Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


Friday. # ieess>)
August CENTS

19350

FRVE



- Parbados



Year 35
lieiesarnienantiangaepeiets oo







U.S. TROOPS CHECK R

£3,400 Million For |
British Re-arming
In Next 3 Years



CASTARINA AVENUE

Korty Mites
krom Pusan

e >} *

: » whe

Big Battle Planned
LONDON, Aug. 3. ' A ; . . .

RITAIN to-night announced the £3,400,000,000 Rearma- By ROY MacCARTNEY

: ment Programme to be effective over the next three With American Forces In KORBA, Aug. 3
years, partly conditional on the receipt of more dollar aid. ied ae “=e : hes ac sam
The anncuncement came in the form of a memorandum A NORTH KOREAN drive on the southern Fron

sent yesterday to Washington and now released, setting
out Britain’s Defence Programme in an answer to the
American request for information.

The new programme will increase the proportion of
national income spent oa defence from eight to ten per
cent.

The memorandum said “How far it will possible
to go towards the new upper limit will depend on the

was halted today about 40 miler

| vital supply port of Pusan
| American troops of the 24th Division fighting with
tank support on an are about 12 miles westward
around Masan on the southern coastal road were
confident that Communist forces would not get

west 9







be


































































































1 , : ) yaa , : oo Titew Veatible was
an t of United States assistance forthcoming much closer to the port, but that a big battle was
Britain's defence budget till in preparation.
£780,000,000 but £100,000,000 \merican troops were digging}post and artiller
; 7 } annum was added last monti f the Naktong were driven back
Che programme will mean -he tion squads were busy on Yor, ha east coa
lewing down of Sritain’s Kumchon, bl ongdok South Kor
~ a ‘onomic recovery, but the wes’
COl ONIA j spokesman explained tt Britain | d * Ma
| < still insists on C
| economic stability ul
. *7] Communism ] bed .
e The Memorandum said the as
| Programme will entail ubstan- , alc he
| (From. Our, Own Correspondent) | ‘all sacrifice by the British people re { > ( €
| Britain told America she “does | ton f hi 4
LONDON, Aug 3. |} not feel able to undertake » full | : > f ok 1 N Kore tat
Vit J OD. Gammar M.P../a diversion of productive e- | I alling f Fare A t he
asks UWiis morning: in letter to} sources to defence purpose | ( \ ve
the Daily ‘Telegraph why no colo-! the United State ean offer | Head Bi
nial army has been recruited for| financial assistance.’ Sor ‘ t irc
he present Korean cr | . . 5 . | : ic
He says one lesson of the Ko-} Sese Contribution Y
nis onerrtpallan: Moat Ceisclits uni tatere| Ne indication of the amount
Sieisaié ‘ive cia etter be -8 {tof aid hoped for was disclosed, n ‘
lores ne of the i nd ereee if | put the Memorandum said Britain ys :
Great Britain, the United. States l expected to be ontribute ; , |
nd France in c anit ie if to Rearmament in | or
F nae eeee ee her Atlantic P. . mite © the wre
he earth against satellite troops | er Atlantic ” sree > f hays
only *” | of charge, implying tl Amer Taegu P Vac fory In 10 De J Ss
No one in Malaya, Hong Kong , “!, co-operation wou ed : 7 e :
Indo China or Korea has ever seen| be heavy ah a
Russian infantryman It said the British Government ;
_ - is savisfied with the WaNpow el — .
ih Bt 4 ast Pee ' | Be ition for defence and proposes a und Sout
mitain is to make up the/to concentrate o1 re-equipmen sug
‘ppalling disparity between Rus | Much of any addi ul Ameri- peas S
sian ground forces and her own] can Aid would be spent in Amei Coe ; i
it cannot be done merely by in- | {; machine toal and raw oe pe
creasing the size cf the ‘Regular’ | materials but the Memo i io” : ope Pac
army or by keeping conscripts in| said Britain wanted freedom t aay lal capita
. t né ari se ala : - be 1 he »
for additional periods. of service jspend the remainder anywher ; !
Other sources must be sought. | rh +p + ' | - ( a 4
1 4 1e new Programm ill bring . j
“Why is there siill no mention | Britain: alee to ia alaieta { Lot 1 ie o
of a great Colonia! army?” asks} phe Memor: i Sie ‘a it de | ne Unite i V
Mr. Gammans. “There are sev-| 4). a ae iectaenr ee as BAe dope fy pbeceae-ibe
eral potential divisions of firsi cabl > witht ee Saad or eyen [the building up of alli
class fighting men in the Coloniat| °* 1 et rag oe ae ee ee a | the. North, Kors et ein a be ; Pa ma aehy “eA
Empire willing and able to fight | 274 Without restoring the direction | eranics alty r
for the standards of morality and pet aaa poueeeren B-sessoabaaa te ines ssc here ,
freedom which are as much their) ,/5@ Memorandum welcomed sae jing mer ters e eee |
heritage as ours.” | American initiative in asking for A BOY AND GIRL enjoy the shade of these Casuarina trees on the St. Jamos Coast, yesterday | allie » over to the offe nay Americ
information about the Defence ere pene een eee “ " oy " . Com nist mees ; cer nas noMeiall
Programme " more ore t have} North Kor
It recalled that Force re A I =] IN th K + | great Meult i reund ‘
S0 : } a ae & u ci
Jury To Visit being provided in Korea and Cc 1eson, on ev ase or 1 ore als traine or i « id
Fl orders have been issued calling Te tes i tok’ ‘ Pots '
“Ploati sjup army and Navy resevists.| JOH Will Wr real Lighting n be gor
t é ‘ al Navy 5. E wm e rt ¢ s . é . {
ting Corpse About 1,000,000 men had received son ! Fy a 9 > i ake 1,200 ; aoe ;
compulsory military training since e ; : , port
Murder Scene {une 19:3 ot esign Pri mgiu on Wednesday, 1
‘ aro ' ' ‘ ;
Reserves | mite seh i risone rs , ; :
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 3. Tiere was therefore a subs SAYS TR | TURNER’S HALL WOODS, the only part of Barbado ; . ‘ Bec
Mire Jury empanelled | for the |stantive and steadily increasing | AYS TRUMAN | vhere the only origina] forest covering of the island still LONDON, Ai : ;
ts es beh pee reserve of young trained man- exists was alive with the whistling of birds and the noise A North Korean Communiqu | a
‘ > £ g to visi 1e water- re £ i the re Ww on Acer: 2 1 1 7 "
front, scene of the allege . ic PA | re a addition to the regula WASHINGTON, Aug. 3 of the gentle trade winds through its 46 acres of trees when | broadcast by Moscow radio out f \ I
vi aie Oo “he a eged i= | Army reserve and over 4,000,000 President Truman today angril | ur roving reporter vx there yesterday morning, But noi |ight claimed the capture of e
le ol Philbert Peyson of which | older men who received military] rejected suggestions that his Sec Se ak ; ; a i mae flerce & | we enen Idier 1 fficet ) ere unde Ke
Boysie Singh and four other men| training in the last war. o retaries of State and Defence Tor tony a iettarianl hi Seema, a he |teking Andor { Nort} ' t t t rhe ¢ { northerner
an T . - —-— _ ogs shattere¢ is ace anc fi ekin dong, ot f N ( e!
are accused. The Government therefore | should resign because of develop- vimsinad thut, - 200 = vf ; yk 4 ront, on Tuvsday e1 ‘ f Ure t coast are vere continu-
hj ey considere é Ss rgent ‘nts leading to the Korean wat Pi Qeuy Y oe : . i. : “oN ¢ Lute rep i herce t Ameri-
hist “oii . “ we onsidered that the most urgent |men ading ] hain ‘ oii saliaane wt €orean force } i i
ree raat i ie ger ree need is to increase the production}/and United States military pre | U.S. TROOPS jae re rng a ae y ig { he j : ‘ied at ore ‘ roke ! in muth } ear
ae oHi bala 3 mens oh ter Rupert] of the new defence equipment paredness. es a biaeeece:| sk lace rs aaa ie 44 me ‘ “eh i ine i —Reuter
; a oe cra ing Vs de ence counsel, Government experts pointes | +i RECK BRIDGES na do e trees alimo m er B 2 a dadeetineasligeti india ila a
suggested that the jury carry out! out to-day that one effect of the The President said at his} the ground and then scamperin; Many prisoner were repo
the experiment, hoping to prove "is aes : Tiwaekly + nf thal’ the | a le back to safety the dogs chasec aptured the same day when Nor > “o. % re %
a ’ greatly increased spending will |‘ y 2 CORTETENCE Was. se | By LIONEL HUDSON x Pare a 8 7 ; , . | a I : ’ | | ° °
he launch used in the alleged|he to bring the country back {two Secretaries, Louis Johnson | On the Northern Front them to) tie acgompanimern 5 ping spas ap ; PO-LA Opo cists Iiromw “aps hss
ae — ae ae come] tow ; austerity standards which ,@nd Dean Acheson were not | KOREA, Aug, h lo ‘a as , 7 \ rh dy d and fon es ; et at “ ae
ushore as claimed by the prosecu-|in recent months were being| 89mg to resign as long as_ lit American troops blew up some the = villager Epes acter ovate : A ! | i l °S < i Vi sf
‘ ° * : ’ > ‘ ry ¥ "7 ee na if ‘ ‘ Vo jy ara
tion on the night of the incident,| gradually relieved was President of the Unité three teel bridges toda earby told the Advocate th ( . : ATH Ommatoes a LDISTErS
April 14, if the tide was low, The steel used for tanks will] States. | hen they retreated east of etuEMeS » Uh ; 2 ae a Reut
V Se se? ‘ pera teuter
; s ; |not therefore be available f " ; g river Waegwa jof the young itt KI Au ;
nf 3 "A 4 > -4 =usti arose a hi re ‘ } x ' ow 1 ‘ { 1
> Brn c Ne f Justice Vincent} motor car industry; working on], oe aes oe a at ae ea ; 20 miles northwest of Fa ground and kil | da rmed the Catholic
3rown refused a plea to stage a such gobds .as vacuum cleanere con erence rom al egations 1 temporary Sout! Korea leat them . y : ‘ b atiie eee es
demonstration, but acceded to the! will be sx itched to electrical Congress that the ee a capital The older monke ive sell U S Moves , 1 eacer ithe
. isit t ; SW ; nt < . ce Esti : Susaransimediie sc ; : e e L i }
request to visit the locus im quo equipment for armed forces ment and the Defence Establis Little had bee ! ca here ve been cat 4
after a breeze between the Bench The proportion of additional|™°"™ had shown themselves Northerners—wh« ere | in which dogs have been severe \ ount Henri Cat
3ar - ‘ pare > or di -alls alan? ta tnt. ¢ ‘ v & : =
ang Bar !amounts being spent this year is)?" re rn ae nv: ee Ti aaa Aeon mauled by the older monke | LackhSu btlet .
ae —_ a planned for after | likely to be a small expenditut See for the outbreak of ( when , He Mes ‘ yer iad One interesting sight was : . } ' nvad \ seam} .
the close of the prosecution’s case. | which il rise as Gove orean wal crossed bridges after disen female key leaping from tree
bis. ‘ v W t rnment + 7 : pt ‘ emale monkey aping | oe i } ext
The hearing is continuing, | ond saaiiatiah a gedduictl One Congressman had suggest: — yesterday in the to tree with a young one clingi SAYS NEHRU : ee ’
. “ » t ‘ « reslor mme 1 c i Ce Lit ‘ { c
—Can Press. switched Reuter. one hey should’ re ¥/ ; ae : in thi se r of: the ecurtly to her breast ¢ j { }
atels i this sector ¢ NEW DELHI, Au vaders were forced
Korean front which has be niet ' ‘ ced !
Foreign Minist Asse rome the northern wing of |! Datel Strengthen 2 ec a ae
isn “Ministers Assembly Under Study the line have retreated 50. || ; ort: same - oat
Wi , miles, in the last four day Defence Forces | Russia Boycott U.N, \or the ouitding but pro-ta
ill Meet | ‘ T President Truman said at | to “tidy up the line ter eyence Fi j nited Nation ; r . ots t
- 7 ex one ay same Conference that the I Communist penetration THE HAGUE. A ‘ © ¢ ed | bon ft ¢ i
STRASBOURG. Aus 3 of establishing formal diplor wee waltleliex. In view of international devel- | situ i Forn | Staff Committee |
Foreign Ministers of the C | Ry 3 “eS: S| Jrelations with» the Vatican ' opments, Holland is taking imme- |] | |
aE se ers te Counc of European Statcsfunder study diate measures to strengthen kh ‘
met in the Town Hall, this symbolic building of Huroy “ defence fort Militar lar ‘ ' t I
. : > , » anit t tr 7 ‘ c ¢ (
this evening to inaugurate the second Annual Session of Fo “y Re aes - i | “J un le Girl” drawn up by Government ¢ 3 aig = : , lt
~ , + . office oO side persona + . ‘ } 1 to P (
the Council’s Consultative Assembly opening next Monday hepreset ative to the Vaticar | £ A ee Fe acal te eviews & ;
Flags of 13 full members of the Council flew t See a te ie mer i ( ‘ i ;
ags s t f outsic which was created by Presider ernment spokesmat \ t 07 |,
the building as Foreign Ministers or their deputies drove] Roosevelt—had now ceased | Defends Her The full-fledged Army division He
into: the courtyard watched by a small crowd No further appointment alon | ‘ vill shortl ye formed {rpm | thei ¥ had: talied
On Monday, when the Consultative Assemb]: : «+.|those lines was being considered Ma . ‘ among D old ( i ecaise
¢ iad : oo i 5 . in #SBSCMO1Y* COSI followit the resignation of the| ! Tria e ceived extensive ilitar if i t I i t
ing of 125 representatives from 15 nations with a mbine ; ' ' i ght «
7 ‘ x ae - Er $ previous personal representativ | in tt wht . ,
population of about 300,000,000, begins its month lonu|t the Parliament. Mr. Myror SINGAPORE. A 3 the lemobilisec . ome counter t
sac ; 5 " . . eae aca , nny iby ‘ at ¥ AUR. @ eer i Nest —Reute Heuter) i :
session, two more flags will be hoisted Taylor A 14-year-old Dutch girl re eee ‘
They are the flags of the West|Plan_ for pooling il and e€ —Reuter ed in the jungle by her a Se ee aL r
German Federal Republic and the | output foster-mother, on Thursday defied ° . | : "
Saar, invited to join the Assembly i Although Britain ha the world to break up her twe e ‘ 4 ye
as associate members. It will be!jo x other inter: iv-old marriage t , ¢ ul l , y
the first time the Gerr 1 flag | : a a , : ray : ee a & y i
t first time th rerman flag has | prelirn a lise i chool teacher Bertha Hertogh e
been hoisted in France since the | plan, Bevir expecte herself Nadra °
end of the o€cupation, | blessir » the full dat a married to school- > » oy” res S a On
Foreign Ministers present this Jit in Assembl | teacher Mansoor Ada nly four lS us SS / Say ere
evening included Ernest Bevin Air Views | da if te e High Court award- c .
(Britain) who drove upto the Ministars® before ‘ tody to her native nurse
Town Hall with his wife; Robert |recgommendation bv t whe cared for her since the LAKE SUCCESS, Aug. 3 ing agare i |
Schuman (France) who strolled |Eeonomic ¢ acit™ oo J ( f 1049 ‘menar lhe United Nation vour, with the So U | (
into the courts smiling Miho} : ais her ‘from Her Butch verent | uncil ended three y alone against it, and Indi |
around him d Count Carlos | }5). ner Coninhk nvapore Court Appeal re- | tonight by adoptin Yugoslavia abstaining }
Sforza (Italy) the js 1. he } ¢ Tit 8 etur } te of it rrer India lele j -euter
Lively Series ’ parent ho ane: re er t Rau, explained tt
Their discussions expect Berge Yethe j pre Kore only be« eh ~
last until S day will clea r i { co jected to vhe order f prior ae Ue } ]
> ne ay
ay tow: What prcihiaes, ti : ae thé. Counatic pyes ch o¢-thelmotiot Prisoners Lynched
ely series of de th i ) I love I t r | Ru ® epresentat Ji On the Russi pro} 7 .
tative sserr € f 4 esided breaking iterr of Chinese mmut }
or : I a0 é th Sovier bo: epresentati the |
wes : € a } 3 4 } ' sre tt é te Natior deadlocked The rie t . |
inni of ar mal Parlia- | tic to r rnmer appiness and p er rne ( he Russian po agair iding Nati |
= si i =n ol The emb ap. by he " ‘ illing first (x China) fis favou I |
F MacBride, Foreign Minis- e tl ‘ Mosler The Mosle 1 f Chinese Commu~ abstention, | |
for Hire pres ng t essio YY oO _ . f epreset ind second were B |
y € j : ; 4 e Herto | , eful ettlement , Russia a I
N : é al ite Ministe I mniflic ‘ |
€ € f both Ministers j give ¢ 1D ‘ € ghte ¢ t yn the adopvion of the proce eae { Reutel
mee : @ on page 5 v s Sxpress Service, ¢ ¢ —Can. Press ndemn- l _





CEE

>.

















AUGUST 4, 1956.






































r . - . ,
PAGE T BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY,
wr ‘iinet a
] !
| ee | |
e e { W To-day to Monday 5 & 8.30 p.m
i]
Ub HOUSEWIVES’ || ; ROYAL
{ wearing a brand
| GUIDE lt sins wean ins ee
} new Si
—_ F. ationa Prices of Carrots and Cab- |} ~ Baabind ,
or Intern tion 1 Meet | bage when the Advocate’ } of slapstick! fi
EN FARNUM left yesterday | checked yesterday were:— { j Aobet CUMMINGS ~
for B.G., by B.W.I1.A. to} Carrots 24 cents per Ib £ f
ride in the forthcoming Inter | Cabbage 30 cents per 1b | é F
national Cycle Meeting, } ,
opens in B.G. to-morrow. C -|
pet ng against representative 2: | 2B B. (. RADIO PROGRAMME
from Venezuela, Trinidad, B.G |
and Panama, he is the lone rider | ae 2 re igust 4; 1950 bi
from Barbados He will t ats 7 an
i , | | : : DONALD
rciurning in six days’ time | |7.50 am The idea of w= GIG YOUNG - MARIE Mc :
Ken is now training to be a | | . the Editorials : i Marry Davenport - Fay Baker - Katharine | arren
operator with Cable & Wireless | | Pees Pee SOS 8 ee REGULAR PRICES
: | Down; 12 soon The News; 12.10 pgn
Staying at Rockley |News’ Analysis; 12.15 p.m. New Re- — - .
MISS JOAN MAGGS of Port-| Henk eat boas Sinn ROXY THEATRE
Spain arrived from Trin- | Were’s Howard; 2 p.m, The News; 3.10 TO-DAY 4.45 and Continuing
idad yesterday by B.W.1.A | p.m ao ae ree, ee Parurnount Pictures present :—
spend two weeks’ holiday with | | Wood “Pas a + te os zie ‘ak. <= ae Alan LADD as. . is
Mr. and Mrs. S. E. White « | lhe News; 4.10 pm. The Daily Ser- “CAPTAIN CAREY U.S.A.
1ckley | ce; 4.15 m. Nights at the Opera;
Rockley | p.m ” anitiy MacPherson at the i. HENDRIX — is LEDERER and
Theatre Organ; 5.15 m. Programme ands o) X, Francis LEDEAE!I Ra
Left yesterday Tarade; 5.30 p.m. Scottish Magazine; vena Joseph CALLEIA
FTER a long holiday stayin t p.m. Trent's Last Case, 6.15 p.m ai : 1 Short -
Iona Liter Quartet; 6.30 n€ Extra Musica 4
d \ with her parents Mr. an 3 1ea of a University: 7 p.m. ‘XY hoa “BIG SISTER BLUE Ss
Mrs T. E. McKenzie a },.10 p.m. News Analysis: 7.15—~7.30 Sena a be es sh nn
“Rowans”, St. George, Mrs. Ma ie, Gains, Reports, 2. ve, Sar: . THE: ;
Phillips and her two daughters | Fe Ain “Radio Newarest B15 p.m. The CUAY TUESDAY 4 en a in
4 . >. yesterday after- » Continues; 8.30 p.m. Ken Beau- dA s .30 p.m. & 8.15 p.m.
ee Oe ao eee man ee” Bene he “Shara HH ora Sig ae
Ce 3 ; “kite hy § = he Promenade Concerts; 3 4 ,
Atkinson Field, she will then gee NEES Sewar W018 pin. tutor “SONG OF _ INDIA’
travel over to Berbice where hei Rider se -Ahe Bio. Eee vey ome with
husband is stationed at Bath lTrial and ‘Execution of Charles 1 SABU, Gail Russell, Turhan BEY, Anthony CARUSO
Estate Aminto DYNE
D
Will represent Windward The End O wraeee sox"
Islands Starring :
R. and MRS. SWITHIN E Humphrey BOGART, Alexander KNOX
SCHOUTEN and their daugh- Colum us Sussue HAYAKAWA, Florence MARLY
ter arrived from St, Lucia yes-
terday by B.W.I.A. and expect Sid é
, to be here for one month, stayiny ’ lhe ee Sees ees “tase, 1nd
at Indramer Guest House, Worth- oat vonrEst ae noi sod bs sae Lucky girl “the luckiest in New |teachers have long realised this
ing she says, is Shirley Potash, 23 ssistant t : > é Se |
te she asked for a salar Se daha ane, Sastaai aks Man or tar Gael (re ee roma: ot Snes | TO-DAY 2.30 p.m. & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing at
> s Agricultural a two years ago. Instead she got a small per- | jingles among school-children in E 4.45 NIGHT 8.30 dail
i aR a li a Mr. Schouten is Agr-.c ul {centage of the show “South Pacific’. It has made more money on Broad- | Britain has always been: | MATINEE 4.45 pm. & ; y
Superintendent, St. Lucia and] way than any since the war. Express. In fourteen hundred and ninety-

will be representing the Windward
Islands at the Working Committee
of the Oils and Fats Conferenc

FATHER, MOTHER AND SON—His Excellency the Governor shakes
hands with his son Denis soo n after he arrived at Seawell on Wed
nesday afternoon en route from England. Mrs. Savage smiling happily

looks on. who are holding a meeting her
RRIVING just in time for tho Junior Wile SANGO “Antone See
. ara ; XHE Barbados Junior Dramatic ‘
August races é ) and
Mrs. Conti Fletch - ee pet. (9ae ‘I Club will present two one- After short holiday
from Trinidad yesterday morning “°C! Plays on September Sth at ISS ELAINE EVANS who i:
by B.W.1.A. to spend a month’s '¢ Drill Hail. The plays ar with Booker Bros. in B.G
holiday in Barbados, staying wit! v; oul he Seven Won't Go,’ By returned to Georgetown yesterda,
the Taylors’ in Beach House, St =» o elgud and Stephen King - by B.W.1.A. after a short holi
Lawrence Their two childrer Hal sang . The Sun Goes Down, day in Barbados, staying with M1
Diane and Brian, and Mr y Heanor Fitzgerald. An audition .14 Mrs. L. Hassell.
Fletcher’s mother Mrs. C. Paulik, Wil! be held shortly to select the
accompanied them. players. Seni B.H.S. Supporters!
° . enior
B.G. ‘Racing Commentator FTER reading no less than ISS MARAROE nuosox ||
I ; > passengers ; fifteen plays, the Barbado PHILIPS and Miss Doroths
coe acai ar yopicony Uramatic Club, (Senior Division), Laifook, two Bishop Anstey Higi
ee w e yesterday after have decided that “Blithe Spirit,’ School supporters arrived fro
ei Th ar -A.. ware Mr. and wiii draw full houses in early Trinidad yesterday morning b)
, gf” sloyd Luckhoo and their \ vember. This is a Noel Cowar: B.W.1.A to give their team son
son Edward. Mr. Luckhoo whi hit. ‘verbal’ support from the touc!

is a Barrister at Law
town, is also a keen
B.G.'s radio commentator for the

in George
turfite anc

lines. They are among severa
young Trinidadian girls who hav
up in the past few days t

At Seawell to meet
her brother



come
races. They expect to be in Ba I ITTLE MARGARET BOURNE, be with the team during the)
bados for about ten days stayir 4 who has just arrived from tour.
at the Hotel Royal. England with her parents Mr. and L
Bently Re-unt ,Airs. C. L. Bourne, was with On holiday from Grenada
amily e-union hem at Seawell yesterday to ISS PATRICIA DANIEL,
OME to spend the long holi Oe a mes brother Peter, wh Miss Dorothy Wilson anc
days. with their-two sons) “iived trom 8.G. by B W.I.A. Miss Veronica Weichweg arrived
were Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Kin Peter is at school in B.G. and from Grenada on Wednesday to
> has come over to spend the long spend two weeks’ holiday in Bar-

who with their daughter Kathleen
arrived from B.G,. yesterday b)
B.W.1.A. Their two sons go tu
the Lodge School.

holidays with his parents who are
here until the end of September
Here for a month

bados, staying at the Cosmopoli-
tan Guest House. Miss Daniel
is a Sister at the Colony Hospital







RS. EDWARD WRIGHT in St. George's Grenada and Miss

Mr. King who is with the Sill: arrived from B.G. yesterday Wilson and Miss Weichweg are
Greenheart Lumber Co., in B.G. afternoon by B.W.1.A. to spend hurses at the same hospital
is on six months’ holiday and 4 month’s holiday at Gibbes’
after spending the summer holi- Beach, St. James. Her children <
days they are going up to St accompanied her. They were met e ROSSWORD,
Kitts, where they used to live at the Airport by Mr. and Mrs eTRPT.P .
several years ago. Mrs. King Fred Olton. | | |
a-sister of Mr. Roy Maloney of Her husband, who was in Bar- | , vr

bados a couple of months ago on
holiday is with Bookers in B.G .
and was formerly Manager of
Bookers Drug Store branch here

wer CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it:

AXYDLBAAX
ly LONGFELLO
One letter simply stands for another. In | xample A ig used
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc je letters, apoa-
'

Barbados, and Mr. Cyril Maloney
who is Manager of the Cable &
Wireless Branch in St. Kitts.





trOphies, the length and formation of thc all hints.
ach day the code letters are different.

are







A Cryptogram Quotation Actoes
yptog Q i 1 Want the pilot does at the
r © . 7 4 _ \
Â¥MX LDRP KDX RMPZ D XLEZDF & is this land suery $ (2)
oe 9. Ivan's currency. (6)
KYMTY' EASJX KMLY EDCMQ TYDJIUZ 10. Original copy. (8) 13, Tree. (3)
is pt wey 5008, under. (3)
a , , a. epousition
WESF ESTPX LS ESXZX—CEDZO 1 Genus of plants, (ey 8> '”)
22 oreh, (9)
' Cryptoquote: I FEEL MY FEEBLE: HANDS UN- 24. The odds and ends, (Â¥)
CLASP, AND \SINK DISCOURAGED INTO NIGHT—LONG- eT eee ee
FELLOW, r Down
aa 4 SatnaRaeeene 1. Any good swimmer ts a potentin)
ce LE d J B ‘ Mice. “ey 2. Dollar plan. (3)
< > . >, 4.
ui 4. “Circus” attraction. (4)
Rup per nd the ack- -roon Bois —I3 ee srectig,
, : » Fleet o sce sh (8)
TR 1, Crook, it Reward. (3)
12. Many asta them, (7)
17. Island ‘in the * Med.’ (5).
18. Positions, (5)
20. Contemptuous abbreviation fo:
an inhabitant. (3)
21. Examine. (4)
23. Mountain peak. (3)
Solution of yesterd i p os!
}, Fledgling, 7; Ease: Br’ Games os
Sip; 12, Sul; is, Try; f4, Amen: ic
o 18, Cantab; 13,° Volun
Mutter; 22; R.A.; 23, Lane; 24, Ass
fais ma en Down: L_ Feat va
. ew; 5S, | Pmt >
Gold braid ib Binters; i6, ‘Biba.’ 1
ute. > 7
seutes 20° "hres antua: 16, Coma







In his anxiety lest dhe weird plant

does further damage to his house,
Mr.

PP MASP SSO Re mney

| FREE YOURSELF

<2 from the

.=s5 BONDS OF

CONSTIPATION
with

DR Tey Ty S
LITT od LLS

are as queer as the others,’
Rupert, ‘I'm sure that
has something
get at him,
to the
And, puttir
off with on
over his
RESERVED

the saw and cuts to do with 7
off branch after branch, That seems 5
to discourage the plant and it grows
at the floor boards can
n place. ‘* These leaves
* ALL RIGHTS

Bear runs for a.
so fll take this st

ask him.”
s scarf, he dashes
r branches

Professor and
gon h
e of th
slder



no more, sot
be put back

he





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WASHINGTON, Ata 3 LONDON, August 3 jused on every possible occasion
Acute poliomyelitis (infantile and in every possible game. Now
varalysis) increased in the United Britain’s death rate in 1948, 11|however, with the increasingly
States last week with 964 cases persons for every 1,000, was the |large part that radio plays in our
eported, compared with 827 for lowest ever recorded, the Regis- | lives, the jingle has changed. Dick
he preceding week, the Public trac General’s Statistical Review | Bentley, one of the comedians of |
Tealth Service said to-day howed on Thursday. Cancer ac-|'he BBC’s popular Variety pro- |
So far this year 6 067 cases have counted for 6.9 per cent of deaths|cramme, “Take It From Here,
“een notified compared with 8,202 as compared with 15.1 in 1947 and | has apparently superseded Colum- |
ast year Reuter 13.9 in 1938.—Can. Press, bus in the children’s estimation. A



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Col bus sailed the ocean blue af fi
Wherever ‘one. went. UL tae a ea
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i MOTION PICTURE LIKE, ...

children |
|

llistener has written to the BBC's
\official magazine, the “Radio
|Times” to say that in the play-
ground he heard the following:
In 1942, in 1942,

Bentley sailed a canoe

| He struck a rock, the clumsy
| clot.

That was a good one, was it not?
The writer suggests that per-
| haps the children feel that Dick
Bentley is as ancient as the rhyme
more commonly used!

CAT UP A TREE

Mickey’s cat climbed up a tree,
Which was sixty feet and three;
Every day she climbed eleven,
Every night she came down seven.
Tell me, if she did not drop,
When her paws would touch the
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WF It Sutureurar ayy payunour ays
cep Wel ayy uo UuayL ‘9an ey) dn “y)
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Tonguc Twister
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PLAZA Fri., Sat., Sun., 5 & 830 p.m. And still insists he sees the! A Powell-Pressburger Production
ghosts, | An Eagle Lion Films Release
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ie cally ghoti. That is. gh as in!
rough, o as in women, ti as in
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With that as a clue, can you say =
6 DOROTHY MALONE what well-known English ex- : vanalll
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Miss COLLEEN ASHBY Singing —Those Foolish Things”
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iisDAY, AUGUST 4, 1950.

Three Men Lift |

Germans Will
The Brick Relieve U.S. Forces

LONDON, Aug, 3.

.
. ‘<> A Foreign Office spokesman 7 .
From History said to-day that Amelaans |Were The following letter to the], Slowly but surely, the new
among a small force of oe —" Times was publishea| 50uth is overcoming two of its
"cs A with rifles to release United States | "UY 9- greatest problems — poverty anc
But It's A Very Slow Job | with riftes to release United | SIR.—I was, greatly interested | ignorance,
Thou wall, O. wall! © sweet and| He said there were 10,000 in the recent debate at the Im-|_ The two go hand in hand

lovely wall! Police in the Western Zones of
—A Midsummer Night's Dream.| Germany, These were armed
with revolvers and came under
Two years’ work on a 40ft. wall] control of the local governments
will finish at the end of this year In addition to this there were
—maybe. The wall, built of|/some Germans and _ displaced
flint, Kentish rag and Chilmark in three Zones used for
stone, runs white and clean, a5} guarding food, . supplies and
if it has been built .yesterday,| military dumps. force was
northwards from the soot-black-| called the Civil Mixed Watch-
ened Wakefield Tower, built in} men’s Corps and came
the Tower of London ‘in 1221. | the control of Allied Authorities.
Yeu it is one of the most ancient The American decision was to
= of the ate tr, London | arm these watchmen with rifles.
wor “A huilt it.700, years 2£0-| "Phe spokesman said he could not
neient Ra e state whether similar action was
Its four-foot thickness is pierced]to be taken in the British Zone

by cight arrow slits, where|'There were 10,000 displaced
medieval bowmen, | crouching! persons in the Watchmen’s Corps
under the strong round arches]j;, the British Zone.—Reuter.
which .still curve proudly over : ;

them, could rain arrows on their
enemies when it formed the west



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



| THE COLONTAL
| PRESS

By Malcol



perial Press Conference on the|Poverty has bred . ignorance.
shortcomings of the colonial Press, | 18norance in turn has bred preju-
and espec ally so of the West| ‘ice, conflict and other evils bur

African Press. With no first-| dening the South.
hand knowledge of the West On this point Ralph McGill,
African Press,.1 am unable. to| hard-hitting, Liberal Editor of th

refute the charges of the Com- Atlanta Constitution, says:
munistic tendencies; but, so far| “In its most poverty-stricken
as the West Indian Press jis/ counties one finds the most hide-
concerned, I may say that luke- bound political thinking, the most
warm .Liberal'sm is the nearest|Corrupt county government an
approach to,Communism§ in 99|Justice, the most friction and
g A well-informed Press and at-| drag on the South’s general pro-
tractively presented news sheets] gress.”

jcan only be attained when well-| Coincident with its economic
trained staff and adequate finan-|development, the South is makin,
cial backing are bolstered up by impressive gains in educating its
a desire on the part of the Gov-| people. But here, as in other
ernments of the various colonies| fields, it still lags behind the rest
to help the Press. At the present] of the nation, It is making pro-
moment none of these is available| gress, but still has a long way to
to the Colonial. Press, There is a} 80.






side of the Inner Bailey of the U.S Did go'den opportunity now to en-| In 1941, for example, of some
ee dee i =" Not Need courage at-least. two of these} 350,000 draft registrants who
Until a bomb fe’ in the great ° , _ {very necessary ads to good jour-|could not sign their names, nine
City raids of December 1940 To Bribe France | nalism . out of ten were Southerners. And
nobody knew that the wall ‘ There is an ingrained belief in|six of the nine illiterate South-
existed. The bomb. demolished Says N.Y. Times this country. that journalism|erners were negroes.

an ugly Victorian barrack of red
brick and stone, known as the NEW YORK, Aug. 3.
Main Guard. 7 The United States did not need
Before the war, soldiers of the|to bribe Franco to become its
regiment guarding the Towerjally the New York Times said
drank tea, played darts inside./to-day in an editorial commenting
Tourists hurried past on_theirj|on the Senate’s grant of a $100,-
way fromm the Bloody Tower] 000,000 loan to Spain ;
witheut a glance. The Senate is going i
7 . ng against an
But besides destroying the|/“almost universal condemnation

Main Guard, the bomb tore] of , i
part of the brick facing from {irs Gomes’ eet ie ae.

a wall which had been incor-j clared ees ee
Experi at the Muniry ot goes, rer april
> inistry Of!that Franco is Anti-Communist

Works recognised the inner wall :
as being part of the ancient ram- Peart
part which stood there in the
days of King Henry III. And
they put their expert masons on

has great. strategic
value from the military view-
point.
“Spain always arouses strong
the job: eee Cone, but it poulds be ad-
Fe sable to | consider e issue
rein tring Left ot calmly, If our military leaders
of these men, specialists| say Spain is necessary to a proper

in the craft of “ancient. monu-
+ , e:
ment pointing.’”’ have been at tei Midas ee nig ili

work there (intermittently, for
they have had to attend to other “However it should be obvious
jobs as well) for the past two|we do not need to bribe Franco
years, painstakingly picking off|to become our ally. He has no
the Victorian crust of ugly brick} choice in the possible war—not
and modern stone, to reveal the even neutrality—for this time
nolle old wall beneath. instead of having a friendly
Now, only the last few yards} Hitler, he would have Stalin to
van en oy to be treated] contend with
still support a cat’s cradle of] “Tt j s i
tubular scaffolding. When that Pavtisth seen tome 7 =
comes down the full extent of | Franco saved by Reeetas help.

the old wall will be revealed. is sti i i
tinh tn Giabien oF'stm ae There is still time to defeat the

the wall is the 65-year-old fore- fe euit y ow pecetony nope
man who for 35 years has looked ne See ee
after London's ancient monu-



ments. One of his greatest tasks
-~-the House of Commons.

H> showed. me how the wall
had been “consolidated” by the
old method of grouting by pour-
ing in the mortar, instead of by
the pressure process.

No Imitation

Egypt Approves
“Watch Dog” Plan

q CAIRO, Aug. 3,
The Independent Newspaper El

“we never ade. , Ahram to-day quoted Egyptian
away, never tes Wy Wicks ot Foreign Of Po Paaea. es saying
restoring.” he. said. “We simply that the United States was to ask
remove. all ‘the eianenbe. scum the Security Council to establish

a Committee fram member states

and leave the old building as it|to take up posts in various coun-



—Reuter.







is. Ifa piece of st ;
ie rentite’ it Bh ner wees tries and report on any threatened
rather leave a gap than put back i. ee i
some imitation of the real thing.” | tri He, SOUNGIE WOU SESESE COUT
Tha top,at the ekposed wall tries concerned in order to facili-
has been. treated with. a special tate the work of the Committee.
renkraue Nf The paper added Egypt had ap-
prep: ion to prevent weeds i
sprouting ‘on tt s proved | the American plan for
these “watch dogs” to be placed
e ae ea other countries
: which might be threatened with
13 Arrested ey ems by Communist Russia.”
: 4 gyptian political observers, El
In Peace Rally Ahram said, believe that Turkey,
Greece and Yugoslavia will ap-
NEW YORK, August 3. prove of the plan which is expect-
Two thousand Left Wing peace |@4 to include Persia,
marchers banned from staging a
rally In Union Square battled 1,000
police ante on Wednesday in fist-
swinging brawls that led to 13
ple eno aere waited W. German Exports
until the homegoing rush hour to a %
make their defiant move. “We Jump By 57%
avant peace. Open up the Square.” iW
the marchers chanted as they FRANKFURT, Aug. 3,
formed ranks. Union Square 14 West German exports during
miles south of Times Square, is|the first half of this year at
the traditional scene of New |$778,400,000 were 57.2% above
York soapbox oratory. When | those for the first half of 1949 the
mounted police bore down on the|Economic Co-operation Special
demonstrations they shouted “cos- | Mission to West Germany reéport-
sack”. —(CP). ed to-day.
‘ones ee eae aan largely
: e result of increased trade with
Ti $ |other world areas, allowin,
Ss, g for
ickets For Church! decreased purchases from dollar
VATICAN CITY, Aug. 3, areas the report said.
Lithuanian Catholics need a —Reuter.
Government ticket costing about Oe linia
ee ert a time they, f° to Cz < >
church, according to a atican Ww
— ees ag a echs ill Sull
aiming that the Catholic pop-
mo, had -c persecuted since Get R u bder
thuania with Latvia and Estonia
was incorporated in the Soviet] ¢ FEAGUE, ees
Union ducing the war the report zechoslovakia will continue to
listed conditions on which its re- Schon Gata’ comenene atth
maining churches can function. the Netherlands and the United

(1) A distance of at least 5 miles | States of Indonesia, it was dis-

closed on Wednesday night,
P.)

must separate each two churches,

(2) Collections for church re-
pairs are prohibited.

(3) Special permission must be
obtained for singing hymns and
chants.

(4) Services may be he!
in the early morning.

—Reuter.

New Oil Refinery

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON.

A further stage in the con-
struction of the new Middle East
Crude refinery at Stanlow,
Cheshire, has been reached with
the completion of the 341 foot
high concrete cooling tower—the
largest of its kind in the world—-
and the installation of three large
spherica) storage tanks,

These steel “ball” tanks, the
first to be erected in any United
Kingdom oil refinery, measure 35
feet in diameter and were de-
signed by a British firm for the
storage under pressure of butane
— one of the many products,
already flowing from this new
Shell refinery which came into
operation last November.

Some of the main units at the
new Stanlow refinery are already
working — the No. 1 distillation
unit, now in continuous opera-
tion at a capacity of 1,000,000
tons per annum, has been sup-
plemented recently by a large

—(C,

1d only

What's on Today

Police Courts 10 a.m.

Court of Appeal and Petty
Debt Court 10 a.m.

Mobile Cinema at Wiltshire
Playfield, St. Philip 8 p.m.



H .E. the Governor opens
Bay Street Boys’ Club
6 p.m.

Port Workers
On Strike

WELLINGTON, Aug. 3.
All major New Zealand ports
came to a standstill on Thursday
as branches of the Waterside

work in sympathy with a week-
long Auckland watersiders dis-
pute over tea breaks.—(C.P.)



PARIS, Aug. 3.
to-day described - as

unit is well advanced and work | Agency reports that a det
















Workers Union decided to stop

Reports‘Unfounded’

A usually reliable source here
: “without
reforming plant, No, 2 distillation |foundation” the American News
achment

cannot be taught successfully. in The 1940 census showed, more-
an academ‘e and. practical man-| over, that nearly six out of every
ner at a university. And while} 100 Southerners had never gone
I fully agree that there is no]to school, compared to three, or
guarantee that the product of a]3.1 per cent, for the rest of the
journalistic school will be a tal-| U.S. Eighteen out of every 100
ented and facile writer, yet hejadults in the South had droppect
will at least, avoid the pitfalls of}out of school, before reaching the
the uninitiated, and will haye},Fifth Grade, compared with less
learned to sift and select. news}than seven (6.9 per cent.) for
and to present it attractively. He|the rest of the nation.

will also have learned that the} The record showed that only
duty of the Press is to uphold] one of ten adults in the South had








“The New South”













Their Millionth
Bag Of Sugar

KINGSTON, July

| North Koréa’s
Oil Supplies

}
|
|
}

m Johnson

is still grinding

Americans are recruiting over
900 Toamaican farm workers bring-
ing the total to over 800 for the

the North Koreans. i neir lines of
communication are under constan: |
air attack and, this, may prove to
be a decisive factor in the outcome |

began working out arrangement
with colleges and institutrons in
the area which could supply suc:



Under, contracts the siat /of the war. Something of the | Past two months.—(C.P.)
ought education from the ins. | cafficulty the invaders will en- N t eS b <
tution. These contracts provid.;¢Ounter in supplying theiy ar- i
that the state pay the institution|â„¢moured columns with oil can be oe uUOMaTINeSs
$1,500 a year per student for/judgei from the following articie CANBERRA, Aug. 3,

medical and dental training,
$1.000 a year per student for
veterinary training. The student
pays no out-of-state fees.

Navy Minister, Josiah Francis
on Thursday emphatically denied
reports that foreign submarines
had been sighted off the Austra-

Wha. appears in the current
issue of Petroleum Press Service:

Though possibly subject to tem-
porary difficulties of s.orage, pack-

Thus for a few thousand dol-|aginu, or local transport, South lian coast. The Sydney Sun pub-
lars a year a state gets access to aj Kore: and the United ‘Nations lished such a report. attributed it
school which would cost’ $3|rorces fighting with her, are as-| @:Sficial sources d said it was
million or $4 million to build. ie La possible that the submarines were

sured of ampie ou supplies, What
as the oil position for the Nortn
Koreans? They have been using a
considerable nuniver of tanks, and
although the distance so far tra-
versed has not been great, and has
not involved any extensive sweeps
on Supply lines sucna as character-
ized tne use of arm-ur in, World
War IT. considerable quantities of
motor fuel and lubricants. are
necessary to keep armoured forces

Russian. The statement from
Francis said New Guinea civilians
early in May reported twice they
sighted what they thought were
submarines “but after investiga-
tions the claim was not confirm-
| ed.”~—(CP)

The institution gets the additional
income, The student gets the
needed training which otherwise
would have been unavailable.
The participating states for this
biennium (1949—51) invested
$1.5 million in the regional pro-
gramme, Last fall 388 students, of
whom 181 were negro, were en-
rolled in participating institutions.
* The Board of Control, estab-
lished last year, administers the

The West Indies Sugar Company,

,and dentistry. from Our London Correspondent Tate & Lyle Subsidiary, bagged
Some states had no medica LONDON, the millionth bag of sugar, making
schools at all. Some lacked facii- THE, difficulty of supplying their! 100,000 tons for the season |
ies for dental training, or veier forward troops wili become a|_ The Money Musk, the largest
inary medicine, The Counci,}â„¢atter of increasing concern to factory in the British West Indies, |

Something You

PAGE THREE



| "Quake In Mexico

MEXICO CITY
trong eartha

ng







{Mexico City « i
cay but there were
reports of damage of
harm (C.P.)
y .
More Cardinals
ROME, Aug. 3
Pope Pius is expected to
vacancies in the Sacred Colleg
of Cardinals, bringing it up t ts
full strength ot 70 at a Consistor
late this year Reuter.
LUXURY,
Cuticura Taleum Po
makes a delightfully
-cooling and
finish to your hath, even

on the hottest day.
the skia es soft as ode

—and ends ag = aa
Sreesign. Use ticura
and complete

Soa
the Tamusy !







Will Appreciate

funds from the ticipat' in action. The needs must also be
Man sek makin pereogte te Os met. of whatever ‘aircraft. ond |i}, laADIaB) PLASTIC BAINCOATE. all since @. $2.90 each.
institution . no st transport are ting wR AR bo PRINTED LINGERIE @ 0c. per Yd.

e Control Board’s director is |"? oyed. G. INE in Emerald Green, Pink, Ked, Gold, Lime Green
Dr, John E. Ivey Jr., brilliant Indispensable Needs and White @ $1.30 per yd,
20-year-old professor from the Accumulated stocks will have SHANTUNG in Blue, Rose, Cream, Pink & Gold @ $1.16 per yd.
University of North Carolina, enabled the North Koreans jo 1950 STYLES LADIES SHOES in White, Black & Brown Suede

The Regional programme is to continue the momentum of their
be extended to the fields of/*uxprise attack, But will they, as
nursing, forestry and social wel-/ their communications, southwards
fare studies. Later needs .n//engthen, be able to maintain, oi
library training will be brought) Supplies to meet, the indispensable

Prices
Also DRESSES, S















from $11.36 to $12.37 —Cuban Heels,
UNSUITS, SHORTS & SLACKS Ete,, Ete.






*! a into the programme, The antire | heeds in the areas of southern s =a SSS Ser SS ;
eer ee ee ae em Ria ry men » a, ae mt ce field of cadaive study hk hign| Korea they occupy, and still be x SPOS SPSS PECL EEL 4
J. suggest that as the colonial) cent had high school education. priority. ; « ;/oble to maintain. efficient armoured |.¢ x
Press has no provincial Press from} Prodded by court decisions and Critics at first viewed the; forces — when they become . en-| mM | Ss
whom it can attract experienced by their own consciences, South- —— setup as Ringe 4 ae Te feng a —— fight journalists an experiment in ; triving man- petuating segregation in educa-) must soon develop? s . . els .
teaching journalism. at an... ac~ eet tine i be rication facili. |tion. The Board has refuted this) There are no oil resources x (Inc. in British Guiana) %
credited university might solve]tjes for the big negro population view. Its chairman Millard Cald-!either in North or South Korea | “ . = i " ~
many of the problems which], the same, time raising the | Well, former Governor of Florida, | But each territory has a refinery.| X ‘ a i %
seem to be giving so many mem-| standards for the whites as well points out that the ques- |The refinery in the north is at e x
bers of Parliament food for] School budgets are being tion of segregation is for the state|Gensen (adjacent to Wonsan) on|'\ © : %
thought. Why not begin in West] increased throughout the South to decide, that the board is mere- | the east coast, and about 150 miles}.% x
Africa? Why not institute chairs|,nq the region, through industry ly an instrument of the several north east of Seoul with which it} x
of journalism in. the three new] ang agriculture, enjoys a larger | States, serving the region. It can-| is connected by rail, Its capacity} i x
universities there with post-| measure of prosperity. not have a policy for or against) before the second World War was x AL UM! NUM W. ARE »
graduate scholarships to Great) Jy Georgia, for instance, school segregation, he says, but must | bout 250,000 tons. In 1946 it was] 1 [ L y x
Britain? I am confident that appropriations increased. from |S¢rve states with differing poli-' described as worn out and obso- x g
a ee ret — * only] 14.4 million in 1938 to $50.° Fort mist esis aoe in lete Even if the refining plant has| ° $
too willing to help the colonies i ‘ _The Southern Regional Educa-|pot been rehabilitated the tank- . . . ¥
by giving the a ee ee er ebmndion the South epee ea slroay has ee age has probably abwrind ry aia % DOMESTIC WARE in a wide variety ¥
every facility to gain practical]is engaged in a unique and suc- | Pationa impact. ner sections} recent communique from Tokyo ‘ x
experience im, all branches of seuss epartinameee programme ridutity a sree are} stating that a refinery has been]}‘ DIAMOND WARE 1S approved by the %
jo ism and newspaper pro- : study plans for developing| pomb h amvis % P %
—. pi otasaene pon started by | Similar programmes. eae a hip pant, The | * Good Housekeeping Institute. x
If thete are fe any, who oo the Governors of the various se ear nae Por refinery in South Korea. is at $ %
the wisdom of providing univer~ thern States in 1947, the edu- anc 1 considerNs | Ulsan the st coast about 50 f ¢
sity courses in journalism, and of cational ‘resourees of the States|Such a programme. Six new Eng-| riles neal oan of “poshh,, the SAUCEPANS, PRY PANS, COFFEE $
giving journalism the status of a| are pooled. Funds are adminis- |land states have already formed | main U.S supply port in. the PERCOLATORS KETTLES EGG- x
profession, then they will be|tered by a board of control for |New England Educational Coun-| south, es Y | , ' x
convinced if they look no farther! Southern Regional Education . ell . =i . ; This refinery was in course of f OACHERS, OMELET PANS. g
than the United States. I sin-|" Fourteen states signed a com- Dr. Ivey and his. staff associ-| section when Japan surrendered g
cerely trust it will be realized) .¢ to share in higher educa~ ates talk with enthusiasin of the] ‘nd in the last Southern Korean %
bat i ha Re ian im tional facilities on a contract Pi eee a budget a sum of 260 million Won x NS
appoint a Roya hich both whites } fee i just beginning, y Nees | n
examine the workings of the Ter bance Waa that its potentialities for the og gam ~ 44 vat alloc ‘a0 % FOR ‘CONSISTENT SATISFACTION 2
Colonial. Press and to make/""%. iting through mountains. of South’s are almost limitless. 1A Ce Ment a eal Sty ‘te x %
recommendations to remedy its| 4 tape and without precedent “Our job,” says Dr, Ivey with nA ts vs capacity ss % BUY g
ills. The diagnosis is evident and to guide them, the Southern Gov- quiet determination, “is to build) | 7 Wes 100,00 J; er 5 ee a x ; 5 %
Te een ae ray, ernors made the Regional Coun- {20 educational system ‘within the ean ast vier. which, wale e 4 >
Yours faithfully, ” hip, with ;South second to none.” ; : PA oh . DIAMOND BRAND ALUMINUM WARE bY
C.&. L. GALS ch bracts Pe ig on. the ‘board He said one of the biggest jobs|be adequate, for supplying. the| ss x
The West Indian Club, from each participating state. betweenmnow and 1953 will be ajWhole of Southern Korea's needa eeesons on ae a ie ane
4 Wigtensll Court, The Regional Council, with state-by-state survey seeking an ol petrolown Fo si COLL LOE LLL ADLLL LILI
S.Wsls» 7 answer to the questions, What ne see SSS SSS
headquarters in Atlanta, decided . There are two main sources from | ee nt ee cn

that the South’s greatest higher
education needs, to meet the
demands of an expanding indus-
try and livestock production, were
in medicine, veterinary medicin®

Bahamas
Legislature
Prorogued

NASSAU, Bahamas, Aug. 2
Last night Governor Sir George
Sandford prorogued the Legisla-
ture ait November 17. He
revealed that during the first six
months of this year, the Bahamas
sold over $1,000,000 in exchange
with the United Kingdom .
During the same period last year
they bought nearly $1,600,000 from
the Pool. The reversed position
was largely the result of heavy
summer tourist travel to Nassau
and Butlin’s vacation village,
Grand Bahama.

Travel to the col
mer, May to July in
over same

———
15 Years’ Service
Not Enough For
ee a ee
Maximum Salary
A motion by Mr. Miller asking |

that all Parochial employees who

have been in the service for 15

years or more, and were not re-

ceiving their. maximum salary
should be raised to the maximum
as had ‘been done with other
employees, Was postponed after

a brief discussion m the St. Mi-

chael Vestry yesterday.

Some mmenbet felt that the
standing form of a certain amount
of increment for each year un-
til the maximum was reached
should stand and they should
make no hurried decision then.

Mr. Miller said that he did not
think his motion was controver~-
sial, ‘The Vestry has ereated a
precedent by allowing employees
who had even years’, service
to be put to their maximum. He
was, Por putting forward any
original idea, but was only point-
ing out that the other men who
had given 15 years’ service should
also be put in that line. Such
was but equitable and just and
he was advocating nothing that
could meet with their disap-
proval,

To do otherwise would be to
create dissatisfaction,

The Hon, V. C, Gale said that
they should stick to their sys-
tem of increments and should not
jump on any haphazard call, for
a maximum,


























ony this surn-
creased 215
period last

‘© Governor also foreshad-
ive agricultural en-
lands

Th

ith
watiuce imports of foodstuffs from

dollar areas . and make the
Bahamas a food-exporting coun~
try, —(€P).

LONDON STOCK
MARKET FIRM

LONDON, August 3.
tancy attend-
Wall



Salaries Committee

They used to have people ap-
pointed ta deal. with salaries and
after it bappened that year af-
ar after a revision had been
there was still a long list
of applicants asking for increases,
the Vestry decided on a basis of
salaries and increments. .

Tf everytime that someone pre-
sented g complaint, imaginary
or otherwise, they were to be
troubled in that way, the main
idea that they had aimed at when
they decided on a basis would
have been useless. They could
not be expected to give snap
votes for such a matter then. He

don S
firmness to-day. Sentiment was
assisted by the trend of events
Korea and the build up of
United States reinforcements.
Domestic stock recorded small
widespread improvements but
the most interest was in overseas
fssues, In the foreign section,
German loans advanced on specu
lative buying, and switching 0+
interest to these brought frac-

was. ler nan than Mr. Mill-| tional losses to Japanese loans.
er and he would counsel him to} Tin share prices were marked
go into it My as it pre-|higher on news of United King-

sented a tremendous lot of diffi-
culties. The matter brought back
to one the old days and the way
in which 5 were sometimes
given jobs in the parochial ser-

. Mottley said that if Mr.
Miller’s sta ts had , been
correct, he would haye supported
them, but they were incorrect
If_he had there and had
asked for the ruling with regards
to. people who had served for 20
years.or more, he would have
supported him, He po af have ,
done that because it would have Bank

had to Bee r the church- Strike

oe pie Some. Bee BUENOS AIRES, Aug. 3.
ple up to the maximum and had| private banking activity came
created a precedent, He assured|to g virtual , standstill here on
Mr, Miller that if he came back |Thursday following an increase in

dom and United States talks on
stockpiling. Rubber shares reflect-
ed an uptrend in the price of
rubber.

Despite some profit-taking, the
oil share market closed with the
majority of small improvements.
Renewed United States buying of
Kaffair developers vig Cape was
reported, The section closed very
firm with useful rises in select-
ed issues.

—Reuter.



has begun on the installation of jof French troops was about to be with a revision of his motion he |strikes among bank servants for

the catalytic cracking plant. sent to Korea. —Reuter.

would get his support. higher pay.—Can. Press.











































can the South be if we use the
human and material resources we
have? What educational machin-
ery do we need to develop and
use these resources? —I.N.S

Flashlight

For School
Inspector

ST. JOHNS,
Mr. A. C. G. Palmer, Federal
Education Officer in the Leeward
Islands for the past six years has











which Northern Korean forces
may now get oil supplies. The
nearer is Manchuria where, in the
district of Fughun, both oil-from-
{coal and shale oil are produced, {
;and the latter refined, No recent

information is available as to the} |
scale of production but there ere
large resources of coal and shale
in this area. ‘There is no rail con-
nection from nearby Mukden right
down to Seoul—about 400 miles--
on to Pusan a further 250 mile
south, It has been reported that
during the Japanese occupation of
Manchuria, natural crude was
also being produced, but output is
believed to be negligible, Also, in
Manchuria there are coastal oil
storage plants at Dairen and Ying-
kow on the northern edge of the



a

As the Manufacturers hav



















Grenada via Barbados to take up
as Education Offi-
r of Schools

ice the only point on the west coast
capable of receiving supplies by
tenkers, but in ships not exceeding,
5.000 d.w. tons

The second nearby source ayail-
able to the North Koreans is Sak-
halin, now entirely territory of the
U.SS.R., and believed to be pro-
ducing from three-quarters to one
million tons of crude gil a year.
Also there is an oil refinery at
Nikolsk in Siberia, a short dis-
tance north of Viadivostock, There
ie a rail connection from Gensan
northwards into Manchuria, But
the railway route in Korea may be
precarious as it skirts the east
coast and is subject to bombard-
ments from the sea well as
from the air.

So long as the North Koreans
receive the support of their north-
ern neighbours, their oll supply
problem appears, at the moment
to be mainly one of maintaining
land and sea communications, of
storage, and of transporting sup-
plies forward to the front, The
overwhelming air strength that, is
now being brought against them
must make these tasks increasingly
aiffiev lt

——

Mixed Farming

Smithers asked the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies
what action has been taken, to
develop the Central Experimen'
Station, Trinidad, in view of the

his appointment
cer and senior Inspecto
in that island,

Saar ene eecen

Our Consumers are asked
utmost economy in the use of

} Pp: ‘a stay in An-
During Mr, Palmer's stay in the Peak period between 6.30 a

tigua fourteen new schools have
been built all of which provide for
practical subjects in the senior
department. Mr. Palmer has seen
to it that the standard in second-
ary schools has been raised from
that of School Certificate to High-
er Certificate.

In 1946 the National Milk bev~-
erage scheme, and reinforced
yeast biscuits were introduced into
schools in Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and Anguilla. Most of the
new schools are in areas which
were never served with schools
before, and some are already
showing signs of being overcrowd-
ed. Undoubtedly, the Leewards
are passing through a phase of
educational reform, Mr. Palmer
came here and found conditions at
rock bottom and has laid a sound
foundation for the future of these
islands the results of which can-
not be seen for years.

Mr. Palmer introduced Visual
Education and generously devoted
a great deal of his time to organ-
ising film shows throughout the
couatryside of islands which had
never before seen a reel. Films
and apparatus which were loaned
by the British Council have pro-
vided a splendid entertainment
especially to those in the minor
islands such as Barbuda, Anguilla
and Tortola.

20th June, 1950.

INC.

Mir.

Mr. Palmer was arbitrator re-| unsatisfactory state of | affairs
sponsible for the “Inquiry into the revealed in the Department ot
Labour Disturbances of 1948. In| Agriculture Report for 1948

1949 he was awarded the M.B.E. 7} paragraph 142 In all the various styles for

Mr. J. Griffiths; Provision for}
the development of the Central
Experiment Station in Trinidad
has been included in a Colonial
Development and Welfare Scheme
for an Agricultural Experimental!
Station which 1 approved in
March, 1950 The purpose of
this scheme is the development
of more stable systems of agri-
culture on a mixed farming basis, |
and investigation into the yield of|
crops so grown in order to improve |
the standard of living of thy
agricultural worker, The total |
cost of the scheme will be}
£158,750, towards which His}
Majesty’s Government are con-
tributing £82,917. It is expected
that the station will come into full}
operation in 1952.

In appreciation of his autstand-
ing achievements in these islands
the Antigua Teachers’ Association
presented their director with a
souvenir leather case for valuable
papers hand painted with a scene
of Antigua and the famous pine-
apple crest along with a scroll

The Antigua Education Depart-
ment also showed their grateful-
ness to Mr. Palmer by presenting
him with a flashlight “as remin-
iscent of the light which by your
work and personality you have
shed on the field of Education in
the Colony and also as symbolic
of the light which will continue to
radiate from your life as you
further climb the Ladder of Suc-
cess” say Mr. P. W. A. Gordon
Inspector of Schools.

in attracti

NOTICE

just completed inspection visits to Gulf of Liaotung, from which our Engines can. no longer be delayed, the
St. Kitts, Nevis and Anguilla, He | supplies could be shipped. to consequence had to put this G
left Antigua on Wednesday for} Korea. Inchon, the port of Seoul, commission and, owing to the

available as a result, may find it necessary to shed load at
intervals during the next few months.

WILLIAM FOGARTY Lib.

JUST ARRIVED = ~-

A new shipment of

Maiden-Form
BRASSIERES

Of further interest is the arrival of

CONGOLEUM and LIN OLEUM
SQUARES

Make your choice at



BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LTD.

e¢ decided that repairs to one of
Company has in
encrating Set (900 K-W.) out of
reduction of standby Plant now

SO

to co-operate by exercising the
Electricity, particularly during
nd 8.30 p.m. until further notice.

Vv. SMITH,
General Manager.

in B. G.

everyday and Evening wear,

ve designs

FOGARTY’S }

eee =





:

ome

eo ee

PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS 4 ADVOGATE

5S e- - S P cee
Printed by the Advorate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.
——$—$—$—$—

Friday, 1950



August 4,



“At Tenerife, the largest of the Canary
Islands, I saw an Annual Procession of
children walking up the cultivable
side of the mountain. They were !ed by
priests and nuns and each child carried
a tree he or she was going to plant. That
was good teaching.”

—C. B.

TREES

WITH the minimum of discussion the
House of Assembly passed on Tuesday a
resolution for $1,600 to enable the Director
of Science and Agriculture to extend the
work of tree propagation. The original
estimate was for the sum of $4,500 but this
was reduced and the new amount will now
be considered by the Legislative Council.

There can be little doubt that the funds
will be granted and the work of propaga-
tion started as soon as possible. But it is
for the general public in whose interest the
money is being spent to make the fullest
use of the work done.

This island which is essentially agricul-
tural needs many more trees than are at
present left standing. The prevention of
erosion and land movements, the attraction
of rain and the percolation of the soil after
rains form only part of the benefit to be
derived from a good tree population. And
it is alarming that so many trees of varying
species could have been destroyed without
any attempt having been made to replace
at least some portion of them.

The Cultivation of Trees Act 1950 pro-
vided for the payment of a small sum to
land owners who planted trees on their
lands. The difficulty in this was that of
propagation. Many people would be willing
to plant casuarina trees but were unable
to grow them. The Director of Agriculture
who is charged with the duty of “promo-
ting the interest and development of arbor-
culture” has now recommended that these
funds be granted to provide the necessary
pots and other equipment for growing
trees and, according to him, for caring
them until they are strong enough to be
replanted without dying.

In years past Arbor Day in this island
saw the interested few apply to the De-
partment of Science and Agriculture for
a few citrus plants. In future Arbor Day
should evidence a new awakening to the
need for trees and a realisation of the bene-
fit to be derived from planting them in an
agricultural community. Trees nourish
life and the Good Earth which produces
food.

Boys’ Day

FRIDAY, August 4, 1950 will be a red
letter day in the history of club life and
in the lives of many of the youth of this
island. Today the Bay Street Boys’ Club
will be opened by the Governor and a be-
ginning will be made in the attempt to
bring a new ray of sunshine into the lives
of the children of the poor.

Social services in this island have been
left mainly to the zeal and untiring energy
of a few individuals but in the case of the
Boys’ Club the community effort is more
likely to ensure success.

It is good to find that a number of indi-
viduals have consented to serve one eve-
ning in each month as supervisor of the
Club. A look at the list published yester-
day will show that the individuals repre-
sent many interests and so the boys of the
club will benefit from the collective knowl-
edge of their “uncles.” It is a service which
will not bring Royal awards but which
nevertheless is evidence of a sense of civic
responsibility.

The Boys too will be able to enter a club
which is theirs and in which they will have
a chance to develop latent talents of good
citizenship.

This is the first internal effort at youth
welfare of this kind; and it is the duty of
the public to give it every encouragement
either financially or by way of service to
their less fortunate brethren. It is only
the first of many Clubs which are needed
throughout the island.

OUR READERS SAY

—_—_—_—_—-—
Ear Strain

To, The Editor, The Advocate,

IR,—I have seen in your columns again where
now Mr. G. H. Adams, leader of the Government
blames the press for making an inaccarate version
of a statement he had made at the last meeting
when speaking on two bills on the Order Paper,
on the first occasion it was His Honour the Act-
ing Chief Justice (Mr. G. Taylor) in some case
on the last sessions; and now it’s Mr, Adams.

Before such charges are made Sir, in my opinion
there should be better facilities, and accommoda-
tion made for these reporters who have to strain
their ears to fear what has been said, as it sur-
prises me how they manage to get a proper re-
port at all with such inconveniences; and soft
voice lecturers.

Sometime ago I suggested loud speakers were

necessary, both in the courts, and in the House.
Why not instal them?

L. B. CLARKE.
Tudor Bridge,
St. Michael.
Cricket Gift
To, The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—After such great success of our cricket-
ers, some one should give a portion of land as 2
dedication to make a well equipped cricket field
for poor boys who would love to be cricketers

This should come from anyone far or near who
has W.I. interest at heart.
Cricket is indeed the game nearest and dearest
to our hearts.
WELL-WISHER,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

(18 YRS.

| What British Schoolboys
Are Taught

A Schoolboy Writes On

The future of the Hritish Colonial Empire in General.
with special reference to the West Indies.

BY ROGER BARBER

Newent Grammar Sehool,

7 MONTHS)

Gloucestershire,

PRIZE-WINNING ENTRY IN THE OVERSEAS LEAGUE ANNUAL EMPIRE ESSAY

in these disturbing times, it is
perhaps difficult to see a certain
future for anything. It is hard
to imagine a secure state arising
from the unrest and politica:
strife present in the world to-
day: and at times, we must con-
fess, the further progress of our
British Colonial Empire appears
likely to be fraught with much
danger and great obstacles.

Some schools of opinion do not
help matters by regarding the
Empire as something of which
Britain ought to be ashamed,
rather than something of which
she ought to be most inordinately
proud; they would take advan-
sage of immediate colonial diffi-
culties to cut the painter and
‘liberate’ the people of our over-
seas territories. They would give
them self-government regardless
of whether the time is ripe,
vather than pursue an unspec-
acular policy of patience and
sersistence.

They seem to forget that the
-olonial Empire consists of coun-
ries which possess indigenous
caces. The Dominions are dom-
nions simply because their in-
iabitants are ‘chips off the old
lock’, but the inhabitants of the
Jolonies are, strictly speaking,
foreigners’. That is why it will
ve such a triumph when these
peoples can achieve a state of
self-government; and that is also
why Britain should strain every
aerve to solve their problems, and
disturbances and agitations should
not foster feelings of shame at
our colonial reeord. We in Eng-
and should realise that our col-
onial peoples are only now reap-
ing the first fruits of Western
teaching, and are just beginning
io ‘feel their feet’.

The dilemmas caused by col-
mial affairs to-day ghould not
discourage us, for they are a mir-
vor of the future, and clearly
show our administrators the paths
to take.

But while it is generally ac-~-
cepted that the Colonial Empire
oas a promising future, it must be
said that the present position
does not exactly encourage such
a decision.

The reason probably is this:
there is to-day a widespread ex-
pectation, for large and quick re-
sults, economic and political from
the colonies. The two words ‘col-
onial development’ are a constant
refrain in international circles,
but it should be understood, by
foreign politicians and U.N.O.
alike, that the British Colonial
Empire cannot be developed in a
twinkling, and the countries are
not merely waiting for an enter-
prising government to perform
the task. Development is forced,
by the extreme diversity of the
countries from which these re-
sults are expected, to be slow. In
the colonies we are not dealing
with Indias and Burmas, which
are relatively advanced civilisa-
tions. Our present colonies are
not. Each colony and group of col-

sonies has its own character, its
own climate crops. history people
which need their own special plan,
not some generalised ‘colonial’
plan,

But the main obstacle to the
rapid development of the colonies
lies in their general backward-
ness. In talking about develop-
ment we are looking ahead to a
point of destination. But do we
sufficiently remember the point of
departure? Do we realise the
conditions of poverty, ignorance
and isolation in which most of
the colonial peoples lived when
we began anything that can be
called development. Think of the
static isolation of the Pacific
islands; think of the misery of
the West Indies’ slave population
at the time of the emancipation
and think of the low-subsistence-
level of the average African tribe.
Yet to-day we see roads, rail-
ways, schools, bicycles, clothes
native journalists, doctors and
lawyers, and hear most impres-
sive speeches from African poli-
ticians, What changes! But how
superficial! Can we ignore the
other side of Westernization? For
often the new influences we have
brought break up the close-knit
families and tribes too quickly
and the people have not been able
in time to absorb a new religion,
er build up new bonds and loyal-
ties, new incentives to work.
Hence alongside the successful
adaptation one finds restlessness,
disruption, dreadful slums, and
pitiful demoralisation of the raw
tribesman-turned-proletariat. The
break-up of the tribal system in
Africa, and the racial division in
East Africa and Malaya tend to
reduce loyalties..The peoples no
longer recognise their hereditary
leaders, and because of their ig-
norance, loyalty to the Empire is
beyond their conception.

Thus it is the physical and
political backgrounds of these
peoples which we must know and
understand, Without this under-
standing we cannot possibly suc-
ceed in this policy of ‘colonial
development’. England has solid
interests in the colonies—economic
and strategic—it would help the
colonies if we defined them, and
not pretended we had all to give
and nothing to get. We have
other, less material interests; we
want to turn wards into friends,
who will stay with us when they
are free to go away; we want to
spread in the world the ideas
which we believe make freedom
and peace. Our success for a fu-
ture in the Colonial Empire de-
pends upon our ability to make
‘the colonial people believe that
our interests are their interests,
and that they can best be gained
iby friendly partnership with us.

In the future we must foster the
same family spirit in the colonies,
as exists in the Dominions; and
} who can do this better than the
«British public?




























COMPETITION, 1950.



ROGER BARBER, 18 year
old schoolboy of Newent
Grammar School, Glouces-
tershire, England, arrives in
Jamaica in the “Bayano” on
the 12th August.

His month’s stay in
Jamaica with Mr, J. H, Car-
gill (4, Duke Street, Kings-
ton), the Hon, Corresponding
Secretary of the Over-
Seas League, is his prize for
the winning entry in the
Over-Seas League annual
Empire Travelling Scholar-
ships com etition.



It is not solely on us, however,
that the burden rests. The col-
onial peoples themselves, mus:
play their full part, as the King
suggested in his Colonial Month
inaugural speech last year. “Pro-
gress depends upon a true sens<
of partnership between all sec-
tions of society, rulers and ruled,
each giving of his best to the com-
mon weal; and I look confidently
to the traditional rulers and chiefs
and also to the political leaders
and representative bodies, to pro-
mote co-operation in their vari-
ous spheres, and so set their faces
against faction and the sowing of
distrust.”

What better formula than this
can there be for the future of the
Colonial Empire? But there are
snags as the King's last few
words imply, the greatest being
perhaps, Communism. We are
all aware of the menace vhis
creed holds for the colonial
peoples — indeed, we have first-
hand evidence in Malaya, Burma,
and very probably, West Africa;
but what can be done about it,
if Britain is to continue her ideals
of liberty and free-speech in her
dependencies? The best Plan is
to forestall the rov by inspiring
such a confidence between our-
selves and the colonials, that they
will find content in British ad-
ministration and will find nothing
attracvive in Communist Imperial-
ism, and will not appease it, or
be beguiled.

It i be said though, that
troubles in some of our most
valuable colonial territories, tend
to obscure for a time from our
view vhe great possibilities which
beth the present and the future
hold for these lesser developed
lands of ours, and hide from us
the fact that if anything in the
world has a future, the British
Colonial Empire has. It is up vo
us in Britain to look after our
part-share in this vast Common-—
wealth, for it is upon the people
of England that the future of the
Empire depends.

A Pattern For The West

Indies
The future of \vhe West Indies
is particularly interesting, as

many islands in the group may
be said to be in a ‘transitional’
state, in so far as they stand be-
tween the extremes of advanced’
and ‘primitive’ being nearer the
former than the latter. They thus
represent those peoples who have
progressed through the establish—
ment of law and order, com—
munications and rudimentary
socia] services, to a measure of
social equality with vhe peoples
ef the Western world, and are
anxious to translate this social
equality into terms of political
equality as well,

Their future, however, like that
of vhe Colonial Empire in general,
lies only through the solving of
problems — problems remarkable
for their very diversity indeed,
‘diversity’ is the keynote of West
Indian life. To take an
example: Both Barbados and
British Guiana are in the West
Indian group, but consider the
contrast Barbados is a compact,
crowded, highly cultivated little
island, with a large relatively
solid population of African ances-
try, and an historical beginning as
u British settlement. Half of
British Guiana’s population is
Eas’ Indian; it is not an island
but part of a continent, and began
as a Dutch colony, It has large
rivers, a vast virgin hinterland
and the special problems set by
its dangerously low coast.

These are only two territories
vaken from an area of 2,500,000
square miles, but they serve to
show that each colony could be,
and to a Jarge extent is, sufficient
unto itself. Such being the case,
we can now see the difficulties
which arise. We in England are
accustomed to think of our Carib-
bean Colonies as one, under the
heading “British West Indies,”
whereas in reality, Jamaica is
Jamaica, Antigua is Antigua, and
St. Kitts, is St. Kitts, and so on,
It is very true that the emancipa~
tion of vhe slaves “freed a race,
but failed to create a society”.
The West Indies are suffering from
that today, and it is the aim of
every legislator and social worker
to construct a West Indian way of
life. When such exists, then can we
proceed to a political future for
our Caribbean brethren but of

what use is political equality
when the simplest form of social
life — vhe Christian family — is

practically non-existent? Here it
must be said, however, that tre-
mendous progress in social wel-
fare has been made. Whe people
have been taught to build proper
sanitary houses, and to make use
of welfare institutions. Scientific
cgriculture has been encouraged
to ensure that the population is
adequately nourished, and educa-
tion perhaps the mo st
important factor — has started
tu alter the Wesv Indian's outlook,
for altered it must be. The
establishment of a West Indian
culture in which the ordinary man
can ‘rest’ and of which the West
Indian peoples can be proud will

do more than anything else to
remove feelings of inferiorivy
from which the average West

Indian suffers, by virtue of his



colour, The establishment ol
techools and colleges has done
much to make him aware of him-
self and his responsibilities, and
is _ rapidly discouraging the}
tendency to laziness, so character-
istic of the Caribbean negro. The
need for constructive leadership
is particularly urgeny at the
present time. The common Man
is no longer content with his lot,
and he is striving to find a place
ia the world ovher than that ac-
corded to the ‘coloured’ man..,
But in this respect great hopes }ie
in the future, for Mr. Bustamante
seems to be the right man for the

job. If the West Indian Universi-
vy can produce men like him, ther
a political future for these is-
lands is assured. Some years

wack thes Moyne Report stated
*nat future policy in the Carib-
bean should be directed towards
federation, Mr. Bustamante, as ‘a
leader of the people’ appears vo
be well on the way to bringing
this about.

The fact that the West Indies
have found a leader in Bustaman-
te (and for that matter, an oppo-
sition in Mr. Manley) is a
promising sign of Political
progress, but we must not los¢
sight. of the fact that the island:
are still Crown Colonies, and that
therefore ‘we in England have a
duty towards them, namely the
vask of future development. How
are we tackling this duty, anc
what is more important, how are

the West Indies responding?
The present state of affairs is
not satisfactory mainly because

of the inadequate training of civil

servanis, As in the case of
colonial policy in general, there is
far too ready a belief that the

mere fact that the British colonial
civil servants has received a full
education 11 England qualifies
him to perform these tasks. This
of course, is not the case and iv is
specially important at this time
when the West Indies (and most
of our colonies) are transitional
between irresponsibility and re-
sponsibility of government that
Colonial workers be carefully
selected. The only justification for
his presence at his post is that he
can contribute something to the
society in which he is placed, and
that he is sincere in his endeavour
to do so.

It is nov only an understanding
of each other’s point of view by
civil servant and local politician
which is lacking in the West In-
dies. Even more important is the
dangerous weakening of confi-
dence in British administration. To
restore this confidence, wivhout
which no remedial measures have
any chance of success, the West
indian must have trust in the in-
cividual British official. That is
why the future lies so distinctly
in the careful selection of every
colonial civil servant, for vhese
men have a tremendous task ahead
of them, It is up to them to
revolutionise the existing methods
ef British Colonial Administra-
tion, which are sadly out of date.
The vime has come now for Brit-
ain to look upon the West Indians
not as children, but as equals.
They can stand on their own feet
now, and it is time the Colonial
Office realised it. This does not
mean however, that the time is
ripe for self-government, as
conditions in the Caribbean will
show, for there is a great differ-
ence in standing on one’s feet and
walking,

From the West Indian point of
view, the future lies with the
middle classes. Given a collab-
oration between them and their
friends in England, progress
vowards the building-up of a mass
political movement, of which they
will become the leaders, should
be steady and secure. Given a
cleavage between the two sides,
however, the result can only be
ene of two alternatives: political
deadlock and social decadence, or
open violence eventually leading
to civil war. If their leaders are
devermined to appeal over the
heads of the British representa—
lives, through the ballot-box and
universal suffrage, then there can—
not be a long or useful future
vhead of the British West Indies.
but given full co-operation on
both sides, vhere will be no need
for the like of Bustamante to
ignore British officials, and the
two parties can move forward to-
gether to the future.

The question of the moment
can be reduced Vo one central
problem, that of confidence, which
s the very cement which binds
the fabric of society together, In
former days it was said that the
West Indian got along well
enough, basing his faith in the
goodness of Queen Victoria. This
simple faith was succeeded by a
Tuivh in the British Empire; this
in turn is dissolving, and what is
to replace it? he answer is
faith in himself as a West Indian;
the development of this faith may
be slow — no matter — when
a man gains self-confidence the
rest of the way is easy.

Which Road For The Future?

By way of conclusion it can be
said vhat a definite future for our
colonies is assured only by a
change of policy on the part of
cur administrators: the art of
showing true friendliness should
be encouraged in British officials,
who hitherto have tended to be
cold and aloof. Just recently a
letter appeared in “The Crown
Colonist” condemning what it
termed ‘official snobbery’ in the
colonies. This is an important
point for how can we expect our
colonies to respond, if we do not

os

show ourselves open to response,

The whole range of problems
presented to the colonial adminis-
trator and the British people
alike, mus’ be approached with
the idea of social, and ultimately
political equality firmly in mind.

The process of re-thinking and
1e-education must proceed until
tlhe basic idea of personal equality

@ on page 7



















OIL NEWS FROM TEXAS

By INEZ ROBE
TULSA, OKLA.

FROM any point in this oil capital of the |

world, one can look across to the low lying,
green hills of the Osage, boundary of the
kingdom wherein once dwelt the richest per
capita community in the world: the Osage
Indians. :

The Osages are still there, but the oil which
once poured for many years an average 1n-
come of $8,000 to $12,000 annually into their
laps, has slowed to a trickle.

in 1949, the income from oil had dropped] |

to a measly $1,200 and will probably not go
much, if any, above that in 1950. The Osages
no longer throw away their old diamonds
when they get dirty or buy a new car every
three months.

In the last four decades, the Osages have
seen catapulted from rags to riches to pseudo-
cags. And now there are plans under way
chat may once again elevate the small tribe
.o comparative riches, although the high,
wide and handsome days of the mid twenties
may never return. »

Geologists estimate that there is still as
much “Black Gold” beneath the surface of
Jsage County as has already gushed from its
subterranean recesses. The problem is how
‘o bring it to the surface, now that the easy
cream has been skimmed from the pool. _

The result is one of the most interesting
seological experiments in the United States.
A group of old wells in the Osage is being
dooded with water in hope it will force to the
surface the vast reserve of oil which scientists
say is still locked in the earth, :

With the blessing of the Osage tribal coun-
sil, a group of oil companies has combined
ander the name of the North Burbank Unit
Jperators to finance, design and construct
chis first large scale waterflood installation
which may.not only revive the Osage wells
out point the way to new activities in other
old fields.

The operators have seta mammoth task for
-hemselves. It embraces a 20-to-30 year pro-
sramme of recovery and conservation in the
Jsage fields, if the pilot or test water-fiood is
successful.

Paul S. Hedrick, oil editor of the Tulsa
Daily World for 28 years and one of the oil
experts of the southwest, believes that water-
flood operations in the north Burbank District
of Osage County alone will recover a mini-
mum of 140,000,000 barrels of oil in a world
powered by gasoline and hungry for pet-
roleum.

After large scale operation gets under way
in this district, production should increase
from the present 4,400 barrels per day to
20,000 barrels, which means a substantial in-
crease in oil payments to the Indians.

Another method, known as “hydrofrac”,
also is being used to tap oil reserves in old
wells. In the hydrofrac method. gasoline is
reduced to a putty substance and forced
under terrific pressure into the sandstone.

This pressure cracks the strata, but neither
burns nor fires the oil deposits. A chemical
is then introduced that dissolves the “gel”,
as the gasoline solution is called, leaving
behind sand particles that serve as “propping
agents” to keep open minute cracks and allow
the oil to escape.

Between these two methods, the Osage may
again be in for a time of plenty and prosper-
ity. But even though his income in recent
years is but a fraction of the thousands he re-
ceived in the good old days, he is still prob-
ably the richest Indian in the United States.

All the mineral rights beneath the surface
of Osage County belongs to the tribe as a
whole. The Osage may sell his surface land
in Osage County but the mineral rights,
through action of the Great White Father in
Washington, are entailed in perpetuity to the
tribe as a whole.

The Osage, desperate for cash, can sell his
“head rights” or his share in the mineral re-
turns, to an outsider. But he may sell only
with the consent of Uncle Sam. Head rights
are quoted by local banks in exactly the same
way that Union Underwear, pfd., is quoted on
the New York stock exchange.

To-day’s quotation places a price of from

$14,000 to $15,000 on a head right, providing

Uncle Sam approves the sale. There are only
2,229 such head rights, as established by the
Government in 1906. (Osages born after that
date are still known as “The Too Late
Osages.’’)

There is no reason to believe that a head
right, now priced at $15,000 will not yield in-
definitely an income of at least $1,200 per
annum. And it may be three, four, five or
even six times that much if the hydrofrac and
water-flood programmes pan out as expected.

Or, if the pale face can’t get Uncle Sam’s }}

permission to buy a head right from an
Osage, he can always marry an Osage belle
with a head right in her dowry. That’s the
way some of Tulsa’s richest citizens once got
their start in the oil business.—INS.

Grey Beard Cricketers
To the Editor, the Advocate

SIR,—In days like these we are looking for new
talent in order that the present high standard of
cricket in Barbados and the British West Indies
may be mainvained, and this talent can only be
found amongst youngsters.

Why then are there so many “has beens” in-
cluded in local elevens who feel that through
respect they should be given a major part in the
game and thus have a chance to display their
much worn-out ability av the expense of the
younger players? We do need the guidance of
these more experienced veterans of the game but
not in the manner in which this is at present being
given.

It is a shame that these decrepiv old men with
one eye on the cemetery gate do not realize the
harm that they are doing to cricket as a whole,
The time has come when we should all join together
and roll these unreasonable bald-pated grey-beards
inside the pavilion where they belong.

Don’t Wait! Shoot?
To the Editor, the Advocate
_ SIR,—As the shooting season is just starting, it
is a fitting time to menvion one aspect of it. We
have good shots in Barbados who would scorn
to murder birds on the ground, But alas! some te
increase the score of their swamp do kil) sitting
birds. If all score books were torn up this evil
would be greatly mitigated. The sportsman would
scon find that bringing off a left and right shot
at birds on the wing give him a greater sense of
skill and pleasure than he will ever get by murder.
ing twenty on the ground. Try it. Give the birds
a chance. Pit your skill against their guile and
speed and see if you can win. Remember the story
of the English gamekeeper and the Foreigner? As
they walked by the edge of the wood a cock
pheasant emerged and began walking away. The
man raised his gun. The shocked keeper
“Oh you wouldn't shoot him now, Sir.” “Ah
no", said the man “I'll wait till he stops ! ! !’ Do
not be among those who wait till he stops.

E, C. JACKMAN.

August 1, 1950.



|
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PRIDAY, AUGUST 4,

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coe cea aerial ant aac et OT Se

































FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 1950. BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE
Vest Will ° ~ - | Senior Sanit I ctor | Doe ct 828 eee
ASHEN Pos F ,
stry i uestion | cet enwe ss » Senior Sanitary Inspector Ort cts ete ee es eee
| ative addees — 4 —y . F M ,
— Uy > Suspended For 4 Months © FOR THE COMFORT OF YOUR
x-Churchward | pee es von | | PETS ae
warden | Buy Seared se | cae Sh
ed the oe | The Commissioner of Health of St. Michael yesterday
ritae’ + ; PURINA LICE P
A t Pla ° Field Ve | ed 2 suspended Inspector G. Fagan from service for four | < 7 OWDER and
bou ying ouchers 8 months. al a ae PURINA INSECT KILLER a
' —_— ———<—_— —_—_-_—-—- This decision was reached afte:
The Vestry of St. Michael is going to hold a special public | . | copaidecetign of a report from | H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD.
meeting as early as possible, which Mr. H. A. Tudor, ex-! ¢ | NO BACK PAY Sen Se eee ree a Distributers. a
Churchwarden, and Mr. Francis H. Pile, the Vestry’s| © ‘FOR PAROCHIAL ost He ge i oF ao ci ,
Auditor, will be asked to attend. The purpose of the} es Be | A. Shepherd, a junior inspectoi | BSBEBBSBBEBBBBBEaBBAaH s*,
meeting is to discuss a statement made by Mr. Pile in his| : rah ip arbs Joa : EMPLOYEES on July 6 with the suggestion th | BSS SRSRSSBBERBRBHREKEEBERBERBESB
statement of Revenue and Expenditure of the parish for | : tdcotown~ BARBA #288 he would be creating a dangerous
the year ending March 24, | § : a en ery ; ST, MICHAEL parochial em-| fain eo ". ages age veela ts
Mr. Pile drew to the attention of the Vestry a certain | rz | pioyees will not get back pay. aaa oa. Se ee
case dealing with the Princess Alice Playing Field in which| © The St. Michael Vestry came tof Inspector Shepherd reporte:| A SPECIAL FOR
some of the vouchers were worth nothing. oe, that decision for the second time} Inspector Fagan to the Chiet
Silke iavigdesiminaeen saab sale - © when Mr. E. D. Mottley again] Sanitary Inspector and his state-
" A motion that the meeting ve iy asked the Vestry to give back} ment was corroborated by fo'! TO D A Y
Nine Watches called was made by Mr. E. D. & t ies pay to those employees. Mr. other inspectors o
rw — by Mr. 5 ; Mottley brought up his motion Inspector Fagan admitted t

PAR AVON + BY AiRMAL)
se ie

| because a large sum of money
wich had been raised in the 1949
0 Estimates had not been spent.

the Board having spoken to In
spector Shepherd along the line
of his statement but said he ha:

Hon'ble V. C Gale was the first |
tc speak on the matter. Quoting
the paragraph of the Auditor’;

cee. eee

Stolen: Valued







report dealing with the worthless e +t Woes the motion was pas tof not used the word “dangerous’ 5 { ’ C R E A M S
, ae ee | i re vote, it resulted in a tie, buif He had made the stateme! . *
vouchers, he said it was a matter e er oO the chairman. M Weatherhead, | ; ‘ e e Arr ames
which the Vestry should take very 1 or put : the caine: ao anal id tt an id bh pe b . ;
INE GENTS’ wrist watches seriously, = ; . : Sains ea i vat it would have reached
valued $230, are reported to giet deen ane: “The Paro- H. Preemchand eye miption’ Wie Mis omemal the C nee every inane He
b 6 rG.c = ‘i ./chial Treasurer has paid on orders Postbox 464 oy ae s arochialfwas therefore a disappointe| ’ E on
~ pe be. = FE agg, Rit tee of the Vestry as he is required to | Film Entertainment Dacamarinsusuiinad smolayess in general. but afte: }man, He realised the implicatio Make TO-DAY’S
ed the Police that they were re-}¢° Under Section 35 of the Ves- } | Paramaribo, July 24th, 1950] onnme) the’ nee te eee ot the statement, however, tt CHERRY CREAMS
moved from his show case be- tries Act, 1911—5, and the pay-| “The film is susceptible of To the Editorship of “The Bar- aunts the oon to employees{ taken seriously by a junior o
tween July 22 and Tuesday. means are wall bona fide, but in|] great artistic expression. It bados Advocate” W : = Bes ype > staff. Mr. {juniors and he was extremely a “MUST-TRY’.
WO BICYCLES were report- aoe oa es were particu- | can be a fine art. But it isn’t Britigetown—-BARBADOS es he rhe .~ . explained that he f sorry he had made it I
ed missing in yesterday’s Po- Mise Savina Fooka ce’ ae used that way mainly, it’s || Dear Editor, a i ween. bh The Board viewed the matte Enjoy this delightful
lice Reports. Clarence Thompson are signed S the ‘Churcn warden? en a et of mass en- || You will be very astonish,to] with only some of oan omehaatad ae ee a i + thut treat at. .
of Mason Hall Street reported the] yj ; ertainment, Anc ink y« lreceive a letter from some one, | ho fey . ent 7 0 ~ “V rate said thut) Pisce
loss of a cycle belonging to Ches- ne sake os on .can say quite truly it’s the who. you do not know. Wirity 1] cartene the back pay such an action by Inspector Fagan
terfield Thompson of the same} js worth pothine certificate which biggest and most important will introduce myself to you. My ee iy 3 voted for the fwho was a senior inspector with | PHOENIX
address. He stated that the cycle Fair Ch form of mass entertainment name is Harry Preemchand and hie he lll ge A Mottley, Mr. fmany years’ service in the De- |
was taken from Fontabelle on} yi. means aaa tah tie] in th eee — et my age is 23 years. I live in Par- waa’ a ee are Mr f partment, suggested that he wat
ames s s ‘generally tha e in the whole world.” ee 2 Oe hg “hase ose who voted against} trying to sabotage the Depart ; ‘
te ios of a cycle valued $45 coats waa ‘mnselt has_at- DENIS FORMAN, a ee tnis letter is {it Were: Mr. Browne, Mr. God- —— sabotage the Depar Soda Fountain
Ph 5 a ji en o the business in hand Director of the British Film @ writing s letter 1S] gard. Hon. V. C. Gale and M fe 4 :
Henie Hal OF oat the Police without assistance from. or know- Institute, speaking in a that several of my friends would Grae, Pe Disgraceful Knights Ltd.
that “the byede was removed from ledge of, the Head of the Depart- BBC programme correspond with boys and girls of Mr. Victor Goddard regarded
the Savoy Club, Mason Hall Street, ment, or the one responsible for Barbados for collecting stamps Decide Now it as a “disgraceful attitude.”



seeing that the work is properly
of carried out, and that the charges
made are fair and reasonable.
_The matter re vouchers uncer-
tified or not properly certified was |
brought to the attention of the}
Vestry in December, 1945. |
Mr. Gale said that that was a |

on Monday.
OODROFFE CLARKE
Palmers, St. John reported |
the loss of his cow valued $130
from a pen on his land at the
same address between 5.00 p.m.
on Monday and 5.45 a.m. on
Tuesday. very serious report. A committee
HOIRS FROM five of the}poqd peen apdottted 40 lnk after
seven Elementary Schools}the Playing Field, and it also had
in St, John took part in the non-/aq Secretary. Certain prominent
competitive Music Festival which | people in the parish who were not
was held at the St. John’s Mixed|members of the Vestre had been
School on Tuesday evening. invited to join the committee, and

The School Hall was packed /they had done so. ‘

with enthusiastic listeners and “IT happen to be a member of
some listened from the windows. |that Committee,” Mr, Gale said,
Among those in the audience| “and I know nothing about these

3 SHIPS IN
THE BAY

The arrival of the Steamship
“Craftsman” brought the number
of ships in Carlisle Bay yesterday
to three. Beside the “Craftsman”
there was the “Alcoa Runner,”
which has been here for many
days, and the “Rivercrest,”

The “Alcoa Runner” and “River-
crest” are discharging cargo while
the “Craftsman” is filling her
hatches with sugar for the U.K

As soon as the “Craftsman” ar-



rere: Rev. Canon P. A. W. Moore vouchers which are not properly| _ d
a Mrs Moore, Rev. Ripper, certified, I think that we as mem-| rived the waterfront went into
Mr. L. Gay, Miss 'G. Denny, Miss| bers of the Vestry owe it to our- jaction. Lighters were loading

etc. Thatswhy I take
tunity to request you
advertise the above
in your most reading
Barbados Advocate”

Correspondence can be pass in
five difference languages: English,
French, Dutch, Hindi or Urdu.

Interested persons can apply
to Mr. H. Preemchand Postbox
464, Paramaribo, Surinam,

Every collaboration would ap-
preciate most highly,

Thanking you in anticipation,

T remain,
Yours Faithfully,
H. PREEMCHAND.

the appor-
if you will
mentioned
paper “The

Postbox 464



Mr, Mottley said he was ask-
ing them to decide then, once and
tor ail, The Vestry had alread

made a decision, but it had come

to his notice that the Church
warden’s report showed that a
very substantial sum of money

which had been budgeted for haa
not been spent.

He felt that if it were possible
to pay the retrospective pay,
members would agree to it.

Three weeks ago when the ides
of cleaning swamps arose because
of the encroaching hurricane
season, the one set of people whx
were uppermost in the minds o)
the people were the scavengers
The day after the flood last year
beside the police, the first people

H. O. Gittens, Miss E. A. Murray
and Miss J. Gill.
The programme

was so ar-

ranged that the Junior choirs

were first to sing. “The Sham-
rock” was sung by the Cherry
Grove Junior School, “All Thru
the Night” by Hothersal Junior

School, “The Merry Traveller”) aecounts
by Welches Village Junior School,| for”

selves and to the ratepayers who
have elected us, and to the Gov-
ernment who are financing these
playing fields, to see that thd
money is properly spent. We are
the custodians of that money with
which the Government has en-
trusted us.

“We should see to it that all the
are properly vouched

sugar on the north and south sides
of the Inner Basin. Loaded light-
ers could be seen cruising down
the Careenage. Some were being
towed by launches while their oc-
cupants relaxed on bags of sugar.

Two launches passing each
other midway between the ship
and the wharf were regularly seen.
They both had lighters in tow but
while one set were empty the

Faces Dangerous
Driving Charge

A case brought by the Police
against Cyril Carmichael of Mile-
and-a-Quarter, St, Peter charg-
ing him with driving the motor
bus S—58 on Tudor Street in a

thought of were the scavengers
They had done yeomen’s work
They had worked faithfully ana
had given a high degree of co-
operation

He knew that the whole affair
had been threshed out with thx
Labour Officer, but he had always

ee ES

‘a



“Come Hither” by Mount Tabor
Mixed School and
Qharlie” by St. John’s
School.

They afterwards grouped to-
gether and sang “Old Folks at
Home,” “My Qwn Dear Land”
and “John Peel.” Representing
the Senior Choirs the St, John’s
Mixed School sang “How Great
is the Pleasure,” “Now is the
Time for Haying,’ “Mighty Lak
a Rose,” “Psalm 67” and “The
Hallelujah Chorus.”

Before the King was sung Mr.
L. St. A. Thorne, Headmaster of
the St. John’s Mixed School, said
that they would present Canon
Moore with an address and gift
from the teachers of the Angli-
can schools of that parish in
recognition of his services as
Chairman of the Board of Mana-
gers of the Schools. !

Canon Moore gave up this post
at the end of July when he also
retired from his other post as
Rector of the parish.

The address was read by Mr.
J. W. Bell while the presentation
was made by Miss S. A. Carring-
ton. The Canon afterwards re-
plied to the address.

: Mr.
“Bonnielaffairs
Mixed

Gale called the state of
r _ “very disquieting,” and
said his opinion was that they
should thoroughly examine all the
vouchers, accounts, etc. relating
to the playing field.

The playing field had a secre-
tary, and according to the usual
vractice he took it that the secre-
tery would have the vouchers
files and orders and would know
about what was going on. He
would know how the work was
carried out and about the orders
made for the materials which
were used.

others were loaded to the water
line.

The Government crane also had
its share of activity yesterday.
During the evening it was used
to unload heavy machinery from
a lighter which was tied off just
below it.

A few yards away from this
erane men could be seen nailing
up boxes of onions. These will
soon be shipped from the island
by the Schooner “Mandalay IT.”

Potato Diver
Fined 5/-

“If you are a diver with a
licence and you find anything
while diving at the sea you must
take the article or articles to the
Comptroller of Customs, you can-
not take anything away,” His
Worship Mr. B. Griffith told Nor-
ris Boyce of Nelson Street yes-
terday when he fined him 5/- for
unlawful possession of a quanti-
ty of English potatoes

Norris in his defence said that
while diving he came across this



Take Measures

Everything possible that could
be done to clear up the matter
should be done, said Mr, Gale, and
he hoped that the Vestry wouid
proceed to do what he was asking
for without delay.

Mr, Bruce Weatherhead, pres-
ent Churchwarden, who was in the
Chair made a statement to the
Vestry. He said:

It is the right of every Taxpayer
to know that his taxes are we'l
spent and correctly accounted for.

It is the duty of the Vestry to
see that such information is given









































to th t bag of potatoes in the sea and
‘A vote of thanks was moved|t0 the ratepayers and that all) did not know what to do with|
by Mr L. T. Gay, District In- reasonable questions relating t9 | them.

Parochial affairs are properly and

spector of Schools, who also paid
promptly answered.

H.P.C. Callender of the Bridge

tribute to Canon Moore. This feret Post said he was on duty on Bay
was seconded by Mr. A, T.|, It is also the duty of the Vestry | Street on August 3 when he saw
Gittens. to see that any government grants] Norris carrying a bag. He got

or Trust Funds, in their charge, are
properly accounted for and to the
satisfaction of the Government.
Since the publication in the
“Official Gazette” of the Parochial
Accounts for the year 1949-50,
many of the Taxpayers of St.
Michael have been asking me all
sorts of questions relative to that
year, I am unable to answer
these questions, The ratepayers
ask me because I am the present
Churchwarden but, I am sorry to
say, although I was senior Guard-
ian for the year 1949-50, I know

Mrs. Moore, in a brief address,
told those parents present to give
the teachers their wholehearted
support and refrain from inter-
fering with the work of the
teachers who were trained to do
their job, She said that education
from books was most desirable
but parents should not fail to
train their children to be helpful
in the homes.

RENE LEACOCK of Hall’s

Land, Bank Hall, St. Michael,
was injured on her left foot af-
ter she was involved in an acci-

suspicious and asked him what he
had in it. Norris started to panic
and he arrested him.

APPLES!

WITH oranges and grapefruit
off the local market at present,
the Tasmania apples which ar-
rived from Australia last week
are being sold out quickly. Al-
ready Goddard & Sons’ supply is
gone, They were sold at 40 cents
per pound.



dent on Tuesday, She was treat-| very little about the repairs and Three normal sized apples
ed by Dr. Cummins and dis-| building etc., for that year and I] usually weigh a pound, The
charged, must therefore pass these ques- | Street sellers have taken over,

now that the store supplies have
petered out and these sellers
make good returns when they
sell them at 18 cents each,

But though oranges and grape-
fruit are not to be had, the
hawker’s tray has an ample stock
of other fruits and greens, There
is g fair quantity of plantains,
local and imported, but mostly
imported, and these are being
sold at an average of eight cents
each. There are also pine apples,
Mangoes cabbages and tomatoes.

ANNUITY

tions on to the Churchwarden for
1949-50.

Soon after I was elected Church-
warden, in March 1950, Mr, Fran-
cis Pile, the Auditor, told me tha‘
he was not satisfied with certain
Vouchers and he would not be able
to sign the Accounts of the 'Par-
ish for 1949-50 and he asked m2
for certain information. I gave him
the requirdd information to the
best of my ability.

I shall now ask the Clerk to read
copies of a letter written by me to
Mr. Pile and his reply thereto

Also involved in the accident
was a bicycle owned by James
Thorpe of Kew Road, St. Michael.
Leacock was a pedestrian.

HE MOBILE CINEMA

fulfil its final engagement
for the week with a show at
Wiltshire Playfield, St. Philip, at
8 o'clock tonight. This show is
for the benefit of residents of
the Wiltshire area,

will







The Weather

relative to the Princess Alice
TO-DAY Plavi Field Accounts. The St. Michael's Vestry at its
Sun Rises: 5.30 a.m. laying Hisid meeting yesterday granted Mrs,
Sun Sets: 6.22 p.m. Two Letters Lilian Drakes the vacant Frizer
High Water; 7.38 am. 7.26 || At this stage in the discussion |Annuity.
Mien: cb. eilaniee) | the Clerk Tr two letters to ae Ae gh Ae a RS er Sue
; r | Vestry. One dated June 17, 1950,
August 5. | was from Mr, Weatherhead to Mr Foreign Ministers
YESTERDAY | Pile, and the other dated June 19

@ from page 1

The Assembly’s Economic Com-
mittee has already put forward a
recommendation that the Consul-
tative Assembly should be the
body supervising the Supra-Na-
tional authority under which the
Pool plan as proposed by Schuman
would operate.

The second big talking point on
the agenda is a proposal by the
General Affairs Committee seek-
ing to break the ban laid down by
the Council's statute forbidding all
discussions in the Assembly on de-
fence matters.

The Committee has drawn up a

Temperature (Max). 87.0 °F.

Temperature (Min). 76.5 °F.

Wind Velocity; 13 miles per
hour.

Wind Direction: 9 a.m E 3
p.m. E, by S.
Barometer: (9 a.m)

3 (p.m.) 29.955.

| was Mr. Pile’s reply.

The first letter reminded M
Pile that Mr. Weatherhead ha:i
sometime ago requested the Ves-
|try Clerk to ask him to prepare
‘an audited Statement of the ac-
counts relative to the Princess
Alice Playing Field for the inform-
|ation of the Central Government.
|The Vestry Clerk had reported
that he had made the request on

|two occasions, but without success
ON SATURDAY | “Subsequently I invited you -

The C.N.S. “Lady Nelson” is|this office,” Mr -Weatherhead’s
expected to arrive in Carlisle Bay | letter said, and I speke with you,
{rom North on Saturday. It will| and you made a promise to let me
scil the following day for St. | have the required Statement; but | bly should be able to hold general

29.997.



“NELSON”? COMING



Vincent, Grenada and George-|this has not yet come to hand, |debates on “political problems of |
town, British Guiana. “A written request has now been | non-military character which are}
The “Nelson” is consigned to| received from the Social Welfare |linked with the need for assuring
Messrs. Gardiner Austin & Co.,| Officer for the audited Statement |the security of Europe 1 ff
Ltd @ on page 7 —Reuter. SSS SS











resolution urging that the Assem- !

dangerous manner on June 21—|fejt the only dispute was the
was adjourned until August 15] question of back pay to the
by His Worship Mr. C. L, Wal- abouring staff,

wyn Magistrate of District “A The difficulty was to give t
yesterday. one staff and not the other, For

Mr, J. E. T. Brancker is appear-
ing on behalf of Carmichael while

Sgt. D. Forde is prosecuting for | nective pay

the Police.

Three witnesses for the prose-
cution were heard, among them
Cardinal Prescod who said he was
a passenger on the motor bus
S—58 on June 21, The bus was
being driven along Tudor Street.
He noticed another —E—44—in
front of S—58. Both buses stop-
ped and when S—58 pulled out
from behind E—44 there was a
collision between the bus, S—58
and a bicycle

|
In answer to a question asked |

by Mr. Brancker as to how fast
the cyclist was riding Prescod
said that hé could not give the
speed but the bicycle was ridden
at a fast rate. An adjournment
was granted so that more wit-
nesses could be summoned



“Belqueen” Brings
Eight Passengers

The 44-ton Schooner Belqueen
(Capt. King), brought eight pas-
sengers from St. Vincent yester-
day. They were: Jacob Yorke
Arnold Young, Edmund Bernard,
Mary Bernard, Dennis Bernard,
J. Redhead, Nowel Taylor and
one other.

This vessel also brought a
quantity of copra, tins of fish oil,

and trucks and suit cases that
were ordered as samples.

No other intercolonial vessels
arrived but the 93-ton E. M
“Tannis” set sail for Trinidad
while the motor vessel “T. B
Radar” left for St, Lucia.

These vessels are all consigned
to the Schooner Owners’ Asso-
ciation.

SHIP UNLOADS LUMBER

The Motor Vessel “Jenkins Rob-
erts,” which arrived on Wednes-
day, was unloading some of its
cargo yesterday at the top end of



making every effort to get it off
the ship Some were pushing
long pieces through the port holes

Gouda Cheese
White Pepper
Black Pepper
Paprika Pepper
Curry Powder
Ground Ginger

Prunes
Lunche

|
|



an overall amount, it would tak«
$40,000 to pay everybody retro-
Of that, less than
half would go to the labourers
and scavengers. They could no
otherwise but be in sympathy
with that set of people. They had
been doing their best and had
showed themselves reasonable
men and he was making a strong
appeal, an appeal from his soul
that they might give a decision
then, a decision in their favour

The amount for the unestab-

said
Matter of Principle
Mr. Miller said that the hope
of reward sweetened labour an
he would second Mr. Moitley

motion, He asked members to loon
at the matter calmly and dis-

| passionately despite the decis.o:

of the Vestry in the past. It we
known to all of them that th
ex-Churchwarden had not spen
some money which had _ beer.
raised in the 1949--1950 Estimate:
and there should therefore be nm
difficulty. It was a matter o
principle and even if they ha
had to borrow the money, whicl

they had no need to do, the)
should pay the scavengers. Thi
men were on their knees, the)
were not commanding.

Mr. Chase said that he wa

prepared to support Mr. Mottley’s
motion as far as the $17,000 anc
he would suggest that he amen
it and let it refer only to worker
of the unestablished staff. Tha
staff had the firm opinion tha
they were entitled to and woul:
get retrospective pay as such pa)
was given to the Governmen
employees. He had pledged him
self to give assistance toward
their getting that pay since th
last election period and he di
not intend then to stray from tt
pledge

Mr. Mottley then pointed ou
that they had given him a Bi
to take before the House, with



the Inner Basin

This vessel brought 71,255 feet
of lumber for Messrs. DaCosta
& Co., Ltd,

The labourers that were un-
loading the lumber yesterday were





SELECT THESE
TO-DAY

Walls Oxford Sausages
Walls Pork Sausages
Danish Ham Sausage

in Syrup

mn Beef with Cereal
Corned Beef Cereal

STANSFELD SCOTT
& CO., LTD.
BROAD STREET.

SS

view to doing justice to two o
the upper employees, Mr. Pur
ton and Mr. Ashby, but th
House had decidedly said tha

they would first have to give thei
decision on that question
Mr. Goddard said that he ha
@ on page 8



per lb, 88
1 oz, tins AD
-32

11

ae 12
4 o7, tins 39
per tin 60

ie os 71
2-lb.tins 1.78
1-lb. tins 43
per tin 54



{ o'clock and
| breakfast period for most city

lished staff would be, $17,000 | hurriedly, however, so that traflic










Finally on the motion of Hon'ble
Vv. C. Gale seconded by Mr. B. A |
Weatherhead, Inspector Fagan was ;
suspended for four months, The
Board also decided to put on record














HARRISON'S "8 Smet
“SOLO” SPRAYERS

DOUBLE ACTION — EJECTS ON BOTH
THE UP AND DOWN STROKES THUS
PROVIDING A CONTINUOUS SPRAY.
IDEAL FOR GARDENS AND ORCHARDS.
COMPLETE WITH FITTINGS INCLUDING
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Si¢ 2



that he be not allowed at any |
time to act in an_ executive}
capacity in the administration.



During the consideration of the |
-harge it was pointed out that In- |
spector Fagan had acted as Assis-
tant Inspector on many occasions |



It was stated too that he had
been giving trouble for some years
and on one oceasion had been sus~-
pended for a month. He had also
been reprimanded by the Board

At the Board meeting yesterday
were the members: Mr. E. D, Mott-
ley, M.C.P., (Chairman), Hon'ble



Weather Mr Vi Godard SOCKET HEAD SET
Ir. Victor Chase and Mr. C. B 1g’ . ia :
er) ae also were Mr. W. W. S¢ REW s







Merritt, Chief Sanitary Inspector
Inspector G, Fagan and Inspector;
A. Shepherd, B, Maycock, C
Jones, O. Henry and D. Batson
who gave evidence

Pipe Line Holds
Up Traffic

REPAIRS to the pipe line
which runs along lower Broad
Street at the corner of .C, F
Harrison & Co., were being made
by the Waterworks Department
yesterday and traffic was held up
at various intervals The long-
est stoppage occurred between 11
12 o'clock, the busy

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PAGE SIX FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 1950.

‘Stop Pyorrhea
in 24 Hours

Bleeding Gums, Loose Teeth and Sore

| Mouth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
French Mouth or a bad disease which
sooner or later will make your teeth fall
out and may cause Rheumatism and Heart
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tightens teeth. [ron clad guarantee
Amosan must make your mouth well and
save your teeth or money back on return
of empty rackage. Get Amosan from your
chemist today.

The guarantee

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



BY CARL _ANNDFRSON

Can ©
AHDERION ———























HENRY









protects you

For Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth



MICKEY MOUSE

POSALISSOSS SOS POE SSOS LO,
y i ; »
HEY! wHere \ [fwe'RE ONLY Rs JUST RECEIVED 3
YUR GOIN! KIDNAPING %
WITH MY FRIENP MICKEY? CEREALS x
\ %,
4 \ P g 1,&, 2.lb. Tins Morton's ¥
$ Oat-Meal %
x ~
$ 1 lb. Tins Tear) sarley
«
& Tins Peter Pan Scotch
~ Oats
Pkgs. Quaker Oats
% Pkgs. Quaker Corn Flakes
8 FRUITS

L.K.B. Peaches
Apperta Apples

Crushed Pineapples

hi~@e

THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER

Cocktail Cherries

Sliced Pineapples
HERE'S MY CREDENTIALS, PROVIN' I'M A



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i
He

' ie - WEEK
OF UNPRECEDENTED
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BARGAINS LIKE THESE COME TO YOU BUT ONCE IN A LIFETIME THEY COME
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WITH CUT PRICES LIKE THESE LASTING FOR MORE THAN ONE WEEK, SURE-
LY WE'LL BE SOLD OUT

YOU MAY BUY US OUT BUT WE GIVE YOU ONE WEEK IN WHICH TO DO SO.
READ THIS, VISIT US AND COMPARE PRICES AND QUALITY










a

—
WHAT
Now?



BY ALEX





THE HOTELS... WE'LL CHECK THEM | |
TO SEE UF DES HAS REGISTERED... | k

i a sae a

a

ZG D ,
Zy \ foe 1
é mee | : ;
) wen | Oy





MAYBE OUR
SEARCH FOR
OES WON'T
BE SO
DIFFICULT





FUGI in Pink, Peach, Lemon CANADIAN & AMERICAN NICKEL ARM BANDS 32c.





















































& White 40c. per yd. PRINTS @ 54c. to 84c. per yd. per pair |
SS |
INDIAN HEAD, Pink, Peach, Y 36 i ri
White & Blue 34 in. wide BEARD 26 th, write Oe, Rey 28 We eee Pee
WELL.,.HE DIONT REGISTER YES...WE HAVE A \ FINE! FING! WHAT IS HIS A MATT GR OF FACT SIR, TO LIKE TO 68c. per yd. MEN’S PURE IRISH LINEN $1.48 per pair
HERE...LET'S TRY THE CECIC DeeiMoNo. ) "ROO NoMBeR? T5 Lice | [See Hin At SELF) HIS LESAGE IS IN HEAVY QUALITY CASE- maretn | Seyret wae CELENESE PANTIES
HOTEL RAEBURN... Ne Oe MENT in Lemon, Beige, $1.80 per yd.
. FOR Two DAYS... wate Blue & White 34 ao KHAKI DRILL lc, 8a. 72c. per pair |
wide, Price ...... 72c. per yd. fee ?
vabaany To SUSPECT M2. . © - per y' $1.00 per yd. LADIES’ HANDBAGS
GBSMOND SKIPPER WHITE CELLULAR ng tree er $3.00 ui
THOUT PAYING $e, tir Ya. GREY FLANNEL 54 in. wide aes



PLASTIC TABLING 45 in. |
LINEN Goods for School & $2.16 per yd. wide $1.30 per yd. |


















Servants Uniform 36 in wide PLASTI AT * ne
She, per.yd. Several Shades. S ee GLASS TOWELS 18 x 34
- Otelity. ied | $3.70 each @ 46c. each
WHITE CAMBRIC 36 in. wide SHIRTS Roy Rogers Sports BATH TOWELS 18 x 36
f Tihs . coop 6 44c. per yd. Shirt $1.00 each @ 60c. each
$$. Bet sacaltec aks 4 h ————
}-ALICO CAMBRIC Extra —————— NYLON STOCKINGS Popu-
‘ neawy, quality 36 in. wide STRIPE SPORT SHIRTS lar Shades @ $1.60 per pair
= @ + 60c., & 68c. per yd. a
BY LEE FALK& RAY MOORES Sa — $1.40 each LADIES SHOES A New Ship-

{POPLIN in Blue, Peach, Pink,
Beige & White @ 54e. per yd.

SHIRTING in Stripes &
Fancy Patterns 36 in. wide
64c. per yd.



ment of these from Holland.
All Styles and Colours
$5.00 per pair
Other Shoes less 10% Discount

SPORTS & DRESS SHIRTS
from $3.00 to $7.00 each
MEN’S PLASTIC BELTS
36c. each





*THRU IGNORANCE, THE KIDNAPPERS
TAKE THEIR ViCT/M8 INTO CANNIBAL
TERRITORY «= :

SOME FOOLISH TRAVELERS ARE LOST.
\'D BETTER FINDTHEM




RANSOM BY TWO
ESCAPED CONV *Té,
SLIM ANDSHO RT Vs+













SUNGLE++









SPUN SILK, Excellent Qual-
ity 30 Shades 36 in, wide price
tor one week only 84e. per yd.



2 PAIRS FOR

| SHOP ECONOMICALLY FOR THE RACES AT - - -

N. E. WILSON

; 31 Swan St.



LADIES’ SILK STOCKINGS



THE HOUSE WELL KNOWN FOR NEW GOODS, GENUINE GOODS AND LOWPRICES.

ALL TROPICALS AND
WORSTED

Less 10% Discount |

& Co., Ltd.







Dial 3676.



















FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 1950. BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
Z T og? '
CLASSIFIED ADS VESTRY What British GOVERNMENT NOTICES ’
. i e _— oes © . ~ Attentior : one halen s + . 2
cLEPHONE 25: { Accounts, anc am therefore . , PG Bree eer : es 7;
; T ON 08 calling as alas ieee a ae Schoolboys Ann nt) Order, 1950, No. 3 which will be published ir i For all white shoes —_
. * m Ginnie the said Stateme without delay cial Gazette of Thursday 3rd August, 1950
FOR SALE | FOR RENT for oes anetion . the. vest Satan this Gods the maximum retail selling price o Mer





aS a ene, a eer as as Cae Bai Are Taught ;

WwW > . « ~
chantable Pitch Pine’ mene ar
tral Government.



is as follows






" — Se - - o _ in company, must ,
AUTOMOTIVE HOUSES “I also take this opportunity to @ From page 4 COLUMN ONE COLUMN TWO ay ;
A-40 VAN Zephe ATTRACTIVE I Well | remind you that I expect you to |Under-lying it, is taken to be a} ARTICLE Retail Price

Ordinary
(Not more than)



less, immaculate. Use PRO <
SHUVER

Main

and drav

hed tings, both
Open on

> bathing





commonplace of
which is not

everyday life,
open to question

have ready for publication during
the month of June a duly author-







—|











































































Propert’s White Renovato iis
“AR — 1936 1 1 good run- fa © : n naa a *. » caus f ° > 236 oY ‘ * i .
Reng eS, + gel pt ved comforts | ised Statement of Parcchial Ac-|°"d certainly is not a cause of Q) Meschesteige pea Pine $236.00 per 1,000 board feet or Present’ Stewie NO 18
R. Mahon, near Police Sut on 817 48.50-t-f"-/counts for the year’ 1949-50, in | Surprise. It is only on such terms | | (Basic Size) pert s - . :
Bellplaine, St, Andrew ee age op I =. accordance with Section 51 of the | #5 these that the British Empire) 4A ugust, 1950. surer way of making sure
| Michael. From now to Dec Fully | Vestries’ Act, 1911 (1911-5).” has a place left for it in the oe ia ae
CARS Chrysler 1941 Sedan; | furnished mod home, Electric 3 Difficulties political strucvure of the twenti- that white shoes are white!
(1) Dodge 1941 Sedan; (1) Morris 10| atid. Refrigerator, For particulars: rot Mr. Pile’s letter i wie atebed eth century | Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
conditio: shy to Cos- | —— > ) > si "
H.P. in good condition. Apply to Cos- | 2684 . Ve's letter in reply state The desirability of this state of}, ent) Order, 1950, No. 26 whict l be blist yf —
mopolitan Garage, Magazine Lane. Phone SEAT Upstairs Fiat at Waverley, Fiat at Waverley to Mr. Weatherhead that the mat- partnership must be emphasised.| — wate 60, No. 26 which will be published in the Official
: 3015 1.8.50—Gn- | Biue Waters Terrace. 3 large Bedrooms | ter of the Princess Alice Playing | some sort of institutional frame- Gazette of Thursday Srd August, 1950 Buck: P R > P E R T's
mn B.S.A. CAR—In good condition. Dial | ee Se eT Tenn. a = yet waeeyee — him | work must be created to bring the | 2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling price ot “Eggs” Mea
2490 or 3578 1.8.50—3n eae nineteen | Soe eatherhead), and that he| peoples together and promote an/ (imported Canadian Large Grade “A”.) is as follows :— Ta ANS , 1 TOV
“PART OF : BOTTOM AND Top knew some of the difficulties, He | understanding between them. The | | SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR
- ELECTRICAL FLOOR of aie would take the opportunity to] British Council and the colonial | . ! In Cartons with Sponge
AIR COOLED REFRIGERATORS mention that it was questionable | Universities have important parts | ARTICLE RETAIL PRICE |
“ The “Silent Knight”. 4c. ft. capac whether it was his (Mr. Pile’s)|to play in this respect, and form (Not more than) ! -
Operated by Keroser.e Oil. Dial 8, obligation to give a separate de-|the most promising lines of ad- | FoGe ° neteaaeai ee ee re
Da. Costa & Co. Lt Blectri aE — | anq | tailed statement, inasmuch as that | vance at the moment. On the suc- | a a 10e. each }
— ue elatelaedebite conve account would be incorporated in cess of such experiments, the pos- 7 oe 7 a a
ALTERNATOR 9 .«w,V.A. Single| niences. For the months of October/the accounts for.the parish. He sibilities of promoting orderly | ayq August, 1950.
eine 0 oe ok igs vei ae eae eae See Bayley. | would however furnish what he constitutional advances depend, It | .
Rare wah 4.8.50-2n. | had already agreed to furnish—a| ‘8 therefore strongly to be hoped “ ge |
Barbados Foundry statement giving the detail as he| that those who attempt to| Vacant Post of Graduate Assistant Master, Grenada |
Phone 4546 3 === '| saw fit, and either signed by him | #Pproach the colonies in the way Boys’ Secondary School. | «
Oe eet pe oy ke ‘ " or covered by a letter, should he | hich the situation demands, will j on the
; nouncing ‘the new “Silent Knight". No PUBLIC SALES not be able to get the necessary | 1)cet "i S ica Wick tee from Applications are invited for the post of Graduate Assistant ’ 9
: Motors, brushes; belts; or other mov- infé mation for his satisfaction. ; Fy ‘f this takes place there 1S! yiaster at the Grenada Boys’ Seco idary School |
i ing. parts, Absolutely ‘silent in opera ss Mr. Pile then promised to get | little reason for despondency | Th : abl z 1
wis Dial 8. Da Costa & Co a : F | abou > ; } e post is pensionable. a: | carries salary atthe rate of}
st Electrical Department 1.8.50—6n. | AUCTION the Statement of Parochial Ac-;° on ven TUsEre, ee 79 2 ae ‘ De
u es sae eee It is all very well however, tu | $1,728 x $96 — $2,160 plus a te:iporary cost of living bonus at
» , p b ’ &
f FRIGIDAIRE—6 cu. feet. Excellent} UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER counts ready w ithin the necessary | keep the object of equal political | 1pproved rates (at present 10%) Qualifications and experience will
; condition Phone 2471 a J. £ time, and to furnish any further| status before us in governing the Ss % a a S a >

I have b instructed to sell by = ; .. ; ae é : : ; ae
l Auction on the spot at Mahogany Lane information required that it was| colonies, but the transition from be taken into consideration in

eee | COMES AT" r 7 | on Thursday 10th August at 2 o'clock within his power to furnish.
REFRIGERATOR One Gan be| one Double roofed house.’ Each root Mr
nadian efrigerator. a pe

: . being 18 by 10 with yard enclosed
. atc w Hutchinson & Co. . Ltd latte asivanias. tent can be
3road Stree « a an



or 2
2



Marine Gardens termining point of entry into the!

Crown Colony rule to responsible Scale. |

Weatherhead repeating his] government should not be made Passages on first appointme: !
statement that he had been asked} too quickly.



%, Marson





COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT

of the officer appointed, as well!
rented or

Dominion _ status



































first parts of the Scripture | 0? the other hand, they prove con-

‘ : : |
| bought. Terms Cash ill sorts of questions about the! should not be allowed to become|°® those of his family, not excceding five persons in all, will be
La | nee A S. t ~ me a: > ° Tel ; mo
| D'Arcy. A. Scott, Auc ries fe matter said he did not propose to} a victory which is won, or a prize provided, |
FURNITURE Sas. AH | say then what those questions/ reluctantly surrendered to those Applications, giving full deta ls of qualifications and experience, .
‘ = = were He would in due course} who have bee! sstul i ‘ 10 t e ®
FURNITURE Birch Dining Chait! bear ESTATE furnish them to the Vestry t ee ‘ie 8 Md be vii, R accompanied by two recent testin »nials, should be addressed to the
$6.00 each, Dining Table $20.00 upwards, | oS estty. struggle; it shou willingly , " nian aie nal tia ali ng ns : ‘ '
humerous’ Presses from $20.00, Side BELVOIR St. James on Seaside Mr. E. D. Mottley said that he| offered at the end of a period in Headmaster, Grenada Boys’ Secon ary School, and should reach him
board from $25 00, Dresal + 2 ta Drawing a d Pies, Tee meio Ly . a member of the Playing} which the people concerned have | "ot later than 11th August, 1950
San inte Gf other Diente et; bargalis 4.8,50—2r ae siege ve it was oer ae been educated to receive it. The successful applicant wil! be required to assume duties on
Prices in Ralph Beard’s Auction Rooms, | papal bo serve on a commiltee as! Finally, it should be brought to} 11th September, 1950
Hardwood Alley. Open daily 8 a.m, to| FOR SALE (2) wardrobe trunks.|@ ‘yes’ man and know nothing} the minds of the colonial peoples, ‘ :
4 p.m Phone 4683 | Trunks, Valises. OWEN T. ALLDER,| about what was happening, but} that firs d :
: 3.8.50—2n. | Roebuck St. Dial 3299 he had happened to be ill at the hat first and foremost, they as
edecazesinas 3.8.50—2n | ti 14 ‘ rising races have duties and obli-
OO f : act ahd gations — to themselves, to the |
MISCELLANEOUS | ponoers, —, Ona. (1) Damaged Morris Not Evil for Evil Empire and to the world, They |
| ss arcial’® s! ‘a » seen 3 : ¥
BOOKS—Second Hand, chiefly His- | 4. er Jones & Co. Lid, Molassses| He had heard Mr, Weather-| re faced with an opportunity to |
tories. Historical Studies Veterinary |pank Yard at back of Empire Theatre. | head’s comments, he had heard|>Uild sound community life on |
> rave . P | Offers in writing will be received by “ i , jy | foundations already laid for the eee
4.8.50—3n : . the letters and he had read Mr. ‘ y faid for them. ——.
sillltaesitant ean : paste ons gains Me React 1988, °° “| Pile’s report. What he was going} S° — depends on Bieta zeniie- ROYAL NETHERLANDS
CIGARETTES All brands jn stock | : 4.8.50—€n. | to do wa nd > alwavs ing this opportunity that they de-
including ASTORIA and FOUR ACES — | sete eee oS Ne Heed a ee serve every encouragement. If, STEAMSHIP CO.
Knight's Drug Stores 4.8 50—2n | ~] = . : 7 SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM 1
| LOST & FOUND ive
|

















|
}
t
}
B. “Radar” will
accept Cargo and Passengers




















































































y, foam-soft berth!



set. Why pay more elsewhere? Archer
Drug Store, Coleridge Street

2.8.50—3n

Trader; Sch Molly N.. Jones; Sch
Marea Henrietta; M.V
berts

the remarks made by Mr. Gale.

The money that had been provid~

ed for the Princess Alice Playing oe ARRIVALS

Fie ad come fro 2 Seh queen, 44 tons, Capt. R
eld had come from the Labour) cing’ trom St. Vincent, Agents: Sch

Owners ‘Association.

S.S. Craftsman, 3,999 tons, Capt
W. F. Oneil, from St. Lucia, Agents:
DaCosta & Co. Lid.

DEPARTURES

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.

Jenkins Ro-

MISCELLANEOUS

WANTED Pint Bottles at
D. V. SCOTT & CO,
3.8.50—T,F.N. | welfare





CALYPSG RECORDS, forty eight that he remembered being taught | tent to settle down and take things Maa ane ata | The M.V. T. ak ae
o a get . Sera Saket Ce s ay ar 1 ‘ ,| M.S. HEC um. 4th, 5th, 8th
titles, only ten each, come and g | was not to render evil for evil, fat ih es uae can be) its. HELENA. Sept.’ 1st, 2nd, 5th | for St. Lucia, St. Vincent
A. BARNES & CO. LTD. LOST | The . ex-Churchwarden, Mr,| little hope for the future, - The SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM Grenada, Aruba, Curacao, “ a
15:4. PN Tudor, was not present at the| fact that many of the colonies are} 5.5 ‘URANIENBORG Aux. 12th Sanine Ww cawaadeay 2 4 we
pa ‘ — | BLACK PLASTIC POCKET-BOOK— | meeting, and there was no ond kicking against the pricks should] S.S. COTTICA Aug. 18th Basta . 1950. nhescay, ne
LIPTON'S FRENCH COFFEE is de- | Between Hall's and Martindale's Rad | who could throw any light on the] be regarded as grounds for cau-|SAMANG TO MADEIRA, PLYMOUTH, ugust, Avou,
‘iy the : sehcan nai please return same to - > ; ant TE \
BE yout cam buy is also the | mont RA Pouice: Station matter except the ex-ChUrea ie re taaiats, Mais [ME GRATGREEAR fon See |
most economical by reason of the 4.8.50—In | warden, iveness of West Indians, Malays, | u's: WILLEMSTAD Sept. 19th BWI S
roneser re ; 2 s ‘ chooner Owners from PORT OF SPAIN
lesser required to the cup — |———— : He thought that Mr. Gale and| West Africans and Cypriots, must] saiLinG TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO ;
* n o rrocer 59c | AOS One G acelet at either ; ‘ = SAIL . RA , : :
ae ano ihiuon ia reer: Gor’ Gib’ of Paradise Beach,|Mr. Weatherhead were right to|be accepted as the rise of young DEMERARA, ETC Scene mes 4047 Pan American brings « new era in air transportation to the
aanike — 4.8.50—8n. | Sentimental value, Will finder bring the matter up, because | and vital peoples, M.S, HECUBA Aug. 26th , ~ : Western Hemisphere... on the wings of the luxurious double-
ee | return to Marine ‘Hotel.. Large reward | certain sections of the Press and We must not however, underes- | S-S. COTTICA Sept. 5th tank 1 Dire oth ‘ .
= “ a aat ree cabriaets tofkecad r d . 4 8. P. MUSSON, 80N @ CO. LTI decked Clippers, Direct convections at New York with other
MOTOR OILS & GREASES—Price’s / 0 4.8.50-¢n | Public had taken up the question, timate the seriousness of the un- AGENT: 7 “KL Presidente” flights to Europe
Becrine nce a ai wah ____ | and more especially because the}rest they may cause, for very real GENTS , x r
oy Teas. tn do"Gin Drums. Whole: | SWEEPSTAKE TICKET — Series ZZ |Government was asking for an|and thorny problems are so raised; s l as Comt
scik & Ratail 1 | 28h Finder | please return same 10 |audited Statement. One could but it is evident that the future ° ° ° uper-Luxury & Super-Comfort Between
REDMAN & TAYLOR’S GARAGE Ltd. | Goulbourne Ince, a .. St: Only make an alidited Statement |lies only in the consideration of ‘ n : : ;
saad 4.8.50-—-8 Michael 4.8.50—In 7 ake a idite: atem ie e Superb meals,..including seven-course
Be gn. | Michac shy meee So these probbetmn ia we neglect to ana Nationa eamsni': pci
rs La lreiggr oA ag sat atten PE se od ed pr ak eer se t a would suggest that they ee Fa oe future is ob- served at your individual table
vent here again, Px s, tir | 905 Finde Bas ; ; lores ‘ > \scur j sos .
ESET Bee EE Ee Oe \O Cobham, Upper Roebuck strest should not discuss the matter any | Scured in dou SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails .
" 4.8.50 4.8.50—In ae ye day, but oe they Montreal Halifax Boston B'dos B'dos + Club lounge and bar on tower deck,
pay should call a special public meet-
oo dace Hikers eh aden § 5 oe Facet . 7 LADY NELSON 22nd July 25th July 27th July Sth A 6th Aug, e Ore 1 perfume et .
ee ween ee al eee | WANTED ing of the Vestry and invite Mr. Harbour Lo CAN, CHALLENGER lth Aug. 14th Aug. —— 24th Aug, 24th Aug ee age pentane hee eee ond
in 10 tb lots. At 1/- per tbh. Hé . en paeegeael Tudor and Mr. Pile to attend. LADY RODNEY 28rd 5. 26 Je ion. | : :
PROVERBS & CO., Ltd | , é ‘ 3rd Aug. 26th Aug. 28th Aug. 6thSep 7th Sep ¢ Extra flight attendants.
are 3.4.50—3n, | There might be certain things on LADY NELSON lith Sep. I4th Sep. 16th Sep. 25th Sep. 26th Sep. NEW
3 | HELP to 1 a nae be were: In Carlisle Bay * Spacious cabin with room to stroll,
OMNIPED — An elastic foot Cushion YOUNG LADY — for our office with | They should not discuss it behin NORTHBOUND ive
SOS RELIG REE SC SOR ae ee, Eaeaieie ee Bove kbeDineg (even | Mr. Tudor’s back. That was his} Sh, Mary E. Caroline; Sch. Eman- " a he Gone. Shises - ee + Living re comfort on both deeks... YORK
KNIGHT'S Ltd B elemetitary) Stenotypist preterably. attitude, said Mr. Mottley, and it ee 7, aomioes Flee aba aE ten nals eee soriyeg 1 = ning, sound-proofing,
RUBBLE-STONE, Concrete-Stone, | Write full particulars of qualifications, | was unlike the attitude which had (Craftsman; Sch. Turtle Dove; Sch. W. TA hl be eg RE hea id elm So and temperature control, *
Sand, Marl, Block-Stone Suitable for capabilities and experience (if any) to been adopted towards him when|L. Bunicia; Sch. Rosarene; M.V. Daer BARS ToLDaie igth Sep ' Ce 30th Sep. Ist Oct Sth Oct
‘and, Marl, -s Suite A 3 1c 2 ards 7 ; Sch. ' ner ath Oct. 10th Oct. 19th Oct. 2th Oct. 24th Cet. " ‘
sawing. Johnson Stables & Garage tt2. HULL & SON, P.O, Box 192 3.8.50-an }he had been ill on one occasion, your) Leica eines Lenten ; Sch ax Pie { * Everybody sleeps at night... between RIO DE JANEIRO
Dial 4205. 29.7 Se a Tal alee Slo ache Mr, Miller said he did not want} Sch aril EB Smiths se ydina A., a | 1 dad and Rio...in a Sleeper . MONTEVIDEO
YARD BOY Apply at Hindu Store | ae 5 : . _ or mith; Sch. Mary M N.B.—Subject to change without notice. \)/ vessels fitted with cold storege cnn ll add a d
SILVER FILIGREE SET Bangle, | 5)° Swan St 4.8,50—1n | -° criticise anyone or do anyone Lewis; Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe; Sch bers. Passenger Fares ani freien ‘etes on application to :— seat or, at a small additional cost, in an
Faring, Brooch, Finger-ring. $6.00 per | °° ““ Si ”'. harm. He associated himself with |P°Ortac; Sch. Burma D.; M.V. Earles



ST
Just arrived Nobles & Hoare lacquer | dozen.
paints in several colours, including sur- ; White Park.
fecpr, primer, putty, compound, and
thinners. Enquire Auto Tyre Company,

Trafalgar Street. Phone 26%
3.8.50—T F.N,

Fund, and had _ been

One (1) Croquet Set in good condition. | handed over to the Vestry by tha
Phone 4039, 3.8.50—3n |Government for administration.
They were therefore wholly re-



j TRANSATLANTIQUE | Only PAA offers such a complete choice of services;

premium “El Presidento” service; regular St
FRENCH LINE

service; and economical Tourist servic
~~ Sailing to Trinidad on the 11th August,



For information see your Travel Agent or:

8.8. “GASCOG





Swine i thictenay Gomi AWe abet) £20 MONTHLY sponsible for that money, M.V. T. B. Radar, 116 tons, Capt 1950.

allowed to import any more Ant Tape| _ Knew Nothing Sette saad te ae Accepting Passengers:— Minimum Fare AW VMERICAN
although out of stock, but we still have EASILY earned at a in oe time He too was a member of the aS mae ag tad a. tdae: Gant $19.00

a supply of “Ant Buttons” which will Feeney ane ton either sex 1 | Playing Fields Committee, and he | rannis, for Trinidad,’ Agents: | ‘toh 3.8. “GASCOGNE” — Sailing to Plymouth on the 17th August,

ast Le teyes a en Pett, eens also contact you with Students in|Knew nothing at all about the| Owners’ Association, 1950.



KNIGHT'S LTD 3.8.50--2n | Colonies and Dominions for pen cor-|spending of the money. He was Deluxe Cabin for Two available $622.00



er HWorto AtRhuwars
Da


























































. i
respondents. | Enclose, 8 i eed making that statement becausq Ships In Touch With B.W.1. Each. | ss & Cou fad, Broad Si,
— ton, Prospect. House, 329° Wigan Road, | any taxpayers and other people} Barbados Coastal Station For Further Particulars, Apply to:— \ On .
E Leigh Lanes, England, had been to him, They felt that] “Ganre Wireless (W.T,) Uta n « | e Phone 2122 (After hours 2303)
PURLIC NOTICES 20.7.50.—30n. |e had always represented prin- | padvise teat ane anh air ‘eonarmunionta Xu M sONES & co,, LTD. - Agents. 1 Aemtans alone
hs — _jciples, but that his mouth was] with the following ships through their
— . ae TBE ray closed because the ex-Church- Barbados Coast Station; — oe oo

ane 5 ae rea at warden happened to be _ his os s Salsas aed Cavina; 3 VELOPED LLLP PLLA PPP PPPDPPPEPLPA PPA AVES

rnc e mee we «OC ormartern; Ss. iconus; Ss. |
Hazelton, Upper Lightsfoot Lane, friend. Ookhill; s.s Arfobec; 8.8 Golfito, %
eee ay eae ene voters Rs He was not accusing the ex- a8 er enon 2 a ee |
applying to ne Governor for naturali- “ anv > se 8. rt erst; S.§ G ulin;
zation, and that any person who knows Churchwarden or anyone else. |

. a is ‘ . 8.§. Oranjestad; §.8. Craftsman; S.S
The Playing Field Committee had], neon ss Empire valdgate: s.s

summoned two meetings and both] Alcoa Corsair; S.S. San Rose: s.s
aad been abortive because the ex- maiele: 7 Whee b s Re Sees
Churehwarden had not attended. mee, apams; 5.5. :
Neither had he attended the meet- pf \ home: BM: | MAES Re
ing of the Vestry that day.

He agreed with the suggestion
made by Mr. Mottley that the

any reason why naturalization should
not be granted should send a written
ard signed statement of the facts to the
Colonial Secretary of Barbados, Public
Buildings, Bridgetown
Dated this Ist day of August 1950.
COTTLE CATFORD & Co.,
Solicitors for Miss Bernardine Edmee
Le Currieux.

sit TOPS wx VALUES
OUR PRICES

EPSP CPFRS

May mean kidney trouble



MAIL NOTICE

A function of the kidneys is to
eliminate harmful impurities from







SESE OSL ES







































































































%
“
%
%
9 5 . %,
3.8.50—2n - see If the ee grow matter should not be _ aepuaee MAILS for, st Vincent; Grenada; 4
, sluggish, these impurities accum- ehind he ex-Churchwarden’s nidad ane ritish Guiana by the |] ¥%
NOTICE ulate and settle and often become Gages ; The Canecni yen omeo. Wainer = % >
a cause of pain in joints and He wanted the public to be sat- Parcel and Registered Mails at 3|% %
Na’ Keteta nd muscles. The we7 to tackle the isfied in mind as to whether the] p.i. on the 4th August 1950. Ordinary | % DEFY x
AUBREY NEWTON REECE trouble is to help the kidneys. money had been properly spent | Mail at 8 a.m. on the Sth August 1950 x %
ecsased They should be toned up with x net He hoped that the special 8 g
Notice is hereby given that any per- De Witt's Pills—the medicine Py naeennes kare] » cal %
son having any debt or claim upon or made specially for this purpose. public ara gaan be called 3
atfecting th tate of Aubrey Newton 7 re - aoa is SOON as possible r y.
Hshta ta it alt he aa | BOWES A aig. WI" Sef ynarea ne | ORTENTAL You Folks! lt Aint No Idle Boast! Come and Prove It. \
ain nomas nis a (ensuing a <4 . — sic aeti
on the 2ist day of July 1949 intestate, the kidueys that brings them ERP me as tevin aie CURIOS. IVORY, TEAR SANDAL %
ik hereby required to send in pete back to perform their natural and sa ayints C tined WARE, TAP- CUT THIS OUT %
tars of ‘thelr claims “auly attested to 11h Pinction properly. ‘This well (§\‘ € . / : ~ £ Soe 5 soucners as preparec ,9eTore 2
Bireet, SSridgetown, on er, before, the Wis drorid sod wre have one punering. 7s, Semone) tae KASHMERE vamere WASHABLE PLASTIC RAIN COATS COMBS, HAIRPINS, HAIR-
bth day of September, 1950 after whic! letters from sufferers telling m a : " In Pink, Blue and Green ; iS, sRS, CREAMS >
date I shall proceed to distribute the : { i le hill. Y , SLIDES, POWDERS, \ , y
sinetof the "estate, amont the ‘parties Mel guterng by taki De ) ee oe er said they wanted | £9%%%G993909%99415977000", Tae ron ae ela For Ladies $2.18 each PERFUMES, ig ed eats ®
ent ereto having regar o oe ’ taki: 4 J = a + 7 F F Sart - BAGS, SHOES, H TS, §
tebts and claims only of which I shall Witt’s Pills. T em all the vouchers, those certified °S JERSEY P ; a 2
then have ‘had notice and that ana for your trouble. Goto {| 2nd uncertified as well. a GIBBS’ DOMESTIO 6c, per a. peste hein Fa ae bareeds BIBBONS BTO., snd neem x
not be liable for assets #0 distribu our cheaiin and Mr. Weatherhead said that a CALICO 36 in. WIDE : eet ee eee, aber Dashery Lines >
to any perton of whose so or claim y get acusly documents relative to the matter} PROVISION GROCERY & Unsurpassed in Quality LADIES VESTS 2 tar $1.00 GENTS V S 2 for $1.00 %
ee af perione sedaniied to the said eae sd that a list | , LIQUOR STORE rR peter ne uae PANTIES Ste. soe ik TS SPORTS SHIRTS 8c. 2
nd all persons t } § a \¢ Eee ng) : TIERS ro %,
estate are requested to settle their of the questions they wanted to| Offers You % GINGHAMS in lovely Checks PLASTIC HEADTIES 25c. 1S PYJAMAS $3.60 pet gut %
ocrounts sithout SIRS July 1950 ask Mr. Tudor should be sent to > | 29 in. wide washable LARGE PLASTIC TABLE- TS DRESS SHIRTS $1.98 up x
; AURELIA ETHELINE REECE, him before the meeting, so that Edam Cheese 9c. Ib whole or Only 47c. per yd. . CLOTH 48 in. x 45 in ENTS BRACES 18c. per pair ;
Qualified BI oy of OUR |\he would have time to prepare é $1.00 Cut . the Estate of Aubrey the replies. Gouda Cheese $1.04 per HEAVY QUALITY LOVELY " GENTS HANDKERCHIEFS
Yt 50 an. | GUARANTEE Discussion then ended. Peanuts 36c. Th POPLIN 36 in. wide in CHILD'S VESTS 30c, each 19¢. up
De Witt’s Pills . | Choice salted Fish 22c. } Pink, Blue, Grey and White PLASTIC PANTIES DRILL 59c., 15c. 97c. $1.00
TICE [shes Sees | ee =F ie perv eae Ey ae
conditions and the ingredients con- | A FEW ‘ f a. } — CO allel salina , e+» : .
NO I bE j Saree to. cighd atandceee. af sere ANTIQUE ani atten’ | a 2 a LOVELY QUALITY FRENCH PEARL NECKLACES $1.50 up PLAIN & STRIPPED TROPICALS x
Q Choice salted Beet 42c. tb GEORGETTE 97c. per yd. EARRINGS $1.00. pair $2.00 per yd. up , %
cmeiratinaceasseaee® das ND > »
a PILLS ican “G re ee eee [D SPREADS LOVE PIN STRIPPED TWEEDS %
one and . IBBON $| BED SPREADS LOVELY Lig Wd Let .
All persons running booths, or De TRE Chandelier pieces GIBBS oe R CHINE 36 in. from $1.08 up QUALITY, Single $4.50, Double yy yeh mee %
‘ a , « 7. NES
TT OT MOMEMEELEE for Kidney and Bladder Troubles FOR SALE ia ney i LINENS FOR UNIFORMS in 10. aa Ao Oe! a all at reduced prices %
at ¥ - s yrooms ay | [RS
games at the Garrison Savannah At your ne Biers ons ‘cesar le Wal be Oyéle | $ attractive shades 36 in. wide GOOD QUALITY BRASSIERS : - %
| | These make charming fixtures i i5e. per yd, SATIN FINISH $1.12 per pair TAILORS BUTTONS FOR x
on August 7th, 10th and 12th eee yee 1Q Dial 3115 ' - ce od s IATS 12¢, per doz. »
8 : 5 een eee ms 214 BROCADES SPUNS, MIAMIES ‘HILDREN RUBBER SANDLES GENTS SHOES, PUMPS, FELTS, x
(Race Days) are hereby noti- NOTICE AAPA LASALLE |, SATIN, TAFFETAS CREPES ee ae te ee ae Ces. UNDERWEAR, CAPS x
i sizes 50c. per po iS, ? i , Ss, q
fied that I have authorised 3 all reduced 5 - : - CIG. CASES, COMBS, BOWTIES, ¥
EDWARD DURANT to collect fees “CALLING ALL R.AF. A Few only - - - 1% CRETTONES & BEDTICKS eee ara be ert ae an > — ee other Lines $
for such booths, stalls ete., on my PERSONNEL” | PIPE WRENCHES 1% also reduced in prices was ne ay Peneer ? *
behalf. Persons failing to comply There will be a meeting of (| sf & ® Come Early & >
: “i lat iat st opened 1& s
ith this order, will have booths the Barbados Branch of the | ‘= 5, > >
Ream Peet, 4 | . * | Hurry if you want to secure any. ve IT’S ONLY i Grab the Oppor- %
removed from the Garrison Savan-} R.A.F. Association on Satur- 1% teawaity. ~
nah for the three (3) days above|{{ day Sth August, 1950, at the {| THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM ik COM THERE AL: VALUES ' S
mentioned sn i ele British Council “Wakefield (CENTKAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors) | % TO OFFER i m0 rie “a 5 - Ni ¥
Eagle Clnb pe 6.30 p.m Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets x Pr. Wm. HENRY ST. DIAL 3466 and Nos. 6, 42 and 53 SWAN ST. %
Broad Street. Ys |: 656566060660565090S50005505 0000009909009 O09 FOV POG OWVOUIU VV DD 9D OOOO SODDISOIODDOOOOODO FOOTIE



A



PAGE RIGHT



MARSHALL, WALCOTT
FLAY SURREY BOWLING

LONDON, Aug. 3
A HUGE partnership between Marshall and Walcott put
the West Indies right on top of Surrey to-day
chiefly responsible for the tourists amassing a t

and was

tal of 454



This gave theron a first innings lead of 273 and then they
claimed two Surrey a innings’ wicke for 29 oe
stumps were dr awn Marshall reached 142 and Walec

149 and they put on 279 for the fourth wicket in 220 salto
The score failed by only four runs to equal the fourth
wicket record for the West Indies in England accomplished
by Worrell and Weekes in the Third Test Match.
—— Having lost three wickets over -

oe fnight with only 72 rums to the
“S ,credit, the West Indies needed

nappers care, but once Marshall and Wa

! cot got their eyes in this moi

| ead In | ing, they treated the bowling wit

jseant respect Once they h ad bee

Fi i t R | | eparated, the end ime fairl
= ear I) |

Irs oun ither gave a chanee during

t sta ach hitt o

AS was expected the Water oe : wail tk e ns he on |
Polo match’ between Snappers and} 9+ o6 the ground e on |
tad pr the out ol 1 ground on ¢ occa mE |
Barracudas at th for i:

Barbadc
Aquatic Ciub yesterday atterminetin

proved to be the most exciting of Bad light was trouble

some when



the two matches played, Snappers | Surrey batted a secor

wen the match five goals to two, | tis caused’ a hold up for hort
This puts Snappers in the lead ell just before the close

the competition, .

In the other fixture Swordfi: ot Nard Drives
overwhelmed Police six goals To return to the big stand, Mar-
love. shall seored mainly throug: hard

The matches were as follows drit es in his stay of four hours, 35

Swordfish 6, Police 0 mit.utes, but when trying a glide

Police playing with two subst - |‘ leg he put the ball into the safe
tutes started off defending stu hands of Alec Bedser
bornly as their goal keeper Walcott’s fierce driving is always
Harris made several good sav a feature of his play and to-day
and it was not until midway Was no exception. He compiled his
through the first half that Mick fourth century of the season and
Jordan playing centre forward f was out when snicking a ball to
Swordtish. finally pierced throu the wicket-keeper. He was at the
their defence. Shortly after th crease for just over four hours
Geoffrey Foster scored their s¢ Bowlers met with more succe
ond goal afterwards until Johnson showed

At the start of the second hs aggression in a bold eighth wicket
Swordfish opened up as Nes\4}stand of 47 if 45 minutes with
Portillo made a fine swim-throus h | Goddard.
to send in goal number three fro n He was not out 39*when the in
oe aeaer tg Sete Ee ings closed, Ramadhin was at the
ook over again, a ore EE ccna 4 a e “intt
Police rallied but their forward te . ;
ware ineffective and down can When Surrey went'in for about
the Swordfish forward line in 70 minutes batting, they had a
final attack, Gerard Jordan hit the {auick reverse when Bedser wi
cross bar twice, each time the bal! bowled with a ball which hit h
re-bounded into play. His brother | bails. Fishlock and May then de
Mickey then collared the ball and] tended stubbornly against — goc
nade no mistake in scoring the | bowling in poor light. It became
sixth and final goal for his team.]so0 bad that the players left th:

= S J field for 20 minutes and soon after

Snappers 5. Barracudas 2 | the resumption May, attempting :

Barracudas completely outplay-| ook, gave fine leg a catch

ed Snappers in the first half of : :

this very fast and somewhat rough Constable’s Defence
game, and though Billy Manning le _

for Snappers opened the scoring, This brought in Constable an
Herbert Portillo playing on the he continued to defend with Fish-









Barracudas wing shot the equal- lock until stumps were drawn.
izer. almost immediately after- Surrey still needed 244 runs to
wards. Without even looking at}avoid tre innings’ defeat with
the goal he scored with a lovely [eight wickets standing

shot from a difficult angle. Stili Continuing — their overnight
Barracudas kept up the offensive: [fourth wicket partnership, Mar-
but their forwards missed golden] shall and Walcott brought the

opportunities. after good work in
their back line by Charles Evelyn,
Basil Brooks and Keith Lewis

Almost at half time however
Kenneth Ince put his side one up
to make the score two to one in
favour of Snappers as the whistle
went for the interval,

West Indies’ score to 203 by lunch
against Surrey at the Oval here
without being parted, At the inter-
val the West Indies, replying to
Surrey’s 161, were 42 ahead with
seven wickets in hand,

50 In 2 Hours

Half time over Snappers. found} A little later came Marshall's
their form and their skipper{50, made in something over 2
George Maclean scored with a }hours.
well placed shot out of reach of When 71, with the total at 186,

goalkeeper Henry Perez. Barracu- {Walcott might have been caught

das were not dismayed and not] trom a return to Westerman, but
long after this Herbert Portillofat lunch the fourth wicket pair
again came into the picture’ by [ were still together

once more beating the Snappers} Ramadhin, who left the field
goalkeeper Taylor, With the score Jafter lunch yesterday because of
at three goals to two the crowd a chill, was much better today
were kept very excited and some |'phe Team's Manager Mr, Kidney

Barracuda fans were even looking
for another equalizer.
Snappers however

said Ramadhin hoped to bat later

in the day.

had other

ideas and they turned on the heat | ,, ee ee ee tea Tie
in full force as, shortly before {!0U" bi ndies’ wickets fa .
time Kenneth Ince followed by J ™™0r collapse setting in once the
Delbert ‘ Bannister put the issue big fourth Wicket stand was brok

en,
This partnership had put on 27



beyond doubt as they each scored,
The teams were as follows:






Swordfish: \ Weatherhead, |?US in 3 hours, 40 minutes, Mar: -
(Capt.), G. Poster, N. Portillo, M. {shall hit 14 fours in a stay of 4
Jordan, K. Lewis, G. Jordan, M.} hours, 35 minutes, while Walcott |
Fitzgerald also hit 14 fours as well as a

Police: FE. Harris, W. Phillips, | six in a little over 4 hours,

Me, D. Richards, (Capt.), L. Dod- Lock and Laker had charge of
ya Alleyne, Z, Williams, G.} the bowling after the interval, but
shby. a steady rate of scoring was main-

Barracudas: H. Perez, K. Taylor, | tained, Walcott vauadd "Ekaoehaetd to
P, Fletcher, C, Evelyn, B. Brooks. tthe century, his fourth of the tour,
(Capt.), H Portillo, E Johnson fand the partnership reached 200

Snappers A Paylor, “ M >} five minutes afterwards, and just
Rogers, Dr Hentivicr, ie nee B Before Marshall @9¢ 6 itis bin»
Manning . ee > * Tdred, This was his third three fig-

Th tie, utet +H ure score of the summer,

e referee was Mr. W. Gibb
As Thursday August 10, is 4 After Lunch

Race Day, next week's fixtures} Marshall was particularly severe

will be played on Tuesday August On Loek, anid the first hundred
8th. The fixtures are: Snappers vs. }Tuns after lunch took only 58
Swordfish and Flying Fish vs. | minutes,

Bonitas. Wher Westerman came on Wal-



cott hooked him to the boundary
and then drove a ball out of the
ground for six in the same over.
Walcott did not survive very long,
being taken at the wicket off a
defensive stroke and it was Parker
who claimed these two wickets.

With Christiani and Gomez to-
gether the game quieted down,

Martindale For
Commonwealth X1

LONDON, Aug. 2
E. A, Martindale of the Wgst
Indies is included in a Common-







BARBADOS ADVOCATE





CENTURY MAKERS







CLYDE WALCOTT t ROY MARSHALL
tered Gomez was cleaned bow]- | SURREY—Ist Innings ise 168
by Laker. He played forward |. WEST INDIES FIRST INNINGS
, ; : | Rue b Westerman
ut missed Stolimever 1.b.w. Parker 45
The West Indies were all out at | Worrell! c¢ Melntyre b Westerman 7
» ie lids vind _| Marshall c A. Bedser Parker,. 143
the fall of their ninth wicket for | Minn, McIntyre b- Parker 14
434 Ramadhin being unable to] Ghristiani ¢ 1. b. Lock 10
bat owing to illness | Gomer b k fae ae 16
fter te > ei io . | Goddard ¢ MeIntyre b A. V. Bedser 12
After tea the eighth wicket pus | ey icon ‘not. out *4
on 47 runs in as many minutes, | valentine b A. V. Bedser 1
and then with the new ball Alec} Ramadhin Absent (Ill) is
Bedser had Goddard taken on the Extras
leg side for 8 wickets to be down Total 434
for 428. Vaientine’s entry meant | i ‘, ts =-
. , ot « £ . ‘ Fall of jickets 1 5 2-26; 3
the last wicket as Ramadhin Ws | , ad: 5-380; 6-381, 7-981; | g42r
unable to bat, but only six runs | 9434
were added before Bedser struck | BOWLING ANALYSIS e
again by clean bowling Valentine, | ah As Bete a 7% "=
so that the innings closed for 434 | We Saris 14 2 | 6 2
with the West Indies 273 ahead | Parker 40 4 88 s
Johnson not out 39 had used | Laker 29 & =i :
Lock 27 7 104 1
the long handle freely, but ne | ga." Bedser % 0 18
should have been caught when 13 Extras b, 2, I.b

Surrey made a bad start in their
bid to save the innings defeat for
only 8 runs scored

with

clean bowled Eric
Trestrail, 12th Man
Ramadhin though stated to be |
ill did not field when
Surrey batted for the
ty minutes and Trestrail appeared

not unduly
as twelfth man
Johnson and

pace

but Constable



Touring Girls |
Win First |
Netball Game |

A LARGE

terday
ball game
Olympia

repres
High School,
13 goals to 9,

His Excellency the Governot
and Mrs. Savage, accompanied by
Mr. W. Lambert, Private Secre-
tary, and Mr. Denis Savage, son
of the Governor, attended. Mrs.
Savage met members of both
teams and also took the first throw
in

Jean Spicer,

the
girls

for

local a
was
Whenever she

of an

The other
? | had 13 tries
Awai is very
land although she

| occasions,

the
had
while

For
sey

Even Honours

| Honours were evenly divide

to a few minutes before

The score was four

after Bishop's

the lead which they kept throug: 1-
out the game.

receiving a good throw,

net,

goals in the

getting

off they



Werrell
batsmen quiet with their aecurat
bowling, but with 18 runs
the boards bad light stopped play

It was possible to resume late
and then Worrell had May caught,
came in to stay with
Fishlock until stumps were drawn
with Surréy 29 for 2.

crowd turned up at
the Queen’s College grounds yes-
evening to witness the Net-
between
Club
sentatives
The visitors won by
This was their first
engagement of the tour.

one of the shooters
visitors,
lesson
Out of 15 tries she scored
excellent
received a pass her
_ | team could nearly always be sure
additional goal.
shooter,
s but only scored three
active in that position

on others she contriku-
ted much to Spicer
local girls,
10 tries
Jean Vaughan had nine tres
ind scored four

Soon after one of the visitors
was penalised and
was awarded, Jean Vaughan thri w
wide of the net.

Before half time the visitors nct-
ted another to put themselves ty
lead.

resumption Gloria Ramsey
to cut down the lead of the visito s.

At this stage the visitors were
into their
things their own way.
still
energy and looked as though they







I Wide by
A. V Bedser



Worrell hlock

¢ Bedser b

not out
Worrell





.Bedser.
‘ Constable not out

Total (for 2

final seven- Wkts. fell’ 1—8, 2

Johnson
Worrell
Gomez

kept th

bye

on




of the
visiting
Bishop's

girls
the
the

and
of

really
in

gave the
shooting,

10 and
position,

in that

June Awai,

missed on some



scoring, spell,
Gloria Rarn-

and scored five



ip
halt tit e
but scon
took

all
High School
Jean Spicer, afte

found the











a free throw

o
afier
scored

Se eS =

Shortly

stride and had
At the blow
full

appeared of

WE





<=}



wealth team which opposes an]}theugh there was full value from would have taken. on another local
England side in the first m&tch}every scoring stroke, team right away :
of the Kingston, Surrey, cricket} Then Parker held a hard hit} On the other hand the local
festival starting August 30, above his head at inidon to dismi | girts appeared to be all worn out
—Reuter. Christiani, and with the score un- by the speed o? the visitors
———— a ote oe :
They ll Do It Every Time | wanes By Jimmy, + itlo on Fadia It
f eee 7 — lee 1}
"Wirey MAKES HERSELF AS GLAMOROUS |B ( MISS SCRAP HEAP OF 1950:
UT LET HIM ALL YOU DAMES ARE ALIKE!) |
AS A MOV! | !
OVIE QUEEN... AND HUBBY | CATCH HER IN

| CeeaNT EVEN KNOW SHE'S ON EARTH +s.



HER RELAXING
DUDS“ HE LETS
| GO LIKE A THIRD-
| BASE JOCKEY.



|
\ MINUTE YOU GET A GUY | |
"HOOKED YOU DON'T CARE | |
| HOW YOU LOOK AROUND
HOME! JUST DOLL UP
( WHEN YOU'RE SASHAYIN’
_ AROUND TOWN !

WE

Westerman

May c Marshall b Worrell

white.)

22



OPEN.

2 no-balls “by

SURREY—2nd Innings

BOWL ING ANALYSIS
Oo,

M R, WwW
2 i ’
7 2
1 0 0
Reuter,

G

4

AT THE





Francis

, Lederer-Calleia
MITCHELL

Paramount
presents

co-starring

WANDA
HENDRIX

with
Josep!

LEISEN

Production
Produced by

|

i





COLLEGE CADETS WIN
INTER PLATOON SPOR TS

A LARGE number:

from Harrison College,
them

turned out to see

of parents and friends of the
Combermere and Lodge S
take part in the Cadet:

cadets
choo!s
Inte

Platoon Sports which was held at the Garrison Savannah}

yesterday afternoon.

















, seal

ve














FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 1950



No Back Pay
For Employees

@ from page 4 Sicenitaiach 5

been able to cor

Hir

and



f the Ve















, Second Division Fixtures







as aie
. 1 wotiuey, <
Number one platoon (Harrison College) was the}i: e that ac
Champion Platoon with 18 ints followed closely by{ ised ut yet they we
. |
- 2 ’ , ld o
Number three (Lodge) and six (Combermere) with 14jt® * Shee
points aS} as they had beer 10k
r ; 7 . i i $43 «| img ward to it for a lon
Before the events the three and gave a good exhibition of
companies were split into platoons. ! control. - oF,
Number one and two platoor The cadets will be breakin,
were Harrison College, Number; camp on Saturday. |
three Lodge and Number four, A ‘Grand Dance }
five and six Combermere. | Results are as follows: — | ‘eins |
The day was a very bright one, oe es |
and all the boys ran around: in}, ; 4,,¢haret, Pace-s0 Yarde: Ut No. [a Messrs. CALEY MOTTLEY
their vests and shorts. Everyone ae eae oo . PATSY SPRINGER
sts and shorts. Veryonel)4 and 5 Platoons.
of them expressed what a wonder-| 2. Centipede & 20 Yards: 1s", Qhiec 1
3 P 2 i \
ful time they were having at tho) Lode No.3 Platoon: 2nd No. 1 Plo") By
barracks. 2. Rew & Spoon Race 60 Yards: 1st “ 4 *
The first event on the pro-| Ne. 1 Platoon: 2nd No. 1 Platoon sz esigiess + ol
é a: J ng ¢ ,| 3rd — | a >, 17k
gramme was the Chariot Race and)“: “Wier Barrow Race—25 Yards: 1st. | | tdisio. Supeiied
this was run over a distance of} n Platoon: 2nd No. 3 Platoon | Mr PERCY GREEN'S Orchestra
50 yards and all platoons took ae He. Platoon. ae ss = ie ane Ni
: Sack Race—4 (ards: Ist jo. 6 | nee
part. This race was very amusing] p)jj,0n: 2nd. No. 2 Platoon: 3rd Please invite your Friends
and spectators rocked with laugh-| 6. Officers’ Race Ist. Major Foster, |
ter as the boys tried to disentanyle| 2nd. Capt. Perkins; srd. Capt. Me
themselves from each other at} Come,
naka. ee . e 7. Running Backwards 25 Yards
the finishing point. Number on} is;) No. 6 Platoon; 2nd. No. 5 Pla = aoe 4) |
latoon was the winner after] teon: 3rd. No. 1 Platoon Jou are i te
Sina a. Tata aa | seat TPege, Leawed Race-00: verge: 1s You are invited to |
z =* . ; No. 2 Platoon; 2nd. No. 4 Platoon )
3rd. No. 6 Platoon & GRAND DANCE | | When your throat feels
Obstacle Race ©. Obstacle Race—1st, No. 6 Platoon: given by | dry and scratchy from harsh
and, No. 2 Plate 3rd, No, 2 Platoo: . wah t >
In the Obstacle Race two teams| ' a oe “7 Messrs. EARL GIBSON and ', | coughing or over-smoking,
Pr sach pis tl ot CLEVE JONES | ust let a soothing, delicious
from each platoon jostleu co pass} ie a \! the first obstacle which was a Fo-night } oe a. Nor iheaat
piece of canvas spread on the POLO at { membranes with
ground with eight boys sitting o K.G.V.M. PARK, St. Phili t taste throat-2asirs medi-
> a i A} ma f AN » wt ) v ig Y wae
the edges to keep it down. A! Tie Bicbasos Holo Ct ‘2 Vit Mr. Percy Green's }) ¥ Gor cinai ingreaents of
the boys crawled under the out-| | E Barbados Polo Club has Orchestt \ 2eo \ s ¥. 2Rub
spread canvas but very few cam. | for purposes of practicing team HS Be {{t 4 ® gee?! | Really medicate
out looking pleased with them-| Work been divided into three ADMISSION oe = 4} ie Rew g!
Ae ; groups as follows: Nefreshments on Sale i\\" ee oe
selves ; Ss as Si )
CYCLONES (Colour White) * ae = -
Next ordeal in this race was th N , : F = = —
C Ms Yi Michelin; Marsh; Williams; Parke ~
bun-eating in which many boys] Frost; Skewes-Cox; Melville eehieastictemcersiccniaininouiiini
who. tried to eat their buns too Peer 4 (Colour Blue) = | eee
fast nearly choked themselves: | mtccer Meste jopane Bric: Gil
Numbcr six platoon (Comber | no " : F ,
cre) won this race Majc YOU SHOULD
; oe erage 4 TORNADOES (Colour Red)
Foster won the Officers Race wit er
Captain Perkins a close second Deane Colin; Deane Vere Deane SEE - .-
When the programme was con | Keith: Eee ee
Ww, Y 1dshaw,

cluded Sergeant D.

TO-DAY

ROXY

THE SCREEN’S MOST

LADD

h

RICHARD MAIBAUM

DONT
MAKE
} ALL THE
CLOTHES

Directed by
MITCHELL LEISEN
oad SL en

ADORABLE ALAN

as the American soldier who
avenges his wartime betrayal!

















AND CONTINUING TWICE



DAILY






















| P.C.S., MAFFEI & Co., Ltd.

TOP SCORERS

IN TAILORING





Stuart of th



“Y" Boys’ Club are in
to attend

in honour of the Cli
President,

at the Combermere

peers

Musie by Mr.
Gectieote a

SUBSCRIPTION
Dress Informal

3

or associated
Y.M.C.A.



(Members are all Friends

every one of us Non-Sne
There will be a

MEETING

6 pan, Sharp
on SATURDAY

To

Summer Meeting

e
DINNER WILL
F.0.0,

at 8 pm,

Cooked
Chef from
People)

by
St

the same
Vincent

Personally
humble

supervised

MENt

Lords hors d’oeuvre
Norfolk Turkey a la Castle

Trent Bridge Baked York

A Farewell Dance

BE SERV

by
servant Ernest Proctor,

tarbados Regiment thrilled th Fight Practice Chukkas will
boys with some “stunt” riding o be played on Saturday Aug. 5
a motor cycle. He sped aroun and all players are requested to
the track at breakneck speed be on the field by 4.15 p m



















Members and Friends of the

vited

ib's

Mr. Harold Brewster |
Sehool

B, Browne's

/-

N.B.—The “Y” Boys’ Club is
in no way connecféd to
with the

—ERNIE'S_—

Democratic Club

and

obs)

of Members Starting at

5TH AUGUST

discuss the First Day's

Programme of the B.T.C,

FD

French
Clever

your]

Grant

Ham.

Old Tra‘fe.d tHome-Made Sausages
by J. N. & Sons,
Oval Minced Pies
Peche Melba
Fruit



and Dance

— at —

THE BARBADOS AQU.
CLUB

(Members Only)
SATURDAY, Aug. 5, 9
PROGRAMME :

{

Mr.
Mr,

| Violin Solo by Mr. Mau
Fitzgerald

Mr. Bannister and Mr.
ard,

Oswin Hi

é

A Cinderella Dance at
night

A Mask Dance — for

tributed.
Music




y Mr.

w wire Orchestra

| Variety Enertainment

Songs by Miss Fay Chase
Miss June Jones

C. Pierrepont

How-
in The Singing West- |

erners impersonating
Eddie Arnold and Gene
Autry.



which
Domino Masks will be dis-








Arnold Mean-

Admission to Ball room—2/-

Entire Proceeds for Charity.
4.8.50.—2n.

|
}
|
|



ae)



p.m. |





ul

rice



Mid-







TWO
REAL
VALUES

FERGUSON SATIN
PLAIN WHITE
40” wide ‘ $1.32 yd.
TOOTAL HOPSAC

REASE RESISTING FINISH
in Plain Shades of Green, Saxe, Crushed

ii at Natural & White $1. 33 wk
CAVE MEPHERD_& & CO.,LTD.

0, 11, 12, 13 Broad Street





agi
ob















SS St

RED ~ HAND PAINTS for all purposes

Por Interior Decoration of Walls and Ceilings

““MATINTO”

Stocked in White, Cream and Green in
1 Gallon and = ', Gailon Tins









For Woodwork

“S”. ENAMEL FINISH PAINT

Dries with a Hard Gloss equalling
Enamel Finish. Does not Discolour
with Age.

Stocked in White and Cream in 1 Gallon,
4 Gallon and 4 Gallon Tins

For Exterior Woodwork

TROPICAL WHITE PAINT

HARD GLOSS PERMANENT
GREEN PAINT

Stocked in 1 Gln., 4 Gln, and 4% Gin. Tins
Phone 42@, 4456.



—-
The Sign of
QUALITY



WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.

A FINE ASSORTMENT

OF

TROPICAL SUITINGS

IN STOCK

AT

OF

| C. B. RICE & Co.
|

BOLTON LANE

FLAT OIL PAINT



Â¥

SBR

hg MN

rane §

‘SEY aeteryrecee sane nce



Full Text

PAGE 1

PACK SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY AUGUST 4 1M0. HENRY BY CARL ANniDc;,->\i MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNc Pretty pretties in RANGER CY FRANK STRIKLK lA^XOX THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS VOO PO NOT 00 CUT o* voim w*v TO /I-M H(( re oo JO BE Vfrrv AtfCC 10 j Cdn'Vfii.4ND so. M*. SlGNO*!^/f UNTIL IT 13 fimSfto. "-—, i—-"~~ \j *5 **" T <> *** Of' \\ ? A A*V HieHDS./ Pf (Stop Pyorrhea In 24 Hours Amoian rr Pr irrkra -Tr..t H..i. JUST RECEIVED 3 r.i,. (Mi i CM* '.Ml I'.-illl'V "FERGUSON FABRICS ii STOCKED BY THE LEADING STORES. Pkgs. Quaker Oat? Pks. Quaker Corn FUkes ritiirs L K B Pea^ne* Apperta Apples Ouahrd Pineapple Ccklail Cherries SI iced Pinea pples inrFs Gropcfiiut. mi Oi Gi;ipcfrun Tomato. Pineapple 5 STAR RIM J: INCE& Co.. Ltd. •: 8 and 9 Roebuck Stn Dial 2236 '.'.'.•.'.'.•.'.•.'.'.'SS.'.**S**S.V, "--'""in,,,,,,,.! BRINGING UP FATHER GEORGE MC.MANUS •MiCCOMTf TO STBJWOHTB-l UP "S TOO MOT t> >-T(-|> fT Hi rxi JIJOT TO'.IT A *NO TT*V ID kEEP UUUM li' ill KIRBY •OV-AM I OCAO TOOTTMOMa->o ' frr I/E ClOTi** OR* AJ'T OJOU* *-U*T DO V I HV '.fTTBjr, I .,. %  .-• %  ... %  votj ABB J THAT hoj 'not up I !*.•< j~nn % % %  • %  >>< %  •IMII'MWOIM B*SANATOtSE^' restores health, ymi h am! .il.'lit* km feeling that you're loo cak. il' an> Imincr kirnply meant ihat rou'we bem taking uw nuwh oui ol youmaf. Your body 11 ihon of to eicntial iircngihraiag teed*—photphorua and proicin. TIMUM ttrengthened To Rl v., right, you need %  court? of •Swuiogen* Nef>* loo. I ovj *la*attgag.' lOoibtiiM ihna iwo graal body-buiUm* loods pbuapbonii and pi mem ID ineir ofgarui. foim, ao Utai tbey arc guktjy abvuibcd into yotf lyMata. D.iy by day gloriom ne he-itih. yuuih and vitality flow Ihtouah your whole body — you/ auen.-ih and wit •confidence come back I Sun OB a ..>( of 'Sanatogen* luday. OH aatl* ol fowl .Armlet, and drturajMa vijtn Tf\ir rooo Mr. Factory Manager LET US HELP YOU WITH YOUR REPAIR PROBLEMS. We can supply the following rx STOCK. BY ALEX RAY" ,%^AT V TW McrraLs... **'LL CMBCK TH NOWT /jo SEE t CES % -AS cEa'&'caej... \C.S8..."-£: MAWgX tC IMf.^ BOLTS at KUT8Iron at Bright Steel All nlie< BEARIKO (Plummer Block) — SKF BALL and Cast Iron Brain Buthcd BOLT TAPS at DIES— In Mta from \\" to V," ASBESTOS ROPE. TAPE and riBRE. etc. (TBE CLAY. BAFFLE BRICKS, etc. Remember: '/*• HtHlllOOS I Ol XMil Lid. HEADQUARTERS TOR Ali TACTORV AND PLANTATION SUVPLD38. 1* MC'L OB81WON9 ST*riN / FINE: F.kC! \\**T ,S NiS OKAS NUMMRT I'D L *J .'% %  ac K*C r s*.: c? L'*i TO MM SEB HWfVW •B-=! i LUCJJJE IS IM JB j HS ^i^^ L bar ttagUafM I-ASNTBwc .r^ i o r -a^^j^ J a^-B f EV. Jl FOQ TWO C AvS... <*V^ ^-*"^^ata1 i* 'KJtBKissVi alvflM Ma y % % %  OtSMCNC c* % %  1 ti^M .viT-n.T lta> -.; 1 — fafMBBEEJ 1-5 B'LL *#^M Wrriii w *w i 1 i IRSS r^nUfVWfir. ONE SOLID OF UNPRECEDENTED BARGAINS wuson's UARGAI-NS L1KK THESE COME TO YOU BUT ONCE IN A LIFETIME THEY COME TO YOU THIS TIME, NOT TO STAY BUT TO LAST FOR ONE WEEK ONLY. WITH CUT PRICES LIKE THESE LASTING FOR MORE THAN ONE WEEK, SURELY WE'LL BE SOLD OUT YOl MAY BUY US OUT BUT WE GIVE YOU ONE WEEK IN WHICH TO DO SO. READ Tins, VISIT US AND COMPARE PRICES AND QUALITY. PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORr.S RIM UNA.!*. XHaUM UAKIWi picnj'E in rh'F BCNSUI JUHSLETMtU I0NODANCI, !£ klONM Mil


PAGE 1

lUOlAV, MOIST 4, 1J50. BARBADOS ADVOCATK t u.i i an Three Men Lift The Brick I rum History Hut It* A Very Slow Job Germans Will .Relieve U. S. Forr*> — \ end*, o .11 O t*e*l and lovely wall! Mutsummnr Night'* Dreasn Two >ears' work on a *W wall will liaish al in* end of this year The wall, built ol Hi,it. Ken.isri rag and Chilrnark MM white and clean. a* if it hat been built yesterday, northwards from the soot-blackened Wakeneld Tower, built In the Tower of London in 1221. Yet it ti one of tho most ancient pj,;ol the Towfr, London workmen built i| 700 years ago Ancient Rampart Its four-foot Uuckneas i* pierced b) .iglM arrvvi 'tit'*, where medieval bowmen, cruuehin. under the strong round archer w| i.li alUl curve proudly OWl Slid i.mi arrows on their eh. lines when it formed the west Mir Inner Baile> uf the I i Mil j bomb fell in the great City raid* of December 194" nobody knew that the wall existed. The bomb demolished an ugly Victorian barrack of red bri k and -stone, known a* the Mai.-i Guard. Before the war. soldiers of the regiment guarding the Tower drank tea. played darts inside Tourists hurried past on their from the Bloody Tower Without a gUil Bui beside* destroying the Main Guard, the bomb tore i irl of the brick facing from .. wall which had been inenrp -lated in the fabric. Expert! of the Ministry' t Woikrecognised the inner wall as being part of the ancient rampart which stood there in the I.. o| King Henry III. And thev put ihelr expert masons on the job. Few Yards l>ft Three of these men. specialists n Hi* craft of "ancient monu ITI a pointing." have been at than I i' termttlenlly, tna hVf had to attend in niher wen) for Ihe past two p;ilr.vtakingly picking oft %  ( 11. i ian crusi of ugly brick odern (tone, to renal tin' i % %  I. old wall beneath. Now. oul. ihe leal few yards which r. main to IH> treated Mill support a cats cradle of tubular %  c.iiTt.ldiiiK When that i •! % %  | ii. % %  tl" full extent of the Old mil will !*> revealed. Man in tharge of the work on the wall ithe 65-year-old fore man who for 3S years has looked after London's ancient monuments. One of his greatest task; —th* HOUM' of Commons. II showed mr how the wall hn<< been "consolidated" by th old method 1 grouting by pourute in the mortar, instead of by Ihe pn nun process. No I mil -I MM i "We new i odd, never take %  way, nevei v any tricks of %  w,. simplv remove .ill the extraneous stun* and leave ihe old building as it Is if .. piece of stone has fallen. : .re it But we would rather leave a gap than put bark some imitation of the real thing." Th" top of the exposed wall has been treated with a special preparation lo prevent weeds sprouting on It. 13 Arrested tn Peace Rally LONDON. Au^. 3 A Pore.git Otflcc spokesman aid lu-da> that Americans were iiTtuiig a small force ol German.* .ill. i triet.. release United State* ( i normal duties lie .aid there were 10.000 Police in the Western Zones of Germany, Th*** were with revolvers and came under control of the local government*. In addition to this there wars me Germans and displaced persons in three Zones used (or guarding food, supplies and military dumps. This force was called the Civil Mixed Watcha's Corps and came under the control of Allied Authorities The American decision was to arm these watchmen with rifles. The spokesman said he could not State whether similar action was be taken in the British Zone There were 10.000 displaced persons m the Watchmen'* Corps i. UM British Zone Renter THE COLONIAL PRESS MM••The New totittr rS !" 0 "* 1 Oil Supplies Their Millionth Bag Of Sugar 'Quakf In Mexico l Mulrol in Johnson m U.S. Did Not Need To Bribe France Says N.Y. Times NEW YORK, Aug 3. The United States did not need o bribe Franco to become it* •ll> the New York Times said to-day in an editorial commenting the Senate's grant of a $100,000.00U loan to Spain The Senate is going against an almost universal condemnation f Franco's regime throughout NEW YORK. August 3. .P !" Two thousand Lefl Wing peace j e<1 marchers banned from staging a rally In Union Square battled 1,000 police late on Wednesday in Bat* swinging brawls that led to 13 arrests. Demonstrators waited until the homegoing rush hour to make their defiant move. "We /want peace Open up the Square." The marchers chanted as they formed ranks. Union Square 1) miles south of Time* Square, is the traditional scene of NewYork soapbox oratory When mounted police bore down on the demonstrations thev shouted "cossack". —< %  ). /..Mowing letter I Ihe fines was published on luly 31. s l(. I .m, ..:., %  .. %  ,. in the recent debate at it.. In, p. Hal PrtM Conference OH the --. lebortl minings of the colonial Prcsv w, incl tepee ally so of the West African Prtss With no flrsihamt knowledge ol the West African Piexi, I am unable to Ihe i hirgn ->f Ihe Com%  but, so far as the West Indian Press Is concerned. I ma* say that lukewarm Liberal sm Is the nearest approach to Ounmunisin In 99 S t eta! of the Caribbean Press well-informed Pres? and attractively preNnted news sheets can < nl> be allained when welltrained siaff and adequate financial becking are bolstered up by ,i ,ii -in on the pegi of the ciovernment'. ol tbg eorlOW colonies to Help Ihe I'liss At the present 0OM if IhiM is available In the Colonial Pr OS, There |v ., K.den opportuntt) now to encourage alh'a CAIRO. Aug 3, (examine the workings 'Id. IndapandOrrl Newspupcr El colonial Press and 'thrum to-day quoted Egyptian Foreign Ollice Officials as spying thai ihe United Stntes was to ask !ni Bacurlty Council to establish a Committee from member slates lo take up potts in various countries and report on any threatened aggression The Council would assess countries concerned in order to facilitate the worn of the Committee The paper added Egypt had approved the American plan for these "watob dogs" lo be placed in '•European and other countries which might he threatened with invasion b\ Communist Russia." EgvpU.in political observers. F.l Ahran. said, believe that Turkey. Greece and Yugoslavia will apf UM (.Ian which Is expectn.hide Persia —Reuter. the Democratic la red. "Reasons give that Franco is and that it has value from the point. 'Spain alway world" t -re primarily Anti-CouimuniM great strategic milinry viewarouses strong emotions but it should be adsable to consider the issue Imly. If our military leaders say Spain is necessary to a proper defence structure one musl accept their judgment "However il should be obvious we do not need lo bribe Franco to become our ally. He has no choice in Uie possible war—not nan neutrality—for ihis time instead of having j friendly Hitler, he would have Stalm to contend with "Il U hard to believe lhar the American people want to aao Franco saved by Amrncan help Than *tiii time to defeat UM measure and we sincerely hope it will be defeated."—Rculrr Egypt Approves "Watt* Dog" Plan of Ihp mlic momniViulaUans lo rcmody it, ilk. Th.dioinosis > Miami %  "< ihp rcmeuie, ar* simpl* Your, fnlthfully. C. A 1. OAU. Tho Weil IndUn Club. 4 Whitehall Court. S W.T. 15 Fears' Service Not Enough For Maximum Salary Miller asking Slow I> but surel>. UH' new South M overcoming two of H greatest problems — po*< ignorance. The two go hand in hand Poverty has bred ignorance Ignorance in turn has brad prejudice, conflict and other evils bur' .ii-iung ihe South. On this point Ralph McOill hard-hiumg. Uberal Ed.tor of thai Atlanta Constitution, MI>S. { "In Its most poverty-stricken counties one finds the most hidebound political thinking, the most corrupt county government and justice, the most friction and race violence, and much of the drag on the South'* general progress." Cointideni with its economle development, the South hi making impress.vc gains In educating Its people But here, as in oth* fields, II still lags behind tinret tf the naUoa. It is making pro gr.-s. but still h.ia long way t go. In liMl. fur example, of some X.U.UUO draft registrants who could nol sign Ihelr names, nine out of ten were Southerners. And of the nine illiterate Southerners were negroes The 1W0 census showed, moreover, that nearly six out of every 100 Southerners had never gone to school, compared to three, or J| per cent, for the rest of the U S. Eighteen out of every 100 %  dults in Ihe South had droppe," opt of school before reaching th Fifth Grade, .compared *"h less than seven (6 9 par cent.) for the rest of the nation The tecord showed that only one of ten adult* in the South had .mpJeted hlfch school, whereas Ihe rest of the nation 15.3 per til had high school education. Prodded by court decisions and by their own consciences. Southerners today are striving manfully to improve education facilities (or the big negro population. the same, time raising th' 1 %  tandardi for the whites as well School budget* aro being creased throughout the South and ihe region, through industry and agriculture, enjoys a largei measure of prosperity. In Georgia, for instance appropriations increased $14.4 million In 1938 tmtlhon In 1950. In higher education ihe South is engaged in a unique and successful experiment—a programmi of regional education Under thla syatam, started b) ihe Governors of the vanou' Southern Slates in 1947. the -du catlonnl resourcea of the State: il pooled Funds are udminti tered by a board of control to Southern ItCgional Education Fourteen states signed a com p**l lo share In higher educa tionol facilities on a contract basis, and in which both white and negroes benefit. Cutting through mountains red lope and without precedi 10 guide them, the Southern Ocernors made the Regional Coun ell bl-radal in membership with one negro serving on the lioard from each participating state The Regional Council headquarters in Atlanta. 07 !" '*" that the South's greatest high'education needs, to meet tl demands of an expandingIndus try and livestock productI-in medicine, veterinary 1 nd dentistt; %  BOM Matai bad w Some lacked fa.ii COM IL. Mgan wurMng out arrangemei %  mil colleges and knsU ill .ite area watch .ou.d M.I, I uatning Coder contract the hjcugh: etlucalion from lution Then* esoixacti mat the stale pay ihe UttUtutioo ..500 a year per itudcnt f 1 medical and dental training, }1 000 a year per tfUdanl Eoi (ratartaaaT] tiammg. The studtn pays no out-of-state fee* Thus for a few thousand dol ina year a state gets access lo 1 school which would coat S3 million 01 $4 million lo bull i The institution gets the add.1101 ... IDeaaW The student 0ttl leaded tralnkifl which otlMca mNld have been unav-il..i%  p.ii in .j.iting siatis for tl tuennium 11949— 511 Investxi US million HI Ihe icgional pr-gramme. Last fall 388 students. >f whom 181 were negro. W>n eirulled in participating insiitutioi'* The Hoard of Control, established last year, administers the lUBjdg from the participating si 0*. ard mikM pay menu to the iitftilulion. The Control Board's director Dr. John E. Ivey Jr brilliant 16-year-old professor from ihUniversity of North Carolina. The Regional programme l t b. extended to the fields of musing, forestry and s irainlttg will he broiighl \*W*!' 1 the piogranime. The enlire il of gi.oln.ite riudj has hlgn priority. • Ucs al first viewe.1 ih regional setup as a means of |K-I lUng segregation in education The Hoard has refuted thti %  IU chairman Millard CaldII. former Governor of Florida points oul that the question ol MgregatlOfl ll for the itate decide, that the board is merely an Instrument Of Ul several north c,e.t .,f Seoul with %  liteBervlnjJ the region It canIs connected bv rail. It: 1 i-ltei '.iu-N tui Koraaru rMuinkaUeti ire 1 UN .K 1 %  I'll lllMTS O' ler constan %  %  %  the millionth bag of s igsi. making | bar 1 the eason ive lorarst facti ,v u %  • Vasi Indha ...1 '.riding .\ .1 %  %  1* r aunsraiion air t.n.ier consun,. I oaTSTfirihe uh. -c r > school from $50 Of witt >i iba AW! S^ mathmi ui u will en mm tar ui jup^i^mg tbair -1 calumm artth oil can -i :10m the following art .in in the curnn irsue ol PatnlowBi Press Seryne To ugh DPMIW31 subject to tent pOrai) ui!l ...11 1 or age, park Hgui,.. or local transport, Soul Con to the I H ll| ar as>ure, of -mine QU sUppUOl WhJtl don for the North Kan DJ I •. e W^II uttog P 1011S1 lerabie nun anr of tai dih.i.igh the dbrtanca versed ha., not been gn.,* not involved any wrtensive ^> baiacti. bed tiie usa of at 41 w< a/aj ft. cm 1. motor fuel and lubricants ..re M %  ... ..1 j forces L ha Dei • BUU ill be mat of whatevei aircraft and motor Iran • U!nK imployed Indispensable Needs Accunwlated siovk ciutbled the North Korean t.i louiiuue the momentum of then surprise attack. Itut will they, a* their comuiuiik'*lIons outliw .nolengthen, be >bU lo maintain oil 1 the indispensable Is In the area* of southern Korea they occupy, aiul sUll b1 -bio to nutiniaiu cdlciciit aiuioured forces when thej beeomv engaged 111 tiie much heavier lighting that must soon develoj.* iiin.u 10 oil ranDumai either in North nl Boytt) Karl Itut each territory has a n-ilnery The refinery in the north 1-' ilensen (adjacent to Woiisani on •at, and about lad Dfettni huh ii •pai Itj 3 rope Pi. > .-uter MortCardinals Not Submarines CANBERRA. Ai.g Nn\ %  Klnistag) J"*iah IranrU OB Thursday emphatlcalb dented reports that foreign submarines had been sighted off ihe Aitia,|lian coast Tiie 'Ci.d-.ei, SUN pub lished -tuch a leuort atlribu lo official sources jd % .. possible thai the > Fraiwis said Nea Ouima ,jil> m Hi lwi* the> > Ighii J #1 %  they thought ..S %  % %  lovcstn tloi.s Ihe rln ,-d •

S<. m . PRINT KU l.lNt.l.UIt: %  'Jt'> ,., Yd GARBADINr: In l.'mrrald Cirern. Pink Kee. Cold. I.lme t.rren and While .. 81.30 per rd. SHANTlNti In Blue. Rose, t'rrjm. I'fnk & (iold ' 11.16 per yd. 19.10 STVLKS I.AUIIS >IIOKS in While, ftlaek \ Brown Sued. Prices ranging from HI 3fi lo $12.37 — lu Heels. Mu, DNKSSES. SI NslTT< XIIORTt X SLACKS Fir FtBiioAiku \ y um s^ *>nm were nedlcliv nol have sagngatlon, utai The Soulhein Hegional KdUCI in-. plan already hat. ha.I niiional impact. Othn %  ecttoni facing similar pmbleuu. per sli.lwng plans for davaloplni sin ual programmes. Th* Western Govern-i Can faranea In 194U began cofeWoaawi su. 11 : programme. Six new Kng la id utes have already formed %  Pew England Educational Coun Ur. Ivey and his slafl asso.iat. talk with enthusiasm at th> l-i %  u's future In the South The> feel that It la Just Iwgjnninv. that Its potentialities for the South's are almost limitless %  Our Job." says Dr Ivey with quiet deieinilnation. 'is lo bulM an educational system wilhm till Snut!i MH-ond to none He said one of the biggest jot between now and 1M3 will l>e n stiile-bv-slate survey seeking an answer to the questions, what can Ihe Soulh be if we use the human and material resources we have? What educational m.ichlncry do we need to develop and use these resources' —IN S H M n.-.-V lotion by Mr. ,at alt Parochial employees who have been in the service for ^5 "more, and were not re their maximum salar> W. German Exports Jump By 57ib w. Tickets For Church VATICAN CITY, Aug. 3. Lithuanian Catholics need a Government ticket costing aboui 1.000 lire each time they go to church, according to a Vatican report published to-night. Claiming that the Catholic population had been persecuted since Lithuania with Latvia and Estonia was incorporated in the Soviet Union during the war the report IIKted conditions on which Its remaining churches can function. (1) A distance of at least 5 miles must separate each two churches. <2) Collections for church repoiri are prohibited. (3) Speciul permission must be obtained for singing hymns and chants. (4) Services may be held only in the early morning. —Reuter. FRANKFURT. Aug. 3, vxporta during U 1 half of ihis vear al $778 400,000 were Sill above those for the first half of 1849 the Economic Co-operation Special Mission to West Germany reportI-.I to-daj. This Improvement was largely the result of increased trade with Id areas, allowing for that the 1 amount raarg 0 ceiving tneunw • %  •• %  • %  7 huuld b r.Kl u, Ih. !" """' K had ten done llh ottci employees, was 1 ~'"S'"^i Ml a brlel discussion at Ihe SI Michael Veslry yesterday Some members felt standing form of a certs of Increment tor each til the maximum was reached should stand and they should make no hurried decision then_ Mr Miller said that he did not think his motion was controversial. The Vestry has created a precedent by allowing employees who had given 15 years' aervuje to be put to their maximum, lie was not putting forward any -Reoler. ad given 15 years' acrvlce should Czechs Will Still Get Rubber PRAGUE, Aug 3. Czechoslovakia will continue to get tin and rubber until ihe new one-year trade agreement with the Netherlands and the United States of Indonesia, it was disclosed on Wednesday night. —IC P.) their uld be t. New Oil Refinery Often %  it,will" i LONDON A further stage in the construction of the new Middle Eas'. Crude refinery at Slanlow. Cheshire, has been reached with the completion of the 341 fool high concrete cooling tower—th.' l.irgest of Its kind in the world— .md the installation of three large ^.herlca) storage tanks. These steel "ball" tanks, the first to be erected in any United Kingdom oil refinery, measure 35 feet in diameter and were designed by a British linn (or the storage under pi — one of the .ilready flowing from this new Shell refinery which came into operation last November. Some of the main units al th" new Stanlow refinery" %  "* already working — the No 1 distillation unit, now In continuous operaijon at a capacity of 1,000.000 tons per annum, has been supplemented recently by a large reforming t-lant. No. 2 distillation unit it well advanced and work ( %  as begun on the installation of •he catalytic cracking plant What's on Today Police Court* 10 ajn. Court of Anneal and Pelly Debt Court 10 a.m. Mobile Cinema at Wiltshire Ptuyfield. St. Philip %  p.m Uie Governor fltreet fpffef Port Workers On Strike WELLINGTON. Aug. 3 All major New Zealand port* came to a standstill on Thursday branches of the Watered* "* u .' c v i,^doeTs I Workers Union decided to stop V?* ,PT^ !" work in sympathy with a wk"* long Auckland watersidor. dispute over lea breaks —IC P > l ol butane ** Rr|M>rtrt fc L T nfoiineai Key bought nearly $1.000.000 Ir-n Ihe Pool The reversed position was largely the result ". hvv aummer tourist travel to Nassau and Butlin's vacation village, Grand Bahama. Travel to Ihe colony thli.sunnier, May tn July lW2J5 g! per cent, over same period Ia-t '"The Governor also (oresh.--.lscd extensive agricultural enlanriM In the Bahama land" wTth BritUh capital that reduce imports el foodstuffs dollar areaa sum rnaKe Bahamas a food-exporting lev —Cfi from th LONDON STOCK MARKET FIRM LONDON. August 3 Despite aomj. hesitancy ..tendcd by overnight caution on o Street most sections or the 1—' SUTstoSc Excl-^gc dispsyed nVmness to-day Sentiment was KSd h> the trend o. event. In Korea and the build up United Slates 'einiorcemonls_ Domestic stock recorded sma widespread improvements but the moat interest was in overseaIssues Ithe foreign section. German loans advanced on sprit-latlve buying and switching o, Interest to these brought (rattlonal losses to Japanese loans. Tin share prices were mnrkeu higher on news of United Kingdom and United States talks on •tockplUng Rubber shares reflected an uptrend In the price ol rubber. Despite some profit-taking, the oil share market closed with the majority of small improvements. Renewrsl United States buying or Kaffalr developers vi. Cape was jeports-d The section closed very firm with useful risein selected bjeues —Renter. Flashlight For School Inspector iB.iu.dc,, Aeteastt Cxwpowl-nt ST JOHNS, Mr A C '-• Palmer, Federal Education Officer in the Leewsrd Islands for the past six year* ha* )u1 completed Inspection visits to St Kilts. Nevis and Angullla He left Antiiiuu o" Wednesday roi Grenada vin Hnrbadus lu take up his appointment as Education OfTlT and senior Inspector of Schools that Island UnriiiK Mr. Palmer's stay in Anliaua fourteen new schools have been built -II of which provide for tual subjei-ts in the senior department. Mr, Palmer has seen to H that Ihe standard in seconder* schools has been raised from St of School C iMcafi "' >".< ir Ccrtlflcstte. In 11146 the National Milk bev crage scheme, and reinforced veast biscuits were introduced in-< 'schools in Antigua, Montserrat. Ntvls and Anguilla Most of the schools are in areas which never served with school'' baftre. Ji$d some are alread> hmvlng signs of being ovaieTDWdUodoubtedly, we Laawordi ire passing through a phase of -ducatiuiuil raform. Mr. I*a\mer %  me here and found conditions at lock bottom and has laid a sound oundation for the future of tl: %  land* the results of which c lot be seen for years policy for or iigainst before the second Worlrl War he says, but BUiil IMJWO low in 1 t*a u *. %  • with differing polldejenbad as worn out and obsolete 1 .. I inut been lelubllll.itisl lbLit ill age has piobubly i-cen raaant eommunaava from Tokya M.itinr that linei h.. i-ifii boinbutl by the Amwn.nin doubt rafartad to fhll plant The niiiiiiv 111 South Korea Ulsan on the east coasl abn i.ule-. north east of Ptisan main US Mipplv porl M th' %  oullt, This rerlnery wag In nt Ol erection when Japan turrVMltftd and in ma laai Boatharn Koraoi bud el I im D( "-'an million Wor (Wlrii W.in Vi%) was allocate, tnietl oal work on ltd) pianl 111 plsinneii capadt) foi U.MJ w.is lOUIMMi ton ... %  ill full rapacity >f ztn.'wi ioj ,. ... !.,.( ,1 ,. in wll ii 'i would I i .i-U-quate for IUp] whole of %  auUiern Kmi-. in |ielroleum product* Kelined ON There art two m.tin source> Iron. which Northern Koican rotces may now get oil MILDCM**. *W nearer Is Kanchurll where. In Uv district of FUV>u"' bolh oil-fiuin ,-oal and shahoil pre produced and ihe Utiar refined. No recen' Information Is available as lo Uv scale of produrtion but there n large resources of coal and -halt-1 t>, ,r. 'there is no rail connection from I.-.rt.y Mukden right] [own lo Se.iul about 4fid miles LSQ to Pui.in %  > further tSO "oi. si/Ulh. It has been rafMCtad Hi • .hiring the JapanaM oceupall' n f crude oil a year Also there U an oil i • %  finery %  | Nlkolsk In Sil^'iia. "h'.rt dl* tanot iwrth of Vlmlivoi-toek. rheie ir a rail connection Iron. Oanaaj northwards into Manchuria, But the railway route in Korea may be precarious as It shirts the oast oast and inents from lha from the nlr So long a, the rloatt Korean' nt-elve Ihe Mpporl of Iheir norin eru nelghhoi.i Ihell oil sum-W problem l moraen. to be malnlv one ol inalnlainlilf land end sea rommnniratlons. o storage, and of trm-i-iiniv -ut-forwaftl to the lr..nt. The overwhelming all -'renftb ihat W now bamg broughl anbi ftepn Wm. FOGARTY LTD. (lnc In Itrilish (iiiinna) ALfjrnmm WARE a >; DOMESTIC WARE in a wide variety v> DIAMOND WARE is approved by the Good Housekeeping Institute. S SAUCEPANS. FRY-PANS, COFFEE PERCOLATORS. KETTLES. EGGPOACHERS OMELET PANS. ji FOR CONSISTENT SATISFACTION .... DIAMOND BRAND AIBHMM WAItf ,*.'***'''-'*•''*'•'< IIARBAIM)S ELKCTRIC SUPPLY (OIIPOItATION LTD. \oii4 1 : As Ihe M*nuf.\. lurer* hsve decided that repair* to ana of uur Knrlnen can no Irniiir be lo hed losd at lnlcr< ah. durlna thf next frw monlho Our Cenumers sre asked to ro-operale br eserehln< the utmost economy In lbae of i:ieelrlcit>. pacakalarlj iliiiin: the Prak period lielwetn fi.20 and 8.30 p.m until rurthrr nailer. SMITH. Oeneral Mauaicr. Hinpl Mr. Palmer introduced Visual now ^-. — ,; Education and Banaroual> devoted |r.n*t mi.V' a itreat deal of his time to organdlrTlri)' ^ ^_ Mixed Farming iea! isini dim showt throughou* itn countryside of islandi which had never before naen a reel Fdn.mil apparatus which were loanci l)j ihe Briush Council have pro-, vided a splendid enleriairunen'| uu> especially to those in Ihe minor islands such as Barbuda. Angullla and Tortola Mr. Palmer was arbitrator lejponslble for Ihe "Inquiry into the Labour Disturbanceof 1MB In I91B he was awarded the M.B E PAFIS Aug A usually reliable source hen to-day described as "without foundation" tho American Now* Agency report? that a detachment, — of French troops was about to be w'th %  revision of his motion h ,ent to Korea -Renter. | would get his support Bank Strike BUENOS AIRES. Aug 3 Private banking activity came to a virtual standstill here on Thursday following an increase in strikes among bank servants for higher pay —Caa Frees. In appreciation of his outstanding achievements tn these islands tho Antigua Teachers' Association y revented theii director with a souvenir leather case for valuablo papers hand painted with a scene ol Antigua and the famous pljirHi-pie crest along with a scroll The Antigua Education I>e V artinent also showed their gratefulies to Mr. Palmer by presenting hi in with a flashlight "as reminiscent of the light whirh bv rau work and personality you have ahed on the field of Education In the Colony and also as symbolic at the Mgbt which will continue to radiate from your life as you mb the I-adder of Success" say Mr P. W A Gordon Inspector of Schools. I tn • - %  l>eparlii.ei.t ol Agrieulture Bepoil tor liMB ii.u.igrni". 142. MrJ Crufluui. IToviSloii 'oi ihe davelopmcnl of the Central Experiment Sution in rnmdaii has been included in a CotoiUal r>^olopnien1 -md Welfare Scheme for an Agr'"ltural Experiment.!, Station which I approved In March. !M0 The purpo*'' Of ihr irTli %  Bel Mnneaaani of more stable systems of agriculture on a mixed fanning ba.s and investigation Into li.' m crops so grown in ofdei the standard of agrieulu.r.l worker. The tol-t coat of Ihe scheme will h £158.750. towards which HiMajesty's aovammen' are e*e> irlbutiiig gW.917. It • that the sta'.lon will come Into full operation In 19M.



PAGE 1

TODAY. AUGUST 4. ltta. BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACK FIVfc Yestry Will Question Ex-Churchwarden About Playing Field Voucher* The Vestry of St. Michael is going to hold a special public i meeting as early as possible, which Mr H. A Tudor. *x-\ Churchwarden, and Mr. Francis H. Pile, UM Voatn I Auditor, will be asked to attend. The purpose <>( this meeliny is lo discuss a statement made by Mr. Pile in hisj statement of Revenue and Expenditure of the parish fat J tin ..MIending March 24. Mr Pile drew to the attention of the Vestry a certain \ case dealing with the Princess Alice Playing Field in which some of the vouchers were worth nothing. H Senior Sanitary Inspector Suspended For 4 Months The Commlniooer ol Health of St. Michael y suspended Inspector G. Fagan from service fa %  Nine Watches Stolen: Valued At $230 N INE GENTS' wrist watches valued $230, are reported to be lost by G. C. Aahby. Jeweller of Swan Street. City He informed the Police tha; they were removed from his show cae between July 22 and Tucsday HpWO BICYCLES were reportX ed missing in yesterday's Police Keports Clarence Thompson of M-sort Hall Street reported th,loss of a cycle belonging to Cheetcrttelrt Thompson of the same address He stated that the cycle was taken from Fontabelle on Tllr du The loss of n cycle valued 141 was reported bv Garfleld Lowe or Eagle Hall He told the Poliothai the cycle was removed from the Savoy Club Mason Hall Street, m Monday W OOIIROFFE C'LAKKC of Palmers. St. John reported the loss of his cow valued $130 from a pen on his land at the same address between 500 p.m. on Monday and SM a.m. on Tuesday C HOIRS FROM five of the seven Elementary Schools in St John took part in the noncumpetilive Music Festival whicn was held at the St. Johns Mixed i, Tuesday evening. The School Hall was packed with enthusiastic listeners and| soiiie listened from the windows. Among those In the audience MMM K.-v Canon PAW. Moore and Mrs. Moore. Rev Ripper, Mr L. Gay. Miss Q Denny. Miss II. O Gittens. Miss E A Murray and Miss J. Gill. The programme was so arranged that the Junior choirs were first lo sing. "The Shamrock" was sung by the Cherry Grove Junior School, "All Thru the Night" by Hothersal Junior School. "The Merry Traveller" by Welches Village Junior School. for "Come Hither" by Mount Tabor Mixed School Bnd "Bonnie qtiarUe' by St John's Mixed School. They afterwards grouped together and sang "Old Folks at Home." "My Own Deor Land' and John Peel." Representing the Santa Choirs the St. John's Mixed School sang How <;reat is the Pleasure." "Now Is the Time for Haying," "Mighty lak a Rose." "Psalm 67" and "The Halllu)ah Chorus." Before the King was sung Mr. I. St. A. Thome. Headmaster of the St John's Mixed School, said that they would present Canon Moore with an address and gift from the teachers of the Anglican schools of that parish in recognition of his services as Chairman of the Board of Managers of the Schools. Canon Moore gave up this post at the end of July when he also retired from his other post as Rector of the parish The address was read by Mr J W. Bell while the presentation j was made by Miss S. A. Carring-: ton. The Canon afterwards replied to the address. A vole of thanks was moved by Mr L T. Gay. District Inspector of Schools, who also paid tribute to Canon Moore This was seconded by Mr A. T. Gittens Mrs. Moore, in a brirf address, told those parents present to give the teachers their wholehearted Mipport and refrain from interfering with the work of the teachers who were trained to do their Job. She said that education from books was most desirable but parents should not fall to train their children to be helpful in the homes. I RENE inmiK of Hall's Land, Bank Hall, St. Michael, was injured on her left foot nfbtr dM was Involved in an accident on Tuesday. She was treated by Dr. Cummins and charged. Also involved in the accident was a bievcle owned by James Thorpe of R>w Road. St Michael I^*ncock was a pedestrian. T HE MOBILE CINEMA will fulfil its linal engagcim-n* for llio week with a show al Wiltshire Playfield. St Philip, at 8 o'clock tonlsht. This show is for the benefit of residents of the Wiltshire A motion that the meeting oc galled was made by Mr E D MOttlO) and supported b] Mr T W Millet Hon'ble V C Gale was to speak on the matter Quoting the paragraph of the Auditor". report dealing with the worth!. %  .> vouchers, he -aid it was a mattci which the Vestry should lake vtrj seriously. The paraitraph said "I chlal Treasurer has paid on orders of the Veatry as he is required to do under Section 35 of the VOBi tries' Act. 1911—5. and the pay-; merits are all beua fide, but in certain cases which were particularly under the Head. Princess Alice Playing Field, the vouchers are signed by the Churchwarden without anyone certifying tha' same, or with a certificate which | Ifl worth nothing. Fair Chances This means generally that the Churchwards*) himself has at-1 tended to the business In hand without assistance from, or know! ledge of, the Head of the Depart, ment. or the one responsible for seeing that the work la properly carried out. and that the charges made are fair and reasonable The matter re vouchers uncertified or not properly certified was brought to the attention of the' Vestry in December. 1945 Mr Gale aid that that was Viw serious report A committee l.ad been appointed to look after tinPl.i'iiig Field, and it al*n h;i i a Secretary. Certain prominent i—ople in the parish who were not members of the Vestry had been invited to join the commute*and they had done so. "1 happen lo be a memr. ftH II H>\ • *ii tlHVAl Letter To The Editor ii pi Film Eiitvrtainiiiciit "The Dm is susceptible Of great arlisti.' expression It ean DC %  An* art. Bui it isn't used that way main* used as a form of mass enlenslntnanl Ann i tfed B csn say quite truly it's the Missal ana most imp form Of mass entertainment Of ii.ii Ktt rliti'H.uuimn! m the whole world DENIS ft HMAN. Director of the British Film Institute speakirg In a BBC profjramnw 3 SHIPS IN THE BAY thai Committee." Mr. Gale said, "and I know nothing about these vOUehtn which nre not properly certified I think that we as members of the Vestry owe It to ourselves and to the ratepayer! smo have elected us, and to the Government who are financing these playing fields to see that the rroney is properly spent We are the custodians of that moncv with which the Government hns entrusted us. "We should see to It that all the account" are properly I'M%  Craftsn %  vai oi ihe Steam l>i. bii'Ugr.l the number 11 >.-., i. i. B in three Beside the "Craliarnan thenwas lbs "Alcoa Runner,* 1 which has been hare for many day. ami r.< Itlvvi. itM I'll, Alcoa Runner 1 si creel %  ire discharging cargo while the "Craftsman" la BUfng bet hatches with sugar for the U K As soon Jthe "Ciaflsm.n" .nrived the waterfront WSOl BBtQ action. Lighten were loading sugar on the north and south sides Of the Inner Basin. Loaded lighters could be seen cruising dOWD the Careenage Some weie ln-in*. lowed by launches while their occupants relaxed on bags of sugar. Two launches passing each other midway between .nid the wharf were regularly seen ouched They both had lighten In low bul i white M| Bel wen empty the Gale called the state of (others were loaded to the water "very disquiet ... The Government crane also had its share of activity yesterday. During the evening it wa inll to unload heavy machinery from a lighter which was tied off jus' !>clow It. A few yards away from 'hi* crane men could be seen nailing up boxes of onions These will soon he shipped from the Island by the Schooner "Mandalay ft." Th Weather TO-DAY Sun Hi—— "I HI a.m. Kan 8eU: 6 tt p-m. IHrh Water: 7.SB am. XM Mr affairs .-aid his opinion was that thev should thoroughly examine all the vouchers, account*, etc relating to the playing field The playing field had a secretary, and according to the usual oractlee he took It that the secretrry would have the vouchers files and orders and would know about what was goitK on He would know how the work was carried out nnd about the orders made for the materials which were used. Take Measures Everything possible thaT coulJ be done to clear up the matter should be done, said Mr. Gale, and he hoped that the Vestrv wouid proceed lo do what he was asking for without delay. Mr. Bruce Weatherhead. present Churchwarden, who was In the Chair made a statement to th-> Vestry. He said It is the right of every Taxpayer to know that his taxes are wo I siient and correctly accounted foi It is the duty of the Vestry to e that such information is given to th* ratepayers and that all reasonable questions relating i Parochial affairs are properly and promptly answered. It Is also the duty of the Vestry to see that any government grants or Trust Funds, in their charge, are properly accounted for and to the satisfaction of the Government Since the publication in th%  Omcial Ga/ette" ot the Parochial Accounts for Ihe year 19-5'I. many of the Taxpayers of St Michael have been asking me all sorts of questions relative to that year, I am unable to answer these questions. The ratepayer. ask me because I am the present Churchwarden but. I am sorry to say. although I was senior Guardian for the year I949-S0. 1 knov very little about the repairs and building etc. for that year and I must therefore pass these questions on to the Churchwarden for 1949-50. Soon alter 1 was elected Churchwarden, in March 1950, Mr Francis Pile. Ihe Auditor, told me tha he was not satisfied with certaii Vouchers and he would not be able to sign the Accounts of the Parish for 1949-S0 and he asked :n %  for certain information. I gave him the required information to DM best of my ability. I shall now ask the Clerk to read copies of a letter written by me to Mr. Pile and his reply thereto relative to the Princess Alice Playing Field Account* Potato Diver Fined 5/"If you arc a diver with a licence and you find anything while diving at the sea you must take the article or articles to the Comptroller of Customs, you cannot take anything away," His Worship Mr. B. Griffith told Norris Boyce of Nelson Street yesterday when bs fined him 5 for unlawful possession of a quantity of English potatoes Norm in his def ence while diving he came across bag of potatoes in the sea did not know what to do th oa 464 %  Param i -'th. 1950 To the sVUtOTShtp of "The IlarAdvocate* 1 Brrdaetown BARBADOS IV.,i K1IM-1 You win be verj .istonuh to receive lettoi from some one. who you do HOI know Firstly I ill Introduce myself to you. My name II. 1 I ,m my age Is 23 years I live m ParBmartbo, Surinam The writing ol this letter is that several >f mv friends would rrespoi 03 md girls of toi collecting stamns Thatswhj 1 tunit> to request you if rou will advertise I nsentlonad ,n your most reading pe] Barl %  Advocate 1 ondanca can >*• i>ass m %  nguagea Kngllsh French. Dutch. Hindi or Urdu. trrtereeied persons csn apply Mr. H Pveemcliand Postfeox 464. Paramaribo, Surinam. Every collaboration would apmost highly. 11 you In entli Inetlon, 1 remain. Yours Failhfulb. II PltFFMCHAND. I ti DM 464 NO BACK PA1 FOR PAROCHIAL BMH0% EES 81 MICHAEL parochial em'piojitrs will not gel back pay. 1 he St. Michael Vestry came to • >.on for the second LsBM when Mr. E. 1> Mutt ley agau: lbs Vrsu> t,. grtre bacn those employees Mr. wrought up his iiiolun large sum of money Sd bean tamed in the 1949 B IsUanetes luui not been spool Whan the motion snu put U 1 resulted in a tie. bul the chairman. Mr Wsathirhsed, tut the casting VOtS givlai the liok pay Mi MOtt< ey's motion w foi panclual ^1 '!< %  :.! hut afti hearing Boroe noranessr rlewi i ihe scope to emploveiof iha iinaslBlillsl 1 sd .A|iiimii that bt Md 1 Ml his vole against Uv %  lam in-, .H.-I In,li ( l 1 .' ..I;II> with only some ol thone ,-' plveaj the iwck pa. Memliers who voted for th' motion won Hi Mottley, Mi Miller. Mr llrathwait. Chase Those who voted against it were Mr Browne. Mr God HOD V C. Gale and Mr Faces Dangerou* Driving Charge Decide Now Mr Mottle* said he Ulfl them to asclda ihon, OSWI -1.1 lor ad The VesUy bad made a decision, out n had come i" his notice '.nat the Churefl leport showed thai vi 1 > substantial sum of mone> which had been budgeted for hau not been spent. • HC (elt that if it were DOSSlDH rrvo pay members would agree to n. %  gO When UM .... oi tin %  ncroncnlni hurrteani season, the one set of petiple win wore uppeNNol In Iha tnlndi 0 tin peQfHO were the scsvengcrs BilOl the DOOd bCOldB the |>olae. the tll'st ps>oph thought of were the soavortgei Thev had done yewmen's work Thev hail workeii f.tlthfulh ano had given a high degree of eooperalion lie knoo thai the wbolo sffsii had bivn threshed out with ll>. Labour Officer, hut he had alwa> felt the only dispute %  / %  III. ..f ll.n k |lil> I" III' %  bourlna staff The difficulty was to give t t.itl and not the other K-n .in overall amount, it would t..k. (HO.ooo to pay stogy b ody rctroipeetlve pay Of that, less than half would go to the UtDOUrei ..•. |-i 1 That) < "old no herwise but be i' 1 Bympathi .pie The. ha I Met -""I bj onal V .. .ase brought by the PolUo against Cyril Carmlchael of MUe..n.i-.i-Wuartrr. St. Peter charging him with driving the molm bus S—M 011 Tudor Street In dangerous manner on June 21 was adjourned until August 1 bv Ills Worship Mr C. L Wal wyn Magistrate of District "A' yesterday. Mr JET llranrker is appearing on behalf of Cannlchael whlh Sgt D. Forde Is prosecuting toi the Police Three witnesses for the prosecution were heard, among tbem Cardinal Prvseod who said he weal w ,,,, ,„.,, v .., if 1 psasenatr on the motor busi ,„.,.,, doing IheC S—5B on June 21 The bus wasi^,,^,,, „ being driven along Tudor StreetIm>n am | ,„. WM makiror He noticed another —E—44—in | apppa i ( nn appeal from his front of S—58. Both buses stopth|lt ,i„. v m | t |,t give a dec ped and when S--58 pulled out l h( n „ decision In their hlVOUl from behind F-—44 there was a. Tnr Bm ount for the la collision between the bus. S -Mashed staff would be, $17,000. hi and a bicycle MW .,... %  IIOI This go %  lion ot the Chief Sandal ronoH showed %  : %  !'. 1 1 liuspeetoi that T Va-aVaVaVaVaVVWeV %  FOR THE COMFORT OF YOUR %  PETS U SE • nmw 1 11 1 rou HI 11 ..„,i %  %  PlIII.Vl l\SH I KILLER | H. JASON JONES A CO. LTD ft Distributees. %  A OsWOSMSTd .1 imnii on Jub f. a % %  •..!, tit he would bo creating a ,f he carried tarn duties he had been laid '•• oarr) Inspector Shepherd nooth Inspector Fagan to the ChiSl Sanitary Inspector and his statement was reMoeorated ba '" other inspectors Inaposior Vagan sdnBlttod %  the Board having spofeon to tti flpeetOI Sht'phertl klOOg the line of his statement but said he ha nut used UM word langeroui He had made the | In a joeiiUi ... with n Idea that it won: the Chief Sanitari InopOCtOt H was thai • man lie roollsod the Irn of the %  tatome nt, hohrovi lakon si louab bj %  lUsslors and he was BOlUTOIBOl? sorry he had made it. vhe Boned slewed the mote v\ itii grove conoern llunl.ir v < OatS said th.t .. Una b) UMBOI tor Is A ho .is .1 seiiioi .11 pet %  1 wit many years' service m the l*< paitrnent, luggoslod that he wai trying v Btaai < Depart ment Disgrareful Mi VK-I.II OoddUnrd 1 II .11 disaToceful ati rinaU) on the motion of Kon'bU \ 1 1 .,,-... %  .Mill Bad), %  .%  %  PB 1 [our months T*U Boa %  %  %  • tune to act In an executive capacity 111 the administration During the consideration of Its -harge it was pointed out that InFagan had acted as Assi bint hsS po os o r o Batson A SPECIAL FOR jm<^p TO-DAY fipWI CREAMS Mukr rll>.\Y'S ^r.K'•£~ MBW (lllllin ( I1KAMS ^Sfct^TBl Ban a "Ml'ST-TRY '^tSsvSf^Bssy/ r.ujuy taia (U-iiui.ifui Irral al . vctpa^r PHOENIX JT Soda Kminlain ^SsTrsV. Knlgha Lid tssssfasv rho VMM Rpe line Holds Up Truffitr, to Mi Branekor as to how fasl '.inevcUst was riding Proao said that h* could not glva the q B 1 nut tbO bit f** was riciden Bt a fast rate An adjournment wos granted so tint more vi'nesses could be nummoned •B'l<|Lntii" Brings Eight PuHHcn^i'rs 'I"he 41-ton Schooner Helnueeti Capt. King), brought eight pasH.P.C. Cailender of the Bridgo I sengers from St. Vincent ycsteiMaller ol Principle It K I' A I It S l winch runs alon Btl SOt it the c. Harrison & Co were being made t.\ the Walei works Department .mil I lathe was held up ..' a ntorvali The long1 cat stoppage occurred betweon 11 l^' o'clock and II o'doek, tinbiarj I breakfa>t period lor most city R D Wen doing the job bun ledly, however, so thai iraflu rniKht 00 amoothl) again Post said he was on duty on Bay Street on August 3 when he saw Norris carrying a bag 1Inot suspicion an I III what he had in It Norns started to panic and he arrested him. Moon: (Last Quarter) Aaguat 5. 1 fc.sTCRDAY Trmperaturr %  %  %  %  1... t top Ihe limn I Tin v* %  brought if lumber f"i M< 1 A 00 Ltd iKHircrs that were un Ir.iilinn the lumber >esterda> were making every effort to get It off the 1 Son,iwere pushing long pieces through the port holi .Mi Miller said that the hOPi 1 iwestanad labour an. ha would second Mr. Mottle) niotiuii. lie asked members to looi at the mattci calmly .mo dh %  I>assinnately despite the ol the Vestry in the past. 11 W4 known to all ol then, that 11 ex-Church warden bad not anon some money which had beei raised In the 1949 -IBM I .md ti.eie should then p dilluulty. 11 was a malU-r 0 iple and even if they ba. bad to borrow the money, whin 1 no need lo oo, the; should pay the scavenger % Thare on their kn 117.000 an. ha would suggest that bJ it and let it refer only to worker of the unestabllshed staff Thu staff had the firm opinion ths B eiitUle-i |0 get retroopocttvo pay as inch pa was given lo the QoVOnUTiei 1 1 ... He had pl^Ufl hm self to give assistance tow;. 10 their gelling that pay atnot last election period and he di not intend then to strav ( pledge Mr Mottlcy then j 1 %  had givt-n I I I B t take In-fore the Ho .. ,1. psoyi ... H i!d first have to %  ., i on that question Mr Coddard snid that he ha. m M ease s I'SUPERSEED SEEDS •ADS J t •at, anapdKtsii '1 kn-i... 1 „ | u m Al....... A.t.,. 'burr Dtlli. (an,..,,,,. (iiiywnUilmuiii. LH*II.I. Dahlia. H"ll.li.* latk.y-i,. Man BOH %  %  >2 hind... Niarll. MJ, I'orluUwra. Salvla. Ska1.1 Willin. Wrtmn l.-liK, Two Letters At this Mage in the discussion the Clerk rend two letters to th. Vestry. One dated June 17, 1950. was from Mr. Weatherhead t Pile, and the other dated June 14 was Mr Pile'* reply. The tii >t letter reminded M 1 Pile that Mr. Weatherhead ha I 1 "omctlme ago requested the Vestry Clerk to ask him to prepare an audited Statement of the ac' counts relative to the Priaonaa ; Alice Playing Field tor the information of the Central Government. •iy Clerk had reported that he had made the request two occasions, bul without BUCC "Subsequently I invited you to this office," Mr .Weatherhead' ay letter said, and I spoke with you Saturday it w ill' d you made a promise to let me ANNUITY The si Michaels Vestry at its meelniM yastOI la) granted Mr*. Lilian Drkex the vacant Prlrer Annuity nJJAtlTY GROCERIES I BKII1 wlATJBRAI LTD. HARRISON'S BROAD STREET "SOLO" SPRAYERS DOUBLE ACTION EJECTS ON BOTH THE UP AND DOWN STROKES THUS I'KOVIDINC A CONTINUOUS SPRAY. II1EAI. KOII GARDENS AND ORCHARDS COMPI ETE WITH rrrnNas INCLUDING 3 NOZZLES KOU VARIOUS MIXTURES SIO M SOCKET HEAR SET SCREWS •i. 5/ltl'. V, |" ALL ONE PRICE Ml I;.\T 1 uii RRAI.S t II; AMIIS (•Ml l.vnuih—:io Fn-i (IENUINE MALACCA CANE HODS WITH SOLID BRASS "LOCK-FAST" CONNECTION'S Compl.U will. DOUBLE WORM SCREW I'l UNdER. CLEARANCE WHEEL. ETC •••• HARRISON'S HARDWARE DEPT. TEL 2364 GOOD and tasty Sandwichc. have a loi v rich flavour srben ai %  ,'. msJc with rnsVnih! how children go tor then There's goodness irthat flavour loo. Mannuc is rk'h in the Mi vitamins that help to build up bodily litness and res] Sanaa to infection. UM it alw> in iioups, BHWs, gravies, sauces-it'^ as economfcal aa it b appetising. Sandwiches made with MAKftliTf The Vitamin 8 Yeast load a NELSON' COMING ON SATURDAY Lnata Nala The C N S c xpfcted to ai 110m North on J, BT4I the following dav for St. have the required Statement; bu Vinrcnt. Grenada and Georgethis has not yet come to hand Brlttaa Guianii I "A written request has now bee-i Thf unsigned toi received from the Social Welfare c.jidinor Austin & Co. [Officer for the audited Statement • en aeae t Fompil Mini-lcraj from pare I The ASMI already put forward a I reeommrndstion that tho Consultative Assembly should t* the! body supervlsini! the Suprn-NaUonal autho-ity under which the) Pool plan as proposed by Schumi would operate. Tinleeond big t.ilkinir ptiint • ihe •genri.. 1 proposal by tl 'ienci-l AIT..I Ing (. %  break lbs ban laid 'town ii>the Council statute forbidding all discussion I on de-1 fence mat The Committee has drawn up i resolution urKina that the Assemtily should be able to hold general debates on non-rnilitar r %  Ii a linked with the rkt the security "f Europe. —Heater SELECT TM9S8B OoUtfa Cheese %  M % %  1 at. tins 4B Black IVppvr n Peppai 11 •:• 1 %  '.!• Walls Oxloni *wges \yt tin Ml Walls Pork Sausage* 71 Danish Ham Sausage .. 1-lb tins 1 7H 1-lb. tins .43 1 %  -, can per tin .1 ..1 *a STANSFELI) SCOTT & CO., LTD. MtrMii -nt. 1 1 FOG YOUe HOAfB^; Sanderson Printed m Beautiful Assorled* Palterns, per yd Cretonnes I1.M CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., LTD, 10. II. It, A 13 Broad M roal



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fridnj. \ %  u I I. lit .to BmrbaJws Aduncate Vn r,i U.S. TROOPS CHE^CK RED ADVANCE £3,400 Million For British Re-arming In Next 3 Years LONDON. AUK. 3. IJKITAt.N tii-iiigjit announced the V.XIii.(MMMMl Kearn .< MM Programme l> hr efferiive ver I he next ihiro |WI| partly conditional on ihr receipt of more dollar u d. The .I'ini nncement cume in the form of %  memorandum sent yesterday to Waohinjjloii and now released. BgCtJagJ mil llrilain's Defence Programme in an rnisurr in the American rennet for infurmr.tion. The new programme will Iftcreasa taw, proportion of national iiuiime -.pent o i detente lr.nu eigall 'o It-n i gg rent. Tin memorandum ndd "How fai ll will i>. m tibia i towards tha now upper limii will depend on tha lad Slab .'. lance forthcomii BrKabr% defet >• MOJBJO HD ' nonosn u added li I month %  down of Britain** wry, but tha [plain %  %  • %  .i economic i iblJ %  1 mmunl 1 i The Memorandum Pi.iKr.iininc will oatail the BrttMh peo| le olii America •->••' d a AMI AMI \ A 1VIMI IF9F VO COLONIAL ARMY? IM ••"• " GtN, AUK %  Itlfl ItAtlv IVlMKIHPll 1 M.P the %  %  rottad for > I Ihr Ko%  til an thai ul %  I I ...... irnnp' only. i ti MM %  '. rl %  huhi China or K-i> .. .v % %  • ii ioa for rleft'i i %  rases %  i Much of aaj • i aouH bi irasshina i %  ..-. %  li k >ut ti>Ui %  ..i.i -.o % %  ii-i'...ii %  The new Phaggai %  rimoat to %  • Mr:iWiim:ili. ..id it is Jury To Visit "/'loafing Corpse"" Murder Scene PORT-OF-SPAIN. Aug. 3. A Jury empanelled for the lloai : H corpse" murder trial i going to visit the water front, teana of the aliened killing of Phi I ben Peyson of which Boyala Blnah and tout other men are accused. This was the Decision %  cached by the Trial Judge attar Hupert ,-M 'nt-r.iri. Singh*) defence counsel, -uggested that the Jury carry out the experiment, hoping to prove oca uaad In the alleged murder could not have come ashore a* claimed by the prosecution on the night of the incident. April 14. if the fide was low. Acting Chief Justice Vincent Brown refused a plea to stage a demonstration, but acceded to the request io visit :he leeae In quo after a brcere lierwemi th.Itonch ..nd Bar The visit is planned foi aflat tion's caso. The hearing is MUD Can Pre*-. the largest Piogr-imn %  '.:. %  . ol laoour reqinH The Memorandun nlttatlve in Making for information about Programme It recalled thai i*Otea an bebsg i'1-iiviried in Korea and % %  %  %  %  1 calling i.p Ann> and Navy reaarvarti About 1.000,000 men had received icanpulsiirv i:nlit..: June 1MB. Ke*.crve* There wai tlicrefore a Nlb> itantlve and %  teodlty I r young trajra i power in adatUon 10 the regular Army reserve and over I.IKIO.OOU older men who training m the bisl wai The Government therefore %  ad thai aba most urgent Ira lease the production ol the new Hefi Government expertpototed out in-day that one effect of the greatly incraasad spendum will tto bring] the countrj bach tarti in recent month* were being gradually relieved. The steel used for tanks will not therefor? be nvatlahl. f motor car industry; working on such good* as vacuum cleanerwill be switched to electrical equipment for armed forces The proportion of additional amounts hemr tpent tfl i iik-i\ io be .J rTo.ii expei I and udU l(. .il.i Forty Miles From Pusan Lii::; that %  bip; battle was I :n preparation %  troop* 1 I 1 I %  i %  %  %  %  1 Falling Hack Achesoiia Jolwson Will Not Resign S4VS TKUMAN v. 1SHINOTON lug 3 %  n i.mi-*..' Defend ttould raalgri bei menu leading to tha Kor ii.iKI'n %  The Piendent said at bla thai :'" two Sacratai lei and Dean Acheviu i!oing in reslgji a* lot was President of th. I States The ueustion arose at eentarenea tron allagaUoni in Congress that the Stat> i. .HI and the Defence I t had shown thems< prepared, either diplomats *n> u Irtarily .' i ttia outhreali ol I Korean erai One Congreeaman had that th.v ahouM telv Foreign Muiislers Asscmhh Will Meet Next Monday : i i Foreign Ministers of th CouncQ ol Europ* met in the Town Hall, this iymbolic building •' Euro] this avenina to Inaugurate (he gacotaj \i the Cotmcil's Consultative Aohoinblv op of 13 full members of the Council M i the bulldiru] as Fbrolgn Mlnigtan oi thaii d< Ulto the coutiyiird watched by a small crow.:. On Monaay, arhen the Corunilutiva A ine < %  : VSS i*afgrggeiBgtivga>ggBgri ):> nal n \< U potwlathM of about SOO.iiOO.one. session, two more flagg will They are UM Bags of tha Weitlplan for o Cierman Federal Repnblir and the output • vhad to join Uv '. an as associate members it will i the German flag has been hoisted m Prance end of the oacuparloi Porelgn Ministers present this Included Ernai b> (Britain) who drove up to the Town Hall with Ufa arlfl; Rohe-t Schuman (Frar mio the courtyard smiling at all around him. and Count Carlos Itab > Uvalj Sernv Their *ion* expected to lat unii U| Fleer the \.*ay foi lively series of debates in the Con• bl> hailed b) European Union enthusl %  ginning ol ment Scan Ma. Bride Rorc.gn Mineter for Bre was prertdlng in toi Number one on the agenda> 1 %  Schuman Monkey Chase BV At Turner's Hall IDS, U e only Darl .i Barbado "•here the only osigunal i ii sovarits] ol tha latand still i th the bhistllruj ol blrdg satd tha noin %  i the [ggjtli %  %  wrndfl %  iiioiiKh ua 4fi gcraj ol trees whan %  %  < %  ve-sterdav tnorning. Hul nn 1 ilv .. floras barking ol I,... koga ehanarvd hhi peace and he VS. TROOPS %  %  Under Study %  %  ing formal d %  lafhMu imdei Tha Prestdsnl said shal UM %  .repr ental Us % %  %  %  %  %  further snpolntrneni .. i %  fi | Of ':' personal i-eji %  • %  it. Mi My LIONI % %  III % %  plan. Bev. Hearing to the i In the A''. .i : Air View* Mtalstan had hefore them th< %  %  %  I bly s K atv ' commendation it thinks fit %  %  %  %  .. %  %  he the hlghlir %  %  % on pace loribcrn %  KoRBA. Aug. 3 American tinopv lew ui> %  ..retreai Nakntong rivei %  %  20 mil. %  capital la'.ti. Norther nen h no means in hoi pui hia croaaed br l daja fl %  ..., %  %  GJ Ua Korean ('" %  %  In UV I — ItClllri II loud barking m gufsaasaa i %  i %  %  n I SI %  %  %  mauled onr interesting sight was f> iNorlh KorranB lake 1,200 IVisCMHTS LONDON \ Ko Oaesaianlau Ha i %  %  %  i %  %  ud '" i %  m gun ... I aptun 'i ''"MM day a %  %  I K Hun I. 10 I .... 1 %  %  1 % %  I 1 %  (hough I i more mei b %  %  I %  %  %  %  %  vhen tbi %  Real %  %  i effort %  %  %  %  %  %  %  1 noil %  1 i iciary In TO Day* %  I h North K" fi %  %  %  %  i : %  %  %  || ... 1 Kori Uv % %  %  ontlnur %  | —Bruin ..... I. -unikey leaptiuf liom Ul I iree with .< ^ uog one llngl irelv t.> he Dutch St ren gt hen Defence Force* -.ICtil ,IM.i. "Jungle (;b*r Defends Her Marriage SINGAPORE Aug 3 A 14-yasn -"i'" Du ad in t I %  day-Old mmriagr to B bCgla) a hoot (> %  .. %  %  Berth HcrhMjh herielf Nadia %  ; %  %  • I onlj four %  %  I :F | Who bar' hpeeel re%  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  . The Herogha -Can Press m HAGUI ; T.ll llfW'l%  i drawn up 1 II rum nt % % %  Tahe ful i %  U.S. Mows LtmkSubtiety -SAYS NEHRU NEW I <> IMl, i %  ... %  %  %  i % %  %  %  ll. i railed in %  i Pro-Leopoldislfl ThroM I^g^^ And Tonialors al Minislrrs %  %  %  I %  : Leo] Rugflia Boycott ( .V M;iil < omiiiill' *' light Ketil %  Security Council Will First Discuss Korean Aggression lg 3 in* aw United Nal kseurU ....... %  itim! Yugoslavia abstnlnlng n |i %  %  %  1 %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  I %  rig %  %  %  : | nit reoreset.Ution and S#COIK; %  .: iflict After Mi adoption of th*prod damnwranglini; %  %  abstain jectad |0 %  %  On UM Rti %  %  %  China* I ..b^leiitK... %  I hrulet I %  %  I %  II %  Reuppe Prisoner* lynched



PAGE 1

PACE EIC.IIT I! Mill .Iiti-. ADVOCATE TODAY, AlC.rST 4. \KU MARSHALL, WALCOTT FLA Y SURREY BOWLING LONDON, A A ill %  ott put the West Indies hhi on top of Sun-<\n\ ti chirflThis H'TI they 0tain i nd mi ... 149 and ihi-y put or Hoi Uw Fourth wicket i Mi The M %  ORtj fnm tuns In eriunl the fourth wicket Mtord lOT the vVeat Indies in England b] Worrell and Weekea in 'he Third Teal Hatch ckcta ovei %  IRMI .III .1.1. credit, da -ties needed %  .. 'heir . %  %  i g %  •' %  i h %  iiMim >i\ KIICS "Snappers" Lead In First Kouml .' %  Polo maii ii IwNMMn Snappers an• ttlion. lii the othei %  xiure %  i love The mat*. h wen a: followS M ..rdtMi ii l'li.e S Police pJayfi i with 1 i %  %  lutes startcrl -*rT defend! u thnr goal •• %  i, | .... .Hid it was nut until mldWl through thr flial h;ilf v tra (CM ward f< lam Portly after tin Oaottro} roatai -cored tbeu a end p il Al UM Man 11 tlta M %  Swordlish opened lip Portillo in m-lhioui h lo send in goal numbet IhP .low rang* Than %  i %  again and ored n i ill in rapid it then forw II %  ad UM BWNH %  :' %  i forward final lUac) i ird Jon H i lime Hi.b I 1 re-bounded into play II n. 'ii i ollared lh> "ilnn t %  lamnuoaa .' Batrac u d aj I Darraaudaj tMnnletely outplay cd Snappers in the m i Uua v.-. Fan md Mrnewhi ugh game, and though Hilly Munniur. lor Snappers opened tin Herbert Purtiiln plat lag on UM ninrarniaat wing %  hoi uw equal bwr aUaaat without avai looking al the gool lip Beared wltti %  lovab Shot from ., dlfl Barraeudaj kept ui U i but thinforwarda mined golden opportunities after good win k in their bach Una by Charles Rveij n, lla-il Brook ..nd KM I /Minnm in hall time howevei Kenneth [no ii. tiuike lhi favour of Sn.i|i|'i' .is the whistle went for the Interval, Half tin % %  over Sneppi their (am and tiGeorge awelean Kored with a well placed shnl i.ui id reach of goalkeeper Mine I'eic Ii. ii red and no long aflar IHi Herberl Portuk again came Into the inline l>> one* more beating (he Bnappei gualkeepei T.ivloi With the scon %  I three goals' were kept very excited and Barracndu tarn ware aeon looking foi %  notbi i i i %  Snappers however had other Ideas and they lumed on the b itiv before lime. Kanneth mot followed I Dalheri Baoni u i put tin uu ix'vonil daubl aa they Taa i'-. n followi Swordieh \ Weaiherhcad, (Cap) >. < %  Poafca N Pmilllo M i; liirla, <'. Jordan M FMagjarald PoUci E ll.irri'. W Phillip' Mc II Hull .i i in) i I. Dodajn, ii AUeyne, t wuilanu, I Aehby. Barraeiidai I! Pen r, K Taj loi P Flet.-hiT, C, K.v.l.n It Brookl (Capt.i, II Portlllo, R quickh N< thai gave n < %  Hi; 11 nunCOLLEGE CADETS WES I \ TER PL A TOON SPORTS A I.AltLir. cumbei <1 pa.ents and frafAOa i tfed from Ilarnson College, Combermere and Lodge >< lurned ottl I -ke part in the CadetInto Spurts which was held at the Garrison Sav i ly iifiernoon. Number one platoon (Harrison College, was th: Champion I'liituon with Id points followed cloai Kumbi il.'Kli^e) jnd six (Combcrmerei a point! UM thii.;.nn gave a good exhili;%  :•• split nit" 1.1-1000control. -ii< i one and two platoni^i The i..tlet wdl be b—akin, llage, Nuana ramp oa Saturday. Ixxlge and Number fon No Hark Pa> For Kniployr. Second Divitiofi Fixtures self that i %  %  • -i that idea %  %  el they %  had ln*i ing forward i" it i i t %  i lUrd Drives %  %  %  %  %  %  %  Ain lledaer. %  l.i .md to-day %  • %  tnpUad hll .u-khig a ball lo %  .-.. i %  r.-.-i*.' for just over four houn< Hov-i. rs met with mori %  %  in .-i ho]. i eigl %  '. 11 in 4S ralnuf i. !!•. %  IN % % % % %  i the >ni R i, n'hm r/n ui the it owing io a grltht dull ploj %  %  T | %  k rev* .. %  % %  i led v ith ;. ball which hll I i. i i lendi .! %  .H : vllni hi It bad thai I i player left H %  iidd for 'jo tnlauMn gfid a a ii*rf %  catch I'niiHliililes Defcm-iThli t I.VIM: W w.roTT M. I..." i %  The We>i indHa were all out at i t.i I i.f thnr ninth wichet Tor unabM to Dg lo illness. .^nih wukct pu. on 47 runs in as many minutes. with thi no* ball Met tkea on the lag -id. II B wlehetJ to t>e dowT.* in. ^ -i '. M Ifnmadhin VI unabh ''>il. but only klx run. •ran ...i". I bel n Bi daw struc'; ; ui txnehag Vaaaatlni I %  o thai the Imrlngi cl oaa d for 43' m i .1 not nut :itf hail usei i. but ii'.should have been caught when IS Burnt* made %  had start in thenbid t<> W.V0 the inmngs defeat for with only 8 runs scored Worrell 'i -i Mc Hedser. TreMrail. 12th Man Humarlhlii though stntnl to •>' nut undul> ill did not ii Id win i. (Or tru %  % % %  %  ii" % %  •'•• % %  .is twelfth in.in i I kept ih lulnnan qulel with theli I liii K but wit! .. bad light ruippad plaj It wai possible I., resume latand Iban wonall had May cnughi bul Cenetable earn* In to stay wi-i .. until xtumps JRJ 29 for a. BOV MARSHALL 1 III • i" i ii .• I ... i ... I.I i, \ v n.^i. .. %  A V Bra.ft UMani i gaiaai Toui Kill I *. t Ml i ia>, am. f—aM s>--**• DOWI INQ %  V.'-M.YaiS l... i. : I, -.. ,. v. '. V IIMIOT i . I. V ,11 b W.n'rll .11 OKI rough) continued lo defend aritta fl I lock unl i.iwn SUIIC till nee d ed 244 runs to nil % %  teat wtt'i %  Co n ulng their overnlghi fourth wicket partnership, Marshall and wairott hrought Ihe We < Indie score against Surrey at the Oval ban without liein.: parted At Ihe interval the WcM frailaa replying lo I %  LCI, wara 42 ahead with kets in hand. 51) In £ Hours A hill, lab i BUM Marshall s methlng wei 1 When 71 with the total al 181. Wak-ott might have been caught %  aara > day was a very bright 01 ..II the boys ran around n vesu and shorts Bvei awaaaad whoi a woraka they were having at i • -rack*. event on the pfOH the ChafiOt Kanau this wan run over %  distance oi 50 vaaaa and all platoons took par! Thi* race was very amusinp and spectators rocked with laughis the boyx tried tn dlsentanKhthemselves from each other at the Onuhing point Numbei on pliitnon was the win %  inking a late start Obstacle Karr in the ohstacie Raea two lean n platoon ii-stle.. to pa 1 the tlrst obstacle which plaaa al canvas spread on ground with eight boys sitting the edges to keep it down. %  irawled under the 0 %  rjvaa but very few ca .ui looking pteiiwd with lha Next ordeal .. .; in which maaj baa Who tried 10 eat then bun* to 11 lv -finked themselves v plata Combat on this race Itaji y net ... n tha ( Iroo i Race a It Captain Perkuw i akaa m and When toe pnigramme eluded Sergjaaat n BtuaM of ti IPigllliaill ^hulled II boya with %  ome "atuni" ridrnaj < %  metal > vile. He i>cri the Irark it hrenkneck Itesults are as follow 1 Ctiaiioi IUc*-W Yaia: Ui Ko T Cmlipmlr H^w M Vsrd< 1 .1 ..„ %  Jnd .Vs. 1 PI' %  V.ird. to 1*1 .... i a R 1 Pl..loon m —. 1 is VarOw IM .1 PUlIOUt: i..t No 1 PI.1.-.I. i *rk RmerSO V-.i 1 !•< No M ... r..--. na. (.* PwaOa " Cnirt M Oraaaa T aanmna B*-h*-j. _' %  \ %  1. St. % Pllt-i. I"U aa iIIUI jra. No 1 Pl^Uon %  H ti it S*aw* I . M (Cant.) C MacU-an Rogn u Bat rdati t K laer. H Manning The rcfert'i' was Mr W Glbbf A* Thursday August 10, is Race Day. next week's llxturei will be plaved on Tiuudny Augiisi 8th. The fixtures are Sn.ippc Swordllsh and Flying Plpii vg Bonlt Murtimlalv Fnr Commamwealih XI IX>NIK)N, AUK I E A Marilndale 0< Ihe WjM Indies Is Included in a Commonwealth team which opposes at' England side in the first match of the Kingston. Surrey <„<-..-( festival starting Angus' 30. t lunch ih W* t i ii ken fall, a nun i .oii.ipsiarttlrtf In ome the big fourth wukct reand wa broh on Tiie portnerahip had put on 27H 1.1.,,i in rnln ti Mai -lull hM M lours |n .i ".. uis. 35 minutes, while Walcoii %  M roart ai well u -.ix in n Iiltle over 4 hours Look add Laker bad charge r lha bowling after tha interval, bit n steady rate of scoring was maintained W\, %  ... %  M i'ii.ill I the oentury, his fourth of the toui and the partaerahlp reached MO uw minute %  flerwardai and JU^I behne Maridiall got Co his hundted lii Waa his third three Ii i t> Ot lha summer After l.tim-h Marshall war particularly wvei %  on Lock. nrM Ihe lust hundred runs after lunch toot) only 51 mi nil-. Whan waaterman came on Wnieott ooked hun i.> the ooundar> ..mi then arova a bidi uut or the gaaahri BX i\ I tin auna over Walcott did not .survive very Ion*;. being taken at the wicket off .. i-u ti ne stroke and it was Parkrr In ad these two wicketWlth CraaiUaal Bad Comae together the game quietetl omwn th.,ugh thenwai lull value from every waring stroke Then Parker hcl.' a hard h t i aad it .nl.lon todismi Touring (iirls Win Fir si Neti>all Game A LAROI crowd H the (Queen's College g lerda avaninj t< the Net i.;.ii garac between giria of ihe Olympla Club and ihe visitmg i of ihe Bishop'* ton won by 10 B Thai was than tb-t .engagement of ihe tour Hla txcellancj the Q ivai i i Savage, accoinpaiued in Mr w. Lambert, Prlvwte SacraBavage, -'"t of the Oovarnor, attended Hi aanbi %  of both look Ihe flrsl throw III .1. ..n Spk < %  : m "I thi for the visitoi teall> gave the local nils a lesson in shooting. Out of 15 tries she sent-. il.nt in that position ceived a pass ha team could nearly always he sun i-i .in additional goal. The Othei shunter. June Awnl bad 13 irles but onli icorei II %  is adtve ui that 1 %  %  nd oltho %  %  <'ii on BH it on < thai rim rxnruifculed much to Spicrr's scoring spell i i ii-iil girls. Oloru Ra iy had m triei ind hll* Jean Vaughan hurt nine tl efore hall III f M B • as fOW .ill %  fter I; hop's Hitfh School 1, h it UirOUl 1uut the game Jean Spicer. .il a good throw, found (he net. So..11 after one of the waa pasiulised and 1 waa awarded Jem Vaughan mn %  wuh of ihe net Befora half tuna the vlattori a I ti-il .mother to put IbeiiiM-Ki t gaiali in the lead Shortly all resumption <;ioria Itamscy to cut down ihe lead of lha vinto Al this stake the visitors wc o getting Into uSetr Btrkle and h d Ihiagg ihaui own way. At the I iff they sllll appeared ful energy and looked ag though the] would have taktui on ,-tnothei !." I loam light away. On Hie ottiei hand the local girl.ippvurod to be all Bx |i s"iSS SAS hBAP OC OSO! OLLVOU WMgsoRE Autie: \ MINUTE V00 6E-i" A SCV ,-XKEV ro, KMTCAQS -0W VOJ .CC< *50„sP „ HOME 1 JTJST DOLL UP I (1HEN rX PS SA5HAVIH' vBmsSmS



PAGE 1

II1II.W lll.lvT I i-i.-.n. BARBADOS ADVOCATE I'AC.E SEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS. VESTRY ion V\I.I: ron III M AUTOMOTIVE 3B2 lt>*rr< I)wl I -On CAR IMS OarrroW a* !" ni-\i.int rdwli'ion. Tjre* •' %  R H*n -ear 1* Brtlpiainr. Si. AI IAW. (11 I*.-!*. IM chn •>• %  Se-Un. BW aM %  %  %  1 t -On. SSI* a. u^/i B S A CAR MM at *>• '" %  •"'• :>: 1 I s -In HOUSES ATTRACTIVE BUNGALOW Well %  ;.: m lumial Badrooau. and drawl %  facln* ELECTRICAL A1P COOLM* KrVRIiJEMATORB Knurl i.-i. Tom nom U> Dec IM FjlOj i.miilinl m ad sen lum* IFor particular* Dul PLAT h.d with modaen coaveeii. enraa Phone •> %  > *> • %  %  OTTOM AND TOI' F1>X)K ol <". %  fed RW HUp. Mf Appi' lot N W, am SO-Sn —7 TTOATOR M t H %  m VaMa, %  %  %  | i %  1 %  o * ElJXTHlf RaWIORRATOBB An%  I t. M %  U ih balla kru ,iln.i in opeiaDM %  OTIS Pa C. %  .>! i ..' '.•:.•• %  1 S JO ! %  VIKI* %  •> %  nm J F %  '• %  BATOR .... %  a* i %  : %  ... IB in a> ir..m pa.* 5 t calling on m* with % %  %  1. as well J. U. the Central Government '.Like tins opportunity In ...ii that I expi %  have ready for publication during the month of Juno a dul i.-ed Statement of Par chiat Accounts for the year l*49-50. in accordance with Section Si of the Vesti-ie*' Act. lull Iliftitultics •' letter in reply sUted 1 Mi Weathetlwad that the matter ol the Princess Alice Playing Field niftl been ducuned a nh mm (Mr Wealherhead), and that h. knew some of the difficulties. He would take the opportunity to mention that it was questionable whether it was his (Mr Pile'.. B to give a separate detailed tatement, inasmuch as that account would be incorporated In the accounts for the parish. He would however furnish what he %  Bd) % %  rand to fun 1 :' !iving the det.nl Whftl British Schoolboys Are Taught At. i ii! AUCTION UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER I h.vc been FURNITURE .... Thuradaa io-n A^J looted Ii r.v I* will i lemufht Termi Cah D Arc>. %  (•II %  Koch ro. I be te-it.-l i RFAL ESTATE i BBiA'cHK si i i. i.i. Sea-de %  %  *• Mafcai ,,i...M, Baart L-m AIIPV oye*i ] %  •.. ,... MISCELLANEOUS HOOKVSacond Hand. i-Metis BMi I % %  Dial "1 ro LTD FOU S.U.E i|i wardrvba trunk* Trunk*. Vall.e. OWEN T AIJ.DEH U Dial 3*M rwoctt Damaircirl" True" Cat H Ja*on Jonea A Co Ud Molaar*. Tank Yatd al ba. of ITmpirr Theatre -.Ulna! "ill Ur ract-lvtd B i . %  %  %  %  Ytdaj nih A.irui it I OS I A (III Ml 1.IIT.IN S IILRNCM COTTE Is daflnilaly lha moat drtlrliHi* i-.nnad t %  -. II || ^1— •" BLACK J'I-AST1(* l**fTCET-IV'K HaiTi and Martlndali-' R-;.j rmdnpleaic ral.irn m to tl>* B>K """"" %  4.30 I,. Fre-h IrTT %  Aa*i>'UWT On* Oold BraeatM (MH Club •nlal .. _I HIrr ParadiaiRaarh \|. [ %  %  • Mo-on-i. | QUaTAWB Prle "a In I ,t Tin. Tins •ttth ^T DtWM •• %  I l GARAOE Ud MAHSM >IA!.l.'s A kW anrlii.piit h*ra> *sm Paf"'' 1 "' i Knitfhi Dnw : SHOITAKI. THKIT a*.**. ZZ :'*! Pindn plraae rC.im •!"* u> Qaulbourra* t"'". M.pp Hill. Bt. Mlrha.>l • -"DRV IB M n bti U i PflkDVI i %  OMN'II'FO A • tor achlna mid llr-d f*l. *• < KNIiniTI 1-ld • jtf|.!U*STONK. Coi.rrta fiione. Karl Blnek-Siona smubia lor aawlna Johnaon BUbita A Garana i.id. PHI BW ' W-an. BLVBI nUQMI SET farms. Brooch. Plnar-rlr, I n-l Why pay m-'a alaewhrr*Onif Store, Cnlartdar SttfTl SWEDWAKE TirKET i -. %  f WANTCI> HELP A YOUNG LADY lo* >ui omra wllh kmwimaj* ol Bok-a'pi" n-*n tinnrniarvi Slai.otyplrt prrfambty. Witts fill particular, of uuailftralawa. rapabllitlM and ap*rWne* If any" W Iinj. A BON. P.O. Boa in. YARD ROY APPtV I Hindu 1 s n MISCELLANEOUS Juit arrived NobleA lloare lacquer pcinta In aaveral coloura. including mrfiCf-r. primer, putly. compound, and thfhnrra. Enquire Auto Tyre Company. T'Bialsnr Street Ph-in^ BBS 3HW TFN Owlnc to Currer-cv Control wa ara no allowed to Import any mow Ant Tap allhouah out of Hock, but B* -till hav a cuppiv of "Ant Butlona*' which wt £el ..( the •oune of the Peat troubtn Price 1 per pk(e of • ObtalnntoUi I KNIGHT'S LTD HW J ITHI.U NaVnCBS NOTICE IS lfEltEBY GtVKN i nernardmruinrr l-r CBrriOUa 0 Rastttoa. Upper Ua*httr...t UM %  Vklntown, Barbados. alnBIe woman. I %  .. Ihr Oo'rrr-.r lO rat Inti. and Uial fen* pecaon who know -i.. on WBf fiatumlliaUOn ahouli DM bo franlod •hould Mod n writtn %  r.l iirned tatrmatit ol tha lacta to U Colonial Saerrtarv of Barbadoa. Publl Bulldlnirv Bridjetowi. Dated thli l-l das of Aufuit ltfl. COTTIJ CATPORD A Co. Solicitor, for Ml Be—i.rdloe Bdmea If furriwa. £20 MONTHLY No *perlt Uomlnlon* for pen Mail only tako fewa da 'On. Prc.,i*ct Houo*. 1 Lcih Lanei. Ciujlaict. NOTICE Notice .• hereby alven thai ijny B*Taoi> havlna any dabl or claim upon or %  tin-tins the rolate of Auhrev Newton Recce. late or IToul Hill. In the pariah of Saint Thorns, who died In thla laland on the Ilel d of Julv IBM intaetaia, ate hereby required Is am-1 In parllcuI-.-of Ihelr clalma duly aite-led to Ihc underaimed in earo ol Mtan. Hutfhlnaofi ft, B-nflel.l. Bollclt"r. James S'iel .lrideelown. on or before the IMh day of Septombar. IfeW afler which d-te I *hall piocenl tn difUilmle to* evart* of the estate •mam Iho partloa ,-r titled thereto h.. Ins reSatd to Ihe f'.i'M* and clalma only of writen I ha'i lien have had nollce and thai I *hall not bo llaMe lor ai-et* db diatrlbuled to an poiaon at whoa* dam or claim 1 (hall not have had nolle* at the I ol auch dlatrlbuUon And "II peratm. Indebted to the aald requretod 1 %  rt'le t riotot Baal lalav J Eatate of Aubrev TAND "PAINS Bd by • U'.'.er. should he n<.t be able to get the necessary infv .nation for bis satisfaction. Mr Pile then promised to get UM Statement of Parochial Act'.in the necessary lime, and in furnish any further on r*qulr*d that it was within his power to furnish. Mr \V. %  %  %  ptBtlR, f,,. %  : %  %  thai in bad baaa BBBWI tbOUl the inoposc to SB} thwi srhat thon quBBtlooi (!. %  WOtlld in due eOUISB | fumish them to UM W M> I l> Mottlt) -aid that he %  member of the Playing \ itimlUeo ii % %  %  habit to Barm on a con %  yaa' man and knov nothlnti ;il->tit what was happening, but M bad happanad to ba ill m the Noi BTU lor Brtl He I.ad heard Air W.,.lhii.i.ii.i utBi I.'' iiad heard %  • read M Pilr's Kport Wh.it he \vas going what in* alwayi thought was the fair thing to 00 OM of partof UM I bal ba rarnambarad being taught to randei avO '" -vn The ex-Chm ehwanieii. Mr Tudor, was not present at the and there was no ona who could throw uny light on Ih. matter except the cx-t hurehlle thought that Mr. Gale and Iff Wealherhead were right to linitu the matter up. bacntsM eertaln -. tieat at tbi Pri and Public had taken up the question, and more especially liecau.se the t I.A.i Linent MM asking for an audited Statement. One could Mil] main an audited Siaw-inent if one had facta. He would suggest that they .should not discuss the m.i'.ir BD] further Uat day but th.d lhe> should call a special public meeting of Ihc Vestry and Invite Mr. Tudor and Mr. PQa to attend Theie might be certain tilings on which light could be thrown They should not discuss it behind Mr Tudor, back. That was his attitude, mild Mr. Molt Ivy. and it was unlike the altitude which had been adopted toward, him when lie had been 111 on one occasion. Mr Miller said he did not wiint to criticise anyone or do anyone i. HIT lie associated himself with the remarks made by Mr Gale I'himoney that had been provided for the Princess Alice Playing from the Labour Fund, and bad handed over to the Vestry by the Government for administration rhaj ware thaiacora wholly re%  ponalbla for that money. Knew NuthiiiK lltoo was a member of the Playing r'ield* Committee, and lie knew nolhing al all about the speiiuing of the money making that statement because) many taxpayers and other people nad been lo him They lelt that : %  bed always represented principles, but that himouth a) Freea Bage 4 under-lying it, is taken to be a lace ol everyday life, v hich is not open to queavioii .T.d certainly is not a cause 01 surprise. It is only on such term%  ..• |ha Mi nish Empire %  M (l placa left for it in the pOaaUcal itnicAira al the twenti-ih Kntury The desnabilitv of this state of p must be emphasised ol institutional framework must be created lo bring the peoples together and promote an understanding between them The British Council and the colonial u' have important part* lo ptaj in this respect, and foim the most promising lines of adthe moment On the BUC* h axpai inients. the pos%  i promoting ndarly coramtUrUotwl advances depend. It is therefore strongly to be hoped thoaa ho attempt to rzned bv him %  'PP 1 "-"" "? colonies in the way gneu oy nmi i*...u- ,i,,„. i( .ri wit GOVERNMENT NOTICES Atlti. I which \v Hi ba | lal GBB-tte of ThursdaLtM. Bl retail itllini! | COLUMN ONE AKTUT.K MM rwo iNot more than> lli Merchantable Pitch P.!i.(Basle Siaa) f29oo par l.ooo board feet trd Ausaat, iso Attention is drawn to the Control Ol 1'iaes (OafaneaJ lAniendt.ent) ouier. ISM. No ^b arhteh BrIU ba pyMtBhad in thi Oafntel al Thursday 3rd Augu*. 150. 2 Under this Ordei the maxinunn tetail BaUlng price Bl 1'Blt* imported Canadian Large Grade "A") is as follows :— i-'itr all II Itiiv slim-s — White shoes, to pass muster in lompaiit. mu*l be spotless, immaculate Use £lt Propcrt's White Kenosalo or Propert t Shuwhilc N| surer way of making sun (hat white shoes arc while AKTICLE KETA 11. PHU E .Not more than) EGGS -Imported Canadian Large Grade "A" 10c. each r II or i. it i s Stan HI n mrr. RKXOVATOR In Carfaaj ail* Spomg* rd August. i;>50 Vacant Post huh the situation demands, will meet With a warm lespoiue fiom them If this tr.kes place theni> .-on for despondency about the future. if Graduate Assistant Master Boys' Secon lary School. %  %  i ill.i I very well however, to fl .7J8 x $96 — $2,160 plus a tei i t iurary cost of living bonus at | approved rates (al present 10'.* ) QuaUnCUeni and evi-rien..will b' taken into eonsideratlon in termimng point m Ikcale. Passages on first appointnn al 'be officer appoint.•). as *all those of his family, net MCiadlna. IUe pBT B Oni In ill, will be 1 vlded. Applications, giving full data Lfl ol qualifications and expeiien.e panied by two recent testn mials, should be Bddfl Mi .-.til .(in iiada Ho. S.. not later than 11th August, I9SH The successful appl llth September. 1950. It : keep the object of equal polit status before us In governing the colonies, but the transition from Crown Colony rule to tesponsible government should not be made itKi quickly. Dominion status should not be allowed to become .\ hich is won, or a prire reluctantly surrendered to those who have been successful In a struggle, it should be Willingly offered at the end of a period in which the people concerned have been educated to receive it. Finally, it should be brought to the minds of the colonial peoples, that first and foremost, they as rising races have duties and obligations to themselves, to the Empire and to the world. The> are faced with an opportunity to build sound community life on foundations already laid la tharo. So much depends on them realising this opportunity that they deserve every encouragement If, on the oth.i hand, they provi t.-nt to Bottla down and lake things M tnaj .ne. then there can be little hope for the future. The fa. that many of thi kicking against the pricks should he regarded as grounds for tious optimism. The very aggressiveness of West Indians. Malays, West Africans snd Cypnots, must be accepted as the rise of young and vital peoples. We must not however, underestimate the seriousness of the unrest they may cause, for very real and thorny problems are so raised: but is evident that the future lies only in the consideration of these problems; if we neglect to consider them, the future is obscured in doubt. Applications arc laWfABa i QraduatO Assistant Master at the Grenada Boj s I School The post is iH'iis. ..!..! .i 'i. FLY TO NEW YORK LARGEST, FASTEST; MOST LUXURIOUS COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT .WORLD! the ioouffl (DECKED) CUPPER' -Churchbe his. May mean kidnmy trouble A I at Ban al tl* kidneys is to c!iM.ii.iHiMrmfnl impurities (torn ilic >i.lcn.. If the kidneys grow • rs'inipiintiesatcumulate and settle and often become a cait-.c of pain in joints and muscles. The wi / to tackle the liou'jle is to help the kidneys. They should be toned up with D'Witt's Pills the medicine Skids speria'ljr (or this purpose. DW-.lt %  Plus have a soothing, cleansing and anuseptic action OB ft that brings ihcni back to prrfotm their natural V function piopcilr. This welltried medicine is sold all orer A the world and we bare many I letters lin.n sufferers telling I ol relief gained, after years ^ of suHeruig, by taking De Witt's Pills. Try them your trouble. Co to chemist sad get a supply NOTICE All persons running I engaged in selling, or running games at the Garrison Savannah on August 7th. 10th and 12th days above E C JONES. Eagle Club. Broad Straet OUR GUARANTEE De Witts Pii' aianiiia.turtdin kl .tidilybygl. conditions \n& the ingredient* conform to ngid standards ol purity. DE WITTS PILLS lor Kidney and Bidder '.„ .r ibscd because the happened to hand He was not accusing the aChurchwarden or anyone el: Playing field Committee had d two meetings and both ad been abortive because UM 8B> buichwardan had not attended Neither had he attended the n..<*liB| of the Vestry that dayHe agreed with the made by Mr. MottIcy that thi matter should not be discussed A-nind the cx-Churchwurdr back. He wanted the public to be nalutled in mind as to wlMMsM UM oonay had been properly spent ,i not. He hoped that the special .mblie meeting would DO called as possible. Mr. Graniiuin supported the UaVHtlon for the special meeting I it WOUU 'ai ili'ate matters il a Ibt of the unoarUflad rouchara was praparad bafora Oia meeting was summoned. They might li*' making a mountain out if a mole till! Mr Mottley said they wanted 11 thivouchers, those certified %  :'.i!led as well. Mr Wealherhead said that all documents relative to the matter would he got. Mr Chase suggested that a list i nest ions they wanted to tsfc Mr. Tudor should ba Bent to him before the meeting, so that I have time to prepare repl' Harbour Log In Carliile Bay |pja> n..rdn Brhooner Adalm. Lmnder. Sch Belqaoeti; S I Cranaman; Beh Turtle Dovo; Brh 1. Bunii-la, Brra Kouurne. M V Ban w..l. Sch PTinceaa Loulw phlBp II nM.,i, sch L*dti .n Q..II E BmiUi. 8rh Mai ewl. Sch Starlon Belle Wolfe I'Ortae. Bth Burma II M V Oder. Brh Mnllv N Jonea. I...... H.-.,r.-tla. M V Jenklm ARRIVAIJI Sch 'W-; ..i. M lor Lin*, from t Vincent. "a iiert A BBDC la lion SB Cl-ilt anuui. MB V T oncu. from Bl l.ueia >%  ,%  A r„ I.UI IHJ-AKTCKIa* M V T II Radar, US On.' inhibntd. tar *H I.n.la. A—nti inera' Awidatu,i BM B y. Tannls Ships In Touch With Barbadoa Coastal Station CABI* and WirrU fdiiae ihal %  'can with (he folio* ln# ihlpa firough thai I -rlxdoi Coast SUUOB: H Ji.lnl.nrr. B B Cavli HorsnssrWrni B.B. Thaii Ot Mhlll; 8 B A Kobe*. S l.dy Nelvm. B S FOrt Amharat. B % S Oranleat-d. ASge-nUna. 8 H ,.!,. \ 1. Rnu S S il: n 8 Ban Wlllndo S B Mar IB] B S IJnaru.. S S ATKobac Herdlla. S B Ranrlllki. Roaario MAIL NOTICE l.wlv Nrbon will b. beiatal Po.l ***tl. real arid ReaTlMere-l Maila ORIENTAL I rtaioH. ivoar. IMK %  Jl-Ullil hA"AII. TAP %  rsTBirs. i.i "Vi snu. TOPS > VALUES OUR PRICES DEFY COMPETITION Ym kVothnlit .tint .V ##/• Ki*€tntt 0nmt and #*rt--#4'COT HI i %  — I'KOVIHION GROCERY aV ^ I UM UK I OKI \ r %  I W Cut Gouda Ch-e-e t JVanuls Choh-asailed Plari .. nfnokad Karrlnr* it P-u. Choice aahed Bar* I NOTICE "< ALLlNG ALL RAF. PI KsnwEi." There will be a meeting of I the Barbados Branch of the Association on Saturday 5th August, 1950 BriUan Coon U "Wata 1 pm. ase m Or It. Mc tb GIBBS' i.mii KIlUviN RIM Trr il i b tea i aaa WMB1VCME8 llll IIMIIM I >IIMMIII 'I (CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. Proprietors! Corner of Broad and Tudor SlreeU I'RINTS W AMIABLE Beautiful Deilrna 4te.. 57e. and B5e. per vd IMIMKHTIC lit. per vd CALICO 36 In. W1DK InaurpaMcd In L)aalll> Only 49r. per yd. GINOHAMK In lovely Cherka Z In. Wide waahahle Only 47.. per yd. IIF.AVY QI-ALITV LOVI I.Y POPLIN ;>. In. wide In Pink, Blur. Grey and White lie. per yd. l.OVFLY QUALITY PaUNOB f.F.ORCKTTh Tr. per yd. SOFT QUALITY UltEPF OF CHINK 3 In. from II.H up MVFN.K FOR I VIFORM* In attractive .had !" Uti In. wide 75e. per yd. RROCAI1FS SPINS. MI\Mlr> NATIN. TAFFETAR UREPES all redored CRFTTONt.H & BEDTIUKS also redurrd In i<. %  I'l.ASIK RAIN COATS In Pink. Blue and t.reen For Ladles fjUM each I.Alllls JI.RSFY PYJAMAS In VajrlagBI Shade IMS per pair LADIES VI SIS Z for $!.• I. AIMIs I'Will' !"• %  rarh Pl.AsMt IIEM'TIES >Be. LAROC PLABTIO TAHLE CLOfll 4H in. i 45 In >l Mb rarh I llll Ii'R VESTS :tr. each PLASTIC PANTIES 36e. OP PEARL NECKLACES MSB UP .. BARKINGS Sl.0> pair BED SPREADS LOVELY QUALITY. SinihS4.50. I>ot.lr rMMlll QUALITY BKAHSIERS SATIN FINISH II I? per pair < IIII.DREN Rl BBI.R SANDLES In all alrem S0r. per pair up IIANKII s IIMMY ONES ll 00pt*i>rtunitu. ////#'///rVW*MV.W-W.V/ '•'''-'-'


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Friday. # ieess>)
August CENTS

19350

FRVE



- Parbados



Year 35
lieiesarnienantiangaepeiets oo







U.S. TROOPS CHECK R

£3,400 Million For |
British Re-arming
In Next 3 Years



CASTARINA AVENUE

Korty Mites
krom Pusan

e >} *

: » whe

Big Battle Planned
LONDON, Aug. 3. ' A ; . . .

RITAIN to-night announced the £3,400,000,000 Rearma- By ROY MacCARTNEY

: ment Programme to be effective over the next three With American Forces In KORBA, Aug. 3
years, partly conditional on the receipt of more dollar aid. ied ae “=e : hes ac sam
The anncuncement came in the form of a memorandum A NORTH KOREAN drive on the southern Fron

sent yesterday to Washington and now released, setting
out Britain’s Defence Programme in an answer to the
American request for information.

The new programme will increase the proportion of
national income spent oa defence from eight to ten per
cent.

The memorandum said “How far it will possible
to go towards the new upper limit will depend on the

was halted today about 40 miler

| vital supply port of Pusan
| American troops of the 24th Division fighting with
tank support on an are about 12 miles westward
around Masan on the southern coastal road were
confident that Communist forces would not get

west 9







be


































































































1 , : ) yaa , : oo Titew Veatible was
an t of United States assistance forthcoming much closer to the port, but that a big battle was
Britain's defence budget till in preparation.
£780,000,000 but £100,000,000 \merican troops were digging}post and artiller
; 7 } annum was added last monti f the Naktong were driven back
Che programme will mean -he tion squads were busy on Yor, ha east coa
lewing down of Sritain’s Kumchon, bl ongdok South Kor
~ a ‘onomic recovery, but the wes’
COl ONIA j spokesman explained tt Britain | d * Ma
| < still insists on C
| economic stability ul
. *7] Communism ] bed .
e The Memorandum said the as
| Programme will entail ubstan- , alc he
| (From. Our, Own Correspondent) | ‘all sacrifice by the British people re { > ( €
| Britain told America she “does | ton f hi 4
LONDON, Aug 3. |} not feel able to undertake » full | : > f ok 1 N Kore tat
Vit J OD. Gammar M.P../a diversion of productive e- | I alling f Fare A t he
asks UWiis morning: in letter to} sources to defence purpose | ( \ ve
the Daily ‘Telegraph why no colo-! the United State ean offer | Head Bi
nial army has been recruited for| financial assistance.’ Sor ‘ t irc
he present Korean cr | . . 5 . | : ic
He says one lesson of the Ko-} Sese Contribution Y
nis onerrtpallan: Moat Ceisclits uni tatere| Ne indication of the amount
Sieisaié ‘ive cia etter be -8 {tof aid hoped for was disclosed, n ‘
lores ne of the i nd ereee if | put the Memorandum said Britain ys :
Great Britain, the United. States l expected to be ontribute ; , |
nd France in c anit ie if to Rearmament in | or
F nae eeee ee her Atlantic P. . mite © the wre
he earth against satellite troops | er Atlantic ” sree > f hays
only *” | of charge, implying tl Amer Taegu P Vac fory In 10 De J Ss
No one in Malaya, Hong Kong , “!, co-operation wou ed : 7 e :
Indo China or Korea has ever seen| be heavy ah a
Russian infantryman It said the British Government ;
_ - is savisfied with the WaNpow el — .
ih Bt 4 ast Pee ' | Be ition for defence and proposes a und Sout
mitain is to make up the/to concentrate o1 re-equipmen sug
‘ppalling disparity between Rus | Much of any addi ul Ameri- peas S
sian ground forces and her own] can Aid would be spent in Amei Coe ; i
it cannot be done merely by in- | {; machine toal and raw oe pe
creasing the size cf the ‘Regular’ | materials but the Memo i io” : ope Pac
army or by keeping conscripts in| said Britain wanted freedom t aay lal capita
. t né ari se ala : - be 1 he »
for additional periods. of service jspend the remainder anywher ; !
Other sources must be sought. | rh +p + ' | - ( a 4
1 4 1e new Programm ill bring . j
“Why is there siill no mention | Britain: alee to ia alaieta { Lot 1 ie o
of a great Colonia! army?” asks} phe Memor: i Sie ‘a it de | ne Unite i V
Mr. Gammans. “There are sev-| 4). a ae iectaenr ee as BAe dope fy pbeceae-ibe
eral potential divisions of firsi cabl > witht ee Saad or eyen [the building up of alli
class fighting men in the Coloniat| °* 1 et rag oe ae ee ee a | the. North, Kors et ein a be ; Pa ma aehy “eA
Empire willing and able to fight | 274 Without restoring the direction | eranics alty r
for the standards of morality and pet aaa poueeeren B-sessoabaaa te ines ssc here ,
freedom which are as much their) ,/5@ Memorandum welcomed sae jing mer ters e eee |
heritage as ours.” | American initiative in asking for A BOY AND GIRL enjoy the shade of these Casuarina trees on the St. Jamos Coast, yesterday | allie » over to the offe nay Americ
information about the Defence ere pene een eee “ " oy " . Com nist mees ; cer nas noMeiall
Programme " more ore t have} North Kor
It recalled that Force re A I =] IN th K + | great Meult i reund ‘
S0 : } a ae & u ci
Jury To Visit being provided in Korea and Cc 1eson, on ev ase or 1 ore als traine or i « id
Fl orders have been issued calling Te tes i tok’ ‘ Pots '
“Ploati sjup army and Navy resevists.| JOH Will Wr real Lighting n be gor
t é ‘ al Navy 5. E wm e rt ¢ s . é . {
ting Corpse About 1,000,000 men had received son ! Fy a 9 > i ake 1,200 ; aoe ;
compulsory military training since e ; : , port
Murder Scene {une 19:3 ot esign Pri mgiu on Wednesday, 1
‘ aro ' ' ‘ ;
Reserves | mite seh i risone rs , ; :
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 3. Tiere was therefore a subs SAYS TR | TURNER’S HALL WOODS, the only part of Barbado ; . ‘ Bec
Mire Jury empanelled | for the |stantive and steadily increasing | AYS TRUMAN | vhere the only origina] forest covering of the island still LONDON, Ai : ;
ts es beh pee reserve of young trained man- exists was alive with the whistling of birds and the noise A North Korean Communiqu | a
‘ > £ g to visi 1e water- re £ i the re Ww on Acer: 2 1 1 7 "
front, scene of the allege . ic PA | re a addition to the regula WASHINGTON, Aug. 3 of the gentle trade winds through its 46 acres of trees when | broadcast by Moscow radio out f \ I
vi aie Oo “he a eged i= | Army reserve and over 4,000,000 President Truman today angril | ur roving reporter vx there yesterday morning, But noi |ight claimed the capture of e
le ol Philbert Peyson of which | older men who received military] rejected suggestions that his Sec Se ak ; ; a i mae flerce & | we enen Idier 1 fficet ) ere unde Ke
Boysie Singh and four other men| training in the last war. o retaries of State and Defence Tor tony a iettarianl hi Seema, a he |teking Andor { Nort} ' t t t rhe ¢ { northerner
an T . - —-— _ ogs shattere¢ is ace anc fi ekin dong, ot f N ( e!
are accused. The Government therefore | should resign because of develop- vimsinad thut, - 200 = vf ; yk 4 ront, on Tuvsday e1 ‘ f Ure t coast are vere continu-
hj ey considere é Ss rgent ‘nts leading to the Korean wat Pi Qeuy Y oe : . i. : “oN ¢ Lute rep i herce t Ameri-
hist “oii . “ we onsidered that the most urgent |men ading ] hain ‘ oii saliaane wt €orean force } i i
ree raat i ie ger ree need is to increase the production}/and United States military pre | U.S. TROOPS jae re rng a ae y ig { he j : ‘ied at ore ‘ roke ! in muth } ear
ae oHi bala 3 mens oh ter Rupert] of the new defence equipment paredness. es a biaeeece:| sk lace rs aaa ie 44 me ‘ “eh i ine i —Reuter
; a oe cra ing Vs de ence counsel, Government experts pointes | +i RECK BRIDGES na do e trees alimo m er B 2 a dadeetineasligeti india ila a
suggested that the jury carry out! out to-day that one effect of the The President said at his} the ground and then scamperin; Many prisoner were repo
the experiment, hoping to prove "is aes : Tiwaekly + nf thal’ the | a le back to safety the dogs chasec aptured the same day when Nor > “o. % re %
a ’ greatly increased spending will |‘ y 2 CORTETENCE Was. se | By LIONEL HUDSON x Pare a 8 7 ; , . | a I : ’ | | ° °
he launch used in the alleged|he to bring the country back {two Secretaries, Louis Johnson | On the Northern Front them to) tie acgompanimern 5 ping spas ap ; PO-LA Opo cists Iiromw “aps hss
ae — ae ae come] tow ; austerity standards which ,@nd Dean Acheson were not | KOREA, Aug, h lo ‘a as , 7 \ rh dy d and fon es ; et at “ ae
ushore as claimed by the prosecu-|in recent months were being| 89mg to resign as long as_ lit American troops blew up some the = villager Epes acter ovate : A ! | i l °S < i Vi sf
‘ ° * : ’ > ‘ ry ¥ "7 ee na if ‘ ‘ Vo jy ara
tion on the night of the incident,| gradually relieved was President of the Unité three teel bridges toda earby told the Advocate th ( . : ATH Ommatoes a LDISTErS
April 14, if the tide was low, The steel used for tanks will] States. | hen they retreated east of etuEMeS » Uh ; 2 ae a Reut
V Se se? ‘ pera teuter
; s ; |not therefore be available f " ; g river Waegwa jof the young itt KI Au ;
nf 3 "A 4 > -4 =usti arose a hi re ‘ } x ' ow 1 ‘ { 1
> Brn c Ne f Justice Vincent} motor car industry; working on], oe aes oe a at ae ea ; 20 miles northwest of Fa ground and kil | da rmed the Catholic
3rown refused a plea to stage a such gobds .as vacuum cleanere con erence rom al egations 1 temporary Sout! Korea leat them . y : ‘ b atiie eee es
demonstration, but acceded to the! will be sx itched to electrical Congress that the ee a capital The older monke ive sell U S Moves , 1 eacer ithe
. isit t ; SW ; nt < . ce Esti : Susaransimediie sc ; : e e L i }
request to visit the locus im quo equipment for armed forces ment and the Defence Establis Little had bee ! ca here ve been cat 4
after a breeze between the Bench The proportion of additional|™°"™ had shown themselves Northerners—wh« ere | in which dogs have been severe \ ount Henri Cat
3ar - ‘ pare > or di -alls alan? ta tnt. ¢ ‘ v & : =
ang Bar !amounts being spent this year is)?" re rn ae nv: ee Ti aaa Aeon mauled by the older monke | LackhSu btlet .
ae —_ a planned for after | likely to be a small expenditut See for the outbreak of ( when , He Mes ‘ yer iad One interesting sight was : . } ' nvad \ seam} .
the close of the prosecution’s case. | which il rise as Gove orean wal crossed bridges after disen female key leaping from tree
bis. ‘ v W t rnment + 7 : pt ‘ emale monkey aping | oe i } ext
The hearing is continuing, | ond saaiiatiah a gedduictl One Congressman had suggest: — yesterday in the to tree with a young one clingi SAYS NEHRU : ee ’
. “ » t ‘ « reslor mme 1 c i Ce Lit ‘ { c
—Can Press. switched Reuter. one hey should’ re ¥/ ; ae : in thi se r of: the ecurtly to her breast ¢ j { }
atels i this sector ¢ NEW DELHI, Au vaders were forced
Korean front which has be niet ' ‘ ced !
Foreign Minist Asse rome the northern wing of |! Datel Strengthen 2 ec a ae
isn “Ministers Assembly Under Study the line have retreated 50. || ; ort: same - oat
Wi , miles, in the last four day Defence Forces | Russia Boycott U.N, \or the ouitding but pro-ta
ill Meet | ‘ T President Truman said at | to “tidy up the line ter eyence Fi j nited Nation ; r . ots t
- 7 ex one ay same Conference that the I Communist penetration THE HAGUE. A ‘ © ¢ ed | bon ft ¢ i
STRASBOURG. Aus 3 of establishing formal diplor wee waltleliex. In view of international devel- | situ i Forn | Staff Committee |
Foreign Ministers of the C | Ry 3 “eS: S| Jrelations with» the Vatican ' opments, Holland is taking imme- |] | |
aE se ers te Counc of European Statcsfunder study diate measures to strengthen kh ‘
met in the Town Hall, this symbolic building of Huroy “ defence fort Militar lar ‘ ' t I
. : > , » anit t tr 7 ‘ c ¢ (
this evening to inaugurate the second Annual Session of Fo “y Re aes - i | “J un le Girl” drawn up by Government ¢ 3 aig = : , lt
~ , + . office oO side persona + . ‘ } 1 to P (
the Council’s Consultative Assembly opening next Monday hepreset ative to the Vaticar | £ A ee Fe acal te eviews & ;
Flags of 13 full members of the Council flew t See a te ie mer i ( ‘ i ;
ags s t f outsic which was created by Presider ernment spokesmat \ t 07 |,
the building as Foreign Ministers or their deputies drove] Roosevelt—had now ceased | Defends Her The full-fledged Army division He
into: the courtyard watched by a small crowd No further appointment alon | ‘ vill shortl ye formed {rpm | thei ¥ had: talied
On Monday, when the Consultative Assemb]: : «+.|those lines was being considered Ma . ‘ among D old ( i ecaise
¢ iad : oo i 5 . in #SBSCMO1Y* COSI followit the resignation of the| ! Tria e ceived extensive ilitar if i t I i t
ing of 125 representatives from 15 nations with a mbine ; ' ' i ght «
7 ‘ x ae - Er $ previous personal representativ | in tt wht . ,
population of about 300,000,000, begins its month lonu|t the Parliament. Mr. Myror SINGAPORE. A 3 the lemobilisec . ome counter t
sac ; 5 " . . eae aca , nny iby ‘ at ¥ AUR. @ eer i Nest —Reute Heuter) i :
session, two more flags will be hoisted Taylor A 14-year-old Dutch girl re eee ‘
They are the flags of the West|Plan_ for pooling il and e€ —Reuter ed in the jungle by her a Se ee aL r
German Federal Republic and the | output foster-mother, on Thursday defied ° . | : "
Saar, invited to join the Assembly i Although Britain ha the world to break up her twe e ‘ 4 ye
as associate members. It will be!jo x other inter: iv-old marriage t , ¢ ul l , y
the first time the Gerr 1 flag | : a a , : ray : ee a & y i
t first time th rerman flag has | prelirn a lise i chool teacher Bertha Hertogh e
been hoisted in France since the | plan, Bevir expecte herself Nadra °
end of the o€cupation, | blessir » the full dat a married to school- > » oy” res S a On
Foreign Ministers present this Jit in Assembl | teacher Mansoor Ada nly four lS us SS / Say ere
evening included Ernest Bevin Air Views | da if te e High Court award- c .
(Britain) who drove upto the Ministars® before ‘ tody to her native nurse
Town Hall with his wife; Robert |recgommendation bv t whe cared for her since the LAKE SUCCESS, Aug. 3 ing agare i |
Schuman (France) who strolled |Eeonomic ¢ acit™ oo J ( f 1049 ‘menar lhe United Nation vour, with the So U | (
into the courts smiling Miho} : ais her ‘from Her Butch verent | uncil ended three y alone against it, and Indi |
around him d Count Carlos | }5). ner Coninhk nvapore Court Appeal re- | tonight by adoptin Yugoslavia abstaining }
Sforza (Italy) the js 1. he } ¢ Tit 8 etur } te of it rrer India lele j -euter
Lively Series ’ parent ho ane: re er t Rau, explained tt
Their discussions expect Berge Yethe j pre Kore only be« eh ~
last until S day will clea r i { co jected to vhe order f prior ae Ue } ]
> ne ay
ay tow: What prcihiaes, ti : ae thé. Counatic pyes ch o¢-thelmotiot Prisoners Lynched
ely series of de th i ) I love I t r | Ru ® epresentat Ji On the Russi pro} 7 .
tative sserr € f 4 esided breaking iterr of Chinese mmut }
or : I a0 é th Sovier bo: epresentati the |
wes : € a } 3 4 } ' sre tt é te Natior deadlocked The rie t . |
inni of ar mal Parlia- | tic to r rnmer appiness and p er rne ( he Russian po agair iding Nati |
= si i =n ol The emb ap. by he " ‘ illing first (x China) fis favou I |
F MacBride, Foreign Minis- e tl ‘ Mosler The Mosle 1 f Chinese Commu~ abstention, | |
for Hire pres ng t essio YY oO _ . f epreset ind second were B |
y € j : ; 4 e Herto | , eful ettlement , Russia a I
N : é al ite Ministe I mniflic ‘ |
€ € f both Ministers j give ¢ 1D ‘ € ghte ¢ t yn the adopvion of the proce eae { Reutel
mee : @ on page 5 v s Sxpress Service, ¢ ¢ —Can. Press ndemn- l _


CEE

>.

















AUGUST 4, 1956.






































r . - . ,
PAGE T BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY,
wr ‘iinet a
] !
| ee | |
e e { W To-day to Monday 5 & 8.30 p.m
i]
Ub HOUSEWIVES’ || ; ROYAL
{ wearing a brand
| GUIDE lt sins wean ins ee
} new Si
—_ F. ationa Prices of Carrots and Cab- |} ~ Baabind ,
or Intern tion 1 Meet | bage when the Advocate’ } of slapstick! fi
EN FARNUM left yesterday | checked yesterday were:— { j Aobet CUMMINGS ~
for B.G., by B.W.I1.A. to} Carrots 24 cents per Ib £ f
ride in the forthcoming Inter | Cabbage 30 cents per 1b | é F
national Cycle Meeting, } ,
opens in B.G. to-morrow. C -|
pet ng against representative 2: | 2B B. (. RADIO PROGRAMME
from Venezuela, Trinidad, B.G |
and Panama, he is the lone rider | ae 2 re igust 4; 1950 bi
from Barbados He will t ats 7 an
i , | | : : DONALD
rciurning in six days’ time | |7.50 am The idea of w= GIG YOUNG - MARIE Mc :
Ken is now training to be a | | . the Editorials : i Marry Davenport - Fay Baker - Katharine | arren
operator with Cable & Wireless | | Pees Pee SOS 8 ee REGULAR PRICES
: | Down; 12 soon The News; 12.10 pgn
Staying at Rockley |News’ Analysis; 12.15 p.m. New Re- — - .
MISS JOAN MAGGS of Port-| Henk eat boas Sinn ROXY THEATRE
Spain arrived from Trin- | Were’s Howard; 2 p.m, The News; 3.10 TO-DAY 4.45 and Continuing
idad yesterday by B.W.1.A | p.m ao ae ree, ee Parurnount Pictures present :—
spend two weeks’ holiday with | | Wood “Pas a + te os zie ‘ak. <= ae Alan LADD as. . is
Mr. and Mrs. S. E. White « | lhe News; 4.10 pm. The Daily Ser- “CAPTAIN CAREY U.S.A.
1ckley | ce; 4.15 m. Nights at the Opera;
Rockley | p.m ” anitiy MacPherson at the i. HENDRIX — is LEDERER and
Theatre Organ; 5.15 m. Programme ands o) X, Francis LEDEAE!I Ra
Left yesterday Tarade; 5.30 p.m. Scottish Magazine; vena Joseph CALLEIA
FTER a long holiday stayin t p.m. Trent's Last Case, 6.15 p.m ai : 1 Short -
Iona Liter Quartet; 6.30 n€ Extra Musica 4
d \ with her parents Mr. an 3 1ea of a University: 7 p.m. ‘XY hoa “BIG SISTER BLUE Ss
Mrs T. E. McKenzie a },.10 p.m. News Analysis: 7.15—~7.30 Sena a be es sh nn
“Rowans”, St. George, Mrs. Ma ie, Gains, Reports, 2. ve, Sar: . THE: ;
Phillips and her two daughters | Fe Ain “Radio Newarest B15 p.m. The CUAY TUESDAY 4 en a in
4 . >. yesterday after- » Continues; 8.30 p.m. Ken Beau- dA s .30 p.m. & 8.15 p.m.
ee Oe ao eee man ee” Bene he “Shara HH ora Sig ae
Ce 3 ; “kite hy § = he Promenade Concerts; 3 4 ,
Atkinson Field, she will then gee NEES Sewar W018 pin. tutor “SONG OF _ INDIA’
travel over to Berbice where hei Rider se -Ahe Bio. Eee vey ome with
husband is stationed at Bath lTrial and ‘Execution of Charles 1 SABU, Gail Russell, Turhan BEY, Anthony CARUSO
Estate Aminto DYNE
D
Will represent Windward The End O wraeee sox"
Islands Starring :
R. and MRS. SWITHIN E Humphrey BOGART, Alexander KNOX
SCHOUTEN and their daugh- Colum us Sussue HAYAKAWA, Florence MARLY
ter arrived from St, Lucia yes-
terday by B.W.I.A. and expect Sid é
, to be here for one month, stayiny ’ lhe ee Sees ees “tase, 1nd
at Indramer Guest House, Worth- oat vonrEst ae noi sod bs sae Lucky girl “the luckiest in New |teachers have long realised this
ing she says, is Shirley Potash, 23 ssistant t : > é Se |
te she asked for a salar Se daha ane, Sastaai aks Man or tar Gael (re ee roma: ot Snes | TO-DAY 2.30 p.m. & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing at
> s Agricultural a two years ago. Instead she got a small per- | jingles among school-children in E 4.45 NIGHT 8.30 dail
i aR a li a Mr. Schouten is Agr-.c ul {centage of the show “South Pacific’. It has made more money on Broad- | Britain has always been: | MATINEE 4.45 pm. & ; y
Superintendent, St. Lucia and] way than any since the war. Express. In fourteen hundred and ninety-

will be representing the Windward
Islands at the Working Committee
of the Oils and Fats Conferenc

FATHER, MOTHER AND SON—His Excellency the Governor shakes
hands with his son Denis soo n after he arrived at Seawell on Wed
nesday afternoon en route from England. Mrs. Savage smiling happily

looks on. who are holding a meeting her
RRIVING just in time for tho Junior Wile SANGO “Antone See
. ara ; XHE Barbados Junior Dramatic ‘
August races é ) and
Mrs. Conti Fletch - ee pet. (9ae ‘I Club will present two one- After short holiday
from Trinidad yesterday morning “°C! Plays on September Sth at ISS ELAINE EVANS who i:
by B.W.1.A. to spend a month’s '¢ Drill Hail. The plays ar with Booker Bros. in B.G
holiday in Barbados, staying wit! v; oul he Seven Won't Go,’ By returned to Georgetown yesterda,
the Taylors’ in Beach House, St =» o elgud and Stephen King - by B.W.1.A. after a short holi
Lawrence Their two childrer Hal sang . The Sun Goes Down, day in Barbados, staying with M1
Diane and Brian, and Mr y Heanor Fitzgerald. An audition .14 Mrs. L. Hassell.
Fletcher’s mother Mrs. C. Paulik, Wil! be held shortly to select the
accompanied them. players. Seni B.H.S. Supporters!
° . enior
B.G. ‘Racing Commentator FTER reading no less than ISS MARAROE nuosox ||
I ; > passengers ; fifteen plays, the Barbado PHILIPS and Miss Doroths
coe acai ar yopicony Uramatic Club, (Senior Division), Laifook, two Bishop Anstey Higi
ee w e yesterday after have decided that “Blithe Spirit,’ School supporters arrived fro
ei Th ar -A.. ware Mr. and wiii draw full houses in early Trinidad yesterday morning b)
, gf” sloyd Luckhoo and their \ vember. This is a Noel Cowar: B.W.1.A to give their team son
son Edward. Mr. Luckhoo whi hit. ‘verbal’ support from the touc!

is a Barrister at Law
town, is also a keen
B.G.'s radio commentator for the

in George
turfite anc

lines. They are among severa
young Trinidadian girls who hav
up in the past few days t

At Seawell to meet
her brother



come
races. They expect to be in Ba I ITTLE MARGARET BOURNE, be with the team during the)
bados for about ten days stayir 4 who has just arrived from tour.
at the Hotel Royal. England with her parents Mr. and L
Bently Re-unt ,Airs. C. L. Bourne, was with On holiday from Grenada
amily e-union hem at Seawell yesterday to ISS PATRICIA DANIEL,
OME to spend the long holi Oe a mes brother Peter, wh Miss Dorothy Wilson anc
days. with their-two sons) “iived trom 8.G. by B W.I.A. Miss Veronica Weichweg arrived
were Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Kin Peter is at school in B.G. and from Grenada on Wednesday to
> has come over to spend the long spend two weeks’ holiday in Bar-

who with their daughter Kathleen
arrived from B.G,. yesterday b)
B.W.1.A. Their two sons go tu
the Lodge School.

holidays with his parents who are
here until the end of September
Here for a month

bados, staying at the Cosmopoli-
tan Guest House. Miss Daniel
is a Sister at the Colony Hospital







RS. EDWARD WRIGHT in St. George's Grenada and Miss

Mr. King who is with the Sill: arrived from B.G. yesterday Wilson and Miss Weichweg are
Greenheart Lumber Co., in B.G. afternoon by B.W.1.A. to spend hurses at the same hospital
is on six months’ holiday and 4 month’s holiday at Gibbes’
after spending the summer holi- Beach, St. James. Her children <
days they are going up to St accompanied her. They were met e ROSSWORD,
Kitts, where they used to live at the Airport by Mr. and Mrs eTRPT.P .
several years ago. Mrs. King Fred Olton. | | |
a-sister of Mr. Roy Maloney of Her husband, who was in Bar- | , vr

bados a couple of months ago on
holiday is with Bookers in B.G .
and was formerly Manager of
Bookers Drug Store branch here

wer CRYPTOQUOTE—Here’s how to work it:

AXYDLBAAX
ly LONGFELLO
One letter simply stands for another. In | xample A ig used
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc je letters, apoa-
'

Barbados, and Mr. Cyril Maloney
who is Manager of the Cable &
Wireless Branch in St. Kitts.





trOphies, the length and formation of thc all hints.
ach day the code letters are different.

are







A Cryptogram Quotation Actoes
yptog Q i 1 Want the pilot does at the
r © . 7 4 _ \
Â¥MX LDRP KDX RMPZ D XLEZDF & is this land suery $ (2)
oe 9. Ivan's currency. (6)
KYMTY' EASJX KMLY EDCMQ TYDJIUZ 10. Original copy. (8) 13, Tree. (3)
is pt wey 5008, under. (3)
a , , a. epousition
WESF ESTPX LS ESXZX—CEDZO 1 Genus of plants, (ey 8> '”)
22 oreh, (9)
' Cryptoquote: I FEEL MY FEEBLE: HANDS UN- 24. The odds and ends, (Â¥)
CLASP, AND \SINK DISCOURAGED INTO NIGHT—LONG- eT eee ee
FELLOW, r Down
aa 4 SatnaRaeeene 1. Any good swimmer ts a potentin)
ce LE d J B ‘ Mice. “ey 2. Dollar plan. (3)
< > . >, 4.
ui 4. “Circus” attraction. (4)
Rup per nd the ack- -roon Bois —I3 ee srectig,
, : » Fleet o sce sh (8)
TR 1, Crook, it Reward. (3)
12. Many asta them, (7)
17. Island ‘in the * Med.’ (5).
18. Positions, (5)
20. Contemptuous abbreviation fo:
an inhabitant. (3)
21. Examine. (4)
23. Mountain peak. (3)
Solution of yesterd i p os!
}, Fledgling, 7; Ease: Br’ Games os
Sip; 12, Sul; is, Try; f4, Amen: ic
o 18, Cantab; 13,° Volun
Mutter; 22; R.A.; 23, Lane; 24, Ass
fais ma en Down: L_ Feat va
. ew; 5S, | Pmt >
Gold braid ib Binters; i6, ‘Biba.’ 1
ute. > 7
seutes 20° "hres antua: 16, Coma







In his anxiety lest dhe weird plant

does further damage to his house,
Mr.

PP MASP SSO Re mney

| FREE YOURSELF

<2 from the

.=s5 BONDS OF

CONSTIPATION
with

DR Tey Ty S
LITT od LLS

are as queer as the others,’
Rupert, ‘I'm sure that
has something
get at him,
to the
And, puttir
off with on
over his
RESERVED

the saw and cuts to do with 7
off branch after branch, That seems 5
to discourage the plant and it grows
at the floor boards can
n place. ‘* These leaves
* ALL RIGHTS

Bear runs for a.
so fll take this st

ask him.”
s scarf, he dashes
r branches

Professor and
gon h
e of th
slder



no more, sot
be put back

he





GIVE YOUR HOME THE MODERN LOOK

COVER YOUR FLOOR WITH

SILVER STAR CONGOLEUM

9 ft.x 9 ft.

ROOT



Squares: 9ft.x 7} ft.-

@ Banish headache, backache, biliousness







'
= igs - 1 coused by irregularity. !
) ft. x 104 ft.—9 ft. x 12 ft. te Dr. Mores Pills contain six active
' vi ingredients.
Continuous Rolls 27 in. 36 in. 72 in. Wide Cut to Order. | ‘fen Saeeere i
es ial TONIC in lent helps restore
Many attractive designs to sclect from. Easy to instal ' «Reval bowel condion. ee |
scomfort, even for hemorrhoid
Easier to keep clean | mache i
4 _ XG A TRUSTED REMEDY |
“7 FOR OV years |
yc CHal -RAT SSS . ae , '
BARBADO: CO-OPERATIVE COTTON ge reid ss cs das on a ach om tes Oh ot dm
a ‘ | {
FACTORY LTD | BEWAREoFworms:! |
Wortms threaten old and young alike. Be
HARDWARE DEPARTMENT — DIAL 2039 [| sare,xour family ke protected with Com-
} makers of Dr, Morse’s Pills, BWI-349. |
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WASHINGTON, Ata 3 LONDON, August 3 jused on every possible occasion
Acute poliomyelitis (infantile and in every possible game. Now
varalysis) increased in the United Britain’s death rate in 1948, 11|however, with the increasingly
States last week with 964 cases persons for every 1,000, was the |large part that radio plays in our
eported, compared with 827 for lowest ever recorded, the Regis- | lives, the jingle has changed. Dick
he preceding week, the Public trac General’s Statistical Review | Bentley, one of the comedians of |
Tealth Service said to-day howed on Thursday. Cancer ac-|'he BBC’s popular Variety pro- |
So far this year 6 067 cases have counted for 6.9 per cent of deaths|cramme, “Take It From Here,
“een notified compared with 8,202 as compared with 15.1 in 1947 and | has apparently superseded Colum- |
ast year Reuter 13.9 in 1938.—Can. Press, bus in the children’s estimation. A



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In 1942, in 1942,

Bentley sailed a canoe

| He struck a rock, the clumsy
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That was a good one, was it not?
The writer suggests that per-
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iisDAY, AUGUST 4, 1950.

Three Men Lift |

Germans Will
The Brick Relieve U.S. Forces

LONDON, Aug, 3.

.
. ‘<> A Foreign Office spokesman 7 .
From History said to-day that Amelaans |Were The following letter to the], Slowly but surely, the new
among a small force of oe —" Times was publishea| 50uth is overcoming two of its
"cs A with rifles to release United States | "UY 9- greatest problems — poverty anc
But It's A Very Slow Job | with riftes to release United | SIR.—I was, greatly interested | ignorance,
Thou wall, O. wall! © sweet and| He said there were 10,000 in the recent debate at the Im-|_ The two go hand in hand

lovely wall! Police in the Western Zones of
—A Midsummer Night's Dream.| Germany, These were armed
with revolvers and came under
Two years’ work on a 40ft. wall] control of the local governments
will finish at the end of this year In addition to this there were
—maybe. The wall, built of|/some Germans and _ displaced
flint, Kentish rag and Chilmark in three Zones used for
stone, runs white and clean, a5} guarding food, . supplies and
if it has been built .yesterday,| military dumps. force was
northwards from the soot-black-| called the Civil Mixed Watch-
ened Wakefield Tower, built in} men’s Corps and came
the Tower of London ‘in 1221. | the control of Allied Authorities.
Yeu it is one of the most ancient The American decision was to
= of the ate tr, London | arm these watchmen with rifles.
wor “A huilt it.700, years 2£0-| "Phe spokesman said he could not
neient Ra e state whether similar action was
Its four-foot thickness is pierced]to be taken in the British Zone

by cight arrow slits, where|'There were 10,000 displaced
medieval bowmen, | crouching! persons in the Watchmen’s Corps
under the strong round arches]j;, the British Zone.—Reuter.
which .still curve proudly over : ;

them, could rain arrows on their
enemies when it formed the west



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



| THE COLONTAL
| PRESS

By Malcol



perial Press Conference on the|Poverty has bred . ignorance.
shortcomings of the colonial Press, | 18norance in turn has bred preju-
and espec ally so of the West| ‘ice, conflict and other evils bur

African Press. With no first-| dening the South.
hand knowledge of the West On this point Ralph McGill,
African Press,.1 am unable. to| hard-hitting, Liberal Editor of th

refute the charges of the Com- Atlanta Constitution, says:
munistic tendencies; but, so far| “In its most poverty-stricken
as the West Indian Press jis/ counties one finds the most hide-
concerned, I may say that luke- bound political thinking, the most
warm .Liberal'sm is the nearest|Corrupt county government an
approach to,Communism§ in 99|Justice, the most friction and
g A well-informed Press and at-| drag on the South’s general pro-
tractively presented news sheets] gress.”

jcan only be attained when well-| Coincident with its economic
trained staff and adequate finan-|development, the South is makin,
cial backing are bolstered up by impressive gains in educating its
a desire on the part of the Gov-| people. But here, as in other
ernments of the various colonies| fields, it still lags behind the rest
to help the Press. At the present] of the nation, It is making pro-
moment none of these is available| gress, but still has a long way to
to the Colonial. Press, There is a} 80.






side of the Inner Bailey of the U.S Did go'den opportunity now to en-| In 1941, for example, of some
ee dee i =" Not Need courage at-least. two of these} 350,000 draft registrants who
Until a bomb fe’ in the great ° , _ {very necessary ads to good jour-|could not sign their names, nine
City raids of December 1940 To Bribe France | nalism . out of ten were Southerners. And
nobody knew that the wall ‘ There is an ingrained belief in|six of the nine illiterate South-
existed. The bomb. demolished Says N.Y. Times this country. that journalism|erners were negroes.

an ugly Victorian barrack of red
brick and stone, known as the NEW YORK, Aug. 3.
Main Guard. 7 The United States did not need
Before the war, soldiers of the|to bribe Franco to become its
regiment guarding the Towerjally the New York Times said
drank tea, played darts inside./to-day in an editorial commenting
Tourists hurried past on_theirj|on the Senate’s grant of a $100,-
way fromm the Bloody Tower] 000,000 loan to Spain ;
witheut a glance. The Senate is going i
7 . ng against an
But besides destroying the|/“almost universal condemnation

Main Guard, the bomb tore] of , i
part of the brick facing from {irs Gomes’ eet ie ae.

a wall which had been incor-j clared ees ee
Experi at the Muniry ot goes, rer april
> inistry Of!that Franco is Anti-Communist

Works recognised the inner wall :
as being part of the ancient ram- Peart
part which stood there in the
days of King Henry III. And
they put their expert masons on

has great. strategic
value from the military view-
point.
“Spain always arouses strong
the job: eee Cone, but it poulds be ad-
Fe sable to | consider e issue
rein tring Left ot calmly, If our military leaders
of these men, specialists| say Spain is necessary to a proper

in the craft of “ancient. monu-
+ , e:
ment pointing.’”’ have been at tei Midas ee nig ili

work there (intermittently, for
they have had to attend to other “However it should be obvious
jobs as well) for the past two|we do not need to bribe Franco
years, painstakingly picking off|to become our ally. He has no
the Victorian crust of ugly brick} choice in the possible war—not
and modern stone, to reveal the even neutrality—for this time
nolle old wall beneath. instead of having a friendly
Now, only the last few yards} Hitler, he would have Stalin to
van en oy to be treated] contend with
still support a cat’s cradle of] “Tt j s i
tubular scaffolding. When that Pavtisth seen tome 7 =
comes down the full extent of | Franco saved by Reeetas help.

the old wall will be revealed. is sti i i
tinh tn Giabien oF'stm ae There is still time to defeat the

the wall is the 65-year-old fore- fe euit y ow pecetony nope
man who for 35 years has looked ne See ee
after London's ancient monu-



ments. One of his greatest tasks
-~-the House of Commons.

H> showed. me how the wall
had been “consolidated” by the
old method of grouting by pour-
ing in the mortar, instead of by
the pressure process.

No Imitation

Egypt Approves
“Watch Dog” Plan

q CAIRO, Aug. 3,
The Independent Newspaper El

“we never ade. , Ahram to-day quoted Egyptian
away, never tes Wy Wicks ot Foreign Of Po Paaea. es saying
restoring.” he. said. “We simply that the United States was to ask
remove. all ‘the eianenbe. scum the Security Council to establish

a Committee fram member states

and leave the old building as it|to take up posts in various coun-



—Reuter.







is. Ifa piece of st ;
ie rentite’ it Bh ner wees tries and report on any threatened
rather leave a gap than put back i. ee i
some imitation of the real thing.” | tri He, SOUNGIE WOU SESESE COUT
Tha top,at the ekposed wall tries concerned in order to facili-
has been. treated with. a special tate the work of the Committee.
renkraue Nf The paper added Egypt had ap-
prep: ion to prevent weeds i
sprouting ‘on tt s proved | the American plan for
these “watch dogs” to be placed
e ae ea other countries
: which might be threatened with
13 Arrested ey ems by Communist Russia.”
: 4 gyptian political observers, El
In Peace Rally Ahram said, believe that Turkey,
Greece and Yugoslavia will ap-
NEW YORK, August 3. prove of the plan which is expect-
Two thousand Left Wing peace |@4 to include Persia,
marchers banned from staging a
rally In Union Square battled 1,000
police ante on Wednesday in fist-
swinging brawls that led to 13
ple eno aere waited W. German Exports
until the homegoing rush hour to a %
make their defiant move. “We Jump By 57%
avant peace. Open up the Square.” iW
the marchers chanted as they FRANKFURT, Aug. 3,
formed ranks. Union Square 14 West German exports during
miles south of Times Square, is|the first half of this year at
the traditional scene of New |$778,400,000 were 57.2% above
York soapbox oratory. When | those for the first half of 1949 the
mounted police bore down on the|Economic Co-operation Special
demonstrations they shouted “cos- | Mission to West Germany reéport-
sack”. —(CP). ed to-day.
‘ones ee eae aan largely
: e result of increased trade with
Ti $ |other world areas, allowin,
Ss, g for
ickets For Church! decreased purchases from dollar
VATICAN CITY, Aug. 3, areas the report said.
Lithuanian Catholics need a —Reuter.
Government ticket costing about Oe linia
ee ert a time they, f° to Cz < >
church, according to a atican Ww
— ees ag a echs ill Sull
aiming that the Catholic pop-
mo, had -c persecuted since Get R u bder
thuania with Latvia and Estonia
was incorporated in the Soviet] ¢ FEAGUE, ees
Union ducing the war the report zechoslovakia will continue to
listed conditions on which its re- Schon Gata’ comenene atth
maining churches can function. the Netherlands and the United

(1) A distance of at least 5 miles | States of Indonesia, it was dis-

closed on Wednesday night,
P.)

must separate each two churches,

(2) Collections for church re-
pairs are prohibited.

(3) Special permission must be
obtained for singing hymns and
chants.

(4) Services may be he!
in the early morning.

—Reuter.

New Oil Refinery

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON.

A further stage in the con-
struction of the new Middle East
Crude refinery at Stanlow,
Cheshire, has been reached with
the completion of the 341 foot
high concrete cooling tower—the
largest of its kind in the world—-
and the installation of three large
spherica) storage tanks,

These steel “ball” tanks, the
first to be erected in any United
Kingdom oil refinery, measure 35
feet in diameter and were de-
signed by a British firm for the
storage under pressure of butane
— one of the many products,
already flowing from this new
Shell refinery which came into
operation last November.

Some of the main units at the
new Stanlow refinery are already
working — the No. 1 distillation
unit, now in continuous opera-
tion at a capacity of 1,000,000
tons per annum, has been sup-
plemented recently by a large

—(C,

1d only

What's on Today

Police Courts 10 a.m.

Court of Appeal and Petty
Debt Court 10 a.m.

Mobile Cinema at Wiltshire
Playfield, St. Philip 8 p.m.



H .E. the Governor opens
Bay Street Boys’ Club
6 p.m.

Port Workers
On Strike

WELLINGTON, Aug. 3.
All major New Zealand ports
came to a standstill on Thursday
as branches of the Waterside

work in sympathy with a week-
long Auckland watersiders dis-
pute over tea breaks.—(C.P.)



PARIS, Aug. 3.
to-day described - as

unit is well advanced and work | Agency reports that a det
















Workers Union decided to stop

Reports‘Unfounded’

A usually reliable source here
: “without
reforming plant, No, 2 distillation |foundation” the American News
achment

cannot be taught successfully. in The 1940 census showed, more-
an academ‘e and. practical man-| over, that nearly six out of every
ner at a university. And while} 100 Southerners had never gone
I fully agree that there is no]to school, compared to three, or
guarantee that the product of a]3.1 per cent, for the rest of the
journalistic school will be a tal-| U.S. Eighteen out of every 100
ented and facile writer, yet hejadults in the South had droppect
will at least, avoid the pitfalls of}out of school, before reaching the
the uninitiated, and will haye},Fifth Grade, compared with less
learned to sift and select. news}than seven (6.9 per cent.) for
and to present it attractively. He|the rest of the nation.

will also have learned that the} The record showed that only
duty of the Press is to uphold] one of ten adults in the South had








“The New South”













Their Millionth
Bag Of Sugar

KINGSTON, July

| North Koréa’s
Oil Supplies

}
|
|
}

m Johnson

is still grinding

Americans are recruiting over
900 Toamaican farm workers bring-
ing the total to over 800 for the

the North Koreans. i neir lines of
communication are under constan: |
air attack and, this, may prove to
be a decisive factor in the outcome |

began working out arrangement
with colleges and institutrons in
the area which could supply suc:



Under, contracts the siat /of the war. Something of the | Past two months.—(C.P.)
ought education from the ins. | cafficulty the invaders will en- N t eS b <
tution. These contracts provid.;¢Ounter in supplying theiy ar- i
that the state pay the institution|â„¢moured columns with oil can be oe uUOMaTINeSs
$1,500 a year per student for/judgei from the following articie CANBERRA, Aug. 3,

medical and dental training,
$1.000 a year per student for
veterinary training. The student
pays no out-of-state fees.

Navy Minister, Josiah Francis
on Thursday emphatically denied
reports that foreign submarines
had been sighted off the Austra-

Wha. appears in the current
issue of Petroleum Press Service:

Though possibly subject to tem-
porary difficulties of s.orage, pack-

Thus for a few thousand dol-|aginu, or local transport, South lian coast. The Sydney Sun pub-
lars a year a state gets access to aj Kore: and the United ‘Nations lished such a report. attributed it
school which would cost’ $3|rorces fighting with her, are as-| @:Sficial sources d said it was
million or $4 million to build. ie La possible that the submarines were

sured of ampie ou supplies, What
as the oil position for the Nortn
Koreans? They have been using a
considerable nuniver of tanks, and
although the distance so far tra-
versed has not been great, and has
not involved any extensive sweeps
on Supply lines sucna as character-
ized tne use of arm-ur in, World
War IT. considerable quantities of
motor fuel and lubricants. are
necessary to keep armoured forces

Russian. The statement from
Francis said New Guinea civilians
early in May reported twice they
sighted what they thought were
submarines “but after investiga-
tions the claim was not confirm-
| ed.”~—(CP)

The institution gets the additional
income, The student gets the
needed training which otherwise
would have been unavailable.
The participating states for this
biennium (1949—51) invested
$1.5 million in the regional pro-
gramme, Last fall 388 students, of
whom 181 were negro, were en-
rolled in participating institutions.
* The Board of Control, estab-
lished last year, administers the

The West Indies Sugar Company,

,and dentistry. from Our London Correspondent Tate & Lyle Subsidiary, bagged
Some states had no medica LONDON, the millionth bag of sugar, making
schools at all. Some lacked facii- THE, difficulty of supplying their! 100,000 tons for the season |
ies for dental training, or veier forward troops wili become a|_ The Money Musk, the largest
inary medicine, The Counci,}â„¢atter of increasing concern to factory in the British West Indies, |

Something You

PAGE THREE



| "Quake In Mexico

MEXICO CITY
trong eartha

ng







{Mexico City « i
cay but there were
reports of damage of
harm (C.P.)
y .
More Cardinals
ROME, Aug. 3
Pope Pius is expected to
vacancies in the Sacred Colleg
of Cardinals, bringing it up t ts
full strength ot 70 at a Consistor
late this year Reuter.
LUXURY,
Cuticura Taleum Po
makes a delightfully
-cooling and
finish to your hath, even

on the hottest day.
the skia es soft as ode

—and ends ag = aa
Sreesign. Use ticura
and complete

Soa
the Tamusy !







Will Appreciate

funds from the ticipat' in action. The needs must also be
Man sek makin pereogte te Os met. of whatever ‘aircraft. ond |i}, laADIaB) PLASTIC BAINCOATE. all since @. $2.90 each.
institution . no st transport are ting wR AR bo PRINTED LINGERIE @ 0c. per Yd.

e Control Board’s director is |"? oyed. G. INE in Emerald Green, Pink, Ked, Gold, Lime Green
Dr, John E. Ivey Jr., brilliant Indispensable Needs and White @ $1.30 per yd,
20-year-old professor from the Accumulated stocks will have SHANTUNG in Blue, Rose, Cream, Pink & Gold @ $1.16 per yd.
University of North Carolina, enabled the North Koreans jo 1950 STYLES LADIES SHOES in White, Black & Brown Suede

The Regional programme is to continue the momentum of their
be extended to the fields of/*uxprise attack, But will they, as
nursing, forestry and social wel-/ their communications, southwards
fare studies. Later needs .n//engthen, be able to maintain, oi
library training will be brought) Supplies to meet, the indispensable

Prices
Also DRESSES, S















from $11.36 to $12.37 —Cuban Heels,
UNSUITS, SHORTS & SLACKS Ete,, Ete.






*! a into the programme, The antire | heeds in the areas of southern s =a SSS Ser SS ;
eer ee ee ae em Ria ry men » a, ae mt ce field of cadaive study hk hign| Korea they occupy, and still be x SPOS SPSS PECL EEL 4
J. suggest that as the colonial) cent had high school education. priority. ; « ;/oble to maintain. efficient armoured |.¢ x
Press has no provincial Press from} Prodded by court decisions and Critics at first viewed the; forces — when they become . en-| mM | Ss
whom it can attract experienced by their own consciences, South- —— setup as Ringe 4 ae Te feng a —— fight journalists an experiment in ; triving man- petuating segregation in educa-) must soon develop? s . . els .
teaching journalism. at an... ac~ eet tine i be rication facili. |tion. The Board has refuted this) There are no oil resources x (Inc. in British Guiana) %
credited university might solve]tjes for the big negro population view. Its chairman Millard Cald-!either in North or South Korea | “ . = i " ~
many of the problems which], the same, time raising the | Well, former Governor of Florida, | But each territory has a refinery.| X ‘ a i %
seem to be giving so many mem-| standards for the whites as well points out that the ques- |The refinery in the north is at e x
bers of Parliament food for] School budgets are being tion of segregation is for the state|Gensen (adjacent to Wonsan) on|'\ © : %
thought. Why not begin in West] increased throughout the South to decide, that the board is mere- | the east coast, and about 150 miles}.% x
Africa? Why not institute chairs|,nq the region, through industry ly an instrument of the several north east of Seoul with which it} x
of journalism in. the three new] ang agriculture, enjoys a larger | States, serving the region. It can-| is connected by rail, Its capacity} i x
universities there with post-| measure of prosperity. not have a policy for or against) before the second World War was x AL UM! NUM W. ARE »
graduate scholarships to Great) Jy Georgia, for instance, school segregation, he says, but must | bout 250,000 tons. In 1946 it was] 1 [ L y x
Britain? I am confident that appropriations increased. from |S¢rve states with differing poli-' described as worn out and obso- x g
a ee ret — * only] 14.4 million in 1938 to $50.° Fort mist esis aoe in lete Even if the refining plant has| ° $
too willing to help the colonies i ‘ _The Southern Regional Educa-|pot been rehabilitated the tank- . . . ¥
by giving the a ee ee er ebmndion the South epee ea slroay has ee age has probably abwrind ry aia % DOMESTIC WARE in a wide variety ¥
every facility to gain practical]is engaged in a unique and suc- | Pationa impact. ner sections} recent communique from Tokyo ‘ x
experience im, all branches of seuss epartinameee programme ridutity a sree are} stating that a refinery has been]}‘ DIAMOND WARE 1S approved by the %
jo ism and newspaper pro- : study plans for developing| pomb h amvis % P %
—. pi otasaene pon started by | Similar programmes. eae a hip pant, The | * Good Housekeeping Institute. x
If thete are fe any, who oo the Governors of the various se ear nae Por refinery in South Korea. is at $ %
the wisdom of providing univer~ thern States in 1947, the edu- anc 1 considerNs | Ulsan the st coast about 50 f ¢
sity courses in journalism, and of cational ‘resourees of the States|Such a programme. Six new Eng-| riles neal oan of “poshh,, the SAUCEPANS, PRY PANS, COFFEE $
giving journalism the status of a| are pooled. Funds are adminis- |land states have already formed | main U.S supply port in. the PERCOLATORS KETTLES EGG- x
profession, then they will be|tered by a board of control for |New England Educational Coun-| south, es Y | , ' x
convinced if they look no farther! Southern Regional Education . ell . =i . ; This refinery was in course of f OACHERS, OMELET PANS. g
than the United States. I sin-|" Fourteen states signed a com- Dr. Ivey and his. staff associ-| section when Japan surrendered g
cerely trust it will be realized) .¢ to share in higher educa~ ates talk with enthusiasin of the] ‘nd in the last Southern Korean %
bat i ha Re ian im tional facilities on a contract Pi eee a budget a sum of 260 million Won x NS
appoint a Roya hich both whites } fee i just beginning, y Nees | n
examine the workings of the Ter bance Waa that its potentialities for the og gam ~ 44 vat alloc ‘a0 % FOR ‘CONSISTENT SATISFACTION 2
Colonial. Press and to make/""%. iting through mountains. of South’s are almost limitless. 1A Ce Ment a eal Sty ‘te x %
recommendations to remedy its| 4 tape and without precedent “Our job,” says Dr, Ivey with nA ts vs capacity ss % BUY g
ills. The diagnosis is evident and to guide them, the Southern Gov- quiet determination, “is to build) | 7 Wes 100,00 J; er 5 ee a x ; 5 %
Te een ae ray, ernors made the Regional Coun- {20 educational system ‘within the ean ast vier. which, wale e 4 >
Yours faithfully, ” hip, with ;South second to none.” ; : PA oh . DIAMOND BRAND ALUMINUM WARE bY
C.&. L. GALS ch bracts Pe ig on. the ‘board He said one of the biggest jobs|be adequate, for supplying. the| ss x
The West Indian Club, from each participating state. betweenmnow and 1953 will be ajWhole of Southern Korea's needa eeesons on ae a ie ane
4 Wigtensll Court, The Regional Council, with state-by-state survey seeking an ol petrolown Fo si COLL LOE LLL ADLLL LILI
S.Wsls» 7 answer to the questions, What ne see SSS SSS
headquarters in Atlanta, decided . There are two main sources from | ee nt ee cn

that the South’s greatest higher
education needs, to meet the
demands of an expanding indus-
try and livestock production, were
in medicine, veterinary medicin®

Bahamas
Legislature
Prorogued

NASSAU, Bahamas, Aug. 2
Last night Governor Sir George
Sandford prorogued the Legisla-
ture ait November 17. He
revealed that during the first six
months of this year, the Bahamas
sold over $1,000,000 in exchange
with the United Kingdom .
During the same period last year
they bought nearly $1,600,000 from
the Pool. The reversed position
was largely the result of heavy
summer tourist travel to Nassau
and Butlin’s vacation village,
Grand Bahama.

Travel to the col
mer, May to July in
over same

———
15 Years’ Service
Not Enough For
ee a ee
Maximum Salary
A motion by Mr. Miller asking |

that all Parochial employees who

have been in the service for 15

years or more, and were not re-

ceiving their. maximum salary
should be raised to the maximum
as had ‘been done with other
employees, Was postponed after

a brief discussion m the St. Mi-

chael Vestry yesterday.

Some mmenbet felt that the
standing form of a certain amount
of increment for each year un-
til the maximum was reached
should stand and they should
make no hurried decision then.

Mr. Miller said that he did not
think his motion was controver~-
sial, ‘The Vestry has ereated a
precedent by allowing employees
who had even years’, service
to be put to their maximum. He
was, Por putting forward any
original idea, but was only point-
ing out that the other men who
had given 15 years’ service should
also be put in that line. Such
was but equitable and just and
he was advocating nothing that
could meet with their disap-
proval,

To do otherwise would be to
create dissatisfaction,

The Hon, V. C, Gale said that
they should stick to their sys-
tem of increments and should not
jump on any haphazard call, for
a maximum,


























ony this surn-
creased 215
period last

‘© Governor also foreshad-
ive agricultural en-
lands

Th

ith
watiuce imports of foodstuffs from

dollar areas . and make the
Bahamas a food-exporting coun~
try, —(€P).

LONDON STOCK
MARKET FIRM

LONDON, August 3.
tancy attend-
Wall



Salaries Committee

They used to have people ap-
pointed ta deal. with salaries and
after it bappened that year af-
ar after a revision had been
there was still a long list
of applicants asking for increases,
the Vestry decided on a basis of
salaries and increments. .

Tf everytime that someone pre-
sented g complaint, imaginary
or otherwise, they were to be
troubled in that way, the main
idea that they had aimed at when
they decided on a basis would
have been useless. They could
not be expected to give snap
votes for such a matter then. He

don S
firmness to-day. Sentiment was
assisted by the trend of events
Korea and the build up of
United States reinforcements.
Domestic stock recorded small
widespread improvements but
the most interest was in overseas
fssues, In the foreign section,
German loans advanced on specu
lative buying, and switching 0+
interest to these brought frac-

was. ler nan than Mr. Mill-| tional losses to Japanese loans.
er and he would counsel him to} Tin share prices were marked
go into it My as it pre-|higher on news of United King-

sented a tremendous lot of diffi-
culties. The matter brought back
to one the old days and the way
in which 5 were sometimes
given jobs in the parochial ser-

. Mottley said that if Mr.
Miller’s sta ts had , been
correct, he would haye supported
them, but they were incorrect
If_he had there and had
asked for the ruling with regards
to. people who had served for 20
years.or more, he would have
supported him, He po af have ,
done that because it would have Bank

had to Bee r the church- Strike

oe pie Some. Bee BUENOS AIRES, Aug. 3.
ple up to the maximum and had| private banking activity came
created a precedent, He assured|to g virtual , standstill here on
Mr, Miller that if he came back |Thursday following an increase in

dom and United States talks on
stockpiling. Rubber shares reflect-
ed an uptrend in the price of
rubber.

Despite some profit-taking, the
oil share market closed with the
majority of small improvements.
Renewed United States buying of
Kaffair developers vig Cape was
reported, The section closed very
firm with useful rises in select-
ed issues.

—Reuter.



has begun on the installation of jof French troops was about to be with a revision of his motion he |strikes among bank servants for

the catalytic cracking plant. sent to Korea. —Reuter.

would get his support. higher pay.—Can. Press.











































can the South be if we use the
human and material resources we
have? What educational machin-
ery do we need to develop and
use these resources? —I.N.S

Flashlight

For School
Inspector

ST. JOHNS,
Mr. A. C. G. Palmer, Federal
Education Officer in the Leeward
Islands for the past six years has











which Northern Korean forces
may now get oil supplies. The
nearer is Manchuria where, in the
district of Fughun, both oil-from-
{coal and shale oil are produced, {
;and the latter refined, No recent

information is available as to the} |
scale of production but there ere
large resources of coal and shale
in this area. ‘There is no rail con-
nection from nearby Mukden right
down to Seoul—about 400 miles--
on to Pusan a further 250 mile
south, It has been reported that
during the Japanese occupation of
Manchuria, natural crude was
also being produced, but output is
believed to be negligible, Also, in
Manchuria there are coastal oil
storage plants at Dairen and Ying-
kow on the northern edge of the



a

As the Manufacturers hav



















Grenada via Barbados to take up
as Education Offi-
r of Schools

ice the only point on the west coast
capable of receiving supplies by
tenkers, but in ships not exceeding,
5.000 d.w. tons

The second nearby source ayail-
able to the North Koreans is Sak-
halin, now entirely territory of the
U.SS.R., and believed to be pro-
ducing from three-quarters to one
million tons of crude gil a year.
Also there is an oil refinery at
Nikolsk in Siberia, a short dis-
tance north of Viadivostock, There
ie a rail connection from Gensan
northwards into Manchuria, But
the railway route in Korea may be
precarious as it skirts the east
coast and is subject to bombard-
ments from the sea well as
from the air.

So long as the North Koreans
receive the support of their north-
ern neighbours, their oll supply
problem appears, at the moment
to be mainly one of maintaining
land and sea communications, of
storage, and of transporting sup-
plies forward to the front, The
overwhelming air strength that, is
now being brought against them
must make these tasks increasingly
aiffiev lt

——

Mixed Farming

Smithers asked the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies
what action has been taken, to
develop the Central Experimen'
Station, Trinidad, in view of the

his appointment
cer and senior Inspecto
in that island,

Saar ene eecen

Our Consumers are asked
utmost economy in the use of

} Pp: ‘a stay in An-
During Mr, Palmer's stay in the Peak period between 6.30 a

tigua fourteen new schools have
been built all of which provide for
practical subjects in the senior
department. Mr. Palmer has seen
to it that the standard in second-
ary schools has been raised from
that of School Certificate to High-
er Certificate.

In 1946 the National Milk bev~-
erage scheme, and reinforced
yeast biscuits were introduced into
schools in Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and Anguilla. Most of the
new schools are in areas which
were never served with schools
before, and some are already
showing signs of being overcrowd-
ed. Undoubtedly, the Leewards
are passing through a phase of
educational reform, Mr. Palmer
came here and found conditions at
rock bottom and has laid a sound
foundation for the future of these
islands the results of which can-
not be seen for years.

Mr. Palmer introduced Visual
Education and generously devoted
a great deal of his time to organ-
ising film shows throughout the
couatryside of islands which had
never before seen a reel. Films
and apparatus which were loaned
by the British Council have pro-
vided a splendid entertainment
especially to those in the minor
islands such as Barbuda, Anguilla
and Tortola.

20th June, 1950.

INC.

Mir.

Mr. Palmer was arbitrator re-| unsatisfactory state of | affairs
sponsible for the “Inquiry into the revealed in the Department ot
Labour Disturbances of 1948. In| Agriculture Report for 1948

1949 he was awarded the M.B.E. 7} paragraph 142 In all the various styles for

Mr. J. Griffiths; Provision for}
the development of the Central
Experiment Station in Trinidad
has been included in a Colonial
Development and Welfare Scheme
for an Agricultural Experimental!
Station which 1 approved in
March, 1950 The purpose of
this scheme is the development
of more stable systems of agri-
culture on a mixed farming basis, |
and investigation into the yield of|
crops so grown in order to improve |
the standard of living of thy
agricultural worker, The total |
cost of the scheme will be}
£158,750, towards which His}
Majesty’s Government are con-
tributing £82,917. It is expected
that the station will come into full}
operation in 1952.

In appreciation of his autstand-
ing achievements in these islands
the Antigua Teachers’ Association
presented their director with a
souvenir leather case for valuable
papers hand painted with a scene
of Antigua and the famous pine-
apple crest along with a scroll

The Antigua Education Depart-
ment also showed their grateful-
ness to Mr. Palmer by presenting
him with a flashlight “as remin-
iscent of the light which by your
work and personality you have
shed on the field of Education in
the Colony and also as symbolic
of the light which will continue to
radiate from your life as you
further climb the Ladder of Suc-
cess” say Mr. P. W. A. Gordon
Inspector of Schools.

in attracti

NOTICE

just completed inspection visits to Gulf of Liaotung, from which our Engines can. no longer be delayed, the
St. Kitts, Nevis and Anguilla, He | supplies could be shipped. to consequence had to put this G
left Antigua on Wednesday for} Korea. Inchon, the port of Seoul, commission and, owing to the

available as a result, may find it necessary to shed load at
intervals during the next few months.

WILLIAM FOGARTY Lib.

JUST ARRIVED = ~-

A new shipment of

Maiden-Form
BRASSIERES

Of further interest is the arrival of

CONGOLEUM and LIN OLEUM
SQUARES

Make your choice at



BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LTD.

e¢ decided that repairs to one of
Company has in
encrating Set (900 K-W.) out of
reduction of standby Plant now

SO

to co-operate by exercising the
Electricity, particularly during
nd 8.30 p.m. until further notice.

Vv. SMITH,
General Manager.

in B. G.

everyday and Evening wear,

ve designs

FOGARTY’S }

eee =


:

ome

eo ee

PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS 4 ADVOGATE

5S e- - S P cee
Printed by the Advorate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.
——$—$—$—$—

Friday, 1950



August 4,



“At Tenerife, the largest of the Canary
Islands, I saw an Annual Procession of
children walking up the cultivable
side of the mountain. They were !ed by
priests and nuns and each child carried
a tree he or she was going to plant. That
was good teaching.”

—C. B.

TREES

WITH the minimum of discussion the
House of Assembly passed on Tuesday a
resolution for $1,600 to enable the Director
of Science and Agriculture to extend the
work of tree propagation. The original
estimate was for the sum of $4,500 but this
was reduced and the new amount will now
be considered by the Legislative Council.

There can be little doubt that the funds
will be granted and the work of propaga-
tion started as soon as possible. But it is
for the general public in whose interest the
money is being spent to make the fullest
use of the work done.

This island which is essentially agricul-
tural needs many more trees than are at
present left standing. The prevention of
erosion and land movements, the attraction
of rain and the percolation of the soil after
rains form only part of the benefit to be
derived from a good tree population. And
it is alarming that so many trees of varying
species could have been destroyed without
any attempt having been made to replace
at least some portion of them.

The Cultivation of Trees Act 1950 pro-
vided for the payment of a small sum to
land owners who planted trees on their
lands. The difficulty in this was that of
propagation. Many people would be willing
to plant casuarina trees but were unable
to grow them. The Director of Agriculture
who is charged with the duty of “promo-
ting the interest and development of arbor-
culture” has now recommended that these
funds be granted to provide the necessary
pots and other equipment for growing
trees and, according to him, for caring
them until they are strong enough to be
replanted without dying.

In years past Arbor Day in this island
saw the interested few apply to the De-
partment of Science and Agriculture for
a few citrus plants. In future Arbor Day
should evidence a new awakening to the
need for trees and a realisation of the bene-
fit to be derived from planting them in an
agricultural community. Trees nourish
life and the Good Earth which produces
food.

Boys’ Day

FRIDAY, August 4, 1950 will be a red
letter day in the history of club life and
in the lives of many of the youth of this
island. Today the Bay Street Boys’ Club
will be opened by the Governor and a be-
ginning will be made in the attempt to
bring a new ray of sunshine into the lives
of the children of the poor.

Social services in this island have been
left mainly to the zeal and untiring energy
of a few individuals but in the case of the
Boys’ Club the community effort is more
likely to ensure success.

It is good to find that a number of indi-
viduals have consented to serve one eve-
ning in each month as supervisor of the
Club. A look at the list published yester-
day will show that the individuals repre-
sent many interests and so the boys of the
club will benefit from the collective knowl-
edge of their “uncles.” It is a service which
will not bring Royal awards but which
nevertheless is evidence of a sense of civic
responsibility.

The Boys too will be able to enter a club
which is theirs and in which they will have
a chance to develop latent talents of good
citizenship.

This is the first internal effort at youth
welfare of this kind; and it is the duty of
the public to give it every encouragement
either financially or by way of service to
their less fortunate brethren. It is only
the first of many Clubs which are needed
throughout the island.

OUR READERS SAY

—_—_—_—_—-—
Ear Strain

To, The Editor, The Advocate,

IR,—I have seen in your columns again where
now Mr. G. H. Adams, leader of the Government
blames the press for making an inaccarate version
of a statement he had made at the last meeting
when speaking on two bills on the Order Paper,
on the first occasion it was His Honour the Act-
ing Chief Justice (Mr. G. Taylor) in some case
on the last sessions; and now it’s Mr, Adams.

Before such charges are made Sir, in my opinion
there should be better facilities, and accommoda-
tion made for these reporters who have to strain
their ears to fear what has been said, as it sur-
prises me how they manage to get a proper re-
port at all with such inconveniences; and soft
voice lecturers.

Sometime ago I suggested loud speakers were

necessary, both in the courts, and in the House.
Why not instal them?

L. B. CLARKE.
Tudor Bridge,
St. Michael.
Cricket Gift
To, The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—After such great success of our cricket-
ers, some one should give a portion of land as 2
dedication to make a well equipped cricket field
for poor boys who would love to be cricketers

This should come from anyone far or near who
has W.I. interest at heart.
Cricket is indeed the game nearest and dearest
to our hearts.
WELL-WISHER,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

(18 YRS.

| What British Schoolboys
Are Taught

A Schoolboy Writes On

The future of the Hritish Colonial Empire in General.
with special reference to the West Indies.

BY ROGER BARBER

Newent Grammar Sehool,

7 MONTHS)

Gloucestershire,

PRIZE-WINNING ENTRY IN THE OVERSEAS LEAGUE ANNUAL EMPIRE ESSAY

in these disturbing times, it is
perhaps difficult to see a certain
future for anything. It is hard
to imagine a secure state arising
from the unrest and politica:
strife present in the world to-
day: and at times, we must con-
fess, the further progress of our
British Colonial Empire appears
likely to be fraught with much
danger and great obstacles.

Some schools of opinion do not
help matters by regarding the
Empire as something of which
Britain ought to be ashamed,
rather than something of which
she ought to be most inordinately
proud; they would take advan-
sage of immediate colonial diffi-
culties to cut the painter and
‘liberate’ the people of our over-
seas territories. They would give
them self-government regardless
of whether the time is ripe,
vather than pursue an unspec-
acular policy of patience and
sersistence.

They seem to forget that the
-olonial Empire consists of coun-
ries which possess indigenous
caces. The Dominions are dom-
nions simply because their in-
iabitants are ‘chips off the old
lock’, but the inhabitants of the
Jolonies are, strictly speaking,
foreigners’. That is why it will
ve such a triumph when these
peoples can achieve a state of
self-government; and that is also
why Britain should strain every
aerve to solve their problems, and
disturbances and agitations should
not foster feelings of shame at
our colonial reeord. We in Eng-
and should realise that our col-
onial peoples are only now reap-
ing the first fruits of Western
teaching, and are just beginning
io ‘feel their feet’.

The dilemmas caused by col-
mial affairs to-day ghould not
discourage us, for they are a mir-
vor of the future, and clearly
show our administrators the paths
to take.

But while it is generally ac-~-
cepted that the Colonial Empire
oas a promising future, it must be
said that the present position
does not exactly encourage such
a decision.

The reason probably is this:
there is to-day a widespread ex-
pectation, for large and quick re-
sults, economic and political from
the colonies. The two words ‘col-
onial development’ are a constant
refrain in international circles,
but it should be understood, by
foreign politicians and U.N.O.
alike, that the British Colonial
Empire cannot be developed in a
twinkling, and the countries are
not merely waiting for an enter-
prising government to perform
the task. Development is forced,
by the extreme diversity of the
countries from which these re-
sults are expected, to be slow. In
the colonies we are not dealing
with Indias and Burmas, which
are relatively advanced civilisa-
tions. Our present colonies are
not. Each colony and group of col-

sonies has its own character, its
own climate crops. history people
which need their own special plan,
not some generalised ‘colonial’
plan,

But the main obstacle to the
rapid development of the colonies
lies in their general backward-
ness. In talking about develop-
ment we are looking ahead to a
point of destination. But do we
sufficiently remember the point of
departure? Do we realise the
conditions of poverty, ignorance
and isolation in which most of
the colonial peoples lived when
we began anything that can be
called development. Think of the
static isolation of the Pacific
islands; think of the misery of
the West Indies’ slave population
at the time of the emancipation
and think of the low-subsistence-
level of the average African tribe.
Yet to-day we see roads, rail-
ways, schools, bicycles, clothes
native journalists, doctors and
lawyers, and hear most impres-
sive speeches from African poli-
ticians, What changes! But how
superficial! Can we ignore the
other side of Westernization? For
often the new influences we have
brought break up the close-knit
families and tribes too quickly
and the people have not been able
in time to absorb a new religion,
er build up new bonds and loyal-
ties, new incentives to work.
Hence alongside the successful
adaptation one finds restlessness,
disruption, dreadful slums, and
pitiful demoralisation of the raw
tribesman-turned-proletariat. The
break-up of the tribal system in
Africa, and the racial division in
East Africa and Malaya tend to
reduce loyalties..The peoples no
longer recognise their hereditary
leaders, and because of their ig-
norance, loyalty to the Empire is
beyond their conception.

Thus it is the physical and
political backgrounds of these
peoples which we must know and
understand, Without this under-
standing we cannot possibly suc-
ceed in this policy of ‘colonial
development’. England has solid
interests in the colonies—economic
and strategic—it would help the
colonies if we defined them, and
not pretended we had all to give
and nothing to get. We have
other, less material interests; we
want to turn wards into friends,
who will stay with us when they
are free to go away; we want to
spread in the world the ideas
which we believe make freedom
and peace. Our success for a fu-
ture in the Colonial Empire de-
pends upon our ability to make
‘the colonial people believe that
our interests are their interests,
and that they can best be gained
iby friendly partnership with us.

In the future we must foster the
same family spirit in the colonies,
as exists in the Dominions; and
} who can do this better than the
«British public?




























COMPETITION, 1950.



ROGER BARBER, 18 year
old schoolboy of Newent
Grammar School, Glouces-
tershire, England, arrives in
Jamaica in the “Bayano” on
the 12th August.

His month’s stay in
Jamaica with Mr, J. H, Car-
gill (4, Duke Street, Kings-
ton), the Hon, Corresponding
Secretary of the Over-
Seas League, is his prize for
the winning entry in the
Over-Seas League annual
Empire Travelling Scholar-
ships com etition.



It is not solely on us, however,
that the burden rests. The col-
onial peoples themselves, mus:
play their full part, as the King
suggested in his Colonial Month
inaugural speech last year. “Pro-
gress depends upon a true sens<
of partnership between all sec-
tions of society, rulers and ruled,
each giving of his best to the com-
mon weal; and I look confidently
to the traditional rulers and chiefs
and also to the political leaders
and representative bodies, to pro-
mote co-operation in their vari-
ous spheres, and so set their faces
against faction and the sowing of
distrust.”

What better formula than this
can there be for the future of the
Colonial Empire? But there are
snags as the King's last few
words imply, the greatest being
perhaps, Communism. We are
all aware of the menace vhis
creed holds for the colonial
peoples — indeed, we have first-
hand evidence in Malaya, Burma,
and very probably, West Africa;
but what can be done about it,
if Britain is to continue her ideals
of liberty and free-speech in her
dependencies? The best Plan is
to forestall the rov by inspiring
such a confidence between our-
selves and the colonials, that they
will find content in British ad-
ministration and will find nothing
attracvive in Communist Imperial-
ism, and will not appease it, or
be beguiled.

It i be said though, that
troubles in some of our most
valuable colonial territories, tend
to obscure for a time from our
view vhe great possibilities which
beth the present and the future
hold for these lesser developed
lands of ours, and hide from us
the fact that if anything in the
world has a future, the British
Colonial Empire has. It is up vo
us in Britain to look after our
part-share in this vast Common-—
wealth, for it is upon the people
of England that the future of the
Empire depends.

A Pattern For The West

Indies
The future of \vhe West Indies
is particularly interesting, as

many islands in the group may
be said to be in a ‘transitional’
state, in so far as they stand be-
tween the extremes of advanced’
and ‘primitive’ being nearer the
former than the latter. They thus
represent those peoples who have
progressed through the establish—
ment of law and order, com—
munications and rudimentary
socia] services, to a measure of
social equality with vhe peoples
ef the Western world, and are
anxious to translate this social
equality into terms of political
equality as well,

Their future, however, like that
of vhe Colonial Empire in general,
lies only through the solving of
problems — problems remarkable
for their very diversity indeed,
‘diversity’ is the keynote of West
Indian life. To take an
example: Both Barbados and
British Guiana are in the West
Indian group, but consider the
contrast Barbados is a compact,
crowded, highly cultivated little
island, with a large relatively
solid population of African ances-
try, and an historical beginning as
u British settlement. Half of
British Guiana’s population is
Eas’ Indian; it is not an island
but part of a continent, and began
as a Dutch colony, It has large
rivers, a vast virgin hinterland
and the special problems set by
its dangerously low coast.

These are only two territories
vaken from an area of 2,500,000
square miles, but they serve to
show that each colony could be,
and to a Jarge extent is, sufficient
unto itself. Such being the case,
we can now see the difficulties
which arise. We in England are
accustomed to think of our Carib-
bean Colonies as one, under the
heading “British West Indies,”
whereas in reality, Jamaica is
Jamaica, Antigua is Antigua, and
St. Kitts, is St. Kitts, and so on,
It is very true that the emancipa~
tion of vhe slaves “freed a race,
but failed to create a society”.
The West Indies are suffering from
that today, and it is the aim of
every legislator and social worker
to construct a West Indian way of
life. When such exists, then can we
proceed to a political future for
our Caribbean brethren but of

what use is political equality
when the simplest form of social
life — vhe Christian family — is

practically non-existent? Here it
must be said, however, that tre-
mendous progress in social wel-
fare has been made. Whe people
have been taught to build proper
sanitary houses, and to make use
of welfare institutions. Scientific
cgriculture has been encouraged
to ensure that the population is
adequately nourished, and educa-
tion perhaps the mo st
important factor — has started
tu alter the Wesv Indian's outlook,
for altered it must be. The
establishment of a West Indian
culture in which the ordinary man
can ‘rest’ and of which the West
Indian peoples can be proud will

do more than anything else to
remove feelings of inferiorivy
from which the average West

Indian suffers, by virtue of his



colour, The establishment ol
techools and colleges has done
much to make him aware of him-
self and his responsibilities, and
is _ rapidly discouraging the}
tendency to laziness, so character-
istic of the Caribbean negro. The
need for constructive leadership
is particularly urgeny at the
present time. The common Man
is no longer content with his lot,
and he is striving to find a place
ia the world ovher than that ac-
corded to the ‘coloured’ man..,
But in this respect great hopes }ie
in the future, for Mr. Bustamante
seems to be the right man for the

job. If the West Indian Universi-
vy can produce men like him, ther
a political future for these is-
lands is assured. Some years

wack thes Moyne Report stated
*nat future policy in the Carib-
bean should be directed towards
federation, Mr. Bustamante, as ‘a
leader of the people’ appears vo
be well on the way to bringing
this about.

The fact that the West Indies
have found a leader in Bustaman-
te (and for that matter, an oppo-
sition in Mr. Manley) is a
promising sign of Political
progress, but we must not los¢
sight. of the fact that the island:
are still Crown Colonies, and that
therefore ‘we in England have a
duty towards them, namely the
vask of future development. How
are we tackling this duty, anc
what is more important, how are

the West Indies responding?
The present state of affairs is
not satisfactory mainly because

of the inadequate training of civil

servanis, As in the case of
colonial policy in general, there is
far too ready a belief that the

mere fact that the British colonial
civil servants has received a full
education 11 England qualifies
him to perform these tasks. This
of course, is not the case and iv is
specially important at this time
when the West Indies (and most
of our colonies) are transitional
between irresponsibility and re-
sponsibility of government that
Colonial workers be carefully
selected. The only justification for
his presence at his post is that he
can contribute something to the
society in which he is placed, and
that he is sincere in his endeavour
to do so.

It is nov only an understanding
of each other’s point of view by
civil servant and local politician
which is lacking in the West In-
dies. Even more important is the
dangerous weakening of confi-
dence in British administration. To
restore this confidence, wivhout
which no remedial measures have
any chance of success, the West
indian must have trust in the in-
cividual British official. That is
why the future lies so distinctly
in the careful selection of every
colonial civil servant, for vhese
men have a tremendous task ahead
of them, It is up to them to
revolutionise the existing methods
ef British Colonial Administra-
tion, which are sadly out of date.
The vime has come now for Brit-
ain to look upon the West Indians
not as children, but as equals.
They can stand on their own feet
now, and it is time the Colonial
Office realised it. This does not
mean however, that the time is
ripe for self-government, as
conditions in the Caribbean will
show, for there is a great differ-
ence in standing on one’s feet and
walking,

From the West Indian point of
view, the future lies with the
middle classes. Given a collab-
oration between them and their
friends in England, progress
vowards the building-up of a mass
political movement, of which they
will become the leaders, should
be steady and secure. Given a
cleavage between the two sides,
however, the result can only be
ene of two alternatives: political
deadlock and social decadence, or
open violence eventually leading
to civil war. If their leaders are
devermined to appeal over the
heads of the British representa—
lives, through the ballot-box and
universal suffrage, then there can—
not be a long or useful future
vhead of the British West Indies.
but given full co-operation on
both sides, vhere will be no need
for the like of Bustamante to
ignore British officials, and the
two parties can move forward to-
gether to the future.

The question of the moment
can be reduced Vo one central
problem, that of confidence, which
s the very cement which binds
the fabric of society together, In
former days it was said that the
West Indian got along well
enough, basing his faith in the
goodness of Queen Victoria. This
simple faith was succeeded by a
Tuivh in the British Empire; this
in turn is dissolving, and what is
to replace it? he answer is
faith in himself as a West Indian;
the development of this faith may
be slow — no matter — when
a man gains self-confidence the
rest of the way is easy.

Which Road For The Future?

By way of conclusion it can be
said vhat a definite future for our
colonies is assured only by a
change of policy on the part of
cur administrators: the art of
showing true friendliness should
be encouraged in British officials,
who hitherto have tended to be
cold and aloof. Just recently a
letter appeared in “The Crown
Colonist” condemning what it
termed ‘official snobbery’ in the
colonies. This is an important
point for how can we expect our
colonies to respond, if we do not

os

show ourselves open to response,

The whole range of problems
presented to the colonial adminis-
trator and the British people
alike, mus’ be approached with
the idea of social, and ultimately
political equality firmly in mind.

The process of re-thinking and
1e-education must proceed until
tlhe basic idea of personal equality

@ on page 7



















OIL NEWS FROM TEXAS

By INEZ ROBE
TULSA, OKLA.

FROM any point in this oil capital of the |

world, one can look across to the low lying,
green hills of the Osage, boundary of the
kingdom wherein once dwelt the richest per
capita community in the world: the Osage
Indians. :

The Osages are still there, but the oil which
once poured for many years an average 1n-
come of $8,000 to $12,000 annually into their
laps, has slowed to a trickle.

in 1949, the income from oil had dropped] |

to a measly $1,200 and will probably not go
much, if any, above that in 1950. The Osages
no longer throw away their old diamonds
when they get dirty or buy a new car every
three months.

In the last four decades, the Osages have
seen catapulted from rags to riches to pseudo-
cags. And now there are plans under way
chat may once again elevate the small tribe
.o comparative riches, although the high,
wide and handsome days of the mid twenties
may never return. »

Geologists estimate that there is still as
much “Black Gold” beneath the surface of
Jsage County as has already gushed from its
subterranean recesses. The problem is how
‘o bring it to the surface, now that the easy
cream has been skimmed from the pool. _

The result is one of the most interesting
seological experiments in the United States.
A group of old wells in the Osage is being
dooded with water in hope it will force to the
surface the vast reserve of oil which scientists
say is still locked in the earth, :

With the blessing of the Osage tribal coun-
sil, a group of oil companies has combined
ander the name of the North Burbank Unit
Jperators to finance, design and construct
chis first large scale waterflood installation
which may.not only revive the Osage wells
out point the way to new activities in other
old fields.

The operators have seta mammoth task for
-hemselves. It embraces a 20-to-30 year pro-
sramme of recovery and conservation in the
Jsage fields, if the pilot or test water-fiood is
successful.

Paul S. Hedrick, oil editor of the Tulsa
Daily World for 28 years and one of the oil
experts of the southwest, believes that water-
flood operations in the north Burbank District
of Osage County alone will recover a mini-
mum of 140,000,000 barrels of oil in a world
powered by gasoline and hungry for pet-
roleum.

After large scale operation gets under way
in this district, production should increase
from the present 4,400 barrels per day to
20,000 barrels, which means a substantial in-
crease in oil payments to the Indians.

Another method, known as “hydrofrac”,
also is being used to tap oil reserves in old
wells. In the hydrofrac method. gasoline is
reduced to a putty substance and forced
under terrific pressure into the sandstone.

This pressure cracks the strata, but neither
burns nor fires the oil deposits. A chemical
is then introduced that dissolves the “gel”,
as the gasoline solution is called, leaving
behind sand particles that serve as “propping
agents” to keep open minute cracks and allow
the oil to escape.

Between these two methods, the Osage may
again be in for a time of plenty and prosper-
ity. But even though his income in recent
years is but a fraction of the thousands he re-
ceived in the good old days, he is still prob-
ably the richest Indian in the United States.

All the mineral rights beneath the surface
of Osage County belongs to the tribe as a
whole. The Osage may sell his surface land
in Osage County but the mineral rights,
through action of the Great White Father in
Washington, are entailed in perpetuity to the
tribe as a whole.

The Osage, desperate for cash, can sell his
“head rights” or his share in the mineral re-
turns, to an outsider. But he may sell only
with the consent of Uncle Sam. Head rights
are quoted by local banks in exactly the same
way that Union Underwear, pfd., is quoted on
the New York stock exchange.

To-day’s quotation places a price of from

$14,000 to $15,000 on a head right, providing

Uncle Sam approves the sale. There are only
2,229 such head rights, as established by the
Government in 1906. (Osages born after that
date are still known as “The Too Late
Osages.’’)

There is no reason to believe that a head
right, now priced at $15,000 will not yield in-
definitely an income of at least $1,200 per
annum. And it may be three, four, five or
even six times that much if the hydrofrac and
water-flood programmes pan out as expected.

Or, if the pale face can’t get Uncle Sam’s }}

permission to buy a head right from an
Osage, he can always marry an Osage belle
with a head right in her dowry. That’s the
way some of Tulsa’s richest citizens once got
their start in the oil business.—INS.

Grey Beard Cricketers
To the Editor, the Advocate

SIR,—In days like these we are looking for new
talent in order that the present high standard of
cricket in Barbados and the British West Indies
may be mainvained, and this talent can only be
found amongst youngsters.

Why then are there so many “has beens” in-
cluded in local elevens who feel that through
respect they should be given a major part in the
game and thus have a chance to display their
much worn-out ability av the expense of the
younger players? We do need the guidance of
these more experienced veterans of the game but
not in the manner in which this is at present being
given.

It is a shame that these decrepiv old men with
one eye on the cemetery gate do not realize the
harm that they are doing to cricket as a whole,
The time has come when we should all join together
and roll these unreasonable bald-pated grey-beards
inside the pavilion where they belong.

Don’t Wait! Shoot?
To the Editor, the Advocate
_ SIR,—As the shooting season is just starting, it
is a fitting time to menvion one aspect of it. We
have good shots in Barbados who would scorn
to murder birds on the ground, But alas! some te
increase the score of their swamp do kil) sitting
birds. If all score books were torn up this evil
would be greatly mitigated. The sportsman would
scon find that bringing off a left and right shot
at birds on the wing give him a greater sense of
skill and pleasure than he will ever get by murder.
ing twenty on the ground. Try it. Give the birds
a chance. Pit your skill against their guile and
speed and see if you can win. Remember the story
of the English gamekeeper and the Foreigner? As
they walked by the edge of the wood a cock
pheasant emerged and began walking away. The
man raised his gun. The shocked keeper
“Oh you wouldn't shoot him now, Sir.” “Ah
no", said the man “I'll wait till he stops ! ! !’ Do
not be among those who wait till he stops.

E, C. JACKMAN.

August 1, 1950.



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coe cea aerial ant aac et OT Se






























FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 1950. BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE
Vest Will ° ~ - | Senior Sanit I ctor | Doe ct 828 eee
ASHEN Pos F ,
stry i uestion | cet enwe ss » Senior Sanitary Inspector Ort cts ete ee es eee
| ative addees — 4 —y . F M ,
— Uy > Suspended For 4 Months © FOR THE COMFORT OF YOUR
x-Churchward | pee es von | | PETS ae
warden | Buy Seared se | cae Sh
ed the oe | The Commissioner of Health of St. Michael yesterday
ritae’ + ; PURINA LICE P
A t Pla ° Field Ve | ed 2 suspended Inspector G. Fagan from service for four | < 7 OWDER and
bou ying ouchers 8 months. al a ae PURINA INSECT KILLER a
' —_— ———<—_— —_—_-_—-—- This decision was reached afte:
The Vestry of St. Michael is going to hold a special public | . | copaidecetign of a report from | H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD.
meeting as early as possible, which Mr. H. A. Tudor, ex-! ¢ | NO BACK PAY Sen Se eee ree a Distributers. a
Churchwarden, and Mr. Francis H. Pile, the Vestry’s| © ‘FOR PAROCHIAL ost He ge i oF ao ci ,
Auditor, will be asked to attend. The purpose of the} es Be | A. Shepherd, a junior inspectoi | BSBEBBSBBEBBBBBEaBBAaH s*,
meeting is to discuss a statement made by Mr. Pile in his| : rah ip arbs Joa : EMPLOYEES on July 6 with the suggestion th | BSS SRSRSSBBERBRBHREKEEBERBERBESB
statement of Revenue and Expenditure of the parish for | : tdcotown~ BARBA #288 he would be creating a dangerous
the year ending March 24, | § : a en ery ; ST, MICHAEL parochial em-| fain eo ". ages age veela ts
Mr. Pile drew to the attention of the Vestry a certain | rz | pioyees will not get back pay. aaa oa. Se ee
case dealing with the Princess Alice Playing Field in which| © The St. Michael Vestry came tof Inspector Shepherd reporte:| A SPECIAL FOR
some of the vouchers were worth nothing. oe, that decision for the second time} Inspector Fagan to the Chiet
Silke iavigdesiminaeen saab sale - © when Mr. E. D. Mottley again] Sanitary Inspector and his state-
" A motion that the meeting ve iy asked the Vestry to give back} ment was corroborated by fo'! TO D A Y
Nine Watches called was made by Mr. E. D. & t ies pay to those employees. Mr. other inspectors o
rw — by Mr. 5 ; Mottley brought up his motion Inspector Fagan admitted t

PAR AVON + BY AiRMAL)
se ie

| because a large sum of money
wich had been raised in the 1949
0 Estimates had not been spent.

the Board having spoken to In
spector Shepherd along the line
of his statement but said he ha:

Hon'ble V. C Gale was the first |
tc speak on the matter. Quoting
the paragraph of the Auditor’;

cee. eee

Stolen: Valued







report dealing with the worthless e +t Woes the motion was pas tof not used the word “dangerous’ 5 { ’ C R E A M S
, ae ee | i re vote, it resulted in a tie, buif He had made the stateme! . *
vouchers, he said it was a matter e er oO the chairman. M Weatherhead, | ; ‘ e e Arr ames
which the Vestry should take very 1 or put : the caine: ao anal id tt an id bh pe b . ;
INE GENTS’ wrist watches seriously, = ; . : Sains ea i vat it would have reached
valued $230, are reported to giet deen ane: “The Paro- H. Preemchand eye miption’ Wie Mis omemal the C nee every inane He
b 6 rG.c = ‘i ./chial Treasurer has paid on orders Postbox 464 oy ae s arochialfwas therefore a disappointe| ’ E on
~ pe be. = FE agg, Rit tee of the Vestry as he is required to | Film Entertainment Dacamarinsusuiinad smolayess in general. but afte: }man, He realised the implicatio Make TO-DAY’S
ed the Police that they were re-}¢° Under Section 35 of the Ves- } | Paramaribo, July 24th, 1950] onnme) the’ nee te eee ot the statement, however, tt CHERRY CREAMS
moved from his show case be- tries Act, 1911—5, and the pay-| “The film is susceptible of To the Editorship of “The Bar- aunts the oon to employees{ taken seriously by a junior o
tween July 22 and Tuesday. means are wall bona fide, but in|] great artistic expression. It bados Advocate” W : = Bes ype > staff. Mr. {juniors and he was extremely a “MUST-TRY’.
WO BICYCLES were report- aoe oa es were particu- | can be a fine art. But it isn’t Britigetown—-BARBADOS es he rhe .~ . explained that he f sorry he had made it I
ed missing in yesterday’s Po- Mise Savina Fooka ce’ ae used that way mainly, it’s || Dear Editor, a i ween. bh The Board viewed the matte Enjoy this delightful
lice Reports. Clarence Thompson are signed S the ‘Churcn warden? en a et of mass en- || You will be very astonish,to] with only some of oan omehaatad ae ee a i + thut treat at. .
of Mason Hall Street reported the] yj ; ertainment, Anc ink y« lreceive a letter from some one, | ho fey . ent 7 0 ~ “V rate said thut) Pisce
loss of a cycle belonging to Ches- ne sake os on .can say quite truly it’s the who. you do not know. Wirity 1] cartene the back pay such an action by Inspector Fagan
terfield Thompson of the same} js worth pothine certificate which biggest and most important will introduce myself to you. My ee iy 3 voted for the fwho was a senior inspector with | PHOENIX
address. He stated that the cycle Fair Ch form of mass entertainment name is Harry Preemchand and hie he lll ge A Mottley, Mr. fmany years’ service in the De- |
was taken from Fontabelle on} yi. means aaa tah tie] in th eee — et my age is 23 years. I live in Par- waa’ a ee are Mr f partment, suggested that he wat
ames s s ‘generally tha e in the whole world.” ee 2 Oe hg “hase ose who voted against} trying to sabotage the Depart ; ‘
te ios of a cycle valued $45 coats waa ‘mnselt has_at- DENIS FORMAN, a ee tnis letter is {it Were: Mr. Browne, Mr. God- —— sabotage the Depar Soda Fountain
Ph 5 a ji en o the business in hand Director of the British Film @ writing s letter 1S] gard. Hon. V. C. Gale and M fe 4 :
Henie Hal OF oat the Police without assistance from. or know- Institute, speaking in a that several of my friends would Grae, Pe Disgraceful Knights Ltd.
that “the byede was removed from ledge of, the Head of the Depart- BBC programme correspond with boys and girls of Mr. Victor Goddard regarded
the Savoy Club, Mason Hall Street, ment, or the one responsible for Barbados for collecting stamps Decide Now it as a “disgraceful attitude.”



seeing that the work is properly
of carried out, and that the charges
made are fair and reasonable.
_The matter re vouchers uncer-
tified or not properly certified was |
brought to the attention of the}
Vestry in December, 1945. |
Mr. Gale said that that was a |

on Monday.
OODROFFE CLARKE
Palmers, St. John reported |
the loss of his cow valued $130
from a pen on his land at the
same address between 5.00 p.m.
on Monday and 5.45 a.m. on
Tuesday. very serious report. A committee
HOIRS FROM five of the}poqd peen apdottted 40 lnk after
seven Elementary Schools}the Playing Field, and it also had
in St, John took part in the non-/aq Secretary. Certain prominent
competitive Music Festival which | people in the parish who were not
was held at the St. John’s Mixed|members of the Vestre had been
School on Tuesday evening. invited to join the committee, and

The School Hall was packed /they had done so. ‘

with enthusiastic listeners and “IT happen to be a member of
some listened from the windows. |that Committee,” Mr, Gale said,
Among those in the audience| “and I know nothing about these

3 SHIPS IN
THE BAY

The arrival of the Steamship
“Craftsman” brought the number
of ships in Carlisle Bay yesterday
to three. Beside the “Craftsman”
there was the “Alcoa Runner,”
which has been here for many
days, and the “Rivercrest,”

The “Alcoa Runner” and “River-
crest” are discharging cargo while
the “Craftsman” is filling her
hatches with sugar for the U.K

As soon as the “Craftsman” ar-



rere: Rev. Canon P. A. W. Moore vouchers which are not properly| _ d
a Mrs Moore, Rev. Ripper, certified, I think that we as mem-| rived the waterfront went into
Mr. L. Gay, Miss 'G. Denny, Miss| bers of the Vestry owe it to our- jaction. Lighters were loading

etc. Thatswhy I take
tunity to request you
advertise the above
in your most reading
Barbados Advocate”

Correspondence can be pass in
five difference languages: English,
French, Dutch, Hindi or Urdu.

Interested persons can apply
to Mr. H. Preemchand Postbox
464, Paramaribo, Surinam,

Every collaboration would ap-
preciate most highly,

Thanking you in anticipation,

T remain,
Yours Faithfully,
H. PREEMCHAND.

the appor-
if you will
mentioned
paper “The

Postbox 464



Mr, Mottley said he was ask-
ing them to decide then, once and
tor ail, The Vestry had alread

made a decision, but it had come

to his notice that the Church
warden’s report showed that a
very substantial sum of money

which had been budgeted for haa
not been spent.

He felt that if it were possible
to pay the retrospective pay,
members would agree to it.

Three weeks ago when the ides
of cleaning swamps arose because
of the encroaching hurricane
season, the one set of people whx
were uppermost in the minds o)
the people were the scavengers
The day after the flood last year
beside the police, the first people

H. O. Gittens, Miss E. A. Murray
and Miss J. Gill.
The programme

was so ar-

ranged that the Junior choirs

were first to sing. “The Sham-
rock” was sung by the Cherry
Grove Junior School, “All Thru
the Night” by Hothersal Junior

School, “The Merry Traveller”) aecounts
by Welches Village Junior School,| for”

selves and to the ratepayers who
have elected us, and to the Gov-
ernment who are financing these
playing fields, to see that thd
money is properly spent. We are
the custodians of that money with
which the Government has en-
trusted us.

“We should see to it that all the
are properly vouched

sugar on the north and south sides
of the Inner Basin. Loaded light-
ers could be seen cruising down
the Careenage. Some were being
towed by launches while their oc-
cupants relaxed on bags of sugar.

Two launches passing each
other midway between the ship
and the wharf were regularly seen.
They both had lighters in tow but
while one set were empty the

Faces Dangerous
Driving Charge

A case brought by the Police
against Cyril Carmichael of Mile-
and-a-Quarter, St, Peter charg-
ing him with driving the motor
bus S—58 on Tudor Street in a

thought of were the scavengers
They had done yeomen’s work
They had worked faithfully ana
had given a high degree of co-
operation

He knew that the whole affair
had been threshed out with thx
Labour Officer, but he had always

ee ES

‘a



“Come Hither” by Mount Tabor
Mixed School and
Qharlie” by St. John’s
School.

They afterwards grouped to-
gether and sang “Old Folks at
Home,” “My Qwn Dear Land”
and “John Peel.” Representing
the Senior Choirs the St, John’s
Mixed School sang “How Great
is the Pleasure,” “Now is the
Time for Haying,’ “Mighty Lak
a Rose,” “Psalm 67” and “The
Hallelujah Chorus.”

Before the King was sung Mr.
L. St. A. Thorne, Headmaster of
the St. John’s Mixed School, said
that they would present Canon
Moore with an address and gift
from the teachers of the Angli-
can schools of that parish in
recognition of his services as
Chairman of the Board of Mana-
gers of the Schools. !

Canon Moore gave up this post
at the end of July when he also
retired from his other post as
Rector of the parish.

The address was read by Mr.
J. W. Bell while the presentation
was made by Miss S. A. Carring-
ton. The Canon afterwards re-
plied to the address.

: Mr.
“Bonnielaffairs
Mixed

Gale called the state of
r _ “very disquieting,” and
said his opinion was that they
should thoroughly examine all the
vouchers, accounts, etc. relating
to the playing field.

The playing field had a secre-
tary, and according to the usual
vractice he took it that the secre-
tery would have the vouchers
files and orders and would know
about what was going on. He
would know how the work was
carried out and about the orders
made for the materials which
were used.

others were loaded to the water
line.

The Government crane also had
its share of activity yesterday.
During the evening it was used
to unload heavy machinery from
a lighter which was tied off just
below it.

A few yards away from this
erane men could be seen nailing
up boxes of onions. These will
soon be shipped from the island
by the Schooner “Mandalay IT.”

Potato Diver
Fined 5/-

“If you are a diver with a
licence and you find anything
while diving at the sea you must
take the article or articles to the
Comptroller of Customs, you can-
not take anything away,” His
Worship Mr. B. Griffith told Nor-
ris Boyce of Nelson Street yes-
terday when he fined him 5/- for
unlawful possession of a quanti-
ty of English potatoes

Norris in his defence said that
while diving he came across this



Take Measures

Everything possible that could
be done to clear up the matter
should be done, said Mr, Gale, and
he hoped that the Vestry wouid
proceed to do what he was asking
for without delay.

Mr, Bruce Weatherhead, pres-
ent Churchwarden, who was in the
Chair made a statement to the
Vestry. He said:

It is the right of every Taxpayer
to know that his taxes are we'l
spent and correctly accounted for.

It is the duty of the Vestry to
see that such information is given









































to th t bag of potatoes in the sea and
‘A vote of thanks was moved|t0 the ratepayers and that all) did not know what to do with|
by Mr L. T. Gay, District In- reasonable questions relating t9 | them.

Parochial affairs are properly and

spector of Schools, who also paid
promptly answered.

H.P.C. Callender of the Bridge

tribute to Canon Moore. This feret Post said he was on duty on Bay
was seconded by Mr. A, T.|, It is also the duty of the Vestry | Street on August 3 when he saw
Gittens. to see that any government grants] Norris carrying a bag. He got

or Trust Funds, in their charge, are
properly accounted for and to the
satisfaction of the Government.
Since the publication in the
“Official Gazette” of the Parochial
Accounts for the year 1949-50,
many of the Taxpayers of St.
Michael have been asking me all
sorts of questions relative to that
year, I am unable to answer
these questions, The ratepayers
ask me because I am the present
Churchwarden but, I am sorry to
say, although I was senior Guard-
ian for the year 1949-50, I know

Mrs. Moore, in a brief address,
told those parents present to give
the teachers their wholehearted
support and refrain from inter-
fering with the work of the
teachers who were trained to do
their job, She said that education
from books was most desirable
but parents should not fail to
train their children to be helpful
in the homes.

RENE LEACOCK of Hall’s

Land, Bank Hall, St. Michael,
was injured on her left foot af-
ter she was involved in an acci-

suspicious and asked him what he
had in it. Norris started to panic
and he arrested him.

APPLES!

WITH oranges and grapefruit
off the local market at present,
the Tasmania apples which ar-
rived from Australia last week
are being sold out quickly. Al-
ready Goddard & Sons’ supply is
gone, They were sold at 40 cents
per pound.



dent on Tuesday, She was treat-| very little about the repairs and Three normal sized apples
ed by Dr. Cummins and dis-| building etc., for that year and I] usually weigh a pound, The
charged, must therefore pass these ques- | Street sellers have taken over,

now that the store supplies have
petered out and these sellers
make good returns when they
sell them at 18 cents each,

But though oranges and grape-
fruit are not to be had, the
hawker’s tray has an ample stock
of other fruits and greens, There
is g fair quantity of plantains,
local and imported, but mostly
imported, and these are being
sold at an average of eight cents
each. There are also pine apples,
Mangoes cabbages and tomatoes.

ANNUITY

tions on to the Churchwarden for
1949-50.

Soon after I was elected Church-
warden, in March 1950, Mr, Fran-
cis Pile, the Auditor, told me tha‘
he was not satisfied with certain
Vouchers and he would not be able
to sign the Accounts of the 'Par-
ish for 1949-50 and he asked m2
for certain information. I gave him
the requirdd information to the
best of my ability.

I shall now ask the Clerk to read
copies of a letter written by me to
Mr. Pile and his reply thereto

Also involved in the accident
was a bicycle owned by James
Thorpe of Kew Road, St. Michael.
Leacock was a pedestrian.

HE MOBILE CINEMA

fulfil its final engagement
for the week with a show at
Wiltshire Playfield, St. Philip, at
8 o'clock tonight. This show is
for the benefit of residents of
the Wiltshire area,

will







The Weather

relative to the Princess Alice
TO-DAY Plavi Field Accounts. The St. Michael's Vestry at its
Sun Rises: 5.30 a.m. laying Hisid meeting yesterday granted Mrs,
Sun Sets: 6.22 p.m. Two Letters Lilian Drakes the vacant Frizer
High Water; 7.38 am. 7.26 || At this stage in the discussion |Annuity.
Mien: cb. eilaniee) | the Clerk Tr two letters to ae Ae gh Ae a RS er Sue
; r | Vestry. One dated June 17, 1950,
August 5. | was from Mr, Weatherhead to Mr Foreign Ministers
YESTERDAY | Pile, and the other dated June 19

@ from page 1

The Assembly’s Economic Com-
mittee has already put forward a
recommendation that the Consul-
tative Assembly should be the
body supervising the Supra-Na-
tional authority under which the
Pool plan as proposed by Schuman
would operate.

The second big talking point on
the agenda is a proposal by the
General Affairs Committee seek-
ing to break the ban laid down by
the Council's statute forbidding all
discussions in the Assembly on de-
fence matters.

The Committee has drawn up a

Temperature (Max). 87.0 °F.

Temperature (Min). 76.5 °F.

Wind Velocity; 13 miles per
hour.

Wind Direction: 9 a.m E 3
p.m. E, by S.
Barometer: (9 a.m)

3 (p.m.) 29.955.

| was Mr. Pile’s reply.

The first letter reminded M
Pile that Mr. Weatherhead ha:i
sometime ago requested the Ves-
|try Clerk to ask him to prepare
‘an audited Statement of the ac-
counts relative to the Princess
Alice Playing Field for the inform-
|ation of the Central Government.
|The Vestry Clerk had reported
that he had made the request on

|two occasions, but without success
ON SATURDAY | “Subsequently I invited you -

The C.N.S. “Lady Nelson” is|this office,” Mr -Weatherhead’s
expected to arrive in Carlisle Bay | letter said, and I speke with you,
{rom North on Saturday. It will| and you made a promise to let me
scil the following day for St. | have the required Statement; but | bly should be able to hold general

29.997.



“NELSON”? COMING



Vincent, Grenada and George-|this has not yet come to hand, |debates on “political problems of |
town, British Guiana. “A written request has now been | non-military character which are}
The “Nelson” is consigned to| received from the Social Welfare |linked with the need for assuring
Messrs. Gardiner Austin & Co.,| Officer for the audited Statement |the security of Europe 1 ff
Ltd @ on page 7 —Reuter. SSS SS











resolution urging that the Assem- !

dangerous manner on June 21—|fejt the only dispute was the
was adjourned until August 15] question of back pay to the
by His Worship Mr. C. L, Wal- abouring staff,

wyn Magistrate of District “A The difficulty was to give t
yesterday. one staff and not the other, For

Mr, J. E. T. Brancker is appear-
ing on behalf of Carmichael while

Sgt. D. Forde is prosecuting for | nective pay

the Police.

Three witnesses for the prose-
cution were heard, among them
Cardinal Prescod who said he was
a passenger on the motor bus
S—58 on June 21, The bus was
being driven along Tudor Street.
He noticed another —E—44—in
front of S—58. Both buses stop-
ped and when S—58 pulled out
from behind E—44 there was a
collision between the bus, S—58
and a bicycle

|
In answer to a question asked |

by Mr. Brancker as to how fast
the cyclist was riding Prescod
said that hé could not give the
speed but the bicycle was ridden
at a fast rate. An adjournment
was granted so that more wit-
nesses could be summoned



“Belqueen” Brings
Eight Passengers

The 44-ton Schooner Belqueen
(Capt. King), brought eight pas-
sengers from St. Vincent yester-
day. They were: Jacob Yorke
Arnold Young, Edmund Bernard,
Mary Bernard, Dennis Bernard,
J. Redhead, Nowel Taylor and
one other.

This vessel also brought a
quantity of copra, tins of fish oil,

and trucks and suit cases that
were ordered as samples.

No other intercolonial vessels
arrived but the 93-ton E. M
“Tannis” set sail for Trinidad
while the motor vessel “T. B
Radar” left for St, Lucia.

These vessels are all consigned
to the Schooner Owners’ Asso-
ciation.

SHIP UNLOADS LUMBER

The Motor Vessel “Jenkins Rob-
erts,” which arrived on Wednes-
day, was unloading some of its
cargo yesterday at the top end of



making every effort to get it off
the ship Some were pushing
long pieces through the port holes

Gouda Cheese
White Pepper
Black Pepper
Paprika Pepper
Curry Powder
Ground Ginger

Prunes
Lunche

|
|



an overall amount, it would tak«
$40,000 to pay everybody retro-
Of that, less than
half would go to the labourers
and scavengers. They could no
otherwise but be in sympathy
with that set of people. They had
been doing their best and had
showed themselves reasonable
men and he was making a strong
appeal, an appeal from his soul
that they might give a decision
then, a decision in their favour

The amount for the unestab-

said
Matter of Principle
Mr. Miller said that the hope
of reward sweetened labour an
he would second Mr. Moitley

motion, He asked members to loon
at the matter calmly and dis-

| passionately despite the decis.o:

of the Vestry in the past. It we
known to all of them that th
ex-Churchwarden had not spen
some money which had _ beer.
raised in the 1949--1950 Estimate:
and there should therefore be nm
difficulty. It was a matter o
principle and even if they ha
had to borrow the money, whicl

they had no need to do, the)
should pay the scavengers. Thi
men were on their knees, the)
were not commanding.

Mr. Chase said that he wa

prepared to support Mr. Mottley’s
motion as far as the $17,000 anc
he would suggest that he amen
it and let it refer only to worker
of the unestablished staff. Tha
staff had the firm opinion tha
they were entitled to and woul:
get retrospective pay as such pa)
was given to the Governmen
employees. He had pledged him
self to give assistance toward
their getting that pay since th
last election period and he di
not intend then to stray from tt
pledge

Mr. Mottley then pointed ou
that they had given him a Bi
to take before the House, with



the Inner Basin

This vessel brought 71,255 feet
of lumber for Messrs. DaCosta
& Co., Ltd,

The labourers that were un-
loading the lumber yesterday were





SELECT THESE
TO-DAY

Walls Oxford Sausages
Walls Pork Sausages
Danish Ham Sausage

in Syrup

mn Beef with Cereal
Corned Beef Cereal

STANSFELD SCOTT
& CO., LTD.
BROAD STREET.

SS

view to doing justice to two o
the upper employees, Mr. Pur
ton and Mr. Ashby, but th
House had decidedly said tha

they would first have to give thei
decision on that question
Mr. Goddard said that he ha
@ on page 8



per lb, 88
1 oz, tins AD
-32

11

ae 12
4 o7, tins 39
per tin 60

ie os 71
2-lb.tins 1.78
1-lb. tins 43
per tin 54



{ o'clock and
| breakfast period for most city

lished staff would be, $17,000 | hurriedly, however, so that traflic










Finally on the motion of Hon'ble
Vv. C. Gale seconded by Mr. B. A |
Weatherhead, Inspector Fagan was ;
suspended for four months, The
Board also decided to put on record














HARRISON'S "8 Smet
“SOLO” SPRAYERS

DOUBLE ACTION — EJECTS ON BOTH
THE UP AND DOWN STROKES THUS
PROVIDING A CONTINUOUS SPRAY.
IDEAL FOR GARDENS AND ORCHARDS.
COMPLETE WITH FITTINGS INCLUDING
3 NOZZLES FOR VARIOUS MIXTURES

Si¢ 2



that he be not allowed at any |
time to act in an_ executive}
capacity in the administration.



During the consideration of the |
-harge it was pointed out that In- |
spector Fagan had acted as Assis-
tant Inspector on many occasions |



It was stated too that he had
been giving trouble for some years
and on one oceasion had been sus~-
pended for a month. He had also
been reprimanded by the Board

At the Board meeting yesterday
were the members: Mr. E. D, Mott-
ley, M.C.P., (Chairman), Hon'ble



Weather Mr Vi Godard SOCKET HEAD SET
Ir. Victor Chase and Mr. C. B 1g’ . ia :
er) ae also were Mr. W. W. S¢ REW s







Merritt, Chief Sanitary Inspector
Inspector G, Fagan and Inspector;
A. Shepherd, B, Maycock, C
Jones, O. Henry and D. Batson
who gave evidence

Pipe Line Holds
Up Traffic

REPAIRS to the pipe line
which runs along lower Broad
Street at the corner of .C, F
Harrison & Co., were being made
by the Waterworks Department
yesterday and traffic was held up
at various intervals The long-
est stoppage occurred between 11
12 o'clock, the busy

%4", 5/16", 46”, 4”
ALL ONE PRICE
10 CENTS EACH

DRAIN CLEANERS

Total Length—30 Feet
GENUINE MALACCA CANE RODS WITH
SOLID BRASS “LOCK-FAST” CONNEC-
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SCREW, PLUNGER, CLEARANCE WHEEL,
ETC.
tl

$22-"" Per 8
HARRISON'S










HARDWARE DEPT.
TEL. 2364

workers

Workmen were doing the job

might go smoothly again

6.5644
PLLA AAPA APOE POE,

















% %
ss i % f
: . =
ms % “ae
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Sa x ees oe ¥
* os
MJ .
The Seed that Succeeds % GOOD ana tasty es
4 ° => x
+
s aes
FRESH STOCK x rp ee Lares
of % s of co i er:
> 4 5 5 . ae er . ‘ 2 _
x, p yee : a. in
FLOWER G % =( CASE”
RDEN § her ear
* t = 3
bie, .
: SEEDS : Ber
% % Sandwiches have a lovey pe
x at x rich flavour when they're
% | made with Marmite — see
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y sa | how children go for them!
% WEATHERHEAD , * There’s goodness in that flavour
y $| too. Marmite is rich in the Bz
nlaimnindnitinis % vitamins that help to build up
% bodily fitness and resistance
Zinnia, Snapdragon (2 kinds) x ‘ y ‘ T ;
Aeratum, Alyssum, Aster. % to infection. Use it also
Balsam, Calliopsis, Candytutt, x ‘ i
Canterbury Bells, Carnation, % in soups, stews, gravics,
Forget me-not, Gaillardia, nde: | — Sauces—it’s as economical
tia, Hollyhock, Lark - it i isi
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turtium (2 kinds), Nigella >
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y ».
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a a» sommer 2} The Vitamin B Food
% -AD OF BROAD. STREET * @ itlamin Yeast ‘00
LACUS GOOO444O"8 Made in England







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C_fOR your HOME)

Sanderson Printed
Cretonnes

en end § 1.99
CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Lib.



10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street










PAGE SIX FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 1950.

‘Stop Pyorrhea
in 24 Hours

Bleeding Gums, Loose Teeth and Sore

| Mouth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
French Mouth or a bad disease which
sooner or later will make your teeth fall
out and may cause Rheumatism and Heart
Trouble, Stop this disease now with the
| new discovery Amosan. Stops bleeding
gums in 24 hours, ends sore mouth and
tightens teeth. [ron clad guarantee
Amosan must make your mouth well and
save your teeth or money back on return
of empty rackage. Get Amosan from your
chemist today.

The guarantee

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



BY CARL _ANNDFRSON

Can ©
AHDERION ———























HENRY









protects you

For Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth



MICKEY MOUSE

POSALISSOSS SOS POE SSOS LO,
y i ; »
HEY! wHere \ [fwe'RE ONLY Rs JUST RECEIVED 3
YUR GOIN! KIDNAPING %
WITH MY FRIENP MICKEY? CEREALS x
\ %,
4 \ P g 1,&, 2.lb. Tins Morton's ¥
$ Oat-Meal %
x ~
$ 1 lb. Tins Tear) sarley
«
& Tins Peter Pan Scotch
~ Oats
Pkgs. Quaker Oats
% Pkgs. Quaker Corn Flakes
8 FRUITS

L.K.B. Peaches
Apperta Apples

Crushed Pineapples

hi~@e

THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER

Cocktail Cherries

Sliced Pineapples
HERE'S MY CREDENTIALS, PROVIN' I'M A



A un N &
I'VE GOT THEM COVERED, LAWMAN, ['VE TRAILED THESE KILLERS, “KERG | SON FABRIC _”” ne %
SHERIFF! 4 Grapefruit, and Orange & %
> Grapefruit, Tomato, x
; ; Pineapple x

STOCKED BY THE ie S

5 STAR RUM 3

%

%

INCE & Co. Ltd. §

STORES.



LESS EOOSSSSOSS

















































































8 and 9 Roebuck Street »
Dial 2236 %
EEE pe. | 080856055559 “4
“Ls. SASL LDP sds enced =
“py Hii il be PAL | i
Or» CEL Mr. Factory Manager
4 ;
’ + Ry i? e
K. @. CANNON .... ~~. THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS 4 Gp. |
ee 1 SG PI, ’ ’ / ‘ LET US HELP YOU WITH YOUR REPAIR PROBLEMS.
NO! § SLEPT ON Dai dean vauecig set eeu, Sa Po ” a I, T 9 / } We can supply the following ex STOOK.
BUON GIORNO, SIGNOR..# SEE THE FLOOR. ARE OF YOUR WAY TO /i'M HERE TO 00 A JOB, ETE ELIS * 10H, YOU'RE noTN, C17 7 }
YOU HAVE BEEN LOOKING OVER \ YOU READY FOR | |BE VERY Mice TO {| CARAMELLA, AND SO, \ OME ON! A ALONE, THEN ? 3 LIV, bifs| 1
THE CASTLE. DID YOU FIND THE AIRPORT? ME,SIGNOR $ UNTIL IT 1S FINISHED, L DIDN'T REALISE . 444 LEFPREVA / il , BOLTS & NUTS—
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COMFORTABLE?{AgR . ANYONE ALONG, THAT hopeless feeling that you're too weak,
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you've been taking too much out of yourself. |
Your body is short of two essential strengthening SKF BALL and Cast Iron Brass
foods—phosphorus and protein. | K Bushed
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ot T q x y @ NERVE TONIC ‘
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‘ My ROOM BLT Ber Tee Algeavy’ iT , | LIKE THAT 7.60 PLT The word ‘Sanatogen’ it a registered trae + a!
W)irs TOO HOT TO f py | SOME CLOTHES ON!
' | WORK

eH












i
He

' ie - WEEK
OF UNPRECEDENTED
BARGAINS « Wiison’s

BARGAINS LIKE THESE COME TO YOU BUT ONCE IN A LIFETIME THEY COME
TO YOU THIS TIME, NOT TO STAY BUT TO LAST FOR ONE WEEK ONLY.

WITH CUT PRICES LIKE THESE LASTING FOR MORE THAN ONE WEEK, SURE-
LY WE'LL BE SOLD OUT

YOU MAY BUY US OUT BUT WE GIVE YOU ONE WEEK IN WHICH TO DO SO.
READ THIS, VISIT US AND COMPARE PRICES AND QUALITY










a

—
WHAT
Now?



BY ALEX





THE HOTELS... WE'LL CHECK THEM | |
TO SEE UF DES HAS REGISTERED... | k

i a sae a

a

ZG D ,
Zy \ foe 1
é mee | : ;
) wen | Oy





MAYBE OUR
SEARCH FOR
OES WON'T
BE SO
DIFFICULT





FUGI in Pink, Peach, Lemon CANADIAN & AMERICAN NICKEL ARM BANDS 32c.





















































& White 40c. per yd. PRINTS @ 54c. to 84c. per yd. per pair |
SS |
INDIAN HEAD, Pink, Peach, Y 36 i ri
White & Blue 34 in. wide BEARD 26 th, write Oe, Rey 28 We eee Pee
WELL.,.HE DIONT REGISTER YES...WE HAVE A \ FINE! FING! WHAT IS HIS A MATT GR OF FACT SIR, TO LIKE TO 68c. per yd. MEN’S PURE IRISH LINEN $1.48 per pair
HERE...LET'S TRY THE CECIC DeeiMoNo. ) "ROO NoMBeR? T5 Lice | [See Hin At SELF) HIS LESAGE IS IN HEAVY QUALITY CASE- maretn | Seyret wae CELENESE PANTIES
HOTEL RAEBURN... Ne Oe MENT in Lemon, Beige, $1.80 per yd.
. FOR Two DAYS... wate Blue & White 34 ao KHAKI DRILL lc, 8a. 72c. per pair |
wide, Price ...... 72c. per yd. fee ?
vabaany To SUSPECT M2. . © - per y' $1.00 per yd. LADIES’ HANDBAGS
GBSMOND SKIPPER WHITE CELLULAR ng tree er $3.00 ui
THOUT PAYING $e, tir Ya. GREY FLANNEL 54 in. wide aes



PLASTIC TABLING 45 in. |
LINEN Goods for School & $2.16 per yd. wide $1.30 per yd. |


















Servants Uniform 36 in wide PLASTI AT * ne
She, per.yd. Several Shades. S ee GLASS TOWELS 18 x 34
- Otelity. ied | $3.70 each @ 46c. each
WHITE CAMBRIC 36 in. wide SHIRTS Roy Rogers Sports BATH TOWELS 18 x 36
f Tihs . coop 6 44c. per yd. Shirt $1.00 each @ 60c. each
$$. Bet sacaltec aks 4 h ————
}-ALICO CAMBRIC Extra —————— NYLON STOCKINGS Popu-
‘ neawy, quality 36 in. wide STRIPE SPORT SHIRTS lar Shades @ $1.60 per pair
= @ + 60c., & 68c. per yd. a
BY LEE FALK& RAY MOORES Sa — $1.40 each LADIES SHOES A New Ship-

{POPLIN in Blue, Peach, Pink,
Beige & White @ 54e. per yd.

SHIRTING in Stripes &
Fancy Patterns 36 in. wide
64c. per yd.



ment of these from Holland.
All Styles and Colours
$5.00 per pair
Other Shoes less 10% Discount

SPORTS & DRESS SHIRTS
from $3.00 to $7.00 each
MEN’S PLASTIC BELTS
36c. each





*THRU IGNORANCE, THE KIDNAPPERS
TAKE THEIR ViCT/M8 INTO CANNIBAL
TERRITORY «= :

SOME FOOLISH TRAVELERS ARE LOST.
\'D BETTER FINDTHEM




RANSOM BY TWO
ESCAPED CONV *Té,
SLIM ANDSHO RT Vs+













SUNGLE++









SPUN SILK, Excellent Qual-
ity 30 Shades 36 in, wide price
tor one week only 84e. per yd.



2 PAIRS FOR

| SHOP ECONOMICALLY FOR THE RACES AT - - -

N. E. WILSON

; 31 Swan St.



LADIES’ SILK STOCKINGS



THE HOUSE WELL KNOWN FOR NEW GOODS, GENUINE GOODS AND LOWPRICES.

ALL TROPICALS AND
WORSTED

Less 10% Discount |

& Co., Ltd.







Dial 3676.
















FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 1950. BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
Z T og? '
CLASSIFIED ADS VESTRY What British GOVERNMENT NOTICES ’
. i e _— oes © . ~ Attentior : one halen s + . 2
cLEPHONE 25: { Accounts, anc am therefore . , PG Bree eer : es 7;
; T ON 08 calling as alas ieee a ae Schoolboys Ann nt) Order, 1950, No. 3 which will be published ir i For all white shoes —_
. * m Ginnie the said Stateme without delay cial Gazette of Thursday 3rd August, 1950
FOR SALE | FOR RENT for oes anetion . the. vest Satan this Gods the maximum retail selling price o Mer





aS a ene, a eer as as Cae Bai Are Taught ;

WwW > . « ~
chantable Pitch Pine’ mene ar
tral Government.



is as follows






" — Se - - o _ in company, must ,
AUTOMOTIVE HOUSES “I also take this opportunity to @ From page 4 COLUMN ONE COLUMN TWO ay ;
A-40 VAN Zephe ATTRACTIVE I Well | remind you that I expect you to |Under-lying it, is taken to be a} ARTICLE Retail Price

Ordinary
(Not more than)



less, immaculate. Use PRO <
SHUVER

Main

and drav

hed tings, both
Open on

> bathing





commonplace of
which is not

everyday life,
open to question

have ready for publication during
the month of June a duly author-







—|











































































Propert’s White Renovato iis
“AR — 1936 1 1 good run- fa © : n naa a *. » caus f ° > 236 oY ‘ * i .
Reng eS, + gel pt ved comforts | ised Statement of Parcchial Ac-|°"d certainly is not a cause of Q) Meschesteige pea Pine $236.00 per 1,000 board feet or Present’ Stewie NO 18
R. Mahon, near Police Sut on 817 48.50-t-f"-/counts for the year’ 1949-50, in | Surprise. It is only on such terms | | (Basic Size) pert s - . :
Bellplaine, St, Andrew ee age op I =. accordance with Section 51 of the | #5 these that the British Empire) 4A ugust, 1950. surer way of making sure
| Michael. From now to Dec Fully | Vestries’ Act, 1911 (1911-5).” has a place left for it in the oe ia ae
CARS Chrysler 1941 Sedan; | furnished mod home, Electric 3 Difficulties political strucvure of the twenti- that white shoes are white!
(1) Dodge 1941 Sedan; (1) Morris 10| atid. Refrigerator, For particulars: rot Mr. Pile’s letter i wie atebed eth century | Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
conditio: shy to Cos- | —— > ) > si "
H.P. in good condition. Apply to Cos- | 2684 . Ve's letter in reply state The desirability of this state of}, ent) Order, 1950, No. 26 whict l be blist yf —
mopolitan Garage, Magazine Lane. Phone SEAT Upstairs Fiat at Waverley, Fiat at Waverley to Mr. Weatherhead that the mat- partnership must be emphasised.| — wate 60, No. 26 which will be published in the Official
: 3015 1.8.50—Gn- | Biue Waters Terrace. 3 large Bedrooms | ter of the Princess Alice Playing | some sort of institutional frame- Gazette of Thursday Srd August, 1950 Buck: P R > P E R T's
mn B.S.A. CAR—In good condition. Dial | ee Se eT Tenn. a = yet waeeyee — him | work must be created to bring the | 2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling price ot “Eggs” Mea
2490 or 3578 1.8.50—3n eae nineteen | Soe eatherhead), and that he| peoples together and promote an/ (imported Canadian Large Grade “A”.) is as follows :— Ta ANS , 1 TOV
“PART OF : BOTTOM AND Top knew some of the difficulties, He | understanding between them. The | | SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR
- ELECTRICAL FLOOR of aie would take the opportunity to] British Council and the colonial | . ! In Cartons with Sponge
AIR COOLED REFRIGERATORS mention that it was questionable | Universities have important parts | ARTICLE RETAIL PRICE |
“ The “Silent Knight”. 4c. ft. capac whether it was his (Mr. Pile’s)|to play in this respect, and form (Not more than) ! -
Operated by Keroser.e Oil. Dial 8, obligation to give a separate de-|the most promising lines of ad- | FoGe ° neteaaeai ee ee re
Da. Costa & Co. Lt Blectri aE — | anq | tailed statement, inasmuch as that | vance at the moment. On the suc- | a a 10e. each }
— ue elatelaedebite conve account would be incorporated in cess of such experiments, the pos- 7 oe 7 a a
ALTERNATOR 9 .«w,V.A. Single| niences. For the months of October/the accounts for.the parish. He sibilities of promoting orderly | ayq August, 1950.
eine 0 oe ok igs vei ae eae eae See Bayley. | would however furnish what he constitutional advances depend, It | .
Rare wah 4.8.50-2n. | had already agreed to furnish—a| ‘8 therefore strongly to be hoped “ ge |
Barbados Foundry statement giving the detail as he| that those who attempt to| Vacant Post of Graduate Assistant Master, Grenada |
Phone 4546 3 === '| saw fit, and either signed by him | #Pproach the colonies in the way Boys’ Secondary School. | «
Oe eet pe oy ke ‘ " or covered by a letter, should he | hich the situation demands, will j on the
; nouncing ‘the new “Silent Knight". No PUBLIC SALES not be able to get the necessary | 1)cet "i S ica Wick tee from Applications are invited for the post of Graduate Assistant ’ 9
: Motors, brushes; belts; or other mov- infé mation for his satisfaction. ; Fy ‘f this takes place there 1S! yiaster at the Grenada Boys’ Seco idary School |
i ing. parts, Absolutely ‘silent in opera ss Mr. Pile then promised to get | little reason for despondency | Th : abl z 1
wis Dial 8. Da Costa & Co a : F | abou > ; } e post is pensionable. a: | carries salary atthe rate of}
st Electrical Department 1.8.50—6n. | AUCTION the Statement of Parochial Ac-;° on ven TUsEre, ee 79 2 ae ‘ De
u es sae eee It is all very well however, tu | $1,728 x $96 — $2,160 plus a te:iporary cost of living bonus at
» , p b ’ &
f FRIGIDAIRE—6 cu. feet. Excellent} UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER counts ready w ithin the necessary | keep the object of equal political | 1pproved rates (at present 10%) Qualifications and experience will
; condition Phone 2471 a J. £ time, and to furnish any further| status before us in governing the Ss % a a S a >

I have b instructed to sell by = ; .. ; ae é : : ; ae
l Auction on the spot at Mahogany Lane information required that it was| colonies, but the transition from be taken into consideration in

eee | COMES AT" r 7 | on Thursday 10th August at 2 o'clock within his power to furnish.
REFRIGERATOR One Gan be| one Double roofed house.’ Each root Mr
nadian efrigerator. a pe

: . being 18 by 10 with yard enclosed
. atc w Hutchinson & Co. . Ltd latte asivanias. tent can be
3road Stree « a an



or 2
2



Marine Gardens termining point of entry into the!

Crown Colony rule to responsible Scale. |

Weatherhead repeating his] government should not be made Passages on first appointme: !
statement that he had been asked} too quickly.



%, Marson





COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT

of the officer appointed, as well!
rented or

Dominion _ status



































first parts of the Scripture | 0? the other hand, they prove con-

‘ : : |
| bought. Terms Cash ill sorts of questions about the! should not be allowed to become|°® those of his family, not excceding five persons in all, will be
La | nee A S. t ~ me a: > ° Tel ; mo
| D'Arcy. A. Scott, Auc ries fe matter said he did not propose to} a victory which is won, or a prize provided, |
FURNITURE Sas. AH | say then what those questions/ reluctantly surrendered to those Applications, giving full deta ls of qualifications and experience, .
‘ = = were He would in due course} who have bee! sstul i ‘ 10 t e ®
FURNITURE Birch Dining Chait! bear ESTATE furnish them to the Vestry t ee ‘ie 8 Md be vii, R accompanied by two recent testin »nials, should be addressed to the
$6.00 each, Dining Table $20.00 upwards, | oS estty. struggle; it shou willingly , " nian aie nal tia ali ng ns : ‘ '
humerous’ Presses from $20.00, Side BELVOIR St. James on Seaside Mr. E. D. Mottley said that he| offered at the end of a period in Headmaster, Grenada Boys’ Secon ary School, and should reach him
board from $25 00, Dresal + 2 ta Drawing a d Pies, Tee meio Ly . a member of the Playing} which the people concerned have | "ot later than 11th August, 1950
San inte Gf other Diente et; bargalis 4.8,50—2r ae siege ve it was oer ae been educated to receive it. The successful applicant wil! be required to assume duties on
Prices in Ralph Beard’s Auction Rooms, | papal bo serve on a commiltee as! Finally, it should be brought to} 11th September, 1950
Hardwood Alley. Open daily 8 a.m, to| FOR SALE (2) wardrobe trunks.|@ ‘yes’ man and know nothing} the minds of the colonial peoples, ‘ :
4 p.m Phone 4683 | Trunks, Valises. OWEN T. ALLDER,| about what was happening, but} that firs d :
: 3.8.50—2n. | Roebuck St. Dial 3299 he had happened to be ill at the hat first and foremost, they as
edecazesinas 3.8.50—2n | ti 14 ‘ rising races have duties and obli-
OO f : act ahd gations — to themselves, to the |
MISCELLANEOUS | ponoers, —, Ona. (1) Damaged Morris Not Evil for Evil Empire and to the world, They |
| ss arcial’® s! ‘a » seen 3 : ¥
BOOKS—Second Hand, chiefly His- | 4. er Jones & Co. Lid, Molassses| He had heard Mr, Weather-| re faced with an opportunity to |
tories. Historical Studies Veterinary |pank Yard at back of Empire Theatre. | head’s comments, he had heard|>Uild sound community life on |
> rave . P | Offers in writing will be received by “ i , jy | foundations already laid for the eee
4.8.50—3n : . the letters and he had read Mr. ‘ y faid for them. ——.
sillltaesitant ean : paste ons gains Me React 1988, °° “| Pile’s report. What he was going} S° — depends on Bieta zeniie- ROYAL NETHERLANDS
CIGARETTES All brands jn stock | : 4.8.50—€n. | to do wa nd > alwavs ing this opportunity that they de-
including ASTORIA and FOUR ACES — | sete eee oS Ne Heed a ee serve every encouragement. If, STEAMSHIP CO.
Knight's Drug Stores 4.8 50—2n | ~] = . : 7 SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM 1
| LOST & FOUND ive
|

















|
}
t
}
B. “Radar” will
accept Cargo and Passengers




















































































y, foam-soft berth!



set. Why pay more elsewhere? Archer
Drug Store, Coleridge Street

2.8.50—3n

Trader; Sch Molly N.. Jones; Sch
Marea Henrietta; M.V
berts

the remarks made by Mr. Gale.

The money that had been provid~

ed for the Princess Alice Playing oe ARRIVALS

Fie ad come fro 2 Seh queen, 44 tons, Capt. R
eld had come from the Labour) cing’ trom St. Vincent, Agents: Sch

Owners ‘Association.

S.S. Craftsman, 3,999 tons, Capt
W. F. Oneil, from St. Lucia, Agents:
DaCosta & Co. Lid.

DEPARTURES

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.

Jenkins Ro-

MISCELLANEOUS

WANTED Pint Bottles at
D. V. SCOTT & CO,
3.8.50—T,F.N. | welfare





CALYPSG RECORDS, forty eight that he remembered being taught | tent to settle down and take things Maa ane ata | The M.V. T. ak ae
o a get . Sera Saket Ce s ay ar 1 ‘ ,| M.S. HEC um. 4th, 5th, 8th
titles, only ten each, come and g | was not to render evil for evil, fat ih es uae can be) its. HELENA. Sept.’ 1st, 2nd, 5th | for St. Lucia, St. Vincent
A. BARNES & CO. LTD. LOST | The . ex-Churchwarden, Mr,| little hope for the future, - The SAILING FROM AMSTERDAM Grenada, Aruba, Curacao, “ a
15:4. PN Tudor, was not present at the| fact that many of the colonies are} 5.5 ‘URANIENBORG Aux. 12th Sanine Ww cawaadeay 2 4 we
pa ‘ — | BLACK PLASTIC POCKET-BOOK— | meeting, and there was no ond kicking against the pricks should] S.S. COTTICA Aug. 18th Basta . 1950. nhescay, ne
LIPTON'S FRENCH COFFEE is de- | Between Hall's and Martindale's Rad | who could throw any light on the] be regarded as grounds for cau-|SAMANG TO MADEIRA, PLYMOUTH, ugust, Avou,
‘iy the : sehcan nai please return same to - > ; ant TE \
BE yout cam buy is also the | mont RA Pouice: Station matter except the ex-ChUrea ie re taaiats, Mais [ME GRATGREEAR fon See |
most economical by reason of the 4.8.50—In | warden, iveness of West Indians, Malays, | u's: WILLEMSTAD Sept. 19th BWI S
roneser re ; 2 s ‘ chooner Owners from PORT OF SPAIN
lesser required to the cup — |———— : He thought that Mr. Gale and| West Africans and Cypriots, must] saiLinG TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO ;
* n o rrocer 59c | AOS One G acelet at either ; ‘ = SAIL . RA , : :
ae ano ihiuon ia reer: Gor’ Gib’ of Paradise Beach,|Mr. Weatherhead were right to|be accepted as the rise of young DEMERARA, ETC Scene mes 4047 Pan American brings « new era in air transportation to the
aanike — 4.8.50—8n. | Sentimental value, Will finder bring the matter up, because | and vital peoples, M.S, HECUBA Aug. 26th , ~ : Western Hemisphere... on the wings of the luxurious double-
ee | return to Marine ‘Hotel.. Large reward | certain sections of the Press and We must not however, underes- | S-S. COTTICA Sept. 5th tank 1 Dire oth ‘ .
= “ a aat ree cabriaets tofkecad r d . 4 8. P. MUSSON, 80N @ CO. LTI decked Clippers, Direct convections at New York with other
MOTOR OILS & GREASES—Price’s / 0 4.8.50-¢n | Public had taken up the question, timate the seriousness of the un- AGENT: 7 “KL Presidente” flights to Europe
Becrine nce a ai wah ____ | and more especially because the}rest they may cause, for very real GENTS , x r
oy Teas. tn do"Gin Drums. Whole: | SWEEPSTAKE TICKET — Series ZZ |Government was asking for an|and thorny problems are so raised; s l as Comt
scik & Ratail 1 | 28h Finder | please return same 10 |audited Statement. One could but it is evident that the future ° ° ° uper-Luxury & Super-Comfort Between
REDMAN & TAYLOR’S GARAGE Ltd. | Goulbourne Ince, a .. St: Only make an alidited Statement |lies only in the consideration of ‘ n : : ;
saad 4.8.50-—-8 Michael 4.8.50—In 7 ake a idite: atem ie e Superb meals,..including seven-course
Be gn. | Michac shy meee So these probbetmn ia we neglect to ana Nationa eamsni': pci
rs La lreiggr oA ag sat atten PE se od ed pr ak eer se t a would suggest that they ee Fa oe future is ob- served at your individual table
vent here again, Px s, tir | 905 Finde Bas ; ; lores ‘ > \scur j sos .
ESET Bee EE Ee Oe \O Cobham, Upper Roebuck strest should not discuss the matter any | Scured in dou SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails .
" 4.8.50 4.8.50—In ae ye day, but oe they Montreal Halifax Boston B'dos B'dos + Club lounge and bar on tower deck,
pay should call a special public meet-
oo dace Hikers eh aden § 5 oe Facet . 7 LADY NELSON 22nd July 25th July 27th July Sth A 6th Aug, e Ore 1 perfume et .
ee ween ee al eee | WANTED ing of the Vestry and invite Mr. Harbour Lo CAN, CHALLENGER lth Aug. 14th Aug. —— 24th Aug, 24th Aug ee age pentane hee eee ond
in 10 tb lots. At 1/- per tbh. Hé . en paeegeael Tudor and Mr. Pile to attend. LADY RODNEY 28rd 5. 26 Je ion. | : :
PROVERBS & CO., Ltd | , é ‘ 3rd Aug. 26th Aug. 28th Aug. 6thSep 7th Sep ¢ Extra flight attendants.
are 3.4.50—3n, | There might be certain things on LADY NELSON lith Sep. I4th Sep. 16th Sep. 25th Sep. 26th Sep. NEW
3 | HELP to 1 a nae be were: In Carlisle Bay * Spacious cabin with room to stroll,
OMNIPED — An elastic foot Cushion YOUNG LADY — for our office with | They should not discuss it behin NORTHBOUND ive
SOS RELIG REE SC SOR ae ee, Eaeaieie ee Bove kbeDineg (even | Mr. Tudor’s back. That was his} Sh, Mary E. Caroline; Sch. Eman- " a he Gone. Shises - ee + Living re comfort on both deeks... YORK
KNIGHT'S Ltd B elemetitary) Stenotypist preterably. attitude, said Mr. Mottley, and it ee 7, aomioes Flee aba aE ten nals eee soriyeg 1 = ning, sound-proofing,
RUBBLE-STONE, Concrete-Stone, | Write full particulars of qualifications, | was unlike the attitude which had (Craftsman; Sch. Turtle Dove; Sch. W. TA hl be eg RE hea id elm So and temperature control, *
Sand, Marl, Block-Stone Suitable for capabilities and experience (if any) to been adopted towards him when|L. Bunicia; Sch. Rosarene; M.V. Daer BARS ToLDaie igth Sep ' Ce 30th Sep. Ist Oct Sth Oct
‘and, Marl, -s Suite A 3 1c 2 ards 7 ; Sch. ' ner ath Oct. 10th Oct. 19th Oct. 2th Oct. 24th Cet. " ‘
sawing. Johnson Stables & Garage tt2. HULL & SON, P.O, Box 192 3.8.50-an }he had been ill on one occasion, your) Leica eines Lenten ; Sch ax Pie { * Everybody sleeps at night... between RIO DE JANEIRO
Dial 4205. 29.7 Se a Tal alee Slo ache Mr, Miller said he did not want} Sch aril EB Smiths se ydina A., a | 1 dad and Rio...in a Sleeper . MONTEVIDEO
YARD BOY Apply at Hindu Store | ae 5 : . _ or mith; Sch. Mary M N.B.—Subject to change without notice. \)/ vessels fitted with cold storege cnn ll add a d
SILVER FILIGREE SET Bangle, | 5)° Swan St 4.8,50—1n | -° criticise anyone or do anyone Lewis; Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe; Sch bers. Passenger Fares ani freien ‘etes on application to :— seat or, at a small additional cost, in an
Faring, Brooch, Finger-ring. $6.00 per | °° ““ Si ”'. harm. He associated himself with |P°Ortac; Sch. Burma D.; M.V. Earles



ST
Just arrived Nobles & Hoare lacquer | dozen.
paints in several colours, including sur- ; White Park.
fecpr, primer, putty, compound, and
thinners. Enquire Auto Tyre Company,

Trafalgar Street. Phone 26%
3.8.50—T F.N,

Fund, and had _ been

One (1) Croquet Set in good condition. | handed over to the Vestry by tha
Phone 4039, 3.8.50—3n |Government for administration.
They were therefore wholly re-



j TRANSATLANTIQUE | Only PAA offers such a complete choice of services;

premium “El Presidento” service; regular St
FRENCH LINE

service; and economical Tourist servic
~~ Sailing to Trinidad on the 11th August,



For information see your Travel Agent or:

8.8. “GASCOG





Swine i thictenay Gomi AWe abet) £20 MONTHLY sponsible for that money, M.V. T. B. Radar, 116 tons, Capt 1950.

allowed to import any more Ant Tape| _ Knew Nothing Sette saad te ae Accepting Passengers:— Minimum Fare AW VMERICAN
although out of stock, but we still have EASILY earned at a in oe time He too was a member of the aS mae ag tad a. tdae: Gant $19.00

a supply of “Ant Buttons” which will Feeney ane ton either sex 1 | Playing Fields Committee, and he | rannis, for Trinidad,’ Agents: | ‘toh 3.8. “GASCOGNE” — Sailing to Plymouth on the 17th August,

ast Le teyes a en Pett, eens also contact you with Students in|Knew nothing at all about the| Owners’ Association, 1950.



KNIGHT'S LTD 3.8.50--2n | Colonies and Dominions for pen cor-|spending of the money. He was Deluxe Cabin for Two available $622.00



er HWorto AtRhuwars
Da


























































. i
respondents. | Enclose, 8 i eed making that statement becausq Ships In Touch With B.W.1. Each. | ss & Cou fad, Broad Si,
— ton, Prospect. House, 329° Wigan Road, | any taxpayers and other people} Barbados Coastal Station For Further Particulars, Apply to:— \ On .
E Leigh Lanes, England, had been to him, They felt that] “Ganre Wireless (W.T,) Uta n « | e Phone 2122 (After hours 2303)
PURLIC NOTICES 20.7.50.—30n. |e had always represented prin- | padvise teat ane anh air ‘eonarmunionta Xu M sONES & co,, LTD. - Agents. 1 Aemtans alone
hs — _jciples, but that his mouth was] with the following ships through their
— . ae TBE ray closed because the ex-Church- Barbados Coast Station; — oe oo

ane 5 ae rea at warden happened to be _ his os s Salsas aed Cavina; 3 VELOPED LLLP PLLA PPP PPPDPPPEPLPA PPA AVES

rnc e mee we «OC ormartern; Ss. iconus; Ss. |
Hazelton, Upper Lightsfoot Lane, friend. Ookhill; s.s Arfobec; 8.8 Golfito, %
eee ay eae ene voters Rs He was not accusing the ex- a8 er enon 2 a ee |
applying to ne Governor for naturali- “ anv > se 8. rt erst; S.§ G ulin;
zation, and that any person who knows Churchwarden or anyone else. |

. a is ‘ . 8.§. Oranjestad; §.8. Craftsman; S.S
The Playing Field Committee had], neon ss Empire valdgate: s.s

summoned two meetings and both] Alcoa Corsair; S.S. San Rose: s.s
aad been abortive because the ex- maiele: 7 Whee b s Re Sees
Churehwarden had not attended. mee, apams; 5.5. :
Neither had he attended the meet- pf \ home: BM: | MAES Re
ing of the Vestry that day.

He agreed with the suggestion
made by Mr. Mottley that the

any reason why naturalization should
not be granted should send a written
ard signed statement of the facts to the
Colonial Secretary of Barbados, Public
Buildings, Bridgetown
Dated this Ist day of August 1950.
COTTLE CATFORD & Co.,
Solicitors for Miss Bernardine Edmee
Le Currieux.

sit TOPS wx VALUES
OUR PRICES

EPSP CPFRS

May mean kidney trouble



MAIL NOTICE

A function of the kidneys is to
eliminate harmful impurities from







SESE OSL ES







































































































%
“
%
%
9 5 . %,
3.8.50—2n - see If the ee grow matter should not be _ aepuaee MAILS for, st Vincent; Grenada; 4
, sluggish, these impurities accum- ehind he ex-Churchwarden’s nidad ane ritish Guiana by the |] ¥%
NOTICE ulate and settle and often become Gages ; The Canecni yen omeo. Wainer = % >
a cause of pain in joints and He wanted the public to be sat- Parcel and Registered Mails at 3|% %
Na’ Keteta nd muscles. The we7 to tackle the isfied in mind as to whether the] p.i. on the 4th August 1950. Ordinary | % DEFY x
AUBREY NEWTON REECE trouble is to help the kidneys. money had been properly spent | Mail at 8 a.m. on the Sth August 1950 x %
ecsased They should be toned up with x net He hoped that the special 8 g
Notice is hereby given that any per- De Witt's Pills—the medicine Py naeennes kare] » cal %
son having any debt or claim upon or made specially for this purpose. public ara gaan be called 3
atfecting th tate of Aubrey Newton 7 re - aoa is SOON as possible r y.
Hshta ta it alt he aa | BOWES A aig. WI" Sef ynarea ne | ORTENTAL You Folks! lt Aint No Idle Boast! Come and Prove It. \
ain nomas nis a (ensuing a <4 . — sic aeti
on the 2ist day of July 1949 intestate, the kidueys that brings them ERP me as tevin aie CURIOS. IVORY, TEAR SANDAL %
ik hereby required to send in pete back to perform their natural and sa ayints C tined WARE, TAP- CUT THIS OUT %
tars of ‘thelr claims “auly attested to 11h Pinction properly. ‘This well (§\‘ € . / : ~ £ Soe 5 soucners as preparec ,9eTore 2
Bireet, SSridgetown, on er, before, the Wis drorid sod wre have one punering. 7s, Semone) tae KASHMERE vamere WASHABLE PLASTIC RAIN COATS COMBS, HAIRPINS, HAIR-
bth day of September, 1950 after whic! letters from sufferers telling m a : " In Pink, Blue and Green ; iS, sRS, CREAMS >
date I shall proceed to distribute the : { i le hill. Y , SLIDES, POWDERS, \ , y
sinetof the "estate, amont the ‘parties Mel guterng by taki De ) ee oe er said they wanted | £9%%%G993909%99415977000", Tae ron ae ela For Ladies $2.18 each PERFUMES, ig ed eats ®
ent ereto having regar o oe ’ taki: 4 J = a + 7 F F Sart - BAGS, SHOES, H TS, §
tebts and claims only of which I shall Witt’s Pills. T em all the vouchers, those certified °S JERSEY P ; a 2
then have ‘had notice and that ana for your trouble. Goto {| 2nd uncertified as well. a GIBBS’ DOMESTIO 6c, per a. peste hein Fa ae bareeds BIBBONS BTO., snd neem x
not be liable for assets #0 distribu our cheaiin and Mr. Weatherhead said that a CALICO 36 in. WIDE : eet ee eee, aber Dashery Lines >
to any perton of whose so or claim y get acusly documents relative to the matter} PROVISION GROCERY & Unsurpassed in Quality LADIES VESTS 2 tar $1.00 GENTS V S 2 for $1.00 %
ee af perione sedaniied to the said eae sd that a list | , LIQUOR STORE rR peter ne uae PANTIES Ste. soe ik TS SPORTS SHIRTS 8c. 2
nd all persons t } § a \¢ Eee ng) : TIERS ro %,
estate are requested to settle their of the questions they wanted to| Offers You % GINGHAMS in lovely Checks PLASTIC HEADTIES 25c. 1S PYJAMAS $3.60 pet gut %
ocrounts sithout SIRS July 1950 ask Mr. Tudor should be sent to > | 29 in. wide washable LARGE PLASTIC TABLE- TS DRESS SHIRTS $1.98 up x
; AURELIA ETHELINE REECE, him before the meeting, so that Edam Cheese 9c. Ib whole or Only 47c. per yd. . CLOTH 48 in. x 45 in ENTS BRACES 18c. per pair ;
Qualified BI oy of OUR |\he would have time to prepare é $1.00 Cut . the Estate of Aubrey the replies. Gouda Cheese $1.04 per HEAVY QUALITY LOVELY " GENTS HANDKERCHIEFS
Yt 50 an. | GUARANTEE Discussion then ended. Peanuts 36c. Th POPLIN 36 in. wide in CHILD'S VESTS 30c, each 19¢. up
De Witt’s Pills . | Choice salted Fish 22c. } Pink, Blue, Grey and White PLASTIC PANTIES DRILL 59c., 15c. 97c. $1.00
TICE [shes Sees | ee =F ie perv eae Ey ae
conditions and the ingredients con- | A FEW ‘ f a. } — CO allel salina , e+» : .
NO I bE j Saree to. cighd atandceee. af sere ANTIQUE ani atten’ | a 2 a LOVELY QUALITY FRENCH PEARL NECKLACES $1.50 up PLAIN & STRIPPED TROPICALS x
Q Choice salted Beet 42c. tb GEORGETTE 97c. per yd. EARRINGS $1.00. pair $2.00 per yd. up , %
cmeiratinaceasseaee® das ND > »
a PILLS ican “G re ee eee [D SPREADS LOVE PIN STRIPPED TWEEDS %
one and . IBBON $| BED SPREADS LOVELY Lig Wd Let .
All persons running booths, or De TRE Chandelier pieces GIBBS oe R CHINE 36 in. from $1.08 up QUALITY, Single $4.50, Double yy yeh mee %
‘ a , « 7. NES
TT OT MOMEMEELEE for Kidney and Bladder Troubles FOR SALE ia ney i LINENS FOR UNIFORMS in 10. aa Ao Oe! a all at reduced prices %
at ¥ - s yrooms ay | [RS
games at the Garrison Savannah At your ne Biers ons ‘cesar le Wal be Oyéle | $ attractive shades 36 in. wide GOOD QUALITY BRASSIERS : - %
| | These make charming fixtures i i5e. per yd, SATIN FINISH $1.12 per pair TAILORS BUTTONS FOR x
on August 7th, 10th and 12th eee yee 1Q Dial 3115 ' - ce od s IATS 12¢, per doz. »
8 : 5 een eee ms 214 BROCADES SPUNS, MIAMIES ‘HILDREN RUBBER SANDLES GENTS SHOES, PUMPS, FELTS, x
(Race Days) are hereby noti- NOTICE AAPA LASALLE |, SATIN, TAFFETAS CREPES ee ae te ee ae Ces. UNDERWEAR, CAPS x
i sizes 50c. per po iS, ? i , Ss, q
fied that I have authorised 3 all reduced 5 - : - CIG. CASES, COMBS, BOWTIES, ¥
EDWARD DURANT to collect fees “CALLING ALL R.AF. A Few only - - - 1% CRETTONES & BEDTICKS eee ara be ert ae an > — ee other Lines $
for such booths, stalls ete., on my PERSONNEL” | PIPE WRENCHES 1% also reduced in prices was ne ay Peneer ? *
behalf. Persons failing to comply There will be a meeting of (| sf & ® Come Early & >
: “i lat iat st opened 1& s
ith this order, will have booths the Barbados Branch of the | ‘= 5, > >
Ream Peet, 4 | . * | Hurry if you want to secure any. ve IT’S ONLY i Grab the Oppor- %
removed from the Garrison Savan-} R.A.F. Association on Satur- 1% teawaity. ~
nah for the three (3) days above|{{ day Sth August, 1950, at the {| THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM ik COM THERE AL: VALUES ' S
mentioned sn i ele British Council “Wakefield (CENTKAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors) | % TO OFFER i m0 rie “a 5 - Ni ¥
Eagle Clnb pe 6.30 p.m Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets x Pr. Wm. HENRY ST. DIAL 3466 and Nos. 6, 42 and 53 SWAN ST. %
Broad Street. Ys |: 656566060660565090S50005505 0000009909009 O09 FOV POG OWVOUIU VV DD 9D OOOO SODDISOIODDOOOOODO FOOTIE



A
PAGE RIGHT



MARSHALL, WALCOTT
FLAY SURREY BOWLING

LONDON, Aug. 3
A HUGE partnership between Marshall and Walcott put
the West Indies right on top of Surrey to-day
chiefly responsible for the tourists amassing a t

and was

tal of 454



This gave theron a first innings lead of 273 and then they
claimed two Surrey a innings’ wicke for 29 oe
stumps were dr awn Marshall reached 142 and Walec

149 and they put on 279 for the fourth wicket in 220 salto
The score failed by only four runs to equal the fourth
wicket record for the West Indies in England accomplished
by Worrell and Weekes in the Third Test Match.
—— Having lost three wickets over -

oe fnight with only 72 rums to the
“S ,credit, the West Indies needed

nappers care, but once Marshall and Wa

! cot got their eyes in this moi

| ead In | ing, they treated the bowling wit

jseant respect Once they h ad bee

Fi i t R | | eparated, the end ime fairl
= ear I) |

Irs oun ither gave a chanee during

t sta ach hitt o

AS was expected the Water oe : wail tk e ns he on |
Polo match’ between Snappers and} 9+ o6 the ground e on |
tad pr the out ol 1 ground on ¢ occa mE |
Barracudas at th for i:

Barbadc
Aquatic Ciub yesterday atterminetin

proved to be the most exciting of Bad light was trouble

some when



the two matches played, Snappers | Surrey batted a secor

wen the match five goals to two, | tis caused’ a hold up for hort
This puts Snappers in the lead ell just before the close

the competition, .

In the other fixture Swordfi: ot Nard Drives
overwhelmed Police six goals To return to the big stand, Mar-
love. shall seored mainly throug: hard

The matches were as follows drit es in his stay of four hours, 35

Swordfish 6, Police 0 mit.utes, but when trying a glide

Police playing with two subst - |‘ leg he put the ball into the safe
tutes started off defending stu hands of Alec Bedser
bornly as their goal keeper Walcott’s fierce driving is always
Harris made several good sav a feature of his play and to-day
and it was not until midway Was no exception. He compiled his
through the first half that Mick fourth century of the season and
Jordan playing centre forward f was out when snicking a ball to
Swordtish. finally pierced throu the wicket-keeper. He was at the
their defence. Shortly after th crease for just over four hours
Geoffrey Foster scored their s¢ Bowlers met with more succe
ond goal afterwards until Johnson showed

At the start of the second hs aggression in a bold eighth wicket
Swordfish opened up as Nes\4}stand of 47 if 45 minutes with
Portillo made a fine swim-throus h | Goddard.
to send in goal number three fro n He was not out 39*when the in
oe aeaer tg Sete Ee ings closed, Ramadhin was at the
ook over again, a ore EE ccna 4 a e “intt
Police rallied but their forward te . ;
ware ineffective and down can When Surrey went'in for about
the Swordfish forward line in 70 minutes batting, they had a
final attack, Gerard Jordan hit the {auick reverse when Bedser wi
cross bar twice, each time the bal! bowled with a ball which hit h
re-bounded into play. His brother | bails. Fishlock and May then de
Mickey then collared the ball and] tended stubbornly against — goc
nade no mistake in scoring the | bowling in poor light. It became
sixth and final goal for his team.]so0 bad that the players left th:

= S J field for 20 minutes and soon after

Snappers 5. Barracudas 2 | the resumption May, attempting :

Barracudas completely outplay-| ook, gave fine leg a catch

ed Snappers in the first half of : :

this very fast and somewhat rough Constable’s Defence
game, and though Billy Manning le _

for Snappers opened the scoring, This brought in Constable an
Herbert Portillo playing on the he continued to defend with Fish-









Barracudas wing shot the equal- lock until stumps were drawn.
izer. almost immediately after- Surrey still needed 244 runs to
wards. Without even looking at}avoid tre innings’ defeat with
the goal he scored with a lovely [eight wickets standing

shot from a difficult angle. Stili Continuing — their overnight
Barracudas kept up the offensive: [fourth wicket partnership, Mar-
but their forwards missed golden] shall and Walcott brought the

opportunities. after good work in
their back line by Charles Evelyn,
Basil Brooks and Keith Lewis

Almost at half time however
Kenneth Ince put his side one up
to make the score two to one in
favour of Snappers as the whistle
went for the interval,

West Indies’ score to 203 by lunch
against Surrey at the Oval here
without being parted, At the inter-
val the West Indies, replying to
Surrey’s 161, were 42 ahead with
seven wickets in hand,

50 In 2 Hours

Half time over Snappers. found} A little later came Marshall's
their form and their skipper{50, made in something over 2
George Maclean scored with a }hours.
well placed shot out of reach of When 71, with the total at 186,

goalkeeper Henry Perez. Barracu- {Walcott might have been caught

das were not dismayed and not] trom a return to Westerman, but
long after this Herbert Portillofat lunch the fourth wicket pair
again came into the picture’ by [ were still together

once more beating the Snappers} Ramadhin, who left the field
goalkeeper Taylor, With the score Jafter lunch yesterday because of
at three goals to two the crowd a chill, was much better today
were kept very excited and some |'phe Team's Manager Mr, Kidney

Barracuda fans were even looking
for another equalizer.
Snappers however

said Ramadhin hoped to bat later

in the day.

had other

ideas and they turned on the heat | ,, ee ee ee tea Tie
in full force as, shortly before {!0U" bi ndies’ wickets fa .
time Kenneth Ince followed by J ™™0r collapse setting in once the
Delbert ‘ Bannister put the issue big fourth Wicket stand was brok

en,
This partnership had put on 27



beyond doubt as they each scored,
The teams were as follows:






Swordfish: \ Weatherhead, |?US in 3 hours, 40 minutes, Mar: -
(Capt.), G. Poster, N. Portillo, M. {shall hit 14 fours in a stay of 4
Jordan, K. Lewis, G. Jordan, M.} hours, 35 minutes, while Walcott |
Fitzgerald also hit 14 fours as well as a

Police: FE. Harris, W. Phillips, | six in a little over 4 hours,

Me, D. Richards, (Capt.), L. Dod- Lock and Laker had charge of
ya Alleyne, Z, Williams, G.} the bowling after the interval, but
shby. a steady rate of scoring was main-

Barracudas: H. Perez, K. Taylor, | tained, Walcott vauadd "Ekaoehaetd to
P, Fletcher, C, Evelyn, B. Brooks. tthe century, his fourth of the tour,
(Capt.), H Portillo, E Johnson fand the partnership reached 200

Snappers A Paylor, “ M >} five minutes afterwards, and just
Rogers, Dr Hentivicr, ie nee B Before Marshall @9¢ 6 itis bin»
Manning . ee > * Tdred, This was his third three fig-

Th tie, utet +H ure score of the summer,

e referee was Mr. W. Gibb
As Thursday August 10, is 4 After Lunch

Race Day, next week's fixtures} Marshall was particularly severe

will be played on Tuesday August On Loek, anid the first hundred
8th. The fixtures are: Snappers vs. }Tuns after lunch took only 58
Swordfish and Flying Fish vs. | minutes,

Bonitas. Wher Westerman came on Wal-



cott hooked him to the boundary
and then drove a ball out of the
ground for six in the same over.
Walcott did not survive very long,
being taken at the wicket off a
defensive stroke and it was Parker
who claimed these two wickets.

With Christiani and Gomez to-
gether the game quieted down,

Martindale For
Commonwealth X1

LONDON, Aug. 2
E. A, Martindale of the Wgst
Indies is included in a Common-







BARBADOS ADVOCATE





CENTURY MAKERS







CLYDE WALCOTT t ROY MARSHALL
tered Gomez was cleaned bow]- | SURREY—Ist Innings ise 168
by Laker. He played forward |. WEST INDIES FIRST INNINGS
, ; : | Rue b Westerman
ut missed Stolimever 1.b.w. Parker 45
The West Indies were all out at | Worrell! c¢ Melntyre b Westerman 7
» ie lids vind _| Marshall c A. Bedser Parker,. 143
the fall of their ninth wicket for | Minn, McIntyre b- Parker 14
434 Ramadhin being unable to] Ghristiani ¢ 1. b. Lock 10
bat owing to illness | Gomer b k fae ae 16
fter te > ei io . | Goddard ¢ MeIntyre b A. V. Bedser 12
After tea the eighth wicket pus | ey icon ‘not. out *4
on 47 runs in as many minutes, | valentine b A. V. Bedser 1
and then with the new ball Alec} Ramadhin Absent (Ill) is
Bedser had Goddard taken on the Extras
leg side for 8 wickets to be down Total 434
for 428. Vaientine’s entry meant | i ‘, ts =-
. , ot « £ . ‘ Fall of jickets 1 5 2-26; 3
the last wicket as Ramadhin Ws | , ad: 5-380; 6-381, 7-981; | g42r
unable to bat, but only six runs | 9434
were added before Bedser struck | BOWLING ANALYSIS e
again by clean bowling Valentine, | ah As Bete a 7% "=
so that the innings closed for 434 | We Saris 14 2 | 6 2
with the West Indies 273 ahead | Parker 40 4 88 s
Johnson not out 39 had used | Laker 29 & =i :
Lock 27 7 104 1
the long handle freely, but ne | ga." Bedser % 0 18
should have been caught when 13 Extras b, 2, I.b

Surrey made a bad start in their
bid to save the innings defeat for
only 8 runs scored

with

clean bowled Eric
Trestrail, 12th Man
Ramadhin though stated to be |
ill did not field when
Surrey batted for the
ty minutes and Trestrail appeared

not unduly
as twelfth man
Johnson and

pace

but Constable



Touring Girls |
Win First |
Netball Game |

A LARGE

terday
ball game
Olympia

repres
High School,
13 goals to 9,

His Excellency the Governot
and Mrs. Savage, accompanied by
Mr. W. Lambert, Private Secre-
tary, and Mr. Denis Savage, son
of the Governor, attended. Mrs.
Savage met members of both
teams and also took the first throw
in

Jean Spicer,

the
girls

for

local a
was
Whenever she

of an

The other
? | had 13 tries
Awai is very
land although she

| occasions,

the
had
while

For
sey

Even Honours

| Honours were evenly divide

to a few minutes before

The score was four

after Bishop's

the lead which they kept throug: 1-
out the game.

receiving a good throw,

net,

goals in the

getting

off they



Werrell
batsmen quiet with their aecurat
bowling, but with 18 runs
the boards bad light stopped play

It was possible to resume late
and then Worrell had May caught,
came in to stay with
Fishlock until stumps were drawn
with Surréy 29 for 2.

crowd turned up at
the Queen’s College grounds yes-
evening to witness the Net-
between
Club
sentatives
The visitors won by
This was their first
engagement of the tour.

one of the shooters
visitors,
lesson
Out of 15 tries she scored
excellent
received a pass her
_ | team could nearly always be sure
additional goal.
shooter,
s but only scored three
active in that position

on others she contriku-
ted much to Spicer
local girls,
10 tries
Jean Vaughan had nine tres
ind scored four

Soon after one of the visitors
was penalised and
was awarded, Jean Vaughan thri w
wide of the net.

Before half time the visitors nct-
ted another to put themselves ty
lead.

resumption Gloria Ramsey
to cut down the lead of the visito s.

At this stage the visitors were
into their
things their own way.
still
energy and looked as though they







I Wide by
A. V Bedser



Worrell hlock

¢ Bedser b

not out
Worrell





.Bedser.
‘ Constable not out

Total (for 2

final seven- Wkts. fell’ 1—8, 2

Johnson
Worrell
Gomez

kept th

bye

on




of the
visiting
Bishop's

girls
the
the

and
of

really
in

gave the
shooting,

10 and
position,

in that

June Awai,

missed on some



scoring, spell,
Gloria Rarn-

and scored five



ip
halt tit e
but scon
took

all
High School
Jean Spicer, afte

found the











a free throw

o
afier
scored

Se eS =

Shortly

stride and had
At the blow
full

appeared of

WE





<=}



wealth team which opposes an]}theugh there was full value from would have taken. on another local
England side in the first m&tch}every scoring stroke, team right away :
of the Kingston, Surrey, cricket} Then Parker held a hard hit} On the other hand the local
festival starting August 30, above his head at inidon to dismi | girts appeared to be all worn out
—Reuter. Christiani, and with the score un- by the speed o? the visitors
———— a ote oe :
They ll Do It Every Time | wanes By Jimmy, + itlo on Fadia It
f eee 7 — lee 1}
"Wirey MAKES HERSELF AS GLAMOROUS |B ( MISS SCRAP HEAP OF 1950:
UT LET HIM ALL YOU DAMES ARE ALIKE!) |
AS A MOV! | !
OVIE QUEEN... AND HUBBY | CATCH HER IN

| CeeaNT EVEN KNOW SHE'S ON EARTH +s.



HER RELAXING
DUDS“ HE LETS
| GO LIKE A THIRD-
| BASE JOCKEY.



|
\ MINUTE YOU GET A GUY | |
"HOOKED YOU DON'T CARE | |
| HOW YOU LOOK AROUND
HOME! JUST DOLL UP
( WHEN YOU'RE SASHAYIN’
_ AROUND TOWN !

WE

Westerman

May c Marshall b Worrell

white.)

22



OPEN.

2 no-balls “by

SURREY—2nd Innings

BOWL ING ANALYSIS
Oo,

M R, WwW
2 i ’
7 2
1 0 0
Reuter,

G

4

AT THE





Francis

, Lederer-Calleia
MITCHELL

Paramount
presents

co-starring

WANDA
HENDRIX

with
Josep!

LEISEN

Production
Produced by

|

i





COLLEGE CADETS WIN
INTER PLATOON SPOR TS

A LARGE number:

from Harrison College,
them

turned out to see

of parents and friends of the
Combermere and Lodge S
take part in the Cadet:

cadets
choo!s
Inte

Platoon Sports which was held at the Garrison Savannah}

yesterday afternoon.

















, seal

ve














FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 1950



No Back Pay
For Employees

@ from page 4 Sicenitaiach 5

been able to cor

Hir

and



f the Ve















, Second Division Fixtures







as aie
. 1 wotiuey, <
Number one platoon (Harrison College) was the}i: e that ac
Champion Platoon with 18 ints followed closely by{ ised ut yet they we
. |
- 2 ’ , ld o
Number three (Lodge) and six (Combermere) with 14jt® * Shee
points aS} as they had beer 10k
r ; 7 . i i $43 «| img ward to it for a lon
Before the events the three and gave a good exhibition of
companies were split into platoons. ! control. - oF,
Number one and two platoor The cadets will be breakin,
were Harrison College, Number; camp on Saturday. |
three Lodge and Number four, A ‘Grand Dance }
five and six Combermere. | Results are as follows: — | ‘eins |
The day was a very bright one, oe es |
and all the boys ran around: in}, ; 4,,¢haret, Pace-s0 Yarde: Ut No. [a Messrs. CALEY MOTTLEY
their vests and shorts. Everyone ae eae oo . PATSY SPRINGER
sts and shorts. Veryonel)4 and 5 Platoons.
of them expressed what a wonder-| 2. Centipede & 20 Yards: 1s", Qhiec 1
3 P 2 i \
ful time they were having at tho) Lode No.3 Platoon: 2nd No. 1 Plo") By
barracks. 2. Rew & Spoon Race 60 Yards: 1st “ 4 *
The first event on the pro-| Ne. 1 Platoon: 2nd No. 1 Platoon sz esigiess + ol
é a: J ng ¢ ,| 3rd — | a >, 17k
gramme was the Chariot Race and)“: “Wier Barrow Race—25 Yards: 1st. | | tdisio. Supeiied
this was run over a distance of} n Platoon: 2nd No. 3 Platoon | Mr PERCY GREEN'S Orchestra
50 yards and all platoons took ae He. Platoon. ae ss = ie ane Ni
: Sack Race—4 (ards: Ist jo. 6 | nee
part. This race was very amusing] p)jj,0n: 2nd. No. 2 Platoon: 3rd Please invite your Friends
and spectators rocked with laugh-| 6. Officers’ Race Ist. Major Foster, |
ter as the boys tried to disentanyle| 2nd. Capt. Perkins; srd. Capt. Me
themselves from each other at} Come,
naka. ee . e 7. Running Backwards 25 Yards
the finishing point. Number on} is;) No. 6 Platoon; 2nd. No. 5 Pla = aoe 4) |
latoon was the winner after] teon: 3rd. No. 1 Platoon Jou are i te
Sina a. Tata aa | seat TPege, Leawed Race-00: verge: 1s You are invited to |
z =* . ; No. 2 Platoon; 2nd. No. 4 Platoon )
3rd. No. 6 Platoon & GRAND DANCE | | When your throat feels
Obstacle Race ©. Obstacle Race—1st, No. 6 Platoon: given by | dry and scratchy from harsh
and, No. 2 Plate 3rd, No, 2 Platoo: . wah t >
In the Obstacle Race two teams| ' a oe “7 Messrs. EARL GIBSON and ', | coughing or over-smoking,
Pr sach pis tl ot CLEVE JONES | ust let a soothing, delicious
from each platoon jostleu co pass} ie a \! the first obstacle which was a Fo-night } oe a. Nor iheaat
piece of canvas spread on the POLO at { membranes with
ground with eight boys sitting o K.G.V.M. PARK, St. Phili t taste throat-2asirs medi-
> a i A} ma f AN » wt ) v ig Y wae
the edges to keep it down. A! Tie Bicbasos Holo Ct ‘2 Vit Mr. Percy Green's }) ¥ Gor cinai ingreaents of
the boys crawled under the out-| | E Barbados Polo Club has Orchestt \ 2eo \ s ¥. 2Rub
spread canvas but very few cam. | for purposes of practicing team HS Be {{t 4 ® gee?! | Really medicate
out looking pleased with them-| Work been divided into three ADMISSION oe = 4} ie Rew g!
Ae ; groups as follows: Nefreshments on Sale i\\" ee oe
selves ; Ss as Si )
CYCLONES (Colour White) * ae = -
Next ordeal in this race was th N , : F = = —
C Ms Yi Michelin; Marsh; Williams; Parke ~
bun-eating in which many boys] Frost; Skewes-Cox; Melville eehieastictemcersiccniaininouiiini
who. tried to eat their buns too Peer 4 (Colour Blue) = | eee
fast nearly choked themselves: | mtccer Meste jopane Bric: Gil
Numbcr six platoon (Comber | no " : F ,
cre) won this race Majc YOU SHOULD
; oe erage 4 TORNADOES (Colour Red)
Foster won the Officers Race wit er
Captain Perkins a close second Deane Colin; Deane Vere Deane SEE - .-
When the programme was con | Keith: Eee ee
Ww, Y 1dshaw,

cluded Sergeant D.

TO-DAY

ROXY

THE SCREEN’S MOST

LADD

h

RICHARD MAIBAUM

DONT
MAKE
} ALL THE
CLOTHES

Directed by
MITCHELL LEISEN
oad SL en

ADORABLE ALAN

as the American soldier who
avenges his wartime betrayal!

















AND CONTINUING TWICE



DAILY






















| P.C.S., MAFFEI & Co., Ltd.

TOP SCORERS

IN TAILORING





Stuart of th



“Y" Boys’ Club are in
to attend

in honour of the Cli
President,

at the Combermere

peers

Musie by Mr.
Gectieote a

SUBSCRIPTION
Dress Informal

3

or associated
Y.M.C.A.



(Members are all Friends

every one of us Non-Sne
There will be a

MEETING

6 pan, Sharp
on SATURDAY

To

Summer Meeting

e
DINNER WILL
F.0.0,

at 8 pm,

Cooked
Chef from
People)

by
St

the same
Vincent

Personally
humble

supervised

MENt

Lords hors d’oeuvre
Norfolk Turkey a la Castle

Trent Bridge Baked York

A Farewell Dance

BE SERV

by
servant Ernest Proctor,

tarbados Regiment thrilled th Fight Practice Chukkas will
boys with some “stunt” riding o be played on Saturday Aug. 5
a motor cycle. He sped aroun and all players are requested to
the track at breakneck speed be on the field by 4.15 p m



















Members and Friends of the

vited

ib's

Mr. Harold Brewster |
Sehool

B, Browne's

/-

N.B.—The “Y” Boys’ Club is
in no way connecféd to
with the

—ERNIE'S_—

Democratic Club

and

obs)

of Members Starting at

5TH AUGUST

discuss the First Day's

Programme of the B.T.C,

FD

French
Clever

your]

Grant

Ham.

Old Tra‘fe.d tHome-Made Sausages
by J. N. & Sons,
Oval Minced Pies
Peche Melba
Fruit



and Dance

— at —

THE BARBADOS AQU.
CLUB

(Members Only)
SATURDAY, Aug. 5, 9
PROGRAMME :

{

Mr.
Mr,

| Violin Solo by Mr. Mau
Fitzgerald

Mr. Bannister and Mr.
ard,

Oswin Hi

é

A Cinderella Dance at
night

A Mask Dance — for

tributed.
Music




y Mr.

w wire Orchestra

| Variety Enertainment

Songs by Miss Fay Chase
Miss June Jones

C. Pierrepont

How-
in The Singing West- |

erners impersonating
Eddie Arnold and Gene
Autry.



which
Domino Masks will be dis-








Arnold Mean-

Admission to Ball room—2/-

Entire Proceeds for Charity.
4.8.50.—2n.

|
}
|
|



ae)



p.m. |





ul

rice



Mid-







TWO
REAL
VALUES

FERGUSON SATIN
PLAIN WHITE
40” wide ‘ $1.32 yd.
TOOTAL HOPSAC

REASE RESISTING FINISH
in Plain Shades of Green, Saxe, Crushed

ii at Natural & White $1. 33 wk
CAVE MEPHERD_& & CO.,LTD.

0, 11, 12, 13 Broad Street





agi
ob















SS St

RED ~ HAND PAINTS for all purposes

Por Interior Decoration of Walls and Ceilings

““MATINTO”

Stocked in White, Cream and Green in
1 Gallon and = ', Gailon Tins









For Woodwork

“S”. ENAMEL FINISH PAINT

Dries with a Hard Gloss equalling
Enamel Finish. Does not Discolour
with Age.

Stocked in White and Cream in 1 Gallon,
4 Gallon and 4 Gallon Tins

For Exterior Woodwork

TROPICAL WHITE PAINT

HARD GLOSS PERMANENT
GREEN PAINT

Stocked in 1 Gln., 4 Gln, and 4% Gin. Tins
Phone 42@, 4456.



—-
The Sign of
QUALITY



WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.

A FINE ASSORTMENT

OF

TROPICAL SUITINGS

IN STOCK

AT

OF

| C. B. RICE & Co.
|

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FLAT OIL PAINT



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hg MN

rane §

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HAKRADOft ADV0CATK FRIDAY, AIT.L'ST 4, 1KB. QaUinq For International Meet K M FATHER. MOTHER AND SON He Bx.ellc.my the Qovernor aak*H hand* with bin BOD Denu -oo n afirr he Arrived at Saawell on Wed route from England. Mr-. Savage "railing happily fii th %  iMday afternoon looka on. A uuviNa )un in tin AuKUfi racas Bran M Mi (..:.',' I b9 11 W I l lo ipand a month's hoUdaj in n.in UM Taylors' in Swell H Lawrence Their two Diana and Bl Fletcher's mother Mr* C Paul k, accompanied them. B.C. 'Racing Commentator A MONG tinpassantan irrivu from ii ; noon by U.W.I.A. WCTC III Bfl Mrs. Lloyd Luikhoo and Uwii son Edward. Mi LucfchOO whi la a Barrister -i Law Ln Qaorfs town, is njjio u kato i B G.'s radio coniment.ilm foi i races. They expect to Dt la ('.. bail*is for .iboul tan da at the Hotel Royal. T iir. Junior .riijurnoi Dramatic iti pn an i -"pleinbei Hlh at 111 Hall. The pi.. Rj Foul Into Seven Wont Go,' b.> Vj Gielglld and Stephen KlH| iiii Bun OoM Down,' i Itsgsgrald. An aucUUon "ill be I'cld shortly to select th" players. Senior A r 1 EJt reading no less thun Biteao plays, the BartMMlo Club, (Senior Division), lied that "Blithe Spirit, 1 -'in draw lull houses in earl; i > i This is a Noel Cowai Family Reunion C om lo spend UM long holl dayi witb nun i.. Men Mi and Mra. Hugh K n who wad Uien daufhtei Kathleti arrived Innn 11.G. yestcui.i. I B.W.I A. Their two the l.odgc School. Mi. Kuig who u with tm .->.ll rjraenheart Lumber Co., lo B i; ki HI ix monthi houdaj after ipt naing the mmmai days they are going up At Seawell to meet her brother I IT ILK MAKCAHET BOURNE. 0 M.Ijust arrived (mm England with her parents Mr and Ml L, Bourne, was with %  In u .,t Scuwell vestenl.iv tbrotnaj Patar. *u arrivad from It ti by B w I A ..I school in BO. and i .i coma nvei to spend the long holidays with his parents who am here until UM gad of Septemhei Here for a month M RS EDWARD WHICH! .in n-.i from B-G afternoon i>> H w.i A. to spen < and •> months holiday at Globes' hui, Beach, st Jamas Hat children I .nxl her. Tliey weic i N I \HNC.M left yi for B.C. by B.W I m the forthcomint Inter,n ii I Cycle Meeting, whlel s in BG. to-morrow. Comig against representative Venezuela. Trinidad, b G Panama, he is the lone ridci He Will I ning in six days' time. n ii now training to Ix< %  MM with Cable A Wlftli Staying at Rockier iss JOAN MAGGS u f Port •la avrlrad h i i -.relay by B W.I A I i weeks' holiday wilh Mr and Mrs S E White Roekhn Left yesterday A PRS .i long hohd..with her parents Mr am Mra T E M K. %  "Rowans", St George, M Phillips and her two daughter returned lo H <; vesterdav lifter %  BOOn hj B W I.A. On arrival .. Ath UOfl Field, she will then traval ovag to Berbice where he husband is stationed at ltuti Batata Will represent Windward Islands M R. and MRS SWITHIN SCHOUTEN and their daughu i grrlrad from st Lucia terday by B W.I.A. and expect ti l>e here for one month layll 4Indnimer Guest House. Worth' Mr Schouten is Agi-e.iltm.d S .|H iintenitent, St Lucia aiel %  ,MII l)r representing the Windwani Islands at the Working Commute, of the Oils and Tats Conferem ho are holding a meeting her which begins on August 10th After short holiday M ISS ELAINE EVANS with Booker Bros in B i. turned to Georgetown yesteni.i. by b W.I A after a short holl •lay in Barbados, staying with Mi ud Mrs. L Hasset I B.H.S. Supporters! M ISS MARGARET HUDSON PHILIPS and Miss Dorotti* 1 .;>.f• >• >k. two Bishop A:istc> Hi, Bchool supporters arrived fron Trinidad yesterday morning i> v It.W.I.A to give their team son, verbal" support from the tout' linea. They are among sever youns] Trinidadian girls who hav i-oine up in the past few days t> (* %  with the team during the i tour. To day lo Monday 5 & 8 30 P m HO \l floMrintfi mtxwt a toi W_ , ^^CUMMINGS'j CTAR rucn ItO.W THEATRE TO-BAY 1.45 and CantlnMlng Pa |.Picluies present :— A, ^CaFTAW CAREY U.S.A.' mi IIKNDIII.X IJov '' '" Air|nrt by Mr and Mi .scv.L.i yearn age Mi Km,. l-'""l Olton. a sister of Mr. Hoy MalOMQ ol Har husband, who was in BuiBarUido*. and Mr Cyril Malonej hados %  couple of months ago on who is Manager of the Cable A holiday is with Bookers In B G Wireless Branch in St. KJtls. "d was formerly Manager of Boofears Drug Store branch here A .nOSSWORD t lampls A is used k letter*, n: an sii hints. saf CBYPTOqi OTt^-Here's lio to tvork it: AXYDLBAAX tf LONUFELLO On* letter simply stands for another In for the three L's. X for the two O's, Me trophies, the length and formation of thi Each day the code letters are different. A Cryptogram i-itt. hr dull" off wuh une Q'. 'Sr • n.'Vbri r r. I "T — Msi E ^ t— Ll_! *tr. i Wnai in* pilot doe* at teciuired tielglit. tS, }i a ium uini augiv %  ..j. V. Ivan* currency, iili in ordinal copy. (Si U. Tree. 14 mm way COM under, i.u 15 l-repoalllon (2) ie. Scrap If ilcnuf ot plant* (SI T2 P.>reri ISI J* The oadu and end* itfi ih u -.1 n.niiei algu. i:t 6) BsjSfl I. Ulc*. %  %  Circua attracUon. II 5. N. African ua*. (6| it. rir-i oi *mali thirie. IBI li Manv Join tnrru. in li. Uland in in* 'alecl ifti IS. I'oaiuooa. (3< ao CouWunptuou* abbretimiob l an liiUabllant. ,3i U. i HKIIU. (> J9 M i,i'i.:. peak, isi Aoiuixin M i*ira. -i ... 1. firufiina, ;. Law. D c'.n,. A. E laTsBtt. ia.TT,'. "* aSV.,i; .. %  ; Oaniaa. i>. voiuau'. ~; HfiiMM n.-i. h-. .. d*H br*.a S, Mi li if., fiS, a=a*. .S i.i\nnii; no\ii iiiniuiiiiiNHiUK COVER YOUR FLOOR WITH SILVER STAR C0NG0LEUM Square*: 9 ft. x 7J (L—< ft x 9 it n ft. x 10| ft—9 ft. x 12 ft. Continuous Rolls U7 In. .16 in. 72 in. Wide Cut to Order. Many attractivr dMlgni to r.plcct from Easy to instal Easier to keep clean. BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVF rOTTON FAfTDP" LTD HARDWARE DEPARTMENT DIAL 2039 r FREE YOURSELF from the BONDS OF CONSTIPATION wilh MORSES Puruhsis I |Mil< ,nir Low Death Rate UlNDDN. Auguot 3 WASHINGTOK, Aug 3. *.< lb i i t.mtilo DM Unitfljd Britain' daath rala in iflis. n %  IIII 'i I • verj was the large port that radio plays A| .|. W 7 f. recorded, the Regis. *ive>. the jingle has changed. Dick General's Statistical Review Boflay. one of the comedians of • i' howed on Thursday. Cancer ac-! he BIH's popular Variety pro"^-.ke It From Here. In fourteen hundred and ninetytwo Columbus sailed the ocean hluc Wherever one WOlt rhlldrcn •ould bo heard chanting it. it was itsed on every possible i-ccaslon and in every possible game Now. however, with the uwr<*arinjb ge part that radi~ ~' I HOI AH ROOT PILLS • TftUITEO REMEDY j rot OVTR SI VEUS BEWARE OF WORMS! So fa i,'in? ii Krutrr KtS nt of deaths -ramine. AOI WOMAN HATER' i D SWIM JgAMIfl D* C .. I ... i tfe in I, Li-.il InlriikJillol 'RANGE I BATI aitAV MORNING ii' II a'alaeh RENEGADES" VAKEIV nt'II TA.VI.OK t.Ali; l"% (The Garden) ST. JAMES WO NKW i'. iiKu HADiu TBDULL Double' •• >IKI Oil V TIME rSSSOm ... i %  %  %  I : lORStS g Tl ,-• I -MITH A. .KUAN i iioi.T m in* aacasi WMTSOBH -VI.\(.i:OA %  *v•* •*#• ,-, .-•,'-.>'---*#*-'-*'***'**.***.'*----'---* GLOBE OPBNINa I t"\V AT 5 S.S The Ptetnn thai Vou've Breamed abaut She wos many things to many menA CWntSBOffOUGM PiCIUAE RtN ISWS> Us TOUR EXTRA DISHES TONITE Ml STAR TALENT SHOW Ms. i oil 11 \ 8HB1 •' Ut| —"Those Foolish Thing'-" Mr ItDV P\KKls —"No Orchids For Milady" Hstr. l.isi.f. MIWITII -Again" Mi MHil BAIXI -"Bless This House" Mi IIAUI KIM. -"Golden Earrings Mr M\\ \lt I III K —"Love Walked In' r AW IBT MR. HT/ HAREWOOD (La^t month'i All Star Winner) MAM i MONIES—Mauricsi Jones PLUS PAH WCATaUl MENDS (hilarious Shorts) BJUTXSH MOVIE TCNE NEWSREEL i M\ I R8AL INTERNATIONAL NEWSREEL AMI FOR AN APERTIF 4 CARTONS OK HENIEKEN'S BEER to be given away FREE TONITE .U DOES lor To-nlgStta Tali D< Ihi sr—Mra. 1. H. L W.rd. Mrs. A l It! w.ilo-.t. Mr Maurice Ga:, and Mr MatlricS Jones I'llltls f„r i..-nl(hl\ Sin Sh.r:—I2e.. 24e.. llaase IS. Bakom title.. Bases 7te. •n Matinee ONLY—Pit Balcony 20: Boxes 51. YOUR BEST REFRIGERATOR BUY TO-DAY IS AN ENGLISH ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR 6.4 cub ft. • CREAM and WHITE • WITH or WITHOUT LOCKS • HERMETICALLY SEALED • ALL STEEL CABINET 5 YEAR GUARANTEE Call early at THE CORNER STORE ^'-VC'.',',-,',^',',',*.*,*^', I! v. SaMM* •----,'. :vsr.v.w.::::w.:::-s.:-AS. ::::• %  • %  • % 





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PACK FOl-R BAKBMIOS ADVOCATE. I r.lllW II '•! >l I I'l. BARBADOS w AOTOGUTE %... —.1 -%  n ~f .4 -I B -1 Frid.y. AUKUSI 1 15 "At Tenerife. the large*! of the Canary Islands. I saw an Annual Procession of children walking up the cultivable side of iHe mountain. They were led by prii-.iv .in.l 111)11-* and each child carried a tree he or she u us gimii; I" plant. That was S' M,f iMchini;." -Cat TREES WITH the minimum of discussion the House of Assembly passed on Tuesday a resolution for $1,600 to enable the Director of Science and Agriculture to extend the work of tree propagation. The original estimate was for the sum of $4,500 but this was reduced and the new amount will now be considered by the Legislative Council. There can be little doubt that the funds will be granted and the work of propagation started as soon as possible. But it is for the general public in whose interest the money is being spent to make the fullest use of the work done. This island which is essentially agricultural needs many more trees than are at present left standing. The prevention of erosion and land movements, the attraction of rain and the percolation of the soil after ntoi form only part of the benefit to be derived from a good tree population. And it is alarming that so many trees of varying species could have been destroyed without any attempt having been made to replace at least some portion of them. The Cultivation of Trees Act 1950 provided for the payment of a small sum to land owners who planted trees on their lands. The difficulty in this was that of propagation. Many people would be willing to plant casuarina trees but were unable to grow them. The Director of Agriculture who is charged with the duty of "promoting the interest and development of arborculture" has now recommended that these funds be granted to provide the necessary pots and other equipment for growing trees and. according to him, for caring them until they are strong enough to be replanted without dying. In years past Arbor Day in this island saw the interested few apply to the Department of Science and Agriculture for a few citrus plants. In future Arbor Day should evidence a new awakening to the need for trees and a realisation of the benefit to be derived from planting them In an agricultural community Trees nourish life and the (lood Earth which produces food. Boys/ Bay FRIDAY, August 4, 1950 will be a red letter day in the history of club life and in the lives of many of the youth of this island. Today the Day Street Boys' Club will be opened by the Governor and a beginning will be made in the attempt to bring a new ray of sunshine into the lives of the children of the poor. Social services in this island have been left mainly to the goal and untiring energy of a few individuals but in the case of the Boys' Club the community effort is more likely to ensure success. It is good to find that a number of individuals have consented to serve one evening in each month as supervisor of the Club. A look Ht the list published yesterday will show that the individuals represent many interests and su the boys of the club will benefit from the collective knowledge of their "uncles." It is a service which will not bring Royal awards but which nevertheless is evidence of a sense of civic responsibility. The Boys too will be able to enter a club which is theirs and in which they will have a chance to develop latent talents of good citizenship. This is the lirst Internal effort at youth welfare of this kind; and it is the duty of the public to give It every encouragement either financially or by way of service to their less fortunate brethren. It is only the lirst of many Clubs which are needed throughout the island. What British Schoolboys Are Taught A Schoolboy Writes On The future off Ihr Irriiisli Colonial limuire in IVruei -l. wilh surriiil rrfrrrnrr to llir West Indies. BY ROGER BARBER 118 YRS 7 MONTHS) PRIZE-WINNING ENTRY IS THE OVERSEAS LEAGUE ANNVAL EMPIRE ESSAY COMPETITION 1950. in these disturbing Umes. it is perhaps difficult to see a certain i.itdre for anything. It Is hard t imagine a MI anstate arising fnm the unrest and politn a. %  trite present in the world today: and at times, we must MB* less, the further progress of our liui.li Colonial Empire appears ...-.-. %  to be fraught with much danger and great obstacles. Some schools of opinion do not help matters by regarding the Empire as something of which Britain ought u> be ashamed, lather than something of which ma ought to be most inordinatcl> proud; they would lake advantage of immediate colonial diflikuiUea to cut the painter and 'liberate' the peopl* ROGER BARBER. Is \,ear old schoolboy of Newent Gra-nmar School, Gloucistmhirc. Enpland. arrirei '" Jamaica In the "Bayann" on %  he I2!h AuLi'r ills moti'h'i stay in Jamaica urtlh Mr. J. II. Caryiil (4, Duke .Street, Kingsto*), the Hoi. Corresponding Seemanj *•' the OeerStaa League, t* Ma prize for ihe urinnlnu entry m the Over-Seai League annual tmptre TnnviUnp Scholarships coif -tiUon. -.1 self OHH KEAIIEBS SAY fair Strnln To, The Edilor. The Advocate, SIR.—I have seen in your columns again where now Mr. G. II. Adams, leader of the Government blames the press lor making an tnacenrate version of a statement ho had made at the last meeting when speaking mi two hills on the Order Paper on the first occasion it was His Honour ihe Acting Cliief JMtlOt (Mr O. Taylor) fai some case on the last sessions; and now it's Mr. Adams. Before such charges Bit made Sir, in my opinion there should lie better facilities, and accommodation made for these reporters who have to strain their ears to *ear what has been said, as It surprises me how they manage to get a proper report at all with such Inconveniences; and soft i.vturcrs SomcUme ago I suggested loud speakers were necessary, both in the courts, and in the House Why not lnstol them? L. B. CLARKE. Tudor Bridge, St. Michael. Cricket Gift To. The Editor. The ."1.1. SIR.— Vsi success of our cricketers, some one should give a poftlo dcdlc.i | nell tquipl %  %  for poor boyi who would love to be cttl l i houJd come from anyone far or near who has W.I. interest U heart. Cricket is indeed the game nearest and dearest to our hearts WILL-WISHER seas territories. They would fava them self-government rcgardl*** %  f whether the time u npe, -Hi' i than pursue un uiiapvi acular policy of patience (crsistence It is not solely on us, huwvvci that the burden rests. The colonial peoples themselves, mu*i play their full part, as the Klnc. uggestd in bin Colonial Month inaugural speech last year "Proand gross depends upon a true asju of partnership between all secThey seem to forget Uiat the lions of society, rulers and (wed, ,'okonlal Empire consists of couneach giving of his best to the comae* which possess uidigenous man weal; and I look eonlWienih •aces. The Dominions art domto the traditional rulers and chtcts iiuma mmply because their inand also to the pohlie.il leaders .abitant* are 'chips off the old and representative bodies to prodock', but the inhabitant* of Uie mote co-operation in their v.u %  olooies arc, strictly speaking, ous spheres, and so set their foci* foreigners'. That is why it will against faction and the Bowing oi such a triumph when these distrust." peoples can achieve a state of What better formula Uwn Ml .clf-govcmmcnt; and that is also can there be for the ruturc or UH .vhy Jintain should strain every Colonial Empire? But there arc mags as the Kings last nerve to solve their problems, and disturbances and agitations should not foster feelings of shame ai our colonial record. We in Eng.uid should realise that our colniial pcopleii are only now reapUie first fruits of Weste, not The establishment oi and colleges has done make him aware oi himnd his responsibilities, and is rapidly discouraging Uul tendency to laziness, so characteriti. of the CanblR-.itnegro The need for COHIrUCUvo leadwshtl is particularly urgent.' at th* present time. The common mar is no longer content with his lot. Dd a plac I.. :iie arorld "tier than that accoidexl lo Hie 'COiOUrad' man. But in this respect gre.it hopes |it in the future. iur Mr llustamante seems lo be Hi. righl man 'or the job. If the West Indian Universiry ran profjuce men like him, thcr .i poUflcal future for these islands Is assured Some year> sport stated •nat futu' lh Caribbean should be directed toward: federation. Mr Bustamante, as 'a leader of Ihe people' appears rt? he anal] on the way lo bringing. I his about ...I that the West Indies have found | Usidai i" I'nstamai. te (and for that matter, an oppo • iiion in Mi Mauley) Is i promising sign of polhlcal progress, but we must not los* right of the fact that the island are still Crown Colonies, and tha' therefore "we in England have duly towards Ihem. namely thi UUk Of futuie ilevelopnieot lln m a tackling this duty, am' whal is more impoitant. how are KM West Indies responding' AM praaaat atatc of aitairs is | | %  he. aus. of the inaileqiale training of civil A. in the case of colonial poll 1 % %  in nanei f.ii loo ntady •• lielief that the mere fact that the British colonial civil servant, hns reoiivod I fif govemmcni thai attractive in Communist ImperialColonial workers be carefully and will not appease it. or selected. The only justification for for It is upon the people Jiriy chance of iiKhan must have trust in the individual British official That why the future lies so distinctly fa) the careful selection of every colonial civil servant, for these it have a tremendous task ahead the extreme diversity of th' lountries from which these re t^c5m£FSi*m£ .mt'dcaUng '-" particularly interesting, as of them. It Is up to them to SSb InSas and Burmas. which niany islands m U* group may rcvohitionise U;e exisUng method. ... %  nl .Uvdv adv.n.ed tvillsaLv ** ld *" "* '" l railslllonil1 •' British Colonial Admmistrast*U>. in so far as they stand be ban, which are sadly out of dale. twecn the extremes of advanced' 'Ihe tune has come now for BritUons Our present colonies are D0t Each colony and group of colonies has Its nvn climate rrops. history peopl which need their own special plan, not sonic generalised 'colonial' plan. But the main obstacle to th K h ., lu and 'primitive' being nearer the am lo look upon the West Indians hiviiirv iieonlc farmer Ihan the latter. They thus not as children, but as equals represent those peoples who have They can stand on their own feet progressed through the establishnow, ami it Is time the Colonial men! of law and order, comOffice raahaad it This docs not niim.iiiohs and rudimentary mean however, that the time Is i-anid devcloiinicnt of the colonies •'" clt services, lo a measure or ripe for self-governinentr, hw in MS wneral backward'"'" ,l •gg^ w,th c l>eoP 1 ^ "' %  '' "> *• Caribbean wili ind isolation ivhich most a began anything that can be died development. Think of the italic Isolation of Ihe Pacific uilklu > alvW N S*vsl0iV ' ,hr Weslc'rn world and are show, for Uu-re is a great differmcnl w" ire looking -head lo^i "".m.s to translate this socia cr.ee ,„ stardlng on ones feet and point of dcsUnaUon. But do we Wfjgg JJf P" Uc81 "'£ ,, WM( ._ xumelenllv rememher the noint of '1 unllt y * wt From the West Indian point of departure* Do we realise the Tne,r lu,ure howvcr l,kr **.} v w ,h fu '""" " with the 2 '' of .-.vnrtv ^anoranci f *• c ^ nnM Empire In general, nuddle claws. Given a collabu of poverty, ignoranc |i#| (inly throu((h Ih)i so)V|na pf 0fUtlon bl lft mi heni Bnd ^, ir arkable friends in Engiand, progress Indeed. \Viwards the building-up of a mass 'diversity' is Ihe keynote of West political movement, of which they Indian life. To lake an will become the leaders, should example:— Both Barbados and be steady and secure Ohhta .' islands, think of the misery or n,,,,,., Guiana ara in the West cleavage bi-twecn Ihe two Hides, the West Indies' slave population | iK |, on group, but consider the bcwevor, Ihe result can only be at the time of the emancipation to ntrasT Barbados is a compact, ene of two alternatives: political and think of the low-subsistencecrowded, highly cultivated little deadlock and social decadence, or level of the average African tribe Island, with %  large relatively open violence eventually leading Yet to-day we see roads, railcoiid population of African ancesto civil war. If their leaders are ways, schools, bicycles, clothes iiy, and an historical beginning as uccrmincd to appeal over the native Journalists, doctors and „ British settlement. Half of heads of the Butish reprcsentaUtwyan, and hear most impresBritish Guiana's population is t.ves. through the ballot-box and sive siecchcs from African poliEast' Indian; It Is not an island universal suffrage, men there canlicians. What changes! But how but part of u continent, and began not be a long or useful future superficial! Can we Ignore lh" aj a Dutch colony. It has large phaad Of the British West Indies, other side of Westerni*aUon? For rivers, a vasl virgin hinterland hut given full co-operation on often the new influences we have and the special problems set by L >Ih side-, than Will be no need brought break up the close-knit I* dangerously low coast for the like of Bustamante to families and tribes too quickly These are only two territories ignore British officials, and the and the people have not been able Vaken from an area of 2.500,000 two parties can move forward lorn time to absorb a new religion, syuare miles, but they serve to geUwr to ihe future. or build up new bonds and loyalshow that each colony could be. The question of the moment •w incentives to work. *d lo a large cxU-nt Is. sufficient C.MI b,reduced ti> one central Hence alongside the sueees-sfiil i 1 1 0 ,! lf S,uh bel "( lho ,; ''' %  P"bIora. Ihtt Of COOfldOtWO, WhiOB daplation one tlnds n-stlessness. we can now see Ute_ dimcultiea U the very cement whlcfa hind disruption, dreadful slums, and hH *! •* %  Oil NEWS FROM TEXAS * mm HIIBH TULSA, OKLA FROM any point in this oil capital uf the world, one can look across to the low lying, green hills of the Osage. boundary f the Kingdum wherein once dwelt the richest per capita c,mniunity in the world the Usage Indians. , ,. Th I % % %  < %  are still there, but the oil which once poured for many years an average income of $8,000 lo $12,000 annually into their laps, has sluwed to a trickle. In 1949, the incume from oil had dropped to a measly $1,200 and will probably not go much, if any, above that in 11*50. The Usages no longer throw away their old diamonds when they get dirty or buy a new car every ihree months. — . In the last four decades, the Usages have Mao catapulted from rags to riches to pseudoAnd now there are plans under way -hat may once again elevate the %  mall trig .o comparative riches, although the high. Aide and handsome days of the mid twenties nay never return. Geologists aftimata that there is still as much "black Gold" beneath the surface oi Jsage County as has already gushed irom Us subterranean recesses. The problem is how .o bring it to the surface, now that the easy .ream has been skimmed from the pool. The mall is one of the most interesting reolofiicaJ experiments in the United States. A group of old wells in the Osage is being .luoded with water in hope it will lorce to the iurface the vast reserve of oil which scientist. say is still locked in the earth. With the blessing of ihe Osage tribal council, a group of oil companies has combined jnder the name of the North Burbank Unii Jperators to ltnance, design and construct -his first large scale watertlood installation .vhich mav not only revive the Osage wells JJI point the way to new activities in other .ldtields. The operators have set a mammoth task lor %  icinsoh-es. It embraces a 20-to-30 year projramme of recovery and conservation in the Jsage fields, if the pilot or test water-Mood is tuccessfui. Paul S. Hedriek. oil editor of the lulsa Daily World for 28 years and one of the oil experts of the southwest, believes that waterflood operations in the north Burbank District of Osage County alone will recover a minimum of 140,000.000 barrels of oil in a world powered by gasoline and hungry for petroleum. After large scale operation gets under way .n this district, production should increase from the present 4.400 barrels per day to 20,000 barrels, which means a substantial mrease in oil payments to the Indians. Another method, known as "hydrofxac", also is being used to tap oil reserves in old wells. In the hydrofrac method, gasoline is reduced to a putty substance and forced under terrific pressure into the sandstone. This pressure cracks the strata, but neither burns nor tires the oil deposits. A chemical is then introduced that dissolves the "gel", as the gasoline solution is called, leaving behind sand particles that serve as "propping agents" to keep open minute cracks and allow the oil to escape. Between these two methods, the Osage may again be in for a time of plenty and prosperity. But even though his income in recent years is but a fraction of tha thousands he received in the good old days, he is still probably the richest Indian in the United States. All the mineral rights beneath the surface .f Osage County belongs to the tribe as whole. The Osage may sell his surface land in Osage County but the mineral rights, through action of the Great White Father in Washington, are entailed in perpetuity to the tribe as a whole. The Osage. desperate for cash, can sell his "head rights" or his share in the mineral returns, lo an outsider. But he may sell only with the consent of Uncle Sam. Head rights are quoted by local banks in exactly the same way that Union Underwear, pfd., is quoted on the' New York stock exchange. To-day's quotation places a price of from $14,000 to $15,000 on a head right, providing Uncle Sam approves the sale. There are only 2.229 such head rights, as established by the Government in 1906. (Osages born after that date are still known as "The Too Late Osages.") There is no reason to believe that a head light, DOW priced at $15,000 will not yield indefinitely an income of at least $1,200 per annum. And it may be three, four, five or %  Veil all limes that much if the hydrofrac and water-flood programmes pan out as expected Or, if the pale face can't get Uncle Sam's permission to buy a head right from an Usage, he can always marry an Osage belle with a head right in her dowry. That's the way some of Tulsa's richest citizens once got their start in the oil business—INS. D. v. scorr TO-DAY'S SPECIALS, ca LTD. at the COLONNADE Tins lleini Vegetable SALAD with Mayonnaise 48 44 Tins OVAI/TINi: (large) 1.24 1.0k Hollies—JH I ItIVS BtBI 2 2(1 WE OFFER VKGETABLK (iARIUN M \M HI %  OH '." and V IIO.-i; IIIIIM.s v M1NIIKKS IV All ltl\<. IMH'S OARHKN lltmVIJ N TRlNtlRS WILKINSON & IIAVNES CO. LTD.—Successors (u pitiful demoralisation of the rribesman-turned-pruletarlat. Th" hreak-up of the tribal system In Africa, and the racial division : Kant Afrira and Malaya tend to bean Colonies UH one. under ill heading "British West whereas in reality, Jamaica Jamaica, Antiw.t is Antii;u;i. ami innser reronnise their hereditary loaders, and because of their isi— noranea, loyalty to the Empire is beyond their cOUoapUOB Thus ii is the physical and political backgrounds of the*<* peoples which we must know and understand Without this understanding we cannot posslbl> Miei tf-1 in this polii-y of 'colonial development'. England has solid interests in the colonies—economic and strategic—It would help the practically ... iloniis if we defined Ihem. and must be ::.;ld In England are Ihe fabric ef society toMhar. In UKtomod to think of our Carlb(OrHMI dan it \v.i> said thBt the Wist lr.ii.,:, got along well Indies." enough, basing his faith in the goodness of Queen Victoria. This simple faith was succeeded by a fain in the British tnipire; this In turn is dissolving, and what Is to replace il? T.ie uawtr |l Uh In himself as a West Indian; tlon of rtie slave* "freed a race 1 lit failed lo creale n society The West Indies are suffering from the development of this faith may that today, and It is the aim of be slow — no matter when •vary legislator and social worker a man gains self-confidence the to construct a West Indian way of rest of the v .iv !< %  easy life Whan such exists, then can w proceed lo a political future tor our Caribbean brethren but ol what am Is poUtfcal equal it v when the simplest form of social life — \he Christian family — Is i-existetit? Here it however, that tie not pretended we had all to give BiandOUl profraai in social w ( -land nothing to get We have lalc has been made. Thr people other, less material interests; we p.ive been taughl to bu.ld proper want lo turn wards into friends, ^mitarv houses, and to make use who will stay with us when they ot welfare institutions. Scientific arc free to go away; we want to i^cuUUra ha been encouraged Hiiaad In the world the ide.is \& tnaura that the i>puiaiion i* whn-h we believe make freedom adequately nourished, and educaand paaot, Our success for a futan i>erhsps the most lure m the Colonial Empire deImportant factor — has startetl pends upon our ability lo male t altar the We*,' Indian's outlook. the colonial people believe that for .tltcred it must ba Th* our interests arc their Intertatt, estabuahmanl i d i West [mUan anil that they ran bent ba Rained lulture In which the ordinary man %  ily partnership with us. ran 'rest' and of which the Watt I In the future we musl foster the Indian peoples can be proud (same family spirit in the colonies, do BOffsj BM .oiyihing else to hi the Dominions; and i.mnve feelings of inferiority I who can do this better than the from which the avajaaa ffaat .British public'. Indian suffers, by virtue nf Hi Which K ... 1 For The Future'.' By wa\ of conclusio:i it cm be said chat ,i definite future for cur is assured only l>> %  i n mne nf |>i licj mi the part ol < ur atlnmustrators: the art OJ showing true friendliness should be encouraged in British officials, who hitherto have tended to be cold and aloof. Just recently Il::. i appeared In "The Croi Colonist" condemning what termed 'official snobbery' In the This is an important point for how can we expect our %  FhOW ourselves OpeB tfl I The whole range of ptob i oni i i teented to the colonial .ouiun^i the British peopl %  like, musV be .ipproached with the idea of social, and ultimately equaUty tumly in nund to The proi-ess of le-thinking and ir-educ.ition must proceed unUl •lea of personal equality • tassir 7 Grvy lit an! Cricketer* To the Xdttor, the Advocate SIR.—In days like these we are looking for new talent In order that the present high standard ol cricket in Barbados and the British West Indies mty ba inauv.alned. and this talenl can only be found amongst youngsters. Why then are there so many "has boens" In:luded in local elevens who feel that through espect they should be given a major part In th< game and thus have a chance lo display then UOta worn-out ability av the expense of the younger players? We do need the guidance of these more experienced veterans of the game bu* in the manner in which this is at present being given. It is a shame that these decrepi,' old men wilh le eye on the cemetery gate do not realize the harm that they are doing to cricket as a whole. Tinume hat come when we should all join logotber HW rIl these unre.tollable bald-patcd grey-beard* Inside the pavilion where the) belong. YOUNGSTER Don't Wmitl Shoot To ihe Editor, ihe Advocate SIR.—As the shooting season U Just starting. H is a lilting time to mention one aspect of It. We have good shots in Barbados who would acorn lo murder birds on the ground. But alas! some te increase the score of their swamp do kill sitting birds If all score books were torn up this eU would be greaUy mlegated. The sportsman would soon And that bringing off a left and right shot at birds on the wing give him a greatar sense of ; kill and pleasure than he will ever get by murder, it.g twenty on the uround Try It. Givsj the birds a chance. Pit your skill against their guile and ii can win. Remember the story : and the Foreigner? As Ihe edge ol the wood a cock pheasant emerged and began walking away. The man raised his gun The shocked keeper cried "Oh you wouldn't shoot him now, Sir." "Ah no", said the man "I'll wait till he stop* ! |"Do net be among those who waif tltl he stops E, C JACKMAN. August 1, 1950. eJHP Pf?D VALUES FOR THE BANK-HOLIDAY t non % %  IIIIISKS : KLAVOl'R.S J to %  UMIXIIII %  III VII imwt IHIIM 3" ; U 4 lbk. rarh — l.0l prr lh. Ill'] I'l It — m v.. (WANS UK IENNENTS BEER GUINNESS' STOUI. 3 YEAR OLD I.OI l IIHAIII III >l TRY BOTTLE. MK.tr UKfT. H.linils llil.k.n. In,k. vmukrd Ki|.|"rSmokrd lillft Ol llicldu k 4 ilihjKr 30r. per lh. !" si <.4llll\|||s i tan