8.45
White Buck Court, Platform, Back and' Toeless $8.45

FOR SAFE SEA BATHING FOR CHILDREN
RUBBER SWIMMING RINGS & WINGS @ $1.30



x

SHOEMAKERS TO THE WORLD.
RELIABLE SHOE REPAIR SERVICE







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in rolls 3” x 12” mesh 7 wide

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Full Text

PAGE 1

PACE srx BARI1A0OS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. AUGUST it. 15" % ^. THE PHANTOM ft i i BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES ** to flying Driving ihit sensational new M.G. Midget u like handling the control* of an aircraft The smooth, responsive power of I2S0 ex. overhead valve engirt* gives you thai kra>rcs*oa. Cushioned riding comfort nude povsiMe by independent front suspension and lateal type shock absorbers add still further to this conception. Come and tee this plus" version of %  world-wide sport* car success. Better mil. come for a drive! NEW TD. SERIES MIDGET M eves often uted lo smart a-.., ache after %  day's -work. SomeTimc 1 even bail to tta> Utctuaci AIUBIKII HH dab Jim .iJ "You're lie from a touch of FORT IIOYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Distributor* Phone 4504 lo I look lirn'i advice Evur? %  . N, -,c sunn no*'" 1 % %  •d to lUn I used Optra*-waahed sway din U'r ''Tfcarki to >ou—end Optra*! •ad perms, loned up eye muscles I'll never be without 11 afitn PROTECT YOUR EYES witk Opt r w m AM BE Y C Mini THIS rai } TV rim of the eye and i laving should be brakhv rlh *sur. If User are red or imd or the whim bloodthot, yeas eyes urea treat mru EYE LOTION rcif %  ggch racket .1 at .-ntificaDy deaipKsl cycbaih. j mm*\m %  *.


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PAGE 1

SalarJay \a|ine paralysed if the nation-wide tUriktt now in effect in Canrda Is not settled by Monday. The Canadian strike, now In its fourth day was called by 124.000 workers aL-o seeking higher wages and shorter hours Reuter OSLO, Aug. 25. About 190 million kroner < £950.000) will be allocated to armed forces out of the new Norwegian extraordinary defence vote of (250,000.000 kroner 112.500.000,) according to a Gov crnmetit proposal to Parliament published to-day. Civil defence will receive C 1.750.000 police £650.000 and £300.000 will be used for stock-piling. The Government's proposal also asks for an additional £300.000 which it is estimated will be the annual cost of running merchant ships which Norway has placed at United Nations disposal for Korea. No information is given obout the way in which the extra money is to be raised But the Government statement emphnsises that private building and Investments will he restricted to meet military and civil defenc: needs. Private consumption will also be restricted partly i > financial measures, and partly through cuts in imports —Heater 'We ume -iere to Strasbourg to substitute European ideas for national ideas. Therefore creating a German army under German command is out of the question and we would rot know what to do with It." But we are ready to contribute %  the economic power of Germany end if necessary aura the power and strength of the German population to a European Army under a common European Political authority for the defence of Europe and democratic freedoms. Dr. Von Brentano who belongs to Chancellor Konrad Adenaue.'s Christian Democrat Party said in supporting Churchill's proposal for a European Army that Ger man representali%*es to the Assembly were in full agreement with the Wesl German Government We do not believe the rearmament of Germany could further any German interests, he said. I am sure I can say a great majority of the German ptople are against creation of a German army or any form of German remilitarisation for obtain ins national interests. —Reuter. THE WHOLE WORLD know of Bhakespoarc. Visitors con his wife Ann Hathaway, and to ThenfimeiiHH of Shakespeare itford upon Avon it tlio birthplace to tinlioiiw. to the COttAgS of lomb in Holy Trinity Church tinlovely old town, which berato tain to his • .mi. % %  mn m i till keepIUIL.II of it* Eluabolban diameter, ar* world famous The productions at the Memorial Htrstfoiil Festival Is built around th 1 Tin-ate*. Hilot ni lern building wl' Avon. i the banks of the America Started Fighting Before Council Approved Says JAKOB MALIK LAKE SUCCESS, Au 25. The United Nation! Security Council ma t t i ng bald t" day t<> raauma eonaldantion <>f Kcxca. began by listpninp. 1 at least Iwo hours of French translations of speeches left vi i from the last meeting. Jakob Malik. Soviet clelei;ate and this months Counci President, proceeded at once to translations of one ol his own speeches, to be followed by that of the British and American delegates after (he adopting of the agenda. Imim-diately after t i>U-l Youths Warned Against Reds HAMBURG, Aug. 25. Representatives of half a million youths of the powerful Wet German Trade Union Fed* tlon met here today lor their lirsl Youth Congress since the war. Trade UhiOn Delegate* from Denmark. Italy. Switzerland Austria, Poland. Belgium, the Saar, Britain and the United Suites were present. Youths and labour officers of the Western Occupation powers are taking part as observers. Harvev Brown. Director of Labour Affairs in the AlUed High Commission asked employers to share with Labour, the burdens of reconstruction and called for a wider u*c of modern mass production methods Warning Gertnali. Youtgi* against the totalitarian crowd of Communist salesmen from the East he told them not to forget •hat Communists the worH over %  rf acting under orders from the high priests of Moscow—Reuter. Floods, Quake Kill 1,000 BOMBAY. AUK 20 More than 1.000 people lnvi died in the earthquake and flood* which have devastated 30,060 square miles of Northern Assam in the past 10 days according to unofficial reports, the All-India Radio stilted today Indian paratrooper*, landed inday in the affected areas The Mrs* group dropped in the sond mlliUiry and nuval force* to Korea on June 28 w.t. made. at 1800 iind the Security Council session at which the Unit* was n&t called until 1900 G. M. T. that day, Malik told the Council "Therefore, it Is u historical t.irt that the United Btafc eminent arUtr.nl. and Illeg a lly started aggression in Kon taaurs before the lecurlty Council meeting, thereby placing beforo the United Nations and the world an accomplished lact". he | ANGLO-U.S. RIFT OVER FORMOSA Dig In For Dawn Attack By JULIAN BATES With MacArthur's Headquarters for Korea, August 26. JJATTLE WEARY American infantry, dug in.^** before Masan on Korea's south coast, today""' awaited a major dawn attack from two Communist divisions which have been ordered to drive straight for Pusan. Northern fronts gave no sign of an all out offensive yet, though Communist pressure persisted and on the east coast had forced a mile wide breach into the Allied line. .tat! nMicots at General Mac-Arthur'* %  i tin coneantntlon of two divisions with heavy funks west of Mas.in eniislttuted the real threat For days now reconnaissance pilots had reported ri'in%  nts movtltfl eastwards from Chinju despite eontinu%  ittacki Ily daylight they were niarchi.K In little groups of 30 or 50 fhlle blgRcr fomiatinnv ajtd Upply columns remained hinden D railway and mininn tunnel> Prisoners taken on this front esterday said they had orders 0 assault Masan defences over H J100 yard front on Thurdav b:ht But American shelling and air attacks scatlere,! their DHM id dtsorgum>e VM %  •.mi ig aua "i i-r i T i. i i %  lainy-Terni Snltilion Bui ih oDunuiei hi *" been %  Otvad I lantly Chou Bn Lai i %  Hit in the Security 1'mrnil arhletl wttl rue%  un abb be un %  i 'acol Malik, who li Cl u nnisstng .ni tha United %  tataa i : don and Washington, bn'h partial ... i %  the mattai i.nt "t i ourl n can be Interred IsM] Will trj '' %  %  Malik moves to put Chou Kn Lai %  ppaal the agenda of one of the forth' coming maatlni Mates South Koreans Strike Bark IN DRIVE TO SEOUL iB* i IOMI. III iMOIf). ROW \ \IIK 2^ %  i i.i i ..r ih. Kort II Penln Mia, the South Koieiiu Army now 'i %  %  i!v '.ill (IP .OMIT' i" rutaad rod luUa and M UM rrord Una north of i ai RM fin KM Coast, %  M BahUng Si.iitlitTii.'ihave a %  Hsirtl Amei lean Comntaadon who know tnaaa louib Intropld Iroopa, .rll. IB) tri.il they export them to %  i niiiiii ^ forea In UM dttva •a I., aooul and > %  < rood The> OBJ it fOlloWa that well'I 111 bi heftei apponcnts for North Koreans tinm .n areat* 11, troopi • iinof many <.f them "ii left behind u|> north, and It unal Hoi .. politli it I \K ;u them. i hevi sratehad theti morala n<> t. k high during the i*d N (I sl^rled when th" 1 wea|>oii hungn South Koreani vM-re supplied with 3.S Bazookas. At least they hod UM nii'.tnnf nipini out Communist tanki North Koreans Forced Hack It was not long, befme. that %  I | ..... (lull tha from thai South Koraara nad foread Nora Koroana buck. H Coaa not appaai tC !*• realised I rail) Utal Bouth Kori in i *t i mi have had iiiitst of the Como'ainst them for weetu !'i i Ui iiu vi v nchUna man the% had II %  UTM An American KUltaa*) Authority Who has bean la Korea since 1041 Mini that if tha South Koreans had ceased to be lighting Ion % %  [M OTH %  June 2.'i unltad Nations Forces would not be 00 the Peninsula now. He said South (ConatM held the gn IUH p m oi UM Una unUI just roconUy, "ii w the} tpUl h anil half with American Kruler Se MM Mau lin£ North Korean troops charsed ,ilh the south coast Defensive an* the 4th Division and regrouped ran nanta ol the 8th and 7th divisions which eartlei had taken a %  evere maullnt; PrlsuMn insisted that the ain body of this rorce. desplle hariitsing by United Nations' patrols and strallng from the air. *s 'argely intact UnlU of UM American 2Slh vision defending Mason have been on their own there since the marines were pulled out to niUIn the threat on the Naklong Itlver hulae a fortnight ago. MacArthur's headquarters rented yesterday ahal preMure i tl>e leUt wm strong Oneeomny had to gfevsround around Ihe "battln mountain"—flerVely mhutiled ridge northwest of laman on the Chlnju-Matum rctOT strentthen his rot argument that omWtet I 10 Of* a> en aaae 3 II Killed In H.A.F. Crush SUfGAPORK, Aug 25 A Hoval Air PorOB DoROl eraahad to-d*> '" l un to Malaya with eleven passengers an crew aboard. Armv DOtl despatched immediately to aoarcl tl Polka rssporti aald un caught fite when aha .is The oecup ml feared to have perished The place whm II %  pin-point* i mi iaft ami It Wl Ar. .y -earch paftRM It lo-nlght —Reuter. SAILS V. SMOKE I ho sails of the old-time clipper havo QtvBfi •wiry to "smoko" 8TH JEWEL ROBBERY PARIS. Aug 25 The eighth lewel robbery in France this month came to light today hi Paris where burglar; broke Into the flat of Georges Charnay last night and stole a Jewel box containing Jewels va!-|ments for th. ued at 1,300,000 francs —Raster, l troops .—Setter. British Officers Leave For Korea LONDON. Aug. 25 Ten British officers left to-night by air for Korea bv way of Montreal and New York, the War Office announced. They are to cany out reconnaissances in Korea and make preliminary arrangeitTival of Briton Cement, Bauxite And Tourists Draw City Talk I ho smoko oF the modopii "O-1PPI-R blill sajls the Wl seven 'seas! LONDON, Aug. 25. Three finance schemes to Jamaica are in the news to-day Two of them, the new Bauxite Marshall Plan Factory Plan and Tourist City *l* !" purposes Project, both of which have been tVdemi. i'>i ol i announced in the past 48 hour*. Apari from goeh on are severely critlclsel The third. Uiis. these funds v the Caribbean Cement Company, to the rodefl eporls proajrees. emment rt< I I pens then ii that tr an met ion News Chronicle City BeWot iiinount> I %  Bic Oscar Hobson this morning sugnational '< eesu that Bauxite and Tourist The second proiert Ml City Projects are in fact Colonial f3.00C.000 Tow ' Development Schemes and thai cribed as "more loti the burden of the cost of them more subtle" will fall on the British taxpayei suggests Ul _. dollar and ft> cent i.eund ond holder of It %  i la to btvosl in -i" %  •'••' %  ortta h L.I.'. 3 000.000 t fflcial B |D"I %  an rulAl ii help Jomtica In hag ee iraw those am* Marshall Aid reserved to the This is currently Quofc lure "' CU1.433 0l t!8'J.287 and • it MM. %  i 4S4, lls lid was %  -..Is ond Bills. . . %  I ^LAYER'S CLIPPER CIGARETTES 10 FOR 16 CENTS MANUFACTURED BY British American Tobacco Co., (Betas Ltd.





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fACB POUR BA2BADOS ADVOCATB SATURDAY. AUGUST 2, 1*50 BARBADOS . 1 4* ADVOGffE Huiifjer, Seen And Hidden y Aey Called — r '~* 1 From f/ie Newsletter of the Royal Bank o/ Canada i Saturday. August 21, n:>" SEAWELL THE habit of blaming the British for all the ills of Barbados is so deeply ingrained that one is tempted to accept with open hands and little thanks the gifts they bring. One of these gifts of $1,212,000 is visibly and impressively in evidence at Seawell Airport today. There day and night a West Indian construction company has been forging ahead with the construction of a new runway which will make Seawell an attractive port of call for many of the world's large airline companies. The Canadian Government have loaned expert engineering personnel and the Barbados Government have contributed a sum approximating to half a million dollars. To all those who have made possible the construction of the new runway at Seawell the thanks of the Community are due But what of the future? At present Seawell Airport is in a transitional stage. The Airport building, small as It is, has been rearranged internally to cope with the additional traffic which has followed upon the increased advertising of Barbados in the world outside. Communications have been taken over mainly by International Air Radio Limited and the restaurant and waiting room look more like a restaurant and waiting room than they did previously. The Airport is however too small to deal with even the present volume of traffic. The Airport manager is overworked and personally has to act as control officer to incoming and outgoing planes. No organisation can be said to be 100 per cent efficient where one man is perpetually on duty. An assistant manager for Seawell Airport is an urgent necessity. Arrangements for parking of cars are also inadequate to cope with the stream oi relatives and friends who accompany passengers to Seawell. If these inconveniences are noticeable now, how much the more will they be obvious when Seawell becomes the most desired airport in the Eastern Caribbean? The greatest credit is due to the British taxpayer, the Barbados taxpayer and the Canadian taxpayer for co-operating through their Governments in making Seawell an important airport on world air routes. Can it be that the need for modern buildings and adequate staffing have been overlooked? Surely not! THE LORD BI§HOP THE resignation of The Lord Bishop from the See of Barbados will come as a surprise to many people in this island. During the five years of his administration of the Diocese he had become respected for his sincerity of views on things ecclesiastical and political. His recent appointment to a seat in the Legislative Council gave full scope to his ability as a man of affairs. His speeches during the early days of the sugar negotiations and his contribution to other debates in the Legislative Council proved that he was not only an eminent divine but one who took a keen and intelligent interest in the island's affairs. It was difficult for Bishop Hughes to be anything else than an outspoken critic of diehard policies and restriction of the rights of individuals. In his first sermon in St. Michael's Cathedral after his enthronement he launched out against unsatisfactory practices in this island and called on the community to rid itself of the old shibboleths and to realise that "it was people that matter." But it is an irony of fate that this same strength of view, according to the Bishop himself, should have been the unhappy cause of his unexpected resignation. He came lo Barbados after having been the Bishop of British Honduras only five months, and as he said then it was merely because he felt that disestablishment of the Church in Barbados would give him the opportunity for service which he n greatly desired. The resignation oi the Bishop from his exalted office on a question of principle is in keeping with the high moral stature of one who has been steadfast in upholding the fundamental facts of Christianity and a champion of the divine commandment "love thy neighbour." AN EXI'KHIMKN i Mn., .,!.. i| %  iv,.>.nig u iro two lllllllllaan. %  • w.-.Wi not only the effect of semi-starvaUo i oil behaviour, intelligence and l"^r sonality. but the order in which tvniptomi developed. First was tiredness, followed by muscle soreness, irritdbiLu. apathy, sensitivity to noise. loss of ambition. loss of self-discipline, dereaso in mental alertness and in the ability to concentrate, moodines* and dizziness That was a ca*e of deliberate semi-starvation over a period of months More to the point is the lesult of surveys made in Canada In 1M9— 1M0. reported bj an Hide in the Canadian Public Health Jauras! Roughly speaking, only 40 per cent of the people studied were adequately nourished, 40 per cent were in a I order-line state, and 20 per cent were seriously undernourished. Still more striking Is the statelent by Dr. L B. Pelt. ChM of tiie Nutrition Division of the Department of National Health. %  M Welfare, to the effect that more children died in the year IB44 from nutritional deficiency diseases than from intan'ile paralysis To this he added: . despHe the fact that our picsent knowledge is sufficient to avoid malnutrition No one would suggest that forty per cent of the people in Canada go around In a perpetual state of hunger, in the ordinary %  ''!! %  of the word. There is another kind of hunger, the hidden lunger that lets people pine aw-jy go through life sluggishly, and finally die before their time, even when they are eating plenty. Many of us drag our way through life, suffering all kinds o' oilments that could be avoided by better feeding. We feel depressed, .itul blame our woes on creditors, the familv Off the boss when perhaps we sutler from vitamin shortage. We feel fatigued, out of sorts and listless, due perhaps to nothing but improper food. Our tables may groan with good things, and yet we may be starving ourselves through ignorance and indifference. We must not deceive ourselves by thinking that poor diets *rc confined to low-Income groups. It Is quite possible to spend a lot of money on food, and yet not be getting the food values that lead to health. The Klght Foods Foods may be divided Into thrsuj main classes: body-building fords. to make Kod your wear-aud-tear; protecUve foods, to ward off disease; and energy foods, to g.vs >uu power and warmth. Good nutriUon involves pajotles (energy), protein fgrowUi. nabi %  U-nance and repair), vitamins and minerals (protection), and "balance". 1 Is not necessary to carry u set of scales and a measuring glass lo the dining table, but only to apply common sense to a knowledge of the qualities and attribute* of foodstuffs "^he amounts of individual Items vary from time to time in the sunnI erson, depending on many ext**r:>al and internal factors such "* age, sex and activity. No figure any genera] table should %  %  i.'kc-i an an absolute value t > ..ssess your dietary requirement These general tables are only approximate. Their use calls fiw food sense and interpretation in keeping with your speciol environment and requirements. Take calories for example A published table may say that the t'erage man needs 2,250 calorlfJS a day. But If he Is sitting at home doing nothing he may need only 2.000, while if he is qut chopping down trees h* may need 4,000. Another authority mny live the amounts In calories Per pound of body weight for various ageshere, again, caution Is needed to interpret the figures in terms of what is being done v.ith the body. The business executive, by the v.,>. wlH. I>e disappointed ea learning how few calories are required for brain work Dr. G. A Dorsey says in hi* inU H iaUng look Why WeBrsuO> Like Hassan llelngs: With the brain actively '. work so little extra energy Is) consumed that calorimeter cannot liini it" ">n the other hand, a Jazz-band drummer us~* up 7.200 calories daily. A nutritionist, commenting on this flginc which was given In a British publication, remarked: "He must r.ave drummed continuously day and night Cooking Is In.p..rt.int Besides making sure that lh< range of food is such as to prn\lde the essentials of good diet. we need lo watch the cooking in ensur" that the goodness is kept there. A sensible word of advice was given by Joseph of the Savoy %  Make the good things as plain ii% possible. God gave a special flavour lo everything Respect 11 .> not destroy it by messing Th,extern to which good fond valueless) iood by unintelligent prcp-i .tu> %  is not [cnerauy ;i|.l>reciated. It i gfj %  kg tin i" w %  b ri-Wtei health and malnutrition. Everyone knows that leafy vegetable are among the essentials of a Mpti dot. bill their goodness too often. f.oea down the drain with the tooking water The boiled fibroi.s tt:eue we eat has lost not onlV its savour but much of Its esse Hal chemical matter Mineral salts have been boiled out Water soluble vitamins have been losl. An Investigation made at the lequesl of the Government ol Newfoundland by nine Canadian. British and United States doctirr resulted in significant findings The ilrst of two diet and healn .i M-.-. five w.ii. ;i(,.nl. rcW. ; id that the average person h .Newfoundland showed no fewer than eight symptoms of denctoiic.v diseases; malnutrition in •art] life resulted ir three out of fqjr dying before the age of 40* only on, person in ten reached 60; the overall death rale was twenty per cent higher than in Ontario, and the death rate among children uas two to three times the North American average. The investigators were puzzled at Ilrst, because the diet, while low in eggs, milk, citrus fruit and tomatoes was good enough In Ash potatoes, cabbage, bread ihd cereals to Justify a higher record of health An article In Saturday Night gives the explanation: "It was n< until the investigators went mi.i tlie ki'ihens of the Islanders that tncy discovered lhat they wars almost literally committing sulcldo by their cooking methods." P-ta toes, for example, were boileci alter peeling losing 50 per cent of their ascorbic acid; they were cooked In the morning and held unUl night, by which process they lost all their ascorbic acid. Cabbages were boiled for one to two Lours losing BO per cent of their ascorbic acid. The second survey showed great improvement, reported by Dr rtussel M Wilder of the Mayo Foundation last December. The government took steps recorn mended by the doctors. Flour was enriched with thiamine, niacln. riboffovin Iron and calcium. Sfu margarine was fortified with vita %  II.IIL A. Canned milk was Import ed. Orange julcg was nudo available to pregnant women and nursing mothers. Schoolchildm received milk and cod liver oil. The result of these diet changes, all In forms which could not be ruined by bad cooking, was lm; lense. The death rate fell from 12,1 to 105 per thousand; deaths fiom tuberculosis fell sharply, from 135 per 100,000 to 101; Infant mortality dropped in three years from 102.3 per 1.000 to 61; and.— significant this—the children wh. had been "like little* wooden Indians" on the Qrst visit "were row noisy, rambunctious and In (uisltive, as children ought to be" It should not be thought that Newfoundland alone is suffering %  Malnutrition due to i-*>r cooking similar findings have been mOdC by the University of Pstwaylvanla. which studies hegeureds of upperincome Phils rlilgaia faaarfles. Besides good salection of basic fuods and goed B eking. variety hi needed. Scieace can analyse i pork chop and aty now much <>' it is protein, but science cannot fathom a man's i*h lor a porx chop and say hosy much of it Itrue hunger, hov much taoey. .'•i.d hew much a love of a beau t:rui-looktne meal The saieat guide for the food 1'iovlder is variety of diet ami v.nety in cooktog Peanuts Br. Kod food, mi there are 10!> different ways of turning thru. into tasty dishes Cheese Is a concentrated fgeni of the inos important nutrlfi\e elements -. irUTJr, and In a rgce t book revje* of the New Yerk Tinaea there wag advertised a b. k containing 250 unusual radi-(-> for cheese ccokery. from hoidoeuvres to %  rf-rt Every age group has Its swp special requirements, ggaj all ar> important. Young people up lo twattfj years need U rj i; ht kind ,.f food to live, to grow to maturity, um to acquire eduotUon The com%  tenuous athletics school and home study, the tension of examinations, and the i upset fe<-ling of adolescence, all combine to put itNM upon the body machinery Lunch is important, and very often an after school snnack (such as a pea:iul butter sandwich, and a glB& nf milk) would be a lifeaaver As the years piss, and we slow down to a decorous pace, the %  energy of youth is not neede-l. and we don't exert the muscular strength of middle life We d< need reasonable amounts of protein, and we should be with foods that „ur nmttmm has taught us ar e easily digested. Milk, fruits and vegetables in full amounts continue to be important Women may l> duwu the nutritional law in tiielr homes, but Uiey are often guilty of breaking their own rules. Men emerge from some survey, with a better record Uian women, except that they arc deficient in vitamin C because they brush aside "rabbit focia" like salads and raw vegetable v On the whole men eat a good lanch, while women Just nibble at something Men make up In sheer volume of tood for their carelessness in selection. A survey In Philadelphia among families in the $2,500 and more Income range found that four out of five married women were undernourished. '•More" is not necessarily 'betUv" in nutrition. A Chinese poet remarked; A well-lllicd stomach is indeed a great thing all else Is luxury ft may be also a pain. An occasional feast matters little; it is the continual daily overloading ounelvcs with food lhat ut so Injurious and deprrssbtf, ff you want to eat like a ditch-digger you must exercise likea ditch-digger Overweight is a problem of great importance. It shortens life, decreases efficiency and increases liability to many diwjases A survey in Canada, reported by Dr. Pett in ]048, revealed lhat rarely have we encountered 'overweight' in less than tan per cent of the adults lu a given area." Medical men are opposed to all violent attempts at weigh! rchiction. Such methods as amount to starvation for all practical purposes often do permanent damage to the liver oi heart. The use of drugs is unwise, except under the care of a physician The simplest way to reduce is lo cut down th. amount of fattening food eaten at each meal, and this may be done, under competent advice, without hardship Don't try i" get rid In three weeks of the exce poundage you spent ten years accumulating This Very Puzzling Problein Of DEATHS from heart diseases J have more than doubled in Britain in the last ten years, I the Registrar-General's annual | statutic.il review revealed. Number of deaths from diseases of the coronary arteries and angina pectoris in 1836 was 15,409 Latest figures shows they have jumped to 36.640 a year In Arteries What has caused thai alarming trend? Are our hearts getting weaker? Is this Uie explanation for our decline In international sport? The astonishing increase of an old ilsease is one of the most puuhng things in medicine today. The disease is found <>ot so much In the heart but in the clotling of Uie small arteries tupplying It—coronary thrombosis. II left untreated it can -ead to very prolonged illness, or sudden death. Tension Doctors believe the increase in The Heart 'H arl disease K due fo.— 1 Enormous increase in the strain and tempo of modern life. We are always tense, and have lost the ability to relax. I. Worry caused by the strain. 3. Excessive smoking which has an adverse effect on the heart muscles. Symptons of heart disease are a sense of oppression or dull aching In the left side of the chest which radiates up to the left shoulder and down the left A sufferer will become breathless after any exertion, which generally produces these symptoms Years ago the disease was restricted to people between 90 and 70. Now coronary thrombosis is found among men and women in the forties and younger. This, I believe, is because young people arc having to bear more strain and worry earlier. Heart sufferers should always seek advice from their doctor. For, if the disease is caught early, a lot can be done They Train A modem invention, the electrocardiogram machine, shows changes in the heart long before they can be u.agnosed by the stethoscope. Nearly every hospital has one Heart diseases can be treated by drugs and surgically. Research into their treatment has met with marked success at Guy'i Hospital, London. While decline in our sporting prestige is not due in any way to the increase M heart disease, there is one Int-resting point to note. Vssj few Britons specialise In one -i""' Oui | ortsmen ; ,. not train as hard u foreigners. It is because the foreigner trains his heart to '.and the extra effort that he wins fVD. i % % %  .. I .p.-.. s, M Oil. READERS SAY (gam To. Trie Edffur, The Advocate. SIR.—The sponsoring of a Boys' Club or a Girls' Club for that matter is a most laudable ideaby any line of reasoning; and I have no doubt that the Bay Street Boys' Club will do some good In the community, and I wish it every success. Some people seem to think that it if within the preview of certain S ople only to do welfare work, ilti lhat I beg to disagree. I notice in a certain local Journal thai it is suggested that the club has u political flavour for reasons set out in the said Journal. One should have no fear about that, so long as Barbados remutns a democracy and the ballot Is secret. What I am concerned about is hat (he eluh seemed to .have been presented to these Juveniles on u platter and no effort on their part has been made to urocure the amenities which I understand have been put at their disposal. I have no doubt that the majority of these boys are of the type which have not completed their education, if they have "seen a school door at all;" and spasmodic lectures and talks are not eiiMiigh. Some provision should lx' made whereby those among them who have neve i l>ecn to school and those who have run away from school, or through other circumstances have not completed their education (and I mean elementarv education) are sent to school wholetlmc. It .\.is necessary I quite realize lhat somebody should provide the les for the accommodation; but it should be the aim that their several talents should be exploited to the full with .i trltw .if causing them by their OWD SsTOra : least 80't of it which will l>e needed to keep the i-luli going. But so long as they at b) psoplii who have no experience In teaching youth and so long as Uiey are no! brought up under the influence of a school, so long as they only listen, play, and go away, they will, I am lure not appreciate any philantrophy showered upon them from around or above The ultimate objective should be a home. Clubs in Barbados have no meaning whatever anu this may eventually degenerate into one of the Main ilubs scattered over the 11 Lice It Women's Freedom MARGARET LANE Keviews New Books I'tiHTKAlT OF A TURKISH FAMILY. Irian Orga. (UoUancs, 16s.) 303 Page*. TURKEY has changed within one generation, perhaps more than any other country. To see those changes taking place in a middle:lass Turkish laxruly, in tne lifetime ol a ooy born in Istanbul in 1908, is lascinaUng,! even though this is a naive and not particu] larly well-written book. Irian Orga's mother was a veiled Turkish lady oi the old type, married at thirteen and living in total seclusion, as befitted her class. Life for the little boy was centred in the women's quarters and in the weekly visit with his grandmother to the h a mmam the luxurious public baths in which well-to-do women loved to spend the day, being scrubbed by servants, lolling about in the steam, anointing themselves with scented oils and eating enormous meals. Those meals! Turkish life in those days was obsessed with food, with perpetual meals of the most cloying and destructive sort. rJvcry domestic occasion was celebrated with mountains of rich and sickly eatables; wedJings were orgies of syrups and sweets. One is not surprised to learn that Turkish ladies rarely felt enough to do more than sit about in enclosed gardens hanging their swimming leads over pieces of embroidery. To the Orga family the 1914 war brought disasters which must have been common enough in Turkey at that time. The father was Killed, their house burned down In the great fire of Istanbul, and the young mother and domineering grandmother were left alone with three young children, a few pieces of salvaged furniture, and not a penny in the world. What could those veiled and sheltered women do, thrown on their own resources in a harsh Oriental world which did nothing to help them? Emancipation was thrust on them, whether they liked it or not. They sold the few jewels that had escaped the lire, went to live in two sordid rooms, and Irian's mother till only 22 after nine years of marriagewent to work in a factory. Facing the hardships of her new life with unexpected courage, she abandoned the veil, even though she was stoned in the streets as a prostitute lor this piece of effrontery. Her sons were sent to a rmarity school and tha mother and grandmother lived chiefly on quarrelling and cabbage soup. It was a hard life, and often makes painful reading. One is constantly amazed, as her children were, that a woman so delicately and heplessly nurtured could make such a gallant struggle for survival in post-war Turkey, where hardships and the new regime showed no mercy to the sort of life she had always known. The struggle, however, extorted a terrible price. By the tune her sons were old enough to go through military school, and the eldest, Orlan, was training to be a pilot, her brain gave way under the pressure of suffering and anxiety, and she was dragged from her family to end her days in an asylum. One learns with relief (since Turkish asylums sound more nightmarish than most) that she died in 1940, shortly before Irfan was sent to England, in charge of a group of young Turkish officers drafted for special training in the RAF. In spite of its shortcomings—and the author is, remember, writing in English, not in his own language—this is an interesting and often moving book. IBTAN OB.. v ... bUafcal; Cll* ; rlfB4 naiMMi -lib Tsi >w llvUr la i,,,d t .i, VINDICATION OF RUSKIN. J. Howard Whitchouic. (Allen and L'nwin. 11K.) M pages. THE more I read about Ruskm the sorrier I feel for him. Fame has played him an ugly trick, for now, instead of caring about his work in education, social reform and art, posterity is chiefly interested in postmortems of his marriage. Ruskin married the beautiful Effie Uray in 1848. For reasons which we can never know for certain (though Mr. Quennell in his recent biography offered the likeliest, theory) the marriage was never -consum1 mated. It became, as one would expect, 1 bitter and unhappy. Six years later the marriage was annulled, and Effie married the painter Millais, with whom she had fallen in love. Ruskin himself later became passionately infatuated with an Irish girl. Rose La Touche. when she was only a child, and il was Effie Millais's bitter letter to Mrs. La Touche. warning her .'.gainst Ruskm'* "cruelty." which eventually prevented then marriage. I do hope our Government will sec the need for Uie urgency of compulsory education to IS years the speeding up of the housing position, the Introduction Of minor Industrie; and exploring the posslhllttle* <" markets foi them, and ever ; lertness to our emigration needs I want to make it crystal dear that I appreciate the efforts made hy the I rirsi things first and one of the tint should be compulsory in St Michael at least When ilrst things are done in si there a/Ul not be Uw need of accusing people of exploiting the ignoranl fur then political ends. the people light and they will find then CLAUDE RAMSAY Brighton, Black Rock. August 22. 1850 The whole story is tragic and mysterious and Admiral Sir William James's book, The Order of Release, and Mr. Peter Quennell'*. more recent biography, present a Ruskin slightly abnormal and distasteful, with whom no woman, however much in love, could have been happy. Mr. Whitehousc's new book is a brave %  ttempt to turn the tables on these disaffected biographers by showing Ruskin in a more reverent light, as blameless and misunderstood. There Ls certninlv truth on both sides, but. as with Byron's relations with Augusta Leigh, we can never know the whole truth for certain. I. NOWAHD "HITIMOI-i „ pr MJ>al -f UM T"" kl-.i.i, H.r*.. ,t B*xbiidi> .,kMl ha. b-.• % %  •! * B |*r I* *,.l wllh Ba.kl. fc.k, a j | H ,, U NOTICE Will o.ir Customers please note that from FRIDAY. Ut .Sfc) II UHER. IK. !" our LUMBER YARD ONLY will he closed lor breakfast from 11 to 12 noon daill with the exception of SATURDAYS when ALL DEPARTMENTS will open from 8 a.m. lo NOON. Our hours of huslne-ig will therefore be as follow! :— MONDAY TO FRIDAY LUMBER YARD 8 a.m. lo 12 noon—I to 4 p.m. HARDWARE A OFFICE 8 a.m. to 4 p.m SATURDAYS ALL DEPARTMENTS 8 a.m. to noon. WILKINSON HAYNF.S CO. LTD. C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. Pbonr. 7! & I6i7 It's Nutritious !! It's Delicious!! It 'a easily Digestible 11 LIDANO SWEET MILK COCOA . always ready for use. Vou simply add two teaspoonfuls to a glass of milk and enjoy a rich food drink. Mt*-I Me eat C O J fll m sF tl



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PACE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. AUGUST 26, 19.-.0 CaJiib Qcdlinq |_|ON A CUKE. C.B K., Xi nuimad by B.W.I.A from Trinidad yesterday morninji. He WD In Trinidad for a couplr of day*, attending a meeting ot the Board of Directors of British West Indian Airways, held in Port-of Spain Amigoi Venezolanoa! " SEE YOU ran .. chart pant*graph in your column •> couple of days ago asking uulhoritles to put up notices on the Munchineel Trees on Kockley Beach", said a lady who telephoned me vasterday "But", she conUnued "whai about the visitor* who speak only Spanish." "Two days ago"." she raid, "a Venezuelan lady at* one ut these berries down on the Si JaaMa coast, not knowing that they were potaonou*.*' "Can you suggest anything' to prevent this sort of thing happening again "' So Carib burrowed into his Spanish Dictionary, and hopes that this little note If prorrinently displayed in each hotel room and in the Guest Houses, will men our Venezuelan visitors not to eat these fruit "Asnlioa Venesolaaos. No eoman de 1st h-ataa verde ue rain de laa mala* d> ManianUla en laa playaa. Murho raldado oue son venenaaaa." Of course, not ires on manchineel treas on the various beaches in Spanish would also help Brothers Return After Holiday M R. CYRII. CUZIEK who nas been holidaying in Barbados with relatives for the past thro? weeks returned to the Dominican Republic yesterday by D.W I A where he is Supt. of Fields in Santa-re Mr Cozier has been living In the Duimiiicim Republic now foe twenty-three years His brother Arden. who is Supt. of the Sugar Factory at Canovnnas in Puerto Rico, ajgo left yesterday by B W I A after a month's hnlidny here. He was accompanied by his wife and young son Arden Jnr. Arden was last in Barbados in 1946 Here For rive Days M R VERNON KNOX arrived yesterday to spend five days' holiday with Mi iind Mm. Austin Belmar in Maxwells Ha told Carib. that his lister and brother-in-law. Mr and Mrs. Alfonso B De Lima were supposed to have come over with him. but at the last moment. Mr. De Lima, had to cancel his passage owing to business. Mr Knox who does conslruclion work for the oil fields in Venezuela has just returned from three months' holiday in the U.S. and Trinidad. On Leave Relief M RS. JOYCE BABB arrived from Grenada on Wednesday afternoon by B.W I A to Join her husband, Mr. Jumes Babb. who Is Acting as Assistant Meteorological Officer at Seawell. for about six weeks, doing leave. Mr. Babb, who is .1 Panamanian, spent most of his boyhood days In Barbados and is an Old H.u risonian. Now he is stationed in Grenada doing similar work. He arrived here a few weeks ago on holiday, and resumed work at Seawell temporarily r> few days ago. His wife is a Grenadlan and so Is their baby daughter Ingnd. who accompanied Mrs Babb over on Wednesday. Frequent Visitor A FTER a week's holiday in Barbados. Mr and Mrs. Thomas Porter and their two little daughters. Katherine and I'umclu left ye*terda> by II W I A for .1 .week's stay In Puerto Hico Mr. Porter is the Good Year representative in TrlniilaH and is a frequettt visitor to Barbados, this time however he was on holiday. They were staying at the Ocean View Motel Off To Antigun W ING COMMANDER H C LAWKS. A turns Manager of International Acradlo Ltd.. stationed in London, who arrived here on August 2lst "ft yesterday morning by B.W.I A for Antigua, with Mi "Bob" Greene, also of l.A.L After their Arm.ni;. visit Wing Comdr. LBWCB will visit Panama Delayed By Hurricane G ROUP CAPTAIN Eric Burton, Government Airport Manager in Antigun has been in Burbado* since August 17th on a short visit. Due to the hurricane In Antigua h* return was delayed. The Rabbitts In Guadalcanal D K. AND MRS R BABBITT are now living In Guadalcanal, Solomon Inlands, in the South West Paclft. Dr Babbitt will be rt I here JIS being House Surgeon and Anaesthetist at the Barbados General Hospiltd from IH47 in 1948. Mrs Babbitt is the former lovce Fields, eldest daughter of Mr mid Mrs. F M fit -idof < '"' %  .Lynn, Belmont Road. They left Barbados two years ago for Canada, and have tnvalM over the greater part of the North American Continent. Their honeymoon was spent in Niagara Falls and since then they have lived in Winnipeg and Montreal, where the Doctor took Post Graduate Courses at the Manitoba University and McGill University in Montreal. They also spent some time In Ottawa and Toronto Leaving Montreal In May, they crossed over to the Western cities of Canada through the Rockies to Vancouver, from whirh port they sailed for the South West Pacific touching nt Honolulu, Hawaii. Suva, Fiji, Sydney and Brisbane* Australia and rlew from there to Guadalcanal, where Dr. Rabbitt 1.' Superintendent and Administrator of the Central Hospital lor the South West Pacific. Although enjoying life in thai p..it of the world they still have not forgotten Barbados, and plan to visit here as soon as the Doctor's six months' leave is due Here For Short Holiday M RS SHEILA ALLAMBY arrived from Trinidad on Tuesday by B.W.I.A. to spend a short holiday with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Blades of "Margate", Hastings. On Holiday J OYCE CHU-CHEONG of Trinidad who is sludyin. therapy at Birmingham is now holidaying From the far north, Joyce has written to say. she Is enjoying her holiday and hopes to visit Sweden. Denmark and N.>t %  > Disillusioned 'INURI was a big diuppoint; awaiting a very small k.rl last weak when -he went with hei father to a erteket match. She thought she was going to see England vs. West Indies. Instead she saw two teams of Arsenal footballers getting into 1 i.-lining for the new sa—sat Her lather, Laurie Scott, Arsenal and England full-back did his best tol console her. hut In vain It %  ;• I West Indies or .lothing for her Not even the sight of Alex Forbes. I Arsenal and Scottish wing-half 1 tor swinging and losing his bal. nOT to be stumped yards out ol his crease could drive the tears from her eyes Hurried Back M ISS ENID MAXWE1X of Atlantis Hotel was among the Barbadian School Teachers 1 < turning to Barbados on Thursday by BWIA. after the School I etchers* Conference recently Mid in no Chatting with her yesterday she told me that they had all had a \ cry enjoyable time. She would have remained on for a longer stay but she had to hurry back in lime for her dance at the Atlantis tr.-night. Visited Kaltaur M B ORLANDO DA SILVA who arrived from B.O., by n.W.I.A on Thursday afternoon. t-x pacts to be In Barbados for a couple of months. This Is his Prsj holidny away from home. Orlande is on long leave from I odtsira and has already spent a i-w months louring the hinterland of BC vlsiUng the Kaiteur Fall. He Is slaying at Lea ton. Worthing. Returned To B.C. I\ *IS8 MARY K1RTON. who has been holidaying Iliirbado* since August 10th, re'orned to BC.. on Thursday itemoon by 11 W I A Miss Kirinn was staying with relatives In Worthing. A Barbadian, she now l.ves In Georgetown, where she .. with Sprostons Ltd No Voodoo In Haiti T HERE is more voodoo 11. England than in tho blackmagic West Indian Island of Haiti, according to M. H. Bourjolly. new Haitian Minister to London A slim dark-skinned Man of 46. he arrived in England laaj week on board tho He de France Voodoo in Haiti i curiosity wow. something to be put in a museum", he said. "Forty years ago a child was killed in a ritual. But two years ago England had the Halgh murders." M. ftourjoily's appointment Is his 1.1st diplomatic Job abroad. As a young man he taught French literature Fourteen years ago he entered Haitian politics, among the stormiest in the world. Journalist s Weddii.g M R MICHAEL GUNNINOIIAM. until recently on staff of the Sund'allon Department of the Fapreas Newspapers if. getting married this month A cousin of Mr. Courtenay Hitch Ins, Editor of the TrtaUad GaarsfcUa. Michael plans to spend his honeyrr-oon In the South of France Double Celebrations R ETURNING from Venezuela or! Thursday afternoon by HW.I.A.. wa Mr. L. A. Fletcher %  P.. :., .1:..i Co Ha snu v swing his son William who is with the Ford Company at La Florida. Venezuela. William arrived with him on his annual leave, and will be rc•urning lo Venezuela next month. It was a day ot double celebrations for the Fletcher family as it was also Miss M. Fletcher's twenty-first birthday. BY THE WAY ... By Beachcomber **SJ KADING bophomologlsts are ika>4 Inclined to attribute the recurring explosion on Mars to the bursting of enormous eggs. It Is pointed out, that, owing lo atmospheric condition!, on that e snet. eggs must stand on end. If Id down on their sides they burst. The theory is thut some huge and ignorant bird built a ii u pa : 1 balloons) from the months of beautifully dressed • %  itniR men, nine lei high and right nroMl. and lm, irlrls with piston-rod legs and rmu that tits I ke a hums rap. Whenever "Hog" Rcvello hit* "Butch" KaU in the lace, the ...mi "Ouch!" without any illustration, would monotonous were thcr.' Whin.,'" 10 fall back on I M-Jiionrd In I.IMMIOII: "Teen And Twenty" Ity %  ••M-nllil 18,498 Russians irklrr Is a pleasant discover) to find that a leading milliner m London has designed a collection >f autumn hats for sale in the nexpensive salon of a London hop. The man with the insight into the pockets of the young woman if today la Mr Aago Thaarup. the Prineesseii More than this: illecUon is especially for Hue Teen and Twenty. She will CM talnly need little persuasion l wear once she has seen these which have just the right gsasaXl of you thf ulneas and sophistic at Itx If she Is wise, she will raiifmNi Mr Aago Thaarup's advlr< 'Hat* for the young will be lltu< but cheeky. They will have l saucy look about them." Imagine a large salon of n London store, brightly lit. with IN LONDON LONDON Sir Harold Scott, Metropolit,o Besides these for his so-called J* 0 ""Comm %  ^^. C ^.^ 'ITS."Tw n .M T.„^.^" .... i.K.. hi* onnual report that an average Ilus including *wne with the dof) lMl JJT" ne forward movement, sitting A touf of 1.1 children were straight on the head arrested compared with f7 ir And even in the heights of such ]ni $ inspiraUon he has not forgotten p„|lcc reports from other cilic. those two perennials—the pull-on B „d towns are likely to reflect nlMiner to the Queen and nd the beret. The former he dislikes—"But one must remember one's customer.' The laUer, the asfly adaptable of all crime Eimilar increase In child lhe report stated. But for the first time since the II headwar there %  > a Mihntaiitial deequally suluble whether crease in the numbers of Indict"vou have length In the face or able offences. Sir Harold said width in the cheekbones. This He attributed this directly t. we saw in cognac felt, trimmed Jhr Criminal Justice Act of 1948. witli velvet Thl T0 ,crt ntv/ sentences of corK,„.,i,. „., ...ou,,.c . -^ t q8F8££5S?S& ivpcited lo two different colour ^-jy, fTf w no douh t that its lincomUnations—one worn by each plications have been fully appicmunnequln. A small close fitting t|attd by the criminal communll ,„ crown, with a touch or chop'When habitual criminals ai mZ^„.7.riUC II inl 'hlrt •"" %  >" "— ,on !aMel h'"aing I, und on arrest to be in possession tight-music playing In *• hackAown hp ^^ nnt n TllUv ho of rop1 „ of Bn Af „ f p£7i nm rnt *i„ St '., !" iVJr,ii*. T.in. il '.own and black tassel, then it is a safe assumption that their •* -_?-*g l ^-?J "g?*JryP l all ,„ black, It was enthusiaeUstudy of the new criminal law is cally gieeled. and the piano burst dictated by something more than gailv into "Do you ken John *n academic interest peei". ,, 'Indeed." the report eoi.tinned Once these autumn inspirations, is reported that 111 some rases U. soft materials, cheerful trim'ouxrl^reakers have dlsoosi^l of th mings and gay colours have been "^ ,s "['I 1 1 l""** ,,lac,-d berore Miss Teen and $***& th f A %  „ twenty's eyes, £***?• Sffi Wtif SSS^SS Twenty Plus), she will need BO p „ lnl wh( ri „ J „.r„unerative. more persuasion thai Mr. Thaarup Tll) oinem .„,. .., ,„iv rate e is quite right—"a dress without %  cournging that it is. in fact, posslhat is like a stalk without B big to make men honest by flower.'* *.ct of Parliament." nd composed, although the moinIng has been an endless sued slon of rehearsals, last mlnu'.i touches and posing photographs Not Frivolous From the nrsl, it u clear Ui.. the show is not so frivolouQuality has not been sacrificed f the sake of economy; the maleria till the beat of the beat, ar. the hats beautifully finished I hand. Mr. Thaarup himself a pleased with the result intorjecling the price from tune to time and adding, 'Tin sorry I seem M pleased." "You are going to sec a lot of soft, shining fabru-s". he said, 'trimmed not only with motifs pompoms, petersham bows ami veiling In draped masses, aast with something new—wool crocheted and knitted Into longstemmed tassels and fringe*". The colours are rich and varied reflecting the Oriental brilliance of Persia, and the sunny brightness of Spain. The two most striking are Khnmseen. a desert dust colour, and Tally-ho, :i heart-warming red. deCRVPTOQUOTK—Here's how Irwork H: AXYDLBAAXR Is LONOFELLOW One letter simply stands for another In this x.gnple A la used for the three L's. X tor the two O's. etc Single Ittera. apoatrophlss, the length and formation of the words are all hints. Each day the code letters are dlffererit LT E F W T T LC ORNAMENTSENECA A Cryptogram CJuotatlot RIT AIRED OEFPRI DZWT-YROIQ. ELEGANCE IS NOT t CROSSWORD Rupert and the Back-room Boy -35 \i Animal. (6) %  C%Ml a^seussf It soaoda. >'.• %  QuUUj. (Si u. A digit, HI IgM SJSpSI C ia him, ind tofcihcf ih*. ro ihcr.g^TlKrt they diKo.fr poo: Grifii Got firmly wtdgtd in th* %  op branch*!. "How on rrh d,d Jl-ihippri?"(. 1 l R u pen W(U. -• >wl,l srt out lor iht vlllsss and lud pauMd lor bruih on this bnk hn •omtthing mahrd lo *" ''(hi und*> our lt," uyi Billy. Besot* a OMU get awsv rhi* i ret *hoi out of (he ground • nd^ oughtu. m lt bnnchei sad r*rnd u, right up int.the ,k f I" l-tni 1 niiner i TliS oppr-iuj of S Dosm. IS) flO ISSMSUon ••r.td. ,) fuel. II SlnSle 141 On*. 141 thM i. it,m '.. •nsiiy Down. (• Kusint.r. snow :n.. .-*„. ,., %  Hiuiioii at PI— — •—— lesrv. arta *_ E,,; "* p ^" tUfmc* 14 Pticnt IT, CHAR! STUFFY N0SI-43^*#4%hgg, fit*ry Co/n/brf : IN YOUR POCKET! >' EI3'***4^*^V^I'^^B***a*|a^' I IVIA \Ot III YDS. DEBEN I hAll V BA1LAR AL CLUB MORGAN El Nile (lib rl ma pillar de las Antilles CENAS DELICIOSAS Servicioloda la Noche Tul 4000 para Rcscrvacionei %  •^T ""%  - ^1^ \W\ aaWWssBBB l ^al JOHN WAYNE ma MAM -mmm TUCKER r....... 9 JOHN A6AR A REPUBLIC PICTURE %  HUT uinii • wa mn %  rncuu ins • MIMI IUHI mi( mm • umt IDHI* • run en • nrnz iuu -r%0*Htf,S'Ow< 1 -l.mM tdw.rOGi.ril Stor, t, r h.., r Br^-n Dire: .JL. WUfl 0*31 ASSOCUlt PlOduCW .' Or.urlfJ C'llr Cfl Also British Movietone News Korea—Security Council's historic meeting Anglo-American Universities Athletic Contests at White City Bluebird ready to try again Mil T -P AY AND TOMORROW 4.3. AND 8.15 Republic Double . Starring: William MAESHALL-Adele MARA in "BLACKMAIL" and "SAN ANTONIO KID with William ELLIOTT— Bobbv BLAKE ADDKD ATTRACTION TO-NITE ONLY AT 8.15 "PROFESSOR ALVINZY" (MAGICIAN) Magic Voodoo Mystery ROYAL TO-DAY AND TOMORROW 4Jt AND 8.30 Rcpuhllr Big Double .. Robert ARMSTRONG-Martln KOSLECK In "GANGS OF THIS WATERFRONT" and "THE CATMAN OF PARIS" with Carl ESMOND —Adele MARA OLYMPIC TO-DAY TO SUNDAY Republic Double . 4.30 AND 8.15 Richard ARI.EN—Cheryl WALKER In "IDENTITY UNKNOWN" "FLAME OF BARBAKY COAST" with John WAYNE-Ann DVORAK SO HANDY—Coirvil with you in potkt. o. handbag—neui, leather v..iiUit VK*. Inta.hr. 1. tiny,but loaded .Ml of motfihiff. IK- SHEI.I.S I'loHES—PUDDING, ROASTINO. Pit OIFT SETS—S PIECE AND II PIECE Pay our Hardware Department a Vltlt Sp=?lous Yard for Easy Parking Or Di.,1 2039. BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LTD. 4.1 Oltl TO-DAY S AND 8.30 AND CONTINUING DAILY Do not be among the few to say you've missed the moan amazing motion picture THE GRIPPING STORY OF THE HATFIELDS AND THE MCCOYS! ... America's most famous feudt Uoseanna McCoy" FumcRAMJx iH.RU-saauoajj RA.UOAII HUBBI M.HMO BAaU.\RT UU riAA. A. muMMMB Extra! Extra Leon ERROL—CUTTE ON DUTY British aaa Aaaerioui Nnranala . TO-MOEatOW IJ* ... Local Talent Audition



PAGE 1

SATI ItllAY. AlT.riT 2S. 19311 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS. WVB Mm X OTI %  state 1 ae Hill, m Mkk•nil Mtv* h uu %  •epnnVl Cfcure Hi*. Audro. B net la. FOR SALE At TO.MOTIVE Al'T'i llVK! O, I...-.. .A,.to l twith prinf fork. Price SUB OB %  fccsl IMI^III Hun:, Is Olympic "tor*. Cor Jamea and Roebue* Street M • S--i TRITK-OM ISM fort V-S True* Applv D V, Scott i> Co vmn Pag 1.-..,.,Mi HI.Bt—*.!• CAR 1IKT Hlllrtu.n Mln. !!.•• mil— Perfect condition Owner losing laland Price •..*•*) areonland Phone HKMTl'RK MAHOGANY Apply S T S/ MAiiooAin i D." 4 fl X 2 <;.--i bi EDAfl 1 fi. 1 ft. re-re and >>an MECHANICAL MACHINE -ftlng.-r Sewing Machine itiobdlo Perfect condition Apply tn WIlium F Hkevl*. Corner queen Victoria Road and Bank Hall X Road MISCKIXANKOl'S OLA II BWAJpt FHOM CZETIIOSlaOVA %  K1AVaeew, Powder Bowh. Cupa %  Fluli Bowli reduced 1o half price So* ovr Show Window-. KjttghH IJd JOB SfUn I'llS Itua bred Cocker Spaniel J>upa App.': Mr* I) H Seelr. A* lit He.PUn St Onnr Dial satJT Vt SO *n PINKINti NIIKARR •* the "igtu-el quality Only SS B and 11. M. Limited quantity %  *• >our Jeweller*. Y De Umn fl Co Lid 10, Broad Street X I SO?n PIX-OND AI-BUM* **• is-ie-* end for H-lnch and carrying eee ror 10 Inch retort*, and w* have the rerord. ton A WARNBh ACO LTD YAWL—-Fraplda" appro*. Jl feet long with Cray Marine en(l'ie Good condition S3.M0 a bargain Apply J H. Edwardt. Phone 3SK FOR RENT HOUSES a largo Bedroom* modern convenl%  1150—Tn WANTED HELP ai-Aiiriro BTLBJCTHICAL FOKEUAN Apt'li M a n — and letter .tatlng experience etc to N 1 O W Dr.ne C.lv Garage Trading Co Ltd Victor; •ittoot .7 • |#_ t „ MISCELLANCOUS POSITION WAIffTB DISTAL TBCMNICUK with over • r* experience In pc*prtTag and c.' Iff all (aid fitting* Acrr>t.c peoceea.i edentuk-a> rate* a ep .': •' ct,sr u Modern Techn'que used In all Rep;v la Oast Wllklna. II. Street. Pert-e(-Spain. Trinidad. STAMPS — Uaad and Mint fWage Slampa of Barbodo. and other Iikat.iU of B* n W I Curacao and Ardu Beat Pinepaid al Caribbean Stamp Society. No 10 Swan Stead. HIM In WANTS n TO BI T -TAMPS tlaed Pottage Btanapa of America aaal B.W.I Ulandi Janice -t Iriie. Stamp Co Bay Street. Sa "' eel SS s . HANTMI T HI MACIIUemS Old Seln Machlna. i.ul M itrder Any make Good Price* p.id Corner Falrehlld and Probyn Sueet <* Kni Street'-Mr*. Vauahan MIW n I'l III II NOTICES II LEV NoTire is trauaiY r.iviw tht all PMwmi hjrvinc any debt or claim* egalnit tha Eatata of Alonxa Ela.wer l*.hley. decaaaad. — Ula o( Cava-w..>d Howell'a Croat Road. In the parl>h o( Saint Michael In thl bland who died on the nth day or May 10S0. ii*eUte. are requaatad to aend In partlriihwi of their clalma dukr Bleated to the uiidanlcnad Clifford klonia Lnalilcy alao known aa CllllSicl lon Smith, ro Maaari Haynea al fBth. No 1 S-.n Street. Brlda. Barbadoi Kolki on or bertbtita the aaaaU of thai >ng the parllea enlltlad thaveto havrea-aid only to euch clalma of which hjll then have had nolle* and I I not be liable for the urt'i or any part thereof eo diatribMM to any prrdebt or claim I ahall not %  virDlPAtTMENT Of EDUCATION Api.li... 1 (luin lrschr and other lultfUv ajuflit iK-rsoti" for the tollou-tn. v.cancM: — MEN WOMKN St. Mary's Bo.vt' School St Mary's Girls School St. Christopher's Boys' School ffeene-rer Girls' School Bay ley's Glrll* School. 2. Tb minimum qualification for entry to the tearhinc the Cambrid.o School Certificate 3 Applications must be Kiibntltted on the appropriate ftWiti lE.S5lb> for men and ES5(c) tor women} which may be obtai H %  from the Department of Education, but randidatea who have alran". submitted one of Lbesc forms in r t ap act of previous vacandea (tv filled) may apply by letter accompanied by c recant testimonial 4. Any teacher who applies for a vacancy on the staff of anothi school must Inform his or her prevent Chairman of MahaffVrl tlMl Hi Head Teacher of any application for auert a trahafet. 5. Alt application.* must reach the Director of ta]ucatlon na4 lat* than Saturday, 2nd September. I960. M o 50—: DEPARTMENT OP EDUCATION Vacancies; in the Elementary Teaching Service Application* ,•! %  invited from teachers with at least 10 yea teaching experience for the Headships of the following, srhools.— St Margarets Mixed School. St. John tliadc I All Saints' Boys' School. St. Peter — Grade It. 2. The minimum professional qualification required is the I'ertl I.... /. of the Department ot exemption therefrom. S. Salary will be in accordance with Government Scales for Head Teachers in Elementary Schools. 4 Candidates who have already sulmiitted application forms In respect ot previous vacancies inow rilled) may apply by letter, accompanied by a recent testimonial. All other candidates should make application on thr appropriate form which may be obtained from the Department of Education All applications must be in the hands ot the Director of Education by Saturday, 2nd September. 1950. %  t I lift In Vacant Post of Cultivation Officer, Department of Science and Agriculture. Barbados. Applications are Invited for the post of Cultivation Officer. Department of Science and Agriculture, Barbados. Applicants should ho'.d the minimum qualification of the Diploma of the Imperial College ol Tropical Agriculture hut consideration will be given to candldatev with the necessary experience who are not so qualified. The post is pensionable and carries salary on scale S2.880 X $144 tu $4,320 Point of entry determined by experience and qualifications. Applications mentioning the names of two referees, should be addressed to the Director of Science and Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should reach him not later than the 30th of September. 1950. Further details will be supplied on request. 20.8.5O—2n. thai > had indebted to She >ald .oate an* requeued te acute the*/ nut i '.-i.i-rt.i-.. without daiay Dated lhb a*h dar al Jwl. ISM CLU'PokO ALONXA I-ASrllJ', ..*• known aa CliRonl AWmi IMSh Qualifies AaeBSMatriter OS tha EslAh.i-> fei-e.lied. (i fj I Apartinentj OB the Set. i.tii Fully fumlahcd H 0 Sa_tn nraswisitoN kti well'* Co jet K Fullfiirni*"! Mr. ft l*-hlev, Mb U mama. MMweir. Ho.d DUI S41T IS s So—an WOUDVAHE Pine Mill Fumiatied turn Itth Septeniber to mid January Ki.g Haalett 3BII or John BlasMl 4840. %  M WOHTtn' DOWN Top Bock BWrtlUfi S bednwma cwnreciiiig Toilet and Bath. ,.,., %  l-.u.Krr-" lut rr-m DellBhtlnl balcony, Two cat garage Fully •neloaad AvaiUble unfur-.sned September I at RJBD Italph llr.,rrl 4SU or BM. 19 S SO— 3II PI III II SAUES AlCTION UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER "NINA" t have been inmrucled by Meaar*. Da Coata a Co Ltd. lo offer for aale IW Public Auction on the Slat day Auctt Aiaruat. r—amnina BM %  pot, the boal called the "NTNA" whl.h %  al preaeni lying above the Victoria Bildg.'. It l S fee' Inrel by M faet wide, and fl fret deep, with a draft of S feet. tl hat Ihe ar.ibor and ipam and can he ea-llv innvertcl Into a r-.a-tal Boat or echooner. For all other parlieubr. applv to D'Arcy A. Scott, Auctioneer ll 50--n REAL ESTATE BUILDING SITES A Mo-t DvPlral Building Site ove.l.K.klng Ihe era. W< thing. St Ijiwrenre and ire (lolf Coui lxt to "Cloud Walkal Bendeavx. Terrere. Chrl(T-.tireh Appl'; C Clarke. T Swan Streit. Phone >01 %  B is.a -"1 AND One lOod hnIf petehea of land Jamea Prj„ .tirartivr apply to D'Arcy A %  nrnly-Mw and a i l-..-1-..t %  K.., mi nrasi Scott. M.igarlnn MS so—an NOTICE re the aVtat* of CAHOI.Iffl SrUMDNS dereaaad NOT1CI IS IIEPieilY G'Z>J thai all -raune having any debt or eUlm afalnlt eatate of Caroline Slnunona, d laatd l.i'e of King "Mw.nl II.—1 Pan* PU1| In the pariah of Saint NLCHiii thi. lUand who died on ,,„ dar. ef Jula iSSO are r q weal e d V. 1 In partlcuba-e of Utelr claimi Uu:y attealed to the iin4mv,„.l ftrBL POLLAUD ar^l 0UAi.niNK MANtC]. Qu.lipni t;,m,iota ol the mil Of the said (-..inline Bhauekuiv. requealaxl to eettbt their indebtedneaa without delay. Dated thy ISth day of July ISM SAMUatL K"i.i..\k[i OCAAI^MNE DAitrn. Wiwlilted EXeculora of Ihp .l| u f l^roltne SUnmona Sacraald. l.B W 4i. Applicatlont nre Invited for the post of Headmaster of the Boys Grammar School in St. Kltts, which will be vacated by the present holder on the 31*t December, 1950. The school roll at present nun bers 110 and courses are offered up to the Higher School Ortitlcntexamination of Cambridge University. 2. The post Is pensionable and carries a salary scale of $2,840 by •120 to $2,880 A temporary cost of living allowance of $240 p.: annum Is also payable and free quarters are provided for the Headmaster The appointment will be on probation for 2 years and subject to the passing of satisfactory medical examination. 3. Applicants should possess a degree of a University within the British Commonwealth, preferably in Mathematics and Physics. Teaching experience will be regarded as an asset, and the appointment will be made at a point in the sslsry scale commensurate with the applicant's qualification and experience. 4. Applications with at least two testimonials and photograph should be submitted to the Administrator of St. Kltts-Nevls not later than the 1st November. 1950. 26 8 50—2n PRICE OF SULPHATE OF AMMONIA Until further notice, the following price has been arranged:DAN LVBISTRY 11.1* I Ml 111 BANK APPLICATIONS for Ihe poet of Man* aser of te %  ,„, tndnatm Agru-ulimai Bank, which will bexnmv vacant on let Hovgenbar next, will be received by Ihe aadSi vigited on ot before 1Mb September. asa Appocanle ihoul, r and eapcrlcnce jnd sriieral educi "V have aome know! accountancy and i age. whteh raast It two r.t em te*llmoni.,l< ir'Sg pre annum rMnl I uicretiumta al fid to CMO S The i w n r aa ful candidate in aagui di>lle on lit November. IM", arid will I* reqtilred to nriUe at the age A L UAlLetY. Mane.* i Sugar Induatrv Agrlciillur.il liar Stth Auguet. law PFSVOMI Th* iindcrtlgricd will offer for aale at their Office No II llilh Street. Brl.We |own, on Wedneadav. SBIh Aurt. IS90. >t S p m <|i Lot 3S. Navy Garden., containing 11.008 T'ire feel ahulllng on tnndi ot the Marine Htotel on th f Booth, and on York Bo-d ,.„ the North I>I &.•*• **auArr feet of land l Chateea Po-d. %' MWhaeS. -llolnnB landnf Mr J N MarahaO on Ihe Wel and Mr. Johneon on the Sm-tn For fjrthcr parUculan end condltlona i.f <.e "iiiilv toCOTTtX CAITOtaV* CIII" %  TIR public are hereby warned i.e. dung credit to my wife Mrs. mil" r.HT.rn inee WaJK aa I do not hold ntyaelf leeponalbie for her or anVi rlac. conlractlng any debt or debu rny name mace* by a written or %  Ifnecl by mc M/..-1 HOHACt n. GBS-E-NReck Hall. Nr Walk In T::E while an* r.eraPy wamod again. •fvtna; oedft to rn wife KwrJINr .aj. >hM aaaievi aa I do not hold at *•!' raapocwdble for her or an rite t wax a, tax* tmr tbt or dot. aigned by ntc. signed Joagpft NATHANDU, WOOD, niert.m SI Oeoree S3 s M m rpfeyj I again* V l-MH Sulphate of Ammonia Maximum Price $120.80 per ton Discount If paid by 30th September. IBM $225 per ton PAYMENT OF WATER RATES Consumers who have not yet paid water rates In respect of ihe quarter ending 30th September, 1B50. are hereby notified that unless these rules are paid nn or IWorc the 31st of August. 1950, the Department, as .mthorised by section 4fi of the Waterworks Act, 1895—1. may stop thr water from (lowing into the premises, in respect of which such rotes are payable, either by cutting off the pipe lo such premises or by such means as they may think fit. and take proceedings to recover any amount due. 25B50—2H MWltAYS "JsS? MILK STOUT L" EDINBURGH SCOTLAND For furtnepatlctil mi iT-Ultitr.i giving creBil lo mawile RVnv si-AIUtOCK in*e Alleyne> aa 1 do hold myaelf raaprHialble for hec or an-ona else contraKUngt any aebt or debt* in rrur name uruoaa toy a wrtltan order f nect by mc. Signed DAHNLTV SPABKIK~K Hlrxi-bvirr Boad COTTIX. CATPOBD Co SOLE AGENTS:— MANNING & CO., LTD. HOVST— n Daubtc roof hone* each ;t | 11 x I coveted with e.lvenl—. SltiMtaq In Vearwood I And. Bl.uk Hock Telephone • D A. Brown* All thai chattel dwelling houer colled •Laurencevifif Conotltutlon Boad. an Michael The House ran'-' Drawing rood I l.-drnome. Breakfaat i Ir-pnt on BM h Tlabove will be ait up lor talc -' public rnr-apetaion at aur o-m-e ie tuaaa ai T'ldaxown aa i lei September IW> .it : p m CABPtNCTON .SStAI.Y. NOTICE Thli |. lo nollft Ihe General Pubraf that Ihe Auction Sale ol the %  >, p-"' %  %  Fliecr which >av .^.crllaad t*a*l fdwM • %  > taw SIM gay of Auguat ha< been Canoalled D'Arcy A Scott. I Aucllonear SB | SS—in PubHf Official Sale The Provoet Marwhal Act ilS04-*> 3D' ON Ftldav the ISth day of Septemher | KM> at the hour of 1 o'clock In ibe ftemoon win be -old at my onVe to the higheet Mdder for any mm not under appralied value II that certain piece ot Lond conit.'' aho. I ?S0 Min.a feet of which > 7-^1 Square Feet form part of a private Bowl rwreUwnpr mentioned •!>e m Ihe Pariah ot Chrtit Cburr.h ting and bounding on three ld* landf ol Ihe Berate of F A. Lwrne r'dl and on the fourth aid* on a -I elahtren feet wide leading ta tho Public Bood catlrd St Matt>ia< nwe'lMng houari Shop B-.llding<. *c uMejajd .. Inllow.Thr wtnle H roperty appralaed to POtTS 1IIOUBAND OUHT HLTNDHFa> AND m.l'TV 1KVWN TOlUPn AND TWTNTV FIVF. tTENTS SWT M. A(t.--,.ed from EDLA VIOLBT Jl 1\S ST. JOSEPH ONE of the most imDosing houses in the Island. This beautiful country property is set in an elevated position encircled with approximately 5 acres of heavily wooded grounds and ornamental gardens. There Bre 5 reception 6 bedrooms4 garages etc. All main servkes. — £6,500 — JOHN M. BLADON Real Estate Agrnts—Auctioneers—Hurverors Phone 4640 Plantation* Bulldim In Carlisle Philip |t !>* %  > Bay M V Bio* as., sk* a**,,,,., laueet. Brh I pasalpha Set LnnaTanker •i, l a, %  — a a ape., St* Tartl aw. Marlon Sale Wolf. i Hennetl. a B CwnadUm Challenge ARBtVAIaS Tanker HUSIP.. ISM lam. Cap* %  et Wagt. froen (Inbada AgaaWa Maui rMCOMB .V (V I ul Srh faurma O m tone rapt *— inej. from Trtnktad. Aaaaw. Aaaorlatuwi M V Cwibba* IBS i nth. from Dommiea. Agent. Uwner' Aeanetallon le-srialiei ,au tan* Capfrom Brltlah Oolana. Ager.1. MeaarDaCWeta A Co Ijd MS ( CMS %  -.-. %  Challi Clarke, from .. (lardinrr Aueun I ngPABTV-n 1 r uwalpha SB ton* Capl Luda AgxajaSaSJaa M V T B Archibald for Dammira Agenf OwneraAasaelalMBn S S Bvlvanfteld. tat ion. %  '•pJe*. for Llabon Agent*lerdtagr Auetln A Cn U.i v H ktyken. *-••> Igej %  ar' .1 V... • ^ %  rhom Co L44 Ships la 1 ouch With Barbados ( nastni Station llOUC-t LICENSE NOTICE H liquor tan t !li-on.i 'I'.rm M n-1. %  t pi i .-e. -*nd Ikaot ml ... *aa No St TSutM a, iwMgaqow. I i.c...t IBM T.. II A TA1MA. The fxawre Wag^.-ie P'-' v 'Stgr-, IJ3IOY MHJ.AS Appl lc.nl N ft Ttrta araala-allor. win be Con. i NEW RELIEF FOR ARTHRITIC PAINS But new treatment doe* more than MM these terrible agonies. A mm prodoot. DOLCIN. has been creale.1 which wot only tivepmmpi relief from the pains due to the symptoms of nrthntls and rneumntigm. but alao .-ffecla thmri. balk orw'xaasew which eonnlilnla %  very important port of the rln-um-. n .i ital hot aground. IXILCIN has been thoroughly lasted in medwnl in-uiuD..na. Ihil.riN ineinkoa-wl IKW, with un\.fc*.lr-n4*-d mger>-s. IMI.( IN as bring pn-*nl.il bv doctors roa. \nd man\ %  urTcrrr* liave alreody rpaunicd norm.I living aa a result oft iking IMM.CIN l>on't rlrl.v Profit bv Iho ajy erifftwa of fellow-victims of these %  •ins. fV-t DOIXIN today. A iiot'ie uf 100 pr-ci-.,. tahlels costa onlv BOLD Pi OB tale at BOOKCK'n Dl'<; STORts iB'das} LTD. I'Mil.* BJH LM Agvtac I I.Male With Ihe i..n..t* .e |kqM Ihl their Barbadoa Coaii Siaik. S H Katel Da France, s H IL,. .... lev U Bg j-ulf. S • Bean neinirlie i USB aperialial; S S grange: a a Hcgeiit LMn, S S S nvfjord. 8 • flclpareil. SS Myken. SS Argeolan. | ii.ve. M mo-.lh lilll; B S Runa B S Baud ford S S Amerigo Veapigpl R S Berepara. S B Arakaka SEAWELL AHBIVAIB BY B W 1 A mi VKNEZUX1.A; rid triierlng Mary leUetln .rcolultl. Fekin Maacol.illl Fnv.to Mar. Hill, FaStkB Mercomlll, Blubettr Mir Ulll. Lucian Dadntt. MaurUin II•chlcilt. William Fletcher. Joe.t'rban David Wolkowtes: Armlnul,. Bor]. Volandn Itorja. Durothv Mei.dl II. r Metidt. cnnttina Meudt Maria t'rbaneia llB'Ar.TUltrS BY B W I A I M I I IMU.Mi Chrlaphea Newman. Antonio Tired.. •urcei.o Lopnt: Frederick Yard Ada l>Jar.i. Maria peJara. Haul ItejaraCei.i DeJaraManuel DeJara. l-n. Onln> ild MackUv Uule Kowalahi. fharl— alakl. Alfredo Kowalaki Jot OtS e CoihW. Freaten. k Springai. Mai BullJamee Arhinne. Hvrtierl King UU Boon CFT (iBFNADASlartoo Hivaap. Albert Blver..Norm, ivaro Mabte Boa* Norm* Ham Prank %  in Edward Oil tenMonk'e Bamaj> u.tare tommlaatnng. Auguala B"*li Tnr AHTIOUA n.rnv SmithErneet lambeit. lapt %  Burton. Barbara ru.le.te... Ea.le agtias; Bobert Oreene. W I'mdt Bertatd Law a. Joaephirar Warnei %  SAN JUAN : Thome* Porter; Amelma Porter. .tl,-. r-ilel Pamela Pt-i Aclm lct Afden Collet. Oilhcrliie Coaler; mra Bechl*.. Clarlco Bcklea. Cyril mm .. |.a Smith Braeewell. Maigalel llia.ewell. imn Alfxander. Ola.1t. KIT' K114. I""Path... t.eitte Dobphln. eann Jenea. Kvel>n gtaal j Christian SclencTj i lieading Room m 1ST IUK1H BOWfN A tHJhm ^J m.-i ai,, .-j MAIL NOTICE SI Kill, by the M De cloeeel at Ihe Ogfl under — If > Ufa... NICE FUHIMTUIIE ?nu will HI'*' '* %  -•' thinte Vai.it.cIBVJI O aMga M %  apPBB, Ltnan Pree;.K h M.hoc.n. e. Matoganiatd or enamelled. Deal or Fit BedKr.idt in Fnll-l***" 1 '"el m .a.k-1 Iron BodgMadi \ t 'h ,.nd Iron Side Ball* Drawing Rpagfl F.II.-I.T. Morn.. Tub . Mh. Hours : Tuepdoy*. rrldaya 10 a. IT, -1 2 o'clock'. Rnturdojo. i i h U nil','*** 1 Vi.ilora Are Welcome TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH %  04 TIMKHS SAMMONITE a heal prool JOHNSON'S STATIONKItV IIAl:im Mil •ne *-pkH Upbnl.Iared Suite Mil al M Only au China. KHrhen a EafclBSti iiun.t. Larder*. Wagg..,.. 11 | Cock UII and Fane Table. Dining Table.. Ex malon and Pored lop. Round Squ„re (ol all-r tlnriaht Cha K > %  aBSMM SAVIN!, PBICF--* L. S. WILSON NOTICES Auguat ITlh teeael. hair ample epace .'ot 1 . -1 %  %  %  "da. INaWB WITHY in I 11 TrlNMad. BW.I and TIM M V T II IIADAH" will I Caff at Pa.M-ngein for SI Vlnreni. '' 1 %  ml Atiiba. aalllns ?ilh Auguat ihe si v c-Anir.nrrwin I >* and r>TiecT> for %  Aiiilgt... Monteerrati si RBta-MaVlB, %  -alTli-aj Saiutday .lh Ai.gtl.l ThM V "DAFBWOOD' will accept Cargo •ailing will \ I ,. ... .1 Ai-ii— date ,.l be given, 11 W.I rtehaoner Os • % %  -" %  1 iin.'i in.<'oDalgnee: Dial: 404?. \ae\ Mcoa. Sisuwuhip Co. .. 1 1 MS USI.MKH -..,< %  •MArr. NO. na .?ih luiv snot jiii* MU) July no. Awg Illl. AU|(I I %  'daw II.I Jill* il-l AugUat .~. uf Skip M-'IA rin; HIM S H *U1)A p Ml I nltl in .I sti '"I"' %  Mi-Ma* IB. %  AICOA PKIA .\u. j: T/bagf Veaarkt bar* llaallrd Baaaaaear Apply 1 IK'UgRT TlioM LTD HARRISON LINE Dl IV. 1HI) IIIDM 1IIK IMTI1I KINC.IHIM Tin %  ONCBBftT" HOOK •S. % %  JUNEC-HrsT" SS. "TKMPI.E AHCH l.'-r. . Inl Aut ,,,.„,. I7lh AUK London 'h A"' 'h ft I 01 Mh Sppt %  ot. il iii 2h Al). itt an.' 8lh S*pl Mth STI THESE ARE REAL >|v LOW PRICES ^ LOVKI.Y TAFKTTA .18 in.. 71c" a yd. f Benulllul <(iiul,i. SATIN In Pink. While, bemui] ond Blue 31 in.. 70^ a yd. JKKSKY SILK in Pink y*. in., wide 68^ a yd. fi \ WASH ABI.K PRINTS BMB eS CALL TO-DAY The^e and Manv More Line, al: THANI BROS. Pr. Wm llr\ Swan Si. li.iMni \m> mi THI. rvmii KINODOM VPIICI Clolei In Barbadol MUST* Urn %  "" "• %  For furlhrv led DA COSTA & CO., LTD.— Agenta PASSAGES TO IRELAND UfTsXIaM PBODUCTt I 11.. Itoseau, Domlnk-a, offer nr \i.A". m xt v.olinglrom Roseau il-mt 23i-d Auitu I %  r ahout 9*9pf th.rtv-ihice days, •tlneleljir i. 'ions for children, .vpply direct. c;oi\<; in A \M-iioi vi. range 11 BL£CTRO-PLATED WAKE THE I IM IIII IMI'IIIIIIM 11 L vi i. \i FOUMDR1 I-ID — Proprietors -,'.-, .;;;;',;::: t*.' r '*'* s.' FRESH FISH BEING SCARCE Tor TO.stjsefni ii I Tio F:.i' Caaa. I Ti. i itm i i.iMiii I. II tHOI II I'HOt IIIIIS A tO.. IIII'^'^eeveaai aaaaaev.---.-^.-. -,-,-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.---. w/



PAGE 1

SATURDAY, AUf.L'ST H, ltSO BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE PtVE 200 Watch Flood Victims Mystery Stone Should Hold Throwing i Thanksgiving T ilt POUCH ere investigating' 11 is now JU *l ov a year a report or bottk nd people movi-d mUl 3M .. r.n-ii i>jid,lo have Government house* at [he Pine. 1 thimboraw. Si. Now *i"> pretty flower garden* j around. UM house* hava a neat Tn. r pearanet There are well Waits who said that % %  tones *n,l '-ired rock* which Join up all IxMUea weri: thrown athe house* hm where the houses are OuilT. but Ihey end abruptly and residents have to walk along a track to get Into Collymore Rock Road or a wide rocky road to let into the Pine Estate Road Small and Buntca There CaaaraM Coward. He said that both the stones and 'it fOtng in the direction of a hoUM' occupied by Stanley Marshall Thin stone throwing is becoming u mystery to the people of : fct It was guig on (or two days and nightand only stopped about 12 minute* in I the Pottea .MTU,,. <( ';; d \-£ e Calnolu g^ H. £S 1*i JS "*' n '." * whooU ihey ueed to go f ''. "*f nd BboUl *" P^'when they lived nearer to gamm-ii jioujid on Thursday j aigiu. A few wciv .'•lightlyI Collymore Rock I* the nwrils I many church ii the area. Sunday ts ,i Little QUtajMr, but that only, difTcreuce on that day. Must of the children go to hool at the Roebuck Boys' injured A MII-IICK CIIOIR is being formed in St Joseph It is being condUCtSKl bj Mr Arnold Il'i m 'id Is at present practising mni aim carol Hill. II already has 14 members. ECAUtt OF THE RECENT • RAINS breadfruits arc pi. tiful in St Joseph and other Lorry and cart loads of this type of fruit are brought into the City nearly every day, B EO RA -; % %  in Saturdn: Vnrtou' s. j bawfean buy them by the huDdrods and sell them at IT to eight cent* A I I R I I^IIIN'Q BOATS went bui retun % %  .. nttta v naU < atebsaj ft ft : s %  .'..' looking en season which will bagln in a : E H.IIIl MM l-KOII ... Or Orannuin „i UM St. Joseph 00) racantly. Since that time many other residents of the pariah are becoming inter) I tl these talk.s and look forward to another W ILFRED MrlHIN ALII of Iliyiifs Bay. Si Jam.ivlm was a passenger on motur lunv M-2183. fell from the platfonn while the truek Wl rcVVWlLtafl uiong Trafalgar street at about 4. HI p in on Th Tho truck is owned by Messrs. sen & Co. and driven | | ,,.,. %  / %  tkini c3 Croas Road 1 %  Od that McDonald King on a ban a fell oft th* li uck when It was turning comDiainecl of internal Injurtea. E LLA HAKHOW Street n POrtad residence was iuoki n i on Thursd.i> %  .Burette: and Garnett that her .. i tared t-t> ..i Ufa removed. HPH1 LOSS of 80 in cash was X reported by Willielniiria Phillip* or Road View. St Petal Bbf told the Polhe that H IVSH removed from her home i tne year. 'pHL ROAD feadfaU from •*t n/i is to liurke's Village is %  M being repaired. This roort goes via V.tughans Land and will soon be completed. T H F SHAMROCK CREDIT ( WON will stage Co-operaIon." Day at St Patrick's School. Jemmotls Lane at 4.IKI o'clock, this evening. All (v IBOVansantg are expected to attend rer road along which buses pas* from the houses, but a bus only passes every hum Iluse* pass every quarter of an hour along Tun Mile Hill, bin ihe distance Is long, the sun generally hot. for the residents, transporter 1 a problem The tree Lady Perowne planted when the first set of houses Was built, is now about six feet tall I il Grazing Uiuu ill the district provides good grazing for sheep, but many do not keep sheep yet. Most of the sheep one sees grazing belong to people of the nearby areas. Those of the Pine houses are all eager to rear pigs, but they are rot sure yet whether they have RdBelant gpsjea to ouotw with HM im Boon have been put up in the district, uut no bag been put in any of %  Mn Onen, once of flood area, and one of those who lost much property because of last year's hurinam'. thinks that she herself aiu. others who livr in the Pine Housing. Estate, should hold a thanksgiving service im Thursday in memory of that eventful night. The thought came to Mrs. Green when sh e lay in her bed last Sunday night, heard the roaring thunder and saw the light up of her room as the rain fell hiavily Lack of Trees There are not many big trees to give shade to the num.. house but there iv always a good wind blowing over the wide stretch of land east of the houses which I. eep the area cool. With mahogany, flamboyant and other trees now being mown, the area \, ill have a good supply of trees soon. Mrs. Price and Mrs \L..n have families ;x each, tne biggest in the district. Virgma Jackman and Jeneta Sealey. each live In a house alone There are five waterfront workers, three mechanics, a baker, a printer, two chauffeurs, four dress makers and a llroad Street elerk among the residents of the district. Each home has a small piece of land attached and many keep kitchen gardens. Businessmen Attract Vezezuelan Tourists AS THE VENEZUELAN tourists continue to pour into Barbados, some businessmen are going all out to find mean* of attracting them, as far as setting Spanish speaking employees are concerned. All businessmen interviewed by tne "Advocate" yesterday described the Venezuelans a> lavish spenders — and no wonder, for here their dollar is worth twice as much as it is worth them in their own counAuto Owners' Association Needed BLOCKED TRAFFIC JUSTIN ALLEYNE of Venture. St. John, who was yesterday found guilty by City Police Magistrate Mr. H. A. Talma of eMruottnj !rallle i>u lioebuck Street on July 13. was ordered to pay a fine of 10/and 21co*t. In default, he will undergo 14 days' imprisonmenl wltfa bard la) oui Alleyne was also fined 20/and 1 cost* with an alternative of one DMOthl Imprisotuaent with hard labour for refusing to give 'Chamber of Commerce to get the "I AM sure that the formation of an Automobile Owners' Associ.ition which will work hand in hand with the Police Highways and Transport will be a great success In Barbados." Major D. Lcnagan a former President of the Automobile Association ol Trinidad told the "Advocate" yesterday He said that he has seen thai such an Association is reall> needed and is prepared to give holehearted support to the his name and address when b*4n,i reported for obstruction. PLANTAINS OVERPRICED A Fine of £'J with 2 costs was %  ', IK'lcir: .I 1 i-.ii> Ro..it. when she was found guilty b> < %  Police Magistrate Mr. C. D. Walwyn of committintf I breach of the Defence Regulations Act. Robinson gold plantains on August 5 at tenuv gch when she should have sold them at 0 cents e.ieh. ralUnji • pay the BM WKIUO M dayr. Robinson will be Impri^Oned for one month with n>f t labour Association going. Major Lenagan believes that tn helping the motorists the public would also gam benefits fro-n such help. he pointed out that in the Association has done quite %  lot for the motorists and he i> gun that if the Association U formed afniiation with both the Automobile Association and th< Koyal Automobile Club In the United Kingdom would be easily obtained. He thinks that in Barbudi there are too many dangerous bends on the streets and Association would be very tnsl mental In remedying this defect of our street: I'laza Opens Next Saturday 1 UK HUllXJETOWN PLAZA will ba opened to the public from Saturday. September 2 when the Warner Bros, musical "Look For The Silver Lining-" will be shown. It is expected that His Exrcller. > and family will attend the Opening performance. The building which started Im months ago, was erected and designed by Messrs. Clarke k Tucker The seatingcapauu It B50 The Box seats ore of dunlopillo while the Bale entire House contain o] | W Btl which were all Imported from the U.K. Mr R. N. W. Gitteiu iiid Mr H V Redman, joint Uanasj %  i Of Caribbean Tlieatr.Ltd., owners and operatm New Plaza told the "Advocate" the policy of the Bridgetown Pla/a is to screen outstanding llriiish and American pictures and ir was conceived and dttJsjMd ba the confident hope that It will prove a place of entertainment worthy of Barbados." Fluorescent Lights They said that the Theatre i equipped with fluorescent lighting. Above the marquee is a large i->ard featuring the current atlra :ion. Mi Glttens said, "this wilt l :>triking appeerante ut night with light etfectively emphasising the fact that 'here indeed U a theatre.' Another special feature tl shoulder high dado uf nle" and aluminum trim Thfl spacious foyer tnebidM %  rand counter with three levels for tn dl p' % %  .' %  of sweets. A vacuum cleaning to lie employed. 1 ^ asm cinema also provider the long felt need of cinema sjotn for a restaurant, catering to patrons and the public from 8 p tn to midnight. Mr. Glttens said Patrons may be sure of a well cooked meal." Parking Space Another desirable feature is ihe adequate parking space whim enclosed. There Is also an closed Cycle Room under ihv pervision of the caretaker Mr. Gittens pointed out thai iribbcan Theatres Ltd. recently becaiM allied with Teeluckshmh rheatfM Ltd. of Trinidad Through this alliance a marking i has been arranged so as lo permit the productions of a number of Film companies >o How through the mine %  Slam rhieta covers 12 dnamai in B a rbado s British Guiana and Trinidad. leading tilm representatives and distributors of Port-of-Spain will Ixin ltnrtwdos for the openln.of tinuwatn. Mr Glttens said that the electrical equipment is West Star. made bv Western F-lectric anc patrons are assured that the> will have the best in sound anr picture The poMablllty of a powet failure has not been overlook.and provision has been madto meet thiemergency There are few of the Broad Street stores who do not have a of the staff who knows ittle Spanish Some ol them are iiuent Strna of them net OB frith remnants ol .\hal they .... 1 It school. But there is room for people who know enough of the language to hi able t>> coax a spender into spending more, a rime about quality price anj th< like in | fiiendly but business like manner One Broad Street store has advertised for such a person, preferably a lady with an attractive personality. Many have called In with .*. view of securine Ihe position. hut no one has ye* b*n chosen A Common Language Mr. Vernon Knight. VgtaanttUn \ ce-CoUBBUl here, said that not only the stores, but the hotels too will have to employ Spanish speaking people if they are really to make the visitor's stay comfortable. What has helped a groat deal up to no w is that some of the wsltors speak French and French lliaahliia people here have been %  big to talk to them in a common language. Again some o| tie Venezuelan* speak English well and can assist their friends who cannol Since the influx of visitors fro-n Venezuela last Easter, some store-. have kept advertising notices in Spanish in their show windows Yesterday morning. C. B. Rice's Tailoring Establishment advert)see in Spanish in this Newspaper My ken Brings Pitch Pine THE inner basin of the Careenage has its busiest days when tiicre is a lumber ship in port The Norwegian steamship 'Myken" arrived on Thursday wttn 249.917 feet of dressed pitch pine from Florida, and yesterday piles of this cargo congested two sides of the inner basin. The Umber stacked on the East side of the inner basin overflowed Into bridge street, preventing the easnr flow of traffic along that road it was being removed steadily during the day lo the various lumber yards of Bridgetown Thirteen! Without One am leave d., West Indian port for another with lives and valuable cargo on board. But as soon as the^ have sailed out of sight, moat of them have no means of cosa munication with land. The Adv-cate %  b) making i (fsfCk y.'-Ter.lay of 13 schooner' which were In port, found om that none of them was equippr %  -v : 1 ..ii only three with receiving sets The three schooners equipped with receiving sets were UM Philip M lt.,vi(tsoil." the Timothv A II Vansluvtnum nd Mn I M Tan receiving sett bowvvai %  %  1 Clarke, the skipper 01 %  %  •! acftooner "amaliM who has been ,.(Old the Advr. ba did not kn. 1 which carried n radio : ting set. Chronometers tin The 'Del' 1 Stool of the "Timothy A H vanalujtinan'' Hid thai Iht kepi sets for aatUna their chronometers with C. M T The chronometer, he iid. should alwayi bi kept on the "dot" as the* an very useful Insirument* in DJfl {gaUea Of the motor vessels, only the %  Caribbee" and the "T %  I are equipped with transmilling n| -els. These have a considcriihle advantage over the Other iii'iTcolonial craft as thev eaa ^ Into eoaiuntinioarJon adtf 1 port in case* of a hurricane, a leak or any other Ills that should bafnu them nt sea THE CONTROL OF SCABIES WITH TETMOSOL l-T I.I aaal vip. rinii. pa *iih a powrful mn TJ-II. JUMIK aawsai 1s I...I10I llw .IllO, 1 hi-u|> h> pro.cn n|KvMllv vsltuhlc !.<• %  wiirelli-in BESMtl •HillrcsSt |II ..1 in ..inmuiiilK. M3| Bi an ItaH*. hMpiuli. BCBO Taa awihod of aat, •imrh HJIHIK ordinary taUet tasp *h Ittnaj*-!'. 1. %  u nxitrnKiil %  > lo cnturc the willini m Bp aw u Ba %  >< all who mi. br apow3 to the nfdiBHi l.im.-.i iatko ^4iUMci*a aBa Tli 'n Mhhii.ditutrJ txl.xr uw.nridl> cHcvi. j ut.m .!: 'TrUikMol S.w tabkita 'Trtm^wV SoluU.* 11% Uod ( ami KOi I .''Kill C it in ii \ iiMirnt A mfajn ••*+** W /-C"^ ( %  #-*-.' /^uirn I ij ll \ISI H\MMHIMIIIV,ltMI A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LID PO. BOX 401. BRlDGiTOWN Di-ciHioii Reversed Two Get Letters Of Adm iniatration TWO petitions for ltlcrs ol Administration were granted by His Honour the Chief Judge. Sir Minn Collymore in the Court of ordinary yesterday. ITiey were as follows — Petition of Nathaniel .Augustus Skeete of Goodland. St. Michael, to the estate of his father Charles Frederick Skeete late of St Peter, deceased Mr C 11. Clarke, K.C. inatruct. Hi by Hutrhinson and Bantlehl. Solicitors, for the petitioner Petition of Mil I trcnt Eudc.|-:i Cnundler of Kitts Village. St James. Widow, to the estate of her husband Christopher Alexa n dot Chandler, more commonly known as Elyn Chandler deed. Mr I) H. I, Ward inMrucle-l bv Haynes & Griffith, Solicitors for the petitioner The Mill* of the following we admitted to probate. Justlna Kudora Deane; Prank Cooding. Gordon Springer: Austine Da Costa Chase (St Michael i Malvina Croft. Coat Of Anns Adorug Court Hoiicir THE Husiness < %  tne Court of Ordinary rvrtaroaj anu done under the Shadow of the Lion •:.. i %  %  -iti.-i.-i in thai Court could have beei) beartcned b) tho words iHeu ct nin dralt Qod ind rnj right iMipcarii^ on the Imperial Coati of Arms. Tho Coat of Arms now occupies I the panel over the (tench, and' replaces one which used lo adorn i the Town Hall, and which Is now! Ui the Leglslutlvc Council Chamber. Mr. Went. Colonial Engineer! was responsible for ordering i i.*d putting in the new one. been expresse 11 Fatted To Stop ,GIDNEY ASHBY of Bwajl Streot. City, was onlere-l bv fit, Poluv Magi.strale Mr. E. A. Mc Lend to pay a line of 20/or in default, to undergo 7 days' imprisonment with hard labour for falling to atop at a major road with the motor car X—2.1" alon,; Fauliel.l Kon.i. The view hi that the Harbadt rather thai be more fitting Chamber DpSJ ..( %  v N >r Ihe t'uun EWEXT WI:KK-,\ .\KW I.M:>IA What's on Today Police Courts 10 a.mMeeUru •* Hounlni K*rd at <.iiiii.il < Km.i. %  :o.l flrat. lnlermediAb> and Second l)iei.n.Cricket matches 1.30 p.m. CeoperatorV Itay st Bt. I'alrlek'i School 4.30 Cuban Paper Stops Publication HAVANA. Aug 2.i The Communist Daily Newspaper Bar at whose offices ban the Cuban Government yeslerdjy installed an official '•Government |lor" hah stopped publication The interventor in charged with inspecting newspapers and books to determine whether they should remain In Communist possession or be turned over to the non-Communist Cuban Confederation of Workers. The Conrederiition claimed Hoi has been established with funds contributed by iratiuri whose object ma a newspaper to defend C< mmvi.i>i workers interests. Kgsjtac 10h FOR STONE THROWING EDW1V HOYCE of 6th Avenue. New Orlaana, was yesterday lined by City Police Magistrate M E. A MCI^-KI. 10/with an alter native of 14 days' imprisonment with hard labour for throwing stone* on the Upper Wharf on Thur-dav PIANIST OFF TO MUSIC FESTIVAL NEW YORK. Aug. 25 Claudio Air.ii. Chilean corner ', pmnist, left here by air to-day In Prestwick. Scotland, where he i (lo make two appearances al th Edinburgh. Music Festival 0 August 27 and 29. Arrau will pin. in a programme featuring Schnman's Fantasy Opus 24 and i be soloist with Stradloionlen Orchestra of Copenhagen playing Beethoven's Concerto No 3 t the same hall. —Heater. NO OBSTRUCTION NO FINE Ull WoNhta Mi H A Taltns nod Mrs. Btbal Oowd a ol %  Beaumont," n.e rm :u .-.i Churctj EJ and. : eoata i<> i>c paid in 14 days or in default one month's Imprisonment for, ob* H. G 'intlith ( hief Sanitary Inspector of CfafiH Church and s.mit.irv taaiioctoi Cyril Morsjan wfaila m ihe SBBBJJU* turn ol their duty on March 14. ISM This (bciasi %  %  Their Honours |fj <. |. nd Mi J W R Chenery. t th,> Assistant Court of lardtvj Their HDHOUIN •lisniis.M-.l the se on Its menu. Mi Q II Adams associated with Mi l) i. Wmii. and loato Hi s*Mnvood Boyce, np%  ared on behalf of Mrs linwili'v Inspection III OriflHh ill 111:. eMiieniid lh.il on March 14 he went to ataa in carry out •0 I n spec t ion there A servant appeared and he told her to tell Mrs. Gowucy that he was watting to IMadmittod for in bupecticMi Mrs Gowdey uppeared t r the window ami said thai |ha was not allowing ihem b] enli-i He that day. in idtfrosatruj Then Honoun Mr. Adam* polBtOd Out that Ml Griflllh arilO ha.i several ca


PAGE 1

I-.\(.i: UG i BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, AUGUST M, 1**1 W.L Defeat Essex In Race With Clock Wmkm Hit* Scored In 2 83 Of Hn. 186 Runs 10 Minn. ESSEX 229 AND 169 W.l. 213 AND (FOR 3 WKTS) 186 SOUTHEND-ON-SEA, ESSEX. AUK. 25 The West Indies scored an excellent victory over Essex %  pitch which always gave the bowlers MIIIH' I I-|| The) t^'t rut of the last seven Essex wickets (or 120 i OIIS and then lot tha mvi-ssary 186 for victory in I hour HI minutes with 5 minutes to spare. On a piuh. ill VIIIK after y Third Series Of 1st Division Open Today terday'* •looking c; | Itiimadhin worried E*sex ball men wilh Ihi'ir spin. and the onl> imUnum to look ul all secure wiu Stanley, the young Grournl-SlalT baburuui, who IB also an Arsenal i.v;iri1 He nave a sound defensive display for 25. UomM bowled his off-spinners unchanged for neatly two ;nul .. TODAY Ihr third series of Flr>l h „if hours and fully ,-umed hU and Intermediate and the fourth fl ve wtckots for 79 runs. Th< WM f DM Second Division game* |„ d .w suffered a shock at 27 whei. o,-n Perhaps I he most interest|hcy Wt ,. IH .,,,.„ ,,,,, r .,. ,,,.,„. in* nmr "'the First Division ,>, Mton taking u „srldMl will be (lie Emnlre-Spnrtan flx.siolbneyer aixi WalcoU ' •' ture which will be played at Bank Hall Skipper Alleyne has made a few changes in his side and the two men brought in :ire H. Bourne who playing in the Second r i tha IMI Hire.ni.ih-hcs and C Harper from the Interme%  Although a bit slow in scoring Bourne iQuite nMfol :* u openhad an escape off jng bat while on the nthcr hand catch when at R CHRISTIAN!scored fine S3 ia as many miimlea. WEST INDIES PLAY MIDDLESEX TO-DAY TO-DAY the West Indian crickW 1 against Middlesex tan will make their third 1950 st an tine. In 192V he hit 103 in appearance at Lord's •TOOT ih.v match which has been described n . GOMEZ—captured 5 of Essex 2nd innings wickets. County Cricket Results IXJNDON. Aug. 25. /* !" Cricket results: At Oval, Surrey 7" bti.t Wcrceatershire by 114 runs Surrey 320; Ftshlotk 77, Parker Barton 55 and secondly 140; so*. It bam ,,rpd l Then Weekes and Kae, runiunj • nd .,_ darlnab between wicket... put <> ;1 scored their tlr.t Tes vici 72 before liae gave sii,x a catch • .^ %  /** %  **** which enabled Buy Sm.ih to become the llrst play r to complete the double of a bundled •TtckMl and a thousand runs this season. Christian! joined Weekes and easy return This proved .,i opan [hen IIxture againsl Middlet onstantlne's game. He baited and S-* g f or 48 at Lord's that I hey suffbowled superbly and the West InWorcestershire 175; Wyatt "S. %  of (be tour, dies Surridge fl for 55, and second)) """su'h "-."• nrst.the County rattled mH7.w.,r1h M. ileMahan S for M. H.iip.r who 1* not a slranoer to exienalve a* hfl !..>'M Wltl first Division rrlrkot enn be exV-cUces to see the rum hit oil, p*c(e1 to pull nil wi-fcjlht I a unbroken stand of 87 in 55 TiidayVt Fixtures are:— ''minutes bringing victory. Weekea batted 105 ol h) up 32 for 0 wickets and declared fortune.'"* the name, and to-day The W.l. replied %  ill-. 230 „l'which A ^^ KM ^ Derby.hlr I ,.„o,. a v.,iir to record an' %  >'"' eontrihuted 86 III Iras than b „.„.,,.,„ u cr |,,,nlre 17. other win on Ibis historic ,Ticket an h "'. "'" h n P !" *^ '" £ Wright 4 fo, 52. Kldtwa. 3 for 30. ,ut for 116. "52,MB A !" ^ „..„„ u. :ondly games the Wesl Indies have won w Twere*i"iiI Troubles with 6 wick39 for t two. luxt one an.i one was drawn. .: ((lWn fo , 21 Thvn ConstanAt Cardiff. Glamorgan-YorkMention of these games recall ,, Wi)liVi \ |nt .> the picture again, hire match abandoned as a draw, names dear to the heart of ever. ,.„, K3E3 u I>at in characteriswicket .under water._ Glamorgan 14 Jamaica Port Workers Strihn KINC;STON, Jamaica, Aug M I'ort workers of the Salt Kiver. the main shipping port of HM Wr: IndiSugar Co.—Tate 'i Lyle— | lintk to-day against bull if sugar going to Engluno The • i*w system reduces then i Negotiations are proceeding been the company and a union representing the workers A coffee hil! PRESIDENT DIES SANTIAGO. CHILE. Aug 25. Arturo Alesandn Habna. 82. twice Hrewdent of Chiledied ol a heart attack to-day Ha ••> President of the Stnaie at he t-me of his death. The news ol his death caused mourning throughout the country. Alesandn had been a leader in Chilean p.nit. I for 50 veors and continued .. to the end —O.F. „;;.;;s. v:.;.;;./..-.;,;;; m^: The home de m,, .„. K ^ ; „ 2L4 Am „ 54 if the four completed Svt 1O g rt 259 runs to win the Gladwln 7 fc W I were in troubles with III-I i.'ti n Kmpli* ...a flparljin at Ctwitarrwrir anil foUrr SI fours, IB and hit a six and while Christiani's 53 %  nutes. the i these Pats n \it or* IMMN IMI I. 1 CabW wii Boaeavl Kail ManUI Hoapnai MHI Wuvdo.t. 1L.. II — BaarM Mtf Baosm Jiaa '.- Plrh.lr* ami Y U P C . lover pna llendrei undving ..r> and Nigel Halg to tion only twe whom have seen In ..iit.ii at Kensington, were i-at* i rkiMlat •%  * %  —-•" -„ . tie fashion He hit up 103 and the for 2. Yorksh West Indies got the runs with 3 wickets in hand. I did nut but. Five Records Smashed In Athletics The Sfarl n. U'est Indies set an attack|B| Melti H Mori a> pla> ; %  ...< %  llumadhin had four snort legs and it iiu*;. three Not until the fifth over was a run scored, and Petei Smith look 24 minutes before hitforerunners of ting his first run to-day. He swept Jack Hobertin to leg for a four. Wilh "n Sanhb m a mood for fiitti: II driving well, it \ wolder that 32 runs came in the Drat 35 minutes Then Smith lolled .i ball into the leg slips and Weekc> held It safely. Later Stanley offered resistance, Compton and Ednch, are members but Gomez claimed his third vieof the Middlesex team, whom the JI", 8 -. tun of the morning when he dsWest Indies have already encountnilsscd Insole with a ball whlcn ered on this Tour, and it will be came back snarply. Stanley continmore than interesting to watch the lied to but well until Rair-adhin remeeting again wilh Si mini, the Ii.rned to the attack, and then the veteran spin bowler who routed ...iing We*t Indian spinner Lured """ batsmen in th.Met' n ;imc Slanley forward for WalcoU U, U>rd s and was dii.MU ,, makt a smart piece of stumplnk. *P. nB,,> e or our k <" Just before lunch Gomei itruek „, < /"' % %  % %  %  ^ %  "V. 'r !" Ml11 thc He bad bowled well this w JSS"" ,,r **" " tables be %  f his l>est deDrawn Game Ihc 1933 game whi> li*.h 132 in 58 minutes in a Last wuket standGriffith hit 62 and Valentine 59 not out, to end off the W I 1st innings 3t> and Mid nth 177 Bata second lime W.I delarcdat 251 for 8 wickets, and when the County had lost wickets for 133 in their final At Eastbourne. Hampshire beat Siusex by 50 auns. Hampshire 12.•: Rogers 137, James Langrldge 7 for 87 and secondly 115. Bndger 15, James Langridge 5 Tor IS Sussex 24? for 9 declared; Cox 121. Shackleton 8 for 58 and secondly 38, Kriott 5 for 5. At Mfnchester, I^ancushireWarwickshlre match drawn. Warwickshire 80. Tattersall 7 for 29. Hdton 3 for 27 and secondly 86 for 1, Lancashire 192 for 2 declared, Wnsbbrook not out 111. Ikin 58 At Lords. Middlesex-Northamptonshire match drawn. Northamptonshire 388; Brookes 160, Oldfield 92, and secondly 7 for I, Middlesex 296. W. Edrich 57. Robertson 56, Sharp 72, Garllek S for 58. Rrutrr. reversed? Meniorii with Middlesex 1939. Pho racall tba fine balling display pul up. The Wesl Indies batted first and rolled up 665--their best figures up to then. GcorgfBKL'SSELS, Aug. 25. again Rvt .ii;Min'''"t'Hip l aaOTM were nmrning, and MU u.inng Ihe third day of the liveries completely dei-eiv.il Ha European Athletic Gan h M> that at the uitiival Caaex te tcdav were 138 runs for 8 wakets and SlSl^SZ. *i2K? Mrs Fanny (Hunkers Kocn. were 154 runs ahead. Dutch Olympic champion and Within half an hour Of the rebuild record holder, easily won sumption after lunch Essex wcru the women's 100 metres final In B u out for 169 runs which Itfl which knocked 2.'10 sec. the West Indies with 2'i htmi %  o IT the old record. which to score 186 runs for vir Derek lligh. 24-yeur-old Brit(irv t.-'i runner, took Ihe men's 400 i> t Hatlini' metres in 47 3 -ees which beet stnllmever andltJe u,-.u I fata ..I, record bv 4 ,0 of a second. ^S?^^,,^^ 1 ^. £,£ Huseby. of Iceland, became the er was soon hitting oul so that m-n's 'putting the weight" chainruns came in 20 minutes pion and in doing so broke the old Then Preston c. ised Only Defeat lasl 111 FreiM-hman Wins Swimming Title VIENNA. Aug. 25. I* lost against Middlesex so far is Alex Jany took another swimi IIIK ,nc flrsl onc tnr y P la V ert '"h'" WM mlng title to France today when he in 1923. as the County had no fixwon the Men's 400 metres freeture In 1900 nor 1906 style event here in the European championship meeting in 4 mins. So the only game the W.l. "" %  lost against Middlesex so far Is iccord and the European record change of fortune by dismiss!, with ii throw of 16.74 metres. Stoumeyer and Walcall within The Russian. Lipp, recently had three balls. He sent Stolirivv.-. i ii'.m. ft :>< H3 % %  vir. but UMI .it rtuBaP ii>i"i: and WfalcoM to I has not yet been ratified as a to a good catch by the wickelEuTOpean record. keeper who lumped to tine ic; G. Dirdonl of Italy won the 50 position. Rae offered a chance at Ulornejres walk In 4 hours 40 jf but Preston fallal to accept it mins 4i 6 sees and then collapsed „ IM1 u e W est Indies were than !" h d ** calTlcd from thl well behind Ihe ollKlt Rae and Weekes however raced Meadlev led the WU i'h 227. J. K I) Sealv folknred with 181, and Jeff Stollmeyer completed II I trio of three I tr bajgoi ii. %  th 117. II was :n"n.i Miss Ben Hammo of France won the women's pentathlon.—Renter glorious batting and the County was defeated by an mm and 228 runs. Apart from Ihestthro* the only other batsman to get a c e ntury for th< In this game the W.l. 264, after Middlesex had put up 337. A brilliant 94 by George Challenor was ihe feature ten-man Innings as Tarilton had taken ill during the gai Prelim back of the tioke Men's 100 d further hi (fames In the water polo ser: ab (tested during the day Then K; iBdl shock to I, god the W I fast bowlers ind John administered a the t'oiinty by dismissing r erm ,.i~ n Hut the 156 runs required for victory proved too much for the W I and they were all out for 85 •.,. ta bowling <>f Hearne 4 for 22, and Fowler Results of the Women's 400 netres relay: First. (Holland) — Massaar. M L Vaessen, H. I Schumacher, 4 2nd. Denmark, 4 mins. 43.1 sees 3rd. Sweden, 4 mills. 44 7 sees. King To Reward Channel Swimmers SS'^S?'""" the score along until at 93 Bade.. __ field a catch off Ray Smith to dismiss Roe and give Smith the disr %  tinctlon of being the first play, i g !" to complete the double of a bun thousand ruus stank Men's 400 metres free style: 1st. lex Jany (France) 4 mins. 48 es: 2nd Jean Boalreux (France) 4 mins 50.1 sees; 3rd, Helni LehSo to-dav. Comptoii. Edrich. uiann (Germany) 4 mins. 51.2 Hoiierlson. Dcwes and Slmms will im renew ac(|uaintHnces with the W.l. Water Polo: Sweden 4, Yugoplayers and strive to get the best lavia 4. Holland II. Austria 1, of the meeting. France 7, Switzerland 3. ~ ,M. ReuUr. DEAUVILLE, Aug. 25. King Farouk to-day promised Wd in Cairo to the successful Egyptian swimmers Quick Scoring Weekes Joined by Chnsliani was scoring well. Driving and pulling -. grandly he reached 54 In 55 minthe marathon English Channel ulea and was chiefly responsible Huce organized by London Daily for putting the West Indies on levtl Mall this week. with •* clock. Egypt and myself are very Wrlh half an hour left for pla>, proud of your magnificent perthe West Indies wanted 45 runs lormance and I will not fail to to win and they got these with a reward you on my return to few minutes to spare Egypt." the King told them when Chr.st.nnl who was dropped hf b received them by royal comUuy Smith when only 2 completed i:.and at the Hotel Du Golf here 50 At a run-a minule while Wefc| Hassan Ad El Rehini who won was bolting freely The unbroken S I.'. S >..-i b>r. •KJWUNG ANAl.YSl?£50 PRIZE CROSSWORD (A*> On'im C'~f-i>—*ll INuUNa m S i|fe £ if. ad MrfilWPOl lMl is MCa No dSO tll b awtrdtd for iht U>rrct r m i n i torrtci loiuoo" of th* Crossword Punt* In iha uu d i>* ihi pen* ont. iireidy dtpotitcd with our ftanhci w.ll b* c -dd Extra ..ij'. ni) t i*ri on plui pspr ft'-iuntei itoM b* lj Poiul or Mo-nir Oretr Nj Kaffti ocieaie* A. ...:. ITadl r, %  :.-•.. Wf.lt. nnl oul %  • % %  •,.: .i %  .1 ihe £1.000 first prixe in the record fourli time of 10 hours and 50 minutes his fellow Eg Hassan Hamad who came third knelt and kissed the King's band ***** -Renter. £Bg I wicket stand pul 87 I I** ay Total .for S -mkc nowiJNO AMAi.Yaia PVV JNI> INNIM.S %  Ulley ; ••• %  •• %  Ray amiih l They'll Do It Every Time .— "— By Jimmy Hado <3>L=NA PECIPEP TO USE HER. EXTRA-SPECUL GORQEOUS PERFUME FOR THE as care WITH PULCIMER ••• rJuST SMELL WlM-FRESH PROM THE BARBERS, OVERPOWERING ANY SCEMT WITHIN THlRTy FEET rvTAad I J Aoimil 1 awddn OulDt.ru S Oiow -eif, 10 EacclUtni 11 Sofficlhing tatibl* i] Pcrsoil pronoun Dm I li mar frighten n-^i peopi* J Pan of aihip 4 Trembk -nh cold fc Named 7 Small uain I NavtgMfl o*d t Ilt h, . I Ml • RclulU -til bt tom due to ary comp*nior. Promourt' d*cbion *> Platf 6laga. 11 .**!*• NO. I A Grand Dance %  M PAHKHAtJ.W Philip oh NDAV Nioirr. itih AU. I*M Aasassdaa t.FWTS I/IAWB t • [uaM Hy f*rcv Otoert'* Ora**tn it -*OiJI> — DONT MIHS IT 1 A HUB *U1 -sav* U> Emplrr TO-NIGHT Mr. Seymour Archer iBrttrr known aa Mlm* Dick Drlvttof Bcrlrir Va> PawtM-ctliillv I'.Mlr. You lo HU DANCE M cuun wuxow. Passaw hoad MHSM Blipplil by Mr Prrc> Oiwn. OrvSkSStta AIlMClFUON I HrziU^tHMBNTS &i HAK *H.II> ... It's the improved Chase and Sanborn! Merc wuids CksB*l desciibe it. You'll have lo taste it. And when you lift a cup of this new Chase and Sanborn lo your lip*, you'll exclaim with delight! You'll uKi-cc with those who • *..ll it. the Imrsi coffee motif, i ..II buy' .ei .i can lodi -vacwuaVpacked. from "H prcer. DANCE TO-NIGHT CASUARiNA (LIB BEUTIE HAYWABD'S OHCHESTHA Steaks & Snacks served throughout The Night 20.8 50—In. DANCE POSTPONEMENT THIS serves lo inform the Genernl public that the Dance which was to be held by Mr. Elkins Griffith at Club Royal. Silver Sands has been postponed until a later dale MAM in DANCE INVITffES to Ihe Dance lo be he.ld at Atluntts Hotel to-night can be dssured that Ihe management Is sparing no efforts to give them an enjoyabla I time w//^/w//Mvy>w, CALADIUM SHOW WHITEHALL, St. PETER Owing to rain I III: . \IIIH\S will be further opened MORNING and AFTERNOON from August 26th t to September 2nd inclusive \ 28.850— 2n I s CHANCE to BUY a PURE IRISH LINEN SUIT SMART FIT AND NEATLY TAILORED J $45.15 &f We also have LINEN TROUSERS in While and Wine $10.96 pi. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10. 11, 12 and 13 Broad Street. %  s.v.vsssss.vs.v.vr*.-s.'.v'SS'-v->-'''SS''-7'" v "''''''''% FOR LADMES: MEXICANS: FOR EVERY DAY WEAR Black $5.85: White $t.5: Brown M oil SPOHTIES in Brown. Flat Heels with Leather Sole S3.30. with Crepe Sole $5.M NEW DESIGNS IN IIHESS SHOES Black Saede Court: Snake skin riaUorm • -. r. White Ruck Court. Platrorm. Back and Tocleo. -M. FOR SAFE SEA BATHING FOR CHILDREN KCHHKK SKIMM1M. RINGS WINGS 0 |1.U SHOEMAKERS TO THE WORLD. | RELIABLE SHOE REPAIR SERVICE :! RNeumafism. Ankles Puffy, Backache. Kidneys Strained! 11 rti Mshla. aw*. Backa iar (fn btrair..—' ttar*ao k.I-. 1'lllta.Swi Khrtinialiatr.. Buralivg llaaafaa, Ki ... A'ldlly or l.i— i.( Kn-riv ami r>vl t>4 h,. r*ar. your rim*. K-lrn TrvuMv % %  ih irur OHalp Kidneys Doctor's Way 1 Ify "v. ITZapi wiU %  K!am>r...ilr pf-aan s pa*'ip(iB |Wd C.ta. HoaatrfCa uiiJ h-ndr-da i | 1 fct"•• %  r...rrt. j-..*. Ihla. No tenetit —No Pay TlW •"> flrml rli-a* of C,l(l. |l>ri -larti lit %  ! Mlpmi ir Kdln-v. rrnvvi rt -•M a. Id. Q.il. -it rhla makra you t— ihr r* aHin. And ao room, ar. Ih. %  ik-i. ili-i Cyalia %  HI aallalv yo. mittry l, und-raimm-y ..I rt" r>Sana %  •( you, mor . Cyit** i".'.i 5iTOrSSMrS r Cvs t ex D '"' • T- cH.onif. %  •-... NIUMATISM BARBADOS AMATEUR BOXING ASSOCIATION Under the Distingu'shed Patronage His Excellency the Governor announces A Series of Thrilling Contests on the night of 4th SEPTEMBER at 8 o'clock At the MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM Entire proceeds in aid of the Bay Street Boys' Club Thc Police Band will play Popular Prices: REFRESHMENTS 17 8550—5n. Wr ran supply Iron slerk n rrrml arrivals B. R. C. Metal Fabric NO. 9 MEDIUM WEIGHT NO. 14 LIGHT WEIGHT in rolls 3" x 12" mesh 7' wide a Expanded Metal Sheets Iron 1" mesh 4' x 8' 1" 4' x 82" ,. 4' x 10' 3" „ 4' x 10 Galv. T mesh T x 8 WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD




Saturday
August 26
1950



Barbados
G.’'s AWAIT RED.

From Shareholders

Cracks At Cripps And
British Railways

From Our Own Correspondent.
LONDON, Aug. 25.
MB. BILLY BUTLIN scored a great personal
_ Success to-day at the Annual General Meeting
of his English Company in London.

Five hundred shareholders were present to hear
him defend his Board’s actions in going ahead with
the development of the Holiday Camp in the
Bahamas and after he had finished they displayed
their whole-hearted approval.

Mr. Butlin was also questioned about the two hotels
which had been bought and sold in Bermuda and Nassau.
reiterated that had those hotels been retained, they would
have quickly showed a profit.



' As it was, Butlin’s had lost over
£90,000 on them.

Butlin Gets Support) .



Mechanic Dies
In Molassec

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, Aug. 25

Twenty-two year old Enoch
George a mechanic employed at
Montpellier Factory died of Car-
bon dioxide poisoning yesterday
after he had been sent into a
molasses tank to connect a piPe.

It was discovered afterwards
that as the result of the hurri-
cane, five inches of rain water
had entered the tank causing
fermentation. .

George collapsed two minutes
efter he had climbed down into
the tank. Foreman LL, Simon,
along with another mechanic H.
Christopher attempted to rescue
him. They both had to be pulled
out and they too collapsed, but
recovered shortly.

Manager Francis Nunes and
two others climbed halfway down
ecd got George out but he was
already dead,

ELECTRICITY
SUSPENDED

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, Aug. 25.

Following the Globe Hotel and
Secretariat fires there have been
two alarms caused by faulty elec-
trical wiring.

The first incidence was discov-
ered at Brown & Co., where papers
were burnt as the result of entan-
gled telephone and electric wires.
Second was at the residence of
Rupert Lewis in High Street where
the Fire Brigade was called to ex-
tinguish flames caused by an
electrical short circuit.

The Administrator has temporar-
ily suspended the Electric Service
until Electrical Mains damaged by
the Globe fire are corrected.

St. John’s is gloomy and desolate
in the evenings. The public are
depressed and cencerned over
the dangerous state of electricity
and telephone services.



LOO



But Sir Stafford Cripps would
have taken 60,000 anyway” said
Butlin and we have certainly had
£30,000 worth of publicity.”

Reporting on Bahamas Camp he
said that arrangements to obtain
an additional £800,000 for the
completion of the Camp wee
still being pursued.

He revealed that since the
camp was opened there had been
17,000 visitors. about half of whom
were day trippers and were
charged £2 a head.

The remainder stayed on
average for a week.

“Considering the problems we
have encountered, I think that is
pretty fair” he added.

One shareholder asked Mr. But-
fin whether he would abandon his
frequent trips to Bahamas and
concentrate on Butlin’s Camps in
this country.

Butlin’s characteristic reply
was: “Jt is ne more trouble these
days. going by plane to the
Bahamas than it is to get to some
parts of this country by British
railways.

Butlin’s Ltd. showed a_ profit
this year of £491,642 compared
with £514,071 last year.

From this profit, the loss on two
Hotels still has to be deducted.

450 Planes Do
Battle Exercise

PARIS, Aug. 25.

Western Union Air Forces to-
day began a three-day battle exer-
cise at Cupola aimed at testing air
defences from the Dutch Coast to
the Alps.

About 450 aircraft including jet
fighters were taking part in the
exercise, the most extensive ever
staged in Europe.

Eight airfields in France, Bel-
gium. and Holland were serving
squadrons from the Royal Air
Force, the French, Belgian and
Dutch Air Forces.

The exercise involved bombing
Paris.

French Defence Minister Jules
Moch, piloting his own aircraft,
was to observe part of the exer-
cise later to-day. —Reuter.





W. Germany Will Help)
European Defence

STRASBOURG, Aug. 25. |

DR. HEINRICH VON BRENTANO, Chief German re-
presentative to the European Assembly, declared here to-

day that Germany was
European
Authority.

Army under a common
He told a Press Conference here that the West

prepared to take her part in a

European Political

German Republic was against rearmament, but felt it her
right and duty to take part in the defence of Europe.

Asked to clarify this, he

£12,500,000 Will
Be Spent On
Norway Forces

' OSLO, Aug. 25.
j About 190 million kroner
j (£950,000) will be allocated to
| armed forces out of the new
| Norwegian extraordinary defence
_ vote of (250,000,000 kroner
£12,500,000,) according to a Gov-
ernment. proposal to Parliament
published to-day. Civil defence
j will receive £1,750,000 police
' £650,000 and £300,000 will be

i used for stock-piling.

The Government’s proposal also
asks for an additional £300,000
which it is estimated will be the



i annual cost of running merchant
ships which Norway has placed
at United Nations disposal for
Korea.

No information is given about
the way in which the extra money

said”:

“We came here to Strasbourg to
substitute European ideas for na-
tional ideas. Therefore creating a
German army under German com-
mand is out of the question and we
would not know what to do with
it.”

But we are ready to contribute
tthe economic power of Germany
and if necessary also the power
and strength of the German popu-
lation to a European Army under
a common European Political
authority for the defence of Eu-
rope and democratic freedoms.

Dr. Von Brentano who belongs
to Chancellor Konrad Adenauei’s
Christian Democrat Party said in
supporting Churchill’s proposal
for a European Army, that Ger-
mai representatives to the Assem-
bly were in full agreement with
the West German Government.
We do not believe the rearmament
of Germany could further any
German interests, he said. I am
sure I can say a great majority of
the German people are against











UNIONS
BROKE
PLEDGE

SAYS TRUMAN

WASHINGTON Aug. 25.

United States railway workers,
threatening g nation-wide strike
for more pay and shorter hours
on Monday, denied today that
they had broken any pledge to
President Truman.

Truman told a Press conference
yesterday that the two Unions
who called the strike of the
Brotherhood of railroad trained
men and of railway conductors,
had done so within an hour after
he had been assured by both
management and _ unions that
there would be no walkout, The
Unions sent a denial that they
had made any pledge to the
White House. The strike call
was issued on Wednesday after
the collapse of White House
sponsored {peace talks directed
by Dr. John Steelman, President
Truman’s Labour Adviser,

The strike would affect 300,000
guards and ticket collectors on
131 railway liens.

A spokesman for the workers
said that they would continue in
their jobs if the Government
seized railways in the event of
the strike,

Should the strike develop vir-
tually all rail transport on the
North American continent would
be paralysed if the nation-wide
strike now in effect in Canada
is not settled by Monday.

The Canadian strike, now in
its fourth day was called by
124,000 workers also seeking
higher wages and shorter hours.

—Reuter.

Youths Warned
se
Against Reds
HAMBURG, Aug. 25.

Representatives of half a mil-
lion youths of the powerful West
German Trade Union
tion met here today tor their first
Youth Congress since the war.

Trade Unibn Delegates from
Denmark, Italy, Switzerland Aus-
tria, Poland, Belgium, the Saar,
Britain and the United States
were present. Youths and labour
officers of the Western Occupation
powers are taking part as ob-
servers.

Harvey Brown, Director of
Labour Affairs in the Allied
High Commission asked employ-
ers to share with Labour, the
burdens of reconstruction and



culled for a wider use of modern |

mass production methods.
Warning Germah, Youtins
against the totalitarian crowd of
Communist salesmen from the
East he told them not to forget





Federa- |







TRAFFIC HINTS FROM STRATFORD

a Re '

THE WHOLE WORLD knows Stratford-upon-Avon as the birthplace
of Shakespeare. Visitors come here to this house, to the cottage of
his wife Ann Hathaway, and to tomb in Holy Trinity Church.
The performance of Shakespeare's plays in this lovely old town, which
still keeps much of its Elizabethan character, are world fapous, The
Stratford Festival is built around these productions:at- the Memorial
b ncenidag the fine motern building Which stands on the banks of the
von.

America Started
Fighting Before
Council Approved

Says JAKOB MALIK

LAKE SUCCESS, Aug. 25.
The United Nations Security Council meeting held to-
day to resume consideration of Korea, began by listening
to at least two hours of French translations of speeches left
over from the last meeting.

Jakob Malik, Soviet delegate and this month’s Councii
President, proceeded at once to translations of one of his
own speeches, to be followed by that of the British and
American delegates after the adopting of the agenda.

- ————+ Immediately after completion

of the translation Malik again de-

: clared that the United States had

Floods, Quake [committed an act of direct aggres-

Ki 1 000 sion in Korea, by intervening
ill 9

{against the North Korean people
BOMBAY, Aug. 26.

He maintained that neither the
British nor the American delega-
tions on the Security Council

More than 1,000 people have | ¢ > “one si » fact.”
died in the earthquake and floods cetild refute “one single fact.
which have devastated 30,000 “Big Lie”

square miles of Northern Assan bi duets bd . j/

in the past 10 days according to ene pt refuting, the world

unofficial reports, the All-India led “big lie” very loudly and re-

Radio stated today called the dirty memory of Hitler

‘ . 1 - minds,” he said
Indian paratroopers landea to- |'°, gut minds, :

day in the affected areas. The first ae United States and the

group dropped in the devastated |United Kingdom cannot under-

region to help land supplies from stand that this is not the way to

aircraft. nandle facts Speaking a

; co sore etjj) {and deliberately, Malik said “I de-

Intermittent tremors were still clare that the United States Gov-

eing felt in hills in northeast
bees Bridges have ‘ been|emment started armed aggres-
washed away and roads torn up {Sion against the Korean people

without any resolution, of the
Security Council.”

President Truman’s order to
send military and naval forces
to Korea on June 28 was made at
1600 and the Security Council
session at which the United States
“imposed its illegal resolution”
was not called until 1900 G. M. T
that day, Malik told the Council

“Therefore, it is a_ historical
fact that the United States Gov-
ernment arbitrarily and illegally
started aggression in Korea several
hours before the Security Coun-
cil meeting, thereby placing be-
fore the United Nations and the
world an accomplished fact”, he
declared.

everywhere by quakes and_ac-
companying floods, Assar.’s Pub-
lic Works Minister Ramnath has
said after a tour of the area
Assam’s Chief Minister, Bishnu
Ram said that 10,000 people had
been affected in northeast Assam.
It was still impossible to assess
full damage,

Assam’s Government Engineer
said it would be at least ten days
before traffic could be resumed
on the main trunk load through
the area. —Reuter.



First British Troops
Off To Korea

| HONG KONG, Aug. 25.
The Aircraft Carrier Unicorn

and the cruiser Ceylon left the

wharf here at 6.00 p.r_ local time

“Bourgeois” Dipiomats
Turning to the Britis, Delegate,
Sir Gladwyn Jebb, who at the
last Council session quoted state-
ments by Lenin, Stalin and other
Soviet leaders to strengthen his



that Communists the world over
are acting under orders from the

high priests of Moscow.—Reuter.

Cement, Bauxite And Tourists

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Aug, 25
Three finance
Jamaica are in the news to-day

schemes ___ for

to-day, carrying Britain’s first
‘eontingent of greund troops for
'the Korean war,—- Reuter.



argument that Soviet Russia often
@ on page 3

Draw City Talk

Aduncate

ee ee

RIVE ON PUSAN

| ANGLO—U.S.

RIFT OVER
FORMOSA

LONDON, Aug. 25,

Reuter’s Diplomatic Correspon-
dent here to-day considered that
behind the appeal by the Chinese
Foreign Minister Chou En Lai for
Security Council action on For-
mosa lay an attempt to sow dis-
cord between the western powers

A tew weeks ago at the time of
General Douglas MacArthur's un- |
expected visit to Formosa, there
were, signs, that this issue might
seriously divide Britain and the
United States and that the Indian
Government would condemn
American policy, It looked as if
the American decision to neutral-
ise Formosa by means of the U.S
navy might give rise to an impor-
tant issue of principle between
London and Washington

Long-Term Solution

But the potential Anglo-Amer-
ican feud on the Formosa question
did not materialise, and it has been
generally understood that an at-
tempt was being made in diplo-
matic exchanges between the two
governments to find a long term
solution to the problem

The prevailing impression is
that though the crisis in Anglo-
American relations has fortunately
been avoided the problem of re-
conciling the different standpoints
of the two countries has yet
been solved.



not

Consequently Chou En Lai’s
move to raise the matter in the
Security Council which will pre-
sumably be supported by Jacob

Malik, who is Chairman until next
Thursday, could be embarrassing
to both Britain and the United]
States

Until a common policy is achiev-
ed on this question between Lon-
don and Washington, both parties |
are interested in keeping the mat- |
ter out of court, It can be inferred |
they will try to do so if Malik
moves to put Chou En Lai’s appeal |
on the agenda of one of the forth-
coming meetings

Reuter,

ll Killed In |
R.A.F. Crash

SINGAPORE, Aug. 25.

A Royal Air Force Dakot
crashed to-day in a jungle
Malaya with eleven passengers an
crew aboard. Army patrols wert
despatched immediately to searct
the area

Police reports said the Dakoti
POR fire when she hit dens¢
jungle trees. The occupants were |
{feared to have perished.

The place where the crash oc-
curred was pin-pointed by other
aircvaft and it was be}



lieved tha

Ariay search parties woul! react |

it to-night. —Reuter,



ae

Price:
FIVE CENTS
Year 35



| Dig In For
Dawn Attack

By JULIAN BATES
With MacArthur’s Headquarters for Korea,
August 26.

BATTLE WEARY American infantry, dug ing” ,
before Masan on Korea’s south coast, today™* =~.

awaited a major dawn attack from two Communist
divisions which have been ordered to drive straight
for Pusan.

Northern fronts gave no sign of an all-out offensive
yet, though Communist pressure persisted and on
the east coast had forced a mile-wide breach into
the Allied line.

But according to staff officers at General MacArthur's
headquarters, the concentration of two divisions with heavy
tanks west of Masan constituted the real threat.

For days now reconnaissance pilots had reported rein-
forcements moving eastwards from Chinju despite continu-
ous eir attacks

— By daylight they were march-

South Koreans
Strike Back

IN DRIVE TO SEOUL

(By Lio? . HUDSON).
KOREA, Aug. 25

Routed and demoralised twe
nonths ago and since swept back
into a corner of the Korean Penin-
sula, the South Korean Army now
has its tail up again

In rugged red hills and lush val-
leys at the front line north of
laegu, and across the East Coast,
these fighting Southerners have a
ew offensive spirit

American Commanders who
know these tough intrepid troops,
vell, say that they expect them to
mighty force in the drive
back to Seoul and beyond

They say it follows that well-

ained and well-equipped South
Koreans will be better opponents
for North Koreans than any west-
‘rn troops

The families of many of them
were left behind up north, and it
is a personal not a political war
with most of them.

I have watched their morale go
ky high during the last few weeks.
It started when the weapon hun-
ery South Koreans were supplied
with 3.5 Bazookas, At least they
had the means of wiping out Com-
munist tanks



North Koreans Forced Back

It was not long, ‘before, that
reports started flowing back from
the front that South Koreans
Bazooka squads had forced North
Koreans back

It Coes not appear to be realised
generally that South Korean Divi-
ione have had most of the Com-
munist forces against them for
weeks, Practically every fighting
man they had was committed in
the line

An American Military Authority
who has been in Korea since 1946
said that if the South Koreans had
ceased to be fighting forces for one
day since June 25 United Nations
Forces would not be on the Pen-
insula now.

He said South Koreans held the
greater part of the line until just
recently, while now they split half
and half with Americaas,

~-Reuter.





SAILS _v.

ing in little groups of 30 or 50
while bigger formations and
supply columns remained hidden
in railway and mining tunnels

Prisoners taken on this front
yesterday said they had orders
to assault Masan defences over

an 800 yard front on Thursday
night. But American shelling and
air attacks scattered their forces
and disorganised supplies

Severe Mauling

North Korean troops charged
with the south coast offensive are
the 4th Division and regrouped
remnants of the 6th and 7th div-
isions which earlier had taken a
severe mauling.

Prisoners insisted that the
main body of this force, despite
harassing by United Nations’ pa-
trols and strafing from the air,
was ‘argely intact

the Amenican «25th
Division defending Masan have
been on their own there since
the marines were pulled out to
contain the threat on the Nak-
tong River bulge a fortnight ago.

Units of

MacArthur’s headquarters re-
ported yesterday that pressure

on the 25th it . One com-
nany had to ind around
the “battle mountain’’—fercely

embattled ridge northwest of
Haman on the Chinju-Masan
sector of the south coast road.

Too Weak

Alex Valentine Reuver’s corre-
spondent on the south coast front
reported that the Allied lack of
manpower. here appeared to rule
out the possibility of forestalling
the Communist offensive by attack.
An American colonel told him: “L
know attack is the best form of
defence but we are not strong
enough; all we can do is to try
to hold them,” Valentine cabled
hat the American staff officers
ittached great importance to the
expected attack on Masan only
30 miles from the vital supply
port of Pusan,

They feared that a major strike
there might force General Mac-
Arthur to draw troops from the
northern front and thus invite
ar all out offensive,

—Reuter.

ee pm eg



SMOKE



ihe sails of the |
old-time clipper
have given ‘way
to “smoke”



accel





Britain. Finally comes n¢
Sir William Stephenson of the}
£1,200,000 Caribbean

Company He informs
helders to-day that building work

Cement |
share-|

|
fron |



‘CLIPPER



the smoke of the

modern CLIPPER’
still sails the
seven seas !

\99

‘ae a.”

















ion of a German army or an : Susie ‘ aaideiliett lcd or: fone ar ¢ ifty cente to tt 7 :
is to be raised. ate eh German Seshiliteriagthion Two of them, the new Bauxite Mere Plans wget - oe ee hae: t ie ate “ il, and deliveries of the plant are|
. ity § “le poses C ' oO schedule N
But the Government statement] for obtaining national interests. | Factory Plan and Tourist City *Pe "Medennatle £ Devt pole’ ie faveak-dii. wpeeiat Britt ight up to , schedule . hile! oc) GARETTES
) emphasises that private building —Reuter. | Project, both of which have been edemplion o ’ a wenicnnt anoutities despite de aluation ‘< _ have
? and investments will be restricted announced in the past 48 hours, Apart from such project io Mr. Gore ‘hopes to petchis. been kept within the original
to meet military and civil defence | are severely criticised. The third, this, these funds would ke applied |, 000 000 °, about helf of its ‘mat
s needs. Private consumption will se 4 the Caribbean Cement Company, to the redemption of Britich G vo ‘al , ee aad ae 3 Ti balance sheet 4 hows an
Fi also be restricted partly by British Officers reports progress. ernment debt. What actually hap Hot a while the British Gov- ¢*penditure of £121,432, invest- .
2 financial measures, and partly : a os ‘el ai Siasi pens then . that transaction mone - we 1 oat ite desire to ment in Jamaican arene
& through cuts in imports,—-Reuter News Chronicle City Editor amounts to the re-issus of th a ee : a ;. Treasury Bills of £189,287 and
2 Leave For Korea Oscar Hobson this morning sug- national debt es Ip Jamaica prea re ora agp éash of £191,499
4 8TH JEWEL ROBBERY titebieie Jb 4 gests that Bauxite and Tourist The second proje ot, Mr Gore’ an ae J a oe! A profit of £1,4% 18s, lld. wa MANUFACTURED BY
PARIS, Aug. 25. Teri’ British ofmMBere Dae atune eee “2 ot Come ene 0 Tourist ¢ ity : des me Seiad made during the a” re ne
The eighth jewel robbery in Tae § p apes -nignt evelopment Schemes and thai cribed as more interesting au f ‘ ‘ : lor J Exchequer ‘ anc
andes this youth cane to leht by ov _ mare by way of Mon-|the burden of the cost of them more subtle Unrequited F.xports Treasury Bills
ae : 7 | treal- an ew York, the War}| will fall on the British taxpayer Hobsor suggest th Effectively counterpart func The lirector far cost] iti . ‘d d
} today in Paris where burglars'Ofice announced: They are to| He points out that part of the Linted "keane project which for. the Bauxite eine kek Me Comps ’ themes a British American Tobacco Co., B OSs. Lt .
—— — oe unt on Sele ann out Seca teeanees in Korea | funds for the Bauxite Factory are Mr. Gore is advertising in An £3,000,000 I City vren s that theit erati
arnay iast ni and s ;and make preliminary arrange-!to be provided out of the five per can papers will resumabl ¢ ent the cre f e left abe
jewel box containing jewels val-/ments for the arrival of British pant be nter t ste rlir : fund “al vf i ; terlin ia ‘ dn Ww
ved at 1,300,000 francs.—Reuter. | troops.—Reuter, Marshall reserved to the Thi currently oo als







— © a pil


PAGE TWO

Caub ¢

ON. H. A. CUKE, C.B.E.,
A returned by B.W.I.A. from
rinidad yesterday morning. ‘He
was in Trinidad’ for a couple of
days, attending a meeting of the
Board of Directors of British West
Indian Airways, held in Port-of-
Spain.

Amigos Venezoilanos!
“J SEE YOU ran a short para~
graph in your column a couple
of days ago asking authorities to
put up notices on the Manchineel
Trees on Rockley Beach”, said a
lady who telephoned me yester-
day. “But”, she continued “what
about the visitors who speak only
Spanish.” “Two days ago’,” she
said, “a Venezuelan lady ate one
of ¢ berries down on the St.
James coast, not knowing that
they were poisonous.” “Can you
suggest anything to prevent this
sort of thing happening again?”
So Carib burrowed into his
Spanish Dictionary, an hopes

that this little note if prominently ¢

displayed im each hotel room and
in the Guest Houses, will warn
our Venezuelan visitors not to eat
these fruit.

“Amigos Venezolanos. No
coman de las frutas verdes que
cain de las matas de Manzanilla
en las playas. Mucho cuidado
que son venenosas.”

Of course, notices on manchineel
trees on the various beaches in
Spanish would also help.

Brothers Return After

Holiday

‘ R. CYRIL COZIER who has

been holidaying in Barbados
with relatives for the past three
weeks returned to the Dominican
Republic yesterday by B.W.I.A.,
where he is Supt. of Fields in
Santa-Fe. Mr. Cozier has been
living in the Dominican Republic
now for twenty-three years.

His brother Arden, who is Supt.
of the Sugar Factory at Canovanas
in Puerto Rico, also left yesterday
by B.W.I.A. after a month's
hpliday here. He was atcom-
panied by his wife and young son
Arden Jnr. Arden was last in
Barbados in 1946

Here For rive Days

; R. VERNON KNOX arrived
yesterday to spend five days’

holiday with Mr. and Mrs. Austin
ar in Maxwells,

He told Carib, that his sister
and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Alfonso B. De Lima were supposed
to have come over with him, but
at the last moment, Mr. De Lima,
had to cancel his passage owing
to business.

Mr. Knox who does construction
work for the oil fields in Vene-
zuela has just returned from
three months’ holiday in the U.S.
and Trinidad.

On Leave Relief
f RS. JOYCE BABB. arrived

from Grenada on Wednesday
afternoon by B.W.I1.A., to join
her husband, Mr. James Babb,
who is Acting as Assistant
Meteorological Officer at Seawell,
for about six weeks, doing leave

Mr. Babb, who is a Panamanian,
spent most of his boyhood days
in Barbados and is an Old Har-
risonian. Now he is stationed in
Grenada doing similar work. He
arrived here a few weeks ago on
holiday, and resumed work at
Seawell temporarily a few days
ago. His wife is a Grenadian and
so is their baby daughter Ingrid,
who accompanied Mrs. Babb over
on Wednesday.

Frequent Visitor
FTER a week’s holiday in Bar-
. bados, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Porter and their two little
daughters, Katherine and Pamela
left yesterday by B.W.1.A. for a
week’s stay in Puerto Rico.

Mr. Porter is the Good Year
representative in Trinidad and is
a frequent visitor to Barbados,
this time however he was on
holiday. They were staying at
the Ocean View Hotel.

BY THE



Pe EADING bophomologists are
inclined to attribute the re-
cu

ng explosions on Mars to the
bursting of enormous eggs.

It is pointed out, that, owing to
atmospheric conditions on that
planet, eggs must stand on end, If
laid down on their sides they
burst. The theory is that some
huge and ignorant bird built a
nest and laid a number of eggs
horizontally on the floor of the
nest. This would cause the eggs
te explode.

Love Conquers All

IDNIGHT chimed from a dis-
tant clock, and still that
strange contest continued. By
now the cheating was so frank
and open, that each jested about
it. “Why not use that king in
your pocket, Smarty?” “Darling,
I will when you use the queen
you palmed when you dealt.” For
these two had become very in-
timate, and as the headmaster
said afterwards: “The green baize
‘was but a greensward upon which
Cupids seemed to disport them-
selves.” Every time he _ press-



“ Any rebate in case | do not
sit cout the full three hours?”



Off To Antigua

ING COMMANDER R. C.
LAWES, Assistant Opera-
tions Manager of International
Aeradio Ltd., stationed in London,
who arrived here on August
2ist ‘oft yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. for Antigua, with Mr.
“Bob” Greene, also of 1.A.L
After their Antigua visit Wing
Comdr, Lawes will visit Panama.

Delayed By Hurricane

to. CAPTAIN Eric Burton,
SJ Government Airport Manager
in Antigua has been in Barbados
since August 17th on a short visit.
Due to the hurricane in Antigua
hus return was delayed.

The Rabbitts In

Guadalcanal
R. AND MRS. R. RABBITT
are now living in Guadal-
canal, Solomon Islands, in the

South West Pacific.
Dr. Rabbitt will be remembered
here as being House Surgeon and

Anaesthetist at the Barbados
General Hospital from 1947 to
1948. Mrs. Rabbitt is the former

Joyce Fields, eldest daughter of
Mr. and Mrs, E. M. Fields of Cora-
Lynn, Belmont Road.

They left Barbados two years
ago for Canada, and have travelled
over the greater part of the North
American Continent.

Their honeymoon was spent in
Niagara Falls and since then they
have lived in Winnipeg and Mon-
treal, where the Doctor took Post
Graduate Courses at the Manitoba
University and McGill University
in Montreal. They also spent
some time in Ottawa and Toronto,

Leaving Montreal in May, they
crossed over to the Western cities
of Canada through the Rockies to
Vancouver, from which port they
sailed for the South West Pacific
touching at Honolulu, Hawaii,
Suva, Fiji, Sydney and Brisbane
Australia and flew from there to
Guadalcanal, where Dr. Rabbitt
is Superintendent and Admin-
istrator of the Central Hospital
for the South West Pacific.

Although enjoying life in that
part of the world they still have
not forgotten Barbados, and plan
to visit here as soon as the
Doctor's six months’ leave is due

Here For Short Holiday

RS. SHEILA ALLAMBY ar-
rived from Trinidad on
Tuesday by B.W.I.A. to spend a
short holiday with her parents,
Mr. and Mrs, Edward Blades of
“Margate”, Hastings.

On Holiday

OYCE CHU-CHEONG of Trin-
* idad who is studying physio-
therapy at Birmingham is now
holidaying. From the far north,
Joyce has written to say. she is
enjoying her holiday and hopes
to visit Sweden, Denmark and
Norway.

WAY...

ed her hand she missed a card or
two. Every time she returned
the pressure, he bade a_ silent
aaieu to his trumps. Slowly she
wore him down. Bewitched by
foolish hopes, he began to play
wildly, neglecting the very ele-
ments of cheating. She smiled
continually, and his eyes were too
often on her face instead of on
her nimble hands. He beyan to
wonder what kind of a scandal
it would create if a headmaster
had to mortgage his school to pay
his card-debts. Marriage seemed
to be the only way out. He
therefore let the cards go hang,
and began to woo her in earnest
ealling her his poopsiewoopsie
and his little mipsikins.

Life is Like That

{| Marylebone = still insists on
‘ banning private flags, there
will probably be a special meet-

ing of the Cabinet to consider
whether the burgee of the Saucy
Mrs. Flobster, moored off (or
rether tied by an old cabman's

CLEARS STUFFY NOSE-L,/2£ as a Shean, , :

Carry
tanr,
y mort

Comte?

IN YOUR POCKET!

$O HANDY —Carry it with you in
pocket or handbag—neat, feather-
weight Vicks Inhaler. It’s tiny, but
loaded full of soothing, nose-clear-
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EASY TO USE—Wherever you hap-
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just unscrew the cap and put the





tip of Vicks Inhaler right into each
stuffy nostril in turn, Ber-e-a-t-h-e
in, and—quick as a breath!—your
nose feels delightfully cool ‘and
clear. So pleasant. So convenient.
Try tt today!

Use as often as needed

P immater







>









Disillusioned
HERE was a big disappoint-
ment awaiting a very small
girl last week ‘when ghe wept
with her father to a t
match. She thought she was going
to see England vs. West Indies.
Imstead she saw two teams of
Arsenal footballers getting into
training for the new season. Her
father, Laurie Scott, Arsenal and
England full-back did his best to
console her, but in vain, It was
West Indies or nothing for her.
Not even the sight of Alex Forbes,
Arsenal and Scottish wing-half
over-swinging and losing his bal-
enee to be stumped yards out of
his crease could drive the tears
from her eyes.
Hurried Back
ISS ENID MAXWELL of
Atlantis Hotel was among
the Barbadian School Teachers
1eturning to Barbados on Thurs-
day by B.W.LA., after the School
Teachers’ Conference recently
held in BG.

Chatting with her yes' she
told me that they had all had a
very enjoyable time. She would
have remained on for a longer
stay but she had to hurry back
in time for her dance at the At-
lantis to-night.

Visited Kaiteur
R. ORLANDO DA SILVA
who arrived from B.G., by
.W.LA. on Thursday afternoon,
expects to be in Barbados for a
couple of months. This is his
first holiday away from home.

Orlando is on long leave from
Rookersa and has already spent a
few months touring the hinter-
land of B.G., visiting the Kaiteur
Fall. He is staying at Leaton,
Worthing,

Returned To B.G.
“ISS .MARY KIRTON, who

has been holidaying in
Barbados since August 10th, re«
turned to BG. on Thursday

afternoon by B.W.LA., Miss Kir-
ton was staying with relatives in
Worthing. A Barbadian, she now
lives in Georgetown, where she
is with Sprostons Ltd.
No Voodoo In Haiti
HERE is more voodoo in
England than in the black-
magic West Indian island of
Haiti, according to M. H. Bour-
jolly, new Haitian Minister to
London. A slim dark-skinned
man of 46, he arrived in England
last week on board the Mle de
France “Voodoo in Haiti is a
curiosity now, something to be
put in a museum”, he said. “Forty
years ago a child was killed in a
ritual, But two years ago England
had the Haigh murders.” M.
Bourjoily’s appointment is his
first diplomatic job abroad. As a
young man _ he taught French
literature. Fourteen years ago he
entered Haitian politics, among
the stormiest in the world.

Journalist’s Wedding
R. MICHAEL GUNNING-
HAM, until recently on the
staff of the Sundication Depart-
ment of the Fxpress Newspapers
is getting married this month, A
cousin of Mr. Courtenay Hitchins,
Editor of the Trinidad Guardian,
Michael plans to spend his honey-

moon in the South of France.

Double Celebrations
ETURNING from Venezuela
on Thursday afternoon by
B.W.LA., was Mr. L. A. Fletcher
of Da Costa and Co, He was visit-
ing his son William who is with
the Ford Company at La Florida,
Venezuela,

William arrived with him on
his annual leave, and will be re-
turning to Venezuela next month.

It was a day of double cele-
brations for the Fletcher family,
as it was also Miss M. Fletcher’s
twenty-first birthday.



By Beachcomber

belt to) Chelsea Embankment is
a private flag or not. The crumb-
ling old thing can ——. be call-
ea a ship, and Admiral Sir Ewart
Hodgson was mobbed by hens
amidships when he last paid a
formal visit of inspection, The
caretaker’s nephew fired a salute
of one gun, and out of the broken
niuzzle came two pairs of breech-
es, a shirt, and a football cap.

In Passing
LIKE the frank confession of
a “housewife” who says that
what she does not like about the
comic strips is the pictures. That
leaves, for her to like, only the

strange dialogue which floats
(enclosed by balloons) from the
months of beautifully dressed

strong men, nine feet high and
eight broad, and siim girls with
piston-rod legs and hair that fits
ke a_ brass Whenever

cap.
“Hog” Revello hits “Butch” Katz
in the face, the word “Ouch!”
without any illustration, would

become monotonous were there
not “Whar!” to fall back on.
ee Bt APS

and in other gauges. It is the
obtainable anywher~

| details of ‘Grand Prix’ and
Kynoch range.





| “GRAND PRIX? is water proof
This cartridge is now back to pre-war Eley-Kynoch standard,

and is completely waterproof.
lengths with 144 oz. standard, or 1} oz. medium heavy load,

Your ammunition distributor will be pleased to give you

ELEY-KYNOCH

SHOTGUN CARTRIDGES
*GRAND PRIX’.‘ ALPFHAMAX’-* MAXIMUM ’.‘GASTIGHT’

Factory Representatives: T. GEDDES GRANT, LTD.,
JAMAICA, TRINIDAD, B. GUIANA, BARBA®@OS

IMPERIAL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES LTD., LONDON



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Fashioned In Lendon:

“Teen And Twenty”

My Derothy Barkley

IT is a pleasant discovery to
find that a leading milliner in
London has designed a collection
of autumn hats for sale in the
inexpensive salon of a London

shop.

The man with the insight into
the pockets of the young woman
of today is Mr. Aago Thaarup,
the milliner to the Queen and
Princesses. More than this: the
collection is especially for Miss
Teen and Twenty. She will cer-
tainly need little persuasion to
wear once she has seen these —
which have just the right mixtur’
of youthfulness and histication
If she is wise, she remember
Mr. “Hats for the young will be little
but cheeky. They will have «
saucy look about them.”

Imagine a large salon of 4
London sto! brightly lit, with
light-music playing in the back-
ground, and awaiting the arrival
of Mr. Thaarup. He enters caim
and composed, although the morn-
ing has been an endless succes-
sion of rehearsals, last minute
touches and posing photographs

Not Frivolous

From the mirst, sc 1s clear tha
the show is not so frivolous
Quality has not been sacrificed for
the sake of economy; the materiais
are still the best of the best, anc
the hats beautifully finished by
hand. Mr. Thaarup himself is
pleased with the result interjec-
ting the price from time to time,
and adding, “I’m sorry I seem so
pleased.”

“You are going -to see a lot of
soft, shining fabrics”, he said,
“trimmed not only with motifs,
pompoms, petersham bows and
veiling in draped masses, ; but
with something new—wool croch-
eted and knitted into long-
stemmed tassels and fringes’’.

The colours are rich and varied
reflecting the Oriental brilliance
of Persia, and the sunny bright-
ness of Spain. The two most
striking are Khamseen, a desert
dust colour, and Tally-ho, a
heart-warming red.









CROSSWORD
a






heck. cheiiied chk

1. Ben :
. ead these lights and
Dienty. (v) -—“

(5)
1-minded ad
a) gir 3)

id greeting !t sounds. (7)

a, etly. (6) 2. A aigit. (3)
Down

it a worry: pursuit? (6)

+e sort of the ladies like.

. Come hither! (8)

‘ ted.

po

ESSeshesoges 9
z

putzie.—Across:
3. vii _eved: 10. Pent; 11
Bed: 15, Sip; 15, Already

an; 12, : ;
16, LCOE.: 17. Oreels; 19, ‘Teal: 21, Not!
22, Tram: 23, Acne;' 24. Err: 3! a‘
Renugate: 2. Over mer e
iter, 5. Tenderiy: 6. Oves: 7
3 Pvions; 17.

Down: 1.
Tingle: a alt ints
er; 9%, Evidence.

mp: 18 Eras 20. Ba

Supplied in 12 gauge 24"
best general purpose cartridge

other cartridges in the Eley-

&

A.16n09/5








SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1950

18,4

Russians
IN LONDON

DON.

Sir Harold Scott, Metropolitan
Police Commissioner, revealed in
his annual report that an average
of three children aged nine or ten
were arrested every day in Lon-

Besides these for his so-called
“Teen and Twenty” age, he has
designed several for the “Twenty
Plus”, including some with the
new forward movement, sitting
straight on the head.

And even in the heights of such
inspiration he has not forgotten
those two perennials—the pull-on
and the beret, The former he dis-
likes—“But one must remember
one’s customer.” The latter, the
most easily adaptable of all head-
gear, equally suitable whether
you have length in the face or
width in the cheekbones, This
we saw in cognac felt, trimmed
with velvet.

Finally, his favourite nat was
repeated in two different colour
combinations—one worn by each
mannequin. A small close fitting
crown, with a touch of “chop-
suey” "—a long tassel hanging
down the back, first in Tally-ho
red crown and black tassel, then
all in black, It was enthusiasti-
cally greeted, and the piano burst
gaily into “Do you ken John
Peel”. ig

Once these autumn inspirations,
{n soft materials, cheerful trim-
mings and gay colours have been

don last year.

1948,

the report stated.

able offences, Sir Harold said.

tention. The Commissioner stated

an academic interest,



A total of 1,149 children were
arrested compared with 973 in

Police reports from other cities
and towns are likely to reflect a
similar increase in child crime,

But for the first time since the
war there was a substantial de-
erease in the numbers of indict-

He attributed this directly to
the Criminal Justice Act of 1948.
This created new sentences of cor-
rective training and preventive de-

“There is no doubt that its im-
plications have been fully appre-
ciated by the criminal community.

“When habitual criminals are
feund on arrest to be in possession
of copies of an Act of Parliament
it is a safe assumption that their
study of the new criminal law is
dictated by something more than

“Indeed,” the report continued
“it is reported that in some cases
housebreakers have disposed of the
tools of their trade and have de-
cided that the possibilities of a








Nee SSS S|
| AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only) |

MATINEE: TO-DAY at 5 p.m.
TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30

KOBERT HUTTON — JOYCE REYNOLDS — JANIS PAIGE }
in’ * WALLFLOWER ™
with EDWARD ARNOLD

A Warner Bros Picture







OPENING TO-DAY and CONTINUING

emt aa Sn er 3
GALUETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES |
Lovable and IRRESISTASLE ESTHER WILLIAMS |

NEPTUNE’S DAUGHTER |
BALCONY 48 ~ HOUSE 30 & 24— PIT 16 — |

——











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TO-DAY & SUNDAY 5 & 8.30 PM.




MONOGRAM’S DOUBLE !

Jimmie DAVIS in “LOUISIANA” (Musical)

— AND —
Johnny Mack BROWN in “SIX GUN GOSPEL”
MONDAY & TUESDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. Ist Instalment of Seria}

“CUSTER’S LAST STAND” with Release

| EMPIRE THEATRE

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30.& Continuing at Mat. & Night
Shows Daily























Feo 9 2 ENS ane OR RS ae



i J0 HN WAY NE. socce mara - rornest rucxer

spe:

placed before Miss Teen and long period of detention raise the co-starring JOHN AGAR A REPUBLIC PICTURE
Twenty’s eyes, (not forgetting (\"\°. : i? Geese gaia aoe aR ecu AmaraA Rene soon IRCNE rR NANO apse Gs
. , risks of their calling beyond the
Twenty Plus), she will need no joint where it is remunerative. with WALLY CASSELL * JAMES BROWN + RICHARD WEBD ARTHUR FRANZ
more persuasion that Mr. Thaarup ~ “The omens are at any rate en- JOLIE BISHOP » JAMES HOWDEN + PETER COE + RICHARD JAECKEL
is quite right—“a dress without a couraging that it is, in fact, possi- Screen Play by Harry Brown—James Edward Grant « Story by Harry Brown - Directed by Allan Dwan
hat is like a stalk without @ ble to make men honest by an Associate Producer —draund Grainger
a eel hit anny we Also British Movietone News
CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how te, work it: Korea—Security Council’s historic meeting
AXYDLBAAXR Anglo-American Universities Athletic Contests
is LONGFELLOW at White Cit
One letter simply stands for another In this example A is used ; y ;
for the three L’s, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters, apos- Bluebird ready to try again
trophies, the length and formation of the words are all hints, oo

Each day the code letters are different.
A Cryptogram Quotatioi
LTEF EC RIT AZRED OEFPRI
WTTLC PQ DZWT—YROEQ.
ELEGANCE IS NOT & MANLY

RIER

ORNAMENT—SENECA.

From Billy's anxious expression
upett can see that he is not
Pp me his leg, and he climbs to
mn him, and together they go
igher.@ There they discover poo:
Grannie Goat firmly wedged in the
top branches. “*How on earth did
this happen ?" cries Rupert. “* Well,

we had just set out for the villa
and had paused for breath on this
bank when something seemed to
move tight under our feet,” says
Billy. ‘* Before we could get away
this tree shot out of the ground
and caught us in its branches and
carried us right up into the sky 1"

ESTA NOCHE

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—— SFE

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TO-DAY AND TOMORROW 4.30 AND 8.15
Republic Double . .

Starring: William MARSHALL—Adele MARA
in “BLACKMAIL”

and
“SAN ANTONIO KID

|
with William ELLIOTT—Bobby BLAKE







————



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Republic Big Double ...
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and
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|
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Mystery









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TO-DAY TO SUNDAY 4.30 AND 8.15
Republic Double .. .

Richard ARLEN—Cheryl WALKER
in
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and

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with John WAYNE—Ann DVORAK

a
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TO-DAY 5 AND 830 AND CONTINUING DAILY
Do not be among the few to say you’ve missed the
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THE GRIPPING STORY OF
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.--America’s most



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RICHARD BASEHART GIGI PERREAU
eemstemseienan Screen Play bs boa Colfer trom + Newel ty Adtecta Hamam
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Leon ERROL—CUTIE ON DUTY
British and American Newsreels . . .

TO-MORROW 9.30 a.m. Local Telent Audition
— ee ee /

ncninee
SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1950



Charlemagne’s
Empire Basis Of
European Fed.

STRASBOURG, Aug. 25.

Count Richard Coudenhove-
Kalergi, Secretary General of a
European Parliamentary Union
said here to-day that the “Charle-
magne group” of Germany,
France, and Italy would probab-
ly be the first step towards a
real European federation.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



U.S. Started
| Fighting Before
| U.N. Approved

@ from page 1
used slogans of peace to hide their
real aims, Malik stated:

“T charge Jebb with a rude dis-
tortion of the meaning of various
quotations he advanced in his re-
marks.”

“The present session of the eames 3 drains mad re

; “bourgeois” diplomats might em-
Couneil of Europe has done 8 A ploy such tricks, he maintained.
one al a a Pe Soviet diplomacy was based on

ropean federation” he told a Press
Conference.

“The Other countries of free
Europe would be linked to them
by more flexible arrangements.

“The states which formerly
constituted Charlemagne’s Empire
together with its African terri-
tories might soon become the
land of liberty, of civilisation and
unparalleled prosperity.

“This Charlemagne union é¢vould;



‘

Goodness me! You surely don’t blame me for trying to mediate between oppasing forces? %



A





can recall Genera] MacArthur

another basis with its main task
to promote peace for the Russiaa
people and to create “foreign con-
ditions which are necessary for
peace,”

Mr. Malik informed the Council

that two new communications had
reached him concerning Formosa
—one from the Chinese Foreign
Minister in Peking, accusing the
United States of aggression against
Chinese territory, and the other
from the American Government
“in justification of its actions.’

|
|

|
i

" PAGE THREE



numerical value of this charge is known as the Atomic Number.





H. GJ
Moseley

whose brilliantly promising
career came to a tragic end
on the Gallipoli beaches
when he was only 28, will
always be remembered for
his discovery that the
atomic nucleus has an
electrical charge the size
of which is characteristic
of the The
Moseley’s

atom.

discovery has been of the greatest importance in the subsequent development

or indeed whether that would
help the morale of American
troops engaged in the desperate
holding operation in Korea

not be set up as a third force but
as a solid pillar of the Atlantic
world.

“The Atlantic union would
also allow our British friends to
view sympathetically and confi-






MacArthur Went

Hy David Temple Roberts
LONDON,

Protests. Pour in

Too . Far

“Undoubtedly members will
Policy Changes want to study these and we will

There have been changes in|“ndoubtedly return to this ques-
the manner of American policy.|tion at a later meeting,” he said



of the Indian sub-continent ahd
China.

| elected to the John Harling Fellowship, His labours were

of atomic physics.

The son of a distinguished zoologist, Moseley was born at Weymouth,
Dorset, in 1887, After a brilliant career at Eton and Trinity College,
Oxford, he became a lecturer in physics at Manchester University. He
resigned this appointment two years later, when he was

dently, the creation of another . Not Satisfactor General in Tokio can no| Malik was about to adjourn the
powerful union—the United States eee eae ous met vr te South Korea, the stern Sir John Pratt, who a Brit- | longer pledge military support/meeting when the American re-
of Europe—which would stand ying action fought by U.S. forces on behalf of the} ish Consul — General in Peking] t0 Chiang. Chiang has now been | presentative objected and then

between it and the Soviet Union

Replying tu a question Count

Coudenhove-Kalergi said a fed—
erated Europe should work with
Britain ‘if possible, without her
if necessary, but never against
her. —Reuter.



McCloy Refuses
To Sign Peace
Appeal

FRANKFURT, Aug. 25.

United Nations will probably have given the world time

to save itself from disaster.

For throughout the nations that
Support the Security Council’s
resolution there has been oppor-
tunity to think of the danger of
the World War with which we
are faced, and time to retract
from foolhardy commitments,
standing more firmly by essen-
tials.

In particular the tense efforts
of the American divisions have
prevented the Far Eastern War
being carried a stage further by
an jmmediate junk-borne inva-
sion of Formosa. If North Korean
troops had swept through the

Refusing to put his signature to| peninsula driving the Americans

Ahe Communist inspired Stock-
holm Peace Appeal, John J.
McCloy, American High Com-

missioner in Germany said here

to-day that the only really aggres-

from Pusan about three weeks
ago -- according to their pro-
gramme — then there would
| have occurred, by now, a whole-
hearted attempt to gain Formosa

sive instrument in the world/ for the Central People’s Govern-

is fully mobilised armed force of

ment of China. The United

Russia and her satellites. He was|States navy was ordered to de-

replying to a _ request

condemning the use of the atom
bomb, made by an Eastern German
Youth Organisation.

McCloy deplored what he called

the basic hypocrisy of the peace

petition, and said he would be
more disposed to believe its ex-
pressed intentions if it condemned
the armed might of the Com-
munist world.

He said the petition purposely
does not cover aggression in other

forms, presently being practised
by Communist forces in Korea.
—Reuter.



Rebel Seeks Refuge

BRUSSELS, Aug. 24.

Captain “Turko” Westerling who
arrived here from Cairo to-day was
told he could not stay in Belgium.

Westerling, wanted by the In-
donesian Government, as a rebel,
was told he would be interned if
he stayed. He said he would
leave Belgium later to-day as he
did not want to spend one day in
a Belgian prison.

Westerling was formerly a Dutch
Commando. He flew into Brussels
and told reporters he was going
to tour Europe.

The bronzed 84-year-old leader
of the “Army of the Heavenly
Host” rebellion in Indonesia early
this year had a seat booked for him
on the afternoon plane for Ams-
terdam, but said he did not want
it.

He said he planned to stay in
Brussels a week or so and then
go on a tour of Europe, visiting
Italy especially.



¢ for his| fend the island; opinion in Brit-
signature to the peace petition|ain was uncertain;

the United
Nations would have been drag-
ged into a war it did not wish,

A Change

But now a great change in
opinion has come across the
|world. By all available indica-
tions there is hardly a responsi-
ble organ of opinion in the world,
or a body of thinking political
leaders, willing to advocate war
on behalf of Chiang Kai-shek
against the Communist Govern-
ment of China. In fact, since
General MacArthur's spectacu-
lar visit to Generalissimo and
Madame Chiang’s fortress there
has been a remarkable change
in opinion. Those, particularly in
London among Conservatives,
who, a few weeks ago were ex-
pressing the view that “war had
begun” and therefore had to be
fought on all fronts with all
available allies, have now fali-
en silent

This does not mean, let it be
made clear, that the policy advo-
cated throughout the United
States, Britain and Western Euro-
pean countries is to hand over
Formosa to the Peking Gov;
ernment, and immediately to
seat that Government at the
United Nations, Moderate opin-
jon and this includes such
newspapers as the “Herald Tri-
bune” in New York and the Sun-
day “Observer” in London — ‘s
now inclined to delimit the war
in the Far East, restrain Chiang
from attacking the Chinese
mainland — and gradually elim-
inate his influence, simultane-
ously deterring the Communist
junks from setting out across the

held out to the People’s Govern-
ment of China that once the
Korean situation is settled and
aggrgssion rebuked there will
be time to seat the Government
of China at the United Nations
and settle its claims on Formosa,

Clearly Put
Quotations from a_ leading
article of the “Manchester
Guardian”, just after Averi!]

Harriman’s visit to General Mac
Arthur, put the view particu-
larly clearly: “Mr. Harriman’s
visit to General MacArthur may
be presumed to reflect the anxi-
ety that the military strategists
must not go too far. But the
political problem cuts deep. Yt
is not only that of avoiding war
but of preparing the conditions
by which the Western countries,
including the United States, can
live at peace with Communist
China .. .. .. But it would
seem that somehow or other the
United States must put herself
right with world opinion on
Formosa .. .. Though the island
was promised to “China,” there
is something to be said— as an
interim measure — for handing
it over to the Formosans to run
as an autonomous State whose
independence and demilitarisa-
tion would be guaranteed by the
United Nations.”



The alarm in Western Europe
is not confined to such news-
papers as the “Manchester Guar-
dian” which has, for months, put

East in the hands of Pandit
Nehru and the chance of a firm



and subsequently adviser to the
Foreign Office on Far East ques-
tions, wrote to the “Times”:—
“For some 18 months Chiang
Kai-shek and his friends have
been blockading the coast of
China and bombing Shanghai, a
city of 6 million inhabitants,
They have been supplied with
arms and money by America.
Therefore the United Nations
have kept silent. But when the
North Koreans invade South
Korea we are told that it is our
duty under the Charter to line
up with America to resist aggres-
sion, Legalistic arguments are
employed to keep Formosa and
Korea in separate dossiers, but
even if, legally, the American
case were watertight (which it
is not) that would not be a very
Satisfactory basis on which to
embark on a world war.”

Sir John Pratt concludes his
letter, (which opened with a
generally accepted favourable
view of Mao Tse Tung’s internal
policies), by declaring that if
we enter a world war while
America still insists on Chiang
as representative of China then
we will be fighting with one hand
tied behind our backs.

The French newspaper “Le
Monde”, which often speaks for
the French Foreign Ministry,
emphasises that what the Rus-
sians most want is Western an-
tagonism towards Communist
China, leading to a disastrous
war. As that newspaper puts
it, “If the junks of Mae try to
seize Farmosa they will be met
by the cruisers of MacArthur,
and America will find herself at
war with China, Whether she
wants it or not the Far East will
become her first task and Europe
become second, Then Moscow
will have virtually won her vic-
tory in the Third World War. She
will only need to wait until the
fruit are ripe.”

Warnings

These sombre warnings have
appeared since General MacArthur
went on his jaunt to Formosa to
be photographed with the Gener-
alissimo, and kissing the hand of
Madame. It is difficult .to pre-
dict what effect on American
policy the change in well-inform-
ed opinion will have. There is
still political danger for President
Truman in flying against the
gale of American sentiment that
“war has begun” and Commun-
ists are the same the world over.
Put President Truman is an

unorthodox man,

Even in election year he can
be expected to act boldly where”

he has to withstand an onslaught

of abuse. If he saves the peace



instructed not to repeat warlike
and
When

rations against China
China-bound _ shipping,
United States forces reverse thei
direction and begin an advance

northwards in Korea the United
but

States will acquiesce in —
not initiate — a_ peace
ment

settle

trusteeshi

the world, as
cing "MOSé nder terim ; 7 ; |
Pe ee ee Tinta: well as from private individuals
nationally protected), It would j and ce ps ‘
be simultaneously announced | The Security Council was bound,
once more. that the United | %¢ declared, to consider the “wish.
,

States does not oppose the
seating of the
at the Security
that were voted by a
of the Council. Great

un

majorit

manent members of the Securit
Council,

This forecast is based on tw
kuppositions The first is

the Korean war extended to
World War. Mr. Malik’s irrita
ting behaviour, but actut

presence, at the Security Council
Soviet
diplomats have been very care~

points that way. And
ful to rebutt all attempts to pi
direct intervention in Korea ©

the Red Army.

On the other side; it has no!
escaped the notice of Washington

policy chiefs that North Kore
extends to a point very close t

the Soviet base at Vladivostok
Long before United States force
have time to advance as far as
that the Red Army would be



The Weather

TO-DAY

Sun Rises; 5.30 a.m.

Sun Sets; 6.22 p.m.

Moon (Full Mbpon)
27.

High Water: 2.27 a.m. 3.40

August

p.m.

Rainfall; .2% inches
YESTERDAY
Temperature (Max): 86.5 °F
Temperature (Min): 73.5 °F
Wind Velocity; 8 miles an

hour.





Wind Direction: 9 a.m E, States during the Jact war. There
8 pm. E.S.E. jwill also be some Dutch women
Barometer: 9 a.m, 29.885 wuxiliaries as medical, clerical
3 p.m, 29,836. ind liaison personne!.—Reuter.
Total Rainfall (to date):
7.20 inches.
taking up defensive posit’ons- Hea ri Tro ul b le
inside Korea — to greet them, o c

Then the last situation would be

far worse than the first,

Washington is surely, by now,

creus'| BLOOD Pressure

peeking an end to the Korea
war that discourages r
aggressions, yet avoids an Ameri

can military advance that woul

involving United Nations
in all Korea, and in

Chiang delegate |
Council if

respors!-
bility falls on the six non-per-

that
the Soviet Union does not, want



read to the Council the American
statement on Formosa.

r Earlier Malik
©lident - said

as Council Pres-
protests against
“United States aggression in
Korea” had been flowing into
United Nations headquarters from
religious, student, and professional
groups throughout

_}es of the broad mass of peoples of
the world.”

Malik instructed the
y | Secretary - General to read

Communists Foreign
y|Chou En Ali, calling
action in Formosa
0} against China.

aggression

the statement of
@lthis very serious
conflict.”

il Chinese Nationalist
Thang replied

ral it
r osa)”.

The Council
until Monday

then

Counci) on its activities for
ear ending last month.

—Reuter.



DUTCH FORCES FOR
KOREA

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 24.
Holland has decided to

Information Bureau

here,

iis government on 8S:
added, He said U fe
omprise of volunteers,

veterans of Indonesian





mostly



Caused by High

lf you have pains the heart
“ palpitation, itcineas “hon dastece al
d (op and back of head and above eyes
e shortness of breath, fee! nervy, or suf

assistant
into
the record the cable from Chinese

Minister
American

Malik declared “we have heard
both parties to
international

delegate
emphatically
‘There has been no United States
aggression against Taiwan (Form-

adjourned
According to rules,
Monday’s session will be private
, |to consider a draft report by bq
; the

send
2,000 infantrymen to Korea, J. P. |
Boudrez, head of the Netherlands
announced

The exact make-up of the con-
tingent would be determined by
saturday, he ;

ree woul ;

fighting
and marines trained in the United





'
\

interrupted by the outbreak ofwar in 1914, but not before he
| had accomplished the researcheswhichwere destined to have
a dramatic effect on the course of the second World War.









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aa ij ing >A, h i is ntries | he can still claim electoral advan- be directly threatening legitimat > heats ‘sleep, loss of memory
Reuter. China Sea. But the promise friendship between the cou! Ss tage, But I doubt whether he! Soviet interests. so oe
oooe | ty igh Blood Pressure. This isa
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PAGE FOUR



A

SS (sce ee

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St, Bridgetown.



Saturday, August 26, 1950



SEAWELL

THE habit of blaming the British for all
the ills of Barbados is so deeply ingrained
that one is tempted to accept with open
hands and little thanks the gifts they
bring.

One of these gifts of $1,212,000 is visibly
and impressively in evidence at Seawell
Airport today.

There day and night a West Indian con-
struction company has been forging ahead
with the construction of a new runway
which will make Seawell an attractive port
of call for many of the world’s large air-
line companies. The Canadian Government
have loaned expert engineering personnel
and the Barbados Government have con-
tributed a sum approximating to half a
million dollars.

To all those who have made possible the
construction of the new runway at Seawell
the thanks of the Community are due.

But what of the future?

At present Seawell Airport is in a transi-
tional stage.

The Airport building, small as it is, has
been rearranged internally to cope with
the additional traffic which has followed
upon the increased advertising of Barba-
dos in the world outside. Communications
have been taken over mainly by Inter-
national Air Radio Limited and the res-
taurant and waiting room look more like
a restaurant and waiting room than they
did previously.

The Airport is however too small to deal

with even the present volume of traffic.

The Airport manager is overworked and
personally has to act as control officer to
incoming and outgoing planes. No organ-
isation can be said to be 100 per cent. effi-
cient where one man is perpetually on
duty. An assistant manager for Seawell
Airport is an urgent necessity.

pvoeate | Muze

| AN EXPERIMENT in Minnesota



From the Newsletter of the Royal Bank

way, will be disappointed on
learning how few calories are re-
two volunteers, revealed not only quired for brain work. Dr. G. A.
the effect of semi-starvation on Dorsey says in his interesting
behaviour, intelligence and pgr- book Why We BehaYe Like Human
sonality, but the order in which Beings: With the brain aetively
symptoms developed. First was at work so little extra energy is
tiredness, followed by muscle consumed that the calorimeter
soreness, irritability, apatiiy, sen- cannot find it.” On the other
sitivity to noise, loss of ambition, hand, a jazz-band drummer uses
loss of self-discipline, decrease up 7,200 calories daily. A nutri-
in mental alertness and in the tionist, commenting on this figure
ability to concentrate, moodiness which was given im a_ British
and dizziness. publication, remarked: “He must

That was a case of deliberate kave drummed continuously day
semi-starvation over a period of and night.”

months. More to the point is the Cooking Is Important

9 few years ago, involving thirty-

result of surveys made in Can—
ada in 1939—1940, reported in an
article in the Canadian Public
Health Journal. Roughly
ing, only 40 per cent of the people
studied were adequately nour—
ished, 40 per cent were in a
border-line state, and 20 per cent
were seriously undernourished.
Still more striking is the state—
ment by Dr. L. B. Pett, Chief of
the Nutrition Division of the
Department of National
and Welfare, to the effect that
more children died in the year

Health. an be converted

Besides making sure that the
range of food is such as to pro-
vide the essentials of good diet,
we need to watch the cooking to
ensure that the goodness is kept
there. A sensible word of advice
was given by Joseph of the Savoy:
“Make the good things as plain
us possible. God gave a special
flavour to everything. Respect it
vo not destroy it by messing.”

The extent to which good fond
into valueless
food by unintelligent preparatioo
is not generally appreciated, It

1944 from nutritional deficiency (an mike the differsnce between
diseases than from infantile health and malnutrition. Every—
paralysis. To this he added: Gne knows that leafy vegetabies

: despite the fact that our are among the essentials of a good
present knowledge is sufficient to diet, but their goodness too often
avoid malnutrition.” goes down the drain with the

No one would suggest that cooking water. The boiled fibrous
forty per cent of the people in tissue we eat has lost not only
Canada go around in a perpetual jts savour but much of its essen-
state of hunger, in the ordinary {jal chemical] matter. Mineral
sense of the word. There is am— salts have been boiled out. Water
other kind of hunger, the hidden soluble vitamins have been lost.
hunger that lets people pine away, An investigation made. at the
go through life sluggishly, and request of the Government ot
finally die before their time, even Newfoundland by nine Canadian,
when they are eating plenty. British and United States doctors

Many of us drag our way resulted in significant findings.
through life, suffering all kinds of
ailments that could be avoided by surveys, five years apart, reveal--
better feeding. ed that the average person i>

We feel depressed, and blame Newfoundland showed no fewer
our woes on creditors, the familY than eight symptoms of deficiency
or the boss when perhaps we {ijseases; malnutrition in early
suffer from vitamin shortage. We life resulted in three out of four
feel fatigued, out of sorts and dying before the age of 40: only
listless, due perhaps to nothing ong person in ten reached 60;
but improper food. Our tables the overall death rate was twenty
may groan with good things, and per cent higher than in Ontario,
yet we may be starving ourselves and the death rate among children
through ignorance and indiffer- was two to three times the North
ence, American average.

We must not deceive ourselves The investigators were puzzled
by thinking that poor diets are at first, because the diet, while
confined to low-income groups. Jow in eggs, milk, citrus fruit and
It is quite possible to spend a lot tomatoes was good enough in fish
of money on food, and yet not potatoes, cabbage, bread and
be getting the food values that cereals to justify a higher record
tead to health. of health.

The Right Foods An article in Saturday Night

Foods may be divided into three gives the explanation: “It was not
main classes: body—building foods, until the investigators went into
to make good your wear—and-tear; the kitchens of the Islanders that
protective foods, to ward off dis— they discovered that they were
ease; and energy foods, to giva almost literally committing suicide
you power and warmth, by their cooking methods.” Pota -

Good nutrition involves calorjes toes, for example, were boiled
(energy), protein (growth, main- after peeling losing 50 per cent
tenance and repair),-vitamins and of their ascorbic acid; they were
minerals (protection), and “bal— cooked in the morning and held

\

The first of two diet and health *

ance”,
It is not necessary to carry a

until night, by which process they
lost all their ascorbic acid. Cab-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ger. Seen And Hidden

of Canada,

|
malnutrition due to poor a
Similar findings pave been made
by the University of Pennsylvania,
which studies of ea. |




income families.
Besides good: of basic

foods and variety

is neered. can analyse »

5
&
5
a
e

ve elements o:
milk, and in a recent book review
of the New York Times there was
advertised a book containing
250 unusual recipes for cheese
cvokery, from hors d’oeuvres to
clessert.

Every age group has its pwr
special requirements, and ary
important.

Young peoplé up to twenty
years need the right kind of food
to live, to grow to maturity, and
to acquire education. The com-
bined effect of strenuous athletics,
school and home study, the ten-
sion of examinations, and the
general upset feeling of adoles-
cence, all combine to put stress

upon the body machinery, Lunch
is important, and very often an
after school snnack (such as a pea-
nut butter sandwich, and a glass
of milk) would be a lifesaver.

As the years pass, and we slow
down to a decorous pace, the
energy of youth is not needed,
and we don’t exert the muscular
strength of middle life. We dc
need reasonable amounts of pro-
tein, and we should be satisiied
with foods that our experience
has taught us are easily digested,
Milk, fruits and vegetables in full
amounts continue to be important.

Women may lay down the nu-
tritional law in their homes, but
they are often guilty of breaking
their own rules,

Men emerge from some surveys

with a better record than women,
except that they are deficient in
vitamin C because they brush
aside “rabbit foods” like salads
and raw vegetables. On the whole
men eat a good lunch, while
women just nibble at something.
Men make up in sheer volume of
food for their ‘carelessness in se-
lection. A survey in Philadelphia
among families in the $2,500 and
more income range found that
four out of five married women
were undernourished,

“More” is not necessarily “pets
ter” in nutrition. A Chinese
“A well-filled
stomach is indeed a great thing:

poet remarked:

fathom a man’s wish for a
i

they liked it or not.
jewels that had escaped the fire, went to
live in two sordid rooms, and Irfan’s mother
—still only 22 after nine years of marriage—
went to work in a factory.

They Called
It Women’s

Freedom

MARGARET: LANE Reviews New Books

PORTRAIT OF A TURKISH FAMILY.
Irfan Orga. (Gollancz, 16s.) 303 Pages.

TURKEY has changed within one genera-
tion, perhaps more than any other country.
lo see those changes taking place in a middle-

-|class Turkish family, in the lifetime of a

poy born in Istanbul in 1908, is fascinating,
even though this is a naive and not particu-
jarly well-written book.

Irfan Orga’s mother was a veiled Turkish
lady ot the old type, married at thirteen and
living in total seclusion, as befitted her class.
Life tor the little boy was centred in the
women’s quarters and in the weekly visit
with his grandmother to the th
luxurious public ba j
women loved to spend the day, being scrub-
bed by servants, lolling about in the steam,
anointing themselves with scented oils and
eating enormous meals.

Those meals! Turkish life in those days
was obsessed with food, with perpetual meals
of the most cloying and destructive sort.
f£very domestic occasion was celebrated with
mountains of rich and sickly eatables; wed-
dings were orgies of syrups and sweets. One
is not surprised to learn that Turkish ladies
rarely felt enough to do more than sit about
in enclosed gardens hanging their swimming
heads over pieces of embroidery.

To the Orga family the 1914 war brought
disasters which must have been common
enough in Turkey at that time. The father
was killed, their house burned down in the
great fire of Istanbul, and the young mother
and domineering grandmother were left
alone with three young children, a few pieces
of salvaged furniture, and not a penny in
the world.

What could those veiled and sheltered

women do, thrown on their own resources in
a harsh Oriental world which did nothing to
help them?

Emancipation was thrust on them, whether
They sold the few

Facing the hardships of her new life with

unexpected courage, she abandoned the veil,



SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1950







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ge ASK FOR A TIN AT YOUR GROCER

set of scales and a measuring bages were boiled for one to two “ll else is luxury.” It may be]even though she was stoned in the streets



Arrangements for parking of cars are
also inadequate to cope with the stream
of relatives and friends who accompany
passengers to Seawell.

If these inconveniences are noticeable
now, how much the more will they be
obvious when Seawell becomes the most

; A , : t , ’ j - 7 allant struggle for survival in post-war

desired airport in the Eastern Caribbean? | #88ess your dietary requirements. min A. Canned milk was import~ yey in Canada, reported by Dr.|& :
These general tables are only ed. Orange juice was made pett in 1948, ¢ Turke: where hardships and e new KIN
approximate. Their use calls tor available to pregnant women and =e revealed that “rarely y P LOO. G

The greatest credit is due to the British
taxpayer, the Barbados taxpayer and the
Canadian taxpayer for co-operating
through their Governments in making Sea-
well an important airport on world air
routes. Can it be that the need for modern
buildings and adequate staffing have been

glass to the dining table, but only hours losing 90 per cent of their

also a pain.

to apply common sense to a
knowledge of the qualities and
attributes of foodstuffs. The
amounts of individual items vary
from time to time in the same
person, depending on many exter—
tial and internal factors such #5
age, sex and activity. No figure
in any genera) table should be
taken as an absolute value to

good sense and interpretation in
keeping with your special environ—
ment and requirements.

Take calories for example. A

ascorbic acid,

The second survey showed great
improvement, reported by Dr
Russel M. Wilder of the Mayo
Foundation last December. The
government took steps recom-
mended by the doctors. Flour was
enriched with thiamine, niacin,
riboflavin irom and calcium, and
margarine was fortified with vita -

nursing mothers. Schoolchildren

received milk and cod liver oil.
The result of these diet changes,

ali in forms which could not be

as a prostitute for this piece of effrontery.
Her sons were sent to a charity school and the
mother and grandmother lived chiefly on
quarrelling and cabbage soup.

_An_ occasional feast matters
little; it is the continual daily
overloading ourselves with food
that is so injurious and depress-
ing. If you want to eat like a
ditech-digger you must exercise
like a ditch-digger,

Overweight is a problem of
great importance. It shortens life,
decreases efficiency and increases
liability to many diseases. A sur-

It was a hard life, and often makes painful
reading. One is constantly amazed, as her
children were, that a woman so delicately
and heplessly nurtured could make such a

have we encountered ‘overweight’
in less than ten per cent of the
adults in a given area,”

Medical men are opposed to all

regime showed no mercy to the sort of life
she had always known.

IMMACULATE

published table may say that the ruined by bad cooking, was tim-
average man needs 2,250 calorigs mense. The death rate fell from
a day, But if he is sitting at 12.1 to 10.5 per thousand; deaths
home doing nothing he may need from tuberculosis fell sharply,

violent attempts at weight reduc-
tion. Such methods as amount to
starvation for all practical pur-
poses often do permanent damage

The struggle, however, extorted a terrible

price. By the time her sons were old enough
to go through military school, and the eldest,

LINEN

only 2,000, while if he is qut
chopping down trees hv may need
4,000. Another authority may

from 135 per 100,000 to 101; infant
mortality dropped in three years

i ae ia ce tee he ee Ortan, was training to be a pilot, her brain



of drugs is unwise, except under
the care of a physician.

gave way under the pressure of suffering and
anxiety, and she was dragged from her fam-

from 102.3 1,000 to 61; and— The simplest way to reduce is] ily to end her days in an asylum.
overlooked? Surely not! give the amounts in calories per significant this—the children who to cut down the amount of fat- . y ony
pound of body weight for various had been “like littla wooden



THE LORD BISHOP

THE resignation of The Lord Bishop
from the See of Barbados will come as a
surprise to many people in this island.
During the five years of his administration
of the Diocese he had become respected
for his sincerity of views on things ecclesi-
astical and political.

ages: here, again, caution is
needed to interpret the figures in
terms of what is being done with
the body.

The business executive, by the

‘This Very Puzzling Problem Of

DEATHS from heart diseases
have more than doubled in
Britain in the last ten years,
the Registrar-General’s annual
Statistical review revealed,

Number of deaths from diseases
of the coronary arteries and
angina pectoris in 1938 was
15,409. Latest figures shows

Indians” on the first visit “were
row noisy, rambunctious and in--
quisitive, as children ought to be.”

It should not be thought that
Newfoundland alone is suffering

The Heart

heart disease is due to:—

1. Enormous increase in the
strain and tempo of modern
life. We are always tense,
and have lost the ability to

Heart

tening food eaten at each meal,
and this may be done, under
competent advice, without hard-
ship. Don’t try to get rid in three
weeks of the excess poundage you
spent ten years accumulating,






sufferers should always
seek advice from their doctor.
For, if the disease is caught
early, a lot can be done.

They Train

A modern invention, the electro-
cardiogram machine, shows

College; resigned
now living in London,

One learns with relief (since Turkish asy-

lums sound more nightmarish than most)
that she died in 1940, shortly before Irfan
Was sent to England, in charge of a group of
young (Turkish officers dr
training in the RAF.

ted for special

In spite of its shortcomings—and the

author is, remember, writing in English, not

in his own language—this is an interesti
and often movie 5 -s

ook.

*** IRFAN ORGA, born Istanbul; educated at Militar; |

commission with Turkish Air Force 1947;



SUITS

MAKE A REALLY DISTINGUISHED ADDITION

TO YOUR SUMMER WARD-ROBE
NOW YOU CAN ENJOY

=

Anticrushable Linens in Ready Mades, by Lomic
these Suits are Sanforised and Mercerised



VINDICATION OF RUSKIN. J. Howard

Whitehouse.

i ‘ . : relax. changes in the heart long before (Allen and Unwin, 10s.) Da COSTA & Co., Lid.
His recent appointment to a seat in the they have jumped to 36,640 a , Worry caused by the strain. they can be diagnosed by the 64 pages.
Legislative Council gave full scope to his year the
ability as a man of affairs. His speeches
during the early days of the sugar negotia-
tions and his contribution to other debates
in the Legislative Council proved that he
was not only an eminent divine but one
who took a keen and intelligent interest in
the island’s affairs.

It was difficult for Bishop Hughes to be
anything else than an outspoken critic of
diehard policies and restriction of the
rights of individuals. In his first sermon
in St. Michael’s Cathedral after his en-
thronement he launched out against unsat-
isfactory practices in this island and called
on the community to rid itself of the old
shibboleths and to realise that “it was
people that matter.” But it is an irony of
fate that this same strength of view,
according to the Bishop himself, should
have been the unhappy cause of his unex-
pected resignation. He came to Barbados
after having been the Bishop of British
Honduras only five months, and as he said
then it was merely because he felt that dis-
establishment of the Church in Barbados
would give him the opportunity for service
which he so greatly desired.

' The resignation of the Bishop from his

What has caused this alarming
trend?

Are our hearts getting weaker?
Is this the explanation for our
decline in international sport?

The astonishing increase of an

disease is one of the most
miaeing things in medicine to-
ay. es

The disease is found not so much
in the heart but in the clot-
ting of the small arteries sup-
plying it—coronary thrombosis.

If left untreated it can lead to
very prolonged illness, or sud-
den death.

Tension

Doctors believe the increase in

eee iee enna eRe aeSenthepicsiseneninsbesreninene
has an adverse effect on the
heart muscles,

Symptons of heart disease are a
sense of oppression or dull
aching in the left side of the
chest which radiates up to the
left shoulder and down the left
arm.

A sufferer will become breathless
after any exertion, which gen-
erally produces these symptoms.

Years ago the disease was restric-
ted to people between 50 and
70, Now coronary thrombosis is
found among men and women in
the forties and younger.

This, I believe, is because young
people are having to bear more
strain and worry earlier,

OUR READERS SAY

Bo
To, The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—The sponsoring of a Boys’
Club or a Girls’ Club for that mat-
ter is a most laudable idea. by any
line of reasoning; and I have no
doubt that the Bay Street Boys’
Club will do some good in the
community, and I wish it every
success,

Some people seem to think that
it is within the preview of certain
people only to do welfare work.
With that I beg to disagree.

I notice in a certain local journ-
al that it is suggested that the club
has a political flavour for reasons
set out in the said journal. One
should have no fear about that, so
long as Barbados remains a dem-

type which have not completed
their education, if they have “seen
a school door at all;” and spas-
modie lectures and talks are not
enough.

Some provision should be made
whereby those among them who
have never been to school and
those who have run away from
school, or through other circum-
stances have not completed their
education (and I mean elementary
education) are sent to school
wholetime.

It was necessary I quite realize
that somebody should provide the
prerequisites for the accommoda-
tion; but it should be the aim that
their several talents should be ex-
ploited to the full with a view of













pital has one,

Heart diseases can be treated by
drugs and surgically. Research
into their treatment has met
with marked success at Guy's
Hospital, London,

While decline in our sporting
prestige is not due in any way
to the increase $f heart disease,
there is one interesting point to
note.

Very few Britons specialise in one
sport. Our sportsmen do not
train as hard as foreigners.

It is because the foreigner trains
his heart to stand the extra
effort that he wins

B.D.
Londou Express Service.

sure not appreciate any philan-
trophy showered upon them from
around or above. The ultimate
objective should be a home.
Clubs in Barbados have no mean-
ing whatever and this may even-
tually degenerate into one of the
many clubs scattered over the
place.

I do hope our Government will
see the need for the urgency of
compulsory education to 16 years
at least, the speeding up of the
housing position, the introduction
of minor industries and exploring
the possibilities of markets for
them, and ever alertness to our
emigration needs. [ want to make
it crystal clear that I appreciate
the efforts made by the Govern-
ment but first things first and one
of the first should be compulsory

THE more I read about Ruskin the sorrier

I feel for him. Fame has played him an
ugly trick, for now, instead of caring about
his work in education, social reform and
art, posterity is chiefly interested in post-
mortems of his marriage,

Ruskin married the beautiful Effie Gray

in 1848. For reasons which we can never
know for certain (though Mr. Quennell in
his recent biography offered the likeliest
theory) the marriage was never consum-
mated.
bitter and unhappy. Six years later the
marriage was annulled, and Effie married

It became, as one would expect,

the painter Millais, with whom she had
fallen in love.

¢ Ruskin himself later became passionately
infatuated with an Irish girl, Rose La
Touche, when she was only a child, and it
was Effie Millais’s bitter letter to Mrs. La
Touche, warning her sgainst Ruskin’s

“cruelty,” which eventually prevented their
marriage.

The whole story is tragic and mysterious
and Admiral Sir William James’s book, The
Order of Release, and Mr. Peter Quennell’s
slightly abnormal

and distasteful, with

whom no woman, however much in love, |

could have been happy.

Mr. Whitehouse’s new book is a brave
attempt to’ turn the tables on these dis-
affected biographers by showing Ruskin in
a more reverent light, as blameless and

more recent biography, present a Ruskin! |

DRY GQODS DEPT,






I}

|

}

— Woted jor —



: . oducati in St. Micha t s . $ :
ee ams oti cctate d oeracy and the ballot is secret, causing them by their own efforts SCUC&tion in St, Michael at least.| misunderstood. There is certainly truth on
¥ exalted office on a question of principle is What I am concerned about is t0 make the money or at least 80% When first things are done first,| both sides, but, as with Byron's relations ’ e
in keeping with the high moral stature of the fact that the club seemed to Of it which will be needed to keep there will not be the need of ac- | with Augusta Leigh, we can never know the Steak sc toasted Sandssiches
Pp oe : have been presented to these ju- the club going. But so long as they cusing people of exploiting the whole truth for certain
one who has been steadfast in upholding veniles on a platter and no effort are talked at by woe who a ignorant for their political ends. ,
‘ nts of Nattant on their part has been made to pro- "0 experience in teaching youth “Give the people light and they |
the fundamental facts of Christianity and a Cue tha aecieei*iad which I under- 2nd so long as they are not will find their ie kin Seen HOWARD WHITEHOUSE is president of the Rus. |
champion of the divine commandment | stand have been put at their dis- brought up under the influence of CLAUDE RAMSAY executor to deal with, Ruskin's becks snd aveumente "|
¥ h ighbour.” posal. I have no doubt that the @ School, so long as they only listen, Brighton, Black Rock. WORLD COPYWRIGHT RESERVED
love thy neighbour. majority of these boys are of the Play, and go away, they will,Iam August 22, 1950 —L.E.S. rm
4 4 d t i
J


â„¢, .

SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1950



200 Watch
Mystery Stone

Throwing

HE POLICE are investigating

a report of

throwing which is said,to have

taken place at Chimborazo, St.
Joseph, on Thursday.

The report came from Preston

Watts who said that stones and

bottles were thrown at the houses} be
Charlies Small and Eunice, °Ut

of
Coward.
He said that both the stones and

bottles were going in the direction |

of a house occupied by Stanley
Marshall.

, This stone throwing is becom-
ing a mystery to the people of
the district. It was going on for
two days and nights and only

stopped about 12 minutes before |

the Police arrived on the scene.
Broken bottles could be seen in

the road and about 200 people} wren

| Flood

bottle and stone!

| Thanksgiving

It now just over a year
{Since people moved into the
| Government houses at the Pine.

Now with pretty flower gardens

is

around, the houses have a neat
appearance There are well
tarred rocks which join up all

along where the houses are built,
they end abruptly and
residents have to walk along a
track to get into Collymore Rock
Road or a wide rocky road to
get into the Pine Estate Road

There are not many church
goers in the area, Sunday is
usually a little quieter, but that
is the only, difference on that
day. Most of the children go to
school at the Roebuck Boys’
School and the Catholic School,
the schools they used to go to

they lived nearer town.
gathered around on Thursday
night. A few were slightly Collymore Rock is the nearer
injured. road along which buses pass

NOTHER CHOIR is
formed in St. Joseph. It is
being conducted by Mr. Arnold
Harris and is at present practising
songs, hymns and carols at Horse
Hill. It already has 14 members.

being

ECAUSE OF THE RECENT

RAINS breadfruits are plen-
tiful in St. Joseph and other
parishes. Lorry and cart loads
of this type of fruit are brought
into the City nearly every day,
especially on Saturdays.

Various City hawkers buy them
by the hundreds and sell them at
prices ranging from four to eight
cents

FEW FISHING BOATS went
4 out at Bathsheba yesterday

but returned with very small
catches. Fish is at present in
short supply and the residents of
St. Joseph are anxiously looking
forward t the sea egg season

which will begin in a few weeks.

IGHTY-FIVE PEOPLE aitend-

ed Health Talk given by

Dr. Grannum at the St. Joseph

Boys’ School recently. Since that

time many other residents of the

parish are becoming interested in

these talks and look forward to
another.

ILFRED McDONALD of

Paynes Bay, St. James, who
was a passenger on motor lorry
M-2483, fell from the platform
while the truck was travelling
along Trafalgar Street at about
4.10 p.m. on Thursday

The truck is owned by Messrs.
Evelyn Roach & Co. and was being
driven by Cecil Watkins of
Howell's Cross Road.

It is understood that McDonald
was sitting on a bag which also
fell off the truck when it was
turning into Bridge Street. He
complained of internal injuries,
A BARROW Garnett

Street reported that her
residence was broken and entered
on Thursday and a quantity of
cigarettes and cash removed.

eo LOSS of $80 in cash was
reported by Wilhelmina Phil-
lips of Road View, St. Peter. She
told the Police that it was re-
moved from her home earlier in
the year,

of

HE ROAD leading from

Frizers to Burke’s Village is
at present being repaired. This
road goes via Vaughans Land and
will soon be completed.

HE SHAMROCK CREDIT
UNION will stage Co-opera-
tors’ Day at St. Patrick’s School,
Jemmotts Lane at 4.00 o’clock
this evening. All Co-operative
movements are expected to attend.

BLOCKED TRAFFIC

JUSTIN ALLEYNE of Venture,
St. John, who was yesterday found
guilty by City Police Magistrate
Mr. H. A. Talma of obstructing
traffic on Roebuck Street on July }
15, was ordered to pay a fine of
10/- and 2/— costs. In default, he
will undergo 14 days’ imprison
ment with hard labour. ’

Alleyne was also fined 20/- and
1/— costs with an alternative of
one month’s imprisonment with
hard labour for refusing to give |
his name and address when being
reported for obstruction.

PLANTAINS OVERPRICED

A Fine of £2 with 2/- costs was
imposed yesterday on Deleina
Robinson of Pounder Gap, West-
bury Road, when she was found
guilty by City Police Magistrate





SS 0 eee ee





from the houses, but a bus only
passes every hour. Buses pass
every quarter of an hour along
Two Mile Hill, but the distance
is long, the sun generally hot, so
for the residents, transportation
is a problem,

The tree Lady Perowne planted
when the first set of houses was
built, is now about six feet tall.

Good Grazing

Grass in the district provides
g0od grazing for sheep, but many
Go not keep sheep yet. Most of
the sheep one sees grazing be-
long to people of the nearby areas.
Those of the Pine houses are all
eager to rear pigs, but they are
rot sure yet whether they have
sufficient space to conform with
the law.

Some electric
put up in the
electric has been
the houses yet

Mrs. Green, once of flood area,
and one of those who lost much
property because of last year’s hur-
ricane, thinks that she herself and
others who live in the Pine Hous-
ing Estate, should hold a thanks-
giving service on Thursday in
memory of that eventful night.

been
no
of

poles have
district, but
put in any

The thought came to Mrs.
Green when she lay in her bed
last Sunday night, heard the
roaring thunder and saw the light
up of her room as the rain fell

heavily.
Lack of Trees

There are not many big trees
to give shade to the many house,s
but there is always, a good wind
blowing over the wide stretch of
land east of the houses which
keep the area cool. With
mahogany, flamboyant and other
trees now being grown, the area
will have a good supply of trees

soon. 5 !
Mrs. Price and Mrs. Mahon
have families of six each, the

biggest in the district. Virginaj
Jackman and Jeneta Sealey, each

jive in a house alone. There are
five waterfront workers, three
mechanics, a baker, a_ printer,

two chauffeurs, four dress makers
and a Broad Street clerk among

the residents of the district.
Each home has a_ small piece
of land attached and many

keep kitchen gardens.



Auto Owners’
Association

Needed

“I AM sure that the’ formation
of an Automobile Owners’ Asso-
ciation which will work hand in
hand with the Police Highways
and Transport will be a great
success in Barbados.” Major D.
Lenagan a former President of
the Automobile Association of
Trinidad told the “Advocate” yes-
terday.

He said that he has seen that
such an Association is really
needed and is prepared to give
his wholehearted support to the
Chamber of Commerce to get the
Association going.

Major Lenagan believes that
in helping the motorists the public
would also gain benefits from
such help.

He pointed out that in Trinidad
the Association has done quite a
lot for the motorists and he is
sure that if the Association is

tr. C. D. Walwyn of committing |formed affiliation with both the

a breach of the Defence Regula-
tions Act.
Robinson

sold plantains

Automobile Association and the
Royal Automobile Club in the

on| United Kingdom would be easily

August 5 at 8 cents each when she | obtained.

should have sold them at 6 cents
each. ‘

Failing ‘> pay the fine within
14 days, Robinson will be impris-
oned for one month with hard
labour.

He thinks that in Barbados
\there are too many dangerous
bends on the streets and the
Association would be very instru-
mental in remedying this defect
of our streets.





Victims ail
Should Hold , %'

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
LUMBER BARS THE WAY





LUMBER blocks the easy flow of traffic on Bridge Street.

Businessmen Attract “yken Brings

Vezezuelan Tourists

AS THE VENEZUELAN tourists continue to pour into
Barbados, some businessmen are, going all out to find means
of attracting them, as far as getting
ployees are concerned, All businessmen interviewed by
tne “Advocate” yesterday described the Venezuelans as
lavish spenders — and no wonder, for here their dollar is
worth twice as much as it is worth them in their own coun-

try.

Plaza Opens
Next Saturday

THE BRIDGETOWN PLAZA,
will be opened to the public from
Saturday, September 2 when the
Warner Bros. musical “Look For
The Silver Lining” will be shown.
It is expected that His Excellency
and family will attend the open-
ing performance.

The building which started ten
months ago, was erected and
designed by Messrs. Clarke &
Tucker, The seating capacity is
850. The Box seats are of dunlo-
pillo while the Baleony and
entire House contain upholstered
seats which were all imported
from the U.K.

Mr. R. N. W. Gittens and Mr
R. V. Redman, joint Managing
Directors of Caribbean Theatre:
Ltd., owners and operators of the
New Plaza told the “Advocate”
the policy of the Bridgetown
Plaza is to screen outstanding
British and American pictures and
it was conceived and designed in
the confident hope that it will
prove a place of entertainment
worthy of Barbados.”

Fluorescent Lights

They said that the Theatre is
equipped with fluorescent lighting.

Above the marquee is a large
board featuring the current attrac-
tion, Mr. Gittens said, “this wilt
present a striking appearance at
night with light effectively empha-
sising the fact that ‘here indeed is
a theatre,’ ”

Another special feature is tu
shoulder high dado of ‘“semasti
tile’ and aluminum trim. The
spacious foyer includes a cand,
counter with three levels for th
display of sweets.

A vacuum cleaning system
to be employed.

The new cinema also provides
the long felt need of cinema goers
for a_ restaurant, catering to
patrons and the public from 8 p.m.
to midnight. Mr. Gittens said
Patrons may be sure of a well
cooked meal.”

Parking Space
Another desirable feature is
the adequate parking space which
is enclosed. There is also an
enclosed Cycle Room under the
supervision of the caretaker.
Mr. Gittens pointed out that
Caribbean Theatres Ltd. recently
became allied with Teelucksingh
Theatres Ltd. of Trinidad.
Through this alliance a working
agreement has been arranged so
as to permit the productions of
a number of Film companies .o
flow through the entire alliance
circuit which covers 12 cinemas
in Barbados, British Guiana and
Trinidad.

Leading film representatives and
distributors of Port-of-Spain wili
be in Barbados for the opening
of this theatre.

Mr. Gittens said that the elec-
trical equipment is West
made by Western Electric anc
patrons are assured that they
will have the best in sound anc
picture, -.

The possibility of a power
failure has not been overlookec
and provision has been mad:
to meet this emergency

NEXT WEEK-A NEW CINEMA



WORK on the new
ders to put the finishing





eine mt —
an en neve ee

Star.

ea



a e
‘ :
Pitch Pine
THE inner basin of the Careen-
age has its busiest days when
there is a lumber ship in port.
The Norwegian steamship “My-
ken” arrived on Thursday with
249,917 feet of dressed pitch pine
from Florida, and yesterday piles
of this cargo congested two sides
of the inner basin. ;
The lumber stacked on the East
side of the inmer basin overflowed
into bridge street, preventing the
easy flow of traffic along that road.
It was being removed steadily
during the day to the various
jumber yards of Bridgetown

panish speaking em-

There are few of the Broad
Street stores who do not have a
member of the staff who knows
at least a little Spanish. Some ol
them are fluent. Some of them
get on with remnants of what they
learned at school.

But there is room for people
who know enough of the langu-
age to be able tv coax a spender
into spending more, argue about
quality price and the like in a
friendly but business like manner.
One Broad Street store has adver- |
tised for such a person, preferably
a lady with an attractive person-
ality. Many have called in with
a view of securing the position,

but no one has yet been chosen
A Common Language



Two Get Letters Of
f oe -« e
Administration
TWO petitions for Letters of
Administration were granted by
His Honour the Chief Judge, Sir
Allan Collymore in the Court of

Ordinary yesterday.

They were as follows:—

Petition of Nathaniel . Augustus
Skeete of Goodland, St. Michael,
to the estate of his father Charles
Frederick Skeete late of St. Peter,
deceased, .

Mr. C, H. Clarke, K.C. instruct.
ed by Hutchinson and Banfield,
Solicitors, for the petitioner.

Petition of Millicent Eudora
Chandler of Fitts Village, St.
James, Widow, to the estate of
her husband Christopher Alex-
ander Chandler, more commonly
known as Elyn Chandler decd.

Mr. D. H. L. Ward instructed
by Haynes & Griffith, Solicitors
for the petitioner.

The wills of the following were

Since the influx of visitors from | admitted to probate,

Venezuela last Easter, some stores! Justina Eudora Deane; Frank
have kept advertising notices in! Gooding; Gordon Springer; Aus-
Spanish in their show windows, | tine Da Costa Chase (St, Michael)
Yesterday morning, C. B. Rice's, Malvina Croft.

Tailoring Establishment advertised
in Spanish in this Newspaper.

Mr. Vernon Knight, Venezuelan
Vice-Counsui here, said that not
only the stores, but the hotels too
will have to employ Spanish
speaking people if they are really
to make the visitor’s stay comfor-
table. What has helped a great
deal up to now is that some of the
visitors speak French and French
speaking people here have been
able to talk to them in a common
language. Again some of the
Venezuelans speak English well
and can assist their friends who
cannot



_——

Failed To Stop

AGIDNEY ASHBY of Swan
Street, City, was ordered by City
Police Magistrate Mr. E. A. Mc
Leod to pay a fine of 20/- or in
default, to undergo 7 days’ im-
prisonment with hard labour for
failing to stop at a major road
j with the motor car X—230 along
Fairfield Road,



Coat Of Arms

Adorns Court House

THE Business of
Ordinary yesterday was done
under the Shadow of the Lion
and the Unicorn, and petitioners
in that Court could have been
heartened by the words Dieu et:
mon droit—God and my right—-!
appearing on the Imperial Coat;
of Arms. !

The Coat of Arms now occupies |
the panel over the Bench, and}
replaces one which used to adorn|
the Town Hall, and which is now
iu the Legislative Council Cham-
ber. Mr. Went, Colonial Engineer,

the Court of





Cuban Paper
Stops Publication

HAVANA, Aug. 25.
The Communist Daily News-
paper Hoy at whose offices here
the Cuban Government yesterday
installed an official “Government





was responsible for ordering) interventor” has stopped pub-
aod putting in the new one. lication.
The view has been expressed| The interventor is charged

that the Barbados Coat of Arms,| with inspecting newspapers and
rather than the Imperial, would| books to determine whether
be more fitting for the Council) they should remain in Communist
Chamber | Possession or be turned over to

the non-Communist Cuban Con-
What’s on Today

federation of Workers.
Police Courts 10 a.m.

The Confederation claimed Hoy

| has been established with funds
Meeting of Housing Board
at Council Chamber 10.30





contributed by workers whose
object was a newspaper to defend
|Cemmunist workers interests.



a.m 7 | —Reuter.
First, Intermediate and |)
Second Divisions Cricket
ees || PIANIST OFF TO
Joope! rs ay a 5
Patrick's School 4.30 M USIC FESTIVA L
Pp. m. NEW YORK, Aug. 25.

Claudio Arrau, Chilean concert
pianist, left here by air to-day for
Prestwick, Scotland, where he is
to make two appearances at the
Edinburgh, Music Festival on
August 27 and 29. Arrau will play
in a programme featuring Schu-
man’s Fantasy Opus 24 and is to
be soloist with Stradiofonien Or-

10/-_ FOR STONE

THROWING

EDWIN BOYCE of 6th Avenue,
New Orleans, was yesterday fined
by City Police Magistrate Mr.
E, A. McLeod, 10/- with an alter



i , j i age laying
native of 14 days’ imprisonment chestra of Copenhagen play l
with hard labour for throwing eee Concerto No. 3 at
stones on the Upper Wharf on| the same hall. Reuter
Thursday. Wei *





REAL
LOVELY !!

The Mayfair's
Mannequins use

ADDIS BEAUTY BRUSH

j Pink, Green & Blue
COMBS in shades to match.

SEE

it.

in



THe AT, .

| KNIGHTS DRUG STORES
PHOENIX PHARMACY







Thirteen!

| Without One

Schooners leave daily, on
West Indian port for anothe
| with lives and valuable cargo on
| board. But as soon as they

| have sailed out of sight, most of |

| check yesterday of 13 schooner
which were in port, found out
that none of them was equipped
with radio transmitting sets and
only three with receiving sets.
The three schooners equipped

with receiving sets were the
i“Paitie Davidson,” the
i“Timothy A. H. Vansluytman’
jand the “E. M. Tannis.” The
receiving sets, however, are o!

no use in case of an emergency
Captain Clarke, the skipper of

| the 72-ton schooner “Emeline,”
| who has been going to sea now
| for many years and on various
| vessels, told the “Advocate” thai
jhe did not know any schooner
which carried a radio transmit-
ting set

Chronometers On The ‘Dot’

A. H. Vansluytman” said that the



Of the motor vessels, only the}
“Caribbee” and the “T. B, Radar” |
are equipped with transmitting |
and receiving sets. These have aj}
considerable advantage over the}
other intercolonial craft as they
can get into communication with
the nearest port in cases of a hur-
ricane, a leak or any other ills
that should befall them at sea

a

Decision Reversed

NO OBSTRUCTION ;
NO FINE

His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
had fined Mrs. Ethel Gowdey of

“Beaumont,” Hastings, Christ
Church £2 and. 1/- costs to be
paid in 14 days or in default

one month's imprisonment for, ob-
structing H. C. Griffith, Chief
Sanitary Inspector of Christ
Church and Sanitary Inspector
Cyril Morgan while in the execu-
tion of their duty on March 14,
1950. This decision was reversed
by Their Honours Mr. G. L.
Taylor and Mr. J. W. B. Chenery,
Judges of the Assistant Court of
Appeal yesterday





Their Honours dismissed the
case on its merits. Mr. G. H
Adams associated with Mr. D,
H. L. Ward, and instructed by
Messrs. Yearwood & Boyce, ap-
peared on behalf of Mrs. Gowdey.

Inspection
Mr. Griffith in his evidence

said that on March 14 he went to
Mrs, Gowdey’s house to carry out
an inspection there A servant
appeared and he told her to tell
Mrs. Gowdey that he was wait-
ing to be admitted for an inspec-
tion. Mrs, Gowdey appeared at
the window and said that six
was not allowing them to enter
her place that day.

In addressing Their Honours
Mr. Adams pointed out that Mr
Griffith who had several cases
with Mrs, Gowdey repeatedly
vent to her place to inspect. Mr
Griffith, he said, had admitted
that her yard was always in a
clean condition. But this particu-
lar day after many regular vis-
its she had refused to admit him
because in her opinion he did
not come with a bona fide inten-
tion to inspect her place, There-
fore Mr. Adams submitted that
tnis refusal could not be called an
obstruction,

In giving their decision Their
Honours agreed with Mr. Adams
that he did not go there with a
bona fide intention to inspect
and that he was just persecuting
Mrs. Gowdey by the amount of
cases that he brought against her.

|



SPUNS

THAT PUT You “Gd

IN THE

24 LEADING
TO CHOOSE

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

18 BROAD

10, Wt,



Auto

evithe
COU
White Park Road. -

them have no means of com-
munication with land, }
| The “Advocate” in making

Captain Stool of the “Timothy |

three schooners kept receiving
sets for setting their chronome-
ters with G.M.T. The chrono-
meter, he said, should always be
kept on the “dot” as they are
very useful instruments in;
navigation. |







PAGE FIVE





| CONTROL OF SCABIES
WITH

‘TETMOSOL

*Tetmosol’ Soap, a pleasantly perfumed
tablet, with a powerful action against
the parasite causing scabies, is particu-
larly intended as a routine measure tor
the prevention of the disease

This soap has proven especially valuable
for controlling scabics outbreaks in
families, and in communities such as
asylums, hospitals, schools, etc.

The method of use, simply replacing
ordinary toilet soap with ‘Tetmosol’, is
sO convenient as to ensure the willing
co-operation of all who may be exposed
to the infection

*Tetmosol’ is also available as a solution
which, diluted before use, rapidly effects
a cure in all cases of scabies

*Tetmosol’ Soap (5%) Single 3 oz.
tablets and boxes of 36.
*Tetmosol’ Solution (25°) Bottles
of 100 c.c, and 2§0 ¢.c.

A rode of IMPERIAL CHEMICAL
(PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED
A subsidiary company of Imperial Chemical
Industries Lid,
WILMSLOW MANCHESTER ENGLAND

SOLE AGENTS AND DISTRIBUTORS IN BARBADOS

A. S. BRYDEN & SONS
(BARBADOS) LTD.

P.O, BOX 403, BRIDGETOWN



AGAIN

PURINA

IN STOCK ...






CHOWS @yw
ANIMALS & POULTR) ‘ Neg

H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.
DISTRIBUTORS,

——,

Pe Saale aay

=—_—

en: > rl
DOMESTIC
EARTHENWARE

THE LARGEST SELECTION AND THE
LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN.

AMONG MANY OTHER ITEMS OUR STOCK INCLUDES—
CUPS AND SAUCERS—All Kinds
WHITE TANKARD JUGS
EGG CUPS WITH FOOT
DECORATED BOWLS
MIXING BOWLS
TEA AND COFFEE POTS
VEGETABLE DISHES (Covered)
PLATES—In All Sizes
NIGHT CHAIR PANS
TEA, DINNER, and COFFEE SETS

in a good range of attractive decorations

AND
A SPECIAL
PIECK KCORATED
TOILET SETS
At $11.87 Per Set.





—

BROAD ST.

LINE OF



o

HARRISON’

—

BROAD STREET
DIAL 2364





—













Wilts
36” wide at
$1.00

a yard



SHADES
FROM

STREET,





IN BLACK NIGHTS

Fi



DR LONGER BRIGHTER

LIGHWMTS. .. FIT = «

-DURALIFE
Batteries

Ebonite Separators

RFESY GARAG
(ROBERT THOM. LTD.)



— Dial 4391






PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1959
TT LL sent ee ream



) HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



LADIES!!!

Tee
| INTRODUCING TWO
] NEW TOILET SOAPS

: CHIC







Beverege after a
Hot and Tiring Day.

Brewed Specially for
Hot Climates.



















PNOT FUNNY! TAKE
KIM AWAY 1 NECT

» IF HIS EXCELLENCY
DOES NOT FIND VOL
COMICAL , YOU
WiLL BE EXECUTED
|\MMEDIATELY..
NOW, THEN ...-
BE FUNNY,
PLEASE!

=z THE Position OF | [
= COURT VESTER IS
A GOOD ONE... GOOD





&
SWEETHEART

UNBEATEN FOR FRAGRANCE

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING
STORES

AT ONLY Ide. CAKE |
|
|

AND ARRANGE
FOR YOUR X’MAS

CALENDARS









HUTT TT
“~

HU
















-! GREeaT scotT!
(fF. \NHAT MAKES MY
iy. ( RAZOR SCRAPE SO?






AVOID THE et
°

TAKE HOME A FEW CAKES
TO-DAY.

ADVOCATE PRINTING
DEPT.

HERE AGAIN!

YOUR OLD FAVOURITE

“ENAMEL-IT”

MADE FROM BAKELITE

Fe a _
fe
DEKE SAID HE'D DOUBLE MY SHARE OF TH
GOLD IF I KILLED THE LONE RANGER!





HOLD YOUR FIRE! WE COME
AS FRIENDS! pope



MISSED HIM! THATS WHAT T ) FAN
GET FOR FIRIN' Too SOON! Laut

ee pe"
Z f y




i Baby
i Péwder —





New Stone



e
BRUSH... UP... YOUR... SMILE...

P.O. Red
Rose Pink
Golden

THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS

GIORGIO! YOU OLD WAR
HORSE! HAVEN'T SEEN











BIGNOR CANNON 7 7 1 CAN'T 00 MORE

Brown
NO,NO! 8AM A
CAPITANO

CANNON ¢

(S$ AFRAID OF THE [ —
EAT LITTLE SIGNOR

CHIEF OF POLICE!

YOU SINCE THE 8TH. IT 1S SO GOOD TO



¢, aed Saxe Blue
4 ARMY DAYS! WHAT
BIUAMT 7 + es ARE YOU NOW?,, WITH THE co BRUSH
; ‘ (toon we 8) AN ADMIRAL? -—“ ve V nannies: LS os * Wisdom's straight-line head reaches O00
nae ep awkward corners easily. i i ‘i
et mel Be || /\ anaes
aXe : ;
y me , % Wisdom’ s angle in the * Wisdom’ s widely-spaced
- : handle is the secret of tufts ‘comb’ between teeth

its comfortable control. ~clean where decay begins.

Wisdoni

ADDIS LTD. OF HERTFORD, MAKERS OF THE FIRST TOOTHBRUSH IN 1780

OBTAINABLE FROM ALL DEALERS
IN THE SCREW-TOP GLASS JARS!



BY GEORGE MC. MANUS








Liha aT

i fi it th

BOY/ I'M GONNA |

STAY HOME AND

TAKE IT EASY-- |]

DON'T FEEL ||

IKE SEEIN!
NY

2 i
ren u! j
\. iy SL ANYONE
ge Topay // [I
. ‘7 2 : MN £4

Cope. 1930, King Festnres Srnsberte. toc ®

OH+HELLO-BIMMY-

HOW'S MY DARLING

BROTHER FEELING
TODAY ?












‘A » Sg im My

RIP KIRBY








| BY ALEX RAYiivn.
' — / va /.He's THE y” eo
J } ) Prearr Sa f-
6 |) a



y 7
e—F — ieee = eb Reet
My cyes often used to smart and At the Club Jim said: “You're
Driving this sensational new M.G. Midget is like handling Jeuaaes topay lneiagerbnabe’: ..See enine Way net ty Oana
the controls of an aircraft, The smooth, responsive power of its =a
1250 c.c. overhead valve engine gives you that impression.
Cushioned riding comfort made possible by independent front

suspension and latest type shock absorbers



wk

6 si \
WE d
THE PHANTOM

ASTHE KING WATCHES THE CANNIBAL
Fife CAM)

THERE WERE TWO \ LCFREMON/AL® |
THERS + MEN+ WE




i Ne a Neen ‘ add still further to this conception, Come
IW? Ae ‘ Ys
Ne aL and se this “as” vesion ofa eee

world-wide sports car success.
Better still; come for a drive!
eye strain now!" I said to Jim

“No
i later. “Thanks to you—and Optrex!
and germs, toned up eye muscles. !'ll never be without it again.”

PROTECT YOUR EYES wth

HE'LL INTERFERE NO MORE? IF HE
ENTERS OUR LAND AGAIN,

DESTROY HIM! A ‘NEW TD. SERIES

MIDGET
Safely fact

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 MAKE THIS TEST

The rim of the eye and inner
lining should be healthy flesh
colour. If they are red or irri-
tated or the whites bloodshot, packet
your eyes nec treatment designed eyebat!






4 memes 2) 02)
ae




















ie
&

SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1950

CLASSIFIED ADS.





BURTON—CAROLINE HARPER,
day evening at her residence
Franeia, Hastings. Her funeral will
leave her late residence at 4.30 p.m
for St. Matthias Church, and thence
to'the Westbury Cemetery. No Flow-
ers by request

Frank, Allan Burton, and Chandler

Family 26.8.50—I1n

yester-
“Villa



GIBBS—SUSAN AUGUSTUS, last night
at her residence, Cave Hill, St. Mich-
ael. Her funeral will leave her late
residence for St. Stephen's Church at
4.30 this afternoon
Olive, Hubert, Maizie, Audrey, Sheila,

Agnes (children).





FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

—_—
AUTO BYKE—One Excelsior Auto Byke
(with spring fork). Price $130.00. (A
Real ‘Bargain). Hurry to Olympic Store,

Cor. James and Roebuck Street
26.8.50—2

perenne

TRUCK—One 1934 Ford V-8 Truck
Apply D. V. Scott & Co. ‘White Pak.
Phone 3493. 16,8.50—t.f.n





a cere

CAR—1947 Hillman Minx. 17,000 miles,
Perfect condition. Owner leaving island
Price $1,400.00. Greenland. Phone 3283, or
2775. 25.8. 50—3n

FURNITURE

—

MAHOGANY DINING TABLE to seat
six; six Birch Chairs, Mahogany Rocker.
Apply S. T. SARJEANT, Roebuck Street,

MAHOGANY CEDAR — Lined 17,
Boy — 4 ft. x 3 ft. x 2 ft. Good con
dition. Three drawers and hanging space
Good bevelled mirror in mahogany
frame, 30 x 20 ins. Price reasons
Archie Clarke, Navy Gardens.
4.8.50—3n

MECHANICAL

MACHINE — Singer Sewing Machine
(treadle). Perfeet condition, Apply to
William F. Skeete, Corner Queen Victoria
Rosd and Bank Hall X Poad

26.8 .50-—2n

MISCELLANEOUS

GLASSWARE FROM CZECHOSLOVA-
KIA—Vases, Powder Bowls, Cups &
Fruit Bowls reduced to half price. See
ovr Show Windows. Knight's Ltd.

25.8.50—3n

















IMPEX Wofld’s best cycle generators
and headlights. Obtainable,.from all lead-
ing stores. 25.8.50—Tn

PUPS—Pure bred Cocker Spaniel Pups.
Appty: Mrs. O. H, Seale, Ashburg Pitn.,
St George. Dial 95227 26.8.50—6n

——$—$——$—$—$——————————————
PINKING SHEARS of the highest qual-
ity. Only $9.89 and $1.98, Limited
quantity. See your Jewellers, Y. De Lima

& Co., Ltd., 20, Broad Street
26.8.50—Tn

RECORD ALBUMS for 10-inch and for

12-inch and carrying cases for 10-inch

records, and we have the records too
A.





& CO., LTD.
10.6,.50—t.f.n.
YAWL—“Frapida” approx. 37% feet
long with Gray Marine engine. Good
condition $3,000 — a bargain. Apply

J. R, Edwards. Phone 2520.
15.8.50—T .F YI.

FOR RENT
HOUSES

FLAT — Upstairs Flat at Waverley,
Blue Waters Terrace. 3 large Bedrooms
semi-furnished with Tame wea

.8.50.—Tn,













HOUSES and Apartments on the Sea,
St. Lawrence Gap. y furnished.
Dial 8367. oo 22.8. 50—2n,

‘THERSISDON-—Maxwell’s Coast Road.
Fully furnished. From September. Mrs
B. Lashley, 5th Bungalow, Maxwell's
Road. Dial 8417, 25.6.50—3n.

WOODYARE — Pine Hill. — Furnished
From 15th September to mid January.
Ring Haslett 331f or John Bladon 4640.

26 .8.50—3nt







WORTHY DOWN—Top Rock having 3
bedrooms connecting Toilet and Bath,
Jarge Lounge-dining room. Delightful
balcony, Two car garage. Fully enclosed
Available unfurnished September Ist
Apply: Ralph Beard. 4683 or 2328

25.8.50—3n

PUBLIC SALES

AUCTION

UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER
sé NINA ”

I have been instructed by Messrs. Da
Costa & Co., Ltd, to offer for sale by
Public Auction on the 3ist day of
August, beginning at 2 o'clock on the
spot, the boat called the “NINA” which
is at present lying above the Victoria
Bridge. It is 66 feet long by 22 feet wide,
and 9 feet deep; with a draft of 6 feet.
It has the anchor and spars and can be
easily converted into a coastal boat or
schooner, For all other particulars apply
to D'Arcy A. Scott, Auctioneer,

19.8.°50.--6n,

- REAL ESTATE

—

BUILDING SITES—-A Most Desirable
Building Site overlooking the sea, Wor-
thing, St. Lawrence and the Golf Course
rext to “Cloud Walk” -at Rendezvous
Terrace, Christ Church. Apply: C. E.
Clarke, 7 Swan Street. Phone 2631 or
3029. 26.8.50—3n.

















a
LAND — One rood twenty-six and a
half perches of land at Prospect, St











QUALIFIED BLECTRICAL FOREMAN.
—Apply in person
experience ete. to H. B. D. W.

Deane,
City Garage Trading Co.
Street.

Ltd., Victoria
i7.8.50—4.f.n.

PERSON to take chat#e of Office—
Male or Female. Position requires sound
bookkeeping experience, ifitiative and
judgment. Apply in writing only, stating
salary required to: Herbert A. Dowding,
Lower Estate Plantation, St. Michael.

26.8.50—8n

MISCELLANEOUS

POSITION W. D
DENTAL TBCHNI' with over 2
years experience in preparing and cyst-
ing all gold fittings Acnylic processing
of partial an edentulous cases a spe-

ciality.

Modern Technique used in all stags
Reply to Geo. Wilkins, 11, Picvon

Street, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad.
33 .8.50—6n

STAMPS — Used and Mint Postage
Stamps of Barbados and other Islands of
the B.W.1L, Curacao and Aruba. Bese
Prices paid at Caribbean Stamp Society,
No. 10 Swan Street. 26.8,50—3n













WANTED TO BUY
STAMPS—Used Postage Stamps of |' 3.
America and B.W.1. Islands. James’ \ st
Indies Stamp Co., Bay Street, St. ">
ael 25.8.59—sn

WANTED TO BUY
MACHINES-—-Old Sewing Machines out
or order. Any make. Good Prices paid.
Corner Fairchild and Probyn Street: or

King Street—Mrs. Vaughan.

26.8,50-—"n

PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE

re the Estate of
ALONZA ELEAZER LASHLEY
deceased

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claims
against the Estate of Alonza Eleazer
Lashley, deceased, — late of Cave-wood
Roaxi, Howell's Cross Road, in the
parish of Saint Michael in this Island
who died on the 5th day of May 1950,
— intestate, are requested to send in
particulars of their claims duly at-
tested to the undersigned Clifford
Alonza Lashley also known as Clifférd
4Jonza Smith, c/o Messrs Haynes &
Griffith, No. 2 Swan Street, Bridge-
town, Barbados Solicitors, on or be-
fore the 30th day of Septermber 1950,
after which date I shall proceed to
distribute the assets of the deceased
emong the parties entitled thereto hayv-
ing regard only to such claims of which
I shall then have had notice and 1
will not be liable for the assets or any
part thereof so distributed to any per-
son of whose debt or claim I shall not
then have had notice,

And all persons indebted to the said
estate ate requested to settle their said
indebtedness without délay.

Dated this 29th day of July, 1950,
CLIFFORD ALONZA Y
also Known as Clifford Alonza Smith
Qualified Administrator of the Es-

tate of Alonza Bleager Lashley deceas-
ed.















ai ee” 1.8.50—4n.
NOTICE
Te tre Poms ot

deceased
NOTICE Is HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim against
the estate of Caroline Simmons, de
ceased late of King Bdward Road
Bank Hal) in the rish of Saint Mich-
ael in this Islan who died on the
Ist day of July 1950 are réquested to
send in particulars of their claims

duly attested to the undersigned
SAMUEL POLLARD and GERGALDINE
DANTEL Qualified Executors of the
will ©f the said Caroline Simmons de-
ceased, c/o Messrs Haynes & Griffith
No. 2 Swan Street, Bridgetown, Ba
bados Solicitors, on or before the 30th
day of September 1950, after which
date we shall proceed to distribute the
assets of the deceased among the par-
ties entitled thereto having regard only
tv such claims of which we shall then
have had notice —/ and we shall not
be liable for the assets or any part
thereof so distributed to any person of
whose debt or claim we shall not then
have had notice. .
And ail persons indebied to the said
estate are requested to settle their in-
debtetiness without delay.
Dated this 29th day of July 1960.
POLLARD

GERALDING DANIEL
Qualified Executors of the will of
Caroline Simmons deceased.



1.8.50—4n.
ls
SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICULTURAL
BANK

APPLICATIONS for the post of Man-
ager of the Sugat Industry Agricultural
Bank, which will become vacant on Ist
November next, will be received by the
ene on or before 15th September,

1. Applicants should have some know-
ledge and experience of accountancy and
a sound general education.

2. They should state age, which must
not exceed forty-eight years last birth-
day, and qualifications.

8. Submit two recent testimonials.

4. Salary £2700 per annum rising by
two annual increments of £50 to £800
per annum,

5. The successful eandidate to assum.
duties on ist November, , and he
will be required to retire at the age of

65 years.
A. L, BAILEY, ©
ager.
Sugar Industry Agricultural Bank.
24th August, 1950
26.8 .50—3n



PERSONAL

—_—_—_—
S== Se
THE public are hereby warned against

James. Price attractive. For particulars! giving eredit to my wife Mrs. HILDA

apply to D'Arcy. A Scott.
Lane. 24.8.50—n.

(eee
The undersigned will offer for sale at

their Office No. 17 High Street, Bridse- |

town, on Wednesday, 30th August, 1950,
at 2 p.m.

(1) Lot 29, Navy Gardens, containing
11,008 square feet, abutting on lands
of the Marine Hotel on the south,
and on York Road on the North.

(2) 5,994 square feet of land at Chelsea
Road, St. Michael, adjoining lands
of Mr. J, N. Marshall on the West
and Mr. Johnson on the Socth.

For further particulars and conditions

f sale, apply to:-—

a COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
22.8.50—8n





THE undersigned will set up for
sale at their office No. 17 High Street.
on Friday ist September 1950 at 2 p.m.
the dwellinghouse called The Cottage
and the land thereto containing 3,250
square feet situate at Cheapside, Bridge-
town.

Inspection any day é¢xcept Thursday
between the hours of 4 p.m. and 6 p.m.
on application to the tenant, Mrs
Thoma

s.
For further particulars and conditions
of sale, apply to:
COTTLE, CATFORD & Co
18.8.50—t.f.n



HOUSE—(1)

29 x 12 x 8 covered with galvanise,

situated in Yearwood Land, Black Rock

Telephone 3369 D. A. Browne.
18.8.50-—t .f.n.

1 asec lreeapl (intemperance lA etn
All that chattel dwelling house cailed
Constitution Road, St.
galleny,
Breakfast
Electric Light

“Laurenceville”
Michael. The House contains
Drawing room, 3 bedrooms,
room and usual out offices
and water service
Inspection on application to the te 1ant
The above will be set
public competition at our
Lucas St., Bridgetown, on
Ist September 1%0. at 2 p.m
CARRINGTON & SEALY,



SMHlicitors
26.8.50—6n
NOTICE

This jis to notify the General Public
that the Auction Sale of the (5 pine
Spars now ing w& th. Constitution
River which was adv dito ‘ak
place on the 3ist day August ha



been Cancelled

tioneer

5.8.50-—1







Double roof house tach

up for sale at
office ir
Friday the

Magazine |> GREEN (née Wall) as I do not hold

rmayself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting any debt or debts in
my name unless by a written order
signed by me.

Signed HORACE Da GREEN,

! Rock Hall, Nr. Walkers,

St. George.
23.8 .50—2n

TILE publie are hereby warned ‘agains’
giving credit to my wife EMELINE
WOOD (née Sealey) as I do not hold

myself responsible for her or anyone

else contracting any debt or debis in

my mame unless by a written order

signed by me,

Signed JOSEPH NATHANIEL WOOD,
Ellerton,

St. George.

23.8.50—2n



THE public are hereby warned against
giving cretlit to my wife RUBY 1D
SPARROCK (née Alleyne) as I do not
jhold myself responsible for her or any-
Jone else contrarting any debt or debts
in my name unless Wy a written order
\sened by me,
i Signed DARNLEY SPARROCK.
Hindsbury Road,
St. Michael,
26 .8.50—2n

Publie Official Sale

The Provost Marshal's Act (1904-6) 30)
ON Friday the 15th day of September
1950. at the hour of 2 o'clock



the appraised value.

All that certain piece of Land con-
tainine about 4,720 squegs feet of which
ares 720 Square Feet form part of a
private Road hereinafter mentioned si-

tuete in the Parish of Christ
Butting and bounding on_ three

Church

| (deed)



to the Public Road called St
Gap, together with
i Dwelling houses, Shop Buildings,
|appraised as follows:—

FIGHTY SEVEN DOLLARS
TWENTY FIVE CENTS
tached from EDLA





EDLA VIOLET SMITH) for

(
towards satisfaction, &c





t
| N.B.- Deposit to be paid on day |
of purthz
Sed. T. T. HEADLEY
35.8. 50—3n

letter stating |



in the
afternoon will be sold at my office to
the highest bidder for any sum not under

sides
on lands of the Pstate of F. A. Layne
and on the fourth side on a
private road eighteen feet wide leading
Matthias
the messuage or
&e.,

| The whole property appraised to FOUP | ‘

THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND
AND

($4,887 25) fe

VIOLET JOHNSON @

and | @)

BARBABOS ADVOCATE

GOVERNMENT NOTICES.

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Applications are invited from teachers and other suitably qualific.
| persons for the following vacancies: —
MEN .
| St. Mary’s Boys’ School

| St. Christopher's Boys’ School



WOMEN i
St. Mary's Girls’ School
Ebenezer Girls’ School
Bayley’s Girls’ School.

2. The minimum qualification for entry to the! teaching serviée is
the Cambridge School Certificate. i

3. Applications must be submitted on the appropriate torms
(E.35(b) for men and E.35(c) for women) which may be obtained
from the Department of Education, but candidates who have already
submitted one of these forms in respect of previous vacancies (how
filled) may apply by letter accompanied by « recent testimonial.

4. Any teacher who applies for a vacancy on the staff of another
school must inform his or her present Chairman of Managers and the
Head Teacher of any application for such a tranafer.

5. All applications must reach the Ditector of Education not later
than Saturday, 2nd September, 1950.

26.8.50—2n.



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Vacancies in the Elementary Teaching Service

Applications are invited from teachers with at least 10 years
teaching experience for the Headships of the following schools: —

St. Margaret’s Mixed School, St. John — Grade I.

All Saints’ Boys’ School, St. Peter — Grade II.

2. The minimum professional qualification required is the Certi‘i-
caic A of the Department of exemption therefrom.

3. Salary will be in accordance with Government Scales for Head
Teachers in Elementary Schools.

4 Candidates who have already submitted application forms in
respect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, ac-
companied by a recent testimonial. All other candidates should make
application on the appropriate form which may be obtained from the
Department of Education. All applications must be in the hands of
the Director of Education by Saturday, 2nd September, 1950.

26.8.50—2n.

eee

Vacant Post of Cultivation Officer,

Department of Science and Agriculture, Barbados.
Applications are invited for the post of Cultivation Officer, De-

partment of Science and Agriculture, Barbados. Applicants should
hold the minimum qualification of the Diploma of the Imperial College
of ‘Tropical Agriculture but consideration will be given to candidates
with the necessary experience who are not so qualified. The post is
pensionable and carries salary on scale $2,880 x $144 to $4,320. Point
of entry determined by experience and qualifications. Applications
mentioning the names of two referees, should be addressed to the
Director of Science and Agriculture, Bridgetown, and should reach
him not later than the 30th of September, 1950. Further details will
be supplied on request.

26.8.50—2n.



Applications are invited for the post of Headmaster of the Boys’
Grammar School in St. Kitts, which will be vacated by the present
holder on the 3lst December, 1950. The school roll at present num-
bers 110 and courses are offered up to the Higher School Certificate
examination of Cambridge University.

2. The post is pensionable and carries a salary scale of $2,640 by
$120 to $2,880. A temporary cost of living allowance of $240 per
annum is also payable and free quarters are provided for the Head-
master. The appointment will be on probation for 2 years and subject
to the passing of satisfactory medical examination.

3. Applicarts should possess a degree of a University within the
British Commonwealth, preferably in Mathematics and Physics. Teach-
ing experience will be regarded as an asset, and the appointment will
be made at a point in the salary scale commensurate with the appli-
cant’s qualification and experience.

4. Applications with at least two testimonials and photograph
should be submitted to the Administrator of St. Kitts-Nevis not later
than the lst November, 1950.

26.8.50—2n.



PRICE OF SULPHATE OF AMMONIA
Until further notice, the following price has been arranged: —





DR
oe

Sulphate of Ammonia. ah

Maximum Price Discount if paid by

30th September, 1950



$120.80 per ton.

$2.25 per ton





25.8.50—2n.



PAYMENT OF WATER RATES

Consumers who have not yet paid water rates in respect of the
quarter ending 30th September, 1950, are hereby notified that unless
these rates are paid on or before the 31st of August, 1950, the Depart-
ment, as authorised by section 46 of the Waterworks Act, 1895—1. may
stop the water from flowing into the premises, in respect of which
such rates are payable. either by cutting off the pipe to such premises
or by such means as they may think fit, and take proceedings to
recover any amount due.

25.8.50—2n.

SOLE AGENTS:—

BLACKMANS
ST. JOSEPH

ONE of the most imposing houses in the Island, This beauti-
ful country property is set in an élevated position encircled with
approximately 5 acres of heavily wooded grounds and orna-

| mental gardens. There are 5 reception, 6 bedrooms. 4 garages
ete. All main services.

£6,500

| Real Estate Agents—Auctioneers—Surveyors
Phone 4640 Plantations Building























































HARBOUR LOG

In Carlisle Bay

Seh. Philip H. Doevideen; Sch Bu

ma D; Sch. Rosarene; Biuenose
Mee; Sch Zita Wonlta; Sch. Frenct:
+ a M.V. Star; Sch. Emeline
. 3 Lauda! Sch

D * Carbbee; 88.6. Spec)s

1 : : SS.6. Specjn-

list; - jin Wo; Sch. iterprise :
Bch Turtle eh! Mant M. Lewis

Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe; Sch Mare
Henrietta; 8.8. Canadian Challenger
ARRIVALS
Tanker Rufinn, 1,835 tons, Capt. Van-
er ont Go ae , Agents: Messrs

4 tons, Capt. Good-
ing, be inided, Agents: Sch. ‘Owners’

M.V. 199 tons,
Gvmbs, from fea,” Agente; ‘Sen
oman,

" Association.
ee, See SEO!

ven Ge Lake nanon,

SS. Clarke,
jesers 8 Austin & Co. Ltd.
A :

Sch. Laudalpha, 60 tons, Capt. Gumbs
for St, Lucia, Agents: Seh. Owners’
Association .

M.V. T. B. Radar, 116 tons, Capt
Archibald, for Dominica, Agents: Sth
Owners’ Assoctation

&.S. Sylvanfield, 4,637 tons, Capt
Pugsley, for Lisbon, Agents: Messrs

Gerdiner Austin & Go. Ltd

S.S. Myken, 4,38 tons, Capt. Dolven
for Grenada, Agents: Messrs Robert
Thom & Co. Ltd

Ships In Touch With
Barbados Coaatai Station

CABLE and Wireless (West Indies?
nicate with the followin
their Barbados Coast Station:—

8.8. Juvenal: 8.8 Sunwhit; S$.Ss
Coulgarve; S.S. San Leonardo; §
Canadian Challenger; S.S. Belita; S

Sylvafield; S.S. Guifbird; S.S. Pathf

ships through

Ltd. Advise that they can now nae

ler; S.S. Sepia; S.S. Rena; S.S. Li _—— es
8. Oberon; §$.S Tindefjell; SS )
Ville D. Ameins; SS. Clarkeswharf {
Sia ore ~=6A DANCE: |
De France; S.S. Ravanger; S.S. Pet- i

\

ter LU;
gull; SS Esso Bethichem;
enneé; S.S. Specialist; SS
grange; S.S. Regent Lion; S.S. Birka-
land; S.S. Byfjord; S.S. Belpareil; S.S.
Myken; S.S. Argentan; 8.S. Hera; S.S
Charmouth Hill; 8.5, Runa; S.S. Rand-
ford; SS Amerigo Vespucci; §.S
Barapara; S.S Arakaka; 5.S. Fiysses

SEAWELL

ARRIVALS BY B.W.1.A.L
from VENEZUELA:
Fred Leisering: Mary Leisering; Aradeo

S.S. San Silvester; S.S. Fern-
8.8. Sur-

Tower-

cotulli; Fakio Marcotulli; Blisabette Mar-
cotulli; Lucian Dadzitis; Mauricio Her-
sehteitt; William Fletcher; Jose Urban-



LIQUOK }
The applicatior wilder
ef liquor license No. S34 of 1950, granted
to Rebecca Spencer in | qqgeweesesee

Marcotulli; Fekio Marecotulli; Favsto :

PAGE SEVEN







LICENSE NOTICE

of Lero Mil

respect of prem
ises viai-—2nd feer of a Istorey building |
known as No. 30 Tudor Si. Bridgetow:

for permission to wee seid liquor licen
Bottom foo

ARTHRITIC PAINS

But new treatment does more than
Se ee. | ease these terrible agonies.
NB —This application will be. cons i-- |

Licenst ‘
) Re te a. ne a | A new product, DOLCIN, has been created which not only gives

the 4th day of September, 1950, at 11 |
o'clock, a.m. |
26 8.50—1n

following pretnises viz- |
of a S-storey wall buildimg st White's |
Alley, Bridgetown '
Dated this Mth day of August, 1950
To H. A. TALMA,
The Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
MILLAR,

prompt relief from the pains due to the symptoms of arthritis and
rheumatism, but also effects the mets bolic processes which constitute
rtant part of the rheumapic state’s background,
add thoroughly tested in medical institutions,
DOLCIN is being used now with unprecedented success, DOLCIN
is being prescribed by doctors now. And many sufferers have already
resumed normal living as a result of taking DOLCIN.
Don’t delay. Proft by the experience of fellow-victims of these
Get DOLCIN today.




a@ very im
DOLCL has

So







Professional Notice

THIS is to inform my friends
and Clients, those whom I have
that 1
the Island for
Yok os
cozt

not contacted personally, A bottle of 100 precious tablets coste
will be out of

approximately
L.

pains,

only

SOLD BY:
On Sale at BOOKER’S DRUG STORES (B’dos) LTD.

ER.

enna ene





:
Notice

Dr. F. A. COX

D.C.P.T. (Chir.
Chiropractor & Optician

has Removed to Lower James St
8.30 to 1 and 2 to 11.30

Removal

Hours




















UNBREAKABLE
GARDEN POTS

That is the name givgn then
by purchasers
seer:

Have you them”?

They are the Tron meter
FOR SALE
At Your Gas Works, Bay St
Small size @ 1/3 medium size @
4/6 and a few large ones @ 4/-
each dozen lots chenper











MISS SYLVIA CALLENDER

& Mr. LAUKIE CALLENDBIK ]
better known as Clgo H
begs to remind you of their (
DANCE
which will be held at the |} patency heirs yur iano eel hand ofl
CHIMMING BELI, UNION )
CLUB ) We
Marchfleld, St. Philip }) aes
On Monday Night 26 August } S.P.MUSSON,SON & CO LTD > BARBADOS
Admission; Gents 2/-: Larlies 1/6 ()
Music by Mr BERTIE HARE. ()
ins wood i
reshments on Sale |
Miss This and blame yourself {!!
26.8.50—1n. §{\

=

cae























ja; David Wolkowiez; Arminuio Borjas
Yolanda Borjas: Dorothy Meudt; Her- ®
bert Meudt; Christina Meudt; Maria an cence
Urbaneja.
y tain BY BW LAL Ki adi nae ie
‘or AD: TRE re > --—--—-
ere Newman; famosie Tirado U ng Room } rene a eee ee im tp ue —
ureand Lopez; Frederick Yard; Ada De [2 : . So ms
Jara; Maria DeJara; Raul DeJara: Cesar IST FLOOR, BOWEN & SONS 6. ee et eiely tat The M.V. “T. B. RADAR” wii
DeJara: Manuel DeJara; Luis Orsini (Broad Street) Hadstone August 17th, Brisbane August hooept Cana and Pasengeerd: ter
Ronald Mackin: Luis Kowalski; Charles Hours: 10 am—2 p.m. ‘ard, Sydney August 80th, arriving Dominica; St. Vineent; Grennads
Kowalski; Alfredo Kowalski; John Grgll: Tuesdays, Wednesday j rbados September 27th. ‘ St. Lucia and Aruba, sailing
Doreen Cozier; Frederick Springer; Mol- 1 ays, 5.8. “GLOULRETER Acad ie Thursday 24th August
tilde Ruiz: James Arkinne; Herbert King Fridays. ast Siet, Adolaide eer 11th ‘ ae , mm
Lily Boon’ 10 a.m.—12 o'clock. evonport Beptamber 18th, Melbourn the MV. “CARIDBEE” _ witt
turd a - m wa G7 . pecept Cargo and Passengers for
( At tht ays. ees ae Dv auny Bet) Sayrembes Dominica; Antigua; Montserrat;
nis §=Roo! be: 1 rriving at Bar a We . .
the Christian 'Solence gs } no wember Att Bui pati Gado he eee
Scion : These vessels have ample space fot r ;
ONRUA: ( ihe Roriptarte ty Maas Gahan } hilled, hard frozen, ond general earge The MV. “DAEBRWOOD" will
For A: ‘ koDY > Cargo acrepted on through bills of accept Cargo snd Passengers for
Harvey Smith; Ernest Lambert; Capt may de reed, borrows, ding with transhipment at Trinidad St. Lucia; St. Vincent; Grenada;
Eric Burton; Barbara Balesterr; Earle re OF pur hased. or Barbados, Britiah Guiana, Windward and Atuba, date of sailing will
stig Legge pomrboe worms” | gv aivors Are Welcome 1 | iis Gait wv; || BW, ;
* ‘ For further particulars app? B.W.I s
For SAN JUAN: a -7 FURNESS W ; % Wot, chooner Owners
Thomas Porter; Amelina Porter; ieee or Trinidad, BWI. cw Association Ine.
Katherine Porter; Pamela Porter: Arden ee and Consignee: Dial: 40
Cozier: Arden Cozier; Catherine Cozier: | DA COSTA & CO. LTD ee; jal; 4047.
James’ Beckles; Clarice Beckles; Cyril TO DAY’S | feruaaaee
-
XK

Corier
For B.G.

Smith Bracewell; Margaret Bracewell,
James Aléxander; Gladys Kirton; Henry
Parker; Gertie Dolphin;
Evelyn Fraser; George
Clement Cha-
ward McPhee,

King, Hilda
John Jeffers:
Collier; William Miller;
derton; Kathleen Sill;
Monica McPhee.
——



MAIL NOTICE

Madls for Dominica; Antigua; Montser-

rat; Nevis, St. Kitts by the M.V Carib-

bee will be closed at the General Post
Office as under:—

Parce!, Registered and Ordinary Mails
at 10.15 a.m. on the 36th August 1950

———————

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you will Jike these

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Vanities (nat Charm, in_ pe-
















LOVELY TAFETTA 36 ins.

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For GRENADA;

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adhesive of colossal strength

\een ALcon —

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yl ORLEANS #E8V1CB
JOHNSON’'S STATIONERY No. Dace
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& HARDWARE ICOA HOAMER 26th July 1th Aus.
LCOA RUNNER e " Yth Auguet 22nd Augum
NEW YOUR SERVIOR
walle Arr.
N.Y. H'des
( _G THULIN" ‘ 2iet July dist July
BYFJORD" llth August 2ist August

‘a oe
CANADIAN SERVICE



VENEZOLANOS AMIGOS

OUTHBOUND

. Sails Sails Arrives

TE NEMOS ATICLOS DE Name of Ship Montreat Halltax Barbados
S.8. “ALCOA PILGRIM” August 25th August 28th September 10th
8. ALCOA PARTNER" September 8th, September llth, September 2st

ORIENTAL

Se Habla Espanol
SOU acs ks



eet neta a atm ee ee

ORTHBOUND

Arrives

Barbadar

Aug. 27th For St. John, NB,
Lawrence River Ports,

5, “ALCOA PEGASUS" & St.

THANT BROS.
Pr. Wm. Hnry. St.

These Vessels have limited passenger accommodation,





















, , fo , Apply : DACOSTA & CO, LTD,—Canadian Service.
eb RE ho ag wey eines ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Service.
shapes — Wardrebes, Dresser- (\
er eeeen PRBS oe }
hogany or Ma- . ‘
hogenised or Guarnatied, ‘Deal or | Recent ! / “
Fir — Bedstends in Full-pannell- 1 2 ! FB Ne)
el or railed Iron ads } . "
Laths and Tron Side Rails, | Arrivals H
Drawi Room Furniture in sie 7 } —
Morris; Tub or other Suites or } 78 Vonthaoe oe y
seperate pieces —- One 4piece MUTTON & PEAS OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
Upholatered Suite, a Hit, at se | MURTON & PEAS
ne en -plece ijn ec VIEN § s ~
caned Deepsent Suite, Only so QOCKEALE carters Vessel From Leaves Due,
eine anen. one | Besrenn TOMATO SOUP i a : hn
SES Segue ae.e -/ erat oat STEAK & TOMATO ( }>.S. “MOONCREST” Londen 3rd Aug. 24th Aug.
Larders, Waggons — eel i MACARONI & CHERSY 3.8. “BROOKHURST” Glasgow &
Cocktail and Fancy Tables ~ FRUIT SALAD { . ¥ ne 1st Bent
Dining Tables, Extension an’ PLUM JAM : wrverpoo] 17th Aug. st Sept.
Fixed tops, Round, Square ana TOMATO JUICE 8.8. “JUNECREST” London 25th Aug. 8th Sept.
[sine Upright Chairs for all TOMATOES S.S. “TEMPLE ARCH” Mh . A’
joome PINEAPPI FE / - . oa ) ig M
i APRICOTS: London 5th Sept. 26th Sept.
ALL AT MONEY. SAVING .
PpRIC HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
v
STUART & SAMPSON \ Vessel F Closes in Barbados
LID 1.8. “SPECIALIST” Londo 25th Aus.
u ° ) Yor further information apply to—
SS Se
’ DACOSTA & (CO., LTD.—Agents
PASSAGES TO IRELAND
THESE ARE REAL che
ANTILLES PRODUCTS LYD., Roseau, Dominica, offer



Passages to Dublin per M.V. “DUALA”, next sailing from Roseav
about 23rd August, and thereafter about every thirty-three days
Single Fare, £70, usual reductions for children.
apply direct.







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' PAGE EIGHT



W.I. Defeat Essex
In Race With Clock

~ Weekes Hiis 83

Scored In 2 Hrs.

ESSEX 229 AND
'W.I. 213 AND (FOR

SOUTHEND-ON-SEA, ESSEX, Aug. 25.
The West Indies scored an excellent victory over Essex
here to-day on a pitch which always gave the bowlers some
help. They got rid of the last seven Essex wickets for 120
yuns and then hit the necessary 186 for victory in 2 hours

10 minutes with 5 minutes to

Third Series
Of Ist Division
Open Today

TODAY the third series of First
and Intermediate and the fourth
of the Second Division games
open. Perhaps the most interest-
ing game in the First Division
will be the Empire-Spartan fix-
ture which will be played at Bank
Hall.

Skipper Alleyne has made a few
changes in his side and the two
men brought in are B, Bourne who
has been playing in the Second
Division for the last three matches
and C. Harper from the Interme-
diate.

Although a bit slow in scoring
Bourne is quite useful as an open-
ing bat while on the other hand
Harper who is not a stranger to
first Division cricket can be ex-
pected to pull his weight. "

Today’s Fixtures are:—

FIRST DIVISION
Empire and Spartan at Bank Hall
Combermere and Police at Comber-
mere
Wanderers and Pickwick at the
College and Carlton at College

Bay

INTERMEDIATE DIVISION

Cable & Wireless ana Wanderers at









Boarded Hall

Mental Hospital and Windwerd a’
Black Rock

Spartan and Empire at the Park
Pickwick and ¥.M.P.C at the
Ova!

SECOND DIVISION

Â¥.M.P.C and Leeward at Beckler
Road

ladige and Police at Lodge

Carlton and Ex e at Cariton

Foundation and College at Founda-
tren

Central and Pickwick at Vaucluse

Regiment arxi Combermere at Gar
rison



Five Records
Smashed In
Athleties

BRUSSELS, Aug. 25.
Five championship records were
broken during the third day of the

European Athletic Games here
teday.

Mrs. Fanny Blankers - Koen,
Dutch Olympic champion and

world record holder, easily won
the women’s 100 metres final in
11,7 secs, which knocked 2/10 sec,
off the old record.

Derek Pugh, 24-year-old Bri-
tish runner, took the men’s 400
metres in 47.3 secs. which beat
the old record by 4/10 of a second.

Huseby, of Iceland, became the
men’s “putting the weight” cham-
pion and in doing so broke the old
record and the European record
with a throw of 16.74 metres.

The Russian, Lipp, recently had
a throw of 16.93 metres, but this
has not yet been ratified as a
European record.

G. Derdoni of Italy won the 50
kilometres walk in 4 hours 40
mins. 42.6 secs and then collapsed
and had to be carried from the
arena.

Miss Ben Hammo of France won
the women’s pentathlon.—Reuter.

King To Reward

Channel Swimmers

: DEAUVILLE, Aug. 25.
King Farouk to-day promised
« reward in Cairo to the two
successful Egyptian swimmers in
the marathon English Channel
Race organized by London Daily



Mail this week.
“Egypt and myself are very
proud of your magnificent per-

formance and I will not fail to
reward you on my return to
Egypt.” the King told them when
he received them by royal com-
mand at the Hotel Du Golf here.

Hassan Ad El Rehim who won
the £1,000 first prize in the record
time of 10 hours and 50 minutes
and his fellow Egyptian Mareeh
Hassan Hamad who came third
knelt and kissed the King’s hand.

—Reuter.



They'll Do It Every Time

GALENA DECIDED TO USE HER
EXTRA-SPECIAL GORGEOUS PERFUME
FOR THE BIG DATE WITH DULCIMER ---
4

VM aa
Zs





terday’s

men with their spin, and the only

“minutes bringing victory.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
VICTORY ARCHITECTS



Of 186 Runs
10 Mins.

169
3 WKTS) 186

spare.
On a



pitch, drying after yes- =
soaking Gomez = and

Ramadhin worried Essex bats- E

. WEEKES—hit hurricane
83 in 105 minutes,
batsman to look at all secure was

R. CHRISTIANI—scored a
fine 53 in as many minutes.

G. GOMEZ—captured 5 of
Essex 2nd innings wickets.

County Cricket
Results

LONDON. Aug. 25.

Cricket results: At Oval, Surrey
beat Wercestershire by 114 runs.
Surrey 320; Fishlock 77, Parker
65, Barton 55 and secondly 140;
Perks 6 for 48.

Worcestershire 175; Wyatt 73,
Surridge 6 for 55, and secondly
171, Howorth 54, McMahon 3 for



Stanley, the young Ground-Staff
batsman, who is also an Arsenal
inside forward, He gave a sound
defensive display for 25.

Gomez bowled his off-spinners
unchanged for nearly two and a
half hours and fully earned his
five wickets for 79 runs. The West
Indies suffered a shock at 27 when
they began their bid for victory
Preston taking the wickets of
Stollmeyer and Walcott in three
balls.

Then Weekes and Rae, running

WEST INDIES PLAY
MIDDLESEX TO-DAY

TO-DAY the West Indian crick- W.1. against Middlesex was Con-
eters will make their third 1950 stantine. In 1928 he hit 103 in a
appearance at Lord’s when they match which has been described as
open their fixture against Middle- Constantine’s game, He batted and
sex, It was at Lord’s that they suff- bowled superbly and the West In-
ered the first defeat of the tour, dies won the game.

yas also é 4 e ,
fee i Re warty pte fll gf arse» Batting first the County rattled

laringly wee ickets, t on Scored their first Test victory. Such

ele Sete Saba Pa e are the glorious fluctuations of the UP a for 6 Se as pe geo 24.

which enabled Ray Sm.th to be- fortunes of the game, and to-day The | L. ae ae os / le eae “At Dover. Kent beat Derbyshire
come the first play r to complete they will endeavour to record an- Learie contribute in less than by 9 wickets. Derbyshire 167:

an hour. He then proceeded to get
rid of the County batsmen as he
liked, and took 7 wickets for 51.
The home side was all out for 126.

other win on this historic cricket
ground.

It will be the fifth encounter be-
tween the West Indies and Middle-
sex, and of the four completed
games the West indies have won
two, lost one. and one was drawn.

Mention of these games recall
names dear to the heart of every

Wright 4 for 52, Ridgway 3 for 30,
and secondly 83, Wright 6 for 45,
Dovey 4 for 20.

Kent 214; Ames 54, Hearn 68,
Gladwin 7 for 73, and secondly.
39 for 1.

At Cardiff. Glamorgan-York-
shire match abandoned as a draw,
wicket under water. Glamorgan 14

the double of a hundred wickets
and a thousand runs this season,

Christiani joined Weekes and
had an-escape off an easy return
catch when at 2. This proved
expensive as he stayed witn
Weekes to see the runs hit off,
their unbroken stand of 87 in 55

Set to get 259 runs to win the
W.1. were in troubles with 6 wick-
ets down for 121. Then Constan-
tine stepped into the picture again,
and flashed his bat in characteris-















lover of the ic fashi » hit up 103 and the for 2; Yorkshire did not bat.
Weekes batted 105 minutes for game in these Oe Me tine eee with 3 :
84 runs and hit a six and nine parts. Patsy At Eastbourne, Hampshire beat

fours, while Christiani’s 53 occu- wickets in hand.

; ed 55 minutes.

The Start

The West Indies set an attack-
ing field as soon as play started.
tamadhin had four short legs and
Gomez three, Not until the fifth
over was a run scored, and Peter
Smith took 24 minutes before hit-
ting his first run to-day. He swept
Ramaduin to leg for a four. With
Smith in a mood for hitting and
Horsfall driving well, it was no

Suusex by 59 wuns. Hampshire
229; Rogers 137, James Langridge
7 for 67 and secondly 115, Bridger
55, James Langridge 5 for 19.
*Sussex 247 for 9 declared; Cox
121, Shackleton 6 for 58 and sec-
ondly 38, Knott 5 for 5.

At Manchester, — Lancashire-
Warwickshire match drawn. War-
wickshire 80, Tattersall 7 for 29,
Hilton 3 for 27 and secondly 86
for 1.

Lancashire 192 for 2 declared;
Washbrook not out 111, Ikin 58.

Hendren, 9
undying mem-
ory and Nigel By
Haig to men-
tion only twe
whom we
have seen in
action at Ken-
sington, were

forerunners of

Jack Robert-

son who was?
with the 1948
M.C.C.

Drawn Game

The 1933 game which ended in
a draw also had its epic moment,
when Herman
Griffith and V,
Valentine added
132 in 58 min-
utes ina last®
wicket stand—
Griffith hit 62



























59 not out,

wonder that 32 runs came in the ‘0. the end off the W.I. At Lords, Middlesex-Northamp-

first 35 minutes. Then Smith lofted Indies. Ist innings of tonshire match drawn.

a ball into the leg slips and Weekes Pray “terri- 382 and Middle- Northamptonshire 388; Brookes

held it safely. ip een George Headley sex replied 160, Oldfield 92, and secondly 7
Later Stanley offered resistance, Compton and Edrich, are members With 177. Bat- for 1.

but Gomez claimed his third vic- of the Middlesex team, whom the “28 a_ second Middlesex 296, W. Edrich 57,

tim of the.morning when he dis- West Indies have already encount- “me WI. de- Robertson 56, Sharp 72, Garlick

‘lared at 251 for
8 wickets, and

missed Insole with a ball which

ered on this Tour, and it will be
came back sharply. Stanley contin-

more than interesting to watch the

5 for 58.
Reuter.



ued to bat well until Ramadhin re- Meeting again with Simms the oa oe
turned to the attack, and then the veteran spin bowler who routed ‘Y, ha ost
wickets for 133

our batsmen in the M.C.C. game }
at Lord’s and was directly re- !"
sponsible for our defeat.

Can Simms again spin out the
W.I. batsmen or will the tables be
reversed?

Memories of the last fixture
with Middlesex, in 1939, should
bring cheer to those who recall the
fine batting display put up.

The West Indies batted first and
rolled up 665—their best figures up
to then. George
Headley led the
way with 227, J.
E. D. Sealy fol-
lowed with 181,
and Jeff Stoll-
meyer complet-

young West Indian spinner lured
Stanley forward for Walcott to
make a smart piece of stumping.

Just before lunch Gomez struck
again. He had bowled well this
morning, and one of his best de-
liveries completely deceived Ray
Smith so that at the interval Essex
were 138 runs for 8 wickets and
were 154 runs ahead.

Within half an hour of the re-
sumption after lunch Essex were
all out for 169 runs which left
the West Indies with 24% hours in
which to score 186 runs for vic-

tory.
W.I. Batting
Stollmeyer and Rae opened the

their final

deft Stolimeyer
turn at the crease rain ended play.

e
Frenchman Wins
° . ie
Swimming Title
VIENNA, Aug. 25.
Alex Jany took another swim-
ming title to France today when he
won the Men's 400 metres free-
style event here in the European
championship meeting in 4 mins.
48 secs.
Preliminaries of the Men’s 100
metres back stroke and further

games in the water polo series
were also contested during the day.

the Women’s 400

Only Defeat

So the only game the W.I. have
lost against Middlesex so far is
the first one they played. This was
in 1923, as the County had no fix-
ture in 1900 nor 1906.

In this game the W.I. scored
264, after Middlesex had put up
337. A brilliant 94 by George
Challenor was the feature of the
ten-man innings as Tarilton had
taken ill during the game.

Then WI. fast oF

Results

the bowlers

West Indies innings and the form- ed the trio of Seanrts and Jour eamidkatared’ & mateee, relay “ere ae

er was soon hitting out so that 27 three f sure shock to the County by dismissing Termelen, and I. Schumacher, 4

runs came in 20 minutes. batsmen, with § them for 82. Francis took 6 for mins. 33.9 secs. 2nd, Denmark, 4
Then Preston caused an abrupt 117. It was 34, and John 4 for 35. Be eee p : .

mins. 43.1 secs. 3rd. Sweden, 4

glorious batting mitear ak, 7 eecs

hange of fortune by dismissin:
Stolle ° t and the County

Stollmeyer and Walcott = withia But the 156 runs required for

Tk Aid ‘ were Was defeated j victory proved too much for the r 7 ’

a icha Aimee -— eee ‘ei, DY. an. innings faews W.L., and they were all out for 85 , Men's 400 metres free style: Ist,

i cot catch by the wicket- 92d 228 runs to the bowling of Hearne 4 for 22, Alex Jany (France) 4 mins. 48

a ag ate y v - Apart from and Fowler sees; 2nd Jean Boaireux (France)
eeper who jumped to fine les these three 4 mins. 50.1 secs; 8rd, Heinz Leh-

position. Rae offered a chance at









; ;, the only other So to-day, Compton, Edrich, mann (Germany) 4 mins. 51.2
37 but Preston failed to accept it pateman to Robertson. Dewes and Simms will secs.
and the West Indies were then get i Céhe renew acquaintances with the W.1, Water Polo: Sweden 4, Yugo-
well behind the clock, tury for the Derek Sealy players and strive to get the best slavia 4, Holland 11, Austria 1,

Rae and Weekes however raced : of the meeting. France 7, Switzerland 3.

the score along until at 93 Bailey + —B.M. Reuter.
held a catch off Ray Smith to dis-
miss Rae and give Smith the dis- P. Smith ec Weekes » Gomez 18
tinction of being the first player Horsfall b Gomez Mw

Inosle 1.b.w. b Gomez . a |

PRIZE CROSSWORD

to compl>te the double of a hun- Vigar 1.b.w. b Ramadhin ll
dred wickets and a thousand runs Stanley stpd. Walcott b Ramadhin.. 25 (for Overseas Competitors only)
this searon Ray Smith b Gomez 1
Mis searon, Wade © Gomez b Ramadhin 19 ENTRANCE FEE. Single Entry 6¢
reston not out 5 N
Quick Scoring Extras 5 byes 2 leg byes : Additional Entries 3d. each °
Weekes joined by Christiani was Total “T69 £50 will be awarded for the correct or nearest correct solution

scoring well. Driving and pulling

crandiy ha reached 94 in 85 soln of this Crossword Puzzle In the case of a tre. the prize money,
ra y e -

SOWLENG -ANALVAES already deposited with our Bankers, will be divided Extra solutions

utes and was chiefly responsible 5... eee ae may be sent on plain paper Remittantes should be by Postal or Money
for putting the West Indies on level Gomez 39 4 67 ~«S Order. No stamps accepted
with the clock, Jones 7 3 9 0

With half an hour left for play, {ayjadhin epee aa og Across

the West Indies wanted 45 runs
to win and they got these with a
few minutes to spare.

1 Animal

WEST INDIES SECOND INNINGS
: 2 Sudden outburst

Rae c Bailey b Ray Smith 30

AP rears a . Stollmeyer b Preston . oe 5 Grow wear,

Christiani who was dropped by Walcott c Wade b Preston : 0 10 Exeationt 7
Ray Smith when only 2 completed Weekes not out 84 "W ething eatable
50 at a run-a—minute while Weekes Christiani not out | 5 2 aoe Mal pronoun
was batting freely. The unbroken eee TE PTO +5 3
fourth wicket stand put on 47 Total (for 3 wickets) ou
runs IVIE|S/S/E| | Down

; ‘ BOWLING ANALYSIS bd

EST RST INNINGS 218

vr ESSEX IST INNINGS .. 229 : a et ae 1 tt may frighten timid
ESSEX 2ND INNINGS peteg gree ee ag eople

Dodds run out 28 Sor ’ ; F. ;
Avery c Stollmeyer b Ramadhin 1g Ray Smith 16.2 Whaler 1 Z ne — cold

ail 1.b.w. Gomez 5 _— .
ei 6 Named

7 Small stain
:
Aeved 4 Pn Oe By Jimmy Hatlo 8 Navigators need the
right + + +
aT 9 He





Results will be sent direct
to every competitor, Promoters’ decision is final and legally binding
Entries must reach us by SEPTEMBER 30th Please post early tod

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| 1am over 2) years of age. | enclose PD, V0! st nmeememaneims
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| with @ scientifically prepared prescription | Tae GLARANTEED Remedy RHEUMATISM

Jamaica Port
Workers Strike

KINGSTON, Jamaica,

Aug. 24. |

Port workers of the Salt River, |
the main shipping port of the West |
Indig Sugar Co.,—Tate % Lyle— |
struck to-day against bulk loading
of sugar going to England. The!
new system reduces their earnings. ;
Negotiations are proceeding be-—
tween the company and a union |
representing the workers |

â„¢



SANTIAGO, CHILE,
Aug. 25.
Arturo Alesandri Palma, 82,
twice President of Chile. died of
a heart attack to-day. He was
the Senate at the
The news ot

President of
time of his death. ;
his death caused mourning
throughout the country. Alesan-
dri had been a leader in Chilean
politics for 50 years and continued
active to the end. —C.P.

PRESIDENT DIES |

What's On?

liello Everybody!

A Grand Dance

Will be given by
MISS ANN HOLDER
(Everybody's Friend)
At the
K.G.V.M. PARK EKALL St. Philip
ON
MONDAY NIGHT, 28th Aug., 1950
Admission
GENTS 2/- :; LADIES 1/6
Music by Perey Green’s Orchestra
b.AR SOLID — DON’T MISS IT!
A Bus will leave the Empire
Theatre at 9 p.m
26.8.50—In

TO-NIGHT

Mr. Seymour Archer
(Better known as Mime Dick
Driver of Electric Van)
Pespectfully invites You to His

|
DANCE

At CLUB WILLOW, Passage Road

Musie Supplied by ,
Mr. Percy Green's Orchestra
ADMISSION 2/-

REFRESHMENTS & BAR SOLID
25.8.50—In

DANCE
TO-NIGHT

CASUARENA CLUB

BERTIE HAYWARD’S
ORCHESTRA
Steaks & Snacks served
throughout The Night

26.8.50—1n.











DANCE
POSTPONEMENT

THIS serves to inform the |
General public that the
Dance which was to be held
by Mr. Elkins Griffith at
Club Royal, Silver Sands
has been postponed until
a later date.












26.8,50—1n. |



INVITFES
to the Dance to be held at
Atlantis Hotel to-night can






be assured that the manage-
ment is sparing no efforts to

give













them an



enjoyable

CALADIUM :
SHOW

WHITEHALL, St. PETER

Owing to rain

THE GARDENS 3);
will be further opened 5
MORNING and AFTER- "

NOON from August 26th
to September 2nd inclusive.
; 26.8.50—2n.



BARBADOS
AMATEUR BOXING

ASSOCIATION

Under the Distinguished
Patronage
His Excellency the Governor














announces
A Series of Thrilling Con-
tests on the night of - -





4th SEPTEMBER
at 8 o'clock

At the MODERN HIGH
SCHOOL STADIUM

Entire proceeds in aid of the |
Bay Street Boys’ Club









The Police Band will

Popular Prices:

play

| BAR & REFRESHMENTS |}





,
i



SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1950

A coffee hit!



mes ids










..-lt’s the improved
Chase and Sanborn!

Mere words can’t describe it. You’ll have to taste
it. Aad when you lift a cup of this new Chase and
Sanborn to your lips, you’ll exclaim with delight!
You'll agree with those who
call it, “the finest coffee
money can buy!*’ Get a can
today—vacuum- packed, from
vour grocer,



PURE IRISH
LINEN SUIT 4

qj
ij
SMART FIT AND
NEATLY TAILORED

$45.15

We also have

LINEN TROUSERS
in White and Wine

$10.96 pr.



SOPPPDPPPPOS OOS

FOR LADIES:
MEXICANS: FOR EVERY DAY WEAR

Black $5.25; White $4.95; Brown $4.00

SPORTIES in Brown, Flat Heels

with Leather Sole $5.30, with Crepe Sole $5.80

NEW DESIGNS IN DRESS SHOES

Black Suede Court; Snake Skin Platform $8.45
White Buck Court, Platform, Back and' Toeless $8.45

FOR SAFE SEA BATHING FOR CHILDREN
RUBBER SWIMMING RINGS & WINGS @ $1.30



x

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PAGE 1

SATURDAY. AUGUST *%. ltt BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE TllfiCt: Charlemagne 9 s Empire Basis Of European led. STRASBOURG. Aug. 25 Count Richard Coudei.huM.Kalergi, Secretary General of a European Parliamentary Union said here to-day that th* "Charlemagne group" of Germany, France, and Italy would probably be the Brat tep towards a real European faderation. "The present session of the Council of Europe has done a Eieat deal towards prep-.uiE the public mind for an authentic European federation" he told a Pre?.* Conference. "The Other countries of free Europe would be linked to them by more flexible arrjng. inents. "The states which formerly constituted Charlemagne'* Empire together with its African territories might soon become the land of liberty, of civilisation and unparalleled prosperity. "This Charlemagne union would not be set up as a third force but as a solid pillar of the Atluntir world "The Atlantic union would also allow our British friends to view sympathetically and confidently, the creation of another powerful union—the United States of Europe—which would, stand between It and the Soviet Union Replying to a question Count Coudenhove-Kalergi said a federated Europe should work with Britain -it possible, without her if necessary, but never against her —Heater. Z goodness me! Ynw surely don't blame me tor trying to mediate betuten oppadmi iamxtIZ U.S. Started Fighting He fort* U.N. Approved g) Irani race I used slogans of pearxto hld Oavifl Templeltol>.ris McCIoy Refuses To Sign Peace Appeal FRANKFURT. Aug. 26. For throughout the nations that support the Security Council's resolution there has been opportunity to think of the danger of the World War with which we are faced, and time to retract from foolhardy commitments. standing more firmly by essentials. In particular the tense efforts of the American divisions have prevented the Far Eastern War being earned a stage further by -in immediate junk-borne invasion of Formosa. If North Korean troops h*d "wept through the Refusing to put his signature to i peninsula driving the Americans the Communist inspired Stock-1 from Pusan about three weeks holm Peace Appeal. John J. ago according to their proMcCloy. American High Comgramme — then there would misMoner in Germany said here have occurred, by now. a wholeto-day that the only really aggreehearted attempt to gain Formoa i sive Instrument in the world for the Central People's Governis fully mobilised armed force ol. me nt of China. The United Russia and her satellites. He was) Slides navy was ordered to dereplying to a request for his. (end the island; opinion in Britsignature to the peace petition lain was uncertain; the United condemning the use of the atom (Nations would have been dragbomb, made by an Eastern German a,.,! jm,, a war n gld not wish. Youth Organisation. McCIoy deplored what h e called I Bul now % ^^ 'change In the basic hypocrisy of th,peacoj „,„,„„ has Mme tcvim3 xhc petition, and said he would be lWolW B y all available indicamore disposed to believe its exUoaa (here u ^^ a responsible org;in of opinion In the world, or a body of thinking political leaders, willing to advocate war on behalf of Chiang Kai-shek aicainst the Communist Government of China In fact, since General MocArthur's spectucu • i.r visit to Generalissimo and Madame Chiang's fortress there ha> been n remarkable change In opinion. Those, particularly in London among Conservatives. who. a few weeks ago were expressing the view that "war had begun" and theiefore had to be fought on all fronts with all available allies, have now fallen silent This does not mean, let it be math) I %  lear, that the policy advocated throughout the United States. Britain and Western European countries is to hand over Formosa to the Pekin/. Gov t ernment. and unmediaU'ly la seat that Government at the United Nations. Moderate opinion — and this includes such newspapers as the "Herald Tribune" In New York and the Sunday "Observer*' In London — a now inclined to delimit the war in the Far Boat, reeumiu Chiang from attacking the Chinese mainland — and gradually eliminate his influence, simultaneously deterring the Communist junks from setting out across the China Sen. Bul the promise is LONDON. Whatever happens next week in South Korea, the stern delaying action fought by U.S. forces on behalf of the UBftcd Nations will probably have given the world time i<> save itself from disaster. held out to the People's GovernBra ss e d Intention* if it condemned the armed might of the Communin world. He said the petition purposely does not cover aggression in other forms, presently being practised by Communist forces In KOTM —Renter. Rebel Seeks Refuge BRUSSELS. Aug. 24. Captain "Turko" Wester!ing who arrived here frojn Cairo to-day was told he could not stay in Belgium Westerling. wanted by the Indonesian Government, as a rebel WBB told he would be interned if I he stayed. He said he would leave Belgium later lo-day as he did not want to spend one day in a Belgian prison. Wester ling was formerly a Dutch Commando. He flew into Brussels and told reporters he was goiog to tour Europe. The bronzed S4-year-old leader of the "Army of the Heavenly Host" rebellion in Indonesia early this year had a seat booked for him on the afternoon plane for Amsterdam but said he did not want it He said he planned to stay In Brussels a week or so and then gc on a tour of Europe, visiting Italy especially. —Reuter. ment of China that once thKorean situation is settled an J aggnjualon rebuked them will be time to seat the %  ovrnuneut of China ut the United Nations and settle its claims on Formosa. Clearly Put Quotations from a leading article of the "Manchester Guardian*, just after Averill Harriman'M visit to General M.ic Arthur, put the view particularly eksarly: "Mr. 1^11-110*^: visit to General MacAr'hur mav he presumed to reflect the anxiety that the military strategists must not go too far. But the political problem cuts deep is not only that of avoiding war bul of preparing the conditions by which the Western countries, letter. Including the United States, can live at pence with Communist China ., . But It would seem that somehow or other the United Slate, must put herself 'ight with world opinion on Formosa Though lbs Man l was promised to "China," Lhcr.is something to be said— as an interim measure — for handing it ovr to Uie >ormosana to run as an autonomous State whose independence and demilitarisation would be euaninteed by the United Nations" TUtG AMBOL? fas The alarm In Western Burop.' hj not contlned to such newspapers as the "Manchester Guardian" which has. for months, put its hopes of settlement in the F<-r Bast in the hand* of Pandl: Nehru and the chance of a linn friendship between the countries of the Indian sub-continent and China Not Satisfactory Sir John Pratt, who w* British Consul General in fnkgagj and subsequently adviser to tho Foreign Office on Far East question*, wrote to the Times*: — "For some 18 months Chiang Kai-shek and his fnendi have been blockading the coast or China and bombing Shanghai, a ity <>f 0 million inhabitants. They have been supplied with money by America. Therefore the United Nations havr kept silent. But when the North Koreans invade South Korea we are told that it li our duty under the Charter to line up with America to resist aggression legalistic arguments are %  gaggjonssj to kogfl K"imoSa and Korea in separate dossiers, but even If. legally, thr Amnii.". casewere watertight (wMeh it Is not) that would not be a vory satisfactory basis on which to embark on a world W.H" Sir John i'mtl concludes lu> hich opened with ally accepted favourable of Mao Tse Tung's internal policies), by declaring that 11 we enter a world war while America still Insists on Chiang as representative of China then we will be lighting with one hand lied behind our backs The French newspaper "l*e Monde", which often speaks for the French Foreign Ministry emphasises that what the Ruasisns most want is Western antagonism towards Communist China, leading to a disastrous war. As that newspaper puts it. "If the iunks of Mac try to seize Funnosa they will be met l>v the cruise rs of Mar Arthur. and America will find herself at war with China. Whether sh. wonts i' or not Uie Far East will become her first task and Europa. become second. Then Moscow will have virtually won her victory 111 Uie Third World War. She will only need to wait until tM fruit -no ripe." Warnings These sombre warnings have appeared since General MacAithui went on bis jaunt to Formosa to iphotogiaplicd with tin Generalissimo, and kissing the hand ol Madame. It Is difficult .to predict what effect on American policy the change in wcll-lnformed opinion will have Then al still political danger lor President Truman in flying against the gale of American sentiment that war has begun" and Communit* are the same the world over. P.ut Prusldent Truman Is an unorthodox man. Even in election year he car. be expected to act boldly where* he finds it necessary --even it ha has to withstand an onslaught of abuse. If he saves the peace ho can still claim electoral advantages But I doubt whether ba can recall General MacAithui or indeed whether that would Help the morale ol Allan h all troop* engaged in UM holding operation in Korea Policy Changes There have been change* m the manner of American policy The General in Tofeio can W longer pledge DUUtarj to Chiang. Chiang han now been instructed not lo repeal warlike operations against China and China-bound shipping When United Stales forces reverse their direction and begin an advance northwards in Korea the United Suites will acquiesce 111 — but not Initiate .1 pages) ssgtla* Hunt invoUm,; United Nation.trusteeship in all Korea, and In ronposa usOn lotarun autonomous Government (mtci nationally protected'. It won! 1 b e simultaneously innounced once more, that the Untied Stales does not oppose the unseating of the Chiang delegate the Security Council i that were voted by a majority of the Count .1 i'.i".i' :< ; blllty falls on the six non-pel inaniut members of u>. lei ara Council. This forecast is based on two Suppositions The first 1tbal the So wet Union does not. u.mi the Korean war extended to a World War. Mr Malik's urlla tine behaviour. bul actuid presence, at the Seeuritv Council points that way And lovM diplonuiu. have been very care ful to rebutt all attempts to pi" direct intervention in Kore OT the Red Army On Ihe other side: II has no 1 escaped the notice of Waslungtoi. pi licy chiefs that North Kore;. extends to a point very close t the Soviet base st Vfsdlvostok I-ong before United States force have time to advance as tar M that the Red Army would fa i^H.G.J. Moseky whose brilliantly promising tureer came to a tragic tna m the Gallipoli btadics whiti he was <*nbf if, will shrays be remembered for hit Jitcovery that the atomic nucleus hai an electrical charge the size of which is characterinic discovery has been of the greatest importance in the subseauent development of atomic physics. The son of a distinguished zoologist, Moseley was bom at\V\-ymouth, Dorset, in i$$y. After a brilliant career at Eton and Trinity Cttttgt, Oxjora 1 he became a lecturer in physics at Mancluster University, lie resigned this appointment two years later, when he was elected to tliejohn I farting fellowship. His labours were interrupted by the outbreak ofwar in 1014, but not be fort he had ai u ivcseniaUve objected 1 read to the Oounafl ne Aaaavtcaa "tsgemont at\ Formosa. Tht Weather TO-DAV 8nn Id-'5.30 a.m. 8un Sets: 6.22 pjn. Mean (Full Mitn Augaol S7. m. 3.40 Hllh Water: g.sn. Kalafall: .2' Inrhea VIIHTr.KliAV Temperatarr (Max>: M.S Temperalare (Mini: TM Wind Velaellv H gafjgl hgsjn Wind IMreeSh-n: S pm. E.8E Barometer: 3 p.m. 19*30. Tatol Rainfall 7.20 Indira. Earlier Malik MCOUB idenl — said protests against Uiute.1 Mattl afgressiim la Korea" had baao BewtBg Into United MaBlHie headtiuarteni from religious, student groups throughout the esorld, •* well as from private individuals % %  the Sea decutred, to Boneldei th "wtahes Of the broad nuiss of peopleo "I the world." Malik instriiucd the lowlalsnt Secretary General to read Into! %  Chinese CommuniKUt Foreign M i nis ter rhou fjn Ah 1 etloll III KMIIII....... :; I'IV I11 KNinst C'hma Malik declared "we h.. he statement of lxth paities t.. %  onflict Chines.Natioiu.l.-t ucli"galo n,.u replied amphaUeauj "There has been no United Stale* g K res>ion against Taiwan (FormosjeJ**, The Council then until Hondas According to rule*, Monday's session will be i""1 -to CUIUlde 1 b > mc Council on Its activities for the eoi ending last month. —Reuter. St IHHH. WKAR At t KSSORIKS PANAMA HATS HOYS (APS HOYS' 4 OtRLV SHOES BOYS SHIRTS. Navy. Brown A White l.men SOCKS A COTTON PANTIES. SI'K IAI. UMtCCTION ON HANDALH Stars:——10 $1.80 per pslr: 11 g 12 *?.0 per pair 1—a --%  per pair. mto\nw V. IMIISS SI.JMV DUTCH FORCES FOR KOREA SAN nUNCUH . Aug. 2*. Holland ha deci !,000 InEanUymi n 1 K [ Boudre/. head < the Netln rlau i' 1 Tile ex.1 ungent arould %  detonnlned by : I %  M-Ul.ll.-'I '; .liliTi as tramed Lo ine united will also be clerical 1 t 1 Kruter. taking up defensive po inside Korea — to greet them. Then the last situation BW ll be Car worse than the first. Weshiiifiton bl surely, to now. seeking an end to the K< rt war that dl^••ourages luiure %  SgnasJone, yel avoids an Am can military advance thsl would be directly threatening legitimate Soviet Interests. Heart Trouble Caused by High Blood Pressure FASTER SERVICE TO BY B.OA.C. CONSTELLATION IN CONJUNCTION WITH B.W.I.A. %  need! %  fount leenlai fifty ••(> cuiitlanats %  •<..ii< jiurays ar t f f I MII lung. to N all six that few He tree Hint rrfl.-cis B.t) A.C't Ill-Tsarold tradltiun uf H t >MdliiTd Bar %  ..> % %  .iperieii' 0T THERE SOONER 1 HTAT THERE LONOBEI rri I Il4.ll.l; Klviag In riigiii. 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