Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Saturday
July 29
1950



+







REDS USE UNDERGROUND FORCES

Russian Takes Chair
In Security Council

‘ LONDON, July 28.
HE NEWS that Jacob Malik, Russian delegate to the
United Nations, would take over the Presidency of the
Security Council next month was splashed in late editions
of this morning’s London papers.
Huge banner headlines eloquently proclaimed the im-
portance which is attached to this development.
Some of these headlines were as follows: |
Daily Express: “Russia Returns to UNO. Malik Phones:
I am in the Chair. Veto on New Korea Moves?”

Daily Graphie: “Soviet Union Drops United Nations
Bombshell”.

Daily Herald:

|



“Russia Surprise United Nations’ Move.” |
News Chronicle : “Russia Returning to Security Council.
Malik ends Boycott and Takes the Chair.”

The Communist Daily Worker carried the words “Rus- |
sians Back in the United Nations”, across its front page. |
Photographs of Malik appeared in seyeral papers |
THE ITALIAN Foreign Minister,”

Count Carlo Sforza said

“I learned with pleasure
Soviet decision

; ;
; Will help or hinder in clearing up
the| Some of the outstanding Inter-
the | National questions.”

to return to 7 ea
Security Council because [ am The British view still was that
deeply convinced that at the | the questions of aggression in |

origin of all foolish and criminal ple A seer eee

18 YEARS AGO.

# is



SATURDAY, EIGHTEEN YEARS AGO, Captain Michael Cipriani
way of the Rockley Golf and Country Club. The two pictures show
the left Mr. Jack Skinner can be seen standing near the ‘plane. ‘ec Story o age 4



Bells Mark | Security Council Debates

“Campaign
For Freedom”

CHICAGO, July 28
Drawings of bells scrawled on





ici : Nations were “ ne ‘
decisions re . ' walls will mark the “Resistance
are sees titanate a} | two distinct and separate matters. Campaigh to onmtinteeee to be
standings, ke eee He reiterated that Britain would opened in the “Iron Curtain”
The Sov oti weainiae abstain from voting on the Chin- | .ountries, Gen Lucius D. Clay,
€ Soviet action I especially) ese question until it was clear former United States Military
appreciated because it recogmises : ir

— that there would be the necessary
implicitly the importance yi the majority in favour of Communist |;
United Nations Assembly and the]China replacing the Nationalist

services which it gives | Representation,
The Communist Leader Palmiro |

Togliati said that this shows once

more that the Soviet policy is con- {to return to the Security Council |:
by

sistently in defence of peace ‘was considerec

Zi. abl pM -

Decisive Factor |

Gueissepe Vittorio, General
Secretary of a 5,000,000 member
Italian General Confederation of |
Labour said “Any attempt to solve |
the crisis of the United Nations |
Assembly which dominates the |
International situation may be the!
decisive factor for a general easing

diplomatic ob- |}
\ 1

Y
ti





Governor

the huge ten-ton
» IN MOSCOW, xussia’s decision |”

giving
for

in Berlin, announced
‘ere. ‘

The campaign will begin when
“Freedom Bell”
rung in Berlin

The eight-foot bell inscribed
‘That this world under God shall
lave a new birth of Freedom” was
t yvesterda

y jn Croydon, Eng-|

ena |

Gen. Clay said it would be per-

nanently hung in a specially dedi- |

‘ated shrine as a tribute to those
their lives in the struggle
human freedom

The first peal would be carried
»y radio to all free peoples of the
rth, he continued. Simultane-
vusly bells would ring out all over

of tension. | the United States church hells,

This would almost automatically city hall bells and school bells.
determine a political easing of Bells would also peal throughout
tension inside various countries,, Western Europe, announcing the

especially in Italy,

“The Christian Democrat Mem-
ber of the Italian Parliamentary
Foreign Commissicy, Giuseppe
Bettiol, described the decision as
“perplexing”. In any case Russia
shows by her decision that she is

1



‘Freedom Crusade” for which the
el! would be the symbol.

Gen. Clav said it was vitally
mportant “for America to step
ip its campaign of truth to blast

false Communist propaganda that
Ameries started the Korean War.

ae and that this country was a nation
MAN IN THE GLARE of imperialist



not ready for a Third World War.” warmongers out to
ia’ conquer the world.”—Reuter.
THE BRITISH F OR E 1G N Russia's Malik,
OFFICE today looked with sus-|seryers toni en 2an%
picious eyes at Russia’s sudden S tonight as a partial re-

Sponse to the Indian and British
approaches to the Soviet Govern-
ment since the Korean War.
Observers noted that the move
followed Marshal Stalin’s reply to

decision to return to the United
Nations’ Security Council.

The Department’s Official spokes-
man told newsmen that before any







12 Atlantic Pact
Nations Hasten



Gipsy Moth, the “Humming Bird” landed in Barbados on the fair-

Costa Rica
Answers

U.N. Appeal

On Korean Situation

LAKE SUCCESS, July
The Security Council with the Soviet member absent met
today to debate the first report made by General Douglas
MacArthur's headquarters on the Korean wat
Jacob Malik, the Soviet delegate

28

continues h boyeot



for each pound.

These apples were part of a goo
supply which arrived from Aus
tralia on Thursday under cok
storage on the S.S. City of Dieppe
This ship was still discharging
eases of apples yesterday

ielaying action Korean
He was confident that this phas«
was ending, that lines would be 1
| Stabilised and the invading forces |
\inay' back from the territor) |
|

|

'

Republic

; 4 it the disposal of the Security
until the end of the month Council “adequate sites for air or
Sir GladwynvJebb of Britain, commenting on the decision] sea bases and places suitable for
by which land, sea, and air forces were deployed said “It is] the establishment of small naval
less than five weeks since North Korean forces crossed th ee an troop quarters oO
‘ ; : ation
38th parallel. In that time large forces have been tran
ported into battle.” Mr. Kicardo Toledo, Under

Jebb added, “This is out- | Secretary of Costa Rica’s Foreign

r standing achievement and | doub,| Affairs Department, also told the
. > 9 At rether it has often been su:-}| United Nations Secretary-Genera!
emocra Ss passed. The scale of the Nort).| Mr. Trygve Lie that his Govern-

4 Cc Korean attack offers the final proo. | Ment wa cues to send volun
Q t ] Ik hat.we had to deal with a system-| ‘CC's for preliminary training in
ents a ID. | act of aggression for which| te Unitea States “in order to

ensure that they will not run

preparations must have been made] |.” “ \ it Ngati t

After breakfast hour yesterda,, for thonths if not for vedi reater ri ks if they are sent te
housewives crowded Messrs att fue ot the” ‘awerdeno the front, than those liable to be

N. Goddard & Sons Grocery t©}jmagine that his initial succe eed by practised troops

a Toa — apples that Wer | wil! do anything but render more} Colombia also replied to the

- doh eg it 2 Wveieeniehh certain his ultimate defeat secretary -General’s appeal for

; ea — uy 43 ; SreS bey Sir Gladwyn said that America| sid and announced its readines

ae aaa ary ae om aie ao" sani. | orces had fought the most difficul, | to negetiate with the unified com-

tralia, and were paying cents) of all military operations, namely |imand about assistance © for
|"
4]

answers to Mr. Lie’s appeal.

they had overrun

Spirit of Sacrifice | pie ° :
Jean Chauvel of France express- | Trade Union



If sufficient refrigerated cary
5 Sar - ; 6 ©
es age sr erect a. ed his country’s appreciation fo:
Oa Saag ane Zealand lines will | the decisive and determined way
bl i i lar calls here, the Chief ;!2, Which Unified Command haa
Officer of the S.S. City’ of Dieppe | taken the difficult situation in|
« . vesterday ' hand
torThe City of Dieppe tae refrig- | The heroism and spirit of sacri-
eration accommodation for 800/fices of the forces are admired -by
tons of cargo and a net tonnage the whole world, he said
f 4,850 tons Nothing was more difficult for |
of 4,850 tons |



Over Korea

the new troops than to fight delay- |} vt



the ‘plone surrounded by a huge crowd of people, In the picture on





LAKE SUCCESS, July 28
Costa Rica today informed the
United Nations that it was placing

the
|

| STUTTGART, American Zone.
July 28
Two British Trade Union teade:
lushed today at a Conference ner



The two Latin American replies
| brought to 29 the total number of

—Reuter

Leaders Squabble

‘American Troops
Fired On From
Prepared Posts

By DEREK PEARCEY
With the American Forces on the South Coast of
KOREA, July 28.
AMERICAN TROOPS on the south coast of

Korea are finding evidence that North Koreans
prepared their invasion long in advance.

During the battle for Hadong, 75 miles west
of Pusan yesterday, Communists used concrete
machine-gun emplacements. Northerners in an-
other area fired on Allied troops from deep holes
in hills without natural cover.

Intelligence Officers have noted other positions
previously prepared by North Koreans on high
ground at strategic points.

As soon as North Koreans entered an area they went
straight to these positions and poured heavy fire on the
Americans from cover.

American Intelligence Authorities assumed that since
the withdrawal of United States troops from Korea at the
end of the occupation, underground forees began prepar-
ing invasion smuggling in and storing arms caches through-
out the country, + '

rat this
of how
oO penetrate
only the
pelume and
attack laver with plenti-
tie ind armys
United States Eighth Army
to-night reported
is very little action

hes idl explained
infiltrators
American

inNocent
yet were

the riddle

G.I’s Reach ‘fh :
U.S. Lines
In Safety



rrying

able t
ful amin

Ihe
Headquarter

there



today the entire Korean

By LIONEL HUDSON front
(WITH THE AMERICAN In the centre the 25th Infantry
FRONTLINE TROOPS) Division lost a little greund but

was organising tor
A company American troopy , k to establish it
cut off for several days by 4) °o™MmMunique said
North Korean flanking movemed® American casualties in Korean
outh of Yongdong in the central fighting total 904 to date, the
ector regained their own lines United States Defence Depart-
ist night (July 27) after ment announced,
ruelling 40 mile mareh through! | They include 76 killed, 8 died
rugged mountains from wounds, 269 wounded, 79

a counter at-

SORBA, , 28 :
KOREA, July position, the

of



“Ammunition was low and we bossa and 472 missing in
; had no food at all, but the mer action. as
were great,” said Captain Terr The “wounded” are those
Field from Arkatisas hurt in combat; the “injured

those hurt in accidents,




“We had supplies dropped bs The latest casualty list was
air on one day and had a hi contirmed yesterday.
feast but the men took care “ki Pyongyany Radio claimed to-
save some of their food for {he ight that the North Koreans had
wourded, in their stee| helm ccupiec Hamyang, 62 miles south
well as in vVneirt canteens’

of Teung
The Communist troops who took
Hamyang, the Radio added, were

Enemy patrols were avoided be-
cause men were weak from lagk
of food and water

the same who earlier captured

Today a roll cal] showed that Namjon, about 25 miles south
of 215 officers and men 4 were west of Hamyang

killed and more missing Pyonghang Radio also claimed











, tne International ‘Transpor, The Americans, mostly young- that an American Superfortress
oe back could be wer kare the letter from Pandit Nehru in Defence Measures Ships of this line call here very ing action, He thought that world | Workers Federation after one saio | sters withouv previous experience forcelanded on Taejon airfield on
to the Soviet Union it wou d have which the Indian Pri “ Minister aval This was the first cal! for Public opinion had done less than, ne would not vote on a motior., weked through the country thick Phu; sday The crew was captured
to be seen whether she intended urged steps to ene th re Minister LONDON, July 28. Sal mi of Die pe justice to the problems of supply Catling for full support for tne} with Communist patrols and vic Pyongyang, the North Korean
to co-operate with or obstruct the | a the conflict, Representatives of the twelve the Vie, 5 i Pi liy discharge ng substantial equipment and)Unitead Nations over Korea | blocks capital, was “flercely bombarded
Council’s workings. , es Atlantic Pact Nations tonight un-] ‘These ships usually dischars, troops \rthur Deakin, General Secre v American aircraft on Thursday

When asked if the Security ‘They also linked the decision ‘ ate a roval of dis-] cold storage cargo at Trinidad ee 7 : fox é amete SAOINESL | They had three meals in four, &” / SIS CRAEY Oils ‘ad
Council could repeal its resolu-|With the talks between British nounced their approval of un at be transhipped to Barbados. 1 Dr. Tsiang, Nationalist China,|(ary of the Transport and Genera | dove and yesterday,” the Radio added
. ee ma. . . se rec e L signedy Pe he r ss { Si é Dé ress i fi rs spet avout Thei ' — *
tions on Korea if the Russians |Ambassador Sir David Kelly and fo accolbthts tiaiinee pesdihonâ„¢. reason is that orders for Barba ie a 7. te rae eae Wetears vole neenng ss ee Their battalion holding th Ly. _Revter:
forced the issue, the spokesman |Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Meeting here as North Atlantic] are not so big. ; iia a ee ' tt % S wry a 14 of the motion, challenged James} jine on the road five miles south sey
said that he thought it would be | Andrei Gromyko, ben sepunle, they. declared The officers are all British wh'le| ikely i € t! ne 7 nas we ms Higgins, Secretary of the National! west of Yongdong, was ordered N RASHES
cifieult for them to project their] The view here was that, though | after a week's discussions that ans the crew are from Alaska today A profound y if ae ott UAlon Railwaymen, when . the} on Monday to smash through the) P.A.A, PLANE C
veto power into the past, especial- the Soviet decision was’ a new “unprovoked act of aggression in about when and where the nextliatter said that his delegation] yuad block cutting it off {rom 10 DE JANEIRO. July 28
ly since they had not been repre- step towards the negotiation of a|Korea makes it of more impor- blow will fall”, Dr, Tsiang added | would abstain from voting because | Yongdong All except thgii A be \ erican Constellation
se e ti ions t . - y : : at Nor rean § ‘rs were j ate s » “ neve a ane bicd ’an Americé Jo a
sé Py = eae 28 sg fecisions. | peaceful settlement in Korea, much |tance than ever for the Govern- Ambon Isolated asia cane soe babe id = no mandate from its mem-| company broke through liane crashed at Sao Leopoldo,
ut he adde a is was |cepend > nature sj rents > lantic } Pana ont rs ; ek wlave wgiewa't aan ‘to. Alegre, Brazil to-ds
speaking unofficially because he }qcboqe 4,0", the nature of thejiments of the North Atla te JAKARTA, July 28 possible because of the enslave-| Figgins said that his Union’s| Four of eleven Americar, tank) Agex Jeaeio. Alegre. ease Sony
; : jagenda M. Jakob Malik would|freaty countries t accelera | } ‘ got through The other seven’ with 43 passengers and seven cre
had not yet had time to look into | propose at Lake Success |the steps necessary to assure theiry ‘The insurgent-held Island of} ment of the minds of people/annual conference just concluded ware Dedeed dows oF inet tolr| ctcucd ihe Hints fee Sane hie
the full implications of Russia's | F or common defence”. Amben:has been economically and] within the Iron Curtain lhad not discussed Korea. Hi Freatle om had to be destroyed. |on @ routine trip to Porto Alegre
return. | EGYPT'S FOREIGN MINISTER The deputies also recognised| militarily isolated for security! Sir Benegal Naru of India made | mphasised that he wanted the . i. —Retuter —Reuter.
B e 9 Re |Mohamed Salah E] Din Bey, told|“the need for maintaining and reasons, Col. Tasya of the Indo-; an appeal to North Korea ee oetion abstention to be officially
ritain’s egret reporters tonight that Egypt would | safeguarding economic epconstrun. nesian General Staff declared to-; at thie stage to scontply with the |rssorded. .
: : 1g. /NOt change her attitude regarding | tion and stability in the North] day ae , Security Council’s resolution t oursquare
i yen foci, we eeckee- ‘Communist China, even if Russia | Atlantic area”. 2 Amban is now the oy y islthel withdraw to the 38th parallel | The British Natlonal Council of \
i bx ie bon 44 a ane Their Chairman, Charles Spof-|jeft to itself. The Republic is ? and save their country muc! abo whict epresented the (i!
sed ret when the Russians |taised the question in the Secgrity : he I ur which reg
i press reg’ , ~ Odie : ; -¢|{ord (United States), said the! only remaining obstacle to the needless suffering ade Unic me f the $i}
i walked out of the Security Coun-:Council when it meets next deputies had achieved “tangible ication of the major part of ‘rade Union movement of the \
cil, “It will be necessary to wait /rionths under the chairmanship of santa? with ee a follow hey a cece Dutch East Indies Home Defence Labour Party and the Cooperative {}!
before it becomes apparent ee Jacob Malik. will meet again next Tuesday for under a single ian com- Sir Benegal explained at the|!evement had said in no uncer- }))
Whether this new step of Russia —Reuter. { ments, able to provide forces to assist wile tienie 2 atts re ea in
ts Spofford declined to comment South Korea. He said the whole orda ageress
"AR SCARE S ELEPS when asked whether the deputies structure of her armed forces was | eee lees Bik Ae
W * ; W \bad discussed or would discuss the POCKET CARTOON designed for home defence fs :
j aci j : |ference should adopt the resolu
question of replacing German in- by OSBERT ACTER “Our internal needs at present | {erence ‘ ,
GEORGETOWN lustry within the overall plans z new LANCASTER ive such that we cannot affor+ ye pod yo ss fo erties
for the North Atlantic vars 2 to send any portion of our force . a Sear os Nine ohnanid
—Keuter. remote areas out of India.|® ® © 5 ae
GEORGETOWN, July 26. There the all greater reason de Steerer eet
reor s al ; i a. . h 2 j therefore why I should like t Cominghy mM fe a
Georgetown was almost thrown into a state of frenzy yes- iS. Uses India ljoin in the tributes paid to the|#¢neral principle of the resolution
\ terday afternoon as truck loads of Military and olice | men of ali countries who are giving 7 fp iniar aie wet ane
‘ turned out without any intimation by Press or Radio, As Go-Between their lives to enforce the decisions, Which included fo a
f dashing along city streets, depositing armed men in full lof this Couneil. | ecebeslinss.7 Mean: tage “Stamm
: . ‘ , 28 | ee pLcearl, « .
fi battle dress—steel-helmeted and with rifles with bayonets us por pone ey ei Bi ciurpaditiiente ‘atone B0tiad bec | dnlbuasee clay GEaeeaeae facae eer,
; fixed, at strategic positions. . ; See a Security Council into an wnpre-|ing and criticised the resolution
r ; a new move, using India as ar e y
Telephones buzzed till late in intermediar es feassure Com- ecde:.ted role, in fact, we ar The Swedish delegation stated
z - jthe evening, as worried George- muhist Daria that the United | functioning at the present moment] that only its railway member
towners, with the war in Korea] > Aine most like ¢ i ‘ouncil” vere opposing the resolution
e us ace Ost i i i States had no territorial ambi iim like a War ( pposing
uppermost in their minds, sought ¥ * nh Dr. Antonio of Ecuador paic The Finnish leader, opposing
| confi ' tions in Formosa, usually well
F e | confirmation to rumours that be- nformed officials said to-da) tribute to the promptness with|the resolution said “We in Finlan¢
ederation | gan oe SOUnGS that Russia had |° The United States has a> sai} which the United States and Untted | regard this resolution as a hostile
oer war on the Western Basandor SH the Chlneae (Commu- Nations had acted in the first|demonstration against the Soviet
- | aes 7 Short time aes nists’ capital, and officials ex- instance in stopping aggression. | Union, with whom Finland has
a Ss omes | Sathered at every corner, while sali P ; , as k He expressed confidence thal|friendly relations.”
parents ran around seeking here|plained that the new move by r Stata aide ‘ . ,
. ‘ , : at- talks between the United States He added that the -Unitec
and there for their children just] the State Department was an a # ; oe Watlons bad ndteodhed the Savile \
PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 28. | out of school. tempt to make certain that the Would it be better to start | and other states would provide] Nations had not accused the S
The Trinidad Legislature after a President’s message reached it Sa tor ree wes @ proud further avenues of collaboration|Union as this resolution did, of
whole day sitting today adjourned But all the excitement was final destination. ” eep fh to the eens? or for the United Nations in Korea in aggressive war in Korea.
until Monday on a motion re just an emergency exercise by —(Reuter.) —Reuter. — (Reuter.)
Hon, Dr. Patrick Solomon, whic the military and police for













sought non - acceptance of the internal security reasons. Sienna
Standing Closer Association Com- |
aioe, wacdhestnd Federation of Greatest excitement was created 9 9 e
the British West Indies. outside the four-cornered George- é 6 an ed Oo ri ers Ou
Opposing the motion, the Hon,|fown Prison, where the rumour
Albert Gomes told the House that} was — de big jail break oa
2 Ss ies cannot hope to|occurred. The presence of steel- : moe Ni ss : ait oe ny Ne ‘a
attain Be penal sinrihasnee helmeted police with bayonets BRUSSELS, July 28 ist and former Premier Paul we ong” the first line of which wuauieie dncie tetas tees
without federation. fixed added credence to this re- Strikers shouting “Hang Leo- Spaak called the strike the start \ “q mn with Le ld—the mar tc e thre wing battle at Leaken
He went on: “We swim to-| port. » pola”, poured into Brussels to- of a revolution, and were turned Down with Leopo ae, Seve Se sm .; cree WITH THAT
: gether or sink alone. No matter : night threatening to mareh again back outside the Palace by bqulg hang" ea oF ‘nie ates ~ : as on eg
' how unpalatable it may be for| _ Meanwhile, Police trucks were} on Laeken Palace the home of mounted Gendarmes w ith . ee om Ore urna in Be natel ° & ino
f some of us, we have got to face | dashing around depositing batches! the newly. returned King Leo- drawn spears, and foot-guards 3 a quare at rPubee ” ada aT e he srved a minute’s sil-
j federation. of armed Volunteers and Police pold. armed with rifles. reeling — to get ory t mn “ne orn : a
We must face the fact that) Constables at strategic points like! ~ “But this time’ we will reach One officer said that the police bogged down in a giant traffic anne. ed eet
a territories of this size and these | Government House, Wireless Sta-| the Palace,” shouted miners, iron would have their work cut out | am. sect tr eaders af van ind Tucted
resources can never hope to re-| tion and Cable Office, the Treas-! foundrymen and chemical work- to handle these Southerners from Police and gendarmes close: hou ee se wee at = on 3;
alise dominion status within the|}Ury and Public Buildings, the ers deseribed as “tough guys” by provinces already paralysed by in. ; . arty panoiine aes lat ar
British Commonwealth of Na-! Banks and Post Office and picking the police. the creeping of the strike Shops that had resisted an aken, they shou is

tions, far less realise indepen-|UpD other batches and returning
dence for nationhood in a werld| them to Police Headquarters and

trike call, closed sudden- we

; ; red £ ssels earlier
Fighting O¢ ee ueeels vhistle-blowing strikers

Gare du Nord. Atthis first influx 3russels must be a dead city ly a They were unmoved by official



time

will reach the Palace”. }
}

))






where national s6lidarity is | Military Depot where other exer-| 4 wave of demonstrators from by to-night or to-morrow morn urged into the heart of the capi ieclarations that plants —
essential for economic survival.| cises were going on the French speaking province ing cried dark-haired Madame tal, calling for “abdication A abandoned without eee
, } vat ae eerdgh! > i ; able B ? 2m0 é y > é ar ookeries ¢ furnaces which
Chiefiy because of these con- ia 5 : : .| of Wallonia pledged to grip the Isable Blume. : ‘ em nstrator at d a banp ee re oe gee CENTS )
siderations we must endeavour | rhe HAHOS Ul Vel —— country in a general strike unless ‘ As po a o ari als — ae . and bout a or * yore Se vd 8 = i 0 wee nn Ge FOR \
»)} sou -¢ é a iow Vas é& r 3 a P Stali é Oy il ence ! mer yt Ac & , ‘ | Was ote tile ‘'
to federate as soon as possible.’ o rest peacefull Afiee hove} King Leopold abdicates rom the ation, a Royalis cin of fies Gaull ie tet babes ae TE H}
Gomes moved an amendment,| to rest peacefully. After the show | Long I ie King i 1 ied from in Qn, 1 ) Pt 1K ))
r d an amenc sha Nee dant mment { aaa bh t Prey f atetonne ; thined from Roval tal industries could be got go { }
. + n to accept the| the Command: € I La night thousand fi yped 1 f ‘ ’ aia iat sd ~ - = a
Committee's Report,” "all went well trators led by the Socia : Reuter PS SSSEESISES









PAGE TWO °

eee



astern pienienieeneenteanmremnenetnememmanaeans BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1950
SS __ eS

= : :
anh Calling **" More: Fer The fee Tee | Wome | Bieter ae renee
Guillotine ? 7 —- | a ee a | eo eho

i
Prices in the local market |











i
"i



Even the daintiest housewife |

Niven's Pimpernel Film Waits For The can now take on the muscle-sized | - a ae . gare tor
Verdict From Goldwyn job of laying a new floor. Nertaiine a vs
‘Just introduced on the market, eowanle Apples:
ige kit which, the makers say, | i 40 aa ‘per pound
Hty Harold Conway kes floor tile laying easy. It Mangoes: 3, 4 and 6 cents
contains the necessary equipment each.

a knife; an awl, a spreader for
the adhesive, and cord and chalk
with which to mark guiding lines.

WHAT NEWS of that very Elusive Pimpernel—which Powell and
Pressburger began making for the Korda company over a year ago?
4 hear that the revised version is now ready; and that Sam
Goldwyn will be asked to see it privately before he leaves London. Tiles should be laid close to-



B.B.C. Radio Programme

“fancy my not noticing that thing!

Why Goldwyn? Because he was the cause i ornel’ ' r ; » 4 ] The two little are not satisfied

hold-up. f the Pimpernel’s gether always working from the die eae - a News with their ee but they say Anyone would think it ad appeared
Goldwyn has centre of the room out to the walls-| analysis; 7.15 a.m. Sandy Mack her- | goodbye and decide to meet on the there all of a sudden.” As he stares
an option on Each tile should be lowered care€-| son at the Theatre Organ; 7.30 a.m next afternoon, As Rupert turns to at it he gets more and more puzzled.
the American fully into the adhesive which has| From the Third Programme: © oN" | go home he trips over a strong ‘‘I've never seen a plant like that
rights, but been left to dry until it becomes Frown we, Editorials: 8. 19 om. } ickly plant growing almost undee — before,’’ he thinks. * t's in full leaf,
threate ned sticky so it will not ooze up. eer Weet Indies: 8.20. 2.m. Militar, | is feet and is sent sprawling. while all the trees ar> bare, and—-
one of his “in- When half the floor is completed, | Bend; 8.45 a.m. Colonial Questions | Good gracious!" he gasps. look—the leaves are like stars !

P »gi , j 9 a.m. Close Down; 1045 a
adhesive may be applied on the] | °V0y, shire: 12 noon The News; 12.10 |

other side and the same process} m. News Analysis; 12.15 p.m. New
followed. After a few days, the] Zcaland vs British Isles;
floor must be washed with warm | Jack Salisbury; 12.45 p-m

lude me out”
acts when he
waw the first
completed





—



et
= =
——









re re : Nerthamptonshire; 1 p-r te

version. soapsuds, rinsed with clear water] 3) the Piano S p.m. Radio Newsree 7 ee :

After trans- Si eee: atthe Plang, 115 pm Bade Seve’ |) AGUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
pr gi P ten~ And that, say the instructions} The News; 7.10 pm ea that | MATINEE: TODAY at 5 P.M.

sion between that come with the kit, is all thera | 9°35, p'm. Starlight TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30



Korda and
Goldwyn
David Niven
and Margaret
Leighton were
taken back to
the studios
and put to

)

{

s it.—I.N.S. Sports Review; 4 p.m. The N » | Sy
‘2% " Sports he Dally Service; 4.15. p.ro I} {ACK CARSON — JANIS PAIGE — DON DeFORE

a

Cc Fire for Girl Guides and Gir )
Seouts, 445 Sandy MacPherson at the |} and DORIS DAY
Suck Gum Not Thom [eine oS |) SpoMancp ON THE HIGH SEAS’
Dance with me; 6.30 pm. F ‘ in ¢

BIRMINGHAM, Eng. Third Programme; 7 p.m. The New

All children should chew gum]7 10° p.m News Analysis; 7.15 p.m







— i Commentary, W.I. v Yorkshire, 8 p.m
work oe nut bao i gee and with] (Scio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. Weekly in Technicolor
secon - the mouth closed. Sports Summary, 8.30 p.m. Camp Fire ve
thought This advice was given by] for Girl Guides and Girl Scouts; 8°50 A Warner Bros. Pisture
seenes. > = is € lje-Da p.m. Interlude, 9 p.m Ring up the
Wher Gold English dentist ay ae tio " Curtain, 10 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m 7 eerie -——- _ asieiale
1 Gold- at the British Dental Association's) tyreriude; 10.15 p.m. John O’Groats to SPECIAL MATINEE: THIS MORNING
wyn was annual meeting at Birmingham. Land’s End; 10.45 p.m Orchestral |! at 9.30 o'clock
asked about He said: Records; 11. pm. The Idea of a Uni-
The Elusive “It exercises the jaws and pre-] Vers! }



CHRISTINE LARSON

in “PARTNERS OF THE SUNSET”
A Monogram Picture

Pimpernel at
atm : a Press Con-

ference last

MR. AND MRS. JOHN WISE and their two children left for the week, he
U.S. via Puerto Rico yesterday by B.W.I.A, They are pictured pulled a wry
here on their way to the ’plane : face and re-
torted: “Let's

EAVING yesterday morning Come Here Every Year not talk about

vents the malformation that results
from under-development.”

The dentist cited three causes} THE FIRST ANRSCO
of irregular teeth! Thumb suck-

ing, ewalewing it * tongue COLOR PICTURE TO \ SS
etween the n the same

ma nd ing] COME TO BARBADOS!
through the pm a eo GATETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES



———_— ||
)

} JIMMY WAKELEY — DUB TAYLOR
{
(
(|
(





= ———=— SSS S——-

















‘ by B.W.1.A. for Puerto Rico . in it, shall we?” ‘ ”
- ‘ 4 " . ’ . TAY fis “ suc not | ~ured,
intienell 404s GG. ak ae R AND MRS A. TAYLUW The amended “it coming. oom mt ee P I ; A Z A SAT., SUN, 8.30 p.m, MAT, SUN. 5 p.m.
and Mrs. Johnnie Wise and the and their young daughter —and by now wale alpole-Day, - it is ! Presenting for the first time in Barbados !
two childien, Audrey and Wate arrived yesterday by B.W.1.A costly — pro- . that the child should ag my Vicgintn Mee ree Action. Bit
son, They ‘are going to live in Mr. from Trinidad to spend a holiday duction is due PRBVIEW : PRavid Niven, Margaret Leighton in dummy rather than a thumb. \FO-DAY and Continuing Sian cee eee aortas mmeee

“a Sone “ : Ahn a ; : —I.NS.
Wise’s home state Pennsylvania +2 3arbados. Mrs. Taylor ana for London The Elusive Pimpernel ee Till Sunday 5 & 8.30 p.m. FLAXY MARTIN

and they will ‘ ae their daughter will be here foc showing next
porarily with ae tem- two months, but Mr. Taylor wii month, what- ? Non
li * only be here for one month, ever the Goldwyn verdict about roles in the film version, if it is ;
Johnnie used to be with the They are staying at “Beach America I have not yet seen a made but not the same two. ROYAL (Worthings)
U.S. Army. during the war and House”, St. Lawrence, and come worthless Powell and Pressburger The story is being changed round



\
| Also The Color Shorts “KING OF THE CARNIVAL"
‘ And Buss Bunny in “HARE SPLITTER”
Shorts “KING OF THE CARNIVAL” & “HARE SPLITTER”



































¥ ; acted i i B- ¢ > a bit. TO-DAY and Tomorrow
was statiéned-for a time at Sea- t0 Barbados every year for a picture, and I'll back their judg- culte a Ve .
well Airfort here, and his wife, holiday. Mr. Taylor is wita ment. Even against the es ee ee ay Baye ee hosel Peuae rie as ri
the former Audrey Lashley is a Huggins and Co., in Port-of- Sam himself. Broadway production of the Lons- She. moa
Barbadian, , Spain. Z 3 Why He Idle? dale play. If that timetable is Stanley RIDGES
A keen radio enthusiast, he To Study Engineering ° adhered to, she would have 2 ; Bill HENRY
operated a “Ham” Station under HAVING shortly for the U.K MARGARET LEIGHTON must Tush job in the ae eee - TO-DAY TO TUESDAY 5 and 8.30 P.M.
the call sign of VP6SJ, and he was is Mr, Herbert Grannum, son nearly have forgotten her Leaey But Mr. Lonsdale, who went “FALSE FACES”
familiarly> known as “Stonewall?! Mr. and Mrs. Wiliam H See her fe. FRB ae ahead to New York to arrange and . JOHN FORD'S NEW AND FINEST
Jackson,” by his radio friends ff4rannum of “Ashton”, Garden Pee eo ee ‘ , the production, is due back in : ioger in : We A ag
Quiet and unassuming, John an “ap, Worthing. sence. he beginning of July she London to-day I hear there has Roy ROC Ean eouk” ea PICTURE Oi THE HALL) Ee
his family will be greatly miss« Herbert is going to Scotland to ret ae eu rig The Cocktail been a disagreement between the John Ford ond Merion C. Cooper present
by their wide circle of friends. udy engineering at Mirrlees 7 o 7 wce author and the American manage-
. “Teachers Week” ,atson, an Engineering Company. a eee ete ees ment -about how zhe Way Things EMPIRE a my eum an
‘he course is expected to last for oom k hi ginal “O Should go on Broadway
pany to take up her orig “LES
live years. re
m2 i. role. 4 - 7 30.
RAL, MISELEY, TUCKER Returned With Grandson "Wy is Miss Leishton loving > UH fe wen wemcamsanin
tive in Barbados, left yesterday by FTER two months’ holiday in to ae koa ieneda. is Has CROSSWORD Hal Wallis’ Production . . .
B.W.1.A. for Antigua. From Barbados, Mrs. Ethel Ray . assing new film role . a > ETL.” "
there he will be going to Tortola returned to Trinidad yesterday pag get uae aaa) PAID IN FULL } A MADEED NATWIKK
via St. Thomas. In Tortola he afternoon by B.W.I.A., accom- starring . : Directed by JOHN FORD
will give a series of five lectures panied by her grandson, Stephen “It was arranged at the start of Robert CUMMINGS | ee ee oe por by JAMES WARDEN GELLAM: Seeun Fhoy by PL Sek MURRAY
at their “Teachers’ Week.” Mansfield, who has also been the play that she should appear Lizabeth SCOTT ]]} : aa A ee EG Rea
holidaying here for about three for a limited season,” say the film Diana LYNN ‘

' Extra;
LEON ERROL in
“BACKSTAGE FOLLIES”

} Eve ARDEN
Not Suitable for Children

ROXY

To Join Husband weeks. They were staying with company. “You never know —we
_ Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Ray at might suddenly find a role for
RS. HAZEL DOWNEY white Hall Flats, Hastings. her.







If an actress of Margaret





accompanied by her two eos es 1
daughters Pat and Wendy left For Trinidad Visit Leighton’s calibre steps out of a } British and American Newsreel
yesterday by B.W.I.A._ for ISS PAULINE FITZGERALD, big stage success to sit idle for TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.15 :

LOCAL TALENT AUDITION

| 9.30 a.m, To-morrow



Puerto Rico intransit for the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. weeks, it aaa 2 aE of
U.S.A. She will join her husband Thomas Fitzgerald of “Raffeen”, Planning carried to excess.

there, who left Barbados about Garrison, left for Trinidad on Dridie’s New Look

United Artists Double
Mickey ROONEY





and Continuing
|
|

































one year ago. Thursday afternoon by B.W.1A. Thomas MITCHELL
. Pauline has gone for a holiday, Gpynris JOHNS, another first- in
Arrived Yesterday but may stay on for an indipinite vate Korda contract star, returns avroes “THE BIG WHEEL" | LEO EEE VELVET SLE PLP VP LAA LPP EEA
" Boose period. She will be staying with from stage to screen soon. k. This Cornish town should be in , ix a
RRIVING from Trinidad yes- her brother Pat and his family in : Lonsdale’s The Way Things Go, 10 Bishopric. a) eee “DAVY CROCKETT iS , %
- &terday morning by B.W.1.A St. Ann’s, Port-of-Spain. in which she is appearing, comes 11 Nota T.T. (3) INDIAN SCOUT” 1$2 A UE ! %
were Mr. and Mrs. Errol Bailey ' uff towards the end of July after 12 @Umit an oath, (4) on (1) : ' * é %
They were intransit from Aruba, Photographs Too! the surprisingly short run of five {4 ar u a, . with |< we: x
where Mr, Bailey is with the HE Antigua Art Group which months. 16. The width of an open mouth. 46) George MONTGOMERY 2 ut UM Mmeten stersing if DIRECT FROM FACTORY 10 WEARER %
Industrial Relations Department is hokling ‘un Exhibition at Miss Johns’s next film job may See ey eras 10) Ellen DREW ARTHUR LAKE-LON CHANEY * - ¥
of the Lago Oil Company. the end of August is not only be in an adaptation of James 2: Beastiy noise. (7) 5 ‘ e $
& o oe at eres i: : : LLOYD BRIDGES: ERIC FELDARY s 5
Mr. Baile d to teach at t1 accepting paintings and drawings Bridie’s A Sleeping Clergyman ae A Great Bary. \o) TANIS CHANDLER « JOHN QUALEN x x
r. Bailey used to teach at the #5, ‘their exhibition, but also which Anatole de Grunwald _ is _ YMPIC TAN MacDONALD | 4 MONOGRAM @PUMPS in White, Brown, Black, Blue 75c., 85c., $1.15 $1 x
St. Mary's Boys’ School before photographs. hoping to make. It would be the Down OL "i PICTURE x @ BALLERINAS in Red. Sizes ? a » Ps. $1.20 x
he went to Aruba and was also my gins, W ives ¢ rst Bridie pl be screened- 1 For ubiicating furniture wheels. i ce in * " » Bines S—8.........,. ees $1.45
; Mrs Higgins, who lives at 40 first Bridie play to be ser RUF OA ; % @ LADIES’ CANV : x
for a short time a member of the gt, Mary Street in St. John’s, under the more screen-like title 4 [is \s ineifective, «8) TO-DAY and Tomorrow % 3 AS RUBBER SHOES ............... 1.95 &
‘Advocate’ staff. He has been ir Antigua, is organising this part of of Flesh and Blood. * Cram torso. (into vehicles 7) 4.30 & 8.15 x @ LADIES’ CANVAS CASUALS in White, Red, Blue 2.95 $
Aruba for two and a half years. the show and she writes, welcom- _ In the last West End revival of ce 3 he Columbia Big Double . . . % @ LEATHER SANDALS WITH RUB vee ae x
z » Chang a truop movement? (9) Gl FORD N FOCH BER SOLES

Here for two or three weeks. ing Barbadian photographers to A Sleeping Clergyman, Margaret 5 frue 14) 6 Quarter score. (4) z4enn A te g Children’s $1.60; $1.90; Ladies’ . R
they are staying with his mother send their exhibits to her for exhi- Leighton played two roles. 4 Re-energise the spring. (8) bad % @ LADIES’ CREPE SOLED SHOES io a 3.15 X
in St. Matthias Gap. bition. Glynis Johns will also act two |! 4 CuEe en aren elay. 4 “THE UNDERCOVER MAN” % ae et DO nEe BROOMS 65s oo. 6 65 -95 to 5.80
2 : eg as eee 1 Bors love this cane. <5) é and x tours Be ~ voi SHOES—Brown or Black $4.30 5.05 %
AD SHI . - 7 Safe (4) 18. inclinea (4) “COVER GIRL” % @MEN’S SOCKS ................ 420., 480, 50. B8c., Ide. &
] sy Sojution ot avs puzzle --Across: . CHILDREN’S - ae ° »
By B h b uuen Of “Ehtembort. Lie amuses 2a, ith x © and LADIES’ ANKLETS %
—bBy Beacncom er ie 'é ‘sini Tie. ‘od 'retanus: = x ; 32c-, 36c., 50c., 40c., 41c. ¥
4 Lere, 2 nen 20. Bros. 47, Rita HAYWORTH % @SHOE POLISHES, SHOE BRUSHES, SUEDE CLEANERS >
T IS coming to something— a constitutional weakness, m’lud,” why do we assume that Amer 5 ee he ek EO 6, Gene KELLEY $ $
but I am not sure to what commented Mr. Honeyweather cans only come to England to} !ennsson 7 Memo: 10. Rid: 8 %
—when a defenceless_ scare-. Gooseboote shrewdly. ‘“Remark- lead the life they are accustomed | \wiaw Nol $ . $
crow’s clothes are stolen. able!” said Cocklecarrot, leaning to lead in America? I leave the x %
The theft is remarkable, be- forward ae watching or eer answer or mea se oye | % 3
cause scarecrows are so badly driver's efforts to dislodge the a cup of tea and a Kipper a e . x
dressed today. There was a time intruding elbow. Mr. Gooseboote, Pavillion d’Armenonville in the | TO-NIGHT SE ee ree ee 3

TRACY sn CASTLE % SHOEMAKERS TO THE WORLD. 3



when the big landed gentry used in an attempt to lend a helping Bois de Boulogne.
to send for someone from their’ hand, got his elbow interlocked i.

own tailoring firm to measure with his colleague's, and the two Watercress magnate sobs
the scarecrows on the estate for of them swayed like Japanese tke le
a couple of suits. That, of wrestlers “Is this a court of N American scientist has dis-
course, explains the odd conduct law? asked the judge sarcasti- covered that the continuous
of the deaf and_ short-sighted eally, “or a Contortionists’ Gala? sound of a telephone bell kills
peer who, on q morning walk, Pray, let me know.” mice; just as the continuous
held a long one-sided conversa~ In passing re a pes oe om.
tion with a smart scarecrow on I GATHER that taxi-strikes anc e continuous § 1 é



.
9446566665 4,
EPP PPPS SPS LEPEE COLL POELLELOO>







DINE AND DANCE
AT

CLUB MORGAN






















To be

the home farm. ten-ton church bel] makes ele-



z must not occur, because they phants very ill, As a modern |
hs Thorogrip flag make a bad impression on Ameri- Dost arpote:
E case was held up yester- can tourists. Any incenvenience Fetchin odin Fale Py
3 : ing winkles from a farm ner t . as ove y
day owing to what is unfor- to the natives is comparatively house THE WEST IN | § | as
tunately a common occurrence unimportant Apparer tly we are Will not cure an old horse DIE MOST POPULAR NIGHT CLUB. |
when Mr. Tinklebury Snapdriver already jot with shame because With no breath in his body G
becomes excited. His elbow again we do not supply enough iced Said the pale tutor DELICIOUS STEAK DINNERS A Sta
got wedged in his mouth water, and have only one tele- Outside the glove-factory Served throughout the Night r

strange as that may sound, “it is phone in hotel bedrooms But Not much.



















Dial 4000 for Reservations
Yooosososess SSOP PEP POOP PEAS EE PPE PS LOLOL LPP PPLESLAP PD APAPITAA of B e auty
- °
Pd “y ‘ -
: HERE'S A NEW LIST... : | follow the advice of
S : : FOR YOUR SUGAR | the charming star
: MUSSOLINIS MEMOIRS 1942—1943 S| of >
I » e t F = 42— i { —
S sarees ‘]| FACTORY REPAIRS wren
g MAXIM GORKI'S “UNREQUITED LOVE” >| “Tal Lux T
Ww always use Lux Toilet Soa
g “TRUTH WILL OUT’—by Charlitte Haldane y vee it’s a real beau’ ae
: x FIREBRI 1 | ek
% ie so j 2 % CKS | my face generously with its rich,
% FROM EMPIRE TO COMMONWEALTH % FIRECLAY eaper lath
x % ~creamy lather, working it in
x “PRINCIPLES OF BRITISH IMPERIAL %| FIRE CEMENT i gently, but thoroughly. ‘Then I
S GOVERNMENT % STEAM PIPE & FITTINGS || rinse with warm water, splash
x “BEAU SABREUR”—by Wren ‘ BAR IRON {| with cold. | With Lax Tollet Soap
% ate) : : PORTLAND CEMENT he + > lather, skin takes on new loveli-
x IN FACE OF FEAR”—by Michael Scot % Teh ness. It feels like smoothing beauty
x = x Stocked by our Plantation Supplies Department \ ae in!”
s ~ LN
> | Telephone No. 4657 Lary
x y ‘ % \ :
° ] / rg 7 8 5 ms
: ini ADVOCATE STATIONERY | oo i * LUX couer soap
x ; ST ORE x BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON i |
8 %| , .
: * FACTORY LTD. { T
6°.996990696066666666666646695% ssh ct tinea ose dad WHITE SOAP OF THE
POOOOSO CS OOOO SOOO OPPS SE SO OCSE SECO E SSCS GO GOSOS SES SOS OS SS OOS OOO SSG OF | essa aS RRR RS TE A-LTS 697-11 10-50 pice Stars
eRe ae ~~ Bass a LEVER rropuce®
’ t



SATURDAY,

Names of Owners of 100 |

JULY 29,

1950

Acres Should be Published

Says Mr. W.

A. Crawford

Mr. W. A. Crawford asked 11 questions when the House of
Assembly met last Tuesday. Mr. Crawford wants Govern-
ment to publish a list of the people who have 100 acres of |

land or more.

Harbaur Log



in Carlisle Bay

Emanuel C Gordon, — Sch
Yacht Leander; Sch. E, M
nis, Sch. Turtle Dove; Sch. W. L
cia; Sch. Rosarene; Sch. Gardenia
jch. Timothy A. H. Vansluytman;
Daerwood; Sch. Princess Louise;
sen Philip H. Davidson; Sch. Lydina

Bel Queen. Sch Mary M.
Sch Cyril Smith; Sch
Belle Wolfe D'Ortac; Seh
D

Sch



daipha;



A Sch
E
Sch

ARRIVALS
Trader, 128 tons
from Turks Island
4,445 tons net, Capt
Kitts

Earles
i Squires,
3.S. Specialist.
Harriman, from St
Schooner Molly N. Jones, 37 tons net,
Capt Clouden, from Dominica
S.S. Mormacgulf, 4,521 tons net
from Puerta Cabello
DEPARTURES

Lady Joy. 46 tons net
for St. Lucia
Caribbee, 100
for Dominica

In Touch with Barbados
Coast Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd, ad-
Vise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their
Parbados Coast Station

net,

Capt
Ww

M V
Parsor

M.V
Gumb

Capt

tons net, Capt





S.S. City of Belgrano, S.S. Hermes,
S.S. Esito, S.S. Silverteak, S.S. Ari-
guani, S.S Cottica, SS. Imperial
Quebec, S.S. Kallada, S.S Golfito,
S.S. Maria de Larrinaga, S.S. Come-
dian, S.S. Springwave, S.s Historian,
S.S. Esso Avila, 3.8 Regent Leopard,
S.S. Rangitata, S.S. Fort Amherst, S.S
Fort Richelieu, S.S. Mara Nike, S.S
Hersilia, $.S Alcoa’ Cavalier, S.S
Regent Tiger, S.S. Byfjorad, s.s

Bachaquero and) S.S. Tsinan



ARRIVALS —
From TRINIDAD

By B.W.1.A.L

Joseph Carter, Olivia Callendar,
Joseph Lutchman, Larry Butler, Edgar
Gunstone, Gordon King
From MARTINIQUE

Jean Littee, Simone Littee, Yvon
Littee

From BRITISH GUIANA
Edgar Adams, Hewlitt Benjamin, Hil-





















He asked

* Will the Government cause to

be published at the earliest
date possible figures showing the |
distribution and ownership of land|
in the colony on the basis of one}
hundred (100) acres and up-
wards?

In view of the colony's acces-!

sion to the Economic Co-oper- |
ation Agreement, will the}
Government please state whether |
it has any plans for application |
for assistance from Marshall Plan |
Funds to which the country is}
now entitled, for the purpose otf!
large-scale irrigatian as part of!
our Agricultural development
programme, or for any other pur-|
pose? }

In view of the necessity for
providing assistance for the |
general improvement of housing

conditions throughout the colony.
Will the Government take early |
steps, in consultation with fhe
sugar producers, to establish ma-
chinery for the purpose of impos-
ing a cess at the rate of 50 cents!
per ton of sugar manufactured in
the island,—the funds from such
levy to be used to help the work-
ing classes to construct repair or
improve their homes?

* Is the Government aware that
the ration allowance accorded
the staff of the Government Indus-
trial Schools is considerably less,
in fact, less than half of that given
to the staffs of other Government
institutions?
2. Will the Government
(a) state the reasons for such
disparity,
(b) take steps to place the
ration allowance of these



employees on the same
basis as those of other
institutions?

* In consequence of the circum-

stance that the Vestry of St.
Philip find it financially imposs
ble, except by borrowing money
for the purpose, to provide public
baths and latrines in the parish
and in view of the fact that the
provision of public baths and
latrines, are not specifically the











Yesterday

Ne

co

Re ad and
ner,

Turning



ted with
Michael

sal Both



morning at approximately
vion Road in Christ Church, when
a Highway

BARBADOS ADV

9.45 o'clock,

in

the motor X-

ca



vehicles were damaged



Better Lose A Minute
Than Lose Your Life

Remember Road Manners

Speaking last night over the local Radio Diffusion Service,
on the subject of Road Manners, Colonel R. T. Michelin,
Commissioner of Police said:—

We are fortunate in living in one
of the most beautiful islands of
the Caribbean It is, however, a
small island with a very large
population and narrow roads.

We have 540 miles of road.
These roads are used by 4,600
motor vehicles and 19,000 bi-
cycles, besides numbers of
donkey carts.

With this large population, pRIs
this amount of wheeled traffic it
is no wonder vhat our roads are
congested, especially so in the
town areas.

Special Care

It is therefore more than ever
necessary for each and eVyeryone
of us to drive, ride and
with special care, and hav§¥ Road
Manners,
Now what
Simply it is driving or ricing or
walking with consideration for



are Road Manners?

ton Carty, Sheila Carty, Amelia [obligation of the local authoritf®& | na ' ,
3 re G : ~) prs us the highway
Texeira, N Gittens, Joyce Gittens, | will the Government make the syne ae eh a find
Louis Git Jessie Gray, John , ; (a) It means -vhen you finc
Macitwllen Gray, duplies ‘tenon necessary funds available to the your car, lorry or bus behind a
Rodrigues, Angela Rodrigues, Lilian Vestry, by way of a grant, for the Conkey cart, being pavient, and
Pilgrim. Anthony Fernandes, Jean} erection of at least two (2) such| “” ting until the road in front of
Fernandes, Rupert Westmaas, Jeanettef baths and latrines in the said Walling f ingi ut
Edwards. Smith Bracewell, Margaret | patish? you is clear before swinging out,
Br well, Mrs. Hinds ; (b) It means when You fet
From MAIQUETIA spasms -onsid-| to a pedestrian crossing, stopping
Jose Alberto. Del Carril, Josephine In consequence of the consid ¥ ; Lh ywin the pedestrians -to
Del Carril, Judith Del Carril, Pamela i erable increase in the cost of pi 2 eee e :
Del Carvil, Pablos Esma Gomez, Pablos| living since the time when they | #¢t across ‘ a
Fdward Gomer, Peter Sehweinburger, | were originally fixed, will the (c) It means giving hand sig-
Josefme Schweinburger, Rafael Castitlo, | Government take steps appreci-
ably .to increase the amounts] ~ r iod?
mune . ; ans | same curreney for the per’
DEPART RES By BW.1AL allowed to married and single Is if a fact that island consta-
Glen Kelly, Ruth Kelly, Sam Key, | Persons “a yon prom the bles were called upon to do
Vivian Mane Albert Maney, Johan payment of Income Tax? special police work and perform
ultoi tihard Dolman, Peter Dolman, # Tee . i ‘
Helen Hoperoés, sgeef) Hoperoks, John Is-the Government aware of| duties of an extepordinety, cra
Merry, Dorothy Phillipe, Ralph Smellie, the acute discomfort experi- during the disturbances o :
Cobsiel _uoadany Michael} iengtrit et, enced daily by members of the $; '* ae the eS vr rt
P oO hue: a ayne, . . . .
Bayne, Elizabeth Biteh, Peter O'Connor, | Fire Brigade at Coleridge St. in be in the affirmative.
Pairick O'Connor, Brnest Turpin, Paul. |consequence of structural and the Government ee ioe
ine Fitzgerald, Pamela ‘Taitt, Adam | other defects in the building which whether they received
Richards. Harry Drew, Bridget O'Toole, | they occupy? remuneration for same, and,
Por ee ; 2, Does the Government pro- if not, why not?
‘ Allsot Steel 2 Reginald Cardozo pose to whe eas ae equip Will the Government please
Pace’ Doth cenne Page. mate} =a new Fite Brigade head-|W ‘state what proportions of the
Edward Benjamin f ee colony's allocation of £800,000
TISH GU 3. Arising out of the fact that) ¢rom* Development and Welfare
For F rtteH OtaaeA Bie ate hs the Probyn Street site long} funds has been already expended
Lopes, Leonilla Lapes, John Alexander. regarded as the likely area! and give details of such expendi-
George Goodrick, Judith Dalton, Richard | for a new Fire Brigade ture?
Humphrey, Trevelyan Sue-a-Quan, headquarters has now been
Harold Birkett, Wendy Drawmer, Emma | converted into a_ central He The House of Assembly re-
aah ete Sen Terence Hawkni ‘bus terminus, if the an- spectfully request Your Ex-
i swer to Question No, 2 bel cellency to send down to this
Fob 4 CUAL ag dicate dane | in the affirmative, will the | House legislation to provide that
Jacqueline armerton, Ligabeth are > yr a Sti
merton, Catherihe Mi{chell, HTN | iy ere) = ot ae all property now owned or here-
remple-Meade, Roland Dela Bastide, bh Ststion are after to be acquired by the Gov-
prone Sante ames Gaorke | new Station; ernment of this island be liable to
asdor q wue Prrera, erna agiia- t on © 4
ferro, Aurora Tagliaferto, Gabriel Tag- | ye Will the Government please| payment of the same Tates of
liaferro John Lueie-Smith, Marian | state the direct and indirect| taxes, parochial or eee
Ee ic Sn mh, iieenPensd Eni Bee i dollar earnings of the colony dur-}| any other a ia eats
Gonger, Eldora Gongér and Barbara ing the years 1938—1949 inclusive, | nature Bad: yawe: in this. ils
Pockuf would be liable.








A beauty treatment
for the
Privileged few?

ARE

and the actual expenditure in the

BEAUTY PREPARATIONS ARE USED
ALL WOMEN THROUGHOUT

THE WORLD!

LET **PQNDS** Assist you.
COLD & VANISHING CREAMS—

FACE & TALCUM POWDERS—
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DEALERS.

STOCKED BY ALL

Y



walk |












nals
to Tet
doing

(d) It means not parking
your car somewhere, which al-
though convenient to you, causes
« lot of inconvenience to others

(e) It means dimming your
lights to on—coming vraffic and not
dazzling other persons using the
road

vo the persons behind you,
them know what You intad

Thoughtlessness

The majority of accidents in
this Island are not caused by fast
and furious driving or riding but
by thoughtlessness on the part
cf the motorisv, cyclist or pedis-
trian To give an instance
this I quote from the Polyre
report of an accident w hob
cecurred in Trafalgar Square |

ot

yesterday !
A car Was proceeding from the |
direction of Victoria Bridge |
towards Chamberlain Bridge, }

the cycle from the direction o¢ |
the Public Buildings toward!
Chamberlain Bridgé. They met}
and collided. The cyclist re-|
ceived a wound, The right rear}
wheel and fork of the cycle and
the radiator grill and right head
lamp of the car were damaged.
No reckless nor dangerous driv-
ing is disclosed in this case. Just a
little more care and attention and
both sides would have, no doubt,
avoided this accident and saved
the damage to both vehicles, This
type of accident happens daily in
Barbados, Let us see if we can
reduce them,

Dislikés Speed Traps

I do not like Speed Traps, I
prefer co-operation. We look
forward to the day when we can
remove the traps from the roads
This will be done as soon as the
driving improves. As a result of
these traps, 152 persons have been
convicted for speeding this year
and fines amounting to £311 paia

in Revenue. Some drivers have

paid £10 and £12 for speeding. Is

it worth it?
If drivers of motor vehicles who
are addicted to speed only
realised that in a distance of
about three miles, the difference
in time between driving at al
dangerous speed, and that of

driving at a moderate and cor











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accident occurred at the

and Transport lorry, M-1438, driver

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respond

caused by Chills etc
preparation
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Broad Street and Alpha Pharmacy, Hastings.
PPP LLSLSCCLCOLGOOS

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junction of Lodge
driven by Annie Matthews,
by Clive Grant of Hother-

119,







fortable one With consideration

for others is only about thro

minutes, I feel sure they would
adopt the more comfortable
mode of travel.

The next time you want to get
somewhere in a hurry, remembe
you will only save a few minute
by speeding. It might result i:
your being involved in an acci-
dent; this will mean delay an@
expense.

Now, Cyclists

Now a word to cyclists, a great
number of you seem to think that
rules of the road only apply to
motorists. You have to conform to
exactly the same code in using the
highway, as the persons driving a
car or lorry,

Do not cut in on the left side of
a vehicle, This is a favourite habit
of a number of cyclists in Broad
Street. It is dangerous and a very
bad habit to get into. Do not ride
more than 2 abreast, besides being
against the law it adds to conges-
tion,

Now a word to the pedestrian
You also have your part to play
in the Road Manners Campaign
When you are walling in the
street or road keep as near to
the side as possible Always
walk facing the on-coming
traffic and not with your back
to it,

Do not stand on the streets o1
siie-walks and gossip with you
friends, Do not gather at street
corners; you obstruct the view of
motorists and cyclists. Use the
pedestrian crossings, they are put
there for your safety and help

When you cross the Victoria and
Chamberlain Bridges use the foot-
paths provided. If you do not, you

add to the congestion on tWese
Bridges
Road Manners
Much can be achieved in im
proving conditions on our roads

by the co-operation of the motor-
ist, the cyclist and the pedestrian
Cultivate Road Manners. Think
of the other users of the road and
not only of yourself, you will find
it helps everyone, Give up speed-
ing, it might result in a serious
accident and only means getting
somewhere a few minutes earlie:

The public can help a_ great

deal in this ‘Safety First’ cam-

paign by reporting to the Police

eases of driving and riding with

disregard for the safety of

others,

We won the last Test MYtch by
the ¢ombination of batsmen
bowlers and fieldsmen, each oj
them played their part, Let us

win the safety of the Roads in
our Island by the co-operation of
the motorist, the cyclist and the
pedestrian

When you drive, ride or
how Road Manners.”

walk






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SHAVING BRUSHES

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‘*RECTOR’S

MIXTURE *°

readily t this effective

w +
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poet =.

— - " .
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Tax
Returns Show
$112,248 Jump

Income

GEORGETOWN
Pax collecte n B

1949 wr





ish Ghiana ul
$5,068 677.21 exceed
hat of Ww reviou year b

d $4,134,
$934,225, The

$122,348. Cc mpa! ies pai

X and ina



ich



come of individuals
arious statutory
5,935,755

Cineome afte

deductions) wi



Income after tax in 1949 ws
reater by $10,740,000 than th
939 figure and $31,000 less tha
he 8 figure. Companies i:
come after tax totalled $461,00
nore than in 1948 but individuals
total income after tax $492,000
less
Of the 3,374 taxpayers for tt

last year of assessment, 725 wer
iraders, 959 civil servants an
1,690 “othér employees”
Twenty-two traders and 2
; “other employees” had income

xceeding $10,800 per annun
| There were no civil servants i
this income group Five in
lividuals were in the highest
brackets—those with gross ir
comes exceeding $30,000, In 1939
there was only one such in
dividual; but there were 9 in 1939
and 7 in 1948

The majority of individual in
come taxpayers were persons ii
receipt of incomes below $1,200
in this category, civil servant
(643) were more numerous tha
traders (403) but other en
ployees” again dominated — the
group with 999, as they did th
53,600—$6,000, $6,000—$8,400, and
the $8,400—$10,800 groups

Companies with
exceeding $5,000
companies with
that figure numbered 104. Twenty
three of these earned income
over $100,000 and income
over $500,000

Excess Profits
collected during
E Profit Tax

incomes
numbered
incomes abov

not
54;

1X,

Tax

1940

was

In
yielded

nol
1948
$782,

587

The total expenditure of th
Income Tax Department for 1949,
including the cost of reorganisa
tional equipment, amounted to
$56,757.00, i.e., 1.1 per cent of the
tax collected. The corresponding
percentages for 1948, 1947, 1946
and 1945 were 0.75 per cent, 0.67
per cent, 0.58 per cent and 0.50
per cent respectively. The bulk of
recommendations of the PublA

IT WAS BRITISH
OTTAWA, July 27.
The British Admiralty has de



the increase resulted from the
Service Salaries and Wages Com-
mission

Two factors, states the Com
missioner, are directly responsible
for the low cost of Incomé Tax
administration in British Guidna
(J) small staff; and (2) the fact
that an overwhelming proportion
of the revenue
large companies.

comes from. the



that a submarine ob
erved Spanish trawler off
he Grand Banks ef Newfound
land on July 10 was British, Naval
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termined
by a

announced today
—Reuter,



it
nit

are:

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yee t
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peor , lone Of memory ongrey,
easily exetted, fear and worry, If you
sufler avy of these symptoms, don't
delay treatment a angle day, because
your may be in . Meno
mown as Hynox), a new
Pregeure ith the ewe ‘dose taken a

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years younger in a few le

2

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ear 1948 on yield for 1949
nainly depended is considered by
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ble one for all industries,”
These amounts were paid on
gross incomes (assessed to April |
30, 1950) of $12,160,691 (com
vanies) and $11,688,926 in-
lividuals). The chargeable ir

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PAGE THREE

Edward
Frankland

ry of valer

ry play dan
nibise juent
TT”
Mt

ith Sir

wyer, British

inklamddiscovere d
ude existence of helium in the sun. Th of th » ith 2
water supply, and instituted a system for db xaminat ’ bacteria
which brought him idespre a mm
Born in Chirclit of re, in a druggist
in Laricaster until he went to Londo age of twenty to i In 1
he was appointed professor of chemistry at Owens College, Manchester. Retutning to
London in 1857, he held appointments at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, TI Ir n

and The Royal School of Mines. He was President of the Chemical
Society from 1871-3, and of the Institute of Chemistry from 1877-8

The Royal Society awarded brim its | Copley M



in 1894. Frankland was knighted in 1897, five yes

ais



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PAGE FOUR





Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad 8t., Bridgetown.





Saturday, July 29, 1950

PEOPLE'S BAND

THE new practice which takes the Police

Band into the various country districts for
evening concerts is certainly to be wel-
comed. The entertainment which it brings
to the people in those districts is a much
needed relief from the drab routine of
everyday life; but in addition) to this, it
serves to foster a spirit of real community
life. :
The Mobile Cinema has in the past sup-
plied limited entertainment along with its
educational work, and the British Council
too, has made a fine contribution in this
respect. These two avenues of cultural
and educational development have been
successful in so far as they have been able
to reach out to those minds capable of
making full use of their services.

With the Police Band it is different.
Captain Raison has become a romantic
figure throughout the island, and known
even if only by reputation to every member
of the community. The Band, too, because
of its improved efficiency has ceased to be
merely the Police Band. It is the People’s
Band. Whether it is providing programmes
of light entertainment at Government
House, classical airs at the British Council
Headquarters, mixed items at the Hastings
Rocks or at the Bay Street Esplanade, there
is always a full attendance to listen. And
especially is this so when the Bandmaster
decides to supply pot pourri of West
Indian airs, Trinidad calypsoes and up-to-
the-minute American jazz. Then there is

‘no'taste left unsatisfied.

is this ability to cater to every taste
which. has enabled the Band to claim as
ardent supporters, people drawn from
every strata of society. It is the bringing
together of these various sections and the
infusion of the real community spirit which
constitutes the greatest service which the
Band can render. It also relieves the
drabness in the life of these simple folk,
and makes them feel for a brief period that
they are part of a larger whole.

The visits of the Band, however, will call
for better facilities such as community
halls and other suitable places of entertain-
ment where the people of the districts can
come together for the purpose, not merely
of éntertainment, but for cultural and
educational development. They will also
afford opportunity for those who live in
the City and who are, in many instances,
unacquainted with country life, to follow
the Band into neglected parts of the island.
mais wift friévitably be followed by a desire

to help in the needed improvement; the
social conscience of Barbados will be
awakened, and, as a community, we shall
be taking a decided step towards real de-
velopment and progress.

Young: Soldiers
THE camp of two hundred and fifty
eadets at the Volunteer Drill Hall is to be
commended. Camp life for young people
" who must live under healthy, active con-
ditions and follow a particular daily
routine is essential to their physical and
mental development. Training in arms
brings a discipline of mind such as can be
found in no other avenue of life. To obey
without question and to carry out instruc-
tions at the moment 1s a training which
gives one a degree of self control without
which life would be a miserable failure.
In addition to this, it must be apparent
to any keen observer that the physical con-
dition of many of our youngsters shows
serious degeneration. The fine upstanding
figure is the exception rather than the rule.
And this can be remedied by proper exer-
cises and diet.

There are those who object to military training
orn the ground that it excites a fractious spirit.
The reverse is the truth. The youngster sure of
himself and enjoying good health is the most
amiable of companions.

The schoolboys, too are to be commended for
giving up portion of their long vacation to attend
camp.

OUR READERS SAY:









|

(Prom Our London Correspondent)

LONDON.

THE Colonial Development
Corporation, now in its third year,
is passing from the planning to the
development stage. In the first
six months of this year, its capital
commitments rose from just over
£14 million to almost £25 million—
a quarter of its available funds—
and C.D.C., expect 1950 to be the
year of its highest capital
expenditure.

In the Corporation’s second
Annual Report, laid before
Parliament today, an optimistic
note is struck,

The Corporation, it is stated,
“has every confidence that,
with the help of modest alloca-
tions of dollars in the early
years, it will, within a short
time, become a net dollar
earner.”

|
American “Know How”
| Wanted

This confidence is expressed in
|a review of negotiations with the
international Bank for Recon-
struction and the possibilities of
American investment in the
Colonies. {

The Corporation feels that it will
be some time before its kind of
undertakings throughout the

British Colonies will attract the
American investor,

“Whatever may be the validity”
the Report states, “of an investor's
fears on grounds of the political
nsecurity of economic stability of
the British colonies, it is unlikely
that the kind of enterprise in

| which the Corporation is interested
will, in present circumstances,
srove to be to any large degree
attractive to the ordinary Amer-
ican investor.

“This position may decisively
change when, in the course of a
few years, the spread and mag-
nitude of the Corporation’s activ-
ities build up into a demonstrably
economic institution through
which American dollar investment
in various forms can be canalised”.

Greater access to American
“know-how” and markets would
provide the best advantage to the
Corporation of participating with
American private enterprise, it is
stated. And the Corporation, it is
made clear, would welcome “the
skill, enterprise and drive which
are characteristic of American
business.”

Particular deterrents to Amer-
ican investment—exchange control
and American taxation laws—are
discussed with reference to meas-
ures now being taken which,
it is hoped, will “encourage the



Time To Take Stock Of
Our Measurements?

(From Our London Correspondent)
LONDON.

The British system of weights
and measures causes endless
amusement to Americans, and
great misery to visiting Contin-
entals. No less confusing to them
is our monetary system, which
admittedly seems designed to give
the utmost trouble to all concerned
and to make mental arithmetic a
real headache,

British experts have urged often
enough a switch over to the metric
system, already in operation over
the greater part of the world, but
without success, France—where
it originated—uses the metric
system, and so do Germany.
Russia, Greece, Turkey, and
seores of other countries.

But we continue to plead all
manner of excuses for not shed-
ding our farthings and florins, our
yards, feet and inches. Now it
seems that the small island of
Cyprus may take the initiative,
and adopt the system herself. The
Government there recently pro-
posed that the metric system of
weights and measures should be
introduced into the colony, thus
bringing to the front the whole
vexed question of an interna-
tional system that would make
trading a simpler and more effici-
ent business altogether.

Cyprus, by her example, may
cause other colonies to think
seriously about abandoning their
present methods of measurement.
She is herself badly in need of a
change. “How”, ask her trades-
men, “are we to explain to cus-
tomers overseas the-fact that a
cantar of olive oil weighs more

tice of
recommendations

Barbados

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

flow of American
British colonies.”

Utopian Scheme Rejected

The Report covers the year to
December 3list last, when there
were actually 28 C.D.C, jinder-
takings in operation, one-third of
them agricultural in character.
Furvher projects under active in-
vestigation, but not yet launched
52 in all—will mean the Corpor-
ation committing itself to capital
expenditure totalling about £50
million. In addition there are 66
projects av an early ‘stage of con-
sideration

These figures do not represent
anything like the total schemes
which have been put up to the
Corporation for consideration.
Some of these, the Report says,
“were inevitably the utopian
schemes and impracticable pro-
posals which e\ ery new organisa-
tion must expect to receive.”

The problem of the develop-
ment period in its financial aspect
is dealt with in the section of the
Keport covering the accounts. The
first two years of planning and
investigation i1cveal that most of
the Corporatio: 's investments will
not begin to yicld at their estim-
ated full rate for a considerable
period,

Ninety per cen’ of the estimated
capital cost of the 28 undertak-
ings launched by the end of last
year will have been incurred by
the end of 1952 but “the total
earnings of these 28 undertakings
are not expected to reach 90 per
cent of their eventual level for
abou’ 10 years after that.”

capital into

Experts Watch Expenses

By the end of the year, the
Corporation invested over £1 m.
in land, buildings, and concessions
and another £1 million in capital
equipment necessary to develop
the productive resources of these
lands and concessions. Expendi-
ture directly related to develop-
ment and land _ clearance
amounted, on the other hand, vo
over £600,000.

Despite the fact that develop-
ment is still very much in the
initial stage, goods to the value
cf £446,000 had been marketed.

Administrative costs have
amounted Yo about 10 per cent of
the total, and emphasising the
financial] control exercised, the
Report declares:

“The Corporation’s finan-
cial administration conforms
to the best standards and the
Board are confident that it
will mee’ the most exacting
requirements of H. M. Gov-
ernment and Parliament.”

It is pointed out that all senior
members of the accounting staff
are members of recognised pro-

than a cantar of carobs, which, in
its turn, weighs more than a can-
tar of onions? Can’t we have aa
equal measurement of weight?’
The change-over would mean that
litres would take the place of
pints, quarts, Cyprus litres, ga:-
lons, kiles, kouzas, loads and the
liquid oke.

What are a few facts about the
metric system? In brief, it is the
decimal system applied to weights
and measures. Everything is in
units of ten; there is no necessity,
therefore, to have fractions. ,

It is estimated by educational
authorities that the metric system,
by dispensing with the need for
fractions, would save at least a
year of time spent by children
learning arithmetic. Two typical
examples from children’s arithme-
tic books are these: “Find the
number of cubie yards in a room
measuring 7 yards, 2 feet, 8 inches
by 14 yards, 1 foot, 3 inches by 6
yards, 5 inches.” How much
simpler is the problem as seen in
a French or German textbook.
“Find the number of cubic metres
in a room measuring 11.42 metres
by 6.42 metres by 4.9 metres.”

When applied to industry, the
saving in cash is startling, One
factory, which switched to metric,
estimated that in one year it saved
ten times the cost of new measur-
ing devices. A railway estimated
that metric would save it £15,000
a year in paper work. No less
beneficial would” be the time-
saving factor for smaller concerns,
and private traders.

The present antique measure-
ments in the U.K. began when
Edward II decided that three

made certain
in our judiciary.



The Visit o

€. D.C. Sinks £25 an Tn) HUROPE AND KOREA
Approved Projects

American Dollars Not A ttracted=Yet

fessional asso@iations and possess
wide commercial and financial ex-
perience.

A section of especial interest to
the Colonial countries concernec
in the C.D.C’s activities is that
headed;
ing the Costs of Colonial Develop-
ment Undertakings” .

changes in Colonial Income-tax
ordinances “which would involve
only a small sacrifice of curren
revenue”, but which would greatly
improve the prospects of som
types of long-term developmen|
projects, which, if undertaken
would eventually “bring muc!
additional revenue to Colonia
exchequers.”

The Corporation express thei:
view that “certain measures 0
standardisation in the economi
field may prove easier of attain-
ment and more directly Leneficia!
to some territories than measures
of political integration which ar+
so Much more in vogue today.”

Big Overheads

Warning is given about the higi
cost of essential services in the
Colonies. Among the main reason:
why Colonial development under-
takings cannot in many cases, ex~-
pect to earn at a rate sufficient t
attract the ordinary outside in
vestor, it is stated, “is the excep-
tionally high sharge for overheads
involved where new resources art
brought into production in econo-
mically backward territories”.

“The Corporation has had to re-
ject proposals for certain
schemes in undeveloped terri-
tories which on the basis of
normal overhead charges would
have had every chance of suc-
cess.”

It is admitted that most existing
Colonial enterprises have had to
create their own amenities and
basic services, including roads,
and have carried the cost. But|
these enterprises, it is added, were
able to proceed at their own pace,
at a time when the costs of the
capital works involved were not
only less in relation to expected
profits, but also the standards
required were lower.

“While the Corporation wel-
comes the improved health and
social welfare conditions which
have been achieved in some Colo-
nies” the Report continues, “by
the enforced compliance with
approved minimum _ standards,
there must clearly be some balance
between the standards of social
welfare required and the means
available to support them, unless
of course, the British taxpayer is
to be called upon to fill the gap”.

—_-

















barley corns made an inch, and
Henry | specified the yard as the
distance from the royal nose to the
tip of the blue-blooded right
thumb! The ancient Chinese had
an “uphill” mile, and a “down-
hill!’ mile, working on the quite
logical assumption that it was
more difficult to walk up a hill
than down one.

During the French Revolution,
the National Assembly appointed
a commission of scientists to settle
on a minimum number of units,
and to place all these units on the
decimal system. They decided
that the basic unit of measurement
should be the metre. It was
divided into 100 equal parts —
centimetres. It was multiplied by
1,000 to make the kilometre —
which is about three-fifths of our
mile. The weight of one cubic
centimetre of water became the
basic measure of weight — one
gram. One thousand grams made
up a_kilogram—2.2 Ibs. One
thousand cubic centimetres became
the litre—somewhat less than our
quart,

It is said that the average
person should be able to adjust
himself to the new system in a
matter of a few days, since there
are only three basic units in it,
the litre for capacity, the gram for
weight and the metre for length.

It can be argued for it that
there would be greater under-
standing and sympathy between
nations, business transactions
would be speeded up considerably,
much paper work eliminated, and
our furlongs would vanish for
ever 4



sentment of these men who suifer-
Absurd ed demotion and the many whe A™ong them was’ the epolition
To the Editor, the Advocate aspired to wearing one chevron iy the eae aly ve The late Captain Michael
_ SIR— My heartiest congratula~ rhe senior Sergeant of the force *!'8chown . Ciprani, a well known Trinidad-
tions are extended to Asst. Super- was now placed in the same plight The recommendation was ac-|ian, was one of the first West
intendent Grant Inspectors denied promotion to the rank of cepted and implemented, but| Indians to own a private plane.

Hy J. €. Oestreicher

POSSIBILITIES that the
may ask the nations of western Europe to
make more substantial contributions to their
own re-armament if they cannot help out in
Korea is being discussed in diplomatic circles
to-day.

European leaders are fearful that an awk-

“Special Factors Affect-|ward situation may arise if this comes to
pass.
A plea is made for certain,It is believed, therefore, that every possible
effort will be made to make at least some
showing in behalf of the United Nations
commitment against north Korean Commun-
ism,

Observers consider
Sweden, determined to maintain strict neu-
trality even though she would have to de-
pend on western Europe in event of conflict
with the east, made an immediate contribu-
tion in keeping with her self-chosen humani-
tarian role in world conflicts.

The government announced that it is don-
ating a full-scale hospital unit, with ambul-
ances, doctors, nurses, surgical instruments
and the like, and that all services connected
with it will be free cf charge.

Sweden has therefore “saved face”.
while Gen. Douglas MacArthur obviously
wants foot soldiers, no one can deny the tre-
mendous value of the equipment that is being
given while the western world regrets that
such materials and specialists become neces-
sary in the wake of war.

Before the Communist invasion of South
Korea occurred, there was a feeling among
European leaders that in the re-armament of
the west, the United States must assume the
major responsibility so far as financing is
concerned.

The American government was willing to
shoulder the brunt of it but made clear it
wanted assurances that the European powers
were doing all they possibly could. But the
European tendency to use as much American
money as they could get remained apparent.

Obviously, the situation in Korea must
change all that.

President Truman’s request to Congress
for an additional 10 billion dollars staggered
European capitals because of the scope. It
drove home to them both the depth of
American determination and the expenses
that are anticipated.

There has been a great deal of criticism
since Defence Minister Emanuel Shinwell
told the House that Britain’s military con-
dition does not allow for complacency.

The conservative press maintains that the
budget allowed the military services since
the end of the war has been more than suffi-
cient to give Britain a feeling of security
evne though land forces were stripped dowr
to a minimum on the home islands.

The Labour government’s obvious answe}
will be that the anti-Communist campaign
in Malaya, the strengthening of defenses at
Hong Kong and continued activation of the
fleet add up to huge expense.

This may not satisfy political critics in the
House. But the United States high com-
mand, well-versed in logistics and the cost of
military undertakings, may take a different

f the “Humming Bird”

By John Prideaux

Bourne, Simmons, Springer,
Chandler and Franklyn on their
well deserved promotion.

Your Editorial of Sunday April
2, commented on the trend of
reform in the creation of the rank
of Inspector. I was resident ‘in
Trinidad when the rank of In-
spector was instituted and at-
tended the function given in hon-
our of Chief Inspectors Kelly
and D’Espine who were promoted
to this rank with equal status.
On my return to this colony in
1946. I was surprised to find that
rather than this new rank being

introduced accordimg to the
Calver’s report, the first vital
change in the local force was

the abolition of the rank L/Cpl.
Now to my further dismay, I am
most reliably informed that the
rank of Sgt. Major—beloved the
world over, with its ancient tradi-
tions of hard work, somewhat
like the rudder of a ship is
abolished.

The members of the House of
Assembly, more especially the
Senior member); for the City,
should realise that the removal



of the rank of L/Cpl has bred
grave dissatisfaction in the Police
force and much of the ado direc

ed at the gallant Col Michelin
is mere smoke to the fire of re-

Set. Major. I am convinced that
the sentiments expressed in your
Editorial defeat the very object
for which it is intended “esprit

de Corps.”

The implementation of these
recommendations — abolition of
L/Cpl. and Sgt. Major have

narrowed the bridge for promo-
tion in the ranks, Both in Trini-
da@ and British Guiana the rank
of L/Cpl and Sgt. Major were re-
tained: even in Jamaica where
Mr. Calver is the Commissioner
of Police, the ranks exist. A
constable’s hope of gaining the
Cpl: stripes are as remote as a
local scientist making an Atom
Bomb. This fact, I repeat has
caused great indifference and
dissatisfaction in the Police Force.

No man on earth likes demo-
tion. All men on earth love pro-
motion. Imagine a man who has
been an N.C.O. for some years
without any default finding him-
self over-night back in the ranks
of a Constable alongside a re-
cent recruit. It needs no psycholo-

gist to discover the reaction.
What about the Sargeants who
hope to be Sergeants Major ! It is
absurd and unwise in my opinion
to abolish these ranks if we need
an efficient and energetic force.

Some years ago, Sir Robert H
Furness, Kt., a former Chief Jus-

what happened? His Honour Mr.
P. A. Lynch, a brilliant jurist,
retired in disgust, rather than re-
turn to the magisterial bench.
Thus, the colony lost the services
of Mr. Lynch, Since then how-
ever, it was found quite neces~
sary to re-institute this office and
the entire public is in agreement.
These police L/cpls who were
demoted are not in the favour-
able position to retire in disgust
but remain in the force an un-
justified disgruntled and dis-
couraged group of men. Some
critic will say, the emolument is
the same, but the above case of
Mr. Lynch can easily answer the
critic. Tam hoping that the Execu-
tive will review this matter in
the interest of the public. 1
never read the Calver report,
but I laboured under the im-
pression that the creation of the
rank of Inspector was another
avenue of promotion not re-
trenchment of the many for the
few favourites. Again what about
the rank of Sub

rank also

Inspector? This
exist in Trinidad.

I am hoping to hear Col. Miche-
lin’s view in his next Press Con-
ference.



Collymore Rock,

ALBERT MAYNARD
St, Michael,

He purchased a ‘Gipsy Moth’ and
named it the “HUMMING BIRD,”
and flew to many of the Islands
in the Windward Group, much
to the enjoyment of the inhabi-
tants. This love of aviation was
to cost him his life, for he was
killed “when his plane crashed into
the side of a mountain in Trinidad,

Captain Cipriani desiring to fly
to Barbados obtained permission
from the proprietors of the “Rock-
ley Golf and Country Club” to
use the fairway as an airstrip,
there being no airport here at that
time. The news got around that
Captain Cipriani would be arriv-
ing here at the end of July, and
the date was afterwards fixed for
the 30th.

Saturday the 30th July 1932
was as beautiful a day as anyone
could

wish for, and all were
talking of the expected arrival
of the “Humming Bird,” as this
was to be the second plane to fly

to this Island, it created quite a
stir among the populace. The first
plane was Captain Lanchester’s
when he visited the Island four
years before while he was on a

flight from the U.S.A. to South
America, but unfortunately for
him, he crashed in taking off when

leaving Trinidad.

All those who could get away
from their jobs on a busy Satur-
day morning collected at the Golf
Club to witness this historic
event; and shortly before 9.30
o'clock the ery of “luk he day”
was heard, and sure enough,
Captain Cipriani and his pilot had
made the Island safely. There
were many young men who were
keenly interested in aviation
present to witness this event, and
to see if this little plane would
land safely on such a ground.
One of these was Mr. J. A. (Jack)
Skinner, now manager of the
Barbados Ice Co. Ltd, who was
building his plane—‘Miss Barba-
dos”—on the second floor of the
same building now occupied in
the manufacture of ‘Bico’ ice-
creams.

On the Monday Bank-holiday,
the first of August, thousands gath-
ered to view this little wonder
who had brought these visitors to
our shores, and to marvel at it.
The pilot, who had accompanied
Captain Cipriani, then took off
and gave the spectators some
thrills by his stunt flying. He put
the little machine through a
severe test, but she reacted well
to every demand, and after some
“hedge-hopping” landed safely,
much to the amazement of the





United States

it noteworthy that

And






SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1950



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Tins JERSEY TOMATO JUICE 25 21

Bottles JEFFREYS BEER



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GREET THE
COMING HOT
DAYS IN

COMFORT
SELECT



In the case of France, the Government car
cite the situation in Indo-China, where vast
French forces are deployed against pro-
Communist rebels. :

The truth of the matter is that all post-war
economics

are precariously

It was with a knowledge of this that ECA
Administrator Paul Hoffman launched his
plan for European “integration.” He believes
that Europe can solve many of its own fiscal
troubles by getting together on matters such
as foreign exchange, customs barriers and
controls.

If Congress approves the 10 billion dollar
appropriation, western Europe may be shaken
into a little greater activity. Certainly this
outlay makes it apparent in advance that the
Legislature is likely to be cool indeed to any
new requests for funds from across the sea-

—ILN.S.



crowd. The next day, the pilo
took the ‘little wonder’ back {
Trinidad, leaving Captain Ciprian
to enjoy a few more days wit!
his many friends in this Island.

Many people will remember Mr
Skinner’s “MISS BARBADOS’
because she was on view at tt

Barbados Aquatic Club, in thi |
ball-room, now occupied by th:

cinema, from Sunday the 6th t:
Saturday 12th of November 1932.
In the early hours of the morniti;
of Sunday the 13th this little plan
was towed to “Inchmarlow,
Chancery Lane, as the pasture a
this place was to be used as ar
airstrip. On the afternoon o
Tuesday the 15th, this little planc
was air-borne with Mr, Noe
Nicolls as pilot and flew for abou’
seven minutes. On returning t
the landing strip it was seen tha!
black smoke was coming fror
the engine and that the pilot wa:
in trouble with the machine whict
was loosing height rapidly. Thi: |
resulted in its crashing within «
quarter of a mile from where i‘ |
had taken off so successfully, |

It was not until six years later |
that Barbados was put on the air-
map of the world, when K.L.M
(Royal Dutch Airlines) opened
their service between Curacao. |
Trinidad, and Barbados with their
first flight taking place to the
newly laid out airport at Seaweli
on the 19th October 1938.

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‘

ae



SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1950

HAPPY FAMILIES AND '
THE ALEXANDRA

His Excellency the Governor told parents and pupils of the
Alexandra School at their speech day on Thursday:

“Often my wife and I have driven past the entrance to this
school and hoped we should be invited one day to see inside.
I do not judge the efficiency of a school solely on the number

of academic successes.
pupils.

| Princess
Margaret
Broadcasts

1
To-morrow
‘eo WORLD CONFERENCE of

Girl Guides and Girl Scouts,
which is being held this week at
Oxford, will close with a camp-
fire to-morrow.

H.R.H. Princess Margaret, who
is the Sea Ranger Commodore, will
be present and will give to each
delegate a Message of Goodwill

from the Guides of Great Britain.
This ceremony will be broad-

—?

|

cast by the B.B.C. and will te
heard to—morrow from 4.15 to 4.45
pm. on 25.53, 19.76 and 16.95

metres. The programme will be
repeated on Sunday from 12.30 to
1.00 p.m. on 19.82 and 25.53
metres.

The broadcast to-morrow will be
heard over Radio Distribution.

TIENTS AT St. _ Peter's

Almshouse will be able to see
a Show given by the Mobile
Cinema on Monday night. This is
part of the Cinema’s programme
for next week.

On Tuesday the Cinema will
give a show on Grazettes Planta-
tion pasture for the benefit of
residents of the Fairfield and
Grazettes area of St. Michael. A
Show will be given at Colleton
Plantation yard on Wednesday
night for those of the Colleton
Plantation area of St. Lucy.

The Cinema will pay a visit to
Cranes Pasture, Christ Church, on
Thursday and give a performance
for residents of the Brittons Hill
area.

The final engagement for the
week will be a performance at
Wiltshire Playfield, St. Philip for
people of the Wiltshire area.

The current programme of the
Cinema includes the “British
News” which gives scenes of the
the West Indies Cricket team in
England, “How to Live Well” and
“Come Saturday” picturing week-
end life in England.

ANY OF THE hawkers that
were formerly in the Probyn
Street "Bus Stand have now re-
moved to the "Bus Stop in Trafal-
gar Square. This "Bus Stop was
erected for the use of passengers
awaiting ’buses going in the direc-
tion of Roebuck Street or White-
park Road but now that these
hawkers block the pavement the
passengers find it difficult to alight
or get into the ’buses,
The hawkers seen yesterday at
this spot were selling mangoes and
sweets.

RTHUR HUTCHINSON of

Pine Hill, St. Michael, re-
ported the loss of a goat valued $50
during Wednesday night. He told
the Police that it was removed
from his open yard.

The loss of a sheep was re-
ported by Gersman King of Bush
Hall. He also told the Police that
his sheep was removed from the
yard on Wednesday night.

HERE WAS ONLY one iraffic

offence recorded yesterday, A
charge was brought against a
motorist for parking in a restricted
area,

BICYCLE valued $35, which

was reported missing by
David Jones of Fontabelle on July
22, was found in a field of canes at
Cottage, St. George on Wednes-
day.

Jones told the Police that the
cycle was removed from the yard
of the Globe Theatre.

N ACCIDENT occurred on

Trafalgar Square on Thursday
between motor car M_ 2584,
owned by J. N. Goddard and
driven by William Meder of God-
dard’s Restaurant and a bicycle
owned by one Agard of Jackson
and ridden by Wilbert Stoute of
Upper Eagle Hall.

)

Stoute fell and was injured. He

went to the General Hospitai
where he was treated and dis-
charged,

The rear wheel and fork of the
cycle as well as the radiator grill,
right head lamp and left park
lamp of the car were damaged.

HILE P.C, 242 HURDLE was

on duty along Belleville at
about 11.15 p.m. on Thursday he
saw a flash of fire from an electric
wire at the end of a pole. He im-
mediately telepiioned the Electric
Company who had the wire
mended.

HE POLICE GARAGE at the

Central Station which was re-
cently extended and renovated, is
nearly completed, Painters were
occupied painting the roof beams
yesterday.



APT. C. E. RAISON and his

Police Band will give a Specia!
Programme of Music at the Prin-
cess Alice Playing Field tonight at
7.45 o'clock



The Weather

TO-DAY

Sun Rises: 5.38 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.22 p.m.
Moon (Full) 28th

YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington): Nil

Total for Month to yester-
day: 2.22 ins

Temperature (Max.): 86.5°F

Temperature (Min.): 76.0°F

Wind Velocity: 13 miles per
hour

Wind Direction: E. by N.

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.965
(3 p.m.) 29.906



“erent, strrenncnnnnmnnersrn cerns namenanneramemmtaransoe ba

[ look first at the appearance of the,

' The way they walk and talk
outside of school, their neatness|
and bearing and the good impres- |
sion which we have gained in|
seeing some of the girls as we
have passed, has been confirmed
now we have been invited inside.

Miss Laurie who has been Head-|
mistress for many years has set}

and maintained a tone in this}
school which is well known
throughout the Island. There is}

no higher tribute to a Headmis-|
tress than when an observer pay:
a compliment to the personality
of a girl and receives from an-,
other observer the comment, “But
she was trained at Alexandra.”



Congratulations

On your behalf I congratulate)
Miss Laurie on her report and the
staff generally and the school on
the achievements of the year. It!
is too late in this term to hope for
a supplementary holiday, but I)
trust that the Headmistress wil!
bear in mind early next term that
it wield be appropriate to give
the school a holiday in honour of
this Speech Day.

Some people have commiser-
ated with my wife and me that

we should have had to visit so
many schools in such a_ short
period. Although I admit that

making a series of speeches of this
type is difficult, we have thorough-|
ly enjoyed ourselves in meeting
so many people and children, I
hope i shall not give offence to the
larger schools if I say that in par-
ticular we have enjoyed visiting
the smaller schools in the country.
There is a family atmosphere in
a function of this size and as a
family is the most important unit
of human society, it creates a
feeling of goodwill and stability
in a community. |

/
Tolstoy once said: “All happy
families resemble each other but
each unhappy family is unhappy
in its own way.” There is nothing
more satisfying than a_ really}
happy family. My wife and I have
been privileged in the last month
to share the home life of a family
here in Barbados with four chil-
dren. One felt the affection and
understanding between its mem-
bers, the willingness to do things
for each other, the children antici-
pating the reeds of their parents,
the sharing of a story or a joke,
and the ready obedience of the
children.

I have come away from that
home free of all the cares of office
and full of happiness and good-
will. If all homes were like that
ene, then indeed the community
of Barbados would be a model for
the world.

And if all communities were
as happy, there would indeed be
world peace.

The point of telling you this is
to emphasize the important part
that homes play in the develop-
ment of a community and the de-
pendence of their success and that
of the community on the girls and
women of Barbados.

Opens The Door

Although the happiness of home
life does not depend on education,
education does open the door to
wider interests. As I said the
other day, the more you learn at
school the less in after life you
will be bored. You may find—as
I myself certainly found — that
however able and devoted your
teachers may be,—and as indeed
I know they are—quite a bit of
your studies at school may seem
to you to be pretty dull.



But what I do urge you to re-
alize is that, in the years after
you have left school you will ap-
preciate that what seemed dull at
the time has in fact served as a
foundation for, or a gateway to,
endless interest and delight.

Take, therefore, all the interest
you possibly can in your lessons
here and now — and I am sure
that many of you do take a great
deal of interest in many or most
of them—but if you cannot find
everything equally interesting, re-
member always there is no scrap
of knowledge that you acquire
here that may not be of the high-
est possible value to you and to
others when you grow up both for
the ordinary practical reasons of
everyday life and because it will
enable you to appreciate more
fully the fascination of this com-
plicated but endlessly varied and
stimulating world in which we
live.

Population Up
219 In June

(Barbado.



Advyrcate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN

Live-births registered as having
occurred ‘n Georgetown during
the month of June, 1950, number
299. Of these 80 were born of
parents with residence outside the
City, leaving a net total of 219.

The still-births registered num-
ber 50, but only 22 of these are
debitable to Georgetown.

Total number of deaths regis-
tered in the City in June was 175,
including 94 of persons, coming
from outside Georgetown, who
died in Georgetown institutions
and nursing homes. Added to the
81 actual city residents, are 5
deaths of Georgetowners who
died at the Mental Hospital, Fort
Canje, Berbice, and this brings the
total to 86.

What Is Journalism?

“I, AS AN old journalist, can-
poet accept off-hand the view that
journalism is a profession. I think
it is at omce an art, a vocation
and a ministry. No amount of
| professional training will fit a
man to be a true journalist unless
| he feels that his duty is to inform,
| to enlighten, and to guide the pub-
| lic through his newspaper, without
i forgetting that his power to do



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

—_—_





CADETS PARADE at St. Ann’s Fort on the first day
of their Camp

Alexandra Head Asks For
More Spacious Buildings

Welcoming the Governor and Mrs. Savage to the Alexandra
School Speech Day on Thursday, Miss Laurie, the Head-
mistress said:

I realise how strenuous and tiring the last three weeks
have been for you with their spate of Speech Days, and I
should not have been at all surprised if I had learnt that
Your Excellency was laid up with a relaxed throat, and
Mrs. Savage with a stiff right arm; however my fears have
heen groundless, and I am delighted to see you here appar-
ently quite strong and well in spite of your past arduous




























duties and cheerfully ready t

Appeal Judges
Dismiss Case

The decision of Mr. H.
Talma, Magistrate of District
Police Court—who ordered El-
1idge Chandler ot Bank Hall to
pay a fine of 30 and 2/- costs
to be paid in days or in
default -undergo one month's
imprisonment for inflicting bodily
harm on Flora Reeves also of
Bank Hall on November 10, 1949
was reversed yesterday by Their
Honours Mr H A Vaughan
and Mr. J. W. B, Chenery
Judges of vhe Assistant Court of




















A
“AN

14

Appeal
Their Honours dismissed the
case without prejudice. Flora

Reeves said on November 10, 1949
she was pulling up grass at a
spot not far from Chandler’s
house, Chandler came out of his
house and hit her son with a hoe
because he was interfering with
hic wife

She spoke to Chandler and told
him that he had no righy to .do
such a thing and he ‘turned and
struck her with the hoe across
her right leg Later Dr. Payne
treated her for the blow.

Mr. D. H. L.. Ward who appear-
ed on behalf of Chandler after
cross-examining Reeves pointed
out that Dr, Payne did not say
whay the bruise could have been
caused by. The only thing that
took place was a bit ofp talking
with Reeves’ son in which
Chandler spoke to him concerning
his wife

Mr. Ward further, submitted
that a blow dealt with the fofce
such as Reeves had told the Coury
would have been easily recognised
by a doctor,

Their Honours told Reeves that
they were not sure whether she had
been struck with a hce or not and
that there was a Certain amount
of doubt in vheir minds.- The
doctor had nov given the cause of
the bruise and that was the mgin
thing in the case

* le :
12 Cases Filed
‘ a .

Against Prisoner
Twelve cases were yesterday
filed against Alonza Gaskin of
Passage Road for the embezzel-
ment of a sum of money totalling
£21. 5s. which was given to him
for David Pile. These cases were
adjourned until September 20, by!
Magistrate Walwyn, as Gaskin is
at present serving a term of im-
prisonment for a similar offence’
at Glendairy. The money was{





{

April, May and June.

DID NOT LIGHT LAMPS

For not having lighted larnps to
the car T-30 on May 5, Magistrate
G. B. Griffith imposed a 10s
fine on Gilbert Nurse of Jemmotts
Lane. The fine is to be paid i:
14 days or in default undergo 14
days’ hard labour.

FINED FOR WOUNDING

Two fines of 10s. in 7 days
and 20s. in 14 days were imposed
on Verona Collins of Beckles
Road, by Magistrate G. B. Griffith,
and Alfred Harewood of Holder’s
Land by Magistrate C. L. Walwyn
when they were both found
guilty of wounding Doris Browne
and Archibald Rock on July 26
and 29.

Magistrate H. A. Talma imposed
a fine of 15s. to be paid in 14
days, on Peter Harding for black-
guarding along Roebuck Street,
a public highway on July 13

FINED 15/-; APPEALS

Clarence Cummings of Lemon
Arbor, was fined 15s. when Mag-
istrate H. A. Talma found him
guilty of stealing a quantity of
wood valued 2s. from Frederick
Sandiford on May 5. Cummings
who has numerous convictions
appealed against thi decision
Sgt. Parris who prosecuted, alsc
gave notice of appeal

40/- FOR ASSAULT

Rupert Alleyne of Lodge Hill
as yesterday ordered pay
fine of 40s. in 14 days, en he
pleaded guilty of assaulting P.C

|

to a










jdepends on the industrial and | Bratiow aite while on duty on away
; ‘ 3efore os } ine
jcommercial sides of newspaper | 28. Before impo a the fine,
| enterprise.” Magistrate ( lL. Walwyn told
i H. Wickham Steed speaking | B aite that that
i n “The British Pre a BBC j of ECO!
Oversea gramme it I .





given to him during the months of} Long

erform them again.
ach Speech Day is a milestone
on the road that the school travels;
we pause for a moment to survey
past successes with pride, to
mourn over defeats, to assess our
needs, and to make fresh resolu-
tions for the future; and so to-
day I propose to tell you some-
thing of the work of the school
in the year January to December
1949.
Six Pass S.C. Exam

Eight pupils were entered for
the School Certificate examina-
tion; of these 6 obtained a certifi-
cate, 3 being placed in Grade II,
one of them with exemption from
the London Matriculation exam-
ination, and 3 in Grade IIl, Two
girls reached Distinction standard
in Seripture, one of them being
placed 2nd among all Barbadian
eandidates in this subject; and
two other girls tied for the 3rd
place in Art in the island. It
was a disappointment that no
@ On Page 7

0



Chief Judge Grants
Application.

IN THE Court of Chancery
yesterday His Honour the Chie
Judge, Sir Allan Collymore, grant-
ed an application for decree for
appraisement and sale of 2,586
square feet of land and a dwelling
house at Béxters Road, and 1,994
square feet of land and a dwelling
house at Cheapside in the suit of
C. H. Williams et al (Plaintiffs)
and E .D, Mottley (Defendant).

Mr. W. W Reece, K.C., instruct-
ed by Messrs. Hutchinson and
Banfield represented the plain-
tiffs.

In the same Court His Honour
granted an application for decree
for appraisement and sale of three
acres, two roods oi land at
Worthing View, Christ Church in
the suit of M. L. Huskisson,
executrix of the will N
Eversley, deceased, versus I
Baez a (Defendant).

In both cases the Registrar
handed in a report of the Liens
affecting the suits.















J



12 Wills Admitted
To Probate

THE wills of 12 people were ad-
mitted to Probate by His Honour
the Chief Judge, Sir Allan Colly-
more, in the Court of Ordinary
yesterday. Their names follow:

Beryl Renna Blackman, Caroline
Simmons, Inez Williamina Roberts,

Jane Elizabeth Matilda Rudder,
George Edwin Olton, William

(St. Michael); Noel Gar-
raway Gowdey, Annie Allamb)
(Christ Church); Walter Conrad
Crichlow (St George); James
Nathaniel Wright (st. Philip)

Gladys Albertha Hunte (St .Lucy)
Adriana Squires (St. John)



Convicted; Discharged

Nineteen-year-old Wesley Bowen
of Chapman Street was convictel
and discharged when he appeared
before Magistrate C, L. Walwyi)
for the larceny of a quantity of
mangoes, valued 8d. from Wesley
Hall Boys’ School on July 27
Magistrate C. L. Walwyn warned
him that the next time he appeared
for such an offence, he would be
sent to prison.



TRAFFIC ISLANDS!

TOO EXPENSIVE

Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN
Government would like to im-
prove th. looks of Georgetown’s
streets by replacing temporary
structures with permanent
attractive traffic islands and has
written the Mayor and Town
Council asking them to contribute
to the costs
Replying to the “invitation” the
Council apart from explaining that

their finances at the present do
not permit them to contribute
have reminded Government that

the Council receives no portion of




the fines for breaches of the traffic
regulations in the City, and in
addition that Traffic control is, by
law, entirely in the hands of
Government. The Council con-
siders therefore, that the expendi
ture for the erection of Traffic



be borne entire]



and |



Cadets Go
Into Camp

Marching with their heads up-
right and swinging their arms, the
Barbados Cadets who
camp yesterday for the first day |
of their eight days’ stay at St.
Ann's Fort, were seen on the
Barracks Square receiving in-
struction from R.S.M.1, Browne
The day began with the boys
being allocated to their various
rooms, after which there was a
demonstration on laying kit. Dur-
ing the period for break, the boys
were seen assembled in groups as
they talked about camp life. A
shout from the R.S.M.1. informe
them that it was time for work
again, and in a moment’s time, the

boys looking eager and anxious
were ready for further instruc-
tions. Posting the guard was their |

next lesson, and this was done by |
a squad of cadets The bugle call
was next explained, after which
the company was dismissed.

Having received their instruc-
tions, the boys strolled off to their
quarters and were heard discuss-
ing what they should do when on
guard duty

The rest of the day being a holi- |

day, the boys swarmed the recre-
ation room where they spent the
time playing indoor games



‘The Windows’
Are Untidy

MANY mothers who live in the|
vicinity of Bay Street and Beckles |

Road take their children o|
evenings to while away an hour}
on the Bay Street Esplanade. It!

is at that time of the evening, too,
that workmen who live nearby,
relax upon the esplanade seats to
enjoy a quiet smoke,

With the well-kept band stacd,
the green turf, small flower
garden and shady trees, the}
esplanade has just that touch}

which invites mothers and nurse:
te carry their children to romp
there, Other “windows” by the
sea along the same street are jus
the reverse of the esplanade
These newly made “windows'’
are in even more thickly populated

entered |



!
|

|

}
|
}

|







areas, but mothers of the district
told the Advocate yesterday that!
they would prefer to stay at-home
it it were not convenient to go the
longer distance to the esplanade,
rather than take their children to
such untidy places

Visitors to sick friends or
relatives at the hospital sometimes
“kill time” around the “window”
at the side of the Eye Department
when they are early or the
evening's visitors are many, byt
it is not a very comforting scene
for one to be around just before
going into a sick room

There are bush and heaps
bricks about that “window”

rusty pipe runs out int
ea The other “window”
Wellington Street is over-run
bush

and
the
nea

with,

’ )



Teachers, Parents
Hold Discussion

Teachers and parents of the
pupils of the St. Silas’ Girls’
School, St. James held a meeting

at the school yesterday to discuss
how they could co-operate to get
the best out of the school children.
In her address to the parents,
the head teacher Mrs, E. Spencer
stressed that her ambition was to
turn out useful girls and told them
plans she had in view
for the improvement of the school
Parents told of the problems of
their children and their school lite
and exchanged uggestion for
ible

of many

8) remedie

Governor Makes
3 Appointments

HIS Excellency the Governor
has made the following acting
pointments:-







Mr. L. N. Chenery, Actir
Assistant Secretary, Colonial
Secretary's Office to act as Assist~-
int Colonial Secretary with effec
i the 10th of July, 1950.
| S. G. Inniss, Acting Harbour
land Shipping Master, to act

| Assistant Secretar Colonial S
jretary’s Office, with effect from the
{24th of July, 1950

Commander H Gartside-Tip-

|pinge, O.B.E., R.N. (Retd.) to act
jas Harbour and Shipping Master
wi t from the 24th of Jul

th effec













;mained







PAGE FIVE





}

' The Harbour |

Policeman
AND HIS WORK

lhe work of a Harbour Police
man is very often not as spectacu-
lar as that of his land patrolling
counterpart, but his role is just
as important, and his work is jus!
as exacting. He is on duty fo
the same four-hour period,
enjoys the same short and
leave periods

lor

But if the local harbour police-
man’s work is not spectacular, !
uniform is picturesque. It dat
back to the days of Lord Nelso:
and Colonel R. T. Michelin, Com
missioner of Police told the Adv«
cate yesterday that he has no pla:

| to change it.

3 Launches

The local Harbour Police carry
ne Inspector, one Sergeant and
three Corporals. It consists of 39

stables. Three motor launches
re used, one large four-oared bo¢
ana _ in addition there are fo
two-oared boats for use in tl
careenage.

The launches patrol Carlisle Ba
throughout the day and night, and
boat patrolling of the careenag
maintained at all times. Th
Harbour Police attend the arrival
and departure of all ships that
visit this port. They patrol th
waterfront and are mainly con
cerned with the prevention
smuggling and thefts of
being landed from lighters

is

cargo

Colonel Michelin said he hope
it would soon be possible to hav
the Harbour’ Police launch
equipped with wireless sets so th:
they could be contacted at
times during their patrol



FIVE SHIPS
IN PORT

’ FIVE ships were in port yester-
day.
Roaney, C.N.S. passenger freightei
the S.S. Herme, Dutch freighte:
the S. Mormacgulf of th
Moore Mec Cormack line,
Harrison liner Specialist and th
5.8, City of Dieppe of the “Mans”
line,

The Rodney left during the night
for Canada with sugar, molasses
and rum while the other four re
to complete discharging
their cargoes,

Flour, cold



storage meat and
apples, butter and various other
items of food were among the
cargo discharged by these ships

The Bay was busy with launches
and lighters going to and from
the ships.



Sunken Boat Not
Yet Recovered

The 121 foot fishing boat
“Orinoco” owned by 48-year-old
Aubrey Quintyne of Supers Land,
St. Philip which sank on Tuesday

with its crew of three about 15

miles off the shore of St. Philip
has not yet been recovered.
The crew were fishing when

| high winds and rough seas broke

the jib of the boat toppling it over
on its side

The “Orinoco”
$400.00

is insured

for



Record Crop

Figures now to hand at the
Department of Science and Agri

culture show a record crop this
year of 158,185 tons of sugar i)-
cluding Fancy Molasses, nearly

2,000 tons over that of the previ-
ous record of 1939. The yield then
was 156,443 tons,





b
Can't Shoot
LONDON,
Major General Cyril Frederick
Coleman 47-year-old commander
of Britain's South-West District
and noted marksman, told army

cadets
shoot,”
Speaking

“The British Army cannot
at Dorchester thi
first-class marksman said

“If only the Army could shoot
a bit better we should be well on
the way to clearing up the Com-
munist trouble in Malaya

“The British Army used in 1914

to be a very fine shooting, Army
That was brought out at Mon
and afterwards. It does not apply

today

The General added that another
of the Army’s troubles was leader-
hip. He said

“There
ducing senior
Army cannot
corporals,
lieutenants

a5 not the major-generosl
wh tne fighting in the
Communist war in Malaya but the
lance-corporal or second lieutenant
leading men,”

is no diffieulty
officers,
get young
sergeants, and

in pro-
but the
lance-
second

dot

six
—I,N.S.



|

|

They were the S.S. Lady,

the!









































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ALSO
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Flour Comes
a ea Geen FIBRE DOOR MATS
some ] j rags oO flour
Pate melee tee er Plain. Ea $2.80, $2.24
a soars bre sh t and $1.74
- : ) | Figured, Ea $2.99, $2,39
du ing the e% 1g for Bele $2.34, $1.80
|

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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Sanaa eames



SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1950

ae ree Christian Sciene

~*~

Y Christian Science
)

)



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON












ST FLOOR, BUWEN & SONS
(Broead Street)
Hours: 10 am—2 p.m
Tuesdays, Wednesdays,

Fri

‘8.
{ 10 a.m.—12 o'clock.

; Keading Room

Saturdays.
\' thts Room the Bible wos D
the Christian Science text-book,
Serepee aod Heatth wita Key to
the Secripturce by MARY BALLER
tnbyY may “De read, oe

{ or pun based.
Visitors Are Wetcome
wwwwwwwe

End Rheumatism
While, You Sleép

+4, O2 RATHER SERGEANT # 1¢ you suffer sharp stabbing
nite MOCO
oh ATOS



pains, if joints are swollen, it
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through faulty kidneysection
Other symptoms of Kidney
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Neuritis, Lum , Getting
up Nee Dizziness, Nerv-
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Fomeaatey Loss of Energy and Appetite and Fre-
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nedicines can't help much because you must
fet to the root cause of the trouble.
Che Cystex treatment is specially compounded
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| i .

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Cystex is approved by Doctors and Chemists Ip
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BUT THE FARMER UP



GRACIOUS -WHAT 16 THIS IS THE















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mart and = =At the Club Jim said: “You're
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he production of this Morris-Commereial ro cwt. éxpress délivery van

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EVEN IN THIS BACKWOODS TOWN, WE VE] | NOW, MR. NAPOLEON,
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SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1950

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



CLASSIFIED ADS. |






















2 TELEPHONE 2508
IN MEMORIAM > tl
FOR RENT
IN loving memory of my dear beloved
son LISLE INNISS who died 31st
July, 1946
Sad and stidden we the call HOUSES
Of the dear one loved by all -_
Depths of sorrow no word can te BUNGALOW From Aug. ist 1950
Of the lost one we loved so i yiy Built Bungalow, Welches
Days of sorrow still come « 3 bedrooms and all modern con-
Secret tears do often flo ces. Dial 2104
For today has brought before us 29.7.50—2n
Sad memories of four yeurs ago
Ever to be remembered by Madaline FLATS.One well furnished, & one
Innigs (Mother) Belfield iss (Uncley Unfurnished near The Rocks, Hastings
Megan Inniss (Sister) Roberts , Box x.y.z. C/o Advocate Co
(Aunt) 29.7, 50—1n 28 .7.50—3n
IN loving mer y of w Dear be- TWO HOUSES - At Hastings, fur-
loved Sister HENRIETTA WEEKES, "Shed and unfurnished, one having 3



known as Sissy who passed away on| bedrooms and the other 4 berooms,



July 29 1950 | vith all modern conveniences Apply
My Sorrow and heart ache Madam Ifill, “Elise Court’, Hastings
No one can heal 25.7. 50—t.f.n
My memory a keepsab
ina ROOMS — Large furnished Rooms,

very cool running water. With or with-
out board. Terms moderate. Ten min-
utes walk to Clubs or City. Dial 3356

25.7. 50-—t.f.n

My Dear one has gone

Though not far away

For we'll meet in the garden

Of Memories each day ,













i From Page 5 sor, but they hope that this
ef } I
pupil from this school obtained a, omission will soon be repairea
iGrade I certificate (Honmours);| We also regret the resignatior.
; but as 344 boys and girls in Bar- | of Mr. Trimingham, who for sc
| bados took this examination, and} many years was our capable Sec-
4 of our candidates obtained a | retary and Treasurer, and when
place among the first 50, and the | obliged through ill-health to give
other two among the first 100, I| up these duties, remained for
feel that the resylt was a sound | some time as a member of the
achievement—a “sueccés d’estime”’| Governing Body. We wish him
though not “a succés fou many happy years of retirement,
The other results which yOU;] welcome the new members
will find recorded on the prow} sall- > nein al
gramme relate chiefly to Art. As | eer rows, Supekes, se ae
usual we took the examinations of ton. May 1 take this op ortunity
the Royal Drawing Soriety, on |io5 "4 ee ee ee fc
which I received the report, “An | 10%,‘ express my grateful thanks
P > to the Governing Body for their
) encouraging result. Commendably | jing consideration and rt
direct work throughout.” = 54| OF cnosals I ap eae ;
papers were entered; there were | }), poner viii, sceliadaeta
no failures, and 33 obtained Hon- | ™¢™. A
ours. I should like also to thank

In addition 6 pupils sent sheets | those who have kindly given us

ef work to the R.D.S. Exhibition. | P'izes. Mrs. O'Neal, the lifelong
All were commended, two being friend of the school, after her
placed in the Ist Class and four retirement from the Governing
in the 2nd Class. Body, has continued to give us

her yearly prize for Reading; Mr.
Brancker has most generously
given two prizes: one for music,

League Of Empire Prize
Although the League of the
Empire Competition in May be-

























Ever to be remembered by Marion j
Weekes 'Sister) Gloria Springer sé
(Niece) | PUBLIC NOTICES
29.7.50—1n
IN perpetual memory of a dear
friend ROSA MURRAY passed to
the Great beyond. One year today | £20 MONTHLY
Shi duly 308. EASILY earned at home in spare time
Through all Eternity to thee dealing in stamps. No experiences
A grateful Pil raise essary. Suitable for either sex. 1
But O Eternity too short also contact you with Students in
To utter all thy Praise Colonies and Dominions for pen cor-
J. Howard & Others es respondents. Enclose 2% stamp. Air
29.7.50-.1n.] Mail only take fews days. F. Parting-
IN Loving aseenmee of oni ‘ ton, Prospect House, 329 Wigan Road,
vemory ) dear " 4 2
mother SILINA JORDAN died 28 July| “igh Lancs, England 20.7.50.—30n
1948. Aged 66. pre a ee eas .
She heard a voice, we did not hear,
That said she must not stay, NOTICE
pt saw a hand we did not see,
at beckoned her away PARISH OF ST. PETER
She is not dead Maynard road leading from Wyndover
But sleeping in Jesus, to Jerusalem Agricultural Station 15
She was sown in weakness closed to traffic
Shall raise in power By order of the Commissioners.
She was sown a natural body E. H. CHALLENOR,
Shall raise a spiritual body. Inspector of Highways, St. Peter
George and Lisie Headley, Stella,] 28.7,.50—3n
Ida, Daisy, Heen; Millicent (children)
29.7.50—I1n, Ev
—: OFFICIAL NOTICE
: a ever loving memory of my be- BARBADOS
over father who fell asleep on July .
29th 1943 - IN THE ASSISTANT COURT
My sorrow and heartache ! care a ache eR
No one can heal (Equitable Ju 7
My memory a keepsake LINDSAY ERCIL BYEBURN One
No one cg stea
My dear one hae gone ADRIANA SEALY Defendant.
Though not far away IN pursuance of an Order in this
For we'll meet in the garden Court in the above actién made on the
Of memories each day 23rd day of June 1950, I give notice to
Ever to be remembered by Mrs. | all persons having any estate, right or
Blenman; Mrs lene Carrington: interest in or any lien or incumbrance
Ouida; (Children) al > se affecting all that certain piece or par-
Doris Nurse (New york; : gennua cel of land situate at Jackmans in the
Ormond, (grand children) . parish of Saint Michael and island afore-
May he rest in peace. said containing by admeasurement one
American Papers please Copy rood fourteen and three fifths perches
29.7.50--1n, | or thereabouts of which area three-fifths
=— ee ee | Of 8 perch forms part of a road in
FOR ‘ x common hereinafter mentioned abutting
SALE and bounding on lands now or late of
A. Coggins on lands of Lower Estate
——| Plantation on lands now or late of
AUTOMOTIVE Clifford Jordan and on a road in com-
mon or however else the same may
ENGINE—One (1) 5 H.P. Motor Boat| butt and bound being the property ot
Engine as good as. new, Apply V.| the defendant to bring before me an
Emtage, Barbados Telephone Co account of their said claims with their
29.7.50—1n, | witnesses, documents and vouchers, to

be examined by me on any Tuesday, 01
Friday between the hours of 12 (noon)
and 3 o'clock in the afternoon, at the
Office of the Clerk of the Assistant
Court of Appeal at the Court House,
Bridgetown, before the 13th day of Sep
tember 1950, in order that such claims



AUTO CYCLE — New Hudson
Cycle. Phone 2521.

Auto
27.7,.50—3n,

ET

Farmall H. Tractor and Grass Cutter
22.6 D. B. H. App.y to M, D. Elliot.
Ashford Plantation, St. John

22.7.50—7n | may be ranked according to the nature

——— | and priority thereot respectively; other-

MOTOR CYCLE—1% B.S.A._ Motor] wise such persons will be precluded

Cycle. Good condition ee oa from the benefit of the said Decree, and
.50—in.

be deprived of all claim on or against
the said property

Claimants are also notified that they
must attend the said Court on Wednes-

itch psapihtamieieeaaialaemailininaantameantet |
TRUCK: One (1) 1934 Chevrolet Truck, |
A-l

Condition. Apply to C. Herbert,













55, Tudor St. City, Telephone 3686. | day, the 18th day of September 1950, at
50—2n | 19 o'clock a.m. when their said claims
. will be ranked.
VAUXHALL, 25 h.p. Going Cheap a2 p
$400.00. Ring Evelyn 2987 or awards oe hee ee hand this 23rd day
one. ar mee one I. V. GILKES,
Pa nen en
Ag Clerk of the Assistant Court o1
Appeal
ELECTRICAL 29.6-50—-3n
COOLERATOR — One Coolerator in
very good condition Can be seen at
B. Korn, 2 Roebuck St. or Phone 3205. OFFICIAL SALE
29.7 .50—2n
BARD AD TH ASSISTANT COURT
IN THE AS!
LIVESTOCK OF APPEAL



(Equitable Jurisdiction) .

—_—
HORSE—One reliable riding or draft LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL

mare, Very quiet. No reasonable offer | Plaintift
Tetieel)cevane: 2008 29.7.50-1n,! ADRIANA SEALY . Defendant
29.7.50—1n." NOTICE is hereby given that by vir-

jtue of an Order of the Assistant Court

| of Appeal dated the 23rd day of June

MISCELLANEOUS 1950 there will be set up for sale to the
s idder 2 the

¢ t ight | highest bidder at the Office of
Saree re Fee pel Clerk of the Assistant Court of Appea:
ver ee ave y at the Court House, Bridgetown, be-
ao tween the hours of 12 (noon and 2

A. BARNES & CO. LTD.

15.7.50—T.F.N. o'clock in the afternoon on Friday, the

15th day of September 1950 All that

RUBBLE-STONE Concrete-Stone, } certain piece or parcel of land situate

| ok-S » ¢ able f at Jackmans in the Parish of Saint
eases aa Braet a aeane Aa: Michael and island aforesaid containing
sa See e 29.7.50—8n, | >Y admeasurement one rood fourteen

and three fifth perches or thereabouts
of which area three fifths of a perch




















Ee
THE MAYFAIR GIFT SHOP annoyn-
ces a new shipment of Dorothy Gray’s
Beauty Preparationmay we help you to
requirements.
choose your ‘q) ne ai,

ST

TYRES AND BATTERIES. Sizes 34 x
7, 32 x 6, 30 x 5 and other sizes, also
Oldham 17 plate batteries. Guaranteed
Enquire Auto Tyre Company Trafalgar
Street. Phone 2696. 21.7.50—t.f.n.

WHITE ANTHURIUM PLANTS —
Phone 2521 27.7.50—B8n

WANTED







=—=—

HELP
—

AN EXPERIENCED MAID — Refer-
ence required. Apply to Mrs Grey
Massiah, Merton Lodge, Collymore
Rock. 29.7.50—2n.

YOUNG MAN-To train as driver/
projectionist for 16mm. film appara-
tus. Secondary education and some
knowledge of electricity a recommenda-
tion. Apply by letter only in own
handwriting and _ enclosing pies of
testimonials to British Council, “Wake

feld". 29.7.50—3n

A JUNIOR for our office Apply by
letter and in person STUART &
SAMPSON Ltd.










29.7. 50—1n

CLERK—To assist with customs work

Apply by/ letter only stating pew
experience. C. F rison & Co. Lid,
experience. ( F. Harrison “ mond
—_—————— ee
MISCELLANEOUS
oo ‘ .
USED POSTAGE STAMPS WANTED
Prompt cash paid for used stamps
If you wish, merchandise such as
fountain pens, cameras, clothing ete

will be sent in exchange Send 200 or

more stamps. TROY HUFFMAN, P.O

Box 331, Miami 3, Florida; U.S A.
29.7.50—2n

WANTED TO BUY
OLD SEWING MACHINES out of
use Good prices paid. Apply Vv
Vaughn, Kings St. or Fairchild and
Trobyn Street 29.7 .50-—2n

LOosT & FOUND

LOST

TICKET —
Finder Please
A. C. Watson,





Serie>
return
Hotei

SWEEPSTAKE
A.A.A. 0636
same to Mrs. M

Windsor, Hastings
50—In

Chain
Jem-

Gold

—— ae
BRACELET—A
â„¢ Patrick's

Bracelet between, St
mott’s Land and Convent
be rewarded on returning

plain

it to the Pres-
29.7.50—2n

ORIENTAL

(SE HABLA ESPANOL)
CURIOS, IVORY, TEAK, SANDAL

JEWELLERY, BRASSWARE, TAP-

ESTRIES, PERFUMES

KASHMERE

GLOVES,

Finder will



forms part of a road in common herein-
after mentioned abutting and bounding
on lands now or late of A. Coggins on
lands of Lower Estate Plantation on
lands now or late of Clifford Jordan
and on a road in common or however
else the same may butt and bound being

the property of the defendant and if
not then sold the said property will be

set up for sale on every succeeding

Friday between the same

£67.14.2
Dated this 23rd day of June 1950.
I. V. GILKES,

Ag Clerk of the Assistant Court of

Appeal

29.6.50—3n
’





PUBLIC SALES





AUCTION
UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER

BY instructions received from Mrs
F. H. Gibbons I will sell at her house
“Gwenville’, Black Rock on
day next, 3rd August at 1 p.m



Wardrobe;
chairs; (1) pair Morris chairs
Mahog: couch; mirror; Oil stove
(1) Mahog: China cabinet;
crawers; Dressing table; Mahog
ing chairs; hat stand; sideboard
many other items of interest
TERMS CASH
D'Arcy A. Scott.

includes;
mahog:

Mahog:

Auctioneer.
29.7,.50—4n

EEE

SHARES in the BARBADOS

40/- per share, plus stamp duty.
CARRINGTON & SEALY
Lucas Street,




hours until
the same is sold for a sum not less than

Thurs-
her
entire lot of household furniture which
upright

Chest of
fold—

and

SHIP-
PING & TRADING CO. LIMITED at

longs really to this year’s work | 2%¢ one for Scripture to the girl)
and not last year’s, I will stil] | Who was 2nd in the island with
mention that the school won the | Distinction standard; Miss

Browne has given a prize to the
other girl who attained Distinc-
tion standard in Scripture; and
Miss O. Dapeiza, one of our “Old
Girls,” has given g Good Conduct
prize, as a token of her gratitude
for what she owes to her old
school.

Junior Fourth Prize for a Hand-
work project, consisting of a
model and a scrap-book illustra-
ting the landing of the first set-
tlers in Barbados.

This work, along with some of
the needlework executed during |
the year is on show in one of the
class-rooms, and I hope that you
will have an opportunity of in-
specting it, after the
ment.

During the year I have been
delighted to hear of successes
of my former pupils. Gladwyn





Art Classes
entertain- | My thanks too, to the British
Council for their many kind-
nesses, They arranged for Mr.
John Harrison to give Art-
classes and lectures, which seven
Trimingham, who was Ist in| pupils and three of the Staff of
the island in the S.C. of 1946,| this school attended with the
has been training as a teacher | greatest interest and apprecia-
in England at Ambleside Col-!} tion; they gave a film-show of
lege. She has just obtained her| Macbeth to the School Certifi-
diploma with outstanding suc-|cate Form, who were keenly
cess, and has been appointed | interested, as they were studying
to a post in one of the London | that play; and they arranged that
County Council schools, Marita} Mr. Fuller should visit Speights-
Archer, who has been studying | town and give us the joy of a
music at Mc. Gili University, | most delightful recital.

obtained her diploma last Aug-| 1 wish also to record my grati-
ust, She is mow teaching music | tude to the Staff for their unfail-
in Montreal, but will return | ing devotion to duty and their
later to the University to study | loyal help in all emergencies, and
for the degree of Doctor of | particularly to Miss Agard for her
Music. She did so well in the} staunch support as Acting Senior
Diploma Exam. that the Dean | Assistant during the absence on
of the University is hoping that | leave of the Senior Assistant.
she will be awarded a scholar-| So much for the past, now
ship. Enid Skinner, who was | What of the future? -- The build-



one of the first nurses at the| ings do not make the school,
General Hospital to be awarded | they are but the shell within
a British Council Scholarship | which the living organism

to train in England, became ajbreathes and moves; but if the
State Registered nurse in 1948, shell were too small, that organ-
smce then she has taken a|ism would be cramped and dwarf-

post-graduate course in Mid- ed and maimed. We have out-
wifery, and is at present doing | 8â„¢Own our shell. This Hall, as
District Midwifery in Surrey. | YOU can see, is much too small;

Gloria Ramsay and Viola Babb, |'t cannot accommodate all the

who are training at our General | Parents, and those girls that you

Hospital, were among the prize- see are less than a third of the

winners this year, the former weno need a new and big-

carrying off the Hygiene prize, .

and the latter the prize as -the Classrooms Needed

best Junior nurse. We need new class-rooms; at.

This year, like most years, has | Present four Forms are sharing
been one of mingled sunshine two ane, We want a studio for
and sorrow. I record with grief ;2Ur Art-classes, and a properly


















the passing of Mr. Hutson, one ae ‘ oe : ol . powease
of the members of our Govern- Seaman steesia = ae eves
ing Body, whose integrity of | housecraft. Several parents have

character, sound practical ability, approached me too about Com
won him the respect of all. His ercial classes; but we cannot
loss has been __ particularly | organise them without a qualified
mourned by the Staff, to whose | teacher, equipment, and a room to
difficulties he always lent a|hold them. One step forward I
sympathetic ear, for he was the} am hoping to take, I plan to start
elected Representative on the}a second language, and hope to
Governing Body of the Assistant ]introduce Latin next year.

teachers of this and our brother} I have been very thankful to
schools, the Coleridge and Parry.}have the wall which has been
‘ No Representative built along a part of the boundary
At present the Assistant teach-|the covered-way, irreverently

christened by the pupils “Pig-pen
alley”, will now have to change
its name! I hope it may be possi-
ble next year to put a similar
wall on the other side.

But, as I nave said, the build-
ings matter far less tnan the life
that goes on within, and so I
would remind parents that the
whole of the education we give

ers have no representative, as
they have not yet been granted the
opportunity to elect his succes-
OOOO

PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife ALMA ELRI
TA BLACKMAN (nee Greaves) as I de
not hold myself responsible for her
anyone else contracting any debt o1
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me
Sed. EUSTACE MERTON BLACKMAN 4

Sargeants Village,
Christ Church
29.7 .50-—2n



For MARL, SAND
GARDEN MOULD
LIME and

BLOCK STONE

Dial 4503





SO SIMPLE



NEW ARRIVALS

LUCAS DYNAMO SETS
CYCLE BATTERY SETS
CYCLOMETERS
CYCLE BULB HORNS
PUMPS & CONNECTIONS

NEWSAM & CO.



Just the turn of a tap &
The Regulo of a Gas Cooker
and a Child can get
PERFECT BAKING RESULTS
Call and see the latest Gas Cookers
At your Gas Showrooms Today.






NOTICE

A LL PERSONS shaving
Shares in B.T.C, Ticket
Books for the Midsummer
Meeting Series A. 0640—49
and B. 7630—9 are requested
to communicate with me the
undersigned not later than
4.8.50 as these books were

A REMINDER
TO-NITE

Mr. GEORGE COBHAM
begs to remind Invitees &
Friends of his

Birthnight Dance





















mislaid,
at his Residence, corner of (Sgd.)_ C. G, DRAYTON,
Nelson and King Wm. Sts c/o L. M. Clarke (Jeweller),

A Gala Time in store. James St.,

29.7.50,—I1n.







on Bottom Floor of
One (1) Aspinall pan

4 0” dia. Disc ... 35

THE OLD RED STORE

REAL ESTATE
—<———es
LA %Acre of by - at Boe ey PPO OO PPAF POO
aes i : For Sale
+
was con® Public Announcement x .
overlooking the Sea, having 4 bed- % ~ AT
rooms, delightful Balconies, etc, with % ’ o x
all modern Satrrse iene: ae |S WEEKES AUCTi N x MOUNT PLEASANT
Beach, safe bathing, for quic sale | ¢ .
£3,500. or fully furnished £4,000. | « x PLANTATION,
Possession within one month. For x SINESS % st. JOHN
viewing Phone 4683 or rh 0-8 R a . .
70-50 %,
—_—_——— fr % One (1) 2 K.W. Belt
“STAUNTON"— Approximately — on | \ PREMISES e| driven D.C, Dynamo £40
15,678 sq. ft. Lawn to the east. 5 % 3
Bedrooms, situated 6th Avenue Belle- | \ xy One (1) Switch Board 15
ville. Apply next door to ee: Waite % cob 4 x pian %
Phone 2553. Inspection any hour % to be opene as soon as | ca m | One (1) Steam E e
26.7.60—3n get possession of premises ¥| ons 10 ngin 5
eee LEO See ae ek | | eee arn ener ee +
a
-
oS
-
Pd
%

28,7 .50-—6n











“4
5
>
%
x
%
x
Be High Street 300 sq. ft, ....... oy, 40
WORTHY DOWN xg %
A delightful Residence at Top Rock lS Have you anything for Sale? One (1) Juice Heater
built in solid Stone, cement use | % . r . ° x 500 fe hges
throughout, Everite Roof desigged % What do you want? % 7"
Construction by R, A. Beard, A.M “ " ’ One , . Ee
Inst. BLE.. F.V.A, Having Three Bed-|% Have you any Correspon- x > sr Multi
s each with conmecting Toilet 1 % dence which you cannot fix? x $ ar oller
Se eae nie | Seer eee st % Have you anyone in trouble? ¥|/% one (1) 7 & 12’ Multi-
ing, Ven z Can I be of any help? BIB tubular Boiler .. 45
Two Car Ga 1% : 21%
Rooms, Toilet ¥|X DIAL 8150 X)R Apply:
% MP
1X C. N. WEEKES if D. M. SIMPSON & CO.
1% %
29.7 | Poser oF [6669S 0SS9OSSOOOTCESSOOOD |





One (1) Juice Heater

5999999995099 569599" SSSSS99999'

Alexandra Head Asks Larger Building







On Guided Missile
Report

here depends on a three-fold cord,
—parents, teachers, children; and
if any one strand is weak, the
whole suffers. Will you therefore

give me your whole-hearted co- | NASSAU, Bahamas: July 27
operation? I welcome healthy| The Guided Missile Bill relating
criticism, and am always ready to}to the establishment of raday
listen to suggestions—or even com- | equipped stations in the Banama
plaints!—from parents. Islands was given a rough ride
Christian Ideals jin vhe House of Assembly last
The mind and character of aj} Pisht

The agreement was approved
of in principle but in a lengthy
heated debate, they criticised the

we wish beautiful and useful

!

|
child are like a garden in which
plants to grow; but we who are

|

!

gardeners know how difficult the details of the Bill proposed by
task is: the weeds spring up so Government and reported from
fast; there are so many

and pests that infest the plants |day night

and hinder their health and The Bill referred back to the

beauty .

We wish our children to grow
up with Christian ideals, to have
the true Christian graces, to be
filled with the love of God, from
Which issues the love of our fel-
low-man. I fear there is too
much selfishness amongst us; the

Committee for furvher considera-
tion and the House adjournel
until today when it is expected
that the Committee will report on
the

al

amended Bill

-C.P.

MAIL NOTICE





|

plagues : House in Committee on Tues-
|



world is full of war and dissen Mails for Trinidad by the Sch. Gar
sion to-day: disputes between Pc ee eee eee
“la 5 ree races otween rae
classes, between races, between | Parcel, Registered and Ordinary. Mails
nations, which all arise from | at 10.15 on the 29th of July, 1950
selfishness. Let us try to weed Mails for Grenada, by the Sch
out this fault and replace it with | “Zoleen” will be closed at the General
lave. | Post Office as under

Parcel, Registered and Ordinary Mails

|
1 therefore earnestly appeal to}
you parents to join with me in|
cultivating these gardens which |
we have to tend so that they may |

at 10.15

a.m. on the 29th of 1950





AUCTION:
SALE

be filled with Christian flowers of
beauty, so that they may be a
joy and place of refreshment to
the community in which we have
to live.






« Fl
KR f 4? Furniture & Effects at
-* “ |
x ad

Welches,
between

Christ Chureh
Maxwells and
Oistins

WEDNESDAY,

August 2nd, at 11 a.m.
and if not concluded

THURSDAY at 11 a.m.
“VIEWING”

Morning of and day prior
to Sale from 2—5 p.m.


















COTTON PRINTS
New Designs 36 ins. at 53c

Flowered & Plain
SPUNS, LINENS & SILKS

|
|
in Outstanding Patterns




PLASTIC HANDBAGS
all Shades at Reduced Prices
SPECIAL !!

GENTS’ SUITINGS
in Striped and Plain

Bi aes: $3.50 & $4.07

A VISIT WILL CONVINCE
YOU.










john *4. Biadon







(Auctioneer)
THE BARGAIN HOUSE iat Plantations Building.
30 SWAN ST. i Phone 4640,
| sl















BARGAINS :=
MANILLA ENVELOPES 6144” x 354” $3.50 per 1000
PAD LOCKS from 12c, each

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY AND HARDWARE

SEND US YOUR ORDERS FOR

6" PORCELAIN TILES

We have them in Pink, White, Blue and Green.

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(CENTKAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets














‘Agreement Reached SHIPPING













MONTREAL, AUSTEALIA, NEw ZEA-
LAND LENE LTD., (M.A.N.2Z. LENE)
SS. “PORT WELLINGTON” sails Mel-

bourne md-July North Queensiand

July—August, Brisbane early August,

Sydney mid-August, arriving Trinidad

approximately 9th September
SS. “GLOUCESTER” replaces “Devon”
sails Fremantle end August, Adelaide

early September, Melbourne first half,

Sydney second half, Brisbane September



PAGE SEVEN



NOTICES



The M.V



ee
———— -—

T. B. “Radar” will

accept Cargo and Passengers

for St.

Grenada,

Lucia,

St.
Aruba,

Vincent,
Curacao

wth, arriving at Trimidad October = Sailing Wednesday, 2nd
These vessels have ample space for 95

chilled, hard frozen, and general cargo. August, 1950

Cargo accepted om through Bills of

Lading with transhipment na

for Rarbados, British Guiana, Windwar

and Leeward Islands. B.W.I_ Schooner Owners
Yor further particulars apply:— Association Inc.

FURNESS. WITHY & CO. LTD, Consignee; Dial: 4047.

Agents, Trinidad.
DA COSTA & CO, LTD.,





MS

=

HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

Due
Vessel From Leaves Barbados
S.S. “RIVERCREST” London 15th July 30th July
S.S. “NATURALIST” Liverpool 28th July llth Aug.
S.S. “MOONCREST” London. 5th Aug 26th Aug.
S.S. “BROOKHURST” Glasgow &
Liverpool 17th Aug. Sst Aug.

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel
. “CRAFTSMAN”
“LORD CHURCH”

Dy,
nn

ALCOA RANGER
ALCOA ROAMER
ALCOA RUNNER

For
.. London
.. Liverpool

For further information apply to—

DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents



Closes in Barbados
3ist July
3ist July



Abcoa Pr en

wey ORLEANS SER.ICE
eal’

Arr.
N.O, B'doe
12th July 2%th July
26th July lith Aug.
9th August 22nd August

NEW YORK S"RVICE
salle

Arr.
a N.Y. B'dos
vc. G. THULIN" 2ist July Sist July
BYFJORD" . ‘ llth August 2ist August
CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND
Sails Sails Al
“yr Name of Ship Mentreal Halifax Harbedes
SS, “ALCOA POINTER" July @ist July 24th Aug Sth
SS, “ALCOA POLARIS” Aus, 4th Aug. 7th Aug. 17th
wai 2
NORTHBOUND
Arrives
att f: Barbados
S.S. “ALCOA PILGRIM" 30th July For Montreal and Quebec,

Apply :



re:



SOUTHBOUND SAILINGS
From Montreal, St, John, N.B,, Halifax, N.S.
To Barbados, Trinidad, Demerara, B.G.

Loading Dates Expected

Montreal Halifax Arrival Dates
8.8. “MARIA anes
_, De LARRINGA" | 26th June 3rd July | 19th July
S.S. “POLYCREST’ 4th July] 19th July | @th August
S.8. “BRUSH” 25th July Sist July | 16th August

PLANTATIONS LIMITED—Agents

ONE SOLID

These Vessels have limited passenger accommodation.
eee ema fennn

DA COSTA & CO,, LTD,
ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York

—Canadian Service,
and Gulf Service.

















































































































































7

<4



WEEK

OF UNPRECEDENTED
ARGAINS « Wiison’s

BARGAINS LIKE THESE COME TO YOU BUT ONCE IN A LIFETIME THEY COME
TO YOU THIS TIME, NOT TO STAY BUT TO LAST FOR ONE WEEK ONLY.
WITH CUT PRICES LIKE THESE LASTING FOR MORE THAN ONE WEEK, SURE-

LY WE’LL BE SOLD OUT
YOU MAY BUY US OUT BUT WE GIVE
READ THIS, VISIT US AND COMPARE

—$—$—$—$—$$ $$$ $$$

FUGI in Pink, Peach, Lemon
& White 40c. per yd.

INDIAN HEAD, Pink, Peach,
White & Blue 34 in. wide
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SHIRTING in Stripes &

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64c. per yd.

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PLASTIC RAINCOATS Good
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SHIRTS Roy Rogers Sports



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PLASTIC TABLING 45
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GLASS TOWELS 18 x 34
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PAGE EIGHT



Nobody Wants To â„¢
Fight Joey Maxim

| (By LAWTON

CARVER)
NEW-YORK. |

Jack Kearns, irrepressible manager of Jack Dempsey in the
heyday of the former heavyweight champion, is around and

about trying to land a bi
weight title older, Joey Max

W.I. Play
Yorkshire
Today

THE first victory of the 1950
West Indies touring team was
scored against Yorkshire at Brad-
ford. Today, the West Indies will
engage this county in a return
fixture at Sheffield, and it is left
to be seen if the tourists can “do
the double”, as they did against
Lancashire, the only other county
with whom they have played a
return fixture, so far.

In their first win, the West
Indies evened the score in victories
each side now having won twice
with three games being abandonec
or drawn. Today’s game will there-
fore be in the nature of a rubber,
or at least it will give one side an
opportunity to go into the lead

This will be the twenty-second
game of the tour, and the’ West
Indies enter upon it with eleven
victories to their credit, and two
reverses, The other eight were
drawn or abandoned,

A game with~ Yorkshire, an
important fixture on the card of
any touring team, as this county
has been English Champions more
times, perhaps, than any other
county. The county of Leyland,
Herbert Sutcliffe and Verity enjoy
a fighting tradition which
youngsters are not permitted to
forget or forfeit and today’s game
will no doubt be another keen
struggle. In the first meeting this
year, the West Indies had to fight
every inch of the way, and need-
ing 87 runs to win in the final
innings, our cricketers lost 7
wickets in the process. It was a
bit of a scare, but we won hand-

is

somely, and in two days,

Today the West Indies will
again encounter the All England
captain, Norman Yardley, and

perhaps Hutton, if well enough,
But can these stop our boys from
winning again? —B.M.



Crichlow Meets
Worme Today

THE Barbados Tennis public
have now been given an _ op-
ery of seeing the leading

al tennis stars in action in the
same tournament.

The First Open Tennis Tourna-
ment now being staged at the
Belleville and Strathclyde Tennis
Clubs, makes this possible,

casas iain ION I a I a tei SS nee

Public support is needed, since
the funds raised from those who
pay a snilling on afternoons for ad-
mission will be used for sending
@ Barbados team to British Guiana
in September.

The tournament continues this
afternoon at Strathclyde at 4.30
p.m. and the fixtures are as fol-
lows:—

Men's Singles:— Court No. 3.
Umpire A. Douglas. D. E. Worme
versus M. P. Crichlow.

Men’s Doubles:— Court No. 2.
Umpire Dudley Wiles. Dr, C.
Manning and E,_ Taylor, versus
P. Patterson and G. H, Manning.

Men’s Doubles:— Court No. 4.
Umpire : E. A, Fitzpatrick. a.
Cato and E. Atkinson vs. J.

Dear.
All matches the best of five sets,
Admission only 1/-.



BROWN SELECTED
ENGLISH SKIPPER

LONDON, July 28.

F. R. Brown (Northampton-
shire), who will lead the M.C.C.
team in Australia next winter, has
been selected to captain England
*n the Fourth Test against the
West Indies at the Oval, begin-
ning on August 12.—Reuter.



CESTAC DEFEATS HENRY

NEW YORK, July 28
Abel Cestac, Argentina, 221
ids had little difficulty in out-

pointing Art Henry 184 of New
York over eight rounds at Dezter
Park last night. —Reuter.

[ They'll Do Ie Ever ‘Il Do It! Every



match for his world light-heavy-

im.

Nodody wants any part
Cleveland 175-pounder. |

There is not a light-heavy
the business who could give panies i
a warm up, and aside from Joe |
Louis himself and Ezzard Charles
you can't name two heavies likely
to whip the slippery dancing-
master

There haven’t been many fellows
in the heavier divisions in recent
years with the boxing class of
Maxim. He is a second rate
puncher (although Kearns will
argue about this), but he is harder |
to hit than a gnat on the wing
and he will jab and cuff you
daffy.

He is a sort of latter day Tommy
Loughran, perhaps not quite us
classy as the Philadelphian but
not far behind as a_ boxer.
Loughran had Maxim's weakness
too—lack of a wallop.

This becomes a decided dis-
advantage when a_light-heavy
moves in among the heavies. Most
of the latter can punch, That
coupled with a weignt edge, plus
the rest of it in reach and height |
often will make a fair heavy-
weight the master of a good
light-heavy weight.

In the present
next best heavyweight behind
Louis and Charles is Lee Savold,
whom Maxim could take, along
with all the rest,

f the

situation, the

Bout

Louis, the retired undefeated
champion, will meet Charles, the
National Boxing Association
champion, in September and
Savold, the British and European
title-holder, probably will hold
out for a match with the winner

Thus if the foregoing pattern is
followed, Maxim is temporarily
crowded off the heavyweight
scene, except for possible smalle
pay days against the lesser
lighters,

There is no sign of immediate
action for him among the men ot
his own division either, uniess
Louis sends Charles back to the
light-heavyweight division, where
he did his scuffling until heavies |
became so scarce — and Louis
retired—when he moved up among
the heavier men.

There are no big fighters any -
where else in the world with the
faintest resemblance to contenders
in the heavier divisions to add u
further touch to the drought,

Yanks Take Over

England's best men were Freddie
Mills, eliminated by Maxim for
the world-light-heavy title, and
Bruce Woodcock, stopped by
Savold, for British and European
recognition as heavyweight
enampion,

Elsewhere in Europe every time
a good man has shoved his heaa
above the pack since the war,
some American has gone over and
drubbed him.

Meanwhile, we have not pro-
duced any newcomers of cham-
pionship potentialities — for the
immediate future—in this country
Louis Charles, Savold, and Jersey
Joe Walcott remain our best. The
Rocky Marcianos, Loland Lastar-
zas and others of that brood are
not ready yet and, alas, may never
be ready,

Louis-Charles

County Cricket
Results

LONDON, July 28.

The results of County Cricket
matehes today were;

At Manchester, Lancashire beat
Middlesex by 94 runs; Lancashire
191; Titmus 3 for 32 and secondly
235, Grieves 91, Young 5 for 63,
Titmus 5 for 65.

Middlesex 209 ,Cooper 51, Hilton
6 for 44 and secondly 123, Hilton
4 for 30,

At Burton, Derbyshire-Sussex
match was drawn,

Derbyshire 261; James Land-
gridge 3 for 16 and secondly 82
for 4.

Sussex 88; Jackson 5 for
secondly 360 for 5 declared,
Landgridge 184.

At Bournemouth, Northampton-
shire beat Hampshire by 156 runs.

Northamptonshire 129, Dare 5
for 33 and secondly 321 for 6 de-
clared, Brookes 91, Livingston 58,
Brice not out 82

on
ai

and
John

Hampshire 114; Clarke 5 for 36
and secondly 180, Garlick 4 for
22,

At Lord's, Gentlemen-Players

match was drawn,
—Reuter.

Time

Aegintered U5. Potent Office

‘The MAIN THING IN THE DREAM HOUSE MAT
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HIS PLAYROOM. HIS! ves, THAT'S CORREC TH













P RACING

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ENC
FOR {
THIg

THERE

VEHK
jas

THERE TOO 7

rag \.
THATS AL

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JOP




A_NASTY
re —_ —

Barbados Beats
English Side

IN JANUARY 1895, the first

English team to visit this Island,

captained by R.
a match at Kensington against a

Barbados team captained by D.
Me Auley.
The English side made 48 runs

in its first innings and 168 runs
in its second innings, a total of
216 runs. Barbados made 100
runs in its first innings and 117
runs for 5 wickets in its second
innings a total of 217
victory by
At the
(Saturday), a photograph of both
teams is on special exhibition for
two weeks. The photograph was
presented to the Museum this
week by Mr. G. B. Y. Cox, a mem-
ber of the team, whose
pear on the mount

notes ap-

The English side consisted of:—

R. S. Slade Lueas (Captain),
H, R. Bromley Davenport, W. H.
Wakefield, R. Berens, R. P. Sewell,
M. Martin Barker, R. L.
Leigh Barrat, A. Priestly J
Weatherby and F. W. Bush.

The local side was comprised of;

Donald Mec Auley (Captain),
W. M. Howell, Lieut. KE. Challenor,
H. Austin (Wanderers Cricket
Club), C. Goodman, C. Browne
H, Cole(Pickwick’s Cricket Club).
G. Learmord, (Spartan Cricket
Club), W. Alleyne, (Captain of
Leeward Cricket Club), A, Somers
BY,

Marshall,
A

Cocks and G
rison College)

Cox, (Har-

The Times of Barbados of 30th
January, 1895,
“England vs.
records: “*
which
casion

the title
England’

under
Little

with their presence, and in num-
bers the old cricketing talent
gethered to cheer our boys in their
friendly rivalry with the English-
men, The whole scene presented
an animated and picturesque ap-
pearance. The Pickwick pavilion
did service as a grand stand, and
all the talent and all the beauty
centred round about it. Officers
of the army and from the West
which is
their

Indian Fleet
these

visiting
shores on annual
rounds, assembled in force to
witness the prowess of their
compeers on a West Indian turf.
Our citizens, both young and old,
seemed to vie with each other in
the array of coloured and yarti-
coloured ribbons which they don-
ned for bands around the much-
in-vogue straw hat; and the ladies
but not gaudy in

shot-

looking gay,
their special
silks and summer robes; the
gentlemer of Barbados and of
England some wearing the proper
heavier

costumes of

tropical outfit, others in
makes, looking lively and en-
thusiastic and many an “old
stager” appearing regenerated in
youthful gear—the hoi poloi in
simpler habits but animated anc
attentive — swelled the magnif-
icence of a scene not scen to pass

from memory”



25-Day Bike Race

PARIS
in the midst of it
annual sports unheaval — the
national bicycle race. The race
is the chief—and normally, only—
item of conversation for mor
than three weeks.

The “Tour de France” got away
this year on July 13, and will winc
up August 7, or 22 laps and mil-
lions of words later. The 1li€
entrants will be followed by twc
motorized carvans, each of more
than 20 vehicles, carrying doctors

France is

nurses, journalists and well-
Ww ishers
Tour authorities already have

reserved more than 10,000 nightly
lodgings throughout the 2,500-
mile marathon.

Favorite was Gino Bartali, ot
Florence, Italy, who won second-
place honors in last year’s tour
His running-mate and last year’s
winner, Fausto Coppi, who was
showing his heels to the best
European cyclists this spring, will
be on the side-lines with a bad
leg.--I.N.S.



_ By Jimmy F Hatlo |

[ee THE FINISHED PRODUCT:.WiTH FURNACE,
TUBS AND BINWAND EVERYBODY ELSE'S
Bosttisened QUINSY CAN'T GET wn sss

S. Lucas, played!

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WEEK

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runs, a 7
me run and 5 wic kets G . W
" Musbum from = syussie ear ?

s: “A couple of large stands, Nationals.
which were erected for the oc-
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inside a large sprinkling of the
softer sex grac¢gd the carnival We know for sure she

- THERES

Lose Mc





Cte OLD MAN
Beave
GEoREer

Second Round ee
Games Start To-day

The second round in the F

irst and Intermediate cricket

series starts today. Playing the first game since the season
has started Empire will meet Pickwick at the Oval and the

only “freshman”

in the team

is the tall bespectacled pacer,

Barker, who is making his debut in the first division.

-

What Will

(By LAWTON CARVER)

NEW YORK.

The fancy pants worn by Miss
Gussie Moran have attracted such
widespread interest that the
United States Lawn Tennis Asso-
ciation speculates in an official
release on what may be expect-
ed of her in the way of a cos-
\ume in the
championships.

The staid and
U.S.L.T.A. retraces Miss
Moran’s career as the wearer of
fancy pants and propounds this
serious question:

“What new treat in the way of
a costume will Gorgeous Gussie
Moran have for tennis fans when
the National Championships are
held at Forest
August 27th?”

Perhaps they have not thought
of asking Miss Moran herself,
if they did ask her,
ible to get a reply as yet. It
could be that so far she has not
been fetched by the whim which
the

forthcoming U.S

starchy

Hills, starting

or
might not be

will dictate her clothing for

is like-

ly to have a surprise in this

matter of her apparel! and that
the gate receipts will be respon-
sive, The U.S.L.T.A. obviously
is not unmindful of this highly
important phase of the amateur |
tennis business.

Hence this release on Miss |
Moran‘s fancy pants. The com- |

|
munique goes on to say:

“A year ago the comely Cali-
fornian created a sensation at
Wimbledon when she appeared on
the courts in a lace-trimmed gar-
ment. That made front page news
London and _ staid family
journals all over the United;
States. It also made Miss Moran
one of the biggest attractions in
women's tennis.”

in

Gents o1 the U.S.L.T.A., you
can say that again and again and
yet again. It so happens that Miss
Moran is one of the best-lookers
with the cutest

in the business,
little mannerisms on the court,
and more of an attraction than
some of the drab dolls who are
her superiors as players

The
further:

“Last March Bbexeoub Gussie
did it again when she wore
black shorts in the Egyptian
championships in Cairo. The
newspapers were filled with it
and people came out to the
matches to have a look whether
not they knew anything about
tennis. Then in the recent Wim-
bledon championships, Miss
Moran had something new once
more, She came on the center
‘ourt in what were described as
‘apple pie” briefs — scalped
around the edges.”

She Has Ability Too

Considering the foregoing you
might assume that Miss Moran
would not find it necessary to be
able to play tennis. All she need

fe

Woke pid observes

or









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“My iusband and
my sister...in
each other's arms!" *

Ow

AT
THE

SHOWING

Last season Barker did very well
in the Intermediate Division, For
Police Carl Mullins will be the
main man in their bowling attack
and everyone is looking forward
to see what he will do in first
division cricket.

Today is the day for all
Second Division matches.

The ‘ “tures are: —

las

First Division
Pickwick vs Empire at the Oval.
Lodge vs Wanderers, at Lodge.

Carlton vs Combermere, at
Carlton
Police vs College, at Queen’s
Park.

The teams are as follows; —

Pickwick: A, M. Taylor (Capt.)
G. L Wood, D. Evelyn, H. King,
H, Jordan, E. L. G. Hoad, H.
Kidney, J, Marshall, L. Foster, G.
Birkett and B. Inniss.

Empire: C. Alleyne, O. M.
Robinson, E, A, V. Williams, E.
Millington, R, Barker, H. King,
D. Grant, N. Symmonds, O. Fields
and C . Wilson,

Carlton: K. A. Greenidge, F.
Hutchinson, N, S. Lucas, D. I.

Lawless, J W. Lawless, K.
Hutchinson, D. A. Williams, K. B.
Warren, E. W. Marshall, A. W.
Edghill and R. Hutchinson.

Combermere O, R. Knight,
O. H. Wilkinson, G. N. Grant,
R, E. Norville, E. A. Coppin,

O. H. Beckles, O. U. Elliott, E. G.
Adams, N. E. Murrell, Mr, S. 1.
Smith and O, R. Harris.

Police: J. W. Byer, W. A. Farmer
C. Mullins, C, Blackman, B. D

Morris, I Warner, C. Bradshaw,
F. Taylor, C, Wiltshire, E. Greene
and E, Brewster,

College: V. C, Smith, C. W.
Smith, J. A Williams, C, N.
Blackman, R, D. Rock, N. G.

Worme, M. D. Mayers, H. F. King,
J. A, Corbin, N. Harrison and Mr.
S. O. C. Gittens.

Intermediate

Empire vs Pickwick,
Hall.

Y.M.P.C. vs Spartan, at Beckles
Road.

Windward vs Cable and Wireless
at Windward.

Wanderers vs Mental Hospital,
at the Bay.

Second Division
Leeward vs Pickwick, at Fosters
Combermere vs Y.M.P.C., at

Combermere.
College vs Lodge, at College.

at Bank

Police vs Foundation, rt
Foundation.

Regiment vs Carlton, ut
Garrison.

Empire vs Central, at Vaucluse

do is show up. But this is not
entirely correct.

She wins, too, as the U.S.L.T.A
points out, as follows:

“So much attention has been
entered on Miss Moran’s cos-
‘umes that her ability as a play-
er has been over-looked. The
California girl won the Egyptian
championship, the all-India
championship the International
tournament at Nice on the Frenca
Riviera and the Kent County
Championship at Beckenham
England, In the British champion-
ship at Wimbledon she lost only
after a hard fight with Mrs.
Margaret Osborne
American titleholder,

the

DuPont,
6—4, 6—4.
ak N. Bi



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. Polo At The

Garrison

AGAIN 8 Chukkas were playea

on Weanesday on ine Garrison
Polo ground, und wis is aceuunteu
for the fact that witn more horses
tnere is not now tnat aelay which
was hecessary wnen tne animals
had to play practically ine entire
evening without a change. The
outstanding player on Wednesday
was Elliott Williams. He is the
oldest player in the Club and a
veteran cavalryman of the first
World War. Not only has he a
geod eye and a powerful drive,
but no player feels that he has
much treedom when Williams is
marking him. Vere Deane on his
new horse is going to be one ot
the top players. His mount is
exceedingly fast and inclined 10
be more fond of the gallop than
in following the ball, but Vere is
an artist at controlling a spirited
horse and already his animal has
begun to realise that he can’t have
his way with such a master on
ais back. It is good to see Jonn
Hanschell playing this season for
ne is very fond of the game, and
if he keeps it up he should cer-
tainly be in the line-up for selec-
tion when it comes to representing
Barbados against teams from
abroad. Nick Parravicino is one
of the youngest members and one
of the keenest, but like Andrew
Arthur and Keith Melleville, his
pony is not good enough to com-

pete. Nick would have a great
future on a better horse, Andrew
Arthur seems to have inherited
some of the skill of his late

father who was the founder of the
present Club. He has a good back
hand drive and seldem misses a
ball, but his pony is not big or
fast enough. Keith Melleville
a brave little player and on a
better horse would quickly im-
prove, No doubt these young
| members will soon be playing on
+mounts more worthy of their keen
interest and skill. Play this after-
noon shoul@ start at about 4.20.

is



SSCS SOD AA rH SPOSOISOE,
SUPER SALE

BARGAINS

Prints — washable, 40c. yd.
Calico—36” wide—49ec, yd.
Plastic Raincoats—$2.18 ea.
Rubber Sandals — 50c. up
Boys’ Socks — 12c. a pair ¢

Anklets — — 15¢. up
36c ea.
Woollens, Shoes & Hats,
White Drill — 8c. yd.
Children’s Vests — 30c. ea.
Khaki Drill — 59c. yd.
Boys’ Caps — — 24c. ea.
Vests (Gents. & Ladies)

Children’s Panties (Plastic)

Thousands of Bargains in
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Departments.

THANI'S

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GARDINER AU



ANIM

of

SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1950





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Sanday
July 30
1950

RED GUNS

Russia Returns To |
Security Council As
“Champion Of Peace” |

(By MICHAEL FRY)
. LAKE sUcuasS, July 29.
‘THE Soviet Government when it returns to the




7 Cy





~ N. Koreans Advance
Against Kumchon

(By LIONEL HUDSON)
With the Front Line Forces in KOREA, Sunda

NORTH KOREAN FORCES were this mor ting

~

Koreans Trek

_ United Nations Security Council next Tuesday
is expected to launch a powerful threo-point peace
campaign to end the war in Korea on certain vermis.
This was the opinion of some of the most exveri

enced diplomats here today, including experts 1° >.
Eastern European countries in close touch with
Russian tactics in the United Nations for many
years.

They pointed out that the Soviet Union was a5 ye

sent spearheading a world-wide campaign aroind
its so-called “peace appeal’’.

The Soviet attitude towards Korea, they added, should be!
judged in the light of the Kremlin’s overall interna! end



South From
Battleline

Kept Moving By Fear

(By DEREK PEARCY)
With American Forces In Korea,
July 29,
A blanket
South Korea
ing feet of thousands of

treking south

From the battle line to the
Southernmost Cape, the roads ate
ined with an endless stream of

humanity kept moving by fear

ot dust

refugees

hangs over
raised by the trudg-

menacing on all sides the strategically inipor
tant town of Kumchon, 31 miles from “aegu

Meanwhile battle-weary American trooos, w
just completed another strategic wit’ so"! oa
lis to the west

main battle front, were out in the hi

3
¢

a

Ww

and north-west of Hwanggan, a town 12 miles to
the north-east of Yongdong.
A Headquarters spokesman said that seven Port)
Korean tanks had been sighted at Kochang, 35 miles
south of the American front lines, supported by

about 200 infantry men.

In the same area, North Koreans had successfully

blocked the main road.

external policy—-to pose as the champion of peace agairst Cities, towns and villages on Elsewhere in the South, he added, 300 Communist
“warmongers” of Britain and America. which refugees converge are al uerillas had flanked American lines and still another
aT : ——+ For this reason and in the light ready crowded to overflowing croup had appeared from the North. Some of these mar-



of past Soviet tactics it was be- Men, some dressed in the tradi-

1 auders he said, were less than 8 miles from Kumchon
lieved that Jacob Malik, ¢ a were le tha

WORRELL (right) and Weekes (left) applauded by tie Pyslish team as they return to the pavilion



hional

Plane Crashes
In Brazil
Manager Killed

RIO DE JANEIRO, July 29.

The only foreign passenger to
be killed in Panar Do srazil
crash yesterday was Raiph Mot-
ley, American Assisiant .lanager
ot the Rio Atlantic Refining Coin-
pany, twice President of the
American Chamber of Commerce,
and for one year, President of the
American Society, Rio De Janeiro.

Yesterday’s Consteilation crash
is described as the greatest in
Brazilian aviation history and
according to a local branch of the
Panair Do Brazil, the reasons
leading to it were still unknown.
The plane was piloted by the well-
known Brazilian ace, Eduardo
Martins Oliver who would have
completed 10,000 flying hours on
this trip.

The plane was due at Porto
Alegre about 9.40 p.m. but it is
understood that the last signal
was received from the plane at
10 p.m, stating that there was
no contact with the control
tower and that the radio compass
was unserviceable.

Eye witnesses state that the
plane circled Porto Alegre Aero-
drome twice at an extremely low
ceiling and attempted to land the
third time around when it crashed
into the hill “Morro Do Chapeu’
about 15 miles from Porto Alegre
im very rough country.

All reports confirm a very low
ceiling with occasional torrentia!
rains, but eyewitness accounts are
extremely conflicting as to wether
the plane started burning in mid-
air or burst into flames after hit-
ting the hill. Local farmers who
climbed the hill reported that the
plane exploded when the crash
took place and when they arrived
near the scene of the disaster
found nothing but a mass of burn-
ing wreckage with a number of

rR
ant

thrown some distance frm the
plane but identification was im-
possible.

It was further stated that part
of the plane burned on the hillsid=
while another part had fallen over
the side of a precipice.

It was rumoured that = an
“Aerovias” aircraft was the first
to report the disaster stat'ng !
had seen the other aircraft lying
on the hillside in a rough wooded
district in a complete blaze anc
with surrounding trees on fire

—(Reuter.)

carbonized bodies showing, with
no sound or sign of life. The
body of one woman had been





Soviet Delegate would on Tuesdays

present the following Three Po:ni

Plan to the Security Council

(1) Immediate cease fire in Korea

(2) The appointment of a Unite
Nations “armistice c¢
sion”’—including Soviet mem-



ber—to supervise the with-
drawal of all military forces,

and their demilitarisation.

Free elec‘ions throughzut “hh

(3)

undefeated at the end ef the second day—with Werre:! 239 not

Test Match which was played at Trent Bridge, Nottio x ham.

Truman May Ask |
3$4,000m. Arms Aid |

For W. Europe e Clash In



















Rioters And Police




out and Weekes 168—of the Third

Belgium









whole of Korea—uncer Uni'ed) aver) Ee July 29. | |
Nations’ supervision x oe jn — Cc ngre we te Ee
This proposal would give Korean | y5hse on tienes en atea lion a BRUSSELS, July 29
Communists several advantages. |.) ormous increase in Americat HUNGRY rioters demonstrating against the, return of
Gattis Conrolidated ms ait to allieé nations—Presi-| _S1ng Leopold clashed with Gendarmes tocay in Brvs-
Firstly it is known that they q ot Tr de latest proposal for els. Demonstrators rallied by bugles threw chairs as
. f bit + | binging the west an unpre Pee ‘ E ‘ ~ teh 4} : ats ‘
have consolidated weir military ¢¢ dented pitch he ts ete et. endarmes rode repeatedly into the:crowd krocking down
gains — ee oe sxe hg : tery preparedness. “| many of them. hid ce
per cent. of the whole 0 the No figure hes yet keen officially ith a wave of Anti-Leopold
country—by seizing the property given but the S:ate Devuennent id strikes spreading from city to
of landlords and distributing it to, adviser John Foster Dulles was | i ib af P : ' city and threatening to paralyse
land hungry peasants. | reported to have mentioned the} e repares the capital itself Defence and In-/|
(Secondly) their political agents | sum of $4,000,000 900 as the likely . terigr a a to-day inovked a}
in the wake of their armies have | re juest from the President. This F I } 23-year-old law providing for'
had several weeks to indoctrinate | would be on top of the $1 2,000,- | or nvasion military requisitioning in emerg-
South Koreans with a hatred of }000 which Congress has already encies,
“white invaders”. | authorised, A White House Con- CALCUTTA, July 29 Troops will be put into those
ference will be held at tk: Presi- A brisk recruitment to the |industrial works considered as
They have been able (0 / dent's request. The gathe ill| Armed Forces is goi in | public necessities. Soldiers will
trengthen their appeal for unity |; ws TeQuest. ihe gare ; will} Armed Forces is going on in pul necessities. Soldiers w
among Koreans on the basis of include both Democratic and Re-| Tibet in the face of the “huge | also provide the basic maintenance
Neen “popular” easter | publican leaders of Congress, Sec~|Communist consolidation. ale «| foe glast furnaces: and coal pits
™ pers h a peli 4,| retary of State Dean Acheson and} the Frontier”, rding to a des- | Where workers are on strike.
Many expe ere leved, | Defence Secretary Louis Johnson. | patc! -davle “Gtateeman” |Some Belgian troops—two_ bat-
knowing the conditions in Korea _ patch in to-day’s “Statesman gian } )
before the war that such a| —(Reuter.) | here from its Kalimpong Corre- eons eorains to a eg em
4 spondent, reports are to be recalled from
programme would have a very ly, ~y . . i” occupation duties in Germany to
elas eek é a ster x a W ill Security Council He said that the determination | provide maintenance for vital
elections held soon after the enc ¥ t> res ‘ » pravailed but {industries and public services
of hostilities. Have Red China? It rat disse sion "HEA auste se o-day's outbreak, ex otly one |
The electoral platform would 2 x > d. The cerrezpondent said | ‘veek after the h tly contested
be made sufficiently broad to) |. MOSCOW, July. 29. cade Tibetans led by Geshe /return of the exiled king climaxed
include Liberals and elements) | Soviet delegate Jacob Malik eet feo. President of the Ti- |# series of strikes that were
among the South Koreans hostile | aoe ate eet on Beet en, j , Provisional Government et |! neral throughout French-speak-
to President Syngman Rhee in| '° os tevin Boies or oM-| Sining are now active on Tibet’ Wallonia the centre of Anti-
the formation of a “Popular | MUnISt China to mem ership and | Bastern frontier organisin Leopold feeling—and were now
hear ‘-representatives of the), , pia ~~ threatening Flanders w ris
Unity” Government. The |< 8 eople’ observers | Tibetan youths into Tibetan tening anders with para
ultimate fate of Non-Communist | Ta bod — e,” observers here} peoples’ Youth Society, Fighting | !YS!s. including the vital port oft
} saic ay. : 4 ” | Antwerp
elements in such a Government |", aap jalong the Eastern frontier be- |
ney thought the agenda w hich pss . | se
would experts recalled, eoaen | Me. Malik would propose for the | tw een Kuomint a repoen ae nee Disak Outlets eae
the well-known pattern) of | )\-oting would embody the gener- | COMmMmunists | Is) still in pragress |, oetene, es os es ) i > - n
5 peg a rere! tet % lal lines of policy expressed by in isolated pockets ecu | ic ee : “hh oe ‘ ny
If presented in such a form, it) Stalin in his reply to the Indian) OROCURE EEO te ee Ne eet
vas thought that the Soviet move | Fyjme Minister, Pandit Nehru and | vec be i 2 vom % ae
sould cause a good deal of con-| vhe reply recently given by’Sovict | ad fe tots ! me aera 3 ireaten-
fusion among Security Council) Deputy Foreign Minister Gromyko | » join them on Monday

members.

A “peace plan” which had the
semblance of cast iron Uniteo
Nations guarantees could appeal to
India and Egypt—who have been
skirting the idea of pacification—
and would require some very sub-
tle diplomatic manouvreing by
the United States, Britain and
France.

Counter Measures

Representatives of these threc
powers were meeting during th
week-end to discuss all poss'ble
Soviet moves on Tuesday and t
prepare counter measures, In
British and American circles it

@ On page 16



RED TROOPS TRAINING
FOR NEW ATTACK
On Indo-China

(By GRA

HAM

JENKINS)

SAIGON, Indo-China, July 29.

Usually reliably informed Frenc

h sources here said today



















Chairmen, Sunde of Norway to

convene session for Monday THE 380-ton Dutch motor ves-

a















In Brussels, 90 of the









| 4 ~ ‘
>. Fawitic assé » Sir! ii ‘a normal
|e tn stants, h ee Guard Shoots U.S. | 700 tramcars were officially stated
rent od Te jto be running. Demonstrators
2 Vice Consul | pulled. off trolleys, and in one;;
Yard Investigates | ae ae |case stripped the ‘driver of his
Pet WASHINGTON, July 29 uniform
. | . . | .
> | he State Department announc- | One hundred mounted Gen-
‘Commons Damage led American Vice Consul |darmes dispersed several hundred
LONDON, July 29. | Dough MacKiernan was killed | riot rs at Prussels north station
Scotland Yard detectives were |W hile escaping acro the Hima- | Joseph Merlot. Socialist Presi-
lealled in to-day to investigate |laya mountains from Communist | dent of the Wallonia Congress
reports that telephone and water |China ) samounned that the States Gereral
systems had been damaged at the |, He and his camel driv had |of Wallonia would be called
Aa adhe: Pre es xeen shot by a Tibeton frontier | together in a few days to consider
House of Coramons, may tg ae **|guard who apparet stook lithe situation
began after reports of the a ine \thern for bandits { The States General ji an
had been received at the police Pee Ste ‘ 4
a ; ssembly of »~presentatives
station. Ay spokesman ao a The State Departm« added an aaiaren ine ae aaa Ste et
Ministry of works, responsible|that MacKiernan was killed on | Wajlonia ahi iad etrinllided
for maintenance And upkeep of | Ar ril 13 after ci sing 1. 6 7on sulate French - speaking ” Southwestern |
all government buildings said, at Tihwa in Sinki ing, North West Province. a !
that no evidence of maliciou of China last September |. The Wallonia Cotereas aim tol
\damage or sabotage had yet been Tt eon ried \ runs “detach Wallonia from the rest of
| found.—Reuter. ner who took 27 da 0 reach Belvium
in Lhasa, the Tibetan capital from } The general situation through-
| “UNLAWFUL” SESSION which a repert radioed to New | guy the country to-day s des-
SECURITY COUNCIL Delhi and Washington j cri ed “chaotic” and the all|
OF Reuter. ! Cathol Cabinet faced with an
The Official Soviet News | an osphere 7 near revolution was
} ; ; . tthoritatively reportec on
sency Tass in a dispatch from | auth }
| ae oY rk said that the decision r | seeking compromise ith the
aay * ca ? oo’ 99 | Socialists and the Liberal |
| by the Security Council’s present ero verdue | i cant
—"eutler,



India Sends Ambulance



ji

grab—long white muslin
sont and white trousers tied at the
nkle—and others in baggy shirt
ind trousers of coarse unbleached
material lead bullocks or pony
or carrying heavier goods
themselves



Those without carts use cradles

made ot two forked boughs su)-
ported on their back by a
shou'der harness-rope

Women, nearly all clad in
National Dress—short bodice and
jong skirt draped loosely from
high around the mid-riff carry

lighter bundles ba‘anced on their
heads

Mongrel dogs roam the village-

jstreets or lic in doorways after
farewell from their departing
owners.

All Korean roads are bad. Even
the main artillerv road consists of
nothing better than a cirt and
gravel track. It chokes travellers
with dust in dry weather and
bogs him down in mud in rain

Travelling along this hell olf
dust and heat in summer, — the

refugee finds only an occasional
‘ree under which to shelter, only
an occasional stream at which to




slake his desperate thirst
Many of the poorest class’ rematr
close behind the Danger Zone,
hoping to return home after
fighting rolls by

Soldiers’ Families

But ihe majoiiyv are lamiuies ¢
South Korean soldiers and police
ren and wemen, fearful of fal
ing into Communis and*,.

Some are fermer North Kor-
euns who escaped across 38th
parallel as _ politica) refugees



after the present Northern regime
me to powel
Very few among the

Ct
evacuces

may be North .Korean. spies and
guerillas posing as refugees as 4
ruse to infiltrate further into th
south Coniinuous screening is

corried out to tran these

In Taegu, South Korean’s new
temporary sea of Government,
the streets are teeming with peo-
ple Crowds of refugees stand
outside public buildings through-
out vhe dey waiting for relief,
nd at night blacked-out door
wavs and. street-pavements are
strewn With the sleeping home
les The number of refugees in
the city defy erleulation

In the past two wooks 59.000
lestituves have pa thr vah
five refugee camps in Taegu
alone Reuter



Communists Are
LExcommunicated

VATICAN CITY, July 29
I'he Vatican Holy Office to-day
sued a decree banning from sac-
cnildren 1
Youth
Who
children to join ¢
Organisauvions

rament all 10 ena
Communist

Purent

ations
the

Organi
alow
omuint
likewl

A

were bar

eda from icrament
leacher who gave instructions
materialistic Communism t

children were excommunicated
by decree

cecree followed
sive campaign by Cathol_c B

especially Italy against

}

Cum

—










United Nations

Are Challenged
—ATTLEE

TAUNTON, Somerset,

5 July 29
The British Prime Minister
Clement Attlee said toc-\y that

though he agreed with criticisms
wv the South Korean

committed Now you can make
ell kinds of special * pleadirig:
you can say that the Soun Kor-
can Government was not
yood one, I agree, But because
a person has not a very good
character it does not excuse the
person who tries to murder hin
“You can say that New China
was not on the ‘Security Council’
“It does not affec’ by one iota
the act of aggression,” Attlee said
he was certain that they had to
say here and now that aggression
should not succeed Tf it were
halted he believed there was good
hone that a more peaeeful world
uld emerge,—(Reuter.)

a very



No More Full Lerigth
Films In Sweden

STOCKHOLM, July
Swedish Studios
mak full length films alter
this year because they no long
pay. the Swedish Film Produce
Association announced today

29

will cease



Ww



They will concentrate instend
on shorts, Advertising and News
Films

A survey showed that com

vanies have been losing an aver-
‘ge of 70,000 vo 100,000 crow
—(Reuter.)



government
it did not alter the act of agg¢res- 7
ion \vhat had been committed positions
against it Addressing 5,000]}c¢over of
people here Attlee said “today We |): rrape
are faced with a direct challenge a
to the authority of the United
Nations ‘
An act of aggression hes been

cut

Late yester

pday

if

spokesman Said that

of Communi
It

an artillery
positions,

sts
miles east of the |
was evident,
North Koreans were
assault
Heavy
moved up to their

was

fo

on
guns

ternoona
a small foree
reported 3

he

added that

preparing, for

American
had been

rward areas

Forces Withdraw

This morning I watched the last
American forces withdraw from
Hwanggan taking p their. new

They haci moved under
a aight rtillery
Despite their weariness
they rapidly dug fe le Chen
they flopped to the g leep
despite the roaring ai! engines
as waves of American. planes
headed north to carry out early
morning attacks on advancing

Communist invaders.

some distance away

t

On a ridge
wo Mustangs

dived to strafe Communist patrols.

While exhausted Americans
slept or slumped in jeeps lay
inert In foxholes and stretched
out on the roadway small groups
and
huddled here and there deep in
nearby gorges were counting up
One regiment had
suffere | fairly heavy losses, The
Regimental Commander told me

of = officers

casualties,

that withdrawal had
Americans by

upor

circling movement

not be

forces in hand.

countered

sub officers

yoen forced
1 wide en
which could
with small

1,086 Casualties

Latest lists available lh
showed that the number of
Can Cas ualties in Koren

1,086.

A number of soldiers
off by enemy
their
ointed out.—Reuter

regained

i



These figures included
killed in action, wounded
in accidents and missing

{
ac

own

RALELG Hi

lin

tod
toca

Ame



fighting



men
injured
action

ho were
later

was

vance

—-

|
L




































that Chinese Communist General Chen Keng in the neigh-| “cave the delegates of the Ameri-jsel “Nero” has been reported lane fe eee y y Et '
bouring Chinese province of Yugnan, was training and|can bloc an opportunity to con-joverdue on its voyage decir | LAKE SUCCess July 29. poe ay aes re ieee a NOW IN si ot ik
equipping about 0,000 troops of the Russian-recognised tinue behind-scenes negotiations |Jacmel, Haiti, for Curacao. ‘ a any offered to send 4 eineds doen Pie i! gaan ae kas
73 : .. “s fl . an to conduct a new sion | The “Nero” left Jacmel aa eld ambu'‘ance unit and a smail|” 1 5 8 eV h wire ST W DELLA. o2 & 24 Ich :
Vietminh Insurrectionary Government for new attacks 0n|}''y.6 the Soviet Union delegate | Monday aa age ew, 6. | surgical unit from her regula political indoe‘ri GENTS STANDARD MO} " ;
‘ | before it . |Monday, July 24 and had net g Ny uIaS Ivrsued in the form In Black and Green 3 ov 4 Speed
Indo-China. ) | Jacob Malik ae mes ithe Chair- \7e iched Curacao up to yesterday aw aap Lane to oe the United |}, the Holy Offer, the â„¢
i) ie darted ee | SOS ee i aed Ail ships 6st A es aa ., | Cutholic authority GENTS 8PORTS MODELS in Black Green and 5!
| These sources declared that this | ss terms yesterday's session| Ail ships in the vicinity of The offer was made by Pandit! ¢., the Presidency of t pt ; :
Yugoslavia irformation — contained in top| of the Council “unlawful” noting Jacmel and Curacao have been|Nehru, Prime Minister of India, | the ; yh ae amplif ed the ; ion With or Without 3 or 4 Spee
secret French Miiitafy Intelli-|¢nat delegat from England,|requested to keep a sharp look'in a telegram f New Delhi to | sa Coney 7 ons
aig gence reports—had changed the| France, India, Cuba and Ecuador |out a tit Werees Cae the oat. we aa eane on LADIES DAWN SPORTS MODELS in Black and © ren
Mobilizes whole future of Indo- China’s | “officiously approved General The “Nero” has made occasional Nations Secretary Genera! Communists With or Without 3 or 4 Speed
guerilla war between insurrec-| MacArthur's report.” —Reuter. calls to Barbados with cargo —(Peuter.) -—- Reuter.)
tionary forces and French Union | in ‘ 4
LONDON, July 29 | forces holding the country |
pa ’ 2 e
aie, Bote 68 Sr ae : Communists Ordered To A e Britai i
radio stations accused Yugoslavia}. They added that attacks similar | som u aio . &sra Va e ri atin. ele l 4
of preparing aggression against| te the North Korean attack on | =
Cominform countries “with the aid South Korea | could be expected LONDON, July 29, and Western Germany. “One ag- 3. Intensification of the drive to elections and so must organ-
of the American imperialists, within five months ‘ According to a message in to- gravation by all possible means of rufaw “he atom bomb on the ion a qualitative rather than a
who want to start a new war| The French sources added that| day's Daily Mail Moscow has or- the rift between Britain and theo th the more this cam ve basis—possibility of
after their first in Korea”. | the guerilla phase of the Indo| dered Communist parties in West- America over recognition of Red paign succeeds the less will Amer- some of the parties having to go
Yugoslavia authorities, Radio| China. war might then be suc-/ern Europe to ravate” the China. “Delegate Berlin were ica dare to use the bom! inderground was mentioned =
Sofia said, had “carried out a new ceeded by a new phase in which |“rift’ between Britain and the given to under tand that but for The mood of the meeting does ea
mobilisation” during the weeks! Vietminh forces might attack the | United States over the issue of this rift Stalin would not have er tance to arma eem to have been particularly =
since the outbreak of fighting in| @elta at brigade or division | recognition of Communist China, couraged Mao Tse Tung Chinese or to unloading optimistic Delegates at Berlin =
Korea. | strength Alexander Clifford Daily Mail cor- Communist leader to reaten t , shipments but the s¢ to have received the im-
i > eayt >| |respondent in a front page m s- eas Form«e 1e last strong- creation of highly trained dock pression that either Russia has not
aera oo aoe ey eal Vietmin forces in the northern] age from Paris, wrote “Moscow old of Chiang 1ek the Na- squad to carry out scie tific acts got the atom Boinh or that she is =
pea - peeeee so-called| ,ountains were estimated to be|new instructions to Communist tionalist leade as aking =
mere’ just as it happened in| 4.900,000 well equipped regular! parties in Western Europe trans- 2 Intensification of the peace No large strikes without reas- CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd. =e
Ss jtroops and 600,000 militia men) mitted to their lez rs at recent ampaigr hict t going on ly interes worker The Korean episode v not re- =
in pee nag , aaded that in|} who were now being rapidly | meeti in Berlin tlined to all over mer, The nple armament : pro- rd havis eons to plan at Stet =:
reer weeks Yugoslavia had} trained and equipped, mainly|me by a source whose the 1 is to ere trnosphere of id high al) and there was not the faintest Distributors ==
greatly intensified her policy of| with United States arms taken|beyond question resistance to war and the general uggestion that general or Euro- =
ia aaeanes agains: the peo-|from disarmed Chinese National-| “These lines of action were laid impression that it is Russia wl te Euro- pe: vas imminent the Dail, 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET
ly gu asa especially Al-| ists and smuggled across the'down for France, Italy, Britain, wants peace,” the Daily Ma ‘ y no Mail a added | =>
ee border.—Reuter, Belgium, Holland, Luxemb: respondent ntinued A —(Reuter.) mM i) Hav H AHHH HUNNLHHHHHHGRNEAE LY Hille
, Ji







PAGE

TWO



AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
JACK CARSON JANIS PAIGE DON DeFORE
a DORIS DAY
in “ROMANCE ON THE HIGH SEAS”
Technicolor

\ Warner Bros.

Picture




GAHETWY (the Garden) ST. JAMES

Last Two Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.20 p.m

Warners Thrille

FLAXY MARTIN”

With Virginia MAYO Za
MONDAY & TFUESDAY—8.30 p.m
MASK OF DEMETRIOS”
Sidney Greenstreet Peter

“PETRIFIED FOREST’
t Bogart Leslie Hows

with Lorre

Hum

ee

PLAZA: 2 shows To-day 5 & 830 pm

“16 FATHOMS DEEP”
Filmed in Thrilling ANSCO COLOR













with Lor



CHANEY Arthur LAKE Tanis CHANDLER
also “HIGH TIDE”
With Don CASTLE and Lee TRACY
A Monogram Double Hii
MONDAY & TUESDAY 5 and 8.30 p.m

“SILENT WITNESS”










with Frank ALBERTSON, Maris WRIXON Other
Also the Ist Inst. of the ACTION Serial
A Moderr ‘rsion of Dumas’
“THE THE TUSKETEERS
with John WAYNE—J: JLH Francis X. BUSH-
MAN, Jr., Raymond HATTON Ruth HALL
A Mon m ACTION Doubie

WED. and THURS }
“THE HUNTED’
and Final Inst of Serial

and 8.30 p.m

with Preston FOSTER
“THE THREE MUSKETEERS”

GLOBE

‘Yo-day 8.30 p.m, Monday and Tuesday, 5 & 8.30 p.m.

eT Se se (07) 3 a
PICTURE: OFTHE FIGHTING CAVALRY.
John Ford and Merion (, Cooper present
JOHN WAYNE + JOANNE ORU - JOHN AGAR
BEN aimee? HARRY CAREY, JR.





















a ol Rb i
SA, Wore a! with win YOR McLAGLEN
COME MLDRED NATWICK + GEORGE O'BRIEN Sma SHIELDS
saeentocres or JOHN FORD i
ee. end LAUEING au oes pete vee 7 AaDs in’ £5 CORPORATIO

EXTRAS :
LEON ERROL BACKSTAGE FOLLIES
BRITISH AND AMERICAN NEWSREELS



OPENING FRIDAY, AUGUST 4TH, 5.00 & 8.30 PM.
She was many -—" to “a men—



a0 Se

ey a) olen!

A GAll NS8OROUGH PICTURE Released through Universal-International

With
ALL-STAR TALENT SHOW
And
4 CARTONS HENIEKEN’S BEER
De «Save Your % Tickets Friday Nite
shorten sentence as ra senalincenginmetpsan ie radish seeosascer ce

Sunday, August 6th, 8.30 p.m,
ARNOLD MEANWELL

THE

and “JASSY”





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SN , ILY 30, 1950
SUNDAY ADVv¢ ADVOC \TI SUNDAY, JULY > a ea
NIS SAVAGE On Holiday
R. DENIS SAVAGE, son of Returning InMid-November Dorothy Returns i pgs acai Pa
His Excellency the Governor Mees; YCE ULE OF Ff
and Mrs. Savage who was due to R. AND MRS. G. H ISS DOROTHY FARMER 4 35 €
arrive here yesterday, will not M left yest r who has been holidaying ia barba holiday ying
now be arriving until Wednesday 7c , to spend Barbados since July 1, returned to Mi Be ty Griffit
afternoon. Their daughter is also Canada, before er to En Canada yesterday morning oe Vea ee
coming to Barbados, and is ex- Jand for two yntt n a visi TCA. soa ee ta % Poa Arriving in Trinidad
pected by the Bonaire about the They will shortly be ed nurse at the Royal Victoria Hospi- Shortly
middle of August. England by Mr. and tel in Montreal. She is the }
° tice who are shortly leay daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe AVID, son of Sir Hubert
Arrived Yesterday England by sea. Mr. King, w ene of “The Lodge” St. Rance, K.C.M.G., Goyerno
USAN JANE, daughter of the is a Director of Messrs. Gar@in: Michael. of Trinidad, and Lady Rance wi
Administrator of Dominica Austin and Co., Ltd., and M be arriving in Trinidad short
and Mr. Arrow-Smith, arriyed King expect ta return o Barba Joins Husband Here spend the Summer holidays with
yesterday by T.C.A. Mrs. Arrow- towards the middle of Novembe his parents.
Smith arrived from Dominica a : . FAY REINGOLD from
few days ago to meet her here Last Visit—4 Years Ago AS

and they expect to return to Dom-
nica early this weék, where Susan
will spend about seven weeks’
holiday with her parents.

While in Barbados they are
guests at the Ocean View Hotel.

Acting Secretary
ISS I~ P. COBHAM,
A.T.C.L., is acting as Sec-
retary of the Trinity College of
Music in place of Sister Mary
Dalton, Hon. T.C.L., (Mother
Sacred Heart, OS.U.,) who,
owing to ill health is unable to
attend the duties of Local Secre-
tary.
Applications should be made
to Mrs. Cobham for all particu-
lars regarding the Local Exam-
inations

Just Finished His Third

Year Science

M* GEOFFREY SKEETE

arrived from Canada yester-
day by T.C.A., to spend two
months’ holiday ‘in Barbados. Son
of Dr. and Mrs. Harold Skeete of
“The Grotto,’ Dalkeith Road,
Geoffrey has just completed his
third year Science at McGill Uni-
versity and when he returns to
Canada after his holiday he will
begin the final year of his four
year course,







Wednesday 2nd August and
Thursday 3rd

A Giant Double :
TARZAN’S
MAGIC
FOUNTAIN
Lex Barker Brenda Joyce
And

EVERY GIRL

SHOULD BE MARRIED
Cary Grant
Diana Lynn

and



Thursday 3rd, 2 p.m.

GRAND
SCHOOL CHILDREN
MATINEE
To See :
TARZAN’S
MAGIC
FOUNTAIN
Children 12¢.
To Sit Anywhere

It is a 2 p.m. Show



GOOD NEWS !
GLOBE
“HALF AN HOUR OF
SWEET MUSIC”

The resumes their

Prograia

on Sunday, August 6th at

8.30 pun.
of

with the Orchestra
ARNOLD MEANWELL
and his New MEANIES







.30 A.M.

ATOR
DAY

or WITHOUT LOCKS

STORE

ISS MARION NICHOLS,

Barbadian, whose last vi;
to Barbados was four years ago,
arrived from Canada yesterd:
morning by T.C.A. to spend two
weeks holiday with her fami!
who are at present at the seg-sicde
at “Seacroft,” St. Lawrence.

Marion, who used to be with
Cable and Wireless before she first
left for Canada in 1943, now work
with T.C.A. in Montreal.

Netball Players Coming
Soon



RRIVING yesterday f r «

Trinidad to spend thres
weeks holiday with Mr. and Mr
J. QO. Tudor of “Beverly Hill

Government Hill, were Miss

Elsa
Morris and Miss Alison Say mn



:

Miss Morris who is a
of the staff of the
High School in Port-of-Spain i:
here to make the last minute
arrangements in connection wit
a Net Ball team from this school
which will arrive here on Tix
day and Wednesday from Trinidad

The team will be comp:
eleven players,
porters are

rember

Sishop Anstey



ised of
and several sup-
also expected {



accompany them.

MAGNIFICENT
H
COLD DANIS
BUFFET SUPPER

SERVED

From 7 to 11 o'clock





Ne “WA “ty, ME . ETER SO}

Phone 3513







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WITH

LINOLEUM

It is wonderful the difference that can be made to

——
s1zes;—

Rolls 3 Feet and 6 Feet Wide

Squares 7 Ft., 6 Ins. x 9 Ft
9 Ft. x9Ft
10 Ft., 6 ins. x 9 Ft
12 Ft. x 9 Ft,

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COVER YOUR FLOOR WITH

SILVER STAR CONGOLEUM

Squares: Oft.x 7) {t—Oft.x Qit
9 ft. x 104 ft.—9 ft. x 12 ft.
Continuous Rolls 27 in, 36 in. 72 in. Wide Cut to Ord
r
Many attractive designs to select from, Easy to in

Easier to keep clean.
BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LTD

HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

DIAL 2039

1 Room

by putting a smart piece of Linoleum on the ous The Roon
immediately looks cleaner and brighter Come and see our
range of attractive designs. We have them in the following

























New York arrived yesterday
by T.C.A. She joins her husband
here, who has been in Barbados
for about two months.

Here for Two Weeks

R. E. J. PARRY was at
well yesterday morning to

4
eea-

arrived from Canada by T.C.A.,
to spend two weeks holiday in
Barbados. Also arriving yesterday
were Miss Betty Smith and her
mother Mrs. Peter Smith. Miss
Smith and Mr. Parry, are shortly
to be married.

After Barbados Holiday

ETURNING to Canada yester-

day morning by T.C.A. was
Mr. Rod C. MaclInnes, Public Re-
lations T.C.A,, in Montreal. He
has been in Barbados since July
8th on holiday. His wife and
family are still here, and are re-
maining on for a longer holiday.

Enjoyable Afternoon

R. J. BE. R. SEATON, BG.
businessman at present
holidaying in Barbados with his
wife was among the crowd at the
Harbour Police Sports on Thurs-
day and had an enjoyable after-

noon with another B.G. friend
AMONG the passengers ar- Mr. Wilkie. He arrived from
riving from Canada pnt a B.G. on Thursday by B.W.I.A.
by T.C_A, were Mr. Geoffrey
| Skeete and Miss Pauline Par- Finally Made It!
ry. They are pictured here as v
they stepped off the ‘plane. RS. ETHEL MILLER, who

has been wanting to come to











among
from Trinidad yesterday
by B.W.I1A

meet his daughter Pauline who pany.

From Aruba

R. and Mrs, Joh Freita

nh ce

and their two daughters were
arriving

the passengers
They were
irom Aruba, where 1!
Freitas is with the Lago Oil Com-
They are here for an in-



definite stay as guests of Mr. and

Nat S Fontabelle

Me
Mrs

Visiting His Mother

ealy in



T. COMDR. CARLTON GOD-
L DARD, son of Mrs. Consuelo
Goddard and the late Maj. T. A
Goddard, former Deputy mmis-
sioner of Police, arrived fro:
Trinidad on Friday afternoon |
B.W.IL.A., to spend a week's holi-
day with his mother. Bett«
known to his Barbadian frien:
as “Pa,” Carlton was last here
four years ago. He expects to re-
turn to Trinidad on Friday.

On U.S. Visit

EV. HARRY T. GENTLES
Supt., of the Mount Sina
Holy Church in Barbados left or
Thursday for Puerto Rico }

B.W.I.A. enroute to the U.S. wher:
he will be in New York for about
six months.

Accompar



him was Rev
Joseph Rawlins, a Barbadian wh
has been living in the U.S. for
thirty-seven years He w
turning to New York after <
day here.

Husband With U.S
Military Attache

ing









| ry . Barbados for years, finally made ETURNING to Venezuela ves
| Cne-Time Barbados it when she touched down at ea ae ey i WeLA, ” Sn
| Opening Batsman Seawell yesterday morning by yrs. Gorah Ste and her two
| FTER two months’ holiday in T.C A. All the way from Victoria, children, Jackson and Trene. Her
| land during which time British Columbia, she is here for husband Col. Ellis, who is witt
|they saw quite a bit of cricket, 4" indefinite stay, and is a gues‘ the U.S. Military Attache in Cara-
|Mr. and Mrs. C. Lincoln Bourne 4t the Enmore Hotel. cas spent some of the holiday with
larrived in Barbados yesterday by them in Barbados but he returned
ES C.A., from England via Canada. Engaged to Venezuela a short while ago
> still have another two ‘ _They were staying at the Para-
rene ae hotly, “whieh they are HE ENGAGEMENT was an- dise Beach Club,
| going to ss rbad nounced during the week i
c a ‘nn hays d in Ba oe between Miss Sylvia Sealy, second Married In Canada
emes h aah » time Gaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred =a rs i he
Sados. o ACN euesan His Sealy of Barbarees Road, to Mr. ISS LITA I. GRIFFITH,
bere een | OF 8 ‘ Neville Grosv r son of Mr. Ezra daughter of Mrs. Griffith an
}iast appearance in Intercolonial Patras x ae aaa Torte Hill. “the late Mr. Oscar riffith ¢
; g € 3 ~ srosvenor y iu s ° ne ? . —~ 7 4
| ricket he PR aD Foggy sae . Montreal was married in Canada
sé t 1 a ne are: . 8 * ; ar ° ? . ~1e
“Grew a beard and reaped Seeurity Liaison Officer jf Strly July, to Mr. Clifford
sos ewiltt, s Mr. a 7,
| harvest,”—of Trinidad wickets! Trinidad Hewitt of Jamaica, ‘The ea!
ey. are staying temporarily took place at the Union United
Mrs. Bourne's father Mr. R. and Mrs, Harry Lee arrived Chuvan ‘
H. Bryan, until they move from Trinidad yesterday The bride who was given i:
“Waters Meet,” a seaside morning by B.W.LA. and expect jyarriage be) had ate Mn.
} » in Worthing. to be here for about ten days, and Courtney Rollock, wore a dress of
| Mr. Bourne is with the West are staying at Cacrabank. They yayon net over taffeta. The
Indian Oil Industries in Trinidad. were accompanied by their two bodice was tight fitting sik a
| Retired Businessman children. Mr. Lee vs Security close round neck and a cape of
| , Liaison Officer, Trinida Chantilly lace. Her sleeves were
| JOHN J. BLOW, retired

M:



a businessman arrived ~

A. yesterday morning on
init rane is staying at the Marine
Hotel.

With Creole Petroleum
AND MRS. RAMON TRA-

Pass if on=
and fall speed

Ou want to be the best



i ina :









om : oD ithlete in school? Useful
Nie brit) thely cipagnins nls on athletic events are given
Sandra left for Venezuela yester of five stamps, just issued
ay by B.W.I. Mrs. Travis an #um to commemorate an
ira have been here for fiv ta ional sports meeting
eeks and Mr. Travis, who Whatever your favourite event,
vith Creole Petroleum joined {nose stamps show the proper
hem here a couple of weeks ago way to do it, The relay race
Also returning to Carmeas yes-
erday were Mrs. Rita Brown
ind her three children. They were
ll staying at the Paradise Beach
lub.
With Barclays Bank
j R. BASIL BROOKS was at
L Seawell yesterday morning to illustration brings out a vital
1eet his fiancee, Miss Joan Ghent pant jy fhe bate must be p passed
sa. aan : rink on W mners going a
‘ho arrived from SEA OE full speed. You have yards
W.LA., to spend two weeks for the change-over,

\oliday in Barbados. She was ac-
ompanied by Miss Kathleen
lerreira, Joan, who now works
ith Barelays Bank used to go to
chool here at the Ursuline Con-
vent. They are staying with Mr.
and Mrs. N, ‘s. N. W. Hart in Worthing.

Perforation: 13) by 14; face
values : from 20 centimes (about
\d.) to 8 francs (1s, 1id.). There
a surcharge to help Belgian
att lores. yee! The set, unused,

London Express Service





us.





long finished with points over the







hands and her veil was of tul!
illusion,

Her bouquet was of whit
carnations and rosebuds.

Matron of honour was th
bride’s sister Mrs. Thoma
Cr ord and the bridesmaid
were Miss Cynthia Rollock, Mi
S. Smith and Miss, M. Gilpin

Dr. Charles Este performed t
ceremony and Mr, V. Hogg w
the Bestman, while young Denz
Alleyne acted as page boy

Student Nurse
NOTHER student nurse re-
turning to Canada yeSterday

was Miss Norma Gill, who is at
the Herbert Reddy Memorial
Hospital, During her holiday in

Barbados her engagement to M

Gerald Tryhane, son of Mrs. Ir:
Tryhane and the late Mr, Lisle
Tryhane of “Bagatelle,” St

Thomas, whom
was announced
Gerald, who has been holidayin
in Barbados since May 6, is study-
ing Electrical Engineering in
Canada, He will be returning to
College in the middle of

September

she met in Canacla





BY THE WAY —By Beachcomber



thing out of order,

The New Matron

HE Governors intervened by
sending their own candidate
head matron for an interview

A CANADIAN paper reports
4 from Ottawa that the play-
ing of musical instruments has
een banned in the Commons.
This blow to democracy followed

what may be described as an un-] for

ual incident. A clergyman mem-|—a worthy, terrifying, square hor-

er, when the division bells rang,] ror “After the French lady,”
whipped a tin flute out of his] Smart-Allick confided to a re-
pocket and played an indistin-| porter, “it was like cold porridge.”
ishable tune.” It is not every] A games master said, “If that mon-

y that this happens — unfortu- ster comes to the School, I go.”
ately. But there was an occasion,} Meanwhile, the French girl had
any years ago, when that Porth-] taken rooms in the local hotel,
wl flautist Mr. Gerald Barry} which was all day besieged by
roduced his flute at a meeting of boys and masters, Two Governors,
he International Court at The] arriving to investigate the posi-
Hague He played “Piri-Piri-} tion, could hardly get into the
Piri” so sweetly that the chairman] hotel. They remained to tea and
id: “This at any rate needs nO/to dinner, and came out trying

| iterpretation. Music speaks our| not to look pleased with them-
} own language to each of us.” Yet] {| was he bound to rule the whale] Allick it was decided to offer the

—LADIES’ SLIPPERS

Many Colours in Felt 2 is ed.

post to Rainette
right there
torchlight
smashing,
marches,
deep
fe

Portevoix. That
were firework displays,
processions, lamp-
bonfires, triumphal
impromptu war-dances,
drinking, and other mani-
tations of satisfaction

Nothing To Do With Me
PROFESSOR of psychology,
I read, has taught pigeons to
play ping-pong and peck out
tune on the piano, in order to
find out if children learn bette:

by reward than punishment. This
seems to me like teaching ferrets
to skate on ice, in order to @is-
‘cover whether red-haired sailors
make jgood grandfathers

Prodnose: I don’t quite follo
that.

Myself: Then you're no psycho
logist, good pint



-pot,



|

Basins and Deep

Bowls 82c., $1.13

Covered Stew-

pans 7l1c., 84c., $1.05
Sst

___COMING___

in a few days



LADIES STRAW HATS Prices |
| Ranging
Trimmed White and Coloured from
Fancy Swiss Straws ... . $2.98 to
$5.69



Your Shoe Store for ‘‘ ARCOLA”
*‘MANSFIELD” “JOHN WHITE” & ‘‘AVENUE”’

EVANS

ENAMELWARE—

|

Pie Dishes

37¢., 48c., 64c.,
Mugs .... . Ste.
Chambers $1.14




and

WHITFIELDS



PAGE THREE

He was always *Soaping”’ dulls hair —

"\\ TIRED) 4s
\\



SUNDAY, JULY 36, 1950 VAY DV OC A rt
(ardening Hints
For Amateurs

Hedges





oases

ta

a «HALO Glories t/













THE principle work in the gar- ; we ‘
clen these days is the “War on vhe ‘
Weeds.” Keeping pace with the
weeds in this weather is a seri- ,

ous business, and any relaxing
means that in no time the place
is over-run. Yet this is also a
grand time for planting trees,
shrubs and hedges, so if you
wre planning any of these jobs
now is the time to do iv.

Hedges make such a delightful
boundary to garden or grounds



Then a
KRUSCHEN ait |
broughia anpere chang

After sufferin ag from thr 1



: ; ymp! is

it is surprising that they are not Salk a r ; |
more frequently used instead of about a : sf |
the less attractive wall or fence tion” and quickly oe

so often seen. A good hedge can
be an inpenetrable green wall in
a few years, and is grown at a
quarter of the cost that is entailed
by building a wall.

the joy of livir
“Up to
suffered co
disorder,
and I gen
I was constan





















: many remedies but \
Sweet Lime ar Ut gave Kr t | Yes, “soaping” your hair with even finest
tria In v | » -
z id cream shampoos hides its natura

Of the many plants suitable has ss abo 1 liquid or cre s mpaos de }

for hedges in Barbados pride of a format : hs | lustre with dulling soap film. .
» > be aliv

place must be given the “Sweet wae toni : | Halo —contains no soa > eX
Lime.” Sweet Lime makes an the human bod If nothing to dull your hair's natural lustre, W = =)
inpenetrable evergeen wall, so sluggish, impurit i | Halo t > ee}
strong that it can, when mature blood streat ed ¢ your very first shampoo, Flalo br SS =)
bear up the weight of a man. It half-a-dozen nm ts is | mexine highlight Its fragrant lather ‘rin Sy
8 eet a ote eee eke ientit \ away quickly in any kind of water — needs no raat
established it is there for an in- mineral Aatie tn) , | ; ; ee ea definite time, some of these hed- restores after-rinse, For hal that's fustrous, use hal '
ges in the island being nearly one neal th
hundred years old. Beautiful ex- ores AMERICA’S BIGGEST SELLING SHAMPOO
amples of this hedge can be ; ce : ae ; : * dh 2 and offectis In America, Halo outsells all other shampoos. The reason? American
seen at the Royal Barbados Bxpelied “Then o ' “vite | women have proved only Halo 5 hait h natural radianee.
Yacht Club, and down in the St. JANE HYLTON ... this cut fre 10 in hospital taking treatment. .

7 becomes a joy @
James coast. It is grown from Give Krus

“re « ocamuing, B.B.C. Radio AYoung British Actress Takes On The Job Of Seotching| LEFF" 55 | Wave revnah se iden botte of soar An

a quicker growing hedge
Fragrinone

we have the Casuarina which : “3% + ® 17k e ’
wienkepe wel eimneaand wat — sexo voix os om PT HOQE “Spake Pit’ Stories Which Maxe A Breakdown

makes an excellent boundary
from seed. 7,00 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m. News

. Analysis; 7.15 a.m. Trent’s Last Case;

7.30 Music Magazine; 7.45 a.m e S ‘
Bread And Cheese ricae tp; Boater € 00.4.8 am. Com- Sound More Al arming ; I al iT i (@ all r is
Another splendid plant for mentary on W.I. vs. Yorkshire; 9 00 ( (Las ( Deeee
: ‘ t

hedges is the Bread-and-Cheese. 2:â„¢- Close Down; 12.00 (noon) The



i ; News; 12.10 p.m. News Analysis; 12.15
This plant is almost evergreen, } m Tip Top Tunes; 12.45 p.m. York- The drug has been injected, and ay Leouard Masley ‘ey come (a bit too simple
is hardy. will tolerate even poor shire vs. West Indies; 1.00—1.30 p.m. the narcosis has begun Lying . imes)
dry conditions, and will grow to Commentary on W.I. vs. Yorkshire; back on the couch, the little house- chil i \ From the moment the star en-

a height of ten feet or more. It 133 p.m. Listeners’ Choice; 2.00 pm. wife hovers in a horrid world t

The News; 2.10 p.m, Home News from mental home this British



is grown from seed Britain; 2.15 p.m. Sports Review; 2.30 Midway between — consciousn« Keo U film calls on all the resources of
. p.m. Meet the Commonwealth; 3.00 and sleep w 4 baanee tal therapy in this country tc
Flowering Hedges p.m, Interlude; 3.10-3.15 p.m. The Soothed by the questior fre Hyl that there is nothing shame.

Among the flowering hedges Besser’s Opera; 3.45 p.m. Records: the doctor, her tensions are grad » , : wh bout neurotic illness, and










































q
there is the lovely quick srowing SO Pa Oe Ne he? Risa’ of ually relaxing. A babble of non- °* oe \ . re be feared about a ;
“PRIDE of BARBADOS” that Music; 5.00 p.m. Listeners’ Choice; sense, buried fears, long-forgotten (° * , 2 en ‘ u Pp?
will grow several feet and flower 5.15 p.m. Programme Parade; 5.30 p.m. prejudices and resentments pour : ao t t Jane Hylton is not P LAY E-
in a few months The Story Teller; 5.45 p.m. British from her lips. The first step o i ‘ ne oing through @n easy Safeguard
Orchestral Music; 6.00 p.m. Trent's tl road to recovery from a ner- ‘ « } pic. Shown going . rough es Rai
“KING r Ss” and Last Case; 6.15 p.m. London Bus Ride; he roac . M ms ture whether cure Shock treatment is given our charm
: KING of FLOWERS and 45 p.m. Music from the Ballet; 7.09 VOUS breakdown has been taken, ‘\ k Fawilend The nareosis is closely followed y »-Up' range is specially
“HIBISCUS” are two more »m. The News; 7.10 pam. News It is a high-point in a new film javiand © erage the eacates abd . ' oe
flowering shrubs that make goog Anaysis; 7.15—7.30 p.m. Cricket Report being made—Britain’s sane and !°! wnd pat : ne copies eat beh a ae with ee bjalleette OF Wath
boundary hedges, serving the on WI. vs. Yorkshire; 7.30—7.45 p.m. considered answer to that jolting U"d ‘ i mental Horas “Wo Aes” Caaaeen, a art first-walkers Om wit
double purpose of providing a BBC Midland Light Orchestra; 8.00 p.m. nese ; ; madness, collapse © be brought back again
purpose I Laing Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. Science American film about madness, F : ot: tees reading the script sham through all the
re. by ae too, The oe Review; 8.30 p.m. Skyrockets Dance Lie’ 4 Snake Pit.” : tt 4 “th " eit : mut h of the film PT ENE %
mer hedge is easily growy from Orchestra; 8.55 p.m. From the Edito- ‘or the past three weeks some A e sistas 7 as echidna “ -
seed, while the Hibiseus is grown rials; 9.00 y.m. Memories of Musical of the ablest mental specialists in S%€ 18 go : ide, -t Vink i 8 mie a ee “am graduate to Clarks
from cutting. Sener 9.30 p.m. Books to Read; Britain have been on duty with a _ But the ‘ of MRS. « nd turns out a moving, -
9.45 p.m. Theatre Talk; 10.00 p.m fil es See) San : SLADE’S ILLNI those ‘hat netimes highly exciting, story x1 shoe They are soft, flexible and scientificall
, The News; 10.10 p.m, Interlude; 10.15 film company at one of the most ~~" "". + dncingly made y ar ble and scie cally
For a low flowering edge (two 1m. Much Binding in the Marsh: 1045 famous mental hospitals in the terri langed) with the Case COnVinC ey oot * So easy to apply
to three feet) within the garden » m. Commonwealth Survey; 11.00 p.m. South tre u gto be that there really are no Snake planned to giv adequate su rt with room for toes
nothing is prettier than the “Blue A Talk Their job: to help paint an ® harr in Britain * So soothing to skin es
Plumbago” which succeeds even authentic picture of what it is No Snake Pid Sugdestions... , to grow.
under poor dry conditions. 3 like to have (and how to cure) a \ : « So kind loth :
The secret of a good hedge is N 1 ¢ It rervous breakdown. «y oenes) Ur the tal, whet eligt on the production o kind to clothes
to begin trimming it early, when Ou Urue y The star is an ordinary British the star is brought back to nor- \vhile I was at the mental home
the plants are about a foot high. housewife whose mental balance ™4@! have t na in the lust ‘ me of the actual a
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ea



PAGE FOUR







INCE this column appeared last Sunday the touring West Indian
team have written her flaming page in the flaming history
of West Indian cricket ney have followed up their victory over



England in the Second Test match at Lerd’s with a handsome win
by a margin of ten wickets in the Third Test at Trent Bridge

” “The magnificent individual performance of Worrell and Weekes,
in the batting department, and of Sonny Ramadhin and Alf Valen
tine in the bowling department, have no doubt overshadowed the
marvellous supporting efforts of the other members of the team al-
though it has not depreciated the value of their efforts when one
comes to analyse the victory

BEST WORLD QUARTET
(PHE Test served to prove, or at least has given the West Indies
the licence to claim that in Worrell, Weekes, Ramadhin and
Valentine. the West Indies possess a quartet unequalled in the world
to-day. ; ;

The Fourth Test has yet to be played and the rubber must be
decided by it. But what should be clear now even to the most
ersatz members of the local sporting community ls, that England,
assuming that they won the fourth Test, could only claim the hon-
ours to be even.

In any review of the Test, and I am not now attempting any
detailed one, we can hardly fail to pay tribute to the solidity Oo
left hander Allan Rae. whose patience and powers of -concentration
and consciousness of his role as opening batsman have been abun-
dantly apparent during the tour.

AN IMPORTANT OPENING ROLE

iE Test served to prove, or at least has given the West Indies

the opening day of the Test, making six runs in the first hour.
but it must at least be conceded that by that time he had over-
come what might have been found or imagined, in the wicket which
was reported to have sweated and on which rain had fallen early
Ye Th Siew mote special mention of this since there has been some
uninformed local criticism of the rate of Rae’s batting and in fairness
to that outstanding opening batsman I must confess that I subscribe to
the opinion that if he had scored even twice as many runs, but had been
out in half the time he took at the wicket, the West indies might be
recording a very different result today. _ ;

However this victory is another step in the direction of persuading
the Imperial Cricket Conference that the West Indies should be in-
cluded in plans for visits to Australia and should we win the rubber
it would be incumbent upon the Board, in the circumstances, to state
some clear policy.

POLICE STAGE AQUATICS

MNONGRATUATIONS to the Police for having staged a successful

Aquatic Meeting on Thursday. I did not expect to see such a
comparatively large crowd in attendance but the interest shown by
the spectators and the full measure of entertainment which they
evidently got from the programme should give no small amount of
satisfaction and encouragement to those interested in the spread of
aquatic activties in the island.

I am among those who would like to see some proper use being
made of the excellent facilities which exist in Barbados for aquatics
and hope for the day when these isolated attempts, which are really
commendable pioneer efforts, are harnessed into an island-wide sport
staged on Association level.

SOME SCATTERED EFFORTS

There have been some Meets staged at Whitsuntide at the Bar-
bados Aquatic Club and some pleasurable attempts made at Oistins
and St. James but could we not now come together and form some
Association for the staging of Aquatics ?

I know the Barbados Water Polo Association could be persuaded
to enlarge the scope of their Association so that they could be re-
sponsible for most of the organised spade-work even if they could
not absorb the proposed new Association.

Harrison and Queen's College have been making their contribu-
tion towards keeping the small flame of aquatics alight, I am sure
that they would welcome the opportunity to do their bit towards
placing this form of sport firmly on the local sporting map

AN ALL-ROUND ATHLETE :
ARBOUR POLICE CONSTABLE BEST deserves credit for his
all round athletic ability, He followed up his impressive showing
at the Police Sports earlier this year when he finished champion
athlete, by winning the 100 and 220 yards (free style), the 75 yards
breast-stroke and the 300 yards (free style). :
Who knows that one who showed that promise might turn out
good enough to represent Barbados and even the West Indies in
aquatics in other parts of the world.

FIRST OPEN TENNIS TOURNAMENT
OR MANY YEARS now there has always been the cry “Barbados
should have an open tournament. ‘Trinidad and British Guiana
do and why shouldn’t Barbados?” Well there is an open Tournament
at present in progress and there is a move to send a representative
team to British Guiana in September of this year.

here is now the opportunity for seeing players of all member
clubs of the Barbados Amateur Lawn Tennis Association in action in
the same tournament.

Hitherto Dr. Charlie Manning, Eric Taylor, Lb. St, Hill. Lisle
Harrison, M. Crichlow, D. Wiles and the many others taking part in
the Open Tournament played for private clubs and there was no
chance of seeing them play together as is the case with Spartan,
Wanderers, Empire, Pickwick and the other clubs of the Barbados
Cricket Association. Now fans can see them in action and be in a
position to gauge their relative strength. c

In addition to this the venture commends itself to the support
of the sporting public. The need for Tennis on Association lines,
the need for an active Amateur Lawn Tennis Association has been
established, and I think, accepted. It only remains now for the
public to lend their support.

THE LADIES HAVE IT

HE Ladies will occupy the sport spotlight for the first half of

August when a Tournig Team of the Bishop's High School,
Trinidad, visits Barbados to play a number of Cricket, Hockey, Ping-
pong, and Netball fixtures, ,

They are due to play against teams from Queen's College, St.
Winifred’s School, Codrington High School, Olympia Club, St.
Michael’s Girls’ School and Queen's College Old Girls.

This is the first of such visits and apart from the novelty of
the visit itself there will be much interegt centred around the
games. I am anxious too to see how the ladies will fare in their
invasion of cricket that once was only a man’s game

PASS THE HAT AROUND

ERE will be a small charge for the netball games but I sug-

gest that if the general public are admitted to the other games
that some of the charming ladies pass the hat around to help to
defray expenses. . ;

A peculiar feature about Barbadian sport is that it has come
to be accepted that one should witness it free of charge, This is
the answer to the once precarious financial condition of the Barba-
dos Amateur Football Association, the Amateur Athletic Association
and many others. ;

Sporting fans should be encouraged to pay for their sport and
realise that in doing so they are playing their part in improving
the standard of sport in the island and indeed in many cases, In
keeping a particular kind of sport alive







SOOO ALLA SS
cocoa tat aad

SUNDAY



Wanderers Score
Lead Points

RAIN

INTERRUPTED PLAY in all

but one of the

First Division games played yesterday as the second series
of games in this Division opened.

At Lodge, Wanderers have already scored pcints for a
first innings lead over the homesters but in the other three

games

WANDERERS vs. LODGE
RANGE cis eo Rod eR ee 22
WANDERERS for 4 wkts).. 248

Wanderers bowled out Lodge for
22 runs half an hour at Lodge
yesterc and piled up 248 for the




a





loss of four wickets when the
second round of First Division
ericket got underway. In a short
spell of five overs, Eric Atkinson
took seven Lodge wickets for
nine ru Dennis Atkinson took
two for three runs in two overs.
Light showers had the w cket
slightly heavy but skipper Cave

won the toss and decided to bat
When three wickets had fallen,
only three runs had been scored.
Play began an hour late due to
the absence of some of the Lodge
team

Taking their turn at the wicket,
the Wanderers batsmen went after
the runs at a faster rate than the
clock. Their first hundred went
up in just over a hundred min-
utes, but they ended up their 248
in 190 minutes. G. Proverbs top-
scored with 70, giving a chance at
50, while Wilkes hit three sixes
before he was run out for 67. FE.
Atkinson who opened the Wander-
ers’ innings with Wilkes, scored
54, which included 10 bound-
aries. Dennis Atkinson at number
four made 33. Norman Marshall
is not out with 16,

Lodge bowled six bowlers, mak-
ing change after change, but
the runs, nevertheless, increased
steadily,

Cave and Hutchinson opened
Lodge’s innings against Norman
Marshall and Eric Atkinson who
began Wanderers’ attack. Cave
took a single off the last ball of
Marshail’s over. During his short
spell at the wicket, he never
freomed quite at ease 2nd he
edged the second ball from Atkin-
son through the slips to G. Prov-
erbs who took the catch. The
second wicket fell two balls later.
It was a fast one from Atkinson
and Mr. MeComie who had joined
Hutchinson made a clumsy
attempt and was bowled. ‘

With the score three, Atkinson
claimed his third wicket in the
last ball of his second over.
Brookes who had taken a single
earlier in the over gave another
catch to G. Proverbs at slips.

The fourth wicket fell 10 runs
later, C. E, Gill made a big hit

overhead for six off Marshail
then in the last ball of E.
Atkinson's third over he spooned
one to H. Proverbs who
the ball

C. O, Williams joined
son who had as yet survived the
Wanderers attack, but without
adding any runs to the score, he
edged a ball to G. Proverbs at
Slips off Dennis Atkinson’s bowl-
ing and with five wickets down,
Lodge had only mustered 14 runs,

Two

caught

Hutchin-



more runs were added
before another wicket fell.
Hutchinson one of the opening

pair who had batted stolidly while
the others went back to the
pavilion sent a rising ball from E

Atkinsor ‘o slips where St. Hill
took the catch.
Lodge's tail end fell for an

additional seven runs.

Wanderers had dismissed the
home team in about half an hour
for the poor showing of 22 runs.
In just five overs Eric Atkinson
had taken seven wickets for nine
runs. Dennis Atkinson claimed the
other two wickets, one batsman
being absent, id two overs, his
bowling yielding three runs.

Eric Atkinson and G, Wilkes
opened for Wanderers in their first
innings against. Brookes and Gill,
Lodge School pace bowlers. The
bowlers pegged away with little
avail against this confident open-
ing pair, Atkinson started to go
at the runs straightway and sent
Brookes’ third ball through the
covers for four, but Wilkes batted
a reserved innings,

With the score at 22, skipper

Cave replaced Brookes = and
brought on McComie. Brookes’
two overs had given 14, runs,

hut the change made little impres-
sion on the quick rate of scoring.
At lunch, Wanderers had scored
80 runs at the rate of a run a
minute. Atkinson was 22 and
Wilkes 2.

95 LAL AEP LPP LLLP LLL PPE A PELL ALA OO LOLS,

the issue is still an open one.

A short shower fell during
lunch and when the batsmen re-
turned to the wicket runs came
siower for a few overs. The
wicket remained heavy but Atkin.

n continued to score freely all
reund the wicket. At 75 Wan-
derers los’ their first wicket.
Atkinson had reached 54 when
he mistumed a bail and played
t high to McComie at cover. The
wicket fell in Brookes’ third
over when he was brought batk
te bowl

G. Proverbs joined Wilkes ani
he, too, began an enterprising
innings The century went up
in 165 minutes. Wilkes carried
his score to 40 by ta backdrive

off Cave for four. He then took
two sixes in the same over
Proverbs was 37. At 50 Prov-

erbs was given a chance. Brookes
in firs’ slip failed to take a bg!
Proverbs played high to him off
Gill's bowling

From a restrained though con-
fident beginning Wilkes began to
tuke a go at the runs to keep
pace with fast scoring Proverbs
He was run out at 67, however,

by a brilliant shy in frem
Brookes, The score board sad
187—-2—-67. D. Atkinson was
the incoming batsman and the

score steadily increased.

Thir’y runs later Wanderers
Jost their third wicket with his
score 70, and when he seemed all
set for a century. The balll was
from Wilkie, but it was a difficult
catch which Outram at square leg
managed to get hold jf.

EMPIRE vs. PICKWICK
EMPIRE (for 3 wkts.) ...... 59

A heavy shower of rain which
started to fall about 4 p.m. and
lasted for 10 minutes on Kensing-
ton Oval yesterday, stopped play
on the first day of the Pickwick--
Empire First Division cricket fix-

ture
Empire had already batted on
the wicket for an hour and 10

minutes and had scored 59 for the
loss of 3 wickets

Rain fell early during the day
and play was started at 2.45 p.m.
The wicket was heavy and easy
paced at the start, but as the
water dried out, it took some turn.

“Foffie’ Williams who went
number three for Empire, made a
breezy 32. His style was not very
attractive but he certainly got the
ball to the boundary.

He was engaged in a partner-
ship with O. M. Robinson which
yielded 42 runs. Robinson, at the
end of his knock, had scored 16.

Pickwick won the toss and sent
Empire to bat on a wicket that

was slowly drying out. O. M.
Robinson and H. D,._ Wilson
opened Empire’s first innings to

the bowling of H. H.
B. DeL. Inniss.

King started from the screen
end and claimed the first Empire
wicket in his third over. He got
Wilson to give an easy catch to
Inniss fielding at mid-wicket.

Wilson was given a life off the
same bowler two balls before.
He made 7 of the total which was
9. Robinson was then 2 not out.

Williams partnered Robinson
When tea was taken a half hour
later, the score was 38 for 1,
Williams 18 not out and Robinson
13 not out.

Only 13 runs were added by
this pair after the interval when
Robinson was caught by King at
second slip off slow leg-break
bowler H, A. Marshall. He scored
16

Marshall had taken over from
Inniss at the pavilion end. He
tossed up a leg break which in-
vited Robinson to come down for
a drive. The ball took the outside
edge of Robinson’s bat giving King
a dolly catch, With the score at
51 for 2, A, Symmonds joined
Williams.

Williams did not partner him
very long. In trying to take a
sharp single from a stroke on the
2. “Foffe” was run out for

Down came the rain immedi-

King and

ately after, driving the players
into the pavilion. Soon after,
Kensington looked more like a

swamp than a cricket field.

Three of Empire’s wickets were
dewn for 59 runs in about 70
minutes,

ADVOCATE

RAININTERRUPTS PLAY

SCORE BOARD

LODGE vs. WANDERERS







LODGE 22
WANDERERS (for 4 wkts.) “4s
LODGE--Ist Innings
Mr. Me Comie b E. Atkinson 0
Hutchinson ¢ St. Hill b E. Atkinson 7
Cave c G. Proverbs b E. Atkinson 1
Brookes ec G. Proverbs b E. Atkinson 1
G c H. Proverbs b E. Atkinson 6
Williams c G. Proverbs b D. Atkinson 0
wi ec G. Proverbs b D. Atkinson 1
Outram ¢ R. Atkinson b E. Atkinson 4
Murray c G. Proverbs b E. Atkinson 0
Goddard absent 0
” not out 1

Extra 1
Total : 22

Fall of wickets: 1-1, 2—1, 3—3, 4-13,
5—14, 6-16, 7—20, 8—21, 9—22.
BOWLING ANALYSIS





Oo. M R. W.
Marshall 3 1 10 0
E. Atkinson 5 1 9 7
D. Atkinson 2 1 3 2
WANDERERS—Ist Innings
E. Atkinson c Mc Comie b Brookes 54
G. Wilkes run out 67
G. Proverbs c Outram b Wilkie 70
D. Atkinson c Wilkie b Gill 33
N. Marshall not out 16
Extras : 8
Total (for 4 wkts.) 248
Fall of wkts. 1--75, 2-—187, 3—217,
4— 248
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo R
Brookes 7 0 “4 1
6 1 36 1
nie 7 0 42 0
11 1 58 1
Outram 6 1 21 0
Cave 4 0 39 0
EMPIRE vs PICKWICK
EMPIRE— ist. Innings

©. M. Robinson c King, b Marshall 16
H. D. Wilson ¢ Inniss b King 7

F. A. V. Williams Run Out 32

A. Symmonds Not Out 4
Total (for 3 wkts.) 59
Fall of wickets; 1—9, 2—51, 3—59.

ANALYSIS
oOo M R
H. King 10 3 2
De L. Inniss 6 1 19
H. R. Jordan 2 0 5
Hi. A. Marshall 4.2 0 10
E. L. G. Hoad 4 0 7
COMBERMERE vs. CARLTON
COMBERMERE—1st Innings
O. Knight b K. Warren
O. Wilkinson |.b.w, K. Hutchinson
G. Grant b Warren
R. Norville c K. Hutchinson b N.
Lucas
Mr. Smith c Edghill b K, Hutchinson
E. Toppin 1.b.w. N. Lucas ..
O. Beckles b K. Hutchinson
E. Adams ec Warren b K. Hutchinson
O. Elliot stpd. wkpr. Marshall, b
K,. Hutchinson
L. Harris 1.b.w. K. Hutchinso
M. Murrell not out +s
Extras :

Total :
Fall of wkts : 1—16, 2—40, 3—41, 4—53,

5—54, 6-55, 7—55, 8—61, 9—67.
BOWLING Anant

BOWLING

om
cond

on

21 Sl uwem coose F8s

5 nF
G. Edghill 1 1 0 0
D. A, Williams 3 0 8 0
K. B, Warren ...,.... 65 3 “4 2
W. Greenidge .... 6 2 il 0
K. Hutchinson 15 4 36 6
N. S. Lucas 9 2 15 2
K. Greenidge 3 2 14 0
POLICE vs.. COLLEGE
POLICE—list, Innings
C. Blackman b Williams 7
F. Taylor b Williams 8
Capt. W. A. Farmer c Worme
b Williams ‘ 23
J. Byer b Williams 1
1. Warner not out 5
Extras 1 wd. 1
Total (for 4 wkts.) 45
Fall of wickets; 1—13, 2—36, 3—38,
4-45
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M. R. W
J. Williams 9.2 1 26 4
J. Corbin .. 6 3 16 0
K. A. King . . 3 2 2 0



CARLTON ys COMBERMERE

COMBERMERE

A heavy shower brought the
Carlton-Combermere First Divis-
ion Fixture at Carlton grounds to
a close just after the schoolboys
were bowled out for 99 runs.

A stubborn 54 by dimunitive
George Grant, who went in first
wicket down for’ Combermere,
highlighted the game. His score
included eight fours and the last
25 runs were knocked up in
approximately 15 minutes.

The only other Combermere
batsman to reach double figures
was O, Wilkinson. their opener,
who knocked up a brisk 23. A
first wicket partnership with
Grant and himself added 24 runs.

Young “Kennie” Hutchinson,
who captured six of the Comber-
mere wickets for 36 runs, gave the
best bowling performance for the
Black Rock team. Kennie was
mainly responsible for routing the
boys. ’

“Brickie” Lucas and “Toodie”
Warren captured two each for 15
and 14 respectively.

Combermere won the toss and
elected to bat. O. Knight and C.

Wilkinson opened the innings.
Wilkinson quickly settled down
and scored freely around the
wicket.

When the total was 16 Knight

was clean bowled in the third
delivery of K. Warren’s fourth
over

G, Grant partnered Wilkinson,
Both batsmen batted with ease.
Runs came easily and this pair
carried the score to 40 before
Wilkinson was out leg before to
K. Hutchinson for a well played
23 which included two fours and
two threes.

After this “Ken” Hutchinson.
bowling from the northern end
and “Brickie’ Lucas from the
southern skittled out the school
team. R. Norville came next but
he only managed to make a few
defencive shots before he was
caught by K. Hutchinson off the
bowling of Lucas without opening
his account.

Mr. Smith parnered Grant whe
by this time appeared to be quite
settled down. He scored a single
off Lucas and went up to face
K. Hutchinson. He pulled the
fourth ball of the next over to
the square leg boundary for six
but in the last ball he was caugh‘
by Edghill at square leg.

The total was 53 when E. Top
pin partnered Grant. Toppin was
soon back in the Pavilion 1.b.w,
to Lucas. His place was taken
by O. Beckles who was quickly
bowled by K, Hutchinson.

The total was 55 for 6 when
£. Adams came in. He was caught
by Warren off the bowling of K.
Hutchinson before any runs were
added.

The following partnership by
OQ. Elliot and Grant broke the
monotony. They added six runs
but Elliot, who went forward to
one of Kennie” Hutchinson’s slow
deliveries was stumped by
wicket-keeper Marshall when his
score was only four.





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L. Harris came in but with only
one run added lunch was taken.

Shortly after the interval Harris
was out leg before to K. Hutch-
inson for 3 runs, Murrell the last
man in survived an appeal. Grant
who had batted throughout the
innings opened up and took two
fours and two twos off the third
over from K. Greenidge. He
scored a four and a single orl
K. Hutchinson’s next over to
carry his score to 43. He then
went down to face the attack of
K. Warren who was brought on
in place of K. Greenidge. He
crashed the ball to the boundary
in the first and third delivery
from Warren to carry his score
to 54 but in Warren’s fifth delivery
he was clean bowled. His score
included eight fours. The Com-
ina first innings closed at
99,

By the time the players had
reached the Pavilion a heavy
shower came and the school boys
could not take the field.

s *

POLICE vs. COLLEGE
POLICE (for 4 wkts.)

THERE was less than two hours
of play in the College-Police
match at Queen’s Park yesterday
because of rain. During this time
Police occupied the wicket and
made 45 runs for the loss of 4
wickets. Of this total Capt. W. A.
Farmer top-scored with 23 runs
out of which he hit three sixes.

College’s fast bowler J. Williams
took all four wickets at a cost of
26 runs. He sent down just over
nine overs of which one was a
maiden and the hit the stumps
three times.

Play did not start until 2.40
p.m. because of heavy showers in
the morning which damaged the
wicket. College won the toss and
sent Police to bat on a wicket
which turned out to be easy
pared.

C. Blackman and F. Taylor
opened the innings for Pouce to
the bowling of J, Williams and J.
Corbin. Runs came slowly and
13 had been made when Blackman
attempting to drive a delivery
from Williams mistimed and was
bowled for 7. Capt. Farmer join-
ed Taylor and opened his account
with two sixes off Williams. He
hit another off Corbin in the next
over. The score now moved
along at a fairly good pace and
when the luncheon interval arriv-
ed after 50 minues’ play, the
score had reached 34 without
further loss.

On resumption only two runs
had been scored when Taylor was
clean bowled by Williams for 3
runs. J. Byer partnered Farmer
and made a single out of two more
runs added to the score, before
he too was bowled by Williams.
I, Warner was the next man in
and made 5 runs out of an addi-
tional 6 to the score, before his
partner hitting out to Williams
was caught by Worme. The rain
which had been drizzling for some
time, now came down heavily
and flooded the wicket putting an
end to the day’s play.

coe VI

i

Is
HERE
AGAIN

I

SIMEON HUNTE & SONS
LTD. — Agents.





oe.
CF MW_ireoo=oFeoqmomnnmonDor=—-—=SaNaeee





SUNDAY, JULY 30, 1950





WHEN these notes appear to-day the Barbados Turf Club sweep-
stake run on the coming August meeting will have completed series
BBB. Thus by some eight thousand odd dollars the sweep will have
broken the record for the first prize amassed only last August and
will be safely past the $40,000 mark. This is not all. There will still
be a few days left next week and it can confidently be expected that
it will finally end off somewhere around EEE or even FFF. Therefore
last year’s First Prize record will have béen beaten by a comfortable
ten thousand dollars before the tickets are stopped being issued from
the offices of the Turf Club. : :

This is prosperity for racing in Barbados which was certainly not
imagined when sweepstakes were started here and even unexpected
up to last year when a new record was established. Yet unless a
depression hits us overnight there are signs that one day we might
even see a first prize of $50,000.

Some people have already asked me how it is that in a little place
like Barbados it is possible to sell more tickets in one sweep than has
ever been sold in the West Indies? Well the reason is not very diffi-
cult to perceive. In Barbados there are only three sweeps per year
while in Trinidad there are no less than six. The interval between
the March meeting and the August meeting is twice as long as any
period in Trinidad between any of their meetings. In the same period
of time it is even possible that three sweeps may be sold in Trinidad
during the time that we are running one and they might sell out
enough series to run through the alphabet four or five times.

; STAKES SHOULD BE RAISED
Nevertheless it is to be hoped that in the light of this continued
prosperity by the sweepstake the Barbados Turf Club will see fit to
carry on with their policy of increasing stake money until we are on
a par with stake value offered at Arima, even if we cannot hope to
reach as high as those provided in Port-of-Spain.

There is absolutely nothing to be ashamed of when it comes to
raising stake money for it is quite clear that of the three major
parties which benefit most by racing the horse owner is the one that
comes off with the lean end of the purse. The Government, of course,
comes oli best, and this year their take should be considerably in-
creased. Next the general public draw the major part of the sweep
in prize money and therefore they will also get an automatic raise.
Of course this is not to say that the horse owner gets no increase at
all. He draws point money which is also fixed on a percentage basis
from the sweep. But he has to wait on the discretion of the Club
to know at the following meeting whether he will get an increase of
stakes. And if that was all he had to worry about everything would
be fine. For him there is the very large undertaking of stable upkeep,
jockey’s fees etc. which have to be taken out of his winnings while he
has to be lucky enough to own a horse good enough to earn any
winnings at all Hence the owners’ story is: no winnings, dead loss.
The Government's: certain money.

Now let us see those stakes going up and make no bones about it.

FORM UNFOLDING

During the week there have been.a lot of very revealing gallops
and gradually the favourites are beginning to single themselves out
as their true form unfolds itself. Of course I am not going to start
picking winners from to-day. We still have another week to go. But
there are on or two who look like very good bets.

For instance I see no reason why Storm’s Gift
not dispose of the A class field in the Steward’s Stakes
with some ease. Fanny Adams I understand is not well,
neither is Beacon’ Bright, judging from his performance
yesterday morning, when he endeavoured to do a mile with Storm's
Gift but could not keep up with the pace. Gun Site looks well enough
but he is such a notorious glutton for work that I doubt if he will be
fit after galloping with such as Battalion and Colleton, Slainte had
the first really good gallop I have seen him gvien since he was in
preparation for the March meeting and this was with the C class
River Sprite yesterday. He did not impress me very favourably.
That leaves Elizabethan and although I think she will give them a
good run, yet her absence from the track since Christmas is playing
its part in retarding her progress. I therefore think the fittest horse
will win and there should be no doubt that this will be Storm’s Gift.

In fact there is one thing I would like to see this mare Storm’s
Gift doing and that is running a mile and a half. But there are no
races of this distance anywhere in the West Indies outside Jamaica
so it is a forlorn hope. However, as best as one is able to judge from
seeing only up to 9% furlong races, I think Storm’s Gift one of the
best stayers we have seen out here for some time. May be not quite
the class of Salamanca, but definitely better than Sugar Lady.

should

SUN QUEEN A HOT NUMBER

Next on the list of hot favourites should be Sun Queen. It is
possible that she is the type who runs better on the bit than when
given a free rein, but her times have been little short of amazing.
Her once round yesterday morning in 1.19 was achieved even easier
than her five last Wednesday. Few prepzration gallops in better
time have ever been done here.

But there is no certainty that Sun Queen will have it all her own
way for the entire meeting. She will have to reckon with Kidstead
and Fair Contest and in the distances, at least, they should afford her
a lot of competition. Kidstead is even more impressive than Fair
Contest except that her starting is badly in need of improvement,
She may well get left by copious lengths and this she cannot allow to
happen if she is to have a chance against the others.

DERBY FIELD IMPROVING

Strange to say the,Derby appears to have retained some rivalry
after all. It should still be Watercress’s race but Apollo, Colleton
and Brown Girl might be taken out of the class in which I placed
them last Sunday. I said that they were among those who could not
keep up a good gallop for nine furlongs. Apollo for one has proved
that he can by galloping nine furlongs yesterday in better time than
it took one of our Derby winners to win the race. Colleton also
finished a mile well with Gun Site. while Brown Girl occasioned con-
siderable surprise by running a distance of little over a mile with
Kidstead on Wednesday and coming home very strong in reasonably
good time. It now remains to be seen how these three will tackle
Watercress in the race. The little filly herself is in fine form and
should stay the distance comfortably. She is one of our few Derby
candidates ever who has had a preparation which would cause one to

think that she was expected to contest a race of nine furlongs and
not six or seven.



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Jmerwase yout VITALITY,

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OBTAINABLE FROM:

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2





SUNDAY, JULY 30, 1950 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE





a . T in Team @ALLOPS: | JULY 30 — NO. 130 |
W.t. Bowled Out Melk Olympia Storm’s Gift And Sun Queen The Topic

For 198 Runs: ac settee Do Best: Kidstead And | of
Yorks 178 for 3 \s> easevriceca: April Flowers Work Well | Last Week |







match on Thursday, August 43,



which Olympia Ciub will op-| THE track was opened up completely yesterday for owners|

er eainrel ) High School, Trinidad at Queen's! and trainers to send their horses against the inside rail for
a j 2 " ‘ - toe seh, %e 1 . : Paes

SHEFFIELD, July 2 pose the touring team of Bishop the first time since preparation for the Aug meeting



t



The West Indies were al! out for 198 against Yorkshire here] College grounds beginning
today and by the time stumps were drawn Yorkshire had]® 2"

oa 7 ea The game will be opened b)
scored 178 for the loss of three wickets Mrs, Savage and the proposed

began. There was no rain to speak of for the last two days
and the going was on the hard side. Consequently times}
were fast throughout the morning









































































barriers.

It was a sound performance on|a half hours from one end claimed] {xtures for other matches are:—j| However Storm's Gift did a very) ae —-
the part of the county. Thirty-|/the eighth wicket and it was be- Friday, 4th August at 9.30 a.m.; | impressive mile gallop in 1.4 a .
six by Everton Weekes and Clyde/coming a triumph for pace bowl-]| Ping Pong at St. Winifreu’s/ finishing very strong while Su ( olf Contest
Walcott was the best score for the | €rs Pierre lasted no time and] School . Queen again figured promine:t , hs
visitors but Len Hutton, England’s| though the last pair hit a merry} Friday, 4th August ai 4.30 p.m.;| UF doing an easy box to box
opening batsman who had noi|24 the side were all out for two} Game: at Gif.s Foundation | 1.19. Others who also did v At Roekleyv
played for a fortnight owing to hort of the second hundred. School good © ork-outs were the imperied =
lumbago was 98 not out for York-| William hit three fours in that Saturday, 5th August at 1.30; mare Kidstead and the half-bre hs ; sti Ee
shire when stumps were drawn | spell and one six to square leg|p.m.; Crickei. B.S. vs. Quec: April Flowers. Kidstead’s tit . FULL progr 1e of a JOR saw Lou Sune ' :
: : rk . , run wees ‘ : P Q 3/3 While coming from “a diy
tenia Ptatintsst ~man|and he was not out 33 when [College at Queen’s College for five furlongs was 1.03 3/5 ’ i anged f he ; } isoned
Yorkshire’s Captain, Norman} \ jen tine was dismissed ts ote Tuesday, 8th August at 9.30\this was accomplished afier shv Fiet ) , tt She was stiff, starch and
Yardley rightly estimated the bow lace had takees: all the wishes a.m a Decne _ 1 Vall »y |had to Ww ait for Abil lv in the fir K ‘ | Cio me i Hani iy iit meat ar PPR. Se
slightly green pitch and put the’ except the last, with Coxon four | Ball at Queen's College two and then finished up on the next Saturday, August Lou's cheeks were White with powder
West Indies in when he won the! ro, 69 outstanding because of his Tuesday, 8th August at 5.00;bit. April Flowers did sev g special competitions : er ee ee wd ee
toss. | unbroken spell. p.m.; Netball. B.H.S. vs. Coc- | furlongs finishing the last five ligh-handicap players, “Looked a» though they. w faint %
In three and a half hours the) rington High Schoo! at Queen’s | 1.03 4/5, never really let down and women, long drivi ; |
West Indies were all out. One of| Yorkshire Batting alace 4 Times for the morning were pitching and putting events 1 The Jandship regulations :
the brightest patches of the ereest The West Indies soon claimed af} Wernesday, 9th August a: 5.00 | follows:— ee ear r showing) cJh‘tor a tew. more. oficers | ey »
Indies innings was the last Ww ao Yorkshire wicket Lowson being } p.m Netball B.H.S vs. | Dulcibella: four in 52} easy some twenty-five of veal g Than members of the crew a ou i .
stand of 24, during which U=-! beaten by the pacer at three, but Queen's College at Queen’s Col- | Gallant Hawk: three in 42 2 5, ers in action 5 : ;
Williams hit a six and three fours.| that was their only success in the lege Flieuxcé: seven furlongs doit Phe men's competition proper The Captain shou
as e: r , 1s hs ; & cee be limited to three | xs but ne Vice-Captain a
Hutton was in his best form for) hour’s play before tea, at which] Thursday, 10th August at 5.00/the last six furlongs and 47 yards | Will be oe 1 to tt eo _ _ che Sivas Linuier DO YOU KNOW that ENO
Yorkshire and has so far hit 14) interval the county were 34 for p.m.; Netball B.HS. vs. St. |in_1.20. wages. diffic. nash ta r, Are all you people deat?” sab ae
fours. He did the bulk of scoring | one wicket. Michael's Girls’ School at St.| Elizabethan: seven and a half)°° one 8 acne awl 4 we es hive Se a er is a cooling and refreshing drink,
during a third-wicket stand of 77 The West Indies gained further } Michacl’s Girls’ School furlongs; the last box to box in otal ioe lig nm : a g org V 7 Then supe A a eres Sie a gentle laxative and a perfect
with Lester 50 of the runs behind! successes by getting Halliday and Friday, 11th August at 5.00)1.20 1/5 an ep ne WHEN: UN ch . a8 I am the lord rear-Admiral | ca ; , (dail ie
him in 35 minutes. Lester, but not before Hutton and | p.m.; Netball. B.H.S. vs. Olym- Rebate and Musk started oi? hig ee nd fais 4 teas ladi eenin ee This is my ship you see corrective for stomach and liver
Coxon had bowled without a| Lester had scored 50 in 35 minutes } pia Club Second Team at Belle-|together but Rebate left her o°. edi Set ae on Bes a ed ptt dedi aise | disorders ?
rest throughout the West Indies | for the third wicket. Hutton was plaine S | partner at the two and wen ahead having a handicap of less than 20 With wisdom in her head
innings and so well did the pace’ pcsitively brilliant during the spell Saturday, 12th August at 5 00} to do box to box in 1.21 3/5. playing a nine-hole flag competi- Said, Joe this “left-turn, right-turn
men control their bowling -- the| and he reached 53 including eight J p.m.; Netball. B H.S. vs. Island Best Wishes had Yvonet in the jo ang those above that figure Demands much Enriched Bread DO YOU KNOW
first three batsmen were beaten | fours in 100 minutes. He contin- Team at Queen’s College saddle this time but still pulled raving 2 kivshole even ris alk wel). fie: he. etiheeee oa ees
by the “moving” ball—that spin-| ued to drive well afterwards and Monday, 14th August at 5 oo }double to Flame Flower. They ““ay 4 lock fhe ents will | Who can march long and far | ; ae
ners were not called on unti! the} Pulled four more balls to theff[p.m.; Hockey at Kensington ; id five in 1.06 2/5. start with pitching and putting Cause inside every kit bag | purgatives in ENO?
lost five minutes of the innings| boundary before stumps were § Oval Suntone took it very easy for|contests by both the men and aUS Pamla t's mH Nothing harmful or
when Wardle claimed the final} drawn. So far he has batted for Tuesday, 15th August at 5.00|/four furlongs and then hustled jj, gies. a snecial ever’ with a tire’ put Wednesday was the hot day | ‘ ' ;
wicket Low minutes short of three hours.Jp.m.; Netball B.H.S vs over Me two. — box to!as a target and the vrize for the Broad Street was in uproar ha forming No
‘ Me ; is was } ’s fir ate or en’ “‘ollege ) 3 : x .28, five in 4 nen Bf , not When the West Indian batsmen et ae aa
arwiee the seam mek eae is was Hutton’s first match for] Queen’s College Cld Girls at} ox in 4 men and long driving by both 5 . 4 nasty tast Never
art a el a fortnight owing to lumbago Queen's College Southern Cross was more busi-|men and women. Numerous prizes | Knoeked-off oll England score ss without BNO}
“Yorkshire suffered an early re- When stumps were drawn York - The following ladies have |Ness-like this time | with Joint have been donated for each event About two thousand Bajans be withou N
hal aie their innings opened shire, 178 for three, were within 20] kindly consented to open other Sronpend a - = once by various local firms And may-be even more
i eee ne runs of the West Indies total, and] Netball games on the dates |7Tound in 23 and the five in’ “Following the field events there All cried out “Congrats Goddard ‘ i “ i
punene meson ‘his et sta ae Se Len Hutton was 2 short of a cen-| below 1.06 1/5. _ ; will be the presentation of prizes Just In front Godaard’s Store Sold in botiles for lasting freshness
by Hutton and vie He best of tury Mrs. Maurice Cave on Tues- Gun Site did a mile with’ won the regular scheduled com- Joe, Lou and Comrade Robert ; é e ;
man Halliday became the | weit Radios rit Banlke day, 8th August Colleton, Both kept together and! petitions through the year and All met in Nelson Street
ha £ es 8 nes > == + 4 " » ne oe aie ‘ . - : . a : one . af rng
the eater lide was caught in| ® Marshall b Yardley 26 Mrs. Glindon Reed on Wed- |fnished on the bit in i 47 2/5 and|the moving picture which has Ane oe eee pan no Ss ruil a
th Then tte " ti . of oe lt We ee Py Cozon 14 | nesday, 9th August woe eae to = in 1.24. A good} been taken over a period of sev :
he “10g (fap a8 ; bs foto. 2 Mrs. E. S. S. Burrowes on| &4llop for Colleton eral months and assembled = on But when we reached the swing bridge Ai ; iy pwr
which had lasted 75 minutes. iI his K. Trowtrail b Whitehead iv Thursday, 10th August ie Storm’s Gift began a mile with| one reel > There was a thrilling scene The words " Kno” and “ Fruit Salt” are registered trade marks
Hutton was then annnenes a is c. aes © Lowecn » Whitehead 26 Miss B, Arne on Friday, 11th Beacon Bright who faded out at Members who intend attending AGRO roman dancing |
artistry and with Lester the score/ G. Gomez c Halliday b Coxon et Aucus 7 the four leaving the mare to do; have been asked to sign up as And playing @ tamnbourine 0/6
¢ ¢ Cc. Williams t 3: August : ! \
rese guickly until Lester was|B jones ibw. i tec ; Mrs Donald Wiles on Saturday,| the distance in 1.434 and the box! carly as possible so that the | min shih: dnkcek Wales “tat |
teken by Pierre off Worrell but} L. Pierre 1.b.w., b Whitehead 0) | 12th ‘August , *'Il to box in 1.20 1/5 Household Committee may arrange | This is West Indies de | SESE O POLLS SLCC LLP AAALAC TEA LE LS:
Wilson stuck firm with Hutton] 4 Valentine b Wardle SE Ree Bes ; ‘hallo Tango worked with Foxglove! for catering. Members will be And while we thank Jeff Stolimeyer
i fs Extras 18 Mrs uaddie Challenor on]. : A ee a We cannot forget Rae |
until the drawing of stumps. This Tuesday, 15th August instead of Starry Night. They/| allowed to bring as many guests
fourth wicket pair having so far Teta rd eee drt did box to box in 1.23 2/5 jas they wish Rae certainly showed Yardley .
"os . ne Epicure did four in 52 ] | He can make runs wh speed ‘
put on 37 runs Fall of wickets: 1—41 16, 4 5 Bie | le . eee aes : Ria Peale: ae i And help defeat oll England .
lay fh tt Se ree Locke W ins Golf Pharos and Postscript did five’ FIRST NATIVE ADVOCATE To keap us in the: lead | %
The Play LING ANA ah se? to T in 1.04 2/5, the latter much the CAPETOWN é }
; ; Coxon se ee easier of the two. ‘AcattGa adipose Linkers At last we have showed England .
The West tegen, made 2 ee wuiichesd 20 0 78 3 ournament Landmark did a box to box ir 2 Peet ‘a cataamatals eee ptanl et West Tadige AAD, do i
start against orkshir ay,| Yardley M02 8 OE YORKSHIRE, July 29 1.22 3/5 eae a . And may be too Australia i
ach 5 | Wardle 1 1 ) i , 3 5 . - recently—the first time in the According to dear Le 1%
even though they ees at Yorkshire First Innings — Bobby Locke, South African| Infusion looked very easy doing! oourt’s history. He was A. M q eee 7 |
for four wickets before “| Hutton not out 98 | holder of the British Open Golf| five in the best time for the morn-}| fyajoy aradtiate bag To-day we will be busy | es
sy the first wicket had fallen] Lowson b Pierre ola } ovu who graduated last year ‘ ) z
aa “oy fost two more while Halliday ¢ Stollmeyer b Jon: 23 Championship to-day added ing. then did a box to| at the University of Capetown For our neat done neighbour is
a ’ 3 7 ester ¢ Pierre b Worrell 36 5 o his season's winnings un Queen then did a box to ts ieaaene a eeCion ak ies tS
five runs were added, and another Wilson not out 16 | when he won the first prize in the| box in 1.19 on the bit all the way. | j===sse= a eee oe © Taye ‘s
at 94. ‘ dies had st a “ | North British Harrogate Profes-| Tiberian Lady went from the) | So next week we will tell you ys
The West Padion. bac ree Total (for 3 wickets 173 | sional Tournament here, This|seven doing the last lap in! SBA VIEW au ST ) eee eee di
anxious to play oF. ms of a big| Fall of wickets: 1-3, 2-64, 2-14 makes his prize money £1,900 in] 1.23 4/5. | Ob 1 The brand that. males us wad S
there were = y ae Pte alee ; two months of play in Britain, for Fabulous was seen out but not | i] iO . —_———- S
aes Paro ec. ie pet with _ he bes won three tournaments as| going fast enough for timing. | USE ab %
closed jus » § well as the Open apart from losing Sun Jewel: four in 55. | sponsore y x
» - . A 3" .
oot ora ae Rea He Sho a tie for another and finishing] Perfect Set did a half speed|}{ HASTINGS, BARBADOS x
mall Lane Sith hata’ eavy owers third on one occasion. His aggre-|five in 1.12 3/5. | EXCELLENT CUISINE J&R BAKERIES 8
pabutatie s ups ed “- it proved grate for the 90 holes of the Battalion did five in 1.08 3/5. | FULLY STOCKED BAR | ws
in the first hour; and Yesterda’ current event was 348 to beat Ken Mopsy: five in 1.05 4/5. | : IR
tcday. The West Indies were i. ' Bousfield the Coombe Hill Club] Fair Contest was tugging at the RATES: $5.00 per Day & makers of 1%
i i tars: God- : ; satin’ “tote MW on . bag ht ‘ aot .
ing three bd ong Ba gd on The gutters in the city area, {Assistant by three strokes with] bit over a box to box in 1.25 1/5.|} upwards ENRICHED BREAD %s
dard, Ramadhin an ; had ¢ sles . , | Rees 352. Slai iv dint onic ltl (Inclusive) ‘s io
35; had a thorough cleaning as some Slainte and River Sprite gal-! }} |
When Stollmeyer lost the toss :
to mie ae beuae Wonlend heavy showers of rain fell dur- To-day in the round postponed | loped strong over 74 furlongs the} i} Apply. - \ d the blend
chipper put the West Indies in to|ing the day. Stretching from from yesterday because of the} last lap in 1.204. 1 ii Mrs, W. S. HOWELL and the blenders of
bat It was not long before there Milk Market and continuing up storm Locke had 70, both Bousfield Vanguard did not look com-: ' Ni
were siens of a turning ball, and|to Baxter’s Road, the gutters very and Rees missing chances of over-| fortable against his half bred SS = | J&R RUM |
after two leg-before appeals) ten overflowed, and sometimes hauling him by taking 70 threes. | companion Joan’s Star. They did| —.—--___-- clei lianabrel ieaeepseeaiabtricateateniasnascieiaiieieel ata su
against Marshall, Stollmeyer was blotted out certain sections of —Reuter. four in 52 2/5, |
i risse t ray ‘he Yard- 1e@ road, 1ese blockages were pollo did nine furlongs picking
dis d that way. Then th : % a a i ; A “7 ae ¢ tusk : |
ley spreadeagled Marshall’s stumps; Caused by the large heaps o . up aytime a e five an
W hed the batsman went down the|/ debris and other waste, which Communist Leader finished better than the latter. |
yitch to try a mighty drive, and| had collected in several areas of ° His times revealed an even pace ~c Wort f '
Raa Worrell caught on the boun-j| the gutters, and thus biocked the Defies U.K. Charge | throughout. Here thev are: nine BARBADOS i URF CLUB
dary when he tried for a six water, Banana and mango skins, FRANKFURT, July 29 ; in 2.06 3/5; the mile in 1.53 4/5;
Weekes and Trestrail restored} mixed with several bits of vege- Max Reimann 51 year old | por tee, 198 4/5; five in
the fortunes of the West Indies|tables and paper formed the leader of the West G = 1.08. '
! 4 > West German Com-| i i ¥
somewhat, more than doubling/greater part of these small | munist Party has o f | Rivermist did three in 47 ‘ ‘ a
nunist Party has come back from g o oe

the total, but at 94 Whitehead got April Flowers working well

the Soviet Zone defying a threat to|



RACES

MONDAY, 7th AUGUST, 1950 (BANK HOLIDAY)
THURSDAY, 10th AUGUST, 1951
SATURDAY, 12th AUGUST, 1950

rosecute |} within herself did box to box in|
Ent ; feet lim on i) fee of | 1.22 and five in 1.03 4/5 *
n er, r 2 ge to arrange e kidnapping | ‘ \ F al mas
PPISC {of anotuer'Commnunist who isin! inside of Sie Plant over. a mil | more dentists in the USA.
LONDON, distavagr: Reimann oe wife| at a two minute gait. They did|

Storm clouds gathered after John Charles Byron, a confi- re 1e Party eadquarters | five in 1,18 2/5. , } |
lunch and for a while the licht!dence man, paid a few coppers to | ¢re this morning but later left Kidstead was tried at the gates! } recommend and use IPANA

through Trestrail’s defence ;
= | storekeeper for the following |f2% an undisclosed destination. | along with Ability, Ante Diem an

four wickets were down.

This brought Walcott in, and he
and Weekes took the score to 120
without further loss before lunch

to the score Weekes was beaten}advertisement to be placed on a|His parliamentary immunity was| Cross Roads. After some rest
ir playing a defensive stroke
Walcott should have gone in the
next over from Coxon but Yard-
ley failed to hold a shot straight
to his hands. Walcott marked the
escape with two fours through
the covers off Whitehead but in
trying to hook another delivery

; | TWENTY FOUR EVENTS IN ALI
board outside his shop: lifted on Thursday to enable the | lessness Kidstead jumped off weil |
“Sensational offer. Apartment] Public prosecutor at Hanover in) but had to wait on Ability to catch |
and contents for sale £130 (364). oe Zone to bring him to up. They did five in 1.03 3/5. |
ADD Hsiao amet |
He did not anticipate, however, Q om o eeecae must first sat-
that his first interested customer |!*f¥ the Lower Saxony Criminal WELFA |
would be a detective. Court that there is a case against AIDS INDIAN LF: -RE
For the next three months|®eimann, after which the date NEW DELHI.

EIGHT EVENTS EACH DAY



FIRST RACE EACH DAY 1.00 P.M

The 2)- SWEEPSTAKLE will be officially closed



|
he spooned a catch to midwicket ; et og ‘ : for > t | 9 : ar : :
Gomer tim from a slip catch and York-|!0", attempting to sell property [he fa a 9 appear steps might £1,900 to be used by the nursing | drawn for on FRIDAY Lith. AUGUST, 1950, at the
shire gave the West Indies no that did not belong to him— ciditea page gg yb a college here to buy a van fitted as GRAND STAND at 4.00 jm. Ticke can be pur-
chance to recover Coxon who]especially to a detective. oe rr Givias Dine ad returned a mobile clinic for infant welfare chased from REGISTERED SELLERS up to 4.00
bowled unchanged for three and INS. | ' . The van will be used by students p.m. on FRIDAY, t1ih. AUGUST, 1950

—Keuter for work in Indian villages









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|

+ OC Pe 4 “ +e, As aed <. 6b 6 ttt tt Ft 46 tt Oe
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SINCE Arthur
music for Th
tically every
Britain, and in F
and Russia, has \
Films. ‘aturall
very young
still large










Music Fe or F time CO Se Startling Predictions
vineing, and the| Your Real Life Told Free

Suir tains Cavalry Patrol... =m NO energy”












=F . . SUN ’ ILY 30, 1950
PAGE SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JULY 30, 195
neurotic sisters, and eae
ngs as the man they
me Would you like to know what the Stars
. the _that is, indicate for you, some of your past exper-
unpleasant. It} iences, your strong and weak points, etc. ’
a subject should _— 2 a chance to test FREE the
leread fitti skill of Pundit Tabore, India’s most fam-
vi ime 08 ete ous Astrologer,
to useful purposes



ex







are good film scx hen can inspirat c - Pa = - who by appiying
rie ea > el re oe . . : y ow ‘RIBBC YN” iow playir the ancient science
on sere are a Globe Theatre has such a CROSSWORL hus built up an en-
than there are ons ti nd though p ps it is mw viable reputation ?
writing of op sider the cm not g The aceuracy of his



predictions and the

on for hundreds of years. 1 com- Vaughan sound practical ed














pare ope a acknow leage — in
ae — « positior 5 his Horoscopes on
They —t it — og Business, Specuia-
in so fur as the fuses t tion, Finances,
of sound and actior me oop" Love affairs,
. te : ; ‘ amous for Friends, Enemies,
snus i - Se Lotteries, Travels,
problems r Changes, Litiga-
f discr tion, Lucky Times,



Sickness etc.,
















s w heve astounded
hae ee a eeeine educated people There’s nothing better than
ne would ‘ GEOnaE MNOEEY ce yd pak PHOSFERINE when you feel low amd
temper k " believes that =o must possess some miserable. It revives the appetite,
an te f sort of second-sight, i i
and CM ee ae eevee. taba’ #0 banishes weakness and depression,
medi sent you FREE your Astral Interpretation puts back much-needed vitality. Tey
if u forward him your full name (Mr -
inspiration in music is an in- S Mrs. or Miss), address and ome ae birth E PHOSFERINE today !

tengible thing lius ha 1 lover is all clearly writien by yourse lo money

10 i ft \. P.O. (Ne
that “the are oa $ drown required but enclose 6d. in B.P.O. (No you NEED



Stamps or Coins) to help cover postage



most precious proper is expressec
conception if a theme is ‘such | a in a wa

personal matter for a composef ms
that it is difficult ag a rule de-
tine the impulses beh t
Similarly, Mozart said “whence or of
how they come I know not; nor called
can I force them.” Some com- content of &
posers do need to be “in the moo Vaughan W ss
to receive inspiration which, seven fin e :Â¥40, has

T
tained his owt le in all his ‘
acknowlédge, comes upon retain ;
a ic films a FUL



and misc. costs. You wil be amazed at
the remarkable accuracy of his state-
ments about you and your affairs. Write
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egain, Address: PUNDIT TABORE,

THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS

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voices in :
indeed be
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Antarctic setti 1g
liams, compose




the A







a psisce = Beaty. ©)

Dewn

th sco



charge—for the ander 158 /








suddenly, without relation to t 6 __ “PAID a, ‘ cing impersonated 6 spirtt
physical and mental processes of William Walton has always said ic 4 Mad master-—qitterent in Hotlanc
the moment. On the other ha that when he film ’ "

a well-known modern con t his inspi ; 7 2 Pri re.



the screen



has said quite frankly that
tion “consists in the intellectual for the cinema
patterning of notes.” its own. He
There are, however, numerous “/™5 in 1936,
c ? 2 c= wEM® Escape Me Never, and has since
examples—including some great written for about a dozen pictures
music—where the motivation pow- jt is interesting to note how Wal-
er has been the impact of an- ton has used classical forms; the
vther art. Poetry has, of course, Spit Fugue
inspired musicians from the ear- the Few, an



ng enimai (4)





the reverse. (5) |



na enclosure

e |e Vee







ob vl Sat ’ sie



the The First of
aglia in














liest times, Elizabethan music was Henry V ar success- sister Cé ave, Mt « a Pive Beauliful
largely vocal, and the Lieder writ- 1, both with ut the That 1 is a verv bare outline of a { Re* j Sov

ers of the 19th century are among 5 *s for which they > writ- iE TO YOUR FINGERTIPS
the greatest names in music— ten Ever the characteristic

CKY PLOQUOTE—Here’s how tu work it: | seeseatls manicured eth

XYDLBAAXR CUTEX

Schumann, Schubert, Brahms and Pauses (compare the last move-
Wolfe. Similarly, but naturally to Ment of his Symphony) are found
a lesser extent, have pictures 19 the fugue, while the sound of

, : alan oa aa the
prompted compositions—Moussor- the arrows hurtling through the
gsky’s Pictures from an Exhibi- #!T during the battle of Agin

is LONGFELLOW

One letter simply stands for another. I
s y stan t n this example A is u
for the three L’s, X for the two O's, ete. i =





court



3 . sequence in > ’, is built into , 7 . Single letters, apos-

tion is an example. The Theatre S©a¥ence in Henry V, is : trophies, the length and formati ;

She rer ee the patte the music in the gene on of the words are al , : 4

ear one oo r, ha ae ee = eainian “ a in LIZABETH SCOTT ‘ach day the code letters are different. — abr se o be ae
= asia pena ES rats ‘ > i arck ae . ie eautiful with magic-wear
Berlioz, a composer who always)!" a Sper eaeee Se) Oe. 0B steewe ee A Cryptogram Quotation S

Arthur Bliss, in his score for
















seemed to need a “programme,"Erpings to Come. shewed breadtt repor CUTEX...the polish that
Sas oe gs to Come, shewed adth at the eleventh } v0 OK
or an external idea, to fire hislo¢ vision in his music which well a a! sn rae 2S ew AO ES Pe Bae Se lasts and lasts. a
originaltiy. The art of ballet tocMf uited the vast score of this film. },¢ ee ae pete eet APPA 32P EBUQK w , i IGHLAND
has inspired some of the world':ffhe same spirit is to be found in “2°; 1% Which he ov Ae es * AWONKC WB



the Indians with a surprise

night attack. There is a



best loved music. his moving work Morning Heroes



3GQTKYO, EPY JVK BGQTKYO LUQ@K CUTEX gives sparkle ro QUEEN







The film provides composersfjgnd also r hi score for 7 lies
with another and similar source offf-he film Men of Two Worlds. A “-NPNK, vee ee mr i “Grand oe
inspiration. The practical prob pertain almost percussive vigour film Things to Come, marked tt Cryptoquote: HE HATH A"TEAR easily... resists peeling ’
lems involved are more complexâ„¢is found in the ballet Checkmate opening of a period in which con- : AR FOR PITY, AND iDpi
and very different, but there is ncgg@s well as in such pieces as the temporary composers accepted A HAND OPEN AS DAY—SHAKESPEARE, f and chipping. "BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY

arch from Things to Come and films as a m
the stirring sequence of the return their art. Looking back over the
to Spain in Christopher Columbus. years, one finds that practically
In Sir Arnold Bax, we have every composer of note in B

reason why music for the film “rn medium for ve
should not reach the same heights
as in these older branches of the

art. Here we have a form of ex



00% SCOTCH WHISKIES
Because CUTEX is so in- IS YEARS OLD

expensive you can afford








SLENDEDe BorTiED py















another example how ¢ mnag- s 7 } al fr avr ne

pression that would appear tome). a with oaenaiane pre to ties iaenatiinn of focitie * to keep several shades on ; ) Ld
straight-jacket its own music anc .ommand of his te hnique, can do It is interesting to st their? read es harmonize DISTILegRS Tarmwecotanp
reduce the composer to a merefag at service to films made in reactions. Some were too ee ; , . a

technician juggling in thirds of a ;britain. Bax is one of the most anxious to try their ha the with your favourite ere

second to meet the requirements ofp wrolific of British composers, hav- new mediur thers were a little

the picture on the screen.@jng produccd a ast quantity of diffident whi le most of them costumes.

Music in this case is only one of music in various forms: piano were nervous about the time -

many elements: it must give way music, chamber music, choral and tor, until they had experienced the |

te the story, the acting, the direc-{ orchestral music, including seven enormous stimulus to their



tion. The photography and, very symphonies. Perhaps he finds cal imaginations which the films
often, even to the sound track it- that the discipline of film compos- could give.
self. In writing music for films ition curbs his fertile imagination The tilm magnate is the rnodern
a composer’s technical equipment too much; at any rate, he has only patron of the composer, both
cannot be too great. written two film scores to date known and unknown, enabling
aad The first was Malta G. C. in him to earn a living. gi xperi-
The average film runs for about whit hie { ent tne Any earn a living. gain experi
an hour and a half, and framed whic his aD score made an im- ence and so concentrate a little
verture, that is. The Title pressive contribution to the film, more comfortably on hi opera
by the Overture, that is, and has been heard frequently in symphonies and quartets. Under
Music and the Finale or Play-out the concert hall since. Oliver these conditions, there is no more
Music, may carry anything from Twist gave his wistful Irish tem- need for a composer to fall below
20 to 60 minutes of music. This perament more opportunity. Being his own standards than in the
music may range from comedy to a fine pianist himself, it was in- past: It is no different, presuma-
tragedy, symphony to swing, music teresting to see how he used that bly, to write music to order for a
halls to madrigals and may include instrument to express the tender- modern film company than it was
anything—brass bands, street ness of young Oliver, while the to write for the Esterhazys or the



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bands, barrel organs, bagpipes, force and vitality of Fagin’s Romp Archbishop of Salzburg The
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Ideally, the composer’s problem and humour unique contribution to the succe
is to give a shape and cohesion to The year 1935, when Arthur of the film to bring to it his ow
the sound track, so that if it were Bliss wrote his fine score for the musical | juality and culture





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. ; ww SE rn , oO. > © SEVEN
SUNDAY, JULY 30, 1950 SUNDAY ADVOCATE ani es dla PAGE SEVE ies
Ex xcurs
Phe Ninth Baronet Turns His Stately Home Into A Luxury School a i h
outside are ar . 7
Every Wednesday and Friday Loosene? First Day
¥ = ] ¥ 7 Y i Be ii gfelds have a e place e Don't let courhi sneezing, ct
themselves while th t g0 tne attacks of Bronchitis or Ast?
. alternately, to Cambridge for the ruim your sleep and energy anothe
Shaw plays and Norwich for the Cisgona ? ay Sate acunt a ihe a
curre offering at the local rep smoke, injec r ts 4
e 9 An English mistress, soon to be through ©
—i a wee reinforced with a resident teacher, oa sen» Dateline te
R who will also act as chYaperon, ately 3 ways: 1. Helr
comes in to look after the foreign Boby move t ang
girls. For the rest, special tutors Powder i. °
. - are in tap in the near-by ‘-niver- ate Youghine
i oy ie See ee
*yke : Handymar Help ere
Lady Bedingfeld takes the
flower-arrangement class, and the nictinmntnbemtieens
normal working staff at Oxburgh cf
have proved willing teachers in
olhmer subjects.
For instance mechanic-handy on sal =
man WILFRID ANDERSON is e+ eenene ye + a
teaching Elizabeth to drive Su
Edmund's car in any spare time ‘
he gets from gun-spraying the ve
antique woodwork of the house ff « WH CO v 4 YPO,
with linseed oil. a OU Si fj :
Against all this academic activ- a f f Paee — \
ity there is the heavily historical WITH A LEA C A i a, J A/S
atmosphere of the house itself C N, LE R SKIN P Wy J. â„¢
Oxburgh Hall has all the things Cay os (MM ify
an Fnglishman’s castle-home
should have 4
Naturally, there £ a _ roon
where QUEEN BLIZABETH slept
That has been turned into an art
studi.—not because of its illus
trious associations, but because it
has a north light. The secret cup-
boards and other hidey-holes have
come in useful for keeping tennis r
logs.
The elaborately carved and
draped four-poster beds, one of ij
which boasts a spread embroid l
ered by MARY QUEEN OF /
SCOTS, are maybe a little awe i
inspiring, but they ave cosier than f
the dormitory cots found in most
schools /
/
Che ‘girls’ rumpeeé-ruoom is the /
- brocaded salon, where they play Sus T /
ee ; 3 ping-pong under the disapproving t Fhe }
@dessiun in bow-and-arrow target shoviing. look of QUEEN ANNE, JAMES IL Bye QUgh), /
and the Bedingfeld who was killed ¥ Ty he
. at the Battle of Worcester frown- “Pe
Hunting Is Extra—Archery Is Free ser fon ie'ssi
S EXtra
e Ancestral Gaze “Moy,
Eve Perrick—On Everybody's Toe In the dining-room it’s the stare m °
: ee of the first SIR HENRY B. which YVONNE Ce of
FROM one of the stately homes of England—one which is*unfortunately in & Cominates the scene Somehow he Vv a. P, Dj r
rather inaccessible spot in Norfolk and therefore not a paying proposition as an open- seems to have a more benign ex- DE CARLO nd Gri ‘rt,
to-the-publie at 2s. 6d. a head venture—a dignified cream and gold brochure is being pression ] | UNIVERSAL ime
‘aes : sina te Fon pt ga the present| TERNATIONAL ;
The home is Oxburgh Hall, built as a manor house in Norman times by OGERUS aaa c ng eld, he should be | STAR a :
de PUGEYS and then in 1482 turned into a 100-roomed castle-type of residence by ae oe oa ne Pombo iY ain | ' co
an early BEDINGFELD with a taste for large living. zovernor of the Tower of London Mish tavaile nei . » your beaut oO
Paashure tate tae for Jaree when Elizabeth was imprisoned | For a lovelier, clearer complexion, base your beauty care oa
there.” + : ‘ norm r
SIR EDMUND and LADY PASTON BEDINGFELD—the present owner and his wife Still, in spite of about 2,000 thorough, careful cleansing. Equally effective for 1 il. dry. or oily
take into their home a limited number of carefully selected young ladies from family portraits looking dow th ate ‘ i te ‘ i 1. ’ olves ever r f mak
foreign countries, whose parents wish them to leara English and the ways of asitecretis Rasen’ the Soy ee a; skins, Max Factor Hollywood Cleansing Cream quickly dissolve V trace O
English country life in the genuine atmosphere of an old English country house. Oxburgh Hall are winning through, dirt, and grime leaves your skin feeling softer, smoother, and refreshingly clean, [
In other words, the Linth baronet and his pretty wife Joan are trying out a new The Bedingfeld ancestors who iight and morning as par f y
idea in solving the old problem of how to maintain the family homestead. Oxburgh uP under i Magy are probably oe : oo night a 1008 par
Hall has become a “luxury” finishing school. Going enough = grave-turning to SE ) ’ d feel
g , ; ; hake the boriai So far, just three young ladies are being finished there—NICOLE HANSON, of ploughed field but there has. been SCREE NSING TIP ; 4l’ the amazing difference.
Paris, MARGARET SCHNEEBURGER, of Switzerland and ELIZABETH HERON of only one sign that anyone is work- SKIN CLEA if a professional fee 1¢ amazing ;
; Aen ae ; ng 3 . - { .
Maldon, Essex—all nineteen years old. ing against the scheme. The crown Give yoursel) i Mux Bactor Ho hy
Guinea-Pigs surmounting the Bedingfeld coat at home. Appy se ream and gentry AT LEADING DRUG AND
i of arm# on the head-board in the wood Cleansing vnur skin with 4 DEPARTMENT STORES
Since Nicole and Margaret come from countries which specialize in finishing oer as has er and massage it rr ies
chools and Elizabeth has already been given the prescribed treatment for turning inexplicably disappeared. ‘natura sponms =
schoolgirls into debs in a Swiss establishment, what the girls are getting at Oxburgh Fine Training small, » » > s + - a » , 4
is not so much a finish as a sort of super-shine on top of that. Sir Edmund shrugs his shoul-
Tha 7 4? 2p ate a Séema ass
This initial trio are, of course, the guinea-pigs. Pupils—‘Well, really, they’re oor — Por walle a ae AA». ew ER RE it =
more like housegue: explains her ladyship—pay £40 month for board and fe ee > & ite ee . ee tg

’ a
wreovers her I7th tuition in one language; English for the foreigners and the natives have a choice of




























Aaiieh the cxown is missing. three.
7 From inen on the school is run
H l 1 A d Ty Wi on a caféteria system. Pick what
oO LYWOOC d n te ar you like and pay for what you
pick, Chargeable “extras” offered
HOLLYWOOD. By JAMES PADGITT sinking ship. include sailing, fencing, riding,
Holl ood was busy taking Brown. Clark Gable was a colonel The Calvary is represented by hunting, painting, flower decora-
tock of itself today with the pos- in the Air Force but he now is on Ronald Reagan. tion, and a secretarial course.
ibility that for the second time in the retired list The Marines claimed Tyrone _ Bei. eC ee ee ea
i decade it may lose some of it Also in the O.S.S. was Paul Power, MacDonald Carey, Glenn .
top talent to the armed forces Douglas; a veteran of the Afr 1 Ford, Louis Hayward and William
nd European theatres lundigan. Victor Mature, Gig
Most of the top aciwt n pic- Young and Cesar Romero chose
tures were discharged from World Da Dailey the inging and the Coast Guard.
War II on a reserve status. If the da tar, Wé an infantry Broderick Crawford, Gene Autry,
vhole group, or even a_ sizeable in the Italian campaigy: yjex Baker, Mickey Rooney, Guinn
number, is called on to don uni- lurphy, the “nation’s most Williams, Red Skelton, Donald
forms again the studios will be decorated soldier’ emerged an Q’Connor, John Payne, Burt Lan-
iard hit to find leading men to Infantry first lieutenant Last week caste:, and Robert and Jobn
fill their shoes Audie enlisted the Texas Mifchum all were enlisted men in |
Top man of the Twentieth Cen- National: Guard the last one.
tury-Fox lot, Darryl Zanuck, was ‘ ‘
dicated ‘a tape corps Me Ae ac gl the Draft eligibles who may be
colonel. He filmed action in Africa ( orp ach a * vi beckoned from promising film }
and Italy tt ne USS fe >" careers in the near future include |
I ik, Director George vie Damone, Johnny Sheffield and |
Jimmy Stewart, holder of one nd Van Heflin John Barrymore, Jr |
best war service records, eservists include Wayne ; |
the service a colonel in vho shot down Mote ee ali eS plans are}
‘ e was in the air planes Robert Taylor, afoot to entertain the troops th
na . las Fairbanks, Robert Mont- in the United States and overseas, | ad bdebibeb hee babi
ree reser also include gt r Richard Ney and John Al Jolson is the first performer to |
William Holden, Robert Howard, who received the Navy seek Washington approval to fly to|
Tony Martin and Tom Cro for heroism involving a Korea.—(I.N.S8.)

|
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Togcther

eaten

FOOD AND DRINK TOGETHER























































Lady B. says there is no other
place like it in England. Certainly
it should soon be recognised as
he best training ground for young
ladies who might marry into other
over-taxed stately homes,

When amans married
- his troubles:begin

Where else could one get the
necessary experience to show

cash customers round the place”

—LE.S.

/

e
- tat 3 hay .

a ee

4

ONLY 3 MONTHS
MARRIED-AND HES
LOSING INTEREST !

_ on

—

ENTIFIC TESTS PROVE »\
THAT,IN 7, CASES OUT OF (0,
COLGATES REMOVES THE
rege ote “.

CAUSE OF. BAD BREATH,











(sa i













POOR KID. YOU MUST
SEE YOUR DENTIST
AND DO SOMETHING
ABOUT BAD BREATH.
—_—

oo P FOR COLGATES, ACTIVE,
| PENETRATING FOAM GETS INTO
HIDDEN CREVICES BETWEEN THE
/ TEETH,CLEANS ENAMEL

BRILLIANTLY, SAFELY — TOO!
‘ Sue




COMBINATION

nbination
knows that Good stout is a @ren
All the world knows that Oysters
since Roman times for thelr
nd value



We have perfected
the combination of
these two ine

MANX

OYSTER STOUT

LATER = THANKS|TO
COLGATE
DENTAL} CREAM








It’s soothing easily
digestible yet richer
and gracious flavour

lets you feel it is doing
good even as you drink

Clean
Your Breath While

You Clean Your Teeth -

AND HELP STOP
TOQTHIDECAY !

INCE & Co., Ltd.,

JOHNSON & REDMAN,
PERKINS & Co., Ltd.,

PITCHER CONNELL & Co., Ltd,

C. D. ROGERS,
G. A. WEBSTER. >, Ss
ING Co. Ltd.—Gole Agenw







Ya

PAGE EIGHT



a == -

Printed by the Advorate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown.



Sunday, July 30, 1950



TOWN ANDCOUNTRY

PLANNING

FOR some months past repairs have been
in progress to a building at the corner of
Swan and Lucas Streets. The repairs which
are. being carried out will leave the street
the same width or very little wider. In
the meantime that part of Lucas Street is
a danger to motorist and pedestrian alike.

Of far greater importance however, than
that particular building is the tendency of
which it is so striking an example. The
streets of Barbados are so narrow that the
motorist who is so much harried by regula-
tions can haVe this consolation, that he
must be one of the best in the world for
were this not so, the condition of the Bar-
badian roads being what they are, there
could be nothing else than massacre upon
the highway.

The tendency is to perpetuate a state of
affairs which may have suited the days
when horse and buggies were the order of
the day but which are not good enough
when larger and larger automobiles are
appearing on the roads. It is imperative
that active and vigorous steps be taken to
widen the streets of the island and in par-
ticular the streets of Bridgetown.

When repairs or reconditioning of build-
ings are being carried out the Govern-
ment should insist* that such buildings

should be taken back so as to widen the .

road at that point. Compensation could be
paid for that part taken over by the Gov-
ernment for the street but it would be an
expenditure in the interest of the island.

Not only in respect of streets and Bridge-
town is the need for Governmental super-
vision necessary. The beauty of this island
is one of the greatest heritages of its people
and efforts directed at preserving its
beauty will have a great object in view.
At present many houses erected in the
island are lacking in architectural design
and in some the construction does not
make allowance for preserving the natural
beauty of the surroundings. The space
between houses is not enough, thus giving
an impression of an overcrowded tenantry
rather than the atmosphere of quiet ease
which is so necessary, particularly in the
Tropics.

It is true that the price of land in Barba-
dos at present is so high that the middle
class person trying to build a house is
forced into buying only enough to hold a
house, but it would be better to have a
house which is less pretentious and have
some ground in which children could play
in safety. The example of those who have
built at Top Rock should be followed.
There a spot is set aside as a playground
in which children can have fun without
fear of being run over by passing vehicles.

Along the coast of the island houses have
been going up so quickly that at present it
is difficult to drive from Bridgetown to
Oistin’s and catch a glimpse of the sea.
Now that process is being extended along
the coast road to Silver Sands and houses
are being built along the Sea Rocks. The
beauty of that lovely stretch of road will
soon be ruined unless further building can
be stopped on the sea side of the road.

This paper has often warned against the
unnecessary encroachment of Government
but in some fields it is necessary that there
be some supervision in the interests of the
island. A Town and Country Planning
Bill should be introduced into the Legisla-
ture which would give to Government the
right to supervise the erection of any new
buildings in the island. The powers at
present held by Government are quite in-
adequate for modern needs.

Government has not set a good example
by abolishing the post of Architect and
Town Planning Officer. A correspondent
has pointed out in these columns that this
now leaves the Government without a
qualified adviser on the erection of new
Public Works.

Government must wake up to its re-
sponsibilities. The passing of political
addresses may be a pleasant pastime but
they do nothing to enhance the prosperity
of the island nor to ensure that the long-
term interests of the island are safe-guard-
ed. Only an Act along the liries of the one
which failed to become law would begin to
give the necessary supervision and direc-
tion to the development of the island. Only
then will the people know that the beauty
of their island home will not be squandered
and sullied with impunity.



Trees

IN the correspondence columns of this
newspaper during the week, attention was
focused on the destruction of trees and ‘he
ill effects which this practice must have
on life in this island. There is little ex-
cuse to be offered but the real reason is
that the average person fails to realise the
overall importance of trees, and this lack
of appreciation has led to a vandalism
which is regrettable.

The popular idea is that trees are planted
to provide shade for men and animals
when they are growing, and cooking fuel
when they are felled. There are far great-
er trees planted methodically.
They beautify the surroundings especially
when they are of the flowering type, they
prevent erosion when planted on the hill-
sides, they also prevent landslides by caus-
ing water to percolate more easily after
heavy rains, they provide shade in places
where it is necessary and finally they at-
tract the rain so necessary in a country dé-
pendent upon agriculture.

uses for

In some parts of the world trees are pro-
tected by legislation and the removal of
one tree demands the planting of three,
as in Ireland, or generally two. This pre-
caution is taken because it is felt that one
may die and the other, having survived will
replace that which had been removed. This
is not the case in Barbados. The Legisla-
ture recently passed a bill which will allow
the payment of six cents to every person
planting certain trees on their lands but
there is no penalty attached to the destruc-
tion of trees of any kind at the whim or
caprice of people who are not particularly
concerned with their value.

There are people in this island qualified
to speak on the subject and the matter is of
sufficient importance that some individual
or society or civic body should undertake,
by means of literature or lectures or both
to enlighten the general public on the ne-
cessity for protecting trees and to acquaint
them with the grave dangers which can
follow the indiscriminate destruction of
trees. Any such action would be welcome
public service.

It must be admitted that the practice in
this island became prevalent in recent
years because of two reasons; first the in-
creased value of furniture made from ma-
hogany and secondly because of the serious
shortage of firewood. The prevalence of
ground provisions as a popular article of
diet demanded a greater amount of cook-
ing fuel than would otherwise have been
the case; but if trees suitable for cooking
fuel are removed methodically, then it
would be easy to protect ourselves by the
planting of two trees whenever one is fell-
ed. It is the indiscriminate destruction of
trees, even fruit bearing trees which needs
prompt attention.



Apples

The welcome arrival of Tasmanian apples
in Barbados this week coincided with the
arrival at this newspaper of a clipping from
the Daily Telegraph of London.

The clipping is in the form of a letter
and is headed Canadian Apples. It quotes
the imports of apples into Britain for the
past four months of this year. The figures
show that £2,555,710 of apples were im-
ported from all countries in that period
and £1,477,960 from Canada.

The writer of the letter a Mr. Hugh
Quilley of Romsey is very perturbed.

The average price per ton of Canadian
apples he claims was £45 and in April
£58—an exceedingly profitable transac-
tion, when one considers that the control
price for the new English crop will be £42.

And he asks “must the British home
producer be put out of business and the
British consumer exploited to the limit?
Quality for quality, cost for cost, price for
price, the British producer can meet all
fair competition, Let the Canadian Gov-
ernment stop its subsidies and the British
Minister of Food free the British market
and the real position will be clear.”

How far does this apparently domestic
issue in the United Kingdom affect the
buyer of apples in Barbados? The answer
is simple. Forbidden access to the Canadian
market and finding no apples available for
export from the United Kingdom the local
buyer obtains apples where he can.

Anyone who has had the privilege of
tasting a Tasmanian apple for the expen-
diture of 20 cents will not regret the ex-
perience and will welcome the enterprise
of the importers who provide a real pleas-
ure at less than the price of all but the
cheapest seats at the cinema.

But when it is known that the cost to
the importer of these apples exceeds £100
per ton then it ought to be immediately
obvious that Barbados is suffering because
Great Britain has no apples to sell and will
not allow Barbados to buy in a cheaper
Canadian market.

If apples were not so rich in vitamins and
such good food it would matter less. As it
is, it matters much.





SUNDAY ADVOCATE
| oo 2 NO) ie y CRICKET!
| St Nesask | OS
j Hewa US
rm REP) Ennis
|

eee ee ae

- Some

I Got Soaked!

BRIDGE OF ORCHY, Argyll,
HIS week I have added to my
experiences of foreign travel
by penetrating far into the Scot-
tish Highlands.

It is a magnificent spectacle. O
all sides are the cairns and gorms,
the bairns, glens and bens, and
everything else thrown in, loch,

stoch and barrel.

But the purpose of my journey
(in KYX2) was to satisfy a long-
held desire to stalk a stag.

Have you ever stalked stags”
Some people do it in order to shoot
them, others to photograph them
My purpose was to get one at bay
and interview it.

The stags in Scotland live in
deer forests. Usually there isn’t a
tree in sight, but it is still called 4
forest.

Party Members

TAGS, as you may have guessed
were the original inventors of
the stag party. And you don’t
wonder really when you think that
during the rutting season in the
autumn one stag may have as
many as 70 wives hanging round
him,

It’s enough to drive any hus-
band to a stag party, and at the
end of the season he’s so fed up
he goes off with the boys and
doesn’t come home till the follow-
ing year.

The wives, or hinds, don’t seem
to mind being left with the chil-
dren. They collect together in
large parties for a good old ten
months’ gossip.

Actually, this is the wrong time
of year to stalk stags. Their horns
are still covered with velvet, so
the sportsmen don’t shoot them till
August or September.

But the MacWicksteed, of Ben
Hampstead, N.W.3, who has been
known to catch trout with a worm,
wasn't worried by a thing like
that, the cad. And, anyway, there
is no law against interviewing a
stag.

The way to stalk a stag is first
to pick one out on the mountain



I AM MORE impressed with
the quantity in this twelfth num-
ber of Bim than the quality.
There seems to be a general urge
in the Caribbean to put pen to
paper. The result, “when it is
good it is very good but when it
is bad it is horrid”,

Some contributors seem to forget
that writing is a means of com-
munication, You have an emo-
tion, a theory, an experience, a
joke, which you would like to
share with other people. But
there is no need to inform them
in addition how clever you are,
and those who like ferreting out
obscurities are more likely to
turn to the crossword puzzle than
to a literary periodical. In other
words some of these contributions
strike me as intolerably self-
conscious.

This seems to me to be espe-
cially true of the verse, set, for
the most part in the moulds which
were fashionable with the Avant-
Garde in England and the U.S.A.
twenty years ago. Since the war
English - speaking poets have
moved towards greater clarity
and simplicity. Slight though
they are, the French verses of
Roland Dorcely seem to me to
have caught the secret of poetry
more surely than the pretentious
contributions in English.

Always excepting Derek Wal-
cott!—Here is a true poet with
something to say which can only
be said in verse, in other words







Siag Party=

Hernard Wicksteed

Has Fun Finding Out
How To Do A Bit Of

Stalking
with a telescope (spying is the
technical term), then walk for

several miles in the wrong direc-
tion.

This is so that you can get into
a position from which to approach
him without being seen or scented.

Its Costly

HEN you get near at last you

start crawling on your tum-
my like a Red Indian, taking ad-
vantage of every hollow, rock and
clump of heather. In the process
you get bruised all over and soak-
ed to the skin and covered in
peaty mud,

Yet people pay enormous sums
of money to undergo the experi-
ence. Before the war they reck-
oned it cost about £25 to shoot a
stag and some people bagged
scores in a season. It probably
costs a lot more now, but no one
has dared work it out,

Once it is shot a stag is worth
around £8, It weighs about 160
lb, dressed and the meat fetches
1ld. a lb. officially and 1s. 3d. in
the black market.

By tradition all the insides of
the deer belong to the professional
stalker who accompanies’ the
sportsmen, They are called hum-
bles, hence humble pie.

His Fags

ELPED by a_ professional
stalker I got near to a stag
sitting under a rock. Two young
stags were keeping watch for him,
rather like fags at a public school.
The fags announced us by start-
ing to run, and the old stag was
about to rise when I said, “Don’t
get up, sir. I’ve only come to
interview you.”
When I was in Cyprus recently
[ was taken to task by a local



Bim Number Twelve

Hy 8. Cunliffe Owen

Author of The Phoenix and
the Dove, Dolphin
Town ete.,

a true poetic theme and always
expressed in terms of true poetry.

Whereas Hugh Popham’s Ballad
of Full Bottoms’ (which fulfils
none of the conditions of a ballad)
might just as well have been
spoken into the telephone to God-
dard’s or Colonnade who would
have delivered the order the next
morning (except the pessaries!)
Superficially, visually, it looks
like poetry, but is in fact little
more than highbrow exercise in
cataloguing, with a little vulgarity
thrown in to “epater le bourgeois”’.

Generally speaking, manner
overloads matter in these poems.
Their authors have not really got
enough to say.

The prose, on the other hand,
suffers from the opposite defect,
plenty to say but uncertainty as
to how to say it. Farrigo by Geof-
frey Drayton, cast in a different
form and worked up might have
been interesting. As it is, this is
not literature but the raw mate-
rial from which literature is
made,

Only the very greatest artists
like Rousseau, or unconscious
geniuses like Pepys, can afford to
admit their readers to their work-
shops

It is wiser not to let them past

newspaper for writing abou.
monks instead of politics. No
wishing to make the same mis-
take in Scotland, I asked the sta.
what he thought about Hom
Rule for Scottish deer.

He said he didna ken much
about that, but he’d heard ther
were some very good jobs foi
deer in English parks.

English park deer are bigger
have better antlers, and live
longer than the deer in the Scot-
tish so-called forests.

Before the war, he said, the
keepers in Scotland used to give
them maize to eat in the winter
and that improved their antlers
but now they got nothing.

Growing a new set of antler
every year was a great strain o:
a fellow in these days of austerity

-We Eat Them’

TAGS lose their antlers in
April and I asked him if this
took a weight from their mind.

On the contrary, he said, it was
most disconcerting.

You’d be jumping over a rock
or something and suddenly bang
would go one of your antlers like
a jockey coming off a horse.
You’d jerk up your head to sce
what. had happened, and of
would come the other.

What did they do with thi
antlers when they’d cast them?
Well, he said, we usually eat
them. There’s a lot of calcium i:
them, you know, and we need
that to grow a new set.

Smart Stag

E stalked and talked for a

little longer, and then thc

stag said he must be awa’ the

noo, but if I heard of any vacan-

cies at Richmond Park or Wind-
sor would I let him know?

And so with his two fags in

attendance he bounced off down

the mountain for a drink with
the boys at the burn.
—L.E.S.

the showroom where the finished
article is displayed.

Edgar Mittelholzer’s contribu-
tion is delightful, the work of an
accomplished artist who uses his
tools like an experienced crafts-
man. Karl Sealy has the born
writer’s gift of revealing charac-
ter in a few lines. Samuel Selvon
has a pleasant way with him.

I would like to congratulate
the printers on the admirable re-
productions of Haitian painters
and John Harrison’s article on the
subject is excellent. It is a pity
that Golde White’s gossipers has

been printed upside down, (or
bound in upside down in my
copy). There are certain artists

whose work is greatly improved
by this treatment, but hers has
earned the right to stand on its
own feet not on its head!

I finish with a plea, I notice
that no less than three of the
stories are concerned with the
colour question. Cannot we let
this old war-horse lie down and
rest for awhile? Cannot the fra-
ternity of writers, whose outlook
should transcend class, colour and
creed, forget this wretched sub-
ject which poisons social inter-
course in the West Indies? Can-
not people write about their fellow
human beings without continually
worrying over the colour of their
skins? The human heart is the
ultimate theme of all worth while
and immortal literature and it is
the same everywhere.



OUR READERS SAY:



Cricketers and Sunday
To the Editor, the Advocate

SIR,—At Manchester, in June.
in connection with the first Test
Match, on Sun@ay June 11th to
be exact, the evening service in the
big Methodist Church-Hall, called
the Albert Hall, was utilised to
join in the welcome of the West
Indies Cricket Team, and link
them up with Divine worship

The minister in charge, the Rev.
W. Gowland, conducted the ser-
vice, and others who took part

were the Rev. Palmer-Barnes,
assistant to Mr. Kidney the
manager of the trip, the Rev. E.
Griffin, superintendent of the

James St. Circuit, Barbados, who
is on short furlough, Mr. K. W.
Crowe of the British Olympic
Team and Secretary of the Man-
chester Athletic Association, and
Mr. Bert Whally, coach of the
Manchester United Football Club,
who is also a Methodist Lay
Preacher.

Some seven members of the
team were expected to attend but
finally only two, Messrs Goddard
and Rae, turned up. There was
widespread interest in the event,
and a great crowd of 1800 p@sons
filled the hall.

The preaching part of the ser-
vice was taken by Mr. Whatley
and the Revd. Palmer-Barnes, the

former taking for his text St.
Paul’s exhortation in 1 Corin-
thians, 16, 13: “Watch ye, stand

fast in the faith, quit you like men,
be strong,” and the latter the com-
mand of God to Moses. “Wherefore
criest thou unto me? Speak unto
the children of Israel, that they
go forward.”

I have the item from my church
paper, the Methodist Recorder,
recently to hand, which also re-
produced on the same page the
photo of the team which appeared
in the local papers at the beginning
of the Tour.

Now is not that something
vastly better for all concerned
than playing part of the match on
the Sunday? Better for the men
to have the Sunday for rest and
for everybody the opportunity for
worship and due respect for
Almighty God,

F.
Pleased Policeman
To the Editor, the Advocate

SIR,—After nearly eight years
of absence I am indeed” delighted
with the progress my island home
is making in its trend towards
modernisation Good structures,
education etc., etal, too numerous
to mention. In my nocturnal
rambles I was struck by the
recent building erected by Planta-

tion’s Limited which is indeed :
credit to local craftmanship, but a
greater surprise laid in store for
me as I journied towards Harmony
Hall district. As I saw the new
Globe Theatre I was impresse:
very much with this palace, and
I am rather doubtful) if the
structure can be surpassed in other
West Indian islands, certainly not
in Trinidad

But certainly what impressed me

most was the vocation I have
chosen, With a little more time,
Col. Michelin in the near future

will have placed Barbados Police
Force very far up the ladder of
progress. I am indeed very pleased
with his latest innovation of in-
cluding the weaker sex in the role
of Police Women, as naturally
women are more suitable to ap-
proach women law-breakers and
delinquent young girls than men.
Other fellow constables in the
West Indies will join me in wish-
ing that other West Indian Islands
would adopt Col. Michelin’s at-
titude and with Col. Michelin’s
ambition of unification of the
West Indian and South American
Forces I wish him good luck in
the attempt.

I have not forgotten
Jamaica has set the example.
KENNETH GRIFFITH P.C. 3657.
July 28, 1950.

that

| Ses

SUNDAY,





WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED

JULY 30,

i=



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SUNDAY, JULY 30, 1950





When The Bell Rings... =
It’s One Big Party |
Line In Antigua

—Says Eunice Savoury

THE story goes that Antigua’s

t when
telephone service was the third to

you can call
member.”

me you re-

be installed in the world. It was What a historic spot the Tele-
put into operation in the early phone Exchange is? More came-
nineteenth century at first for

tas are focussed on that building
every week than on any other
part of the island. No beauty spot
attracts the tourist’s camera be-

Government use only and as time
went by it extended commercial-
ly until it has reached its capa-

city of five hundred subscribers. fore he has made certain he has
Little or nothing has ever bee snapped that famous sight: the
done to modernize the equipment only spot in the world where
and the method of conveying some five hundred wires find
lines continues to be exactly t their way to the switchboard
same aS Was done a ceatury ago. through a broken glass window
In 1924 the exchange was vos without cameras look up
moved from High St. to its almost getting stiff necks and
present site in the upper flat of with astonishment wonder he Ww
a shabby old building at the ee linesman ever traces
corner of Long and Thames St, f aulty line in the massive co-
and there a new switch board {Sion within the building. They

enquire, Does it work? “Yes in-
deed it does work, and surpri
ingly well too, provided you
have patience, and if you do not
possess patience, you will surely
cultivate patience in Antigua.

accommodating two operators was
installed. There is a staff of six
girls and the chief operator who
lives on the premises and answers
night calls only trom 9 p.m. till
7 a.m. year in and year out. The
girls work doubly from 7 a.m. till

4 p.m. singly Regardless of the many faults

and





from 4 p.m.
till 9 pn There are also two - = vy and anc “ee service
extra operators employed to re- te public has no need to worry

too seriously taking into consider-
ation that commercials, doctors,
Between 1Â¥30 and 1950 surveys lawyers and all can listen or talk
have been made by five differe:t ull day and every day at the rate

lieve on holidays





experts. They have all reported, of 8 cents per day. Without
departed, and have never bee, ®X@eseration an average of 3.000
heard of siuice. Number SIX SUR- Calls are put through daily.

sceptical view of the whole lear ]_jyhtfHarwey, Smith who is mak
is—"Are these yet another lot of ing the survey on behalf of tne
birds of passage or is “SIX” Colonial Office says I never
Antigua’s lucky number?” “is imagined there was such a tele-

Antigua going into private life on phone system still in existence. - 1



i . t Q the las i ype was
the wires, or is Antigua going to ite ai ree nae ame
continue to have one great’ big Harvey Smith has already covered
Talkie Talkie Party?” One gen- 7S as 3 te

the island with Mr. H. D. C.
Moore, Supt. of Telephones. Last
Friday Colonel V. G-. Bloodworth
C.B.E,, who is making a survey
throughout the West Indies on
behalf of Cable & Wireless arrived
and before he had time to accus-
tom his eyes to the whirl of wires
he had to seize the only possible
opportunity of getting to Mont-
serrat on Saturday morning.

With a little luck Mr. Harvey
Smith and Colonel Bloodworth
hope to arrive back in Antigua

tleman recently asked, “Does the
Antigua Telephone service have
party lines?” “Of course we do,
it is always a party line” was the
reply and furthermore, country
tolk need never bother to come to
town to hear the news. They just
pick up the receiver and are en-
tertained with all the very latest
lit bits.

This miraculous telephone ser-
vice extends all over the island
and even crosses the sea at one
point, from the Narrows to Guiana next Monday. Colonel Bloodworth
Island, There are two branch ex- says that he must be back in Bar-
changes, one at Parham and the bados by 6th August—A party is
other at All Saints. There are in the air.
several lines which carry two,
three, four and five parties. The
one line which carries five parties ¢¢
goes in the direction of the fash-
ionable Beach Hotel area, Num-
ber five on that line is Mrs. Cyril

B. G. To Have
Cassava Processing
Factory

(Barbados Advocate Corr

GEORGETOWN



Rice Sweepings’”’
Sold As Food

An opportunity which British
Hobson at Edgewater and when Gulenale THERA farmers. have
she is required her bell rings SLX (Pachades Advocate Cottespondent) inne swahted: will’be theirs by
TIMES. Picture what a musical 1

KINGSTON, year-end—a steady and long-term
house Edgewater must be with A rice importation from Briush outlet for a very considerably ex-
tingling staccatto trills throughout Guiana has caused a temporary panded production at remunera-
the day while the bell is heard upset in the tocal rice market tive prices. This will be
calling parties two, three and four. quring recent weeks. As a resulc Provided by a processing factory
Nevertheless Mrs. Hobson claims of the fact that this importation NOW nearing completion at Kings-
that she receives excellent service js being offered on the market for ‘
even better than that experienced human consumption instead ot ,, 8 the factory will be in opera-
when she lived in the city. stock feed as expected, the Food tion at the end of the year, the
Mr, Cox Chambers is the name Contraliee = han Rectaad +e ng Department of Agriculture ‘ has
of the earliest superintendent that jurther import licences for this called upon farmers to embark
can be remembered by a few mem- commodity will be issued “in the pale atk Senge fee eae
— Sean: Pireareace ime ign, interest of public safety”. While the processing factory
: nine : ~~ In the meantime the Criminal will fulfil a variety of other pur-
ancient service is due to its being Investigation Department has been poses, one of the most important
an earth return system with gal- called in to investigate the cir- of its activities will be the manu-
vanised overhead wiring which cumstances of the importation and facture of cassava flour, which
causes frequent cross talk. One subsequent sales. will (1) afford a profitable outlet
irrascible _Governor after three a statement issued Saturday by for farmers’ sava; (2) provide
fruitless attempts to speak on a the Food Controller stated that a consumers with a nutritious flour
line occupied by two old ladies commodity described as “Stock and thereby (3) reduce British
gossiping, shouted to the operator, feeq” and which in fact was rice Guiana’s dependence on wheaten
“Take those two damn old mag- sweepings, is being offered to the flour, which is at present imported
pies off the line and let the Gov- trade from British Guiana. A ‘rom hard currency areas
ernor do his work”. certain quantity, the Food Con- Ligure neal is being
9 q 1e ) uctior Or Cc
There is no telephone directory. troller said, was recently imported ae ee Meee os
Operators have to know every- without an import licence and ““Goccaya starch is already a good
body throughout the island by some of this is being offered to gojjay-earner for Brazil and other
name, and in most cases they know the public as rice for human con- ooyntries which export substantial
the names of houses as well. They sumption despite its inferior quantities to the United States of
are all a very efficient good quality. America
natured lot of girls, not only are The It is proposed to establish, in the

outlet

cas

given
sava



importer concerned told

they educated as operators but the press that the British Guiana near future, in the Pomeroon
they are the most intelligent up, Government had sent samples of River and North West Districts,
to date information bureau. There what was described as “stock machinery for processing cassava

is no tourist bureau on the island, feed” to several firms in Kingston roots into meal for shipment 7
a ; j , yeorge “his Aas > Ww
but any stranger can ring the ex- and inquired whether they were Georgetown. This measure wi




















ee eerste

TOURISTS NEVER MISS THIS—Famous snap





worth Ww ent
comparec¢
!

million les

ing period of
a lola

valued at $11,424,036

more

694,085 tons at-a
638

the

total of

million





SUNDAY



}

be



Canada Does $ 3m
More Trade With
B. G.

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent

GEORGETOWN,



Canada continues to be Britis!
Guiana’s best customer and |}
actually increased her purchas«
during the first six months of tl
year by nearly $3 million

otal exports for the half yea

June 30, 1950, amounted t
613° whilst imports wer:
212. As it is the Colony
imports exceeded exports I

$3,517,599

Of the total exports
to Cs
with $6,645,48
rst six months of
United Kingdom
3,355,091, or

$11,496,02%
ida i
i for the
1949, whilst the
bought
ipproximately
s than the
1949
tll holds top place
export of 86,290







$1M%

ond-

corres}

sugar with
ton

slightly
which wa

balance

than one half of

old to Canada and the

Bauxite is next in line vith

value of $6,140,-

Only other items which reached

ven-tigure mark run

($2,058,734) and rice ($1,637,211
Import figures disclose that of

$27,231,212, which is $21





more than was imported
in 1949, $12,935,768 came fron
Britain or $14 million more than
for 1949, where: import from
Canada have remained more
less stati



First Wire-Nails Factory







ADVOCATI

shot of Antigna's

only

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN
ir, J. Smeaton, F.L.A., Deput:
Director Eastern Caribbean Re
ional Library (British Council)
ivrived from Trinidad, July | 2:
{1 will remain in British Guiana
four or five weeks
rhe object of his visit is to ad
vise and co-operate with — the
Librarian and Staff of the Public
Five Library in re-organisauon
f the Librar book stocks and
procedures as a first step to the
initiation of rural Library services
The Regional Library will afford
the Library technical advice and
issistance in this matter and will
ilso help by grants of new book
nd in other way
The Library will be closed to
the public during — the period
August 3 to September 2, as the
ork of re-organisation is neces-
ivily heavy and will occupy the





Telephone Exchange



Georgetown

Free Library





1e of the



f¢



Adams To

Barbados Advocate Corresponden

GEORGETOWN



Overhauling

le talf during th

Practise InB.G.

t)







PAGE NINE

a
sas @€8 28
| Sn nn ae ne ee ee ee ee
& FOR THE COMFORT OF YOUR wa
1, ee
a a

IRINA LICE POWDER, and
@ PURINA INSECT KILLER
H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD.







Questions In
Parliament

WEST INDIES UNIVERSITY
COURSES
Miss Irene Ward last week asked
the Secretary of State for the
Colonies what provision there will
ve at the new West Indian Uni-





versity for West Indians to take is .
studies in home-making subject mi g Distributers. B
und the crafts of the islands :

Mr. J. Griffiths: | understand Sueseeepepeseeepeuaoeueaen

that the University College of the
West Indies does not at present
contemplate making provision for
these studies

Miss Ward: In view of the im-
portance of these studies to the
West Indians, would the right hon
Gentleman go into the matter t
see whether such courses could

t be initiated in this Univer

y
Mr. Griffiths: The University is







FOR THE BEST IN
|





n autonomous body, I will con- ‘
vey the suggestion of the hon a BEABTIFOA
Lady to them

Miss Ward asked the Secretary Cast- FO-CLEAN

t State for the Colonies what i
ec policy recommended in the
West Indies for dealing with un-
employment adolescents
Mr. J
W é
{Nise
mong

imong
Griffiths replied
Indian Governments
that unemployment
adolescents is a special
problen In the Colonies
for which recent information is
available’ in the Colonial Office,
the position is as follows, In Brit
ish Guiana, a juvenile employment
exchange service has recently
been inaugurated. Apprenticeshit
schemes in building and engineer-
ing trades are also. being started
under the Industrial Training
Ordinance
In TYinidad irrangements for

vocational guidance and the plac
f

recog

three

ing of those leaving school are
based on the United Kingdom
system, but are still in the experi

mental stage. There are plans for
the early extension of the present
limited facilities for pre-voca-
tional and technical training. The
establishment of farming institutes
and farming schools fot

training
adolescents in agriculture | and
husbandry i ilso being actively
considered
In Jamaica, the question of un-
employment among adoleseents is
being studied; in view of the gen
eral unemployment situation and
of the financial position of the





Government, it has not yet been
possible to formulate a definite
policy Legislation regarding ap-
prenticeship is however being
drafted in the light of a report
prepared by a local committee and
a survey to determine the absorp
tive capacity of various industrie
for skilled workers who have
completed apprenticeship training
has already been carried out

Gold and Dollar Balance

Mr. Keeling asked the Chan
cellor of the Exchequer if he will
publish in the Official Report a
statement showing the dollar ex-
penditure and earnings of each
Colony Protectorate and Trust
‘Territory

Sir S. Cripps: | propose in the
next Balance of Payment’s White

SPECIALS
YOU'LL
APPRECIATE





Paper to give figures of the net e
gold and dollar balance of the
Colonies as a whole for the first

half year of this year. "Noere are
technical difficulties in the way of
giving more detailed information
and it will not be possible to give!
figures for each individual Colony. |
But T am examining whether the |
available information can be pre-} @

Ladies’ Hats
Small Shapes in Smart Styles
$4.09 and $4.17



nted in any more detailed wa
Potatoes Are . S ny SEE THEM
Scarce Cluffon 2A

ON SHOW

THE present shortage of sweet |
potatoes is merely a seasonal mat- |
ter the Director of Agriculture told | @
the Advocate yesterday.

He said that around the month
of July and August there is gener
ally a searcity but by, Septembe

A Lovely Range of Designs’
. $2.10°

Plastic Baga

AT

HARRISON'S

nee ——>



there is generally a good suppl
again as the potatoes planted in DRY GOODS
May are then reaped, In Black, Brown Red and

With suitable weather the su; » DEPT
ply of potatoes sometimes become White @ $2.73 & $3.36 é
abnormally large and. then cf
course they are processed into
flour for animals feed



































e irls i > fi t only provide employment for (BarLados Advocate Correspondent) Robert Adams, British Guiana
change, and any of those girls interested. Only one firm took up Ho y I sein” athe Corresp 4 ia ate rae Rihwan «tree
willingly give the most accurate the offer and imported 2,000 bags. @ number of sorters, ttn of First of its kind ge eich Lan” actor, lawyer, singer, wrest. *
prompt assistance. The com-~ Customs accepted the description S osava in thane avesa to Tia Waker: Cite aero ee, Brit radla’a teahire tent 7ee thie CUS J. Tt “ ‘
plaint from an operator’s point of the B.G. Government and so at ok Secriace aga the rail santana aes oak : pa zoe at ae ated tha aiamaee ot ee rv. 8 ake
of view is that you would be did the importer. Upon examipe- Farmers’ cassava will be pur- gtart juct “ain ae e British Council will be returning - iL "5 =
amazed at the number of folks tion it was found that the con- mhakad at tae tingstan factiry and ar prov uc ion in Jamaica Home dutingd tia Hawes eanihe ;
who do not trouble themselves signment contained 20 per cent. 7's) pomeroon and North Wests Qctober this year with backir Bob coming home with his i :
to answer the bell instantly and whole grains and the rest bpolker: istrict a ; sinotnal’ eee ide at Receament, und SRD eteonier ietea cavd « theae
some who never answer it at all. grains. The importer offered the Contres Cash will be paid for] POneer snoustr, net children, and plans to practise hi
They are quite accustomed to commodity to his customers a8 cuppiies at these centres and all}, !t a eer hoo output Wil profession before the Supreme CLASPS and BUCKLES
night pranks where often a gay “stock feed” and it sold fast, but further transport charges paid nS ely 500,000 nails per Court here "
lad at a dance hall = turn the a be on 200 ee ee Gay. For Ladies’ Dresses in Shades of
handle and say, “Operator are Trade Controller seiz: he stock . Y fy
you there?” — Yes — “Well stay on hand. ; Will Study B. G. SCN eT va “a White, Red, Grey, Green, Salmon
there”, The importer said he was await - Ri 1 d t a SSS SSS ute, Khed, Grey, Gr yf ’
The operator gets her’s back ing the outcome of the issue with ice naus ry :
when some clever person decides interest because no licence is re- PERFUMES THAT % Rosewood, Helio, Beige
to ask the time in the wee hours quired for importation of stock (Barbados Advocate CNGSION. AST 6 a0 ‘
of the morning. “Any Hour” is feed from British Guiana. “If | Mintalat. 1 foe Aunt aitute 4 43 L ~ , Prices each from 28 (0 nog
the reply, The most frequent sold my customers grass to feed |’ i as . Hy =e D. Wi A. | GewaPetames: Célocnes ha ‘ ae ES I t
joke enjoyed by operators is their stock and they choose to go Jamaica, =e aes A aedeagal “P rr Vath ane Wath) —
when a party calls, and then home and cook it and eat it, that Barrant has accepted an inv ny ‘owder (Face
can’t for the life of them remem- js none of my business,” he said. t© Visit British arate Ne uae ’ aaa a cere
ber whom they require.—“Why?” Yesterday according to inform- Pte Fovkionentes ; = feces aaa ag \ rn Q N ' 1,
The individual has been so en- ation from British Guiana, Mr ple Aca hihi a Hot ba AVE HEPHERD & A) itp
grossed in listening to a spicy Peter Bayley. manager of that of the Jamaica era See "| THE COSMOPOLITAN | } - v4 e GLASS BEADS
conversation of who is having Colony’s Rice Marketing Board, been receiving the prig mn fe} :
saltfish and fungie for breakfast said that the shipment was not the eee a cares ou secrete | bax PmONse s0(1 & 4441 | 10, 1, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET
that they have quite forgotten “Rice Sweepings”, which is not OPinions expressed by agricul |) NIGUT P B1-4h : eqs
their own business. In such exported but broken rice which bole gegen tees ee et for Milk Doilies
cases the tor says, “ i inoe ‘ ” ‘armers as to the FOL) sees ain Bae wlneranietes senbetiin
ASES operator says, “O.K. js shipped as “stock feed”. developing the industry SSS SSS _ 3 i =!
* SS = SS gocesoos POCO LD LEGO ELESPLELLPELEPPPAPPAPASPIPY , | CECE LLL SASS PSOE
For Delightful Refreshment i} 8 : Mr. Fact Mccncnges
We Offer I r. kactory Manager
>
y
% LET US HELP YOU WITH YOUR REPAIR PROBLEMS.
% We can supply the following ex STOCK
4
+
$
% ¥ BOLTS & NUTS
| % m ; Iron & Bright Steel All sizes
1 § ; Pe
8 FoR THE RACES 5 BEARING (Plummer Block) —
ian 8
' | $ Soda Biscuits—Tins & Pkgs Custard Powder—Tins 3 } SKF BALL 4nd Cast Iron Brass
e 3 ‘ P ‘ rave c 91 T Bushed
: Cocktail Biscuits—Tins & Hams (2{ Ttbs)—Tins
TI ig papas s
- —e A een ‘8 eae Salad Cream—Bottles % | BOLT TAPS & DIES—
1% Sweet Tins & Pkgs. Table Jelly —Packages $ | In sets from 4” to 1/4”
| Our Buyer goes yearly to the i} Cocktail Onions —Bottles Table Raisins—Packages % ASBESTOS ROPE, TAPE and
| British Industries Fair. 1% Sandwich Paste es fins Jams and asm % FIBRE, etc. i
iy $s +
io x C
rial 1D Mathew Nats 3 i Ti RII
MALTED MILK | ase it niee w Prices | |% Pears — Bots. & Tins Sponge Pudding — Tins $ : {
SANDWICHES | sone s Lo | Peaches—Bots. & Tins Chicken Haddies — Tins $ Remember i}
nee " o | EWEL Z | Cake Mix—Packages Golden Arrow Rum % I) ~ of rmy . ney
TEAS—HOT DOGS—COOL DRINKS a. 3 \||| The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Led. |
“Ep > 1M ht
SERVICE Al 7 ? ’ % ‘ x] | )}
I ‘ ¥; DE LIMA & Cco., LTD: } $ PERKINS & CO LTD. x i HEADQUARTERS FOR ALL FACTORY AND PLANTATION
if .
KNIGHT’S SODA FOUNTAINS Wt! & aera sas a SUPPLIES i
Phoenix & City Pharmacies Phone 4644 o- 20, Broad Street is Roebuck Street ms Dial 2072 & 4502 1) tk
7 } nD +i a |
Se | ————— Fae CS LLL LoL CELLOLLE OCLC LOLOL ~ ~ : ——











Butcher on show at

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



Mr. FREDDIE MILLAR stands beside the ‘plane during its

Queen's Park

WINGS OVER BARBADOS





ople whose memeries monoplane later to be named
we yack eightegy years “Miss Barbados.”
ag jay by an account of the The ‘plane which had a wing
vi Mickey” Cipriani to Bar- span 26 feet, 8 inches was con-

be in his private "plane on structed from plans supplied by
30, 1932, will remember the the Allison Aircraft ‘company of
t of Mr, Jack Skinner America

and Mr. Sydney Weatherhead ta Working moégtly on evenings,









pl = me ee of sometimes at night and on most
y ; : est Indies holidays, these two young en-
ane structed. “Miss Be spieisasts gradually completed the
Pcl: MOROP ane’ Shs .ruction of the *plane. When
ar recessf launched it ; : 5
fovelnhet Aso ke tuey had got it into so advanced
a Stage of building tha the ige
at the Bay Mansion could no long
who 1s BROW sccommédate it, they wer ve
ar Sanya Ice Com~- permissi!sn by Mr. Don Jonns«
be id a Afteen minutes usa a part of the buildin:
= : ; He is,a pleasant yo, Factory for housing ft This
mec Aman of midvic ag: 'putlding now houses the ‘!Bico”
with ’ oS wir Mit i Ice cream plant

mentions the un-

sarbados.”



lasin he Engine Bought

r of an hour he re- ~Mr,, Skinner was able to pur-
n interesting story of the chase a Gnome Rotary engine
j and death of ‘‘Miss Barbados” from the U.S.A. from surplus stock
and here it is 4 from the Great War of 1914-18.

The late’ Captain Michael
Cipriani of Trinidad, the pioneer
of private flying in that island,







“Miss Barbados”

Mr. J. A. Skinner said that he was so interested in the news that
owned and built the first and only Mr. Skinner was building a
ever built and flown in private ‘plane that he flew to Bar-



As far back as 1932 bados on July 30 in his private
irted to put his idea of owning ’plane “The Humming Bird” and
a ‘plane into something gave as one of the chief reasons









and assisted by Mr. for his flight, the wish to see Mr

Weatherhead, he started ¢kimer’s ‘plane and to discuss
mnstruction in a garage at the private flying with him.

ansion of a high winged wy. Skifiner.was taken up in the

ie

MISS BARBADOS ON SHOW at the Barbados Aquatic Club.
erhead who built it, and Mr. Nicholls thé pilot, pose beside
= \

. eine nine sb

Look for the Red White
& Blue Pump Globe

MANUFACTURED IN TRINIDAD BY TRINIDAD LEASFHOLDS LYD
AGENTS '

2
PA COSTA & CO., Lip e
JAMES A. LYNCH & CO. Lp”



2 ,



y ; , i rial fight. The ceroplane had

iby o. Ss. ‘ opp een ‘akon to Cnanccry Lene Ww

‘ are Christ Church, and oo the open
Humming Bird" for a flight over Vasture in the vicin t 4 Inel

the island and took over the wn Viarlowe a suitable 1° gz ground
trols for a short time as discovered, ‘Th? engine
on te : sving ti le

Miss Barbados” was completec hich 1 been gving Woe .

in November of 1932 and from wat ree, a 4 noe

Sunday, November 6 to Saturday,

> cockpit The engine was
November 12 at the request of Mr in SBS corkns Scan

sterted and Miss Barbados glided

George Manning it was put On sorward gracefully rising into the
show at the Barbados Aquatic gi, attaining a height of five hun
Club cared feet Mr. Nicholls headed

her seawards and she appeared

Ready For Flight to be flying easily



On Sunda November 13 the
litle monoplane was towed rlape Crashes
Inch Marlowe” Chancery Lane
since it was intended to use the After travelling about a mile out
pusture there an airstrip. But to sea, “Miss Barbados” described
Tuesday, November 15 wa © big graceful arc and headed foi
dey the landing place. It was quickly
Mr. Noel Nicholls, a licensed Observed by those at the landing

base that the engine was giving
trouble and although faced with
he problem of avoiding a house
when making a forced landing
Mr. Nicholls by great skill and
presence of mind avoided wha
might have proved a fatal acci
lent, and although the plane was
vrecked irretrievably the intrepid
irman to the relief of the many

pilot and a friend of the amateur
builders took over the controls and
started the ‘plane on maiden
voyage, but after a perfect take
off and a climb to five hundred
feet the pilot had to make a forced
landing and the ‘plane was wreck-
ed

its

The Advocate of November 16





gives the following description of snxicua spectators, stepped ou

the maiden flight:” ef the wreckage without sustain
“MISS BARPADOS" CRASHES ON jng atseratch. The under-carri

TRIAL FLIGHT oa Ws eae ae
Miraculous Escape of Skiiful Pilot e of the aeroplane wi torn
Aeroplane reduced to rmatehwood away, and the cockpit was reduced

“Yesterday afternoon Mr. Jac! » matehwood
Skinner and Mr. Weatherhead
the builders of the aeroplane “Miss
Sarbados.” decided t &

The destruction of the aeroplane
ust have been a severe blow to
he young constructors but their
joy at the miraculous eseape of
the pilot made them forger thei:

d her on

Cisappointment Mr Nichol!
suid that “Miss Barbad took off
perfectly and answered to the
controls easily but he soon dis-
covered that the engine Was not
n.aking the correct number ol
revolutions. He was returning to

ihe landing ground to investigate

‘he trouble when suddenly th
engine gave out and he was com-
peed to make a forced |onding
“Miss Barbados” was fitted with ;
Gnome engine — a type whic
has been discarded since 1917.”

When interviewed last evenin
Mr, Skinner, nothing caunved by
his misfortune, announced his in

tention of building another al
1eta] aereplane in the nea
iuture

After the ‘rash, Mi Skinne)
aid, Mrs. Kathleen Hughes started

a fund with a view to giving finan-
cial assistance to a scheme for re-
building the plane or building an
other one



This scheme tell through arn
after the Barbados Aero Club wa
formed, Mr. Skinner asked th
sponsors of the fund for permissio:
io transfer the money to the credi
Mr. Skinner and Mr. Weath- cf the newly toma tub ar :
it. thought that it was serving tt
same purpose that he had in

erred

SEC.

TRIC
USEHOLD ELEC
aT APPLIANCES





Designed for elegance and effici-
ency, fitted with a bakelite handle

for comlort and easy control, the
G.E.C,

iron glides smoothly and

enortiess urning your labour

into pleasur

THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD.
{ BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

a CC Te



OF ENGLAND
= ae

— : =

construction at Baxter's Road.

tended “Miss Barbados” to do and
that was to encourage and stir up
iceal interest in private flying.

Two More Try

Mr. Freddie Millar, M.C.P.
and Mr. Gordon Butcher also had
their try at the amateur construc-
tion of a high winged monoplane.
As a matter of fact, Mr. Millar
told me yesterday that he con-
eived the idea of constructing 2
plane when he was only eighteen
years old. 1

He began building a ‘plane with

1e assistance of Mr. Hugh Grant

in Bank Hall but the idea fell
rough.
However Mr. Gordon Butch-

er and he began to build a high
‘winged monoplane in 1942 at Bax-
ters Road, from blueprints sup-
plied by Peyton Paul of the U.S.A.

Construction was almost com-
pleted and the job would have
ween finished if import restrictions
nad not prevented importation of
ihe materials necessary for finish-
ing it.

They completed construction of
the under-carriage, fuselage, and
notor mount and had the engine
installed. Mr. Butcher broke off
his work at Springer's Foundry
to make two trips to Canada to
set much needed material. He had
u narrow escape on returning from
ne of these trips when the C.N.S.

‘Lady Nelson” was torpedoed in
he St. Lucia harbour. He man-
ged io save the material and
brought it safely here

Piane On Show

The plane was put on show at
e Annual Industrial Exhibition
December, 1942, and crowds

gathered around it to see a plane
arom close range, and to hear the
motor started time and again,

Bul failure to get permifsion to
import the nec ary steel fittings
nad other materials for finishing
the job led to a stalemate, and
the ‘plane is now too old to be
conditioned. '

Mr. Millar had a warm wgrd to
ay for the kindness and interest
hown by Mr. Harold Manning of
the Barbados Aero Club. He had
presented them with sufficient alr-
eraft cloth for covering the fuse-
Inge and the wins

Some Usetul Gifts




The Barbados Aero Club had
iso made them a gift of the
heels and much _— serviceable

culpment after their own train-
ing ‘plane had crashed.

Mr. Charles Baeza, another
member of the Barbados Aero
Club, had given them some very

eful odds and ends that had
roved to be of great help in the
construction of the ‘plane.

Mr. Millar said that his brother
suther Millar had, joined Mr.
jutcher and himself after they
ad begun construction of the
‘plane and had given them con-

derable assistance.

He said that they were sorry
it they did not get a chance to
mplete their ’plane and have it

town, but they ‘still talk about
uilding another one.

U.S. Army
Stepped Up
To 834,000

WASHINGTON, July 28.

The United States Army plans
to bring its strength up to
834,000. An increase of 240,000
officers and men over the 594,000
now in uniform, Carl Vinson,
Chairman of the House Armed
Services Committee, announced
today.

The increase is planned under
President Truman’s additional
expenditure emergency budget
request of $10,500,000,000 for the
fiscal year 1951.

Vinson said General J. Law-
son Collin, Army Chief of Staff
told the Committee that $165,000, -
000 would be spent for tanks,
guns, field artillery, and other
“hardware equipment”.

—(Reuter) |



N. Koreans Use
Russian Weapon

With MacArthur’s Headquarters, |
KOREA, July 28.
North Koreans are widely
using Soviet self-propelled-gun
mechanised vehicles closely re- |
sornae tanks and often con-|
fused with tanks, American officer
gaid here today. It was a weapon |
of support, far more vulnerable |
than the tank but could knock
out a tank, he added.

Lightiy armoured, it weighs
about 11 tons and is highly mobile, |
being capable of 25 miles an hour
on roads and 10 miles an hour}
across country. It carries about 70 |

rounds of ammunition and has a!
range of 200 miles without re- |

fuelling. —Reuter.

JOURNALISTS
MISSING

By JULIAN BATTES

With MacArthur’s Headquarters,
KOREA, July 28.

_A passport belonging to Stephen

Simmons a British Newspaper

Correspondent missing with three

cther Journalists on a flight to



the Korean front yesterday, was |

washed ashore in Japan today.

Only one survivor had so far

been found, of 23 passengers and |
the |

@ three-man crew when
Dakota Type Courier plane
plunged into the sea eight miles
off the shore of Oshima Island.

A Japanese fisherman last night
found the wreckage of the plane





SUNDAY, JULY 30, 1950



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When over-indulgence in food and
drink causes headache or stomach
discomfort Alka-Seltzer brings you
First Aid. Drop one or two tablets
in a glass of water, Watch it fizz and
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which the Americans identified, ,

A special Rescue Squad of war-

ships and fishing boats was con-

tinuing the search for survivors
—Reuter.



Dean Of Trinidad

To Give Mission

In B.G.

(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN.
The Very Rev. J. E, M. Ash-

worth, Dean of Port-of-Spajn,
will be visiting British Guiana
next month to give an 8-day

mission at St. Andrew’s Church,
Cove and St. John, East Coa’st;
Cove and John, East Coast. Dem-
erara.

_ Rev. J. M. Eby, the Vicar of
St. Andrew’s has announced that
the Dean will arrive on August
24, and the Mission wil, be held
from August 25 to September"1.
There will be four services each
day a’ 6 a.m.,9a.m. 3 p.m. and
7.30 p.m.

The Dean will be assisted at
the services by Rev. L. C. Gar-
mandy of St. George’s Cathedral.







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haa relia I:







SUNDAY, JULY 30, 1950 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN

Centenary Of The Consecration Of St. Matthias Ar S| HUBBUCK’S
Hy John Prideau

vy
cHurcH \SKER| DIPLOMATTE
E Flat Oil Paint































of the Les and
Chapels in Barbad St. Matthias j
is by far the best known to Visit v
> 7 |
sate nes Shae SERVICES |H D!

ated in the c of
district, an visited b
bers of nearly every I
denomination. As Ch









METHODIST CHURCH
JAMES STREET















P a NM a.m Rev. B. Crosby, 7 p.m
St. Matthias’ not very old, as Rev. H. C. Payne
it celebrates > centenary of it *AYNES BAY
Consecration on the dy f Au 930 a.m Mr E. L Bannister,
ation on Lug 7 pm Mr, J. Layne
ust, 1950 WHITEHALL |
enge Bishop n (1824 Ny . “ an B. Crosy, 7 p.n
—42), the first Bish Barba
dos, a large program vas ca GILL MEMORIAI }
: , 1! an Rev. H. C. Payne, 7
ae - wane tr a oo eee ee
es mi ue ' : . wy Sist instant st 7.15 p.m Relentless itching—caused by germs under
hy ee Pn eee eee the skin, speedily develops into irritating |
the w _ _ Z S ; F he by S. ©. Gclnters pimples and open sores unless checked. |
also educatec S he ne ge HOLETOWN Thousands of skin sufferets have proved |
Fifteen of these newl oa 830 ar Mr. G. Harper, 7 p that there i nothing more sure in results |
Chapels may 4 tae Bs Boe than D.D.D. Prescription. This famous |
parish C pon WEES EF i BANK HALI liquid healer does penctrate the tortured
ruins by the hurrican \ 9.30 a.n Mr. J. B. Hayne skin tissues, attack the festering germs and
lith, 18% bu t rv $ Re me b drive out the infection. Whatever form of
faith courage he remailt i. ‘ sh IGHTST. 2WN skin trouble is giving you pain and distress |
undaunted, and with subscript Me. i. Husbana ’ ECZEMA, es ee
both locally and r ver SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIS ENXUPTIONS, PRIC LY AT, |
he practically rebuilt every 4 ; : KING STREET MALARIA SORES or RINGWORM |
Church that had been demolished aaa ee m.: Pastor ©. F.. Reid just a few applications of wonderful : er
Raehies te an Poihia erie ce i x oe D.D.D. Prescription will give instant ; All the pigments in its manufacture have been
> > * gave the reins of . . s \ K avis . 2 s ; "9
etna 16 gave up me A TRAMCAR on the Hastings Road, opposite the Hastings Rocks; not yesterday, but towards the BANK HALd relief. Persevere, and the good results | specially selected to resist the action of lime; they
, . : ~ . } > " } * Z
: Mr. John Mayers, a very active Close of the last century, when tram cars ran as far as the Hastings Rocks. Church Leader ee. eeuees sie pts No | are fast to light, and are of very fine texture,
: 3 , ‘ é * o 2 c che ;
and public spirited man, realis- One hundred years ago, just about the time St. Matthias Church was being built, the Hastings CHURCH OF GOD everywhere | ensuring a smooth, even surface.
_ing the need of a Church in the district was the seaside resort for Barbadians, It is now the Hotel district. [T. MIC s ; ; i . s . ‘
Hastings district, gave three- voc Aes Hoa Hes, Ko Wil 4 ! Diplomatte” is free from lead, and is the ideal
uarters of an acre of land; and ; Weekes F.B. Armstrong Ltd., Bridgetowr . : . $ , » coverin capacity 720
: bh 1837 a contract was made hai Parry, on the 2nd of August 1850; the harbour of St. Thomas on there were two over the sea at CHRIST CHURCH sanitary paint, Average ¢ s cap .

tween the Rector of Christ when the Burial Ground was November 10th 1852.” “Hastings Bath” one at Rockley .12 3m: Cox Road Rev. E. W sq. ft. per gallon,

Church, the Rev. C. C. Gill, and ears we er same time _St _ Matthias’ was used as a known as “Wharton's,” and = st. JOHN " iis . say

Mr. Mayers for the building of us Ground was closed in 1854 Garrison Chapel, as there was no further along the coast there 11 am: Sherbourne — Re J } ‘

Mr Mayers This : ’ ; after the yellow fever epidemic. place of worship in the Garrison, y ELS ne ” Agents : FRANK B. ARMSTRONG LTD.

the Chyrch contract was were two more, Warsaw’ and Winter. .

for the sum of 3,250. This arin are several grim reminders and the British Government Layne’s. Of these, there remains Winton rene My; 7). 3 PRESCRIPTION
. of the ravages of ; rri i f £75

failed in 1841. and a further this horrible paid the sum of £75 per annum only one, the one at “Hastings


































. . 7 p.m: Massiah Street Rev. JF
Sa nad aa y the fever, one is a marble tornb for the use of the Chapel. The Baths.” Winter = . 990906999 9000>
eo. bron eaeea a, Am ,- erected in memory of those who Chaplain of the Forces conducted Towards the close of the: last s : ~ ae OS808 5
ished building, and to pay Mr. lost their lives on board the H.M. a service for soldiers at 8 a.m century, the tram-car ran as far MORAVIAN = s
Mayers a further sum of one Frigate * Dauntless while on a each Sunday, and the Vicar con- as Hastings Rocks, and it is 4 a Saas ee 4 x (RRIVED ry
thousand pounds In 1848 when Voyage from St. Thomas to Bar- ducted one at 4.30 p.m. for those within living memory when the ea § 1 < Z }
Rev. A. Reece was appointed to bados in 1852 who had been on duty during houses at “Coconut Walk” were her: Rev. Ernest New *
St. Matthias’ District. the Church H.M. ‘Dauntless, 53 guns, the morning service. still used as sea-side houses; and ,,; , wrack eereice Preacher s
had not been completed, but by 330 men. Edward Bellew The spot in front of the Mili- many of the sites now occupied mr Allman, 7 o. Evening Service ~
the end of October the interior Halstead, Captain. Around this tary Hospital, (now Pavilion by hotels were private resi- Preacher: Mr. Culpepper %
was finished and= ar opening tomb rest the remains of 15 Court), was open land from the dences. The “Marine” built rl oh nie aan = ‘ x
service was held at which the officers, and the Captain’s road to the sea, and there was about sixty years ago, was the Holy Communion Prescher. oe : .
Chaplain of the Forces, Rev steward, of H.MS. Frigate , monument erected to the mem- first large hotel to be erected in New. 7 p.m. Evening Service. Preacher %
W. W. Jackson, preached ‘Dauntless,’ who, together with ory of fourteen soldiers and one the Island About forty-five M™. Swire , x
Although this Church was 38 seamen, 2 marines, and 10 married woman of the 36th years ago this came into the pos- 7 » m eee marin: scales 6 CYL DIESEL ENGINE
started during the episcopate of boys, buried in this Garrison Regiment, who were killed by session of the late Mr. E. G. Mr. § . % °
Bishop Coleridge, due to the and one officer Three seamen, the destruction of the barracks Pomeroy, an American, who did 4 _ SHOP HI |
failure of the contract and other six marines and one boy com- and hospital during the awful much to put Barbados on the y, ‘kc moe Service; Preacher i
delays, he resigned before it was mitted to the deep. All per- visitation of the hurricane of tourists’ map His coach and ‘ DUNSCOMBE 1S
completed so it was consecrated ished by Yellow Fever, which August 11th 1831. This monu- horses with their bugler was a _9 4m. Morning Service; Preache: i %
by his successor, Bishop Thomas broke out at sea on leaving ment was moved after the Gar- tegular Saturday night event in Mr, Barket, 7 p.m. Evening Service. | %
rison was withdrawn from the Bridgetown, during the winter "°° ©") ‘Tanels 1%
Island, and re-erected at the top pen when he took guests CHRISTIAN SCIENCE hs
eee —_ of Bush Hill. rom his hotel for drives through First Church of Obrist, Scientist, x - : : “ ”
2 Cosa wistinh’ yoirk. ‘au the MUG CHY and’ te saute: One cu: Btldetown, Upper Bay Street, Ag 42 B.H.P. — Also available with “Half Track’
Hastings district was the sea- of his favourite drives was Wedne a3 8 p.m, â„¢A Service which x
side resort of the inhabitants of through the “Belle” Plantation includes Testimonies of Christian Science | %& Main Features:
parbades, and Severe = a them the “haunted "**!'"# SUNDAY, JULY 30, 1950 ¥
can be found in the old papers yoods. Subject of Lesson-Sermon: LOVE .
relating to the houses situated From Hastings Rocks to the slag Sige i oa a Beloved, let % @ 8sATTERY IGNITION @ BELT PULLEY
along this coast. One of these Marine Hotel was open pasture, and every one that loveth is) born ai | & LIGHTS
is an ad: by Mr. J. Pairman, and the “Rocks” was the resort God, and knoweth God % e

POWER TA
who draws the public’s attention of the young and old when the bs vet ee oF SMEAER ° OF
to his bath-house at Hastings, a Military Band gave concerts on

Bible: For the Son of Man is nox % @ 5 FORWARD GEARS

The















oF
, % oe oy oe POSES , ALY 64, 2% ote

SPSL



short way above the General Wednesday nights. During the on Sena men’s lives, but to save @ WHEEL WEIGHTS
Hospital (Pavilion Court) St. twenties and early thirties of science and th with Key to the! ® and REVERSE
Ann's, situated in a natural this century there were great Scriptures — o
basin called ‘Shark’s Hole,’ which changes in this district; the land jy... mapped are renee ee ae x
is protected from the surge of referred to was sold out and He unveiled the Christ. the spiritual ues |@
the seg by a ledge of rocks, and houses were erected. The old of divine love, Page is : % ON DISPLAY AT OUR SHOW ROOM
the sea inside is very smooth residence known as “Homestead” % ’
and never less at low tide than was purchased by Mr. V. Parra- $ Prices on Application--Your Enquiries Cordially Invited
four feet deep. vicino and opened as the “Wind- ing, and the “Ocean View” took \%
This type ‘of bath-house built sor Hotel.’ This was later pur- in the adjoining. residenc« which | %
over the sea was a common sight chased by a syndicate and the was previously known as ‘Cobury x
in the early part of this century, present structure erected, The Villa’ which in the late nineties 1%
and continued to be enjoyed by old ‘St. Clair’ was purchased and of the last century was run by|%
the people of Barbados until the pulled down and the ‘Royal’ Mrs. Imogene Seon, and the %
ST. MATTHIAS CHURCH, celebrates the Centenary of its Con- rough sea, caused by the near erected in its place. The “Hast- while the late J. D, Lamming ran] ¢&
secration on August 2. approach of a tp ie 1921, Seen em nye ‘Chateau ey Mrs, J, F. Bourne, |& White Park Rd. Robert Thom Ltd. — Dial 4616 i
ox — i destroyed them to this time storied structure to the o tila he “Sea View.” > ¥ \ b
en re x STS EY a estroyed t p Is Ris a8 yr 2
; — = ee emmnnontee

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PAGE TWELVE



Australian Rovers Camp
Meat In St. Vincent























































No More
Houses For























i Flooded Ar
~ i t I 4 ‘ 4u
Arrives ih ii fee lacal "ea oode €a
; wit
oi MEA SHORTAGE, ey, Says Housing Board
Which va Xpert ig the
Barbados for many week as ’ 7 ; ;
now "coe to an ; i “Whe; t ay THE Housing Board feels
S.S. City of Dieppe sailed into sie P : ; trong'y that no re-erection of
Carlisle Bay recently with a ’ bouses on the flood areas should
quantity of Australian meat on » silieae wines’ 7 be permitted. At a meeting of the
board a smile could be seen on ‘ . % a ‘ae : Board held yesterday the matter
ell the faces of Public Markey S50' Phy eae Paes was discussed and members ex-
butchers oe, Se eee ee pressed the hope that the Gov-
As usual shoppers flocked the Part of Septem I as i ernment would soon send down
Meat Market yest iijorbon oy Sepetee C529 eo ts : - legislation to prevent any re-
to purchase their weekend quota ceted—and peers ps : peopling of the Delamere and Halls
and many wert happy t see thing possible to atisfy emand Road areas.
_ ET a; not nave. | et eer mee ere: a oars The Government does not wisi:
~_ ee the butcher’ “7 een SPORE VERE Se to purehase the land at Grazettes
ane oomea a ee James ith B } rr 0p the Board was advised yesterday
“'Gome enquired if the beet cwas coe ; sie Tee in a letter from the Financial
from Argentine but were just as 5',-Wincent and a par rs Secretary. This arose out of the
happy to hear it was from gcdiaien core ae eee forwarding of an offer for sale
Australia. On per ‘was over- en Sround : of the land by the Barbados Co-
heard saying ‘ ires once it i a re ie Augu operative Bank
beef.” ee ean peed Engineer Available
A butcher the Advocate Illy those vom aa The clerk of the Board read a
yesterday that the shortage wa aurpes ee . ° . Mr. E, ALLEYNE (cent freasurer of the American Aii Society of the West Indies (Inc.) letter to members from the
felt bec tuse cattle owners in- on ; Distributing foodstuffs to the por St. James Parish yesterday. He is assisted on the left by Financial Secretary, informing
creased on their prices w hen the ; Rally . Ofedeme TA: on the -rinhs Mrs. ‘Loi o-worker of the Christ Church Baby League them that the Director of High-
eres Hee ms page ati a8 i The Scou : the ga ish Oo * ° ways and Transport had agreed to
wustead of weighing cattle, pr®- Si Thomas held a rally, on the CY ye make the services of Mr. Harris,
ferred to sell them “by sight srounds of the St. Thon Boys’ S| Ji n = P R Ce , Ai a Wins on :
‘cs yunds of the § ( Bo a a. V : e of the Department’s engineers,
os we wey, they made mor Séhool on ‘Saturday “1st July at ?* e es oor a € CE j ( owar . available to the B to assist
it > Said . .
ys A + p.m. Rove Scouts and Cubs of with the survey work at the Bay
“Ah! e “B then th: 7
i w ee ig . 3 er Se a * the 26th -( Welch: 29th (South ce * Scholarship Estate. The Board were also in-
er. After he has slauchtered tna L°rough), 66th (Holy Innocent ] ts rom merica formed by their Secretary that the
animal and all has been and 71st (St. Thomas) Groups a _ : THE FIRST Police Scholarship 4rea known as Beckles Hill which
he finds that instead of 1 3 tended the parade which was In- St “Rarbadis ‘an be grateful to the gener: of th> in the history of the Barbados forms part of the Bay Estate is
profit he has lost on the deal.” spect 1 DC Mr ra Tha arbadians can be gi iteful to le gen y oft Police Force goes to nine-year-old "Ow being surveyed with a view
R. D. LUCIE SMITH will Gay. After the inspection — the American Aid Society for the West Indies, Inc., was‘ex- Earl Arthur Howard, son of L/Sgt. to being replanned.
va give the “Employer's Point various groups indulged In games pressed by the poor of St. James’ Parish when hundreds Barton Howard and Mrs, Howard Barrow D. 6.50 pmp ing y
a oo i tt eee » San H Petia oe \ See sits assembled at the Lady of the Dale Lodge Room, Orange of “Merlin”, White Hall, St ‘ale are sctuse’ Ghasices!
2e ven in the é ai. singing included. A yarn was giver eet th Se ai SB oa ga : ae Ha ee Michael question of refus sposal
on Monday next at 8 p.m by the D.C. and a vote of thank Hill, yesterday to receive gifts of clothing, * od and or. at the Bay, and members agreed
As this is the finak lecture ar- {9 visitorsqas moved and secondéd cial help brought over from America by Mr. E. A. Alleync to the use of both cancrete bins
ranged for the month by Clerks’ 14 Scouters H. D. Rowe and P. E Treasurer of the Society. at selected points, and metal
Union, it is expected that there yj, respectively. Founded a few years ago by Mr - bins. They agreedt with Mr
will be a large turn out of mem- The D.C. glso took the opportu- Hilbert Wilkinson a printer of this r Mottley’s suggestion that if the
ue, aoe oe eae kere nity to confer with the Scouters island, The American Aid Society bins were supplied by the Board,
“OSS ~ te 6 ry G22n ond Scouts tlative to the Scout for the West Indies Inc., has beer e e e e the Commissioners of Health
was reported by Georgs : service in..c sending gifts to the various Wes should keep two carts in the area
Skee a airs . To Messenger Service in connectic ending gi c . shou I
Skeete of Haggatt Hall, S} ma with the Hurricane Relief Organ- Indian Colonies with a view t for the emptying of the metal
ae. J He informed the Poth ~ isation assisting the poor and aged un bins into the conerete bins. The
be howe Ea ee eee tem Rovers of the 26th Barbadc Mr. Alleyne who conducted the ; 4 latter would be cleaned daily by
ri eee etween Thursday and (Welches) Group’ celebrated the Presentation was assisted by A contribution of $104.40 wa the scavengers
ARLTON STOUTE of Hast- first anniversary of the forma- Madame Ifill, Messrs. J. M. Crick, made by Mrs. Florence Goddar« ’
iChat Witch cake AL Site inet ‘Crek Thursday, E- S.A. Holder, Vestryman of the towards the Y.W.C.A. Fund. Th« Conference Necessary
ings, Christ Church, report- ane, 5 hy , t a Bes Tt S dae Parish, Rev. L. V. George, Vicar total has now reached $606.05 = | fs oe
ed to the Police that his house 20th July a ee wart tn thi; of St. Silas and St. Albans, Rev. while at the.end of last week 4 To get this programme ar-
was broken and entered on Fri- (St. Thomas) took part in thi ; ie $376.00 ranged, the Board agreed that the
i 4 } “waare ” Se R. O. George, curate of St. Peter was only $376.0 > th
day and four dress lengths, val- function The celebration wi Mrs. Lorde, Mrs. Marshall. Mr: mount Acting Director of Medical Ser-
ued $22.82, the property of his continued with a week-end camp ae “Mrs Crichina) ad Miss V e \C vices along with the Board’s
wife, Nora Stoute, were removed. at st Philip’s Boys’ School, dur- Pilgrim of the Ct ist ‘Chitch uty 16.0 Secretary should confer with the
N ACCIDENT occurred at ing which the rs attended 4 etm oF me Chris es “mc Maisie and " 1embers
ing which the Rovers attende . . lat ameiant 20 0 Chairman and other member:
. ¥ 7 Almshouse. Fourteen barrels of . ae
the Junction of Prince Alfred Chureh Parade at the Paris! clothing, food, etc., were distri 100 of the Commissioners of Health
ae vhapel Streep on Friday at Church, This was followed by : buted While the following sum i ob The Secretary produced a plan
about 12.10 p.m. between motor “seouts Own" at the Headquart- were donated to charitable insti 10 00 showing the proposed re-layout
car X.80, owned by John Beckles ers, Welches School, at 4.15 p.m. tution 5 00 of Section B of the Bay Estate
of Stream Road, Christ Church, at which the A.L.C. for Rover Madame Ifill $5.00; Bl Asso The plan was approved
a Dies ig bevinn _ “villa = Major C. Glindon Reed, inspect- ejation $20.00; Nurses? J ee ter ee 5 Of Mr. T. Went, Director of Pub-
St. "Michael gee a tavclg Saad ed the Crew and gave a short fo; Special Case $6.00; and Mrs. E H. Che f lic Works, was present at the
. voaresy, © vn . talk Bes f T otto *hrist Stuart & Sa ‘ . ; meeting, and joined in the dis-
and ridden by Cyril Lyneh_ of st oO yme Bottom, Christ 0 EARL HOWARD
Dash Valley St George. The The acting Rover Leader, Mr. Church $5.00 wo ea ee 3 cussion in connection with the
front wheel of ‘the bicycle was T. T. A. Smith, deserves hearty Mr. Alleyne said that the Society wet wishe 1 6 Young Howard, who was in proper drainage of the Constitu-
damaged 4 congratulations on the progress was endeavouring to do all in its WN. Forde 200 Standard [V at the St. Stephen’s tion Swamp ,
LSTON HARPER of Halls which the Crew has made under power to help the poor of these Hinds & Co 2% Boys’ School, was chosen from : The Board gave the Secretary
Road was injured when he his leadership islands and assured them of the ft too among ten other boys who took formal approval to become an
was involved in an accident while Philatelist inter which Barbadians abroad + 100 the examinations at Harrison Officer of the Central Hurricane
riding his bicycle along Broad = 4 Se a ge . - Rover Specially are taking in their home Me 1 College Mr. J. C. Hammond, Relief Organisation.
Btrest on Beidey morning, ny Scoute r, Scout or over folk. He promised to do all he cat =! t », Headmaster of Harrison College,
Also involved in the accident Sects - Stamp eee when he returns to America to yy)" " 12 was the examiner,
y ~ ae iets , and willing to correspond and ex- agny » West Indian of their H A 4 Th ie $cholarst being y
was m@or car S. 102, owned by * ; s i onvince ndia 1ei i j [his Scholarship is being
Charles Duncan of ‘“Boylstop,” change used stamps with & King’s duties and responsibilities to their ¥) Ds 4 awarded yearly and is provision- RAIN STOPS
St. James, and driven by Lamonte Scout in Canada is hereby asked. brothers and sisters who are in â„¢ vn too ally at Harrison College for three
Morris of the same address > Scout Meedauscterm: less fortunate positions H. Baird 600 years. At the end of this period POLO. TENNIS
RES 3efore leaving the islanc or ash Ls 2 G0 j : be. reviewed « 5 7 -
i, tr pies aoe toes their Overseas camp in St, Vin- — Flor Oho SHE he eens and ee POY Phe lawn tennts matches which
, i 5 pi “fn x cent, the Rovers held an inter- a “4 . i Hihrinak nied is Were to take place at Strathclyde
half acres of fourth crop young : : : ¢ * Tota 606 08 ar I financed by Func -
canes were destroyed when a fire ¢reW camp at St. Philip's Boys 20 9 Fine headline ollected from the publication of Yesterday evening, had to b
atte Start i School on Saturday and Sunday . the: Police Magasina of +h Postponed owing to rain. A hard
occurred at Society Plantation, ; 7 Se as ‘ ; ° 1e Police Magazine of which i
St. John, at about 3.45 p.m. on Rovers from the various crews FOR the unlawful possessio Bicyele Car Major A. Farmer, Deputy “own pour fell during mid-day.
Friday. _ throughout the island turned out of a quantity of sugar alon ae ? : Commissioner of Police, is the but the sun came out during th:
The tyres and platform of motor 19 great numbers and many im- ‘Tudor Street on July 28, Magis Collide Editor, P afternoon and it seemed as if pla
lorry J. 127, property of C. N. portant things were discussed trate C. L. Walwyn imposed * . Major Farmer told the Advo- would have been possible. About
Reece of the same Plantation, an ean pa Rovers attended 20/- fine on James Edwards of Dennis Grannum of Water Mill cate yesterday that 12 boys were 4.15 p.m. the rains came again
were also destroyed in the fire ae as a aan teat tars Suttle Street Road, Bay Land, St. Michael, was selected but only ten eventually and although falling for a shor!
Se ee ee eee mi ioner of ‘Scouts in that area when there will be a closer rela- njured on Saturday, when he took the exams. He pointed out time, small pools of water collect-
j ras bei riven by Julian SS10 . ‘ at ares yhe are Ww »¢ a closer rela- i Dan ics i rf ‘hin wh tere cf : sis ete .
which was being Geiys Ba John, «~Mr dD Spencer welcomed tionship between Guides and was involved in a collision with I at daughters of members of thi ed on the courts.
Forde of Sealy Hall, § ha GE He Later they were addressed Ser ; a ial hich . will motor car in Bay Stuect Ferce will also be able to bene- Due to rain members of th:
was in the field of cangss when it tay " Speen Wend ME ree ae in the island which Wa Granhuis comin at cut t from this Scholarship one Barbados Polo Club played no|
back-fired and caught the cane: r the Boys' Se hool whe rid th it : my = cae tae , ce . ee on the left hip. The bicycle was year it goes to a boy and the other chuk at the Garrison Savan-
a eanes and lorry are in- ke. ie tookinertaedandite tee oe kat ml 1e address 1 neat to a girl, nah yesterday evening,
sured, . * a : . ‘ 2 :
ree daa Nh peniphnicneer
FT i 5 ates Le ee Sarr Rt on ef ‘eee ee ot er hhh ts Ahi at hbnsithnbn ete hk
eS BS es % ‘ a b
. A ws Ae i - Sy ; :
remember... CHAN |
ir . ! See ' :
, , ' a. 19
3 *y | | f
t | | A
2 } s
| | .
j h
|



‘

n/



|
|





@



Silvikrin Lotion wita |
OIL brings a triple
benefit to dry hair. It
replaces the natural oils which are lacking: it acts as a dressing as well
as a health-giving lotion: it contains Pure Silvikrin, the hair’s natural
food. A few minutes daily massage with Silvikrin Lotion WITH OIL
will bring new life, health and vitality to your hair, and will keep it
perfectly groomed throughout the day. Fromm all
chemists, hairdressers and stores.

-= -_ ee
, Silvikri
LOTION WITH OIL

SILVIKRIN basQRaTagigs LTO: LONDON: Nwie-









: APC ftllCl t
y Jor long and t
short drinks k
f
3 f
; SN é
} Igents: LM. B. MEYERS & CO. UTD. = a

SieEpee ea eb Trr Ente Fe TEETER FSW









ow Tear ewe neee,
“O39

Fatherly Advice

[Ww te Direct or Airmail for





THE STEPPING ST&
TO SUCCESS

Don’t hesitate about your future ! Go forward,
confident that The Bennett College will see
you through to a sound position in any care
you choose. The Bennett College inethods











are individual. There's a friend!
personal touch that encour-

ages quick progress and

makes for early

efficiency













CHOOSE
YOUR CAREER

Accountancy Exams. All Commercia: Subjects Plumbing
Aviation (Engineering and Commercial Art Quantity Surveying
Wireless Draughtsmanship, All Radio Service Engineering
Book -keeping Branches Radio ‘Short Wave
Building, Architecture G.P.O., » Dept. Secretarial Examinations
and Clerk of Works institute of Municipal Shorthand Picman's
Carpentry and Joinery Engineers Surveying
Chemistry Mathematics Teachers of Handicralt
Civi! Engineoring Matriculation Telecommunicat ons
Civil Service Mining. All Subjects (City & Guilds
Engineering, All Branches Novel Writing Television
Subjects and Examina- Plastics Wireless Telegraph) and
tigns Police, Special Course Telephony

f your requirements are not listed cbove, write us for free advice

Direct Mail to DEPT. 1i8g——______-
THE BENNETT COLLEGE LYD.

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND



cena aC.



SUNDAY, JULY 30, 1950







Elastoplast dressings stretch with
skin yet adhere
firmly in place. Comfortable

movement







| convenient... protectiv they
| keep you going whilst s heal
Each tin contains a v ty of




sizes








FIRST AID DRESSINGS )
dll

inosine













i ’
MH yer f sei
jf) |f{" STRENGTH» f
HI | NG TH" 2 ‘
//] s ctw i
Hl 40 :
.
3 * ys ‘<
i] | ce \ Bem ~
Vi EN you rt losing energy and / jon ,
’ t ' ‘ n you no longer a
life mak a” M ®
t ty econ) ig & t = ‘ /
! sse enath- = Ter
id > orus mein, " ee
} 25,000 duces e ‘
| Bicod and nerves enriched {Spe ; '
| the gra f
\ : course of ‘Sanctos ai ee a
N / S pe Cin sale 100 ”
bines the wo prea ntial foods ey :
protein —in their # ‘SBF
f » that they are quickly | vitality flow i y
yur De again yo re i





youth and | Start on a course of ‘S

SA NATOGEN”

») NERVE TONIC FOOD

e

restores health. youth and vitality

ered trade m of Genate

se ee nae a







Ti a glass of Andrews
gives a pleasurable feeling
of freshness, But that’s
not all! Andrews ensures
Inner Cleanliness through
its gentle laxative action,
and keeps you fit and cheerful.

Andrews cleans the mouth, settles the stomach,
| tones up the liver, and finally, gently clears the
| bowels.

At any time of the day, when you feel in need of
| a refreshing, invigorating drink, just take one
teaspoonful of Andrews in a glass of cold water.





ANDREWS uver sat





















iaaiitia: Cede totais
«A NIGHT IN CARACAS”
THE CHILDREN'S GOODWILL LEAGUE
(THE SHED)

My Friends

| DR. J. V. HENSON and MADAM O’LINDY
cordially invite you to their

lirand Farewell Dance & Floor Show

EO)





: starring :

MADAM O'LINDY

and her unforgettable
CARACAS NIGHTS
mm a musival bombardment

entitled - - -

Come to the

“MARDI GRAS”



MADAM O'’LINDY
DANCE OF ALL DANCES 3
SHOW OF ALL SHOWS }
NIGHT OF ALL NIGHTS

Musical Fireworks by
Caracas Ni specially
rained B.G. Orchestra fea-
turing GEORGE CLARKE
nd his Georgi f

ins

ADMISSION — — 48¢
Bar & Refreshments
Available
Doors Open from 7 p.m.

C and B Early





SUNDAY, JULY +30, 1950 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN







—













HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



By Appointment
Gin Distillers
te H.M. King George VI






tt

MAJESTY
ga KING MICKEY MOuUSé!
KING’ BUSINESS? 1








, JA@ AND GUS... BUT I HAD TO
OU OUT OF THAT CROUCH !













HOORAY
FOR KING!

S f iss Stuy om a eT





BY CHIC YOUNG

UTTER Tepes yy










- —~ ssi ee
hice aae e NC
PROMISE 'S J et BUMSTEADS

; CHILDREN SHOULD
~ \\ ALWAYS KEEP ¢

NO, DEAR. You Lieto, » BE BORN AT THE






= 9
(Zz
“+ oy
\

AS













i { |
AE WNG FOR CAN'T DO IT a) READY PROMISE IGURING )\—” THEIR WORD
Tr EFS “(Pa | | WiLL KEEP you tia irae “| 2 a -- DAGWOOD, ,
re) eal Vi [UP TOO LATE ;~ < MADE THEIR | ere.
Gy ree > | OA A
a7 Ww) Gh, &
r he ve “s\ y
ho ref e®s
bor’ Ve IN THE FUTURE!
em > Ss e
4q \ Pu ce
ea). ey



|
a 8




THE LONE RANGER





(FANE CHASE 'EM, THEY CAN SHOOT
| US FROM AMBUSH. I'VE GOT A BETTER
| PLAN. PACK ALL THAT CAMP GEAR AN!
TAKE IT TO MY OFFICE!

THEY WERE > N FOR U5, SHER'EF] lie
| THEY MOVED LIKE GRE GHTNIN'!

‘Caterpillar’ Diesel Tractors









“BUY IT NOW AND HAVE
IT WHEN YOU'LL NEED IT MOST”’



Sd

ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LTD.

Iweedside Road, St. Michael








K. ©. CANNON ...... . THE RIDDLE OF















I'VE GOT TO TALK QUICKLY. \>
DON'T SHOW ANY SURPRISE-
JUST LISTEN. | KNOW ALL /






; T WAS DEMOBBED OUT HERE
-\.){ FROM THE R.A.F. I'VE SEEN
- HE; \ vou BEFORE , SOMEWHERE -~

: NOT 8TH. ARMY WALLAH
BY ANY CHANCE?.-

THAT'S RIGHT!
SORRY | DON'T
RECALL YOUA

FACE, HOLLIS.

ie SEE ME AT THE AIRPORT \~ >
4 -| TO NOON, | HAVE



A SMALL, PRIVATE PLANE
THERE. WE CAN 60 UP
WHERE WE CAN BE

SURE OF NOT BEING
OVERHEARD,

OKAY FOR VOU?













ONE SOLID

WING We EEK
OF UNPRECEDENTED

BARGAINS « Wilson’s

BARGAINS LIKE THESE COME TO YOU BUT ONCE IN A LIFETIME THEY COME |
TO YOU THIS TIME, NOT TO STAY BUT TO LAST FOR ONE WEEK ONLY.
WITH CUT PRICES LIKE THESE LASTING FOR MORE THAN ONE WEEK, SURE-
LY WE'LL BE SOLD OUT
YOU MAY BUY US OUT BUT WE GIVE YOU ONE WEEK IN WHICH TO DO SO.
READ THIS, VISIT US AND COMPARE PRICES AND QUALITY.
ee —_ — —— — a















S SENT FROM |
OUR FARM= THE RUDE
—_— FELLOW SAID YOU

Lee |) ORDERED IT PUT
ON THe Ligeary-r
Br | HAD TO REMOVE
| THE FURNITURE



BY GOLLY=-I HAD |
BETTER GO _HOME-
IT MIGHT BE SOME-|
THIN! I DON'T WANT Ui
TO SsEE”













NICKEL ARM BANDS 32c.

per pair

FUGI in Pink, Peach, Lemon
& White 40c. per yd.

INDIAN HEAD, Pink, Peach
White & Blue 34 in. wide
68c. per yd.

HEAVY QUALITY CASE
MENT in’ Lemon, Zeige
Green, Blue & V/hite 34 i
wide. Price 72¢c. per yd.

WHITE CELLULAR siceenihanatpareitatinn saliactigsicchenaieencllimenes ”

84e. per yd. GREY FLANNEL 54 in. wide baa $3.00 up

eerie $2.16 per yd PLASTIC TABLING 45 in.
school ¢ Rone Ave wide $1,30 per yd.

CANADIAN & AMERICAN
PRINTS @ 4c. to 81e. per yd.
PLAID 36 in. wide 48e. per yd.
MEN’S PURE IRISH LINEN
SUITING 28 in. wide







GUINEA BIRDS PUMPS

You $1.48 per pair
LIE, SIR!

GET OUT OF
HERE BEFORE







CELENESE PANTIES

$1.80 per yd. ne :
i2c. per pair

LADIES’ HANDBAGS

KHAKI DRILL 64c., 88e., ony

$1.00 per yd.





LINEN Goods for
Servants Uniform 36 in wid



PLASTIC RAINCOATS Good







bile

THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES












80c. per yd. Several Shade
WHITE CAMBRIC 36 in. wid
OBI eth 44c. per yd.

CALICO CAMERIC Extra
heavy quality 36 in. wide
@ S6e., 60c., & G8. per yd.

POPLIN in Blue. Peach, Pink,

$3.70 each

SHIRTS Roy Rogers Sport

shirts . $1.00 each



STRIPE SPORT SHIRTS
$1.40 each



GLASS TOWELS 18 x 34
(@ 4%e, each

BATIT TOWELS 18 x 36
@ 60¢, each

NYLON STOCKINGS Popu-
lar Shades @ $1.60 per pair

LADIES SHOES A New Ship-

| APOLOGIZE. YOUR STORY IS CORRECT. |MY FORCE 1S LIMITEDIF NO WHITE MAN CANNIBALS ~ > W z SPORTS & DRESS SHIRTS ment of these from Ho!land.
BUT (M NOT SURE WE CAN DO ANY-_) THEY HEADED NORTH, HAS EVER COME 9 HEAD-HUNTERS# peas Re Winte © Sic: yer 34. All Styles and Colours
THOSE ARE THE TWO THING. WE'RE AT THE JUNGLES THEY'RE GOING INTO CANNIBAL OUT OF THAT {AND THIS IS REAL from $3.00 to $7.00 each Ait













EDGE HERE, YOU KNOW.

UIDES WHO KIDNAPPED
Rvf

AND HEAD-HUNTER COUNTRY.

| DOUBT IF THEGUIDES’ &
REALIZE THAT! TS

SECTION, ALIVE

—





SHIRTING in Stripes
Fancy Patterns 36 in. wide
64c. per yd.
ellent Qual
wide price
84c. per yd.

SPUN SILK, Ex
ity 30 Shades 36 i
for one week only



SHOP ECONOMICALLY FOR THE RACES. AT - - -

N. E. WILSON

THE HOUSE WELL KN
31 Swan St.

OWN



MEN’S PLASTIC BELTS
36e. each
LADIES’ SILK STOCKINGS
2 PAIRS FOR $1.20

FOR NEW GOOD

GENUINE

@ $5.00 per pair

Other Shoes less 10% Discount

ALL TROPICALS AND
WORSTED

Less 10% Discount





& Co., Ltd. |

GOGDS AND LOW PRICES.

Dial 3676.







PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS. |

SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JULY 30, 1950

ae





CHIROPRACTIC Sa =













































































































































































































































RUBBLE-STONE, Concrete-Stone,

Sand, Marl, Block-Stone Suitable for
sawing. Johnson Stables & Garage Lid
Dial 4205. 29.7.50—8n.



TYRES AND BATTERIES, Sizes 34 x
7,32, 6, 90 = @ and other, ses, algo | x
Oldham 17 plats eae ene :
Enquire Auto Tyre Comp: come
Street. Phone 2696. 21.7.50-—t.f.n,

TOILET PAPER — Just_arrived.
ment “‘CAMELIA” and “ANDREX"















order signed by me
Sed. EUSTACE MERTON BLACKMAN
Sargeants Village,
Christ Chureh,
29.7. 530—2n



The public are hereby warned against
giving oe credit to my wife VERONA
{nee Durant) as 1 do not
hold noe responsible for her or any-
ene else contiicting any debt or debts
in mp name unless by a written order
signed by me.













Signed JOSEPH ALLEYNE
Paper. Obtainable from all ieahtnd Penny Hole,
Stores. 30,7.50.—-3n. St. Philip.
30.7.50—2n.
STEEL CABINETS er me merepaa) ’
Steel Cabinets. Suitable for ces, ~PURLIC SALES
Homes ete. Give us a call and we will mC SALES
be only too willing to give further in-
farmation. ‘Phone 2959 Tae, pat penne ed
; co Ltd., Bolton Lane.
Tmport & Export Cow Mids Ben7-30.—an. | AUCTION
PLANTS —
pine 25218 A UMIUM san | UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER
3 21.
—~ > BY instructions received from Mrs
WANTED F. H. Gibbons I will sell at her house,
x “Gwenville Black Rock on Thurs-
ELP day next, 3rd August at 1 p.m ioe
ENCE! AID Refer- | entire lot of household furniture whic!
aioe: Biiiwai: Apeiy to. aed Grey | includes; are Hrardeppe) ween
srte Age mahog: chairs; (1) pair Morris chairs;
eel eee | SORES, atten. Mahog: couch; mirror; Oil stove;
Bs a rea) Mahog: China cabinet; Sheet AS
4 arawers; essing table; _Mahog: old-
caste ter Tie Ra areata ing chairs; hat stand; sideboard; and
tus. Secondary education and some | many ae ase of interest
knowledge of electricity a recommenda- ny ae AGRA Astana
tion. Apply by letter only in own Arey os, AUC = Tan
handwriting and enclosing copies of
testimonials to British Council, “Wake~
‘ela’ 29.7 .50—3n
ana REAL ESTATE
HOUSE—One Double roofed House at
MISCELLANEOUS rbados Postage | Push Hall. Land can be rented. Apply
Stamps. Paying 50c foe: 100 for mix-|C. M, Greenidge, Roebnolyy feet
tures le., 2c., 3c., values. Send 500] Spry Street ia cent
or more stamps to Bahamas Stamp Com- MARISTOW — At Maxwell's Coa
pany, Box 1436, Bahamas, B.W.I everlooking the Sea, having 4 bed-
9.7.50.—4n, | cooms, delightful Balconies, ete,, with
all modern conveniences, on ae
TED TO BUY Beach, safe bathing, for quick sale
OLD SEW MACHINES out of} £3,500. or fully furnished £4,000.
use. Good prices paid Apply V Possession within one month. For
Vaughn, Kings St. or Fairchild and] viewing Phone 4683 or 8402.
TIrebyn Street 29.7.50—2n 26.7.50—5n.
SHARES in the BARBADOS as
| 7 PING & TRADING CO. LIMITED a'
LOST & FOL ND 40/- per share, plus stamp dut
——— CARRINGTON & S
Lucas Street.
LOST 28.7,50—6n
BRACELET—A plain Gold Chain 7
Bracelet between, St. Patrick's Jem- WORTHY DOWN

mott's Land and Convent, Finder will
be rewarded on returning it to the Pres-
betery 29.7,50—2n

Series LI



SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—
9234. Finder please return same to
Lawrence Laicag, Smal! Town, St. John

30.7.50—1n

CHILDREN

almost daily injure themselves,
often cut themselves, injure their
knees or elbows by falling, they
often catch skin-injuries when
sporting and playing, by a kick:
or a fall. A wise mother there-
fore, always has atin of PUROL
ready, because she knows only
too well how helpful this reme-
dy is in al such cases. Sima









toes

Se0 Bae Daz? Se Brae “eae im

A_ delightful Residence at Top Rock,
built in solid Stone, cement use
throughout, Everite Roof designed and
Construction by R. A. Beard, A.M.
Inst., B.E., F.V.A, Having Three Bed-
rooms each with connecting Toilet and
Beth, with built in Presses, Breakfast
and Sun Balconies, Large Lounge, Din-
ing, Veny Modern Kitchen., Outside
Two Car Garage, Three Servant's







Rooms, Toilet & Bath, Laundry, Fully
Enclosed, Gardens well laid out. Pos-
session Sept Ist. Price £4,500, Foy
Viewing Ring 468 or #402
29,.7.50-—2n
——
=





HEALTH PRACTISE

Scientific Swedish Massage

W. G. ELLIS

GRADUATE MASSEUR
Treatments given in your
Home Appointment.

Residence: Alville,
Upper Westbury Road.
flours: 4,30 to 7.30

—<—

by

p.m.



_———S——









Tel.



YOU'LL BE GLAD TO LEARN no deubt tho. we



SOUTHBOUND



CTE. GLE,






GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.,

—— > ———————

TRANSATLAN WIGUE

LINE
~~ Sailing to Trinidad on the 11th August,

FRENCH
» “GASCOGNE”
1950,

12th

24th

Sails

eth A

24th Aug. 24th Aug.
7th Sep
26th Sep.



Arrives
Montreal |

3rd
Sth ¢

Sails Sails Salls Arrives
Montreal Halifax Boston B'dos
22nd July 25th July 27th July Sth Aug
lith Aug. idth Aug. —
23rd Aug. 26th Aug. 28th Aug. 6thSep.
llth Sep. I4th Sep. i6th Sep. 25th Sep.
NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives = Arrives
B'dos B'dos Boston Halifax
LADY RODNEY 25th July 26th July 7th Aug. §$th Aug
LADY NELSON 18th Aug. 20th Aug. 29th Aug. 3lst Aug.
LADY RODNEY 19th Sep. 2ist Sep. 30th Sep. Ist Oct.
LADY NELSON 8th Oct. 10th Oct, 19th Oct. 20th Oct
ee
N.B.—Subject to change without notice vessels fitted with cold storage cham-
bers, Passenger Fares and treiwit es on application to :—

Accepting Passengers:— Minimum Fare

$19.00
1959,

8.8. “GASCOGNE” — Sailing to Plymouth on the 17th August,

Deluxe Cabin for Two available $622.00

B.W.1, Each.

For Further Particulars, Apply to:—

Rh. M.

MAPLE MANOR xo |

GUEST HOUSE RAY

Opposite Hastings Rocks to Ch
I. BOURNE

—B021. Manageress
26.6 Wt fo





vONES & CO., Lib. eee



BE ADVISED

ND JORDAN is

our SUIT and I

> man
T

aT

=e oupsciter Gealecceiere

Aug,
Sep.
Jet.
Oct,

us



LTD. — Agents.

:

=|



have

just received a shipment of Plain and Perforaicd
ZINC SHEETS

THE CENTRAL

Proprietors)

Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets







TIME

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM



TO USE...



(With the Distinctive Flavour)

rhe

Third Test is Over but

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL

Continues to
the

score

“NOT OUT”

and will
Blend

always be

SIP IT — To Enjoy it

Blenders

John D. Taylor &





EDAEP EPEAT NY

(CENTKAL FOUNDRY LTD.—

Sens Lie.


























|

AUCTION SATE

WEDNESDAY August 2nd

| at 11 a.m.
and continuing on the Following
Day at 11.00 a.m., if necessary

FURNITURE & HOUSEHOLD
EFFECTS

BELVEDERE

Welches, Ch, Ch,
mile Oistins side of
Parochial Treasury)

Instructions have been received
from Dr. R. C, Price to sell the
following valuable furniture and
effects, wWhiclt are almost without
exception, in outstandingly good
condition :

Upholstered Couch and Easy
Chairs, 4 Steel Framed Chairs

upholstered in Red leather, China




abinet, Antique Wall Bracket,
1 urge Brass Tray and Table, Large
Dining Table, 6 Dining Chairs,
Sideboard, Bookstand, Double End-
ed Settee, Side Tables (all in
mahogany), Glass Topped Table,
Inlaid Table, Modern Bedroom
furniture in Bireh, Double and

Divan Beds with Spring Filled and



Record Cabinet, Gallery Furniture,

Standard & Table Lamps, Clocks,
‘Wall Brackets with Glass Candle
Shadec, Stokes Electrie Cooker,







Hotpoint Electric Cookers, Small
Valor Stove, Frigidaire, Electric
Mixers, Fan Toaster and Iron.
Many kitchen requisites all in
excellent order. Kitchen Dresser,
Larder, Tables, Chairs, Mats, Iron-
ing board Mahogany Trays,
large election of Glass
Very fine Cut Set —
Champagne, Water : Sherry;
Liqueur Glasses nger Bowls,
Collection Irridescent Glass, Rube

| Large antity © Miscel
a » a2 Sees : . Ware; Cut

ass ecanters “hina nel
Crown Ducal. Minton, Marigela.
Eggshell and several very fine
examples of 22 Carat Gold Leaf
Plates-Roval Sermetie Wedre-
wood, Black Knight, ‘ete Pair

Silver Bracket Lamp with Glass

Candle Shades, Plated Fruit Stands
Entree

Cake Basket








Dish, Meat

Cover, Chafing Dish Candelabria

| Cardtray ete Axminster,

Egyptian and rpets “and

Wags Cust te Tools,

| awn Mower feet plastic Hose.

| 3 approx Length 15 in.

a Pipe, ; Matting, Potted

} Palr Lilie rns and numerous
other useful

Viewing Mor neg of and After

an pr to Sale: fron tn

AUCTIONEE! —

| John 84. Biacdon |

AF
4640, 1

S., F.V.A.) |
antations

Phone Building |

Dunlopillo Mattresses, Ladies and
Dressing Tables, Bedside
Chairs, Antique Linen

"Pal nted Furniture, Walnut }
Murphy Radio (as New),
Table, Portable Record
Playe r (Plays 8) Singer Sewing
Machine with electrie motor (as
New) Quantity good Records,






































—ALSO—
SILENT SENTINELS
By Commander R. Langton Jones R. N.

DIAL 3301

w CO.



BONE CHINA
TOBY JUGS

as follows:

Bufeater, Captain Flint, Bill Sykes, Bobby Bevins
Old Mac, Jock, Hookey, ete.

LOUIS BAYLEY

JEWELLERS

Sole Represetitatives for The ROLEX Watch Co.
Please see our Show Window at the Aquatic Club,

WILLIAM FOGARTY LID.

INC. in B. G.

JUST ARRIVED = =

A new shipment of

Maiden- Form
BRASSIERES

In all the various styles for everyday and Evening wear.

Of further interest is the arrival of

CONGOLEUM and LINOLEUM
SQUARES
in attractive designs

Make your choice at

FOGARTY’S





These make delightful GIFTS. You will be pleased with the
Beautiful Colouring translated into the individual characters

Bolton Lane & Victoria Streets














BLOCK OF FACTORY BUILD-

INGS in Bridgetown, built of
Stone, wood and steel, 10,300 sq. |
ft. land. 30.7.50.—1n, |

REAL ESTATE
JOHN
| M4.

BLADON

AFS,FVA.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

FOR SALE

“LITTLE BATALLYS”, St. Peter.
Charming small country house
standing in approximately 1 acre.
This property was redesigned by
its arehitect owner and contains
3 reception, 3 bedrooms, 2 bath
and toilets, kitchen, laundry, de-
tached servants’ quarters and
garage. Very attractive arched
verandah on two sides and fern-
ery. Right of way to sea

“46, ROEBUCK ST." Modern
spacious and well built commer-
cial property in first class business
location Ideal for Bakery;
Grocery; Provisions; Offices; Bond
ete Open to offers which must
be submitted to the Agent.

RESIDENCE 11, Giaeme Hall Ter-
race, Attractively designed mod-
ern 2 storey house well set back
in approximately 4 of an acre of
ground with wide frontage. Coral
stone walls with asbestos roof,
flush panelled doors, all built in
cuypands. There ts a large lounge
and ing room ue gallery, 3
rooms, kitehen, 2
vision ‘for solar heater,
erty may be purchased fully furn-

ished if required at a very reason-
able figure.

“VILLA ROSA,” Passage Road,

City. Very attractive centrally
located stone bu w with
double carriageway in roxi-
mately 14,000 sq. ft. This well
built ay contains a front
gallery lounge, _ separate

dining room, 3 large bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, and toilets, pantry and
kitchen. Good courtyard at rear.
Very reasonable figure asked.

“WINDY RIDGE,” St. James, This
very attractively situated modern
bungalow, has 3 large bedrooms (all
with basins} verandah, 2 lounges,
dining room, 2 toilets.’ There are
two acres, one under cane and
the remainder is very well laid
out with lawns, fruit trees, flower-
ing shrubs ete. The view can
never be spotied and prevailing
breezes are unobstructed. 5 miles
from town centre







PROPERTY, White Park Road. A
very solidly but! storey prop- |
erty with 7 bedro: . vast lounge, |
living rooms and verandahs,
double drivewa; and set in
approximately 2 acres. Ideal for
conversion into offices flats,
boarding house or school. Knock

down price for quick sale

| REAL ESTATE AGENT
Auctioneer & Surveyor

PLANTATIONS BUILDING |

Phone 4640



I ¥ “TIC SSS : Notice
HARB O UR . | RESTORES HEALTH | Professional Notice
| ? S. JOS. and GLADYS FERREIRA, F
bihinenta ti ae In Carlisle Bay SEAWELL aa oe eee Re, eee Bape FOR THE HURRICANE PERIOD Are you sufterine from any of
———— Sch. Emanuel ¢ Gordon; Se ARRIVALS—By BW 2 Daily (except Holidays) T T YOU HAVE these Ailments?
7 7 ry | Leudaipha; Yacht Leander; Sch. E. M From TRINIDAD ‘ : r Chiropractic service also fate SEE ‘HA’ ; : n!
re FOR RENT Fenaie, Sch. Tystle Dove; Sch. W. 1 iy bertson,| method of electrical massage. Phone |} HAMMERS, NAILS, LANTERNS Etc.
TAYLOR—META (Tee Tee”) yesterday one; SC nh. Gardenia 1 x 1 Alst Joan Ghent, | 9 Daily fexeept Holidays
” afternoon, Her funeral will leave her ——e| Eunicia; Sch. Rosarene; $< Tncees ta : Px jaftne Muriel : ) HAVE YOU SEEN OUR trout rot iy <2. meee
sate, senidance Greendelds, Dt aed L ‘ . 3 Ne Pullip it Davidson; Sch. I Young, Michael H Pauline ne = ee Se Sorgen Maes, ok Puller ond ine Weve ein Dieting, Reduc- |
nk Prnoo ¢ muise; Sc “ * K < Fe Judi } , 3 . }
| Grunosoe Church, Country Rosd, ena] SaaS Lydina A., Sch. eye B smith; Sch An Kathleen Ferreira. Judit |), Hatchet — All in One — Only $2.12 ing and Building Up. (See) — |
» Westbury Cemete: ——— s “ry {. Lewis: Sch arion 3 . De rm Hels - v7 ;
thence to the Westbut y Cemetery BEDROOM One Large Bedroom to sary 5D Dortet: Sch Mee O Jory De = see For athe Looe 6. SRaDanaw,
30.97.50 Te ge ote yrent. a : © Cave| M.V. Earles Trader; S< Mc w. Fee . Sr rey LIME and tablished T HERBERT Ltd Incorporated Orthopedic Masseuse ong Dictian
e > , . 5 2. | Jones o! wil r ‘ wie - i iu F belle — ‘Phone i
IN MEMORIAM ee = aie ARRIVALS of ge aay cong ore BLOCK STONE |) 1860 . . 1926 eee rae sire ae. |
: vaaan ; one Sch. Mary E. Caroline, 54 tons net R Edward } j Roebuck St t
In foving memory of our dear Mother] BENSONHURST 13 ie fae in c aa Joseph, from Dorr D pi ve—e vera v Dial 4503 i & i
and Auat Mrs. ISA GRANNUM who] For particulars, Dtal 3239. me : * nha “ ine tichae! 1 *
9 ne ” i } ontbrun 'e >
ee _ tee sa, fat BUNGALOW Attractive Bungalow, Ewounds fram. Peram othe ae = : ~ el SSeS %
De n'a a oad, Hastings oth drooms é Sree Sarees yertha Sylveste’ | |
Need +n Rg Poet nat eons "aso opening on. | Sch. Belqueer, net, Capt aoe oo eee | HAVE YOU GOT A y
eo aoe Verandah facing sea. All comforts. Tele-| jing. from Vincent aoe | x
Ba ae ==. Se Tine Sy Ne, maraRRRA—ny WA NOTICE | BARGAINS: § COLD or COUGH §
by best: 76 tons net, Capt. Stoll, for ish TRINIDAD aa co at SI
~ did es a BUNGALOW — From Aug. Ist 1950. | 7), .[08 : vor pe Davis, Mrs. Elsie Hunt, Mise Our office will be closed to »
, £ on t Cne newly Built Bungmiow, Welches| “<'s city of Dieppe, 4,850 tons net, Hunt, Mrs. Edith Laurence, Miss|]{ business on Saturdays dur- , \F SO TRY g
Ever ey by phe Posie Road 3 hess Py pee all modern con Capt c ee Pear tix tay Bheee Mrs | ing the months of August 1 e %
SLSIE (Daughters); 21 “nn 2.25 1 cott Miss Sylvia Scott, Mr + 7 a oes . 7 , ‘
ADELINE ow ains BHODA WEEKES | VOUmce 20:1:00—-t, | PO 2-H De ‘San, ae Gertrude Bell, Miss | COTTLE Care ap er BROWNE'S $
(Sister); MURIEL, STELLA, VALLIE, Mary Wiloughby » CA ) « Co., i 6%" x 354” |
(Nieces) FLATS—One well furnished, & one MAIL NOTICES Flort McGee, | 30.7.50,—2n. j 1 J
_—- 4, | unfurnished néar The Rocks, Hastings * ftoaay = } TAIN COUGH 3
In ever loving mertiory of our gertl Box x.y.2. Cfo Advocate Co. 7 Ethel | | $3.50 per 1,000 9
beloved 2 ther and 7 oe oe tie 28.7 .50-—3n MAILS for Martinique, Ar tau a s ,
LIE STANTON who fell asleep on Jt Croix, St. Thomas VI w York b ie } |
July, 1948 he Lord “FARAWAY” St. Philip coast, furnish-| th, S's. Fort Amherst will be closed at gs Misa | SO SIMPLE | PAD OCKS ( RE 3
Wee is hat ‘anal of paees ed, 8 bedtogms water my wpe. the ral Post Office as under ; Rev. | L
hose in that | oo . a. ia Lighting plant, ble car-port, r- Parcel and Registered at 2 por ze} I ss | |
With "whowe. whose wore fe OT gsan| Fart came Mecha Rall BepABAT OH] Ordinaey niall at 3 pm onthe dist tase Bownie, Mad] | from 2c, each ie, Tulare Senate te come 8
Ever to be remembered by her children] Dia 76. 1 a— July 1960 Mr i 4 athleen John-| . .
meee Bone Hilary, Stanley — (child - * . Wavesiey ‘Mail for the United Kingdom by the UO “a0; G \ vi Daphnia . Hoarseness, Reenohigh saint hoe
ROE amne, arendeniiony, see Onn Sine waters ae *D iaine fedrectnn S.S. Golfito will be closed at the Gen Mayers | Phe mat thea ge ae. ° |
and Helen Goodric (Sister), : jue Waters i. ~ | eral Post Office as under For ANTIGUA | | +» ete.
Stantonesgnd Hu ’s family corusturgohed ee OO Peovan.| Parcel Mall at 12 noon, Registered Miss Ines Shi t Mr. | Risley | JONHNSON’S STATIONERY |
: ae | Mail at 2 pm. Ordinary Mail at Tucke Mi Margaret B r |
IN loving memory of our Dear Mother MODERN STONE BUNGALOW. Seclu-| p.â„¢m. on the Ist August 1950 Smith Brace Just the turn of a tap & | C. CARLTON BROWNE
a oe who \pased sway On} oF part of Pine Hill, 2 meerones 2 sitineiiesnpenaeimnsinemnchondipalae The Regulo of a Gas Cooker | — AND — Wholesale & Retail Druggist % |
July 3 a ie servants’ rooms, Garage Solar heating and a Child can get
See ee ee ce wwe (ane Bical & Go." Soljeltors, 18-2 GOVERNMENT NOTICES || PERFECT “BAKING RESULTS 186, Roebuck St. Dial 2813
day ves R. Ss ic} is * ors, | Call and see the latest Gas Cookers | 2
Thecp un Wear one var task js ov] Roebuck, St, Telephone eS ate At your Gas Showrooms Today. | PLESSIS POSSE
Skeep on dear one you 6.80—t.f.n. I |
Your willing hands) will toil no more. | 665: 39966609 SVP,
For those you loved, you did your “NEWHAVEN” crane Sones, mipnianed, Attention is drawn to the Detence (Control D ig and Patent ) | ie ys
God grant you now eternal rest rere eZ Po and Proprietary Medicine Prices) Order, 1950, No Yasan h will be ! . $ Public ie g
Ever to be remembered by Rito] vagnifieent | bathing beach, November,| published in the Official Gazette of Monday 31st July. 1950 cecil 1? WE OFFER % -
Ina, Adeline, Elsie (daugi ie 50-—1n. | fitst half Deeember. Dial 4476, 2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling prices of “Phil- } ORIENTAL | <
ee SS adpcatese Melt te fae eet lips Milk of Magne ’ are as follows (SE HABLA ESPANOL) * WEEKES’ AUCTION %
eee Oe — 1 y 7
> . : ROOMS — Large furnished Rooms,j* t ote " AX 1 | CURIOS, IVORY, TEAK, SANDAL o
FOR SALE very cool running water. With or with- . - MAE ae JEWELLERY, BRASSWARE, TAP- | eo NAIL SCISSORS 1% $
very foot t ° Lteruls ‘ren aate. ITEM INIT OF SALE PRICE ESTRIES, GLOVES, PERFUMES. i | EEZERS BUSINESS %
: ; ; 56 ¥
AUTOMOTIVE utes walk to Clubs or City jal 33: a e@ TW. S MART & .
CyCLE — Norman Motor 25.7.50-—t.f.n KASH MERE | s
ione 3381 . a a | x,
cyele “In good condition Ne 7:50—3n. |] “THE SNUGGERY” — Lower Westbury Phillips Milk of Magnesia 4 oz. bottle 46c @ FILES 3 PREMISES z
Road, near Brandon's Beach ‘wo rooms | ~
fe del onion ee fe |. lw » es (1B 02 90¢. | 0998555995599 OOOO @ SHAVING BRUSHES %
Cycle. Good condition oF . van pins hRiinnnle siibibiliceaclightjeeeene—neneninigateesiaititlie rom ae a abe $ s
-7.60—6n 4 ——_____—— — Senn 30.7 -2n.|% % RS to be opened as soon asI can &
TRELAWNY — Furnished or unfur- a =" g @ RAZO et rae remises ©
VAUXHALL, 25 hp. Going Cheap } nished, 3 Bedrooms each with running 1% FOR SALE 3 “ get én" totton fe ~ &
$8s.00. “Ring Evelyn 2087 or Bawerds) witer, usual Dubie. rooms, Servants DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORT 1% % & %
2453 28.7.50—3n room ete Second house east of Pavilion % “WINDSOR LODGE” | * x
zs : “our *hone 3001 20.7,.50-—1n . 7. ened % a
Court. Phon HIGHWAY NO. 3A is closed to through vehicular traffic between % y CALL IN TO-DAY AT > THE OLD RED STORE %
~ . “hi 9 y ace a 4 .
ECTRICAL Castle Grant and Chimborazo Village. ie ‘ % Government Hill, St. Michael $ | | 2
wa LOR One Coolerator in ‘ ‘_ 30.7.50.—2n. | §, ‘ : | ’ * ¥
vee ai oititon "Cas ees, S| PUMILIC NOTICES |% Standing on One Acre with $18 COLLINS s High Street x
mn, 2 Roebuck St. or Phone 3295, | i ' nthe | >
B. Korn vor 29.7 50—2n. ——————————————————— ed enkheoe 8 Six Acres attached. | Disha aad Tadic Creeks, os pace way anette for Sale? %
REFRIGERATOR — One 7 cu. ft Dr. PRESCOD B. O’NEAL HURRICANE RELIEF OR N ‘vy. if For all particulars apply... 2} % What do you want? %
Leonard Canadian Refrigerator, Can be B to inform his friends and Cli- A practice of certain sections of the Hurricane Relie rganisatio R § 3
ah at GW. Hutchingon & Co.) lin, | ents that his Office will be closed from will take place on Sunday, the 30th of July, 1950, between 10 a.m. x H. H. WILLIAMS, | Have you any Correspon- s
Broad Strect ere s 8th July, re-opens Tuesday hated ay be us or broadcasting are Office: Pinfold St. dence which you cannot fix?
ee 8.7.50-8n.| and 1 p.m. The frequencies that may be used for broadcasting ® Dial 2676 Mave-you ancdse-in tounlen &
* Ist . ; J : OR. Re 9\% ‘ 7 ye you any ?,
ve inch Twin Cyl prick” Combines Theneolle = 7.1; 5.4 and 2.14 megacycles or wavelengths of 42.25; 55.55 and 140.2 1% Can I be of any help? S
rigerating unit with driving motgr Y metres respectively. P POECOCCEEELO CELE SBOOS F x
ai with MONTHL fe practice it is planned to tes iring J h
taular Spulivaser-cemnivee oe cali £20 2. During the practice it is planned to test out the rocket firing $0S0Se0GuUSSEEETSSSOSSSF ust Ww at a 1 DIAL 8150 %
eration capacity, all’ complete in work EASILY eared es Pet ee tinnan equipment to be used in connection with hurricane warnings at the! % x \ C. N. WEEKES $
entral F y Ltd Hi in _ stamps. ¥ --
ing order. Central Foundry Ltd. oinies Suitable fof either sex. a Police Stations. ; 1S For Sale $ Fisherman RS
also contact oni eae A aust Pi 3. This notice is issued to allay any alarm which may be caused g f Va % 1
loni and minions > eee : ee eae : sania doin’ wasted av » picke i ——— —
LIVESTOCK Feneatbets, Enclose 2% stamp. ai by the discharge of the rockets or by messages which may be picked | ¥ AT * i i j
NEN GOAT — One Saanen Goat] Mail only take fews days artin| ; Noes: reaalvere. 3 > R
giving Milk, Apply GoW. Allen, Dial ton, Prospect House, 329 Wigan Road,| Up by private wireless r 26.7.50-—3n | 3 MOUNT PLEASANT z | equires... i Barbados Real Estate
4420, 30,7.50.—1n. | Leigh Lancs , England. sates ny 3 PLANTATION, 3 | P \
8.20.80. | y { |
_— ST. JOHN. $ . X ne¢
MECHANICAL | % | GALVANIZE WIRE NETTING, LACING WIRE, FISH
BIKES, Hercules Silver King, on terms, NOTICE | 3 One (1) 2 K.W. Relt % ’ .
all models, Black, Green. A,’ Barnes & 3 2 Kw. S| HOOKS, SEINE TWINE and MANILLA ROPE. INDUSTRIAL—COMMERCIAL
Co., Ltd, 25.6.50—t.f.n, PARISH Wine ‘ene wrAS ai Be driven D.C. Dynamo £40 $ | \ RESIDENT
_ Mt, ynard ad leading from ve al aise Diels drtidihenisell ttalllaccaes | . j TAL
BICYCLE—One $-Spged Abbmndale | 1" deommainan Agricultural Station is NEI IDS = ——=, S one QQ). Switch Board 15 y We can now supply all your requirements for the ({{ Telephone 2336
, in perfeet ing order, Com-| " : : s z
Miele with Lock, Bell &* Light.” (Price | “sed 10 CARRE nee ROYAL NETHERLANDS | y One (1) Steam Engine $ | Sonor \ Office. Hastings Hotel Lid.
$50.00) Apply to Reuben Gilkes C/o " E. H. CHALLENOR, co ¥ 634 x 10 “s BI q
Advocate, Broad St. Inspector of Highways, St. Peterr STEAMSHIP . | 2 ole itn a ae ¥ | \ |
28.7.50—3n * > |
Sailing from Amsvercum, ftotterdam The M.V. T. B, “Radar” will One (1) Aspinall pan B N RB. H 1@ Ww E L L ’ ;
SY yen ne M.V. T. B. “Radar” wi x qQ) 1 3 | é
ELLANEOUS * ; “COUNTANCY, COST ACCOUNT- and scoeet Garni ass . ‘ 4’ 0” dia. Disc 35 % |
MISCELL FACIAL TISSUES —Specially | COCO OMPANY SEICRETARYSHIP| 9. §. “ARNETA" July 19, 22, 27th sony “= en Tees $ Zi iar s806 Lasabast dh Mhbdeers FOR SALE
put up in attractive ere rae eae BOOK-KEEPING—A six months’ “In- M. S. “HECUBA” Aug. 4, 5, 8th for St. Lucia, pe incent, One (1) Juice Heater 3 | ) (
{gr your eonvenience. Obtainable every | tensive Method” Course (Recognised) M.S. “HELENA” Sept. 1. 2. 5th Grenada, Aruba, Curacao. 300 sq. ft 40 $| a EN-DAH-WIN, Pine Hill. New
where. — | for award of Dipioma as ae pati Marae Meee aexet Sailing Wednesday, 2nd Rog) Seat = ieee x SS Sj stone bungalow. Drawing /dining
— ever description | Fellow) will qualify you or ig er status s ugus' August, 1950. ) room, 3 drooms, tea room, bath
ae, thie, Ny Jewels, e Silver, | by spare-time postal study. For details, Salling to Madeira Plymouth & g One 4 et Heater 4 $ room, kitchen, wash room, _gar-
Watercolours » Auto| write now: The Principal, LONDON itwerp and Amsterdam % Tow a. tS os % BOOKS OF GREAT INTEREST 1 age, 3000 sq fk and, Wa er, Elec-
gravhs, ete., a Antique Spop, | SCHOOL, OF ACCOUNTANCY, 12 M WILLEMSTAD" July 25th ' is . , | Salty, see nis bungalow ‘before
a Roya) Yacht CWB. ae a Duke Street, St. James's togean, | ® ov M. 8. “ORANJESTAD" Aug. 22nd B.W.1. Schooner Owners |% One » 8 x 12’ Multi- ; you buy
949.—tOn.! 1 England 22 Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo Association Ine i’ tubular Boiler 50 | r, DOVER, Christ Ch
. = = . s ‘ | ) ; ureh, 6 lots on |
E SPRINGS All sizes, Demerara, Etc. Consignee; Dial: 4047 1% | THE SECOND w ORLD ub AR sea 3 x 10,000 and 3 x 12,000 sq
GRAMOPHONE SPRINGS PERSONAL M. S. “HERSILIA™ July 27th |} One (1) 7’ x 12 Multi- | ft. also acreage. "
od: Electric Pick-up Arms < » 1d
Reproducers, M. S. “HECUBA” Aug. 24th 1g tubular Boil olume : ;
(Magnetic) at New Market Store, Ch a:b daURSON. COW a GC. To 12 ePwae Soler 45 } ST. PHILIP, near Rices. 1% acres |
side, Dial 4579, 9.7.50. 4 . P. ' . ” SE" FE good arable land. ROCKLEY, ne
' hereby warned against Apply: 7 7; my tt near |
CALYPSO RECORDS, forty cient! wrt "credit toms wile ALMA ELIT S “WE ik: stanion -. oe THE GRAND ALLIANCE MIM] Stites ese, woul 1 acre ‘land: |
Te een eeves a co, rr {10% hold tersele reaponsiie for ‘her or| (Y dian N ti I Si rag By WINSTON S$. CHURCHILL |p on Busan ates
. t ruyse res] ns! he 1
oe A. BARNES & CO. LTD, 1 arcing else contracting any debt or ana L a 1ona Ss ea mis! il = _ BOCEEEESESEGSEE66666566566" y )}
15.7,50--T.F.N. debts in my name unless by a written Sesion —————







SUNDAY,

JULY 30,

War In Asia:

1950



THE NEED TO MEDIATE

Hy David Temple Roberts

THE United Staves











has an-

swered the efforts of Pandit
Nehru to mediate between the
great powers with a definite re-
jection of the Indian arguments
It seems, to this writer, that
the exchange of messages be-
trays lack of logical thought
about the situation created by
aggression in Koea. This is a
dangerous moment frr illogical

thinking, especially since Presi-
dent Truman’s calling up of re-
serves and dispatch of additional
bombers and atom bombs io
European bases means that both

world powers are baring their
teeth

In the first place, there is
Pandit Nehru’s message. Since

the Government of India recog-
mised the Government of the
People’s Government of China it
has been our endeavour to bring
about the admission of its repre-
sentatives to the various organi-

Sations and agencies of whe
United Nations.

Our present proposal was a
renewal of this effort. It. was

made on its merits,” writes Pan-
dit Nehru, with commendable
sense, “but also in the hope vhat
if would create a suitable atmos-
phere for the peaceful solution
of the Korean problem”. vs
Straightforward Bargain

Here the Indian is

premier
laying himself open to justified
charges of diplomatic horse-

irading—and also to misinterpre-
tation. Does India really imagine
that the admission of China would,

in itself, lead to a_ solution in
Korea? The Soviet Union would
return to the Security Council

with the arriving delegates from
Peking. Though they would not
be able to veto Security Council
resolutions already in force, there
is an ominous sound in Stalin’s
reference to the “obligatory par-

ticipation
Powers”
cisions.
Nehru’s

of the Five Great
in United Nations de-
The weakness in Mr.
argument is to suppose
that admission of Communist
China to the United Nations—a
reasonable proposition supported
by the British Government—
would change Soviet behaviour
at the United Nations, or her
satellite’s behaviour in Korea.

Mr. Nehru’s words can be read
as a straightforward bargain: “We
vote China in: you call off your
Korean dogs.” If that is how
they were meant then Mr, Nehru
must be less experienced than I
believe him to be.

Trygve Lie went to Moscow six
weeks ago to hear Stalin’s terms
for settlement of the “cold war”.

Here I will put them briefly.

In the Far East: recognised
Communist China at U.N.O. and
allow China a free hand in For-
mosa; and in Japan a peace treaty
followed by U.S. withdrawal.

In Indo-China: the withdrawal
of France and a treaty with Ho-
Chi-Minh.

In Germany, a_ peace treaty,
with drawal of “Allied Forces”,
and “unification” of the country.

In Western Europe: the removal
of military teeth from the gums
of the Atlantic Pact. And the
Atom Bomb; scrap it. Stalin’s
terms for peace in the cold war
are complete surrender on all
fronts. Does Pandit Nehru think he
can be halted with the concession
of one point? The Indian Premier
surely cannot believe that. So, if
he is suggesting that one conces-
sion should be made for the sake
of another, he is embarking on the
dangerous road of appeasement. By
putting pressure on one point
after another Stalin might always
tind a mediator to give way to
what he wants,



COVETED SPACES WILL
GROW RICE

By LOUIS L. LECK

Thoughtful Australians
about the e

government which giv

The report states that huge
potential rice fields lie in this
area. It was prepared by W.

Poggendorff, chief of the division
of plant industry in the depart-
ment of commerce.

Australia’s oriental neighbours,
urgently needing more living
Space for their over-populated
territories, have long cast envi-
ous eyes on the northern terri-
tory. They will now be able to
point to an official Australian re-
port, saying that the Common-
wealth has the very land they so

urgently need to grow their
staple food—rice,
These hundreds of thousands

of acres of potential rice-growing



land are at present lying idle.
At best, they are used as occa-
sional pastures for wandering

rds. The reaction of Austra-
lia’s neighbours is not hard to
predict

The chairman of the Rice
Equalization Association, A, E.

Symons, says that “before the
war there was an exportable sur-

plus of rice amounting to 6,500,-

mpty spaces in the north west.

uninhabited land is a national danger area
A report was presented recent]

es grounds for even

SYDNEY, Australia.
always have been concerned
This vulnerable,

y to the Commonwealth
greater anxiety,

000 tons, most of which came
‘rom Burma, Siam and Indo-
China.

To-day this supply has
dwindled to less than 1,500,000
tons, and is still dwindling be-

cause of the turmoil in those
countries,”
These great rice - exporting

countries have been disrupted by
Communist infiltration, on top of
the damage done to their paddy
fields by the Japanese. Their
embankments were broken, their
water buffalo killed, and their
fields allowed to grow over with
weeds.

What can be done to protect
the so-called “back door of Aus-
tralia?”

There is only one effective
method of protecting it. That is
fast development.

Poggendorff’s report contains
clear-cut pYoposals for action.
With the increased utilization of
the land, the - Commonwealth
hopes to avoid censure and pres-
sure from the crowded countries
of Southeast Asia,



NO GROUNDNUTS
SO PLAN HALTS

By ALAN

HARVEY

But I do not believe that is
what Pandit Nehru ‘intended. He
states his belief that the People’s
Government of China should be
admitted to the Security Council,
and that to admit her would not
encourage aggression.

There are the strongest
ments in favour of that

argu-
course
Jiplomatic forms and formulae are
fuppeced to represent the real
lorces in the world.

Diplomacy grew up, over the
centuries, as a form of civilised
contact to permit powers in total
disagreement one with another,
and having conflicting interests to
be able to discuss and negotiate

The United Nations is an exten-
sion of diplomatic method—not
Something entirely new and dif-
ferent. When it was formed it was
agreed that it should represent
the realities of the powerful forces
in the world. Why else were five
powers singled out as permanent
members? Why were they given a
power of veto?

Did not the United States origin-
ate and support that insistence on
the veto? The logical conelusion

from these answers is that the
People’s Government of China,
controlling all China save the

island of Formosa, should be rep-
resented as a Great Power at the
United Nations.

Otherwise the Security Council
is a mere nonsense and the United
Nations should start to wind up
its affairs and dispose of its assets
—including the new building in
New York.

Achievement

Dean Acheson is right to point
out that admission of China would
not solve the problem of Korea
But it might make the United
Nations ready to deal with the
future of Korea once the North
Korean aggressors have with-
drawn and a truce has been estab-
lished

It was through the United
Nations that the blockade of Ber-
lin by the Russians, and the conse-
quent end of the airlift, wa
achieved. The United Nations still
has services to render: but re-
making the United Nations should
not be a bargaining point in nego-
tiation. It should be carried



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througl without reference t
Ke on S merits the mis
take been to allow Stalin tc
Uunk he can use it in a bargair

Whatever confusions there may





be in Pandit 1ru’s approach t





he pres crisis. it must be
mitted that there are even gre
inconsistences in Dean Acheson's
revealing answer to Indian

Premier.

Sinee President Truman’s mes-
sage Congress, and powerful
American landings in Korea, it is
possible to something of
the course of events in that divided
peninsula. Within a short period
the United States forces will have
held the North’ Korean aggression
n check. Soon after, the Ameri-
can forces will begin to advance
Experience of Britain and France
in Malaya and Indo-China shows

to

foresee



that they will have to deal with a]

difficult’ guerilla problem. It is
possible to see ahead a deadlock
in which large United States
forces, (and some British) will be
commitied to occupying and polic-
ing S. Korea, while on the other
side the North Korean satellites of
the Soviet Union will not be able
to advance. The danger of this
Situation is that the South tip of
Korea is strategically menacing to
United States control of Japan
and the North tip of Korea is much
too near the Soviet base at Vladi-





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)
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eo OM TS
LONDON. = a | e
Britain’s groundnuts plan, which roused political as- seas eiepiinince nT
§ I Pp p
sions and grew few groundnuts, has been scrapped, ; & THURS |
Nobody says so officially. It is merely admitted that WED & ' . |

after three years of controversy, well-meant plans to set | 1.30 o 8.15 pom.

the plains of Africa blazing with groundnuts have heen | |

abandoned. The idea now is to transform the original United Artists Double : |

scheme into a broad project for colonial development, leay- , ) B. H SUNFLEX DISTEMPER

ing the groundnuts to wither as they will. Hedy Lamart 1
Food Minister Maurice Web Now, it is known, nearly be | ‘ res avabie
outlined the new policy in a £36,000,000 has been spent. In Dennis O’Keefe [here is no other compara
House of Commons debate, For return. this year’s yield of oil- | wail finish for new plaster,
the first time, there was an offi- bearing seeds is about £350,000. RED {| '. Sava ¢ s and
cial admission of failure This includes both groundnut. A J. Arthur Rank Presentation \ DISHONOU | and we have Seven shades

“I recognize quite frankly,” and sunflowers, which were in- ain ' ( white in gallon containers.

Webb “that the original troduced as a substitute when — Ni
hopes have not been realized, the nuts proved difficult to grow Ul
and that we shall have te view When the plan was launched, y qi
the scheme in a new light the hope was to produce @ssen- RO AL saning : ‘ |

“If it is to prosper and flour: tial ‘ats in a hurry to cope with GEORGE ELLEN (| LTD.
ish, it must ultimately be shaped a world shortage Now Webo LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY 4.30 & 8.30 p.m. , y and { A. BARNES & CO.,
as a broad project of colonial de- —. ‘ ‘. a 4cae ¥ F \ ;
velopment with a wide and “Whether or not those short- i tala Ane Bae as wth {\ | ames BEER
catied agricultural content, ages are as valid as they were— Republic s Action Double a : 1 HOA oELRY. I Dat if dé {{ ereteh ttt | wane aes
rather than the purely food-pro- which is open to argument che Stanley RIDGES — Bill HENRY PHILIP REED as onpror saoIT Ho f BLOOD ON } 6 MPSA PPPOPP GL ELO PLLA PLOY
ducing idea on which it was first now seems clear to any — eae, ADDISON RICHARDS ROPERT BARRAT ( i %
established.” that it would be unwise to focus WILLIAM WILKERSON 4 Tye

the project exclusively on this ( ‘an SE FACES” ' "7 x A . Su: a

Webb’s words were a sad epi- original purpose of producing FALSE FA Associate F se THE SUN % Are you thinking about taking
taph upon one of the labour gov- fats” AND Seems Pay y SOUND 10 % 4 ‘

, jects. rhic i inuts ve ..? » 2
ernment’s pet projects, which In the long run, the ground en — % . fi . Tc lida a f-. ;
started in a fine glow of idealisin pian must merge into a scheme of = | $ Ty ip or your I ? y
and quickly became a political colonia! development in its wid- ig Sy
headache. From the first, nothing est sense In it would be weed Roc! : a '
went right The drive to grow the vast capital resources, . ng of the Cowboys r 2s 3 5 $
gioublattacdunia North Ameri- painfully - gained experience of (ng oF he Counts £O-DAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 845 p.m. % & it é
ca..s call peanuts encountered tropical agriculture “all the TR imbia Big Double R Then Let Us Supply You
obstacle after obstacle, from ‘ge accumulation of men, mate- Giler Ford Nina Fock %
drought and flood to nat la- rials and ideas called the ground- ; ie 1% vilih Vote
bour trouble nuts scheme. A REPUBLIC PRODUCTION uf “THE UNDER COVER MAN” 1%

— AND 1% ‘ . ,
' ‘ 5 rt ‘
WEST GERMANS CAN INCREASE MONDAY & TUESDAY 4:30 & 8.0 pm, oe 3 a C om
i Z : i with §
; Republic's Big Double - - { Rita Hayworth — Gene Kell: 1% SU il ASES
; 7 Bee ah gene Ck ABMS NL: & Sc iaeaias in Spr ae i i i ar ~
' Dennis O'KEEFE — stance E Palmers eae ates.
POLICE FORCES s O'K oon ance MOOR | MONDAY & TUESDAY 4.30 & 8.15 p.m. iP
¢ i A ;}Cclumbia Double -
BONN, July 28. not mentioned in the lettery offi iss . % ‘ are r a ra j P he lavnes :
- Allied High Commissioners to- cials said. ZARL CARROLL VANITIES } Sonn ruf ieorge (Gabby) Haynes Ranging from 12” to 28
day sent a letter to the West Ger He answered a ere — AND ‘) BREED” %
rnment permitting therm. by the West German ancellor 7 “THE UNTAMED BREE ! on ‘ we ie
ar iaceeae etaatoonsia in West Konrad Adenauer — whether | AND ig ALL AT MODERATE PRICES \
z by 10 sr cent some Allies would permit increases in ; i j SUEM NE” m t at . pears
asally well informed allied offi- the Police strength of Western rwo-M a Ul B anne ‘ mas Pay Us A Visit And Be Convinced !
clals said today. Germany because a _ powerful Lom NEA Ann savage eT ep % ;
jitional men will ke under “People’s Police” is being built up _ resent ora are x %
a onnt of 11 State Govern- in Eastern Germany and the pre- WEDNESDAY FHURSDAY 4.20 & 8.15 p.m. i} x :

ates ta Ke he sant highly decentralised nature Columbia Double - - |
Wien Police Fer, es hay of West German Police. | Leslie Brooks Richard Dix {i x dos Har ware 0
mainly ur district and city The Question took on a new | | IN iN g e ¢ oT) -
mented urgency when war began in| { ; . - . oe , 2" ” Uh % cae
control. inae.; Aiea nunbviers cansiae | SECRET of es WHISTLER it * THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)

Tr vill be considered as self- ered that creation of adequate { Sheila aia PES “94 \ % ’ 5 gre 406
eintonand mobile units and may mobile Police Forces in Western| ' ee Saat , “BLACK EAGLE Ht | % Nos. 38 & 52 Swan Street — ‘Phone 2109, 3534, or 4406
be equipped with light weapons Germany would release Allied| }} THURSDAY NITE 8.30 writ? Kt) =
é srowd dispersing equipment troops now engaged in virtually] Fa ke ecu Bisho \ nie Patt % 806.656.5605 BSEOSGOCLEOOCO0S0OCSSSOSSSOOOOE
eh al "ee 9 Contrary to Police duties in the Ruhr | Sih “CARACAS NIGHT vy , ‘ GB OCCC BO OOOO OOOO OSG —
earlier reports, machine guns are —Reuter. AS 3 sa)







PAGE SIXTEEN

"These Men
Delight
Millions





tory of
We







G uN 0 in anc
Fa Bow ler Adonis
of the Aru
Wrigley, scorer
d others

By ERIC L. ROBINS Ys

i6W days a@gu i rece.ved a
hanc-witpen wus leLier iron
Arwur €2ifvan, the old Engians

@nd SUSSCR Ceprdit and last vowl-

ei i iormer i est Match selector,







new ta.nuus wiPeugnout tne crick-
eung world for ms Vest mateu
sunuaaries, ang occasion coun-
meéniaries ana shrewd comii vu
The piay

Alimony other things, Mc rile
“Yus, the Lests have veal
interesung, but my own Opi ©
is tha. ine West thaie at
superior team to ours

“Yardley has announecd f
wont goxw Australia, so tne pol-cy
of our sejectors mow 1S Surciy |

give the captaincy to the man who

will get the job in Australia. i
don’t favour a pro. captain: a
hasn’t got the authority of an

amateur, and most of them don (

want the job.

“The Ear-Bashers’ Union” now
includes Leary CoWstantine
and Ken Ablack - both of the
West Indies. Ken Abiack playec
for Northants, ana is a Spia vow
er

Promising Players

“The most promis.ng
players in England are DONALD
CARR (Oxford skipper), DOG-
GART, DAVID SHEPPARD, Peter
May (Cambridge), Tom Gravene)
(Gloucester), Arthur Milton
Gloucester), BOB BERRY and
Tattersall (right hand off-spin-
ner) (both Lanes.) and LOWSON
(Yorkshire).

“I like the W. Indies players
WORRELL is easily the best
stroke player, closely followed bj
JEFF STOLUMEYER, whilst
MARSHALL is also a delightfu:
bat to watch. WEEKES and WAL-
COTT hit the ball hard through
the covers and John Goddard is a
really good skipper. Their fast
attack has been a failure and God-
dard relies on his* spin attack
Ramadhin and Valentine, though
I don’t expect any of them will
reish a Trent Bridge wicket to
bowl on in the third Test

“We've had a fairly good sum.-
mer on the whole, though it has
rained quite a lot this last fort-
night.

“Well, all the best, Eric—an-
hope to see you in Colombo on
October Ist. (D.V.)

“Yours sincerely,

“Arthur Gilligan.”

This letter from Arthur’s strange
looking address, “Fir Tops, Round-
abouts, Pulborough, Sussex.’ dated
July 14, took my mind back to the
little, green box from which
Arthur and his fellow-commenta-
tors broadcast to cricket-lovers
all over the world—the little,
green box with the long window
that opens like the windscreen ot
a car, which has become
familiar a landmark to Eng ish
cricket crowds,

Commentators

What sort of men are these com-
mentators, whose voices are s

easily recognised wherever crick-
et is played? While on leave two
years ago from Ceylon, where I
am a Methodist miss:onary, I was
privileged to meet them all many
times, and needless to say, I
found them what they sound, a
friendly bunch of sportsmen,

But make no mistake about it,
a Test Match commentator's life
is no easy one. These men enjoy
their job, but they work so hard
that, like honest workmen the
world over, they are exhausted
at the end of their day. Even
after being on the air in turn
for every moment of the six
hours play, plus a few minutes
extra for summaries in the in-
tervals, they are not free to go
home until they have made re-

young



cords of their impressions for
listeners at home and overseas
Then only, at about 7.30, can

they put on their jackets and go
back to their hotel

In addition to his work for the
B.B.C., E. W. (Jim) Swanton, who.
like Arthur Gilligan, is a free-
lance broadcaster, in contrast to
Rex Alston and John Arlott, who
are on the staff of the B.B.C., has
to write his report for the next
morning’s- edition of his news
paper, “The Daily Telegraph.”

Arthur is very proud of his local
knowledge of English weather
vagaries, hence his usually accu-
rate weather and wicket forecasts
His method is to study the weath-
er forecasts in the morning
papers, over an early breakfast
In the bus or tram going down to
the ground he starts: his fellow-
travellers talking on the subject
Then he pumps the groundsman
After which he recalls his expe-
riences as a captain on that ground

| They'll! Do It Every ‘Time



ASOUT TO SM
PEDESTRIANS






Arthur

TL=AD-ON, LIKE TRAINS

) ONE-WAY TRACK P|)
;



‘TAND:&NG; (left) Arthur E. R. Gilligan and John Arlott. Rex Russia Returns

Alston is speaking into the hand-mike, while the green broad- |
casting box is seen in the background.

in the ‘twenties, weighs it all up
carefully and then, at about 8.30
am G.M.T., he broadcasts a
cvutious estimate of the situation
He often used to s#y to me during
tue Australian tour of 1948, beam-
ing all over his face’ “I’m righ.
ugpain to-uay, Eric lve never been
wrong yet!”
On Furlough

I enjoyed Arthurs company
oUl.cn during that furlough, During
Test wlhaich at Nottingham
1 took him along to the chilaren’s

«ning matinee at a local cin-
em, where, in South Indian cos-
lume, I talked to the youngsters
about missionary work in the East,
idtlowed by Arthur on
cricket. At Leeds we did similar-
ty. ‘There Arthur told the chil-
wren a good story against himself.
“When Sussex came to Leeds to
play Yorkshire one year,” he said,
“a friend of mine phoned up the
pavilion and asked for me. The
iellow who answered the phone
sd: “No, I'm afraid you can’t
speak to Gilligan. He’s just gone

the

in to bat.’ ‘Oh, that’s all right,’
said the voice at the other end,
‘1 dt hold on then!”

At Nottingham, on the Sund vy
morning in the middle of the Test
Match, Arthur came to Church
with me, It was a fine sight, after
the service, to see the children
who were present—especially the
beys—crowding round Arthur,
plying him with questions about
the Test Match, which he answered
a>» eagerly as they asked them,
and getting them to autograph
their hymnbooks! It was a Sunday

% they won’t soon forget.

Popular as he is everywhere,
readers in the West Indies will be
surprised to learn that when on
the air he defended Keith Miller
rerce bowling of bumpers to Len

Hutton, at Nottingham in 1948
while the crowd loudly booed its
disapproval, he didn’t please all

his English listeners by a long
chalk. I heard him being severely
criticised on the _ following
day by members of the crowd who
disliked Miller's tactics.

Arthur had previously told me
in the presence of his fellow-
c.mmentators; “There is one par-
ticular privilege granted to us
broadcasters which even the most
widely-read journalist hasn't got
We are in a position to scotch any
attempt to stir up a controversy
several hours earlier than any
irresponsible paper can try ty
start one I regard it as part of
our job to keep cricket clean,
And while IT have the chance to
broadcast I intend to do it.”

Miller ‘Petulant’

As a matter of tact, thinking it
over since, I have come to the con-
clusion that some of Miller’s bow1!-
ing that day was’ not what it
should have been, Even the care-
ful London “Times” correspon-
dent wrote that Miller appeared
‘petulant’ But that is not the
point What Arthur said to me
privately, and later put into prae-
tice on the air, shows the spirit
the men. ; While he and his
present colleAgues are in the box
we are not likely'to have a recurr-
ence of such A@ppleasantness as
that occasioned in 1933 by the de-
plorable ‘body-line’ controversy.

John Arlott is the Adonis ot
the ‘Ear-Bashers’ Union” His
two consuming interests in life



oft





Ar LAs



SP
AC K~
ONA




WHAM!





Test well worth reading.



_|j) | SECOND MAKE <3]
DECISION“SWERVE .\4//
THE SAME WAY++

“COLLISION |! 2A.’
> Fe 2 ie be

SUNDAY

“Cnribbean



W.L. Shoxt Steries
ARIBBEAN VOICES’ on Sun-
30th July, will consist of two







presenting three of Beethoven's
works including his ‘Eroica’ Sym-
phony. On Wednesday the BBC
Symphony Orchestra’ conducted
by Sir Malcolm Sargent present
the concert and on Friday it will
be the turn of the London Sym-

phony Orchestra conducted by
Basil Cameron. The recorded
programmes are on Tuesday at
4.15 p.m. and on Friday at 9.00
p.m. the former presenting a

work by the Australian composer
Clive Douglas in keeping with the
policy of the Promenade Concerts
to present new works by compos-
ers of all ages and nationalities,
and Strauss’s Symphonic Poem, |
‘Death and Transfiguration’ and







To Security
Council

@ From Page 1 |
was pointed out that the only)
egitimate government in Korea
Was that of Dr. Rhee—the Korean
Republic set up by the United
Nations. Any peace plan they
said, would therefore have to be

are cricket and poetry Well-
known the author of three
books of poetry and for his popu-
lar B.B.C, poetry feature, “Book
of Verse’, he is even better known
for his particularly vivid and wit-
ty cricket commentaries. For in-
stance, who of those who hear:
it will readily forget his compari-
son of Ernie Toshack’s batting in

the Leed's Test with an old lady prefaced by two conditions:
poking with her umbrella at a 1 Cease-fire and withdrawal
wasps’ nest? Even his fellow-com- of North Korean troops beyond
mentators laughed aloud at that. ihe 38th parallel ; : ‘
They often do whe. John is at 2. Restoration of the
the mike. His cricket books, Republic’s authority in
“How To Watch Cricket”, “Gone territory
to the Test Match” and others are Any plan which would ask for
It is to be the stimultaneous withdrawal of
hoped that he will write one on both aggressor and defender
the present tour of the West In- would in British and American
dians. . If it is as good as this opinion be not only unrealistic
others it will sell well, 7 but quite outside the spirit of
Though a useful club-cricketer, the charter. .
the nearest John Arlott has come Alternatively it was though!
to playing in first class cricket is that the Soviet Union might o
as twelfth man for Hampshire, Tuesday propose “horse-trade”
which he did several times before to Council: “let the Communist
the war, Chinese delegate enter into
United Nations and we will usc
our influence to obtain peace ir
Korea”.
General opinion was, however
that the Chinese Communist
issue was no longer a burning
one for thé Soviet Government.
The other prediction most fre-
quently heard here was that vhe
Soviet Government was returning
to the Security Council to block
any action by the United Natiohs

as




Korean
its own

Rex Alston

On the other hand, bespectacled
Rex Alston, son of a Canon cf the
Anglican Church and ex-Public
school master in charge of cricket
at Bedford School, played tor Bed-
fordshire, a minor county, regu-
larly during the school holidays
for several seasons. He finished up
as captain of his county. To pass
the time on a long train journey
home after a match, he told me

how he managed to get the job ‘n caSe of new aggression elge-
which has made his smoothly where. This was discounted by
flowering, well modulated voice any experts as improbable.

familiar in homes all over the Inasmuch as if the Security
world. Council was blocked by veto, the

Security General could call ar
cmergency session of the whole
yeneral Assembly and so by pase
the Security Council altogether
—Reuter.

He left school-mastering during
the war, when part of the staff of
the B.B.C. was evacnated to Bed-
ford, Soon tiring of the compara-
tive monotony of announcing vari-
ety and musical programmes from
a Northern studio of the B.B.C,
he persuaded the Outside Broad-
casting Director to give him a
trial as a cricket commentator.
His first efforts were never heard
by the public. They were record -
ed at a county match and later
approved. He had his first real
chance when, at short notice, he
was called upon suddenly to take
he place of a ccmmentator who

iis colleagues posted with all the
iacts end figures relating to scores,
limes taken by batsmen over their
runs, bowling analysis, etc., etc.,
without whien none of the men
we hear would be able to give us
all the accurate and consistent de-
tails which they do, thanks to
Avthur Wrigley, with such appar-
ent ease

Those faithful and long-suffer-

was unable to broadcast. Since i masters of improvisation, the
thes Rex has never looked back, Outside-Broadcaste ngineers,

Kenneth Ablack and Leary lodged for so long in cribbed
Constantine are the growingly CRtners ’ of strange cricket

4 rounds,” as Rex Alston and John

Arlott heve put it, should also

teke their bow here, For they too

fre part of the team, and not the
ast essential one

Now I must cut this article out

popular guest commentators this
year, just as Roger Blunt, who
toured England with the New
Zealanders in 1927, and last sea-
son. The year | met the com-
mentators the Alan



guest was ond send it to Arthur Gilligan
McGilvray, former Captain of the »nd his friends, to swell the mail
New South Wales State XI in the which reaches them daily from
Sheffield Shield, and in private cvery corner of the world. I shall
lite in the shoe business It is take the liberty of adding the

interesting to note that the first
cricket match ever broadcast was

rreetings of all cricket-lovers in
the West Indies and British Gui-





that between New Zealand and ‘no, along with my own, T know
Essex, from the old Leyton ‘at he and his colleagues in the
ground, in 1927. The commenta- £reen box will appreciate it

tor was the famous ‘ericketing cicteshases iecitastni nce tals idlteeaiatntensitatain

padre, (now Canon) F. H. Gill- Pete

ingham.

Arthur Wrigley
Heard on the radio only in oc-
easional, discreet stage whispers,
but always in the green box with
the commentators, is also Charter-

|
| Wes!







ed Accountant rthur Wrigley.
the B.B.C. scorer. No article on
this subject would be complete °

without mention of him. He keeps}



=

By Jimmy Hatlo




Cc. %
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of

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TOP SCORERS



and Frank Pettingel

lasts








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Hello Folk! Let's swing

A GRAND

DANCE

which will be given by
MR. SYLVAN BARKER
At the Princess Alice Playing
Field, St Michael
Tuesday Night, Ist August, 1950
Admission—Gents 2/-, Ladies 1/6

Music by Mr. CLEVIE GITTENS'
Orchestra
shments on
Invite Your

Sale
Friends

Sponsored By
Messrs OWEN SEALY &



CLEMENT JACKMAN
(Better known as Bobby Golf)
at The Children’s Goodwill

League (Shed)
CONSTITUTION ROAD
on Thursday Night, ard August,
1950
ADMISSION: 2/-
Music by Mr. PERCY GREEN'S
Orches*ra
A_Well-stocke Bar —



Please Invite your friends



Hello Boys and Girls! Wha s On?

A Grand Dance

will be given by

FITZGERALD WALLACE
(Known as Ward)
and Mr. COLVIN POLLARD

Mr.

At SAVOY CLUB, Mason Hall St
Kindly lent by the Management

on Tuesday Night, ist August, 1950
Admission: Gents 2
Music Mr. Arnold Meanwell’s
Orchestra
BAR SOLID
Please invite

~ — Ladies 1/6
by

your Friends





This version









ot

excernts f(T

ce short stories there has | , . ,
been quite a dearth of poetry in oO of J. B. Priestley’s Best
this programme this month—the ’ :
first by Hugh Blackman of Trini- nO SERRE De. Hi a 2.30
Gad and the second by Jack J - -ucace? will have a
Govdon of British Guiana. Broad- Chance of. hearing An Inspector
hee ; uy J. B. Priestley, generally
cast begins ut the regular time of dat ae coe Be kin tenet plays.
v0.17 re ¥ . .
. When it made its first appearance
Promenade Concer.s b it received an ousbending
wo ‘live’ broadeasis from the ;,.: » being presented by the
Promenade Concerts at the Royal ojq vic Company with Sir Ralph
Aibert Hall will be given ‘in the pi.nardson and Sir Laurence
coming week and two recordings Olivier in its ranks Only once
aiso at times convenient for lis- before had the Old Vie produced
tening in this area The ‘live a new play by a contemporary
broadcasts will be on Wednesday ouyipor. its usual policy being to
day, August 2nd and 4th, ()40.. “edtablished classics In
at 2.30 p.m. the former featuring Tuesday's radio version Richard
Brahms’ Violin Concerto in D Williams plays the part of Inspec-
with Jean Pougnet as the solo ig¢ Goole and the cast includes
violinist and Mendelssohn's ‘Ital- Angela Baddeley, Gladys Young
ian’ Symphony, and the latter , fe sta










7 an : . an
AJ the Queen, shown here, may la)
































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AGENTS: -Wilkinson & Haynes &
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TAS/AS.8



The Committee and Members
of the EVERTON CLUB

request the pleasure of

your Company
to their
TAIT 14)
ANNUAL DANCE
QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE

Tuesday Night, Ist August,
1950

at
on

Music by Mr, Percy Green's

Orchestra,
Subscription 2/-

——s
SS

SSS













You are invited to
A GRAND DANCE
given by
Messrs. EARL GIBSON and
CLEVE JONES
— on —
Friday Night, August 4, 1950
at
K.G.V.M. PARK, St. Philip
Musie by Mr: Percy Green’s

Orchestra
‘ ADMISSION — 2/-
if

Refreshments on Sale

)) “Y" Boys’ Club are invited

|
Members and Friends of the
to attend

A Farewell Dance

in honour of the Club's
President,

Mr. Harold Brewster
at the Combermere School
on Friday, August 4th, 1950
Musie by Mr. C. B, Browne's

Orchestra

SUBSCRIPTION
Dress Informal
N.B.—The “Y” Boys’ Club is
in no way connecféd to

or associated with the
Y.M.C.A,

3/-

| Variety Entertainment
and Dance

in toe
THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB
(Members Only)

SATURDAY, AUGUST 5,

PROG

Muse y Chase

Miss June Jones

Mr Oswin Hill

Mr. C. Pierrepont
N Maurice

9 P.M.

| Songs by



Violin Sel.

| gera'd
| A Cindereila Danee at M.dnight
A Mask Dance or which Dom-
io Masks will Le distributed

Fitz-



Music by Mr. Arr

Orche

id Meanwell's
ta,





Admission to Ballroom — 2/

Entire Proceeds for Charity.
30.7.50.

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WEST INDIAN
HANDCRAFTS

See rhe
Dominica

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Bridge & Trafalgar Streets |

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1950








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Prices ranging from $11.36 to $12.37 —Cuban Heels.
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BROADWAY mpEENâ„¢ STRODE.



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BIM NUMBER TWELVE 2/= |

SOME HAITIAN PAINTERS : John Harrison |
REPRODUCTIONS OF PAINTINGS
Castéra Bazile, Rigaud Benoit, Wilson Bigoud, René Exumé
Enguerrand Gourgue, Luckner Lazare, Fernard Pierre,
Louverture Poisson _
THREE PRINTS OF BARBADOS 100 YEARS AGO
THE LITERARY MOVEMENT IN THE FRENCH
WEST INDIES: Andre Midas
A REVIEW OF ART EXHIBITIONS IN BARBADOS
AUGUST 1949—APRIL 1950
REPRODUCTIONS OF PAINTINGS
M. Aked, Karl Broodhagen, John Harrison, Helmut Kolle
FARRAGO ;

G.
Pages from a Diary; Geoffrey Drayton
POETRY

W. Therold Barnes and L. E. Brathwaite (Barbados). A. N.

Forde (Grenada), Roland Doreély (Haiti), A. L. Hendriks and

Basil MacFarlane (Jamaica), Daniel Thaly (Martinique),
E. M. Roach (Tobago), Derek Walcott (St. Lucia).

SHORT STORIES

C. M. Hepe and Karl Sealy (Barbados), Edgar Mittelholzer

(British Guiana), Roger Mais (Jamaica), Ernest Carr, Cecil
Gray, Clifford Sealy and Samuel Selvon (Trinidad)

LIGHT VERSE : Hugh Popham
BOOK REVIEWS : G. H. Archibald, J. W. B. Chenery,
fF. A. Collymore, Aubrey Douglas-Smith
FRONTISPIECE Golde White



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Full Text
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PAGE 1

r vi.i si\ ii i \ SI'Ml.W WlVIH "ATK SUNDAY. JllA These* Men Delight Millions ind nut Among I :,.. .1-1 || | DOWI...ai... ... ,.,••I %  %  | n oof I I ... I %  I %  I n a i don't mvoui pro. c e pta tn •' %  i amateur, and most oi ihi i ba I i on new i ie ntins 4fa 01 UM i "Cnribbean Voices W.I. Skewl Start** ICES' on Sun• •f two .t' ihofl gtories there has I dearth of p-i.mr this month U %  ond bj .1.1. K .1 don "f Bril %  . N' .rk* of 4 • it rtic-it.v %  B&m In at 2.30 HI Tuesday will have a i bearing 'An Inspector %  by the ( %  hi vn NH Ralph t O irary Friday August Sod and 4th' %  < %  •> %  %  %  • %  %  • will in i pi %  > : %  -. or Goule and th. Oladj %  Voting ... 1 This version %  %  ball %  'i n.. II us.t'nnrei.s : %  • rm at me Royal |D ba liven in • %  • week -ml two recordings AU %  i %  tenlni In this area The 'Uve' .... .mi. lbs former 'eaturlna *. %  hmi violin Concerto H lib Jean Pougn I v nlimsi and Mer.fli-I^..' i. Symphony, and the latter ... wnUnfl three of I;.. works including Ml 'aUroica Bymplmnv On W.ilneMi.ij It;. 11I1C Symphony Otehaatn conducted h> Sir Malcolm Saw the concert and on Friday it will b* the turn of the London Symphony Cfrenoatra conducted by Baal] Cameron The recorded programmes are on Tuesday at 4 15 p.m. and on Friday at 6 00 p m. the former pi. work by the Australian composer ("live Douglas in keeping poUcj if the Promenade Conearti U preeenl new works 1>. composan al .'ii ages and nationalities. and Strauss's Symph >:. Poet 'Death and Transfiguration' and 'ANOTHER REMARKABLE THING ABOUT WHITt AftTS rromi>in Player-. get in Rrigland an i. Ajm "' i OrART, DAVID SHEPPARD, Petei i iravatH .• (Gloucester), A %  i n u r Milton tor), BOB BERRY and Tj.ftersall (right harm II.II (both Lanes i ami LOWBON I JIT I "I hke the w. IndJei Blayen WOKIil. the bc*l /ng %  %  JEFF STOliiMETER w hill MARSHALL Is also a dehghtfu hat to watch. WEEKES I • TAN'b.Wi: ilrfl) Arthur K. R. Gillfxan ind John Arlotl k> AUlon is speakIns Into the hand-mike while in. crren broad tSkSttBg h"* N *rn In the i.... *..;.-..m.H in the 'twenties, weighs it all UB .. %  ... %  ID d post] Well...lefully and then, at about H3u knjwn Ba the author of thr-.v 0 M I %  •• broadcul poetry and for his popue.slimatc o( the situation U.i B.B-C poetry feature. "Booh used lo say to me during of Vet ***, evei %  ". i known Australian lour of 1W8, beamlot hll particularly vtvid and witall over his face' "I'm nub. iy cricket i For In-..ay, Erie lve navai been stance, who ,f those win, i. u | %  %  "•" > %  || will readily (oriel | On I urlou ;h son of Ernlfl Toahai batting in i anjoyed Arthu: % %  company the Leed'i Test with an old Indv COTT hit the ball hai HI* that furlough, mum* |*>king with her umbrella %  .. th* urt"Sa and John Qoddard U • ,. n t ftotttngnam was] m Even hts (eltow^omgood skipper rneli I ... n along to the chilarenl men) I al that. nlag nattnae at a local ctaiThaj ..f:-n do whoi John is a HI where, m South Indian COBthe mike His crick-'! I ...1: .n.e. i uiked io the ydungstan "How To Watch Cricket", "Oone about missionary work in Uie East, to the TBet Match* 1 apd otiwn are %  %  nd God dard rdn Hamadhtn and Valentine, though I dent expect any of thei Mowed by Arthur on Teat well worth reading H is to b.uieket At Leadi we did rimilarhoped that be win write one on l There Arthur told the etuithe preeenl low of the Waal Ini gwxi Hory against Mrnaelf. diana If it is ns KOO.I Trent Bridge bowl on in the third Teat "We've had a fairly good sum %  mar on the whole, though I rained Ojulte %  lot this last forturban S us-,x came to Leeds to others It wUl aall wea 0 Vorkafa N M reer." he said. Though %  i i ,il i lub-ericketer, Irlend rd mine phoned up th< tin i.-ai. t .i. ,n Arlotl has com.on pavniofl and asked for me The to playlni In Bral BlBM cricket i. twelfth man for Hampshire. No. I'm afraid rOU mn't Which he did "Well, all the best hope to see you in Colombo October 1st (D.V ) "Voura sincerely, Arthur Lhlligan Tlua letter from Arthui looking address. "Fir Tons, Round Ubouls. Pulborough. Sussex dateii ,, (lo|( | „ n „,,.„. July |4. took my mind back to the A Mottingham, on the Bundaj little. g-e,n box from wlvch rrortung In the middle of theTaal Arthur and ins reUow-commenUMatch. Aith to cricket-lovers little, vim low all over the world—tl; green box with the long that opeM hke the windscreen ol a car. which has become n %  familiar a landmark to Eng lah cricket crowds. Commentators What sort of men are th) I i I ii H rrtators, wnoaa voteaa an i ognised wherei i at is played! While on leave two Ceylon, where I am a Methodist niiss.ouaiy. I wa • %  all man] leas to say, I found them what they sound. Q friendly bunch of sports: Hut malm no mwaka about ant wnieh he did S4>vern) times liefnr.* Bh to OllUgan, I|e\ lull gOn the war. lo bat.< Oh. that's all right,' Rex AMon e voice at the other end, Ontheotinvi hanfJ.fetnailBLkul Rex Alston, ton .>f %  Canon r r the Church and ex-l'uhln MI,. i i master In charge of crick it Church al IteoTord School, i.laved tor Bedii w.,., n„e ignt, aftet tordahlre, a minor county n-gu the atrviee, to toe the children larly during the school holiday* %  %  %  i-n.,|,(, i.,llv tlu!..: .v,r.,l %  ..,.".. He llnudied u-i bej rowdlng round Arthur, a* Mptain of his county. To pas Soviet Government wa plying him with question! afaoul the tune On i long tram journey He Test Match, which he ai.v^.u.i home Bitei .. match, in told me a. eagerly as they asked Ihem. how he managed lo get (he job and getting them to autograph which has made his smoothly their hyinnbooks! It wa.s a Sun.i.iv BOWerlng; well modulated voice they wiinl BOOB fimili..r in honn s all over the Popular as t i i i Id I .'. i Me toft ochoei-maaumnc durtng %  lean that when on *he war, _when purt ot the staff i ba dofendad Keith Mrllei Russia Returns To Security Council g) From Pace I WBl pot nto d out that the only *giUmate government in Korea v.'us that of Dr. Khee tin Korean ttepublk set up by the United Nations. Any peace plan they aid, would therefore have to be prefaced by two conditions: 1. Cease-fire and withdrawal of North Korean troops beyond the 38th parallel. 2. Restoration of the Korean Itcpublic's authority in Its own territory Any plan which would ask tot the simultaneous withdrawal of both aggressor and defcndei would In British ond American opinion be not only unu.ili-ti but quite outside the spun o DM charter. Alternatively it was though' that the Soviet Union mght o Tuesday propose "horse-trade' to Council: "let the Communist Chinese delegate enter into United Nations und we will us* OUT influence to obtain peace II Korea". (aneral opinion was. h that the Chine*e CommunUr issue was no longer a burrUDj one for the Soviet Government The other prediction m i I '" ntly heard here was that .he inn in the Security Council '•> block ..ny action by the United Nations 'n ease t new aggression elsewhere This was discounted by II. any experts as improbable. Inasmuch as if the Security Council was blocked by vein. th< Security General rgsney session of the whoh '!' I'.ni' \..,v evacuated *. while the crowd loudly booed ltd '" : "' nines from %  !.'..ppioval. he didn't plcafC all Nothern studio of the ll.H.C . '• his English listeners bv a long "' PftMaded the Outakla BrOadi toto^a life clia i ki heardhlm M M V) r ,^ rs-Ung Director to give him a OM line men enjoy ,. r „ iciscrt „ n „ ,. K r(lll „ W|[(| trial as .-, rickct commentator. :!::;:' ^*:*r:?. !" h !* tsJarsasL"*" Iwh ; 51 .ST!• %  l i V" i vr i, m v '" 1 lu, "V disliked Miller's tactics %  PUbWc. They were recordArthur hod previously told ma "" :I %  """"V match and later in the presence of his lellowApproved H. tlliit, Irke honest workmen tin world over, they are exhausted at the end of their day. Even after being on the air In turn %  i v moment ol tin* six hours play, plus a few minutes %  ii' the n no) free to .•> home until they have made records of then Imprcaslons for ••••" %  pi to stir up listeners al home and overseas several hours earl Then only, at abOul 7 30. they put on their (ark. I back to th.u hotel %  tatOra: "There i-. .. .. i n titular privilege granted to us HMI which even the most widely-read Journalist hasn't not We lire in a position to scotch any controversy than any iireaponslbla papei cati try t. i regard it as part of our job to keep cricket And while I have Ihe ih.nn t., IB ,addlUon lo M work (or the broadcast i rniend m do It" k. \ M I-".;;' S,v "' m "0Miller PetVUBt 1 like Arthur Ouligan, u .. bee,\ lance i Irast to nvtn Hex Alston and John Arlolt. who are on the staff of the B.B.I has lBg ,„.„ ,,. wu% „,„ „. |M to wme hia report tor UM next Stolid havTbeeo. Evan the morntois. edition o bit nawi .,,, ,,,„,!„., .. TU 1Pi paper 'The l, rriegraph ... I; „ „,„, Arthui is very P/oudof hia local pctuUnt' Bui that la noi UV knowl r' ' %  %  -"•'* point What Arthui Bh! to ma vagaries. n.-rAopular guest commentat.i tin year, just as Roger Blunt, who tOUTi l Knglond with the New in 1037, and last | son. Tne year I met th. ...m la ton the guest was Alan McOUvray, rormei captain o4 the '(linking it N ew Booth W.,U State XI in the %  in.. %  I h..'.i aometi %  t;.acoiiBheffleld Bhield, and ... private that omeofBUller^bowli lh ln Ih( yhll4 buglnaas it Ii 1 interesting to nnte that the lirs; rL *" cricket match ever hroadiet wai "' %  'l l ">thai between New Zealand and appeared Essex, from the old Leyton grouiKl. In 1927 The commentator was the famous cruketin padre, (now CaiMO) F H OIUirrgham. Arthur Wri^lry Hoard on the radio oni) I catlongl, discreet I rl hut agwaj m tin green box the coBuncntators, is also Chsrtsred Accountnnt Arthur Wrlglc) the li ii c pcorar. No article on Ihi uwccl would i-complete without meatlori of him He keeps nis colleagues posted with all the 1nd figures relating to scores. Limes taken by b-t.-mei i their inns, bowling analysts, etc.. etc without whim none o; the men we hear wouM be able to give us al' the accurate and consistent dehad his first real '" ll which they do, thanks l< KIDNEY TROUBLE Here a a medicine made ipecie/Jy for it . II you suspect that there'* ''something wrong" with your kidneys it generally means that they need a corrective medicine Neglected kidneys giM riie to vsnou* distressing symptoms such as backache, rbeumaUc pains, lumbago, sciatica, bladder disorders with scalding and burning. The trouble tut rts when the kidneys grow sluggish and fail to perform their natural function ot helping to alter away harmful impurities from the system. You can restore these H vital organs to normal activity by taking De Witt's Pills. They act directly on the k.dneya and you will very quickly feel the good they are doing. Try them (or your trouble. Go to chemist and I 7*-*yy.-* diluted (or UM — goes lurthe' sn. PERMANENT -C.innoi wssh-ou ^. or evtponte Combines with thr ,j, fibrei, .oinifiii the timber an. l W i A'tes naMIIQtHS Co. tld.. llBB, W Kent. e r.ftond. / AGENTS-Wilkinton 0 Hsynes | (?*J Co Bridgetown, Barbados. For permanent protection A TLAS*!, i BW!T^T?*'?.".W1 (j. ^gC7iiftiiiiiUui> For Chic house coats IAMB0KA ANNUAL DAM'E sII.K KN.iIni I \HRIt in Ink i. ll.-llo. Green and While It" wide. Per Yd. Sllto/l-. In Pink Blue PSBSil White. 36" wide Per Yd CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., LTD. .4 13 Broad Street Something loir Will I//#•<•#-/#' • 1.AD1ES PLASTIC RAINCOATS—all sizes fi tt 20 each MERCERIZED PRINTED LINGERIE fl 0c. per Yd. • \i:i'. MUM hi Kmerald Green. Pink. lied. Gald. Lime Green and White W'<\* ullis *>1\MISSION — 2/IterreithinrnU on Sale KIM NUMBER TWELVE 2/SOME HAITIAN PALMERS : John Harrison REPRODUCTIONS OF PAINTINGS Oaeatra Baatta, mti %  %  • Beuoit. wiuon BUoud. Rene Batgajai Ennuerrand Goumue. Lurkner Lasare. Eernard Pierre, Louverture Poluon THREE PRINTS Ol BARBADOS 100 YEARS AGO THE LITERARY MOVEMENT IN THE FRENCH WEST INDIES: A id re Mida* A REVIEW OF ART EXHIBITIONS IN BARBADOS At'GCST 199 APRIL 19SB HI I'llODI (TIONS OF PUVriNGS G. M. Aketl, K.rl Broodtiaicn. John HarrLun. Helmut Kolle F\RR\GO • Pe Irom a Diary: Geoffrey Drayton POETRY W. I!:. i. .LI Barnes and L. E. Bralhwalte (Barbadoa). A N Forde (Grenada!. Roland Dorcelv t Haiti) A L H-ndriks and Ba*ll MacFarlane (Jamaica), Daniel Thaly (Martinique), E. M. Roach iTobaio). in r Waleolt




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/ PACE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATl-RDAV. JULY M. 1S0 CaJtib Qallinq Any More For The Guillotine ? Niven's Pimpernel Film Waits For The Verdict From Goldwyn My %  ar*M (on way *VHAT NEWS of thai verv ElumvPimpernelwhich Powell and bwsjef begun making for the KordP company OVai •• >eir ago" I hoar that the revised version is now ie..dy. and that Sam OoMwrn will be asked to see II onvalelv before he leave* London. Why Goldwyn" Because he VU the CtHl : 'nperrela hold-up has an option on ihe American rights, b u I threat e n e d MM M* I ludi n.# %  oot" VhM he Maw the first camp 1 1 .ITMHI1 After Irani* %  ttjatk tension between Kuril %  and C o I d w n David Nina and Margaret l-ighton were taken back to l h • studios and put to I k aaln for . o n d IhOHfBl Lay Your Own Floor NKW YORK, the daintiest housewlf %  r cake on the muscle-* i/cd Wh i GoldI'lmpernel at PreCon1 ait MR. AND MRS JOHN VVJ two i-hildrcn left for the U.S. via Puerto Rico vesjtardaj %  } IIWIA. rim ..re piclured here on their way to the 'plane 1 EAVINC yesterday morning by B.W.I A. for l-i intratisit to the U.S. were Mi and Mrs. Johnnie Wise and their two rhildfen, Audrey and Ja.kton They are going to live In Mr. W. home state Pennsylvania and they will be staying temporarily with his parents. Come Here Every Year week pulled a wry face snd retorted: "Let's out talk about M il AND MBS. A TAYUM !f'„f '£, !" &a and ihvar young daughu. — an d b>now arrived yesterday by U.W.I A ,„stly — prolion, Trinidad to upend a hohd) ductlon Is due in It.irbados Mrs. Taylor ana foi London then daughter will be here for .showing next (WO months, but Mr. Taylor win month, whatonly U here for one month ever the Gold Johnnie used to be with the They re staying at "Beac'i Amei S Army during the war and Houta* St Lawrence, and U stationed lor n time at Sea'o BaroadOi every year Airport hare, and his wife holiday. Mr. Taylor can lap of laying n new floor. Just introduced on the market i kit which, the makers cay, Ke floor tile laying easy. It ronU.:is the necesaary equipment an awl. a spreader for Up) %  iheslve. und cord and chalk with which to mark guiding lines Tn-s should I* laid close together always working from the centre of the room out to the walls. %  pel ttta should be lowered carehilly into the adhesive which his been left to dry until it become* sticky so it will not ooze up. When half the floor Is completed. adhcatva maybe applied on the OtAM side and Ihe same process followed. After a few dav-. the tl.i. must be washed with warm Is rinsed with clear water ..xed. Ad that, say the u -' in.' rome with the kit. is all thetj I It —IN S Suck Gum Nol Thumb BIRMINGHAM. Eng All children should chew gum ,iut only after meals and with tn closed. This advice was given by English dentist A. Wulpoie-Day at the British Dental Associations annual meeting at Birmingham He *aid. "It exert iscs the jaws and pe%  %  .,,.' %  ..• i that result, from under-development Tinlientist cited three cause* of irregular teeth! Thumb sucKing. swallowing with the tongu* letween the teeth In the a baby, and breathing through the mouth •if sucking cannol be cured, •aid Walpole-Day. "it is better that the child should have a iiher than a thumb" —INS HOUSEWIVES GUIDE Price-, in the iPcaJ market for apples and n when the Atlvi>-~a>< yesterday sfssn Tasmania Apples. 40 cents per pound Mangoes 3. 4 and 6 centa each. Rupert and the Back-room Boy-8 B.B.I. Radin Pr.rj.aaar rtwDAV rj pa Ami... Ill %  fcia, M-Clhr•en ai m. Th*niw or*an. > a> • %  Pram Ova Third Program"* S am rrom in. Miion..:. tT>-~ e^rxSr I IB B. Wi Indu-. %  Ji %  MlHUr ,4, |4i i m Cto- nown. I 3 Vo.kU.irs. II noon Th* N>. H.M a Newt AnslrHn. H IS P > %  *** .land v. B.i-uh Islss; II p an Jr.* BaliSbur>'. I* 4S P %  %  %  The two stilt psit si *h uWr siivePturt. tsedbrs aa dtodt I MSI ifitmoon. As I ss> horns ht it.pt prstkir pl.m gee*in| U It.. ..1 .1 si "Good s'soou* %  i.r:ioM under i sprawling h* |ps. Anjons would think n Tiid *pptr^l then all of s suddtn." Ai h* BtatM mhf gcti mow and more puiilrd. "I'M nrxtr ttn a pljn: .ikt lhai briot.,*' he ihinks. "Vl %  lull aMl. wKik all ihe ireta atbar.. adkwk ihe Icavciatr like iai UM P I P m in. Newi .V ,11... I 10 p in ijaarsi The I i I atarUgM lew, 4 Dalit —. Camp FJre fw Onl * : I, m The New i Inlcitud' |U II p in John O'Oraala lo Und'a End. IS *i p in Orchertrsl Recotdi. II i> •" The Uti Hwjui • I Urfe" N-w UniTHE FIRST ASiM'O COLOR PICTURE TO COME TO BARBADOSI Mil VI H S'LI'W CIXRMA IManSw. Onl/) .1 MINI I niDll .ii %  r M TONH.HT IO TIE9IIAV MlillT at Ml 1 M'K OaBaOH — JAMS PAIGE — IH)N 1HFORE ud IHIRIn 1)4* IIOMANd ON THE IIKiH SEAS' in Tcchnirolur A Warner Bros. Pasture SPKMI. MATINEE: THIS MORMNli at 9.30 o'clock IIMMV WAKIIIV — m B TAYLOR CHRISTINE LARSONPARTNERS OF THE SUNSET A Monoaram Picture In I have the former Audrey I-ashlev Barbadian. A keen radio enthusiast, he operatad a "Ham" Station undci the rail sign of VPOSJ, and he wag b known aa -Sionewall Jarkson," by his radio trlenda J Qulat and unassuming, John an I his family will be greatly nalgp I by their wide circle of friends. I "Tuchen Week" nd Co., In Port-of verdict about rolM in the tllm version, il It %  not yet een a *-iade but not the same two. tbieaa Powell and Pteuburger 1 h.. atorv la lieing changed round (The Garden) ST. JAMES ... %  Mare /.."..II seoii. Darolkr MSIBSH FLAXY MARTEN KIM. ill lll 1 \RMVAL II Htki *ri irrrs %  INIVAI." a -HAaE -l I H ll II inent Kven against Sam himself Why MARGARET IV. IdlrV LZIGHTON inusl furooflcii her Lddu |g in IfM Pimpernel has donr L IIEH I l!..llM.|l M R 11. R1SELEY TUCKER British Council representutive in Barbados, left >tsUid.i> I.. A B.W.I.A for Antigua. From i there he will be goliiK to Tofflola rvlurnad via St. Thomas. In Tortola he aftemooo will give a aeries of live l.vtur* (...im-d b> at their "Teachers" Week BtaPJflaM Mil. 1.1 Huggl SpalU To Study Engineerinfi L EAVING norili for Hie I r. is Mr. Herbert Cjrannum. soi I : MI and Mrs. Widum II J .1.1111111:1. ol "Ashton', Uardei I ipp, Wnilhilig. 1 in 1 tri 1 is going to Scotland to I ud>' eiigineexlng at Miul<< jlson. an Engineering Company bornY returns from the Broadway 1 i.iomrse is expected to last for torn pany to take up her original live years. ro i. Returned With Grnndaon Why * -*" %  Laafbto" Bl %  1 BMI pi .. idhered ruga lap %  ,. TI of the LonsIf thai tiir.e'...l It Is she would have a ttM ill"• GLOBE %  carl., Blakrney /""' • since. At the beginning of Jul> MM 1 leaves the cast of The C arrange ihe protlurtii.n. is due back In -day I hear there has Iss^earfllOl In'twcen the author and the American manage. 11 how The Way Things JOHN FORDS NfW AND FINEST PICTURE OF THE FIGHTING CAVALRV! her film contract Alexander Korda Ha.* ny pressing new I To Join Husband nj vo months' holiday In V,. c, 8, Mrs. Ethel Hay Korda i Trinidad yesterday ror Mt wr grandson' Stephen "It was arranged at the start of wVTiaa im him UP3 *f %  *" •**•' here for about ItatM for a limited, season. %  Tnay were staying v Mr and Mrs. Charlie Raj HS. HAZEL DOWNEY W hile Hull Flats. Hastings. For Trinidad Vitif left say the film company. "You never fa might suddenly nnd a role for If an actress of Margarrt Lasghton*! calibre steps out of M 1 ; weeks, it seems pliiiining curried to • Hrklie'a HaM I.M.U M daughters Put and Wendy .yesterday by B.W.I.A. ._ Puerto Rico inlransit for the I'* ilaughler of Mr nnd Mi U.S.A. She will Join her husband Thomas Fitzgerald of "Raffet-n there, who left Barbados about Harrison, left for Trinidad M oiuvear ago. Thursd;i> gilafnooa by n.WI.A. , „ PatiltM has gone for a holiday. Q^ysiS JOHNS, another f>Arrived Yeaterday | >u t may stay on for an indefinite ra(l Korda contract star, ntersu period. She will be staying with jr,,.,, jrayc 1" screen soon. A RRIVING from Trinidad yeshrr brother Pat and his family in Lonsdalc's The Way Things Go, lerdav morning by B.W.I.A g t Ann's. Port-of-Spain in which she Is aPPaarlni were Mr. and Mrs. Errol Uailev ..ti towards the end of Jul They were intransit from AruU. rnotographa lool itaa surprisingly short run of llv where Mr. Bailey is with ll.e rpllK Anlmua Art Group which months. Industrial Relations Department I | s holding an Exhibition -t Miss Johns s.neat film )'">"';•> of the Logo Oil Company. h( and of August is not only be in an ..dap ution *' J -" %  u • aeeeptlng DsJnttngi and drawings Bridies A Sleeping t wgwu. u i^SALS^V&^SRm, but also wWAn^dcO^ CROSSWORD %  z—, ;i in 1 1 %  SSB J 1 "i n Extra: LEON ERROL In "BACKSTAGE FOLLIES' British and American Newareel. LOCAL TALENT Al'DlTTON 9.30 i in To-morrow Mr. Bailey used to St. Mary's Boys' School before he went to Aruba and was ufec for a short Umo a member of ttu •Advocate' staff. He has been li Aruba for two and a half years Henfor two or three week* they are staying with his mothei in St. Matthias Gap. irni* Atrn t_ 10 Blatiopric 1*1 i r. oi Atlmii an ostii. (l M uo petrol. HI i an lunsn Hi I an %  .. Ita ,| . .,-r, II. II. L .. I OS II. .%  a \ great 11 Hi'r a tnir (HECK THESE VALUES! %  Mlllt %  IllOtllilllllll llllll 4||| ||. (.. i lOgrM ID •I .. hoping lo make It would be In. M IggliK. who live, at 40 llnl Bridle play to b •creenerU. %  was Street in St John., under the morejr.een-llke till" AoUlUA I. organlMng this part ol ol fU-.h and J""" 1 _,,„., „, Ih,3m ..".I >!.'• write., welromIn Ihe la.l WeM End revival ol in. Ba.hadu.n ..holographer. lo A Sleeping Clergyman. Margarr .end their exhihlu lo her lor exhiLelghton plgyed ... .... Glynl. John, will also act two BY THE WA\-By Beachcomber I T IS coming to something but i am not Mir.t" wfipt when %  crow's clothen are stolen. The thclt is nniarkable. because scarecrows ure so badly dressed today. There was a time whafl the big landed gentry used to send for someone from their own tailoring firm to BaPaa l a ff Ihe scarecrows on the estate for a couple of suits. That, of .curse, explains the odd DWlucI of the dipi peer who. on held a 1' %  lion with lha home farm. Thv Thnrofiri/i flu/e npHE tnse win held > 1 day owing • a common < %  • wtian Mr Tlnkli become* exi Iti H %  Ibow again got wedged In hal mouth strange us that may sound, "it Is i OOnatltuUonal wtalOaaai, m'lud," why do we assume that Auu-.iit.-d Mr. Honevweuther cans only come lo England u ..,shrewdly "Hemarklead the life they are accustonud .,,,!,. said CoeklacarroL leaning to lead In America"' I kwolhr (OTward and watching Mr. Snapanswer to the man who asked loi driver's efforts to dislodge the %  cup of tea and a Uppar ;.t UH intruding elbow Mr Gooseboote. I'uvilhon d Armenonviiie in truin BO iUanint to (and u helping Bols de Boulogne apt his elbow interlock.-! %  coUaagua'a, and the two like Japanese B'**rrrf*a magmilr mi ensft of A N AJnericon ihr bidsMi lareaaai. J* covered that lh. ntiHt has dateonUi round nf ,i pflpphODa bell kills mice, just as the eonUnuoui sound of a muffin bell killdog and the continuous smi ,.i of %  tm-tmi .hutch bell makes elephants very ill. As a DMtlan gad the judge sarcasti %  ta 1 Galii" %  %  me kniiw /*/ /mining 1 0 \: in it that 1 s^-it rUtPi ltd LtaP dn Amerl* poet wrote: \>i\ ineanvenlanet reteaeap n-inkles mparatlvaly house tppant i 1 wa an p/UI aol mra an old hone • i hum bOCPUM U'uli ii" breath tn his hodi, ivi dn i: Btd Said lh pale tutor onl) one lastOuislditM nlocc-/art0'|* badrOORH But WOt much. fro.. lIKitirs A IVEW MM... MISSOI.IMS MBHOWa INS—IMS MAXIM ituiKis • UNSEQUraSO I.OVK" TKITII HILL OUT — kj Ch.rlille llnldane %  FK()>I tSflU TO lOMMONHKALTII•I'RINCII'I.HS OS BRITISH 1MPF.R1AI. GOVERNMKNT" %  BaVM) SABRF.f R"—by Wren "IN FACE OF FEAR"—by Michael Scot &f ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE .',-,'-'.*,',',',',',',-,-,-,',',*.-.V*.','.'*'-^'. '.*.-.*.',•. '.',',',',',^,','SS. WMHV.M-, -W,v.','.'.',',v,. al'I'MI'S In While. Brown. Blark. Blue 55c.. V, IMS |1 H 0BALLKKINAS in Red. Slira 3—8 $1 45 a LADIES' CANVAS RUBBER SHOES liJ 0 LADIES' CANVAS CASCALS In While. Rrd. Blue ... 2.95 a LEATHER SANDALS WITH K I mil K SULES ChUdren'a tl 0: $1 .10; Ladle, JJ J5 : M „; j 15 a LADIES' CREPE SOLED SHOES I J.5 lo :. ... a) MEN'S "1.1. his., SHOES—Brown or Black >l SO 5 j a MEN'S SOCKS Je„ 4J,., 50,. j k fc ^CHILDREN'S and LADIES' ANKLETS 32c, Sfic., Se., 4c. 41c. a-IU>l I'OLISIIES, SHOE BRl'SHES. Sl'EDE CLEANERS WORLD. I To be as lovely as A Star of Beauty follow the advice of the charming star Maria Montez, who says— I always use Lux Toilot Soap— it's a real beauty care. 1 cover my face Rcneromly with la rich, super-creamy lather, working it in gently, but thoroughly. Then I rinse with warm water, splash with cold. With Lux Toilet Soap lather, skin takes on new loveliIt feels like smoothing beauty In!" TOILET SOAP IN STARS



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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, JULY M, 1S0 HF0RY E o o BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY r Mooon > NtCvV A—O^ BLONDIF. BY CHIC YOUNG D*GV*OCO-tXJNT ( WQCK ON THAT I W*DlO WHILE Tut PLUG IS [ CONNCCTED ^STCP IT, cuor1 e MI mm, %  ..%  % %  i CM) r %  H ,. •. %  ^1 <> -I 1 '* •an THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER H B %  A.V'iOA TFtmimwiriaiirTZ THE RIDDLE OF THE ROME REBELS BRINGING UP FATHER JI-, CgjLP (3GT -•..,.=g. J >&24 GCCOO-W**AT -.-'. f T.,:SsSJfr* RJT "VC F*Jth*GB|jp ^5 v\0cl7v -A*, TV*F RAT* J T-47 -OjftG _.. >Mp nUM OUT" BY GEORGE MC.MANUS Rio KIRBY |w<*MtfXat W NO*>*L* ']^ r on Cfin_ -.5... Tftx AM ASAi DO VOUREA.LY LOvi MM a r-v-sBY ALEX RAYMOND I VSA*: jc CHTiU %  :, j -SPaNS* < %  I M AWT <*3fc r HF PHANTOM UHMMMO* ;— ,c* v y. I EVEN IN THIS BACKROOM W0** HEA8D ABOUT YDue.HI6H ~~ POWERED HOUnM* PUBUCNV STUNTS NOW.MR NAPOUON,(SCOlONEl. VOUADMITTHS > BUT DIDN'T KIDNAPPERS WERE {HAVEANVTUINSl suitesvwi UIBEM IODCWITM.AMI BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES rMDOWDU LIKE THAT'.'IWOOf THE HIGHEST PRICSD STABS IN f KOIIVW00DADE KIDNAPPED" ; AMP NOBODV a ^K — ^"^ BEIIEVE ;' jj]9h iwiLtow/ I Christian Sfienre Specially designed for Barbados, this Black Patent Oxford is now on show in leading stores. See them for yourself. > \ \ I HWkHi Kaf to | UM< i.. MAIV fil IT W %  i %  *. r4. borrow .i. Viailora Are*Welcomc J End Rheumatism While You Sleep heading Room I'mm i') am.—2 p.m TuMuaya, WeUneni-TB Frldaji to a.m.—12 o'clock' Sniur uiyt > % %  a>Mn ia> Klkl* ami i* r-hittiui. s true* iMl-boo. ..-.. vd H'.oh warn mi U M r W w k) >4II BALCI j ixi. borrow a •oath*. uu an4 (n • *M, .. -inn. iik* MH aoi !" - HIU a ,-..'. !< iMi >rM*n MMT. OuMkli • %  • %  '>'" %  <" <^aim • hareatul ar aMfmi Jrui i'aa • arki in %  "Bja lo too raaf liouktai i main lillina lha K'oi* whlcli ai allacaint •oai Kidn harmkii m I Orli naof haklth-AaWrkjlat. Oadlr |lao"oua arida ailh -hUh TOar ayMaan Ma I-<*IM iuralfd I Hlr>nfIiiam and l*lBilf>ai*a iin I H"v> •n(*tl< I roan Ida tk*W*a ol dtaaaaa-ktlaia an in* cVlKal* llliri oitaniian. ana Mlmntalaa Ih* a Mpatl. aM. t Uaaa / A.M aa /or (••," ' auaaVri • %  ttai HuilM i(" I %  Hi InaCiIlkil It Ihtf '''( %  -.uia" aldl r ..-i tfauv a G.a-a-lts. I P-Ycai I ^ m or MOMT •*I cnarplHal'. Cystex;r. /•:. IF YOl WANT TO GET AHEAD GET A Tf A i ~%^ •D Dl K • |MMI.. MMI IIMIOMATISM R QUALITY PAINTS S P^USSON SON ECOITD-BMMDOS MoRf goods in ... AlOflE promts ouc of this modern /Vlorris Commercial iWtfp) p.rt-.hty M,rntrinB fritm taiKti of ..* itrab Wh) not U] tTjiuuir 0> No c>* ttr.in no-I laid io Jtir IIIM lnvr "Ihanh'loyOu siil Opt ret 1 RM i ntcr h tthoin it afim PROTECT YOUR EYES **%* >i^P*< Optrex %  EYE LOTION %  %  rHii rfir i TWnm ofrhrrvf nd hMa lininfl thoaU he hrilrh. i-r^ lOlour ti ihr> are rrd <>i irrw (aaakl 01 ihe h>Ra MOOJIIMH VOUI *v*l nwd tTaa W W U f Wl rtM priVJuC-KTl in thlk MiWTM-t*OQilTICTClaI 10 CWI. akatMaal A ilu* .Hiicoanc of careful tevarch irtoUip reJ -JpaKllV MO CUbiC fe. i .jl>fit:.-uunh hiding d.r. h >ic>.'ning rnr U4ur< and low )• lam nmc on .ollcction i I.MA.TV l-i>rirddrT.inr. %  nunrmivt lime on cvrrt I rft or rent h. %  %  wif pttclti . rilkanS MORRIS-CHNMERCIAi FORT ROYAL i. AIIAI.i: LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Distributor! Phone 4504



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PAC.I. MtlllT SINDAV AI1MM \ n M Ml 11 .11 I V 111 I'.. MRa^j0_ADVOrE rr.-l.d It II.' Ad.... I BrKftUBB Sntuliix. July :l. Ifljn ftWIS WIM Ol VTilY PI.A.VM.M; FOR some months past repairs have been in progr— to a building at the corner of Swan and Lucag Streets Tlurepairs which an* brinn tarried oul will leave the street the same width or very little wider. In the meantime that part of LUCM Street is a dancer to motorist and pedestrian alike. Ol :.'. ortanct however, than that particular building is the tendency of which it |g H rtyiking an example. Tin* streets ol BarfaadOf arc n narrow that the motorist who is so much hurried by regulations can haVe this consolation, that he must be one of the best in the world for were this not so. the condition of the Barbadian roads inim; what they are. there could be nothing else than massacre upon the highway The tendency is t. perpetuate a state ol affairs which may have suited the days when horse and buggies were the order of the day but which art* not good enough when larger and larger automobiles are appearing on the roads, it is imperative that active and vigorous steps be taken to widen the streets of the island und in particular the streets of Bridgetown. When repairs or reconditioning of buildings are being carried out the Government should insist' that such buildings should be taken back so as to widen the road at that point. Compensation could be paid for that part taken over by the Government for the street but it would be an expenditure in the interest of the island. Not only in respect of streets and Bridgetown is the need for Governmental supervision necessary. The beauty of this island is one of the greatest heritages of its people and efforts directed at preserving its beauty will have a great object in view. At present many houses erected in the island are lacking in architectural design and In some the construction does not make allowance for preserving the natural beauty of the surroundings. The space between houses is not enough, thus giving an impression of an overcrowded tenantry rather than the atmosphere of quiet ease which is so necessary, particularly in the Tropics. It is true that the price of land in Barbados at present is so high that the middle class person trying to build a house is forced into buying only enough to hold a house, but it would be better to have a house which is less pretentious and have some ground in which children could play in safety. The example of those who have built at Top Rock should be followed. There a spot is set aside as a playground in which children can have fun without fear of being run over by passing vehiclesAlong the coast of the island houses have been going up so quickly that at present it is difficult to drive from Bridgetown to Oistin's and catch a glimpse of the sea. Now that process is being extended along the coast road to Silver Sands and houses are being built along the Sea Rocks. The beauty of that lovely stretch of road will soon be ruined unless further building can be stopped on the sea side of the road. This paper has often warned against the unnecessary encroachment of Government but in some fields it is necessary that there be some supervision in the interests of the island. A Town and Country Planning Bill should be introduced into the Legislature which would give to Government the right to supervise the erection of any new buildings in the island. The powers at present held by Government are quite inadequate for modern needs. Government has not set a good example by abolishing the post of Architect and Town Planning Officer A correspondent has pointed out in these columns that this now leaves the Government without a qualified adviser on the erection of new Public World Government must wake up to its responsibilities. The passing of political addresses may be a pleasant pastime but they do nothing to enhance the prosperity of the island nor to ensure that the longterm interests of the island are safe-guarded. Only an Act along the lines of the one which failed to become law would begin to give the necessary' supervision and direction to the development of the island. Onlythen will the people know that the beauty of their island home will not be squandered and sullied with imp Ifceea IN the correspondence columns of this newspaper during the week, attention was focused on the destruction of trees and he il! effects which this practice must have on life in this island. There is little exbe offered but the real reason is that the average person fails to realise the overall importance of trees, and this lack of appreciation has led to a vandalism which is regrettable. The popular idea is that trees are planted to provide shade for men and animals when th> (ring, and cooking fuel When the) are felled. There are far greatfoj trees planted methodically. They beautify the surroundings especially when they are of the flowering type, they prevent erosion when planted on the hillsides, they also prevent landslides by causing water to percolate more easily after heavy rains, they provide shade In places where it is necessary and finally they attract the ram so necessary in a country de l>cndent upon agriculture. In some parts of the world trees are protected by legislation and the removal of one tree demands the planting of three, aIn Ireland, or generally two. This precaution is taken because it is felt that one may die and the other, having survived will replace that which had been removed. This is not the case in Barbados. The Legislature recently passed a bill which will allow the payment of six cents to every person planting certain trees on their lands but there is no penalty attached to the destruction of trees o( any kind at the whim or caprice of people who are not particularly concerned with their value. There are people in this island qualilied to speak on the subject and the matter is of Hitnotant importance that some individual or society or civic body should undertake. by means of literature or lectures or both to enlighten the general public on the necessity for protecting trees and to acquaint them with the grave dangers which can follow the indiscriminate destruction of trees. Any such action would be welcome public service. It must be admitted that the practice in this island became prevalent in recent years because of two reasons; first the increased value of furniture made from mahogany and secondly because of the serious shortage of firewood. The prevalence of ground provisions as a popular article of diet demanded a greater amount of cooking fuel than would otherwise have been the case; but if trees suitable for cooking fuel are removed methodically, then it would be easy to protect ourselves by the planting of two trees whenever one is felled. It is the indiscriminate destruction of trees, even fruit bearing trees which needs prompt attention. Apple* HI' HAVE Jl'ST Rrri:ivui Koine .Siua* Party— 1 Got Soaked! BRUKJE OF onCHV. Ars>!I, T HIS week 1 have added lo mi snpeneneei of foreign travel by penetrating far Into the BcatUsh HighUnd*. It IK ; %  N If) all sides arc tin ret the bairn*, ileni and betas, and • %  • M %  "IIM.,. en* thi stoeh and barrel Ilnl The I'urp'isc of mv jmirne-. I Is KYX held desire to stalk a stag. Hove you ever stalked sta**.' It inord i holograph them My purpose was to get on and Interview it. Igfl in Scotland live In deer foresti Uniallj then Ires in sight iit it Li itlll railed fore.st Paris %  *!. mil. i N S TAGS, as you may have guessed Wen the original inv> the stag party And you don't wonder rsellj when you think th.it 'luring the rutting season in tin autumn one stag may have BS many as 70 wives hanging round him. It's enough to drive any husband lo a stag, party, and it tin end of the gtBOOO he's M fed Up he goes "(T with the hoys and deesnl corns home tin the following year. The wives, or hinds, dot to rnlnri being left with the frhllIren They collet-1 iQOJSthSJ %  irge parlu Im .. good old ten months' gossip. Actually, this is the wrong time of year to stalk stags Thru hon are Mill covered with velvet, -> the sportsmen don't shoot them till Augusl or September Bui the Mac Wick si red. Ol BSfl Hampstead, NU'i known to catch trout with a worm, wasn't worried by a thing like thai, the cad And. anyway, there is no law against Interviewing a stag. The way to stalk %  stag Is tint to pick one oul on ihe mountain iu i II. •..i \ i. ksi* a Has Fun 1mding Out How To Do A Bit Of Sulking Ing u uas then walk for i n| dlrecWllh a teles. i i %  lion. This is so that you can gel Into a position from winch lo approach DOttl being seen or scented It* immtiy The welcome arrival of Tasmanian apples in Barbados this week coincided with the arrival at this newspaper of a clipping from the Daily Telegraph of London. The clipping is in the form of a letter and is headed Canadian Apples. It quotes thi imports of apples into Britain for the past four months of this year. The figures show that £2,555.710 of apples were imported from all countries in that period and £1.477.960 from Canada. The writer of the letter I Mr. Hugh ((uilley of Romsey is very perturbed. The average price per ton of Canadian apples he claims was £45 and in April £58an exceedingly profitable transaction, when one considers that the control puce for the new English crop will be £42. And he asks "must the British home producer be put out of business and the British consumer exploited to the limit? Quality for quality, cost for cost, price for price, the British producer can meet all fair competition. Ltt the Canadian Government stop its subsidies and the British Minister of Food free the British market and the real position will be clear." How far does this apparently domestic issue in the United Kingdom affect Ihe buyer like a Red Indian; inking advantage ol every hollow, rock and clump ol heather In ihe process %  .: ii,ak at lo ihe skin and covered in peaty mud Vet people pay enormous sums 10 undergo the experlre lbs war they rackOSt about £25 lo shoot I some people bagged %  ROODIt probably .i In! mine now, but no one i work it out. Once n is shot a stag Is worth around KB. It weighs about 160 lb dressed and the meal fetches lid a lb officially and Is. 3d. In market By tradition all the inside* of •long lo the professional BtalkSf WHO accompanies Uie I'M.-, .tic called huinbtea, hei M humble pie II la i a as H BLPSD by a professional ... i I got near lo a stag sitting under a rock. Two young rs keeping watch for him. rather like fags al a public school The lags announced us by startlog to run. and the old slag was about to rise when I said. "Don't got up. sir. I've only come to ntertiew you." When 1 was in Cyprus recently i \v;is taken to task by a local newspaper for writing abou. monks instead of politics No wishing lo make the same mis lake in Scotland. I asked the sla what he thought about Horn. Rule for Scottish deer. %  Id he didna ken nun I about that, bul he'd heard ther were some very good Jol foi deer In English parks English park deer are bigger have better antlers, and liv longer than the deer in the Scot tish so-called forests. Before the war. he Hid, Uu keepers in Scotland used to K>V< them malxe to eat in the wintei and that improved their antler* but now they got nothing Growing a new set of antler every year was a great strain n -i fellow in these days of austerity .We Eat Them' S TAGS lose their antlers bi April and I asked him if thi.. ti-k a weight from their mind On the contrary, he said, It was most disconcerting. You'd be lumping over a roch or something and suddenly bant, would go one of your antlers lik. a Jockey coming off a horse You'd Jerk up your head lo Ml what had happened, and of would come the other What did they do with th antlm when they'd cast them' Well, he said, we usually eel them There's a lot of calcium n lhem. you know, and we nee that to grow a new set Smart Slag W E stalked and talked for little longer, and then tlu slug said he must be awn' thi noo, but if I heard of any vacancies al Richmond Park or Windsor would I let him know? And so with his two fags in attendance he bounced off dowi. the mountain for a drink with the boys at the bum. —L.E.S. Hi III \ II in lie %  • Twelve 1 AM MOKE impressed with the quantity in this twelfth number of Dim than the quality. There seems to be a general urge in the Caribbean to put iwn to paper. The result, "when ll Is good It Is very good bul when it Is bad it Is horrid". Some contributors seem to forget that writing is a means of communication. You have an emotion, a theory, an MpsrienOB, g Joke, whirh you would like lo share with other people Hut there is no need to Inform thggfl in addition how clover rou ari and those who like ferreting oul obscurities arc more lik.-h i turn lo the crossword puzzle ihan to a literary periodical In other words some of these contributions strike me as Intolerably self( ullSCI.iU'. This seems to me to be especially true ol toe MISC. set. for the most part in the moulds which were fashionable with the AvantGardc in England and the USA twenty years ago. Since Iks war English speaking poets hnve moved towards greater clarity and simplicity. Slight though they are. the French verses of Roland Dorrelv seem lo mc to have caught the •sen l moro %  ureta than the ; i %  % %  %  ontrihutionv In English Always excepting Derek Walrolt Here i ;i true i.rt with something to s.i> which can onh be said in verse, in othn words Wj S. I unlifle Owen Author r The Phoenix and the Dove. Dolphin Town etc.. I innpottle theme sod always expi m terms of true poetry. Whereai Hugh I'ophams Ballad o/ Full tsotto (which fulfils none of the conditions of a ballad) might just as well have been spoken into the telephone to Goddard's or Colonnade who would have delivered Ihe order the next morning (except the pessaries') I %  illy, visually, il looks like poetry, but is in fact lillle more than highbrow exercise In cata l ogui n g, with %  Uttta vulgarity thrown in lo "epclrr le bouryrois'". illy ipesJdng. manner i III these poems. Their authors have not really got enough to say. The prose, on Iho other hand, sutlers from the opposite defect. plenty to say but uncertainty as lo how lo say It Farritfo by Geoffrey Druytnn, cast in a different form and worked up might have been Interesting. As it is. this is nut literature but the raw materlal (rom which literature is made. Only the eery greatest artists like Rousseau, or unconscious geniuses like Pepys, can afford to admit then leaden to thenwork%  no) lo let Uwn peat the showroom where Ihe finished .iiiu le is displayed. Edg.ir Miltelholzers contribution Is delightful, the work of an •itcompllshed artist who uses his ir-1like an experienced craftsman. Karl Sealy has the born writer's gift of revealing character in a few lines. Samuel Selvon has a pleasant way with him. I would like lo congratulate Ihe printers on the admirable reproducUons of Haitian pamlero and John Harrison"s article on tlu subject is excellent. It is n pit. that Ciolde White's gossipers has been printed upside down, (or bound in upside down In my copy). There are certain artisl* whose work is greatly improved by this treatment, but hers has earned the right to stand on Us own feel not on its head! I nnish with a plea. I notice that no less than three of Uu stories are concerned with the colour question. Cannot wc Id this old war-horse lie down god rest for awhile? Cannot the fraternity of writers, whose outlook should transcend class, colour and creed, forget this wretched subject which poisons social Intercourse in the West Indies? Cannot people write about tin %  human beings without continually worrying over the colour of thou skins? The human heart Is the ultimate theme of all worth whilr Bad immortal literature and it t< Hie same everywhere. Ol H III AIM IIS V\Y: Crickelem and Suruluv To tke Edstor, the Advocate SIH,—At Manchester, in June. in cogatoottan with ihe first Test Match, on Sunday June 11th lo be exact, the evening service in Ihe big Methodist Church-Hall, rnllci the Albert Hall, was utilise*! to join in the welcome of ihe West Indies Cricket Team, and link them up with DtVUM %  i The minister in charge, the Rev. W QowigBdL eondii'-te.i I vice, and olhers who took part were the Rev. Palmer-Barne-. assistant to Mr. Kidney the manager of the trip, the Rev I GrtfUn. superintendent of the James St. Circuit, Barbados, who is on short furlough, Mr. K. W. Crowe of the Brinsh Olympic Team and Secretary of the M chesler Athletic Association, and Mr llert Whally. coach of the Manchester United Football Club, who Is also a Methodist Lay Preacher. Some seven members of ihe team were expected to attend but Anally only two. Messrs Goddurd and Rae. turned up Then' was widespread interest in 0 and a great crowd of 1801 1 filled Ihe hall. The preaching part of the peri>v Mr Whatli-y and the Revd. Palmer-R<: former taking for his text st i ihortatMn In i Corinthians, 16, 13: 'Watch ye. stand fast in the faith, quit you like men, be strong." and the latter the com| ..no of Hod to Moses. -Whereforr cricft thou unto me! Speak unto the children of l-rael. lhal they go forward I Ii ii,the item from my church .. M'lhixlist Recorder. recently to hand, which also reproduced on ihe same page inc photo of the learn which appeared in the local papers at the beginning of the Tour. NOW is nol that something natty better for all concerned than playing part of the match on layl Better for the men to have the Sunday for rest and for everybody the opportunity for worship and due respect for Almighty God. r. G. ftgejaegf Policeman To tke Fdifor. the Adt-ocare SIR.—After m of absence 1 am indeed delighted with the progress my island home .in it* trend towards ..urn. Good structures. etc rial, too numerous to mention in my nocturnal -.truck bv the reeeal building erected by Plantation's Limited which is Indeed credit lo local craftmanship, hut %  greater surprise laid in store foi me as I joumied towards Harmony Hall district As I saw the new Globe Theatre 1 was Is very much with this palace. nnour LAMPS. LANTERNS, iTOTJEfl askd IBONfl U SM bring than io t A Shipment of SNOWCEM Uhil... 1 rrjin. Fink. Yrllnw. juil l.njiiiil. WILKINSON x BATNBS CO. I Tit Itanium to C.S. PITCHER & CO, LTD. 'Flumes : (SH7. 4*7;. IIM KVWIll SIOKFS AUSTHAI.IAN SF.V1I '. tLADI PEACH JAM APRICOT JAM DANISH CHICKEN BROTH (SSI DANISH CHICKEN BROTH MAYPOLE LEMON CURD JACOBS CM Ul Cl RltS CHEESE CRISPS ft ""''If BPCSSEI. SPROUTS ... HJEINZ MAN< >> ( HUTNEY K W V SAUTERNE KWV SKERRY DRY M SWI K W V PAARL TAWNY PORT KWV SWEET VEHMOCTII .!/# e* fjiBitr fii t "j*J. j.sr/ *V.W rut: /. F.AVOVHMTK i %  lb. tins .44 47 .48 He .40 .. .. 1 II .. hot. .48 -.i I V.\ ..;*. .M tin .49 99 3 10 .. .. COCKADE FINE RUM 5? perbot$l.l6 per gal $4.08 STAIN SFi;i.l SCOTT A CO.. mi. GREET THE COMING HOI DAYS m COMFORT SELECT SUMMER SUITS made to measure from the following American Mercerised Poplin . IMJM EmlUh MereeiWd IN.pl m . . tai.1| Faaagga "iion Suiiinc tttJt Pure Linen $31.50 All Wool Trees* Rig from Stl 50 II. I OS I V A to.. Lid. DR GOODS DEPT Ft 9 /* Never too late lo Celeb rule GODDARD'S ' %  < RUM



PAGE 1

PAGE ftll'RTEEN SUNDAI \ll\Ot Ml SUNDAY, JL1.Y M. l.5u CLASSIFIED ADS. HARBOUR LOG k ?e, I %ilOK MIT A Tee T.. ururnn... Met (unrnl "ill leave he" UM residence OrcenArld.. St l.chaJ .%  n (or the OrUlo.1 • Rad. and thanre tu the We-ibus C-inrterj |-"end. ... ae-i M -' %  M1M IN MEMORIAM Ma* C* inn* you I ^, I ', M ,V %  uered I.' RITA. IWA. HAB*..H.D i*VM*U IH> rtlHHiA AFt-lra. *.*... ML'-TCL STWLLA VA1.LIE. 'HMW | . .... ,„.. ..I "uidMV I IK STAN! "P "n *•" Juh. IMS %  Thoee M thai land %  >( P*a* dMd .iat OHM* j'al Meier. (locdiMMr tMataHi *T ,.,: H %  %  %  !' %  % %  I IN loving memoiof our Dear Mothe* II* ORAJfHVM K> p->d my July M*h 1B On* >r haa p-utaed -** that Tli* onr * loved > tilled ai Sbep on den orr rejuf taah la ',, %  :IJTI£ linr.dft will loll no n For thoee wu lovqd. vou did your fr'Oll SAM AUTOMOTIVE .vlOlUan v)il Cyrl< In food .\tMIB*ui Molol Ml phr-ie SMI M 1 SO~n 0 S A MoWr 1't..M > rf 7.tS-dn VAI X I ..: •**• oo Hint Mi ELECTRICAL ** %  % % % %  HrrmcifBATlSI, VNIT li % inch by & liven Twin Cjl TrK" Combined rteti.gcallfig unit with driving aaot.,ioh.il.ir rundenan int>.u and with HI. f_* tfai — 11 -atila LIVESTOCK MECHANICAL BIKE* : %  Co. Lid ZiOMt f I Mill HrVI M On* Lgjgr Ihdioorn W nd wt.r.i 'Ma.-i..i i"' J01th H-.I........ ml Dr.. Iwnii apenina Ml a*. r.t.lali lading -. AH haaEl JUT*, l.tn from *u( Irt !•*" .1 i— .<> .. %  ..... no-. maT'iM n-ATS—Ona) well lrr.H*Md A i nfumlihod N T'i. A.*. HWI-|i A*Mo a aM Co I I—Hi*mi, %  > %  '.. I Wfpal Lighting plant. Da.iblr lv a Nichoil. A Co lolKiior*. ISI-1 %  i M Telephone am Ma . t JHWHAVBr Crane Caatt, furnl. i<*dnrn_ Watrimiii •<.ph. LMr, Doublr aaraa*. I Srrvant re. •*-'AfrH hathtnl hrarh. Km-finlrt. rv' lialf Urti-'il-r Dial **tt HT3A ) ROOMS — IJII fumithfd to>i< %  •Ty tool rwintnf *X*r With o* wiih%  "it hnard Trrm, nviina'r T-i IMiln walk to Clubi CII Cm Dial X1M Tlir "tNCOOKHV Iwr Waatbur N nrandiAB#*rh T*o room* >|4>'o%(d li-iia* Apply m. pmilai< PUtmiraM at • nf ur IfOMTX aaah wilti running public lonrriA *arvi IMHI.K Minus Rrstoi) it HM\I w cloard from .paa Tuaada*i T so>m ml* lhat hta W"w * Satuiday tth July, lit Alaf £20 MOhfTHLY EASILY wraM at homa In ipu* lallru| In *Uinp. Ho aporiancnrccaMty fcilUbh. lof allhw . 1 alio tint tart you with ttudanU in Culoiiloa and Domlnlona lor pan cor•r>poiidaiili Kncloao t't atamp An Mall only Uko faa day. T Partln. Ion. Proaparl Houaa. 3 Wlan Boad Ulh Lanca. IngUnd. CHIROPRACTIC RESTORES HEALTH In Carlisle Bay i itKM fcr. n t* I i Hunt. Miu %  %  MAIL NOTICES MAll I %  Par.rl *nd R^iatorvt Vail, al 1 (> m Urdlnwy Mall at I I July IfM iho UnlWd KII>,.I %  %  %  -ill b> tinrfd ..' tral pnat or. %  M -if J'ai.aH Mail al 12 MM UKirinr %  Mall ai I v m Ordinary Mall al 1 p m OP IK* IK Auus during ihr rnon!h5 i,f August. COTTUE, CATFORD & Co 30 7 50 2n. SO SIMPLE MANILLA ENVELOPES >*" x SS" $3.50 per 1,000 PADLOCKS from 12c. each Jan IM turn of a tap TM R*Jlo Of a Oai CooKar and a Child to.. s n PEJUXCT BAKTNG HtSfl T. r..ii and M lb* lt.-.i Uai Cookan JWMSHIS S / 1 IHtXI H 1 — AND — in mm tin. HAVE YOU GOT A | COLD or COUGH IF SO TRY BROWNE'S CERTAIN ( i ll (.11 CUKE Tho Uniijdo Remedy far Coufha. CoM*. Broach Itta, Sol* Iniaai. Moaiaatuna. Bionchial ArUmu, Whc-.pm Coua*. D ii a w v( Uva t Pet; and Lunai, *tc ate. A". :.! %  nd Propr**lr) Medicine l*nc< %  will U> publUhct] ^ Under thl* Order the maxiiinii lip* Milk of Magnenia" are as (ollOWl MAXIMUM KF.TA1L, ITEM PhUllpi Milk of Magnesia UNIT OF SALE 4 of. bottle 12 OJ 90c. IlF.PARTMr.NT OF HIOHWAYB AND TRANSPORT HIGHWAY NO. 3A is closed to through vehicular traflta CaiUfj Gran! atirf t'liimi-t .<. %  ViUKe. FOII s\i I • NAIL SCISSORS • TWKRZERS • FILES • SHAVING BRUSHES • RAZORS WINDSOR LODGE" Government Hill, St. Michael BICYCU. on. 1 Sptad AUbaid-l. i Ml (Ml MM ardor, dmnletiv.i". I ..irk Ball A l.iaht tpnrr ai>io, Apply to Rauban Ollkaa Co Ad. '. M-...i %  IWSCELLANEOyS r NOlfCE i .ii-ii or at mm Maynard road loading Horn Wyndi.v io J**uaaJam Aaiuuhural Matum ikaaad t Iraflk |v order of th* Commlaalan*ra E H CHAIJXNOB. Iniprrtui l High**av*. "' •*•** ANTIQtrEA— af aimCMIui. ola J Win rrotouri Corly I %  : % %  .n iw at Oorrtrufaa Annum ad)ouiln| Royal Yacht Llut-iile Dial I CALYPSO RECORDS. forty ca|Mtltlaa. enl) ion tarh. com* and (at tham A IIAIINES a •'<• LTD li T SO -T F S ACCOUNTANCY. C(*T ACCOtrNTIM, COMPANY SIT BETAKY SHIP UfMiK KKKIINI. A %  !• raoniha la bHUtva MMlMaT t !" i-r i Hci-Kn lard leu award ol l>l|.oma aAaaorlat* or rrllnw* ".III quality you ur IH*I.I atatua h) aparr-ll'iv poalal alud* '• %  drUH. .111. i... Tnr ITIiKlpal UlNDun SCHOOL 'if ACOSONTAHCV II :.uk* Hlm-t. SI Jair.r* lund.m. 8 W I England IS T JO An HURRICANE RELIEF ORGANISATION A practice of certain sections of the Hurricane Relief Or.;. will take place on Sunua>, the 30th of July. 1950. bttwsen 10 SJn. and 1 p.m. The ftequcii'ii-. lhat may be used foi bvoadciulinK atTSJ 1.1; 5.4 and 214 megacycles or wavelengths of 42.25; 55.55 end 140.2 metre* respectively 2. During the prarlU* il i pl.inind to lest out the rocket Bring. e<|ulpment to be used in connection with hurricane wamlnss at the Police Stations. 3. This notice Is Issued to allay any alarm Which mas be caused by the discharge of the rockets or by DMBBIfai which may be picked up by privnte wireless n* I 26.7.50— 3n SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. aalllai Iran ABIIUICIBI. )l*iui4in • %  >• Aalaiary %  S -ABMKTA July IK. If. tlth M S 'IIECfllA %  Aii| a. V Sth M S "IIKMtNA" SapI J. Blh K.Hint fioM AajKUrdBM and D. i St %  -COTTtCAAuKuat lath Six Acres attached For all particulars apply . H. H. WILLIAMS. OBBBK Pin/old SL Dial 2676 CALL IN TO-DAY AT COLLINS' DRUG STORES Broad and Tudor Streets. C CARLT0N BROWNE I WholeaaU A Retail DruiiUI Jt 1U. .Uebaek Ks. nial -1 %  £ ;*.*.;', *****&***'**;*,*,.*,;'£ I I'lllilir \lllln|i||< iliini! I [ WEEKES AUCTiOM j § MART & BUSINESS | PREMISES THF 01.11 RFD STORE PEHSOKAl. I Slon* Dial nviii* credit lo ml -il. M MA KJH TA Ml .AC KM AN mar O.eavra. aa I .1 nut hold in -II ie.p.m.11.1* lor har 01 .,.i..i,. afcM U i,iractlna am debt 01 drbl. In in* name unleaa b\ a -rltlM mdar alned b] BM Sad rUBTAIT. MKBTiiN HMUKMA%  "I"'""'VlllBf]*. chrM Churcti TYRFJl AND I, H %  I, N i I and oil.i Oldhan, II plate lattlerlaa F!"fl.re AW Strtel Fhdii inanMaM Company TraaalMr !ii:*-ifi, TOILKT I'AI'KR J. menl -'CAMKIIA" and l-ap*. Obtainable Ir TS -aTTOR" IViaoi SnUahU lor Ocll* ill a .a'i ....I >. further i Impoil A F.ipxil I WAXTEII NCID MAID li.-1-r Ai.plv io Mr. Orey ii lodge, CollMtiore W 7 SO an YOtlNU M. prr.jaellonUl !.<> %  Clrlclty a reioiTUiirndueiir-lnatng i-oplaa Of inliali Counrtl "Waba. VI Sft-an %  J'-:,. Ma-!.• Pa>ir %  U-'.ama. Stamp Contt&lian^i. B W I S1S 4P tiAMTrn TO pn "1I> M'AUtC MACIUNFS Mta G.-.-1 ,•— pak3 Al Vaughn. KaTaT si I.OMT A HM Ml LOST irtt'i Laid be re-aided i hater v rmdar will %  u I he Pre^ m T soin M i l H h K I almosi daily injure thetnsetveSi often cut ihcmiclvcs. injure their knee* or elbows by falling, they often caich skin-injuries when sporting and playing, by a kick, or a fall. A wise mother therefore, always hai a tin of PUROL ready, because the knows only too well how helpful (hit reoscdy is in al such cases. tftjaaaaV PUROL. %  aSTr/ --**-is>-> MTO un.g rraelH to , r ,ife VEBOM. ilJJTYNK UWS Uu.anf aa I do la. -Id myaolf rvapiMiMbl* lor her or m M alae COctrtKlmg any debt or drb' UIIICM i" a orlltoai mdn M S lll.ltsll.IA July Pth M S "HECUBA" Aug Sh S P MUSAON. SON A CO LTD The MV T ft %  Radar" .ill accept Cargo and Passengers for St. Lucia. St. Vmctni, la. Amba. Curacao Sailing Wwlnaeday, 2nd August. 1050 VI Schooner Owners laaocUOea inc Coaalfaea; inai: IM1 Canadian .National Steams! ;!' For Sale MOUNT PLEASANT >T PLANTATION. ST JOHN 1* I One (I) 2 K W. Bait driven DO. Dynamo £40 N ; One (1) Switch Board 15 *? ; Ono ih A. a 11* Aug lih Aua 1MB AMI tird Aua Xtli Aug SRih Am SlhSae I lib Sap lth Hep Hllh Rep aim sp. I fcy i % %  •• %  (.Ml Al-IJ.ir.r Pll Kir NOBTHBOtiND LADY RODNEY LADY NEIAON LADV HODNEY IADY NEIAON 'IH Aug. %  •), A (ui iju, Attf ; Imi. A %  Join Aua Ih Aug. Slat Aug. 3i.| Sap I Ocl ISth Oct. Mth.r s\i is UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER nv aiMimHiiai iswusd Irani Mr. f If fllb(H 1 Will —II al Nei laaMaS, OwaavUM 111, .k id.k mi Thuradaa ivr.i 3id Augu.l at I p in hei mine lot of h.m-i.tid NrnMMra "n>h UieludcK. nilii| aVardeotwi upricht ilng uablr. Maho • :.i TTStMS CASH REAL ESTATE HOUSEOne Double r-xtfed rtouaa al mil Hall i .....I can be leiiled Apply M irrau|Si... I IS 1 SOn MABI-ToW At Maxwall'i Cuaat -verlooktng Ihr Sea having • badu. Aallghilul Balconies, ate. wlUi modern ronvanlencea PrlvaW Beach. .., bathing, for quKk aale tIMO ar fully tumlahed Cf.OBt PuaaoaalMi *>lthln ona month. Pr rSM Phone MtM or a+W ai M M. 0 per ahare. plua aUmp dutj CAKB1NOTON A NEAl.Y H T vi .. i. in. nil NUN A rlrtlghlful ReMdanca al Top Rock bulH la 1.11,1 aione, rnnent uae iLniughnut. Evrnlr Root dralgned and CxiirUu.-lloii by R A Heard. A M lt II r V A Havlral Thiee Bedtooiihi h with coranakHIng Twirl and H-th. -ith biull In P raaaia. IUe.ihlaa< aud Sun n..ka.in.-, lairga lounge. Dmhig. Vtan Modinn Kitchen OutUd* TVo Car drag*. Ttiree -.,.. %  • ma. Ti-Hal A Bath. Iuiinik. Pullv o-ed. flardena well laid out Poalon Sapl lit llrr XtMO To. aim iiiug 4MI o. MO; HEALTH PRACTISE W. G. ELLIS l.KADI ATI-: SiASSEI'K. fatwjnanta givi in your Honi*' b) Appoiiilnicnl %  AHillf. iipct Wesibury Hoad. 4 30 to 740 p in. GARDINER AUSTIN & :0.. LTD. AeiiU. CO. QUL, inA\sAra.\>ri<>rK ntjDtCR LINK. ftaV " Cabin I %  ,. || %  | M B.W I. Each fr'or Purlher Pattb ular^i. Apply (o:— fl M. JONES & CO., L'iD.-Agent:i YOCI.I. BE OL All TO LBABN aa it obi il. .>, hai just rcrcivi-d n shipim-iii al Plata ">' Perfara i I ZINC SHKKTS fill. CKMIIAI i:.MIM>UII>l (OBffHAIf IOIMIRI I.Il>. Piup tlla il C'ornrr of Urind .IIHI luiltir Slrrrl. f I si; TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM OViih ilic Dbdacdva naeaar) ii..rhini Ian a Oral hut TAYLORS SPECIAL •as* IT — in,., #' I a ioii 11 In •/aim U. Taylor A AaMM l.t'l. AurnoN SAII WUINKSDAY Aiutuat 2nd at 11 a.m. BELVEDERK Dt I. C IN ice to aell the iluabla lurmiurt %  —* ar* aA i HMyt '.i..img|y (aaal t ptKiUUrvd Couih and Baay Ciiaira. 4 steel Framed Chain r I I.II Irque Wall market. Tray and Table. Largo %  DliUna Chair., •v-lehua'd. llo.kttMn.t. Ih.ublr EL!ed Settee. Side T.r %  inlaid Table. Modem Krdroom Birrh. Do-.bi* and i | Filled and UatUaaa-a, Mdlra and .. Cabtaai Ohaira, Antique Linen 1 '."", Wairut Tahla Ui.rphy Itadhi la. N*i I'." table Hrcord %  Man II Slnar. RewUlg I mnlor laa Bd Record., %  Caller, >\,.nlt.i-,. Btan-Uid A Table Lamp., Clock. %  r, % %  "Elerirlc Cooker. %  afeaea, sm.n %  rrMMatra, Eloclnc luaau-r ..Mi („,„ ,' . '' "'* 1 '.''"" %  MW tVSaV "•'"Many Ttaw, ..,,, c i i o n of Ohua PW GCArt aier Port; Rhrrry; Bo L-rge ,,. antlly I. %  Ina "inVludw 33 Carat ;, lM I^" Bavar^n. Wrd.er Brad I'.n % %  -...In.ter T T.-.I.. %  1 J-I...V4. II... Just what a Fisherman Requires . GAI.VAMZK WIKK NETTING. LACING WIRE. I Ml BOOKS, SEINE TWINE and MANILLA ROPE. Wr con now supply all your requiri'incnls fur Ihr season. I HlBb Slrcct -; ^' Uiing (or Sale? o a What do vou want? *?. J : ; A Have you any Correspono ! dentc which vou cannot (lx? \ ; Have you anyone in trouble'. A ,>* Can 1 be of any help? v .* THAT GICn V DIAL 8150 C N WEEKF-S If a B. 11 O \V I I I Lumber A Hardware BOOKS OF GREAT INTEREST) THK si ;v \\OII I I I UAH I'a/ame V THE (.HIV/) .M.LI.WIT: By WINSTON S. CHURCHILL —AISO— sil IM SE.XTi.VKLS By Commander R. Langton Jones R. N. iv: CO. — DIAL 3301 BONE CHINA TOBY JUGS Ibaaa rnaka Ira 1 • %  1. m room. hHcfven. -a.li -a* ami .q n Land tiieii) -** thla bvinga* Ba| DOVkB I 1.1.1 ( karrh, 1 M* j x 10.000 ,„ d 1 n alfai acrrage •1 I'lllLllnear Bl.e # lb a. u-"1 arable land BOCKLA. n t.all Caar.*, af.l 1 „ ,, 1,1 •• %  BUSH BAY SI. !. %  ,. ,„ ,. I 5 altr. %  LLOtK OF I At TOBY Bill lr0* la arMgalaoaj. I>u(|i -tune. >.ood and ata*I 10JB0 REAL ESTATE JOHN hi. BLADON A r s r v A. Formrrly DUra 4 Bladon FOR SALE I h ..iid contalmi J badroomi. a bath and tolleu. kitchen, laundry, deia. iir-t .iii.nU quartnn and aaaaea VOtl MtaWat l lO aSOaakj verandah a Urge kiunga b*dr>orr. kltrhen f aarvant'i room.. iom for two ^.j,^ ,„„. vutun I, %  nm haaler Thla propart v „,> be p.irehawd lull* furn%  •hed if reaiuireri t a v rra-naba* Itgur*. 2*" %  ****'' Pmm %  -* j. Very attraetuiand can trail v kKarteii atone buivajBlow V.tfi doubt. aarrSjgaMw i„ aa-pttnl. hiaitrM 14.0M aq ft ThN -wt) bin ,.,<,pa,., ronialni. a front aaiiei barge lounge tanarate dining room, j Ur*. bedio-.m* J bathn-.tna g-kg tollau. pantrr Br d Jitrhen oood court-.ard at rear Vae reoannaht' flgvire aiked WINU1 NUM.I -!. Jan.*.. Till* bungalow ha. with haaln.i 1 Mil joa the rrnulr'n t never U -r-.ii^ %  tMM %  %  "on mi large liedrmmta tall rrandah t..tret. Tlieie are • under ran? ane1 % %  AL ESTATE AGENT Auctioneer A Snrvr.or rLANT\T!ONS 111 ll.l)|\(i 1'hone 4640



PAGE 1

SATURDAY. JULY 29, 19S0 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS. Alexandra Head Asks Larger Building IN MEMORIAM July. ISM Dave at -orrtn. I s-rret Han .i. For um*< hat b-.>iyttii i ftM minion,, a| %  IN lOVI.ig lax ml *,lt*->. HrNHlFTTA knoon aa Sifc. who paaead July ISM My Sorrow and hurt arh* No i iOII BENT .TO DIM Ki Ha*, mat I T SO—3n No on* •> Mi My Dear oii*> 1 Tea .,.. i %  ' : F p ii „..i ,n MM ... TWO HOUSES I,t i.i.hrd -in. -.„ I-M %  : ". nd the Ir, th ill n Mhn UM D htMfeH n %  tllW C U 1.I II-.-I i,a> i tI 1 | I:OOMS I( the Royal DtawuiB *Sa I which I reeeiv-d the report. '•An l encouraging result. Commcn.iahlv direct work throuf hout." 44 i papers were entered; theic were no failures, and 33 obtained Hon.ddilioii 6 pupils > he R.6.S. Exhibition, j I'l HI II %  ttl situ j.ii in A grateful BMW. Hut O Ktomm %  T.t ult*. all thy Praia.I Howard Olher. IB 7 SO In ll -v of our dr-titr MKlh.. RIUNA JORDAN died M Juis Ml V.1..I .... J*h* heard %  vor*. w* did no* hrar That Mid th* muA rrt atar. Mi* taw a hand • did ml ***. Thot bxikotMd bar away Mi* H ra>I dead But draping In Jeau>, She a* nun in weahneea Shall raiae in power She waa aown a ivalural bothy Shall raise a apl ritual body. (ienlg* mid U>r lleadlrv. H-rll.. Ileen. Miiarent eat in peae* Ante-Kan J*p*r plea a e Copy. I-OH Mil AUTOMOTIV E KMOOfll Ona i I i Engine a> good a i I F Motor Boat ftJMJ | AUTO rYCI* New Hi.dann Auto Farmall II a D H i Aahford Plai Tractor and Grata Cutler I, Apply to M. D. Elliot tat ion, At John Bt SO—7n D S A Motor fmwmu PM n T.ao—41 TKUCK. A-l l'..„.l •-. T %  I £20 i M-i-ll Ul *T It Hi: Maynard road leading from Wvndo ii Jeruulem Agricultural Station loacd to traffic. Bv ordiT ol th* Commlaaiowar* | U OIAIJJENOII. Iimuntor of Hlghwava. SI F*1 It 7 n gj lruml'.xr.i kM thej ht>\>o t-tt thu S .;JII from thi< xehool %  % %  ill soon be repsirea rsds 1 cerUhcBle (Hortoun). We ulso rtfM the reslgnatioi but a 344 boys and girli in BarI of Mi Tnmmil baring took thia examination. UMI many years was our capable Se, • 4 of our candidate* obtained a rrtary and Treasurer, and when place among tinfirst M, and the obliged through ill-health to gjlva A rt ltao other two among the ilrst 100. I up these dutiec. remained fur Bungalow, w-irhe. <*' "> %  > lh *•** WM uunit wmf time as a member of t'^ ill modem conj achievement--ft "suece* dWUM (; uV eining Body We wish him n.any happy years of retuement1 welcome the new BMfjB%bai*l. knows bfcmksc of :h-House of Assembly and Dr Kii • ton. May I take this opportunity too. to express ni> grateful thanks to the Governing Body for their hind eonaider.ilion and support of proposals I have put before Ih.iti 1 should like also to thank .-.--..those who have kindly given us All m tommi-ndcd. lo l*ln. "" %  nd ' *• h ~'. ,?"" *" pi I in ll..1,1 flau and lour Jrlirmcm from the Oovrrnlnt in the 2nd Clan. Body, haa eontinued lo ive u ........ l^asue Of Empire MM 1 h w* %  >'""" •• -. %  longs really to this year's work and not last year's, I will still that the school won the Junior Fourth Prize for a Handproject, consisting of a model and a scrap-book IIlustra* !iii,' Us* landing of the first settlers In Barbados This work, along with some of thfj iKTilk'vmk IXBOUtad dujing UMI >...! tl oo show In one of the .l.ivs-iuiiiis. and i hope that you will have an opportunity of in.spicliii*; K, afU'i the entertainI My thanks too. to the Untisb ?nt I Council for their many kindIhuring the >rar I have been ; nesses. They arranged for Mr. delighted to hrar of %  .u rr e m* John Harrison to give Artof my former pupils (;iadwyn I classes and lectures, which seven Trim in* h.m. who was 1st In pupils and three of the Staff of MONTHLY horn a in .mod — .tamp.. No e-pcrlencea Suitable lor eiUtor •* ... %  you with Stud*nW in Co|Mil*a and Domlnlona for pen cotre-pondmt. gncloa* H at-mp AH M.-. 11 onlr Uka fewi dayi F Parllnai Pro-pacl Home. 3 Wlgan Road NOTICE OFFICIAL NOTICE j in UN ADRIAN A SCALY i thieeflfthi road mtloned abultli ne ill 1M4 Chevrolet Tnich in A|i|ilt %  Hi IClt>. Telephone XStS U 1 2u VAl'XIIAIJ.. S h S0a W Ring KvelM. Ml ELECTRICAL COOLXHATOR — One Conlerator PUmtifl Delei-d^n Ordar in I f,„nt in the above action mad* on -3rd day of June IU0. 1 give irtUc* all p*r-on. IkWlBfl any eststr. right ^r any Uen or liuruirOwcr afTacling all thai certain pl*ca o. parcat of land altual* at Jaxkmam m uu pari.h o( Saun MHhael and lalsad alore•+\a twnlaining by admeaaiira-nent or" -ood fourteen and three Rnh. i*rch or ihereabouu of whwh srra of a parcn forma part of common hercinartemrntlor Aivd bounding on land* now or late i A CoggUti on land! of Lower E*U' Plantation on land* now or lab) i Clirlord Jordan and on a road in con mutt or however else th* aam* may bull and bound being the property the defendani to bring befor* ma an recount of their -aid clalma wtlh lh'wltneaaea. documentt and vouchee*, h* esammed by me on any Tue-day. Friday between the hour. and a o'clock In ~Offlt* of th* Cli— — — Court of Appeal at tha Court ROu-e. B"dg*lown. before the lltli day of September ISM. in order thai auch claim, may ha ranked according to the natur* aixl udorllv thereof respectively. otherwla* auch person* will b* precluded from the benefit of the -aid !>*** and be deprive* of all claim oo or again*' the aald property Claimant* are alao noUflvd thai th*> itttnd the (Bid Court on Wedne*ntr>*r lJ0. ild cUlm .._ anked ivn under StJ hand thl* JSrd day June IftSO I. V. GILKFS. Al Clerk of the Anl.taut Court App*. • .50llramkiT has most generously u-i. and one for Scripture to the girl who was 2nd in the kttfsad with Distinction standard; Miss BRWM hM given a priie to the other girl who attained Distinction standard in Scripture, and :i. 1( -ei/.a. one of our "Old Girls. 1 has given „ (ion.! I'oiulucl prize, as a token of her gratitude for what she owes to her old school. Art CIBSSO kg**. dpi %  parents. leachiis. cbiiV It any one strand is whole suffer* Will you gi\e me >DUI wlmli -hearted cooperation I %  critu .sin. ... %  listen to Bt|g N fajgiesU ..i I plaints' from parents Christum IdtwU The mind and charade. Of a obild are like a garden in snick we wish beautiful a i plants to grow; but w* gDOB how iliflienlt the task is; the weeds spring up SJ fast; there are so DuttU aajgl psstl that infest the BUBfj and hinder then health and btCMtJ w. .h our childn i up with Chrtstbu the true Christian frscos, to filled with the love of 0 which issues the love of our M Ii." --iiiae I (Ml UB re is lOO mm h -elllslme>s %  ntOfttSJSl ns. tin world is full of %  sion to-day: dispute-, botwsen classes, betwotn races, bsgwoer nations, which all ." % %  ti M.'lllshness Let us tr> to wee i .'Ul this fault .I'M i. %  ]...,. H ,.|i 1 thercfiin FOB p.ueiil' In nun vrlth DM IB cultivating UMM BBTOV I • Im I we rtavo to tend s.i that the. fna) be tilled with Christian ftowiT I of ISNUt] i thnt thev i UL ,ii,i %  : .i. . %  %  the community in which we havt to live AgnHni.-iit ReMbed SHIPPING NOTICES i)n Guided MUsilt Repoti PfASSAI i. .. .i ThoGu %  UVttl i Blfhi %  t'l ll, [niniple 1 i UfiSBd tht dadjjlh o| i;,e BID in. %  lli.II. IBM in CimnutU-e on TuesdBI night The B i : tion an.I i Itournc i until today when it | iii.it tinCornmitti i tinsarsMtctod ntn < r MAIL NOTICE ,al-l> Pth "-aptembei S-Sael l "' UasaSH fli.t half %  M ksa "i at tiHttaaS tHi..I. realata hav* ample apace l" i l iaiit fumn. and seearral rara-> .-plr-t on thmagh mil" I Ui iranahipmeni al Tnnid.il BrlUati ihiiana. Windwa-d F*a larlkei sariualao *aei-: — itfHNBSS WTTMT B CO LTI Agent*. Trinidad DA COSTA CO LTD Agent a. it "Rsdar" wdl %  Si Vincent. Grenada. Aruba. Curaca.. Sailing Wednesday. Jnd August ltt%0 %  W I -.I,.,.,.,., Iv, ,.. AaaorlaUan Ine Coaalgnee: Dial: 4047 Parr* %  T.i • Si July. IBM* Mall* tii.. %  F ON %  .i. i ii. g om lli HARRISON LINE .1 lUM.n .'RDM TID DHRVD KIM.IMIM Vessel KIVKllCi'-EST' %  NATURAI ";ST" .\1NCiO>.T' IliaKlKHCHST" Frt>m I-mdon lavertool London i. ,....".. .\ l.lV.vl.i l Mh July 28th July Mh Aug Due HOT! ; %  !• .. 30th July 11th Aug 26th Aug M 17th Aug 311st Aug. day. the ttli day of SaWatl 10 octock a m when their OFFICIAL SALE BAHDADOI „..-IN THF AASISTAN1 COt'hT OF APFSAI, lEuullt-bK' Jurl*dHnloni LINDSAY r.RCIl. RYgBUKN OllJ the i-l*nd in the St. of 1946. %  i.ibeen training as a tearhrr In I n-Umi at AmMeslde ColInc. She has lust obtained her diploma with outstanding surerssi. ami ha* hern appointed to a post In one of the London i %  iinii' Council schools. Marlla Archer, who has been aludylnr miuifc at Mc. Gill t niverslty. oblainrd her diploma last AugUBt. She la now leaching music la Montreal but will return later to the Cnivrr-.it> to studv for the degree of Doctor Music. She did so well In the Diploma Fxam thai the Dean of the I'nlvenrM) is hoping that •die will be awarded a scholarship, i in.! Skinner, who was one of the first nurse* al the General HoaplUal to be awarded a British Council fu-holarshlp U train in England, became a State Registered nurse In 1948. -in • %  then she has taken a post-graduate rourse In Midwifery, and Is at present doing District Midwifery In Surrey. Gloria Ramsay and Viola Babb. who are training at our General Hospital, were among the priiewlnnera this year, the former carrying oil the Hyglen*" prise, and the latter the prise aa the best Junior nurse. This year, like most ye..is. RBI been one of mingled sunshine and sorrow. I record wilh griof the passing of Mr Hutson. one of the members of our Governing Body, whose integrity of character, sound practical ability, won him the respect of all. His loss has been particularly mourned by the Stuff, to whose difficulties he always lent a sympathetic ear. for he was the elected Representative on the Governing Body of the Assistant 1 teachers of this and our brother schools, the Coleridge and Parry No RopresentalWe At present the Assistant tearhhave no representative, a.* they have not v. 1 l>een granted the opportunity to elect his succesthis school attended with K'e.itiM uitereM and apprevia! lion; they gave a fllm-show of i Macbeth to the School Certiflj CBni Fmni wno were kernlv Interested. a s they were siudynn; that play; and they arranged that Mr. Fuller should visit Speights11 i; and give us the Joy of a I most delightful recital I I wish also to record my gratitude to the Staff for their unfailing devotion to duly and their loyal help In all emergencies, and of particularly to Miss Agard for her itaunch support as Aeting Serimr Assistant during the absence on leave of the Senior Assistant. So much for the past, now hat of the future" The buildings do nol make the school, they are but the -*hcli within %  Inch the living organist breathes and moves; hut if the shell were too small, that nrganiii would Initanipetl and dwarfi and maimed We have outgrown our shell This Hall, as you can see. is much too small. it cannot accommodate all the parents, and LbOM gnls that you see are less than a third of the school. We need a new and bigger Hall Classrooms Need**! We need new class-rooms; at. present four Forms are sharing two rooms. We want a studio for ur Art-classes, and a properly 'quipped room for Domestic Science, for I feel that every woman should lie trained in housecraft. Several parent* have approached me too about Comnereial classes, but we cannot irganise them without a qualified teacher, equipment, and a room to hold them. One step forward I am hoping to take I plan to start a second language, and hope t.. introduce Latin next year. I have been very thankful to have the wall which has been built along a p.nrt of the boundary the covered-way. irreverently christened by the pupils "Pig-pen alley", will now have to change Its name! 1 hope It may be possible next year to put a similar wall on Hie ottMB. IcV But. ns I nave said, the buildings matter far less man the life that goes on within, and would remind parents that the hole of the education we gl •VR6$ COTTON l-RINTs New H. -I. II3(i ins .il || Flowered A Plain SI'IAS. I.INKNS A SILKS In Outstanding I'allrrn* FLASTIC HANDBAGS all Shades at Reduced Frlte. SPECIAL! GENTS SI ITINGS In Striped and I'lain at S3 SO ti 8401 A VISIT WILL t ONVIM r. voc THE BARGAIN HOUSE AUCTION SALE Kuiiiitinv ft tftaeti ..I "BELVEDERE" Welch**, Chrial Churefa between M*aw*lli *nd Oistins WBDNESDAX, Aiiunsl 2nd. ul II a.m. urn! if IKH concluded TIIIKSDAV al 11 a.m. -VIKWINf." | lit .1 ii;i\ |i lot to Sal* from '.' B p m J..-.S-1. Hi—ton (AnUhn—f) I'liinliilium BuUdlBg. I'll,.ll,. lillli HI.MI u \KII ion nil tMini KIMJ.HI Vn*n for riiAr-rsuAN" London LORD fllllli II i %  i %  Closet In Barbados 31st July 31st July DA COSTA A CO.. LTD.—Agents W McOCU SisamAhipCo. Site. %  •'. OKtLBAIaS ->. n UCOA SANOgM H.'.IA HOAMFN il %  . IKNMIi i <; TIIUUN" BYFJonr N.O. WSea Itth JulV rtn JulSSth Julr till. Atig tlh Auau.t J Augual NSW ross. fjrjgssj RR Biea tl*t July 11*1 July lllr. Augvt.l Hit AugUM sill Ml not Nil Nass* al saie S Al.llA |1>lNTlt SS "ALCOA POLAHtS' ITrlMatWftal SgBVICg Maatraal it.in.. July ii.t July Mlh Aug. au. Aug Ilk Arrive* .w.fc.a.. A i Mh sHRW—BUSIR SB "AU-OA Ml The** Ve**el* 1BIM" %  atim V.ilil HeS ST Arrl Ha. a paeaaaa* %  SW !i,l. Fur Mont c.i ..id QuaBac. A COOTA TIIUM 11 B CO. LTD Canadla 1> —New Yorlt and On C3S ONE SOLID WEEK OF UNPRECEDENTED BARGAINS <" Wilson's ilAIKIAINS I.IKK THESE COME TO YOU BUT ONCE IN A LIFETIME THEY COME TO YOU THIS TIME, NOT TO STAY BUT TO LAST EOK ONE WEEK ONLY. WITH CUT PRICES LIKE THESE LASTING FOR MOKE THAN ONE WEEK, SURELY WELL BE SOLI) OUT YOU MAY BUY US OUT III T WE lilVE YOU ONE WEEK IN WHICH TO DO SO. READ THIS, VISIT US AND COMPARE l-Rll'ES AND J)UAIJTY. FUtil in Pink. Si White Li-mnn Ilk. per yd. INDIAN HEAD. I 1 i.... I-.--..-1. While ABlue 34 in wiile 8He. per >d. HEAVY QUALITY CASEMENT Ui Lemon Belie, Green. Blue A Whltl It wiile. Price 72c. per wl. WHITE CELLULAR Mc. per yd. LINEN dead* for School & ServantI Uniform :<>'• in wide Mc per >d. Sevi r %  Shade WHITE CAMKKH Bin wide only Heper yd CALICO CAMBRIC Exlra hcaw quality 3d In aide ,/ •Ik.. 6llc., & IIKe. per yd. POPLIN in Blue Peach, Pink, Beivje & While (a Sic. per yd. SHIRTING m .Stripes £ Fancy Patterns itli in. wide 6lr. per yd. SPUN SILK. Excellent Quality 30 Shades .'16 in wide price for one week only K4c. per yd. ( VNADIAN & AMERICAN PRINTS ,, 51c. In Hlr per yd. PLAID :ill ii wide IKc. per yd. MEN'S PURE IRISH LINEN SUITING 2H in. wide USD per yd. NICKEI ARM BANDS 32c. I,, i pair GUINEA BIRDS PIMPS $1.48 per pair KII IKI Dllll.l. Me, H*c., I1.M per yd. GREY F \NNEL 54 In. wide 2.lli |M-r yd. PLASTIC RAINCOATS Qeod Quality M.70 each sllllllKO) Rogai* Sports Shirt* $1.00 each STRIPE SPORT SHIRTS M lileaili sl-llRTs & DRESS SHIRTS from S3.IHI tu ST.IMI each MEN'S PLASTIC BELTS 36e. each LADIES' SILK STOCKINGS I PAIRS FOR ,,..., $1.20 CEI.ENESE PANTIES 72c. per pair LADIES' HANDBAGS 13.00 up PLASTIC TABLING 45 in. wide (1.30 per yd. GLASS TOWELS 1 x 34 ii 46r. each BATH TOWELS 18 x 36 II 60c. each NYLON STOCKINGS Popular Shade. ',i (I.M per pair LADIBS SHOES A New Shipment cif these from Holland. All Styles and Colours II MM per pair Other Shoes less 10% Discount ALL TROPICALS AND WORSTED l.,ss in'; IHsiiiinii SHOP ECONOMICALLY FOR Till. RACES AT N. E. WILSON & Co., Ltd. THE HOUSE WELL KNOWN FOR NEW GOODS. II Swan SI. INI: GOODS AND LOW PRICES. Dial 367S.


Saturday
July 29
1950



+







REDS USE UNDERGROUND FORCES

Russian Takes Chair
In Security Council

‘ LONDON, July 28.
HE NEWS that Jacob Malik, Russian delegate to the
United Nations, would take over the Presidency of the
Security Council next month was splashed in late editions
of this morning’s London papers.
Huge banner headlines eloquently proclaimed the im-
portance which is attached to this development.
Some of these headlines were as follows: |
Daily Express: “Russia Returns to UNO. Malik Phones:
I am in the Chair. Veto on New Korea Moves?”

Daily Graphie: “Soviet Union Drops United Nations
Bombshell”.

Daily Herald:

|



“Russia Surprise United Nations’ Move.” |
News Chronicle : “Russia Returning to Security Council.
Malik ends Boycott and Takes the Chair.”

The Communist Daily Worker carried the words “Rus- |
sians Back in the United Nations”, across its front page. |
Photographs of Malik appeared in seyeral papers |
THE ITALIAN Foreign Minister,”

Count Carlo Sforza said

“I learned with pleasure
Soviet decision

; ;
; Will help or hinder in clearing up
the| Some of the outstanding Inter-
the | National questions.”

to return to 7 ea
Security Council because [ am The British view still was that
deeply convinced that at the | the questions of aggression in |

origin of all foolish and criminal ple A seer eee

18 YEARS AGO.

# is



SATURDAY, EIGHTEEN YEARS AGO, Captain Michael Cipriani
way of the Rockley Golf and Country Club. The two pictures show
the left Mr. Jack Skinner can be seen standing near the ‘plane. ‘ec Story o age 4



Bells Mark | Security Council Debates

“Campaign
For Freedom”

CHICAGO, July 28
Drawings of bells scrawled on





ici : Nations were “ ne ‘
decisions re . ' walls will mark the “Resistance
are sees titanate a} | two distinct and separate matters. Campaigh to onmtinteeee to be
standings, ke eee He reiterated that Britain would opened in the “Iron Curtain”
The Sov oti weainiae abstain from voting on the Chin- | .ountries, Gen Lucius D. Clay,
€ Soviet action I especially) ese question until it was clear former United States Military
appreciated because it recogmises : ir

— that there would be the necessary
implicitly the importance yi the majority in favour of Communist |;
United Nations Assembly and the]China replacing the Nationalist

services which it gives | Representation,
The Communist Leader Palmiro |

Togliati said that this shows once

more that the Soviet policy is con- {to return to the Security Council |:
by

sistently in defence of peace ‘was considerec

Zi. abl pM -

Decisive Factor |

Gueissepe Vittorio, General
Secretary of a 5,000,000 member
Italian General Confederation of |
Labour said “Any attempt to solve |
the crisis of the United Nations |
Assembly which dominates the |
International situation may be the!
decisive factor for a general easing

diplomatic ob- |}
\ 1

Y
ti





Governor

the huge ten-ton
» IN MOSCOW, xussia’s decision |”

giving
for

in Berlin, announced
‘ere. ‘

The campaign will begin when
“Freedom Bell”
rung in Berlin

The eight-foot bell inscribed
‘That this world under God shall
lave a new birth of Freedom” was
t yvesterda

y jn Croydon, Eng-|

ena |

Gen. Clay said it would be per-

nanently hung in a specially dedi- |

‘ated shrine as a tribute to those
their lives in the struggle
human freedom

The first peal would be carried
»y radio to all free peoples of the
rth, he continued. Simultane-
vusly bells would ring out all over

of tension. | the United States church hells,

This would almost automatically city hall bells and school bells.
determine a political easing of Bells would also peal throughout
tension inside various countries,, Western Europe, announcing the

especially in Italy,

“The Christian Democrat Mem-
ber of the Italian Parliamentary
Foreign Commissicy, Giuseppe
Bettiol, described the decision as
“perplexing”. In any case Russia
shows by her decision that she is

1



‘Freedom Crusade” for which the
el! would be the symbol.

Gen. Clav said it was vitally
mportant “for America to step
ip its campaign of truth to blast

false Communist propaganda that
Ameries started the Korean War.

ae and that this country was a nation
MAN IN THE GLARE of imperialist



not ready for a Third World War.” warmongers out to
ia’ conquer the world.”—Reuter.
THE BRITISH F OR E 1G N Russia's Malik,
OFFICE today looked with sus-|seryers toni en 2an%
picious eyes at Russia’s sudden S tonight as a partial re-

Sponse to the Indian and British
approaches to the Soviet Govern-
ment since the Korean War.
Observers noted that the move
followed Marshal Stalin’s reply to

decision to return to the United
Nations’ Security Council.

The Department’s Official spokes-
man told newsmen that before any







12 Atlantic Pact
Nations Hasten



Gipsy Moth, the “Humming Bird” landed in Barbados on the fair-

Costa Rica
Answers

U.N. Appeal

On Korean Situation

LAKE SUCCESS, July
The Security Council with the Soviet member absent met
today to debate the first report made by General Douglas
MacArthur's headquarters on the Korean wat
Jacob Malik, the Soviet delegate

28

continues h boyeot



for each pound.

These apples were part of a goo
supply which arrived from Aus
tralia on Thursday under cok
storage on the S.S. City of Dieppe
This ship was still discharging
eases of apples yesterday

ielaying action Korean
He was confident that this phas«
was ending, that lines would be 1
| Stabilised and the invading forces |
\inay' back from the territor) |
|

|

'

Republic

; 4 it the disposal of the Security
until the end of the month Council “adequate sites for air or
Sir GladwynvJebb of Britain, commenting on the decision] sea bases and places suitable for
by which land, sea, and air forces were deployed said “It is] the establishment of small naval
less than five weeks since North Korean forces crossed th ee an troop quarters oO
‘ ; : ation
38th parallel. In that time large forces have been tran
ported into battle.” Mr. Kicardo Toledo, Under

Jebb added, “This is out- | Secretary of Costa Rica’s Foreign

r standing achievement and | doub,| Affairs Department, also told the
. > 9 At rether it has often been su:-}| United Nations Secretary-Genera!
emocra Ss passed. The scale of the Nort).| Mr. Trygve Lie that his Govern-

4 Cc Korean attack offers the final proo. | Ment wa cues to send volun
Q t ] Ik hat.we had to deal with a system-| ‘CC's for preliminary training in
ents a ID. | act of aggression for which| te Unitea States “in order to

ensure that they will not run

preparations must have been made] |.” “ \ it Ngati t

After breakfast hour yesterda,, for thonths if not for vedi reater ri ks if they are sent te
housewives crowded Messrs att fue ot the” ‘awerdeno the front, than those liable to be

N. Goddard & Sons Grocery t©}jmagine that his initial succe eed by practised troops

a Toa — apples that Wer | wil! do anything but render more} Colombia also replied to the

- doh eg it 2 Wveieeniehh certain his ultimate defeat secretary -General’s appeal for

; ea — uy 43 ; SreS bey Sir Gladwyn said that America| sid and announced its readines

ae aaa ary ae om aie ao" sani. | orces had fought the most difficul, | to negetiate with the unified com-

tralia, and were paying cents) of all military operations, namely |imand about assistance © for
|"
4]

answers to Mr. Lie’s appeal.

they had overrun

Spirit of Sacrifice | pie ° :
Jean Chauvel of France express- | Trade Union



If sufficient refrigerated cary
5 Sar - ; 6 ©
es age sr erect a. ed his country’s appreciation fo:
Oa Saag ane Zealand lines will | the decisive and determined way
bl i i lar calls here, the Chief ;!2, Which Unified Command haa
Officer of the S.S. City’ of Dieppe | taken the difficult situation in|
« . vesterday ' hand
torThe City of Dieppe tae refrig- | The heroism and spirit of sacri-
eration accommodation for 800/fices of the forces are admired -by
tons of cargo and a net tonnage the whole world, he said
f 4,850 tons Nothing was more difficult for |
of 4,850 tons |



Over Korea

the new troops than to fight delay- |} vt



the ‘plone surrounded by a huge crowd of people, In the picture on





LAKE SUCCESS, July 28
Costa Rica today informed the
United Nations that it was placing

the
|

| STUTTGART, American Zone.
July 28
Two British Trade Union teade:
lushed today at a Conference ner



The two Latin American replies
| brought to 29 the total number of

—Reuter

Leaders Squabble

‘American Troops
Fired On From
Prepared Posts

By DEREK PEARCEY
With the American Forces on the South Coast of
KOREA, July 28.
AMERICAN TROOPS on the south coast of

Korea are finding evidence that North Koreans
prepared their invasion long in advance.

During the battle for Hadong, 75 miles west
of Pusan yesterday, Communists used concrete
machine-gun emplacements. Northerners in an-
other area fired on Allied troops from deep holes
in hills without natural cover.

Intelligence Officers have noted other positions
previously prepared by North Koreans on high
ground at strategic points.

As soon as North Koreans entered an area they went
straight to these positions and poured heavy fire on the
Americans from cover.

American Intelligence Authorities assumed that since
the withdrawal of United States troops from Korea at the
end of the occupation, underground forees began prepar-
ing invasion smuggling in and storing arms caches through-
out the country, + '

rat this
of how
oO penetrate
only the
pelume and
attack laver with plenti-
tie ind armys
United States Eighth Army
to-night reported
is very little action

hes idl explained
infiltrators
American

inNocent
yet were

the riddle

G.I’s Reach ‘fh :
U.S. Lines
In Safety



rrying

able t
ful amin

Ihe
Headquarter

there



today the entire Korean

By LIONEL HUDSON front
(WITH THE AMERICAN In the centre the 25th Infantry
FRONTLINE TROOPS) Division lost a little greund but

was organising tor
A company American troopy , k to establish it
cut off for several days by 4) °o™MmMunique said
North Korean flanking movemed® American casualties in Korean
outh of Yongdong in the central fighting total 904 to date, the
ector regained their own lines United States Defence Depart-
ist night (July 27) after ment announced,
ruelling 40 mile mareh through! | They include 76 killed, 8 died
rugged mountains from wounds, 269 wounded, 79

a counter at-

SORBA, , 28 :
KOREA, July position, the

of



“Ammunition was low and we bossa and 472 missing in
; had no food at all, but the mer action. as
were great,” said Captain Terr The “wounded” are those
Field from Arkatisas hurt in combat; the “injured

those hurt in accidents,




“We had supplies dropped bs The latest casualty list was
air on one day and had a hi contirmed yesterday.
feast but the men took care “ki Pyongyany Radio claimed to-
save some of their food for {he ight that the North Koreans had
wourded, in their stee| helm ccupiec Hamyang, 62 miles south
well as in vVneirt canteens’

of Teung
The Communist troops who took
Hamyang, the Radio added, were

Enemy patrols were avoided be-
cause men were weak from lagk
of food and water

the same who earlier captured

Today a roll cal] showed that Namjon, about 25 miles south
of 215 officers and men 4 were west of Hamyang

killed and more missing Pyonghang Radio also claimed











, tne International ‘Transpor, The Americans, mostly young- that an American Superfortress
oe back could be wer kare the letter from Pandit Nehru in Defence Measures Ships of this line call here very ing action, He thought that world | Workers Federation after one saio | sters withouv previous experience forcelanded on Taejon airfield on
to the Soviet Union it wou d have which the Indian Pri “ Minister aval This was the first cal! for Public opinion had done less than, ne would not vote on a motior., weked through the country thick Phu; sday The crew was captured
to be seen whether she intended urged steps to ene th re Minister LONDON, July 28. Sal mi of Die pe justice to the problems of supply Catling for full support for tne} with Communist patrols and vic Pyongyang, the North Korean
to co-operate with or obstruct the | a the conflict, Representatives of the twelve the Vie, 5 i Pi liy discharge ng substantial equipment and)Unitead Nations over Korea | blocks capital, was “flercely bombarded
Council’s workings. , es Atlantic Pact Nations tonight un-] ‘These ships usually dischars, troops \rthur Deakin, General Secre v American aircraft on Thursday

When asked if the Security ‘They also linked the decision ‘ ate a roval of dis-] cold storage cargo at Trinidad ee 7 : fox é amete SAOINESL | They had three meals in four, &” / SIS CRAEY Oils ‘ad
Council could repeal its resolu-|With the talks between British nounced their approval of un at be transhipped to Barbados. 1 Dr. Tsiang, Nationalist China,|(ary of the Transport and Genera | dove and yesterday,” the Radio added
. ee ma. . . se rec e L signedy Pe he r ss { Si é Dé ress i fi rs spet avout Thei ' — *
tions on Korea if the Russians |Ambassador Sir David Kelly and fo accolbthts tiaiinee pesdihonâ„¢. reason is that orders for Barba ie a 7. te rae eae Wetears vole neenng ss ee Their battalion holding th Ly. _Revter:
forced the issue, the spokesman |Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Meeting here as North Atlantic] are not so big. ; iia a ee ' tt % S wry a 14 of the motion, challenged James} jine on the road five miles south sey
said that he thought it would be | Andrei Gromyko, ben sepunle, they. declared The officers are all British wh'le| ikely i € t! ne 7 nas we ms Higgins, Secretary of the National! west of Yongdong, was ordered N RASHES
cifieult for them to project their] The view here was that, though | after a week's discussions that ans the crew are from Alaska today A profound y if ae ott UAlon Railwaymen, when . the} on Monday to smash through the) P.A.A, PLANE C
veto power into the past, especial- the Soviet decision was’ a new “unprovoked act of aggression in about when and where the nextliatter said that his delegation] yuad block cutting it off {rom 10 DE JANEIRO. July 28
ly since they had not been repre- step towards the negotiation of a|Korea makes it of more impor- blow will fall”, Dr, Tsiang added | would abstain from voting because | Yongdong All except thgii A be \ erican Constellation
se e ti ions t . - y : : at Nor rean § ‘rs were j ate s » “ neve a ane bicd ’an Americé Jo a
sé Py = eae 28 sg fecisions. | peaceful settlement in Korea, much |tance than ever for the Govern- Ambon Isolated asia cane soe babe id = no mandate from its mem-| company broke through liane crashed at Sao Leopoldo,
ut he adde a is was |cepend > nature sj rents > lantic } Pana ont rs ; ek wlave wgiewa't aan ‘to. Alegre, Brazil to-ds
speaking unofficially because he }qcboqe 4,0", the nature of thejiments of the North Atla te JAKARTA, July 28 possible because of the enslave-| Figgins said that his Union’s| Four of eleven Americar, tank) Agex Jeaeio. Alegre. ease Sony
; : jagenda M. Jakob Malik would|freaty countries t accelera | } ‘ got through The other seven’ with 43 passengers and seven cre
had not yet had time to look into | propose at Lake Success |the steps necessary to assure theiry ‘The insurgent-held Island of} ment of the minds of people/annual conference just concluded ware Dedeed dows oF inet tolr| ctcucd ihe Hints fee Sane hie
the full implications of Russia's | F or common defence”. Amben:has been economically and] within the Iron Curtain lhad not discussed Korea. Hi Freatle om had to be destroyed. |on @ routine trip to Porto Alegre
return. | EGYPT'S FOREIGN MINISTER The deputies also recognised| militarily isolated for security! Sir Benegal Naru of India made | mphasised that he wanted the . i. —Retuter —Reuter.
B e 9 Re |Mohamed Salah E] Din Bey, told|“the need for maintaining and reasons, Col. Tasya of the Indo-; an appeal to North Korea ee oetion abstention to be officially
ritain’s egret reporters tonight that Egypt would | safeguarding economic epconstrun. nesian General Staff declared to-; at thie stage to scontply with the |rssorded. .
: : 1g. /NOt change her attitude regarding | tion and stability in the North] day ae , Security Council’s resolution t oursquare
i yen foci, we eeckee- ‘Communist China, even if Russia | Atlantic area”. 2 Amban is now the oy y islthel withdraw to the 38th parallel | The British Natlonal Council of \
i bx ie bon 44 a ane Their Chairman, Charles Spof-|jeft to itself. The Republic is ? and save their country muc! abo whict epresented the (i!
sed ret when the Russians |taised the question in the Secgrity : he I ur which reg
i press reg’ , ~ Odie : ; -¢|{ord (United States), said the! only remaining obstacle to the needless suffering ade Unic me f the $i}
i walked out of the Security Coun-:Council when it meets next deputies had achieved “tangible ication of the major part of ‘rade Union movement of the \
cil, “It will be necessary to wait /rionths under the chairmanship of santa? with ee a follow hey a cece Dutch East Indies Home Defence Labour Party and the Cooperative {}!
before it becomes apparent ee Jacob Malik. will meet again next Tuesday for under a single ian com- Sir Benegal explained at the|!evement had said in no uncer- }))
Whether this new step of Russia —Reuter. { ments, able to provide forces to assist wile tienie 2 atts re ea in
ts Spofford declined to comment South Korea. He said the whole orda ageress
"AR SCARE S ELEPS when asked whether the deputies structure of her armed forces was | eee lees Bik Ae
W * ; W \bad discussed or would discuss the POCKET CARTOON designed for home defence fs :
j aci j : |ference should adopt the resolu
question of replacing German in- by OSBERT ACTER “Our internal needs at present | {erence ‘ ,
GEORGETOWN lustry within the overall plans z new LANCASTER ive such that we cannot affor+ ye pod yo ss fo erties
for the North Atlantic vars 2 to send any portion of our force . a Sear os Nine ohnanid
—Keuter. remote areas out of India.|® ® © 5 ae
GEORGETOWN, July 26. There the all greater reason de Steerer eet
reor s al ; i a. . h 2 j therefore why I should like t Cominghy mM fe a
Georgetown was almost thrown into a state of frenzy yes- iS. Uses India ljoin in the tributes paid to the|#¢neral principle of the resolution
\ terday afternoon as truck loads of Military and olice | men of ali countries who are giving 7 fp iniar aie wet ane
‘ turned out without any intimation by Press or Radio, As Go-Between their lives to enforce the decisions, Which included fo a
f dashing along city streets, depositing armed men in full lof this Couneil. | ecebeslinss.7 Mean: tage “Stamm
: . ‘ , 28 | ee pLcearl, « .
fi battle dress—steel-helmeted and with rifles with bayonets us por pone ey ei Bi ciurpaditiiente ‘atone B0tiad bec | dnlbuasee clay GEaeeaeae facae eer,
; fixed, at strategic positions. . ; See a Security Council into an wnpre-|ing and criticised the resolution
r ; a new move, using India as ar e y
Telephones buzzed till late in intermediar es feassure Com- ecde:.ted role, in fact, we ar The Swedish delegation stated
z - jthe evening, as worried George- muhist Daria that the United | functioning at the present moment] that only its railway member
towners, with the war in Korea] > Aine most like ¢ i ‘ouncil” vere opposing the resolution
e us ace Ost i i i States had no territorial ambi iim like a War ( pposing
uppermost in their minds, sought ¥ * nh Dr. Antonio of Ecuador paic The Finnish leader, opposing
| confi ' tions in Formosa, usually well
F e | confirmation to rumours that be- nformed officials said to-da) tribute to the promptness with|the resolution said “We in Finlan¢
ederation | gan oe SOUnGS that Russia had |° The United States has a> sai} which the United States and Untted | regard this resolution as a hostile
oer war on the Western Basandor SH the Chlneae (Commu- Nations had acted in the first|demonstration against the Soviet
- | aes 7 Short time aes nists’ capital, and officials ex- instance in stopping aggression. | Union, with whom Finland has
a Ss omes | Sathered at every corner, while sali P ; , as k He expressed confidence thal|friendly relations.”
parents ran around seeking here|plained that the new move by r Stata aide ‘ . ,
. ‘ , : at- talks between the United States He added that the -Unitec
and there for their children just] the State Department was an a # ; oe Watlons bad ndteodhed the Savile \
PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 28. | out of school. tempt to make certain that the Would it be better to start | and other states would provide] Nations had not accused the S
The Trinidad Legislature after a President’s message reached it Sa tor ree wes @ proud further avenues of collaboration|Union as this resolution did, of
whole day sitting today adjourned But all the excitement was final destination. ” eep fh to the eens? or for the United Nations in Korea in aggressive war in Korea.
until Monday on a motion re just an emergency exercise by —(Reuter.) —Reuter. — (Reuter.)
Hon, Dr. Patrick Solomon, whic the military and police for













sought non - acceptance of the internal security reasons. Sienna
Standing Closer Association Com- |
aioe, wacdhestnd Federation of Greatest excitement was created 9 9 e
the British West Indies. outside the four-cornered George- é 6 an ed Oo ri ers Ou
Opposing the motion, the Hon,|fown Prison, where the rumour
Albert Gomes told the House that} was — de big jail break oa
2 Ss ies cannot hope to|occurred. The presence of steel- : moe Ni ss : ait oe ny Ne ‘a
attain Be penal sinrihasnee helmeted police with bayonets BRUSSELS, July 28 ist and former Premier Paul we ong” the first line of which wuauieie dncie tetas tees
without federation. fixed added credence to this re- Strikers shouting “Hang Leo- Spaak called the strike the start \ “q mn with Le ld—the mar tc e thre wing battle at Leaken
He went on: “We swim to-| port. » pola”, poured into Brussels to- of a revolution, and were turned Down with Leopo ae, Seve Se sm .; cree WITH THAT
: gether or sink alone. No matter : night threatening to mareh again back outside the Palace by bqulg hang" ea oF ‘nie ates ~ : as on eg
' how unpalatable it may be for| _ Meanwhile, Police trucks were} on Laeken Palace the home of mounted Gendarmes w ith . ee om Ore urna in Be natel ° & ino
f some of us, we have got to face | dashing around depositing batches! the newly. returned King Leo- drawn spears, and foot-guards 3 a quare at rPubee ” ada aT e he srved a minute’s sil-
j federation. of armed Volunteers and Police pold. armed with rifles. reeling — to get ory t mn “ne orn : a
We must face the fact that) Constables at strategic points like! ~ “But this time’ we will reach One officer said that the police bogged down in a giant traffic anne. ed eet
a territories of this size and these | Government House, Wireless Sta-| the Palace,” shouted miners, iron would have their work cut out | am. sect tr eaders af van ind Tucted
resources can never hope to re-| tion and Cable Office, the Treas-! foundrymen and chemical work- to handle these Southerners from Police and gendarmes close: hou ee se wee at = on 3;
alise dominion status within the|}Ury and Public Buildings, the ers deseribed as “tough guys” by provinces already paralysed by in. ; . arty panoiine aes lat ar
British Commonwealth of Na-! Banks and Post Office and picking the police. the creeping of the strike Shops that had resisted an aken, they shou is

tions, far less realise indepen-|UpD other batches and returning
dence for nationhood in a werld| them to Police Headquarters and

trike call, closed sudden- we

; ; red £ ssels earlier
Fighting O¢ ee ueeels vhistle-blowing strikers

Gare du Nord. Atthis first influx 3russels must be a dead city ly a They were unmoved by official



time

will reach the Palace”. }
}

))






where national s6lidarity is | Military Depot where other exer-| 4 wave of demonstrators from by to-night or to-morrow morn urged into the heart of the capi ieclarations that plants —
essential for economic survival.| cises were going on the French speaking province ing cried dark-haired Madame tal, calling for “abdication A abandoned without eee
, } vat ae eerdgh! > i ; able B ? 2m0 é y > é ar ookeries ¢ furnaces which
Chiefiy because of these con- ia 5 : : .| of Wallonia pledged to grip the Isable Blume. : ‘ em nstrator at d a banp ee re oe gee CENTS )
siderations we must endeavour | rhe HAHOS Ul Vel —— country in a general strike unless ‘ As po a o ari als — ae . and bout a or * yore Se vd 8 = i 0 wee nn Ge FOR \
»)} sou -¢ é a iow Vas é& r 3 a P Stali é Oy il ence ! mer yt Ac & , ‘ | Was ote tile ‘'
to federate as soon as possible.’ o rest peacefull Afiee hove} King Leopold abdicates rom the ation, a Royalis cin of fies Gaull ie tet babes ae TE H}
Gomes moved an amendment,| to rest peacefully. After the show | Long I ie King i 1 ied from in Qn, 1 ) Pt 1K ))
r d an amenc sha Nee dant mment { aaa bh t Prey f atetonne ; thined from Roval tal industries could be got go { }
. + n to accept the| the Command: € I La night thousand fi yped 1 f ‘ ’ aia iat sd ~ - = a
Committee's Report,” "all went well trators led by the Socia : Reuter PS SSSEESISES






PAGE TWO °

eee



astern pienienieeneenteanmremnenetnememmanaeans BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1950
SS __ eS

= : :
anh Calling **" More: Fer The fee Tee | Wome | Bieter ae renee
Guillotine ? 7 —- | a ee a | eo eho

i
Prices in the local market |











i
"i



Even the daintiest housewife |

Niven's Pimpernel Film Waits For The can now take on the muscle-sized | - a ae . gare tor
Verdict From Goldwyn job of laying a new floor. Nertaiine a vs
‘Just introduced on the market, eowanle Apples:
ige kit which, the makers say, | i 40 aa ‘per pound
Hty Harold Conway kes floor tile laying easy. It Mangoes: 3, 4 and 6 cents
contains the necessary equipment each.

a knife; an awl, a spreader for
the adhesive, and cord and chalk
with which to mark guiding lines.

WHAT NEWS of that very Elusive Pimpernel—which Powell and
Pressburger began making for the Korda company over a year ago?
4 hear that the revised version is now ready; and that Sam
Goldwyn will be asked to see it privately before he leaves London. Tiles should be laid close to-



B.B.C. Radio Programme

“fancy my not noticing that thing!

Why Goldwyn? Because he was the cause i ornel’ ' r ; » 4 ] The two little are not satisfied

hold-up. f the Pimpernel’s gether always working from the die eae - a News with their ee but they say Anyone would think it ad appeared
Goldwyn has centre of the room out to the walls-| analysis; 7.15 a.m. Sandy Mack her- | goodbye and decide to meet on the there all of a sudden.” As he stares
an option on Each tile should be lowered care€-| son at the Theatre Organ; 7.30 a.m next afternoon, As Rupert turns to at it he gets more and more puzzled.
the American fully into the adhesive which has| From the Third Programme: © oN" | go home he trips over a strong ‘‘I've never seen a plant like that
rights, but been left to dry until it becomes Frown we, Editorials: 8. 19 om. } ickly plant growing almost undee — before,’’ he thinks. * t's in full leaf,
threate ned sticky so it will not ooze up. eer Weet Indies: 8.20. 2.m. Militar, | is feet and is sent sprawling. while all the trees ar> bare, and—-
one of his “in- When half the floor is completed, | Bend; 8.45 a.m. Colonial Questions | Good gracious!" he gasps. look—the leaves are like stars !

P »gi , j 9 a.m. Close Down; 1045 a
adhesive may be applied on the] | °V0y, shire: 12 noon The News; 12.10 |

other side and the same process} m. News Analysis; 12.15 p.m. New
followed. After a few days, the] Zcaland vs British Isles;
floor must be washed with warm | Jack Salisbury; 12.45 p-m

lude me out”
acts when he
waw the first
completed





—



et
= =
——









re re : Nerthamptonshire; 1 p-r te

version. soapsuds, rinsed with clear water] 3) the Piano S p.m. Radio Newsree 7 ee :

After trans- Si eee: atthe Plang, 115 pm Bade Seve’ |) AGUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
pr gi P ten~ And that, say the instructions} The News; 7.10 pm ea that | MATINEE: TODAY at 5 P.M.

sion between that come with the kit, is all thera | 9°35, p'm. Starlight TONIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30



Korda and
Goldwyn
David Niven
and Margaret
Leighton were
taken back to
the studios
and put to

)

{

s it.—I.N.S. Sports Review; 4 p.m. The N » | Sy
‘2% " Sports he Dally Service; 4.15. p.ro I} {ACK CARSON — JANIS PAIGE — DON DeFORE

a

Cc Fire for Girl Guides and Gir )
Seouts, 445 Sandy MacPherson at the |} and DORIS DAY
Suck Gum Not Thom [eine oS |) SpoMancp ON THE HIGH SEAS’
Dance with me; 6.30 pm. F ‘ in ¢

BIRMINGHAM, Eng. Third Programme; 7 p.m. The New

All children should chew gum]7 10° p.m News Analysis; 7.15 p.m







— i Commentary, W.I. v Yorkshire, 8 p.m
work oe nut bao i gee and with] (Scio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. Weekly in Technicolor
secon - the mouth closed. Sports Summary, 8.30 p.m. Camp Fire ve
thought This advice was given by] for Girl Guides and Girl Scouts; 8°50 A Warner Bros. Pisture
seenes. > = is € lje-Da p.m. Interlude, 9 p.m Ring up the
Wher Gold English dentist ay ae tio " Curtain, 10 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m 7 eerie -——- _ asieiale
1 Gold- at the British Dental Association's) tyreriude; 10.15 p.m. John O’Groats to SPECIAL MATINEE: THIS MORNING
wyn was annual meeting at Birmingham. Land’s End; 10.45 p.m Orchestral |! at 9.30 o'clock
asked about He said: Records; 11. pm. The Idea of a Uni-
The Elusive “It exercises the jaws and pre-] Vers! }



CHRISTINE LARSON

in “PARTNERS OF THE SUNSET”
A Monogram Picture

Pimpernel at
atm : a Press Con-

ference last

MR. AND MRS. JOHN WISE and their two children left for the week, he
U.S. via Puerto Rico yesterday by B.W.I.A, They are pictured pulled a wry
here on their way to the ’plane : face and re-
torted: “Let's

EAVING yesterday morning Come Here Every Year not talk about

vents the malformation that results
from under-development.”

The dentist cited three causes} THE FIRST ANRSCO
of irregular teeth! Thumb suck-

ing, ewalewing it * tongue COLOR PICTURE TO \ SS
etween the n the same

ma nd ing] COME TO BARBADOS!
through the pm a eo GATETY (The Garden) ST. JAMES



———_— ||
)

} JIMMY WAKELEY — DUB TAYLOR
{
(
(|
(





= ———=— SSS S——-

















‘ by B.W.1.A. for Puerto Rico . in it, shall we?” ‘ ”
- ‘ 4 " . ’ . TAY fis “ suc not | ~ured,
intienell 404s GG. ak ae R AND MRS A. TAYLUW The amended “it coming. oom mt ee P I ; A Z A SAT., SUN, 8.30 p.m, MAT, SUN. 5 p.m.
and Mrs. Johnnie Wise and the and their young daughter —and by now wale alpole-Day, - it is ! Presenting for the first time in Barbados !
two childien, Audrey and Wate arrived yesterday by B.W.1.A costly — pro- . that the child should ag my Vicgintn Mee ree Action. Bit
son, They ‘are going to live in Mr. from Trinidad to spend a holiday duction is due PRBVIEW : PRavid Niven, Margaret Leighton in dummy rather than a thumb. \FO-DAY and Continuing Sian cee eee aortas mmeee

“a Sone “ : Ahn a ; : —I.NS.
Wise’s home state Pennsylvania +2 3arbados. Mrs. Taylor ana for London The Elusive Pimpernel ee Till Sunday 5 & 8.30 p.m. FLAXY MARTIN

and they will ‘ ae their daughter will be here foc showing next
porarily with ae tem- two months, but Mr. Taylor wii month, what- ? Non
li * only be here for one month, ever the Goldwyn verdict about roles in the film version, if it is ;
Johnnie used to be with the They are staying at “Beach America I have not yet seen a made but not the same two. ROYAL (Worthings)
U.S. Army. during the war and House”, St. Lawrence, and come worthless Powell and Pressburger The story is being changed round



\
| Also The Color Shorts “KING OF THE CARNIVAL"
‘ And Buss Bunny in “HARE SPLITTER”
Shorts “KING OF THE CARNIVAL” & “HARE SPLITTER”



































¥ ; acted i i B- ¢ > a bit. TO-DAY and Tomorrow
was statiéned-for a time at Sea- t0 Barbados every year for a picture, and I'll back their judg- culte a Ve .
well Airfort here, and his wife, holiday. Mr. Taylor is wita ment. Even against the es ee ee ay Baye ee hosel Peuae rie as ri
the former Audrey Lashley is a Huggins and Co., in Port-of- Sam himself. Broadway production of the Lons- She. moa
Barbadian, , Spain. Z 3 Why He Idle? dale play. If that timetable is Stanley RIDGES
A keen radio enthusiast, he To Study Engineering ° adhered to, she would have 2 ; Bill HENRY
operated a “Ham” Station under HAVING shortly for the U.K MARGARET LEIGHTON must Tush job in the ae eee - TO-DAY TO TUESDAY 5 and 8.30 P.M.
the call sign of VP6SJ, and he was is Mr, Herbert Grannum, son nearly have forgotten her Leaey But Mr. Lonsdale, who went “FALSE FACES”
familiarly> known as “Stonewall?! Mr. and Mrs. Wiliam H See her fe. FRB ae ahead to New York to arrange and . JOHN FORD'S NEW AND FINEST
Jackson,” by his radio friends ff4rannum of “Ashton”, Garden Pee eo ee ‘ , the production, is due back in : ioger in : We A ag
Quiet and unassuming, John an “ap, Worthing. sence. he beginning of July she London to-day I hear there has Roy ROC Ean eouk” ea PICTURE Oi THE HALL) Ee
his family will be greatly miss« Herbert is going to Scotland to ret ae eu rig The Cocktail been a disagreement between the John Ford ond Merion C. Cooper present
by their wide circle of friends. udy engineering at Mirrlees 7 o 7 wce author and the American manage-
. “Teachers Week” ,atson, an Engineering Company. a eee ete ees ment -about how zhe Way Things EMPIRE a my eum an
‘he course is expected to last for oom k hi ginal “O Should go on Broadway
pany to take up her orig “LES
live years. re
m2 i. role. 4 - 7 30.
RAL, MISELEY, TUCKER Returned With Grandson "Wy is Miss Leishton loving > UH fe wen wemcamsanin
tive in Barbados, left yesterday by FTER two months’ holiday in to ae koa ieneda. is Has CROSSWORD Hal Wallis’ Production . . .
B.W.1.A. for Antigua. From Barbados, Mrs. Ethel Ray . assing new film role . a > ETL.” "
there he will be going to Tortola returned to Trinidad yesterday pag get uae aaa) PAID IN FULL } A MADEED NATWIKK
via St. Thomas. In Tortola he afternoon by B.W.I.A., accom- starring . : Directed by JOHN FORD
will give a series of five lectures panied by her grandson, Stephen “It was arranged at the start of Robert CUMMINGS | ee ee oe por by JAMES WARDEN GELLAM: Seeun Fhoy by PL Sek MURRAY
at their “Teachers’ Week.” Mansfield, who has also been the play that she should appear Lizabeth SCOTT ]]} : aa A ee EG Rea
holidaying here for about three for a limited season,” say the film Diana LYNN ‘

' Extra;
LEON ERROL in
“BACKSTAGE FOLLIES”

} Eve ARDEN
Not Suitable for Children

ROXY

To Join Husband weeks. They were staying with company. “You never know —we
_ Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Ray at might suddenly find a role for
RS. HAZEL DOWNEY white Hall Flats, Hastings. her.







If an actress of Margaret





accompanied by her two eos es 1
daughters Pat and Wendy left For Trinidad Visit Leighton’s calibre steps out of a } British and American Newsreel
yesterday by B.W.I.A._ for ISS PAULINE FITZGERALD, big stage success to sit idle for TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.15 :

LOCAL TALENT AUDITION

| 9.30 a.m, To-morrow



Puerto Rico intransit for the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. weeks, it aaa 2 aE of
U.S.A. She will join her husband Thomas Fitzgerald of “Raffeen”, Planning carried to excess.

there, who left Barbados about Garrison, left for Trinidad on Dridie’s New Look

United Artists Double
Mickey ROONEY





and Continuing
|
|

































one year ago. Thursday afternoon by B.W.1A. Thomas MITCHELL
. Pauline has gone for a holiday, Gpynris JOHNS, another first- in
Arrived Yesterday but may stay on for an indipinite vate Korda contract star, returns avroes “THE BIG WHEEL" | LEO EEE VELVET SLE PLP VP LAA LPP EEA
" Boose period. She will be staying with from stage to screen soon. k. This Cornish town should be in , ix a
RRIVING from Trinidad yes- her brother Pat and his family in : Lonsdale’s The Way Things Go, 10 Bishopric. a) eee “DAVY CROCKETT iS , %
- &terday morning by B.W.1.A St. Ann’s, Port-of-Spain. in which she is appearing, comes 11 Nota T.T. (3) INDIAN SCOUT” 1$2 A UE ! %
were Mr. and Mrs. Errol Bailey ' uff towards the end of July after 12 @Umit an oath, (4) on (1) : ' * é %
They were intransit from Aruba, Photographs Too! the surprisingly short run of five {4 ar u a, . with |< we: x
where Mr, Bailey is with the HE Antigua Art Group which months. 16. The width of an open mouth. 46) George MONTGOMERY 2 ut UM Mmeten stersing if DIRECT FROM FACTORY 10 WEARER %
Industrial Relations Department is hokling ‘un Exhibition at Miss Johns’s next film job may See ey eras 10) Ellen DREW ARTHUR LAKE-LON CHANEY * - ¥
of the Lago Oil Company. the end of August is not only be in an adaptation of James 2: Beastiy noise. (7) 5 ‘ e $
& o oe at eres i: : : LLOYD BRIDGES: ERIC FELDARY s 5
Mr. Baile d to teach at t1 accepting paintings and drawings Bridie’s A Sleeping Clergyman ae A Great Bary. \o) TANIS CHANDLER « JOHN QUALEN x x
r. Bailey used to teach at the #5, ‘their exhibition, but also which Anatole de Grunwald _ is _ YMPIC TAN MacDONALD | 4 MONOGRAM @PUMPS in White, Brown, Black, Blue 75c., 85c., $1.15 $1 x
St. Mary's Boys’ School before photographs. hoping to make. It would be the Down OL "i PICTURE x @ BALLERINAS in Red. Sizes ? a » Ps. $1.20 x
he went to Aruba and was also my gins, W ives ¢ rst Bridie pl be screened- 1 For ubiicating furniture wheels. i ce in * " » Bines S—8.........,. ees $1.45
; Mrs Higgins, who lives at 40 first Bridie play to be ser RUF OA ; % @ LADIES’ CANV : x
for a short time a member of the gt, Mary Street in St. John’s, under the more screen-like title 4 [is \s ineifective, «8) TO-DAY and Tomorrow % 3 AS RUBBER SHOES ............... 1.95 &
‘Advocate’ staff. He has been ir Antigua, is organising this part of of Flesh and Blood. * Cram torso. (into vehicles 7) 4.30 & 8.15 x @ LADIES’ CANVAS CASUALS in White, Red, Blue 2.95 $
Aruba for two and a half years. the show and she writes, welcom- _ In the last West End revival of ce 3 he Columbia Big Double . . . % @ LEATHER SANDALS WITH RUB vee ae x
z » Chang a truop movement? (9) Gl FORD N FOCH BER SOLES

Here for two or three weeks. ing Barbadian photographers to A Sleeping Clergyman, Margaret 5 frue 14) 6 Quarter score. (4) z4enn A te g Children’s $1.60; $1.90; Ladies’ . R
they are staying with his mother send their exhibits to her for exhi- Leighton played two roles. 4 Re-energise the spring. (8) bad % @ LADIES’ CREPE SOLED SHOES io a 3.15 X
in St. Matthias Gap. bition. Glynis Johns will also act two |! 4 CuEe en aren elay. 4 “THE UNDERCOVER MAN” % ae et DO nEe BROOMS 65s oo. 6 65 -95 to 5.80
2 : eg as eee 1 Bors love this cane. <5) é and x tours Be ~ voi SHOES—Brown or Black $4.30 5.05 %
AD SHI . - 7 Safe (4) 18. inclinea (4) “COVER GIRL” % @MEN’S SOCKS ................ 420., 480, 50. B8c., Ide. &
] sy Sojution ot avs puzzle --Across: . CHILDREN’S - ae ° »
By B h b uuen Of “Ehtembort. Lie amuses 2a, ith x © and LADIES’ ANKLETS %
—bBy Beacncom er ie 'é ‘sini Tie. ‘od 'retanus: = x ; 32c-, 36c., 50c., 40c., 41c. ¥
4 Lere, 2 nen 20. Bros. 47, Rita HAYWORTH % @SHOE POLISHES, SHOE BRUSHES, SUEDE CLEANERS >
T IS coming to something— a constitutional weakness, m’lud,” why do we assume that Amer 5 ee he ek EO 6, Gene KELLEY $ $
but I am not sure to what commented Mr. Honeyweather cans only come to England to} !ennsson 7 Memo: 10. Rid: 8 %
—when a defenceless_ scare-. Gooseboote shrewdly. ‘“Remark- lead the life they are accustomed | \wiaw Nol $ . $
crow’s clothes are stolen. able!” said Cocklecarrot, leaning to lead in America? I leave the x %
The theft is remarkable, be- forward ae watching or eer answer or mea se oye | % 3
cause scarecrows are so badly driver's efforts to dislodge the a cup of tea and a Kipper a e . x
dressed today. There was a time intruding elbow. Mr. Gooseboote, Pavillion d’Armenonville in the | TO-NIGHT SE ee ree ee 3

TRACY sn CASTLE % SHOEMAKERS TO THE WORLD. 3



when the big landed gentry used in an attempt to lend a helping Bois de Boulogne.
to send for someone from their’ hand, got his elbow interlocked i.

own tailoring firm to measure with his colleague's, and the two Watercress magnate sobs
the scarecrows on the estate for of them swayed like Japanese tke le
a couple of suits. That, of wrestlers “Is this a court of N American scientist has dis-
course, explains the odd conduct law? asked the judge sarcasti- covered that the continuous
of the deaf and_ short-sighted eally, “or a Contortionists’ Gala? sound of a telephone bell kills
peer who, on q morning walk, Pray, let me know.” mice; just as the continuous
held a long one-sided conversa~ In passing re a pes oe om.
tion with a smart scarecrow on I GATHER that taxi-strikes anc e continuous § 1 é



.
9446566665 4,
EPP PPPS SPS LEPEE COLL POELLELOO>







DINE AND DANCE
AT

CLUB MORGAN






















To be

the home farm. ten-ton church bel] makes ele-



z must not occur, because they phants very ill, As a modern |
hs Thorogrip flag make a bad impression on Ameri- Dost arpote:
E case was held up yester- can tourists. Any incenvenience Fetchin odin Fale Py
3 : ing winkles from a farm ner t . as ove y
day owing to what is unfor- to the natives is comparatively house THE WEST IN | § | as
tunately a common occurrence unimportant Apparer tly we are Will not cure an old horse DIE MOST POPULAR NIGHT CLUB. |
when Mr. Tinklebury Snapdriver already jot with shame because With no breath in his body G
becomes excited. His elbow again we do not supply enough iced Said the pale tutor DELICIOUS STEAK DINNERS A Sta
got wedged in his mouth water, and have only one tele- Outside the glove-factory Served throughout the Night r

strange as that may sound, “it is phone in hotel bedrooms But Not much.



















Dial 4000 for Reservations
Yooosososess SSOP PEP POOP PEAS EE PPE PS LOLOL LPP PPLESLAP PD APAPITAA of B e auty
- °
Pd “y ‘ -
: HERE'S A NEW LIST... : | follow the advice of
S : : FOR YOUR SUGAR | the charming star
: MUSSOLINIS MEMOIRS 1942—1943 S| of >
I » e t F = 42— i { —
S sarees ‘]| FACTORY REPAIRS wren
g MAXIM GORKI'S “UNREQUITED LOVE” >| “Tal Lux T
Ww always use Lux Toilet Soa
g “TRUTH WILL OUT’—by Charlitte Haldane y vee it’s a real beau’ ae
: x FIREBRI 1 | ek
% ie so j 2 % CKS | my face generously with its rich,
% FROM EMPIRE TO COMMONWEALTH % FIRECLAY eaper lath
x % ~creamy lather, working it in
x “PRINCIPLES OF BRITISH IMPERIAL %| FIRE CEMENT i gently, but thoroughly. ‘Then I
S GOVERNMENT % STEAM PIPE & FITTINGS || rinse with warm water, splash
x “BEAU SABREUR”—by Wren ‘ BAR IRON {| with cold. | With Lax Tollet Soap
% ate) : : PORTLAND CEMENT he + > lather, skin takes on new loveli-
x IN FACE OF FEAR”—by Michael Scot % Teh ness. It feels like smoothing beauty
x = x Stocked by our Plantation Supplies Department \ ae in!”
s ~ LN
> | Telephone No. 4657 Lary
x y ‘ % \ :
° ] / rg 7 8 5 ms
: ini ADVOCATE STATIONERY | oo i * LUX couer soap
x ; ST ORE x BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON i |
8 %| , .
: * FACTORY LTD. { T
6°.996990696066666666666646695% ssh ct tinea ose dad WHITE SOAP OF THE
POOOOSO CS OOOO SOOO OPPS SE SO OCSE SECO E SSCS GO GOSOS SES SOS OS SS OOS OOO SSG OF | essa aS RRR RS TE A-LTS 697-11 10-50 pice Stars
eRe ae ~~ Bass a LEVER rropuce®
’ t
SATURDAY,

Names of Owners of 100 |

JULY 29,

1950

Acres Should be Published

Says Mr. W.

A. Crawford

Mr. W. A. Crawford asked 11 questions when the House of
Assembly met last Tuesday. Mr. Crawford wants Govern-
ment to publish a list of the people who have 100 acres of |

land or more.

Harbaur Log



in Carlisle Bay

Emanuel C Gordon, — Sch
Yacht Leander; Sch. E, M
nis, Sch. Turtle Dove; Sch. W. L
cia; Sch. Rosarene; Sch. Gardenia
jch. Timothy A. H. Vansluytman;
Daerwood; Sch. Princess Louise;
sen Philip H. Davidson; Sch. Lydina

Bel Queen. Sch Mary M.
Sch Cyril Smith; Sch
Belle Wolfe D'Ortac; Seh
D

Sch



daipha;



A Sch
E
Sch

ARRIVALS
Trader, 128 tons
from Turks Island
4,445 tons net, Capt
Kitts

Earles
i Squires,
3.S. Specialist.
Harriman, from St
Schooner Molly N. Jones, 37 tons net,
Capt Clouden, from Dominica
S.S. Mormacgulf, 4,521 tons net
from Puerta Cabello
DEPARTURES

Lady Joy. 46 tons net
for St. Lucia
Caribbee, 100
for Dominica

In Touch with Barbados
Coast Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd, ad-
Vise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their
Parbados Coast Station

net,

Capt
Ww

M V
Parsor

M.V
Gumb

Capt

tons net, Capt





S.S. City of Belgrano, S.S. Hermes,
S.S. Esito, S.S. Silverteak, S.S. Ari-
guani, S.S Cottica, SS. Imperial
Quebec, S.S. Kallada, S.S Golfito,
S.S. Maria de Larrinaga, S.S. Come-
dian, S.S. Springwave, S.s Historian,
S.S. Esso Avila, 3.8 Regent Leopard,
S.S. Rangitata, S.S. Fort Amherst, S.S
Fort Richelieu, S.S. Mara Nike, S.S
Hersilia, $.S Alcoa’ Cavalier, S.S
Regent Tiger, S.S. Byfjorad, s.s

Bachaquero and) S.S. Tsinan



ARRIVALS —
From TRINIDAD

By B.W.1.A.L

Joseph Carter, Olivia Callendar,
Joseph Lutchman, Larry Butler, Edgar
Gunstone, Gordon King
From MARTINIQUE

Jean Littee, Simone Littee, Yvon
Littee

From BRITISH GUIANA
Edgar Adams, Hewlitt Benjamin, Hil-





















He asked

* Will the Government cause to

be published at the earliest
date possible figures showing the |
distribution and ownership of land|
in the colony on the basis of one}
hundred (100) acres and up-
wards?

In view of the colony's acces-!

sion to the Economic Co-oper- |
ation Agreement, will the}
Government please state whether |
it has any plans for application |
for assistance from Marshall Plan |
Funds to which the country is}
now entitled, for the purpose otf!
large-scale irrigatian as part of!
our Agricultural development
programme, or for any other pur-|
pose? }

In view of the necessity for
providing assistance for the |
general improvement of housing

conditions throughout the colony.
Will the Government take early |
steps, in consultation with fhe
sugar producers, to establish ma-
chinery for the purpose of impos-
ing a cess at the rate of 50 cents!
per ton of sugar manufactured in
the island,—the funds from such
levy to be used to help the work-
ing classes to construct repair or
improve their homes?

* Is the Government aware that
the ration allowance accorded
the staff of the Government Indus-
trial Schools is considerably less,
in fact, less than half of that given
to the staffs of other Government
institutions?
2. Will the Government
(a) state the reasons for such
disparity,
(b) take steps to place the
ration allowance of these



employees on the same
basis as those of other
institutions?

* In consequence of the circum-

stance that the Vestry of St.
Philip find it financially imposs
ble, except by borrowing money
for the purpose, to provide public
baths and latrines in the parish
and in view of the fact that the
provision of public baths and
latrines, are not specifically the











Yesterday

Ne

co

Re ad and
ner,

Turning



ted with
Michael

sal Both



morning at approximately
vion Road in Christ Church, when
a Highway

BARBADOS ADV

9.45 o'clock,

in

the motor X-

ca



vehicles were damaged



Better Lose A Minute
Than Lose Your Life

Remember Road Manners

Speaking last night over the local Radio Diffusion Service,
on the subject of Road Manners, Colonel R. T. Michelin,
Commissioner of Police said:—

We are fortunate in living in one
of the most beautiful islands of
the Caribbean It is, however, a
small island with a very large
population and narrow roads.

We have 540 miles of road.
These roads are used by 4,600
motor vehicles and 19,000 bi-
cycles, besides numbers of
donkey carts.

With this large population, pRIs
this amount of wheeled traffic it
is no wonder vhat our roads are
congested, especially so in the
town areas.

Special Care

It is therefore more than ever
necessary for each and eVyeryone
of us to drive, ride and
with special care, and hav§¥ Road
Manners,
Now what
Simply it is driving or ricing or
walking with consideration for



are Road Manners?

ton Carty, Sheila Carty, Amelia [obligation of the local authoritf®& | na ' ,
3 re G : ~) prs us the highway
Texeira, N Gittens, Joyce Gittens, | will the Government make the syne ae eh a find
Louis Git Jessie Gray, John , ; (a) It means -vhen you finc
Macitwllen Gray, duplies ‘tenon necessary funds available to the your car, lorry or bus behind a
Rodrigues, Angela Rodrigues, Lilian Vestry, by way of a grant, for the Conkey cart, being pavient, and
Pilgrim. Anthony Fernandes, Jean} erection of at least two (2) such| “” ting until the road in front of
Fernandes, Rupert Westmaas, Jeanettef baths and latrines in the said Walling f ingi ut
Edwards. Smith Bracewell, Margaret | patish? you is clear before swinging out,
Br well, Mrs. Hinds ; (b) It means when You fet
From MAIQUETIA spasms -onsid-| to a pedestrian crossing, stopping
Jose Alberto. Del Carril, Josephine In consequence of the consid ¥ ; Lh ywin the pedestrians -to
Del Carril, Judith Del Carril, Pamela i erable increase in the cost of pi 2 eee e :
Del Carvil, Pablos Esma Gomez, Pablos| living since the time when they | #¢t across ‘ a
Fdward Gomer, Peter Sehweinburger, | were originally fixed, will the (c) It means giving hand sig-
Josefme Schweinburger, Rafael Castitlo, | Government take steps appreci-
ably .to increase the amounts] ~ r iod?
mune . ; ans | same curreney for the per’
DEPART RES By BW.1AL allowed to married and single Is if a fact that island consta-
Glen Kelly, Ruth Kelly, Sam Key, | Persons “a yon prom the bles were called upon to do
Vivian Mane Albert Maney, Johan payment of Income Tax? special police work and perform
ultoi tihard Dolman, Peter Dolman, # Tee . i ‘
Helen Hoperoés, sgeef) Hoperoks, John Is-the Government aware of| duties of an extepordinety, cra
Merry, Dorothy Phillipe, Ralph Smellie, the acute discomfort experi- during the disturbances o :
Cobsiel _uoadany Michael} iengtrit et, enced daily by members of the $; '* ae the eS vr rt
P oO hue: a ayne, . . . .
Bayne, Elizabeth Biteh, Peter O'Connor, | Fire Brigade at Coleridge St. in be in the affirmative.
Pairick O'Connor, Brnest Turpin, Paul. |consequence of structural and the Government ee ioe
ine Fitzgerald, Pamela ‘Taitt, Adam | other defects in the building which whether they received
Richards. Harry Drew, Bridget O'Toole, | they occupy? remuneration for same, and,
Por ee ; 2, Does the Government pro- if not, why not?
‘ Allsot Steel 2 Reginald Cardozo pose to whe eas ae equip Will the Government please
Pace’ Doth cenne Page. mate} =a new Fite Brigade head-|W ‘state what proportions of the
Edward Benjamin f ee colony's allocation of £800,000
TISH GU 3. Arising out of the fact that) ¢rom* Development and Welfare
For F rtteH OtaaeA Bie ate hs the Probyn Street site long} funds has been already expended
Lopes, Leonilla Lapes, John Alexander. regarded as the likely area! and give details of such expendi-
George Goodrick, Judith Dalton, Richard | for a new Fire Brigade ture?
Humphrey, Trevelyan Sue-a-Quan, headquarters has now been
Harold Birkett, Wendy Drawmer, Emma | converted into a_ central He The House of Assembly re-
aah ete Sen Terence Hawkni ‘bus terminus, if the an- spectfully request Your Ex-
i swer to Question No, 2 bel cellency to send down to this
Fob 4 CUAL ag dicate dane | in the affirmative, will the | House legislation to provide that
Jacqueline armerton, Ligabeth are > yr a Sti
merton, Catherihe Mi{chell, HTN | iy ere) = ot ae all property now owned or here-
remple-Meade, Roland Dela Bastide, bh Ststion are after to be acquired by the Gov-
prone Sante ames Gaorke | new Station; ernment of this island be liable to
asdor q wue Prrera, erna agiia- t on © 4
ferro, Aurora Tagliaferto, Gabriel Tag- | ye Will the Government please| payment of the same Tates of
liaferro John Lueie-Smith, Marian | state the direct and indirect| taxes, parochial or eee
Ee ic Sn mh, iieenPensd Eni Bee i dollar earnings of the colony dur-}| any other a ia eats
Gonger, Eldora Gongér and Barbara ing the years 1938—1949 inclusive, | nature Bad: yawe: in this. ils
Pockuf would be liable.








A beauty treatment
for the
Privileged few?

ARE

and the actual expenditure in the

BEAUTY PREPARATIONS ARE USED
ALL WOMEN THROUGHOUT

THE WORLD!

LET **PQNDS** Assist you.
COLD & VANISHING CREAMS—

FACE & TALCUM POWDERS—
LIPSTICKS — HAND LOTION—
SKIN FRESHENER ETC., ETC.

DEALERS.

STOCKED BY ALL

Y



walk |












nals
to Tet
doing

(d) It means not parking
your car somewhere, which al-
though convenient to you, causes
« lot of inconvenience to others

(e) It means dimming your
lights to on—coming vraffic and not
dazzling other persons using the
road

vo the persons behind you,
them know what You intad

Thoughtlessness

The majority of accidents in
this Island are not caused by fast
and furious driving or riding but
by thoughtlessness on the part
cf the motorisv, cyclist or pedis-
trian To give an instance
this I quote from the Polyre
report of an accident w hob
cecurred in Trafalgar Square |

ot

yesterday !
A car Was proceeding from the |
direction of Victoria Bridge |
towards Chamberlain Bridge, }

the cycle from the direction o¢ |
the Public Buildings toward!
Chamberlain Bridgé. They met}
and collided. The cyclist re-|
ceived a wound, The right rear}
wheel and fork of the cycle and
the radiator grill and right head
lamp of the car were damaged.
No reckless nor dangerous driv-
ing is disclosed in this case. Just a
little more care and attention and
both sides would have, no doubt,
avoided this accident and saved
the damage to both vehicles, This
type of accident happens daily in
Barbados, Let us see if we can
reduce them,

Dislikés Speed Traps

I do not like Speed Traps, I
prefer co-operation. We look
forward to the day when we can
remove the traps from the roads
This will be done as soon as the
driving improves. As a result of
these traps, 152 persons have been
convicted for speeding this year
and fines amounting to £311 paia

in Revenue. Some drivers have

paid £10 and £12 for speeding. Is

it worth it?
If drivers of motor vehicles who
are addicted to speed only
realised that in a distance of
about three miles, the difference
in time between driving at al
dangerous speed, and that of

driving at a moderate and cor











{OFFS SS9G05996805

:
FEVER



accident occurred at the

and Transport lorry, M-1438, driver

An unequalled preparation for combating Malaria and
other Fevers, skilfully compounded from tested Drugs, Fever
respond

caused by Chills etc
preparation
Remember it is a “RECTOR’

S PRODUCT” Obtainable

Messrs Booker’s «epos) Drug Stores Ltd.

Broad Street and Alpha Pharmacy, Hastings.
PPP LLSLSCCLCOLGOOS

OCATE





junction of Lodge
driven by Annie Matthews,
by Clive Grant of Hother-

119,







fortable one With consideration

for others is only about thro

minutes, I feel sure they would
adopt the more comfortable
mode of travel.

The next time you want to get
somewhere in a hurry, remembe
you will only save a few minute
by speeding. It might result i:
your being involved in an acci-
dent; this will mean delay an@
expense.

Now, Cyclists

Now a word to cyclists, a great
number of you seem to think that
rules of the road only apply to
motorists. You have to conform to
exactly the same code in using the
highway, as the persons driving a
car or lorry,

Do not cut in on the left side of
a vehicle, This is a favourite habit
of a number of cyclists in Broad
Street. It is dangerous and a very
bad habit to get into. Do not ride
more than 2 abreast, besides being
against the law it adds to conges-
tion,

Now a word to the pedestrian
You also have your part to play
in the Road Manners Campaign
When you are walling in the
street or road keep as near to
the side as possible Always
walk facing the on-coming
traffic and not with your back
to it,

Do not stand on the streets o1
siie-walks and gossip with you
friends, Do not gather at street
corners; you obstruct the view of
motorists and cyclists. Use the
pedestrian crossings, they are put
there for your safety and help

When you cross the Victoria and
Chamberlain Bridges use the foot-
paths provided. If you do not, you

add to the congestion on tWese
Bridges
Road Manners
Much can be achieved in im
proving conditions on our roads

by the co-operation of the motor-
ist, the cyclist and the pedestrian
Cultivate Road Manners. Think
of the other users of the road and
not only of yourself, you will find
it helps everyone, Give up speed-
ing, it might result in a serious
accident and only means getting
somewhere a few minutes earlie:

The public can help a_ great

deal in this ‘Safety First’ cam-

paign by reporting to the Police

eases of driving and riding with

disregard for the safety of

others,

We won the last Test MYtch by
the ¢ombination of batsmen
bowlers and fieldsmen, each oj
them played their part, Let us

win the safety of the Roads in
our Island by the co-operation of
the motorist, the cyclist and the
pedestrian

When you drive, ride or
how Road Manners.”

walk






WE OFFER

NAIL SCISSORS
TWEEZERS

FILES

SHAVING BRUSHES

RAZORS

CALL IN TO-DAY AT

COLLINS’ DRUG STORES

Broad and Tudor Streets.



‘*RECTOR’S

MIXTURE *°

readily t this effective

w +
y
poet =.

— - " .
Â¥
{ ‘,
.
oy

SS SSS ee —

SPOOL LEELA TF AES >,

at
at

44,4044

LOCOCO COPOOON SOOO

PSPSPS FOOD?

SOCCCOS SSS SSSSSSSSSSSS

Tax
Returns Show
$112,248 Jump

Income

GEORGETOWN
Pax collecte n B

1949 wr





ish Ghiana ul
$5,068 677.21 exceed
hat of Ww reviou year b

d $4,134,
$934,225, The

$122,348. Cc mpa! ies pai

X and ina



ich



come of individuals
arious statutory
5,935,755

Cineome afte

deductions) wi



Income after tax in 1949 ws
reater by $10,740,000 than th
939 figure and $31,000 less tha
he 8 figure. Companies i:
come after tax totalled $461,00
nore than in 1948 but individuals
total income after tax $492,000
less
Of the 3,374 taxpayers for tt

last year of assessment, 725 wer
iraders, 959 civil servants an
1,690 “othér employees”
Twenty-two traders and 2
; “other employees” had income

xceeding $10,800 per annun
| There were no civil servants i
this income group Five in
lividuals were in the highest
brackets—those with gross ir
comes exceeding $30,000, In 1939
there was only one such in
dividual; but there were 9 in 1939
and 7 in 1948

The majority of individual in
come taxpayers were persons ii
receipt of incomes below $1,200
in this category, civil servant
(643) were more numerous tha
traders (403) but other en
ployees” again dominated — the
group with 999, as they did th
53,600—$6,000, $6,000—$8,400, and
the $8,400—$10,800 groups

Companies with
exceeding $5,000
companies with
that figure numbered 104. Twenty
three of these earned income
over $100,000 and income
over $500,000

Excess Profits
collected during
E Profit Tax

incomes
numbered
incomes abov

not
54;

1X,

Tax

1940

was

In
yielded

nol
1948
$782,

587

The total expenditure of th
Income Tax Department for 1949,
including the cost of reorganisa
tional equipment, amounted to
$56,757.00, i.e., 1.1 per cent of the
tax collected. The corresponding
percentages for 1948, 1947, 1946
and 1945 were 0.75 per cent, 0.67
per cent, 0.58 per cent and 0.50
per cent respectively. The bulk of
recommendations of the PublA

IT WAS BRITISH
OTTAWA, July 27.
The British Admiralty has de



the increase resulted from the
Service Salaries and Wages Com-
mission

Two factors, states the Com
missioner, are directly responsible
for the low cost of Incomé Tax
administration in British Guidna
(J) small staff; and (2) the fact
that an overwhelming proportion
of the revenue
large companies.

comes from. the



that a submarine ob
erved Spanish trawler off
he Grand Banks ef Newfound
land on July 10 was British, Naval
Headquarters

termined
by a

announced today
—Reuter,



it
nit

are:

top.and mck 30 need and aheve ey.
yee t
» Seine in gopitation.
peor , lone Of memory ongrey,
easily exetted, fear and worry, If you
sufler avy of these symptoms, don't
delay treatment a angle day, because
your may be in . Meno
mown as Hynox), a new
Pregeure ith the ewe ‘dose taken a

-
toad off the weart, and makes
years younger in a few le

2

Nexco from your chemist &
i ts guaranteed to rake you feet
end-strone or money back.

fi

WO ELIE ASE EPP SOOTS

ARRIVED !!



SSS

o

ae ane

White Park Rd

SOLOS SSS OSS SSS SISOS

¢ 4346,
ALLO LOO

ear 1948 on yield for 1949
nainly depended is considered by
the Commissioner of Income Tax
to have: been “a fairly profita-
ble one for all industries,”
These amounts were paid on
gross incomes (assessed to April |
30, 1950) of $12,160,691 (com
vanies) and $11,688,926 in-
lividuals). The chargeable ir

42 BHP

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ON DISPLAY AT OUR SHOW ROOM

Prices on Application—Your Enquiries Cordially Invited

COURTESY GARAGE

663 ttt Ft







PAGE THREE

Edward
Frankland

ry of valer

ry play dan
nibise juent
TT”
Mt

ith Sir

wyer, British

inklamddiscovere d
ude existence of helium in the sun. Th of th » ith 2
water supply, and instituted a system for db xaminat ’ bacteria
which brought him idespre a mm
Born in Chirclit of re, in a druggist
in Laricaster until he went to Londo age of twenty to i In 1
he was appointed professor of chemistry at Owens College, Manchester. Retutning to
London in 1857, he held appointments at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, TI Ir n

and The Royal School of Mines. He was President of the Chemical
Society from 1871-3, and of the Institute of Chemistry from 1877-8

The Royal Society awarded brim its | Copley M



in 1894. Frankland was knighted in 1897, five yes

ais



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PAGE FOUR





Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad 8t., Bridgetown.





Saturday, July 29, 1950

PEOPLE'S BAND

THE new practice which takes the Police

Band into the various country districts for
evening concerts is certainly to be wel-
comed. The entertainment which it brings
to the people in those districts is a much
needed relief from the drab routine of
everyday life; but in addition) to this, it
serves to foster a spirit of real community
life. :
The Mobile Cinema has in the past sup-
plied limited entertainment along with its
educational work, and the British Council
too, has made a fine contribution in this
respect. These two avenues of cultural
and educational development have been
successful in so far as they have been able
to reach out to those minds capable of
making full use of their services.

With the Police Band it is different.
Captain Raison has become a romantic
figure throughout the island, and known
even if only by reputation to every member
of the community. The Band, too, because
of its improved efficiency has ceased to be
merely the Police Band. It is the People’s
Band. Whether it is providing programmes
of light entertainment at Government
House, classical airs at the British Council
Headquarters, mixed items at the Hastings
Rocks or at the Bay Street Esplanade, there
is always a full attendance to listen. And
especially is this so when the Bandmaster
decides to supply pot pourri of West
Indian airs, Trinidad calypsoes and up-to-
the-minute American jazz. Then there is

‘no'taste left unsatisfied.

is this ability to cater to every taste
which. has enabled the Band to claim as
ardent supporters, people drawn from
every strata of society. It is the bringing
together of these various sections and the
infusion of the real community spirit which
constitutes the greatest service which the
Band can render. It also relieves the
drabness in the life of these simple folk,
and makes them feel for a brief period that
they are part of a larger whole.

The visits of the Band, however, will call
for better facilities such as community
halls and other suitable places of entertain-
ment where the people of the districts can
come together for the purpose, not merely
of éntertainment, but for cultural and
educational development. They will also
afford opportunity for those who live in
the City and who are, in many instances,
unacquainted with country life, to follow
the Band into neglected parts of the island.
mais wift friévitably be followed by a desire

to help in the needed improvement; the
social conscience of Barbados will be
awakened, and, as a community, we shall
be taking a decided step towards real de-
velopment and progress.

Young: Soldiers
THE camp of two hundred and fifty
eadets at the Volunteer Drill Hall is to be
commended. Camp life for young people
" who must live under healthy, active con-
ditions and follow a particular daily
routine is essential to their physical and
mental development. Training in arms
brings a discipline of mind such as can be
found in no other avenue of life. To obey
without question and to carry out instruc-
tions at the moment 1s a training which
gives one a degree of self control without
which life would be a miserable failure.
In addition to this, it must be apparent
to any keen observer that the physical con-
dition of many of our youngsters shows
serious degeneration. The fine upstanding
figure is the exception rather than the rule.
And this can be remedied by proper exer-
cises and diet.

There are those who object to military training
orn the ground that it excites a fractious spirit.
The reverse is the truth. The youngster sure of
himself and enjoying good health is the most
amiable of companions.

The schoolboys, too are to be commended for
giving up portion of their long vacation to attend
camp.

OUR READERS SAY:









|

(Prom Our London Correspondent)

LONDON.

THE Colonial Development
Corporation, now in its third year,
is passing from the planning to the
development stage. In the first
six months of this year, its capital
commitments rose from just over
£14 million to almost £25 million—
a quarter of its available funds—
and C.D.C., expect 1950 to be the
year of its highest capital
expenditure.

In the Corporation’s second
Annual Report, laid before
Parliament today, an optimistic
note is struck,

The Corporation, it is stated,
“has every confidence that,
with the help of modest alloca-
tions of dollars in the early
years, it will, within a short
time, become a net dollar
earner.”

|
American “Know How”
| Wanted

This confidence is expressed in
|a review of negotiations with the
international Bank for Recon-
struction and the possibilities of
American investment in the
Colonies. {

The Corporation feels that it will
be some time before its kind of
undertakings throughout the

British Colonies will attract the
American investor,

“Whatever may be the validity”
the Report states, “of an investor's
fears on grounds of the political
nsecurity of economic stability of
the British colonies, it is unlikely
that the kind of enterprise in

| which the Corporation is interested
will, in present circumstances,
srove to be to any large degree
attractive to the ordinary Amer-
ican investor.

“This position may decisively
change when, in the course of a
few years, the spread and mag-
nitude of the Corporation’s activ-
ities build up into a demonstrably
economic institution through
which American dollar investment
in various forms can be canalised”.

Greater access to American
“know-how” and markets would
provide the best advantage to the
Corporation of participating with
American private enterprise, it is
stated. And the Corporation, it is
made clear, would welcome “the
skill, enterprise and drive which
are characteristic of American
business.”

Particular deterrents to Amer-
ican investment—exchange control
and American taxation laws—are
discussed with reference to meas-
ures now being taken which,
it is hoped, will “encourage the



Time To Take Stock Of
Our Measurements?

(From Our London Correspondent)
LONDON.

The British system of weights
and measures causes endless
amusement to Americans, and
great misery to visiting Contin-
entals. No less confusing to them
is our monetary system, which
admittedly seems designed to give
the utmost trouble to all concerned
and to make mental arithmetic a
real headache,

British experts have urged often
enough a switch over to the metric
system, already in operation over
the greater part of the world, but
without success, France—where
it originated—uses the metric
system, and so do Germany.
Russia, Greece, Turkey, and
seores of other countries.

But we continue to plead all
manner of excuses for not shed-
ding our farthings and florins, our
yards, feet and inches. Now it
seems that the small island of
Cyprus may take the initiative,
and adopt the system herself. The
Government there recently pro-
posed that the metric system of
weights and measures should be
introduced into the colony, thus
bringing to the front the whole
vexed question of an interna-
tional system that would make
trading a simpler and more effici-
ent business altogether.

Cyprus, by her example, may
cause other colonies to think
seriously about abandoning their
present methods of measurement.
She is herself badly in need of a
change. “How”, ask her trades-
men, “are we to explain to cus-
tomers overseas the-fact that a
cantar of olive oil weighs more

tice of
recommendations

Barbados

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

flow of American
British colonies.”

Utopian Scheme Rejected

The Report covers the year to
December 3list last, when there
were actually 28 C.D.C, jinder-
takings in operation, one-third of
them agricultural in character.
Furvher projects under active in-
vestigation, but not yet launched
52 in all—will mean the Corpor-
ation committing itself to capital
expenditure totalling about £50
million. In addition there are 66
projects av an early ‘stage of con-
sideration

These figures do not represent
anything like the total schemes
which have been put up to the
Corporation for consideration.
Some of these, the Report says,
“were inevitably the utopian
schemes and impracticable pro-
posals which e\ ery new organisa-
tion must expect to receive.”

The problem of the develop-
ment period in its financial aspect
is dealt with in the section of the
Keport covering the accounts. The
first two years of planning and
investigation i1cveal that most of
the Corporatio: 's investments will
not begin to yicld at their estim-
ated full rate for a considerable
period,

Ninety per cen’ of the estimated
capital cost of the 28 undertak-
ings launched by the end of last
year will have been incurred by
the end of 1952 but “the total
earnings of these 28 undertakings
are not expected to reach 90 per
cent of their eventual level for
abou’ 10 years after that.”

capital into

Experts Watch Expenses

By the end of the year, the
Corporation invested over £1 m.
in land, buildings, and concessions
and another £1 million in capital
equipment necessary to develop
the productive resources of these
lands and concessions. Expendi-
ture directly related to develop-
ment and land _ clearance
amounted, on the other hand, vo
over £600,000.

Despite the fact that develop-
ment is still very much in the
initial stage, goods to the value
cf £446,000 had been marketed.

Administrative costs have
amounted Yo about 10 per cent of
the total, and emphasising the
financial] control exercised, the
Report declares:

“The Corporation’s finan-
cial administration conforms
to the best standards and the
Board are confident that it
will mee’ the most exacting
requirements of H. M. Gov-
ernment and Parliament.”

It is pointed out that all senior
members of the accounting staff
are members of recognised pro-

than a cantar of carobs, which, in
its turn, weighs more than a can-
tar of onions? Can’t we have aa
equal measurement of weight?’
The change-over would mean that
litres would take the place of
pints, quarts, Cyprus litres, ga:-
lons, kiles, kouzas, loads and the
liquid oke.

What are a few facts about the
metric system? In brief, it is the
decimal system applied to weights
and measures. Everything is in
units of ten; there is no necessity,
therefore, to have fractions. ,

It is estimated by educational
authorities that the metric system,
by dispensing with the need for
fractions, would save at least a
year of time spent by children
learning arithmetic. Two typical
examples from children’s arithme-
tic books are these: “Find the
number of cubie yards in a room
measuring 7 yards, 2 feet, 8 inches
by 14 yards, 1 foot, 3 inches by 6
yards, 5 inches.” How much
simpler is the problem as seen in
a French or German textbook.
“Find the number of cubic metres
in a room measuring 11.42 metres
by 6.42 metres by 4.9 metres.”

When applied to industry, the
saving in cash is startling, One
factory, which switched to metric,
estimated that in one year it saved
ten times the cost of new measur-
ing devices. A railway estimated
that metric would save it £15,000
a year in paper work. No less
beneficial would” be the time-
saving factor for smaller concerns,
and private traders.

The present antique measure-
ments in the U.K. began when
Edward II decided that three

made certain
in our judiciary.



The Visit o

€. D.C. Sinks £25 an Tn) HUROPE AND KOREA
Approved Projects

American Dollars Not A ttracted=Yet

fessional asso@iations and possess
wide commercial and financial ex-
perience.

A section of especial interest to
the Colonial countries concernec
in the C.D.C’s activities is that
headed;
ing the Costs of Colonial Develop-
ment Undertakings” .

changes in Colonial Income-tax
ordinances “which would involve
only a small sacrifice of curren
revenue”, but which would greatly
improve the prospects of som
types of long-term developmen|
projects, which, if undertaken
would eventually “bring muc!
additional revenue to Colonia
exchequers.”

The Corporation express thei:
view that “certain measures 0
standardisation in the economi
field may prove easier of attain-
ment and more directly Leneficia!
to some territories than measures
of political integration which ar+
so Much more in vogue today.”

Big Overheads

Warning is given about the higi
cost of essential services in the
Colonies. Among the main reason:
why Colonial development under-
takings cannot in many cases, ex~-
pect to earn at a rate sufficient t
attract the ordinary outside in
vestor, it is stated, “is the excep-
tionally high sharge for overheads
involved where new resources art
brought into production in econo-
mically backward territories”.

“The Corporation has had to re-
ject proposals for certain
schemes in undeveloped terri-
tories which on the basis of
normal overhead charges would
have had every chance of suc-
cess.”

It is admitted that most existing
Colonial enterprises have had to
create their own amenities and
basic services, including roads,
and have carried the cost. But|
these enterprises, it is added, were
able to proceed at their own pace,
at a time when the costs of the
capital works involved were not
only less in relation to expected
profits, but also the standards
required were lower.

“While the Corporation wel-
comes the improved health and
social welfare conditions which
have been achieved in some Colo-
nies” the Report continues, “by
the enforced compliance with
approved minimum _ standards,
there must clearly be some balance
between the standards of social
welfare required and the means
available to support them, unless
of course, the British taxpayer is
to be called upon to fill the gap”.

—_-

















barley corns made an inch, and
Henry | specified the yard as the
distance from the royal nose to the
tip of the blue-blooded right
thumb! The ancient Chinese had
an “uphill” mile, and a “down-
hill!’ mile, working on the quite
logical assumption that it was
more difficult to walk up a hill
than down one.

During the French Revolution,
the National Assembly appointed
a commission of scientists to settle
on a minimum number of units,
and to place all these units on the
decimal system. They decided
that the basic unit of measurement
should be the metre. It was
divided into 100 equal parts —
centimetres. It was multiplied by
1,000 to make the kilometre —
which is about three-fifths of our
mile. The weight of one cubic
centimetre of water became the
basic measure of weight — one
gram. One thousand grams made
up a_kilogram—2.2 Ibs. One
thousand cubic centimetres became
the litre—somewhat less than our
quart,

It is said that the average
person should be able to adjust
himself to the new system in a
matter of a few days, since there
are only three basic units in it,
the litre for capacity, the gram for
weight and the metre for length.

It can be argued for it that
there would be greater under-
standing and sympathy between
nations, business transactions
would be speeded up considerably,
much paper work eliminated, and
our furlongs would vanish for
ever 4



sentment of these men who suifer-
Absurd ed demotion and the many whe A™ong them was’ the epolition
To the Editor, the Advocate aspired to wearing one chevron iy the eae aly ve The late Captain Michael
_ SIR— My heartiest congratula~ rhe senior Sergeant of the force *!'8chown . Ciprani, a well known Trinidad-
tions are extended to Asst. Super- was now placed in the same plight The recommendation was ac-|ian, was one of the first West
intendent Grant Inspectors denied promotion to the rank of cepted and implemented, but| Indians to own a private plane.

Hy J. €. Oestreicher

POSSIBILITIES that the
may ask the nations of western Europe to
make more substantial contributions to their
own re-armament if they cannot help out in
Korea is being discussed in diplomatic circles
to-day.

European leaders are fearful that an awk-

“Special Factors Affect-|ward situation may arise if this comes to
pass.
A plea is made for certain,It is believed, therefore, that every possible
effort will be made to make at least some
showing in behalf of the United Nations
commitment against north Korean Commun-
ism,

Observers consider
Sweden, determined to maintain strict neu-
trality even though she would have to de-
pend on western Europe in event of conflict
with the east, made an immediate contribu-
tion in keeping with her self-chosen humani-
tarian role in world conflicts.

The government announced that it is don-
ating a full-scale hospital unit, with ambul-
ances, doctors, nurses, surgical instruments
and the like, and that all services connected
with it will be free cf charge.

Sweden has therefore “saved face”.
while Gen. Douglas MacArthur obviously
wants foot soldiers, no one can deny the tre-
mendous value of the equipment that is being
given while the western world regrets that
such materials and specialists become neces-
sary in the wake of war.

Before the Communist invasion of South
Korea occurred, there was a feeling among
European leaders that in the re-armament of
the west, the United States must assume the
major responsibility so far as financing is
concerned.

The American government was willing to
shoulder the brunt of it but made clear it
wanted assurances that the European powers
were doing all they possibly could. But the
European tendency to use as much American
money as they could get remained apparent.

Obviously, the situation in Korea must
change all that.

President Truman’s request to Congress
for an additional 10 billion dollars staggered
European capitals because of the scope. It
drove home to them both the depth of
American determination and the expenses
that are anticipated.

There has been a great deal of criticism
since Defence Minister Emanuel Shinwell
told the House that Britain’s military con-
dition does not allow for complacency.

The conservative press maintains that the
budget allowed the military services since
the end of the war has been more than suffi-
cient to give Britain a feeling of security
evne though land forces were stripped dowr
to a minimum on the home islands.

The Labour government’s obvious answe}
will be that the anti-Communist campaign
in Malaya, the strengthening of defenses at
Hong Kong and continued activation of the
fleet add up to huge expense.

This may not satisfy political critics in the
House. But the United States high com-
mand, well-versed in logistics and the cost of
military undertakings, may take a different

f the “Humming Bird”

By John Prideaux

Bourne, Simmons, Springer,
Chandler and Franklyn on their
well deserved promotion.

Your Editorial of Sunday April
2, commented on the trend of
reform in the creation of the rank
of Inspector. I was resident ‘in
Trinidad when the rank of In-
spector was instituted and at-
tended the function given in hon-
our of Chief Inspectors Kelly
and D’Espine who were promoted
to this rank with equal status.
On my return to this colony in
1946. I was surprised to find that
rather than this new rank being

introduced accordimg to the
Calver’s report, the first vital
change in the local force was

the abolition of the rank L/Cpl.
Now to my further dismay, I am
most reliably informed that the
rank of Sgt. Major—beloved the
world over, with its ancient tradi-
tions of hard work, somewhat
like the rudder of a ship is
abolished.

The members of the House of
Assembly, more especially the
Senior member); for the City,
should realise that the removal



of the rank of L/Cpl has bred
grave dissatisfaction in the Police
force and much of the ado direc

ed at the gallant Col Michelin
is mere smoke to the fire of re-

Set. Major. I am convinced that
the sentiments expressed in your
Editorial defeat the very object
for which it is intended “esprit

de Corps.”

The implementation of these
recommendations — abolition of
L/Cpl. and Sgt. Major have

narrowed the bridge for promo-
tion in the ranks, Both in Trini-
da@ and British Guiana the rank
of L/Cpl and Sgt. Major were re-
tained: even in Jamaica where
Mr. Calver is the Commissioner
of Police, the ranks exist. A
constable’s hope of gaining the
Cpl: stripes are as remote as a
local scientist making an Atom
Bomb. This fact, I repeat has
caused great indifference and
dissatisfaction in the Police Force.

No man on earth likes demo-
tion. All men on earth love pro-
motion. Imagine a man who has
been an N.C.O. for some years
without any default finding him-
self over-night back in the ranks
of a Constable alongside a re-
cent recruit. It needs no psycholo-

gist to discover the reaction.
What about the Sargeants who
hope to be Sergeants Major ! It is
absurd and unwise in my opinion
to abolish these ranks if we need
an efficient and energetic force.

Some years ago, Sir Robert H
Furness, Kt., a former Chief Jus-

what happened? His Honour Mr.
P. A. Lynch, a brilliant jurist,
retired in disgust, rather than re-
turn to the magisterial bench.
Thus, the colony lost the services
of Mr. Lynch, Since then how-
ever, it was found quite neces~
sary to re-institute this office and
the entire public is in agreement.
These police L/cpls who were
demoted are not in the favour-
able position to retire in disgust
but remain in the force an un-
justified disgruntled and dis-
couraged group of men. Some
critic will say, the emolument is
the same, but the above case of
Mr. Lynch can easily answer the
critic. Tam hoping that the Execu-
tive will review this matter in
the interest of the public. 1
never read the Calver report,
but I laboured under the im-
pression that the creation of the
rank of Inspector was another
avenue of promotion not re-
trenchment of the many for the
few favourites. Again what about
the rank of Sub

rank also

Inspector? This
exist in Trinidad.

I am hoping to hear Col. Miche-
lin’s view in his next Press Con-
ference.



Collymore Rock,

ALBERT MAYNARD
St, Michael,

He purchased a ‘Gipsy Moth’ and
named it the “HUMMING BIRD,”
and flew to many of the Islands
in the Windward Group, much
to the enjoyment of the inhabi-
tants. This love of aviation was
to cost him his life, for he was
killed “when his plane crashed into
the side of a mountain in Trinidad,

Captain Cipriani desiring to fly
to Barbados obtained permission
from the proprietors of the “Rock-
ley Golf and Country Club” to
use the fairway as an airstrip,
there being no airport here at that
time. The news got around that
Captain Cipriani would be arriv-
ing here at the end of July, and
the date was afterwards fixed for
the 30th.

Saturday the 30th July 1932
was as beautiful a day as anyone
could

wish for, and all were
talking of the expected arrival
of the “Humming Bird,” as this
was to be the second plane to fly

to this Island, it created quite a
stir among the populace. The first
plane was Captain Lanchester’s
when he visited the Island four
years before while he was on a

flight from the U.S.A. to South
America, but unfortunately for
him, he crashed in taking off when

leaving Trinidad.

All those who could get away
from their jobs on a busy Satur-
day morning collected at the Golf
Club to witness this historic
event; and shortly before 9.30
o'clock the ery of “luk he day”
was heard, and sure enough,
Captain Cipriani and his pilot had
made the Island safely. There
were many young men who were
keenly interested in aviation
present to witness this event, and
to see if this little plane would
land safely on such a ground.
One of these was Mr. J. A. (Jack)
Skinner, now manager of the
Barbados Ice Co. Ltd, who was
building his plane—‘Miss Barba-
dos”—on the second floor of the
same building now occupied in
the manufacture of ‘Bico’ ice-
creams.

On the Monday Bank-holiday,
the first of August, thousands gath-
ered to view this little wonder
who had brought these visitors to
our shores, and to marvel at it.
The pilot, who had accompanied
Captain Cipriani, then took off
and gave the spectators some
thrills by his stunt flying. He put
the little machine through a
severe test, but she reacted well
to every demand, and after some
“hedge-hopping” landed safely,
much to the amazement of the





United States

it noteworthy that

And






SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1950



D. v.SCoTT “TO:DAY'S. SPECIALS
&CO..LTD. at the COLONNADE









Usually Now

. c.
Tins DANISH CREAM ....... 35 30
Tins JERSEY TOMATO JUICE 25 21

Bottles JEFFREYS BEER



WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED .

SPARE PARTS
COLEMAN Products

We will be pleased to repair your LAMPS, LANTERNS,
STOVES and IRONS if you bring them to us.

ALSO

SS 1

A Shipment of .



| SNOWCEM

in the following Colours:
White, Cream, Pink, Yellow, and Terracotta

{| WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD.—Successors to

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AUSTRALIAN PINEAPPLE JUICE... Pa S ‘31
AUSTRALIAN SALAMI SAUSAGE....... |, 1b. 1.05
HEINZ GREEN PEAS........,........... . tin 40
FRENCH MUSHROOMS ........-......-.. sow 54
RED CURRANT SHPLY 05/00, ecco cuca; Sa 133
CARVES BOOT JEDLY 0b stad » bot. 44
ANCHOVY SAUCE ....00.00 00.) meg gis gt 34
BLACKBUCK WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE | 33
SIGNAL COCKTAIL ONION............. , .. a
AUSTRALIAN PEACHES ...... Divaeetonin PAM 64
STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO., LTD.









GREET THE
COMING HOT
DAYS IN

COMFORT
SELECT



In the case of France, the Government car
cite the situation in Indo-China, where vast
French forces are deployed against pro-
Communist rebels. :

The truth of the matter is that all post-war
economics

are precariously

It was with a knowledge of this that ECA
Administrator Paul Hoffman launched his
plan for European “integration.” He believes
that Europe can solve many of its own fiscal
troubles by getting together on matters such
as foreign exchange, customs barriers and
controls.

If Congress approves the 10 billion dollar
appropriation, western Europe may be shaken
into a little greater activity. Certainly this
outlay makes it apparent in advance that the
Legislature is likely to be cool indeed to any
new requests for funds from across the sea-

—ILN.S.



crowd. The next day, the pilo
took the ‘little wonder’ back {
Trinidad, leaving Captain Ciprian
to enjoy a few more days wit!
his many friends in this Island.

Many people will remember Mr
Skinner’s “MISS BARBADOS’
because she was on view at tt

Barbados Aquatic Club, in thi |
ball-room, now occupied by th:

cinema, from Sunday the 6th t:
Saturday 12th of November 1932.
In the early hours of the morniti;
of Sunday the 13th this little plan
was towed to “Inchmarlow,
Chancery Lane, as the pasture a
this place was to be used as ar
airstrip. On the afternoon o
Tuesday the 15th, this little planc
was air-borne with Mr, Noe
Nicolls as pilot and flew for abou’
seven minutes. On returning t
the landing strip it was seen tha!
black smoke was coming fror
the engine and that the pilot wa:
in trouble with the machine whict
was loosing height rapidly. Thi: |
resulted in its crashing within «
quarter of a mile from where i‘ |
had taken off so successfully, |

It was not until six years later |
that Barbados was put on the air-
map of the world, when K.L.M
(Royal Dutch Airlines) opened
their service between Curacao. |
Trinidad, and Barbados with their
first flight taking place to the
newly laid out airport at Seaweli
on the 19th October 1938.

SUMMER
SUITS

made to measure
from the following





American Mercerised
Poplin .......... $28.50

English Mercerised








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from $44.50

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FRUIT

Strawberries in Tins
Pineapple in Tins
Apricot in Tins
Prunes in Tins
Guavas in Tins

AUSTRALIAN
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49c. per tin







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Nestle Cream
Danish Cream 2 SIZES
BISCUITS ‘ ra
Carr's Sweet Biscuits x
Carr’s Chocolate Biscuits Milk Fed %
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CROWN DRINKS
CHICKENS
SEVEN FLAVOURS .
FROZEN SALMON Milk Fed
HADDOCK, KIPPERS eKks
SWEET BREADS — DUCKS
TURTLE SOUP 8
TURTLE STEAK B4¢ per th. >
GOLD BRAID RUM 3
3 Years Old i g
8 ed at every Cele tion. >
§ Served st ver comes GODDARD'S 3
$ IT LIKES YOU. i %
$999995599599656595995: 66090000000000000060000006"
‘

ae
SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1950

HAPPY FAMILIES AND '
THE ALEXANDRA

His Excellency the Governor told parents and pupils of the
Alexandra School at their speech day on Thursday:

“Often my wife and I have driven past the entrance to this
school and hoped we should be invited one day to see inside.
I do not judge the efficiency of a school solely on the number

of academic successes.
pupils.

| Princess
Margaret
Broadcasts

1
To-morrow
‘eo WORLD CONFERENCE of

Girl Guides and Girl Scouts,
which is being held this week at
Oxford, will close with a camp-
fire to-morrow.

H.R.H. Princess Margaret, who
is the Sea Ranger Commodore, will
be present and will give to each
delegate a Message of Goodwill

from the Guides of Great Britain.
This ceremony will be broad-

—?

|

cast by the B.B.C. and will te
heard to—morrow from 4.15 to 4.45
pm. on 25.53, 19.76 and 16.95

metres. The programme will be
repeated on Sunday from 12.30 to
1.00 p.m. on 19.82 and 25.53
metres.

The broadcast to-morrow will be
heard over Radio Distribution.

TIENTS AT St. _ Peter's

Almshouse will be able to see
a Show given by the Mobile
Cinema on Monday night. This is
part of the Cinema’s programme
for next week.

On Tuesday the Cinema will
give a show on Grazettes Planta-
tion pasture for the benefit of
residents of the Fairfield and
Grazettes area of St. Michael. A
Show will be given at Colleton
Plantation yard on Wednesday
night for those of the Colleton
Plantation area of St. Lucy.

The Cinema will pay a visit to
Cranes Pasture, Christ Church, on
Thursday and give a performance
for residents of the Brittons Hill
area.

The final engagement for the
week will be a performance at
Wiltshire Playfield, St. Philip for
people of the Wiltshire area.

The current programme of the
Cinema includes the “British
News” which gives scenes of the
the West Indies Cricket team in
England, “How to Live Well” and
“Come Saturday” picturing week-
end life in England.

ANY OF THE hawkers that
were formerly in the Probyn
Street "Bus Stand have now re-
moved to the "Bus Stop in Trafal-
gar Square. This "Bus Stop was
erected for the use of passengers
awaiting ’buses going in the direc-
tion of Roebuck Street or White-
park Road but now that these
hawkers block the pavement the
passengers find it difficult to alight
or get into the ’buses,
The hawkers seen yesterday at
this spot were selling mangoes and
sweets.

RTHUR HUTCHINSON of

Pine Hill, St. Michael, re-
ported the loss of a goat valued $50
during Wednesday night. He told
the Police that it was removed
from his open yard.

The loss of a sheep was re-
ported by Gersman King of Bush
Hall. He also told the Police that
his sheep was removed from the
yard on Wednesday night.

HERE WAS ONLY one iraffic

offence recorded yesterday, A
charge was brought against a
motorist for parking in a restricted
area,

BICYCLE valued $35, which

was reported missing by
David Jones of Fontabelle on July
22, was found in a field of canes at
Cottage, St. George on Wednes-
day.

Jones told the Police that the
cycle was removed from the yard
of the Globe Theatre.

N ACCIDENT occurred on

Trafalgar Square on Thursday
between motor car M_ 2584,
owned by J. N. Goddard and
driven by William Meder of God-
dard’s Restaurant and a bicycle
owned by one Agard of Jackson
and ridden by Wilbert Stoute of
Upper Eagle Hall.

)

Stoute fell and was injured. He

went to the General Hospitai
where he was treated and dis-
charged,

The rear wheel and fork of the
cycle as well as the radiator grill,
right head lamp and left park
lamp of the car were damaged.

HILE P.C, 242 HURDLE was

on duty along Belleville at
about 11.15 p.m. on Thursday he
saw a flash of fire from an electric
wire at the end of a pole. He im-
mediately telepiioned the Electric
Company who had the wire
mended.

HE POLICE GARAGE at the

Central Station which was re-
cently extended and renovated, is
nearly completed, Painters were
occupied painting the roof beams
yesterday.



APT. C. E. RAISON and his

Police Band will give a Specia!
Programme of Music at the Prin-
cess Alice Playing Field tonight at
7.45 o'clock



The Weather

TO-DAY

Sun Rises: 5.38 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.22 p.m.
Moon (Full) 28th

YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington): Nil

Total for Month to yester-
day: 2.22 ins

Temperature (Max.): 86.5°F

Temperature (Min.): 76.0°F

Wind Velocity: 13 miles per
hour

Wind Direction: E. by N.

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.965
(3 p.m.) 29.906



“erent, strrenncnnnnmnnersrn cerns namenanneramemmtaransoe ba

[ look first at the appearance of the,

' The way they walk and talk
outside of school, their neatness|
and bearing and the good impres- |
sion which we have gained in|
seeing some of the girls as we
have passed, has been confirmed
now we have been invited inside.

Miss Laurie who has been Head-|
mistress for many years has set}

and maintained a tone in this}
school which is well known
throughout the Island. There is}

no higher tribute to a Headmis-|
tress than when an observer pay:
a compliment to the personality
of a girl and receives from an-,
other observer the comment, “But
she was trained at Alexandra.”



Congratulations

On your behalf I congratulate)
Miss Laurie on her report and the
staff generally and the school on
the achievements of the year. It!
is too late in this term to hope for
a supplementary holiday, but I)
trust that the Headmistress wil!
bear in mind early next term that
it wield be appropriate to give
the school a holiday in honour of
this Speech Day.

Some people have commiser-
ated with my wife and me that

we should have had to visit so
many schools in such a_ short
period. Although I admit that

making a series of speeches of this
type is difficult, we have thorough-|
ly enjoyed ourselves in meeting
so many people and children, I
hope i shall not give offence to the
larger schools if I say that in par-
ticular we have enjoyed visiting
the smaller schools in the country.
There is a family atmosphere in
a function of this size and as a
family is the most important unit
of human society, it creates a
feeling of goodwill and stability
in a community. |

/
Tolstoy once said: “All happy
families resemble each other but
each unhappy family is unhappy
in its own way.” There is nothing
more satisfying than a_ really}
happy family. My wife and I have
been privileged in the last month
to share the home life of a family
here in Barbados with four chil-
dren. One felt the affection and
understanding between its mem-
bers, the willingness to do things
for each other, the children antici-
pating the reeds of their parents,
the sharing of a story or a joke,
and the ready obedience of the
children.

I have come away from that
home free of all the cares of office
and full of happiness and good-
will. If all homes were like that
ene, then indeed the community
of Barbados would be a model for
the world.

And if all communities were
as happy, there would indeed be
world peace.

The point of telling you this is
to emphasize the important part
that homes play in the develop-
ment of a community and the de-
pendence of their success and that
of the community on the girls and
women of Barbados.

Opens The Door

Although the happiness of home
life does not depend on education,
education does open the door to
wider interests. As I said the
other day, the more you learn at
school the less in after life you
will be bored. You may find—as
I myself certainly found — that
however able and devoted your
teachers may be,—and as indeed
I know they are—quite a bit of
your studies at school may seem
to you to be pretty dull.



But what I do urge you to re-
alize is that, in the years after
you have left school you will ap-
preciate that what seemed dull at
the time has in fact served as a
foundation for, or a gateway to,
endless interest and delight.

Take, therefore, all the interest
you possibly can in your lessons
here and now — and I am sure
that many of you do take a great
deal of interest in many or most
of them—but if you cannot find
everything equally interesting, re-
member always there is no scrap
of knowledge that you acquire
here that may not be of the high-
est possible value to you and to
others when you grow up both for
the ordinary practical reasons of
everyday life and because it will
enable you to appreciate more
fully the fascination of this com-
plicated but endlessly varied and
stimulating world in which we
live.

Population Up
219 In June

(Barbado.



Advyrcate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN

Live-births registered as having
occurred ‘n Georgetown during
the month of June, 1950, number
299. Of these 80 were born of
parents with residence outside the
City, leaving a net total of 219.

The still-births registered num-
ber 50, but only 22 of these are
debitable to Georgetown.

Total number of deaths regis-
tered in the City in June was 175,
including 94 of persons, coming
from outside Georgetown, who
died in Georgetown institutions
and nursing homes. Added to the
81 actual city residents, are 5
deaths of Georgetowners who
died at the Mental Hospital, Fort
Canje, Berbice, and this brings the
total to 86.

What Is Journalism?

“I, AS AN old journalist, can-
poet accept off-hand the view that
journalism is a profession. I think
it is at omce an art, a vocation
and a ministry. No amount of
| professional training will fit a
man to be a true journalist unless
| he feels that his duty is to inform,
| to enlighten, and to guide the pub-
| lic through his newspaper, without
i forgetting that his power to do



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

—_—_





CADETS PARADE at St. Ann’s Fort on the first day
of their Camp

Alexandra Head Asks For
More Spacious Buildings

Welcoming the Governor and Mrs. Savage to the Alexandra
School Speech Day on Thursday, Miss Laurie, the Head-
mistress said:

I realise how strenuous and tiring the last three weeks
have been for you with their spate of Speech Days, and I
should not have been at all surprised if I had learnt that
Your Excellency was laid up with a relaxed throat, and
Mrs. Savage with a stiff right arm; however my fears have
heen groundless, and I am delighted to see you here appar-
ently quite strong and well in spite of your past arduous




























duties and cheerfully ready t

Appeal Judges
Dismiss Case

The decision of Mr. H.
Talma, Magistrate of District
Police Court—who ordered El-
1idge Chandler ot Bank Hall to
pay a fine of 30 and 2/- costs
to be paid in days or in
default -undergo one month's
imprisonment for inflicting bodily
harm on Flora Reeves also of
Bank Hall on November 10, 1949
was reversed yesterday by Their
Honours Mr H A Vaughan
and Mr. J. W. B, Chenery
Judges of vhe Assistant Court of




















A
“AN

14

Appeal
Their Honours dismissed the
case without prejudice. Flora

Reeves said on November 10, 1949
she was pulling up grass at a
spot not far from Chandler’s
house, Chandler came out of his
house and hit her son with a hoe
because he was interfering with
hic wife

She spoke to Chandler and told
him that he had no righy to .do
such a thing and he ‘turned and
struck her with the hoe across
her right leg Later Dr. Payne
treated her for the blow.

Mr. D. H. L.. Ward who appear-
ed on behalf of Chandler after
cross-examining Reeves pointed
out that Dr, Payne did not say
whay the bruise could have been
caused by. The only thing that
took place was a bit ofp talking
with Reeves’ son in which
Chandler spoke to him concerning
his wife

Mr. Ward further, submitted
that a blow dealt with the fofce
such as Reeves had told the Coury
would have been easily recognised
by a doctor,

Their Honours told Reeves that
they were not sure whether she had
been struck with a hce or not and
that there was a Certain amount
of doubt in vheir minds.- The
doctor had nov given the cause of
the bruise and that was the mgin
thing in the case

* le :
12 Cases Filed
‘ a .

Against Prisoner
Twelve cases were yesterday
filed against Alonza Gaskin of
Passage Road for the embezzel-
ment of a sum of money totalling
£21. 5s. which was given to him
for David Pile. These cases were
adjourned until September 20, by!
Magistrate Walwyn, as Gaskin is
at present serving a term of im-
prisonment for a similar offence’
at Glendairy. The money was{





{

April, May and June.

DID NOT LIGHT LAMPS

For not having lighted larnps to
the car T-30 on May 5, Magistrate
G. B. Griffith imposed a 10s
fine on Gilbert Nurse of Jemmotts
Lane. The fine is to be paid i:
14 days or in default undergo 14
days’ hard labour.

FINED FOR WOUNDING

Two fines of 10s. in 7 days
and 20s. in 14 days were imposed
on Verona Collins of Beckles
Road, by Magistrate G. B. Griffith,
and Alfred Harewood of Holder’s
Land by Magistrate C. L. Walwyn
when they were both found
guilty of wounding Doris Browne
and Archibald Rock on July 26
and 29.

Magistrate H. A. Talma imposed
a fine of 15s. to be paid in 14
days, on Peter Harding for black-
guarding along Roebuck Street,
a public highway on July 13

FINED 15/-; APPEALS

Clarence Cummings of Lemon
Arbor, was fined 15s. when Mag-
istrate H. A. Talma found him
guilty of stealing a quantity of
wood valued 2s. from Frederick
Sandiford on May 5. Cummings
who has numerous convictions
appealed against thi decision
Sgt. Parris who prosecuted, alsc
gave notice of appeal

40/- FOR ASSAULT

Rupert Alleyne of Lodge Hill
as yesterday ordered pay
fine of 40s. in 14 days, en he
pleaded guilty of assaulting P.C

|

to a










jdepends on the industrial and | Bratiow aite while on duty on away
; ‘ 3efore os } ine
jcommercial sides of newspaper | 28. Before impo a the fine,
| enterprise.” Magistrate ( lL. Walwyn told
i H. Wickham Steed speaking | B aite that that
i n “The British Pre a BBC j of ECO!
Oversea gramme it I .





given to him during the months of} Long

erform them again.
ach Speech Day is a milestone
on the road that the school travels;
we pause for a moment to survey
past successes with pride, to
mourn over defeats, to assess our
needs, and to make fresh resolu-
tions for the future; and so to-
day I propose to tell you some-
thing of the work of the school
in the year January to December
1949.
Six Pass S.C. Exam

Eight pupils were entered for
the School Certificate examina-
tion; of these 6 obtained a certifi-
cate, 3 being placed in Grade II,
one of them with exemption from
the London Matriculation exam-
ination, and 3 in Grade IIl, Two
girls reached Distinction standard
in Seripture, one of them being
placed 2nd among all Barbadian
eandidates in this subject; and
two other girls tied for the 3rd
place in Art in the island. It
was a disappointment that no
@ On Page 7

0



Chief Judge Grants
Application.

IN THE Court of Chancery
yesterday His Honour the Chie
Judge, Sir Allan Collymore, grant-
ed an application for decree for
appraisement and sale of 2,586
square feet of land and a dwelling
house at Béxters Road, and 1,994
square feet of land and a dwelling
house at Cheapside in the suit of
C. H. Williams et al (Plaintiffs)
and E .D, Mottley (Defendant).

Mr. W. W Reece, K.C., instruct-
ed by Messrs. Hutchinson and
Banfield represented the plain-
tiffs.

In the same Court His Honour
granted an application for decree
for appraisement and sale of three
acres, two roods oi land at
Worthing View, Christ Church in
the suit of M. L. Huskisson,
executrix of the will N
Eversley, deceased, versus I
Baez a (Defendant).

In both cases the Registrar
handed in a report of the Liens
affecting the suits.















J



12 Wills Admitted
To Probate

THE wills of 12 people were ad-
mitted to Probate by His Honour
the Chief Judge, Sir Allan Colly-
more, in the Court of Ordinary
yesterday. Their names follow:

Beryl Renna Blackman, Caroline
Simmons, Inez Williamina Roberts,

Jane Elizabeth Matilda Rudder,
George Edwin Olton, William

(St. Michael); Noel Gar-
raway Gowdey, Annie Allamb)
(Christ Church); Walter Conrad
Crichlow (St George); James
Nathaniel Wright (st. Philip)

Gladys Albertha Hunte (St .Lucy)
Adriana Squires (St. John)



Convicted; Discharged

Nineteen-year-old Wesley Bowen
of Chapman Street was convictel
and discharged when he appeared
before Magistrate C, L. Walwyi)
for the larceny of a quantity of
mangoes, valued 8d. from Wesley
Hall Boys’ School on July 27
Magistrate C. L. Walwyn warned
him that the next time he appeared
for such an offence, he would be
sent to prison.



TRAFFIC ISLANDS!

TOO EXPENSIVE

Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN
Government would like to im-
prove th. looks of Georgetown’s
streets by replacing temporary
structures with permanent
attractive traffic islands and has
written the Mayor and Town
Council asking them to contribute
to the costs
Replying to the “invitation” the
Council apart from explaining that

their finances at the present do
not permit them to contribute
have reminded Government that

the Council receives no portion of




the fines for breaches of the traffic
regulations in the City, and in
addition that Traffic control is, by
law, entirely in the hands of
Government. The Council con-
siders therefore, that the expendi
ture for the erection of Traffic



be borne entire]



and |



Cadets Go
Into Camp

Marching with their heads up-
right and swinging their arms, the
Barbados Cadets who
camp yesterday for the first day |
of their eight days’ stay at St.
Ann's Fort, were seen on the
Barracks Square receiving in-
struction from R.S.M.1, Browne
The day began with the boys
being allocated to their various
rooms, after which there was a
demonstration on laying kit. Dur-
ing the period for break, the boys
were seen assembled in groups as
they talked about camp life. A
shout from the R.S.M.1. informe
them that it was time for work
again, and in a moment’s time, the

boys looking eager and anxious
were ready for further instruc-
tions. Posting the guard was their |

next lesson, and this was done by |
a squad of cadets The bugle call
was next explained, after which
the company was dismissed.

Having received their instruc-
tions, the boys strolled off to their
quarters and were heard discuss-
ing what they should do when on
guard duty

The rest of the day being a holi- |

day, the boys swarmed the recre-
ation room where they spent the
time playing indoor games



‘The Windows’
Are Untidy

MANY mothers who live in the|
vicinity of Bay Street and Beckles |

Road take their children o|
evenings to while away an hour}
on the Bay Street Esplanade. It!

is at that time of the evening, too,
that workmen who live nearby,
relax upon the esplanade seats to
enjoy a quiet smoke,

With the well-kept band stacd,
the green turf, small flower
garden and shady trees, the}
esplanade has just that touch}

which invites mothers and nurse:
te carry their children to romp
there, Other “windows” by the
sea along the same street are jus
the reverse of the esplanade
These newly made “windows'’
are in even more thickly populated

entered |



!
|

|

}
|
}

|







areas, but mothers of the district
told the Advocate yesterday that!
they would prefer to stay at-home
it it were not convenient to go the
longer distance to the esplanade,
rather than take their children to
such untidy places

Visitors to sick friends or
relatives at the hospital sometimes
“kill time” around the “window”
at the side of the Eye Department
when they are early or the
evening's visitors are many, byt
it is not a very comforting scene
for one to be around just before
going into a sick room

There are bush and heaps
bricks about that “window”

rusty pipe runs out int
ea The other “window”
Wellington Street is over-run
bush

and
the
nea

with,

’ )



Teachers, Parents
Hold Discussion

Teachers and parents of the
pupils of the St. Silas’ Girls’
School, St. James held a meeting

at the school yesterday to discuss
how they could co-operate to get
the best out of the school children.
In her address to the parents,
the head teacher Mrs, E. Spencer
stressed that her ambition was to
turn out useful girls and told them
plans she had in view
for the improvement of the school
Parents told of the problems of
their children and their school lite
and exchanged uggestion for
ible

of many

8) remedie

Governor Makes
3 Appointments

HIS Excellency the Governor
has made the following acting
pointments:-







Mr. L. N. Chenery, Actir
Assistant Secretary, Colonial
Secretary's Office to act as Assist~-
int Colonial Secretary with effec
i the 10th of July, 1950.
| S. G. Inniss, Acting Harbour
land Shipping Master, to act

| Assistant Secretar Colonial S
jretary’s Office, with effect from the
{24th of July, 1950

Commander H Gartside-Tip-

|pinge, O.B.E., R.N. (Retd.) to act
jas Harbour and Shipping Master
wi t from the 24th of Jul

th effec













;mained







PAGE FIVE





}

' The Harbour |

Policeman
AND HIS WORK

lhe work of a Harbour Police
man is very often not as spectacu-
lar as that of his land patrolling
counterpart, but his role is just
as important, and his work is jus!
as exacting. He is on duty fo
the same four-hour period,
enjoys the same short and
leave periods

lor

But if the local harbour police-
man’s work is not spectacular, !
uniform is picturesque. It dat
back to the days of Lord Nelso:
and Colonel R. T. Michelin, Com
missioner of Police told the Adv«
cate yesterday that he has no pla:

| to change it.

3 Launches

The local Harbour Police carry
ne Inspector, one Sergeant and
three Corporals. It consists of 39

stables. Three motor launches
re used, one large four-oared bo¢
ana _ in addition there are fo
two-oared boats for use in tl
careenage.

The launches patrol Carlisle Ba
throughout the day and night, and
boat patrolling of the careenag
maintained at all times. Th
Harbour Police attend the arrival
and departure of all ships that
visit this port. They patrol th
waterfront and are mainly con
cerned with the prevention
smuggling and thefts of
being landed from lighters

is

cargo

Colonel Michelin said he hope
it would soon be possible to hav
the Harbour’ Police launch
equipped with wireless sets so th:
they could be contacted at
times during their patrol



FIVE SHIPS
IN PORT

’ FIVE ships were in port yester-
day.
Roaney, C.N.S. passenger freightei
the S.S. Herme, Dutch freighte:
the S. Mormacgulf of th
Moore Mec Cormack line,
Harrison liner Specialist and th
5.8, City of Dieppe of the “Mans”
line,

The Rodney left during the night
for Canada with sugar, molasses
and rum while the other four re
to complete discharging
their cargoes,

Flour, cold



storage meat and
apples, butter and various other
items of food were among the
cargo discharged by these ships

The Bay was busy with launches
and lighters going to and from
the ships.



Sunken Boat Not
Yet Recovered

The 121 foot fishing boat
“Orinoco” owned by 48-year-old
Aubrey Quintyne of Supers Land,
St. Philip which sank on Tuesday

with its crew of three about 15

miles off the shore of St. Philip
has not yet been recovered.
The crew were fishing when

| high winds and rough seas broke

the jib of the boat toppling it over
on its side

The “Orinoco”
$400.00

is insured

for



Record Crop

Figures now to hand at the
Department of Science and Agri

culture show a record crop this
year of 158,185 tons of sugar i)-
cluding Fancy Molasses, nearly

2,000 tons over that of the previ-
ous record of 1939. The yield then
was 156,443 tons,





b
Can't Shoot
LONDON,
Major General Cyril Frederick
Coleman 47-year-old commander
of Britain's South-West District
and noted marksman, told army

cadets
shoot,”
Speaking

“The British Army cannot
at Dorchester thi
first-class marksman said

“If only the Army could shoot
a bit better we should be well on
the way to clearing up the Com-
munist trouble in Malaya

“The British Army used in 1914

to be a very fine shooting, Army
That was brought out at Mon
and afterwards. It does not apply

today

The General added that another
of the Army’s troubles was leader-
hip. He said

“There
ducing senior
Army cannot
corporals,
lieutenants

a5 not the major-generosl
wh tne fighting in the
Communist war in Malaya but the
lance-corporal or second lieutenant
leading men,”

is no diffieulty
officers,
get young
sergeants, and

in pro-
but the
lance-
second

dot

six
—I,N.S.



|

|

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Flour Comes
a ea Geen FIBRE DOOR MATS
some ] j rags oO flour
Pate melee tee er Plain. Ea $2.80, $2.24
a soars bre sh t and $1.74
- : ) | Figured, Ea $2.99, $2,39
du ing the e% 1g for Bele $2.34, $1.80
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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Sanaa eames



SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1950

ae ree Christian Sciene

~*~

Y Christian Science
)

)



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON












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- |
| « AL
Ss 4 colour. If they are red or irri- FREE! in each

colour. If they are red or int ae een FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

your eyes need treatment designed eyebath



MAKE THIS TEST

“SY The rim of the eye and inner

TZ lining should be healthy flesh



F



Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504


SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1950

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



CLASSIFIED ADS. |






















2 TELEPHONE 2508
IN MEMORIAM > tl
FOR RENT
IN loving memory of my dear beloved
son LISLE INNISS who died 31st
July, 1946
Sad and stidden we the call HOUSES
Of the dear one loved by all -_
Depths of sorrow no word can te BUNGALOW From Aug. ist 1950
Of the lost one we loved so i yiy Built Bungalow, Welches
Days of sorrow still come « 3 bedrooms and all modern con-
Secret tears do often flo ces. Dial 2104
For today has brought before us 29.7.50—2n
Sad memories of four yeurs ago
Ever to be remembered by Madaline FLATS.One well furnished, & one
Innigs (Mother) Belfield iss (Uncley Unfurnished near The Rocks, Hastings
Megan Inniss (Sister) Roberts , Box x.y.z. C/o Advocate Co
(Aunt) 29.7, 50—1n 28 .7.50—3n
IN loving mer y of w Dear be- TWO HOUSES - At Hastings, fur-
loved Sister HENRIETTA WEEKES, "Shed and unfurnished, one having 3



known as Sissy who passed away on| bedrooms and the other 4 berooms,



July 29 1950 | vith all modern conveniences Apply
My Sorrow and heart ache Madam Ifill, “Elise Court’, Hastings
No one can heal 25.7. 50—t.f.n
My memory a keepsab
ina ROOMS — Large furnished Rooms,

very cool running water. With or with-
out board. Terms moderate. Ten min-
utes walk to Clubs or City. Dial 3356

25.7. 50-—t.f.n

My Dear one has gone

Though not far away

For we'll meet in the garden

Of Memories each day ,













i From Page 5 sor, but they hope that this
ef } I
pupil from this school obtained a, omission will soon be repairea
iGrade I certificate (Honmours);| We also regret the resignatior.
; but as 344 boys and girls in Bar- | of Mr. Trimingham, who for sc
| bados took this examination, and} many years was our capable Sec-
4 of our candidates obtained a | retary and Treasurer, and when
place among the first 50, and the | obliged through ill-health to give
other two among the first 100, I| up these duties, remained for
feel that the resylt was a sound | some time as a member of the
achievement—a “sueccés d’estime”’| Governing Body. We wish him
though not “a succés fou many happy years of retirement,
The other results which yOU;] welcome the new members
will find recorded on the prow} sall- > nein al
gramme relate chiefly to Art. As | eer rows, Supekes, se ae
usual we took the examinations of ton. May 1 take this op ortunity
the Royal Drawing Soriety, on |io5 "4 ee ee ee fc
which I received the report, “An | 10%,‘ express my grateful thanks
P > to the Governing Body for their
) encouraging result. Commendably | jing consideration and rt
direct work throughout.” = 54| OF cnosals I ap eae ;
papers were entered; there were | }), poner viii, sceliadaeta
no failures, and 33 obtained Hon- | ™¢™. A
ours. I should like also to thank

In addition 6 pupils sent sheets | those who have kindly given us

ef work to the R.D.S. Exhibition. | P'izes. Mrs. O'Neal, the lifelong
All were commended, two being friend of the school, after her
placed in the Ist Class and four retirement from the Governing
in the 2nd Class. Body, has continued to give us

her yearly prize for Reading; Mr.
Brancker has most generously
given two prizes: one for music,

League Of Empire Prize
Although the League of the
Empire Competition in May be-

























Ever to be remembered by Marion j
Weekes 'Sister) Gloria Springer sé
(Niece) | PUBLIC NOTICES
29.7.50—1n
IN perpetual memory of a dear
friend ROSA MURRAY passed to
the Great beyond. One year today | £20 MONTHLY
Shi duly 308. EASILY earned at home in spare time
Through all Eternity to thee dealing in stamps. No experiences
A grateful Pil raise essary. Suitable for either sex. 1
But O Eternity too short also contact you with Students in
To utter all thy Praise Colonies and Dominions for pen cor-
J. Howard & Others es respondents. Enclose 2% stamp. Air
29.7.50-.1n.] Mail only take fews days. F. Parting-
IN Loving aseenmee of oni ‘ ton, Prospect House, 329 Wigan Road,
vemory ) dear " 4 2
mother SILINA JORDAN died 28 July| “igh Lancs, England 20.7.50.—30n
1948. Aged 66. pre a ee eas .
She heard a voice, we did not hear,
That said she must not stay, NOTICE
pt saw a hand we did not see,
at beckoned her away PARISH OF ST. PETER
She is not dead Maynard road leading from Wyndover
But sleeping in Jesus, to Jerusalem Agricultural Station 15
She was sown in weakness closed to traffic
Shall raise in power By order of the Commissioners.
She was sown a natural body E. H. CHALLENOR,
Shall raise a spiritual body. Inspector of Highways, St. Peter
George and Lisie Headley, Stella,] 28.7,.50—3n
Ida, Daisy, Heen; Millicent (children)
29.7.50—I1n, Ev
—: OFFICIAL NOTICE
: a ever loving memory of my be- BARBADOS
over father who fell asleep on July .
29th 1943 - IN THE ASSISTANT COURT
My sorrow and heartache ! care a ache eR
No one can heal (Equitable Ju 7
My memory a keepsake LINDSAY ERCIL BYEBURN One
No one cg stea
My dear one hae gone ADRIANA SEALY Defendant.
Though not far away IN pursuance of an Order in this
For we'll meet in the garden Court in the above actién made on the
Of memories each day 23rd day of June 1950, I give notice to
Ever to be remembered by Mrs. | all persons having any estate, right or
Blenman; Mrs lene Carrington: interest in or any lien or incumbrance
Ouida; (Children) al > se affecting all that certain piece or par-
Doris Nurse (New york; : gennua cel of land situate at Jackmans in the
Ormond, (grand children) . parish of Saint Michael and island afore-
May he rest in peace. said containing by admeasurement one
American Papers please Copy rood fourteen and three fifths perches
29.7.50--1n, | or thereabouts of which area three-fifths
=— ee ee | Of 8 perch forms part of a road in
FOR ‘ x common hereinafter mentioned abutting
SALE and bounding on lands now or late of
A. Coggins on lands of Lower Estate
——| Plantation on lands now or late of
AUTOMOTIVE Clifford Jordan and on a road in com-
mon or however else the same may
ENGINE—One (1) 5 H.P. Motor Boat| butt and bound being the property ot
Engine as good as. new, Apply V.| the defendant to bring before me an
Emtage, Barbados Telephone Co account of their said claims with their
29.7.50—1n, | witnesses, documents and vouchers, to

be examined by me on any Tuesday, 01
Friday between the hours of 12 (noon)
and 3 o'clock in the afternoon, at the
Office of the Clerk of the Assistant
Court of Appeal at the Court House,
Bridgetown, before the 13th day of Sep
tember 1950, in order that such claims



AUTO CYCLE — New Hudson
Cycle. Phone 2521.

Auto
27.7,.50—3n,

ET

Farmall H. Tractor and Grass Cutter
22.6 D. B. H. App.y to M, D. Elliot.
Ashford Plantation, St. John

22.7.50—7n | may be ranked according to the nature

——— | and priority thereot respectively; other-

MOTOR CYCLE—1% B.S.A._ Motor] wise such persons will be precluded

Cycle. Good condition ee oa from the benefit of the said Decree, and
.50—in.

be deprived of all claim on or against
the said property

Claimants are also notified that they
must attend the said Court on Wednes-

itch psapihtamieieeaaialaemailininaantameantet |
TRUCK: One (1) 1934 Chevrolet Truck, |
A-l

Condition. Apply to C. Herbert,













55, Tudor St. City, Telephone 3686. | day, the 18th day of September 1950, at
50—2n | 19 o'clock a.m. when their said claims
. will be ranked.
VAUXHALL, 25 h.p. Going Cheap a2 p
$400.00. Ring Evelyn 2987 or awards oe hee ee hand this 23rd day
one. ar mee one I. V. GILKES,
Pa nen en
Ag Clerk of the Assistant Court o1
Appeal
ELECTRICAL 29.6-50—-3n
COOLERATOR — One Coolerator in
very good condition Can be seen at
B. Korn, 2 Roebuck St. or Phone 3205. OFFICIAL SALE
29.7 .50—2n
BARD AD TH ASSISTANT COURT
IN THE AS!
LIVESTOCK OF APPEAL



(Equitable Jurisdiction) .

—_—
HORSE—One reliable riding or draft LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL

mare, Very quiet. No reasonable offer | Plaintift
Tetieel)cevane: 2008 29.7.50-1n,! ADRIANA SEALY . Defendant
29.7.50—1n." NOTICE is hereby given that by vir-

jtue of an Order of the Assistant Court

| of Appeal dated the 23rd day of June

MISCELLANEOUS 1950 there will be set up for sale to the
s idder 2 the

¢ t ight | highest bidder at the Office of
Saree re Fee pel Clerk of the Assistant Court of Appea:
ver ee ave y at the Court House, Bridgetown, be-
ao tween the hours of 12 (noon and 2

A. BARNES & CO. LTD.

15.7.50—T.F.N. o'clock in the afternoon on Friday, the

15th day of September 1950 All that

RUBBLE-STONE Concrete-Stone, } certain piece or parcel of land situate

| ok-S » ¢ able f at Jackmans in the Parish of Saint
eases aa Braet a aeane Aa: Michael and island aforesaid containing
sa See e 29.7.50—8n, | >Y admeasurement one rood fourteen

and three fifth perches or thereabouts
of which area three fifths of a perch




















Ee
THE MAYFAIR GIFT SHOP annoyn-
ces a new shipment of Dorothy Gray’s
Beauty Preparationmay we help you to
requirements.
choose your ‘q) ne ai,

ST

TYRES AND BATTERIES. Sizes 34 x
7, 32 x 6, 30 x 5 and other sizes, also
Oldham 17 plate batteries. Guaranteed
Enquire Auto Tyre Company Trafalgar
Street. Phone 2696. 21.7.50—t.f.n.

WHITE ANTHURIUM PLANTS —
Phone 2521 27.7.50—B8n

WANTED







=—=—

HELP
—

AN EXPERIENCED MAID — Refer-
ence required. Apply to Mrs Grey
Massiah, Merton Lodge, Collymore
Rock. 29.7.50—2n.

YOUNG MAN-To train as driver/
projectionist for 16mm. film appara-
tus. Secondary education and some
knowledge of electricity a recommenda-
tion. Apply by letter only in own
handwriting and _ enclosing pies of
testimonials to British Council, “Wake

feld". 29.7.50—3n

A JUNIOR for our office Apply by
letter and in person STUART &
SAMPSON Ltd.










29.7. 50—1n

CLERK—To assist with customs work

Apply by/ letter only stating pew
experience. C. F rison & Co. Lid,
experience. ( F. Harrison “ mond
—_—————— ee
MISCELLANEOUS
oo ‘ .
USED POSTAGE STAMPS WANTED
Prompt cash paid for used stamps
If you wish, merchandise such as
fountain pens, cameras, clothing ete

will be sent in exchange Send 200 or

more stamps. TROY HUFFMAN, P.O

Box 331, Miami 3, Florida; U.S A.
29.7.50—2n

WANTED TO BUY
OLD SEWING MACHINES out of
use Good prices paid. Apply Vv
Vaughn, Kings St. or Fairchild and
Trobyn Street 29.7 .50-—2n

LOosT & FOUND

LOST

TICKET —
Finder Please
A. C. Watson,





Serie>
return
Hotei

SWEEPSTAKE
A.A.A. 0636
same to Mrs. M

Windsor, Hastings
50—In

Chain
Jem-

Gold

—— ae
BRACELET—A
â„¢ Patrick's

Bracelet between, St
mott’s Land and Convent
be rewarded on returning

plain

it to the Pres-
29.7.50—2n

ORIENTAL

(SE HABLA ESPANOL)
CURIOS, IVORY, TEAK, SANDAL

JEWELLERY, BRASSWARE, TAP-

ESTRIES, PERFUMES

KASHMERE

GLOVES,

Finder will



forms part of a road in common herein-
after mentioned abutting and bounding
on lands now or late of A. Coggins on
lands of Lower Estate Plantation on
lands now or late of Clifford Jordan
and on a road in common or however
else the same may butt and bound being

the property of the defendant and if
not then sold the said property will be

set up for sale on every succeeding

Friday between the same

£67.14.2
Dated this 23rd day of June 1950.
I. V. GILKES,

Ag Clerk of the Assistant Court of

Appeal

29.6.50—3n
’





PUBLIC SALES





AUCTION
UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER

BY instructions received from Mrs
F. H. Gibbons I will sell at her house
“Gwenville’, Black Rock on
day next, 3rd August at 1 p.m



Wardrobe;
chairs; (1) pair Morris chairs
Mahog: couch; mirror; Oil stove
(1) Mahog: China cabinet;
crawers; Dressing table; Mahog
ing chairs; hat stand; sideboard
many other items of interest
TERMS CASH
D'Arcy A. Scott.

includes;
mahog:

Mahog:

Auctioneer.
29.7,.50—4n

EEE

SHARES in the BARBADOS

40/- per share, plus stamp duty.
CARRINGTON & SEALY
Lucas Street,




hours until
the same is sold for a sum not less than

Thurs-
her
entire lot of household furniture which
upright

Chest of
fold—

and

SHIP-
PING & TRADING CO. LIMITED at

longs really to this year’s work | 2%¢ one for Scripture to the girl)
and not last year’s, I will stil] | Who was 2nd in the island with
mention that the school won the | Distinction standard; Miss

Browne has given a prize to the
other girl who attained Distinc-
tion standard in Scripture; and
Miss O. Dapeiza, one of our “Old
Girls,” has given g Good Conduct
prize, as a token of her gratitude
for what she owes to her old
school.

Junior Fourth Prize for a Hand-
work project, consisting of a
model and a scrap-book illustra-
ting the landing of the first set-
tlers in Barbados.

This work, along with some of
the needlework executed during |
the year is on show in one of the
class-rooms, and I hope that you
will have an opportunity of in-
specting it, after the
ment.

During the year I have been
delighted to hear of successes
of my former pupils. Gladwyn





Art Classes
entertain- | My thanks too, to the British
Council for their many kind-
nesses, They arranged for Mr.
John Harrison to give Art-
classes and lectures, which seven
Trimingham, who was Ist in| pupils and three of the Staff of
the island in the S.C. of 1946,| this school attended with the
has been training as a teacher | greatest interest and apprecia-
in England at Ambleside Col-!} tion; they gave a film-show of
lege. She has just obtained her| Macbeth to the School Certifi-
diploma with outstanding suc-|cate Form, who were keenly
cess, and has been appointed | interested, as they were studying
to a post in one of the London | that play; and they arranged that
County Council schools, Marita} Mr. Fuller should visit Speights-
Archer, who has been studying | town and give us the joy of a
music at Mc. Gili University, | most delightful recital.

obtained her diploma last Aug-| 1 wish also to record my grati-
ust, She is mow teaching music | tude to the Staff for their unfail-
in Montreal, but will return | ing devotion to duty and their
later to the University to study | loyal help in all emergencies, and
for the degree of Doctor of | particularly to Miss Agard for her
Music. She did so well in the} staunch support as Acting Senior
Diploma Exam. that the Dean | Assistant during the absence on
of the University is hoping that | leave of the Senior Assistant.
she will be awarded a scholar-| So much for the past, now
ship. Enid Skinner, who was | What of the future? -- The build-



one of the first nurses at the| ings do not make the school,
General Hospital to be awarded | they are but the shell within
a British Council Scholarship | which the living organism

to train in England, became ajbreathes and moves; but if the
State Registered nurse in 1948, shell were too small, that organ-
smce then she has taken a|ism would be cramped and dwarf-

post-graduate course in Mid- ed and maimed. We have out-
wifery, and is at present doing | 8â„¢Own our shell. This Hall, as
District Midwifery in Surrey. | YOU can see, is much too small;

Gloria Ramsay and Viola Babb, |'t cannot accommodate all the

who are training at our General | Parents, and those girls that you

Hospital, were among the prize- see are less than a third of the

winners this year, the former weno need a new and big-

carrying off the Hygiene prize, .

and the latter the prize as -the Classrooms Needed

best Junior nurse. We need new class-rooms; at.

This year, like most years, has | Present four Forms are sharing
been one of mingled sunshine two ane, We want a studio for
and sorrow. I record with grief ;2Ur Art-classes, and a properly


















the passing of Mr. Hutson, one ae ‘ oe : ol . powease
of the members of our Govern- Seaman steesia = ae eves
ing Body, whose integrity of | housecraft. Several parents have

character, sound practical ability, approached me too about Com
won him the respect of all. His ercial classes; but we cannot
loss has been __ particularly | organise them without a qualified
mourned by the Staff, to whose | teacher, equipment, and a room to
difficulties he always lent a|hold them. One step forward I
sympathetic ear, for he was the} am hoping to take, I plan to start
elected Representative on the}a second language, and hope to
Governing Body of the Assistant ]introduce Latin next year.

teachers of this and our brother} I have been very thankful to
schools, the Coleridge and Parry.}have the wall which has been
‘ No Representative built along a part of the boundary
At present the Assistant teach-|the covered-way, irreverently

christened by the pupils “Pig-pen
alley”, will now have to change
its name! I hope it may be possi-
ble next year to put a similar
wall on the other side.

But, as I nave said, the build-
ings matter far less tnan the life
that goes on within, and so I
would remind parents that the
whole of the education we give

ers have no representative, as
they have not yet been granted the
opportunity to elect his succes-
OOOO

PERSONAL





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife ALMA ELRI
TA BLACKMAN (nee Greaves) as I de
not hold myself responsible for her
anyone else contracting any debt o1
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me
Sed. EUSTACE MERTON BLACKMAN 4

Sargeants Village,
Christ Church
29.7 .50-—2n



For MARL, SAND
GARDEN MOULD
LIME and

BLOCK STONE

Dial 4503





SO SIMPLE



NEW ARRIVALS

LUCAS DYNAMO SETS
CYCLE BATTERY SETS
CYCLOMETERS
CYCLE BULB HORNS
PUMPS & CONNECTIONS

NEWSAM & CO.



Just the turn of a tap &
The Regulo of a Gas Cooker
and a Child can get
PERFECT BAKING RESULTS
Call and see the latest Gas Cookers
At your Gas Showrooms Today.






NOTICE

A LL PERSONS shaving
Shares in B.T.C, Ticket
Books for the Midsummer
Meeting Series A. 0640—49
and B. 7630—9 are requested
to communicate with me the
undersigned not later than
4.8.50 as these books were

A REMINDER
TO-NITE

Mr. GEORGE COBHAM
begs to remind Invitees &
Friends of his

Birthnight Dance





















mislaid,
at his Residence, corner of (Sgd.)_ C. G, DRAYTON,
Nelson and King Wm. Sts c/o L. M. Clarke (Jeweller),

A Gala Time in store. James St.,

29.7.50,—I1n.







on Bottom Floor of
One (1) Aspinall pan

4 0” dia. Disc ... 35

THE OLD RED STORE

REAL ESTATE
—<———es
LA %Acre of by - at Boe ey PPO OO PPAF POO
aes i : For Sale
+
was con® Public Announcement x .
overlooking the Sea, having 4 bed- % ~ AT
rooms, delightful Balconies, etc, with % ’ o x
all modern Satrrse iene: ae |S WEEKES AUCTi N x MOUNT PLEASANT
Beach, safe bathing, for quic sale | ¢ .
£3,500. or fully furnished £4,000. | « x PLANTATION,
Possession within one month. For x SINESS % st. JOHN
viewing Phone 4683 or rh 0-8 R a . .
70-50 %,
—_—_——— fr % One (1) 2 K.W. Belt
“STAUNTON"— Approximately — on | \ PREMISES e| driven D.C, Dynamo £40
15,678 sq. ft. Lawn to the east. 5 % 3
Bedrooms, situated 6th Avenue Belle- | \ xy One (1) Switch Board 15
ville. Apply next door to ee: Waite % cob 4 x pian %
Phone 2553. Inspection any hour % to be opene as soon as | ca m | One (1) Steam E e
26.7.60—3n get possession of premises ¥| ons 10 ngin 5
eee LEO See ae ek | | eee arn ener ee +
a
-
oS
-
Pd
%

28,7 .50-—6n











“4
5
>
%
x
%
x
Be High Street 300 sq. ft, ....... oy, 40
WORTHY DOWN xg %
A delightful Residence at Top Rock lS Have you anything for Sale? One (1) Juice Heater
built in solid Stone, cement use | % . r . ° x 500 fe hges
throughout, Everite Roof desigged % What do you want? % 7"
Construction by R, A. Beard, A.M “ " ’ One , . Ee
Inst. BLE.. F.V.A, Having Three Bed-|% Have you any Correspon- x > sr Multi
s each with conmecting Toilet 1 % dence which you cannot fix? x $ ar oller
Se eae nie | Seer eee st % Have you anyone in trouble? ¥|/% one (1) 7 & 12’ Multi-
ing, Ven z Can I be of any help? BIB tubular Boiler .. 45
Two Car Ga 1% : 21%
Rooms, Toilet ¥|X DIAL 8150 X)R Apply:
% MP
1X C. N. WEEKES if D. M. SIMPSON & CO.
1% %
29.7 | Poser oF [6669S 0SS9OSSOOOTCESSOOOD |





One (1) Juice Heater

5999999995099 569599" SSSSS99999'

Alexandra Head Asks Larger Building







On Guided Missile
Report

here depends on a three-fold cord,
—parents, teachers, children; and
if any one strand is weak, the
whole suffers. Will you therefore

give me your whole-hearted co- | NASSAU, Bahamas: July 27
operation? I welcome healthy| The Guided Missile Bill relating
criticism, and am always ready to}to the establishment of raday
listen to suggestions—or even com- | equipped stations in the Banama
plaints!—from parents. Islands was given a rough ride
Christian Ideals jin vhe House of Assembly last
The mind and character of aj} Pisht

The agreement was approved
of in principle but in a lengthy
heated debate, they criticised the

we wish beautiful and useful

!

|
child are like a garden in which
plants to grow; but we who are

|

!

gardeners know how difficult the details of the Bill proposed by
task is: the weeds spring up so Government and reported from
fast; there are so many

and pests that infest the plants |day night

and hinder their health and The Bill referred back to the

beauty .

We wish our children to grow
up with Christian ideals, to have
the true Christian graces, to be
filled with the love of God, from
Which issues the love of our fel-
low-man. I fear there is too
much selfishness amongst us; the

Committee for furvher considera-
tion and the House adjournel
until today when it is expected
that the Committee will report on
the

al

amended Bill

-C.P.

MAIL NOTICE





|

plagues : House in Committee on Tues-
|



world is full of war and dissen Mails for Trinidad by the Sch. Gar
sion to-day: disputes between Pc ee eee eee
“la 5 ree races otween rae
classes, between races, between | Parcel, Registered and Ordinary. Mails
nations, which all arise from | at 10.15 on the 29th of July, 1950
selfishness. Let us try to weed Mails for Grenada, by the Sch
out this fault and replace it with | “Zoleen” will be closed at the General
lave. | Post Office as under

Parcel, Registered and Ordinary Mails

|
1 therefore earnestly appeal to}
you parents to join with me in|
cultivating these gardens which |
we have to tend so that they may |

at 10.15

a.m. on the 29th of 1950





AUCTION:
SALE

be filled with Christian flowers of
beauty, so that they may be a
joy and place of refreshment to
the community in which we have
to live.






« Fl
KR f 4? Furniture & Effects at
-* “ |
x ad

Welches,
between

Christ Chureh
Maxwells and
Oistins

WEDNESDAY,

August 2nd, at 11 a.m.
and if not concluded

THURSDAY at 11 a.m.
“VIEWING”

Morning of and day prior
to Sale from 2—5 p.m.


















COTTON PRINTS
New Designs 36 ins. at 53c

Flowered & Plain
SPUNS, LINENS & SILKS

|
|
in Outstanding Patterns




PLASTIC HANDBAGS
all Shades at Reduced Prices
SPECIAL !!

GENTS’ SUITINGS
in Striped and Plain

Bi aes: $3.50 & $4.07

A VISIT WILL CONVINCE
YOU.










john *4. Biadon







(Auctioneer)
THE BARGAIN HOUSE iat Plantations Building.
30 SWAN ST. i Phone 4640,
| sl















BARGAINS :=
MANILLA ENVELOPES 6144” x 354” $3.50 per 1000
PAD LOCKS from 12c, each

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY AND HARDWARE

SEND US YOUR ORDERS FOR

6" PORCELAIN TILES

We have them in Pink, White, Blue and Green.

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(CENTKAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors)
Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets














‘Agreement Reached SHIPPING













MONTREAL, AUSTEALIA, NEw ZEA-
LAND LENE LTD., (M.A.N.2Z. LENE)
SS. “PORT WELLINGTON” sails Mel-

bourne md-July North Queensiand

July—August, Brisbane early August,

Sydney mid-August, arriving Trinidad

approximately 9th September
SS. “GLOUCESTER” replaces “Devon”
sails Fremantle end August, Adelaide

early September, Melbourne first half,

Sydney second half, Brisbane September



PAGE SEVEN



NOTICES



The M.V



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St.
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wth, arriving at Trimidad October = Sailing Wednesday, 2nd
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BARGAINS LIKE THESE COME TO YOU BUT ONCE IN A LIFETIME THEY COME
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PAGE EIGHT



Nobody Wants To â„¢
Fight Joey Maxim

| (By LAWTON

CARVER)
NEW-YORK. |

Jack Kearns, irrepressible manager of Jack Dempsey in the
heyday of the former heavyweight champion, is around and

about trying to land a bi
weight title older, Joey Max

W.I. Play
Yorkshire
Today

THE first victory of the 1950
West Indies touring team was
scored against Yorkshire at Brad-
ford. Today, the West Indies will
engage this county in a return
fixture at Sheffield, and it is left
to be seen if the tourists can “do
the double”, as they did against
Lancashire, the only other county
with whom they have played a
return fixture, so far.

In their first win, the West
Indies evened the score in victories
each side now having won twice
with three games being abandonec
or drawn. Today’s game will there-
fore be in the nature of a rubber,
or at least it will give one side an
opportunity to go into the lead

This will be the twenty-second
game of the tour, and the’ West
Indies enter upon it with eleven
victories to their credit, and two
reverses, The other eight were
drawn or abandoned,

A game with~ Yorkshire, an
important fixture on the card of
any touring team, as this county
has been English Champions more
times, perhaps, than any other
county. The county of Leyland,
Herbert Sutcliffe and Verity enjoy
a fighting tradition which
youngsters are not permitted to
forget or forfeit and today’s game
will no doubt be another keen
struggle. In the first meeting this
year, the West Indies had to fight
every inch of the way, and need-
ing 87 runs to win in the final
innings, our cricketers lost 7
wickets in the process. It was a
bit of a scare, but we won hand-

is

somely, and in two days,

Today the West Indies will
again encounter the All England
captain, Norman Yardley, and

perhaps Hutton, if well enough,
But can these stop our boys from
winning again? —B.M.



Crichlow Meets
Worme Today

THE Barbados Tennis public
have now been given an _ op-
ery of seeing the leading

al tennis stars in action in the
same tournament.

The First Open Tennis Tourna-
ment now being staged at the
Belleville and Strathclyde Tennis
Clubs, makes this possible,

casas iain ION I a I a tei SS nee

Public support is needed, since
the funds raised from those who
pay a snilling on afternoons for ad-
mission will be used for sending
@ Barbados team to British Guiana
in September.

The tournament continues this
afternoon at Strathclyde at 4.30
p.m. and the fixtures are as fol-
lows:—

Men's Singles:— Court No. 3.
Umpire A. Douglas. D. E. Worme
versus M. P. Crichlow.

Men’s Doubles:— Court No. 2.
Umpire Dudley Wiles. Dr, C.
Manning and E,_ Taylor, versus
P. Patterson and G. H, Manning.

Men’s Doubles:— Court No. 4.
Umpire : E. A, Fitzpatrick. a.
Cato and E. Atkinson vs. J.

Dear.
All matches the best of five sets,
Admission only 1/-.



BROWN SELECTED
ENGLISH SKIPPER

LONDON, July 28.

F. R. Brown (Northampton-
shire), who will lead the M.C.C.
team in Australia next winter, has
been selected to captain England
*n the Fourth Test against the
West Indies at the Oval, begin-
ning on August 12.—Reuter.



CESTAC DEFEATS HENRY

NEW YORK, July 28
Abel Cestac, Argentina, 221
ids had little difficulty in out-

pointing Art Henry 184 of New
York over eight rounds at Dezter
Park last night. —Reuter.

[ They'll Do Ie Ever ‘Il Do It! Every



match for his world light-heavy-

im.

Nodody wants any part
Cleveland 175-pounder. |

There is not a light-heavy
the business who could give panies i
a warm up, and aside from Joe |
Louis himself and Ezzard Charles
you can't name two heavies likely
to whip the slippery dancing-
master

There haven’t been many fellows
in the heavier divisions in recent
years with the boxing class of
Maxim. He is a second rate
puncher (although Kearns will
argue about this), but he is harder |
to hit than a gnat on the wing
and he will jab and cuff you
daffy.

He is a sort of latter day Tommy
Loughran, perhaps not quite us
classy as the Philadelphian but
not far behind as a_ boxer.
Loughran had Maxim's weakness
too—lack of a wallop.

This becomes a decided dis-
advantage when a_light-heavy
moves in among the heavies. Most
of the latter can punch, That
coupled with a weignt edge, plus
the rest of it in reach and height |
often will make a fair heavy-
weight the master of a good
light-heavy weight.

In the present
next best heavyweight behind
Louis and Charles is Lee Savold,
whom Maxim could take, along
with all the rest,

f the

situation, the

Bout

Louis, the retired undefeated
champion, will meet Charles, the
National Boxing Association
champion, in September and
Savold, the British and European
title-holder, probably will hold
out for a match with the winner

Thus if the foregoing pattern is
followed, Maxim is temporarily
crowded off the heavyweight
scene, except for possible smalle
pay days against the lesser
lighters,

There is no sign of immediate
action for him among the men ot
his own division either, uniess
Louis sends Charles back to the
light-heavyweight division, where
he did his scuffling until heavies |
became so scarce — and Louis
retired—when he moved up among
the heavier men.

There are no big fighters any -
where else in the world with the
faintest resemblance to contenders
in the heavier divisions to add u
further touch to the drought,

Yanks Take Over

England's best men were Freddie
Mills, eliminated by Maxim for
the world-light-heavy title, and
Bruce Woodcock, stopped by
Savold, for British and European
recognition as heavyweight
enampion,

Elsewhere in Europe every time
a good man has shoved his heaa
above the pack since the war,
some American has gone over and
drubbed him.

Meanwhile, we have not pro-
duced any newcomers of cham-
pionship potentialities — for the
immediate future—in this country
Louis Charles, Savold, and Jersey
Joe Walcott remain our best. The
Rocky Marcianos, Loland Lastar-
zas and others of that brood are
not ready yet and, alas, may never
be ready,

Louis-Charles

County Cricket
Results

LONDON, July 28.

The results of County Cricket
matehes today were;

At Manchester, Lancashire beat
Middlesex by 94 runs; Lancashire
191; Titmus 3 for 32 and secondly
235, Grieves 91, Young 5 for 63,
Titmus 5 for 65.

Middlesex 209 ,Cooper 51, Hilton
6 for 44 and secondly 123, Hilton
4 for 30,

At Burton, Derbyshire-Sussex
match was drawn,

Derbyshire 261; James Land-
gridge 3 for 16 and secondly 82
for 4.

Sussex 88; Jackson 5 for
secondly 360 for 5 declared,
Landgridge 184.

At Bournemouth, Northampton-
shire beat Hampshire by 156 runs.

Northamptonshire 129, Dare 5
for 33 and secondly 321 for 6 de-
clared, Brookes 91, Livingston 58,
Brice not out 82

on
ai

and
John

Hampshire 114; Clarke 5 for 36
and secondly 180, Garlick 4 for
22,

At Lord's, Gentlemen-Players

match was drawn,
—Reuter.

Time

Aegintered U5. Potent Office

‘The MAIN THING IN THE DREAM HOUSE MAT
QUINSY WILL ERECT IS A BASEMENT FOR
HIS PLAYROOM. HIS! ves, THAT'S CORREC TH













P RACING

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ENC
FOR {
THIg

THERE

VEHK
jas

THERE TOO 7

rag \.
THATS AL

i) is)
JOP




A_NASTY
re —_ —

Barbados Beats
English Side

IN JANUARY 1895, the first

English team to visit this Island,

captained by R.
a match at Kensington against a

Barbados team captained by D.
Me Auley.
The English side made 48 runs

in its first innings and 168 runs
in its second innings, a total of
216 runs. Barbados made 100
runs in its first innings and 117
runs for 5 wickets in its second
innings a total of 217
victory by
At the
(Saturday), a photograph of both
teams is on special exhibition for
two weeks. The photograph was
presented to the Museum this
week by Mr. G. B. Y. Cox, a mem-
ber of the team, whose
pear on the mount

notes ap-

The English side consisted of:—

R. S. Slade Lueas (Captain),
H, R. Bromley Davenport, W. H.
Wakefield, R. Berens, R. P. Sewell,
M. Martin Barker, R. L.
Leigh Barrat, A. Priestly J
Weatherby and F. W. Bush.

The local side was comprised of;

Donald Mec Auley (Captain),
W. M. Howell, Lieut. KE. Challenor,
H. Austin (Wanderers Cricket
Club), C. Goodman, C. Browne
H, Cole(Pickwick’s Cricket Club).
G. Learmord, (Spartan Cricket
Club), W. Alleyne, (Captain of
Leeward Cricket Club), A, Somers
BY,

Marshall,
A

Cocks and G
rison College)

Cox, (Har-

The Times of Barbados of 30th
January, 1895,
“England vs.
records: “*
which
casion

the title
England’

under
Little

with their presence, and in num-
bers the old cricketing talent
gethered to cheer our boys in their
friendly rivalry with the English-
men, The whole scene presented
an animated and picturesque ap-
pearance. The Pickwick pavilion
did service as a grand stand, and
all the talent and all the beauty
centred round about it. Officers
of the army and from the West
which is
their

Indian Fleet
these

visiting
shores on annual
rounds, assembled in force to
witness the prowess of their
compeers on a West Indian turf.
Our citizens, both young and old,
seemed to vie with each other in
the array of coloured and yarti-
coloured ribbons which they don-
ned for bands around the much-
in-vogue straw hat; and the ladies
but not gaudy in

shot-

looking gay,
their special
silks and summer robes; the
gentlemer of Barbados and of
England some wearing the proper
heavier

costumes of

tropical outfit, others in
makes, looking lively and en-
thusiastic and many an “old
stager” appearing regenerated in
youthful gear—the hoi poloi in
simpler habits but animated anc
attentive — swelled the magnif-
icence of a scene not scen to pass

from memory”



25-Day Bike Race

PARIS
in the midst of it
annual sports unheaval — the
national bicycle race. The race
is the chief—and normally, only—
item of conversation for mor
than three weeks.

The “Tour de France” got away
this year on July 13, and will winc
up August 7, or 22 laps and mil-
lions of words later. The 1li€
entrants will be followed by twc
motorized carvans, each of more
than 20 vehicles, carrying doctors

France is

nurses, journalists and well-
Ww ishers
Tour authorities already have

reserved more than 10,000 nightly
lodgings throughout the 2,500-
mile marathon.

Favorite was Gino Bartali, ot
Florence, Italy, who won second-
place honors in last year’s tour
His running-mate and last year’s
winner, Fausto Coppi, who was
showing his heels to the best
European cyclists this spring, will
be on the side-lines with a bad
leg.--I.N.S.



_ By Jimmy F Hatlo |

[ee THE FINISHED PRODUCT:.WiTH FURNACE,
TUBS AND BINWAND EVERYBODY ELSE'S
Bosttisened QUINSY CAN'T GET wn sss

S. Lucas, played!

REALLY
OVER A HUNDRED
RACES THG

WEEK

'¢
|





runs, a 7
me run and 5 wic kets G . W
" Musbum from = syussie ear ?

s: “A couple of large stands, Nationals.
which were erected for the oc-
s were filled to repletion, Big Attraction
inside a large sprinkling of the
softer sex grac¢gd the carnival We know for sure she

- THERES

Lose Mc





Cte OLD MAN
Beave
GEoREer

Second Round ee
Games Start To-day

The second round in the F

irst and Intermediate cricket

series starts today. Playing the first game since the season
has started Empire will meet Pickwick at the Oval and the

only “freshman”

in the team

is the tall bespectacled pacer,

Barker, who is making his debut in the first division.

-

What Will

(By LAWTON CARVER)

NEW YORK.

The fancy pants worn by Miss
Gussie Moran have attracted such
widespread interest that the
United States Lawn Tennis Asso-
ciation speculates in an official
release on what may be expect-
ed of her in the way of a cos-
\ume in the
championships.

The staid and
U.S.L.T.A. retraces Miss
Moran’s career as the wearer of
fancy pants and propounds this
serious question:

“What new treat in the way of
a costume will Gorgeous Gussie
Moran have for tennis fans when
the National Championships are
held at Forest
August 27th?”

Perhaps they have not thought
of asking Miss Moran herself,
if they did ask her,
ible to get a reply as yet. It
could be that so far she has not
been fetched by the whim which
the

forthcoming U.S

starchy

Hills, starting

or
might not be

will dictate her clothing for

is like-

ly to have a surprise in this

matter of her apparel! and that
the gate receipts will be respon-
sive, The U.S.L.T.A. obviously
is not unmindful of this highly
important phase of the amateur |
tennis business.

Hence this release on Miss |
Moran‘s fancy pants. The com- |

|
munique goes on to say:

“A year ago the comely Cali-
fornian created a sensation at
Wimbledon when she appeared on
the courts in a lace-trimmed gar-
ment. That made front page news
London and _ staid family
journals all over the United;
States. It also made Miss Moran
one of the biggest attractions in
women's tennis.”

in

Gents o1 the U.S.L.T.A., you
can say that again and again and
yet again. It so happens that Miss
Moran is one of the best-lookers
with the cutest

in the business,
little mannerisms on the court,
and more of an attraction than
some of the drab dolls who are
her superiors as players

The
further:

“Last March Bbexeoub Gussie
did it again when she wore
black shorts in the Egyptian
championships in Cairo. The
newspapers were filled with it
and people came out to the
matches to have a look whether
not they knew anything about
tennis. Then in the recent Wim-
bledon championships, Miss
Moran had something new once
more, She came on the center
‘ourt in what were described as
‘apple pie” briefs — scalped
around the edges.”

She Has Ability Too

Considering the foregoing you
might assume that Miss Moran
would not find it necessary to be
able to play tennis. All she need

fe

Woke pid observes

or









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PLLLPPELPD LPL PPLE LOPP PLESSIS





“My iusband and
my sister...in
each other's arms!" *

Ow

AT
THE

SHOWING

Last season Barker did very well
in the Intermediate Division, For
Police Carl Mullins will be the
main man in their bowling attack
and everyone is looking forward
to see what he will do in first
division cricket.

Today is the day for all
Second Division matches.

The ‘ “tures are: —

las

First Division
Pickwick vs Empire at the Oval.
Lodge vs Wanderers, at Lodge.

Carlton vs Combermere, at
Carlton
Police vs College, at Queen’s
Park.

The teams are as follows; —

Pickwick: A, M. Taylor (Capt.)
G. L Wood, D. Evelyn, H. King,
H, Jordan, E. L. G. Hoad, H.
Kidney, J, Marshall, L. Foster, G.
Birkett and B. Inniss.

Empire: C. Alleyne, O. M.
Robinson, E, A, V. Williams, E.
Millington, R, Barker, H. King,
D. Grant, N. Symmonds, O. Fields
and C . Wilson,

Carlton: K. A. Greenidge, F.
Hutchinson, N, S. Lucas, D. I.

Lawless, J W. Lawless, K.
Hutchinson, D. A. Williams, K. B.
Warren, E. W. Marshall, A. W.
Edghill and R. Hutchinson.

Combermere O, R. Knight,
O. H. Wilkinson, G. N. Grant,
R, E. Norville, E. A. Coppin,

O. H. Beckles, O. U. Elliott, E. G.
Adams, N. E. Murrell, Mr, S. 1.
Smith and O, R. Harris.

Police: J. W. Byer, W. A. Farmer
C. Mullins, C, Blackman, B. D

Morris, I Warner, C. Bradshaw,
F. Taylor, C, Wiltshire, E. Greene
and E, Brewster,

College: V. C, Smith, C. W.
Smith, J. A Williams, C, N.
Blackman, R, D. Rock, N. G.

Worme, M. D. Mayers, H. F. King,
J. A, Corbin, N. Harrison and Mr.
S. O. C. Gittens.

Intermediate

Empire vs Pickwick,
Hall.

Y.M.P.C. vs Spartan, at Beckles
Road.

Windward vs Cable and Wireless
at Windward.

Wanderers vs Mental Hospital,
at the Bay.

Second Division
Leeward vs Pickwick, at Fosters
Combermere vs Y.M.P.C., at

Combermere.
College vs Lodge, at College.

at Bank

Police vs Foundation, rt
Foundation.

Regiment vs Carlton, ut
Garrison.

Empire vs Central, at Vaucluse

do is show up. But this is not
entirely correct.

She wins, too, as the U.S.L.T.A
points out, as follows:

“So much attention has been
entered on Miss Moran’s cos-
‘umes that her ability as a play-
er has been over-looked. The
California girl won the Egyptian
championship, the all-India
championship the International
tournament at Nice on the Frenca
Riviera and the Kent County
Championship at Beckenham
England, In the British champion-
ship at Wimbledon she lost only
after a hard fight with Mrs.
Margaret Osborne
American titleholder,

the

DuPont,
6—4, 6—4.
ak N. Bi



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. Polo At The

Garrison

AGAIN 8 Chukkas were playea

on Weanesday on ine Garrison
Polo ground, und wis is aceuunteu
for the fact that witn more horses
tnere is not now tnat aelay which
was hecessary wnen tne animals
had to play practically ine entire
evening without a change. The
outstanding player on Wednesday
was Elliott Williams. He is the
oldest player in the Club and a
veteran cavalryman of the first
World War. Not only has he a
geod eye and a powerful drive,
but no player feels that he has
much treedom when Williams is
marking him. Vere Deane on his
new horse is going to be one ot
the top players. His mount is
exceedingly fast and inclined 10
be more fond of the gallop than
in following the ball, but Vere is
an artist at controlling a spirited
horse and already his animal has
begun to realise that he can’t have
his way with such a master on
ais back. It is good to see Jonn
Hanschell playing this season for
ne is very fond of the game, and
if he keeps it up he should cer-
tainly be in the line-up for selec-
tion when it comes to representing
Barbados against teams from
abroad. Nick Parravicino is one
of the youngest members and one
of the keenest, but like Andrew
Arthur and Keith Melleville, his
pony is not good enough to com-

pete. Nick would have a great
future on a better horse, Andrew
Arthur seems to have inherited
some of the skill of his late

father who was the founder of the
present Club. He has a good back
hand drive and seldem misses a
ball, but his pony is not big or
fast enough. Keith Melleville
a brave little player and on a
better horse would quickly im-
prove, No doubt these young
| members will soon be playing on
+mounts more worthy of their keen
interest and skill. Play this after-
noon shoul@ start at about 4.20.

is



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Rubber Sandals — 50c. up
Boys’ Socks — 12c. a pair ¢

Anklets — — 15¢. up
36c ea.
Woollens, Shoes & Hats,
White Drill — 8c. yd.
Children’s Vests — 30c. ea.
Khaki Drill — 59c. yd.
Boys’ Caps — — 24c. ea.
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Children’s Panties (Plastic)

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Sanday
July 30
1950

RED GUNS

Russia Returns To |
Security Council As
“Champion Of Peace” |

(By MICHAEL FRY)
. LAKE sUcuasS, July 29.
‘THE Soviet Government when it returns to the




7 Cy





~ N. Koreans Advance
Against Kumchon

(By LIONEL HUDSON)
With the Front Line Forces in KOREA, Sunda

NORTH KOREAN FORCES were this mor ting

~

Koreans Trek

_ United Nations Security Council next Tuesday
is expected to launch a powerful threo-point peace
campaign to end the war in Korea on certain vermis.
This was the opinion of some of the most exveri

enced diplomats here today, including experts 1° >.
Eastern European countries in close touch with
Russian tactics in the United Nations for many
years.

They pointed out that the Soviet Union was a5 ye

sent spearheading a world-wide campaign aroind
its so-called “peace appeal’’.

The Soviet attitude towards Korea, they added, should be!
judged in the light of the Kremlin’s overall interna! end



South From
Battleline

Kept Moving By Fear

(By DEREK PEARCY)
With American Forces In Korea,
July 29,
A blanket
South Korea
ing feet of thousands of

treking south

From the battle line to the
Southernmost Cape, the roads ate
ined with an endless stream of

humanity kept moving by fear

ot dust

refugees

hangs over
raised by the trudg-

menacing on all sides the strategically inipor
tant town of Kumchon, 31 miles from “aegu

Meanwhile battle-weary American trooos, w
just completed another strategic wit’ so"! oa
lis to the west

main battle front, were out in the hi

3
¢

a

Ww

and north-west of Hwanggan, a town 12 miles to
the north-east of Yongdong.
A Headquarters spokesman said that seven Port)
Korean tanks had been sighted at Kochang, 35 miles
south of the American front lines, supported by

about 200 infantry men.

In the same area, North Koreans had successfully

blocked the main road.

external policy—-to pose as the champion of peace agairst Cities, towns and villages on Elsewhere in the South, he added, 300 Communist
“warmongers” of Britain and America. which refugees converge are al uerillas had flanked American lines and still another
aT : ——+ For this reason and in the light ready crowded to overflowing croup had appeared from the North. Some of these mar-



of past Soviet tactics it was be- Men, some dressed in the tradi-

1 auders he said, were less than 8 miles from Kumchon
lieved that Jacob Malik, ¢ a were le tha

WORRELL (right) and Weekes (left) applauded by tie Pyslish team as they return to the pavilion



hional

Plane Crashes
In Brazil
Manager Killed

RIO DE JANEIRO, July 29.

The only foreign passenger to
be killed in Panar Do srazil
crash yesterday was Raiph Mot-
ley, American Assisiant .lanager
ot the Rio Atlantic Refining Coin-
pany, twice President of the
American Chamber of Commerce,
and for one year, President of the
American Society, Rio De Janeiro.

Yesterday’s Consteilation crash
is described as the greatest in
Brazilian aviation history and
according to a local branch of the
Panair Do Brazil, the reasons
leading to it were still unknown.
The plane was piloted by the well-
known Brazilian ace, Eduardo
Martins Oliver who would have
completed 10,000 flying hours on
this trip.

The plane was due at Porto
Alegre about 9.40 p.m. but it is
understood that the last signal
was received from the plane at
10 p.m, stating that there was
no contact with the control
tower and that the radio compass
was unserviceable.

Eye witnesses state that the
plane circled Porto Alegre Aero-
drome twice at an extremely low
ceiling and attempted to land the
third time around when it crashed
into the hill “Morro Do Chapeu’
about 15 miles from Porto Alegre
im very rough country.

All reports confirm a very low
ceiling with occasional torrentia!
rains, but eyewitness accounts are
extremely conflicting as to wether
the plane started burning in mid-
air or burst into flames after hit-
ting the hill. Local farmers who
climbed the hill reported that the
plane exploded when the crash
took place and when they arrived
near the scene of the disaster
found nothing but a mass of burn-
ing wreckage with a number of

rR
ant

thrown some distance frm the
plane but identification was im-
possible.

It was further stated that part
of the plane burned on the hillsid=
while another part had fallen over
the side of a precipice.

It was rumoured that = an
“Aerovias” aircraft was the first
to report the disaster stat'ng !
had seen the other aircraft lying
on the hillside in a rough wooded
district in a complete blaze anc
with surrounding trees on fire

—(Reuter.)

carbonized bodies showing, with
no sound or sign of life. The
body of one woman had been





Soviet Delegate would on Tuesdays

present the following Three Po:ni

Plan to the Security Council

(1) Immediate cease fire in Korea

(2) The appointment of a Unite
Nations “armistice c¢
sion”’—including Soviet mem-



ber—to supervise the with-
drawal of all military forces,

and their demilitarisation.

Free elec‘ions throughzut “hh

(3)

undefeated at the end ef the second day—with Werre:! 239 not

Test Match which was played at Trent Bridge, Nottio x ham.

Truman May Ask |
3$4,000m. Arms Aid |

For W. Europe e Clash In



















Rioters And Police




out and Weekes 168—of the Third

Belgium









whole of Korea—uncer Uni'ed) aver) Ee July 29. | |
Nations’ supervision x oe jn — Cc ngre we te Ee
This proposal would give Korean | y5hse on tienes en atea lion a BRUSSELS, July 29
Communists several advantages. |.) ormous increase in Americat HUNGRY rioters demonstrating against the, return of
Gattis Conrolidated ms ait to allieé nations—Presi-| _S1ng Leopold clashed with Gendarmes tocay in Brvs-
Firstly it is known that they q ot Tr de latest proposal for els. Demonstrators rallied by bugles threw chairs as
. f bit + | binging the west an unpre Pee ‘ E ‘ ~ teh 4} : ats ‘
have consolidated weir military ¢¢ dented pitch he ts ete et. endarmes rode repeatedly into the:crowd krocking down
gains — ee oe sxe hg : tery preparedness. “| many of them. hid ce
per cent. of the whole 0 the No figure hes yet keen officially ith a wave of Anti-Leopold
country—by seizing the property given but the S:ate Devuennent id strikes spreading from city to
of landlords and distributing it to, adviser John Foster Dulles was | i ib af P : ' city and threatening to paralyse
land hungry peasants. | reported to have mentioned the} e repares the capital itself Defence and In-/|
(Secondly) their political agents | sum of $4,000,000 900 as the likely . terigr a a to-day inovked a}
in the wake of their armies have | re juest from the President. This F I } 23-year-old law providing for'
had several weeks to indoctrinate | would be on top of the $1 2,000,- | or nvasion military requisitioning in emerg-
South Koreans with a hatred of }000 which Congress has already encies,
“white invaders”. | authorised, A White House Con- CALCUTTA, July 29 Troops will be put into those
ference will be held at tk: Presi- A brisk recruitment to the |industrial works considered as
They have been able (0 / dent's request. The gathe ill| Armed Forces is goi in | public necessities. Soldiers will
trengthen their appeal for unity |; ws TeQuest. ihe gare ; will} Armed Forces is going on in pul necessities. Soldiers w
among Koreans on the basis of include both Democratic and Re-| Tibet in the face of the “huge | also provide the basic maintenance
Neen “popular” easter | publican leaders of Congress, Sec~|Communist consolidation. ale «| foe glast furnaces: and coal pits
™ pers h a peli 4,| retary of State Dean Acheson and} the Frontier”, rding to a des- | Where workers are on strike.
Many expe ere leved, | Defence Secretary Louis Johnson. | patc! -davle “Gtateeman” |Some Belgian troops—two_ bat-
knowing the conditions in Korea _ patch in to-day’s “Statesman gian } )
before the war that such a| —(Reuter.) | here from its Kalimpong Corre- eons eorains to a eg em
4 spondent, reports are to be recalled from
programme would have a very ly, ~y . . i” occupation duties in Germany to
elas eek é a ster x a W ill Security Council He said that the determination | provide maintenance for vital
elections held soon after the enc ¥ t> res ‘ » pravailed but {industries and public services
of hostilities. Have Red China? It rat disse sion "HEA auste se o-day's outbreak, ex otly one |
The electoral platform would 2 x > d. The cerrezpondent said | ‘veek after the h tly contested
be made sufficiently broad to) |. MOSCOW, July. 29. cade Tibetans led by Geshe /return of the exiled king climaxed
include Liberals and elements) | Soviet delegate Jacob Malik eet feo. President of the Ti- |# series of strikes that were
among the South Koreans hostile | aoe ate eet on Beet en, j , Provisional Government et |! neral throughout French-speak-
to President Syngman Rhee in| '° os tevin Boies or oM-| Sining are now active on Tibet’ Wallonia the centre of Anti-
the formation of a “Popular | MUnISt China to mem ership and | Bastern frontier organisin Leopold feeling—and were now
hear ‘-representatives of the), , pia ~~ threatening Flanders w ris
Unity” Government. The |< 8 eople’ observers | Tibetan youths into Tibetan tening anders with para
ultimate fate of Non-Communist | Ta bod — e,” observers here} peoples’ Youth Society, Fighting | !YS!s. including the vital port oft
} saic ay. : 4 ” | Antwerp
elements in such a Government |", aap jalong the Eastern frontier be- |
ney thought the agenda w hich pss . | se
would experts recalled, eoaen | Me. Malik would propose for the | tw een Kuomint a repoen ae nee Disak Outlets eae
the well-known pattern) of | )\-oting would embody the gener- | COMmMmunists | Is) still in pragress |, oetene, es os es ) i > - n
5 peg a rere! tet % lal lines of policy expressed by in isolated pockets ecu | ic ee : “hh oe ‘ ny
If presented in such a form, it) Stalin in his reply to the Indian) OROCURE EEO te ee Ne eet
vas thought that the Soviet move | Fyjme Minister, Pandit Nehru and | vec be i 2 vom % ae
sould cause a good deal of con-| vhe reply recently given by’Sovict | ad fe tots ! me aera 3 ireaten-
fusion among Security Council) Deputy Foreign Minister Gromyko | » join them on Monday

members.

A “peace plan” which had the
semblance of cast iron Uniteo
Nations guarantees could appeal to
India and Egypt—who have been
skirting the idea of pacification—
and would require some very sub-
tle diplomatic manouvreing by
the United States, Britain and
France.

Counter Measures

Representatives of these threc
powers were meeting during th
week-end to discuss all poss'ble
Soviet moves on Tuesday and t
prepare counter measures, In
British and American circles it

@ On page 16



RED TROOPS TRAINING
FOR NEW ATTACK
On Indo-China

(By GRA

HAM

JENKINS)

SAIGON, Indo-China, July 29.

Usually reliably informed Frenc

h sources here said today



















Chairmen, Sunde of Norway to

convene session for Monday THE 380-ton Dutch motor ves-

a















In Brussels, 90 of the









| 4 ~ ‘
>. Fawitic assé » Sir! ii ‘a normal
|e tn stants, h ee Guard Shoots U.S. | 700 tramcars were officially stated
rent od Te jto be running. Demonstrators
2 Vice Consul | pulled. off trolleys, and in one;;
Yard Investigates | ae ae |case stripped the ‘driver of his
Pet WASHINGTON, July 29 uniform
. | . . | .
> | he State Department announc- | One hundred mounted Gen-
‘Commons Damage led American Vice Consul |darmes dispersed several hundred
LONDON, July 29. | Dough MacKiernan was killed | riot rs at Prussels north station
Scotland Yard detectives were |W hile escaping acro the Hima- | Joseph Merlot. Socialist Presi-
lealled in to-day to investigate |laya mountains from Communist | dent of the Wallonia Congress
reports that telephone and water |China ) samounned that the States Gereral
systems had been damaged at the |, He and his camel driv had |of Wallonia would be called
Aa adhe: Pre es xeen shot by a Tibeton frontier | together in a few days to consider
House of Coramons, may tg ae **|guard who apparet stook lithe situation
began after reports of the a ine \thern for bandits { The States General ji an
had been received at the police Pee Ste ‘ 4
a ; ssembly of »~presentatives
station. Ay spokesman ao a The State Departm« added an aaiaren ine ae aaa Ste et
Ministry of works, responsible|that MacKiernan was killed on | Wajlonia ahi iad etrinllided
for maintenance And upkeep of | Ar ril 13 after ci sing 1. 6 7on sulate French - speaking ” Southwestern |
all government buildings said, at Tihwa in Sinki ing, North West Province. a !
that no evidence of maliciou of China last September |. The Wallonia Cotereas aim tol
\damage or sabotage had yet been Tt eon ried \ runs “detach Wallonia from the rest of
| found.—Reuter. ner who took 27 da 0 reach Belvium
in Lhasa, the Tibetan capital from } The general situation through-
| “UNLAWFUL” SESSION which a repert radioed to New | guy the country to-day s des-
SECURITY COUNCIL Delhi and Washington j cri ed “chaotic” and the all|
OF Reuter. ! Cathol Cabinet faced with an
The Official Soviet News | an osphere 7 near revolution was
} ; ; . tthoritatively reportec on
sency Tass in a dispatch from | auth }
| ae oY rk said that the decision r | seeking compromise ith the
aay * ca ? oo’ 99 | Socialists and the Liberal |
| by the Security Council’s present ero verdue | i cant
—"eutler,



India Sends Ambulance



ji

grab—long white muslin
sont and white trousers tied at the
nkle—and others in baggy shirt
ind trousers of coarse unbleached
material lead bullocks or pony
or carrying heavier goods
themselves



Those without carts use cradles

made ot two forked boughs su)-
ported on their back by a
shou'der harness-rope

Women, nearly all clad in
National Dress—short bodice and
jong skirt draped loosely from
high around the mid-riff carry

lighter bundles ba‘anced on their
heads

Mongrel dogs roam the village-

jstreets or lic in doorways after
farewell from their departing
owners.

All Korean roads are bad. Even
the main artillerv road consists of
nothing better than a cirt and
gravel track. It chokes travellers
with dust in dry weather and
bogs him down in mud in rain

Travelling along this hell olf
dust and heat in summer, — the

refugee finds only an occasional
‘ree under which to shelter, only
an occasional stream at which to




slake his desperate thirst
Many of the poorest class’ rematr
close behind the Danger Zone,
hoping to return home after
fighting rolls by

Soldiers’ Families

But ihe majoiiyv are lamiuies ¢
South Korean soldiers and police
ren and wemen, fearful of fal
ing into Communis and*,.

Some are fermer North Kor-
euns who escaped across 38th
parallel as _ politica) refugees



after the present Northern regime
me to powel
Very few among the

Ct
evacuces

may be North .Korean. spies and
guerillas posing as refugees as 4
ruse to infiltrate further into th
south Coniinuous screening is

corried out to tran these

In Taegu, South Korean’s new
temporary sea of Government,
the streets are teeming with peo-
ple Crowds of refugees stand
outside public buildings through-
out vhe dey waiting for relief,
nd at night blacked-out door
wavs and. street-pavements are
strewn With the sleeping home
les The number of refugees in
the city defy erleulation

In the past two wooks 59.000
lestituves have pa thr vah
five refugee camps in Taegu
alone Reuter



Communists Are
LExcommunicated

VATICAN CITY, July 29
I'he Vatican Holy Office to-day
sued a decree banning from sac-
cnildren 1
Youth
Who
children to join ¢
Organisauvions

rament all 10 ena
Communist

Purent

ations
the

Organi
alow
omuint
likewl

A

were bar

eda from icrament
leacher who gave instructions
materialistic Communism t

children were excommunicated
by decree

cecree followed
sive campaign by Cathol_c B

especially Italy against

}

Cum

—










United Nations

Are Challenged
—ATTLEE

TAUNTON, Somerset,

5 July 29
The British Prime Minister
Clement Attlee said toc-\y that

though he agreed with criticisms
wv the South Korean

committed Now you can make
ell kinds of special * pleadirig:
you can say that the Soun Kor-
can Government was not
yood one, I agree, But because
a person has not a very good
character it does not excuse the
person who tries to murder hin
“You can say that New China
was not on the ‘Security Council’
“It does not affec’ by one iota
the act of aggression,” Attlee said
he was certain that they had to
say here and now that aggression
should not succeed Tf it were
halted he believed there was good
hone that a more peaeeful world
uld emerge,—(Reuter.)

a very



No More Full Lerigth
Films In Sweden

STOCKHOLM, July
Swedish Studios
mak full length films alter
this year because they no long
pay. the Swedish Film Produce
Association announced today

29

will cease



Ww



They will concentrate instend
on shorts, Advertising and News
Films

A survey showed that com

vanies have been losing an aver-
‘ge of 70,000 vo 100,000 crow
—(Reuter.)



government
it did not alter the act of agg¢res- 7
ion \vhat had been committed positions
against it Addressing 5,000]}c¢over of
people here Attlee said “today We |): rrape
are faced with a direct challenge a
to the authority of the United
Nations ‘
An act of aggression hes been

cut

Late yester

pday

if

spokesman Said that

of Communi
It

an artillery
positions,

sts
miles east of the |
was evident,
North Koreans were
assault
Heavy
moved up to their

was

fo

on
guns

ternoona
a small foree
reported 3

he

added that

preparing, for

American
had been

rward areas

Forces Withdraw

This morning I watched the last
American forces withdraw from
Hwanggan taking p their. new

They haci moved under
a aight rtillery
Despite their weariness
they rapidly dug fe le Chen
they flopped to the g leep
despite the roaring ai! engines
as waves of American. planes
headed north to carry out early
morning attacks on advancing

Communist invaders.

some distance away

t

On a ridge
wo Mustangs

dived to strafe Communist patrols.

While exhausted Americans
slept or slumped in jeeps lay
inert In foxholes and stretched
out on the roadway small groups
and
huddled here and there deep in
nearby gorges were counting up
One regiment had
suffere | fairly heavy losses, The
Regimental Commander told me

of = officers

casualties,

that withdrawal had
Americans by

upor

circling movement

not be

forces in hand.

countered

sub officers

yoen forced
1 wide en
which could
with small

1,086 Casualties

Latest lists available lh
showed that the number of
Can Cas ualties in Koren

1,086.

A number of soldiers
off by enemy
their
ointed out.—Reuter

regained

i



These figures included
killed in action, wounded
in accidents and missing

{
ac

own

RALELG Hi

lin

tod
toca

Ame



fighting



men
injured
action

ho were
later

was

vance

—-

|
L




































that Chinese Communist General Chen Keng in the neigh-| “cave the delegates of the Ameri-jsel “Nero” has been reported lane fe eee y y Et '
bouring Chinese province of Yugnan, was training and|can bloc an opportunity to con-joverdue on its voyage decir | LAKE SUCCess July 29. poe ay aes re ieee a NOW IN si ot ik
equipping about 0,000 troops of the Russian-recognised tinue behind-scenes negotiations |Jacmel, Haiti, for Curacao. ‘ a any offered to send 4 eineds doen Pie i! gaan ae kas
73 : .. “s fl . an to conduct a new sion | The “Nero” left Jacmel aa eld ambu'‘ance unit and a smail|” 1 5 8 eV h wire ST W DELLA. o2 & 24 Ich :
Vietminh Insurrectionary Government for new attacks 0n|}''y.6 the Soviet Union delegate | Monday aa age ew, 6. | surgical unit from her regula political indoe‘ri GENTS STANDARD MO} " ;
‘ | before it . |Monday, July 24 and had net g Ny uIaS Ivrsued in the form In Black and Green 3 ov 4 Speed
Indo-China. ) | Jacob Malik ae mes ithe Chair- \7e iched Curacao up to yesterday aw aap Lane to oe the United |}, the Holy Offer, the â„¢
i) ie darted ee | SOS ee i aed Ail ships 6st A es aa ., | Cutholic authority GENTS 8PORTS MODELS in Black Green and 5!
| These sources declared that this | ss terms yesterday's session| Ail ships in the vicinity of The offer was made by Pandit! ¢., the Presidency of t pt ; :
Yugoslavia irformation — contained in top| of the Council “unlawful” noting Jacmel and Curacao have been|Nehru, Prime Minister of India, | the ; yh ae amplif ed the ; ion With or Without 3 or 4 Spee
secret French Miiitafy Intelli-|¢nat delegat from England,|requested to keep a sharp look'in a telegram f New Delhi to | sa Coney 7 ons
aig gence reports—had changed the| France, India, Cuba and Ecuador |out a tit Werees Cae the oat. we aa eane on LADIES DAWN SPORTS MODELS in Black and © ren
Mobilizes whole future of Indo- China’s | “officiously approved General The “Nero” has made occasional Nations Secretary Genera! Communists With or Without 3 or 4 Speed
guerilla war between insurrec-| MacArthur's report.” —Reuter. calls to Barbados with cargo —(Peuter.) -—- Reuter.)
tionary forces and French Union | in ‘ 4
LONDON, July 29 | forces holding the country |
pa ’ 2 e
aie, Bote 68 Sr ae : Communists Ordered To A e Britai i
radio stations accused Yugoslavia}. They added that attacks similar | som u aio . &sra Va e ri atin. ele l 4
of preparing aggression against| te the North Korean attack on | =
Cominform countries “with the aid South Korea | could be expected LONDON, July 29, and Western Germany. “One ag- 3. Intensification of the drive to elections and so must organ-
of the American imperialists, within five months ‘ According to a message in to- gravation by all possible means of rufaw “he atom bomb on the ion a qualitative rather than a
who want to start a new war| The French sources added that| day's Daily Mail Moscow has or- the rift between Britain and theo th the more this cam ve basis—possibility of
after their first in Korea”. | the guerilla phase of the Indo| dered Communist parties in West- America over recognition of Red paign succeeds the less will Amer- some of the parties having to go
Yugoslavia authorities, Radio| China. war might then be suc-/ern Europe to ravate” the China. “Delegate Berlin were ica dare to use the bom! inderground was mentioned =
Sofia said, had “carried out a new ceeded by a new phase in which |“rift’ between Britain and the given to under tand that but for The mood of the meeting does ea
mobilisation” during the weeks! Vietminh forces might attack the | United States over the issue of this rift Stalin would not have er tance to arma eem to have been particularly =
since the outbreak of fighting in| @elta at brigade or division | recognition of Communist China, couraged Mao Tse Tung Chinese or to unloading optimistic Delegates at Berlin =
Korea. | strength Alexander Clifford Daily Mail cor- Communist leader to reaten t , shipments but the s¢ to have received the im-
i > eayt >| |respondent in a front page m s- eas Form«e 1e last strong- creation of highly trained dock pression that either Russia has not
aera oo aoe ey eal Vietmin forces in the northern] age from Paris, wrote “Moscow old of Chiang 1ek the Na- squad to carry out scie tific acts got the atom Boinh or that she is =
pea - peeeee so-called| ,ountains were estimated to be|new instructions to Communist tionalist leade as aking =
mere’ just as it happened in| 4.900,000 well equipped regular! parties in Western Europe trans- 2 Intensification of the peace No large strikes without reas- CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd. =e
Ss jtroops and 600,000 militia men) mitted to their lez rs at recent ampaigr hict t going on ly interes worker The Korean episode v not re- =
in pee nag , aaded that in|} who were now being rapidly | meeti in Berlin tlined to all over mer, The nple armament : pro- rd havis eons to plan at Stet =:
reer weeks Yugoslavia had} trained and equipped, mainly|me by a source whose the 1 is to ere trnosphere of id high al) and there was not the faintest Distributors ==
greatly intensified her policy of| with United States arms taken|beyond question resistance to war and the general uggestion that general or Euro- =
ia aaeanes agains: the peo-|from disarmed Chinese National-| “These lines of action were laid impression that it is Russia wl te Euro- pe: vas imminent the Dail, 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET
ly gu asa especially Al-| ists and smuggled across the'down for France, Italy, Britain, wants peace,” the Daily Ma ‘ y no Mail a added | =>
ee border.—Reuter, Belgium, Holland, Luxemb: respondent ntinued A —(Reuter.) mM i) Hav H AHHH HUNNLHHHHHHGRNEAE LY Hille
, Ji




PAGE

TWO



AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
JACK CARSON JANIS PAIGE DON DeFORE
a DORIS DAY
in “ROMANCE ON THE HIGH SEAS”
Technicolor

\ Warner Bros.

Picture




GAHETWY (the Garden) ST. JAMES

Last Two Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.20 p.m

Warners Thrille

FLAXY MARTIN”

With Virginia MAYO Za
MONDAY & TFUESDAY—8.30 p.m
MASK OF DEMETRIOS”
Sidney Greenstreet Peter

“PETRIFIED FOREST’
t Bogart Leslie Hows

with Lorre

Hum

ee

PLAZA: 2 shows To-day 5 & 830 pm

“16 FATHOMS DEEP”
Filmed in Thrilling ANSCO COLOR













with Lor



CHANEY Arthur LAKE Tanis CHANDLER
also “HIGH TIDE”
With Don CASTLE and Lee TRACY
A Monogram Double Hii
MONDAY & TUESDAY 5 and 8.30 p.m

“SILENT WITNESS”










with Frank ALBERTSON, Maris WRIXON Other
Also the Ist Inst. of the ACTION Serial
A Moderr ‘rsion of Dumas’
“THE THE TUSKETEERS
with John WAYNE—J: JLH Francis X. BUSH-
MAN, Jr., Raymond HATTON Ruth HALL
A Mon m ACTION Doubie

WED. and THURS }
“THE HUNTED’
and Final Inst of Serial

and 8.30 p.m

with Preston FOSTER
“THE THREE MUSKETEERS”

GLOBE

‘Yo-day 8.30 p.m, Monday and Tuesday, 5 & 8.30 p.m.

eT Se se (07) 3 a
PICTURE: OFTHE FIGHTING CAVALRY.
John Ford and Merion (, Cooper present
JOHN WAYNE + JOANNE ORU - JOHN AGAR
BEN aimee? HARRY CAREY, JR.





















a ol Rb i
SA, Wore a! with win YOR McLAGLEN
COME MLDRED NATWICK + GEORGE O'BRIEN Sma SHIELDS
saeentocres or JOHN FORD i
ee. end LAUEING au oes pete vee 7 AaDs in’ £5 CORPORATIO

EXTRAS :
LEON ERROL BACKSTAGE FOLLIES
BRITISH AND AMERICAN NEWSREELS



OPENING FRIDAY, AUGUST 4TH, 5.00 & 8.30 PM.
She was many -—" to “a men—



a0 Se

ey a) olen!

A GAll NS8OROUGH PICTURE Released through Universal-International

With
ALL-STAR TALENT SHOW
And
4 CARTONS HENIEKEN’S BEER
De «Save Your % Tickets Friday Nite
shorten sentence as ra senalincenginmetpsan ie radish seeosascer ce

Sunday, August 6th, 8.30 p.m,
ARNOLD MEANWELL

THE

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SN , ILY 30, 1950
SUNDAY ADVv¢ ADVOC \TI SUNDAY, JULY > a ea
NIS SAVAGE On Holiday
R. DENIS SAVAGE, son of Returning InMid-November Dorothy Returns i pgs acai Pa
His Excellency the Governor Mees; YCE ULE OF Ff
and Mrs. Savage who was due to R. AND MRS. G. H ISS DOROTHY FARMER 4 35 €
arrive here yesterday, will not M left yest r who has been holidaying ia barba holiday ying
now be arriving until Wednesday 7c , to spend Barbados since July 1, returned to Mi Be ty Griffit
afternoon. Their daughter is also Canada, before er to En Canada yesterday morning oe Vea ee
coming to Barbados, and is ex- Jand for two yntt n a visi TCA. soa ee ta % Poa Arriving in Trinidad
pected by the Bonaire about the They will shortly be ed nurse at the Royal Victoria Hospi- Shortly
middle of August. England by Mr. and tel in Montreal. She is the }
° tice who are shortly leay daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe AVID, son of Sir Hubert
Arrived Yesterday England by sea. Mr. King, w ene of “The Lodge” St. Rance, K.C.M.G., Goyerno
USAN JANE, daughter of the is a Director of Messrs. Gar@in: Michael. of Trinidad, and Lady Rance wi
Administrator of Dominica Austin and Co., Ltd., and M be arriving in Trinidad short
and Mr. Arrow-Smith, arriyed King expect ta return o Barba Joins Husband Here spend the Summer holidays with
yesterday by T.C.A. Mrs. Arrow- towards the middle of Novembe his parents.
Smith arrived from Dominica a : . FAY REINGOLD from
few days ago to meet her here Last Visit—4 Years Ago AS

and they expect to return to Dom-
nica early this weék, where Susan
will spend about seven weeks’
holiday with her parents.

While in Barbados they are
guests at the Ocean View Hotel.

Acting Secretary
ISS I~ P. COBHAM,
A.T.C.L., is acting as Sec-
retary of the Trinity College of
Music in place of Sister Mary
Dalton, Hon. T.C.L., (Mother
Sacred Heart, OS.U.,) who,
owing to ill health is unable to
attend the duties of Local Secre-
tary.
Applications should be made
to Mrs. Cobham for all particu-
lars regarding the Local Exam-
inations

Just Finished His Third

Year Science

M* GEOFFREY SKEETE

arrived from Canada yester-
day by T.C.A., to spend two
months’ holiday ‘in Barbados. Son
of Dr. and Mrs. Harold Skeete of
“The Grotto,’ Dalkeith Road,
Geoffrey has just completed his
third year Science at McGill Uni-
versity and when he returns to
Canada after his holiday he will
begin the final year of his four
year course,







Wednesday 2nd August and
Thursday 3rd

A Giant Double :
TARZAN’S
MAGIC
FOUNTAIN
Lex Barker Brenda Joyce
And

EVERY GIRL

SHOULD BE MARRIED
Cary Grant
Diana Lynn

and



Thursday 3rd, 2 p.m.

GRAND
SCHOOL CHILDREN
MATINEE
To See :
TARZAN’S
MAGIC
FOUNTAIN
Children 12¢.
To Sit Anywhere

It is a 2 p.m. Show



GOOD NEWS !
GLOBE
“HALF AN HOUR OF
SWEET MUSIC”

The resumes their

Prograia

on Sunday, August 6th at

8.30 pun.
of

with the Orchestra
ARNOLD MEANWELL
and his New MEANIES







.30 A.M.

ATOR
DAY

or WITHOUT LOCKS

STORE

ISS MARION NICHOLS,

Barbadian, whose last vi;
to Barbados was four years ago,
arrived from Canada yesterd:
morning by T.C.A. to spend two
weeks holiday with her fami!
who are at present at the seg-sicde
at “Seacroft,” St. Lawrence.

Marion, who used to be with
Cable and Wireless before she first
left for Canada in 1943, now work
with T.C.A. in Montreal.

Netball Players Coming
Soon



RRIVING yesterday f r «

Trinidad to spend thres
weeks holiday with Mr. and Mr
J. QO. Tudor of “Beverly Hill

Government Hill, were Miss

Elsa
Morris and Miss Alison Say mn



:

Miss Morris who is a
of the staff of the
High School in Port-of-Spain i:
here to make the last minute
arrangements in connection wit
a Net Ball team from this school
which will arrive here on Tix
day and Wednesday from Trinidad

The team will be comp:
eleven players,
porters are

rember

Sishop Anstey



ised of
and several sup-
also expected {



accompany them.

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H
COLD DANIS
BUFFET SUPPER

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From 7 to 11 o'clock





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Phone 3513







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Squares 7 Ft., 6 Ins. x 9 Ft
9 Ft. x9Ft
10 Ft., 6 ins. x 9 Ft
12 Ft. x 9 Ft,

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Continuous Rolls 27 in, 36 in. 72 in. Wide Cut to Ord
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Many attractive designs to select from, Easy to in

Easier to keep clean.
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FACTORY LTD

HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

DIAL 2039

1 Room

by putting a smart piece of Linoleum on the ous The Roon
immediately looks cleaner and brighter Come and see our
range of attractive designs. We have them in the following

























New York arrived yesterday
by T.C.A. She joins her husband
here, who has been in Barbados
for about two months.

Here for Two Weeks

R. E. J. PARRY was at
well yesterday morning to

4
eea-

arrived from Canada by T.C.A.,
to spend two weeks holiday in
Barbados. Also arriving yesterday
were Miss Betty Smith and her
mother Mrs. Peter Smith. Miss
Smith and Mr. Parry, are shortly
to be married.

After Barbados Holiday

ETURNING to Canada yester-

day morning by T.C.A. was
Mr. Rod C. MaclInnes, Public Re-
lations T.C.A,, in Montreal. He
has been in Barbados since July
8th on holiday. His wife and
family are still here, and are re-
maining on for a longer holiday.

Enjoyable Afternoon

R. J. BE. R. SEATON, BG.
businessman at present
holidaying in Barbados with his
wife was among the crowd at the
Harbour Police Sports on Thurs-
day and had an enjoyable after-

noon with another B.G. friend
AMONG the passengers ar- Mr. Wilkie. He arrived from
riving from Canada pnt a B.G. on Thursday by B.W.I.A.
by T.C_A, were Mr. Geoffrey
| Skeete and Miss Pauline Par- Finally Made It!
ry. They are pictured here as v
they stepped off the ‘plane. RS. ETHEL MILLER, who

has been wanting to come to











among
from Trinidad yesterday
by B.W.I1A

meet his daughter Pauline who pany.

From Aruba

R. and Mrs, Joh Freita

nh ce

and their two daughters were
arriving

the passengers
They were
irom Aruba, where 1!
Freitas is with the Lago Oil Com-
They are here for an in-



definite stay as guests of Mr. and

Nat S Fontabelle

Me
Mrs

Visiting His Mother

ealy in



T. COMDR. CARLTON GOD-
L DARD, son of Mrs. Consuelo
Goddard and the late Maj. T. A
Goddard, former Deputy mmis-
sioner of Police, arrived fro:
Trinidad on Friday afternoon |
B.W.IL.A., to spend a week's holi-
day with his mother. Bett«
known to his Barbadian frien:
as “Pa,” Carlton was last here
four years ago. He expects to re-
turn to Trinidad on Friday.

On U.S. Visit

EV. HARRY T. GENTLES
Supt., of the Mount Sina
Holy Church in Barbados left or
Thursday for Puerto Rico }

B.W.I.A. enroute to the U.S. wher:
he will be in New York for about
six months.

Accompar



him was Rev
Joseph Rawlins, a Barbadian wh
has been living in the U.S. for
thirty-seven years He w
turning to New York after <
day here.

Husband With U.S
Military Attache

ing









| ry . Barbados for years, finally made ETURNING to Venezuela ves
| Cne-Time Barbados it when she touched down at ea ae ey i WeLA, ” Sn
| Opening Batsman Seawell yesterday morning by yrs. Gorah Ste and her two
| FTER two months’ holiday in T.C A. All the way from Victoria, children, Jackson and Trene. Her
| land during which time British Columbia, she is here for husband Col. Ellis, who is witt
|they saw quite a bit of cricket, 4" indefinite stay, and is a gues‘ the U.S. Military Attache in Cara-
|Mr. and Mrs. C. Lincoln Bourne 4t the Enmore Hotel. cas spent some of the holiday with
larrived in Barbados yesterday by them in Barbados but he returned
ES C.A., from England via Canada. Engaged to Venezuela a short while ago
> still have another two ‘ _They were staying at the Para-
rene ae hotly, “whieh they are HE ENGAGEMENT was an- dise Beach Club,
| going to ss rbad nounced during the week i
c a ‘nn hays d in Ba oe between Miss Sylvia Sealy, second Married In Canada
emes h aah » time Gaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred =a rs i he
Sados. o ACN euesan His Sealy of Barbarees Road, to Mr. ISS LITA I. GRIFFITH,
bere een | OF 8 ‘ Neville Grosv r son of Mr. Ezra daughter of Mrs. Griffith an
}iast appearance in Intercolonial Patras x ae aaa Torte Hill. “the late Mr. Oscar riffith ¢
; g € 3 ~ srosvenor y iu s ° ne ? . —~ 7 4
| ricket he PR aD Foggy sae . Montreal was married in Canada
sé t 1 a ne are: . 8 * ; ar ° ? . ~1e
“Grew a beard and reaped Seeurity Liaison Officer jf Strly July, to Mr. Clifford
sos ewiltt, s Mr. a 7,
| harvest,”—of Trinidad wickets! Trinidad Hewitt of Jamaica, ‘The ea!
ey. are staying temporarily took place at the Union United
Mrs. Bourne's father Mr. R. and Mrs, Harry Lee arrived Chuvan ‘
H. Bryan, until they move from Trinidad yesterday The bride who was given i:
“Waters Meet,” a seaside morning by B.W.LA. and expect jyarriage be) had ate Mn.
} » in Worthing. to be here for about ten days, and Courtney Rollock, wore a dress of
| Mr. Bourne is with the West are staying at Cacrabank. They yayon net over taffeta. The
Indian Oil Industries in Trinidad. were accompanied by their two bodice was tight fitting sik a
| Retired Businessman children. Mr. Lee vs Security close round neck and a cape of
| , Liaison Officer, Trinida Chantilly lace. Her sleeves were
| JOHN J. BLOW, retired

M:



a businessman arrived ~

A. yesterday morning on
init rane is staying at the Marine
Hotel.

With Creole Petroleum
AND MRS. RAMON TRA-

Pass if on=
and fall speed

Ou want to be the best



i ina :









om : oD ithlete in school? Useful
Nie brit) thely cipagnins nls on athletic events are given
Sandra left for Venezuela yester of five stamps, just issued
ay by B.W.I. Mrs. Travis an #um to commemorate an
ira have been here for fiv ta ional sports meeting
eeks and Mr. Travis, who Whatever your favourite event,
vith Creole Petroleum joined {nose stamps show the proper
hem here a couple of weeks ago way to do it, The relay race
Also returning to Carmeas yes-
erday were Mrs. Rita Brown
ind her three children. They were
ll staying at the Paradise Beach
lub.
With Barclays Bank
j R. BASIL BROOKS was at
L Seawell yesterday morning to illustration brings out a vital
1eet his fiancee, Miss Joan Ghent pant jy fhe bate must be p passed
sa. aan : rink on W mners going a
‘ho arrived from SEA OE full speed. You have yards
W.LA., to spend two weeks for the change-over,

\oliday in Barbados. She was ac-
ompanied by Miss Kathleen
lerreira, Joan, who now works
ith Barelays Bank used to go to
chool here at the Ursuline Con-
vent. They are staying with Mr.
and Mrs. N, ‘s. N. W. Hart in Worthing.

Perforation: 13) by 14; face
values : from 20 centimes (about
\d.) to 8 francs (1s, 1id.). There
a surcharge to help Belgian
att lores. yee! The set, unused,

London Express Service





us.





long finished with points over the







hands and her veil was of tul!
illusion,

Her bouquet was of whit
carnations and rosebuds.

Matron of honour was th
bride’s sister Mrs. Thoma
Cr ord and the bridesmaid
were Miss Cynthia Rollock, Mi
S. Smith and Miss, M. Gilpin

Dr. Charles Este performed t
ceremony and Mr, V. Hogg w
the Bestman, while young Denz
Alleyne acted as page boy

Student Nurse
NOTHER student nurse re-
turning to Canada yeSterday

was Miss Norma Gill, who is at
the Herbert Reddy Memorial
Hospital, During her holiday in

Barbados her engagement to M

Gerald Tryhane, son of Mrs. Ir:
Tryhane and the late Mr, Lisle
Tryhane of “Bagatelle,” St

Thomas, whom
was announced
Gerald, who has been holidayin
in Barbados since May 6, is study-
ing Electrical Engineering in
Canada, He will be returning to
College in the middle of

September

she met in Canacla





BY THE WAY —By Beachcomber



thing out of order,

The New Matron

HE Governors intervened by
sending their own candidate
head matron for an interview

A CANADIAN paper reports
4 from Ottawa that the play-
ing of musical instruments has
een banned in the Commons.
This blow to democracy followed

what may be described as an un-] for

ual incident. A clergyman mem-|—a worthy, terrifying, square hor-

er, when the division bells rang,] ror “After the French lady,”
whipped a tin flute out of his] Smart-Allick confided to a re-
pocket and played an indistin-| porter, “it was like cold porridge.”
ishable tune.” It is not every] A games master said, “If that mon-

y that this happens — unfortu- ster comes to the School, I go.”
ately. But there was an occasion,} Meanwhile, the French girl had
any years ago, when that Porth-] taken rooms in the local hotel,
wl flautist Mr. Gerald Barry} which was all day besieged by
roduced his flute at a meeting of boys and masters, Two Governors,
he International Court at The] arriving to investigate the posi-
Hague He played “Piri-Piri-} tion, could hardly get into the
Piri” so sweetly that the chairman] hotel. They remained to tea and
id: “This at any rate needs nO/to dinner, and came out trying

| iterpretation. Music speaks our| not to look pleased with them-
} own language to each of us.” Yet] {| was he bound to rule the whale] Allick it was decided to offer the

—LADIES’ SLIPPERS

Many Colours in Felt 2 is ed.

post to Rainette
right there
torchlight
smashing,
marches,
deep
fe

Portevoix. That
were firework displays,
processions, lamp-
bonfires, triumphal
impromptu war-dances,
drinking, and other mani-
tations of satisfaction

Nothing To Do With Me
PROFESSOR of psychology,
I read, has taught pigeons to
play ping-pong and peck out
tune on the piano, in order to
find out if children learn bette:

by reward than punishment. This
seems to me like teaching ferrets
to skate on ice, in order to @is-
‘cover whether red-haired sailors
make jgood grandfathers

Prodnose: I don’t quite follo
that.

Myself: Then you're no psycho
logist, good pint



-pot,



|

Basins and Deep

Bowls 82c., $1.13

Covered Stew-

pans 7l1c., 84c., $1.05
Sst

___COMING___

in a few days



LADIES STRAW HATS Prices |
| Ranging
Trimmed White and Coloured from
Fancy Swiss Straws ... . $2.98 to
$5.69



Your Shoe Store for ‘‘ ARCOLA”
*‘MANSFIELD” “JOHN WHITE” & ‘‘AVENUE”’

EVANS

ENAMELWARE—

|

Pie Dishes

37¢., 48c., 64c.,
Mugs .... . Ste.
Chambers $1.14




and

WHITFIELDS
PAGE THREE

He was always *Soaping”’ dulls hair —

"\\ TIRED) 4s
\\



SUNDAY, JULY 36, 1950 VAY DV OC A rt
(ardening Hints
For Amateurs

Hedges





oases

ta

a «HALO Glories t/













THE principle work in the gar- ; we ‘
clen these days is the “War on vhe ‘
Weeds.” Keeping pace with the
weeds in this weather is a seri- ,

ous business, and any relaxing
means that in no time the place
is over-run. Yet this is also a
grand time for planting trees,
shrubs and hedges, so if you
wre planning any of these jobs
now is the time to do iv.

Hedges make such a delightful
boundary to garden or grounds



Then a
KRUSCHEN ait |
broughia anpere chang

After sufferin ag from thr 1



: ; ymp! is

it is surprising that they are not Salk a r ; |
more frequently used instead of about a : sf |
the less attractive wall or fence tion” and quickly oe

so often seen. A good hedge can
be an inpenetrable green wall in
a few years, and is grown at a
quarter of the cost that is entailed
by building a wall.

the joy of livir
“Up to
suffered co
disorder,
and I gen
I was constan





















: many remedies but \
Sweet Lime ar Ut gave Kr t | Yes, “soaping” your hair with even finest
tria In v | » -
z id cream shampoos hides its natura

Of the many plants suitable has ss abo 1 liquid or cre s mpaos de }

for hedges in Barbados pride of a format : hs | lustre with dulling soap film. .
» > be aliv

place must be given the “Sweet wae toni : | Halo —contains no soa > eX
Lime.” Sweet Lime makes an the human bod If nothing to dull your hair's natural lustre, W = =)
inpenetrable evergeen wall, so sluggish, impurit i | Halo t > ee}
strong that it can, when mature blood streat ed ¢ your very first shampoo, Flalo br SS =)
bear up the weight of a man. It half-a-dozen nm ts is | mexine highlight Its fragrant lather ‘rin Sy
8 eet a ote eee eke ientit \ away quickly in any kind of water — needs no raat
established it is there for an in- mineral Aatie tn) , | ; ; ee ea definite time, some of these hed- restores after-rinse, For hal that's fustrous, use hal '
ges in the island being nearly one neal th
hundred years old. Beautiful ex- ores AMERICA’S BIGGEST SELLING SHAMPOO
amples of this hedge can be ; ce : ae ; : * dh 2 and offectis In America, Halo outsells all other shampoos. The reason? American
seen at the Royal Barbados Bxpelied “Then o ' “vite | women have proved only Halo 5 hait h natural radianee.
Yacht Club, and down in the St. JANE HYLTON ... this cut fre 10 in hospital taking treatment. .

7 becomes a joy @
James coast. It is grown from Give Krus

“re « ocamuing, B.B.C. Radio AYoung British Actress Takes On The Job Of Seotching| LEFF" 55 | Wave revnah se iden botte of soar An

a quicker growing hedge
Fragrinone

we have the Casuarina which : “3% + ® 17k e ’
wienkepe wel eimneaand wat — sexo voix os om PT HOQE “Spake Pit’ Stories Which Maxe A Breakdown

makes an excellent boundary
from seed. 7,00 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m. News

. Analysis; 7.15 a.m. Trent’s Last Case;

7.30 Music Magazine; 7.45 a.m e S ‘
Bread And Cheese ricae tp; Boater € 00.4.8 am. Com- Sound More Al arming ; I al iT i (@ all r is
Another splendid plant for mentary on W.I. vs. Yorkshire; 9 00 ( (Las ( Deeee
: ‘ t

hedges is the Bread-and-Cheese. 2:â„¢- Close Down; 12.00 (noon) The



i ; News; 12.10 p.m. News Analysis; 12.15
This plant is almost evergreen, } m Tip Top Tunes; 12.45 p.m. York- The drug has been injected, and ay Leouard Masley ‘ey come (a bit too simple
is hardy. will tolerate even poor shire vs. West Indies; 1.00—1.30 p.m. the narcosis has begun Lying . imes)
dry conditions, and will grow to Commentary on W.I. vs. Yorkshire; back on the couch, the little house- chil i \ From the moment the star en-

a height of ten feet or more. It 133 p.m. Listeners’ Choice; 2.00 pm. wife hovers in a horrid world t

The News; 2.10 p.m, Home News from mental home this British



is grown from seed Britain; 2.15 p.m. Sports Review; 2.30 Midway between — consciousn« Keo U film calls on all the resources of
. p.m. Meet the Commonwealth; 3.00 and sleep w 4 baanee tal therapy in this country tc
Flowering Hedges p.m, Interlude; 3.10-3.15 p.m. The Soothed by the questior fre Hyl that there is nothing shame.

Among the flowering hedges Besser’s Opera; 3.45 p.m. Records: the doctor, her tensions are grad » , : wh bout neurotic illness, and










































q
there is the lovely quick srowing SO Pa Oe Ne he? Risa’ of ually relaxing. A babble of non- °* oe \ . re be feared about a ;
“PRIDE of BARBADOS” that Music; 5.00 p.m. Listeners’ Choice; sense, buried fears, long-forgotten (° * , 2 en ‘ u Pp?
will grow several feet and flower 5.15 p.m. Programme Parade; 5.30 p.m. prejudices and resentments pour : ao t t Jane Hylton is not P LAY E-
in a few months The Story Teller; 5.45 p.m. British from her lips. The first step o i ‘ ne oing through @n easy Safeguard
Orchestral Music; 6.00 p.m. Trent's tl road to recovery from a ner- ‘ « } pic. Shown going . rough es Rai
“KING r Ss” and Last Case; 6.15 p.m. London Bus Ride; he roac . M ms ture whether cure Shock treatment is given our charm
: KING of FLOWERS and 45 p.m. Music from the Ballet; 7.09 VOUS breakdown has been taken, ‘\ k Fawilend The nareosis is closely followed y »-Up' range is specially
“HIBISCUS” are two more »m. The News; 7.10 pam. News It is a high-point in a new film javiand © erage the eacates abd . ' oe
flowering shrubs that make goog Anaysis; 7.15—7.30 p.m. Cricket Report being made—Britain’s sane and !°! wnd pat : ne copies eat beh a ae with ee bjalleette OF Wath
boundary hedges, serving the on WI. vs. Yorkshire; 7.30—7.45 p.m. considered answer to that jolting U"d ‘ i mental Horas “Wo Aes” Caaaeen, a art first-walkers Om wit
double purpose of providing a BBC Midland Light Orchestra; 8.00 p.m. nese ; ; madness, collapse © be brought back again
purpose I Laing Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. Science American film about madness, F : ot: tees reading the script sham through all the
re. by ae too, The oe Review; 8.30 p.m. Skyrockets Dance Lie’ 4 Snake Pit.” : tt 4 “th " eit : mut h of the film PT ENE %
mer hedge is easily growy from Orchestra; 8.55 p.m. From the Edito- ‘or the past three weeks some A e sistas 7 as echidna “ -
seed, while the Hibiseus is grown rials; 9.00 y.m. Memories of Musical of the ablest mental specialists in S%€ 18 go : ide, -t Vink i 8 mie a ee “am graduate to Clarks
from cutting. Sener 9.30 p.m. Books to Read; Britain have been on duty with a _ But the ‘ of MRS. « nd turns out a moving, -
9.45 p.m. Theatre Talk; 10.00 p.m fil es See) San : SLADE’S ILLNI those ‘hat netimes highly exciting, story x1 shoe They are soft, flexible and scientificall
, The News; 10.10 p.m, Interlude; 10.15 film company at one of the most ~~" "". + dncingly made y ar ble and scie cally
For a low flowering edge (two 1m. Much Binding in the Marsh: 1045 famous mental hospitals in the terri langed) with the Case COnVinC ey oot * So easy to apply
to three feet) within the garden » m. Commonwealth Survey; 11.00 p.m. South tre u gto be that there really are no Snake planned to giv adequate su rt with room for toes
nothing is prettier than the “Blue A Talk Their job: to help paint an ® harr in Britain * So soothing to skin es
Plumbago” which succeeds even authentic picture of what it is No Snake Pid Sugdestions... , to grow.
under poor dry conditions. 3 like to have (and how to cure) a \ : « So kind loth :
The secret of a good hedge is N 1 ¢ It rervous breakdown. «y oenes) Ur the tal, whet eligt on the production o kind to clothes
to begin trimming it early, when Ou Urue y The star is an ordinary British the star is brought back to nor- \vhile I was at the mental home
the plants are about a foot high. housewife whose mental balance ™4@! have t na in the lust ‘ me of the actual a
This encourages the plants to ‘ LONDON. has buckled. Not because, as in W®! ds of vhe mental ients « ined that parts of
branch practically from the , J, ; ‘ “The Snake Pit” film she is hys- ov ; film. were not accurate.
ground, and prevents that bare woman who complained terical, overbred, subject to neurs A Ph | ‘ ‘ \ whole ward was invited to S
svalky look seen at the bottem of @bout her husband insisting on cic jit pecause the tri ind direc ‘ Phe nd on the set and watch vine
some hedges. reading the Bible to her in bed stresses of life in modern E na tive eff film el quer take by take. Their



It can be taken as a general Was denied a divorce in London.
rule that when planting a hedge ‘Justice Sir Hubert Wallington



have got her down. lade peopl ) ate mentall estions were sharp and to the

SANDALS























Cramped housing quarters, wot i afraid int, and everyone of them wa
the plants should be spaced two asked: ries about rationing and queues, t' eonvine ‘ epted — particularly by Jane
feet apart, with the second row “How can it be cruelty for @ shred her nerves to breakir beyt ere ar Iton, who had previously spent ” é
two feet in front of ‘the first. : well-meaning husband to read joint. i eek, iaguisest as a ae Ga Re nS0T, ENGLAND
panting a second row, place the one or two extracts from the The interference of a bossy I tk I ag udent, in the v.ards, to get vhe a a ee
planis in between those of the Bible to his wife at bedtime?” mother-in-law, who lives witl rs. Slad ( eal right sort of bac} und for her | | LOCAL AGENT ALEC RU LL & CO., BARBADOS
the first row thus. —I.NS. her, her husband and the I t mance Si aes . ene z = ~
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ea



PAGE FOUR







INCE this column appeared last Sunday the touring West Indian
team have written her flaming page in the flaming history
of West Indian cricket ney have followed up their victory over



England in the Second Test match at Lerd’s with a handsome win
by a margin of ten wickets in the Third Test at Trent Bridge

” “The magnificent individual performance of Worrell and Weekes,
in the batting department, and of Sonny Ramadhin and Alf Valen
tine in the bowling department, have no doubt overshadowed the
marvellous supporting efforts of the other members of the team al-
though it has not depreciated the value of their efforts when one
comes to analyse the victory

BEST WORLD QUARTET
(PHE Test served to prove, or at least has given the West Indies
the licence to claim that in Worrell, Weekes, Ramadhin and
Valentine. the West Indies possess a quartet unequalled in the world
to-day. ; ;

The Fourth Test has yet to be played and the rubber must be
decided by it. But what should be clear now even to the most
ersatz members of the local sporting community ls, that England,
assuming that they won the fourth Test, could only claim the hon-
ours to be even.

In any review of the Test, and I am not now attempting any
detailed one, we can hardly fail to pay tribute to the solidity Oo
left hander Allan Rae. whose patience and powers of -concentration
and consciousness of his role as opening batsman have been abun-
dantly apparent during the tour.

AN IMPORTANT OPENING ROLE

iE Test served to prove, or at least has given the West Indies

the opening day of the Test, making six runs in the first hour.
but it must at least be conceded that by that time he had over-
come what might have been found or imagined, in the wicket which
was reported to have sweated and on which rain had fallen early
Ye Th Siew mote special mention of this since there has been some
uninformed local criticism of the rate of Rae’s batting and in fairness
to that outstanding opening batsman I must confess that I subscribe to
the opinion that if he had scored even twice as many runs, but had been
out in half the time he took at the wicket, the West indies might be
recording a very different result today. _ ;

However this victory is another step in the direction of persuading
the Imperial Cricket Conference that the West Indies should be in-
cluded in plans for visits to Au