Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text






Friday

August 25

19350

=



BOMBERS REPE

ee

Lord | Bishop Of |

B'dos Resigns

"THE BISHOP OF BARBADOS has tendered his

resignation from the See of Barbados to His
Excellency the Governor-in-Executive Committee
and to the Archbishop of the West Indies, to take
effect not later than February 22nd. next.

; In 1944 notice of Legislation to disestablish the Church
in Barbados was given. It was the possibility of such Leg-

islation passing into law and

the consequent changes which

such an enactment would involve for the Church, which
alone induced him to accept nomination for election as

Bishop, in succession to Dr. Bentley.

For various reasons

the proposed legislation was not carried into effect.

BISHOP HUGHES

a —

B.G.ReadyFor
$10m. Rice |
Corporation

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Aug. 24,

After four weeks debate the
Legislature on Wednesday evening
passed the controversial rice mar-
keting amendment ordinance
which cleared way fdr creation of
a $10,000,000 rice devélopment
corporation with the British Gui-
ana’ Government © and Coloni#il
Development Corporation as part-
ners,

At the outset Clause 7 of the
Bill was severely attacked by the
majority of unofficial members
who asserted that the Clause was
discriminatory as it excluded the
proposed corporation from control
by the Rice Marketing Board.

During the debate last week the
Governor adjourned the Council
and held an in camera conference
with unofficial members, following
which the clause was amended to
the satisfaction of all but two, the

@ on page 7

Alf’s Mother
Wants Him To!
Go To India

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jca., Aug. 24.

Alfred Valentine’s mother yes-
terday cabled the left hand spin
bowler in England advising him to
accept the invitation to tour India
with the Commonwealth team
She said her decision came after
consideration of the educational
advantage of the tour and the fact
he would benefit from the added
cricket experience, and also as
Ramadhin already accepted the in-
vitation, she does not want
him to break the Valentine-Ram—
adhin combination whicf in her
opinion means a great deal to the
West Indies,

She was sure Valentine would
do just as she wishes. Prior to
the cable Valentine had turned
down the invitation, saying he
preferred the educational schol-
arship offered to him by the Ja-
maica sporting public,









THE FINAL TEST AT THE

The Bishop has found it in-
creasingly difficult during the last
five years, to work under the pre-
sent system, as prescribed by the
Anglican Church Act. The Church
does not manage its own affairs
through the Synod as it ought.

The distribution of available
manpower is prescribed by the
Act and is out of keeping with pre-
sent needs, The Lay Representa-
tion in Synod does not really re-
present the members of the Church
who have no voice in the appoint-
ment of representatives The
Synod has no power to enact
Canons for the Government of the
Church, and the method of ap-

pointment to benefices is unsatis- |

factory.
_ The Bishop no longer feels
justified in trying to work a sys-

tem which he believes inimical |

to the best interests of the

Church, and the rejection of his

nominee by the

Board for the Parish of St. John

has convinced him that he must

resign.

The Rt, Rev. William James
Hughes, M.L.C,. was educated at
the College of Resurrection, Mir-
field, University of Leeds. He was
Vicar of St. Benedict, Bordesley
1927-30. From 1930-44 he was Rec-
tor of St. George’s Cathedral,
Georgetown, He wos, Sub-Dean
from 1930-37 and De "from 1937-

|44. He was Bishop ofBritish Hon-

duras during 1944-45. He is author
of a publication in 1947 called
THINK AGAIN.



Planes Supply
Flood Victims

ASSAM, Aug. 24.

m Indian coat es aircraft to-
jay uted . em feod
sup io vittins vast floods

Sweeping north eastern Assam
aiter earthquakes which blocked
and diverted rain swollen rivers

in the Ganges—Brahmaputra
basin last week.
Reportd to-day buggested

that the death rate from disease
was high among 5,000,000 ma-
rooned people. Reuter Correspond-
ent who flew over 1000 square
miles of flooded land said the

Appointments |

;

|
|



HOUSE FULL









ee

AT THE OVAL

®

: 5 = . , Bewce
“Ground Full” at the Oval for the final Test match between England and the West Indies,

and here



Germany
Decides Fate
Of Europe

STUTTGART, Aug. 24.
The fate of Europe will be de-

stench of dead cattle, fish and|¢:ded in Germany Franz Bluecher,

wild animals forced his aircraft
to climb higher on many occa-
‘sions. He saw human corpses
floating with elephant carcases in
floodwaters.

Deadly snakes were attacking
homeless peasants as they tried
to escape rising floodwaters, and
50 had died from snake bite.

Assam’s Chief Minister Bishnu
Ram Medshi said earthquakes
had destroyed the homes of
500,000 people —Reuter.



Gun Controlled
By Rad ia

WASHINGTON, Aug. 24.

Recent Intelligence reports re-
ceived here indicated that the
Russians have perfected a radio-
controlled machine gun, according
to usually reliable sources.

The gun can be set up in a
small well protected nest, and then
be fired either by direct electrical
connections or radio, by men hun-
dreds of yards away.

These sources said this meant
that one normal machine gun
crew could handle dozens of such
guns while hiding in comparative
safety.

—Reuter.

|





Vice Chancellor .and leader of
West Germany’s Free Democratic
Party said at the opening here to-
day of the fourth World Liberal
Congress.

The world must allow Germany
to build up her economy, her be-
lief in herself and in others, and
get rid of the sense of isolation
which was such a_ dangerous
psychological factor Bluecher said.
He was addressing delegates from
25 nations gathered in Stuttgart’s
festivity decorated casino. The
necessity of the day is not to look
at collectivism and Communism
gathering strength, as a_ bird
watches a snake waiting for it to
strike. We must attack, We must
not base our hope in defence,
mentality. This has been the curse
of the world ever since 1945.

—Reuter.

TWO AIRMEN KILLED

VICTORVILLE, Air Force
Base, California. Aug. 24.

Two United States airmen were
killed and one seriously injured
when two B26 Army Invader
Bombers collided and crashed last
night on a desert near here. A
fourth was reported missing. —

The aircraft on a routine night
training flight exploded when they
hit the ground.



—Reuter.



OVAL



Part of the West Indian contingent in

hit by the West Indian
Test.—Central Press,

tear giving

vent

is a portion of the vast crowd

ee

| $3,000,000 Released



in the very primitive and |! ject which may assist in solving On Arms Aid
impulsive effort to prove its | Jamaican unemployment’,
nature. | “American investors are aiready WASHINGTON, Aug. 24
It was oil, all right | interested,” added Mr. Gore. “But The House Appropriations
But he had to be rushed they are asking to get a concession] Gommittee ‘o-day passed a War
to a nearby hospital so that to operate a gambling casino. And Emergency Bill providing $16,-
burns sustained in the face I might form a syndicate myself.| 771 084,479 for the expansion of
and hands could be treated. thave been sort of promised per-} America’s armed might and _- for
He was allowed to go mission to build a casino by the|the ‘arming of friendly nations.
home.—LN.S. | Government of Jamaica. But! ‘The bill included 4,000 million
| Governor Huggins ha: always re-| dollars for arms aid to foreign
| fused and the Governor has the| countries
y 4e “ | overruling vote But Gor ernor It provides cash for 5,333 new
Editor Arrested | Huggins is leaving on September warplanes and other equipment
19; then I am going to Jamaica to|for this country’s growing war
* i if ataQ see wha "a Jo. machine. In sending the bili to
For High Pre ason | se ve 1598.6 the House floor the Cc fae
ATHENS, August 24. wrote this sharp criticism of the
Dionysios Chrystakos, left-wing | 200 CHILDREN JOIN i ves oe peeenee Pr ran oeem
Member of the Greek Parliament Events of recent week have
was arrested today and commit EMIGRANT. PARENTS linede ‘ crystal clear Haed mill
tec for tria] before the Military “ jtury planning end hinking ir
Court on charges of high treason , ROME, August 24 «4, {key positions is not as clear and
He is the editor of the Left-Wihg More than 200 Italian children | gee rete,as it should be, Fut it i
daily “newspaper Deme-ration | efi Genoa today aboard the) aot the ‘purpose of the Commit
i which is accused of spreading | Steamer Sante Fe to ,oin ¢ nigrant | tee at this time to critic past
| unrest and attempting to diminish | Parents .in Argentina, Theic | errors
public confidence in the armed | Parents who emigrated from The bills total is ©81,400,119 less
jorce Maly during the past year left the than the amount President Tru-
As Parliament is adjourned,| children behind unti' they had’ man requested. Reductions have
Greek deputies are deprived of) cstabli hed homes in Arvzentina. | cen made in military items



which, saw the W.[; beat England,
—Central Press

ti nn ne

For Jamaican
Tourist City

GAMBLING CASINO IN THE AIR

(Our London Correspondent)
LONDON, Aug. 24.

A GAMBLING CASINO will probably be the mainstay
of the Tourist City project for which Mr. James Gore,
wealthy Jamaican industrialist, has received promise of
release by the British Government of £3,000,000 blocked
sterling.

Talking to our correspondent in New York last night,
Mr. Gore said “The Colonial Office is releasing funds and
I will build chalets and bungalows on 25,000 acres of Jamai-
can Government land which I have leased for 99 years.

“Two years ago when I acquired
|i Britain would not grant funds.
“This time I spent three months
in London and now I have a Colo-
nial Office letter dated August 14,
signed by H. S. Heinmann.
| “It says ‘I am asked by Secre-
tary Griffiths . it is decided
jour application for the release of
|; blocked sterling securities be
| granted the decision is
| taken in view of a desire of H.M
Government to encourage a pro-

IT WAS OIL

MANILA

A central Luzon ou pros-
pector, in his own backyard,
struck up what he supposed
was the real McCo)

He proceeded to voila
his discovery by siriking a
match against the element,













their immunity.—Reuter. ;

World
Tons More Sugar



Man, Sugar Brokers, question

LONDON whether it will be possible for

Next year the world is expected the price level of to-day to be
to produce two an li maintained







{tons more sugar in 195¢ It is pointed out that Cuba in
reaching a total of ¢ 000 ton spite of many adverse circum-
stances is expected to have a crop
Thi considerat e tl of nearly five and a half million

t any other t ‘ r tor r



Aduorate_:

RE

—Reuter, |

Expects 2% Million

Price:

FIVE CENTS

ADVA

Year 35

NCE



North Koreans Prepare

Mass Attack On

Reds Must Win
By Sept. 15 |
|

Naktong River.

Or Never

Says U.S. GENERAL

By ROY MACARTNEY

TAEGU, Aug. 24
Major General Hobart R, Gay
faid here today that unless the
enemy makes good by September
15, he will be finished. We shall

je too strong for him
General Gay the Late
Patters Chief of Staff in
War 2 and now
the first Cavalry Division said he
telieved there were at presetit

500 American tanks in Korea,





George
World
Commander of

any time



I guess there are not more
han a few dozen enemy tanks ruman
!opposite my forces in position
Polong the Naktong River around
Yaegu he added \ jpposes Loan
| Asked whether Communists
could launch an offensive capable i »
f pushing United Nations forces Oo pain
nto the sea, General Gay said
that it is probably t late now WASHINGTON, Aug. 24.
Of tour Communist Divisions ( President Truman expressed or
;supposed to have been opposite}! °s!4on again to-day to Senate
his cavalry in the Teegu area on in recently approving |&
last week, Generi! Gay doubted} |9%,000,000 loan to Spain. He told



Whether any but the North} ‘8 weekly Press Conference he
Korean Second Division had more| ‘4 not like it. Both he and Sec-
than 50 per cent of its strength etary of State Dean Acheson

—Reuter imy expressed opposition to any

We Are Back
Where We
Started

—SAYS NEHRU

NEW DELHI, Aug. 24

Indian Prime Minister Pandi
Nehru said here to-day that with |
the failure of the United Nations
Mediator Sir Owen Dixon's mis-
sien on the Kashmir dispute
gO back to where
from.”

Nehru told a Press Conference
that it was because the Security
Council did not answer the ques-
tion who was the aggressor in

oan to Spain which was made
utside normal machinery.

Both said that Spain could apply

1 the usual manner to the bank
tor a loan This would mean

ivestigation of Spain's credit.

If the action of the Senate was
confirmed by the House of Repre-
sentatives and not voted by the
President, the United States
Government would be obliged to
make this loan to Spain without
nvestigating Spain's economic sit-
uation.

—Reuter,

Red Morale
Has Declined.

TOKYO, Aug. 24,



‘we |

we = started

r : a Cautious optimism over the

Segal that ‘the trouble had |i ocean war was expressed here to-

Nehru described as Alice }4#Y by Admiral Forrest P. Sher-
' 2 SSSCribad as. an eC iman, chief of the United States
in Wonderland Business" both naval operations and General J
Mediator Sir Owen Dixon’s|Lawton Collins, Chief of Staff of
vague proposal” for replacing|the United States Army, on their
Kashmir’s State Government by|return from a front line visit to
a United Nations Authority du-|Korea
ring a_ limited plebiscite and Sherman at a press conference
Pakistan Prime Minister Liaquat|said a “remarkably fine job” had
Ali Khan’s attempt to blame|been done under difficult cireum~-
India for the failure of mediation | stances. The fact that the United
talks cen ee oe ~. et ae re-

> rhethor . . mainec where 1 wes or some

ore ey Paulas tee te. bn time and that offensive strikes by
: ee ‘ United Nations forces had been
ure of Dixon's talks the Prime possible at all “speaks for itself,”
Minister replied “I put the blame), caja ' ; ener
a hundred per cent on Pakistan ¢ —Reuter.
for the whole Kashmir trouble.” |
The Prime Minister said that while], SS





there had been no demarche from
Delhi to Peking regarding Tibet
“it is perfectly true that we have

fmformally pointed out to the
Chinese Government, the de-
sirability of settling the ques-
tion peacefully, I have every
hope it may be settled peace-
fully.”

It was conceivable, Nehru said,
that prelimina.” talk might
take place in New Delhi between
representatives of the Chinese
Government and, the ‘Tibetan
delegation.—Reuter.










America Will Spend
$16,771,084,479





—Reuter.



In 1951

hoarded between one and one anc
a half million tons this year, it
cannot be expected that a repeat
will take place in 1951

Already prices in New York f
next year are quoted
siderable discount, but conclude

the circular “one must

shWines
D Maintain the
same Hi

Standard of
Quality as
shipped to

These

& SHERRY

You can enjoy
them again
greater

Taegu ©

KOREA, Aug. 24.

“[}OUCHING down only long enough to reload and

refuel, bombers used as tactical artillery shot
up North Korean forces today, cf

nist efforts to mount a new off

ive across the

Light bombers and fighters concentrated on the
two most critical fronts — west of Masan on the
south, coast approaches to MacArthur's vital port
of Pusan, supply harbour, and the Waegwan-Kunwi
sector where communist forces were reported mass-
ing for a new major assault on Taegu.

Late frontline despatches said that the battle area had
been ominously quiet fer 36 hours but a new Communist
attempt to overrun Taegu and an attempt to push south
over the all weather highway to Pusan, was expected at

Night assaults on the American
Defence Line west of Masan on
the south coast were beaten off
without loss of ground, but there
too Communists were reported
gathering strength for an at-
tempted breakthrough.

Prisoners report that some
North Korean forces massed on
the South coast—depending like
locusts on what they gain as they
move—have had nothing to eat
for four days,

Driven as much by hunger as
by orders and still superior in
numbers and = firearms, North
Koreans were expected by ob-
servers here to be able to mass
for a decisive new offensive.

Jet fighters early flew off for
rocket and machinegun attacks
on North Korean troops massed
west of Masan,

Eighth Army Headquarters
said American troops entrenched
behind barbed wire on hills be-
tween the Communists and Mac-
Arthur's supply harbour, Pusan,
beat off a small attack at dawn.

Ominous Quiet
Forward of their ridge posi+
tions, patrols probed up to 2
miles but reported no contact

with the main body of Communist
forces, For 24 hours’ there has
been an ominous quiet—first
quiet in several weeks,” an Eighth
Army spokesman sald.

Around Taegu where the main
Communist force appears to be
concentrated for a pincers assault
ecross the Naktong only smail
hagassing attacks on South Ko-
rean forces were reported during
the night.

In a shatp short battle yester-
day a battalion of the American
27th “Wolfhound” Regiment
cleared out a roving pocket of
Communists who had been at-
tacking American gun positions
about four miles behind the
lines

Today Americans dug in on a
ridge flanking the Taegu-Kunwi

highway preparing with strong
armour support and self - pro-
pelled guns to meet the new
offensive.

American patrols last night re-
ported 600 North Korean troops
with some armour grouped on the

@ on page 7




include

in
quantity
®

GAMUNER AUSTIN & Co., Ltd.

Ageuts

Commu... \



PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1956





a









| NER SSS ESSE ne SE SDAA SEE
AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEES: TO-DAY & TO-MORROW at 5 p.m.
TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30

KOBERT HUTTON — JOYCE REYNOLDS — JANIS PAIGE

AND LONG EARRINGS

LF



SHORT HAIR

a"

BBCRadioProgramme

PRIDAY August 25, 1950

7 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; 7.16 a.m. The African Queen:
7.20 a.m. The Technique of Communist





Carub (Calling

PREMIER WATCHES

Wins Oxford Scholarship

M®. MICHAEL wrict, oer een, tara Pontes Oe

~phew of Mrs. C. A. L. a.m. Serenade; 9 a.m. Close Down; 12 : e
Dan EE sooty wets oe fan He Nee: WP on gen aw in * WALLFLOWER
Se eRe Sie . a ysis; 12 p.m ew Records: m
arship from Cranley Scheol to Short Story; 1.16 p.m. Radio Newsreel; :

Oxford University. However 1.29 p i Here’s Howard; 2 p.m. The with EDWARD ARNOLD

News; 2.10 p.m, Home News from Bri-
tain; 2.15 p.m. Sports Peview: 2.39 pan
Edimburgh international Fes ; 3.20
p.m. Interiude; 3.30 p.m torr, 4
p.m. The News; 4.10. p.m e diy
Service; 4.15 p.m. Nights at the Opéra;
5 p.m. Sandy MacPherson at the Theatre

Michael will not be going up to
Oxford for two years Owing to
the faet that he is going into the
Army under the National Servite
scheme,

Bros Picture

A Warner



Organ; $.15 p.m. Programme Parade |) SaaS



Pulsating 5.30 p.m. Scottish Magazine; 6 p.m. Th2 {
Afri ; 6.45» Mi on
RS. S. @. FLETCHER, Editor ey Ee A ot
of the “Gleaner”, now in Communist Interrogation; f p.m, e
England, hopes to return to News; 7.10 Pe Sees, Amalves fie
Jamaica, within a Week. Com- anc OPENING TO-DAY 230 AND 8.30
menting on the politieal situation ~

Story; 8.30 p.m. Ian Stewart;
From the
jews;



in Jamaica, Mr. teher smilingly
said—“Jamaica is pulsating at the
moment.”

I also have news this week of a
tormer “Gleaner” man Ambrose
G. Williams of Jamaica. He re-
cently sat for his Association
Correctors of the Press Examina-
tion and is how waiting for the
results, In the meantime he is
working at H.M. Stationery Office
in Aldwych, just off Fleet Street.

the Editorials; 9 p.m.
ade Concerts; 10 p.m. The
p.m. Interlude; 10,15 p.m, ffney Post
Office; 10.45 p.m, World Affairs: 2 p.m.
Johnny Miner.

and continuing at Mat. and Night Shows Daily
“ . ape

ST MN OR I BENS MEARS: DO Mh

stem et yop



SKELETON
CRISSY! ORD

—7.% p.m
Easex; 7.30—7,45 p.m. To be announced;
& p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. Short



The 1950 version of the ninetcon-twenties look,

at’s Cricket hair and long, lon . Short, short
Th ke 5 S earings and cigarctte holder. The ult i
HERE'S ao knowing the cigarette holder is of gold, carved Tike a delete hastttho =

lengths to which West Indians
will go to satisfy their passion for
ericket! One who travelled from
Grenada to London for a surgical
operation postponed his appear-
ance at the surgeon's table because
of his avidity to see the fourth

Londo@t «

th

PS

1ck-room Boy—54

ARRAS



:
5
‘
(

Rupert and
A \ | PM

Prime Minister of England—-Mr, Attlee watches the final



Test match at the Oval when the W.I. won over England. Test match at the Oval. He is oo
—Central Press. Captain Earle Hughes, visiting nnn
TR GEORGE SEEL, K.C.MG., London for the first time in 35 re a
Head of C.D. and W. left Barrister Returns ron — ott ee. = stereme
Barbados on Wednesday afternoon R. G. BENNETT NILES who {© Wit now wi as ra- JOH N WAYNE és Le ay
by B.W.LA. for St. Lucia, He is with the Labour Depart. ‘!- ADELE MARA + FORREST TUCKER

leaves there for Trinidad to-mor-
row, and will be returning to Bar-
bados on Sunday afternoon, He is
on a routine visit to these two

ment here and a Barrister-at-Law
arrived in 3arbados yesterday
from the U.K. via Trinidad.

Mr. Niles has been in England

CLUES ACROSS
2. Both car and ova. tur him
- Fellow in paie colours.
- Almost fit? hey may make

Returned Yesterday Se JOHN AGAR

FTER a short holiday in Bar-
bados, Mrs. Kathleen Sill

A REPUBLIC PICTURE

Sapa eae ke ne rR rR

with WALLY CASSELL * JASIES DROWN + RICHANG WEES» AATIVE FRANZ
JOLIE BISHOP + JAMES HOLDEN * PETER GOE » RICHARD JALOSEL

Saptnggtntes EIDE RE <1 VES er




‘he 2 ‘

1, aye *










2
7
9
- one complete! >
islands. for twenty months studying for his 2nd her son Hugh returned to Just as Podgy comes breathlessly 10. Cork, for example ? Screen Play by Harry Srown—James Edward Grent Story by terry Lrown - Directo by Alan Deen
Never Seen a Cricket Bar finals and he was called to the eek ay afternoon by to join ‘high Maver Woks ‘upereistel 13. Many intend to do an ins ty; Associate Producer —< ‘ound Gesinirar
Bar on 21st of June. WALA. « . 2 Goat appears. “So it's you!” " ‘ , an is nt :
Match o 4 I do believe tha: voice comes from ae super. “Why could you 1g Bauare metres. Alao British Movéebous Mees
N HOLIDAY at the Windsor By Sea And Air Back From Conference ae beanenes.”” te MUNCHSs have come down instead of call. 15 ‘Ga, no strong drink tor K ; ss s 5
Hotel are MY. and Mrs. Ken- R. AND MRS. JOHN PARKER HE Barbadian school teachers ‘ at sat hiaie aaa it's = ns ms up >" pyri ae 16 Apparently a Bob is tov mucn orea—Security Council’s historic meeting
a i ; Mobs sticky aut f irayrue’s up here ; s or is s s de
ye “oe “== cone eob deft Barbados yesterday. who left for B.G. two weeks Do: RET Ae dint eenk TES ily. Rocke ME SRR onal sharpener mee Anglo-American Universities Athletic Contests
Bobby and Barbara, Americans Mr. Parker by Alcoa Ship to ago to attend the Conference of clink: ae ae MB Lt os be oi Toy ein. Reais ly. Name of a film actress in at White City
living in Venezuela, Mr. Pearce is Triniylad and Mrs. Parker by the Caribbean Union of Teachers, he pang. Wy an Seueie Bt the womens) :
with _ Caribbean Petroleum and B.W.I.A. to Georgetown. Mr. rcturned home yesterday after- : 21. Acknowledge fully we have to Bluebird ready to try again
1 for several years : ) y
hag been living, for s veri, Parker is with the Pure Cane noon by B.W.I.A. admit.

in Venezuela. They arrived 22. Contract. in one sense







Trinidad by B.W.1.A. on Tuesday
afternoon.

Never having seen a cricket After Two Weeks ISS FAY ROBERTS of OPENING DAY and CONTINUING CLUES DOWN J
match, the Pearces hope to go Grenada has not regretted TO- Boos. : 1. Wherein. those used
down to Kensington Oval on Sat- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Proudly Presents : tes tere eS be toon, | R Oo xX VY

urday to see what it’s all about.

Molasses Co., and will fly to B.G
from Trinidad over the week-end

R. AND mkS. D. J. SANDER-

No Regrets

choosing Barbados as the place to
spend her first holiday away from













Lovable and IRRESISTABLE ESTHER WILLIAMS

7 IN Ls
SE ests
above
him, and the worried face of Billy

23. Word we get from children to-
lay.
24. Eloquence, or a political party

























































rw sutnn 3 3. Alice's alias ?
This is their first visit to Barba- 4) | econ gp Re gg os home. She arrived here twe aN . Indulge in some : 24." TO-DAY TO SUNDAY 4.30 AND 8.15
arn rere i . B weenie ; i‘ ey’ 7 :
dos. Two years ago they were in (ew by T.C.A. for Van. Weeks ago and is staying with : ona of ‘the hewbices ne Republic Double . . .
Tobago, but find Barbados very iN - Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sebright at NEPTUN °*§ DAUGHTER 6. It’s murder!
much nicer. couver, British Columbia after “Merrington”, Rockley E 8. Suitable participant in insect se BLACKM se
When Carib saw them in spending two weeks’ holiday. Mr. “No doubt it was her sister 9. pe ( ‘ AML
Bridgetown yesterday, young Bob- Sanders is a City official at Yv » wh eco ended Bar- am a azy a en 10. His zeal. | t wees ot re. ida
by Was hunting for some golf balls. Vancouver. sede tO het, an che Rar teanteeen 11; Screen with a red centie, Starring: William MARSHALL—Adele MARA
Guests Of King’s Nephew here before on holiday. Yvonne queue, ef Shilling
R. and Mrs. Bob King. have Son Remaining To Learn ;, at present holidaying in PLAZA FRI. 5 & 8.90 P.M, 17. Just, abot properis trained vo and
returned to London from English Martinique. Fay expects to re- MONOGRAM'S EXCITING NEW BOXING THRILLER ! 18. But doe» the mode! find it =
turn to Grenada on Monday.

Holiday Over

difficu't ?

\
SOLUTION

Leo GORCEY and the BOWERY BOYS in —
“FIGHTING FOOLS”

SAT. & SUN. (Only) 5 & 8.30 P.M. MONOGRAM'S DOUBLE !
Jimmie DAVIS in LOUISIANA (Musical)
and Johnny MACK BROWN in “SIX GUN GOSPEL”

Paris where they have been on a
short holiday as guests of the Hon. |
Gerald Lascelles, nephew of the

R. FREDERIC PAYEN,
Director of “Credit Quade-
King. Bus loupeen” Bank in Basseterre R. and Mrs. “Ronnie” Black
- arrived from Guadeloupe yester- who have been holidaying
Touring W.I. day afternoon by B.W.1I.A. with in Barbados for the past few
. THOMAS BLACKSTOCK. his gon Eric. weeks with at SDBSrOO. Boe o
i to. return to Trinidad to-day. Mr.
my seapal bettie be eronto arrived Mr. Payen will be returning to Black is on a sugar estate in South
! from Trinidad yesterday by Guadeloupe on Sunday, but Eric ‘Trinidad; Mrs. Black is a niece of
B-W.LA. for a very brief visit, He #8 "emaining in Barbados for Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Knight with
is on.a familiarisation tour of the ®P0Ut six months to learn Kaglisn. whom they have been staying at
West ‘Indies and has.already vis- Ss Visi “Mervue”, Marine Gardens.
ited Jamaica and Trinidad, He ex- econd Visit
pects to leave here to-morrow for
Bermuda by T.C.A. ISS MARY WEDDERBURN
Besides touring the island he who returned to Venezuela
also plans to visit all of the hotels. yesterday morning by B.W.1.A, is
He is a guest at the Marine Hotel btu ee Petroleum in erning Director of Bottlers Ltd., in
. ~aracas anc us @ her seconc Trinidad.
On Short Holiday Phi to ee She wfis here He a come up to make the
5 or two weeks staying at the g,, ad
ERE until Monday for a short Windsor Hotel. Mary. who is from ps mcr: gays ter Fn a pees
holiday are Mr. and Mrs. England has been in Venezuela for \\i1) be manufactured and bottled

with William ELLIOTT—Bobby BLAKE

ROYAL

TO-DAY ONLY 4.30 AND 8.30
Republic Whole Serial .. .

<*G=eMEN NEVER FORGET”
with Clayton MOORE—Roy BANCROFT
















Here For a Few Days
RRIVING from Trinidad yes-
terday morning by B.W.LA.

was Mr. Frank Nothnagel, Gov-

OPENING TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 & Continuing
The Record Breaking Motion Picture

THE GRIPPING STORY OF
THE HATFIELOS AND 4

Excitement

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY TO SUNDAY 4.30 AND 8.15
Republic Double .. .



CRRA. Rina a Eee

B. L, Richards who will be staying four years. a ee Richard ARLEN—Cheryl WALKER
at “Blue Vista.” Rockley New Ste SU=C.S ROVEERERE 08: Sie: Te THE M°COYS ! in “
Road with friends. — Leaving On Saturday ritory,
Mr. Richards is with the S.D.A. UE to leave for a holiday in Carib understands that the site .».America’s most “IDENTITY UNKNOWN ~”
Clinic in Port-of-Spain. They ar- Canada by T.C.A, to-morrow of this building will be situated
rived from Trinidad yesterday are Mrs, Edna Hutchinson and at Bay Street. famous feud! ; and
morning by B.W.1A. N her daughter Barbara. Mr. Nothnagel was met at
Back From B.G. Holiday Seawell by Mr. Nestor Baiz, a cA af

“FLAME OF BARBARY COAST”
with John WAYNE—Ann DVORAK

On Short Visit Managing Director of Bottlers
Mr. E. D. Mottley, M.C.P. R, BILL STUART, T.C.A. Sta- Ltd., and Mr. Baiz’s fiancee Miss

who left Barbados on August 10th tion Manager here will also Sonja Scott.

returned home yesterday afternoon be among the passengers leaving Mr. Nothnagel expects to be

by B.W.LA. after a short B.G. for Canada by T.C.A. to-morrow here for a few days and is staying

holiday. on a short visit. at the Ocean View Hotel.

BY THE WAY...

to keep a

Mes. RUBY MOTTLEY, wife of



SAMUEL GOLDWYN presents

“Roseanna ©

Bl
: starring
= FARLEY GRANGER - CHARLES BICKFORD RAYMOND MASSEY





















By Beachcomber

asked Lord

... they are worth

N article on how A Varacious Reader Lear anything?”

railway compartment tt i » fis Shortcake. “Not a sound,” said RICHARD BASEHART GIGI PERREAU °
y, compupiene 0 N the seaond night of his i). Captain, mopping his’ head, and introducing JOAN EVANS talkin about !
yourself says that card-playing visit to Boulton Wynfevers, which was dripping with beer (Derced be IRVING RIL « Scron Pay by bn Calis inten» Moved by Albuns tansy ™

Foulenough again retired to the
library when his host and
hostess went to bed “J hope
the servants won't disturb your
reading again,” said Lady Short-—
cake. “I’m sure they won't,”
replied Foulenough. About 3 a.m.
Lord and Lady Shortcake were

by RAO RADNO PICTURES, ING.

EXTRA! EXTRA!» TONITE

LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

frightens most people away, But
that is a tame trick. There are
many more effective methods.

thrown by the butler. “Has it
been raining?” asked Lady
Shortcake. “Only a few drops,”
he answered, still mopping.

Whither, Vegetables ?
HREDDED turnips to

One is to sit in the
talk to a bit of luggage on the
seat beneath you. Another is to
lie on the floor of the compart-

rack and

you,

foe olte we. ®wakened by the sound of Mrs. Mockpudding. NORTON MOORE—“As if I Didn't ina”
ee ee eal. A third 'S breaking glass. “It must be the It is not without significance, WINSTON DAISLEY—"4 Winds hat eee on My ee
alee oe arge — in _your Captain reading,” said Lady and therefore may be said to be COSFORD HUSBANDS—“You Do”
“Pm afraid e forsee a. Snortcake acidly. “How do you with significance, that on this MISS BETTY TAYLOR—“My Foolish Heart”
loore. Th cay ave got mean?” asked her husband. duy, Vegetable Wednesday, the TREVOR MARSHALL—“Surrender”
5 eye under the seats. “We will go and see,” she index figure of the cost of living VERNON PRICE—“I Can Dream”

Also, I’ve got measles.” A fourth
is to say to the intruders, “Now,
this is the old banqueting hall,
where, in 1571, William Rufus
was stabbed by a horse.” A
fifth is to say, “Sh! Don’t shout;

replied. So downstairs they went.
Foulenough had time to dive
back into the library. The ser-
vants kept very quiet. When the
library door opened there was
the Captain, deep in “Engineer-

is 124. And until we can iniport
the succulent mango-grass of the
Kikawipiti Islands, we must try
to utilise moss, lichen and other
nutritious growths which do not
costs dollars, “We cannot eat

GUEST STAR — MISS GLORIA BENTHAM
wae rae e Peterkin; Miss Thelma Sarjeant, Miss Nancy

PLUS

SAVE YOUR % TICKETS AND WIN A CARTON JEFFREY’S

coal ice tips S's boston: pe ing For Girls.” He jumped up. eoal,” as Sir Thomas Pullover has Bree NO INCREARE IN PRICES
' » 1tS Decause I'm not “I say, it must be later than I well said, “since in earl t 4
Mis here at. all. thought,” he erled, “Did You that babit ts diemorea a oe h Pit 16 — House 30 — Balcony 40 — Boxes 54. {

POODCESEVES OPES DOSS OSSS

2D



EQUIP YOUR KITCHEN
AND PANTRY with

45+, " »
gone’ EPO PIES PP OPO A OTP OS OOOPSS
>



ar

PORCELAIN & STAINLESS





: PYREX
: 3
x,
‘ OVEN and STEEL KITCHEN SINKS
Pad
-
% TABLE WARE
WITH DOUBLE and SINGLE _.
A Wink an TO SELECT FROM
: CAeee cakes DRAIN BOARD and CABINET
PLATES—D:
: One : . wear PLA nh a SOUP, BREAKFAST
8 among the FIRST thought of and the most satisfying in these HOT DAYS SCALLOPEG Soerta AN ASSET TO EVER Y MODERN
% is ICED TEA steeped from “MY NAH.” GIFT SRT So ee TG, EXE
% “M Y N A H” is grown, blended and packed in Ceylon. The Tea Garden Pay our Hardware Department a Visit KITCHEN.
: of ae ao will enjoy the Flavour and Refreshing effect when you ee Or Dist 3080" on
~ use ea, ne
: § See them on Show at... THE CORNER STORE

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4563666654 “ s
PPPLELLLPPLP PP LPPDLLPPPDPPAPPPPPPDPBPLPPPLPL APPL LPBLLL PLL LPL SS CSFTPOPSS

s {



FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1950



FULL-PAGE
PUNCH

By C.V.R.
NEW YORK,

A fine example to-day of the
spirit that has taken hold of the
American people. It concerns 24
friends most of them from Broad-
way, nearly all of them too old
for fighting.

Frustrated, they met to discover
what they could do for the cause.

They decided there might be
people who didn't feel as ardently
as they. That it might help if
they could wake up those waver-
ers.

So to-day a full — page adver -
tisement (£1,820 an insertion) ap-

Its theme:
We've got to beat Communism.

THEN IT ADDS: It'll make very
heavy demands upon us. We shall
have to give everything to ciefend
our liberty, Let’s give it, and let’s
give ourselves, ‘till Russia, wo,
has been taught that our free
world’s more than a match fer
the world of Jenghiz Khan.”

[Jenghiz Khan, Mongoi and
Tartar emperor, was born the son
of a petty chieftain in Worth
Mongolia in 1162. From about 1177
he was involved in almost un-
broken warfare with various
tribes. His armies invaded India,
and conquered China, His name
means “perfect warrior.” He died
in 1227.]

Some of the 24: Song - writer
Irving Berlin, playwright Maxwell
Anderson, Madeleine Carroll,
Richard Aldrich, Gertrude Law-
rence’s husband, comic-strip artist
Milton Caniff, Raymond Massey,
and Howard (“Life with Father”)

SOME HINTS of what Ameri-
cans may have to give are con-
tained in a repoyt just sent to Con-
gress by the Federal Reserve
Board, roughly equivalent to the
Governors of the Bank of Eng-
land.

Sound financing of the costs of
rearmament will, says the reporv,
require “soak-the-poor” taxes as
well as higher taxes on the well-
to-do and corporations.

There should be no excess prof-
its tax—President Truman said
to-day he was willing to have one
if Congréss wanted it — unless
the emergency turmed out to be
a short one. Much better, said the
board, to boost corporation and
individual taxation.

Stronger curbs on credit for
home-building were called for:
And the board made a_ special
point that there must be rigid cuts
in all Government welfare spend-

ing.

PROPOSAL from Congressman
Omar Burleson: Buy 4 _ lonely
Pacific island and send all domes-
tic Communists convicted of treas-
on there “to reflect long and well
on their sins,

Labour To
Discuss The
Colonies

(From Our London Correspondent )
LONDON.

MR. JAMES GRIFFITHS, Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies,
Mr. A. Creech Jones, former Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies,
and Dr. Rita Hinden, Secretary of
Fabian Colonial Bureau, are to be
the principal speakers at a London
Conference on September 23,
arranged by the Bureau.

Main theme of the Conference
will be “The Challenge to Labour
in the Colonies.” There will be
three sessions and subjects dis-
cussed will inelude ‘Labour's
achievements in the Colonies”,
“What the Colonies Mean to You",
and “The Way Forward in the Co-

1 L?
onies.

Federation
—Not Yet

(From Our London Corresprondent)

“The other islands may federate
but British Guiana is not yet
ready.” That was the reply given
by Mr. Edward Gunraj of Vreed-
on-Hopp, British Guiana, in
answer to my enquiry — “What
are your views on federation for
the West Indies?” Mr. Gunraj, a
law student of the Middle Temple,
eagerly anticipates the time when
he will be back in British Guiana
as a qualified barrister-at-law to
help wage war against illiteracy.



Rumanian Forces
Teo Learn Sialin’s Art

LONDON, August 23.

Rumania’s War Minister Gerald
Emil Bodnars today ordered the
country’s armed forces to “learn
Stalin’s military art, improve
combat training and skill, and be
ready to defend at any time the
State Interests of Rumania and
the Democratic group led by the
Soviet Union”.

A Bucharest Radio Broadcast
heard in London today said Bod-
nars made this call, in an order
today marking the sixth anniver-
sary of Rumania’s challenge from
the Axis to the Allied side in the
last war. The order denounced
the American, British and French
Governments as enemies of the
Rumanian working class. It
pledged eternal friendship and
co-operation with the Soviet
Union.

The order also expressed soli-
darity with the “heroic soldiers of
Korea whose example should
inspire every member of the
Rumanian armed forces”.

———_—__—_—-
VOLUNTEERED
CHICAGO, Aug. 21.

A thirty-eight-year—old Chicag»
businessman volunteered today to
fly over Moscow and drop an
atomic or hydrogen bomb on the

miin.

He is Lar Daly, operator of a
stool and chair factory who claims
to have founded the “Christian
Action Party,” the slogan of which
is “war now with Red Russia.”

He made his offer in a letter ad-
dressed to President Truman
which said the party proposed to
“christianity and world freadom’’
and advocated the use of the atom
and hydrogen bomb against “forces
of anti-Christ.”



. What's the fuss this time? Has Noél Coward lost his twe dots already or does Sinatra wart to cross the road

.



The Mystery Man Who Trafficked in Honours—The Man Whose Woman

| Death-secret of Maundy Gregory
Revealed After Nine Years



Friend Was Exhumed

HIS END CAME UNDER NAZI RULE

From PERCY HOSKINS: Paris

SCOTLAND YARD has

marked “Closed” on the dossier

of one of the most intriguing and colourful characters ever
to be named on the files of the Criminal Record Office. An
inquiry made after a routine check-up on first offenders of |the maximum fine ef £50 would

years ago disclosed that J Maundy Gregory, friend of | be

Mr. Norman (now Mr. Justice)

Birkett, K.C., defending, said that
there would be a plea of guilty;
that it was the first prosecution

of its kind;

and that so far as

Gregory was concerned, the object
of the prosecution had been fully

established.
“I submit that the proper end
is that you should impose a

monetary penalty,” he said.
But the magistrate said that
inadequate.

“Gregory”, he

kings and who himself claimed descent from kings, is dead. | Said, “will go to prison for two

Paris police told the Yard that
he died in a military hospital in
Paris in 1941, during the German
occupation —- the Maundy Gregory
who was jailed in London for
trafficking in honours and who,

later, was the central figure in a}

still unexplained death riddle.

Scotland Yard is now trying,
with the help of the International
Police Commission, to find out
details of Gregory’s last_days in
Paris. E

M. Jean Nepot, the assistant
director, worked all today search-
ing for someone who could tell

him how Gregory, who was 64,|
came to. die in the German-con-'

trolled hospital, and what was
the cause of death.

Once An Actor

In a cemetery at Ivry I stood
by the grave of a man who in
his day was a guardian of State
secrets and who claimed ances-
try back to Edward III, in the
14th century.

Princes and prelates, peers and
distinguished commoners, states-
men, leaders of the arts and of
the sciences — he was on closest
terms with them all.

_ He had palatial offices in Par-
liament-street, between Scotland
Yard and Downing-street.

Earliest known of Gregory's
activities was his working as an
actor and becoming a producer in
London’s West End. That was in
1908 for a revival of “Dorothy.”

Then he ran an agency as sort of hotel detective. When
the 1914 war began the Govern-
ment apparently considered that
his knowledge so gained would be
of value, and he was introduced
to Whitehall.

‘Counter-espionage’

Later, he claimed to be engaged
on counter-espionage, and after
the war he became well known in
the capitals of Europe

It was in February 1933 that
London was surprised by the an-
nouncement that the Director of
Public Prosecutions had taken
out a summons accusing Maundy
Gregory of an offence under the
Honours (Prevention of Abuses)
Act of 1925,

This Act was passed to stamp
out traffie in honours,

There was gossip of recently
bestowed titles having been
bought for sums involving hun-
dreds of thousands of pounds.

One such story concerned a
cautious commercial magnate who,
it was said, had been offered a
peerage by Maundy Gregory for
£10,000.

“Give me 24 hours to think it
over,” said the magnate.

The next day he was said to
have told Gregory: “I have de-

cided to accept your offer and| Gq





months, and pay a fine of £50

j mander Edward Whaley Billyard|and the costs of the prosecution.”

Leake, D.S.0., R.N. (retired), of
Lowndes-square, S.W.

He was acctova of having un-
lawfully tried to obtain £10,000
from Lieut.-Commander Leake
“as an inducement for endeavour-
ing to procure the grant of a
dignity or title of honour.”



LINKED
WITH 8 KINGS

anyone who question-
ea Maundy Gregory's

ancestry, he would produce
@ pedigree 4ft. long, com-
piled by the e of
Heralds.

From the time of Edward
Ill, it passed through English
history and disclosed
Gregory’s kinship with some
of the most famous figures
of the past.

The last entry was:—

“Arthur John Maundy
Gregory, of Abbey Lodge,
Abbey-road, St. John’s Wood
Co. London. Born July 1 1877
at Southampton aforesaid.”

is suggested that
Gregory, though his mother,
the blood of eight kings

England in veins;
that John o' Gaunt, “time-

honoured Lancaster,” Harry
Hotspur, and the Black
Prince were among his fore-
bears; and that his lineage
‘was traceable to William the
Conqueror.



‘Closed Doors’

Lieut.-Commander Leake _ told
the court that he was introduced

He commended “the very proper
attitude taken up by Lieut.-Com—
mander Leake.”

The cae which everybody
thought would bare a thousand
secrets ended. Although it was
in the House of Commons
that there were other complaints
no further action was taken.

Yard inquiry

While Gregory was in jail
Scotland Yard began investiga-
ting the circumstances of e

death of a 59 - year-old former

actress,
This woman — Mrs. Edith
of Mr

Rosse, former wife

TH






















































F.



London Express ¢

To reporters who tracked him
to Paris, Gregory said it was “no
vulgar intrigue” this “wonderful
friendship” of his with Mrs.
Rosse. The world had known
them as brother and sister: that,
indeed, had been their relation-
ship.

Gregory told the reporters
of Mrs. Rosse’s last illness.

He was lunching with the King
of Greeee at a West End restau-
rant when a telegram came calling
him home,

He went home and stood by her
bedside. “Quick”, she cried.
“Pen and paper.” He fumbled in
his pocket, and drew out the
luncheon menu card. And on
that the will was written with
the doctor standing by.

Then a few days later, after
they had dinner together, Mrs.
Rosse had another seizure,

Search For Grave

They could not -ave her.
the day she died.
another luncheon

On
Gregory had
appointment

with the King of Greece.

a grive
Frederick Rosse, a composer—died /“dear, sweet friend” by the river-
in Gregory’s house in Hyde Park- |side, where many of their happi-
terrace the previous September. | est hours had,been spent.
Her death had been certified tm} He’ told of difficulties: how he
be due to cerebral hemorrhagé |had offered 100 guineas to the

and chronic Bright’s disease,

News From B.G.

\
|

Drop In Business

Recorded By B.G. |

And T’dad Mutual |

{Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, BG.
BUSINESS done by the British
Guiana and Trinidad Mutual Fire
Insurance Co. Ltd., for the year
ending June 30, 1950, was below
that of the previous year, but the
Chairman, Mr. W. S. Jones, in
his report said it was substantial
The previous year’s business was
a record, he pointed out.

1610 policies were issued insur-
ing $5,433,161.11 with premiums
of $57,691.05. Lapses and sur-
renders during the year were,
however, greater than usual, the
net increase being 713 policies—
$1,277,082.11 of insurance with
premiums totalling $11,493.67.
The total fire risks on the Com-
pany’s books at 30th June was
$30,499,983.11; of this $2,069,15
has been reinsured.

Fire Claims paid and provided
for at the end of June, 1950 was
$6,159.42. Included in the amount
provided for claims at the end of
June, 1949 was an amount of
$11,800 which*was found subse-
quently not to be payable and
placed to the credit of the year’s
Profit and Loss (Annual Account.

The case which everybody
the Trinidad Branch was main-
taining its steady progress. Its
assets now total $1,636,605. The
Barbados Branch which was
established late in 1949 under the
Management of Mr. Harry C. M
Hunte, has made a good start.

Mr Jones stressed the urgent
need for everyone to strive for the
elimination of fire hazards, He
declared: “I look to Government,
and hope not unavailingly, to
provide means for the education
of the public in fire prevention
and to provide fire fighting equip-
ment manned by well trained per~-
sonnel capable of adequately
combating any outbreak of fire
that might occur.” He urged
Government to enact Legislation
that is necessary for reducing
as far as is possble, existing fire
hazards

On a motion for the payment
vf the Ordinary Dividend, it was

decided to declare 3% on the
wdinary script capital to the
year ending June 30, 1950, making
with the interim dividend of

three per cent paid, six per cent.

60% Gash Profit

Return From The
Hand-In-Hand

\Terbedes Advooute Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G,
Policy holders of the Hand-in-
Hand Mutual Fire Insurance Co.,
Ltd., entitled to it, will receive

' He’ kept it. (r felt no good a cash profit return of 60% this
purpose would be served by |Â¥ear. This was disclosed by the
postponing it.”) And then he |Chairman, the Hon. G. H
went in*search of for-his;]Smellic, who declared that the
Company had another successful

year.
At the 30th June there were
13,167 policies in force insuring

parish funds if permission could

A will made shortly before her | be given him to bury her where

death read:
fand this amounted to about
£18,000} to be left to Mr. J.
Maundy Gregory to be disposed
of as he thinks best and in accord.
ance with what I should desire.”

“Everything I have | she wished,

A churchwarden’s consent was

necessary. He found one; he was |

@ butler, and he was at a whist
drive. But Gregory induced him

The Yard and the woman’s|to sign the ~ecessary papers.

relatives began to ask: —
1. Why did Mrs. Rosse leave her
money to Gregory in a will
written in his handwriting?

And so Mrs. Rosse was buried.

“ in Lendom at the inquest
the tordner the late Mr. Ingleby
lle, was told by Sir Bernard

2. Why was she buried in a lead }Spilsbury that there had been no
coffin in a Thames river-bank | hemorrhage; there were no signs

churchyard which was in a ,0t Bright's disease; the

continual state of flood?

death cer-

tificate had been completely

3. Had she died an unnatural| wrong.

death.
In other words had murder
been done?
The Home Office granted an
exhumation order and the coffin

But there was nothing to show
what was the cause of death.

Summing up, the coroner said:
“I do not wish to emphasise the

at the time still full of water—|point which has been mentioned

was lifted from its grave at Bis-
ham, Berkshire, on April 28,

Dr. Roche Lynch, the Home
Office analyst, and the late Sir

to Gregory, who explained that |BRernard Spilsbury, the patholo-

the highest authorities
him to accept an honour but that

“sinews would be necessary to |put Gregory was

open certain closed doors.”

wished | gist, began their examination. _.

The inquest was held in July,
not there,

that certain drugs do decompose
whet exposed or when they have
been buried in soil waterlogged
or otherwise

“All I will say is that no poison
has been found, and no poison
will ever be found in this body.
Therefore no possible charge

although he had been subpoenaed could arise out of this inquiry.”
It could be done for £10,009 |to attend, He had left the coun-
but £12,000 would make it easier. | try.

An open verdict was recorded.
rT —LES.



News From J°ca:

Too Many Holidays
Already—Says Official

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jamaica
Kingston's Acting Mayor, Coun-
cillor Wills O, Isaacs has asked the
overnment to declare a national



here is my cheque, signed . i ival of the
the title I have decided te adopt. oo bee ae Of ‘he West
The day I get the peerage you) jndian Cricket Team at the end
ean cash the cheque, of the current tour.

He got the peerage. The Government, however, has

Gregory's appearance at Bow-| made no comment on the telegram
street arose out of a report made| which Mr. Isaacs sent to the Gov-
to the Treasury by Lieut- Com-|ernor at the conclusion of the
Fourth Test, but in local adminis-
trative circles the impression
geined is that the idea is frowned
on as being impractical.

“Jamaica has too many holi-
days already as it is,” an official
said.



The Weather

Sun Rises: 5.30 a.m.

Sun Sets: 6.22 p.m.

au (Full Meon) August
Rainfall: .07 of an inch,
High Water: 1.36 a.m. 3.08



JAMAICA _TO_GET
TOURIST CITY.

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent,

KINGSTON, Jamaica
The United Kingdom Govern-
ment has approved the release of
blocked sterling capital in London
for re-investment in Jamaica. This
approval followed requests which
‘Mr. James F. Gore, Jamaican in-

p.m.

YESTERDAY
Temperature (Max.): 86.5
Temperature (Min.): 72.5
Total Rainfall (to date) :7.02

inches.
Wind Velocity: 9 miles.
Wind Direction: 9 am. E
3 p.m. E.N.E,
Barometer 9 a.m, 29.899
3 p.m. 29.824

dustrialist, made to the United
Benn 5.30 pam, Kingdom Government for the
release of these funds, so that



American investors could divert
frozen London Capital into a pro-
ject for the establishment of a
Tourist City in Jamaica.

Mr. Gore was backed by the
Jamaica Government and the Un-

AMBASSADOR RESIGNS

WASHINGTON, Aug. 24.
Dr. Eduarda Zurieta, Colombian
Ambassador to the United States



> employment Committee of the
for the past year, has resigned) House of Representatives in his
}and plans to go back to Bogota to negotiations and is now engaged
resume his law practice He ex-|in London in interesting both
pects to be relieved of his duties] British and American financier
\ shortly. in his $15,000,000 project



anr

Jamaican Violinist

India Govt.

Is Sub-Professor | § cholarship

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica

Jamaican violinist, Patrick Ver-
mont, has accepted an invitation
to become sub-Professor of the
Royal Academy of Music in Lon-
don and will shortly be going on
a tour of American with the Royal
Philharmonic Orchestra under Sir
Thomas Beecham. ;

Mr. Vermont is the only Jamai-
can student to perform with other
musicians from Canada, Australia,
New Zealand, Tasmania and other
countries, in London.



Spanish Class
At W.I. Varsity

KINGSTON, Jamaica

At present in Jamaica conduct-
ing the Spanish summer school of
the University College of the West
Indies is Professor Jose Otero-
Espasandin, of Waynesburg Col-
lege in Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

Twenty-two are registered for
the school which will operate for
three weeks.

‘conidia

Policemen Imprisoned.
(Barbados Advocate Correspondent
KINGSTON, Jamaica
After a trial lasting several days
three Jamaican policemen were
sentenced to prison by a Kingston

Resident Magistrate Saturday.
The three constables were con-
victed of extortion, conspiracy

and bribery in connection with an
unauthorised raid on a Peaka
Peow vendor's shop.

They were sentenced each to 12
months imprisonment,

Peaka Peow is a gambling game
imported from China and operated
locally and illegally by the Chin-
ese pc lation at an estimated
ue of 65,000,000




p

nnual va

For B.G. Youth

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

In accordance with the Govern-
ment of India’s policy in award-
ing a certaig number of scholar-
ships to students in different
parts of the world each year, the
one granted to British Guiana this
year has been awarded to Mr,
Womesh Chandra Persaud, 20-
year-old ex-Civil Servant,

Mr. Persaud who secured his
Cambridge Higher School Certifi-
cate in December, 1947 with
exemption from the London Inter-
Arts, is expected to leave the
Colony on or around August 27,
by K.L.M, plane for Delhi, India
where he will pursue a course of
higher education.

RICE SHORTAGE NOT
DUE TO EXPORTS

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

Rice, British Guiana’s staple
food, continues to be short, but
only in a certain grade — Brown
“A”

Rice Marketing Board Manager,
Mr. Peter Bayley, stated that the
shortage was not due to export,
but is the result of abnormal con-
ditions prevailing at the present
time. Full supplies of the lower

grade are available throughout
the year,

Brown “A” rice has not been
exported to the West Indian

Islands, Mr. Bayley said, adding
that for the first seven months of
1950 less rice was exported as
compared with the corresponding
period of last year. This is attrib-

uted to heavy rainfall during the
| early months of the year

$29,380,817 .03 with premiurns
totalling $349,285.22—an increase
of 62 policies insuring $264241
and a decrease in premium 061
$34.36. The comparatively smal!
inerease in Insurance and th:
slight decrease in premium is dut
mainly to the withdrawal of two
or three large insurances for
various reasons. The amount of
reinsurance carried was 2,694,-
470,10,

‘Chronicle’ Starts
Cricketers’ Fund

(Barbados Advocace Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, BG.

The “Daily Chronicle” is spon-
soring a fund for the purpose of
getting souvenirs for members of
the victorious West Indians. The
souvenirs will most likely take
the form of gold medals with the
Colony's Coat of Arms and suita-
ble inscriptions.

Said the Chronicle in announc-
ing the Fund: “There can be no
doubt that the 1l6-man West
Indies team have done the home-
land a great service and have in
four months done more -to give
weight to our national prestige
than any other effort in similar
time.”

B.G.’s Sugar
Production

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, B. G.

Sugar Production for the week
ending August 12, was 1,846 tons
bringing actual sugar made for
this year to 100,070 tons

Actual sugar produced fot the
same period last year was 83,553
tons.

To date this year 1,187 tons

of sugar was made from farmers’
canes as compared with 987 tons
for the corresponding period
last year

BETTER LIBRARY
SERVICE FOR BG.

(Barbados Advocate Corre, nt)

GEORGETOWN, B. G.
Reorganisation plans for the
Public Free Library, which will
also embrace the Rural Service,
was begun recently and when
completed will offer the com-
munity of British Guiana a much
more efficient and useful service.
In the Colony presently tc
co-operate with the reorganisation



is Mr John Smeaton, Deputy
Director of the Easftvn, Carib-|
bean Regional Library. |

Recently the B.G, Government
assumed responsibility for the
Colony’s Library Service and has
granted an initial sum of $4,000)
for the carrying out of these plans }
Part of the cost of the servicé|
in Georgetown is still borne by}
the City Council i

Interviewed, Mr. Smeaton said|
| that the Rural Service will re-|
| quire period years if a

| complete ervice over the}
Colon organised |

efficientls



*** PAGR THREE





| No More Surrender

Mouth and
(Barbados Advocate Corresnonden*) | that will sooner or later cause your teeth
no more concessions poet. the first day, ends sore mouth

%y
mperial | leeth Loose
On I
| Loose Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea.
to fail out and may also cause Rheumatism
That kly tightens the teeth. Iron clad

Preference ‘Gums Bleed ¢::)°:"¢
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
GEORGLTOWN, B. G. and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
should be granted by surrender- | guarantee

Amosan must make your

ing Imperial preferences, is the | Mouth elk and save peut teeth or

= . money back on return, of empty pack-
effect of a resolution which the |age. Get Amosan from your chemist
Georgetown Chamber of Com- today. The guar-

meree has decided to forward to Amosan antee protects

Government to be sent to the|Sfer Pyerrhea—Tremch Mouth
Seeretary of State for the] = = -

Colonies.
President of the Chamber, Mr fee MOP T ET
H. G. Seaford, O.B.E., said that i »
a meeting will be held in the|,
South of England on September 1 FREE YOURSELF
28 next, where resolutions will 1
be passed with reference to var-|4
ious preferences. i
He asked the Chamber to agree 1
to send a resolution to Govern-
ment to impress on the United
Kingdom Government the neces-
sity to take a firm stand against
any further concession in order
to safeguard the position of the
Commonwealth.

Cricket Holiday
“Out Of Order”











CONSTIPATION

rt with .

sa tel T





(Barbados Advocate Correspondent) INDIAN
GEORGETOWN, B.G. RC _ Pl ah
Suggestions to grant a holiday oleh a




to celebrate the West Indies



Test Victory in England met with ; Cee 1
opposition at the Georgetown caused leveguierity .
Chamber of Commerce. 1 © Dr. Morse’s Pills contain six eeive ;
= 18 ingredients.

Mr. G. W. E. Cooper, Managet © Gentle, effective 9-hour action wilt not §
of the Demerara Tobaceo Co.,, ! disturb your rest.
Ltd., brought up the question ;°@ Special TONIC ingredient helps restore
which he said was altogether out sermat bowel condition. 1
of order. He said: “I think we 4 ene seated annem
are all very proud of the West ' t
Indies and we all congratulate] | A TRUSTED REMEDY 4
them, but I personally fee) it Aan EARS {
will be a very sorry day if we} |: \ Ja FOR OVER 50 v 1
had a_ holiday for such an Fore ain otirence wan ire
occasion.”

He thought it would have been |! BEW AREorworms! ;
in order if it was a question of | Worms threaten old and young alike, Be)
granting a holiday to school] 4 fre yous family je protein by the

children but to disrupt business
on an occasion such as this was
‘altogether out of order,

ude by the
§ makers of Dr, Morso’s Pills RW 1-349, |

. a ~

ee

ROBINSONS

‘PATENT, BARLEY
makes Se for baby .-. _

‘PATENT’ GROATS
makes weaning a happy time for baby—
and mother F



THERE’S PAIN RELIEF

AND TONIC BE
Yes! — Yeast- Vite quickly
soothes away neu-
ralgia, nerve and rheumatic
pains —but it does something
else too ! Because of its valuable
tonic properties Yeast - Vite
helps you to feel brighter, look
better, sleep more casily and
enjoy more energy. Neat time
ou want pain felief take Yeast-
Vite and get tonic benefit too!

EFIT

YV/80j2



This natural sea-fresh food,
SevenSeaS pure Cod Liver
Oil, is a wonderful tonic in
convalescence. Its rich natural
fats and vitamins help to
restore energy, build up new
health,

SevenSeaS is pleasant tasting,
easy to take and readily
digested.





eecee eeoeoeeseeseseseeseoeesete
2 An invalid’s "quick * recovery :
° GP ely ap :
: is helped . by, SevenSeaS ¢



Stokes & Bynoe, Ltd., P.O. Box 401,

Bridgetown Barbados

In bottles containing 6, % or 16 fluid ounces.
Also capsules in tubes containing from 25.

If you cannot get SewenSeaS write to, +



INC.

in B, G.

NEW! NEW! NEW!

A new Shipment of...

MOSS
CREPE

in several delightful shades

“the
for



ideal material
Weddings”





'
§



PAGE FOUR



Printed by the Advorate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown.
Friday, August 25, 1950

ROAD USERS

THE members of the Council of the
Chamber of Commerce have decided to
form an Automobile Owners’ Association
in this island. It is a welcome step and
one which should bring great benefit to
the travelling public. The objects of the
Association will be to co-operate with the
government departments concerned with
the regulating of traffic in order to bring
about certain improvements which might
be considered necessary.

Twenty years ago an Automobile Asso-
ciation founded by Mr. E. P. Corner func-
tioned in this island and served a most
useful purpose. Motoring was then in its
infancy in Barbados and there was only a
handful of cars. Today motoring is not
regarded as a luxury but is part and parcel
of the everyday life of the community. In
those days there was a single ’bus service
outside Bridgetown and that was to
Speightstown. Nowadays there is a ’bus
service to almost every part of the island
and ’buses have replaced the defunct
Tramway and Railway Services.

Today the number of motor vehicles
both for private use and for purposes of
tréde has increased to such an extent that
there is now approximately one motor



vehicle for every 30 persons in the island.

This does not take into account the number
of animal drawn vehicles and bicycles. If
these are to be accommodated on 574 miles
of road along with the pedestrian traffic,
it is clear that there must be great appre-
ciation of the necessity for the exercise
of care on the roads. It is no insult to
motorists to say that they must be educated
to their responsibilities and their duties.
a well organised and lively Automobile
And this can more effectively be done by
Association, than by any other source.

The Committee of management of such
an organisation might well distribute lit-
erature, organise lectures, stage motor
rallies for demonstration purposes as dis-
tinct from motor racing, protect them-
selves and the general public from the
activities of reckless motorists and in
many other ways bring a consciousness of
the dangers of the roads to peaple who use
them without a care in the world.

Secondary in importance is the pointing
out to the Highways and Transport Depart-
ment and the Police the necessity for re~
moval of blind corners and the erection of
road signs. The number of accidents in
this island, it was pointed out by the
Commissioner of Police was not in any
great measure due to these corners or the
lack of signs. They were due to lack of
eare. And he might well have added, con-
sideration for other users of the road. The
exchange of experiences by motorists
might well lead to suggestions for remedi-
al measures as far as physical difficulties
are concerned but it is the work of an
Automobile Association to inculcate a
sense of responsibility in the minds of
those who have charge of motor vehicles
on the roads.

It is true that affiliation of this Associa-
tion with the British Automobile Associa-
tion might bring benefits to those who are
in position to do motoring overseas. But
the membership need not be limited to
this class. The immediate benefits are to
the people of this island; and there will al-
ways be a far greater number at home
than those who travel abroad.

Every motor owner in Barbados should
consider whether it is not his duty to join
such an Association. At present there is
a great need for such work as it could do;
and the sponsors should form an informal
committee as soon as possible in order to
attract membership over a wide area. On
this depends its ultimate success.

) ADVOGATE

\
|
|
1
LONDON.

NEXT WEEK we will hear Mr
Churchill's resounding voice again
Since the war he has spoken on
several occasions, as a politician
pleading the causes of the Con-

it. If the United Nations had not

been involved there would have

been no more feeling about Korea

than about the French four-year-

old war in Indo-China, or the

Philippines’ struggle against the
ukKs.

servative Party. An his remarks Huk

have had mixed reception—mixed
in the same half-and-half propor.
tions as the nation’s political in-
clinations. But next week he
will come to the microphone and
certainly bring to mind his war.
time broadcasts when he gave the
country great confidence—chiefty
because he sounded prepared to
tell us all, both fair news and
foul,

This has been an uneasy week.
Only a few days back the Govern-
ment announced a re-armament
programme that sounded sturdy.
But it is now coming clear to us
that our American allies do not
see it that way. While a British
task force is now on its way to
Korea there is noticeable looking
over the shoulder on the part of
the American leaders to see when
their friends are coming. Britain
has a troubled conscience. The
issue will not be dodged by blow -
ing to American requests for a
few thousand British troops from
our Malaya and Hong-Kong gar-
risons. The trouble is that we
are not entirely certain how far
we are “in” this war in Korea
For instance it was Neville Cham—
berlain who said that Czecho-
Slovakia was a small far-away
country about which we knew
nothing. He was jeered at for
that remark; but Korea looks far
further away; and not even the
best-informed know very much
about it. Nevertheless we repd
war reports of American gallantry
end exhaustion. A few weeks
ago, when news of the first re-
treats came back, the everyday
attitude was to remark that Brit-
ain was in the last two world wars
at least two years before America
—so now it was their turn. But
the mood has changed, It was
almost insupportable, that we
should still be spectators of the
heavy fighting. Yet, at the same
time, there is little passionate
sense that our own fate will ba
decided in Korea. That this is an
United Nations War is the one
vitally important reason why
British people feel strongly about





Winston Churchill has an excel-
lent argument to put forward on
the radio next week, He will ask
Attlee why he announced more
than a month before the day, that
Parliament wovld return on Sep-
tember 12. When Parliament
went for its holidays om July 28,
(a month after fighting began in
Korea), there was no hint of
urgency. But a few weeks later,
suddenly, something has happen--

ed. Why not bring Parliament This

back quickly to discuss this “some.
thing’? (1 can almost hear, al-
ready, Churchill’s voice echoing
with indignation.) Cannot Par-
liament be told?

To this the Prime Minister 1s
expeciea to give a soft answer
that turns away wratn, Provably
the Government decided on ex-
tending conscription and raising
service pay and then somebody
became so excited that the de-
cision was taken and the an-
nouncement recalling Parliament!
What an opportunity it has given
Winston Churchill; and how the
Labour tacticians must be worry-
ing! As the international situation
grows more tense, Churchill the
war leader, takes over from
Churchill of the Conservative
Party—and the Labour leaders
become more afraid of him.

Virus Defeats Anti-histamin

The battle was fought on 1,550
fields of war. On each field hordes
of viruses armed with weapons of
fiendish cruelty advanced and
overwhelmed the peace-loving
defenders, In fact the Common
Cold, estimated to cost the United
States $1,500,000,000 annually in
lost working time, has defeated
another attempt to hold it in
check. The Medical Research
Council asked for 1,550 volunteers
to suffer the Cold and treat it
with the so-called “Cold Cure”
based on anti-histamin drugs
marketed widely in America,
Some of the victims were given
pills of anti-histamin, others were

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

NEWS FROM BRITAIN | NATURE’S

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS |









given pills that

tne same, but nothing in
them. The res' re identical
for both utiously, the
Medical ‘ouncil states

has revealed
drugs have
tion of

that a year of
no evidence tha

to be effective.
if you really e you have a
“cold cure” in pocket some-
thing seems to feaben to the virus
ederts a8 Wal prety tney tire and

ts of will power they tire an
wilt. The best for a cold is
still to believe can cure it

seems to ive a profitable
field of enterprise the medicine
man—or the patent medicine man
with a gift of the gab. It might
also be considered carefully at
Lake Success

The Pains Of Being A Peer

Lord Hailsham, former Lora
Chancellor of England, died this
week. For the House of Commons
this was melancholy indeed. For
it means that Quintin Hogg, his
eldest son, will never be seen agalp
arguing from his place in the
second row—just behind the Op-
position Front Bench, One of the
penalties of being a peer is that,
like lunatics and Ministers of the
Church of England, it is impos-
sible to sit in the House of Com-
mons. Many a promising political
career has been cut short by the
deafh of an ennobled father, And
so it seems with Quintin Hogg.
Jovial, forthright, argumentative—
even jovially bad-tempered, if
that is possible—he made himself
liked even by Socialists. He gained
prominence when he won the
election fight at the City of Oxford
against the volatile scholarly so-
cialist—A. D. Lindsay, the Master
of Balliol. It was a memorable pre-
war struggle—with Lindsay heav-
lly backed by the undergraduate
non-voters, and Hogg timing his
meetings deliberately to clash
with his opponent’s. Quintin Hogg
has been one of the keenest sup-
porters of reform for the House of
Lords—which would allow peers
to choose being elected to the
Commons instead of inheriting
seats in the Lords.



Will Russia Attack?

Hy KINGSBURY SMITH

PARIS.

Plans which are being formu-
lated today for the re-armament
of western Europe are based on
the calculated risk that despite
the gravity of the international
situation Russia will refrain from
precipitating war with the United
States during the next three years,

Why do the western European
allied governments believe that
Russia will not attack America
during that time?

To get the answer to this
vitally important question, Inter-
national News Service sought the
private views of top level Ameri-
can diplomats in Europe, as well
as leading western European
officials,

The inquiries showed that the
belief that the Soviet government
will avoid precipitating a direct
conflict with the United States is
based ‘on the following three
major assumptions:

1. That Russia fears the effects
of Arnerican atom bomb attacks;

2. That Russia does not yet
possess an adequate stockpile of
atom bombs;

3. That Russia’s industrial war
potential is still too weak in com-
parison with that of the western
allies to risk a major conflict.

Western defence planners are
said to attach considerable impor-
tance to the third point, despite
the reports that Russia’s military
forces include 165 active divisions,
25,000 tanks, and 19,000 front
line planes,

On the basis of military and
diplomatic intelligence reports,
the western European govern-
ments estimate that Russian steel
output for this year will be
approximately 22 million tons.

America’s steel production for
1950 is expected to top 71 million
tons. Great Britain will produce
around 16 million tons and the
rest of western Europe approxi-
mately 24 million tons. Thus, the
western allies will produce a total



OUR READERS SAY

of about 111 million tons, as com-
pared with Russia’s 22 million.

It is recognised that a much
greater percentage of Soviet steel
production is probably devoted to
armaments than is the case at
present in the western democra-
cies. Nevertheless, the steel pro-
duction of the western world is
so far superior to that of Russia
that top level American and Euro-
pean officials doubt the ability of
the Soviet Union to wage a pro-
longed major war with the west-
ern world,

Russia likewise is believed to be
extremely weak in respect to oil
reserves compared with the west-
ern democracies,

It is estimated that Russia will
produce this year only 33 million
tons. On the other hand, the
United States and the western
European democracies are expect-
ed to produce 415 million tons.

In the case of aluminum,
Russia’s production is estimated at

Arte.

*...He says he’s j..st

invented false teeth that

make chewing figs a delight
—are you interested?”



about 200,000 tons for 1950,
whereas the United States and
Canada will produce around
900,000 tons,

It is such statistics as these
which have led the western
defence planners to assume that
Russia will not precipitate in the
near future a direct, conflict with
America and ‘the Atlantic Pact
allies,

Western officials profess to be-
lieve that Russia would risk war
with the United States now only
if she had sufficient atom bombs
to deliver a quick knock-out blow
to western, and especially Ameri-
can industrial potential.

It is not believed that Russia
has any such stockpile now, al-
though members of the United
Nations military committee re-
cently considered it possible that
the Soviets might have 20 bombs
and be producing them at the rate
of one to one and a half per
month,

Even if this estimate was cor-
rect, western officials are inclined
to doubt that Russia would run
the risk of a direct and probably
prolonged conflict with the west.

It is on this assumption that the
western defence planners think
they have three years to re-arm
western Europe.

High ranking officials in Paris
told this correspondent that if the
American and other western allied
governments thought that the
danger of a direct Soviet attack
was imminent, they would
switching their economies over to
a full war-time footing immedi-
ately instead of pursuing partial
mobilization.

It is conceded by the diplomatic
officials that if the allied govern-
ments have guessed eee about
Russia’s atom stockpile and indus-
trial strength, the third world war
might come before the re-arma-
ment of the western powers has
progressed sufficiently to discour-
age the Soviet leaders from pre-
cipitating a major riage OT



BOMBS

WASHINGTON.

The discovery in northern Quebec of what
is believed to be the world’s biggest meteo-
rite crater is a hint to ambitious mankind
that nature’s missiles still pack more power
than even the most fearsome of atomic
bombs.

The hole in the granite face of the Quebec

on wasteland is about three times wider and

perha deeper than the great Arizona
sonia whith until now has held the record
with a spread of nearly a mile and a 570-foot
depth, notes the National Geographic
Society.

A meteorite that could gouge out such a
scar as that in Canada would obliterate the

largest city and surrounding region. Yet, in| |

all the thousands of years that such heavenly

bodies have been plunging earthward, no; }

catastrophic strike has ever been known in| }
a settled area. Likewise, there are no|}
authentic records of a direct hit on any|{{
human, and relatively few accounts exist of] })
damage to property.

A meteorite is a meteor that is successful

in touching ground. Out of space, meteors; }

in general are fast-moving bodies—ranging

in size from dust particles to many tons of|

substance,
When their travels bring them in contact
with the earth’s atmospheric oxygen, they

flare up, and before “burning out” or explod-| }

ing can be seen as “shooting stars,” to use
the popularly descriptive but inaccurate ex-
pression. Dozens of such meteor falls may
often be observed on a clear night. The best
shows come during the last half of the year,
with extensive showers scheduled this
month and in November.

Although many meteorites must have hit
the earth since the dawn of time, only about
1,450 have so far been found. They are
slowed down, and cooled off on their way
through .the atmosphere; hence scientists
look with suspicion on old and new tales of
conflagrations set off and deep penetrations.

_ Meteorites are identified by their composi-
tion, by a characteristic dark, thin crust, and
by the curious forms and markings they may
have. They are usually made of iron mixed
with nickel, or stone, or combinations of
these elements, plus additional smaller sub-
stances, including rarely, microscopic bits of
diamond.

The largest meteorite on public display is
one which was found in Greenland in 1895
by the Arctic explorer who later discovered
the North Pole, Robert E. Peary, Still shown
in New York City, it weighs 364% tons. The
smallest single fall amounted to but five
grams.

Rated the most destructive of all known
meteorites was the monster that struck in
the heart of Siberia in 1908. Scientific investi-
gators later reported that a vast forested
area had been devastated and a herd of rein-
deer killed Instead of leaving one huge
crater, this meteor pockmarked the landscape
with numerous lesser ones, the largest of
which was 150 feet in diameter.

Besides the giant craters of Quebec and
Arizona, other large and imposing meteorite
sites are found at Odessa, Texas; and the
island of Oesel, Estonia; in central Australia,
Arabia, Argentina, and elsewhere. —LN.S.



Packhorse
Of The Air

BOURNEMOUTH. |

Gauchos will no longer ride the pampas,
or cowboys the prairies, if a Bournemouth
firm have their way. Instead, they will use
the Hoppi-copter—the motorcycle of the air
—which flies 10 to 15ft. above the ground at
45 to 50 miles an hour, carrying one person
or a 200lb: payload.

The hoppi-copter, which weighs 150lb.,
consists of a seat, with an engine beneath
and rotor blades above.

On production models it is planned to fit
a Perspex front which, say the designers,

will give the machine an egg-sh -
te gg-shaped appear.

TO SELL AT £500
Mr. Beresford Martin, director of the firm
which is to produce the hoppi-copter, says
that the machine can cover 50 miles an hour,
Cane with 20 miles a day by a horse.
‘The hoppi-copter can be used where

ins Pers he says.

e hoppi-copter is expected to sell at
£500. Trials have been completed at Hurn
Airport and development work on the first

hoppi-copter to be made in this c i
proceeding.—L.E.S. ene

Radio Advertising

To the Editor, The Advocate
-—Those concerned, whether
advertisers or Radio Company,
should not suppose that the vexa-
tion from Radio advertisements
has died away. On the contrary it
is I think more intense and ex-
tended. I was recently one of a
group in a drawing room when an
expression of annoyance by one
person was received with the
cordial approval of the whole
company. It is indeed a nuisance
to have to hasten to turn off the
loud speaker in order to escape
and then you may shortly miss
something you would like to hear,
This applied particularly to “Re-
quest Time” but off and on all

y.

And the Sunday advertising,
especially is reprobated. It is
really most out of order and re-
pellent—disgusting is a word used
—to have a shouting about some-

a suggestion by one of your cor-
respondents a time back for the
formation of a Union
that he or she, would come again
and say something more about
that idea. There are several things
such as a Union might do in
the matter, in additton to advising
the Company sometimes as to im-
provements in its programmes —-
as they suggest would be welcome.

For one thing it could impress
on the Company that it is not
fairplay to expect the subscribers
to pay for an instrument for their
own annoyance; it reminds one
of the proverb about “cutting a
stick for use on your own back.”

Or they might be urged ito re-
duce the monthly fee as a com-
pensation. With 3,000 to 4,000 sub-
foresee Spore the a
is up there—they can
hard up and need this wisidonal
income. Or alternatively, they
might charge a trifle more if really
necessary, and get rid of the an-

body’s wares follow instantly one noyance altogether.

a religious service, almost before
the prayer or hymn or the Bene-
diction has died off the air. We
have plenty of secular affairs dur-

4 Or, again, as has been suggested
yin your columns, a time, or times,

for advertisements might be ap-

e week and want time to 4pointed when those who do not

digest the good words about faith
and duty on the Sabbath.
then it is very unfair for a small

want to hear them—a great com-

And ..|jpany I judge — would know when

to shut off the speaker. Meantime

shopkeeper to be charged and) it is difficult to think that the
fined for opening on Sunday fiplan can yield much return, so
while the big firms can advertise}'many people being annoyed in-
and push for business and nothing#stead of interested

WEARY WILLIE

said or done
a August 21, 1950.

I thought that when I welcomed
; 4

¢

a

Tennis
To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Permit me to commend
the Barbados Lawn Tennis Asso-
ciation for at last achieving some-
thing which should have been done
long years ago. I feel sure that
the Association will go from
strength to strength having at its
head such exponents as Lr. H, E.
Skeete, O.B.E., and Mr. E. P. Tay-
lor who have worked indefati-
gably to get the Association going,

Having some idea of the finan-
cial difficulties of the Association
1 agree with your leader writer
in Sunday’s issue that the Asso-
ciation should and must make an
island wide appeal for funds and
I feel sure that it will meet with
the success which it so richly de-
serves. I would also advise the
Association to hold a well adver-
tised dance or some other form of
entertainment which should help
to defray the present expenses of
sending a team to B. G.

As I have been asked by phone,
letters, and even button holed in
the streets to give my impressions
of the team going to B. G., I can
assure yor that the team is a well
balanced one although I am some-
what surprised to see the ommis-
sion of St, Hill, and here again
finance speaks for itself for it is
a pity that we could not afford
to send four players instead of
three which makes me feel that
the two seeded players will have
to work very hard if we have to
against players as Mat-
Brothers from B. G. and

play the

thias

Farquharson from Jamaica. It is
very heartening also for our team
inasmuch as young Motte Trille
did not come out for his summer
vacation as he is also one of the
best play: in Jamaica.

Our earry with them every
good wish from every sport loving
member of the island and more
so from

TENNIS FAN.

Prison Farm
To the Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—It may be remembered by
some of your readers that when a
company of serious - minded folk
made a move last year towards
the reduction of lawlessness in
the island one of the plans was
that the thief should be kept un-
der control until he had revaid
the value of any goods stolen.

It is interesting and encour-
aging to see in that fine journal,
the Crown Colonist (July issue)
that a similar plan has been ap-
proved in Dominica, Here is the
paragraph: —

“The Committee appointed to
consider praedial larceny has
unanimously recommended the
establishment of a Prison Farm,
where crops should be grown by
prisoners under sentence, and sold
for the benefit of the peasant or
planter who has suffered loss by
theft.”

It was also recommended that
fines and prison sentences should
be considerably increased, and
small livestock included under
the ordinance: also to penalise re-
ceivers — a valuable addition.

T am also glad to see that “Pre-
ventive Detention” is being im-
posed with us. But I wonder
what “reformatory treatment is
being used during such .

August 22, 1950.

Ramadhin
To, The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—
Hurrah, to Ramadhin! one of
the aces

Of West India’s team of hardy
cricketers
Who like meteors flashed from
various places
And carved a history unpar-
alleled by far.
But ‘tis of Ramadhin I want to

He° who o’ernight came up a
strange new shoot
With fire in his soul, vengeance
in his limb
And stumps of England wreck'd
O what a loot!
They cannot understand Rama-
dhin’s art
That Venus handed out to him
the night
Before he sailed for England a
modest lad,
His name unknown and critics
derided at.
But heaven reserves the plain
to make the great,
Not many wise, not
noblemen are called.
Oh Ramadhin
shining bright,
'hy name is talked
million lips!

many

thy stars are

upon a

The __ batsmen’s
heavens of

Know thy nature and thy cun-
ning wrist.

Continue, Ramadhin,
our Iere land,

Bag some more game,
grouse but many wickets!

long-famed
id

son of

not

Cc T. BAPTISTE.
Nelson Street,
St. Joseph,
Trinidad.
August 17, 1950.

Bus Service

To, The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—As bus fares are going to
be increased, I do hope we will
have better service, as the hope of
Barbados lies in a “buck to coun-—
try” movement. The country ‘s
the pride of Barbados, but owing
to difficult travelling, people are
afraid now even to live in the sub-
urbs, Many times passengers
have to wait in the sun almost half
an hour, and then are left stand-
ing in the road. The health and
progress of Barbados, is being in-
jured by this backward means of
travel, also tourists are inconveni-
enced, and results in dissatisfac-
tion. Some buses make for the
square and do not take passengers
into town. It is not fair, after pay-
ing fare, to be dished off anywhere.

the
and health

Buses should run through
City. Better
would result

business

communications are bad or for oil pipe-line
\

WELL WISHER.







D. V. SCOTT

& CO

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1956



‘

TO-DAY'S SPECIALS
at the COLONNADE

LTD

Usual Now

Jars Peanut Butter (10 oz.) 55 50
Pkgs. Quaker Puffed Wheat 34 30
Bottles N.E.B. Beer ..



4a

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VERITAS PRESSURE LANTERNS & GLOBES
OIL-LAMPS & CHIMNEYS
BURNERS NO. 1 & 2

LAMP WICKS

ROPE, 3/16” and 1%”
GALVANISED & IRON NAILS

——___.
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’Phones 4472 & 4687

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DUTCH BEER, TENNANT’S BEER, McEWAN’S BEER
TENNANT'S STOUT, GUINNESS STOUT, CALDER’S STOUT

FRUIT in TINS

GRAPES — Large Tins
FRUIT SALAD
GOOSEBERRIES
PEACHES — Large Tins
PEARS — Large Tins
CORN — Large Tins

GRAPES — Small Tins
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BEANS — CAULIFLOWER

GODDARD'S |



TT TT

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1956

Everybody Was Yellow

-.- And Then The Hurricane Broke
HY EUNICE SAVOURY



DO YOU REMEMBER those tales our grandparents |
told of the many strange atmospherical incidences which |

occurred preliminary to the
bados in 1831 and in 1898 ?



hurricanes which struck Bar-
I recollect one in particular.

and that was the description of the setting sun doing its
utmost to peep through dusky grey clouds a few minutes

before its disappearance behind the horizon.

How it cast

a ghastly yellow reflection across the earth causing every

object to appear as if it were

: Infant Dies
At Hospital

AREWOOD, a porter at the

General Hospital, reported to
the Pclice that the 3-month-old
female child of Athlese Jordon of
Collymore Rock who was admitted
to the Hospital at about 5.00 p m.
on Wednesday, died half an hour
Jater.

A post mortem examination
was performed yesterday.

NSPECTORS Bourne and

Springer, who left the island
during the month to attend a
course at Police College Hendon.
England, are enjoying their short
stay in British Guiana very
much.

Colonel R. T. Michelin, Com-
missioner of Police told the
Advocate yesterday that he has
received letters from both In-
spectors.

They told him that they have
been very well looked after by
the British Guiana Police Force
and were being shown around the
various Police departments of that
colony.

They called there cn the first
leg of their voyage to the U.K.

| “The

LMINA DENNY of Farm Road,
St. Peter, a pedestrian, was

involved in an accident with
motor car E-51 along Queen
Street, St. Peter at about 12.15
p.m. on Wednesday. She was
wounded in her head and is
detained at the General Hospital.

The car is owned by Betty Jones
of Colleton, St. Peter and was also
driven by her.
eo ‘BUS S-49 was

damaged in an_ accident

along Farmers Road, St. Thomas,
on Wednesday. It was being
driven by Gilbert Thorne of
Hillaby, St. Thomas

Also involved in the accident
was motor lorry M-78, owned by
the Department of Agriculture
and driven by Walter Headley of
Spring Farm, St. Thomas.

HE HANDLE BARS and front
wheel of a bicycle, owned and
ridden by Darnley Small of Red-
man Land, Goodland, St. Michael
were damaged in. an accident
along Kingston Road at about
11.20 p.m. on Wednesday.
Motar Car G-354, owned and
driven by Sylvan Straughn of
Salters, St. George, was also
involved. It is understood that
the cycle skidded,

NE MOTORIST was charged
yesterday for driving in a
manner dangerous to the public.
There were four traffic offences
recorded yesterday. The other
three charges were against a
cyclist and two motorists. The
cyclist was charged for not having
a lighted lamp to the front of his
cgnle.:

A motorist was charged for not
paying the appropriate tax on
his motor vehicle and another for
using the vehicle for purposes
other than those for which it was
licensed.

‘Athelbrook’
Leaves Port
Stern First

It is unusual to see a vessel
reversing out of the Careenage
but this incident occurred yes-
terday when the 285-ton Tanker
Athelbrook was leavhtg port.

This vessel is sister ship of the
Athel Ruby. When it entered the
inner basin it did not turn about
but continued to face the River
Road direction



af >
It toox its load of 89,414 gallons ] he ‘Radar

of vacuum pan molosses from the
Jason. Jones compound == and
shortly after midday yesterday
it reversed out of the Careenage
and left for Trinidad.

It is under the command of
Capt. Lonsdale and consigned to
Messrs, Jason Jones & Co. Ltd.

The S.S. Hecuba which brought
some of the first Christmas Tree
decorations to the island, sailed
yesterday for Paramaribo. It is
consigned to Messrs. S, P. Musson.



Illegal Liquor
Selling Cost £20

RUPERT ELLIS a 31-year-old
salesnan of Jackson, St. Michael,
was found guilty yesterday of
selling jiquor without first obtain-
ing a licence.

His Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod
before whom the case was heard
fined him £206 to be paid in
monthly instalments and ordered

him in default to undergo three

months’ imprisonment.

First witness for the prosecution
was P.C. Tull who said that on

August 7 he was on duty on the | six years,

Garrison
with P.C.

Savannah in company
334 Pilgrim. He

noticed that Ellis had a table with

a few things on it.

He was not standing there |Jamaica to load general cargo for
long when a man went up tofits return trip to the Cayman . a ee
Ellis and’ gave him something | Islands. ‘ : BUS C ONDUC TOR Jose
which appeared to be money. The vessel changed owners in| Stuart of Hillsv ick St. Jo oe
Ellis gave the man a bottle of |1949, when it made its first call} will have to pay a fine of
rum. On seeing this he approached |to Barbados. in one month or under go on
Etlis and asked him to produce his | Since then, it has been slightly | month’s imprisonment with hat

licence for selling liquor. Elli
could not and he seized the bo:



of bottles which were at the side | St

the table. TI box
three bottle 11 bottle

bottles of gin, f



containe





t and nine bottles of bee





affected with jaundice,
This happened in Antigua on
the afternoon of Monday 2lst.
While it lasted we thought
it was great fun, everybody was
yeilow, the trees and canefields
were yellow, even that range of
hills in the distance forming
Sleeping Indian” were
yellow, and gradually all the veg-
etation seemed to be transform-
ed into beautiful shades of pur-
ple, darker and darker, until
finally we could no longer risk to
gaze into the darkness, because
the winds were by now so strong
we could hardly stand or even
walk without difficulty.

Anticipate The Wind

It was possible to anticipate the
increasing strength of the wind
as it raged and roared through
the house. The rain it brougnt
with it dashed against our some-
what exposed wooden bungalow.
In spite of all precautions water
seeped under the doors. At 9.15
witn one terrific bang the lights
and telephone were gone. A pele
near the house had collapsed
from then on we spent most of
our time moving furniture from
room to room trying to find a dry
‘spot. We found just one, and
only one, for now the leaks from
the roof were out of control. It

|

MEMBERS of the victorious West Indian Test team visited
and here is the very successful spin bowler, Ramadhin, with one of the operators who deals with calls a

to his own country.

‘Gokey’ Goes
Empty

NO FANCY MOLASSES

SOME weeks ago, the moto
vessel “Gokey” called at Barba-
dos for a load of fancy molasses
in bulk for Canada, but had to
leave port under water ballast
instead.

The reason for



this was that

was no use trying to catch the
water it simply poured through.
Ey 10.30 we could only hear by
shouting at each other and the
storm had apparently reached its
maximum as far as ihis island
was concerned. The wind howled
perpetually and like some great

the Government had forbidden
the shipping of fancy molasses
eut of the island in bulk,

This prohibition does not stand.
however, with the shipment of
vacuum pan molasses out of the
island. On Wednesday, the motor
vessel “Athelbrook” was in the

giant paused intermittently
drawing a long breath and then
blowing it out with all its might.

In a wooden house, the sen-
sation was as if the building
Would split if the constant vi-
bration continued to _ increase.
Then came a dreadful crash on
the galvanised roof, and another,
and another. What was this ter-
rifying bombshell right overhead,
more frightening than thunder?
A few more of those and pcr-
haps the roof would be pierced
through. Then came an awful
rumbling, thumping sound which
appeared to be rattling its way
from one end of the verandah to
the other. The unexpected bumps
and thumps were far more hor-
rifying than the periodical flash-
es of lightning followed by the
usual peals of thunder. The first
hammering turned out to be
merely a few branches of a near-
by Eucalyptus tree which broke
away and connected with the
roof. The second was only an
old soap box colliding with the
gallery rails and floor.

Climax

The climax came between two
and three in the morning when
the hurricane suddenly decided
te change its direction and we
survived a sort of lifting, rising
sensation. By this time the winds
had reduced their velocity of at
least a hundred miles per hour.
People of the surrounding vil-
lages say this was their most
agonising period because they
felt their huts might have been

Careenage filling her tanks with
126,000 gallons of this commodity
for export to Trinidad.

Vacuum pan molasses was being
shipped in bulk from Barbados
for the past 20 to 25 years. Only
small quantities have been ship-
ped out in barrels for U.K. and
Canada by Harrison liners and
Canadian liners,

The vacuum pan molasses ship-
ped out of Barbados by the ships
of the “Athel Line” is usually
tuken to Trinidad and British
Guiana where it is transferred
on big tankers for shipment to
U.K. and Canada. «

Before the war, big (ankers
have called here for supplies of
this commodity but that was
stopped because it took about
four days to load one tanker.

Tankers Call Often

The tanks here for storing vac-
uum pan molasses ready for ship-
ping which are situated on the
wharf around the inner basin of the
Careenage, have a capacity of 4
million gallons. This necessi-
tates the regular calling of tank-
ers to the island to prevent an
overflow of the tanks at the va-
rious sugar factories

The motor vessel “Athelbrook”
which was yesterday at this port,
a new tanker of the “Athel Line”,
hes recently come down from
England.

It has come to replace the well

| known “Athel Ruby” which has

made many a call here recently.
At some periods of the year, the
“Athel Ruby” used to make a
weekly call.

The new “Athelbrook” will be

swept completely off their weak| (perating on what is called the

foundations.

Throughout Antigua precau-

“shuttle service’. It
take vacuum pan

will only
molasses as

tions were taken well in advance | cargo.

although only a gale was anti-

Messrs, Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.,
“Advocate”

cipated. This turned out to be a, told the yesterday
“Small Hurricane’, A more)that they expect a big vacuum
severe thrashing is hard to visual-] pan molasses tanker to arrive at
ize; this has been quite enough|Barbados about mid-September
to cause owners of modernly |to take a load. In this case, the
built houses to feel that the old} big tanker will anchor in Carlisle

fashioned storm shutters are }|Bay while the, “Athelbrook” will
needed sometimes. be used to take the vacuum pan
Antigua was hit by a hurri- | â„¢olasses to her

cane twenty-two years ago. It) yacuUM PAN MOLASSES is
is felt that the destruction then Jine yesidual cane juice after the
rhe eteal br ete extraction of sugar has taken
The electrical storm in 8 was | place.
ere, but the velocity of
the wee on both occasions was FANCY MOLASSES is the in-
about the same verted cane juice concentrated
into syrup from which no sugar

has been extracted.

Definition
by courtesy of the Department of
Science and Agriculture.





Is Strange

PERHAPS the strangest looking
of motor vessels which call here is
the 116-ton “T.B. Radar.”

Most unlike the others, the
bridge of the “T.B, Radar” is set hvane
right astern leaving from forward ay
to midship plain.
winches can he seen above that

ie c av = ty)
Pe or B. Radar” is so built for along Bay Street. sl ae
the freighting of lumber. It was The houses on this spo wet
ly ilt in the Cayman Islands, the all knocked down last month anc
ie of which it carries on the |the greater portion of debris ha:

stern.

What’s on Today

Police Courts 10 a.m.

1 Court of Appeal 10 a.m,
Petty Debt Court 10 a.m,
Exhibition of Pottery at

Barbados Museum
Table Tennis Trials at

“Window By Sea”
Cleared Of Debris

LABOURERS were busy

Hospital which is the most recen





fishing boats and other smal
craft could be seen hauled up 0
the beach while at other
idlers baked in the sun.
The Esplanade, another
dow by the sea”, has
been cleaned up. The terrace ha
been repaired in various spot



“win

variety of colours.

yp?
The rails that enclose th

Y.M.C.A, 7 p.m.

of harps and the trimming aroun
the roof bears
It has been on the run now for | Barbados “Coat-of-Arms”.
During the first five | Rand Stand is now one

years, it made trips from the Cay- | most attractive in the island
»>|man Islands to British Honduras
where it took lumber for Cuba
From Cuba it would then sail for







s | conv erted and put on a regular | labour for over loading the bu
x|run from Barbados to Dominica, | G--282 on Neils Road
Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada, order was made 0
Aruba and Curacao, V day by Mr E
The vessel has a gross tonnage McL« P. M t

f 162 t nd al has passenger |

ommodatior Fey

supplied yesterday

yes-
removing debris from the
Only two }open spot opposite the General

“window by the sea” to be opened

been removed. In the backgrouna

spots

recentiy

where there were holes and the
Band Stand is being painted in =

Stand are decorated with designs
designs. of th

This
of the

Overloading Cost £2 |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

SENDS A GREETING

I RAMADHIN

_ Major Stoute

Major R.A. Stoute, who was
recently appointed Deputy Com-
|missioner of Police of Barbados,
; returned to the island on Wednes-

tending a Senior Oflicer’s course
in England at Police College
| Ryton-on-Dunsmore, ncar Coven-
| try, Warwickshire. He will resume
duty on Monday.

“I consider the ccurse and at-
tachments extremely interesting
and beneficial”, he told the Advo
cate yesterday. He also saw the
Second Test at Lord’s and met
Goddard. Weekes, Worrell, Roy
Marshall and others.

Although the College that Major
Stoute attended is at Warwickshire
he did not see the West Indies be-
ing defeated by that County. For-
tunately on the day on which that
match had begun he was leaving
Ireland on the first leg ef his voy-
age home.





He met several prominent Police |

Officers and Detectives both of the
Metropolitan and other Forces in
the U.K. The trip to England and
the return voyage were very
pleasant and he has made many
friends in the U.K.

He left Barbados on March 1.
and arrived in England on March
14. The course at Ryton-on-Duns-
more ended on June 9. Attending
the course were Police Officers
from nearly all the Home Forces
in the U.K. and Wales and 12
Officers from Colonial territories.

At Scetland Yard

During the course he visited
many Police Forces including Lan-
cashire and the Leeds City Police
where he was attached for two
weeks. At the conclusion of this he
did a two weeks’ course at Scot-
land Yard and was afterwards at-
tached to the Kent County Police
for another two weeks. He visited
various Headquarters and Stations.

On the completion of the courses
he left England for Ireland on
August 2. He spent afew days
there and left on August 9 by the
R.F.A. Dewdale for Trinidad
where he arrived on Wednesday
morning and left in the evening by
B.W.LA. for Barbados



SHORT CUT

MOTORISTS use the site
of the burnt out Centrai
Foundry building as a bye-
way for entry to St.
Michael’s Row from Tra-
falgar Square. The road
below the site is used by
"buses coming from the ’bus
stand and is for one way
traffic.

Traffic other than ‘buses
have to go right round Tra-
falgar Square before going
up St. Michael’s Row

| Motorists have decided that
the car park is not a road
the crossing of which is
troubled by legal restric-
tions, and instead of going
the long distance, thev take
this short cut.





Sold Over Schedule;

Fined £2

RUBY HAYNES, C/o

Police Magistrate Mr. C.

of the Defence Regulations Act

hard labeur.

Ss

i

FRESH GRAPES—Per lit
BRIDAL ICING SUGAR
BANQUET CASTOR SUG



PRUNES—7 lb. Tins
; CHEESE—Per Ib

RAISINS—Per Ib
TOMATOES (Whole)-—Per
TABLE SALT—Per Pkt









the Wood-street telephone exchange,

Returns Home) In Custody ss «

day evening by B.W.1.A. after at- |















Harola
Proverbs, Rockley, Christ Church
was on Wednesday ordered to pay
a fine of £2 with 2/- costs by City

Walwyn, for committing a breach} ground the week-end for St. Vin-

Haynes offered for sale to a go.
buyer, a half-pound tin of Rown- :
tree Cocoa for 39 cents when the] the ‘Advocate’ that the longer his
fixed price was 37 cents per tin.| vessel laid up in the Careenage,

Failing to pay the fine in the|the

given time, Haynes will undergo| He did not see the point of se-
one month’s imprisonment with| maining in port wondering w
er a hurricane would come.





you will need for that

ANNIVERSARY CAKE

,
COCKADE FINE RUM_ |
STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO.. LTD. |;

HOME

Barbados |
37 Years Ago’

When Mr. Walter Haynes lef
Barbados 37 years ago for Canada

the chief methods of transporta-
tion. An old Barbadian and an
engineer, Mr. Haynes came back
to the island last Saturday
morning for a short vacation.

Mr. Haynes who has been a
machinist at the Steel Company
of Canada for 33 years, has i
foreign wife and six children
} and considers Canada his home
| He was 24 when he left the
island to seek his fortune, he
said He left his parents, but
no brothers or sisters. There
was an engineer shop in Trafal-
ger Square in those days whicl
was owned by D. M. Simpson
} and it was there that Mr. Haynes
| learnt his trade
| The site, now known as Queen's
Park, had only become a park
e few years before he left the
island. Then too, electricity was
in its infancy and street lighting
by gas was in vogue. He was
|} Surprised to hear that gas was
still used in some parts of the
} island for street lighting.

He went to school at St
Leonards He said that those
' school days come back to him as
sweet period of life, q period
} of rollicking and fun

Only One Church
Before he left he said, there
was only one church and one
entrance at the Westbury ceme-
tery He has not had time yet
go about the island to see

° |} more extensive changes, but he
On ‘Myken ! visited the grave yard to see the





Saadeh Held





names of his parents and old

acquaintances. He knows few

While the labourers were busy | people here now, most of his
unloading the Norwegian Steam- | friends have died

ship Myken in Carlisle Bay yes-} [yn Canada, Mr. Haynes told

terday a Norwegian seaman,/ the Advocate sewage gutters run

Camilleri, was locked up in the

, underground, He thought that
vessel's brig below.

the same scheme could be carried

buggies, tram-cars and trains were |

Camilleri is held in custody in
connection with the fatal stabbing
of Hansen, another Norwegian
seaman, while the vessel was in
Guadeloupe.

The 4,389-ton Myken, under
Captain Dolven arrived yesterday
from Dominica. It is chartered
by the Alcoa Steamship Company



out here to allow of a sidewalk.
With all the streets having side-
walks there, he thinks it annoy-
ing that one should have to walk
along the road here with so much
traffic always on the go

Mr, Walter Haynes was given
a wrist watch by his Company
as a tribute after he had put in

of the U.S.A. and consigned to

25 years’ service, All who have
Messrs. Robert Thom, ae .



‘ : served 25 years or more and
It brought 800 bags of cornmeal those who have resigned and
for its Agents. Also included ini are still alive after that long
its cargo was a quantity of con-i service, are given an annual
fectionery, pine lumber, tomato ; dinner, Mr. Haynes thought
| juice, prepared coffee, sole leather | highly of the Company's con-

and coffee beans.
The Steamship Oranjestad
which

| sideration in giving annual din-
‘ners, and throughout his interview

arrived on Wednesday ; ; atte) aaah oe
from Grenada brought a quantity be ie t ger dinner
of shoes, cotton goods. shell but- reference oO e 8
3 habia eet van, | crept in
ne See eee peuee, Fate now works eight hours a

He
| day at $1.20 per hour. He thinks
life has not done him ill and looks
forward to seeing his family
again on September 1

terday for Madeira. It is under
the command of Captain Hazel-
koff and consigned to Messrs
S. P. Musson, Sons & Co, Ltd.

The S.S. Alcoa Partner, which
|was taking a load of sugar, also
sailed yesterday. It is bound for
New Brunswick. The S.S. Mormac- |





‘Nina’ Is A
Faded Memory
Schooners Come The eee sete wits vee
e , a St. Je *s for ne <
And Go Despite fine of ‘i Columbus. Banter is
Th Weather | still tied off in the inner basin, The
e

}deck is now bleached while the
The hurricane season is_ here,

j bottom is covered with moss.
but this does not prevent the flu- j to

| Early in 1948 the Nina drifted

| St. Vincent and returned to

rst Barbados under its own power,

ent movement of schooners and AC by the Motor Vessel

dawn left for La Guaira











. © essels to and from | &ccompanile : : :
artedee, eam | Daerwood. On its return it was
Even the most recent report | taken out to shoot a few scenes

but soon after it was brought into
the inner basin and has been there
ever since,

The “Nina” was built in 1948
as sister ship to “Santa Maria,” |
/another caravel used here for the

that a hurricane had struck An-
tigua did not scare schooner cap-
tains from leaving this port the
next day, bound for other men]



Indian Islands.
Anchored in the Careenage yes-

terday were 13 schooners and two | filming of the Christopher
motor vessels, but none of them | Columbus picture.
were lying up in port for safety | That ana the “Santa Maria”

against bad weather, were both designed and built at
> 8 ames ¥ ard by
Seven of the vessels were being | the St. James Dock Yard i

unloaded of their cargoes of rice Clarke and mene: ane fo tea
i tine ir ¢ sm earatinks -| Maria’ was first launched anc
fruit. firewood and charcoal; four | re estar heaibeed eboke, eal

were taking cargo in preparation
for leaving port towards the ena
of the week while four others were
idling, awaiting cargo with which
to sail.

Captain Stoll
A. H. Vansluytman”
was expecting to sail on Saturday
for British Guiana. The vessel was

tafter
Many an evening they could be
}©een under sail and power, far
| the West off the St. James
, op | Coast, shooting scenes. On, eve-
of the Timothy | res when the vessels) com-
pho i | pleted they were anchored off
| the Dock Yared :
‘Santa Maria’

. ¢

t ischarging the last of its | End oi

ieee ae Suddenly ove night, the “Santa
He ‘did not think that the hurri- | Maria" went up in flames and

cane which struck Antigua would |that was the last of her. The

reach him on his course from Bar- | next morning, only charred pieces
bados to British Guiana. Hence he | of wood showed where the “Santa
did not see the necessity of lying | Maria” was anchored.

up in j r shelter The “Nina” was close by when
mee } Se “Santa Maria” was burning
Skipper McFarlane of the Bluel put the flames did mot reach
Nose. Mac was also poeparing to her
i f itish Guiana on Satur- :
= ter anip. was being loaded It was not long after when the

with lime and marl. “Nina” met her first bit of mis-

He agreed with Captain Stoll i oop While . sting ee
at. > ricane which struck | alone one evening, the vessel fe
that, the, nyze ean into difficulties and could not

Antigua would be out of their path
~-Barbados to British Guiana,
“The weather will have to be up

reach the St, James Coast,
It drifted w'th crew aboard and

: rt.” said skip- me days atter, it was towed
eep me in this port,” said skip ‘0 _ day ar, it
ee Gwiare of the “Gardenia W.”, mY St. Vinee 2 8 fen ‘n
ic ; also expected to sail oter vessel “Daerwood” was
which is also P sent from Barbados in search of
rr ; vessel was awaiting car-|her but that was ouly in time
cent. His vessel , to accompany the “Nina” back
from St. Vincent.

Another schooner captain told When the Nina sailed into St.
Vincent everyone was curious and
on its return here local folk were
also interested, but at present no
ne seems to even look at the
vessel and it is quickly becoming
a faded memory.

less trade it would make.



24 LEADING
TO CHOOSE





THAT PUT

PAGE FIVE



IN STOCK ...

PURINA.
CHOWS

ANIMALS & POULTR)



H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.
DISTRIBUTORS.







TO-DAY’S SPECIAL

COCOANUT
CREAMS

in and Enjoy some at...

KNIGHTS LTD.
PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN

HARRISON'S — ==>"

Come







DOMESTIC
EARTHENWARE

THE LARGEST SELECTION AND THE

LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN.

AMONG MANY OTHER ITEMS OUR STOCK INCLUDES-
CUPS AND SAUCERS—AIl Kinds
WHITE TANKARD JUGS
EGG CUPS WITH FOOT
DECORATED BOWLS
MIXING BOWLS
TEA AND COFFEE POTS
VEGETABLE DISHES (Covered)
PLATES—In All Sizes
NIGHT CHAIR PANS
TEA, DINNER, and COFFEE SETS _

in a good range of attractive decorations

AND
A SPECIAL LINE OF

5 PIECE DECORATED
TOILET SETS
At SU1L.837 Per Set.

HARRISON

BROAD STREET
2364

DIAL



DRINK
CLAYTON'S




















You

36” wide at

$1.00:

a yard L



SHADES
FROM



= CAVE

12

‘
}
i



SHEPHERD

LTD. “

& CO.,

13 BROAD STREET







ss.

PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1958











1 > An Idee! Tonic
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Brewed Specially for
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~ FREAN'S

PARTY AIDS=
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MICKEY MOUSE

i ee

| [WE ROPE VOU Witt)
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|
|
THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER | | ) nr
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66
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os Ta ie eee z i
WERE 1OU IW PAGANINNS ) 1 CONT SEE WHaT IT's | ( BEWARE OF STUART! WN ARE te esl pee SO, SIGNOR CANNON, YOU 4 -
RESTAURANT THIS @OT TO 00 WITH vou, HE'S DANGEROUS) 4> = DINNER, SomeTIME...// DO, my DEAR ) ARE BUSV CHASING -ER, e. Delphinium Brown
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BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MAN











oo



53S590%
WIFE PHONED JUST
BEFORE YOU GCT IN-SHE
| SAID HER BROTHER BIMMY















|| iF HE Passes
|| HERE-T HOPE |.
1G IN TOWN AND WILL CALL | iil || HE DOESKOT
ON, YOU- SHE WANTS YOU = |
TO SEE Him /!



SOME

T WON'T RUN INTO
MAGGIE'S BROTHER - |.
an poland DO KNOW

Cer LL NOT SE HIM -AN! one? OF A PLACE ?
NEVER COULD--1'M hf







A RUBBER FLOOR COVERING
DUNLOP FORT CALL AND SECURE YOURS EARLY ,
Some motorists can boast of the mileage of their tyres ; some enjoy
safety ; others will talk of tyre silence or good looks, or some pet e

In 4 BEAUTIFUL PATTERNS
theonetyrethat | = THRBIRTIW. 3"
feature that has taken their fancy. But you, with your new Dunlop

WIDE @ $3.32 Yd.
10 & ii Roebuck Street.
Port, can beat them all — for this is the one tyre that has everything — INC IN B.G

* YOU’LL BE MILES AHEAD WITH |® ECC COCO TEE PARTITE
THE N E W
3 FEET
SUITABLE FOR BATHROOM, PASSAGE
Or MOTOR CAR MATS Etc
h hi ssscersel
as e veryl in YOVOWSO SSO 0S SSBF 95 OF OESF4 6$$$S99999 ;
every feature the resources of Dunlop can produce to give maximum
wear with safety, silent running and distinctive appearance.



man When thinking ofa. ..

Increase Road and individuatity, : R

tall ADIO
Increases Skid be aed ,
Resistance on

rrr eae , Wet Surfaces.

i Greater number y

of tread edges
cs ‘Think of a K.B.

volume:
where



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IS THAT FOR ME? UGH+SHES RITA*HOW CAN Y YOU FOOL, IF | STOP *AND THE CANNIBAL



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AEALE IT MusT ENQUGH~-] | GARLIC! » 3

BE A'B’ PICTURE!

4 7 peat
“at
~ t ~~
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\ = holding at
-” high speeds,
‘ creat ital

aw y,

j =
- ‘ Strengthen tyre
|

Good sur for the “QUEEN MARY”, “QUEEN
ELIZABETH” and the “CORONIA”

against accidental

Harmonises with
modern car body
designs.
Tread pattern
persists to the
d.

: The foundation ‘ Listen in to ZFY for the K.B. Programme
We P, of the new Fort's .
cad reliability.
"FORT CASING ®

‘ -m. Local Tim
PLUS SILENT RUNNING RIGHT TO THE END OF ITS LONG LIFE Friday at 7.30 p.m. ”



damage. Good enough for U \

Pree
‘
o

DUNLOP RUBBER CO. LTD., BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND ¢
ECKSTEIN BROS. — Bay Street '99000000500069090009 960099550506 59 000 SUS OOSSION











FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1950



CLASSIFIED

TELEPHONE

IN MEMORIAM



Sacred to the memory of imv dear Has-
band WILLIAM G. PIERREPOINTE, who
departed this life Auguct 2th, 1947

We carmot say, nor we will not say,

That he is dead but far away.

With a loving smile and a wave of hand

He has wandered into unknown

land,

Sleep on beloved and take your rest,

God know I love you still.



Evelyn.
25.8.50-—1n





FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

CAR——Citroen (X-169) A bit shabby,
but goes like a Bomb. $1,459. Hugh Pop-
jam, “In Chancery”, Christ Church.













9.8.°50.—6n.
TRUCK—One 1934 Ford Truck
Apply D. V. Scott & Co. ‘Vhite Pak.

Phone 3493. 16.8.50—t.f.n

CAR—1947 Hillman Min 7,000 miles
Perfect condition. Owner leaving island
Price $1,400.00. Greenland. Phone 3283 or

75. 25.8.50—8n

FURNITURE

MAHOGANY CEDAR — Lined Tp)
Boy — 4 ft. x 3 ft. x 2 ft. Good con
dition, Three drawers and hanging space
Good bevelled mirrom in mahogany
frame, 30 x 20 ins. Price reasona
Archie Clarke, Navy Gardens.

24.8 50--3n,

FURNITURE — 1 Painted Press; 1

Baby’s Press; 1 Kitchen Cabinet: 1

Small Mahogany Table. Phone 3252.
24.8.50—2n.

MISCELLANEOUS

|

_GLASSWARE FROM CZECHOSLOVA-

KIA.—Vases, Powder Bowls, Cups &

Fruit Bowls reduced to half price. See
ovr Show Windows. Knight's Ltd

25.8.50—3n



















IMPEX World's best cycle generators
and headlights. Obtainable, from all lead-
ing stores. 25 .8.60—Tn

RECORD ALBUMS for 10-inch and for
12-inch and carrying cases for 10-inch
records, and we have the records too

A, & CO., LTD.









Alle ess satel mete pl p anes
YAWL—‘“Frapida” approx. 37% feet
long with Gray Marine engine. Good
condition $3,000 a bargain. Apply
J. R. Edwards, Phone 2520.
15.8.50—T.F tY.





FOR RENT
HOUSES

FLAT — Upstairs Flat at Waverley,
Blue Waters Terrace. 3 large Bedrooms
semi-furnished with modern conveni-
ences. "Phone 8283. 20.8.50.—7n.

FLAT — ‘“Wrenscourt", Palm Beach,
Hastings. 3 Bedrooms, Drawing and Din-
ing Rooms, 2 Verandahs, Pantry, Kitchen,
Garage. All modem conveniences. Cool
and airy, near the sea, Available Octo-
ber. Apply: C. E. Clarke, 7 Swan Street.
Phone 2631 or 3029 25.8.50-—5n
TWO FLATS—At “Inch Marlow”. Fully
Furnished. Phone, John Bladon 4640.

9.8.'50.—6n.

THERSISDON—Maxwell’s Coast Road.
Fully furnished. From September. Mrs.
B. Lashley, 5th Bungalow, Maxwell's
Road. Dial 8417. 25.8.50—n.



















My House “In CHANCERY”, for three
months, to careful tenants, Fully -fur-
nished. From Sept. 1st. Write Hugh Pop-
ham. Phone John Bladon 4640.

_.. 9,8,'50,—6n,

WORTHY DOWN—Top Rock having 3
bedrooms connecting Toilet and Bath,
jarge Lounge-dining room. Delightful
balcony, Two car garage. Fully enclosed



Available unfurnished September ist
Apply: Ralph Beard. 4683 or 2328.
25.8.50—3n
FOR RENT OR LEASE
UNFURNISHED
“PARAISO”'—-Barbarees Road Situ-

ated one mile from the City. Drawing
and dining room, Front and side Galleries,
Kitchenette, three large bedrooms each
with running water, modern tiled bath
with shower and tub bath with hot
water laid on upstairs. Large games
room, bedroom with running water.
kitchen and store rooms on ground floor
Servant's room with toilet and bath. Gar_
age with room for two cars. Electricity
and Gas. Please ring 8382

22.8.50—t.f.n







PUBLIC SALES
AUCTION

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON TUESDAY 29th by order of Mrs
E. P. Baker, we will sell her Furniture
at “Banyan Beach", Brighton, which in-
cludes Sideboard, Serving, Coffee and
Side Tables, Arm, Morris and Eas.
Chairs, Gate-Leg Tea Table; Book Case
(Glass Doors) all in Mahogany, Rugs,
Wall Mirrors, Glass and China, Lioyd
Loom and Rush Chairs and Rockers; 2
Single Bedsteads with Vono Simmons
Springs, Deep-Sleep Mattresses, Mird
Press, Dressing and Bed-side Tables,
Linen Press, all in Mahogeny; G.E
Refrigerator, 3-Burner Ger Stove,
Larder, Step Ladder, Palms in Cement
Pots, Pressure Cooker, Electric Iron and
other Items.

Sale 11.30 o'clock

BRANKER, TROTMAN

Auctioneers







‘Terms 8]
& CO.
% .8.50—22n

REAL ESTATE

————$— —

LAND — One rood twenty-six and a
half perches of land at Prospect, St,
James. Price attractive. For particulars
apply to D'Arcy, A, Scott, Magazine
Lane. 24.8.50—2n

THE undersigned will set up for
saie at their office No. 17 High Street,
on Friday ist September 1950 at 2 p.m.
the dwellinghouse called The Cottage
and the land thereto containing 3,250
square feet situate at Cheapside, Bridge-
town.

Inspection any day except Thursday
between the hours of 4 p.m and 6 p.m,



TS oe

on application to the tenant, Mrs
Thomas.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale, appiy to:

COTTLE, CATFORD & Co
18.8.50—+.f.n.

HOUSE—(1) Double roof house cach
29 x 12 x 8 covered with galvanise,
situated in Yearwood Land, Black Rock





1, Chattel house and 3,200 square feet
of land.

2. 10 perches of land.

3. 2 roods of land.

4. 17% perches of land. All situate
near Auburn and Indian pond,
Joseph the properties of the late Wil-
lam T. Walton deceased. The above
properties will be set up for sale by
public competition at our Office, James
on Friday 25th August 1950 at
For inspection apply on premi-

9

2 p.m.
ses,
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors
17.8.50—5n



|
——<—<—_—=—————

Lvervbody Praise
de Missis

COFFEE

but duh dont

DISTILLED

WATER





buy
GAS

she

e







—



Â¥ ILKES,
1
| Hours: 8.30 to 1 and 2 to 11.30



ADS.

WANTED





HELP

CASHIER—Assistant Lady Cashier. For
the Hastings Hotel. Apply in person with
references to Manager 24.8.50—t.f.n





MALE CLERK—For Traffic Dept., City
Office, B.W.LA, Ltd. One with some pre-
vious experience preferred.

Apply by ag testimonials to:





QUALIFIED ELECTRICAL FOREMAN.

—Apply in person

experience etc. b W. Deane,
City Garage Trading Co. Ltd., Victoria
Street. . 17.8.50—t.f.n.

MISCELLANEOUS

FURNISHED Cottage at Wortht
St. Lawrence with Garage.
A.B.C. c/o Advocate.



or
Apply:—

19.8. 50—6n.
POSITION WANTED

DENTAL TECHNICIAN with over 20
years experience in preparing and cast-





ing all gold fittings Acnylic processing
of partial an edentulous cases a spe-
ciality.

Modern Technique used in all sta@=

Reply to Ged. Wilkins, 11, Pic °*
Street, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad,

3 .8.80- on



WANTED TO BUY
STAMPS—Used Postage Stamps of
America and B.W.I. Islands. James’ \'

Indies Stamp Co., Bay Street, St. Mich
ael. 25 .8.50—3n.

PUHLIC NOTICES
NOTICE

This is to notify the General Public
that the Auction Sale of the (5) pine
Spars now lying in the Constitution
River which was advertised to ta‘:°
place on the 3lst day of August has
been Cancelled.

D’Arcy A. Scott, .
Government Auctioneer,
25.8.50—In

1S.













(Deceased)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that. all
persons having any debt or claims against

the Estate of Joseph Wiggins deceagd,
late of Flat Rock, in the Parish of Saint
George in this Island who died in this
Island on the 27th day of March are
requested to send in particulars of their
claims duly attested to the ypcerenee’
G. Seymour Alleyne of Mason Street,
Bridgetown, on or before the @ay
of September, 1950, after whith date I
shall proceed to distribute the assets of
the deceaserl among the parties entitled
‘thereto, having regard only to sich
claims of which I shall then have
had notice and I will not be liable for
the assets or any part thereof so distribu-
ted to any person of whowe debt or claim
I shall not then have had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to gettle their in-
debtedness without delay.

Dated this 8th day of Angust, 1950

G. SEYMOUR ALLEYNE,

Qualified executor of the Estate of

OSEPH WIGG



OFFICIAL NOTICE

S.
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF
APPEAL

{Equitable Jurisdiction).
HUNT Plant
endant

Fi

IN pursuance of an Order in this
Court in the above action made on the
22nd. day of: , 1950, I give notice
to all persons having any ¢state, right
or interest in or ‘any lien or incum-
brance affeeting

Alb~that~scertain piete or parcel
of lamd situate at the Ivy in the par-
ish of Saint Michael aforesaid containing
by admeasurement Four thousand seven
hundred and seventy square feet or
thereabouts abutting and bounding on
lands of James Murray, on \ynds of
Blanche Grosvenor, on lands of gpe
Forde and on two sides on the pubiic
roed called Ivy Road or however else
the same abut and bound together with
the dwellinghouse and all and singular
other the buildings and erections on
the said parcel of land erected apd built
standing and being with the appurten-
ances to bring before me an account
of their said claims with their witnesses,
documents and vouchers, to be examined
ter me on any Tuesday, or Friday be-
tween the hours of 12 (noon), and 3
o'@lock in the afternoon, at the Office
of the Clerk of the Assistant Court of
Appeal at the Court House, Bridgetown,
befdre the Ist day of November, 195°,
in order that such claims may be rank-
ed according to the nature and priority
thereof re’pectively; otherwise such per-
sons will be precluded from the, benefit
of the said Decree, anit be deprived of
all claim on or against the said property.

Claimants are also notified that they
must attend the said Court on Wednes-
day, the 1st day of November, 1950, at
1€ o'clock a.m, when their said claims
will be ranked. e

Given under my hand this 22nd day
of August, 1950.

. V. GILKEs,
Ag. Clerk of the Assistant Court of
1.
mes 25.8.50—In

OFFICIAL SALE

BARBADOS.
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF
APPEAL

uitable Jurisdiction)
AUGUSTUS HUNTE—Plaintifft
FITZGERALD CLARKE—Defendant

NOTICE is hereby given that by virtue
of an Order of the Assistant Court of
Appeal dated the 22nd day of August,
1950, there will be set up for sale to
the ‘highest bidder at the Office of the
Assistant Court of Appeal at the Court
House, Bridgetown, between the hours
of 12 (noon) and 2 o'clock in the after-
noon on Friday, the 3rd day of Novem-
ber, 1950.

All that certain piece or parcel of land
situate at the Ivy in the parish of Saint
Michael aforesaid coritaining by admeas-
urement r tho seven hundred
and seventy square feet or thereabouts
abutting and bounding on lands of
James Murray on lands of Blanche
Grosvenor on lands of one Forde and
on two sides on the public road called
Ivy Road or however else the same abut
and bound together with the dwelling-
house and all and singular other the
buildings and erections on the said
parcel of land erected and built stand-
ing and being with” the appurtenances
and if not then sold the said property
will be set up for sale on every succeed-
ing Friday between the same hours until
the same is sold for a sum not less than
£400. 0. 0

Dated this 22nd ay of 1950.



August,
. G 5
Actg. Clerk of the Assistant Court

of Appeal.
25.8.50.—3n.



Removal Nofice

Dr. F. A, COX
D.C.P.T. (Chir.)

Chiropractor & Optician
has Removed to Lower James St

a |
TO-DAY’S |
NEWS FLASH |

EGG TIMERS
SAMSONITE: —a heat proof
adhesive of colossal strength

at

|

|
|
|
|
j
|

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY |
& HARDWARE



HARBOUR LOG

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Philip A. Davidson; Sch. Bur-
{ma D., Sch Rosarene; Sch. Bluenoee
Mac; Seh Sip Wonita; Seh. Prances
Smith; M.V jue Star; Sch. Bmeline;
Sch. Belqueen; Sch. Laudalpha; Sch
Lady Noeleen; S'S, Alcoa Polaris; Sch.
Princess Louise; M.V. T. B Radar:
Sch. Timothy A. H, Van Sluytman; Sch.

Gardenia W; Sch. Enterprise; Sch. Tur-

tle Dove; Sch. Many M. Lewis; Sch

Mary M. Lewis; Sch. Marion Belle

Welfe; Sch. Marea Henrietta; 8.8
Sylvanfield; S.S. Myken
ARRIVALS

Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe, 74 tons,

Capt. Every, from British Guiana,

“gents: Sth. Owners’ Association
Sch. Marea Henrietta, 43 tons, Capt

Selby, from St. Lucia, Agents Sch
Owners’ Association.
S.S. Sylvanfield, 4,389 tons, Capt.

Pingsley, from Curacao, Agents: Messrs
Gardiner Austin & Co. Ltd

DEPARTURES.

8.S. Oranjestad, 2,855 tons, Capt.
Hazelkoff, for Madeira, Agents: Messrs.
S. P. Musson, Sons & Co., Ltd.

8.8. Heeuba, 2,220 tons, Capt. Del-

zenne, for Paramaribo, Agents: Messrs S.
P. Musson, Sons & Co,, Ltd.

S.S. Mormaedawn, 4,521 tons, Capt.
Gregson, for La Guaira, Agents: Messrs.
RM. Jones & Co. Ltd.

S.S. Alcoa Partner, 3,931 tons, Capt
Pembroke, for New Brunswick, Agents:
Messrs. DaCosta & Co. Ltd

Tanker Athelbrook, 285 tons, Capt
Lonsdale, for Trinidad, Agents: Messrs.
HM. Jasom Jones & Co,. Ltd.

Ships In Touch With
Barbados Coastati Station

CABLE and Wireless (West Indies)
Ltd. advise that they can now commu-
nicate with the following ships through
their Barbados Coast Station.

$.S. Jane Stove: S.S. Del Sud: S.S
American; S.S. Quilmes; S.S. Myken;
8.8. Hendrik Fisher: S.S. Lady Nel-
son; S.S. Canadian Challenger; s.s.
Sunwhit; S.S. Hecuba; SS. Interpeter;
$.S. Alcoa Pegasus: S.8. Casablanca

$.S. Syivafield: S.S. Toulouse: S.S.
Spinanger; S.S. Mormacdawn; S,S,
Fredrika: S.S. Imperial Quebec: S.S.

Oranjestad; S.S, Haparangi; S.S. Be
lita; S.S. Rena: S.S. Monte Arnabal,
$.S. Cumberland; S.S. the Cabins; S.S.
Somerset: S.S. Irania; S.S. Willemstad
$8. Alcoa Partner; S.S. Fort Moultrie:
§.S. Coulgarve: S.S. S. Paula: S.8S.
Hera: S.S. Esso Bethlehem: S.S. Spe
ciolist: S.S. Fort Royal: §.8. Arakaka

8.8. Liparus; S.S. Regent Juguar; 5.S
Matina: S.S. Imperial Quebec: s.s.
Svenor; S.S. Juvenal; S.S. Regent

Panther: B.T. Gobeo: 'S.S. Athelchief:
S.S. Esso Philadelphia: S.S. Tindefjell:
SS. Beechhill: S.S Argentan; S.S
Frederic A, Eilers: S.S. S. Gaspar; S.S.
Spidola; M.S. Amerigo Vespucci; 5.8
Annarelia: S.8. Kongsstein: S.6. Sax-
onstar: S.S. Bacchus; S.S. Turbinellus;
S.5. Prins Philips Willem; S.S. Stan-
bell; SuS. Ariguani: S.S. ‘Elax; S.S
Sundale; 5.S. Fort De France: SS.
Tista: S.S. Sunwalt: S.8. Sunvalley:
S.S. Katherine; SS. Andreas: 58.8.
Norita; 5.8. Gascony: S.8. Villeda-
miens; S.S, Lampania: S.S. Belita: 8.5.
Mooncrest; $.S. Mormacdawn: S.S. Al-
phacka.



ARRIVALS BY B.W.1.A.L
From TRINIDAD: S
Andrew Christine; Catherine Richards,

William Simmons; Bernard Richards:
Tnimas Blackstack; Frank Nothnagel;
Stanley Osbourn; Arthur ima:
George Niles; Henry Gootman; Austo
Matheus; Estala DeHrullon; Mahomed
Degia; Mahomed Patel; Ahmed .Pandor;

Mrs. Edith Bedell; Benjamin Bedell;
Mrs, Hazell Bedell; Henry Bland;
Thomas Springer; Aaron Springer; An-
drew Warner; Selwyn Jaleel, Arthur

Moore; John Branch George H. Wilkie;
Olga Blonval; Francia Blonval; Adoifo
Bionval; Mir: Yonala Stoute; Clementina
White.

ARRIVALS by B.W.D. AL.
From GRENADA;

Cyril Bennett, Liuelctte Fuchs, Otte
Fuchs, Theodore Worrell, Maxwell
Thomas, Erayntrude Gomas, Ivelow
Mitchell, Joyee Babb, Ingrid Babb.
From ANTIGUA: ;
George McMichael, Louis Fisher, Perci-
val Jeffers, Smith Bracewell, Margaret
Bracewell.

From HAITI:

Herry Ben.
From JAMAICA:

John Newton Whitton, Syvia Marge
Whitton, Susan Sarah Whitton, John
Whitton, Joseph Diver, Ivy Pratt.
From PORTO RICO:

Evelyn P. Outram, Sidney Spira.

DEPARTURES—By B.W.LA.L.

For TRINIAD:

Bhanoomatie Singh, Befaial Singh, Edris
Mercier, Orona Scatriffe, Susan Acker-
man, Ruby DeSilva, Elrice Roett, Sam-
uel Roett, Christopher Roett, Esther
Roett,, Joan Maggs, Isabel Toshea, Bar-
bara Adams, James Adams, Hon. H. A.
Cuke, O.B.E., M.L.C,. America Machado,
Raphael Machade, Enrique Miquilarera,
Losbio Fineo, Dolores Fineo, Luis Fineo,
Jacques Cramer, Denis tes, Clive
Valere, Maria Campos, Caesar’ Fernan-
dini,, Collin Pilgrim, Ancilla Henry,
Sheila Henry, Henry Goodman, Bismark
Drayton, William Simmons, Christian
Alexander, Lionel Brewster, Antoneito
Corales,Vaides, Carlota Castro-Gruber,

For LA GUAIRA:

Bertha Voorwijk, Maartem Voorwijk,
Madelaine Voorwiik, Alda Zapata, Jose-
fine Schweinborger, Peter Schweinborger,
Viviana Barzilay, Lily Barzilay, Nora
Palenzona, Mariella Palenzona, Isabella
Palenzona, Armando Palenzona, Cesar
Palenzona, Saba De Mayer, Mary Wed-
derburn Tilma Calcano, Anat Calcano,
Ludovik, Wolken, Carmen Plaza, Maria
Benitz, Elias Roth. ‘

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



GREETINGS









FLASH FROM LAND TO LAND

MEMBERS of the victorious West Indian Test team visited the Wood-street telephone exchange

and in this picture Weekes, Walcott, Goddard

the overseas telephones.



3 Schooners
Bring Rice

“Three large quantities of rice
have already been brought to the
island by intercolonial vessels
from British Guiana this week.

Apart from the 1,250 bags
brought by the Schooner Timothy
Van Sluytman on Monday, the 69-
ton Schooner Mary M. Lewis,
under the command of Capt. Mar-
shall, brought 1,500 bags on
Wednesday and the 74-ton Schoon-
er Marion Belle Wolfe. under Capt.
Every, brought 2,000 bags of
which 150 were broken, yesterday.

The 84-ton Turtle Dove, skip-
pered by Capt. Olivierre, also ar-
rived from British Guiana but this
only brought 161 tons of firewood
and 400 bags of charcoal.

Other cargo brought by the
Mary M. Lewis included 300 bags
of charcoal and 45 tons of fire-
wood.

The Wolfe also brought J1 pieces
of sawn mora and 25 pieces of
sawn greenheart, 500 wallaba
posts, 500 bags of charcoal and
nine tons of firewood,

Twenty-one casks of honey were
brought by the 43-ton Schooner
Marea Henrietta which arrived
from St. Lucia yesterday. The re-
mainder of its carge was made up
of 67 packages of fresh fruit, 200
posts, 280 bags of charcoal. 50
drums of cocoanut oil. 24 bags of
cocoanuts and 205 bags of copra.

These vessels are all consigned
- the Schooner Owners’ Associa-
ion.



Financial Plans

To Be United

LONDON, August 24.

Twelve North Atlantic Pact
deputies this morning set up a
Committee to co-ordinate the
financial plans of separate
defence schemes drawn up by
Treaty countries, usually reliable
sources said.

Charles Spofford, American
chairman of deputies presented
the United States views and com-
ments on plans,

He was also believed to have
outlined the extent and type of
aid the United States was pre-
pared to give to supplement
defence programmes’ of her
eleven Atlantic Pact partners.

Charles Spofford, American
Chairman of the Atlantic Pact
Council of Deputies, today told
the meeting of the Twelve Nation
Council that their proposed
financial contributions to the
revised defence programme were
not sufficient, according to usually
well informed source.

There was still a considerable
gap to close.

It was understood Spofford did
not give any indication of the
amount that might be expected
from the United States to fill
the gap. —Reuter.



GOVERNMENT NOTICES.



PRICE OF SULPHATE OF AMMONIA

Until further notice, the following price has been arranged: —



Maximum Price

Sulphate of Ammonia ..

—



$120.80 per ton





Discount if paid by
30th September, 1959

$2.25 per ton





25.8.50—2

PAYMENT OF WATER RATES

Consumers who i:ave not yet

paid water rates in respect of the

quarter ending 30th September, 1950, are hereby notified that unless
these rates are paid on or before the 31st of August, 1950, the Depart-
ment, as authorised by section 46 of the Waterworks Act, 1895-1. may

stop the water from flowing into

the premises, in respect of which

such rates are payable. either by cutting off the pipe to such premises
or by such means as they may think fit, and take proceedings to

recover any amount due,

——



BARBADOS,
IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery

Defendant)
documents and vouchers to be examined
the hours of 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece

in the parish of St.

the same may abut and

OFFICIAL NOTICE

admeasurement two roods two and two-tenths perche
Abutting and bounding on jands formerly of W
now of one Walrond on lands formerly of G. G. Medford but
of one Farnum on lands formerly of Alfred F. Green but now of
Pilgrim and on the public road called Spooners Hill or howeve

25.8.50—2n.



Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all

persons having or claiming any estate, right or interést or any lien or incum-
branee in or affecting the property hereinafter mentioned
to bring before me an account of their claims with their witnesses

(the property of the

by me on any Tuesday or Friday between
afternoon at the Registration Office, Public

Buildings, Bridgetown before the 26th day of Oct. 1950, in order that such claims
may be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority
respectively, otherwise such persons will be precluded from, the benefits of
decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said property.

PLAINTIFF: LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL
DEFENDANT: VIOLET JOHNSON

thereof

f any

or parcel of land situate at Spooners Hil!
Michael and Island aforesaid containins by
or thereabouts

T. E. Richards but

ow
one
else

bound Together with the dwelling house

called “Homestead” and all and singular the buildings and erections

both freehold and chattel on the said lands erected and built standing

and being with the appurtenances the said dwelling house land

hereditaments and premises being the property of the defendant
Bill filed 28th July 1950.
Dated the 22nd August,’ 1950

H WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery
a “

and Williams are

2 U.S. Ships
Sunk
—REDS CLAIM

TOKYO, Aug. 24.
Pyongyang (North Korean-,
Radio) to-day claimed that Com-
munist aircraft sank an American
ship on Tuesday off Soijak Island.
Early yesterday Pyongyang Ra-
dio claimed an American destroyer
had blown up off the Korean east
coast after an engagement with

Communist shore batteries. An
American spokesman here ridicul-
ed this. —Reuter,



Govt. Plans To
End Strike

IN CANADA

OTTAWA, Aug. 24.

The Government worked on
Thursday on plans for getting the
full weight of parliament behind
action to end the general rail
strike as it awaited Tuesday's
cpening of the emergency session.

As the critical strike went into
the third day there was no direct
Government intervention in pros-
pect before the opening of Parlia-
ment with the Administration
standing by its decision to have
legislatots share the responsibil-
ity for any action,

What that action might be was
still problematical, Prime Minis-
ter St. Laurent in announcing the
opening date on Wednesday said
the Cabinet had not yet taken final
decisions on the programme of
action it will lay before the Com-
mons. Deliberations on the mo-
mentous issue, the outcome of
which may have a heavy bearing
oa future industrial relations in
rational industries such as rail-
ways, went on Thursday morning
at a Cabinet meeting.

One hundred and twenty-four
thousand railway employees went
on strike Tuesday for higher wages
end shorter hours.

Can Press,

Dockers Refuse
To Load Goods

For Russia

NEW YORK Aug. 24.

Members of the Longshoremen’s
Association here who recently re-
fused to unload goods from Russia
have now decided not to load ships
with goods for Russia or countries
associated with her,

The first ship affected was
American 8,000-ton freighter
the Moore-McCormack
bound for Gdynia Poland

The Union decided last week to
boycott all shipments of Soviet
products entering New York and
Loston.

New York dockers had refused
two days earlier to unload a cargo
of Russian furs,

The embargo on unloading was
later extended to air cargoes.

—Reuter.

COFFEE REPORT:
IS_ CONFUSING

NEW YORK, August 24.



an
of
Lines



Representatives of the Latin
American coffee industry today
criticised the revised Congres-
sional report on coffee prices
They said that it would aggravate
bitter resentment — in Latin-
America, and confuse people in
the United States,

Four Latin-American nations

asked the Special Commission on
Coffee of the Inter-American
‘Economic and Social Council to
consider the report urgently at
its meeting next Tuesday. The
report made by the Sub-com-
mittee made recommendations
designed to bring the coffee trade
in the United States under closer
scrutiny. It replaced an carlie:
report to which the State Devart-

ment objected because it placed
part of the blame for recent
coffee price increases in the
United States on some Latin-

American countries.—Reuter



Kravehenko In Rio
RIO DE JANEIRO, Aug. 24



Victor Kravchenko, forme
Soviet official in the United States
and author of the book “I chose
freedom” arrived at Rio De
Janeiro last night, om his way
to Buenos Aires. Kravchenko
declined to make any statements
to ne@ws-men saying that he
would hold a Press Conference
on his way back, when he in-

tends to remain a few days here



He is on a mere pleasure trip
Kravchenko who is under a
heavy guard of F.B.1. agents
and Brazilian plain clothes men
will leave for Buenos Aires this
evening. He ji travelling ler
the name of Pietro Martinez

—Reuter

seen at their particular section of



BombersRepel

Red Advance |Canadian Nation

@ From Page 1

west bank of Naktong, ready to
move Jato the Hyongpung bridge-
head 15 miles south of Taegu—
lower jaw of the threatened pin-
cers thrust on this vital communi-
cations city ia the northwest
corner of the “defence box.”

On the East Coast, a Regiment



of the South Korean Capital
Division was forced to withdraw
North of Pohang during the
night, but this morning two
Divisions prepared to mount a
counter attack. :
Airforce Headquarters said

£26 Invader bombers were also
in the air early today winging of
for new strikes at marshalling
yards and troop concentrations
around Taegu and Chinju on the

south coast,
Late yesterday jet fighters far
behind Communist lines report-

ed strikes on ox-carts which ex-
plojed under rocket fire. They are
belieyed to have been laden with
ammunition. North Korean Radio





said early today that one Ameri-
ean aircraft was shot down hy
flak yesterday while _ raiding
Pyongvang
Counter-Attack
Speaking for the first time in
weeks of theis own air activity,

Communist Radio said Communist
troops with air support were re-
pelling a final counter-offensive
effort of American and South
Korean forces,

Naval Headquarters
American destroyer for
recond time in three days
ried out a bombardment of the
fer north east coast port of
Chongim sterday, raising fires
that were visible 10 miles at sea
Here, targets were the Mitsubi-
shi iron works rail yards anc
docks

With little
Korea today
Airforce
centrated
interdiction.

said an

the
car-



y



ground action it
the American Fifth
repcrted its action con-

on oa behind-line:

A midday Communique - saic
that north of the 87th parallel
Mustangs ranged over the Won
ju, Kimpo, Seoul snd = Suwor
ereas and claimed eight locomo
{ives destroyed, three damage
end three flak points hit ane
cestroyed.

Factories Bombed

A large number of buildings ir

two villages were rocketed anc
strafed when found to shelter
cLemy troops and supplies

"hree factories were also bombed
rocketed,

A .total of 93 sorties in close
upport of ground forces was
‘own, The principal effort was
» the Northern sector along ap-
proaches to Taegu, where build-
ings sheltering the enemy were
strafed

Pilots observed no worthy
enemy action over the front

One Mustang was lost due t

enemy action but the place an:





exact cause were unknown

Superforts continued to smast
enemy war potential raining
heavy bofnbs on military an
industrial installations, marshal
Jing yards and key bridges nort!
cf the 38th parallel

—Reuter.



B.G. Rice

Corporation

@ from page |!
Hon. D. P. Debidin and Dr, C,
Jagan, who maintained opposition

to the end.

Before the motion was put to the
vole on Wednesday, the Financial
Secretary the Hon. BE. F. McDuvid
emphasised that C.D.C. or any
other development corporation to
be formed must be a free explorer
outside the market if they were to
make @ suecess of the venture.

McDavid pointed out however
there was sufficient safeguard to
protect others engaged in the In-
dustry. Amended Clause 7 pro-
vides for the Governor to invite
persons to particpate in establish-
meat and operation of the propos-
cd @evelopment corperation and
uny agreement between Govern-
ment and corporation will have to
meet with legislative approval, as
well as any arrangement with re
gard to marketing or domestic
consumption and export trade, and
rice produced in the colony; also
the fixing of grade and prices will
be done in collaboration betweer
the corporation and the Rice Mar-
keting Board

The passing of the Bill paves the
way for large scale development
of the colony’s rice industry. The
new corporation will take over the
Government central mill at Ma-
bhuicony rice development
scheme es





a

lished with two other
Berbice

Aid




Es
providi



sequibc

ne the









an

he









PAGE SEVE!
‘ 7 x ~ +
Senate Cuts “imed 15/- For
$200,000, 000 Indecent Language i
WASHINGTON igust 24 [LVINCS TONE BOURNE of 2nd
ie oy \ 1 tex 8 Road 1s 6 6GH
i of w H Vv i ined 15/- by City
iy it the § H - Dp trate Mr F A
ret Cer itter ad ag fel i for using imdeceut jan>
$200,000,000 off this year’s ¢ ove nenitioned
propriations for onomi read j i3 In default,
ration and administration, The pe re it spend 14 days" tre
mir tt we 1 eported 7 iment
ait 1 agreenent 0 redu
Senate upprove propos { hefore it beeomes effective
00,000,000 loa to Spain to woud uce new money for
ny) $ Eeonomic aid from the
cut’ which must esate approved figure of
proved by both Houses of Con- $2 106,000 to $2,250,000,000.





SHIPPING NOTICES

























= ———
ROYAL NETHERLANDS er ee a ce
STEAMSHIP co sceept Cargo and Passengers for
. iniea: St, Vincent; Grena?
SAILING FROM PERDAM Lucia and Aruba, sailing
ROTTERDAM AND ANTWERP May Sth August
iS. HECUBA Aue. 4th, Sth, 8th » . ‘an o°
M.S, HELENA Sept.’ ist, and, 5th ut CN ee ae
= ena cept Cargo ane >a
ee Sukie _ AMSTREDAM Pominica; Antigua; Montserrat;
38. COTTICA Aus. 18th ee Ne AEE Seay
_ Soth August
SATLING TO MADEIRA, PLYMOTZU pry ie
ANTWERP AND AMSTERDAM The M.V. “DAERWOOD" will
1.8. ORANJESTAD Aug. 22nd accept Cargo and Passengere for
1.8. WILLEMSTAD Sept. 19th St Lucta; St. Vincent; Grenada
SATANG YO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO and Aruba, date of sailing will
DEMERARA, ETC be given
WS, HECUBA Aug, 26th B.W.1. Schooner Owuers
S. COTTICA Sept. Sth Association Inc.
S. P. MUSSON, SON & OO. LTD. Consignee; Dial: 4047

«

AGENTS





al Steamships











JUTHBOUND Salts vile Salis Arrives Sails
Montreal Halifax Boston Garbados Barbados
“ANADIAN CHALLENGER | 11 aug 4 Aug 25 Aug. 26 Aug
ADY RODNEY 28 Aug j é 28 Aug 6 Sept £
ANADIAN CRUISER i Aus 3 >t 13 Sept S Se
LADY NELSON iL Sept i4 t W Sep 25 Sept. 22 Seg
ANADIAN CHALLENGER . 27 Sept. 30 Sept Oct ;
ADY PODNEY 1 Oct If t 16 Cet ui Oct 2 y
ANADIAN CRUISER Oct 27 Oct 7 Noy 7
ADY NELSON i Nov 4 Nov € Nov 15 Nov v
SS
ORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal Sit. John
ATY ROONEY I €e' 1 Sept 0 Sept 1 Oct 5 Oct
sADY NELSON W Oct 19 Get â„¢ Oct 24 Oct
\DY ROONEY 9 Nov ii Ne 20 Nov 21 Nov
ADY NE'SON p ) Nov 8 Dec 10 Dee



B.—Biibject to change without notice
bers, Passenger Fares and freight +

vessels fitted with eld storage cham
es of application to :-

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.







PASSAGES TO IRE

ANTILLES

LAND

VRODUCTS LTD., Roseau, Dominica, offer
Passages to Dublin per M.V, “DUALA”, next sailing from Roseay
about 28rd August, and thereafter about every thirty-three days.
Single Fare, £70, usual reductions for children.
Apply direct











_ Mr. Factory Manager

PPPS E FEEL FOF eee

need of

ou in

vi ¥
y 7 sr
EXPANDED METAL
We von supply it In the following size:
Ot. ~ 3ft, x Bin. mesh
Bit. x Sft, x Itoins, mesh
Of & 3ft. x ‘ain, Mesh
ft, x aft, x lin. mesh



THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
Corner Broad & Tudor Streets



4

TS SS SSS SSE
HERE!

AFRICAN PRINTS

in Cottom...
A MULTI-PURPOSE FABRIC





.

inst





VROADWAY BWIKESS Soda.



Of Se





= SN
PLLA ALLLOPLVALSSSS,





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¢ Bushed ‘

%

g BOLT TAPS & DIES—

% Tn sets from \%” to Ye”

% ASEISTOS ROPE, TAPE and

¢ TIBRE, etc.

%

x PIRE CLAY, BAFFLE BRICKS, etc. )

e §

R Remowber: - 5 d
The BARBADOS .OUNDRY Led.
MWEADQUARTERS FOR ALL FACTORY AND PLANTATION

SUPPLIES,
LLLP DOELLLLLL ALLL ALALDLPSLLL LLLP.



CORPORATION — LTD.

NOTICE

As the Manufacturers have decided that repairs to one of
our Engines can no longer be delayed, the Cotapany has in
consequence had to put this Generating Set (900 K-W.) out of
commission and, owing to the reduction of standby Plant now
wailable as a result, may find it necessary to shed load at
intervals during the next few months.

Our Consumers ave asked to co-operate by exercising the
utmost economy in the use of Electricity, particularly during
the Peak period between 6,30 and 8.30 p.m. until further notice.

Vv. SMITH,

General Manager.
20th June, 1950.

BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY







’ PAGE EIGHT



VERDICT. ON
THE TESTS

Death From Natural Causes
HY PETER DITTON

NOW the shouting has

been lost and won, the time is appropriate to open the in-
quest on yet another series of English Test failures.

Channel 550_
Yds Too Much

DOVER, Aug. 24.
Philip Michman, 19-year-old
British schoolboy to-day gave up
his attempt to swim the channel
from Britain to France only 550
yards off the French coast, it was
officially stated here.

For three hours the swimmer
tried to reach the shore arguing
with his father, who accompany-
ing him in a launch, wanted him
to give up the attempt.

He climbed into the boat un-
aided, and his father iold the
cheering crowd on the shore that
Philip would try again. salle kha

The boy swam the Channel
from France to England in 23
hours 48 minutes last year. Had
he succeeded to-day he would
have been the fourth swimmer
to conquer the Channel in both
directions —Reuter.



Argentinian Does
Fastest Lap

NORTH HAMPSHIRE, Aug, 24.

Argentina’s Juan Fangio today
set up the fastest time in prac-
tice here for the
Trophy Motor race to be held on

hour did a lap of the 2.88 mile
airfield circuit in one minute, 52
seconds. Close behind him came
Italy’s Farina also driving an Alfa
Romeo with the lap in one min-
ute 54 seconds.

Delayed by last minute mechan-
ical troubles the new British
National Racing car “Brom” did
not uppear today but it was hoped
that one of the two cars entered
for Saturday’s race would appear
tomorrow for practice. The race
is regarded as part of the sixteen
eylinder Brom’s development
programme for the 1951 Grand
Prix Season.

The fastest car in practice to-
day among standard production
models entered for a _ separate
event on Saturday was the Italian
two litre Ferrari which
did the lap at 81.88 miles per
hour while British three and
half litre Jaguar went round at
81.24 miles per hour.

Although not officially recog-
nised as a Grand Prix event,
Saturday’s race has attracted the
best cars and drivers in Inter-
national racing.

Ttalian Ferraris and Maseratis,
as well as French Talbots will

join with Broms attempting to
hold the so far supreme Alfa
Romeos.

—Reuter.






POOR GEORGE ~
HAG BEEN HAVING WILD OF
OF A NEW FAST BOWL
GREW UP TO RESLUe CN

ee a

°
French Girl
. o °
Wins Diving
VIENNA, Aug. 24
Nicole Pelisard of France, to-day
won the Women's — high board
diving event in the European
swimming championships here,
The Freach girl who was runner-
up to her compatriot Bureau for
the springboard title yesterday,
scored 85.87 points in the high
diving. Alma Staudinger, Aus-
tralia was second with 82.38 points
and Birte Christopherson, (Den-
mark) third with 82.31 points.
—Reuter

The








THIS IS THE PART WHERE
MEPHISTOPHELES SINGS HiS

LISTEN FOR HIS FIENDISH

H-HAH “HEAR iT?
NOW HE'S SORE, SEES

“stay

Saturday. arg
te i long hop was a long hop no matter }
Driving an Italian Alfa Romeo, ji
Fangio, averaging 92.85 miles an who the bowler, and as such was

Do It Eve




DIABOLICAL SERENADE +++

LAUGHâ„¢HE'S JUST COME UP
FROM THE LOWER REGIONS
IN A CLOUD OF SMOKE-NOWss
TUM-DE-TUM-TUM-DE-TUM+

died away, now the battle has

We had been told before the
tour began that the trouble with
the West Indies cricket team was
a tendency to become dispirited
when things were not going right
for them now we know different-
ly. They lost the first Test at Old
Trafford and according to that
reckoning should have lost the
next three. But no.

They licked their wounds after
the Manchester game and then
launched a series of attacks which
reduced English cricket to the
same state of helpiessness that the
Australians had reduced it to two
years previously. This year was
remarkable for the number of in-
juries to England's star players.
and did provide an excuse which
was not available when the Aus-
sies were here.

But even allowing for the fact
that Hutton. Compton, Washbrook.
Edrich, Parkhouse, Bailey and
Evans all missed one or more
matches the position is still rather
grim.

It is a sad reflection that five
years after the war we still could
not put adequate replacements in
the field to fill the gaps left by
our top men.

John Goddard has _ sportingly
declared that the loss of cricket
during the war years was the de-
ciding factor. That was a nice ges-
ture, John. But the excuse cannot
hold water much longer.

The real reason why the tourists
from the Caribbean were so suc-
cessful is that they play cricket as |
it should be played—and as it wasj|
played in this country not so very

International} long ago. Not for them the stolid

in the crease’ outlook. A

hit for four or six. A slight move-
ment down the wicket and the ball
short of a length became a half-
vo ley and that meant four more.

The contrast when England
batted was amazing. Half-volleys
and long hops were treated with
a gentleness that could only be
described as feeble and I cannot
recall one occasion when the West
Indies close-to-the-wicket fielders
were forced to retire to a safer
area.

It was this reticence to attack
the bowling which made Ramad-
hin and Valentine into the giants
they finally became, They are un-
doubtedly great bowlers—I have
already described them as _ the
finest young combination produced
by any country -at any time—but
{ cannot help wondering how they
might have fared had they been
treated with slightly less timidity
in the first two Tests

They would still bave taken a
lot of wickets but their average
might have been considerably
higher. Furthermore they might
not have been called ypon to bowl
so frequently and that woyld not
have been a bad thing for England.

But now it is all over. Congratu-
lations John Goddard. Well played,
West Indies. You have proved
yourselves worthy cricketers and
fully deserving of an opportunity

}to oppose Australia for the world
“Ashes”.

Individual bouquets are not easy
to distribute. Ramadhin. Valentine,
Worrell and Weekes have deserved
all that has been said about them.

There is, however. one other
member of the side whom I feel
has been equally responsible for
England’s defeat.

He is Alan Rae, the Winchmore
Hill Club cricketer and West In-
dies left-handed opening batsman.
Cautious at times in the extreme,
Rae nevertheless was the founda-
tion stone-on which all the West
Indies success was built.

He failed at Old Trafford and
the West Indies lost, He scored a
century at Lords and they won by
326 runs.

At Trent Bridge he compiled 68
in just over four hours and paved
the way for Worrell and Weekes
to slaughter England's tired attack.

Finally, he completed another
century at the Oval and the West
Indies won by an innings.

It has been said that figures can
be twisted to suit any argument.
But in this case at least, [ feel
they are straightforward enough
and while not suggesting that he
has been the star of the side, I
think his efforts have been insuffi-
ciently praised,

Football Results

LONDON, Aug. 24.

Second Division: Hull City 3,
Barnsley 3; Queen’s Park Rangers
1, Notts County 0; Swansea Town
1, Sheffield United 2; West Ham
United 2, Luton Town 1,

Third Division. Southern: Port
Vale 1, Newport County 0; Watford
3, Reading 1: Barrow 2, Halifax
Town 0; Carlisle United 3, Gate-
shed 0.

4 Ay ol pposaeruaiaaerad ’ Salta





’ ° —
Time’

“ WHO ARE WE__
LISTENIN’ TO @














ONE GOAL

YESTERDAY afternoon during the match between Flying Fish and
Paul Foster, gets high out of the water to save one from the Snappers

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

SAVED!



Snappers however went on to win the match 2 goals to love.

}
|

|

snappers the Firing i goa



Essex Leading W.L.

On First Innings

Trevor Bailey

Takes 5 Whtis.

On Rain Affected Pitch

WEST INDIES

213

ESSEX 229, AND (FOR 3 WKTS) 49

SOUTHEND, Aug. 24.

A fine spell of fast bowling by Trevor Bailey helped
Essex to accomplish a splendid feat in taking a first innings
lead over the West Indies tourists here to-day.

The West Indies seemed assured
of a substantial lead when Chris-
tiani and Stollmeyer put on 104
for the opening partnership. and
later Gomez and ‘Weekes put on
58 for the fourth wicket partner-
ship. The pitch however, was
showing signs of becoming lively
and Weekes fell in the last over
before lunch. After the interval
the last six West Indies wickets
fell in fifty minutes for 28 runs.
Bailey, fast and hostile with a
strong wind at his back took five
of these for 13 runs in 6.4 overs.

The Smith cousins, Ray with
his off breaks and Peter, leg
breaks, bowled with consistent

steadiness and when the West In-
dies innings ended Ray needed
only one more wicket to complete
the double of a thousand runs and
one hundred wickets this season,

The Start

Christiani and Stollmeyer soon
struck a run a _ minute rate of
scoring when they continued their
unbroken overnight score of 68,
although both had a little luck in
the early overs. Christiani reached
50 after batting 95 minutes, and
the opening stand reached 104 be-
fore both men fell at the same
total.

First Peter Smith tricked Stoll-
meyer, who playing back, broke
his own wicket and then Smith
held a fierce cut off Preston to dis-
miss Christiani. These wicket falls
caused a reduction in the rate of
scoring

Essex met with further success
at 187 when Ray Smith’s slow off-
breaks caused Trestrail to play
back and miss one delivery which
broke the wicket.

Weekes came in to open cau-
tiously against the bowling of Ray
and Peter Smith, but he gradually
settled down and with Gomez pro-
ceeded on a profitable stand which
neared the half century.

Then just before lunch was due
Weekes fell to Preston. He gave

a catch to midon when attempting

to repeat an earlier pull to the

boundary, bringing about his dis- |

missal. Lunch was taken at this
wicketfall with the West Indies
185 for 4.

After Lunch

The collapse of the West Indies
after lunch was due to Trevor
Bailey, the England fast bowler
who in 6.4 overs took 5 wickets
for 13 runs.

With only 9 runs added to the
lunch total Walcott and Rae were
both out. Walcott failed to get out
of the way of a lifting ball from
Bailey and gave a high catch to the
wicket keeper, while Rae failed to
open his account before giving a
catch off Ray Smith’s leg breaks.
This was Smith’s 99th wicket of
the season, and he needs only one
more to complete the double of a
hundred wickets end a thousand
runs for the season. Bailey was
bowling decidedly fast, and the
collapse continued. He was suc-
cessful with a second appeal for
l.b.w. against Gomez and had
Williams caught.

Then Ramadhin hit Ray Smith

through the covers for 4, but Jones
wh




I’M GOIN’ DOWN TO
THE LOWER REGIONS
OF THE CELLAR TILL

THIS THING BLOWS







THE OPERA LOVER WHO
BRINGS HIS OWN ALBUMS»:s
AND EXPLAINS ‘EM sss

THANX TO
PHYLLIS LAWRENCE,

3800 CARPENTER AVE,
BRONX 65, N.Y.

was another lb.w. victim off
Bailey, and Pierre was ouy caught
at the wicket without scoring for
the innings to close 16 short of
the Essex total.

The last six West Indies wickets
fell in 50 minutes after lunch for
only 28 runs,

The pitch remained rather live-
ly when Essex batted again and
Jones made the occasional ball
lift. Dodds and Avery however
made a confident start but with
thirty six runs on the boards, bad
light stopped play and then heavy
rain followed so that tea was

taken.
After Tea

Rain held up play for two hours
and a quarter after tea dnd by
close of play Essex were 49 for
three wickets. Strenuous efforts
were made to dry the pitch and
after an inspection by the captains
play did not begin until 6.30 p.m,
and in the remaining thirty min-



oe

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utes Essex lost three wickets. _

West Indies attacked with
Gomez and Ramadhin on a pitch
still very wet. Dodds was run out
foolishly at 38 and Gomez ciaimed
Bailey at 45. Avery fell in the last
over,

Seores:—

WEST INDIES

FIRST INNINGS

Christiani ¢ Peter Smith b Preston 60

Stolimeyer hit wkt, b Peter Smith 42
Trestrail b Ray Smith oe
Gomez |.b.w. Bailey . . 4
Weekes c Vigar b Preston Tre |
Walcott c Wade b Bailey . oan oe
Rae c Preston b Ray Smith : c
Williams c Peter Smith b Bailey .. 5
Jones l.b.w. b Bailay ...........5 2
Ramadhin not out ....0 6... ceeseee 4
Pierre c Wade b Bailey 0

Extras: 11 byes, 6 leg byes 7
Total 212
BOWLING ANALYSIS

oO M R w
Builey 164 3 44 5
Preston 16 2 49 2
Ray Smith .. 27 4 44 2
Peter Smith .. , 22 2 49 1

ESSEX SECOND INNINGS
DaGde run Out ....ccissecssscessess
Avery ¢ Stollmeyer b Ramadhin .. 1?

Bailey |.b.w. b Gomez . 5
P. Smith not out .... tiie 1
Extras .... 0
Total (for 3 wkts) 49
red of wickets; 1—38; 2—45; 349
BOWLING ANALYSIS
°o M Ww
Pierre ey 3 oO 14 0
Gomez : 12 4 6 1
Jones ogee 3 1 4 0
Ramadhin €.1 2 5 1
—Reuter.

Barbados Bisley
Men For Home

(By London Correspondent)
LONDON, AUG, 24.

Six members of the Barbados

Bisley Team left England a



for the West Indies aboard the
Golfito,



I think I'd like
a White Horse

a joy to find again”

Call in To-day and inspect

our range of Tropical
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‘Snappers Beat

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oS



FRIDAY, AUGUST 235, 1954

NEW GAMES OPEN
LOCALLY TO-MORROW

THE Third Series of First and Intermediate Division Games,
and the Fourth of the Second Division, open to-morrow, and there
are fourteen fixtures scheduled to take place

eepreretasicyetensninenserstpe- scene The games, grounds and Um-
| pires appointed are as follows:—
} AUG. 26, Sept. 2, 9.

Flying Fish
AS SECOND ROUND
GETS UNDERWAY

SNAPPERS fulfilled their prom-
ise to defeat Flying Fish yester-
day when in the second fixture of Geet ae FIRST DIVISION

y ; n ye t Co :
the afternoon at the Barbados |match in a melee in front of the | timpires C. Cumberbatch. & C.dibson.
Aquatic Club they beat the white |Piying Fish goal, Ince drew Fos- | _ College vs Carlton at College; Umpires
capped Flying Fish two goals to |ter out of his goal and scored with | *y¢ Foster & © Roacnford
love. Flying Fish playing without C i ranparene, Ve, aces ar. Mar

. ; a@ well placed shot. One minute | pires L. King & L. Spellos
their centre-forward Denis Atkin-|jxcer the referee blew off. Snap-| Empire vs Spartan at Bank Hall: Um-
son put up a stubborn fight and | pers, the victors;were very prompt | °"* J: H- Walcott & H. B. Jordan
did well not to be beaten by a|with three crisp cheers for the |

wider margin. losers, who replied in like manner,



pers team, and partly to incorrect
| passing.
Finally





















near the end of

Um-

INTERMEDIATE DIVISION

Cable & Wireless vs Wanderers at

In the other game Police] The referee was Maj Boarded Hall; Umpi W. Bayley &
s s ajor | i | 208 . mpires yviey

turne the atch of W. Arche

the <= die laeiane Fs Foster, | Mental Hoeptial vs Windward at Black

7 : : The teams were as follows:— j Kock: Umpires P. O. Evelyn & S.

team played with six men as

Police had one man on the sick

: O. Johnson, B. Patterson, A. Tay-
list. Rain during the first match |jo, T. Yearwood and J. Genaa”
had spectators on the crowded pier |" police : — Mc. D. Richards
hurrying for shelter, but it only | (Capt.), G. Porter, L. Dodson, w

lasted for about five minutes. ili Sie {
The matches were as follows: — oo i SOS Te AE

BONITAS 8 POLICE 0 Flying Fish: —P. Foster, (Capt.),

Bonitas winger Owen Johnson T. Yearwood, H. Weatherhead, T.
scored two quick goals shortly |Johnson,
after play began, before Police got |F. Potter.
into their stride to make several] Snappers

Gilkes.
Spartan vs Empire at Park; Umpires
Batson & J. Hal!
Pickwick vs ¥.M.P.C. at Oval; Um

Bonitas:— M. Foster, (Capt.),

pires W. Harewood & J. Hinds

SECOND DIVISION
) Aug. 26, Sept. 2 .
, ¥.M.P.C. vs Leeward at Beckles Ra.
| nphees Cc. Archer & B. Clarke:
Lodge vs Police at Lodge: Umpires G.
\ Bradshaw & S. Beckles ; o
; Carlton vs Bmpire at Carlton: mm
D, Davies, J. Knight and jpires A. Harewood & C. Collymore.
} Fonndation vs College at Foundation:
| Umpires R. Pinder & G. Clarke
Central vs Pickwick at Vaucluse; Um-
Bowen & S. Cole.

— G. MacLean,
raids on Bonitas ‘
Maurice Foster who brought off |MacLean, B. Manning, F. Man-
some very well anticipated saves, |ning and A. Taylor.

Then “Boo” Patterson put his ext Thur: rh ill
team one up about midway through ieee ‘police ae Risetnalen a

goalkeeper | (Capt.), K, Ince, D, Bannister, G. | ines J
Regiment vs Combermere at Garrison:
Umpires G. Forde & L, H. Roach

ORIENTAL

the first half. Just before half lene 7 !
time however Johnson again |>oMitas vs. Sword Fish. sia ta i tated sion
scored, but Yearwood was ad-| Bookers (B’dos) Drug Stores CURIOS, IVORY, TEAK, SANDAL

JEWELLERY, BRASSWARE, TAP-

judged offside and according to Jare presenting a silver cup to the RARE. CAL

rules had to Jeave the water; the |player who scores the most goals

goal was therefore cancelled. in this league, and seven Pifco
In the second half Police were |Zip Lites”, for the winning team

definitely on top, having a man |in the K. O. Competition.

unmarked all of the time, and for

the entire half except on one or
if

two occasions when “Boo” Pat-

terson and Johnnie Grace swam
SMART FIT AND
NEATLY TAILORED

through, play was centred in the
°

Bonita goal area, but the Police
We also have

forwards either shot wide or could
LINEN TROUSERS

not get past goalie Foster. The
in White and Wine

final whistle found the score un-
changed, Bonitas the winners by
$10.96 pr.
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

three goals to love.
10, 11, 12 and 13 Broad Street.

ESTRIES, GLOVES,


















to BUY a

SNAPPERS 2 _ :
FLYING FISH 0

The first half of this game was
extremely fast and exciting, the
ball never went outside, it was
seven minutes of constant play.
Snappers were definitely the
superior team, but the Flying Fish
defence saved many awkward
movements.

Play was hardly a minute old
when Delbert Bannister got away
from his man and scored from
close range. Snappers kept up
persistent attacks and the Flying
ish forward line just couldn’t
get hold of the ball, in fact the
Snapper goalkeeper Taylor only
touched the ball once for the en-
tire match and that was only to
throw the ball back into play.

In the second half, Snappers
turned on the _ heat, but their
efforts were either broken up by
the Flying Fish defence, Harold
Weatherhead, Tim Yearwood, and
Tony Johnson or by their goal-
keeper Foster. But with the attack
broken they couldn’t get the ball
to their forwards. This was partly
due to close marking by the Snap-

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Full Text

PAGE 1

rAc.r, six BAItmnOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. AUGUST 25. 13" HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON PEEK FUEAN': PARTY AIDSSERVE YOUR GUESTS "P. F. TWIGLETS" & "P. F. MARTINI CRACKERS'. DELICIOUS & APPETISING. HERE AGAIN! YOUR OLD FAVOURITE "ENAMEL-IT" MADE FROM BAKELVTE Sjmc motorists can boast of the mileage of their tyres ; wmie enkiy Mifeiy; others will talk of tyre silence or food looks, or some pei mature that has taken iheir fancy. But you, with your new Dunlop I ; ort, can beat ihcm all — lor tins is the one lyre that has fveryihi/tg [ very feature the resources of Dunlop can produce lo give maximum ear with safety, silent running and distinctive appearance. MB, WMturtxaa. of traB4 M|H GriMif IIU —1 — rlo*-OU - lltll k|k WHdl. AM 4 HI HCIHM -.l.lW... New Stone P.O. ic.-d K" %  • Pink I I M A RUBBER FLOOR COVERING In 4 BEAUTIFUL PATTERNS > FEET WIDE CO LTD. ilRHINCUAH. INCLANO ECKSTEIN BROS. — B>7 Street RADIO Think of a K.B. lltr king l RADIOS. Good •noufih for the "QUEEN MARY", "QUEEN ELIZABETH" and the "CORONIA" Good enough for U Listen in to ZFY for the K. B. Programme Friday at 7.30 p.m. Loral Time








Friday

August 25

19350

=



BOMBERS REPE

ee

Lord | Bishop Of |

B'dos Resigns

"THE BISHOP OF BARBADOS has tendered his

resignation from the See of Barbados to His
Excellency the Governor-in-Executive Committee
and to the Archbishop of the West Indies, to take
effect not later than February 22nd. next.

; In 1944 notice of Legislation to disestablish the Church
in Barbados was given. It was the possibility of such Leg-

islation passing into law and

the consequent changes which

such an enactment would involve for the Church, which
alone induced him to accept nomination for election as

Bishop, in succession to Dr. Bentley.

For various reasons

the proposed legislation was not carried into effect.

BISHOP HUGHES

a —

B.G.ReadyFor
$10m. Rice |
Corporation

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Aug. 24,

After four weeks debate the
Legislature on Wednesday evening
passed the controversial rice mar-
keting amendment ordinance
which cleared way fdr creation of
a $10,000,000 rice devélopment
corporation with the British Gui-
ana’ Government © and Coloni#il
Development Corporation as part-
ners,

At the outset Clause 7 of the
Bill was severely attacked by the
majority of unofficial members
who asserted that the Clause was
discriminatory as it excluded the
proposed corporation from control
by the Rice Marketing Board.

During the debate last week the
Governor adjourned the Council
and held an in camera conference
with unofficial members, following
which the clause was amended to
the satisfaction of all but two, the

@ on page 7

Alf’s Mother
Wants Him To!
Go To India

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jca., Aug. 24.

Alfred Valentine’s mother yes-
terday cabled the left hand spin
bowler in England advising him to
accept the invitation to tour India
with the Commonwealth team
She said her decision came after
consideration of the educational
advantage of the tour and the fact
he would benefit from the added
cricket experience, and also as
Ramadhin already accepted the in-
vitation, she does not want
him to break the Valentine-Ram—
adhin combination whicf in her
opinion means a great deal to the
West Indies,

She was sure Valentine would
do just as she wishes. Prior to
the cable Valentine had turned
down the invitation, saying he
preferred the educational schol-
arship offered to him by the Ja-
maica sporting public,









THE FINAL TEST AT THE

The Bishop has found it in-
creasingly difficult during the last
five years, to work under the pre-
sent system, as prescribed by the
Anglican Church Act. The Church
does not manage its own affairs
through the Synod as it ought.

The distribution of available
manpower is prescribed by the
Act and is out of keeping with pre-
sent needs, The Lay Representa-
tion in Synod does not really re-
present the members of the Church
who have no voice in the appoint-
ment of representatives The
Synod has no power to enact
Canons for the Government of the
Church, and the method of ap-

pointment to benefices is unsatis- |

factory.
_ The Bishop no longer feels
justified in trying to work a sys-

tem which he believes inimical |

to the best interests of the

Church, and the rejection of his

nominee by the

Board for the Parish of St. John

has convinced him that he must

resign.

The Rt, Rev. William James
Hughes, M.L.C,. was educated at
the College of Resurrection, Mir-
field, University of Leeds. He was
Vicar of St. Benedict, Bordesley
1927-30. From 1930-44 he was Rec-
tor of St. George’s Cathedral,
Georgetown, He wos, Sub-Dean
from 1930-37 and De "from 1937-

|44. He was Bishop ofBritish Hon-

duras during 1944-45. He is author
of a publication in 1947 called
THINK AGAIN.



Planes Supply
Flood Victims

ASSAM, Aug. 24.

m Indian coat es aircraft to-
jay uted . em feod
sup io vittins vast floods

Sweeping north eastern Assam
aiter earthquakes which blocked
and diverted rain swollen rivers

in the Ganges—Brahmaputra
basin last week.
Reportd to-day buggested

that the death rate from disease
was high among 5,000,000 ma-
rooned people. Reuter Correspond-
ent who flew over 1000 square
miles of flooded land said the

Appointments |

;

|
|



HOUSE FULL









ee

AT THE OVAL

®

: 5 = . , Bewce
“Ground Full” at the Oval for the final Test match between England and the West Indies,

and here



Germany
Decides Fate
Of Europe

STUTTGART, Aug. 24.
The fate of Europe will be de-

stench of dead cattle, fish and|¢:ded in Germany Franz Bluecher,

wild animals forced his aircraft
to climb higher on many occa-
‘sions. He saw human corpses
floating with elephant carcases in
floodwaters.

Deadly snakes were attacking
homeless peasants as they tried
to escape rising floodwaters, and
50 had died from snake bite.

Assam’s Chief Minister Bishnu
Ram Medshi said earthquakes
had destroyed the homes of
500,000 people —Reuter.



Gun Controlled
By Rad ia

WASHINGTON, Aug. 24.

Recent Intelligence reports re-
ceived here indicated that the
Russians have perfected a radio-
controlled machine gun, according
to usually reliable sources.

The gun can be set up in a
small well protected nest, and then
be fired either by direct electrical
connections or radio, by men hun-
dreds of yards away.

These sources said this meant
that one normal machine gun
crew could handle dozens of such
guns while hiding in comparative
safety.

—Reuter.

|





Vice Chancellor .and leader of
West Germany’s Free Democratic
Party said at the opening here to-
day of the fourth World Liberal
Congress.

The world must allow Germany
to build up her economy, her be-
lief in herself and in others, and
get rid of the sense of isolation
which was such a_ dangerous
psychological factor Bluecher said.
He was addressing delegates from
25 nations gathered in Stuttgart’s
festivity decorated casino. The
necessity of the day is not to look
at collectivism and Communism
gathering strength, as a_ bird
watches a snake waiting for it to
strike. We must attack, We must
not base our hope in defence,
mentality. This has been the curse
of the world ever since 1945.

—Reuter.

TWO AIRMEN KILLED

VICTORVILLE, Air Force
Base, California. Aug. 24.

Two United States airmen were
killed and one seriously injured
when two B26 Army Invader
Bombers collided and crashed last
night on a desert near here. A
fourth was reported missing. —

The aircraft on a routine night
training flight exploded when they
hit the ground.



—Reuter.



OVAL



Part of the West Indian contingent in

hit by the West Indian
Test.—Central Press,

tear giving

vent

is a portion of the vast crowd

ee

| $3,000,000 Released



in the very primitive and |! ject which may assist in solving On Arms Aid
impulsive effort to prove its | Jamaican unemployment’,
nature. | “American investors are aiready WASHINGTON, Aug. 24
It was oil, all right | interested,” added Mr. Gore. “But The House Appropriations
But he had to be rushed they are asking to get a concession] Gommittee ‘o-day passed a War
to a nearby hospital so that to operate a gambling casino. And Emergency Bill providing $16,-
burns sustained in the face I might form a syndicate myself.| 771 084,479 for the expansion of
and hands could be treated. thave been sort of promised per-} America’s armed might and _- for
He was allowed to go mission to build a casino by the|the ‘arming of friendly nations.
home.—LN.S. | Government of Jamaica. But! ‘The bill included 4,000 million
| Governor Huggins ha: always re-| dollars for arms aid to foreign
| fused and the Governor has the| countries
y 4e “ | overruling vote But Gor ernor It provides cash for 5,333 new
Editor Arrested | Huggins is leaving on September warplanes and other equipment
19; then I am going to Jamaica to|for this country’s growing war
* i if ataQ see wha "a Jo. machine. In sending the bili to
For High Pre ason | se ve 1598.6 the House floor the Cc fae
ATHENS, August 24. wrote this sharp criticism of the
Dionysios Chrystakos, left-wing | 200 CHILDREN JOIN i ves oe peeenee Pr ran oeem
Member of the Greek Parliament Events of recent week have
was arrested today and commit EMIGRANT. PARENTS linede ‘ crystal clear Haed mill
tec for tria] before the Military “ jtury planning end hinking ir
Court on charges of high treason , ROME, August 24 «4, {key positions is not as clear and
He is the editor of the Left-Wihg More than 200 Italian children | gee rete,as it should be, Fut it i
daily “newspaper Deme-ration | efi Genoa today aboard the) aot the ‘purpose of the Commit
i which is accused of spreading | Steamer Sante Fe to ,oin ¢ nigrant | tee at this time to critic past
| unrest and attempting to diminish | Parents .in Argentina, Theic | errors
public confidence in the armed | Parents who emigrated from The bills total is ©81,400,119 less
jorce Maly during the past year left the than the amount President Tru-
As Parliament is adjourned,| children behind unti' they had’ man requested. Reductions have
Greek deputies are deprived of) cstabli hed homes in Arvzentina. | cen made in military items



which, saw the W.[; beat England,
—Central Press

ti nn ne

For Jamaican
Tourist City

GAMBLING CASINO IN THE AIR

(Our London Correspondent)
LONDON, Aug. 24.

A GAMBLING CASINO will probably be the mainstay
of the Tourist City project for which Mr. James Gore,
wealthy Jamaican industrialist, has received promise of
release by the British Government of £3,000,000 blocked
sterling.

Talking to our correspondent in New York last night,
Mr. Gore said “The Colonial Office is releasing funds and
I will build chalets and bungalows on 25,000 acres of Jamai-
can Government land which I have leased for 99 years.

“Two years ago when I acquired
|i Britain would not grant funds.
“This time I spent three months
in London and now I have a Colo-
nial Office letter dated August 14,
signed by H. S. Heinmann.
| “It says ‘I am asked by Secre-
tary Griffiths . it is decided
jour application for the release of
|; blocked sterling securities be
| granted the decision is
| taken in view of a desire of H.M
Government to encourage a pro-

IT WAS OIL

MANILA

A central Luzon ou pros-
pector, in his own backyard,
struck up what he supposed
was the real McCo)

He proceeded to voila
his discovery by siriking a
match against the element,













their immunity.—Reuter. ;

World
Tons More Sugar



Man, Sugar Brokers, question

LONDON whether it will be possible for

Next year the world is expected the price level of to-day to be
to produce two an li maintained







{tons more sugar in 195¢ It is pointed out that Cuba in
reaching a total of ¢ 000 ton spite of many adverse circum-
stances is expected to have a crop
Thi considerat e tl of nearly five and a half million

t any other t ‘ r tor r



Aduorate_:

RE

—Reuter, |

Expects 2% Million

Price:

FIVE CENTS

ADVA

Year 35

NCE



North Koreans Prepare

Mass Attack On

Reds Must Win
By Sept. 15 |
|

Naktong River.

Or Never

Says U.S. GENERAL

By ROY MACARTNEY

TAEGU, Aug. 24
Major General Hobart R, Gay
faid here today that unless the
enemy makes good by September
15, he will be finished. We shall

je too strong for him
General Gay the Late
Patters Chief of Staff in
War 2 and now
the first Cavalry Division said he
telieved there were at presetit

500 American tanks in Korea,





George
World
Commander of

any time



I guess there are not more
han a few dozen enemy tanks ruman
!opposite my forces in position
Polong the Naktong River around
Yaegu he added \ jpposes Loan
| Asked whether Communists
could launch an offensive capable i »
f pushing United Nations forces Oo pain
nto the sea, General Gay said
that it is probably t late now WASHINGTON, Aug. 24.
Of tour Communist Divisions ( President Truman expressed or
;supposed to have been opposite}! °s!4on again to-day to Senate
his cavalry in the Teegu area on in recently approving |&
last week, Generi! Gay doubted} |9%,000,000 loan to Spain. He told



Whether any but the North} ‘8 weekly Press Conference he
Korean Second Division had more| ‘4 not like it. Both he and Sec-
than 50 per cent of its strength etary of State Dean Acheson

—Reuter imy expressed opposition to any

We Are Back
Where We
Started

—SAYS NEHRU

NEW DELHI, Aug. 24

Indian Prime Minister Pandi
Nehru said here to-day that with |
the failure of the United Nations
Mediator Sir Owen Dixon's mis-
sien on the Kashmir dispute
gO back to where
from.”

Nehru told a Press Conference
that it was because the Security
Council did not answer the ques-
tion who was the aggressor in

oan to Spain which was made
utside normal machinery.

Both said that Spain could apply

1 the usual manner to the bank
tor a loan This would mean

ivestigation of Spain's credit.

If the action of the Senate was
confirmed by the House of Repre-
sentatives and not voted by the
President, the United States
Government would be obliged to
make this loan to Spain without
nvestigating Spain's economic sit-
uation.

—Reuter,

Red Morale
Has Declined.

TOKYO, Aug. 24,



‘we |

we = started

r : a Cautious optimism over the

Segal that ‘the trouble had |i ocean war was expressed here to-

Nehru described as Alice }4#Y by Admiral Forrest P. Sher-
' 2 SSSCribad as. an eC iman, chief of the United States
in Wonderland Business" both naval operations and General J
Mediator Sir Owen Dixon’s|Lawton Collins, Chief of Staff of
vague proposal” for replacing|the United States Army, on their
Kashmir’s State Government by|return from a front line visit to
a United Nations Authority du-|Korea
ring a_ limited plebiscite and Sherman at a press conference
Pakistan Prime Minister Liaquat|said a “remarkably fine job” had
Ali Khan’s attempt to blame|been done under difficult cireum~-
India for the failure of mediation | stances. The fact that the United
talks cen ee oe ~. et ae re-

> rhethor . . mainec where 1 wes or some

ore ey Paulas tee te. bn time and that offensive strikes by
: ee ‘ United Nations forces had been
ure of Dixon's talks the Prime possible at all “speaks for itself,”
Minister replied “I put the blame), caja ' ; ener
a hundred per cent on Pakistan ¢ —Reuter.
for the whole Kashmir trouble.” |
The Prime Minister said that while], SS





there had been no demarche from
Delhi to Peking regarding Tibet
“it is perfectly true that we have

fmformally pointed out to the
Chinese Government, the de-
sirability of settling the ques-
tion peacefully, I have every
hope it may be settled peace-
fully.”

It was conceivable, Nehru said,
that prelimina.” talk might
take place in New Delhi between
representatives of the Chinese
Government and, the ‘Tibetan
delegation.—Reuter.










America Will Spend
$16,771,084,479





—Reuter.



In 1951

hoarded between one and one anc
a half million tons this year, it
cannot be expected that a repeat
will take place in 1951

Already prices in New York f
next year are quoted
siderable discount, but conclude

the circular “one must

shWines
D Maintain the
same Hi

Standard of
Quality as
shipped to

These

& SHERRY

You can enjoy
them again
greater

Taegu ©

KOREA, Aug. 24.

“[}OUCHING down only long enough to reload and

refuel, bombers used as tactical artillery shot
up North Korean forces today, cf

nist efforts to mount a new off

ive across the

Light bombers and fighters concentrated on the
two most critical fronts — west of Masan on the
south, coast approaches to MacArthur's vital port
of Pusan, supply harbour, and the Waegwan-Kunwi
sector where communist forces were reported mass-
ing for a new major assault on Taegu.

Late frontline despatches said that the battle area had
been ominously quiet fer 36 hours but a new Communist
attempt to overrun Taegu and an attempt to push south
over the all weather highway to Pusan, was expected at

Night assaults on the American
Defence Line west of Masan on
the south coast were beaten off
without loss of ground, but there
too Communists were reported
gathering strength for an at-
tempted breakthrough.

Prisoners report that some
North Korean forces massed on
the South coast—depending like
locusts on what they gain as they
move—have had nothing to eat
for four days,

Driven as much by hunger as
by orders and still superior in
numbers and = firearms, North
Koreans were expected by ob-
servers here to be able to mass
for a decisive new offensive.

Jet fighters early flew off for
rocket and machinegun attacks
on North Korean troops massed
west of Masan,

Eighth Army Headquarters
said American troops entrenched
behind barbed wire on hills be-
tween the Communists and Mac-
Arthur's supply harbour, Pusan,
beat off a small attack at dawn.

Ominous Quiet
Forward of their ridge posi+
tions, patrols probed up to 2
miles but reported no contact

with the main body of Communist
forces, For 24 hours’ there has
been an ominous quiet—first
quiet in several weeks,” an Eighth
Army spokesman sald.

Around Taegu where the main
Communist force appears to be
concentrated for a pincers assault
ecross the Naktong only smail
hagassing attacks on South Ko-
rean forces were reported during
the night.

In a shatp short battle yester-
day a battalion of the American
27th “Wolfhound” Regiment
cleared out a roving pocket of
Communists who had been at-
tacking American gun positions
about four miles behind the
lines

Today Americans dug in on a
ridge flanking the Taegu-Kunwi

highway preparing with strong
armour support and self - pro-
pelled guns to meet the new
offensive.

American patrols last night re-
ported 600 North Korean troops
with some armour grouped on the

@ on page 7




include

in
quantity
®

GAMUNER AUSTIN & Co., Ltd.

Ageuts

Commu... \
PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1956





a









| NER SSS ESSE ne SE SDAA SEE
AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEES: TO-DAY & TO-MORROW at 5 p.m.
TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30

KOBERT HUTTON — JOYCE REYNOLDS — JANIS PAIGE

AND LONG EARRINGS

LF



SHORT HAIR

a"

BBCRadioProgramme

PRIDAY August 25, 1950

7 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; 7.16 a.m. The African Queen:
7.20 a.m. The Technique of Communist





Carub (Calling

PREMIER WATCHES

Wins Oxford Scholarship

M®. MICHAEL wrict, oer een, tara Pontes Oe

~phew of Mrs. C. A. L. a.m. Serenade; 9 a.m. Close Down; 12 : e
Dan EE sooty wets oe fan He Nee: WP on gen aw in * WALLFLOWER
Se eRe Sie . a ysis; 12 p.m ew Records: m
arship from Cranley Scheol to Short Story; 1.16 p.m. Radio Newsreel; :

Oxford University. However 1.29 p i Here’s Howard; 2 p.m. The with EDWARD ARNOLD

News; 2.10 p.m, Home News from Bri-
tain; 2.15 p.m. Sports Peview: 2.39 pan
Edimburgh international Fes ; 3.20
p.m. Interiude; 3.30 p.m torr, 4
p.m. The News; 4.10. p.m e diy
Service; 4.15 p.m. Nights at the Opéra;
5 p.m. Sandy MacPherson at the Theatre

Michael will not be going up to
Oxford for two years Owing to
the faet that he is going into the
Army under the National Servite
scheme,

Bros Picture

A Warner



Organ; $.15 p.m. Programme Parade |) SaaS



Pulsating 5.30 p.m. Scottish Magazine; 6 p.m. Th2 {
Afri ; 6.45» Mi on
RS. S. @. FLETCHER, Editor ey Ee A ot
of the “Gleaner”, now in Communist Interrogation; f p.m, e
England, hopes to return to News; 7.10 Pe Sees, Amalves fie
Jamaica, within a Week. Com- anc OPENING TO-DAY 230 AND 8.30
menting on the politieal situation ~

Story; 8.30 p.m. Ian Stewart;
From the
jews;



in Jamaica, Mr. teher smilingly
said—“Jamaica is pulsating at the
moment.”

I also have news this week of a
tormer “Gleaner” man Ambrose
G. Williams of Jamaica. He re-
cently sat for his Association
Correctors of the Press Examina-
tion and is how waiting for the
results, In the meantime he is
working at H.M. Stationery Office
in Aldwych, just off Fleet Street.

the Editorials; 9 p.m.
ade Concerts; 10 p.m. The
p.m. Interlude; 10,15 p.m, ffney Post
Office; 10.45 p.m, World Affairs: 2 p.m.
Johnny Miner.

and continuing at Mat. and Night Shows Daily
“ . ape

ST MN OR I BENS MEARS: DO Mh

stem et yop



SKELETON
CRISSY! ORD

—7.% p.m
Easex; 7.30—7,45 p.m. To be announced;
& p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. Short



The 1950 version of the ninetcon-twenties look,

at’s Cricket hair and long, lon . Short, short
Th ke 5 S earings and cigarctte holder. The ult i
HERE'S ao knowing the cigarette holder is of gold, carved Tike a delete hastttho =

lengths to which West Indians
will go to satisfy their passion for
ericket! One who travelled from
Grenada to London for a surgical
operation postponed his appear-
ance at the surgeon's table because
of his avidity to see the fourth

Londo@t «

th

PS

1ck-room Boy—54

ARRAS



:
5
‘
(

Rupert and
A \ | PM

Prime Minister of England—-Mr, Attlee watches the final



Test match at the Oval when the W.I. won over England. Test match at the Oval. He is oo
—Central Press. Captain Earle Hughes, visiting nnn
TR GEORGE SEEL, K.C.MG., London for the first time in 35 re a
Head of C.D. and W. left Barrister Returns ron — ott ee. = stereme
Barbados on Wednesday afternoon R. G. BENNETT NILES who {© Wit now wi as ra- JOH N WAYNE és Le ay
by B.W.LA. for St. Lucia, He is with the Labour Depart. ‘!- ADELE MARA + FORREST TUCKER

leaves there for Trinidad to-mor-
row, and will be returning to Bar-
bados on Sunday afternoon, He is
on a routine visit to these two

ment here and a Barrister-at-Law
arrived in 3arbados yesterday
from the U.K. via Trinidad.

Mr. Niles has been in England

CLUES ACROSS
2. Both car and ova. tur him
- Fellow in paie colours.
- Almost fit? hey may make

Returned Yesterday Se JOHN AGAR

FTER a short holiday in Bar-
bados, Mrs. Kathleen Sill

A REPUBLIC PICTURE

Sapa eae ke ne rR rR

with WALLY CASSELL * JASIES DROWN + RICHANG WEES» AATIVE FRANZ
JOLIE BISHOP + JAMES HOLDEN * PETER GOE » RICHARD JALOSEL

Saptnggtntes EIDE RE <1 VES er




‘he 2 ‘

1, aye *










2
7
9
- one complete! >
islands. for twenty months studying for his 2nd her son Hugh returned to Just as Podgy comes breathlessly 10. Cork, for example ? Screen Play by Harry Srown—James Edward Grent Story by terry Lrown - Directo by Alan Deen
Never Seen a Cricket Bar finals and he was called to the eek ay afternoon by to join ‘high Maver Woks ‘upereistel 13. Many intend to do an ins ty; Associate Producer —< ‘ound Gesinirar
Bar on 21st of June. WALA. « . 2 Goat appears. “So it's you!” " ‘ , an is nt :
Match o 4 I do believe tha: voice comes from ae super. “Why could you 1g Bauare metres. Alao British Movéebous Mees
N HOLIDAY at the Windsor By Sea And Air Back From Conference ae beanenes.”” te MUNCHSs have come down instead of call. 15 ‘Ga, no strong drink tor K ; ss s 5
Hotel are MY. and Mrs. Ken- R. AND MRS. JOHN PARKER HE Barbadian school teachers ‘ at sat hiaie aaa it's = ns ms up >" pyri ae 16 Apparently a Bob is tov mucn orea—Security Council’s historic meeting
a i ; Mobs sticky aut f irayrue’s up here ; s or is s s de
ye “oe “== cone eob deft Barbados yesterday. who left for B.G. two weeks Do: RET Ae dint eenk TES ily. Rocke ME SRR onal sharpener mee Anglo-American Universities Athletic Contests
Bobby and Barbara, Americans Mr. Parker by Alcoa Ship to ago to attend the Conference of clink: ae ae MB Lt os be oi Toy ein. Reais ly. Name of a film actress in at White City
living in Venezuela, Mr. Pearce is Triniylad and Mrs. Parker by the Caribbean Union of Teachers, he pang. Wy an Seueie Bt the womens) :
with _ Caribbean Petroleum and B.W.I.A. to Georgetown. Mr. rcturned home yesterday after- : 21. Acknowledge fully we have to Bluebird ready to try again
1 for several years : ) y
hag been living, for s veri, Parker is with the Pure Cane noon by B.W.I.A. admit.

in Venezuela. They arrived 22. Contract. in one sense







Trinidad by B.W.1.A. on Tuesday
afternoon.

Never having seen a cricket After Two Weeks ISS FAY ROBERTS of OPENING DAY and CONTINUING CLUES DOWN J
match, the Pearces hope to go Grenada has not regretted TO- Boos. : 1. Wherein. those used
down to Kensington Oval on Sat- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Proudly Presents : tes tere eS be toon, | R Oo xX VY

urday to see what it’s all about.

Molasses Co., and will fly to B.G
from Trinidad over the week-end

R. AND mkS. D. J. SANDER-

No Regrets

choosing Barbados as the place to
spend her first holiday away from













Lovable and IRRESISTABLE ESTHER WILLIAMS

7 IN Ls
SE ests
above
him, and the worried face of Billy

23. Word we get from children to-
lay.
24. Eloquence, or a political party

























































rw sutnn 3 3. Alice's alias ?
This is their first visit to Barba- 4) | econ gp Re gg os home. She arrived here twe aN . Indulge in some : 24." TO-DAY TO SUNDAY 4.30 AND 8.15
arn rere i . B weenie ; i‘ ey’ 7 :
dos. Two years ago they were in (ew by T.C.A. for Van. Weeks ago and is staying with : ona of ‘the hewbices ne Republic Double . . .
Tobago, but find Barbados very iN - Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sebright at NEPTUN °*§ DAUGHTER 6. It’s murder!
much nicer. couver, British Columbia after “Merrington”, Rockley E 8. Suitable participant in insect se BLACKM se
When Carib saw them in spending two weeks’ holiday. Mr. “No doubt it was her sister 9. pe ( ‘ AML
Bridgetown yesterday, young Bob- Sanders is a City official at Yv » wh eco ended Bar- am a azy a en 10. His zeal. | t wees ot re. ida
by Was hunting for some golf balls. Vancouver. sede tO het, an che Rar teanteeen 11; Screen with a red centie, Starring: William MARSHALL—Adele MARA
Guests Of King’s Nephew here before on holiday. Yvonne queue, ef Shilling
R. and Mrs. Bob King. have Son Remaining To Learn ;, at present holidaying in PLAZA FRI. 5 & 8.90 P.M, 17. Just, abot properis trained vo and
returned to London from English Martinique. Fay expects to re- MONOGRAM'S EXCITING NEW BOXING THRILLER ! 18. But doe» the mode! find it =
turn to Grenada on Monday.

Holiday Over

difficu't ?

\
SOLUTION

Leo GORCEY and the BOWERY BOYS in —
“FIGHTING FOOLS”

SAT. & SUN. (Only) 5 & 8.30 P.M. MONOGRAM'S DOUBLE !
Jimmie DAVIS in LOUISIANA (Musical)
and Johnny MACK BROWN in “SIX GUN GOSPEL”

Paris where they have been on a
short holiday as guests of the Hon. |
Gerald Lascelles, nephew of the

R. FREDERIC PAYEN,
Director of “Credit Quade-
King. Bus loupeen” Bank in Basseterre R. and Mrs. “Ronnie” Black
- arrived from Guadeloupe yester- who have been holidaying
Touring W.I. day afternoon by B.W.1I.A. with in Barbados for the past few
. THOMAS BLACKSTOCK. his gon Eric. weeks with at SDBSrOO. Boe o
i to. return to Trinidad to-day. Mr.
my seapal bettie be eronto arrived Mr. Payen will be returning to Black is on a sugar estate in South
! from Trinidad yesterday by Guadeloupe on Sunday, but Eric ‘Trinidad; Mrs. Black is a niece of
B-W.LA. for a very brief visit, He #8 "emaining in Barbados for Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Knight with
is on.a familiarisation tour of the ®P0Ut six months to learn Kaglisn. whom they have been staying at
West ‘Indies and has.already vis- Ss Visi “Mervue”, Marine Gardens.
ited Jamaica and Trinidad, He ex- econd Visit
pects to leave here to-morrow for
Bermuda by T.C.A. ISS MARY WEDDERBURN
Besides touring the island he who returned to Venezuela
also plans to visit all of the hotels. yesterday morning by B.W.1.A, is
He is a guest at the Marine Hotel btu ee Petroleum in erning Director of Bottlers Ltd., in
. ~aracas anc us @ her seconc Trinidad.
On Short Holiday Phi to ee She wfis here He a come up to make the
5 or two weeks staying at the g,, ad
ERE until Monday for a short Windsor Hotel. Mary. who is from ps mcr: gays ter Fn a pees
holiday are Mr. and Mrs. England has been in Venezuela for \\i1) be manufactured and bottled

with William ELLIOTT—Bobby BLAKE

ROYAL

TO-DAY ONLY 4.30 AND 8.30
Republic Whole Serial .. .

<*G=eMEN NEVER FORGET”
with Clayton MOORE—Roy BANCROFT
















Here For a Few Days
RRIVING from Trinidad yes-
terday morning by B.W.LA.

was Mr. Frank Nothnagel, Gov-

OPENING TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 & Continuing
The Record Breaking Motion Picture

THE GRIPPING STORY OF
THE HATFIELOS AND 4

Excitement

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY TO SUNDAY 4.30 AND 8.15
Republic Double .. .



CRRA. Rina a Eee

B. L, Richards who will be staying four years. a ee Richard ARLEN—Cheryl WALKER
at “Blue Vista.” Rockley New Ste SU=C.S ROVEERERE 08: Sie: Te THE M°COYS ! in “
Road with friends. — Leaving On Saturday ritory,
Mr. Richards is with the S.D.A. UE to leave for a holiday in Carib understands that the site .».America’s most “IDENTITY UNKNOWN ~”
Clinic in Port-of-Spain. They ar- Canada by T.C.A, to-morrow of this building will be situated
rived from Trinidad yesterday are Mrs, Edna Hutchinson and at Bay Street. famous feud! ; and
morning by B.W.1A. N her daughter Barbara. Mr. Nothnagel was met at
Back From B.G. Holiday Seawell by Mr. Nestor Baiz, a cA af

“FLAME OF BARBARY COAST”
with John WAYNE—Ann DVORAK

On Short Visit Managing Director of Bottlers
Mr. E. D. Mottley, M.C.P. R, BILL STUART, T.C.A. Sta- Ltd., and Mr. Baiz’s fiancee Miss

who left Barbados on August 10th tion Manager here will also Sonja Scott.

returned home yesterday afternoon be among the passengers leaving Mr. Nothnagel expects to be

by B.W.LA. after a short B.G. for Canada by T.C.A. to-morrow here for a few days and is staying

holiday. on a short visit. at the Ocean View Hotel.

BY THE WAY...

to keep a

Mes. RUBY MOTTLEY, wife of



SAMUEL GOLDWYN presents

“Roseanna ©

Bl
: starring
= FARLEY GRANGER - CHARLES BICKFORD RAYMOND MASSEY





















By Beachcomber

asked Lord

... they are worth

N article on how A Varacious Reader Lear anything?”

railway compartment tt i » fis Shortcake. “Not a sound,” said RICHARD BASEHART GIGI PERREAU °
y, compupiene 0 N the seaond night of his i). Captain, mopping his’ head, and introducing JOAN EVANS talkin about !
yourself says that card-playing visit to Boulton Wynfevers, which was dripping with beer (Derced be IRVING RIL « Scron Pay by bn Calis inten» Moved by Albuns tansy ™

Foulenough again retired to the
library when his host and
hostess went to bed “J hope
the servants won't disturb your
reading again,” said Lady Short-—
cake. “I’m sure they won't,”
replied Foulenough. About 3 a.m.
Lord and Lady Shortcake were

by RAO RADNO PICTURES, ING.

EXTRA! EXTRA!» TONITE

LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

frightens most people away, But
that is a tame trick. There are
many more effective methods.

thrown by the butler. “Has it
been raining?” asked Lady
Shortcake. “Only a few drops,”
he answered, still mopping.

Whither, Vegetables ?
HREDDED turnips to

One is to sit in the
talk to a bit of luggage on the
seat beneath you. Another is to
lie on the floor of the compart-

rack and

you,

foe olte we. ®wakened by the sound of Mrs. Mockpudding. NORTON MOORE—“As if I Didn't ina”
ee ee eal. A third 'S breaking glass. “It must be the It is not without significance, WINSTON DAISLEY—"4 Winds hat eee on My ee
alee oe arge — in _your Captain reading,” said Lady and therefore may be said to be COSFORD HUSBANDS—“You Do”
“Pm afraid e forsee a. Snortcake acidly. “How do you with significance, that on this MISS BETTY TAYLOR—“My Foolish Heart”
loore. Th cay ave got mean?” asked her husband. duy, Vegetable Wednesday, the TREVOR MARSHALL—“Surrender”
5 eye under the seats. “We will go and see,” she index figure of the cost of living VERNON PRICE—“I Can Dream”

Also, I’ve got measles.” A fourth
is to say to the intruders, “Now,
this is the old banqueting hall,
where, in 1571, William Rufus
was stabbed by a horse.” A
fifth is to say, “Sh! Don’t shout;

replied. So downstairs they went.
Foulenough had time to dive
back into the library. The ser-
vants kept very quiet. When the
library door opened there was
the Captain, deep in “Engineer-

is 124. And until we can iniport
the succulent mango-grass of the
Kikawipiti Islands, we must try
to utilise moss, lichen and other
nutritious growths which do not
costs dollars, “We cannot eat

GUEST STAR — MISS GLORIA BENTHAM
wae rae e Peterkin; Miss Thelma Sarjeant, Miss Nancy

PLUS

SAVE YOUR % TICKETS AND WIN A CARTON JEFFREY’S

coal ice tips S's boston: pe ing For Girls.” He jumped up. eoal,” as Sir Thomas Pullover has Bree NO INCREARE IN PRICES
' » 1tS Decause I'm not “I say, it must be later than I well said, “since in earl t 4
Mis here at. all. thought,” he erled, “Did You that babit ts diemorea a oe h Pit 16 — House 30 — Balcony 40 — Boxes 54. {

POODCESEVES OPES DOSS OSSS

2D



EQUIP YOUR KITCHEN
AND PANTRY with

45+, " »
gone’ EPO PIES PP OPO A OTP OS OOOPSS
>



ar

PORCELAIN & STAINLESS





: PYREX
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‘ OVEN and STEEL KITCHEN SINKS
Pad
-
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WITH DOUBLE and SINGLE _.
A Wink an TO SELECT FROM
: CAeee cakes DRAIN BOARD and CABINET
PLATES—D:
: One : . wear PLA nh a SOUP, BREAKFAST
8 among the FIRST thought of and the most satisfying in these HOT DAYS SCALLOPEG Soerta AN ASSET TO EVER Y MODERN
% is ICED TEA steeped from “MY NAH.” GIFT SRT So ee TG, EXE
% “M Y N A H” is grown, blended and packed in Ceylon. The Tea Garden Pay our Hardware Department a Visit KITCHEN.
: of ae ao will enjoy the Flavour and Refreshing effect when you ee Or Dist 3080" on
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: § See them on Show at... THE CORNER STORE

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4563666654 “ s
PPPLELLLPPLP PP LPPDLLPPPDPPAPPPPPPDPBPLPPPLPL APPL LPBLLL PLL LPL SS CSFTPOPSS

s {
FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1950



FULL-PAGE
PUNCH

By C.V.R.
NEW YORK,

A fine example to-day of the
spirit that has taken hold of the
American people. It concerns 24
friends most of them from Broad-
way, nearly all of them too old
for fighting.

Frustrated, they met to discover
what they could do for the cause.

They decided there might be
people who didn't feel as ardently
as they. That it might help if
they could wake up those waver-
ers.

So to-day a full — page adver -
tisement (£1,820 an insertion) ap-

Its theme:
We've got to beat Communism.

THEN IT ADDS: It'll make very
heavy demands upon us. We shall
have to give everything to ciefend
our liberty, Let’s give it, and let’s
give ourselves, ‘till Russia, wo,
has been taught that our free
world’s more than a match fer
the world of Jenghiz Khan.”

[Jenghiz Khan, Mongoi and
Tartar emperor, was born the son
of a petty chieftain in Worth
Mongolia in 1162. From about 1177
he was involved in almost un-
broken warfare with various
tribes. His armies invaded India,
and conquered China, His name
means “perfect warrior.” He died
in 1227.]

Some of the 24: Song - writer
Irving Berlin, playwright Maxwell
Anderson, Madeleine Carroll,
Richard Aldrich, Gertrude Law-
rence’s husband, comic-strip artist
Milton Caniff, Raymond Massey,
and Howard (“Life with Father”)

SOME HINTS of what Ameri-
cans may have to give are con-
tained in a repoyt just sent to Con-
gress by the Federal Reserve
Board, roughly equivalent to the
Governors of the Bank of Eng-
land.

Sound financing of the costs of
rearmament will, says the reporv,
require “soak-the-poor” taxes as
well as higher taxes on the well-
to-do and corporations.

There should be no excess prof-
its tax—President Truman said
to-day he was willing to have one
if Congréss wanted it — unless
the emergency turmed out to be
a short one. Much better, said the
board, to boost corporation and
individual taxation.

Stronger curbs on credit for
home-building were called for:
And the board made a_ special
point that there must be rigid cuts
in all Government welfare spend-

ing.

PROPOSAL from Congressman
Omar Burleson: Buy 4 _ lonely
Pacific island and send all domes-
tic Communists convicted of treas-
on there “to reflect long and well
on their sins,

Labour To
Discuss The
Colonies

(From Our London Correspondent )
LONDON.

MR. JAMES GRIFFITHS, Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies,
Mr. A. Creech Jones, former Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies,
and Dr. Rita Hinden, Secretary of
Fabian Colonial Bureau, are to be
the principal speakers at a London
Conference on September 23,
arranged by the Bureau.

Main theme of the Conference
will be “The Challenge to Labour
in the Colonies.” There will be
three sessions and subjects dis-
cussed will inelude ‘Labour's
achievements in the Colonies”,
“What the Colonies Mean to You",
and “The Way Forward in the Co-

1 L?
onies.

Federation
—Not Yet

(From Our London Corresprondent)

“The other islands may federate
but British Guiana is not yet
ready.” That was the reply given
by Mr. Edward Gunraj of Vreed-
on-Hopp, British Guiana, in
answer to my enquiry — “What
are your views on federation for
the West Indies?” Mr. Gunraj, a
law student of the Middle Temple,
eagerly anticipates the time when
he will be back in British Guiana
as a qualified barrister-at-law to
help wage war against illiteracy.



Rumanian Forces
Teo Learn Sialin’s Art

LONDON, August 23.

Rumania’s War Minister Gerald
Emil Bodnars today ordered the
country’s armed forces to “learn
Stalin’s military art, improve
combat training and skill, and be
ready to defend at any time the
State Interests of Rumania and
the Democratic group led by the
Soviet Union”.

A Bucharest Radio Broadcast
heard in London today said Bod-
nars made this call, in an order
today marking the sixth anniver-
sary of Rumania’s challenge from
the Axis to the Allied side in the
last war. The order denounced
the American, British and French
Governments as enemies of the
Rumanian working class. It
pledged eternal friendship and
co-operation with the Soviet
Union.

The order also expressed soli-
darity with the “heroic soldiers of
Korea whose example should
inspire every member of the
Rumanian armed forces”.

———_—__—_—-
VOLUNTEERED
CHICAGO, Aug. 21.

A thirty-eight-year—old Chicag»
businessman volunteered today to
fly over Moscow and drop an
atomic or hydrogen bomb on the

miin.

He is Lar Daly, operator of a
stool and chair factory who claims
to have founded the “Christian
Action Party,” the slogan of which
is “war now with Red Russia.”

He made his offer in a letter ad-
dressed to President Truman
which said the party proposed to
“christianity and world freadom’’
and advocated the use of the atom
and hydrogen bomb against “forces
of anti-Christ.”



. What's the fuss this time? Has Noél Coward lost his twe dots already or does Sinatra wart to cross the road

.



The Mystery Man Who Trafficked in Honours—The Man Whose Woman

| Death-secret of Maundy Gregory
Revealed After Nine Years



Friend Was Exhumed

HIS END CAME UNDER NAZI RULE

From PERCY HOSKINS: Paris

SCOTLAND YARD has

marked “Closed” on the dossier

of one of the most intriguing and colourful characters ever
to be named on the files of the Criminal Record Office. An
inquiry made after a routine check-up on first offenders of |the maximum fine ef £50 would

years ago disclosed that J Maundy Gregory, friend of | be

Mr. Norman (now Mr. Justice)

Birkett, K.C., defending, said that
there would be a plea of guilty;
that it was the first prosecution

of its kind;

and that so far as

Gregory was concerned, the object
of the prosecution had been fully

established.
“I submit that the proper end
is that you should impose a

monetary penalty,” he said.
But the magistrate said that
inadequate.

“Gregory”, he

kings and who himself claimed descent from kings, is dead. | Said, “will go to prison for two

Paris police told the Yard that
he died in a military hospital in
Paris in 1941, during the German
occupation —- the Maundy Gregory
who was jailed in London for
trafficking in honours and who,

later, was the central figure in a}

still unexplained death riddle.

Scotland Yard is now trying,
with the help of the International
Police Commission, to find out
details of Gregory’s last_days in
Paris. E

M. Jean Nepot, the assistant
director, worked all today search-
ing for someone who could tell

him how Gregory, who was 64,|
came to. die in the German-con-'

trolled hospital, and what was
the cause of death.

Once An Actor

In a cemetery at Ivry I stood
by the grave of a man who in
his day was a guardian of State
secrets and who claimed ances-
try back to Edward III, in the
14th century.

Princes and prelates, peers and
distinguished commoners, states-
men, leaders of the arts and of
the sciences — he was on closest
terms with them all.

_ He had palatial offices in Par-
liament-street, between Scotland
Yard and Downing-street.

Earliest known of Gregory's
activities was his working as an
actor and becoming a producer in
London’s West End. That was in
1908 for a revival of “Dorothy.”

Then he ran an agency as sort of hotel detective. When
the 1914 war began the Govern-
ment apparently considered that
his knowledge so gained would be
of value, and he was introduced
to Whitehall.

‘Counter-espionage’

Later, he claimed to be engaged
on counter-espionage, and after
the war he became well known in
the capitals of Europe

It was in February 1933 that
London was surprised by the an-
nouncement that the Director of
Public Prosecutions had taken
out a summons accusing Maundy
Gregory of an offence under the
Honours (Prevention of Abuses)
Act of 1925,

This Act was passed to stamp
out traffie in honours,

There was gossip of recently
bestowed titles having been
bought for sums involving hun-
dreds of thousands of pounds.

One such story concerned a
cautious commercial magnate who,
it was said, had been offered a
peerage by Maundy Gregory for
£10,000.

“Give me 24 hours to think it
over,” said the magnate.

The next day he was said to
have told Gregory: “I have de-

cided to accept your offer and| Gq





months, and pay a fine of £50

j mander Edward Whaley Billyard|and the costs of the prosecution.”

Leake, D.S.0., R.N. (retired), of
Lowndes-square, S.W.

He was acctova of having un-
lawfully tried to obtain £10,000
from Lieut.-Commander Leake
“as an inducement for endeavour-
ing to procure the grant of a
dignity or title of honour.”



LINKED
WITH 8 KINGS

anyone who question-
ea Maundy Gregory's

ancestry, he would produce
@ pedigree 4ft. long, com-
piled by the e of
Heralds.

From the time of Edward
Ill, it passed through English
history and disclosed
Gregory’s kinship with some
of the most famous figures
of the past.

The last entry was:—

“Arthur John Maundy
Gregory, of Abbey Lodge,
Abbey-road, St. John’s Wood
Co. London. Born July 1 1877
at Southampton aforesaid.”

is suggested that
Gregory, though his mother,
the blood of eight kings

England in veins;
that John o' Gaunt, “time-

honoured Lancaster,” Harry
Hotspur, and the Black
Prince were among his fore-
bears; and that his lineage
‘was traceable to William the
Conqueror.



‘Closed Doors’

Lieut.-Commander Leake _ told
the court that he was introduced

He commended “the very proper
attitude taken up by Lieut.-Com—
mander Leake.”

The cae which everybody
thought would bare a thousand
secrets ended. Although it was
in the House of Commons
that there were other complaints
no further action was taken.

Yard inquiry

While Gregory was in jail
Scotland Yard began investiga-
ting the circumstances of e

death of a 59 - year-old former

actress,
This woman — Mrs. Edith
of Mr

Rosse, former wife

TH






















































F.



London Express ¢

To reporters who tracked him
to Paris, Gregory said it was “no
vulgar intrigue” this “wonderful
friendship” of his with Mrs.
Rosse. The world had known
them as brother and sister: that,
indeed, had been their relation-
ship.

Gregory told the reporters
of Mrs. Rosse’s last illness.

He was lunching with the King
of Greeee at a West End restau-
rant when a telegram came calling
him home,

He went home and stood by her
bedside. “Quick”, she cried.
“Pen and paper.” He fumbled in
his pocket, and drew out the
luncheon menu card. And on
that the will was written with
the doctor standing by.

Then a few days later, after
they had dinner together, Mrs.
Rosse had another seizure,

Search For Grave

They could not -ave her.
the day she died.
another luncheon

On
Gregory had
appointment

with the King of Greece.

a grive
Frederick Rosse, a composer—died /“dear, sweet friend” by the river-
in Gregory’s house in Hyde Park- |side, where many of their happi-
terrace the previous September. | est hours had,been spent.
Her death had been certified tm} He’ told of difficulties: how he
be due to cerebral hemorrhagé |had offered 100 guineas to the

and chronic Bright’s disease,

News From B.G.

\
|

Drop In Business

Recorded By B.G. |

And T’dad Mutual |

{Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, BG.
BUSINESS done by the British
Guiana and Trinidad Mutual Fire
Insurance Co. Ltd., for the year
ending June 30, 1950, was below
that of the previous year, but the
Chairman, Mr. W. S. Jones, in
his report said it was substantial
The previous year’s business was
a record, he pointed out.

1610 policies were issued insur-
ing $5,433,161.11 with premiums
of $57,691.05. Lapses and sur-
renders during the year were,
however, greater than usual, the
net increase being 713 policies—
$1,277,082.11 of insurance with
premiums totalling $11,493.67.
The total fire risks on the Com-
pany’s books at 30th June was
$30,499,983.11; of this $2,069,15
has been reinsured.

Fire Claims paid and provided
for at the end of June, 1950 was
$6,159.42. Included in the amount
provided for claims at the end of
June, 1949 was an amount of
$11,800 which*was found subse-
quently not to be payable and
placed to the credit of the year’s
Profit and Loss (Annual Account.

The case which everybody
the Trinidad Branch was main-
taining its steady progress. Its
assets now total $1,636,605. The
Barbados Branch which was
established late in 1949 under the
Management of Mr. Harry C. M
Hunte, has made a good start.

Mr Jones stressed the urgent
need for everyone to strive for the
elimination of fire hazards, He
declared: “I look to Government,
and hope not unavailingly, to
provide means for the education
of the public in fire prevention
and to provide fire fighting equip-
ment manned by well trained per~-
sonnel capable of adequately
combating any outbreak of fire
that might occur.” He urged
Government to enact Legislation
that is necessary for reducing
as far as is possble, existing fire
hazards

On a motion for the payment
vf the Ordinary Dividend, it was

decided to declare 3% on the
wdinary script capital to the
year ending June 30, 1950, making
with the interim dividend of

three per cent paid, six per cent.

60% Gash Profit

Return From The
Hand-In-Hand

\Terbedes Advooute Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G,
Policy holders of the Hand-in-
Hand Mutual Fire Insurance Co.,
Ltd., entitled to it, will receive

' He’ kept it. (r felt no good a cash profit return of 60% this
purpose would be served by |Â¥ear. This was disclosed by the
postponing it.”) And then he |Chairman, the Hon. G. H
went in*search of for-his;]Smellic, who declared that the
Company had another successful

year.
At the 30th June there were
13,167 policies in force insuring

parish funds if permission could

A will made shortly before her | be given him to bury her where

death read:
fand this amounted to about
£18,000} to be left to Mr. J.
Maundy Gregory to be disposed
of as he thinks best and in accord.
ance with what I should desire.”

“Everything I have | she wished,

A churchwarden’s consent was

necessary. He found one; he was |

@ butler, and he was at a whist
drive. But Gregory induced him

The Yard and the woman’s|to sign the ~ecessary papers.

relatives began to ask: —
1. Why did Mrs. Rosse leave her
money to Gregory in a will
written in his handwriting?

And so Mrs. Rosse was buried.

“ in Lendom at the inquest
the tordner the late Mr. Ingleby
lle, was told by Sir Bernard

2. Why was she buried in a lead }Spilsbury that there had been no
coffin in a Thames river-bank | hemorrhage; there were no signs

churchyard which was in a ,0t Bright's disease; the

continual state of flood?

death cer-

tificate had been completely

3. Had she died an unnatural| wrong.

death.
In other words had murder
been done?
The Home Office granted an
exhumation order and the coffin

But there was nothing to show
what was the cause of death.

Summing up, the coroner said:
“I do not wish to emphasise the

at the time still full of water—|point which has been mentioned

was lifted from its grave at Bis-
ham, Berkshire, on April 28,

Dr. Roche Lynch, the Home
Office analyst, and the late Sir

to Gregory, who explained that |BRernard Spilsbury, the patholo-

the highest authorities
him to accept an honour but that

“sinews would be necessary to |put Gregory was

open certain closed doors.”

wished | gist, began their examination. _.

The inquest was held in July,
not there,

that certain drugs do decompose
whet exposed or when they have
been buried in soil waterlogged
or otherwise

“All I will say is that no poison
has been found, and no poison
will ever be found in this body.
Therefore no possible charge

although he had been subpoenaed could arise out of this inquiry.”
It could be done for £10,009 |to attend, He had left the coun-
but £12,000 would make it easier. | try.

An open verdict was recorded.
rT —LES.



News From J°ca:

Too Many Holidays
Already—Says Official

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jamaica
Kingston's Acting Mayor, Coun-
cillor Wills O, Isaacs has asked the
overnment to declare a national



here is my cheque, signed . i ival of the
the title I have decided te adopt. oo bee ae Of ‘he West
The day I get the peerage you) jndian Cricket Team at the end
ean cash the cheque, of the current tour.

He got the peerage. The Government, however, has

Gregory's appearance at Bow-| made no comment on the telegram
street arose out of a report made| which Mr. Isaacs sent to the Gov-
to the Treasury by Lieut- Com-|ernor at the conclusion of the
Fourth Test, but in local adminis-
trative circles the impression
geined is that the idea is frowned
on as being impractical.

“Jamaica has too many holi-
days already as it is,” an official
said.



The Weather

Sun Rises: 5.30 a.m.

Sun Sets: 6.22 p.m.

au (Full Meon) August
Rainfall: .07 of an inch,
High Water: 1.36 a.m. 3.08



JAMAICA _TO_GET
TOURIST CITY.

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent,

KINGSTON, Jamaica
The United Kingdom Govern-
ment has approved the release of
blocked sterling capital in London
for re-investment in Jamaica. This
approval followed requests which
‘Mr. James F. Gore, Jamaican in-

p.m.

YESTERDAY
Temperature (Max.): 86.5
Temperature (Min.): 72.5
Total Rainfall (to date) :7.02

inches.
Wind Velocity: 9 miles.
Wind Direction: 9 am. E
3 p.m. E.N.E,
Barometer 9 a.m, 29.899
3 p.m. 29.824

dustrialist, made to the United
Benn 5.30 pam, Kingdom Government for the
release of these funds, so that



American investors could divert
frozen London Capital into a pro-
ject for the establishment of a
Tourist City in Jamaica.

Mr. Gore was backed by the
Jamaica Government and the Un-

AMBASSADOR RESIGNS

WASHINGTON, Aug. 24.
Dr. Eduarda Zurieta, Colombian
Ambassador to the United States



> employment Committee of the
for the past year, has resigned) House of Representatives in his
}and plans to go back to Bogota to negotiations and is now engaged
resume his law practice He ex-|in London in interesting both
pects to be relieved of his duties] British and American financier
\ shortly. in his $15,000,000 project



anr

Jamaican Violinist

India Govt.

Is Sub-Professor | § cholarship

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica

Jamaican violinist, Patrick Ver-
mont, has accepted an invitation
to become sub-Professor of the
Royal Academy of Music in Lon-
don and will shortly be going on
a tour of American with the Royal
Philharmonic Orchestra under Sir
Thomas Beecham. ;

Mr. Vermont is the only Jamai-
can student to perform with other
musicians from Canada, Australia,
New Zealand, Tasmania and other
countries, in London.



Spanish Class
At W.I. Varsity

KINGSTON, Jamaica

At present in Jamaica conduct-
ing the Spanish summer school of
the University College of the West
Indies is Professor Jose Otero-
Espasandin, of Waynesburg Col-
lege in Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

Twenty-two are registered for
the school which will operate for
three weeks.

‘conidia

Policemen Imprisoned.
(Barbados Advocate Correspondent
KINGSTON, Jamaica
After a trial lasting several days
three Jamaican policemen were
sentenced to prison by a Kingston

Resident Magistrate Saturday.
The three constables were con-
victed of extortion, conspiracy

and bribery in connection with an
unauthorised raid on a Peaka
Peow vendor's shop.

They were sentenced each to 12
months imprisonment,

Peaka Peow is a gambling game
imported from China and operated
locally and illegally by the Chin-
ese pc lation at an estimated
ue of 65,000,000




p

nnual va

For B.G. Youth

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

In accordance with the Govern-
ment of India’s policy in award-
ing a certaig number of scholar-
ships to students in different
parts of the world each year, the
one granted to British Guiana this
year has been awarded to Mr,
Womesh Chandra Persaud, 20-
year-old ex-Civil Servant,

Mr. Persaud who secured his
Cambridge Higher School Certifi-
cate in December, 1947 with
exemption from the London Inter-
Arts, is expected to leave the
Colony on or around August 27,
by K.L.M, plane for Delhi, India
where he will pursue a course of
higher education.

RICE SHORTAGE NOT
DUE TO EXPORTS

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

Rice, British Guiana’s staple
food, continues to be short, but
only in a certain grade — Brown
“A”

Rice Marketing Board Manager,
Mr. Peter Bayley, stated that the
shortage was not due to export,
but is the result of abnormal con-
ditions prevailing at the present
time. Full supplies of the lower

grade are available throughout
the year,

Brown “A” rice has not been
exported to the West Indian

Islands, Mr. Bayley said, adding
that for the first seven months of
1950 less rice was exported as
compared with the corresponding
period of last year. This is attrib-

uted to heavy rainfall during the
| early months of the year

$29,380,817 .03 with premiurns
totalling $349,285.22—an increase
of 62 policies insuring $264241
and a decrease in premium 061
$34.36. The comparatively smal!
inerease in Insurance and th:
slight decrease in premium is dut
mainly to the withdrawal of two
or three large insurances for
various reasons. The amount of
reinsurance carried was 2,694,-
470,10,

‘Chronicle’ Starts
Cricketers’ Fund

(Barbados Advocace Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, BG.

The “Daily Chronicle” is spon-
soring a fund for the purpose of
getting souvenirs for members of
the victorious West Indians. The
souvenirs will most likely take
the form of gold medals with the
Colony's Coat of Arms and suita-
ble inscriptions.

Said the Chronicle in announc-
ing the Fund: “There can be no
doubt that the 1l6-man West
Indies team have done the home-
land a great service and have in
four months done more -to give
weight to our national prestige
than any other effort in similar
time.”

B.G.’s Sugar
Production

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, B. G.

Sugar Production for the week
ending August 12, was 1,846 tons
bringing actual sugar made for
this year to 100,070 tons

Actual sugar produced fot the
same period last year was 83,553
tons.

To date this year 1,187 tons

of sugar was made from farmers’
canes as compared with 987 tons
for the corresponding period
last year

BETTER LIBRARY
SERVICE FOR BG.

(Barbados Advocate Corre, nt)

GEORGETOWN, B. G.
Reorganisation plans for the
Public Free Library, which will
also embrace the Rural Service,
was begun recently and when
completed will offer the com-
munity of British Guiana a much
more efficient and useful service.
In the Colony presently tc
co-operate with the reorganisation



is Mr John Smeaton, Deputy
Director of the Easftvn, Carib-|
bean Regional Library. |

Recently the B.G, Government
assumed responsibility for the
Colony’s Library Service and has
granted an initial sum of $4,000)
for the carrying out of these plans }
Part of the cost of the servicé|
in Georgetown is still borne by}
the City Council i

Interviewed, Mr. Smeaton said|
| that the Rural Service will re-|
| quire period years if a

| complete ervice over the}
Colon organised |

efficientls



*** PAGR THREE





| No More Surrender

Mouth and
(Barbados Advocate Corresnonden*) | that will sooner or later cause your teeth
no more concessions poet. the first day, ends sore mouth

%y
mperial | leeth Loose
On I
| Loose Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea.
to fail out and may also cause Rheumatism
That kly tightens the teeth. Iron clad

Preference ‘Gums Bleed ¢::)°:"¢
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
GEORGLTOWN, B. G. and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
should be granted by surrender- | guarantee

Amosan must make your

ing Imperial preferences, is the | Mouth elk and save peut teeth or

= . money back on return, of empty pack-
effect of a resolution which the |age. Get Amosan from your chemist
Georgetown Chamber of Com- today. The guar-

meree has decided to forward to Amosan antee protects

Government to be sent to the|Sfer Pyerrhea—Tremch Mouth
Seeretary of State for the] = = -

Colonies.
President of the Chamber, Mr fee MOP T ET
H. G. Seaford, O.B.E., said that i »
a meeting will be held in the|,
South of England on September 1 FREE YOURSELF
28 next, where resolutions will 1
be passed with reference to var-|4
ious preferences. i
He asked the Chamber to agree 1
to send a resolution to Govern-
ment to impress on the United
Kingdom Government the neces-
sity to take a firm stand against
any further concession in order
to safeguard the position of the
Commonwealth.

Cricket Holiday
“Out Of Order”











CONSTIPATION

rt with .

sa tel T





(Barbados Advocate Correspondent) INDIAN
GEORGETOWN, B.G. RC _ Pl ah
Suggestions to grant a holiday oleh a




to celebrate the West Indies



Test Victory in England met with ; Cee 1
opposition at the Georgetown caused leveguierity .
Chamber of Commerce. 1 © Dr. Morse’s Pills contain six eeive ;
= 18 ingredients.

Mr. G. W. E. Cooper, Managet © Gentle, effective 9-hour action wilt not §
of the Demerara Tobaceo Co.,, ! disturb your rest.
Ltd., brought up the question ;°@ Special TONIC ingredient helps restore
which he said was altogether out sermat bowel condition. 1
of order. He said: “I think we 4 ene seated annem
are all very proud of the West ' t
Indies and we all congratulate] | A TRUSTED REMEDY 4
them, but I personally fee) it Aan EARS {
will be a very sorry day if we} |: \ Ja FOR OVER 50 v 1
had a_ holiday for such an Fore ain otirence wan ire
occasion.”

He thought it would have been |! BEW AREorworms! ;
in order if it was a question of | Worms threaten old and young alike, Be)
granting a holiday to school] 4 fre yous family je protein by the

children but to disrupt business
on an occasion such as this was
‘altogether out of order,

ude by the
§ makers of Dr, Morso’s Pills RW 1-349, |

. a ~

ee

ROBINSONS

‘PATENT, BARLEY
makes Se for baby .-. _

‘PATENT’ GROATS
makes weaning a happy time for baby—
and mother F



THERE’S PAIN RELIEF

AND TONIC BE
Yes! — Yeast- Vite quickly
soothes away neu-
ralgia, nerve and rheumatic
pains —but it does something
else too ! Because of its valuable
tonic properties Yeast - Vite
helps you to feel brighter, look
better, sleep more casily and
enjoy more energy. Neat time
ou want pain felief take Yeast-
Vite and get tonic benefit too!

EFIT

YV/80j2



This natural sea-fresh food,
SevenSeaS pure Cod Liver
Oil, is a wonderful tonic in
convalescence. Its rich natural
fats and vitamins help to
restore energy, build up new
health,

SevenSeaS is pleasant tasting,
easy to take and readily
digested.





eecee eeoeoeeseeseseseeseoeesete
2 An invalid’s "quick * recovery :
° GP ely ap :
: is helped . by, SevenSeaS ¢



Stokes & Bynoe, Ltd., P.O. Box 401,

Bridgetown Barbados

In bottles containing 6, % or 16 fluid ounces.
Also capsules in tubes containing from 25.

If you cannot get SewenSeaS write to, +



INC.

in B, G.

NEW! NEW! NEW!

A new Shipment of...

MOSS
CREPE

in several delightful shades

“the
for



ideal material
Weddings”





'
§
PAGE FOUR



Printed by the Advorate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown.
Friday, August 25, 1950

ROAD USERS

THE members of the Council of the
Chamber of Commerce have decided to
form an Automobile Owners’ Association
in this island. It is a welcome step and
one which should bring great benefit to
the travelling public. The objects of the
Association will be to co-operate with the
government departments concerned with
the regulating of traffic in order to bring
about certain improvements which might
be considered necessary.

Twenty years ago an Automobile Asso-
ciation founded by Mr. E. P. Corner func-
tioned in this island and served a most
useful purpose. Motoring was then in its
infancy in Barbados and there was only a
handful of cars. Today motoring is not
regarded as a luxury but is part and parcel
of the everyday life of the community. In
those days there was a single ’bus service
outside Bridgetown and that was to
Speightstown. Nowadays there is a ’bus
service to almost every part of the island
and ’buses have replaced the defunct
Tramway and Railway Services.

Today the number of motor vehicles
both for private use and for purposes of
tréde has increased to such an extent that
there is now approximately one motor



vehicle for every 30 persons in the island.

This does not take into account the number
of animal drawn vehicles and bicycles. If
these are to be accommodated on 574 miles
of road along with the pedestrian traffic,
it is clear that there must be great appre-
ciation of the necessity for the exercise
of care on the roads. It is no insult to
motorists to say that they must be educated
to their responsibilities and their duties.
a well organised and lively Automobile
And this can more effectively be done by
Association, than by any other source.

The Committee of management of such
an organisation might well distribute lit-
erature, organise lectures, stage motor
rallies for demonstration purposes as dis-
tinct from motor racing, protect them-
selves and the general public from the
activities of reckless motorists and in
many other ways bring a consciousness of
the dangers of the roads to peaple who use
them without a care in the world.

Secondary in importance is the pointing
out to the Highways and Transport Depart-
ment and the Police the necessity for re~
moval of blind corners and the erection of
road signs. The number of accidents in
this island, it was pointed out by the
Commissioner of Police was not in any
great measure due to these corners or the
lack of signs. They were due to lack of
eare. And he might well have added, con-
sideration for other users of the road. The
exchange of experiences by motorists
might well lead to suggestions for remedi-
al measures as far as physical difficulties
are concerned but it is the work of an
Automobile Association to inculcate a
sense of responsibility in the minds of
those who have charge of motor vehicles
on the roads.

It is true that affiliation of this Associa-
tion with the British Automobile Associa-
tion might bring benefits to those who are
in position to do motoring overseas. But
the membership need not be limited to
this class. The immediate benefits are to
the people of this island; and there will al-
ways be a far greater number at home
than those who travel abroad.

Every motor owner in Barbados should
consider whether it is not his duty to join
such an Association. At present there is
a great need for such work as it could do;
and the sponsors should form an informal
committee as soon as possible in order to
attract membership over a wide area. On
this depends its ultimate success.

) ADVOGATE

\
|
|
1
LONDON.

NEXT WEEK we will hear Mr
Churchill's resounding voice again
Since the war he has spoken on
several occasions, as a politician
pleading the causes of the Con-

it. If the United Nations had not

been involved there would have

been no more feeling about Korea

than about the French four-year-

old war in Indo-China, or the

Philippines’ struggle against the
ukKs.

servative Party. An his remarks Huk

have had mixed reception—mixed
in the same half-and-half propor.
tions as the nation’s political in-
clinations. But next week he
will come to the microphone and
certainly bring to mind his war.
time broadcasts when he gave the
country great confidence—chiefty
because he sounded prepared to
tell us all, both fair news and
foul,

This has been an uneasy week.
Only a few days back the Govern-
ment announced a re-armament
programme that sounded sturdy.
But it is now coming clear to us
that our American allies do not
see it that way. While a British
task force is now on its way to
Korea there is noticeable looking
over the shoulder on the part of
the American leaders to see when
their friends are coming. Britain
has a troubled conscience. The
issue will not be dodged by blow -
ing to American requests for a
few thousand British troops from
our Malaya and Hong-Kong gar-
risons. The trouble is that we
are not entirely certain how far
we are “in” this war in Korea
For instance it was Neville Cham—
berlain who said that Czecho-
Slovakia was a small far-away
country about which we knew
nothing. He was jeered at for
that remark; but Korea looks far
further away; and not even the
best-informed know very much
about it. Nevertheless we repd
war reports of American gallantry
end exhaustion. A few weeks
ago, when news of the first re-
treats came back, the everyday
attitude was to remark that Brit-
ain was in the last two world wars
at least two years before America
—so now it was their turn. But
the mood has changed, It was
almost insupportable, that we
should still be spectators of the
heavy fighting. Yet, at the same
time, there is little passionate
sense that our own fate will ba
decided in Korea. That this is an
United Nations War is the one
vitally important reason why
British people feel strongly about





Winston Churchill has an excel-
lent argument to put forward on
the radio next week, He will ask
Attlee why he announced more
than a month before the day, that
Parliament wovld return on Sep-
tember 12. When Parliament
went for its holidays om July 28,
(a month after fighting began in
Korea), there was no hint of
urgency. But a few weeks later,
suddenly, something has happen--

ed. Why not bring Parliament This

back quickly to discuss this “some.
thing’? (1 can almost hear, al-
ready, Churchill’s voice echoing
with indignation.) Cannot Par-
liament be told?

To this the Prime Minister 1s
expeciea to give a soft answer
that turns away wratn, Provably
the Government decided on ex-
tending conscription and raising
service pay and then somebody
became so excited that the de-
cision was taken and the an-
nouncement recalling Parliament!
What an opportunity it has given
Winston Churchill; and how the
Labour tacticians must be worry-
ing! As the international situation
grows more tense, Churchill the
war leader, takes over from
Churchill of the Conservative
Party—and the Labour leaders
become more afraid of him.

Virus Defeats Anti-histamin

The battle was fought on 1,550
fields of war. On each field hordes
of viruses armed with weapons of
fiendish cruelty advanced and
overwhelmed the peace-loving
defenders, In fact the Common
Cold, estimated to cost the United
States $1,500,000,000 annually in
lost working time, has defeated
another attempt to hold it in
check. The Medical Research
Council asked for 1,550 volunteers
to suffer the Cold and treat it
with the so-called “Cold Cure”
based on anti-histamin drugs
marketed widely in America,
Some of the victims were given
pills of anti-histamin, others were

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

NEWS FROM BRITAIN | NATURE’S

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS |









given pills that

tne same, but nothing in
them. The res' re identical
for both utiously, the
Medical ‘ouncil states

has revealed
drugs have
tion of

that a year of
no evidence tha

to be effective.
if you really e you have a
“cold cure” in pocket some-
thing seems to feaben to the virus
ederts a8 Wal prety tney tire and

ts of will power they tire an
wilt. The best for a cold is
still to believe can cure it

seems to ive a profitable
field of enterprise the medicine
man—or the patent medicine man
with a gift of the gab. It might
also be considered carefully at
Lake Success

The Pains Of Being A Peer

Lord Hailsham, former Lora
Chancellor of England, died this
week. For the House of Commons
this was melancholy indeed. For
it means that Quintin Hogg, his
eldest son, will never be seen agalp
arguing from his place in the
second row—just behind the Op-
position Front Bench, One of the
penalties of being a peer is that,
like lunatics and Ministers of the
Church of England, it is impos-
sible to sit in the House of Com-
mons. Many a promising political
career has been cut short by the
deafh of an ennobled father, And
so it seems with Quintin Hogg.
Jovial, forthright, argumentative—
even jovially bad-tempered, if
that is possible—he made himself
liked even by Socialists. He gained
prominence when he won the
election fight at the City of Oxford
against the volatile scholarly so-
cialist—A. D. Lindsay, the Master
of Balliol. It was a memorable pre-
war struggle—with Lindsay heav-
lly backed by the undergraduate
non-voters, and Hogg timing his
meetings deliberately to clash
with his opponent’s. Quintin Hogg
has been one of the keenest sup-
porters of reform for the House of
Lords—which would allow peers
to choose being elected to the
Commons instead of inheriting
seats in the Lords.



Will Russia Attack?

Hy KINGSBURY SMITH

PARIS.

Plans which are being formu-
lated today for the re-armament
of western Europe are based on
the calculated risk that despite
the gravity of the international
situation Russia will refrain from
precipitating war with the United
States during the next three years,

Why do the western European
allied governments believe that
Russia will not attack America
during that time?

To get the answer to this
vitally important question, Inter-
national News Service sought the
private views of top level Ameri-
can diplomats in Europe, as well
as leading western European
officials,

The inquiries showed that the
belief that the Soviet government
will avoid precipitating a direct
conflict with the United States is
based ‘on the following three
major assumptions:

1. That Russia fears the effects
of Arnerican atom bomb attacks;

2. That Russia does not yet
possess an adequate stockpile of
atom bombs;

3. That Russia’s industrial war
potential is still too weak in com-
parison with that of the western
allies to risk a major conflict.

Western defence planners are
said to attach considerable impor-
tance to the third point, despite
the reports that Russia’s military
forces include 165 active divisions,
25,000 tanks, and 19,000 front
line planes,

On the basis of military and
diplomatic intelligence reports,
the western European govern-
ments estimate that Russian steel
output for this year will be
approximately 22 million tons.

America’s steel production for
1950 is expected to top 71 million
tons. Great Britain will produce
around 16 million tons and the
rest of western Europe approxi-
mately 24 million tons. Thus, the
western allies will produce a total



OUR READERS SAY

of about 111 million tons, as com-
pared with Russia’s 22 million.

It is recognised that a much
greater percentage of Soviet steel
production is probably devoted to
armaments than is the case at
present in the western democra-
cies. Nevertheless, the steel pro-
duction of the western world is
so far superior to that of Russia
that top level American and Euro-
pean officials doubt the ability of
the Soviet Union to wage a pro-
longed major war with the west-
ern world,

Russia likewise is believed to be
extremely weak in respect to oil
reserves compared with the west-
ern democracies,

It is estimated that Russia will
produce this year only 33 million
tons. On the other hand, the
United States and the western
European democracies are expect-
ed to produce 415 million tons.

In the case of aluminum,
Russia’s production is estimated at

Arte.

*...He says he’s j..st

invented false teeth that

make chewing figs a delight
—are you interested?”



about 200,000 tons for 1950,
whereas the United States and
Canada will produce around
900,000 tons,

It is such statistics as these
which have led the western
defence planners to assume that
Russia will not precipitate in the
near future a direct, conflict with
America and ‘the Atlantic Pact
allies,

Western officials profess to be-
lieve that Russia would risk war
with the United States now only
if she had sufficient atom bombs
to deliver a quick knock-out blow
to western, and especially Ameri-
can industrial potential.

It is not believed that Russia
has any such stockpile now, al-
though members of the United
Nations military committee re-
cently considered it possible that
the Soviets might have 20 bombs
and be producing them at the rate
of one to one and a half per
month,

Even if this estimate was cor-
rect, western officials are inclined
to doubt that Russia would run
the risk of a direct and probably
prolonged conflict with the west.

It is on this assumption that the
western defence planners think
they have three years to re-arm
western Europe.

High ranking officials in Paris
told this correspondent that if the
American and other western allied
governments thought that the
danger of a direct Soviet attack
was imminent, they would
switching their economies over to
a full war-time footing immedi-
ately instead of pursuing partial
mobilization.

It is conceded by the diplomatic
officials that if the allied govern-
ments have guessed eee about
Russia’s atom stockpile and indus-
trial strength, the third world war
might come before the re-arma-
ment of the western powers has
progressed sufficiently to discour-
age the Soviet leaders from pre-
cipitating a major riage OT



BOMBS

WASHINGTON.

The discovery in northern Quebec of what
is believed to be the world’s biggest meteo-
rite crater is a hint to ambitious mankind
that nature’s missiles still pack more power
than even the most fearsome of atomic
bombs.

The hole in the granite face of the Quebec

on wasteland is about three times wider and

perha deeper than the great Arizona
sonia whith until now has held the record
with a spread of nearly a mile and a 570-foot
depth, notes the National Geographic
Society.

A meteorite that could gouge out such a
scar as that in Canada would obliterate the

largest city and surrounding region. Yet, in| |

all the thousands of years that such heavenly

bodies have been plunging earthward, no; }

catastrophic strike has ever been known in| }
a settled area. Likewise, there are no|}
authentic records of a direct hit on any|{{
human, and relatively few accounts exist of] })
damage to property.

A meteorite is a meteor that is successful

in touching ground. Out of space, meteors; }

in general are fast-moving bodies—ranging

in size from dust particles to many tons of|

substance,
When their travels bring them in contact
with the earth’s atmospheric oxygen, they

flare up, and before “burning out” or explod-| }

ing can be seen as “shooting stars,” to use
the popularly descriptive but inaccurate ex-
pression. Dozens of such meteor falls may
often be observed on a clear night. The best
shows come during the last half of the year,
with extensive showers scheduled this
month and in November.

Although many meteorites must have hit
the earth since the dawn of time, only about
1,450 have so far been found. They are
slowed down, and cooled off on their way
through .the atmosphere; hence scientists
look with suspicion on old and new tales of
conflagrations set off and deep penetrations.

_ Meteorites are identified by their composi-
tion, by a characteristic dark, thin crust, and
by the curious forms and markings they may
have. They are usually made of iron mixed
with nickel, or stone, or combinations of
these elements, plus additional smaller sub-
stances, including rarely, microscopic bits of
diamond.

The largest meteorite on public display is
one which was found in Greenland in 1895
by the Arctic explorer who later discovered
the North Pole, Robert E. Peary, Still shown
in New York City, it weighs 364% tons. The
smallest single fall amounted to but five
grams.

Rated the most destructive of all known
meteorites was the monster that struck in
the heart of Siberia in 1908. Scientific investi-
gators later reported that a vast forested
area had been devastated and a herd of rein-
deer killed Instead of leaving one huge
crater, this meteor pockmarked the landscape
with numerous lesser ones, the largest of
which was 150 feet in diameter.

Besides the giant craters of Quebec and
Arizona, other large and imposing meteorite
sites are found at Odessa, Texas; and the
island of Oesel, Estonia; in central Australia,
Arabia, Argentina, and elsewhere. —LN.S.



Packhorse
Of The Air

BOURNEMOUTH. |

Gauchos will no longer ride the pampas,
or cowboys the prairies, if a Bournemouth
firm have their way. Instead, they will use
the Hoppi-copter—the motorcycle of the air
—which flies 10 to 15ft. above the ground at
45 to 50 miles an hour, carrying one person
or a 200lb: payload.

The hoppi-copter, which weighs 150lb.,
consists of a seat, with an engine beneath
and rotor blades above.

On production models it is planned to fit
a Perspex front which, say the designers,

will give the machine an egg-sh -
te gg-shaped appear.

TO SELL AT £500
Mr. Beresford Martin, director of the firm
which is to produce the hoppi-copter, says
that the machine can cover 50 miles an hour,
Cane with 20 miles a day by a horse.
‘The hoppi-copter can be used where

ins Pers he says.

e hoppi-copter is expected to sell at
£500. Trials have been completed at Hurn
Airport and development work on the first

hoppi-copter to be made in this c i
proceeding.—L.E.S. ene

Radio Advertising

To the Editor, The Advocate
-—Those concerned, whether
advertisers or Radio Company,
should not suppose that the vexa-
tion from Radio advertisements
has died away. On the contrary it
is I think more intense and ex-
tended. I was recently one of a
group in a drawing room when an
expression of annoyance by one
person was received with the
cordial approval of the whole
company. It is indeed a nuisance
to have to hasten to turn off the
loud speaker in order to escape
and then you may shortly miss
something you would like to hear,
This applied particularly to “Re-
quest Time” but off and on all

y.

And the Sunday advertising,
especially is reprobated. It is
really most out of order and re-
pellent—disgusting is a word used
—to have a shouting about some-

a suggestion by one of your cor-
respondents a time back for the
formation of a Union
that he or she, would come again
and say something more about
that idea. There are several things
such as a Union might do in
the matter, in additton to advising
the Company sometimes as to im-
provements in its programmes —-
as they suggest would be welcome.

For one thing it could impress
on the Company that it is not
fairplay to expect the subscribers
to pay for an instrument for their
own annoyance; it reminds one
of the proverb about “cutting a
stick for use on your own back.”

Or they might be urged ito re-
duce the monthly fee as a com-
pensation. With 3,000 to 4,000 sub-
foresee Spore the a
is up there—they can
hard up and need this wisidonal
income. Or alternatively, they
might charge a trifle more if really
necessary, and get rid of the an-

body’s wares follow instantly one noyance altogether.

a religious service, almost before
the prayer or hymn or the Bene-
diction has died off the air. We
have plenty of secular affairs dur-

4 Or, again, as has been suggested
yin your columns, a time, or times,

for advertisements might be ap-

e week and want time to 4pointed when those who do not

digest the good words about faith
and duty on the Sabbath.
then it is very unfair for a small

want to hear them—a great com-

And ..|jpany I judge — would know when

to shut off the speaker. Meantime

shopkeeper to be charged and) it is difficult to think that the
fined for opening on Sunday fiplan can yield much return, so
while the big firms can advertise}'many people being annoyed in-
and push for business and nothing#stead of interested

WEARY WILLIE

said or done
a August 21, 1950.

I thought that when I welcomed
; 4

¢

a

Tennis
To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Permit me to commend
the Barbados Lawn Tennis Asso-
ciation for at last achieving some-
thing which should have been done
long years ago. I feel sure that
the Association will go from
strength to strength having at its
head such exponents as Lr. H, E.
Skeete, O.B.E., and Mr. E. P. Tay-
lor who have worked indefati-
gably to get the Association going,

Having some idea of the finan-
cial difficulties of the Association
1 agree with your leader writer
in Sunday’s issue that the Asso-
ciation should and must make an
island wide appeal for funds and
I feel sure that it will meet with
the success which it so richly de-
serves. I would also advise the
Association to hold a well adver-
tised dance or some other form of
entertainment which should help
to defray the present expenses of
sending a team to B. G.

As I have been asked by phone,
letters, and even button holed in
the streets to give my impressions
of the team going to B. G., I can
assure yor that the team is a well
balanced one although I am some-
what surprised to see the ommis-
sion of St, Hill, and here again
finance speaks for itself for it is
a pity that we could not afford
to send four players instead of
three which makes me feel that
the two seeded players will have
to work very hard if we have to
against players as Mat-
Brothers from B. G. and

play the

thias

Farquharson from Jamaica. It is
very heartening also for our team
inasmuch as young Motte Trille
did not come out for his summer
vacation as he is also one of the
best play: in Jamaica.

Our earry with them every
good wish from every sport loving
member of the island and more
so from

TENNIS FAN.

Prison Farm
To the Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—It may be remembered by
some of your readers that when a
company of serious - minded folk
made a move last year towards
the reduction of lawlessness in
the island one of the plans was
that the thief should be kept un-
der control until he had revaid
the value of any goods stolen.

It is interesting and encour-
aging to see in that fine journal,
the Crown Colonist (July issue)
that a similar plan has been ap-
proved in Dominica, Here is the
paragraph: —

“The Committee appointed to
consider praedial larceny has
unanimously recommended the
establishment of a Prison Farm,
where crops should be grown by
prisoners under sentence, and sold
for the benefit of the peasant or
planter who has suffered loss by
theft.”

It was also recommended that
fines and prison sentences should
be considerably increased, and
small livestock included under
the ordinance: also to penalise re-
ceivers — a valuable addition.

T am also glad to see that “Pre-
ventive Detention” is being im-
posed with us. But I wonder
what “reformatory treatment is
being used during such .

August 22, 1950.

Ramadhin
To, The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—
Hurrah, to Ramadhin! one of
the aces

Of West India’s team of hardy
cricketers
Who like meteors flashed from
various places
And carved a history unpar-
alleled by far.
But ‘tis of Ramadhin I want to

He° who o’ernight came up a
strange new shoot
With fire in his soul, vengeance
in his limb
And stumps of England wreck'd
O what a loot!
They cannot understand Rama-
dhin’s art
That Venus handed out to him
the night
Before he sailed for England a
modest lad,
His name unknown and critics
derided at.
But heaven reserves the plain
to make the great,
Not many wise, not
noblemen are called.
Oh Ramadhin
shining bright,
'hy name is talked
million lips!

many

thy stars are

upon a

The __ batsmen’s
heavens of

Know thy nature and thy cun-
ning wrist.

Continue, Ramadhin,
our Iere land,

Bag some more game,
grouse but many wickets!

long-famed
id

son of

not

Cc T. BAPTISTE.
Nelson Street,
St. Joseph,
Trinidad.
August 17, 1950.

Bus Service

To, The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—As bus fares are going to
be increased, I do hope we will
have better service, as the hope of
Barbados lies in a “buck to coun-—
try” movement. The country ‘s
the pride of Barbados, but owing
to difficult travelling, people are
afraid now even to live in the sub-
urbs, Many times passengers
have to wait in the sun almost half
an hour, and then are left stand-
ing in the road. The health and
progress of Barbados, is being in-
jured by this backward means of
travel, also tourists are inconveni-
enced, and results in dissatisfac-
tion. Some buses make for the
square and do not take passengers
into town. It is not fair, after pay-
ing fare, to be dished off anywhere.

the
and health

Buses should run through
City. Better
would result

business

communications are bad or for oil pipe-line
\

WELL WISHER.







D. V. SCOTT

& CO

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1956



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GODDARD'S |
TT TT

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1956

Everybody Was Yellow

-.- And Then The Hurricane Broke
HY EUNICE SAVOURY



DO YOU REMEMBER those tales our grandparents |
told of the many strange atmospherical incidences which |

occurred preliminary to the
bados in 1831 and in 1898 ?



hurricanes which struck Bar-
I recollect one in particular.

and that was the description of the setting sun doing its
utmost to peep through dusky grey clouds a few minutes

before its disappearance behind the horizon.

How it cast

a ghastly yellow reflection across the earth causing every

object to appear as if it were

: Infant Dies
At Hospital

AREWOOD, a porter at the

General Hospital, reported to
the Pclice that the 3-month-old
female child of Athlese Jordon of
Collymore Rock who was admitted
to the Hospital at about 5.00 p m.
on Wednesday, died half an hour
Jater.

A post mortem examination
was performed yesterday.

NSPECTORS Bourne and

Springer, who left the island
during the month to attend a
course at Police College Hendon.
England, are enjoying their short
stay in British Guiana very
much.

Colonel R. T. Michelin, Com-
missioner of Police told the
Advocate yesterday that he has
received letters from both In-
spectors.

They told him that they have
been very well looked after by
the British Guiana Police Force
and were being shown around the
various Police departments of that
colony.

They called there cn the first
leg of their voyage to the U.K.

| “The

LMINA DENNY of Farm Road,
St. Peter, a pedestrian, was

involved in an accident with
motor car E-51 along Queen
Street, St. Peter at about 12.15
p.m. on Wednesday. She was
wounded in her head and is
detained at the General Hospital.

The car is owned by Betty Jones
of Colleton, St. Peter and was also
driven by her.
eo ‘BUS S-49 was

damaged in an_ accident

along Farmers Road, St. Thomas,
on Wednesday. It was being
driven by Gilbert Thorne of
Hillaby, St. Thomas

Also involved in the accident
was motor lorry M-78, owned by
the Department of Agriculture
and driven by Walter Headley of
Spring Farm, St. Thomas.

HE HANDLE BARS and front
wheel of a bicycle, owned and
ridden by Darnley Small of Red-
man Land, Goodland, St. Michael
were damaged in. an accident
along Kingston Road at about
11.20 p.m. on Wednesday.
Motar Car G-354, owned and
driven by Sylvan Straughn of
Salters, St. George, was also
involved. It is understood that
the cycle skidded,

NE MOTORIST was charged
yesterday for driving in a
manner dangerous to the public.
There were four traffic offences
recorded yesterday. The other
three charges were against a
cyclist and two motorists. The
cyclist was charged for not having
a lighted lamp to the front of his
cgnle.:

A motorist was charged for not
paying the appropriate tax on
his motor vehicle and another for
using the vehicle for purposes
other than those for which it was
licensed.

‘Athelbrook’
Leaves Port
Stern First

It is unusual to see a vessel
reversing out of the Careenage
but this incident occurred yes-
terday when the 285-ton Tanker
Athelbrook was leavhtg port.

This vessel is sister ship of the
Athel Ruby. When it entered the
inner basin it did not turn about
but continued to face the River
Road direction



af >
It toox its load of 89,414 gallons ] he ‘Radar

of vacuum pan molosses from the
Jason. Jones compound == and
shortly after midday yesterday
it reversed out of the Careenage
and left for Trinidad.

It is under the command of
Capt. Lonsdale and consigned to
Messrs, Jason Jones & Co. Ltd.

The S.S. Hecuba which brought
some of the first Christmas Tree
decorations to the island, sailed
yesterday for Paramaribo. It is
consigned to Messrs. S, P. Musson.



Illegal Liquor
Selling Cost £20

RUPERT ELLIS a 31-year-old
salesnan of Jackson, St. Michael,
was found guilty yesterday of
selling jiquor without first obtain-
ing a licence.

His Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod
before whom the case was heard
fined him £206 to be paid in
monthly instalments and ordered

him in default to undergo three

months’ imprisonment.

First witness for the prosecution
was P.C. Tull who said that on

August 7 he was on duty on the | six years,

Garrison
with P.C.

Savannah in company
334 Pilgrim. He

noticed that Ellis had a table with

a few things on it.

He was not standing there |Jamaica to load general cargo for
long when a man went up tofits return trip to the Cayman . a ee
Ellis and’ gave him something | Islands. ‘ : BUS C ONDUC TOR Jose
which appeared to be money. The vessel changed owners in| Stuart of Hillsv ick St. Jo oe
Ellis gave the man a bottle of |1949, when it made its first call} will have to pay a fine of
rum. On seeing this he approached |to Barbados. in one month or under go on
Etlis and asked him to produce his | Since then, it has been slightly | month’s imprisonment with hat

licence for selling liquor. Elli
could not and he seized the bo:



of bottles which were at the side | St

the table. TI box
three bottle 11 bottle

bottles of gin, f



containe





t and nine bottles of bee





affected with jaundice,
This happened in Antigua on
the afternoon of Monday 2lst.
While it lasted we thought
it was great fun, everybody was
yeilow, the trees and canefields
were yellow, even that range of
hills in the distance forming
Sleeping Indian” were
yellow, and gradually all the veg-
etation seemed to be transform-
ed into beautiful shades of pur-
ple, darker and darker, until
finally we could no longer risk to
gaze into the darkness, because
the winds were by now so strong
we could hardly stand or even
walk without difficulty.

Anticipate The Wind

It was possible to anticipate the
increasing strength of the wind
as it raged and roared through
the house. The rain it brougnt
with it dashed against our some-
what exposed wooden bungalow.
In spite of all precautions water
seeped under the doors. At 9.15
witn one terrific bang the lights
and telephone were gone. A pele
near the house had collapsed
from then on we spent most of
our time moving furniture from
room to room trying to find a dry
‘spot. We found just one, and
only one, for now the leaks from
the roof were out of control. It

|

MEMBERS of the victorious West Indian Test team visited
and here is the very successful spin bowler, Ramadhin, with one of the operators who deals with calls a

to his own country.

‘Gokey’ Goes
Empty

NO FANCY MOLASSES

SOME weeks ago, the moto
vessel “Gokey” called at Barba-
dos for a load of fancy molasses
in bulk for Canada, but had to
leave port under water ballast
instead.

The reason for



this was that

was no use trying to catch the
water it simply poured through.
Ey 10.30 we could only hear by
shouting at each other and the
storm had apparently reached its
maximum as far as ihis island
was concerned. The wind howled
perpetually and like some great

the Government had forbidden
the shipping of fancy molasses
eut of the island in bulk,

This prohibition does not stand.
however, with the shipment of
vacuum pan molasses out of the
island. On Wednesday, the motor
vessel “Athelbrook” was in the

giant paused intermittently
drawing a long breath and then
blowing it out with all its might.

In a wooden house, the sen-
sation was as if the building
Would split if the constant vi-
bration continued to _ increase.
Then came a dreadful crash on
the galvanised roof, and another,
and another. What was this ter-
rifying bombshell right overhead,
more frightening than thunder?
A few more of those and pcr-
haps the roof would be pierced
through. Then came an awful
rumbling, thumping sound which
appeared to be rattling its way
from one end of the verandah to
the other. The unexpected bumps
and thumps were far more hor-
rifying than the periodical flash-
es of lightning followed by the
usual peals of thunder. The first
hammering turned out to be
merely a few branches of a near-
by Eucalyptus tree which broke
away and connected with the
roof. The second was only an
old soap box colliding with the
gallery rails and floor.

Climax

The climax came between two
and three in the morning when
the hurricane suddenly decided
te change its direction and we
survived a sort of lifting, rising
sensation. By this time the winds
had reduced their velocity of at
least a hundred miles per hour.
People of the surrounding vil-
lages say this was their most
agonising period because they
felt their huts might have been

Careenage filling her tanks with
126,000 gallons of this commodity
for export to Trinidad.

Vacuum pan molasses was being
shipped in bulk from Barbados
for the past 20 to 25 years. Only
small quantities have been ship-
ped out in barrels for U.K. and
Canada by Harrison liners and
Canadian liners,

The vacuum pan molasses ship-
ped out of Barbados by the ships
of the “Athel Line” is usually
tuken to Trinidad and British
Guiana where it is transferred
on big tankers for shipment to
U.K. and Canada. «

Before the war, big (ankers
have called here for supplies of
this commodity but that was
stopped because it took about
four days to load one tanker.

Tankers Call Often

The tanks here for storing vac-
uum pan molasses ready for ship-
ping which are situated on the
wharf around the inner basin of the
Careenage, have a capacity of 4
million gallons. This necessi-
tates the regular calling of tank-
ers to the island to prevent an
overflow of the tanks at the va-
rious sugar factories

The motor vessel “Athelbrook”
which was yesterday at this port,
a new tanker of the “Athel Line”,
hes recently come down from
England.

It has come to replace the well

| known “Athel Ruby” which has

made many a call here recently.
At some periods of the year, the
“Athel Ruby” used to make a
weekly call.

The new “Athelbrook” will be

swept completely off their weak| (perating on what is called the

foundations.

Throughout Antigua precau-

“shuttle service’. It
take vacuum pan

will only
molasses as

tions were taken well in advance | cargo.

although only a gale was anti-

Messrs, Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.,
“Advocate”

cipated. This turned out to be a, told the yesterday
“Small Hurricane’, A more)that they expect a big vacuum
severe thrashing is hard to visual-] pan molasses tanker to arrive at
ize; this has been quite enough|Barbados about mid-September
to cause owners of modernly |to take a load. In this case, the
built houses to feel that the old} big tanker will anchor in Carlisle

fashioned storm shutters are }|Bay while the, “Athelbrook” will
needed sometimes. be used to take the vacuum pan
Antigua was hit by a hurri- | â„¢olasses to her

cane twenty-two years ago. It) yacuUM PAN MOLASSES is
is felt that the destruction then Jine yesidual cane juice after the
rhe eteal br ete extraction of sugar has taken
The electrical storm in 8 was | place.
ere, but the velocity of
the wee on both occasions was FANCY MOLASSES is the in-
about the same verted cane juice concentrated
into syrup from which no sugar

has been extracted.

Definition
by courtesy of the Department of
Science and Agriculture.





Is Strange

PERHAPS the strangest looking
of motor vessels which call here is
the 116-ton “T.B. Radar.”

Most unlike the others, the
bridge of the “T.B, Radar” is set hvane
right astern leaving from forward ay
to midship plain.
winches can he seen above that

ie c av = ty)
Pe or B. Radar” is so built for along Bay Street. sl ae
the freighting of lumber. It was The houses on this spo wet
ly ilt in the Cayman Islands, the all knocked down last month anc
ie of which it carries on the |the greater portion of debris ha:

stern.

What’s on Today

Police Courts 10 a.m.

1 Court of Appeal 10 a.m,
Petty Debt Court 10 a.m,
Exhibition of Pottery at

Barbados Museum
Table Tennis Trials at

“Window By Sea”
Cleared Of Debris

LABOURERS were busy

Hospital which is the most recen





fishing boats and other smal
craft could be seen hauled up 0
the beach while at other
idlers baked in the sun.
The Esplanade, another
dow by the sea”, has
been cleaned up. The terrace ha
been repaired in various spot



“win

variety of colours.

yp?
The rails that enclose th

Y.M.C.A, 7 p.m.

of harps and the trimming aroun
the roof bears
It has been on the run now for | Barbados “Coat-of-Arms”.
During the first five | Rand Stand is now one

years, it made trips from the Cay- | most attractive in the island
»>|man Islands to British Honduras
where it took lumber for Cuba
From Cuba it would then sail for







s | conv erted and put on a regular | labour for over loading the bu
x|run from Barbados to Dominica, | G--282 on Neils Road
Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada, order was made 0
Aruba and Curacao, V day by Mr E
The vessel has a gross tonnage McL« P. M t

f 162 t nd al has passenger |

ommodatior Fey

supplied yesterday

yes-
removing debris from the
Only two }open spot opposite the General

“window by the sea” to be opened

been removed. In the backgrouna

spots

recentiy

where there were holes and the
Band Stand is being painted in =

Stand are decorated with designs
designs. of th

This
of the

Overloading Cost £2 |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

SENDS A GREETING

I RAMADHIN

_ Major Stoute

Major R.A. Stoute, who was
recently appointed Deputy Com-
|missioner of Police of Barbados,
; returned to the island on Wednes-

tending a Senior Oflicer’s course
in England at Police College
| Ryton-on-Dunsmore, ncar Coven-
| try, Warwickshire. He will resume
duty on Monday.

“I consider the ccurse and at-
tachments extremely interesting
and beneficial”, he told the Advo
cate yesterday. He also saw the
Second Test at Lord’s and met
Goddard. Weekes, Worrell, Roy
Marshall and others.

Although the College that Major
Stoute attended is at Warwickshire
he did not see the West Indies be-
ing defeated by that County. For-
tunately on the day on which that
match had begun he was leaving
Ireland on the first leg ef his voy-
age home.





He met several prominent Police |

Officers and Detectives both of the
Metropolitan and other Forces in
the U.K. The trip to England and
the return voyage were very
pleasant and he has made many
friends in the U.K.

He left Barbados on March 1.
and arrived in England on March
14. The course at Ryton-on-Duns-
more ended on June 9. Attending
the course were Police Officers
from nearly all the Home Forces
in the U.K. and Wales and 12
Officers from Colonial territories.

At Scetland Yard

During the course he visited
many Police Forces including Lan-
cashire and the Leeds City Police
where he was attached for two
weeks. At the conclusion of this he
did a two weeks’ course at Scot-
land Yard and was afterwards at-
tached to the Kent County Police
for another two weeks. He visited
various Headquarters and Stations.

On the completion of the courses
he left England for Ireland on
August 2. He spent afew days
there and left on August 9 by the
R.F.A. Dewdale for Trinidad
where he arrived on Wednesday
morning and left in the evening by
B.W.LA. for Barbados



SHORT CUT

MOTORISTS use the site
of the burnt out Centrai
Foundry building as a bye-
way for entry to St.
Michael’s Row from Tra-
falgar Square. The road
below the site is used by
"buses coming from the ’bus
stand and is for one way
traffic.

Traffic other than ‘buses
have to go right round Tra-
falgar Square before going
up St. Michael’s Row

| Motorists have decided that
the car park is not a road
the crossing of which is
troubled by legal restric-
tions, and instead of going
the long distance, thev take
this short cut.





Sold Over Schedule;

Fined £2

RUBY HAYNES, C/o

Police Magistrate Mr. C.

of the Defence Regulations Act

hard labeur.

Ss

i

FRESH GRAPES—Per lit
BRIDAL ICING SUGAR
BANQUET CASTOR SUG



PRUNES—7 lb. Tins
; CHEESE—Per Ib

RAISINS—Per Ib
TOMATOES (Whole)-—Per
TABLE SALT—Per Pkt









the Wood-street telephone exchange,

Returns Home) In Custody ss «

day evening by B.W.1.A. after at- |















Harola
Proverbs, Rockley, Christ Church
was on Wednesday ordered to pay
a fine of £2 with 2/- costs by City

Walwyn, for committing a breach} ground the week-end for St. Vin-

Haynes offered for sale to a go.
buyer, a half-pound tin of Rown- :
tree Cocoa for 39 cents when the] the ‘Advocate’ that the longer his
fixed price was 37 cents per tin.| vessel laid up in the Careenage,

Failing to pay the fine in the|the

given time, Haynes will undergo| He did not see the point of se-
one month’s imprisonment with| maining in port wondering w
er a hurricane would come.





you will need for that

ANNIVERSARY CAKE

,
COCKADE FINE RUM_ |
STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO.. LTD. |;

HOME

Barbados |
37 Years Ago’

When Mr. Walter Haynes lef
Barbados 37 years ago for Canada

the chief methods of transporta-
tion. An old Barbadian and an
engineer, Mr. Haynes came back
to the island last Saturday
morning for a short vacation.

Mr. Haynes who has been a
machinist at the Steel Company
of Canada for 33 years, has i
foreign wife and six children
} and considers Canada his home
| He was 24 when he left the
island to seek his fortune, he
said He left his parents, but
no brothers or sisters. There
was an engineer shop in Trafal-
ger Square in those days whicl
was owned by D. M. Simpson
} and it was there that Mr. Haynes
| learnt his trade
| The site, now known as Queen's
Park, had only become a park
e few years before he left the
island. Then too, electricity was
in its infancy and street lighting
by gas was in vogue. He was
|} Surprised to hear that gas was
still used in some parts of the
} island for street lighting.

He went to school at St
Leonards He said that those
' school days come back to him as
sweet period of life, q period
} of rollicking and fun

Only One Church
Before he left he said, there
was only one church and one
entrance at the Westbury ceme-
tery He has not had time yet
go about the island to see

° |} more extensive changes, but he
On ‘Myken ! visited the grave yard to see the





Saadeh Held





names of his parents and old

acquaintances. He knows few

While the labourers were busy | people here now, most of his
unloading the Norwegian Steam- | friends have died

ship Myken in Carlisle Bay yes-} [yn Canada, Mr. Haynes told

terday a Norwegian seaman,/ the Advocate sewage gutters run

Camilleri, was locked up in the

, underground, He thought that
vessel's brig below.

the same scheme could be carried

buggies, tram-cars and trains were |

Camilleri is held in custody in
connection with the fatal stabbing
of Hansen, another Norwegian
seaman, while the vessel was in
Guadeloupe.

The 4,389-ton Myken, under
Captain Dolven arrived yesterday
from Dominica. It is chartered
by the Alcoa Steamship Company



out here to allow of a sidewalk.
With all the streets having side-
walks there, he thinks it annoy-
ing that one should have to walk
along the road here with so much
traffic always on the go

Mr, Walter Haynes was given
a wrist watch by his Company
as a tribute after he had put in

of the U.S.A. and consigned to

25 years’ service, All who have
Messrs. Robert Thom, ae .



‘ : served 25 years or more and
It brought 800 bags of cornmeal those who have resigned and
for its Agents. Also included ini are still alive after that long
its cargo was a quantity of con-i service, are given an annual
fectionery, pine lumber, tomato ; dinner, Mr. Haynes thought
| juice, prepared coffee, sole leather | highly of the Company's con-

and coffee beans.
The Steamship Oranjestad
which

| sideration in giving annual din-
‘ners, and throughout his interview

arrived on Wednesday ; ; atte) aaah oe
from Grenada brought a quantity be ie t ger dinner
of shoes, cotton goods. shell but- reference oO e 8
3 habia eet van, | crept in
ne See eee peuee, Fate now works eight hours a

He
| day at $1.20 per hour. He thinks
life has not done him ill and looks
forward to seeing his family
again on September 1

terday for Madeira. It is under
the command of Captain Hazel-
koff and consigned to Messrs
S. P. Musson, Sons & Co, Ltd.

The S.S. Alcoa Partner, which
|was taking a load of sugar, also
sailed yesterday. It is bound for
New Brunswick. The S.S. Mormac- |





‘Nina’ Is A
Faded Memory
Schooners Come The eee sete wits vee
e , a St. Je *s for ne <
And Go Despite fine of ‘i Columbus. Banter is
Th Weather | still tied off in the inner basin, The
e

}deck is now bleached while the
The hurricane season is_ here,

j bottom is covered with moss.
but this does not prevent the flu- j to

| Early in 1948 the Nina drifted

| St. Vincent and returned to

rst Barbados under its own power,

ent movement of schooners and AC by the Motor Vessel

dawn left for La Guaira











. © essels to and from | &ccompanile : : :
artedee, eam | Daerwood. On its return it was
Even the most recent report | taken out to shoot a few scenes

but soon after it was brought into
the inner basin and has been there
ever since,

The “Nina” was built in 1948
as sister ship to “Santa Maria,” |
/another caravel used here for the

that a hurricane had struck An-
tigua did not scare schooner cap-
tains from leaving this port the
next day, bound for other men]



Indian Islands.
Anchored in the Careenage yes-

terday were 13 schooners and two | filming of the Christopher
motor vessels, but none of them | Columbus picture.
were lying up in port for safety | That ana the “Santa Maria”

against bad weather, were both designed and built at
> 8 ames ¥ ard by
Seven of the vessels were being | the St. James Dock Yard i

unloaded of their cargoes of rice Clarke and mene: ane fo tea
i tine ir ¢ sm earatinks -| Maria’ was first launched anc
fruit. firewood and charcoal; four | re estar heaibeed eboke, eal

were taking cargo in preparation
for leaving port towards the ena
of the week while four others were
idling, awaiting cargo with which
to sail.

Captain Stoll
A. H. Vansluytman”
was expecting to sail on Saturday
for British Guiana. The vessel was

tafter
Many an evening they could be
}©een under sail and power, far
| the West off the St. James
, op | Coast, shooting scenes. On, eve-
of the Timothy | res when the vessels) com-
pho i | pleted they were anchored off
| the Dock Yared :
‘Santa Maria’

. ¢

t ischarging the last of its | End oi

ieee ae Suddenly ove night, the “Santa
He ‘did not think that the hurri- | Maria" went up in flames and

cane which struck Antigua would |that was the last of her. The

reach him on his course from Bar- | next morning, only charred pieces
bados to British Guiana. Hence he | of wood showed where the “Santa
did not see the necessity of lying | Maria” was anchored.

up in j r shelter The “Nina” was close by when
mee } Se “Santa Maria” was burning
Skipper McFarlane of the Bluel put the flames did mot reach
Nose. Mac was also poeparing to her
i f itish Guiana on Satur- :
= ter anip. was being loaded It was not long after when the

with lime and marl. “Nina” met her first bit of mis-

He agreed with Captain Stoll i oop While . sting ee
at. > ricane which struck | alone one evening, the vessel fe
that, the, nyze ean into difficulties and could not

Antigua would be out of their path
~-Barbados to British Guiana,
“The weather will have to be up

reach the St, James Coast,
It drifted w'th crew aboard and

: rt.” said skip- me days atter, it was towed
eep me in this port,” said skip ‘0 _ day ar, it
ee Gwiare of the “Gardenia W.”, mY St. Vinee 2 8 fen ‘n
ic ; also expected to sail oter vessel “Daerwood” was
which is also P sent from Barbados in search of
rr ; vessel was awaiting car-|her but that was ouly in time
cent. His vessel , to accompany the “Nina” back
from St. Vincent.

Another schooner captain told When the Nina sailed into St.
Vincent everyone was curious and
on its return here local folk were
also interested, but at present no
ne seems to even look at the
vessel and it is quickly becoming
a faded memory.

less trade it would make.



24 LEADING
TO CHOOSE





THAT PUT

PAGE FIVE



IN STOCK ...

PURINA.
CHOWS

ANIMALS & POULTR)



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DISTRIBUTORS.







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AMONG MANY OTHER ITEMS OUR STOCK INCLUDES-
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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1958











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WIFE PHONED JUST
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| SAID HER BROTHER BIMMY















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|| HERE-T HOPE |.
1G IN TOWN AND WILL CALL | iil || HE DOESKOT
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FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1950



CLASSIFIED

TELEPHONE

IN MEMORIAM



Sacred to the memory of imv dear Has-
band WILLIAM G. PIERREPOINTE, who
departed this life Auguct 2th, 1947

We carmot say, nor we will not say,

That he is dead but far away.

With a loving smile and a wave of hand

He has wandered into unknown

land,

Sleep on beloved and take your rest,

God know I love you still.



Evelyn.
25.8.50-—1n





FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

CAR——Citroen (X-169) A bit shabby,
but goes like a Bomb. $1,459. Hugh Pop-
jam, “In Chancery”, Christ Church.













9.8.°50.—6n.
TRUCK—One 1934 Ford Truck
Apply D. V. Scott & Co. ‘Vhite Pak.

Phone 3493. 16.8.50—t.f.n

CAR—1947 Hillman Min 7,000 miles
Perfect condition. Owner leaving island
Price $1,400.00. Greenland. Phone 3283 or

75. 25.8.50—8n

FURNITURE

MAHOGANY CEDAR — Lined Tp)
Boy — 4 ft. x 3 ft. x 2 ft. Good con
dition, Three drawers and hanging space
Good bevelled mirrom in mahogany
frame, 30 x 20 ins. Price reasona
Archie Clarke, Navy Gardens.

24.8 50--3n,

FURNITURE — 1 Painted Press; 1

Baby’s Press; 1 Kitchen Cabinet: 1

Small Mahogany Table. Phone 3252.
24.8.50—2n.

MISCELLANEOUS

|

_GLASSWARE FROM CZECHOSLOVA-

KIA.—Vases, Powder Bowls, Cups &

Fruit Bowls reduced to half price. See
ovr Show Windows. Knight's Ltd

25.8.50—3n



















IMPEX World's best cycle generators
and headlights. Obtainable, from all lead-
ing stores. 25 .8.60—Tn

RECORD ALBUMS for 10-inch and for
12-inch and carrying cases for 10-inch
records, and we have the records too

A, & CO., LTD.









Alle ess satel mete pl p anes
YAWL—‘“Frapida” approx. 37% feet
long with Gray Marine engine. Good
condition $3,000 a bargain. Apply
J. R. Edwards, Phone 2520.
15.8.50—T.F tY.





FOR RENT
HOUSES

FLAT — Upstairs Flat at Waverley,
Blue Waters Terrace. 3 large Bedrooms
semi-furnished with modern conveni-
ences. "Phone 8283. 20.8.50.—7n.

FLAT — ‘“Wrenscourt", Palm Beach,
Hastings. 3 Bedrooms, Drawing and Din-
ing Rooms, 2 Verandahs, Pantry, Kitchen,
Garage. All modem conveniences. Cool
and airy, near the sea, Available Octo-
ber. Apply: C. E. Clarke, 7 Swan Street.
Phone 2631 or 3029 25.8.50-—5n
TWO FLATS—At “Inch Marlow”. Fully
Furnished. Phone, John Bladon 4640.

9.8.'50.—6n.

THERSISDON—Maxwell’s Coast Road.
Fully furnished. From September. Mrs.
B. Lashley, 5th Bungalow, Maxwell's
Road. Dial 8417. 25.8.50—n.



















My House “In CHANCERY”, for three
months, to careful tenants, Fully -fur-
nished. From Sept. 1st. Write Hugh Pop-
ham. Phone John Bladon 4640.

_.. 9,8,'50,—6n,

WORTHY DOWN—Top Rock having 3
bedrooms connecting Toilet and Bath,
jarge Lounge-dining room. Delightful
balcony, Two car garage. Fully enclosed



Available unfurnished September ist
Apply: Ralph Beard. 4683 or 2328.
25.8.50—3n
FOR RENT OR LEASE
UNFURNISHED
“PARAISO”'—-Barbarees Road Situ-

ated one mile from the City. Drawing
and dining room, Front and side Galleries,
Kitchenette, three large bedrooms each
with running water, modern tiled bath
with shower and tub bath with hot
water laid on upstairs. Large games
room, bedroom with running water.
kitchen and store rooms on ground floor
Servant's room with toilet and bath. Gar_
age with room for two cars. Electricity
and Gas. Please ring 8382

22.8.50—t.f.n







PUBLIC SALES
AUCTION

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON TUESDAY 29th by order of Mrs
E. P. Baker, we will sell her Furniture
at “Banyan Beach", Brighton, which in-
cludes Sideboard, Serving, Coffee and
Side Tables, Arm, Morris and Eas.
Chairs, Gate-Leg Tea Table; Book Case
(Glass Doors) all in Mahogany, Rugs,
Wall Mirrors, Glass and China, Lioyd
Loom and Rush Chairs and Rockers; 2
Single Bedsteads with Vono Simmons
Springs, Deep-Sleep Mattresses, Mird
Press, Dressing and Bed-side Tables,
Linen Press, all in Mahogeny; G.E
Refrigerator, 3-Burner Ger Stove,
Larder, Step Ladder, Palms in Cement
Pots, Pressure Cooker, Electric Iron and
other Items.

Sale 11.30 o'clock

BRANKER, TROTMAN

Auctioneers







‘Terms 8]
& CO.
% .8.50—22n

REAL ESTATE

————$— —

LAND — One rood twenty-six and a
half perches of land at Prospect, St,
James. Price attractive. For particulars
apply to D'Arcy, A, Scott, Magazine
Lane. 24.8.50—2n

THE undersigned will set up for
saie at their office No. 17 High Street,
on Friday ist September 1950 at 2 p.m.
the dwellinghouse called The Cottage
and the land thereto containing 3,250
square feet situate at Cheapside, Bridge-
town.

Inspection any day except Thursday
between the hours of 4 p.m and 6 p.m,



TS oe

on application to the tenant, Mrs
Thomas.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale, appiy to:

COTTLE, CATFORD & Co
18.8.50—+.f.n.

HOUSE—(1) Double roof house cach
29 x 12 x 8 covered with galvanise,
situated in Yearwood Land, Black Rock





1, Chattel house and 3,200 square feet
of land.

2. 10 perches of land.

3. 2 roods of land.

4. 17% perches of land. All situate
near Auburn and Indian pond,
Joseph the properties of the late Wil-
lam T. Walton deceased. The above
properties will be set up for sale by
public competition at our Office, James
on Friday 25th August 1950 at
For inspection apply on premi-

9

2 p.m.
ses,
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors
17.8.50—5n



|
——<—<—_—=—————

Lvervbody Praise
de Missis

COFFEE

but duh dont

DISTILLED

WATER





buy
GAS

she

e







—



Â¥ ILKES,
1
| Hours: 8.30 to 1 and 2 to 11.30



ADS.

WANTED





HELP

CASHIER—Assistant Lady Cashier. For
the Hastings Hotel. Apply in person with
references to Manager 24.8.50—t.f.n





MALE CLERK—For Traffic Dept., City
Office, B.W.LA, Ltd. One with some pre-
vious experience preferred.

Apply by ag testimonials to:





QUALIFIED ELECTRICAL FOREMAN.

—Apply in person

experience etc. b W. Deane,
City Garage Trading Co. Ltd., Victoria
Street. . 17.8.50—t.f.n.

MISCELLANEOUS

FURNISHED Cottage at Wortht
St. Lawrence with Garage.
A.B.C. c/o Advocate.



or
Apply:—

19.8. 50—6n.
POSITION WANTED

DENTAL TECHNICIAN with over 20
years experience in preparing and cast-





ing all gold fittings Acnylic processing
of partial an edentulous cases a spe-
ciality.

Modern Technique used in all sta@=

Reply to Ged. Wilkins, 11, Pic °*
Street, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad,

3 .8.80- on



WANTED TO BUY
STAMPS—Used Postage Stamps of
America and B.W.I. Islands. James’ \'

Indies Stamp Co., Bay Street, St. Mich
ael. 25 .8.50—3n.

PUHLIC NOTICES
NOTICE

This is to notify the General Public
that the Auction Sale of the (5) pine
Spars now lying in the Constitution
River which was advertised to ta‘:°
place on the 3lst day of August has
been Cancelled.

D’Arcy A. Scott, .
Government Auctioneer,
25.8.50—In

1S.













(Deceased)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that. all
persons having any debt or claims against

the Estate of Joseph Wiggins deceagd,
late of Flat Rock, in the Parish of Saint
George in this Island who died in this
Island on the 27th day of March are
requested to send in particulars of their
claims duly attested to the ypcerenee’
G. Seymour Alleyne of Mason Street,
Bridgetown, on or before the @ay
of September, 1950, after whith date I
shall proceed to distribute the assets of
the deceaserl among the parties entitled
‘thereto, having regard only to sich
claims of which I shall then have
had notice and I will not be liable for
the assets or any part thereof so distribu-
ted to any person of whowe debt or claim
I shall not then have had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to gettle their in-
debtedness without delay.

Dated this 8th day of Angust, 1950

G. SEYMOUR ALLEYNE,

Qualified executor of the Estate of

OSEPH WIGG



OFFICIAL NOTICE

S.
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF
APPEAL

{Equitable Jurisdiction).
HUNT Plant
endant

Fi

IN pursuance of an Order in this
Court in the above action made on the
22nd. day of: , 1950, I give notice
to all persons having any ¢state, right
or interest in or ‘any lien or incum-
brance affeeting

Alb~that~scertain piete or parcel
of lamd situate at the Ivy in the par-
ish of Saint Michael aforesaid containing
by admeasurement Four thousand seven
hundred and seventy square feet or
thereabouts abutting and bounding on
lands of James Murray, on \ynds of
Blanche Grosvenor, on lands of gpe
Forde and on two sides on the pubiic
roed called Ivy Road or however else
the same abut and bound together with
the dwellinghouse and all and singular
other the buildings and erections on
the said parcel of land erected apd built
standing and being with the appurten-
ances to bring before me an account
of their said claims with their witnesses,
documents and vouchers, to be examined
ter me on any Tuesday, or Friday be-
tween the hours of 12 (noon), and 3
o'@lock in the afternoon, at the Office
of the Clerk of the Assistant Court of
Appeal at the Court House, Bridgetown,
befdre the Ist day of November, 195°,
in order that such claims may be rank-
ed according to the nature and priority
thereof re’pectively; otherwise such per-
sons will be precluded from the, benefit
of the said Decree, anit be deprived of
all claim on or against the said property.

Claimants are also notified that they
must attend the said Court on Wednes-
day, the 1st day of November, 1950, at
1€ o'clock a.m, when their said claims
will be ranked. e

Given under my hand this 22nd day
of August, 1950.

. V. GILKEs,
Ag. Clerk of the Assistant Court of
1.
mes 25.8.50—In

OFFICIAL SALE

BARBADOS.
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF
APPEAL

uitable Jurisdiction)
AUGUSTUS HUNTE—Plaintifft
FITZGERALD CLARKE—Defendant

NOTICE is hereby given that by virtue
of an Order of the Assistant Court of
Appeal dated the 22nd day of August,
1950, there will be set up for sale to
the ‘highest bidder at the Office of the
Assistant Court of Appeal at the Court
House, Bridgetown, between the hours
of 12 (noon) and 2 o'clock in the after-
noon on Friday, the 3rd day of Novem-
ber, 1950.

All that certain piece or parcel of land
situate at the Ivy in the parish of Saint
Michael aforesaid coritaining by admeas-
urement r tho seven hundred
and seventy square feet or thereabouts
abutting and bounding on lands of
James Murray on lands of Blanche
Grosvenor on lands of one Forde and
on two sides on the public road called
Ivy Road or however else the same abut
and bound together with the dwelling-
house and all and singular other the
buildings and erections on the said
parcel of land erected and built stand-
ing and being with” the appurtenances
and if not then sold the said property
will be set up for sale on every succeed-
ing Friday between the same hours until
the same is sold for a sum not less than
£400. 0. 0

Dated this 22nd ay of 1950.



August,
. G 5
Actg. Clerk of the Assistant Court

of Appeal.
25.8.50.—3n.



Removal Nofice

Dr. F. A, COX
D.C.P.T. (Chir.)

Chiropractor & Optician
has Removed to Lower James St

a |
TO-DAY’S |
NEWS FLASH |

EGG TIMERS
SAMSONITE: —a heat proof
adhesive of colossal strength

at

|

|
|
|
|
j
|

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY |
& HARDWARE



HARBOUR LOG

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Philip A. Davidson; Sch. Bur-
{ma D., Sch Rosarene; Sch. Bluenoee
Mac; Seh Sip Wonita; Seh. Prances
Smith; M.V jue Star; Sch. Bmeline;
Sch. Belqueen; Sch. Laudalpha; Sch
Lady Noeleen; S'S, Alcoa Polaris; Sch.
Princess Louise; M.V. T. B Radar:
Sch. Timothy A. H, Van Sluytman; Sch.

Gardenia W; Sch. Enterprise; Sch. Tur-

tle Dove; Sch. Many M. Lewis; Sch

Mary M. Lewis; Sch. Marion Belle

Welfe; Sch. Marea Henrietta; 8.8
Sylvanfield; S.S. Myken
ARRIVALS

Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe, 74 tons,

Capt. Every, from British Guiana,

“gents: Sth. Owners’ Association
Sch. Marea Henrietta, 43 tons, Capt

Selby, from St. Lucia, Agents Sch
Owners’ Association.
S.S. Sylvanfield, 4,389 tons, Capt.

Pingsley, from Curacao, Agents: Messrs
Gardiner Austin & Co. Ltd

DEPARTURES.

8.S. Oranjestad, 2,855 tons, Capt.
Hazelkoff, for Madeira, Agents: Messrs.
S. P. Musson, Sons & Co., Ltd.

8.8. Heeuba, 2,220 tons, Capt. Del-

zenne, for Paramaribo, Agents: Messrs S.
P. Musson, Sons & Co,, Ltd.

S.S. Mormaedawn, 4,521 tons, Capt.
Gregson, for La Guaira, Agents: Messrs.
RM. Jones & Co. Ltd.

S.S. Alcoa Partner, 3,931 tons, Capt
Pembroke, for New Brunswick, Agents:
Messrs. DaCosta & Co. Ltd

Tanker Athelbrook, 285 tons, Capt
Lonsdale, for Trinidad, Agents: Messrs.
HM. Jasom Jones & Co,. Ltd.

Ships In Touch With
Barbados Coastati Station

CABLE and Wireless (West Indies)
Ltd. advise that they can now commu-
nicate with the following ships through
their Barbados Coast Station.

$.S. Jane Stove: S.S. Del Sud: S.S
American; S.S. Quilmes; S.S. Myken;
8.8. Hendrik Fisher: S.S. Lady Nel-
son; S.S. Canadian Challenger; s.s.
Sunwhit; S.S. Hecuba; SS. Interpeter;
$.S. Alcoa Pegasus: S.8. Casablanca

$.S. Syivafield: S.S. Toulouse: S.S.
Spinanger; S.S. Mormacdawn; S,S,
Fredrika: S.S. Imperial Quebec: S.S.

Oranjestad; S.S, Haparangi; S.S. Be
lita; S.S. Rena: S.S. Monte Arnabal,
$.S. Cumberland; S.S. the Cabins; S.S.
Somerset: S.S. Irania; S.S. Willemstad
$8. Alcoa Partner; S.S. Fort Moultrie:
§.S. Coulgarve: S.S. S. Paula: S.8S.
Hera: S.S. Esso Bethlehem: S.S. Spe
ciolist: S.S. Fort Royal: §.8. Arakaka

8.8. Liparus; S.S. Regent Juguar; 5.S
Matina: S.S. Imperial Quebec: s.s.
Svenor; S.S. Juvenal; S.S. Regent

Panther: B.T. Gobeo: 'S.S. Athelchief:
S.S. Esso Philadelphia: S.S. Tindefjell:
SS. Beechhill: S.S Argentan; S.S
Frederic A, Eilers: S.S. S. Gaspar; S.S.
Spidola; M.S. Amerigo Vespucci; 5.8
Annarelia: S.8. Kongsstein: S.6. Sax-
onstar: S.S. Bacchus; S.S. Turbinellus;
S.5. Prins Philips Willem; S.S. Stan-
bell; SuS. Ariguani: S.S. ‘Elax; S.S
Sundale; 5.S. Fort De France: SS.
Tista: S.S. Sunwalt: S.8. Sunvalley:
S.S. Katherine; SS. Andreas: 58.8.
Norita; 5.8. Gascony: S.8. Villeda-
miens; S.S, Lampania: S.S. Belita: 8.5.
Mooncrest; $.S. Mormacdawn: S.S. Al-
phacka.



ARRIVALS BY B.W.1.A.L
From TRINIDAD: S
Andrew Christine; Catherine Richards,

William Simmons; Bernard Richards:
Tnimas Blackstack; Frank Nothnagel;
Stanley Osbourn; Arthur ima:
George Niles; Henry Gootman; Austo
Matheus; Estala DeHrullon; Mahomed
Degia; Mahomed Patel; Ahmed .Pandor;

Mrs. Edith Bedell; Benjamin Bedell;
Mrs, Hazell Bedell; Henry Bland;
Thomas Springer; Aaron Springer; An-
drew Warner; Selwyn Jaleel, Arthur

Moore; John Branch George H. Wilkie;
Olga Blonval; Francia Blonval; Adoifo
Bionval; Mir: Yonala Stoute; Clementina
White.

ARRIVALS by B.W.D. AL.
From GRENADA;

Cyril Bennett, Liuelctte Fuchs, Otte
Fuchs, Theodore Worrell, Maxwell
Thomas, Erayntrude Gomas, Ivelow
Mitchell, Joyee Babb, Ingrid Babb.
From ANTIGUA: ;
George McMichael, Louis Fisher, Perci-
val Jeffers, Smith Bracewell, Margaret
Bracewell.

From HAITI:

Herry Ben.
From JAMAICA:

John Newton Whitton, Syvia Marge
Whitton, Susan Sarah Whitton, John
Whitton, Joseph Diver, Ivy Pratt.
From PORTO RICO:

Evelyn P. Outram, Sidney Spira.

DEPARTURES—By B.W.LA.L.

For TRINIAD:

Bhanoomatie Singh, Befaial Singh, Edris
Mercier, Orona Scatriffe, Susan Acker-
man, Ruby DeSilva, Elrice Roett, Sam-
uel Roett, Christopher Roett, Esther
Roett,, Joan Maggs, Isabel Toshea, Bar-
bara Adams, James Adams, Hon. H. A.
Cuke, O.B.E., M.L.C,. America Machado,
Raphael Machade, Enrique Miquilarera,
Losbio Fineo, Dolores Fineo, Luis Fineo,
Jacques Cramer, Denis tes, Clive
Valere, Maria Campos, Caesar’ Fernan-
dini,, Collin Pilgrim, Ancilla Henry,
Sheila Henry, Henry Goodman, Bismark
Drayton, William Simmons, Christian
Alexander, Lionel Brewster, Antoneito
Corales,Vaides, Carlota Castro-Gruber,

For LA GUAIRA:

Bertha Voorwijk, Maartem Voorwijk,
Madelaine Voorwiik, Alda Zapata, Jose-
fine Schweinborger, Peter Schweinborger,
Viviana Barzilay, Lily Barzilay, Nora
Palenzona, Mariella Palenzona, Isabella
Palenzona, Armando Palenzona, Cesar
Palenzona, Saba De Mayer, Mary Wed-
derburn Tilma Calcano, Anat Calcano,
Ludovik, Wolken, Carmen Plaza, Maria
Benitz, Elias Roth. ‘

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



GREETINGS









FLASH FROM LAND TO LAND

MEMBERS of the victorious West Indian Test team visited the Wood-street telephone exchange

and in this picture Weekes, Walcott, Goddard

the overseas telephones.



3 Schooners
Bring Rice

“Three large quantities of rice
have already been brought to the
island by intercolonial vessels
from British Guiana this week.

Apart from the 1,250 bags
brought by the Schooner Timothy
Van Sluytman on Monday, the 69-
ton Schooner Mary M. Lewis,
under the command of Capt. Mar-
shall, brought 1,500 bags on
Wednesday and the 74-ton Schoon-
er Marion Belle Wolfe. under Capt.
Every, brought 2,000 bags of
which 150 were broken, yesterday.

The 84-ton Turtle Dove, skip-
pered by Capt. Olivierre, also ar-
rived from British Guiana but this
only brought 161 tons of firewood
and 400 bags of charcoal.

Other cargo brought by the
Mary M. Lewis included 300 bags
of charcoal and 45 tons of fire-
wood.

The Wolfe also brought J1 pieces
of sawn mora and 25 pieces of
sawn greenheart, 500 wallaba
posts, 500 bags of charcoal and
nine tons of firewood,

Twenty-one casks of honey were
brought by the 43-ton Schooner
Marea Henrietta which arrived
from St. Lucia yesterday. The re-
mainder of its carge was made up
of 67 packages of fresh fruit, 200
posts, 280 bags of charcoal. 50
drums of cocoanut oil. 24 bags of
cocoanuts and 205 bags of copra.

These vessels are all consigned
- the Schooner Owners’ Associa-
ion.



Financial Plans

To Be United

LONDON, August 24.

Twelve North Atlantic Pact
deputies this morning set up a
Committee to co-ordinate the
financial plans of separate
defence schemes drawn up by
Treaty countries, usually reliable
sources said.

Charles Spofford, American
chairman of deputies presented
the United States views and com-
ments on plans,

He was also believed to have
outlined the extent and type of
aid the United States was pre-
pared to give to supplement
defence programmes’ of her
eleven Atlantic Pact partners.

Charles Spofford, American
Chairman of the Atlantic Pact
Council of Deputies, today told
the meeting of the Twelve Nation
Council that their proposed
financial contributions to the
revised defence programme were
not sufficient, according to usually
well informed source.

There was still a considerable
gap to close.

It was understood Spofford did
not give any indication of the
amount that might be expected
from the United States to fill
the gap. —Reuter.



GOVERNMENT NOTICES.



PRICE OF SULPHATE OF AMMONIA

Until further notice, the following price has been arranged: —



Maximum Price

Sulphate of Ammonia ..

—



$120.80 per ton





Discount if paid by
30th September, 1959

$2.25 per ton





25.8.50—2

PAYMENT OF WATER RATES

Consumers who i:ave not yet

paid water rates in respect of the

quarter ending 30th September, 1950, are hereby notified that unless
these rates are paid on or before the 31st of August, 1950, the Depart-
ment, as authorised by section 46 of the Waterworks Act, 1895-1. may

stop the water from flowing into

the premises, in respect of which

such rates are payable. either by cutting off the pipe to such premises
or by such means as they may think fit, and take proceedings to

recover any amount due,

——



BARBADOS,
IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery

Defendant)
documents and vouchers to be examined
the hours of 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece

in the parish of St.

the same may abut and

OFFICIAL NOTICE

admeasurement two roods two and two-tenths perche
Abutting and bounding on jands formerly of W
now of one Walrond on lands formerly of G. G. Medford but
of one Farnum on lands formerly of Alfred F. Green but now of
Pilgrim and on the public road called Spooners Hill or howeve

25.8.50—2n.



Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all

persons having or claiming any estate, right or interést or any lien or incum-
branee in or affecting the property hereinafter mentioned
to bring before me an account of their claims with their witnesses

(the property of the

by me on any Tuesday or Friday between
afternoon at the Registration Office, Public

Buildings, Bridgetown before the 26th day of Oct. 1950, in order that such claims
may be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority
respectively, otherwise such persons will be precluded from, the benefits of
decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said property.

PLAINTIFF: LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL
DEFENDANT: VIOLET JOHNSON

thereof

f any

or parcel of land situate at Spooners Hil!
Michael and Island aforesaid containins by
or thereabouts

T. E. Richards but

ow
one
else

bound Together with the dwelling house

called “Homestead” and all and singular the buildings and erections

both freehold and chattel on the said lands erected and built standing

and being with the appurtenances the said dwelling house land

hereditaments and premises being the property of the defendant
Bill filed 28th July 1950.
Dated the 22nd August,’ 1950

H WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery
a “

and Williams are

2 U.S. Ships
Sunk
—REDS CLAIM

TOKYO, Aug. 24.
Pyongyang (North Korean-,
Radio) to-day claimed that Com-
munist aircraft sank an American
ship on Tuesday off Soijak Island.
Early yesterday Pyongyang Ra-
dio claimed an American destroyer
had blown up off the Korean east
coast after an engagement with

Communist shore batteries. An
American spokesman here ridicul-
ed this. —Reuter,



Govt. Plans To
End Strike

IN CANADA

OTTAWA, Aug. 24.

The Government worked on
Thursday on plans for getting the
full weight of parliament behind
action to end the general rail
strike as it awaited Tuesday's
cpening of the emergency session.

As the critical strike went into
the third day there was no direct
Government intervention in pros-
pect before the opening of Parlia-
ment with the Administration
standing by its decision to have
legislatots share the responsibil-
ity for any action,

What that action might be was
still problematical, Prime Minis-
ter St. Laurent in announcing the
opening date on Wednesday said
the Cabinet had not yet taken final
decisions on the programme of
action it will lay before the Com-
mons. Deliberations on the mo-
mentous issue, the outcome of
which may have a heavy bearing
oa future industrial relations in
rational industries such as rail-
ways, went on Thursday morning
at a Cabinet meeting.

One hundred and twenty-four
thousand railway employees went
on strike Tuesday for higher wages
end shorter hours.

Can Press,

Dockers Refuse
To Load Goods

For Russia

NEW YORK Aug. 24.

Members of the Longshoremen’s
Association here who recently re-
fused to unload goods from Russia
have now decided not to load ships
with goods for Russia or countries
associated with her,

The first ship affected was
American 8,000-ton freighter
the Moore-McCormack
bound for Gdynia Poland

The Union decided last week to
boycott all shipments of Soviet
products entering New York and
Loston.

New York dockers had refused
two days earlier to unload a cargo
of Russian furs,

The embargo on unloading was
later extended to air cargoes.

—Reuter.

COFFEE REPORT:
IS_ CONFUSING

NEW YORK, August 24.



an
of
Lines



Representatives of the Latin
American coffee industry today
criticised the revised Congres-
sional report on coffee prices
They said that it would aggravate
bitter resentment — in Latin-
America, and confuse people in
the United States,

Four Latin-American nations

asked the Special Commission on
Coffee of the Inter-American
‘Economic and Social Council to
consider the report urgently at
its meeting next Tuesday. The
report made by the Sub-com-
mittee made recommendations
designed to bring the coffee trade
in the United States under closer
scrutiny. It replaced an carlie:
report to which the State Devart-

ment objected because it placed
part of the blame for recent
coffee price increases in the
United States on some Latin-

American countries.—Reuter



Kravehenko In Rio
RIO DE JANEIRO, Aug. 24



Victor Kravchenko, forme
Soviet official in the United States
and author of the book “I chose
freedom” arrived at Rio De
Janeiro last night, om his way
to Buenos Aires. Kravchenko
declined to make any statements
to ne@ws-men saying that he
would hold a Press Conference
on his way back, when he in-

tends to remain a few days here



He is on a mere pleasure trip
Kravchenko who is under a
heavy guard of F.B.1. agents
and Brazilian plain clothes men
will leave for Buenos Aires this
evening. He ji travelling ler
the name of Pietro Martinez

—Reuter

seen at their particular section of



BombersRepel

Red Advance |Canadian Nation

@ From Page 1

west bank of Naktong, ready to
move Jato the Hyongpung bridge-
head 15 miles south of Taegu—
lower jaw of the threatened pin-
cers thrust on this vital communi-
cations city ia the northwest
corner of the “defence box.”

On the East Coast, a Regiment



of the South Korean Capital
Division was forced to withdraw
North of Pohang during the
night, but this morning two
Divisions prepared to mount a
counter attack. :
Airforce Headquarters said

£26 Invader bombers were also
in the air early today winging of
for new strikes at marshalling
yards and troop concentrations
around Taegu and Chinju on the

south coast,
Late yesterday jet fighters far
behind Communist lines report-

ed strikes on ox-carts which ex-
plojed under rocket fire. They are
belieyed to have been laden with
ammunition. North Korean Radio





said early today that one Ameri-
ean aircraft was shot down hy
flak yesterday while _ raiding
Pyongvang
Counter-Attack
Speaking for the first time in
weeks of theis own air activity,

Communist Radio said Communist
troops with air support were re-
pelling a final counter-offensive
effort of American and South
Korean forces,

Naval Headquarters
American destroyer for
recond time in three days
ried out a bombardment of the
fer north east coast port of
Chongim sterday, raising fires
that were visible 10 miles at sea
Here, targets were the Mitsubi-
shi iron works rail yards anc
docks

With little
Korea today
Airforce
centrated
interdiction.

said an

the
car-



y



ground action it
the American Fifth
repcrted its action con-

on oa behind-line:

A midday Communique - saic
that north of the 87th parallel
Mustangs ranged over the Won
ju, Kimpo, Seoul snd = Suwor
ereas and claimed eight locomo
{ives destroyed, three damage
end three flak points hit ane
cestroyed.

Factories Bombed

A large number of buildings ir

two villages were rocketed anc
strafed when found to shelter
cLemy troops and supplies

"hree factories were also bombed
rocketed,

A .total of 93 sorties in close
upport of ground forces was
‘own, The principal effort was
» the Northern sector along ap-
proaches to Taegu, where build-
ings sheltering the enemy were
strafed

Pilots observed no worthy
enemy action over the front

One Mustang was lost due t

enemy action but the place an:





exact cause were unknown

Superforts continued to smast
enemy war potential raining
heavy bofnbs on military an
industrial installations, marshal
Jing yards and key bridges nort!
cf the 38th parallel

—Reuter.



B.G. Rice

Corporation

@ from page |!
Hon. D. P. Debidin and Dr, C,
Jagan, who maintained opposition

to the end.

Before the motion was put to the
vole on Wednesday, the Financial
Secretary the Hon. BE. F. McDuvid
emphasised that C.D.C. or any
other development corporation to
be formed must be a free explorer
outside the market if they were to
make @ suecess of the venture.

McDavid pointed out however
there was sufficient safeguard to
protect others engaged in the In-
dustry. Amended Clause 7 pro-
vides for the Governor to invite
persons to particpate in establish-
meat and operation of the propos-
cd @evelopment corperation and
uny agreement between Govern-
ment and corporation will have to
meet with legislative approval, as
well as any arrangement with re
gard to marketing or domestic
consumption and export trade, and
rice produced in the colony; also
the fixing of grade and prices will
be done in collaboration betweer
the corporation and the Rice Mar-
keting Board

The passing of the Bill paves the
way for large scale development
of the colony’s rice industry. The
new corporation will take over the
Government central mill at Ma-
bhuicony rice development
scheme es





a

lished with two other
Berbice

Aid




Es
providi



sequibc

ne the









an

he









PAGE SEVE!
‘ 7 x ~ +
Senate Cuts “imed 15/- For
$200,000, 000 Indecent Language i
WASHINGTON igust 24 [LVINCS TONE BOURNE of 2nd
ie oy \ 1 tex 8 Road 1s 6 6GH
i of w H Vv i ined 15/- by City
iy it the § H - Dp trate Mr F A
ret Cer itter ad ag fel i for using imdeceut jan>
$200,000,000 off this year’s ¢ ove nenitioned
propriations for onomi read j i3 In default,
ration and administration, The pe re it spend 14 days" tre
mir tt we 1 eported 7 iment
ait 1 agreenent 0 redu
Senate upprove propos { hefore it beeomes effective
00,000,000 loa to Spain to woud uce new money for
ny) $ Eeonomic aid from the
cut’ which must esate approved figure of
proved by both Houses of Con- $2 106,000 to $2,250,000,000.





SHIPPING NOTICES

























= ———
ROYAL NETHERLANDS er ee a ce
STEAMSHIP co sceept Cargo and Passengers for
. iniea: St, Vincent; Grena?
SAILING FROM PERDAM Lucia and Aruba, sailing
ROTTERDAM AND ANTWERP May Sth August
iS. HECUBA Aue. 4th, Sth, 8th » . ‘an o°
M.S, HELENA Sept.’ ist, and, 5th ut CN ee ae
= ena cept Cargo ane >a
ee Sukie _ AMSTREDAM Pominica; Antigua; Montserrat;
38. COTTICA Aus. 18th ee Ne AEE Seay
_ Soth August
SATLING TO MADEIRA, PLYMOTZU pry ie
ANTWERP AND AMSTERDAM The M.V. “DAERWOOD" will
1.8. ORANJESTAD Aug. 22nd accept Cargo and Passengere for
1.8. WILLEMSTAD Sept. 19th St Lucta; St. Vincent; Grenada
SATANG YO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO and Aruba, date of sailing will
DEMERARA, ETC be given
WS, HECUBA Aug, 26th B.W.1. Schooner Owuers
S. COTTICA Sept. Sth Association Inc.
S. P. MUSSON, SON & OO. LTD. Consignee; Dial: 4047

«

AGENTS





al Steamships











JUTHBOUND Salts vile Salis Arrives Sails
Montreal Halifax Boston Garbados Barbados
“ANADIAN CHALLENGER | 11 aug 4 Aug 25 Aug. 26 Aug
ADY RODNEY 28 Aug j é 28 Aug 6 Sept £
ANADIAN CRUISER i Aus 3 >t 13 Sept S Se
LADY NELSON iL Sept i4 t W Sep 25 Sept. 22 Seg
ANADIAN CHALLENGER . 27 Sept. 30 Sept Oct ;
ADY PODNEY 1 Oct If t 16 Cet ui Oct 2 y
ANADIAN CRUISER Oct 27 Oct 7 Noy 7
ADY NELSON i Nov 4 Nov € Nov 15 Nov v
SS
ORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal Sit. John
ATY ROONEY I €e' 1 Sept 0 Sept 1 Oct 5 Oct
sADY NELSON W Oct 19 Get â„¢ Oct 24 Oct
\DY ROONEY 9 Nov ii Ne 20 Nov 21 Nov
ADY NE'SON p ) Nov 8 Dec 10 Dee



B.—Biibject to change without notice
bers, Passenger Fares and freight +

vessels fitted with eld storage cham
es of application to :-

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.







PASSAGES TO IRE

ANTILLES

LAND

VRODUCTS LTD., Roseau, Dominica, offer
Passages to Dublin per M.V, “DUALA”, next sailing from Roseay
about 28rd August, and thereafter about every thirty-three days.
Single Fare, £70, usual reductions for children.
Apply direct











_ Mr. Factory Manager

PPPS E FEEL FOF eee

need of

ou in

vi ¥
y 7 sr
EXPANDED METAL
We von supply it In the following size:
Ot. ~ 3ft, x Bin. mesh
Bit. x Sft, x Itoins, mesh
Of & 3ft. x ‘ain, Mesh
ft, x aft, x lin. mesh



THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
(CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
Corner Broad & Tudor Streets



4

TS SS SSS SSE
HERE!

AFRICAN PRINTS

in Cottom...
A MULTI-PURPOSE FABRIC





.

inst





VROADWAY BWIKESS Soda.



Of Se





= SN
PLLA ALLLOPLVALSSSS,





LET US HELP YOU WITH YOUR REPAIR PROBLEMS,

We can supply the following ex STOCK.

BOLTS & NUTS—
Iron & Bright Steel — All sizes

BEALLNG (Plummer Block) —
&KPF BALL and Cast Iron Brass







¢ Bushed ‘

%

g BOLT TAPS & DIES—

% Tn sets from \%” to Ye”

% ASEISTOS ROPE, TAPE and

¢ TIBRE, etc.

%

x PIRE CLAY, BAFFLE BRICKS, etc. )

e §

R Remowber: - 5 d
The BARBADOS .OUNDRY Led.
MWEADQUARTERS FOR ALL FACTORY AND PLANTATION

SUPPLIES,
LLLP DOELLLLLL ALLL ALALDLPSLLL LLLP.



CORPORATION — LTD.

NOTICE

As the Manufacturers have decided that repairs to one of
our Engines can no longer be delayed, the Cotapany has in
consequence had to put this Generating Set (900 K-W.) out of
commission and, owing to the reduction of standby Plant now
wailable as a result, may find it necessary to shed load at
intervals during the next few months.

Our Consumers ave asked to co-operate by exercising the
utmost economy in the use of Electricity, particularly during
the Peak period between 6,30 and 8.30 p.m. until further notice.

Vv. SMITH,

General Manager.
20th June, 1950.

BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY




’ PAGE EIGHT



VERDICT. ON
THE TESTS

Death From Natural Causes
HY PETER DITTON

NOW the shouting has

been lost and won, the time is appropriate to open the in-
quest on yet another series of English Test failures.

Channel 550_
Yds Too Much

DOVER, Aug. 24.
Philip Michman, 19-year-old
British schoolboy to-day gave up
his attempt to swim the channel
from Britain to France only 550
yards off the French coast, it was
officially stated here.

For three hours the swimmer
tried to reach the shore arguing
with his father, who accompany-
ing him in a launch, wanted him
to give up the attempt.

He climbed into the boat un-
aided, and his father iold the
cheering crowd on the shore that
Philip would try again. salle kha

The boy swam the Channel
from France to England in 23
hours 48 minutes last year. Had
he succeeded to-day he would
have been the fourth swimmer
to conquer the Channel in both
directions —Reuter.



Argentinian Does
Fastest Lap

NORTH HAMPSHIRE, Aug, 24.

Argentina’s Juan Fangio today
set up the fastest time in prac-
tice here for the
Trophy Motor race to be held on

hour did a lap of the 2.88 mile
airfield circuit in one minute, 52
seconds. Close behind him came
Italy’s Farina also driving an Alfa
Romeo with the lap in one min-
ute 54 seconds.

Delayed by last minute mechan-
ical troubles the new British
National Racing car “Brom” did
not uppear today but it was hoped
that one of the two cars entered
for Saturday’s race would appear
tomorrow for practice. The race
is regarded as part of the sixteen
eylinder Brom’s development
programme for the 1951 Grand
Prix Season.

The fastest car in practice to-
day among standard production
models entered for a _ separate
event on Saturday was the Italian
two litre Ferrari which
did the lap at 81.88 miles per
hour while British three and
half litre Jaguar went round at
81.24 miles per hour.

Although not officially recog-
nised as a Grand Prix event,
Saturday’s race has attracted the
best cars and drivers in Inter-
national racing.

Ttalian Ferraris and Maseratis,
as well as French Talbots will

join with Broms attempting to
hold the so far supreme Alfa
Romeos.

—Reuter.






POOR GEORGE ~
HAG BEEN HAVING WILD OF
OF A NEW FAST BOWL
GREW UP TO RESLUe CN

ee a

°
French Girl
. o °
Wins Diving
VIENNA, Aug. 24
Nicole Pelisard of France, to-day
won the Women's — high board
diving event in the European
swimming championships here,
The Freach girl who was runner-
up to her compatriot Bureau for
the springboard title yesterday,
scored 85.87 points in the high
diving. Alma Staudinger, Aus-
tralia was second with 82.38 points
and Birte Christopherson, (Den-
mark) third with 82.31 points.
—Reuter

The








THIS IS THE PART WHERE
MEPHISTOPHELES SINGS HiS

LISTEN FOR HIS FIENDISH

H-HAH “HEAR iT?
NOW HE'S SORE, SEES

“stay

Saturday. arg
te i long hop was a long hop no matter }
Driving an Italian Alfa Romeo, ji
Fangio, averaging 92.85 miles an who the bowler, and as such was

Do It Eve




DIABOLICAL SERENADE +++

LAUGHâ„¢HE'S JUST COME UP
FROM THE LOWER REGIONS
IN A CLOUD OF SMOKE-NOWss
TUM-DE-TUM-TUM-DE-TUM+

died away, now the battle has

We had been told before the
tour began that the trouble with
the West Indies cricket team was
a tendency to become dispirited
when things were not going right
for them now we know different-
ly. They lost the first Test at Old
Trafford and according to that
reckoning should have lost the
next three. But no.

They licked their wounds after
the Manchester game and then
launched a series of attacks which
reduced English cricket to the
same state of helpiessness that the
Australians had reduced it to two
years previously. This year was
remarkable for the number of in-
juries to England's star players.
and did provide an excuse which
was not available when the Aus-
sies were here.

But even allowing for the fact
that Hutton. Compton, Washbrook.
Edrich, Parkhouse, Bailey and
Evans all missed one or more
matches the position is still rather
grim.

It is a sad reflection that five
years after the war we still could
not put adequate replacements in
the field to fill the gaps left by
our top men.

John Goddard has _ sportingly
declared that the loss of cricket
during the war years was the de-
ciding factor. That was a nice ges-
ture, John. But the excuse cannot
hold water much longer.

The real reason why the tourists
from the Caribbean were so suc-
cessful is that they play cricket as |
it should be played—and as it wasj|
played in this country not so very

International} long ago. Not for them the stolid

in the crease’ outlook. A

hit for four or six. A slight move-
ment down the wicket and the ball
short of a length became a half-
vo ley and that meant four more.

The contrast when England
batted was amazing. Half-volleys
and long hops were treated with
a gentleness that could only be
described as feeble and I cannot
recall one occasion when the West
Indies close-to-the-wicket fielders
were forced to retire to a safer
area.

It was this reticence to attack
the bowling which made Ramad-
hin and Valentine into the giants
they finally became, They are un-
doubtedly great bowlers—I have
already described them as _ the
finest young combination produced
by any country -at any time—but
{ cannot help wondering how they
might have fared had they been
treated with slightly less timidity
in the first two Tests

They would still bave taken a
lot of wickets but their average
might have been considerably
higher. Furthermore they might
not have been called ypon to bowl
so frequently and that woyld not
have been a bad thing for England.

But now it is all over. Congratu-
lations John Goddard. Well played,
West Indies. You have proved
yourselves worthy cricketers and
fully deserving of an opportunity

}to oppose Australia for the world
“Ashes”.

Individual bouquets are not easy
to distribute. Ramadhin. Valentine,
Worrell and Weekes have deserved
all that has been said about them.

There is, however. one other
member of the side whom I feel
has been equally responsible for
England’s defeat.

He is Alan Rae, the Winchmore
Hill Club cricketer and West In-
dies left-handed opening batsman.
Cautious at times in the extreme,
Rae nevertheless was the founda-
tion stone-on which all the West
Indies success was built.

He failed at Old Trafford and
the West Indies lost, He scored a
century at Lords and they won by
326 runs.

At Trent Bridge he compiled 68
in just over four hours and paved
the way for Worrell and Weekes
to slaughter England's tired attack.

Finally, he completed another
century at the Oval and the West
Indies won by an innings.

It has been said that figures can
be twisted to suit any argument.
But in this case at least, [ feel
they are straightforward enough
and while not suggesting that he
has been the star of the side, I
think his efforts have been insuffi-
ciently praised,

Football Results

LONDON, Aug. 24.

Second Division: Hull City 3,
Barnsley 3; Queen’s Park Rangers
1, Notts County 0; Swansea Town
1, Sheffield United 2; West Ham
United 2, Luton Town 1,

Third Division. Southern: Port
Vale 1, Newport County 0; Watford
3, Reading 1: Barrow 2, Halifax
Town 0; Carlisle United 3, Gate-
shed 0.

4 Ay ol pposaeruaiaaerad ’ Salta





’ ° —
Time’

“ WHO ARE WE__
LISTENIN’ TO @














ONE GOAL

YESTERDAY afternoon during the match between Flying Fish and
Paul Foster, gets high out of the water to save one from the Snappers

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

SAVED!



Snappers however went on to win the match 2 goals to love.

}
|

|

snappers the Firing i goa



Essex Leading W.L.

On First Innings

Trevor Bailey

Takes 5 Whtis.

On Rain Affected Pitch

WEST INDIES

213

ESSEX 229, AND (FOR 3 WKTS) 49

SOUTHEND, Aug. 24.

A fine spell of fast bowling by Trevor Bailey helped
Essex to accomplish a splendid feat in taking a first innings
lead over the West Indies tourists here to-day.

The West Indies seemed assured
of a substantial lead when Chris-
tiani and Stollmeyer put on 104
for the opening partnership. and
later Gomez and ‘Weekes put on
58 for the fourth wicket partner-
ship. The pitch however, was
showing signs of becoming lively
and Weekes fell in the last over
before lunch. After the interval
the last six West Indies wickets
fell in fifty minutes for 28 runs.
Bailey, fast and hostile with a
strong wind at his back took five
of these for 13 runs in 6.4 overs.

The Smith cousins, Ray with
his off breaks and Peter, leg
breaks, bowled with consistent

steadiness and when the West In-
dies innings ended Ray needed
only one more wicket to complete
the double of a thousand runs and
one hundred wickets this season,

The Start

Christiani and Stollmeyer soon
struck a run a _ minute rate of
scoring when they continued their
unbroken overnight score of 68,
although both had a little luck in
the early overs. Christiani reached
50 after batting 95 minutes, and
the opening stand reached 104 be-
fore both men fell at the same
total.

First Peter Smith tricked Stoll-
meyer, who playing back, broke
his own wicket and then Smith
held a fierce cut off Preston to dis-
miss Christiani. These wicket falls
caused a reduction in the rate of
scoring

Essex met with further success
at 187 when Ray Smith’s slow off-
breaks caused Trestrail to play
back and miss one delivery which
broke the wicket.

Weekes came in to open cau-
tiously against the bowling of Ray
and Peter Smith, but he gradually
settled down and with Gomez pro-
ceeded on a profitable stand which
neared the half century.

Then just before lunch was due
Weekes fell to Preston. He gave

a catch to midon when attempting

to repeat an earlier pull to the

boundary, bringing about his dis- |

missal. Lunch was taken at this
wicketfall with the West Indies
185 for 4.

After Lunch

The collapse of the West Indies
after lunch was due to Trevor
Bailey, the England fast bowler
who in 6.4 overs took 5 wickets
for 13 runs.

With only 9 runs added to the
lunch total Walcott and Rae were
both out. Walcott failed to get out
of the way of a lifting ball from
Bailey and gave a high catch to the
wicket keeper, while Rae failed to
open his account before giving a
catch off Ray Smith’s leg breaks.
This was Smith’s 99th wicket of
the season, and he needs only one
more to complete the double of a
hundred wickets end a thousand
runs for the season. Bailey was
bowling decidedly fast, and the
collapse continued. He was suc-
cessful with a second appeal for
l.b.w. against Gomez and had
Williams caught.

Then Ramadhin hit Ray Smith

through the covers for 4, but Jones
wh




I’M GOIN’ DOWN TO
THE LOWER REGIONS
OF THE CELLAR TILL

THIS THING BLOWS







THE OPERA LOVER WHO
BRINGS HIS OWN ALBUMS»:s
AND EXPLAINS ‘EM sss

THANX TO
PHYLLIS LAWRENCE,

3800 CARPENTER AVE,
BRONX 65, N.Y.

was another lb.w. victim off
Bailey, and Pierre was ouy caught
at the wicket without scoring for
the innings to close 16 short of
the Essex total.

The last six West Indies wickets
fell in 50 minutes after lunch for
only 28 runs,

The pitch remained rather live-
ly when Essex batted again and
Jones made the occasional ball
lift. Dodds and Avery however
made a confident start but with
thirty six runs on the boards, bad
light stopped play and then heavy
rain followed so that tea was

taken.
After Tea

Rain held up play for two hours
and a quarter after tea dnd by
close of play Essex were 49 for
three wickets. Strenuous efforts
were made to dry the pitch and
after an inspection by the captains
play did not begin until 6.30 p.m,
and in the remaining thirty min-



oe

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utes Essex lost three wickets. _

West Indies attacked with
Gomez and Ramadhin on a pitch
still very wet. Dodds was run out
foolishly at 38 and Gomez ciaimed
Bailey at 45. Avery fell in the last
over,

Seores:—

WEST INDIES

FIRST INNINGS

Christiani ¢ Peter Smith b Preston 60

Stolimeyer hit wkt, b Peter Smith 42
Trestrail b Ray Smith oe
Gomez |.b.w. Bailey . . 4
Weekes c Vigar b Preston Tre |
Walcott c Wade b Bailey . oan oe
Rae c Preston b Ray Smith : c
Williams c Peter Smith b Bailey .. 5
Jones l.b.w. b Bailay ...........5 2
Ramadhin not out ....0 6... ceeseee 4
Pierre c Wade b Bailey 0

Extras: 11 byes, 6 leg byes 7
Total 212
BOWLING ANALYSIS

oO M R w
Builey 164 3 44 5
Preston 16 2 49 2
Ray Smith .. 27 4 44 2
Peter Smith .. , 22 2 49 1

ESSEX SECOND INNINGS
DaGde run Out ....ccissecssscessess
Avery ¢ Stollmeyer b Ramadhin .. 1?

Bailey |.b.w. b Gomez . 5
P. Smith not out .... tiie 1
Extras .... 0
Total (for 3 wkts) 49
red of wickets; 1—38; 2—45; 349
BOWLING ANALYSIS
°o M Ww
Pierre ey 3 oO 14 0
Gomez : 12 4 6 1
Jones ogee 3 1 4 0
Ramadhin €.1 2 5 1
—Reuter.

Barbados Bisley
Men For Home

(By London Correspondent)
LONDON, AUG, 24.

Six members of the Barbados

Bisley Team left England a



for the West Indies aboard the
Golfito,



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‘Snappers Beat

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oS



FRIDAY, AUGUST 235, 1954

NEW GAMES OPEN
LOCALLY TO-MORROW

THE Third Series of First and Intermediate Division Games,
and the Fourth of the Second Division, open to-morrow, and there
are fourteen fixtures scheduled to take place

eepreretasicyetensninenserstpe- scene The games, grounds and Um-
| pires appointed are as follows:—
} AUG. 26, Sept. 2, 9.

Flying Fish
AS SECOND ROUND
GETS UNDERWAY

SNAPPERS fulfilled their prom-
ise to defeat Flying Fish yester-
day when in the second fixture of Geet ae FIRST DIVISION

y ; n ye t Co :
the afternoon at the Barbados |match in a melee in front of the | timpires C. Cumberbatch. & C.dibson.
Aquatic Club they beat the white |Piying Fish goal, Ince drew Fos- | _ College vs Carlton at College; Umpires
capped Flying Fish two goals to |ter out of his goal and scored with | *y¢ Foster & © Roacnford
love. Flying Fish playing without C i ranparene, Ve, aces ar. Mar

. ; a@ well placed shot. One minute | pires L. King & L. Spellos
their centre-forward Denis Atkin-|jxcer the referee blew off. Snap-| Empire vs Spartan at Bank Hall: Um-
son put up a stubborn fight and | pers, the victors;were very prompt | °"* J: H- Walcott & H. B. Jordan
did well not to be beaten by a|with three crisp cheers for the |

wider margin. losers, who replied in like manner,



pers team, and partly to incorrect
| passing.
Finally





















near the end of

Um-

INTERMEDIATE DIVISION

Cable & Wireless vs Wanderers at

In the other game Police] The referee was Maj Boarded Hall; Umpi W. Bayley &
s s ajor | i | 208 . mpires yviey

turne the atch of W. Arche

the <= die laeiane Fs Foster, | Mental Hoeptial vs Windward at Black

7 : : The teams were as follows:— j Kock: Umpires P. O. Evelyn & S.

team played with six men as

Police had one man on the sick

: O. Johnson, B. Patterson, A. Tay-
list. Rain during the first match |jo, T. Yearwood and J. Genaa”
had spectators on the crowded pier |" police : — Mc. D. Richards
hurrying for shelter, but it only | (Capt.), G. Porter, L. Dodson, w

lasted for about five minutes. ili Sie {
The matches were as follows: — oo i SOS Te AE

BONITAS 8 POLICE 0 Flying Fish: —P. Foster, (Capt.),

Bonitas winger Owen Johnson T. Yearwood, H. Weatherhead, T.
scored two quick goals shortly |Johnson,
after play began, before Police got |F. Potter.
into their stride to make several] Snappers

Gilkes.
Spartan vs Empire at Park; Umpires
Batson & J. Hal!
Pickwick vs ¥.M.P.C. at Oval; Um

Bonitas:— M. Foster, (Capt.),

pires W. Harewood & J. Hinds

SECOND DIVISION
) Aug. 26, Sept. 2 .
, ¥.M.P.C. vs Leeward at Beckles Ra.
| nphees Cc. Archer & B. Clarke:
Lodge vs Police at Lodge: Umpires G.
\ Bradshaw & S. Beckles ; o
; Carlton vs Bmpire at Carlton: mm
D, Davies, J. Knight and jpires A. Harewood & C. Collymore.
} Fonndation vs College at Foundation:
| Umpires R. Pinder & G. Clarke
Central vs Pickwick at Vaucluse; Um-
Bowen & S. Cole.

— G. MacLean,
raids on Bonitas ‘
Maurice Foster who brought off |MacLean, B. Manning, F. Man-
some very well anticipated saves, |ning and A. Taylor.

Then “Boo” Patterson put his ext Thur: rh ill
team one up about midway through ieee ‘police ae Risetnalen a

goalkeeper | (Capt.), K, Ince, D, Bannister, G. | ines J
Regiment vs Combermere at Garrison:
Umpires G. Forde & L, H. Roach

ORIENTAL

the first half. Just before half lene 7 !
time however Johnson again |>oMitas vs. Sword Fish. sia ta i tated sion
scored, but Yearwood was ad-| Bookers (B’dos) Drug Stores CURIOS, IVORY, TEAK, SANDAL

JEWELLERY, BRASSWARE, TAP-

judged offside and according to Jare presenting a silver cup to the RARE. CAL

rules had to Jeave the water; the |player who scores the most goals

goal was therefore cancelled. in this league, and seven Pifco
In the second half Police were |Zip Lites”, for the winning team

definitely on top, having a man |in the K. O. Competition.

unmarked all of the time, and for

the entire half except on one or
if

two occasions when “Boo” Pat-

terson and Johnnie Grace swam
SMART FIT AND
NEATLY TAILORED

through, play was centred in the
°

Bonita goal area, but the Police
We also have

forwards either shot wide or could
LINEN TROUSERS

not get past goalie Foster. The
in White and Wine

final whistle found the score un-
changed, Bonitas the winners by
$10.96 pr.
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

three goals to love.
10, 11, 12 and 13 Broad Street.

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SNAPPERS 2 _ :
FLYING FISH 0

The first half of this game was
extremely fast and exciting, the
ball never went outside, it was
seven minutes of constant play.
Snappers were definitely the
superior team, but the Flying Fish
defence saved many awkward
movements.

Play was hardly a minute old
when Delbert Bannister got away
from his man and scored from
close range. Snappers kept up
persistent attacks and the Flying
ish forward line just couldn’t
get hold of the ball, in fact the
Snapper goalkeeper Taylor only
touched the ball once for the en-
tire match and that was only to
throw the ball back into play.

In the second half, Snappers
turned on the _ heat, but their
efforts were either broken up by
the Flying Fish defence, Harold
Weatherhead, Tim Yearwood, and
Tony Johnson or by their goal-
keeper Foster. But with the attack
broken they couldn’t get the ball
to their forwards. This was partly
due to close marking by the Snap-

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PAGE 1

PACE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 2S, 1." VERDICT ON THE TESTS Ih-.ilh From Natural Causes ill PI n II mi ro> NOW tin' shuutmt; lias died .iw.iy. now m< battle hart been lust and won, the time is appropriate to open the indues! 00 vet another series <( English Test failures. %  Wt bad been told be/or* Channel 550 Yds Too Much OXK UOAl. SAVED! DOVER. Aug. 24. Philip Michman. 19-year-old British schoolboy to-day save up his attempt to swim the channel from Britain lo Franca oni\ sso yards oft the French co*t. it was ofTiclallv stated '..r.Km ihrcc houi.< the -wimmer tried to reach the shore arguing with his lather, who accompanying him In .1 launch. WUtM him to give up the attempt. Ra climbed into the boat unaided, and his father told the ch e er ing crowd on the shore -h.it Phtli;> would try again ttm boy swam tinChan from France to England in hour* 48 minutes last year. Had he. suceeeded tn-da,v h> would have been Uw fourth >wlmm to conquer the Channel In both direction* — Sealer. Argentinian Does Fastest Lap NORTU HAMI-SHIHF-. Aug. 24. Argentina's Juan Fanglo today set up the fnstcst time in practice, bara for the International Trophy Motor rare to lw held on Saturday Driving mi Italian Alfa Itomoo, Fanglo. averaging 92 85 miles an hour did a lap of the 2.88 mile airfield ClrCO.ll in one minute. f2 seconds Close In-hind him came Italy's Farina also driving an Alfi Romeo with the lap in one minute 54 seconds. Delayed by last minute mechanical troubles the new British Natt—• al Racing car "Brom" did not appear today but it was hoped that one of the two ears entered for Baturday'i race arould appear tomorrow for practice. The race is regarded as part nf the sixteen cylinder Brom's development programme for lb* IBM Grand Prix Season. The fastest i-it in practice today among standard producUon models entered for a separate event on Saturday was thf Italian l ar i> IIIT.Ferrari which did the lap at 81.88 miles per hour while British three and hair litre Jaguar went round at 81.24 miles per hour. Although not officially recognised as a Grand Prix event. Saturday's race has attracted the best cars and drivers in international rating. Italian Ferrariand Maseratis. as well as French Talbots will loin srfth Bromi attempting: i bold lln•• '.'i Miprome Romaot —ReUter. the began thai the trouble with le West Indies v tendency to become dispirited hen things wan not going right' ir them now we know different. They lost the llrst Tesl at Old TrafTord and according to that reckoning should have lost the next three But no. They licked their wounds after the Manchester game and then launched a series of attacks which reduced English cricket to the same state of helplessness that the Australians had reduced It to two years previously. This year was remarkable for the number of in.uries to England's star players, and did provide an excuse which not available when the Aus%  Mhere. But even allowing for the fact ih.it Hutton Cocnpton. Washbrook. Edrlch, Parkhousc, Bailey and Evans all missed one or more notches the position Is still rather grim It is a sad reflection that five yiars after the war we still could in : put adequate replacements' ihe field to till ihe gaps left by our top men. John Goddard has sportingl> declared that the loss of cricket during Ihe war years was the deciding factor. That was a ni.< sjaature, John But the excuse cannot hold water much longer. The real reason why the tourists from the Caribbean were so successful Is that they play cricket as j it ihould be played—and as it wasj played in this country not so very I Not for them the stolid j "stay in the crease" outlook A long hop was a long hop no matter who the bowler, and as such was hit for four or six A slight movedown the wicket and the ball short of a length became a halflag .uid that meant four man" The contrast when England is amazing. Half-volleys and long hops were treated with a gentleness thai could only be described as feeble and I cannot ra .'11 one occasion when the West buftuM clone to-tha-uichat fielders were forced to retire to a safer area YESTERDAY afternoon during the match between Flying Pisa and Snapper*, the Flying risk goalie Paul Foster, geta high out of the water to save one from the Snappers centre forward, Kenneth Iaee. Snupperhowever went on to win the match 2 goals to love. Snappers Beat Flying Fish AS SECOND ROUND GETS UNDERWAY SNAPPERS fulfilled thei. prurn.-e to defeat Flying Fish yester%  mv when in the second fixture of the afternoon at the Barbados Aquatic Club they beat the arittta capped Flying Fish two goals to love. Flying Fish playing without their centre-forward Denis Atkinson put up a stubborn light and did well not to be beaten by a wider margin In the other game Police turned in their best match of the season against Bomtas Each team played with six men as Police had one man on the sick list. Rain uuring the first match had spectators on the crowded pier hurrying for shelter, but it only lasted for about five minutes. The matches were as follows; — NEW GAMES OPEN LOCALLY TOMORROW THF. TMrd Series of First and Intermediate Division Games, and the Fourth of the Second Division, open to-morrow, and there are fourteen fixtures scheduled to take place — %  %  — The games, grounds and UmEssex Leading W.I. On First Innings Trevor Bailey Takes 5 Wkts. On Rain Affected Pitch WESTINDIES 2/3 ESSEX 229, AND (FOR 3 WKTS) 49 SOUTHEND. Aug. 24. A tine spell uf fast bowling by Trevor Bailey helped Kssrx lo accomplish a splendid teat in taking a lirst innings lead over the West Indies tourists here to-day. Alfa THE6A|Aftjrtg POOt &fOC6f "DM MH.' I •> *S I A til ll < %  '• 8e* I'P •' I > % %  French Girl Wins Diving this reticence to attack bowling which made Itamadand Valentine Into the giants the) llnally became They are unlouhtedly great bowlers—I have i|u;i(i> described them as the • mi st young combination produced b) any country at any tn:.'-—but I cannot help wondering how they might have fared had they been : tth slightly less timidity In the llrst two Tests They would still have taken a lot of wickets but their average might have been considerably DUMI Furthermore they might not have been called upon to bowl so frequently and that wogld not have hit i< .1 had thing for Holland But now it is all over. Congratulations John Goddard. Well played. West Indies. You have proved yourselves worthy cricketers and fully deserving nf an opportunity lo oppose Australia for the world "Ashes" Individual bouquets are not easy to distribute. Ramadhin Valentine. Worrell and Weekes have deserved I all that h;is been said about them. There is, however, one other member of the side whom I tatl has been equally responsible for England's defeat. lie is Alan Rae, the Winchmure Hill Club cricketer and West lnlies left-handed opening batsman. Cautious at times in the extreme. Rae nevertheless was the foundation stone-on which all the West Indies success was hullt. He failed at Old TrafTord and the West Indies lost. He scored a century at Lords and they won by 326 runs. At Trent Bridge he compiled 68 in just over four hours and paved the way for Worrell and Weekes to slaughter England's tired attack. Finally, he completed another century at the Oval and the West Indies won by an Innings. It has been said that figures can be twisted to suit any argument But in this case at least, I feel they are straightforward enough and while not suggesting that he has been the star of the side. I think his efforts have been insufficiently praised. The West Indies seemed assured of a substantial lead when Christian! and Stollmeyer put on 104 for the opening partnership, and later Gomez and Weekes put on 58 for the fourth wnkei p.oiiieishlp. The pitch however, was showing signs of becoming lively and Weekes fell in the lust over before lunch After the Interval the last six West Indies wickets fell in tlfty minutes for 28 runs. Bailey, fast and hostile with a strong wind at his back took five of these for 13 runs in (1.4 overs. The South ..IIMI.-. H.iy vvitli his off breaks and Peter, leg breaks, bowled with consistent steadiness and when the West Indie%  rinings ended Ray needed only one more wicket to complete the double of a thousand run one hundred wickets this The Start soon VIENNA, At Nicole Pallsard of Franc won the Women's high board diving event In the European swimming .M.unpionship* here The French girl who was runnerup io m i loinp.itriot llureau for the springboard title yesterday, scored 85 87 points in t vlng. Alma SUudinge Football Results LUNDOIV Aug. 2< Second Division: Hull City 3, lt.-irn.dcy 3; Queen's Park Rangers 1. Notts County 0; Swansea Towi .„. 1. Sheffield United 2; West Han: high, United 2. Luton Town L Aus-I third DlvhdM. Southern Port traUa wag second with 82 38 points I Vale 1, Newport County 0. Watford ..nd ButChmtopherson. (Deni. Reading 1; Barrow 2 lliil.fa* markt third with 8231 points I Town 0; Carlisle United 3. Gate-Renter I .shed 0 V "S7~ — "" Christuiui and Stollmey struck a run a minute rate of | and i scoring when they continued their unbroken overnight score of 68. although both had a little luck in Ihe early overs. Chrislianl reached 50 alter batting 05 minutes, and the opening stand reached 104 before both men fell at the same total. First Peter Smith tricked Stollmeyer. who playing back, broke his own wicket and then Smith held a fierce cut off I*reston to dismiss Christian! These wicket falls caused i reduction in the rate of %  coring Essex met with hirthc at 137 when Ray BtnluYi slow ofl breaks canned Trosirail to plu> back and < ilss on da ivory wiii-h broke tm . \\, kea ama I i '" open cau%  ,I...I : %  %  %  .ID: of Ray %  nd Pat irnlth, but ha gradually i o m ea pro, arofltabla itand atnieh %  red tha hall century. \ Thin just battea lunch was due Weekei roll t" P taaton. Ha gave catch to tntdon when atteiupling | i repe.it ii earlier pull to the boundary, bringing about his dismissal. Lunch was taken at this wick.ifall with the West Indies 185 for 4. After Lunch The collapse of the West Indies after lunch was due to Trevor Bailey, the England last bowler who in 84 overs took 5 wickets for 13 runs. With only 9 runs added to the lunch total Wnlcott and Rae were both out. Walcotl failed to get out of the way of a lifting ball from Bailey and gave a high catch to the wicket keeper, while Rae failed to open his account before giving a catch off Ray Smith's leg breaks. This was Smith's 9Bth wicket of the season, and he needs only one more to complete the double of a hundred wickets ind a thousand t tot the season Bailey was bowling decidedly fast, and the illapse continued. He was successful with a second appeal for l.b.w. against Gomez and had Williams caught Then Ramadhin hit Ray Smith through the covers for 4, but Jones was another l.b.w. victim ofl Bailey, and Pierre was ou> caught at the wicket without scoring for he innings to close 16 short of he Essex total. The last six West Indies wickets fell In 50 minutes after luich for unlv 28 runs. The pitch remained rather lively when Essex batted again and Jones made the occasional ball lift. Dodds and Avery however made a confident start but with thirty six runs on the boards, bad light stopped play and then heavy rain followed so that tea was taken After Tea Rain held up play for two hours and a quarter after tea and by close of play Essex were 4B for three wickets Strenuous efforts made to dry the pitch and after an Inspection by the captains play did not begin until 6.30 p.n Lite* Esaex lost three wickets. West Indies attacked with Oomej and Ramadhin on pitch still very wet. Dodds was run out foolishly at 38 and Gome? ciaimcd Balbry at 45 Avery fell in the last over. Scores: — WEST INDIKK KinitT INNINKS ChrlUanl PHM JSmllh b Prwoo SE Stnllmryrr hll wfct. b J>el*r Wmlh K Tr-Kln.il I. Rev SSnllh %  Own.-. I l> w B..1. Weeara c Vifar b Ht*on ... *3 Wlcctl r W>dr b ftUltoy I Ree i Ptr.lon b Ray gnulh C WlllUn < pviar Smith b Stall*? 9 JOHN I b w b Ii...i. %  I ttamedhln ixil out .... 4 !•!-. r. r W ..I. b It. ii' • !>tno || byee, %  \t byem 11 Total IP DUWLDJtl ANAI.VMS Pre.l.i.1 Hev Sri PWrr v 1 r>oirt B Aver> i ii...... BllMTAH POLKE a -iwi*i oor i i rsif of n k keti: I -* %  BOWLING ANA1.VSIS the remaining lhiil> ruinUelflto. Harbados Bistey Men For Home uLassdaa Cat LONDON. AUG. 24 Six members of the P. ui-ailo Bisley Team left England to-day for the West Indieaboard thi BoniLis winger Owen Johnson %  earad two quick goebt shortly aller play began, balorv Police got Into their .-trifle io make several raids on Bomtas goulkeeper Muurlce Foster who brought ofl some very well anticipated saves. Thtn -Boo" Patterson put his team one up about midway through ihe ilrst half. Just before hall time however Johnson agai I scored, but Yeorwood was adtudKcd offside and according rules had to leave the water; the goal was therefore cnnceUfd. In the second half Police were definitely on top, having a muit unmarked nil of the time, and for the entire half except on one two occasions when "Boo" Patterson and Johnnie Grace s through, play was centred in the Bonkta goal area, but the Pol forwards either shot wide or could not Rtf past goulle Poster. Ttie final whistle found the score unchanged, Bonitas the winners bv three goals to love. FLTING FISH The first half of this game was extremely fast and exciting. Uio ball never went outside, it was seven minutes or constant play. Snappers were definitely the superioi team, but the Hying Pttn defence saved many awhwar I movements. Play was hardly a minute old when Delbert Bannister got sway from his man and scored from close range Snappers kept up p-raistent attacks and the riying nsh forward line Just couldn t get hold of the ball, in fsct the Snapper goalkeeper Taylor only touched the ball once for the enlire match and that was only to throw the ball back into play. In the second half. Snappcts turned on the heat, but their ctlort* were either broken up by the Flying Fish defence. Harold ithorheod. Tim Yearwood and Toiiv Johnson or by their keeper Foster But with the^attack broken they could£t get the ball to their forwards. ThisVas paitlv due to close marking by the Snapliers toam. and partlv i ;%  nf. Finallv near Iha and "t llu match in a melee in ir-mt of th.. Inee drew Pos' ter out of his goal and scored with well placed shot. One minute later the referee blew off. Snappers, the victors were very prompt Ith three crisp cheers for the loners, who replied in like manner. The referee was Major A R Poster The teams were as follows-Benltaa:— M. Foster. fCapt.). O Johnson, B. Patterson. A. Taylor. T. Yearwood and J. Gruce. Police — Me. D. Rlc h a r d t, fCapt.), G. Porter. L. Dodson, W Phillips. M Franklin and Z Williams. Flylnc rash T Foster. (Capt.l. T Yearwcd, H We-lherhca.l. T Johnson. D. Daviea. J. Knight and P. Potter Snappers : — G. MacLean. (Capt.), K. Ince. D Banmsti r, C. MacLeau. B. Manning. F. Manning and A. Taylor. >res appom.ed are as follows:— At Ci. IS. Jtoft. . 0. FIRST MVIBION . ;-.npir t" Cum>>rti*rh ej C Gibo-. loll.% v. Caitton .1 C.ill.K C foMn A t, fWenderera v .-hc-awirk at B.|Urnp'r !" IKit* A I SpelkM XKip.r* vi Sperf-P -t H*nk lUll Um-.J H WW*I1 It B Jeroai> 1NTERMEDIATF DIVISION Cable A Wlrl*ei ve Wnderee. a* Poardrri Hall; Ump.ru W Bavltv Aichrr Mental HeasSW "i snsa kea P O %  Uilke* %  puwii v. EmpUc el : C Baboo A J Hall l'k-l v Y M PC %  .',• W il.'tm-nl Si %  rs.! I'MISt(OM) DIVISION Y M P C I U-ipir** ( > u-me %  nsMssai .plree \" v t-wanl %  Bn^ki IW Arcbar B C.rlt Pole* el LodSr Umpire* O. S BM-kll,. Skiipii* at CMIII.HI Unr Hirwood A C CDUynHMe. ..,uFi.m-li.Uon' Pi>Mlrr A (i Clark* Next Thursday's llxtures will be:— Police vs. Barracudas and Bonitas vs. Sword Fish. Bookers (B'dos) Drug Stores .ne presenting a silver cup to the pl.iN.r who scores the most goats in this league, and seven I'ifcn "Zip Lite*", for the winning team in the K. O. Competition. "I think I'd like a White Horse better than anything" CHANCE to BUY a PURE IRISH LINEN SUIT SMART NEATLY WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky A pleasure to remember, a |uy iu find again" FRANK B. ABatSTHOI. SUMMER TIME SUITS Call in To-day n

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PACK POUR BARBADOS ADVOCATB FRIDAY, Al'OUST 25, 195 MM* h UM A4 EARBA0OSAm^TF \E\VS I ltO>i 311.1 \1 \ T -1 UMliu Friday. AURUNI 25, l5 By IIWIII II >ll-l I IIOIH IMS KO.\l> I SI US THK members •! the Council ul the Chamber of Commerce have decided to forrr an Automobile Owners' Association in this island. It is a welcome step and one which should bring great benefit to the travelling public The objects of the Association will be to co-operate with the government departments concerned with the regulating of traffic in order to bring about certain improvements which might be considered necessary. Twenty years ago an Automobile Association founded by Mr. E. P. Corner functioned in this island and served a most useful purpose. Motoring was then in its infancy in Barbados and there was only a handful of cars. Today motoring is not regarded as a luxury but is part and parcel of the everyday life of the community. In those days there was a single 'bus service outside Bridgetown and that was to Speights town. Nowadays there is a 'bus service to almost every part of the island and 'buses have replaced the defunct Tramway and Railway Services. Today the number of motor vehicles both for private use and for purposes of tri.de has increased to such an extent that there is now approximately one motor vehicle for every 30 persons in the island. This does not take into account the number of animal drawn vehicles and bicycles. If these are to be accommodated on 574 miles of road along with the pedestrian traffic. it is clear that there must be great appreciation of the necessity for the exercise of care on the roads. It is no insult to motorists to say that they must be educated to their responsibilities and their duties, a well organised and lively Automobile And this can more effectively be done by Association, than by any other source. The Committee of management of such an organisation might well distribute literature, organise lectures, stage motor rallies for demonstration purposes as distinct from motor racing, protect themselves and the general public from the activities of reckless motorists and in many other ways bring a consciousness of the dangers of the roads to people who use them without a care in the world. Secondary in importance is the pointing out to the Highways and Transport Department and the Police the necessity for temoval of blind corners and the erection of road signs, The number of accidents in this island, it was pointed out by the Commissioner of Police was not in any great measure due to these corners or the lack of signs. They were due to lack of care. And he might well have added, consideration for other users of the road. The exchange of experiences by motorists might well lead to suggestions for remedial measures as far as physical difficulties are concerned but it is the work of an Automobile Association to inculcate a sense of responsibility in the minds of those who have charge of motor vehicles on the roads. It is true that affiliation of this Association with the British Automobile Association might bring benefits to those who are in position to do motoring overseas. But the membership need not be limited to this class. The immediate benefits are to the people of this island; and there will always be a far greater number at home than those who travel abroad. Every motor owner in Barbados should consider whether it is not his duty to join such an Association. At present there is a great need tor such work as it could do; and the sponsors should form an informal committee as soon as possible in order to attract membership over a wide area. On this depends its ultimate success. LONDON. NEXT WEEK mm will hear Mr tesouml uti vole* K HI %  war he httft spoken on rvveral oc ca sion s as a politkiu. pleading the causes of the Conurvsuve Party. An his remark* I ave had mixed reception—mixed In the same half-and-half proper. l.ons as the nation's political inclinations. But next week he will come to the micro] certainly bring to mind his war. lime broadcasts whan hi gave the lo'intry great confidence ChfttflS because he sounded prepared to tell us all, both fair news and foul This has been an uneasy week. Only a few days back the Government announced a re-armament programme that sounded sturdy. But it is now coming clear to ux that our American allies do not ee It that way. While a British ia.sk force la now on its way to Korea there is noticeable looking BVSg the shoulder on the part ut the American leaders to see when their friends arc coming. Britain has a troubled conscience Theissue will not be dodged by Wowing to American requests for B few thousand British troops from our Malay* and Hong-Kong K-T r'sons. The trouble Is that we are not entirely certain how far we are "in" this war In Korea For instance It was Neville Chamberlain who said that Czechoslovakia was a small far-away country about which we knew nothing. He was Jeered at foi that remark; but Korea looks for lurther away; and not even the best-Informed know very much about it Nevertheless we read war reports of American gallantry ,nd exhaustion A few week's ,igo. when news of the "rsl re treats came back, the everyday Attitude was to remark Uiat Britain was In the last two world wars at least two years before America —so now It was their turn. But the mood has changed. It was ..'ino*t insupportable, that we hc.ul.l still be .spectators of the heavy righting. Yet. at the *"" %  lime, there is little passional u : ense that our own fate will %  •> ..ectded in Korea. That this U an United Nations War Is the one vitally important reason why brlllsh people feel strongly abu< •1. If the United Nations bad not been involved there would hav %  I tora 'ii-ling about Kore i than about th. French four-year old war In Indo-China, or the Philippines' struggle against the lluks Wlns*OD Churchill has an excellent argument In pot forward on the radio not week He will ask Attlee why he announced mor** than a month before the day. that larliamcnt woi'b! return on Sep Icinber 12 When ParUarncni went for Its holidays on July 28, ta month after lighting began in Korea), there was no bint o' urgency. But a few weeks lain suddenly, something has happen ul Why not bring Parliamem back quickly to discuss this "some thing""' (I can almost hear, already, Churchill's voice echoing with indignation 1 Cannot Pailiiment be told* To Una u.e PrUM Minuter > i u> give a soft answer that turns away wratn. itouably the Oovi i ad on extending oonscriyUon and .-alsing service p-y and then somebody became so excited that the decision was taken and toe announcement recalling FMUanoeDt] What an opportunity it has given Winston Churchill; and how th Labour tacticians must be worrying? As the international situation grows more tense, Churchill the war leader, takes over from Churchill of the Conservative Party—and the Labour leaders become more afraid of him. Virus Defeats Anti-histamin The battle was fought on 1.550 fields of war. On each field hordes of viruses armed with weapons of BandMl cruelty advanced and overwhelmed the peace-loving defenders. In fact the Common Cold, estimated to coat the United States |1.MK),000.000 annually in lost working time, has defeated another attempt to hold it in check Tre Medical Research Council asked fur 1.550 volunteers In suffer the Cold and treat it with the so-called "Cold Cure" based on anti-histamin drugs marketed widely In America. Some of the victims wore given pills of antl-hlstamin. others were ith.-n pili.s that loofceu !" d tasted tne same, but had nothing is them rhc result*? wl'r. foi both an.upal "kiutiouslv. the ..r.b, (Council stataa that a year of leUs no evidence that ^a drug. h. any value LD la* prevention of j.,Hy-produced Old* America thuse drug* are widely advertised .jnd generally believed In. AaaTUiey are said to be effective. The nt.swtr is thai if you really betm.,you have a "cold cure" In you. pocket sOmcthlhg Mams to happ n to Lhe viruinvaders. Under "he repelum: effect, of will power they tire and wilt. The best cure for a cold is still to believe ygju can cure it This seems to leav< a profitable Held of enterprise foi the medicine man—or the patent medicine man with a gift of the ir-b It might also be considered carefully a" Lake Success The Pains Of Brine A Peer Lord Hallsham, former Lore r of England, died this. week. For the Hou;e of Commonthis was melancholy Indeed. *"oi it means that Quint in Hogg, hi* eldest son, will nes H ba seen again arguing from hi.place in Ue second row—just thmd the Opposition Front Bench. One of the penalties of being a peer is that, ike lunatics and Ministers of the Church of England, it is Impossible to sit in the House of Commons. Many a promising political i-arccr has beeu cui short by the death of an ennobled father. Ana M> it seems with Quint in Hogg Jovial, forthright, argumentative— even jovially bad-tempered, it tl at Is possible—he made himself liked even by Social ists. He gained prominence when he won the election fig-lit at the Cits of Oxford against the volatile scholarly socialist—A. D. Lindsay. the afg >f BalUoi It was a memorable prewar struggle—with Lindsay heavily backed by thu undergraduate non-voters, and Hong timing his meetings deliberately to clash with his opponent's Quintin Hogg has been one of the keenest supC irtcrs of reform for the House of ard*—which would allow peer! to choose being elected to tho Commons Instead of Inheriting seats in the Lords. Will Russia Attack? Il> Ki:\,SIM Hi SMITH PARIS Plans which are being formulated today for the re-armament of western Europe are based on the calculated risk that despite the gravity of the international situation Russia will refrain from precipitating war with the United States during the next three years. Why do the western European allied governments believe that Russia will not attack America during that time? To get the answer to this vitally important question, International News Service sought the private views of top level American diplomats in Europe, as well as leading western European officials. The inquiries showed that the belief that the Soviet government will avoid precipitating a direct conflict with the United States U based on the following three major assumptions: 1. That Russia fears the effects of Amcricur atom bomb attacks; 2. That Russia does not yet possess an adequate stockpile of ptom bombs: 3. That Russia's industrial war potential is still too weak In comparison with that of the western allies to risk a major conflict. Western defence planners are said to attach considerable Importance to the third point, despite the reports that Russia's military forces include 165 active divisions, 25,000 tanks, and 19.000 front line planes. On the basis of military and diplomatic intelligence reports, the western European governments estimate that Russian steel output for this year will be approximately 22 million tons. America's steel production for 1950 Is expected to top 71 million tons. Great Britain will produce around 16 million tons and the rest of western Europe approximately 24 million tons. Thus, lhe western allies will produce a total of about 111 million tons, as computed with Russia's 22 million. It Is recognised that a much greater percentage of Soviet steel production is probably devoted to armaments than Is the case at present in the western democracies. Nevertheless, the steel production of the western world is MO far superior to that of Russia that top level American and European otlinals doubt the ability of the Soviet Union to wage a prolonged major war with the western world. Russia likewise is believed to be extremely weak in respect to oil reserves compared with the western democracies. It is estimated that Russia will produce this year only 33 million tons. On the other hand, the United States and the western European democracies arc expected to produce 415 million tons. In the case of aluminum, Russia's production is estimated at Silts. ',,.H( isyi he's 1 • %  Interned lalte let-ifi that i. MI', chewing /ig u delight —art you interfiled."" about 200.000 tons for 1990. whereas the United States and Canada will produce around 900,000 tons. It is such statistics as these which hove led lhe western dsCanea planners to assume that Russia will not precipitate in the near future a direct conflict with America and the Atlantic Pact allies. Westorn officials profess to believe that Russia would risk wnr wlln the United States now only if she had sufficient atom bombs to deliver a quick knock-out blow to western, and especially Amerl• an industrial potential. It is not believed that Russia has any such stockpile now, although members of the United Nations military committee recently considered it possible that the Soviets might have 20 bombs ami be producing them at the rah of one to one and a half pel month. Even If this estimate was correct, western officials are inclined to doubt that Russia would run the risk of a direct and probably prolonged conflict with the west. It Is on this assumption that thi western defence planners think they have three years to re-arm western Europe. High ranking officials in Paris told this correspondent that If the American and other western allied governments thought that th danger of a direct Soviet attack was imminent, they would be switching their economies over to a full war-time footing Immediately Instead of pursuing partial mobilization. It is conceded by the diplomatic officials that if the allied governments have guessed wrong about Russia's atom stockpile and industrial strength, the third world %  might come before the re-armament of the western powers has progressed sufficiently to discc age the Soviet leaders from precipitating a major conflict. — IN v NATURES BOMBS WASHINGTON. The discovery in northern Quebec of what is believed to be the world's biggest meteorite crater is a hint to ambitious mankind thjt nature's missiles still pack more power than even the most fearsome of atomic bombs. The hole in the granite face of the Quebec wasteland is about three times wider and perhaps deeper than the great Arizona crater which until now has held the record with a spread of nearly a mile and a 570-foot depth, notes the National Geographic Society. A meteorite that could gouge out such a scar as that in Canada would obliterate the largest city and surrounding region. Yet, in all the thousands of years that such heavenly bodies have been plunging earthward, no catastrophic strike has ever been known in a settled area. Likewise, there are no authentic records of a direct hit on any human, and relatively few accounts exist of damage to property. A meteorite is a meteor that is successful in touching ground. Out of space, meteors in general are fast-moving bodies—ranging in size from dust particles to many tons of substance. When their travels bring them in contact with the earth's atmospheric oxygen, they flare up, and before "burning out" or exploding can be seen as "shooting stars," to use the popularly descriptive but inaccurate expression. Dozens of such meteor falls may often be observed on a clear night. The best .shows come during the last half of the year, with extensive showers scheduled this month and in November. Although many meteorites must have hit the earth since the dawn of time, only about 1.450 have so far been found. They are lowed down, and cooled off on their way through .the atmosphere; hence scientists look with suspicion on old and new tales of conflagrations set off and deep penetrationsMeteorites are identified by their composition, by a characteristic dark, thin crust, and by the curious forms and markings they may have. They are usually made of iron mixed with nickel, or stone, or combinations of these elements, plus additional smaller substances, including rarely, microscopic bits of diamond. The largest meteorite on public display is one which was found in Greenland in 1895 by the Arctic explorer who later discovered the North Pole. Robert E. Peary Still shown in New York City, it weighs 3o\<. tons. The smallest single fall amounted to but five grams. Rated the most destructive of all known meteorites was the monster that struck in the heart of Siberia in 1908. Scientific investigators later reported that a vast forested area had been devastated and a herd of reindeer killed Instead of leaving one huge crater, this meteor pockmarked the landscape with numerous lesser ones, the largest of which was 150 feet in diameter. Besides the giant craters of Quebec and Arizona, other Targe and imposing meteorite sites are found at Odessa, Texas; and the island of Oesel, Estonia; in central Australia. Arabia. Argentina, and elsewhere. —I.N.S. BE PREPARED For High Winds and Rainy Weathvr we offer HURRICANE LANTERNS & CHIMNEYS VER1TAS PRESSURE LANTERNS & GLOBES OIL-LAMPS & CHIMNEYS BURNERS NO. 1 & 2 LAMP WICKS ROPE. t/M* and 1V4* GALVANISED & IRON NAILS Packhorse Of The Air BOURNEMOUTH. (•auchos will no longer ride the pampas, or cowboys the prairies, if a Bournemouth Arm have their way. Instead, they will use the Hoppi-copter—the motorcycle of the alri —whicn flies 10 to 15fl. above the ground at 45 to 50 miles an hour, carrying one person or a 2001b. payload. The hoppi-copter, which weighs 1501b.,. consists of a seat, with an engine beneath and rotor blades above. On production models it is planned to fit a Perspex front which, say the designers, will give the machine an egg-shaped appearance. TO SELL AT £500 Mr. Beresford Martin, director of the firm which is to produce the hoppi-copter, says that the machine can cover 50 miles an hour, compared with 20 miles a day by a horse. "The hoppi-copter can be used where 1 communications are bad or for oil pipe-line inspection", he says. The hoppi-copter is expected to sell at £500. Trials have been completed at Hurn, Airport and development work on the first | hoppi-copter to be made in this country is proceeding—L.E.S. It II HEADERS SAY Radio .!/<< IIL-'UITo the Editor. The ^duocafe SIR.—Those concerned, whether advertisers or Hadiu Company, should not mippose Uiat the vexation from Radio advertisenienis has died away. On the contrary It is I think morr intense and extended. I was recently one of a group in a drawing room when an expression of annoyance by one parson wu* received with the cordial approval o( fthe whole a .suggestion by one of your correspondents a time back for the formation of a Subscrlbars Union that he or she, would come again and say something more about that idea. There nre several thingi such as Union might do in the matter, in addition to advising the Company sometimes as to improvements in its programmes .is they suggest would be welcome. For one thing it could impress on the Company that it is not irplay to expect the subscribers own annoyance; it reminds one of the proverb about "cutting a aUck for use on your own back." Or they might iw urged to reduce the monthly tee as a compensation. With 3,000 to 4.000 sub^-ribers -I suppose the number Is up there—they can hardly be hard I ''m can yield much return, so while the big firms can advertisermany people being annoyed inand push for business and nothingl-tisid of interested. ald ordone WEARY WI1.1.1F thought Uiat whin I walnMned* August 21, 1BS0. Tennit To Tlic Editor. The Advocate, SIR.—Permit me to commend lhe Barbados Lawn Tennis Association for at last achlevuig something which should have been dona long years ago I feel sure that the Association will go from strength to strength having at its head such exponents as Lr. H. E Skeete. O.B.E., and Mr. E. P. Taylor who have worked indeiatigably to get lhe Association going. Having some idea of the financial difficulties of the Association 1 agree with your leader writer in Sunday's issue that the Association should and must make an island wide appeal for funds and I feel sure that il will meet with the success whlrh it so richly deserves. I would also advise the Association to hold a well advertised dance or some other form of entertainment whtcli should help to defray the present cxpensea of sendlne a team to B. G. As I have been asked by phone, letters, and even button hoied In the street* to give my Impressions of thu team g'lng to B. G., I can assure yoo. that the team Is a well balanced one although I am somewhat surprised to see the ommlssion of St. Hill, and here again finance speaks for Itself for It Ii %  a wa could nut afford t'mr players instead of three whi-li n the two seeded players will have to work very hard If wi play against players as the Matthias Brothers from B. G. and Farquharson from J. very heartening also for our team Inasmuch as young Motte Trille did not come out for his summer vacation as be is also one of the best playasa In Jamaica. Our boya curry with then cver\ good wish from every sport loving member of the island and monso from TENNIS FAN. Prison Farm To fluEditor. Tk$ Advocate SIR.—It may be remembered by some of your readers mat when a company of serious minded folk mado a move last year towards the reduction of lawlessness in the island one of the plans was that the thief should be kept under control until he had reoaid the value of any goods stolen. It is interesting and encouraging to see in that fine journal. the Crown Colonist (July issue) that a similar plan has been approved in Dominica Here Is the para graph: — 'The Committee appointed to consider praedlal larceny has unanimously recommended the establishment of a Prison Farm, where crops should be grown by prisoners under sentence, and sol(< for the benefit of the peasant or nlantcr who has suffered loss by theft." It was also recommended that fines and prison be considerably increased, and snail livestock incluiu the ordinance: also to penalise receivers — a valuable addition. I am also glad to see that "Prevaottva Detention" is being Imposed with us But I wonder what "reformatory treatment Is bring used during such detention. F. O. August 23. 1950. Ramadhin To, The Editor, The Advocate, Sift,— Hurrah, to Ramadhin! one of the aces Of West India's team of hardy crickvteni Who like meteors flashed from various places And carved a history uriparai'cled by far. But 'tis of Ramadhin I want to sing— lie who o'ernlgnt came up a strange new shoot With Are in his soul, vengeance in his limb And stumps of England wreck'd O what a loot! They cannot understand Ramadhin's art That Venus handed out to him the night llefore he sailed for England a modest lad. ills name unknown and criticj derided at. (Hit heaven reserves the plain to make the great. Mot many wise, not many npblemen are called. Oh Ramadhin thy stars are shining bright. Thy name is talked upon a million Ups! The batsmen's long-famed; heavens of England Know thy nature and thy cunning wrist. Continue, Ramadhin, son of our Iere land. Bag some more game, no: grouse but many wickets' CHARLES T. BAPTISTE Nelson Street. St. Joseph. Trinidad. August 17. 1930. Bun Servtro To. The Editor. The Advocate. SIR,—As bus fares are going to be increased. I do hope we will have better service, as the hope -f Barbados lies in a "Wck to coun try" movement. The country %  the pride of Barbados, but owing to difficult travelling people arc afraid now even to live In the suburb*. Many times passenger-; have to wait in the sun almost half an hour, and then arc left standing In the road. The health ani progress of Barbados, is being Injured by this backward means of travel, also tourists are Inconvenienced, and results In dissatisfaction. Some buses make for the square and do not take pa ss enger s Into town. It is not fair, after paying fare, to be dished off %  nywbari Buses should run through the City Better business and health would result. WELL WISHER \\ II.KIN -,n\ HAYNE8 CO. LTD. Successors to C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD Phonr. Hit 4W7 It's Nutritious !! It '* Delicious ! It's easily Digestible !! LIDANO SWEET MILK COCOA . always ready for use. You simply add two teaspoonfuls to a glass of milk and enjoy a rich food drink. VHEESH A i filth Ills DUTCH CHEESE, NEW ZEALAND CHEESE (-AUK'S CIIEAM CRACKER, CARK'S WATER BISCUITS 111 DUTCH BEER. TENNANTS IIEER, McEWANS BEER TENNANT'S STOUT. GUINNESS STOUT. CALDER'S STOUT lilt II in II.VS GRAPES — Large Tins FRUIT SALAD CIOOSEBERRIES I'F.ACHES Large Tim PEARS Large Tin. CORN Large Tin. JAMS PEACH JAM STRAWBERRY JAM BLACK CURRENT JAM CRAPES — Small Tin. STRAWBERRIES RHUBARB PEACHES — Snull Tin. PEARS — Small Tin. CORN — Small Tin. APRICOT JAM RASPBERRY JAM FIG JAM BRAMTELL JELLY i !U \l h (.Ii Mil — ,,r, II, sl.36 K \lsl\s—a*r pk< Ml. RAISINS—per lb. lgc. rffOII V IHIIXnS 7 riaruurs STRING BEANS — CAULIFLOWER f.WlKV L_





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\ FRIDAV, AUGUST J5. 1*S BASBADOS ADVOCATE *" %  PAGE TUKtt FULL-PAGE PUNCH By CV.R. Tho.wp.on NEW YORK A fine example to-dav of the %  pitit thai has taken hold of (he American people. It concern* 24 friends moat of them from Broadway, nearly all of them too old for lighting. Frustrated, they met to discover what they could do for the caua* They decided there might be people who didnt feel ** ardently as thev That it might help if they could wake up those waver* an. So to-day a full page DHVIT tlaement < £1,320 an Insertioo) appeared In a morning newspaper IU heading "Let's make r... mistake about if it* theme We've got to beat Commun.sm THEN IT ADDS It 11 miK vary neavy demands upon us. We Khali have to give everything to iltfen t our liberty. Lot's five it, and let's give ouraetres. '1111 ruauo, loc, has been taught tU.it Mr free world's more than a match Irr the world of Jenghiz Khan." IJenghU: Khan, Mongol and Tartar emperor, wa* bom the son of a petty chieftain In North Mongolia in 1102 From about 11."" he was Involved in almost unbroken warfare with tribes Hrs armies invaded India, and conquered China. HU name means "perfect warrior." Indied in 1227 1 Some of the 24: Song writer Irving Berlin, playwright Maxwell Anderson. Madeleine Carroll. Richard Aldrlch, Gertrud> Lawrence's husband, romic-atrip trvsM Milton Camff, Raymond Matsey. and Howard ("Life with Father ') Lindsay ROME NINTH of what Americans may have to give are contained in a repoet just sent to Congress by the Federal Reserve Board, roughly equivalent :o the Governors of the Bank of Englnnd Sound financing of the co*>U of rearmament will, says the report. require "soak-lbe-poor" taxes as well as higher taxes on the wellto-do and corporation* Then should be no exeat.-. profIts tax—President Truman ;iid to-day ha was willing to have on. if Congress wanted it — unless the emergency farmed out to be a short one Much better, said the board, to boost corporali m and individual taxation. Stronger curbs on credit for home-building were called 'or: And the board made a speual point that there must be rigid cuts in all Government welfare spending. PROPOSAL from Congies-mian Omar Burleson: Buy ft lonely Pacific island and bend all domestic Communist* convicted of treason there "to reflect long and well on their sins. Labour To Discuss The Colonies (From Our LondSti C**re**ondn > LONDON. MR JAMES GRIFFITHS, Secretary of SUte for the Colonies, Mr. A. Creech Jones, former Secretary of Slate for the Colonies. and Dr. Rita Hinden. Secretary o' Fabian Colonial Bureau, are to be the principal speakers at a London Conference on September 23. arranged by the Bureau. Main theme of the Conference will be "The Challenge to Labour in the Colonies." There will be three sessions and subjects discussed will Include "Labour's achievements In the Colonies", 'What the Colonies Mean to You' and "The Way Forward in the CoIonics." 1 ii ill %  .\rs From II.4.. Drop In llusiiirss Recorded IU B.C. And l "dud Mutual r.KoitC.ETOWN. B.G IH'SlM-st British [•Miami and Tr aid Miding June 30. 1930 eras >>etow hat of the pre\ious V***. I Chairman, Mr W. S Jones, in saad u . Tin iitoioui year's bualnaej was a record, he pointed out. Ao J/ow Surrender On Im/ierial Preference Teeth Loose Gums Bleed ••'•I SLT W/ial'i the fiu* ban Ha .Ni'.l Couurd lost hit luv aUtfs ufit-udy or doe* Sinulru uan' fo cross ihe road London Bsprmv I The Mystery Man Who Trafficked in Honours — The Man Whose Woman Friend Was Exhumed Death-secret of Maundy Gregory Revealed After Nine Years 1610 policies were issued Inn $5,433,161 11 with premiums nf S57.6V1 OS Lapse* and surrender* during the yaai were. h-wM-i. greater than usual, the reaae being 713 polii tlalTT.Ml 11 of inauranee with premiums totalling 911.493.87 Tn* total Bra rtE on lha Ootav pany's books at 30th June wm $30,490,083 11; of Hal S2.OW.15 has basil H-insured. Km' Chums paid and provided %  I tha god ol Juno, 1950 was t6.l50.42. Included In the amount provided fur claims at Ihe end of June, 1040 was an amount of fii.800 iwh**iifound subseDBH ottj not to M P*J placed to the credit of ii Preen* and l-o** (Annual Account Thr case which eVegybatttj ll.e Trinidad Branch was maintaining Its steady progress. Its assets now total Il.63g.g05. The 1 Branch which QjflOItvairOV That M BO grunted b) Imperial | < %  I faiafauun wt \, SSSJI Cstanbi Commeraa has deetaed lo forward to Government to be saM to the Secretary of S(..tr Oaaasuaa, President ef the Oiasr.ber. Mr 11 G Seafera. O B E said that a m ee tin g will be hetd m the South of ssngUMMl on Sepleinbei 2g next, where raaolul be passed with rrfen nee lo various iTefe ranees. sir to agree to semi a resolution to Oov nient to impress on tha Unite* Kingdom Government • sit*lo take a firm "•*• iho <-*ih If** • -*•* ilons am* a ~oI'-im Th Su.rfW Pjm.rmm "% Kf, Norman (now Mr. Justice) Hirkctt. K C defending, said that there would be a plea of gultt>; that it was the first prosecution of Its kind: and that so far as Gregory was concerned, the object of the prosecution had been fully established. "1 submit that the proper end of one of the most intriguing and colourful characters ever !_ ""£ >** 'a^r'Xm seid"* to be named on the tiles of the Criminal Record Office. An n.d the magistrate wid th inquiry made after a routine check-up on first offenders of years ago disclosed that J Maundy Gregory, friend of kings and who himself claimed descent from kings, is dead. HIS END CAME UNDER NAZI RULE % % %  rtmi %  '.•111 % HUSKIES: l-ari* SCOTLAND YAJIU has marked "Closed" on the dossier Paris police told the Yard that mander Edward Whaley BUlyuxd he died in a military hospital in [ Leake. D SO.. R N. (retired), of ixiwndeii-square, SW. Federation —Not Yet irram Our London Corieprond*nn "The other islands may federate but British Guiana Is not yet ready." That was the reply given by Mr. Edward Gunraj of Vreedon-Hopp. British Guiana, in answer to my enquiry — "What are your views on federation for the West Indies?" Mr Gunra). a law student of the Middle Temple. eagerly anticipates the tune when he will be back in British G as a qualified barrister-at-law to help wage war against Illiteracy. Ruman %  aii Forces To Learn Su&Iin's Art LONDON. August 23. Rumania's War Minister Gerald Emil Bodnars today ordered the country's armed forces to "leam Stalin's military art, improve combat training and skill, and be ready to defend at any time the State Interests of Rumania an I the Democratic group led by the Soviet Union". A Bucharest Radio Broadcast heard in London today said Bodnars made this call, in an order today marking the sixth anniversary of Rumania's challenge from the Axis to the Allied side In the last war. The order denounced the American. British and French Government! as enemies of the Rumanian working clase. It pledn^' eternal friendship and co-operation with the Soviet Union. The order also expressed solidarity with the "heroic foMlars of Korea whose example should inspire every member of th Rumanian ar med forces'' VOLUNTEERED CHICAGO, Aug. 21 A thirty-elght-year-old Chicsr businessman volunteered today lo fly over Moacow and drop a;i %  •tomic or hydrogen bomb on the Kremlin He Is Lar Daly, operator of a stool and chair factory who claims to have founded the "Christian Action Party," the slogan of which is "war now with Red Russia" He mode his offer In u letter addressed to President Truman which said the party proposed to "Christianity and world freedom and advocated the use of the atom and hydrogen bomb ax-' I of anti-Christ." ipi Pases m 1041. during the German occupation -the Maundy Gregory who was jailed in London for trafficking in honours and who, later, was the central figure in a still unexplained death riddle. Scotland Yard Is now trying, v ith the help of the International Police Commission, to find out details of Gregory's last. days in Paris. M. Jean Nepot, the assistant director, worked all today searchng for someone who could tell .im how Gregory, who wan •*, came to die In the German-conUed hospital, and what was the cause of deaitv Once An Acter cemetery at lvry I stood by the grave of a man who in day was a guardian of State secrets and who claimed ancestry back to Edward III. in the 14th century*. Princes and prelates, peers and distinguished commoners, statesmen, leaden of the arts and of sciences — he was on closest terms with them all. He had palatial offices in Parinment-strcet. between Scotland Yard and Downing-strect. Earliest known of Gregoi tivdies was his working as actor and becoming a producer in London's West End. That was 1908 for a revival of "Dorothy Then he ran an agency as sort of hotel detae.iv*. Wh the 1914 war began the Goven ment apparently considered th his knowledge so gained would be of value, and he wan tntrod to Whitehall. Counter-espionage' Later, he claimed to be engaged on counter-espionage, and after the war he became well known in He was nccu.-t-u of having unsSMtaala Iried to obtain £10,000 from Lieut-Commander LaM "as an inducement for endeavouring to procure the grant of u dignity or title of honour." LINKED WITH 8 KINGS ed Maundy QfteggeTj '* aneeatrr. he weald produce a pedigree, 4ft. long, eom piled by th* College of Hormlds. Train the Ume of Edward IU. It i -is-(i through English history and dlarlesed Gregory's kinship with some of the moat famvw* Qgurro of the peas. The last entry was: — "Arthur John Maundy Gregory. of Abbey Lodge. Abbey-read, si Jolia's Woed Co London. Mom July 1 IST1 .M Southampton afureaald." T a I a eiiggeeted that Gregory, though hi* mother, had the blood of eight king* *f England tn has vetaa: that John a' Genet, turn honoured Line set er." Harry Hotspur, and thr Black Prince were among his forebeera; and thai Ms lineage was traceable to William the Conqaeror. 'Closed Door*' the capitals of Europe It was In February l33 that' Lieut.-Commander I-c;ikc told London waa surprised by the an-I the court that he was introduced nounccment that the Director of Public Prosecutions had taken oul j summons accusing Maundy Gregory of an offence under th Honours (Prevention of Abuses) Act of 1025. This Act was passed to stamp out traffic in honours. There was gossip of recently bestowed titles having been bought for sums Involving hundreds of thousands of pound: One such story concerned autinus commercial magnate who, t was said, had been offered peerage by Maundy Gregory n EI O.OOO. "Give me 24 hours to think it 'or.** said the magnate. The next day he was said lo have told Gregory. "I have decided lo accept yeur offer and s my cheque, signed the title I have decided tc adopt. The day I get the peerage y n cash the cheque. He got the peerage. Gregory's appearance at Bowstreet arose out of a report mad' to the Treasury by LieutCom Thf Weather Kan Rises: 5.3* a Han Seta: *Xt pjn Moon (Full to Gregory, who explained that the highest iiulhorlln-s wished him to accept an honour but that 'sinews would be necessary to open certain closed doors." It could be done for £10.000 but 112,000 would make II easier. urn fine of IM would inadequate "Gregory", he said "will go lo prison for two months, and pay a line of {SO and the costs of the prosecution." He commended "the very proper %  ttrbjda taken up by Ueut.-Comnvmder Leake." The cae which everybody thought would bare a thousand secreu* ended. Although it was the House of Commong' lhat there were other complaint?, no further action was taken. Yard Inquiry While Gregory was tn Joil Scotland Yard began investigating the circumstances of the death of %  39 year-old former actress. This woman — Mm. Edith 1 Marion Rosee, former wife or MT* 1 Frederick Rosse. a composer—ndied in Gregory's houee in Hyde Parhtomice the previous September Her death had been certifed to be due to cerebral hemorrhag* .mil chronic Blight's disease. A will made shortly before het aeath road: Even-thing I have [and this amounted u. about £18.0*0j to be left to Mr. J. Maundy Gregory to be disposed ol as he thinks best und in accord. ance with What I should dtalre The Yard and the womai.'k relatrvaa began lo ask.— I. Why did Mrs Rosse leave her money to Gregory in a svID written in his handwriting Z. Why was she buried in a lead coffin In a Thames river-bank churchyard which was in J continual state of flood? 3. Had she died an unnatural leatn In other words had murder been done? The Home Office grunted an %  xhumallnn order and the coffin —at Ihe time still full of water— was lifted from it* grave at Itisham, Berkshire on April 28. Dr. Roche Lynch, the Hom. hut Gregory was not there .' %  (though he had been subi>oen*c paperv And so Mrs. Rosse was burled. Beck in I.ondon nt the nu^uest Ih coroner the late Mr lngleby oddle. was told by Sir Bernard Spilsbury lhat there twd Uen no hemorrhage; there wore no -igns ot Bnghl's disease; UV' death certlncate had been completely wrong. Dul there was nolhiiu t.> what was the cause of death. Summing up. the coroner said. *I do not wish k) emphasise Ui>point which has bean mentioned thai certain drugs do decompose when exposed or when they have been buried In soil waterlogged or otherwise "All I will say is lhat no poi^m has been found, and 00 poison will ever be found in this body. Therefore no possible charge could arise oul ol this inquiry.' An open .-idnl MM1 recorded 1. E S labllahad Lite i M liMti under ttg .iwigenient of Mr Marry' C. M into, has made a good siart Mr Joii.-s Itteasasi Hie urgen %  . far as is potable, existing il in i.i i don %  Bwttoa for lha P-.MI < ni; , the Ot.luiHiy Dividend. II wa> laaktoa to easusWi I on w* niin.n^ seripl cegetal n ib> vear ending June 30, 1W0. making With the taterttn dividend ol %  %  60% Cash Profit Return From The Hand'ln-Hand ,-'— 'WM Vrt.o..!. -irr—imdnil; i.i %  d:<;i ri iWN H'. l*%Atcy holders of tin ll-nd-inHajDd Mutual FinIneun I'd asnat e ad. to it will reretve a cash prollt relurn ul I TJUa was 4 86 Th.' componUVei* amal* II. reuse in IIIMII. ami th i ghl awkaraaag In i>""' lun iiainly to the withdrawal of two IIM.Ilargr insnuinn lo, aiious reasons. The amount nf insurance carried was *2.t4,tfeV lo. *Chrniflt*" Slurls CatUkxHiem' Fund GIORGETOWN, It G DM | i 'i % %  IH sponOgjng %  fund tor the purpose of gelling souvenirs for members oi &M V.I tortoUf W-.i lodmnn. The i. will most likely tak< the form of gold medals with the Colony's Coat of Aim;, and sullnSaiil tinChroiltcl* m jiinuuiiiinn !("• Fund "There cm Uno doubt that Ihe 16-m.ui West liKlics team have done Ihe homeland a gival service und have In b>ur months done more to giv eight to our national preetlge than any other effort In similar Crickel llili ..nvap.MvilHil GBORGKTtiWN. BG Suggestions to gi.mi a hululay to celebrate IhsWest Indies Test Victory In England met with nsmeailliin at Il>r Georgetown Chamber of Commerce. Mr 0 W E OoOMT, Manager of (he Itemerara Tobacco Co.. Ltd Innughl up Ihl FREE YOURSELF from the BONDS Of CONSTIPATION with "MORSES "Hoof PILLS which he -1,1 ..; Mi.k-i Mr s.,. i i. iv praurJ Iiwlies and M ol llit-iii. but I pern will be a VOD .,„ had a boUda) i. ration in I'litei granting %  hotlda Children but to disrupt hustness on an occasion such as sag snM 'altogether oul of order' thought it rder If 11 w altogeth 1 think we ol |h Weal l TeUI Rauifall tie dit*):7.0* Inches. Wind Velocity: 9 mile*. Wind DirerUeai: fl aja. E 3 v in I.M Barometer 9 a_m ".'< *'*'' 3 p.m. Z9.8M Menii 5.39 p.m. AMBASSADOR RESIGNS WASHINGTON. Aug 24 Dr. Eduarda Zurieu, Colombian Ambassador to the United States tor the past year, has resigned and plans to go back to Bogota to resume his law practice He expects to be relieved of his duties shortly. Too Many Holidays Already—S*y* Official KINGSTON, Jamaica Kingston's Acting Mayor, Councillor Wills O. Isaacs has asked the Government to declare national holiday here on th* arrival of the Jamaic-n niemtiers ol the West Indian Cricket Team at the end oi the current tour. The Government, however, has made no comment on the telcgiam which Mr. Isaacs sent lo the Governor at the conclusion of the Fourth Test, but In locul admlmsIti alive circles the impression gained Is that the Idea is frowned on as being Impractical "Jamaica has too many holidays already as It Is," an official said. Jamaican! Violinist Is Sub-Professor %  %  **#* Jmnaici onl. h* to becon Iloyal Ac and A<1>'•• .--*"< Guiana's staple to be short, but i grade — Brown Rape, British food, continueonly in a certai "A." ftice Maiketing Board Manager, Mr. Peter Bayley, stHted lhat the shortage *fal not due to export, but %  the result of abnormal conditions prevailing at the present time. Full supplies of the lower grade are available throughout th* year. Brown "A" rice has not been exported to the West badiafl Islands. Mr. Bayley said, adding lhat for the first seven months ISM les* rice was exported compared with the corn period of !a*;t year. This Is attributed to heavy rainfall during the early months of the year B.G.'K Sugar Production Sug.ii GEOBXJBTOWN, Ii 0 • Production foi the week! kugusl 12. wus 1.81(1 ton* ngnm actual nigai mada DM r this year to uo,o7o Ii Actual sugar produced lot the .. on. parjod ai 1 > ." anal B3.553' T<. gggsj 'i.i Ml 1187 tons' f sugar was made from tofi iiefa* anas as compare-] will'. M7 ton* i iir the correspondsng period j nat year. BETTER SERVICE LIBRARY FOR B.C. %  n>rbaO(i Advotalv CbirrjranSiili IXtTOWK, BTG. Raorg lisMrtlon plans for the Public Free l.it.rary-. which will %  laO embrace lite Rural Service wag iiegun recevfla and srhei %  ompleted will offer the eornmnnlty of B 0 Dg a much, mon eftii'ient and useful service pga onthf tro-operaUwith the reorganltatlon is Mr. John Smeatnn I>epu1'. Direetrir of the EasfN bean Regional Library. th* B.O. Government iissumed for the SI-I vn" and har granted an inltinl sum nf S4.000 for the carrying otH of these plans Part of the r'M ,,f (ha ..'tvirf In Georgi liorne by i nineiI Intervo % %  • i .don said will require a -.irs If a i efficiently. ROBINSONS %  PATLNT;BARLBY m*k*t milk atoe* dtgeiilbla lor baey •PATE'rVr^CROATS make* wesatng a hapey thna fee bebv— I* frarf '*ck*t •f ndgn. punt but it don clKioolneawscefki tur.K prKpenies icsi-Viie hi lp you ro *rH hrinhter, awk benati an p •—>> oaMlg and eimiy mon soerg] New ume 1/ you want ptin r.bef uYeast. Viic and get ionic benefit loo i This niturtl -ml viismint help lu teiittre enctgy. build up new health. ScvenSeaS iplrjxnt Uiting, ca*y to take and roJily digested. An invalid's quick recovery is helped by j SevenSeaS %  ••••••••••••• %  •••a* sian • n>'*. Lid. FOB* dBHnwn H*'l>nd4 • |. J sssei WllLIAM FOGARTY LTD. INC. B. G. I NEW! NEW! NEW! A new Shipment of . MOSS CREPE in several delightful shades "the ideal material for Weddings"



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FBIDAY. AUGUST 25, IKO BARBADOS ADVOCATE 1\.i MM. Infant Dies At Hospital H I \I:|HMOII ., P o ml HonplUl, tiie i '.i-' .i.-i Hi.; female child ol A' \Y %  eporled to month-old I admitted Everybody Was Yellow \nd Then The Hurricane Broke HX I.I NM I SAVOI'HY DO YOl KKMKMBKK foec tale-. OUT grandparent* it.Id of the many strange atmospherical incidences which 1 hminary to the hurricanes which struck Bar11 1831 and in 1898? I recollect one In particular, and that was the description of the setting sun doing its ntmoM u> peep through dusky gray clouds a few minutes before its disappearance behind the horizon. How it cast a ghastly yellow reflection across the earth causing every object to appear as if it were affected with jaundice. This happened in Antigua 011 the afternoon of Monday 21 st While it lasted we thought i: was great fun. everybody was yellow, the trees and canelleWs were yellow, even that range hllli in the distance forming "The Sleeping Indian" were yellow, and gradually all the vegetation seemed to be transformed into beautiful shades of purple, darker and dorRer. until finally we could no longer risk to Laze into the darkness, because the winds were by now so strong we could hardly stand or even v-alk without difficulty. Anticipate The Wind It was possiole to anticipate the increasing strength of tne win.i as it raged and roared through the house. The rain it MtNUjnl with 11 dashed against our somewhat exposed wooden bungalow. In spite of all precautions water seeped under the doors. At 9.15 witn one terrific bang the lights and telephone were gone. A p. lw near tne house hod collapsed from then or. era spent most ol our time moving furniture from room to room trying to find a dry spot. We found just one. and only one. ft* now the leaks Irom the roof were out ol control. It no use trying to catch the water it simply pouted through. ty 10.30 we could only hear by snouting at each oilier and the storm had apparently reached its maximum . tar as dlis island vncerned. The wind howled perpetually and like some great giant paused inlermilteiillj drawing a long breath and then blowing it out with all its might In a wooden house, the scntion was as If the building Would split if the constant vibration continued to increase. Then came a dreadful crash on the galvanised roof, and another, and another. What was this terrifying bombshell right overhead. more frightening than thunder? A few more of those and perhaps the roof would be pierced tnrough Then came an alul mbling, thumping sound which appeared to be rattling its way from one end of the verandah to the other. The unexpected bumps and thumps were far more horrifying than the periodical flashes of lightning followed by the usual peals of thunder. The flr*t hammering turned out to be merely a few branches of a nearby Eucalyptus tree which broke away and connected with the roof. The second was only an old soap box colliding with the gallery rails and floor. Climax The climax came between two and three in the morning when the hurricane suddenly decided to change its direction and we ved a sort of lifting, rising sensation By this time the winds had reduced their velocity of at least a hundred miles per hour. People of the surrounding villages say this VH their most agonising period because they lelt their huts might have been swept completely off their weak foundations. Throughout Antigua precautions were taken well In advance although only a gale was anticipated. This turned out to be Small HurVicane". H\M\IIIII\ SI MIS % I.IIIIMM. HO.Wt to tl 11' sJUtal -t about S.Ou p 1:1 oa U'.nesday. died half an hour later A post mortem examination was psffonnad .< %  .irday. I NSfEtTOIS Bourne and Springer, who left the island during the month to attend course at Police College Hendi England, are enjoying their short stay in British Guiana very much. Colonel K T. Michelm. Commissioner of Police told the Advocate yesterday that he has received letter* from both pec tor*. They told him that they have been very well looked after by tne British Guiana Police Force and were being shown around the various Police departments of that colony. They celled then an the flr k*J Ol then* voyage to the U K E I.MINA DENNT of Farm Road. St. lYter. it pedestrian, wio involved In an sccMatri with motor ear E-51 along Queen Street. St Peter at about 12 15 p.m. on We.ii 1 ; Sin...i wounded in her head and Is detained at the General Hospital. The car 1OWNd lj> Hetty Jones of Colleton. St. Peter and was also driven by her. L I-KHAKI) HIS S-49 was damaged in an accident %  long Fanners HoacSi Thoma*. on Wednesday. It was being driven by Gilbert Thome of Hillaby, St Thomas Also Involved In the accident was motor lorry 11-1$, owned by the Department of Agriculture and driven by Walter Headley of Spring Farm. St. Thomas. qpn IIAM1L, BARS and front I whoa) of %  bicycle, owned and ridden by Daniley Small of Redman Land. Goodland. St. Michael war* damaged In an accident along Kingston Road at about 11.20 p.m. on Wednesday. Motar Car G-3M. owned and driven by Sylvan Straughn of Salters, St. George, was also involved. It is understood lhat the cycle skidded. O NE MOTORIST was charged yesterday for driving in a manner dangerous to the public. There wenfour traffic offences *'• : % %  %  !.. Tinother three charge* were against cyclist and two motorists. The cyclist was charged for not having a lighted lamp to the front of his cycle. A motorist was charged for not paying the appropriate tax on his motor vehicle and another for using the vehicle for purposes QCner than those for which it lice ns e d 'Athelbrook' Leaves Port Stern First It is unusual to see a vessel reversing out of the Careenage but this Incident occurred yesterday wheii the 283-ton Tanker AfhWoiW. was leav-Kg port. This vessel 1* sister ship of the AIM) RMOV, When it entered the inner basin it did not turn about but continued to face the Rive Rgad direction It too* its load of 89,414 gallons I of vacuum pun molosses from the Jason Jones compound MM shortly after midday yaaterda] :' reversed out of the Careenage and left for Trinul.nl It is under the command of ('apt Isinsdale and consigned to Messrs. Jason Jones It Co. Ltd. The SS. Hecuba which brought some of the first Christmas Tree decorations to the island, sailed for Paramaribo. It is consigned to Messrs S. P. Mu*son Illegal Liquor Selling Cost £20 RJPKRT ELU8 a 31-year-old! sak.>.naii ol Jackson. St. Michael. dltj w'sterday of selling aquoi without first obtain] nig a licence. His Worship Mr. E. A McLeod before whom the case was heard fined him £20 to be paid in monthly instalments and ordered him in default to undergo three months' imprisonment rttnaea for the prnsccutkan was P.C. Tull who said that on August 7 he was on duty on the Garrison Savannah in company with PC 334 Pilgrim. He noticed that Ellis had a table with 'hlngs on it H< **M not standing there long when a man went up to 1 Dd gave him something which appeared to be money. 1-111 gave the man a bottle o; rum ne approached 1 luce hH nee for selling liquor Ellis could not and he seised the box of bottles which WSJ box contained three bottles 11 bottles of rum bottles of gin, four l> 0 stout and nine bottles of beer. MEMBERS of the rtctonou* Wet IlMllan Teat Irani viMtt.l th' Wood tr**t telephoi and hen1* thr very MKcessflil -pn. howler. Ramadhlti, wl'h one of a operators who At some periods of the v. II Ihe "Athel Ruby" used to make seklj call IlM new % %  Athelbrook" will be operating on what is called the "Shuttle service". It will only take vacuum pan molasses o cargo. Messrs. Jason Jones ft Co., Ltd., -1 told the "Advocate" TftSli.ll flgy more What they expect a big vacuum Returns Home Major K. A. Stoute, who was •> %  tl appointed Deputy Commissioner of Police of TWbado*. returned to the Island on Wednes rung to IIW l.A s lending a Senior Ofllcer s in England at Police Kyi %  ..-,. %  %  1 ne He will OUtj m Monday. "I consider the OOUggSj ; I and others, Although the College that Major Simile .it:, lined Is at Warwickshire he did not see the West Indies being defeated bv that County. Fortunately on the day on which that match had begun he was leaving Ireland on the first leg jf his voyage home. He IT ,-t several prominent Police Officers and Detectives both of the Metropolitan and other Forces In the U.K. The trip to England and While the labourers were bus. unloading the Norwegian SteamClrittUa Bay yesterday a Norwegian seaman, Camilleri. was locked up in thel "* %  brig belo< fter al| *hip Mykew course College CovenBarbados 37 Years Ago WhSBO Mr Walter Haynea lef Barbados SI years ago for Canada buggies, tram-cars and trains wen•>( tranaportaB An okl Hail...,nun and MD 1 ame bach U> the Salu.day morning for a short Vashstion M: Baynrsi iu has been .• machinist at the Steel Compuny of Canada for 33 ye.,' foreign wife ami six children and considers Canada I Ha was 24 when fst i. It Ukl Island to rank his fortune, hi Mid If*ksfl hll parenlf. hu* is Then was an engineer shop In %  Bqu in 1'iose day* wnicl wa. owimi b) 1 M. Sunp*cti and it kvu there thai Mi H term hat trade %  m a a park %  fr^ yeari before he left ti island. Then loo, elect] in its Infancy and street lighnm by gas Hi Bnn surprised to hear that gas was -till used in BORM part* of the island for street lighting Ha "< ol rl st that those school days connback to him ;is ;> meet period of h(< ol rolueUni and fun Only Cine ('hurrh Before he left he said, llieie was only one church and one entrance al the Wcstbiii> CO i nOtery Me has iii>t had urna rat lOOUt the Island to see v tensive changes, but he visited the grave yard to ice the I hi* parents and old jcqualntaiiciHe knowtaw people hare BOW, moat of his friends have died %  '., %  II ..Id Camilleri is held in custody in connection with the fatal stabbing of Hanson, another Norwegian s.aman. while the vessel was in Guadeloupe. The 4,3(19-ton Myken. under Captain Doiven arrived 'seiarilaj horn Dornmioa it u el rtnn by Ihe Alcoa .Steamship Company i)f the USA and Consigned to Messrs Robert Thorn. It hrought 800 bags of i-nrnmeiil foi its Agents Also include! 11. Us cargo was a quantity of conj fectimiery. pine luml>er. tomato juice, prepared coffee, sole leather I and coffe. 11 The Steamship OranjrUd vhich arrived on Wednesday; from Grenada brought a quantity Of shoes, cotton goods, shell butI very j tons and shirting. It sailed yes%  m m rz'z.r$'"r.„L\ J-JSFUST^5?si^SB s the return voyage J ileasant and he hi riends In the U.K. [the command of Captain Rasa] Me left Barbados on March I. [-off and consigned to Messrs and arrived in England on March [ S P Musson. Sons & Co. Ltd 14. The course at Ryton-on-Duna| The S S. Aleos Partner, which %  led on June 0. Attending %  \ %  taking a load of sugar, also the course were Police Officers [ sailed vesterday It Is bound for from nearly all the Home Forces NVw Brunswick The SS Mi in the UK and Wales and 12 [dawn left for La Gunlrs Officers from Colonial territories At Scotland Yard Dur.ng the course he visited man) Police Forces including 1-ancashise and the Leeds Clta Po us •/hare be rat attaenad (" %  two weeks At the 1 onclusfo 1 of tin iif did a two weeks' course at Scotland Yard and was afterwards attached to the Kent County Police for another two w -ek-. He visited rarlotl Headquarters and Stations On the completion of the courses he left Enwlnnd for Ireland on August 2 He spent a few days n August 9 bv the UFA Dawdala for Trinidad where he arrivrd on Wednesday morning '*nd left in the evening h\ II W l.A f.r Barbados the Advocate sewage g^L't^'L^ run ind He thought that out here to allow of a With all the streets having sidewalks there he uunh .id have '" walk alnlig the road here with SO much traffic always on Mr Walter Hn.vnes was given .1 wnsi watch by his Company as a tribute after he bad put In 25 years' service All arho have. %  %  vi'l ^'> vi'„is m those wlu> have resigned and are still alive : ,ft< 1 thai long •mn.v are given an iinmmi d 1 n u 1 r Mr Haynea thought highly of the Company'0M%  Ideratlon Ul H' 11 "^ -mnual dinners, and throughout his mtarvhra with the Advocate, somehow, rofarance le Iba annual dinner erant hi Hi new works eight hour* The 'Radar 9 Is Strange PERHAPS Uie strangest looking of motor vessels which call here Is the 116-ton "T.B. Radar." Most unlike the others, the bridge of the "T.B. Radar" is set 1 ight astern leaving from forward to midship plain. Only two winches can bo seen above that part of the deck." The "T. B. Radar'' is so built for the freighting of lumber. It was built in the Cayman Islands, the „amc of which It carries on the •tern. _^^__ pan molasses tanker to arrive at < Uarbados about mid-September to take a load. In this case, the hie tanker will anchor in Carlisle Bay winic tin, %  AtheUvook" will he used to take the vacuum pan to her VACI I'M PAN MOI.ASsI s the residual cane juice alter the extraction of sugar has taken place. FANCY MOLASSES is the inverted cane Juice concentrated Into syrup from which no sugar has been extracted. I)rl,mli,.:i supplied yesterday by courtesy of the Department ut •Jrlenre and Agriculture SHORT CUT MOTORISTS use the site Of the burnt out Central Foundry building as a byeway for entry to St. Michael's Row from Trafalgar Square. The rood In-low the site is used by 'buses coming from the tnil stand and is for one way traffic. Traffic other than nusta have to go right round liafalgar Square before gi.lug up St Michael's Ko.v Motorists have decided that the 1 ar park is not re i I the crossing of which is troubled by legal rcdn-Uong, and instead ol the long distance, th*" taha this short cut Schooners Come And Go Despite The Weather The hunrlenne reason is here., but this does nut prevent the fluent movement of schooners and BVsnU motor vessels to and from ] Barbados Even tin* most recent report that a hurricane had struck Antigua did not scare schooner cap' tains from leaving this port the next day. bound tor other Waal Indian Islands. At %  rawed m the Careenage yestardaj wan II rchoonan and two motor vessels, but none of them were lying up in port for safety against bad weather. Seven of the VI-SM win U'ln unloaded of their cargoes of rice fruit tire wood and charcoal, four .vi'ic taking cargo in preparation for leaving port towards the ana of the week while four others wer* idling, awaiting cargo with which to What's on Today Police Courts la a.m. Court of App*d 19 a.m. Petty Debt Court 10 ...in Exhibition of Pottery at Barbados Museum Table Tennis Trials t y.M.C.A. : p.m It has been on the run now for nx years. During the first five years, it made trips from the Cayman Islands to British Honduras where it took lumber for Cuba From Cuba it would then sail for Jamaica to load general cargo for its return trip to the Cayman Islands. The vessel changed owners in 194S. when it made its first call to liar bad o*. Since then, it has been slightly converted and put on a regular iun from Barbados to Dominica, %  4 Vincent, Grenada. Aruba and Curacao. The vessel has a gross tonnog of 162 tons and also has passenger accommodation. "Window By Sea" (Jlcured Of DebriH J-AHOUItKKS were busy yesterday removing debris from ttu open BPOt opposite lha Genciai Hospital which Is the moat n •'window by the sea" to be opened along Ua> B> The houses on this spot *ti all knocked down last monln ano the greater portion of debris ha: been removed. In the background fishing boats and other smal craft could be seen hauled up 01. the beach while at rsUji idlers baked in the sun. The Esplanade, another "window by the sea", has recently been cleaned up. The terrace ha been repaired in various potwhere there were holes and ir.i Band Stand Is being painted In l variety of colours. %  _, The rails that enclose 'h, Stand are decorated witb qaalgn of harps and the trimming a-mm the roof hears designs of th Barbados "Coat-of -Arms' 1 TH pan-' Stand is now one of th most athraethni In the w.land .11 Sold Over Sfhrdulr; Fined £2 | RUBY HAYNES. C a Hare j Proverbs. Rockley. Christ Chun l J was on Wednesday ordered to pay j a line of tl with 21costs by Ci< lice Magistrate Mr C I I'wyn, for committing a brea: .1 of the Defence Regulations Act Haynes offered for sale to a buyer, a half-pound tin of RownOrai • oooa for 39 cents when tl* I was 37 cents per tl \, Failing to pay the fine in tne given time. Haynes will undergo one month's imprisonment w-'h hard labour UM-rluiitliiiii (Ifst^2 BUS %  will ha CONDUCTOR JM f Hillsv. %  ,. e to pay a fin' %  %  tiprisonment with har labour for overloading the bu Road This order was D lay by Mr I tne date of thoffence was July 13. Captain Stoll of the 'Timi.tliv A. H. Vansluytman" said that he was expecting to sail on Saturday for British Guiana. The vessel was then discharging the last of its He did Dot think that the luirilcane which struck Antigua would reach him on his course Irom Barbados to iii.tish Oul ina Hanea ha md not tea lha necessity of lying %  up in port for shelter Skipper McFuilane of tl* "ine Nose. Mac was also preparing to sail for British Guiana on Saturday. His ship was being loaded with lime and marl. He agreed with Captain Stoll that the hurricane which struck Antigua would be out of their path Barbados to British ( •The weather will have t I-' Up i., keep me In this port, raid iwpper Wallace of the "Gardenia W. which is also expected to sail around the week-end for St. Vincent. His vessel was awaiting carAnother schooner captain told the 'Advocate' that the longer hll vessel laid up m the Careenage, the less trade it would make. He did not see the point or remaining in port wondering whethei a hurricane would come tot I'mc him ill and looks forward to seeing his family again on September 1. Faded Memory \ The Caravel Nina, which was .bulh at St. James for thfl BUTl li K "f the Columbus Picture, rc TII i ued .ff in Ihe Inner luism. Tin: .leek is nowbleached while Ina bottom icovered with moss. In 1MB the Nina drifted to St." Vmi.-iit and returned to under its own power. Mcomnenled b) to* Motor Vessel; Itirrwood. On its return it was i taken out to shoot a few scenes but soon after it was hi .night into I it. i.i.i i I ID .'"I has iK-enthen'l %  ,, inei The -Nina" WBS built In 1948 as sister ship to "Santa Maria." isad nan tot lb • filming of the Christopher Columbus picture. Tli.it .mil th<"N.ml.i Maria" were i>th oaslgned .uid built at the st .lame. ih'k Tard by i %  i Hi I Rlchardfl The -Santa %  m lit i lunched m" 1 oma weeks tbej oould be i. i .ul mid power, fa*MI the West off the St James Coast, hhooling scenes On eve an th. %  %  here i of the D fc v..i.' Kml -i S.inl Maria' night, the "Sanh Maria" wut up in flames an that was lha h".l of in. The next morning, only charred places of wood ah S.I'.I Mai lii" v i. Tin • wiis close by wher but her Maria" was burning flames did not reach you will need for that £ ANNIVERSARY CAKE ^^J RAl Ks i' IT It l.Sfl BRIDAL ICING SUGAH TTcl H 11ANUUET CASTOII S17UAK J2 7 lb. Tin. 1.33 65 RAISINS IVr Ih 40 TOMATOES (Wl. 15 TABLE SM.T—Per I'kl COCKADE FINE RUM STA.XSFEM.1K siiirr to.. i.ri>. It W.i N'II.. nto DOl long after 'when the Ml her ttrsi bit of inlsH While %  hooting ftuM Ing. the vessel fell .md could not i %  he st Jamas Coast li drifted id new aboard and %  it me towed Into Bt \ bou 1 I "-i" wu" rid trorn Hailwdos in search of her but that wanlv In tin." %  n i an* the "Nina" bock fiom st Vincent Mna mailed Into St reryoni was eurtoua and on 111 fi tun bare looal folk wen also intaraatod, but at present no i i %  "-em to ev. n lo..k ;,' tj,e i nd it is Mui.klv becorr a faded memory. H. w\ li STOCt ... PURINA CHOWS IX/l/l/.S P1HI.IKI i Jonai & Co, DISTRIBUTORS i v./) nun TO-UtWS SHRGBSX COCOANUT CREAMS Come in and Enjoy som. at ... KM..II IS I.TII. PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN HARRISON'S BROAD ST. DOMESTIC EARTHENWARE THE LARGEST SELECTION AND THE LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN. AMONG MANY OTHlR llfMS OUR STOCK INCIUMSCUPS AND SAUCERSAll Kindt WHITE TANKAIIII JUGS ECU CUPS WITH FOOT DECORATED BOWI.S MIXINti BOWI.S TEA AND COFFEE POTS VEGETABLE DISHES l('..vered| PLATES—In All SUM NIGHT CHA'R PANS TEA. DINNER I COFFEI SETS In a KIHKI range "t ittraeUva rfecorm on AND A SPECIAL LINE OF .j fit-:* I: in HHIMI n loirir SKIS Al SII.II7 I'llSri. HARRISON'S BROAD DIAL STREET 2364 DItINK CLAYTON'S V*=i KOLA TOINIC SPUNS TH.tr ITT i.x mi: roi 24 LEADING SHADES TO CHOOSE FROM 36" wide at •1.00 a yard CAVE SHEI'HEItl) & <(>.. LTD.



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PAfiK TWO BARBADOS A\OCATK FRIDAY. AUGUST :;. I50 Ccuub Calling I>III >III:II BVII in s Pnn.u Mu.i-Ur of Blflilhl 111 MQM .nitclios the final Tc5t maU-h at the Oval artsSfl thr W.I *n*0 ovrr England Central rm-i. S IR GEORGE SEEL. K.CM.O, Head uf CD. and W left Barbados on Wcdneadu aftornwm by B.W.I A |M St LUCU Hi loaves there fe returning to Barbados on Sunday afternoon He Is on a routine visit to these two island-' Never Seen a Cricket Match O N HOLIDAY at the Windaor Hotel are MY and Mr*. Ke Mth Pe.irce and their two ehlldr Bobby and Barbara, America living in Vene/ucia Mr. Pearce la with Carihnaai Palioaanm and ha* been living lor ieveral yearf, k in Venezuela They arrived via Trinidad by B.W 1 A on Tuesday afternoon. Never having seen a cricket match, the Pearce* hope to go down to Kensington Oval on Saturday to see what It's all about This is iheli Oral vtaM to Barbartos. Two years ago they were In Tobago, but find Barha* much nicer. When Carib saw Uiem in Bridgetown yesterday, young Bobby was hunting lor some gulf balls GuU Of Kin,'. Nephew Son Rf „,„•„• To Learn TkMTt and Mrs. Bob King, have • 1V1 returned to I-ondon from Cnglltn Paris where they have l>een on %  short holiday as guests of the Hen Gerald Laseelles nephew of the King i men in I'.ai I .. R via Trinidad. Mi Nile* ha* been in England for twenty months studying for his Bar finals and he was calico to lha Bar on list of JunBy Sea And Air rR AND MRS. JOHN PARKER left Barbados yestorday Mr, Parker by Alcoa BsUp i. Trinajlad -nd Mis Parker by B.W I A to Georgetown. Mr with the POX MoU** Co.. untt will (ly to I) C idad over the I After Two Weeks Wins Oxford Scholarship M R M It II A K I. WRIGHT, nephew of Mr* C. A. L . %  .] a*-hip from franley School to University. fcaagaj Michael will n 1571. William Itiilov was stabbed by a horse." A l.fth is to say, "Sh" Don't shout: n.y godmother i* .deaf; if you C*mt see her. it's because I'm not ii ally here at all." A Vnrnrinu* BB****B**W O N the second night of his visit to Boulto i w. %  Toulenough again retired to the library when his host and hostess went to bed "J hope the servants woi't disturb yoUl reading again." said L;nl\ Shortcake "I'm sure they won't." replied Fculenough About 3 am Lord and Lady Shortcake were awakened by tne sound of breaking glass. "It must be the .'apt.iiri reading;" said Lady Snortcake acidly. "How do you mean?" asked her husband. We wlU go and see." she replied. So downstairs thai) '"' Koi.liiioinh had time to dlvi bSCk into the library. The BBf> "Us kept vciy OJUM When the library door opened there was the Captain, deep In "aaiglhaai ins For Girls." He lumped up U n must be Inter than I thought," h tf cried. 'Uid you %  (i.i anything?" asked Lord s:.oilcake "Not a sound," said the Captain, mopping his head, which was dripping with beer tlrown by the butler 'Has it been raining?" asked Lady Shortcake "Only a few drops," he answered, still mopping B hilhvr. Vegetable* f S HREDDED tumipa to Mrs Mockpuddlng. It Is not without significance, and tlierefore may be said lo be With slgnillcancc, that on this day. Vegetable Wednesday, the index llgure of the cost of living Is 124. And until we can irrfport tht* succulent mango-grass of thi Kikawlpiti Islands, we must try to utilise moss, lichen and other rulrltious growths which do not costs dollars. "We cannot eat coal." as Sir Thomas Pullover has well said, "since In early youth that habit is discouraged i.'-'X.V.'', V//////AV/////////,v////Ay//^^/ AV /^/ A .// // -fUijfa. unong the FIRST lhouhl at and Itumost salis'; Ing in these HOT DAYS is ICED TEA steeped d.,m "1IYNAH." "M Y N A H" is grown, blended and packed in Ceylon The Tea Garden of the World. You will enjey the Flavour and Refresliing effect when you use"M YN Air 'TV., '',.'.V.V/,'.V.V.V/,',V.V.','.'.'.V,'.V.V.V.V.V.V.V/A'/.r SHORT HAIR AND LONC EARRINCS BHCIIadi.a'r^raRme M Th* Mm t ID %  m **w A">lt>u. 1 IS *.m TK Arrrt SJMWI ~ "• m> T* TH-tinta.!* ..f rmnaninti %  IT. fiwfi. lite Wllo L> 1 IB it, ProCIWiMfW Pai*tf*. *.l n aiTfnMi: • • *• CUM* Down. IS i*. Th Hrw. II II p m Hm*r* I %  "T..I-. i ts a SMbuiih Iniatl m i m aisa a i, s i .. Th# S. w. hrre. mm k**M Nr ffoii B m. Sh—i* fn*. *S*B. ...UHUOOIUI Fr.Uwal. 1 • p.pi BaCtWI"-* I 1* p m^h. *JB, Ntahu ai DM OA* (ITB1-.I nay 1 I'h.. Proc^nu-ir P. _._j Scolli* Magailri*. p m Afrlr.n Ouf.ii. • IS n. MWM*> •mna*. SS p "i Tt* T-ehniou* y>i rii""i."i lntrrr*S**">. r p m fh. HrwT 1* p m Ne**a Analvua: T II ? J* p m Crwkrl hrpi'i' on W t VI Eawn 1 7 M p m Tab. .noourcM %  p.in Radio N*W*r**l; I li p m Siior Bt*r\. %  %  p m Un Stowarl. %  S p m tl,r Kdilotul*. • p m FttKn Ihf Ftnn—fi Mr Conrerl.: I* P I" Thr JB#w.. I* I" p m lnl*(l>M**. 19 IS p i" P^lHnev rott OAV*. ID 41 p m World AffaU*' II m..-. p i rhf*. ••i} ... PLAZA i a • % %  F.M. "FIC.nTINO FOOLS" HAT. a sits. lOmin • a S.M P.M MONOOBAMS nm mi aaa* DAVia m LOUISIANA iHat.Mii 1 johnny MACK BROWN bj "SIX Ol'N GOSPEL" com ... M*nt Inirad lo dn *n in; • 8p*cr ;mtr mor* ihi i quarr n.cl-r* F MI I (11 (Hi i-**-~ — Bui DO iirosn drmi u HMBB. App^irnti) Dap u UMI mue In rrsnor f< th 1 wrt i *Baf*-**Mi Nam* of mm *?tra* i Brttln *t the nommt I L Otlr*l**-. Il*r .-:-, t Ac^nnwlerts* lu.l* wc h*Ti i admit Contrnct in onr K;W Wont we tet from children It s. IIIIIHIUII i n ilioae U*e IS#Tr >Q I HT*lB| found EMPIRE THEATRE OPENING TO-DAY 2 TO AND R.30 and continuing at Mat. and Night Show*: Daily w JOHN WAYNE ...-_ JOHN AGAR ana MM • naSn nasa MPJBliC PICTIiW GLOBE OPENINO TO-DAY ft A S.IO C-ontlnalng Trip Rrrord flr-raklm Motion Plrturr BB*BBs**s%iaaVaHL*SBSB*l THE GRIPPING STORY OF THEHATFIELDSA.NO THEM-HYS! ..Anmrica's most famous fowd SAMUEL (JOLDWYN Hoseanna McCoy" KSUU.lt-.v.. IK IllUliS MXKMU) UtaVMl HAffn SKH\RDIASFHMr U(J MMUMi .• %  i .% %  .,.-. %  h M s mv EXTRA I EXTRA! lOXIIi: LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE NORTON MOORE-"AJ U I Dina'I Havi Elmuull on Mv Mind" WINSTON DAISIJY--4 Wlnd^ And 7 Se," """' COSfORO HUSBANDS—"You Do" MISS HnTY TAYLOH_"My Foolish HfUt" TREVOR MARSHALL— "Surrcadet" VEI1NON PRICE—"I c.n Dnm" OVBST STAR — MISS OLORIA KENTHAM JUDOES-Mr r. Pewrkln: Ml, Th.ln, a Snr„\ Sarjeant. Mlf* Nanry SAVE YOURJy TICKETS AND WIN A CARTON Jl I I'KF Y'S a***.. NO INCREASE IN PRICES '""*"* I-H16Houae M — I ileny 49 — Boan 54. EQUIP YOUR KITCHEN AHD PANTRY with PYREX OVEN and T.ABLE WARE A WIDE RANGE TO SELECT FROM t ASSEROLES SAUCE BOATS PLATES—DINNER, SOUP, BREAKFAST MEAT PLATTERS CUSTARD CUPS SCALLOPED SHELLS DISHES—PUDDING. ROASTING, PIE CIFT SETS—5 PIECE AND 11 PIKCE. Pay our Hardware Department o Visit Spacious Yard for Easy Parking Or Dial 20M. f lirt's alias? mUlliiin BOI-Pr Jl They'rr *lw*r* loucd at thr •lid Of thr r-.r--.jip.-.-> Iti murdir Puiublr iMrdripant in inasci w*rtr ? 'One -mist* lanai. i. rtl> ir*l U rdravatMit. 8Crr*ii wlITi ifi| r it.r Th* *r> '*r [or a loutum escu !" ion Ju*t abmi: p'upvri-. 'ramrti t repair thr .Trnnafr ,. B i' do** -he modn nna u fljiiirir%  SOI.ITIO\ I11T1L' ri* 'SlTfT got, 'jf rTflfMHIC A IllbJJaiSl?*tfjinitl. TfWpW 0 ll Itp-'0!0_N MrTllllil* r-jHjO tlitomWIt KEFTaSTHE1RT0tS! Mltllt Mlltll MUrt SHtTM • .;*; %  '-'.•" i • l*il HISSP • llMtl mu • mo tS. • r-|a*M • L .U f !" * BHi B'*ra—;(xn-n n-MM -*. '1 :*f *t :•* •-•••X< tooflstc PicCufa: .inAlso British Movietone News Korea—Security Council's historic meeting Anglo-American Universities Athletic Contests at White City Bluebird ready to try again HOW TO-DAY TO SUNDAY 4.30 AND 8.1S Republic Double . •• BLAt EMAIL Stan-inn: William MARSHALL—Adele MARA and •• SAX AXTOXMO hilt with William ELLIOTT—Bobby BLAKE ROYAL TO-DAY ONLY 1.30 AND 8.30 Republic Whole Serial . -f.-lll.y \ 1.11 II FORGET" with Clayton MOORE—Roy BANCROFT Action T hrills E xcitement OLimpi i TO-DAY TO SUNDAY 4.30 AND 8.1S Republic Double . Richard ARLEN—Cheryl WALKER in IDEXTTTV TXEXnWX and •FLAME Ol IIIIIIIART IOISI" with John WAYNE-Ann DVORAK . they are worth talking about! BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LTD. PORCELAIN & STAINLESS STEEL KITCHEN SINKS WITH DOUBLE and SINGLE DRAIN BOARD and CABINET AN ASSET TO EVERY MODERN KITCHEN. See them on Show at... THE CORNER STORE i •



PAGE 1

I KIDU VI (.1 ST 25, Hill BAKIIADOS ADYOCATK PACE SFYF.N CLASSIFIED ADS. HARBOUR HI l.llll IIM.N I I VSII I EIOM I IMI III I..1.MI mii*ii ito* IN Ml MHUI \.M PUTABXrolNTK B • r--h. .. _.• —-in .._. Thai he i> dead i.< i n . %  % With %  loving entile end n wove of Um He has %  lend. eSeeP MII Ixtovrd and UK* your reel. Ood know I area you mil Evelyn FOR SALE AUTOMOTIVE CAB Crtioen IX-IMI A bit (hobby but aee ilka %  Bomb ll.n Hmti Pop. Urn. "In Chiwfty. Chuat Church. • sso -an TRUCK—OnIBM Ford VI Truck Apply D. V. Icoll Co. -Vhlte Pah Pa* M Ml la > IB—II n CA1I I**: II. BBBMI Uin.. iTOBO mil. IVrfect condition Owner *4 cycle generator* nno hcadlighta Obtainable, from all le>dBRtX)HD ALBUMS for It-Inch and ta reeorda. and raeae for It-Inch in %  YAWL -Traplda" appro* 37> feet long with Marine engine Good condition WOOD a bargain Apply J. R Edwards Phone MSP 1ft • *0~T r f I FOB RENT HOUSES FLAT VpMatra Flat at Wavrttev Blue Water. Terrace 1 large BedroomseTnl-furril.hed with nrndtni convenlerase*. Thoi* On. SOPJP.—Tn. F1.AT "Wrenarouri" Palm Beach. I Bedroom.. Ih,wlng and DinIn* Room*. I Vp.an.ialu. Pantr> Kitchen Garage All moduen mnici". i TWO TLATSAt "Inch aiarlow". rully Fuinlahed. Phone. John Illedon *S40 P-feS. -n THEItSlBDOnT—Me*wel1 Cnaat Road rull' furnuhed From Saplmibn Mr. B. Leahley. HI, n,m tf ..low. Manwetl Read Dial MIT 8 So—. My House "In CltANC-ERY". for three Bnotilha. to earel ,1 tenant* Pull* furiii.I. %  From Rapt l.t Writ* Hugh Popham. Phone John Illadon *•. ^ SJ^aa,—aa. WORTHY DOWN-TW Rock bavin*. I bedroom* I'onnretiti*: Toilet -net Bath %  area Lounge-Bin I eg room Dclurhlful hah-nnv Two rot g..r.>f> Fully enclotec' Avalliible unfurni.hci nrplornher 1 Apply: n-lph Herd 4M3 or -TO niMIII 11 ELICASIIII'JI A.M. lam l_ad> Caehaer For the HaatMc* HotaAppK in poraon with iaf,rancaa to Uan.|*r 34 • 5P--I t i MALE CLXBK For TranV Dpt Cltj OBIoa. B W I A Ltd On* with aoBM pr vloua rvparienca ptafaarad Apply by lot tat with tvMimonlali to: BRANCH MANAGKB B W.I A, LTD. Iwwar Broad Biraat i H B D W MISCELLANEOUS mtNISHBD Cotlaia at Worthlnf oSl Lawroncr with Gat-fa Apply A B.C c o Advocata. poaiTins v, \Mti> DRNTAL TBCHMC1AN with ovar 9 aipaHanac in p"inw and ccjdModam Tachnajua uiad in all ataf Baply to Gar. Wilkma. II. fh iuaat. Port-of-Spa in. Tiinid-d • %  a* _. %  aRampa of S IN and RW I labwuta Jamaw v i Stamp Co Day Ultra' Rt Ui.li 1ft ft • 3t-. PVHLic \onris In Crlisle Bay %  rh. Pbihp PI Davtdaoo Brh But ma T. Art. Boaarona fkh Blur.,.. Mat. Bch Ziu WaaiKo Bah rai.,a Rinfthi M v Blur fRar. Ma. Bmaim. ffc-h BMajtn Brh Laiaftalpha^ Brli Udy NtarkMn %  Alcoa Polariv Brl Ptlnra*. LouW ; M.V T B Rada. Srh Ttm..ih'. A H Van tld|l mil. Ber Ghtdaaila W. Ben Bnurrptiar Brh Tua Ha Dova; Brh Ma*. M X*wia ; S*b Man M I.-.I. Srb Marlon Ball '• 'Ball Macro Ha-mirim KB *vr-anaW s n MyBan ABRIVAIfl Brh Manor. Balla Wolta 74 lom capl a. from %  rman Oulaax /fmu; B.'h Owner AaaacUtlan Bch Mart* Ranrmta. O ton. Cap! Balhv. from Bt LucU. AftwartBrh SB Bylvanflau. 4.W >,.• Capi Pit..ir' from Curacao. Aatnta Mm" Gatdmar Annlo %  Co Ltd DCPABT\'RTB B %  OranjMtad. J.ftH lona, Capt HaaalhnR lm Madeira Apciia Ma..-. B P Muaaon. aona A Co Ud 8 B Hnuba, t,a*> tona Capt Dal%  enna. for P|rantarib*>. Aiiant. Mr.... S P •..raw.*. Eon. at Co. Ud S N Mormardawn. 4.U1 tona. Capt 0;cdaon. for Lo Gualta. AptiU Mawu. RM Jonaa 4k Co Lad B B Alcoa partnar. XUI tona. Capt PambroMa for New BtunawlcK. A*rniMaaar. DaCoata & C 114 Taaikat Alhrlbr..*. aW tona. Cap) 1^..-lair tot Trinidad. Aamu Maaar. II Jaaun Jone* & C.V.. Lid Ship. ID Touch With B.rb.do. Loutal St.lion Smalr (.His f-'OO.OOO.'HM) timed 15/For ll'tllHl-llI l.all^llil<:<' V. s %  %  i %  %  1 ; %  %  .. %  Mi ft %  %  : „ • BBB1 P| | %  %  %  %  lu'tHtOPflU' Bid Iron, itie Thitut which mua) ;'.ivrfl liKiire of 'Hin to $2,250,000 M SHIPPING NOTICES iOYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. %  .. n ii>>i rnc IV, advi i h. %  Weal MEMBBR8 of the Victorian. Wait Indian Taat teakn Bialtod the Wood olraet tilaphono *chane and In taaft picture Weekea, Waliott. Ooddard unit Williams ate seen al then perticulat aectUrn of toe overaean telephone-. NOTICE I Aui Pilll'. fc;rc !o notily lha Bale Of the Iftl |. IVI.IB In (ha ConiUtutio' ik-h BBM advartlaad Ui U tha list day qf Auauat la ellad D'Arcy A aVM. OovemmetM Apeln.iiaer. ati soiNOTICE JI>SI;PH Wn;aiNB ipecwiaodi NoTIcr. IS HBatEBV i :IVBN thai ., oraona havlrai aitv dabt .k. in lha Pariah .it S-.nlecarro in thla laland who dhtd La thi. Mand on UM ITth day of BtaTrch are aand In pattlculat* of Uiei' duly aUeatad to tha uiutaratane.i nour ABapiia Of hlawm Rail Btraer I-trlfrtoWti, on or befr.ro II* at-id 6 %  %  Beptarnber. HaW. aftar which d.tta I I pr.H-aaat to dl.lrlrxita lha aaaala of io. havltai i ipaiil only to auch it." of which I -hall then have had noliew and I will not be Habit for ha aaaav ot Ml part litr-reuf MI iiuii ib-.iM lo any prrenn of wheb* debt or elajm And all paraona mdebtod lo the all -I.,le ate requemtad to atttle thou in W.'adnaoa wlthliul dalarDated thia ftth da* of Annual, iftao G BrTVMOUR A1-1ITNI" (jnalinnl c.ernlnt pf tha KHtalp "I WICK; i w n.• %  II • SO t:> FOB BFNT OR I.RAHF. i\irMMiF.ri %  •|'AltAISO"-Bartn.raa Road Situated one milr from tha> City Drawlnd rod dlnliifl room. Front and tide Oallcn... Kltrh-netla. thraw Urpa badronma aarh %  lift tunnitiK water, ittodarn tiled balh with lo,ar and tub balh with hot wetar i..id or. u|>rtalra. I-re cainea toom. bedroom with tunning; n.iler. kitchen and atora n>-ia %  ><• pound lb" Servam room with tullat and bath. C • %  ipe a-lth room for Iwo cai>. ElcctrUity nd ( 31.I.BC—t f ii PI Hl.lt MALES AUCTIONUNDER THE SILVER HAMMER ON TUESDAY 3Ph by order of Mr* h. PBaker, we will aril her Puinilurp M "Banyan Beach". Brurhlon. which InCnwea Bide board. arrvm B i-nfiec IM H'de Tibia. Arm, Morn, and Eai' Chair-. (;..to-I*tt Ta* Table. Hook Ctf •Oln I>.,r>. all in Mahofany. u'. Wall Mirror.. Glaaa and %  Loom and Rmh CIL.IT. and Hi-rkir.. ." Sin|le Baditcad* with Vono BUnmoni Bpelnita. Daap-Bleap Mattretaei. Mini Prea. Dra*ai-i|[ itnd Red-tde Tabl— Linen Praaa. all In Mahosaaay; O E RefrHieratot. J-Burmy Oeir. Slu.va landi-i. Step l.utdrr. Pa!ma In Cctnan pou, Preaaure Cooker. Clrclio Inn ftW other Item. SJHT II o'clock Term* Coal BRANKr.K. TROTMAN A CO.. ABCU REAL ESTATE LAND One rood twenly-al* -nd I half perchea of land a I Prosper I. W Jamea Pra-e altta. H-.r y..t parUcuUr: appl% to IVAt.v A Bcott. MK' I-L H %  av-a, OFFICIAL NOTICE liAKBADOS IN THE AIBUTABT COt BT 4F APPTAI. 'Liquiiable JunadMlioni. VrilKON aVUQlJRTUR HUHTB-d-lai,^ T/UBKAIOCl-ARKv Dafendant a-md day itlce of Araaaaat. HaW. 1 give i an paraona havtnjr any ^ala. rwm n.tm.t in or any Inn o* Incum i-uw* arraajtaMC of land aUtiaar at Hie Ivy In the par if Saint Michael a foreaaid contalnini hundtad and acvanty aquare feet or lt..-reeaoiit. abuttlnt ." %  •! b.ii.dli. "> i.ual. of Jamea Bliirray. on 'jrtda of Blanche Oroavenor. on landa of ohe Furde and on two atdra on lha puClc Mini rallad Ivy Road ot hnwevar clae thi aamo abut and bound todalh.r nh t>.( iliarlliiiKlimiar .nil all and alnetHar ntbet tha buikUnd. and erertiuna on the aoid parcel of land erected ,'d built -t..clinr and haiim with Ira* appurton%  incr. to blind before ma an account of their aakt clatme with ihatr wimaaaa.. (lorumenta and wuaheta. to be r.'mlnrd I. me on any Tueidiry. or Friday be twtaii the hour* of If inooni. and o'clock In the after noon, at the Offlc of the aerk of the Aniatant C~utt o 'i>p..il a) the Court llouae. llrlilKei<>-<>. laafora the I As %  through ir-.lr a%art.~dr* Coaat Matlon B B Jane StoveII DM Bud* II Amertroji; SB Qullmea SB Myken. B • Hendnh Flaher; 8 8 lady Nel •"ii; II CaiuBalat. Chalkaodar. II linwhlt; BB Hecuba U) Intaipeist. 8 S Alcoa Pasaaua; 8 S CaaabUnci. S B ByrralleMB S Tookmae B S Bolnataler II Murmacdawn. I,| Frcdrtka S K Imperial (fuauec B 8 Oianjeitad S S Hapar-i Bl B.B Be llta I B -. .. B B Mont* Amab-' B Cuinbrrlainl S 8 the Cabin.' SB loniaraat SS bania s B BillenuUad I 8 Alcoa Paftnn s s Foil SouHrfc 8 Coulfarve SB B PaulaB S B 8 Fain BeUiIahem. B s spa 11 Fort Royal8 fl Arakaka B S Llparua 8 S HCBenl Juauaf BB M^tina: SB Imperial Quebec'B.B Bvanor; a B Juvenal; S H Regan' .-anlhae: BT Oebeo : BB Atiiak-euef B.B Baao PhiladelphiaR 8 Tn>drt|i B % Beachhlll S S AiaentanFred.-tic A Ellcr. 8 I Qaapa Bplil.iui. M S An.itim Veapueel AnriareHi; SR K.-ip>"i. Hf 3 Schooners Bring Rice 2 U.S. Ships BombersRepel Sunk Red Advance -RfDS CLAIM Thrtf lare quantltios of rlct* have already been brought to the Island by intercolonial vessel* from Jlrltish Guiana this week brought' bv'The 1 Schooner 2 Tlmoth^ R lJl "' Von sTJnnlninn „n Mnmhv ihaltll """IIM .ilicnift Sank an All.Ii ,,n £n sSSZ" Mo ^i £.", ** '""-"i "','. s ,J k M T' rr Marlon Mitt W>M. under Capt -4 S s s mil B.a Arlfuan Baa aled S FOn 1 %  • B S Sun-art B B. Stii KnlheHneB N .1 i It Oaaec .B 8 l.i j la B8 Bali H % %  creel. 8 S Me rnuwda. nS a %  !'.. Every, brought 2.000 bags as which ISO were broken, vesterday B 8 The SB-ton Turtle Done, sklp!" "\ lapred by Capt. Oilvivrrc. also arami: rived from British Gulanu but thl.i SB only brouiiht 161 tons of rtrewoad R B and 400 bflgs of charcoal. '*"•: Other cargo brought by tinksd Mary M Lewis included 300 Daf* as of charcoat and 43 tons of llreAI wood. ThtWnlle nlM) brought Ii pieeo of aawn mora and 25 pieces of awn grcenheart, 500 wallah; posts, 500 bags of charcoal and nine tons of llrewood. Twenty -one casks of honey wen brought by the 43-ton Schounei Mareo Henrietta which nrrtverl St. Lucia yesterday The r• Fran Face 1 west bank ol Naktong, ratal) tn bUO BH R^BOOUnaj brl.UcTOKYO. Ail.-1 ,,.„, |, n nps ill(||l (lf Ttiritu _. Pyon>'an B .North Ko.e-n-. kwr ,. ll % f the tlireBitBiMJd plnetn thrust on this vital rommunleattooi city ..1 the oorthwasl i %  : uurMtaoa bos %  On the Eaal Coaat. k Rtglnatnl ni DM South KiiH.iTi Captutl Division .! % %  Bon c.i I Norn of Poiiaiii: durlni mi tight, but this Rponlaa] MH M V a W O fl l prepared to mount <> %  iiitci atUl'k Airforre Ileatl'iuaiiert; said I'M nvadfi hi % %  .. ..., %  i in tln-_*u early today "inning, of IM ni'v strikes at nal >nrds and trH|i maOaMTBtafltM around Tacun ami ('lnn)ti on the BffMt I..t.' vesterday jet BghtaVI III iichmd i t lines report..ttrUtW in nx-ciirts which pfj^ed under rocket ilnTUB) ItTiev.i'-l to have liecn laden uilli nltlon Ninth KiiTi'iin Itiidi ifter an engagement with Communist ahore battBI %  U American apnkesman here ridiculed thlft K.ulrl Govt. Plans To End Strike IN CANADA tai-ima drums of cocoanul oil. 24 bags of ARRlVAIf) BY UW I A I '" Fi.im TRINIDAD nil Andtrw Chilatlr.e. Callinlna Ri.-li.rilv of William ftimn.H.. Barnard H..-hrd. M,"* "SSSST 1 AS!L, "OSSK i"""> -' <••;•" ?'• ! n.-.|ga Nllea. Hentv Oootntan; AttuHO rOCORtlUtS Wild 205 i>Ugl of Copm Matneua: EaaaU Daaa-ullon; Mahomed These vessels arc all consigned sr %  r h s!i;:""-Ji !" "ssx: ;„i hc &h !" '"""*-* 9 r, Haaell nadall Kerry Bland. "'"' Bpnnirr. Aaron aprim tfaw Warner; Selwyn Jaleel. Moore; John Ilr.iixh George |l (llga Blo-.val Francta Blonl fltonval; Mrr Ronald atonic. Clemantm OTTAWA. Aug. 24. The Government worked on Thursday on plans for getting the lull weight of | wi I lament behiicl aald BBTlj (od" thai DM Aim-iiaction 6 end the general tail ",n .ilrcraft (m shot down by ilrlke as it awaitexl Tuesday's '' %  % %  efhlla raldinr iinder of its ara was made up < i>eiiing of the emergency session. v '" P nir a S p i r frC6h frult 20ft A the "itical stiiko went Hit ( oiinltr-Altiifk tion. Atthn AHIMVAJ/a by B.W I A I. ppse* GRBMADACytil Banneil. Uutectte ruche, Otta PtaBia. Theodore Worrell. Maxwell Tti ot i i.i a. gnarntnid*. Goraaa. Ivalow Mitchell. Joysa Baka>. Inrrid Babb. From ANTIGUA Ith Leuka Fiahei Oearaa M.-Mictu., *| JefTeri III. -ell Itaat HAITI lla.r^ Hen Ftom JAMAICA: John Hawton Whitii.n. By. ni Whllto... Buaan Batah WhIHoi Whltt-m. Joaeph bi.*er. lv. Prai Ftom POHTO RM.-0 rACtyn P Outran,. Sidney SpU third day there was no direct '^ r I? m ', m,crv ''"""" "a-KSf" BpeBkini (..I Uu Anl DM In oct before the O|H-IIII,K of Parlia,,; ,, „ u :/ ow|1 „,, llllvllv ient with the Administration (•.muiniiusl lt:ntio M.IO Communist landing by Its decision lo hav.? ,.,%  „, W ith an .support were re%  .oslalors share the responsible{olliitg a llnol coURtof oAoniHrB 'v for "iiy action effoTl of American and Soutli What that action might be was K"> %  < • till problotAatical. Frlme MinisHi I I Hi i nnriers said mi St. Laurent In announcing the ..nteriean doKlUJUII for the .pening date on Wedltoaday said ,in.i:ri UriM in tnfWl days cartheCabinet had not yet taken final iit'd on', a Ixitnbardment of the decisions on the piogramme Of f-r north easi H>H*I port of action it will lay bofore the ComChttlgliri vertterrlay. raisin* nrr !" mons. Deliberations oo Iho nioi i.it nr visibly, 10 rntlag at sea mcnluus issue, the outcomo of Nail I rare MoIflUuDl „ which may have a heavy bearing -in iron work-. i...l 1 I "^**Un-c the , futurfi arJu-irlal relations in hemci drawn "JJ'b ""'on*' Industries such as rail.With liillc ground -t "FinancialPlains > To Be United LONDON, August 24 Twelve North Atlantic lat t deputies this morning set Baan. laJ Tr, C aTy''rounTrie7 iSS s7lalS *>% want on Thuraday morning Korea lod ay the American K.m BwrVnaUd^ lrle8 U5Ufllly rehflh,c at a C^biriet meating. Airfare. %  action o Charles SpoiTord American nc *\ un w t] '" %  '-'H> four c,-.it,ate Finer, rviorea Flnao. Lui. Fineo Jaoauea Crame>, Denu Bale.. CUvt v.,ie.. Maria tempo*, Caesar' Feman dinl.. Coliln Pllgi Shalla Hanr>. Hem illiam Aleaandat. Lionel Rtew.iei Cnratea VaMf. Carlo!. Cai chairman of deputies prevented the United States views and comments on plans. He was also believed to have outlined the extent and type ol Bid the United States was prepared to give lo supplement defence programmes of h<*i eleven Atlantic Pact partners. Charles Spoflord. American Chairman of the Atlantic Part Council of Deputies, today told the meeting of the Twelve Nation f>ao*aaaa, BBBJSI Council that thei,proposed Cai < %  (initial! AatoaaBia iro-O tuber. Dockers Rvfum* To Load GOd : a*t-i i |aM M Bapl IS OS|| '. %  %  -.1 > BNADI 1 %  :s An a> A.m mm %  1 SOI so 1 ., •tin U>Y H-'UHfY %  .OS s" BBBl -..1. %  SO N... %  llalllat Mantra • %  Sltart With eolfl at • %  plu-aH.ai to •. LTD. ,M.-. N Hi Dec B.-ehii.lect Ii. %  tomae wilrui.n Bjaaal beta Paa-ngcr Parae an.1 (raia GARDINER AUSTIN & CO Agents. PASSAGES TO IRELAND Avrn 11 a FEODUCTfl LTD., RosaBU, Dorrdnlca. offer P IV IMAU". next tailing from Roseau 1 2J| t '..TV thtrtv-tlircc days. Hmgll Fan, i:i0. usual rrdii llni.s for ehllclrrii %  I lAI'WIHlli METAL gL a -II •ft v THI; ir-MHAI I Ml'Oltll M MIMKM. IIMMlllV I.Tlt—IToprlrtoral flirnrr llni.nl A 1 inlor Strreta 1 /it st run: if 111 .' AFRICAN PRINTS THE undceaiarieal will et up for t*W at their oftce No IT 'Huh Btreet. on Friday IM September IMS at 1 pro. the dwellinghouec called Tha Collage and Ihe land thereto .ontetnlne: 3W square ieal .lt,.,.te ..1 CbearaMlc. Bridgetown Inapecttoi! any day atSMsd Thiaraday between the Inura of 4 pro. and a p m on application to tho tenant. Mr. Thomaa For further parttcul.it* and conditioner aale, aM COTTIX. CATFORD 0, Co 1 (III lh.ul.l-roof houee tweh 34 x l> %  %  covered with Salvaniie. otwated In Vrarwood LAIMI. Black Rock Telephone aw D A Browne II ft 50—1 f n I. Chattel house and M00 aquare feet jf band t 10 perche. of land 1. I rooda of land. 4. IIS perche. of land All aituatc near Auburn and Indian pond. St Joaeph the propertiea of Ihe UU William T Walton deceaeed The abora pmpaTiiea will be art up for aale by public cornpeiiiion at out Office. Jamea Street, on Friday SMh Auauat 1MB a 1 p hi For inipectioti apply on ptrml VRARWOOD A noYCF %  aaaMSan II • SO—an OFFICIAL SALE r.AtiiiAnos J .„„, _. IN 1H1 ASSISTANT COI ST Ol ArrsAL • BQultable JurtadlCtloiii VEidOJ* Aucrsrus HUNTB jpiamnri % rr7r.r_RAJ.Il CI^RKt Defandan NOTICE U hereby given that 0* virtue of an Ordat of the Aaa-atant Coutl ol Appeal doted the find da> ot Auu't. 1KM>, there will be act up^ lo, Hto Uic h-fheat blddat at the OfBee ol the Aaalalant Curt of Appeal at the Court House, Bridgetown, between Ihe hour* of II inoom and 1 o'chwk in the afternoon on Friday, the ird f-r ol November. 1PJ0. All lluit certain piece or parcel of land iluate at the Ivy In lha parun o*_ Bai Foe LA GHAIRA: Berlha V,r-il.. Maarlam Voorwilk Madrlalne VnorwiiK. Alda Eapala. Joae *".. -. %  iia.u.Uiifi. Pater Schwelr.oorgrr Vivian a liar n la. Lily Bam lay. Nora Palen.ona. Matlella Pal.in.rfva. laabella Ptilrniiiiia. Armando Paieniona. Craai Piilen.ona. Sal* De Mayer. Mry Wed dcrbum Tilma Calcanw, Anal Calcano. Lndovlk. Wolken. Carmen Plaaa. Maria IV-nm Rliai Roth nnancial contributions to the Association here who recently .. revised defence programme were (|lied to unloaf i goods froni R UMI(I not sufficient, accord ng to usually have now decided not to load ships well informed gourc*. v ith goods for Itussia or cotintriiThcre was -Ull a considerable swoclated with her gap to close The first ship affected was an ll was understood Spoftoid did American B.lMJO-ton frightei ..I not give any Indu-ation of the ii ie Moore-McCormack Lines amount that might be exprvwd bound for Gdynia I from the United States to 1111 Tha Union deddad Mil araafc to the gap. .ii" GOVERNMENT NOTICES. %  iluate at the Ivy in tha par Michael aioreeaid .mitaining viiement Four iliouaand erv by adm ibulUi ind -.ur.'ln* ..I <;., land, ol .n Ur publ |v> Road ot howevei ;" bound looellier nauaa -nd all arid alnaula. !" ~. —. 1 ,.\,. ,-.< .-e.-.,.i, '.TI (he -aid id built alandof ni. a Fnrde and ,,_..e road called elae the iam abut lha dwellingaold the aald property 1 up lot aale oei every aucceed. betHpan lha name hnutuntil la autd fot a >um not lea* than a hifind day ol Auauat IBM I V fllLKES. •|ei nl the AaalBtant Court or Appeal lift Jo 3n Removal Notice Dr F A COX D C P T (Chit 1 Chiropractor a Optician ha. Bernnved to lower Junii Bl lUiui. in to I and 1 to 11 30 PRICE OF BULPHATE OF AMMOIHA Until further notice, the followlni price has been arranged;I oycotl all shipments of Soviet products entering New York aied I'-os ton New, York dockers had refused two days earlier to if Russian furs The embargo on unloading Wi later extruded to ,iii cargoes —n>utcr. Sulphate of Ammonia 9120.80 per ton Discount If paid by SOth September. IBM 12 25 per ton 2..R.SW2n PAYMENT OF WATER RATES Consumers who bad r. 1 yet paid water rates In leaneet of 'he quarter ending 30th September, 1990, are hereby nouflott than unless these rates are paid on or before the list of August, 1950, the Departrnant, as authorised by section 46 of the Waterworks Act, 1895— 1 may stop the water from flowing into the premises, in respect of which such rates arc payable, either by cutting off the pipe to such premises or by such means ss they msy think tit. and take proceeding* to recover any amount due. 25.8.50—2n COFFEE REPORT IS CONFUSING NEW YORK August 24 Representative), oi the LaUli American coffee Industry todav criticised the revised Congressional report oo eottce prw They said that II would aggravate hitter n-sentinenl it. Aoieijcii aiul BBDJ I BtM, (ho United M %  Four laitin-Aiiu'i i aaked the Special Cwnnikenun on Coffee of the Inter-American "Economic and Social Council I roiisider the report in its meeting next Tuesday Tht icioit made by the Sti.-.s.n mltlce made %  <. %  im %  < ndatJ deaigned to brlnu the i in the United Stales under do • f scrutiny. It replaced an idday Cafrununloua %  o that north of tl i ad oval lha Won )U. Kinipo. Seoul nd Snwo' bl loeoiii'irea daati'Dtad, three damu I nd three flak points hit %  -i ft : Fmlories lliinilied A large Hum'"*! of i< %  pa xilliiirt-were iiicrotcl ui" •trafed when foim i lo ibBltai i rmy troop-t and supplies %  i II bombed •i^l roi %  I A total of 93 HOrlies in eloBI .ipporl of ground MTI bfl iiiiiiiipul effort w) %  i ihe Norihein aaaaai along an• %  < Hebe*, to Ti amara bullnV Inga anpitarlng the anen rei •.trsfed Pilots observed enemy action over the Imnt One Mustang was lout due t load a "argo enemy action but the phwa HO ;.nt CBUBt ..ere unknown Sii|" rfi.'t frmtiiilie I .em' war pniei ibs on mil! .iistall.ilK'n U yards and key bridgt the 3Hth |.:irall. I — Iteuter in i'attnn ... %  pi Rpi, ) lORfC MtOAIIUIV MIIESS SHI. Mr. Factory Manager J.I.T U HELP YOU WITH Y. 'JU nni'ATB FXOBLBHB. ,* We cm supply ihe following; or STOCK. B0*.T3 a NUTS— lion Brtglit Btaei — AH slsa r.iiA i\ii iPlummer Block) — BOLT TAPS ft fJir.S 11 oats from W to Vt~ ASE; RTOS ROPE, TAPE and ] IBRB. etc. FIRi: ri.AY, BAI'! :.i: BRICKS, ate. B.C. Rice Corporation •> fram par I Mori IT P. IX'hidln and Dr, C I an. who maintained opposition to ihe and IWoic the motion wag put to Ihe vole on \s< i m Bdei w# Fin in. lal to. I r r %  E P MllLiMd ei'iphasised thnt ( I> t' 01 BB] • ii.pmnnt MrporaUoo u imed must i(rae < BB4orei la the market if tie, -, H COFFEE IHSTILLED WATF.H TO-DAYS NEWS FLASH %  00 TIMERS SAVS'lNTl V a heat proof JOHNSON'S STATIONERY A HARDWARE OFFICIAL NOTICE RaJuaAoqe, Df PURRUANCX of the Crun—s-i Art 1BDS. 1 do hereby give notice ••. al peraor.a having or clatming any eetate. nsht ot Ihleraat or any Hen or inrub. brance la '-r arlecilng the propeit> hatetnaftet ftwntaawd Mhr pc^aitv — in. Defendant, lo bring before me an account of their claim* with their %  < document' and voucher, to lie eaaimnail by me n anv Tueadi the houra of II noon and 3 o'clock in tha aftem—>n al the Ragl BuBdinew. Bt li a r town befotr tho SSIh day of Oct. ISM. in ol %  nav be repotted on and ranked eceordine to Ihe nelure and pen raapactlvalY. otharwlap .ueh perron, will be precluded rmirt, the bai decree and be deprived ol all claim, on or again*! the aald property PBOPfr-Tt ALL THAT rertala paru Kravrhrnko In Rio Office P i -Fief.' M admeasurement two . Al. I ting a: -1 aoajad %  %  v. ,,< ..... Valraaa "'. oim Famum en land. Pilgrim aial on the publi. ( abut and bound TudeOier with report to which the State Denart, "" K '' %  "ucceaof the wnture ment objected because ii placed M, i)„vi-i prjntan] aaji htrwerai part of ihe blame for recant tnaie WM sunieient safeguard to coffee price increases in lh I"dect others engaged in the InUnited States on some Latinduatr* Amended Clause proAmerican countries —Reuter rides lor tin '"ivnimi to mvlir —^— ^—— %  to paiiupate In aatablishti ami aaBhTatloa. of the propoapeieni iM i a ar a aioBj and — agre(JtrvarnBIO DE JANEIRO. Aus 21 heea) to Victor Kravchenko. f -i otneiai in the 01 lad St ,n. and author or the book "I chops M „ rr i |o marketing or dome to 1 expoii traaa an Janeiro last night, on his way ,, c produced in the colon, ilso to Buenos Airei Kravchenk ti.-nxing of K t. Kin declmad to make any %  Uternenti | ufJksratlori betv-etti: to to news-men saying that he the Rice Msrbut w "uld hold a Press Conferenie kedrtfl I mm on his way lck. when he inThe ptuaslng of the Itill pavea the '"'* tends to remain a few -lays hen' way for large scale develop.m-n(B, He ta on a mere pleasure tr.p %  ,on. Kravchenko who la itndei a ike ovar th< n hca\T guard of F.H I agents Governs* III at Hand Brazilian plain clothe* „ Buenos Aires thi scheme establmhed with two other evening He i travelling Esaequibt. nftalftUwflacii-L the nmm of I*'**'" Martmei with Marshall Aid providing the a • ka-an. —Renter necessary machinery. asi Thm H I Hit it,OS io$ XOHV Ltrt. ITEADtjUARTF.RA FOtt ALL FACTORY AND PLANTATION dtrpPUES. BARBADOS EIFATRIC SUPPLY CORPORATHIN LTD. or panel ol land Mluelc at Bpooi char I and laland aforeeakl isuntai two and two-tenlha perche. or UM n land, 'ormerly of W T E Bleri landa lormerly of O O Mrdfotd iiartaarly of Alfred F Creer. b il rvc. nwd called Bprm thet with the dwelllni all and ilngulat tha boildma. an tKith freehoM and chattel on the aald landa erected and b^i and being with ihe aopurtenancaa tha aaid doeillnv hooaa land Heradtlamerit* and premier) being the peotKri* af the dependant NOTICE As the Manufacturers have tlIded that repairs ta one of nur Engines ran no lon-er he mliyed. the Cohtuanr baa In BBBl Mi-nce had la put this (let. -t illnr Set (980 K W.) out of c-jmrnlBrtan and avrtai to the redaction of standby Plant now .callable at a result, may "nil Ii neeesaarf ta shed load at tntrr"als duiinc the next few m :i:!%  Our Consumers a*e asked tn <*uperate by exerrlslnc the nlrnosl eaaSBBBO MI ihe rise nf M-.'ritlli. particular!* during Utc Peak peH.nl betVraafl €.30 and *1B p.m. antil farther notice. *9th June. '.•SO. V. SMITH, General Manager.



PAGE 1

Frld.T i •.-, i Bartotitos Mwta Price: I I I (IVIS Year .-•.-. BOMBERS REPEIi RED ADVANCE Lord Bishop Of B'dos Resigns XHE BISHOP OF BARBADOS has tendered his resignation from the See of Barbados to His Excellency the Oovernorin Executive Committee and to the Archbishop of the West Indies, to take effect not later than February 22nd. next. In 1H44 lattice of l-egislatmn to disestablish the Church in Barbados was given. It was the possibility oi su.' islation passing into law and the consequent changes which such an enactment would involve for the Church, which alone induced him to accept nomination for election as Bishop, in succession to Dr. Bentlev. For various reasons the promised legislation was not carried into effect The Bishop hu found it increasingly difficult during tin last live years, to work under the present system, as pie&crlbed by Ihe Anglican Church Act The Church does not manage iti own affair.' Ihrough the Synod an it oughi distribution of ovallabla HOI Si. N'U \T THE OVAI. BISHOP Ht'fiHES B.G.ReadyFor $10m. Rice Corporation The manpower is prescril>ed by the Act and is out of keeping with present needs The Lay li. tion in Synod docs not really represent the members of the Church who have no voice in the appoint* mem of representatives. The Synod has no powci t Canons for Ihe Government of the Church, and the method of appointment to Ix-nences is unsalt-f:n tin \ The Bishop no longer feels justified in trying to work a svst lem which he believes inimicii!. to the best interests of the Church, and ihe rojoctiofl of his nominee by the Appointment*' Board for the Parish or St. John [ has convinced him that he must resign. The Hi. Kev. William James Hughes. M.L.C. was educated at I the College of Resurrection. Mlrtield. University of Leeds. He was Vicar of St. Benedict. Bordeslev 1827-30 From 1930-44 he was Rector of St. George's Cathedr.il. Georgetown He w-_ Sub-Dean [from 1330-37 am) De .'from 1B37|44. He was Bishop os>Brhnh Honduras durinc 1944-4%. He is author of a publication In 1947 ailed or a publication THINK AGAIN GEORGETOWN, Aug. 24. After four weeks debate Uie Legislature on Wednesday evening passed the controversial rice marketing amendment ordinance which cleared wav for creation of a $10,000,000 rice development corporation with the British Guiana Government and Colonial Development Corporation as partners. At the outset Clause 7 of the Bill was severely attacked by the majority of unofficial members who asserted that the Clause was discriminatory as it excluded the proposed corporation from control by the Rice Marketing Board During the debate last week the Governor adjourned the Council and held an lit camera conference with unofficial members, following which the clause was amended to the satisfaction of all but two. the _*-". p ** p 7 Alf 8 Mother Wants Him To Go To India trYilm Our Own Coni>oniwould benefit from the added cricket experience, and also as Htim.-iiihin already accepted Ihe invitation, she does not want him to break the Valentine-INm adhin combination whicfV in her opinion mean*a great deal to the West Indies. She was SUMValentine would do lust as she wishes. Prior to Ihe cable Valentine had turned down the Invitation, saying he preferred the educational scholarship offered to him by the Jamaica sporting public. Planet Supply Hood Victims North Koreans Prepare Mass Attack On Taegu Reds Must Win By Sept. 15 Or Never Says U.S. GENERAL B> KO\ MM uii Nl \ TAEGU. Aug 24 Genorol Hoban r Qaj i...id hwrr today that to tnenu mnkoi good bj September U b,. Onlsnod w. shaU i c UH> strong for him. General <;..* uM LS*S Qeorssj %  'Chief of Staff in World War 2 j.nd now first Cavalry Division said he t.t then • on at •Ground Pull" at the Oval for the final Test and here is a portion of the vast crowd arfUeh Germany Decides Fate Of Europe ASSAM, Aug 24. Indian transport aircraft today parachuted emergency iood supplies to victims of vast floods sweeping north eastern Assam alter earthquakes which blocked and diverted rain swollen rivers in the Ganges—Brahmaputra basm last week. Iv-'port4 to-day suggested that the death rate from disease was high among 5,000,000 marooned people Heater Correspondent who flew over 1000 square STUTTGART. Aug. 24. miles of Hooded land said the The fate of Europe will be deslench of dead cattle, fish and '--ded in Germany Franz B wild animals forced his aircraft Vice Chancellor and leader of t:. climb higher mi many ucoaWest Germany'* Free Democratic slons. He saw human corpses Party said at the opening here lofloating with elephant carcases in aa V * the fourth World Liberal floodwaters. Congress. Deadly snakes wer,attacking The world must allow Germany I homeless peasants as the v tried *" bulld U P "*** economy, her beto escape rising floodwaters. and JjJ l""*^!* ond ln < h er ^ a d 50 had died from snake bite. * rtd <* tiie *t"**' %  'oUU'" Assam's Chief Minister Bl&hnu which weaauch a daniEeroiis Ram Medshi said earthquakes P'^lx.logical factor Bucxhcr amid. had destroyed the homes (1 ,'He was addr^mg delegate, from i between Riglanrl and the West jndU .. Hu W I h.< rnglanri —Central Freaa 600.000 people —Heater. Gun Controlled By Radio WASHINGTON. AUK 24 Recent Intelligence reports received here Indicated that the Russians have perfected a radiocontrolled machine gun. according to usually reliable sources. The gun can be set up in a %  null well protected nest, and then be fired either by direct electrical connections or radio, by men hundreds of yards away. These sources said this meant that one normal machine gun new could handle dozens of such guns while hiding in comparative safetv —Reuter 75 nations gathered in Stuttgart's festivltv decorate.! casino. The necessity of the day is not to look at collectivism and Communism gathering strength, as a bird watches .i snake wailing for It to strike. Wo mull attack. We mu-t not base our ho|-c In defence, mentality. This has Iwcn the cur.-e of the world over since 1945. —Reuter £3,000,000 Released For Jamaican Tourist City GAMBLING CASINO IN THE AIR TWO AIRMEN KILLED VICTORVILLE. Air Force a, California Aug 24. Two United States airmen were killed and one seriously Injured when two B20 Army Invader Bombers collided and crashed last night on a desert near here A fourth was re|Krted missing. The aircraft on a routine night training flight exploded when they hit the ground. — %  eater. THE FINAL TEST AT THE OVAI. (Our London Correspondent) LONDON. Aug. 24 A GAMBLING CASINO will prubablv be the mainstay of the Tourist City project tor which Mr James (km. wealthy Jamaican industrialist, has received promise of release by the British Government of £ 3.000.000 blocked sterling. Talking to our correspondent in New York last night. Mr. Gore said "The Colonial Office is releasing funds and I will build chalets and bungalows on 25.000 acres of Jamaican Government land which I have leased for 99 yean. "Two years ago when I acyulied it Britain would nol grant funds. "This lime I spent tnfOO mum; %  in l>ondon and now I have a Colonial Office letter dated August 14, signed hy It S Helnmann. "It says 'I am asked by Secrel.nv (.ninths it is decided S >ur application for the release of re-ked sterling MCUfitJoi bt granted .... Ihe decision ii taken in view of a desire of H M Government to encourage a protect which may assist in nlving Jamaican unemployment'. "American investors are already ii.leresled," added Mr OoTi "Btl they are asking lo gel %  concession 10 operate a gambling casino And ( might form a syndicate myself have been sort of promised permission to build a casino by th Government of Jamaica Rut Governor Muggins haalw: fused and the Governor has Ihe ovsjCTulini vota Bui Oc "imn Huggins is laiavloi "ii Rept 9; then I m going to Jama IT WAS OIL MANILA. A central Lu/un uu prospector, in his own I'lekvnrd, struck up -thai I lp I I was the real Met He pnwMded lo > his discovery by sinking <• match ag'nr t tbn element, in the \'cr> primdiv. and Impulsive eitort to provo its nature. It was oil. all i.iihBut he had to b ruah %  to a nearby hospital *> that bums sustained In U I and hands could be tieated He was allowed to go home.—I.N.S Editor Arrested For Hi^li Tn'uson ATHENS, August 24. Dienystofl Chrvstakos. left-wing It mber of tl I r ,.'.. %  U I \y fore Ihe Mil.l.i' ourl on charges of Mn h I* ithe adltor of Uie Leit-Wihg owi p t pai llemt" ratfw.i rhich ii aceuMd <•! il>Un| IN prubahh t. 1 i %  |)|l :!, %  fti an doubted Of tow c^onununrsi ( %  upposoU lo I. ivt i%  his cavalry in the T. Mast week. General ('. %  >ny but the North Korean B ooOPd Division h.i.i men than 5l pet cent of its %  Usjngth —Renter We Are Back Where We Started -SAYS NEHRU NEW UE1JII, Aul 21 Indian I'M,.,,. Mb |, ,.„„,, Ihll will, the f.iilm, Q| :,„ ,., Mediator Su Owen DIUI'I mUUan un UM K.I-IIH buck lo whenwi .imii.i Nehru lold ., .._ "•* '*. W J^. b9vmut9 th e S'- hours but a new Communist iiitrmpl t, overrun TaeiUi and an attempt to push south Weather highway to Pusan. was expected at over the I aitv turnTruman Opposes I AMI n To Spain WASHINGTON, Aug. 24. %  in gprsjsssjd BB> %  Jftla t<>-d.i\ to Senate %  ti in roconUy .ipprnviiut • .oo.ooo.imo lo.n i.. siwin. lb' told WORs) PrOSS ColarWsSMO he Id MM like t HoUi he ami Seeet:.i\ of St„U' Dean Acheaon it v expressed oppootttoa to any in (o S|>uui which was made iimm.il ui.ii-hiitfry. Bolh sold II. .it BpoJa eould ipBb i the usual nonnOT to the bank '. ., loan This would mean n-lir.ilii'ii of Spain's credit If tin aetton ••( Uw Senate was %  •nllrini'-l h\ ihe Mouse of Hepre.uitl nol voted by the President. the United State* iioveinm.it would b0 obliged to n.ake thi.s loan to Spain wltnoiit i.vestlgatmg Spain's economic situation *-Reuter had I" both I %  I i,,. n %  Council did not lion who was the .., Kashmir that th* t %  risen Nehru described a> Woadstrland Busii Mediator Sir Owe :mue p r oposa l fos Kashmii's Stale Oovs, i UnltOr] Nations Authotits dUln| i iimiti-i plobtsdui tatd Pakistan PrinuMifUSfa | All Khan's attempt t.. blamt India fin lheen no demitr< he from iMhi to 1'ikiii,: rsjardioi Tibc: It i |M if., th true tl. .t .i (...v. 'mfonnallv polntOd Ml HI Ihe h. dohtrabillty of *elllln the quostton iieacefully I have every hope it may tM tt'ifullv It was rooi-eivalJe. Nehni said, that prelimln..talkl IFltgW take ,,1 in N< a Delhi between representatives of the Clum-e Government and. the Tibetan delegation—Reoter. lied Morale HUM Declined TOKYO. Aug. 24. CoUttoUl optimism QVi U* Kon-an war was eapressed here lodaj bj Admiral rnnssl P sin i man. chief of thff United States naval opeialiomt and GonSTal J Lawton O I i of of Moll of Ua l : lb Bl it* %  %  ly, on theii roturn from %  > front Una i^it lo Kofi %  Sh.im.i. onferi tv i ltd a "rams I Una |ob" had %  undsi diiii uli in cum lot i rhc fart that th.Unltad Mai from In Karoo had ro..ii,nl i i %  • '. that OffonstVs strikes by nltsd Natloni rorei %  h.t.i bsssi ll nil ''SJIOOkS for llirlf." —Reuler Hid Night assaults un the American IX-Ien.e Line west of Masan on the south coast were beaten off without loss of ground, but theie too Communists were reported lathering strength fur an attempted breakthrough l*risoners report that ORM North Korean forces massed on tlie South coast—depending like locust* on what Utoj B .m .> llie> i ,ove>--huve had nothing lo eat for four days Driven as much by hunger as by orders and still sup-uoi kg numbers and firearms, North Korean? were expected by Ob%  \ • i here to be able to mass lor a decisive new offensive Jet Ugh ten early flew off for roCKOt and mathinegun attacks on North Korean Iroopmassed %  At 1 Of M.IS.Itl Eighth Army Hcadquarteni said American troops entrenched behind barbed wire on hills between ih t Communists and MacArthur's supply harbour, Pusan. boot off a small attack -t dawn. Ominous tjuicl Forward] of their ndge posii 1 %  i i up to 8 i lies but i.'i" rU'i no contact V 1th the main body of Communist hirers For 24 hours there has been an ominous quiet—first quiet m sjtVOrol weeks." un Eighth Aims ipohaasnagi said Around Taegu where the main ConuntHstSt force appoars lo be ..in enttitttti (in a plnevrs assaall •crass the Naktoug only small hiuvisNing attacks on South KoIIII forces were reported during the night. In a sharp snort battle rsslerdiy n hattnllon of the American 27th -Wolfhound" ReRlmen. i leared out a roving pocket of i.mnmiiists who had been att. eking Ameneii'i gu*i positions %  bOUt four miles behind the lines Today Americans dug in on a < dm flanking the Taegu-Kunwl Mghwjiv preparing with strong armour support and self propelled guns lo meet the new offensive American patrols last night reported 800 North Korran troops vilh some armour grouped on Ihe a n page 1 America Will Spend 116,771*064,479 On ArniH Aid iifl.Pi i I 700 CHILDREN JOIN EMIGRANT PARENTS KOMR. AugUOl 24 Uors MI. in L'oo itah m i hil Iron lef. Oonos toSstv ibn rd th. tats Fs to loo i BSnJ in ArKentiiiH. TtMi uannts vno i iel from Bah during ihe post year lefl the ehlldron behind untl' UtOJ hat) Grook depuMc '"' homes In Ar %  Real^-r —RVuser. WASMINCTON. Aim The House Appmpr Cominiltec 'o dn> p.e >' prod %  • a |wq and s bnli aiiDi ions more sugar Uioi) %  This is con.Ml. it sny oil Commenting upon this In thri current circular E. D ami Man. Sugar Brokers. H will be possible for i maintained %  %  many sdvorso stances bit >f naorly rive and a half million tons and Europe will IMmuch more self-supporting If the world has stock piled and hoarded between a half million tons th.. cannot be expected that a repeat aril] laks place in 1951 Already prices in New Yart foi Demi rooi %  the cm oi,.i ono n st l> %  %  These include GILBEYS PORT & SHERRY You can enjoy them again in greatei quantity &f iMumi iosrmsu,ui ^ mmammmmmm